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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

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http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1944leba 




"1 X 7TTH full awareness of the inadequacy of words to describe 
our profound belief in them, we dedicate this page to those 
men of Lebanon Valley College who are now engaged in armed ser- 
vice to their country. In their hands and in the hands of their com- 
rades lies the future of our civilization. With their victory this 
civilization will be preserved for us and for those who shall follow. 
To some of them may come death and pain, but this they suffer 
courageously knowing that their sacrifice will prevent religion and 
democracy from being laid waste by the forces of darkness. We are 
confident that the chords of this immortal music will ultimately 
sound forth in a victorious symphony of joy, and stand as a symbol 
of freedom to all nations. To the men who shall make this possible 
we owe an inexpressible debt of gratitude. May God speed the clay 
when this symphonic symbol shall become our reality. 





Administration 
Building 



Conservatory 
of Music 





College 
Church 



Carnegie 
Library 




Men's 
dormitory 





North 
Hall 






South 
Hall 





£ West Hall 



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"TAR. CLYDE A. LYNCH, president of Lebanon Valley College, this year 
as never before is compelled to take a staunch stand in behalf of the future 
successful continuance of higher education. Lebanon Valley has need of such 
an exact and efficient executive. The best of the College personality is embodied 
in its president who represents a well-rounded leader. Specifically he is a gentle- 
man, a scholar, coordinator of many groups, representative, director, public 
speaker, theologist, psychologist, adviser, host — and friend. 




12 



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MISS MARY E. GILLESPIE'S duties 
are twofold. As supervisor of the Con- 
servatory she directs her activities efficiently. 
As social dean of women and hostess of North 
Hall she is understanding and impartial. Her 
interests are not confined to the halls of the 
Conservatory but reach into the fields of 
opera, travel, and the collection of Hawaiian 

trinkets. A study of poise, dignity, and charm, Miss Gillespie is ever an attractive 
and gracious lady. 

DR. A. H. M. Stonecipher is the epitome of scholarship. Dignity befitting a dean 
and pince-nez becoming a professor characterize this respected gentleman and 
well-versed language tutor. He fills the capacity of personal adviser, able instructor, 
and religious speaker. His patience and playful sense of humor command us to admire 
"Our Dean." 



13 



sponsor 

L/f\mcet5 a.nd LiommLtt^e5 oj\ tne. liocLid <yk I'cu5tee5 

President E. N. Funkhouser 

Vice-President H. H. Baish 

Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
C. A. Lynch, Chairman 
E. N. Funkhouser S. C. Enck W. N. McFaul 

J. H. Ness J. P. Gruyer S. H. Derickson 

H. E. Miller 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
L. A. Sattazahn, Chairman C. A. Lynch, Pres. 

E. N. Funkhouser, Pres. Board of Trustees S. H. Derickson, Treas. 
H. H. Baish, 1942 G. C. Ludwig, 1943 F. B. Plummer, 1944 

J. E. Gibble, 1944 

AUDITING COMMITTEE 
H. E. Schaeffer, Chairman M. R. Fleming J. E. Oliver 

NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
D. E. Young, Chairman C. G. Stambach G. C. Ludwig 

Mrs. Louisa Yardley 

FACULTY COMMITTEE 
H. H. Baish, Chairman C. A. Lynch J. H. Ness 

G. C. Ludwig M. R. Metzger 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS COMMITTEE 
P. B. Gibble, Chairman C. A. Lynch C. W. Hiser 

H. T. Lutz H. H. Shenk Mrs. Louisa Yardley 

LIBRARY AND APPARATUS COMMITTEE 
W. A. Wilt, Chairman C. A. Lynch P. E. V. Shannon 

J. E. Oliver P. A. W. Wallace 

FARM COMMITTEE 
J. E. Gibble, Chairman C. A. Lynch S. H. Derickson 

Albert Watson G. C. Ludwig 

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 
P. A. W. Wallace, Chairman C. A. Lynch M. L. Stokes 

H. T. Lutz Mrs. Louisa Yardley S. O. Grimm 



14 



1 



cui^anJXit 



TO 



A Cherished Friend and Teacher 

Edward P. Rutledge, M.A. 

Lofty in character, sincere in purpose, 

devoted in duty, faithful in service, 

helpful in friendship. 



THIS BOOK IS GRATEFULLY DEDICATED 

BY 

THE CLASS OF 1944 



15 




TCLCuLt 



f 




Dr. L. G. Bailey 

"Here's a case I must tell you 
about!" 



Mrs. Ruth Engle Bender 
"Where's Andrew?" 



Dr. Edward M. Balsbaugh 

The liaison officer between stu- 
dents and employers. 



Dr. Alios H. Black 

L.V.C.'s mathematical philoso- 
pher. 



Joseph Battista 

He has made the "Polka" a 
tradition. 



R. Porter Campbell 

Divides his time between being 
church organist and conservatory 
prof. 



Dr. Andrew Bender 

Chalk talks with original illus- 
trations. 



D. Clark Carmean 

Lives in a little red house flown 
Lovers' Lane. 








17 




-(-in unhcLmLLLCLt tk 



eme. 



President Reynolds G. Marquette 

Vice-President Glenn Zerbe 

Secretary Eleanor J. Frezeman 

Treasurer Phyllis Thumma 



Kathryn Irene Albert 
Grace Vera Bardarik 
Joanne Barbara Bittner 
Elizabeth Louise Bowman 
Verna Catherine Cassatt 
Grace Marie Cully 
Janet Marie Dietz 
Virginia Mae Dromgold 
Eleanor Jean Frezeman 
Jean Marion Gingrich 
Ruth Romaine Glatfelter 
Dorothy Virginia Graybill 
Helen Louise Hartz 
Eleanor Louise Hershey 



Marian Laura Himmelberger 

Edna Mae Hollinger 

Ruth Edith Killian 

Sarah Evelyn Koury 

Ruth Lois Karre 

Edith Alma Kreiser 

Erma May Loy 

Viola Mabel Miller 

L. Christine Mumma 

M. Eloise Parr 

Ruth Elizabeth Reiff 

Mary Jane Rowe 

Helen Louise Sattazahn 

Nancy Margie Sattazahn 



Clare Cecilia Schaeffer 
Helen Mead Seabrook 
Viola Evelyn Shettel 
Phyllis Elaine Snyder 
Sarah Elizabeth Stauffer 
Mary Jean Strock 
Andrea Mary Thompson 
Jean Corinne Thrush 
Phyllis Cary Thumma 
Helen Adelaide Wennerholm 
Mary Jane Wieland 
Francis Eleanor Workman 
Catharine Salome Yeager 



is 



Mark Raphael Arnold 
Dale Rtjssel Beittel 
Leonard Marlin Cohen 
James Francis Devlin 
Albert Patric DiJohnson 
Leroy Wilson Dinger 
Richard Demy Dombach 
Asher Samuel Edelman 
Lloyd Victor Fegan 
Richard Merril Fluss 
Gabriel Bernard Frank 
Marshall L. Gemberling 
Robert Allen Gollam 
Carl Wilhelm Grttber 
Francis Austin Heckman 
Edwin Charles Horstick 
Norman Charles Howells 
Joseph Peter Kania 
William Jonathan Keeler 
Gordon Blair Kemp 



Clyde Young Kramer 

Samuel Fouler Light, Jr. 

Mervin Mages 

Walter Peter Mahoney 

Matthew J. Maley 

James Joseph McGraw 

G. Reynolds Marquette 

Frank Robert Meze 

Leonard Mikionis 

Charles Warren Miller 

Sidney Stanley Miller 

Irvin Orel 

Henry Leonard Poole 

Lincoln F. Ramsey 

Clarence Reed, Jr. 

Wayne Ellsworth Rohland, Jr. 

William Alger Rothrock III 

Charles Stanley Ruhl 

George Peter Rutt 

Kenneth Lowell Sampson 



Thomas James Schaak 
Kenneth Stewart Schappell 
John Henry Shalley 
Chester J. Sherman 
John Roy Sherman 
Frank Shupper 
Erwin Randolph Smarr 
Jerome Bernard Smith 
Arthur William Stambach 
Mason Staub 
Edward Peter Strickler 
George Bobb Wagner 
John William Wagner 
Arthur Arnold Weiss 
James Edward Wert 
Harvey Edward Wolfe 
Walter Glenn Zerbe 
Robert Andrew Zimmerman 
Thomas Multan Zimmerman 



id Inttoclucecl 



19 




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min« teS 



The Athletic Council 



f I THE Athletic Council of Lebanon Valley College was created several 
years ago in answer to a need which was felt to exist for a group to 
determine in just which direction our athletic program should go. At 
present the Council is made up of six members : Dr. Amos Black is head 
of the Council; Dr. G. A. Richie, Secretary; C. G. Dotter, College 
Alumnus, Treasurer; Coach Jerome W. Frock represents the Depart- 
ment of Athletics; and Dr. M. L. Stokes and Professor Frederick K. 
Miller, Faculty Members. 

Since the creation of the Council, athletics at Lebanon Valley have 
taken great strides forward. There is a definite program, there are definite 
men in charge of seeing it carried out, and the entire set-up is most 
satisfactory. Furthermore, the establishment of a Council such as this 
has given to certain men the responsibility for the college's athletic 
program, and they carry it out, without interference or objection. This 
Council has proved invaluable in this respect, for it removes from the 
shoulders of an already over-burdened administration the problems that 
school athletics carry, and at the same time gives those athletics the 
attention they deserve. 



22 



SCHEDULE 

Sept. 26— Lewisburg, Pa. L.V.C. Opp. 

Bucknell University 7 

Oct. 2— Bethlehem, Pa. 

Moravian College 

October 10— New York City 

City College of New York ... 36 

Oct. 17 — Allentown, Pa. 

Muhlenberg College 6 

Oct, 24— Philadelphia, Pa. 

Drexel Institute 19 12 

Nov. 7 — Annville, Pa. 

Juniata College 27 

(Homecoming Game) 

Nov. 14 — Reading, Pa. 

Albright College 13 6 

Nov. 21— Chester, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Military College . . 7 




-fi alatzntlc pLau oh mu5lca.L hotce5 . , . 




23 



The freshmen, with their "Beat Al- 
bright" signs, were not disappointed as 
the Flying Dutchmen climaxed a great 
defensive season with an equally great 
offensive victory over the Red and White 
of Albright, Taming the Lion for the 
second consecutive year, the 1942 Blue 
and White gridiron aggregation turned in 
a most successful season by winning four 
and tying one out of eight games to dupli- 
cate the previous year's percentage. 







1 89 



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DESPITE the fact that the size of the squad made it impossible to even hold scrimmages at practice, the 
Flying Dutchmen fought their way through one of the gamest schedules in recent years. Faced with the 
smallest squad — eighteen — in the athletic history of the school, Coach Frock molded together five upper- 
classmen and seven freshmen into a scrappy, well-organized machine which gave Valley a more-than-successful 
season. The first game saw the inexperienced Blue and White, under the leadership of newly-elected captain 
Matala, put up a terrific defensive battle against the heavy, veteran Bucknell squad, only to lose in the last 
four minutes of play 7-0. Outplaying their opponents in every department, the Dutchmen proved in their 
game with Moravian that they had everything they needed except scoring punch. In spite of the fact that they 
ran circles around the boys from Bethlehem throughout, the game ended in a scoreless tie. The "Iron Men" 
of Lebanon Valley journeyed to the great city to tackle C. C. N. Y. After a slow first half, our boys ran rough- 
shod over their opponents to roll up a 36-0 figure. Fighting every inch of the way, the Valley lost a tough one 
to the highly-touted Muhlenberg Mules by the margin of a touchdown. The Boys in Blue were a bit over- 
confident when they arrived for their game with Drexel, and consequently the half ended 12-0 in favor of the 
Dragons. Revamping themselves, the Dutchmen came back to register a Merriwell finish by scoring a third 
touchdown on a long pass in the final three seconds, to win 19-12. The Homecoming Game with Juniata was 
a run-away affair as L. V. C. scalped the Indian for the "Dads" to the tune of 27-0. The Valleyites then 
humbled their greatest rival, Albright, for the second straight year. The half-time score stood at 6-6, but an 
unforgettable 70-yard sprint by a freshman back put the game in the bag for the Blue and White, and they won 
13-6. Experiencing a noticeable let-down, the Flying Dutchmen closed the season with their poorest showing. 
The P. M. C. cadets downed them 6-0 on a first-half pass. 

Sparked by veteran Wasilewski, the forward wall consisted of such performers as Kania, Devlin. Rotzinger, 
MiKionis, Keeler, Donan, Mahoney, Cornelius, and Tatol, while Matala, Harriger, Maley, Dorazio, Shupper, 
and McGraw alternated at the backfield posts. 



24 





"Jerry" Frock 

HEAD of the department of athletics 
- quietly efficient - lover of the 
game - perfection through thoroughness 
- member of Athletic Council - L. V. 
alumnus - speaks only when spoken to - 
determined - expects good football from 
his boys. 



"Mike" Intrieri 



T INE coach - "Jerry's" assis- 
-*-^ tant - winning smile - popu- 
lar proctor of Men's Dorm - ex-pro 
- head basketball and baseball men- 
tor - advice given freely - a unique 
dialect - trains Navy hopefuls. 



25 




1U3p*t 




Middle: Matt Maley, Miles 
Harriger, Frank Shupper 

Bottom: Eddie Rotzinger, Jim 
Devlin 



Page 27 

Top: Joe Kania, Lennie Mi- 

kionis, Joe Tatol 
Middle: Jim McGraw, Walt 

Mahoney, Marsh Cornelius 
Bottom: Tommy Don an, Henry 

Poole, Dick Dombach 




-fiction Skotd . 



Matala leading some "head-bash- 
ing" interference in that Drexel 
thriller. 




Dorazio running that familiar 
"Frock special" — the off-tackle spin. 



"Cappy" Matala took a pass from 
Shupper to score on this play. 



Just before the battle — the "ret" 
lays down the law. 



28 



McGraw landed head-first opening 
a hole for Nick on this line buck. 



Believe it or not, there's a Flying 
Dutchman under that pile scoring 
six points. 



Forty-two yards were gained by 
Harriger on this punt run-back. 




It looks as though Devlin were 
helping the Indians on this tackle. 



. oh tke. LxcLme. 



29 




-fi iplzlted lection . . . 



MjSlfcftf 



U » f* > 



THE problem of keeping up the spirit on 
the home front, while the boys fought all 
but one of their battles on foreign fields, was 
solved by the cheerleaders, who were given 
much assistance by the "German Band." 
Rousing pep meetings, bonfires, snake dances, 
parades — all helped in making this year's foot- 
ball season a success from all angles. Those 
"rip-roaring," "vaudeville-ish," Friday morn- 
ing chapel sessions, which aided the school 
morale as a whole, were the result of the efforts 
of cheerleaders Harry Miller. George Stine, 
Kenneth Gerhart, and Oscar Sevier, and the 
"German Band" — Paul Fisher, trumpet; Carl 
Derr, baritone; Carroll Reed, tuba; James 
Bachman, trombone; Clayton Hollinger, horn. 





nHHE Archery Club is one of the youngest organ- 
izations on campus, as it came into being within 
the last four years. The club is composed of individ- 
uals who have made archery their major sport; it 
provides instruction for novices as well as competi- 
tion for experienced toxophilites. The activities of 
the club include both matches between club members 
and matches with other schools. The teams that 
compete with other schools are chosen from the high 
scorers in the intra-club tournaments. 



I ke. v2L7iLca.to oh tke. tzttowl . . . 



31 





"I ^ THEN sports-minded girls come back 
* * to College in the fall the first thing 
they think of is Hockey. This year an un- 
usually large number of under-class girls 
participated in this sport. Because of the 
large number interested, two teams were 
formed. One was composed of freshmen, and 
the other was an upper-class team. Quite a 
few games were played between them. On 
Homecoming morning the Frosh played a 
fighting game with the upper-classmen, but 
lost, 5-2. 

The climax of the Hockey season came 
when Lebanon Valley entertained Shippens- 
burg and Susquehanna at a Hockey Play 
Day. Four games were played. In the fore- 
noon the Honor Squad defeated the Frosh 



/ne 5ound on a. . . . 



32 





fjewLnLne. 



Utile- 



cz 



y 



from L. V., 3-0. Shippensburg then de- 
feated Susquehanna, 2—1. In the afternoon 
Shippensburg won first place in the day's 
events by defeating L. V.'s Honor Squad, 
2-1 . L. V. Frosh went down to defeat again, 
this time at the hands of Susquehanna, 2-0. 
After light refreshments were served at the 
field, the two visiting teams headed home. 

Transportation limited the activities of 
the Hockey squad this year; so intramural 
Hockey was popular on the campus. The 
freshmen deserve a lot of credit for develop- 
ing such a good team, so as to make the 
intramural games lively and interesting. The 
prospect for next year is very bright. Let's 
hope that more intercollegiate games can be 
played by that time. 



i|.<M 




33 




I j 



J L U 






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JIGGER BOARD 

Margaretta Carey 
President 

Genevieve Stansfield 
Vice-President 

Ruth Haverstock 

Secretary 

Dorothy Jean Light 
Treasurer 









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-find now a. m(Lje5tlc 5tza.ln, dumbolhlna Law 



ON THE campus the scales of justice are held in the collective hands of four cooperative organi- 
zations whose duties are to enforce the rules and to mete out punishments both major and 
minor to those who overstep the limits of their prerogatives. The Women's Commuters' Council, 
the Women's Student Government Association or "Jigger Board," the Men's Day Student Congress, 
and the Men's Senate are all elected by and hold jurisdiction over the groups of persons that their 
names signify. In addition to their judicial capacity the governing bodies also function as the spon- 
sors of a student program that will knit the men and women of Lebanon Valley into a harmonious 
recreational group. The Student Faculty Council aids in this latter task as well as handling their 
own specific duties of preserving understanding between faculty and students and discussing campus 
problems and improvements with the proper authorities. 




MEN'S SENATE 

Walter Ebersole 
President 

Lloyd Crall 
Vice-President 

Charles Newbaker 
Secretary 



34 



WOMEN'S COMMUTERS' 
COUNCIL 

Louise Keller 
President 

Katheeine J. Sheek 
Vice-President 

MAEJOEIE FfiANTZ 

Secretary 

Maey Ellen Klopp 
Treasurer 



<zn 



dotdt 



et 



MEN'S DAY STUDENT 
CONGRESS 

Feanklin Patschke 
President 

Cyril Little 
Vice-President 

Sidney Bashoee 
Secretary-Treasurer 



STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL 

Dennis Sheer 
President 

Donald Baetley 
Vice-President 

Louise Kellee 
Secretary 



35 





(yen/ note5 u/inq tndt wcll/ . 



FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Jean Daugherty President Janet Schopf 

Barbara Converse Vice-President Jo Marie Shannon 

Dorothy Cox Secretary Dorothy Cox 

Ruth Haverstock Treasurer Ruth Haverstock 

Anniversary President Emma Catherine Dunkle 



"1 A 7"HEN first organized in 1871, the Clionian Literary Society, second oldest society on campus, 
* * functioned chiefly as a literary club. Gradually it has discarded its literary tendencies until 
at present it is taking an active part in the social life on campus. Dances in the gym, joint sessions 
with the other societies, hikes, and teas are sponsored by Clio as rushing activities to welcome the 
freshmen girls. Along with the social atmosphere, 
Clio maintains the fine old traditions of Minerva 
and the Owl, her symbolic patronesses. The most 
important Clionian event of the college year is the 
anniversary celebration with a formal dance. This 
year, on January 2, Clio celebrated her seventy- 
second anniversary with a formal dance held at the 
Lebanon Country Club. Every year the Society 
joins Philo in presenting a play. 



36 





DELPHIAN Literary Society, the "baby" of the 
campus societies, has, through the course of 
sixteen years, changed its purpose. It now functions 
as a social organization. It welcomed prospective 
members last fall with a Dutch hike, with traditional 
ceremonies on the banks of the Quittapahilla. The 
annual joint session with Kalo, brother society, was 
held, and a delightfully different tea, following a 
patriotic theme, was given. Rushing season cul- 
minated in an initiation of the pledged members. On 
February 6, old and new members and guests cele- 
brated Delphian's sixteenth anniversary with a dance 
at Annville's Green Terrace. On March 19, Kalo- 
Delphian play was presented. 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Eleanor Witmeyep. ... ... . President . . . 

Jane Geubep. Vice-President 



SECOND SEMESTER 
.... Martha Wilt 
. . Kathryn Deibler 



Mary Eiizabeth Moyer Secretary Vera Shoop 

Jane Klucker Treasurer Jane Klucker 

Anniversary President Mary Elizabeth Grube 



. . . tktouak the mu5ica 



'.ca.Lv2a.Uetn 



87 




OFFICERS 

President 

George Wilkialis 
John Talnack 

Vice-President 
Warren Silliman 
Miles Harriger 

Secretary 
Ned Miller 
Robert Zimmerman 

Treasurer 

Robert Kern 
Glenn Zerbe 

Chaplain 

Oscar Seyler 

Sergea nts-at-arms 
Richard Dombach 
Joseph Kania 
William Keeler 




T7' ALO was the second literary society to be organized for men on campus. This socially 
progressive group has followed the modern trends of college societies. They strive for the 
promotion of fraternity, companionship, and friendliness. Kalo has always taken a very active 
part in campus social life. Through joint society sessions, smokers, the play, and the Anniver- 
sary Dinner Dance, this society exhibits the spirit of "jolly good fellows." 



Mdodied <zn<£ memotlel 




38 




,//< 



oiteLu evening! 



rilHE oldest organization on the campus, Philokosmian Literary Society, continues in its seventy- 
sixth .year to maintain its high place among the leading groups of Lebanon Valley College. Philo, 
during all its years of existence, has recognized the value of friendship, good-will, and cooperation, 
and has realized that the social development is as essential as the intellectual development in the 
molding of a well-rounded life. Through joint sessions and periodic meetings Philokosmian promotes 
such a feeling of good-will. Through its activities, it aids its members to get along in the best way 
with their fellow men. 




OFFICERS 

President 

Dennis Sherk 

Walter Ebersole 
Vice-President 

Herman Fritsche 

Jacob Rhodes 
Secretary 

Paul Fisher 

Howard Neidig 
Treasurer 

Harry Miller 
Executive Chairman 

Howard Neidig 

Charles McConnell 
Sergeants-at-A rms 

Robert Beck 

Richard Stine 

George Rutt 

Asher Edleman 



39 



rkcult 



y 




Alexander Crawford 

Majors in voice with a minor in 
medicine. 



Virginia Darnell 

The students set their watches 
regularly when she makes her ap- 
pearance each morning at 7:20. 



Dr. Samuel H. Derickson 

Your interests are always cer- 
tain to be his interests. 



W. Merl Freeland 

Now all the soldiers are enjoy- 
ing "Turkey in the Straw." 



Mrs. Mary C. Green 

The gracious lady of May Day. 



Dr. Samuel O. Grimm 

The gatekeeper between college 
and the armed service. 



Esther Henderson 

Recently initiated into dormi- 
tory life at L.V.C. 



Dr. Lena L. Lietzau 

Delights classes with tales of her 
adventures abroad. 





41 




%£tk 



erne 



FIRST SEMESTER 
Harry Allen Wohlrab 
Lloyd James Housel . . 
Lizzette P. Fisher . . . 
Anna Adams 



SECOND SEMESTER 

President Lloyd James Housel 

Vice-President . . Gerald D. Kauffman 

Secretary Miriam Lyter Jones 

Treasurer Anna Adams 



Anna Adams 

Katherine Helen Allen 
Etta Mae Ayers 
Patricia Marie Bartels 
Sarah Rosalie Blauch 
Alma Ruth Brandt 
Mary Jane Brown 
Janet Rosaltha Coover 
Berenice Louise Corbalis 
Eris June Day 
Elizabeth Ehrengart 
Lizzette Prempert Fisher 
Marjorie Louise Frantz 
Elizabeth Anna Gooden 



Evelyn Catherine Hiester 
Doris Hope Hoffman 
Maeredith La Verne Houser 
Geraldine Rider Hltss 
Miriam Lyter Jones 
Norma Viola Kiscadden 
Johann Louise Klick 
Nancy Bomberger Kreider 
Marian Elizabeth Leininger 
Martha Elva Light 
Caroline Elizabeth Matter 
Sara Ellen McGeehin 
Madeline M. Meiley 
Mary Elizabeth Miller 



Charlotte K. Mohler 
Dorothy Elizabeth Moyer 
Sarah Skidmore Porter 
Yvonne Lorraine Raab 
Frances Rosalie Reinhold 
Mary Jane Rowe 
Grace Eleanor Spangler 
Doris Jean Sterner 
Virginia Irene Stonecipher 
Marian Elenore Ulmer 
Jeanne Arlene Waller 
Marie Laona Werner 
Eleanor Virginia Zeigler 
Esther Marie Zimmerman 



42 



Russel John Aurentz 
Milton Werner Baker 
Robert Franklin Beck 
James Stanton Brulatour 
A. Alfred Delduco 
John A. Detweiler 
Wayne Clifford Fenstermacher 
Joseph Michael Fiorello 
James Edward Flinchbaugh 
Edward George Granger 
Mahlon A. Groff 
Miles Duane Harriger 
Bruce Elwood Herb 
John Wesley Horn 



Elmer Hobert Horst 
Lloyd James Housel 
Gerald Donald Kauffman 
Brian Herbert Kintzer 
John Henry Light 
Paul Lipsitz 
William John Lloyd 
Matthew Joseph Maley 
Earl S. Raby 

Frank Lewis Reinhold, Jr. 
Donald Detweiler Rettew 
Luther Eyler Robinson 
William Edward Rumpf 



John Walter Schreiber 
Oscar Winfield Seyler 
Paul 0. Shettel, Jr. 
Donald Edgar Smyser 
Cawley Richard Stine 
Robert Douglas Streepy 
John W. Swanger 
Anthony Francis Wallace 
Herman J. Weiser 
Jack David Wiessman 
Edward Donald Withers 
Harry Allen Wohlrab 
John Balthaser Yoder 



L 



ecornel mote namLLLCLt 



LLU 



43 




?/f * J*****A* 





Ike. notn5 hLing out a. 5ummon5 



28— 



Date 
January 5 
January 9 
January 14 
January 18 
January 23 
January 
January 30- 
February 3- 
February 6- 
February 10- 

February 17- 
February 20- 
February 25- 
March 3- 

March 6- 



THE SEASONS RECORD 

L. V. C. Opp. 

Indiantown Gap Medical Detachment at Indiantown 28 24 

Gettysburg at Gettysburg 36 46 

Indiantown Gap Post Team at Annville 58 47 

Bucknell at Annville 37 44 

Lafayette at Easton 46 57 

Dickinson at Carlisle 48 45 

Gettysburg at Annville 44 43 

F and M at Annville 45 41 

Lehigh at Annville 60 41 

Bucknell at Lewisburg 44 43 

Extra Period 

Muhlenberg at Annville 56 67 

Albright at Reading 48 75 

F and M at Lancaster 49 47 

Albright at Annville 52 65 

Muhlenberg at Allentown 54 78 

704 762 



46 



TT^OR the first time in five 
years Lebanon Valley court 
hopes were flying high only to 
meet disaster in mid-season by a 
death-dealing blow struck by 
Uncle Sam. However, it was not 
unexpected and the Dutchmen 
were fortunate to fly their banner 
as long as they did. Before the 
blow was dealt the team was able 
to garner seven of their eight wins, 
thus being able to finish on the 
top side of the 500 mark. 



. . to action 





The Dutchmen got off to a good 
start by squeezing out a win over 
the Indiantown Gap Military 
Doctors, then dropped a close 
and heartbreaking game to the 
Gettysburg College Bullets. They 
rebounded into the win column 
by scoring a "fourth quarter" 
win over the Gap Post Team, 
then met with two straight de- 
feats at the hands of Bucknell and 
Lafayette. The Dutchmen then 
struck back with all their fury 
and scored five straight wins over 

47 




hapless Diplomats of Franklin 
and Marshall. They dropped 
four of their last five contests. 

As the curtain fell the Dutch- 
men ended with the best basket- 
ball record of the last five years 
with eight wins and seven losses. 

Faced with rebuilding an en- 
tire squad at the beginning of the 
season, with only three veterans 
back from the previous year's 
squad, "Bill" Gollam, "PeeWee" 
Miller, and Harry Matala, Coach 



Dickinson, Gettysburg, F and M, 
Lehigh, and Bucknell, to ring up 
the longest winning streak by a 
Valley team in many years. The 
streak came to a halt as the core 
of the well-rounded court team 
was called to the service and on 
the very next game met with a 
stubborn Muhlenberg Mule that 
ruined the brilliant victory train 
of the Dutchmen. After the Muh- 
lenberg game the only team that 
they were able to defeat was the 




Intrieri welded together an all- 
frosh quintet. 

The team lined up with Frank 
Shupper and "Ussie" Miller on 
the forward line, "Marsh" Gem- 
berling in the pivot, and "Jimmy" 
Devlin and "Rinso" Marquette 
in the backcourt. The draft 
caught Gemberling and Mar- 
quette from the starting five, 
along with Matala. The latter 
part of the season found the re- 
vamped Dutchmen composed of 
Harriger and C. W. Miller in the 





front court, Gollam or Neidig in 
the pivot, and the guard positions 
held by Devlin and Shupper or 
C. R. Miller. 

Shupper and "Ussie" Miller 
led the team in scoring with 175 
and 129 points respectively, and 
wouldhavebeen aided by"Marsh" 
Gemberling who had collected 
111 points before being called to 
active duty. The team as a unit 
scored 704 points for the season 
against 762 points scored by 
their opponents. 

49 




-fin CLnlmcLted lection 



f I iHE girls' basketball honor squad had a 
most successful season this year. All the 
games were won except the next to the last one 
which was tied with Elizabethtown. The sea- 
son opened by defeating Lebanon High School, 
40-33, in the Annville gymnasium. This 
proved to be a fine opening battle for the team 
in preparation for the big game with Albright 
the following week. Defeating Albright proved 
to be no easy task, but the girls came through 
winning, 26-24. Elizabethtown College and 
L. V. girls have developed a friendly rivalry, 
but E-town has usually been out on top. This 
year the home girls defeated them, 23-22, in 



50 




. . . dellahtl tke. 5en5e5 





the first game and tied them, 37-37, in the 
second game. 

The biggest sports event of the season was a 
trip to Shippensburg over one week-end. 
Girls engaged in other activities besides basket- 
ball and came home victorious in them all. 

Possibly the outstanding players of the sea- 
son were: Stonecipher, Moyer, Bittner, and 
Witmeyer. Johns, Witmeyer, and Wilt played 
their last game of basketball for L. V. at Ship- 
pensburg, but the prospects for next year look 
fine with a veteran forward group to step in and 
lead the way. 



51 




-fin exalted theme 5 endl 



PRESENTING a program of social, physical, moral, and spiritual value, the 
Y.W.C.A. exists for each woman student. The work of the organization begins 
when the Y.W.C.A. cabinet meets with the Y.M.C.A. in a retreat which is usually 
held at Mt. Gretna. Here the groups work and play together, planning the program 
for the new year. As the freshmen make their appearance on the campus, the "Y's" 
are prepared to direct and assist. Weekly Quiet Hour and Friendly Hour services 
give the student an opportunity to participate in religious services. Heart-Sister 
Week and Mothers' Week-end are activities strictly for the women. This year the 

Y.W.C.A., under the leadership 
of Marian C. Kreider, organized 
Red Cross work on the campus. 
The varied program aims to in- 
clude every woman student. 




52 




out & ckcdUnqe. to 5etvlce. 



TYPICAL of the spirit on campus is the Y.M.C.A., for it is everyone's organiza- 
tion. It is the "Y" that rescues new students from their loneliness with Fresh- 
man Week, and it is the "Y" that enlivens dull week-ends with parties, hikes, and 
dances. Dads like to see the boys at "home," so a Dad's Day is sponsored. Weekly 
Quiet Hour and Vesper Services are responsibilities of the "Y's." A yearly week-end 
jaunt in the fall to the seclusion of Mt. Gretna provides the cabinet an opportunity 
to get acquainted and to plan for the coming school year. President Donald Bartley 
graduated at the end of the first semester and was succeeded by Lloyd Crall. 



53 




THE students of the college who are 
biology majors or those who have an 
interest in the biological sciences find an 
opportunity to acquire and distribute in- 
formation about this field in the Biology 
Club. Each member of the club is ex- 
pected to choose at least one project a 
year for his individual study. When this 
project is completed it is presented to the 
club at one of the regular monthly meet- 
ings. The topics presented and also those 
which are not adaptable to lecture demon- 
strations are printed in the monthly pub- 
lication of the club. The club adviser is 
Dr. Derickson and the presidents this 
year were John Hampton and Theodore 
Bachman. 




S-szofjound. V2a.55a.ae5 demanding 




:a 




T N ORDER to express and further their 
■*• interest in science, the members of the 
Chemistry Club meet monthly. These 
regular meetings include many features. 
Generally there is a review of the latest 
developments in chemistry. Reports on 
the lives of great chemists and presenta- 
tions of special topics are given by club 
members. Guest speakers and motion pic- 
tures add variety, as do the occasional 
short talks by Dr. Bender and Dr. Porter. 
The popular field trips were curtailed this 
year. The president of the club was Leroy 
Yeatts, Jr. 



. . . intelliaent a.na.Lu5L5 



55 





(lcllm and letioul toned on eondectatlon 



1IFE Work Recruits maintains its place with the other organizations on campus in promoting a 
_i well-rounded sphere of activities. Religious life is the central theme. The purpose is fellowship 
among and development of apt and capable Christian leaders. Ministerial and missionary students 
and others who aspire to enjoy the best of Christian companionship and to serve their fellow men 
through the medium of religion comprise its membership which totals thirty-three. Activities 
necessarily were somewhat curtailed this season, but with a sincere feeling that religion must main- 
tain its equilibrium irrespective of conditions, L. W. R. sponsored deputation teams to various 
churches. These serve a definite advertising mission for the college and also provide fine opportuni- 
ties for student training in arranging and conducting worship services. The regular programs and 
activities were very ably arranged and guided by President, Lloyd Crall; Vice-President, Lloyd 
Housel; Secretary-Treasurer, Martha Crone; and Deputation Chairman, Gerald Kauffman. 



56 





-fj dbtuwlna 5ectlon delttoul commtzcencu . . . 



THE International Relations Club is a student organization which aims to keep its members well 
informed on the current history of international affairs. The main topics for discussion this year 
concerned various phases and personalities of the war, our relationships with other nations at war, 
national conditions, and the post-war world. Book reports on topics such as these are a vital part of 
every meeting. Recently club membership has been restricted to twelve students and the Club ad- 
viser, Professor Frederick Miller. Every member participates in the meetings, either in open dis- 
cussion, original talks, or reports. Several times this year the group met at homes of the members. 
Franklin Patschke is the President of the Club. 




57 




/riicn and va.ued < 



ex.v2te55i.on 



X.V2 



171 VERY other week for most of the past year an announcement of a Green Blotter Club meeting 
■"-- * has appeared on the bulletin board. Each notice brought an encouraging response, as a good part 
of this Club's small, select membership moved in on Dr. Struble's cozy fireside. Throughout the year 
a variety of literary forms were presented and criticized — free verse, rhymed metres, short stories, 
sketches, and essays. Each manuscript was carefully discussed, giving the author the full benefit of 
the opinions of the other members. R. Howard Paine was Head Scop and Genevieve Stansfield was 
Keeper of the Word Horde. 



58 





L/t<ZfncLtLe eLoczuence. . 



THE Wig and Buckle Club, organized under the auspices of the English Department, is Lebanon 
Valley's means of furthering the development of dramatics on campus. Membership in the Club 
is divided into three classifications: cub, general, and letter. Cub members are those whose applica- 
tions have been accepted but who have done nothing notable in the field of dramatics; the general 
members are those who have taken a major role in some production, assisted in staging or costuming, 
or aided the production in any worth-while way; letter membership is the classification which in- 
cludes the most experienced dramatists who have made some outstanding contribution to produc- 
tions either on the boards or backstage. 

This year the Wig and Buckle Club chose for its annual three-act production the brilliant Kauff- 
man and Hart work entitled The Man Who Came to Dinner, recently produced on Broadway as 
well as on the screen. The one-act play, The Boy Comes Home, by A. A. Milne was enacted on 
Homecoming Day. Dr. George G. St ruble acts as faculty adviser for the Club and as director of the 
Club's productions. 



59 





SptztKLLna wit 



60 




with a tlnae. oh qoo<£-ncLtutecl buhhoonetu 



THE Wig and Buckle Club opened the 1942-43 dramatic season at L. V. C. with the Kauffman- 
Hart comedy, Tine, Man Who Came to Dinner, starring the Wig and Buckle President, Den- 
nis Sherk. The presentation of The, Man Who Came to Dinner came appropriately as a tribute to 
the late Alexander Woollcott after whom the leading character, Sheridan Whiteside, was patterned. 
Mr. Woollcott died a week before the L. V. C. Thespians presented their season's opener. 

Special mention is in order for the director, Dr. George G. Struble, not only for his excellent work 
as a producer, but also for his magnificent program notes which were especially designed in memory 
of Mr. Woollcott. 

The play itself, an adventure in which a mixture of farce, melodrama, and satire kept the audience 
in perpetual good humor, was unusually well handled by the supporting cast as well as by the lead- 
ing man. 



61 





J-iism 



y 



5cene5 ate 5v2tecL 



)V2\ 



■/. 



f I ^HE Kalo-Delphian contribution to a successful Kalo 
Anniversary week-end was a four-act mystery comedy 
entitled Grumpy. Grumpy, a well-to-do man with eccentric 
tendencies, was delightfully portrayed by Oscar Seyler. He 
was ably co-starred with JaneGruberin the role of Virginia, 
Grumpy 's granddaughter. 

Grumpy, directed by Mrs. Paul Billet and Dr. George G. 
Struble, was a tasty evening's entertainment — just the 
thing to relax the sufferers of wartime nerves. It was light. 
It was funny. It hit the spot. 



62 



T N MAY, 1942, Philo and Clio united to bring Sidney 
Howard's The Late Christopher Bean to the Valley 
boards as a part of Philo's annual Anniversary week-end 
celebration. Louise Keller appeared in the role of Abby, 
whose only joy in life was her undying faith in the great- 
ness of The Late Christopher Bean, an almost obscure New 
England painter. Orchids for her magnificence. 

Oscars also to the veterans Sherk and Brulatour for their 
living performances. However, the supporting cast is not 
to be slighted, for they, too, added vigor and deliberation to 
the production. 



UV2(. 



tk 



uyion ike. mu5lc<zl ca.nva.5 



l 




63 



I ke. (yedtlna tkutnm oh . 



"ALLAMEN, allamen, allamen potash-ka, 
■^ ish-kity Boom Boom, Ethyl bethyl, 
Russia Prussia, Spunyah!" — the Band's 
own yell! Oh, yes, their formal name is 
Lebanon Valley College Boys' Band — a 
rootin' tootin' gang that can outcheer every- 
body else at our football games. Snappier 
drills can't be found anywhere. They are a 
neat-looking outfit in their blue-and-white 
uniforms. Musical performance? Super de 
luxe, definitely! At rehearsals they all work 
furiously — to the point where coats and ties 
come off and Prof's baton suffers physical in- 
juries! That's why they're so good. Some of 
our boys have left recently to help Uncle 
Sam — but an invincible Band remains! 





64 





T EBANON Valley College Girls' Band— 
snappily attired tooters in their blue- 
and-white uniforms. They always make a 
big hit when they appear at football games 
with the Boys' Band. An independent or- 
ganization, they appear sometimes at girls' 
athletic contests, and on chapel programs a 
few times throughout the year. They can 
march — they can drill — they can play — and 
in general they can put things across with a 
bang! Their only deficiency lies in the fact 
that they must wear ties — and here the 
Boys' Band steps in! They are a fine group 
of musicians and enjoy working hard for 
Prof. Rutledge — seven-thirty in the morning- 
preferred!!!! 



tne d.tum.5 Lnttoa.uce5 a. mcztek 



65 



ike. luqqeltion ok <z enotCLLe. . . • 



T^ORTY-TWO voices under the baton of 

Professor Rutledge hard work brings 

high standards consequently, L. V. boasts 

one of the finest choral societies of the East 

— no gas, no tour but the Glee Club 

Gremlins came through on Valentine's Day 

then Uncle Sam stepped in now it's 

"E.P. and his all girl choir" they made 

their debut at the annual Music Festival 

their schedule included other engagements 
in neighboring towns and at the Bacca- 
laureate Service good luck to these 

songsters! 





66 



mnL>hmhb9MH 



maBBIBtmMmmammaax 





fTTOPS in L. V. C.'s instrumental groups 

you must be good to get in 

long hours of hard work find reward in the 
annual spring concert repertoire in- 
cludes serious and light classical composi- 
tions highlight of the year was the trip 

to Harrisburg to hear the Philadelphia 

Symphony its success is due largely to 

the able conducting of Professor Rutledge. 



Ike. ma.je5tu oh tke hull otckelttz . 



67 



-fk 



e. ex.y2te55l<jn 



• • • 




Tympani 
Margaretta Carey 



'Cello 

Jessie Robertson 




Clarinet 

Walter Ebersole 



Piano 

Hazel Fornoff 



. . . ok tLttbtic 3 kill 




Conducting 
Paul Fisher 



Trombone 
James Bachman 




Piano 

Miriam Carper 



Trumpet 
Reynolds Marquette 



Organ 

Jeanne Waller 



69 



TtZCU.Lt 



■9 




Dr. V. Earl Light 

'"Spring is here, the grass is riz, 
I wonder where the flowers is." 




Helen Ethel Myers 

Latest interest is the famous 
Heilman collection. 



Harold Malsh 

Journeys twice a week from 
Harrisburg to give violin lessons. 



Dr. Jermain D. Porter 

Exterminator of L.V.C.'s book- 



Ralph M. McGrath 

Analyst of international affairs 
and expounder of psychological 
principles. 



Dr. G. A. Richie 

Preacher, professor, Sunday- 
School teacher and L.V.C. sports 
enthusiast. 



Frederick K. Miller 

Model-railroad engineer and 
hopeful Victory gardener. 



Frederick Schweppe 

A newcomer with great operatic 
ambitions and a definite talent for 
dramatics. 





& o"" 



,A If* 



71 



*•** 







JONES ROSS ALBERT 

Conserve's prize bass - artistic inclinations - chocolate 
marshmallow - "Br-r-sk!" - skilled in good-byes - sud- 
denly developed an amazing English accent. 



RICHARD IRA BACASTOW 

Glamour boy - sprouting wings - lawyer-to-be - likable 
personality - pulse-quickening smile - competes with a 
Marine and an Ensign for a blonde. 



JAMES SMITH BACHMAN 

"Geranium" - 3 a.m. steaks - chief air-raid warden - 
sled addict - understanding and likable - Army's gain, 
our loss - off-campus crush. 






Hunlot (jlLo.66 . . . 



72 





. . HunLot (iLcl56 



THEODORE BRANDT BAGHMAN 

Bachman's dream: Thrush, a pipe, and "La Mer" - Navy 
sawbones - nature lover - future Dr. Cronin - better 
known as "Aunt Mary." 



BETTY VIRGINIA BARTELS 

Midget math minor - ballerina on skates - Hershey 
Junior College fan - library assistant - enjoys rapid con- 
versation - busy little blonde. 



SIDNEY MILNE BASHORE 

Chem assistant - motorcycle mechanic 
own) - M.D. -to-be - delusions of 
good man!" - sympathetic pal. 



(he builds his 
Delilah - "He's a 





73 








SAMUEL HOWER BEAMESDERFER 

Music critic - student of human nature - well-read - 
"No, I'll have to disagree with you on that" - fine con- 
versationalist - allergic to red. 



ALFRED LEONARD BLESSING 

What a line! - dapper - waltz-king - cross-examiner - 
pride of the Air Corps - flash - Bethlehem Steel graduate. 



BETTY JUNE BOMGARDNER 

Organ and violin devotee - contender for "best-dressed" 
title - a taste for ice-cream - watch those dimples. 



HunLot LiLa.65 . . 







V 




. . . HunLot 6llcl65 



NORMAN MARTIN BOUDER, JR. 

Test-tube Tarzan - Baltimore's own - Harry James' 
rival - "Beep! Beep! I'm a jeep!" - weekly elopements 
- that striped sweater. 



JOHN EDWARD CARBAUGH, JR. 

Senator - saxophone swingster - intramural high-scorer 
- excellent raconteur - embryo ensign - fun-loving Le- 
moyne lover — cueball - Hale's the nurse. 



MIRIAM NAOMI CARPER 

"Mim" - proficient pianist - conscientious student - 
travels from Palmyra - "Ken" - brisk personality - ac- 
celerated course - dark eyes - versatile musician. 





75 








GENE UDELLE COHEN 

Stick-spinner - good student - corkscrew kinks - week- 
ends at Penn State - fast talker - "Did I tell you the one 
about . . . ?" 



BARBARA ELIZABETH CONVERSE 

Pythagorean pursuer - Mandle Converse-ationalist - neat 
with a needle - New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and 
ports south - wanders like a thought - sophisticate. 



DOROTHY MAY COX 

Conscientious accelerated student - congenial - definite 
interest in medicine - trim - Battista's pupil - intelli- 
gent - quiet and ladylike. 



puniest 6llcl66 . • . 



76 






IP^H mm 


^? 


^^t^^k. 


!i 





. . . Hunlot (lL(Z55 



JOHN SHENK CURRY 

Junior Morgenthau - Hershey dribbler - slip-horn spe- 
definite executive ability - a gentle- 



cialist 
man 



orderly 

tennis expert 



prom-leader - ping-pong whiz. 



CARL LEINBACH DERR 

Baritonist de-luxe - "Banjo" - a "real" card-player - 
advocate of "Reading has everything" - lover - military 
musician - a "painter." 



ROBERT JOHN DONOUGH 

Harvard Supply School aspirant - our color-blind banker 
- Mt. Holyoke week-ends - Block-Busters' long-shot ar- 
tist - cashier at I.G.M.R. 




77 




t*V 



-v 



* — ■■..*. ii 4 



««•* ** 






NICOLA ANGELO DORAZIO 

Business ad-dict - a diamond in the rough - pigskin 
punter, horsehide hitter, and cowhide courtster - the guy 
for Gen. 



GEORGE ERVIN EDWARDS, JR. 

"Chick" - Annville sportsman - third in a line of chem- 
ists - soda-jerker - keeper of the hot-corner - Navy 
hopeful. 



PAUL GOTTSHALL FISHER 

"Sniff" - typical Senator - symphonist - witty wit - 
slaps the bass - quick blush - tutor, tooter - on the 
Dean's list, as usual. 



QunLOt LLLCL56 . . . 



78 





. . . Hunlot (2.LCL56 



HAZEL JANE FORNOFF 

Pianistic expressionist - vertex of the murder triangle 
poised - accompanies Marvin - charming appearance 
artistic temperament, but not temperamental. 



LELAND STANFORD FOX 

Ardent scientist - possessor of subtle humor - wheel-cog 
of Hershey Community Theatre - dependable - ten- 
dency toward basketball - unassuming intelligence. 



JEAN LOUISE GARLAND 

Ingenue - mellifluous voice - graceful - magazine Mad- 




emoiselle - harbors the harbinger of spring; 
(Robin, of course). 



in her heart 





79 






KENNETH RAYMOND GERHART 

Poetic discussions on chemistry - feather-weight title- 
holder - ballroom sharpie - flashy dresser - judge of 
feminine beauty - an Erskine Hawkins fan. 




RUTH JANET GRAYBILL 

Chem kid - Annapolis commuter - knit one, talk two - 
a dabbler in oils - lengthy week-ends - a cover-to-cover 
girl. 



MARY ELIZABETH GRUBE 
History majorette - I.R.C.-er - "Betty" 



Hall key - neat and agreeable 
phian's anniversary president. 



keeper of South 
campus belle - Del- 



Huniot L1LCL66 . o . 



so 





. . . Huniot (jlUm 



CHARLOTTE EUGENIA HARNISH 

Hi there! - Baltimore babbler - blood-donor - botanist 
- admirer of dogdom - burns the midnight oil - distin- 
guishes between "mice and men." 




RUTH EMILY HAVERSTOCK 

Personality smile - profs' pride - Miss Gillespie's assis- 
tant - knit-wit - Bob's little helper - quiz kid - big- 
city girl. 



ELIZABETH ANN HESS 

New addition to North Hall - Deanna Durbin voice - 
specializes in a correspondence course - quiet, but lots of 
fun - glistening, black tresses - Hans-ome. 





f&* 



'^^\ 



81 






•Her* 






RICHARD JAMES HOERNER 

Commandos' captain - 500-shark - grocer - tricky eyes 
and wavy hair - day-student "axe" king - our male math 
wizard. 



CLAYTON ELIAS HOLLINGER, JR. 

"Red" - perfecter of bird-calls - Navy airman - any- 
thing for a laugh - "Claytonia" - there's a devilish glint 
in his eye! 



EDGAR JOSEPH JIRAS 

Staunch defender of the Jirean principles of chemistry - 
over-cut kid - enviable reputation as a swimmer - 
"Where's Sid?" - strives for form in tennis. 



Qunlot (2Hcl66 . . . 



82 





unLOl LlLa.55 



<2L 



EMIL ROBERT KERN 

Medical aspirations - inhabitant of Dreamland - quip- 
ster — nice fishing for Trout-man! - little-boy grin - 
summer painter - strong, silent man. 



MARIAN MARK KREIDER 

"Golly Ned" - home-town girl - editor - reserved — 
Jack of all trades - pretty little farmerette - permanent 
position on Dean's List - future medico. 



ELIZABETH AMY KREISER 

Lives in the lab - newcomer to South Hall - keeps Stein 
in the dark - Ono accent - Honor-Roll resident. 





83 



"L \ 





DOROTHY HOPE LANDIS 

Shy, little girl - First Lady of Myerstown - Chevy- 
shover - Jill-of-all-trades in the conserve - "Dodie." 



DOROTHY JEAN LIGHT 

Admirable actress - maid of honor - major in Ralph, 
minor in English - daily letter-writer - well-dressed - 
sincere. 



ELIZABETH JEAN LIGHT 

"Hon" - biology butterfly - high-stepper - flippant - 
bedecked with ribbons - he's in the Air Corps - dress- 
shop clerk - gum-chewer. 



HunLot LlL<Z66 . . . 



84 





. . Hunlot LiLcLM 



JANET NAOMA LIGHT 

Excels on viola - daily misses Lebanon bus - quiet, al- 
ways happy - shares (with approximately five others) the 
couch in the day-student room. 



MINNIE EVELYN LING 

Nimble-fingered clarinetist - 
song - artistically inclined - 
itors in South Hall parlor. 



"Anchors Aweigh," theme 
rapid speech - receives vis- 



LOUIS DAVID MANDES 

Talented linguist - ladies' man - prefers brunettes - 
hater of the late bus systems - plaid-shirt promoter - 
distinctive laugh. 






85 





CHARLES ALBERT McCONNELL 

"Mac" and his pipe - a Philokosmian and a Republican 
- he's met La Guardia - heckler - chess fiend - "Are 
you eating breakfast at the Pennway?" 



JOHN BENJAMIN MENGEL 

Artist with a camera — wedding in February - "Ginnie 
likes — ." - feels the call of the wild - works in the dark 
- definitely attracted by red. 



CHARLES ROBINSON MILLER, JR. 

"Pee Wee" - basketball his forte - Bus. Ad. his affliction 
- Esther his attraction - on the Marines' list of young 
hopefuls - water-pistol expert. 



HunLoi tiLa.66 





. . . Vunlot LllclM 



EMMA CATHERINE MILLER 

"E. C." — music master - Jigger-board fan - natural 
make-up - the power behind the German band - would 
be a picnic in a revolving door. 




HARRY KREIGER MILLER, JR. 

Interest in chemistry and Alma - faculty adviser - 
dummy-boy - independent - likes to be comfortable - 
it's the creamery on Saturday. 



NED ELLSWORTH MILLER 

Boogie-woogie soldier boy - Dutchman from "Walley 
Woo" - disc collector - heart interest at home - hand- 
some swing artist. 




87 




Si 



i 





BETTY MAE MINNICH 

Elocutionist extraordinaire - Shakespeare shark - West 
Hall prexy - P.A.W.'s assistant - school-girl complexion 
- red coat - cockney expert - "90% or above" student. 



MARK ANDERSON MOBLEY 

Set for seminary - connoisseur of foods - "Oh ineffable 
bliss!" - interior decorator - American Chain enthusiast, 
"indubitably" - variety of tastes. 



WAYNE LYTLE MOWREY 

Able accompanist - fine organist - member of the Carlisle 
Quincy axis - much missed member of the "29" - Wayne 
and Jane. 



^Lunlot (-U 



CL65 . 





. . . HunLot (lL(Z56 



MARY ELIZABETH MOYER 

"Itsy-bitsy" - nuts about nuts - checkerberry phos- 
phate - vaccinated with a phonograph needle - inquisi- 
tive - travels daily - 5 & 10 sweets girl. 



HOWARD ANTHONY NEIDIG 

Organic major - practical joker - a yellow-bowl and a 
crew-cut - he's going to Delaware - jive collector - at- 
traction in South Hall - Pee Wee's partner. 



CHARLES EDWARD NEWBAKER, JR. 

Adept sportsman - Steelton's drummer-boy - "I 

I'll take a nap" - Washington widower - epistles to Rita 

- Senate secretary. 









89 







JOSEPH EDWARD NICHOLS 

Joe College - keeps up with The Times - part-time grocer 
— skeptical - Navy reservist - admirer of Fritz. 



VINCENT ALDO PRONIO 

Business administration boy - fashion-plate - toots a 
trumpet for the Arena orchestra - smoothie - Chocolate 
Town commuter - appreciates feminine pulchritude. 



CARROLL MELVIN REED 

"Tommy" - hail-fellow-well-met - "you all" - igloo- 
dweller - waiting for the Navy to come through - metic- 
ulous - Father Reed - German bander. 



(LunLot ClL 



a.66 . 



90 





. . . y.unlot (j-La.65 



LAURA BURTZ ROYE 

Contralto voice - Susquehanna transfer - black hair and 
snapping eyes - rings on her fingers and bows in her hair 
- her brother's a maestro. 



STERLING SYLVESTER SANDERS 

"Wolf" - Dr. Bender's enthusiastic disciple - unpredict- 
able — tennis fiend - figures on the ice - mitey gymnast 
- ardent student. 



EDGAR FRANKLIN SCHNEE 

Research in chemistry - American store executive - 
plugger - Wednesday night at Clay - curly mop - 
Charlie Atlas's rival. 






91 






GLENN PALMER SCHWALM 

"Smoky" - pitcher on the basketball team - pre-med 
man for Hahnemann - cliff warbler - no girls allowed - 
Dutch as sauerkraut. 




GARNETA LOUISE SEA VERS 

Musical mathematician — athletic abilities - "Gardenia" 
- hep to the jive - epics to Steve - long-awaited phone- 
calls. 



JO MARIE SHANNON 

French interests - neat phrases - well-turned - needle- 
pointer - flirtatious eyes - "Bob says — " - a siren on 
the stage. 



Hunlot (2ta.56 . . . 



92 





. . . Hunlot ClLa.15 



CHARLES ARTHUR SHELLEY 

Pre-Theo - red top - Robin Hood - if you want Shelley, 
look for Zimmy - long walks, not unaccompanied. 



BRUCE CHESTER SOUDERS 

Actor, writer, and vocalist - bon vivant 
- Patty's partner - newsman 
busy - limestone livelihood. 



lolloping walk 
his mission keeps him 



EARL JONES SPANGLER 

"Suzy," the sleeper - outdoor man - enthusiastic eques- 
trian - Campbelltown's contribution to the sandlot - 
weakness for blondes - ex-mailman turned soldier. 





93 




i ...I 




SAMUEL ELMER STEIN 

Chem theorist - "Duke" - Elizabeth's lab partner 
proficient ping-pong paddler - Ed's hitch-hiking cohort 
big, juicy steaks - tennis fan. 



GEORGE CLAYTON STINE, JR. 

Brains of the 203-204 syndicate - shrewd businessman - 
Esquire advertisement - "Rabbi" - "West Philly won 
again!" - catchy smile. 



VERNA PAULINE STONECIPHER 

Solid in psych - labors with Latin - practices child psy- 
chology - pleasant — golden locks in a variety of arrange- 
ments - receives pleasure from Paine. 



Qunlot LiLclM . . . 



94 





. . . HunLot LllclM 



MIRIAM WINIFRED TIPPERY 

"Tippy" - petite pianist - cameo complexion - two by 
four - smitten with Smitty - easy on the eyes. 



MARILYN ESTHER TROUTMAN 

Learning Latin - anxiously awaits her library hours - sur- 
prise flashes of wit - 5 and 10 girl - letters from Pvt. 
Emil R, 



EARL ALBERT TROUP 

Preacher - Alpha to Omega - Pappy's assistant - walk- 
ing chem handbook - "Roupy-Doupy-Troupy" - iceman 
legends - off-campus attraction. 



: ~~" i ~-— /~ — ■ ' 






95 







ESTHER MAY WAGNER 

Substitute comparative prof - freckles - a shining crown 
of hair - capable - a friend in the Marines - charming in 
green - Gerry's roomie. 



BENEDICT ALEXANDER WASILEWSKI 

"Big, battling Ben" — mainstay of our forward wall - 



backstop from Shenandoah - Stokes' 
nochle fiend - frequents South Hall. 



"Benedict" - pi- 



MARTHA ELIZABETH WILT 

"Martie" - sports historian - emphatic expressions - 
Sam's gal - striking appearance - popular - a Miller dev- 
otee - sportswoman of L.V. - the measles kid. 



Hunlot LLLCL65 . . . 



96 





. . HunL&Z (jLLd66 



JOHN ROY WISE 

"Josh" - Cornwall's sleepless wonder - "Superman," 
holding down a job, a tough course, and a girl - army 
medico - ace and fouler of the "axe" league. 



CLYDE RICHARD WITMEYER 

College church choir soloist - Annville's native son - 
trombonist - loves them all - chain smoker - Uncle 
Sam engineered him to Fort Lewis. 



CHARLES WILLIAM WOLFE 

"Reverend" - class prexy - his Pontiac takes a beating 
- true friend - "Smoker" - congenial - he's engaged! - 
"Are you going to Soc?" 




97 







ROBERT YANNACCONE 

Jeff accepted him - loquacious - "Got anything to eat?" 
- Dotty leaves him Cox-eyed - he's from Missouri - 
"Dark Eyes." 



MARY MARTHA YEAKLE 

Mt. Gretna trek - a good kid - "louder and more bell- 
like" - she loves 'em all - sawed-off, hammered-down 
alligator - L.V.C.'s war correspondent. 



HunLot Clu 



untot LIL&ll . . 



1)8 




r^k 



%"4b 



A0r*****«*£ 








'%/ 




-fi thzuLOfi excitement tun! tktouan tne otckedtttz 



THE Lebanon Valley "stickmen" passed through a rather dull season, winning two and losing four, 
for a percentage of .333, the last four games of the season being canceled because of the gasoline 
ban. "Mike" Intrieri took over the reins for his first season as baseball mentor of the Dutchmen. 
After the first few weeks of practice, it looked as though the question mark of the '42 team was going 
to be the pitching staff. No hurlers were available that had any previous experience on the "rub- 
ber." It appeared as though Don Staley were going to be our mainstay on the mound, but he suffered 
a sore arm and was sidetracked back to second base, his old position. Dick Seiverling and Lloyd 
Crall were to be used in the relief role on the pitching staff. The surprise was that Harry Matala 
turned out to be a moundsman, pitching three games, while Seiverling hurled the other three contests. 
The catching position was held down by Ben Wasilewski. 

Zerbe, at the initial sack, Staley at the keystone, Smith on the "hot corner," and Withers at 
"short" rounded out the infield, while the outfield was manned by "Charlie" Miller, "Dick" Beckner, 
D wight Fake, or "Chick" Edwards. 

Forty-six hits were recorded at the plate, as Staley led with nine, Beckner and Fake had seven 
each, while Smith and Zerbe accumulated six apiece. Both Fake and Staley hit safely in five of the 
six games. Gremlins were plentiful when the Dutchmen were on the field, resulting in twenty-three 
errors, none of which did anything to help win ball games. 




100 




SCHEDULE 

Date Opp. 

April 23 — Elizabethtown at Elizabethtown 7 
April 27 — Moravian at Bethlehem ... 6 

May 2— Drexel at Annville 9 

May 5 — Juniata at Annville 7 

May 9 — Muhlenberg at Annville ... 4 
May 13 — Elizabethtown at ElizabethtownlO 
May 16 — Dickinson at Carlisle .... Canceled 
May 19 — Susquehanna at Selingsgrove . Canceled 
May 20 — Bucknell at Lewisburg .... Canceled 
May 30 — Muhlenberg at Allentown . . Canceled 



L.V.C. 

10 

5 

1 
8 
1 
3 



The Sz 



eaio-n 



THE ELIZABETHTOWN GAME 

Inaugurating "Mike's" first year as coach of 
the varsity nine, the Dutchmen came through 
successfully in the curtain opener. Showing un- 
expected batting strength, Valley shoved over 
ten runs on eleven hits. Zerbe connected for a 
"case of Wheaties" in the third inning, while 
Staley had four-for-five, including a double and 
a triple. Matala, surprise pitcher, allowed eight 
widely scattered hits. 

THE DREXEL GAME 

May Day brought the Drexel Dragons to Annville for 
Lebanon Valley's first home game. Given only five hits, the 
Dutchmen went down to defeat 9-1. Carter, of Drexel, fanned 
ten and twice struck out batters with bases loaded. Matala 
pitched well for the Intrierimen but was given poor support, 
the Blue and White committing six errors. 



THE MORAVIAN GAME 

Although Moravian's powerhouse was held to 
six hits by Seiverling, it eked out a 6-5 decision 
in a battle which was close all the way to the 
last of the ninth. With one out and the score 
tied at 5 all, Moravian's number three man hit 
a single, moved to third on an overthrow by 
Seiverling and a sacrifice, and then scored the 
winning run on a long fly to centerfield. Valley 
had loaded the bases twice in earlier innings but 
failed to score those potential runs. "Charlie" 
Miller's long triple along the right field line was 
one of the features of the game. 



THE JUNIATA GAME 

The L. V. C. tossers won their second game of the season 
behind steady twirling by Seiverling and consistent "clubbing" 
by Beckner. The sixth inning was prosperous for the Dutch- 
men when they collected five runs. Beckner "rang the bell" 
by belting four hits in four trips to the plate. The visitors 
came within one run of tying the score in the ninth, but 
Seiverling bore down and protected the lead by striking out 
the last batsman for Moravian. 



101 





THE MUHLENBERG GAME 

Errors by Valley in the field gave 
the Mules three unearned runs and a 
4-1 victory in Lebanon Valley's fifth 
game of the season. Matala was 
matching Muhlenberg's Trinkle on 
the mound but these errors ulti- 
mately proved the margin of victory. 
Lebanon Valley's one run was scored 
by Matala when he doubled in the 
third and raced home on a long 
single by George Smith. Edwards, 
a new replacement in left field, 
garnered two hits to be high man 
for the Blue and White. 




102 





THE ELIZABETHTOWN GAME 

The E-t owners' nine avenged an 
early season set-back by trouncing 
the Valley 10-3. Seiverling, wobbley 
in the first inning, gave up two walks 
and a double which accounted for 
four runs and proved too much for 
the Blue and White. He weakened 
again in the sixth and "Chuck" New- 
baker, throwing from the leeward 
side, baffled the visitors for three 
innings. Six errors did nothing to 
help Seiverling out of the hole. 
Wasilewski's triple and two hits off 
Smith's bat were bright spots for 
Valley. Both teams collected seven 
hits, but that column under the let- 
ter "e" proved disastrous. 



103 




f I ^HE "L" Club represents the cream 
of Lebanon Valley's athletes. Mem- 
bership requirements are high and 
those who attain it may well be recog- 
nized as athletes of the finest type and 
men of the highest calibre. Among 
their activities, other than athletic, are 
the sale of chapel seats to keep the 
club's finances in good order, and the 
conducting of a dance once a year, the 
evening of Homecoming Day. 

This year their ranks have been de- 
pleted until only six members remain. 
The others have gone to prove on a larger, more important field 
that they have the "stuff" it takes to win, and we know that 
wherever they are, they will be fighting for our freedom just as 
hard as they fought for our glory when they were with us. 



UnaLn 



lama 



5ona hot 




104 



rriHE objective of the Women's Ath- 
letic Association is expressed in its 
motto: "Every girl in a sport, and a 
sport for every girl." A well-balanced 
intra-mural sports program is the chief 
aim of this active organization. Girls 
can gain membership by earning two 
hundred points. Points are earned by 
participating in the various sports as an 
amateur or a member of the honor 
squad. Each sport is headed by a 
sports leader selected by the members 
of the organization. Among the out- 
standing events sponsored by W. A. A. this year wera a hockey 
sports day and a scavenger hunt and social. Many girls owe 
their social and physical development to the activities of the 
W. A. A. 



the Mue and White 





105 




T7 da.u on meLodiM 



A/I" AY 2, 1942 May Day a fairy day 

•*• a clay in Dixie! Old Sol's benevo- 
lent grin radiates Southern hospitality air is 

warm and drowsy a darkey melody haunts the 

shadows echoes of waltz music laughter 

of children the call to the hunt the bay of 

the hounds the plaintive voice of cotton- 



106 



pickers sweet, warm scent of flowers a mammy's lullaby L. V. C. teems with Dixie char- 
acters the surging hymn of the OPMississippi fills the listening air . 

Characters from Uncle Tom's Cabin come to life: assorted darkies with assorted grins choco- 
late, pigtailed pickaninnies fat, comfortable mammies gracious court ladies in ice-cream 

colored taffetas the warm scarlet of waiters' coats jazz colors of the jockeys Southern 

gentlemen in military gray . 

Music heralds daybreak Garland's nymph-like figure hails the morn the earth is awak- 
ened! a silence a stir and a whisper brushes the field of humanity stirring music the 

Queen, Betty Foster, and her attendants, Louise 
Bogar, Mary Louise Clark, Virginia Goodman, 
Ruth Heminway, Marguerite Martin, Betty 
Shillott, Victoria Turco, advance with stately 

tread in the sun's spotlight the Tom Thumb 

figures of the flower girls and train-bearers 

proud stance of Duke and Gretchen, grandly 

obedient to their petite mistress and the 

Queen is crowned by charming Madame Green 

and lo! at the magic touch of the Queen, 

an orchid blooms on her shoulder! gifts for the 

Queen Long Live Her Highness! shy speech 

of the new monarch All hail the Queen of the 

May!!! 

Now her subjects, one and all, haste to amuse 

her merry rustics dance with "daisy-secrets" 

in their eyes the strains of 01' Man River 




107 





the lament of the cotton-pickers 

bent figures grotesque 

shadows on the grass a flash of 

sunlight out tumbles a carload 

of pickaninnies piping treble 

voices "Oh Susannah, don't you 

cry for me" eager, tilting, tum- 
bling dancing now jaunty jock- 
eys trot in from the hunt "Well 

shut ma' mouf, look dah!" The 

Old Gray Mare ambles dis- 

jointedly along dangles into a 

dance what fun! 

And it is noon sun's high 

in the heavens portly waiters 

serve succulent, sizzling barbecues 

and radiant grins nostalgic 

music of men's voices old songs 

a croquet game in fluid colors 
bright maidens weave the rib- 
bons of the May Pole swaying 

steps and billowing skirts now, 

a sterner note, as Southern gentlemen 
demonstrate the Sabre Dril' 




martial music and southern 
honor waltz music an in- 
vitation to a dance gentle- 
men and their ladies oblige 

the Queen is radiant she is 

pleased but it is late 

the Queen, still smiling, retires 
the court follows . 

Quietly night descends but 

the honor and glory of every 




rn h3§£ j 




Li 


i 






gpp 


Wm i i«hi 




sfxHSHU 


"Tli 



American is born anew in the 
hearts of all of L. V. C. as Old 
Man River in his loyalty to the 
South personifies what should be 
our contribution to our un- 
divided nation as the South 

fades slowly from our view, and 
we visualize once again the hand- 
clasp of the Man in Blue and the 
Man in Gray. 



109 




f-Mipf h»^i : i 


1 - > ^r 



te • fe 



1 ' 




^2&? 



■AiV 



A- 



Idt! 





Dr. Hiram H. Shenk 

". . . and still tlie wonder grew 
that one small head eonld carry 
all he knew." 



Dr. Milton L. Stokes 

L.Y.C's ambassador to the 
University of Toronto. 



Dr. Paul 0. Shettel 

"Who knows but what tomorrow 
Ho() might be ice-cream or shoe 
polish." 




Dr. George G. Stroble 

"I'm an authority on chickens 
now, you know." 



Dr. Stella J. Stevenson 
The lady in red — hat. 



Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace 

From the trail of Conrad 
Weiser to the trail of the Six Na- 
tions. 



Dr. Clyde S. Stine 

Drill sergeant and assistant hyp- 
notist. 



Rev. William A. Wilt 

Teacher with stories from a life- 
time of experience. 







113 




' 


ja^U. * 


■ 






MpHB ^*^ V 




/,; '- Jr 




^^ 




^^^^^^HUHH^^H 



Sent* 



zmoM 



John Bamberger 


Donald Bartley 


Margaretta Carey 


Shirley Carl 


Doris Carter 


Ann Collins 


Lloyd Crall 


Martha Crone 


Jean Daugherty 



Kathryn Deiblee Marvin Detambel Mrs. James Duke 

Emma C. Dunkle Walter Ebersole Betty Mae Emrich 

Frederick Frantz, Jr. Herman Fritsche Mary Jane Fulton 



SenL 



enL&ti 








William Gollam 
Mary Johns 
Elizabeth Kerr 



Jane Gruber 

D. Pauline Keller 

Mary Ellen Klopp 



John Hampton 
E. Louise Keller 
Jane Klucker 



Marian C. Kreider 


Verna Kreider 


Cyril Little 


Dorothy March 


Harry Matala 


Harold Maurer, Jr 


Mary Mehaffey 


Stephen Metro 


Albert Morrison 



Sent* 



emotl 





_s 



emoti 



Helen Mobbison 

Robert Ness 
Jacob Rhodes 



Mrs. June Moyer 
Howard Paine 
Jessie Robertson 



Paul Mover 
Franklin Patschke 
Janet Schopf 



David Shaner Charles Sharman, Jr. H. Dennis Sherk 

Katherine Jane Sherk Vera Shoop Warren Silliman 

Doris Smith Grace Smith Genevieve Stansfield 



SznL 



emote 



it *** 





& 



emotl 



John Talnack 



George Wilkialis 



Hans Uberseder Robert Uhrich 

Fleanor Witmeyer Leroy Yeatts, Jr. 



1 ^*t ft r-»»-r 





** 



••V 




-{-/ Llakt meloclu l5 

to65ea.lya.ck . . . 

SCHEDULE 

Date L. V. C. Opp. 

April 25 

Dickinson at Carlisle 9 

April 29 

Muhlenberg at Allentown 9 

April 30 

Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster . 9 

May 2 

Elizabethtown at Annville .... 5 2 

May 9 

Bucknell at Lewisburg 9 

May 15 

Elizabethtown at Elizabethtown . . 2 5 



122 




1 5& ■ ■ n' 

. . and north, between |.# j» 
m£ 5ttlna5 






TJANDICAPPED by not having their 
own courts in condition until after the 
season was well under way, the 1942 Lebanon 
Valley tennis team produced one of the poor- 
est records in the last several years. In play- 
ing more-experienced and better-coached 
squads, the Blue and White racqueteers were 
able to capture one out of six matches; co- 
incidentally, this one victory was the only 
battle waged on the L. V. C. courts. Led by 
captain Alton Smith, the team was com- 
posed of Fisher, Wallace, Hambright, Ne- 
ville, Jiras, and Hummel. 



123 




I kernel on tefjlective eontemv2La.tlon . . 



"PHI ALPHA EPSILON, the only na- 
tional honor society on campus, con- 
sists of members of the senior class whose 
scholastic average during their first seven 
semesters has been eighty-eight per cent or 
higher. The society serves two purposes. It 
gives recognition to those who have consis- 
tently done excellent work, and it stimulates 
other students to do likewise. The members 
this year include Donald Bartley, Martha 
Crone, Frederick Frantz, Robert Ness, 
Howard Paine, Jacob Rhodes, Dennis Sherk, 
and Leroy Yeatts, Jr. 



124 





First Semester Editor . . David Shaner 
Second Semester Editor . Louise Keller 

Business Manager . Frederick Frantz, Jr. 



rpHE news organ of the campus, La Vie 
Collegienne, is published weekly, on 
Thursday, from September to June except 
during vacations and examination weeks. 
Every year an opportunity is offered to in- 
terested individuals to try out for positions 
on the staff. Until the faculty approves the 
prospective staff members, they are classed 
as cub reporters. Upon being approved by 
the faculty, these persons' names are placed 
on the masthead, and thus are recognized 
as full-fledged La Vie staff members. 



/Qecotded ex.cLu5L\feLu bu J-CL vie . . . 



125 




3*fo 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Marian M. Kreider 

Associate Editors Dorothy Jean Light 

Harry Miller 

Literary Editors Betty Minnich 

Jo Marie Shannon 
Samuel Beamesderfer 
Bruce Souders 
Marjorie Frantz 

Sports Editors Martha Wilt 

Harry Miller 

Organizations Editors Barbara Converse 

Betty Grube 

Conservatory Editor Emma Catherine Miller 

Art Editor Genevieve Stansfield 

Student Photographers John Mengel 

Donald Rettew 

Typist Ruth Graybill 



BUSINESS STAFF 



Business Manager Charles Wolfe 

Associate Business Managers . Charles Shelley 
Charles Miller 

Advertising Manager . . Robert Yannaccone 



126 





(lompiLeM ok ike ptoatdm note! . . . 



/^^\UR annual publication, the Quittapahilla, undertakes each year to present an 
authentic and permanent record of that year at Lebanon Valley College. This 
has been accomplished by preceding classes, and now, we, the class of 1944, offer in 
this volume the result of our efforts. 

This is a wartime yearbook. Curtailment of materials and a smaller budget have 
forced us to cut out a little here and to take away some more there. Some of our 
fondest plans have not materialized. However, without apologies, we are presenting 
this book as our contribution to the history of a college at war. 

If our book makes a favorable impression upon the student body, and if it is 
worthy of a place beside its predecessors, we have many obligations to acknowledge. 
Genevieve Stansfield has done our art work. Professor Carmean cheerfully stepped 
in when we desperately needed a photographer. John Mengel very capably took 
over this responsibility when he came here. Edward Stansfield suggested our theme. 
Hard-working editorial and business staffs unselfishly contributed time and effort. 
Our deepest thanks go to all of these. 



127 



|<nS' m* 



(ZLt . 



Outstanding Woman Leader 

Marian C. Kreider 




Outstanding Man Leader and Best-Dressed Man 
Walter Ebersole 



128 




Outsta nding Sportswoma n 

Martha AVilt 



Outstanding Sportsman 

Harry Matala 




..PL 



aueti 



f 




Best-Dressed Woman 

Katy Dunkle 




st-Looking Woman 

Jean Daugherty 




129 



Best-Looking Man 

William Keeler 




-(-/ aulet ex-jatelllon on tke. nlahtlna Smut . . . 



/^\UR Defense Council this year has proved it- 
self completely capable of handling any 
emergency calling for its action. Under the direc- 
tion of Professor Frederick K. Miller and his assist- 
ant, Walter Ebersole, both blackouts and daylight 
alarms have been handled with prompt efficiency. 
The departure from school of so many members of 
our defense set-up, with the calling of the army 
reserves, might have had serious consequences, 
had not the student body cooperated in the re- 
placing of these individuals. As it now stands, the 
Council is a dependable body, ready, willing and 
able to do its part in our national defense set-up 



130 




• ^Patrons • 



Mr. C. E. Piersol Annville, Penna. 

Rev. Paul E. V. Shannon York, Penna. 

Rev. William A. Wilt Annville, Penna. 

Rev. Ralph H. Wolfe Conestoga, Penna. 

Rev. G. E. Miller York, Penna. 

Mr. A. Yannaccone Minersville, Penna. 

Jerry Kauffman Manchester, Md. 

Rev. Stephen E. Raby Ephrata, Penna. 

Rev. LeRoy W. Dinger Tower City, Penna. 

Men's Senate L.V.C., Annville, Penna. 

Life Work Recruits L.V.C., Annville, Penna. 

Y.M.C.A L.V.C., Annville, Penna. 

Y.W.C.A L.V.C., Annville, Penna. 

Delphian Literary Society L.V.C., Annville, Penna, 



132 



VISIT 


5 c and 10c 


"Hot Dog" FRANK 


Ben Franklin Stores 


Light Lunches and Sandwiches 




of All Kinds 


37 West Main Street 


ANNVILLE, PA. 


ANNVILLE, PA. 


Webb & Wolfe 


J. H. TROUP'S jr 

The Leading Jl V 


"Your Sporting Goods Store" 


MUSIC JJlfSf 
STORE *WT 


211 WALNUT ST. 


HARRISBURG, PA. 


FOR OVER 60 YEARS 




HARRISBURG and LANCASTER 


Phone: 


Annville 7-3511 


Hershey 1-0611 


Jtingsley & Brown, Inc. 


C LEA NERS 


AND DYERS 


DELUXE SERVICE • 



133 



Automatic Heating Sherwin Williams 
Stoker, Oil and Gas Paints and Varnishes 

SPENCER CASSEL 

Plumbing, Heating, and Hardware 

Phone: 8-5341 Phone: 7-5131 
2 54 N. College Street 14 E. Main Street 
PALMYRA ANNVILLE 


ANNVILLE PAPER BOX 
COMPANY 


Compliments of 

J. H. LONG SONS 

CLEONA, PA. 


Cleona Pretzel Bakery 

JOSEPH C. EARLY, Prop. 

"Taste the Difference 9 ' 
CLEONA, PA. 


KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture, Floor Coverings 
Electrical Appliances 

Modern Funeral Home 
ANNVILLE • PENNSYLVANIA 


M«gg3& =■" KRE,DER SPORTS 

M2^7CUOFS "500- Juveniles 

^ »/ O fl W t ^ Manuja ctured by 


ANNVILL] 


E, PENNA. 



134 



the place for Gifts, Stationery 

Leather Goods, Luggage, Greeting Cards 



Portrait and Commercial T T^ ♦•-t-v/^kl 'o Developing and Printing 
Photography A XttJ- LJCl ^ Enlarging and Framing 



757-159 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PENNA. 



Sales Division: 38-40 North Ninth Street, Lebanon, Penna. Phone: 291 

EBERSOLE, Inc. 

Tontiac and Oldsmobile Motor Cars 

Modern Equipped Service Department 



East Perm Avenue, CLEONA, PENNA. 

Phone: Lebanon 2210-J 



WEAVER AND SON 
HATCHERY 

4 Leading Breeds and several Cross Breeds. All 

eggs hatched come from N. H. Pullorum 

Cleaned State Blood -Tested Stock 



Quality Chicks for Profit Phone: 7-7916 ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



135 




D. L. Saylor & Sons 

Contractors and Builders 

COAL and LUMBER 

* 

ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 


S- A. Bomgardner's 
DAIRY 

PALMYRA Phone: 8-5521 
TRY OUR ICE CREAM 


Davis' Pharmacy 

Greeting Cards ♦ Sodas ♦ Cosmetics 

PRESCRIPTIONS COMPOUNDED 

103 West Main Street 
ANNVILLE ♦ PENNSYLVANIA 


Compliments of 

John Hirsh Store 


Compliments of 

J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER, Pres. 
" 'Insure in sure insurance" 

Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Pa. 



136 



MERIN-BALIBAN 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

School and College .Annuals 
ioio Chestnut Street Philadelphia, Pa. 



CHURCH CENTER 
PRESS 

Supplies for all branches of 
religious work 

Printing : Publishing 
MYERSTOWN, PENNSYLVANIA 



J. Edward Gantz 

Portraiture 

781 Cumberland St. Lebanon, Pa. 



H. E. MILLARD 



HIGH CALCIUM LIME AND LIMESTONE PRODUCTS 



Ask Your Dealer for Millard's Agriculture and Mason's Lime 



Annville, Penna. 



137 



THIS YEAR AS WE PAY TRIBUTE TO 

The Class of 1944 

THE PENNWAY 
RESTAURANT 

joins all the members and faculty of 
Lebanon Valley College in saluting those 
of you who are serving in the Armed 
Forces of our country; and our only wish 
is that when Reunion time rolls around 
again, those who anxiously wait at home 
will be proud to greet you. 



138 



JOHN B. CURRY'S SONS 



Coal f Feed * Grain i Flour 



Warehouse: Swatara Station 



Flour Mill: Palmyra, Pa. 



"The Hitchin' Post" 

PROPRIETORS: 

CRALL 

WOLFE 

BEITTEL 

"RENO PROOF KNOTS" 
Room 213 Men's Dorm. 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive Shoes 

HILL & DALE SHOES 
For College Girls 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 
"For the Man Who Cares" 



34 N. Eighth Street 



LEBANON, PA. 



JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST AND DECORATOR 

"The Flower Shop" 

Corsages Our Specialty 

Rear of Court House LEBANON, PA. 

Flowers Telegraphed 

Anywhere, Anytime 

Phone: Lebanon 592 



Ice Cream Goes to War — Demand Exceeds Supply 

We thank our distributors and customers for 
their cooperation and patience during these 
times when we must ration our production. 

Please inquire; if at all possible, 
we will supply 

C. B. Gollam & Sons Mfgr's 

6th and Maple Streets 

Sales Room: Drum's Dairy Lunch, "The Pride of the Boro" 



PRONIO'S GENERAL STORE 



HERSHEY, PA. Tel. 503 



139 



To the 1945 Editor of 

QUITTAPAHILLA 

"VT'OURS is the task to prepare another school 
annual which will serve as a record of the activities 
of your class. If your yearbook means anything, it 
must be not only an accurate record of activities, but 
what is more, it must reflect something of the spirit 
of your class. Carefully turned phrases and good 
photographs and drawings can be so utilized as to 
make an interesting record. 

#The multitude of high-school students entering the 
service of their country will particularly realize the value 
of a first-class yearbook. For them it will be a treasured link 
with the past ; for their parents and friends, a recollection of 
happy years. Today's editor, then, has an added responsi- 
bility in planning an annual for these appreciative readers. 

Since 1878 we have been engaged in the art of 
the printed word. Through the years we have built 
a business based on high standards and high ideals. 
As a result, we are able to place at your service a 
staff of experienced designers, skilled craftsmen and 
well-informed representatives who are always avail- 
able to discuss your problems with you. 



Our representatives will be delighted to discuss the 1945 
edition of your annual with you and your adviser. Let us assure 
you that an interview obligates you in no way. To further ac- 
quaint you with the art of printing, we suggest that you visit us 
here at the Mount Pleasant Press to see what we do and how we do 
it. Write or telephone us for an appointment. 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 

^JSiount Pleasant Press 

HARRISBURG • PENNSYLVANIA 

Telephone: 4-6235 



140 





ESBENSHADE'S 
BOOK STORE 

Books Gifts 

Greeting Cards 
Office Supplies 



The home of Parker Pens 
Try "Parker 51" 

Courtesy • Quality . Service 

41 NORTH EIGHTH STREET 
LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA 



The Store Dependable 




Cor. Third and Market Streets 

HARRISBURG, PA. 

Central Pennsylvania's Greatest 

Fur Coat Makers 

AND 

Fashion Center 

for Women and Children 

Furs ' Coats • Dresses • Accessories 



OWN 

Cold Storage Fur Vault 

IN THE STORE 

Complete Expert Fur Service 

Repairs — Remodeling — Cleaning 

TELEPHONE 7237 

We Will Call for Your Coat 



,ii wJMHJ 



The Largest and Best Known Clothing 
Store in Central Pennsylvania 



for MEN and BOYS 



•CLOTHING 'FURNISHINGS 
•HATS 'SHOES 

Nationally Known 
Guaranteed Merchandise 



Kuppenheimer 
North brooke 
Glen Brooke 
Griffon Clothes 

Florsheim Shoes 



Stetson Hats 

Shirtcraft, Kaynee 
Arrow Shirts 

Interwoven Hose 

Munsingwear 



£)outfichS 



320 Market St. 



Harrisburg, Pa. 



141 



AUTOGRAP HS 



142 



AUTOGRAP HS 



143 



AUTOGRAPHS 



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