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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1945leba 



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Dedication . . . 



TO THE BOYS of our class who have joined the Armed 
Forces, and to all who have left the campus for the same 
purpose, the Class of 1945 dedicates its book. 

This is the way we chose to let you know about the people, the 
work and play, and all the other little odds and ends that go to 
make Lebanon Valley our school. It is to tell you how things are 
going here at L. V. ; to show you the changes that have come, the 
additions that have been made, and the things that have remained 
the same. 

We just wanted to put it simply, and so we wrote a letter. 



Members of the Class of '45 
now in the service 




Albert, Richard 
Aurentz, Russel 
Baker, David 
Baker, Milton 
Beck. Robert 
Beshore, Fred 
Blessing, Alfred 
Brulatour, James 
Bucher, Eugene 
Burrell, Richard 
Crimmel, Herbert 
Delduco, A. Alfred 
Englehart, Edwin 
Fenstermacher, Wayne 
Fiorello, Joseph 
Good, Robert 
Granger, Edward 
Harriger, Miles 
Herb, Bruce 
Himmelberger, Harry 
Horn, John 
Huff, George 
Hughes, Melvin 
Hultin, Carl 









Latz, David 
Light, John Henry 
Light, V. Earl 
Lloyd, William 
Maley, Matthew 
Mateyak, Paul 
McConnell, Charles 
Miller, Ned 
Pruyn, Jack 
Racine, William 
Reinhold, Frank L., Jr. 
Robinson, Luther 
Rumpf, William 
Schaeffer, Jacob Robert 
Schreiber, John 
Seyler, Oscar 
Shaak, Dewey 
Smyser, Donald 
Stine, Cowley Richard 
Streepy, Robert 
Summers, Harold 
Terr, Arthur 
Ventresca, Anthony 
Wallace, Anthony 
Wiessman, Jack 
Yoder, John 




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President of the College, Dr. Clyde A. Lynch 




T~\R. LYNCH hasn't changed one 
bit — only he's busier. He re- 
mains the supreme example of every- 
thing a president should be. You know 
what he's like — so friendly and under- 
standing, and even with new plans con- 
stantly on his mind, he remains a 
scholar, an orator and a wonderful 
adviser and leader. Oh, and Foxie — 
he's still doing tricks for all visitors, 
and he and Dr. Lynch continue to take 
their walks. I guess they go to the 
waterworks — that was always their 
favorite walk you know. 



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A/TISS GILLESPIE is really a peach about late 
permissions when the fellows come back on 
furloughs, and she's making surgical dressings ga- 
lore! She hasn't lost her sense of humor, and at 
parties she really gives her all to help us have good 
times. She's so nice to sit down and talk to. And 
remember how you boys liked to dance with her? 
She hasn't changed a bit. I guess she hasn't for- 
gotten hobbies, but she's so enthusiastic about 
accelerated programs and Red Cross work I don't 
see when she gets time for them. She's still the 
gracious Miss Gillespie. 




Dean of the College 
A. H. M. Stonecipher 



Director of Conservatory 
Miss Gillespie 




TAEAN STONECIPHER is still our dignified 
and scholarly Dean. He's taken over several 
courses for profs who have gone into the service, 
and somehow manages to maintain that Abraham 
Lincolnish manner. Let's see, you'll remember his 
being so tall, his black hat and overcoat, his um- 
brella, and, oh yes, he hasn't lost his pince-nez. 
And you should see his fine yard — he has it in 
good shape. He mows, he rakes and he weeds. 
Funny, isn't it, how the busy always find time to 
be busier? 




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Bailey, L. G. 

Now you see him, now you 
don't — and his mustache is the 
same way. 



Black, Amos 

And guess what — Amos, Jr.! 



Balsbaugh, E. M. 

You never know what a prof 
will do next — this one turned poet. 



Campbell, R. P. 

A perfectionist on the organ! 



Bender, Andrew 

A youthful stride, and a real in- 
terest in his students. 



Carmean, D. Clark 

Our persuasive Red Cross en- 
thusiast. 



Bender, Mrs. Ruth Engle 

Her family is her vocation - 
teaching, her avocation. 



10 




JJu. to-CAjJb* 



Intrieki, Mariano 

And here's the man who found 
our theological basketball team. 





Crawford, Alexander 

His amazing fund of energy ac- 
counts for the extra work he is do- 
ing. 



Lietzau, Lena Louise 

Highly respected proponent of 
Sunday night teas. 




Derickson, S. H. 

A kindly word and a friendly 
smile. 



Light, V. Earl 

Our chief morale builder- 
that's the least we can say. 




Henderson, Esther 

Girls — it's you and sports now. 



Malsh, Harold 

He plays the violin superbly. 



11 







Myers, Helen Ethel 

"Have you seen the latest 
addition to the Montgomery col- 
lection?" 



Shenk, H. H. 

Our progressive thinker — and 
he has the nicest blue eyes! 



Porter, Jermain D. 

A scholar of profound thought 
— humble and respected. 



Sponseller, Edwin H. 

Our good-will messenger from 
Yale — in a bright red jacket. 



Richie, G. A. 

An enthusiastic hustler — be it 
game or class. 



GL, 



&JttijL 



OUtJL. 



Stevenson, Mrs. Stella J. 

Seldom seen, except in the 
classroom, but by her red hat ye 
shall know her. 



Rutledge, Edward P. 

Artist, pal, — well, just a great 
fellow. 

12 




CZfruna CL ~C(9~t '. 



Travis, Elizabeth 

A new artist — a real one and a 
smiling one. 




Stine, Clyde S. 

How can he be so wide-awake 
and humorous at eight o'clock in 
the morning? 



Wallace, P. A. W. 

A heart-warming personality- 
and such enthusiasm! 



Stokes, M. L. 

We are looking for an extension 
school in Pittsburgh any day now! 



Wilt, Rev. William A. 

His faith makes ours stronger. 



Struble, George G. 

Inserts dry wit in many a lec- 
ture. 










13 



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14 



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"1 \ 7"E BELIEVE in giving recognition where recognition is due. Certainly you re- 
member those who are responsible for doing the little things that make the Valley 
run so smoothly — Bert and Ben and Eddie — all the men and women employed by the 
College. They are always ready and anxious to help us in whatever way they can, and 
we want them to know how much we appreciate it. They are truly the dei ex machina 
of L. V. 




15 



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IN A WORD or two for each, we can tell you how they're doing. JIGGER- 
BOARD : They seem to discover everything — but the freshmen find the hay- 
stack just the same. W. C. C. : That little igloo they meet in certainly turned out 
some hot ideas. STUDENT FACULTY: This is our mediation board— that 
law, order and justice may prevail. MEN'S DAY STUDENT CONGRESS: 
All's quiet (?) around the Day Student House so we guess the "big stick" is being 
wielded rather convincingly. MEN'S SENATE: The Senate is just full of mem- 
bers that wish somebody else were in their shoes, but they manage to frighten 
the freshmen rather efficiently. 




STUDENT FACULTY 

President 

Charles Wolfe 

Vice-President 
Bruce Souders 

Secretary 

Betty Minnich 



JIGGERBOARD 

President 

Ruth Haverstock 

Vice-President 
Elizabeth Ann Hess 

Secretary 

Marian Ulmer 

Treasurer 
Grace Spangler 



16 



MEN'S SENATE 

President 

Charles Wolfe 

Vice-President 
Joseph Kania 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Edward Withers 



MEN'S DAY 
STUDENT COUNCIL 

President 

Sidney Bashore 

Vice-President 
Sterling Sanders 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Edgar Schnee 

Student Faculty Repre- 
sentative 
John Detweiler 

Junior Representative 
Brian Kintzer 



WOMEN'S COM- 
MUTERS COUNCIL 

President 

Elizabeth Jean Light 

Vice-President 
Blossom Levitz 

Secretary 

Janice Stahl 

Treasurer 
Clare Schaeffer 




17 



Officers and Committees of the Board of Trustees 

President E. N. Funkhouser 

Vice-President H. H. Baish 

Secretary-Treasurer S. H. Derickson 



E. N. Funkhouser 
J. H. Ness 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

C. A. Lynch, Chairman 
W. N. McFaul 

D. E. Young 
H. E. Miller 



S. H. Derickson 
J. Paul Gruver 



E. N. Funkhouser, 
Pj-es., Trustees 

J. E. Gipple, 1944 

F. B. Plummer, 1944 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

A. Sattazahn, 1945, Chairman 
C. A. Lynch, 

Pres., College 
H. H. Baish, 1945 
S. H. Derickson, 

Sec.-Treas. 



O. E. Good, 1946 
G. C. Ludwig, 1946 
Harold T. Lutz, 1946 



M. R. Fleming 



AUDITING COMMITTEE 
P. B. Gibble, Chairman 



J. E. Oliver 



I. S. Ernst 



NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

H. E. Schaeffer, Chairman 
J. L. Appenzellar 



G. C. Ludwig 



FACULTY COMMITTEE 




C. A. Lynch 

P. E. V. Shannon 

J. P. Gruver 



D. E. Young, 
Chairman 

E. D. Williams 



BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
COMMITTEE 



C. A. Lynch 
E. E. Miller 
E. D. Williams 



I. S. Ernst, Chairman 
P. B. Gibble 
H. H. Shenk 



LIBRARY AND APPARATUS 

COMMITTEE 



C. A. Lynch 
J. E. Oliver 
P. A. W. Wallace 



W. A. Wilt, Chairman 
C. G. Stambach 



FARM COMMIT! ! i 

C. A. Lynch 
J. E. Oliver 
Albert Watson 



J. E. Gipple, 

Chairman 
S. H. Derickson 



PUBLICITY COMMITTEE 



C. A. Lynch 
0. T. Ehrhart 
H. T. Lutz 
S. O. Grimm 



P. A. W. Wallace, 

Chairman 
Mrs. L. W. Yardley 



18 




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FIRST SEMESTER SECOND SEMESTER 

Ruth Haverstock ...... President Gerald Kauffman 

Bruce Souders Vice-President Richard Hoerner 

Martha Yeakle Secretary Esther Wagner 

Marian Kreider Treasurer Marian Kreider 



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19 



SENIOR 

CLASS 





Anger, Jean P. 



Bartels, Betty V. 





Bashore, Sidney M. 



Beamesderfer, Samuel H. 



Bomgardner, Betty J. 




Bouder, Norman M. 




Carper, Miriam N. 
20 




Cox, Dorothy M. 






Fornoff, Hazel J. 



Gerhart, Kenneth R. 



Haverstock, Ruth E. 






Hess, Elizabeth A. 



Hoerner, Richard J. 



Kreider, Marian M. 




Kreiser, Elizabeth A. 




Landis, Dorothy J. 

21 





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SENIOR 

CLASS 





V . .-—is 



Light, Elizabeth J. 



Ling, Minnie E. 





Mandle, Barbara C. 



. - ! I 

Miller, Emma C. 




Minnich, Betty M. 





Mobley, Mark A. 



Moyer, Mary E. 
22 







Schnee, Edgar F. 



Schwalm. Glenn P. 






Seavers, Garneta L 



Shelley, Charles A 



Snoddy, Buryl E. 




Souders, Bruce C. 




Stein, Samuel E. 
23 




i 
Stonecipher, Verna P. 






Tippery, Miriam W. 



Wagner, Esther M. 



Wolfe, Charles W. 




Yeakle, Mary M. 




Words are so empty . 



Things we feel most we sometimes can't express. We miss her; we had respect 
and admiration for her, and we are grieved to think that she, who cherished and 
enjoyed each moment of the life she lived so fully, should be forced to part with 
that which she most dearly loved. 

Her brave fight to win back her health remains a challenge to us, . . . the 
students and faculty, who express with sincerity their sorrow upon the death 
of Ruth J. Graybill. 



24 




& CO 




FIRST SEMESTER 

Lloyd Housel President 

Gebald Kauffman Vice-President 

Miriam Jones Secretary 

Yvonne Raab Treasurer 



SECOND SEMESTER 

. . . Geraldine Huss 
. . William Schindel 
.... Miriam Jones 
.... Yvonne Raab 



Qsnd Qusrujyu, AoJU^td xsna, 



25 



Junior . . . 



ANNA ADAMS 

"Is she kidding, or is she telling 
the truth?" This South Hall 
heckler goes in for Muhl-training, 
and with that engaging smile, 
why not? A "Lover" of argument, 
she is South Hall's prima donna. 



ETTA M. AYERS 

Meet our perfectionist in dress. 
As Tennyson has it, "and lightly 
was her slender nose tip-tilted 
like the petal of a flower." Her 
accuracy has been proved in class 
and office, and she gets an "E" 
for her Army and Navy morale 
program. 



PATRICIA M. BARTELS 

A conscientious student, Pat is 
extremely good-natured. We sup- 
pose you all know that her hope 
chest is very well Soudered. Al- 
ways effervescent, always talking, 
always a good kid. 



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26 



• • • v^lclSS 



DALE R. BEITTEL 

He won his reputation as "Lil 
Abner" and kept it by wearing 
those PLAID shirts. Our own 
superman finds pleasure in his 
music and music in his pleasure. 
He also takes time to sermonize 
and philosophize. 



GENE G. BOWMAN 

Mr. Anthony solved the troubles 
of this willowy smooth dresser. 
The sparkle from her diamond 
puts that sparkle in her eyes. She 
is also interested, incidentally, in 
historical and psychological 
trends. 



MARY JANE BROWN 

A stately maiden, gracious and 
reserved, she will undertake most 
anything. And we can't help 
mentioning those expressive eyes 
and that beautiful hair. The 
wings she wears have flown to 
her from India. 




27 



Junior . . . 






VERNA C. CASSATT 

"My man? Which one?" She 
took over Marty's position as 
L. V.'s war correspondent. Her 
fiery temper quickly forgives and 
forgets, and her downright friend- 
liness and big heart make her the 
life of South Hall. A pinochle 
promoter who excels at folk 
dancing. 



ROBERT P. CHRIST 

Our "handy" man in chapel — 
and what happened when he 
wasn't there! A good organizer 
and an orator who likes to tell us 
that chocolate isn't all that's 
sweet in Hershey. He combines 
school and work with an efficiency 
that demands our admiration. 



BERENICE L. CORBALIS 

She is everybody's friend and is 
quietly but thoroughly enjoying 
life. Her Tal-Nack for music is 
enviable, and her sense of humor 
is casually subtle. An amicable 
redhead who amuses — no matter 
what she is doing. 






*:?'MikO 



28 






Class . 




m 






JOHN A. DETWEILER 

Adam the Lover is also sometimes 
referred to as Hank Cupid — we 
really can't say why. Bashful and 
droll, he takes a sincere interest 
in his work, and he is quite the 
man on the basketball and hand- 
ball courts. He's blond. 




LEROY W. DINGER 

Leroy is noted for owning one of 
the poorest excuses for a car, and 
it usually reposes between re- 
pairs as a campus landmark. 
Warm-hearted and gullible, here 
is one fellow who can take it. And 
there's a girl in Philly with a 
steady Hum. 




LLOYD V. FEGAN, JR. 

His habitat is the chem lab, and 
he used to own the Ark. A snappy 
suit-er whose specialty is rec 
hour, his way with the women is 
really smooth. Medical school is 
his final destination — he hopes. 




29 



Junior . . . 









LIZETTE P. FISHER 

This three-day Conservite is 
quick and clever, but she is still 
known as the Beautiful Dreamer. 
A souvenir collector with a mag- 
netic personality, Fifi can act. 
Ask her about that summer at 
the shore! 



JAMES E. FLINCHBAUGH 

He has more Mohler trouble 
than anyone we know. Our super 
salesman will always be remem- 
bered as that charming rocketeer. 
Miss Myers just couldn't do 
without him. Could be his con- 
scientious humor! 



FRANCIS F. FLURER 

The master of argument, 
"Flurer" is a minister with sev- 
eral years of experience in the 
field of service to his credit. We 
miss seeing the "Missus" around, 
but he takes care of that for us by 
spending half his time at home. 
We understand he has a full- 
time charge. 



30 



• • • V^IclSS 




PATRICK J. FRANK 

A family man, he has been ac- 
cepted at Jefferson Medical 
School. Suave and quietly stu- 
dious, Pat is always on hand with 
friendly advice. Dependability 
is his forte and fascinating is his 
mustache. 



MARJORIE L. FRANTZ 

Our educated screwball reminds 
us of an accident ambling some- 
where to happen. A polka fiend 
(pronounced f double end) who 
is always good for a laugh. And 
she is a true leader and a poetess 
of promise. What a combination! 



JOHN H. GABLE 

A charge to keep has he — also a 
family. Vivian keeps him step- 
ping, and she hasn't had her first 
birthday yet! A kind joviality 
and his many interests make his 
friendship a thing to be desired. 



31 



Junior . . . 



ELIZABETH A. GOODEN 

"I don't get it," Betty is a key- 
board coaxer who is equally ac- 
complished at boogie and classi- 
cal music. She is a gracious host- 
ess, a steady worker, and the 
possessor of plenty of unused 
talent. 



EVELYN C. HIESTER 

Here's a really all-round girl with 
the right amount of confidence 
and always the right answers. 
We wonder where she keeps that 
hidden dynamo, because she is 
constantly bounding with energy. 
And she is a composer and 
"waver" of no mean ability. 



EDNA MAE HOLLINGER 

Her effervescence makes her a 
good soda jerkess, and she always 
seems to be rarin' to go. This 
generous, inquisitive giggler is 
known to us as "Helen's Guiding 
Light," Vivacity is the keyword 
of her existence. 




.* 







32 



• • • v^lclSS 







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LLOYD J. HOUSEL 

Our theological football star has 
also turned into quite a lady's 
man. Long time prexy of the 
Junior Class — he still managed 
to keep an even temper, and that 
is an accomplishment. And he is 
casually car-less at the moment. 



MAEREDITH L. HOUSER 

She is just a little bit north of 
South Carolina — and not be- 
cause she wants to be. "Reedy" 
is an accomplished musician and 
a home-made fashion plate who 
neatly sets the pace for the rest 
of us. Need we mention the fact 
that she is easy on the eyes — but 
definitely. 



GERALDINE R. HUSS 

Doc has a mind of her own which 
she frequently expresses in de- 
bate. She wouldn't like us to say 
this, but she really is a con- 
scientious student who is deter- 
mination personified. A practical 
jokester — and only she can get 
away with it. 







33 



Junior . . . 





MIRIAM L. JONES 

One can usually find a Bill-et- 
doux on Mini's desk — her dark- 
eyed charm explains it. But even 
this doesn't seem to keep her from 
concentrating on Shakespeare, 
harmony, or what have you. And 
she can always find the funny 
side of anything. 



GERALD D. KAUFFMAN 

Hershey buds are his favorite 
sweets. Jerry has distinguished 
himself as a leader here on cam- 
pus, but he still hasn't lost that 
boyish laugh — thank goodness. 
His ability to be serious is ably 
shown in his well-thought-out 
sermons. 



BRIAN H. KINTZER 

Never let it be said that he isn't 
the Best Man — at least in some 
situations. He has kept a lot of 
people guessing — Congressmen, 
road riders, and women. A bas- 
ketball enthusiast with a puckish 
sense of humor. 






34 




c- \ 



* 

'V. / 



NORMA V. KISCADDEN 

She commutes between Lebanon 
Valley and Montgomery Ward's 
and practices her super salesman- 
ship on World Citizen recruits. 
"Mac's" favorite slogan seems to 
be, "But Prof, my train was late." 
A jolly Math wizard with a keen 
sense of responsibility. 



• • • V^lclSS 




JOHANN L. KLICK 

Yo-hann, as we prefer to call her, 
is mentally alert in studies as well 
as wit. She has won fame on 
campus as co-author of the book, 
"Hopping Etiquette," and as a 
rapid-fire conversationalist. Her 
dimpled smile and her trim figure 
make her crooning a little bear- 
able. 



SARAH E. KOURY 

Cookie's main interest is a Navy 
man — home port, Fredericksburg. 
While most girls spend hours 
trying to curl their hair, she 
spends time uncurling hers — and 
do we envy her. A happy Con- 
servite with an infectious laugh, 
she takes her Kitty-Karre with 
her wherever she goes. 



35 



Junior . . . 



BLOSSOM R. LEVITZ 

Crisply charming Blossom is a 
future medico of great promise. 
She always looks as if she has just 
stepped out of Vogue — and she 
lends her gowns for the most 
unique purposes! We wonder if 
there is any exciting place in the 
United States that she hasn't 
visited. 



MARTHA E. LIGHT 

Martha is one of those rare people 
on campus who takes her study- 
ing seriously. Quiet and unassum- 
ing, she is the girl in the bonnet 
of blue. The little she says is 
definitely worth listening to, and 
she has ceased to be a menace on 
the highway — we hope. 



PAUL LIPSITZ 

Leo the Lip is our magician par 
excellence, and we wouldn't mind 
seeing one of those performances 
again. He emerges from the 
Chem lab approximately once a 
day to read the bulletin board. 
"Lippy" seems to be forever 
searching for the hidden humor 
in anything. 




36 



• • • v^lclSS 



CAROLINE E. MATTER 

We all know Caroline as an in- 
dividualist and a solemn joker. 
She is artistically endowed, so- 
phisticated by mood, and pos- 
sessed of a gorgeous head of hair. 
Her philosophy of life is "What's 
an overcut card?" 



SARAH E. McCEEHIX 

She never fails to post her nightly 
Billing, and the Navy is also re- 
sponsible for that sparkler on her 
left hand. Sallie's natural beauty 
and her placid outlook on life 
make a swell combination! Noth- 
ing disturbs her — not even a nois.y 
dining hall or a heckling table. 



CHARLOTTE K. MOHLER 

She's a Music Major and her 
favorite song is JIM. The way 
we understand it, her bass violin 
takes a beating over the week- 
ends. That constant smile is an 
indication of her natural pleasant- 
ness, and she sincerely likes her 
"book learning." 






37 



Junior . . . 



DOROTHY E. MOYER 

Mixing math, music, and sports 
is quite a task, but here is one 
girl equal to it. Teaching takes 
second place in her heart to a 
certain Army man, but Dotty 
remains through it all, a con- 
scientious student. 



ELIZABETH ANN MOYER 

She takes many, many trips to 
Pliilly, and that caduceus must 
have something to do with it. 
Sweet tempered and unassuming, 
Betty Ann has a sense of rhythm 
and a real love of dancing. She 
is distinguished by her quiet 
beauty. 



YVONNE L. RAAB 

Strikingly attired, she "wows" 
the campus with her color com- 
binations. Our brisk efficiency 
expert knows how to get things 
done. She is a fluent parlez-vous- 
er and chocolate is her mania! 
Her well-kept tresses are indeed 
a true crowning glory. 




38 



Class 



E. STEPHEN RABY 

He's our Speed King on crutches 
and a steady firm debater. 
Quincey's pride and joy has a 
drawl all his own, and a spirit 
that's invincible. We don't know 
how it happened, but now we 
call him Raby-Baby. 



F. ROSALIE REINHOLD 

Music is her first love, but then 
there's always Louie. Rosalie 
lives life to its fullest and seems 
to have found the secret of su- 
preme contentment. She is un- 
usual in that she can play a bas- 
soon, and play it well. Her pupils 
also find her adept at the piano. 



DONALD D. RETTEW 

He can make music with the 
baton and is capable of teaching 
the art. Don has a photographic 
eye and is administratively in- 
clined. Painstaking in his in- 
terests, he finds the hours after 
2 a.m. most conducive to work. 






39 



Junior . . . 





MARY JANE ROWE 

"Oh-simple girl" is, beyond doubt, 
her favorite quip. And they say 
there are methods in her mad- 
ness — and we do mean methods. 
Red hair plus Navy Blue make a 
pleasing combination. She is 
usually seen with her twin (?) — 
well, at least in name. 



WILLIAM H. SCHINDEL 

A newcomer on campus, Bill has 
distinguished himself as a mu- 
sician, an actor, and a chemist. 
He is a smooth dresser and goes 
in for all kinds of dancing — re- 
member the dorm play? His in- 
tellectual witticisms are con- 
stantly being punctuated by a 
raised eyebrow. 



NANCY K. SCHREIBER 

Recently wedded to Johnnie, she 
took those frequent trips to 
Williamsport to be near him. 
She is one of the world's best 
cooks, and potato soup is her 
specialty. Charming and win- 
some, she can handle a tractor as 
smoothly as she does her car. 






40 



• • • v^lclSS 






SARAH ELIZABETH SHEETZ 

Liz is the most indefatigable 
worker on campus, and we think 
23 hours is really work. The 
little maid with the braid, she 
has won a reputation as an in- 
lab-itant, first class. There is 
merriment in her eyes, and she 
refuses to accept responsibility 
for "little brother." 



ERWIN R. SMARR 

Here is our funster and punster 
with a Devil-ish gleam in his eye. 
A brain.v Chem student, he has a 
yen for acting — when is he and 
when isn't he? He holds undis- 
puted title of champ letter writer 
to pals in the service. 



DONALD S. SMITH 

An interesting conversationalist, 
he makes a specialty of chapel 
jokes. Donald's time is divided 
between college and a steady job 
at Middletown. He is another 
one of those cheerful Hershey 
Junior College products, con- 
tributing his talents to L. V. 





41 



Junior 




JEROME B. SMITH 

We miss the only instigator of 
life on the campus — the co-pro- 
ducer and writer of the first 
Men's Dorm Play. Jerry's super 
style of ballroom dancing helps 
to make him God's gift to the 
women. There is an art to 
whistling with a cigarette in your 
mouth. 



GRACE E. SPANGLER 

North Hall has discovered lately 
that Blondie is Coast Guarding 
an officer. First chair violinist, 
Grace shows her true personality 
and astounding sense of humor to 
transients of Third Floor — Left 
Wing. As a practice teacher, 
they say she's tops. 



JANICE M. STAHL 

Janice is either writing or flying 
to Polly, and she is rightly proud 
of her picture collection of him. 
She is always eating, but all excess 
energy goes to jitterbugging. Her 
vivid face and warm brown eyes 
make her a cover-girl candidate. 





--,; 



Wr 



•-.. 




42 



• • • v^lclSS 






^j!. 



i+jm 




ARTHUR W. STAMBACH 

Absolutely nothing changes his 
calm expression, except perhaps 
his weekly attempts to be with 
the newly-engaged. Art is the 
idol of the youthful cornetists he 
tutors in Lebanon and is recog- 
nized on campus as a promising 
minister. 



DORIS J. STERNER 

She knows a Hershey Bear — and 
we don't mean in the Zoo! South 
Hall's prexy is too natural and 
kindhearted to be one of the 
"sterner" sort. She is an im- 
maculate dresser, and the person 
to whom "Dark Eyes" must have 
been dedicated. 



GILDA M. TULLI 

An accomplished writer and an 
intent reader, she is naturally 
Dr. Wallace's pride and joy. She 
is a multi-linguist with a charm- 
ing accent and a yen for argu- 
ments. Gilda is off in another 
world all her own. 




43 



Junior . . . 




x 



MARION E. ULMER 

Judy is balanced between Con- 
serv and College, and she vainly 
tried to teach her roommate 
math. She is everybody's friend, 
even though she pens those hor- 
rible midweek sentences. Us- 
ually serious-minded, she is cap- 
able of making a lot of noise — and 
that inimitable giggle is evidence 
of it. 



JEANNE A. WALLER 

C o n s t an 1 1 y Olen - chuckling, 
Jeanne cannot disguise the mis- 
chief in her eyes. Her masterly 
rendition of "Rhapsody in Blue" 
and her superior work in her 
music will never be forgotten. A 
rabid hater of 8 o'clock classes, 
she wakes up in time for hockey 
and basketball. 




MARTIN R. WEBER 

Doc can only spend a limited 
time on campus because of his 
family and full-time practice. By 
his bow tie shall ye know him, 
and you can't miss those snappy 
clothes. A psychology enthusiast, 
his favorite greeting is "What's 
your trouble?" 





44 



• • • vulclSS 





V* 




HERMAN J. WEISER, JR. 

An outstanding member of "Ben- 
der's Gang," he is also a physicist 
extraordinaire. "Work" has a 
prominent place in his life — 
studies and otherwise. A thor- 
ough and easy-going man behind 
the scenes, Herm is the dorm's 
most reliable waker-upper. 



EUGENE B. WENGER 

May we present the life of the 
German class! Mister Wenger is 
a theological arguer who is pre- 
paring to help the teacher short- 
age — is that why he wears a 
black tie? A well-trained bari- 
tone, he takes each day as it 
comes. 



EDWARD D. WITHERS 

A steady student and waiter, Ed 
has taken a real interest in North 
Hall this year. Inevitably, the 
nickname, Jane, has stuck since 
he was a freshman. A recent find 
in the realm of basketball and 
football, he is a man who withers 
but never fades. 





45 



Junior Class 






H. EDWARD WOLFE 

Ed seems rather shy and reticent, 
but then you can't tell a book by 
its cover. He takes time out 
from Chem lab to indulge in 
his favorite pastime — matinees. 
Here's one man who has every thing- 
down Pat. 



ESTHER M. ZIMMERMAN 

She is a Major in English with 
the Shelley point of view. Zimmy 
confirms the theory that two 
red-heads are better than one. 
She also proves by her laughing 
eyes and smile for everyone that 
good things come in small pack- 
ages. 




ROBERT A. ZIMMERMAN 

A great lover of music and of 
Cookies too! The originator of 
the Men's Dorm broadcasting- 
studio has left us for the Navy. 
Bob was an expert on the French 
horn weekdays, but on Saturday 
he wielded drumsticks. 






46 



/? 




v_. 




V) 

I 



//%^ 



L 




Fffflfl 



President Joseph Kania 

Vice-President Nancy Sattazahn 

Secretary Phyllis Snyder 

Treasurer Eleanor Frezeman 



\J hjL h&ftkl CUxJL CL 



ihfti 



lfUsruM_s. 



47 




Sophomore Class 



. . . and more and more, the sophomores are having to take an important part in campus activities. 
Which, since they led the classes in the campaign fund, is just as it should be. But this has its bad 
points, too, for the size of the proverbial sophomore head has swelled considerably. "Just think! We 
don't have to bother about freshman rules any more." 

This one class has its finger sunk deep into every pie, and shows signs of not giving just a little piece 
to the freshmen. (The upper classmen, of course, are a different matter.) 

The majority of them have taken to studying, although some seem to enjoy the knowledge gained in 
parlors more than that in the texts. But that all goes to make a wide-awake group, which is just what 
any college wants, and more like them. 



48 



CLASS ROLL 



Albert, Kathryn I. 
Bittner, Joanne B. 
Bowman, Elizabeth L. 
Cully, Grace M. 
Deitz, Janet M. 
Dromgold, Virginia M. 
Early, Robert F. 
Frank, Gabriel B. 
Frezeman, Eleanor J. 
Gingrich, Jean M. 
Greene, Elizabeth A. 
Gruman, Gerald J. 
Hartz, Helen L. 



Hershey, Eleanor L. 
Himmelberger, Marion L. 
Karre, Ruth L. 
Killian, Ruth E. 
Kreiser, Edith A. 
Loy, Erma M. 
McDonald, Jacqueline A. 
Meily, Madeline 
Mumma, Lorraine C. 
Reiff, Ruth E. 
Sattazahn, Helen L. 
Sattazahn, Nancy M. 
Schaeffer, Clare C. 



Seabrook, Helen M. 
Seidel, Richard D. 
Shettle, Viola E. 
Shupper, Frank 
Snyder, Phyllis E. 
Stauffer, Sarah E. 
Strock, Mary J. 
Thrush, Jean C. 
Wagner, George B. 
Wieland, Mary J. 
Workman, Frances E. 
Yeager, Catherine S. 




49 




GirW Dorm Life 





^AJi>hjJLu JtftL TAfl&A, OJvL QJUJiTb QsnA 




51 




Freshman Class 



. . . fresh as a spring day . . . no, not poetry, just an apt description of this year's freshmen. The 
annual deluge occurred at the beginning of the year, in considerable force. Then, as a crowning touch, 
a tidal wave in January. Tender sprouts in a field of thorns, and, as expected, they soon became thorny 
enough themselves. 

Honestly though, considering the handicaps a war brings to a college, in decreased enrollment, travel 
difficulties and all that, the Frosh have done very well for themselves and for us. Realizing the need for 
cooperation to make a success of all functions they turned out en masse at every affair. A few have 
gone — the draft does that — but those who are still here have proved that they've got the stuff that 
counts. More power to them! 



52 



Bashore, Robert M. 
Bedger, Jean E. 
Bickel, George W. 
Boyer, Donald S. 
Brinser, Foster M. 
Brubaker, Elizabeth J. 
Butt, Betty J. 
Cappelli, Calvin C. 
Carson, Burton E. 
Carson, June A. 
Cohen, Abba D. 
Cover, Richard E. 
Dickel, Helen L. 
Ebersole, Irene M. 
Emerich, Mildred M. 
Engle, Esther M. 
Evelev, Dorothy L. 
Eyster, Kathleen M. 
Flinchbaugh, Gladys E. 
Frank, Gabriel B. 
Gingrich, Betty J. 
Gingrich, Russell L., Jr. 
Goodling, Lois M. 



CLASS ROLL 

Goodman, Nora M. 
Haines, George G. 
Hartman, Samuel A., 2nd. 
Hensel, Thomas A. 
Horstick, Louise G. 
Hudyma, Jean E. 
Johns, Nancy V. 
Kania, Joseph P. 
Kauffman, Miriam J. 
Keifer, William L. 
Kitchen, Winifred J. 
Kline, Robert M. 
Kolb, Barbara R. 
Lenker, Theodore L. 
Markley, Joseph L. 
Marshall, John E. 
Moody, Leocadia C. 
Mease, Carolyn L. 
Miller, Harriet E. 
Moss, Carolyn R. 
Mullin, John W. 
Myers, Mary E. 
Palmer, Mildred M. 



Parmer, Charles E. 
Parr, Malcolm A. 
Quickel, Madalyn V. 
Rasher, Joye A. 
Rentzel, Ethel M. 
Ross, Martha I. 
Saurman, Nancy 
Saylor, Clyde J. 
Schade, Marion L. 

SCHLOSSER, ARLENE B. 

Schott, Sarah A. 
Seibert, William J. 
Sheetz, David P. 
Smith, Edmund R. 
Smith, Dorothy M. 
Spitler, Evelyn A. 
Strauss, Elinor F. 
Strickler, Andrew P. 
Stonecipher, Evelyn M. 
Wennerholm, Helen A. 
Wentling, Stanley A. 
Zerbe, Richard S. 




53 




There's nothing like 







rt liberal education 



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w, 








56 




57 




LEARNING FROM ABOVE 



58 



u9jl nasij-L oJl jtkiL o^nd CLouajul Jt< 



OUUJUL JL&4> 





. . . amid radical changes. And the major emphasis seems to be on 
activities connected with war work, although the others are certainly not 
being slighted. Several new clubs have made their appearance on campus 
and promise to be valuable, permanent additions to L. V. Yet with all these 
changes, we are determined to keep the organizations alive and to try to 
improve them until you return. 



59 





Marjorie thinks over new ideas 



Johann and Etta smile at problems 




EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor Marjorie Fraxtz 

Associate Editor Johann Klick 

Literary Editors Lizette Fisher 

Geraldtxe Hess 

Photographic Editor Donald Rettew 

A rt Editors Etta Atres 

Eleaxor Frezeman 

Co?i!<ervatory Editor Evelyn Hiester 

Drama Editor William Schixdel 

Sports Editor Herman Weiser 

Typists Betty Goodex 

Mark Mobley 

60 




Don selects his best pictures 



QUITTIE STAFF 



WERE you ever on a Quittie staff? Now sit down, 'cause we are going to make a very 
corny pun — the occasion just screams for it : we can't help it : Quittie staff is what we 
weren't, but often wanted to be. We never saw such a mess in our life — even-body in every- 
body else's way, stealing everybody else's lines, cutting classes and getting "in Dutch." hav- 
ing all our ideas cost far too much. Oh. well, somehow things seemed to be working out. 
though — I don't know why. First of all. Who could do what? O. K. That was decided. 
Then we had the wrong whos doing the wrong whats. So, another mad scramble. That 
settled how to do things. Sweat, blood, and tears — you've no idea. Anyhow, we hit upon 
some ideas and we played them through no matter how they've come out. Time was literally 
flying and we had to grab SOMETHING as it flew by! If the pictures aren't in straight, 
the ink is splashed, the pages not the same size, bear with us. It's all meant in the right 
spirit. And no matter what we have said before, we LOVED making it up for you. 




EDITORIAL STAFF, continued 

Staff Miriam Jones 

Gene Bowman 
Marian Ulmer 
Robert Christ 
Patricia Bartels 
Yvonne Raab 
Jeanne Waller 
Frances Workman 
Charlotte Mohler 
Janice Stahl 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager Gerald Kauffman 

Advertising Manager .... James Flinchbaegh 
Assistant Advertising Manager . . . Blossom Levitz 




Gerrv counts and recounts — no monev 



61 



Ha ©te Collegtenne 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Vol. XX 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11. 1943 



No. S 



THE newspaper was one of the items hit hardest by the war. In spite of this, the staff did 
a great job. News, features, pictures, and letters from you servicemen made up the 
copies which came out almost every other Thursday. 

We owe a lot to Editor Bruce Souders, and to Associate Editor Marjorie Frantz for a job 
well done even with major drawbacks. Etta Ayers, assisted by Gerald Kauffman, handled 
the business department smoothly. The other department heads were: Co-neivs Editors, 
Christine Mumma and Betty Bart els; Conservatory Editor, Dorothy Landis; Sports Editor, 
Geraldine Huss; Feature Editor, Samuel Beamesderfer ; Exchange Editor, Frances Workman; 
Circulation Manager, James Flinchbaugh. Those of the staff who are in the service are 
Robert Donough, Miles Harriger, Irwin Orel, Theodore Bachman, and Gene Cohen. 




•We Must Win the Peace 

Having left Lebanon Valley College in 1918 to become a student in Bonebrake 
Seminary. I had an unforgettable experience on a cerlain November day. A man came 
down our street, gesticulating wildly and shouting unintelligibly — all this in an atmos- 
phere of intense excitement, pierced by shrieking whistles and made vibrant by jubilant 
bells. Opening my window, I heard him exclaim, "The war's ove.' the war's over." The 
image of my brother in France crowded out everything else in my mind; and my heart, 
filled with unrestrainable emotion, found relief in "Praise God from Whom All Blessings 
Flow." 

The City of the W right Brothers became delirious. A victory-intoxicated people em- 
ployed every means to express their unbounded joy. Spirited spectators applauded im- 
promptu parades, and zooming airplanes performed breath-taking acrobatics far above 
the tall office buildings in the downtown section of Dayton. This was the False Armistice, 
preceding November eleventh by four days. . . 

62 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE 



ESTABLISHED 1925 



Vol. XX— No. S 



Thursday, November 11, 1943 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE is published every Thursday throughout the college year except 
during holiday vacations and examination, by the students of Lebanon Valley College. Annville, 
Pennsylvania. 

LA VIE is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press and the Intercollegiate Press. Na- 
tional advertising is secured through the Nat'onai Advertising Service, Inc., College Publishers 
Representative, 420 Madison Avenue, New York, N. Y. 



Managing Board 

Bruce Souders _ Editor 

Etta Ayers Business Manager 

Marjorie Frantz Associate Editor 

Christine Mumma Co-News Editor 

Betty Bartels Co-News Editor 

Dorothy Landis Conservatory Editor 

Geraldine Huss Sports Editor 

Sam Beamesderfer Feature Editor 

Frances Workman Exchange Editor 

Dr. George G. Struble \ 

Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace V Faculty Advisers 

Prof. Edward P. Rutledge ' 

News Staff — Marion M Kreide-, Donald Rettew, Erma Loy, Lizette Fisher, Madelyn Quickel, 
Sara Schott, Gerald Gruman, Edna Mae Hollinger, Elizabeth Jean Light, Eleanor Strauss, 
and Claire Schaeffer. 

Conservatory Staff — Ruth Kane, Emma Catherine Miller. 

Sports Staff — Malcolm Parr. 

Feature Staff — Yvonne Raab, Ruth Kane, Edith Kreiser. 

Typist — Yvonne Raab. Gale Horstick. 

Business Staff 

James Flinchbaugh Circulation Manager 

Gerald Kauffman Assistant Business Manager 

Dr. Milton L. Stokes Faculty Adviser 

Staff — Stephen Raby, Donald Rettew, George Haines. 




Bruce and Etta plan coming issues La Vie almost ready to go to press 



63 




Clio 



MINERVA, the Goddess of Wisdom, must still be watching over Clio, because their 
membership has failed to decrease. Could the influx of freshmen be attributed to that 
riotous hike or to the deliriously brewed tea that Clionians served during the rushing season? 
Could be! 

And no one can ever forget that snowy night at the Hotel Hershey when, to the strains of 
sweet music, the flowing color of gowns, uniforms and tuxes moved smoothly across the 
floor. 

Then there were Joint Sessions to remember and exciting Ping-Pong Tournaments to play 
until, all in all, Clio more than kept up her reputation as an outstanding social organization 

Their officers for the year were: 

Anniversary President — Betty Ann Hess 




FIRST SEMESTER 
Barbara C. Maxdle 



SECOND SEMESTER 



President . . Betty Bartels 
Miriam Tippery . . Vice-President . . Betty Axx Moyer 
Marjorie Fraxtz .Recording Secretary Rosalie Reixhold 
Ruth Karre . Corresponding Secretary . . . Ruth Karre 
Yvonne Raab . Treasurer .... Yvonne Raab 



Nancy Johns 
JrxE Carson 
Barbara Kolb 



USHERS 



Jeaxx t e Kitchex 
Betty June Gingrich 



64 



FIRST SEMESTER 

Emma Catherine Miller President 
Gabxeta Seavers . . Vice-President 



SECOND SEMESTER 



Caroline Matter 
Grace Spangler 
Lizette Fisher . Recording Secretory Phyllis Snyder 

Marian Ulmer . Corresponding Secrelnry .Marian Ulmer 
Doris Sterner . . . . Treasurer . . . . Doris Sterner 
Phyllis Snyder . . . Pianist . . . Helen Seabrook 



Viola Shettel 
Frances Workman- 
Edna Mae Hollinger 



WARDENS 

Madalyn Qcickel 
Gale Horstick 
Nora Mae Goodman 




Delphian's a little sparsely membered this year. too. A nice lot of girls though. They 
started things rolling last fall with a unique little hike out to the Quittie. You know, out in 
that meadow back of Millard's. There was one antic we especially remember — did you ever 
see one of those human automobiles? Like when a person beeps for a hom. and someone 
falls flat for a blow-out? Well, that's what it was like. 

They gave a very pretty tea at Hallowe'en time (only they almost didn't have enough 
to drink!) Then initiation night came along with the usual messy proceedings and hilarious 

tortures. 



And on Saturday night. March IS. the society marked its seventeenth anniversary. 
shindig was held in the Community Building at Hershey. 



The 



Anniversary President Anna Adams 



Delphi 



nan 




65 



' 


•1 


} * 


"l". \a 




^5r "f^ , ^ - ' 


it z\ 


HP* fgrJIMMP^ -^"J^J ' * 


MMM||^ H Mggp!OT|P , ' L '' 

. — . 



Choric Speaking 



OFFICERS 

President Marjokie Frantz 

Vice-President . . . Madalyn Quickel 

Secretary Betty Gooden 

Treasurer Jeanne Kitchen 

Adviser Edward P. Rutledge 

Conductor .... Eleanor Hershey 




JAMES THURBER has recently ar- 
rived on campus and were we sur- 
prised at his mode of appearance! 

One morning in chapel a newly formed 
group presented to us several of his most 
famous fables, and since then the girls 
have given some fine performances, here, 
there, and everywhere. The surprising 
thing about this organization is that it 
was started and is being maintained en- 
tirely by students — and what do you 
know, they are mostly freshmen and 
sophomores. 

Their purpose is to interpret poetry in 
an artistic way, and a side aim is to ac- 
quire for themselves better speech and 
tone. They have been holding their meet- 
ings regularly, at which times they at- 
tempt to study the scientific principles of 
choric speech. For a really up-and-com- 
ing organization — nothing can top this! 



66 




Life Work Recruits 



NOW, particularly, the Life Work Re- 
cruits have a real job ahead of them. 
Living according to true Christian ideals 
is difficult enough even in normal times, 
but now, besides living up to these stand- 
ards, they must teach their principles to 
others. 

It is quite possible that their task would 
be much simplified if more people — 
especially more college students — would 
take an active interest in their work. 

Basing their activities on the assump- 
tion that religion plays one of the most 
important roles in the development of the 
world after the war, they have set out to 
apply the principles of Christianity to 
their lives and ours. And these principles 
do work. For we can say, it's too bad 
there weren't more associations like this 
one twenty years ago. 



OFFICERS 

President Lloyd Housel 

Vice-President . . . Gerald Kauffman 

Secretary Esther Zimmerman 

Treasurer Stephen Raby 

Deputation Chairman Dale Beittel 

Pianist Miriam Tippery 




67 



Y Organizations 

THE Y's have concentrated their atten- 
tion this year, not on a new program, 
but on keeping things together as they were 
before the war. They are still the first 
friend of the freshmen and have been re- 
sponsible for properly launching this year's 
frosh on their college career. Those dull 
week-ends were enlivened by parties, hikes, 
hayrides and dances — not to mention the 
well-planned Mother's and Dad's week ends. 

The Christmas activities were the high- 
light of the year's program; they seemed to 
have more meaning for the student body, 
especially with the addition of a Communion 
Service two nights before vacation, and a 
pageant embodying the theme of a prayer for 
peace. 

Both Y organizations have continued to 
remain lively groups trying to keep up those 
traditions which are a vital part of L. V. 




Marian and Charlie successfully teamed 




68 




Y. M. C. A. Cabinet Y.W . C. A. Cabinet 



President Charles Wolfe 

Vice-President Lloyd Housel 

Secretary Edward Withers 

Treasurer Stephen Raby 

Corresponding Secretary . Charles Shelley 

Social Chairman Herman Weiser 

World Friendship Chmn. James Flinchbaugh 
Freshman Adviser .... Gerald Kauffman 
Publicity Chairman .... Donald Rettew 

Quiet Hour Dale Beittel 

Music Chairman .... William Schindel 
Property Manager Leroy Dinger 



President Marian Kreider 

Vice-President Marjorie Frantz 

Corresponding Secretary . Eleanor Hershey 

Recording Secretary Gene Bowman 

Treasurer Elizabeth Gooden 

Day Student 

Representatives .... Maeredith Houser 
Betty Ann Moyer 
Social Advisers . . Mrs. Frederick Miller 

Mrs. Amos Black 
Library Chairman . . . Ruth Haverstock 
World Friendship Chairman Sarah Stauffer 
Social Chairman .... Nancy Sattazahn 
Friendly Hour Chairman . Frances Workman 
Asst. Friendly Hour Chmn. Ruth Gladfelter 
Quiet Hour Chairman . . Geraldine Huss 
Asst. Quiet Hour Chmn. . Esther Zimmerman 
Music Chairman Elizabeth Reiff 



69 




International Relations Club 



"O EING informed on affairs of the day is the 

•*-* prime function of the International Rela- 
tions Club. And do they have their hands full 
now? These "little incidents" with Ireland and 
South America make post-war planning so easy. 

And speaking of the world afterward, the 
I. R. C. has its own ideas on the subject, having 
discussed the idealistic fol-de-rol along with the 
practical aspects of winning the peace. 

The I. R. C. has combined with the World 
Citizenship Group to get a better and broader 
exchange of ideas, and there is no doubt that 
this is one organization well worth having. 



President . . . Samuel Beamesderfer 
Vice-President .... Lizette Fisher 
Secretary-Treasurer . . . Yvonne Raab 




Sam — director of debates 



70 




World Citizenship 



WHEN Colonel M. Thomas Tchou, former Secretary to Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, visited 
the campus early this fall, he really started something. He awakened us to thinking about a new 
movement that is actually based on a very old idea — that of World Citizenship. Dr. Wallace accepted 
the challenge of carrying on the work in this vicinity, and he helped us to organize our own group 
right here on campus. The whole idea is still in the formative process, but numerous meetings are 
being held in the community in order to make World Citizenship an active, moving force. All its 

members hope to learn what they can of present 
and future world relationships, and to persuade 
others of the universality of this thing we call 
Citizenship. 

In the Lebanon County Chapter, the officers 
are: President, Dr. Clyde A. Lynch: Vice-Presi- 
dent, Rev. Frederick Hasskarl; Secretary-Treas- 
urer. Dr. Paul A. W. Wallace: Other members: 
Mrs. C. M. Coover. Dr. A. H. M. Stonecipher. 
Dr. William A. Wilt. Mr. Samuel H. Beamesder- 
fer. Mr. Bruce Souders. Miss Helen Hartz. 

The student committee is as follows: Chairman, 
Samuel Beamesderfer : Secretary-Treasurer. Miss 
Helen Hartz. 
Inspirer of world-wide thought 












First and last aiders to the cause 



Red Cross 



AFTER looking over this page, you fellows in the service will have real reason for feeling 
proud of your Alma Mater. L. V. C. is now one of the few campuses in the U. S. which 
can boast of its own Red Cross chapter. It was organized and is directed by Miss Henderson 
and Prof. Carmean. Enthusiasm runs high, for this is the opportunity that those of us still 
here at school have been waiting for. Many classes are being held in the evenings, some of 
which are Nutrition, Home Nursing, First Aid and Canteen. Time is being spent learning 
the art of folding square corners when making a bed, what to do in case of shock, and how to 
stop bleeding in case of accident. Miss Gillespie is again supervising the bandage making, 
and fellows and girls alike are donating their blood at the Lebanon Blood bank. 

The unit of air-raid wardens has been organized again this year, and is ready to function 
at the call of the whistle. You see, fellows, L. V. C. is war conscious. 




72 




HA 

The officers of the Red Cross Chapter are: 

Chairman *' Lizette Fisher 

Vice-Chairman Geraldine Huss 

Secretary Betty Jean Butt 

Treasurer .... Marian Ulmer 

Publicity Chairman Miriam Jones 




73 




Biology Club 

THIS organization was founded for all those who wish to delve further into the private lives of 
birds, bees, flowers, and bacteria. Of course, at its monthly meetings, other things scientific are 
discussed more or less volubly. And on certain happy occasions, some of Dr. Derickson's best sweet 
cider helps build club morale no end. 

When the weather permits, the members go on field trips, and panting along yards behind Dr. 
Derickson, they finally arrive at Little Round Top, much too exhausted to think about biology — 
or anything else, almost. 

This club, though, is one of the really enjoyable and smoothly running organizations on campus. 

President Esther Wagner 

^^^__ Vice-President Marian Kreider 

%^HB Secretary Nancy Sattazahn 

^k ■ Treasurer John Detweiler 



Biologists follow Esther 





74 




President 

Vice-President . . . 
Secretary-Treasurer 



Ruth Haverstock 

. Herman Weiser 

Elizabeth Kreiser 




Ruth heads chem enthusiasts 



THE Chem Club is one of those organizations whose members attend its meetings because they are 
intensely interested in the subject. Here learning is spiced with fun, and the short lectures are 
always on some subject of importance to the budding chemist. 

On occasion short movies dealing with some phase of the chemical world are shown. (But no car- 
toons, darn it!) 

Then there were the good old days when the Chem Club got back to the smell of labs at the steel 
plants in Lebanon, or at the mines in Cornwall. And when we can get tires and gas again, you can 
bet your boots that Drs. Bender and Porter will lead their brood out on their little jaunts again. 



Chemistry Club 




75 



r 




Phi Alpha Epsilon 



The new members elected this year are: 

Samuel Beamesderfer Ruth Haverstock 
Marian Kreider Elizabeth Kreiser 

Betty Minnich 




T TERE are the brains even if they 
•*■ -*■ don't like to admit it. They're tops! 
Each student elected to Phi Alpha Epsi- 
lon has attained an average of 88 for the 
first three and one-half years of his college 
career. Stick-to-itiveness and effective 
use of the midnight oil, along with fine 
character, are the qualities which the 
members possess. Every spring the new 
intelligentsia are welcomed at a banquet 
which is attended by the faculty members 
as well as the alumni. 



76 



Green Blotter 

TTERE are LVC's potential Woolcotts 
-*■ ■*■ and Whitmans, the members of the 
Green Blotter Club. All the aspirant has 
to do is to write his Mss., hand it to 
either Dr. George Struble or to the Chief 
Scop, who, this year is Bruce Souders, 
and then hold his breath until judgment is 
passed upon it . If he is not used to living 
without air, this can be bad, because the 
club meets only once in four weeks — the 
first Tuesday of every month. The meet- 
ings take place at Dr. Struble's home, with 
four receptionists in attendance — both 
Dr. and Mrs. Struble, and also their 
children, Trygvye and "Tonky." 

The criticisms of the manuscripts (the 
main purpose of the club) sometimes 
firing forth hectic discussions, but they 
always end happily — with refreshments. 




Host and hostess to the Ink Spots 



Head Scop 

Keeper of the Word Horde 



Bruce Souders 
Ruth Karre 



Ink Spots 



Marian Kreider 
Dorothy Landis 
Evelyn Hiester 
Frances Workman 
Elinor Strauss 



Samuel Beamesderfer 
Marjorie Frantz 
Christine Mumma 
Edith Kreiser 
Gerald Gruman 




77 




After the Ball 



78 



dkjuuialljt kR 7, -Lt 





. . . maybe it is on Broadway; here it's a lot of hard work and just as 
much fun. This year, with a definite shortage of theatrically-minded 
men, the work has been thrown on a few who took care of all aspects of the 
business — staging, publicity and finally, acting. 

But it has turned out to be an engaging pastime again this year, and the 
plays have been just varied enough to attract theatre-goers with all tastes. 



79 




Wig and Buckle 

OUR dramatic organization had some difficulties this year over the choice of a play suitable to 
both faculty and club members, and one which would be practical to produce with the shortage 
of men interested in dramatics. The club gave up its large production in the first semester in favor of 
the Men's Senate show, but they did produce The Devil and Daniel Webster at Homecoming. 

Because of the already-mentioned shortage of male talent, coupled with the general insufficient 

interest in the club's work, meetings were not held 
regularly this year. While we regret it, the war does 
affect us here and there's nothing we can do about it. 
We are quite sure however that in the future we will 
have another group even better than our former Wig 
and Buckles, and that Dr. Struble will again be able to 
direct them in the sort of plays the organization has 
proved itself more than able to produce. 

OFFICERS 

President Betty Minnich 

Vice-President Marjohie Frantz 

Secretary Yvonne Raab 

Treasurer Robert Zimmerman 




80 




Philo-Clio 



PHILO-CLIO did a choice farce last season, and not too subtle a one at that. Out of the Faying 
Pan concerns the antics of three girls and three young men, all of them stage-struck and with a 
touch of talent, who have taken jointly a four-room-and-bath apartment just above that of a success- 
ful producer. 

During the course of the play, they trap the producer into watching their act and cooking them a 
free meal at the same time. 

The situation becomes ticklish when two policemen 
get involved in the kids' "murder," and even more so 
when the father of one of the girls walks in to find his 
daughter living with three strange men. Definitely a 
queer situation, and just as definitely a play that more 
than pleased the audience. 

THE CAST 

George Clayton Hollinger 

Norman Harold Maurer 

Mrs. Garnet, the housekeeper . Betty Gooden 

Tony Dennison Erwin Smarr 

Muriel Foster Mary Mehaffey 

Kate Ault . . Marjorie Frantz 

Marge Benson Clare Schaeffer 

Dottie Genevieve Stansfield 

Mr. Coburn, Dottie's father Gordon Kemp 

Mr. Kenny, the producer Bruce Souders 

Mac and Joe, the policemen Jerry Smith 

George Rutt 




81 




Dorm Show 



TWO young men got together one evening and began to put on paper an idea they had held in 
their minds for some time. Their plan took root, and before long the whole campus was interested 
in their work. The two young men were Jerry Smith and Ken Gerhart; the idea was the Men's 
Senate Show, Mother! You Never Told Me! The script was okayed by the faculty, and work began — 
work with a cast of twenty-six men, who also helped with the staging. 

On the evening of December 16, 1943, the curtains of Engle Hall rose on the first original student 
revue to be presented on the Lebanon Valley Campus. The plot centered around a young man, a 
former L. V. student, who had just returned from the South Pacific area where he had been shooting 

down those da — uh, darned Japs. He 
went to the new modernized Pennway to 
see the L. V. Rockettes perform, South 
Hall to see his girl. 

We hope this show will be the first of 
many annual riotous revues written by 
some enterprising campus men. It cer- 
tainly should be, for it laid a more than 
successful foundation for the things to 
come. 




82 




Around the Stage 




CENTER OF DISTRACTION 



84 



VJua*. u^. -ttiU nruM^lt, J>n Mul alt, anot— 





. . . those weird sounds continue to emanate from the Conserv. When the fellows left last 
February they took a piece out of the heart of the Conservatory— a piece that can never be replaced 
until they return. But L. V.'s musical performances do not lack that "Rutledge" professional touch; 
and Miss Gillespie works constantly toward higher standards of teaching and playing. We admire the 
conserv, and so much of our reputation rests upon it. 



85 



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EMMA CATHERINE MILLER 





ELIZABETH ANN HESS 






86 




MAEREDITH HOUSER 



HAZEL FORNOFF 





EVELYN HIESTER 



87 



JEANNE WALLER 





RUTH KARRE 




BARBARA KALB 




Symphony 



PRESENTING the L. V. C. Symphony, one of the finest of its kind, 
directed by one of the finest of his kind. Its annual concerts have be- 
come traditional, and people travel from far and wide to hear them. They 
began the New Year with their most impressive performance — a Spanish 
Melody, an overture, and the Grieg Piano Concerto in A minor just wafted 
us away. And after intermission came that lyric soprano voice, rich and 
thrilling as always. It was over all too soon, yet the memory of it will never 
leave us. 

The orchestra has a definite feministic touch this year, but we are very 
proud of it — after all, look what Phil Spitalny did! 




College Orchestra 

DON'T let the title mislead you, for this or- 
ganization is very much a part of the con- 
servatory — so much so that practically everyone 
who ever passes through the conserv courses is a 
member of it at some stage of his career. Pro- 
fessor Carmean, who directs the future directors 
in his own scientific way, starts the Christmas 
ball rolling every year with a program which con- 
tains medleys of the ever-beautiful carols. 



89 




Glee Club 



This group of female humming-birds began warbling 
early in the season, in spite of the lack of inspiration — 
usually furnished by the male of the species. They were 
restricted, however, to short-distance flights — Lebanon 
and other nearby towns — as the war has clipped their 
wings (which they hope will grow in again soon). 
Prof. Rutledge, the leader, seems to know just the right 
kind of birdseed to hand out. He gives and they give, 
and the results. Co-opera. 



Chorus 



This is a mixed group in two ways — first, it is open to 
both "conserv" and college "studes," and second, it is 
composed of both girls and boys. This year there was 
one whole handful of boys (including Prof) mixed in 
with the girls. Sometimes at practice there would be a 
stir three times, and then, suddenly, the bass section 
was missing. However, when The Messiah was pre- 
sented at the annual Music Festival, some of the male 
townspeople and alumni were willing to help make 
success again possible. 




90 



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Concert Band 

Formerly the Boys' Band, its name was changed this 
year to the Concert Band because of the addition of all 
the pretty little concertinas (the girls), not to mention 
the subtraction of the boys. However, unbaffled by 
circumstances, they're working up to par in the true 
Rutledge style. 

The players, plus the uniforms, do a good job of 
morale-building, and the lipstick on the mouthpieces 
goes unnoticed. 



Girls' Band 



The (iirls' Band — what other kind is there? Oh, yes, 
the Concert Band. There is a difference — in personnel, 
but not in management — as Prof. Rutledge is the 
manager of this one, too. It's of pre-war origin, and is 
unmanned by choice — believe it or not. The girls meet 
every Tuesday afternoon and have lots of fun "playing 
school." 




91 









^ 



92 




May Court 



Queen of the May . . 
Maid of Honor . . . 
Members of the Court 



. . . Jean Daugherty 
. Dorothy Jean Light 
Genevieve Stansfield 
Jessie Robertson 
Ann Collins 
Katherine Dunkle 
Jane Seiverling 
Janet Schopf 





94 




MAEREDITH HOUSER 



Presenting -- Miss Quittie 



&c 



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it 

HAZEL FORNOFF 




BETTY ANN HESS 




GENE BOWMAN 



JANICE STAHL 



96 





VIRGINIA DRUMGOLD 




DOROTEY GRAYBILL 




BARBARA KOLB 



JEAN BEDGER 



97 




SUMMERESCAPADES 



Cu^L 



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MARIAN KE EIDER 

Outstanding Woman Leader 





CHARLES WOLFE 

Outstanding Man Leader 



100 




BETTY JUNE BOMGARDXER 
Best Dressed Woman 




WILLIAM SCHINDEL 

Best Dressed Man 




JOANNE BITTNER 
Best Woman Athlete 



101 



FRANK SHUPPER 

Best Man Athlete 





BARBARA KOLB 
Best Looking Woman 




DALE BEITTEL 
Best Looking Man 



102 




We will remember — how that day you left 
We walked with quickened steps on frosted streets 
And filled the station with our songs anil shouts. 
Our farewells froze with every breath we took, 
And laughter lost itself in half-choked sobs. 
We watched the train move slowly down the track — 
A small black spot that sank into the snow. 
Confusion died, and we stood silent there, 
Whispering unheard goodbyes and simple prayers. 
We promised you that we who then remained 
Would keep the 'Valley' as you knew it best 
'Til you return. 



Long weeks and months have slipped away 

since then, 
But we still look for you and wait the day 
When trains are not black chugging thieves at all, 
But messengers of joy that bear you home. 
That day will come, although we know not when, 
And we who will have waited here for you 
Will show you how the daffodils have bloomed — 
A tree was planted here, a rose bush there — 
And ivy still clings to familiar walls. 
There will be much to see — and much to tell — 
When you return. 

mlf 




103 




222 -& ** 





Lt. Jerome Frock Lt. Paul 0. Shettel Pvt. Joseph Battista 
and son, Paul, Jr. 



Pfc. Frederic 
Miller 



Sgt. Merle Freeland 



Faculty in the Service 



TO THESE, our faculty members now in the service, we would also dedicate this book. AVe miss 
them in the class room and on the campus, and we look forward to the day when they will be 
able to exchange their khakis and blues for caps and gowns. 

Dr. Shettel entered the army as a chaplain, with the commission of Lieutenant. He reported to 
the Chaplain's School at Harvard University on November 6, 1943, and after his training there was 
sent to a German prison camp at Little Rock, Arkansas. 

We were all quite proud to hear Mr. Battista (we call him Private Joe now) with the All-Soldier 
Revue in which he was featured while he was stationed at the New Cumberland Reception Center. 
During the winter he also appeared with the National Symphony of Washington at their concert in 
Richmond, Virginia. While practicing with the orchestra in Washington, he had the privilege of 
playing for Mrs. Roosevelt. And so, you see, even while in the service, Mr. Battista has been able to 
maintain his highly acclaimed reputation as a pianist. 

Prof. Miller visited the campus recently and verified the song, "What do we do in the Infantry? 
We walk, we walk, we walk." 'Fritz' had many interesting stories to tell us about life in the army as 
he sees it, including tales of his buddies — one of whom was an ex-longshoreman and the other an 
ex-truck driver. But the most interesting to us were those of the infant-ry at home who was as glad to 
see him as we were. 

Mr. Freeland has been away from the campus the longest, for he was inducted into the service 
on March 27, 1943. At the present time he is with the Intelligence Department working with maps 
that must be kept up to date. As can easily be seen by his picture, he, too, has an added attraction 
here in Annville. We are hoping that it won't be long until the heir apparent will be able to play 
Turkey in the Straw with his father some Friday 
morning in chapel. 

On May 27, 1943, 'Jerry' Frock reported to 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina at the U. S. Navy 
Pre-Flight School. He had previously received 
his commission as Lieutenant. Now he is continu- 
ing his work at the Naval Air Station in Peru, 
Indiana. 

We would like to mention here that Dr. 
Grimm is temporarily with the faculty of Franklin 
and Marshall College where he is teaching many 
of the courses he taught at L. V. In this way he is 
cooperating with the government's programs for 
fellows who continued their education while in the 
Army and Navy. 

We are, indeed, proud of these professors who 
have joined the armed forces, even as we are proud 
of those who remain with us to carry on a double 
share of the work. 




106 




oC. 7/ * Ak^uj^l Lii q/ittL— 




. . . and keeps its grip on everything that really matters . . . Take this business 
of Sports, for instance. It would have been as easy as beating Albright for all 
sportsmen and sportswomen on campus just to throw up their hands and decide to 
suspend athletics until the war was over and we were a fully manned college again. 
But instead, the fellows and girls had really active teams in football, basketball, etc., 
and they even surprised themselves by winning some games! You would have been 
proud of our sporting spirit this year. 



107 




"L" Club 




rflHE "L" Club is a campus organization made up 
*■ exclusively of athletes of the school. Only those fellows 
who have won their varsity "L" can gain admittance to the 
club. The requirements for admittance are of the most 
strenuous type, and so the club contains only the best of 
athletes. 

This year, due to the national emergency, the member- 
ship of the club is extremely small. The armed forces have 
taken the cream of Lebanon Valley's crop of athletes, leav- 
ing only three members to hold up the activities of the 
club. In normal times the club holds a dance on the eve- 
ning of Homecoming Day and sells chapel seats to provide 
for the purchase of sweaters for the members, besides their 
activity in athletic events. 



108 



« 




IN THE SPRING of the year after basketball had run 

its season, the fellows were looking for an outside sport 
to take its place. Baseball was just the thing to fill the spot. 
With the help of Coach Intrieri, three teams of dorm stu- 
dents were organized. These three teams were very ably 
managed by Robert Ness, Edward Withers, and Charlie 
Wolfe. 

All of the games offered thrills for both teams and 
spectators. The pitching was of the best, f< aturing, for the 
Dodgers, Joe Kania; for the Pirates, Lloyd House! ; and for 
the Cardinals, John Carbaugh. As the season neared its 
close the Dodgers held the lead hut things were made very 
hot when they were tied by the Pirates. When the season 
ended not only had the Pirate s tied for first place, hut also 
they came out top team in the league. The season was ended 
by a game between the dorm's All-Stars and the day stu- 
dents' Sluggers, which ended in a defeat for the All-Stars. 



Intramural 
Baseball 




10it 




Basketball 



BASKETBALL turned out to be our only inter-collegiate sport of the year. With only one 
member of last year's varsity remaining, Mike called on other fellows to support their 
Alma Mater. Many of these fellows had never thought of playing before, but when called 
upon, they came out to give the best that they had. They all practiced hard and took fre- 
quent trips to the Annville High School to scrimmage with the Annville varsity and junior 
varsity teams. 

After only two games had been played, the first semester ended; one member of the team 
graduated, while another left for the service. Even after losing some of the few stars they 
had, the team still kept fighting to win and their efforts were rewarded twice during the 
season. 

When the last game was played, it was discovered that Frank Shupper, our only veteran 
from last year's varsity, came out with the high score of one hundred forty-nine points. The 
statistics also showed that there were two games won against six games lost. In these games 
we had made three hundred and six points and had three hundred sixty-three points against us. 

We saw some mighty good playing during the season, and we congratulate the fellows who 
kept basketball alive on the campus. 




110 




BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



Lebanon Valley College 


. . . 27 


Lebanon Valley College . . 


. . 38 


Lebanon Valley College 


. . 38 


Lebanon Valley College 


39 


Lebanon Valley College 


. . 45 


Lebanon Valley College 


. . 39 


Lebanon Valley College . . 


. . 36 


Lebanon Valley College . . 


. . 44 


Totals 


306 



Albright 4.5 

Lehigh 51 

Gettysburg 59 

Lehigh 47 

Elizabethtown 30 

Albright 47 

Gettysburg 53 

Elizabethtown 31 

363 




111 




Right Around the 
Court 



Intrieri-Men in 
Action 




112 




Football Games 



AUTUMN came, initiation passed, and something had to occupy our students' time. Football, of 
£X course. The underclassmen, coached by Shupper and Kania, set to work with a thirteen- 
man team, practising heartily every day — almost. Over in the other ('amp Coach Intrieri's upper 
classmen worked equally hard at passes and line 
bucks. On the big day a large L. V. ( '. crowd turned 
out to watch the underclassmen fight bravely against 
the overwhelming power of their opponents, only to 
go down in defeat, after showing momentary flashes 
of brilliance, by a score of 26-13. 

An informal, off-t he-record game was arranged 
for November 20, at which time Shippensburg State 
Teachers College was to play our united team. The 
brave L. V. C. warriors, with four days of practice 
behind them, traveled to Shippensburg, only to find 
an experienced, regular team that trounced them 
40-0. Believe me, even though against superior for- 
ces, the boys fought with a spirit that is a credit to 
Lebanon Yallev. 




113 




Archery 



BETTER duck — those Robin Hoods are pulling the strings again. Whenever the weather 
permits they're right out there smacking the old bull's eye (?). Anyhow, they're out 
there. No fooling, though, plenty of those kids do all right. Their activities this spring had to 
be confined to intra-mural meets because we just can't make it to other schools. But we 
rationalize happily along, telling ourselves that by the time we can travel we'll be good 
enough to take all our opponents on at once. And you just watch, we will, too. 




114 




W. A. A. 



A THLETICS on the campus have taken a decided turn toward putting the fairer sex in the 
IX. limelight. W.A.A. has tlirected the activities of their organization so that the motto 
may be realized, "Every girl in a sport, and a sport for every girl." The girls on the campus 
who have earned two hundred points become members, and any additional earned points are 
used for the Gold "L." Each sport is headed by a sports leader selected by the members of 
the organization. Sports days, scavenger hunts, hikes, and socials were among the out- 
standing events of the year. 




llo 




Girls' Basketball 



SINK IT." And bov, they have been. We licked Elizabethtown. St. John's Lutheran, Shippensburg, and the 
Frosh beat Schaefferstown High. After I get my breath I'll tell you about the games we lost. Let's see — 
we started out by beating E-town 17-14. Then St. John's from Reading by 47-27. Next came friend Albright. 
In small print I admit they downed us twice: 27-21 and 29-19. And golly. E-town came back to take us 47-29. 
But we woke up to beat S.S.T.C. 20-11. and the freshmen team beat Schaefferstown 39-20. 

So many new players made it a little hard trying to get a working combination but we almost made up for it 
in durability — you know — that certain something a famous cigarette's supposed to have. But heck, we played 
in spurts — good, then bad. But at least, the ending was good. 



Hockey 



GOLLY, we beat Shippensburg this year! 
Would you believe it? It's the first time in 
eight years, and we were really tickled. 

Incidentally, nothing has ever been done 
about that hill on the side of the field — and you 
know what that can do to a person after several 
nights of practice. 

Our first game was with Shippensburg, and we 
finished up with a scoreless tie. Success seems to 
be mainly due to a freshman goalie by the name 
of Nora Mae Goodman who is showing us how to 
play hockey the vigorous wav. 

Then came Homecoming Day. and S.S.T.C. 
went down to the tune of 7-0. The freshman 
team kept things rolling by beating Myerstown 
High .5-3. And generally speaking, we were 
mighty happy about the girls who swung those 
hockey sticks for L. V. this year — they did a 
wonderful job. 




116 




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*** 



BUDGET 



Don's cigarettes $50.00 

Bus tickets, bought but not used 1.50 

Dummy paper for plastering the walls . . 30.33 

New wig for Frantz (she tore out all her hair) .50 

Fingernails for Klick .15 

Twelve typewriter ribbons ... 10.00 

Three dozen boxes of toothpicks 3.60 

Six cartons of Pepsi-Cola shhhhh 

Long-distance phone calls : 5.00 

Twenty-five bottles of Alka-Seltzer 2.76 

Half dozen safety valves, well popped how much are those things, anyhow? 

Shoe leather and cough lozenges for advertising agents 75.00 

Stamps for morale letters (not that it did any good) 25.00 

Chewing-gum — none — we had no priorities 

Incidentals 

Photography, Engraving, Printing gratis 




120 




SPECIAL 
MENTION 

TO— 

Dale and Charlie a very special 
special thanks for all their helpful sug- 
gestions and excellent ideas. 

The truck drivers and Middletown 

workers who provided our transporta- 
tion to and from Harrisburg. 

Those certain few on and off the 
staff who never failed to come to the 
rescue of fair (??) maidens in distress. 

The photography supply companies who occasionally came across with some necessary 
materials. 

The profs who would not let us cut classes. 

Miss Myers for allowing us to postpone library hours. 

Miss Gillespie for giving us the room and extra time to work 'after hours'. 

Betty Gooden and Mark Mobley' who typed off articles at the eleventh hour and saved 
us from impending doom. 

Our families who have undergone a terrific strain since last June, and who have developed 
severe cases of Quittie nerves. 

The telephone companies who managed to interpret incoherent long distance calls. 

Miss Fencil for racing around the Ad Building with messages for the staff. 

The Ration Board for the midnight oil we burned. 

Squeakie for catching our ideas and putting them on paper in her own inimitable style. 



121 





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128 



College 'Days . . . 



They cement many lasting friendships. Soon you and your 
classmates will take different roads, and it may be years before 
some of you meet again. School days do not last forever — and 
when they are past, memories are kept warm by the photo- 
graphs of friends and pals of the classroom and campus. 

Your chums should have a "personality portrait" of You, 
and you will prize one of theirs in return. In a year or so, you 
will be glad you took this means of keeping alive the memories 
of your school days. 

And the home folks will always cherish a portrait of "the 
turning point" in your life. 

This studio is the headquarters for the best photographic 
work and the doors are open to the students of Lebanon Valley 
and their friends. 

Why not arrange to come to the studio now and have that 
photograph taken? 

SPECIAL STYLES AND RATES 
FOR STUDENTS 

Second and Walnut Streets, Harris burg, Penna. 

Phones: 5228-5229 

HARVEY L. ENSMINGER 



129 




John Hirsh Store 

Men's Furnishings 

MEN'S • LADIES' . CHILDREN'S 

SHOES 
Annville, Penna. 



FUNCK'S GARAGE 



General Repairing 



OFFICIAL A. A. A. SERVICE 

J. C. FUNCK 

14-16 South White Oak Street 

Official Inspection Station No. 3068 



ATLANTIC PRODUCTS 



Annville 7-5121 



Phone: 
Annville 7-3511 
Hershey 1-0611 



Kingsley & drown, Inc. 



CLE A NERS 
AND DYERS 



DE LUXE SERVICE • 



130 



ESBENSHADE'S BOOK STORE 

Books • Greeting Cards • Gifts • Office Supplies 

PARKER PENS— "Try a Parker 51" 
COURTESY . QUALITY . SERVICE 

41 North Eighth St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Ice Cream Goes to War — Demand Exceeds Supply 

"We thank our distributors and customers for their 
cooperation and patience during these times when we must ration our production" 

Please inquire — // at all possible we will supply 

C. B. Gollam Sons, Mfgr's 

6th and Maple Streets, Lebanon, Pa. 

Phone: 21 

the place for Gifts, Stationery 

Leather Goods, Luggage, Greeting Cards 



Portrait and Commercial 
Photography 



Harpel's 



Developing and Printing 
Enlarging and Framing 



151-159 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PENNA. 



ft 



VISIT 
Hot Dog" FRANK 

Light Lunches and Sandwiches 
of All Kinds 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



■wot 




131 



Compliments of 



Lebnadrome Roller Rink 



North 6th & Willow Streets 



Lebanon, Penna. 



ROLLER SKATING NIGHTLY EXCEPT MONDAYS 
SPECIAL RATES TO SCHOOLS AND ORGANIZATIONS 

Music by the Hammond Electric Organ and Solovox 



Lebanon's Leading Furniture Store 



wJ^St ▼II mm 



VISIT OUR FASHION SHOP 



Quality at Moderate Prices • 



"The Hitchin' Post" 

PROPRIETORS: 

WOLFE 

BEITTEL 

"RENO PROOF KNOTS" 

Room 103 Men's Dorm. 



Compliments of 



Lebanon News Agency 

SAMUEL S. ETTER, Prop. 



132 






<J\lcQhee's Restaurants 



Platters 



Sandwiches 



Soda Fountain 



BEST BY TASTE TEST" 



Phone: 7-3841 



ANNVILLE. PENNA. 




Phone: 3261 



LITTLE CRYSTAL 

Restaurant 



A. HELIP 



705 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Compliments of 



Dr. John J. McDonald 



LEBANON, PA. 




SHOES 



MODERN 

HEALTH 

SHOES 

Manufactured by 



KREIDER SPORTS 



"300" Juveniles 



•AY^-£-\g MS&du C>C>. 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



133 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture • Floor Coverings • Electrical Appliances 

Modem Funeral Home 



ANNVILLE 



PENNSYLVANIA 



"A Fashion Institution" 

LOGAN'S 

816 CUMBERLAND STREET 

Lebanon, Pa. 

Tel. 836 

Max Love's 

Cleaning 



c^o 



10 WEST MAIN STREET 
Annville, Pa. 




SEE 



Miller, The Tailor 

FOR FORMAL WEAR 
TO LOAN 



538 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Phone: 1-479 



Millinery 



ANN'S SHOPPE 

716 CUMBERLAND STREET 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Hand Bags 



Lingerie 



134 



THIS YEAR AS WE PAY TRIBUTE TO 



The Class of 1945 



THE PENNWAY 
RESTAURANT 



joins all the members and faculty of 
Lebanon Valley College in saluting those 
of you who are serving in the Armed 
Forces of our country; and our only wish 
is that when Reunion Time rolls around 
again, those who anxiously wait at home 
will be proud to greet you. 



135 



WAR 



Cause and Prevention 



? 



Dr. j. j. Mcdonald 



IF YOU WANT AN ADVENTURE STORY 
OF A TRAVELOG DONT BUY THIS BOOK. 

IF YOU WANT A CLEAN-CUT, FEARLESS 
DISCUSSION OF THE FUNDAMENTAL 
DIPLOMATIC AND PSYCHOLOGIC CAUSES 
OF WAR, THEN ORDER THIS BOOK 
TODAY. 

IF YOUR BOOKSTAND CANNOT SUPPLY 
IT, ORDER DIRECT BY MAIL. 

PRICE {postpaid} $1.00 



J. J. McDonald 

Publisher 

LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA 



Philadelphia Shoe Store 

Lebanon, Penna. 



PRONIO'S GENERAL STORE 

Where Coffee Is Roasted Daily 
HERSHEY, PA. Tel. 503 



136 




Talace of Siveets 



SINCE 1917 



LEBANON, PENNA. 



Compliments of 



iJttilady Shopp 

4 SOUTH EIGHTH STREET 
Lebanon, Pa. 



O 



Complete Line of Ladies' Apparel 



H. E. MILLARD 



HIGH CALCIUM LIME AND LIMESTONE PRODUCTS 



Ask Your Dealer for Millard's Agriculture and Mason's Lime 



Annville, Penna. 



137 



RISSER FUNERAL HOME 

226 Cumberland Street 



IT COSTS NO MORE TO CALL RISSER 



Phone: 3044 



John B. Risser 



%amsey's 

%e st durante 



C^J 



630 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



J. C. Rowe 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

Duffield, Pennsylvania 



R. D. 1 



CHAMBERSBURG, PA. 




D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 

Contractors and Builders 



(T-fO 

COAL and LUMBER 



ANNVILLE 



PENNSYLVANIA 



138 



Compliments of 




J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER, Pres. 

"Insure in sure insurance" 


Compliments of 

State Theatre^ 


Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Pa. 




Buy it at 


Shearer & Becker 


Seabold's Drug Store 


FOOD STORE 


ANNVILLE 


Annville, Pennsylvania 


Bell Phone: 


Lebanon 3068 


Thomas A. Wagner 


Manufacturer of 


HIGH CALCIUM LIME 


R.F.D. No. 2 


LEBANON, PA. 



139 



1945 QUITTAPAHILLA 



>r 



Engraving 
Trinting and Tending 



by 



J. HORACE McFARLAND 
— COMPANY -* 

JSlount Tleasant Tress 

HARRISBURG a PENNSYLVANIA 



140 




Telephone: 7-4801 

A. R. Shearer 

Mobilgas — Mobiloil — Service Station 

MAIN AND WHITE OAK STREETS 

Annville, Pa. 



J. E. Shenk & Son 

Furniture 

RADIO— POPULAR AND CLASSIC RECORDS 
FLOOR COVERINGS AND HOME APPLIANCES 



SEEDS 



TOYS 



2900 Herr Street 

PENBROOK— HARRISBURG, PA. 

Phone: 4-4977 



Compliments of 

Saylor's Drug Store 

"Prescriptions 

47 SOUTH EIGHTH STREET 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Quality Chicks for Profit 



WEAVER AND SON 
HATCHERY 

4 Leading Breeds and several Cross Breeds. All 

eggs hatched come from N. H. Pullorum 

Cleaned State Blood -Tested Stock 



Phone: 7-7916 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



J. H. TROUP'S 

THE LEADING MUSIC STORE 

For Over 60 Years 

Harrisburg and Lancaster 




141 



WHELAN DRUG CO., Inc. 

"Where Quality Counts" 

Drugs :: United Cigar Agency :: Sodas 



(T^O 



770 CUMBERLAND STREET 

Lebanon, Pa. 



SIXTY YEARS OF 
PRINTING SERVICE 



SOWERS 

Printing Company 



SCHOOL ANNUALS 

PERIODICALS 

BOOKS 



Lebanon, Pennsylvania 




Welch's Souvenir and Gift Shop 

707 Cumberland St., Lebanon, Pa. 

Phone: 190 



ENGRAVING OF NAMES AND INITIALS A SPECIALTY 

Expert Watch Repairing- -Three-day Service 



142 



PATRONS 



▲ A 



Mr. and Mrs. Frederick S. Fraxtz Lebanon. Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Schott Cornwall, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Newton Ulmer Phoenixville, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Raab Dallastown, Pa. 

Mr. Joseph Markley New Castle, Pa. 

Mr. Max Fisher Lemoyne, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Ayers Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cover Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Summers Lebanon. Pa. 

Mrs. Ida Frey Red Lion, Fa. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Mobley Red Lion. Pa. 

Miss Naomi I. Frey Red Lion, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Goodman .... Harrisbnrg, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rasher Harrisburg. Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman J. Weiser Harrisburg. Pa. 

Rev. Stephen E. Raby Ephrata, Pa. 

A Friend 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond S. Kreiser Ono, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Laconics Jonestown. Pa. 

Dr. Joseph S. Bowman Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. Perry A. Tschop Red Lion. Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl W. Sterner Laureldale, Pa. 

Dr. M. Dale Yoctjm Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. S. F. Snyder ... . . Paxinos, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. G. Myers Lebanon, Pa. 

Miss Helen B. Ro s and Mrs. George S. Ross . . . Myerstown, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Williams Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Anger Seottdale, Pa. 

Dr. H. H. Baish . Harrisbnrg. Pa. 

Mr. O. E. Good Harrisbnrg. Pa. 

Mr. Albert Watson . Carlisle. Pa. 

Rev. P. E. V. Shannon . York, Pa. 

Mr. Alfred K. Mills Annville, Pa. 

Chaplain Fall A. Miller . . England 

Pfc. Frederic K. Miller U. S. Army 

Rev. Harry E. Miller Lebanon. Pa. 

Rev. Willi \\i A Wilt Annville, Pa. 

Rev. W. Miller Price Annville, Pa. 

Mr. Roy K. Garber .... Columbia, Pa. 

Mr. Norman Streicher Annville, Pa. 

Dr. J. DeWolf Silberman Annville, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Edwards Annville, Pa. 

Mr. Christian Gingrich Annville. Pa. 

Miss Amelia Winter Red Lion. Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Y. Snyder Red Lion, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. George C. Mullin Hummelstown, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Keifer Lebanon. Pa. 

Mrs. John E. Marshall Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Beamesderfer .... Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. HuDYMA Lebanon, Pa. 

Men's Senate . L. V. C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elvin Miller Hershey, Fa. 

Mr. and Mrs. William K. Bowman Palmyra, Pa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon X. Cassatt Harrisbnrg, Pa. 

Mr. anil Mrs. William Klick Lebanon, Pa. 

Miss Helen E. Myers Annville, Pa. 

Rev. C. Guy Stambach Harrisbnrg, Pa. 

Rev. W. I. Kacffman Manchester, Md. 

Mr. C. G. Dotter \imville. Pa. 

Mr. John Hinsicker Lebanon, Pa. 

Dr. Gut A. GebberiCH Lebanon, Fa. 

Mr. and Mrs. Murray Bowman Lebanon, Pa. 

Mrs. R. J. Schropp Lebanon, Pa. 

Mr. Harold T. Lutz Baltimore, Md. 



143 



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ograpk 



144