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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

1941 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1941leba 



Copyright 1940 by 

CHARLES R. BEITTEL, Jr. 

Edilor 

JOHN H. DRESSLER, Jr. 
Business Manager 




An important milestone in the history of Lebanon 
Valley College is heralded by the Junior Class in presenting 



The 1941 Quittapahiila 



CHARLES R. BEITTEL, Jr. 
Editor 

JOHN H. DRESSIER, Jr. 
Business Manager 



Reduced to its simplest terms in this issue of the Quittapa- 
hilla is the problem of yearbook design. Obedience to a very 
few rules which were considered to be adequate definitions 
of the purpose of an annual has taken the place of the pursuit 
of a theme or the use of any of the various other devices by 
which necessary unity is customarily achieved. Several 
changes, primarily in format, have been effected. Such 
rearrangements are the results alone of conformity to these 
few basic rules. 



The purpose of this volume may well be considered to have 
been accomplished if from its content of word and picture 
there may be extracted in time to come incitations to reflec- 
tive memories of days at Lebanon Valley College. 



The lid isn't removed when a fellow gets off to college and becomes, to a degree 
probably greater than ever before, seli-dependent. Yet the necessary removal of 
some of the external sanctions which previously limited his sphere of activity may 
make that lid seem very, very light. W ithout doubt the most difficult problem 
confronting the proctor of a dormitory — any dorm for that matter, but especially 
of a men's — is to get the inhabitants of that dormitory to do as Dr. Shettel's Greeks 
did: "to enter into life with the lid on." If the finding of a workable and successful 
solution to this problem alone were taken into consideration, it would have to be 
acknowledged without reserve that Professor and Mrs. Carmean are completely 
filling the requirements of the task which they undertook when they moved into 
the suite of rooms over the archway of the Men's Dormitory. Nor has the creation 
of a model society involving more than one hundred young men been effected by 
the application of strict rules enforced by the proctor, for now more than ever does 
there exist a truly democratic form of self-government, free of external interference. 
And all of the dormitory inhabitants like and respect the couple placed over them 
by the college administration. No finer evidence of this could be desired than the 
tea set given to them by the boys last Christmas, in the purchase of which every 
resident male student had a small share. 



Proctors of This Wide-Open Dorm Are 





. . . Professor and Mrs. D. Clark Carmean 



A dedication of this issue of the Quiltapahilla is sincerely and gratefully made to 
Professor and Mrs. Carmean by the Junior Class of Lebanon Valley College, in- 
dicating, it is hoped, the appreciation felt toward them for all of their many services 
to the college and the student body . . . understanding management of a wide- 
open dorm, intelligent and efficient work in the field of music, unselfish assistance 
in the preparation of the pictorial part of this volume, and innumerable kindnesses 
on a thousand and one different occasions. 



The story of Lebanon Valley College, now approach- 
ing its seventy-fiith anniversary, is an interesting and 
stimulating account, not of a few brilliant or wealthy 
men, but of a people and an ideal. The people were the 
members of the eastern conferences of the Church of 
the United Brethren in Christ; the ideal, that of estab- 
lishing and maintaining a co-educational institution of 
learning in which the highest scholarship should be 
fostered and encouraged in a Christian atmosphere, 
and in which religion should subsist without sectarian- 
ism. Form was given to that ideal when that people 
founded Lebanon Valley College at Annville, Pa., in 
1866. 

To an outside observer the history of the college from 
its opening by the first president, Dr. Thomas Rees 
Vickroy, on May 7, 1866, in a building donated by the 
old Annville Academy, which is now South Hall, might 
seem to consist merely in increases in the student body 
and corresponding increases in the faculty, the pur- 
chase of new grounds, and the erection of new buildings. 
The inner history, however, was marked by a long and 
bitter struggle against insuperable obstacles, a struggle 
carried on by heroic men and women on the faculty, 
among the students, and in the conferences. 

Many people doubted the wisdom of providing higher 
education for the Church's young people. These per- 
sons launched a violent attack against the educational 
policy of which the college was the fruit. Their an- 
tagonistic efforts almost put an end to the college in 
the first year of its existence. But the conference stood 
loyally by the institution it had created and fought the 
matter through, though it meant in the end the drop- 
ping of many valued members from the Church. 

Another crisis developed about twenty years later over 
the question of relocating the college. This problem so 
seriously divided the supporters of the college that all 
progress was halted. In the emergency Dr. E. Ben- 
jamin Bierman was called to the presidency in 1890. 
On the wave of enthusiasm which he was able to set in 
motion, a policy of permanency and enlargement was 
accepted, resulting in the renovation of buildings and 
an increase in the number of students. 

Dr. Roop became the chief administrative officer in 
1897. Under his guidance the college entered a new 
period of expansion in which Engle Music Hall, the 
Carnegie Library, and North Hall were first built. 
When the old Administration Building was destroyed 
by fire, old friends and new patrons rallied to build a 
new Administration Building, a dormitory for the men, 
and a heating plant. Dr. Roop also provided proper 
quarters and modern equipment for the science de- 
partments. 




Administration Building 



The inauguration of the late President George Daniel 
Gossard marks the beginning of the greatest era of 
prosperity. In the course of his term of office the 
student body trebled in numbers, the faculty standard 
was raised, and the elimination of all phases of secondary 
education gave the institution true college status. 
During this same period two great endowment cam- 
paigns were completed, the college's economic position . 
made sound, and her permanency placed beyond 
question. 

The future of Lebanon Valley College, now a matter of 
conjecture and wishful thinking, will resolve itself 
into the continuation of the story of a people and an 
ideal. The people will still be, for the most part, the 
members of the eastern conferences of the Church of 
the United Brethren in Christ, with their numbers 
augmented, to be sure, by other friends who have been 
attracted to the support of the college in the passing 
of time. Moreover, the ideal must be found to be 
identical with that which three quarters of a century 
ago was deemed of sufficient worth to be advanced 
even at the risk of foundering an infant denomination. 
At the present time President Clyde A. Lynch is 
writing the title for the next chapter of the dramatic 
story. The turn that the story is to take is dependent 
upon the extent to which his ambitious plans can be 
projected into realities by a people aroused to the 
energetic, and perhaps sacrificial, support of their ideal. 



Board oF Trustees 



EAST PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE 



PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE 



Rev. S. C. Enck 
Rev. p. B. Gibble 
Rev. O. T. Ehrhart 
Rev. D. E. Young 
Mr. E. W. Coble 
Rev. W. A. Wilt 
Rev. H. E. Schaeffer 
Mr. John Hunsicker 
Mr. J. R. Engle 
Mr. John E. Gipple 
Mr. M. H. Bachman 
Rev. H. E. Miller 
Prof. H. H. Baish 



Harrisburg, Pa. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Lancaster, Pa. 

Annville, Pa. 

Penbrook, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

Middletown, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



Rev. J. H. Ness 
Rev. G. I. Rider 

Mr. Albert Watson 
Mr. O. W. Reachard 
Rev. p. E. V. Shannon 
Rev. F. B. Plummer 
Mr. E. N. Funkhouser 
Mr. R. G. Mowrey 
Rev. C. Guv Stambach 
Mr. Harold P. Lutz 
Rev. M. R. Fleming 
Hon. W. N. McFaul 
Rev. Ira S. Ernst 



York, Pa. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Carlisle, Pa. 

Dallastown, Pa. 

York, Pa. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Hagerstown, Md. 

Quincy, Pa. 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Red Lion, Pa. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Carlisle, Pa. 



VIRGINIA CONFERENCE 



Rev. J. E. Oliver 
Mr. G. C. Ludwig 
Rev. E. E. Miller 
Rev. W. H. Smith 



Petersburg, W. Va. 

Keyser, W. Va. 

Martinsburg, W. Va. 

Elkton, Va. 



Rev. Millard J. Miller Martinsburg, W.Va. 
Rev. J. Paul Gruver Roanoke, Va. 



ALUMNI TRUSTEES 

Mrs. Louisa Williams Yardley 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Prof. C. E. Roudabush Minersville, Pa. 

Mr. A. K. Mills Annville, Pa. 



TRUSTEES AT LARGE 

Bishop G. D. Batdorf Harrisburg, Pa. 

Dr. H. M. Imboden New York City 

Mr. Maurice R. Metzger Middletown, Pa. 



Members of the college faculty who are heads of departments are ex officio members 
of the Board of Trustees. 






r\ 



y 



1 




President Clyde A. Lynch 



Dr. Lynch, as president of Lebanon Valley College, finds himself in the unenviable 
position of coordinating factor between all the many groups that are in any way 
connected with the college: trustees, faculty, students, parents, alumni, patrons, 
and a host of others. His ability to fill this exacting executive position efficiently 
is evinced by the institutional progress since his inauguration in 1932. Probably 
the most wearying of his multiple duties is the necessity for speech-making, both 
far and near, in the performance of which task he has been of immeasurable value 
as the college's ambassador of good will to the general public. Annually Dr. and 
Mrs. Lynch become the gracious host and hostess to the three lower classes at 
the traditional afternoon teas and to the graduating class at the impressive Senior 
Banquet. Dr. Lynch is very much interested personally in theology and psy- 
chology. In connection with his pursuance of the latter subject, he has as his 
helper. Foxy, the singing dog. Long walks round out the daily activities, and 
if favorable weather happens to coincide with one of those scattered breathing 
spells, he might be seen playing a creditable game of tennis. 



10 





Dean A. H. M. Stonecipher 



Miss Mary E. Gillespie 



Dr. Stonecipher, tall of stature and dignified of mien, is a just and firm dean. 
He is not, however, half so stern as would seem to be indicated by his office or 
his scholarly appearance. As a teacher of Latin and Latin literature, he is very 
thorough and patient. A familiar classroom trait is the habit of balancing his 
glasses on his slender and tapering forefinger. In the spring Dean Stonecipher, 
a tennis enthusiast, becomes a familiar figure on the faculty playing court. This 
year he has been engaged in special efforts to set up an advanced and more 
democratic system of student self-government and to improve the chapel atten- 
dance and conduct. 



Miss Gillespie, supervisor of the Conservatory of Music, is also social dean of 
women and hostess of North Hall. In addition to the numerous duties associated 
with these offices, she also teaches several classes in methods of teaching music 
and one in the history of music. Outside interests include travel, opera, and the 
collecting of old glass. Of all the many significant events that she witnessed in 
Europe this past summer, she was perhaps most impressed by the celebration of 
the fall of the Bastille in Paris. As a woman. Miss Gillespie is attractive and 
gracious; as a teacher she is impartial and understanding. 



11 




Dr. L. G. Bailey presents the facts of psychology with a 
slight southern accent. No thumbnail sketch of the pro- 
fessor of psychology would be complete if mention of his 
hypnotic powers, his two sons, and his true-false tests were 
neglected. 

Edward M. Balsbaugh, assistant professor of education, is 
one of the fairly recent additions to the faculty. College 
duties outside the classroom include the directing of the 
Placement Bureau and the secretaryship of the Alumni 
Association. By dealing with essentials instead of verbose 
details, in practice he approaches the limit defined by the 
concept of the ideal teacher which he advances in theory. 

Dr. Andrew Bender's frequently expressed desire, "Oh! 
If we could but get inside of an atom to see how it is 
made," typifies his genuine enthusiasm for chemistry, which 
department is in no small way indebted to him for its 
development. 

Mrs. Ruth Engle Bender, professor of piano, finds many 
opportunities a day to use her favorite expression, "Now then, 
let's try a few scales." Friends, students, and visiting artists, 
whom she frequently entertains, all testify to the charm 
that makes her an excellent hostess. 

Dr. Amos H. Black is the likable exponent of mathematics 
at L. V. C. His chapel speeches are among those least frowned 
upon by the 8:55 assemblage. He is frequently selected to 
act as chaperon at the college dances, not alone because 
of his willingness to act in that capacity, but even more 
because his obvious enjoyment adds to the fun of all. 



Dr. R. R. Butterwick, emeritus professor of philosophy 
and religion, may be seen revisiting the campus almost 
any sunny afternoon. His humor and broad-mindedness 
endear him to all, especially to those students who were 
fortunate enough to have had him as a teacher. 

P. Porter Campbell, professor of organ, was a pupil of the 
world-famous Pietro A. Yon. This association has made 
him very engrossed in his work, and he spends many hours 
practicing at the organ. 

D. Clark Carmean has the dubious honor of being proctor 
of the Men's Dormitory. And as if that weren't a sufficiently 
large problem for one man, he is also professor of band and 
orchestra instruments and a supervisor of the music practice 
teaching at Hershey. Still, he finds time for varied outside 
interests, among which cameras and dogs are most familiar 
to Lebanon Valley students. 

Alexander Crawford, professor of voice, teaches on the 
basis that if a person wills to do a thing, he can do it. He is a 
favorite with his students both as an effective teacher and 
as a fine man. 

Dr. Samuel H. Derickson, head of the biology department 
and proponent of hard work, is a true friend of his many 
students. An unfortunate illness recently kept him from 
meeting his classes for lectures. During his confinement 
an intelligent exercising of remote control and the respectful 
cooperation of those enrolled in his courses maintained class 
and laboratory work at practically their usual level. It has 
been said that the high-powered binoculars which he dis- 
tributed for nature study are a boon to mankind. 



12 




Merl Freeland, professor of piano for the last two years, is 
an accomplished concert pianist. His definite sense of humor, 
his whimsical smile, and his collegiate arrangement of "Ar- 
kansas Traveler" make him a popular figure on the campus 
and concert platform alike. 

Jerome W. Frock, better known as Jerry, is the coach of the 
Flying Dutchmen of the gridiron and the freshman basket- 
ball team as well as director of physical education for men. 
With the exception of the inevitably necessary appearances 
during football season, Jerry is seldom seen in public. 

Christian R. Gingrich waxes enthusiastic whenever any 
social problem is concerned. Experiences from his legal 
practice provide a limitless source of illustrative material for 
political science and sociology lectures. One class period was 
enlivened not a little bit by the appearance of a hobo. This 
peripatetic individual for some time after leaving Annville 
faithfully kept a diary of his colorful wanderings which he 
submitted to Chris. 

Mrs. Mary C. Green, professor of French and one of the 

most attractive members of the faculty, acquired her complete 
mastery of that language by virtue of an extended stay in 
Paris from 1901-1914. The severest test of her kindliness is 
the assortment of answers received in reply to her queries 
about the weather and the date which usually preface the 
hour's work. 

Samuel O. Grimm fills the position of registrar of the 
college and in addition teaches a number of more or less allied 
subjects which include astronomy, mathematics, physics, and 
aviation. He has an almost inexhaustible supply of knowledge 
in all subjects. Although his tests are reputed to be very 
difficult, he always gives the students the benefit of the doubt. 



Esther Henderson, director of women's physical education, 
is very well liked by all of "her girls." Showing enthusiasm 
for her work. Miss Henderson has accomplished wonders in 
women's athletics and May Day presentations since her 
arrival at L. V. C. 

Dr. Lena Louise Lietzau, professor of German, is also 
proctor of West Hall. As a result of her instigation, regular 
Sunday evening teas are now a feature of that particular 
dormitory's social life. Incidentally, the aromas which 
emanate from her room put the dining-hall to shame. 

Dr. V. Earl Light, assistant professor of biology, once each 
year delights his assistants' hearts and stomachs with an in- 
vitation to an excellent home-cooked meal. He has a well- 
balanced sense of humor — ask the group of fellows with whom 
he was laughing the other day. But he looks upon anything 
that resembles monkey business with a fo ceful disfavor. 

Harold Malsh, professor of violin, has just marked his 
fifteenth anniversary as a teacher in the Conservatory of 
Music. On campus only two days a week, he gives instruction 
to an amazing number of students in that short space of time. 
Professor Malsh is an accomplished concert violinist, having 
a keen ear and perfect pitch. 

Frederic Miller, professor of history, is another cub member 
of the faculty this year. Outside of the classroom he en- 
courages further interest and research in history by acting 
in an advisory capacity for the International Relations Club. 
Fritz apparently likes Annville, for he has just moved into 
that new home located across from the athletic field. 



13 




Nella Miller is an accomplished concert pianist as well as 
professor of piano. Miss Miller practices faithfully in spite of 
her full teaching schedule. Before coming to the local con- 
servatory, she taught at the Juillard School of Music in 
New York. 



Hiram H. Shenk, professor of history, is one of the most 
popular professors in the college. His command of historical 
facts is unquestionably amazing, and his lectures are un- 
usually well illustrated with little historical anecdotes which 
bring life to his subjects. 



Ella Moyer, professor of music theory, is indeed one of the 
good scouts of the conservatory. Her wide interests, youthful 
personality, humor, and ready conversation make her a 
favorite with college students as well as with her own pupils. 

Helen E. Myers devotes most of her time to her work as 
college librarian. Indeed, she is so conscientious in overseeing 
the work that for the short time she was unable to come to the 
library this winter, she sent daily notes of instruction to her 
assistants. 



Dr. Paul O. Shettel, professor of philosophy and religion, 
came to us directly from the great philosopher, George Boaz. 
The ease with which he uses complicated philosophical terms 
and his unexpected sparks of humor leave his classes open- 
mouthed. 

Dr. Stella Johnson Stevenson, professor of French litera- 
ture, has a thorough knowledge of the language bolstered by 
a summer spent abroad. She is especially noted for the 
astounding patience with which she conducts her classes. 



Dr. G. A. Richie, professor of Bible and Greek, has a dual 
personality. One is the serious professor that is met in class; 
the other is the snappy little fellow who gives pep talks in 
chapel during the football season. 



Dr. Clyde S. Stine, professor of education and instructor of 
public speaking, has been with us a comparatively short time. 
Because his courses are certainly not snaps, it might be said 
that the students do learn to work under him. 



Edward P. Rutledge, professor of band and orchestra in- 
struments, also directs the College Band, the Girls' Band, the 
Symphony Orchestra, the Chorus, and the Glee Club, as well 
as the Beacon Hill Chorus, which for the past three years 
has been adjudged the best rural chorus group in the state. 
All the members of these organizations are eager to tell of his 
abilities as a director and his tireless energies. 



Dr. Milton L. Stokes, professor of business administration 
and economics, is also adviser of the girls' debate team. He is 
a true internationalist, being a citizen of Canada, a resident of 
the United States, and a champion of South America. His 
efforts were instrumental in bringing to the campus, for the 
first time, a chapter in a national fraternity. Pi Gamma Mu, 
the National Honorary Social Science Fraternity. 



14 




Dr. George G. Struble, associate professor of English, is 
also adviser of the Green Blotter Club, the Wig and Buckle 
Club, and chairman of the faculty boards which direct student 
publications. Before coming here he lived in the central 
states and taught for a time in the Philippines. 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace, professor of English, is a true 
gentleman and a scholar ... a worthy example of the 
"manly man" about whom he so often speaks. His lectures 
are masterpieces of English composition. Right now the entire 
campus is anxiously awaiting the completion of the book 
upon which he is working. 



Miss Margaret Wood, instructor in hygiene, political 
sciences, and economics, spends her non-teaching moments 
regulating the college diet, nursing infirmary-confined students 
back to health, and looking after the social welfare of her 
South Hall charges. Each week end she rushes off to Phila- 
delphia, usually accompanied by Marjorie Anne, to do re- 
search work for her doctor's degree. 

Rev. W. A. Wilt, pastor of the College Church, fills the pulpit 
of what is probably the most difficult charge in the conference. 
Pre-theological students often find their way to his study for 
advice. Speaking in chapel about once a week, he sometimes 
becomes the object of rather pointless but pointed criticisms, 
which more than anything else indicate merely that something 
he has said really hit home. 



This Familiar Group Keeps College Records and Accounts Straight 



15 






Student Self-government at Lebanon Valley in the last year took another forward step 
with the formation of two separate governing bodies for the day students. This move 
adjusted in large part the unequal distribution of governing power and granted the day 
students a voice in government equal to that of the resident students. In the words of 
Dean Stonecipher, who directed the creation of the new groups after a careful survey of 
conditions on other campuses, the purpose of the new setup is to provide "a more equal 
distribution of representation in student government along the lines of natural division." 
Accordingly, there are now four operative representative bodies, each of which has limited 
legislative and judicial control over a definite group of students. These groups are the Men's 
Senate and the Women's Student Government Association, the organizations whose member- 
ship is decided in elections by the resident men and women students respectively, and the 
Men's Day Student Congress and Women's Commuters Council, the bodies whose members 
are named by the day students. In addition there is a fifth organization, the Student- 
Faculty Council, which likewise underwent a rearrangement so that it now has a wider 
representation and is more effective in operation. Its prime function is to act as a clearing 
house for the various problems of campus life. 



Me 

John Moller 
Paul Horn 
Richard Bell 



I Senate 

President 
Vice-President 
Secretary- Treasurer 





Women's Student Government 
Association 



Jeanne Schock 
Evelyn Evans 
Floda Trout 
Carmella Galloppi 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



16 



Student-Faculty Council 

Paul Horn President 

Joseph Carr Vice-President 

Louise Saylor Secretary 



i9 P Q 




1 ^_w« 


^ 


\^^ 


^ •V^iJ 




_^ !s 







Men's Day Student Congress 

Richard Moody President 

Herbert Miller Vice-President 

Alexander Rakow Secrelar\--Treasurer 




Women's Commuters Council 

Anna Evans President 

Adele Black Vice-President 

Marian Reiff Secretary 

Eloise Hollinger Treasurer 



17 




Prexy Leads the Graduation Procession 



The Class of 1940 

finishes its four-year sojourn at Lebanon Valley College and moves on, with 
newly granted bachelorates tucked underarm, into an uncertain future, hoping 
that its individual members shall be permitted to pursue their diverse chosen 
courses of work or further study. 



18 




First Semester Senior Officers 



Lillian Leisey, Secretary 
John Moller, President 



William Bender, Treasurer 
Daniel Seiverling, Vice-President 



Second Semester Senior Officers 

Carmella Galloppi, Secretary Donald Ludwig, Vice-President 
Richard Baldwin, President William Bender, Treasurer 




19 



SENIORS 






Marv Elizabeth Albert 



Robert Raymond Artz 



Dean Mover Aungst 





Richard H. Baldwin 



George R. Barnhart 




Charles Miller Belmer 






John L. Bemesderfer 



William L. Bender 



Adele Louise Black 



20 



SENIORS 






Barbara B. Bowman 



Thomas B. Bowman 



William Josiah Brensinger 






Elwood Richard Brubaker Florian Wendell Cassady 



Lucie Helen Irene Cook 






Mary Anne Cotroneo 



J. Stanley Deck 



Robert Edward Dinsmore 



21 



SENIORS 






Margaret Elizabeth Druck 



Jane Virginia Ebv 



Carl Y. Ehrhart 






Anna M. E\ a\s 



Evelyn Rosser Evans 



Thomas G. Fox, Jr. 






Carmella Profeta Galloppi 



Mildred E. Gardner 



C. Dennis Geesey 



22 



SENIORS 






Robert Shirey Grimm 



Cecil Willis Hemperly 



August Herman 






Ruth Evelyn Hershey 



Henry Franklin Hoffman, Jr. 



Rachael Evelyn Holdcraft 






Paul Edward Horn 



W. Frederick Huber 



William H. Jenkins 



23 



SENIORS 






George A. Katchmer 



Richard Dellinger Kal i fman 



Sterling H. Kleiser 






Orval \V. Klopp 



Christine E. Kreider 



Lillian Mae Leisey 






David Franklin Lenker 



Jesse Sanford Lenker 



Harold H. Lighi 



24 



SENIORS 






Ralph R. Lloyd 



Dorothy Elizabeth Long 



Lela Weaber Lopes 






Donald Paul Ludwig 



John Howard Lynch 



GusTAV Thurwald Maury 






Evelyn L. Miller 



Herbert L. Miller 



Edward Robert Minnick 



25 



SENIORS 






John V. jMoller 



Richard E. MooD^ 



P. Kenneth Morrow 






George Gerald Munday 



John Herbert Ness 



Ruth V. Norton 






John George Oliver 



Lucille Grace Olllk 



Harold S. Peiffer 



26 



SENIORS 






Edward A. Powell 



Ellen Lydia Reath 



James G. Reed 






Freeman Daniel Rice 



Clayton Merle Rider 



Anthony John Rozman 






Louise Saylor 



John Ambrose Schaeffer 



William Scherfel 



27 



SENIORS 






Verna M. Schlosser 



Jeanne E. Schock 



Irwin Donald Schoen 






Warren D. Sechrist 



Daniel S. Seiverling 



Evelyn Maye Seylar 






Stewart Bennet Shapiro 



George Harry Smee 



Robert Gleim Spangler 



28 



SENIORS 






H. Herbert Strohman 



Americo Taranto 



Mary Alice Touchstone 






Christian B. Walk, Jr. 



Richard Pershing Weagley 



Margaret S. Weimer 






Robert Browning Wert 



James Richard Whitman 



Esther Naomi Wise 



29 



SENIORS 





ERNICE E. \\ ITMLR 



Harry William Wolf 





Harold G. Yeagley 



Kathryn M. Zwally 



30 



SENIORS 



i t 1. It i 



m 



, . . Possessing Requisite Qualities of Character and Scholarship 



OFFICERS 

Dr. a. H. M. Stonecipher 

Dr. H. H. Shenk 

Dr. Stella Johnson Stevenson 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



Carl Ehrhart 
Anna Evans 
Thomas Fox 
Robert Grimm 



Newly Elected Members 

Frederick Huber 
Lillian Leisey 
Lela Lopes 
Evelyn Miller 



John Moller 
Richard Moody 
Louise Saylor 
Stewart Shapiro 



Phi Alpha Epsilon Society was founded in the spring of 1935 for the purpose of awarding 
recognition for scholastic excellence. Membership in this local counterpart of the national 
scholastic fraternity, Phi Beta Kappa, is limited to those members of the senior class who 
have maintained an average of eighty-eight per cent or better in their courses during their 
first three and one-half years. With the recent induction of twelve new members this grow- 
ing society now lists a total membership of fifty-eight. The annual banquet, which is at- 
tended also by alumni members, was held this spring on April 3 at the Harrisburg Civic 
Club. Dr. Ernest M. Cress, who has been state botanist of Pennsylvania since 1920 and 
is the author of books, bulletins, and magazine articles on botanical subjects, delivered 
the evening's address. 



31 



The Class of 1941 



apparently cares very little for precedents, except those set by 
itself. First of all there was the choice of "Mystery of Greenfmgers" 
for the Junior Class Play. Dramas of a mystery trend have been 
chosen but rarely as vehicles for Lebanon Valley's Thespians. 
Certainly the holding of the first open Junior Promenade in the 
history of the college was a daring step, especially since Johnny 
McGee's Orchestra, a band well on the way to popular music tops, 
was secured to provide the musical entertainment of the evening. 
And it will have to be admitted that this edition of the Quittapahilla, 
whatever else it may be, is at least a break with the past in some 
few respects. 



32 




First Semester Junior Officers 

Max Flook, Treasurer Samuel Derick, Vice-President 

Bernard Bentzel, President Ferne Poet, Secretary- 



Second Semester Junior Officers 



Ferne Poet, Secretary 
George Grow, President 



Alexander Rakow, Vice-President 
Max Flook, Treasurer 




33 




BERNARD CHARLES BENTZEL 

We offer you, ladies and gentlemen, that ace 
of aces, the top-flight airman of them all, 
Mr. Bentzel. Barnie takes great pride in his 
exploits in the Civil Aeronautics Course. 
Even here on solid earth — on the dance-floor, 
to be exact — Barnie's feet are inclined to take 
wing and do a few fancy turns. Barnie 
certainly does have the courage of his con- 
victions. Few other people would dare to 
sport that flashy satin jacket of his on the 
campus. Yes, girls, he's "^'ork's gift to 
Lebanon Valley College. Whoa! Janie has 
the inside track, and Barnie doesn't even 
recognize a waiting-line. Too bad! 



JEANNE LOIS BLIVEN 

Jeannie has a way about her that spells neat- 
ness in everything she does. Conscientious- 
ness in her work is proved by her fine grades; 
willingness to cooperate makes her a favorite 
among her classmates. Around the conserv 
Jeannie maintains a serious attitude, but her 
South Hall dorm-mates are loud in their 
insistence that she is full of fun and often 
gives way to lighter moods. 



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CHARLES R. BEITTEL, JR. 

Charles personifies quiet efficiency, as evi- 
denced by his handling of the editorship of 
this publication. A conscientious student, 
Charles is directing his efforts toward the 
career of a medical missionary, and, if present 
observations are any indications, success. 
When Charles is stirred and the fighting 
spirit within him aroused, he is apparently 
willing to tackle all hazards, as witnessed by 
a certain incident during a recent tug-of-war 
when he came nigh losing his gentlemanly 
appearance in a tussle with Mauler Stevens. 
The adventurous heart of a warrior must lie 
beneath that coat of calm, cool, and collected 
male. 



RICHARD CLARENCE BELL 

Dick is an advocate of the back-to-the-farm 
movement. True, there is nothing like the 
fresh air of the wide open spaces, as portrayed 
in Dick's countenance with its spreading 
smile. Perhaps that smile is Dick's key to 
professional success. Oh, yes! Dick is a busi- 
nessman; in fact he handles the candy busi- 
ness of the men's dorm. Dick is somewhat of 
a flash on the basketball court, too. He 
doesn't go in for varsity competition, but is a 
shining light in the intramural games. And 
. . . someone told us he likes brunettes, girls. 




34 



ANNA MAE BOMBERGER 

In Anna Mae we have efficiency at its best, 
whether it be as a hbrary assistant, as a 
student, or in extra-curricular activities. She 
is an accompHshed organist, we have dis- 
covered, and may be found practicing in the 
conservatory in her spare moments. To the 
Shakespeare class she has proved a faithful 
secretary, providing up-to-the-minute infor- 
mation on the doings of the Hedgerow Players 
and urging our attendance at their produc- 
tions. In spite of the fact that this sounds 
like all work and no play, she must have her 
more frivolous moments, for she is often seen 
in the company of a certain drugstore Russian. 



MARGARET JANE BORDWELL 

For a long time we've been catching ghmpses 
of Margie's personality through the many 
clever posters for which she is responsible. 
This petite charmer has skipped right into 
the hearts of us all with her gay greeting, her 
ever-present smile, and her perky hair ribbons. 
In the dorm, the lab, the classroom, on the 
stage, or at a dance, Margie's presence is 
always felt — and frequently heard — as a vital 
part of campus doings. 




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FRED E. BOSNYAK 

Bos is one of those enigmas of human nature, 
a popular non-socialite. He stalks about the 
campus, apparently absorbed in his own 
thoughts of — we don't know what — but they 
may be dark plots, for Fred has been de- 
scribed as the menacing villain type, the 
villain who steals the girls' hearts. Witness 
one Norma for particulars! Bos excels in 
athletics — football in particular — so much so 
as to have been elected football captain for 
the coming season. "You could hardly call 
Bos a smoothie, but he'll certainly do," say 
those who know him. 



MARGARET ELIZABETH BOYD 

Dancing feet and graceful motions are in- 
dicative of Peggy's presence. These charac- 
teristics help her on the stage, and she is 
acclaimed as a favorite actress on campus. 
While rehearsing her parts or chatting in the 
dorm, she knits. But get this straight, boys, 
she's not preparing to be an old maid! In the 
conserv she is recognized as talented, and is 
often called on to perform the valuable 
service of accompanying. 



35 



ROBERT EDWARD BREEN 

Here is one of those exceptionally reticent 
swains who seems to have built up an almost 
impenetrable shell around himself, ^'et there 
are those who claim it can be penetrated if 
one is of the chosen few. A tall blond chemis- 
try major with a flair for bridge, REB has 
proved his ability in fields other than his 
chosen one, for he is a trumpeter in our 
College Band. Among his fellow commuters 
he has shown himself to be a good sport — 
he is razzed continually and can take it! This 
Lebanon lad appears to be walking in the 
clouds most of the time. Rumor has it that 
a certain North Hall lass may be accountable. 



GLADYS M. BROWN 

Hailing from Palmyra, Gladys upholds the 
honor of that town in the conserv. Playing 
the piano is her favorite accomplishment, and 
she is often to be found in a practice room, 
either practicing for herself or helping some- 
one else in the role of accompanist. Gladys 
is not given to shouting about herself, but 
do not get the idea that she is overly meek; 
she is quite capable of standing up for her 
rights, and often does so. Ordinarily, how- 
ever, she trusts to her deeds rather than her 
words to get her through. And they do! 




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EARL T. CATON, JR. 

\\ herever one finds the coil and bell of the 
tuba, one is sure to find Earl, who can make 
that rather unwieldy instrument sound as 
flexible in tone manipulation as a trumpet. 
Having the traditional build of an operatic 
tenor. Earl does not let the tradition down, 
for he possesses a high tenor voice which he 
handles with authority whether in his church 
choir or the College Glee Club. 



SOLO.MON BROOKS CAULKER 

Far from home and the sunny clime of his 
native shores, Solomon has his burdens to 
bear, one of his chief complaints being the 
cold weather. Apparently the heating plant 
does not do right by our Solomon, for he finds 
it necessary to resort to the aid of hot plates, 
a distinctive feature of his always immaculate 
room, to obtain a sufiiciently torrid tem- 
perature. Solomon is an inveterate arguer, 
and, right or wrong, he never gives way to 
his opponents — especially where the British 
Empire is concerned. King George could 
find nowhere a more loyal subject. 



36 




RALPH LORAIN CONLEY 

"They laughed when I sat down to play, 
but. . . ." Mr. Conley is an athlete, an 
all-round athlete. He plays hard and well 
at all games, but excels at none. We have a 
feehng Ralph could if he wanted to — excel, 
we mean — but apparently he feels it a waste 
of time and effort to expend the needed 
energy. Oh, well, he seems happy. He has 
his fun with not too much work thrown in 
and seems to get along to his own satisfaction. 
Yes, Ralph is somewhat of a ladies' man, too, 
but chooses to confine his attentions to a 
select few, not to mention any names here. 



JOE ELVIN CONRAD 

This shy, reserved, left-handed pre-med really 
exemplifies what is implied by the term 
student. Always more than a few steps 
ahead of everyone else in his work, Joe spends 
much of his time in lab. Often he becomes so 
absorbed in his work that when someone 
talks to him, he just doesn't hear. In spite 
of all his seriousness, however, he likes his 
fun and has it. Though he resides in Palmyra 
with his doctor brother — Joe is following his 
example as to profession — he claims Valley 
View as his home community. And that 
partly explains his Dutchified accent. What 
we want to know is whether he is always as 
bashful as he appears. 



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THEODORE CIAMILLO 

A scholar and a gentleman is Ted of the Long 
Island Ciamillo's, if you please. In addition, 
he IS an athlete — quiie a footballer and a 
boxer of no mean prowess. It is quite a treat 
on a lovely sunshiny afternoon to see Ted 
setting out on that grind known in the 
athletic world as roadwork. Even after that 
he is not too tired to burn the midnight oil. 
Never let it be said that he neglects the 
scholastic side of his education. Bye the 
bye, the men on the campus would like to 
know something about the charming stranger 
whom Ted escorts to college functions. 



CATHERINE RUTH COLEMAN 

"It was a great big, great big big; and then 
there was a little little." No, these aren't the 
lyrics for the fourth stanza of "Three Little 
Fishies," but just a sample of midnight 
poetry from L. V.'s Gertrude Stein, Kay 
Coleman. Around the dorm she is famous for 
this poetry, her generous nature, her draw- 
ings, her work in plaster of Paris, and for 
innocent remarks which always bring a laugh. 
But around the conserv it's a different story. 
There her real musical ability and her willing- 
ness to help everyone keep her in constant 
demand. But everywhere the final word is 
the same: Kay's a real friend and a true 
conservatory artist. 




37 




CONRAD KREIDER CURRY 

Our boy Curry and Prof. Stokes' boy Hurry, 
so to speak, has come to our Alma Mater to 
further his education in the business de- 
partment. It seems he has already applied 
some of his knowledge in various business 
enterprises, including insurance. Dubbed 
"No-Trump" Curry in those notorious card 
games of the day students, he is a ca-d shark 
of the wickedest genre. When walking about 
the campus his unmistakable swagger dis- 
tinguishes him from the mob. He belongs to 
that order of car drivers known as speed- 
kings, and consequently has struck up an 
acquaintance with certain gentlemen in 
white cars. 



SAMUEL DERICK 

Sam, the tall and lanky blond type, almost 
verges on the smoothie side of the register, 
and at the same time comes quite close to 
exemplifying our old friend Joe College. You 
really should see Sam on the dance-floor to 
appreciate him to the fullest possible degree. 
Rhythm seems to be an important part of his 
make-up, and he loves it — especially with 
Bunny! Sam could be quite the social lion 
of the campus if he so desired, for he possesses 
all the requisite qualities of leadership, but he 
apparently chooses to live in his own little 
world apart. Ah, me! 



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JOAN, ELIZABETH COX 

Foremost among North Hall's bridge babes, 
Joan comes from a family notable for its 
beauty. And, like a true daughter, Joan 
came through this year by her election as the 
most beautiful girl on campus. Although she 
is following in her sister's footsteps toward a 
job teaching music, we are sure Joan will 
never be an old maid school teacher, for we 
are told that a certain Steelton football hero 
has a strong feeling against any such fate for 
Joan. Joan's vivid ejaculations upon first 
glance at her bridge hand are fast becoming 
notorious and are one reason why she is so 
well liked by everyone. 



EDWIN CLAUDE CREEGER, JR. 

Eddie, although he hails from Thurmont, a 
little town somewhere near the Mason- 
Dixon Line, really gets around. If the number 
of feminine acquaintances he boasts, both on 
and off campus, are any indication, he just 
plain "has what it takes." For not a few of 
these acquaintances he is indebted to Glee 
Club trips, so the story goes! Eddie's class- 
mates in the conserv tell us that he gets 
around over there, also. And, indeed, all of 
us agree, for we are quite used to hearing 
from him, either singing a fine tenor or playing 
clarinet or piano. 




38 



DOROTHEA RUTH DONOUGH 

Dot is one of Lebanon's valuable contribu- 
tions to our campus. The Women's Day 
Student Room invariably hears her query, 
"Which shall I eat first, my orange or my 
cake?" From all directions comes the answer, 
"The orange, of course!" But this daily 
problem seems to be Dot's only vulnerable 
spot, for be it in scholastic or social activities, 
she is a leader. Her cheerful disposition, her 
sympathetic understanding, and her winning 
smile make her popular with us all. 



LAURENE E. DREAS 

Strutting and twirling her baton in a real 
professional manner as she leads the Girls' 
Band, Renee is familiar to us all. Her more 
mature manner is accounted for by the fact 
that she is somewhat older than most of the 
girls. Her conserv work is marked by her 
performance on the bass fiddle (which she 
can slap on occasion) and on the piano. Not 
all her time is taken up in the conserv, how- 
ever. She does manage to save some for the 
treasurer of the junior class! 




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JOHN HENRY DRESSLER, JR. 

"A thing of beauty is a joy forever" — espe- 
cially those Petty girls — so Johnny believes. 
Johnny's room, with the consent of cellmate 
Wiggle, bears the appearance of an art gallery 
featuring excellent copies of that most famous 
example of the modern girl. Oh, no! Johnny 
is not a forger; he gladly takes the credit for 
those masterpieces. Johnny is a rare in- 
dividual — a business ad major who rates 
praise from Dr. Stokes. The praise is ob- 
viously deserved if John's efficiency as busi- 
ness manager of this publication is any indica- 
tion. According to the girls, one of Johnny's 
outstanding assets is that pair of gorgeous 
brown eyes. 



JANE Y. EHRHART 

Professor Ehrhart, as she is known to her 
friends, is Public Example No. 1 of the well- 
recognized fact that brains and personality 
can be found in one person. She is very much 
interested in history, and is president of the 
1. R. C. In fact, next year she will be Fritz's 
right-hand gal. Janie is loved chiefly because 
she is a good sport. She appreciates the lighter 
side of life, and many a time her giggle breaks 
the silence of the Ad Building halls. So in- 
fectious is that laugh that no sooner does it 
sound than everyone else joins right in. And 
have you seen her calico giraffe? 



39 



CARL MAURICE ERDMAN 

Joe College personified — such is Maurie. 
When one thinks of him it is with quite a 
conglomeration of impressions . . . smart 
clothes, the latest phonograph records, sports 
(fencing, horseback riding, flying), Dottie — 
in fact, Maurie is quite the personality about 
campus. He displays qualities of leadership 
and managership which bring him to the fore 
among student activities, but he chooses to 
remain in the background — you know, the 
power behind the throne type. Maurie is 
quite successful as a business ad major, which 
should prove our statement regarding his 
executive abilities. 



JOSEPHINE L. ERNST 

Jo is one of South Hall's "Pidgeons." With 
her ready and original wit and her friendly, 
generous, and helpful attitude, she makes 
friends wherever she goes. Sometimes we 
wonder whether she is more interested in her 
Business Administration and law courses or 
in a certain person now living in Philadelphia. 
But we do know she is interested in current 
events, reading (even poetry at times!), and 
art. Didn't you know? The drawings on her 
wall would do credit to . . . well, at least 
to Jo! 




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MARY LUCILE ESBENSHADE 

Since Lucie has changed from a day to a dorm 
student, many of us have come to realize that 
she isn't always so quiet and reserved as we 
were led to believe. Sincerity, high ideals, and 
ability to do real hard work are the char- 
acteristics she is counting on to make her 
successful when she attains her goal of be- 
coming a missionary. Quite aside from her 
books and religious work, Lucie is the able 
leader of the archers of the campus. Ne'er 
did surer hand bend a bow. 



MARLIN ALWINE ESPENSHADE 

Espie has endeared himself to L. V. audiences 
as one of the outstanding character actors 
(comic roles are his specialty) on the amateur 
boards of the campus. Mo t of his spare time 
is spent in the biology labs where he keeps 
company with one of his greatest discoveries. 
Junior. Junior is a ground hog, but Marlin 
assures us he is a ground hog with a dis- 
tinctive personality. Could it have been 
gained by association? Marlin is essentially 
a social being — right in there on everything 
that happens — a familiar figure at all func- 
tions, and, upon occasion, is the life of the 
party. 



40 




ETHEL MAE FISHER 

Although she seems rather quiet at first 
impression, Ethel soon makes her presence 
felt in any group. One of her chief interests 
is music, and she spends part of each day in 
the conserv practicing violin and studying 
harmony. Chapel speakers may be interested 
to know that Ethel records many chapel 
speeches in shorthand in a little notebook. 
Whether she intends to use these as in- 
criminating evidence or food for thought, we 
wouldn't know! 



MAX KENNETH FLOOR 

In spite of the fact that South Hall demands 
so much of his time, the rest of us have 
managed to get to know Max also. He will 
be especially remembered by the members of 
his class because of his insistence at every 
meeting of bringing up the little matter of 
class dues! Coming from a little town some- 
where in the heart of Maryland, Max brought 
with him his jovial smile which is his passport 
wherever he goes. 



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JOSEPH W. FAUBER 

Here's a lad with a hearty and distinctive 
laugh! It will be remembered long in the 
conserv, as will his gentlemanliness. For Joe 
is a real gentleman in spite of his many boyish 
pranks. He proves that his calm, scientific 
way of thinking comes in handy by walking 
out of exams long before anyone else is 
finished — and he does get good marks! His 
Jokes and his French horn are as much a part 
of Joe as his laugh. And, oh yes, "Don't tell 
me your troubles; I'm not your mother!" 



HARRY LAFORCE FEHL, JR. 

Like all Shenandoah transfers, Harry has 
that open-hearted hospitality and exhilarat- 
ing good humor so typical of those southern 
students. He is exceptionally easy to get 
acquainted with and has already gained many 
friends but his heart is still in Shenandoah! 
A conscientious pre-ministerial student, he 
may be found in the library almost any time 
of the day, usually with an education book 
in front of him. Listen for that crazy ir- 
resistible laugh of his and you can't help 
knowing his whereabouts. Harry is an all- 
round kid from Parkton, Maryland. And 
even though he lives with his prof uncle, 
he does no apple-polishing. What is the 
secret of such self-control? 




41 




ALEXANDER JOSEPH GITTLEN 

There are two of those Gittlen boys here on 
our campus. This is the elder one — the boy 
with all that dark, wavy hair, and not the 
one who wears glasses. Joe is quite ghb with 
his tongue and can talk his way in and out of 
almost anything. He is a chemist and an 
active participant in athletics. At handball 
he is hard to beat, and he was captain of his 
class basketball team. From his frequent 
arguments it is easy to gather that he is crazy 
about blondes and W illiam Penn High School, 
and at the same time allergic to brunettes 
and John Harris High School! 



HENRY G. GOTTSHALL 

Mr. Gottshall supplies the conservatory 
people with their musical supplies, for he is 
the owner of Annville's music store. Desiring 
more knowledge of music facts, he is also 
studying in the conservatory. His ability to 
keep his point of view young, in spite of the 
fact that he is older and married, makes him 
liked by all; his high degree of intelligence 
makes him an outstanding student. 



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MARTHA ELIZABETH FOSTER 

Betty, a transfer from Temple, is new on our 
campus this year. In spite of her compara- 
tively recent advent she has wasted no time 
in making many friends, both male and fe- 
male. Betty seems to be one of these rather 
happy-go-lucky people, but really she is much 
more serious than appearances would indicate. 
She is widely read, especially in the line of 
poetry, — her favorites being Emily Dickinson 
and Edna St. Vincent Millay. Her many 
interests include archery, sewing (which urge 
seems to occur in fits) and walking. She can 
talk intelligently on almost any subject and 
is ready to try almost anything once. 



WILMER J. GINGRICH 

Is there no end to the list of day students? 
Here is one who is essentially a home-town 
boy. Gainer, quiet, unassuming, and reserved, 
might be dubbed the mystery man, for no 
one, not even of his intimate friends, seems to 
know much about him. A tall and lanky 
chemist, he spends much time in lab. Besides 
his interest in the sciences, however, he has an 
inclination towards certain athletics, of 
which basketball is chief. As a player for his 
class in the day student intramural contests, 
he is especially good; varsity games find him 
an enthusiastic fan. 




42 



BERNARD JOSEPH GRABUSKY 

"You've got to be a football hero . . ." and 
Grubbie is just that — the dream player. He 
always gets his man, to say nothing of the 
ladies. Football is not the only science in 
which Grubbie excels. How about that 
beautiful line of his? There is certainly 
something about this little boy toughie that is 
attractive. Mr. Grabusky is also a business- 
man and an efficient one, too. "Say it with 
flowers," pleads Mr. Grabusky, and how can 
the gentlemen refuse? Oh, what big muscles 
you have, Grubbie! After all, there are more 
ways than one to win a point. 



JAMES EARL GREIDER 

Yes, another set of brothers! This is Jim, 
source of contention in this year's tug-of-\var. 
No wonder, for with those powerful muscles 
of his he could almost win the tug single- 
handed. A pre-med student, Jim transferred 
to L. V. in his sophomore year from Dickin- 
son. In his unpretentious way Jim has gained 
the reputation of being a real gentleman on 
all occasions, and he is recognized as such by 
both girls and fellows. 




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SAMUEL O. GRIMM, JR. 

Soggy Junior, whether he knows it or not, is 
without a particle of doubt one of the best- 
looking young gents on our campus, and 
incidentally a heart-breaker. Just a smile 
from him with those deep dimples is enough 
to quicken any girl's pulse and send her blood 
pressure sky high. A hard-working soda 
jerker at the Davis Pharmacy, Sam likewise 
puts forth great effort on our tennis courts, 
and by swinging a mean racquet has come 
away with not a few victories to his credit. 
Though 'tis rather nasty to make such a fine 
fellow blush (but he does it so beautifully), 
we cannot help mentioning that his heart 
interests, seemingly few and far between, lie 
in a certain off-campus P. K. 



GEORGE LAMAR GROW 

Mr. Grow, Porkie to his friends, is something 
of an enigma to campus sleuths. The gentle- 
man manages quite well to conceal his private 
life. He has a little rule which states, "Spend 
all week ends off-campus." No one has, as 
yet, been able to discover what George does 
on all those week ends ofF-campus. Porkie's 
chief distinguishing characteristic is that 
haircut. The haircut plus his round face and 
innocent eyes may account in a large part 
for the ni kname which has become so much 
a part of him. George is one of those rare 
individuals who know all the answers with 
a minimum of study. Lucky? 



43 



WILLIAM RICHARD HABBYSHAW 

Red is one of the Hummelstown commuters 
who is extremely partial to red hair and South 
Hall. He is very well hked by all of his fellow- 
students in spite of the tricks which he plays 
at their expense. His widely scattered inter- 
ests include dancing, shooting (accompanied 
by his dog), aviation, and traveling. He is a 
member of the C.M.T.C., and has won several 
medals in swimming and shooting. In his 
sophomore year Bill made a very capable 
class president. During the summers. Red 
has been a general Jack-of-all-trades, his 
various occupations ranging all the way from 
waiter to bellboy at tbe Hotel Hershey. 



ROBERT GONDER HACKMAN 

Versatile is the word for Bob, at home on the 
stage, in a band or orchestra, on a dance-floor, 
in the classroom, playing his ocarina, or 
throwing that wonderful line of his (and it is 
good, too) in a bull session. How he manages 
to get into so many different situations we'll 
never know, but we do know how he gets out 
of them — by using that sense of humor which 
is so natural to him and typical of him. By 
virtue of his bass voice, deep out of all pro- 
portion to his stature, he is a vital member 
of the College Glee Club. 




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LUKE E. HAINS 

This true gentleman of the conserv is one of 
our day student friends from down Lebanon 
way — Avon, to be exact. Unlike many of the 
people from Lebanon County, he is proud of 
his Pennsylvania German surroundings and 
does not try to hide his background (as if he 
could). In the conserv his work on flute is 
felt in the band, the symphony orchestra, and 
the flute trio. As if this were not enough, he 
is an accomplished pianist, and from time to 
time he is to be found at the console during 
chapel periods. At home he leads the Sunday 
school orchestra and — well, there is a girl! 



DONALD HAVERSTICK 

Don is the only pre-veterinarian in our class. 
This choice of vocation is typical, for Don is a 
proponent of rugged individualism. In one 
respect only does he follow convention; he 
shows signs of becoming a "church pillar." 
But we who know him are sure that Don isn't 
interested in mere convention here any more 
than anywhere else. His good-natured air 
and sense of humor make him valued as a 
friend. 



44 




MARY ELLEN ROMAN 

No, this is not Deanna Durbin's sister, but 
Mary Ellen Homan from Lebanon. She does 
sing, however, as a hobby, and her person 
emanates that certain sweet sincerity that 
has made Deanna beloved. Mary Ellen is a 
conscientious history student who mystifies 
all of us by the amount of church work and 
household duties which she takes care of 
besides her school work, ^^'e like her for her 
cheerful disposition, her generosity, and her 
ability to accept bad breaks uncomplainingly. 



CARL CALVIN HOTTENSTEIN 

Someone new has joined the day student 
ranks. 'Tis one Doc Hottenstein, a big boy 
from Richland, beyond Myerstown. His 
average time, the authorities claim, in driving 
from his fair hometown to Annville is twenty 
minutes. From this we gather that he is a 
mean man at the steering-wheel. Aren't there 
any patrolmen between these two towns? Or 
is Carl just a child of luck? A jolly good 
fellow at cards, he does not neglect his 
studies for this pastime, for he does exception- 
ally well as a mathematician and physicist. 



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RAYMOND C. HESS 

A typical Nordic in appearance, Raymie 
possesses outstanding scholastic ability as a 
result of which his name often appears among 
the list of honor roll students. This well- 
liked lad from Jonestown has developed quite 
an interest in all sports and he daily follows 
the athletic records. In his romantic ventures 
we hear he is having a bit of competition. 
But never let it be said that Jonestown lost 
to Harrisburg without a fight, Raymie. 



ELOISE MAE HOLLINGER 

Some future Latin students will learn their 
conjugations and declensions under Eloise, 
and they may thank their lucky stars for their 
opportunity, for Eloise believes that whatever 
is worth doing is worth doing well. Her 
thoroughness in her scholastic work has 
placed her on the honor roll many times. 
Behind this industry, however, is a surprising 
sense of humor and love of good fun. Eloise 
plays just as hard as she works. Her fellow 
day studentettes tell us she is always ready 
for a good joke. 




45 




LILLIAN JEANNETTE KALBACH 

Jeannctte is one of the three inmates of that 
second-tloor madhouse in North Hail where 
everybody stops off as often as possible. 
Little (in size only), frank, peppy, spunlcy, 
natural — there is no end to the adjectives 
which describe Jeannette. Her own true loves 
are dogs and dancing, and her pet aversions 
are roaches and thousand-ieggers. Always 
ready with a quick comeback, Jeannette is a 
wonderful pepper-upper. And when it comes 
to friends (both male and female), the line 
forms to tlie right! 



NATHAN I. KANTOR 

And speaking of operations, it seems Nate has 
had his share of them. As a result of several 
visits to the hospital he is minus a rib and an 
appendix. Can it be that the nurses are 
attractive? In the day-student quarters he is 
shown a great deal of favoritism when the 
boys are seeking an ob'ect upon which to give 
vent to their heckling urges. If our assump- 
tion is correct, Nate has quite a few memories 
in this connection. A biologist, a singer of 
cheerful ditties (a pitch-pipe might help), a 
chick-raiser, a jokester (slightly on the corny 
side), a city slicker from Harrisburg — this is 
friend Kantorl 



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AUDREY JANE IMMLER 

"I never withdraw" may be a quotation from 
George Bernard Shaw, but it describes 
Audrey perfectly, for she is as determined as 
the day is long. Coupled with this char- 
acteristic is her valuable self-confidence, 
noticeable whether she is performing at the 
piano or adding a helpful suggestion to a class 
discussion. But even these two do not give 
the complete description. Add to them 
originality and you have Audrey! Witness 
the fact that she originated and executed this 
year's May Day theme. 



ARTHUR JORDAN 

Not for nothing has this gentleman from New 
\'ork, who so personifies our romantic con- 
ception of the ancient Viking, been elected 
the best -looking man on campus for the last 
two years. We have learned to look to him 
for interesting stage characterizations and a 
rich tenor addition to the Glee Club. It is 
characteristic of Art that we often see his 
impressive figure wending its way to the 
conserv before time for classes to begin, for 
he is really a hard worker and does study and 
practice conscientiously. 




46 



HAVEN KESSEL 

"Oh, my heart belongs to Shenandoah" 
should be Haven's theme song. Haven, a 
transfer from the apple valley, is quite proud 
of his collection of pictures of that worthy 
institution below the Mason-Dixon Line, 
especially those featuring a certain fair face. 
Haven apparently finds our northern nights 
quite chilly, as evidenced by that worthy 
article of garb, the nightcap, an important 
feature of his wardrobe. Although to all 
appearances quiet and unassuming, he some- 
times amazes onlookers with a display of 
puckish prankstering and a high-pitched 
giggle that must be indicative of an effer- 
vescing something beneath the calm. 



MARJORIE B. KISHPAUGH 

Coming to us from the Sunny South (Duke, 
to be exact), Marjorie has carried some of its 
warmth and friendliness to our campus. A 
good sport, and naturally cute, Marjorie 
makes friends easily with both sexes. She 
finds Annville a fine place for reasons scholas- 
tic and otherwise. Her ambitions are along 
medical lines, and many an afternoon she 
spends delving into the realms of frogdom in 
the biology lab. 




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LYNN HOFFMAN KITZMILLER 

This ruddy-cheeked Dutchman from Halifax 
is quite a hunter. That is, he hunts deer, 
squirrel, and rabbit (and he gets 'em, too). 
To date he hasn't applied for a license to hunt 
co-eds! Where (or should we say ij?) studies 
are concerned, Lynn's preference seems to 
be chemistry, judging from the amount of 
time he spends in the lab. But, judging from 
the same source, he seems to have some other 
pretty strong interests. Rumor has it that 
he is quite a square dancer, but L. V. wouldn't 
know! 



ARTHUR A. KOFORTH 

"Still waters run deep" — so the saying goes. 
You never can tell about Art. He seems to 
take everything in and give nothing out in 
the way of words. You almost need a six- 
horse team to drag a statement from him. 
Art is the mystery man of the campus. His 
past, present, and future are obscured in 
silence. Some of the girls are interested, but, 
alas! the pinnacle has never been scaled. 
Always well dressed. Art apparently believes 
that clothes make the man. We've heard 
whisperings about the campus concerning 
"two-beer" Koforth. Can it be? And he 
looked like such a nice boy, too. 



47 



FILLMORE THURMAN KOHLER, JR. 

Because Fillmore only laughs when people 
hurl the word misogynist at him, we think 
this pose of being a woman-hater is nothing 
more than a good joke on his fellow students. 
Jokes seem to be a specialty of his, judging 
from his side remarks in soc class. Fillmore 
is a pre-legal student, and profs and classmates 
alike say that that word student is well- 
applied in his case. 



MARTHA JANE KOONTZ 

Knowing just what one wants to accomplish 
is a task of no little difficulty for most of us. 
M. J., however, not onlj' usually knows quite 
certainly the objectives which she wishes to 
reach, but she reaches them. Extra-curric- 
ularly she exerts a personable leadership in 
numerous fields, being especially active in 
the campus religious organizations and, 
recently, on the L. V. stage as a capable 
actress. When in action she doesn't pull her 
punches and seldom telegraphs them. Al- 
though, if you paid particular attention, you 
might just catch the slight but determined 
elevation of one eyebrow as it is raised just 
the least bit higher than the other. 




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DOROTHEA BETTY KROLL 

This friend from New York is South Hall's 
poet laureate. And here's someone the con- 
serv missed, for she supplies music often for 
the entertainment of herself and her friends. 
If ever you want anything done, and done 
well, call on Dot, for dependability is her 
middle name. A real German background 
and a native ability for the language make 
her a good student in all her German courses. 
A girl so quiet and yet so likable is a novelty 
on this campus; Dot may be a bit hard to 
understand at first, but her many friends 
prove she is one swell person. 



FRANK ANTHONY KUHN 

Kuhnie has all the potentialities of a ladies' 
man — quite easy to look at, personable, 
athletic — but, the gentleman is bashful! 
There have been several attempts to drag 
Frank from his shell, but such attempts have 
met with no marked degree of success. The 
words poelry in motion could almost be used 
to describe him with a football — just getting 
poised for one of those beautiful passes. They 
usually connect, too — the science in back of 
the art. We may also compliment Kuhnie 
on his beautiful sense of humor. Frankly, 
you will seldom see high-pressured ribbing 
taken more gracefully than as Mr. Kuhn 
receives it. 



48 




WILLIAM HENRY McKNIGHT 

McNoogle, our man with the oh-so-glorious 
past and the fascinating eyes, claims top 
honors as chief agitator in biology lab, as one 
of the few who have spent a night in a snow- 
plow, as Lebanon's badly needed one good 
doctor of the future, and as a superior hunter 
who always brings home a deer — also a dear 
answering to the name Alma (and not Mater 
either). From all appearances. Bill has 
acquired not a few friends among his fellow- 
men. They know him to be a good sport, a 
jolly fellow, a pipe-smoker, and quite a 
humorist! It's fun knowing him. 



CHARLES RICHARD MILLER 

Although married, Charlie might be called a 
college widower, for Dottie is miles away 
teaching school all week. But Friday noon 
finds him thumbing Windsor way. This 
embryo-preacher steps out in front in his 
bible, Greek and philosophy classes. As a 
member of the Y. M. cabinet, and a tenor in 
the College Glee Club, Charlie is rounding 
out his preparation for his future profession. 



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BRADFORD WILBER LONG 

Come what may — rain, snow, or shine — 
Brad must see his lady love in Schuylkill 
Haven. His lack of interest in the female 
element on our campus is probably explained 
by this fact, as is his sudden change for the 
serious within the past year. A good-natured 
fellow, he works hard as a pre-theological 
student, and on the side conducts activities 
in the boys' department of the "Y" in Leba- 
non. He is an Annville lad, and among those 
individuals whonr one seldom sees except 
when he doesn't cut a class. 



ROBERT JOSEPH MANDLE 

This New Jerseyite belongs to the long list of 
new faces appearing on our campus this year. 
Bob is a transfer from Johns Hopkins and a 
very interested science student. His collec- 
tion of pipes of all shapes and sizes is his 
pride and joy; almost any time of day he may 
be seen walking along proudly exhibiting one 
of his specimens. But what we really want to 
see is the day when Bob will smoke his 
hookah. 




49 




ELIZABETH FERNE POET 

Pretty and intelligent, Feme is a walking 
antithesis of the now obsolete phrase "beau- 
tiful but dumb." From the number of extra- 
curricuhir activities she manages in addition 
to her studies, we judge that she has more 
than twenty-four hours in her day. One of 
these special activities is Bill, and when these 
two red-heads get together .... A sweet 
disposition and very pleasing personahty 
join forces to help make Feme the popular 
girl that she is. 



FRANCES ELEANOR PRUTZMAN 

Frances' highest aspiration is to live an 
exemplary life and train herself for the work 
she is phxnning to do, that of being a mission- 
ary to some under-privileged people here in 
the United States. She is a very busy girl on 
campus, because she works so hard in every- 
thing she does. She is an especially good 
student, and has the distinction of always 
having her work ready on time. Frances' 
special spare-moment pleasure is watching 
basketball games. 



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MABEL JANE MILLER 

Except for the obvious fact that she always 
sits and stands so very erect, no one (not even 
her hall-mates) seems to know much about 
Mabel Jane. Anyone who is in a class with 
her, however, will testify to her ability as a 
student. Her special interests — aside from 
classes and books — are stage productions, 
preferably Shakespeare's, and Tarrytown, 
New York. But Mabel Jane insists it is the 
Hudson she goes back to see! 



ROBERT ALEXANDER NICHOLS III 

A fine young chap from Lebanon is Bob, 
better known to his fellow 7.0 strugglers as 
Dr. Nichols. This year Bob gave definite 
proof to the statement that looks are often 
deceiving, for, though hardly our conception 
of a Herculean individual, he had the strong- 
est grip of all the males in the psych lab — 
grizzly football men included. Henceforth 
the co-eds should stop and reconsider when 
contemplating a handshake with Bob. He 
incidentally does not believe in co-educational 
colleges — women are too nice to work with, 
for they tend to become a distraction rather 
than a help! 




50 



ALEXANDER BORIS RAKOW 

A decided asset to any class is Alex, that 
singing biologist and potential doctor from 
Lebanon. Always happy, he livens up the 
biology labs with his antics; he even gave all 
his co-workers "Gone With the Wind" names. 
Ever since his freshman year he has been a 
leader of his class and an athlete of ability. 
Shall we ever be able to forget this iron man 
of the gridiron and basketball floor? Im- 
possible, for Muscles has gained an indisput- 
able place in our college life whi~h can't be 
denied him. A faithful sports commentator 
for La Vie, he declares that he is a confirmed 
bachelor, but recent developments have led 
us to doubt this good man's word! 

R. ROBERT RAPP 

Who's that tall someone going toward South 
Hall with a pipe in his hand, a Yankee 
Doodle feather in his hat, and a sort of 
savoir-Jaire nonchalance about him? 'Tis Bob 
Rapp, of course! He is an only child and yet 
surprisingly unselfish. He attends Sunday 
School and church nobly, not letting a 
Saturday night fling interfere. Though not 
the life of the party. Bob always helps along 
with the fun — and when he does make a 
remark it's certain to be clever. He is a 
member of the Day Student Congress, a reck- 
less driver (riding with him is more fun than 
a roller coaster, since the brakes of his car 
function only grudgingly), and, above all, he 
is a thoroughly likeable chap — in spite of his 
short hair cut! 




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WILLIAM B. REED 

Formerly a conserv student. Bill is now 
seeking knowledge in the college departments. 
Ah, gone are the days of ten-minute exams 
and a life of leisure. The campus has been 
wondering for three years now — is Bill a 
sworn bachelor and woman-hater, or just 
what is the reason for that lone-wolf act of 
his? They say that he is in his element in bull 
sessions, possesses quite a command of the 
art of conversation, usually belligerent con- 
versation. What is that old adage about red 
hair being a fair indication of temperament? 
Seems to hold true in Bill's case. 



MARIAN LOUISE REIFF 

This comely lass can claim achievements in 
two distinct fields, for she is both an excellent 
scholar and an accomplished pianist. On 
campus she spends most of her time in the 
college departments, but during her spare 
moments at home she is organist and junior 
choir director at her church. In addition to 
all this she finds time to accompany the 
Hershey Community Chorus. The striking 
thing about Marian is not merely that she 
does so many different things, but that she 
does them all so very well. 



51 



ROBERT HEFFELMAN REIFF 

To most of us Bob is usually identified as 
Marian's brotFier. Quiet, self-contained, he 
has not as yet asserted himself to any great 
extent on our campus — thus, this epithet. 
Since he is rather adept in the field of science, 
he spends much of his time among the beakers 
and the test-tubes of the chem lab. His pet 
aversion, by the way, is chapel. 



MILDRED LOUISE RITTLE 

Mildred, noted for her quiet ways, might well 
serve as a model of dignity to many on our 
campus. Her school-time is spent in practicing 
on the organ and tooting a clarinet in the 
Girls' Band. We know her to be an adept 
manager by the fact that she never wastes a 
minute of her busy day. As one aspiring to 
teach the essentials of music to little school 
children in the not -too-distant future, Mildred 
is preparing herself well. 




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RICHARD RUFUS RODES 

This young man from Edgewood, Pennsyl- 
vania, is one of this year's crop of transfers 
from Shenandoah. Already he has made a 
reputation for himself as a good student and a 
clean-cut fellow who practices what he 
preaches, as befits one preparing for the 
ministry. "I dream of Jeanie. . ." is his 
reason for showing so little interest in L. V. 
co-eds. But Dick is far from being classed as 
anti-social; his membership in various clubs 
and the College Band indicates that he is 
always available for a good time. 



ELLEN ELIZABETH RUPPERSBERGER 

Ellen is one of our very pretty co-eds who 
comes from the city of oysters and southern 
hospitality — Baltimore. Although she is living 
in Maryland and being educated in Penn- 
sylvania, she is sure that New Jersey is the 
garden-spot of the earth. Ellen is first and 
foremost a student of the arts, being a good 
dancer, an accomplished actress, and an avid 
lover of music. She is undoubtedly one of the 
best -liked girls on campus, and if off-campus 
following is to be judged by mail, she has a 
cortege of no little size. 



52 




LOUELLA M. SCHINDEL 

Dottie (her nickname is a hangover from her 
youth) is a blonde girl from the once-notorious 
Hagerstown. Her extreme versatility is 
evidenced by her interests here at L. V. In- 
cluded among these are English, tennis, 
bridge, dancing, clothes, and — oh, joyful 
day! — Maurie. In connection with the last 
mentioned, may we say that Lebanon is her 
second home. Now that spring is here, we 
wonder which will suffer most, her tennis or 
Maurie. You guess. 



IRENE MARIE SEIDERS 

This quiet, bashful girl-that -was has turned 
into quite a lively, extrovertish girl-that-is. 
Some say the change can be attributed to 
Reading. Not many people would be ambi- 
tious enough to work for a major in both 
history and biology, but Irene is. Her secret 
is hard study and no worry. Her ability to 
keep on studying so hard is aided by her pet 
peeve, which is that L. V. has no tall, hand- 
some men who are aspiring to law as a career. 



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BETTY ANNE RUTHERFORD 

It is not difficult to sense Betty Anne's pres- 
ence in a crowd. Her lively chatter and con- 
tagious good humor make her more than 
welcome in the day-student quarters of South 
Hall. The chief banes of her existence are 
ethics class and her lunches. Betty Anne is 
an all-round girl, but she specializes season- 
ally. Winter finds her debating for L. V., but 
with the warm weather of spring, she turns to 
archery, at both of which she is very skilful. 



EDNA CARPENTER RUTHERFORD 

Carpy, as she is best known, is the brown-eyed 
lass from South Hall who has such difficulty 
staying on her feet. Of all her many interests, 
perhaps the greatest is at E-town College. In 
spite of all the time she spends in the lab — 
and she doesn't seem to mind working for 
hours at a stretch — Carpy always has a bit 
left over for fun and laughter; and when she 
laughs, everyone within hearing distance (a 
sizable radius) laughs, too. 




53 




FRANK LANDIS SHENK 

This mitey fine chap with a mighty loud 
voice has won our applause on numerous 
occasions ever since his freshman year both 
on and ofT the stage. He is deeply interested 
in drama and has taken enough time off from 
his work in the business department of the 
college to display his talent as an actor in 
various roles — as a robot, a funny old man 
Mr. Pim, a crook, and a sophisticated and 
rather effeminate elder brother. His other 
interests have made him a wit, decidedly good 
company, a dancer of no mean ability, an 
artist of sorts, and even a lucky winner in the 
recent wave of Confucius Say contests. 



FREDERICK WILSON SMEE 

Funny-paper fans take note — here is the 
flesh and blood version of that character in 
the humor sheets called Herky. Just drop 
the y and you have Fred's nickname among 
the boys. Another one of that quiet, con- 
scientious group of students, Herk does find 
time for a bit of diversion now and then in a 
good game of cards. Always a sports fan, he 
suffered a misfortune in basketball some time 
ago, and as a result his class team has been 
deprived of a good player. Strangely enough, 
during the week, he is said to divide his 
evenings between seeing a certain young lady 
and playing dart baseball on a church team. 
How about it, Fred? 



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FRED ELLSWORTH SHADLE 

Freddie is the little boy with the big trombone. 
Essentially the quiet type, about the only 
time he does emit much sound is when he 
exercises his talents in the band. Sh-h-h! 
Freddie is a scientist. Most of his time, when 
not practicing, is spent in the chem lab 
throwing atoms around. Freddie is a student 
in the full sense of the word, and he aims to 
go places in this world of ours. In addition to 
being quiet himself, he dislikes noisy people. 
Can that be why he shuns the company of 
the opposite sex? The girls would like to know. 



ISABEL VIRGINIA SHATTO 

If you have ever seen those blue eyes of Izzy's 
gazing into space, remember that Penn State, 
though many miles away, holds special in- 
terest for her. In plain words, Isabel thinks 
foresters are tops! Even an athlete of such 
general excellence as Izzy has particular 
favorites; she prefers basketball, hockey, and 
tennis. Around the dorm Izzy is known for 
her quiet ways; she has learned the desirable 
art of having fun without making herself a 
target for Jigger Board action. Conscientious 
to the ?ith degree, Isabel is a careful student 
and a loyal friend. 




54 



STAUFFER L. SMITH 

"Any pies, any cakes, any pastries today?" 
From that cry we know it can be no one but 
that "thank you" man of the Pennway, 
Smitty. Incidentally, no matter how often 
we have tried to make him forget, his memory 
has never failed; so he always rings up our 
cash. There are no free purchases where he 
is concerned! This seller of doubtful pastries 
(ask the boys who know!) has made many 
vain attempts to be a griper, but somehow he 
cannot be sincere enough to make any im- 
pression and has been doomed to failure in 
this line — strange indeed for a day student. 



HARVEY BOWMAN SNYDER 

Harvey is the answer to a nurse's prayer — 
preferably a charming little nurse from 
Lebanon. In his chosen profession, that of a 
doctor, he should find her helpful in quieting 
impatient patients. This Cleona lad has 
extended his interest beyond the science field 
in several directions. He is quite a good 
printer, and also a successful professional 
song-bird. For some reason he is inclined to 
be rather pessimistic in his outlook, but deep 
down inside he believes this is really a fine 
old world and will do any favor for anyone. 




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MARY ELIZABETH SPANGLER 

Congeniality is a virtue and one of which 
Mary Liz has an abundance. It is seen around 
the dorm, in her social life on and off campus, 
and in her conserv classes. "Who's for a 
hand of bridge?" is her after-dinner theme. 
And somehow or other Murphy always 
manages to have a lot of people around her 
and to keep them all in a good humor. Her 
ability to wear clothes well is the envy of 
the dorm. But Mary Liz's abilities are not 
all along social lines by any means, as evi- 
denced by her membership in the Glee Club 
and the College Symphony Orchestra. 



DAVID G. SPITTAL 

Another of the well-Iifced transfers from 
Shenandoah is Tyrone Power Spittal. Dave's 
reputation depends on a few outstanding 
traits ... he is a typical Scotsman, lacks a 
sense of humor, is friendly, always makes a 
pleasing appearance, and is truthful enough 

to admit that L. V. is harder than S some 

other places! Although Dave's schoolmates 
of the last two years insist that he is quite a 
lady-killer, he hasn't given us any demon- 
strations of his ability in this line. Perhaps he 
prefers southern ladies because he's such a 
gentleman himself! 



55 



PAUL W. STOUFFER, JR. 

"All the world's a stage," and "All the world 
loves a lover." These quotations seem always 
somehow to be hiding somewhere back of 
Paul's every move; he seems to be playing to 
an audience at all times, be it one or twenty. 
Paul apparently finds classes a superfluous 
part of his college education. It is, as a rule, 
easier to keep track of the number of times he 
attends a class than of the number of times 
he cuts. Mr. Stouffer is possessed of a Russian 
complex. We wonder what ancestor Nicholas 
Nichalai Nicholaievitch would have to say. 



JEAN L. STRICKHOUSER 

Jeanie is the petite girl with the grande heart, 
well known to everyone on campus because 
of her ability to mix. A conserv student, she 
plays saxophone and xylophone. In the Girls' 
Band her xylophone is abandoned for a pair 
of drumsticks with which she proves that 
rhythm is a part of her. Not that anyone who 
has ever danced with her needs that proof, for 
Jeanie is really at home when dancing. 
Even-tempered and always cheerful, she is 
easy to get along with and barrels of fun to 
know. 




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HIRAM COOK TINDALL 

"Hi, Hi!" Strange as it may seem "Tindall" 
is the other half of this remark and not 
"Let's roll!" In one short year our friend 
from Wooster has become a campus landmark 
by virtue of his dancing, his jokes, and his 
distinctive giggle. Said giggle has become 
especially well known in the library where 
Hi spends a lot of time — looking at Life 
covers! Lest it be thought that friend Hi is 
entirely socialite, we must in fairness to him 
say that he is, upon occasion, a brave student. 
\\ itness the fact that smglehanded and armed 
only with his trusty fountain pen he upholds 
the masculine side of the fray in a certain 
non-snap English course. 



FLODA ELLEN TROUT 

\\1iile Flo appears to be a paragon of all 
virtues, we are glad to report that she is not 
one of those prim young ladies who makes 
life miserable for us poor mortals. Flo is one 
of the most versatile persons on our campus, 
being a talented actress, president-elect of the 
\\ . S. G. A., successively a biology and 
English assistant, and a member of the Green 
Blotter Club. For further information, see 
Bob! 



56 




ROBERT EARLE WRIGHT 

Bob is another one of those queer specimens 
designated as business ad majors, but the 
general impression seems to be that he has 
not yet reached the stage of taking it seriously. 
About the only thing he does take seriously 
around here is the charming Caroline. Bob 
is something of a flash on the basketball 
floor — when he gets into a game. And they 
say he is something of a flash about New 
Holland, too. Can you imagine having to 
deliver bread to your back door every 
morning? "Some fun!" says Bob. 



CLINTON DEWITT ZIMMERMAN 

Though much older in years and by far more 
serious than the rest of his classmates. Papa 
Zimmerman has weathered the storm and has 
come this far along the way quite successfuHy. 
He is a short, spectacled man with a high 
voice and a great deal of self-confidence, to 
which we may attribute his determination 
to see his theological training through to the 
end. Every day he drives his well-loaded taxi 
from Harrisburg. And whether we want to 
admit it or not, he is more than one jump 
ahead of the majority of us, for he is married 
and has a family ! 



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THELMA LEONA TRUPE 

There's something about a hysterical woman 
that is hard to forget, so Nellie is sure of being 
remembered, for even her mild laughs have a 
ring of hysteria in them. Nelhe is progressing 
rapidly towards her goal of being a music 
teacher. She plays the piano, sings in the 
Glee Club, and plays trumpet in the Girls' 
Band (we hear she's very partial to trumpets). 
On the other side of the ledger she's most 
interested in a swing around the dance-floor, 
a hand of bridge . . . and trumpets! 



EVELYN LEONA WARE 

When Little Eva is around, the much-heard- 
of modern woman seems to be a myth. Her 
prettiness, cute clothes, good nature, and 
girlish giggle all contribute to her strict 
femininity and daintiness. Without a doubt, 
Eva has the tiniest hands on campus, and if 
you don't believe it, ask John. Whenever 
you hear "Alexander's Ragtime Band," you 
can feel sure that Eva and John are in the 
offing. 




57 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Ralph Mease 
Robert Sarge 
Ruth Heminway 
Robert Guinivan 



SECOND SEMESTER 



President 
Vice-President 

Secretary- 
Treasurer 



Ralph Shay 
Robert Dresel 
Ruth Heminway 
Robert Guinivan 



Anger, Jean Priscilla 
Barber, Irene Miriam 
Boltz, Louise Adeline 
BoGER, Earl William 
Brehm, Kathrvn Elizabeth 
Brensinger, Donald Harry 
Carr, Joseph Edward 
Clark, Mary Louise 
Cox, Margaret Alice 
Cross, Mildred Louise 
Curry, Herbert Shenk 
Davies, Martha Elizabeth 
Deitzler, Phyllis Elizabeth 
Diefenderfer, William Henry 
DoBBS, GuY' Luther, Jr. 
Drendall, Harry Iven 
Dresel, Robert Franklin 



Ebersole, Loy Arnold 
Cayman, Sara Elizabeth 
Geyer, Phoebe Rachel 
Gittlen, Samuel M. 
Glen, Donald James 
Goodman, Virginia Warfield 
Gravell, Georgia Betty 
Greider, Herbert Russell 
Guinivan, Robert Maurice 
Guthrie, Kenneth Lawrence 
Hambright, Robert Daniel 
Hartman, Sara Elizabeth 
Helms, Richard John 
Heminway, Ruth Esther 
Herr, Anna Mary 
HoLBROOK, Eleanor Louise 
Hollinger, June Elizabeth 



58 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Holly, Marjorie Anne 
HoRST, Russell Joseph 
Kaufman, Lorraine Leone 
Keim, Ralph Edwin 
Kissinger, Carolyn Sarah 
Koons, Lucille Ellen 
KozLOSKY, Peter Paul 
Kubisen, Steven Joseph 
Laucks, Fredericka 
Lehrman, Anne 
Light, Mary Grace 
Long, Ruth Alice 
Loser, Dorian Elizabeth 
Manwiller, Ralph Heck 
Martin, Marguerite Helen 
Mays, Robert Vernon 
McFerren, Edward Carroll 
Mease, Ralph Risser 
Moore, George Luther 
Morey, Roger Dexter 
Mueller, Willia.m Paul 
Olenchuk, Peter George 
Peters, Marie Patricia 
Reber, Earl Wayne 
Rothmeyer, David Clair 

Zimmerman, 



Sarge, John Robert 
Sattazahn, Elizabeth Mary 
ScHiLLO, Edward C. 
Sechrist, Helen Rae 
Shay, Ralph Stanton 
Sherk, Carl Raymond 
Shillott, Betty Louise 
Sholley, Irma June 
Smee, Pauline Elizabeth 
Smith, George Washington 
Snavely, Dorothy Jeanne 
Snell, Viola Arlene 
Stabley, Dorothy Jane 
Staley, Donald Stauffer 
Stevens, Alfred Edward 
Stoner, Samuel Hess 
Swope, John Francis 
TuRCO, Victoria 
Tyson, Charles James W., Jr. 
Weiler, Robert Tournsley 
Wild, Harold 
Wix, Ruth Irene 
WoRNAS, Chris George 
Youse, Theodore Frederick 
Ziegler, George Clinton 
Frank S., Jr. 



59 



FROSH-SOPH RIVALRY 




More rosin for the Frosb 



Take it easy. Bill 
Don't get that rope wet 



Doc starts across 



You tell him, Steve 



Danny gets excited 



Sophs pulled to no avail 



60 



Urged on by kindly upper-classmen, the two lower classes each year come to grips on various fields of honor 
to do battle in more or less earnest struggles for supremacy. Holding little brief for custom, the Class of '43 last 
fall tripped the Class of '42 in both the Tug-of-War and the Frosh-Soph Football Classic. The football game, 
hotly contested throughout, was decided 7-6 in favor of the Frosh by reason of a successful extra-point try. 




Steele's passes were accurate 
Hambrigbt's extra-point try was blocked 



Tiger Benneti gets set 



Muddy but victorious Freshmen 



Muddy and vanquished Sophs 

Too many Frosh in VVei/er's way 

They called them as they saw them 



61 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Russell Paine 
Fay Brigham 
Janet Schopf 
Jackson Zellers 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



SECOND SEMESTER 

Walter Ebersole 
Richard Beckner 
Pauline Keller 
Jackson Zellers 



62 



Armstrong, Henry 
Bamberger, John Alexander 
Hartley-, Donald Francis 
Batdorf, Leon Stanford 
Beckner, Richard Best 
Bennett, John W'infield 
Boeshore, Anna Mae 
Boltz, Margaret Virginia 
Boniberger, Dorothy Hartz 
Bowman, Anne Louise 
Brigham, Laura Fay' 
Brine, Dorothy Louise 
Bryce, George Wendell 
Carey, Margaretta Adelaide 
Carl, Shirley Chaitt 
Carter, Doris Lorraine 
Collier, Annette Louise 
Collins, Ann B. 
Crall, Lloyd Hornberger 
Crist, Robert Elsworth 
Crone, .\L\rtha Loltse 
Crouse, Earl W illiam, Jr. 
Daugherty, Jean Louise 
Deibler, Kathryn Savilla 
Detambel, Marvin Harold 
Don-moyer, William McKinley, Jr. 
DuNKLE, Emma Catherine 



Eaton, Samuel Custer, III 
Ebersole, Mervin Richard 
Ebersole, Walter King 
Eminhizer, John Wesley, Jr. 
Emrich, Betty AL\e 
Encle, Robert Melvin 
Feinstein, Leo 
Fleming, Lorin Eugene 
Frantz, Frederick Stassner 
Fritche, Herman Alvin 
Garbade, Albert Martin, Jr. 
George, Walter John 
Gingrich, Harold Warren 
GoLLAM, William Edwin 
Graybill, Ruth Janet 
Grogan, Norma Lorraine 
Gruber, Jane Gingrich 
Gruber, Ruth Rebecca 
Gruman, Marva Eunice 
Hammond, Joyce 
Hampton, John Ellis 
Hartman, Richard Daniel 
Heagy, John Garfield 
Heiland, Robert Elmer 
Heilman, Robert Arthur 
Hocker, John Brendel 
Immler, Richard Andrew 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Jackson, Thomas William 
Johns, Mary Elizabeth 
Keller, Dorothy Pauline 
Keller, Emma Louise 
Kerr, Elizabeth Krause 
Klopp, Mary Ellen 
Klucker, Dorothy Jane 
Krause, David Light 
Kreider, Marian Catherine 
Kreider, Ruth Leah 
Kreider, Verna Laura 
Krovic, John Joseph 
Landis, Carl Stanley 
Little, Cyril James 
Mages, Evelyn Jaye 
March, Dorothy Louise 
Matala, Harry Nicholas 
Mattson, Robert Marvin 
Maurer, Harold William, Jr. 
Mehaffey, Mary Elizabeth 
Metro, Stephen Joseph 
Meyer, George Koehler 
Mock, Miriam Grace 
Morrison, Albert Harold 
Morrison, Helen Alice 
Mott, Frank 
MuNSELL, Fred William 
Ness, Robert Kiracofe 
NoviCK, Jerome Francis 
Oberholtzer, Harry Irving 
Olexy, William Matthew 
Owen, Richard Deen 
Paine, Russell Howard 
Patschke, Franklin Edward 
Phillips, John Richard 
Pollock, Elmer Clement 



Rhodes, Jacob Lester, Jr. 
Robertson, Jesse Custer 
Schmaltzer, Henry Walter 
Schmuhl, Raymond Frederick 
ScHOPF, Janet Marie 
Seitzinger, Charles Nelson 
Shaner, David Willard 
Sherk, Herman Dennis 
Sherk, Katherine Jane 
Shively, Max Grove 
SiLLiMAN, Warren Benjamin 
Smith, Doris Chittick 
Smith, Grace Eleanore 
Smith, Jane Evelyn 
Stansfield, Genevieve Marie 
Steele, William Hopper 
Steiner, Robert Augustus 
Stine, Evelyn Justina 
Sykes, Harold Stanley 
Talnack, John Paul 
Tavalaro, Vincent Alfred 
Touchstone, Joseph Carey 
Tritch, Verdun Francis 
Uberseder, Hans William 
Uhrich, Robert Walter 
Urquhart, Charles Dallas 
Walter, John 
Weidman, John Carl 
Whistler, Robert George 
Wilkialis, George Walter 
Witmer, Leona Almeda 
WiTMEYER, Eleanor Louise 
Wolf, Joseph Hain 
Yeatts, LeRoy Brough, Jr. 
Yestadt, James Francis 
Zellers, Jackson Sanders 



63 



1- 



A 



Outstanding personalities of the four classes 
are pictured on the pages immediately following. 
On the first four pages are presented the individ- 
uals selected by the entire student body in a poll 
conducted by the 1941 Quittapahilla as being first 
in leadership, outstanding in athletics, displaying 
the best taste and style in dress, and being the 
most attractive persons on campus. On the last 
four pages of this section are presented those 
Conservatory of Music students who, in the 
estimation of their teachers, may truly be called 
Conservatorv Artists. 



Louise Saylor, Senior 

Outstanding Leader 
Best in At/itetics 




64 



Edward Schillo, Sophomore 

Best in Athletics 









John Moller, Senior 

Outstanding Leader 



65 




Robert Spangler, Senior 

Best-dressed 



Dorothy Long, Senior 

Best'V ressed 




66 



Arthur Jordan, Junior 

Best-Looking 





Joan Cox, Junior 

Best-Looking 



67 




Jeanne Schock, Senior 



Voice 



Harold \'eagley, Senior 

Cornet 




68 



Mary Anne Cotroneo, Senior 

Via lit! 





Earl Caton, Junior 

Sousaphone and Voice 



69 




Robert Hackman, Junior 

Baritone 



Catherine Coleman, Junior 

flute 




70 



Jessie Robertson, Freshman 

Cello 





Victoria Turco, Sophomore 

Vio liti 



71 



The purpose of the Conservatory is to teach music historically and estheti- 
cally as an element of liberal culture; to ofTer courses that will give a thorough 
and practical understanding of theory and composition; and to train artists 
and teachers. 



A knowledge of the theory of music is gained in sight singing, dictation, and 
harmony courses. Practical application of the theory is found in method 
courses for all grades and culminates in the study of general and specific prob- 
lems which confront the director of school music organizations and classes. 
Each prospective teacher is given instruction on every band and orchestra 
instrument. The Conservatory student's academic studies are rounded out 
with classes in the principles of conducting, eurythmics, the history of music, 
and music appreciation. To develop musicianship in the individual student 
specialized instruction is given in fields in which proficiencies are shown. The 
Senior student, having finally gained a thoroughly substantial background, is 
confronted with the student teaching of both vocal and instrumental classes 
of children from kindergarten to high school age. 

Outside of the classroom and practice-room much of the Conservatory student's 
time is taken up by participation in the various musical organizations and ad- 
vanced ensemble groups. Each organization gives a concert in the course of 
the year. Individual artists and ensembles play in the Friday morning chapel 
programs which are given over to the Conservatory. The progressing student 
gains self reliance, stage presence, poise, and experience through appearances 
in the student evening recitals which develop musical taste and discrimination 
and acquaint both the student and the audience with a wide range of the best 
of musical literature. 



72 



One of the Best in the East 





Professor Edward P. Rutledge 



He doth bestride our music world like a Colossus. This adaptation of 
Shakespeare's expressive simile fittingly describes Professor Rutledge, for it is 
he who keeps the Lebanon Valley musical organizations at the high level which 
they have attained under his direction. The Symphony Orchestra, Glee Club, 
Chorus, College Band, and Girls' Band all come under his efficient supervision. 
Since becoming a member of the Conservatory faculty in 1931, he has won the 
respect and admiration of fellow professors and students alike. Always modest 
about his own achievements, he gives full recognition of merit to all who come 
under his supervision. Every now and then, although much too infrequently, 
he provides a rare treat by skilfully playing the cornet, proving that he is an 
artist on that instrument as well as being very familiar with the other members 
of the brass family. When correcting a student's mistake, he will articulate 
in a clear tone with almost phenomenal speed, showing that the tongue is 
quite apt for fast passages. Professor Rutledge is also proficient in the handling 
of another family of instruments, the percussion group. He teaches a class in 
percussion and plays in emergencies. His directorship of the college instru- 
mental organizations shows that he thoroughly understands the fine points of 
orchestral works. His understanding of vocal work is evidenced by the fine 
performance of the Glee Club, College Chorus, and Beacon Hill Chorus which 
he conducts. And there probably is no Conservatory student who hasn't found 
him a friend and an aid in some problem, whether it had to do with music 
or not. 



73 




College Band 



Personnel 



Flule and Piccolo 
Luke Hains 
Hain Wolf 
LoY Ebersole 

Saxophone 

Robert Crist 

French Horn 
Harold Wild 
Joseph Fauber 
Frederick Huber 
Richard Rodes 

Clarinel 
Dennis Sherk 
Harry Wolf 
Herbert Strohman 
Irving Oberholtzer 
Walter Ebersole 
Donald Brensing^r 
Edwin Creeger 
Donald Hartley 
Earl Grouse 
Warren Sechrist 



Cornet 

Harold \'eagley 
Robert Bieber 
John Talnack 
Robert Breen 
Ralph Manwiller 
Herbert Curry 

Bariloyie 

Robert Hackman 
Hans Uberseder 

Trombone 
Dennis Geesey 
Roger Morey 
Frank Zimmerman 
Richard Moody 

Percussion 

Henry Hoffman 
Sterling Kleiser 
Richard Phillips 
LoRiN Fleming 

Bass 

Earl Gaton 
Clayton Rider 

Drum Major 

Carroll McFerren 



74 




Girls' Band 



Personnel 



Flute 

Sara Cayman 

French Horn 

June Hollinger 
Mildred Gardner 
Jessie Robertson 
Genevieve Stansfield 
Lucille Koons 

Clarinet 
Lucie Cook 
Margaret Druck 
Ruth Hershey 
Mildred Rittle 
Phyllis Deitzler 
Virginia Goodman 
Louise Boger 
Verna Kreider 

Alto Clarinet 
Margaret Cox 

Baritone 

Rae Sechrist 
Mary Albert 
Mary Grace Light 



Cornet 
Mary Grace Longenecker 
Gladys Brown 
Christine Kreider 
Verna Schlosser 
Thelma Trupe 
Marguerite Martin 
Victoria Turco 
Anna Mary Herr 
Evelyn Stine 

Trombone 
Esther Wise 
Audrey Immler 
Joan Cox 

Mary Elizabeth Spangler 
Margaretta Carey 
Doris Smith 

Bass 

Mary Anne Cotroneo 
Carolyn Kissinger 
Irma Sholley 

Percussion 

Margaret Boyd 
Catherine Coleman 
Ruth Long 
Dorian Loser 
Jean Strickhouser 

Drum Majoress 
Laurene Dreas 



75 




Symphony Orchestra 



Personnel 



Flute 

Catherine Coleman 
Luke Hains 

Oboe 

Mary Grace Light 

Clarinet 

Herbert Strohman 
Irving Oberholtzer 
Walter Ebersole 

Bassoon 

Lucie Cook 
Harry Drendall 

Trumpet 
Harold Yeagley 
Robert Bieber 

French Horn 
Harold Wild 
Earl Caton 
Joseph Fauber 

John Talnack 

Trombone 
Dennis Geesey 
Fred Shadle 



Percussion 

Henry Hoffman 
Frederick Frantz 
Margaretta Carey 

Violin I 
Mary Anne Cotroneo 

(Concertmaster) 
Victoria Turco 
George Moore 
Mary Elizabeth Spangler 

Violin II 
Marvin Detambel 
Betty Shillott 
Marjorie Holly 
Verna Kreider 
Louise Boger 

Cello 
Jessie Robertson 
James Yestadt 

Bass Viol 

Robert Hackman 
Ruth Wix 
Laurene Dreas 



76 




F 


1 .^ 





Glee Club 



Personnel 



Soprano 

Mary Albert 
Margaret Boardwell 
Margaret Boyd 
Louise Collier 
Lucie Cook 
Mildred Gardner 
June Hollinger 
Carolyn Kissinger 
Marguerite Martin 
Jeanne Schock 

Conlraho 
Catherine Coleman 
Jessie Robertson 
Verna Schlosser 
Rae Sechrist 
Irma Sholley 
Mary Elizabeth Spangler 
Evelyn Stine 
Thelma Trupe 
Esther Wise 



Tenor 
Earl Caton 
Edwin Creeger 
Arthur Jordan 
Ralph Manwiller 
Charles Miller 
Robert Weiler 
Harold Wild 
Harold Yeagley 

Bass 

Elwood Brubaker 
Joseph Fauber 
Dennis Geesey 
Robert Hackman 
Henry Hoffman 
William Jenkins 
John Oliver 
Howard Paine 
Lloyd Kroll 



77 



The picture below is one of the more striking of a group sent from China 
by Mrs. Calvin Reber to Evelyn Miller, 1939-40 president of the 
Y. W. C. A. Mrs. Reber will be remembered by many on campus as the 
former Audrey Fox, 1939, who was president of the Y. W. C. A. for the 
1938-39 term and prominent in the activities of the religious organizations 
while a student at Lebanon Valley College. Mr. and Mrs. Reber left the 
United States but a short time ago as missionaries to a war-torn China. 
Since the founding of the college almost seventy-five years ago, men and 
women have gone out from Lebanon Valley College to engage actively 
and courageously in religious careers, either as ministers or missionaries, 
both under the guidance of the mother United Brethren denomination 
and for other churches. 

Is any specific reason for the inclusion of this picture necessary beyond the 
desire to make a permanent record of the appealing look on the face of 
the ragged urchin standing in the prow of the second boat? 



. Unto the Least of These 



78 





Life Work Recruits 



Florian Cassady 
Carl Ehrhart 
Phoebe Geyer 
John Ness 
Jane Ehrhart 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Deputation Chairman 
Pianist 



Future religious leaders make up the membership of this active organization. Many of 
these students, now the leaders in religious activities on campus, are planning earnestly to 
complete their education in some theological seminary and then enter the ministry, or to 
serve as missionaries either abroad or to some underprivileged group in our own country, or 
to engage in general church or social work. The Life Work Recruits hold regular meetings 
in which open discussions are featured; frequently faculty members or visiting religious 
leaders attend these meetings in the capacity of guest speakers and counselors. The sendmg 
of deputations to near-by churches is a major part of this group's work. In cooperation with 
approved and competent Conservatory students who contribute the musical portion of the 
programs, small groups of students plan and have the entire charge of services in the various 
churches to which they have been invited. Of especial interest to their fellow students was 
the series of deputations to the local United Brethren Church, the College Church, which 
were surprisingly well supported by the college students. Helpful faculty advisers for the 
past year were Dr. G. A. Richie, Dr. P. O. Shettel, and Dr. C. S. Stine. 



79 




Young Men's Christian Association Cabinet 



Paul Horn 
Fred Shadle 
Robert Guinivan 
Robert Dinsmore 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



Through his Big Brother, a Y. M. C. A. appointed friend, a fellow who has decided to 
matriculate at Lebanon Valley first learns about the college that is located in Annville and 
the things he'll do there and the people he'll meet there. And during Freshman Week the 
members of this organization's Cabinet are on hand to help him make the proper beginning 
for a profitable stay of four years. From then on, frequently in conjunction with the 
Y. W. C. A., numerous social and religious activities are sponsored by this Association, to 
which, incidentally, every male student belongs. Dad's Day is held in the fall. It's a day 
when the payer of bills gets a chance to inspect the campus and the buildings and to see 
whether or not he's getting his money's worth. Usually there is a football game in the 
afternoon in which the Valley football machine in ruthless fashion runs up a huge score over 
an unfortunate victim. And the day is ended with a splendid banquet in which not too much 
time is taken up with speeches. The Y. M. and Y. W. jointly edit the standard manual of 
instruction for freshmen, the L Book. In addition, they contribute greatly toward the success 
of the annual May Day celebrations. Together they sponsor early morning pre-holiday 
services and take turns in having charge of the weekly evening prayer service. One of the 
most ambitious and worthy programs undertaken, in which these local organizations are in 
competition with the corresponding groups in the other United Brethren colleges, is the 
World Fellowship Project. 



80 



"il f 



ff I 



^r'^ 






Young Women's Christian Association Cabinet 



Evelyn Miller 
Floda Trout 
Ruth Heminway 
Edna Rutherford 
Anna Evans 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 



Helpful Big Sisters and an entertaining Freshman Week program do much to help new 
freshman women students become acclimated to their new surroundings and make them 
appreciative of the work done by the Young Women's Christian Association. This organiza- 
tion has as its purpose, as does the Y. M. C. A., the maintaining of Christian ideals on campus 
and the securing of a proper and harmonious balance between religious and social activities, 
in the sponsoring of both of which it is one of the most active agencies. Every year one week 
is set aside as Heart Sister Week during which every girl tries to outdo her fellows in showering 
favors, kindnesses, and small gifts — without being suspected or caught — upon her Heart 
Sister; the week is closed with a delightful tea in each of the girls' dormitories and in the 
girls' day student room. Just before the Christmas vacation these ambitious girls help the 
rest of the campus solve the gift problem by selling linen, jewelry, and novelty gifts at their 
Christmas Bazaar. Together with the Men's Y, a fact not mentioned across the page, they 
arranged a carol sing last year and saw to it that the campus was put into the proper holiday 
condition by the erection of a large and gaily lighted Christmas tree. Early in the spring 
a Mothers' Week End is held. For two or three days the mothers live with their daughters 
and get to find out just what college life nowadays is like. Frequently this event coincides 
with the date of the annual spring Music Festival so that the mothers are enabled to enjoy a 
real musical treat as well as other well-planned entertainments. 



81 




Editorial Staff 



Charles R. Beittel, Jr. 
IVIarlin Espenshade 
Paul Stouffer 
Martha Jane Koontz 
Ferne Poet 
Marian Reiff 
Floda Trout 
Catherine Coleman 
Margaret Bordwell 
Anna Mae Bomberger 
Fred Shadle 
William Reed 
Jane Ehrhart 

LOUELLA ScHINDEL 

Alexander Rakow 

Raymond Hess 

Samuel Grimm 

Samuel Derick 

Betty Anne Rutherford 

Isabel Shatto 

Edna Rutherford 



Editor-in-ChieJ 
Associaie Editors 

Literary Editor 
Associate Literary Editors 



Photography Editors 

Statistics Committee 

Athletics Editor 
Assistants 



Girls' Athletics Editor 

Assistant 

Secretary 



Business Staff 



John H. Dressler, Jr. 
Richard Bell 
Fred Smee 
Frank Shenk 



Business Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 
Members of Business Staff 



1941 QUITTAPAHILLA 



John H. Dressler, Jr. 
Business Manager 




Charles R. Beittel, Jr. 
Editor-in-ChieJ 




Their Efforts Are Presented in This Volume 



83 



Editorial Staff 



Carl Y. Ehrhart 
Lillian Mae Leisey 
Robert Dinsmore 
Jane Stabley 
Paul Stouffer 



Editor-in-ChieJ 
Associate Editor 
Sports Editor 
Sports Editor 
Feature Editor 



Reporters 



Mary Touchstone 

Lucie Cook 

Louise Saylor 

Ellen Reath 

John Ness 

David Lenker 

Lela Lopes 

Charles Beittel 

Jane Ehrhart 

Ferne Poet 

Louella Schindel 

Betty Anne Rutherford 

Frances Prutzman 



Alex Rakow 
Ruth Long 
Martha Davies 
Margaret Cox 
Guy Dobbs 
Ralph Shay 
Marjorie Holly 
Genevieve Stansfield 
Martha Crone 
Howard Paine 
David Shaner 
Louise Keller 
Kent Baker 



Business Staff 



John V. Moller 
John H. Dressler 
Warren Sechrist 
Richard Bell 
Donald Glen 
Elmer Pollack 



Business Manager 
Assistant Business Manager 
Circulation Manager 
Assistants 



84 



Ha ^it CoUegienne 




Carl Y. Ehrhart Editor-in-Chief 

John V. Moller Business Manager 




Weekly Portrayers of the Changing College Scene 



85 




-SS£^ 



Ink Spots Meet at Dr. Struble's 



The Green Blotter Club was instituted several years ago to function 
as a needed stimulant and guide for creative writing on the campus. 
Membership in the organization is limited to the four aspirants from 
each class whose proved merits seem to mark them as being most 
worthy of inclusion in the group. Meetings, held once each month 
at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Struble, are pleasantly informal. Each 
author in the course of the evening reads any prose or poetry which 
he might have written since the last meeting, submitting it for the 
constructive, instructive, or destructive criticisms of his fellow writers. 



Adviser 
Head Scop 
Keeper-oJ-\\'ord- Horde 



Dr. G. G. Struble 

Evelyn Evans 

Martha Davies 



Typical works of the Green Blotter Club members, selected from 
those published in the 1939 and 1940 supplements to La Vie 
Collegienne, are gladly reprinted here. Poems alone have been chosen 
for these two pages, for the inclusion of the more lengthy prose pieces 
would have made impossible the representation of more than one or 
two of the authors. 

Wisdom of the ages teaches 
That tomorrow shall be bright; 
Yet, for all my knowings, 
1 cannot stay my tears tonight 
— Buttercup 



Emily Dickinson 

She voiced her soul's sweet sorrow with 

her pen 
That only she and God might know, but 

then 
She died. 
Trusting friends that her thoughts with 

her would go. 
How would her heart cry now, were she 

to know 
They lied. 

—B. 

The Judas Kiss 

A kiss — so sweet. 

Yet with poison filled, 

A feigned vent for passion true. 

One man it banished from the earth. 

Would it be so with you? 

A kiss — honey-flavored venom, 
Yet with a promise given 
To pass the forbidden portal through. 
One man it sent to an endless world 
That it might be so with you. 

—Van 



86 



Old Love 

Old love is like an old favorite frock, 

Faded, dependable, yet weary 

Of the monotonous task 

Of assuming the same contours 

Year by year. 

Old love is like an old favorite frock 
That one averse to sentiment 
Disdains to hoard as a treasure, 
And yet scorns to discard 
As tho' indifferent. 



—Rae 



Forgive me, God, 

Today I killed a dancing butterfly. 
Before I came a fleeting bit of gold. 
But when I passed 

A dirty yellow spot upon my streamlined window. 
— Joa?i 



Drooping countenance; blank, bleary eyes; 
Disconsolate carriage; shifty hands; 
Mouth accustomed to uttering lies; 
Feet shambling o'er fear-scarred lands — 
Age destitute of respect. 

— Nancee 



Jim 

He puts his hand upon my shoulder 
And he looks me in the eye 
Then he grows a little bolder 
Though he's really very . hy. 
As he draws me closer to him 
I'm glad that I am me, 
For he's my own precious Jim 
And today he just reached three. 

— Rocelvri 



Swallows 

In the gloaming of day 
Half hidden by the trees. 
Through the wide-open vault 
Dart these. 

With their wings outspread 
On the waiting air. 
And each piercing eye 
Aware. 

—Rae 



Lebanon Valley College 

Matrimonial agency for the region. 

Fool-maker, Teacher of facts, 

Dealer in Sheepskins, and the Students' Money Grabber; 

Decrepit, rustic, weatherbeaten. 

In the city of the One Man Police Force. 

They tell me you are wicked and I believe them, for 

I have seen your naughty boys from the windows 

pour water on innocent by-passers. 
And they tell me you are crooked and I answer, yes, 

it is true. I have seen the gunman kill and go free 

to kill again. 
And they tell me you are brutal and my reply is, on the 

strips of narrow paper I have seen the marks of 

thwarted students. 
And having answered so, I turn to the conservatory of 

this my college, and pointing with damning finger I 

say come and show me another college with men so 

strong as to be alive amidst this wailing and 

gnashing. 
Flinging myriad noises upon those slaving task on 

task, here is a cold, stark bedlam set vivid in a 

sleeping town. 
Mournful as a dog when the moon is at full, discordant 

as the amplified tuning of a symphony. 
Tooting 
Bawling 
Screeching 
Blaring 

Drumming, Squeaking, Rumbling. 
Under the smoke and dust from the railroad, washed 

by the too-frequent rains. 
Groaning under the terrible task of feeding a hundred 

or more Mohawkers, 
Proudly stands my Alma Mater, smelling of the fish 

on Friday, 
Smelling of the sweat of the would-be athletes and the 

mixtures of the would-be chemists. 
Laughing 
Laughing the decrepit, rustic, weatherbeaten laugh 

of age, 
Proud to be marriage bureau, Fool-maker, Teacher of 

facts, Dealer in Sheepskins, and the Students' 

Money Grabber. 

— Buttercup 
Civilization 
There was a time when dead men 
Were brought from the front — 
Stacked in neat piles 
And carried in a cart with dignity; 
Now they leave them where they fall 
And run over them with tanks to make blood-red jelly! 

— Rocelyn 



87 




Embryo Scientists: Chemists Above and Biologists Below 



The two science clubs of the campus are active, progressive organiza- 
tions whose membership lists are made up mainly of pre-professional 
students planning to become doctors, surgeons, researchers, science 
teachers, or perhaps industrial chemists, such as the one pictured analyzing 
a heat of steel on the opposite page. A photograph quite similar to this 
could have been taken in the laboratories of steel plants in near-by Harris- 
burg, Lebanon, Steelton, or even in Lebanon Valley's chemistry laboratory. 



Chemistry Club Officers 

Richard Moody President 
George Smee Vice-President 

Raymond Hess Secretary-Treasurer 
Warren Sechrist Publicity Agent 



Biology Club Officers 

Elwood Brubaker President 
Herbert Miller Vice-President 
Edna Rutherford Secretary 
Marlin Espenshade Treasurer 



88 



The Chemistry Club, organized about ten years ago at the suggestion 
of Dr. Bender, who has since then been the Club's adviser, held very 
successful bimonthly meetings during the past year. Student reports on 
topics of general interest, including brief biographical sketches of the lives 
of great pioneers in the field of chemistry, and reviews of current develop- 
ments by informed members, frequently in conjunction with actual 
demonstrations, formed the nucleus of the meetings. At times motion 
pictures showing mining, refining, or manufacturing processes are obtained 
from the United States Bureau of Mines of the Department of the 
Interior to augment the reports. Once or twice in the course of a year 
a trip is made, sometimes of an extended nature, to various industrial 
establishments. 

The Biology Club carried out a varied program in the scholastic year 
1939-40. Meetings, held on the third Thursday of every month, were 
carefully planned so that they not only provided instruction but also 
maintained interest, and usually consisted of reports from the more 
active members on unusual or little-known biological subjects. Of special 
interest were those gatherings when former members of the group, usually 
those who had gone on to medical school or were doing graduate school 
work, were present to give informal talks on their work and experiences 
since leaving the environment of Lebanon Valley's Biology Club. Climax- 
ing the activities of the year was the weekend trip to Mt. Gretna where 
field tramps were made to various points in that vicinity. 



Chemist Making Steel Analysis 




89 



Outbreak of the general conflict in Europe has had a stimulating effect upon the work 
of the International Relations Club. It has not only provided the topic for discussion for 
several meetings, but through newspaper reports has aroused a greater interest than ever 
before in the American foreign policy, which interest has of course been reflected in the 
general discussions. The lives of important personalities in the war have been reviewed 
as well as the military and diplomatic news of the belligerents. 

At one meeting various members of the Club represented Hitler, Chamberlain, Daladier, 
Stalin, and Mussolini. They sat around a council table in an effort to straighten out the 
tangle but got nowhere. 

The I. R. C. conducted a student poll on national questions which resulted in Dewey and 
Hull being selected as prospective candidates. On the matter of American foreign policy 
an isolation course was advocated and the cash-and-carry neutrality policy favored. 



90 



This Finn's Fate 




A Finnish "Ghost Patroller" stops in a 
forest in Finland during the late war with the 
U. S. S. R. to clean his rifle, which has been 
equipped with a Diopter telescope for spotting 
the enemy at great distances. This picture is 
printed here because the disastrous events in 
Europe are becoming of deeper significance 
every day to the more fortunate Western 
Hemisphere. May his portrait always bear 
mute witness to his bravery and that of his 
outnumbered fellows and be a grim commen- 
tary on the ruthless policies pursued by the 
militaristic totalitarianisms in achieving their 
ends. 




. . . Crept into the Speeches of Debaters and the Discussions of I. R. C. Cabinet Members 

Choice of a question for this season's debating teams was vitally affected by the war 
situation in Europe. With bombs bursting in Europe, the teams felt it would be helpful to 
discuss the foreign policy of the United States. The question chosen was: Resolved: That 
the United States should adopt a policy of strict isolation in armed and civil conflict out- 
side the Western Hemisphere. 

The Women's Debating Team, coached by Dr. M. L. Stokes and managed by Louise Saylor, 
was composed of Louise Saylor, Lillian Leisey, Betty Anne Rutherford, Dorothea Donough, 
Floda Trout and Mildred Cross. Their schedule included debates with Ursinus, Gettysburg, 
and Upsala. 

The Men's Debating Team had a very active season. The chief feature of their program 
was the radio debates which were sponsored by radio stations WHP and WKBO, Harrisburg. 
Besides the radio debates they held numerous debates at the college. Carl Ehrhart and 
Paul Horn visited the campuses of Muhlenberg and Moravian Colleges on a three-day trip. 
Other colleges scheduled for debate were Elizabethtown, Franklin and Marshall, Gettys- 
burg, Wagner, Dickinson, and the University of Toledo. 

Besides debating the isolation question, the men's team also discussed Government owner- 
ship of railroads, federal aid to education, and the war-guilt problem. Their team was ably 
coached by Dr. Stine, instructor of public speaking, and managed by John Moller. Carl 
Ehrhart, Paul Horn, Florian Cassady, Robert Mays, Donald Bartley and George Wilkialis 
composed the men's team. 

The Carnegie Endowment's purpose in undertaking the work of International Relations 
Clubs in colleges and universities throughout the world is "to fix the attention of students 
on those underlying principles of international conduct, of international law, and of inter- 
national organization, which must be agreed upon and put into action if a peaceful civiliza- 
tion is to continue." 

The local Club, under the supervision of Frederic Miller, professor of history, has completed 
the most successful year since its organization. The Club year began with a supper hike 
for all old and new members. In December, the president of the Club, Jane Ehrhart, at- 
tended the annual conference of the 1. R. C. clubs held at New Jersey College for Women. 
As a result of her attendance at the conference, the Club was reorganized into two groups, 
the Club proper and the Cabinet. The Club meetings are open to all students for general 
discussion of current events, while the Cabinet, composed of ten individuals chosen for their 
intelligence and special interest in foreign affairs, engage in special research work. 
The members of the Cabinet are: Professor Miller, Jane Ehrhart, president, Martha Davies, 
vice-president, Richard Baldwin, secretary-treasurer, Florian Cassady, Carl Ehrhart, 
John Ness, Betty Anne Rutherford, Robert Dresel, Elizabeth Sattazahn and Ralph Shay. 



91 




German Students Meet Informally in West Hall 



Harold Light President 

Anna Mae Bomberger Vice-President 
Frances Prutzman Secretarv-Treasurer 



Der Deutsche Verein is an organization devoted exclusively to the 
fostering of German interests and tastes from a cultural and esthetic 
point of view. Their meetings are held in the parlor of West Hall under 
the guidance of their adviser. Dr. Lena Louise Lietzau. German is spoken 
in these meetings and interesting discussions take place. German folk- 
dances, customs, dress, art, literature, and culture are studied to see the 
effect which they have on the Western civilization and also to find how 
much we owe to our German heritage. The club m the past has sponsored 
several German movies, given plays, and secured speakers. This year's 
program was devoted in part to the reviewing of the lives of great Germans 
such as Mozart and Baron von Steuben. At the end of the year there is 
a banquet in the traditional German style at a near-by hotel. 



92 




Flying Dutchmen Receiving Ground Instruction 



Flight training, preparation in an entirely new field, was made available to Lebanon 
Valley students this past year when college authorities were enabled, through the cooperation 
of the Civil Aeronautics Authority, to conduct a civilian pilot training course. Only the 
healthiest applicants are accepted for this training, and a prerequisite is the passing of a 
very thorough medical examination by Government-appointed doctors. Actual work in 
the course consists of seventy-two hours of ground school instruction, taught by Professor 
Grimm, and from thirty-five to fifty hours of flight instruction given at the Penn-Harris 
Airport in Harrisburg. Upon the completion of this work the aspiring pilot is subjected to 
an extremely rigid testing at the hands of a Government examiner to determine his knowledge 
of aeronautical theory and regulations and to establish his competency as a safe pilot. 
Having successfully passed this ordeal by examination, the student is awarded a private 
pilot certificate of competency and may, if his physical condition is sufl^iciently perfect, take 
steps for an even higher rating. Only ten applicants were permitted to sign up for this course 
this past year. It is hoped, however, that results of this initial trial will be such as to warrant 
and permit a doubling of L. V. C.'s allocation. 



93 




Campus Thespians 



Louise Savlor 
Barbara Bowman 
Floda Trout 
Marlin Espenshade 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



The Wig and Buckle Club is the dramatic organization on the L. V. C. campus which 
presents several one-act plays during the year and also, usually near the beginning of the 
school year, a full-length play. This year's presentations consisted of the one-act play, "The 
Valiant," and the more pretentious "Dover Road." 

Membership in the Wig and Buckle Club, which is much sought after, is in three different 
progressive classes or levels, each dependent upon the contribution of the individual to the 
stage. Various contributions to the success of a performance, either on the stage or behind 
the backdrop, make the aspiring individuals eligible for club, general, or letter membership. 
The officers of the Club are elected from the letter members; they and a selected executive 
committee have charge of the Club's work and also of the presentations under the very able 
direction and guidance of the Wig and Buckle Club adviser. Dr. George Struble. Dr. Struble 
either directs the plays or has some particularly interested and able student help as a director 
in the production of the plays on L. V. C. campus. 



94 



■■■:':-:i^!¥y7s:^-':,^^ 




In Mr. Lati.Tier's Home Along "Dover Road" 



The Wig and Buckle Play for this year as presented by the L. V. C. players on November 15 
was "Dover Road." The staging of this full-length piece was the group's main effort of the 
year and was no exception to the long line of enjoyable plays hitherto presented by the 
Dramatic Club. Dean Aungst, Robert Hackman, and Feme Poet carried out their assign- 
ments splendidly in their respective roles. Fine work was also done by two newcomers to the 
L. V. stage, Margaret Boltz and Hi Tindall. 

The story of "Dover Road" certers around a Mr. Latimer whose hobby was helping couples 
to get to fully understand each other before they took that big step into or out of matrimony. 
Anne and Leonard were eloping, and, being led to think they were stopping at a hotel, they 
were received at the home of Mr. Latimer. In the meantime, Eustasia, who is Leonard's 
wife, and dashing young Nicholas were also running away together. They, too, mysteriously 
find their way to the home of Mr. Latimer. The ccmplications which follow provide a very 
exciting play, and the ease with which Mr. Latimer skilfully sets straight the tangled affairs 
of the concerned couples, showing them in their true character, makes the story complete. 



95 




Mr. Pirn, Intruder Extraordinary 



"Mr. Pirn Passes By," by A. A. Milne, was presented by Kalozetean and Delphian 
Literary Societies as their annual joint performance. The play, in three acts, concerned 
itself with the affairs of the Mardens, a man, his wife, and a daughter so foolish as to have an 
artist for a boy friend. Mr. Pirn, an elderly version of the absent-minded type of professor, 
blundered into the picture and caused a little trouble in the Marden household. It seemed 
that Mrs. Marden had been previously married to another man, and, upon the supposed 
death of her first husband in Australia, had married again. Mr. Pim, in a very misunder- 
standing way, told her that her former husband was still alive. As the story progressed, 
Mr. Pim dropped in to visit upon occasion and then vanished completely for a time, always 
reappearing, however, at the proper moment. Frank Shenk as Carraway Pim with Dean 
Aungst as George Marden took leading honors in this presentation. Carol Kissinger as 
Olivia played the part with finesse. Credit also goes to Robert Artz and Myrtle Leff for 
interpreting the love interest. Last but not least, much credit is due Dr. Struble and Dr. 
Stine for the splendid work they accomplished in putting over the passings by of misunder- 
standingly understanding Mr. Pim. 



96 




The Involved Case at Greenfingers 



The Junior Class Play was an entirely new type of presentation for L. V. C. — a mystery 
play — and it afforded opportunities for a variety of acting. Many of the actors were having 
their first tries on the local amateur boards, but, if the audience's reaction may be used as a 
basis for judgment, "The Mystery of Greenfingers," which centered around the Greenfingers 
Palace Hotel in the Peak District, was quite a success. While a violent storm raged outside, 
very strange things began to happen inside. At the opening of the play some of the staff, 
who had come early in the season, were discussing various details when from out of the storm 
came a Miss Tracy, played by Martha Jane Koontz. From the moment of her arrival things 
began to happen. First she brought in a lady companion who went directly to her room. 
Very soon, while Miss Tracy was much engaged in conversation a shot was heard. Then the 
story really began to get under way. A Mr. Crawther, a sleuth of no mean ability, played by 
Don Haverstick, soon arrived on the scene to attempt to discover the murderer as well as 
the murdered, for "it" had completely vanished. As the action proceeds it becomes more 
and more complicated, until finally the poor little Miss Tracy completely changes character 
and the play ends in a very surprising manner. Much credit goes to Dr. Struble for directmg, 
to Paul Horn for staging, and to the following actors and actresses: Martha Jane Koontz, 
Margaret Boyd, Margie Bordwell, Feme Poet, Arthur Jordan, Don Haverstick and Frank 
Shenk. Then, too, a vote of thanks goes to the orchestra for the music which added much to 
the evening's performance. 



97 




Just Plain Clarence Smith, Coleoptera Expert 



"Clarence" is Mr. Tarkington's story of a young man who, unknown to all the rest, really 
was someone, a fact which no one found out until the last act. Margie Bordwell, as Cora 
Wheeler, really distinguished herself in four words when she said "No, no more coffee!" It 
wasn't the words that counted, or the situation in which they were said, but it was that 
sighing sound of a love-sick swan which really put the lighting effects into the words as she 
tried to make Clarence fall in love with her. Credit, too, is due Robert Hackman as Papa 
Wheeler, Ellen Ruppersberger as Mama Wheeler, Danny Seiverling as Bobby Wheeler, 
and Marlin Espenshade as Clarence. The involved story as to who Clarence really was 
finally resolved itself into the fact that he was only Clarence Smith, an authority on the 
Coleoptera. The Charles Smum, Charles Short or Charles Anything-else was a complicated 
matter, but at last all's well that ends well. Again there are Dr. Struble and Dr. Stine to 
thank for putting "Clarence" into good working order in a very limited time. Also to Paul 
Horn and his stage crew go Philo's and Clio's many, many thanks. 



98 




Entertainmeit for Homecomers and Mothers 



The Wig and Buckle One-act Play presented this year was "The Valiant." Given on 
Homecoming Day, this short drama scored a hit with a very receptive audience. Under the 
direction of William Jenkins and Dr. Struble, Floda Trout and John Oliver starred in this 
one-acter. John Oliver, as the prisoner James Dyke, gave a very creditable portrayal of the 
man who, to save sorrow for others, would not give his true identification. Even to the girl 
who the audience was sure was his own sister he showed no evidence of recognition: he was 
a man unknown, he remained a man unknown. Miss Trout, as Josephine Paris, gave a 
splendid piece of acting as the inquiring young lady who was interested in the convicted man. 
Richard Baldwin, as the warden, carried a heavy role in grand fashion. Even the clock 
fulfilled its important assignment in a timely manner. 

Another one-act play given this year was "The Tenth Word," presented by the girls as 
one of the highlights for Mothers' Week End. This play gave a contrast between the old 
and the new, a story of a girls' finishing school where the same story of elopement happened, 
even though there was a difference of fifty years, except for modern dress. All in all, another 
one-act play very well presented. 



99 




Danny and Jane Enjoyed Themselves at Philo's Anniversary 



Many campus social activities are sponsored by the four local literary societies whose 
names are derived from an earlier period when their prime purpose was to afford their 
members opportunities for literary improvement. Now, however, their status approaches 
that of the local fraternities and sororities in other colleges, and the interests which they 
further have changed accordingly. Intersociety competition is of a healthy, democratic 
sort which is an assurance of progress in many phases of campus life — social, entertainment, 
pwlitical — as long as it is maintained. The climax of each society's program for the year 
is the celebration of its anniversary, which usually takes the form of a formal dinner-dance 
at a near-by hotel. 



100 




Delta Lambda Sigma 



Rachael Holdcraft, Anniversary President 



Barbara Bowman 
Rachael Holdcraft 
Dorothea Kroll 
Viola Snell 
Ferne Poet 
Irene Seiders 



President 

Vice-President 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 



Kathryn Zwally 
Edna Rutherford 
Phoebe Geyer 
Viola Snell 
Ferne Poet 
Jane Stabley 



Delphian Literary Society, the youngest campus social organization, was formed just 
eighteen years ago to relieve the overcrowded conditions of the one girls' society then in 
existence and to give the girls more of an opportunity to display their abilities and talents. 
After a consultation with the oracle of Delphi the society was organized under the name of 
Delphian. With so few years behind it, Delphian cannot boast of much of a background, 
for its history is still in the making. Each year brings new blood and new ideas into the 
organization, giving new life to the spirit of the oracle of Delphi which hovers constantly 
over the society. This year, after a rushing season fdled with an enjoyable hike, a welcoming 
tea, and numerous joint sessions, came a splendid climax in a well-planned dinner-dance — 
the first in the society's history — at the Hotel Harrisburger. The non-dancers were pro- 
vided with an evening of entertainment, too; their assessment took them to see the popular 
motion picture "Gone with the Wind." The final event of the year came in the successful 
production of the play "The Youngest," by Philip Barry, which was given with the 
cooperation of Kalo. 



101 




Phi Lambda Sigma 



Daniel Seiverling, Anniversary President 



John Lynch 
Robert Hackman 
Donald Haverstick 
Robert Hambright 
Donald Glen 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 

Chairman oj Executive 
Committee 



William Bender 
Cecil Hemperly 
Marlin Espenshade 
John Dressler 
Bradford Long 



Philokosmian Literary Society is the oldest organization on the campus, with 
seventy-three years of history behind it. The society sponsors many campus 
activities such as discussions, joint sessions, smokers, and dances. Their social 
program is not limited solely to members, but includes many activities for the 
entire student body. A Football Pep Dance and several Poverty Dances were 
sponsored which did much to enliven otherwise dull week ends. Philo also joined 
with Delphian in having a joint session, a departure from the ordinary which was 
very favorably received. This year's annual play, given in conjunction with Clio, 
and introducing the anniversary celebrations, was the Shavian satirical piece "Arms 
and the Man." The anniversary festivities were concluded with the annual dinner- 
dance which was held at Galen Hall, Wernersville, Pa., and was attended by eighty- 
five couples. 



102 




Kappa Lambda Sigma 



Edward Minnick, Anniversary President 



George Munday 
Richard Baldwin 
Florian Cassady 
Ralph Mease 
Richard Moody 



President 
Vice-President 
Recording Secretary 
Corresponding Secretary 
Treasurer 



William Scherfel 
August Herman 
George Katchmer 
Dean Aungst 
Richard Moody 



Kalozetean Literary Society is the brother society of Philo. Although not so 
old as its partner, it has, nevertheless, made rapid progress in fostering social 
activities and developing campus leaders. It has a well-developed social program 
which it utilizes at every possible opportunity. Kalo's dances, smokers, and joint 
sessions are noted for their fellowship and humor. Much competition is engaged 
in with Philo, which keeps both societies on their toes in an effort to prove which 
society is the better. This has never been proved and probably never will be. 
However, the fun and the friendships fostered by this competition are found to be 
invaluable. Kalo joins with all the societies in the fall in giving the annual all- 
society session for the benefit of the new students. Under the able direction of 
Mrs. Paul Billett and Dr. Struble, Kalo joined with Delphian in presenting Philip 
Barry's "The Youngest," with Martha Davies and Richard Baldwin playing the 
lead roles. On March 29 Kalo held its annual dinner-dance at the Hershey Hotel, 
thus marking the climax of their year's activities. 



103 




Kappa Lambda Nu 



Carmella Galloppi, Anniversarx' President 

Lillian Leisev President Louise Saylor 

Betty Anne Rutherford Vice-President Louella Schindel 

Louise Saylor Recording Secretary Eleanor Holbrook 

Jean Strickhouser Corresponding Secretar},- Victoria Turco 

Bernice Witmer Treasurer Bernice Witmer 

Margaret Bordwell Editor oj Olive Branch Floda Trout 



The Clionian Literary Society was established sixty-nine years ago as a society 
of a literary nature. Today it functions as a purely social organization, but 
Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, retains her position of patron goddess of the 
society. The owl and the olive branch are emblems of the society and are displayed 
on dance favors and programs as well as on the Clio pins. The society room is in 
North Hall, and it is from her place in this hall that Minerva is privileged to wit- 
ness such events as the initiation ceremonies and meetings. Throughout the 
year there are a series of events such as the hike with its impressive ceremony, the 
informal party for Freshmen, and evening social gatherings. This year there were 
several additional joint sessions and a Leap Year Dance at which the girls took 
the initiative. The formal Anniversary Dance, which is the highlight of the social 
year, was held this year at the Hotel Abraham Lincoln in Reading. The anni- 
versary play, which is always held jointly with Philo on the eve of May Day. 
this year was Shaw's "Arms and the Man." 



104 




First and only existent chapter of a nationally recognized fraternal organiza- 
tion on Lebanon Valley's campus is the local chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, National 
Honorary Social Science Fraternity, which was established last spring through 
the efforts of Dr. Milton L. Stokes, professor of business administration and 
economics. Perhaps the inclusion of the fraternity's purpose here would be more 
appropriate than anything else that might be written. 

"The purpose of Pi Gamma Mu is the inculcation of the ideals of scholarship and 
social service in the study of all social problems. Pi Gamma Mu was organized 
not to oppose or advocate any particular social movement. It aims rather to 
instill in the mind of the individual a scientific attitude toward all social ques- 
tions. Its particular purpose is to send out from our colleges and universities young 
men and women imbued with social idealism, trained in scientific thought, and 
encouraged to help others to be scientific in their thinking on all social questions. 
Incidentally, it aims at more cooperation between students and the several branches 
of social science, all of which must make contributions of knowledge if our social 
problems are to be solved. Pi Gamma Mu aims to occupy a position in the field 
of social science comparable to that of Phi Beta Kappa in the field of literary 
studies and of Sigma Xi in natural science. Nevertheless, it differs from the 
ordinary honor society in having an active program for the society as a whole, 
its chapters, and all of its members." 



105 




Cheer Leaders Revive Winter-Chilled Fans 



Varsity athletics play a big part in the lives of Lebanon Valley College students, whether 
they be actively engaged in one or more of the major sports or merely in a more passive 
manner cheer on the teams from the bleachers. But one mustn't possess outstanding abilities 
in order to enjoy the recreational benefits of actual and active participation in sports, for 
especially of late has there been developed an extensive intramural program, sponsored by 
such interested campus organizations as the Women's Athletic Association and the Men's 
Senate, in which each student has a chance to become actively engaged. 

Every student, by virtue of the fact that he has paid an activities fee, is a member of the 
Athletic Association and accordingly is entitled to free admission to all the home games of 
the several teams. Many alumni cooperate in swelling the Athletic Association's membership. 
Athletics are quietly and efliciently controlled by an Athletic Council consisting of representa- 
tives of the Faculty and Alumni. This group relieves the administration of the many prob- 
lems found in the managing of intercollegiate athletics. Its chief purpose is to approve all 
programmes and to determine Lebanon Valley's policies. This the Council has done, and 
under its paternal guidance Lebanon Valley athletics are continuing to advance to a higher 
level. 



106 



Christian Walk 
President 

Charles Belmer 
Vice-President 

Bernard Grabusky 
Secretary-Treasurer 




Varsity Competitors in Intercollegiate Athletics 



Varsity "L" Club membership, cherished goal of all campus athletes, is limited to the varsity performers who 
have brought fame and glory to their Alma Mater in intercollegiate competition and to the student m.anagers 
of the various seasonal sports. After undergoing an initiation that draws howls of pain from the stout-hearted, 
strong-armed heroes, the favored athletes are then permitted to enjoy the full privileges of recognized varsity 
men. Carrying with it the most honor is the right to wear the varsity "L" sweater which the organization 
furnishes its members from funds obtained from the annually sponsored dance held on Homecoming Day. Other 
favors are accorded to the members of this group, the most noteworthy being the presentation of small gold 
charms in the shape of a football, basketball, or baseball, indicating the major sport in which letters have been 
won. Intercollegiate competition will remain a healthy, vital factor in college life at L. V. C. as long as the "L" 
Club spirit prevails on the campus. 



The Women's Athletic Association, under the capable leadership of Miss Esther Henderson, has carried 
out the recent trend in women's athletics by establishing a well-organized intramural program. Miss Henderson's 
chief desire is to have a sport for every girl and a girl in every sport. Her aim has been realized to a great 
degree, for this year sixty-five per cent of all the women on Lebanon Valley's campus are engaged in some form 
of sport. To gain membership in the W. A. A. a girl must earn two hundred points. Points are earned by par- 
ticipation in the various sports either as a member of the honor team or by membership on a dormitory team. 
Letters are given to those girls who earn one thousand points. The officers are made up of Seniors and Juniors. 
Each sport has a leader who is in charge of administering that sport; she is chosen from Sophomore members of 
the club. The year's activities were ended by the banquet held May 13. This was a formal affair to which both 
old members and initiates were invited. This year Miss Anne Hodgkins was the speaker. 



107 



Louise Saylor 
President 

Anna Evans 
Vice-President 

Edna Rutherford 
Secretary 

Isabel Shatto 
Treasurer 



Leaders in Wonren's Sports 




Flying Dutchmen of the gridiron crossed foreign goal-lines often enough during 1939 to conquer 
six of the nine opposing elevens. An overwhelming but expected drubbing at the hands of a dozen 
Boston College teams marked the first encounter as one for the loss column but goaded on Blue 
and White players to win the next five games in succession. The smart of end of the season defeats 
by a vengeful St. Joseph's and an unruly rival Albright was little alleviated fay the easy task of 
sending Juniata's Indians back to their reservation in the intermission between those two battles. 
For service rendered on the striped field throughout their college careers, Captain Charles Belmer, 
Christian Walk, August Herman, George Katchmer, and Donald Ludwig were awarded the 
coveted miniature gold footballs after playing their last game for Lebanon Valley. 



Sept. 30 Boston College at Boston, Mass. 

Oct. 6 *Moravian at Bethlehem 

Oct. 14 Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster 

Oct. 21 University of Delaware at Newark, Del. 

Oct. 28 Pennsylvania Military College at Hershey 

Nov. 4 Susquehanna University at Annville 

Nov. 11 St. Joseph's at Philadelphia 

Nov. 18 Juniata at Annville 

Nov. 25 Albright at Hershey 
*Night Game 



.V. c 



Opp 
45 


6 





8 


7 


7 


6 


31 





45 


19 


2 


13 


32 





20 


40 



108 



These Gridtnen Proved Their Worth 



53 T6 4 ^64^6 5^ 69 1 "^ 
7? 63 66 60 4, t 74 80 



fd 



'TTT 



78 73 



:s«r«»«f».»»r«..4ri^^ 



A new combination of coaches 
kept the lights burning late in their 
second floor Ad Building office 
chasing circles and crosses over 
sheets of paper while planning deep 
grid strategy. Mike Intrieri, of 
near-by Steelton, with experience 
gained from high school, college, and 
professional play and from several 
years of coaching duties elsewhere, 
had full charge of the Valley for- 
ward wall and otherwise assisted 
Jerry Frock, who, as usual, assumed 
the responsibilities of head coach 
and tutored the huskies in the 
backfield. 




The Board of Strategy 



The aerie of the Boston Eagles afforded no safe roost for a wandering Flying Dutchmen eleven 
far north of its accustomed habitat. Twenty thousand Bostonians jammed into Alumni Field at 
Newton and made the horseshoe resound with loud-voiced acclamations for Montgomery, Cig- 
netti, and O'Rourke who took turns running rough-shod through the sadly outclassed and out- 
numbered boys from Annville. A prejudiced Yankee official, sporting a tin horn on his wrist, 
nullified the Valley's only possible score, the result of Ed Schillo's sixty-yard gallop with an inter- 
cepted Boston lateral, by stoutly declaiming that both offender and offended had been oflPside. 
Most spectacular of the many outstanding Boston players was dark-skinned and shifty Lou 
Montgomery who pirouetted effortlessly through a wavering Valley line and adroitly avoided the 
secondary. Incidentally, Coach Leahy's team fared well enough on brown bread and baked beans 
to be invited to a post-season clash with Clemson University in the Cotton Bowl on New Year's Day. 

A first-quarter lead of one touchdown, jealously and successfully guarded throughout the re- 
mainder of the game, muzzled a yapping pack of hard-running Greyhounds. Opening scrimmage 
centered about the midfield chalk line until halfway through the initial period when Kuhn, faking 
an end run, faded back to throw a long forward pass deep into Moravian territory to Grabusky 
who trotted into the hostile end zone for the single score of the evening. Thereafter the Boys in 
Grey from Bethlehem reeled off three first downs for every ten-yard advance made by the Boys in 
Blue, but Schillo's long, well-directed punts terminated and rolled back their drives, making the 
extra yardage of no avail. A heavy, enveloping mist was settling down over the field and painting 
haloes around the floodlights as Moravian, in the last minutes of play, mixed spinners, reverses, 
and passes to advance forty-nine yards into the half of the field belonging to a desperate Valley 
team that braced itself in the shadow of the uprights to stave off defeat. 



109 




Captain Belmer 
Over the Ball 




Gloomy Jerry Frock smiled as his revamped lineup 
humbled the proud Diplomats of Franklin and Marshall 
before a Dad's Day crowd of six thousand spectators on 
Williamson Field. The focus of early action shifted rapidly 
as both sides, trying to harness the stiff October wind, 
took to kicking the pigskin. Valley threatened first when, 
following Grabusky's interception, Kuhn unerringly threw 
to Walk who worked his way to the F. & M. ten-yard line. 
The sons of Ben and John yielded five more three-foot 
lengths and then held firm to take the ellipsoid on downs. 
As Suchena went behind his own goal-line, hoping to boot 
his team out of immediate danger, a clumsy snap from 
center pulled him off balance and he was felled for an 
automatic safety that gave L. V. C. a two-point first-period 
lead and ultimately provided the answer to that day's big 
question. In the second quarter, with Kuhn and Schillo 
bucking the line and Walk skirting the end on a deceptive 
shovel-pass, the Dutchmen moved fifty yards in the right 
direction to the Diplomats' twelve. At that point Kuhn 
stepped backward and catapulted a spiral to Walk in pay 
territory. Schillo's attempted placement was ruled no 
good. A revived Lancaster outfit, smarting under Coach 
Holman's between-the-halves reading of the riot act, be- 
came more aggressive in the second half. Taking to the 
air, F. & M. advanced deep into Valley territory, and 
Suchena smashed through the line to score standing up. 
The additional point try was pronounced good. Hard- 
pressed, the Frockmen stiffened and rolled over the goal- 
line in an effort to enlarge their slim lead. The too-hasty 
motion of a backficld man, however, voided the additional 
six-pointer. The fray closed with Lebanon Valley's line 
standing firm from end to end against repeated and frenzied 
Diplomat assaults. 



Frank Kuhn 
Pass Expert 



110 



Reliable Walk 
Pass Receiver 



Second one-point victory in as many weeks was credited 
to Lebanon Valley footballers as they traveled across 
Mason and Dixon's line to nose out a scrappy underdog 
Delaware University eleven striving for its first triumph 
of the year. Walk scored for the Blue and White on a 
forward pass tossed out by Schillo who then added the 
supremely important extra point. Performance of the 
Mud Hens was creditable, for they stopped the supposedly 
high-powered L. V. C. eleven short. Fortunately, how- 
ever, they were weak in the one-point department. 

Twenty-four seconds of play in the spacious Hershey 
Stadium provided time enough for the swift-striking Fly- 
ing Dutchmen to make their first score against eleven 
bewildered Cadets. Pennsylvania Military College, after 
receiving the opening kickoff, had been compelled to 
kick on the second play. Kuhn, standing calmly on the 
Soldiers' twenty-five, deftly deposited the pigskin in the 
arms of an expectant Chris Walk who squeezed across the 
last broad stripe before the second hand of Mr. Hershey's 
big clock had completed half of its first 360° sweep. Un- 
mindful of the wintry blasts that swept lengthwise through 
the huge Chocolate Bowl, Frank Kuhn paced the Valley 
attack with one direct hit after another, displaying an 
uncannily accurate style of aerial work. The dumb- 
founded Cadets wilted under the merciless strafing and 
were scattered before lightning scoring thrusts in every 
period but the third, as Ciamillo, Kuhn, and Schillo broke 
through into the diagonally marked end region to secure 
the additional L. V. C. tallies. Dazzling runs vied with 
the brilliant passing for the onlookers' plaudits. Not to 
be forgotten was the perfectly timed interference, with 
Grabusky and Bosnyak outstanding, which effectively 
cleared the carriers' paths. 




Ed Schillo 

Magic Toes i^^- 



111 





Another Valley Score in the Chocolate Bowl 



Completing nine out of ten passes, Kuhn more than pleased a capacity Homecoming Day crowd as he 
steered an uncompromising Valley football machine in its conquest of Susquehanna University. Speedily 
unslinging his arm after running back the kickoff fifty-seven yards, Kuhn propelled the football over the 
Crusader line to Walk who lightly rom.ped the requisite distance for the first score in an elapsed fifteen seconds 
from the beginning of competition. In short order the home team boosted their total skyward by marking up 
two more touchdowns, one of which was the outcome of an unpardonable crime perpetrated by Schillo who 
stole the ball from a Susquehanna runner while his companions formed a pile-up to screen the act of knavery. 
M(jved with compassion, Coach Frock sent in an entire reserve team for whom the Selinsgrovers were just a 
little more than a match. But for sixty minutes Jerry was undisputed master of ceremonies; he judiciously ran 
the show in such fashion that the whole squad saw action while the score grew to an agreeable but not too 
unwieldy size. 

The best odds of the season seemed to point to an assured Blue and White victory over St. Joseph's, but nine 
Hawk seniors, playing their last game on their Alma Mater's field before a host of returned alumni, exploded 
the myth of Valley superiority. First-half activity ended in a stalemate. The Dutchmen, however, had trouble 
in maintaining a steady line; the air, moreover, no longer presented any means for advance, for the omnipresent 
Saints clustered noisomely about passer and intended receiver. Revitalized by a halftime rest, St. Joseph 
players completely dominated third-quarter scrimmages and twice trespassed the forbidden L. V. C. end zone. 
In the final period the Valleyites recouped their morale sufficiently to threaten more than once but were success- 
ful, insofar as the figures show, merely in cornering the Hawks for an automatic safety. While going down in 
unpredicted defeat, the efforts of Walk and Herman were cheering and heartening. And Captain Belmer 
fought like a man possessed, trying to extend an already lengthy winning streak another notch, receiving for 
his pains two nicely blackened eyes and a broken nose. 



112 



About twenty years ago the first of a long series of football games was played with Juniata College. Not 
once in that length of time have the Indians been victorious. In the latest encounter, number fifteen, Lebanon 
Valley, chafing under the stinging remembrance of a recent upset, meted out one of the severest wallopings yet. 
Concentrating on sustained drives, the Dutchmen scored in every period while they held the hapless team from 
Huntingdon scoreless. Smith provided the feature event when he grabbed a punt and quick-stepped seventy- 
five yards to score in the fourth quarter. 

The Lions made good the boasts that a gang of Albright vandals, slinking out of Reading in the dead of 
night, had painted and brushed all over campus buildings and walks of a deserted Lebanon Valley College 
made empty by vacationing students at Thanksgiving time, for they shellacked the Dutchmen in a free-scoring 
enactment of the traditional tussle staged in the Hershey Stadium. Halftime score, with Albright holding a 
narrow 7-6 lead, offered no indications of the riotous play to follow. Trouble started early in the second half. 
Kuhn, standing on his own twenty-yard line, attempted to throw a forward pass. Albright's Snyder came in 
fast, batted the ball to earth, and apparently booted it across the goal-line where Gustitus wrapped himself 
around it. The officials won the ensuing argument and ruled that a touchdown had been made, for Kuhn, so 
they said, had not passed the ball. Thereafter the rampant Lions took turns with the men in white knickers in 
clawing and mauling the demoralized Valley. The longest run of the year and the highlight of the game came 
when Schillo, receiving a kickoff in the last sixty seconds of play, raced behind beautifully formed interference 
to a goal line ninety-three yards away. 

Football lettermen elected Bosnyak captain for the 1940 season in a meeting held shortly after playing the 
last 1939 game. Fred, who for three years has adeptly filled various positions in the Lebanon Valley line, is a 
worthy successor to big and blond Charley Belmer. 



Kuhn Couldn't Ask for Better Blocking 





113 



A late-starting quintet lost four matches in a row before hitting its stride. After mastering the new 
system introduced by Coach Intrieri, the hoopsters thoroughly enjoyed themselves in the second half 
of the season as they merrily jarred the leaders of the league from their exalted positions. Since the 
five men first to peel off their sweatshirts were all Sophomores, some prognosticators have already 
crawled out among the twigs in predicting Valley domination for next year. 



Jan. 6 *FrankIin and Marshall at Lebanon 

Jan. 12 *BuckneII at Lewisburg 

Jan. 16 *Ursinus at Collegeville 

Jan. 20 *Gettysburg at Gettysburg 

Jan. 23 **Dickinson at Carlisle 

Feb. 3 *Gettysburg at Lebanon 

Feb. 6 *iMuhIenberg at Lebanon 

Feb. 10 *AIbright at Reading 

Feb. 12 *Bucknell at Lebanon 

Feb. 15 *Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster 

Feb. 23 Moravian at Lebanon 

Feb. 24 *Muhlenberg at Allentown 

Mar. 2 *Ursinus at Lebanon 

Mar. 5 *AIbright at Lebanon 

*Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate League Games 
** Extra Period 



L. V. C. 


Opp 


25 


48 


34 


37 


41 


45 


35 


37 


62 


60 


39 


34 


39 


52 


38 


35 


59 


50 


42 


33 


45 


43 


29 


47 


53 


41 


47 


40 



L14 



League Leaders Feared These Valley Basketballers 





Ralph Mease Sends One Through the Hoop 



The experienced Diplomats from Franklin and Marshall, passing and shooting with skill and ease, 
provided first game competition for the still ragged Blue and White dribblers. Throwing caution to 
the winds, the Valley five scampered about the Lebanon court in an early aggressive spurt that gave 
them a surprising 13-4 advantage at the end of the first quarter. But as the Dutchmen, showing the 
effects of insufficient training and practice, began to tire rapidly, F. & M. quickly stepped out into the 
lead and built up a sufficiently great difference in the scores to send in a reserve squad in the last 
period. 

The Bisons were given a scare when Mease broke loose from towering guards to toss up field goals 
aplenty from all angles. In celebrating its debut into the Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate Basketball 
League, Bucknell, playing on its home court, defeated the Dutchmen by a slim three-point margin. 
The fray was closely contested throughout, although the boys from Lewisburg usually managed to 
keep a basket or two ahead. Valley prospects were brightest when, with five minutes of play in the 
last quarter remaining, the score stood tied. Under pressure the Bucknell giants hit the cords to build 
up a lead which they maintained by judiciously freezing the ball. 

Charity tosses proved fatal to the Blue and White cagers as they traveled to Collegeville to meet a 
highly touted Ursinus quintet. Lebanon Valley was able to outscore Ursinus in goals from afield but 
was ineffective at the foul-line. Mease, Schillo, and Kubisen did most of the shooting for the Valley- 
ites while Staley bore the brunt of the attack along with Youse who showed up well in his first real 
opportunity under fire. 



lis 



Up Goes Kubisen! 




The Bullets hit the hoop in the final seconds of a nip-and-tuck game to mete out Valley's 
fourth consecutive league defeat. With one minute to play, the Dutchmen were leading by 
two points. And then Simon of Gettysburg knotted the score as he tallied on a floor-length 
set shot. Preferring not to have the contest extended, Stretch Trimmer followed up with a 
beautiful overhead shot that clinched the tussle. Schillo and Mease were again the sharp- 
shooting marksmen for Lebanon Valley. 

Victory at long last was the portion of Coach Intrieri's 
passers when they stopped Dickinson in a thrilling non-league 
encounter. The Flying Dutchmen's efforts for the first time 
were crowned \\ith success in an overtime drama enacted at 
Carlisle. The Red Devils provided real opposition but were 
forced to concede at the conclusion of an extra five-minute 
period, unable to cope longer with Valley's clicking offense. 
A hot-handed Mease wreaked havoc as he sent the sphere 
through the basket for a total of twenty-two points. 

A brief free-for-all, quickly halted by authorities, inter- 
rupted play in the third quarter of the second Gettysburg 
game as some excited spectators poured onto the Lebanon 
floor to enlarge a misunderstanding between Ed Schillo and 
part of the G-burg squad. That night it was the accurate 
tossing of Ed and Mitey Ralph Mease that gave Valley its 
first league triumph. Youse and Staley played exceptionally 
fine defensive ball while Kubisen bottled up the far-famed 
Stretch Trimmer to keep the Bullets from sinking too many 
counters. 

Everything thrown at the hoop by the charges of cagey 
Coach Julian went on through for a tally as the Mules 
peppered their way to victory over a listless Blue and White 
team that showed little of the same dexterity in passing or 
promising form displayed in the preceding Gettysburg game. 
Scoring was close throughout the first half with neither side 
enjoying too much of a lead at any time. During the next 
two periods, however, the Red and Silver lads not only found 
the range but completely upset the Valley defense with their 
fast cutting and shrewd blocking. This match was the rough- 
est one yet, for no less than five men were forced to leave the 
floor via the personal foul route. As always Mease and 
Schillo accounted for much of the L. V. C. score. Staley 
showed up well in the backcourt in battling for a lost cause. 



116 




Starting Five: Youse, Guard; Mease, Forward; Kubisen, Center; Schillo, Forward; Staley, Guard. 



The dangerous Lions were tamed by a band of Dutchmen who, in tripping their foes from Reading, dragged 
them back into a tie with the Blue and White for the lowly last place. It was Bob Artz, that exponent of the 
push-up shot with the left hand, who came through for his Alma Mater in the last quarter to steady the waver- 
ing Valleyites and give them a three-point victory over Albright. The important action came in the final 
stanza when Artz, replacing Kuhn, immediately tossed in three field goals to make up a five-point deficit and 
give L. V. C. a point advantage. Don Staley then took his cue and added two more baskets to secure the game. 
Mease marked up fourteen of the Valley's total in the first half. 

Flexible Steve Kubisen, Valley player with the automatic rebound and the India-rubber style, bounced about 
the Lebanon High School gym with sufficient agility to chalk up twenty counters and lead the Blue and White 
in its conquest of the elongated quintet from Bucknell. In the last period of play, with the Bisons ahead by 
the slim margin of one foul shot, Bob Artz again stepped into the limelight by making a difficult under-the- 
basket shot to give the Dutchmen a lead which they did not thereafter relinquish. 

An overconfident F. & M. was tumbled from its position as league leader by a vengeance-seeking Lebanon 
Valley team that followed the snow plows to Lancaster in defiance of the winter's worst blizzard. Regarding 
the Valley tilt as one of those unimportant encounters necessary merely to fill out the schedule, the condescend- 
ing Diplomats were rather rudely awakened from their dreamings by an L. V. C. outfit that dominated play 
from the very beginning. In the last quarter three of the Blue and White regulars, Staley, Schillo, and Kubisen, 
were ruled out on personal fouls, so that Coach Intrieri was compelled to substitute Kuhn, Wright, and Artz 
who made a creditable showing for themselves by displaying some fine defensive play during their stay in the 
contest. Diminutive Ralph Mease was by this time top scorer in the league. Very close behind him was Bob 
Keehn of Ursinus. It is interesting to note that the final tabulations at the season's conclusion found these two 
scoring stars in the same positions. 

Moravian had won eleven straight before its ill-fated journey to Lebanon. Ed Schillo was the number 
one enemy of the Bethlehem boys that evening, for he made twenty points to lead the scoring and played an 
excellent floor game that ruined many a Moravian attempt. Mease and Kubisen provided some able assistance 
to aid the winning cause, while Bob Artz flashed some signs of his sophomore form in his aggressive play in 
the short time he saw action. With the accompanying Moravian band intermittently blaring martial strains 
across the arena, the Valley five jumped into a quick lead which was effaced in short order by the long arching 
shots of the Greyhound forwards. The Blue and White were trailing until the third quarter. During the last 
period and a half, however, both dials on the scoreboard read about the same and moved ahead at about the 
same rate. Not too long before the sounding of the final buzzer, Staley knotted the count with his only two- 
pointer, following which Schillo made his last field goal to make twelve the Greyhounds' unlucky number. 



117 




Mease Passes to Youse 



The Muhlenberg jinx for the second time downed the Flying Dutchmen. Showing the 
effects of the Greyhound race of the night before, the Valleyites tired rapidly, permitting 
the victory-starved Julianites to romp to a comparatively easy win. Unable to keep up with 
the stiff pace set by the well-rested Mules, the Valley lads fell far behind after gaining their 
usual early lead. Ted Youse was the outstanding Blue and White performer, gaining eight 
points and playing an excellent all-round game to gain the plaudits of the Allentown fans. 
Don Staley, doing his share to stave off defeat, contributed seven points toward the in- 
adequate total. 

Championship hopes faded for the Bears as Valley returned to winning form to take 
Ursinus into camp in a walkaway. This encounter brought the two main contenders for 
top scoring honors, Ralph Mease and Bob Keehn, into action opposite each other. A com- 
pilation of the totals at the game's end revealed that Mease had gathered twelve points to 
Keehn's nine. The first half was mild with very close guarding by both teams. In the second 
half the Bears' defense collapsed completely as Schillo and Kubisen stepped up the tempo to 
something more than waltz-time. 

Mease clinched the scoring title as Lebanon Valley closed its season with an impressive 
victory over Albright. Ralph's final total for the dozen league games was 135, ten points 
beyond his nearest rival. The Blue and White flashed a brilliant second half attack that 
left the Red and White stunned and confused. Hitherto little heard from insofar as scoring 
was concerned, Youse went on a spree in which he kept sending the sphere through the net 
with unerring accuracy. Quite outstanding was the work of Steve Kubisen who was in on 
every play, grabbed the ball off both bankboards, and still found time to score heavily. By 
the way, this was the last game for Bob Artz and Danny Seiverling. 



118 



Jerry Frock's undermanned yearling team was treated by its opponents with none of 
that same respect which last year's outfit, now the nucleus of a formidable varsity, success- 
fully demanded. Losing nine of eleven scheduled games, the Freshman quintet by mid- 
season was being referred to as the "Circus" by the more inconsiderate spectators of its 
antics between two baskets. Silliman's wrong-way act and the ball-handling of Bill Olexy 
will be remembered with a chuckle for many a day. Reflection, however, forces the ac- 
knowledgment of the fact that they seldom permitted themselves to be outscored by more 
than ten points a game. Moreover Gollam could score from off the bankboards to lead his 
companions with a total of 83 points. And to Harry Matala must go the nod of recognition 
for the best floor-work and an appearance of naturalness in maneuvering a basketball. 



Jan. 6 Franklin and Marshall at Lebanon 

Jan. 10 *Hershey Industrial School at Lebanon 

Jan. 20 Gettysburg at Gettysburg 

Feb. 3 Gettysburg at Lebanon 

Feb. 6 Hershey Industrial School at Hershey 

Feb. 10 Albright at Reading 

Feb. 12 Lebanon Business College at Lebar on 

Feb. 20 Hershey Junior College at Hershey 

Feb. 23 Pine Tree Confectionery at Lebanon 

Mar. 2 Hershey Junior College at Lebanon 

Mar. 5 Albright at Lebanon 

*Extra period 



L. V. C. 


0pp. 


31 


27 


18 


20 


11 


23 


23 


28 


14 


34 


23 


50 


34 


21 


37 


39 


31 


32 


33 


39 


26 


65 



119 



Unsteady First- Year Passers 




Chief Metoxen's last nine, with its complete freshman infield, could garner only two 
victories from the series of eight games contested in the spring of 1939 to post a meagre 
.250 average for the season and finish well down in the league cellar, providing a nonc-too- 
brilliant finale for his Annville coaching career. 



April 22 *Gettysburg at Annville 

May 2 *MuhIenberg at Allentown 

May 6 Loyola at Annville 

May 9 *Juniata at Huntingdon 

May 10 Western Md. at Westminster, Md. 

May 12 *Ursinus at Annville 

May 18 *BuckneII at Annville 

May 20 *Drexel at Philadelphia 

*Eastern Pennsylvania Collegiate League Games 



L. V. C. 


0pp. 


2 


3 


1 





4 


6 


5 


11 


4 


11 





5 


6 


1 


2 


7 



120 



Blue and White's Turn at Bat 




Air, 




Schillo's Safe! But Ump Says "Yer Out!" 



Fading in the pinches, Valley's diamond squad lost its '39 campaign-opener on the home 
field to a fast G-burg team that skilfully took advantage of every break to eke out a 3-2 
victory in the closing innings of an errorless ball game. Kuhn pitched like a master, allowing 
the Bullets but seven hits, one of which, unfortunately, was a circuit clout by Handsome 
Harry O'Neill that proved to be the winning blow. A promising initial performance was 
turned in by the frosh infield composed of Schillo, Staley, Mease, and Smith, whose only 
failings were in the traditionally weak batting department. 



A fifteen-inning whitewashing bleached the Mules as the Blue and White nine journeyed 
to Allentown for its second league encounter. Again it was Kuhn on the mound, going the 
whole gruelling distance and granting but six well-spaced hits while fanning twelve swinging 
opponents. Danny Seiverling scored the deciding tally in the fifteenth period when the 
combination of a walk, a steal, Schillo's single, and a momentarily lowered guard at home 
plate enabled him to be the only one to touch all four sacks in the prescribed sequence. 
Strangely enough, the same Muhlenberg outfit one year earlier had battled L. V. C. for 
thirteen innings in a similar fracas pitched and won by Kuhn. 



121 



122 



A May Day defeat was handed the Valleyites by the visiting Loyola U. opposition from 
Baltimore, Maryland. Valley started out determinedly but recurrent attacks of weakness 
in the crucial moments left too many men stranded, permitted too many enemy runners to 
cross the home plate, and ultimately meant victory for the Southerners. Yearling pitcher 
Weiler kept Loyola's batsmen well in hand until the fatal eighth when he suddenly lost 
control and was replaced by veteran hurler Rozman, whose efforts proved to be of no avail, 
for his offerings were immediately clubbed for the winnmg runs. 

Juniata had little trouble in decisively downing the draggling Dutchmen in an error- 
filled contest played at Huntingdon. The Metoxen-men at no time in the course of the game 
enjoyed a lead over the Indians, their closest approach to mastery of the field occupying 
but a brief instant in the sixth when the score momentarily stood tied at four to four. Kuhn, 
manfully attempting to fulfil his third pitching assignment, was awarded the frailest support 
by his teammates and had to be relieved at the height of the massacre. 

Invading Westminster, Maryland, the Blue and White diamond team was effectively 
subdued by a merciless Western Maryland College. Insufficient action earlier in the season 
began to tell on the ordinarily steady Valley twirler George Katchmer who was pounded in 
the fateful fifth period for a total of nine runs that sewed up the game for the Marylanders. 
Bob Weiler replaced Big George in the waning innings and hurled commendable ball for 
the remainder of the game. Bill Rakow supplied the one consoling feature of the afternoon 
by poling out two long homers in defiant support of a lost cause. 



Danny Wields a Mean Bat 





Frankie Kuhn is the Man on the Mound 



Those hungry Ursinus Bears came up from CoIIegeville and satisfied their appetitive 
natures by blanketing the Annville cohorts and administering the fifth defeat of the season. 
Kuhn, back at the pitching post for the locals, made a fine showing by eliminating eleven 
Bears via the strike-out route. Ursinus, however, abetted by two L. V. errors, converted 
some opportune hits into counters, including several of the unearned variety. Freshman 
Ralph Mease, exhibiting fine fieldmanship at shortstop and smacking out two of the Valley's 
scattered hits, was outstanding performer of the day. 

An impotent Bucknell fell victim to the creditable and sparkling mound work of a very 
determined Bob Weiler who limited the Lewisburg aggregation to a mere four hits for the 
regulation nine innings of play. Blue and White batsmen unleashed their full fury on the 
Bisons, pounding out eleven hits and giving Bob inspired support in the fielding division. 
Chief Metoxen's freshman infield showed to marked advantage, working together as a 
smoothly synchronized unit and making some highly spectacular stops. 

The league-leading Dragons of Drexel played the part of the spider-to-the-fly host to 
Lebanon Valley in the season closer at Philadelphia. Kuhn pitched a fair brand of ball for 
the Valley in yielding up nine safe blows. But the Blue and White bats were helpless before 
the Drexel hurler. Erratic fielding coupled with feeble stick-wielding at the plate spelled 
defeat and the downfall of the Dutchmen's morale. The loss relegated Lebanon Valley to 
the league's number six berth, while Drexel remained atop the Eastern Collegiate heap with 
a clean slate. 



123 



1939 racket wielders, in action practically every day, volleyed their way successfully 

through a gruelling series of thirteen matches to gain victory in a majority of the contests, 
including an amazing number of shutouts. Members of the tennis squad, coached by Jerry 
Frock, were Umberger, Shapiro, Evelev, Grimm, Vaughan, Sherk, and Creeger. 







L. V. C. 


Opp 


April 15 


Swarthmore at Swarthmore 


4 


5 


April 25 


Elizabethtown at Annville 


7 





May 2 


Bucknell at Annville 


3 


6 


May 3 


Dickinson at Carlisle 


4 


5 


May 4 


Catawba at Annville 


6 


1 


May 5 


West Chester at Annville 


5 


4 


May 6 


Albright at Annville 


5 


1 


May 8 


Moravian at Ann\-ille 


9 





May 10 


Mt. St. Mary's at Emmetsburg, Md. 


7 





May 11 


Juniata at Annville 


7 





May 12 


Bucknell at Lewisburg 


1 


6 


May 17 


Franklin and Marshall at Annville 


3 


6 


May 20 


Muhlenberg at Annville 


2 


6 



Buddie Umberger, Number One Netman 



124 





Swinging Dutchmen Grimm, Shapiro and Evelev 



Led by steady Jake Umberger, the tennis team accounted for itself in manner quite 
commendable as it met in turn the rigors of a difficult schedule, transportation problems, 
and the worry of ill-kept home courts. In the first match, with Swarthmore ser\-ing up stiff 
opposition, an under-par Valley squad showed the effects of insufficient practice as it suffered 
a narrow 5-4 defeat. However, when Elizabethtown College cam.e to do battle on Annville's 
uneven clay courts, the Dutchmen were ready and girded for action. The E-towners put 
their rackets back into their presses upon the conclusion of that afternoon's play, having 
tasted much of the bitter whitewash. But the time had not yet come for any streak of wins. 
A strong Bucknell team volleyed its way to a 6-3 triumph in spite of the desperate L. V. 
attempt to turn the Bison stampede. Dickinson's racketeers made another m.ark on the 
wrong side of the ledger for the Valley when they eked out a meagre 5-4 win. This very 
close match was not decided until the final doubles contest in which Dickinson played hard 
to outlast a tiring pair of Blue and White netmen. Catawba, on a northern tour, felt the 
full wrath of the irate Dutchmen. The North Carolinians were in no wise able to refuse to 
accept a severe 6-1 setback. Displaying another bit of clever tennis playing, the Lebanon 
Valley volleyers won from the West Chester Teachers 5-4 in a thrilling match. May Day 
festivities were started off in the proper and approved manner as the traditional rivals from 
Albright were handed a convincing 5-1 shellacking in an abbreviated match. This, in- 
cidentally, was the Valley's fifth match in as many days; of the five contests the rapidly 
improving Dutchmen had won three and played creditably in the other two. With one day 
of rest before the resumption of activities, the racket wielders continued in amazing fashion 
by slashing viciously through the next three engagements to shut out their opponents 
completely. The hapless Moravian squad was the first to experience such complete defeat. 
The second victim in the whitewashing spree was the Mount St. Mary's team. Continuing 
its masterful playing, the squad administered another clean sweep to the Juniata Indians 
to chalk up its sixth straight victory. The imposing string of successes was neatly clipped 
by Bucknell in a return engagement, 6-1. In this encounter Umberger was the sole winner. 
And then Franklin and Marshall showed its superiority by serving up another loss, 6-3. 
The Valley netsters were unable to regain peak form for the final game of the season and so 
were forced to yield to Muhlenberg, 6-2. In this concluding match, Stewart Shapiro suffered 
his only defeat of the season, a remarkable feat considering the number and nature of his 
opponents. 



125 




Miss Henderson's Girls Wield Big Sticks 



Hockey is a major girls' sport at Lebanon Valley, and one in which many take an active interest. This 
year's team was greatly handicapped from the start because the previous graduation had taken some of the 
best players; in fact, almost the entire forward line was composed of Freshmen, most of whom had never 
played hockey before coming to L. V. C. 

The first game was with Shippensburg, and the Valley girls showed they lacked experience and coordination, for 
the game ended 0-5 in favor of Shippensburg. After much hard work on the part of the whole team they 
showed much better form in their encounter with the highly rated Harrisburg Hockey Club. This club is 
made up of hockey players of long experience who make hockey a hobby. The Valley girls were able to hold 
their speedy opponents to a 2-3 score. After this the girl's hockey team stalemated both Linden Hall and 
Albright in 1-1 games. In these encounters. Oiler, Saylor, and Kishpaugh showed excellent defensive work. 
Brubaker as goalie displayed good stick work throughout the season, and it was mostly because of her efforts 
and those of the rest of the backfield that the hockey scores of the opponents were kept as low as they were. 
The climax of the hockey season was a trip to Shippensburg where the girls participated in a Play Day. Four 
schools, Lebanon Valley, Cedar Crest, Susquehanna, and Shippensburg, competed. Four games were played; 
tw-o in the morning and two in the afternoon, between the two winners and the two losers of the morning. 
At these Play Days good hockey is stressed. The players and the coaches talk over weaknesses and general 
stick work. 

Hockey at Lebanon Valley is played for the fun gained by each player, and as many players as possible see 
action. The varsity is not stressed, but rather the benefit derived by each girl in participation in the sport 
is emphasized. 

The prospects for next year look quite bright with an experienced forward line ready to step in and capably 
handle their hockey sticks. 



126 



The girls' basketball honor team has just completed a successful season. They opened their play 
by defeating Albright 34-23 in the Annville gymnasium. And then they showed that the home floor 
wasn't an aid to them, for in the next game they traveled to Albright and again came out with the big 
end of a 27-21 score. The biggest basketball event was a Play Day at Cedar Crest. In the morning 
Lebanon Valley defeated Moravian 30-9. But in the afternoon the girls dropped a close, hard-fought 
contest to Cedar Crest by a 13-19 score. These Play Days are always looked forward to by the girls, 
for they are always royally entertained. The final game was lost to Elizabethtown, which adheres to 
the real varsity system, by a 24—32 score. 

It is hard to name outstanding players on a team that cooperated as well as this one, but Louise Saylor, 
with her accurate sharp-shooting, and Isabel Shatto, with her consistent floor work, won the respect 
of their fellow players. 

Paralleling the honor team's activities, the W. A. A., under the leadership of Phoebe Geyer, ran an inter- 
dormitory tournament. These games gave girls who would otherwise not engage in sports, a chance 
to play. On the whole, these games are close 
ones, competition is keen, and a great deal of 
pleasure is derived from them. This year the 
South Hall aggregation won the championship 
from the Day Students who previously had held 
it for four straight years. There was also inter- 
class competition with the Seniors carrying off 
the "bacon." 

On Mothers' Week End the Frosh-Juniors played 
the Soph-Seniors (see picture) in the final game 
of the year. A hard-fought game showed the 
mothers that the girls really knew their basket- 
ball. Neither team was able to score much and 
the game ended 18-16 in favor of the Frosh- 
Junior combination. 

Evidencing the spirit of girls' sports at Lebanon 
Valley College, the motto of the Women's 
Athletic Association points out major objectives 
too frequently made subordinate in college ath- 
letic competition. 

Ranks first the game, then comes the player, 

And last oj all the prize; 
Exalt your name, play hard and fair — 

All hail to her who tries. 



127 



Mothers Witnessed a Hard-fought Game 




A MEXICAN 




FIESTA 




A Mexican Fiesta spirit invaded the L. V. campus with all 
its spontaneous gayety, color, dancing, singing, and inciden- 
tals when dawned a gorgeous May Day morn last spring. 
The sun, in all his splendor, rivaled the glory of his own 
countenance "down Mexico way." Ringing with snatches of 
song and whistling, the campus took on a festive air under the 
nimble fingers of the willing workers and creative artists who 
transformed it into a strange world of color with flowers, 
streamers, gourds — color, color riotous, everywhere! 

Under the skilled tutelage of our artistic conserv students, 
the student body became Mexican peasants, dancers, Indians, 
even cocks — just for a day — to present to the public an 
afternoon in another world. Assisted by a symphony 
orchestra and male chorus, the dancers whirled gayly in a 
mad attempt to adequately entertain the lady of the day, 
the Queen of the May. 

The entertainment of the day was all incidental to the big 
feature, the dramatization of "Ferdinand, the Bull." L. V. 
presented, for pleasure of queen and public, the most stu- 
pendous, colossal, and gigantic Ferdinand you could wish to 

see. Lolling in the shade of the old cork tree, sniffing the fragrance of the lovely flowers 
through his nostrils, Ferdinand was disturbed by the bravest toreador the field could offer, 
the most vicious fighting bull the stockyards could offer, and finally, the largest, most beauti- 
ful queen bee that art could offer. 

This is just a kaleidoscopic picture of our gay dream world of that day. 




128 







Variety enhanced the scene presented in the arena for the pleasure and enter- 
tainment of Her Majesty. In addition to the symbolic dances of the groups, she 
was entertained by a wisp of humanity in colorful array who pirouetted on and off 
the scene on the stepping bars of a gay Spanish dance. Then there was the romance 
of a rhythmic team — the lovely senorita and seiior featuring the sombrero in their 
solo. There was the humor of the battle to the finish between Sefior Country-bred 
Cock and Sefior City-bred Cock. Alas! Poor Seiior Country-bred Cock was carried 
off the scene in the despair of defeat by his master and mistress. 

The whole scene was climaxed by a great display in which the entire cast partic- 
ipated. The campus became the scene of whirling colors, dancing lights, colorful 
fireworks, and crackling firecrackers. And then all died away as the court followed 
their queen from the scene and the laughing actors of the afternoon disappeared 
from view. For a brief while we had been transported to another world of existence, 
and the memory will linger in the air for many days and nights to come. 



129 




CAMPUS ROYALTY 




Queen Marianne Treo 
Maid-of-honor Anita Patschke 



Royalty smiled upon the colorful scene 
before it, enhanced by the melody in the 
air. The music created the background 
and atmosphere of the whole scene. One 
could hardly refuse to sway to the gay 
rhythms of the orchestra as they accom- 
panied the dancers, or to dream of romance 
in a strange, colorful realm far apart from 
our everyday lives, as the blended voices 
of the male chorus serenaded the royal 
court with the haunting strains of melodies 
which excite in every heart that little 
corner given over to dreams of romance, 
adventure, and gaiety. 

Small wonder that the charming ladies of 
the royal court should smile upon all this 
dream realm of song and dance, for it was 
all designed for them and their entertain- 
ment — and for the throngs who came to 
pay homage and \\ere so graciously wel- 
comed by Her Majesty. 



Court: Helen Bartlett, 







The Queen and her Court, rulers for a day, dominated the 
whole scene and colorful array. Could we ask a lovelier, more 
gracious, more charming queen than she who had been "queen 
of beauty" on the campus for the past three years? The players 
and actors of the day played to a royal court worthy of their 
greatest effort and heights of performance. To the loveliest ladies 
of the campus bowed the dancers, only to whirl away on lilting 
strains of music and to disappear in a fantasy of color. 

The ladies of the court thrilled to the gay abandon of dashing caballeros with their huge 
sombreros, gay little peasants worshipping their valuable helpmate, the donkey, to the tune 
of the "Donkey Serenade," bronzed savages beseeching the Great Father to send rain to 
relieve the parched fields, the gay sefiorita and her gallant dancing partner. They laughed 
at the antics of Ferdinand and the burlesqued cock-fight promoted by the city slickers. 
The court returned to the world of colorful May with the stately May-pole dance of the Jun iors. 
With all the charm, grace, and color of new-grown flowers in the sun-kissed breeze, the lovely 
American senoritas and their escorts danced their stately praise to the god of spring and 
May represented by the traditional May-pole. And all the while, the god of the heavens 
smiled his blessing upon the scene. 

A wandering troubadour romanced in song, circulating among the throngs with his musical 
snatches of lovely sentiments. Gay vendors offered for sale flowers and souvenirs of L. V. C.'s 
Mexico. 

The bazaar atmosphere of that gay land "south of the border" was maintained in all details. 



Amy Meinhardt, Jean Houck, Arlene Hoffman, Amy Monteith, Jean Marbarger 



131 










WHAT? 



WHEN? 



HOW? 



WHO? 



A Lebanon Valley College Frame-Up 



1. WHAT? The picture that will fit into this frame is the contemplated 
college gymnasium. It will cost between S250,000 and S500,000, depending 
on our present needs and the funds available for its construction. The 
blue-prints are in the President's desk and are not likely to be forgotten. 
The Department of Physical Education and Athletics must curtail its 
activities, with a consequential loss of efficiency, because of our present 
inadequate gymnasium. Beyond a doubt when we shall have a better 
gymnasium we shall produce still better teams and provide a better health 
program for our students. 

2. WHEN? Just as soon as the general economic situation is favorable and 
the cooperating conferences of the Church of the United Brethren in 
Christ give us the green signal to go ahead and actualize the dreams of 
many student generations, we shall launch the campaign to furnish the 
wherewithal to erect and equip a gymnasium that will be a credit to this 
institution. 

3. HOW? Not by wishful thinking; and "faith without works is dead." 
With a few exceptions Lebanon Valley College has depended on a large 
number of relatively small gifts secured in two intensive financial cam- 
paigns. The projected campaign for the new gymnasium and increased 
endowment will probably proceed according to the same plan, though the 
solicitation for larger gifts will be included in the program. 

May we reasonably expect one or more of the 575 philanthropic founda- 
tions to assist us in this program of expansion? Of all such money in the 
twentieth century, 73.2 percent has been given to twenty universities. 
The remainder is unequally distributed among 425 colleges. There are 
800 other American colleges that have not received and have no expecta- 
tions of becoming the beneficiaries of these foundations. 

The general guiding principle of these foundations and of private phil- 
anthropies is not on the basis of the greatest need but on that of making 
grants "to him that hath." Institutions that are well established naturally 
attract the attention of prospective donors. 

Furthermore, the vast majority of foundational gifts are for the purpose of 
aiding special research and demonstration in harmony with modern 
educational trends in those institutions where professors and specialists 
are conducting experiments and educational innovations. 



132 



WHO? There may look into this frame a pair of eyes that belongs to an 
alumnus or to some other friend of Lebanon Valley College who has been 
blessed with a degree of prosperity that will enable him to supply the 
picture for this frame. A memorial gymnasium would be an appropriate 
method to honor the life of a relative or friend: or, as is often the case, the 
donor may perpetuate the memory of his own life by erecting and naming 
a building, the need of which is both apparent and imperative. 

If we discover WHO will supply this picture, the questions of WHEN 
and HOW will then be answered. If no individual WHO can supply the 
picture, we all, as members of the collective WHO, are ready to follow 
the leadership of the President just as soon as he is given the right of way 
by those in whose authority is the destiny of Lebanon Valley College. 




A new gymnasium might some day be a part of the view framed by this 
archway of the Men's Dormitory, replacing the row of frame houses which 
now serve as the President's home, the Conservatory Annex, and West Hall. 



133 



SNAPS ABOUT 




Polka-dotted jam session 

German Batiders give salute 
Paul and Jack talk it over 



Prettying up for the camera 
So unbelievably studious 



134 



THE CAMPUS 




Coming jrom Chapel 



Lecture in English 26 



g:iy loiterers 



Investigating chemical mysteries 

February 2g, IQ40, vice versa day 
Flying Dutchman, C. A. A. style 



135 



The Business Staff of the 1941 Quittapahilla extends 
its thanks to the businessmen of Annville and near-by 
communities for the good will which they have 
evidenced in the buying of advertising. Although the 
publishers of this volume might not be so fully depen- 
dent upon the returns from advertisements as those 
in some other similar institutions, nevertheless, the 
budget is bolstered no little bit by such sales. As a 
concrete expression of our appreciation, Mr. Advertiser, 
we have modified the usual layout of this last portion 
of the book so that in effect you will be receiving on 
the average the benefit of a space two or three times 
larger than that purchased. 



136 



VISIT. 



HERSHEY 

"THE SUMMER PLAYGROUND OF PENNSYLVANIA' 



All Outdoor Amusements 

Swimming • Boating • Golf — Four Courses, ^4 Holes 
Picnic Grounds Contain 1000 Acres 

Orchestras of l^ational Reputation 

Play Dance Tvlusic in a Modern Manner in the Hershey Par\ Ballroom 
on Wednesday, Saturday, and Holiday J^ights 

Midget Auto Racing at the Hershey Stadium on Monday and Thursday nights 
Starting May 2 and running through September 

Do you know that you can have a week end of Golf at Hershey for $10? 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



MARY ELIZABETH ALBERT Lebanon, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Chorus, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 4; May Day, 
1, 2, 3; Girls' Band, 2, 3, 4; Wig and Buckle, 3, 4; College 
Orchestra, 3, 4. Class: "Dear Brutus," 3. 



GEORGE R. BARNHART 

Business Administration 
College: Commerce Club, 1, 



Lebanon, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



ROBERT RAYMOND ARTZ 
Business Administration 



Lebanon, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College: Men's Senate, \, 2, 3; Basketball, L 2, 3, 4; 
Student-Faculty Council, 2, 3; Football, 2, 3; Baseball, 2; 
"L" Club, 3, 4; Wig and Buckle, 2, 3, 4; I. R. C, 4. 
Class: President, 3; Football, 1; Tug-of-War, 1. Society: 
"Mr. Pim Passes By," 3; Minstrels, L 



DEAN MOVER AUNGST Pine Grove, Pa. 

English Kalozetean 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4; German Club, 
I, 2, 3, 4; May Day, L.2, 3; "Post Road," 2; "Wurtzel- 
Flummery," 2; "Tovarich," 3. Class: Tug-of-War, 2; 
Football, 2; Numeral Fight, 2. Society: Minstrels, 1; 
Play, 1, 2, 3. 



RICHARD H. BALDWIN 
Social Science 



Johnstown, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; I. R. C, 3, 
Cabinet, 4, Sec, 4; May Day, 3; Wig and Buckle, 3, 4; 
"The Valiant," 4. Class: Football, 3, 4; Basketball, 3, 4; 
Baseball, 3, 4. Society: V.-Pres., 4; "The Youngest," 4. 



CHARLES MILLER BELMER Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Business Administration 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, Capt., 4; Basketball, 1; 
Baseball, 2; Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; "L" Club, 1, 2, 3, 
V.-Pres., 4; Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4. Class: Quitlapabilla, 3. 



JOHN L. BEMESDERFER 

Mathematics 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Kalozetean 



College: Men's Day Student Congress, 4. Class: 
Quitlapahilla, 3. 



WILLIAM L. BENDER 

Business Administration 



Annville, Pa. 
Philokosmian 



College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Tovarich," 3 
Chemistry Club, 1; Commerce Club, 2, 3; Y. M. C. A., 1 
Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4; Men's Day Student Congress, 4 
May Day, 1, 2, 4. Class: Treas., 1, 2, 4, Pres., 3; Numeral 
Fight, 1, 2; Tug-of-War, I, 2; Football, L 2; Basketball, 
1, 2, 3; "Dear Brutus," 3. Society: "Pride and Preju- 
dice," 2; Pres., 4. 



137 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



ADELE LOUISE BLACK 

Social Studies 



Harrisburg, Pa 
Clionian 



College: W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey, 2, 3; May Day, 
1, 2, 3; Eclectic Cluh, 4; Women's Commuters CounciL 
Society: V.-Pres., 3. 



J. STANLE\' DECK 

Social Science 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Kalozetean 



College: Commerce Club, 2, 3, 4; L R. C, 1; 
Chemistry Club, 1. Class: Numeral Fight, 1, 2; Quitta- 
pabilla. Business Manager, 3. Society: Minstrels, L 



BARBARA B. BOWMAN 

French 



Dauphin, Pa. 



Delphian 



College: W. S. G. A., 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1, 2; 
Hockey, 1; Basketball, 1,2, 3, 4; Student-Faculty Council, 
3; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Wurtzel-FIunimery," 2; 
"Tovarich," 3; La Vie, 2. Class: Quittapabilla, 3; "Dear 
Brutus." Society: Sec., 2, 3; "The Bishop Misbehaves," 
1; "R. U. R.," 2; "The Youngest," 4; Pres., 4. 



ROBERT EDWARD DINSMORE Red Lion, Pa. 

Business Administration Pbilokosmian 

College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; La Vie, Sports 
Editor, 4; May Day, 1, 2; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1, Treas., 
4; Wig and Buckle, 2, 3, 4. Class: Quittapabilla, 3; 
Numeral Fight, 1; Tug^of-War, 1, 2. Society: Treas., 3. 



THOMAS B. BOWMAN 

Business Administration 



Lebanon, Pa. 
Kalozetean 

3: Pi 



College: Band, 1, 2; Commerce Club, 1 
Gamma Mu, 4. Class: Quittapabilla, 3. 



WILLIAM JOSIAH BRENSINGER Emmaus, Pa. 

Biology (Pre-Med.) Kalozetean 

College: Band, 1; Symphony Orchestra, 1; Biology 
Club, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 4; Biology Assistant, 3, 4; 
Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4. Class: Tug-of-War, 2; Numeral 
Fight, 1, 2. 



MARGARET ELIZABETH DRUCK Red Lion, Pa. 

Music Education Delphian 

College: Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; \\ . A. A., 3, 4; Girls' Band, 
2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2; W. S. G. A., 3. Class: Basketball, 
1, 2, 3, 4. Society: Warden, 1; Pres., 4. 



JANE VIRGINIA EBY 
Latin 
College: May Day, 1, 



Lebanon, Pa. 
Clionian 
Class; Quittapabilla, 3. 



ELWOOD RICHARD BRUBAKER Annville, Pa. 

Biology, Chemistry Pbilokosmian 

College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Biology Club, 2, 
V.-Pres., 3, Pres., 4; Glee Club, 4; Chorus, 1, 4; Y. M. C. A. 
Cabinet, 3, 4; Biology Assistant, 2, 3, 4. Class: Numeral 
Fight, 1,2; Football; 2; Basketball, 2, 3, 4; V.-Pres., 2. 



FLORIAN WENDELL CASSADY 



Historv 



Petersburg, W. Va. 
Kalozetean 



College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; I. R. C, 3, 
Cabinet, 4; Debating, 3, 4; "^^ M. C. A. Cabinet, 4; May 
Day, 3; Life Work Recruits, 3, 4, Pres., 4. Society: 
Chaplain, 3, 4, Sec, 4. 



LUCIE HELEN IRENE COOK Emmaus, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Hockey, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2; Girls' Band, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club', 2, 3, 4; W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day, 
1, 2; College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Band, 3, 4; La Vie, 3, 4; 
Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Tovarich," 3; Symphony 
Orchestra, 4; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 4; 
Music Prize, 3. Class: "Dear Brutus." Society: 
Play, 2, 3. 



MAR^- ANNE COTRONEO 
Music Education 



Johnstown, Pa. 
Clionian 



College: Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; College 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 4; Band, 3, 4; Chorus, 
1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Assistant to Dean of 
Women, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3, 4. Society: Treas., 3. 



THE SCHOOL^S BARBER SHOP 
IS 

KARL'S SHOP 

Three-Chair Service 



1 W. Main St. ANNVILLE, PA. 



Greeting Cards and Gifts 



JEANETTE^S 



13 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



138 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



CARL Y. EHRHART Lancaster, Pa. 

History Pbilokosmian 

College: La Vie, 1, 2, 3, Editor-in-Chief, 4; Y. M. C. 
A. Cabinet, 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating, 1, 2, 3, 4; I. R. C. Cabinet, 
3, 4; Green Blotter, 3, 4; First Prize Sophomore English, 2; 
Who's Who Among American College Students, 4. Class: 
Quittapabilta, Editor-in-Chief, 3. Elected to Phi Alpha 
Epsilon. 



ANNA U. EVANS 

Hi.storv 



Annville, Pa. 



Clii 



College: Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; W. A. A. 
Cabinet, 3, 4, Treas., 3, V.-Pres., 4; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
3, 4, Treas., 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; Women's Commuters' 
Council, Pres., 4. Class: Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey, 
1, 2, 3; Quittapabilla, 3. Elected to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



EVELYN ROSSER EVANS 



Lancaster, Pa 



Clionian 



Hislory 

College; Hockey, 1; W. A. A., 3, 4; Green Blotter, 
1, 2, 3, Pres., 4; Fencing, 3; May Day, 1, 2, 3; La Vie, 1, 2; 
W. S. G. A., V.-Pres., 4; Eclectic Club, 3, 4; Wig and 
Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4. Class: Quittapabilla, 3. 

THOMAS G. FOX, JR. Union Deposit, Pa. 

Chemistry, Pbysics, Mathematics 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Elected to Phi 
Alpha Epsilon. 



CHURCH CENTER 
PRESS 

Supplies for all branches of 
religious work 

Printing : : Publishing 

MYERSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 

For Super Service Visit . . . 

TOM BLACK'S 

Atlantic Station 

♦ 

North and East Streets 
HARRISBURG, PENNA. 

Phone: 3-9729 



CARiMELLA PROFETA GALLOPPI Utica, N. Y. 

English Clionian 

College: W. S. G. A., Treas., 4; La Vie, 2; Wig and 
Buckle, 2, 3, 4; Chorus, 3, 4; May Day, 3; W. A. A., 4. 
Class: Quittapabilla, 3; Hockey, 4. Society: Anni- 
versary Pres., 4. 



MILDRED E. GARDNER 

Music Education 



Harrisburg, Pa. 
Clionian 



College: Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; Wig and 
Buckle, 1, 2; Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3; College Orchestra, 2. 



C. DENNIS GEESEY 

Music Education 



BOVERTOWN, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: College Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Symphony 
Orchestra, 3, 4. Class: Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Numeral Fight, 1; Tug-of-War, 1, 2. 



ROBERT SHIREY GRIMM 

Mathematics, Phvsics 



Annville, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Wig and Buckle, 1; 
Basketball, 1; Education Assistant, 2, 3, 4; Physics 
Assistant, 3, 4. Class: Basketball, 2, 3. Elected to Phi 
Alpha Epsilon. 



CECIL WILLIS HEMPERLY 
Business Administration 



Harrisburg, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Student-Faculty 
Council, 4; Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4. Class: Quittapabilla, 3. 
Society: V.-Pres., 4. 



AUGUST HERMAN 

Chemistrv 



Minersville, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College : Chemistry Club, 1 , 2, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
"L" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; C. A. A. Student Pilot, 4. Society: 
V.-Pres., 4. 



RUTH EVELYN HERSHEY 
Music Education 



Hershey, Pa. 
Clionian 



College: Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Girls' Band, 2, 3, 4; May 
Day, 1, 2, 3. 



HENRY FRANKLIN HOFFMAN, JR. Reading, Pa. 

Alusic Education Kalozetean 

College: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Symphony Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; 
College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 
2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



RACHAEL E. HOLDCRAFT 
Social Studies 



Hagerstown, Md 

Delphian 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Biology Club, 4 
Wig and Buckle, 3, 4; Student-Faculty Council, 4 
W. S. G. A.. 4; W. A. A., 3, 4. Society: V.-Pres., 4 
Anniversary Pres., 4. 



139 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 




Museum Specimens Wander . . . 

SENIOR ACTIVITIES 

PAUL EDWARD HORN York, Pa. 



History 



Pbilokosmian 



College: Life Work Recruits, I, 2, 3, 4, Deputation 
Chairman, 2, Pres., 3; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1, Sec, 2, 
V.-Pres., 3, Pres., 4; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4, V.-Pres., 3; 
Debating, 3, 4; Men's Senate, 2, V.-Pres., 4; Student- 
Faculty Council, 1, Pres., 4. Class: Tug-of-War, 1, 2. 
Society: Chaplain, 1; Sec, 3. 



W. FREDERICK HUBER Lebanon, Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Biology Club, 2; 
Band, 1, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3. Class: Basketball, 3. 
Elected to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



Charleston, Va. 



WILLIAM H. JENKINS 

Pre-Medical 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Biology Club, 3, 4; 
Life Work Recruits, 3, 4; Chorus, 3, 4; Glee Club, 3, 4; 
Wig and Buckle, 3, 4; "Tovarich," 3; Director of "The 
Valiant," 4. Class: "Dear Brutus." 



GEORGE A. KATCHMER Emeigh, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; "L" 
Club, 2, 3, 4. Class: Basketball, 3, 4; Quiltapabilla, 3. 
Society: Sec, 4. 



RICHARD D. KAUFFMAN Dallastown, Pa. 

Chemistry, Mathematics Pbilokosmian 

College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; Wig and Buckle, 3; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 3, 4; College Band, 2, 3. Class: 
"Dear Brutus," 3. 

STERLING H. KLEISER Lebanon, Pa. 

Biology Kalozetean 

College: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; Biology 
Club, 3, 4. Society: Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Sergeant-at- 
Arms, 1, 2. 

ORVAL KLOPP Myerstown, Pa. 

Alusic Education 

College: Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

CHRISTINE KREIDER Lebanon, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: May Day, 1, 2, 3; Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

LILLIAN MAE LEISEY Lebanon, Pa. 

Latin, History Clionian 

College: La Vie, 2, 3, Assoc. Editor, 4; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, 1, 4; Debating, 2, 3, 4; Editor "L" Book, 4; 
May Day, 1, 2; Pi Gamma Mu, 4; Women's Commuters 
Council, 4; Education Assistant, 2, 3, 4. Class: Sec, 1, 4; 
Quittapahilla, 3; Literary Editor. Society: Pres., 4. 
Elected to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



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Contractors and Builders 
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SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



DAVID FRANKLIN LENKER 
Business Administration 



Harrisburg, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College: Wig and Buckle, 1; Baseball, 1; Commerce 
Club, 1, 2; La Vie, 2, 3, 4; Art Club, 3; C. P. T., Student 
Pilot, 4. Class: Quittapabilla, 3. 



JESSE SANFORD LENKER 

Business Administration 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1 
Club, 1, 2. 



Harrisburg, Pa. 
Kalozetean 
Baseball, 1; Commerce 



HAROLD H. LIGHT Cornwall, Pa. 

German Pbilokosmian 

College: German Club, 2, 3, Pres., 4. 



RALPH R. LLOYD 

Business Administration 



Hershey, Pa. 

Pbilokosmian 



College: Commerce Club, 1, 2; Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4. 
Class: Tug-of-War, 1; Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1; 
Quittapabilla, 3; "Dear Brutus," 3. Society: "Arms and 
the Man," 4. 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 

DOROTHY ELIZABETH LONG 

East Orange, N. J. 

Social Science Clwnian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Wurtzel- 
Flummery," 2; May Day, 1, 2, 3; Eclectic Club, 2, 3, 
Pres., 4; Chorus, 4; Basketball, 1, 2. Class: Quittapa- 
billa, V.-Pres., 3. 



LELA WEABER LOPES Schaefferstown, Pa. 

Matbematics 

College: May Day, 1, 2; Archery, 2, 3; "L" Club, 3; 
La Vie, 4. Elected to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



DONALD PAUL LUDWIG Hummelstown, Pa. 

History, Business Administration Kalozetean 

College: Football, 1, 2; Baseball, 2, 3; "L" Club, 2, 3, 
4. Class: Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4. Society: Minstrels, 1, 2. 



JOHN HOWARD LYNCH 
History, Education 



Annville, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: Football, 1; C. A. A., Student Pilot, 4; Wig 
and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4; "Post Road"; I. R. C, 3, 4; Biology 
Club, 3, 4. Class: Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Society: "Pride and Prejudice," Pres., 4. 




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141 



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SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



GUSTAV THURWALD MAURY Coaldale, Pa. 

Biology Pbilokosmian 

College: I. R. C, 2; Chemistry Club, 2. Class: 
Quittapabilla, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 1, 2; 
Numeral Fight, 1, 2. 



JOHN V. MOLLER 

Business Administration 



Clifton, N. J. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: I. R. C, 1, 2, Pres., 3, 4; La Vie, Business 
Mgr., 4; Men's Senate, 2, 3, Pres., 4; Debating, 3, Mgr., 4; 
Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2; Football, Mgr., 4; 
Civilian Pilot Training, 4. Class: Pres., 1, 2, 4. Elected 
to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



EVELYN L. MILLER 

Latin, French 



Millersburg, Pa. 



Clioni' 



College: May Day, 1, 2, 3; Student-Faculty Council, 
1; Hockey, 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 3, Pres., 4; W. A. A. 
Cabinet, I, Sec, 2, 3; Life Work Recruits, 4; Green Blotter, 
3, 4. Class: "Dear Brutus," 3; Sec, 2, 3; Quittapabilla, 3. 
Society: Sec, 2. Elected to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



RICHARD E. MOODY 

Cbemistrv 



Lebanon, Pa. 



Kalozetean 



College: Chemistry Club, 2, Sec.-Treas., 3, Pres., 4; 
Men's Senate, 3; Day Student Congress, 4; Band, 1, 2, 4; 
Biology Club, 2. Class: Numeral Fight, 1; Quittapabilla, 
Associate Editor, 3. Society: Sec, 3, Treas., 4. Elected 
to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



HERBERT L. MILLER 



Hummelstown, Pa. 

Biology Pbilokosmian 

College: Biology Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 
3, 4; Biology Assistant, 3, 4; Day Student Congress, 
V.-Pres., 4. Class: V.-Pres., 3. 



EDWARD ROBERT MINNICK Mt. Carmel, Pa. 
Biology Kalozetean 

College: Chemistry Club, 4; Biology Club, 3, 4. 



P. KENNETH MORROW 
Cbemistry 



Mount Union, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: Wig and Buckle, 1; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; 
May Day, 1. Class: Numeral Fight, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2. 



GEORGE GERALD MUNDAY 
Business Administration 



Bronx, N. Y. 
Kalozetean 



College: Football, 1; Commerce Club, 1, 2; Pi Gamma 
Mu, 3, 4; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; "The Tea Pot on the 
Rocks," 4. Class: Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Football, 2; 
Tug-of-War, 2; Numeral Fight, 2. Society: "R. U. R.," 
2; Pres., 4. 



142 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



JOHN HERBERT NESS 
History, English 



\'oRK, Pa. 



Phi 



College: Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4; Life Work Recruits, 

1, 2, 3, 4; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1, 2, Sec, 3, 4; I. R. C, 

2, 3, Cabinet, 3, 4; Men's Senate, 4; Commerce Club, 2; 
La Vie, 2, 3, 4; Chorus, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; Wig and 
Buckle, 3, 4. Class: Quittapabilla, 3; Tug-of-War, 1, 2; 
Football, 2; Numeral Fight, 1. Society: Chaplain, 3. 



RUTH V. NORTON 



History 



Harrisblrc, Pa. 



Petersburg, W. Va. 
Pbilokosmian 



JOHN GEORGE OLIVER 

Pre-Medical, Biology 

College: Wig and Buckle, 3, 4; "Maker of Dreams," 3; 
"The Valiant," 4; Chorus, 3, 4; Glee Club, 4; Biology 
Club, 4. 



EDWARD A. POWELL Robesonia, Pa. 

English 

College: Symphony Orchestra, 1, 4; College Orches- 
tra, 1, 2; German Club, 2; Wig and Buckle, 2. 



ELLEN LVDIA REATH Hagerstown, Md. 

Biology 

College: Frostburg S. T. C, 1, 2; W. S. G. A., 3; 
Basketball, 3, 4; W. A. A., 3, Cabinet, 4; Biology Club, 
3, 4; La Vie, 4; Hockey, 3, 4. 

JAMES G. REED Shamokin, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

College: Wheaton College, 1, 2; German Club, 3, 4. 



LUCILLE GRACE OLLER Campbelltown, Pa. 

Biology Clionian 

College: Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Archery, 3; W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; W. S. G. A., 4; Biology 
Club, 4; Chemistry Club, 4; May Day, 1, 2. Class: 
Volleyball, 2, 3. 

HAROLD S. PEIFFER Elizabethtown, Pa. 

History 
College: Life Work Recruits, 2, 3, 4. 



FREEMAN D. RICE 

Chemistry, Mathematics 
College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4. 



Annville, Pa. 



CLAYTON MERLE RIDER 
Music Education 



MiDDLETOWN, Pa. 

Kalozetean 



College: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 3; College 
Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4. Class: Numeral 
Fight, 2. Society: Kalozetean Minstrels, 1. 



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143 



SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



ANTHONY JOHN ROZMAN Steelton, Pa. 

Business Administration Pbilokosmian 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Baseball, 2, 3, 4; "L" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



LOUISE SAYLOR 

Economics 



East Orange, N. J. 
Clionian 



College: Debating, 1, 2, Mgr., 3, 4; Wig and Buckle, 
1, 2, Sec, 3, Pres., 4; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1, 2, 4; W. A. A. 
Cabinet, 2, Pres., 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; Hockey, 3, 4; 
La Vie, 4. Class: V.-Pres., 1; "Dear Brutus," 3; Quitta- 
pabilla, 3. Society: Treas., 2; Sec, 4; "Clarence," 3; 
"Pride and Prejudice," 2; "Three-Cornered Moon," 1. 
Elected to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



WARREN D. SECHRIST Dallastown, Pa. 

Chemistry Pbilokosmian 

College: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chemistry Club, 2, 3, 4; 
La Vie, 3, 4. Class: Numeral Fight, 1,2; Football, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1, 3; Quittapahilla, 3. Society: Chairman 
Executive Committee, 3. 



DANIEL S. SEIVERLING 



Ephrata, Pa. 



History Pbilokosmian 

College: Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 
3, 4; Cheerleader, 1, 2, 3, 4; Men's Senate, 1, 3, 4; Y. M. 
C. A. Cabinet, 1, 3; "L" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Wig and Buckle, 
1, 2, 3, 4. Class: Numeral Fight, 1, 2; Tug-of-War, 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2. Society: "Three-Cornered Moon," 1; 
"New Bride," 2; "Clarence," 3. 



JOHN AMBROSE SCHAEFFER Lebanon, Pa. 

Business Administration 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 

WILLIAM SCHERFEL Pottstown, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

College: I. R. C, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4. Class: 
Numeral Fight, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2; Tug-of-War, 1, 2; 
Junior Prom Leader, 3; V.-Pres., 2. Society': Pres., 4. 

VERNA M. SCHLOSSER Myerstown, Pa. 

Music Education 

College: Girls' Band, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; 
Chorus, 1,2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; Women's Commuters 
Council, 4. 



EVELYN MAYE SEYLAR Highspire, Pa. 

Englisb Clionian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, 1; Hall Pres., 4; W. S. G. A., 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; 
Chorus, 1. 

STEWART BENNETT SHAPIRO Lebanon, Pa. 

Pre-Medical Kalozetean 

College: Tennis, 1, 2, 3, Mgr., 4; La Vie, 3; Chemistry 
Club, 2, 3, 4; Biology Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. Class: Quittapa- 
billa, 3; Basketball, 3, 4. Elected to Phi Alpha Epsilon. 



GEORGE HARRY SMEE Harrisburg, Pa. 

Cbemistry 

College: May Day, 1, 2; Chemistry Club, 
V.-Pres., 4; Chemistry Assistant, 4. 



1, 2, 3, 



JEANNE E. SCHOCK 

Music Education 



Mount Joy, Pa 
Clionian 



College: W. S. G. A., 2, Sec, 3, Pres., 4; Girls' Band, 
2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, 1, 4; May Day, 1, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; Student- 
Faculty Council, 4. Class: Quittapabilla, 3. 



IRWIN DONALD SCHOEN 

Business Administration 



Lebanon, Pa. 



ROBERT GLEIM SPANGLER Lebanon, Pa. 

Business Administration Kalozetean 

College: I. R. C, 3, 4; Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
May Day, 1, 2; Art Club, 2. 



H. HERBERT STROHMAN 
Music Education 



Lebanon, Pa 
Kalozetean 



College: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 
3, 4; College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3, 4; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4. 




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SENIOR ACTIVITIES 



AMERICO TARANTO Linden, N. J. 

Education Kalozetean 

Class: Basketball, 3, 4; Football, 3, 4; Baseball, 3. 



JAMES RICHARD WHITMAN Lebanon, Pa. 

Business Administratioti 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Base- 
ball, 1, 2; Commerce Club, 1, 2, 3, 4; Pi Gamma Mu, 3, 4. 
Class; Quittapabilla, Sports Editor, 3. 



MARY ALICE TOUCHSTONE Fredericksburg, Pa. 

English, History Delphian 

College: Green Blotter, 1,2, 3, 4; La Vie, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
"L" Book, 3; W. A. A., 2, 3, 4; German Club, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Hockey, 3, 4; Quittapabilla, 3. 



ESTHER NAOMI WISE 

Music Education 



EHZABETHVILLE, Pa. 

Clionian 



College: Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; 
Student-Faculty Council, 2; Chorus, 1, 2, 3, 4; College 
Orchestra, 3, 4; Volleyball, 2. Class: "Dear Brutus," 3. 



CHRISTIAN BITNER WALK, JR. 

Washington Boro, Pa. 

History Kalozetean 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3, 4; Baseball, 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Men's Senate, 3; "L" Club, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Basketball, 4. Society: Sec, 3. 



BERNICE ELIZABETH WITMER Harrisburg, Pa. 

English Clioniayi 

College: May Day, 1, 2, 3; Archery Club, 3, 4; 
Eclectic Club, 3, 4. Class: Sec, 2, 3. Society: V.-Pres., 
3; Treas., 4. 



RICHARD PERSHING WEAGLEY 

Greencastle, Pa. 

Biology Philokosmian 

College: May Day, 1, 2; Biology Club, 4. Class: 
Quittapabilla, 3; Basketball, 1, 2; Numeral Fight, 1, 2; 
Tug-of-War, 1, 2; Table Tennis, 3. 



MARGARET S. WEIMER Lebanon, Pa. 

English Clionian 

College: W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3; 
Hockey, 1, 2, 3, 4; Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



ROBERT BROWNING WERT Lebanon, Pa. 

History Philokosmian 

College: May Day, 1, 2, 3; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3, 4. 
Class: Numeral Fight, 1; "Dear Brutus," 3. Society: 
"Pride and Prejudice," 2; Sergeant-at-Arms, L 



HARRY WILLIAM WOLF Stouchsburg, Pa. 

Music Educalinti 

College: West Chester S. T. C, 1, 2, 3; Band, 4; 
College Orchestra, 4; Chorus, 4. 



HAROLD G. YEAGLEY Harrisburg, Pa. 

Music Education 

College: Band, 1, 2, 3, 4; Symphony Orchestra, 2, 3, 4; 
Glee Club, 2, 3, 4; German IJand, 1, 2, 3, 4; Day Student 
Congress, 4; May Day, 1, 2, 3, 4. 



JOHN A. YINGST 

Mathematics 

College: C. P. T. Student Pilot, 4. 



Cornwall, Pa. 



KATHRYN M. ZWALLY New Holland, Pa. 

Social Studies Delphian 

College: May Day, 1, 2; Basketball, 2, 3; Debating, 1; 
W. A. A., 1, 2, 3, 4. Society: Warden, 1. 



145 



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146 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 



CHARLES R. BEITTEL, JR. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Cbetnistry Pbilokosmian 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3, Sec.-Treas., 2; 
May Day, 1; La Vie, 2, 3; Men's Senate, 3; Biology 
Assistant, 2; Chemistry Assistant, 3. Class: Quittapa- 
billa, Editor-in-Chief, 3; Numeral Fight, 1. 



RICHARD CLARENCE BELL Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pre-Medical Pbilokosmian 

College: Men's Senate, 2, Sec.-Treas., 3; La Vie, 2, 3; 
Chemistry Club, 1,2; Biology Club, 2; Wig and Buckle, 
1, 2, 3; "Tovarich," 2; Student-Faculty Council, 2; May 
Day, 1, 2. Class: Tug-of-War, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
Football, 1, 2; Quiitapabilla, 3. Society: Treas , 2; 
Sergeant-at-Arms, 2; "Pride and Prejudice," 1; "The 
New Bride," 2. 



BERNARD CHARLES BENTZEL York, Pa. 

Chemistry Pbilokosmian 

College: Football, 1, 2; C. A. A. Flying, 3. Class: 
Football, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Tug-of-War, 2; Pres., 3. 
Society: Sergeant-at-Arms, I. 



JEANNE LOIS BLIVEN 
Music Education 
College: Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3. 



Sugar Loaf, N. Y. 
Delpbian 



Palmyra, Pa. 



ANNA MAE BOMBERGER 

History Delpbian 

College: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 2, 3; German Club, 



2, 3; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; Life Work Recruits, 
Class: Quiitapabilla, 3. 



2, 3. 



MARGARET JANE BORDWELL Hagerstown, Md. 

Biology, Englisb Clionian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; "Post Road," 1; 
Biology Club, 2; Chorus, 2, 3; Glee Club, 2, 3; W. A. A. 
Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Eclectic Club, 3; May Day, 1, 2. Class: 
Quittapabilla, 3; "Mystery at Greenfingers," 3; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2. Society: "Olive Branch," Editor, 1, 2, 3; 
"Clarence," 2; "Pride and Prejudice," 1; "The New 
Bride," 2. 



GLADYS M. BROWN 

Music Education 



Palmyra, Pa. 

Clionian 



College: Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2, 3; 
Chorus, 1, 2, 3. 



EARL T. CATON, JR. Harrisburg, Pa. 

Music Education 

College: Band, 1, 2, 3; Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 
\, 2, 3; German Band, 2, 3; Day Student Congress, 3; 
May Day, \, 2. Class: Football, L 



SOLOMON BROOKS CAULKER 

Mambo-Shenge, Sierr,\ Leone, West Africa 

History, Greek Pbilokosmian 

College: I. R. C, 1, Cabinet, 2; Life Work Recruits, 
1, 2, 3; Bible and Greek Assistant, 3. 



THEODORE CIAMILLO 
History 
College: Football, 2, 3. 



Inwood. L. I. 
Kalozetean 



CATHERINE RUTH COLEMAN Johnstown, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Symphony Orchestra, 
1, 2, 3; College Orchestra, 1; Girls' Band, 1,2, 3; College 
Band, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2; Life Work 
Recruits, 1, 2, 3. Class: Quittapabilla, 3; "Mystery at 
Greenfingers," 3. 



RALPH LORAIN CONLEY 
Business Administration 



Lemoyne, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: Football, 1, 2; Baseball, 1, 2. Class: Foot- 
ball, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Tug-of-War, 2. 



JOE ELVIN CONRAD Valley View, Pa. 

Biology, Cbemistry Kalozetean 

Class: Numeral Fight, 1. Society: "R. U. R.," 1. 



FRED E. BOSNYAK 

Business Administration 



Middletown, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College: Football, 1, 2, 3; "L" Club, 1, 2, 3; Baseball, 
Mgr., 2. Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 



JOAN ELIZABETH COX Ephrata, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3; Eclectic Club, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day, 1,2; Chorus, 1, 2, 3. 



MARGARET ELIZABETH BOYD Manheim, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Chorus, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3; Girls' Band, 
1, 2, 3; College Orchestra, 3; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1; 
Hockey, 1. Class: "Mystery at Greenfingers," 3. 

ROBERT EDWARD BREEN Lebanon, Pa. 

Cbemistry, Mathematics Pbilokosmian 

College: Band, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3. Class: 
Basketball, 2, 3; Tug-of-War, 2. 



EDWIN CLAUDE CREEGER, JR. Thurmont, Md. 

Music Education Pbilokosmian 

College: Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; College Band, 1, 2, 3; 
Tennis, 2; College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; May 
Day, 1, 2, 3; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 3; Wig and Buckle, 1; 
German Band, 2, 3. Class; Tug-of-War, 1,2; Numeral 
Fight, 1; Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2. 



CONRAD KREIDER CURRY 
Business Administration 



HUMMELSTOWN, Pa. 

Kalozetean 



147 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 



SAMUEL DERICK 

Business Administration 



Harrisburg, Pa. 

Kalozetean 



College: May Day, 1, 2, 3; Cheerleader, 1, 2, 3. Class: 
V.-Pres., 3; Treas., 1. 



DOROTHEA RUTH DONOUGH Lebanon, Pa. 

History Clionian 

College: May Day, 1, 2; Debating, 2. Class: 
Hockey, 1. 



LAURENE E. DREAS 

Music Education 



Reading, Pa. 



Delphian 



College: Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Girls' Band, 
1, 2, 3; College Orchestra, 1, 2; Biology Club, 2, 3; Wig 
and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; "Post Road," 1; "Tovarich," 2; 
Chorus, 1, 2, 3. Society: "R. U. R.," 1; "Mr. Pirn 
Passes By," 2. 



JOHN HENRY DRESSLER, JR. Millersburg, Pa. 

Business Administration Phitokosmian 

College: \\'ig and Buckle, 1,2, 3; La Vie, 3; Chemistry 
Club, 1; Art Club, 2; May Day, 1; Men's Senate, 3. 
Class: Quittapabilla, Bus. Mgr., 3; Tug-of-War, 1, 2; 
Numeral Fight, 1; Football, 1, 2. Society: Treas., 3. 




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JANE Y. EHRHART 

History 



Lancaster, Pa. 



Cli, 



College: International Relations Club, 1, Sec. -Treas. 
2, Pres., 3; La Vie, 1, 2, 3; Debating, 1, 2; \V. A. A., 2, 3 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 2, 3; Hockey, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2, 3 
Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3, Pianist, 2, 3; Eclectic Club, 3 
Class: Quittapabilla, 3; Hockey, 1; Volleyball, I, 2. 



CARL MAURICE ERDMAN 
Business Administration 



Lebanon, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College: Fencing, 1, 2, 3; C. A. A. Flying, 3. Class: 
Football, 2; Numeral Fight, 2; Tug-of-War, 2. 



JOSEPHINE L. ERNST Carlisle, Pa. 

Economics Delphian 

College: W. S. G. A., 2, 3; Student-Faculty Council, 
2; Biology Club, 2, 3; Hockey, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2; May 
Day, 1; W. A. A., 1, 2, 3. Class: Sec, 2. 



MARY LUCILE ESBENSHADE Bird in Hand, Pa. 

English 

College: W. A. A., 1, 2, Cabinet, 3; L. W. R., 1, 2, 3; 
May Day, L 2; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, L 2, 3; Archery 
Club, 2, 3; German Club, 3; Biology Club, 3. 



148 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 

MARLIN ALWINE ESPENSHADE 

MiDDLETOWN, Pa. 

Biology Pbilokosmian 

College: Biology Club, 2, Treas., 3; Chemistry Club, 
1, 2, 3; Biology Assistant, 3; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, Treas., 
3; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Debating, 1; Student- 
Faculty Council, 1. Class: Quittapahilla, Assoc. Ed., 3 
Tug-of-War, 1, 2; Numeral Fight, 1. Society; Sec, 3 
"Pride and Prejudice," 1; "The New Bride," 2; "Clarence,' 



JOSEPH \V. FAUBER 

Music Education 



Lebanon, Pa. 

Pbilokosmian 



College: Band, 1, 2, 3; Symphony Orchestra, 2, 3; 
Chorus, 1, 2, 3; German Band, 2, 3; College Orchestra, 
1, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2; Wig and Buckle, 1; Men's Day 
Student Congress, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3. Class: "Mystery 
at Greenfingers," 2; Tug-of-War, 1, 2; Numeral Fight, 1. 

HARRY LAFORCE FEHL, JR. Parkton, Md. 

Education Pbilokosmian 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Life Work Re- 
cruits, 3; International Relations Club, 3; Wig and 
Buckle, 3. 



Washington, D. C. 
Clionian 



ETHEL MAE FISHER 

History 

College: Chorus, 1, 2; Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2; 
Biology Club, 3; May Day, 1, 2; W. A. A., 1, 2, 3. Class: 
Hockey, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3. 



Shenk & Tittle 

Everything for Sports 

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When In Harrisburg Stop At 

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Highway Service Stations 

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SIX CONVENIENTLY LOCATED STATIONS 

2d and Verbeke Sts. 18th and Derry Sts. 

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Chestnut and 4th Sts. 17th and Paxton Sts. 




Giving Bert an Added Task 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 

MAX KENNETH FLOOK Mversville, Md. 

History 

MARTHA ELIZABETH FOSTER Ocean City, N. J. 
Englisb Clionian 

College: Temple University, 1, 2. 

WILMER J. GINGRICH Annville, Pa. 

Chemistry Pbilokosmian 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; May Day, I. 
Class: Football, 1,2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Tug-of-War, 1, 2. 

ALEXANDER JOSEPH GITTLEN Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Biology Club, 1, 2, 
3; Archery Club, 3; La Vie, 1, 2; May Day, 1. Class: 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Handball, 1, 2, 3; Tug-of-War, 1, 2. 

HENRY G. GOTTSHALL Annville, Pa. 

Music Education 

BERNARD JOSEPH GRABUSKY Minersville, Pa. 
Business Administration 
College: Football, 1, 2, 3. 



149 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 



Dauphin, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



JAMES EARL GREIDER 

Biology, Chemistry 

College: Baseball, 1, 2; Biology Club, 1, 2; Chemistry 
Club, I. Class: Tug-of-War, 1, 2; Football, 1,2; Numeral 
Fight, 1, 2. 



SAMUEL O. GRIMM, JR. Annville, Pa. 

Mathematics Philokosmian 

College: Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Tennis, 1, 2; May 
Day, 1. Class: Basketball, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2. 



GEORGE LAMAR GROW Shamokin, Pa. 

Education Kalozetean 

College: Bucknell, 1; Football, 2, 3. Class: Basket- 
ball, 2, 3; Pres., 3. 



WILLIAM RICHARD HABB^SHAW 

HUMMELSTOWN, Pa. 

Business Administration Kalozetean 



CARL CALVIN HOTTENSTEIN 

Alatbematics, Physics 



Richland, Pa. 



AUDREY JANE IMMLER 
Alusic Education 



Harrisburg, Pa. 
Clionian 



College: Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3; Women's Commuters 
Council, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3; May Day, 1, 2, 3. 



ARTHUR JORDAN 

Music Education 



Jamaica, N. Y. 
Philokosmian 



College: Glee Club, 2, 3; College Orchestra, 1; Wig 
and Buckle, L Society: "Pride and Prejudice," L 



LILLIAN JEANNETTE KALBACH Lebanon, Pa. 

History Clionian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; I. R. C, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day, 1,2; Eclectic Club, 2, Sec, 3. Class: Volley- 
ball, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2. Society: Sec, 2; "The New 
Bride," 2. 



ROBERT GONDER HACKMAN Lititz, Pa. 

Music Education Pbilokosmian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; "Post Road," 1; 
"Tovarich," 2; "Dover Road," 3; Glee Club, 2, 3; College 
Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Band, 1, 2, 3; Symphony Orchestra, 
1, 2, 3; German Band, 2, 3; Men's Senate, 3. Class: 
Tug-of-War, 1, 2; Football, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2; V.-Pres., 
1, 2; Numeral Fight, 1. Society: "Clarence," 2. 



NATHAN I. KANTOR 



LUKE E. HAINS 

Music Education 



Avon, Pa. 



Kalozetean 



College: Band, 1, 2, 3; Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; 
College Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2, 3. 



DONALD HAVERSTICK 

Cbemistrx', Biology 



Atlantic City, N. J. 
Pbilokosmian 



College: May Day, 1, 2; Wig and Buckle, 2; "Dover 
Road," 2. Class: Tug-of-War, 1, 2; Numeral Fight, 1, 2; 
Football, 1, 2. 



RAYMOND C. HESS 

Cbemistrv 



Jonestown, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Men's Senate, 2; 
May Day, 1. Class; Quittapabitla, 3. 



ELOISE MAE HOLLINGER Annville, Pa. 

Latin Clionian 

College: May Day, 1, 2; Women's Commuters 
Council, 3, Treas., 3. Class: Hockey, 1. 



MARY ELLEN HOMAN Lebanon, Pa. 

History 
College: May Day, 1, 2. Class: Hockey, 1. 



Biologv 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Biology Club, 1, 2, 
3; La Vie, 1, 2. 



JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST AND DECORATOR 

''The Flower Shop'' 

Corsages Our Specialty 

Rear of Court House LEBANON, PA. 

Flowers Telegraphed 

Anywhere, Anytime 

Phone: Lebanon 592 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive Shoes 

HILL & DALE SHOES 
For College Girls 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 
"For the Man Who Cares" 



34 N. Eighth Street 



LEBANON, PA. 



150 



JUNIOR 

HAVEN KESSEL Moorefield, W. Va. 

History 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Life Work Re- 
cruits, 3; I. R. C, 3. 

MARJORIE B. KISHPAUGH Hershey, Pa. 

Biology Clioitian 

College: Duke University, 1, 2; Biology Club, 3; 
Hockey, 3. Class: Basketball, 3. 

LYNN HOFFMAN KITZMILLER Halifax, Pa. 

Chemistry Pbilokosmian 

College: Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 1, 3. 
Class: Numeral Fight, 1, 2; Tug-of-War, 1, 2; Foot- 
ball, 1, 2. 

ARTHUR A. KOFORTH Bareville, Pa. 

Biology Pbilokosmian 

Class: Basketball, 1, 2. 



FILLMORE THURMAN KOHLER, JR. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Political Science (Pre-law) Pbilokosmian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2; 
L R. C, 1; Commerce Club, 2. 



ACTIVITIES 

MARTHA JANE KOONTZ Baltimore, Md. 

English Clionian 

College: W. S. G. A., 1; German Club, 1; Y. W. C. A. 
Cabinet, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 2, 3; Life Work Recruits, 
1, 2, 3. Class: "Mystery at Greenfingers," 3; Quittapa- 
hilla, 3. Society: "Pride and Prejudice," L 



DOROTHEA BETTY KROLL Chester, N. Y. 

Latin Delphian 

College: May Day, 1, 2; W. A. A., 1, 2, 3; German 
Club, 3. Class: Volleyball, 1, 2. Society: Sec, 3. 

FRANK ANTHONY KUHN Camp Hill, Pa. 

Business Administration 

College: Men's Senate, 2, 3; Football, 1, 2, 3; Fresh- 
man Basketball, 1; Basketball, 2, 3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3. 



HARPEL'S 

Kodaks and Movie Cameras 

Stationery 

Luggage and Gifts 

l'bl-159 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 



AUTOMATIC HEATING 
STOKER, OIL and GAS 



SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 
PAINTS and VARNISHES 



SPENCER CASSEL 

Plumbing . Heating . Hardware 
Philco Refrigerators and Radios 



254 N. College Street 
PALMYRA, PA. 

Phone: 8-5341 



14 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Phone: 7-5131 



BRADFORD WILBER LONG 

Creek 



ROBERT JOSEPH MANDLE 

Biology 



Annville, Pa. 



Closter, N. J. 



WILLIAM HENRY McKNIGHT Myerstown, Pa. 

Biology Pbilokosmian 

College: Biology Club, 1, 2, 3. Class: Numeral 
Fight, 1, 2; Tug-of-War, 1,2. 



CHARLES RICHARD MILLER Windsor, Pa. 

History 

College: Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3; Wig and Buckle, 
1, 2, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; International 
Relations Club, 1, 2; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 2, 3. 



MABEL JANE MILLER 
English 



Mount Joy, Pa. 



Delphian 



College: May Day, 1, 2; Wig and Buckle, 2, 3; Y. W. 
C. A. Freshman Cabinet, 1. 



ROBERT ALEXANDER NICHOLS, III 



Biology 



Pbilokosmian 



Lebanon, Pa. 



College: Biology Club, 1, 2, 3; Chemistry Club, 3; 
La Vie, 3; May Day, 1. 



ELIZABETH FERNE POET Red Lion, Pa. 

French Delphian 

College: La Vie, 1, 2, 3; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, 1; 
W. A. A., 1, 2, 3; Hockey, 1. 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; May 
Day, 1, 2, 3; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; "Dover Road," 3; 
French Assistant, 3. Class: Sec, 1, 3; Quittapabilla, 3; 
"The Mystery at Greenfingers," 3. Society: Warden, 1; 
Chaplain, 2; Treas., 3. 



151 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 



FRANCES ELEANOR PRUTZMAN Lancaster, Pa. 

English, German Delphian 

College: Green Blotter, 1, 2, 3; Life Work Recruits, 
1, 2, 3; German Club, 1, 2, Sec.-Treas., 3; La Vie, 1, 2, 3; 
W. A. A., 2, 3. 



ALEXANDER BORIS RAKOW Lebanon, Pa. 

Biology Kalozeiean 

College: Football, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 2; La Vie, 
1, 2, 3; Men's Day Student Congress, Sec.-Treas., 3; 
Biology Club, 3; Chemistry Club, 3. Class: Quittapa- 
billa, 3; V.-Pres., 1; Treas., 3. 



R. ROBERT RAPP Lebanon, Pa. 

Chemistry Philokosmian 

College: Chemistry Club, 1, 2, 3; Day Student 
Congress, 3. Class: Football, 2; Tug-of-\\'ar, 2. 



WILLIAM B. REED 



Historv 



Pine Grove, Pa. 



College: Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day, 1, 2; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, 2; College Orchestra, 
1, 2, 3. Class: Numeral Fight, 1; Tug-of-War, 1; Basket- 
ball, 1, 2; Table Tennis, 2, 3; Football, 3; Quutapahilla, 3. 



MARIAN LOUISE REIFF New Cumberland, Pa. 

English Clionian 

College: Chorus, 1; May Day, 1, 2; Women's Com- 
muters Council, 3, Sec, 3. 

ROBERT HEFFELMAN REIFF 

New Cumberland, Pa. 
Chemistry 

College: May Day, 1, 2. 

MILDRED LOUISE RITTLE Lebanon, Pa. 

Music Education 
College: Girls' Band, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2. 



RICHARD RUFUS RODES Edgewood, Pa. 

Bible, History 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Chorus, 3; Life 
Work Recruits, 3; Band, 3. 

ELLEN ELIZABETH RUPPERSBERGER 

Baltlmore, Md. 
English Clionian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; Eclectic Club, 3; 
Chorus, 1. Class: Basketball, 1; "Mystery at Green- 
fingers," 3. 

BETTY ANNE RUTHERFORD Lebanon, Pa. 

History Clioniaii 

College: W. A. A., 2, Cabinet, 3; La Vie, 1, 2, 3; 
Debating, 2; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; I. R. C, 2, 3. Class: 
Hockey, 1, 2; Quittapahilla, 3. Society: Sec, 2; V.-Pres., 3. 



EDNA CARPENTER RUTHERFORD 



3ainbridge, Pa. 



Biology 



Delphian 



College: May Day, 1, 2; Student-Faculty Council, 1; 
Hockey, 1, 2; W. A. A. Cabinet, 3; '\'. W. C. A. Cabinet, 
2, 3; Biology Club, 2, Sec, 3; Basketball, 1, 2; Volleyball, 
1, 2. Class: Sec, 2; Quittapahilla, 3. Society: Critic, 2. 



LOUELLA M. SCHINDEL 

English 



Hagerstown, Md. 



Cli, 



College: La Vie, 1, 2, 3; W. A. A. Cabinet, 3; Eclectic 
Club, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2; First Prize Sophomore English, 
2. Class: Quittapahilla, 3. Society: V.-Pres., 3. 



IRENE MARIE SEIDERS 

Biology, History 



Halifax, Pa. 



Delphian 



College: Biology Club, 2, 3; W. A. A., 2, 3; May Day, 
1, 2; Hockey, 2; Basketball, 1, 2. Class: Hockey, 1, 2; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3. Society: Warden, 1, 2. 

FRED ELLSWORTH SHADLE Valley View. Pa. 

Chemistry Kalozetean 

College: Band, 1, 2, 3; Symphony, 3; Y. M. C. A., 
V.-Pres., 3. Society: Sergeant-at-Arm.s, 1. 



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152 



Where Lebanon Valley Students 
Get Together 

Pennway Restaurant 

Affiliated with the Pennway Ba\eries 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 



ISABEL VIRGINIA SHATTO Millersburg, Pa. 

Social Science Clionian 

College: W. A. A. Cabinet, 2, 3; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; 
May Day, 1, 2; Wig and Buckle, 2; I. R. C, 3. Class: 
Quittapabilla, 3. 



HARVEY BOWMAN SNYDER Cleona, Pa. 

Biology Pbilokosmian 

College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; "Tovarich," 2; 
Glee Club, 1, 2, 3; Biology Club, 3; Cliemistry Club, 3; 
May Day, 1, 2. Class: Football, 1, 2; Tug-of-War, 1. 
Society: "Pride and Prejudice," 1. 



FRANK LANDIS SHENK 

Business Administration 



Palmyra, Pa. 
Kalozetean 



College: Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3; "Post Road," 1 
"Tovarich," 2; May Day, 1, 2. Class: V.-Pres., 2 
"Mystery at Greenfingers," 3; Quittapabilla, 3. Society 
Sergeant-at-Arms, 1; "R. U. R.," 1; "Mr. Pirn Passes 
By," 2; "The Youngest," 3. 



FREDERICK WILSON SMEE Harrisburg, Pa. 

Business Administration 

College: Men's Day Student Congress, 3; May Day, 
1, 2. Class: President, 2; Football, 2; Basketball, 2; 
Quittapabilla, 3. 



STAUFFER L. SMITH 
Physics 



Annville, Pa. 



MARY ELIZABETH SPANGLER Lebanon, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Symphony Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Girls' Band, 
1, 2, 3; College Orchestra, 1, 2; Glee Club, 3; Wig and 
Buckle, 1, 2; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2, 3. 



DAVID G. SPITTAL 

Englisb 

College: Shenandoah College, 1, 2; Wig and Buckle, 
3; "Dover Road," 3; I. R. C, 3. 



South Fork, Pa. 
Pbilokosmian 



Pbilokosmian 



PAUL W. STOUFFER, JR. New Cumberland, Pa. 

History 

College: Green Blotter, 2, 3; German Club, 3; La 
Vie, 3; International Relations Club, 1, 2. Class: Num- 
eral Fight, 1; Quittapabilla, 3. 



153 



JUNIOR ACTIVITIES 



JEAN L. STRICKHOUSER 

^'ORK New Salem, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3; Chorus, 1, 2, 3; Eclectic 
Club, 2, 3; May Day, 1, 2, 3. Society: Sec, 3. 



THELMA LEONA TRUPE Akron, Pa. 

Music Education Clionian 

College: Girls' Band, 1, 2, 3; Glee Club, 3; Eclectic 
Club, 3; May Day, 1, 2; Chorus, I, 2, 3. 



HIRAM COOK TINDALL Dutch Neck, N. J. 

English Pbilokosmian 

College: W'ooster College, 1, 2; Wig and Buckle, 3; 
"Dover Road," 3. 



EVELYN LEONA WARE 
History 



lARRlSBURG, 



Clionian 



College: International Relations Club, 1, 2, 3; May 
Day, 1, 2; Wig and Buckle, 1, 2, 3. Class: Basketball, 1. 
Society: "Pride and Prejudice," 1. 



FLODA ELLEN TROUT 

English 



WicoNisco, Pa. 



Clionian 



College: Green Blotter, 1, 2, 3; Wig and Buckle, 
1, 2, 3, Sec, 3; "Maker of Dreams," 2; "The Valiant," 
3; Debating, 2, 3; ^^ W. C. A. Cabinet, 2, V.-Pres., 3; 
W. S. G. A. Sec, 3; Biology Assistant, 2; English As- 
sistant, 3. Class: Quiltapabilla. Society: "Pride and 
Prejudice," 1; "Clarence," 2. 



ROBERT EARLE WRIGHT New Holland, Pa. 

Business Administration Kalozetean 

College: Basketball, 3; Freshman Basketball, 2. 
Class: Basketball, 2; Football, 2; Tug-of-War, 2. 

CLINTON DEWITT ZIMMERMAN Penbrook, Pa. 
Creek 
College: Life Work Recruits, 1, 2, 3. 



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Cottiers sprinting £o. 



LEBANON, PA. 



Printing . Binding . Offset 

PUBLICATIONS • SCHOOL ANNUALS 
General Commercial Printing 



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A BOOK INVENTORY 
OF 10,000 VOLUMES 

STATIONERY and SCHOOL SUPPLIES 
628 Cumberland St., Lebanon 



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and 

SUPPLY CO. 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



C. B. GOLLAM & SONS 

Manufacturers of 

Gollam's "SUPREME" Ice Cream 

The Cream of Matchless Merit 

Phone : 2 1 6th and Maple Streets 

LEBANON, PA. 



154 



To the 1942 Editor of 

%\[Z Quittapahilla 

Annuals that have been a credit to your alma 
mater were supervised by your predecessors. 
From the very first number they have endeav' 
ored to foster the ambitions of the graduates, 
and uphold the standards of your institution. 



THE MOUNT PLEASANT PRESS 

(printer of this edition), likewise has high standards to main- 
tain. To this end we place at your service a staff of experi' 
enced designers, supported by capable craftsmen in every 
department of this modern printing establishment. 

Our representative will be pleased to discuss the 1942 edi' 
tion with you. An interview will incur no obligation. Will 
you write us, or telephone for an appointment? 



» 



J. HORACE McFARLAND CO. 

Momt Pleasiant Prcflis! 



Telephone: 6235 



HARRISBURG, PENNA. 



155 



Keeping a promise spoken, we absolve Mr. Dale Fohl, of 
the J. Horace iMcFarland Company, the printers, of any 
possible blame in connection with the late issuance of the 
1941 Quittapahilla. For these many months he has served as 
an additional external conscience, signaling the approach of 
red-letter deadline days in true Jiminy Cricket style. 

Expressing sincerest appreciation, we thank all of the 
many persons who have aided in the production of this 
volume, whether it be in an advisory, technical, or literary 
capacity. 

THE EDITOR 



156 




Winter Scene Along Lovers' Lane 



157