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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1948leba 



TABLE or CONTENTS 



FOREWORD 
I DEDICATION 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 
r THE CLASSES 

r 

' GOVERNING BODIES 

ORGANIZATIONS 
CONSERVATORY 
DRAMA 
SPORTS 

HATS OFF 

SPECIAL MENTION 
PATRONS 
ADVERTISEMENTS 



— 3 — 



FOREWORD 



The members of rhe Class of 1948 are especially proud that the 
privilege of editing this Qu/napahi!Li has been theirs. 

You know the look of the real "Quittie" in a dr\ season, how its 
sparkling waters barelv cover the rocks on the bottom, and how 
its channel grows narrow 'til vou can see the nakedness ot the 
willow roots along its edge. 

You've seen it, too, in flood, when swollen waters rise to lap at 
the tree trunks, leaving behind them a dull brown streak of earth 
to show where thev have been. 

This issue of the Q_!i!ttdpjhil!ci accomplishes what the stream 
whose name it bears could never imitate; it shows the drought and 
flood together. The Class of 194S has seen its alma mater at her 
wartime worst, when college life was little more than a \estige 
of what It should have been. Now, in the second halt of our college 
davs, we know our school at its overflowing best, and the Dutch- 
man thes higher than ever before. 

So we, who learned to know and love "The Willev" in time of 
drought, point proudlv to its new high water mark, and give to vou 
our "Quittie." Mav vou eniov the storv it tells, as we ha\e en- 
joved the livinij of it. 




Vr. Andrew Bender 



d E V I C 

Amid the ever surrounding mass of test tubes and heakers, 

Works a man who has put his heart and soul into a fight; 
A fight on the upward way — the wav of truth, 

A fight to better his field, himself, and his college. 
To this man we dedicate this book. 

Through his many years in the service of humanity, 

Through his triumph over partial blindness and great loneliness, 

He served his country in time of need, and humanity always. 
It is to this man we dedicate this book. 

True leader, friend, and ever-guiding counselor, 

Human dynamo, working that others may better live; 
Patient teacher, even with the least of us, a genius in his own right. 

It is to him we dedicate this book. 

It IS because he explaineth when everything is so dark, 

It is because he upholds "John 8:32", 
It is because he lives with molecules — always hoping to meet a new one, 

(Or a new way to meet an old one). 
That we, who have profited by his influence, his sincerity. 

And his wealth of knowledge. 
Do dedicate to him this book. 



Mrs. Ruth Eng/e Bender 




A T I N 

At the side of the man with the test tubes 

Stands a woman whose Hfe is music. 
The seldom found hlend of artist and homemaker 

Unusually thoughtful, kindly and sympathetic. 
To this woman also we dedicate this book. 

As a teacher — patient and understanding. 

As a civic leader — aggressive and energetic. 
As a friend — kind, loving and generous. 

As an artist — supreme. 

In her church a constant worker, a doer oi good and right deeds, 

hi her home a hne hostess and homemaker. 
As a woman — cultured, sweet, and gentle. 

Devoted to her family, church, college and community. 

It is because she brings sunshine to darkened lives, 

And is tireless in her devotion to others; 
It is because her life is composed of music and love, 

And all that is hne and honest. 
That we, who have been taught not only how to play or write music — 

But how to make hearts sing, 
Do dedicate to her this book. 



Administration 
and faculty 





AVMINISTRATION BUILDING 







£ /if 015 HALL 



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MEN'S DORMITORy 



Our President 




DR. ayVE A. LYNCH 

Dr. Lynch is rhe supreme example of the efficient executi\e and 
understanding advisor. With the increased enroUment a heavier 
responsibility is placed upon him, but in spite of this he finds time 
to give friendly advice to those who need it. An\'one who has 
ever visited him will hnd him a sympathetic listener and an ani- 
mated conversationalist. In addition to his college duties, he takes 
an active part in many civic and religious activities where he dis- 
plays his skill as a speaker. 



14- 



Our deans 



MISS MARY 1. 6ILUSPIB 

Miss Marv E. Gillespie, Dean of the 
Conservatory and Dean of Women, is a 
familiar figure not merely on our own 
campus, but also among the music edu- 
cators of any local or national group. We 
are sincerely proud of the position that 
our conservatorv holds in the realm of 
music, a position largely due to the dy- 
namic yigor with which Miss Gillespie 
advances the newest and best in music. 
Although her schedule is extremeh' heavy, 
one can always depend upon her presence 
at all major school functions, not forget- 
tine the formal dances. 




dR. A. H. M. STONECIPHER 

Dr. Stonecipher is still fulfilling his 
duties as a teacher of languages and phi- 
losophy as well as dean. He presents a 
dignified and scholarly appiearance which 
IS accentuated bv his height. He possesses 
a quiet and sympathetic disposition, but 
still displays a read\- sense of humor. His 
well-kept yard and garden are an evidence 
of his ambitious nature and his love of 
out-door lite. 




— 15 — 



^•^ 



n«^» 4m^^ 






Dr. L. G. Bailey — Ardent champion of 
our youngest science 



Mrs. Ruth Engle Bender — Pedagogue 
superb 



Dr. Edward M. Balsbaugh — Loyal 
"old grad" with a young heart 





Dr. Amos H. Black— Staunch upholder 
of classroom informalit\- 



Mrs. Margaret Barthel Baxstresser — 
Lebanon Valley's great, attractive and 
excellent pianist 



R. Porter Campbell —Custodian of our 
great organ 




Dr. Andrew Bender — Pride in his 
students 



D. Clark Carmean — Our future farmer, 
with the viola and boyish grin 




r. 



"^'/ (jg^ 



^:^ 



Dr. William B. Castetter — Warden iif 
■■ Poker Flats" 




William H. Egli — FavorabU imprc 
with his students 



Alexander Crawford — A figure out of 
Dickens 



Grant Feeslr — Guardi.in of the pigskin 



^^^^ 



Dr John I Cretzinger — Mediator be- 
tween Freshmen biologists and the 
microscope 



i^^ 



Dr. Chester A. Feig — The teacher is al- 
ways right 



Dr. Samuel H. Derickson —Wizard's 
eves and fingers rediscover the universe 



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Mrs. Conrad Frank — Our septa linguist 



ii 



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W. Merl Freeland — Just a family man 
at heart 



•'-^■ 




Miss Jessie H. Haag — An able instructor 
and organizer 



Rev. David W. Gocklev — Busy man 
about campus 



4iMM 



Miss Elizabeth Kaho — Omaha's pride 
and jov 



Mrs. Mary C. Green — A "vet" comes 
to the rescue 









Dr. Maud P. Laughlin — Infectious 
hiughter of a popular prof. 




Dr. Samuel O. Grimm — ^^Just what the 
name implies — but we're really only 
kidding. 



.^««^ « 






ii^ 



Dr. Lena L. Lietzau — Lends the Vallev 
a continental air 




'W 




Dr \'. Earl Light— Our champion 
•Dad"— and they all have crooked 
little hngers 



Ralph R^ Measl— Master of the "hig" 




Dr, John F. Lotz— Let his work speak 
for Itself 



Dr, Frlderick K. Miller— Lebanon 
\'allev's ideal teacher 




Harold Malsh— Paterfamilias of the 
Conseivatorv 



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Mrs. Xixon' Mumper -Jovial member ot 
the "Shenk dvnastv" 




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Charles Massinger — Our vote as the 
best-dressed man on campus 



Miss Helen Ethel MvERS—Helpful di 
penser of the printed word 




r. 








Dr. Robert K. Ness — "Now there is 
one more thing ..." 



Edward P. Rutledge — Good things 
come in little packages 






Mrs. Ruth H. Ness— An excellent teacher 



Dr. Hir,\m H. Shenk — Perennially be- 
loved . . . matchless raconteur 



Dr. G. a. Ritchie — Plowman of the 

textbook 



Frank E. Stachow — Definitely no 
"square;" strictly "one of the boys" 









Reynaldo Rovers — Golden-voiced tenor 



Dr. Stella Johnson Stevenson — Takes 
her teaching seriously 





Dr. George G- Struble — \'asr store- 
house of dramatic witticism 



Dr. Pall A W Wallace — molder of Dr. William ,\. Wilt— the man with 

character, interpreter of life the hig voice 




• J|. 



[I. '4'. 



Sw-'-**-^ ' 



Claude R. Donmovlr Miss Gladys M. Fenxil 

Financial Secietary Ass't Registiar 




21 — 



TRUSTEES 



OFFICERS 

Vresident . E. N. Funkhouser 

Vice-President Charles L. Bitzer 

Secyetary and Trciisi/rer S. H. Derickson 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Representatives from the East Pennsylvania 
Conference 
The Rev^ S, C, Enck, A.iVL, B D , D,D, 
The Rev^ P^ B. Gibble, A.M., B.D., D.D. 
The Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, A.B , D D, 
The Rev. D. E. Young, A.M., B.D., D.D. 
Mr. E. W. Coble 
Mr. Park F. Esbenshade 
The Rev. W. A. Wilt, D.D. 
The Rev. H. E. Schaeffer, A.M., D.D. 
Mr. Charles L. Eitzer 
Mr. Roy Garber 
Mr. John E. Gibble 

The Rev. G. Edgar Hertzler, A.B., B.D , S.T.M 
Hon, Miles Horst, MS, LED. 

Representatives from the \'irginia Conference 
The Rev. J. E. Oliver, A B , B D. 
Mr. G. C. Ludwig 

The Rev. Carl W. Riser, A.B , D.D, 
The Rev. E, E. Miller, A.B,, D D. 
The Rev. J. Paul Gruver, A.B., B.D., D.D. 
The Rev, Paul J. Slonaker, A.B. 



D.D. 



D.D. 



Representatives from the Pennsylvania 
Conference 
The Rev. John H. Ness, A.B,, B,D,, D.D. 
The Rev. G. I. Rider, A.B., D.D. 
Mr. Albert Watson 
Mr. Huber D. Strine, A.B., MA. 
The Rev. P. E. \. Shannon, A.B., B.D. 
The Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., D.D. 
Mr. E. N. Funkhouser, A.B., LL.D. 
Mr. R. G. Mowrey, A.B,, FED D 
The Rev. C. Guy Stambach, .IB., B.D 
Mr. Harold T. Lutz 

The Rev. Mervie Weltv, A.B , B D , D.D 
Hon. W. N. McFaul, LL.B. 
The Rev, Ira S, Ernst, A B., B.D , D.D. 

Trustees at Large 
Bishop J. B. Showers, A.B., D.D. 
Dr. H. M. Imboden, A.B., M.D., Sc.D. 
Mr. Maurice R. Metzger, A.B., LL.B. 
Hon. J. Paul Rupp, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 
Mr. Lloyd A. Sattazahn 
Mr W. H. Worrilow 



•\lunini Trustees 
Wilbur C Pllmmer, A B PhD LL D 

Mr ] L \PPENZLLLAR, ^ B 

Mr E D Williams, A B 




•l-Vf ; T^ Hi i 




familiar Figures on Campus 







The Classes 




©1^ 



24 — 



/ 

>- 






Senior Class Officers 

President . David W. Shaner 

Vice-Presidetit George E. Edwards 

Secretary Irene M, Ebersole 

Treasurer Robert A. Zimmerman 



26 — 



Class History 



The history of the class of 1947 began in confusion, September 1943, when sixty-five starry-eyed 
students reported for Freshmen Week. Although few in number, rhe class from the beginning began 
to prove its worth. In the "Conserv," budding talent was discovered, as also in other studies and 
activities. On a campus suffering from the handicaps which war brings to a college, the freshmen did 
the job of creating a bit ot e.xcitement and tun exceedinglv well. Realizing the need for cooperation 
to make a success of all functions, thev turned out en masse at everv affair. 

Bv the fall of 1944 with the beginning of their sophomore \ear, we found all members well ac- 
climated to college life, although the class now was limited to just fortv girls and onlv a few fellows. 
Of course, there was an all-time low of spirits and morale, and although there wer.- few dances and 
parties, the class showed abilities chietlv in the fields of performance — both scholasticallv and music- 
allv. 

Then came the lunior \ear, and sudden!\- the campus as a whole was getting back to n;>rinal. Men 
again! And with them came a complete change in ever\bodv's morale. The returning ex-G.l.'s 
swelled the numbers of the class and suddenlv thev were thrown into the midst of an extremeh- bus\- 
year. The class as juniors was a leader in the "social whirl," sponsoring dances throughout the 
school term, and winding up the vear with a gala Junior Prom. In the world of dramatics the Junior 
Shakespeare class verv capably presented Shakespeare's "Twelfth Night" under the snonsorship of 
the entire class. The "Conserv" juniors wrote and directed the first Mav Dav since pre-war davs, and 
their finished product proved to be a beautitul and remarkable piece of work. The\- used Tschaikow- 
skv's "Nutcracker Suite" as the theme oi their presentation. The ]uniors also edited their own 
"Quittie" publication and a number of their members served as capable assistants on the "La \'ie" 
staff. 

And finally the best year of all! — as seniors the numbers again were augmented, this time to the 
tune of women and men. The class held an executive position in practicallv all affairs of the colLge, 
various members serving as officers of the many campus organizations. In varied capacities thev have 
capablv planned manv successful activities. The seniors have well filled the role of leading the rest 
of the student bodv. Manv ot them have attained scholastic honors and ten of the^r number have been 
nationallv recognized bv "\\'ho's U'ho in -\merican Colleges." It seems altogether fitting and proper 
to recognize here the "Conser\ " Seniors who ha\e exhibited so fine a feeling of uniL\', with plent\' of 
originalitv, superb enthusiasm, and a \im and vigor admired b\" all. Besides being adequate pertYirmers 
in the "Conserv," they had numerous "get-togethers," most outstanding of which was their four- 
dav trip to New York Citv. 

Yes, the Class of 1947 has most successtullv given ot its talents and energies to our .\lma .Mater. 
Now, with Commencement nearing, and all thoughts centered in what is to come next, there is a 
common feeling of regret as the import of the occasion is realized. As all good things must come to 
an end, so must this college history, and we say a fond farewell to our student and faculty friends. 




27 



SENIOR 
CLASS 




RICHARD BACASTOW 







GLRALD ARTHUR 
BEHMAN 






y^s 



^\ 



JONES ROSS ALBERT 




AV 



FLORENCE ELIZABETH 
BARNHART 





KATHRYN IRENE ALBERT 




JEAN ELIZABETH 
BEDGER 



n 



: \ 



BARBARA KOLB BEITTEL 



#4 



GEORGE HAROLD 



BUCHER 






BETTY IEA\ BUTT 



CARL LEINBACH DERR 



MARMN HAROLD 
DETAMBEL 






HELEX LUCILE DICKEL 



IRENE .\L\E EBERSOLE 



GEORGE ERMN EDWARDS 






MILDRED MAE EMERICH 



ESTHER MARIE ENGLE 




KATHLEEN MAE 
EYSTER 





LLOYD \ ICTOR 
FEGAN, JR. 





\ERXOX .\L FICKES 




KENNETH RICHARD 
FIDLER 



PAUL GOTTSHALL FISHER 



GLADYS ERDINE 
FLINCHBAUGH 






I 



/ 



J. RUSSELL GINGRICH 



NORA MAE GOODMAN 



RICHARD GRABOYES 




CHARLOTTE E. HARXTSH 




HARRY jOHX PAUL 
HIXLMIELBERGER 





RICHARD DANIEL 
HART\L\N 




CLAYTON ELLAS 
HOLLIXGER, JR. 





JEAN ELLA HUDYMA 




RICHARD ANDREW 
IMMLER 



NANCY \ IRGINIA JOHNS 



EMIL ROBERT KERN 






^^ 



L 




LOUIS DAMD MANDES 





BURNELL LOVE KESSEL BRIAN HERBERT KIXTZER 





k^^ 



CHARLES ALBERT 
McCONNELL 





DA\ID L^ LIGHT, JR 





FRANK ROBERT MEZE 




CHARLES ROBINSON 
MILLER, JR. 



GEORGE LINWOOD 

MOORE 



WAYNE LYTLE MOWREY 






CHARLOTTE lEAN 
MYERS' 



MARY ELIZABETH 
MYERS 



MILDRED PALMER 
NEIDEIGH 




CHARLES [T:»\V\RD 
NEWBAKER, JR. 





JAMES PATTERSON 





JOHN RICHARD PHILLIPS 




\ INCENT ALDO PRONIO 



MADALYN VIRGINIA 
QUICKEL 




JOYE ANN RASHER 





WAYNE ELLSWORTH 
ROHLAND,JR. 





MARTHA ISABEL ROSS 




NANCY SAURMAN 



MARION LUCILLE SCHADE 



ARLENE BETTY 
SCHLOSSER 





HENRY WALTER 
SCHMALZER 



MARTHA JOYCE SCHMIDT 



SARA AMANDA SCHOTT 





MARLIN DAMD SEIDERS 



DAMD WILLARD SHANER 




ALTON MATTHEW SMITH 






DOROTHY MAE SMITH 



E\'ELYN ARMISTINA 
SPITLER 



ENELYN MARIE 
STONECIPHER 






ELINOR FRANCES 
STRAUSS 



EDWARD PETER 
STRICKLER 



MARGARET TODD 
TRUMEO 




WARREN' DURWOOD 
TRUMBO 




^ 




BENEDICT ALEXANDER 
WASILEWSKI 







..^1 




HERMAN JOSHUA 
WEISERJR. 




MARTHA HUBER 
WIKERD 



HAROLD WILD 



JAMES FRANCIS 
YESTADT 





RICH.vRD STANTON 
ZERBE 



ROBERT ANDREW 
ZIMMERMAN 




Junior Class Officers 



Frcstdent Miles D. Harriger 

Vicc-Frcsidiut George R. Marquette 

Secntary Mildred A. Neff 

Treasurer Nan'cy Elaine Heilmax 



— 37 — 




When We Were frosh . . . 

This was our initiation to a new world of knowl- 
edge. We were fledglings lost in the vastness of 
the institution of which we were a part. New 
halls and corridors, new classes, new wonders, we 
never dreamed could be; these were ours to take or 
to Ignore. We came verv much afraid of what our 
fate in college would be, only to find the upper- 
classmen willing helpers and guiding counselors in 
whatever endeavor we attempted. We also found 
our professors kind and noble men who have de- 
\oted their lives to the instruction of the younger 
generation of which we were a part. Sometimes 
we were skeptic of our professor's good intentions 
especialh' when finals came around. Some of us 
were rudelv awakened to the fact that we were no 
longer in high school. 

Our social life was inhibited greatlv, due to the 
lack of men on the campus, hut through it all we 
had some very memorable occasions together. 
One which I'm sure will stick in the minds of all 
those who attended was the Junior Prom at The 
Hershey Hotel. Thru it all we survived to be 
better able to meet the problems of the coming 
vears. 



38 



4-i.sr:^:^«5 



Just Last Year ... 

We returned in the f.ill no longer yearlings but 
uppercl.issmen, sophomores to he exact; and we 
couldn't he told much we didn't know. The men's 
dormitory was now using two floors, and social 
activities were more prevalent and also more tun. 
Intercollegiate sports were resumed in basketball 
and baseball under the supervision of coaches 
Frank Shupper and Frank Kuhn respectively. Our 
basketball team was quite a novelty with its play- 
ing coach, Frank Shupper. Some of our classmates 
proved themselves to be tops on the court and on 
the diamond, in winning nine out of tw-elve games 
in basketball and two out of four in baseball. 

The second semester, the influx of ex-G.I.'s made 
its first noticeable appearance on our campus, and 
now lights could be seen on the third floor of the 
men's dormitorv after a lapse of four \ears. It 
seemed that things were getting back to normal. 

Our dramatic program was also getting back to 
normal with Wig and Buckle offering "Berklev 
Square," and with the dav students presenting 
"Cuckoos on the Hearth." This was the first time 
since before the war, that we had pla\-s with men 
in them. Our vear ended with the feeling that 
next year, things would reallv be back to 
normal, and we would have at least two vears of 
real college life. 



39 





And Now Today .. . 

This, our junior year at the \'allev, was to he one 
of the most memorable in our lives. We incurred 
new responsibilities, all of which we accepted with 
varying degrees of enthusiasm. We elected one of 
our classmates as "Miss Quittie" and set about to 
draft and publish the traditional vearbook. Wig 
and Buckle presented "Januarv Thaw" in which 
some of our classmates further proved themselves 
competent actors and members of the production 
staff. Kalo and Philo raised and shook the dust 
of three vears off their paddles as thev initiated 
new members. We did better work in class and 
laboratory because now we were resolute in pur- 
pose and unshakeable in doctrine. 

The football team, under the capable supervision 
of "Scoop" Feeser, turned in a fairly good record 
of four wins, one tie, and three defeats. Several of 
our classmates showed that they had the stuff as 
thev pulled down first string positions. The 
climax of the season came when we defeated Mr. 
St. Mary's 38-6 in a game at the "Maple Street 
Stadium." The team was at its best form in this 
encounter. Our basketball squad, coached by ex- 
L. \'. court star, Ralph Mease, hit above the .500 
mark in a rough season, which saw Albright as 
the onlv team to whip us twice. 

Social affairs hit a new high with Clio-Philo 
and Kalo-Delphian joint dances, the dav student 
\^alentine dance, the Junior Prom, our own Junior 
Prom this time, and the resurrection of May Day 
to Its full scale pre-war existence. 

Now we are seniors, wise seniors. We have 
taken all that Lebanon \'allev can offer and given 
quite a bit m return. We trust that our experiences 
will make it easier for those who follow us, — for 
our little brothers and sisters! 



40 



JUUIOR CLASS 





Maryruth Staiil Adams 

She married her BuJJ\- . . . heart-shapeJ 
face . . . soft pleasant voice . . . child- 
like ways which hide an adult wisdom 
. . . journalisticallv inclined. 



Dawn Horxbaker Albert 

A technician who turned to music . . . 
and housekeeping . . . active . . . pleasant 
. . . excellent student . . . petite and pre- 
cise . . . "Have you seen friend husband? 
Now where did I leave him?" 



William Melvin Albrecht 

"Bill". . . another brain . . . digs into 
chemistry with a desire to learn ... a 
faithful member of dance band . . . de- 
pendable and an excellent worker . . . 
getting ready for graduate work. 



41 — 






,^c 




V 



Bertha Barbara Barbixi 
"Bert" . . . Hershey Junior College 
transfer . . . outstanding athlete . . . 
water safety instructor . . . only girl in 
Hershev car pool . . . congenial manner 
. . . promising and brilliant future . . . 
interested in the state of the union. 



Robert Franklin Beck 
"Bob" . . . Frequenter of South Hall 
. . . serious student ... a determined 
athlete . . . he'll get that letter yet . . . 
flaming red hair . . . genial personality 
. . . popular . . . Eddie's right-hand man 
on Quittie staff. 



Alvin Carl Berger 
"Al" . . . expert on clarification . . . 
sees her only on Tuesdays, Thursdays, 
Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and special 
occasions . . . dramatist looking toward 
the legitimate theater . . . dry humor . . . 
student extraordinar\-. 



Rena Mae Biely 
Athletically inclined . . . good and 
lengthy conyersationalist . . . warm and 
winning . . . daily correspondence to 
Penn State . . . characteristic laugh . . . 
charming girl with a winsome smile. 



42- 




\ 



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■***««'*«i*' 




mi03» 



,,»,,«« jfsr«— 




■.jimmfmsm 



Ri 



Isabel Billow 




"Ruthie" . . . quiet . . . friendly . . . 
dependable worker . . . served the Y. W. 
faithfully . . . real enthusiast for those 
Saturday morning field trips . . . Dr. 
Derickson's right-hand woman. 





Arthur Irvin Bodden 


••Art' 


. . . modest and unobtrusive 


person . 


. . needs a lab partner in cheni- 


istry . . 


. "Why hurry? There's a lot of 


time." 


. . often seen but seldom heard. 



Carolyn Boeddinghaus 

"Shortie" . . . Ipana smile . . . en- 
gaged to Frank . . . peppy . . . from jer- 
sey . . . one of the cheerleaders . . . out- 
door girl . . . cute . . . Psych ma|or . . . 
fond of children. 



Charles Daniel Bolan 

A tall man with carefree walk . . . dry 
humor . . . strong tendency toward 
bachelorism . . . operator of Bolan's 
Gladiolus Farm . . . affinity for beat-up 
Fords . . . will make a good conscientious 
teacher. 

— 43 — 






Melvyn Richard Bowman 
"Mel" . . . The only married man in 
Palmyra's clique . . . hard worker . . . 
likes to talk, but not too much . . . also a 
good listener ... La Vie's business mana- 
ger . . . one of Lotz's best students. 



James Stanton Brulatour 
"Jim". . . "Well, gotta go study" . . . 
deep resonant bass voice . . . Joe College 
. . . revolutionary President of Wig and 
Buckle Club . . . ladies' man with a 
special interest in them all . . . quiet . . . 



John F. Cek 
"Johnny" . . . known to all as a hard 
diligent worker . . . always in the biology 
lab . . . painstakingly careful . . . some- 
times eccentric . . . worries over nothing 
. . . Bailey's specimen of the future doctor. 



Doris Helen Clements 
"Clem" . . . clement by nature as well 
as bv name . . . tiny hands and feet . . . 
congenial companion . . . capable chemist 
. . . faithful La Vie typist . . . "But I 
don't studv." 



44 










A. Alfred Delduco 
"Fritz". . . a ladies' man . . . Dean's 
list. . . "How did that happen?" . . .ap- 
plies himself verv well . . . talks in his 
own crowd . . . mav become a lawver . . . 
a master of picturesque speech and patter. 





Herbert Eltox Ditzler 
"Herb" . . . married, with a cute little 
wife ... an ex-Juniata man, but . . . 
president when we were sophs . . . like- 
able . . . manv are the worries of the 
married . . . preparing for the field of 
transportation. 



Ann-a B. Dunkle 
Tall in form and fair of face . . . queenly 
bearing ... a dazzling smile . . . metic- 
ulous in dress ... a good listener . . . 
future Pulitzer Prize winner . . . nice to 
know. 



Mary Jane Eckert 
Brilliant conserve artist . . . "Ach! 
Gertie" . . . Dean's list . . . promising 
career . . . thrilling voice . . . striking 
. . . Glee Clubite . . . personality plus 
. . . she handles classical and popular 
music with equal ease . . . one of the 
campus beauties. 



45 








'*!»■> '' ,$ - 



"S^S^ iS* 





^3^: ^ 



"^f 







>p' m^ 



Robert Melvin Engle 
Hershey Theatre "manager" . . . labor 
over capital advocate . . . axe-league 
specialist . . . pilot of Hummelstown 
Green Hornet . . . sunnv smile . . . brown 
wavv hair . . . nice to know. 



Edwin Francis Englehart 
"Eddie". . . Earnest Quittie Bus. Mgr. 
. . . conscientious . . . sincere . . . 
jovial . . . winning personality . . . 
friendly as a Great Dane . . . clarinet 
artist . . . devoted husband . . . L.\'.'s 
future Irving Berlin . . . "I'm in a hurry 
now. When could I see you?" 



Mary Jane Flinchbaugh 
"Janie" . . . "Gee, I could drink a 
coke" ... a real friend . . . loads of fun 
. . . Glee Club contralto . . . kevboard 
artist . . . "O, my lands!" (said with the 
eyes crossed) . . . lovely brown eyes . . . 
sweet disposition. 



▲t^ 



Daniel Wayne Fox 
"Danny" ... A red-headed navigator 
from Wormleysburg ... a capable stu- 
dent . . . "I'll either make money or I'll 
lose it" . . . "get your office furnishings 
here!" . . . enjoys a heated discussion. 



46' 








1^ 



»M »: %. g- -■ 







Gabriel Barnard Frank 

Sunnv disposition ... a pleasant greet- 
ing to all . . . one of Mrs. Stevenson's 
"Si" bovs . . . applies himself very well 
. . . "Ladies and gentlemen of the Jury— ". 



Mary Elizabeth Frank 

"Be Frank" . . . the voice that carries 
. . . upright as an exclamation point . . . 
leader . . . puppy-dog friendliness . . . 
Jiggerhoard worries . . . linguistic ahilitv 
. . . "D'va wanna, huh?" 



El.aine Louise Frock 

\'enus with arms . . . Karl's her man 
. . . gentle dignitv . . . smooth dancer 
. . . onion addict . . . trailing tresses . . . 
late riser . . . one of the Elaine duo. 



Peter Gamber, Jr. 

"Pete". . . friendly greeting to all . . . 
diminutive football player . . . excels in 
basketball ... his aim — to get through 
school . . . tendency to stand around the 
edge of a crowd . . . knows many in- 
fluential people. 

— 47 — 



■%<#l^'t 




oj^'*' 







1 1 iiiftdf^' 




Mary Kathleen Garis 
"Kathv" . . . congenial . . . ready for 
fun . . . "Hey kids, let's mass cut" . . . 
classtime wanderlust . . . curly hair . . . 
suffers from horse-back riding . . . stately 
bearme. 



John Walter Gaul 
"Jack" . . . dashing man about town 
. . . beautiful hunk of man . . . excellent 
hurler of the proverbial "bull" . . . 
dermatologist . . . frequents Harrisburg 
and York . . . one of Harriger's "Hot 
Shots" . . . 



Ruth Evelyn Gearhart 
"Ruthie" . . . hip, hip! . . . cheer- 
leader's leader . . . loads of pep and 
energy . . . excellent party planner . . . 
brave ... a beautiful deep faith . . . has 
her heart in her work. 






Anthony Joseph Gerace 
"Tony" . . . "Fellows, you should see 
the baby!" . . . friendlv, if you know him 
. . . conscientious . . . clarinet artist . . . 
a vocabulary all his own . . . always busy 
. . . rugged but nice. 



48 











Mark Smith Gingrich 
A quiet, well built man ^ . . producer 
of "different" odors in the chem Lib . . . 
wavv hair . . . "A cow? What's that?" 
. . . one of Dave Light's bovs . . . gives 
sound effects to our basketball games. 



Mary Louise Grube 
"Grubie" . . . fnendlv and motherl\- 
. . . alwavs dependable . . . pleasant 
smile . . . xylophonist . . . scrupulous 
student . . . smooth of skin ... a bril- 
liant Mortimer . . . one of Miss Gillespie's 
able music assistants. 



George Gilroy Haines, Jr. 
Record bug . . . tloods third floor of 
Men's Dorm with music . . . io\ial . . . 
mild mannered . . . usually found at 
South Hall . . . intramural sports . . . 
foreign diplomatic service, )a! Ja! 



Miles Duane Harriger 
Able president of the S.F.C. and the 
Jr. Class . . . letterman . . . liberal 
minded senator . . . rod and gun en- 
thusiast . . . member of the "'Who's Who 
in American Colleges". . . worth knowing. 



49 



r. 





-«^ Mk 




Wlp\. \ 



Helen Louise Hartz 

Ex-Navy girl . . . principal's daughter 
. . . neat and tranquil . . . pleasing per- 
sonality . . . always haying a good 
time . . . makes friends with everyone 
. . ."Does anybody want to buy a ticket 
for anything?" 





Nancy Elaine Heilman 

Dr. Light's right-hand girl . . . well- 
poised . . . immaculate dresser . . . 
sweet . . . fair as the Lilv maid of Astelot 
. . . interested in a certain John . . . 
efficient Treasurer of the Jr. Class . . . 
Quittie's capable advertising mgr. . . . 
a go-getter. 



John W. Horn 

Bright sparkling eyes ... a mis- 
chievous smile . . . proud owner of a '47 
Packard . . . following in his father's 
footsteps . . . Hockey enthusiast . . . en- 
gaged to a beautiful ex-Lebanon \'alleyite. 



John Paul Hummel, Jr. 

Side-kick of Engle Inc. . . . interest lies 
across the river . . . beauty parlor in- 
spector . . . kind in word, thought and 
deed . . . when he is not eating, he's sell- 
ing something to eat. 



50 — 





^. 1^. 






Doris Louise Hyman 
"Sunshine" or "Alovsius" . . . en- 
rhusiasnc and wittv . . . spasmodic 
spurts of energy . . . scads of friends . . . 
versatile . . . bubbling . . . loves to sleep 
. . . "baker of tempting cheesecake" . . . 
lots of fun. 



'Ken' 



Kexjiro Ikeda 
. . a worthy citizen of our 



campus . . . serving room sergeant . . . 
Miss Bank's right-hand man . . . serious- 
minded student . . . rhumba expert . . . 
liked bv everyone . . . one can always ex- 
pect a ready smile. 



Dorothy May Kaufiman' 
"Dottie" . . . congenial Conservite 
. . . noted accompanist . , . sweet and 
bashful . . . villain in Henrv I\' . . . 
talented . . . capable . . . from Lebanon 
. . . long, beautiful page-bj\" . . . habitu- 
ally on Dean's list. 



Theodore Doxald Iveller 
"Ted" ... La \'ie's capable, non- 
radical editor . . . conscientious . . . 
Literary talent par excellence . . . man of 
deep thought . . . always seen with Berger 
. . . unusually pleasant voice . . . ex- 
cellent actor . . . good mathematician. 



51 




» 



'jk 



[I<^«^' 








Barbara Ann KiLHErrER 

■Biirb" . . . unusual and talented . . . 
Chemistrv major . . . helpful assistant 
. . . distinctive stride . . . dislike for 
rising in the morning . . . likes over- 
sized dogs . . . might work at the "Little 
Red School." 



Frederick David Koons 

"Fred" ... a family man with a pretty 
wife and daughter . . . conscientious and 
hard working student . . . ]ack-of-all- 
trades about the campus . . . quiet and 
well-liked hv all. 



Grace Elizabeth Laverty 

Talented viola plaver . . . Dean's list 
. . . early riser . . . burst of laughter . . . 
frequents the P-wav . . . member of the 
Harrisburg Svmphonv . . . coffee lover 
. . . Henrv I\"s jollv Inn mistress. 



Joanna Rae Lawhead 

"Pete". . . dark-e\-ed outstanding cam- 
pus beauty . . . drama enthusiast . . . 
cheerleader . . . fabulous . . . dark com- 
plexion . . . disarming smile . . . fond 
of celery and pussycats . . . sparkling 
white teeth . . . 



52 









John Henry Light 

First impression of quietness soon 
shattered . . . "What fools these mortals 
be" . . . where there's Light there is 
laughter ... a bachelor — until he meets 
the right one . . . one of Grimm's advance 
ph\-sics students. 



\^ERNAL Earl Light, Jr. 

Tall . . . distinguished looking . . . 
man of action . . . congenial . . . sunny 
smile . . . twinkling eves . . . groovy 
bass fiddle . . . transportation a la motor- 
cvcle . . . short haircut and shorter 
mustache. . . On the hicvcle built for two. 



William John Lloyd 

"Bill" . . . Harriger's roommate . . . 
|o\ial and quiet . . . preparing for a medi- 
cal career . . . always late for that eight 
o'clock . . . seldom talks but when he 
does it's a mouthful. 



Mary Helen Long 

Always has a cheery "Good Morning" 
for everyone . . . warm and pleasant smile 
... an outstanding organist from Pal- 
myra . . . former Conservite now major- 
ine in Historv. 



53 — 




^M 









Earl Roylr Marks 
Dav student from Richland . . . pre- 
ministerial . . . ideally suited for his 
calling . . . emanates scholarship . . . 
part-time worker in a home town garage 
. . . well liked bv all. 



George Reynolds Marquette 
"Rinso" . . . jokester . . . energetic 
student . . . personal magnetism . . . 
three letter man . . . hero of the "45" 
Gettysburg basketball game, remember? 
. . . terrific trumpeter of the dance band 
. . . friendly . . . active. 



Una Joyce Meadows 
Zany wit . . . unique personality . . . 
colorful wardrobe . . . fair complexion 
. . . sparkling efFeryescence . . . smooth 
jitterbug . . . Gargantuan appetite . . . 
coltish run ... a sweet, laughing miss. 



Karl Eugene Miller 
"Barefoot boy with cheek" . . . "off 
we go into the wild blue yonder" . . . 
Wig and Buckle's bustling business mana- 
ger . . . idyllic romance with Elaine . . . 
high ideals. 

— 54 — 







■ » 







Pearl Suvilla Miller 
The brain . . . chemistrv whiz . . . 
long blonde hair . . . rmv . . . usuallv 
tounJ in rhe Chem lab . . . adept at 
mathematical hgures . . . big blue eves 
. . . pleasing personality. 



Robert Johx Miller 
"Bob" . . . laughing Adonis . . . Boh 
hails from Shenandoah College . . . ver- 
satilefellow . . . handball enthusiast . . . 
the tinkle ot wedding chimes awaits him 
in August . . . "Now, let us pray!" 



Mildred Arlexe Neff 
"Millie" . . . dark . . . sweet-faced 
. . . life of the dorm . . . Conservite . . . 
seen with Janie . . . imitations . . . 
friendiv . . . York's her home . . . ever 
smiling . . . likes to tease . . . the light 
of Bob's life. 



COXSTAXCE \'eROXICA NeSTOR 

"Connie". . . oboe plaver with temper- 
.iment . . . favorite color is "Red". . . 
enviable lasting suntan . . . vim-full 
cheerleader . . . tastefully dressed . . . 
talented . . . Conserv artist . . . ask her 
about the "Roumanian Rhapsody." 



55 








*^- ^ 









Blake Harold Nicholas 
Clark Gable . . . budding mustache 
. . . daily dozen at Stony 's "Gym" . . . 
long distance phone calls for Florida sugar 
reports . . . makes Ethics class interesting 
. . . has a commandinff voice. 



Bernardo J. Penturelli 
"Bennie" . . . mushroom king . . . 
swing band participant . . . always one 
jump ahead of the prof. . . . cautious poli- 
tician . . . cagey second baseman . . . 
faithful attendent of North Hall Parlor 
. . . handsome and nice . . . dependable. 



Ella Kathryn Rhoads 
"Kitty" . . . devotee to Bover and 
biology . . . well-groomed dark hair . . . 
curls up for a snooze anvwhere . . . con- 
fident . . . never failing vvaker-upper . . . 
diminutive in stature. 



Luther Eyler Robinson 
"Lew" . . . married to an attractive 
former co-ed . . . one who believes in 
natty attire . . . encased behind that sober 
face sprawls the brain of a schemer. 



56 















-^*^ 





Samuel James Rutherford 

"Sam" . . . amateur dramatist ... a 
constant \vorr\- to Dr. Bender . . . labora- 
tory terror . . . amiable . . . dominant 
personality . . . "Bov, did vou hear the 
one about—" . . . active . . . clever. 



Tho-Mas James Shaak 

"Tom" . . . roguish pleasantrv . . . 
loves them all . . . fnendlv . . . straight- 
forward . . . congenial Conservite . . . 
master of ivories . . . governed bv moods 
. . . "Gosh, I don't know" . . . "Hey, 
anvbodv going my wav?" 



Fraxklix G. Sexger III 

A new arrival from Shenandoah College 
. . . self-sufficiency personified . . . "I'm 
really terribly busv" . . . preparing for the 
ministr\' . . . lends his musical talent to 
the Glee Club. 



Thelma Mae Sharp 

Ever ready smile . . . fondness for 
felines . . . hearty laugh . . . solitaire 
enthusiast . . . concocter of late snacks 
. . . friendly greeting . . . ambition to he 
a social worker. 



— 57 — 



< 



~ J. 












^IP*^ 





Vl-'i»^' 




■.yfe^ ^f^ 




''-wr- 




Thelma Zimmerman Shearer 

"Zimmie" . . . no more . . .Christmas 
chimes mixed with wedding bells . . . 
bright-eyed flutist . . . talkative . . . 
Dutch accent . . . addicted to Morpheus 
. . . drollery . . . Penn State bound . . . 
"Thev say that falling in love is wonder- 
ful".' 



David Patrick Sheetz 

"Dave". . . on the list of L.\'.'s newest 
fathers . . . "Hev, fellows! The babv's 
off the bottle now.". . . A veritable whiz 
at calculus . . . one of the Chem lab's 
popular tenants. 




DoRis Newman Shettel 

Likes to be called "Doris Lee" . . . 
versatile person . . . overflows with vigor 
... a true lover of nature . . . "What is 
worth doing at all is worth doing. Well?" 
. . . she has deserted us for the hills of 
Arkansas. 



Iris Opal Shumate 

True gem . . . tall and quiet ... a whiz 
at figures . . . twinkling glimmer in her 
eyes . . . unassuming and likeable ... a 
mania for hiking . . . one of Miss Myer's 
girls. 



— 58- 








^ \ 



^ kv 









7\/^ 





Margaret Elizabeth Smith 

"Peggy" . . . dark curlv h.iir . . . in- 
fectious laugh . . . lots of personalit\- . . , 
French horn plaver . . . trips to Harris- 
burg . . . earlv to bed . . . talks in her 
sleep . . . sweet and petite. 



Robert Joseph Sourbier 

"Bob" . . . Amateur hypnotist . . . 
handler of the brush and palette . . . 
music loyer . . . most interesting con- 
yersationalist . . . knows something about 
everything . . . Quittie's capable Art 
Editor. 



Earl Jones Spangler 

Amiable, equine lover ... a Hershey 
Jr. College alumnus . . . "Suzv" possesses 
a hearty tenor . . . plans a career in busi- 
ness . . . right now his biggest "business" 
is carried on at the race track. 



\^iroinia Irene Stonecipher 

"Ginnv" . . . the Dean's attractive 
daughter. . . very sociable . . . "What'll 
It be girls? Coffee?" . . . one of the card 
sharks of South Hall . . . looking for- 
ward to a marital career . . . warm and 
pleasing conversationalist. 



59 









*%.* 



'^i^^0lr 



Dorothy Louise Strassburger 
"Doctie" . . . saxophonis: . . . fond of 
wearing green . . . choir-leader aspirations 
. . . warm smile . . . jokester . . . gray 
eves . . . Earl of Westmoreland in Shake- 
speare's "Henry I\"' . . . diligent worker. 



Robert Douglas Streepy 
"Streepy" . . . best dressed man . . . 
pianist improviso . . . model railroad fan 
. . . gab artist . . . sophistication a la 
superbe . . . speaks rapidly . . . conserve 
artiste . . . knows his classical music A 
to Z. 









Andrew Philip Strickler 

His voice is like the roar of the surf on 

a rock strewn coast . . . hair like the 

(lames of hell of which he preaches . . . 

earnest and sincere in everything he does. 



Arthur Leon Terr 
"Terr" . . . knows his way around 
women . . . likes a good argument . . . 
discusses psychology freely with those 
who listen . . . nice mannered . . . true 
gentleman . . . not at all bitter ,just sar- 
castic. 



— 60- 






IP I 




ll 



-^_„ •*m 




M'«^v. 



Franklin Hertzler Unger 
"Frank" . . . jolly Conservite ... all 
smiles . . . frienJlv . . . like father like 
son . . . tricky trumpeter . . . Glee Club 
supporter . . . hits a wicked B . . . co- 
operative and sincere . . . winning sense 
of humor. 



Frank. Edwin Urich 
Resident of South Hall . . . ardent 
reader . . . one man cheerint; section . . . 
likeable fellow . . . Shorty's his girl . . . 
one of Prof . Miller's boys . . . short hair- 
cut . . . KilroN- ! remember). 



\'iRGi.NiA Mai; \'ou(.ht 
"Ginnie " . . . with the light brown 
hair . . . demure smile . . . modest brain 
. . . subtle sense of humor . . . aesthetic 
ebony fingernails . . . always a gracious 
hostess . . . 



John William Wagner 
Quiet . . . amiable person . . . use of 
profound words . . . yawns and rolls oyer 
to sleep even in the midst of a violent 
"bull session" . . . bus addict. 



61 









<s^^ ^t. . v» 



^,^\ 



J# I- 










r 



l'!^ 



if'^f^ ^ifS) 




Miriam Rebecca Wehrv 

"Mini" . . . green eves . . . striking 
brow . . . tinv waistline . . . Pine Grove 
accent . . . slinlcv black evening gown 
. . . accomplished musician . . . striving 
for long hair . . . pleasant to look at . . . 
nice to know. 



Donald Edward Weiman 

"Don". . . staunch Philokosmian man 
. . . not married but almost . . . drv 
humor . . . nothing like a drink to help 
things along . . . Legion supporter . . . 
excellent thinker . . . wants to become a 
doctor . . . knows a lot of jokes. 




.^^' 






T^ % 





James Edward Wert 

"Jim" . . . tvpical Palmyra boy . . . 
So there's fault in evervthing? . . . too 
much time in South Pacilic . . . Dean's 
list . . . steady and capable worker . . . 
repeater (?) of classroom humor . . . ex- 
pects to become an Accountant. 



Ruth Eleanor Whitman 

Cute little "chick" from Cornwall . . . 
has a friendlv wav with people . . . nice 
smile of undetermined quality . . . studies 
hard and is well repaid . . . often seen in 
the Chem lab . . . attractive personality. 



62 



■^2:^r^-2 








m 




Robert Lewis Withelder 

"Bob" . . . prep.inng to enter the field 
of Industrial Chemistry . . . married and 
proud of his two hovs . . . pleasing per- 
sonality . . . well liked . . . Why does he 
go home weekends? 



Irene May Withers 

"Ed" . . . chem major and loves it . . . 
first team hockey and basketball . . . can 
repair anything . . . "W.A.A. candv is 
here— see Eddie" . . . speaks so-o-o-o-o 
softlv. 



Charles P. Yeagley, Jr. 

"Charlie" ... a new face on the Flying 
Dutchman's campus . . . flaming red hair 
. . . winning smile . . . Conserv artist 
. . . plays terrific piano . . . Dean's list 
. . . valuable asset to future musical educa- 
tion. 



Paul Richard Yingst 

"St. Paul" . . . Quittie's graving Edi- 
tor . . . "to be or not to be" . . .the Dark 
Mirror . . . Connoisseur of the feminine 
form . . . singer of songs of America . . . 
man of distinction— Chem, that is. 



63 





ify* 




^ ^ 





iSh »!^^ 



.^' 





John Balthaser Yoder, Jr. 

"Flight into fantasy" kid . . . mixes 
music with Business Administration . . . 
co-pilot of Blake and Balthaser Bologna 
Bomber . . . high-scorer of champion pre- 
war Botch Brothers . . . shines again on 
hardwood court. 



Harold Edwin Zeigler 

My goodness, another minister . . . 
quiet likeable fellow ... a gentleman's 
gentleman . . . serious minded . . . hard 
worker . . . "The Lord has called and I 
shall serve him." 



Sara Ann Zellers 

Tall . . . fair . . . classic features . . . 
breakfasts at the P-wav . . . ardent horse 
lover . . . intends to have her own stables 
somedav . . . spends her weekends in 
Lancaster . . . the livelv corpse from 
Henrv IV . 



Rhoda Mae Ziegler 

Modest intellectual . . . conscientious 
worker . . . A-1 in Math . . . frequent 
visitor at the library . . . indescribabh- 
gentle . . . bright warm smile . . . de- 
pendable to the wth degree. 



64 






Fj^m"^ 



w-*^ 





EDNA CAROLINE JOHNSON 



Now We Have But Fond Memories 

A golden haired, smiling faced, industrioLis hctle worker, she 
lives in our memorv. She loved life, gave of herself freeh' and now 
remembrance of her spurs us to carrv on from where she left off. 
In Memoriam — Edxa Carolixe Johnson. 



65 




Sophomore Class Officers 

President Joseph M. Fiorello 

Vice-Presiden: Glexn L. Hall 

Secretary James E. Lindemuth 

Treasurer Asher S. Edelman 



66 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 




History 



The first event which brought the members of the class of "49" together into a group in which 
chiss spirit really prevailed was the Tug of War with the sophomore class on October the twelfth, nine- 
teen hundred and forty-five. The freshmen were the losers. 

Prior to this we had been walking about on campus recognizing other members of our class as 
such, only because of the blue and white "dinks" which we were compelled to wear until the begin- 
ning of the Christmas vacation. Most of us thought the dinks very collegiate-like and becoming. 
We didn't mind wearing them a bit. 

On the sixteenth of Januarv we elected class orticers. This was our first class meeting and those 
elected were: President, Jack Gaul; \'ice-President, George Rutledge, Secretary, John Shettel; and 
Treasurer, Betty Ruth Jones. 

At a meeting on the twentieth of February the class selected blue and white as our colors, and a 
class cheer and motto was also chosen. "Rinso" Marquette was elected to be our athletic manager. 

We sponsored a dance on the twentieth of April in the Annville Fire House. All who attended 
had loads of fun. 

The fellows of our class plaved a total of five basketball games with the upperclassmen in the gym 
during the basketball season. These games added to the class spirit and were enthusiastically attended 
by the upperclassmen. 

When the campus murder took place almost all of the members of our class were caught believing 
every bit of the plot and we were dubbed "suckers" by every upperclassman on the campus. 

On the seventh of January, nineteen hundred and fortv-six a meeting of the class of "49" was called 
and new officers were elected for the sot^homore vear. Our newofficers are: President, Joseph Fiorello; 
\'ice-President, Glenn Hall; Secretary, James Lindemuth; and Treasurer, Asher Edeiman. 



67 — 




Class 



ACHENBACH, MaRIAN J. 

Arnold, Mark R. 
Bailey, Margaretta E. 
Baker, Joyce E. 
Baker, Robert E. 
Baker, Ronald L. 
Bashore, Robert M., Jr. 
Behney, Donald 
Bell, Esther R. 
Benedick, Harry E. 
Bieber, Eugene R. 
Blouch, Barbara A. 
Bomgardner, Robert E. 
BoROTA, Nicholas H. 
Boyer, Harold E. 
Boyer, Peter P. 
Boyer, \^era J. 
Brinser, Foster M. 
Briody, Elyzabeth a. 
Britton, Howard L, Jr. 
Brunner, William J. 
BuDESHEiM, Mary E. 
Ceck, Mary E. 
Cocos, William S. 
Cohen, Leonard M. 
Conway, William T. 
Cook, Hattie R. 
CousLER, Glenn E. 
Crincoli, Michael F. 
Daubert, Harlan A. 
Deardorfp, Philip C. 
DiJohnson, Albert P. 
Donmoyer, Willi.\m M. 
Downey, Ralph A. 
Dubs, Joseph C. 
Earhart, Jacob E. 
Early, Robert F. 
Eckenroth, Herbert A. 
Eby, Richard Y. 
Edelman, Asher S. 
Etter, David S. 
Fake, Dwight C. 
Feaster, Harold L. 



68 



Roll 



FiDLER, JOHX A. 

FioRELLo, Joseph M, 
Fleischer, David 
FoRS, Oscar, Jr. 
FuNXK, Dennis L. 
Gainor, Erma S. 
Gaxtz, Frederick L. 
Gates, Richard D. 
Geib, Donald A. 
Geib, Marion I. 
Ghmberlin'G, Marshall 
Getz, Russell P. 
Gibson, Carl W. 
Gilbert, Anne 
Girton, Dale 
Glover, Mary L. 
Grovlr, Robert R. 
Hall, Glenn L. 
Hare, William F. 
Hartman, Samuel A. II 
Hazen, Nina H. 
Heckendorn, John J. 
Hess, Robert E. 
Hess, Walter W. 
Hicks, William L. 
Hildebrand, Alvin S. 
Hissner, Jeanne L. 
HorrMAN, Harry H.,Jr. 
HoRST, Mary L. 
Hughes, Melvin H. 
Jones, Betty R. 
Jones, Marvin H. 
KAurrMAN, Earl F. 
Keller, Stanton H. 
Kessler, Joanne L. 
Kreider, Howard B.,Jr. 
Kreiser, Wesley R. 
Krokenberger, Edith R. 
Krout, Faye L. 

KuRILLA, VIiCHAEL 

Lau, Audrey C. 
Leid, Norma J. 



69 — 








Class 



Light, Warren E. 
LiNDEMUTH, James E. 
Loser, John F. 
Mahoney, Walter P. 
Malick, Donald V. 
Marshall, John E. 
Mateyak, Paul 
Matter, Martha J. 
Mattern, Paul D. 
McCoy, Robert P. 
Meiser, Beatrice M. 
Meyer, Nancy R. 
Millard, A. Marion 
Miller, Charles W. 
Miller, Martha M. 
Miller, Richard J. 
Miller, Robert H. 
Miller, Sidney S. 
Moore, Df.an S. 
Moore, William T., Jr. 
Murphy, Erma R. 
Norris, Joanna H. 
O'Donnell, Mary A. 
Orel, Irvin 
Oxenrider, Bry'ce C. 
Paup, William O. 
Phillips, William S. 
Powell, Loudelle F. 
Pye, Richard G. 
Radai, Joseph L. 
Reamer, E. Leon 
Reemsnyder, Olive M. 
Rhine, Earl E. 
RissER, John V. 
Roemig, Irvin J. 
Rohrbaugh, Laverne E. 
RooTE, Rose Marie 
Rothrock, William A. Ill 
RuHL, Charles S. 
Russman, Grover C. 
Salzman, Mary C. 
Sampson, Kenneth L. 



70 



Roll 



SCHOLLENBERGER, CuARLES R. 

ScHWALM, Marian E. 
Shank, Lois J. 
Shenk, John R. 
Sherman, Chester J., Jr. 
Sherman, \'in'cent A. 
Shettel, Paul O., Jr. 
Shindel, Erxest 
Shultz, Ella M. 
Shumax, M. Laiaune 
Skiles, James W. 
Smith, Dorothy M. 
Smith, Joseph D.,Jr. 
Spangler, Paul J. 
Steiner, Edward R. 
Steixer, Russell I. 
Stickel, Ross E.,Jr. 
Sutton, Ruth P. 

SwAXGER, JOHX W. 

TiCE, Frederick S. 
Tome, Charles W.,Jr. 
Wagxer, Clair D. 
Wall, Naxcy G. 
Walters, Dexe T. 
Warfel, Luzetta J. 
Weaver, Jaxet K. 
Werner, Dorothy E. 
Werner, \'irgixia M. 
White, Richard D. 
Widmanx, Raymond J. 
Witt, Clarexce 
WoLi , Karl L., Jr. 
Wolf, Mary C. 
WuCHTE, JoHx I. 
Yeakll, Joseph H. 
YixGST, Harold E. 
Yixgst, William J. 
YoFFEE, David \ . 
Zeigler, Melvix R. 
Zerbe, John E. 
Zimmermax, Thomas M. 
ZiNK, Dorothy E. 









71 




freshman Class Officers 



Fresident John Charles Smith 

Vke-Pivs/dent Raymond A. Kline 

Secretary Pauline M. Stoner 

Treasurer John E. Adams 



With the beginning of the fall term in 1946, the largest freshman class ever to enter Lebanon X'alley 
College and the largest post-war class was welcomed into L. \'. C.'s rank and file. Three hundred 
eighty students entered with three hundred seven of them male students. Lebanon \'allev as well 
as other colleges felt the large influx of returnmg G.I.'s. 

Freshman week began on Monday morning, the sixteenth of September, with examinations and 
lectures. In the afternoon Dr. Clyde A. Lvnch introduced the faculty members to the new students. 
This was followed by a reception held in the college church. 



72 



freshman Class 




Manv of the traditional freshman rules were laid aside much to the disappointment of the upper 
classmen. Since manv of the G.I.'s thought it siUv, the usual dink and blue tie did not appear, and 
less class discrimination was shown. Also, the frosh girls were allowed to have dates during the first 
semester, a permission frowned upon bv the upper class girls who remembered their less fortunate daxs. 

Shortlv after school began, a number of freshmen nursed shocked nervous svstems after the murder 
of "Red" Hollinger, a prominent senior. However, the publicitv of previous murders lessened the 
number of cases of h\-steria and innocence. Nevertheless enough were taken in to make the upper- 
classmen feel that their annual murder was worthwhile. 

The initiations bv the four societies in October doublv made up for the Ia.\ frosh rules. Many 
gullible freshmen were seen emerging with smeared paint, lipstick, flour, eggs, etc. in one undis- 
tinguishable mess and smell. Also, we heard that some of the fellows had a difficult time sitting in 
class for the next few davs, and all because of the powerful arm of big "Ben" Wasilewski. 

December brought with it our class election. The freshman class is now competentlv represented 
bv John Charles Smith, Jr., "Smittv" as president. 

One of the things we like best about our school is its friendlv spirit. It is our hope to continue 
in this spirit and to contribute more than our share to the pages of college historv. We want to make 
this one of the best freshman classes ever to have passed through Lebanon \'allev College. 



73 




Class 



Adams, John E. 
Albert, Luke S. 
Albright, Robert W. 
Aldinger, Glenn R. 
Allwein, John H. 
Alwood, George D. 
AsHWAY, Mary J. 

AwKERMAN, LOY C. 

Bacastow, Arthur J. 
Bachman, Franklin I. 
Bachman, Walter E. 
Bailey, Richard W. 
Baker, Lee K. 
Barnes, Ralph T., ]r. 
Barth, Miriam E. ' 
Barto, Betty J. 
Barto, James L. 
Beam, Ethel M. 
Beam, Harold W. 
Beamesderfer, Charles R. 
Beck, Edgar O. 
Becker, Floyd E. 
Beddall, John R. 
Bell, Florence J. 
Bemesderfer, Richard L. 
Benedict, Paul W., Jr. 
Bixler, Russell J. 
Blanken, Robert W. 
Blauch, James R. 
Blecher, Arlene M. 
Bohr, Dean H. 
Bolger, Joseph R. 
Bomberger, George K. 
Bomgardner, Robert L. 
Bowman, James 
Bowman, Lewis W. 
Bowman, Robert K. 
Boyer, Clayton C. 
Bricker, Harry L.,Jr. 
Bright, Nancy H. 
Broome, Paul E. 
Brown, Frederic W. 
Brown, Thomas P. 
BucHER, Eugene S. 
BucHER, Norman B.,Jr. 
Burrell, Richard E. 
Carl, John K. 
Checket, Richard A. 
Christianson, Barbara C. 
Clark, Donald F. 
Clark, Russell E. 
Clarke, Mark G. 
Clodoveo, Raymond 
Clouser, Earl G. 
Cohen, Abba D. 
Crowell, Steven S. 
Culhane, Thomas P., Jr. 
Dale, Phyllis L. 
Daugherty, Mary F. 
Deens, Henry C 
Diament, Ellis S. 
Dickerson, Joseph G-,Jr. 
DiJoHNSON, Henry A. 
DoLAN, Teresa E. 
Donley. Richard W, 
Doyle, Robert D. 
Dubs, Willlam R. 



^ 




74 



Roll 



DusMAN, Harry M. 
Earich, Douglas R. 
Eberly, Hugh L. 
Eblijjg, Richard D. 
EcKERT, Doris L. 
EcKERT, James 

EcKERT, JOHM 

Edelman, Mary C. 
Edwards, Fred J. 

EiCEMAV, George H. 
Eigenbrode, Charles R. 
Eigenbrode, Ralph F. 

ElSENHAUER, JOHN H. 

EisENHouR, Richard E. 

Ellin'ger, Bernard A. 

Ely, George F.,Jr. 

Englehart, Robert N. 

Eppley, Janet F. 

Erdley, Anna F. 

Espenshade, Ralph S. 

Esterline, Marilyn R. 

Evans, Charles D. 

Fake, Margaret A. 

Farnsler, Richard N. 

Fehr, Alex J. 

Feig, Robert C. 

Felty, Glenn H. 

Ferguson, William D. 

Fields, Clifford C. 

Fiorello, Salvatore p. 

Fisher, Richard D. 

Fisher, Robert H. 

Fisher, William G. 

Fitterer, Bruce P. 

Ford. Charles R, 

Foster, Robert E. 

Fowler, Donald S. 

Frank, Joseph J, 

Frantz, Roger R. 

Fraungelter, Daniel H. 
Frey, Mary K. 
Fuhrman, Mary L. 
Furman, Wallace W. 
Gage, Walter G.,Jr. 
Gaul, Charles E. 
Garverich, Sidney A. 
Geidt, Audrey P. 
Gerasinovich, Milan 
Gerhart, Paul J. 
Gerhart, Rachel G. 
Gill, Otho B- 
Gramm, Jack D. 
Greenawalt, Charles K. 
Gregg, James E. 
Greiner, Morris H. 
Groff, Clarian L. 
Grossglass, Janet E. 
Grove, Sylvan D. 
Gruber, Glenn E. 
Gully, Robert L. 
Habecker, Evelyn M. 
Hackman, Willis H. 
Hamilton, Robert S. 
Hanshaw, Harry H. 
Hartman, Richard D. 
Heim, John S. 
Heistand, Clifford A. 



— 75 





r^\ff 



Class Roll 



Herr, Christine J, 
Hess, Robert W . 
HicKERNELL, Joseph S. 
Hockley, Frank \V. 
HoEFLiNG, William A. 
HoFFER, Donald R. 
Hoffman, Charles R- 

HOFFMAN, RuSSEL L. 

Hoover, Richard R. 
HoRST. Arthur E. 
Hostetter, Henry G. 
Howard, George M. 
Howard. Robert C. 
Hower, Clyde E. 
Hren, Antony' R. 
Huff, Frank Brelesford 
Hull, Jeanne C. T. 
Hunter, George R., Jr. 
Ilgenfritz, John H. 
Jagnow, Mary L. 
Jones, William G. 
Karsnitz, Lee L. 
Kauffman, Paul W. 
Kaylor, Richard L. 
Keech, Roger E. 
Keeler, William J. 
Keller, Henry E. 
Keller, Lillian M. 
Kettering, Russell L. 
KiLMOYER, Doris J, 
Kirkpatrick, Kenneth P. 
Kleinfelter, Barbara A. 
Kleppinger, Gerald S. 
Kline, Raymond A. 
Kline, Robert M. 
Klingensmith, Doris L. 
Knies, Richard T. 
Knowlton, Elbridge N. 
Kostenbauder, Jean M. 
Kramer, Ruth A. 
Kreider, Janet L. 
Kurtz, Michael A. 
Kutchever, Anthony J. 
Lane, Melvin M. 
Layser, Joseph W. 
Layser, Ray A. 
Lebegern, Howard F. 
Leman, Dorothy E. 
Leonard, Floyd R. 



Light, Clifford J. 
Light, Oscar S.,Jr. 
Light, Ruth E. 

LiNDEMON, SlaDE S., Jr. 

Long, Calvin H. 
Long, Paul M. 

LONGENECKER, AlTON A. 

Longenecker, Mark S. 
Madeira, Harold G. 
Mall, Irving A. 
Mantz, Alonzo L. 
Marquette, Robert H. 
Mazzoni, Bernard R. 
McClure, John E. 
McCurdy, Lloyd E. 
McGraw, James J. 
McKiNLEY, Roger M. 
McMicHAEL, James R.,Jr. 
Menear, Ellwood J. 
Miller, Betty M. 
Miller, Etta R. 
Miller, Geraldine A. 
Miller, Henry W. 
Miller, Lyle C. 
Miller, Phyllis L. 
Miller, William F. 
Moller, Richard W. 
Moody, Ralph R.,Jr. 
Moyer, Richard P. 
Murray, James F. 
Myers, Betty J. 
Nagle, Elliott V. 
Nebb, William W. 
Nepi, Albert J. 
Nelson, Eugene E. 
Neubaum, Earl C. 
Neyer, John W. 
Oswald, Ralph A., Jr. 
Paine, J. Donald 
Paine, Ralph H. 
Parker, James E. 
Parker, Russell M. 
Parr, Robert G. 
Patterson, George F. 
Pechini, Maggio p. 
Peiffer, Martin M. 
Peiffer, Ruth A. 
Peters, James C. 
Platz, Stephen E. 
Potter, Donald A. 
PuLLi, Frank, Jr. 



— 76 



Class Roll 



Quarry, Ralph J. 
Ravndal, Maxwell B. 
Read, Annette C. 
Remley, Stl'art K. 
Renner, Sylvester St. A. 
RissER, Walter H. 
RoEMiG, Charlotte P. 

ROHRBAUGH, ChARLOTTE E. 

Roman, George 
Rothermel, Geraldine M. 
Rothgaber, Clifford P. 
Roy, Richard 
Royer, Mary A. 
ScHMiCK, Richard E. 
Schneider. Martin 
Seltzer, Richard E. 
Shaak, Robert S. 
Sharkey, John R. 
Shay, Edwin H. 
Sheetz, Robert H. 
Sheppard, Robert M. 
Sherriff, Florence M. 
Shutter. Carl T. 
Siegel, Herman 
Simmons, Charles W. 
Slifer, Betty J. 
Smith, Howard H. 
Smith. John C. 
Smith, Walter A., Jr. 
Snavely, Jack 
Snyder, Gilbert D. 
Snyder, Richard A. 
Souders, Agnes M, 
Spangler, L. Betty 
Spangler. Richard H. 
St \UB, John H. 
Steele, Robert A. 
Steely, William D , Jr. 



Stine.Johx D. 
Stolte, Robert H. 
Stoner, Pauline M. 
Stricicler, Doris M. 
Strohman, Bert G. 
SwARTz, Richard W. 
Thomas, Dorothy J. 
Thomas, Doris M. 
Thomas, Donald L. 
Tile, Charles M. 
Uhrich, Karl H. 
Uhrich, Robert A. 
Urich, Nan E. 
Villa, Peter S. 
VoGEL, Clyde K. 
Wall.vce, David H. 
Walters, Clarence G., J 
Walters, Elvin W. 
Walters, Robert N. 
Wattai, John J. 
Weidman, Dren 
Werner, Vivian J, 
Wersen, Katherine ^ 
Wert, Edgar D 
Wertz, William 
Wilhelm, James A. 
WiLHiDE, Anita E. 
Williams, Earl K. 
Williams, Edward 
Williams, Harry M. 
Wolfe, Harold C, 
Wolfersderger. Jacob 

WOLFSON, EdYTHE 

Woll, Neal E. 
Wood, John E. 
YocuM, Edgar A. 
Zangrilli, Alfred G 
Zengerle, Joseph T. 



H. 



Special and Part-Time Students 



Bailey, Mrs, Margaret 
Barry, Alfred J. 
Bechtel, Margaret T. 
Beicher, John j. 
Christian, Madeline E. 
Clemens, Ralph W.,Jr. 
Davis, Kenneth J. 
Englehart, Hazel V. 
Fields, Richard D. 
FiNKBONE, Betty" M. 
Gallery, William V. 



Hess, John W. 
Johnson, John A. 
Kirchner, Frank R. 
Lebo, James E. 
Lesher, Cora E. R. 
Lewis, Kenneth K. 
Light, Richard H. 
Long, Amos, Jr. 
Madlem,John R. 
Mayhoffer, George P. 
McKenna, Gerard J. 



Meyer, Simon 
Miller, Charles R., Jr. 
Miller, Ned E. 
Parsons, James W. 
PoMRANiNG, Charles E. 
Sadler, Paul H. 
Schwalm, Lyle R. 
Stevens, Lucille H. 
Stine. C- Richard 
\'erni, Nilola 
Zimmerman, Harry M. 





®5^1? 



Governing Bodies 




78 




; ;• 




\ \ N' 




Men's Senate 



"With how little wisdom 
the world IS governed" 

Going back into historv we find that the Men's Senate was a direct result of the 
"Death League." This group of terrorists led their attack against the freshmen, and it 
was only after the intervention and a plea on the part of the administration for common 
decency that birth was given to the Men's Senate, a democratic student government 
body. 

The Senate is trying hard to keep its aims in view. These aims include dormitory 
discipline and student welfare. Moreover, Men's Senate crusaded for the Thursday 
activity period and promoted the Men's Dormitory Axe League. The Senate cooperated 
with Jiggerboard to sponsor a delightful Christmas banquet and dance. "Blood, sweat, 
and tears," but there will always be a Senate. 




Jiggerboard 



There are onl\' twti qikilines in the 
world: efficiencx' and inethcienc\-, and 
onlv two sorts of people: the efficient 
and inefficient. 

— George Bernard Shaw 



Jiggerboard, an organization whose popularity is debatable, is that austere group of 
girls, more formallv known as the Women's Student Government Association. This 
austere group gives free advice to a select group of voung ladies on specified evenings 
after dinner. They are quiet, capable and efficient in discovering and correcting all those 
little shortcomings the freshmen girls :^and upperclass women) seem to make frequently. 



81 




Men's day-Student Congress 

Heed this well: vou can govern men 
onlv bv serving them. 

During the war the entire men dav-student population composed the Men's Day- 
Student Congress. As was the case with most campus organizations, its activity was 
severely curtailed and lost much of its power. The post-war Congress is now in the 
throe of reorganization. 

The governing body is constructed on the representative democracy plan — the men 
dav-students (excluding freshmen) cast ballots for their choice of the nominees proposed 
by the Dean. These elected representatives comprise the Men's Day-Student Congress. 
They then choose, from their own group, their officers. This Congress forms the im- 
mediate governing body over the individual man dav-student, and controls him in the 
manner specified bv the college administration. 

Due to the verv large number of dav-students now attending Lebanon \'alley, this 
organization is in the same position as the well known "Old Woman who lived in a 
shoe." 



82 




Women's Commuters' Council 



The Women's Commuters' Council was organized to maintain order among the 
women day-students, because their problems are somewhat dillerent from those of the 
dorm students. 

In keeping with the tradition of past women dav-students, on December twentieth 
thev had a Christmas partv in the dav-student room, at which time the girls exchanged 
gifts. The freshmen decorated the rooms and served refreshments, which helped to 
make the party a success. 

On February fourteenth the day-students held a Valentine's Dance in the Spanish 
room of the Hershey Hotel. A King and Queen of Hearts were chosen to reign for the 
evening, and they were given a box of chocolates. Because of the hard work of the ticket 
committee the dance was one of the outstanding social events of the year. 



83 




Student faculty Council 

What is worth doing at all is worth 
doing well. 

The Student-Faculty is composed of a representative from each organization on 
campus and of three faculty members. Its main function is to discuss plans and improve- 
ments which are related to the student body as a whole. However, these plans and im- 
provements have seldom risen above the embrvo stage. 

A secondary function of the organization is to discuss the problems of students. It 
attempts to bring about a closer understanding between students and faculty. The 
value of the organization as an integral part of school life should be very great, and we 
sincerelv hope that future years will get them nearer to the realization of that ideal. 



84 




Religious Coordinating Council 

The Religious Coordinating Council is a new organization on campus this \ear. It 
IS a council that does exactly what its title indicates — coordinates all the religious 
activities of the school. 

The Council is composed of the President and one elected representative from each 
of the three organized religious groups — the Y. W. C. A., the Y. M. C. A., and the Life 
Work Recruits. These six leaders lay the plans for all religious activities. 

In addition to overseeing the entire religious program, the Council is responsible 
for the Religious Emphasis Week Program. 

The Council is composed of the following: President, Joseph D. Smith, Secretary, 
Ruth I. Billow, Paul G. Fisher; Florence E. Barnhart, Harold E. Zeigler; and Joseph H. 
Y^eakel. 



85 — 



OrMnizations 




7^ y*<lX 



86 




Oiuittie Staff 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Editor-in-Chief Paul R. Yingst Section! Editors 

Art Editor Robert Sourbier Charles Bolan 

7-. cj-* T- 1' Doris Hyman 

Drama Editor Iheodore Keller _ „ 

A * T T- rSARBARA KlLHEEFER 

Conservatory Editors Mary Jane hcKERT Ioamna Lawhead 

Karl Miller Mildred Neff ' 

Men's Sports Editor ^ . George R. Marquette Rhoda 

Women' s Sports Editor Irene Withers Photoirapby Editor 

Typists Carolyn Boeddinghaus Photography Assistants ^ 
Doris Clements 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager Edwin F. Englehart 

Associate Business Manager . . . Robert F. Beck 

Advertising Manager Elaine Heilman 

Advertising Assistants Elaine Frock 

Ken'jiro Ikeda 



Samuel Rutherford 
Thomas Shaak 
Frank Urich 
Ruth Whitman 
Harold Zeigler 

ZlEGLER 

Mary Elizabeth Frank 
Ella Kathryn Rhoads 
Virginia \'ought 
Miriam Wehry 



Wellf here it is , , . 



The production of the 194S Q//!tfap,/b//Li was undertaken by a group of students, who, collectiveh, 
knew little about the minute details connected with publication of a yearbook. Undaunted b\' their 
lack of experience, the staff went ahead with the planning of this book, and worked together in com- 
mendable fashion. There was plenty of hard work, and often eyeryone became discouraged, but as a 
compensating factor, the group still had a lot of fun and gained a wealth of experience in this par- 
ticular field of endeayor. 

Doris Lee Newman, as Editor-in-Chief, initiated work on the "Quittie," but at the end of the 
first semester she moved to Arkansas, and the job then fell upon the capable shoulders of the Associate 
Editor, Paul Yingst. The new Editor-in-Chief took the situafu)n in hand immediately, and soon the 
process of reorganization had been effected. 

The central theme found in this book is a Penns\ lyania-German motif, based on our Fhing Dutch- 
man. With this theme the staff hopes to connect the record of e\ents and personalities found at 
Lebanon \'alley College in the 1946-47 school year with some of the unusual and distinctne char- 
acteristics of the folk through which this locality has become famous. 

A successful publication would not ha\e been possible without the splendid cooperation of the 
entire staff. Special mention should be gnen to Editor-in-Chief, Paul Yingst, Dram.i Editor, Ted 
Keller, Business Manager, Eddie Englehart, and Associate Lousiness NLmager, Bob Beck for those man\- 
sessions in the Men's Senate room which lasted until the "wee h(.)urs," to Robert Sourbier for his 
superb art work, ro Joanna Lawhead whose willingness to type past "quitting time" helped us "o^•er 
the hump," to Elaine Heilman for the excellent results she obtained in her ad\ertising campaign, and 
to Sam Rutherford for his willingness to assume extra duties in addition to handling some extremeh' 
difficult write-ups in a yery capable manner. 

We sincerely hope the Junior Class will be proud of this- their 194S Q///tf./pj/i//Li. 




89 — 




La Vie Col/egienne 



Adding two more pages to last vear's four, the La \ le this vear set as us 
goal the revival oi all its pre-war popular features as well as a thorough 
coverage of all campus news. Not only did they succeed in this, hut, with 
the aid of a hard-working staff, the editors presented many new features and 
were able to publish special issues at Christmas and during the music festival. 
But regardless of the size of the scoop or the number of pages in the edition, 
the most discussed question of the vear was, "Who did write that gossip 
column?" The answer to this will probably be next year's biggest scoop. 



90- 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE 



Established 1925 



Vol. XXIII— No. 9 



ThursJ.iv, Febru.irv 20, 1947 



LA ME COLLEGIENNE is published bi-weeklv throughout the college \ear, ex- 
cept holiday vacations and examination periods, by the students of Lebanon \'ailev 
College, Ann\ille, Pennsvlvania. 

LA \'IE IS a member of the Associated Collegiate Press and the Inter-collegiate Press. 
National advertising is secured through the National Advertising Service, Inc., College 
Publishers Representative, New York, N. Y. 

EDITOR 
Theodore D. Keller 

ASSOCIATE EDITOR 

RoNWLD B.VKER 

DEPARTMENTS 

News Editor AUin C. Berger, Jr. 

Sports Editor Charles Tome 

Conservatory Editor Elinor Strauss 

Feature Editor Joanne Kessler 

\'eteran's Editor J^'hn .A. Fidler 

Exchange Editor Ruth Gearhart 

Staff Photographer James Gregg 

Advisers Drs. Struble, Wallace, and Rutledge 

MANAGING BOARD 

Business Manager Melvvn Bowman 

Copy Editors Doris H. Clements, Martha Matter 

Circulation Editor Richard Pye 

Adviser Dr. John F. Lotz 



ASSISTANT EDITORS 



Esther Bell 
Theresa Dolan 
George Ely 
Alex Fehr 
William Fisher 
Rhoda Zieeler 



Russell Getz 
Dale Girton 
Elaine Heilman 
Robert Howard 
Jean Hudyma 
John Marshall 



Bett\' Ruth Jones 
Irving Mall' 
Martha Matter 
Madalyn Quickel 
Marvcarol Salzman 
Samuel Rutherford 



Bettv Jean Slifer 
Frederick S. Tice 
Nan Urich 
Donald Weiman 
James E. Wert 
Kathr\'n Albert 



TYPISTS 
Ruth Billow Ruth Gearhart Barbara Kleinfelter Annette Reed 

Erma Gainor George Haines Erma Murphv Lorraine Spangler 



— 91 




Green Blotter 



Rumor has u that the usual procedure of the members of this, the club of campus 
writers, may be summed up in the words, "Blood, sweat, and tears." But not in that 
order. 

First, comes sweat as each of the aspiring authors labors long hours over a promising 
idea, whipping it into shape for presentation at one of the regular monthly meetings. 

Next, come the tears as his brain child, so carefully built up, is ruthlessly torn apart, 
noun bv noun, bv merciless criticism from his fellows. 

But all's well that ends well for the writing bug is in his blood, and some dav, in 
spite of present rejection slips, another of his brain children will top the best-seller list 
while another generation of Ink Spots go through the mill at L. \ . C, shedding their 
blood, sweat, and tears. 



92- 




Legionnaires of L.V. C. 



The Legionnaires, the onlv purely social organization on Lebanon \ allev's campus, 
is composed of veterans of World War IL They are proud of their fine record as an or- 
ganization. In their two rears of existence thev can sav that thev have never gone "in 
the hole" and that their social activities have been verv successful. 

One aim of the organization is to aid anv ex-G.l. who mav get into trouble with the 
administration. The spotlight, focused on the club's activities, remains on the grand 
dinner-dance at the Hotel Penn-Harris. 

Due to the unprecedented number of ex-G.I.'s on the campus and the many activities 
of the older organizations, the Legionnaires have been hindered in the execution of their 
plans for other social activities. Next year the Legionnaires expect to endorse a complete 
program of activities. 



— 93 — 




Philokosmian 



It IS rumored that Philo in its seventy-ninth year is beginning to run down. Its 
heart and other internal organs are becoming old and decrepit. Philo is slowly giving 
way to Its younger brother, Kalo, who is only seventy years old. However, Philo has 
sponsored a few Saturday night dances and several smokers, and on the whole has 
functioned well as a social organization. The annual Philo and Clio Dance was a grand 
affair, and true to the real Christmas spirit all students were invited. The softly lighted 
Community Building Ballroom, with its Christmas decorations, was a fitting setting 
for the spirit of friendliness and comradeship which prevailed. 

As this book goes to press, Philo is house cleaning and hopes to emerge as a stronger 
and better organization. 



94 — 




Clionian 



Clio, observing its seventy-fifth anniversary, is the oldest of the women's literary 
societies. Throughout the many years it has preserved the ancient traditions of Minerva 
as its patron goddess, and has retained the owl, the symbol of wisdom, and the olive 
branch of unchallenged victory. 

Clio's rush week was the scene of many actnities. There was the hike along the 
Quittie, the stream not the yearbook, a charming tea in cleaned-up Clio hall, and an 
impressive fashion show starring a bridal ensemble — nothing like preparing for the 
futurel Clionians look back upon the festive Christmas dance with pleasant glowing 
memories. The climax of the year was the colorful, annual anniversary dance. 



95 — 




Kalozetean 



The Kalozetean Literarv Societv was organized on the Lebanon \'alley College 
campus in 1877 in opposition to the older men's society. Its original function was that 
of a debating societ}-, but through the years it has evolved into a social society whose 
primary function is to provide good times for its members and promote jovial good- 
fellowship among them. The Kalo smokers are something to be remembered in the 
hearts of all Kalo Alumni, and the spring formal dance is always one of the finest dances 
of the year. 

At the present time it is the largest organization on campus and is looking forward 
to much greater expansion in the coming year. 



96 




Delphian 



"Successful Rushing Season" bv Delphian was the prelude to a grand year for the 
society. No one can forget the hike to Fink's because we had all the food we could eat, 
and a most uncooperative wind blew out all the ceremonial candles. "Red paint," "eggs," 
these words, I fear, shall long have a special significance to those who underwent the 
trials of initiation. Later we, along with our Kalo brothers, displayed our talent in a mas- 
terful presentation of "The Hot Water Hero." Finally arrived the grandest event of the 
season, our Kalo-Delphian dinner-dance with Evelvn reigning. The Abraham Lincoln 
in Reading served us delicious food, though we were all too e.xcited to eat. A picture of 
lovely girls in lovely gowns and handsome beaux in formal attire made it an evening 
that will live lon^ in our memories. . . . 



97 — 




Chemist ry Club 



The Chemistry Club, organized in 1932 bv Dr. Bender, has flourished with the ex- 
ception of a few years in the late 30's. Under his fine guidance the club has become a 
strong, hard working unit. Its primary function is to acquaint students with present 
day industrial methods. This is done either by an illustrated lecture, a movie, or trips 
through various industrial plants. It also serves as an introduction to historical chem- 
istry with such trips as the field trip to the Charcoal Furnace at Cornwall. 

This organization with its varied and interesting program with the added help of 
Dr. Ness will continue to be an outstanding educational club. 




Psychology Club 



After man\' false starts the Psychology Club has tinallv gained a tooting among the 
L. \'. C. Clubs. After three vears of pioneering this club has become one of the largest 
and most influential groups on the campus as well as one of the most popular ones. At 
their meetings an\-thing can happen and usually does. Under the guiding attention of 
capable officers \yho are themselves Psychology majors, reports on yarious subjects 
have been given bv the individual members. This vear some of these topics for discus- 
sion have been: Brain Spro/as, case studies on Schizophrenia, and Cm You Ki7j.v." These 
varied and unique discussions held at each monthh' meeting have attracted many \ isitors. 
Like the held of Psychology, this organization is ever progressing. 



99 




Model Railroad Club 



In the past year a new organization has come into being on our campus. Under the 
direction of Professor Frederick Miller, the new club has obtained the use of the base- 
ment of the infirmary as its headquarters and is planning to build a double loop of track 
for the club's use. HO gauge, \'^^ scale, has been selected because it can be built for a 
low cost in a small space. All locomotives and rolling stock are the property of in- 
dividuals in the club, and only the track and platform belong to the club. At present 
the club possesses about forty cars and two locomotives collectively, which, when the 
layout IS completed, will be running on schedule. They hope in future years to greatly 
increase the size of the club. 



100 




Red Cross 



The Red Cross, having originated during the war vears, is now functioning under 
its new ad\iser, Miss Jessie H. Haag. In 1946 a delegation of the College Unit Red 
Cross attended the national convention in Philadelphia. The delegation returned to 
the campus with a handful of new and better plans related to peacetime activities. A 
Senior Life Saving program has been inaugurated, it is available to all students and is 
followed up h\' an Instructors' Course, given bv an Area Representative. A Standard 
First Aid Course of practical value to evervbodv is also offered. 

During this past month, March, the local unit in cooperation with the Lebanon 
County Chapter of the Red Cross, has entered into a wholehearted drive to solicit funds 
for the Red Cross. Projects for veterans in hospitals are under wav; these include col- 
lecting magazines, toilet articles, and games. The Red Cross can be said to function 
actively at Lebanon N'allev. 



101 — 




Life Work Recruits 



"Prav ve therefore the Lord of the harvest, that he should send forth hiborers into 
the harvest." 

The Life Work Recruits is composed of voung people dedicated to full time Christian 
service. Believing that practical experience is beneficial as a supplement ro the prepara- 
tion for the ministry, the L. W. R. sends deputations to the various churches in the 
conference. The purpose of these deputations is to enlist young Christians in the 
ministry. 

Although much of the active ser\ ice of the L. W. R. is rendered to the churches of 
our denomination, the organization takes part in the weeklv services and renders valu- 
able aid during Religious Emphasis Week. 



102 




X M. C. A. 



After an extended absence trom our campus, the Men's Y-Cabinet has again become 
a dominant force in college affairs. Although there ma\' be no ballv-hoo accompanying 
Its efforts, much work has been done in collaboration with its sister organization to 
instil a more meaningful religious feeling on our campus. The men's "Y" cooperated 
with the Y. W. C. A. and the faculty in sponsoring the activities of Freshman 'Week. 
The purpose of their big brother movement is to make the freshman feel more at home, 
bv putting him under the wing of an upper classman. The "Y" also successfully con- 
ducted a Square Dance Jamboree held in the Annville High Gvm on Fehruarv first. In 
every wav the Men's Y-Cabinet aims to do what it can to be a benefit to the entire 
student bodv. 



103 




y. IV. c. A. 



The Y. W. C. A., sister to the Men's Y-Cabinet, is the dominant religious group on 
campus for women. The Y. W. C. A. with the Y. M. C. A. are overburdened with work, 
and yet both function very smoothly. Members serve on the welcoming committee 
for freshmen, and thus the Y. W. C. A. with the Y. M. C. A. are the first campus or- 
ganizations that new students meet. Throughout the year the Y. W. C. A. conducts 
well attended \'espers and Quiet Hours. It also forms the backbone of the inspiring 
pre-holiday Sunrise Services. 

Although it participates in many other events. Heart Sister Week and Mother's 
Day are its special projects. 

"With advice and leadership from Dave, the Y. W. C. A. will continue to do an out- 
standing job. 



104 




freshman "/" Cabinet 



The Freshman "Y" Cabinet has come a long wav this vear in establishing itselt as 
an organization in its own right. The aim ot the organization has been not only to aid 
the Senior "Y" Cabinet in its work, but also to sponsor social projects with the ap- 
proval of the Senior "Y" Cabinet. 

This "Y" Cabinet consists of the Freshman Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. Cabinets 
which work together as a unit. Those composing the female part of the "Y" are Mary 
Frv, Geraldine .Vliller, Janet Grossglass, Charlotte Rohrbaugh, Pauline Stoner, Dons 
Strickler, Ruth Light, Evelyn Habecker, Ethel Mae Beam, and Lillian Keller. Those 
representing the men of the Y. M. C. A. are Ed Wert, Lee Baker, Gerald Clippinger, 
Bob Dovle, Bob Baker, Charlie Tome, Paul Kautfman, Bill Pavne, Bob Stolte, Bob 
Englehart, Bob Steele, and Bob Howard. The advisers are Florence Barnhart and 
\'ernon Fickes. 



105 




&1^M 



Conservatoty 




)<h®WM 



106' 



CONSERVATORY 




Organ 



WAYNE MOWREY 



Cornet 



RALPH DOWNEY 




108 



ARTISTS 



French Horn 



PAUL FISHER 





Piano 



BARBARA KOLB BEITTEL 



109 — 




Piano 

THOMAS SHAAK 



Conducting 



BETTY JEAN BUTT 



•^ 



:^, 




'1 





flute 

KATHERINE WERSEN 



Piano 

CHARLES YEAGLEY 





English Horn 



CONSTANCE NESTER 



Vocal 

MARY JANE ECKERT 





College Band 



"I hear those gentle voices calling — Go Vallev, Go \'allev, Go, Go, Go!" When 
everything is quiet at the game you can expect to hear this yell start new pep. Now 
that the boys are back again, the organization will be "for men only." Prof, is really 
happy as he puts this fine group of musicians through "the paces," but judging by the 
smiles on their faces as they come out of the band room, thev don't mind his, "2 before 
23," or "6 after A," or "the second ending of the first strain." It's a fine group on the 
field at half time, on the concert stage, at a Hallowe'en parade or wherever they may 
be putting on a performance. Oh, yes, don't forget the clothes pins and sun glasses for 
May Day or the rain — and speaking of rain — remember the drill at Dickinson? They 
left the field — but only after the stands were empty of people. Keep your eyes open 
and your ears keen or you'll miss the snappiness and superb tones of an excellent group 
of musicians. 



112 




Girls' Band 



"Well, girls, let's trv 'Rainbow' again" — It's bright and earlv, and Professor 
Rutledge IS speaking to the Girls' Band session at eight o'clock on a Wednesday morn- 
ing. The feminine counterpart of the marching band is at it again after a vear of silence 
which was due mostlv to the war and the man shortage. A mightv "snazzv" outfit it 
is, too, as anyone will tell vou after seeing them at the Juniata game an outfit ot good 
sports in spite of Ole' Man Winter sneaking up on us that da\-. With the tirganization 
as It IS this vear, we can look forward to a britjht future tor the teminine Sousa-lovers. 



113 




Symphony Orchestra 



This organization is stnctlv for musicians — to be a member is the highest of honors. 
Here again, Professor Rutledge is responsible for the fine quality of music produced. 
Those Thursday morning sessions at eight o'clock weren't the most pleasant things to 
think of as we set the alarm Wednesday night, but it is a pleasant way to wake up for 
that nine o'clock methods class. The crowning glorv for those early morning tune-ups 
came with the annual concert in mid-January. Their dress and music are matched; and 
as Professor Rutledge conducts, the audience is held spellbound by the beauty of the 
chords, the cadenzas, and the satisfying passages. 



114 




College Orchestra 



For vou who are not "Conservites" and enjoy a session in symphiony work, this is 
vour organization. Under the capable leadership of Prof. Carmean, you will plav manv 
different t\'pes of better music, .\lthough vou can meet onlv tiftv minutes each week, 
those minutes are well spent. .\t Christmas time there are carols, all through the vear, 
music that is pleasant; and then in the spring, a concert — the special number on the 
program this vear being George Gershwin's "Concerto in F", which was ablv supported 
bv our own Prof. Freeland at the piano. You mav expect plentv of hard work, but vou 
will be rewarded through a gratifving feeling that comes with the completion of a 
job well done. 



115 - 




Junior Orchestra 



The "one-.mj-onlv" musical organization composed entirely of beginners. It is 
the barometer of instrumental activity in the Conseryatory, and a large one this year. 
Attendance is in the nineties. As each student begins the study of a new instrument, he 
brings it to Junior Orchestra for his ensemble experience. The milestones of his L. \ . C. 
career are clicked off by his achieyements on the instruments until he has mastered them 
all; then he is crowned "with all the rights and privileges thereunto appertaining." 



116 




Chorus 



Pass bv the chapel at four o'clock on Thursdav afternoon and vou'II hear the com- 
bination of quality and volume produced bv those who sound well even outside ot the 
shower. College "book-worms" and Conservatorv "note-nuts" come together under 
Prof. Rutledge's expressive hands to produce the choral music for the college. The 
Chorus found its reward in the packed house at the Spring Festival, which was held 
this vear on April 17 and 18. A tremendous ovation was given to this group upon 
the presentation of its program which included Rossini's "Stabat Mater," Liszt's "Pre- 
ludes To Eternitv," Donizetti's "Sextet from 'Lucia,' " and a full, rich choral arrange- 
ment of the ever-popular "Finlandia" by Jean Sibelius. 



117 




Glee Club 



Lebanon \'allevites brag onh- when thev've got something to reallv brag about! And 
we don't mind bragging about our Glee Club! We almost burst with pride when we 
heard our singers in the spring concert, not to mention when we heard the fine com- 
ments on their performances during their Delaware tour in March. Any of the girls will 
gladly give you a burn bv burn description of Rehobeth in summer or a meal bv meal 
description of Delaware in spring, chicken and all. Our club definitely covered mileage 
this vear under the baton of Prof. Rutledge not to mention the accompaniment of the 
tuneful, sparkling trumpet trio. "Girls, I want two svllables on that beat — not 
arrrrrrr, but ah — oo — uhr" — "That was a good rehearsal, but now let's sing it." Prof, 
never fails to get the desired results with but one exception — and reallv, we couldn't 
help that the bus broke down twent\' miles from nowhere — nowhere being in Delaware. 



118 




Girls' Choir 



Not entirely forgotten on cimpus is this \xicA organization, a memory of the war 
years and the accompanying man shortage. Composed of girls from the mixed glee club 
with a few additions, the choir has trayeled extensively both this past summer to 
Rehobeth Beach, Delaware, for a sun-bakeJ stay, and this past school year to Harnsburg 
and Millersville for concerts. The group is much in demand even though, in reality, 
it has been replaced bv a mixed glee club, and practice time seems such an elusive thing. 
Another stay at the shore is being arranged for this summer, an eagerly awaited treat 
for the girls. Here's hoping that the girls have profited by last summer and don't try 
too hard at the business of getting a quick tan. 



119 




Horn Ensemble 



With the return of the G.I.'s, Prof. Rutledge came upon a new glory — a group of 
nine French horns making up a new musical organization. Of course, our two feminine 
members, Peg and Mary Jane, add to the appearance. At the meeting each week, pleasure 
is found in reading through and practicing the music to be used later on for those who 
enjov the weirdness of the horn. The ensemble has provided special music in several 
of the chapel services during the past school vear, and has participated also in one of 
the student recitals given in Engle Hall. It's true you may hear a bad note now and 
then, but that is a French horn player's privilege. By the way, Paul, how about playing 
the "Schluss" again? 



120- 




The Lebanon Valley Collegians 

Now in the second vear of existence, the Lebanon \'allev Collegians have established 
their place among the campus organizations. Thev play for numerous college functions, 
have fun, and try out new arrangements written bv members of the band. During this 
past school vear the Collegians provided music for such affairs as the "Welcome to 
Freshmen" dance, held during Orientation Week, the College Christmas Dance, the 
Cheerleader's Benefit Dance, the W.A.A.'s "Night Club" Dance, and the Philo-Clio 
Dance. The activities of the orchestra have not been limited to this campus, but in- 
clude playing for dances sponsored bv other colleges. Under the leadership ot their 
organizer, Eddie Englehart, the Collegians look forward to a bright and promising 
future. 



121 





®f<r 



drama 




®^ 



122 




Wig and Buckle 



The Wig and Buckle Club is the dramatic organization of Lebanon Valley College. 
Organized in 1935, it is one of the youngest clubs on campus, and has on its roll some 
very active and able personas dramaticas. 

Membership in the Wig and Buckle is achieved by participating in any phase of a 
college production — acting, directing, make-up, scenery, properties, or any one of the 
dozen activities which go with the presentation of a play. Thus it is possible for any 
student to participate in a Wig and Buckle play. 

Thus far in the 1946-47 season, Wig and Buckle, under Dr. Struble's direction, has 
offered two one-act plays, "Jean D'Arc," by the girls, and "Moonset" by the boys of 
the club, and one three-act opus, "January Thaw." The organization is planning to 
produce one more three-act play this year. 



124 — 




January Thaw 



came early this year to L. \ . — the twelfth and thirteenth of December to be exact. Januar\ Thaw, a three-act coniedv 
by Bellamy Partridge and the initial offering of the Wig and Buckle Club, was directed bv Dr. George G. Struhle and 
was presented before capacity audiences by a well-balanced cast. 

With the support ranging from actual ham-on-the-hoof to the less lively but alwavs-good-for-a-laugh t\pe, Clavton 
Hollinger completely ran away with the acting laurels with a hilarious characterization of a deadpan farmer from 
Republican New England. 

Also contributing greatlv to the success of the production was Frank Huff, who, although never actually seen bv the 
audience, was responsible for the extremely well-executed setting, the best to grace Engle Hall for many seasons. 



125 




Shakespeare's ''King Henry IV" 



Dr. Paul A. W, Wallace's production of Shakespeare's King Henry IV, Part I was one of the most 
memorable events in the annals of L. \'. C. stage history. An ambitious undertaking for the best of 
amateurs, this five-act play was acclaimed by students and visitors alike. Never before were so many 
varied pictures of life crowded into two and one-half hours: political intrigue, civil war, the prodigal 
son, tender love, and of course the gay grand larceny and immortal comedy of the theater's greatest 
comic character, Sir John Falstaff. 

With only the simple stage settmgs and colorful costumes of the Elizabethan era to aid them, an out- 
standing cast gave an outstanding performance. The play dealt with the development of the character 
of Prince Hal, who was later to become Shakespeare's ideal king. Alvin Berger as Hal presented a con- 
vincing performance as the prodigal equally at home in a tavern or in court. As the impetuous and fear- 
less Hotspur, Edward Steiner came dangerously near to winning complete sympathy for the rebel cause. 
His tender farewell to his wife played by Joanna Lawhead, the poignant scene in which Mildred NefF, 
as Lady Mortimer, sang farewell to her husband whose language she could not understand were among 
the most touching scenes in this, primarily a man's play. 

Theodore Keller was properly harassed as the aging and troubled king, while John Shettel gave one 
of his finest performances as the evil and malicious instigator of the rebellion. In complete contrast to 
the propriety of the staid English court were the hilarious tavern scenes. Grace Laverty was pleasantly 
amusing as Mistress Quickly, jolly murderess of the King's English. Outstanding among the rogues 
at the tavern was the merry scene-stealer, Joe Yeakel, who apparently enjoyed his huge false red nose 
as much as the audience. 

But it remained for Tom Schaak's FalstafF to completely win over the audience. Playing the role to 
the hilr, Tom presented a comedy characterization that defies future equalling. His presentation of the 
famous honor soliloquy evoked appreciative applause from the audience. 

Each of the supporting parts was extremely well handled, and much credit must be given to the 
business staff headed bv Eddie Englehart for the success of the production. 



126 




© /^^ 



sports 




128 




4 




football 



After a three-vear lavofF in intercollegiate sports competition, Lebanon \'allev once 
again found itself hack in the thick of athletic battle with a well-balanced sports pro- 
gram. It need not be said that our athletes were equal to the task. 

The competition in all sports circles has been tough this past year. Most college 
teams were loaded with dvnamite material so our own boys had to really "put-out" in 
order to accomplish the fine records of which we are all proud. 

Under the guiding hands of head coach Grant "Scoop" Feeser and line coach "Hank" 
Schmalzer, our men of the gridiron turned in a record of 4 wins, 3 losses, and 1 tie. This 
was accomplished with only four veteran gridmen, the rest being new to college ball. 
The coaches and team deserve our most sincere gratitude for a job well done. 



— 130 — 




^ y- 


j^^ "^ 


^ /- 


R.EIDER- 


HATEVAtC 


OEMtStRUMG 


a. a. 


R.T. 


R..E:. 



After the Final Whistle 



Oct. 4— L. V. C. 
Oct. 12— L. V. C. 
Oct. 19— L. \\ C. 
Oct. 26— L. \'. C. 
Nov. 2— L. V. C. 
Nov. 9— L. V. C. 
Nov. 16— L. V. C. 
Nov. 28— L. V. C. 



26 Moravian 

Dickinson 2 

American Int 

6 Youngstown, 20 

38 Mt. St. Mary's 6 

19 Juniata 

13 P. M. C 

6 Gettysburg 26 



SCORING 

Hen Dijohnson 36 pts. (6 T.D.'s) 

"Rinso" Marquette 30 pts. (5 T.D.'s) 

"Marsh" Gemberling 14 pts. 

George MayhofFer 7 pts. 

Herb Eckenroth 6 pts. 

Bob Bowman 6 pts. 

Pat Clemens 6 pts. 

Pete Gamber 3 pts. 





Girls' Basketball 



The 1946-47 girls' basketball season proved ro be in sharp contrast to its predecessor, the hockex 
season. While the hockev season had been quite brilliant in the enthusiasm sht)\vn and in the number 
of victories, basketball embodied less of both. However, there is a good side to the picture and that 
is found in the enjovment of the game which the participants made evident. This en|ovment is one 
of the necessarv factors in maintaining sportsmanship. 

Intra-mural basketball which brought to view a number of former varsity players gave perhaps 
the most recreation of the season to both plavers and spectators. 

Our girls who continued to stick bv the team through its manv defeats are to be commended 
highly for having the characteristics that true sportsmanship includes. 

L. \'. C. Opp. 

Jan. 17 — Lebanon \'allev at Elizabethtown 22 28 

Jan. 25— Lebanon \'alley at Penn Hall 15 21 

Feb. 12 — Lebanon \'allev at Lock Haven 34 42 

Feb. 15 — Lebanon Vallev at Albright 22 21 

Feb. 19 — Shippensburg at Lebanon \'allev 47 33 

Feb. 22 — Lebanon \'alley at Millersville 25 30 

Feb. 26 — Millersville at Lebanon \'alley 38 25 

Mar. 8 — Lebanon \'alley at Gettysburg 10 37 

Mar. 10 — Lebanon Valley at Shippensburg 24 30 

Mar. 12 — Elizabethtown at Lebanon \'allev 20 30 



133 




Basketball 



Our new baskerhall mentor, Coach Ralph Mease, proved his mettle bv turning out a court 
team that could play with the "best." With a very tough schedule facing him, Coach Mease 
went to work and molded a combination that provided us with many thrilling moments — 
especially those sweet moments of victory. Our lanky center, Marsh Gemberling, walked 
away with individual scoring honors, and was later selected for the third All-State team and 
the first Middle Atlantic team. Marquette and Dijohnson did a magnificent job in holding 
down the back-court posts, while Hess and Gamber provided thrills galore in the forward 
slots. Our hard wood boys were the perfect example of five fighting hearts working together — 
for this alone we are able to speak proudly of their feats during the past season. Let the 
teams' record speak. 



— 134 — 



Through the Hoop . . . 



Dec. 


11 


Dec. 


18 


Dec. 


lo- 


Jan. 


ll 


Jan. 


15 


Jan. 


18- 


Jan. 


29- 


Feb. 


1- 


Feb. 


5- 


Feb. 


8- 


Feb. 


11 


Feb. 


15 


Feb. 


17- 


Feb. 


19- 


Feb. 


22- 


Feb. 


26- 


Mar 


1- 



-Gettysburg Away 

-Lafayette Away 

-Findlay (Ohio) Home 

-Elizabethtown Away 

-Albright Home 

-Moravian Awav 

-Dickinson Away 

-Juniata Away 

-Mora\ian Home 

-F. c^ M. Home 

-Elizabethtown Home 

-Albright Awav 

-La Salle Awav 

-Juniata Home 

-Scranton Home 

-Susquehanna Home 

-F. v*!^ M Awav 



.. y 


Opi- 


43 


49 


57 


72 


50 


43 


77 


50 


46 


59 


55 


57 


55 


61 


60 


40 


68 


56 


67 


35 


53 


32 


52 


81 


59 


72 


56 


32 


55 


57 


51 


50 


54 


30 




— 135 




Hockey 

Veteran upperclassmen, capable freshmen, an experienced new coach, new equipment, and 
a great spirit of enthusiasm ushered in the 1945 hockey season. These factors plus many hours 
of practice have resulted in a satisfyingly successful season. 

The first two encounters of the season were unsuccessful. The girls played excellent 
hockey but were unable to score. In the remaining five games, however, the team worked as 
a powerful unit, and when the season ended, the girls had won four games, tied one, and lost 
two. This record undoubtedlv ranked among the best in the hockey seasons of Lebanon 
\'allev. 

HOCKEY SCHEDULE 

L. V. Opp. 

Oct. 29— L. V. at Lock Haven 4 

Nov. 5— L. V. at MillersviUe 2 6 

Nov. 7 — L. V. at Susquehanna 2 1 

Nov. 9 — Susquehanna at L. V 3 

Nov. 12— Millersville at L. V 1 1 

Nov. 15 — L. V. at Shippensburg 4 

Nov. 25 — Shippensburg at L. V 4 2 



136 — 




Cheerleaders 



No longer must the Flying Dutchmen relv on chance support of rabid roott-rs^ For 
the first time, a cheering squad of twelve has been officiall\- appro\-ed bv the administra- 
non. These students ha\'e had special training. Practice has been held several nights a 
week throughout the sports season. Old cheers have been revamped; new ones par- 
ticularly appropriate for basketball ha\e been introduced. The German Band has given 
solid rhythmic aid. New uniforms have been secured bv funds raised bv the cheer 
leaders' efforts, by contributions from the band fund, and bv gifts from other student 
organizations. 

Our cheers are due to them for a )ob well done. 



137 




Women's Athletic Association 



The Women's Athletic Association, which was founded in 1937, now boasts of a 
larger and better organization. Under the leadership of Miss Haag, their capable and 
efficient instructor, the W.A.A. was reorganized earlv in the fall of 1946. Along with 
i"nan\" changes came manv new members. It also introduced a fine and varied program 
of outdoor activities. Jean Bedger, outstanding girl leader of the vear, was its able and 
well-liked president. The "Nite Club" held on March eighth in the Annville High 
gvm will be remembered as one of the most hilarious moments of the school vear. 

Under Miss Haag's guiding hand, the W.A.A. will become a superior club on campus. 



- 138- 




///// 



I" Club 



The "L" Cluh consists onlv of \arsit\- men in the three major sports; that is, football, 
basketball and baseball. The "L" is gi\en bv the Athletic Council in recognition of a plaver's 
ability in the realm of sports. The Club in its recognition of all members receiving "L's" 
gives sweaters to each member. A gold pin is awarded to each senior participating in football. 
The student managers become members of the "L" Club in their senior year. 

During the past vear the "L" Club sponsored the Homecoming Dav Dance held in the 
Annville High School gvm. This is not all thev have done. Thev handled the concessions 
and selling of programs at all the home football games. The sale of chapel seats went over 
big thanks to the hne cooperation of the freshmen. 

This organization seems to be as huskv as the fellows of which it is composed. Long life 
and continued usefulness is wished for it. 



139 



Hats Off 







140 



Miss Quittie 




Elaine Frock 



142 — 



Miss Ctuittie's Attendants 



Joanna Lawhead 





Mary Jane Eckert 



143 




'\ 



Phyllis dale 



Barbara 
Be/ttel 




— 144- 




Who's Who 



Each year ten seniors are chosen from the Conservatory of Music and the college to 
represent Lebanon \'allev in "Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges." 

This is a nationwide honor organization that recognizes services to the school campus 
activities, scholarship, and all honorary and social organizations to which a student 
mav belong. One of its most interesting features is the Student Placement Service, 
through which the students are recommended ro American employers who are seeking 
capable college graduates to fill responsible positions. 

This organization ranks high on the campus and its members are respected bv faculty 
and students alike. 



145 



CAMPUS 



Outstanding Woman Leader 

JEAN BEDGER 


Outstanding Man Leader 

PAUL FISHER 






t' 






■^: -% 








•^*«^ 




ROBERT STREEPY 

^^£•5/ dressed Man 



JOANNE KESSLER 

Best dressed Woman 



Best Looking Alan 

WILLIAM KEELER 



LEAVERS 




GEORGE MARQUETTE 

Men's Sports Leader 



JEAN BEDGER 

Women's Sports Leader 




May Day 



Telephones kept ringing — everyone was asking would Mav Day be held as scheduled. Rain had 
already forced its postponement for one week, and, on the morning of Mav 11, clouds and more late 
arriving April showers offered little hope for the afternoon. Suddenly the rain stopped, and in spite 
of a gray overcast that still darkened the skies, the word came thru: on with the show! 

On it went, and with the arrival of Queen Ginnie and her beautiful court no one missed the sun 
for the campus sparkled with a radiance all its own. 

The baton was raised, with a swoop it descended gracetullv, and Lebanon \'alle\- paid homage to 
its queen with music and dancing. 

As the music of Tchaikowsky's Nutcracker Suite thrilled the ears, a gay swirl of all the colors of 
the rainbow dazzled the eyes: peppermint sticks twirling gracefully; jet black notes weaving in and 
out among silvery flutes; red and blue toy soldiers drilling hastily, lest they run down and need re- 
winding; painted Chinese dolls dancing with mincing step; gaily dressed Russian peasants executing 
intricate acrobatics; Sultan Mike leering hungrily at a strange dancer as his filmy dressed wives looked 
on dubiously; the magical whirling of the Sugar Plum Fairy as the audience scrambled for candy passed 
to them bv her children attendants; the unforgettable waltz of the ballerina flowers ending in a mad 
frenzy as they sought to avoid the shears of the gardeners; and, finally, the May Pole with its flying 
streamers, and stiff boys and graceful girls weaving intricately around about each other. 

And at last, as tho in accord with the applauding audience, even the sun appeared and nodded its 
approval on the recessional of the unforgettable May Pageant, 1946. 



148 



SPECIAL MENTION 
TO 



Bertha Barbixi and Robert J. Miller for their verv valuable assistance along literarv lines. 

Kathryx Albert, Betty Jean Butt, Carl Derr, \'ernon Fickes, Paul Fisher, Gladys Flixch- 
BAUGH, Frank Huff, Joanne Kessler, and Katherine Wersen for furnishing us with manv of the 
hard-to-get articles without which this book would have been incomplete. 

Marion Bo.mberger for sacnticing many of those much-desired dates with Paul in order to do some 
more of our typing. 

Dave Gockley for going out of his wav to call special meetings, making announcements for us in 
Chapel, securing glossy prints and cuts to he used in this publication, helping us to remind the faculty 
when they were scheduled to ha\e their pictures taken, and just all-around morale building. 

Hazel Englehart for her trips to the printer, for her tremendous volume of typing, for writing 
Mrs. Bender's "Dedication," and for staying up until early morning so often to give Eddie something 
to eat after a gruelling session with vearhook lavout. 

Mrs. Yingst — Paul 's mother, that is — for the manv hours she took from her schoolwork and house- 
work in order to help proof-read the great amount of copy found within these covers. 

Miss Pencil for being able to remain calm, sane and ever-smiling through the barrage of questions 
and requests thrown at her bv the staff, and her prompt, cheerful compliance with our wishes. 

Dr. Wallace for his long, untiring efforts in the producing and directing of the Junior Class play — 
Shakespeare's "King Henrv I\'" — and for his sound and practical ideas by which we were able to 
increase the plav's profit and thus contribute a greater amount to the "Quittie" fund. 

Dr. Lotz, Dr. Struble, and Prof. Car.mean for helping us over some of the "rough spots" in their 
advisory capacity. 

Mr. Donmoyer for "going to bat" for us and giving us a real helping hand in the solution of some 
of the financial difficulties we encountered. 

The men at the Annville Post Office who delivered all those Special Delivery letters and packages 
from the photographer and the printer until they had a path worn to the college. 

The facultv in general for their splendid cooperation in helping us to get this hook ready for the 
press. 

And to all others we have failed to name who have contributed to the success of this Yearbook. 



150 



PATRONS 



MR. AND MRS. HARRY W. ALBRECHT 

MR. AND MRS. L. A. BECK 

MR. AND MRS. HUGH A. BODDEN 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES BOEDDINGHAUS 

MR. AND MRS. ROY A. CLEMENTS 

MR. AND MRS. W. HOMER ENGLEHART 

MR. AND MRS. JOHN E. FRANK 

MR. AND MRS. D. H. FROCK 

MR.,]. HARXEY GEARHART 

.MR. AND MRS. j. HARRY GRUBE 

MRS. C. XL HARRIGER 

MR. C. E. HEILMAN 

MISS MARTHA HOSTETTER 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM G. HYMAN 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE E. KELLER 

.MRS. ELIZABETH H. LONG 

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT E. MARQUETTE 

MUMMERT-DIXON CO., Hanover, Pa. 

MRS. ELSIE NEFF 

MR. AND .MRS. JOHN L. NESTER 

MR. AND MRS. C. B. RHOADS 

MR. AND MRS. RAY F. SCHAAK 

MR. AND MRS. CECIL STRASSBURGER 

MR. AND MRS. D. FRANK X'ENATTA 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM S. \'OUGHT 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES F. WEHRY 

MR. AND MRS. GEORGE WISE 

MR. AND MRS. EDWARD D. WITHERS 

MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM PAUL YINGST 



L51 



Automatic Heating Sheruin Williams 

Stoker, Oil and Gas Paints and Varnishes 



Plumbing 



'Demand Fresh Ice Cream" 

Gollam's Supreme Ice Cream 

Made Fresh Daily 



mmi (lissEL 


Specializing for Parties, Picnics, Clubs, 
Banquets or any other social functions 


Heating and 


88 


Hardware 


C. B. GOLLAM SONS Mfgr's 




"Master Ice Cream Service" 


Photie: 8-53-il 
209 N. Railroad Street, PALMYRA 




Photie: 7-5131 

14 E. Main Street, ANNVILLE 


6th and Maple Sts. Lebanon, Pa. 
PHONE: 2 1 



WEBB & WOLFE 

Sporting and Athletic Equipment for Every Sport 



211 \^alnul Street 



Harrislmre. Peniia. 



Complimoits of . . . 

R. W. KNOLL 

General Contractor 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



"As near as your nearest telephone''' 

SAYLOR^S DRUG STORE 

PRESCRIPTIONS 

47 South 8th Street, Near the Post Office 
Phone: 104-] LEBANON, PA. 



-152 — 



J^ERIN STUDIOS 

Specialists in yearbook photography. Pro- 
viding highest quahtv workmanship and 
efficient service for manv outstanding schools 
and colleges yearly. 



Ofjicicil pbotogr.ipbers to the 

"1948 QUITTAPAHILLA" 

All portraits appearuig in this publication 
have been placed on tile in our studios, and 
can be duplicated at any time for personal 
use. Write or call us for further information. 



1010 CHESTNUT STREET 
PHILADELPHIA, PENNA. 



153 



VISIT 

"Hot Dog" FRANK 

Light Lunches and Sandwiches 
of All Kinds 

BREYER'S ICE CREAM 

■'It's the Talk of the Toioi" 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



for WESTINGHOUSE 

^'Bi/y at Tuck's, 
and Save Many Bucks" 

124-126 N. 8th Street Lebanon, Pa. 



LEBANON NATIONAL BANK 

Souud Biiiikitig Since 1832 

MEMBER EEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 
Ninth and Cumberland Sts.. Lebanon. Pa. 



FUNCK'S GARAGE 

Genera/ Repairing 

OFFICIAL A. A. A. SERVICE ATLANTIC PRODUCTS 

J. C. FUNCK 

14-16 South White Oak Street Annville 7-5121 

Official Inspection Station No. 3068 



QUALITY CLOTHES 

Shankroff and Shultz 

Men's and Boys' 
Clothiers 

Where 6th crosses Cumberland 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



S. A. BOMGARDNER'S 



Dairy 



TRY OUR ICE CREAM 

Phone: 8-5 521 
40 East Main St. Palmyra, Pa. 



154 — 



Phone: 


Annville 7-3511 


Hershey 1-0611 


Kingsley & Brown, Inc. 


CLE Ay Ens 


i\D DYERS 


• l)E LI XE 8EK\ ICE • 


Compliine)its of . . . 


Spinet Pianos 


ANDREWS 


LESTER 


Cut Rate Store 


KRANICH & BACH 


8th and Cumberland 


LLOYD V. FEGAN 


LEBANON. PENNA. 


428 North 10th Street Lebanon, Pa. 


Shearer & Becker 


Coiriphments of . . . 


FOOD STORE 


Stony's Restaurant 


tJ^ 


8 


Annville, Pennsylvania 


ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



155 



D. L. SAYLOR 

& SONS 
Contractors and Builders 

SPECIALIZED 
CABINET WORK 

All Building Materials 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


DAVIS PHARMACY 

103 West Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

Parker Pens mid Pencils 
Sheaffer Pens and Pencils 
Evcrsharp Pens and Pencils 
Whitman Candy 
Double K Nuts 


"IT PAYS TO PLAY" 

Parson's Sport Center 

719 Chestnut Street 
Lebd noil's One -Stop Sport Shop 


FINE CONFECTIONERy SALTED NUTS 

Phone: 2015-R 

I^ARMELKORN SHOP 

W. H. WERTZ, Proprietor 

71 8 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 


When in need of Flowers 
think of 

VAVROUS 

33 5 Guilford St. 512 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


Co'tnp\\-)y\e'nt$ of 

H. D. KREIDER 

ESSO Service Station 

CLEONA, PA. 


WOLF FURNITURE CO. 

Appliances, Furniture 
Floor Coverings 

7'i4-7'i6 Willow Street Lebanon, Penna. 
Phone: 326 



156 




Compliments of the 

ASTOR THEATER 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



157 



AIR STEP SHOES ROBLEE SHOES 
FOR W OMEN FOR MEN 

Compliments of 

Shultz and Bratton 

BROWN hilt SHOES 

848 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


FTD . . . Flowers By Wire . . . FTD 

Gingrich's Flower Shop 

• 

3 NORTH 9th STREET 

Lebanon 


THOMPSON'S 

FURNITURE RUGS 

funeral ©ircctors 

120- 126 South 9th Street 

LEBANON. PENNA. 


WERT BOOK STORE 

628 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON, PENNA. 

Phone: 25 15 

Books, Bibles. Molloes. Greeliiuj Cards 

Bible School Material, Sunday School Supplies 

Stationery 


Compliments of . . . 

"CI ELY'S" 

Dol/y Madison 
Ice Cream 

CLEONA, PENNA. 


-PHOTOGRATHS Live Forever" 

ULRICH STUDIO 

Portraits, Framing 
Commercial Photography 

I Developed 5 14 Cumberland Street 

Film ■ Printed LEBANON, PA. 

/ Enlarged Phone: ^110 


H. W. KREIDER 

CLOTHIER 

Nationally knoini good 
merchandise 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 



— 158 — 




SHOES 



Gtvi 



MODERN 

HEALTH 

SHOES 

^Manufacture^/ by 



KREIDER SPORTS 



"500" Juveniles 



S\^^|)YJ^^^^t^- 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



H. E. MILLARD 
LIME and STONE CO, 

SERVING 

Indmtry-Biiilding- Agriculture 

TOP QUALITY COURTEOUS SERVICE 
REASONABLE COST 

Annville, Pa. 



Compliments 

LAUCK BROS 

Palmyra 
GIFTS STATIONERY 



Compliments of 

CRONE & REED 

Sportsman's Supply Store 

Hunting, Fishing, Athletic Supplies 
and Equipment 



5 38 Cumberland Street 

LEBANON, PENNA. 

Phone: 580 



159 



If It's ct Hit— It's Here 

Compliments of 

STATE THEATRE 

511-515 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


WENGERT'S DAIRY 

Lebanon, Penna. 


THF. BON -TON 

J^ebaiion's Greatest Stores 


JUVENILE SHOE SHOP 

Home of 

Quality Footwear 

FOR CHILDREN AND JUNIORS 

31 South 8th Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


Compliments of 

F AND W GRAND 

744 CUMBERLAND STREET 
Lebatioii, Pa. 



160 



T5o a Graduate . . . 



OUR WISH FOR YOU IS THIS: 

MAY YOUR GOAL BE A WORTHY ONE, 

MAY YOU HAVE THE COURAGE AND SELF- 
CONFIDENCE TO STRIVE FOR IT, 

MAY YOU HAVE SUCCESS AND HAPPINESS 
WHEN YOU HAVE ATTAINED IT. 



THE PENNWAY 



— 161 



SCHAEFFER'S 

720 Cumberland St. 
LEBANON. PENNA. 

New Dresses, Coats, Suits, and Sportswear 
Arrive Daily at Popular Prices 


FIELDS 

SWEET SHOP 

127 N. 8tli Street 

LEBANON, PENNA. 


Compliments of . . . 

LLOYD'S 

POTATO CHIP 

CO. 

LEBANON. PENNA. 


RADIO SERVICE 

E.W Hostetter 

RCA . VICTOR ■ COLUMBIA 
RECORDS 


Lester Pincus Originals RKythm Step 

Compliments of . . . 

David's 

EXQUISITE FOOTWEAR for WOMEN 

118 N. 8th Street LEBANON, PA. 
Tnomasetti s Eileen 


Conipliruetits of 

J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER, Pres. 

"Insure in sure insurance" 

Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Penna. 


The place for GIFTS • STATIONERY • LUGGAGE 

Portrait and Commercial 1 1 1 Developing ana Printing 
PKotograpKy J^ XctlTlDd S Enlarging and Framing 

LEATHER GOODS ■ GREETING CARDS 

757-759 Cumberland St. LEBANON, PENNA. 



162 — 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture • Floor Coverings • Electrical Appliances 

Modern Funeral Home 

ANNVILLE PENNSYLVANIA 


The Charm of the Old and the Thrill of the .\ew 
Are Beautifully Blended at the 

HOTEL LEBANON 

■OS THE SQL ARE' 

25 S. 9th St. • Phone: 4101 

EVERY ROOM— E\ERV SHOWER 
Outside \'ie\v TILED 
with Telephone. Uniform Temperature. 
Simmons Comfort. Convenient Parlcing. 


piNGRICH IIOTOR pOMPANY 
UENERAL lYIoTORS UARS-PARTS 

Expert Body • Mechanical Repairs 

for AW Makes of Cars 

• 
LEB.WON PAI.MYFU 

Phone: :r2 Phone: S-:i:;',l 


Buick. Parts and .STvicr • (lic\ mlri ami Buifk 


JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST .\ND DEtOR.\TOR 

'THE FLOWER SHOP' 

Corsages Our Specialty 
Rear of Court House • LEBANON. PA. 

Floiters Telegraphed Anizckere, Anytime 
Phone: Lebanon 592 


Complimetits of 

LEBNADROME 

ROLLER RINK 

North 6th and Willow Sts. • LEBANON, PA. 

• 

Roller Skatina \iahtly Except Mondays 

and Wednesdays. Spfcia! Rates to Sehools 

and Oroani-zalions 

Music by the Hammond Electric Organ and Solovox 


Shop at. . . 

HAAK BROS. 

"'Headquarters for Xuu-eave" 

SOCKS . ANKLETS 
ATHLETIC SOCKS 


ANNVILLE 
FROZEN FOOD SERVICE 

.4 INDIVIDUAL LOCKERS 
^ FOOD PROCESSING 
^ FROZEN FOODS 

400 E. Main .St.. .\XX\ILLE. P.\. 

Phone: 7-77 JJ 

OUR OWN MAKE ICE CREAM 



— 163 



EBERSOLE, Inc. 


Compliments of 




Lebanon Netvs Agency 


PoHtiac and Oldstuobile 


Motor Cars 


c-^o 


• 


SAMUEL S. ETTER. Prop. 


"A Fashion Institution" 


Modem Equipped 




Service Department 

• 


LOGAN'S 




816 CUMBERLAND STREET 


CLEONA. PENNA. 


Lebanon, Pa. 




TeL: 836 


J aiidenuilciys 


Compliments of . , , 


LADIES' APPAREL 




607 CUMBERLAND STREET 


BAILEY'S 


Lebanon, Penna. 


Cocktail Lounge and Bar 


Junior Dresses, Sports near 






922 CUMBERLAND STREET 
Lebanon, Penna. 




DIAMONDS JEWELRY 




A. N. HOFFER 


Hammond Organ Music Nightly 


Watches, Gifts 




5 NORTH NINTH STREET 
Lebanon, Penna. 


SPECIAL DINNERS and LUNCHES 
SERVED DAILY 



164 



Compliments of 



Fink^s Bakery 



Have 

You 

Tried 

Our 
Filled 

Doughnuts? 



— 165 — 



Telephone: 7-4801 

A. R. Shearer 

Mobilgas— Mobiloil Service Station 

U. S. TIRES 

MAIN AND WHITE OAK STREETS 
Auuville, Peuiia. 


When hnilding or buying a home . . . 
Arrange Your Mortage Loan Thru 

Palmyra Bank and Trust Co. 
PALMYRA, PA. 

The Bank with the Chimes 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 




DIAMONDS oj 
DISTINCTION 

1 II r • 




For Quality and Style 
C. L. RICKES 

827 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


{ 


stoll^t"Ticf< 


1 


20 N. N 


fl.l:|Jd.|.M:||:KJlJdJI.I:M 

Jewelers 
nth Street Lebanon 


, Penna. 


Phone: 2268 

ISleum ail's 

RADIO SERVICE 

RCA-Zeiiith and Philco Radios 

REFRIGERATORS -WASHERS 
APPLIANCES 

6th and Wahiiit Sts. 


ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

EXCIASltE SHOES 

Collegebred Shoes 
'•^For College Girls'^ 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 
"For the Man W ho Cares'' 

34 !V. Eighth Street LEBANON, PA. 


THE FARMERS TRUST COMPANY 

of Lebanon Pa. 

Cotuplete Baukjug Facilities 
CONSERVATIVE CONFIDENTIAL COURTEOUS 

J\iember Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation^ 



166 



George V\/ ashington Tavern 

STEAKS SEAFOOD 
ITALIAN SPAGHETTI 

loth and Cumberland Streets 
LEBANON. PENNA. 


Compliiih'iits of . . . 

TED KLOPP'S 

F/ini/t/ire Co. 

1001 CUMBERLAXD STREET 
LEBAXOX, PEXXA. 


Alh!n)is—Seii and Used Records Phonograph Rentals jor Spechil Occasions 
RADIOS COMBISATIOSS 

PLA-MOR MUSIC COMPANY 

Distributors of All Makes Phonographs and Amusement Games 
THE BEST IN AUTOMATIC MUSIC 

Main Office: Harrisb//rg Br.nich: 
119 N. Eighth Street Walter C Yost. Mgr. 4508 Berkley Street 
LEBANON, PA. R/chard G. Miller. Asst Mgr. COLONIAL PARK 
PHONE: 3834 PHONE: 5-5^39 


GRUBB^S ICE CREAM BAR 

CLEONA, PENNA. 

Sodas Light Lunch Sundaes 

WHOLESALE Phone: 4140 
RETAIL 


Co»iplh)ie)its of . . . 

Charlie "^aer^s 

ARMY & NAVY STORE 

5-7 South Eighth Street 
LEBANON. PA. 


Coiiihlitneiits of 

arnold's funeral i^omc 

712 Chestnut Street 
LEBANON. PA. 



167 



M. B. KRUM 


J. EDWARD GANTZ 




photographer 


Hohland's funeral ^crtiicc 


m 


LEBANON. PENNA. 


781 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 


LO'JAY 


SHOP 


7th &? Cumberland Streets 


Lebanon, Pa. 


Millinery 


Sportswear 


Hand Bdgs 


Lingerie 


Sea//? Treatmoits 


Hair Stylists 


HOCKLEY'S BEAUTY SALON 


118 SOUTH 8th STREET 

Phon* 


LEBANON, PA. 

;: 478 


Expert Hair Cutting 


Specializing in Permanent Waves 


Compliments of 

The DARI'DEL 


Successor to Esbenshade's 

Donmoyer's Book Store 

R. K. DONMOYER 


Lebanon s J^ewest and Most Modern 
DAIRY 


BOOKS, OFFICE SUPPLIES, 
GREETING CARDS 


& DELICATESSETi STORE 


Filing Devices Rental Library 


781 Cumberland St. Lebanon, Pa. 


41 N. EIGHTH ST. LEBANON, PA. 



168 



Complimeuts of . . 

nUen Franklin Stores 

37-39 W. MAIN ST. ANNVILLE, PA. 

YOUR College Store 



Open Friday and Sat. Evenings 



E. W. WOLFE, Owner 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

AUTOMOTIVE TRADE 

ASSOCIATION 

of LEBANON 

ik ^ i^ 



Harry L. ISAeyer 

CLEONA, PA. 

Your MILK Dist. 

Hershey's • V/engert's 



FUEL 



AMERICAN 

AMOCO 

GAS 

PRODUCTS 

COAL 



OIL 



169 — 



J. H. TROUP'S ,^^ 

The Leading ^^^^^^S) 
Music Store W^^^^^^^t 

FOR 0\"ER SIXTY YEARS ' ' } 
HARRISBURG and LANCASTER 


Candle and Gift Studio 

11 East Main Street 
Annville, Pa. 

T 

Jewelry, Cosmetics, Stationery 
and Magazines 


NORTH SIDE BANK 

Member Federal Reserve System 

7th and LEHMAN STREETS LEBANON, PENNA. 


SHENK & TITTLE 

"Everything for Sport" 

T 

313 Market Street, HARRISBLRG, PA. 


GOLD CROSS C:AR0L\"X 

R. E. KREIDER 

Shoes for the Entire Family 

Fitted B^■ X-Ra->- 

PALMFRA . PE.X.XA. 

FLORSHEIM WEVEXBERG 


Compliments of 

DR. F. G. SHEESE 

Dentist 

36 East Main Street, Annville, Pa. 


L. M. SHEAFFER 

Cloisterdale Farm Eggs 

T 

BRAACHES: 

Mifflin, Penna. ■^^'"" Offi''-' 
Carlisle, Penna. EPHRATA, PENNA. 



170 



1948 QUITTAPAHILLA 



Engraving 
Printing and Binding 



by 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 

Mount Pleasant Press 
HARRISBURG . PENNSYLVANIA 



171 



Autographs 



111- 






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