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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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• The Wbrld today is upset, with regimes being 
overthrown, with revolution rife, with economic 
welfare: strained to the breaking point 



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ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 









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* With a thousand and one points of friction 
prevalent on all sides, advance in one direc- 
tion at least continues undaunted— unwavering. 



THE ENGLE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 






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* Throush centuries it has gone on without 
fail in times of war and peace^ prosperity and 
depression. Science is perpetual in its motion. 



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THE CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



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* In bio ogy, in chemistry, in astronomy^ in 
medicine, in mathematics, the world progresses 
— forges forward without pause. It is thus 
that .... 



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THE COLLEGE CHURCH 





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to the Science Department^ to its professors^ 
to its students, to the great men present and 
past whose accumulated knowledge is the basis 
of further accomplishment/ we dedicate .... 



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WEST HALL 



'UPpt imjumr^LM; "i i8liia ti t fji|'<iiiiir If. 





I N n M M imi 1 1 1 ^^^^^^^ 

the 1935 Quittapahilla/ annual of college life^ 
published by the Junior Class of Lebanon 
Valley College .... 




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and copyrightecl in Annville, Pennsylvania, 
by its editor/ Henry G. Palatini, and its busi- 
ness manager, Charles L. Hauck, Jr. 



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SOUTH HALL 










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IV. 
V. 



The Administration 
The Classes 
The Activities 
Athletics 
Features 




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MEN'S DORMITORY 



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M I N I STRATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Representatives from the East Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev, 5 C, Enck, A.M., B.D., D.D. Harrisburq, Pa. 1934 

Rev, P. B. Cibble, A.M., B,D., D.D. Palmyra, Pa. 1934 

Rev 0. T. Ehrhart, A.B , D.D. Lancaster, Pa. 1934 

Rev. D. E. Young. A.M.. B.D., D.D. Harrisburg, Pa. 1934 

Rev. H. E Schaeffer, A.B., D.D. Pennbrook, P-. 1935 

Rev. G. W. Hallman, AM, Harrisburg, Pr. 1935 

Rev, J Jones, A M , B.D , D D. Annville, Pa. 1935 

Mr. C. L. Graybill Lancaster, Pa. 1935 

Prof. H H. Baish, A.M., LLD. Harrisburg, Pa. 1936 

Mr. |. R. Engle, A.B, LL.B, LL.D. Palmyra, Pa. 1936 

Mr. John E. Gipple Harrisburg, P.-^. 1936 

Mr. M. H. Bachman Middletown, Pa. 1936 

Rev. H. E Miller, AM . BD. D.D. Lebanon, Pa. 1935 



Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev J, H, Ness. AB. B D , D D. York, Pa, 1934 

Rev. G I. Rider, A.B , D.D. Hagerstown, Md 1934 

Mr. Albert Watson Carlisle, Pa. 1934 

Mr. Reuben M. Rife Chambersburg. Pa. 1934 

Rev. P. E. V. Shannon Dallastown, Pa 1935 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, D.D Hagerstown. Md 1935 

Mr. E. N. Funkhouser. A B. Hagerstown. Md 1935 

Mr. R. G. Mowrey Quincy, Pa. 1935 

Rev. P. O. Shettel. A B . D.D. Baltimore. Md. 1936 

Mr. C. A. Chandler Carlisle. Pa. 1936 

Rev. M. R. Fleming. BD. PhD.. D.D. Red Lion. Pa. 1936 

Hon. W. N. McFaul. LL.B. Baltimore. Md. 1936 

Rev. Ira S. Ernst, A.B. Carlisle, Pa. 1936 

Representatives from the Virginia Conference 

Rev. W. F, Cruver, D,D, Martmsburg. W. Va. 1934 

Mr. G. C. Ludwig Keyser. W. Va. 1934 

Rev. W. H. Smith. A.B. B.D. Elkton. Va. 1935 

Rev. Vv'. A. Wilt Martmsburg. W. Va. 1935 

Rev. ]. H. Brunk. D.D. Blairton, W. Va. 1936 

Rev. G. W. Stover Winchester. Va. 1935 

Alumni Trustees 

Mrs. Louisa Williams Yardley, '18, A.B. Philadelphia, Pa. 1934 

Prof. C. E. Roudabush. '03, A.M. Minersville. Pa. 1935 

Mr. A. K. Mills, '04 Annville, Pa. 1935 

Trustees at Large 

Bishop G. D. Batdorf Harrisburg. Pa. 1934 

Dr. H. M. Imboden NewYorkCity 1934 

Mr. O. W. Rechard Dallastown. Pa. 1934 



33 




CLYDE A. LYNCH 
A.M., B.D., D.D., PH.D. 

President of Lebanon Valley College 



The atmosphere of a Christian college should be favorable to the 
promotion of science. Science and religion are not antagonistic; 
they are complementary. Goethe observed that existence ana- 
lyzed by human reason leaves a remainder. Religious interpreters 
of this significant remainder are finding powerful allies today 
among distinguished men of science. Repudiating the old ma- 
terialistic philosophy, that was "threatening to bind our souls 
with secular chains," outstanding physicists contend that this 
universe cannot be explained solely in terms of matter. There- 
fore, it is becoming easier to believe in the priority of spirit and 
in the supremacy of those cultural values that make men pre- 
eminent in the animal kingdom. 

Here the student is helped to synthesize his knowledge gained 
in many fields — to formulate an adequate philosophy that will 
yield life-long satisfactions and supply the highest motivations 
in his quest for the summum bonum. Sympathetic professors 
assist him to retain his religious attitudes in those critical periods 
when his earlier faith is challenged by widening knowledge. 

The flower plucked out of the crannied wall whispers its 
secret about Cod and man to the reverent investigator. All 
courses properly pursued lead ultimately to Cod. In college days 
the youth has unique opportunity of reviewing and interpreting 
the creative and historic processes — 

"Some call it Evolution, 
And others call it Cod." 



34 




THE FACULTY 

The faculty of a college stands as a medium for the student's grasp of life 
which he will sooner or later meet outside the small realm of friends and asso- 
ciates on the campus. It is through the eyes of the faculty that the student 
first gets a true picture of what he must face and the experiences which none 
of us can escape. In truth, the very foundations upon which a college rests are 
laid largely upon the shoulders of its faculty. 

A faculty is not solely the determiner of the intellectual quality of the stu- 
dents. It affects greatly his social attitudes as well. After all, each professor 
represents merely another interpretation of his own field of activity, and it is 
this interpretation which grows out of the professor's outlook on reality, his 
reactions toward certain movements and existing conditions, and his ability 
in the art of common sense reasoning that becomes a large part of the student 
himself. 

The student attending a small college in which the faculty is of a superior 
quality is undoubtedly at a great advantage because of the opportunity he has 
in making better contact with this powerful influence. The privilege of per- 
sonal instruction and advice, of intimate friendship, and of other social rela- 
tionships is within closer grasp, and in many instances the student gradually 
accepts the professor as a trustworthy confidant. 

It is this type of relation between teacher and student, and a broadminded 
desire to reveal the truth which characterize the faculty of Lebanon Valley 
College. The work of every department is directed by instructors who are well 
qualified and capable of presenting an adequate and practical type of instruc- 
tion. 

Henceforth, there exists at Lebanon Valley that ever-present living link 
binding the truth-seeking student with the truth-revealing instructor — a 
combination sure to promote a better feeling of familiarity, a home-like envir- 
onment, and a cultural uplift. 



35 



FACULTY 



HIRAM H. SHENK 

A.B., LLD. 
Professor of History 



O. EDGAR REYNOLDS 

A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Education 



SAMUEL H. DERICKSON 

M.S., Sc.D, 

Professor of Biological Science 

SAMUEL 0, GRIMM 

B.Pd, A.M. 

Professor of Physics and Registrar 

CHRISTIAN R. GINGRICH 

A.B., LL.B. 

Professor of Political 

Science and Economics 

PAULS. WAGNER 

A.M.. Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 

ROBERT R, BUTTERWICK 

A.M., B.D , D.D. 

Professor of Bible and Philosophy 

MARY C. GREEN 

Dean of Women 

Professor of French 



PAULA. W. WALLACE 

Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

G. ADOLPHUS RICHIE 

A.M., B.D., D.D. 
Professor of Bible and 
New Testament Greek 

MILTON L. STOKES 

A.M., LL.B. 

Professor of Business 

Administration 

E. E. MYLIN 

A.M. 

Physical Director and Coach 

EUGENE H. STEVENSON 

A.M. (Oxon.) , Ph.D. 

Professor of History 

M. STELLA JOHNSON 

Ph. D. 

Professor of French 



ANDREW BENDER 

Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 



V. EARL LIGHT 

M.S., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology 



HELEN E MYERS 

A.B. 

Librarian 



L. LOUISE LIETZAU 

Ph.D. 
Professor of German 



36 



FACULTY 



GEORGE C. STRUBLE 

M.S., Ph. D, 

Associate Professor of English 



RUTH E, BENDER 
A.B. 
Piano 



L GARY BAILEY 

AJvl.. PhD 

Professor of Psychology 

and Education 

MILDRED S. KENYON 

B.S., A. M. 

Director of Physical 

Education for Women 

ALVIN H. STONECIPHER 

Ph. D. 

Professor of Latin 

MARGARET A. WOOD 

B.S. in Ed. 

Professor of Hygiene 

Dietitian, School Nurse 

NORMAN A. HEMPERLY 

A.B. 
Assistant in Mathematics 

MARY E. GILLESPIE 

B.S. 

Director of the Conservatory 

of Music 



R. PORTER CAMPBELL 
Mus.B. 
Organ 

ALEXANDER CRAWFORD 
Voice 

HAROLD MALSH 
Violin 

ELLA MOYER 

B.S., MA. 

Professor of Theory 

EDWARD P. RUTLEDGE 

B S., MA. 

Professor of Instrumental Music 

NELLA MILLER 
Piano 

D. CLARK CARMEAN 

A.B., MA. 

Associate Professor of 

Instrumental Music 

J, OWEN JONES 

A.M., D D 

Pastor of the College Church 



37 



i 
I 




SENIOR OFFICERS 

First Semester 

J. ALLAN RANCK President 

ANNE MATULA Vice-President 

KATHRYN WITMER Secretary 

J. M. JORDAN Treasurer 

Second Semester 

H. A. McFAUL President 

KATHRYN MOWREY Vice-President 

A. CHARLOTTE WEIRICK Secretary 

THOMAS MAY Treasurer 



39 




MARVIN L. ADAMS 
Adamsdale, Pa. 

Business Ad. Kalo 

College: Commerce Club, I, 2, 
3, 4; May Day Program, 1. 

Class; Scrap, 1, 2; Tug, 1 ; Nu- 
meral Fight, I, 2; Secretary, 2. 
Society; Anniversary Committee, 



REV. T. I. BARNHART 
Hershey, Pa. 

Bible and New Testament Greek 



HAiDEE BELLE BLUBAUCH 
Baltimore, Md. 

History Clio 

Class; Hockey, 2, 3. 

Society; Corresponding Secre- 
tary, 2. 



MIRIAM ANNA BOOK 

H^rrpcburg, Pa. 

English Clio 

College; Education Assistant, 2, 
3. 4; Library Assistant, 2, 3, 4; Y. 
W. C. A., 3, 4; Eurydice. I, 2; 
May Day Program, 2, 3; Wig and 
Buckle, 4; Reader's Club, 3, 4. 

Class; Play, 3; Prom Committee, 
3. 

Society; Chaplain, 3; Usher, I; 
Anniversary Play, I, 3; President, 
4; Judiciary Committee, 4; Anni- 
versary Committee, 2, 3. 



ALLEN EUGENE BUZZELL 
Sparrow's Point. Md. 

Business Ad, Kalo 

College; Y. M. C. A,. 2; Orches- 
tra, I ; Band, 2. 3. 4; Commerce 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, Vice-President, 3; 
Debating Team. 2, 3 ; May Day Pro- 
gram, 1. 2; Wig and Buckle, 4, 
President, 4. 

Class; President, 2; Scrap, 1. 2; 
Football, 2; Junior Play, 3; Quitta- 
pahiila Staff, 3. 

Society; Anniversary Play, I, 2; 
Judiciary Committee. 3. 



GEORGE V. DERICKSON 
Annville. Pa. 

Biology Kalo 

College; Glee Club, 1, 2; Men's 

Senate. 2; Delphian Anniversary 

Play, 1. 

Class; Scrap, 2; Football, 2. 
Society; Anniversary Play. I, 2, 

3; Anniversary Committee, 2; 

Minstrels, 3. 





MATILDA ROSE BONANNI 




Myerstown. Pa. 




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College; 


Orchestra, 1 , 2, 


3, 4; 


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3, 4; Eurydice, 


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4; Girls' Band, 4 


May 



Day, I, 2, 3, 4; Philo Anniversary 
Orchestra, 2. 

Class; Hockey. 2; Archery, 1, 2. 

Society; Anniversary Play. 2. 



MARY MARGARET BRACE 
Lebanon, Pa. 

History Delphian 

College; History Club. I, 2, 3; 

International Relations Club, 4. 
Society; Anniversary Committee, 

2, 3. 



PAUL E. DEIMLER 
Hummelstown. Pa. 

Business Ad. 



KENNETH MORGAN EDWARDS 
Pottsville, Pa. 

History Kalo 

College; Coe College, 1; Drew 

University, 2; Life Work Recruits, 

3, 4. 

Society; Chaplain, 4. 



THOMAS C. EDWARDS 
Pottsville, Pa. 

English 

College; Wesleyan University. 
2; Band. 3, 4. 



CYRUS DANIEL ENCLE 
Hummelstown. Pa. 

Biology 



Kalo 



EMMA KATHRYN FASNACHT 
Annville, Pa. 

Latin Clio 

College: Scholastic Prize. I; 

Basketball, 3; German Club. 2, 3, 

4, Secretary. 3. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 



WILLIAM KEMPER FISHBURN 
Ephrata, Pa. 

Business Ad. Philo 

College: Football, I, 2; Com- 
merce Club, 1,2,3,4. 

Class: Football, I ; Basketball. 
1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2. 



CEM CAROLYN CEMMILL 
Glen Rock. Pa. 

English Delphian 

College: Basketball, 2, 3, 4; 
Wig and Buckle. 4; Reader's 
Club. 4; W. S. G. A., 4; -Hall 
President, 4; May Day Program, I, 
2.3.4. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 
Society: Pianist, 2; Warden, 1; 
Corresponding Secretary, 3; Presi- 
dent, 4. 



DOROTHY ELIZABETH ELY 
Arendtsvillc. Pa. 

Music Delphian 

College; Orchestra. 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Eurydice, 1,2; Glee Club. 3, 4; 

Girls' Band, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Hockey, 2. 
Society; Warden, 1; Secretary. 

2; Pianist. 3. 



DEWITT MILLER ESSICK 
Downingtown. Pa. 

History Philo 

College: Men's Senate. 2, 3, 4 
History Club, 1 , 2, 3. President. 3 
International Relations Club. 4 
Chemistry Club. 2; German Club 
1. 2; May Day Program. I , 2. 3 
La Vie Collegienne. 2, 3, 4; Wig 
and Buckle, 4. 

Class: President, 2; Football, 1. 
2; Tug. 1, 2; Scrap, I. 2; Basket- 
ball, 2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3; Prom 
Committee, 3. 

Society: President, 4; Secretary, 
2; Sergeant at Arms, I ; Anni- 
versary Committee. I, 2. 3, 4; An- 
niversary Play, 2, 3; Chairman of 
Executive Committee, 3. 



GRANT FEESER 
Lebanon. Pa. 

Biology 

College; Football, 1. . 
"L" Club, 2, 3, 4. 



JAMES ). FRIDY 
Mountville, Pa. 

Business Ad. Kalo 

College; Chemistry Club. I; 

Commerce Club. 2, 3, 4; May Day 

Program, 1 . 

Class; Scrap, I , 2. 

Society; Anniversary Committee, 

2. 



JOSEPH CAPP GILBERT 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Chemistry 

College: Penn State, 1, 2. 





MARY ELIZABETH COSSARD 
Annville, Pa. 

English Delphian 

College: Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 

Hockey, 1 , 2, 3 ; Reader's Club, 1, 

2, 3, 4; Assistant in English, 4; 

May Day Program, 1 , 2, 3. 

Class: Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Hop 

Committee, 2. 

Society: ludiciary Committee, 2, 

3; Play Committee, 4. 



VERNA IRENE CRISSINCER 
New Cumberland, Pa. 



Mathematics 

College: W. S. C. 



MARY SPOTTEN CROFF 
Columbia, Pa. 

French Clio 

College: Assistantship in French, 

4; May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; 

Reader's Club, 2, 3. 4; Y. W. C. 

A., 1. 

Society: Usher, 1 ; Corresponding 

Secretary, 2. 



CHRISTINE GINGRICH CRUBER 
Annville, Pa. 

English Clio 

College: La Vie Collegienne, 2, 
3, 4; English Assistant, 3, 4; In- 
ternational Relations Club, 4, Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, 4: Orchestra, 1, 
2, 3; May Day Program, I, 2; De- 
bating Team, I ; Y. W, C, A., 1. 

Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3; 
Hockey, 2, 3. 

Society: Usher, I; Anniversary 
Play, 2; Editor, 3; Critic, 4. 



ROBERT CLINGER HEATH 
Reading. Pa. 

Music Kalo 

College: Glee Club, 2, 3, 4. 
President, 4; Band, 3, 4, Secretary, 
3; Orchestra. 3, 4; May Day Pro- 
gram, 1, 2, 3, 4; Operetta, 4. 



CLAIRE MELVIN HITZ 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Bible and New Testament Creek 

College: Glee Club, 1, 2; Life 
Work Recruits, 1 , 2, 3, 4; Y. M. 
C. A., 3, 4; Prayer Meeting Co- 
Chairman, 4; May Day Program, 1, 
2, 3; Assistant in Bible and Creek, 
4. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 



Delphian 

A., 4, Treas- 
4, Treasurer, 
Presicjent. 4; 
4; May Day 
3; 



urer, 4: Y. W. C. A., 
4; Art Club, 2, 3, 4, 
Hockey, 4, Captain, 
Committee, 2, 3: Reader's Club, 
Mathematics Assistantship, 4. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3; Secretary, 
3 ; Prom Committee, 3. 

Society: Warden, 1 ; Recording 
Secretary, 3; Judiciary Committee, 
2, 3; Corresponding Secretary, 3; 
Critic, 2; Anniversary Committee, 
1, 2, 3. 



D. DWIGHT GROVE 
Felton, Pa. 

Pre-Medical Philo 

College: Band, 2, 3, 4; German 
Club, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 
3, 4, Vice-President, 4; May Day 
Program, I, 2; Chemistry Assist- 
ant, 4; Honor Roll, 4. 

Class: Football, 2; Basketball, 2, 
3 ; Tug, 2; Scrap, 1 , 2. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1; 
Editor, 2; Corresponding Secretary, 
3: Anniversary Committee, 1 , 2, 3, 
4. 



E. BRAD HARTMAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Education 

College: Drexel, 1 . 



CATHERINE FIETTA HECKMAN 
Reading, Pa. 

Music Clio 

College: Glee Club, 3, 4; Eury- 

dice, 1, 2; Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; 

Girls' Band, 4; Symphony, 4; May 

Day Program, 1 . 2, 3, 4. 

Class: Hockey, 2; Archery, 1, 2. 



EARL EDWARD HOOVER 
Somerset, Pa. 

Biology Kalo 

College: La Vie Collegienne, 3; 
May Day Program, 2, 3; Assistant 
in Biology, 2, 3, 4. 

Class: President. 3; Scrap, 1,2; 
Tug, 1, 2; Football, 1. 

Society: President, 4; Secretary, 
2; Critic, 3; Play Committee, 1, 2, 
3; Anniversary Chairman. 4; ju- 
diciary Committee, 2, 3. 



DOROTHY MARY JACKSON 
Esterly, Pa. 

English Delphian 

College: W. S. G. A., 4; Y. W. 

C. A., 4. Corresponding Secretary, 

4; Reader's Club, 2, 3. 4; Art Club, 

3,4. 

Society: Warden, 1; Treasurer, 

3. Vice-President, 4. 



). MITCHELL JORDAN 
High Rock, Pa. 

Pre-Medical Philo 

College: Men's Senate, 3. 4; 

Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; May 

Day Program. 1, 2, 3; Football 

Manager, 3. 4; "L" Club, 3, 4. 
Class: Treasurer, 4; Quittapahilla 

Staff, 3; Football, 1, 2; Tug, 1, 2; 

Scrap, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1; 

Vice-President, 3. 



WENDELL REUBEN KING 
Richland, Pa. 

Mathematics 

College: Lehigh Universit)', I. 



MARGARET E. KOHLER 
Smithsburg, Md. 

French Clio 

College: V^. S. G. A., 3; Y. W. 

C. A., 2, 3, 4; German Club, 1, 2, 

3. 4; French Assistant, 3, 4; May 

Day Program, 1,2; Debjting Team, 

1. 

Class: Vice-President, 2: Junior 

Play, 3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 
Society: Anniversary Play, 1,2; 

Pianist, 1, 2, 3. 



MARK RANK KREIDER 
Cleona, Pa. 

Business Ad- 
College: Commerce Club, 1, 
3, 4; German Club, 1, 2, 3. 4. 



RAY B. JOHNSON 
Johnstown, Pa. 

History Philo 

College: Shenandoah College. 1, 
2; History Club, 3; International 
Relations Club, 4; Life Work Re- 
cruits, 3, 4; Delphian Anniversary 
Play, 3; May Day Program, 3; 
Wig and Buckle, 4; Y. M. C. A., 
4. 

Class: Junior Play, 3. 
Society: Cnairman of Executive 
Committee, 3; Anniversary Play, 3; 
Anniversary President, 4. 



PETER WILLIAM KANDRAT 
Minersville, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalo 

College: Football. 1. 2, 3, 4; 
"L" Club, 3, 4, President, 4; 
Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; French 
Club, 1 ; May Day Program, I, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 3, 4; 
Tug. 1 ; Baseball. 1. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms. 1 ; 
Anniversary Play, 1, 3; Corres- 
ponding Secretary, 4. 



GEORGE MARTIN KLITCH 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pre-Medical Kalo 

College: May Day Program, I. 
Class: Tug, I, 2; Football, 1, 2; 
Scrap. 1 , 2. 

Society: Secretary. 3; Sergeant 
at Arms, I ; Judiciary Committee. 
3; Treasurer, 4; Anniversary Presi- 
dent, 4. 



ANNA MORAN KREBS 
Palmyra, Pa. 

Latin Clio 

College: Basketball, 1, 2. 3, 4; 

Hockey, 4. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 



MARTHA ULRICH KREIDER 
Media, Pa. 

History Clio 

College: W. S. G. A., 4, Vice- 
President, 4; Y. W. C. A., 1 ; His- 
tory Club, 2, 3 ; Green Blotter Club. 
3, 4, Scop, 4; La Vie Collegienne. 
2, 3, 4; Hockey Manager, 4. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3; Quittapa- 
hilla Staff, 3; Hop Committee, 2. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 2; 
Treasurer, 3; Editor, 2; Anniversary 
Committee, 1 , 2. 





HELEN RUTH LANE 
Lodi, N. ]. 

English Delphian 

College: French Club, 1; Art 

Club, 3, 4; Reader's Club, 2, 3, 4; 

Varsity Basketball Manager, 3; 

May Day Program, 1 , 2. 

Class: Vice-President, 1 ; Hockey, 

2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 
Society: Usher, 1 , 2. 



JOHN |, B. LIGHT 

Lebanon, Pa, 

Chemistry 

College: Honor Roll, 3. 



A. MARGARET LONGENECKER 
Middletown, Pa. 

Mathematics Clio 

College: W. S, C. A., 2, 4, Presi- 
dent, 4: Y. W. C. A., 3, 4; May 
Day Program, 1 . 2, 3 ; Mathematics 
Assistant, 4 : Student - Faculty 
Council, 4. 

Class: Junior Prom Committee, 
3. 

Society: Recording Secretary, 3; 
Judiciary Committee, 3; Anniver- 
sary Play, 3. 



ANNE E. MATULA 
Middletown, Pa. 

Mathematics Clio 

College: International Relations 
Club, 4; French Club, 2, 3; Debat- 
ing, 1 : May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; 
Eurvdice, 1 , 2. 

Class: Vice-President, 3, 4; 
riockey, 2. 

Society: Warden, 1; Recording 
Secretary, 3; Treasurer, 3; Presi- 
dent, 4; Anniversary Play, 1, 3. 



HARRY ALGIRE McFAUL 
Baltimore, Md. 

History Philo 

College: Men's Senate, 4; Wig 
and Buckle, 4; History Club, 1, 2, 
3; May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; Y. 
M. C. A. Conference, 1 , 2. 

Class: President, 4; Prom Com- 
mittee, 3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3; 
Scrap, I, 2; Tug, 1, 2; Football, 
2; Basketball, 2. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 
Secretary, 2; Vice-President, 
Treasurer, 4; Anniversary Play, 
3 ; Anniversary Committee, 1 , 2. 
4. 



I, 



FREDERICK D. LEHMAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Biology 

College: Y. M. C. A., 4; Del- 
phian Anniversary Play, 3; Christ- 
mas Play, 4; Cheer-leader, 1, 2; 
Wig and Buckle, 4; Reader's Club, 
2, 3, 4; May Day Program, 1, 2, 3; 
Band, 2, 3, 4: Chemistry Club, 1; 
Tennis, 1 , 2, 3, 4. 

Class: Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Tug, 1 ; Baseball, 1 ; 
Scrap, 1, 2; Play, 3; Hop Com- 
mittee, 2. 



MAX HENRY LIGHT 
Annville, Pa. 

History Kalo 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 4: Captain, 4; 
"L" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day Pro- 
gram, I . 

Class: Tug, 1 , 2. 



RUTH ANNA MARK 
Hagerstown, Md. 

English Delphian 

College: Reader's Club, 1 , 2, 3, 

4; Y. W. C. A., 1. 
Class: Hockey, 2, 3. 
Society: Warden, 1 . 



THOMAS SENGER MAY 
Paradise, Pa. 

Education 

College: Millersville State Teach- 
ers' College, 1 ; Y. M. C. A., 3, 4; 
Life Work Recruits, 2, 3, 4, Sec- 
retary, 3. 



CLYDE SNADER MENTZER 
Ephrata, Pa. 

History Philo 

College: Y. M. C. A., 2, 3, 4; 
Treasurer, 3, Freshman Advisor, 4; 
La Vie Collegienne, 2, 3, 4; Man- 
ager of Debating, 4; Delphian An- 
niversary Play, 2, 3 ; Christmas 
Play, 4; Wig and Buckle, 4; 
Green Blotter, 3, 4; Reader's Club, 
2, 3, 4; History Club, 2, 3; May 
Day Program, 1, 2, 3. 

Class: Junior Play, 3; Play Com- 
mittee, 3; Basketball, 1, 2. 3, 4; 
Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2, 3; 
Anniversary Committee, 2, 3, 4; 
Vice-President, 3; Pianist, 2, 3. 



LEROY CHARLES MILLER 
Pottsville. Pa. 

Business Ad. Kalo 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2. 

3, 4; May Day Program, 1. 
Class: Scrap. 1 . 
Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1 ; 

Anniversary Committee, 4. 



MILDRED ALMEDA NYE 
Annville, Pa. 



History 

College: Y. 
History Club, 
lations Club. 
4; Eurydice, 
sistant, 2. 3, 
Day Program. 



Clio 
W. C. A.. 1. 3. 4; 
3; International Re- 
4; Wig and Buckle, 
1 , 2; Education As- 
4; Chorus. 4; May 
1. 2, 3. 
Class: Hockey, I, 2, 3j junior 
Play, 3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1, 2, 
3: Editor, 1 : Anniversary President, 
4. 



|. ALLAN RANCK 
New Holland, Pa. 

Mathematics Philo 

College: Y. M. C. A., 2. 3. 4 
Vice-President, 3, President, 4 
Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Prayer Meeting Chairman, 3; La 
Vie Collegienne, 3, 4; Wig and 
Buckle, 4. 

Class: Treasurer, 3: President, 
4: Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Secretary, 2; Anniver- 
sary Play, 2, 3. 



LUKE KINSEL REMLEY 
Hummelstown. Pa. 

Biology Kalo 

College: Juniata, 1 ; German 

Club, 2; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; 

Biology Assistant. 4; Pre Medical 

Scholarship, 3. 

Class: Treasurer, 3. 



C. CEORCE RUDNICKI 
Plymouth. Pa. 

Physics 

College: Drexel Institute, 1. 



KATHRYN MAUDE MOWREY 
New Cumberland, Pa. 

Mathematics Delphian 

College: Y, W. C. A.. 1. 2, 3, 4, 
President, 4: International Rela- 
tions Club, 4: Reader's Club, 2, 3, 
4; Hockey, 4; May Day Commit- 
tee. 2, 3 : Mathematics Assistant, 
4; Library Assistant, 2, 3, 4; La 
Vie Collegienne, 2, 3, 4: Debating 
Team, I, 2. 3, 4. 

Class: Vice-President, 2, 4; 
Hockey, 3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Vice - President, 4; 
Chaplain, 3; Anniversary Com- 
mittee, 2, 4. 

PAUL DRESNER PEIFFER 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Education 

College: May Day Program, 2; 
History Club, 2, 3. 



LESTER HERBERT REED 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Pre-Medical Kalo 

College: Band, 2, 3. 



EARL SHERMAN RICE 
Annville, Pa. 

Business Ad. 

College: Commerce Club. I. 
3, 4. 

Class: Basketball, 1 , 2, 3. 



ADELAIDE RUTH SANDERS 
Lebanon. Pa. 

Music 





ELIZABETH LOUISE SCHAAK 
Lebanon. Pa. 

History Clio 

College: History Club, 2, 3; 
Reader's Club. 2, 3. 4. President. 
-4; Green Blotter Club. 3, 4. Keeper 
of the Worde Horde. 3; English 
Prize. 2; Psychology Assistant. 4; 
Debating Team, 1, 2. 3. 4; La Vie 
Collegienne, 3, 4; Hockey, 4. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3; Quittapa- 
hilla Staff, 3. 

Society: judiciary Committee. 2, 
3. 4; Vice-President, 4; Editor, 3; 
Anniversary Committee. 3. 4; An- 
niversary Play. 3. 



RICHARD DONALD SCHREIBER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Pre-Medical Philo 

College: Men's Senate, 4; Band. 

3, 4; La Vie Collegienne, 3, 4, 

Managing Editor, 4. 

Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 



EDGAR 8. SCHANBACKER 
Lebanon. Pa. 

Business Ad. 

College: Commerce Club, 1. 2, 
3. 4. 



GEORGE DAVID SHERK 

Progress. Pa. 

Business Ad. Kalo 

College: Y. M. C. A., 3, 4; May 
Day Program, I, 2. 3; Commerce 
Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Delphian Anni- 
versary Play, 3; Wig and Buckle, 
4. 

Class: Treasurer, 2; Quittapa- 
hilla Staff, 3; Scrap, 2; Football, 
I. 2; Basketball. 1, 2. 

Society: Vice-President, 3; Cor- 
responding Secretary, 3; Anniver- 
sary Play, 1 ; judiciary Committee, 
4; Minstrels, 3. 



lOHN E. SLOAT 
Elizabethtown. Pa. 

Chemistry 

College: Elizabethtown, 



ARTHUR GOOD SPICKLER 
Elizabethtown. Pa. 

Biology Kalo 



JAMES HEBER SCOTT 
Lebanon. Pa. 

Chemistry Kalo 

College: Chemistry Club. 1. 2, 
3, 4. 



RICHARD SILLIK SLAYBAUGH 
Biglerville. Pa. 

Music Philo 

College: Symphony Orchestra. 1. 

2. 3, 4; Glee Club. 1. 2, 3, 4; 

Band, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A.. 2; Glee 

Club Treasurer, 4. 

Society: Pianist, 2, 3, 4. 



ESTHER LOISSMELSER 
Camp Hill. Pa. 

English Delphian 

College; Reader's Club. 1, 2, 3, 

4. 

Class: Hockey, 2. 
Society: Chaplain, 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN JONES TODD. JR. 
Flushing, N. Y. 

Business Ad. Kalo 

College: Men's Senate. 3, 4; 
President. 4; Business Manager. La 
Vie Collegienne, 4; May Day Pro- 
gram, 1, 2. 3; Commerce Club. 1 
2, 3, 4; Student-Faculty Council 
2. 

Class: Football. 1, 2; Tug. 1. 2 
Basketball, I, 2, 3; President, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1, 2 
Secretary, 3; Anniversary Play. 1, 
3. 



EDMUND HENRY UMBERCER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Mathematics Philo 

College: Mathematics Prize, 1 ; 
English Prize, I ; La Vie Colleg- 
lenne, 2. 3. 4. Editor, 4; Debating 
Team, 1, 2; Band, 3. 4, President, 
4; Little Symphony, 3, 4; Green 
Blotter. 3. 4; Physics Assistant, 2, 
3, 4. 

Class: Editor, 1934 Quittapa- 
hilla. 

Society : President. 4. 



DALE MARSHALL WAMPLER 
Harrisburg. Pa. 

Chemistry Kalo 

College: Albright, 1; Cheer- 
leader, 2, 3, 4. 

Class: Tug, 1 ; Football, 1. 



KENNETH SAMUEL WHISLER 
Hanover, Pa. 

Chemistry Philo 

College: Chemistry Club, I, 2, 
3, 4; May Day Program. 1, 2. 

Class: Scrap, 1; Tug, 2; Play 
Committee, 3; Quittapahilla Staff, 
3. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1,2; 
Secretary, 2; Anniversary Commit- 
tee, 2; Anniversary Play, 2. 



KATHRYN LOUISE WITMER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

English Clio 

College: Library Assistant, 3, 4; 
W. S. C. A., 4; Reader's Club, 2, 
3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer, 4; Ger- 
man Club, 2. 

Class: Hockey, 2, 3; Secretary, 
4. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 4; 
Anniversary Play, 3. 



ROBERT DANIEL WOMER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Business Ad. 

College: Debating, 1, 2. 3, 
Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



LEONARD VOLKIN 
Mount Pleasant, Pa. 

Biology 

College: Football, 1, 2. 
•L" Club. 2, 3, 4. 

Class: Basketball, 3. 



Kalo 
3, 4; 



Clio 
A., 3, 4; 
Hockey, 4; 
Mathe- 

Hockey, 2, 



A. CHARLOTTE WEIRICK 
Enola, Pa. 

Mathematics 

College: Y. W. C. 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
May Day Program, 1 , 2, 
matics Assistant, 4. 

Glass: Secretary, 4; 
3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Pianist, 2; Recording 
Secretary, 2; Anniversary Commit- 
tee, 3, 4. 



RUSSELL LEEROY WILLIAMS 
Winfield, Pa. 

Education 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4: 
Basketball. 1 . 2, 3, 4; Baseball. 1, 

2. 3. 4. Captain, 4; "L" Club, 2, 

3, 4, Vice-President, 4. 



MINNA ELLIOTT WOLFSKEIL 
Elizabeth, N. |. 

Business Ad. Delphian 

College: Business Ad. Assistant, 
3. 4; Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4, 
Secretary, 1; Art Club, 2, 3, 4, 
President, 3; Basketball, 2. 3, 4; 
Debating Manager, 3, 4; May Day 
Program, 1 , 2, 3 ; W. S. C. A., 3. 

Glass: Secretary, 3; Quittapa- 
hillia Staff, 3; Hop Committee, 2. 
Society: Warden, 1 ; Usher, 1 
2; Judiciary Committee, 1, 2, 3 
Anniversary Committee, 3. ' 4 
President, 4. 



JOHN DAVID ZECH 
Spring Crove, Pa. 

Chemistry Philo 

College: Band. 2, 3, 4; Chem- 
istry Club. 1, 2, 3, 4, President, 4; 
German Club, 1, 2; May Day Pro- 
gram, 1 ; Honor Roll, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Basketball, 2, 3, 4. 
Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1. 





JUNIOR OFFICERS 

First Semester 

WARREN MENTZER President 

ALLEN STEFFY Vice-President 

CATHERINE WAGNER Secretary 

J. P. DENTON Treasurer 

Second Semester 

HOWARD A. LLOYD President 

SARAH K. McADAM Vice-President 

HELEN EARNEST Secretary 

J. P. DENTON Treasurer 



48 



A. REBECCA ADAMS 

Cainesboro. Pa. 

History CLIO 

"Becky" seems to have just enough of that quality known as 
Southern charm. She's made many friends, although she has been 
on our campus for only a short time. But she's true-blue and de- 
serves loads of credit for being so faithful to that certain some- 
one she left behind her. 

"Becky " has taken quite an interest in. and has proven herself 
extremely loyal to our Girl's Varsity Basketball team Next year 
we expect to see Becky as one of our star guards. 

She's a good student. But. while she takes her work rather 
seriously, she does not allow it to keep her from entering campus 
social life. Let it never be said that "Becky" enjoys nothing but 
her books. 

We feel sure that with all her charm and lovely disposition her 
future success is assured. Best wishes, Rebecca. 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Rogues' Gallery, 3. 



CASPER E. ARNDT 

Annville, Pa. 

Business Ad. 

"Handsome Dutch," one of the most active fellows on the 
campus, is also one of the most popular. Whether in the class 
room or on the ball diamond, he is equally proficient and his 
deeds equally valorous. Since his Sophomore year he has been a 
member of the Men's Senate, helping to decide the guilt or in- 
nocence of accused strayers from the "straight and narrow." 

A cheerful disposition is perhaps his chief characteristic, and 
he is easily recognized by a smile that refuses to disapoear. This 
trait will serve as a valuable agency when "Dutch" leaves the 
campus for the world. We expect to hear great things from him 

College: Baseball, 1 , 2, 3 : Basketball, 1 , 2, 3 ; Men's Senate, 2. 
3 ; Commerce Club, 1 , 2, 3 ; Varsity "L" Club, 2, 3 ; May Day Pro- 
gram, 2. 

Class: Flag Scrap, 1 ; Football, 2; Tug, 1 : Basketball, 1 . 



RICHARD LEROY AX 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Mathematics 



KALO 



Mathematics, the Queen of the sciences, has summoned this 
young man to her court. He, in turn, has become one of her most 
loyal subjects. 

Utilizing the same determination he exhibits in solving diffi- 
cult problems in calculus classes, "Dick" penetrates the service 
of a particularly dangerous opponent on the tennis court, and for 
several years he has been one of Lebanon Valley's most depend- 
able racquet wielders. 

During the stormy months of the winter season the Ax is 
sharpened mentally and kept alert by participation in the uni- 
versally popular game of pinochle, the diversion doted upon by 
the denizens of the deep iday-students) . Between games "Dick" 
is usually to be found in the center of a group of students, dis- 
cussing historical problems or lending a hand to a less adept stu- 
dent of mathematics. 

College: Tennis, 2. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 




A9 




Music 



RUTH WELLS BAILEY 
Reading, Pa. 



DELPHIAN 



Ruth is our well-known Conservatory student whose chief 
claim to fame lies in bringing sweet tones out of Roemig's piano 
— or any other one for that matter. We think that Ruth would 
like to become a professional accompaniest and we can easily say 
that she has her foot on the right path. She plays the piano for 
almost everything on the campus — even down to Miss Kenyon's 
dancing classes. 

After speaking so much about Ruth's musical ability, we 
should add that Ruth has a very pleasing personality. Above all 
she is noted for her frankness and her clever wit. With such a 
combination of character and talent, is it any wonder that we ex- 
pect to hear her broadcasting in the future — or accompanying 
brilliant artists on their tours. We wish you every bit of success, 
Ruth 

College: May Day Program, 1,2; Symphony Orchestra, 3 ; Glee 
Club, 2, 3 ; Girl's Band, 4; Orchestra, 2. 



STEWART BARTHOLD 

Shillington, Pa. 

Mathematics 

Barthold is another one of our big, dashing athletes. He is the 
type of fellow who plays his best at all times. And, correlatively, 
he works his hardest at all times. On the football field or basket- 
ball court, on the waiter force, in his studies. "Butch" throws 
himself into the job and makes good. He is a splendid combina- 
tion of athlete and student. 

But Butch finds time for social endeavors, too. Although he 
has a fair one at home and courts no ties on the campus, he is 
equally popular with male and female. At social functions you 
may see him flashing his personality, or flashing his managerial 
ability with his own particular poise and energy. 

Week-ends certainly do see "Butch" hitting for home on the 
double time, but no matter. At the rate he is now going, we feel 
quite confident in predicting that he will make a fine husband. 

College: Football, 1 , 2, 3 ; Basketball, 1 , 2, 3 ; Baseball, 1, 2; 
Varsity "L" Club, 2, 3. 



GALEN B. BAUCHER 
Hershey, Pa. 



Business Ad. 
Tall, blonde, handsome, and athletic. Girls, 



PHILO 

what could be 

sweeterr' There is a serious drawback, however, for Galen has 
several shares of stock in a Hershey heart and vice versa. 

"Whiz" is very versatile. An accomplished tackle on the foot- 
ball team, he is also a female impersonator whose ability is of the 
highest calibre. Fortunate students who have witnessed his abil- 
ity at character portrayal remember especially Galen's speaking 
likenesses of Zasu Pitts and Greta Garbo. 

The friendship of Baugher is highly valued. His is not the fair- 
weather type, but typically sincere. It is the very sincerity of the 
man which will in all probability lead him to great accomplish- 
ment. 



College: Football, 
merce Club, 1 , 2, 3. 



Class: Football, 1 : Basketball. 
Society: Dance Committee, 2 



2, 3; Student-Faculty Council, 2; Com- 
2. 



50 



GUY ALLEN BEAVER 

Aristes, Pa. 

Biology PHILO 

Cul Allen, or more commonly "Buster," is the aspiring "hot- 
cha" crooner of the third floor who can easily be distinguished by 
his melodious and vociferous warblings despite his neglected 
stature. Stature, did we say? This wee "Buster" is, never-the- 
less, an ardent member of the "grunt and growl" racket and has 
been quite an efficient 125 pounder for the "Collegians" wrest- 
ling squad. He sprang into prominence when, in his first match, 
he succeeded in pinning his York "Y" opponent. 

Guy is the sort of fellow with whom one has little difficulty 
in making friends. He undoubtedly possesses one of the most 
genial and kind-hearted natures on the campus. Despite the fact 
that he is unusually shy around the opposite sex, Guy has found 
a welcome door somewhere in the locale. We wish our congenial 
crooner the best of everything in his future exploits — and with 
that wish goes the feeling that Aladdin and his lamp were no 
surer of success than we are. 



College: May Day Program, 
Class: Flag Scrap, 1 , 2. 



2. 



HERBERT R. BLOUCH 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Bible and New Testament Greek 

This young man has enjoyed several experiences as vet foreign 
to most of us. his classmates. I might call him the "Flying Par- 
son," were 1 his press agent. And truthfully so! He is preparing 
for the ministry at present, but before he entered Lebanon Valley 
he had become the proud holder of a private pilot's license. But 
he h£*s still another claim to fame — his membership in the ranks 
of the Benedicts, an honor to which few students on our campus 
aspire. 

Two things distinguish "Herb" from other members of a group 
in which he might be: first, a superficial quality, his immaculate 
and conservative clothing: second, an intellectual trait, his 
soundness of thought in any argument, especially those of re- 
ligious character. 

This tendency to make sure of himself before he speaks is 
"Herb's" major fine point. It would be anyone's fine point. And 
on this we base his theoretic rise to a high position in the church 



Education 



FRANK BORAN 
Minersville, Pa. 



Here is another person blessed with the faculty for modera- 
tion and with a combination of traits which blend as perfectly 
as does the sunset with the horizon, Frank is an athlete of no 
mean ability, football and baseball being his chief fields, Frank is 
a leader — a quarterback in football, an officer on the Men's Sen- 
ate, an officer in the "L" Club. Frank is a worker — his grades, 
despite his many extra-curricular activities, are silent testimon- 
ials. Frank is a socializer — oh well, see for yourself. 

What is his secret? Good looking and athletic, personality 
radiates from our Irish friend, "Frankie" has perhaps more real 
friends than anyone of whom we know. Anyone who comes in 
contact with Boran never leaves with an unpleasant thought. 
With his love for History, we should suggest a post as a diplomat 
for him. 



College: Football, 
Secretary-Treasurer, 
urer, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 



2, 3: Baseball, 
: Men's Senate, 



, 2, 3: "L" Club, 1 , 2, 3 : 
1. 2. 3; Secretary-Treas- 



1.2. 




51 




ANNE ELIZABETH BUTTERWICK 

Annville, Pa. 

English DELPHIAN 

Anne, a small, slender individual, has never had the pleasure 
of knowing what a flunk looks like. She is well versed in the art 
of getting good grades, and can discuss with perfect freedom any- 
thing from "Why is man a featherless biped" to the "Coal short- 
age at the equator " 

Furthermore. Anne's winning personality is enhanced by her 
taking ways. To those who have not cultivated her acquaintance 
we shall say that you certainly are missing something. Anne is 
always radiant, smiling, happy. 

With her dignified personality, she expects to teach school. 
We hope that she attains a record as long as that of her father 
and as good. 

College: Reader's Club, 1 , 2, 3 ; May Day Program, 1,2; Quit- 
tapahilla Staff, 3 ; "Y" Cabinet, 1 . 

Class: Hockey, 1,2; Play Committee, 3. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 1 ; Corresponding Secretary, 2; 
Anniversary Play Committee, 3. 

ELIZABETH ANN CARL 

Bayonne, N. ). 

History CLIO 

"Bibby " is another "West Haller." "Bibby" is chief cook and 
bottle washer at Miss Meyer's Orphan Asylum. Missing meals is 
her hobby, since she prefers her own cooking. 

Her unselfish nature overcomes her upon receipt of a package 
from home and she sees to it that the football team is well fed. 
Listing her other accomplishments, next comes her assistant 
managership of our hockey team. Then comes bridge, with the 
unfailing tendency on Carl's part to bid the cards her partner 
doesn't have. Still another passion is the cinema. Then the crown- 
ing devotion. She would go to Madagascar to hear Bing Crosby. 
Every time Bing gets on the air, "Bibby" is sure to be found hug- 
ging the speaker while "Smoke Gets in Her Eyes." 

College: May Day Program, 1 , 2, 3 ; Hockey Manager, 3; His- 
tory Club, 2, 3. 

Class: Hop Committee, 2; Hockey, 1, 2. 

Society: Warden, 1 ; Anniversary Committee, 1,2; Anniver- 
sary Play, 2. 

ALMAM.CLINE 

Ml-. Sidney, Va. 

English CLIO 

Ah said a real Suthun belle, suh, and Ah meant it. Alma hails 
from below the Mason-Dixie line. Her accent is the softly allur- 
ing southern drawl almost of the old colonel's type. And a soft 
drawl is suitable, too. Alma is the quiet, easy type of girl one can't 
help but like. 

Quietness seems usually to cover a depth of feeling and a 
depth of ambition. Alma doesn't stray from the rule. She has 
made a mark for herself in class work this year which is of the 
distinguishing type. In outside activity, too, she has taken a 
hold. The Reader's Club, the Life Work Recruits, the Rogues' 
Callery, and Clionian have her for an ardent worker in any cause. 

In her first year here she has gained many fine friends by being 
a fine friend herself. It was certainly a severe loss to Shenandoah 
and a great gain for Lebanon Valley when Alma decided to trans- 
fer. We wish her the best of luck while she is with us and after 
she has left these halls. 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Reader's Club, 3; Life 
Work Recruits, 3; Rogues' Gallery, 3. 



52 



LENACOCKSHOTT 
Jamestown, N. Y. 

French CLIO 

Lena is West Hall's handy-girl. Lena fixes everything from 
electric lights and radios to telephones and shoe strings. Ef- 
ficiency, a loud laugh ithat makes even the Great Kandrat how 
his head), and all the other attributes of nicety are this girls 
trade-marks. 

Every costume on the campus can be safely termed her crea- 
tion. After seeing some of her creations draping the backs of erst- 
while dancers in the May Day pageants and in various plays, we 
wonder if Lena could not make good as a designer in Hollywood. 

Lena has only two important vices. The first is a regular Wed- 
nesday letter from Carl. The second is the blight of a nation — 
an addiction to tea (and not pink) . 

College: Life Work Recruits, 1,^, 3; Library Assistant, 2, 3: 
W. S. C. A, 2, 3 ; Y. W. C. A., 1 , 3 ; Wig and Buckle, 3 ; May Day 
Program. 1 , 2. 

Class: Hockey, 1 , 2, 3. 

Society: Chaplain, 2: Judiciary Committee, 2. 

FRANK THOMAS CULLATHER 
Minersville, Pa. 

Education KALO 

"Cully" is the smallest member of the class. But physical size 
in this case is by no means indicative of ability and accomplish- 
ment. Frank has for the past three seasons been an active worker 
for the athletic department, as an assistant manager for three 
years in all sports, and finally now as regular manager of basket- 
ball. 

His size is paradoxical, too, in his classroom accomplishment. 
There is no one who attacks his text book work with more zeal 
and earnest application than our own "Cully." He is one of the 
distinguished few who can give hours and hours of his time to 
outside activity and still come up with a smile and a fine average 
at exam time. 

We suspect that he will make a dandy teacher. His applica- 
tion, his knowledge, and his winning personality are things which 
any agency will recognize. 

College: Manager Basketball, 3 
1,2, 

Class: Flag Scrap, 1,2; Tug, 1 
Tem, 1 . 



Assistant Manager in Sports, 
Football, 1,2; President Pro 



MYRLE EVELYN DEAVEN 
Jonestown, Pa. 

Music CLIO 

We hardly knew Myrle until one night in the Conservatory we 
heard her play the piano. Then we wanted to know her. and we 
came to. As we did, we found a charming personality with intel- 
lect, ability, and a general niceness combined in a pleasing way. 
Myrle is the kind of girl we usually read about but seldom come 
to know. 

In her studies she is far ahead of the average. She throws her 
entire self into all her work and instills it with the personal spirit 
which always means success. But she's far from what one com- 
monly terms a "book-worm." Myrle likes the social side of life 
as well. 

Whether Myrle decides to teach music, become an accom- 
paniest, or study further with a view toward concert work, we are 
sure she will make good. She is one of those fortunate people who 
can put their own personalities into their renditions — an at- 
tribute which spells fame. 

College: Girl's Band, 3; College Orchestra. 3, 




53 





J. PHILIP DENTON 

Farmingdale, N.Y. 

Business Ad. 

"Phil" is one of the best-natured fellows on the campus, and 
many of us wonder what the secret of his happiness is. No matter 
what the weather is, or how rough the going, Phil always comes 
through with a cheery "How are you" or some witticism that 
can't get by without a laugh. 

His happiest moments are those spent in reading blood and 
thunder stories of the wild west, or in playing the revived old 
game of Russian Bank. He is the sort of chap whom everyone 
enjoys having around because of that same cheery disposition 
and that contagious laugh. 

Phil is Business Ad., and surely knows his business. Both as 
class treasurer and as assistant business manager of the year book 
he has demonstrated that his knowledge is applicable. We'd like 
always to be a friend of the fellow who is always a friend. 

College: Commerce Club, 1 , 2, 3. 

Class: Treasurer, 3 ; Assistant Business Manager, Quittapahilla, 
3. 



Mathematics 



ROSE DIETER 
Bogota, N. J. 



CLIO 



Here's to Rose, one of the most carefree, happy-go-lucky girls 
on the campus. She is always around when anything exciting is 
to take place, and always ready to enjoy her share of the fun. She 
is one of the live wires in the Clionian Literary Society, with her 
dancing playing a major part in entertainments. 

Besides dancing, dramatics play an important part in her in- 
terests. The role of "Kathryn" in the "Taming of the Shrew" is 
perhaps her best remembered portrayal. 

Yet social activity does not detract her too much from the 
class work. She has learned to mix the two in a cocktail of mar- 
velous blend. In mathematics she excels especially, but is a good 
student in all classes. We wish her the best of success and happi- 
ness in the future in whatever field of work she enters. 



College: Chemistry Club, 2; May Day Program 
Buckle, 3. 

Society: Usher, 1 ; Anniversary Play, 
tee, 1 , 2, 3 ; Vice-President, 3. 



2; Wig and 
2; Judiciary Commit- 



MARSHALL E. DITZLER 

Lickdale, Pa. 

Chemistry 

Test tubes, beakers, and Bunsen burners help to make a perfect 
background for a life-like portrait painted in words of this in- 
dustrious, serious-minded young man whose true love, first, last 
and always, is the study of chemistry and related subjects. 

His leisure time, of which there is little, is usually spent in 
one of two places. The first rendezvous is the library where Mar- 
shall's virtually incessant search for knowledge of the latest de- 
velopments in the realm of chemistry is continued by constant 
perusal of scientific periodicals. When a less exciting pastime is 
sought, he may usually be found in the day student room in- 
dulging in a match of his pinochle wits with those of his fellow 
scientists — Walter, Remley, and Ax. 

Whatever the problem at hand might be, Marshall's enviable 
ability to apply himself whole-heartedly and win results promises 
success. 



54 



MARGARET HOLMES EARLY 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Music CLIO 

"Peg" is the light, cheery girl who possesses a combination of 
wit, personality, and scholastic ability — as well as a marvelous 
mastery of the piano — and whom we frequently see patrolling 
the Lebanon pike behind a venerable model "T." Excellently 
qualified for whatever she undertakes, she is another one of 
those fortunate people who have "the touch of gold " 

As an associate editor of the Quittapahilla, she has done her 
work with an efficiency quite astonishing in view of the environ- 
ment. We are deeply grateful to her for it. 

We are certain that "Peg" will be successful in any career 
Here's wishing the best of good fortune to a deserving recipient. 

College: Conservatory Assistant, 3: Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; May 
Day Program, 1,2; Glee Club, 1 , 2, 3 : First Prize in Sophomore 
English, 2. 

Class: Quittapahilla Associate Editor, 3; Soph Hop Commit- 
tee, 2: Hockey, 1 . 

Society: Anniversary Committee. 1. 2; Critic. 1 ; Pianist. 2 
Anniversary Play, 1 . 

HELEN F. EARNEST 
Lebanon, Pa. 

English CLIO 

Reserve your interest, gentle reader, for this anthropoid of the 
species mulier sapiens with the pleasing physiognomy, is no other 
than Helen Earnest. Have you ever seen a couple idly strolling 
from the Ad Building to the Library, all the time arguing in a 
somewhat subdued tone'' Three guesses it's Helen and "Dutch." 

Eagerly we tell you that this young lady is homocentric, as she 
is following in the same way and preparing for the vocation of 
pedagogy, as are a great many of her classmates. Aside from this, 
she is a shining literary light on the campus, and is by no means 
a tyro along her line. 

We wish her success and feel confident that she will be 
crowned with a glorious halo of triumph and reward. 

College: Debating. 2. 3 ; La Vie Collegienne. 2, 3: Reader's 
Club, 3 : Wig and Buckle. 3 ; May Day Program, 1 , 2. 

Class: Secretary. 3; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: judiciary Committee, 2, 3; Editor, 2, 3: Recording 
Secretary, 3; Anniversary Play, 2; Usher, 1. 

ROBERT WILLIAM ETTER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Chemistry 

Another of our Benedicts is "Bob," who joined their ranks in 
his sophomore year. He has elected chemistry as his chosen work 
and thus far has been so successful in that course that he has 
been made one of the laboratory assistants. Not only in chemistry 
does he excel, but he is a fine student in other courses as well, as 
is evidenced by the long string of A's following his name on the 
college records 

Besides these scholastic achievements, he has found sufficient 
time to win a place on the college debating team. We wonder if 
his debating experience helps him at home, or if his wife is still 
the one to get the last word in their household discussions. At 
any rate. Robert William seems headed for a fine career. We can 
picture him in the dignified role of a senator or a congressman, 
or some other place of equal importance. The best of luck to you. 
Bob. May the judges continue to give you the decisions of the 
court in life as in Lebanon Valley forensics. 

College: Debating Team, 1, 2. 3; Chemistry Assistant. 2. 3; 
Chemistry Club. 3. 




55 




DAVID JAMES EVANS 

Annviile, Pa. 

Business Ad. 

When some wise old sage said "actions speak louder than 
words" he was undoubtedly thinking of someone like "Davey" 
Evans. That ancient chestnut was tailor made for this quiet young 
man. 

However, I have learned that at times the dreaminess in his 
eyes is not brought there by profound thought on the writings 
of Adam Smith or Bastable, but rather by a longing to be near a 
certain sweet young thing in Philadelphia (I'm betraying secrets 
again ) . 

When Dave is assigned a report, he attacks it with an enviable 
tenacity, usually burying himself in volumes of material and re- 
fusing to be rescued until he is able to present a perfect theme. 
If a professor, in response to a query, is rewarded by dumb head 
shakings on the part of most of the class, he invariably gets the 
answer from "Quiet Dave." More power to you, "Davey!" 

College: Commerce Club, 1 , 2, 3. 



BETTY A. FORD 
Trenton, N. J. 



DELPHIAN 



French 

Betty, our pretty and popular brunette from South Hall, has 
extended her popularity from our campus to the United States 
Military Academy, if one would judge by the looks of her room. 
She is the supply base for the entire Hall, sharing everything with 
the girls from her ironing board to "The Pointer." The dormitory 
looks forward to the regular publication of this magazine from 
West Point. 

If a medal or pink ribbon (pink is Betty's favorite color) were 
to be awarded to the uncattiest female in L. V. C, Betty would 
surely get it. 

The most outstanding feature of her room is a huge picture of 
a certain blonde football player who has a particular yen for South 
Hall and who spends seven evenings per week there in the com- 
pany of our brown-eyed, brown-haired beauty. 

Society: Usher, 2; Judiciary Committee, 3. 



CHARLES ROBERT FURLONG 

Lykens, Pa. 

Education KALO 

This is the man who made "Horsie, Keep Your Tail-up" the 
hit song of the campus last year. His rendition of it in Kalo 
Minstrels of 1933 was perhaps the outstanding number of the 
show. Charlie spends a lot of time on the stage. He has been in 
all of the minstrel shows and all of the anniversary plays since 
his arrival on the campus. A strong, pleasing voice is perhaps the 
secret of his success on the stage. 

His accomplishment does not end here. To go on with the ex- 
tra-curricular achievement, he is a star guard on the varsity 
eleven, and an active member of the "L" Club, Reader's Club, 
and "Wig and Buckle." In the college he is an excellent student 
and one of the greatest readers. He is making a record for him- 
self of which his wife and son may well be proud. Yes, wife and 
son. Our mighty Charlie is far ahead of the rest of us in life. 

College: Football, 1 , 2, 3 ; Glee Club, 1 : Wig and Buckle, 3; 
Varsity "L" Club, 2, 3 ; Reader's Club, 2, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1 , 2, 3 ; Minstrels, 1, 2; Recording 
Secretary, 2; Play Committee, 3 ; Vice-President, 3. 



56 



WILLIAM E. CERBER 

Tamaqua, Pa. 

History PHILO 

"Bill" is one of the most likeable persons on the campus and, 
although not exactly a "lady's man," he has caused many a co-ed 
a heart throb when his tall figure crosses the campus. 

Although he himself is inclined to be quiet, those who know 
him will tell you that he enjoys life to the utmost. His main inter- 
est at L. V. C. has been in the realm of music. Despite the fact 
that he is not a Conservatory student, he has taken active part in 
the forming and maintaining of our band and orchestra as the 
outstanding organizations they are today. His ability with the 
trumpet is recognized by all who have heard him play. As a 
"College Rambler" he has furnished many lilting strains for 
dancers on our campus. 

With his studies, in which he is quite adept, he mixes pinochle 
and billiards. With this ability to be temperate in all things he 
will certainly go out in life with the best chances for success. 

College: Band, 1 , 2. 3 : Orchestra, 1 , 2. 

Society: Vice-President, 3. 

HENRY HAROLD CRIMM 

Annville, Pa. 

Physics PHILO 

Physics and mathematics have conspired to ensnare the major 
portion of this popular student's time in the college. His scholas- 
tic ability is demonstrated by the place of prominence he occupies 
on the college honor rolls, and by his position as lab assistant. 

Although much of "Hen's" time is spent in quest of the elusive 
A, he has sufficient leisure time to be a member of the glee club, 
a thespian of no mean ability, and a swimmer of much prowess. 
He is an active society worker, and enjoys the confidence of his 
classmates. He has served as their treasurer for an entire year. 

In successfully rounding out his college career. Hen has a 
heart-interest in a little home-town girl who might consider her- 
self very fortunate in having captured the affections of this very 
capable young man. 

College: Mathematics Prize, 1; Chemistry Assistant, 2, 3; 
ChemClub, 1 , 2, 3. 

Class: Treasurer, 2. 

Society: Play, 1.2. 



HELEN D. CRUSKO 
Garfield, N. ]. 



DELPHIAN 



History 

"Crussie" hails from THE Garfield in New Jersey, and has a 
particular fondness for French. West Hall, salami, Lou, a certain 
football man, and Reading. Ask her about Reading after the last 
Thanksgiving vacation. Neatness is Helen's hobby. She is con- 
tinuously scrubbing, washing, ironing and dusting. Her spare 
time she spends with two kinds of bridge — Auction bridge and 
Quittie bridge. 

"Crussie" has a merry little giggle that can work wonders on 
a case of blues. Her cheery disposition will be her greatest asset 
when she sets out to teach her French. We wonder sometimes, 
though, whether she will ever get to that French class, or if she 
will decide to let the fiddler take care of the home expenses. 

College: May Day Program, 1 . 2. 3. 

Class: Y. W. C. A., 1 ; Hockey, 1 , 2. 3. 

Society: Recording Secretary, 3. 




57 




IDA KATHERINE HALL 

^ ,1 Lancaster, Pa. r^>-i r,, n a k i 

Music DELPHIAN 

Ida Katherine came to the campus this year from Westchester. 
For us it was a gain, for Westchester a loss. Her wit and charm 
are appreciated wherever she goes. 

It didn't take Ida Katherine long to become acclimated. She 
became a member of several organizations — the Glee Club, Girl's 
Band, Delphian, and Green Blotter — in short order. Besides, she 
was elected to the staff of the 1935 Quittapahilla and earned a 
permanent berth on the varsity hockey squad. Into ail her work 
she carries her vivid, attractive personality. It is small wonder 
that she takes so easily to a new social circle. She has earned a 
host of friends at Lebanon Valley — friends she will hold through 
her magnetism. 

If she carries this same spirit into her life work — music — we 
shall certainly hear much more from Ida Katherine in the years 
to come. 

College: Westchester, 1,2; Glee Club, 3 : Girl's Band, 3 ; Green 
Blotter, 3 ; Varsity Hockey, 3. 

Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Critic, 3; Anniversary Play Committee, 3. 

CHARLES L. HAUCK, JR. 

n A I Bayside, N. Y. ix a i ^^ 

Business Ad. ' KALO 

If we were to believe everything "Charlie" tells us about New 
York, our only ambition in this life would be to live there — but 
thus far everyone has been content only to listen to him. 

It is to Charlie that all praise is due for the efficient manner in 
which the business end of publishing this book was handled. 
Fine work, Charlie. 

Besides being a very good student, Charlie finds time to take 
active part in many of the various dramatic productions on the 
campus. And, "lest we forget," his attempts at "socializing" are 
well received (we only heard l . 

Perhaps his greatest service to the school was rendered when 
he brought "Aphrodite" into our midst, for "to know her is to 
love her." It would be a dull world if we did not hear Charlies 
hammer pounding vainly into "Aphy's" intestines these fine 
Saturday afternoons. 

Good luck, Charlie. May the business world receive you with 
open arms. 

College: Commerce Club, 1 , 2, 3 ; Wig and Buckle. 3 ; May Day 
Program, 1 , 2, 

Class: President, 2; Vice-President, 2: Quittapahilla Staff, 3; 
Play, 3 : Flag Scrap. 1,2; Basketball, 1 ; Tug, 1 . 

Society: Corresponding Secretary, 2; Minstrels, 1, 2; Judiciary 
Committee, 2; Anniversary Play, 3. 

SARAH ESTELLA HEILMAN 

Lebanon, Pa. ^. ,^ 

French CLIO 

Sarah should be nicknamed "Red," but for some mysterious 
reason she is dubbed "Cynthia." Another curious thing about 
Sarah is her droll humor. Unless one is a close friend, the tan- 
talizing remarks are entirely meaningless and do not go beneath 
the surface. 

Sarah is one of the few students of Latin and French and she 
may often be seen behind a big dictionary of either language. Not 
only does she excel in these studies, but in all the others that 
she pursues. 

Whenever there is deviltry in the air we can depend upon 
Sarah to help us. For instance, she has a yen for putting obnoxious 
articles between clean sheets. 

Sarah is planning to teach in the near future, and with her high 
ambitions, pleasing personality, and intellectual power we are 
sure that she will be successful. 

College: May Day Program, 1 , 2. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2. 



58 



GEORGE |. HILTNER 
Baltimore, Md. 

English PHILO 

Heil ! to our own "Hitler," one of the best all-around men on 
the campus. George's ability, his quick wit, and willingness to 
lend a helping hand have gained for him the friendship of all who 
know him. 

He is active in every organization with which he is connected 
and still finds time to keep his class work far above the average 
His love for music and dramatics has led him into the band and 
into various campus and town productions. His work in the Junior 
Play was especially commendable for one with less ability could 
never have handled this role. 

But someone has said that George has a mill-stone about his 
neck. We have our doubts about the stone, but he has been seen 
"milling" about town. 

College: Band, 1 , 2, 3 : La Vie Collegienne, 2, 3 : Green Blotter 
Club, 2, 3 ; Wig and Buckle, 3 ; May Day Program, 1 , 2, 3. 

Class: Flag Scrap, 1,2; Tug, 2 : Basketball, 1,2; Junior Play, 3 ; 
Quittapahilla Associate Editor, 3. 

Society: Play, 1 , 2, 3 ; Vice-President, 3 ; Executive Committee 
Chairman, 3; Secretary, 2. 



CHARLES W. HOKE 

New Cumberland, Pa. 

Bible and Creek 

Probably the first good thing we can say of Charles is that he 
belongs to the rather select and dignified group, the Life Work 
Recruits, and that it is his ambition to become a minister. Al- 
though he IS a day student, many of us have made a close ac- 
quaintance with him and have learned to like and admire him for 
his cheery mood and his sincerity. 

Besides pursuing a course here at Lebanon Valley, he serves as 
an efficient "soda-jerker" in one of New Cumberland's flourish- 
ing drug stores. It is rumored that, because of his adeptness at 
the art and because of his long employment. Charles is now a 
possessor of the first mortgage on the establishment. We are all 
hoping that some day he will be able to buy license plates for 
something more comely than his present "rambling wreck." 

Best wishes, Charlie, from all of us to one we know will go far 



FRANCES HOLTZMAN 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry CLIO 

"Fran" is another newcomer (transferred from Ward-Bel- 
mont) who has gained instant popularity. And small wonder' 
"Fran" has all the attributes people like. Her very simplicity is 
an invitation to friendship which cannot be denied. 

But her ambitions are far from simple. She is one of the few 
female pre-medical students. Long hours of her time are spent 
in the laboratories where she gains success with everything. She 
is certainly laying a most firm foundation for her later work. 

But "Fran" also has time for outside work. She is an accom- 
plished player on both the varsity hockey and basketball teams. 
Then too there is her social adventures which should be men- 
tioned but which we dare not. We think the best policy for us 
to follow is to "peter" out by saying Success is "Fran's" in every- 
thing she does now — and success, we know, will be hers later. 

College: Ward-Belmont, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 3; Secretary, 
3; Hockey, 3; Basketball, 3. 




59 




MICHAEL KANOFF 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Business Ad. KALO 

"Mike" IS perhaps our most dependable partaker in class 
sports. Whether it be football, a watery tug, a terrific flag scrap, 
a sleepy numeral fight, or a whizzing basketball game, Mike is 
right in there fighting to put '35 on the top. 

It is fortunate for us that Mike and Pete decided to pose them- 
selves in such a manner as to prevent their confusion in this sec- 
tion. Had they not we should assuredly been accused of transpos- 
ing the pictures by some who themselves would be puzzled. Our 
only set of twins have certainly afforded ample fun when be- 
wildered freshmen, unaware of the likeness, have been startled 
to see Kanoff at West Hall one minute and Kanoff at the Penn- 
way the next. But it finally is straightened out. 

As for congeniality, I doubt very much if there is another man 
like Mike — unless it be his brother Pete. Any number of us have 
either of them to thank for many of our outstanding fun-fests 
during college life. 

ColSege: May Day Program. 1,2; Commerce Club, 1 , 2. 3. 

Class: Football. 1. 2; Tug. 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2; Flag Scrap, 



Society: Anniversary Committee, 
tary. 1 . 



2. 3 : Corresponding Secre- 



PETE PETCOFF KANOFF 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry KALO 

We are experiencing extreme difficulty even now in making 
Pete stand out as distinctive from Mike. These inseparable broth- 
ers could have just one biography written. 

Speaking of biography, we recall one time during the freshman 
year that they did. in all seriousness, compose only one auto- 
biography for the two of them. Although it did not turn out as 
well as might be expected, it was a fine joke and a fine exhibition 
of the Kanoff sense of humor. 

But. outside of social activity, the tastes of the Kanoffs do 
separate. Pete is a premedical student — and a good one. He holds 
medicine as his ideal career rather than the business profession 
of his brother. 

But whatever they do, they know they will have the solid good 
wishes of the Class of '35 behind them. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1 , 2, 3 : May Day Program, 2. 

Class: Basketball, 1. 2; Football, 1, 2; Flag Scrap. 1. 2; Tug. 
1,2. 

Society: Anniversary Committee. 2. 

FRANCES WITWER KEISER 
New Holland, Pa. 

Latin CLIO 

Quieti' Yes. But underneath that quietness there lies a wealth 
of ambition. Take her major, for example. There are only a few 
students in the entire college who have nerve enough to tackle 
Latin as the subject for their mastery. But Frances has tackled 
and mastered it. Her proficiency doesn't, however, end there. 
She is a good student in all her courses. 

On the outside, she is an active worker in several organiza- 
tions. From her first arrival on the campus, she has been one of 
the mainstays of the "Y" and one of the real props of Clionian. 

But one of her greatest achievements is her ability to make 
friends. No girl who knows Frances can help but like her. The 
very difficulty one experiences in breaking through the outer 
mask makes the reward of her fine-natured companionship all 
the greater. Success to you. Frances. 

College: Y. W. C. A.. 1. 2. 3; Secretary. 3 : W. S. G. A., 3. 

Society: Judiciary Committee. 1 ; Usher. 2; Recording Secre- 
tary, 3. 



60 



ETHEL IRENE KELLER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



Music 



Ethel is known by only a very few people. She bobs off and on 
the campus like a flash, and it is only in these flashes that the 
student body gets a look at her. But once you have learned to 
know her you have learned to like her. 

She is startlingly accomplished at the organ. Her technique is 
magnificent, and it is with pleasure that we look forward to hear- 
ing her again and again in recitals in the Conservatory. Her ability 
doesn't end there. In all of her music studies, and in her college 
studies as well, she is a hard worker and a steady one. Hers is the 
application which reverses the old order and makes mole-hills 
out of mountains. 

What we cannot understand, though, is the secret behind her 
absolute buoyancy. What is it. Ethel? A man?' We've always had 
the hunch that you were holding out on us. 

May the best of luck and the best of organ positions be yours. 

College: Girl's Band, 3. 



ERNEST HAROLD KOCH 
Easton, Pa. 



Mus 



KALO 



We wish that Ernie's first name were spelled with an A. Earn- 
est would be a much better cognomen than Ernest. For he is that 
In whatever he decides to do he puts his entire mind. This is par- 
ticularly evidenced in his artistry at the keyboard. "Kokie" is 
the best male pianist on the camous. playing with equal inspired 
art anything from Chopin to Gershwin 

His chief claim to fame, though, in our estimation, lies in his 
mimicry. It is no uncommon thing for Ernie to have a group con- 
vulsed with laughter as he impersonates some diva rendering a 
classic number — or some master male singer giving a concert. 

Like all artists, Ernie is temperamental and given to moodi- 
ness. Yet his sunny nature seems to prevail. To this fine fellow 
go our best wishes for a happy life. 

College: Band, 1 . 
Club, 2, 3. 

Class: Flag Scrap. 
3. 

Society: Pianist, 1,2: Minstrels. 1 . 2. 



2, 3 ; Orchestra. 1 , 2, 3 ; Symphony. 3 : Glee 
2; Tug, 1,2; Football, I ; Basketball, 1, 2, 



GEORGE KONSKO 
Palmerton, Pa. 

Chemistry KALO 

Anyone who knows the meaning applied to the word "agita- 
tors" on the Lebanon Valley Campus will testify that probably 
the most prominent and most efficient member of the group is 
George, the "Gorgeous" Konsko. He is always ready for anything 
from which he can derive fun. His hard voice and glowering ex- 
pression have stricken many frosh with terror in past years. But 
to those who know him. he is just an all-round good fellow with 
the hardest of exteriors and the softest of hearts. 

George has made a name for himself on the gridiron and or 
the diamond. Although this was his first year on the regular 
eleven, he started in many of the games and saw action in nearly 
all. On the baseball field he is a master behind the plate. His 
technique is beautiful to watch — and. we might add. enjoyable 
to hear. His remarks have added loads of color to some very dull 
games. 

College: Varsity Football. 3 ; Basketball. 3 ; Baseball, 2. 

Class: Football, 1, 2; Flag Scrap, 1, 2; Tug, 1, 2; Basketball, 1. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2. 




61 




LESTER JOHN LINCLE 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Business Ad. PHILO 

"Jake" is our future Clarence Darrow. Law class without his 
brilliant comments would be as drab as doughnuts without cof- 
fee. And, girls, what an impressive figure he is with his wavy 
black hair, his ready smile, and his deep, throaty voice. 
"Jake's" dry wit and subtlety are ingenious weapons ever at his 
command. Does he utilize them perfectly? We refer you to any- 
one who has witnessed his delightful ability, when he is awak- 
ened from an innocent snooze, to change a professor's stern 
countenance into a smiling one with a well chosen remark. 

Seriously, though, here is one of the hard workers — both on 
1he campus and off. His industrious attitude, coupled with just 
the right amount of readiness to join in any fun-fest, has made 
h'm a real friend of the faculty and students alike. 

College: Commerce Club, 1 , 2, 3. 

Class: Tug, 1 , 2. 



HOWARD ALBRIGHT LLOYD 

Hershey, Pa. 

Business Ad. PHILO 

"Hobby " Lloyd is one of the "Hershey Crew." 'We're glad he 
chose Lebanon Valley as his alma mater. He brightens up a place 
with his presence. A pleasant and smiling disposition is one of his 
chief assets. 

In the Business Ad Department he has a reputation as a good 
student. At home, after lecture hours, he holds down a job at the 
Ice Palace. In the class of '35 he is an industrious member. On 
Ihe "Quittie " staff he has carried out his assignments readily and 
well. All in all, it adds up to one thing — "Hobby" is a worker. 

But Lloyd by no means misses the social life on or off the 
campus. Dancing is one of "Hobby's" chief hobbies. 

All told, he is one of those people about whom one sings "For 
He's a jolly Good Fellow." 

College: Commerce Club, 1 , 2. 3. 

Class: Tug, 1 ; Football. 1,2: Basketball, 1,2; Flag Scrap, 1,2; 
Quittie Staff, 3: President, 3. 

Society: Dance Committee, 3. 



THEODORE KOHR LONG 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Chemistry KALO 

This handsome, curly-haired youth is Labanon's contribution 
to the betterment of the lonely condition of the co-eds on our 
campus. But, paging Ripley, he has no time for such frivolities as 
girls, unless, perchance, he is keeping something from us. 

"Ted" is a genuine rarity in that he is a quiet day-student. Yet 
he makes his school home in a room where other students seem 
to have stricken the word quiet from their vocabularies. 

The major portion of his time on the campus is spent in labs. 
Whether the task be finding an unknown, formulating an intri- 
cate equation, or tracing the nervous system of a member of the 
feline family, he is equally at ease. 

If an overwhelming majority of A's in undergraduate days may 
be regarded as a favorable omen, I feel confident in predicting 
a most successful career for Ted in his chosen field, medicine. 

College: Chem Club, 1 , 2, 3 ; Honor Roll, 1 , 2, 3. 



62 



CLYDE H. MACEE 

New Bloomfield, Pa. 

Chemistry PHILO 

Behold the Lionell Atwill of the class of '35 — "Maggy," our 
character par excellence. Clyde is one of the budding scientists 
of this fair institution, spending much of his time in the labora- 
tories obtaining facts and reaching conclusions on questions of 
great import. 

Anyone looking for a partner in the three favorite indoor 
sports of a collegian with time on his hands but suffering from a 
tired feeling, should be directed to "Maggy" for he is a pinochle 
player of the first water, a practical joker and "frosh baiter" of 
much originality, and an intelligent discussion leader when "bull 
sessions" take a turn in that direction which is their wont, hie 
is always ready to lend a hand to any worth while undertaking, 
which explains his popularity among his fellow students. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1 , 2, 3 ; Wig and Buckle, 3. 

Class: Football, 1, 2. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1, 2. 



MARY M. MARCH 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



DELPHIAN 



History 

"I'll be faithful" is Mary's theme song. And she has been 
faithful. She doesn't socialize much, except when a certain young 
German student from Garfield, N, J., is on our campus. Then 
Mary is happy. 

Dispensing with the joking, Mary is a swell girl. She is kind, 
generous, and always ready to help her fellow students. We know 
she gets lonesome, but that doesn't ruin her disposition. Her 
room is always open to her friends, and many good times we have 
had there. 

Mary has several talents. She is a good student, an accom- 
plished cook and housekeeper, and a pleasant-voiced singer. Her 
songs have been blues of late, but we expect that in the near 
future all that will change. 

College: May Day Program, I, 2; International Relations 
Cabinet, 3. 

Class: Hockey, 1 , 2. 

Society: Warden, 1 ; judiciary Committee, 2; Chaplain, 3, 
Usher, 2; Anniversary Committee. 3 

SARAH KATHARINE McADAM 
Lebanon, Pa. 

English CLIO 

"Kotty" is here at L. V, C, to acquire another set of letters to 
place after her name. Degrees do add to one's dignity. She already 
has several, and her name looks very elegant when it is all writ- 
ten out — Miss Sarah Katherme McAdam. D. C, PI. A., A. A. Any 
additions will be gratefully accepted. The D. C. stands for Doctor 
of Campusology. It was awarded for excellent work her sopho- 
more year. She also got her A. A. (amateur actress) for her por- 
trayal of "Candida" and the neurotic lady in "She Stoops to Con- 
quer." Our advice to Kotty is "Co West, young lady, go West." 
And last but not least the P. L. A., (Psychology Lab Assistant) , 
and can she make a pneumograph, strapped on a young man's 
chest, go crazy! 

College: Reader's Club, 2, 3; History Club. 1.2; Eurydice, 1 ; 
Glee Club, 3 ; May Day Program, 2; Philo Play, 2; Wig and Buckle. 

Class: Junior Play Committee, 3; Play, 3; Vice-President, 3; 
Quittapahilla Staff, 3 ; Hockey, 1 . 

Society: Critic, 2, 3; Anniversary Committee, 2; Basketball 
Team, 2; Judiciary Committee, 2, 3; Play Committee, 2; Usher, 
1 ; Play, 2. 




63 




WARREN FRANKLIN MENTZER 
Valley View, Pa. 

Bible and New Testament Greek KALO 

"Barney," despite the fact that he comes from that forgotten 
wilderness called Valley View, is well liked by all students. Creek 
does not appall him — he is brave. V/ork in organizations does not 
frighten him — he is industrious. Adverse fortune does not dis- 
courage him — he is trusting. Rumor does not sway him — he is 
white. 

In short, "Barney" is certainly about the best example of the 
future minister of which this campus can boast. He does not 
think only of the studious side in his preparation for his life 
work, although he takes care of that in fine fashion. His is a 
wider interest. He cultivates the friendship of all and through 
these friendships gains the knowledge of men which will prove 
invaluable to him in the future. 

College: Y. M. C. A., 1 , 2, 3 ; Vice-President, 3 ; Men's Senate, 
3; Band, 1 , 2, 3 ; Baseball, 1, 2; Glee Club, 1 ; Life Work Recruits, 
1,2,3. 

Class: President, 3; Vice-President, 2; Football, 2; Basketball, 
Tug, 1,2; Flag Scrap, 1,2; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 
Society: Chaplain, 1, 2; Corresponding Secretary, 2; Critic, 3 ; 
Minstrels, 1,2; Judiciary Committee, 2. 



2 



Creek 



BRUCE MANNING METZCER 
Middletown, Pa. 



PHILO 



When one thinks of a quiet, sedate fellow, he seldom relates 
him to one who spreads cheer and who wears a smile for every- 
one. Yet Bruce is one of that unusual type whose ever present, 
cheery "hello" makes us immediately attached to him despite his 
veil of restraint. He is very conscientious in all his undertakings 
and has gained himself a position in the Lebanon Valley aristo- 
cracy — the "A" students. 

Bruce has a rare ambition — that of becoming a professor of 
New Testament Greek. Anyone who knows this language at all 
will realize the absolute Spartan courage of the man who un- 
dertakes its complete mastery. But we do think Bruce will do it. 
He himself has said that he would rather study Greek than eat. 
Well, it's still all Greek to us, Bruce, but we do wish you from 
the alpha to the omega of success. 

College: Honor Roll, 1 , 2, 3 ; Y. M. C. A., 3 ; Reader's Club, 3 ; 
Life Work Recruits, 1 , 2, 3. 



PAULA. MILLER 

Lebanon, Pa. 

History KALO 

Good natured "Crap" might well change his name from Paul 
to "Tall" for he is just that — no more, no less. He is a remarkable 
combination of "Moose" Krausse and Ellsworth Vines for he 
utilizes his height advantageously on both the basketball and 
tennis courts. It is probably on the former, however, that he has 
cut the widest swathe. "Polly" is a pivot-man of no mean repute 
and his fame as a hoopster has spread throughout the Collegiate 
loop. 

Paul divides his spare time equally between playing practical 
jokes on his pal Feeser and chasing various members of the fair 
sex. At both he is an accomplished hand. 

He is well liked by the student body and by the people who 
have watched his clean conduct on the basketball court. His 
ready smile and pleasing personality combine to make "Tall Paul " 
a popular Miller. 

College: Basketball, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1 ; Football, 1 , 2. 



64 



MARIETTA EUGENIA OSSI 

Garfield, N. J. 

Chemistry DELPHIAN 

Hail, Garfield! And this representative of that ethereal Joisey 
land is just brimming with joviality. Marietta is alvi'ays wearing a 
smile, is always cheerful, and seems to derive continual enjoy- 
ment out of life. Although she spent a year at N. Y. U. before she 
came to Lebanon Valley, she nevertheless began to take a promi- 
nent part in class and social activities in very short order. She first 
displayed her abilities by gaining membership in the exclusive 
Green Blotter Club. She has also been an active worker on the 
La Vie staff as well as the Quittapahilla. 

If time spent in the laboratories is a gauge for future success. 
Marietta should be a "Wow" in the field of medicine. For days 
at a stretch she confines herself to breaking anything from test 
tubes to distilling apparatus in the chemistry Lab. Yet they tell 
me that Marietta never breaks a dish when she's washing dishes 
for Ma. 

College: N. Y. U., 1 : Chemistry Club. 2, 3 ; Reader's Club, 2, 3 : 
La Vie Collegienne, 3 ; Quittapahilla Staff. 3 ; Green Blotter Club, 
3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2; Corresponding Secretary. 3. 

HENRY G. PALATINI 

Garfield, N. J. 

French PHILO 

Henry is probably the busiest and one of the most capable men 
in the Junior Class. "Pal," as we know him. is the editor-in-chief 
of our year-book, and it is not an infrequent sight to see him 
scouring the halls in search of copy. He has been an important 
figure in class, society, and extra-curricular activities, and has 
proved to be an efficient leader in whatever he undertakes. 

"Pal" is the sort of fellow with whom we seek to retain a last- 
ing friendship because it is to our advantage to have a man of his 
calibre and influence on our side. In the Class Play, Henry dis- 
played his all-round ability by the way in which he handled a 
difficult role. 

With him go our best wishes for a successful future which will 
undoubtedly be his. 

College: Reader's Club, 1,2; Green Blotter Club, 2, 3 ; La Vie 
Collegienne, 1.2; 2nd Prize, Sophomore English; Press Service, 
2,3. 

Class: Junior Play. 3 ; President. 2; Quittapahilla Editor. 3. 

Society: judiciary Committee. 1,3; Critic, 1 . 

ELNORA LOUISE REEDER 

Fayetteville, Pa. 

Music DELPHIAN 

EInora is another one of those transfers who bring with them 
a breath of fine spirit which is always a valuable addition to the 
campus. She came from Penn Hall this year and immediately be- 
came one of the most active people in the Conservatory of Music. 

In class work she is a devoted follower of the rules of study 
which demand application. And her work shows it. She has gained 
the favor of the faculty with no trouble through her abilities in 
the lecture rooms and practice rooms. 

It is evident, too, that EInora likes the social side of life. She 
has certainly formed a great attachment for a little blond boy 
from town who is constantly seen in her company. More power 
to you, EInora. 

We heartily forgive you those eerie noises which proceed from 
the conservatory. Your voice is certainly not one of those con- 
tributing to the din. Perhaps some day. when you have become a 
renowned diva, we'll pay $5.50 a seat to hear you. 

College: Penn Hall, 1, 2; Glee Club, 3; Girl's Band, 3 ; Y. W. C 
A, 3. 




65 




EMMA |. REINBOLD 

Jonestown, Pa. 

German CLIO 

For the campus being who radiates a most lovable personality 
we nominate Emma Reinbold. No one can talk to Emma for a 
few minutes without becoming a fast friend of hers. And once a 
friend, always a friend. The deeper your insight into her nature 
becomes, the more pay-dirt you find. Wit, warmth, intellect, 
pleasantness — the whole list of attributes, are behind the frank 
face and sunny smile. It is small wonder that everyone has a 
pleasant word for the little girl from Jonestown who made good 
at our big college. 

Emma's major is German. And she has her major mastered. 
Perhaps one of the hardest courses at Lebanon Valley, German 
is "pie" for Emma. She combines her record breaking classwork 
with a wealth of outside activity from dramatics to athletics. Ap- 
plication is the secret — the same application which will make 
every task "pie" for Emma later on. 

College: German Club, 1 , 2, 3, President, 3 ; Reader's Club, 3 ; 
Varsity Hockey, 3. 

Class: Hockey, 1 , 2, 3 ; Captain, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2; Critic, 3. 

). HENRY RICKER 

Carlisle, Pa. 

Chemistry KALO 

"Jake" is the tall blond terror from Carlisle, But his ravishing 
appearance is lost to most of the girls on the campus. A beautiful 
brunette from South Hall has had his stocks cornered for three 
years. 

J. Henry is an aspirant to the M. D. degree. Another doctor 
who will encourage young husbands to feed their wives a bushel 
of apples each day. But he too may swing from the ordinary med- 
ical field into the field of criminology. Along with his roommate, 
Rose, he sits up many nights trying with might and main to figure 
out how the hero in the "continued next month" thriller will 
escape from the dungeon at the base of the eerie old castle. If his 
weird methods for extricating these penned up people are work- 
able, we fear that perhaps he will even swing into an author with 
a tome on "How to Break Jail in Five Easy Blasts." 

College: Football, 1,3; Baseball, 1, 2; Basketball, 1. 
Class: Football, 1,2; Flag Scrap, 1 ; Tug, 1 . 
Society: Anniversary Play, 2. 



WILLIAM GEORGE ROSE 

Trenton, N. J. 

Chemistry KALO 

Rose's nickname is "Punk." But don't let it fool you. He is far 
from a "punk" in anything he tries. On the football team he is 
outstanding. On the basketball team he is outstanding. As a pre- 
medical student he is outstanding. In short "Bill" is one of the 
fellows gifted with a modified "Midas Touch" — turning every- 
thing he touches into a good thing. 

His hobby seems to be criminology. Vv'ith his ambitions as a 
doctor, perhaps we will hear of him some day as a celebrated 
scientific criminologist. It's a fine field and a field in which, as 
usual, "Punk" will again make his nickname paradoxical. At 
least, with his appearance, he should be able to gain the com- 
plete confidence of any female collaborators on cases. He cer- 
tainly will cause havoc among the hearts of the nurses when he 
serves his interne-ship. 

College: Football, 1 , 2, 3 ; Basketball, 1 , 2, 3. 



66 



LESTER FAIRFAX ROSS 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Creek PHILO 

Another of our prospective ministers is this husky lad from the 
West Shore. He is very versatile, and if at any time the supply of 
preachers should exceed the demand, this unthinkable phenome- 
na would never bother friend Lester. Two other professions might 
attract him, barbering and salesmanship. That he has a perfect 
understanding of the intricacies of the tonsorial art has already 
been demonstrated during his freshman year on the campus. His 
business ability, having gained it where he might, has been re- 
warded by a junior partnership in the firm of "Hoke and Ross, 
Candy Vendors Extraordinary." But we think sincerely that he 
will never lack a pulpit as long as he chooses to preach the gospel. 
A winning personality has "Les." His friends are met with a 
cheery hello and a hearty (not boisterous) slap on the back. These 
attributes round out the make-up of one who will go far in his 
chosen life work. 

College: Football, 1 ; President, Freshman "Y" Cabinet. 



Music 
Dale, or "Casey,' 



DALE HENRY ROTH 
Biglerville. Pa. 



PHILO 



is the boy who has made "Home on the 
Range" and "Casey Jones" a part of our college life. He has vir- 
tually sung his way into the heart of everyone who knows him, 
despite the fact that his frequent early morning "tuningsup" 
aren't conducive to ambitious sleepers. But "Casey's" guitar ac- 
companied cowboy ditties are by no means his whole repertoire. 
Time and again in the conservatory he has demonstrated that his 
voice is extraordinarily well adapted to concert singing as well. 
On the baritone and trombone he is equally accomplished. 

Dale has won himself many friends through a smiling person- 
ality and a natural convivial temperament. He seems destined to 
go on in life making a friend of everyone he meets and keeping 
those friends. We are all proud of Dale and wish him the best of 
success. 

College: Huntington College, 1 ; Clee Club, 2. 3; Band, 2, 3; 
Little Symphony, 3 : Orchestra, 2, 3 ; May Day Program, 2. 



GERALD RUSSELL 

Youngsville, Pa. 

Biology KALO 

Allow us to introduce "Cring Bosby," or the Street Singer of 
the third floor (Men's Dorm). He's always crooning love songs 
and we used to wonder why, but no longer. A certain little girl 
from North Hall has had him "weavering" back and forth across 
the campus for almost three years. But with it all his warbling 
never improves. 

"Jerry" is a good fellow "for a' that" and seems to make it his 
business to tend strictly to his own. At a place like this such an 
endeavor cannot help but evoke a flood of admiration, and, need- 
less to say, Jerry has many friends. 

Much of his time is spent in the Biology Laboratory where his 
scholastic interests are embodied. He is one of the students of 
our class who really works hard. We feel little fear about his 
success in anything, whether it be teaching or — oh, what's the 
difference. 

2; Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 



Class: President, 1 ; Flag Scrap, 1 
1 ; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 

Society: Secretary, 3; Minstrels, 




67 




CHARLES FRANCIS RUST 

Lansdowne, Pa. 

History 

"Smoky" is little but mighty, as many ot our opponents on 
both the gridiron and on the diamond and basketball court have 
discovered. The class of '35 has a great pride in "Rusty" as one 
of its greatest athletes. In football he has made a great record 
for himself as a quarterback. None of us who witnessed this 
year's P. M. C. game will ever forget the mighty little man, 
"Charlie" Rust. The huge hulks who opposed him, and even the 
physically large men who played with him, faded to insignifi- 
cance as the mighty Rust kicked, passed, and rushed the ball all 
over the field. 

It would seem, by our first paragraph, that Charlie is purely 
and simply an athlete. But this is not so. "Smoky" is a good stu- 
dent. And besides being a good student, he is a popular student. 
If there ever was a man who was unspoiled by success, it is our 
own "Charley." One of the most popular men on the campus, it 
is only because of his own irresistable personality. 

College: Football, 1 , 2, 3 ; Basketball, 1 , 2, 3 ; Baseball, 1 , 2, 3 ; 
"L"Club, 1, 2, 3. 

R. LESLIE SAUNDERS 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Music KALO 

Leslie, more commonly "Les," is the man who has won fame 
on the campus and off as a master of the slide trombone. In a 
very short time his ability was discovered and the student-body 
was making good use of him. We will never forget his marvelous 
rendition of the difficult "Thoughts of Love" in the first band 
concert. He is now a member of the orchestra at the famous Her- 
shey Theatre. 

In years he is somewhat ahead of the general run of students. 
But it doesn't harm his geniality. He is easy to get along with and 
makes friends fast. 

His days of bachelorhood, though, are almost over. We under- 
stand, through the society columns of the Capital's newspapers 
that R. Leslie is engaged. We look forward with pleasure to the 
forthcoming cigars when the bells ring out. Lots of luck, Les, and 
may all your children be as adept with the trombone as their 
famous father. 

College: Band, 1,3; Orchestra, 1,3; Glee Club, 1,3. 



ROBERT LUICARD SCHEIRER 

Pine Grove, Pa. 

Music PHILO 

Robert, or "Bob" is usually distinguished locally through the 
fact that he plays the musical telescope, or bassoon, in the band. 
We've often wondered how the thing would sound if we'd ever 
hear it in a solo, but thus far all we know is that he sits in the 
back row and is apparently playing something. Bob is a day stu- 
dent and drives daily from Pine Grove in his well-known Green 
Chevrolet with the seat next to him fully occupied by a certain 
Junior girl. 

"Bob " is a quiet, sincere fellow with a rather pleasing sense of 
humor which to most of his fellow students is unknown He is an 
ardent student of the conservatory, and takes an active part in 
most of the musical organizations and functions. We believe that 
this likeable, willing to work chap will some day attain the suc- 
cess which he undoubtedly merits. 

College: Band, 1 , 2, 3 ; Orchestra, 1,2; Glee Club, 2, 3 ; Sym- 
phony Orchestra, 3 ; May Day Program, 1 , 2. 



68 



KALO 
Schwartz, or at least "Tough Luck" Schwartz. It 



HARRY ). SCHWARTZ 

Ephrata, Pa. 

Biology 

"Calamity 
seems that everything in the medical dictionary must at one time 
be connected with his name, "Bill" has lost months due to sick- 
ness during his stay at Lebanon Valley. 

But it hasn't deterred his scholastic progress. With the aid of 
an ambitious summer program he has remained up with us in 
standing despite his many set-backs. Yet he is by no means a 
book-worm. Far from it' He is rather the happy-go-lucky chap 
who takes things as they come, disposes of them in a finished 
style, and goes on to the next thing with a song and a smile. 

It is this personality that lists him a friend with all the campus 
people. Even his roommates, despite "Bill's" perpetual raids on 
soap, cigarettes, tooth-paste, and other incidentals, put him on 
the gentleman's side of the fence. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1 , 2, 3 ; German Club, 1 , 2, 3. 

Class: Football, 2; Basketball, 1,2; Flag Scrap, 2; Qu:ttapahilla 
Staff, 3. 

Society: Judiciary Committee, 2, 3. 



KENNETH C. SHEAFFER 
New Bloomfield, Pa. 



Business Ad. 



PHILO 



"Ken" is the boy on the campus who always appears as neatly 
groomed as Gallant Fox after the Derby. No reflections on the 
horse) . But, truthfully, a fine physical appearance and a tempera- 
ment seldom moody or sullen combine to make him one of the 
most pleasant fellows of our acquaintance. He is an ambitious 
student in his department and at the same time an active worker 
in extra-curricular activity. 

But we have strong suspicions that he is a traitor. A number of 
our boys swear that they heard this same Sheaffer cheering for 
the Juniata girls' hockey team when the latter met Lebanon Val- 
ley. Is it true, or do we "Smith" our guess. (Vv'e defy anyone to 
find a worse pun in this section. ) 

We are laughing now, but we have a hunch that out in the 
world he will be the one to laugh last — and not be a fool for 
waiting so long. 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3; May Day Program, 1, 2; 
Band, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; La Vie Coliegienne, 3; Debating 
Team, Assistant Manager, 3. 

Class: Junior Play, 3 ; Quittapahilla Staff, 3, 

Society: Anniversary Play, 1 ; Sergeant at Arms, 1 ; Recording 
Secretary, 2 ; Critic, 3 ; Anniversary Committee, 3. 

CHARLES WILBUR SHROYER 

Annville, Pa. 

Biology KALO 

"Wib" is one of the few students who has had residence in 
Annville since the day of his birth, his home lying just across the 
street from the Campus. Yet he is a severe addict to starting late 
which earned him the reputation of "Caboose" during his first 
year. Of late his prowess has dimmed in the face of far more 
accomplished late arrivals, but we still remember his abilities as 
we remember the perfections of other past masters. 

A sonorous bass voice is a prime attribute of friend Wilbur. 
He has been one of the mainstays of the Kalo Minstrels in the 
past two years, and will probably continue his work in this re- 
spect. In the Glee Club too he has lent his ability. 

Quiet "Wib," who is yet in for any fun that may be lying 
around, gains the confidence of all his acquaintances, and keeps 
a friend once made through the years. 

College: Glee Club, 1,3; Treasurer, 3. 

Society: Anniversary Play, 2; Minstrels, 1 , 2. 




69 




Education 



ALBERT SINCAVACE 
Minersville, Pa. 



"Slim's" greatest ambition is to become a coach, and if his 
ability at the center position of our football team can be taken 
as a barometer of success, Warner, Anderson and the rest will 
fade to mere nothings in comparison with him. 

"Slim" already has a knowledge of life in the outside world, 
having worked several years before coming to college. And his 
was no child's play. He was a coal miner. We remember a story 
about him, which he modestly denies, concerning itself with the 
rescue of a fellow-miner in a mine accident. 

On the baseball team last Spring, Sincavage was the only play- 
er to have a batting average of 1 .000 (never mind the details) . 
We think this is typical of him and sincerely hope he continues 
to bat 1.000 in the future. 

College: Football, 1 , 2. 3 ; Baseball, 2; Men's Senate, 3; "L" 
Club, 3. 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 



WILLIAM HUNT SMITH 
Trenton, N. 1. 



Business Ad. 



On one of the back pages of this book Smith is rated, through 
the medium of popular vote, the best athlete on the Lebanon 
Valley Campus. A fine choice. As an end on our football team, a 
guard on the five, and a hurler on the nine, he has demonstrated 
time and again "that ol' fight in there." 

But the extra time required by participation in athletics has by 
no means hindered Smith's other activities. As a student he rates 
highly. He is secretary of the Commerce Club, a member of the 
Men's Senate, and an active member of the "L" Club, To fill in 
his spare moments this year he acted as sports editor for this 
same Quittapahilla. 

Everything Smith decides to do, Smith does well. Dependable, 



able, sure — that's "Bill 
call him a friend. 

College: Basketball, 
Commerce Club, 1,2,: 
Club, 2, 3. 



It is small wonder that people like to 

2, 3 ; Baseball, 1 , 2, 3 ; Football, 1 , 2, 3 ; 
; Secretary, 3; Men's Senate, 2, 3; "L" 



Class: Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 



German 



PAULINE TILLIE SNAVELY 
Ono, Pa. 



CLIO 



Pauline is one of the reserved people on our campus. But just 
because she is quiet does not say that she cannot appreciate a bit 
of fun. 

"Shnebly" is a most conscientious student, and in German she 
is one of Miss Lietzau's ardent disciples. German is her chosen 
field of study and she carries her interest over into the depart- 
mental German Club, of which she is an active member. 

For sportsmanship she is quite unrivaled. She owes this reputa- 
tion for an amazing bit of sacrifice which she performed recent- 
ly — that of sleeping on several chairs when there was a shortage 
of beds. Her name becomes immortalized through this feat of 
self-denial. 

"Tillie" is planning to be a teacher, and, since she comes from 
a family already successful in that line and since she herself is 
so able and perseverant, we feel sure that she is on the road to 
success. Here's to her! 



70 



ALLEN W. STEFFY 
Wyomissing, Pa. 

History PHiLO 

"Monsieur" Steffy, of the Wyomissing Steffys! Here is one 
chap we couldn't get along without. His cheerful disposition and 
his wide range of abilities has won him many friends. As a student 
he is majoring in History and has served as an assistant this past 
year. We wonder where he acquired his wide knowledge of the 
subject. 

Steffy is a wolf in sheep's clothing so far as the women go 
But despite constant warnings, they will continue to fall. For 
"Monsieur" has a way with them — as a certain young lady on 
Main Street might tell you. 

Steffy is quite an athlete, too. along with his other accom- 
plishments. His work on the class basketball team has shown us 
that. With such a diversity of interests, Steffy will win the toss 
every time. 

College: History Assistant, 3 ; May Day Program, 1,2: Reader's 
Club, 3: International Relations Cabinet, 3, President, 3; History 
Club, 2. 

Class: Flag Scrap, 1 ; Basketball, 1,2; Vice-President, 3. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1 : Judiciary Committee, 3. 

DAVID LAWSON THOMPSON, )R. 
Williamstown, Pa. 

History PHILO 

In Dave we have the best type of sport this campus can boast, 
A more loyal supporter of our varsity teams and class scraps is 
hard to find. At times so quiet and at times a typical "agitator," 
Dave is rather hard to understand. 

Although his attitude toward the females seems to be nega- 
tive, as far as the men go he is a fine friend. He is generous to 
them even to the extent of allowing them to practise his own 
secret formula for the passing of true-false examinations. This 
memorable system, according to Dave, has worked wonders in 
examinations and should be most useful to future students at the 
institution. 

Thompson hardly meddles with extra-curricular activity. The 
major portion of his time is spent in studying. But he does show 
keen interest in pocket billiards, and is extremely adept with a 
ping-pong paddle. 

With a spirit of friendship as near his own as we can make it, 
we wish Dave the greatest success in life. 

Class: Flag Scrap, 1,2; Tug, 1 , 2. 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1 ; Recording Secretary, 2. 

PHILIP UNDERWOOD 
Pottsville, Pa. 

Biology PHILO 

"Phil" is truly a different type of person than that usually 
found on this campus — different not in the sense of being pecu- 
liar, but different in his being so hard to understand and to 
analyze, A sophisticate quite beyond reach was my first impres- 
sion of him. But as we became better acquainted, I realized that 
he was a most loyal and helpful friend. He never gets into the 
limelight of activity, but moves rather about the edge, doing his 
work quietly and doing it well. 

He is a biology major who takes his work seriously, spending a 
good deal of his time in the laboratories. Whether it is the Renais- 
sance thirst for knowledge which keeps him there so much, or 
whether it is the attraction of the sweet females with whom he 
works is still a point of discussion. 

To wish "Phil" luck would be superfluous. The world always 
rewards a good worker and a good friend. 

College: Biology Assistant, 3 ; "Y" Cabinet, 3 ; May Day Com- 
mittee, 2. 

Society: Chairman, Executive Committee, 3. 




71 




CATHERINE p. WAGNER 

Annville, Pa. 

English DELPHIAN 

Small in stature, but mighty in achievements, "Cappy" is a 
very conscientious worker in everything she attempts. She is 
given to moods which are sometimes hard to interpret, varying 
as they do from the morbid up through the angry to the extreme- 
ly happy. 

But "Cappy" never lets her moodiness lose her friends. She is 
upright and loyal throughout. And, although inclined to be stu- 
dious, she finds time to take an active interest in the social life. 

She has aspirations for the field of missionary activity, but re- 
gardless of her life work (we place our money on matrimony) , 
she will make good — and with our sincere best wishes. 

College: Wig and Buckle, 3 ; Y. W. C. A., 3; Prayer Meeting 
Chairman, 3; Philo Anniversary Play, 3: Library Assistant, 3; La 
Vie Coliegienne, 3. 

Class: Secretary, 2 ; Hockey, 1,2; Junior Play, 3 ; Quittapahilla 
Staff, 3. 

Society: Executive Committee, 2; Corresponding Secretary, 3: 
Chaplain, 2; Anniversary Play, 2. 

RICHARD LEHMAN WALBORN 

Millersburg, Pa. 

Economics PHILO 

One of the first questions freshmen ply is "Who is that long 
drink of water — the one with the determined grin on his face and 
the tennis racket in his hand?" Bill Tilden, we answer, almost. 
Perhaps Dick "Tilden" Walborn, but at any rate the tallest mem- 
ber of our class and as likeable as he is tall. Although he does hail 
from Millersburg, and although he is a profound student of eco- 
nomics, people are inclined to forget it and let his personality 
dominate their thoughts of "Dick." 

Bes'des being an earnest student, "Dick" has spent enough 
time developing his artistry with the racket to warrant those 
things we have previously said of him. The game he plays on the 
court may be taken as typical of him on the whole — determined, 
a hard worker, clean, and sportsmanlike. 

College: Y, M. C. A , 2, 3, Treasurer, 
President, 2; Tennis, 2; Commerce Club, 

Class: Flag Scrap, 1 : Tug, 1 . 

Society: Sergeant at Arms, 1 ; Pianist, 2; Secretary, 2, 3. 



3: Band, 1 , 2, 3 ; Vice- 
1, 2, 3: Orchestra, 1. 



DONALD EARL WALTER 

Hummelstown, Pa. 

Chemistry 

"Bucky" Walter is one of the most popular day-students, an- 
other one of the early birds of this fraternal group who sleepily 
boards the 5 A. M. rattler for this seat of learning. Probably his 
chief claim to popularity is his masterful knowledge of that favor- 
ite pastime of so many college students, pinochle. But another 
trait which is much admired by his host of friends is his happy 
faculty of returning from a date at just the opportune time to 
furnish homeward transportation for stranded fellow addicts to 
the feminine charms. 

He's going to be a doctor — and, as far as scholastic abilities 
can be used as a gauge of future progress, we'll bet on him to be 
a good one. But worried husbands will do well to replenish their 
supply of apples and to make this deterrent to doctors a staple 
part of their complaining wives' diets. Doctor Walter will be a 
dangerous customer to compete with when his charm is flashing. 

College: Chemistry Club, 1 , 2, 3. 



72 



Mathematics 



MARGARET WEAVER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



CLIO 



Peggy is one of the quiet and unassuming girls of our class 
Because of her rather retiring nature, very few people really learn 
to know her, but those few cherish her friendship very much. She 
can be depended upon as a helper in any situation which presents 
itself. 

Peggy has plenty of wit and humor and is always ready to take 
a quietly active part in the social side of college life. She is usual- 
ly seen in the company of a young man named Jerry. Perhaps that 
has something to do with her absence from North Hall at certain 
times during the day and evening. 

At any rate, a faithful friend and a silent worker like Peggy is 
sure to succeed. 

College: W. S. C. A.. 1 ; Y. W. C. A., 3. 

Class: Hockey, 1,2; Freshman Y Cabinet. 

Society: Recording Secretary. 2 ; Treasurer, 3. 



HARRY CLAY WHITING 
Cape May Court House, N. |. 



KALO 



History 

Harry, I "Sully" to us) , is one of our outstanding football play- 
ers and has made quite an enviable record during the past season 
as a plunging fullback, "Sully" also plays varsity baseball. How- 
ever, his abilities at these sports do not overbalance his qualities 
as a student and as one possessed of a likeable personality and a 
happy-go-lucky nature. 

"Sully" is full of fun, and can usually be found up to some sort 
or mischief from which he draws much apparent pleasure. 

None of us will forget the picture of him after he had received 
a free hair-cut as part of his "L" Club initiation. But the artistic 
cross on his scalp did nothing more than "mark the spot" from 
which his pleasing personality originates. We're expecting to 
hear a lot more from "Sully" before his college days have ended 
and afterward as well. 

College: Football, 2, 3; Baseball, 2; "L" Club, 2, 3. 

Class: Football, 1 ; Quittapahilla Staff, 3. 



|OHN E. WITTER 
Newmanstown, Pa. 



Business Ad. 



Daily the thriving metropolis of Newmanstown sends us one 
of her most illustrious sons in the person of "Johnny" Witter. 
His quiet and unassuming manner, together with his good nature, 
has made him a sworn friend of all the day students. During the 
spring when most young men's fancies turn to thoughts of love, 
John's thoughts turn to baseball, for he is one of the choice hurl- 
ers hereabouts. 

Whenever smoke begins to curl from the windows and doors 
of the day student room, and most of the fellows there appear to 
be enjoying one of Ben Bernie's famous "props," you may be sure 
that John has again been playing Santa Claus, to the distress of 
his father's inventory sheets. 

This generous nature is one of his prime attributes. There is 
no person who can truthfully say that he came to John for help 
and did not get it. He is an infallible resource in times of trouble. 

Good luck, John! Keep throwing them up to the plate in the 
same fine manner and you'll surely succeed. 




73 




SOPHOMORE 



ROLL 



ADAM BICLER, )R. 

West Willow, Pa. 

JAMES ORVILLE BEMESDERFER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

LOUISE EMALINE BISHOP 
Newport, Pa. 

JAY HENRY BOLTON 
Linglestown, Pa. 

HERBERT HARVEY BOWERS 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

CATHERINE NANCY BOWMAN 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

RUTH ELIZABETH BRIGHT 
Cornwall, Pa. 

VIRGINIA KATHRYN BRITTON 
Hershey, Pa. 

FRANK BRYAN 

Asbury Park, N. J. 

LAVINIA MELISSA CASSEDY 
Budd Lake, N. J. 

ROBERT CASSEL 

Woodbury, N. J. 

MABEL CHAMBERLIN 
Ephrata, Pa. 



BEN COHEN 

Lebanon, Pa. 

JOHN THURSTON DAVIS 
Jonestown, Pa. 

CATHERINE ELIZABETH DEISHER 
Jonestown, Pa. 

BEVERLY ESTELLE DELCADO 
Hewlett, N. Y. 

OLETA ALVA DIETRICH 
Palmyra, Pa. 

ROBERT LAMONT EDWARDS 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

MARTHA PRISCILLA ELSER 
Penbrook, Pa. 

ANNA MARY ERDMAN 
Hershey, Pa. 

LESTER PACE ESHENOUR 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

SYLVIA CHARLOTTE EVELEV 
Lebanon, Pa. 

EARL BECKLEY FAUBER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

EDWARD HENRY FAUST 
Lebanon, Pa. 



ANNA LOUISE FRANCIS 
Boyertown, Pa. 

LOUIS PAUL FRANK 
Lebanon, Pa. 

EVELYN CECILI4 FRICK 
Lebanon, Pa. 

VICTOR PAUL FRIDINGER 
Mountville, Pa. 

WILLIAM P. CILFILLAN 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

ALICE LOUISE CILLAN 
Penbrook, Pa. 

JUNE STAUFFER GINGRICH 
Annville, Pa. 

JACK STEWART GLEN 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

DOROTHY FEAR GRIMM 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

CARL FREDERICK GRUBER 
Annville, Pa. 

HARRY GINGRICH GRUBER 
Annville, Pa. 

GERALDINE JOYCE HARKINS 
Cornwall, Pa. 



74 




:lass 



BERTHA WYNNE HARM 
Hershey. Pa. 

SAMUEL SCHLOUCH HARNISH 
Witmer. Pa. 

WILLIS HOWARD HEFFNER 
Annvllle, Pa. 

VERNON CLETUS HEMPERLEY 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

PAUL HERSHEY 
Annville. Pa. 

MARK lAMES HOSTETTER 
Annville, Pa. 

LESTER STEINER HOUTZ 
East Berlin, Pa. 

RICHARD LIGHT HUBER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

ANTHONY AUGUST |ACNESAK 
Emaus, Pa. 

HENRY JULES KARCHER 
Lodi, N. J. 

MARY ALICE KAUFMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

IRMA ISABEL KEIFFER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 



ROLL 

DANIEL HOMER KENDALL 
Hagerstown, Md. 

JOHN WILLIAM KIRKPATRICK 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

JOHN WILLIAM KREAMER 
Annville, Pa. 

HARRY LESTER KRONE 
Thurmont, Md. 

PAUL EDWARD KUHLMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

HAROLD KELLER KURTZ 
Lebanon, Pa. 

MARIAN ESTELLE LEISEY 
Lebanon, Pa. 

EARL CHESTER LIGHT 
Lebanon, Pa. 

JOHN GEORGE LOOS 
Reading, Pa. 

SARAH MARGARET LUPTON 
Winchester, Va. 

HAZEL JANE MARCH 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

THELMA JEAN McCREARY 
Dillsburg, Pa. 



IRVIN HERR MYER 
Annville, Pa. 

LOIS GWENDOLYN MILLER 
Pennington, N. J. 

EDGAR PLOUGH MONN 
Chambersburg, Pa. 

JOHN HENRY MUTH 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

HOWARD HAROLD NYE 
Lebanon, Pa. 

RAYMOND PATRIZIO 
Oakmont, Pa. 

WILLIAM DAVID PRESCOTT 
Tower City, Pa. 

JOSEPH WILBUR PROWELL 
Cly, Pa. 

RICHARD CARLTON RADER 
Lititz, Pa. 

CALVIN HENRY REBER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

RAE ANNA REBER 
Pine Grove, Pa. 

LOUVAIN RUTH ROBERTS 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



75 



SOPHOMORE ROLL 



DONALD OSCAR SANDT 
Emaus, Pa. 

ROBERT JACOB SAUSSER 
Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

IRWIN RUSSELL SCHAAK 
Lebanon, Pa. 

MILLER SAMUEL SCHMUCK 
York, Pa. 

JACK HARTMAN SCHULER 
Lebanon. Pa. 

GEORGE EDWARD SHADEL 
Minersville, Pa. 

CARL WILBUR SHANK 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

LOUISE ADALINE SHEARER 
Caldwell, N. J. 

MARY JANE SHELLENBERGER 
Mountville, Pa. 

ROBERT HAMILTON SHOLTER 
Harnsburg, Pa. 

JANE ELIZABETH SHOWERS 
Mountville, Pa. 



WINONA WINIFRED SHROFF 
Lebanon, Pa. 

CHRISTINE ANNA SMITH 
Lebanon, Pa. 

BOYD LAYMON SPONAUCLE 
Hershey, Pa. 

CODA WELFORD SPONAUCLE 
Hershey, Pa. 

CHARLOTTE LOUISE STABLEV 
Red Lion, Pa. 

RAYMOND B. STEFANO 
Utica, N. Y. 

MARY VIRGINIA SUMMERS 
Waynesboro, Pa. 

HELEN HUMMER SUMMY 
Manheim, Pa. 

ROBERT BENJAMIN TROXEL 
Jonestown, Pa. 

IVA CLAIRE WEIRICK 
Enola, Pa. 

DAVID JOHN YAKE 
Lebanon, Pa. 



76 








SOPHOMORE OFFICERS 

First Semester 

JOHN WILLIAM KIRKPATRICK President 

RAE ANNA REBER Vice-President 

LOUISE CILLAN Secretary 

ROBERT CASSEL Treasurer 

Second Semester 

WILBUR SHANK President 

MARIAN LEISEY Vice-President 

ADAM BICLER, Jr Secretary 

ROBERT CASSEL Treasurer 



77 




FRESHMAN 



ROLL 



CLAIRE ELIZABETH ADAMS 
Pine Grove, Pa. 

EDWARD ROBERT BACHMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

MARY LOUISE BATZ 
Lebanon, Pa. 

RICHARD ALBERT BAUS 
Lebanon, Pa. 

RUTH LORETTA BUCK 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

HAROLD E, BEAMESDERFER 
Shamokin, Pa. 

LLOYD BEAMESDERFER 
Shamokin, Pa. 

PAUL CYRUS BILLETT 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

ELIZABETH BINGAMAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

EDNA ANNABELLE BINKLEY 
Annville, Pa. 

GERALD ECKELS BITTINGER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

WILLIAM EDWARD BLACK 
Lebanon, Pa. 



MARLIN WALTER BOWERS 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

JOHN MARLIN BROSIUS 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

JAMES LLOYD CROOK 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

THELMA BEATRICE DENLINGER 
Hershey, Pa. 

HOMER ELWOOD DONMOYER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

MINNIE JANE DRUMM 
Williamstown. Pa. 

MAXINE LARUE EARLEY 
Emeigh, Pa. 

WILLIAM HARRY EARNEST 
Lebanon. Pa. 

JOHN KENNETH EASTLAND 
Ramsey, N. J. 

RALPH WEIK EBERLY 
Sheridan, Pa. 

MIRIAM C. EICHNER 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

ELEANOR CAROLINE ENGLE 
Palmyra, Pa. 



78 




ROLL 



MORRIS MUMMA ENCLE 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

MARTHA CLIPPINCER FAUST 
Waynesboro, Pa. 

RUTH ESTELLE COYNE 
Mahanoy City, Pa. 

RAYMOND CHARLES CRANDONE 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

SELMA PRISCILLAGRIM 
Dallasfown, Pa. 

LOIS MARIE HARBOLD 
Dallastown, Pa. 

MARY JEAN HARNISH 
Palmyra, Pa. 

RUSSELL CONDRAN HATZ 
Annville, Pa. 

HENRY HEISEY 
Lebanon, Pa. 

CHARLES IRA HOFFMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

LOUISE ELEANOR HOFFMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

HAROLD C. HOLLINCSWORTH 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



GEORGE MARK HOLTZMAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

HELEN VIRGINIA HOUCK 
Lebanon, Pa. 

JOHN CROWFORD HOUTZ 
Biglerville, Pa. 

FRANK BERNARD HUBER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

RUSSEL NATHANIEL JENKINS 
Barnesboro. Pa. 

ROBERT EUGENE KELL 
Loysville, Pa. 

WARREN CARBER KING 
Hershey, Pa. 

CHARLES BAMBURGH KINNEY 
Farmingdale, N. Y. 

ESTHER LEOTTA KOPPENHAVER 
Pillow, Pa. 

FERNE RUTH LAYSER 
Annville, Pa. 

NORMAN LAZIN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

WILBUR ARTHUR LEECH 
York, Pa. 



79 



FRESHMAN ROLL 



SARAH ELIZABETH LIGHT 
Annville, Pa. 

THEODORE MANDON LOOSE 
Reading, Pa. 

BURRITT KEELER LUPTON 
Wyckoff. N. J. 

ROSE ELEANOR LYNCH 
Annville, Pa. 

FRANCIS W. MacMULLEN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

WILLIAM FRAZER MASIMER 
Hershey, Pa. 

MARY ELIZABETH McALLISTER 
Gettysburg, Pa. 

SARA KATHERINE MECKLEY 
Enola, Pa. 

HARRY EDGAR MESSERSMITH 
Myerstown, Pa. 

JAMES HENRY MILLER 
Harrisburg. Pa. 

LESTER WILSON MORGAN 
Williamstown, Pa. 

MARLIN WILBUR MORGAN 
Williamstown, Pa. 

JACK ROLLER MORRIS 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

GAYLE ELIZABETH MOUNTZ 
Lemoyne, Pa. 

GRACE MARIE NAUCLE 
Camp Hill, Pa. 

ELWOOD EDWARD NEEDY 
Boonsboro, Md. 



ANNA HERR ORTH 
Lebanon, Pa. 

HAROLD PHILLIPS 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LEONARD WILLIAM PHILLIPS 
Coaldale, Pa. 

EDWARD ALLEN POWELL 
Robesonia, Pa. 

HOWARD FRANKLIN REBER 
Elizabethville, Pa. 

FRANK ALLEN RUTHERFORD 
Lebanon, Pa. 

JACK EDWARD SCHMIDT 
Lebanon, Pa. 

DONALD EMERSON SHAY 
Lebanon, Pa. 

BARRY HUGH SHAPIRO 
Lebanon, Pa. 

CORDELLA REBECCA SHEAFFER 
Oberlin, Pa. 

RETA JOYCE SHOLLEY 
Annville, Pa. 

GEORGE LIGHT SMELTZER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

CYRUS GOOD SMITH 
Lebanon, Pa. 

RICHARD THOMAS SMITH 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

IDA BELLE SMITH 
Windsor, Pa. 

MARJORIE HELEN SMITH 
Myerstown, Pa. 

CLAIR ALBERT SNELL 
Lebanon, Pa. 



JOHN LOUIS SPEC 
Garfield, N. J. 

HENRY C. STEINER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

BERNARD ALBERT STEVENS 
Coaldale, Pa. 

DOLORES ROMAINE STILES 
Red Lion, Pa. 

CHESTER A. STINEMAN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

LOUIS ERNEST STRAUS 
Baltimore, Md. 

CHAUNCEY ROYALTON SWARTZ 
Annville, Pa. 

EDWIN HOMER TALLMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

CURVIN LIVINGSTON THOMPSON 
York, Pa. 

DUEY ELLSWORTH UNCER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

EARL CLAYTON UNGER 
Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

ROBERT W. WALKER 
Camp Hill, Pa. 

MARY GILBERT WEBB 
Gettysburg, Pa. 

PAULINE KATHRYN YEAGER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

WILLIAM HENRY ZIERDT 
Lickdale, Pa. 

JOHN ZIMMERMAN 
Manheim, Pa. 



80 




FROSH OFFICERS 

First Semester 

DUEY ELLSWORTH UNCER President 

WILBUR ALGERNON LEECH Vice-Pres.dent 

SELMA PRISCILLA GRIM Secretary 

JAMES CROOK Treasurer 

Second Semester 

RICHARD T. SMITH President 

ELEANOR LYNCH Vice-President 

GRACE NAUGLE Secretary 

JAMES CROOK Treasurer 



81 



CONSERVATORY ROLL 

Seniors 

Matilda Rose Bonanni Robert dinger Heath 

Dorothy Elizabeth Ely Catherine Fietta Heckman 

Margaret Holmes Early Adelaide Ruth Sanders 
Richard Sillik Slaybaugh 

Juniors 

Ruth Wells Bailey Ernest Harold Koch 

Myrle Deaven Leslie Saunders 

Ida Katherine Hall Robert Luigard Scheirer 

Ethel Irene Keller Einora Reeder 
Dale Henry Roth 

Sophomores 

Helen Jean Bitting I rma Isabel Keiffer 

Catherine Nancy Bowman John George Loos 

Frank Bryan Rae Anna Reber 

Lavinia Melissa Cassedy Donald Oscar Sandt 

Catherine E. Deisher Robert Jacob Sausser 

Oleta Alva Dietrich Jack Hartman Schuler 

Martha Priscilla Elser George Edward Shade! 

Lester Page Eshenour Donald Shope 

Anna Louisa Francis Jane E. Showers 

Samuel S. Harnish Charlotte L. Stabley 

Andthony August Jagnesak Mary Virginia Summers 
Helen Hummer Summy 

Freshmen 

Elizabeth Bingaman Esther Koppenhaver 

Edna Binkley Sarah Light 

William Black Gayle Mountz 

Ruth Coyne Cordelia Shaeffer 

Russell Hatz Chester Stineman 

Frank Huber Henry Steiner 

Earl Unger 



82 




GLEE CLUB 



R. HEATH President 

D. ROTH Vice-President 

H. SUMMY Secretary 

R, SLAYBAUCH Treasurer 

C. STABLEY Librarian 

R. BAILEY Accompanist 

E. P. RUTLEDCE Director 



PERSONNEL 



Sopranos 

M. Bonanni 
N. Bowman 
I. Hall 

C. Heckman 
C. Mountz 
R, Reber 
E, Reeder 
J. Showers 
W. Schroff 
H. Summy 



Tenors 



S, Goodman 
R. Heath 
A. Ranck 
D^ Roth 
R. Sausser 
J, Schuler 
D. Shope 
C. Stineman 
R, Smith 



Contraltos 

O. Dietrich 
M. Early 
M. Elser 

D. Ely 

E. Fnck 

S^ McAdams 

M. Nye 

J. Shellenberger 

C. Smith 

C. Stabley 



Basses 

L. Beamesderfer 
C. Derickson 
S. Harnish 
E. Koch 
C. Mentzer 
L. Saunders 
K. Shaeffer 
R. Scheirer 
R. Sholter 
R. Slaybaugh 
W. Shroyer 



Strains of music from the twelfth to the twentieth century literature sung by 
forty young people in maroon-colored robes; the blaring of a trumpet; the 
singing of a violin; the piano harmonies from a Liszt or a Debussy — all these 
and more one hears and sees when he attends a concert given by our Glee Club. 

The Lebanon Valley Glee Club as a musical organization on our campus, is 
second to none. In the spring the club travels to various towns and cities, giv- 
ing concerts of superior quality. In the past two years it has experienced a 
spectacular rise — leaping from an obscure position to immediate recognition 
by musicians in many sections of the state. 

Behind all the successes and laurels that the organization has gained has 
been the encouragement and most efficient leadership of its director. Pro- 
fessor Rutledge. 



R3 




SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

E. P. RUTLEDCE, Conductor 



Flutes 

A. jagnesak 
M. Early 

Oboes 

C. Smith 
E. Koch 

Clarinet's 

E. Umberger 
C. Heckman 

Bassoons 

R. Scheirer 
R. Smith 

French Horns 

R^ Heath 
L. Krone 
N. Bowman 



PERSONNEL 
Trumpets 

E. Unger 
W. Black 

Trombones 

F. Bryan 
D. Roth 

S. Harnish 

Tympani 

W. Kirkpatrick 

1 St Violins 

M. Elser 
O. Dietrich 
). Schuler 
M. Bonanni 
H. Butterwick 



2nd Violins 

R. Hatz 
R. Sausser 
C, Mountz 
A. Herr 
E. Powell 

Violas 

A. Sanders 
R. Bailey 

Cellos 

Prof. Carmean 
J. Goodyear 

String Basses 

R. Slaybaugh 
C. Stineman 



The Little Symphony is a new organization on the campus and promises to 
attain heights worthy of its name. Its members are a select group of well 
trained musicians who meet weekly under the directorship of Professor Rut- 
ledge. 

Because of its recent formation the Symphony has not yet given a home 
concert. However it plans to make its debut in the annual Music Festival to be 
held this spring. 

The musicianship and untiring efforts of Professor Rutledge coupled with 
the ability and cooperation of the orchestra members are sufficient assurance 
of many successful symphony concerts in the seasons to come. 



84 




BAND 

E. UMBERCER President 

W. MENTZER Vice-President 

W. KIRKPATRICK Secretary 

C. HILTNER Treasurer 

EDWARD P. RUTLEDCE Director 



Piccolo 

A. Jagnesak 

Oboe 

C, Smith 

Clarinets 

E. Umberger 
R. Schreiber 
E. Koch 
T. Edwards 
R. Walborn 

D. Grove 
R. Sausser 
L. Morgan 
M. Morgan 
L. Moser 

K. Schaeffer 

Saxophones 

J. Zech 

C, Snell 

D, Shope 
W. Leech 



PERSONNEL 

Trombones 

E Fauber 
F Bryan 
R. Rader 
S- Harnish 
R, Eberly 

Basses 

R, Slaybaugh 
W. Mentzer 

Drums 

J^ Bolton 
C. Stineman 
A. Buzzell 
C. Hiltner 

Tympani 

W. Kirkpatrick 

Drum Major 

F Lehman 



Cornets 

W. Cerber 
J. Loos 
E. Unger 
W. Black 
J. Glen 
R. Huber 
H. Stiner 
G. Bittinger 
H. Bowers 

Altos 

R. Heath 

L. Krone 

H. Kendall 

H. Hollingsworth 

H. Beamesderfer 

Baritones 

L. Saunders 

L. Beamesderfer 

D. Roth 



Picture an enthusiastic director, an eager group of young men in snappy blue 
and white uniforms, an array of instruments from piccolo to tuba, and melt 
them all together into one glorious outpouring of melody and — presto! you 
have our band. 

Organized in the fall of the year 1931 by Professor Rutledge, the Lebanon 
Valley College Band has well merited its position as one of the best in this part 
of the state. Its membership is made up of both college and conservatory stu- 
dents who meet every Monday and Wednesday evening for rehearsal. 

Playing at many important winter and spring athletic events as well as 
broadcasting and giving frequent Friday morning chapel concerts, the band has 
come to be an indispensable part of our activities on and off the campus. 



85 




1. Miss Matilda Rose Bonanni 

Soprano 

2. Dale Henry Roth 

Tenor 

3. Leslie Saunders 

Trombone 

4. Miss Margaret Early 

Pianist 



86 




1. Miss Martha Priscilla Elser 

Violinist 

2. Miss Catherine F. Heckman 

Pianist 

3. Miss Ruth Wells Bailey 

Pianist 

4. Chester A. Stineman 

Bass Violinist 



87 




THE MEN'S SENATE 

Seniors 

JACK TODD President 

J. M. JORDAN Vice-President 

Allen Buzzell DeWitt Essick H. A. McFaul Richard Schreiber 

Juniors 

FRANK BORAN Secretary-Treasurer 

William Smith Albert Sincavage Warren Mentzer Casper Arndt 

Sophomores 

Robert Cassel Samuel Harnish David Yake 

Freshman 

Robert Walker 

The Men's Senate is the student governing body of the enrolled men at 
Lebanon Valley. A group nominated by the faculty and elected by the student 
body in a general poll, the Senate has time and again demonstrated its effi- 
ciency as a legislative and executive group. 

Under the leadership of Jack Todd, the ruling body has formulated a code 
of orderly conduct for the 1933-34 school year which is a compliment to the 
realm of student-government. Various difficult obstacles thrown in the way 
of the group were overcome with expediency and care taken against a repeti- 
tion of the same occurrence. 

The sway of the Men's Senate and the submission of the male students to 
its authority is a fine tribute to the character of the male students at Lebanon 
Valley. From its beginnings as a noble experiment, it has grown to be an 
important, efficient, effective, and satisfactory reality. 



89 




W. S. C. A. 

MARGARET LONCENECKER President 

MARTHA KREIDER Vice-President 

VERNA CRISSINCER Treasurer 

LENA COCKSHOTT Secretary 

Representatives 

DOROTHY JACKSON Senior 

KATHRYN WITMER Day Student 

FRANCES KEISER Junior 

JANE SHELLENBERCER Sophomore 

RUTH BUCK Freshman 

The Women's Student Government Association is composed of all regularly 
matriculated women students of the college. The purpose of this Association 
is to maintain order and decorum in the vicinity of the college, at social func- 
tions, and in associations with men students. 

An executive board which meets the approval of the faculty is elected by 
the members of the association and has the power to act for the association 
in all matters of student conduct. This reigning board is advised by five faculty 
members of their own choosing. 

An annual meeting of the Association is held each May, at which time 
members for the executive board of the ensuing year are elected and reports 
are presented by the retiring officers. In the fall another general assembly is 
held, for the purpose of reading the constitution and by-laws to the entire 
enrollment. From that time on the board accepts no excuses for ignorance of 
rules. 

The Women's Student Government Association is striving to do its duty on 
the campus. The cooperation of every girl is needed for the success of the 
group on future occasions. 



90 




THE Y. M. C. A. 

J. ALLAN RANCK President 

WARREN MENTZER Vice-President 

ROBERT CASSEL Secretary 

RICHARD WALBORN Treasurer 

GEORGE SHADEL Pianist 

DR. R. R. BUTTERWICK Faculty Advisor 

Seniors 

Clyde S. Mentzer C. Melvin Hitz Thomas May 

Fred D. Lehman Ray B. Johnson George Sherk 

Juniors 

Philip Underwood Allen Steffy 

The organization which has done most for the male enrollment at Lebanon 
Valley College is undoubtedly the Y. M. C. A, It has in its hands, primarily, 
the Christian leadership of the institution. With their informal "Y" meetings, 
their joint meetings with their sister organization, their "big brother" move- 
ment, and their prayer circle groups they do this work efficiently and well. 

But they extend their activity to the social improvement of their member- 
ship as well. The chief memorial to their truly unselfish devotion to the stu- 
dent-body is the magnificent recreation quarters, the "Y" room. It is here 
that the men of the college spend many hours in good clean fun at billiards, 
ping-pong, chess, and checkers, or listening to the radio in the comfortable 
sitting room. 

As long as there is a college there will be a Y, M. C. A. working in the same 
way for the "greatest good to the greatest number." 



91 



/'©r^ 




Y. W. C. A. 

KATHRYN MOWREY President 

MARGARET KOHLER Vice-President 

FRANCES KEISER Recording Secretary 

DOROTHY JACKSON Corresponding Secretary 

VERNA CRISSINCER Treasurer 

RAE ANNA REBER Pianist 

Representatives 
Seniors 

Margaret Longenecker Miriam Book Charlotte Weirick 

Juniors 

Margaret Weaver Lena Cockshoot Catherine Wagner 

Sophomores 

Martha Faust IrmaKeifer 

The Young Women's Christian Association is a great asset on any campus, and 
on Lebanon Valley's campus it is a true factor in the promotion of the christian 
ideals of love, sacrifice, and fellowship. Its membership is composed of all the 
girls of the student body, who automatically become members upon their 
matriculation. 

The Y. W. C. A. sponsors many functions during the year — the "big sister" 
movement, freshman week, the Hallowe'en party, the Christmas banquet, 
various other parties, and the May Day festival. This latter, attended by a 
host of friends of the college, is a grand spectacular pageant staged in conjunc- 
tion with the Y. M. C. A. and supported by the entire student body. 

In sponsoring these various social affairs, the "Y" is striving to build fine, 
well-rounded characters in the girls at Lebanon Valley. 



92 




PHILOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



Colors: BLUE AND COLD 



Phi Lambda Sigma 

Motto: "ESSE QUAM VIDERE" 

RAY B. JOHNSON Anniversary President 

DE WITT ESSICK President EDMUND UMBERCER 

GEORGE HILTNER Vice-President WILLIAM CERBER 

KENNETH WHISLER Secretary LESTER KRONE 

H. A. McFAUL Treasurer RICHARD WALBORN 

JACK GLEN Critic KENNETH SHEAFFER 

MILLER SCHMUCK Chaplain LOUIS STRAUB 

PHILLIP UNDERWOOD Executive Chairman GEORGE HILTNER 

RICHARD SLAYBAUGH Pianist RICHARD SLAYBAUCH 

HOMER KENDALL Sergeants-at-Arms JOHN HOUTZ 

SAMUEL HARNISH ROBERT KELL 

LESTER KRONE KENNETH EASTLAND 



Philo, the oldest organization on the Lebanon Valley campus, is in its sixty- 
seventh year. From the very beginning, it has been a progressive institution 
and never has tradition been allowed to interfere with the betterment of the 
group. Consequently, as the college proper bcame more and more capable of 
tending to the literary needs of the students, the society, along with its rival 
groups, changed accordingly. From a strictly literary function it has gone 
through an evolution until at present it is primarily a social organ — perform- 
ing a service by far more needed by its membership than that afforded by the 
old conception. 

Philo's activities are motivated with a spirit of brotherhood. Programs and 
inter-society meetings are carried on as cooperative enterprises with all par- 
taking, share and share alike. It is thus that, by providing social diversion and 
by inculcating the feeling of relationship, Philokosmian serves its membership. 



93 




THE CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Kappa Lambda Nu 

Motto: ■■VIRTUTE ET FIDE" Colors: COLD AND WHITE 

MILDRED NYE Anniversary President 

ANNE MATULA President MIRIAM BOOK 

ELIZABETH SCHAAK Vice-President ROSE DIETER 

JANE SHELLENBERGER Corresponding Secretary JANE SHELLENBERCER 

FRANCES KEISER Recording Secretary HELEN EARNEST 

MARGARET WEAVER Treasurer VIRGINIA BRITTON 

HELEN EARNEST Editor MAXINE EARLEY 

KATHERINE McADAM Critic EMMA REINBOLD 

IRMA KEIFFER Pianist LOIS HARBOLD 

MARION LEISEY Chaplain LENA COCKSHOTT 

Kappa Lambda Nu celebrated the completion of sixty-three years of active 
service on the Lebanon Valley Campus this year. The society held a formal 
dance at the Penn-Harris Hotel, in Harrisburg. 

Sixty-three years have given Clio many fine old traditions to uphold. Guided 
by Minerva and by the symbolic owl of the society emblem, the group has done 
its best to preserve the Clionian Literary Society as a model social group at 
Lebanon Valley. 

Although the old literary style of the club has given way to a more necessary 
social activity, it has not been entirely discarded. Clio, in her meetings, mixes 
a delicate concoction perfectly blended of both the social and the literary 
traditions. It is this spirit of excellent moderation which is the greatest 
promise of future life and prosperity for Kappa Lambda Nu. 



94 




THE KALOZETEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 

Motto: "PALMA NON SINE PULVERE" Colors: RED AND OLD COLD 

CEORCE KLITCH Anniversary President 

EARL HOOVER President ALLEN BgZZELL 

JAMES FRIDY Vice-President CHARLES FURLONC 

PETER KANDRAT Corresponding Secretary ANTHONY JACNESAK 

ROBERT CASSEL Recording Secretary ROBERT SAUSSER 

STEVv/ART BYERS Chaplain MORGAN EDWARDS 

WARREN MENTZER Critic |AMES FRIDY 

CEORCE SHADEL Pianist CEORCE SHADEL 

TEDDY KOWALEWSKI Sergeants at Arms ROBERT WALKER 

ARTHUR HEISCH JOHN BROSIUS 

CARL NELSON HOWARD REBER 

The founding of Kalo in 1877 was the result of one of man's basic emotions, 
the urge to excel a rival. Our rival society had been organized for a decade, but 
furnished an insufficient outlet for this powerful urge among the men on our 
campus. Thus Kappa Lambda Sigma was launched upon a career of social and 
literary activity of the highest order. 

From an original enrollment of twelve members the organization has risen 
to a position of eminence on the campus. Its anniversaries and its dinner- 
dances are perhaps the outstanding social functions of the year, 

Kalo has a tendency toward modernism. It has taken the stand that one 
who lives in a modern world must think, act, and be modern. Therefore today 
Kappa Lambda Sigma, with her large membership embracing all types of 
campus men, shows every indication of retaining her prominence. 



95 




DELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Delta Lambda Sigma 

Motto: "KNOW THYSELF" Colors: SCARLET AND COLD 

GEM CEMMILL Anniversary President 

MINNA WOLFSKEIL President CEM CEMMILL 

KATHRYN MOWREY Vice-President DOROTHY JACKSON 

CATHERINE WAGNER Corresponding Secretary MARIETTA OSSI 

HELEN LANE Recording Secretary HELEN CRUSKO 

BELLE MIDDAUGH Critic IDA K. HALL 

MARY MARCH Chaplain LOUISE BISHOP 

RUTH ANNA MARK Treasurer RUTH ANNA MARK 

LOUISE BISHOP Wardens ELIZABETH BINGAMAN 

MABLECHAMBERLIN CORDELLA SHEAFFER 

Twelve years ago several girls, feeling that a second girl's literary society was 
needed on this campus, banded together and formed what is known now as 
the Delphian Literary Society. In these few short years this society has become 
one of the most popular organizations on the campus. Their social affairs are 
among the highlights of a year of life at Lebanon Valley. 

This year, on February 17, Delta Lambda Sigma celebrated her anniversary 
at the Civic Club in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The atmosphere was not that of 
the usual dance — it had its own unique, dignified air. The affair was enjoyed 
immensely by all the members and friends who were present. 

Guided by her oracle and by the spirit of good will among the members, the 
society hopes that the future will be even more successful than the past has 
been. 



96 




THE CHEMISTRY CLUB 

JOHN ZECH President 

DWICHT GROVE Vice-President 

FRANCES HOLTZMAN Secretary-Treasurer 

The Chemistry Club was organized under the supervision of Dr. Andrew 
Bender in the Spring of 1929. The club, the only organized group in the 
science department, has made rapid strides of progress and today it is one of 
the most active and one of the largest of our campus organizations. Its mem- 
bership consists of those students who are interested in any way in the science 
of Chemistry. 

Meeting monthly, the club is addressed by various of its members on chosen 
and prepared topics. One of the first aims is to discuss new discoveries in the 
field of chemistry and their application in the field of industry and medicine. 
The second objective is to give members training in speaking before a group — 
training especially valuable to those students who, majoring in sciences, have 
little opportunity to cultivate this faculty in regular college work. 

But modern science is not the only object of interest. Old discoveries, the 
romantic lives of ancient scientists, the pursuit of scientific knowledge 
throughout the long ages: afl form a vital and interesting part in the meetings 
of the group. Dr. Bender, as adviser of the group, is a constant contributor of 
valuable information. The more complex problems of scientific progress be- 
come as clear as day under his expert explanation. The Chemistry Club should 
soon branch out into more specialized groups — and will do so if the member- 
ship continues to increase as it has in the past. 



97 




^^'■^^^'•^^^^S^ 



THE COMMERCE CLUB 

ALLEN BUZZELL President 

GEORGE SHERK Vice-President 

WILLIAM SMITH Secretary 

A number of years ago the Commerce Club was organized by the Business 
Administration students at Lebanon Valley. In the course of time the mem- 
bership has swelled until the group is now one of the largest on the campus. 
During the year 1933-34 it has been under the capable direction and leader- 
ship of Professor Milton L. Stokes, faculty adviser, and Mr. Allen Buzzell, 
president. 

The purpose of this club is to acquaint the student with present business 
activities and developments in the world of finance and industry. In carrying 
out this aim it has secured prominent men of this and of other localities to 
address the organization. Although the meetings are irregular, each is vitally 
important and of the greatest interest. The gatherings are informal so as to 
enable the student members to ask questions which are answered and dis- 
cussed by the speaker of the evening. Occasionally the club holds seminars at 
which there is no visiting speaker. 

Through the efforts of the presiding officers and the faculty adviser, plans 
are being made to have some nationally known figures visit our campus and 
discuss vital economic matters with members of the club. It is in this manner 
that the organization is a cultural and practical asset to all students. It will 
continue to be of service, chiefly to the Business students, but to the general 
enrollment as well. 



98 




INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CABINET 

ALLAN STEFFY President 

RAY JOHNSON Vice-Pres.dent 

CHRISTINE CRUBER Secretary-Treasurer 

The International Relations Cabinet is an outgrowth of the History Club, 
which was organized about six years ago. The group in its present organization 
is made up of the combination of the History and Commerce Clubs. Since its 
organization it has grown and flourished until now it is one of the most active 
clubs on the campus. The regular members include all prospective teachers of 
history, although other students are always invited to attend the meetings. 

One primary aim of the club is to acquaint the student with the details and 
particulars of the many important current topics. It seeks to link the past with 
the present, or in a different sense, to connect and relate the facts of the text- 
book with those of the modern newspaper. Matters of international import- 
ance are of special interest, and Dr. E. H. Stevenson, adviser of the group, and 
Mr. Allan Steffy were sent to the Washington Conference on Pan-American- 
ism in Washington. Mr. Steffy prepared a paper on the subject which was 
read to the convention. 

Participation in the regular programs of the Cabinet gives the speakers ex- 
cellent practice, besides helping him to develop the habit of individual think- 
ing. To that extent, active student participation in the discussion periods is 
especially encouraged. In these respects the club has exerted a beneficial in- 
fluence on the campus. It owes much of its success to its capable adviser. Dr. 
Stevenson. 



99 




THE INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATING TEAMS 



Men's Teams 

Affirmative 

Allen Buzzell Mark Hostetter Robert Womer 

Edmund Umberger Ray Johnson John Morris 

Manager — Clyde Mentzer 

Women's Teams 

Affirmative 

Kathryn Mowrey Helen Earnest Marion Leisey 

Grace Naugle Elizabeth Schaak Winona Schroff 

Manager — Minna Wolfskeil 



Negative 

Calvin Reber 
William Earnest 



Negative 

Louise Cillan 
Christine Smith 



The Lebanon Valley Debating teams are coached by Dr. E. H. Stevenson and 
Professor Milton Stokes. They have trained their groups efficiently and well, 
enabling them to meet teams from such places as the University of Penn- 
sylvania, Gettysburg. Fairmont Teachers of West Virginia, and other equally 
fine debaters. 

The question of debate during the 1933-34 season concerns itself with the 
N. R. A. The contests, held in Philo Hall, attract a large group of students who 
are interested both in the public speaking and the historical and economic 
values. The judges are open-minded professional men chosen from a large 
group of Lebanon merchants, lawyers, and doctors. 

An unusual amount of intellectual and social profit is derived from the 
activity of debating — both for the members in active participation and for 
the audience. These functions are rapidly becoming among the most popular 
on the campus. 



100 




THE GERMAN CLUB 

EMMA REINBOLD President 

EMMA FASNACHT Vice-President 

EVELYN FRICK Secretary-Treasurer 

Those students of Lebanon Valley College desiring to stimulate interest both 
socially and mentally in the German nation, and to promote fellowship be- 
tween German and English speaking peoples, organized the German Club in 
May, 1930. 

The Club is under the able guidance of Miss Emma Reinbold, who is very 
well fitted for her position. Dr. Lena L. Lietzau is the faculty adviser who 
acquaints the members with information peculiar to her own charming per- 
sonality and character. The club meets semi-monthly at which time literary 
programs are presented and the works of German writers are discussed. The 
students who take part in the program criticize the work according to its 
literary value and its interest both constructively and destructively. 

To German majors and minors the club is especially serviceable since it in- 
creases their speaking knowledge of German and acquaints them with the past 
and present history of the Germanic lands. In these days of increased world 
travel and fellowship, a club such as "Der Deutsche Verein" has a vital func- 
tion in fitting college students with a more comprehensive understanding of 
true international and cosmopolitan life. 

This the club accomplishes: by special reports at the meetings on the prob- 
lems confronting the German people and relations between German and Eng- 
lish speaking nations, a higher standard of amity, and a greater appreciation 
of German literature. 



101 




THE LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

THOMAS SENCER MAY President 

WARREN MENTZER Vice-President 

MILLER SCHMUCK Secretary 

HOMER KENDALL Treasurer 

CATHERINE DEISHER Pianist 

The Life Work Recruits is a group comprised of all those people on the campus 
who are definitely interested in church work of any kind. It numbers among 
its membership ministerial students, choir workers, and aspiring missionaries 
of both sexes. 

Meetings are held regularly and speakers procured to address the assembly. 
These men and women are chosen to deliver messages of vital import and of 
applicable quality. They are speakers from various surrounding churches, mis- 
sionaries, and religious leaders of all kind. 

During the Spring term, the group goes out on various Sundays to take over 
complete direction of church services in various meeting places of the sur- 
rounding country. They take charge of all phases of the Sunday worship from 
the music to the sermon. 

The group aims, in this manner to improve the abilities of its members 
along the lines of Christian endeavor. It is an invaluable training organization 
for those students who will make their life work in these fields. Under the 
leadership of accomplished students, and the guidance of the experienced 
faculty, it ranks as an important character-molding organization on the 
Lebanon Valley Campus. 



102 





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THE VARSITY 'L " CLUB 



PETER KANDRAT President 

FRANK P. BORAN Secretary-Treasurer 

The Varsity "L" Club is composed of those people who have earned their 
varsity letters in one of the three major sports at Lebanon Valley. This ruling 
is practically inflexible, except in the case of someone who is voted into 
membership because of outstanding ability in one of the minor sports. 

For its individual members the club buys, through its treasury and with the 
aid of the college, emblems of the various sports. These emblems, coupled 
with the Varsity "L." are the only recognition afforded athletes at Lebanon 
Valley. 

But the "L" Club is by no means a selfish organization. It has a general 
interest in the social and athletic life of the student body at large. Each year 
the group sponsors the inter-class basketball league games which are held in 
the alumni gymnasium. These functions have become a vital part of student 
life at Lebanon Valley. Too, the members run a series of dances which are 
priceless entertainment in the dull lulls between scheduled campus events. 

It is in this way that the Varsity "L" Club has the interest and friendship 
of the entire student body. As long as there are athletic teams at the institu- 
tion there will be an "L" Club. V^ith their unselfish spirit and their democratic 
ideals, the group should, through graduate members, become one of the most 
powerful on the campus. 



103 




THE ROGUES' GALLERY 

VERNA CRISSINCER President 

HAROLD PHILLIPS Vice-President 

REBECCA ADAMS Secretary-Treasurer 

If a novel or unique poster appears on any of the campus bulletin boards, it is 
most likely a product of some ingenious member of the Rogue's Gallery. From 
the name of this organizatin one might expect almost any type of activity, but 
in reality the Rogues' Gallery is composed of those people on the campus who 
are interested in some phase of art, whether it be charcoal sketching or in- 
terior decorating. The members realize that art, regardless of the form it 
takes, is a means of self expression. 

At the time of its organization the membership was limited to the feminine 
element of the student body. However, at the begirining of this year, mem- 
bership to the club was open to any student on the campus. Several artistically 
inclined men joined the club and brought with them a score of new ideas. 
Various projects were immediately planned for the year. 

Perhaps the most successful of all work has been the Christmas decorations. 
By means of clever lighting and color arrangement, a most unique effect evoked 
the admiration of the entire student body. 

The Rogues' Gallery chooses as one avenue toward higher appreciation the 
study of both old and modern paintings and of the great masters who put 
them on canvas. The entire work of the group is based on this theory that an 
appreciation of art is necessary to the intellectual growth and development of 
an individual if he is to have a well rounded culture during his life. 



104 



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THE READER'S CLUB 

ELIZABETH SCHAAK President 

KATHRYN WITMER Secretary-Treasurer 

In October, 1925, the Reader's Club was organized under the capable direc- 
tion of Dr. P. A. W, Wallace, It has always been one of the best attended 
organizations on the campus. Due to the addition of another departmental 
club, the meetings of this group have become monthly at the comfortable 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Wallace. The hospitality that these charming people 
afford is perhaps one of the greatest reasons for the large and regular attend- 
ance of the members. 

The club meetings provide an opportunity for students who are particularly 
interested in literature to become acquainted with the fine works of authors 
of all countries in the various literary fields Before the general discussions of 
works of interest, there are specially prepared reports, by select groups, on 
assigned volumes. 

Reader's Club particularly concerns itself with current literature. As the 
latest books arrive in the library they are placed on the Reader's Club shelf in 
order to reserve them for the consideration of the members. G. B. Lancaster, 
or Miss Littleton, is a modern of special importance to the group since many 
of the club members met her during her several months stay at the home of 
Dr. Wallace in Annville. 

Like the other departmental clubs, the Reader's Club aims always toward 
the furtherance of knowledge and culture among its members. With the con- 
tinued kind aid of Dr. and Mrs, Wallace, the group should remain a permanent 
and important factor in Lebanon Valley life. 



105 




THE GREEN BLOTTER CLUB 

MARTHA KREIDER Head Scop 

MARIETTA OSSI Keeper of the Word Horde 

DR. C. C. STRUBLE Adviser 

The Green Blotter Club is still in its infancy, having been organized in Novem- 
ber, 1932, for the purpose of stimulating literary activity on the campus and 
of improving the creative-writing ability of its members. There are sixteen 
members, two of each sex from each class. Freshmen members are chosen 
through competition each fall. 

The group meets informally at the home of Dr. Struble every third Thurs- 
day. Manuscripts are read by their respective authors and these attempts 
criticized from every possible angle by the listeners. A wide variety of writing 
is displayed by these "inl<spots." A novel has been started. A series of short 
stories has been submitted. Poems come from the pens of others. Biography, 
characterization, essays in philosophy, and countless other branches of the 
field of creative writing fill out the picture. 

At various meetings throughout the year guests are invited from among 
the faculty and professional friends. These guests are especially chosen for 
their faculty of giving additional criticism from the standpoint of knowledge 
and experience. 

It is in this way that the Green Blotter — the only and the first successful 
attempt at a writers' organization on the Lebanon Valley Campus — aims to- 
ward the improvement of the writing abilities of its members. It is hoped, 
when the mechanism of the group has sufficiently developed, to widen the 
scope of its membership and make it even more real a developer of student 
talent. 



106 




LA VIE COLLECIENNE 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

EDMUND H. UMBERCER Editor-in-Chief 

KATHRYN MOWREY Associate Editor 

RICHARD SCHREIBER Managing Editor 

RICHARD BAUS Assistant Managing Editor 



Martha Kreider 
Helen Earnest 
Christine Gruber 
Catherine Wagner 



REPORTORIAL STAFF 

Allan Ranck 
Sylvia Evelev 
DeWitt Essick 
Clyde Mentzer 



Elizabeth Schaak 
David Yake 
George Hiltner 
Robert Cassel 



Jane Shellenberger 



Marietta Ossi 



BUSINESS STAFF 

JACK TODD Business Manager 

KENNETH SHEAFFER Assistant Business Manager 

ALLEN BUZZELL Circulation Manager 

La Vie Collegienne is the weekly voice of Lebanon Valley College. It is the 
chief journalistic enterprise on the campus. 

Its staff have embodied into it news, humor, and editorial value which have 
made its issues things to be preserved as a lasting memorial of college days. 

Constantly improving, the newspaper promises to grow until it becomes an 
even greater organ of college life at Lebanon Valley. To its editors and to its 
staff go the sincere congratulations of the student body. 



107 




THE 1935 QUITTAPAHILLA 

H. C. PALATINI Editor-in-Chief 

DR. C. STRUBLE Faculty Adviser 

CHARLES L. HAUCK Business Manager 

GEORGE HILTNER Associate Editors MARGARET EARLY 

S. K. McADAM Literary Editors MARIETTA OSSI 

HARRY WHITING HOWARD LLOYD 

HELEN EARNEST Feature Editors CATHERINE WAGNER 

WILLIAM SMITH Sports Editors WARREN MENTZER 

IDA K. HALL College Editors ANNE BUTTERWICK 

|. P. DENTON Business Staff DAVID EVANS 

KENNETH SHEAFFER CASPER ARNDT 

This is the 1935 Quittapahilla. the work of the staff listed above. During the 
months of preparation of this volume, we have tried our best to put out a book 
which would be a pleasing reminder of the 1 933-34 session at Lebanon Valley 
College. 

In its publication, we have gleaned much knowledge from our predecessors, 
but at the same time we have instilled a different spirit, a different theme 
than has been the case in the past. We have tried to incorporate in it the spirit 
of the actual life at the college. 

If we have succeeded, we have succeeded as a staff, not as any individual. 
The entire book is a cooperative enterprise with the work of nineteen people 
solidly incorporated into it. 



-108 




THE WIG AND BUCKLE 

ALLEN BUZZELL President 

CLYDE MENTZER Recording Secretary 

MILDRED A. NYE Corresponding Secretary 

). ALLAN RANCK Treasurer 

The Wig and Buckle is the infant organization in the college proper. It is a 
departmental club under the guidance of the English department, and is open 
to all those campus people in any way interested in the stage. It has an inner 
circle of those people who have had previously sufficient stage experience to 
warrant it, and an outer circle of members who are interested but not ex- 
perienced. 

Since its birth, the wig and buckle has been extremely active. The members 
have presented several short dramas for the student body in the lulls between 
major productions. These shop plays are entirely student-produced. Among 
the skits, the outstanding ones were "The Bishop's Candlesticks," and two 
classics, the Creek tragedy "Antigone," and the Old English "Everyman." 

The club serves several functions in this way. Primarily they are promoting 
the acting ability of the membership. At the same time, with setting, lighting, 
costuming, coaching and all the other related factors in the hands of the stu- 
dents themselves, they are promoting practical knowledge of the phases of 
dramatics other than acting. 

The Wig and Buckle seems destined to carry on the traditions of the theater 
at Lebanon Valley for a long time. The membership is extremely fortunate in 
having Dr. Wallace, whose ability as a dramatic coach and critic as well as his 
technical ability, are recognized by the student body. 



109 




D R 



P. A. W. WALLACE 



We dedicate this page to Dr. P. A. W. Wallace, faculty adviser 
of the Wig and Buckle Club, and coach of the Junior Play, Philo 
Anniversary Play, Philo-Clio Anniversary Play, and the Music 
Department's operetta. ... To call a play "Wallace-coached" is 
to call it the height of perfection in dramatic presentation. No 
detail of any kind — from the correctness of a table cover to the 
proper enunciation of words — escapes his watchful eye. He is 
both a master coach and a master technician. . . . Among his 
dramatic successes at Lebanon Valley he has numbered Mar- 
lowe's "Faustus." "Cyrano de Bergerac," Shaw's "Candida," 
"Seven Keys to Baldpate," the Sullivan operetta "Trial by Jury," 
and others. . . . From this wide range of productions we see 
readily the versatility and ability of the director. We compliment 
you, Dr. Wallace. 



110 




PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 

Presents 
OLIVER GOLDSMITH'S 

SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER 

The Philokosmian Literary Society celebrated its sixty-sixth anniversary the 
week-end of May 5. 1933. "She Stoops to Conquer," Goldsmith's delightful 
comedy, was presented in the Engle Conservatory on Friday evening. The 
Reverend Wade S. Miller delivered the invocation and Samuel Ulrich the 
President's address, after which the curtain rose on the first of three acts of 
splendid comedy. 

The story of the play centers around the entrancing of one bashful Young 
Marlowe by the bewitching Kate Hardcastle. The latter, since Marlowe throws 
off his backwardness only with girls of the lower class, allows the hero to be- 
lieve her home an inn and her a serving girl. The play winds to a hilariously 
pleasant finish. 

Kate Hardcastle and Young Marlowe were ably portrayed by Gloria Lavan- 
ture and Raymond Johnson respectively. Chester Goodman assumed the role 
of Mr. Hardcastle. Clyde Mentzer, as Tony Lumpkin, together with his 
mother. Miss Sarah McAdam, provided the comedy relief. Catherine Wagner, 
and H. Algire McFaul took admirably to the foil roles of Miss Neville and 
Hastings. 

The remainder of the cast was as follows: Samuel Ulrich, Clyde, Magee, 
George Hiltner, Henry Grimm, and Charles Daugherty as serving men; Miss 
Ruth Garner as Dolly: Mr. Allan Ranck as the landlord : and Mr. DeWitt Essick 
as Sir Charles Marlowe. 

Dr. P. A. W. Wallace was responsible for the coaching of the play. The 
finished performance of the actors, their absolute poise, and the fineness of 
the set spoke of Dr. Wallace's capability as a director of Lebanon Valley pro- 
ductions. 

The play was followed immediately by a reception in the alumni gymnasium 
for the old members and friends of the Society. On the following evening the 
annual Spring Dance was held at the Hotel Weimer, Lebanon. 



111 



THE JUNIOR CLASS 

Presents 
GEORGE BERNARD SHAW'S 

"CANDIDA" 

"Candida," a three-act comedy by George Bernard Shaw, was presented by the 
Junior Class in the Engle Conservatory, December 6, 1933. It was the first 
major dramatic production of the year, and was presented in such an artistic 
manner that the fullest expectations of the appreciative audience were rea- 
lized. 

The study of the Reverend James Morell in Victoria Park, London, is the 
scene of the play. Eugene Marchbanks, a young emotional and idealistic poet, 
is in love with Candida, the wife of Morell, an Anglican clergyman. The 
Reverend is a great advocate of labor reforms and is so interested in making 
speeches that he seems to forget his wife. This usual triangle is treated in an 
unusual manner. Candida's love is of a maternal and protective sort. She must 
decide which of the two men, Eugene or her husband, needs the inspiration 
of her love. Finally she gives it to "the weaker of the two," her husband. 

Shaw's characterization of Candida was successfully carried out by Kath- 
erine McAdam, who gave the impression of a mature, well-poised and under- 
standing woman. Candida's tact in handling the critical situation, her wisdom 
and reasoning, were well portrayed by Miss McAdam's fine acting. 

The character of James Morell, the clergyman, was portrayed by Kenneth 
Sheaffer. His appearance was that of a dignified clergyman. His assured and 
complacent manner fitted splendidly with his lines. 

In marked contrast to Morell's appearance and manner was Henry Palatini 
in the role of Marchbanks, the shy, eager, and impulsive poet. The love scene 
at the opening of the third act, when Morell discovers his wife and the poet, 
gave Mr. Palatini a fine opportunity to display his artistry. 

The part of Burgess, Candida's father, a laughable, crude Cockney, was 
brought to life by George Hiltner. Miss Catherine Wagner, as Proserpine 
Garnett, the secretary infatuated with the Reverend Morell, gave a fine inter- 
pretation of her role. Charles Hauck, as Alexander Mill, a curate, took his part 
as the indifferent, foppish clergyman excellently well. 




112 




The story of the play is in itself quite simple, but the situations are complex 
situations due to the odities of character of the various persons. The Reverend 
Morell and his wife find the young poet Eugene without friends or family due 
to the aristocratic lack of sympathy for his idealism. They take him in and he 
promptly falls in love with Candida. The Reverend, complacent to the nth 
degree, suspects nothing. But finally, in a fiery scene, he finds out the whole 
thing. His complacency is shaken by the very cleverness of this boy. As the 
play progresses we see the young poet become dominant instead of the older 
clergyman. Finally, in despair. Morrell demands that his wife choose between 
them. She chooses to stay with James, telling the latter that he needs her more 
than Eugene. Morell, finally realizing how incapable he really is. accepts this. 
Eugene goes "out into the night." 

Miss Proserpine. Burgess, and Lexy Mill are foils for the other characters. 
Burgess, at the same time, provides comedy relief with his crudeness and his 
humorous accent. All lend vitally to the development of the plot and the ex- 
position. 

The setting of the play was excellent. It represented, in all its possibilities, 
a comfortable room in a typical English rectory. The costuming was in keeping 
with the setting and characterization. 

The 1935 Thespians are to be complimented for the submersion of their 
own personalities and the assuming of those of Mr. Shaw's drawing. Long 
tedious hours of practice were necessary to do this. The cast sacrificed its time 
willingly for the furtherance of a perfect production, going so far as to give 
up their Thanksgiving recess to remain in rehearsal. This was one of the main 
factors in the finished performance which was given to the audience on the 
night of December 5. But there was one factor even greater than the admitted 
diligence of the actors — the coach. The Junior Class is extremely indebted to 
Dr. Wallace for his own sacrifice of time to the play. In the poise of the actors, 
in the inflections, the natural motions, the assuming of the English accent, the 
very naturalness of the unnatural, could be seen his expert hand. 

On the whole, the presentation of "Candida" was another milestone in 
dramatic history of Lebanon Valley. It will doubtless rank in the memory of 
Valley people as among the best performances. 



113 




KALO AND DELPHIAN PRESENT "HAY FEVER" 

Students, alumni, and friends celebrated the 1 1 th anniversary of the Delphian 
Literary Society and the 46th anniversary of the Kalozetean Literary Society 
with the production of Noel Coward's "Hay Fever," in the Engle Conserva- 
tory the night of March 23. The program was formally opened with the invo- 
cation delivered by Dr. Alvin Stonecipher, Cem Cemmill, as Delphian anni- 
versary president, welcomed the guests to the anniversary celebration. George 
Klitch, as Kalo anniversary president, invited the guests to a social to be held 
in the alumni gym after the play. 

The curtain was drawn on a very homey scene in a large English country 
house. A rather slovenly brother and sister, Simon and Sorel Bliss, introduced 
the atmosphere and idea of the play to the audience. The Bliss family were a 
very artificial group. They cared for no one but themselves. Consequently their 
week-end guests were left to amuse themselves or to enter into the family 
arguments. Mrs. Bliss had been an actress and had never quite recovered. She 
never failed to remember her past career in her contact with other characters. 
Very intricate love affairs developed among the guests and the plot became 
complicated. The entire week-end is just one grand melee with an occasional 
theatrical outburst in the form of Mrs. Bliss' favorite play, "Love's Whirl- 
wind." 

In Act I the audience met the characters as they arrived. The prize fighter, 
Sandy Tryell ; the vamp, Myra Arundel ; the diplomat, Richard Creatham ; and 
the flapper, Jackie. Different members of the family had invited them down 
and all had promised them the same bedroom, the Japanese room. The first 
squabble ensued and was settled by allowing Richard to sleep in the boiler 
room and Jackie to sleep in the Japanese room. 

In the second act the turmoil became even greater, ending in a grand free 
for all argument. The action was swift, reaching its climax with the dramatiza- 
tion of dear old "Love's Whirlwind" by Mrs. Bliss. 



114 



The guests all met at the breakfast table in the third act, and agreed to 
leave the Bliss home. A bit of humor was added by Clara, the maid. While the 
guests were upstairs packing, the family came down for breakfast. Still an- 
other argument breaks out — this time over the various inaccuracies in Mr. 
Bliss' new novel, "The Sinful Woman." During the family scrap, the guests 
stole out of the house. Sore! ran to the window to watch them go, but Mr. 
Bliss went on reading his latest creation as the curtain fell on the unblissful 
Bliss family. 

Mary Cossard as Judith Bliss created the theatrical melodramatic atmo- 
sphere both by her actions and by her voice. George Sherk, as Simon, inter- 
preted the role of a spoiled, ill-tempered son. Catherine Wagner, as Sorel, 
presented a sophisticated, well-mannered, but temperamental young ingenue. 
The character of Sorel offered a delicious contrast to that of Simon. Ida Kath- 
erine Hall, as Myra Arundel, gave excellent life to the character of the vamp. 
Allen Buzzell filled excellently the part of David, the author. He cared nothing 
about family affairs but was bent upon having an intrigue with one of the 
female guests. The role of Jackie, the flapper, was cleverly handled by June 
Gingrich while Charles Furlong skilfully represented Tryell, the pugilist. 
Charles Hauck portrayed the part of the dignified and sophisticated states- 
man. 

The success of the production was undoubtedly due in major portion to the 
excellent coaching of Dr. George Struble. Evidences of careful training and 
excellent poise, as well as the correctness of the setting paid tribute to his un- 
tiring effort. 

"Hay Fever" had the distinction of being the first play to be presented un- 
der the new society plan of joint production. It was a pleasing testimonial to 
the worth of the new system. Relieving crowded stage conditions, the doubling 
up of the societies in their annual productions will at the same time not ham- 
per the fineness of the stagings if we take the Kalo-Delphian work as an ex- 
ample. 




115 




THE WIC AND BUCKLE PRESENTS "EVERYMAN" 

"Everyman," a morality play, was the last of a series of one-act plays presented 
throughout the year by the newly organized dramatic club, the Wig and 
Buckle. 

"Everyman" stands as the best illustration of the morality play, and repre- 
sents mankind burdened with sin and striving toward salvation. Its serious 
dignity and effectiveness, its dramatic appeal, and the allegorical significance 
of the dialogue and action made the dramatization of this work well worth 
the while. The soul, called Everyman, is summoned by Death to appear before 
God for a reckoning of his sins. He appeals to all the forces upon which he re- 
lied in life — Riches, Beauty, Strength, Friendship, Kindred, Fellowship, Goods, 
Good Deeds, Discretion, Five Wits — to go with him and support him ; but he is 
deserted at last by all except the despised Good Deeds. 

Despite the fact that the club is in its infancy, the stage properties and cos- 
tumes are limited, and the play itself gives few directions for dramatization, 
the cast, under the capable direction of Dr. Wallace, presented a commend- 
able and striking interpretation of this difficult drama. 

The costuming and stage property aspects of the presentation gave evidence 
of keen deliberation and choice. The brilliancy and appropriateness of the 
dress gave a striking and fascinating touch to the performance in that it helped 
to hold the attention of the audience. The colors, gay and attractive, tended 
to detract from the somewhat pessimistic outlook of the play. The lighting ef- 
fects in the opening scene, as well as throughout the performance, also added 
powerfully. The grave of Everyman was an outstanding and startlingly impres- 
sive stage property. 

The main roles were taken by Clyde Mentzer, as Everyman, Charles Hauck 
as God, Allen Buzzell as Death, Mildred Nye as Good Deeds. The entire cast 
deserves high praise for their untiring efforts and their final presentation of a 
thoroughly finished production. 

Other one act plays presented by the Wig and Buckle were: "A Bedtime 
Story," "The Bishop's Candle-Sticks," and "Antigone." It is through these 
monthly plays that the club does its chief work in the stimulation of interest 
in dramatics and the practical advancement of its membership along these 
lines. 



116 





f? 





MARION WINIFRED KRUCER 
QUEEN OF THE MAY 





117 




MARGARET CAROLYN SHARP 
MAID OF HONOR 



118 



1. The Crowd 

2. Processional 

3. Queen, Maid, and FloAier 
Cirl 

4. The Court 

5. Scotch and Dutch Attend- 
ants 

6. King Pachyderm of Tibet 

7. Pete and Mike? or Mike and 
Pete? 

8. The May Pole 

9. Triumphant Recessional 





H 



, \ 




m « 




THE ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

R. R. BUTTERWICK Chairman 

M. L. STOKES Secretary 

C. G. DOTTER Treasurer 

E. E. MYLIN Athletic Director 

C. A. LYNCH President of the College 

E. H. STEVENSON Faculty Member 

C. R. GINGRICH Faculty Member 

P. S. WAGNER Faculty Member 

As soon as athletics became a major activity at Lebanon Valley, the need of 
an athletic council was seen. The administration could not efficiently deal 
with the various little details involved in an athletic program. Thus, in 1919, 
the first council was organized. Nine members from the faculty, alumni, and 
student body composed the governing board of the first group. It existed in 
various forms, doing its work passably well, until, in 1927, a change was 
deemed necessary. The group was then reorganized and assumed its present 
form. The personnel is the president of the college, five faculty members, one 
alumnus, and the athletic director. The council elects officers among its num- 
ber and functions as a distinct organization of the college. 

The present council relieves the already overworked administration of all 
the management of the athletic program for the year. It is an active force in 
determining athletic policies and programs for the school year and for the 
future. 



121 



p^ 



^ w 




E. E. MYLIN 
A characteristic shot 



FAREWELL TO A FINE COACH AND A FINE MAN 

After eleven years of successful coaching at Lebanon Valley. E. E. Mylin will 
go to Bucknell next fall as the University's head football coach, 

"Hooks" came to Lebanon Valley in 1923 as head of the coaching and 
physical education departments. Handicapped throughout his eleven seasons 
of football, basketball, and baseball by extremely small squads and poor equip- 
ment, he vi/orked wonders for the Blue and White. 

A genius of the gridiron, Mylin chalked up some amazing victories. The 
most sensational and memorable triumph was the Brown University game of 
1927, when the Blue and Vv^hite tripped the famous "Iron Men" 13-12, with 
"Charlie" Celbert, well-known Cardinal shortstop, in the line-up. In that same 
season the eleven held the Fordham Rams to a 13-3 score. The '27 gridmen 
are rivaled only by the 1933 Mylin squad with its five imposing victories, two 
ties, and two defeats. 

On the court and diamond Mylin has also produced fast stepping clubs. The 
Blue and V\/hite boys have been responsible for a great deal of the characteris- 
tic, fiery speed of the Eastern Pennsylvania Intercollegiate League tilts. 

Coach Mylin, though we are extremely sorry to see him go, has our best 
wishes. V/e know that he will more than fulfill the Bison hopes with his char- 
acteristic technique. 

The best of luck, Hooks! 



122 







9^^^^*^ ^H^^P^ «BSi^^^ ■ ^^ — ' '*i^^Pri 



"Wmw"' 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 









1933 Season 


Date 


Place 


Opponent 


Sept. 


29 


Lewisburg, Pa. 


Bucknell U. 


Oct. 


7 


State College, Pa. 


Penn State 


Oct 


14 


New York City 


City College 


Oct. 


21 


Lebanon, Pa. 


Mt. St. Mary's 


Oct. 


28 


Newark, Del. 


U, of Delaware 


Nov. 


11 


Huntingdon, Pa. 


Juniata 


Nov. 


18 


Lebanon, Pa. 


Drexel 


Nov. 


25 


Reading, Pa. 


Albright 


Nov, 


30 


Chester, Pa. 


P M, C. 
Aggregate Score 



L. V. 


0pp. 





34 


6 


32 


32 





10 


8 


13 


6 


27 


7 


16 


6 


6 


6 









10 



99 



JORDAN 
Manager 



■ )UaM'tfiifl>M 



CULLATHER 
Assistant Manager 




123 




■«f ~e-' jfj/m. 



Lebanon Valley 
Bucknell 34 



BISONS BUMP LEBANON VALLEY IN OPENER 






II 



m 




Hats off to the most successful season ever experienced at Lebanon Val- 
ley — a season made possible by the strenuous efforts of an exceptionally 
small squad under the fine coaching of "Hooks" Mylin and "Marty" Mc- 
Andrews. 

The "Flying Dutchmen" started intensive training in September, and 
after three weeks of grueling practice, opened their season against the 
Bucknell Bisons at Lewisburg, The game was played under the floodlights 
since the heat of the September days was too intense for the game. 

As was previously expected, Captain Joe Volkin and his Blue and 
White team met stiff opposition at Bucknell, taking a decisive 34-0 
trimming. The Annville Collegians displayed some fine defensive work in 
the initial quarter and held the Bucknell machine scoreless. However, 
they could not withstand the hard charging line and the mighty thrusts 
of the burly Bison backs. Consequently, in the latter half of the game the 
Herd thundered on to a one-sided victory. 

Coach Snavely's minions tallied two touchdowns in the second period 
and added one more in the third. At this point both coaches sent many 
substitutes into the game. But despite the changes, the scoring continued 
against the fast weakening Lebanon Valley team. 

The first period progressed with the "Flying Dutchmen" battling the 
Bisons to a scoreless draw. Charley Rust's punting, and penalties inflicted 
on the Bisons, aided the Valleymen. Despite five first downs to Lebanon 
Valley's none, the Bisons could not work the ball into scoring territory. 
On the opening kick-off Bucknell returned the ball to the 45 yard line 
and on six plays moved deep into Lebanon Valley territory. But the ball 
was grounded in the end zone and the visitors gained possession of the 
ball for the start of their offensive plunging. After several unsuccessful 
plays. Rust thrilled the crowd with a punt to Bucknell's 7 yard line. Smith 
recovered a Bucknell fumble, and the "Dutchmen" were placed in scor- 
ing position but were unable to push the ball across. 

In the remaining periods Bucknell had rather easy sailing with a weak- 
ening of the Annvillians defense due to injuries and a shortage of sub- 
stitutes. In the second period the home boys scored two of their touch- 
downs, added one more in the third, and succeeded in pushing two more 
across in the final quarter, giving them an overwhelming victory. 



MYLIN 
Coach 

McANDREVi/S 
Assistant Coach 

VOLKIN 
Captain 



124 



^•^T f 






^yM ^f-'-^KiHt 



Lebanon Valley 6 
Penn State 32 



LIONS FIND THE BLUE AND WHITE STUBBORN 

On the beautiful day of October 1 2 the "Flying Dutchmen" journeyed to 
State College to renew the yearly battle against the Penn State Lions. 
Circumstances were very adverse for Lebanon Valley due to injuries sus- 
tained during the Bucknell game. Although the squad was greatly weak- 
ened, the fight which is characteristic of Lebanon Valley grid teams came 
to life again, and on many occasions kept the Lions from an apparent 
score. 

The ancient Lion jinx stayed right at the heels of "Hooks" Mylin's 
eleven and consequently State came through victoriously with a score of 
32-6. However, Lebanon Valley showed quite a different brand of ball 
than was played against Bucknell the previous week. The Valley cohorts 
were pleased to see a stalwart Blue and White line force State into the 
air for the only two earned touchdowns of the game. 

It was a victory for State, but not by any means as much a walk-away 
as the score seems to indicate. Handicapped by its crippled regulars, 
Lebanon Valley went into the game as the underdog, but put up such a 
fight that it appeared at times as though the Lion's roar would be silenced 
for the first time in eighteen years. 

The initial period featured some interesting plays, with the only real 
threat to score being made when State took the ball on her own 45 yard 
line and marched in successive plays to the L. V. C. one foot line. But 
here they were unable to push over a score in three plays. 

In the second period Lebanon Valley opened with a bang, and after 
successive gains by passes from Feeser to Barthold, a short pass, Feeser to 
Smith, was good, and Smith scampered over the Lion goal for the first 
score of the game, putting L. V. in the lead, 6-0. 

A short time later catne the disastrous moments with their two inter- 
cepted passes that paved the way for State touchdowns. The third period 
resulted in one more score for the home team. In the middle of the period, 
after a stubborn Lebanon Valley line had again held State inches short of 
the goal, the Blue and White executed a bad punt to State which resulted 
in a score after two successive plays. 

In the last quarter, with just minutes to go, a Lebanon Valley pass was 
again intercepted. State threw again and Rothmell, twenty-seven yards 
down the field, crossed the line for the final score as the whistle ended 
the contest. 



B. 5P0NAUCLE 
Guard 

BARTHOLD 
Halfback 

BAUCHER 
Tackle 




125 




'-^f ^^'"^ 




f^^^* 



Lebanon Valley 32 

C. C. N. Y. 






"FLYING DUTCHMEN" TROUNCE NEW YORKERS 

After two defeats at the hands of superior opponents, Lebanon Valley's 
eleven reached the height of its power in downing the Lavender horde of 
C. C. N. Y. by a 32-0 score. This game saw Lebanon Valley back in the 
game in its full strength as all players injured in previous games were 
again in uniform. 

City College's line was completely outcharged and its running and 
passing plays stopped by the Blue and Vv'hite. Until the last period the 
Lavender attack failed to carry the pigskin beyond midfield. In this 
period, however, a desperate passing attack carried the New Yorkers to 
the 36 yard line where their only and last stiff thrust wilted against the 
flawless Blue and Vv'hite defense. 

Charley Rust, Lebanon Valley's midget quarterback, played most 
havoc with the New Yorkers. Although directly responsible for only one 
touchdown, he was instrumental in the scoring of all the others, and his 
passing and punting gleamed throughout the game. Lebanon Valley 
crossed the goal line seven times but was called back twice in the first 
half because of penalties. The Blue and White chalked up ten first downs 
as compared to four for City College. 

City College, during the first half, never penetrated beyond its own 43 
yard line while Lebanon Valley was gaining at will. Whiting, Konsko, and 
Feeser showed up well in the Blue and White backfield and crashed the 
City College line without trouble. Smith, Williams, and Sincavage were 
outstanding on the line. The forward wall was never outwitted and ap- 
peared to be the best balanced line that Mylin had developed for some 
time. 

Lebanon Valley scored her first touchdown in the first quarter when 
Rust punted out on City College's twelve yard stripe. On the return punt 
by Dillon, Rust ran forty-five yards for the first Blue and White score. 
Early in the third period Whiting scored from the 5 yard line after a 
blocked punt, and a few minutes later Feeser scored from the City College 
25 yard line after receiving a poor punt. Two scores were again added in 
the fourth quarter on beautiful runs by Konsko and Feeser. 

The Mylinmen displayed their full power against the New York team 
— both offensively and defensively. Facing a team in its own class for the 
first time during the season, the Blue and White gave its first forecast of 
what was to follow during the hard season. 



FURLONG 
Guard 

WILLIAMS 
End 

KONSKO 
Fullback 



,:^:ii :-„.'. 



126 



Lebanon Valley 10 
Mt. St. Mary's 8 



IJ I 




SMITH KICKS FIELD COAL TO SINK SAINTS 



Enthused over the victory of the previous week, the "Flying Dutch- 
men" went in to action at Lebanon on October 21 against the strong Mt 
St. Mary's team from Emmitsburg. Md. The "Dutchmen" of Lebanon 
Valley turned almost certain defeat into victory over the Marylanders in 
the waning moments of the game by virtue of Bill Smith's perfect place- 
ment for a field goal from the fifteen yard line. It was a thrilling climax 
to a brilliant final period drive that enabled the Blue and White to turn 
In a 10-8 triumph over their bitter mountaineer rivals. It was Lebanon 
Valley's third straight victory over Mt. St. Mary's and enabled the Blue 
and White to inaugurate the 1933 home campaign by keeping the string 
of Bethlehem field victories unbroken. 

Lebanon Valley was outplayed throughout the first half and could do 
practically nothing against the airtight defense of the visitors. Trailing 
8-0 by virtue of a touchdown and a safety scored by the Saint's gridmen, 
the Mylinmen entered the final quarter, seemingly doomed to defeat. 
During the third period, the "Flying Dutchmen" had displayed a better 
brand of ball than in the first two quarters but lacked the punch for a 
sustained drive. Aroused to a fighting pitch in the final session, after 
Frank Boran was removed from the game because of injuries, the Blue 
and White started the first of their three desperate threats to score. 

The drive started at about midfield, and a pass, Rust to Feeser, was 
good for 29 yards, giving the "Flying Dutchmen" a first down on the 20 
yard stripe. Rust crashed through for a nice gain, and on the next play. 
Russ Williams crossed the goal line on a perfect end-over-end run. Smith 
place kicked the extra point to bring Lebanon Valley within one point of 
Mt. St. Mary's. 

Lebanon Valley then started another drive down the field by an aerial 
attack and advanced the ball to the visitors 8 yard line. Held for three 
downs. Rust sent Smith back to place-kick for a field goal. It was unsuc- 
cessful. Mt. St. Mary's punted out of danger, but the Valley offense 
started down the field once more, and reached the 8 yard line for the 
second time. Smith went back on a fake placement. Rust passing to 
Feeser. The oval grounded over the goal line and the Saints took the ball 
again in the shadow of their goal posts. The mountain lads tried two run- 
ning plays, and on the second Smith recovered Reilley's fumble. The ball 
was moved up to the fifteen yard marker. The pass was to Rust who 
placed the ball for Smith. Smith's perfect boot soared between the goal 
posts to win the game. 



LIGHT 
Halfback 

C. SPONAUCLE 

Guard 

SMITH 
End 






127 








Lebanon Valley 1 3 
Delaware 6 



DELAWARE THIRD STRAIGHT VALLEY VICTIM 





Lebanon Valley's "Flying Dutchmen" journeyed to Frazer Field, Newark, 
Delaware, on October 28. and in a desperate last period rally, staged a 
sensational comeback and turned in their third straight victory, with a 
1 3-6 score, against the Delaware University Blue Hens. 

It was not until the final fifteen minutes of play that the Blue and 
White really made the feathers fly. when, trailing 6-0. the Mylinmen 
uncorked a powerful attack which did not stop until the Blue and Gold 
goal line had been crossed on two different occasions. 

Delaware scored early in the second period from their 32 yard line on 
a long pass. Then Lebanon Valley, playing a revamped game in the third 
quarter, took the offensive but could not cross the scoring stripe. Then, 
early in the last period V\/illiams circled right end from the 12 yard line. 
Two minutes later Feeser tossed a beautiful pass to Rust from the 23 
yard line and the latter stepped into the end zone to make the score 1 2-6. 
Rust, from a dropkick formation, passed to Feeser for the extra point. 

Delaware vainly attempted to pass their way back to the desired end 
of the score, but it was in vain. Kandrat ended their threat when he in- 
tercepted one of their passes. The game ended with Lebanon Valley in 
possession of the ball at midfield. Once again a second half drive had 
netted a victory from almost absolute defeat for the boys in Blue and 
V^hite. 

Charlie Rust, brilliant signal barker, and "Scoop" Feeser, flashy half- 
back, were the leading lights of the "Flying Dutchmen's" attack, while 
Barthold, Whiting, and Kandrat stood out defensively in the Lebanon 
Valley backfield. In the line. "Chick" Furlong and Captain Joe Volkin 
were especially dangerous to the Blue Hens. 

Delaware was very outstanding in its passing attack, featuring Thomp- 
son and Kemske, who caused a great deal of worry and excitement for the 
Lebanon Valley team and fans. 

As a whole, the game proved to be a most interesting and colorful spec- 
tacle. The perfect day. the huge crowd of people, and the bands of either 
institution put a spirit into the game seldom seen in small college football. 




JENKINS 
End 

HOUTZ 
Tackle 

BELL 
Guard 



128 



#l«'-'? 



Lebanon Valley 27 
Juniata 7 




MYLINMEN SCALP INDIANS IN SECOND HALF 



The "Flying Dutchmen" gained their fourth straight victory at Hunting- 
don on Saturday, November 1 1, taking the Juniata Indians into camp, 
27-7. It was another second-half comeback and the final thirty minutes 
of the game were decidedly in favor of the Blue and White gridders. 

In the first half the Mylinmen were penalized a total of eighty yards 
and found it difficult to make up the lost ground. Several long gains were 
called back because of these penalties. A fifteen yard set-back early in 
the second quarter placed the ball on Lebanon Valley's one yard stripe. 
On a play through center Konsko fumbled and Friend recovered in the 
end zone for Juniata's lone six-pointer. 

At the start of the second half the Indians advanced the kickoff to their 
thirty yard line. Two attempts at the line failed and Given dropped back 
to punt. Konsko broke through the defense and blocked the kick. Smith, 
charging in behind Konsko, fell on the ball over the goal line for the Blue 
and White's first score. 

Immediately the Lebanon Valley offense began to click and registered 
twenty points before the quarter ended. In the fourth quarter Rust inter- 
cepted a Juniata pass and raced forty yards for the final touchdown of the 
game. 

The relative strength of the two old rivals is best shown by the statis- 
tics of the game. Lebanon Valley outgained Juniata 282 to 170. This in- 
cludes yards from scrimmage and passes. Juniata lost 33 yards from 
scrimmage, Lebanon Valley, 29. The penalties against the Blue and 
White squad went to the high total of 99 yards while Juniata was set 
back only 30, The Mylinmen garnered 9 first downs to 8 for the Indians. 
Smith, of Lebanon Valley, converted three out of four. 

Mylin's second half team again showed a crushing power drive and an 
airtight defensive which thrilled the spectators with its very machine-like 
action. The Blue and White moved with deadly and accurate precision 
throughout the encounter. 

A severe and permanent loss to the team came in the early moments 
of the game, when Pete Kandrat's leg was broken. Kandrat had taken the 
ball off right tackle for a thirty-yard run, when he slipped and fell under 
the drive of an Indian tackier. He was removed to the Huntingdon hos- 
pital where it was announced that his fine defensive playing would be 
lost to the Valley for the remainder of the season. The loss was especially 
serious in face of the strong opposition expected from Drexel the follow- 
ing week-end. 



KANDRAT 
Halfback 

RICKER 
Tackle 

CROOKS 
End 







J 




1^. 




129 




Lebanon Valley 16 
Drexel 6 







"FLYING DUTCHMEN" DRUB DREXEL DRAGONS 

The Blue and White eleven, whose gaining power showed continual pro- 
gression after the first victory, crushed the highly touted Drexel Dragons 
in Lebanon, on November 18, by a 16-6 score. It was a fitting main- 
event for Lebanon Valley's first annual alumni homecoming day, attend- 
ed by a great amount of Lebanon Valley grads. 

The Mylinmen drew first blood from the Dragons early in the first 
period when Smith downed Knapp in the end zone for a safety and two 
points. However, Drexel, led by Potter and Knapp, came back strong in 
the same period and advanced the ball to their own 45 yard line. Then 
Knapp dropped back and heaved a long pass to Brevda, who raced 20 
yards to score. 

Drexel threatened again in the second period, advancing the ball to 
the four yard line. But a pass, Knapp to Potter, was grounded in the end 
zone, giving the ball to Lebanon Valley. 

In the third period Lebanon Valley took the ball on an exchange of 
punts on the 45 yard line. Feeser, on a reverse, circled left end to the 20 
yard stripe. Rust, on the next play, skirted right end and was thrown out 
of bounds on the one-foot line. Feeser slipped off right tackle for the 
touchdown and Smith kicked the extra point to make the score 9-6 for 
the Blue and White Machine. 

Drexel threatened again in the final period when a series of passes and 
off-tackle gains by Sam Potter brought the ball to midfield. Here Lebanon 
Valley held and Rust kicked into the end zone. On the next play, Knapp's 
pass to Foxx, was intercepted by Konsko, Lebanon Valley fullback, who 
raced through the entire Drexel team to score. Smith again converted. 

Lebanon Valley scored eleven first downs to nine for Drexel. Each was 
penalized 35 yards. Both teams flashed a vicious aerial attack which kept 
the spectators keyed up to a frenzy despite the cold rain which came 
down through most of the encounter. 

Feeser was the outstanding player for Lebanon Valley, making beauti- 
ful gains, backing up the line, and successfully crossing the goal line for 
a score. Knapp, Potter, Kemske, and Foxx were the main-stays of the 
visiting aggregation. 

On the Lebanon Valley forward wall. Furlong, Smith, Sincavage, and 
Volkin also contributed great strength, keeping the Dragons from gains 
at very critical times and often breaking up the strong Drexel aerial 
attack. The Mylin-McAndrews line had again proved itself the best ever 
produced by the Valley. 



BORAN 
Quarterback 

STEFANO 
Guard 

ROSE 
Tackle 



130 



Lebanon Valley 6 
Albright 6 





BLUE AND WHITE TIED BY INSPIRED LIONS 

On November 25 came the Albright game. This was the twenty-fourth 
renewal of a feud which dates back to 1 893. 

The Lions were the underdogs going into the encounter with the fast- 
stepping Lebanon Valley team which had won five and lost two in a 
record season. However a surprise was in store for the spectators and 
players. Albright played inspired ball throughout the game while the 
Blue and White appeared off form for the first time since Bucknell. Only 
in the last quarter did the Valleymen click in the usual manner when 
they overtook Albright's 5 point lead. 

Albright used running power and a fine aerial attack to push over a 
touchdown in the second period after a determined drive from the 
Lebanon Valley 35 yard line. A series of passes enabled the Smith- 
coached clan to penetrate the Valley's territory. A series of line plunges 
punctured the Blue and Vv'hite forward wall and brought the Reading 
eleven to the six yard marker. Then Tommy latesta, one of the best run- 
ning backs to face the Dutchmen during the year, slipped off tackle to 
score the touchdown. Captain Hino's attempted place-kick for point was 
wide of the uprights. 

The second half brought new hope to the Lebanon Valley rooters, for 
the "Dutchmen" seemed to have regained their previous power. During 
the third period L. V. completely outplayed the Lions, rushing through 
for eight first downs to the Reading warriors' four. It was in the final 
quarter that "Scoop" Feeser pulled down a 20 yard aerial heave from 
Charley Rust's accurate arm and raced thirty yards through the Crimson 
and White to knot the count at 6-6. Smith missed the try for extra point 
from placement, the ball falling short of the cross-bar. 

The remainder of the game was an even encounter of brawn with 
brawn. Whereas Lebanon Valley had gained strength as the game pro- 
gressed, Albright had lost none. The Lions gave one of the finest exhibi- 
tions of football witnessed by Lebanon Valley during the exciting fall 
season. Several times the Mylin machine penetrated deep into the de- 
fender's territory, only to lose the ball on downs after finding Albright's 
two-hundred pound forward wall impregnable. 

Feeser and Rust were outstanding in the Blue and White backfield 
Smith and the Sponaugles played excellent ball in the front For Albright, 
eleven men got the credit for the splendid game. 





FEESER 
Halfback 

MASIMER 
Guard 

PATRIZIO 
Quarterback 



131 




if^ 




P.M. CO 
Lebanon Valley 




/ ^ 




RECORD ELEVEN CLOSES SEASON IN GLORY 

Just five days after the grueling Albright game came the Pennsylvania 
Military College fracas. Even the stiff Reading encounter faded to the 
tameness of tennis in comparison. 

P. M. C. expected a set-up against Lebanon Valley in this Turkey Day 
game. But the Flying Dutchmen gave their strong opponents a rude sur- 
prise. The Cadets, instead of having the expected easy time, were not 
even the aggressors, having all they could do to keep the Blue and White 
machine from scoring on no less than four occasions. The cheering mass 
in the flag-draped stadium at Chester saw a brilliant, thrilling game of 
football throughout. 

In the first half, Lebanon Valley, with Charley Rust, the diminutive 
triple-threat man scintillating, held the upper hand and on one occasion 
drove throughout to the Soldiers' four yard marker, only to lose the ball 
when one of Rust's passes was grounded in the end zone, barely missed 
by Feeser's fingers. The second period witnessed two of the prettiest 
plays of the game — the quick kicks of Red Pollock and Charley Rust. 
Pollock booted a long spiral 75 yards down the field. Rust, not to be out- 
done, a short time later sent the oval sailing from his own 20 yard line 
past the opposing end zone, a total of more than 100 yards. 

The third period went to P. M. C. Three times Coach Timm's boys 
marched into Lebanon Valley territory only to lose the ball in the face of 
the unyielding defense of the Lebanon Valley line. Their last serious 
threat ended when Sincavage pulled down a Pollock pass and raced 35 
yards to the P. M. C. 15 yard line before the Cadets downed him. 

In the last quarter P. M. C. again made a desperate attempt to score. 
Lackwood intercepted Rust's pass, returning the ball seven yards to the 
L. V. 42 yard marker. Carrying the ball three times in succession, Stevens 
drove through to the 30. There, as before, the Cadet running attack 
collapsed. On the fourth down Pollock faded back and rifled one of his 
widely heralded passes to Weaver, who got by the Blue and White sec- 
ondary but dropped the ball in the end-zone. 

Thus ended one of the biggest upsets of the current season. The rec- 
ords of both teams were about even. But in this last game the Blue and 
White, underdogs going in, had outplayed the strong Cadets. It is safe to 
say they at least should share the mythical championship of small college 
football teams in Eastern Pennsylvania. 

This game brought to a close Coach Mylins eleventh (and, sadly, last) 
successful grid season at Lebanon Valley. 



RUST 
Quarterback 

Vi/HITING 
Fullback 

SINCAVAGE 
Center 



132 




A PACE FOR THOSE WHO CAIN NO CLORY 



The ode to our field luminaries is great, but let us not forget those who, 
throughout the season, worked with grim determination to fill the loop 
holes caused by adversity. Let us look back to those in the background 
who, though they were not in continuous and valiant struggle against our 
opponents, gave their all to help the team develop during the practice 
sessions in preparation for future encounters. 

Bill Masimer, of Hershey, came to L. V. this year to experience his 
first year of Collegiate gridiron tactics. Although he did not see much 
action this season, he will probably prove himself a bulwark of our future 
teams. 

"Dutch" Arndt, a genial member of the junior class, who has been pro- 
ficient on the diamond, has labored under the handicap of a lack of pre- 
college experience in the line of the pigskin. Still each year he spends a 
portion of the season as a reserve, seeing little action, but lending him- 
self with grim determination to the bettering of the varsity players. 

Three stalwart linesmen must be recognized. In "Jake" Ricker we 
have a rangy tackle who gave an excellent performance in the last game 
of the season, against P. M. C. We look forward to great achievement by 
this man in the coming year. Ed Bell, one of the Orsino protoges from 
Canonsburg. was a faithful plugger on the Blue and White reserve string 
throughout the long months. His excellent spirit and his willingness to 
work made him a fine prospect. Last in this trio, but far from the least, 
is our own giant "King Kong" Houtz of Biglerville. Since he made such an 
impressive debut as a tackle this year, we certainly anticipate a tackle of 
repute in "King." 

Russ Jenkins, former Keystone Academy star from Barnesboro, proved 
his value when he threw himself into a breach at the Penn State and gave 
a fine account of himself. He is a newcomer who can be depended upon 
to make fine varsity material. 

To switch from the boys who don the suits, where would a team be 
without efficient managers? Mitch Jordan and Frank Cullather are a 
pair of workers who come up to all expectations. Nothing was too great 
or too small for these boys to accomplish. It is with regret that we wit- 
ness Jordan's departure. But in his assistant, little "Cully," the coal- 
cracker, we have a spendlid substitute. 

This page would not be complete if we omitted mention of the cheer- 
leaders and of Professor E. P. Rutledge's marvelous Blue and White Band, 
The efforts of Wampler and Needy with their megaphones brought a 
huge volume of encouraging noise from the stands. The band, nattily 
attired in their regulation suits, added color, spirit, and a holiday air 
which did much to create a favorable atmosphere for the team. 



HOLTZMAN 
End 

JORDAN 

Manager 

CULLATHER 
Assistant 

133 





Jan. 


10 


Jan. 


13 


Jan. 


17 


Jan. 


20 


Feb. 


3 


Feb. 


10 


Feb. 


14 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


21 


Feb. 


24 


Mar. 


3 


Mar. 


7 



Mar. 10 



The Squad 

VARSITY BASKETBALL— 1934 

THE SCHEDULE 

Drexel at Philadelphia 
F. & M. at Lebanon 
Gettysburg at Gettysburg 
Muhlenberg at Allentown 
Ursinus at Lebanon 
Gettysburg at Lebanon 
Albright at Reading 
Dickinson at Carlisle 
F. & M. at Lancaster 
Drexel at Lebanon 
Muhlenberg at Lebanon 
Ursinus at Collegeville 
Albright at Lebanon 

Aggregate Scores 



SEASON 




L. V. 


Opp 


42 


37 


37 


36 


27 


28 


27 


22 


34 


32 


28 


35 


42 


43 


34 


35 


32 


41 


45 


44 


39 


40 


33 


45 


37 


31 



457 



469 




Coming back from the Christmas holidays, Coach Mylin called for his 1934 
basketball candidates. Only two senior players, Captain Light and Russ Wil- 
liams, answered the call. But there were numerous Junior letter men, namely 
Rust, Rose, Smith, and Barthold. The prospects looked bright for a successful 
season with the above mentioned seasoned players and such prospects as 
Miller, Patrizio, the Sponaugles, and Konsko. 

The boys started off with a bang by winning the first three 
out of four games, losing one to Gettysburg by a one-point 
margin. Then however Dame Fortune quit the job and the 
next nine games yielded only three victories. Three of these 
losses were by one point, and only on two occasions (Ursinus 
at Ursinus, and F. & M. at F. & M.) were the boys outclassed 
by the opposition. 

The season opened with the team playing Drexel at Phil- 
adelphia on January 10, the initial Eastern Pennsylvania Inter- 



MYLIN, Coach 



134 



collegiate Basketball League game for the season. The team lined up with 
Barthold and Rust at forward. Miller at center, and Light and Smith at guard. 
The combination flashed like a league winner, coming out with a 42-37 vic- 
tory. Numerous fouls slowed up the game somewhat. But the smooth passing 
attack of the Valleymen clicked religiously and they were able to garner 
numerous baskets. Scoring honors for the encounter went to Barthold with 19 
points, a remarkable total for the first game of the season. Smith contributed 
eleven points toward the total. For Drexel Knapp was outstanding with five 
double-deckers. Reynolds and Kline had eight points each. 

On the night of January 1 3 the Blue and White entertained the F. and M. 
basketeers at Lebanon in the initial home contest. The Mylinmen chalked up 
the second straight win by dumping the Lancaster quintet in a thrilling 37-36 
battle. Throughout the game spectacular shots were registered by Jacobs and 
Stouck, F. & M. forwards. Barthold again led the team in scoring with 13 
points. Rust and Miller contributing a large share also. The teams passing at- 
tack was much smoother than that of the Drexel game and looked like a cham- 
pionship combination. 

The team next journeyed to Gettysburg and played the champions of two 
preceding years. Gettysburg, confident due to the last encounter of the pre- 
ceding year in which they swamped the Valleymen by 30 points, expected a 
walk-away. However they were pushed to the very finish to beat the Blue 
and White 28-27. It was the closest call experienced by the Bullets on their 
home floor in four years. It was another indication that Lebanon Valley was 
making a bid for the championship. The "Flying Dutchmen" led at half time 
by a 16-15 score and held the lead until the final minutes of the game. This 
was mainly due to the fine shooting of Barthold and Rust coupled with a de- 
cided improvement in the foul shooting. Gettysburg never gained a lead until 
the thTrd quarter was well under way. But they held it from then on. The re- 
markable feature of this game was that in the last five minutes of this game 
neither team was able to score a point, each displaying a great defensive 
strength. Dracha and MacMillan were the big guns for the Bullets, scoring 
over half of their team's points. For the Valley. Barthold, Rust. Rose, and 
Smith shared the scoring honors with Rose's buckets touching on the spectacu- 
lar. Although the game was a loss, the boys considered it a moral victory to 
hold the strong G'burg team to one point advantage on their own floor. 

The team journeyed to Allentown to try their luck with the Muhlenberg 
team on January 20. The team once more hit its winning stride and took the 
Muhls into camp with a 27-22 verdict. The game was decidedly in favor of 
the Blue and White during the first half. They led the Allentowners 18-6 at 
half time. Charlie Rust, high scorer during this period, was forced out on per- 
sonals. The second half, however, was a different story. Muhlenberg came out 
determined to win and for a time the Mylinmen seemed as much at a loss as 
had Muhlenberg in the preceding period. The home team scored fifteen points 
before the Valleymen were able to place a bucket, and had the lead with but 
a few minutes to go. Barthold, Patrizio, and Smith let fly with a couple of field 
goals just before the final whistle sewed up the game for Lebanon Valley. 
Barthold, Rust, Miller, and Light were outstanding throughout the game. 
Rogers and Cochrane showed up best for the "Muhls" with nine points and 
seven points respectively. 





li^', 




LIGHT, Captain 
WILLIAMS 
BARTHOLD 
SMITH 




135 







Coming up fast in the closing minutes of play, Mylins' Minions nosed out 
the Ursinus Bears in Lebanon on February 3, winning 34-32, strengthening 
their hold on second place in the Eastern Pennsylvania loop and jumping with- 
in a half game of the league leading Gettysburg Bullets. It was a second half 
rally which turned the tables in favor of the homesters. With Ursinus playing 
a brand of basketball not wholly reconcilable to a cellar team, Lebanon Valley 
could not get going during the first twenty minutes of play. The first half 
ended with the Blue and White on the short end of a 22- 1 6 score. However, in 
the second half the Valley seemed to recover and rallied to take and hold the 
lead. Field goals by Rust increased the short lead in the closing minutes. 
Ursinus drew up closer but the whistle blew with Lebanon Valley still out in 
front. 

After a week's lay off following the rough and tumble Ursinus game, the 
team went into action against the Bullets for the second time, this time on 
the Lebanon floor. The powerful league leaders once again defeated the Blue 
and White, this time by a 35-28 count. But the game's outcome was not cer- 
tain until the last minutes of the game. The Mylinmen put up a hard fight, 
and only the spectacular long shots of Dracha and Kitsmiller near the end of 
the game changed the score in favor of Gettysburg. This defeat sorely jolted 
the championship aspirations of the Mylinmen. The locals fought stubbornly 
and at times it appeared as though they might eke out a victory, but the visi- 
tors were always capable of retaining their small margin of safety. L, V, never 
headed the Bullets after the opening minutes of the contest. 

On Wednesday, February 14, the Flying Dutchmen headed for Reading de- 
termined to draw first blood in the games with the ancient rival, Albright. 
They did not lack determination but they did lack two points and returned to 
Annville with another one-point loss credited against them, the books reading 
43-42 in favor of the Reading quintet. The game was loosely played through- 
out. The Lions held a decided advantage throughout the game which the Blue 
and White was unable to cut down until a final desperate rally in the last three 
minutes, when they scored ten points but failed to put in the winning bucket. 
The usual hard-scrapping and close playing which usually features an L. V.- 
Albright tilt was not apparent until late in the game. Barthold kept up his 
league scoring pace, leading his team with 12 points, latesta and Osliso, with 
1 2 and 1 4 points respectively, were Albright's scoring aces. 

Dickinson's Red Devils were the next opponents in the only non-league 
game of the season. The Blue and White lost in the closing minutes of a hair 
raising game by the score of 35-34. This was the second one-point loss in two 
days and the third of the season. Captain Kennedy was the hero of the game 
for the Dickinson squad when he dropped a field goal in the last fifteen sec- 
onds of play to send the Red Devils out in front. Going into the last period the 
score was 34-30 in favor of Lebanon Valley by virtue of a wild scoring spree 
by Rust, Miller, and Barthold. With two minutes to play, Steel sank a twin- 
pointer and a foul for Dickinson and made it possible for Kennedy's last-sec- 
ond bucket to win for his quintet. Rust, Lebanon Valley's star forward, was 
high scorer with an 1 1 point total. Wilson's ten points led for the Red Devils. 

The team slipped another notch in league play on February 21 when they 
lost their third straight league encounter to F. & M. by a 41-32 score. The 
eagle eye of johnny Moore, Nevonian sub, the inability of Miller to get the tap 



RUST 
MILLER 
ROSE 
PATRIZIO 



136 



from Wenrich, towering F. & M. pivotman, and a poor percentage of Blue and 
White foul shooting combined to cost the Valleymen the game. Moore could 
not be stopped, shooting from all angles of the court, caging eight double- 
deckers and two fouls. Barthold was runner up in scoring honors with 14 
counters to his credit. 

The Flying Dutchmen, with Rust dropping buckets from all angles of the 
court, barely nosed out the Drexel Dragons in Lebanon on Saturday night, Feb. 
24. The score was 45-44 at the end of the most bitterly contested game of the 
loop this season. It was incidentally the Valley's only extra period contest in 
two years. Knapp scored five field goals to lead a first half Dragon attack that 
placed the visitors ahead 22-12 at half time. This half was a slow affair, many 
easy shots being missed by either team. In the second half, with Rust and 
Barthold leading, Lebanon Valley launched a powerful attack which knotted 
the count at 37 all when the whistle blew. In the extra period a field goal by 
Kline and a foul by Shnipes sent Drexel ahead 40-37, but the lead was short 
lived as Rust and Smith counted goals to send the Blue and White ahead again 
by 45-40. Reynolds dropped two rapid fire shots to bring the score to 45-44 
as the extra period ended. 

Another closely contested game was dropped to the Muhlenberg outfit 
when they came to Lebanon on March 3. The locals led throughout the game 
and were apparently sailing to another victory when the visitors began a per- 
sistent spurt that advanced them into the lead during the final few minutes 
of play. The Muhls' ability to sink long shots gave them the contest. The win- 
ning goal was registered from a point three quarters down the court by a man 
who had never scored a bucket in inter-collegiate basketball theretofore. Soal- 
field took the scoring honors for the Allentowners. Cochrane and Smith fought 
a close struggle. 

Chase's Ursinus Bears clawed the Valley into submission 45-33 at College- 
ville on the night of March 7. Annville's Flying Dutchmen trailed throughout 
the contest. The home team rolled up a 23-15 lead at half time and further 
outscored the Mylin Minions after intermission. Lebanon Valley was unable to 
stop the scoring drive of Johnson, Sumners, and Creenvalt. Rust, Barthold, 
and Smith shared the Blue and White scoring except for two fouls by Light 
and Patrizio. 

The Blue and White came from behind in a sparkling second half rally to 
defeat their traditional rivals, Albright, by a 37-3 1 score at Lebanon on March 
10. The game was attended by a record crowd. Victory enabled the Blue and 
White to slip into fourth place in the league. It was a typical Annville-Reading 
fracas and was one of the roughest games of the year. The Lions played rings 
around the Mylinmen throughout the first half to assume what seemed an 
unconquerable 22-12 lead at half time. But Rust, Smith, and Miller applied 
the pressure, dropping bucket after bucket for nineteen straight points for a 
3 1 -24 lead with five minutes to go. Osliso finally broke the ice for the visitors. 
Lebanon Valley's 19 point drive was the most sustained drive exhibited in 
league competition and was a thrilling finish to a somewhat disappointing 
season. 



SPONAUGLE 
ARNDT 

CULLATHER. Mgr. 
CLEMENS, Pub. 






137 





The Squad 



FROSH BASKETBALL 





THE SCHEDULE 






Opponent- 


Place 


L V. 


Opp 


F. & M. Frosh 


Lancaster 


22 


45 


St. Paul's 


Lebanon 


47 


41 


Belle Knitting 


Lebanon 


26 


46 


Albright Frosh 


Reading 


35 


18 


F. & M. Frosh 


Lebanon 


21 


44 


Lebanon Business C. 


Lebanon 


40 


24 


Long's Bakery 


Lebanon 


37 


44 


Arrows 


Annville 


54 


38 


Albright Frosh 


Lebanon 

Aggregate Scores 


45 


28 




327 


328 




WILLIAMS, Coach 



138 



FROSH BASKETBALL 

With the selection of George Konsko to fill the coaching position, the Fresh- 
men began practicing for what was considered to be one of the toughest 
schedules to face a Frosh team in years. Undaunted, the Plebes practiced faith- 
fully under the observing eye of Coach Konsko, Intricate plays were learned to 
perfection in no time at all. Passing, floorwork, and bucket-shooting were also 
stressed. Experienced men were available and Coach Konsko had a fine team 
ready for the beginning of the season. 

In their first appearance the Frosh found the F, & M, yearlings too powerful 
and suffered a 45-22 defeat. Snell and Billett fought valiantly for our Frosh 
but to no avail, Jaeger, Sponaugle, and Apple proved too hard a combination 
to stop. Although they had practiced together, the Freshmen attributed their 
failure to the fact that there was little display of cooperation. Faulty passing 
was also a factor in the trouncing. But the Blue and White showed lots of 
promise in this, their initial encounter. 

Despite the fact that Billett, Snell and Kinney scored 14, 10, and 1 1 points 
respectively for a total of 35. the L. V. Frosh were extended to their utmost 
in disposing of St. Paul's quintet of the Eastern Pennsylvania League. The final 
score was 47-41. Clever passing by Snell, Speg, Crook, and Masimer, Frosh 
guards, enabled the Frosh to work the ball down the court. However, Lorah 
of St. Paul's was high-scorer of the evening with 16 markers. His teammate, 
Klett, scored 15. The Freshmen had demonstrated a cooperative ability which 
enabled them to win for the first time 

After holding the Bells Knitting team to a half-time score of 23-22, the 
Frosh faltered in the last two frames and lost out by a 46-26 score. The ap- 
pearance of Sweeney Light, ex-L, V. star, bolstered up the Knitter's defense 
and offense immensely. Billett, Snell, and Speg fought hard for the Frosh, but 
their best efforts produced no great results. Despite their scrapping to the 
last minute, the Plebes were helpless before the slashing attack of the indus- 
trials. 

In the preliminary game to the L. V, -Albright Varsity game, the L. V. Frosh 
overwhelmed the Reading Rivals by a 35-18 score. Kinney, Snell, and Billett 
starred once more, Speg, Snell, and Crooks displayed a fine brand of guarding, 
the success of which is indicated by the meagre points garnered by the Lion 
Cubs. Becker of Albright was the only one who succeeded in penetrating the 
defense with any consistency. The outstanding performer of the Albright 
Frosh, he netted four field-goals and three fouls for a total of eleven points — 
more than half of the Cubs' grand total. 



BILLETT 
SPEG 
SNELL 
KINNEY 





A \ 



139 







Outclassed and badly out-scored, the Plebes took a decisive whipping at the 
hands of the F. & M. Yearlings for the second time. With Jaeger and Sponaugle 
running wild, for the Nevonians, L. V. found themselves on the very short end 
of a 44-21 score. Billett, with 7 points, was high man for the L. V. Frosh. 
Kinney and Snell followed with four points apiece. Sponaugle led the winners 
with 1 5 markers while his teammate Jaeger accounted for 1 3. 

Coming back to the win column, the Frosh found no difficulty in making 
victims of the Lebanon Business College quintet. Fernsler distinguished him- 
self at center for the Businessmen while Kinney, Snell, Speg, and Houtz came 
through in fine fashion for the Blue and White. Besides playing a beautiful 
guarding game, Speg and Snell managed to ring up 8 and 10 points respec- 
tively. The Lebanon boys struggled valiantly to keep the game moving, but 
the L. V. Frosh were too much for them and the game went to the Blue and 
White yearlings, 40-24. 

Failing to hold a half-time lead, the Frosh went down to defeat at the hands 
of Long's Bakery quintet, 44-37. Billett was by far the outstanding performer 
on the court and strove mightily to keep the Frosh in the running with his 23 
point total. Euston, Kirkessner, and Rank led the Baker's attack with 1 2, 1 1 
and 9 points respectively. With the opening whistle of the second half, the 
Doughboys began a scoring rampage which not only evened up the score but 
gave them a comfortable lead. The desperate rally on the part of the College 
boys was in vain. 

In their next encounter, the Freshmen entertained the Arrows from Harris- 
burg. After assuming an early lead, the Plebes had no trouble in maintaining 
it, and ended up on the long end of a 54-38 score. After the second period, 
the yearlings settled down to their usual fast brand of basketball. Snell and 
Speg played a spectacular game at the guard posts, keeping the opposition in 
check and finding time to toss in a few field goals. Billett at center, and Kinney 
at forward, played fine basketball also. 

Realizing that it was their last appearance in Frosh basketball togs, the 
Frosh made their grand finale in fine style. Pitted against the Albright Cubs 
once more, our Plebes proceeded to cuff them into submission to the tune of 
45-28. Once again Snell, Billett, and Kinney starred for the Frosh. Their com- 
bined efforts alone yielded 39 points — enough in itself to down the Little 
Lions. Speg scintillated in the guard role, he and Crook supplying the remain- 
ing 6 points of scoring. McClintock, Riffler, and Kehler were the stars for the 
Reading representatives. With this splendid showing the Plebes lowered the 
curtain on their basketball career as Freshmen. 

With their season ended, the Frosh looked with pride on one of the best 
records attained by a Freshman club in the past few years. The yearlings com- 
pleted the season with five wins and four losses. This is in face of the fact that 
Freshmen teams are composed of men who never knew each other before and 
who play together only one season. 

Snell, Billett, Kinney, and Speg were the outstanding performers. Crook, 
Holtzman, Donmoyer, Masimer, and Loos rounded out the team in great style. 
They have become trained material available now for varsity stock next season. 



HOUTZ 
LOOSE 
CROOK 
HOLTZMAN 



140 








ON THE DIAMOND IN 33 











0pp. 


L.V 


April 26- 


-Cettysburg 


at 


Annville 


8 


7 


April29- 


— Drexel 


at 


Philadelphia 


6 


9 


May 17- 


—Susquehanna 


at 


Selinsgrove 





1 


May 19- 


-Albright 


at 


Annville 


1 


4 


May 20- 


-Bucknell 


at 


Annville 


3 


2 


May 23- 


-Susquehanna 


at 


Annville 


2 


11 




Total 


Runs Scored 




20 


34 



141 











1. Wood, Capt. 

2. Kazlusky 

3. Kraybill 

4. Williams 

5. Smith 

6. Rust 

7. Boran 

8. Konsko 



iB^ 



CAPTAIN WOODS TEAM SUCCESSFUL DESPITE INCLEMENT WEATHER 

After three weeks of intensive practice, Coach Mylin's nine opened its season 
entertaining Gettysburg at Annville. Although defeated, the Mylinmen 
showed up well in their initial contest of the season, as the close 8-7 score 
indicates. The final outcome was in doubt until the last ball was pitched. 
Mylin elected to start Bill Smith on the slab, but he was relieved by Captain 
George Wood in the seventh. Wood did fine relief work, yet it was necessary 
to chalk the game up as his loss. Gettysburg, too, found it necessary to use 
two pitchers. Coach Bream started Tony Kozma, C-burg football captain for 
1933 and star end, but in the eighth the home boys threatened to overcome 
the lead by three successive hits and a free ticket. Kozma turned over the 
mound duties to Howard who managed to finish the game successfully. 
Gettysburg could only gather single tallies, except in the eighth when they 
crossed the plate three times. The "Flying Dutchmen" earned their runs in 
the third, seventh, and eighth. Rust and Boran led the Valley batters with 
three and two hits respectively. 

On the twenty-ninth of April Lebanon Valley defeated the Drexel Dragons 
on the latter's field by the score of 9-6. This was the team's initial 1933 vic- 
tory; and, incidentally, the team's first league victory of the season. Boran and 
Captain Wood turned in stellar performances throughout. On the whole, 
though, the contest was rather loosely played by both teams. Both Shaffner 
of the losers and Wood of Lebanon Valley were touched for plenty of hits, be- 
sides receiving ragged support throughout the game. The former yielded fifteen 
bingles while his teammates erred seven times. Wood's teammates registered 
six miscues throughout the game, but Wood's ability to tighten up in the 
pinches saved the Valleymen from defeat. Konsko, V\/illiams, Barthold, and 
Whiting were the stars at the bat. Rust and Boran turning in several splendid 
fielding plays to augment the performance. Keene and Burns were the hitting 
stars for Drexel, both collecting two hits, while Knapp and Reynolds were 
outstanding in the field. 

The team was unable to play again for nearly a month due to inclement 
weather, but on May 17 the elements finally relented and allowed a game 
with Susquehanna University at Selinsgrove. The layoff seemed to do the boys 
good as far as fielding was concerned, although their batting eyes were slightly 
off (in all probability due to the excellent brand of ball pitched by Yaros, not 
to the long inactivity) . The encounter proved to be one of the most finely 
contested during the season. The 1-0 victory was hard earned by the hurling 
of Bill Smith and the excellent fielding and timely hitting of his teammates. 
Rust and Boran put in several sparkling bits of fielding, averting scores by the 



142 



opposition at critical moments. Base hits were few and far between in the 
game, the total of both teams coming to a bare nine with no man being 
credited with more than one hit. Lebanon Valley was on the long end with 
five hits to Susquehanna's four. The lone tally came in the seventh frame 
when Arndt crossed the plate after two successive errors followed his single. 

There was only a day's rest before the Blue and White nine started against 
Albright in Annville. This game resulted in the sweetest victory of the season, 
since it was the first time in several years that Lebanon Valley subdued its 
Reading rival. Captain 'vVood rose to unprecedented heights when he pitched 
his team to a 4-1 triumph over the strong Red and White nine. Wood struck 
out nine men and allowed only four hits. His contest was never in doubt. Hino 
starred for Albright while Charlie Rust's hitting in the pinches and his spec- 
tacular fielding insured the game for L. V. Frankie Boran's brainy base run- 
ning and stellar fielding was another factor adding greatly to this magnificent 
victory of Captain Wood and his hardworking teammates. 

On the following day the team dropped a close one to Bucknell, 3-2, before 
a colorful May-Day crowd in Annville. This was the third game of the week 
for the Lebanon Valley boys, yet they put up a courageous and close battle. It 
was a well played game on either side, with the Valleymen scoring their two 
runs in a thrilling though vain ninth inning rally, featuring brilliant work by 
Konsko, Rust, and Boran, whose stick work furnished the punch for this rally. 
In all probability there would have been many extra base hits, and a different 
outcome, had it not been for the strong adverse wind and the brilliant catches 
by Bucknell's outfield, which had ten put-outs all told — seven going to 
Vetter, the Bisons' exceptional center fielder. Smith and Rhubright faced each 
other on the mound. Smith pitched fine ball after the third inning, holding 
Bucknell scoreless, but the damage had been done. Rhubright held his slight 
edge despite the dangerous ninth inning. 

The last game of the season was played at Annville, in a return engagement 
with Susquehanna on Wednesday afternoon. May 23. The Lebanon Valley 
boys won their fourth game of the season. 1 1 was a one-sided affair, the Dutch- 
men getting on the long end of an 11 -2 score. The tallies proves that the team 
had once more found their batting eyes, collecting nine hits from the offerings 
of Meyer and Gray. Whiting, Rust, and Konsko collected two apiece. Once 
again George Wood pitched sure-fire baseball, never allowing any doubt as to 
the outcome. 



1. Mentzer 

2. Barthold 

3. Sincavage 

4. Vi/hiting 

5. Arndt 

6. Shaffer 

7. Knisely, Mgr. 

8. Cullather, Asst. 




A r 



o ^. 



M ^ 



(^ 




GIRLS' VARSITY BASKETBALL 



Date 



Feb. 


3 


Feb. 


7 


Feb. 


13 


Feb. 


18 


Feb. 


23 


Feb. 


24 


Mar. 


10 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


17 



School 

Juniata 

Ursinus 

Elizabethtown 

Keystones 

Juniata 

Penn Hall 

Albright 

Keystones 

Elizabethtown 



SCHEDULE 
At 

Huntingdon 

Collegeville 

Elizabethtown 

Annville 

Annville 

Annville 

Annville 

Myerstown 

Annville 

Aggregate Scores 



L. V. 


Opp 


18 


17 


17 


43 


20 


37 


31 


16 


33 


34 


32 


20 


35 


27 


20 


37 


23 


22 



229 



253 




After the Christmas vacation girls' basketball practice was begun in earnest. 
Several times a week, under the sharp eyes of Coach Kenyon, the Blue Belles 
practiced in the fire-hall with the hopes of putting girls basketball on the map 
for L. V. C. Both two division and three division were practiced. However, in 
all the games with the exception of the Keystones at Myerstown, the three 
division type of ball was used. 

The good freshman material was combined with the veteran members to 
produce a flashing sextette. The three senior girls on the team, Cemmill, 
Krebs, and Weirick, were made alternating captains. 1 1 was arranged that each 
one would pilot the team for three games. Miss Fasnacht, capable manager, 
secured nine games for the team, five of which were to be played at home. 
The Blue Belles opened their season on February 3 with a game at Juniata 
College and emerged victorious with a score of 18-17. Anna 
Krebs, captaining the team, was high scorer for the Blue and 
i*^ White, scoring 1 5 of the 1 8 po'nt total. The clever passing and 

H'' the careful guarding of the g ris made this game an unusually 

interesting encounter. 

The second game was played with Ursinus on February 7. 
There the Blue and White suffered its first defeat by the over- 
whelming score of 43-17. Clem Cemmill flashed on the floor, 
scoring 1 2 points out of the 1 7 total. Ursinus was very power- 
ful due to her strong line of material. However, the Blue Belles 
made a very creditable showing against the opposition. 



MISS DORIS KENYON 

Coach 

MISS EMMA FASNACHT 

Manager 



144 



On February 1 3 L. V. met Elizabethtown at Elizabethtown. where they suf- 
fered a 37-20 defeat. Krebs, Captain, was again high scorer, making 16 out 
of 20. Many substitutions were made due to the injury of several L. V. players 

The fourth game, the first home encounter, brought victory to the Blue and 
White — the girls scoring 31 points to the 16 scored by the Keystone Col- 
legians from Myerstown. M. Smith starred in this game, piling up 20 markers 
for L. V. C. The Weirick sisters successfully checked the scoring threats of 
the Keystone forwards. 

The second home game was with Juniata College, on February 23. The home 
team was outplayed in the first quarter but they made a strong comeback dur- 
ing the second period and turned a drab encounter into one packed full of 
thrills. The final score was in doubt until the last moment, fast passing and 
spectacular bucketing keeping the crowd in an uproar. But the Blue Belles 
went down to glorious defeat in the final minute by a 34-33 score. 

On the following day the Blue and White lassies stopped Penn Hall in the 
Annville High School gym, to the tune of 32-20. Gem Gemmill, playing for 
the first time since the breaking of her finger early in the season, played a fine 
game at forward She and Krebs were chiefly responsible for the victory over 
the strong visitors. 

March 10 was perhaps the banner day for L. V, C Not only did the men 
(both Varsity and Plebes) take Albright across the coals, but the girls won 
from the Albright cagewomen with a 35-27 score. Once again Gemmill (act- 
ing Captain I and Krebs showed unusual form, scoring 1 3 and 22 points respec- 
tively. 

The Belles were defeated in a return game with the Keystone Collegians 
on March 1 3 at Myerstown. The score was 37 to 20. The Blue and White was 
at a great disadvantage since two-division was played for the first time in this 
meeting. 

The last game of the season v^/as played on March 17 when the Blue and 
White defeated Elizabethtown 23-22 in a return game at Lebanon Valley, 
Our Belles led throughout the game. Gem Gemmill again piloted the Blue and 
White, she and Krebs starring at forward with the Weirick girls guarding 
efficiently. 



GEMMILL 
WEIRICK 
KREBS 
CHAMBERLIN 




This closed the rather successful season of five wins and four defeats. The 
aggregate score of 229 points against 253 for the opposition was a commend- 
able record. From the very beginning the girls were handicapped with the 
loss of several prominent players through injury. Gem Cemmill, outstanding 
forward, broke a finger in the play and was unable to take part in any encount- 
ers until the last two games. Light, Binkley, Harkins, and Engle were also out 
of play during the major part of the season. 

Orth and Smith, two freshmen girls, were the outstanding additions. Orth, 
tall Lebanon High product, formed, with Mabel Chamberlin, a center pair 
which was unrivaled. Their masterly jumping and passing was responsible in 
great part for the teams record. Charlotte and Iva Claire Weirick formed a 
sister team at the guard posts, which, when they were playing together, made 
an invincible barrier to the high scoring of the opposition. Krebs and Smith 
took the forward positions a good deal of the time and formed a formidable 
pair of bucketeers. Cemmill, in the short time she was able to play, proved a 
forward of no mean repute. Hazel March, substitute, also contributed greatly 
to the team's success. 

Coach Kenyon deserves no end of credit for the way in which she handled 
her team this year. Hampered throughout by the various adversities already 
mentioned, and taking her team despite this against the strongest available 
opponents, she displayed her coaching prowess by placing a fine sextette of 
coordinated players on the floor. It was this same spirit of cooperation rather 
than individual starring which enabled the Blue Belles to go on through the 
season with a creditable string of victories. 

Although the next season's team will be without the valuable services of 
Cemmill, Krebs, and C. Weirick, they should place a winning club on the 
court. There is a vast supply of excellent material on hand from this season. 
They, coupled with the fresh material and new reserves of next season, should 
insure a fine brand of girls basketball for Lebanon Valley in the ensuing season. 




ORTH 

I. V^EIRICK 

SMITH 

MARCH 




Captain Donmoyer Returns 



1933 VARSITY TENNIS 







SCHEDULE 






Date 


Opponent 


At 


L. V. 


Opp 


Apr. 26 


Dickinson 


Annville 


3 


6 


Apr. 28 


Juniata 


Huntingdon 


3 


4 


May 1 


Elizabethtown 


Annville 


7 





May 2 


Gettysburg 


Gettysburg 


6 


1 


May 17 


Gettysburg 


Annville 


6 


3 


May 18 


Dickinson 


Carlisle 


4 


5 


May 19 ■ 


St. Josephs 


Philadelphia 


1 


6 


May. 22 


Albright 


Reading 


2 


6 


May 26 


Elizabethtown 


Elizabethtown 


7 





May 27 


Moravian 


Bethlehem 


6 


3 


May 29 


Albright 


Annville 


2 


5 


June 3 


Alumni 


Annville 


1 


6 



Aggregate points 



48 



45 



ZECH, Manager 



147 





) : , ■■ r , • ' • I ! • • ; • rj ' ■ 



DONMOYER 

LEHMAN 

WALBORN 



1933 VARSITY TENNIS 

Braving the chilly blasts of April, the Lebanon Valley net-men were defeated 
by the Dickinson team in a hard fought contest. Donmoyer and Lehman won 
singles matches for Lebanon Valley. Traveling to Juniata the Annvillians re- 
ceived their second defeat, Donmoyer and Walborn this time drawing blood 
in the singles. 

The net-men's first victory was chalked up against Elizabethtown by the 
one-sided score of 7-0. The Blue and White continued the next day by down- 
ing Gettysburg in an easy going contest in which the Valleymen were never 
threatened. 

After a week of rain the court-men again defeated Gettysburg. But the 
next three matches, against Albright, Dickinson, and St. Josephs, resulted in 
defeats for the Annville Club. In the Dickinson match Lehman and Donmoyer 
eked out wins for Lebanon Valley. Donmoyer was the only one able to win 
against St. Joe. 

On May 26 Lebanon Valley snapped its losing streak once more by repeating 
over Elizabethtown, 7-0. The winning continued when the team traveled to 
Moravian. But the last two matches were dropped to superior rivals. Albright 
and the Alumni. 

With the graduation of Captain Donmoyer Lebanon Valley lost its greatest 
tennis player. Never has the campus seen his equal. In four years of college 
tennis he has received just four defeats. In 1930 Donmoyer won nine singles' 
matches and lost none; in 1931 he won eleven and lost one; the following 
year he triumphed nine times and lost twice ; and in 1 933 he again took eleven 
and lost one. Forty wins against four defeats is his record. We salute his great- 
ness! 



NYE 

LANTZ 

STEVENSOI-J 




INTRAMURAL 
FOOTBALL 



1. Frosh 

2. Officials 

3. Action 

4. Sophs 




Frosh 6 — Sophs 



^-•^ ^ -."' .^ n 




HOLTZMANS PUNT THRILLS GALA GATHERING 

Fortunate were the fans who, on Saturday morning, November 4, witnessed 
the annual classic of the gridiron, the Sophomore-Freshman Football game. 
Although outweighed by their worthy opponents, the Frosh succeeded, by 
hard fighting, in scoring one touchdown and retaining their lead for the dura- 
tion of the fast and furious encounter. Quarterback Masimer, acting captain 
of the Green team, flashed his form with reckless abandon, cutting capers 
which much bewildered the more seasoned opposition, Billett and Speg, at 
the end posts, were the nucleus of the yearling team. It was Billett who, in 
the second quarter, scored the lone tuochdown by virtue of his spectacular 
catch of Masimer's pass across the goal line. For the Sophomores, Sandt 
Sholter and Schmuck were by far the most outstanding, but trim Kirkpatrick 
was the best player. 

The encounter was on the whole a weird series of uncanny plays by both 
stalwart elevens. Everything from the Statue of Liberty to Strangler Lewis 
tactics were exhibited. But for all the rabid wrangling, the game was excep- 
tionally clean, no serious injuries being suffered. Credit for this should per- 
haps go to Messrs. Boran and Rust who composed the select officialdom for 
the grid-feud. 

Coach Rudnicki, of the yearlings, was confined to his bed with the gout on 
the morning of the fracas, but Nathaniel Jenkins, prominent local barber and 
football player, filled in the breach. For the sophomores Utica Stefano vainly 
chewed his nails and made substitutions. 

The high light of the game was the quick-kick executed by George Holtz- 
man (not related to the pretzel Holtzmans). It was a tense moment. The 
valiant Freshmen had been pushed back into their territory. Silence reigned as 
Masimer sang the signals in his clear soprano voice. The ball was snapped to 
Holtzman. Holtzman fondled the ball for some sixteen deliberate seconds and 
then booted — halfback Bittmger in the seat of the pants. The day was saved! 
The Frosh had triumphed. 



149 





GIRLS' VARSITY HOCKEY 

This season, for the first time, Lebanon Valley placed a Girls' Varsity Hockey 
team in the field. Though only two games could be arranged it was a fair be- 
ginning and the athletic department is planning for another season with a full 
schedule. 

Both games were played away from home because of the lack of an adequate 
playing field on the campus. The first game, November 4, was with Penn Hall. 
Although the L. V. girls lost the game by a 7-1 count, they showed commend- 
able power in their debut in intercollegiate hockey. The Blue Belles were the 
only ones who scored against Penn Hall this season. The second game was 
played with Juniata College at Huntingdon, November 1 1 . Once again the Blue 
and Vv'hite co-eds bowed, this time to the tune of 1 -0. The game was in a sea 
of mud due to rain and spills and slides featured the humorous encounter. 

Though the hockey season was brief this year, there are hopes for a longer, 
more brilliant, and more successful season in the fall of '34. 

MEN'S WRESTLING CLUB 

This fall a number of young men on the Valley campus, interested in the sport 
of wrestling yet realizing that there was no hope for the organization of the 
same in the athletic department this year, organized a semi-private club for 
the promotion of the grappling art. They were, of course, not under adequate 
tutelage except for the few minutes which the prominent town business man 
and ex-Penn State grunt and groan artist, Mr. I. Long, was able to grant the 
group. 

The group had several meets with other schools. The record, considering the 
fact that the team was a collection of unschooled wrestlers, was highly satis- 
factory. All the victories gained by the individuals were due to their own 
fighting spirit and their love of the game. 

The matmen have impressed the student-body and faculty with one fact — 
that a broadening of the athletic program to cover the wide variety of interests 
is an absolute necessity on our campus. 







INTER-CLASS 

BASKETBALL 

LEAGUE 



1. Soph 

2. Juniors 

3. Fresh 

4. Seniors 




The inter-class championship honors for the basketball season of 1934 were 
captured by a strong, aggressive quintet representing the Sophomores. The 
second year men became more powerful as the tournament advanced and it 
was apparent that their team was the one to beat. But the winners were in- 
vincible. 

The first game of the play was easily taken from the Plebes by a superior 
Junior five who completely smothered their unseasoned rivals 50- 1 2. The sec- 
ond encounter, which brought together the Seniors and Sophomores, was 
probably the closest contest of the series. In was featured by a last second shot 
which turned what looked like a heart-breaking defeat into a smiling victory 
for the Sophs, 35-34. In the third game the Frosh trotted out a revamped team 
that thoroughly jolted the Seniors, and the spectators as well, by handing the 
top-classers a 43-35 setback. 

The next contest brought into prominence two undefeated teams, the 
Juniors and Sophomores. Both aggregations, class rivals as well as court rivals, 
were out to trim the ears off the opposition. For the first three quarters the 
Juniors held the upper hand, and were apparently on the road to victory and a 
fulfillment of championship aspirations when the Sophs staged a rally that 
caught and passed the dazed third year crew. The final score was 45-36. The 
Frosh, visualized in the fifth encounter of the tournament of the ice-box their 
opportunity to tie the fast-stepping Frosh tormentors. The yearlings waged an 
uphill fight against their confident rivals but were forced into final with- 
drawal with a 38-31 reversal. In the last meeting, the ice-box resounded with 
cheers and jeers as the revenge-seeking Juniors battered the Seniors into 50- 
40 submission. 

THE STANDING 

Won Lost 

Sophomores 3 

Juniors 2 1 

Freshmen 1 2 

Seniors 3 



151 




u 



R 




1. Miss Minna Eliott Wolfskeil 

Best Lool<ing Cirl 

2. William George Rose 

Best Looking Man 

3. Max Henry Light 

Most Popular Man 

4. Miss Gem C. Gemmill 

Most Popular Girl 



153 




1. Miss Helen Frances Earnest- 

Wittiest Girl 

2. Earl Edward Hoover 

Wittiest Man 

3. Edmund Henry Umberger 

Most Intelligent Man 

4. Miss Marian Estelle Leisey 

Most Intelligent Girl 



154 



I. 




1. Miss Mary Elizabeth CoBsard 

Best Dressed Girl 

2. Charles Lawrence Hauct;, Jr. 

Best Dressed Man 

3. Russell LeeRoy Williams 

Best Male Dancer 

4. Miss Rose Katherine Dieter 

Best Female Dancer 



155 




1. Miss Kathryn Maude Mowrey 

Best Female All Around Worker 

2. John Allan Ranck 

Best Male All Around Worker 

3. William Hunt Smith 

Best Male Athlete 

4. Miss Ada Charlotte Weirick 

Best Female Athlete 



156 




1. Old Faithfuls 

2. Frosh Damsels 

3. Lodi and More Lodi 

4. Bob and Max 

5. Officialdom 

6. Hizzoner the Historian 

7. The Man Who Paves the Way 

8. Al Smith? 



157 




1. Before the Crash at P. M. C. 

2. La, la, and la ! 

3. Roommates 

4. Pretty, Pretty! 

5. Welcome! '34 Quittie! 

6. Holy Mackerel! 



158 




1. Burritt and Grandmother Speg 

2. "O, Pagan Spirit!" 

3. "The Farmer, the Farmer — " 

4. "Believe me" 

5. Pop! Co the Cold-fish 

6. Mrs. Greene's Little Girls 

7. Naughty Child 

8. Machinery Conquers Brosius 



159 





1. The Faculty Table 

2. Rust, Caterer Supreme 

3. Barthold Inhales Soup 

4. Whiting and His Gunboats 

5. Dr. Struble Dishes It Out 

6. Todd, Requiescent in Pacerr 



160 




1. Tyrone Tabby 

2. Budding Physicist 

3. The Mascot 

4. Will She Blow!' 

5. Kill, Kut, and Kolor 



161 




£v ^'3^ ''-'•■ ■-- 



1. "Y" Rest (not a pun) 

2. Wrong Ball, Wampler! 

3. Where's the Student? 

4. Jenkins Lowers Duey's Ears 

5. Remley for Air 

6. "Aphrodite's" Weekly Work-Out 



162 






1. Snowed in 

2. Citadel 

3. The Harrisburger on Time 

4. For Springtime Lovers 

5. For a Sleighing Party 

6. Empty now — but Wait 



163 




ECREIDER'S BRIDGE 



"Where blushing swains 
their tales of love con- 
fess." 



164 







"Here Relax upon a Sum- 
mer's day, and let the 
flowing waters bear your 
cares away." 



LOVER'S LEAP 



165 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 




May 6 — Supposedly May Day. First attempt. Soggy campus, torn um- 
brellas, and the absence of the royal hip boots keeps the dignified 
queen indoors. Fearless Philos wade through briny deep to 66th 
anniversary at the Weimer. 

May 8 — Skunk trapper foiled by canny creature. 

May 9 — Unofficial cross-country record established by collegiate Cas- 
savona. Lesher joins the rifle club as Long protests hog-killing. 

May 11 — Jigger Board eats chicken with its fingers. Kreider elected 
Head Scop of Green Blotter. 

May 12 — Campus nymphs tripped obediently to Prof Shauer's bellow- 
ing, Mowrey suffers in silence as Grove treads her toes. 

May 13 — What?' No May Day! Just another Shauer. Todd's Flushing 
Commodores substitute with a dance. 

May 1 5 — Spring serenaders clustered about ivy-clad walls of North Hall. 
Oodle-ay-eo! 

May 16 — English 66 Thespians steal the show from professional per- 
oxided Ophelia and pigeon-toed Hamlet. Large crowd attends per- 
formances by traveling company. 

May 19 — Sob scene in touching farewell chapel program induced by the 
Alma Mater. Not a dry eye in the student body. 

May 20 — May Day at last. Festivities barely beat out thunder-storm. 
Farewell Spring Recital and dance in the alumni gym. 

May 22 — Exams again! 

May 24 — Senate dines at Hummelstown. More gravy on clean vests. 

May 30 — Memorial Day. One day of strange interlude from the hard 
seats in the chapel. 

June 1 — Last day of school. Books fly into trunks (the bottom of the 
trunks! with amazing rapidity. 

June 3 — Senior wits scintillate in class day program. 

June 4 — Baccalaureate. Proud parents bristle with pride. 

June 5 — Commencement. All's well that ends well. 

June 6 — All quiet on the Western Front. 



166 



COLLEGE CALENDAR (Continued) 



Vacation Antics of Favorite Professors: 

Prof Stokes, after six weeks of teaching, returns to the North. 

Professor Struble also struggled with summer students. 

The Richies summer at Gretna. Bobby Jones gets a new rival as the 
Professor takes up golf. 

Prof. Stevenson runs the tennis tourney- 
Mrs. Greene, after pumping French idioms into American idiots, 
vacations in Atlantic City. 

Miss Moyer made a grand tour in a grand manner viewing the Grand 
Ganyon. 

Miss Lietzau tutored her Chicago cousins in German, gratis. 

The Reynolds, the Shenks, and the Rutledges vacationed in the 
middle west. What a fascination this territory has for our campus 
intellects. 

With hay-fever as a powerful incentive. Prof. Wallace indulged in 
some serious translations 

Coach Mylin also went to Chicago. 

Professor Wagner and the family battled mosquitos in joisey. 

Sept. 22 — The "Y" members took the unsuspecting Frosh for a party 
in the Cleona woods and made them walk home. The psychological 
moment to get acquainted — woods — trees. . . . 

Sept. 23 — Student-Faculty reception climaxed Freshman week Shy 
males and giggling females in best bibs and tuckers step on each 
other's feet to the music of the College Ramblers. Big Sisters and 
Big Brothers do the right thing by little Nellie and Harvey. 

Sept. 24 — The Frosh are swept with a queer disease called homesick- 
ness. Some cry, but others take it like veterans. 

Sept. 25 — The old grind begins. Beaming faces on all sides with here and 
there a look of sophistication. 

Sept. 29 — Band breaks through with a pep meeting. Todd and Wampler, 
steaming and stuttering, lead several wall-splitting cheers. Buck- 
nell triumphs. 

Oct. 7 — Debaters did their part at Harrisburg Convention in choosing 
N. R, A, as annual wrangle. Penn State wins over the Blue and 
White. 

Oct. 9 — L. V. C, goes on the air in initial broadcast of the series. 

Oct. 11 — Jigger Board makes provision for naughty girls while dunking 
doughnuts at the famous Kal-Bach Inn. 




rSo^gltf^vV.^= 





^o>,..Huna ftl-oorP 



167 



COLLEGE CALENDAR (Continued) 




Oct. 12 — Porcelain fang replaces famous gap in Umberger's jaw. Sophs 
return to ancestral diversions in climbing pole to win flag scrap, 
Cruber wins, showing little difference from his ancestors except 
that he shaved. 

Oct. 14 — Flying Teutons wreck City College 32-0. Wampler pays $3.50 
for a New Jersey Nut. Well, look where it came from. 

Oct. 17 — Another cabinet formed. Historians decide to form exclusive 
circle. . ■ 

Oct. 21 — The Valley gains a close triumph over Mt. St. Mary's. Smith's 
toe becomes immortal as he kicks the placement to win 1 0-8. Happy 
army swoops down on Dr. Lynch to demand holiday. 

Oct. 25 — Mr. and Mrs. Activity announce the birth of a new child — 
The Wig and Buckle. 

Oct. 26 — Dr. Weygandt Parades the Poets for eager chapel audience. 

Oct. 28 — Delaware added to the string of L. V. victims. 

Nov. 1 — Sophs emerge doused with victory in the tug. 

Nov. 2 — Grunt and growl artists organize. 

Nov. 11 — Huntingdon Indians scalped 27-7. 

Nov. 13 — Art Club gets risque and changes name to Rogues' Gallery. 

Nov. 14 — Green Blotter acquires new inkspots. Bigler, Straub, Stevens, 
Hall, and Earley make debut as budding authors. 

Nov. 16 — The "Chief," while consuming a quart of ice-cream, writes 
an editorial from experience on eating too fast. 

Nov. 17 — "The battle's over, the victory's won." Pledges get initiation. 
Males politely refrain from sitting down. Bring on the air cushions. 

Nov. 18 — Big time alumni-homecoming. Drexel bows 16-6. Band plays 
and spectators sit through deluge to see Feeser run wild. 

Nov. 25 — Inspired Albright holds Lebanon Valley grid heroes. No mud 
this year but dirty looks anyhow. Clionians flit to Penn Harris for 
annual dance. Hopping forbidden by Dean. 

Nov. 30 — Thousands miss Turkey dinners to watch thrilling 0-0 stale- 
mate between P. M, C. and L. V. C. 

Dec. 12 — Annual round of Christmas parties. Men's dorm inmates fail 
to find clean sock to hang up. 



168 



COLLEGE CALENDAR (Continued) 



Jan. 2 — Return to school for a badly needed rest after the Christmas 
holidays. 

Exams — Strange Interlude No. 2 

Jan. 26 — Wrestling Collegians try again against Wyoming Seminary. 
Battered specimens shewn after office hours. 

Feb. 8 — Initial recital of the year. Six students prove their education. 

Feb. 9 — Don Juan Hoover. Byron Mentzer, Cassanova Edwards, and 
Clark Todd engage in heated debate — "Why Love Anyway?" 

Feb. 13 — Military band organized by 32 girls. Student body suffers in 
silence. 

Feb. 14 — Book presents Wig and Buckle play, "Antigone." Scant cos- 
tumes display shapely male figures. 

Mar. 1 — F. P. Selsam defends France in Chapel address. What was it 
that Napoleon said to Josephine^ 

Mar. 7 — Lena Cockshott elected big shot of new "Y" Cabinet. Mentzer 
the male man of the hour. 

Mar. 8 — Buzzell stole show from Mentzer in "Everyman" by his intrigu- 
ing, seductive union suit (labeled Death, if you please) . 

Mar. 9 — "Conserve" burns with pride over dance success starring Jack 
Schuler and orchestra with the imported floor show led by Myers- 
town's Mae West. "BIbbie" Carl stars as Tarzan's Ape-Woman 
with costume to match in Clio program. Dust flies everywhere as 
co-ed's clean-up for Mothers' week-end. 

Mar. 10 — Even the athletic teams shine for mothers. Albright drops 
three encounters to Blue and White. Wrestlers tie Johns Hopkins. 

Mar. 12 — Letdown after mothers went home Forensic Lions tear L. V 
cubs in verbal duel. 

Mar. 1 5 — Series of highly enjoyable teas given by Mrs Lynch close. 

Mar. 16 — Glee Club opens at Cornwall. 

Mar. 23 — Kalo-Delphian "Hayfevers." Everybody's got it. 

Mar. 24 — Kalos in borrowed tuxedos head for Harnsburg. 

Mar. 28 — Easter Rabbit calls the children home for a week of Spring 
leave. 




169 



TO OUR ADVERTISERS 

The business staff of the 1935 Quittapahilla deeply 
appreciates the cooperation of the businessmen 
whose names appear in this section. We sincerely 
thank our advertisers for their help in making this 
book a success. You are certainly worthy of the 
patronage of the student body at Lebanon Valley 
College. 





HAIRCUTS AT 

KARL'S SHOP 

Make you the answer to a Co-ed's praver 

Karl Snyder, Proprietor 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



Stationery 



Jcicelyy 



From Freshman to Seniors 

All Your College Needs 

Are Supplied Bv 

GRIMM'S 

"The College Book Store" 

Now in More Spacious Quarters 

Try Our 5 and 10 Cent Dept. 



Peiiihnits 



]V[agc!Z_iues 



D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors a)id Builders 
Coal and Liiniher 



Annville, Penna. 





"Where Lebanon \'alley 


students get togeth 


er" 




PENNWAY HOTEL 






Affiliated 


with the 






PENNWAY 


BAKERY 




Annville 




Penna. 



172 



Fciiiijui 


iits 


The Lebanon \'allev Co-ed's 


Thank 


f/Ugi 


nvjies 








VOGUE BEAUTY 


SHOP 












For rheir conquests 








For 


Appointmexts Call Lehdiiou 114S 


Sruai-t A. W 


'ood. 


Prop. 


.Al./r 


^J. 




-2.1 Chestnut St., Lebaxox, Pa. 


H 


J } vents 



Kreamer Brothers 

FURXITURE 
UXDERTAKIXG 



Private Amhuhince 
Service 



The Busiest 

FURNITURE STORE 

In Lebanon Countv 

AxxviLLE, Pexxa. 



Sji/cfir/cbes 


Di)iih-i\\ 


ROE MI G 


s 


Home-Made Ice C 


REAM 


t<5>^ 




I. H. Roemig 




ALmutacturer 




<^!^ 




10 East jMaix Street 


Axx\'iLLE, Pa. 




Su/hlaes 


SodclS 



CLOTHING ofQUALITY 



LEBANON 



PENNA. 



173 



HERSHEY 

"Vlay ground of Centra/ Pa." 

IN SUMMER 

HERSHEY PARK BALLROOM presents World Renowned Orchestras 

SWIM in lovely Hershey Pool 

PLAY GOLF on one of four famous Hershev Courses 



IN WINTER 
HERSHEY COMMUNITY THEATER 
Presents Grand Stage and Screen Shows 

HERSHEY PARK ICE PALACE 
Fine Skating League Ice Hockey 



A Membership m the Hershey Community Club is really worth while when your' re at L. V. 

ami forever after. 



Patronize 



FINK'S BAKERY 

For Oi/cility Baked Products 
of All K/itds 



¥. 



Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



H 


W. MILLER 


Hardware and House Vurnishini^ Goods 


.\twater Kent 


Radios Maytag Washers 




r-fo 


12. AND 


14 E. Main Street 


A 


nnville, Pa. 



See 

MILLER the TAILOR 

For Your Next Suit 

538 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



174 



''A Good Shop for Men" 

Smart Men's Furnishings Qualitv Clothes 

^^E^ S H A P I R O " S EEE^— 



S44 CUMBERLAXD St. 



Lebaxox, Pa. 



ARNOLDS 


BOOT SHOP 


Exclusive Shoes 


ot^ 


VARSITY GIRLS' 


For G/r/s 


FLORSHEIM SHOES 


"For the mail who cares" 


ot^ 


34 X. Eighth St. 


Lebanon', Penna. 



JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 



Flor/st and Decorator 



Hii^h irrade of cut tlowers 

and potted phmts 

for all occasions 



FHF FLOWER SHOP' 

Rear ot Court House 

Phone Leb. ^91 

Corsagt'S our Specialty 

Lebanon, Pa. 



HERSHEY DAIRY PRODUCTS 

LABORAFORY CONFROLLED 



— t-S?-" 



Protection at the Source Guards 
Hershev's Qualitv 



175 



I AK]->A/Xi>t^S RE0/ < XBI-E1 




IIXKKISIII lil. 



CAS SAT T 
& COMPANY 



INVESTMENTS 

Samlcr Buildin? Lebanon, Pa. 

Major H. D. Case, Manager 



Lebanon Vallev Srudents 
find the 

A S T O R 
THEATER 

A Reliable Source of 
Clean Entertainment 



Under ci inanageiiu'iit icbich 

dedicates itself to 

present 

The Latest Shows 

AT Popular Prices 



'The Colleee Theater" 



Annville 



Penna . 



FLOWERS 

for 
All Occasions 



HERSHEY ESTATES 
GREENHOUSE 



Hershev, Pa. 



Phone 

248 



]\\.ei)iber 
F. T. D. 



SHENK & TITTLE 

Everything for Sports 



3 13 Market Street 



Harrisbursf, Pa. 



176 





AT THE 


DINE 


GREEK TE;5i:5lAC:i 


• 


One mile e.ist of Annville 


DASC:^ 


IVe Invite L. T^. C. Studaits 
diid Their Piireiits 




To Try Our Delicious Foods. 



The Photogmphic Story 

in this book 

is the work of 



APEDA STUDIOS 

"Photography in all of its possihilhies" 



.12.-116 West 4Srh Street 



New York Citv 



177 




IDMIEiyD ' OF' EKGMAVIKG 



INC 




>iJoiir dream oj a peijecl L^tuiiiai comes Ir 
We place at your disposal our staff of 300 master 

craftsmen men who have given their 

life to their art men who have made 

"Bureau Craft" and "Quality" 
synonymous 

oUlnfieal)ol!s 




178 



Henry G. Palatini, EJi tor- in-Chief Charlies L. Haulk ju., Bwniii'ns Mjnagc\ 

19 3 5 
QUITTAPAHILLA 

P // h U .s hi' d by t hi' J //>i/or Chiss of l^cbiiiioii \^dllcy College 



A N N V I L L E , P E N N S Y L \' A N I A 



April 19, 1934 

Mr. W. F. Ross 
The DuBois Press 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Dear Mr. Ross: 

When we were confronted with the dilemma of letting out the contract 
for the printing and binding of our publication, we tried to make up a 
list of requirements which the bidders had to meet. Some of our listed 
requirements were: financial stability as shown by Dunn & Bradstreet 
Reports, experienced in the year book field judged by past perform- 
ance, and last but by no means least, dollar for dollar value. 

Out of some dozen or more firms who bid on the 1935 Quittapahilla your 

firm was selected as best qualified both by us and by the faculty. Now 

that our book is on the presses, we are more than ever convinced of 
the soundness of our judgment. 

Both you, Mr. Ross, and your Mr. Sullivan have made our work a pleas- 
ure. We are also indebted to you for innumerable suggestions which 
have improved the quality of our book and lightened our labor. We have 
never found you too busy to take a personal interest in the ' 'Quittie. ' ' 

We are deeply grateful and sincerely wish you the best of success. 

Sincerely, 



J^urxi^^^tW 




Business Manager 




Editor 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

THE 1935 QUITTAPAHILLA wishes especially to 
acknowledge the invaluable aid of the Messrs. Sul- 
livan and Ross of the DuBois Press, Messrs. Norton 
and Degnan, of Apeda Studios, and Mr. Art Segal of 
the Bureau of Engraving. Without the fine and kind 
cooperation of these gentlemen, the book would 
have been an impossibility. 

We wish also to thank Richard Walborn, Duey 
Unger, Bernard Stevens, Phillip Underwood, John C. 
Houtz, and Earl Hoover for their help in the produc- 
tion of this annual and the Certainteed Products 
Company for the use of the color plates for the 
division pages.