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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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Copyrighted 1937 

CURVIN DELLIXGER, Jr. 

FAiloT 

C. BOYD SHAFFER 

Business Manager 



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A NEW spirit pervails at Lebanon 
-^^- Valley College. . . a spirit of equal- 
ity, of groping for knowledge, of friendliness, 
of cooperation . . . the Class of '38 and the 
Quittapahilla Staff wish to convey this new 
idealism to students and friends of the 
College through medium of this publication 
. . . may it be picked up and cherished 
through the years to come. 

This publication is not intended to be per- 
fect nor to be a literary masterpiece ... we 
wish to portray, through photography and 
a simple message, life as it actually exists 
on our campus ... in years to come we 
can again visualize these blissfully happy 
days in our "smoke-dreams" as we sit at the 
fireside with this volume on our laps. 

Will this book be a success.' . . . that is 
for the students to determine . . . we sin- 
cerely hope their criticisms will be just and 
not too severe . . . The Junior Class is 
pleased to present to you the result of our 
united efforts — The Quittapahilla. 



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CuRvix Bellinger 



C. Boyd Shaffer 



Staff of the 1938 Quittapaliilla presents this 
issue of the annual yearbook . . . staff ably 
directed by Curvin Dellinger . . . business 
department efficiently handled by C. Boyd 
Shaffer . . . feel justly proud of this book 
. . . trust that it will meet with your ap- 
proval . . . flowing, modern style used for 
first time, with the hope of producing a more 
informal and a more interesting work . . . 
photomontage in fore part of book an in- 
novation . . . candid photography used 
wherever possible . . . many new features 
will be noticed while leafing through the book 
. . . attempt made to picture students as 
others see them . . . much unnecessary 
material omitted . . . activities of seniors not 
listed, although most outstanding accomplish- 
ments included in brief write-ups . . . junior 
class treated in customary manner . . . intend 
to show informal short glimpses of campus 
life. 



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PROFESSOR MILTON L. STOKES 



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THE Class of 1938 humbly dedicates this edition of the "Quittapahilla' ' 
to Professor Milton L. Stokes ... In our associations with our 
fellow men, we constantly make contacts with men and women whom we 
look up to with reverence and respect . . . some people seem to grow 
on you and become a part of your life and character . . . such a man 
is Professor Stokes ... a keen thinker and observer, a diligent student 
of financial and business problems, a competent teacher is this, our 
friend . . . always able to help solve the problems of the students 
and help them along life's journey . . . how could the Class of '38 
make a more proper and fitting dedication? We salute you, Professor 
Stokes, and say — "Success is yours." 



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ADMINISTRATION 
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CONSERVATORY 
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MEN'S 
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COLLEGE 
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Representatwes from the East Pennsylvania Conference 

Mr. J. R. Engle, A.B., LL.B., LL.D Palmyra, Pa. 

Mr. John E. Gipple Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mr. M. H. Bachjian Middletown, Pa. 

Rev. H. E. Miller, A.M., B.D., D.D Lebanon, Pa. 

Prof. H. H. Baish, A.M., LL.D Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rev. S. C. Enck, A.M., B.D., D.D Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rev. p. B. Gibble, A.M., B.D., D.D Palmyra, Pa. 

Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, A.B., D.D Lancaster, Pa. 

Rev. D. E. Young, A.M., B.D., D.D Harrisburg, Pa. 

*Rev. a. S. Lehjlvn, D.D Harrisburg, Pa. 

Rev. H. E. Schaeffer, A.M., B.D Penbrook, Pa. 

Rev. J. O. Jones, A.M., B.D., D.D Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mr. John Hunsicker Lebanon, Pa. 

Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. C. Guy Stambach Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Rev. Paul 0. Shettel, A.B., B.D Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. M. R. Fleming, B.D., Ph.D., D.D Red Lion, Pa. 

Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL.B Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. Ira S. Ernst, A.B., B.D., D.D Carlisle, Pa. 

Rev. J. H. Ness, A.B., B.D., D.D York, Pa. 

Rev. G. I. Rider, A.B., D.D Hagerstown, Md. 

Mr. Albert Watson Carlisle, Pa. 

Mr. O. W. Reachard Dallastown, Pa. 

Rev. p. E. V. Shannon, A.B., D.D York, Pa. 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., D.D Hagerstown, Md. 

Mr. E. N. Funkhouser, A.B Hagerstown, Md. 

Mr. R. G. MowTiEY, A.B Quincy, Pa. 

Representatives from the Virginia Conference 

Rev. J. H. Brunk, D.D ]\tartinsburg, W. Va. 

Rev. G. W. Stover Winchester, Va. 

Rev. W. F. Gruver, D.D Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Mr. G. C. Ludwig Keyser, W. Va. 

Rev. E. E. Miller, A.B Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Rev. W. H. Smith, A.B., B.D Elkton, Va. 

Alumni Trustees 

Mr. a. K. Mills, A.B Annville, Pa. 

Mrs. Louisa Williams Y.\rdley, A.B Philadelphia, Pa. 

Prof. C. E. Roudabush, A.M., D.Ped Minersville, Pa. 

Trustees at Large 

Bishop G. D. Batdorf, Ph.D Harrisburg, Pa. 

Dr. H. M. Imboden, A.M., M.D New York City, N. Y. 

Members of the College faculty who are heads of departments are ex officio members of 
the Board of Trustees. 

*Deceased. 



Page 20 




DR. CLYDE A. 
LYNCH 



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This college is under two fundamental extra-academic obligations to its stu- 
dents : first, to inculcate high ideals and provide wholesome activities conducive to 
the development of Christian character; second, to make this miniature world, 
designated as the campus, a veritable social laboratory in which students may demon- 
strate proficiency in acquiring certain desirable social attitudes. To accomplish this 
every student is urged to participate in extra-curricular activities and to exercise 
his prerogatives as a campus citizen in cooperation with the student-government 
body. 

The more nearly the campus approximates those ideal patterns of life and action 
which our society realizes so imperfectly, the more likely will this institution pro- 
duce men and women who are prepared both theoretically' and practically for 
intelligent and consecrated leadership, and who will elevate the general welfare 
above personal ambition and party aggrandizement. Otherwise, American democ- 
racy will be imperiled between the Scylla of Communism and the Charybdis of 
Fascism. 

The present world ferment has destroj-ed campus isolation. The once seques- 
tered halls have been invaded bj' strange sights and sounds and radical ideas that 
leave but an imaginary dividing line between the campus and the impinging world. 
Students are becoming more serious, and they evince a sense of responsibility that 
has rung down the curtain alike on the campus playground and on the purely 
speculative classroom. 

Progressive colleges are discouraging the use of sadistic relics of barbarism and 
are encouraging a more democratic campus citizenship. Students are given certain 
rights and privileges commensurate with their demonstrated value to campus society. 
Refractory students suffer a loss of privileges and esteem; but instead of being 
forced to external conformity, induced by physical punishment, they receive their 
motivation through friendly counsel and the example of upper classmen in proper 
campus behavior: a slower but a surer process. This system presages the doom of 
Fascism and prefigures the democracy of tomorrow. 

CLYDE A. LYNCH, President 



Page 81 




ike Tdculti 



Dr. L. G. Bailey . . . "This is not a black and white world, but a gray 
one," a favorite expression . . . applies his psychology at all times . . . 
recently became a proud papa . . . interesting lecturer . . . pleasing 
voice with light southern accent . . . Dr. Andrew Bender . . . spends 
much time developing his show-cases in the entrance of the Ad building 
. . . practically lives in his laboratory . . . analyzes stone for quarries 
. . . proud of the fact that he attends chapel only once a year — at opening 
exercises — he should be!! . . . Ruth Engle Bender . . . piano instructor 
. . . only piano teacher who has pupils off campus . . . active in Annville 
and Lebanon clubs . . . accomplished pianist and accompanist . . . 
Dr. R. R. Butterwick . . . humorous philosopher . . . extensive knowl- 
edge of religious subjects . . . broad-minded in regard to the younger 
generation . . . immovable in an opinion which has already been made 
. . . makes frequent use of personal examples . . . R. P. Campbell . . . 
spends hours practicing on the new Moller organ . . . studied with Pietro 
Yon . . . organist in St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Lebanon . . . D. 
Clark Carmean . . . social Dean of men . . . loves to entertain the boys 
at odd hours . . hobby is camera studies . . efHcient on band and 
orchestra instruments . . . true pal to all students . . . Alexander Craw- 
ford . . . lover of youth and beauty . . . always keeps fit . . . modern 
in most ideas but has a slight trace of old-fashioned ideas in styles . . . 
completely absorbed in his new recording and amplifying equipment . . . 
artistic temperament . . . delightful to know and a true friend . . . 
S. H. Derickson ... a true friend . . . master in his field . . . great 
help in soliciting students . . . perpetually interested in botany and 
zoology . . . takes great pride in his museum and motion picture camera 

Page 22 




. . . Jerome W. Frock . . . coaches football . . . wears shoe leather out 
while he watches his boys out there fighting . . . avoids chapel and all 
public appearances . . . tardy when he does go . . . Mary E. Gillespie 
. . . makes an attractive appearance . . . charming personality . . . 
great aid in soliciting students for the conservatory . . . efficient executive 
. . . takes charge of practice teaching in the music department . . . C. R. 
Gingrich . . . extensive social worker . . . skillful lawyer . . . chips in 
with Sociology class to aid underprivileged children of Annville ... a good 
scout and liked by all his students . . . Mrs. Mary C. Green . . . social 
Dean of women . . . vivid interest in girls' welfare . . . lived in France 
for years . . . speaks French as a second nature . . . charming personal- 
ity and makes a lovely appearance . . . sweet and lovable ... a trust- 
worthy confidante when her girls are in trouble . . . S. O. Grimm . . . has 
a wide knowledge in practically all fields . . . can answer practically any 
question . . . registrar of the college . . . good scout . . . likes to experi- 
ment with new mechanisms in lab . . . always gives his students the 
benefit of the doubt . . . Esther Henderson . . . due to her ability last 
year's May Day was a huge success . . . grand sport . . . has put a zest 
in women's athletics . . . sponsors tricky activities for her girls . . . owns 
a nobby Chevy coupe . . . mourns over her mischievous wire-haired fox 
terrier which lost itself several months ago . . . Lena Louise Lietzau . . . 
adviser of German Club . . . obtained her Dr.'s degree in University of 
Vienna . . . absorbed in German interests . . . life of a party . . . enter- 
tains lavishly ... an excellent cook . . . Dr. V. Earl Light . . . uses 
excellent lecture methods ... an alumnus of Lebanon Valley College . . . 
royally entertains biology lab assistants . . . high sense of humor . . . 
delves in heredity of crooked little fingers . . . Hubert Linscott . . . 
assists in vocal instruction . . . here only three days a week . . . enjoys 
reading ... an excellent vocal entertainer . . . Harold Malsh . . . teaches 

Page 23 




violin on campus . . here only a couple days a week . . . accomplished 
concert violinist . . . Emerson Metoxen . . . gives his physical ed boys 
a stiff workout . . . coaches basketball and baseball . . . Nella Miller 
. . . proud of Betty Bly . . . makes week-end visits to New York to see 
her husband . . . accomplished concert pianist . . . Ella Moyer . . . 
reads extensively, especially travel literature . . . loves traveling . . . 
has been all over Europe . . . likes Germany best . . . great conversa- 
tionalist . . . fond of youth and its ways . . . Helen E. Myers . . . 
librarian . . . friendly and interested in the welfare of others . . . rides 
with professors going and coming to school . . . belongs to various clubs 
. . . entertains beautifully . . . extensive knowledge on all subjects . . . 
good business manager . . . Dr. O. E. Reynolds ... a friend of teachers 
. . . possesses wonderful memory and an eager and wide-awake attitude 
. . . takes a personal interest in the welfare of his students . . . well read 
in all fields . . . may be remembered for his humorous stories . . . 
Dr. G. A. Richie . . . faculty adviser of Life Work Recruits . . . speaks 
in chapel weekly . . . doesn't quite approve of dances on the campus . . . 
a conscientious worker . . . Edward Rutledge . . . director of girls' and 
boys' band, Glee Club, and Symphony Orchestra . . . takes an active 
interest in his pupils outside of class . . . specializes in band and orchestra 
instruments . . . Dr. H. H. Shenk ... a well-known historian of 
Pennsylvania . . . intensely interested in Indians . . . faculty adviser 
of Men's Debating Club . . . retiring personality until acquainted . . . 
may be found in "Who's Who in America" . . . Dr. E. H. Stevenson . . . 
Oxonian . . . faculty adviser of International Relations Club . . . gifted 
personality . . . manifests active interest in all current events . . . 
marvelous knowledge of history . . . excellent professor . . . humorous 
and friendly . . . Mrs. Stella Stevenson . . . scholastic Dean of women 



Page 21^ 




. . . traveled abroad last year with group of Delaware University students 
studying in France . . . speaks French fluently . . . always seen wearing 
a hat ... a fresh-air fan . . . Milton L. Stokes . . . faculty adviser of 
Women's Debating Team and of Commerce Club . . . recently married 
. . . entertains in his new Annville residence . . . the answer to most any 
question as far as he is concerned is "Canada" ... a friend of the student 
body . . . Dr. A. H. M. Stonecipher . . . Dean of college . . . not 
nearly as stern as his position as Dean and his expression seem to indicate 
. . . tennis fan ... a learned gentleman . . . Dr. George G. Struble 
. . . faculty adviser of Green Blotter Club, Wig and Buckle Club . . . 
directs numerous campus dramatic functions . . . entertains in an inter- 
esting manner . . . absorbed in history of words . . . gives thought- 
provoking exams . . . lived in the Central States and the Philippines . . . 
named his children Tonkie and Marian Trygve . . . Dr. Paul S. Wagner 
... on leave of absence due to illness . . . has not been teaching this 
year . . . missed greatly in the classroom ... a favorite of the student 
body . . . Dr. P. A. W. Wallace ... a true gentleman ... a scholar 
. . . lives in the world of literature . . . recently gave up extra-curricular 
activities to write his long-dreamed-of book . . . one of our most interest- 
ing lecturers . . . Margaret A. Wood . . . dietitian . . . nurse . . . 
working for Dr.'s degree . . . can give advice to girls in almost any line 
. . . sticks previously cut strips of tape on cupboard doors . . . loves 
solitude and books . . . Benjamin Owen . . . recently married . . . 
could almost be taken for a student because of his youthful appearance 
. . . accomplished pianist . . . attractive to the ladies . . . Amos Black 
. . . new to campus this year . . . likeable . . . fond of reading in any 
field . . . keen intellect . . . recently became a fond father . . . liked 
by student body. 
Page 25 




Seniot 0La.65 Q^^iceti 

George Smeltzer President Francis MacMullen 

Edward Schmidt Vice-President Maxine Earley 

Martha Faust Secretary Lois Harbold 

Grace Naugle Treasurer Grace Naugle 



Page 28 



The Minuet May Pole Dancers 

Bob and Kay Reber Fixes a Flat Going for the Mail! 

LuPTON, THE Biologist South Hall Lassies Playing in the Sand Ain't Love Grand? 

Why the Smiles? 





CLAIRE ELIZABETH ADAMS . . . socially a Delphian . . . opening president 
. . . English major and assistant . . . library assistant . . . interested in German 
Club, Life Work Recruits . . . active in society plays . . . junior plav, "The 
Admirable Crichton." . . . EDWARD ROBERT BACHMAN . . . Kalo . . . 



majoring in Business Administration 
change their minds." . . . Men's 
Quittie staff . . . Commerce Club 
HOMER BARTHOLD . . . Kalo . 



Bachmanism — "Only dead men never 
Senate . . . college basketball . . . 1937 
. . . class basketball and football . . . - 
. . major in music education . . . com- 
pleted course in three years by going to summer school . . . member of Band and 
Symphony Orchestra . . . clarinet soloist . . . RICHARD ALBERT BAUS . . . 
Chemistry . . . editor of La Vie Collegienne . . . the widow "tweed" . . . asso- 
ciate editor of 1937 Quittie . . . Physics assistant . . . Wig and Buckle . . . 
"Dicky the Boss" . . . HAROLD EBLING BEAMESDERFER . . . Kalo . . . 
serious-minded . . . Bible and Greek major . . . main activities are Green 
Blotter, Life Work Recruits, Y. M. C. A., College Band . . . prospective minister 
. . . active in all religious organizations . . . PALTL C. BILLETT . . . socially, 
member of Kalo ... a Chemistry major . . . Chemistry assistant . . . "B" 
in Billett signifies basketball and baseball . . . basketball captain . . . president 
of "L" Club . . . also plays football for his class . . . ELIZABETH BINGAMAN 
. . . Delphian . . . major in public school music . . . accomplished pianist . . . 
teaches piano theory in a Harrisburg music school . . . active in Girls' Band . . . 
EDNA ANNABELLE BINKLEY . . . member of Clio . . . major in public 
school music . . . pianist and organist . . . forward on basketball team . . . 
active in Girls' Band . . . GERALD ECKELS BITTINGER . . . Philo . . . 
seriously a History major . . . main interests are College Band, history, teaching, 
arguing, and dancing . . . active in class and society functions . . . intends to 
enter law school . . . WILLIAM EDWARD BLACK . . . member of Kalo . . . 
major in public school music . . . outstanding trumpet-player . . . member of 
College Orchestra, Band, and Glee Club. 



Page 30 




JOHN MARLIN BROSIOUS . . . Kalo . . . Biology major . . . belongs to the 
Chemistry Club . . . class basketball and football . . . great desire to become 
M.D. . . . seen constantly with Reber . . . RUTH BUCK . . . Clionian . . . 
major in French . . . assistant to Dr. Reynolds . . . very proficient pianist . . . 
president of "Jigger Board" . . . seen frequently with a teacher from Hummels- 
town . . . THELMA DENLINGER . . . English major, Latin and French 
minors . . . from the "Chocolate Town"' . . . Clionian . . . Hershey Com- 
munity Theater: "Tickets, please" . . . cashier at Park Cafeteria . . . HOMER 
DONMOYER . . . Economics major . . . member of Commerce Club . . . 
Kalozetean . . . hitch-hikes from Lebanon . . . ardent sports-fan . . . "the 
tops" in tennis . . . following in Claude's footsteps . . . MAXINE LARLTE 
FARLEY . . . Clio . . . English major . . . Green Blotter . . . W. S. G. A. 
Board . . . Student-Faculty Council . . . Wig and Buckle Club ... La Vie 
reporter . . . WILLIAM HARRY EARNEST . . . Business Ad. honor student 
. . . member of Commerce Club . . . Philokosmian . . . sports editor of La Vie 
. . . editor-in-chief of '37 Quittapahilla . . . bass voice in numerous L. V. stage 
productions . . . JOHN KENNETH EASTLAND . . . Philo anniversary presi- 
dent . . . major in English . . . one of Jersey boys . . . takes active part in 
dramatics . . . Wig and Buckle Club . . . frequently seen on the L. V. C. dance 
floor . . . takes great pride in being Madame Green's waiter . . . ELEANOR 
CAROLINE ENGLE . . . socially Clio . . . History major . . . Junior Prom 
committee . . . Clio anniversarv committee . . . one of North Hall's effervescing 
co-eds . . . MARTHA CLIPPINGER FAUST . . . Clio . . . History major 
. . . main activities are in Y. W. C. A., president . . . W. S. G. A. board . . . 
Wig and Buckle Club . . . junior play . . . International Relations Club . . . 
KARL R. FLOCKEN . . . Chem. major . . . Chemistry assistant . . . aspiring 
M.D. . . . day student . . . many friends on L. V. campus . . . outstanding 
actor in "Admirable Crichton" and "Truth about Blayds." 



Page 31 




RUTH ESTELLE GOYNE . . 

worker ... a prospective music 
in Girls' Band and Glee Club . . 
from Eastern Baptist Seminary 



cheerful and efficient . . . willing Clionian 
supervisor . . . College Orchestra . . . active 



WILLIAM GEORGE GROSZ 

. active in Life Work Recruits . 



. transfer 
ambitious 



student . . . major in Bible . . . Greek . . 
minister . . . LOIS MARIE HARBOLD 
in Business Administration . . . pianist . 
. . . flair for wearing stunning clothes . . 
affairs . . . GERALDINE HARKINS . . 
. . . well known for her cheery "Hello" . 
Chevie . . . interested in basketball 



possesses all qualities of a successful 
. . Clio . . . president . . . major 
. . . library assistant . . . junior play 
. . active and interested in all social 
. . Clionian . . . major in Education 
. . . commuted every day by way of 
interests are in Penn State . . . MARY 



JEAN HARNISH . . . Clio . . . History major . . . Psychology assistant . . . 
secretary of International Relations Club . . . interested in dramatics . . . junior 
play . . . super charge of personality . . . debater . . . RUSSELL CONDRAN 
HATZ . . . Kalo . . . major in public school music . . . Lebanon Valley's 
Fritz Kreisler . . . main interests are Band, Glee Club, Symphony Orchestra, 
String Quartet . . . strives for perfection in his art . . . ARTHUR RICHARD 
HEISCH . . . Kalo . . . honor student in Business Administration . . . also assis- 
tant . . . officer in Commerce Club . . . star end on football team . . . honorary 
captain . . . participates also in basketball and baseball . . . WINIFRED 

. socially a Philo . . . transfer from Shenan- 

. known for southern drawl . . . interested 

Wig and Buckle play . . . HAROLD CHESTER 

Kalo . . . Philosophy . . . Religion major . . . ac- 



WOODROW IILMMKLRIGHT . 

doah . . . Social Science major . 
in dramatics, junior play 
HOLLINGSWORTH .'. 



tive in Life Work Recruits . . . day student . . . interested in debating . . . 
ROBERT EUGENE KELL . . . Philo opening president . . . Business Ad- 
ministration major . . . Commerce Club . . . executive ability . . . business 
manager of La Vie . . . participated in class football and basketball. 



Page 32 




CHARLES BAMBURGH KINNEY . . . Kalo . . . honor student . . . His- 
tory major and assistant . . . interested chiefly in International Relations Club, 
debating, German Club . . . dramatic performance in class and society plavs . . . 
varsity basketball . . . ESTHER LEOTTA KOPPENHAVER . .". socially a 
Clionian . . . major in public school music . . . participates actively in Glee 
Club, College Orchestra, Girls' Band . . . member of girls' hockej' team . . . 
enthusiastic over teaching music . . . NORMAN LAZIN . . . Biology major 
. . . Kalozetean . . . one of the day students who hainit the labs . . . tennis 
another of his rackets . . . basketball . . . clerk: "Any fresh fruit today, lady?" 
. . . WILBUR ARTHUR LEECH . . . Kalo . . . Bkogy major . . . Biology 
assistant . . . College Band . . . Wig and Buckle member . . . class and society 
plays . . . particularly active in social affairs of society and class . . . SARA 
ELIZABETH LIGHT . . . socially a Clionian . . . major in public school music 
. . . active in Girls' Band, Glee Club, College Orchestra . . . excellent pianist and 
organist . . . accompanist . . . forward on basketball team . . . THEODORE 
MANDON LOOSE . . . Kalo . . . ambitious Education major . . . very active 
in International Relations Club, Life Work Recruits . . . Y. M. C. A. officer . . . 
Men's Senate . . . participates willingly in class affairs . . . class basketball . . . 
BURRITT KEELER LUPTON . . \ honor student . . . Chem. major . . . 
officer in Chemistry Club . . . interested in all scientific fields . . . spends con- 
siderable time in research work . . . continually adds to his fine collection of 
minerals . . . ROSE ELEANOR LYNCH . . '. Clio . . . History major . . . 
French assistant ... La Vie reporter . . . active in Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion . . . enthusiastic over hockey and basketball . . . interested in social affairs 
. . . FRANCIS AV. MACMULLEN . . . honor student . . . Kalozetean . . . 
Chem. major, Chem. assistant, and president of Chemistrj' Club . . . main inter- 
ests are sanitation and English royal history, which he knows from "A to Z" . . . 
president of senior class . . . SARA KATHERINE MECKLEY . . . French 
major, with Latin minor . . . Dr. Reynolds' efficient Education assistant . . . 
active participant in Clionian affairs . . . member of Eclectic Club . . . known 
to friends as "Sally." 




HARRY EDGAR MESSERSMITH . . . Heil Hitler! Herr Messersmith is 
your ardent supporter! . . . from "Myerstatel" . . . German major, German as- 
sistant, president of German Club . . . Kalo play: "You and I" . . . Inter- 
national Relations Club . . . JAMES HENRY MILLER . . . Biology major: 
"young hopeful" M.D. . . . favorite exercise: taking walks, putting feet on 
chairs . . . Kalozetean minstrels . . . makes heat wa\es run up and down a 
piano . . . GAYLE ELIZABETH MOUNTZ . . . public school music . . . 
Clionian anniversary president . . . popular soprano soloist . . . active member 
of Girls' Band, Glee Club, Symphony Orchestra, and Eclectic Club . . . '37 
Quittie staff . . . vice-president of sophomore class . . . ^'ERA BELLE MUL- 
HOLLEN . . . transfer from LTni\'ersity of Pittsburgh . . . English major . . . 
Clionian . . . faithful to I. R. C. . . . deliater ... in another Johnstown flood. 
Belle could cry "Help!" "Hulfe!" "Aidez-moi!" or "Eripe!" . . . GRACE MARIE 
NAUGLE . . . exceptionally fine Business Ad. student . . . Clionian opening 
president . . . skilled pianist . . . active in Commerce Club, Eclectic Club, 
Y. W. C. A., La Vie, Wig and Buckle . . . manager of Girls' Debating . . . asso- 
ciate editor '37 Quittie . . . class secretary and treasurer . . . ELWOOD ED- 
WARD NEEDY . . . Kalo . . . Philosophy . . . Life Work Recruits president 
... La Vie . . . football manager . . . tug and scrap . . . society minstrels 
. . . efficient officer of Y. M. C. A. . . . Bible assistant . . . MARLIN RAY 
0'NE.\L . . . transfer from Shenandoah . . . public school music . . . Kalo- 
zetean . . . flashy drum major of L. V. C. Band . . . member of Glee Club and 
Orchestra . . . popular conservatory student . . . ANNA HERR ORTH . . . 
History major . . . Clionian . . . unassuming, popular and proficient day student 
. . . outstanding athlete: hockey fullback, basketball center . . . first president 
of Women's Athletic Association . . . RUTH PHENICIE . . . English major 
. . . transfer student from Shenandoah . . . accomplishes a great deal along the 
line of art, including knitting, sketching, painting . . . member of Y. W. C. A. 
. . . quiet but friendly . . . HAROLD PHILLIPS . . . French major from the 
"big city" . . . society of "Geeps" . . . president of Wig and Buckle . . . last 
word on New York theater activities . . . make-up man, director, technician, 
etc., for L. V. stage ... La Vie feature columnist. 




JOSEPH WILBUR PROWELL . . . Biology . . . Chemistry . . . out- 
standing L. V. C. bachelor . . . liibernates in Biology lab . . . \'acation spent in 
steel mill . . . future M.D. . . . HOWARD F. REJBER . . . Kalo . . . major 
in Biology . . . expects to teach in near future . . . greatly- interested in photog- 
raphy . . . did much work for the 1938 Quittie . . . FRANK ALLEN RUTHER- 
FORD . . . pre-medical changed to Business Ad . . . society of "Geeps" . . . 



'37 Quittie staff . . . bridge addict . . 

the scenes for L. V. stage productions 

Chem. major . . . another "Geep" . 

nician . . . Wig and Buckle Club . . 

member of Quittie staff . . . bridge partner of Rutherford . . 

EMERSON SHAY . . . Kalo . . . also a pre-medical student . . 

gleam of deviltry in his eye" . . . class basketball and football 

scrap . . . CORDELLA SHEAFFER . . . public school music . 

Delphian . . . plays trombone in Girls' Band . . . able pianist . 

year in operetta, "Trial by Jury" . . . Glee Club . 

SMELTZER . . . Business Administration student . . 



Wig and Buckle Club . . . man behind 

. . JACK EDWARD SCHMIDT . . . 

. Kalozetean . . . ingenious stage tech- 

. last vear vice-president of class . . . 

DONALD 

"there is a 

. tug and 



active m 

freshman 

. GEORGE LIGHT 

37 Quittie staff . . . 



active in Commerce Club and Band . . . Kalo minstrel . . . hobbies: bridge and 
dancing . . . intends to become a banker . . . day student chauffeur . . . 
CYRUS G. SMITH . . . majoring both in public school music and History . . . 
sometimes appeared in chapel tooting an oboe . . . L. V. Band . . . Glee Club 
. . . Orchestra . . . class tug and flag scrap . . . MARJORIE HELEN SMITH 
. . . Clio . . . History major . . . outstanding in athletics . . . basketball and 
hockey . . . class play, "Admirable Crichton" . . . last spring "Marge" assisted 
friend Trego in leading Junior Prom . . . comes to Annville daily by means of 
the Messersmith "gas buggy" . . . RICHARD THOMAS SMITH . . . Kalo 
. . . pre-medical student . . . society president . . . one of the future politi- 
cians of Penns3'lvania . . . class president . . . class play . . . College Band 
. . . one of the organizers of the Kalo minstrels. 



Page 35 




CLAIR ALBERT SNELL . . . "to love her was a liberal erlucatioii" ... as- 
sistant in Math. . . . varsity basketball guard . . . "L" Club . . . Band . . . 
class football . . . baseball . . . JOHN LOUIS SPEG . . . Kalo . . . Chemis- 
try . . . "smile and the world smiles with you" . . . basketball . . . class presi- 
dent . . . "L" Club . . . Men's Senate . . . class tug, scrap, football . . . 
HENRY CYRUS STEINER . . . Philo . . . conserv. student with a major in 
public school music . . . Symphony and College Orchestras . . . Band . . . 
Glee Club . . . society pianist . ." . DELORES ROMAINE STILES . . . 
Delphian anniversary president . . . P^ench major . . . Y. W. C. A. cabinet . . . 
head of costume committee for May Day . . . vice-president of W. S. G. A. . . . 
CHESTER ARTHUR STINEMAN .' . . Kalo . . . public school music . . . 
drum major for three consecutive years . . . aided in making the Lebanon Valley 
Band one of the most outstanding in the East . . . Glee Club . . . Orchestra . . . 
LOUIS EARNEST STRAUB . . . Philo president . . . Bible, Greek . . . "full 
of wise saws and modern sayings" . . . most outstanding man on campus . . . 
president of Y. M. C. A. . . . Green Blotter Club president ... La Vie Col- 
legienne news editor and associate editor . . . business manager of 1937 Quittie 
. . . FLORA MAE STRAYER . . . English major . . . transfer from Shenan- 
doah College . . . Life Work Recruits . . . quiet member of South Hall's talka- 
tive group . . . EDWIN HOMER TALLMAN . . . Chemistry-Biology . 
several years hence he will be known as Dr. Tallman . . . Chemistry Club . 
class football . . . comes to L. Y. C. daily by means of the thumb route . 
JOHN W. TREGO . . . Philo . . . Biology . . . also a pre-medical student . 
handsomest man on the campus . . . Junior Prom leader . . . basketball . 
tug and flag scrap . . . Society Anniversary Committee . . . ROSE STUART 
TSCHOPP . . . Delphian . . . voice . . . female member of Needy-Tschopp, 
Inc. . . . Glee Club . . . Life Work Recruits . . . Penn Hall. 



Page 36 




DUEY ELLSWORTH UNGER . . . Kalo . . . Biology . . . Men's Senate 
president . . . class president . . . La Vie Collegienne . . . society play . . . 
Y. M. C. A. . . . Student-Faculty Council . . . EARL CLAYTON UNGER 
. . . Kalo . . . public school music . . . for four ,^ears Earl has been considered 
the best trumpet-player in the conservatory . . . Band . . . Glee Club . . . 
Symphony and College Orchestras . . . PAUL KENNETH WALTZ . . . Kalo 
. . . Biology . . . Juniata College . . . formerly from Altoona . . . bridge en- 
thusiast . . . head usher at Hershey Theatre . . . teller of tall tales . . . Band 
. . . society minstrels . . . MARY WEBB . . . Delphian . . . resided in South 
Hall . . . from the battlefield town . . . major in Latin . . . member of Girls' 
Band . . . diligent worker in whatever she undertakes . . . PAULINE YEAGER 
. . . Latin and French major . . . day student, active in Hummelstown Dramatic 
Club . . . enjoys movies . . . knits and sews . . . "How about a ride in that 
new Plymouth, Polly?" . . . JOHN H. ZIMMERMAN . . . Philo . . . Chem- 
istr}^ . . . day student . . . hailing from down Manheim way . . . "your brain 
is the nearest gold-mine; keep digging" . . . Chemistry Club . . . flag scrap 
and tug. 



Page 37 




^uniot 0La65 0'iiicet5 



)avid Byerly 


President 


Paul Ulrich 


Wanda Price 


Vice-President 


Wanda Price 


Dorothy Kreamer 


Secretary 


Lucille Hawthorne 


)ean Gasteiger 


Treasurer 


Dean Gasteiger 



Page 38 



Top Roio: STUDIOUS JUNIORS SNOW LOVERS SOUTH HALL LASSIES 
WHAT A WRECK! 

Bottom Row: MAXIXE AXD BALDY WALKIXG IX THE RAIN 

JUXIORS IX MAY DAY COACH THOMPSOX THE TURK 





Clahexce 

AUNGST 



Martha 
Baney 



Clifford 
Bahnhart 



Elizabeth 
Bender 



Lloyd 
Berger 



Ralph 
Billett 



Page iO 



CLARENCE CHRISTIAN AUNGST . . . College . . . Basketball 1, •i, 3 
. . . "L" Club 2, 3 . . . Commerce Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Class . . . Football 1, 2 
. . . Tug 1, 2 . . . Society . . . Kalo . . . Minstrels 2 . . . Sergeant-at-Arms 
1 . . . Approximately six feet three — "mustachioed" good looks . . . found in 
his spare time in a white coat, flourishing an ice-cream dipper at the Pennway . . . 
walks (no, we don't mean talks) with a southern drawl . . . meets the other fellow 
more than half-way in being pleasant . . . soda-jerker in his third year . . . also 
a varsity basketball plajer ... we mustn't forget that he is one of L. V. C.'s 
minister's sons. 

MARTHA ISABELLE BANEY . . . College . . . Hockev 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . Y. W. C. A. 1 . . . "La Vie" Staff 2 . . . German Club 1 
. . . Class . . . Vice-Pres. 1 . . . Student Faculty Council 3 . . . "Quittie" 
Staffs . . . An I. Q. that, accompanied bj- a less unaffected attitude of friendliness, 
would be enough to scare people away . . . plays hockey, basketball, and tennis, 
goes for long walks, writes long letters, works long, long hours at Brunner's . . . 
bounces up and down on her bed every night in order to get tired enough to go to 
sleep ... is likelj' to be found reading a novel at four in the morning, or when 
standing on her head. 



CLIFFORD BARNHART . . . College . . . "La Vie" 2, 3 . . . Green 
Blotter 1, 2, 3 . . . May Day 2 . . . One of the few male literary students on our 
campus . . . consistent honor student . . . member of the select literary group, 
the Green Blotter . . . won a competitive scholarship examination before matricu- 
lating at L. V. C. . . . an "A" student in psychology . . . enjoys a good game of 
handball . . . one of Editor Baus's reliable reporters ... he who quoted you 
at odd times in "What Thej- Say ' . . . always interested in the latest magazines 
and books . . . witty expressions are constantly heard by those with whom he 
associates. 



ELIZABETH TEALL BENDER . . . College 
petitive Prize 1 . . . "La Vie" 3 . . . Y. W. C. A. 1 . 
Band 1, 2, 3 . . . International Relations Club 2, 3 . . 
Life Work Recruits 1,2 . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2. 3 . 
Rec. Sec. 3 . . . Class . . . Basketball 2 . . . Society 
fies the ambitious student . . . sincere and dependable 
ates she will have a B.S. in Music plus a B.A. Degree . . 
ease of movement as a hostess . . . everyone feels right at home when greeted 
by a friendly smile such as hers . . . might also add that she is one of Clio's most 
active members ... if a job must be accomplished, gi\e it to Betty, and we're 
certain of results ... if all of us were fortune-tellers we would be sure to predict 
success in Capital Letters. 



. . Day Student Com- 

. Glee Club 1 . . . Girls' 

. . German Club 3 . . . 

. . . W. A. A. Cabinet 3, 

. . Clio. . . . Personi- 

. . when Betty gradu- 

Bettv is known for her 



LLOYD BERGER . . . College . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2 . . . German 
Club 3 . . . Class . . . Football 1, 2 . . . Tug 1, 2 . . . Flag Scrap 1, 2 . . . 
Society . . . Kalo . . . The Jeff who lost his Mutt when Ben Bollinger moved to 
Shippensburg . . . became acquainted with the dance-floor in his second year 
. . . likes to know all kinds of people . . . possesses one of those rare honestly 
democratic spirits . . . has ideas about an exciting newspaper career . . . some- 
times surprises us with his love of music and literature . . . known for his realistic 
interpretation of a corpse in a Wig and Buckle play and of Simple Simon in his 
first May Day . . . belongs to the German Club and talks Dutch to the natives 
of Annville. 

RALPH EDWIN BILLETT . . . College . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Baseball 1, 2, 3 . . . "L" Club . . . Class . . . Football 1, 2 . . . Tug 1, 2 
. . . Society . . . Kalo, Rec. Sec. 3 . . . Makes the basketball fans hold their 
breath while his clean shots swish tlu-ough the basket . . . induces the baseball 
fans to have a comfortable feeling that second base will be well guarded and that 
L. V. C.'s team will have at least a few three-base hits per season . . . makes the 
birds and the radio jealous when he whistles or croons . . . makes a few close 
friends and no enemies . . . causes most people to wonder whj' they have never 
learned to know him better. 



Page 41 



ROBERT BLACK . . . College . . . Ursinus 1 . . . Society . . . Philo 
. . . Two-hiindred-pound guard and captain at Hershey High . . . has come to 
L. ^'. after one year at Ursinus ... in summer a frequenter of the Hershey Park 
Ballroom . . . used his brawn and ability in class tugs and football games . . . 
interested in a certain "Jean" of Hershey . . . quiet, but friendly if you take the 
initiative in becoming acquainted . . . fond of good food : consumed sixteen oysters 
at a certain stag banquet . . . smart dresser . . . that is "Ham." 

JOHN BOLLMAN . . . College . . . Lehigh 1 . . . Commerce Club 2, 3 
. . . Deep bass voice; six foot, three; daj' student at L. V. C. . . . has had four 
;\'ears of practical business experience in operating a filling station before registering 
in the business course . . . knows his drinks from "A to Z" since he dispenses all 
kinds at a state store when not at school . . . former basketball star at Lehigh 
before transferring to L. V. C. . . . continues an active interest in all sports as 
an enthusiastic fan . . . slightly older than the rest of us, but we are proud to 
call him one of our number. 



HERBERT HARVEY BOWERS . . . College . . . Band 1, 2 . . . Chorus 
3 . . . Life Work Recruits 1 . . . Society . . . Philo . . . Elder of the Bower 
brothers who returned after one year's absence . . . during that time he worked 
at various places in order to complete his college work . . . minister's son who is 
following in his father's footsteps . . . takes an active interest in social affairs . . . 
has the appearance of and is typical of the average college student . . . neat dresser, 
quietly .self-confident, diligent and ambitious . . . we are glad to welcome him into 
our ranks. 

MARLIN BOWERS . . . Society . . . Philo . . . Possesses the fieriest hair 
of all the red-heads on the campus . . . one of the best dressers at L. V. C. . . . 
sells shoes at a retail store in Harrisburg each Saturday . . . has come into our 
fold from the Class of '37, due to a year's absence . . . worked in steel mills during 
that time . . . one of the Bittinger-Bower red-headed "twins" . . . hopes some 
day to enter the legal profession . . . broad-minded . . . can discuss economic 
questions with intelligence, forcefulness, and clarity. 



CLAYTON P. BOYER . . . The middle-aged member of our class who wrote 
"C.B." with the stamp of approval of the psychology department on all our papers 
. . . one of the finest students of psychology that has ever registered for the course 
. . . also rumored that he knows all the correct answers in Dr. Richie's classes . . . 
an ordained minister . . . serves a charge in the vicinity of Downingtown . . . 
assistant to Dr. Bailev . . . commutes one hundred miles daily . . . a war veteran. 



FRANK BRYAN . . . College . . . Band, 2, 3 . . . Symphony 1, 2, 3 . . . 
College Orchestra 1, 2, 3 . . . Trombone Quartette 3 . . . Society . . . Kalo 
. . . Minstrels 3 . . . Two years ago a happy-go-lucky young man at L. V. C, 
unfortunately, was forced to leave school because of ill health . . . returned more 
serious and a completelj' cured individual . . . one of the ablest trombonists in the 
band and orchestra . . . girls will tell you he is handsome . . . popular in the 
conserve . . pleasing personality . . . friendship worth cultivating. 



Page i2 



ROBEET 

Black 



John 

BOLLMAN 



Herbert 

Bowers 



Marlin 
Bowers 



Clayton 

BOYER 



Frank 
Bryan 




Page 43 




Helen 
buttehwick 



David 
Byerlt 



Adolph 
Capka 



Isabel 
Cox 



Paul 

CUNKLE 



Gordon 
Davies 



Page U 



HELEN BUTTERWICK . . . College . . . X;<rHege Orchestra 1, 3 . . 
Symphony 1, 2, 3 . . . Girls' Band 1, 2, 3 . . . Glee Club 2, 3 . . . Class . . . 
"Alison's House" . . . SociETY^^,^.^-CTio . ^. Clump, clump, clump — a witty 
remark — a giggle — and there-w^nave^Heten . . . Helen Butterwick, P. D. (Pro- 
fessor's Daughjtei4— ^'TTMjperhaps P. D. may stand for "Perfectl_y Dynamic" in 
relation to her violin playing . . . however, despite the P. D. we have definite 
evidence that her heart is with the common people . . . tragedy in her life occurred 
when she rode on the same train with Robert Taylor — and didn't know it until 
after the ride was over . . . made "Mrs. Hodges" in the Junior play a character 
that we won't stop chuckling over until the play itself is forgotten. 

DAVID ALLEN BYERLY . . . College . . . Band 1, 2, 3 . . . "La Vie" 

2 . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Commerce Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Class . . . Pres. 3 
. . . Tug 1,2... Society . . . Kalo . . . "As Husbands Go" 1 . . . Minstrels 
2, 3 . . . Mighty mite who became president of his class in his Junior year . . . 
mixes business with pleasure when the big dances come around by getting the 
girls to tease the boys into ordering orchids and gardenias from him . . . was 
"Wibby" in Kalo's play, "As Husbands Go" . . . gets a big kick out of letters 
from his kid brother . . . commonly known as Johnny Speg's stooge — all because 
Johnny thinks Davy's O. K. and Davy thinks Johnny's O. K. — and Johnny 
happens to be the Senior member. 



ADOLPH JAMES CAPKA . . . College . . . Senate 3, Sec.-Treas. 3 . . . 
Student-Faculty Council 3 . . . Baseball 1, 2, 3 . . . "L" Club 3 . . . Commerce 
Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Class . . . Pres. 2 . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Football 1, 2 
. . . Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . Tug 2 . . . Society . . . Philo, Sec. 3, Vice-Pres. 
3 . . . Juniors have a tendency to carry their money in their "Cap" . . . that is. 
Cap is a favorite to put in charge of the business end of any enterprise ... he 
would gladly work on the waiter force all year for the mere joy of it . . . president 
of his class in his Sophomore year . . . "Three in a row — three in a row — put it 
right over there — right over" comes with all the persistence of a side-show barker's 
voice as Cap from his short-stop position on the baseball team cheers the pitcher 
on to victory. 

ISABEL LOUISE COX . . . College . . . Eclectic Club 3 . . . Glee Club 
1, 2, 3 . . . Symphony 2, 3 ... Y. W. C. A. 1 . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Girls' Band 1, 2, 3 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . She might be an advertisement 
for a girls' finishmg school: beautiful, talented, and possessor of the virtues of 
modesty and industry . . . one of Clio's harmony trio . . . Isabel's French horn 
can be easily identified by the taste of her particular brand of lipstick . . . must 
have read S. S. Van Dyne for years in order to give so realistic an interpretation of 
a well-known L. V. C. tragedy heroine as she did early in her Sophomore year . . . 
can be told readily from one side of the campus to the other by her candj'-stick coat. 



PAUL VINCENT CUNKLE . . . Harrisburg commuter . . . lad who made 
the saxophone wail with the Jimmy De Angelis band at Gretna last summer . . . 
now he may be heard each week-end with the Diplomats . . . conscientious stu- 
dent . . . prospective minister with music as a hobby . . . enjoys handball, 
boxing and wrestling . . . one who spends an entire afternoon on one drawing in 
biology lab. and secures several "98's" for his persistence . . . appears in chapel 
as a student lecturer for the Y. M. C. A. 

GORDON DA VIES . . . College . . . Football 1, 2, 3 . . . Baseball 1, 2 
. . . Senate 2 . . . "L" Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Class . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Voice that growls out all the correct answers in history class . . . dependable 
strength that takes out the opponent in each play in football games . . . will 
behind the kind of a "yes" or the kind of a "no" that stays "yes" or "no" . . . 
ambition that always finds some kind of a job, anywhere from a steel mill to 
a five-and-ten-cent store . . . fair-mindedness that makes a good interclass 
basketball "ref" . . . has sense of humor that keeps all work and no play from 
making him a dull boy ... all these things make "Dodo" Davies a man. 



Page J/S 



HARRY DEAVEN . . . College . . . Life Work Recruits 1, i, 3 . . . 
International Relations Oiib 1 . . , Society . . . Philo . . . One hundred and 
ninety pounds of bone, fat, and brawn . . . fair of face . . . jolly disposition . . . 
always inclined to be agreeable . . .-prospective minister of the gospel . . . 
"conies from Jonestown over" . . . R. R. IBiit^rwick's philosophizing protege 
. . . during week-ends and vacation periods retrieves coal from the Swatara . . . 
strongest he-man in psych, hand dynamometer test . . . Greek and Bible "A" 
student. 

CURVIN NELSON BELLINGER . . . College . . . Commerce Club 1, 2, 
3 . . . "La Vie" Staff 3 . . . Senate 3 . . . Student- Faculty Council 2 . . . 
Class . . . Editor 1938 "Quittie" 3 . . . "Alison's House" 3 . . . Football 1 
. . . Society . . . Philo . . . Treas. 2 . . . One of the few who are willing — nay, 
anxious — to take politics and examinations seriously . . . protagonist of Republi- 
canism and the virtues of Red Lion . . . patient bearer of the nick-name "Cyrano" 
. . . has a look of intelligence — probably due to his great expanse of forehead with 
a dreamer's expression that may, or may not, be due to the "specs" he wears or 
an air of independence resulting from holding his head several notches higher than 
average, and a business-like walk which developed shortly after he became editor 
of the "Quittie." 



WALTER MELVIN EHRHART . . . College . . . Band 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Y. M. C. A. 1 . . . Class . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 
. . . Tug 1,2... Society . . . Philo . . . Sergeant-at-Arms 1 . . . He will go 
to waiters' heaven, if any such place exists, for his good nature in carrying seconds, 
and thirds on coffee to South Hall's table . . . good nature is also demonstrated 
by his generosity in lending his radio . . . does a great deal of socializing a la 
Brunner's . . . has ambitions to go places in the line of medicine . . . has one 
very efficient weapon which makes it wise to be in his favor: his camera is noted 
for its ability to take inercilesslj' candid snapshots. 

HERMAN ELLENBERGER . . . College . . . May Day 2 . . . The slim 
six-footer who seldom speaks unless spoken to . . . fellow workers in the labora- 
tories find him an interesting companion . . . graduated as salutatorian from local 
high school . . . won competitive scholarship before matriculating . . . continues 
as an honor student in science department . . . intends to become a teacher after 
securing a Ph.D. . . . hopes to devote his time to research in chemistry. 



BEATRICE FINK . . . College . . . Glee Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Girls' Band 
1. 2, 3 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3 . . . Society . . . Delphian . . . Friends call her 
"Bea" . . . epitome of what one expects in a blonde . . . seldom see her week- 
ends . . . travels frequently . . . likes metropolitan life . . . lyric soprano . . . 
voice "discovered" at L. V. C. . . . practices assiduouslj' . . . has aspirations for 
a life of song . . . not ill-founded . . . also an accomplished pianist . . . plays 
an alto in Girls' Band . . . takes her music seriouslj' . . . often takes a joke that 
way . . . frank friend . . . gentle, reserved, and quiet ... by no means an 
introvert . . . often breaks into light laughter or song. 

ESTHER ANNA FLOM . . . College . . . Debating 1, 2, 3 . . . Wig and 
Buckle 2, 3 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3 . . . German Club 2, 3 . . . Society . . . 
Delphian, Corres. Sec. 2, 3 . . . Has come very near to being arrested for violation 
of anti-monopoly laws — her monopoly being exercised o\'er the biology microscopes 
. . . the intensity of word and mannerism which helps her in dramatic endeavors 
and in debating is equally effective in her day-to-day class and social contacts . . . 
sets the high-water mark in North Hall's studying records . . . one of the German 
students who makes German sound like German . . . surprises us with a delightful 
soprano singing voice . . . one of the pioneers in field of medicine as a woman's 
profession. 



Page 46 




Page i7 




Nora 
Franklin 



Marshall 
Frey 



Walter 
Fridinger 



Michael 
Garzella 



Dean 

Gasteiger 



Wilbur 

GiBBLE 



Page 48 



NORA FRANKLIN . . . College . . . Girls' Band 1, 2, 3 . . . Chorus 1. 
2, 3 . . . Glee Club 1 . . . Society . . . Delphian . . . Petite brunette with 
starry hazel eyes . . . friendlj^ smile for all . . . musical rich soprano voice . . . 
wish we'd hear it more often . . . likes to pick out the new tunes . . . has already 
sung over radio several times . . . over Pittsburgh when only a Freshman . . . 
trusting friend . . . considerate of other feelings . . . good-natured . . . sort we 
love to tease . . . can take a joke . . . has one "Big Moment" after another . . . 
kept house alone last summer . . . protected by State Police who live next door 
. . . makes the best of things. 

MARSHALL ROSETTE FREY . . . College . . . Baseball 2 . . . Class 
. . . Football 1, 2 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . Tug 2 . . . Society . . . Kalo 
. . . Around the dance-floor like a speed demon in an ice palace . . . ideal athlete 
in the sense that he plays baseball, basketball, etc., purely for the fun of playing 
. . . believes in simplicity, cleanliness, and strength in life — lives his philosophy 
instead of preaching it . . . unicjue capacity for the consumption of baked beans 
and butter . . . especially pleased when called by his middle name . . . sings 
with plenty of volume and expression when afflicted with an overflow of buoyant 
spirits. 



WALTER PIERCE FRIDINGER . . . College . . . Football 1, 2, 3 . . . 
"L" Club, Sec.-Treas. 3 . . . Commerce Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Society" . . . Philo 
. . . Not only a college football hero, but also looks like one . . . works at Brun- 
ner's in leisure time . . . one of Dr. Butterwick's favorite instruments to illustrate 
his points of philosophy . . . grace and agility he displays on the football field 
and behind the soda fountain is equally apparent on the dance-floor . . . trans- 
ferred from Virginia Military Institute his Sophomore year . . . witty remarks 
keep fellow-workers at Brunner's constantly laughing . . . that's "Pete. " 

MICHAEL FRANK GARZELLA . . . College . . . May Day 1 . . . 
Y. M. C. A. 1 . . . Basketball, Freshman Mgr. 1 . . . Football, A'sst. Mgr. 1 . . . 
Class . . . Football 1, 2 . . . Society' . . . Philo . . . Few of his associates 
have stumbled on the fact that he has those things called ideas . . . gives the 
impression, every now and then, that he is a realist in the highest sense of the word : 
that he sees himself as he is, sees his world as it is, and is willing to work hard to 
make the two combine to produce the best results . . . but don't get the impression 
that the fun that he and the Mayflower, his car, have together isn't genuine — it is. 



DEAN WELLINGTON GASTEIGER 
Senate 3 . . . Commerce Club 1, 2, 3 . . 
. . . Treas. 2, 3 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3 . 
. . . Society . . . Philo, Sec. 2, Treas. 3 



. . College . . . Y. M. C. A. 2 . . . 

Debating, Asst. Mgr. 3 . . . Class 

Football 1, 2 . . . "Quittie" Staft' 3 

. . Known to all members of his class 



as the red-haired, silent treasurer who exchanges neatly written slips of paper — 
called receipts — for five-dollar bills . . . known to students as Miss Myers' noise- 
less assistant . . . known in the men's dorm for his conscientious study . . . known 
altogether too little, judging by complaints of many members of the other three 
campus dormitories ... so full of sincerity and modesty that it oozes out of his 
ears . . . first on the tennis-court each spring. 



GRANT WILBUR GIBBLE . . . College . . . Commerce Club 1. 2, 3 . . . 
Baseball 2 . . . Day Student Council 3 . . . Class . . . Football 1. 2 . . . 
Society . . . Kalo . . . Day student from Palmyra, suburb of Annville . . . 
black hair, black eyes . . . another preacher's son . . . constant occupant of day 
student room . . . plaj's a fine hand of bridge . . . interests center about "Immy" 
. . . ardent sports fan . . . pitcher last year on the varsity squad . . . active 
participant in arguments and discussions on finance, government . . . caustic wit 



Page 49 



JOHN RUPP GONGLOFF . . . College . . . Commerce Club 1, 2, Vice- 
Pres. 3 . . . Baud 1, 3, 3 . . . Wig and Buckle 3 . . . Class . . . Treas. 1 . . . 
Basketball 1, 5, 3 . . . "Alison's House" . . . Society . . . Vice-Pres. 3 . . . 
Corres. Sec. 2, 3 . . . Minstrels 2, 3 . . . Favorite target for those subtle hair- 
tonic wise-cracks . . . happiest when head over heels in some enterprise which 
demands action and still more action . . . memorable among such enterprises was 
his attempt to pin Republican club buttons on each and every student on L. V. C. 
campus durmg the past election . . . one of the most popular of the campus 
bachelors . . . good-looking, good dancer, the proud possessor of a newly accjuired 
mustache . . . foot-loose and fancy free . . . admirably cast as a newspaper 
reporter in a recent campus play. 

JOHN GROFF . . . College . . . Chemistry Club 3 . . . Math. Club 2 
. . . International Relations Club 3 . . . Class . . . Basketball 1, S . . . Call 
him "Johnny" . . . modern Napoleon . . . calm determination . . . practical 
knowledge of how to "follow through" to his goals . . . keen minded . . . chemis- 
try and math, don't daunt him . . . one of those who help themselves . . . 
delivers pretzels . . . energetic . . . walks with speed . . . doesn't let all work 
and no play keep him away from extra-curricular activities . . . although a day 
student he is a faithful follower of L. V. sports . . . likes dancing . . . dependable 
. . . you can count on John . . . enjoys everything he does . . . has an easy 
grin . . . decidedly an optimist. 

SYLVA RUTH HARCLERODE . . . College . . . Rogues' Gallery 1, 2 
. . . Green Blotter 1, 2, 3 . . . German Club 1, 2, Sec.-Treas. 3 . . . "La Vie" 
Staff 3 . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . Editor of the "Olive Branch" 2, 3 . . . 
Class . . . "Alison's House" 3 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . Kind of girl who 
could ne\'er be bored or lonely, even on a farm . . . her accomplishments are 
sufficient and her interests varied enough to keep her mind busy and happy under 
almost any condition . . . plays the piano and mouth-organ at the same time by 
means of a self-invented apparatus . . . sketches students and professors with 
indiscriminate candor . . . writes poetry . . . takes her notes in neat, printed 
letters as rapidly as most of us could scribble them . . . likes to knit . . . has a 
keen insight into human nature which she makes evident in her character portrayals 
in campus dramatics. 

GERALD LAUBACH HASBROUCK . . . College . . . Symphony 3 . . . 
Band 3 . . . Chorus 3 . . . College Orchestra 3 . . . Another member of the 
well-known clan of Readingites . . . comes to us from Dartmouth College with a 
B.A. Degree . . . known among both sexes for his pleasing personalit.y . . . ask 
him how he's doing and he'll answer "peachy swell" . . . often we are surprised 
the way he jiggles words of many syllables to a good advantage . . . likes to pass 
on his own viewpoints in a heated discussion . . . thinks Greta Garbo is a top- 
notch actress . . . won't eat potatoes for fear of getting fat. 

LUCILLE HAWTHORNE . . . College . . . May Day 1,2... Wig and 
Buckle 1, 2 . . . Class . . . Hockey 1, 2 . . . Basketball 1, 2 . . . "Alison's 
House" 3 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . Everyone calls her "Patty" . . . curly 
blonde with dimples . . . lots of personality . . . hails from Harrisburg . . . 
usually seen with "Barb" . . . seriously taking up social service . . . befriends 
all needj' children she can find . . . initiated the day-student donations of Christ- 
mas and Thanksgiving baskets . . . participates in girls' athletics . . . generally 
has an "S. P. from P. S." . . . until afPair becomes a "C. B." . . . which is 
enigmatic way of discussing a State man . . . girl with a sense of humor. 

GRETA ANNABELLE HEILAND . . . College . . . Girls' Band 1, 2, 3 
. . . Glee Club 1 . . . Class . . . Hockey 1 . . . Basketball 1 . . . Society 
. . . Delphian, Chaplain . . . Pianist 3 . . . "As Husbands Go" 1 . . . Hard- 
luck Greta: recovered from a bob-sled accident in time for Delphian in her Sopho- 
more year — then, just before the big night, slipped on the ice and broke an ankle 
... in her Junior year harbored a bad appendix until after exams were over and 
then had to lose it just in time to keep her again from Delphian . . . known on 
the waiter force as "Gretta" and "Shirley" — also famous in the same circle for her 
dangerous "left hook" . . . probably the most-teased-without-making-hard-feel- 
ings girl on the campus. 



Page 50 



John 
gongloff 



John 
Geoff 



Sylva 
Harclerode 



Gerald 
Hasbrouck 



Lucille 
Hawthorne 



Greta 
Heiland 




Page 51 




Russell 
Heller 



Hazel 
Hemixway 



Violette 

HOERNER 



Ethel 

HOUTZ 



Erxestine 
Jagxesak 



Robert 
Johns 



Page 52 



RUSSELL KRATZER HELLER . . . College . . . Band 1,2. 3 . . . Sym- 
phony Orchestra 1, 2, 3 . . . College Orchestra 1, 2. 3 . . . Class . . . Basketball 
1, -2, 3 . . . Football 2 . . . Flag Scrap 1, 2 . . . Society . . . Philo . . . 
Known for his kindness and congeniality . . . takes long walks by himself which 
may signify a love of nature or a desire to dramatize "In My Solitude" . . . staunch 
player in the viola section of symphony orchestra . . . has an extremely wide 
streak of dependability in him . . . always a cheerful greeting for everyone he 
meets . . . likes to work hard . . . truly master of himself . . . never misses any 
event which may help to broaden his range of knowledge, which is admirable. 

HAZEL MARGARET HEMINWAY . . . College . . . Y. W. C. A. 1, 2. 

Sec. 3 . . . Debating 3 . . . Readers' Club 1, 2 . . . Hockey 1, 2. 3 . . . Sopho- 
more English Prize 2 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3 . . . Eclectic Clula 1, 2, 3 . . . Class 
. . . Basketball 2, 3 . . . Sec. 1 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . Vice-Pres. 3 . . . 
A sunny smile ... a cheery greeting . . . nonchalant air . . . that's Hazel . . . 
search the wide world over but there remains onl^' one like her . . . not phlegmatic 
. . . quick and sharp in word-play ... a thinker . . . persuasiveness, prudence, 
and good judgment won her a place on the debating team . . . ardent sports- 
woman . . . prominent on the hockey field . . . plays basketball and tennis . . . 
keen, brilliant mind . . . always ready to help . . . popular assistant and tutor 
for "Parlez-vous-ers" . . . capable organizer . . . efficiently managed much of 
Clio's rushing season . . . ideal, all-round college girl. 

VIOLETTE HOERNER . . . College . . . French Assistant . . . Day Stu- 
dents' Society 3 . . . Student in every sense of the word . . . achieved a straight 
"9;)" average in all subjects the past semester . . . must also possess great mental 
ability for an accomplishment such as this . . . well liked by associates although 
envied for her high marks . . . perse^■e^ance unbounded . . . timid outside class, 
but for Prof. Bailey is always prepared with the correct answer . . . anticipate a 
highly successful teaching career for this zealous student. 

ETHEL MAE HOUTZ . . . College . . . Readers' Club 1, 2 . . . Life 
Work Recruits 1, 2, 3 ... W. A. A. 2, 3 . . . Class . . . Basketball 2, 3 . . . 
Hockey 2, 3 . . . Society . . . Delphian, Chaplain 2 . . . E^erybodj' knows 
her as the quiet, pleasant, obliging library assistant . . . most people know her 
as one of the most studious residents of our most studious dormitory — West Hall 
. . . active member of the Life Work Recruits and a leader at midweek prayer 
meetings . . . many know that there is gray matter as well as time and effort 
behind those honor marks ... a few have discovered her gay, impulsive moods, 
her keen sensitivity to beauty in all its forms, and her Wordsworthian reverent 
love of nature. 

ERNESTINE MARY JAGNESAK . . . College . . . Hockey 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . "La Vie" 2, 3 . . . W. A. A. Cabinet . . . Class . . . 
"Quittie" 3 . . . Hockey 1,2, 3 . . . Society . . . Delphian, Chaplain 2, Treas. 3 
... Foremost of the co-ed sportswomen . . . to "Jackie" autumn, winter, spring 
and summer are hockey, basketball, baseball, and swimming and tennis seasons 
. . . food, and lots of it . . . hats are things that occasionally she sticks on some- 
where on the back of a head full of topsy-turvy curls . . . voice is something to 
yell with at every football, baseball, and basketball game within fifty miles of the 
campus . . . friends are friends, enemies are an unknown quantity, and the rest 
of the population consists of what she describes as seeming to be "real nice." 

ROBERT MARCH JOHNS . . . College . . . Symphony 1, 2. 3 . . . 
Band 1, 2, 3 . . . College Orcheslra 1, 2, 3 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3 . . . Glee Club 
. . . Class . . . Football 1, 2 . . . Society . . . Kalo . . . Minstrels 2, 3 . . . 
Six-foot piece of humanity from Lebanon . . . jack-of-all-trades . . . holds down 
the flute section in the Symphony Orchestra . . . has a surprisingly heavy bass 
voice for so wiry a boy . . . plays the fiddle in the Freshman Jazz Band . . . 
likes to talk about his sleepless nights and forms of dissipation . . . votes for New 
Year's Eve as the best night of the year . . . shakes a wicked leg when it comes 
to dancing . . . always has a surprising amount of stories on hand which in them- 
selves are very versatile. 



Page 53 



THEODORE KENNETH KARHAN . . . College . . . Symphony Orches- 
tra 3 . . . Chorus 3 . . . Came to us after completing two years at Julliard . . . 
secured a Bachelor of Music degree from Peabody Conservatory . . . makes 
lasting impression as an artist ... to hear him play his violin verifies the preceding 
statement . . . has been concert master in the Harrisburg Symphonj' Orchestra 
. . . well versed on any subject from the "Last Atlantic" to "Social Pathology" 
. . . says he likes girls — especially riding with them to practice teach . . . has the 
true art of impersonation when telling stories . . . has all the qualities that lead 
to success. 

EMILY ELIZABETH KINDT . . . College . . . Girls' Band 1, 2. 3 . . . 
Operetta 3 . . . May Day 'i . . . Society . . . Clio . . . Came to L. V. just 
three years ago and soon found herself a "bolt" — not a bolt that pins you down 
but rather leads to happiness and good fortune . . . Emily spends her time in the 
Conserve, where she juggles notes, bars, staffs, etc. . . . no, she's not learning to 
be a professional juggler; she's taking a music course . . . "but still we gaze . . . 
and yet our wonder grows" ... so petite ... so piquant . . . yet so well poised 
. . . seems to be precocious elf-child endowed with wisdom of a giant . . . intense 
. . . individualistic . . . plajs a marimba. 



K\THRYN KNOLL . . . College . . . Girls' Band 1, '2, 3 . . . Chorus 1, 
'2, 3 . . . Glee Club L '2, 3 . . . Comes to school every day on the "choo-choo" 
from AVernersville . . . has to make a dash to get to the Conserve, on time . . . 
gifted musically . . . this little lad}' can administer a beating to a marimba . . . 
to the drums in the Girls' Band ... to a piano between times . . . good student 
. . . becoming proficient on clarinet . . . practices with encouragement of an 
interested friend . . . amused public-speaking class with story of washbowl, or 
something, on train . . . one of a foursome that lunches at Brunner's . . . demure, 
loyal, and sincere . . . sees two sides of a question. 

CAROLYN ESTELLA KOHLER . . . College . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Hockey 1, 2, 3 . . . W. A. A. 2, Treas. 3 . . . Rogues" Gallery 1, 2 . . . Readers' 
Club 1, 2 ... Y. W. C. A. . . . Class . . . Hockey 1, 2, 3 . . . Basketball 1, 
2 . . . Society . . . Clio, Corres. Sec. 2 . . . Five foot, two . . . but no eyes 
of blue . . . rather they're large brown eyes that are wide awake every minute of 
the day . . . infinite zest for life . . . always wanting to be "up and doing" every 
minute . . . versatile ... on basketball floor, dance-floor and tennis-court . . . 
enjoys battling wits with friends and spends much time with her books . . . lively 
and bubbling . . . laughingly this charming Miss trips through life . . . glad she 
is alive and happy . . . causes others to catch her buoyant spirit. 



DOROTHY ELLEN KREAMER . . . College . . . Basketball 1. 2, 3 . . . 
Hockey 2, 3 . . . W. A. A. 3 . . . Basketball Leader 3 . . . Wig and Buckle 
1, 2, 3 . . . International Relations 3 . . . Eclectic . . . Class . . . Sec. 3 . . . 
Society . . . Clio, Corres. Sec. 3 . . . Always the first to bring the latest fashion 
in coifi'ures to L. V. C. campus . . . possesses a pert pug nose and unbelievably 
blue eyes . . . and a kid brother whose cheering and booing ability she is willing 
to match against any baseball fan . . . makes the first teams in all the major 
women's sports . . . enjoys all out-of-door activity, including tennis, hiking, 
swimming, etc. . . . always found carrying a bag of candy around with her . . . 
it is suspected that she gives away more than she eats. 

JOHN WILLIAM KREAMER . . . College . . . Commerce Club . . . 
Society . . . Philo . . . Annville student who is the son of the well-known local 
undertaker . . . works in the furniture store at odd hours . . . hopes to become 
a businessman or store manager some day . . . able conversationalist . . . active 
participant in all social affairs . . . small in stature but has personality plus . . . 
returned to student life after two year's absence . . . when not in class is seldom 
seen on the campus and too few of us learn to know him . . . active member 
of the Commerce Club. 



Page 54- 



Theodore 
Kabhan 



Emily 
Kindt 



Kathryn 
Knoll 



Carolyn 

KOHLER 



Dorothy 
Kreamer 



John 
Kreamer 




Page 55 




Harold 
Kroske 



George 
Lazorjack 



Lucille 
Maberry 



John 
Marbarger 



Ella 
Mason 



Jean 
McKeag 



Page 56 



HAROLD WILLIAM KEOSKE . . . College . . . Football 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . Baseball 1, "2, 3 . . . Class . . . Pres. 1 . . . Society 
. . . Kalo . . . Never can figure out where Harold's charm lies in his lazy walk 
or in his general easy-come, easy-go attitude . . . plays football, basketball, and 
baseball with the same effective results . . . seems to have a fatal attraction for 
trouble — all kinds of trouble, including auto accidents . . . was made president 
of his class the first day after campus activity began in his Freshman year . . . sings 
tenor in kitchen-force choir. 

GEORGE WILSON LAZORJACK . . . College . . . Chemistry Club 3 
. . . May Day 2 . . . Pronounced with accent on second syllable . . . tall and 
slim . . . spends each afternoon in one of the labs . . . has one of the most 
difficult science courses of any student . . . includes anatomy, physics, and two 
science courses . . . hopes to join geological or biological expedition some daj' 
. . . cultivates several hundred species of cactus plants . . . enjoys tennis, hand- 
ball, and basketball . . . has traveled through almost all of the forty-eight states 
and several neighboring countries . . . this summer he intends to go to Cuba . . . 
conscientious in evervthing he undertakes. 



LUCILLE SMALL MABERRY . . . College . . . Eclectic 2. 3 . . . Y. W. 
C. A. 1, 2, Vice-Pres. 3 . . . Wig and Buckle 1. 2, 3 . . . Girls' Band 2, 3 . . . 

Class . . . Sec. 2 . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . Pianist 2 . . . 
Anniversary Committee 2, 3 . . . Our modern ''Goldilocks" . . . very talented 
song-bird . . . member of Clio's harmonizing trio . . . this golden-crowned Miss 
has a giggle all her own . . . does her share to "Light" up North Hall . . . de- 
pendable and efficient . . . displayed tireless efforts in choosing suitable "big" 
and "little" sisters . . . talented musician . . . plays piano and flute . . . 
graceful dancer . . . brilliant patriotic dancer for Maj' Day . . . capable leader 
. . . discriminating taste ... let us present our versatile Schuylkill Haven Miss 
and our true friend . . . Lucille. 

JOHN PORTER MARBARGER . . . College . . . Senate 2, 3 . . . Chem- 
istry Club 1, 2 . . . May Day 2 . . . Class . . . Tug 1, 2 . . . Society . . . 
Philo . . . Dependable, hard-working pre-medical student . . . constantly in one 
of the laboratories . . . takes week-end trips to New York in order to attend opera 
productions . . . tunes in on all operatic broadcasts . . . takes part in a bridge 
game now and then . . . appears as a student who is confident concerning his own 
abilities . . . drives the "Blue Bird" to school each day from near-by Palmyra. 



ELLA TAMSON MASON . . . College . . . Readers' Club 1, 2 ... Wig 
and Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . W. S. G. A. 1, 2, 3 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3 . . . Class . . . 
Play Committee 3 . . . Society . . . Delphian, Cor. Sec. 2 . . . Play Com- 
mittee 2, 3 . . . The little girl with the big eyes and the dark brown hair . . . 
delicacy of manner keeps her complete frankness from being too cruel . . . has a 
fling for reading the very latest novels on the market . . . peculiar aversions to 
systematic methods of opening packages . . . dislikes all forms of housework . . . 
always willing to enter a discussion on the possibility and desirability of "purely 
platonic love." 

JEAN McKEAG . . . College . . . Y. W. C. A. 1 . . . "La Vie" 1 . . . 
Debating 1 . . . Basketball 2, 3 . . . Hockey 2, 3 . . . International Relations 
Club 3 . . . Sophomore English Prize 2 . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . Class 
. . . Student Faculty Council 2 . . . Vice-Pres. 2 . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . 
Society . . . "Children of the Moon" 1 . . . "Bill of Divorcement" 2 . . . 
Editor of "Olive Branch" 2 . . . Brilliant student with a dynamic personality . . . 
has unusually heterogeneous interests and abilities . . . concentrates efforts along 
a few lines to secure maximum accomplishment and enjoyment . . . artistically 
talented . . . major parts in numerous plays . . . amuses friends with clever 
caricatures . . . assists in history and English . . . capable and energetic . . . 
interested in sports, girls' as well as boys' . . . competent waitress last year for 
L. V. C. and Green Terrace . . . does her own thinking . . . loves fun and frolic 
. . . hearty laugh enlivens all. 



Page 57 



JOHN E. MILLER . . . College . . . Band 2, 3 . . . Glee Club 2, 3 . . . 
May Day 1,2... Gives us a first and lasting impression of a German "Maestro" 
. . . appears to be very quiet but with a supreme dependability . . . never allow 
John to deceive you by his quietness because too often he stands on top with a 
humorous remark that makes him rate with everyone . . . knows what he wants 
and goes after it ... it is said all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy, but 
John E. proves that to be somewhat exaggerated. 

CATHERINE LUCILLE MILLS . . . College . . . Eclectic Club 2, Sec- 
Treas. 3 . . . Y. W. C. A. 3 ... W. A. A. Cabinet 3 . . . Girls' Band 2, 3 . . . 
Glee Club 1. 2, 3 . . . Symphony 3 . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . Class 
. . . Vice-Pres. 2 . . . "Quittie"' Staff 3 . . . "'Alison's House" 3 . . . Society 
. . . Clio, Anniversary Committee 3 . . . "Mitzie" is one of those individuals 
whom, in high school, we described as "all-round" girls . . . keeps on hand an 
ever-ready supply of jokes with which to put a new acquaintance at ease and an 
old acquaintance in a good mood . . . equall.y attractive in her hiking boots or in 
dancing sandals . . . sings and dozes in the Ignited Brethren choir each Sunday 
morning ... is able to put a hockej- ball over the goal-line, a basketball through 
the basket, a tennis ball over the net, to keep her ice-skates on the ice, and her 
bathing-cap above the water. 



AGNES LEONINA MORRIS . . . College . . . Readers' Club 1, 2 . . . 
Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 ... Y. W. C. A. 3 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3 . . . Baseball 
Leader 3 . . . Hockey 2, 3 . . . Debating 2, 3 . . . Society . . . Delphian, 
Critic 1, Recording Sec. 2, 3, Judiciary Committee 2, Literary Committee 3 . . . 
Nicknamed "Pokey," short for Pocahontas, because of her dark, braided hair, her 
erect carriage, and her deep brown eyes . . . always keeps a big bo.x of cookies 
under her bed to offer to chance visitors or to starving South Hallers . . . not 
ashamed to have old-fashioned ideas about black and white standards of right and 
wrong . . . applies these standards to her conduct and maintains a sympathetic 
attitude toward conflicting standards — or lack of standards of other people . . . 
sets a high-water mark in the quality of sincerit.v. 

RITA MARIE MOSHER . . . College . . . Girls' Band 1, 2, 3 . . . May 
Day 2 . . . Hockey 1 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . One of the well-liked girls 
on the camjius . . . most proficient pianist . . . ease and grace of movement are 
characteristic expressions describing her . . . likes curly hair . . . causes her to 
spend hours before a mirror before retiring . . . likes pretty clothing and odd 
hats . . . gives us an immediate impression of a typical college co-ed . . . pet 
di\-ersion is giving a home to strange cats and dogs and concerning herself with 
their welfare. 



WARREN FRANKLIN MOYER . . . Society . . . Philo ... For two 
years held the record for commuting the greatest distance to L. V. C. — sixty miles 
to and from Pine Grove . . . this year he became a dorm student . . . interests 
center on a home-town girl . . . perhaps that is why he is so often absent from 
the campus week-ends ... an "A" student in biology . . . pursuing a pre- 
medical course . . . hobby — music . . . few can rival his ability to make his violin 
laugh and cry at will . . . won several music contests through this ability . . . 
perhaps Warren should properly be a conservatory student . . . one of the few 
noiseless inmates of the men's dorm. 

HELEN ARBELLA NETHERWOOD . . . College . . . Green Blotter 1, 
2, 3 . . . Girls' Band 1, 2 . . . May Day 1, 2 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . 
Moved from South Hall to North Hall in her Sophomore year . . . one of those 
fortunate persons who quietly and unassumingly accomplishes many things . . . 
unobtrusive, gentle, and wouianly, is sure of herself and what she wants . . . keen 
sense of humor and a knowledge of general topics make her an entertaining con- 
versationalist in her grou]) of intimate friends . . . capable library assistant, Helen 
helps many to find their way along the stacks of books ... as a member of the 
Green Blotter, she contributes many clever and worth-while manuscripts . . . 
cheerful smile and a shy manner characterize her. 



Page 58 



John 
Miller 



Catherine 
Mills 



Agnes 
Morris 



Rita 

Mosher 



Warren 
Moyer 



Helen 
Netherwood 




Page 69 




Cecil 
Oyler 



Waxda 

Price 



Charles 
Raab 



James 

RALSTO>f 



Lena 

RiSSER 



Mary 
Roberts 



Page 60 



CECIL CHARLES OYLER . . . College . . . College Band 1. 2, 3 . . . 
College Orchestra 1, 2, 3 . . . Symphony Orchestra 1, 2, 3 . . . Glee Club 1, 2, 
3 . . . Trumpet Quartette 1, 2, 3 . . . Brass Quartette 1, 2, 3 . . . Band, Vice- 
Pres. 3 . . . Society' . . . Kalo . . . Commonly known as "Whitey" and 
"Baldy" . . . made first appearance rolling a peanut across the campus with his 
nose as part of Kalo initiation . . . trumpeter and French horn player of no mean 
ability . . . one of the leaders of "The Harrisonians" . . . known for his clever- 
ness . . . pet diversion is his car "Gertie" . . . almost suffered a broken heart 
when it was smashed . . . likes to play amusement machines . . . all-round good 
sport with a most pleasing personality. 



WANDA LANGDEN PRICE . 

Hockey 2, 3 . . . W. S. G. A., Sec. 3 . . 
Vie" Staff 3 . . . German Club 1 . . 
3 . . . Society . . . Clio, Cor. Sec. 3 . 



. . College . . . Basketball 2, 3 . . . 
. Y. W. C. A. 1 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3 . . . "La 
. Class . . . Vice-Pres. 3 . . . "Quittie" 
. . One of those fortunates who learn more 



in five minutes studying than most of us do in several hours . . . breaks her 
characteristic silence with occasional remarks loaded with dry, subtle humor . . . 
neat and efficient to the nth degree . . . only red-headed girl on the campus . . . 
a star scorer on our Girls' Hockey Team . . . takes teasing about her South 
Jersey brogue with a smile . . . the facial expression that peeks out from behind 
her freckles is coy, wistful, and just a little elfish. 



CHARLES HENRY RAAB . . . College' . . . Chemistry Club 1, 2 . . . 
International Relations Club 2, 3 . . . May Day 1, 2 . . . Class . . . Tug 2 
. . . "Alison's House" 3 . . . Society ... Kalo . . . Genuine individualist as 
differentiated from those who assume such an attitude in order to appear sensa- 
tional . . . more prone to accept his own judgment than that of our ancestors in 
deciding what's what in the world . . . talks with amazing rapidity, considering 
the bigness of the voice that he has to handle . . . nearly freezes his good-natured 
room-mate to death because of his individualistic ideas of ideal ventilation . . . 
likes hunting and hunting dogs . . . enjoys seeing rabbits and birds in action more 
than seeing them still, bloody, and mangled with shot. 

JAMES RALSTON . . . College . . . Graduate of Dickinson . . . "Jimmy" 
already has a degree, being a graduate of Dickinson . . . entered L. A'. C. as a 
Junior in the conservatory of music . . . expert pounder of the ivories . . . spends 
week-ends playing with orchestras . . . studies hard during the week . . . quiet, 
reserved air makes him hard to approach . . . known to many only as the piano 
player at Recreation Hours . . . rarely seen without his bosom pal, Frank Bryan 
. . . makes many a girl's heart skip a beat as he walks to and from meals. 



LENA EVELYN RISSER . . . College . . . Eclectic Club 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Readers' Club 1,2... Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 ... Y. W. C. A. 1 . . . Hockey 
1,2 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3 . . . Class . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . "Alison's House," 
Costume Committee 3 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . "Bill of Divorcement" 2 . . . 
With ciuick tattoo of leather heels, Lena always appears in a hurry . . . attacks 
everything with a zest that originated in Lititz . . . live wire on the campus . . . 
diversified interests and thorough in all of them ... as a staff member of the 
1938 Quittapahilla she has displayed a great deal of abilit,y and persistence . . . 
as chairman of the Costume Committee for "Alison's House" she proved that 
where good judgment and common sense are needed she can offer "the tops" . . . 
a truly dependable lass. 

MARY CAROLYN ROBERTS . . . College . . . Tennis Sports Leader 2, 
3 . . . Class . . . Soph Hop Comm., Chairman . . . "Alison's House" 3 . . . 
Society . . . Clio . . . Attractive, poised, and self-confident . . . Carolyn has a 
flair for wearing sport clothes and for wearing them well . . . good dancer, she 
always leads in all social functions . . . may often be seen at Brunner's where she 
indulges in a favorite pastime of eating . . . sincere and frank, she makes and 
keeps friends . . . proved her mettle as an actress by her portrayal of the role of 
"Elsa" in "Alison's House" . . . enthusiastic in her enjoyment of outdoor sports, 
she is one of the first on the tennis-courts in the spring and the last in the fall . . . 
enters all activities with a zest. 



Page 61 



VERNON ROGERS . . . College . . . Shenandoah College 1, i . . . Band 
3 . . . German Club 3 . . . Class . . . "Alison's House" . . . Society . . . 
Philo . . . Ministerial student from the South . . . came to us after two years 
at Shenandoah . . . outstanding personality' in many dormitory bull sessions . . . 
cleverly portrayed a character in the Junior play . . . loves a hot argument . . . 
conscientious student, even between exam weeks . . . frequently exhibits a delight- 
ful type of dry humor . . . not everything is work with "Rog" . . . spends leisure 
time in the poolroom . . . expert with the cue stick . . . frequently wields a ping- 
pong paddle . . . also believes in doing right whatever he undertakes, be it work 
or play. 

FRANK ROZMAN . . . College . . . Football 1, 2, 3 . . . Basketball 1 
. . . "L" Club . . . SociETV . . . Philo . . . "Rozie" is a star lineman on our 
gridiron outfit . . . charges hard and fast . . . human power-house . . . rated 
as a terror l)y all opponents . . . business ad student . . . also a member of 
Philo . . . rather quiet, as a rule, around the dorm . . . usually studying or 
listening to the radio . . . takes pride in his artistic moustache . . . always ready 
to participate in the fun . . . the originator of the "cackle" laugh ... as a 
Freslinian, one of the leaders in the rebellion against the upper classmen . . . takes 
studies seriously along with his football . . . regular fellow and a real friend to 
all those who know him. 



HERBERT A. SAYLOR . . . College . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . 
May Day 2 . . . Cheerleader 2, 3 . . . Society . . . Kalo . . . Minstrels 2, 3 
. . . All right, a little en-thu-u-si-i-asm! ... a little pep in there! . . . that's our 
cheerleader ... an almost perfect impersonator of Ed Wynn . . . able actor 
and stage technician . . . constructed many original stage properties and sceneries 
. . . majors in physics and sciences . . . Scout-master of a local troop of Boy 
Scouts . . . enjoys a good set of tennis. 

ROGER BEHM SAYLOR . . . College . . . Senate 3 . . . May Day 1, 2 

. . . Cheerleader S . . . Class . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Flag Scrap 1, 2 . . . 
Society' . . . Philo . . . Although "Rog" gives to the casual observer the im- 
pression that there is nothing that he likes to do quite as well as to do nothing, 
we notice that his grades indicate that his boredom doesn't extend to his studies 
. . . also notice that he manages to drag hinisrlf around to class meetings and 
committees regularly ... it is also a bit contradictory of the original observation 
that he is invariably found piping the basketball scores from the balcony in all the 
intramural games . . . furthermore, several girls have returned from dances, when 
escorted by Rog, complaining of being "worn out." 



HENRY O. SCHOTT . . . College . . . Chemistry Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Inter- 
national Relations Club 2, 3 . . . Glee Club 2 . . . Math. Club 2 . . . Day 
Student Council 3 . . . Society' . . . Philo . . . Small, blue-eyed, curly-haired, 
blond . . . sleeps through most lectures but secures a goodly number of "A"s 
. . . generally adopts the slogan "Better late than never" . . . enjoys dancing 
. . . recently developed a liking for bridge . . . plays a good game of handball 
. . . interested in current affairs and problems . . . can ably judge the worth of 
current movies . . . always ready to laugh at another fellow's jokes ... all in 
all, an amiable friend. 

ALAN SCHULER . . . College . . . Commerce Club 1, 2, 3 . . . May 
Day 2 . . . Class . . . Tug 1, 2 . . . Scrap 1 . . . Football 1 . . . Society 
. . . Kalo . . . Neat and flashy dresser . . . excellent conversationalist . . . 
"conversation, it doth seem, is an art" . . . always well poised . . . spends a 
large amount of time in a social manner . . . actively interested in current ques- 
tions and politics . . . may take up the study of law . . . tennis player of more 
than average ability . . . swell dancer . . . recently deserted the ranks of would- 
be bachelors for his East Orange friend in North Hall . . . that is a composite 
picture of "Harry." 



Page 62 



Vernon 
Rogers 



Frank 

ROZMAN 



Herbert 
Saylor 



Roger 

Saylor 



Henry 

SCHOTT 



Alan 

SCHULER 




Page 63 




C. Boyd 

Shaffer 



Daniel 

Shearer 



EUGEXE 

Shexk 



Barbara 

Sloanb 



Paul 

Sloxaker 



Gail 
Spangler 



Page 64 



CHARLES BOYD SHAFFER . . . College . . . "La Vie" 3 . . . Wig 
and Buckle 2, 3 . . . Chemistry Club 1, 2 . . . Debating Club 1, 2, 3, Pres. 2 . . . 
International Relations 1, 2 . . . Class . . . Pres. 2 . . . "Quittie" Staff, 
Business Mgr. 3 . . . Society . . . Pliilo . . . Spends long, laborious evenings 
in the biology lab. — and produces drawings that are masterpieces well worth the 
effort . . . one of the most active members of his class . . . serves on various com- 
mittees — president in his Sophomore year . . . characteristic choice of neat 
clothes in gray tones offsets his soft, wavy hair, parted in the middle . . . looks 
like a Greenwich Village poet of the last decade . . . has achieved a complete 
reversal of personality since his Freshman days when his too-sharp wit threatened 
to scare off would-be associates. 

DANIEL SHEARER . . . College . . . Y. M. C. A. . . . Life Work 
Recruits 1, 2, 3 . . . Glee Club 1 . . . German Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Wig and Buckle 
2, 3 . . . Class . . . Basketball 1 . . . Tug 1, 2 . . . Society . . . Philo, 
Chaplain 2 . . . Everyone knows "Dan" by his curly hair . . . frequently seen 
in previous years with a certain music student . . . his cowboy songs have been a 
popular menace to the cliff-dwellers' quiet and solitude . . . active in Y. M. C. A. 
work . . . capably handled the Deputations Committee this year . . . also in- 
tensely interested in German language and people . . . preparing himself to enter 
a theological school . . . some day hopes to be a U. B. minister and return to the 
campus as the college pastor. 



EUGENE SHENK . . . College . . . Basketball 1 . . . Tennis 2 . . . 
Band 1 . . . Commerce Club 1, 2. 3 . . . Class . . . Football 2 . . . Society 
. . . Kalo . . . Minstrels 3 . . . First appeared on the campus as a timid Fresh- 
man — this year suddenly blossomed and takes an active part in class discussions 
. . . one of the most active arguers in the day-student circles . . . good-looking, 
straightforward, freckle-faced, and friendly . . . bridge and pinochle addict . . . 
commuter from Palmyra . . . played Freshman basketball and varsity tennis . . . 
last summer helped erect the sports arena at Hershey . . . "What about your 
election predictions, Sheeny.'" 

BARBARA SLOANE . . . College . . . May Day 1, 2 . . . Wig and 
Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . Class . . . "Alison's House" 3 . . . Hockey 1, 2, 3 . . . 
Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . Tennis 1, 2, 3 . . . Society . . . Clio . . ." "Party of the 
second part" of Hawthorne and Sloane . . . will likewise serve society . . . her 
"S. P. from P. S." is a wrestler . . . "Girls, j'ou'll never know!" — favorite expression 
at exam time . . . energetic . . . seeks activity constantly . . . plays any given 
position in basketball . . . goalie in hockey . . . tennis . . . tall, attractive blonde 
. . . tells stories of similar "stature" . . . acute sense of imagination . . . be- 
tween abbreviations and tall stories, "Pat" and "Barb" keep us guessing . . . 
to know them is to like them, even though they nibble carrots under your ear in 
the library . . . we have to laugh when "Barb" laughs. 



PAUL SLONAKER . . . College . . . Shenandoah College 1, 2 . . . Y. M. 
C. A. 3 . . . Life Work Recruits 3 . . . Both a prospective teacher and a minister- 
ial student . . . speaks slowly, acts slowly . . . possesses that slow southern 
drawl . . . Yes-s sah . . . courteous and well-mannered Southerner . . . trans- 
ferred from Shenandoah College last fall . . . enjoys a good meal ... is known 
to have a large capacity for food . . . unusual tendency for contradicting his 
professors . . . predict an unusually successful career for him. 

GAIL MAXINE SPANGLER . . . College . . . International Relations 
Club 2 . . . Hockey 2, 3 . . . Basketball 1, 2, 3 . . . W. A. A. . . . Society 
. . . Clio . . . Keeps day students in gales of laughter relating week-end activities 
. . . admits a predisposition toward State men . . . teases all the gullible ... is 
it a joke or not a joke? — that is our constant question . . . good sport . . . one of 
Miss Henderson's henchmen . . . plays mean game of hockey, basketball, and 
tennis ... in this case bubbling water runs deep . . . has a genuine love for 
literature, especially poetry . . . for a while it was Sara Teasdale's ... a Freud 
fan . . . open-minded, clear, and original thinker . . . many abilities as yet not 
disclosed. 



Page 65 



CALVIN SPITLER . . . College . . . "La Vie" 1, 2, 3 . . . International 
Relations Club 1, 2, Pres. 3 . . . German Club 1,2... Debating 3 . . . Math. 
Club 2 . . . Class . . . Flag Scrap 2 . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Society . . . 
Pliilo . . . Major academic interests are history and German . . . courageous 
New Dealer in a Republican community . . . not averse to getting into a good 
argument, and the opportunity never has to knock twice . . . enthusiastic student 
of national and international social, political, and economic affairs . . . can be 
trusted with responsibilities . . . consistent thinker . . . knows what lie wants 
. . . accomplishes what he sets out to do . . . another type of his abilities is 
shown by his journalistic work for "La Vie" and "Quittie" . . . grins and frowns 
by turns . . . sense of humor and seriousness tend to predominate alternately 
. . . rugged individualist. 

THERESA KATHRYN STEFAN . . . College . . . Wig and Buckle 3 
. . . International Relations Club 2, 3 . . . German Club 1, 2, 3 . . . "La Vie" 
3 . . . Debating 3 . . . Class . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Society . . . Clio 
. . . Out of the stillness comes a ripple of laughter . . . yet from the same source 
emerges a dynamic personality . . . debater, actress, student journalist, honor 
student . . . "Want a book?" — "Terry" will find it tor you . . . serious student 
. . . sense of humor unable to be concealed . . . considerate . . . helpful . . . 
a smile in easy reacli . . . purposeful . . . convincing . . . open to the thoughts 
of others ... a bit of procrastination . . . yet we present a person we are glad 
to have met and known. 



MARY LOUISE STONER . . . College . . . Eclectic Club 3 . . . Readers 
Club 1,2 . . . "La Vie" 2, 3 . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 3 . . . W. A. A. 2, 3 . . 
Class . . . "Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . "Children of the 
Moon" . . . Judiciary Committee 3 . . . On the surface a societj' woman . 
blonde, blase and sophisticated . . . loves dancing and all the rest of it . . . has 
spasmodic intellectual streaks when she wants to read . . . artistic ... as a 
painter she is able to express her art . . . initiated questionnaire for "La Vie' 
. . . proved her dramatic ability when she so perfectly played the part of heroine 
in "Children of the Moon" . . . versatile, expresses her "urge to create" in art, 
talk, drama . . . underneath she is the "eternal woman" . . . kind of heart, 
shrewd of judgment, keen of mind . . . capacity for sacrifice, and for great love. 

WARREN STRICKLER . . . College . . . International Relations Club 1 
2, 3 . . . Life Work Recruits 1, 2, 3 . . . Red hair, blue eyes, fiery temper . . 
ministerial student . . . drives his Chevrolet from his home in Lebanon every 
day . . . can lecture at any time on the evils of the return of prohibition . . 
voted for Landon in last election but believes a judicial reform would not be im- 
possible ... it is rumored that he has a devoted young wife at his home in Mt 
Carmel ... at least, he often visits home week-ends. 



CHAUNCEY SWARTZ . . . Ordained minister who is doing his pre-seminary 
work among us . . . brilliant Greek student ... in his spare time a carpenter 
and decorator . . . preaches in four churches of the Bellegrove charge . . . has 
had marvelous success in his calling: an outstanding number of converts each year 
. . . called to ministry twelve years ago at a Lykens charge . . . home in Annville, 
close to the campus . . . reserved in nature but a good sport . . . "He that 
hath knowledge spareth his words." 

CURVIN LIVINGSTON THOMPSON . . . College . . . Y'. M. C. A. . . . 

Life Work Recruits 1, 2, 3 . . . Class . . . "Alison's House" 3 . . . Basketball 
. . . Flag Scrap 1, 2 . . . Tug 1, 2 . . . Society . . . Philo . . . "Bill of Di- 
vorcement" . . . Possesses a rare combination of personality traits especially 
valuable in hi.s chosen profession, the ministry . . . most unexpected of these is 
liis broad fiehl t)f interests . . . admirable sense of humor . . . another rare asset 
is a very cliarniing wife of whom he gives us fleeting glimpses on special occasions 
. . . will ])r()bubly l)e a menace to the organist in his church, for his rich voice 
rivals anj' organ . . . activities ^'ary from dramatics to intramural basketball. 



Page 66 



Calvin 
Spitler 



Theresa 
Stefan 



Louise 
Stoner 



Warren 
Strickler 



Chauncey 

Swahtz 



CURVIN 

Thompson 




Page 67 




John 

TlXDALL 



Paul 
Ulrich 



John 
Walmek 



Russell 
Wert 



Ethel 
Wilt 



Christine 

YODER 



Page 68 



JOHN CARTER TINDALL . . . College . . . Football 1, "2, 3 . . . Basket- 
ball 1,2... Class . . . Pres. 1 . . . His qualities of leadership are established 
beyond the shadow of a doubt by the unusually large number of friends that he has 
made on the campus . . . these qualities probably consist in the main in a com- 
plete inability to be anything other than sincere, in a blind faith in his own con- 
victions, and in a manly independence of spirit . . . athletic fans remember 
vividly some of the long runs he made on the football field, his dependability and 
teamwork on the basketball squad, and his baseball record of good pitching, plus 
a high batting average. 

PAUL THEODORE ULRICH . . . College . . . Chemistry Club 1, '2 . . . 
Math. Club -Z . . . May Day "i . . . Class . . . Sec. 1 . . . Basketball 1 . . . 
"Quittie" Staff 3 . . . Pres. 3 . . . Society . . . Philo . . . Tall, dark, and 
handsome . . . has a keen scientific mind . . . wizard at math. . . . popular 
with boys and girls alike, as shown by his election as Class President . . . careful 
choice of committees representative of all campus groups illustrates his democratic 
and conservative policy . . . elaborate and ingenious pla.ns for Junior Prom to 
make it "biggest and best in history of school" . . . capable and energetic photo- 
graphic editor for this "Quittie" . . . expects to teach a few years . . . plans to 
develop his artistic ability by further study at Drexel ... a future designer or 
engineer. 



JOHN DAVID WALMER . . . College. . . . Football 1, 2. 3 . . . "L" 
Club . . . May Day 1, 2 . . . Chemistry Club 3 . . . Day Students' Council, 
Sec. . . . Class . . . Football . . . Society . . . Kalo . . . Fine physical speci- 
men . . . won a letter in football although he never played this game before coming 
to L. V. C. . . . boxes for recreation . . . champion boxer of the Citizen's Military 
Training Camp of the eastern states . . . modest and unassuming . . . prospec- 
tive M.D. . . . some day hopes to enter the political arena . . . girls protest that 
he is entirely too little known . . . interested in current problems . . . one of 
the most active members of Prof. Gingrich's sociology class. 

RUSSELL WERT . . . College . . . Liternational Relations Club 2, 3 . . . 
May Day 1 . . . Class . . . Flag Scrap 1.2... Football 1 . . . Society . . . 
Philo . . . One of the best-natured fellows we know . . . blond, yet not entirel.v 
light-haired . . . serious when necessarj' . . . plans to teach history ... a day- 
by-day student . . . seldom visible to us after school hours . . . conflicting in- 
terests keep him in Lebanon ... in a certain five-and-ten store any Saturday 
you will see an efficient young man rearranging things . . . cheerfully accepts 
what has to be done . . . very witty . . . but with him it's not a fault . . . his 
theme song might be, "I Love Life." 



ETHEL VIRGINIA WILT . . . College . . . Life Work Recruits 1, 2, 3 
. . . May Day 1, 2 . . . Class . . . Hockey 2, 3 . . . Basketball 2, 3 . . . 
Society . . . Clio . . . Has an M.D. that does not mean medical doctor but 
minister's daughter . . . hockey and basketball enthusiast . . . takes her sociol- 
ogy seriously . . . sympathetic and sincere confidante for many girls' problems 
. . . is known for her dependability in any kind of work . . . a delightful hostess : 
her guests are always at ease . . . gives a lasting impression of sincerity and 
friendliness ... an all-round, worth-while friend to have. 

CHRISTINE DOROTHY YODER . . . College . . . Glee Club 1, 2, 3 
. . . Girls' Band 1, 2, 3 . . . Chorus 1, 2, 3 . . . Society' . . . Clio . . . Fair 
young lady from Lebanon . . . sometimes we wonder whether or not she has 
ancestors that were Alpine climbers . . . usually seen wearing a hat adorned with 
feathers ... we must admit "Miss Tine" those feathers, especially the bright 
orange ones, are quite becoming . . . since "Tine" has been here at L. V. she has 
cultivated a most pleasing mezzo-soprano voice ... if L. V.'s fortune-tellers get 
together they might predict the Metropolitan Opera House as her future "play- 
house." 



Page 69 



BEATRICE ESTELLE ZAMOJSKI . . . College . . . Chemistry Club 2, 
Vice-Pres. 1 . . . German Club 1, 2, 3 . . . Hockey 2, 3 . . . Basketball 2, 3 
. . . W. A. A. 2, 3 . . . Society . . . Clio, Usher 1 . . . "Olive Branch" 2 . . . 
Known as "Bunny" . . . spends much of her time in L. V.'s laboratories . . . 
likes to make a collection of all kinds of insects that she has incarcerated in bottles 
. . . likes to study cats in biology lab. to see what makes them go . . . greatly 
interested in brain surgery . . . likes to keep her room and personal property 
immaculate . . . known for her friendliness and grand array of friends . . . West 
Hall's efficient nurse and relief agent to Miss Wood. 

MARY ELIZABETH ZARTMAN . . . College . . . Wig and Buckle 1, 2, 
3 . . . May Day 1. 2 . . . Class . . . Sec. 2 . . . Society . . . Clio . . . 
"Children of the Moon" . . . Tranquility and kindliness is apparent in every 
smile and nod and every intonation of licr rich, low voice . . . one of the commut- 
ing students who find time to make valuable contributions to all forms of extra- 
curricular activity . . . broad interests, a flair for using the exact word, and a 
keen sense of the dramatic add up to make her one of our most interesting con- 
versationalists . . . nor is she too academic to enjoy a basketball game or a dance 
... is a member of the Daughters of the Revolution and is representative of all 
the dignity that the name implies. 



HARRY ZERBE . . . College . . . College Orchestra 1, 2, 3 . . . Class 
. . . Flag Scrap 1 . . . Society . . . Kalo . . . Conservatory's contortionist 
. . . possesses cjuite a few unique talents, one of which is standing on his head to 
play "Chicken Reel in D" on his fiddle ... no matter where we are we know 
Harry, alias Jockey, by his nasal laugh . . . great believer in the gregarious in- 
stinct, for where he is we find a dozen others . . . such friendliness is hard to be 
surpassed, since he has the kind of personality that draws a lot of staunch friends. 



Page 70 



Beatrice 
Zamojski 



Mahy 
Zartjian 




Harry 
Zerbe 



Paijell 




^otakomote Sla55 wiiiceti 



Howard Baier 
Clyde Raezar 
Helen Bartlett 
Carl Dempsey 



President 
Vice-Premdent 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Raymond Smith 
Roy Weidman 
Dorothy Yeagle 
Carl Dempsett 



MEMBERS OF CLASS 

Bacastow, Merle Stoner Hershey, Pa. 

Baier, Howard Nelson Palmyra, Pa. 

Bartlett, Helen Marjokie Baltimore, Md. 

Beamsderfer, Lloyd Reading, Pa. 

Bowers, Karl Edward Harrisburg, Pa. 

BoYER, Geraldine ELIZABETH HarrisbuFg, Pa. 

Brown, Charles Willard Hershey, Pa. 

Brown, Robert Gayle Lemoyne, Pa. 

Bulota, Stanley New Ringgold, Pa. 

Clabk, William Ford Chester, Pa. 

Clippinger, Robert Smith Waynesboro, Pa. 

Conrad, Louis Johnson Harrisburg, Pa. 

Davies, Jonah A Kingston, Pa. 



Page 72 



Dempsey, Carl Wilson Williamsport, Pa. 

Dbuck, Makgaret Elizabeth Red Lion, Pa. 

Ellenberger, Gertrude Mary Annville, Pa. 

Engle, John Warren Hummelstown, Pa. 

Etchberger, William Lebanon, Pa. 

Evelev, Arthur Sherman Lebanon, Pa. 

Fox, Audrie Eleanora York, Pa. 

Fridinger, Evelyn Gertrude Steelton, Pa. 

Gangwer, Mildred White Lititz, Pa. 

Geyer, Grace Eleanor Middletown, Pa. 

Goodman, Benjamine Moury Shamokin, Pa. 

Graby, Cora Elizabeth Annville, Pa. 

Guinivan, Thomas AVilliam Camden, N. J. 

Haas, Mildred Elizabeth Annville, Pa. 

Hamm, Leander Herbert Harrisburg, Pa. 

Heckman, Robert Raymond Reading, Pa. 

HiMMELBERGER, Helen Irene ■ ■ ■ Harrisburg, Pa. 

HocKER, Kenneth Leverne Steelton, Pa. 

Hoffman, Arlene Elizabeth Ephrata, Pa. 

HoLBROOK, Margaret Harrisburg, Pa. 

HoucK, Jean Ewing Lebanon, Pa. 

Immler, Luther Henri Palmyra, Pa. 

Johnson, Julia Ida Lebanon, Pa. 

Keene, Ruth Catherine Cleona, Pa. 

Kinney, Harlin Shroyer Farmingdale, L. I., N. Y. 

Kitzmiller, John Kunkle Harrisburg, Pa. 

Koenig, William Ferdinand Reading, Pa. 

KoPE, Nelda Romaine Hummelstown, Pa. 

Kress, Edward Ken Minersville, Pa. 

Krum, June Harriet Myerstown, Pa. 

Lawson, Catherine Sara Dallastown, Pa. 

Lehman, Clarence Long Palmyra, Pa. 

Leiniger, Pauline Lillian Lebanon, Pa. 

Levitz, Razelle Lebanon, Pa. 

Light, Anna Louise Lebanon, Pa. 

Light, Harold Heilman Cornwall, Pa. 

Long, Robert Winfield Hummelstown, Pa. 

Lopes, Olga Weaber Schaefferstown, Pa. 

LuDWiG, Donald Paul Hummelstown, Pa. 

MacEwen, Sara Katherine Palmyra, Pa. 

Main, Harper Patterson, Jr Shippensburg, Pa. 

Marbarger, Jean Isabel Palmyra, Pa. 



Page 73 




Meiniiardt, Amy Mae Lykens, Pa. 

Metzger, Edith Maude Middletown, Pa 

MoNTEiTH, Amy Martha Barnesboro, Pa. 

Morrison, Anna Elizabeth Steelton, Pa. 

Morrison, Nellie Colclough Minersville, Pa. 

MoYER, John Henry Hershey, Pa. 

MussER, Jay Charles Elizabethtown, Pa. 

Neissner, Virginia Helen Johnstown, Pa. 

Null, Dorothy Louise Lebanon, Pa. 

Patschke, Anita Eleanore Lebanon, Pa. 

PoLONiAK, Frank Wallington, N. J. 

Raezer, Clyde B Ephrata, Pa. 

Ranck, Ida Irene Bareville, Pa. 

Richie, Alice Mary Annville, Pa. 

RoHRER, Ruth Romaine Port Trevorton, Pa. 

RozMAN, Anthony John Steelton, Pa. 

Rutter, Samuel Peiffer Lebanon, Pa. 

Sabo, Bertha Helene Berwick, Pa. 

Saylor, Eugene Clyde Lancaster, Pa. 

Sekulski, Joseph John Harrisburg, Pa. 

Silvers, Damon Lee Trenton, N. J. 



Page 7!, 




Smith, Donald George Lebanon, Pa. 

Smith, Raymond Richard Red Lion, Pa. 

Smith, Robert William Harrisburg, Pa. 

Straus, Harry D Myerstown, Pa. 

Strayer, Robert Curvin Buchanan, Mich. 

Strickler, Evelyn May' Lebanon, Pa. 

Tho\l\s, Joseph Bowker Bordertown, N. J. 

TscHOPP, Robert Paul Red Lion, Pa. 

Umberger, Jacob Quentin Mt. Gretna, Pa. 

Umberger, Molly Elizabeth Schaefferstown, Pa. 

Weidman, Roy Andrew Akron, Pa. 

Weirick, Ernest Carl Enola, Pa. 

Wentley, Dorothy Anna Palmyra, Pa. 

Whister, Catherine Bordertown, N. J. 

Worley, Charles Donald Windber, Pa. 

Yeakel, Dorothy Adelaide Mahanoy City, Pa. 

Yingst, KL\thryn Blossie Lebanon, Pa. 

YoKUM, George Eugene, Jr Harrisburg, Pa. 

Zeiters, Dorothy Louise Hummelstown, Pa. 

Zerbe, Grover Franklin Valley View, Pa. 

Zettlemoyer, Elvin John W. Philadelphia, Pa. 

ZuBROFF, Lillian Minersville, Pa. 



Page 75 




jaw-e */s:?^?6SM*6»<^^ 



7'ce5/tman ^la55 0'^^icet5 



John Mollee 
Ruth Hershey 
Lillian Leisey 
William Bender 



Fresident 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



John Moller 
Louise Saylor 
Lillian Leisey 
William Bender 



Albert, Mary Elizabeth Lebanon, Pa. 

Artz, Robert Raymond Lebanon, Pa. 

AuNGST, Dean Moyer St. Albans, L. I., N. 

Baker, A. Kent Duncannon, Pa. 

Barnhart, George Rees Lebanon, Pa. 

Beard, James Allen Schaefferstown, Pa. 

Belmer, Charles Miller Glen Falls, N. Y. 

Bemesderfer, John Leroy Lebanon, Pa. 

Bender, William Lloyd Annville, Pa. 

Black, James Egbert Hershey, Pa. 

Bollinger, Dorothy Lebanon, Pa. 

BoRAN, Robert Paul Minersville, Pa. 

Bowman, Barbara Beamer Dauphin, Pa. 

Brensinger, William Josiah Emaus, Pa. 

Bow^MAN, Thomas Bear Lebanon, Pa. 

Brown, Warren Wayne Lykens, Pa. 

Brubaker, Elwood Richard Lebanon, Pa. 

Callen, Mathew, Jr Harrisburg, Pa. 

Capello, Arthur Grant Steelton, Pa. 

Chapin, Claude Edward Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clark, Jane Rebecca Palmyra, Pa. 

Clouser, Leon Ben Kleinfeltersville, Pa. 

Clymer, Gerald Kenneth Harrisburg, Pa. 

Cook. Lucie Helen Irene Wiconisco, Pa. 

CoTRONEOM, Mary Ann Johnstown, Pa. 



Page 76 



Criswell, Harry Clay Waynesboro, Pa. 

Curry, Ira Louis Swatara Station, Pa. 

Deck, John Stanley Lebanon, Pa. 

DiNSMORE, Robert Edward Brogueville, Pa. 

Eby, Jane Virginia Lebanon, Pa. 

Ehrhart, Carl Yarkers Lancaster, Pa. 

Evans, Anna Margaret Annville, Pa. 

Evans, Evelyn Rosser Lancaster, Pa. 

Foreman, David Anderson Waynesboro, Pa. 

Fox, Thomas G., Jr Union Deposit, Pa. 

Friel, John Paul Princeton, N. J. 

Geesey, Claude Dennis Red Lion, Pa. 

George, Robert B Minersville, Pa. 

Gerry, Ruth Marjorie East Orange, N. J. 

Gingrich, Norman John Campbelltown, Pa. 

Gollam, Lucille Margaret Lebanon, Pa. 

Grimm, Robert Shirey Annville, Pa. 

Heiland, Dwight Mast Myerstown, Pa. 

Heilman, Alfred Henery Palmyra, Pa. 

Hemperly, Cecil Willis ■ . . . Harrisburg, Pa. 

Herman, August Carl Minersville, Pa. 

Hershey, Ruth Evelyn Hershey, Pa. 

HiTZ, Jean Adelle Cornwall, Pa. 

Hoffman, Henry T., Jr Reading, Pa. 

Hoffman, Minerva Walker Berlin, Pa. 

Horn, Paul Edward York, Pa. 

Hor.st, Mary Elizabeth Lebanon, Pa. 

HuBER, W. Fredrick Lebanon, Pa. 

Irish, William Chapel Hershey, Pa. 

Johns, Edward Columbia, Pa. 

Katchmer, George Andrew Emeigh, Pa. 

Kauffman, Richard Dellinger Dallastown, Pa. 

Keith, Elvin William Minersville, Pa. 

Kleinfelder, John William Morrisville, Pa. 

Klopp, Orval A^'oodrow Myerstown, Pa. 

Kreider, Christine Evelyn Lebanon, Pa. 

Kreiser, Sterling Haaga Lebanon, Pa. 

Kreiser, Joseph Richard Lebanon, Pa. 

Leisey, Lillian Mae Lebanon, Pa. 

Lenker, David Franklin Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lenker, Jes.se Sanford Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lester, Philip Howard Williamstown, Pa. 

LiND, Anna May Palmyra, Pa. 

Lloyd, Ralph Roy Hershey, Pa. 

I>ONG, Dorothy Elizabeth East Orange, Pa. 

Lopes, Lela Weaber Schaefferstown, Pa. 

Lynch, John Howard Annville, Pa. 

Maury, Gustav Thurwald Coaldale, Pa. 

Melman, Milton Middletown, Pa. 

Meyer, Jean Patricia East Orange, X. J. 

Miller, Evelyn Loretta Millersburg, Pa. 

Miller, Herbert Levere Hummelstown, Pa. 

MoLLER, John Vincent Clifton, N. J. 

Moody, Richard Elwood Lebanon, Pa. 

Morrow, Paul Kenneth Loysville, Pa. 



Page 77 




MuNDAY, George Gerald New York City, N. Y. 

Myers, Paui^ Erb Harrisburg, Pa. 

Nagle, Vincent Paul Pottsville, Pa. 

Ness, John Herbert York, Pa. 

Norton, Ruth V Harrisburg, Pa. 

Oller, Lucille Grace Waynesboro, Pa. 

Peffley, Howard Northamer Harrisburg, Pa. 

Reiil^n, Janet Berlin, Pa. 

Rice, Freeman Daniel Annville, Pa. 

Rider, Clayton Merle Middletown, Pa. 

RuppERSBERGER, RuTH Eleanor Baltimore, Md. 

Saylor, Louise East Orange, N. J. 

Schaffer, John Ambrose Lebanon, Pa. 

Scherfel, William Pottstown, Pa. 

ScHLOSSER, Verna Mae Myerstown, Pa. 

ScHOCK, Jeanne Elizabeth Mount Joy, Pa. 

ScHOEN, Irwin Donald Lebanon, Pa. 

Sechrist, Warren Doyle Dallastown, Pa. 

Seiverling, Daniel Snayder Ephrata, Pa. 

Seylar, Evelyn Maye Halifax, Pa. 

Shaffer, Paul Eugene Duncannon, Pa. 

Shapiro, Stewart Bennet Lebanon, Pa. 

Shaw, Lena May Downingtown, Pa. 

Shenk, M. Elizabeth Annville, Pa. 

Slodysko, Leonard Albert Shamokin, Pa. 

Smee, George Harry Harrisburg, Pa. 

Smeyne, Azer Leon Lebanon, Pa. 



Page 7S 




Spangler, Robert Gleim Lebanon, Pa. 

Strohman, H. Herbert Lebanon, Pa. 

Sumner, Doyle Leonard Bonthe Sherkro, Sierra 

Leone, West Africa 

Taylor, Harvey Patterson Harrisburg, Pa. 

Theodore, Leonard William Annville, Pa. 

Thomas, Mrs. Elizabeth B Annville, Pa. 

TiERNEY, Bette Marie East Berlin, Pa. 

Timer, Joseph Burnard Emeigh, Pa. 

T0UCH.STONE, Mary Alice Eredericksburg, Pa. 

Vavrous, Lillian Mae Lebanon, Pa. 

Walk, Christian Ritner Washington Boro, Pa. 

Weagley, Richard Pershing Greencastle, Pa. 

Weimer, Margaret Sellew Lebanon, Pa. 

Wert, Robert Browing Lebanon, Pa. 

White, Odell William Sheridan, Pa. 

Whitman, James Richard Lebanon, Pa. 

Wise, Esther Naomi Elizabeth ville. Pa. 

Witmer, Aimee Frances Hershey, Pa. 

Witmer, Bernice Elizabeth Harrisburg, Pa. 

Yeagley, Harold George Harrisburg,. Pa. 

Yingst, John Allen . Cornwall, Pa. 

YocuM, Martin Dale Lebanon, Pa. 

Zerfoss, Allen Bolton Hummelstown, Pa. 

Zimmerman, Ray R Topton, Pa. 

ZwALLEY, Kathkyn Matilda New Holland, Pa. 



Page 79 




$ s 




■(itl^l-^tic Council 



Lebanon Valley's athletics conducted under watchful eye of the Athletic 
Council . . . programs and policies for the present and future are deter- 
mined by this body . . . membership limited to eight men . . . faculty 
represented by four members . . . athletic department represented by 
both directors . . the college president and one alumnus complete this 
valuable addition to the administrative forces of the college . . . airing 
of numerous problems transpires at the frequent meetings . . . adminis- 
tration thereby relieved of these matters . . . greater efficiency shown by 
this method of procedure . . . the great importance of sagaciously deter- 
mining the athletic policies renders this committee infinitely valuable . . . 
ever-increasing prominence being gained by the Council in the whole work- 
ings of the administration of the college . . . indispensability of the body 
is now recognized . . . bigger and better things for the future are promised 
according to the past record of our Atliletic Council 

Dr. R. R. Butterwick President 

Dr. E. H. Stevenson Secretary 

C. G. Dotter Treasurer 



Page 82 




ffoack 



oache5 



Men's athletic department headed by Jerome W. Frock . . . L. V. C. 
ahimnus in Class of 192.5 . . . served as line coach of football teams at 
John Harris High for several years . . . succeeded Hooks Mylin here in 
September, 1934 . . . now serving his third year as head football coach 
and freshman basketball coach . . . three-year record of his L. V. C. 
football teams shows I'i victories, 13 defeats, and one tie . . . nearly all 
games played against schools with larger student bodies . . . undefeated 
season recorded by freshman basketball team under Frock's tutelage in 
1936 . . . baseball and varsity basketball teams coached by the assistant 
athletic director, Chief Metoxen ... a former star in three sports for 
L. V. C- . . . graduated in 1927 . . . coached at Glen Xor High School 
and York Collegiate Institute before returning to his Alma Mater . . . 
only two league reverses handed IMetoxen-coached nines in two years . . . 
league title annexed in 193.5 . . . basketball teams show steady improve- 
ment even though losses have outnumbered wins . . . women's athletics 
directed by Esther Henderson . . . graduate of Miami University and 
Columbia University . . . served as women's athletic director at Shippens- 
burg State Teachers' College before coming to Annville . . . noticeable 
re-awakening of athletic spirit has transpired since her coming to L. V. C. 
. . . basketball teams demonstrate a superior style of play . . . field 
hockey teams also show decided improvement . . . stringent training 
efforts insi.sted upon by Miss Henderson . . . duties of coaching tennis 
team shouldered by Dr. E. H. Stevenson . . . success of teams demon- 
strates his proficiency . . . several fine racket-wielders developed by 
Stevie. 



Page 83 




^I'^-tel^^ 






ei 33 



64 69 40 '71, 3B 44 34 10 




0^fi^0^^^f ^ f^^^f(^^ ^"f^f t"¥|i^tif f ^^^^-j^^ 



~ji^v« jiv'sfiissrssaffiiaae-iiSSi, 



Toot^a// 1936 

Opp. L. V. C. 

Sept. 26. Kutztown Teacher.s at Annville .... 6 19 

Oct. '2. Bucknell at Lewisburg 20 

Oct. 10. Juniata at Annville 18 

Oct. 17. Drexel at Philadelphia 9 

Oct. "ZJ.. St. Thomas at Scranton 18 

Oct. 31. P. M. C. at Chester 6 7 

Nov. 7. St. Joseph's at Annville 15 

Nov. 14. Albright at Reading 26 7 



SUMMARY OF FOOTBALL SEASON 

Flying Dutchmen experience rather mediocre season in li}3(i . . . three 
victories over-balanced by five defeats . . . coaches handicapped bj' light 
material. Kutztown Teachers prove stubborn foe in season's opener but 
finally succumb 19-6. Blue and White suffers initial defeat under arc- 
lights at Lewisburg . . . Bucknell outplays and outclasses visitors to 
score 20-0 victory. Second and easiest victory is scored in home game 
against Juniata Indians 18-0 . . . early lead permits Frock to employ 
numerous substitutes. Drexel scores 9-0 victory over L. V. C. at Phila- 



Page 8k. 



delphia . . . Freshmen ineligibility forces Frock to use only a very limited 
squad . . . lack of available substitutes proves a decided handicap. St. 
Thomas registers decisive 18-0 victory over Valleyites in Scranton contest 
. . . Tindall, Kress and Company overwhelmed by Tommies. Most thrill- 
ing victory of season occurs at Chester . . . P. M. C. tallies on the opening 
kick-off to lead 6-0 ... T>. V. C. scores in last 20 seconds to win 7-6. 
Homecoming Day spoiled by St. Joe's second half attack . . . field-goal 
followed by a pair of touchdowns gives Hawks a 1.5-0 decision. Albright 
overpowers Flying Dutchmen in traditional battle at Reading . . . Dick 
Riffle leads his cohorts to 26-7 triumph in rough game. Art Heisch ap- 
pointed Honorary Captain for the season . . . Ed Kress receives .Vl'- 
State mention . . . stellar play of Kroske at center, Davies, Poloniak, 
Frank Rozman, and Weidman at guard and tackle positions features 
L. V. C. defensive play . . . Bulota, Smith, Slodysko, and Johns also 
perform line duties ably . . . Frey, Hei.sch, Ludwig, and Belmer perform 
steadily at end posts. Bob Brown, star sopliomore end, injured in Bucknell 
game and lost to team for five weeks. Backfield duties capably handled by 
eight outstanding men . . . Tindall as the flashy runner; Kress, the punter 
and passer; Pete Fridinger, the blocking back; Tony Rozman, the plugger; 
Johnny Walmer, the Jonestown battler; Harper Main, the Shippensburg 
farmer; and Walk and Friel, freshman stars. Managerial duties performed 
by Elwood Needy. Much credit is due the fine Blue and White band for 
its moral support so generously donated . . . cheerleaders also did their 
part . . . Gordon Davies elected captain for 1937 . . . team loses only 
Art Heisch by graduation. 







^^ 



^'S 




A. llKlS. II 
J. TlXDALL 
S. BULOTA 

R. Weidman 



V. IJOZMAX 

G. Davies 
E. Kress 

A. ROZMAN 



W. Fridinger 
H. Kroske 

F. POLONIAK 

R. Brown 



Page 88 




R. Fhey 


J. Wal-mer 


D. S.MITIl 


H. Main 


D. LUDWIG 


C. Walk 


J. Friel 


C. Belmer 


E. Johns 


L. Slodysko 


J. Kbieser 


A Herman 



Page 89 



L. V. C. 19 



Kutztown Teachers 6 



Lebanon Valley opens 1936 football season with 19-6 victor}' over Kutztown 
State Teachers College eleven at Annville . . . victory is rather unimpressive . . . 
193o score repeated. Teachers lead 6-0 at half . . . second-half rally nets three 
touchdowns for Flying Dutchmen . . . neither team shows ability to maintain 
sustained attack . . . L. V. C. registers ten first downs to visitors" nine ... all 
scores direct result of breaks . . . ^'alley boys lose two first-half scoring opportu- 
nities by fumbles . . . L. ^'. C. fumble recovered by Kutztown on Dutchmen's 
J'.j-Nard stripe in first quarter . . . four successive first downs net Teachers' first 

. efforts to score fail twice . . . triple reverse 
extra-point-try fails. Local boys get started 
after intermission . . . Kress reco\iTs fumble on L. V. C. 20-yard line ... on 
foiu-th down Ed Kress passes to Ra\niic Frey for first Valley touchdown of the 
season . . . extra point place-kicked l)y Tony Roxman to put Teachers behind, 7-6. 
Poor Kutztown punt gives Flying Dutchmen anotlier scoring opportunity in fourth 
quarter . . . advance featured by Kress' 23-yard gain through the middle of the 
line . . . later scores from the one-yard stripe. Final touchdown direct result of 
day's best sustained drive . . . total of 57 yards covered . . . touchdown scored 
b}' Walk . . . final figures show 19-6 triumph for L. V. C. 



own on L. \'. C. 5-yard marker 
jjushes ball across on third tr>' 




Bucknell 20 



L. V. C. 



Lebanon ^'alley loses night game to superior Bucknell outfit . . . Mylin's men 
register 20 points to ex-charges' . . . seven first downs registered by Frockmen. 
Bucknell gets first scoring chance in opening minutes after L. V. C. fumbles . . . 
four plays net only 5 yards as threat is repulsed . . . Kress kicks to Bisons' 15 
. . . steady advance halted when Poloniak recovers fumble on Lebanon Valley's 
29-yard line . . . Tindall and Kress alternate in carrying ball in drive which nets 
51 yards . . . attack brought to abrupt end as pass is intercepted . . . Bucknell 
offense once again starts rolling . . . score prevented b\' Flying Dutchmen's 
magnificent goal stand. Soon Bisons get ball on their own 30 . . . one run nets 
first tlown . . . long pass puts ball in Valley territory . . . another pass puts ball 
on 3-yard stripe . . . next plunge results in score . . . extra-point conversion 
gives Bisons 7-0 lead at half time. Third-period pass interception gives Mylinmen 
possession of ball on L. V. C. 30-j'ard line . . . two successful passes result in 
second touchdown, extra point kick goes wide . . . last L. V. C. hope fades as 
Bucknell intercepts a Kress pass . . . Quick makes sensational 45-yard run . . . 
completed pass puts ball on Valley 3-yard line . . . third touchdown registered 
on the next play . . . extra-point try is successful . . . game ends with more 
powerful Bisons on long end of 20-0 count. 



Page 90 



L. V. C. 18 



Juniata 



Lebanon Valley's Flying Dutchmen romp through Juniata Indians 18-0 on 
home field . . . Tindall and Kress account for scores . . . blocked punts lead to 
two third-period touchdowns . . . Frock uses numerous reserves in last period. 
Juniata kicks off to Tony Rozman . . . Steelton flash is downed on his 24-yard 
line . . . three plays net L. V. C. the initial first down of the game . . . Tindall 
returns punt to visitors' 40 . . . three tries give L. ^'. C. first down on visitors' 
l28-yard stripe . . . two attempted passes barely miss completion . . . Juniata 
takes ball on downs . . . long pass nets substantial gain . . . Corbin gains 5 yards 
to reach Valley territorj' . . . exchange of punts returns ball to visitors" territory 
. . . Frank Rozman blocks punt, giving L. V. C the ball on Juniata's 21 . . . scor- 
ing chance lost on a fumble . . . later Tindall dashes 24 yards to visitors' 24 . . . 
Kress bounces lateral pass to Tindall for first touchdown . . . half ends with 
Flying Dutchmen leading 6-0. Kress tallies second L. V. C. touchdown on fifth 
play of the third quarter after a Juniata punt is partially blocked . . . total of 
45 yards gained on the play . . . another Indian punt blocked . . . L. V. C. gets 
ball on visitors' 14 . . . Tindall sweeps around end on the first play for a score. 
Frock puts in numerous substitutes . . . final tally is 18-0, marking Flj'ing Dutch- 
men's easiest test of the season. 




r 




Drexel 9 



L. V. C. 



Drexel Dragons prove better on muddy field to defeat Lebanon Valley 9-0 at 
Philadelphia . . . short-handed Annville gridders fight hard but fail to capitalize 
on breaks . . . faulty punting spells defeat . . . Stevens, makeshift end, scores 
all 9 points for Drexel. First Dragon threat comes in first period . . . long drive 
reaches visitors' 7-yard stripe . . . incompleted pass on fourth down gives L. V. C 
temporary relief . . . remainder of first half produces no significant results . . 
teams battle evenly. Dragons get big break on second play of the third period . . 
Stevens breaks tlirough and blocks Kress' punt on L. V. C. 2o-yard line . . 
unmolested he snatches up the pigskin and runs for a touchdown. Third Dragon 
scoring opportunity occurs ten minutes later . . . Kress' poor punt gives Drexel 
the ball on L. V. C. 26 . . . off-tackle play gains 5 yards . . . forward pass puts 
ball on 12-yard line . . . three line bucks net 7 yards . . . Stevens boots pigskin 
neatly between uprights for 3 points. Late third period puts ball on L. V. C. 6-yard 
line . . . Annville line digs in, holding for four downs . . . lone Valley scoring 
threat comes in last period . . . drive featured b,y Kress' 2o-yard run from fake 
kick formation . . . advance is halted on 15-yard line . . . game ends with 
Drexel winning 9-0. Dragons lead in first downs 10-9 . . . game marks third 
defeat in row for Flying Dutchmen at hands of Dragons. 



Page 91 



St. Thomas 18 



L. V. C. 



Lebanon Valley footballers make fruitless journey to Scranton on October 24 
. . St. Thomas registers 18-0 triumph over guests in first clash between the two 
schools . . . 4000 witness rather one-sided contest . . . Tommies prove strongest 
opponents since Fordham Rams were tackled in 1935 . . . home team presents 
powerful offense and impenetrable defense . . . Dutchmen never proceed inside 
\-ictors' 30-yard stripe . . . visitors forced to assume defensive style of play . . . 
Scranton boys score in each of first three periods . . . Frock uses few substitutes 
against coal-crackers. First (i jjoints ciialked midway in the first quarter . . . 
plunge from 8-.yard line by St('i)iianck turns the trick . . . extra point is missed 
. . . second touchdown is tallied after '24-yard pass puts ball on L. V. C. 4-yard 
line . . . two line bucks produce score . . . extra-point try again proves futile 
. . . half ends with Tommies holding 12-0 lead. Bad break for Lebanon Valley 
gives St. Thomas third scoring opportunity . . . blocked punt is recovered oh the 
visitors' 1 -yard line . . . Gilboy, substitute St. Thomas back, plunges for score . . . 
L. A'. C. defense tightens ... all further St. Thomas threats are repulsed . . . 
little offensive strength exhibited b.y Annville boys . . . game ends with St. 
Thomas holding 18-0 lead . . . defeat not taken too hard since it was rather 
expected . . . lack of naturalness of rivalry decidedly noticeable . . . better 
team won. 




L. V. C. 7 



P. M. C. 6 



Last-minute touchdown gives Lebanon Valley 7-6 conquest over Pennsylvania 
Military College eleven in Chester game . . . Main's placement for extra point 
breaks 6-6 deadlock . . . Kress passes to Frey for tt)uchd()wn in Valley's dying 
effort . . . greatest victory of the year for L. V. C. Fl\ing Dutchmen open game 
by kicking off to P. M. C. . . . Spang receives ball on 15-yard line . . . cuts 
toward his right sidelines and evades all L. V. C. tacklers . . . sensational dash 
nets hosts 6 points . . . all-important extra-point try is unsuccessful. Third 
period and first half of fourth period produce no startling results . . . Annville 
boys seem to get inspiration in dying minutes of the game . . . optimistic Blue and 
White Band anticijjates rousing finish . . . strains of "Lebanon Vallej'" pour over 
gridiron . . . Flying Dutchmen get ball on their own 35-yard line . . . sustained 
drive takes ball to P. ]M. C. 6-inch line ... 25 yards netted on Walk to Main 
forward pass . . . Walk to Frey pass puts ball on 4-yard line . . . Cadets hold 
for four downs . . . punt gives ball to L. V. C. on home team's 23 . . . Kress' 
pass intended for Frey is grounded in the end-zone . . . time for just one play 
remains . . . Kress fades back . . . ball spirals toward end-zone . . . Raymie 
Frey sinks to his knees with the pigskin in his arms . . . Main converts . . . L. 
V. C. wins 7-6. 



Page 92 



St. Joseph's 15 



L. V. C. 



St. Joseph's Hawks spoil Lebanon Valley's homecoming b\- administering 15-0 
defeat . . . tight battle for three quarters develops into rout in final period . . . 
L. V. C. kicks off to Hawk's io . . . ball is run back 13 yards . . . Kress returns 
St. Joe punt 22 yards to his own 37 . . . first L. V. C. play sees Kress run to Hawk's 
44 for first down . . . Kress kicks . . . St. Joe fumbles on their own 34 . . . 
L. V. C. advances ball to 6-incli line but fails to score . . . intercepted pass kills 
next Valley scoring threat . . . Cole's kick drives Flying Dutchmen back . . . 
sustained efforts repeatedly return ball to St. Joe territory . . . visitors always 
brace in danger zone . . . exchange of kicks gives Hawk's ball on their own 42 to 
start the third quarter . . . series of runs and passes take pigskin to L. V. C. 
3-yard line . . . on fourth down Hartman drops back to 12-yard line for field-goal 
attempt . . . tr\' is successful for placement giving St. Joe 3-0 lead. Several punts 
exchanged immediately thereafter . . . Kj-ess makes 31-yard run to Hawk's 
territory . . . pass, Kress to Tindall, puts ball on visitors' 24 as third period ends 
. . . ball is lost on downs . . . Hawk attack again starts rolling . . . Marhefka 
scores on fine 26-yard dash . . . fumbles and intercepted passes appear in abun- 
dance . . . Harrison intercepts a Tindall pass and scampers 35 yards behind per- 
fect interference for a score . . . L. V. C. fumbles twice on next kick-off to lose 
ball. Game ends with Hawks winning lo-O. 



X 



Albright 26 



L. V. C. 7 



Meeting of traditional foes results in decisive victory for Albright Lions . . . 
Dick Riffle stars as Lebanon Valley is snowed under in rough battle . . . Red and 
White team presents diversified attack to completely overpower rivals. Second- 
stringers start contest for Reading outfit . . . this line-up penetrates deep into 
L. V. C. territory but threat dies as field-goal attempt is unsuccessful . . . varsity 
men enter game as second period opens . . . Riffle and Troisi alternate in smashing 
through Lebanon Valley line . . . Riffle scores from 2-yard line . . . L. V. C. 
receives next kick-off . . . Kress punts to Albright 10 . . . Troisi returns it to 
the 20 . . . Riffle smashes through Vallej' line on the next play ... he cuts to 
his left and outraces the secondary . . . o5-yard jaunt results in touchdown. 
Valley receives kick-off . . . pass is intercepted . . . Riffle fades back . . . heaves 
pigskin ... it falls into MuUer's hands in mid-field . . . races to score . . . 
Albright leads 19-0 at intermission. Third period a continuation of the second . . . 
63-yard drive ends the fourth and last Red and White touchdown . . . Flying 
Dutchmen refuse to stop trying . . . two long drives made against Albright, re- 
serves . . . first one stopped on 6-incli line . . . five minutes later L. V. C. 
threatens again . . . Kress takes ball over from the 2-yard line for final Valley 
touchdown of the season . . . Friel kicks extra point. Game ends 20-7 with 
superior Albright squad taking deserved honors. 



Page 93 




£a5k(iiiaU 



VARSITY SCHEDULE 

Opp. L. V. C. 

Jan. 7. Dickinson at Carlisle 47 34 

Jan. 9. Franklin & Marshall at Lebanon 61 38 

Jan. 13. Ursinus at Collegeville 31 39 

Jan. 19. Gettysburg at Gettysburg 46 35 

Jan. 30. Gettysburg at Lebanon 37 39 

Feb. 1. Drexel at Philadelphia 39 33 

Feb. 3. Muhlenberg at Lebanon 44 49 

Feb. 10. Albright at Reading 34 47 

Feb. 13. Drexel at Lebanon 30 40 

Feb. 17. Franklin & Marshall at Lancaster 60 25 

Feb. 18. Bucknell at Harrisburg 49 52 

Feb. 25. Ursinus at Lebanon 38 41 

Feb. 27. Muhlenberg at Allentown 43 41 

Mar. 2. St. Joseph at Philadelphia 46 38 

Mar. 6. Albright at Lebanon 33 30 

Mar. 10. Bucknell at Lewisburg 35 40 



Page 9Ji 



FRESHMAN SCHEDULE 

Jan. 8. Hershey Industrial School at Hershey 

Jan. 9. Franklin & Marshall Frosh at Lebanon 

Jan. 30. Hershey Industrial School at Lebanon 

Feb. 5. Lykens High School at Wiconisco . . 

Feb. 10. Albright Frosh at Reading ..... 

Feb. 13. Central Penn. Business College at Lebanon 

Feb. 17. Franklin & Marshall Frosh at Lancaster 

Feb. 18. Harrisburg Catholic High at Harrisburg 

Mar. 4. Middletown U. B. Church at Middletown 

Mar. 6. Albright Frosh at Lebanon 



0pp. 
20 
34 
31 

27 
53 
27 
49 
28 
40 
46 



L. V. C. 
19 

18 

15 

35 

32 

22 
24 
30 
35 
16 




P.\UL BiLLETT 

Edward Kbess 



Ralph Billett 
Edwaed Bachman 



Clair Snell 
Carl Dempset 



Raymond Frey 
Robert Brown 





l/at5Ltij SailcQtLaU 



Chief ]\Ietoxen".s 1937 edition of the Lebanon Valley basketball team 
showed great improvement over his previous outfits ... tie for third 
place with Muhlenberg gained by record of 6 victories and 6 defeats . . . 
4 non-league games also split . . . Frey and P. Billett second and third 
respectively in league scoring race . . . effective defense play of Snell and 
Brown another feature . . . season opened against Dickinson at Carlisle 
on January 7 . . . home team triumphs by score of 47-34 . . . both teams 
demonstrated fine offensive games . . . first league tussle two days later 
results in 61-38 victory for Diplomats of F. & M. . . . fine games played 
by Frey and P. Billett provide some solace for Valley rooters . . . first 
1937 victory notched against Ursinus in Collegeville court . . . score 
against weak Bear outfit is 39-31 ... P. Billett and Rozman lead scorers 
with 15 and 14 points respectively . . second league loss suffered at 
Gettysburg on January 19 . . . Bullets stage late rally to win 46-35 . . . 
Valley boys play fine brand of ball until late in fray . . . tables turned on 
Bullets 11 days later at Lebanon . . Bullets acquire early lead . . . 
Valley boys fight hard and finally catch invaders . . . tense struggle 
climaxed as Tony Rozman scores winning basket in final 30 seconds to 
give L. V. C. a 39-37 conquest over visitors ... P. Billett leads Annville 
attack with 10 points . . . second home victory scored over Muhlenberg 
two days later . . . close contest ends with L. V. C. leading 49-44 . . . 
Raymie Frey stars with 11 points . . . Mules hold 4'-2-41 lead with 3 



Fage 96 




minutes to play . . . Valley spirit ekes out' win . . . weak Albright 
quintette thrashed in Reading contest 47-3-t ... 1.5 out of 18 foul tries 
successful . . . early lead assumed by Blue and White to lead 24-1.3 at 
half time . . . Red and White rally nipped . . . Drexel Dragons unsuc- 
cessfully invade the Valley, Feb. 13 . . . Flying Dutchmen avenge previous 
defeat to the tune of 40-30 . . . Dragons lead 17-16 at intermission 
. . . second half rally saves day for homesters ... P. Billett leads 
scorers with 15 ... F. & M. hands L. V. C. another sound trouncing at 
Lancaster . . . Diplomats score at will in recording 60-25 triumph . . . 
result never in doubt . . . fine comeback staged by Valley dribblers in 
overcoming Bucknell the following evening . . . L. V. C. boys stage late 
rally to nip Bisons 52-49 in Harrisburg tilt . . . up-staters hold 29-23 
lead at half-waj^ mark . . . Frey tops scorers with 19 . . . Flying Dutch- 
men repeat earlier victory over Ursinus Bears at Lebanon . . . Bears give 
Annville team a scare in losing 41-38 game marked by listless play . . . 
Frey again racks up a counter . . . neat floor-work turned in by Snell and 
Brown . . . Muhlenberg evens count with Flying Dutchmen at Allen- 
town, Feb. 27 . . . two pointer in last 30 seconds plunges invaders to 
43-41 defeat . . . fouls erase 3 Valley stars . . . powerful St. Joseph 
aggregation overcomes L V. C. 46-38 . . . closeness of score indicates 
fine brand of ball played by Blue and White . . . Captain Paul Billett 
leads attack with 15 points . . . Albright Lions score 33-30 upset as 
league schedule is brought to a close . . . inspired boys from Reading 
stage late rally to overcome Blue and AVhite passers . . . 1937 season 
brought to a close at Lewisburg . . . L. V. C. defeats Bucknell 40-35 
without using a substitute. 



Page 97 




TtQ^kman lIa5lcQtlfall 



Freshman basketball team finished sad season with 2 victories and 
8 defeats . . . Coach Frock handicapped by inferior material . . . boys 
try hard but lack of height and experience proves disastrous . . . season 
opens at Hershey on Jan. 8 . . . strong Industrial School outfit wins 
close tilt 20-19 . . . winners lead at half-time 13-6 . . . strong L. V. C. 
comeback falls just short of victory . . . tight defenses a feature . . . 
teams show lack of practice . . . F. & M. Frosh administer sorry beating 
next night at Lebanon . . . winners hold only 1,5-14 lead at half-time 
. . . last half rally completely overpowers Valley boys . . . only 4 points 
scored against air-tight defense of Diplomats . . . final score is 34-18 
. . . examination period depletes Frosh ranks . . . four performers lost 
to Frock . . . Hershey Industrial School trounces Frosh in return tilt on 
Jan. 30 . . . college yearlings never threaten Industrial boys . . . final 
score is 31-15 . . . Artz leads L. V. C. scores with 10 . . . coal-region 
trip results in first Valley victory on Feb. .5 . . . Lykens High succumbs 
in game played at Wiconisco . . . Frosh gain early lead and continue in 
front throughout . . . Geesey and Artz top scorers with 11 and 9 points 
respectively . . . Albright Frosh score decisive victory in Reading game 
on Feb. 10 . . . Red and White Frosh pile up '29-14 lead before inter- 
mission . . . sad story ends with young Flying Dutchmen on short end 
of 53-32 count . . . Artz and Schaefler lead loser's scorers in vain effort 
. . . next defeat is administered by Central Pennsylvania Business College 
on Feb. 13 . . . capital city boys win comparatively close tilt 27-22 on 
Lebanon High court . . . Vallev boys display fine brand of ball after it is 
too late . . . hapless Frosh outfit suffers crushing defeat at Lancaster on 
Feb. 17 ... F. & ]\I. yearlings display entirely too much power and speed 



Fage 98 



in registering 49-24 shellacking . . . small Valley boys lost on huge Ar- 
mory floor . . . close beginning soon turns into rout . . . fouls erase all 
extra L. V. C. performers . . . Geesey leads scorers with 8 points . . . 
second and last victory recorded against Harrisburg Catholic High the 
following night . . . losers lead 18-12 at half-time . . . rousing come-back 
gives Annville boys a 30-28 victory . . . Danny Seiverling leads attack 
with 12 markers . . . losing form regained in game at Middletown on 
March 4 . . . U. B. Church of that town stages fine comeback to score 
40-35 victory . . . 17-15 half-time lead of losers soon dissipated . . . 
Artz tops scorers by notching 12 markers . . . season ends with ignominious 
defeat at hands of Albright Frosh two days later . . . 22-9 lead at half- 
time is stretched to 46-16 score as final gun blasts ... no tears shed over 
completion of schedule . . . fighting qualities of Artz and Seiverling pro- 
vide sole consolation . . . flashes of ability also demonstrated by Whitman 
and Geesey. 



Dennis Geesey 
.James Whitman 



John Schaeffer 
Robert .^rtz 



Daniel Seiverling 
.Joseph Kreiser 



Robert Grimm 
Charles Belmer 




HeiieUU 1936 



SUMMARY OF LEAGUE GAMES 

0pp. L. V. C. 

Apr. 18. Getty.sburg at Gettysburg 3 

Apr. 30. Juniata at Annville 5 8 

May 5. Ursinus at Collegeville 1 8 

May 12. Bucknell at Annville 3 13 

May 15. Drexel at Annville 3 13 

Mav 20. Albright at Reading 5 8 



EXHIBITION GAMES 

0pp. L.V. C. 

Apr. 23. Palmyra A. A. at Palmyra 6 4 

May 2. Albright at Annville 2 5 

May 8. Moravian at Bethlehem 1 3 

May 9. Susquehanna at Selinsgrove 6 3 

May 16. Muhlenberg at Allentown 8 

May 21 Palmyra A. A. at Palmyra 7 7 

May 23. Mt. St. Mary's at Emmit.sburg .... 2 10 



Flying Dutchmen again prove their mastery at diamond sport . . . 
nine victories and two defeats recorded against collegiate foes . . . league 
competition shows four victories against one defeat . . . single defeat in 
league suffered at Gettysburg in season opener . . . E. V. C. forced to 
take second place as a result . . . decisive triumphs scored by Valleyitcs 
against other league foes . . . two exhibition games played against 
Palmyra A. A. . . . semi-pros gain one victory and one tie against collegiate 
rivals . . . second string pitchers u.sed by Metoxen in those games . . . 
team demonstrated almost impenetrable defense but inconsistent . . . 
offense pitching of Paul Billctt, tall blond right hander, an outstanding 
feature . . . his record shows six victories and one defeat ... 71 opponents 
fanned in 60 innings . . . only 21 free tickets to first base issued by the 
ace hurler . . . peak reached in his one-hit shutout victory over Muhlenberg 



Fage 100 



. . . southpaw chucking of Johnny Tindall, bald-headed sophomore, also 
excellent . . . his record shows three victories, no defeats and one tie 
. . . marvelous control borne out by the total of only nine passes issued 
in forty innings . . . remainder of pitching shared by Ralph Billett and 
Jonah Davies . . . both try hard but lack ability to become regular 
moundsmen . . . pitchers aided by smooth work of the infield . . . Adolph 
Capka at shortstop and Ralph Billett at second are outstanding . . . both 
cover huge territory and throw with deadly accuracy . . . Kroske at third 
and Bartolet at first complete tight inner cordon . . . long stretch of first 
sacker nips many runners . . . receiving duties capably handled by Kress 
and Poloniak, freshman stars . . . both prove valuable aids to moundsmen 
. . . backstops also demonstrate ofl'ensive power . . . outfielders also lend 
defensive help . . . Jonah Davies, Ross Sheesley, and Ray Patrizio gather 
in many potential hits from opponents' bats . . Davies wields big bat 
consistently for L. V. C. . . . hitters at mercy of Ecker, Gettysburg mound 
ace, in season opener . . . batting eyes gradually sharpened . . . climax 
reached with 13 run assaults on weak tossers of Drexel and Bucknel! 
. . . final count shows 90 runs for Flying Dutchmen against 44 for oppo- 
nents . . . team under tutelage of Coach Chief ^Ntetoxen . . . fine judgment 
apparently exercised in molding team together . . . manager's job handled 
by Pete Klipa . . . only two performers lost by graduation: Bartolet, 
steady first sacker, and Patrizio, veteran flychaser, completed college careers. 



Paul Billett 
John Tindall 



Charles Babtolet Ralph Billett 

Frank Poloniak Jonah Davies 



Harold Kroske Edward Kress 

Adolph Capk.\ Marshall Frey 





Flying Dutchmen open 1936 season at Gettysburg on April 18 . . . 
home team administers 3-0 defeat to visitors . . . Paul Billett pitches 
5-hit game for Metoxenmen but Tindall gets only L. V. C hit off Ecker, 
Gettysburg hurler . . . Bullets score twice in third inning and once in 
eighth . . . contest very well played despite cold weather . . . L. V. 
shows great defense but little power . . . league title decided by this 
game . . . next game contested against Palmyra A. A. on April 23 . . . 
semi-pros prove too much as collegians lose 6-4 . . . winners score 3 runs 
in first inning of slants of Ralph Billett . . . Dutchmen retaliate with 2 
in second on an error and hits by R. Billett and Poloniak . . . semi-pros 
add to lead with i more in third . . . pitchers hold upper hand until sixth 
when L. V. scores several hits . . . Jonah Davies doubles . . . Bartolet 
singles ... P. Billett triples to score 2 runs . . . Tindall takes mound 
in sixth . . . yields 1 run . . . L. V. C. fills bases in eighth with none out 
but fails to score . . . League season opens at home as Juniata bows 8-5 
. . . first inning attack proves decisive . . Bartolet's triple, singles by 
Tindall and Poloniak, four bases on balls, and two hit batsman result in 
6 runs . . . two Indian pitchers needed to face twelve Valley batters . . . 
error gives Juniata 1 run in second ... P. Billett effective until fifth . . . 
Indians tee off, scoring 4 runs in fifth . . . Billett regains control . . . 
Dutchmen add 2 in sixth to clinch game 8-5. Second victory recorded 
May 2 as part of May Day celebration . . . Albright subdued 5-2 in 
non-league battle . . . Tindall outpitches Felty in tense game . . . L. V. 
C. gets 7 hits to 6 for Lions . . . Tindall aids own cause by hitting three- 
bagger . . . R. Billett's homer feature of game . . . Capka stars afield 
. . . Lions score one in first . . . home boys even count in second . . .R. 
Billett hits round tripper in third . . . another added in sixth after visitors 
scored second marker . . . game clinched in seventh . . . Capka singles, 
Tindall walks, Felty errs as runners score . . . Tindall shows pitching 
prowess in squelching late rallies . . . second league triumph of season 
is recorded against L'rsinus at Collegeville on May 5 . . . score is 8-1 as 
visitors take early lead and are never headed . . . near shut-out pitching 
by P. Billett features . . . Ursinus boys register only 5 safe hits . . . 
L. V. C. defense once again proves superb . . . attack shows improve- 
ment. Flying Dutchmen visit Bethlehem for contest May 8 . . . Moravian 
downed in non-league encounter 3-1 . . . Tindall demonstrates ability as 
a southpaw . . . superb ball pitched by Dutch Neck, N. J., lad in spite 
of ragged support . . . Moravian makes only 6 hits as six batters are 
fanned ... no scoring at all for first innings . . . TindalFs single, 
Davies' triple produce score . . . count evened by Moravian . . . rally 
in eighth decisive for visitors . . . trick accomplished by R. Billett's 
double and Capka's single . . . Tindall's pitching completes 3-1 triumph. 



Page 102 




Valley tossers visit Selinsgrove the following day . . . travelers defeated 
by Susquehanna tossers 6-3 ... in non-league encounter Jonah Davies 
makes debut as mound artist . . . wildness proves his undoing . . . 
eight Crusaders go down on strikes . . . Vanulis starts downfall of visitors 
in first stanza by hitting four-bagger with one on base . . . L. V. C. never 
gains lead . . . bats silenced by Badger who fans 11 while being touched 
for only 5 hit.s. Bucknell makes disastrous trip to Annville on May 1*2 
. . . league battle proves rout for visitors . . . hitting power asserts 
itself in defeat of Bisons . . . L. V. C. scores in six of eight innings . . . 
5-run rally in eighth provides climax . . . attack led by Ralph Billett 
with four .safeties . . . Tindall and Poloniak get three apiece . . . up- 
staters blanked for first eight innings ... 3 runs in ninth spoil Paul 
Billett 's shut-out . . . Bisons garner only 5 hits as nine are fanned . . . 
once again great pitching is the Flying Dutchmen's formula for success 
. . . 13-3 victory indicates rejuvenated line-up of hitters. Astounding 
hitting spree continues against Drexel in league battle at home on May 15 
. . . once again the count is 13-3 . . . Annville boys score 5 in first, 4 in 
fourth to assume early lead . . . Tindall, Kroske, and Sheesley feature 
Valley attack with 3 hits apiece . . . Tindall given flawless support as 
he allows 8 hits and fans 5 . . . Dragons score lone tallies in second, fifth, 
and sixth innings . . . hits made by all L. \'. C. players in thrilling dis- 
play of power. Twenty-four hours later Valley tossers reach new heights 
in whitewashing Muhlenberg 8-0 at Allentown . . . Paul Billett surpasses 
all previous performances in allowing only one hit as he fans 14 Mules 
. . . third base untouched by Muhlenberg runners . . . L. V. C. batters 
start slowly ... no scoring for four innings ... 1 run tallied in fifth, 
1 in sixth, '2 in seventh . . . great climax comes with 4 in the eighth . . . 
12 hits recorded by Chief Metoxen's pupils. Flying Dutchmen again con- 
quer Red and White of Albright in return engagement at Reading . . . 
pitching duties shared by Billett and Tindall . . . L. ^^ C. accumulates 
5-0 lead in three innings . . . Albright scores "2 in fourth . . . L. V. C. 
retaliates with 3 more in fifth . . . Billett routed by 3-run rally in the 
sixth . . . Tindall puts out fire as Blue and White turns in 8-5 triumph 
. . . attack led by Jonah Davies and Bartolet with 3 hits apiece. Valley- 
ites tie Palmyra A. A. in return contest . . . L. V. C. overcomes 4-run 
deficit to take 7-6 lead in the eighth inning . . . semi-pros come back 
with single tally to gain tie. Successful season brought to a close by register- 
ing 10-2 victory over Mt. St. Mary's . . . Billett fans 1 1 in return to form 
... 13 hits chalked up by Annville boys . . . Tindall leads attack with 
3 singles . . . home-runs hit by Bartolet and Kroske . . . L. V. C. as- 
sumes early lead and is never headed. Ball tossers lay aside equipment 
until 1937. 



Page 103 




'Tenni5 1936 

Opp. L. V. C 

Apr. 25. Susquehanna at Selinsgrove 7 

Apr. 27. Elizabethtown at Elizabethtown .... 7 

Apr. 28. Muhlenberg at A llent own 7 2 

May 2. Franklin & Marshall at Annville ., . . . 1 2 

May 6. Bucknell at Annville 4 5 

May 7. Franklin & Marshall at Lancaster ... 9 

May 8. Albright at Reading 4 5 

May 16. Dickinson at Annville 5 4 

May 20. Ursinus at Annville 3 4 

May 30. Albright at Annville 2 6 



Page 10k 



r. 



QnnL5 Jjumntaii 



Lebanon Valley raeket-wielders again have successful season . . . 
1936 record shows 6 victories and -4 defeats for Flying Dutchmen . . . 
Donmoyer again is ace of netmen . . . Nye, Ax, and Shroyer, seniors, 
repeat past high-class performances . . . newcomers Shenk, DeHuff, and 
Umberger also show exceptional strength . . . team again coached by 
Dr. Stevenson . . . first two matches rained out . . . season opened on 
April 2,5 at Selinsgrove with 7-0 conquest of Susquehanna team . . . 
Crusaders fail to win single set . . . Elizabethtown next victim in post- 
poned match . . . class of Annville boys demonstra'^ed again as 7-0 
whitewashing is administered . . . victory string snapped at Allentown 
on April 28 . T . Muhlenberg triumphs 7-2 . . . only Donmoyer and 
DeHuff turn in victories for L. V. C. . . . May Day festivities tainted by 
loss to Franklin & Marshall . . . Diplomats prove too strong in annexing 
7-2 victory . . . first defeat of season suffered by Donmoyer . . . three 
matches on consecutive days test stamina of Valley boys . . . Bucknell 
overcome May 6 on Annville courts . . . final score is 5-4 . . . L. V. C. 
boys rally from 3-4 deficit to record victory . . . closest match of the 
season . . . spectators thrilled by come-back of Dutchmen in final doubles 
match . . effects evident the next day . . . 9-0 rout recorded by F. 
& M. at Lancaster . . . defeat is worst of season suffered by Annville 
boys . . . following day sees Valleyites defeat traditional rivals in Reading 
match . . . Albright loses tight affair 5-4 . . . hard-fought matches the 
order as rivals split the six single set-tos . . . L. V. C. annexes two of 
three doubles encounters to win . . . fourth defeat of season suffered at 
Dickinson on May 16 . . . score is 5-4 . . . close doubles defeats cost 
L. V. C. the match . . . Donmoyer, DeHuff, and Ax record single vic- 
tories . . . Ursinus raeket-wielders lose close match to Valleyites four 
days later . . . score is 4-3 in abbreviated encounter . . . season closes 
with traditional match against Albright on Memorial Day . . . grand 
finale results in 6-2 triumph for Lebanon Valley . . . decided superiority 
demonstrated by Blue and AVhite boys . . . last taste of intercollegiate 
competition for Hib Nye and Dick Ax . . . fine records turned in by both 
during college careers. 




J-^. 




ghU'4^c 



OclcQi 



L. V. C. girls open hockey season by witnessing professional hockey 
games . . . international tournament held at St. Martin's Cricket Club 
at Philadelphia . . . fifty of our hockey players attended these games to 
see how advanced hockey may be played . . . this inspired our hockey 
groups at Lebanon \'alley College to work harder . . . encouragement to 
develop technique to such a degree that our games would be a better brand 
of hockey . . . had three teams named for the international teams, 
United States, Scotch, and Czechs . . . United States team won all of its 
six games . . . Scotch team second by winning three . . . Czechs rated 
last . . . from these three teams, our team was chosen . . . this team 
played games with other schools . . . game with the Harrisburg Hockey 
Association on Home-coming Day . . . first half score 1-0 in favor of 
Harrisburg . . . forward line stronger than L. V. C.'s . . . back field 
superior to Harrisburg's . . . second half, Jackie Jagnesak, center half- 
back, tied score . . . final score 1-1 . . . Anna Ortli at right half-back 
played fine defensive game . . . teams evenly matched . . . next game 
with Shippensburg State Teachers . . . won by L. V. girls . . . score 3-1 
. . . first half teams evenly matched . . . Wanda Price scored 2 goals 
while Jean Houck scored one goal . . . next game at Susquehanna Uni- 
versity . . . hockey play day . . first time honor squad participated in 
a hockey play day sponsored by S. U. . . . teams represented: Cedar 
Crest, Shippensburg State Teachers College, Susquehanna University and 



Page 106 




QhW -HoclcQu 



Lebanon Valley College . . . each team to play every other team during 
the day . . . first game of the day lost to Susquehanna University . . . 
final score 1-0 . . . L. V. C.'s team not clicking as well as usual . . . 
second game played with Cedar Crest . . . first half our forward line and 
back field functioned perfectly . . . Jean Houck scored beautiful goal just 
before the whistle ended the half . . . score at half 1-1 . . . second half 
not as well played as the first half . . . game lost to Cedar Crest . . . 
final score 3-1 . . . Gail Spangler, L. V. C.'s goalie, displayed nice tech- 
nique in keeping the ball out of our cage . . . last game played with 
Shippensburg . . . final score favor of L. V. C, 1-0 . . . Gertrude Ellen- 
berger and Helen Bartlett played fine games in wing positions in all three 
games . . . teams were shown hockey technique . . . luncheon and a 
formal banquet were enjoyed by our hockeyets . . . Miss Gable of Phila- 
delphia guest speaker at banquet . . . topic, "The Olympics" . . . tables 
decorated with model hockey fields . . . captain of each team presented 
with one of these fields . . . hockey squad had a most enjoyable time . . . 
Junior varsity team played Linden Hall, losing by a score of 2-1 . . . teams 
played nice hockey all season . . . ideals are to develop not only better 
hockey but also secure better field . . . despite all hindering factors we 
can say Miss Henderson has done a fine job coaching hockey this year . . . 
looking forward to a well-organized group of teams next year . . . with 
the cooperation of all we should have another successful year of hockey. 



Page 107 




(^hW SaiketUl 



Girls' basketball team enjoyed very successful season this year . . . 
under the able direction of our coach, Miss Henderson, team showed im- 
provement over last year . . . varsity team chosen from dormitory teams 
. . . L. V. C. won all games played . . . first game was played with 
Albright at home . . . girls came through with a score of 45-14 . . . fast- 
played game . . . one feature of game was fine sportsmanship of both 
teams . . . practice game with Shippensburg State Teachers College was 
next victory . . . score 54-20 . . . big feature of year was a basketball 
Play Day sponsored by W. A. A. . . . five schools were entertained . . . 
Susquehanna, Cedar Crest, Dickinson, Shippensburg, and Albright . . . 
idea of Play Day is new ... is being accepted and enthusiastically under- 
taken by all the better colleges . . . holding Play Days fosters spirit of 
friendship and fellowship between schools . . . girls and coaches and 
players submit problems which the entire group tries to solve . . . short 
games are played and discussed critically . . . helpful hints are given 
. . . three ten-minute games were played consisting of two five-minute 
periods . . . Lebanon Valley's team played the first short game with 
Dickinson . . . victory for L. V. . . . score 12-0 . . . after games were 
played all the players got together in a round-table discussion from which 
coaches were excluded . . . questions were asked about rules . . . new 
rules were explained . . . movies on "Basketball Technique" were shown 
in chapel . . . after the movies the full-time games were played . . . 



Tage 108 



Lebanon Valley defeated Cedar Crest 40-17 . . . Freshmen-Sophs team 
played Linden Hall at Lititz . . . won by a score of 41-20 . . . varsity 
team closed the season with a trip to Reading where they played Albright 
. . . victory again for L. V. . . . score 33-8 . . . successful season . . . 
every game played was a game won . . . marked improvement over last 
year's games . . . Play Day which was sponsored by the W. A. A. on our 
campus, under the direction of Miss Henderson was most successful . . . 
considered biggest feature of the year. 




Anna Evans 

COKA GhABY 



Alice Richie Saka Light 

Lucie Cook Ernestine Jagnesak 



Edxa Binkley Dorothy Kreamer 

Jean Hand Anna Orth 





CfhW Untta-muiaU 

Women's Athletic Association sponsored intra-mural games for all 
women interested in various sports . . . fall games, organized hiking, con- 
sisted of hare and hound chases, treasure hunts, scent trails, moonlight 
and supper hikes . . . any girl on campus allowed to join in hiking . . . 
tennis . . . tournament finally determines girl tennis champion . . . 
archery, a new sport at L. V. C. . . . archery class tournament followed by 
tournament with other schools . . . hockey major sport in fall, about 
seventy-five girls participated in games . . . basketball popular sport in 
winter . . . first have intra-mural program . . . one team from each dorm 
with two day-students' teams . . . class round robin . . . final honor 
group is chosen from all teams to play outside schools . . . handball, ping 
pong, and badminton for those who do not participate in basketball . . . 
spring baseball tournament between classes . . . tennis, hiking and arch- 
ery resumed . . . volleyball class tournament . . . intra-mural games 
are featured in order that all girls can participate . . . gives every girl a 
chance to play any game she prefers . . . intra-murals becoming popular 
in all colleges . . . ends competition between schools which usually ends 
in a bad feeling . . . intra-murals acquaint girls with each other . . . 
games have been very successful on campus . . . well attended by 
student body . . . Miss Henderson, girls' coach, has done much to 
promote intra-mural games. 



Fage 110 




Iiou5 ' SJittta-mutaU 



Annual tug-of-war starts interclass activities . . . home-coming morn- 
ing event takes place on banks of the "Quittie" . . . Paul Myers carries 
rope across creek . . . Thompson's Frosh pull Sophs . . . return the 
compliment on next yank . . . third pull takes place on dry land . . . 
Frosh triumph after grueling struggle . . . event completed as both 
coaches are thrown into the water . . . Soph-Frosh football game played 
Nov. 21 . . . Sophs start off fast attack, functions well . . . Raezer's pass 
to Umberger scores 6 points . . . bad pass from center spoils extra-point 
eflFort . . . Frosh come to life after intermission . . . Artz climaxes drive 
by sweeping end for a touchdown ... tie broken as Geesey slips off tackle 
for extra point . . . leg-weary players unable to score further . . . happy 
Frosh leave field with 7-6 triumph to show . . . Interclass Basketball 
League starts in December . . . Seniors get off to fast start . . . strug- 
gling underclassmen unable to overcome early lead of near-grads . . . 
victory over Sophs on Feb. 24 clinches title for Seniors . . . Frosh capture 
second honors after slow start . . . Juniors finish third . . . unlucky 
Sophs finish far in the rear . . . height and experience of Seniors prove a 
decided advantage . . . Kinney and Trego of the Seniors finish f)ne-two 
for league scoring honors . . . consistent play of Loose and Heisch also a 
feature . . . Freshmen paced by Peffley and Foreman, star forwards . . . 
Munday at center and Moller at guard also play fine games . . . un- 
familiarity with floor proves a handicap to yearlings at first . . . play 
improved with experience . . . Juniors start fast, then slow down . . . 
fine work of Capka, Frey, and Gasteiger keep team going ... all high 
scores held down by Frey's expert guarding . . . hopeless Sophs led by 
Thomas and Dempsey . . . numerous overwhelming defeats prove de- 
moralizing . . . lack of man power really accounts for sad showing. 



Tage 111 



Alau "^au TQ6tli^aL 



May 2, 1936, dawned bright and sunny — perfect for 
the traditional May Day Festival on the Lebanon 
Vallej^ College Campus . . . bright festival decora- 
tions bedecked the campus which swarmed with people 
. . . subject the "Pageant of the Nations" . . . Olym- 
pic Festival, the occasion for the meeting of all the 
nations in the spirit of friendship and good will . . . 
purpose of the festival interpreted to the May Queen 
by the Spirit of the Olympias, portrayed by Carolyn 
Kohler who carried the long, narrow Olympic flag with 
the chain of five links ... a herald summoned each 
nation in turn who presented their native dances . . . 
program began with the procession of all participants 
and the Coronation of the Queen . . . Louise Gillan, 
the Queen of the May, with Kathleen Poole, the Maid 
of Honor . . . ladies of the court were Louise Shearer, 
Iva Claire Weirick, Jane Shellenberger, jNIarian Leisey, 
June Gingrick, Rae Anna Reber . . . Queen was pre- 
sented with gifts by the president of each class . . . 
Paul Hershey represented the Senior Class, Edgar 
Messersmith the Junior Class, Adolph Capka the 
Sophomore Class, and Robert Tschopp the Freshman 
Class . . . dances of the Nations were presented for 
the entertainment of the Queen and her court . . . 
Japan was represented by Rose Tschopp who sang 



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LOUISE GILLAN 

May Queen 




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KATHLEEN POOLE 

Maid of Honor 




"Japanese Love Song" . . . Alice Richie and Mildred 
Haas gave a Japanese Duo-Dance . . . two dances 
were given by the Freshman girls, a Fan Dance and a 
Parasol Dance . . . Sweden presented a drill which 
was executed by the Freshman boys . . . the Freshman 
girls gave a Swedish Clap Dance . . . Jean McKeag 



Page 116 



as a young Spanish girl gave a solo dance for Spain . . . 
Sophomore girls danced the "Alma ^Yaltz" ... a trio, 
Gayle Mountz, Helen Summy, and Charlotte Stabley, 
sang "Irish Eyes Are Smiling," as a representative of 
Ireland . . . Freshman girl music students gave an 
Irish Folk Dance . . . Russia presented the Boys' 
Glee Club in a Russian Chorus . . . Sophomore and 
Junior girls gave a livelj^ Russian Folk Dance . . . 
America was represented by several groups . . . 
Yvonne and Jay Metoxen in an. Indian Dance . . . 
Sophomore and Freshman boys in a Pipe of Peace 
Dance . . . Senior girls and boys in the Mozart ^Minuet 
. . . colorful, natural scarf-dance bj^ Carolyn Roberts, 
Lucille Maberry, and Hazel Heminway . . . Junior 
girls and boys enacted May Pole Dance . . . festival 
ended with the recessional . . . Professors Rutledge 
and Carmean directed the musical selections . . . 
pageant was written and directed by Esther Henderson, 
Director of Physical Education for Women . . . as- 
sisted by Emerson Metoxen, Director of Physical Edu- 
cation for Men . . . under supervision of the Y. M. 
C. A. and Y. W. C. A. Cabinets. 





COURT ENTERS INDIAN DANCE 

WALTZ DANCE RUSSIAN DANCE ENTRANCE 

SPANISH SHAWL DANCE 
JAPANESE DANCE CALISTHENICS 

MAY QUEEN ENTERS RUSSIAN DANCE 





DANCE BEFORE QUEEN ENTRANCE OF MAY POLE DANCERS 

ANOTHER GROUP ENTERS INDIANS ON MARCH 

ATTENDANTS ENTER 
OLYMPIAD DANCE VIEW OF SPECTATORS 

COURT ON THRONE FOLK DANCE 



Page 119 




BEST ATHLETES 

Edward Kress 
Ernestine Jagnesak 




BEST -LOOKING 

Marianna Treo 
John Trego 





EARL UNGER 

Cornet 



JEAN i\L\RliARGER 

Voice 



ROBERT JOHNS 

Flute 



SARA LIGHT 

Organ 





PHIL LESTER 

Trombone 



GAYLE MOUNTZ 



ROBERT CLIPPINGER 

Organ and Tympani 




RITA MOSHER 

Piano 




The Junior Class presented Pulitzer Prize "Alison's House" by Susan Glaspell 
. . . Fridaj' evening, December 11, 19.S6 . . . under the direction of alumnus 
Robert Spohn, who gave his most capable attention to the production . . . super- 
vised by Dr. Struble, associate professor of English . . . stage setting elaborately 
planned and beautifully executed by Carl Conrad . . . stage properties attended 
to by Roger Saylor and Charles Raab . . . lighting, make-up, odds and ends 
expertly handled by Harold Phillips . . . costuming by Lena Risser . . . the plot 
concerned the happenings on the last day of the nineteenth century in the house 
where Alison, the poet, lived . . . scenes took place in the library and in Alison's 
room . . . Cur\'in Thompson as old Stanhope attempted to sell the homestead 
and to persuade to come live with him his eccentric old sister, Agatha, charac- 
terized very well by Barbara Sloane . . . Curvin Dellinger as Eben, and Catherine 
Mills as Louise, Eben's wife, portrayed a typically unsuited married couple . . . 
Carolyn Roberts played the beautiful role of Elsa, around whom the main action 
and Alison's poetry centered . . . Ted Stanhope, the dim-witted college lad, 
cleverly characterized by Charles Raab . . . John Gongloff in the role of Richard 
Knowles, the reporter in love with Stanhope's secretary, Ann Leslie, sympatheti- 
cally played by Silvia Harclerode . . . Jennie, the maid, taken amusingly by Lucille 
Hawthorne . . . most humorous parts, Mr. and Mrs. Hodges, expectant pur- 
chasers of the homestead, depicted by Vernon Rogers and Helen Butterwick . . . 
on the whole an extremely clever play . . . beautifully planned . . . delightfully 
presented. 

Fage 12i 



Wla and EuckU J^lau 

"The Truth about Blayds," an A. A. Milne play . . . second of the 
annual three-act productions . . . presented by the Dramatic Club, No- 
vember 12, 1936, in Engle Hall . . . scenes took place in a room of Oliver 
Blayds' house in Portman Square . . . plot concerned members of the 
Blayds family whose lives revolved around Oliver Blayds, the aged poet 
. . . the truth was finally discovered — Blayds' poetry was not his own, but 
that of a dead friend who had left the poetry in his care . . . effect of this 
discovery upon the family was almost disastrous, but by it all are enabled 
to become their own masters, not the slave of a domineering old man . . . 
Oliver Blayds, the white-haired, bewhiskered, eccentric, would-be poet was 
admirably characterized by Robert Tschopp . . . Mary Zartman displayed 
real ability in an appealing portrayal of Isobej Blayds, the devoted daughter 
who gave her life to the poet's whims . . . William Blayds-Conway, 
Blayds' pretentious son-in-law, was played with great skill by Karl Flocken 
. . . Marion, his ever-adoring and dutiful wife, was excellently portrayed 
by Dorothy Kreamer . . . William Clark enacted the role of Oliver 
Blayds-Conway, and Jean McKeag as Septima Blayds-Conway gave a 
clever interpretation of his unconventional sister . . . Louise Saylor took 
the part of Parsons, the maid . . . crowning achievement was Dean 
Aungst's natural, sincere, and clever interpretation of a newspaper reporter, 
A. L. Royce, who won Isobel after an eighteen-year separation ... di- 
rected by Dr. Struble . . . staged with the cooperation of the inevitable 
and most necessary Rutherford, Schmidt, Hal Phillips, and Richard Baus. 








Pliilokosmian and Clionian Literary Societies joined on the occasion of Philo's 
sixty-ninth anniversary to present Clemence Dane's stage success, "Bill of Divorce- 
ment" . . . Friday evening. May 1, 1936 in Engle Hall . . . scenes took place in 
a small country house on Christmas Day of 1933 . . . audience under the assump- 
tion that a law had been passed in Parliament granting divorces to those married 
to drunkards, criminals, or insane . . . plot concerned the divorce of Margaret 
Fairfield from her husband who was in an insane institution ... at the time of 
the play she was in love with another man, and her daughter was engaged to be 
married . . . they are stunned by the appearance of Hilary, the husband, who 
had been set free . . . situation is solved when Sydney, the daughter, realizing she 
has a taint in her blood and could never be happily married, decides to remain 
with her father . . . Margaret Fairfield, the wife of the insane Hilary, was por- 
trayed charmingly by Theresa Stefan . . . Jean McKeag gave a marvelous inter- 
pretation of the self-sacrificing daughter . . . Kenneth Eastland did very well as 
Gray Meredith, Margaret's lover . . . Kit Pomphrey, Sydney's abandoned 
fiance, was enacted by John Trego . . . Robert Tschopp did a remarkable piece of 
character portrayal as the crazed Hilary Fairfield . . . Jane Shellenberger skill- 
fully portrayed the eccentric aunt . . . Dr. Alliot and Rev. Pomphrey, friends of 
the family, were represented by William Earnest and Curvin Thompson respectively 
. . . Lena Risser filled the role of Bassett, the maid . . . directed expertly by 
Harold Phillips . . . staging in charge of Edward Schmidt and Allen Rutherford 
. . . Dr. P. A. W. Wallace assisted in casting. 



Page 126 



KaLo and "^QLpklan -(i nni\tet6atu X'Lau 

Kalozetean and Delphian Literary Societies on Kalo's sixtieth anniversary, 
Friday evening, March 19, 1937, presented "The Bishop Misbehaves," by Frederick 
Jackson . . . scenes were a taproom and a hall of the Bishop's palace . . . young 
couple are endeavoring to avenge a financial injury to the young lady's father by 
robbing the offender . . . plans are laid and then —the Bishop of Broadminister 
and his sister interfere and play detective . . . Bishop brings everyone together, 
finds the perfect solution in righting the wrong, and all go merrily on their way . . . 
Harlan Kinney, the bartender, was supreme in his clever and convincing charac- 
terization . . . Charles Raab as Mr. Brooke, the timid secretary, was extremely 
amusing and did a splendid character portrayal . . . Bishop's sister was exception- 
ally well done by Anna Morrison . . . Dean Aungst, as the misbehaving Bishop, 
played his role with the utmost finesse and ability . . . Donald Meadows, the 
gentleman thief, and his fiancee, Hester, were enacted by Richard Smith and 
Mildred Haas . . . Edgar Messersmith, as Mr. Waller, was a tough customer who 
wasn't so tough when his wife was present . . . the blase Mrs. Waller was por- 
trayed by Barbara Bowman . . . parts of Collins and Frenchy, assistants in the 
burglary, were played by Arthur Heisch and John Speg . . . play was cast and 
directed by Dr. George G. Struble and Robert Spohn . . . lighting by Edward 
Schmidt . . . make-up by Harold Phillips . . . members of the societies aided in 
the staging and gathering of properties. 




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Dad's Day, sponsored by the Y. M. C. A., occurred this year on Satur- 
day, Feb. 13 . . . event is staged yearly by the "Y" as an ideal plan to 
bring the dads into closer contact with the school, and to give them a real 
idea of their sons' college life . . . many of the dads arrived Saturday 
morning, and were taken on an inspection tour of the college buildings 
. . . after lunch in the college dining-hall, the dads were guests of the 
Conservatory students in Engle Hall . . . address of welcome was first 
delivered by Dr. A. H. M. Stonecipher, dean of college . . . Louis Straub, 
president of the Y. M. C. A., addressed the dads in behalf of that organ- 
ization . . . musical program for the afternoon featured Emily Kindt and 
her marimba; John Zettlemoyer, violinist; a trombone quartet composed 
of Frank Bryan, Philip Lester, Warren Brown, and Dennis Geesey; Robert 
Heckman at the organ; and vocal selection by Ray Zimmerman . . . last 
but not least that inimitable campus orchestra, the Amalgamated Agitators 
. . . after this program, to give Dad a view of the more intimate scenes of 
everyday life, college motion pictures were shown by Prof. Derickson . . . 
climax of the day was reached when, at 5 o'clock, the fathers and sons 
gathered for a royal banquet in the dining-hall . . . while Father smoked 
the after-dinner cigar, Dr. Butterwick, toastmaster for the evening, intro- 
duced the speakers: Rev. O. T. Ehrhart of Lancaster, a representative of 
the East Pennsylvania Conference to the Board of Trustees; Dr. Clyde A. 
Lynch, president of the College; Duey Unger, student representative, and 
Dr. G. A. Richie, who gave some interesting baseball statistics . . . after 
the banquet. Dad was taken to the basketball game between L. V. and 
Drexel, where he saw L. V. come out on top. 



Page 128 




MotliQl' 5 'Pau 



Y. W. C. A. sponsored Mother's Weekend on March 6 and 7 . . . many of the 
mothers arrived Friday evening and attended the Clionian meeting in Clio Hall, 
where entertainment was provided and refreshments were served . . . Saturday 
morning more mothers arrived . . . were taken on tours of inspection until 10.30, 
when they were invited to attend Play Day, sponsored by the W. A. A. . . . 
mothers watched their daughters play basketball until lunch was served in the 
college dining-hall . . . after lunch the mothers went to the chapel for moving 
pictures on basketball technique . . . this feature of Play Day enabled the mothers 
as well as the players to observe various techniques in order to understand the game 
better . . . mothers spent the remainder of the afternoon either watching more of 
the basketball games or becoming acquainted with other mothers and their daugh- 
ters' friends ... at 5 o'clock the mothers were feted at a banquet arranged in 
their honor . . . tables were decorated with green borders, flowers, and candles, 
and there were large silhouettes on the walls representing mothers and daughters 
. . . after the feast there was entertainment . . . Mary Ann Cotroneo played he- 
violin, Virginia Neissner sang several songs, and at the end Gayle Mountz led in 
group singing ... in the evening mother went along and cheered with daughter at 
the basketball game, this time between Albright and L. V. . . . after the game 
everyone returned to the dorms, and mother, at her expense, was initiated into the 
traditional Saturday night feeds . . . following church and Sunday School the next 
morning, the mothers and daughters gathered on North Hall steps for a group 
picture ... in afternoon they were taken on a tour of the men's dormitory . . . 
weekend was climaxed by the Y. W. tea for the mothers and daughters on Simday 
afternoon . . . Irish motif shamrock of Saint Patrick predominated in the napkins, 
green plates, mints, and decorations . . . refreshments were served buffet style 
and Mrs. Lynch and Mrs. Stonecipher poured ... as entertainment, Helen 
Butterwick played several violin selections, Jean Marbarger gave two vocal solos, 
Mrs. Harnish sang, and Mrs. Bender played several piano numbers . . . more than 
50 mothers attended at least part of the program ... all expressed appreciation 
for the pleasant weekend and programs which had been planned . . . mothers 
became acquainted with each other, met their daughters' friends, saw many of the 
Ultimate diversions of their daughters' college life ... on the whole, enjoyed a 
rather perfect weekend . . . 



Vage 129 




Sand 



Flute and Piccolo: 
Robert Johns 
Benjamine Goodman 

Oboe: 

Cyrus Smith 

Clarinets: 
Homer Barthold 
Harry Crisswell 
Walter Ehrhart 
Arthur Evelev 
John Gongloff 
Gerald Hasbrouck 
Alfred Heilman 
William Koenig 
Milton Melman 
Vernon Rogers 
Warren Sechrist 
Herbert Strohman 
Harvey Taylor 
Ernest Weirick 

Saxophones: 

Richard Kauffman 
Wilbur Leech 



Richard Smith 
Robert Smith 

Cornets: 
William Black 
Thomas Bowman 
Dwight Heiland 
Cecil Oy'ler 
Robert Strayer 
Henry' Steiner 
Earl Unger 
Harold Yeagley 

Altos: 
Gerald Bittinger 
William Brensinger 
George Smeltzer 
Ray Zimmerman 

Baritones: 

David Byerly' 
Warren Brown 
Russell Heller 



Trombones: 
Frank Bryan 
Gerald Clymer 
Dennis Geesey 
Luther Immler 
Philip Lester 
John Moody" 
John Moyer 

Basses: 

CuRviN Dellinger 
David Foreman 
John Miller 
Merle Rider 

Percussion : 
Robert Clippinger 
Robert Heckman 
Henry- Hoffman 

Sterling Kleiser 

Drum Majors: 
Marlin O'Neal 
Chester Stineman 



Page 132 




(fltW £and 



Flutes: 
Lucille Maberry 
Catherine Mills 

Clarinets: 
Edna Binkley 
Helen Butterwick 
Lucie Cook 
Arlene Hoffman 
Ruth Keene 
Esther Kopenhaveh 
Sara Light 
Amy Meinhardt 
Eleanor Reeder 

Cor7iets: 
Elizabeth Bingamen 
Nora Franklin 
Helen Himmelberger 
Mary Grace Longenecker 
Anna Morrison 
Gayle Mountz 
Marianne Trbo 
Kathryn Yingst 
Dorothy Zeiters 

Baritones: 

Virginia Neissner 
Irene Ranck 
Christine Yoder 



AUos: 

Isabel Cox 
Beatrice Fink 
Mildred Gangwer 
June Krum 
Anita Patschke 
Ruth Rohrer 

Trombones: 
Greta Heiland 
Lena Shaw 

CORDELLA ShEAFFER 

Rose Tschopp 
Dorothy Yeakel 



Elizabeth Bender 
Dorothy Bollinger 
Mary Ann Cotroneo 
Jean Marbarger 

Percussion: 
Ruth Goyne 
Emily Kindt 
Kathryn Knoll 
Rita Mosher 

Drum Major: 
Lucie Cook 



Page 133 




giee eiuk 



Sopranos: 

Helen Buttervvick 
Isabel Cox 
Beatrice Fink 
Mildred Gangwer 
Jean Marbarger 
Anna Morrison 
Gayle Moxintz 
Irene Ranck 
Rose Tschopp 

Contraltos: 

Evelyn Fridinger 
Ruth Goyne 
Ruth Keene 
Kathryn Knoll 
Esther Koppenhaver 
Catherine Mills 
Virginia Neissner 
Dorothy Null 
Christine Yoder 



Tenors: 
Homer Baethold 
William Black 
Mathew Callen 
Stuart Goodman 
Alfred Heilman 
Vincent Naugle 
Marlin O'Neal 
Cecil Oyler 
Robert Smith 
Chester Stineman 



.s; 

Robert Clippinger 
Luther ImiMler 
Russell Hatz 
Robert Johns 
John Miller 
Eugene Saylor 
Cyrus Smith 
Henry Steiner 
George Yokum 
John Zettlemoyer 



Accompanist: Sara Light 



Page 134 




•& 



Sumpltonu 0'tcfie5tta 



Flutes: 

Robert Johns 
Catherine Mills 

Ohoes: 

Gerald Hasbrouck 

Cyrus Smith 

Clarinets: 

Homer Barthold 
Herbert Strohman 

Bassoons: 

Richard Smith 
Robert Smith 

Trumpets: 
William Black 
Henry Steiner 

French Horns: 

William Brensinger 
Isabel Cox 
Cecil Oyler 
Eakl Ungek 

Tympani: 
Robert Clippinger 



Trombones: 
Warren Brown 
Mathew Callen 
Philip Lester 

Violins: 

Russell Hatz, Concertmaster 
Helen Butterwick 
Marianne Cotroneo 
Benjamine Goodman 
Theodore Karhan 
Esther Koppenhaver 
Gayle Mountz 
Kathryn Yingst 
John Zettlemoy'er 

Violas: 
Russell Heller 
Eugene Saylok 

Violoncellos; 
Frank Bryan 
Marianne Treo 
Dorothy Zeiters 

Bais Viols: 

Chester Stineman 
George Yokum 



Page 135 




QuittLG 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Edifor-m-Ckief, Curvin N. Dellinger, Jr. 



Literary Editors: 
Martha Baney 
Wanda Price 
Theresa Stefan 
Calvin Spitler 

Photography Editor: 
Paul Ulrich 



Photographer: 

Walter Ehrhart 

Typist: 
Lloyd Berger 

Associates: 
Jean McKeag 
M. Louise Stoner 



Sports Editors: 

Ernestine Jagnesak 
Roger Saylor 

Class Statistics: 
Lucille Maberry 

Organization: 
Lena Risser 



BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager, C. Boyd Shaffer 
Associates 



Dean Gasteiger 
Adolph Capka 



David Byerly 
Catherine Mills 



Large amount of time and energy was necessary to produce this pub- 
lication . . . efficient staff, in all phases of activities connected with pub- 
lication of book . . . photography editors, typists, and copy-readers 
should be specially commended . . . hope that the staff has justified its 
selection for the publication of the 1938 Quittie . . . 



Page 136 




/. 



a vie ^olUaienne 



Weekly news publication of the students at Lebanon Valley College 
... in its twelfth year of existence . . . voice of the college campus . . . 
provides training in journalism for those students interested in furthering 
their education along this line . . . attempts to reflect activities of the 
student body in its editorial and feature columns . . . editorials are not 
necessarily the consensus of opinion of the student body, but merely the 
views of the editor . . . molds campus opinion . . . recounts past events 
in a complete and interesting way and accurately foretells coming events 
. . . valuable record of the varied activities on the L. V. C. campus . . . 
general reportorial staff consists of fifteen members who deal with the news 
of the campus . . . the special assigned work covers the material for the 
four literary societies, conservatory notes, athletics, and alumni . . . this 
year the "La Vie" staff has been given a place in which to do its blue 
penciling, thumping on the typewriter, and other necessary work ... a 
room of the conservatory annex has been set aside for this purpose and 
equipped with table, chairs, typewriter, lamp, and bookcase . . . office 
has a typical journalistic atmosphere . . . newspapers abound in multi- 
tudes and cover all available table space . . . the clicking of the typewriter 
and the scratch of blue pencil may be heard throughout the room ... at 
the end of every year the staff holds a banquet with some noted speaker 
as the guest of the evening. 



Richard A. Baus Editor-in-Chief 

William Earnest ) . . _ , . 

Louis Straub } ^«*«^^««« Editors 

Robert Kell Business Manager 



Page 137 




Alen 5 Senate 



Men's governing body of L. V. C. . . . have legislative, executive, and 
judicial power ... six seniors, five juniors, three sophomores, and one 
non-voting freshman . . . nominated by the faculty . . . elected by the 
student vote, of members of respective classes . . . duty to observe and 
administer laws of the Senate . . . rules of the Senate are formulated by 
the group, and receive faculty approval. Senate this year under leader- 
ship of Duey Unger . . . conscientiously performs his duties as president 
. . . Senate enforces freshman rules . . . wear dinks, no dates, precedence 
given to upperclassmen . . . disobedient frosh have rules extended, run 
errands, etc. . . . supervises conduct of men at L. V. C. . . . try to have 
students realize proper respect for rights and property of others, and act 
in accordance with the rules of the school. Senate attempts to decrease 
the amount of noise in the halls and the number of windows, doors, etc., 
that are broken . . . with W. S. G. A. sponsors the Football Holiday 
Dance ... an organization in answer to the popular request of students 
in all schools, for student government and more student power . . . suc- 
cess of Senate depends on faithful cooperation of every student, not only 
officers and representatives. 

Duey Unger President 

Louis Straub Vice-President 

Adolph Capka Secretary-Treasurer 



Page 138 



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Jigger board of L. V. C. . . . feminine legislators and dormitory law 
enforcers . . . freshmen appear before this board to confess their sins of 
commission and omission . . . trials held for those who are reported 
violating rules . . . gives "campuses" and "man-campuses"; even a 
"roomus" now and then . . . when seniors' rooms are in need of cleaning, 
frosh might even clean rooms to purge away their sins . . . members have 
power to give regular permissions . . . president has authority in absence 
of the Dean of Women . . . composed of dormitory students and one day 
student representative . . . members nominated by the board, secure 
faculty approval and are elected by the student girls . . . this year's 
president is Ruth Buck elected by members of the board . . . has privilege 
of occupying center suite on second floor of North Hall . . . signs all slips 
for home permissions . . . co-sponsors of Holiday Dance in the Alumni 
Gym . . . funds provide for such items as Christmas trees for halls, 
dormitory decorations, and games for the parlors . . . appoints hall presi- 
dents and proctors . . . hall presidents become members of the board 
. . . has charge of decorum of women on campus . . . functions in col- 
laboration with the Men's Senate . . . has analogous powers, but holds 
meetings minus the feeds . . . each girl is a mutual member of the W. S. 
G. A. . . . owes her cooperation to the board to make it worth while and 
successful. 

Ruth Buck President 

RoMAiNE Stiles Vice-President 

Gayle Mountz Treasurer 

Wanda Price Secretary 



Page 139 



^'.|i;^W.-S j|;;;, .--.- . '>,*».*^i*, 



Student -T'acultu Council 

A connecting link between the faculty and students . . . composed of 
the presidents of the Men's Senate and the AV. S. G. A. board, two members 
elected from each class and six faculty representatives . . . one of the 
newer organizations on the campus, originating last year and having much 
success its initial year . . . meets once a month to consider suggestions 
which students have submitted to the representatives of their respective 
classes, thus affording an opportunity to the students to make known their 
complaints and give suggestions for any possible improvements . . . 
problems arising from campus life and its activities are duly considered 
and referred to appropriate committees or organizations with suggestions 
for action . . . recreation hour is the answer to the students' appeals for 
opportunity for informal social gatherings . . . brought about last year 
largely through the influence of the Council . . . non-publication of 
semester grades is also a result of last year's activity . . . one of the 
problems to be solved this year is chapel . . . trying to find a way to 
satisfy both students and faculty with interesting programs, yet not losing 
the religious element belonging to chapel . . . organizations of this nature 
help to right the wrongs on a campus and strengthen the weak features of 
an institution . . . add enjoyment and satisfaction to life on campus . . . 
this the Student-Faculty Council has done . . . judging from its accom- 
plishments of the first two years, the Council is an organization of in- 
estimable worth on the campus of L. V. C. 

Prof. D. Clark Carmean Chairman 

Arlene Hoffman Secretary 



Page UO 



r jji.-^sit .\ I > w ^ 




Local honorary scholarship society . . . founded on Lebanon Valley 
College campus in the spring of 1935 . . . counterpart of national Scholar- 
ship fraternity, Phi Beta Kappa . . . students having maintained an 
average of 88 per cent or better during their first three and a half years and 
having good moral character are eligible for membership . . . present 
membership is twenty-six . . . founded to create more scholastic interest 
on the campus and to acknowledge the scholastic proficiency of worthy 
students . . . goal toward which all should strive . . . hold annual 
banquet at the close of each school year . . . new members are: 

Richard A. Baus 
William H. Earnest 
Karl R. Flocken 
Charles B. Kinney 

BURRITT K. LupTON 

Rose Eleanor Lynch 
Francis MacMullen 
Grace M. Naugle 
John Zimmerman 

Dr. a. H. M. Stonecipher President 

Dr. H. H. Shenk Vice-President 

Dr. Stella Johnson Stevenson . . . Secretary-Treasurer 



Page Ul 




Religious group including all male students of the college . . . pro- 
motes Christian leadership, social well-being, and bonds of friendship 
among male students . . . creates interest in events of a religious nature 
. . . very active in campus activities . . . assists Y. W. C. A. in numerous 
projects . . . sponsors May Day pageant . . . publishes a frosh "L" 
handbook that is valuable to every freshman . . . sent delegates to con- 
ference sponsored by the State Y. M. . . . held at Lock Haven State 
Teachers' College . . . three-day session Dec. 4-6 . . . has charge of 
vespers in Y room of men's dorm . . . collaborates with Y. W. to plan 
freshman week . . . introduces frosh to students and new campus life 
. . . helps to acquaint them generally . . . upperclassman adopts a 
freshman as his "little brother" . . . means of forming friendships and of 
having one real pal . . . featured poverty party with Y. W. in alumni 
gym . . . true to name . . . Y room furnishes place for recreation . . . 
magazines, ping-pong, billiards, chess, checkers, and radio are features of 
entertainment . . . organization speaks for itself . . . many projects 
show value. 

Louis Straub President 

Harold Beamesderfer Vice-President 

Robert Clippinger Secretary 

DuEY Unger Treasurer 

Donald AVorley Pianist 



Page H2 




Y. W. consists of all women students at L. V. C. . . . work carried on 
by a cabinet of fifteen girls, chosen at a general election of all members. 
Purpose to establish Christian ideals on campus . . . aids each girl in her 
mental, spiritual, and moral life . . . helps arrange and carry out plans 
for freshman week when guidance from such an organization is needed 
. . . many other activities carried on during remainder of year . . . this 
year helped sponsor a Poverty Dance held in Alumni Gym . . . May Day 
under direction of combined Y. W. and Y. M. cabinets . . . various teas 
held; one given for each class . . . Heart -sister Week and Mother's Week- 
end under direction of Y. W. . . . freshman cabinet sold sandwiches in 
order to raise money to buy a rose for each mother. Another outstanding 
project is the Japanese bazaar held several days before Christmas vacation 
. . . cabinet made donation to Annville's Welfare Fund . . . purchased 
wall lights for gym that are now being used for recreational hours and 
dances . . . several members sent to conferences held on campuses of 
neighboring colleges . . . reported work of other Y. W. C. A. bodies of 
surrounding colleges. 

Martha Faust President 

Lucille Maberry Vice-Preside?it 

Hazel Heminway Recording Secretary 

Grace Naugle Corresponding Secretary 

Sara Meckley Treasurer 



Page H3 




J^ki ^amlfda Sia. 



ma 



Oldest organization on campus . . . sixty-nine years' history back of 
it . . . although a literary society, it has developed socially, holding many 
social functions . . . recognizes value of goodwill, friendship and coopera- 
tion . . . realizes that social life as well as literary or intellectual life is 
a necessity for a well-rounded person . . . developed social phase of society 
as it progressed . . . emphasizes spirit of true comradeship . . . promotes 
such qualities through joint sessions, periodical meetings, and smokers for 
the freshmen . . . practices goodwill by allowing its hall to be used for 
prayer-meetings, play practices, and as a photographic studio . . . out- 
standing among Philo activities is their Anniversary Dance held the evening 
of May Day . . . formal dinner-dance held last year in the Yorktowne 
Hotel, in York, Pa. . . . gala celebration that will be long remembered by 
the many who were present . . . music furnished by the Blue Moon 
Orchestra of York . . . evening prior to the dance Clio and Philo pre- 
sented their anniversary play, "A Bill of Divorcement." 



Kenneth Eastland Anniversary President 



Robert Kell 
John Trego 
Dean Gasteiger 
Adolph Capka 
Curvin Dellinger 



President 

Vice-President 

Treasurer 

Secretary 

Chairman of Executive Committee 



Louis Straub 
Adolph Capka 
Raymond Smith 
Calvin Spitler 
Robert Tschopp 



Page m 




Kappa ^ambda A/u 

Originally organized chiefly as a literary club for women at L. V. C. 
. . . developed gradually during the past sixty-six years into social organi- 
zation . . . needed to develop the social life on campus . . . has become 
more sorority-like . . . traditions of Minerva and the owl, its symbolic 
patronesses, have not been entirely discarded . . . aim is sociability and 
promotion of the finer and more esthetic things in life . . . last spring 
joined with Philo to present Clemmence Kane's play, "A Bill of Divorce- 
ment" under direction of Harold Phillips . . . proved a great success . . . 
activities for freshmen this fall included teas, programs, and a hike . . . 
"light house tragedy" and "William Tell" were main features besides 
taffy apples . . . most important function on Clio calendar is the anni- 
versary dance . . . this year held December 6 at Hotel Hershey . . . 
danced to the music of Alex Bartha and his orchestra . . . many alumni 
and students attending the dance declared it a success in every way . . . 
hope to meet again next year at Hotel Hershey . . . they sponsored two 
movies, had joint sessions with Philo and Kalo . . . rendered symphony 
in black and white in the opening program of the four societies . . . meet- 
ings held Friday evenings in hall . . . many informal one o'clock business 
meetings called as needed . . . gave tea in honor of mothers of Clio girls 
during Mother's Week-end . . . improved hall by adding furniture . . . 
revised constitution. 



Gayle Mountz 
Grace Naugle 
Hazel Heminway 
Sara Meckley 
Dorothy Kreamer 
Helen Bartlett 
Sylvia Harclerode 
Arlene Hoffman 



Anniversary President 

President 

Vice-President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 

Editor of Olive Branch 

Pianist 



Lois Harbold 
Louise Stoner 
Jean Harnish 
Lena Risser 
Helen Bartlett 
Margie Gerry 
Amy Meinhardt 



Page H5 




Kappa JLambda Siama 

Progressive literary society . . . organized in 1877 . . . first to hold a 
formal dinner-dance as a part of its anniversary celebration . . . exempli- 
fies trend toward modernism in literary societies . . . participates in 
general society functions . . . holds smoker for the freshmen . . . parti- 
cipates in opening program of the four societies . . . has joint sessions 
with both Clionian and Delphian literary societies . . . Kalo minstrel 
show has been revived on L. V. C. campus . . . has become an outstanding 
annual affair . . . last year Kalo initiated what is to become a traditional 
anniversary dinner-dance at Hotel Hershey . . . Friday of anniversary 
week-end, Kalo and Delphian jointly produced "The Bishop Misbehaves" 
by Frederick Jackson . . . directed by Dr. Struble . . . assisted by 
Robert Spohn . . . following night Kalo activities climaxed by their 
anniversary dinner-dance at Hotel Hershey . . . lovely affair . . . thor- 
oughly enjoyed by everyone present. 



George Smeltzer 
Richard Smith 
Edgar Messersmith 
Robert Heckman 
John Gongloff 
Duey Unger 



^-1 11 n iversa ry Pres iden t 
President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 



Edgar Messersmith 
John Gongloff 
Louis Conrad 
David Byerly 
Duey Unger 



Page U6 




'^QLta JLamlfda Slama 

Youngest society on L. V. C. campus . . . established and recognized 
fifteen years ago . . . similar to other societies in that it was organized 
for a literary purpose . . . through years of development has become a 
social group ... is again emphasizing literary value . . plans to have 
literary meetings, securing a speaker outside the student body . . . has 
had one at which Mrs. Stevenson spoke on her trip abroad ... all the 
girls were invited to meeting . . . reported a lovely time and a very inter- 
esting talk . . . open house featured frequently, hall is on the first floor 
of South Hall . . . appearance of hall improved during the year . . . 
programs, teas, and a hike given for the freshmen in the fall . . . has 
joint sessions with each of men's societies . . . impressive ceremony on 
banks of the "Quittie," and good food remembered from hike . . . partici- 
pates in opening program of four societies . . . girls gave tea for their 
mothers during Mother's Week-end . . . small group in Delphian able to 
secure cooperation of each girl . . . establishing strong bond of friendship 
among them . . . clima.x of Delphian activities and events is the anni- 
versary dance . . . held this year at Harrisburg . . . attended by many 
students, alumni, and faculty . . . production of "The Bishop Misbe- 
haves" given with Kalo, week-end of Kalo anniversary. 



RoMAiXE Stiles 
Claire Adams 

CORDELLA ShEAFFER 

Agnes Morris 
Esther Flom 
Ernestine Jagnesak 
Alice Richie 
Greta Heiland 
Ruth Rohrer 
Mildred Druck 



Anniversary President 

President 

Vice-President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 

Pianist 

Wardeiis 



CoRDELLA ShEAFFER 

Elizabeth Bingaman 
Ruth Rohrer 
Agnes Morris 
Ernestine Jagnesak 
Greta Heiland 
Esther Flom 
Barbara Bo^VMAN 
Kathryn Zwally 



Page U7 




Q^Qen ulottQt 



One of the few exclusive clubs on the campus . . . comparatively 
young organization . . . had its birth in November, 1932 . . . organized 
for purpose of stimulating writing activity and for improving creative and 
individual thinking in journalism . . . club composed of sixteen students 
. . . four chosen from each class, including two men and two women 
representatives . . . membership obtained by submission of manuscripts 
to be read and judged by the club . . . meetings held every third Thurs- 
day, at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Richie . . . members present original 
writings . . . either short story, poem, biography, character sketch, 
essay, treatise on philosophy, or what have you . . . each individual reads 
his own manuscript and is judged and criticized by others . . . construc- 
tive criticism offered . . . as it is restricted only to talented persons, much 
good and worthwhile material is submitted . . . guests occasionally in- 
vited . . . guests may be students interested in the club, not having 
membership, faculty members or persons off campus who are well versed 
in the field of literature . . . advancement was made this year through 
the adoption of a constitution . . . gives club definite foundation on which 
to work from year to year . . . opportunity given to those interested to 
develop ability . . . keeps interest in creative writing alive and at work. 

Dr. George Struble Adviser 

Maxine Earley Head Scope 

Clifford Barnhart Keeper of the Word Horde 



Page US 




'Qiman 



(?u 



Der Deutsche Verein has progressed rapidly since 1930, the year of its 
organization . . . members of club include anyone interested in the Ger- 
man field . . . aim is to become acquainted with German customs, habits, 
language, culture, and mode of dress; in short, anything pertaining to 
Germany and its inhabitants . . . success due to real enthusiasm of 
members, and tireless efforts of the officers as well as the adviser. Dr. 
Lietzau . . . Dr. Lietzau's trip abroad last summer has been the source 
of many interesting discussions and talks at club meetings . . . during 
meeting near Christmas she told of Christmas in other lands and the club 
sang carols . . . new interest in the Pennsylvania German has been taken 
this year . . . club observed a Pennsylvania German night discussing 
speech, customs, occupations, foods, places of settlement, and peculiarities 
of these people . . . featured an outside quartet . . . sang Pennsylvania 
songs . . . serving of refreshments an added attraction . . . club at- 
tended a German movie . . . plans made to present a German play or a 
German chapel program to give others benefits of their interests and 
activities . . . has been means of keeping and increasing interest in Ger- 
man among students. 

Dr. Lena Lietzau Adviser 

Edgar Messersmith President 

Calvin Spitler Vice-President 

Sylvia Harclerode Secretary-Treasurer 



Page H9 




Women 5 -fitltUtlc •H56oclatlon 

New organization that arranges recreation for all girls on campus . . . 
organized this year under the supervision of the Girls' Physical Education 
Director, jNIiss Henderson ... to promote such activities as will benefit 
girl students . . . composed of girls especially interested in sports . . . 
members admitted by use of point system, final award a school letter . . . 
sponsors sport play days and spring initiation . . . hopes to hold an annual 
spring formal . . . governing powers executed by four officers and a 
leader for each sport . . . chosen by the members of the organization once 
a year . . . member of National Amateur Athletic Federation . . . also 
National Hockey Association . . . chief goal is to interest many girls in a 
desire to play ... to spend leisure time in a profitable way . . . slogan 
"A sport for every girl, and every girl in a sport." President of W. A. A. — 
Anna Orth — has been functioning as a very active officer . . . supports 
the cause of intra-mural athletics . . . raises standards of girls' sports 
... on an educational basis . . . trains in student leadership . . . pro- 
motes a health program . . . creates higher ideals of sportsmanship. 

OFFICERS OF THE W. A. A. CABINET 

Anna Orth President 

Eleanor Lynch Vice-President 

Wanda Price Corresponding Secretary 

Elizabeth Bender Recording Secretary 

Caroline Kohler Treasurer 



Page 150 




Honorary athletic organization . . . open to all male students of L. V. 
C. who received varsity "L" in any sport . . . team managers also 
eligible for membership . . . this year ten new men initiated ... in- 
cludes Belmer, Frey, Heisch, Ludwig, Main, Needy, Smith, Walk, Walmer, 
and Weidman . . . function to foster and support athletics in L. V. C. 
. . . buys all athletic awards in the form of sweaters and letters . . . 
sponsored several football dances on the nights of home games . . . con- 
ducted refreshment stand at football field ... at last secured a room in 
basement of men's dorm . . . recently purchased furniture and radio for 
the room . . . used jointly with Men's Senate ... all members of "L" 
Club and Senate are allowed to use the room . . . reserved for "L" Club 
Monday nights and Senate Tuesday nights. 

President Paul Billett 

Vice-President John Speg 

Secretary Walter Fridinger 



Page 151 





jv 


1 

i 


^4f?^4 


'1 


■1 




* ■ 


1 ■ * : ' ^, ! 4i/.^ Vi^l 



^alxatina 



Difficult schedule of debates has been arranged . . . girls' schedule 
includes debates with Penn State, Gettysburg, Bueknell . . . men debate 
Lincoln University, Washington, and Wagner College in New York. Girls' 
affirmative team composed of Jean Harnish, Louise Saylor, Hazel Hemin- 
way . . . negative composed of Theresa Stefan and Belle Mulhollen . . . 
former coached by Professor M. L. Stokes . . . latter coached by Doctor 
Black . . . will use Oxford style of debate . . . Grace Naugle, manager 
. . . Margaret Holbrook, assistant manager . . . prospects of a highly 
successful season. Men's teams coached by Dr. H. H. Shenk . . . affirma- 
tive team composed of William Clark, Curvin Thompson, Calvin Spitler 
. . . negative team includes Boyd Shaffer, Charles Kinney, and Carl 
Erhart . . . affirmative to use Oxford plan of debate . . . negative to 
continue Oregon style . . . Manager, Charles Kinney . . . Assistant 
Manager, Dean Gasteiger . . . several debates between various campus 
teams . . . two most successful teams hold debate at end of season. 



Fage 152 



r\(^a 




2clectlc ^lub 



Exclusive club for girls . . . membership limited to twenty . . . 
chosen from all classes by members of club . . . meeting held every two 
weeks at homes of members living in Annville . . . girls take turns serving 
as hostesses . . . two hostesses at each meeting . . . provide good enter- 
tainment and delightful refreshments . . . meetings include business, fun, 
and food . . . holds one or two big dances a year . . . this year a Valen- 
tine Formal . . . held at General Sutter Hotel in Lititz . . . danced to 
music of the Greystone Orchestra . . . brilliant affair . . . club originated 
to provide social evening in that atmosphere found only in homes . . . 
enables one to forget school and worries for several hours . . . promotes 
feeling of sociability and friendliness. 



Lois Harbold . . . 


President 


Catherine Mills . . 


Treasurer 


Ruth Buck 


Hazel Heminway 


Maxine Earley 


Dorothy Kreamer 


Martha Faust 


Lucille Maberry 


Eleanor Lynch 


Lena Risser 


Sara Meckley 


Louise Stoner 


Gayle Mountz 


Arlene Hoffman 


Grace Naugle 


Margaret Holbrook 


Lillian Zubroff 


Amy Monteith 


Isabel Cox 


Ruth Ruppersberger 



Page 153 




SJntatnailonaL /Qelaiion5 ^lulf 

Organization founded four years ago by Dr. E. H. Stevenson . . . 
international collegiate organization . . . now under his direction . . . 
nucleus of organization composed of a cabinet of eight most active mem- 
bers . . . most active club on campus . . . vital current topics discussed 
. . . members study and interpret political, social, and economic events 
. . . aim of club is to give a deeper understanding of national and inter- 
national affairs and to develop a proper attitude toward world politics . . • 
meetings have been well attended this year . . . usually at the home of 
Dr. Stevenson . . . discussions are led by students themselves . . . 
debates held at various meetings . . . have had charge of several chapel 
programs . . . several students sent to lecture at civic clubs . . . dele- 
gates attended conference at University of Delaware . . . several outside 
speakers heard during the year . . . Mrs. Kaiser-Harnish of Berlin, 
Germany, and Miss Riegelman of Geneva, Switzerland ... a fine organi- 
zation for those who wish to broaden their knowledge on present-day 
world affairs. 

Calvin Spitler President 

Elizabeth Bender Vice-President 

Jean Harnish Secretary 

CABINET 

Elizabeth Bender Theodore Loos 

William Clark Jack Moller 

Jean Harnish Charles Raab 

Charles Kinney Calvin Spitler 



Page 154 




Life Work Recruits is an active organization on our campus . . . com- 
posed of students who plan to devote their lives to work in the Christian 
field, to better humanity either as ministers, missionaries, Sunday-school 
teachers, choir, or social service workers . . . important influence in 
development of the spiritual side of life . . . regular meetings provide a 
prominent speaker or opportunity for open forum discussion . . . pro- 
vision made for special and personal interviews with religious leaders ap- 
pearing on the campus . . . Dr. and Mrs. Wilt also offer a great service 
to the students . . . students have the privilege of interviewing or talking 
to them at any time . . . important work of the organization is in charge 
of deputation committee . . . deputations sent to town and rural churches 
. . . conduct complete service, including music and sermon . . . minis- 
terial students and the conservatory students make it possible to furnish 
very worthwhile programs and services . . . practical e.xperience improves 
abilities of the members . . . benefits small congregations . . . has 
definite value to students in preparation for careers of religious service . . . 
chapel program once every three weeks is in charge of organization . . . 
under guidance of Dr. and Mrs. Richie and Rev. and Mrs. AVilt . . . has 
accomplished much as a training institution and as an excellent daily 
spiritual influence. 

Elwood Needy President 

Edith Metzgee Vice-President 

Audrey Fox Secretary-Treasurer 

Daniel Shearer Chairman of Deputations Committee 



Page 155 




rOmmetce 



<2U 



Business administration students organized Club several years ago . . . 
Professor M. L. Stokes is the competent adviser . . . acquaints students 
with present business activities and problems . . . Club has grown in 
importance and membership . . . aim is to reconcile text-book theory of 
modern business and finance with actual business and financial problems 
. . . members participate in open forum discussions at various meetings 
. . . hear addresses of well-known business men who have abundant knowl- 
edge of economic matters of today . . . students report on topics not 
treated in detail in the classroom, thus adding interesting information . . . 
Club engages prominent lawyers, stock brokers, heads of business concerns 
to acquaint students with business activities . . . students are given 
privilege of questioning the speaker after the talk . . . make trips to 
business houses to see various departments of modern business . . . learn 
how component parts are welded into efficiently integrated business house 
. . . social feature of this business men's and women's club is the banquet 
at the close of the school year . . . have a prominent, educated business 
man as the guest speaker . . . Club has proved a great asset to graduates 
who have entered the field of business. 

Arthur Heisch President 

John Gongloff Vice-President 

Margaret Holbrook Secretary-Treasurer 



Page 156 




U/ia and SackU (?U 



Youngest and most progressive Club on the L. V. C. campus . . . 
organized under the auspices of the Enghsh department and directed by 
Dr. George Struble . . . essential to further development of dramatics on 
the campus . . . Harold Phillips, president for the past two years . . . 
widely experienced stage-man . . . new members are admitted by appli- 
cations approved by the executive committee and the Club . . . member- 
ship is divided into three classifications: cub, general, and letter . . . cub 
signifies those whose applications have been accepted but who have done 
nothing notable in any field of dramatics . . . general is an advanced 
classification into which fall those who have taken a major role in a pro- 
duction, assisted in some field of staging or costuming, or aided the pro- 
duction of a play in some worthwhile way . . . letter membership for the 
most experienced dramatists who have been outstanding in several major 
productions or whose aid in technical lines has been indispensable . . . 
officers of the Club are chosen from the letter members . . . executive 
committee, which supervises the activities of the Club, may be elected 
from general or letter membership . . . produced in the last few years 
such outstanding successes as "The Man in the Bowler Hat," "The Rector," 
"The Late Christopher Bean," "Where the Cross is Made," and its latest 
production "The Truth about Blayds" . . . Club has a prominent place 
on campus and promises to become more important in future college 
dramatics. 

Harold Phillips President 

Kenneth Eastland Vice-President 

Maxine Earley Secretary 

Allen Rutherford Treasurer 



Page 157 



To Our Advertisers 



THE BUSINESS STAFF of the 
1938 "Quittapahilla'" extends its 
sincere gratitude to the businessmen 
whose names appear in this section. 
Their hearty cooperation has played a 
large part in making this book a possi' 
bility, and we strongly recommend them 
to the patronage of the student body 
and friends of Lebanon Valley College. 



Page 160 



SARONY STUDIO 



1206 Chestnut Street 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



School and Commercial 
Photography 



Page 161 



Dndi 



ex 

Adams, Claire Elizabeth 30, 147 

Albert, Mary Elizabeth 79, 145 

Artz, Robert Raymond 79, 98, 99, 157 

Aungst, Clarence Christian 40, 125, 1'27 

Aungst, Dean Moyer 78, 146, 157 

Bacastow, Merle Stoner 75 

Baehman, Edward Robert 30, 95, 146, 156 

Baier, Howard Nelson 72, 75, 144 

Baker, A. Kent 79 

Baney, Martha Isabelle 40, 136, 140 

Barnhart, George Rees 79 

Barnhart, Jefferson Clifford 40, 137, 148 

Barthold, Homer Merkle 30, 132, 134, 135 

Bartlett, Helen Marjorie 72, 74, 143, 145 

Bans, Richard Albert 30, 137, 141, 157 

Beamesderfer, Harold Ebling 30, 142, 146 

Beamesderfer, Lloyd 

Beard, James Allen 

Belmer, Charles Miller 78, 84, 85, 89, 98, 99, 146, 151, 156 

Bemesderfer, John Leroy 79 

Bender, Elizabeth Teall" 40,133,137,145,150,154,157 

Bender, William Lloyd 76, 79, 144, 157 

Berger, Lloyd Daniel 40, 136, 146, 149 

BiUett, Paul Cyrus 30,94,95,101,146,151 

Billett, Ralph Edwin 40,94,95,101,146,151 

Bingaman, Elizabeth 30, 133 

Binkley, Edna Annabelle 30, 108, 109, 133 

Bittinger, Gerald E 30, 132, 144 

Black, James Egbert 

Black, Robert Stanley 43 

Black, William 30, 132, 134, 135 

Bollinger, Dorothy 

Bollman, John Adam 43 

Boran, Robert Paul 

Bowers, Herbert Harvey 43, 144, 155 

Bowers, Karl Edward 74 

Bowers, Marhn Walter 43 

Bowman, Barbara Beamer 79, 127, 147, 152 

Bowman, Thomas Bear 78, 146 

Boyer, Clayton P 43 

Boyer, Geraldine Elizabeth 74 

Brensinger, William Josiah 78, 135, 146 

Brosious, John Marlin 31 

Brown, Charles Willard 75 

Brown, Robert Gayle 84,85,88,94,95,144,151 

Brown, Warren W'ayne 132, 135, 146 

Brubaker, Elwood Richard 144 

Bryan, Frank Albert 43, 132, 135, 146 

Continued on page 165 



Page 162 



VISIT 

HERSHEY 

"The Summer Capital of Pennsylvania" 

ALL OUTDOOR AMUSEMENTS 

Swimming • Boating • Golfing 

PICNIC GROUNDS CONTAIN 1000 ACRES 



Orchestras of National Reputation play Dance Music in a modern manner 
in the Hershey Park Ballroom on Wednesday and Saturday nights 

Do you know that you can have a week-end of 
Golf at Hershey for $10 



Where Lebanon Valley Students 
Get Together 

Pennway Hotel 

Ajjiliated with the Pennway Ba\ery 
ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Page 163 



2BS03BSHS^^^a^^^ 







5<: 



PROBLEMS THAT CONFRONT THE EDITORS OF 



School and College Annuals 

Bulletins, Catalogues, Text-Books 

and Similar Publications 

can usually be solved in consultation with members of 
our staff. Authors, editors, and publishers of educational 
and technical books are invited to investigate our facili- 
ties for producing large or small editions. 

Our representative will call at your office, or we will 
welcome you at our business home in the Capital City. 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 

jfllQount Pleasant Prefig 
HARRISBURG • PENNSYLVANIA 




Page 164 



INDEX 

Buck, Ruth Loretta 31, 120, 139, 140, 143, 145, 153 

Bulota, Stanley 75, 84, 85, 88 

Butterwick, Helen Irene 44, 124, 133, 134, 135 

Byerly, David Allen 38, 44, 132, 136, 146, 156 

Callen, Mathew, Jr 79 

Capello, Arthur Grant 78, 84 

Capka, Adolph James 44, 101, 136, 138, 140, 144, 151, 156 

Chapin, Claude Edward 144 

Clark, Jane Rebecca 79, 145 

Clark, William Ford 125 

Clippinger, Robert Smith 74, 123, 132, 134, 135 

Clouser, Leon Ben 78 

Clymer, Gerald Kenneth 79, 133 

Colgan, Donald 

Conrad, Louis Johnson 84, 178 

Cook, Lucie Helen Irene 78, 108, 109, 133, 145 

Cotroneo, Mary Ann 79, 133, 135, 145 

Cox, Isabel Louise '. .44,134,135,145,153,157 

Criswell, Harry Clay 78, 132, 144 

Cunkle, Paul Vincent 44 

Curry, Ira Louis 156 

Davies, Gordon 44, 84, 85, 88 

Davies, Jonah A 

Deaven, Harry Walter 47, 144 

Deck, John Stanley 78 

Dellinger, Curvin Nelson, Jr 5, 47, 124, 132, 136, 137, 138, 144, 156 

Dempsey, Carl AVilson 72, 74, 84, 95, 144 

Denlinger, Thelma Beatrice 31 

Dinsmore, Robert Edward 78, 144 

Donmoyer, Homer Elwood 31, 104, 105 

Druck, Margaret Elizabeth 74, 147 

Earley, Maxine Larue 28,31,139,145,148,153,157 

Earnest, William Harry 31, 126, 137, 141. 144, 156, 157 

Eastland, John Kenneth 31, 126, 137, 157 

Eby, Jane Virginia 

Ehrhart, Carl Yarkers 78, 144, 149, 155 

Ehrhart, Walter Melvin 47, 132, 136, 144 

Ellenberger, Gertrude Mary 150 

EUenberger, Herman Albert 47 

Engle, Eleanor Caroline 31, 145 

Engle, John Warren 75 

Etchberger, William 146 

Evans, Anne Margaret 79, 108, 109 

Evans, Evelyn Rosser 79, 145 

Evelev, Arthur Sherman 75, 132 

Faust, Martha Clippinger 28,31,139,143,145,153,157 

Fink, Beatrice Lucille 47, 133, 134 

Flocken, Karl R 31, 125, 137, 141, 157 

Flom, Esther Anne 47, 74, 143, 147, 149, 152 

Foreman, David Anderson 78, 132, 144 

Fox, Audrie Eleanor 74, 143, 155 

Continued on page 168 



Page 165 



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TITTLE 


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HARRISBURG, PENNSYLVANIA 



Page 166 




PROGRES!^ 



There are few fields where the necessify for progress — fh» 
demand for new Ideas, is as pronounced as !n the production 
of School Annuals. ^ Here in Can'fon we take pride in not 
only keeping pace, buf in setting the pace for innovations 
and changes in this highly progressive field. ^ When you 
work with Canton you art hand in hand with experienced 
people, constantly on the alert to sense the wants of 
Annual publishers, and quick to change from the old order, 
and offer new and unusual ideas to progressive editors. 

THE CANTON ENGRAVING & ELECTROTYPE CO., CANTON, OHIO 



Page 167 



INDEX 

Fox, Thomas G., Jr . 146 

Franklin, Nora Mae 48, 133, 147 

Frey, Marshall Rosette 48, 101, 146 

Frey, Raymond Theodore 75, 89, 94, 95, 144, 151 

Fridinger, Evelyn Gertrude 74, 134 

Fridhiger, Walter Pierce 48,84,85,88,151,156 

Friel, John Paul 84, 85, 89 

Gangwer, Mildred White 75, 133, 134 

Garzella, Michael Frank 48 

Gasteiger, Dean Wellington 38, 48, 136, 138, 144, 152, 156 

Geesey, Claude Dennis 78, 98, 99, 132, 144 

George, Robert B 

Gerry, Ruth Marjorie 78, 145, 148, 157 

Geyer, Grace Eleanor 75, 145 

Gibble, Grant AVilbur 48, 146, 156 

Gingrich, Norman John 

Gollam, Lucille Margaret 79 

Gongloff, John Rupp 51, 124, 132, 146, 156, 157 

Goodman, Benjamine Moury 75, 132, 135, 144 

Goyne, Ruth Estelle 32, 133, 134, 139 

Graby, Cora Elizabeth 74, 108. 109, 145 

Grimm, Robert Shirey 98, 99 

Groff, John Yeagley 51, 154 

Grosz, William George 32, 144, 155 

Guinivan, Thomas William 75, 137, 155 

Haas, Mildred Elizabeth 75, 127, 147 

Hamm, Leander Herbert 75 

Harbold, Lois Marie 28,32,121,14,3,145,153,157 

Harclerode, Sylvia Ruth 51, 124, 137, 145, 148, 149, 157 

Harkins, Geraldine Joyce 32 

Harnish, Mary Jean 32, 139, 152, 154, 157 

Hasbrouck, Gerald Laubach 51, 132, 135 

Hatz, Russell Condran . .32, 134, 135 

Hawthorne, Lucille Katheryn 38, 51, 124, 145 

Heckman, Robert Raymond 75, 146 

Heiland, Dwight Mast 132, 146 

Heiland, Greta Annabelle 51, 133, 147 

Heilman, Alfred Henry 78, 132, 146 

Heisch, Arthur Richard 32, 84, 85, 88, 127, 156 

Heller, Russell Kratzer 52, 132, 135 

Heminway, Hazel Margaret 52, 143, 145, 152, 153 

Hemperly, Cecil Willis 78, 144 

Herman, August Carl 78, 84, 89, 146 

Hershey. Ruth Evelyn 76, 79, 145 

Himmelberger, Helen Irene 75, 133, 145 

Himmelright, Winifred Woodrow .... 32, 144 

Hitz, Jean Adelle 

Hocker, Kenneth Leverne 75, 144 

Hoerner, Violette Bertha 52 

Hoffman, Arlene Elizabeth 74, 140, 145 

Hoffman, Henry T., Jr 132 

Continued on page 170 



Page 16S 



Sowers Printing Co. 

Catalogs, Annuals 

Books 

General Commercial Printing 

LEBANON, PA. 


HARPEL'S 

Kodaks and Movie Cameras 

Stationery 

Luggage and Gifts 

151-159 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 


Diehl Drug Store 

Drug Supplies 

Prescriptions Filled 

Sodas, Sundaes 

VISIT THE "SAFE PLACE" 


The School's BARBER SHOP Is 

Karl's Shop 

THREE CHAIR 

SERVICE i 

1 West Main Street Annville, Pa. 


CHURCH CENTER 
PRESS 

Cteligioufi! ^upplp J^ougc 

PRINTING 
PUBLISHING 

MYERSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 


BOLTON'S GARAGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Atlantic Gasoline 

Oils 

and Greases 

Superior Service Quality Products 


JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST AND DECORATOR 

''The Flower Shop" 

Corsages Our Specialty 
Rear of Court House Lebanon, Pa. 

Phone : Lebanon S92 


Compliments of 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Brunner 



Page 169 



INDEX 

Hoffman, Minerva Walker 79, 145 

Holbrook, Margaret 75, 145, 152, 153, 156 

Hollingsworth, Harold Chester 32 

Horn, Paul Edward 79, 140, 144 

Horst, Mary Elizabeth 

Houck, Jean Ewing 108, 109 

Houtz, Ethel Mae 52, 147, 155 

Huber, W. Frederick 

Immler, Luther Henri 74, 132, 134, 146 

Irish, William Chapel • 

Jagnesak, Ernestine Mary 52, 108, 109, 120, 136, 137, 147, 150 

Johns, Edward 89 

Johns, Robert March 52, 122, 132 

Johnson, Julia Ida 75 

Karhan, Theodore Kenneth 55, 135 

Katchmer, George Andrew 78, 84 

Kauffman, Richard Dellinger 78, 132, 144 

Keene, Ruth Catherine 74, 134 

Keith. Elvin William 75, 146 

Kell, Robert Eugene 32, 137, 144, 156 

Kindt. Emily Elizabeth 55, 133, 145 

Kinney, Charles Bamburgh, Jr 33, 141, 146, 152, 154, 157 

Kinney, Harlin Shroyer 74, 127, 140, 146 

Kitzmiller, John Kunkle 75 

Kleinfelter, John William 78, 84 

Kleiser, Sterling Haaga 

Klopp, Orval Woodrow 79 

Knoll, Katherine Mae 55, 75, 134 

Koenig, William Ferdinand 132, 146 

Kohler, Carolyn Estella 55, 145, 150 

Kope, Xelda Romaine 74 

Koppenhaver, Esther Loetta 33, 133, 134, 135 

Kreamer, Dorothy Ellen 38, 55, 108, 109, 125, 145, 150, 153, 154, 157 

Kreamer, John William 55, 144, 156 

Kreider, Christine Evelyn 79, 145 

Kreiser, Joseph Richard 78, 84, 89, 98, 99 

Kress, Edward Ken 75,84,85,88,94,95,101,120,142,146,151 

Kroske, Harold William 56, 88, 101 

Krum, June Harriet 133, 145, 157 

Lawson, Catherine Evelyn 145 

Lazin, Norman 33, 146 

Lazorjack, George Wilson 56 

Leech, Wilbur Arthur 33, 132, 146, 157 

Lehman, Clarence Long 75, 83, 138, 146 

Leininger, Pauline Lillian 74, 145 

Leisey, Lillian Mae 76, 79, 145 

Lenker, David Franklin 79, 146, 156 

Lenker, Jesse Sanford 79, 146, 156 

Lester, Philip Howard 79, 123, 132, 146 

Levitz, Razelle 

Light, Anna Louise 75, 145 

Continued on page 172 



Page 170 



H. E. MILLARD 

HIGH CALCIUM LIME AND 

LIMESTONE 
PRODUCTS 

As\ your dealer for Millard's Agricultural and 
Mason's Lime 



FOR Better Pastry, use 



GILT EDGE FLOUR 



Telephone the Flour Mill : 
62R5 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Page 171 



INDEX 

Light, Harold Heilman 149 

Light, Sara EHzabeth 33, 108, 109, 122, 133, 134 

Lind, Anna May 

Lloyd, Ralph Roy 79, 144, 156 

Long, Dorothy Elizabeth 78 

Long, Robert Winfield 137, 148, 149 

Loose, Theodore Mandon 33, 138, 142, 145, 154 

Lopes, Olga Weaber 

Lopes, Lela Weaber 79 

Ludwig, Donald Paul 84,89,146,151 

Lupton, Burritt Keeler Lawlin 33, 141 ' ~ 

Lynch, John Howard 78, 84, 144 

Lynch, Rose Eleanor 33, 137, 141, 145, 150, 154 

Maberry, Lucille Small 56, 133, 136, 143, 145, 153, 157 

MacEwen, Sara Katherine 147, 157 

MacMullen, Francis William 28, 33, 138, 141 

Main, Harper Patterson, Jr 84, 89 

Marbarger, Jean Isabel 74, 122, 133, 134, 145 

Marbarger, John Porter 56, 138 

Mason, Ella Tamson 56, 139, 146, 157 

Maury, Gustav Thurwald 38, 144 

McKeag, Jean Ellen 56, 125, 126, 130 

Meckley, Sara Katherine 33, 143, 145, 153 

Meinhardt, Amy Mae 74 

Melman, Milton 78, 132, 146 

Messersmith, Harry Edgar 34, 127, 137, 146, 149, 154 

Metzger, Edith Maude 74, 142, 143, 155 

Meyer, Jean Patricia 78 

Miller, Evelyn Loretta 78, 140, 145 

Miller, Herbert Levere 

Miller, James Henry 34, 134, 146 

Miller, John Rodger 59, 132, 134 

Mills, Catherine Lucile 59, 124, 133, 134, 135, 136, 143, 145, 150, 157 

Moller, John Vincent 76, 78, 144, 156 

Monteith, Amy Martha 74, 145, 153 

Moody, Richard Elwood 

Morris, Agnes Leonina 59, 143, 146, 150, 152, 157 

Morrison, Anna Elizabeth 74, 127, 133, 147, 157 

Morrison, Nellie Colclough 74, 134, 147 

Morrow, Paul Kenneth 79 

Mosher, Rita Marie 59, 123, 133, 145 

Mountz, Gayle Elizabeth 34, 123, 133, 134, 135, 139 

Moyer, John Henry 74, 132, 146 

Moyer, Warren Franklin 59, 144 

Mulhollen, Vera Belle 34, 145, 152, 154, 157 

Munday, George Gerald 78, 84, 146, 156 

Musser, Jay Charles 121, 146 

Myers, Paul Erb 146 

Naugle, Vincent Paul 75, 78, 146 

Naugle, Grace Marie 28, 34, 137, 141, 143, 145, 152, 156, 157 

Needy, Elwood Edward 34,83,137,142,146,151,155,157 

Continued on page 174 



Page 172 



KREIDER'S 



MEATS -:- GROCERIES -:- FRUITS 

Special Prices All the Time 

23 West Main Street, ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

'Phone: 9173 



John A. Gingrich 



Corsages, Center Pieces, and Decorations 
jor the Occasion 



37 North Eighth Street, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Thone: 1856 



D. L. SAYLOR 

AND SONS 



Contractors and Builders 
Coal and Lumber 



D 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



Kreamer Bros^ 

FURNITURE AND FLOOR 
COVERINGS 

Westinghouse Electric Ranges 

Easy Electric Washers 

Leonard Electric Refrigerators 

Hoover Electric Sweepers 

Gas and Coal Ranges 

R. C. A. Radios 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



MODERN KREIDER SPORTS 

HEALTH 

SHOES ^"^^^ ''500" Juveniles 

J^anujactured by 




ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



Fage 173 



INDEX 

Neissner, Virginia Helen 74, 133, 134, 145 

Ness, John Herbert 78, 144, 155 

Netherwood, Helen x\rbella 59, 145, 148 

Norton, Ruth V 

Null, Dorothy Louise 

Oiler, Lucille Grace 79, 145 

O'Neal, Marlin Ray 34, 134 

Orth, Anna Herr 34, 108, 109, 150 

Oyler, Cecil Charles 60, 132, 134, 135 

Patschke, Anita Eleanore 75, 145 

Peffley, Howard Northamer 79, 155 

Phenicie, Ruth Virginia 34 

Phillips, Harold 34, 137, 157 

Poloniak, Frank 75, 84, 85, 101, 146, 151 

Price, Wanda Langden 38, 60, 136, 137, 139, 145, 150 

Prowell, Joseph Wilbur 35, 146 

Raab, Charles Henry 60, 124, 127 

Raezer, Clyde B 72, 75, 144 

Ralston, James Henry 60 

Ranck, Ida Irene 74, 133, 145 

Reber, Howard Franklin 35 

Reiman, Janet 

Rice, Freeman Daniel 

Richie, Alice Mary 75, 108, 109, 137, 147, 148 

Rider, Clayton Merle 132, 146 

Risser, Lena Evelyn 60, 126, 136, 145, 153, 157 

Roberts, Mary Carolyn 60, 124, 145, 150 

Rogers, Vernon 63, 124, 132, 144, 149 

Rohrer, Ruth Romaine 75, 133, 139, 147 

Rozman, Anthony John 75, 84, 85, 88, 144, 151 

Rozman. Frank Albert 63, 84, 85, 88, 144, 151 

Ruppersberger, Ruth Eleanor 79, 139, 145, 153, 157 

Rutherford, Frank Allen, Jr 35, 157 

Rutter, Samuel Peiflfer 74, 146 

Sabo, Bertha Helene 

Saylor, Eugene Clyde 74, 134, 135, 144 

Saylor, Herbert Alfred 63 

Saylor, Louise 76, 78, 125, 143, 145 

Saylor, Roger Behm 63, 136, 138, 144, 156 

Schaffer, John Ambrose 

Scherfel, William 74, 146 

Schlosser, Verna Mae 

Schmidt, Jack Edward 28, 35, 157 

Schock, Jeanne Elizabeth 79, 145, 157 

Schoen, Irvin Donald 

Schott, Henry Orth 63, 144 

Schuler, Alan Edward 63, 146 

Sechrist, Warren Doyle 78, 132, 144 

Seiverling, Daniel Snayder 78, 98, 99, 138, 144 

Sekulski, Joseph John 

Seyler, Evelyn Maye 79 

Continued on page 176 



Page 174 



Arnold's Boot Shop 

Exclusive Shoes 

COLLEGE BRED 

for Girls 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 

"For the Man Who Cares" 

34 N. Eighth St. LEBANON, PA. 



PEGGY'S BEAUTY 
SHOP 

The Touch That Completes 
the Personality 

54 West Sheridan Avenue 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Phone: 34-R 



LOREN MURCHISON 
AND CO. 

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY 

AVill furnish 

the rings for the classes 

of '38 and '39 

Class Rings, Pins, Favors, Trophies 

Central 
Shoe Repair Shop 

"A Trial Will 
Convince You" 

FRANK DINUNZIO, Proprietor 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Keystone Engineering 
Corporation 

LEBANON, PENNA. 

Electrical Engineers 

Contractors 

Superior Electrical Construction 

Offices also located in Reading 
and Philadelphia, Pa. 



At Basch's you will find dresses for all occa- 
sions at moderate prices. 
A visit to our shop will convince you. 
Come in and get acquainted. 

"Style without Extravagance" 

BASCH'S 

304 North Second Street 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Phone 3-4116 



Jackson Enterprises 

When in Lebanon, Pa. 
Enjoy Your Stay by Visiting the 

COLONIAL Theatre CAPITOL Theatre 
Mirrophonic Sound Wide Range Sound 

JACKSON Theatre. All-Talking 

Greatest of Shows — Prices to Meet All Pocketbooks 
ALSO VISIT THE 

COLONIAL BALL ROOM 

Lebanon's Finest Dance Hall Can Be Rented 
for Card Parties, Dances, Banquets, Etc. 



Shapiro's 
MEN'S STORE 

Clothing and Furnishings 
for Gentlemen 

844 Cumberland St., LEBANON, PA. 



Page 175 



INDEX 

Shaffer, Charles Boyd 5, 64, 136, 137, 144, 152, 157 

Shaffer, Paul Eugene 84, 98, 99 

Shank, M. Elizabeth 

Shapiro, Stewart Bennet 146 

Shaw. Lena May 79, 133, 147 

Shay, Donald Emerson 35, 146 

Sheaffer, Cordelia Rebecca 35, 133, 139 

Shearer, Daniel LeRoy 64, 142, 144, 155 

Shenk. D. Eugene, Jr 64, 104, 105, 146, 156 

Silvers, Damon Lee 74, 144, 156 

Sloane. Helen Barbara 64, 124, 145, 157 

Slodysko, Leonard Albert 84, 89 

Slonaker, Paul Jeremiah 64, 155 

Smee, George Harry 

Smeltzer, George Light 28, 35, 132, 146, 156 

Smeyne, Azer Leon 78 

Smith, Cyrus Good 35, 134, 135 

Smith, Donald George 89 

Smith, Marjorie Helen 35, 144 

Smith, Raymond Richard 72, 144, 156 

Smith, Richard Thomas 35, 127, 132, 146 

Smith, Robert William 74, 132, 135, 146 

Snell. Clair Albert 36, 94, 95, 146, 151 

Spangler, Gail Maxine 64 

Spangler, Robert Gleim 79 

Speg, John Louis 36, 127, 146, 151 

Spitler, Calvin Dubbs 67, 136, 137, 149, 152, 154 

Stefan, Theresa Kathryn 67, 126, 136, 137, 145, 149, 152, 154, 157 

Steiner, Henry Cyrus 36, 132. 134, 135 

Stiles, Delores Romaine 36, 136, 140, 143, 147 

Stineman, Chester Arthur, Jr 36, 132, 134, 135 

Stoner, Mary Louise 67, 136, 137. 145, 153, 157 

Straub, Louis Ernest 36, 120, 137, 138, 142, 144, 148, 155 

Straus, Harry D 

Strayer, Flora Mae 36, 155 

Strayer, Robert Curvin 75 

Strickler, Evelyn May 75, 145, 156 

Strickler, Warren Leo 67, 154, 155 

Strohman, H. Herbert 132, 135, 146 

Sumner, Doyle Leonard 78, 155 

Swartz, Chauncey Royalton 67 

Tallman, Edwin Homer 36 

Taylor, Harvey Patterson 

Theadore, Leonard William 78 

Thomas. Joseph Bowker 74, 144, 154 

Thompson, Curvin Livingston 67, 124, 126, 142, 144, 155 

Tierney, Bette Marie 79, 149, 157 

Timek, Joseph Burnard 78, 84, 145 

Tindall, John Carter 68, 101 

Touchstone, Mary Alice 79, 148 

Trego. John Wilson 36, 121, 126, 138, 144 

Continued on page 177 



Page 176 



INDEX 

Treo, Marianna Jeanette 75, 121, 133, 135, 144 

Tschopp, Robert Paul 75. 125, 126, 144, 157 

Tschopp, Rose Stuart 36, 133, 134, 155 

Ulrich, Paul Theodore 38, 68, 136, 144 

Umberger, Jacob Quentin 75, 104, 105 

Umberger, Molly Elizabeth 

linger, Duey Ellsworth 36, 122, 137, 138, 140, 142, 146 

Unger, Earl Clayton 36, 132, 135 

Vavrous, Lillian Mae 79, 145 

Walk, Christian Ritner 78, 84, 89, 146, 151 

Walmer, John David 68,89,146,151 

Waltz, Paul Kenneth 37 

Weagley, Richard Pershing 78 

Webb, Mary Gilbert 37, 147 

Weidman, Roy Andrew 72,75,84,88,144,151 

AVeimer, Margaret Sellew 

Weirick, Ernest Carl 75, 132, 142, 144 

Wentling, Dorothy Anne ....... 74, 157 

Wert, Robert Browning 144 

AVert, Russell Hopkins 68, 144, 154 

Whister, Catherine 

White, Odell AViUiam 

AVhitman, James Richard 78, 84, 98, 99, 156 

AVilt, Ethel Alrginia 68, 145, 155 

AA'ise, Esther Naomi 79, 145 

AA'itmer, Aimee Frances 79 

AA^itmer, Bernice Elizabeth 79 

AA'orley, Charles Donald 134 

Yeager, Pauline Katherine 37 

Yeagley, Harold George 79, 132 

Yeakef. Dorothy Adelaide 72, 74, 133, 145 

Yingst, John Allen 78 

Yingst, Katherine Blossie 133, 135, 145 

Yocum, Martin Dale 74, 79 

Yoder, Christine Dorothy 68, 133, 134 

Yokum, George Eugene, Jr 135, 146 

Zamojski, Beatrice Estella 71, 145, 149 

Zartman, Mary Elizabeth 71, 125, 145, 157 

Zeiters, Dorothy Louise 74, 133, 135, 145 

Zerbe, Grover Franklin 75, 146 

Zerbe, Harry 71, 146 

Zerfoss, .411en Bolton 

Zettlemoyer, Elvin John 75, 134, 135, 146 

Zimmerman, John 37, 141 

Zimmerman, Ray R 78 

Zubroff, Lillian 74, 145, 153 

Zwally, Kathryn Matilda 79, 147, 152 



Page 177 



Class of 1938 wishes to give heartiest thanks to all those 
who played a major part in making this book possible . . . 
first, to all members of the staff, who have given valuable 
time to complete their assigned jobs ... to Prof. D. Clark 
Carraean, who has spent long hours on the photographic 
part of the book and made valuable suggestions in this field 
... to the representatives of Sarony Studios, who have 
given us 100 per cent cooperation ... to P. Mark Parthe- 
more, Jr., and W. E. Rowe, of J. Horace McFarland Co., 
who gave their personal attention to the smallest details 
in the printing end . . . last but not least, to Dietrick 
Rempel, who handled the engravings and did the designing 
of the book . . . the Class again says. We thank you . . . 



Page 178 



■(ilma Matex 



To thee, dear Alma Mater, 

This ringing song we raise; 
A song that's fraught with gladness, 

A song that's filled with praise. 
We cannot help but love thee. 

Our hearts are full and free. 
Full well we know the debt we owe 

To dear old L. V. C. 

We come from old New Hampshire, 

Where winter breezes blow. 
And from the sunny Southland, 

Where sweet magnolias grow. 
We've sung "Star-Spangled Banner," 

To "Dixie" given a cheer; 
But now we raise this song of praise 

To Alma Mater dear. 

Ye sons of Lebanon Valley, 

Put forth j'our strongest might, 
And let our Alma Mater 

Win each and every fight. 
Lift high her royal banner. 

And keep her honor clear, 
And let our song with voices strong 

Ring down through many a year. 

— Max F. Lehman, '07 



Page 179 



AU T GRAPHS -^ 



AUT GRAPHS 



The End