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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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i 




EDMUND H. UMBERGER 

Editor 

ALLEN E. BUZZELL 
Business Manager 




THE 



CUITTADAHILLA 




PUBLISHED BY THE 

JUNIOR CLASS OF 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 




EDICATED TC 



SAMUEL OLIVER 6RIMM 

B. Pd., A. M. 

Professor of Physics and 
Registrar of the College 



His years of service to our Alma 
Mater, his deep concern for her 
success, have earned for Profes- 
sor Grimm the respect of all 
who know him well. It may truly 
be said of him, "To give the 
advice of an honest friend is the 
highest mark of personal worth." 



recEwccD 




In years to come, we wi 
be glad to be reminded of 
our friends and old familiar 
scenes of college days. 
When in these reminiscent 
moods, let us idly turn the 
pages of the '*Quittie", 
and allow warm memories 
of Lebanon Valley life to 
flood our minds . . . 




CCNTENT/ 



I . . Administration 



..CI 



asses 



. Organizations 



IV . Publications 

V . . Athletics 
VI.. Features 




THE 

ALMA MATER 



To thee, dear Alma Mater, 

This ringing song we raise; 
A song that's fraught with gladness, 

A song that's filled with praise. 
We cannot help but love thee. 

Our hearts are full and free; 
Full well we know the debt we owe 

To dear old L. V. C. 

We come from old New Hampshire, 

Where winter breezes blow. 
And from the sunny Southland, 

Where sweet magnolias grow. 
We've sung "Star-Spangled Banner," 

To "Dixie" given a cheer; 
But now we raise this song of praise 

To Alma Mater dear. 

Ye sons of Lebanon Valley, 

Put forth your strongest might. 
And let our Alma Mater 

Win each and every fight. 
Lift high her royal banner, 

And keep her honor clear, 
And let our song with voices strong 

Ring down through many a year. 



Max F. Lehman, '07. 



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CAMPLf AND 
ADMINI/TCATICN 



Lebano}! l^illey ifjstitutions afid ideals 
resolve t/ieiiiselves into two components; 
one transient and carried along from year 
to year by the ever-changing student body, 
the other constant and vested in the college 
Itself and its administration. This latter is 
the Lebanon Valley that remains for us to 
visit in the years to come. We are glad to 
remember these places and these faces as 
friends. 



The College 
Church 

Whence silver 

chimes salute 

departing 

day. 




Administration 
Building 

Seat of toi 
and fount of 
\nowledge. 




* 




South Hall 

College 
prototype — 
7S[oi(.' girls' 
dormitory. 




I ■ 



^^ 



North Hall 
Porch 

Between the pillars 

appears the 

green. 








North Hall 

Where maidens 
divell m 
happiest 
accord. 



West Hall 

Here damsels dwell 

m close-kjiit 

harmoiiM. 





A Quiet 
Stream 

Pauses to form 
this shaded 
pool. 



SWATARA 

Greek 

Mirroring 
the hills' deep 
wooded slope. 




X.. 



E€ACD Cl= TRUSTEES 



President 
"Vice President 
Seer etary -Treasurer 
Financial Secretary 



J. R. Engle 

E. N. FUNKHOUSER 

S. H. Derickson 
J. R. Engle 



Representatives from the East Penns_vli'a?iia Con/ereiice 



Mr. 


J. R. Enole, A.B., LL.B.. LL.D. 




Palmyra, Pa. 


193 3 


Mr. 


John E. Gipple 




Harnsburg, Pa. 


1933 


Mr. 


M. H. Bachman 




Middletown, Pa. 


1933 


Rev. 


H. E. Miller, A.M., B.D., D.D. 




Lebanon, Pa. 


1933 


Rev. 


S. C. Enck, A.m., B.D.. D.D. 




Harnsburg, Pa. 


1934 


Rev. 


P. B. GiBBLE, A.M., B.D., D.D. 




Palmyra, Pa. 


1934 


Rev. 


O. T. Ehrhart, A.B., D.D. 




Lancaster, Pa. . 


1934 


Rev. 


D. E. Young, A.M.. B.D.. D.D. 




Harnsburg, Pa. 


1934 


Rev. 


H. E. Schaeffer, A.B.. D.D. 




Penbrook, Pa. . 


193.'i 


Rev. 


G. W. Hallman, A.m. 




Harrisburg, Pa. 


igs.'i 


Rev 


J. O. Jones, A.M., B.D., D.D. 




Annville, Pa. 


193. S 


Mr. 


C. L. Graybill 




Lancaster, Pa. . 


193.'; 




Ref>rese7itatuies from tlie Pennsvh'anm Conference 




Rev. 


M. R. Fleming, B.D., Ph.D.. D.D. 


Red Lion, Pa. . 


193 3 


Rev. 


William R. Glen. A.B. 




Baltimore, Md. . 


1933 


Hon 


W. N. McFaul, LL.B. 




Baltimore, Md. . 


1933 


Rev. 


Ira S. Ernst, A.B. 




Carlisle, Pa. 


1933 


Rev 


J. H. Ness, A.B., B.D., D.D. 




York, Pa. 


1934 


Rev. 


G. L Rider, A.B., D.D. 




Hagerstown, Md. 


1934 


Mr. 


Albert Watson 




Carlisle, Pa. 


1934 


Mr. 


Reuben M. Fife 




Chambersburg, Pa. 


1934 


Rev. 


P. E. V. Shannon 




Dallastown, Pa. 


193.S 


Rev. 


F. B. Plummer. D.D. 




Hagerstown, Md. 


193.i 


Mr. 


E. N. Funkhouser, A.B. 




Hagerstown, Md. 


193.=; 


Mr. 


R. G. MOWREY 




Quincy, Pa. 


193.=; 




Representatives from the \ 


''irginia Conference 




Rev. 


J. H. Brunk. D.D 


Blairton, W. Va. 


1933 


Rev. 


G. W. Stover .... 


Winchester, Va. 


1933 


Rev. 


W. F. Gruver, D.D. 


Martinsburg, W. Va. . 


1934 


Mr. 


C. G. LUDWIG .... 


Keyser, W. Va. 


1934 


Rev. 


W. A. Wilt .... 


Martinsburg, W. Va. . 


193.S 


Rev. 


W. H. Smith, A.B., B.D. 


Elkton, Va': 


1935 




Alumni Tru 


stees 




Prof 


. H. H. Baish, '01, A.M., LL.D. 


Harrisburg, Pa. . 


1933 


Mrs. 


Louisa Williams Yardley, '18, A.B. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


1934 


Prof 


. C. E. RouDABUSH, '03, A.M. . 




Minersville, Pa. 


193. S 





CLYDE A. LYNCH 

A.M., B.D., D.D., PH.D. 

President 0/ Lebanon Valley College 

Mankind stands on a new cultural frontier. We are prospecting for a new 
social order. What is our orientation? Do we survey the passing order with icono- 
clastic repudiations; or, having experienced the futility of bare negations, are we in- 
telligent enough to recogniie and conserve the best in our cultural heritage and use it 
as the base from which we can project and progressively realize new patterns of social 
behavior? 

The content and attitudes of the new culture will be determined largely by 
college-trained leaders. They are obligated to '"articulate the dumb, deep want of 
the people." With ideals high enough to engender the enthusiasm of a new crusade 
and with intelligence sufficient to give direction to the masses groping for better 
things, these leaders will be neither reactionary nor radical, but idealists with both feet 
on the ground in our world of practical affairs. 



a a 



[231 




Hiram H. Shenk 
A.M., Ll. D. 

Professor of History 



Samuel H. Derickson 
M.S., Sc.D. 

Professor of 
Biological Science 




i 




Samljel O. Grimm 

b.Pd., A.m. 

Professor of Physics 
and Registrar 



Christian R. Gingrich 
A.B., Ll.B. 

Professor of Political 
Science and Economics 




i 




Paul S. Wagner 
A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of 
Mathematics 



Robert R. Butterwick 
A.M., B.D., D.D. 

Professor of 
Bible and Philosophy 




[24] 



I 




Mary C. Green 

Dean of Wo?nen 
Professor of French 



Andrew Bender 
Ph.D. 

Professor of 
Chemistry 





Helen E. Myers 
A.B. 

Librarian 



O. Edg.^r Reynolds 
A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Education 
and Psychology 








P.AUL A. W. W.ALL.\CE 

Ph.D. 

Professor of English 



G. Adolphus Richie 
A.M., B.D., D.D. 

Professor of Bible 
and JSfeu' Testament Gree}{ 




[25] 




Milton L. Stokes 
A.M., Ll.B. 

Professor of Business 
Adyninistration 



E. E. Mylin 
A.M. 

Physical Director 
and Coach 





Eugene H. Stevenson 
A.M. (OxoN.), Ph.D. 

Professor of 
Historx 



M. Stell.^ Johnson 
Ph.D. 

Professor of 
French 





V. E.\RL Light 
M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 
of Biology 



L. Louise Lietz.^u 
Ph.D. 

Professor of 
German 




[26] 




George G. Struble 
M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 
of English 



L. Gary Bailey 
A.M., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 
of Education 





Mildred S. Kenyon 
B.S., A.M. 

Director of Physical 
Education for Women 



Alvin H. Stonecipher 
Ph.D. 

Professor of 
Latin 





Margaret A. Wood 
B.S. IN Ed. 

Associate Professor of 
Hygiene, Dietitian, 
School yiurse 



Robert Rawhohser 
A.B. 

Assistaiit in 
Mathematics 




[27] 




Mary E. GiLLtspib 
B.S. 

Dvector of the Conservatory 
of Music 




Ruth E. Bender 
A.B. 

Piano 




R. Porter Campbell 
Mus.B. 

Organ and Piano 




Alexander Cr.'Wvford 
Voice 



[28] 




Harold Malsh 
Violin 






A 



Ella Mover 
B.S., MA. 

Professor of Theory 




Edward P. Rutledge 
B.S., M.A. 

Professor of Instrumental 
Music 




I. Owen Tones 
A.M.. D.D. 

Pastor of the College Church 



[29] 



x^x 



i 



The classes graduate quickly from the verd- 
ant simplicity of freshman hood to the 
gowned dignity of senior estate. In this 
process of transition they give to Lebanon 
Falley their distinctive and cosmopolitan 
touch and receive instead the maturing in- 
fluence of Alma Mater. By this exchange 
both gain to an extent often unfelt and 
unsuspected until the classes have joined the 
long roster of those icho are alumni. 




u 




SENICI^ CLASS msTCpy 

Tenipus fugit! How often we have questioned the validity of this old Latin 
phrase, when, in the classroom, we were subjected to ordeals which were of more 
interest to the curriculum committee than to us. But now as our undergraduate days 
are numbered, we reluctantly bow to the fatalism of this maxim. It is, however, not in 
utter dejection that we view the passing of our college careers, for we have tried 
to do as the poet bade us, — "Gather ye rosebuds while ye may." Most of the class 
of '33 have had little time for the idea that a college should be some kind of a 
medieval monastery. In fact, they have been blessed with less than a hand's count of 
Medievalists. 

The friendships formed, the problems encountered, the activities engaged in at 

Lebanon Valley, have made indelible impressions upon our lives. "Well never be 

the same!" — quite true of every one of us. Yes, we agree with old Solon, at least in 

this: 

"Wine, Wit, and Beauty still their charms bestow. 

Light all the shades of life, and cheer us as we go." 

However, we have not been inordinate in our affections, evidences of which may 
be found by reminiscing upon our more serious accomplishments. In physical com- 
bat our shields have been brightened by many victories. Need we mention our tri- 
umphs in the cultural realms — the year book with its Grecian theme, and our Junior 
play, "Mr. Pim Passes By?" These two achievements, one in the literar>' iield and 
the other m the dramatic, are true sources of pride. 

With a deep sense of our failings in many instances, we hand down our heritage 
to our successors for whatever it may be worth to them. May they build more nobly 
than we have. We leave our Alma Mater with few regrets, many joys, and much 
gain, resigned to life's transient nature so ably expressed in the words of Herrick: 

"Thus times do shift; each thing his turn does hold; 
New things succeed, as former things grow old." 

—P. D. E., '33. 



1321 




Seniors . . . 





President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

First Semester 



George Wood 
Trula Koch 

LOUELLA HeiLMAN 

Albert Kazll'sky 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Second Semester 



Darwin Willi ard 

Lee Stone 

Sophia Morris 

Albert Kazlusky 



34 



RUTH MURIEL AGEN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

English ^A.2 

College : Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 1, 2; 

English Assistant, 4. 
Society: Critic, 4. 



WILLL\M BARNES 
Elizabeth, N. J. 
Business Administration KA2 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 4; Men's 
Senate, 4. 

CIdss: President, 3; Basketball, 2, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2; 
Baseball, 1. 

Society: President, 4; Anniversary Play, 3. 



LESTER GEORGE BIXLER 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

College: Biology Assistant, 3: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



EDGAR CLINTON BRINSER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Business Administration 

CoHege: Commerce Club, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Football, 2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 



MILDRED W. CHRISTIANSEN 
Randolph, Mass. 
English AA2 

College: Eurydice, 1, 2, 3; May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; 
W. S. G. A., 3: History Club, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A., 2, 3, 
Vice President, 3; Art Club, 4: Chemistry Club, 1. 
Class: Hockey, 3. 
Society: Judiciary Committee, 2, 3. 



LEMUEL PERCY CLEMENTS 

Tampa, Fla. 

English KA2 

College: La Vie Collcgienne, 1, 2, 3, 4; History Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Reader's Club, 1, 2, Treasurer, 2; May Day 
Program, 1, 2, 3; "L" Club, Manager Varsity Basketball, 
Editor College Press Service, 4. 

Class: President, 1; Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball, 1, 2; Tug o' War, 1, 2; Scrap, 1, 2; Junior Play, 
3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Corresponding Secretary, 2, 3; Anniversary 
Play, 2, '3. 




1351 



x: 




RUTH ELIZABETH COBLE 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Latin KAN 

College: Y. W. C. A., 1, 2, 3, 4, Pianist, 3, President, 
4; Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President, 4; 
History Club, 3, 4; May Day Program, 1. 
Class: Basketball, 1; Hockey Team, 3, 4. 
Society: Pianist, 2; Judiciary Committee, 1, 2; Record- 
ing Secretary, 3; Chaplain, 3; Anniversary Committee, 3. 

WOODROW STRAYER DELLINGER 

Red Lion, Pa. 

Pre-Medical *A2 

College: Men's Senate, 2, 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer, 3, 
President, 4: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Student-Faculty 
Council, 4. 

Class: Treasurer, 1; Quittapahilla Staff, 3; Tug o' War, 
2; Football, 1, 2; Junior Play, 3. 

Society: Corresponding Secretary, 2; Anniversary Play, 
2; Vice President, 3; Chairman of Executive Committee, 
3; Anniversary Committee, 2, 3, 4: President, 4. 

CLAUDE RANK DONMOYER 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Business Administration KA2 

College: Tennis, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 2, 3, 4, Man- 
ager, 4; *'L" Club, 4; Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CLARENCE EARLEY 
Emeigh, Pa. 

ka:: 

College: La Vie Collegienne, 2, 3, 4: Green Blotter 
Club, 4; May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; English Assistant, 4: 
Reader's Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Delphian Anniversary Play, 
1. 2. 3, 4. 

Class: Junior Play, 3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2, 3; Pianist, 1, 2. 

HELEN LOUISE EDDY 

Lebanon, Pa. 
French KAN; 2KH 

College: Eurydice, 1, 2, 3; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4: Chorus, 
4; Debating, 3, 4: Scholastic Prize, 2; English Prise, 2; 
May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; German Club, 3, 4, Pianist, 4. 

Class: Hockey Team, 3, 4; Junior Play, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 3; Vice President, 3. 

WILLIAM AUGUST EHRGOTT 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Biology 

College: Biology Assistant, 4; Biological Scholarship, 3. 



136] 



PAUL SYLVESTER ELLENBERGER 
Annville, Pa. 
Education 



PAUL DAUGHERTY EMENHEISER 
York Haven, Pa. 
History *A2 

College: Y. M. C. A., 3, 4, Conference, 3: Life Work 
Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 2: History Assistant, 3: 
Glee Club, 1, 2; History Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Scrap, 1, 2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 
Society: Chaplain, 3; Anniversary Play, 2, 3. 



ANNA LUCILLE ENGLE 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
History KAX; 2KII 

College: May Day Program, 1, 2, 3: Y. W. C. A., 2, 3; 
Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President, 3. 
Class : Hockey, 4. 
Society: Chaplain, 2, 3; Sigma Kappa Eta, 2, 3, 4. 



KATHRYN BISHOP ENGLE 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
English 

Society: Sigma Kappa Eta, 2, 3, 4. 



KAX; 2KI1 



MAE IRENE FAUTH 

Wrightsville, Pa. 

Chemistry KAN 

College: Science Prize, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4: Green 

Blotter Club, 4: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Reader's Club, 

2, 3, 4, Vice President, 4; German Club, 2, 3, 4. 

Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3; Hockey Team, 3, 4: Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1, 4; Judiciary Committee, 4. 



RICHARD HENRY FENSTERMACHER 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 

College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4. 




[37] 




FRANK RICHARD FERNSLER 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Business Administration 

College: Commerce Club, 2, 3. 



WILLIAM WEINHOLD FOCHT 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

College: BaskctbalK 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Football, 1, 2: Tug o" War, 2: Class Scrap, 2. 



DOROTHY PAULES FORRY 
Audubon, N. ]. 
History 

College: Basketball, 2, 3, 
May Day Program, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1; Vice President, 2; Hockey, 3, 4. 
Society: Anniversary Play, 1; Anniversary Committee, 
1, 2, 3,' 4: Usher, 1, 2, 3; President, 4. 



AA2 
History Club, 2, 3, 4; 



RUTH LOUISE GARNER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Social Science AA2 

College: Ursinus, 1, 2. May Day Program, 3: French 
Club, 3: W. S. G. A., 4: Reader's Club, 3; History Club, 
3, 4: French Assistant, 4; Art Club, 3, 4. 
Class: Secretary, 3: Hockey, 3, 4. 
Society: Anniversary Play, 3; Judiciary Committee, 3, 4. 



BEN BOOSER GEYER 
Middletown, Pa. 
Business Administration KA2 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day Pro- 
gram, I. 

Class: Scrap, 1, 2. 

Society: Recording Secretary, 2: Anniversary Play, 2. 



KATHRYN MAY GOCKLEY 
Schuykill Haven, Pa. 
Biology KAN 

College: Reader's Club, 3, 4: German Club, 2, 3, 4, 
Vice President, 4, Critic, 2: May Day Program, 1. 



138] 



CHESTER OSCAR GOODMAN 
Bible and Greek Sunbury, Pa. <l.Ai; 

College: Y. M. C. A., 1, 2, 3, 4, Conference, 2, 3, 
Dayton Conference, 4; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3: Men's Senate, 
2; Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4; La Vie Collegienne, 
3, 4: History Club, 3, 4; Bible and Greek Assistant, 3, 4; 
Debating, 4: May Day Program, 1, 3; Delphian Anni- 
versary Play, 4. 

Class: Tug o" War, 1; Scrap, 1, 2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: President, 4; Vice President, 3: Recording 
Secretary, 2: Chaplain, 1: Anniversary Play, 3, 4. 

FLO LORRAINE GRIM 
Chemistry Dallastown, Pa. aa:; 

College; Y. W. C. A., 2, 4: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; 
May Day Program, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Secretary, 4. 

Society: Treasurer, 3; Anniversary Committee, 3, 4: 
Judiciary Committee, 4. 

DOROTHY REBECCA HARTZ 
Latin Palmyra, Pa. KAX: 2K1I 

College: May Day Program, 3; Y. W. C. A., 1. 
Society: Sigma Kappa Eta, 2, 3, 4. 



ARLINE MABLE HECKROTE 
Conyngham, Pa. 



aa: 



English 

College: La Vic Collegienne, 2, 3, 4; Reader's Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4; May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; Press Service, 4, 
Assistant Editor, 4; History Club, 4, Secretary, 4; Y. W. 
C. A., 1, 2. 

Class: Secretary, 2; Hockey, 3, 4; Basketball, 1: Quitta- 
pahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Warden, 1; Anniversary Committee, 2, 3; 
Recording Secretary, 4: Vice President, 4. 

GERALD WILSON HEILMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Business Administration KA— 

College: Debating, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 2, 3, 4; Com- 
merce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra, 4. 



LUELLA MAE HEILMAN 
Palmyra, Pa. 



AAi: 



German 

College: Y. W. C. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; German Assistant, 4; 
German Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 4; May Day Pro- 
gram, 1. 3. 

Class: Hockey, 3, 4. 

Society: Secretary, 3; Chaplain, 3. 




[39] 




NORMAN ALBERT HEMPERLY 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 4: Schol- 
astic Prize, 3; Men's Senate, 4; Chemistry Assistant, 3, 4. 



RUSSELL MARK HENNE 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Business Administration 

College: Reserve Football, I, 2, 3, 4: Commerce Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4. 

Class: Football, 1, 2, 



RICHARD WAGNER HOLSTEIN 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Biology 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President, 4. 



JAMES KENNETH HUGHES 

Johnstown, Pa. 

Education *A2 

College: University of Pittsburgh, 1, 2: History Club, 
3, 4; May Day Program, 3. 

Societ\ : Editor, 3; Anniversary Committee, 3, 4. 



WILLIAM LEROY JACKS 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Chemistry 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Football, 1, 2. 



ALBERT ALEX KAZLUSKY 

Minersville, Pa. 
Chemistry KA2 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4: Baseball, 1, 
2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; German Club, 2, 3; "L" 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day Program, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Treasurer, 4; QuittapahiUa Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, I, 2: Sergeant at arms, 1, 2; 
Anniversary Committee, 2, 3. 



[40] 



JOHN FREDERICK KLEIN 
Mathematics Reinerton, Pa. $A2 

College: Men's Senate, 4; Mathematics Assistant, 4. 
Class: Baseball, 1, 2; Tug o" War, 2. 

AMOS HYSON KNISLEY 
Chemistry Red Lion, Pa. .{.AS 

College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4: May Day Program, 

1, 3: Baseball Manager, 4. 

Class: Scrap, 1, 2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 
Society: Sergeant at arms, 1, 2; Vice President, 3; An- 
niversary Play, 2. 

TRULA HELEN KOCH 
Mathematics York Haven, Pa. AA2 

College: May Day Program, 3; Kalozetean Anniversary 
Play, 1, 2; Mathematics Assistant, 4; W. S. G. A., 4. 

Class: Junior Class Play, 3; Vice President, 4: Quitta- 
pahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1, 2, 4, Directress, 4: Chap- 
lain, 3: Anniversary Committee, 2, 3. 4; Judiciary Com- 
mittee, 2, 4; Recording Secretary, 3. 

CHARLES EDWARD KRAYBILL 

Florin, Pa. 

Business Administration $A2 

College: La Vie Collegienne, 4: Reserve Baseball, 1, 2, 

3; Y. M. C. A., 3, Treasurer, 3: Commerce Club, 2, 3, 4: 

Manager of Debating, 4. 

Class: Treasurer, 3; Baseball, 1, 2; Quittapahilla Staff. 
Society: Treasurer, 4; Anniversary Play, 3; Critic. 4. 

MARION WINIFRED KRUGER 

English Carlisle, Pa. AA2 

College: W. S. G. A., 4, Treasurer, 4; Eurydice, 2, 3; 
Reader's Club, 3, 4: History Club, 2, 3, 4; Art Club, 3, 
4; English Assistant, 4: May Day Program, 1, 2, 3: 
English Prize, 1. 

Class: Secretary, 1; Quittapahilla Staff, 3; Basketball, 1: 
Hockey, 3, 4, Captain, 4. 

Societv: Warden, 1: Pianist, 2; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, 3: Judiciary Committee, 3; Operetta, 1: Vice Presi- 
dent, 4: Anniversary Committee, 1, 2, 3: Anniversary 
Play, 2, 3, 4; Anniversary President, 4. 

WALTER OTTO KRUMBIEGEL 

History Hillside, N. J. ka:: 

College: Men's Senate, 3, 4, Vice President, 4; La Vie 
Collegienne, 1, 2, 3, 4, Editor, 4: Reader's Club, I, 2, 3, 4; 
Green Blotter Club, 4: German Club, 3, 4; History Club, 

2, 3, 4; History Assistant, 4: English Prize, 1. 

Class: Editor — 1933 Quittapahilla; President, 2: Scrap, 
I, 2; Tug o' War, 1. 

Society: President, 4: Anniversary Play, 2, 3, 4; Critic, 
3: Sergeant at arms, 1. 





GLORIA ELIZABETH LAVANTURE 

Oberlm, Pa. 

English AA2 

Collegt: Education Assistant, 1, 2, 3, 4: Library Assist- 
ant, 2, 3, 4; Reader's Club, 4: May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; 
La Vie Collegienne, 3, 4. 

Class: Vice President, 1; Secretary, 3; Junior Play, 3; 
Basketball, 1; Quittapahilla Staff, 3; Hockey, 3, 4. 

Society: Critic, 4: Anniversary Play, 3, 4: Warden, 1; 
Anniversary Committee, 1, 2; Judiciary Committee, 4. 



RUSSELL LEROY LEIBIG 
Harnsburg, Pa. 
Mathematics 

College: Mathematics Assistant, 4. 
Class: Football, 2. 



KATHRYN ANNA LEISEY 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Latin KA\: 2KII 

College: Reader's Club, 3, 4; French Club, 3; Scholastic 

Prize, 1; Second English Prize, 2: May Day Program, 3; 

History Club, 4. 

Society: Sigma Kappa Eta, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



KATHRYN ANNABELLE LUTZ 
New Cumberland, Pa. 
Music KAN 

College: Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4: Orchestra, 3, 4. 
Society: Pianist, 1; Corresponding Secretary, 3; Anni- 
versary President, 4. 



NOAH K. MACK 
Collegeville, Pa. 
Chemistry 

College: Eastern Mennonite School, 1, 2, 3. 



MILDRED MARION MAY 
Lititz, Pa. 
English KAN 

College: W. S. G. A., 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 3, President, 
4: English Assistant, 4: Y. W. C. A., 1; College Press 
Service, 4: Student-Faculty Council, 4: Green Blotter Club, 
4: Reader's Club, 3, 4. 
Class: Vice President, 2. 
Society: Usher, 2; Vice President, 3. 



[42] 



HARRIET LOUISE MILLER 

York, Pa. 

Biology AA- 

CoOege: Biology Assistant, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 

2, 3, 4; Eurydice Club, 1, 2, 3; May Day Program, 1, 3: 

Art Club, 4. 

Class: Vice President, 1: Basketball, 1: Hockey, 3. 
Society: Judiciary Committee, 4: Anniversary Com- 
mittee, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



MIRIAM ELIZABETH MILLER 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Latin KAX; 2KII 

College: May Day Program, 1, 2, 3: French Club, 3. 
Society: Sigma Kappa Eta. 1, 2, 3, President, 4. 



SOPHIA MORRIS 

Wyoming, Pa. 

English KAX 

College: Library Assistant, 2, 3, 4; Reader's Club, 3, 4; 

Y. W. C. A., 2, 3, 4, Treasurer, 4; W. S. G. A., 4, 

Vice President, 4. 

Cla.'is: Hockey, 3, 4: Vice President, 3; Secretary, 4. 
Society: Corresponding Secretary, 3; President, 4. 



FREDERICK E. MORRISON 

Elizabeth, N. J. 
Economics KAi: 

College: Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4, Captain, 4: Men's Senate, 
1: Glee Club, 2, 3: "L" Club, 3, 4, Vice President, 4; 
Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1. 

Class: President, 2; Scrap, I, 2; Tug o' War, 2; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2; Baseball 1, 2. 



HOMER AMOS MUMAW 
Dalton, Ohio 
Biology 

College: Eastern Mennonite School, 1, 2, 3. 



HELEN JANE MUTH 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
English KAX: -KH 

College: Reader's Club, 3, 4: May Day Program, 1, 2: 
La Vie Collegienne, 2, 3, 4; English Assistant, 4. 

Society: Critic, 3; Vice President, 4; Anniversary Play, 
2; Anniversary Committee, 3. 




[43] 




X 




CARL RUSSELL MYERS 

Annville, Pa. 

Mathematics 'i'X'^ 

College: Mathematics Prize, 1; May Day Program, 1, 2, 
3; Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3; Chorus, 4; Mathe- 
matics Assistant, 4. 

Class: Class Scrap, 1, 2; Tug o" War, 1, 2. 

Societv : Sergeant at arms, 1, 2; Anniversary Committee, 
2, 3, 4; Anniversary Play, 2, 3. 



MIRL^M IRENE OWEN 
Ormand, Fla. 
History KAN 

College: Rollins, 1; Reader's Club, 2, 3, 4, Secretary, 
4: History Club, 2. 3, 4: Art Club, 3, 4: Y. W. C. A., 2. 
Class: Vice President, 3: Hockey, 3, 4; Corresponding 
Secretary, 4. 

Societv: Critic, 2: Vice President, 3; Judiciary Com- 
mittee, 3; Anniversary Committee, 2, 3, 4; President, 4. 



REGINA MAE OYLER 
Arendtsville, Pa. 
Music AA2 

College: Indiana State Teachers College, 1: Orchestra, 
2, 3, 4: Chorus. 2, 3, 4. 

Society: Usher, 3: Anniversary Committee, 4, 



MELVIN E. PATRICK 
Annville, Pa. 
Bihlc and Greek 

College: Life Work Recruits, 1, 2 , 3, 4: Chorus, 4. 



GEORGE DARIUS SALLADE 
Sinking Spring, Pa. 



Mathematics 

Class: Basketball, 2. 



KAS 



LUTHER ABRAHAM SAYLOR 
Annville, Pa. 
Business Administration 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4: Men's Senate, 3, 4. 
Class: Football, 2: Baseball, 1, 2: Basketball, 1, 2, 
3, 4. 



[44] 



LEONARD MELLEFONT SCHROPE 
Valley View, Pa. 
German KA— 

College: Band, 3, 4: Orchestra, 2, 3; German Club, 
1, 2, 3. 

Class: Scrap, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 3, 4; 
Tug o' War, 1, 2. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Anniversary Play, 2, 3; 
Vice President, 3, 



ANDREW SCHWARTZ, JR. 

Ephrata, Pa. 

Chemistry *KH 

College: Drexel Institute, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club. 4. 



MARGARET CAROLYN SHARP 
Altoona, Pa. 
Music KAX 

College: Indiana State Teachers" College, 1; Univer- 
sity of Pittsburgh, 2; Orchestra, 3, 4; Eurydice, 3; Inter- 
collegiate Ball Representative, 4; Chorus, 3, 4. 



MIRIAM RACHEL SILVIUS 
Pottsville, Pa. 
French KAN 

College: German Club, 1, 2; French Club, 3; May Day 
Program, 1, 3; Chorus, 4: Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 
Class: Secretary, 3: Hockey, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1; Judiciary Committee, 2; 
Chaplain, 3; Anniversary Committee, 3. 

WILLIAM MARTIN SPEC 

Garfield, N. J. 

German KAi) 

College: German Club, 3, 4; History Club, 2, 3; La 
Vie Collegienne, 3, 4. 

Class: President. 3: Quittapahilla Staff, 3: Football. 
1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2: Tug o' War. 
1, 2; Scrap, 1, 2. 

Society: Vice President, 3: Sergeant at arms, 1; Secre- 
tary, 2; Anniversary Committee, 3: Anniversary Play, 
1, 2, 3, 4: Judiciary Committee, 2. 3. 



LEE JAY STONE 

Trenton, N. J. 

Business Administration K-VIi 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball. 4: May Day 
Program, 1, 2, 3, 4; Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3. 4. 

Class: Vice President. 4; Basketball, 1, 3: Tug o" 
War, 3. 




1451 




VIRGINIA GRAY THRUSH 
Shippensburg, Pa. 
Music KAN 

College: Mary Baldwin College, 1: Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; 
Eurydicc, 2, 3; Chorus, 4. 

Society: Anniversary Committee, 2, 3, 4; Judiciary 
Committee, 3, 4. 



HARRY MALTER TOBIAS 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Bihle and Greek *A2 

College: Glee Club. 1; Chorus, 4; German Club, 1, 
2, 3, 4^ Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

Class: Football, 1, 2; Tug o' War, 1, 2; Scrap, 1, 2. 



SAMUEL DEWITT ULRICH 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry 'i'AS 

College: Glee Club, 3: May Day Program, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Men's Senate, 3; Y. M. C. A., 3; 
Delphian Anniversary Play, 2. 

Class: Treasurer, 2: Tug o' War, 1, 2; Scrap, 1, 2; 
Baseball, 2; Basketball, 1. 2: QuittapahiUa Staff, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Secretary, 2: Anniver- 
sary Play, 2, 3; Anniversary Committee, 1, 2, 3: Anni- 
versary President, 4. 



GRANT J. UMBERGER 

Middletown, Pa. 

Philosophy 'i'A- 

College: Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Society: Chaplain, 3. 



THEODORE CLIFTON WALKER 
Reading, Pa. 

Music ka:s 

College: Glee Club, 1, 2; Orchestra, 3, 4; Band, 4; 
May Day Program, 1, 2, 3: Chorus, 4. 



[46] 



STUART WESLEY WERNER 
Pine Grove, Pa. 
Bible and Greek 



<I>A:i 



College: Y. M. C. A., 4. President, 4: Glee Club, 3; 
Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4: German Club, 2. 

Class: Tug o" War, 1, 2: Scrap, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2; 
Baseball, 2. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Chaplain, 1, 2; Record- 
ing Secretary, 2; Corresponding Secretary, 3; Anniver- 
sary Committee, 2, 4; Anniversary Play, 2, 3. 



DARWIN RANDOLPH WILLL^RD 

Lykens, Pa. 

Biology KAi: 

College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Biology Assistant, 4, 
Class: President, 4. 

Society: Treasurer, 3, 4; Judiciary Committee, 3; An- 
niversary President, 4. 



WILLIAM WOLF WOGAN, JR. 
York, Pa. 
Business Administration 'l'\ — 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1. 2, 4; Com- 
merce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; "L" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Baseball, 1, 2. 



GEORGE AUGUSTUS WOOD 
Trenton, N. J. 
Business Administration 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, Captain, 
4; Men's Senate, 3, 4; "L" Club, 3, 4: Commerce Club, 
1, 2, 3, 4, Vice President, 3; Student-Faculty Council, 3. 
Class: President, 4; Football, 1; Basketball, 1. 



HARRY EDWARD ZECH 
Spring Grove, Pa. 
Bible and Greek -I'AS 

College: Y. M. C. A., 4; Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Secretary, 2, President, 3, 4: Debating, 3; Orchestra, 
2; Band, 3, 4; German Club, 2, 3; History Club, 3. 
Class: Tug o' War, 2: Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Chaplain, 1; Vice Presi- 
dent, 3; Chairman Executive Committee, 3; President, 4. 




[47] 



ii 



JLNICC CLAXX msTCcy 

We met on Lebanon Valley campus as the class of thirty-four. There we began 
the trials and tribulations of the Freshman year. We bravely faced initiations at 
the hands of the Sophomores, inwardly resolving to grin and bear them, no matter 
how terrifying they might be. 

"Ike" Bu^zelFs sensational capture of the banner in the flag rush, and the defeat 
of the Sophomores in the numeral fight were the first hints the other classes received 
of our exceptional capabilities. Let us forget about the tug of war, and also the 
Soph-Frosh basketball game. When, at last, it was time to assume Sophomore stand- 
ing, we joyiuUy laid aside our green berets and burned our dinks. 

After a happy summer in our various homes we came back to school, all set for 
the Frosh. With great strategy, as at least we thought, the Soph hike was turned 
into a Soph ride. This action inconvenienced the Frosh tremendously and we were 
obliged to carry on without them. 

Again we captured the flag rush, this time with the aid of Galen Martin. The 
numeral fight was almost as easy. The Frosh-Soph football game was just a slip. The 
final score was 25 to m favor of the Frosh. 

Our first attempt at sponsoring a college social affair, the Soph Hop, was a great 
success. Anyway, everyone had a good time, and we made two dollars. 

At the end of the Sophomore year we could truthfully proclaim, "O, World, we 
have done our duty to L. V. and her Freshmen." 

At last we were members of that proud and haughty group calling themselves 
upper-classmen. We strolled about the campus with great dignity, racking our brains 
for means with which to finance our year book. The Junior Play was one of our 
first projects. We selected "The Importance of Being Earnest," by Oscar Wilde. Dr. 
Wallace kindly consented to direct it. Later, with the help of Todd's new jazz or- 
chestra, we promoted several unique dances in the gym. The Quittie fund seemed 
to thrive by our efforts. 

Now that our Junior year is so near to a close, we are looking forward to a happy 
Senior year — the last year for us all here together at L. V. C. C. W., '34. 



1+8] 







Juniors . . . 




^i^ ..™_ 

> — ^ — ' // 

tn.Wolfs%il r.R^ttiley J. Scotb "O. Gris singer 

JUNICCX 

JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

First Semester 

PresicieiU JACK ToDD 

Vice President James Scott 

Secretdrv MiNNA WoLFsKeIL 

Treastirer LuKE Remley 

Seco7Td Stvatittr 

President Earl Hoover 

W\ce President Anna Matula 

Secretarv Verna Grissinger 

TT&asuysr Allan Ranck 



[50] 



MARVIN L. ADAMS 

Adamsdale, Pa. 

Business Administration KA2 

"Red" is another one of those men 
who speak little but do much. Like 
most people of that type, he really 
says something when he speaks. A 
proof of this is the sight of his name 
on the school honor roll. "Red" is 
one of the few "A" students, and he 
well deserves his "A's" as he is one 
of the most diligent workers in our 
class. 

"Red" is a Business Administration 
student, and from all appearances, 
should make his niche in the world 
of finance. He is one of the loyal 
members of the Commerce Club. 

He works diligently in all of his 
undertakings, and due to his industry, 
his never-ending good nature, and his 
friendliness towards all, he has en- 
deared himself to his classmates. 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day Program, 1. 

Class: Secretary, 2: Scrap, 1, 2. 

Societv: Anniversary Committee, 2. 





HAIDEE BELLE BLUBAUGH 

Myersville, Md. 

History KAN 

Haidee is recuperating in Myers- 
ville, Maryland, after a too strenuous 
first semester: but next year she will 
be back with us. She has been a boon 
to West Hall by providing special 
autographed footballs for the recrea- 
tion which we enjoy in the privacy of 
upstairs halls. Haidee herself has a 
great weakness for this sport — a weak- 
ness which includes even the varsity 
captain. 

We won't soon forget Haidee's 
cheerful disposition, which has helped 
us over many jolts of our college life. 
She IS optimistic and rarely becomes 
disillusioned. We miss her sunny 
smile, and her spirit of gay good humor 
that have added an unforgettable bit 
of pleasure to the lives of her school- 
mates. We are all very eager to have 
her back next year. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 

Soc\ety: Corresponding Secretary, 2. 



[51] 




MIRIAM ANNA BOOK 
English Harrisburg, Pa. KAX 

Some lives are care-free, without 
purpose. Others seem purposeful, 
well planned. "Mim" belongs to the 
second class. Surely here is a life 
with a purpose, with a goal. Every 
action, every effort leads to some set 
mark; every movement is made with 
some purpose in mind. Just what the 
goal may be, or how often it is 
changed, we do not know. But what- 
ever it is, Miriam is true to it. Here 
is great depth of determination, will- 
power, and self-knowledge. This 
stick-to-it-ive-ness also applies to ex- 
ternal matters, for whatever cause Mir- 
iam supports has a loyal upholder. Her 
very assurance is a convincing argu- 
ment in itself. 

College: Y. W. C. A., 1, 3: W. S. 
G. A., 1: Education Assistant, 2, 3; 
Art Club, 2, 3: Eurydice, 1. 2; Read- 
er's Club, 3: May Day Committee, 
1, 2. 

Class: Junior Play, 3. 

Society: Usher, 1; Anniversary 
Play, 1: Chaplain, 3; Critic, 2: Anni- 
versary Committee, 2, 3. 



MATILDA ROSE BONANNI 

Myerstown, Pa. 

Music KAN; 2;KH 

A gay, joyous Neapolitan with all 
the delightful connotations this phrase 
conjures up — that's Tillic. With her 
flashing black eyes and her true "joie 
de vivre, " she easily won a way into 
all our hearts, where she is sure to 
remain. 

Matilda has a glorious voice that 
just rises and soars — leaving us rather 
breathless with the sheer beauty of it. 
We like her best when she sings her 
own native songs which suit her tem- 
perament so well. In addition to this, 
she is quite an excellent violinist. 

Having all these qualities of the 
true artist and a capacity for enjoy- 
ing life as a whole, Tillie will always 
have friends, love, beauty, and happi- 
ness. After all, what more could one 
wish? 

College: Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 
2, 3; Eurydice, 1, 2. 

Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2. 




[52] 



M 



MARY MARGARET BRACE 

Lebanon, Pa. 

History -iA2; SKH 

Individual and unusual are two ad- 
jectives to apply to Mary Margaret, 
who is always herself, who always is 
doing the unexpected. 

This tall blonde sophisticate is a 
loyal society member and is very ac- 
tive in dramatics. Her interests also 
extend into our neighboring city 
where she is a member of several 
clubs. Add to this the attraction of 
a dark, very tall individual known as 
Mike, and you know why we see so 
little of her on the campus. 

She is a person who does not be- 
lieve that all knowledge comes from 
classes and textbooks, but rather that 
It comes from experiences. With such 
a clear philosophy of life and such 
a fund of practical knowledge, we 
can predict nothing but the best for 
Mary Margaret. 

College: History Club, 1, 2, 3. 

Societv: Anniversary Committee, 
2, 3. 





ALLEN EUGENE BUZZELL 

Sparrow's Point, Md. 

Business Administration KA2 

Actor, businessman, debater, stu- 
dent. These seem like a lot of ac- 
complishments for such a little man, 
but Buzzell is a Trojan for work. One 
can think of him as a reincarnation 
of the Elizabethan ideal plus the de- 
sirable qualities of the modern man. 

"Buzzy" is always doing something. 
Work is his joy, yet a social function 
is not complete without his presence. 
A delightful personality effervescing 
with energy has earned him the title 
of "Little Caesar" (from Sparrow's 
Point). 

College: Y. M. C. A., 2: Orchestra, 
1; Band, 2, 3: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 
3, Vice President, 3: Debating Team, 
2, 3; May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Class: President, 2: Scrap, 1, 2; 
Football, 2; Junior Play, 3; Quittapa- 
hilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1, 2; 
Judiciary Committee, 3. 




[531 




ROTHERMEL LEON CAPLAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Business Administration 

Caplan is Lebanon Valley's captain 
of industry. The zest with which he 
devours Business Ad. courses and the 
acumen he displays in contact with 
his fellow-students mark Rothermel as 
a coming power in finance. 

This Lebanon lad is never at a loss 
for words, as many a professor can 
testify after hearing his comment on 
a subtle point raised in class. His 
acidulous tongue is checked only when 
he is in company with the fairer sex 
— which lately is becoming frequent, 
for Rothermel seems to have perceived 
the value of socializing. 

Besides his curly auburn hair, Cap- 
lan's chief attractions are his famous 
green car and a fundamental worth 
of character which will insure him suc- 
cess when he goes into the "wide, 
wide world." 

College; Commerce Club, 2, 3. 



PAUL E. DEIMLER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Chemistry 

This big man comes to us daily in 
his powerful, low-slung roadster, and 
leaves his barbering business in Hum- 
melstown to take care of itself while 
he sates his thirst for knowledge at 
this institution (of higher learning). 

Deimler is one shrewd boy; he 
would rather borrow money on bonds 
than rent a safe-deposit box, because 
the interest rate is lower than the 
rental charge. 

This tonsorial artist is also a big 
shot in the D. S. P. L. (Day Stu- 
dents" Pinochle League) and is an au- 
thority on the proper bid for a hun- 
dred aces and three strikes in trump. 

Behind his quiet demeanor is a 
comprehensive perception — in other 
words, he may seem to be asleep, but 
he misses nothing. 




[54] 




GEORGE VALLERCHAMP 

DERICKSON 

Annville, Pa. 

Biology KAS 

George has decided to follow in his 
father's footsteps and enter the sci- 
entific world. However, he has chosen 
medicine as his profession rather than 
scientific research. George's main in- 
terest centers around Biology, and he 
works long and hard in the laboratory 
to fulfill his botany and anatomy re- 
quirements. He is planning to take 
up his medical work in Europe, and 
we sincerely hope that his ambitions 
may be realized. 

George takes an active part in class 
affairs, and the social functions of the 
school. He is a zealous supporter of 
his chosen society and finds femi- 
nine companionship not at all un- 
pleasant. 

College: Glee Club, 1, 2; Men's 
Senate, 2: Delphian Anniversary 
Play, 1. 

Class: Scrap, 2: Football, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1. 





V. JUNE EBY 
Palmyra, Pa. 
Music 

When this young lady decided to 
transfer from West Chester to Leba- 
non Valley at the close of the first 
semester this year, the college in gen- 
eral and the conservatory in particu- 
lar gained a valuable asset. As Eng- 
lish words fail adequately to describe 
June, we must fall back upon "chic" 
and "petite" to sing her charms. In 
intellect, too, is this Palmyra lass quite 
superior; to hear her recite in Math 
and Ed. is a revelation. We have no- 
ticed June at concerts and plays in 
the company of a dark stranger, and, 
with others, have thought: "Lucky 
boy!" 

Although the class of '34 has not 
had much opportunity to become in- 
timately acquainted with June, each 
new unfolding of her pleasant person- 
ality yields promise of a true and val- 
uable friend. 

Coliege: West Chester State Teach- 
ers' College, 1, 2, 25-2. 



[55] 




DOROTHY ELIZABETH ELY 

Arendtsville, Pa. 

Music AA2 

When it comes to "tickling the 
ivories," Dottie is right there. Her 
fingers speak for themselves. She 
plays, sings, blows things, and gets 
away with it. Dottie leans a bit to- 
ward the classics, too. Ask her about 
one William Shakespeare. And this 
isn't the only man on whom she can 
discourse. Music and the "conserve" 
have their charms in such rare things 
as Prince Charmings, for we notice 
that Dottie has taken to sitting in the 
parlor, after the repasts offered in the 
dining hall, and talking to — ahem — a 
man. 

Dot's always starting things. She 
bobbed her hair and brought back the 
little old-fashioned curls — cute and 
most becoming to the wearer. 

College: Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Eury- 
dice, 1, 2: Chorus, 3; May Day Pro- 
gram, 1, 2. 

Society: Warden, 1; Pianist, 3; Re- 
cording Secretary, 3; Anniversary 
Committee, 3. 



CYRUS DANIEL ENGLE 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

Biology KA2 

A member of the Hummelstown day- 
student contingent — one who can't 
possibly be forgotten or ignored — is 
Danny Engle. Every day-student has 
heard, at one time or another, in the 
midst of a rabid bull session, Danny's 
high-pitched, slightly querulous voice, 
raised to make an observation which 
no one else has thought of, and which 
casts an entirely different light upon 
the subject. 

This same analytical perspicacity is 
employed by Engle in his studies. He 
potters happily about the biology lab, 
gazing fondly upon the most prosaic- 
appearing specimens. We expect Dan- 
ny at any time to notice some pheno- 
menon no one else has seen before, 
and by this discovery, to earn for 
himself a place high in the annals of 
biological science. 




1561 



^jS- 



DEWITT MILLER ESSICK 

Downingtown, Pa. 

History *Ai; 

Dame History has attracted into her 
train of admirers this blond young 
man from Downingtown. Not only is 
Essick specializing in History, but he 
also is president of the History club. 
Ever since Essick came to L. V. C. he 
has been popular and busy helping 
here, showing his interest there, and 
gaining honor as well as responsibility 
(and weight) until now he is assistant 
editor of this book. 

College: Men's Senate, 2, 3; His- 
tory Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 
2: German Club, 1, 2: May Day Pro- 
gram, 1, 2; Y. M. C. A. Conference, 
1: La Vie Collegienne, 3. 

CldSi: President, 2; Football, 1, 2; 
Tug o" War, 1, 2: Scrap, 1, 2: Bas- 
ketball, 2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Secre- 
tary, 2; Anniversary Committee, 1, 2; 
Anniversary Play, 2; Chairman Exe- 
cutive Committee, 3. 





ELVIN BELDEN FAKE 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Education 

Fake — the most genuine person on 
the campus. He doesn't talk much or 
often, but when he says something, it 
is with an assurance and finality that 
leave nothing to be desired. A droll 
and dry sense of humor goes far to 
make him the popular man he is. 

Besides being a terror as center on 
the class football teams, and chairman 
of the reception committee for fresh- 
man day students (male), Fake finds 
plenty of time to spend on History 
and is reported to be authoritatively 
informed on the intricate details of 
that fascinating subject. He is mas- 
ter of the fine art of agitation and usu- 
ally is at the bottom of such rousing 
activities. Pinochle proficiency rounds 
out his assortment of skills. 

College: History Club, 1. 

Class: Football, 1, 2. 



[57] 




EMMA KATHRYN FASNACHT 

Annville, Pa. 

Latin KAX; 2KII 

If you want to find a good example 
of studiousness, look for Emma. Usu- 
ally you will find her translating Livy 
or Cicero with great gusto. Nor do 
her efforts go unrewarded, for very 
seldom does she receive a grade less 
than "A". Emma is interested espe- 
cially in Latin and German: as for 
History, she has a remarkable ability 
to remember even the detailed inci- 
dents in the life of a nation. 

Emma also is an active member of 
Der Deutsche Verein, of which or- 
ganization she is secretary. Predom- 
inantly a student and scholastic lu- 
minary of our freshman year, Emma 
seems to care little for social activi- 
ties, although taking an active part 
in girls" basketball. With her char- 
acteristic industry, studiousness, and 
persistency, Emma is well fitted to 
attain success. 

College: Freshman Scholastic Prize: 
Basketball, 3: German Club, 2, 3, 
Secretary, 3. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 



WILLIAM KEMPER FISHBURN 

Ephrata, Pa. 

Business Administration <I>Aw 

From Ephrata, the borough of 
championship basketball teams, and of 
the world-famed cloisters, comes this 
robust and athletic young man so well 
known in the sports circles of L. V. C. 
For two years Bill plugged away on 
the football field. His perseverance 
turned the joking which the fellows 
began to aim at him into acknowledg- 
ments of respect. Among his other 
well-liked sports are baseball, basket- 
ball, ping-pong, and pool. 

"Fishy" is a prospective high-pres- 
sure business man, a real butter and 
egg man in the making. During the 
summer he practices salesmanship and 
has been known to make at least one 
sale. Perseverance leads to success and 
we surely wish it for you. Bill! 

College: Reserve Football, 1, 2: 
Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Football, 1. Basketball, 1, 2. 




[58] 



JAMES TILDEN FRANTZ, JR. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

Jim is one of our quiet day stu- 
dents — a rarity to be sure. A hard 
worker and a pleasant companion, Jim 
is kept quite busy, for in addition to 
his work at the school, he holds a 
position at the Y. M. C. A. in Leb- 
anon, working a part of the afternoon 
and evening. As a major, Jim has 
chosen Chemistry, having had some 
practical application of this science 
as an industrial chemist for the Beth- 
lehem Steel Company for several sea- 
sons. After Jim has realized his mark 
in his chosen line of endeavor, it will 
not be accreditable to some chance 
fancy of Dame Fortune, but all the 
credit will rightfully go to one who 
has applied himself to the task at hand 
with never ceasing courage and forti- 
tude. 

CoUege: Chem Club, 1, 2. 3. 

Class: Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3. 





JAMES J. FRIDY 

Mountville, Pa. 

Business Administration K.Vi) 

"Just Jim, that's him," perfectly nat- 
ural, never biased, always friendly. He 
is so very unassuming that you would 
think his greatest worry is matching 
his necktie to his shirt. He has de- 
veloped a philosophy of life that never 
fails him, so that he comes through 
all kinds of trying experiences with 
a smile and asks for something hard. 
The above qualities are enough to 
make any individual popular, but on 
top of it all he adds a chsrming per- 
sonality, a lively conversation, and a 
kindly attitude. 

He is a student of economics and 
related subjects. Some morning when 
you see him attenipting to "bum" a 
dime for breakfast, you know his idea 
of high finance. The sum total in- 
cludes a passion for bridge, pool, and 
bull sessions. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1: Com- 
merce Club, 2, 3: May Day Program, 
1. 

Class: Scrap, 1, 2. 



[59] 




GEM CAROLYN GEMMILL 

Glen Rock, Pa. 

English AA2 

Gem possesses many of the quali- 
ties of a precious stone — a sparkle and 
a beauty which have drawn to her 
a host of admirers. An uncanny and 
magnetic attraction has laid low male 
hearts in a score of other colleges be- 
sides Lebanon Valley. We admire 
Gem for her originality and departure 
from old forms. But perhaps we can 
depict her appeal in more rhythmic 
measures : 

Has a yen for Russ Columbo, frater- 
nities, blind dates: 
Knows a Sigma Phi from Gettysburg, 

a Theta Nu from State; 
But It really makes no difference if it's 

L. v., Pitt, or Penn, 
Life is always good to Gemmie, for 
the world is full of men. 
College: Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 
Class: Hockey, 1, 2, 3. 
Society: Warden, 1: Pianist, 2; 
Corresponding Secretary, 3: Anniver- 
sary Play, 3: Judiciary Committee, 2, 3. 



JOSEPH CAPP GILBERT 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

Joe is a new member of the student 
body this year, having spent the past 
two at Penn State, where, in the pur- 
suit of pre-medical knowledge, he has 
made an enviable record. Joe is con- 
tinuing this work at Lebanon Valley, 
majoring in chemistry, deeming this 
science of atoms and electrons a ne- 
cessity in unravelling the mysteries of 
various pathological variations. 

Joe also spends his time in pursu- 
ing certain Butterwick "courses" in 
addition to his science work, as evi- 
denced by his strollings on campus 
pathways. But why does Joe come 
to town in a truck? And why the 
mustache, "John" Gilbert? 

The questions stop there. We know 
the rest, and it points to the highest 
success — in any field. 

CoHcge: Penn State, 1, 2. 




60 



MARY ELIZABETH GOSSARD 

Annvillc, Pa. 

English -iAS 

Our Mary typifies the habitue of 
the Savoy Lounge, caviar in some 
smart Trouville den, skiing and sled- 
ding at St. Moritz, and the worldly 
calm of a Riviera retreat. Incident- 
ally, what can this worldly-wise young 
lady say about those numerous prom 
bids from Temple men? 

The real Mary signifies all of these 
things and more. There is the Mary 
of violent moods, of wild exultations, 
of biting wit. Hovj well she presents 
an unruffled demeanor to the many 
vicissitudes that face all of us from 
day to day. It seems as though noth- 
ing can level the barrier of her regal 
reserve and dignity. But beneath is 
the warm sympathy and the eager spir- 
it of inquiry her friends have learned 
to know and to love. 

College: Basketball, 1, 2, 3: La Vie 
Collegienne, 2, 3; Reader's Club, 1, 
2, 3. 

Class: Junior Play, 3; Quittapahilla 
Staff, 3. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 2, 3. 





VERNA IRENE GRISSINGER 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

Mathematics AA!C 

Here's to Verna — the best-natured 
girl on the campus. Always ready to 
help, whether it be to turn a sym- 
pathetic ear to the plaints of a heart- 
sick freshman or to lend more mater- 
ial aid in the way of willing services, 
Verna, stands in a class by herself. 

Although this young lady is quite 
active in class and society, her heart 
and soul are devoted to the queen of 
sciences, mathematics. We believe we 
shall always remember Verna as she 
stands surveying a particularly difficult 
problem on the board, the qui:;ical 
little smile on her face exhibiting the 
determination which is destined to car- 
ry her far. 

College: Art Club, 2, 3; May Day 
Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Secretary, 3: Hockey, 2, 3. 

Societv: Corresponding Secretary, 
3; Warden, 1; Anniversary Commit- 
tee, 1, 2, 3. 



[61] 




MARY SPOTTEN GROFF 

Columbia, Pa. 

French KAX 

Studious, amhitious, precise, and 
neat — that's "Prissy." And maybe 
that name suits her pretty well. Drop 
into her room any odd moment and 
there sits Mary with dictionary, gram- 
mar, and what-have-you piled around 
her, while she laboriously digs away 
with "habeorisset" and the rest of 
those foreign materials. French 36 
iinds her talking back to the prof, 
quite nonchalantly. In other words, 
she knows her Latin and French. 

As a member of Clio, she has lent 
a helping hand many times in decor- 
ating, arranging programs, and last 
minute details. We must not for- 
get one thing — Mary can eat. Ask her 
about Mrs. Wallace's luncheon in her 
(Mary's) freshman year. Our hats go 
otT to "Prissy" as a good bid for a 
successful "school-marm." 

College: Reader's Club: May Day 
Program, 1, 2; Y. W. C. A., I. 

Society: Corresponding Secretary, 2. 



DANIEL DWIGHT GROVE 

Felton, Pa. 

Pre-Medical *A2 

"Lefty" is a man upon whom one 
can always rely. Ever ready to help 
whenever his aid is needed, he possesses 
a host of friends. Few men in the 
dormitory are quite so cheerful and 
full of life as he. 

In the band, "Lefty" performs well 
in the clarinet section. But the chief 
interest in college for Grove is the 
chemistry lab, where he spends a large 
part of his time. His success in his 
major proves that he is quite a chem- 
ist. Then too, his interest in physics 
must not be overlooked. 

College: Band, 2, 3: Chemistry Club, 
1, 2, 3: German Club, 1, 2: May Day 
Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Football, 2: Basketball, 2: Tug 
o' War, 2: Scrap, 1, 2. 

Societv : Sergeant at arms, 1 : Editor, 
2; Corresponding Secretary, 3; Anni- 
versary Committee, 1, 2, 3. 




1621 



CHRISTINE GINGRICH GRUBER 

Annville, Pa. 
English KAN 

Teen's secret potion of happiness is 
life — simple, unadorned life. To her 
every moment is an event, every day 
an occasion. She puts herself whole- 
heartedly into every second. No day 
IS hum-drum to her. Each new dawn 
brings a whole day full of happenings, 
and she lives fully every moment, con- 
fident of the interest the next hour 
will bring. This zest of life seems to 
be the motivating force in Teen"s life. 
Anyone who is near her is drawn in- 
exorably into this web of hopeful en- 
joyment. Perhaps here one sees for 
the first time the fullness of life. 

College: La Vie Collegienne, 3; Or- 
chestra, 1, 2, 3; May Day Program. 
1, :: Reader's Club, 2, 3; History Club, 
3; English Assistant, 3; Debating. 1: 
Y. W. C. A., 1. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3; Quittapahilla 
Staff, 3. 

Societv: Usher, 1; Anniversary Play. 
2; Editor, 3. 





Mus 



ROBERT CLINGER HEATH 
Reading, Pa. 



KAi: 



Bob is a student of music, and as 
such has been quite successful. The 
piano and French horn are his special- 
ties. But knowing Bob, it would seem 
that his chief interest was something 
quite different — the Taft Hotel in 
N. Y. C, for instance. His fun-mak- 
ing keeps his associates in constant 
laughter and good spirits. No one 
need fear boredom as long as Heath 
is near. 

The pleasant part of Bob's character 
is that when the time for frivolity is 
gone, and it is ability that is needed, 
he does not lack, and most especially 
not in the musical field. His inter- 
est has been centered chiefly in 
the music organizations, the band, or- 
chestra, and glee club, in all of which 
he plays a vital part. 

College: Band, 3; Orchestra, 2, 3: 
Glee Club, I, 2, 3; May Day Pro- 
gram, 2. 



[63] 




CATHERINE FIETTA HECKMAN 

Reading, Pa. 
Music KAN; ZKII 

Catherine is one of the most bril- 
liant of our Conservatory students. 
One has only to look at her "A" record 
to realize this. Her abilities, however 
are not confined to the Conservatory 
but are readily recognized in her col- 
lege work as well. 

Kitty is a very temperamental artist, 
but she is always faithful in her prac- 
ticing. Because of her high ambitions, 
she works harder than most people, 
but to her practice is often more en- 
joyable than some other more frivolous 
occupation. 

Although she is wrapped up in her 
music she nevertheless finds time to 
be a very active member of her chosen 
society, Clio, and the French club 
where she is an excellent conversa- 
tionalist. 

College: Orchestra, 2, 3; Chorus, 2, 
3; Eurydice, 1, 2. 

Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 



CLAIR MELVIN HITZ 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Bible and Greek 

"Cheerfulness is a small virtue, it is 
true, but it sheds a brightness around 
us in this life that neither dark clouds 
nor rain can dispel its happy in- 
fluence." Clair is always overflowing 
with cheerfulness and goodwill and 
quite appropriately too, for he is plan- 
ning to spend his life in the ministry, 
a field where such virtues are surely 
not amiss. We have learned to expect 
and to enjoy his quaint quips and 
quirks. 

But there is a serious and thought- 
ful Hitz, who lays aside jokes and friv- 
olity for the time and engages in the 
work of his chosen profession. Not 
the least among his many accomplish- 
ments is his music, both vocal and in- 
strumental. 

We need not fear for his success 
with such virtues to carry him on. 

College: Glee Club, 1, 2, Treasurer, 
2; Y. M. C. A., 3; Life Work Re- 
cruits, 1, 2, 3; May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 




[64] 



EARL EDWARD HOOVER 

Somerset, Pa. 

Biology KA2 

"Herhie" is one of the workers in 
our class. Holding down the posi- 
tion of president, he has done a com- 
mendable piece of work. It is due 
mainly to his guidance and ideas that 
our class has gained. 

Hoover is the biologist. He has 
taken nearly every course in the de- 
partment, and aside from that, holds 
the biology assistantship. 

"Herbie" is one of the biggest fel- 
lows in the class, always jolly, al- 
ways in for some fun: but when 
there is work to be done, invariably 
ready to do it. He was a member 
of our class teams, and we can still 
remember him as anchor man in th"> 
tug. He remains a bulwark of 
strength on which his friends can rely. 

College: Biology Assistant, 2, 3: 
La Vie Collegienne, 3; May Day 
Program, 1. 

Class: Tug o' War, 1, 2: Football, 
1, 2: Scrap, 1: President, 3. 

Society: Critic, 1; Secretary, 2; 
Anniversary Play, 2. 





DOROTHY MARY JACKSON 

Esterly, Pa. 

English AA2 

"Dot" hails from a little place 
down below Reading. And what a 
lively little "dot" she is on the cam- 
pus! Although not so big in some 
ways as in others, this does not mean 
that she hasn't plenty of vim, vigor, 
and vitality. Just watch her on the 
hockey field, or her dust on the ten- 
nis court. Yes sir! You have to 
have nerve to return those fast shots 
across the net. 

"Dottie" spends precious moments 
in the library, browsing around, and 
attends all the highly recommended 
plays. And she is a saleslady. Do 
you remember the ice-cream booth 
outside of North Hall on May Day? 
Look for "Dot" behind the counter 
making bigger and better sales for 
our college! 

College: Reader's Club, 2, 3: Art 
Club, 2, 3: May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Hockey, 2. 

Society: Treasurer, 3: Anniversary 
Committee, 3. 



[65] 




J. MITCHELL JORDAN 

High Rock, Pa. 

Pre-Medical *A2 

"River" is another member of our 
class who expects to enter the medical 
profession. Mitchell is interested in 
chemistry, as are most pre-medical stu- 
dents, and he is one of the most loyal 
and dilitjent members of the Chemistry 
Club. 

Besides his scholastic activities, "Riv- 
er" was manager of varsity football 
for the 1932 season. 

He is also an asset to our class. Be- 
sides being athletic editor of the 
"Quittie", he always takes an active 
part in class affairs and is an able 
member of our class football, basket- 
ball, and tug teams. 

College: May Day Program, 1: As- 
sistant Athletic Manager, 2; Football 
Manager, 3: Men's Senate, 3: Chem- 
istry Club, 1. 2, 3; German Club, 1, 
2; "L" Club, 3. 

Class: Tug, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2: 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Scrap, 1, 2: Quit- 
tapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Anni- 
versary Committee, 1, 2, 3. 



RAY B. JOHNSON 

Johnstown. Pa. 

History *A2 

Ray is a newcomer to our class this 
year, coming from Shenandoah Col- 
lege to finish his work at Lebanon Val- 
ley. And speaking of Shenandoah, 
there still seems to be an attraction 
there for our new friend. Ray has 
formed many warm friendships among 
us by his kindness, his sincerity, and 
his abilities. 

He demonstrated his dramatic gifts 
very commendably in the Junior class 
play, "The Lnportance of Being Ear- 
nest." He is a ministerial student, 
and speaks so well and earnestly that 
one must admire him and feel sure of 
his ability to succeed in the minstry. 
Ray has a craving for psychology 
which he satisfies at every possible 
opportunity in discussion or in read- 
ing. Our best wishes are for his suc- 
cess. 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; 
History Club, 3: Debating, " 3: Life 
Work Recruits, 3; Delphian Anniver- 
sary Play, 3. 

Class: Junior Play, 3. 




[66] 



PETER KANDRAT 

Minersville, Pa. 

Chemistry KA2 

"Petie" is an athlete, a student, a 
scientist, and one of Lebanon Valley's 
avowed optimists. He has a hearty 
laugh, and a whole horde of emotions 
concealing a scholarly and penetrating 
mind. 

Pete is a science major and can be 
found at all his leisure moments in the 
laboratory trying to fathom the secret 
of the elusive atom, or the mysteries of 
life. Particularly does he enjoy him- 
self in physics lab where he spends 
long hours listening to Prof. Grimm's 
explanations of cosmic phenomena. 
Pete seems certain to attain in his 
future activities the success he already 
has gained as an end on our football 
team. 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry 
Club, i, 2, 3; French Club, 1; "L" 
Club, 3. 

Class: Basketball. 1, 2, 3; Tug o' 
War, 1; Baseball, 1. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; An- 
niversary Play, 1, 3. 





WENDELL REUBEN KING 
Richland, Pa. 
Mathematics 

After a year at Lehigh (about which 
he loves to reminisce, telling tales of the 
initiations and escapades he experi- 
enced). King came to Lebanon Valley. 
Mathematics is the field of this com- 
muter's ambitions, and in it he can 
display quite some ability. 

Yet he is suited to the field of diplo- 
macy. Every year King cuts his math 
classes to go deer-hunting. But he ap- 
peases the wrath of Prof. Wagner by 
conscientiously sending a bountiful 
portion of venison to the math men- 
tor. 

He is rather reserved and quiet, but 
a kind and warm friend at heart. He 
mixes handball and pinochle with cal- 
culus and logarithms in just the suit- 
able proportions. This talent for divid- 
ing his work and play should make 
King a leader in the world. 

College: Lehigh University, 1. 



[67] 



!^'?*JjiJ~je.ii:' 




MARGARET ELIZABETH KOHLER 

Smithshurg, Md. 
French KAX 

This old world would become pretty 
dull at times if there were not folks 
like Marg to put some pep into it. 
Whatever Marg does, she does with 
lots of zeal, drawing others into her 
spirit of enthusiasm. This same vigor 
is applied to work as well as play. 
Marg is always vitally interested in 
something, whether it be the class play, 
the week-end, or German. She has a 
cheery manner of treating everyone as 
her friend. Wherever she is, a spirit 
of joviality and good-will prevails. She 
is putting quite a bit of her enthusiasm 
into the study of language. We all 
hope that, in her work as interpreter, 
she can assist those who need her help 
with her knowledge and sympathy. 

College: W. S. G. A., 3; Y. W. C. 
A., 2, 3: German Club, 1, 2, 3; French 
Assistant, 3; May Day Program, 1, 2; 
Debating, 1. 

Class: Vice President, 2: Junior Play, 
3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1, 2; 
Pianist, 1, 2, 3. 



GEORGE MARTIN KLITCH 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry KA2 

George is one of those few people 
whom we all understand. To know 
him is to love him. His qualities of 
always trying, always encouraging, and 
usually succeeding have gained for him 
the admiration of all his associates. He 
is one of those quiet folks who stroll 
about with a wise, calm air and im- 
presses all with his delightful person- 
ality and refreshing smile. 

He has chosen science as his major 
and often is observed in the labora- 
tories diligently pursuing knowledge. 
Many a weary hour has George spent 
in the physics lab, boring down to the 
foundations and principles of the 
science. However, when a social event 
is in progress he is sure to be present, 
adding a delightful touch with his 
pleasant ways and ready wit. 

College: May Day Program, 1. 

Class: Tug o" War, 1, 2: Football, 
1, 2; Scrap, 1, 2. 

Society: Secretary, 3; Sergeant at 
arms, I: Judiciary Committee, 3. 




[68] 



Latin 



ANNA MORAN KREBS 
Palmyra, Pa. 



KAX; 2KII 



Here is one of the quiet and unas- 
suming girls of our class. Because of 
her retiring nature, very few people 
really know Anna, but these few cher- 
ish her friendship very much. 

Extremely conscientious and studi- 
ous, Anna has little to say, hut her ac- 
tions speak louder than words. Then, 
too, Anna is an enthusiastic Latin 
student. AH these characteristics fail 
to take into account one of Anna's 
most dominant abilities. She is one 
of our outstanding basketball players, 
and when it comes to hockey Anna is 
always there to make the winning goal. 

Since, after all, life is just a game, 
we know that Anna will be one of its 
best players and that she will always 
come through with the winning stroke. 

College: Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 
Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 
Society: Sigma Kappa Eta, 1, 2, 3; 
Vice President, 3. 





MARK RANK KREIDER 
Cleona, Pa. 
Business Administration 

This curly-haired, dark-eyed Junior 
manages each day to tear himself away 
from his native hamlet, Cleona, so that 
he can prepare himself for the give- 
and-take of the world of finance and 
industry by digesting the Business Ad- 
ministration course at our fair insti- 
tution. 

There is nothing noisy or boisterous 
about Mark, but whenever there is a 
joke afoot or a little bit of the "de'il" 
to raise, he is there ready for his share 
of it. Quiet and steady application 
at his law and iinance courses have 
earned for Kreider an enviable repu- 
tation. His only diversions at Lebanon 
Valley are the regular pinochle sessions, 
at which he displays evidence of that 
acumen which seems certain to earn 
him a great measure of success as a 
business man. 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3; 
German Club, 1, 2, 3. 



[69] 




MARTHA ULRICH KREIDER 

Media, Pa. 

History KAN 

If you want some one to teach a 
dance, to inveigle class dues from a 
true Scotsman, to write a clever article, 
or to plan a snappy program, see 
Martha. Whatever she is asked to 
do, she does willingly and well. Always 
helping others, whether they be seniors 
or freshmen, she takes an important 
part in the life of the dorm. Nothing 
is too much trouble for her to do for 
someone else. It is to her we go to 
borrow pins, necklaces, and other 
trifles on the eve of a big event. She 
is generally happy and her buoyant 
moods are contagious. We feel that 
a great future is in store for anyone 
so generous and kind. 

College: History Club, 1, 2, 3: Green 
Blotter Club, 3; La Vie Collegienne, 
2, 3; May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Hockey Team, 2, 3; Quitta- 
pahilla Staff, 3. 

Soaety. Editor, 2; Critic, 2; Anni' 
versary Committee, 2, 3; Treasurer, 3. 



HELEN RUTH LANE 

Lodi. N. J. 

English AA2 

Like "a lady from the past, with a 
past" is our Helen — to most of us an 
appealing heroine from a Sabatini 
novel, a heroine with a fiery life and 
a tempestuous nature. But alas for 
public opinion! There is no vivid past 
for her, and her nature and life are 
calm and full of deep, rich meaning. 
Helen has a tendency occasionally to 
VvTinkle her brows and philosophise, 
hut more often to ramble on and on, 
conversing about the everyday things 
of life. With an overflowing joy of 
living, she meanders over our campus, 
and lingers in our memories as the girl 
with the detached air. Certainly, else 
wherefore Helen of Troy? "The face 
that launched a thousand ships" lives 
again at Lebanon Valley. 

College: French Club, 1; Art Club, 
3: Reader's Club, 2, 3; Varsity Basket- 
ball Manager. 3; May Day Program, 
1, 2. 

Class: Vice President, 1; Hockey, 
2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Usher, 1, 2. 




[70] 



FREDERICK DEIBLER LEHMAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Biology 

Were college honors given for soci- 
alizing, Freddie long ago would have 
put the rest of the L. V. C. males to 
shame. What his secret of success can 
he we are not sure, but we do not 
want to discount his aptitude. Please 
don't think that Fred spends all his 
time in this manner. He is a great 
student, especially in biological sub- 
jects. He is an earnest worker in many 
of the college groups. He has been 
the dashint; drum-major of the band, a 
star on the tennis team, a fine actor in 
several plays on the campus, and i 
basketball enthusiast. His portrayal '.f 
the sanctimonious "Dr. Chasuble" 
probably will be his best-remembered 
accomplishment. 

CoJIege: Tennis, 2: Band, 2, 3; 
Cheer Leader, 1, 2: May Day Program, 

1, 2: Chemi.stry Club. 1: Reader's Club, 

2, 3; Delphian Anniversary Play, 3. 
Class: Football, 1. 2: Basketball, 1, 

2, 3; Tug o' War, 1: Baseball, 1; 
Scrap, 1, 2; Junior Play, 3. 





HOMER ALBERT LIGHT 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

Our shining Light from Lebanon 
has not a little in common with his 
illustrious namesake, the sage poet of 
ancient Greece. Whenever Homer is 
cornered in a hot discussion, or the 
"joshing" becomes a little rough, he 
always is ready with a pointed answer. 
Homer is quite proficient in the tech- 
nique of agitation and acknowledges 
no superior in the gentle art of cajol- 
ing innocent freshmen. These activ- 
ities are by no means confined to the 
campus of Lebanon Valley, for, like 
all good day students. Homer "tears" 
occasionally in his home town, Ann- 
ville's largest suburb. 

This young man's chief academic in- 
terest seems to be in the chemistry 
lab, where he performs noxious ex- 
periments ad iii/inititm. Homer has a 
basis of fine qualities upon which to 
rely. 

Coffege: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 



[71] 




MAX HENRY LIGHT 

Annville, Pa. 

History KA:2 

Max is one of our big slashing and 
dashing athletes. He has been a mem' 
ber of the basketball and football 
teams, being a halfback in football and 
one of our best guards in basketball. 
We expect big things from him in both 
of these sports next season. 

In his scholastic life. Max has chosen 
History as his pet subject, and hopes 
to teach it when he leaves his Alma 
Mater. Along with his teaching duties. 
Max expects to be a coach. We know 
he will succeed in this line of endeavor, 
for Max has a personality which seems 
to work itself into the hearts of his 
classmates, especially the North Hall 
co-eds. (Max waits in the hall after 
every meal.) 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; May Day Program. 
Class: Tug o' War, 1, 2. 



CARL PHILLIPS LONG 

Enola, Pa. 

Chemistry K-^.- 

This is "Sarge", and what would 
the men's dorm do without the army? 
He came to us after spending four 
summers in C. M. T. C. camp, and at 
times gave us his repertoire of bugle 
calls — but, alas, no more. 

However, Long does not expect to 
ally his whole life with the army. As 
a pre-medical student he hopes some 
day to become a leading surgeon. He 
claims that he knows the Hippocra- 
tcrian oath already. 

"Sarge" is one of the best-natured 
members of our class and enjoys a good 
joke any time. He is especially noted 
for the ever-increasing number of 
pranks which he plays on his fellow 
dorm students. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day Program, 1: German Club, 
1, 2; Y. M. C. A. Conference, L 

Class: Scrap, 1. 2; Tug o' War, 1, 
2; Football, 1, 2: Quittapahilla Staff, 
3; Junior Play, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1. 




[72] 






A. MARGARET LONGENECKER 

Middletown, Pa. 
Mathematics KAX 

In any gathering of people there 
is always one who stands out as master 
of all situations. Such a person is 
"Marg". With an unassuming dignity, 
she always is in the lead. This dignity 
and poise is not a pose, but is the 
natural outcome of a well-trained life. 
Underneath this surface of dignity and 
culture there is a fund of good humor 
and kindliness. Marg's character is 
truly of the dual-personality type. To 
outsiders, she seems self-contained, cer- 
tain and assured. To those who know 
her better is revealed the other Marg. 
She is simple, trusting, and friendly. 
For her is reserved a life of leadership 
with knowledge and kindness as its 
guide-posts. 

College: Y. W. C. A., 1, 2, 3; W. S. 
G. A., 2: May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Junior Play Committee, 3. 

Societv: Recording Secretary, 3; 
Usher, l'. 





RUTH ANNA MARK 

Hagerstown, Md. 

English ■ AA2 

When Ruth Anna arrived on the 
campus, an honor student from Hagers- 
town, she folded up her wings, remov- 
ed her halo, parked them in the north- 
east corner of West Hall's attic, and 
proceeded to have a good time. In 
spite of her varied interests, she still 
tinds time to maintain her high schol- 
astic records. Although "Rufus" is a 
good mixer, and has participated in 
many college activities, she has never 
lost sight of her high ideals. 

At first, she was inclined to be 
amused at the many Lebanon Valley 
romances. But — like the young man 
whose "fancy lightly turns to thoughts 
of love" — we find Ruth Anna looking 
with favor on a certain young man: 
and Spring sees this West Hall Junior 
"klitching" at the straw of romance. 

College: Reader's Club, I, 2, 3; 
V. W. C. A., 1. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 
Soctetv: Warden, 1, 



[73 




WILBUR H. MATHIAS 

New Cumberland, Pa. 
Chemistry KAIS 

Wilbur's particular hobby at college 
has been in the line of science. Chem- 
istry and physics take up his time. We 
often find hmi poring over a chemistry 
book or working diligently in the lab- 
oratory. 

When not laboring in the laboratory, 
making cute little spectrographic pho- 
tos, or at his books, Wilbur turns to 
his music. He is an accomplished vio- 
linist, and aspires to be a second Rubin- 
off. Crooning is another of his talents, 
and "Bing" entertains (?) his room- 
mates at unearthly hours with his 
melodious voice. 

This curly-haired lad is another of 
our five-day students, leaving the 
campus over the week-end in order to 
make regular trips to his home town. 
We often wonder what might be the 
attraction. 

College: Orchestra, 1, 2, 3: Chem- 
istry Club, 1, 2: May Day Program, 1, 
2; German Club, 1, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Committee, 1. 



ANNE E. MATULA 

Middletown, Pa. 

Mathematics K-^^^ 

If you hear a cheery laugh that 
seems to hold a wealth of good humor 
and friendship in it, you will know 
that Anne is near. Her hearty ex- 
pression of mirth indicates her warm- 
ness and kindliness of heart. She is 
well versed in the art of being a 
friend. Whatever her tasks, she per- 
forms them wholeheartedly, entering 
with vigor into every new enterprise 
that enlists her aid. All her charac- 
teristics seem molded together to make 
of her a true friend. She is frank and 
determined in her opinions. True 
sympathy is found in Anne, always 
ready to listen and to help. Sincerity 
IS here with all its enhancing qualities. 
Surely Anne's purpose in life is to have 
friends by being one. 

College: Debating Team, 1: Eury- 
dice, 1, 2: May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Vice President, 3; Hockey, 2, 

Society: Recording Secretary, 2; 
Treasurer, 3: Anniversary Play, 2. 




[74] 



THOMAS SENGER MAY 
Paradise, Pa. 
Education 

Some members of the ministerial 
group are always sober, sedate, and 
solemn. Some are among the greatest 
fun-lovers of the community — especial- 
ly when that community is a college 
campus. Tom is happily blessed with 
a combination of both these qualities. 
He can deliver a sermon with sincer- 
ity, assurance, and ability, yet his spirit 
of optimism leads him to enjoy the 
heartiest of jokes. 

Tom spent a year at Millersville 
preparing for teaching, but turning his 
heart toward the ministry he came to 
Lebanon Valley for his final training. 
Here at the Valley he has made quite 
a name for himself as an active "Y" 
worker. 

Quite in keeping with his chosen 
profession is the name of his place of 
residence. Paradise. We know life 
for him will retain the synonomous 
connection with his home town. 

College; Millersville State Teachers 
College, 1; Y. M. C. A., 3: Life 
Work Recruits, 2, 3, Secretary, 3. 





HARRY ALGIRE McFAUL 

Baltimore, Md. 

History *AS 

"Mac" is the life of the party. 
Wherever he goes, his good humor and 
his ready wit follow after him. He 
is taking a pre-law course here at Le- 
banon Valley, and we expect to see 
him some day as a second Justinian, 
possibly as a judge in his home town, 
Baltimore. 

"Mac's" sociali:ing at college did 
not begin until his sophomore year. 
At this time he seemed to gain a par- 
ticular alEnity for remaining on the 
campus. We believe "Mac" has met 
the one and only. Time alone will 
tell. 

College: Y. M. C. A. Conferences, 
1, 2; May Day Program, 1, 2; History 
Club, 1, 2, 3: German Club, 1, 2. 

Class: Scrap, 1, 2; Tug o' War, 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 2; Quittapa- 
hilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Secre- 
tary, 2: Vice President, 3; Anniversary 
Play, 2; Anniversary Committee, 1, 2. 



[75] 



■Xs. 



"^^ 




LEROY CHARLES MILLER 

Pottsville, Pa. 

Business Administration KA2 

"Rubio" came to us after spending 
part of his college life at Gettysburg. 
He is not one of the quiet type, but 
what he lacks in quietness, he makes 
up by his never-ending generosity and 
good nature. 

He is one of our Business Adminis- 
tration students and expects some day 
to be a big business man. Sometime 
he might be president of General Elec- 
tric. 

"Rubio" lives in the coal regions 
and makes frequent trips in that direc- 
tion. We often wonder exactly what 
it is which seems to attract him. 

We predict a bright future for 
this member of our class, for with his 
ability, and good nature is coupled 
ambition. "Rubio" never shirks. He 
puts his shoulder to the wheel and at- 
tainment alone can result. 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day Program, 1. 

Class : Scrap, 1 . 

Societv: Sergeant at arms, 1. 



CLYDE SNADER MENTZER 

Ephrata, Pa. 

French *Ai; 

Latin, French, English — no studies 
hold terrors for Clyde, who is one of 
the studious members of our class. But 
there is much more to college than 
classes and Clyde is interested in many 
extra-curricular activities. Be it plays, 
societies, social affairs, or what-not, 
Clyde applies himself with the same 
earnestness and service. 

Basketball is "Shorty's" favorite ath- 
letic activity, and the Juniors have 
been fortunate to have him supporting 
the class's honor as a forward for their 
team. 

College: Y. M. C. A., 3, Treasurer, 
3: Reader's Club, 2, 3; Green Blotter 
Club, 3; Debating, Assistant Manager, 
3: History Club, 2, 3; La "Vie CoUegi- 
enne, 2, 3: Glee Club, 1, 2: May Day 
Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Quittapahilla Staff; Junior 
Play; Basketball, 1, 2, 3: Junior Play 
Committee. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2; Del- 
phian Anniversary Play. 2, 3; "Vice 
President, 3; Pianist, 2, 3. 




[76] 



WINIFRED HOWARD MILLER 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Education -^Ai; 

This world of ours is a strange, 
harmonious thing, with lots of differ- 
ent folk in it, yet each with a certain 
place. Some folks seem made to work: 
others seem to know how to play. It 
seems that "Winnie" came here just 
to make the world brighter. Her very 
presence dispels the gloom. No situa- 
tion can become tense when she is 
around, for with a laugh she removes 
the cause of strain, with a smile she 
finds a place in any company she may 
meet. Folks are always at ease in 
"Winnie's" presence. She radiates 
health and happiness as she moves 
about the campus in her own carefree 
way. Surely here is one sent to re- 
move our troubles and to bring us 
cheer. 

College: Basketball, 1, 3. 
Class: Ring Committee, I. 
Society: Anniversary Committee, 1, 
2, 3; Warden, 1. 





KATHRYN MAUDE MOWREY 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

Mathematics -1A2 

Here's to Kit, student of students, 
debater of debaters, and leader of 
leaders. Not only is Kit one of the 
most outstanding girls on the campus 
scholastically, but also is she one of 
our social agitators. Originality plus, 
that's Kit, and speaking of being orig- 
inal, have you ever heard her giggle? 
Whenever we hear her "squeaks" we 
can be sure that she is in the midst 
of "razzing," either as the aggressor 
or victim. 

Kit is one of those fortunates who 
have the qualities necessary to success 
in life; friendliness, intelligence, leader- 
ship, ambition, and strength. 

College: Y. W. C. A., 1, 2, 3: La 
Vie Collegienne, 3, 4; Debating Team, 
1. 2. 3; May Day Program, 2; History 
Club, 1, 2, 3: Reader's Club, 2, 3. 

Class: Vice President, 2, 3; Hockey 
Team, 3: Quittapahilla Staff, 3: Scho- 
lastic Prize, 2. 

Society: Chaplain, 3: Head Usher, 
3: Judiciary Committee, 3. 



177] 




MILDRED ALMEDA NYE 

Annville, Pa. 

History KAN 

Take dark red wavy hair, impish 
brown eyes, a merry laugh and you 
have . . . just a very faint idea of 
"Millie". 

She is one of the dynamos of energy 
on the campus, always ready to help, 
whether it be "Y" work, glee club, 
dramatics, or hockey. W^e wonder 
that she has time to answer those long 
letters she receives daily. 

Do you remember Sister Marcella, 
Audrey, and Cicely? Yes, they were 
all "Millie" in various versions. Have 
you ever seen a busy, hard-working 
assistant in Dr. Reynold's office? That's 
"Millie," too. 

With her cheery, optimistic outlook 
on life, "Millie" can't help but suc- 
ceed in whatever she attempts. 

College: Y. W. C. A.. 3; History 
Club, 3; Eurydice, 1, 2: Education As- 
sistant, 2, 3; May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Clasa: Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Junior Play; 
Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1, 2; 
Editor of Olive Branch, 1. 



PAUL DRESHER PEIFFER 
Litit:, Pa. 
History 

Lititz sent one of her most industri- 
ous young men when Paul came to 
join us. When he studies, he con- 
centrates: when he works, he works 
faithfully: and when he plays — foot- 
ball and ping-pong seem to have spe- 
cial attraction for him. Although 
Peitfer has not played varsity football, 
he has shown his skill and grit on 
the campus and in the class games. He 
has developed himself into an artist 
at ping-pong, and is an adept expon- 
ent of the fascinating pastime of 
pocket-billiards. 

There seem to be interests every 
week-end at home (or is it Lancaster?) 
but we would not begrudge him any 
of the joys of life he so well deserves. 

College: Muhlenberg, 1; History 
Club, 2, 3. 

Class: Football, 1; Scrap, 1; Tug o" 
War. 




[78] 



J. ALLAN RANCK 

New Holland, Pa. 

Mathematics *-^- 

Allan is one of the hard workers of 
our class. As he is a math major, this 
could easily be expected. He works 
diligently at everything which he at- 
tempts and he does it well. 

Ranck is very much absorbed m the 
Y. M. C. A., and is one of its leaders 
on the campus. He is interested in 
dramatics, having taken part in many 
productions at Lebanon Valley. 

Allan also is quite a singer and has 
been a member of the Glee Club since 
his advent as a Frosh. He can be re- 
lied upon to fill in with a solo at any 
time. Last year's interest in the east- 
ern part of Annville seems to have 
been transferred to Main street — one 
reason why Ranck spends many of his 
week-ends here in our village. 

College: Y. M. C. A., 1, 2, 3, Vice 
President, 3; Life Work Recruits, 3; 
Praver-meeting Chairman. 2: Glee Club, 
1, 2: Band, 2; La Vie Collegienne, 3. 

Class: Treasurer, 3: Quittapahilla 
Staff, 3. 

Societv: Executive Committee Chair- 
man, 3. 





LESTER HERBERT REED 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

"Lester the Bopper," so dubbed by 
his day-student associates, is really not 
"Ivan the Terrible," as the pseudonym 
may imply. On the contrary, Lester's 
good disposition has earned the friend- 
ship of many students. Always with 
a ready laugh and a bit of repartee, 
he IS a welcome member at any of the 
gab-fests in the lower chamber. 

Lester is a pre-medical student, and 
takes his studies seriously, reading in- 
tensively of medical literature better to 
acquaint himself with the correct 
phraseology and terminology of his 
chosen profession. He is also ac- 
quiring quite a library of scientific 
literature. One of his pet hobbies is 
dissecting dogs in the anatomy lab. 
The other hobby is the girl friends — 
in a big way. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Band, 2, 3. 



[79] 




LUKE KINSEL REMLEY 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Biology 

Although he started late (having 
spent his freshman year at Juniata), 
Luke has made his stay here "Will- 
werth" the time. Luke's ready greet- 
ing and million-dollar smile have made 
him quite a favorite with the student 
body. 

Remley is one of our promising pre- 
med students, and is an ardent biolo- 
gist. He spends most of his hours at 
the college in the Biology lab, doting 
on anatomy. Luke really has ability, 
which, when properly applied and de- 
veloped, will combine with his most 
amiable personality to result in noth- 
ing less than an eminent M. D. 

His most enjoyed recreations are 
pinochle, bull-sessions, and handball. 
In all these, as in anything he attempts, 
he IS quite successful. More power to 
you, Luke! 

College: Juniata College, 1; German 
Club, 2; Chemistry Club, 2, 3. 

Class : Treasurer, 3. 



EARL SHERMAN RICE 
Annville, Pa. 
Business Administration 

A resident of Annville, Earl leads 
a mysterious life of his own in his 
native hamlet, and is a veritable erem- 
ite until the approach of spring. Then 
he emerges from his seclusion and ex- 
pends illimitable energy in rolling the 
tennis courts, which he maintains in 
ideal condition. 

There the sight of his smooth biceps 
rippling under deeply tanned skin 
arouses a chorus of admiring "ohs" 
and "ahs" from an audience of en- 
thusiastic co-eds. But Earl seems to 
have no time for the campus ladies, ex- 
plained perhaps by the aforementioned 
seclusion. Might there be feminine 
interests for this young man in the 
veiled portion of his existence? 

He spends the remainder of his col- 
legiate activity, apart from his indus- 
trious application to studies, perform- 
ing expertly upon the green baize of 
the "Y" room pool table. 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 




[80] 



ELIZABETH LOUISE SCHAAK 

Lebanon, Pa. 

English KAN; DKII 

Betty — the girl with the smile, the 
girl with the joke, the girl with the 
personality. How Betty manages to 
do all her work is a mystery to her 
friends, for in classes, as in everything 
else, she is able to produce the goods. 

Betty is active in Reader's Club as 
well as in the Green Blotter Club; 
she is a member of the debating team, 
where she shows her ability to substan- 
tiate her arguments: she displays her 
literary skill as a member of the "La 
Vie" and "Quittie" staffs. 

Nor can Betty's powers as a convcr* 
sationalist be ignored. Many times 
she has pleased her friends with an 
interesting discussion on any topic 
from cabbages to kings. 

College: Reader's Club, 2, 3: La 
Vie Collegienne, 3; History Club, 3; 
Green Blotter Club, 3, Secretary, 3; 
Third Sophomore English Prize. 

Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3: Hock- 
ey Team, 1, 2, 3, Captain, 2. 

Society: Editor of Olive Branch, 
2: Judiciary Committee, 3; Sigma 
Kappa Eta, 1, 2, 3. 





EDGAR BENDER SCHANBACKER 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Business Administration 

Schanbacker commutes daily from 
Lebanon, and as a consequence we do 
not see as much of him as we should 
like to see. "Eggs" usually is quiet 
and gains a great deal more by listen- 
ing to what goes on than by taking 
an active part in the arguments and 
discussions. 

At first glance one might be inclined 
to think that Schanbacker is not ath- 
letic, but a session on the basketball 
floor or the handball court would 
speedily set one right. Long hours of 
practice at the Lebanon "Y" have 
made "Eggs" a veritable connoisseur 
of indoor sports. Add to this his ability 
as shown in the exacting studies of the 
Business Ad. course, and you have the 
reason why his opinions are seriously 
considered by his classmates and fel- 
low day-students. 

CoJiege: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3. 



[81] 



.■'^. 




RICHARD DONALD SCHREIBER 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Pre-Medical ^AS 

Dick is a man of unexpected abil- 
ities, and possesses that seemingly an- 
omolous combination — genuine artis- 
tic appreciation and an amazing pas- 
sion for science. 

His artistic leaning is expressed 
chiefly through the medium of music. 
Every week-end finds Schreiber playing 
his assorted saxophones and clarinets 
until the wee small hours of the morn- 
ing — and people who should know 
claim that there is no better dance- 
band man in the county. 

Dick aspires some day to be a doc- 
tor, and to that end performs all kinds 
of mysterious experiments upon mal- 
odorous cats and fish. His natural 
calmness and capability, which will be 
a big asset to him in his medical career, 
at present earn for him the friendship 
and respect of all who know him. 

College: Band, 3: Chemistry Club, 3. 
Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 



JAMES HEBER SCOTT 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Chemistry 

"Cab Rudy George Duke Roger 
Will Noble" Scott. Yes, sir! All in 
one breath and then some. "Buster," 
as he is more intimately known, is our 
campus crooner, and an all-round in- 
strumentalist. He holds down a regu- 
lar berth in a Lebanon orchestra, be- 
ing featured as a vocalist as well as 
a sax player. Boy, oh boy! When he 
starts tearing on that old baritone 
"sassophone," Sweet Sue assumes un- 
precedented allurement. 

Jim is also interested in dramatics, 
taking important roles in Lebanon pro- 
ductions, though as yet he has not 
participated in a campus play. 

At school Jim is majoring in chem- 
istry, directing his efforts toward in- 
dustrial application of that science. But 
his personality and talent along the 
aforementioned social lines point to 
a successful career as a dance band 
director. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3. 




[82] 



WALTER CARL SHAFFER 
Johnstown, Pa. 
Business Administration 

Shaffer is one of our business men 
who is preparing to battle the depres- 
sion or perhaps be battled by it. He 
should be especially capable after hav- 
ing had several years experience before 
his college career. Moreover he has 
a start on most of his classmates, 
having come to college a married man, 
whence has arisen the name by which 
he is most popularly known, "Pop". 

Shaffer is a man whom one would 
like to know and yet is not quite able 
to understand. He expresses himself 
so sarcastically or so seriously that one 
many times is at a loss to discern 
whether he is in earnest or not. 

Shaffer is also a sport enthusiast, 
being in training for both football and 
basketball. 

Coliege: Commerce Club, 1, 1, 3: 
Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Football, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Tug o' War, 1, 2; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3. 





GEORGE DAVID SHERK 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Business Administration KA2 

George is a promising Business Ad- 
ministration student, and has hopes of 
being one of the nation's leading bank- 
ers. We hope that his ambitions are 
fulfilled so that some day "Sherkie" 
will be able to buy the Cadillac of his 
dreams. 

Sherk also has entered into many 
campus activities. He is a leader in 
his society, has been in many dramatic 
productions on the campus, and last, 
but not least, is circulation manager of 
"Quittie", a big undertaking for so 
small a piece of humanity as George. 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Mav Day Program, 1, 2: Y. M. C. A., 
2, 3: Delphian Anniversary Play, 3. 

Class: Treasurer, 2; Football, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1, 2; Scrap, 2: Quittapahilla 
Staff, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, I; Cor- 
responding Secretary, 2; Vice-Presi- 
dent, 3: Anniversary Play, 3; Judiciary 
Committee, 3. 



[.83] 




Musi< 



RICHARD S. SLAYBAUGH 
Biglersville, Pa. 



>J>A2 



Dick is one of the music students 
of the class and hails from the great 
apple section of Pennsylvania. He is 
a conscientious student and practices 
constantly in the conservatory. His 
ability in playing musical instruments 
ranges from blowing the giant bass 
horn to caressing the small and gentle 
vioUn. 

Besides being an accomplished vir- 
tuoso, Dick also has taken to the hobby 
of writing original musical selections 
and making arrangements for the or- 
chestra in which he plays. 

There are also the interests which 
a co-ed school can provide for a young 
man, and especially a young man with 
a Chevrolet. "Clothes make the man," 
they say, and the same could be re- 
marked for automobiles at a place 
where such articles are scarce. 

College: Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Glee 

Club, 1, 2, 3: Band, 2, 3: Y. M. C. A. 
Pianist, 2. 

Societv: Pianist, 2, 3. 



JOHN E. SLOAT 
Elijabethtown, Pa. 
Chemistry 

Sloat spent the first two years of 
his college life at Elizabethtown Col- 
lege, and when he decided to transfer 
his scholastic efforts to Lebanon Val- 
ley, the college gained an ardent 
worker. John is a chemistry major in 
the full sense of the word. Having 
enrolled in qualitative and quantitative, 
practically all his spare hours are spent 
in the chemistry lab. Sloat prides him- 
self on being among the first to get 
out his unknowns, and to solve anal- 
ytical problems. 

Of course John does not spend all 
his time in lab ("all work and no 
play," you know), and occasionally 
takes time out to toss a baseball or to 
indulge in the established day student 
pastime, pinochle. 

College: Elisabethtown, 1, 2. 




[84] 



ESTHER LOIS SMELSER 

Camp Hill, Pa. 

English -^A: 

Who says this world isn't a small 
place? Here we have a Japanese-born 
lady right in our midst. Tall, blonde, 
neat, and ready to defend her rights — 
that's Esther. One thing the women 
on this campus are still wondering 
about is how she keeps her hair in such 
perfect order when the winds are play- 
ing havoc with the other females' 
tresses. It must be love. Esther's ro- 
mance with a "twin" is of rather re- 
cent date, but it is flourishing as 
Spring advances. 

Esther is an active member of Read- 
er's Club, a staunch hockey player, 
and a student, not to mention her 
artistic accomplishments. With her 
abilities we feel sure that Esther will 
be a successful teacher, and our luck 
goes with her. 

College: Reader's Club, 1, 2, 3. 
Class: Hockey, 2. 
Society: Chaplain, 2, 3. 





ARTHUR GOOD SPICKLER 

Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Chemistry KAi: 

Spickler is another lad who trans- 
ferred from Elizabethtown to Lebanon 
Valley in his Junior year. As a chem- 
istry major he diligently pursues a 
course in qualitative. Art finds great 
pleasure in running unknowns. He 
likes to pretend that he is a detective 
searching for the clues that will lead 
him to an "A" in the course. 

Art enjoys the distinction of being 
the only bald-headed Junior in the 
class, though there are others on the 
way. In the day students' room he 
takes a "razzing" for his noble dome, 
but Art just laughs it off and refuses 
to be troubled with it. He is quite an 
affable character and to all who know 
him — "a peach of a guy." 

College: Elizabethtown, 1, 2; Chem- 
istry Club, 3. 



[85] 



■^. 







CARROLL SPRENKLE 
York, Pa. 
Biology 

Having chosen Biology as his major, 
"Sprenk" spends many hours in lab, 
delving into the secrets of botany and 
zoology. His earnest efforts in this 
field have been rewarded with a bi- 
ology assistantship. 

"Sprenk" is one of the outstanding 
athletes of our Junior class. He made 
his letters in both football and basket- 
ball in his second and third years. 
Playing right tackle on the varsity 
eleven, "Pidge" is a valuable man on 
defense and is quite capable of taking 
care of any man on the offense. As a 
center in basketball, "Sprenk" can 
cover the floor with the best of them. 

He is a lad who tries hard and 
accomplishes much and for whom a 
prominent place in later life is surely 
waiting. 

College: Men's Senate, 2, 3; "L" 
Club, 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer, 3; 
Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Biology Assistant, 3. 



JOHN JONES TODD, JR. 

Flushing, N. Y. 

Business Administration KAS 

"Toad" is the blond Adonis of our 
class — tall, muscular, handsome. A 
strong sense of humor is a comple- 
ment to Jack's more conventional con- 
servatism. He is a fortunate individual 
who has developed a well-balanced 
character and yet is a regular fellow 
who commands the admiration of his 
classmates. 

Jack IS a close student of economics 
and is continually keeping up to date 
with the latest in Wall street, Owen 
D. Young's theories, and all of inter- 
est in his chosen field. Such ambition, 
curiosity and good-will certainly merit 
success. 

College: Secretary-Treasurer Men's 
Senate, 3: Student-Faculty Council, 2; 
Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3; May Day 
Program, 1; German Cluh, 1: La Vie 
Collegienne, 3; Cheerleader, 3. 

Class: President, 3: Scrap, 1, 2; 
Tug o' War, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3. 

Societv: Vice President, 3: Re- 
cording Secretary, 2; Sergeant at arms, 
1; Anniversary Play, 1. 




EDMUND HENRY UMBERGER 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Mathematics "tA^ 

Hail to our editor! Edmund came 
to us from Lebanon High and in doing 
so made an immeasurable contribution 
to the potential abilities of our class. 
A cheerful friend, a willing worker, 
a shark in Mathematics, and an ac- 
complished musician, Umberger has 
gained the friendship and admiration 
of his classmates. There seems to be 
little rest for him from his numerous 
tasks, and even the charms of sleep 
cannot allure him when there is work 
to be done. 

When labors are slightly less in- 
sistent, handball proves quite inter- 
esting and Umberger enters into the 
sport with all enthusiasm. Expertness 
in checkers and chess he gains from 
an extensive library. We admire you, 
Ed, and we know that the greatest 
success is in store for you. 

College: Green Blotter Club, 3: 
Band, 3: Debating Team, 1, 2: La Vie 
Collegienne, 2, 3; Physics Assistant, 
3: Mathematics Priie, 1: English Prise, 
1. 

Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 





LEONARD VOLKIN 

Mount Pleasant. Pa. 

Chemistry KA2 

Captain Leonard is a hard charging 
football player, a brawny athlete in his 
gridiron togs and a gentleman in civ- 
ilian dress. "Joe's" cheery smile and 
his good nature that his fellow students 
are unable to ruffle have won him 
many college friends. 

He has applied himself to many 
fields and has enjoyed success as an 
athlete, student, and scientist. "Palook" 
seems to be one of the best-informed 
men on the campus, for he is able and 
willing to speak authoritatively on 
every subject which may arise. His 
conversations, which never lack wit, 
his quick mind and yearning for 
knowledge predict almost certain suc- 
cess. He expects to teach biology and 
coach winning teams some day — and 
we sincerely nope that fortune smiles 
on his efforts. 



1, 



3; "L" 



CoHcge: Football, 
Club, 2, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Tug o" 
War, 1. 




KENNETH SAMUEL WHISLER 

Hanover, Pa. 

Chemistry *A2 

"Ken" IS one of our chemistry ma- 
jors and has hopes of becoming a lead- 
ing industrial chemist. We believe 
that his ambitions may be realized, 
because he surely is a conscientious 
worker. 

is not snuffing up 
the dim retreats of 
he is enjoying the 
You can always de- 
to produce the 



When Whisler 
noxious fumes in 
the chemistry lab, 
bright side of life, 
pend on "Kenny 



necessary chuckles. He does more than 
his share to light up the third floor of 
the men's dorm. 

Aside from his mirth-provoking pro- 
clivities, Whisler is ambitious. How 
well we know this to be true, as he is 
the photographer for the "Quittie". 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day Program, 1, 2; Y. M. C. .A. 
Conference, 2, 3. 

Class: Scrap, 1; Tug o' War, 2; 
Junior Play Committee, 3; Quittapa- 
hiUa Staff, 3. 

Socxety: Anniversary Committee, 
2; Anniversary Play, 2; Sergeant at 
Arms, 1, 2, Secretary, 2. 



A. CHARLOTTE WEIRICK 

Enola, Pa. 

Mathematics KAN 

One of God's greatest gifts to man 
is good humor, and that trait shines in 
Charlotte. From morning to night 
every cloud is banished with her soft 
little giggle. Even after three years 
in college, Charlotte's sarcasm is well- 
rounded, without sting. No argument 
can enlist her support. However, when 
Charlotte is firmly convinced of right 
or duty, she stays on board until the 
ship sinks. 

Charlotte is also an all-around ath- 
lete. In her very first year, she showed 
her worth on the basketball floor. Since 
then she has defied competition, and 
also excels in hockey. 

With the good humor, determina- 
tion, and friends that her character 
assures for her, Charlotte is certain to 
find life and live it wherever she is. 

College: Y. W. C. A., 3: Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3: May Day Program, 1, 2. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3, Captain, 3; 
Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Societv: Anniversary Play, 2; Pian- 
ist, 1; Usher, 2; Recording Secretary, 
2. 




[88] 



RUSSELL LEEROY WILLIAMS 
Winfield, Pa. 
Education 

Praises are always sung of our ath- 
letes, but there is something more we 
can say of Russ than the regular order 
of encomia. Have you ever seen Russ 
after a particularly rough scrimmage? 
He just seems to grin and bear it, 
without losing his unconcerned smile. 
And have you seen him pick those 
passes out of the air? The class of 
'34 is proud of their football star. 

Williams' neighbors in the dormi- 
tory always are cheered by his merry 
laugh and his pleasant crooning. There 
is nothing gloomy about him, and his 
temperament can best be described by 
the old and much used phrase, "hap- 
py-go-lucky." Russ is a keen educa- 
tion student, and derives a savage de- 
light from mastering those courses. 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3: Basket- 
ball, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; "L" 
Club, 1, 2, 3. 





GLADYS WITHELDER 

Zerbe, Pa. 

Education KAX 

Aloof, imperturbable, and very 
much at ease in this complex world 
is Gladys. To some her life is a mys- 
tery; to those who are so extremely 
fortunate as to know her it is a de- 
lightfully romantic play. Her success 
on the campus, both scholastically and 
socially, is due mainly to her inval- 
uable trait of self-reliance. She is as- 
sured of her own ability to go a long 
way just as we are. Who besides 
Gladys could so charmingly teach us 
the lesson of poise and daintily con- 
trolled dignity? 

Do her interests vary? Oh my, yes! 
In a minute, she can become engrossed 
in anything from medicine to politics. 
These are some of the things that go 
to make life a gem of purest Ray 
serene for Gladys. 

College: Kutztown State Teachers 
College, I: History Club, 3. 

Societ\: Corresponding Secretary, 
3. 



[89] 



V. 



%,, 



*%. 




KATHRYN LOUISE WITMER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

English KAX; ::iKn 

Kathryn Louise is one of those all- 
round persons. As a student she ranks 
with the highest; as a friend she is one 
of the best — true-blue clear through. 
As a hostess — no one ever will for- 
get the delightful party she gave 
Reader's Club after "Mourning Be- 
comes Electra." 

At present she is preparing for a 
two-fold career, being interested in 
both teaching and library work, and 
serving as assistant librarian to gain 
experience in her chosen field. 

Did you ever see Kathryn Louise 
put jig-saw puzzles together? She is 
a wizard at it. With the same ease 
and rapidity, events are fitted into 
her life — a picture but partly finished 
which shows promise of becoming a 
rich and beautiful whole. 

Cofiege: Reader's Club, 2, 3; 
German Club, 2. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 

Society: Sigma Kappa Eta. 1. 2, 
3, Secretary, 2. 



MINNA ELLIOTT WOLFSKEIL 

Elizabeth, N. J. 

Business Administration AA2 

There is a strange kind of ink which 
leaves no trace. Only when the docu- 
ment is held to the fire is the writing 
evident. So in the world there are 
some folks who seem to be like all 
the other millions, but who, when the 
test comes, display most unusual qual- 
ities. To all eyes, Minna appears the 
woman of the world, moving with 
knowledge and quiet beauty. There 
seems to be nothing extraordinary in 
her assured capable manner. But in 
an instant this all changes. Minna 
drops her cloak of hard, calculating 
knowledge and becomes her real self 
with a definite goal and purpose. 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball, 1. 2, 3; May Day Program, 
1, 2: Art Club, 2, 3, President, 3; 
W. S. G. A., 3: Business Administra- 
tion Assistant, 3. 

Class: Secretary, 3; Hockey, 2, 3; 
Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 1, 
2; Warden, 1; Usher, 1, 2; Anniver- 
sary Committee, 3. 




[90] 



ROBERT DANIEL WOMER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Business Administration 

"A remarkable lad" is only one of 
the many ways in which we are able 
to describe him. Bob is one of our 
honor group, and, contrary to the gen- 
eral opinion of this type of student, 
is not continually hitting the books. 
He is one of those few so gifted as 
to gain practically complete apprecia- 
tion of a subject upon the first read- 
ing. Enrolled in the Business Admin- 
istration department. Bob is planning 
a career as a lawyer. His fitness for 
this type of endeavor is well displayed 
bv his splendid record in debating 
both in high school and in college. 
Here, due to his ability to comprehend 
the situation at hand, to think clearly 
and to express his ideas forcefully, he 
has gained success — a success that 
will continue. 



College: Debating Team, 
Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3. 



1, 





JOHN DAVID ZECH 

Spring Grove, Pa. 

Chemistry "tAS 

Spring Grove and the poultry busi- 
ness have done without this young 
man so that he might come to college 
to delve into the mysteries of chem- 
istry and biology. John has proved 
himself worthy of Spring Grove's hope 
and has mastered these sciences by 
inventing for the dictionary a new 
set of synonyms: study and Zech. 

Somewhere in the course of his 
three years in college, he has acquired 
the name "Captain," and captain he 
shall be in all his ventures, if he con- 
tinues in such accomplishments as his 
college work indicates. Moreover, we 
may say of John that chief among his 
likes is the saxophone, and among his 
dislikes, dates. John must surely win 
success for himself with such virtues. 

College: Band, 2, 3: Chemistry 
Club, 1, 2, 3: German Club, 1, 2; 
May Day Program, 1. 

Class: Basktball, 2, 3. 
Society: Sergeant at arms, 1. 



[91] 



XCPH€M€PC CLASS HISTOCy 

The year 1931 brought us, a new assortment of "greenies," to a higher institution 
of learning about which we had heard so much and knew so little. However, the class 
of '35 was soon to have numerous good times that can be found only in college life. 

Our first real experience came in what we were told was a "numeral fight". True 
freshmen, we started early to "clean up", but we soon found that the bitter always 
comes with the sweet. Tired, exhausted, disappointed because of futile searches for 
the "wise fools," we were virtually annihilated by a confident, stronger group. How- 
ever, we were not the sort who give up easily even though this first humiliation was 
followed by a heart-breaking defeat in the "flag scrap," and an undesired wetting 
in the tug-of-war, for we came back strong and gave our rivals a real drubbing in the 
football game. However our fellow under-classmen proved themselves to he of equal 
caliber, for they later defeated us in a well played nip-and-tuck basketball game. 

Our hike, although it was rudely interrupted by a seemingly starving group of 
"sophs," ended successfully. Society meetings, anniversaries, plays, recitals attracted 
many of our number to take an active part in them. Even examinations and quaran- 
tines failed to remove a spirit of friendship so very typical of our initial year. 

After summer vacation we still retained our fine spirit. This was displayed in 
our first inter-class test of the new year when we thoroughly humbled the "frosh" 
in the "numeral fight." We followed this with another victory in the "flag fight," 
and then valiantly held a much heavier Freshman football team to a scoreless tie. 
However, to pull double your weight into a stream is a far more difficult task, so we 
lost the tug-of-war. 

We have shown our ability to fight valiantly, and we have produced outstand- 
ing students m the field of athletics and in social and scholastic achievements; there- 
fore, we are confident that the class of '35 will continue to achieve great things and 
render valuable services to its "Alma Mater" during its remaining years. — G. H., '35 



[92] 




Sophomores . . . 




o 

< 

O 



[94] 




W.tnenVzev 



H. Grimm 



President 
"Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 
First Semester 



Second Semester 



Henry Palatini 

Charles Hauck 

Olive Kaufman 

Henry Grimm 



Charles Hauck 

Warren Mentzer 

Catherine Wagner 

Henry Grimm 



[95] 



CLASS Cr 1935 
C€$TER 



ALBERT ROBERT ANDERSON 
Roebling, N. J. 
Economics 



ka:; 



College: Men's Senate, 2: Y. M. C. A., 
2, Pianist, 2; Commerce Club, 1, 2, Secre- 
tary, 2. 

Class: President, 1. 

Society: Corresponding Secretary, 1. 



CASPER EDWARD ARNDT 
Annville, Pa. 
Business Administration 

College: Baseball, 1; Commerce Club, 1, 
2: Men's Senate, 1, 2. 

Class: Tug o' War, 1; Football, 1. 



GEORGE HENRY ARNOLD 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Business Administration 



RICHARD LEROY AX 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Mathematics ■i'Ai: 

Class: Basketball, I. 



STEWART JAMES BARTHOLD 
Shillington, Pa. 
Mathematics 

College: Football. 1, 2; Baseball, 1: Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2; "L" Club, 2. 
Class: Football, L 



FRANCIS XAVIER BAUER 
Myerstown, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 



GALEN BENJAMIN BAUGHER 

Hershey, Pa. 

Business Administration <I>A2 

College: Student-Faculty Council, 2: Re- 
serve Football, 1, 2: Commerce Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Football, 1: Basketball, 1, 2. 



Biology 



GUY ALLEN BEAVER 
Aristes, Pa. 



College: May Day Program, I 

Class: Scrap, 2: Basketball, 1: Tug o' 

War, 2. 



HERBERT ROY BLOUCH 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Bible 

College: Life Work Recruits, 1, 2. 



FRANK PATRICK BORAN 
Minersville, Pa. 
History 

College: Football, 1, 2: Baseball, 1; Men's 
Senate, 1, 2: "L" Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 



ANN ELIZABETH BUTTERWICK 

Annville, Pa. 
French AA2; 2KH 

College: May Day Program, 1. 

Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 

Society: Usher, 2: Sigma Kappa Eta, 1, 2. 



ELIZABETH ANN CARL 
Bayonne, N. J. 
History 

College: May Day Program, 1. 
Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 
Society: Usher, 1. 



KAN 



[96] 



THEODORE RAMON CASSELL 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2. 



MARSHALL ERNEST DIETZLER 
Lickdale, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 

College: Chemistry Club, 1. 2. 



ALICE HELENA COCKSHOTT 
Jamestown, N. Y. 



Mathematics 



KAN 



College: May Day Program, 1; Life 
Work Recruits, 1, 2: Y. W. C. A., 1. 

Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 

Society: Usher, 1; Chaplain, 2: Judiciary 
Committee, 2. 



FRANK THOMAS CULLATHER 

Minersville, Pa. 

Biology KA2 

Class: Football, 1, 2: Basketball, L 
Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Anniver- 
sary Committee, 2. 



CHARLES U. B. DAUGHERTY 

Dallastown, Pa. 

Bible and Greek ■t'A:: 

College: Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 
Treasurer, 1; Glee Club, I, 2; Orchestra, 1; 
May Day Program, 1. 

Class: Vice President, 1; Scrap, 1; Tug 
o' War, 2. 

Society: Chaplain, 1, 2: Corresponding 
Secretary, 2; Anniversary Play, 1. 



JAMES PHILIP DENTON 
Farmingdale, N. Y. 
Business Administration 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2. 



HELEN FRANCES EARNEST 

Lebanon, Pa. 

English KAN; SKU 

College: Debating Team, 2; May Day 
Program, L 

Society: Usher, 1; Olive Branch Editor, 
2: Sigma Kappa Eta, 1, 2. 



KENNETH MORGAN EDWARDS 
Pottsville. Pa. 
History 

College: Coe College, 1: Drew, 2: Life 
Work Recruits, 2. 



THOMAS C. EDWARDS 
Pottsville, Pa. 
English 

College: Wesleyan U.,I; Band, 2. 



ROBERT WILLIAM ETTER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Chemistry 

College: Chemistry Assistant, 2: Chem- 
istry Club, 1, 2; Debating Team, 1, 2. 



DAVID JAMES EVANS 
Annville, Pa. 
Chemistry 



ELIZABETH AMELIA FORD 
Trenton, N. J. 



French 



AAl 



ROSE KATHERINE DIETER 
Bogota, N. J. 



Mathematics 



KAN 



College: May Day, 1. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1; Usher, 1; 
Judiciary Committee, 2. 



Mu 



JOHN IRA FUNK 
Cleona, Pa. 



College: Band, 1, 2; Chorus, 2; Orches- 
tra, 2. 



[97] 



X. 



ROBERT CHARLES FURLONG 

Lykens, Pa. 

Education KA^ 

College: Football, 1 2; Glee Club, 1. 
Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 
Society; Anniversary Play, 1, 2; Coi 
responding Secretary, 2. 



SARAH ESTELLA HEILMAN 

Lebanon, Pa. 

French KAN; SKH 

College: May Day Program, 1. 
Class: Hockey, 2. 

Society: Usher, 2; Sigma Kappa Eta, 1, 
2, Secretary, 2. 



Music 



DORIS MAE GORRECHT 
Mount Joy, Pa. 



KAX 



College: Art Club. 2: May Day Program, 
1; Orchestra, 1, 2: Y. W. C. A., 1. 
Society: Pianist, 2. 



HELEN DOROTHY GRUSKO 
Garfield, N. J. 
English 



aa:: 



WILLIAM EDWARD GERBER 

Tamaqua. Pa. 

History <^A^ 

College: Band, I, 2: Orchestra, 1, 2. 



HENRY HAROLD GRIMM 

Annville, Pa. 

Chemistry "^X- 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2; Mathe 
matics Prue, 1: Chemistry Assistant, 2. 
Class: Treasurer, 2. 
Societv: Anniversary Play, 1. 



CHARLES LAWRENCE HAUCK 

Bayside, N. Y. 

Business Administration KA2 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2; May Day 
Program, 1. 

Class: Vice President, 2: President, 2: 
Scrap, 1, 2; Tug o'War, 1, 2. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1: Correspond- 
ing Secretary, 2. 



MICHAEL KANOFF 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Business Administration 



KAi; 



College: Commerce Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 
Tug o' War, 1, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Committee, 1 



1, 2; 



PETE PETCOFF KANOFF 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry KA2 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Football, 1, 2: Scrap, 1, 2; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2: Tug o' War, 1, 2. 



ELBRIDGE BRADBURY HARTMAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
English 

College: Drexel Institute, 1. 



GEORGE JOSEPH HILTNER 

Baltimore, Md. 

English *A2 

College: Band, 1, 2, Treasurer, 2; Green 
Blotter Club, 2: May Day Program, 1. 

Class: Basketball, 1: Scrap, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1; Sergeant 
at arms, 1. 



ERNEST HAROLD KOCH 

Mount Carmel, Pa. 

Music KA2 

College: Band, 1, 2: Orchestra, 1, 2. 
Class: Basketball, 1; Tug o' War, 2. 
Societv: Picnist, 1, 2. 



FRANCES WITWER KEISER 
New Holland, Pa. 



Latin 



KAX 



College: Y. W. C. A., 1, 2. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 1: Usher, 2. 



198] 



GEORGE GORGES KONSKO 

Palmerton, Pa. 

Chemistry KA^ 

Class: Football, 1, 2; Scrap, 1, 2: Bas- 
ketball, 1, ;. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2. 



OLIVE MARGARET KAUFMAN 

Lansdale, Pa. 

Chemistry JA^i; 

Coliege: Chemistry Club, 1, 2: May Day 
Program, 1: Y. W. C. A., 1; Eurydice, 1. 
Class: Secretary, 1, 2; Hockey, 1, 2. 
Society: Warden, 1; Pianist, 1. 



STANLEY ANSEL KING 

Hershey, Pa. 

Business Administration $A2 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Tug o' War, 1, 2; Scrap, 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2, 



BRISBON BOYD LANTZ 
New Cumberland, Pa. 
Education 

Coliege: Football, 1, 2: "L ' Club, 
Tennis, 1. 

Class: Football, 1. 



HOWARD ALBRIGHT LLOYD 
Hershey, Pa. 



Economics 



<:>A2 



College: Commerce Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Football, 1, 2: Basketball, 1, 2: 
Scrap, 1, 2: Tug o' War, 2. 



JOHN JACOB LIGHT 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Pre-Medical 



LESTER JOHN LINGLE 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Economics t{>Ai 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Scrap, 1, 2: Tug o" War, 1, 2. 



THEODORE KOHR LONG 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Prc-Mcdical 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2. 



CHARLES JAQUITH MEYER 
Elizabeth, N. J. 
Business Administration 

College: Commerce Club. 1, 2. 
Class: Scrap, 1, 2; Tug o'War. 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2. 

BELLE PENNINGTON MIDDACGH 

Camp Hill, Pa. 

Biology AAS 

College: Art Club, 1: Basketball, 2. 
Class: Vice President, 1: Hockey, 1, 2. 
Society: Basketball, 2. 

CLYDE HUGH MAGEE 

New Bloomiield, Pa. 

Chemistry 'f'AS 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2. 
Class: Football, 1; Basketball, I. 
Society: Anniversary Play. 1. 

MARY MAGDALENE MARCH 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

French AA2 

College: May Day Program, 1. 
Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 
Society: Warden, I. 

SARAH KATHARINE McADAM 

Lebanon, Pa. 

English KAX; ZKU 

College: Eurydice, 1; History Club, 2. 
Societv: Usher, 1; Critic, 2; Sigma 
Kappa Eta, 1, 2. 

WARREN FRANKLIN MENTZER 

Valley View, Pa. 

Bible and Greek KA2 

College: Y. M. C. A., 1, Secretary, 1; 

Baseball, 1; Life Work Recruits, 1, 2: Band, 
1, 2; Glee Club, 1. 

Class: Football, 2: Vice President, 2; 

Scrap, 2: Tug o" War, 1, 2. 

Society: Chaplain, 1, 2: Sergeant at 
arms, 1. 



[99] 



BRUCE MANNING METZGER 
Middletown, Pa. 

English *a: 



MARIETTA EUGENIA OSSI 
Garfield, N. J. 
Chemistry 



AA2 



College: N. Y. U., 1; Green Blotter 
Club, 2; La Vie Collegienne, 2; Assistant 
Manager Debating, 2; Reader's Club, 2; 
Chemistry Club, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2. 



LESTER FAIRFAX ROSS 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Bible and Greek "I-A: 

College : Life Work Recruits. 

Class: Football, I. 

Society. Sergeant at arms, 1. 



Music 



DALE HENRY ROTH 
Biglerville, Pa. 



•I-AS 



College: Indiana Central, 1; Life Work 
Recruits, 2; Chorus, 2; Band, 2. 



HENRY PALATINI 

Garfield, N. J. 
English *Ar 

College: La Vie Collegienne, 1, 2; 
Student-Faculty Council, 1; Reader's Club, 
1, 2; Delphian Anniversary Play, 1; Green 
Blotter Club, 2, Head Scop, 2. 

Class: Tug o' War, 2; Scrap, 2; Presi- 
dent, 2. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1: Editor, 2. 



FRANCIS STEPHEN ROTUNDA 

Annville, Pa. 

Chemistry KA2 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2. 
Class : Scrap, 1 . 



CASIMIR GEORGE RUDNICKI 
Plymouth, Pa. 
Physics 



College: Drexel Institute, 1. 



EMMA JANE REINBOLD 

Lickdale, Pa. 

KAX; 2KH 

College: German Club, 1, 2. 

Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 

Society: Sigma Kappa Eta, 1, 2. 



GERALD BERNARD RUSSELL 

Youngsville, Pa. 

Biology KAS 

Class: President, 1: Basketball, 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2; Tug o' War, 1: Scrap, 1. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1; Recording 
Secretary, 2. 



HENRY JACOB RICKER 

Carlisle, Pa. 

Pre-Medical KAl 

College: Reserve Football, 1: Baseball, I. 
Class: Football, 1, 2; Scrap, 2; Tug o' 
War, 2. 



CHARLES FRANCIS RUST 
Lansdowne, Pa. 
History 

College: Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2 
Baseball, 1; "L" Club, 1, 2. 



WILLIAM GEORGE ROSE 
Trenton, N. J. 
Chemistry 



College: Football 
"L" Club, 2. 



1, 



KA2 

Basketball, 1, 2: 



HARRY JOSEPH SCHWARTZ 
Ephrata, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 



ka: 



College: Drexel Institute, I. 
Class: Scrap, 2; Football, 2: Tug o' 
War, 2. 



100 



KENNETH CHARLES SHEAFFER 

New Bloomfield, Pa. 

Business Administration 'I'AZ 

College: Glee Cluh, 1; Chorus, 2: Com- 
merce Club, 1, 2; May Day Program, 1. 

Societv: Sergeant at arms, 1: Recording 
Secretary, 2; Anniversary Play, 1. 



MARGARET ISABEL WEAVER 

Harnshurg, Pa. 

Mathematics KAN 

College: W. S. G. A., 1. 

Class: Hockey, 1, 2. 

Society: Recording Secretary, 2. 



CHARLES WILBUR SHROYER 

Annville, Pa. 

Biology KAS 

College: Glee Club, 1: Chorus, 2. 
Class: Treasurer, 1. 
Society: Sergeant at arms, I. 

ALBERT JOHN SINCAVAGE 
Mmersville, Pa. 
History 

College: Football, 1, 2. 
Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 

PAULINE TILLIE SNAVELY 

Ono, Pa. 

German KAX 

College: German Club, 2: May Day Pro- 
gram, 1. 

Society: Sigma Kappa Eta, 1, 2. 

ALLEN WEIDNER STEFFY 

Wyomissing, Pa. 

History "tAi; 

College: History Club. 2; Y. M. C. A., 
1; May Day Program, 1. 

Class: Scrap, 1; Basketball, 1, 2. 
Society: Sergeant at arms, I, 2. 



HARRY CLAY WHITING 

Cape May Court House, N. J. 

History KAIS 

College: Football. 1, 2: Baseball, 1, 
Class : Football, 1 . 



CATHERINE LILLIAN WAGNER 

Annville, Pa. 
English .iAi) 

College: Reader's Club, 1, 2: May Day 
Program, 1; Life Work Recruits, I, 2. 

Class: Secretary, 2: Hockey, 1, 2. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 2: Anniver- 
sary Play, 2. 



DONALD EARL WALTER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 
Pre-Medical 



RICHARD LEHMAN WALBORN 

Millcrsburg, Pa. 

Business Administration •I>A2 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2; Band, 1, 
2, Vice President, 2; Orchestra, 1; Y. M. 
C. A., 1. 

Class: Tug o" War, 1; Scrap, I. 

Society: Sergeant at arms, 1, 2; Pianist, 2. 



WILLIAM HUNT SMITH 
Trenton, N. J. 
Business Administration 

College: Football, 1, 2; Baseball, 1; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2: Commerce Club, 1, 2; "L" 
Club, 2. 



DALE MARSHALL WAMPLER 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry KAS 

College: Albright, 1; Cheerleader, 2. 
Class: Tug o' War, 1; Football, 1. 



PHILIP UNDERWOOD 

Mmersville, Pa. 

Biology "JAS 

College: May Day Program, 1; Y. M. C. 
A., 1. 



JOHN EDMUND WITTER 
Newmanstown, Pa. 
Business Administration 

College: Baseball, I. 



[1011 



fCESHMAN CLASS HISTCRr 

One memorable week in September, 1932, brought one hundred and twenty- 
five new faces to the Lebanon Valley campus. Yes, the Frosh! We had come to 
spend four years preparing for a life's work, but little did we realize the difficulties 
ahead. Neither did we realize how short a time four years seem to be. 

\Vh;.t a. week that first was! Orientation tests — hard and tiring! "Y" entertain- 
iner.ts! Homesickness! Loneliness! 

Soon these things were driven into the background as the several societies and 
clubs on the campus invited us to attend their meetings and become members. Equally 
interesting and important was the development of the traditional rivalry between 
the Sophs and Frosh. The first contest between the two classes was the "numeral 
fight." After the classes had spent a night of hiding, waiting, chasing, and placing 
banners, morning found the Soph flags much in evidence. 

And then the flag rush. Grease, dirt, pushing, pulling. Many times we threat- 
ened, but finally the Sophs were victorious. 

However, revenge is sweet. Came the tug o' war. The Sophs were outweighed 
considerably and within a short time were twice pulled into the "Quittie." 

Ne.xt came the football game. Pre-game favorites, we met stern opposition, and 
had to accept a 0-0 dead-lock. 

Our next event was the hike to Mount Gretna. Good food! Good fun! 
Although the Sophs discovered our destination they could not spoil our evening. 

During the winter season we found ourselves occupied with many society func- 
tions, as plays and programs, and with athletic affairs as well. Our class basketball 
team, however, could finish no better than third m the inter-class league. 

We did not understand how upper-classmen could regard our Frosh days as so 
exquisitely happy, with the "Senate" and "Jiggerboard," and upper-classmen terrify- 
ing us constantly. But now that our hated dinks and berets will be seen but a short 
time, we too see that these have been happy days. 

We Frosh can well be proud of our first year at Lebanon Valley, and through 
the remaining years we shall earnestly endeavor to uphold the spirit of the school. 
— M. J. S., '36. 



11021 




Fresh 



men . . . 




< 

O 



[1041 




jt-RcVcr 




0. Sponau^le TTt^inOaltftOsKv C Gill an 

m 




R.HwVcr 



Cl.Heiscli 




S. By^rs 



fCESHMEN 



President 
Vice Preside)!! 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Assistant Treasurer 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 
first Se7nester 



Boyd Sponaugle 

Arthur Heisch 

Rae Anna Reber 

Richard Huber 

Louise Gillan 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Assistant Treasurer 



Second Semester 



Teddy Kowalewski 

Stewart Byers 

Rae Anna Reber 

Richard Huber 

Louise Gillan 



1105 



CLASS €r 1936 
C€STEC 



George Strickler Bachman 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Adam Gochenour Bigler 
West Willow, Pa. 

Louise Emaline Bishop 
Oberlin, Pa. 

Helen Jean Bitting 
Newport, Pa. 

J.AY Henry Bolton 

Linglestown, Pa. 

Herbert Harvey Bowers 
Harnsburg, Pa. 

Catherine Nancy Bowman 
Cleona, Pa. 

Ruth Elizabeth Bright 
Cornwall, Pa. 

Virginia Kathryn Britton 
Hershey, Pa. 

Stewart Gross Byers 
Greensburg, Pa. 

L.avinia Melissa Cassedy 
Budd Lake, N. J. 

Robert Cassel 

Woodbury, N. J. 

Mabel Chamberlin 
Ephrata, Pa. 

Leroy William Clark 
Johnstown, Pa. 

Ben Cohen 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Esther Romaine Daugherty 
Hanover, Pa. 

John Thurston Davis 
Jonestown, Pa. 

Catherine Elizabeth Deisher 
Jonestown, Pa. 



Beverley Estelle Delgado 
Hewlett, N. Y. 

Oleta Alva Dietrich 
Palmyra, Pa. 

Albert Shook Ebbert 
Biglerville, Pa. 

Robert Lamont Edwards 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Martha Priscilla Elser 
Penbrook, Pa. 

Anna Mary Erdman 
Hershey, Pa. 

Lester Page Eshenour 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Sylvia Charlotte Evelev 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Earl Beckley Fauber 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Edward Henry Faust 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Martin John Flinchbaugh 
Windsor, Pa. 

Anna Louisa Fr.\ncis 
Boyertown, Pa. 

Louis Paul Fr.^nk 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Evelyn Cecelia Frick 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Victor Paul Fridinger 
MiUersburg, Pa. 

John Fry, Jr. 

Annville, Pa. 

Mary Elizabeth Funk 
Cleona, Pa. 

Alice Louise Gillan 
Penbrook, Pa. 



[106] 



June Stauffer Gingrich 
Annville, Pa. 

Jack Stewart Glen 

Chambersburg, Pa. 

Dorothy Fear Grimm 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Carl Frederick Gruber 
Annville, Pa. 

Harry Gingrich Gruber 
Annville, Pa. 

Jay Howard Haldeman 
Lawn, Pa. 

Ger^aldine Joyce Harkins 
Cornwall, Pa. 

Bertha Wynne Harm 
Hershey, Pa. 

Samuel Schlough Harnish 
Witmer, Pa. 

Willis Howard Heffner 
Annville, Pa. 

Arthur Richard Heisch 
New York, N. Y. 

Dorothy Irene Heiser 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Vernon Cletus Hemperly 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Anna Mary Herr 

LandisviUe, Pa. 

Thomas J. Higgins 
Excelsior, Pa. 

Mark James Hostetter 
Annville, Pa. 

Lester Steiner Houtz 
East Berlin, Pa. 

Richard Light Huber 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Anthony August Jagnesak 
Emaus, Pa. 



Mary Alice Kauffman 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Irma Isabel Keiffer 

Elizabethville, Pa. 

Daniel Homer Kendall 
Hagerstown, Md. 

John William Kirkpatrick 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Robert Eichinger Koons 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

George Teddy Kowalewski 
Boonton, N. J. 

John William Kreamer 
Annville, Pa. 

Edward Hugo Krebs 
Annville, Pa. 

Raymond Heilman Kreider 
Cleona, Pa. 

Harry Lester Krone 
Thurmont, Md. 

Paul Edward Kuhlman, Jr. 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Harold Keller Kurtz 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Marian Estelle Leisey 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Charles Elmer Lesher 
Carlisle, Pa. 

Leon Jerome Levitz 
Lebanon, Pa. 

E.arl Chester Light 
Lebanon, Pa. 

John George Loos 
Reading, Pa. 

Sar.ah Margaret Lupton 
Winchester, Va. 

Hazel Jane March 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



fl07] 



Thelma Gene McCreary 
Dillsburg, Pa. 

Irvin Herr Meyer 
Annville, Pa. 

Lois Gwendolyn Miller 
Pennington, N. J. 

Edgar Plough Monn 

Chambershurg, Pa. 

John Henry Muth 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

Carl Elmer Nelson 
Milton, Mass. 

H-krold Hershey Niebel 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

Howard Harold Nye 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Raymond Patrizio 
Oakmont, Pa. 

William David Prescott 
Tower City, Pa. 

Joseph Wilbur Prowell 
Cly, Pa. 

Richard Carlton Rader 
Litit;, Pa, 

Calvin Henry Reber 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Rae Anna Reber 

Pine Grove, Pa. 

Theodore Neff Reese 
Stoylestown, Pa. 

Louvain Ruth Roberts 
Harnsburg, Pa. 

Donald Oscar Sandt 
Emaus, Pa. 

Ross Leslie Saunders 
Harnsburg, Pa. 

Robert Jacob Sausser 

Schuykill Haven, Pa. 



Miller Samliel Schmuck 
York, Pa. 

Jack Hartman Schuler 
Lebanon, Pa. 

George Edward Shadel 
Minersville, Pa. 

Carl Wilbur Shank 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

Louise Adaline Shearer 
Caldwell, N. J. 

Mary Jane Shellenberger 
Mountville, Pa. 

Robert Hamilton Sholter 
Harnsburg, Pa. 

Jane Elizabeth Showers 
Mountville, Pa. 

Winona Winifred Shroff 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Christine Anna Smith 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Boyd Laymon Sponaugle 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Coda Welford Sponaugle 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Charlotte Louise Stabley 
Red Lion, Pa. 

Mary Virginia Summers 
Waynesboro, Pa. 

Helen Hummer Summy 
Manheim, Pa. 

Robert Benjamin Troxel 
Jonestown, Pa. 

Henry Miller Uhler 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Iva Claire Weirick 
Enola, Pa. 

Ruby Leona Willwerth 
Ephrata, Pa. 

David John Yake 
Lebanon, Pa. 



[1081 




z 

N 
Z 





-^ 



V 



■■'-A. V 

. ■ X;. ■■■ 



[m^pP==*W^ 




PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 
Motto: "Esse Quam Videre." Colors: Old Gold and Navy Blue. 



Chester Goodman 
Harry McFaul 
DwiGHT Grove 
Kenneth Sheaffer 
J. Allan Ranck 
James Hughes 
Charles Daugherty 
Henry Palatini 
Charles Kraybill 
Richard Slaybaugh 
Richard Walborn 



Anniversary President 

President 

Vice President 

Correspoyiding Secretary 

Recording Secretary 

Chairman Exec. Committee 

Critic 

Chaplain 

Editor 

Treasurer 

Pianist 

Sergeant at arms 



Samuel Ulrich 

Woodrow Dellinger 

Clyde Mentzer 

Charles Daugherty 

David Thompson 

DeWitt Essick 

. Charles Kr.wbill 

. Paul Emenheiser 

Allen Steffy 

. Charles Kraybill 

. Richard Walborn 

Samuel Harnish 



Sixty-six years ago, the Philokosmian Literary Society came into existence. Its 
motto, "Esse quam videre," shows the true spirit of the society even better than its 
long list of achievements. 

Philo combines the literary, spiritual, and social in its yearly program. Speeches, 
essays, musical numbers, et cetera, are features of its regular literary programs. 
Socially, Philo cooperates with the girls' societies in several joint sessions a year. 



1110] 




CLICNIAN LITECACy rCCIETT 



Motto: "Virtute et Fide.' 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



Colors: Gold and White. 



Miriam Owen 
Jane Muth 

Margaret Longenecker 
Haidee Blubaugh 
Margaret Early 
Miriam Book 
Anne Matula 
Christine Gruber 



Anniversary President 

President 

Vice President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Critic 

Chaplain 

Treasurer 

Editor of Oiit'e Branch 



Margaret Kohler Pwnist 



. BCathryn Lutz 

Sophia Morris 

Helen Eddy 

Margaret Weaver 

Gladys Withelder 

Sar-IiH McAdam 

Lena Cockshott 

Martha Kreider 

Helen Earnest 

Margaret Early 



In 1872, several girls of the college, feeling the need of a literary organization, 
organized the Clionian Literary Society. During the past sixty-two years, Clio has 
always striven to uphold the cherished traditions and high ideals e-xpressed in its 
motto — Virtute et Fide. 

Clio's meetings attempt to combine something of the spiritual, literary, and social 
elements, as is shown in the readings, talks, musical numbers, original skits, et cetera. 
These are always enjoyable affairs. 



[lilj 




rALOZETEAN LITECACT SCCIETT 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 
Motto: "Palma non sine Pulvere." Colors 



Walter Krumbiegel 
Jack Todd 

Charles Furlong . 
Albert Anderson 
Earl Hoover 
Darwin Willlard . 
Allen Buzzell 
Ernest Koch 
George Konsko 
Gerald Russell 
Warren Mentzer . 



Anniversary President 

Preside?it 

Vice President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Critic 

Treasurer 

Chaplain 

Pianist 



J 



Senjeants at Arms 



1 



Red and Old Gold. - 

Darwin Willlard 

WiLLLAM Barnes 

George Sherk 

Gerald Russell 

Charles Hauck 

. George Klitch 

Darwin Williard 

Warren Mentzer 

Ernest Koch 

Stewart Byers 

Carl Nelson 

Robert Sausser 



Again the Kalozetean Literary Society has enjoyed a successful year. Again 
it has furthered the new social order which it was instrumental in introducing to the 
campus. Remembering that a break from the strict literary traditions of the society 
was inevitable, Kalo has planned toward more modern undergraduate activities, at the 
same time remembering the wholesome ideals of her founders. The goal has been 
set far in advance, but by earnest elfort and cooperation, Kalo will attain it. 



1112] 




DELPHIAN LITEKAPy SCCIEXr 



Motto: "Know Thyself.'' 



Dorothy Forry 
Marion Kruger 
Verna Grissinger 
Arline Heckrote 
Ruth Agen 
Kathryn Mowrey 
Dorothy Jackson 
Jane Bricker 
Helen Grusko . 
Dorothy Ely 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Anniversary President 

President 

'Vice President 

Corresponding Secretary 

Recording Secretary 

Critic 

Chaplain 

Treasurer 



Wardens 
Pianist 



Colors: Scarlet and Gold. 

Marion Kruger 

Marion Kruger 

Arline Heckrote 

Gem Gemmill 

Dorothy Ely 

Gloria LaVanture 

Esther Smelser 

Dorothy Jackson 

Hazel March 

June Gingrich 

Charlottee Stabley 



Delta Lambda Sigma has always endeavored to live up to her motto "Know 
Thyself," and by so doing, to help her members to know each other more intimately, 
and to create a spirit of friendship and cooperation. Delphian has had many novel 
programs during the year, which encouraged the development of originality and 
leadership. The eleventh anniversary was celebrated by a play and formal dance. 
Delphian members hope that under the protection and guidance of her oracle, the 
society may go still further. 



1113] 



X, 




XIG/HA i\At)P/l ETA 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Miriam Miller 

Anna Krebs 

Sarah Heilman 

Elizabeth Schaak 



Sigma Kappa Eta, an organization including all women day students, was organ- 
ized during the 1930-31 school term. The name, Sigma Kappa Eta, is derived from 
three Greek letters, meaning, "associating day hy day." 

This organization is an expression of the girls' desire to learn to know each other 
through a medium different from that of the regular classes. The club originated 
with the intention of creating a bond of unity between the day students and those 
living in the dormitories. Formerly the commuting students knew their resident 
college mates only through occasional contacts in the classrooms and the campus. 
Sigma Kappa Eta attempts to make the day student feel that College life is more 
than mere attendance at classes. The organization cooperates with the Women's 
Student Government Association by means of a committee on Rules and Regulations. 

The club, although one of the infant organizations on the campus, has iine aims, 
and it is to be hoped that with the passing years its goals will be realized. 



114 




XTLDENT-rACLLTy CCLNCIL 

The Student-Faculty Council is an existing, although rather obscure organisation. 
Its object is the arbitration of questions arising on the campus between the two groups 
which its name signifies. The Faculty is represented by a committee appointed for 
that task. The representative body for the students is composed of an elected 
member of each class, and the presidents of the two student goversment bodies. 

In the course of the school year, there is a great possibility of discussing and 
attaining mutual agreements upon many social, scholastic, and disciplinary problems 
of the campus. This council is a bond between student and faculty, which, if exercised 
properly, is of great value. Nothing can insure the success of a college so much as a 
harmonious relationship between all the individuals and groups concerned. The 
Student-Faculty Council deserves support and attention, not only as the "Committee 
of Complaints," as it has been called, but also as a positive means of promoting 
good- will. 



115] 




a.EbWert- 



1116] 



MEN'S XCNATE 

The conduct of male students of Lebanon Valley College is directed by the 
Men's Senate. Nominated by the faculty, the members are elected by the popular 
vote of their respective classmates. It is an organized body, proportionally representing 
the four classes, and endeavoring to maintain a high standard of gentlemanly conduct 
on the campus. 

Fifteen men compose the personnel of the Men's Senate and officers are elected 
from the members. There are six Seniors, five Juniors, three Sophomores, and one 
Freshman. Each of the three upper classes is represented by a day student. In 
addition, three members of the faculty compose the Faculty-Senate committee, which 
aids the Senate in its administration. 

Of late, petty Freshman rules have been abolished. Those remaining are regu- 
lations thought necessary by the Senate to help the new students become accustomed 
to life on the campus. Penalties imposed by this group for infraction of the rules 
are limited by its constitution, and are subject to faculty approval. 

The Senate works with the interests of the students constantly in mind. They 
had several major offenses to cope with this year, but the successful and tactful way 
in which they handled these cases proves, beyond all doubt, the value of this organ- 
ization. 

Cooperation is a most important element in assuring the success of student govern- 
ment. An understanding is necessary if the Senate is to act efficiently as a repre- 
sentative of the male students. It is therefore necessary for the student body and 
Men's Senate to cooperate as much as possible in order to make certain the perman- 
ence of student government at Lebanon Valley College. 



1117) 



^; 



x. 




^.&atrner 



J.muVU 



3, Shcllenbcrger 



[lis] 



>V. $. G. A. 

The Women's Student Government Association is a governing body of nine 
members, whom the girls have elected to represent them in college affairs which 
necessitate the regulated conduct of students. 

Student government aids in the promotion of invaluable training in good 
citizenship, high ethical standards, and lofty levels of integrity among the girls in the 
college. One of the chief aims of student government is to achieve social harmony 
on the campus. This can be gained only by recognizing and respecting the privileges 
of associates, and by realizing one's duty to society. 

Every girl in the student body automatically becomes a member of the W. S. G. A., 
to which she pledges her allegiance. This membership requires that each girl attend all 
of the association meetings, and that she conduct herself in conformity with the 
highest moral and ethical standards of society. 

The association delegates its legislative and executive powers to a group com- 
posed of nine members: five Seniors, two Juniors, one Sophomore, one Freshman. 
The board is aided by an advisory committee consisting of three female members of 
the college faculty, chosen by that group. With the aid of this committee, the board 
strives to maintain order and decorum in the dormitory, in buildings, on the campus, 
in the town, and to encourage a high order of conduct and social relationship on the 
campus. 

The W. S. G. A. has been an active organization since 1915. However, it needs 
the cooperation and confidence of the girls as a whole to make it a continued success- 
ful and effective institution. 



119 




S. Uli-ich 



C.Goodman 



a. Cln4erson 

p. arxlst 



p. EttuJoheiser 




T ma 



G.Shcrt^ 



ttUHitx 



[1201 



•-as 



y. M. C. A. 

The Y. M. C. A. of Lebanon Valley College is an organuation which exists for 
the benefit of the male students. It endeavors to develop the spiritual life of the 
individual in order that there may be a Viiell-rounded life. This organization has been 
active since 1887, not only in local campus activities, but also in intercollegiate aifairs. 

Each Sunday evening, devotional meetings, or vespers, are conducted; and once 
a month joint sessions are held with the Y. W. C. A. The Y. M. C. A. endeavors 
to promote the social life by sponsoring hikes, parties, and other social events. The 
"Big Brother" movement aids the new students on the campus in becoming acclimated, 
and it also helps to form closer contacts between the new students and the faculty. 
This movement often creates sincere friendships and offers of service, which help 
the new students feel perfectly at home in the college family. 

The purposes and aims of this organisation as set forth by its founders are lofty 
indeed. The Y. M. C. A. endeavors to lead students to a faith in God through 
Jesus Christ. Special emphasis is laid on the joy that comes from living the Christian 
life. It strives to increase growth in Christian faith and character, especially through 
the study of the Bible, prayer, and through a reasonable way of thinking. 

During the past year a pool table and radio have been installed m the new "Y" 
rooms to provide the students with enjoyment in their leisure moments. As a place 
for recreation of a light type, the "Y" rooms are certainly filling a long-felt need. 



[121] 




S.nicrvts 

TreasMfer 



y.^VX.A 



tn.ChrisHansCti 

\), Pres. 




xnXoagetiec^pe 



[122] 



y. w. c. A. 

All girls, when they register at Lebanon Valley, become members of the Y. W 
C. A., an association whose purpose primarily is to spread the spirit of Christianity 
love, sacrifice, and fellowship. 

The Y. W. C. A. takes an active part in many social functions. Some of the 
most important to which the "Y" lends its support are the reception for the new- 
students, and the Hallowe'en party. Besides, it sponsors the annual autumn hike 
for all the students, as well as the teas for the girls of each class. 

It is the duty of the "Y" to see that life on the campus is well balanced. Its 
activities are not merely confined to the social, but enter the spiritual and intellectual 
fields as well. At different intervals throughout the year, the Y. W. C. A. joins 
with the Y. M. C. A. in presenting special religious programs in the chapel. On all 
other Sunday evenings the Y. W. C. A. holds its regular Friendly Hour vesper serv- 
ices. By these two types of meetings the "Y" helps to instill into the lives of the 
students a deeper spiritual appreciation. 

The largest project undertaken by the "Y" is the May Day pageant. Another of 
great importance is the student project to help maintain a college in Africa. Equally 
important is the annual bazaar which offers many attractive gifts to the shopper. 

Thus the Y. W. C. A., always striving to help build fine, upright characters, 
leads the girls toward a Christ-centered life. 



[1231 



V 




President 
Vice President 
Treasurer 
Drum Major 



CAND 



Theodore Walker 

Richard Walborn 

George Hiltner 

Fred Lehman 



Our band is one of the greatest sources of pride to Lebanon Valley College. The 
band is of the highest calibre, and is not an ordinary organization by any means. They 
can play martial airs for athletic contests equally as well as they can perform concert 
numbers. . 

It consists of thirty-six members and is well rounded in every aspect. The 
members make an especially fine appearance in their handsome blue uniforms trimmed 
with white. 

Though still an infant organization, the band already has earned a wide reputation. 
Much of this is due to the capability of the director, Professor Rutledge. Moreover, 
the members contribute to its success by way of experience and unusual talent. While 
their music has always been of the highest type, they have augmented their reputation 
by excellent marching, which won first prize for them among the musical organizations 
in the Hallowe'en parade at Lebanon. 

The band is vital to the promotion of school spirit at pep meetings and at the 
game itself, and it is hoped that, with such an excellent start, they will grow and 
flourish. 



[124] 




CRCHESTCA 



Director, PROFESSOR E. P. RUTLEDGE 



Although organized only a few years ago, the orchestra has already become a 
musical organization of which Lebanon Valley may well he proud. From its small 
beginning it has grown steadily, until today it numbers forty-nine pieces, with indi- 
cations that It will continue to grow, since the conservatory has been fully accredited. 

The increase in numbers has brought a wider variety of instruments. Among the 
new pieces are a harp, a bassoon, French horns, violas, string basses, and flutes — all 
of which are found in a regular symphony orchestra. The orchestra is a capable 
group of musicians, handling symphony as well as any other kind of music, a fact 
which they demonstrated in their concert before the Easter holidays. 

The forward strides of the orchestra have been greatly due to the efficient train- 
ing and directing under the baton of Professor Rutledge, and also to the unusual 
abilities, and increased interest and attendance on the part of the members. 



[125 I 




CUCCUS XNW) GLEE CLUE 

Director, PROFESSOR E. P. Rutledge 

A comparatively new organization on the campus of Lebanon Valley is a chorus 
of mixed voices. This organization of sixty-eight members was formed under the 
tutelage of Professor Rutledge as a part of the Conservatory of Music's program, and 
offers a full semester hour's credit each year. 

The mixed chorus has attempted to unite the talent of both the conservatory and 
the regular college students. It is not necessary for its members to have had voice 
training. Ability to read music is the principal requisite. 

From the mixed chorus has come Lebanon Valley's new vested choir, which may 
indeed be called the "'cream of the crop." This organization is a selection of the 
finest voices of the original chorus. It has toured several parts of the state during 
the year, and has presented excellent concerts in various cities. The mixed chorus 
itself has performed before Lebanon Valley students in a chapel exercise, and during 
the Christmas program. These two clubs, with their talent, are destined to do great 
things, and gain future success. 



[126] 




ACT CLLC 



President 
Secretary 



Minna WolfsKeil 
Dorothy Jackson 



Among the survivals of the myriad of clubs, cliques, et cetera, that have been 

organized on our campus during the recent years, stands out one in particular the 

Art Club. With a bit of the spirit that once moved the ancients to abolish the hard 
lines of meager necessity, and to add grace and beauty to their everyday surroundings, 
this enterprising group has attempted to improve the many plain, or perhaps unsightly, 
places of the students" acquaintance. 

Since its organization, the club's activities have been constantly broadening and 
developing. This year, the club was responsible for the novel Christmas decorations 
which brought forth admiration to a high degree. This developed a desire on the part 
of the members of interior decorating, which now occupies the field of attention. 
Many new and varied projects are planned for the remainder of the year. After all 
is said and done, art is self-expression whether it be in the fantastic shapes used in 
jig-saw puzzles, or in the actual sketching of designs by hand. 



1127 




READER'S CLUE 



President 
Wice President 
Secretary -Treasurer 
Faculty Adviser 



Clarence Early 

Mae Fauth 

MiRLAM Owen 

Dr. p. a. W. Wallace 



The Reader's Club is indebted to Dr. P. A. W. Wallace for its origin. It was 
organized in October, 192.S. The club meets bi-monthly and informally in the com' 
fortable living room of Dr. and Mrs. Wallace's home. 

These meetings provide an opportunity for students, interested in literature, to 
become acquainted with the fine works of authors of other countries, as well as the 
works of American authors, and the various fields of literary style in America. Here, 
students are free to give self-expression to their ideas concerning certain authors and 
their style. Interesting discussions concerning modern literature, Canadian, Scandinav- 
ian, Oriental, and negro literature are presented each year. Humor also comes in for 
a full evening's discussion. This year a new type of program was introduced when the 
writings of alumni, professors, and students were reviewed. 

The Reader's Club has always been interested m dramatics, and on several 
occasions some of the members attended plays at Harrisburg and Reading. Walter 
Hampden was seen in "Cyrano de Bergerac" and "Caponsacchi". Eugene O'Neill's 
"Mourning Becomes Electra" was also presented at Harrisburg, while "Green Pas- 
tures" was viewed in Reading. 



[1281 




GCCEN CLCTTCR CLUE 



Head Scop 

Keeper of the Word Horde 

Adviser 



Henry Palatini 

Elizabeth Schaak 

Dr. G. G. Struble 



The "Green Blotter" is the infant club of the campus, having been organized 
only in November, 1932. After securing the permission of the Activities Committee, 
and the services of Dr. Struble as adviser, the club was organized with a membership 
of twelve, representing the three upper classes. Two boys and two girls were selected 
from each of these classes. The Freshmen members were chosen through open compe- 
tition in short time. 

The club has a two-fold purpose: first, to stimulate literary activity on the 
campus; second, to improve the writing ability of its members. Writing of all types 
is encouraged among members, and is constructively criticized by the club. 

Despite the short span of its existence, the Green Blotter Club has already fostered 
a poetry contest open to all students, and has also published a supplement to "La Vie 
CoUegienne." The "Inkspots" engaged in the production of a play written by one 
of its members. These are but a few of the many things the organization has already 
accomplished, which make a splendid future predicable. 



1129 




INTECCCLLEGIATE 
DEBATING TEA^S 

WOMEN'S TEAMS 

Ajfirnidtivc: T^egatrje 

Betty Schaak Marian Leisey Kathryn Mowrey Helen Earnest 

Louise Gillan Winona Shroff Helen Eddy Sylvia Evelev 

Managers — Minna WolfsKeil and Helen Lane 

MEN'S TEAMS 

A.jfirmdtive T^egative 

Allen Buzzell Ray Johnson Gerald Heilman Robert Etter 

Chester Goodman Stuart Byers Robert Womer Calvin Reber 

Managers — Charles Kraybill and Clyde Mentzer 

The debating club is one of the outstanding organisations on the campus. It 
offers an excellent opportunity for those students who are interested in forensic 
activities. The quality of debating at Lebanon Valley always has been of the highest 
rank, and this year the club has by no means missed the mark. The question for 
debate this year was, Resolved : That all intergovernmental World War debts, in- 
cluding reparations, should be cancelled. Under the capable direction of the coaches. 
Professors Stokes and Stevenson, both the affirmative and negative teams prepared 
strong arguments. Their ability has been proved by the marked success they have 
achieved this year. 



11301 



n 




msTCcy CLUE 



President 
Vice President 

Secretary 



DeWitt M. Essick 

Kathryn M. Mowrey 

Arline Heckrote 



Ever since its organization five years ago, the History Club has grown and 
flourished on the campus. Its regular members include all prospective teachers of 
History, though other students are always invited, and often attend the meetings. 

One primary aim of the club is to acquaint the student with the details and 
particulars of the many important current topics. It seeks to link the past with the 
present, or, in a different sense, to connect and relate the facts of the textbook to 
those of the modern newspaper. Subjects of national and international interest are 
discussed. In all considerations, an attempt is made to gain the impersonal view- 
point, rather than a prejudiced and biased outlook. 

Participation in its programs gives the speaker good practice in public speaking, 
besides developing the habit of individual thinking. To that extent active student 
participation m the discussion periods is especially encouraged. 

Though not quite as regular in its meetings the past year, nevertheless the club 
exerted a beneficial influence on the campus. Much of its success is due to its capable 
adviser. Professor Stevenson. 



[131] 



PTv^S^JOT^Sr, 




CHEMISTCr CLUB 



President 

Vice President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Norman Hemperly 

Richard Holstein 

John Zech 



In the spring of 1929 the Chemistry Club was organized under the supervision 
of Dr. Bender. Although of comparatively recent origin, the club has made rapid 
strides forward, and today it is one of the largest in the school. Its membership 
consists of those students majoring in chemistry, and of others interested in that 
science. 

It meets monthly and has as its purpose the accomplishment of a four-fold ob- 
jective. The first aim is to discuss new discoveries in the field of chemistry and 
their application in industry. The second objective is to give members training in 
speaking before a group of students. The third aim is to have prominent men from 
the field of industrial chemistry address the group. The fourth project of the or- 
ganization is to visit neighboring industries and there to see, as well as to study, 
the application of chemistry. These trips always prove interesting and beneficial 
to all chemistry students. Actual observation helps create the impression of reality 
and connection between the material in the textbook and the practical use. 



1132] 




DEC DEUTSCHE VEDEIN 



President 
Vice President 
Secretar \ -Treasurer 



LUELLA HeILMAN 

Mae Fauth 
Emma Fasnacht 



The students desiring to stimulate interest, both socially and mentally, in the 
German race and to promote fellowship between German and English-speaking 
peoples, organized the German club in May, 1930. Its membership includes those 
students who are interested in the German language, literature, and customs. At 
the bi-monthly meetings literary programs are presented and the works of German 
writers discussed. Keen interest is shown in singing German songs and in arousing 
kindred feelings and emotions. To German majors and minors the club is especially 
serviceable since it increases their speaking knowledge of German and acquaints them 
with the past and present history of Germany. In these days of increased world 
travel and fellowship among nations, a club such as "Der Deutsche Verein" has a 
vital function in fitting college students with a more comprehensive understanding 
of true international and cosmopolitan life. 

This "Der Verein" accomplishes by careful reports at the meetings on the 
problems confronting the German people and the relations between the German and 
English-speaking nations. 



[133] 




LITE >V€Cr CECCUITS 



President 
"Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 
Pianist 



Harry Zech 
Ruth Coble 

Thomas May 
Lester Ross 

Melvin Hitz 



The Life Work Recruits are a group of students who plan to devote their Hves 
to Christian work. They have heard the call of Christ to service, and have decided 
to accept it. Now, as His followers, they intend going forth into the world to give 
Christian help and advice to all those less fortunate. 

As an organization at Lebanon Valley, their object is to develop a spiritual life 
on the campus. Each year they pursue an intensely active program. Regular weekly 
meetings are held in North Hall parlor, at which time prominent speakers appear 
before the group to deliver inspirational messages. Open forums form an important 
part of their programs. The organization also provides for personal interviews with 
religious leaders whenever they appear on the campus. Several times the group has 
sent a deputation team or squadron into the nearby counties to conduct regular 
church services. 

Through their ministry on the campus and elsewhere, the Life Work Recruits 
are gaining valuable training for a life of active Christian service. 



134 




VACSITT 



** ■ 99 



CLUC 



President 
'Vice President 
Secretary -Treasurer 



■ Lee Stone 

Leonard Volkin 

Carroll Sprenkle 



The "L" Club has been an active organization on the campus ever since it came 
into existence in 1922. Ralph Homan, an outstanding athlete of that year, was in- 
fluential in getting the club started, and served as its first leader. Since then it has 
grown under other capable leaders and now numbers on its roll every prominent 
athlete. 

To gain membership, the applicant must have won his varsity letter in one of the 
three major sports — football, baseball, and basketball. To be a member of this club 
is the desire of every athlete. As might be expected, this results in increased eifort 
on the athlete's part to gam a position on any varsity team, and thus the teams reach 
more efficient levels. 

While one purpose is to gain harmony and co-operation among the varsity ath- 
letes and promote their athletic and social interests, equally important is the sponsor- 
ing of the inter-class basketball league for the male students. The club also helps to 
iill in the social needs of the students at large by sponsoring several dances throughout 
the year. 



1135 




CCM/HECCE CLLC 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



William Barnes 

Allen Buzzell 

Albert Anderson 

Louise Shearer 



A short time ago the Commerce Club was organized by the Business Admin- 
istration students of Lebanon Valley College. Then but a small organization, it has 
grown to be one of the largest on the campus. 

The purpose of this club is to acquaint the student with present business acti- 
vities and developments in the world of finance and industry. In carrying out this 
aim, it has secured prominent men of this locality to address the organization. Mr. 
Moyer, well-known Lebanon lawyer, and Mr. Freas of Newburger, Loeb 5? Co., stock 
brokers, are two of the speakers that have appeared on the programs. Mr. Fitz- 
gerald, Vice Chairman on the Committee on Public Relations of Eastern Railways, 
frequently appears as a speaker before the Commerce Club. 

Informal gatherings are held in which students ask questions which are answered 
and discussed by the speaker of the evening. 

Through the elforts of the officers and advisers, plans are being made to have 
some nationally-known figures visit our campus and discuss vital economic matters 
with the members of the Commerce Club. 



1136 



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[138] 



LA VIC CCLLEGIENNC 

The Undergr-aduate Nevv'spaper of Lebanon Valley College 

Published Every Thursday of the College Tear 

Member of the Intercollegiate Newspaper Association of 
the Middle Atlantic States 

La Vie CoUegienne of 1933 is the outgrowth of the college paper of 1888. 
That year saw the first weekly publication by the students at Lebanon Valley. In 
the course of these years. La Vie CoUegienne has made rapid strides, developing 
from a simple, small issue into its modern form. 

The success of this paper has been due largely to the efforts of its capable 
editors. Aiding them have been competent and faithful stalf members. Their co- 
operation in the past has brought forth the modern La Vie, which, as an example 
of student journalism, is worthy of comparison with any other college papers, and 
even with those of smaller cities. 

La Vie IS really the voice of Lebanon Valley. It contains all the news of the 
campus, describing the scholastic, social, and athletic activities in each issue. It 
discusses not only current campus topics, but also presents in special columns, a 
glimpse of the outer world's current topics, as well as a summary of the interests 
of other schools. 

Another important function of La Vie is to keep alumni in touch with the acti' 
vities at the college, and keep the students informed of the work that various alumni 
are doing. 

La Vie is a vital part of campus life. It represents the students and welcomes 
any literary contributions or helpful suggestions for betterment. 




[140] 



THE €LITTAPAHILL/1 

The Year Book of Lebanon Valley College 
Published Ayxniially by the Junior Class 

There probably is no better means of presenting a cross-section of college life 
than through a year book. Hence the Quittapahilla. This book is inti?nded as a 
bird's-eye view of life on the campus of Lebanon Valley College; for the present 
students as a remembrance of their own college days; for others as an example of life 
at Lebanon Valley in 1933. 

It was by no means an easy task to prepare and publish this book. Often the 
job threatened to get the best of the workers, and they nearly gave up in despair. 
Especially were the finances a troublesome obstacle, but with helpful suggestions 
from the faculty, and the hearty co-operation of the class, the barriers fell, and the 
work came to a successful conclusion. 

The staff of the Quittapahilla has endeavored to give you the best year book 
possible. With that in mind, they have paid special attention to those sections which 
always are a very popular part of the book. Though they hive cut its length 
slightly, they have tried not to detract in any way from its quality. 

For those unfamiliar with the word Quittapahilla, we may remark that it is 
derived from an Indian word, "Cuit-peh-elle," meaning "a spring that flows from 
ground among the pines." It is the name of the creek on the south and west of 
AnnviUe, whose sparkling waters finally empty into the Swatara. 



1141 



THE XTUDENTS* HAND CCCr 




Editor 

Assistant Editor 
Business Manager 



Chester Goodman 

Kathryn Mowrey 

Stuart Werner 



C. O. Goodman 



The Students" Handbook of Lebanon Valley College has 
been a tradition for many years, but unlike many traditions, 
It IS still in a period of usefulness. In fact, it is a very definite 
contribution to the comfort and knowledge of the new students 
as they enter the college. 



This small book is the product of an editor and an assistant editor, who are 
elected from the cabinets of the Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A., respectively. Within 
Its covers is included everything from the stern and compelling laws of the Men's 
Senate to the humorous definitions of trite college idioms. The book acquaints the 
newcomer with places, organizations, courses, and miscellaneous information which 
he needs. It is a welcome from the Christian Associations and the student govern- 
ment bodies to the new student as he arrives, and remains as a guide while he is 
here. In short, it is a "friend in need." 

THE CCLLECE ECESS XECVICE 



Editor-iyi-Chief 
Associate Editors 



J 



L. P. Clements 

Marion May, Arline Heckrote, 

Henry Palatini, Boyd Sponaugle 



In Its initial year, the College Press Service has filled a long-felt need by supply- 
ing Lebanon Valley with desired publicity in newspapers throughout the countr>^ 

Every activity on the campus received due notice in the columns of the daily 
press, not only in Eastern Pennsylvania, but also beyond the 
borders of the state. The accomplishments of Lebanori Valley 
students were brought to the attention of home-town papers, 
which consequently carried items informing the "folks back 
home" of the doings of their favorite sons and daughters. 
Particularly in football did the Press Service prove valuable, 
as the newspaper sports departments atoned for a long neglect 
by devoting an appreciable amount of space to L. V. C. 
athletics. . l. P. Clements 

The Press Service seems sure to advance under its able supervision and to afford 
valuable training to its editors. 




[142] 




THE ATHLETIC CCUNCIL 



President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

President of the College 

Faculty Member 

Faculty Member 

Athletic Director 



R. R. BuTTERWICK 

P. S. Wagner 

G. G. DOTTER 

0. A. Lynch 

M. L. Stokes 

C. R. Gingrich 

E. E. Mylin 



Lebanon Valley's first Athletic Council was organized m 1919. Nine members 
from the faculty, alumni, and student body composed the governing hoard of the 
first council. It existed in various forms until 1927, when a change in policy was 
deemed advisable. It was then that the reorganization took place, and the controlling 
body assumed its present form. 

The council is an outgrowth of the need of a responsible group to direct athletic 
affairs of the college. It serves to relieve the administration of the many details 
and incidents relative to the athletic program. It is an active force in determining 
athletic policies and programs for each school year. 

Its present personnel is the president of the college, four faculty members, one 
alumnus, and the athletic director. They elect officers among themselves and work as 
a distinct organization of the college. 



[144] 






William B. Buser 
Asst. Football Coach 

For the past two seasons 
Coaeh Mylin has been assisted 
in his football work by William 
B. Buser. "Buse" hails from 
Columbia University, where he 
starred as fullback on the Lion 
eleven. He handled the backfield 
at Lebanon Valley and under 
his able tutelage the Blue and 
White ball carriers gained much 
valuable knowledge. 





E. H. Stevenson 
Coach of Tennis 

Although busily occupied as head of 
the History Department, Dr. Stevenson 
has an intense interest in tennis. A 
player of marked ability himself, Dr. 
Stevenson is admirably suited to coach 
the tennis team. The fans could well 
be confident that this year's squad, led 
by Capt. Claude Donmoyer, would up- 
hold Dr. Stevenson's fine record as a 
coach. 



Mildred A. Kenyon 
Director of Women's Athletics 

Miss Kenyon has completed her sec- 
ond year as coach and directress of 
women's athletics at L. V. C. She 
quite capably handles the co-ed athletes 
in indoor gymnastics and in the pro- 
duction of hockey and basketball 
teams. Miss Kenyon also has charge of 
the May Day festivities and has pre- 
sented some novel and interesting 
themes on the campus. 



[145] 




E. E. Mylin, A.m. 
Director of Athletics 



Mylin Completes Decade at Lebanon Valley 



With the end of the 1932-33 season Coach 
E. E. Mylin brought to a close a successful 
decade as mentor of the three major sports at 
Lebanon Valley. 

In 1916 "Hooks" was graduated from Frank- 
lin and Marshall where he starred in athletics. 
He received his A.M. in 1917 at the same in- 
stitution. Having completed his education for 
the time being, Mylin spent twenty-nine months 
in the United States Army. He saw active 
service overseas, and was wounded in action. 

In the spring of 1919 he was athletic officer 
in charge of the 79th Division A. E. F. Upon 
his return to America in 1919 "Hooks" became 
an instructor in mathematics and coach of Mas- 
sanutten Military Academy in Virginia. From 
1920 to 1923 he coached athletics at Iowa State 
College, Ames, Iowa. 



In 1923 Mylin came to Lebanon Valley to 
assume the head of the coaching and physical 
education departments. During his ten-year re- 
gime at the Valley, "Hooks" has produced sev- 
eral successful teams, perhaps the most outstand- 
ing of which was his 1927 eleven which defeated 
Brown's famous Iron Men and held the power- 
ful Fordham Rams to a 13-3 score. At Lebanon 
Valley Coach Mylin has developed many suc- 
cessful athletes of whom the most prominent is 
Charlie Gelbert, short-stop of the St. Louis 
Cardinals. "Chief" Metoxen, "Peck" Piersol 
and "Henny" Homan also cast good reflections 
on Mylin's training. 

Coach Mylin was instrumental in organizing 
the Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate Basketball 
and Baseball Leagues and was honored by be- 
ing elected to the presidency of the former in 
the initial year of its existence. 



[1+6] 




VAPSITy rCCTCALL 



SEASON OF 19J2 




A. Kazlusky 






]. M. 


Jordan 


Captain 






Manager 




Date 


Place 


Opponent 


L.V. 




Opp 


Oct. 1 


State College, Pa. 


Penn State 







27 


Oct. 7 


Allentown, Pa. 


Muhlenberg 


6 







Oct. 15 


New York, N. Y. 


Fordham 







52 


Oct. 22 


Lebanon, Pa. 


Juniata 


19 







Oct. 29 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


St. Joseph's 


19 







Nov. 5 


Springfield, Mass. 


Springfield 







27 


Nov. 12 


Emmitsburg, Md. 


Mt. St. Mary's 


9 







Nov. 19 


Reading, Pa. 


Albright 
Total Points . . . . 







6 




. 53 


112 



0.- 






c^ 



o 



0> 






.;^^,«~' y^, ^^^,: _ 



THE SQUAD 



[147] 





1 - \^ 






F. HO [(AN 




Lions of Nittany Claw 

Blue and White, 27-0 



Rust and Volkin Shine as Penn State Takes 

Initial Tussle of 1932 Season 

From L. V. 



STATE COLLEGE, Pa., Oct. 1.— After a 
three-week period of early training Lebanon 
Valley's gridiron squad journeyed to State Col- 
lege to engage Penn State in the initial game 
of the 1932 season. The team, followed by an 
enthusiastic representation of Valley rooters, was 
confident that it had an even chance to tame 
the Lions and hoped to be the first aggregation 
of Lebanon Valley gridiron warriors to bring 
back the crown of laurel from the Nittany 
stadium. 



yard 
way. 
three 



L. VOLKIN 



Lebanon Valley received on her 10 
stripe and the 1932 season was under 
After failing to advance the ball in 
plunges, L. V. punted to State's 30 yard line. 
The Lions immediately began their rush. Calling 
plays in rapid-fire succession, they marched down 
the field to a touchdown. L. V. immediately at- 
tempted a comeback and twice was in easy 
^coring position hut failed to push it over. State, 
however, turned down no such opportunities and 
during the course of the second quarter added 
13 points to their score. 

During the third quarter Boran sustained a 
broken finger and was forced to retire from 
the game. He was replaced at quarterback by 
Rust while Stone went in at right half. Three 
times during the second half Lebanon Valley 
advanced the ball within scoring distance but 
failed to cross the final stripe. Rust, Boran, 
Stone, and Feeser must be complimented for 
their fine work in running the ball, while the 
efforts of Volkin, Kazlusky, and Wogan in the 
line were outstandnig. 

The game was fairly played by both teams but 
a lack of concerted effort in the final push caused 
Lebanon Valley's downfall. 




M. KARINCH 




A. SINCAVAGE 



[148] 





ip^i^iK^r^^^ 



H. WHIIJNC, 



V 
^ ^ 




Lebanon Valley Scores 
Upset Over Muhlenberg 



Dopesters Amazed as Bluejackets Win 

Night Tussle from AUentown 

Mules — Score 6-0 



R. WILLIAMS 



ALLENTOWN, Pa., Oct. 7.— One week 
after the severe lacing handed her by Penn State, 
Lebanon Valley arrived at AUentown to be 
handed a second defeat by Muhlenberg — ac- 
cording to all the dopesters. These gentry drew 
their conclusions from Lebanon Valley's set-back 
at the hands of State and the decidedly strong 
showing which the Mules had made against 
Lafayette the previous week. The game, played 
at night, proved to be one of the biggest ups'ets 
in eastern Pennsylvania college circles. 

Muhlenberg could not find the soft spots which 
she expected in L. V.'s line and did not maintain 
a sustained drive at any time. The Valley grid- 
ders did not find the Mules to be nearly as 
tough as hearsay had them. Feeser and Whiting 
gained consistently through the line while Rust 
and Stone circled the ends for valuable yardage. 
Early in the first quarter L. V. advanced the ball 
to the Mules' 8 yard line but lost a touchdown 
when an official called back the ball because of 
crawling. 

Early in the third quarter a pass. Rust to 
Feeser, placed the ball on the 30 yard stripe. 
A plunge by Rust, followed by a pass to Feeser, 
gave L. V. the ball on Muhlenberg's 20 yard 
line. Then Rust sent Russ Williams on the old 
end-around play to produce the only score of 
the game. Twice more the Lebanon Valley 
gridders made drives deep into Muhlenberg 
territory but were unable to add to their score. 
However, they found no difficulty in holding 
the Mules at bay and proved themselves a greatly 
improved team. 




C. FURLONG 




^1^ 



W. WOGAN 



[149] 




M. LIGHT 



f I I ll i |iil i|iil|i | iiilil | i | |il i i |liiiii : 






Fordham Rams Conquer 

Lebanon Valley Eleven 



Ne« Yorkers Crush L. V. Gridders by 

52-0 Score — Kazlusky Named 

on All-Star Team 



A. KAZLUSKY, Capt. 



NEW YORK, N. Y., Oct. 15.— A small 
squad of Lebanon Valley foothall men appeared 
on the Polo Grounds to meet the powerful 
Fordham machine. The scrappy Blue and White 
warriors realized that nothing short of a miracle 
could give them victory, but they cherished the 
hope that they would make as good a showing 
as the Lebanon Valley aggregation back in 1927, 
when Charlie Gelbert and "Peck" Piersol were 
the stars of the Valley. In this game five years 
ago Piersol kicked a field goal in the initial 
quarter, and the Valleymen held the Rams 
scoreless until the third quarter. 

However, no such luck was in store for the 
boys today. At the scheduled time Major Cav- 
anough brought three full teams on the field. 
He started his varsity against the Blue and 
White, and the Vallev boys never had a chance 
to show their stuff. Nevertheless, they displayed 
the old L. V. spirit when they held the Rams 
for downs on their own four-yard line in the 
opening quarter. Early in the game Whiting, 
L. V. fullback, suffered a sprained hand and a 
valuable defense man was lost. 

The Rams rushed over two scores in the first 
quarter, two in the second, one in the third, 
and three in the final period. Four tries for 
extra points were blocked, and the final score 
was: Fordham, 52: L. V., 0. 

Captain Albert Kasluskv was undoubtedly the 
outstanding player on the Valley eleven, and 
the fact that the Fordham aggregation was well 
aware of his efforts was shown when they named 
him as left guard on their all-opponent team. 




S. BARTHOLD 




A. HEISCH 



[1501 




B. SPONAUGLE 




Juniata Indians Lose 

To Inspired Valleymen 



Mylin's Blue and White Eleven Tames 

Aborigines, 19-0, as Stone 

and Smith Score 



W. SMITH 



LEBANON, Pa., Oct. 2 2.— For the second 
time they were completely outplayed by the Boys 
here decked in war paint, firmly resolved to take 
the scalp of Lebanon Valley. For the second 
time they were completely outplayed by the boys 
in Blue, who won handily, 19-0. 

Lebanon Valley scored on a break in the first 
quarter when Wenger of Juniata got off a bad 
punt to Barthold, who advanced the ball to the 
20 yard line. In three snappy plays the Valley 
boys made first down with goal to go. Whiting 
crashed center for 3 yards and then Feeser 
crossed the goal line off tackle and fumbled. 
Once more the break was for L. V. — Smith 
recovered for a touchdown. 

In the second quarter Juniata fumbled on their 
20 yard line for a 10 yard loss and again Wenger 
got off a bad punt to Stone who received the 
ball on the Indians' 25 yard marker. Stone tore 
off 9 yards through tackle and Feeser made a 
first down. On three consecutive plays Stone 
crashed through center for the second score of 
the game. 

Late in the third quarter Rust received a punt 
in mid-field after which Stone galloped 50 yards 
around right end for a touchdown, scoring the 
last 6 points of the game. Stone converted the 
try for extra point. Juniata, convinced that 
further attempt to crash the L. V. line was use- 
less, resorted to her aerial attack, but to no 
avail. L. V.'s final march down the field was 
foiled when the bluejackets were penalized 15 
yards after Stone had reeled off a 25 yard gain. 




L. STONE 




P. KANDRA.T 



[151] 





G. FEESER 




Lebanon Valley Snares 

Hawks in Fifth Tussle 



Annville Gridders Garner 19 Points 

From St. Joe Birds — Feeser and 

Rust Work Well 



W. SHAFFER 



PHILADELPHIA, Pa., Oct. 29.— Lebanon 
Valley's blue and white gridsters engaged Coach 
Emid Thomas" St. Joseph Hawks, winning 19-0, 
in the Annville aggregation's fifth game of the 
season. A strong wind blew from the west, 
and the sun in the last quadrant of his arc 
shone directly in the eyes of the team defending 
the east goal. Conditions were extremely bad 
for a football game. 

Lebanon Valley won the toss and chose to 
defend the west goal, thus having both wind 
and sun at their backs. A bad punt by the 
Saints placed L. V. in a scoring position. How- 
ever, the St. Joe line proved obdurate and L. V. 
could not gain. Stone elected to try a place 
kick which was unsuccessful. A short time later 
another St. Joe punt went out of bounds on the 
2 yard line. On two laterally-thrown screened 
passes, Feeser carried the pigskm over for a 
touchdown. Stone added the extra point. 

During the second period St. Joe blanked the 
Lebanon Valley boys and three times were in 
scoring position but were unable to produce a 

counter. 

Once more the wind gave succor to the Valley 
forces and sent Rust's punt out of bounds on 
St. Joe's one yard stripe. Campbell's return 
punt was carried back and out on the 5 yard 
line. Three stabs at the St. Joe line produced 
no more than a 5 yard penalty against the Val- 
ley, so Rust once more snapped the screened 
pass to Feeser for the second score. The Valley 
boys scored again in the final quarter when Rust 
went wide around right end for 3 yards and 
a touchdown making the final score 19-0. 




152 










Springfield Backs Too 

Much for Valley Team 



Hard, Fast Driving Gains 27-0 Score 

for Massachusetts Men — Capt. 

Kazlusky Shines 



sponaugLe 



SPRINGFIELD, Mass., Nov. .S.— Lebanon 
Valley received an unexpected 27-0 lacing today 
at the hands of a powerful Springfield eleven. 
The Valley gndsters, showing no such form as 
they displayed in the games against Juniata and 
St. Joe, were smothered by their fast-rushing 
maroon opponents. The loss of "Scoop" Feeser, 
who was injured in the St. Joe game, was sadly 
felt, and when Boran had to leave the game 
early in the second quarter, the team was indeed 
crippled. 

The first half was a night-mare for Lebanon 
Valley as the team fell before a maze of line 
plunges, spinners and end runs. By the time the 
half was over the score stood 20-0 in favor of 
the New Englanders. 

In the third quarter the Valley opened her 
passing attack and two tosses. Rust to Lesher, 
netted 28 yards. Then Brown intercepted Rust's 
pass and raced to the Blue and White's 5 yard 
line, and in three plunges Hawkes crossed the 
final stripe, adding six points to the Springfield 
score. 

The final quarter was filled with excitement as 
L. V. showed her real fighting spirit, and the 
Rust-to-Lesher forward passing combination ad- 
vanced the ball to Springfield's 15 yard line. 
The maroon team held for downs, but on the 
next play Kazlusky broke through and blocked 
Shields' punt. The ball bounced back behind 
the Springfield secondary. Kazlusky, followed by 
Sincavage, raced after the oval. "Murph", using 
real football headwork, blocked out the opposing 
player nearest the ball so that Sincavage could 
take over the pigskin for a score. However, 
"Slim" was tackled as he was picking up the 
ball and L. V. lost the last opportunity to score. 




W. ROSE < 



[153] 





Valley Pounds Out Win 

Over Mountaineers, 9-0 



C RIjSI 




Rust Makes Lone Touchdown as Lesher, 

Boran, and Williams Help Blue 

and White Cause 



C. SPRENKLE 



EMMITSBURG, Md., Nov. 12.— The Le- 
banon Valley eleven annexed their fourth win 
of the season when they defeated Mt. St. 
Mary's by a 9-0 score on Edis Field. The game 
early developed into a punting duel between 
Rust of L. V. and Lynch of the Mountaineers. 
Late in the second period Rust received one of 
Lynch's punt on the Staints' 48 yard line. A 
pass, Rust to Williams, was good for 9 yards 
and on the next play Stone went otf tackle for 
9 yards and a first down, placing the ball on the 
Mountaineers" 30 yard line. 

Rust then took the ball around left end, 
dodged and twisted his way through the Mt. 
St. Mary's secondary defense, and raced 30 
yards to score the only touchdown of the game. 
Stone's educated toe made the extra point good 
i and the score stood L. V., 7 — Mt. St. Mary's, 0. 

Throughout the second half the Valley grid- 
sters camped around the Saints' 20 yard line 
but were unable to execute a score. Barthold 
dropped Rust's pass when he was over the goal 
line and Rust juggled a toss from Frankie Boran 
with an open field before him. In the fourth 
period two penalties placed the Mountaineers on 
their one yard line. McCormack attempted to 
run the ball from behind his own goal line and 
was downed for a safety adding 2 points to 
L. V.'s score. 

Rust's playing was outstanding for he gained 
more ground than all the other L. V. ball toters 
put together. Lesher also turned in a nice per- 
formance with Kazlusky, Feeser, Boran, Light, 
and Volkin contributing their usual heads-up 
performances. 




J. BOLTON 



[154] 





L. V. Gridders Lose in 

Muddy Sea at Albright 



Boys in Blue Falter, 6-0, as Parsons 

Gain Lucky Break — Completed 

Pass Tells Tale 



R. HENNE 







W. BUSER 



READING, Pa., Nov. 19. — The annual strug- 
gle between Albright and Lebanon Valley 
turned out to be a dual disappomtniient for 
the L. V. rooters. Heavy rainfall had converted 
the Reading gridiron into a veritable quagmire 
but the officials decided to play the game re- 
gardless. 

The teams lined up in a sea of mud smirched 
with puddles of water and stacks of straw. 
After the first three plays it was impossible to 
tell the players apart since all wore the same 
uniform of Reading mud. 

Both teams were bent on winning this all- 
important fray. Before long it was quite evident 
that the inevitable break would win the game. 
The break came late in the third quarter when 
Albright had the ball on L. V."s 30-yard line. 
Larry Hatton threw a pass to Johnny Fromm, 
who had slipped back to the Valley's secondary 
and who sloshed his way 20 yards to execute the 
only score of the day. 

Lebanon Valley did its best work in the 
opening quarter. Shortly after the game started 
Volkin blocked a kick 15 knots from L. V.'s 
touchdown port. On the second play Boran at- 
tempted a short lateral to Rust hut the referee 
blocked the ball and Orr recovered for Albright. 
Most of the first period was played on Albright 
territory with the ball changing hands frequent- 
ly due to fumbling. 

The fans got a laugh every time a man missed 
a tackle and slid for several yards before he 
could find sufficient friction to quell the mo- 
mentum of his drive. The punting was good on 
both sides considering the mud and water-soaked 
ball. 

It was a hard game to lose and it was only 
Lady Luck who decided the contest. 




M. JORDAN, .Mgr. 



[155] 



Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate Basketball League 



FINAL LEAGUE STANDING 



Gettysburg 

F. & U. . 

Albright 

Ursinus 

Muhlenberg 

Lebanon Valley 

Drexel 



w. 


L. 


Pet. 


. 10 


■ 2 


0.833 


. 8 


4 


0.667 


. 8 


4 


0.667 


. 6 


6 


0.500 


. 6 


6 


0.500 


. 4 


8 


0.333 


. 


12 


0.000 



The Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate League elosed its second season this year. 
As in the 1931-32 campaign, the league again was very successful and in every way 
can be called a boon to small college basketball in Pennsylvania. Gettysburg led 
the group this season, and duplicated its feat of last year by coming through its 
league schedule with the loss of only two games. The Bullets lost to Albright early 
in the season and were upset by a much weaker Muhlenberg outfit later in the 
campaign. 

F. &' M., early in the season, seemed to be a stronger contender for the league 
laurels, having led the league at the start. However, they fell down completely at 
the end of the season and had to be satisfied with a second place tie with the Al- 
bright Lions, a team which found itself at the finish of the race. Ursinus and 
Muhlenberg ended the regular league season at the halfway mark, each having won 
half her games and in a tie for center position in league standing. Lebanon Valley 
won only one-third of her games this year, being victorious over Albright, Muhlen- 
berg, and Drexel twice. Lebanon Valley seemed to have the material for a win- 
ning combination, but just could not click as she should have. Drexel finished 
in the cellar position, losing all of her league games. 

High scoring honors went to Claude Lodge, captain and forward of the Ursinus 
Bears, who succeeded "Cal" Heller, lanky pivot man of Lebanon Valley's 1931- 
32 aggregation. Lodge amassed a total of 127 points as compared to Heller's 168 
of last season. The Ursinus captain collected 50 field goals and 27 free tosses for 
his total. Bill Focht, Lebanon Valley's center, was the only member of the home 
team to finish high in the scoring, coming in fifth with a 101 point total. 

The two high scorers of each team were as follows: Lodge and Johnson of 
Ursinus, DeFranco and Oslislo of Albright, Focht and Barthold of Lebanon Valley, 
Jacobs and Brubaker of F. &? M., Howard and Kitzmiller of Gettysburg, Nixon and 
Horine of Muhlenberg, and Knapp and Hoff of Drexel. 



[156] 



.i-! 
1 




i 


1 




n 


i 




i' ^ 


■'} 




: r***i 


^ 







SEASON OF 1932- J 3 




Frlu E. Morrison 
Captain 



L. Percy Clements 
Manager 



L,V. 

L. V. 
*L. V. 
*L. V. 
*L. V. 

L. V. 
*L. V. 
*L.V. 
*L. V. 



13 
34 
42 
38 

27 
23 
37 
37 
26 



Temple 33 

Susquehanna 29 

Drexel 32 

Ursinus .... . . 41 

Gettysburg 34 

St. Joseph 27 

Drexel 33 

Ursinus 46 

Muhlenberg 30 



*L. V. 


33 


L.V. 


37 


*L.V. 


36 


*L. V. 


29 


*L. V. 


36 


*L.V. 


29 


*L. V. 


42 


L.V. 


29 



L.V. .S48 



*League games. 



F. e^ M 43 

Susquehanna 38 

Albright 45 

F. fef^M 33 

Muhlenberg 30 

Gettysburg 50 

Albright 37 

Bucknell 35 

Opponents 636 




THE SQUAD 



[157] 




W. SMITH 




Blue and White Cagers 

End Seventh in League 



Quintet Wins Five and Loses Twelve 

in Poor Season While Dividing 

With Albright 



M. TIGHT 



Following a two-week training period, Le- 
banon Valley's Blue and White basketeers 
opened their 1932-33 season on December 15, 
with the fast and powerful Temple Owls at 
Philadelphia. The Temple team, finely coached, 
found little difficulty in the Valley quintet who 
had not yet got the feel of the game and were 
far from being sure of themselves. The speedy 
Owls winged their way among the Valley boys 
and ran up the towering score of 53-13. After 
the Christmas holidays the basket brigade met 
the Susquehanna Crusaders at Selinsgrove on 
January 7. The game, though rather close, was 
never really in danger, and the Valley men 
walked off with a 34-29 verdict. Journeying to 
Philadelphia once more, our cage quintet tossed 
goals with the Drexel Dragons in the first league 
tilt of the season. The game was close and well 
played on both sides, finally ending with L. V. 
on the long end of a 42-3 2 score. Captain Mor- 
rison, Focht, and Smith were high scorers, con- 
tributing 34 of the 42 points. 

On January 14 our basketeers met the Ursinus 
Bears in Lebanon for the first home fracas. 
During the first half the L, V. quintet flashed 
old-time form and ran up a 21-15 lead. How- 
ever, the peppy Collegeville five came from be- 
hind in the closing minutes of the fray to snatch 
victory by a 41-38 margin. The Gettysburg 
Bullets, last year's league champions, next en- 
gaged our quintet in a hotly contested game 
played on the home court. The Bullet boys. 





[158] 






led by Captain Jones, ran up a three point lead 
in the first half. However, the boys in blue 
came out in the second period and tied the 
score at 17 all only to lose out in the last three 
minutes of play, the Gettysburgians taking the 
game by a 34-27 score. The St. Joseph Hawks 
next met the Blue and White team in Lebanon. 
The game as usual was close until the final 
quarter when the home team lagged behind, 
allowing the Hawks to steal the game to the 
tune of 27-23. 

On February 3, the Valley bucketeers came 
from behind in the closing minutes of play to 
snatch victory from the Drexel Dragons at Ann- 
ville. The Dragons amassed a ten-point lead 
in the second half, only to have the Blue and 
White, led by Charlie Rust, who scored 1 ,i 
points in the second half, assume the lead and 
add another victory to the L. V. column. In the 
next fray at Collegeville, Lebanon Valley suffered 
its third league loss when the Ursinus Bear, 
led by Lodge and Johnson, clawed its way to 
a 46-37 victory. The following game, played 
with Muhlenberg at Allentown, also spelled de- 
feat for the Valley men. The Mules came from 
behind in the last ten minutes of play to hold 
L. V. down and kick their way to a 30-26 
victory. 

Franklin and Marshall's undefeated team in- 
vaded Lebanon on February 10 and added an- 
other victory to its list when they dropped the 
Valley boys by a 43-3 3 score. The Blue and 
White made two attempts to run up a substan- 
tial lead, only to have the stronger F. 6? M. 
quintet surpass them in the end. Five days later 
Susquehanna turned the tables on the L. V. 
quintet, forging ahead by one point in the last 
minute of play. The game was sluggish through- 
out, and poor playing on the part of the Valley 
caused the 38-37 defeat. The Boys in Blue 
again met defeat when they were trounced by 
the Albright Lions at Reading to the tune of 




C. RUST; 




W. ROSE 



[159] 





W. SHAFFER 





45-36. Albright had amassed a 21-point lead 
in the first half, but the Valley boys stepped out 
in the second half and scored 18 points to the 
opponents' three. Here the rally was stopped 
and Albright added four more points to her 
score to take victory by an 8-point margin. 

At Lancaster, L. V. was again defeated by 
F. &? M. in a fast and furious game. Both teams 
played hard, speedy ball throughout and only 
in the closing minutes did the Nevonians amass 
their four-point lead to take the game by a 
33-29 count. Two days later the Blue and 
White quintet met Muhlenberg in the Lebanon 
High gymnasium. Playing a snappy brand of 
ball, the Valley boys came from behind in the 
second half and drove the Mules to defeat by a 
score of 36-30. At Gettysburg L. V. received 
the worst trimming handed her by any league 
opponent. Playing an exceptionally speedy brand 
of ball from the very beginning, the Bullets 
zipped their way to a 25-point lead in the first 
half. Lead by Dracha, Kitzmiller, and Jones, the 
battlefield five piled up points until the final 
gun ended the game at 50-29. Lebanon Valley 
rallied in the second half, but the Gettysburg- 
lans possessed such a lead that they were never 
in danger. 

The Albright Lions next invaded the Valley 
and were defeated by the Blue and White 
quintet by a 42-37 score. Using a new line-up, 
the Valley boys showed their best playing of 
the year, and for the first time maintained a lead 
throughout the game. Focht, Williams, and 
Barthold led the way to victory, scoring 30 
points among them. The team tossed 16 out of 
19 fouls, a percentage which would have turned 
several of its defeats into victories. The Lebanon 
Valley basketeers ended their season at Lewis- 
burg, where they went down to defeat at the 
hands of the Bucknell Bisons. The game was 
loosely played on both sides, the Bisons finally 
stampeding to win by a six-point margin. 

Lebanon Valley made a relatively poor show- 
ing in the 1932-33 season, sadly missing the 
services of Captain Heller, Bob Stewart, and 
Sweeney Light. However, the team improved 
greatly toward the end of the season, and will 
undoubtedly make a much better showing next 
year. 




P. CLEMENTS, Mgi-. 



[160] 



rCESHMAN CASrETCALL 



SEASON OF 19?2'?3 



William W. Wogan 
Coach 



Frank Cullather 
Manager 



L. V. Frosh 16 

L. V. Frosh 21 

L. V. Frosh 26 

L. V. Frosh 13 

L. V. Frosh 37 

L. V. Frosh 23 

L. V. Frosh 28 

L. V. Frosh 28 

L. V. Frosh 18 

L. V. Frosh 22 

L. V, Frosh 31 

L. V. Frosh 263 



Penn Abbatoir 34 

Pottsville High School . . ; . 19 

Belle Knitting Company .... 29 

Hershey High School 39 

Consumers' Ice Company .... 40 

F. fe? M. Frosh 24 

Long's Bakers 31 

Albright Frosh 45 

F. fe? M. Frosh 28 

Hershey High Shool 21 

Albright Frosh 33 

Opponents ....... 343 




FRESHMAN SQUAD 



[161] 




B. SPONAUGLE 




L. FRANK 



Although winning but two out of eleven 
games, the college Freshmen were successful in 
adopting the system introduced by Coach Wil- 
liam "Red" Wogan. Seven games were played 
on the home court and four were played away. 
It is interesting to notice that the Freshmen 
lost four extra-period games. After short prac- 
tice, the first year men opened their season 
with the Lebanon City League champs, the Penn 
Abbatoir passers, in a preliminary to the Ursinus 
game. Penn Abbatoir won 34-15. Frank was 
high scorer for the Blue and White with five 
points, followed by Patrizio and C. Sponaugle 
with three each. 

Invading foreign territory for the first time, 
Coach Wogan's yearlings defeated the strong 
Pottsville High School quintet by a 21-19 score. 
Throughout the entire game the Frosh held the 
edge with Frank leading his teammates with 
ten points, while B. Sponaugle and Uhler split 
second honors with four points each, Patrizio 
and Fry playing a great floor game. 

In a preliminary to the Gettysburg game, the 
Belle Knitting club of Lebanon nosed out the 
beginners by a 29-26 score. The contest ended 
in a 24-24 deadlock, but in the extra five-minute 
period the Belle Knitters came through vic- 
torious. 

Flashing form throughout the entire fracas, 
the Hershey High School five swamped the Blue 
and White Frosh 39-13 on the Hershey Com- 
munity Club floor. W. Sponaugle led the attack 
for the chocolate mixers, with nineteen points, 
while Frank and Heinbach garnered the only 
points for the Valley Frosh. 

Preliminary to the St. Joseph tilt, Wogan's 
men lost an extra-period game, 40-37, to the 
Lebanon Consumers" Ice Company. The Frosh 



C. SPONAUGLE 




ri62] 





S. HARNISH 




W. WOGAN, Coach 



aggregation jumped off to an early lead, and 
held a 19-12 advantage at half time. In the 
final quarter the Icemen accumulated a four- 
point lead, but the Valley men tied the score 
at 3 3-all before the final whistle blew. In the 
extra period the Ice team sank three field goals 
and a foul to win 40-37. Considered the under- 
dog, the Valley Freshmen surprised their fans 
by holding the strong F. ii M. Frosh to a one- 
point win. B. Sponaugle led the attack for 
Coach Wogan's five, with 1 1 points, while 
Stouck and Rampulla split honors with eight 
points for the invaders. Displaying a weak 
offense and a ragged attack, the Blue and 
White received a setback by Long's Lebanon 
quintet in a preliminary tilt. Frank starred with 
thirteen points, and Patricio drew second honors 
with six points. 

At Reading the fast-passing Albright club 
scored a 4.^-28 victory over the Valley Frosh 
in an exciting game. The Blue and White de- 
fense formed slowly in the first half, and as a 
result, the Lion cubs led at half time, 21-9. 
Coming back in the second half with a new 
brand of ball, the Woganites gained rapidly, 
but they could not overcome the big lead. 
Schlegel, Woods, and Syphord led the Red and 
White passers, collecting 30 of the 48 points. 
At Lancaster, in the preliminary tilt, the F. &? 
M. Frosh showed brilliant form, winning a 
28-18 decision over the hard-fighting Valley 
yearlings. Frank led the scoring, with ten points, 
and Uhler and C. Sponaugle tied for second 
honors. 

Preliminary to the Muhlenberg game, the 
Valley Freshmen handed the high-stepping 
Hershey quintet a 22-21 verdict on the Lebanon 
court. Trailing 14-9 at intermission, the year- 
lings came back chiefly through the foul route 
to shade the Dauphin County boys 13-7. In 
the final game, the much-touted Albright Frosh 
quintet barely defeated the scrapping Valleymen. 
After two extra periods, the invaders won 33-31. 
Frank, B. Sponaugle and Patrizio were outstand- 
ing for L. V. while Schlegel and Woods were 
high men for the Lion cubs. 

"Diggie" Frank was high scorer for the sea- 
son with S.i points. Then came C. Sponaugle 
with 43: B. Sponaugle, 41; Patrizio, 39; and 
Uhler, 24. 



R. RADER; 




F. CULLATHER, Mgi-. 



[163] 





CASEBALL 



SEASON OF 1932 




R. E. Dennis 






Captain 






Date 


Opponent 


Place 


April 22 


Drexel 


AnnviUe, Pa. 


April 26 


Juniata 


Annville, Pa. 


April 30 


Juniata 


Huntington, Pa. 


May 11 


Drexel 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


May 17 


Susquehanna 


Annville, Pa. 


May 19 


Albright 


Annville, Pa. 


May 21 


Susquehanna 


Selinsgrove, Pa. 


June 4 


Ursinus 

Rims Scored 


Collegeville, Pa. 



P. S. KOHLER 
Manager 



L.V. 

8 
2 
1 
6 

17 

2 

3 
14 



0pp. 

1 

7 
4 
7 
4 
3 
1 
11 

45 




THE SQUAD 



[164] 




Baseballers Have Fair 

Success in '32 Season 




Boran and Smith Sparkle as Batsmen 

Put Four Games in Win Column 

and Drop Five 



Lebanon Valley initiated its baseball season 
at Annville by slamming out an 8-1 win over 
the Drexel Dragons of Philadelphia. Bill Smith, 
lanky Hurler, turned in a fine exhibition of 
hurling in the first game of his college career. 
Smith allowed one run in the first inning when 
the Dragons managed to collect a double and 
a single. From that time the Drexel boys did 
not get beyond second base. Snappy, clear in- 
fielding by Boran, Light and Capt. Dennis con- 
tributed largely to Smith's success. Shortlidge, 
Boran, and Smith each collected 3 hits, while 
Williams slammed out four and Light two. The 
Valley outhit Drexel 16-6. 

In the second game of the season Lebanon 
Valley bowed to the Juniata Indians by a 7-2 
count. Witter, frosh southpaw, began the hurl- 
ing for L. V. versus Blough for the Indians. 
Witter proved wild in his initial game when he 
walked 5 men in the first two innings and al- 
lowed four runs to cross the plate. He was 
relieved by Montieth, who blanked the Hunt- 
ington nine until the eighth inning when he 
was nicked for five hits and three runs. The 
Valley sluggers couldn't get next to Blough's 
curves, collecting only 5 hits. They scored one 
run in the first and one in the third inning. 

Four days later the Blue and White nine 
again engaged the Juniata Indians at Hunting- 
ton. The game was converted into a pitchers' 
duel between Smith of L. V. and Fraker of 
Juniata. Smith allowed 5 hits to Fraker's 4. 
However, two errors by Arndt in the second 




R. STE'W'ART 



[165] 





G. WOOD 






^ V 




|F. BORAN 



inning allowed three warriors to cross the plate 
and gave the Indians a lead which the Valley 
boys were unable to overhaul. Frankie Boran 
garnered 2 of Lebanon Valley's four hits and 
played a neat game at second base. 

The Lebanon Valley sluggers lost a 7-6 de- 
cision to the Drexel Dragons at Philadelphia in 
the fourth game of the season. The Blue and 
White led off in the second inning with 2 runs 
following hits by Williams and Light. Drexel 
evened matters in the same inning when Wood 
was nicked for four hits. L. V. tied the score 
again in the ninth when Shortlidge and Dennis 
crossed the plate to knot the count at 6-a\\. 
Wood was relieved in the tenth by Montieth 
who blanked the Dragons in that frame but 
allowed the winning run to cross in the eleventh. 

Susquehanna came down to Annville on May 
17 to match bats with the Lebanon Valley swat- 
ters and went down with the score standing 
17-4 against them. The Valley batsmen opened 
the attack by amassing ten runs in the first inn- 
ing. George Wood on the mound for L. V. 
pitched a consistent game throughout. He al- 
lowed the visitors 1 1 hits but kept them well 
scattered and only four Crusaders ever reached 
the home plate. Frankie Boran was the leading 
slugger for the Blue and White, collecting a 
home run, a triple, and a single. This was just 
about L. V.'s finest showing during the season. 

The Lebanon Valley diamond artists next 
tangled bats with the Albright nine at Annville. 
The game turned out to be a pitchers' duel 
between Smith of L. V. and Betz of Albright. 
Bet^ allowed ten scattered hits to Smith's eight, 
but emerged from the fray victorious by a 3-2 
margin. Albright opened the scoring with two 
runs in the third inning. The Valley boys made 
one counter this inning and evened the score in 
the sixth. Albright's winning run was scored in 
the eighth inning. Rust, Heller, and Boran led 
the home team sluggers with two each, one of 
Heller's blasts going for three bases. Stan Hino, 
shortstop for the opposition, connected for three 
safeties. 



J. MONTIETH 




R. WILLIAMS ^ 



[166] 



wimM 









A. KAZLUSKY 




S. BARTHOLD 



Two days after going down to defeat at the 
hands of the Albright nine, Lebanon Valley 
journeyed to Emmitsburg, Md., to engage Mount 
St. Mary's in a nine inning fracas. Montieth 
started hurling for the Blue and White and was 
hit for three runs in the second, one in the 
third, and three more in the fourth. He was 
relieved in the seventh by Wood who held the 
Mountaineers scoreless for the remainder of the 
game. The Valley batsmen couldn't get next 
to Edeler's speedy hooks and connected safely 
only !^ times. Edeler kept his hits well scattered 
and the Valley boys were unable to reach home 
plate. 

On May 28 Lebanon Valley traded swats with 
the Susquehanna Crusaders at Selinsgrove. The 
game was another pitching duel between Smith 
of L. V. and Lefty Dunks of the Crusaders 
with Smith coming out on the tall side of a 
3-1 score. Lebanon Valley scored two runs in 
the first inning when Rust led off with a single. 
Frankie Boran, next batter, scored Rust with a 
three bagger and Shortlidge scored Rust with 
a single. The third Valley run came in the 
second when Heller slammed out a two bagger 
and later scored on an error. Smith allowed 4 
hits which he kept well scattered and was backed 
up by snappy fielding in all positions. 

Lebanon Valley journeyed to Collegeville to 
engage the Ursinus Bears in the last game of 
the season. It was a slugfest between the bats- 
men of the Valley and Ursinus clubbers. Toiling 
under a blazing sun, both pitchers weakened in 
spots. The fielding too was ragged, with fre- 
quent errors on both sides. The Blue and 
White sluggers garnered 14 runs against the 
Bears" 1 1 to bring victory to pitcher Bill Smith 
and the L. V. nine. 

Lebanon Valley concluded the season with 
four wins and five defeats. The new material 
received its baptism to the Mylin system, and 
as a result got into fine shape for the '3 3 
season. 



C. ARNDT 



1 

9 




p. KOHLER, Mgr. 



[167] 



VACSIXy TENNIS 



SEASON OF 1932 



Claude Donmoyer 


E. H. 


Stevenson 


DoN.ALD Rank 








Captain 






Coach 




Manager 




Date 






Opponent 






Place 


L. V. 


Opp 


April 


20 




Elizabethtown 






away 


7 





April 


23 




Dickinson 






away 


3 


6 


April 


28 




Juniata 






home 


5 


2 


May 


7 




F. and M. 






home 


2 


5 


May 


13 




Juniata 






away 


5 


2 


May 


18 




Susquehanna 






away 


5 


2 


May 


21 


: V 


St. Joseph's 






home 


4 


3 


May 


2 3 




Albright 






away 


2 


5 


May 


27 




St. Joseph's 






away 


3 


3 


May 


31 




Albright 






home 


1 


6 


June 


4 




Moravian 

Total Match 


?s Won 


away 


4 


3 




41 


37 




TENNIS SQUAD 



[1681 



■b ' "'■^ 




J. I.EATHE^^ 




K. 1 I.HM \N 




Lebanon Valley Netmen 

Triumph in Six Starts 



Tie One and Lose Four While Captain 

Donmoyer Displays Excellent 

Form in Matches 



The tennis team representing L. V, C. in 193 2 
completed a successful season with 6 wins, 4 
losses, 1 tie, and ? washouts. 

In the first match of the season the netmen 
defeated the Elijabethtown racketeers in straight 
sets for a 7-0 score. The Stevenson-coached 
lads displayed real form and did not lose a single 
set to E-town. Lebanon Valley next journeyed 
to Dickinson and after a terific battle lost by 
a 3-6 score. Donmoyer, Snyder, and Biely 
starred for L. V. C. in this match. Juniata's 
representatives on the clay courts were the next 
to fall before the terrific blows of our net men 
by a .''-2 score. 

F. a M."s strong tennis team then came to 
L. V. C. where they defeated our forces by a ^-Z 
score. In this match Lehman was the only 
L. V. C. racket-wielder who came through with 
a win in singles. Captain Donmoyer lost to 
Kready, the Middle Atlantic States champ, in 
straight sets. Juniata again bowed to the Blue 
and White netmen on the Indian's home 
grounds by a score of .^-2. In this match every 
L. V. C. man showed form and Donmoyer, 
Snyder, and Lehman starred. 

Susquehanna next bowed to L. V. C. by a 
.S-2 score. The Blue and White lads displayed 
a superior brand of tennis which kept the boys 
from up the river well under their power. The 
St. Joe Hawks were next on the home courts 
and after a hard-fought battle, the Stevenson- 
trained netmen came out on the better side of 
a 4-3 score. The Albright racket-wielders com- 
pletely outclassed L. V. C. on two occasions, 
winning the first match by a 2-5 score, and the 
second by a 1-6 score. Lebanon Valley's tennis 
team brought to a close a very successful season 
by handing Moravian a 4-3 setback. 



C. SN1 OtH 





i:. ST( VENSON. Co.icli 



[169] 




W. LIGHT 





§f ;C. GELBERT 



METOXEN 



Outstanding Athletes 

Developed Under Mylin 



Seven Luminaries of Past Ten Years 

Continue in Professional and 

Coaching Work 



P^ PIERSOL 



"Charlie" Gelbert, '29, famous shortstop of 
the St. Louis Cardinals, is without doubt the 
most outstanding athlete ever graduated from 
Lebanon Valley. He was a three-letter man 
under coach Mylin, starring in all major sports. 

"Peck" Piersol, '28, will long be remembered 
at Lebanon Valley for his stellar football career. 
"Peck" was famous for his educated toe and in 
his last game against Albright kicked three field 
goals from the 24, 38, and 51 yard lines. 

The accomplishments of "Henny" Homan, "24, 
will stand as an example of what a good small 
man can do. "Henny's" spirit overcame his si:e 
handicap, and after graduation he starred as 
quarterback of the Frankford Yellow Jackets of 
Philadelphia. 

"Chief" Metoxen, 27, nephew of the great 
Metoxen of the Carlisle Indians, nobly upheld 
his tribal traditions at Lebanon Valley. As a 
savagely-fighting guard in football, "Chief" was 
hard to beat. He was right at home on the 
basketball court and a hard-hitting catcher in 
baseball. 

"Stan" Piela, '29, ranks high among the all- 
round athletes turned out from Lebanon Valley. 
"Stan" held down varsity positions at center and 
end on the gridiron squad and was a very 
successful baseball pitcher. He was perhaps the 
best basketball player who ever represented the 
Valley. 

"Jap" Albright, '30, came from Ephrata to 
star in three major sports at Lebanon Valley. 
Although probably the finest basketball guard 
ever to play for L. V. C, his best-remembered 
feat is his 60-yard completed pass in the 1928 
Muhlenberg football game. 

"Sweeney" Light, '3 2, three-letter man for 
four years, rounds out this septet of Lebanon 
Valley's super-athletes. A consistent performer 
at third base and a steady basketball guard, his 
chief success was as a plunging full-back. 




S. PIELA 



[170] 



GICL$' VACSIXy CASI^ETCALL 



SEASON OF 1932-33 



Miss Mildred Kenyon 
Coach 



Miss Helen Lane 
Manager 



Lebanon Valley . 


19 


Lebanon Valley . 


21 


Lebanon Valley . . 


20 


Lebanon Valley 


18 


Lebanon Valley . 


19 


Lebanon Valley . 


26 


Lebanon Valley . 


. 12 3 



Elizabethtown 20 

Ursinus 39 

PennHall 31 

Juniata 38 

Juniata 24 

Elizabethtown 18 

Opponents . . . . . . .170 




GIRLS" BASKETBALL SQUAD 



[171] 




M. WOLFSKEIL 




M. CHAMBERLIN 



The girl's varsity basketball team this year 
was greatly weakened by the loss of more than 
half of last year's regulars through graduation. 
However, by adding material from the Freshman 
class to the remnant of last year's varsity, Miss 
Kenyon was able to put a regular team on the 
floor. Although the record established this sea- 
son by our coeds is not an enviable one, the 
girls did show marked improvement throughout 
the year. 

On February 1 at Elizabethtown, the Lebanon 
Valley Misses inaugurated their season with a 
21-20 loss to the E-town sextet. Largely through 
accurate shooting by Gem Gemmill and Anna 
Krebs, the score was tied at half time. During 
the second half, however, the Blue Belles were 
outscored 8-7, thus giving Elizabethtown a one- 
point victory. Mabel Chamberlin at center and 
Iva Claire Weirick at guard turned in nice per- 
formances for their initial game of college ball. 

On the following Saturday the Blue and 
White sextet engaged the Ursinus lassies at 
Collegeville, where they lost an exciting game 
by a 39-21 count. Although the score does not 
indicate it, the game was extremely well played, 
Lebanon Valley's floorwork equaling Ursinus' 
in every phase except the center tap. The loss 
of Gem GemmiU at forward was keenly felt in 
spite of Anna Kreb's stellar game. 

Two weeks later the Lebanon Valley Blue 
Belles suffered another defeat at the hands of 
the Penn Hall passers. Here the L. V. lassies 
met a new system of playing which was a large 
factor contributing to their downfall. In the 
center section the free throw was used in the 



G. HARKINS 




I. C. ■W'EIRICK 



[172] 




I., MILIHR 




M. KENYON. Coach 



On March 1 1 the Blue and White Basketcers 
again bowed before the attack of the Indian 
maidens at Juniata. Displaying an entirely dif- 
ferent brand of playing than that exhibited a 
week before, the Valley Misses held the fast-step- 
ping Juniata sextet to a 24-19 score. The six 
girls who started the contest played the entire 
game without substitution and without commit- 
ting a single foul. This is a feat which is seldom 
accomplished and can be performed only by a 
well-coached and well-balanced team. Harkins 
and Krebs at forward shot with great accuracy, 
while WolfsKeil and Chamberlin were active in 
advancing the ball. The Weinck sisters at guard 
were very consistent and held their opponents 
to comparatively low scores. 

The last game of the season was played on 
the home court with Elizabethtown. The Blue 
Belles continued their brilliant streak and 
emerged from the fray on the sunny side of a 
26-18 score. The Blue and White aggregation 
turned in a perfect account for itself, both on 
the offense and on the defense. 

While the Blue and White coeds won only 
one game out of six, it is clearly evident that 
the winning combination was not discovered until 
the final two contests. With the entire varsity 
squad back next year, the Valley girls may 
safely look forward to a successful season. The 
players for next year are of stellar ability. 
Anna Krebs, one of the best forwards Lebanon 
Valley has seen, Mabel Chamberlin, a fighting 
center, Gemmill at the other forward post, the 
two Weiricks guarding, and a host of other 
fine players should be a winning combination. 



A. FASNACHT 




[173] 




« 



Junior Lassies Prove Selves Hockey Champs 



Hockey season at L.V.C. came in with a 
bang in the fall of 1932. At a meeting held 
to elect captains for the class hockey teams, 
the following leaders were chosen: Seniors, 
Marion Kruger; Juniors, Charlotte Weirick; 
Sophomores, Peggy Weaver; Freshmen, Iva 
Claire Weirick. 

In the first game the Juniors subdued the 
Seniors, last year's champions, to the tune of 
5-0, Millie Nye and Betty Schaak doing the 
scoring for the winning team. 

The Frosh saw their first action together 
in a game with the Sophs. It was one of 
the most e.\citing contests of the season and 
the Sophs finally won by a 2-1 count. Cap- 
tain "Peggy" Weaver caged the ball twice for 
the Sophs and June Gingrich scored for the 
Frosh. 

The Seniors came back to their old fast 
method of play by defeating the Sophomores 



Won 



Juniors 
Frosh . 



FINAL LEAGUE 
Tied Lost 

1 

1 1 



5-1. Miriam Owen and Marion Kruger dis- 
played nice teamwork to score the five points 
for their group. 

The Junior-Frosh game proved to be an- 
other of the season's surprises. The Frosh 
team, now more proficient in experience and 
coordination in their passes, held the Juniors 
to a 1-1 deadlock. Charlotte Weirick and 
June Gingrich made the only goals. 

The Juniors, spurred to attack by their only 
tie of the season, defeated the Sophs 7-0. 
Then, in the final game of the season, the 
Frosh, continuing their fast playing, beat the 
Senior team 5-2. 

The Juniors won the tournament with their 
record of no games lost. However, they were 
closely pressed by the Frosh. With the splen- 
did material represented in the interclass 
teams, Lebanon Valley should put forth a 
successful varsity team next fall. 

STANDING 

Won Tied Lost 

Seniors 1 2 

Sophs 1 2 

->< 

5-' ■ 




fI74l 







SENIORS 




Senior Quintet Wins Interclass Supremacy 



This year the Interclass Basketball League 
provided more than its share of entertainment 
for the student body. To put it mildly, the 
games were rough, providing thnlls and ex- 
citement for the spectators, and giving the 
referees plenty of trouble. But the usual spirit 
of sportsmanship and fun prevailed through- 
out the entire schedule. 

Competition for the intramural champion- 
ship title was keen, and the final standing 
showed the Seniors and Juniors tied with two 
victories and one defeat each. The play-off 
game, the fastest and most exciting contest 
of the league season, found the Seniors on 
the long end of a 33-28 score. This victory 
gave the class of 1933 the title for the second 
successive year. 

The Seniors, with "Lut" Saylor as their 
captain, defeated the Sophs, and later the 
Frosh, with little difficulty. Their rough and 



tumble contest with the Juniors resulted in 
their first defeat in two years. 

A revamped Junior team, led by Captain 
Volkin and "Pop" Shaffer, won from the 
Sophs and Seniors after losing its initial 
game to the fighting Frosh quintet. 

Captain Konsko and his Sophomores had 
trouble in getting started this year, losing in 
succession to the Seniors and Juniors by wide 
margins. However, they came through with 
an important 36-31 victory in the grudge affair 
with their Frosh rivals. 

The Frosh team opened the season with a 
win over the Juniors in a close game. This 
proved to be the only victory of the season 
for the yearlings. The remaining two games 
resulted in defeats at the hands of the Senior 
and Soph teams, though they caused the latter 
no end of trouble. 



W< 



Seniors 
Juniors 



FINAL LEAGUE STANDING 
Lost Percentage 

Sophs 



1 



0.750 
0.500 



Frosh 



Won 
.. 1 
. . 1 



Lost 



Percentage 
0.333 
0.333 




[1751 




Soph Eleven Holds Frosh to Scoreless Tie 



Two evenly matched and determined class 
teams met on the college athletic field to settle 
the question of football supremacy. The issue 
was never satisfactorily settled, for the game 
resulted in a scoreless tie with plenty of "ifs" 
and "buts." 

The Soph line was outweighed by the Frosh, 
but much of the v^jeight was fat and did little 
or no good. The two backfields were evenly 
matched in running and punting, although 
the Sophs had the advantage in aerial attack. 

The first half was a sec'saw affair staged 
near the center of the field. Several times the 
Frosh penetrated Sophomore territory on fine 
runs by Niebel and Heinbach. Each time the 
attack failed, for on two occasions the first 
year men fumbled, and another time the Soph 
defense tightened as the yearlings lost on 
downs. In this period the Sophs gained little 
ground and were aided considerably by 
Konsko's punting. At no time during the 
period did either team advance the ball be- 
yond the other's twenty yard stripe. 

The second half showed determined Soph- 



omores, led by Captain "Frankie" CuUather, 
vainly trying to cross the Freshman goal line. 
Twice they advanced to the ten-yard marker, 
but each time the heavy Frosh line held for 
downs. On these, and several other occa- 
sions, Niebel's toe proved very helpful in 
getting the ball out of dangerous territory. 
Pete Kanoff and George Konsko ripped off 
several long gains for the Sophs, but at no 
time were they able to cross the last white 
stripe. The Frosh made a final attempt to 
score and succeeded in advancing the ball to 
midfield as the game ended at 0-0. 



Lineup : 






Soph 


Pos. 


Frosh 


Russell 


L.E. 


Shaffer 


Mentser 


L.T. 


Sandt 


Meyer 


L.G. 


Kirkpatrick 


Magee 


C. 


Bolton 


Cullather 


R.G. 


Schmuck 


Ricker 


R.T. 


Koons 


Miller 


R.E. 


Reese 


Konsko 


Q.B. 


Niebel 


P. Kanoff 


R.H.B. 


Uhler 


Arndt 


L.H.B. 


Heinbach 


Lloyd 


F.B. 


Edwards 



[176] 






fgfieioII^Bi^^n^^ 



I i;f«^ "^^ * 



V \"A i.i.i:^ < '< " •''*■'* ' ' ' 



!■! NNS 



vl^ \-v: \, M lii-i \i 



.^, Hold. lint-Pin Disfussrd cia.*.. iic<t ()((,<. ,. 
Party /"<"•>"'"''»'""' M Ore*'!! IJIolter 




»*»<. F, fnuth 




Fred E, Morrison 
Chosen the most popular seyiior man 



[178] 




Miss Ruth L. Garner 
Selected as the most personable graduate 



[1791 





Miss Anne Kiehl 
^iieen of the May 



|I80 




DANCER6 



[1811 







t4 






»>1 V 



CiUJ-i^J^::^. 



I 1821 




JLNICK DCC/H-SPCINe, 1932 




11831 



xs. 




// 



// 



The Importance oF Being Earnest 

Produced bv the Class of 19i4 

The Junior class presented for its annual play "The Importance of Being Earnest," 
by Oscar Wilde. This three-act drama was given in the Engle Conservatory, Tuesday 
evening, December 6, 1932, to a large number of delighted Lebanon Valley students 
and friends. 

This play, one of the best known works of Wilde, furnished the audience with 
an evening of excellent entertainment. Called "a trivial comedy for serious people" 
by its producers, the play lived up to its reputation, creating an atmosphere of light 
comedy. 

The story takes place in England with the first act located in London, and the 
remaining two at the country estate of John Worthing. Mr. Worthing, John at 
home and Earnest in the city, is in love with Gwendoline Fairfax, a London society 



(184J 




girl. She becomes engaged to hini under his name of Earnest. Algernon MoncriefF, 
a friend of Mr. Worthing, comes to the country posing as Mr. Worthing's brother 
and assuming the name of Earnest. He soon becomes engaged to Cecily Cardew, 
the niece of Mr. Worthing. When Gwendoline Fairfa.x comes to the country and 
meets Cecily, things begin to happen when they find that each is engaged to Earnest. 
Of course the two men get the thing straightened out, and the play ends with both 
love-affairs running smoothly. 

Allen Buzzell and Ray Johnson did good work in the parts of John Worthing 
and Algernon MoncriefF respectively, as did Margaret Kohler and Mildred Nye as 
Gwendoline Fairfax and Cecily Cardew. Miriam Book was a fine example of the 
dowager Lady Bracknell. Fred Lehman and Mary Gossard, as Canon Chasuble and 
Miss Prism, supplied a great number of laughs in their extravagant costumes. Other 
parts were taken by Carl Long and Clyde Ment:er, who served as butlers. 

To Dr. Wallace goes much of the credit for staging this play so successfully. 



[185] 



V: V 



% 




Doctor Faustus 

Phi Lambda Sigma 

Philokosmian Literary Society observed its sixty-fifth anniversary in the Engle 
Conservatory on Friday evening. May 20, 1932. The play presented on this occasion 
was "Doctor Faustus," an old English drama written by Christopher Marlowe. Dr. 
Wallace and Dr. Struble, as directors, were greatly responsible for the success of 
the production. 

"Faustus" IS the best of Marlowe's plays. Its story of Faustus selling his soul 
to the devil is ver>' absorbing, and full of interesting scenes, especially in the conjur- 
ing acts of Faustus. The appearance of the three devils and other inhabitants of Hell 
attracts the attention, as does the exceptional amount of vigorous, slapstick comedy. 

The actors almost outdid themselves throughout the play, and as a result the 
production was one of the most polished ever presented on the campus. 

Paul Keene as Faustus played one of the best roles of his entire career. He was 
ably supported by Chester Goodman in the part of Mephistophilis. Kermit Taylor 
played Lucifer capably, while Charles Kraybill, John Hughes, Clyde Mentzer, and 
Algire McFaul supplied the audience with an abundant share of laughs. Other 
prominent parts were taken by Fred Mund, Carl Myers, and Paul Emenheiser as 
papal legates. 



[186] 




The Taming of the Shrew 

Kappa Lambda Tsjii 

Clionian Literar>' Society celebrated its sixty-second anniversary' on Saturday 
evening, April 1, 1933. After the invocation by Miss Mary Rank, "30, and the 
welcome by Miss Kathryn Lut;, anniversary president, came the delightful presen- 
tation of a novelty version, in modern dress, of the Elizabethan farce, "The Taming 
of the Shrew," by William Shakespeare. 

The theme of the play is the taming of a girl, self-willed and individualistic, to 
make her properly subservient and domesticated after her marriage. The scenes 
were laid in local places. The production was modernized in language, collegiate in 
dress, and acted entirely by girls. Most of the success of the play was due undoubtedly 
to the capable student direction and untiring efforts of Miss Marion May. Those 
who appeared in the cast were: Rose Dieter and Mae Fauth in the leading roles as 
Kathryn and Petruchio; Baptista, Kathryn Leisey; Vincentio, Kathryn Witmer; Lucen- 
tio, Louise Gillan; Gremio, Gladys Withelder; Hortensio, Sarah Heilman; Tranio, 
Jane Shellenberger; Biondello, Helen Eddy; Grunio, Mildred Nye; Curtis, Helen 
Earnest; a pedant, Anne Matula; Bianca, Irene Heiser; a lord, Miriam Book; Chris- 
topher Sly, Sarah Kathrj'n McAdam; and a number of servants and bridesmaids. 



[187] 




The Last Mile 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 

Kalo;etean Literary Society celebrated its fifty-sixth anniversary on April 7, 1933. 
The entertainment of the evening was a play, "The Last Mile/' by John Wexley, 
which was followed by a reception in the Alumni gymnasium. 

"The Last Mile" is a gripping and dramatic play which portrays the emotions 
and inner selves of men in the death house, each awaiting his hour for electrocution. 
It contrasts the different outlooks which they have on their present life, and the life 
to be. It also shows the different reactions of the prisoners to the situations as they 
arise, and how they endeavor to meet their fate bravely. The play somehow emerges 
as a "Journey's End" of a war that has not yet had its November eleventh. 

The roles of the players were: Fred Mayor, Stuart Goodman; Richard Walters, 
Percy Clements; "Red" Kirby, William Barnes; Vincent Jackson, Charles Furlong; 
Eddie Werner, Walter Krumbiegel; Guard Drake, Peter Kandrat; John Meats, Wil- 
liam Speg; Guard OTlaherty, Henry Ricker; Guard Peddie, Wilbur Shroyer; Principal 
Keeper Callahan, Leonard Schrope; Guard Harris, Jack Todd; Tom D'Amoro, George 
Konsko; Father O'Conners, Albert Ebbert; Frost, a reporter, Carl Nelson; Brooks, 
another reporter, George Sherk. 



[188] 




// 



// 



An Accusing Finger 

Delta Lambda Sigma 

Delphian Literary Society celebrated its eleventh anniversary Friday evening, 
February 17, 1933. "An Accusing Finger," a mystery comedy by Mane Doran, was 
presented on this occasion, under the direction of Miss Trula Koch. 

The story centered around the disappearance of valuable family jewels, after which 
there was the usual excitement and suspicion. Interwoven with the main action of the 
play was an abundance of genuine, wholesome humor which added much to the ap- 
peal of the story. The play ended happily, however, with a clever solution of the 
crime by the young heroine. 

The characters included Marietta Ossi as Mrs. Hamilton, the victim of the 
theft; Chester Goodman, as Mr. Hamilton; Marion Kruger, as Peggy Cooper, the 
heroine; Catherine Wagner, as Tessie Hastings; George Sherk, as her brother. Tod; 
Gloria La Vanture, as Lily, Mrs. Hamilton's niece; Trula Koch, as Mrs. Neal, the 
housekeeper, who aided in the crime; Mortimer Duncan, her husband, portrayed by 
Clyde Mentzer; Ray Johnson, as John Wayne, a young clerk; Fred Lehman, as Wil- 
liam Cooper, Peggy's father; Charlotte Stabley, as a nurse; and Gem Gemmill, as 
Sally, the maid. The cast deserves credit for producing an enjoyable and interesting 
entertainment. 



[189] 



"%. 



%. 




[190 




[191] 





Miss Ruth M. Agen 
Senior Scholastic Honors 



fl92] 




Norman A. Hemperly 
Senior Scholastic Honors 



1931 



V 




11941 



CCLLEGE CALEND/IR 



March 3 — Faculty announcement — "We 
like to lecture to a group of faces filled 
with Beech-nut Chewing Gum." 

March 4 — Open house! The annual get-to- 
gether of the mohawkers. 

April 17 — The reaper takes a dear and 
beloved friend. Dr. Gossard passes away. 



May 5 — Pest house blues begin, 
fever hits L. V. C. 



Scarlet 




May 12 — Belle Middaugh wins a ")ingle" 
contest. The watch really runs. 

May 14 — May Day. The queen wasn't the 
only one to reign. 

June — Good-bye, Seniors! 

September 13 — The green stock arrives in droves on our beloved campus. 

September 16 — The cream of the crop, upper classmen, arrive — greener and fresher 
than the yearlings. 

September 17 — Faculty-student reception. Faculty dons glad rags to receive upper 
classmen and freshmen. 

September 30 — Literary societies pick up their tomahawks and go in search of new 
victims. Skits in chapel. 

October 20 — The world meets L. V. C. College press service is inaugurated with 
Clements at the head. 

October 22 — Juniata game. A victory! Frosh parade. 




1195 



% 



CCLLEGE CALENDAR 




October 30 — Mock election! The students prove to be 
staunch supporters of the Republican elephant. 

November 3 — A new infant arrives. The Green Blot- 
ter club is organi;:ed. 

November 19 — Clio goes ritzy at the Colonial ball- 
room. An anniversary minus a play. 

November 23 — First inter-class hockey game. How 
the dirt flies! 

December 1 — Dr. Lynch takes office as L. V. C.'s 
president. 



December 6 — A big day! The juniors 
tell about "The Importance of Being 
Earnest" by Oscar Wilde. 

"Joe Palooka" Volkin is elected leader 
of the 1933 gridsters. 

Prominent members of the "L" Club 
turn barbers. All new members ex- 
hibit the latest in coiffures. 





December 13 — Christmas banquet! Tuxedoes, filling, 
gravy, evening wraps. 

December 16 — With kisses, sighs of relief, and great 
Christmas spirits (?) we leave in hope that Santa 
will not miss us on his annual visit. 

January 6 — Sophomores hold a hop, skip, and jump 
contest, with music by Art Zellers" Harmony 
Hounds. 

January 12 — Kalo Minstrels. An accomplished hunch, 
this Kalo gang. 



fl96 



CCLLEGE CALENDAR 



January 18 — The hammer falls. Semesters and then 
the faculty come in for their fun. "He flunks!" 
"He conditions!" "He passes!" "Grade A!" (and 
it isn't milk!). 

January 28 — Exams over? Going home? You bet! 

January 31 — Installation of new dining hall bustards. 
What a good gang — Good for what? 

February 2 — Henry "Winchell" Palatini heads the 
1933 "Quittie." Lots of luck! Hope the depres- 
sion will be depressed. 

February 5 — Good-bye to the Kreider mansion. 





February 18 — Delphians and escorts trip 
the light fantastic toe in an aristocratic 
way at the Hotel Weimer. 

February 22 — Washington's birthday. 
Mentser emerges from ambush. 

March 2 — Green Blotter cuts its first 
tooth with a supplement in La Vie. 
We want more teeth! 



March 9 — Billiard tourney gets under way. 

March 20 — Leslie Saunders crowned "ivory king." 

April 7-8 — Kalos stage "The Last Mile" and hold 
their annual dinner dance. 

April 12 — Home to meet the bunny. 

April 28 — Big Junior Prom. Class of 1934 makes 
money in depression. 

May 5-6 — Philo anniversary play. And then Al Hol- 
lander at the Hotel Weimer ballroom. 

May 6 — Rain on May Day. What a shame! 




[197] 




11981 




[199] 




[200] 




12011 



\ 



\ \ 




Guess Where 



[202] 



Compliments 

ROY H. LIGHT 



WALL PAPER 

AND 

WINDOW SHADES 



Main & Manheim Sts. 
ANNVILLE PENNA. 



Sandiviches Dinners 


ROEMIG'S 


Home-Made 


Ice Cream 


* 


I. H. ROEMIG 


Altinufncturer 


30 East Main Street 


Annville, Pa. 


Sundaes Sodas 




Duck or Be Ducked 



HERSHEY PARK 

Hershey, Pa. 

"The Park U'ith a Country: 
Club Attniisf>here" 

18-HoLE Public Golf Course 

dancing 

Every 
Wednesday and Saturday 

World F"amous Crchestras 

Ice Palace open from December until 
April with Ice Skating Every Evening 

Hockey is a regular iveekly 
attraction 



[203] 




Intestinal Fortitude? 



John L. Bernstein 

Florist 

and 

Decorator 

High Grade of Cut Flowers 
and Potted Plants 
For all Occasions 



The Flower Shop 

Rear of Court House 
Bell Phone 592 

Greenhouses Front and Maple Streets 
Bell Phone 963 

Lebanon, Pa. 



ARNOLD'S 
BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive 
Shoes 

Varsity Girls' 

for Girls 

FLORSHEIM 
SHOES 

For the JSIan ic/io Cares 

34 N. Eighth Street 
Lebanon Pa. 



Kreamer Brothers 

FURNITURE 
UNDERTAKING 



Private Ambulance 
Service 



Lebanon County's 
Busiest 

Furniture Store 



Annville 



Penna. 



[204] 



ASTOR 
THEATER 

Presenting 

Tried and Proven 

Clean Shoics 

of M erit and Prestige 

The Latest 

at the earliest 

availability 

Popular Prices 




ThREH MuSKEliitRS 




Three Ball in the Corner 



The 
Pennw ay Hotel 

and 
Pennwav Bakery 



JJ^ish to Thank 

The Faculty and Students 

For Their Patronage 



AXN\IL1,E 



Penna. 



|:35j 



'^i'SjSW'' 




It's Your Move 



S. MERCURIO 

&SON 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Wholesale 
Fruit and Produce 



"We dont keep the best 
We Sell it!" 



GRIMM'S 
BOOK STORE 

Yoitr College Needs 

in Stationery, 

Loose-leaf Books 

and fillers 

Also 

5 & 10-Cent Store 
Goods 

Try Us First 



SHENK 



AND 



TITTLE 



* 



'Everything for 
Sport" 



* 



313 Market Street 



Harrisburg 



Penna. 



[:o6] 





HO 1 EL 


WEIMER 






Lebanon, Pa. 




Coffee Shoppe 


Famous for Fine 


Food 



HERSHEY 

DAIRY 
PRODUCTS 



•* 



LABORATORY 
CONTROLLED 



Protection 

at the Source Guards 

Hershey's Quality 




Scandalize My Nami 



noutrichs: 



[ 5 Always Reliable a 



Harrisburg. Pennsylvania 



[207] 



UNION EMBLEM 
COMPANY 

College 

and 

Fraternity Jeicelry 

Favors 

Felt Goods 

and 

Commencement Stationery 

P.A.LM'iRA, PeXXSVL\ANIA 

P. H. NISSLEY. Mgr. 




Will It Explode? 



Visit 

The 

Lebanon Palace 

of Sweets 

HOME-MADE 
CANDIES 

AN'D 

ICE CREAM 

ffe Serve 
Light Luncheons 




Antique Col:hli'r's Bench 
as a Loiu Book Tabic 

HOW WILL YOU 

FURNISH YOUR 

HOME? 

\\ hen you come to this all important 
question, don't rush blindly into pur- 
chases vou will soon regret. TRU- 
TYPE REPRODrCTIONS have a 
style and workmanship that is as 
lasting as the lovely antiques after 
which they are patterned. 

TRUTYPE "Add — A — Piece' Plan 
will show you the ideal way to furnish 
for lasting satisfaction. Write us for 
particulars and the name of the TRU- 
TYPE Dealer in your vicinity. 

STATTON FURNITURE 
MFG. COMPANY, Inc. 

HACJERSTOWN MARYLAND 



[208] 



Specidlizinq in School 

and CoUeqe Annual 

Photoqraphy 

ITlay & Durrelt 

Portraits 



Three seuent^'-seuen Fifth Auenue 
NEIP IJORK 



Official Photographer 
to the 

1934 Quittapahilla 



1209] 






X 















The Staff of the 

1934 Quittapahilla ... 

Wish gratefully to acl^nowledge 
the aid shown to them in the 
production of this volume. 
Especially are they indebted to: 

The Philokosmian Literary 
Society for use of the society 
hall during photographic work; 

Messrs. May and Durrett of the 
firm of May &? Durrett for their 
assistance in taking pictures; 

Mr. G. R. Warren, of the 
Hammersmith'Kortmeyer Co. 















[310] 



IVLirahile dictu! 

The work . . . 
is ended 

V 



[211] 



Sfffcr • 



X 



V