(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Quittapahilla"

QUXS 





RIIilsST 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1949leba 



TABLE Of CONTENTS 

FOREWORD 

DEDICATION 

ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 
THE CLASSES 

GOVERNING BODIES 
ORGANIZATIONS 
CONSERVATORY 
SPORTS 

WE SALUTE . . . 

ODDS AND ENDS 

SPECIAL MENTION 
PATRONS 

ADVERTISEMENTS 



3 — 




^"!r7\' "fb j^ tf fjt J-& 



— 4 — 



FOREWORD 



All proper yearbooks, it seems, must be provided with a foreword and 
a theme. Vast amounts of research have failed to unearth just why this 
is so. Forewords sometimes explain the purpose of a book; but everyone 
knows that a yearbook is a sort of condensed diary, photo album, and scrap- 
book, and that it serves to freshen the memory of college life when one is 
middle-aged and staid. 

The problem of theme was attacked somewhat in reverse of the usual 
procedure. Recognizing the near impossibility of doing anything really 
new, we ignored theme entirely at first, and began by looking at covers. 
Indians and log-cabins were looked at. Knights in armor and castles in the 
air were contemplated. Icebergs and stylized representations of the atomic 
age were inspected. There was a sunburst which we pictured on a brilliant 
vermilion jacket. Somehow we just couldn't see it. There was quite an 
assortment of charming death-heads which tempted us sorely. Finally we 
saw one which we liked, and being possessed of the conviction that cover 
and theme should match, we chose our Norse motif to go with it. 

At this stage another problem presented itself. The road sign east of 
Annville clearly spells Quitapahilla with one "t", and the printers told 
us that this is the correct spelling. For years, here at Lebanon \^allev, the 
name of the sacred stream has been spelled with two "t's." We were in 
doubt as to whether to follow hallowed tradition, or to introduce the new- 
form. After some discussion we decided upon the latter course. 

These problems being solved, the Staff started on the Book itself, but 
that, as Kipling would say, is another story. 




CORNWALL FURNACE 

Dr. Miller saved from destruction the very valuable historic 
records of the Cornwall Furnace. In his recent doctorial thesis, 
Dr. Miller devoted a chapter to the history of this monument of 
colonial times. 




:i»srr-w. 




dr. Frederick K. Miller 



d Ed I CAT I OH 

To FREDERICK K. "FRITZ" MILLER, Professor of History, we dedicate 
the 1949 edition of the "Quittie." Those of us who have worked with him 
praise him for his sincerity and thoroughness, in the classroom and out. As 
a teacher of history he is the historian's delight. As an advisor to student 
organizations, he is the epitome of help, guidance, and inspiration. 



— 7 — 




ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



FSTC 



Homi 




moK 



CARNEGIE LIBRARY 





NORTH HALL 



President 




DR. aVDE A. iyUCH 

Dr. Lynch, to all who are acquainted with him, represents the 
zenith of college presidents. He maintains not only the dignity 
necessary to such a position, but combines' with it the rare qualities 
of amiability and geniality. Without a doubt, the eloquence of 
oratory and conversation reaches supremacy in this, our capable 
executive. It is with extreme delight and pride that we the students 
salute him, our leader and friend. 



■12- 



deans 



MISS MARY £. GILUSPli 

Miss Mary E. Gillespie occupies two of the 
most important positions on our campus; Dean 
oi Women and Director of the Conservatory. 
Her advice and counsel are welcomed by all 
because of her friendly manner and sincere 
interest in student problems. Through her 
dynamic personality and ability to organize, 
the Conservatory has been raised to a level of 
high distinction in the music world. Because of 
her willingness to accept new ideas and chang- 
ing trends, as well as her ability to mix her 
work with her social life, she represents the 
symbol of modern versatility. 





dR. A. H. M. STONECIPHER 

Dr. Stonecipher, by both his appearance and 
temperament, exhibits dignity and friendliness. 
For the many problems of guidance our dean 
suggests workable solutions. He is not only 
our advisor and organizer, but a scholar in the 
true sense of the word. His characteristic chuckle 
produces a feeling of ease in his presence. In 
his genuine interest in student affairs and his 
remarkable zest for living, our dean remains 
unequalled. 



— 13 — 




Dr. Edward M. Balsbaugh — An ex- 
tremely quiet gentleman. 



Ruth Engle Bender — Piano teacher 
for the younger "fry." 



Margaret Barthel — Tops as a pi 
anist. 



William M. Bond — "Father Time. 



Dr. Amos H. Black — "Does aiybody 
have any questions?" 



R. Porter Campbell — Superb organ- 
ist and competent teacher. 



Dr. Andrew Bender — A capable 
chemist with incessant enthusiasm. 



D. Clark Carmean — Man of many 
skills. 



— 14- 








William B. Castetter — Informal 
classroom discussions. 



Dr. Samuel H. Derickson — Keenly 
interested in his work. 



Alexander Crawford — Patriarch of 
the Voice Department. 



Doris Sponaugle Drescher — Our 
very attractive women's coach. 



Dr. John I. Cretzinger — "Micro- 
scopia reveals nature in its true light." 



William H. Egli — "It goes without 
saying . . ." 





''Wik 




Dr. Hubertis Cummings — Distin- 
guished gentleman of the old school. 



Carl Y. Ehrhart — Dry wit and 
resonant voice. 



15- 





William H. Fairlamb, Jr. — Adds ar 
tistry CO familiarity with the key- 
board. 



Frances T. Fields — Alternates be- 
tween her Spanish class and the li- 
brary with equal vim and vigor. 



Grant Feeser — "Now don't forget 
to block." 



Paul H. Fisher — "Take to the 
blackboards." 






Dr. Chester A. Feig — Visual aid is 
his strong point. 



Luella Umberger Frank — When 
is she going to learn esperanto? 



Dr. Donald Fields — Always ready 
to help. 



W. Merle Freeland — Faculty "Joe 
College." 



16 — 





Rev. David Gockley — He of the 
long prayer. 



Dr. Mari Luise Huth — Believes in 
laying a firm foundation the first 
year. 




Mary C. Green — Personification of 
"teachers are human." 



Elizabeth E. Kaho — "In my merry 
Oldsmobile." 



Dr. Samuel O. Grimm — ' 'Now in the 
Hinglish system." 



Andrew Kerr — Grand old man of 
football. 



Florence E. Houtz — She "strides' 
toward knowledge. 



Dr. Helene Kostruba — Her story 
reads like the Arabian Nights. 



■17- 






/ 



Maud P. Laughlin — Benevolent 
despot who'll never grow old. 



Dr. John F. Lotz — L.V.'s Morgen- 
thau. 



•W"^ ^^ '* 



>^ 



Dr. Lena Louise Lietzau — Strict 
disciplinarian but good natured. 




Harold Malsh — Has a daughter 
following in his footsteps. 





Dr. \'. Earl Light — "And anyone 
who is late has to buy ice cream 
for the class." 



Charles Massinger — New Jersey 
bachelor. 




Hilbert V. Lochner — A predilection 
for charts. 



Dr. Frederick K. Miller — \^eteran's 
spokesman and factual historian. 



— 18- 







Ralph Mease — Poker-faced court 
mentor. 



Dr. G. a. Richie — Ardent attender 
of athletic functions. 




Clara A. Monismith — Unusual proc- 
tor of the Men's Dormitory. 



Reynaldo Rovers — In interpreta- 
tion — the true artist. 




«*•« 




Helen E. Myers — Helpful and enthusiastic 
"Y" advisor. 




E. P. Rutledge — Energy is his middle 
name. 



Robert K. Ness — Former L.V.'ite 
who made good. 



Dr. Hiram Herr Shenk — The cor- 
ner-stone of Lebanon Valley. 



— 19- 





<1 





'7^ 






Rev. Bruce Souders — Versatile 
young instructor of English and 
speech. 



Dr. p. a. W. Wallace— His subtle 
wit keeps every one on his toes. 




Frank E. Stachow — Inspiration to 
his students. 



Dr. William A. Wilt — Kindly pas- 
tor of our college church. 



Dr. Stella Johnson Stevenson- 
Spanish with a southern accent. 



Willis Wissler — The Dewey Deci- 
mal System as a way of life. 





Dr. George G. Struble — Enthu- 
siastic host to Green Blotter — 
himself a writer. 



Marvin E. Wolfgang — Takes a 
great interest and pride in his 
students. 



■20- 





— 21 — 




-22- 




Senior Class Officers 

'President Edwin Englehart 

Vice-President Paul Yingst 

Secretary Mildred Nepf 

Treasurer Virginia Vought 



— 23 — 



Class History 



The year which we are now completing draws to a close the undergraduate 
history of the class of '48. There have been ups and downs and many thrill- 
ing experiences had by all who participated in the activities of L. V.C. during 
its rise from the dark days of 1944 to the sunnv present. 

Ask anv member of the class of '48 to tell about the life at L. W C. during 
the war. No men! that was the real trouble. Therefore no athletics or 
dramatics — no nothing! In just three short years Lebanon \'alley has risen 
out of the dust that surrounded it to be an institution twice its pre-war size; 
to offer more courses in more departments than ever before; and to continue 
to be one of the centers of citizen building that has exemplified it in the past. 
The class of '48 has watched this progress. It has watched the lights go on 
again on the second and third floors of the Men's dorm. It has seen Wash- 
ington Hall rise from a seemingly meaningless hole in the earth. It has seen 
Lebanon \'alley push forward scholastically, athletically, and socially to 
attain a position far above its pre-war standards. This May marks the end 
of the class of '48, but through the efforts of many of its members Lebanon 
\'alley College has become a better place in which to studv and to live. 



■24- 



SEHIOR CLASS 




DAWN HORNBAKER ALBERT WILLIAM MELMN ALBRECHT BERTHA BARBARA BARBINI 




ROBERT FRANKLIN BECK 



ALVIN CARL BERGER 



MARY HELEN BICKEL 



■25- 





RUTH ISABEL BILLOW 



ARTHUR IRWIN BODDEN CAROLYN BOEDDINGHAUS 




CHARLES DANIEL BOLAN 




MELVIN RICHARD BOWMAN JAMES STANTON BRULATOUR 




JOHN F. CEK 



DORIS HELEN CLEMENTS 



A. ALFRED DELDUCO 




HERBERT ELTON DITZLER MARY JANE ECKERT ROBERT MELVIN ENGLE 




JO 



EDWIN FRANCIS ENGLEHART 
GABRIEL BARNARD FRANK 





MARY JANE FLINCHBAUGH 




MARY ELIZABETH FRANK 



ELAINE LOUISE FROCK 





«r*-- 



^^^ 



PETER GAMBER, JR 



MARY KATHLEEN GARIS 



JOHN WALTER GAUL 




ANTHONY JOSEPH GERACE 



MARY LOUISE GRUBE 




GEORGE GILROY HAINES 



HELEN LOUISE HARTZ 



NANCY ELAINE HEILMAN 





JOHN PAUL HUMMEL 






DORIS LOUISE HYXLW 




KENJIRO IKEDA 






DOROTHY MAY KAUFFiMAN 



RUTH E\'ELYN KEECH 




I 





THEODORE DONALD KELLER BURNELL LOVE KESSEL BARBARA ANN KILHEFFER 




FREDERICK DA\'1D KOONS GRACE ELIZABETH LAVERTY 



JOHN HENRY LIGHT 





GEORGE REYNOLDS 
MARQl ETTE 



JOYCE UNA MEADOWS 



KARL EUGENE MILLER 




RENA MAE MILLER 



MILDRED ARLENE NEFF CONSTANCE VERONICA NESTOR 








BLAKE HAROLD NICHOLAS BERNARDO J. PENTURELLI ELLA KATHRYN RHOADS 




W' 





LUTHER EYLER ROBINSON 



SAMUEL JAMES RUTHERFORD 




:«r5^ •#*Bp!\, 





THOMAS JAMES SHAAK 



FRANKLIN G. SENGER III 




THELMA MAE SHARP 




THELMA ZIMMERMAN 
SHEARER 




"""^ 



Smii** ^ 




DAMD PATRICK SHEETZ 




IRIS OPAL SHUMATE 





ROBERT JOSEPH SOURBIER EARL JONES SPANGLER EDWARD RAYMOND STEINER 





Hk^lfe 




DOROTHY LOUISE 
STRASSBURGER 



ROBERT DOUGLAS STREEPY ANDREW PHILIP STRICKLER 





ARTHUR LEON TERR 



FRANK EDWIN URICH 



VIRGINIA MAE VOUGHT 






JOHN WILLIAM WAGNER 



MIRIAM REBECCA WEHRY 




DONALD EDWARD WEIMAN JAMES EDWARD WERT RUTH ELEANOR WHITMAN 





IRENE MAY WITHERS 



CHARLES R. YEAGLEY, JR. 



PAUL RICHARD YINGST 




JOHN BALTHASER YODER, JR. HAROLD EDWIN ZEIGLER 




SARA ANN ZELLERS 






RHODA MAE ZIEGLER 




Junior Class Officers 

President Glenn Hall 

Vice-Fr,sident Harry Hoffman 

Secr:tary Joane Kessler 

Treasurer Alvin Hildebrand 



35- 



Junior Class History 



The Class of '49 was the first class of which the vast majority of men students were veterans. The 
spirit these men injected into the campus had an effect which will require years to restore the campus 
life to the traditional college temperament. 

These men, matured beyond their years, returned with a new, driving purpose. Education was 
their goal and all efforts were directed toward that end. It is only fair to say that the social and extra- 
curricular activities suffered greatly because of this factor. Campus leaders had great difficulty in 
gaining active support for school projects, but professors were tickled pink to lecture and teach classes 
which were very critical and thorough. 

Gone were the days of the tie and dink, freshman rules, and the old college do-or-die. The Class 
claimed the glory for the achievements of the outstanding athletes it possesses and yet, at athletic 
contests was put to shame bv the lack of enthusiasm when compared to the spirit shown by the op- 
posing school. However, the intramural teams showed a fiery competitive attitude in the axe league 
and touch-football games. 

The dances were not the hits it was hoped they would be as the heavy load carried by so few proved 
too great and the helping hand of the bystanders was not extended. 

The driving power behind the few successes can be credited to the clever co-eds. It seems that 
the class of '49 is possessed of an extraordinary amount of talented femininity. They have starred on 
the hockey field and basketball court; they have shown their literary talents and, most important, 
have proved to be the factor which somewhat counterbalances the effect of the veteran. 



36- 



^^^^^mt^m s m ^^^^^^m 



i|i|iiniiii iM^^^^^^^Wy " L.r^J ^ ^^^^^^W 








,?Si 



iS 



Iv-M 



kt^^ 




K^ 



^4. F 




?r«5s' 



-/ y 



'jr 





at 



'^«^*^g^^3l. \M 



f 1-*^' 









IJLiiinit 












JUHIOR CLASS 






JOHN EDWARD ADAMS 

"Whatchasay?" . . . wife's from Ohio . . . 
slip-horn virtuoso ... no time 'for the 
classics . . . has his own band . . . strong 
supporter of the musician's union . . . pro- 
duces music of good quality. 



MARION JEAN ACHENBACH 

"Peepsie" . . . day student from Hummels- 
town . . . friendly disposition . . . tastefully 
dressed . . . good sport . . . popular soda 
jerk . . . political science enthusiast . . . 
usually found curled up in a soft chair . . . 
"Do you need a pair of Argyles?" 



MARK R. ARNOLD, JR. 

Always happy . . . likes to argue . . 
super shoe salesman . . . hates English . . 
shock of blond hair . . . operates fror 
Lebanon . . . Business Ad. major. 



— 42 — 







MARGARETTA ELIZABETH BAILEY 

"Bailey" . . . dependable . . . studious 
. . . Walter Winchell's rival . . . working 
for herM.R.S. degree . . . not mathematically 
inclined. 




ROBERT EARL BAKER 

Man of many moods . . . Chem. major 
. . . ardent lover of the Bar-bar-A . . . in- 
teresting speaker . . . "Anybody do his 
calculus?" . . . capable lab assistant ... a 
staunch member of Philo . . . "Sure I'll have 
a cigarette." 




RONALD LEE BAKER 

Sports fan . . . iconoclast . . . surveyor of 
feminine pulchritude . . . advocate of realism 
in literature . . . cynical wit . . . the cru- 
sading editor . . . one of the Literati . . . 
"I was under pressure." 




JAMES L. BARTO 

Usually seen with a good friend! ... al- 
ways joking . . . takes studies seriously 
. . . friendly . . . happily married . . . Dr. 
Lochner's capable assistant . . . women and 
dogs his specialty . . . "If I could get my 
car." 



-43- 



itC 







ROBERT MERLE BASHORE 

Excels in his studies . . . pleasing per- 
sonality . . . well liked . . . following in 
his brother's footsteps . . . well known in 
the axe league . . . interested in sports . . . 
upholding family tradition it's JefF. Med. for 
Bob next year. 



HAROLD WAYNE BEAM 

Theologian from Johnstown . . .Rodney's 
serious-minded, hard-working Daddy . . . 
shares his wife with the office . . . his win- 
some personality and religious convictions 
assure us of a promising spiritual leader. 



ESTHER ROMAINE BELL 

Full of fun . . . avid athlete . . . strictly 
lab-conscious . . . baby teeth . . . many 
nick-names. . . enviable hair . . ."Have you 
heard this one?" ... a grand person to know 
. . . recognized by her giggle and accom- 
panying grin. 



HARRY ELMER BENEDICK 

Serious, and yet easygoing . . . always 
composed . . . conscientious . . . never lets 
a night go by without writing to that girl 
back home . . . likes sports . . . determined 
. . . quiet and shy ... in truth a "Hot 
Water Hero." 



-44— 








EUGENE RALEIGH BIEBER 

Quiet . . . sincere . . . looking forward to 

his own home . . . studious ... a papa . . . 

chem. major . . . plays in the axe league . . . 

confused by the intricacy of Math '48 . . . 

conscientious student . . . interested in all 
sports. 



i 



1 1 #|i 




RUSSELL JACOB BIXLER 

"Jake" . . . tennis enthusiast . . . con- 
servite . . . superb violonist . . . everybody's 
friend . . . takes very good care of his car 
. . . sharp dresser . . . jokes! 




BARBARA ANN BLAUCH 

"Barb". . . psycho-analyst of North Hall 
. . . speed demon with knitting needles . . . 
whistle-bait . . . jewelry galore . . . con- 
tinually cutting her hair . . . her pet peeve: 
French . . . smooth dancer . . . abundance 
of common sense. 




■'%f^ 



DEAN HENRY BOHR 
From the hills of "Tar" City 



the 



huntsman . . . aspiring Chem teacher . . . 
ask him about his girl friends . . . increased 
egg production . . . "Did you do this cal- 
culus problem?" . . . ardent collector of old 
exams. 



-45- 




\ 




JOSEPH RICHARD BOLGER 

"Dick" . . . sturdy, good-looking, im- 
peccable dresser . . . Iturbi with shoulders 
. . . conserv's most eligible bachelor despite 
Palmyra's endeavors . . . infectious good 
nature . . . "Go get 'em Jack!" . . . des- 
tination, a teaching career. 



NICHOLAS HOLMBERGER BOROTA 



Jitterbug . . . Math 
collection . . . tall . . 
. . . Steelton boy . . . 
there last night" . . . 
Houtz a bad time. 



major . . . record 
. nice new Chevvie 
'Not tonight, I was 

tries to give Miss 



HAROLD EDWIN BOYER 

"Kittv" . . . brilliant pre-dental student 
. . . should be an A-1 chopper-fixer . . . 
claims, "That's not right," then proves it 
. . . big spaghetti and Mt. Penn fan . . . 
eood conversationalist . . . handv in the lab. 





PETER PRICE BOYER 

Married man . . . lives in Quentin . . . 
spends spare time sleeping in the day student 
room . . . man of large proportions . . . 
conserv student . . . "I'll do it tomorrow." 



-46 — 





VERA JANE BOYER 

Dark hair . . . attractive . . . always with 
a smile . . . oh, for another weekend at 
State . . . music is her field . . . finds the 
"rec hours" very interesting ... an ex- 
ceptionally talented organist . . . seen at all 
social functions. 






FOSTER MARTIN BRINSER 

Conversationalist, and how . . . scatter- 
brain . . . those dance-band jobs . . .student 
teaching whiz? . . . engaged . . . What a 
driver! . . . plays a sax with gusto. 




ELYZABETH ANN BRIODY 

"Betz" . . . beautiful long, dark, wavy 
hair . . . industrious . . . attractive per- 
sonality . . . frequent visitor to the library 
. . . Chet's the one and only . . . Russia's 
her pet peeve . . . looking forward to a 
teaching career . . . "May I help you, 
please?" 




W- 1 



f;/ 



PAUL EUGENE BROOME 

About to middle-aisle it with Joyce . . . 
wotta tenor . . . congenial . . . smile for 
everyone . . . dipping ice-cream is his arm 
breaker, but didn't affect his helping hand 
. . . get her Hershey kisses here. 



•47- 





WILLIAM JOSEPH BRUNNER 

Tall blond . . . \'arsity eager . . . knows 
his German . . . his airforce section was the 
"best" . . . augments his wardrobe by 
pilfering his brother's clothes . . . raises 
chickens . . . president of Deutsche \'erein. 




MARY ELLEN BUDESHEIM 

"Budie" . . . jovial . . . low voice . . . 
rippling laughter . . . midnight gab-sessions 
. . . likes to tell vou where Seven \^alleys 
is . . . "I think I'll cut this class" . . . 
attractive . . . always game for a good time 
. . . carries the bass drum. 





RAYMOND CLODO\TO 

Business Ad. major . . . black wavy hair 
. . . likes to argue politics . . . part-time 
bartender . . . another of the married men 
... a big man for such a small car. 





LEONARD MARLIN COHEN 

Friendly . . . studious . . . strong family 
ties. . . can discuss Psychology learnedly . . . 
enthusiastic V. P. of Psych. Club . . . com- 
muter from Harrisburg . . . always dashing 
from class to class to class and home. 










WILLIAM THOMAS CONWAY 

House-painting four year project . . . Eng- 
lish ace from South Cleona . . . pleasing 
personality . . . pretty wife and daughter 
. . . transportation by Nash . . . carefully 
evaluates his bridge hands. 



HATTIE RUTH COOK 

"Hat". . .cheerful. . . great defender of 
womens' rights . . . psychology fiend . . . 
the printing profession has its advantages . . . 
musically inclined . . . ex-day student . . . 
blond hair. 



GLENN E. COUSLER 

One of the boys from York . . . dependable 
. . . conscientious . . . College band . . . 
interested in intra-mural sports . . . loves 
bull sessions . . . the "Eel" . . . hobby is 
sleeping through Monday eight o'clocks. 




MICHAEL FELIX CRINCOLI 

Exponent of New Jersey brogue . . . 
future history teacher . . . manager of the 
basketball team . . .well-dressed. . ."What 
is it wit chu?" . . . Rotund and boisterous, 
Mike's after "da marks." 



w 



— 49 — 




A 




HARLAN AARON DAUBERT 

The Pine Grove kid . . . excellent pianist 
. . ."The Brain". . .shy. . . part owner of 
the new Astoria . . . consumer of the lighter 
beverages . . . infectious grin . . . the owner 
of a rare personality. 



PHILLIP CAL\'IN DEARDORFF 

Aggressive . . . likeable — after you know 
him . . . champion of right . . . steady and 
capable . . . well-dressed . . . pre-med, his 
wife will make a charming receptionist . . . 
plays a rough game of ping pong. 



HENRY CHARLES DEENS 

Chain letter fame . . . pre-med . . . mili- 
tary minded . . . \'alley Forge grad . . . 
always prepared . . . terror of soph-upper- 
classmen football game . . . member of re- 
taliatory junket . . . Fainted F & M . . . 
kills frogs the hard way. 





•fWl 




JOHN ADAM DETWEILER 

"Detweeter" . . . "Good old days at 
L. V. C." . . . the organizer of the men day 
students . . . reviver of Freshmen rules . . . 
another aspirant to be a doctor . . . well 
liked, good natured . . . helpful assistant to 
Dr. Derickson. 



50- 





ALBERT PATRIC DIJOHNSON 

Pinochle major . . . friendly . . . bachelor 
type . . . versatile . . . studious looking 
. . . life of the party . . . the voice that 
carries . . . "Have any nickles for the coke 
machine. Bub?" 




RALPH ARTHUR DOWNEY 

Hails from Lititz . . . talented cornet 
soloist . . . "We'll take my car" . . . has 
frequented all dorms in past years . . . 
friendly and congenial . . . "Don't trifle with 
me." 



JOSEPH CLAYTON DUBS 

Plays trumpet . . . spends weekends in 
Carlisle . . . waiter . . . those Glee Club 
tours . . . small but mighty . . . has a 
"downey" room-mate . . . impressionable 
... a stalwart citizen. 



m 








JACOB E. EARHART 

"Jake" ... a pre-ministerial student of 
high caliber . . . has his own charge . . . 
well liked . . . makes friends easily ... an 
industrious student . . . "Well, I have to 
study now" . . . takes exceptional care of 
his new car. 



-51- 






^'Si^ 



^ 






ROBERT EARLY 

Jovial . . . proud of his "new car" . . . 
studies hard . . . well-groomed . . . many 
friends . . . polishes the floor in the axe 
league . . . speakes for himself ... the 
scientific evangelist. 



RICHARD YODER EBY 

Studious and dependable . . . full of fun 

. .high ideals. . . "Anybody wanna ride?" 

. one of the Palmyra boys . . . well up on 

current affairs . . . always ready to talk, in 

class or otherwise. 



ASHER SAMUEL EDELMAN 
Versatile leader . . . conscientious . . . 
"Y" Cabinet ... Phi Lambda Sigma secre- 
tary . . . Glee Club . . . puts up with Abba 
Cohen . . . "You dirty dogs." . . . pipe 
smoker ... red soup-strainer on upper lip. 



DWIGHT CLIFFORD FAKE 
Good athlete . . . conscientious and hard 
working ... a definite school asset . . . 
hunter deluxe . . . majoring in social studies 
. . hazy about economics . . . plays trum- 
pet. 



-52- 








HAROLD LA MAR FEASTER 

Zany wit . . . active in sports . . . class- 
room humor . . . lot of friends . . . amiable 
. . . obviously a very proud family man . . . 
and fellows, the baby has eight teeth . . . 
expects to become a math teacher. 




JOSEPH MICHAEL FIORELLO 

Big Joe . . . handsome hunk of man . . . 
the "Mr. Anthony" of campus . . . accepted 
at Jefferson Medical College . . . determined 
to reach the heights of his ambitions . . . 
"Think I came here to give ya a thrill?" 




DAVID FLEISCHER 

Diligent student . . . the boy that slings 
the ten-syllable words — and knows what 
they mean . . . "Gotta go study" . . . avid 
chapel attender . . . "But what does he really 
have?" . . . rational thinker who carefully 
evaluates his beliefs. 



^IK '« 




DENNIS LIGHT FUNCK 
"Time for a mass cut" . . . makes good 
grades as Chem major . . . seeing eye for 
chem students in organic lab . . . pin-ball 
artist . . . axe-man in the axe league . . . 
Fisher's buddy. 



-53- 





V U 



ERMA STRICKLER GAINOR 



"Erm" . . . Bus. Ad. major 
special interest in Annville . . 



. has a 
recently 
converted into goalie . . . unusual collection 
of stuffed animals . . . patience and fortitude 
. . . glistening black tresses. 




MARION IDA GEIB 

Attractive brunette from Rexmont . . . 

friendly . . . charming personality . . . 

chem lab tenant . . . efficient salesgirl . . . 
certain sparkle in her eyes and sparkler on 

that finger . . . looking forward to the 
chiming of wedding bells. 



MARSHALL GEMBERLING 

Tall . . . quiet . . . \'arsity end . . . plays 
basketball and baseball, too . . . courts 
Janet Weaver . . . History major . . . poker 
plaver . . . midnight snack fan . . .pinochle 
shark. 



i^ 



PAUL JACOB GERHART 

From Jonestown over . . . Psychology 
major . . . slow talker . . . conscientious in 
his work . . . rec hall kibitzer . . . tyro at 
bridge . . . anxious to get out . . . pleasant 
personality. 



-54- 






RUSSELL PAUL GETZ 

Glee Club basso . . . big man, little clari- 
net . . . marvelous sense of humor . . . may 
be seen all fall on touch football field . . . 
The Cot7i'pleat Angler . . . wash-room warbler. 



ANNE GILBERT 

"Charlie" . . . campus belle . . . Dr. 
Struble's right-hand girl . . . immaculate 
dresser. . . attractive personality . . . "Oh, 
which shall it be: Tom, Dick, or Harry?" . . . 
In class when the mood strikes . . .big wheel 
of Lebanon . . . Junior Women's Club. 



MARY LEE GLOVER 

Typical Southern belle . . . hails from 
Harper's Ferry . . . special interest in the 
Air Corps band . . . adorable accent . . . 
red hair without the temper . . . turkev farm 
. . . original evening gowns. 




CHARLES KENNETH GREENAWALT 

"Greeny". . . good conversationalist . . . 
Business Ad. major . . . father's little helper 
during the summer . . . gentlemanly ways 
with the ladies . . . "Oh, well, tomorrow 
is another day." 



-55- 



iiV 






ROBERT RAY GROVER 
Tries to be everybody's friend . . . ex- 
trovert . . . works at cheinistry in his time 
off as president of Phi Lambda Sigma . . . 
Had a forced acquaintance with Gilbert and 
Sullivan . . . frustrated . . . loves to drive, 
has no car. 



GLENN LESLIE HALL 
President of Student Faculty Council and 
Junior Class . . . pleasant voice . . . quiet 
manners . . • affable . . . immaculate neat- 
ness in clothes . . . nice to know. 



HARRY HERR HANSHAW 
Tall and quiet . . . studious ... can 
usuallv be found in the library ... a way 
with women . . . "No more chemistry for 
me," . . . summer-time, truck jockey . . . 
eternal search for the ideal snap course . . . 
got stung in Geology. 



SAMUEL A. HARTMAN 
Quiet, soft spoken lad from Palmyra . . . 
studying to be a doctor . . . conscientious 
. a summer resident of Mount Gretna . . . 
swell guy when you get to know h-m. 



56- 





\W^M 



FRANCIS AUSTIN HECKMAN 

"Hecky" . . . master of colloquial idiom 
. . . satirical wit . . . "gas costs money" 
. . . champion of the ex-GI . . . "Got 
anything to eat?" . . . Sam's buddv . . . 
radio club enthusiast ... a knack for acting. 



m^ 



ROBERT EARNEST HESS 

Three letterman, excels in all . . . married 
. . . most ardent fan is daughter Susie . . . 
always ready for a heated discussion . . . 
future history prof . . . found "Gold" in 
California. 




I ill 



~n. 



WALTER WINFIELD HESS 

"Wally" . . . never without a smile . . . 
another athletic Hess . . . married . . . 
popular . . . has intentions of becoming prof 
and coach . . . borrows his notes . . . argues 
with axe league refs. 



ALVIN SYLVESTER HILDEBRAND 

Treasurer of Junior class - . . pre-ministerial 
. . . nice smile . . . co-operative . . . quiet 
. . . latent sense of humor . . . life work 
recruits' prexy . . . ideas of his own . . . 
bats .380 and plays first base. 



— 57- 






JEANNE LOUISE HISSNER 

"Hiss" . . . sweet and petite . . . versatile 
. . . Bob's her man . . . beautiful complexion 
. . . neat in appearance . . . future English 
teacher . . . "Have you had your clothes 
cleaned recently?" 



HARRY HARRIS HOFFMAN JR. 

Future Jefferson Medical man . . . Texas 
convert . . . Two lovers: P'Way coffee and 
Fay . . . the "Mortcher" Sky-Rocket . . . 
"Let's go to movies." . . . snappy sport 
jackets and bow ties. 



HENRY GLENN HOSTETTER 

Former Air Force pilot . . . devoted hus- 
band and father . . . famed for his curly hair 
and congeniality . . . teaching history is his 
ambition . . . good student. 






FRANK BRELSFORD HUFF 

One-man Gallup poll . . . word-of-mouth 
publicity for L. V. C. ... conscientious 
student . . . gaudy bow ties . . . dependable 
. . . "I've got an appointment." . . . 
constructive inquisitiveness . . . Shakespeare 
brain. 



-58- 





BETTY RUTH JONES 

"Jonesie" . . . well-supplied with gray 
matter . . . adorable clothes . . . infectious 
laugh . . . never a free moment . . . well- 
rounded personality . . . outstanding pianist. 




EARL FRY KAUFFMAN 

Annville boy . . . Business Ad. major . . . 
dependable worker . . . quiet and pleasant 
. . . thinks before he acts . . . w^avy hair . . . 
discusses national affairs thoroughly . . . war 
upset plans, hopes to graduate this time. 




STANTON HARRY KELLER 

"Stan" . . . always a notable comeback 
. . . local boy . . . dependable and steady 
worker . . . business is his chosen career 
with an eye on statistics . . . hangs out at 
Hot Dog's. 





JOANNE LUCILLE KESSLER 

"Jo" . . . the "New Look" . . . one of 
Dr. Derickson's field trip enthusiasts . . . 
Green Blotter . . . jewelry addict . . . im- 
maculate . . . original hair styles . . . lover 
of nature . . . fond of bicycling . . . writes 
poetry. 



— 59 — 






HAZEL JEAN KINNEY 

Transfer from University of Denver . . . 
Bus. Ad. major . . . Long Island twang . . . 
sparkling eyes . . . long black tresses . . . 
sports enthusiast . . . exuberant manner of 
speaking. 



PETER PAUL KOZLOSKY 

Former athlete . . . married and has an 
identical image named Tommy . . . congenial 
. . . star Hershey salesman . . . Business Ad. 
major . . . ex-Miami U. Football man . . . 
pipe smoker . . . beautiful wife. 




-^ 



HOWARD BUCHER KREIDER, JR. 

"Hoppy" . . . pleasant . . . debater of 
some note . . . sense of humor . . . horses 
. . .jeep!. . . gentleman farmer . . .rounds 
up cattle with an Oldsmobile . . . wonders 
why he's in school. 





WESLEY KREISER 

Chem major following the family tradi- 
tion . . . dutchy . . . "Gertie Goes Plain" 
. . . quiet . . . hails from Ono . . . lab 
assistant . . . always talking about Chem 
Club . . . determined to pass calculus. 



-60- 




h- 



EDITH RADCLIFFE KROKENBERGER 

Another Jersey-ite . . . enthused about 
zoology field trips . . . president of West Hail 
. . . good German student . . . May Day 
archer . . . blushes . . . conscientious Jer- 
sey-ite. 






FA YE LUCILLE KROUT 

Tiny of stature but big of heart . . . danc- 
ing feet . . . member of the Pennway Coffee 
Club . . . That Pretty Blue Hat . . . "Here 
'tis!" . . . even temperament . . . un- 
assuming and gay ... a friend to all. 



MICHAEL KURILLA 

"Mickey" . . . future M. D. . . . biology 
bug . . . soft-spoken . . . well-dressed man 
of distinction . . . Honolulu memories . . . 
you should hear about Ira Guggenheim. 




AUDREY COLLEEN LAU 

Conservite . . . one of Crawford's prides 
. . . tall . . . big, blue eyes . . . quiet . . . 
rather shy . . . continually studying Sociol- 
ogy and Shakespeare . . . liked by all who 
know her. 



^* 



-61- 




M 



W~' 




« 



HOWARD FISHER LEBEGERN 

Jack Green, the tennis queen, or L. V.'s 
threat to Alice Marble . . . Business Ad. 
major . . . sports enthusiast . . . Jack is as 
equally conscientious as a student as he is 
Verni's pin ball partner. 



SLADE SMITH LINDEMON JR. 

Tall and lanky . . . comes from Baltimore 
. . . Psychology major . . . art gallery in 
his room . . . "little Aristotle," the logic 
brain ... a cliff dweller. 



AMOS LONG JR. 

Part-time clerk at Sears . . . Business Ad. 
major . . . conscientious student . . . grave 
as a judge . . . his mind works with the 
greatest facility ... a truly well-liked 
Cleona man . . . quiet and sincere. 






JOHN FOX LOSER 

Another one of the schools many married 
men . . . has a second home at Hot Dog 
Frank's ... a Business Ad. major . . . fol- 
lows sports enthusiastically . . . his future 
is in the business world. 



-62- 







DONALD VERNON MALICK 

"Don" . . . biology brain with the dark 
wavy hair . . . dependable . . . Bio. assis- 
tant . . . home every weekend to work? . . . 
vivid colored shirts . . . keeper of insect 
menagerie. 




IRVING ALLEN MALL 

Business Ad. major . . . hails from Harris- 
burg . . . authority on Le Havre . . . 
pleasant voice . . . well spoken of by his 
professors . . . can always be found playing 
cards in the day student room ... a swell 
fellow to know. 




ROBERT HENRY MARQUETTE 

Jovial . . . well-rounded musician ... a 
father . . . "My trousers seem to be getting 
smaller" . . . bass man . . . backbone of 
Johnny Adams rhythm section . . . possesses 
a jet-propelled "car" . . . spends many 
hours practice teaching. 




JOHN EDWIN MARSHALL 

Never a dull moment . . . La Vie' s business 
manager . . . well-dressed play boy . . . am- 
bitious pre-med student . . . "Let's see, 
where was I?" . . . gigantic lunch bags — 
gaining weight fast. 



— 63 — 




MARTHA JEAN MATTER 

Harassed editor of La Vie and the Qtiittk 
. . . impossible in the morning . . . psycho 
major and English . . . usually seen with 
Pete . . . non-conformist . . . blond hair 
. . . conscientious student. 




ROBERT McCOY 

Industrious lad . . . enjoys social activities 
. . . outdoor sportsman . . . amateur auto 
mechanic . . . drives a Terraplane . . . likes 
history, music, and his pipes. 




JAMES JOSEPH McGRAW 

"I'm not fat" . . . favorite haunt the sack 
. . . always a Buick . . . hot corner custo- 
dian . . . Miss Becker's pride and joy . . . 
intramural sports enthusiast . . . surprised 
the campus by recent revelation of his mar- 
riage. 



GIRARD JOSEPH McKENNA 

Conscientious Bus. Ad. student . . . those 
terrific weekends in Brookh-n . . . com- 
placency at mealtime . . . mimicker deluxe 
. . . daily delites from P. O. . . . "Do you 
prep?" . . . loves the aesthetic in his room. 



-64 — 







BEATRICE M. MEISER 

"Beattie" . . . attractive blonde . . .loads 
of fun . . . score of friends . . . the life of the 
day students ... a student of the microscope 
. . . socially active . . . always neatly 
dressed. . . Are you always collecting money? 



NANCY REBECCA MEYER 

Accomplished cellist . . . original hairdo 
. . . natural beauty . . . versatile person . . . 
conscientious . . . daily correspondence to a 
certain medical school . . . one of Dr. Derick- 
son's girls . . . Qiiittie' s faithful art editor. 



MARION A. MILLARD 

"Annvillite" . . . peaches and cream com- 
plexion . . . favorite subject: Cliff . . . abun- 
dance of energy . . . faithful friend . . .good 
conversationalist . . . myriads of clothes 
. . . pleasant voice. 




MARTHA MAE MILLER 
"Marcie" or "Marty" . . . hails 



fron 



Harrisburg . . . her sparkling eyes are fo- 
cussed on Benny . . . petite grammarian . . . 
has enduring memory and an abundance of 
brain matter . . . semi-vegetarian. 



— 65 — 



^Q^ 
^■^ 



^N&^ 



^ 






RICHARD JOHN MILLER 

Pleasant personality . . . quiet . . . 
friendly . . . one of the Palmyra crowd . . . 
well liked by all . . . sells groceries on week- 
ends . . . consistently getting spring fever 
. . . studies hard . . . the business world 
has use for another tvcoon. 



ROBERT HART MILLER 

One of Doc. Bender's chem boys . . . 
Apollo when not titillating the campus with 
his pranks, and La Vie cartoons, can be found 
in his room hitting the books . . . No, the 
profs don't give him such good marks just 
because he has a dimple. 



SIDNEY S. MILLER 

Eager student . . . quiet . . . clarinet 
addict . . . army man . . . pre-med . . . 
rough with Chem lab equipment . . . spends 
half his life hitch-hiking ... in business 
with his brother . . . desires to excell in his 
intended profession. 



RICHARD WILLIAM MOLLER 

Keeps up with "Jonesey" . . . ex-Navy 
fly-boy . . . crew cut . . . temperamental 
. . . advertises via hand-bills distributed 
from a piper cub . . . preparing for the bar 
. . . Kale's able secretary. 



■66- 






V H 





WILLIAM TRYEON MOORE 

"Moose" . . . hails from Lebanon . . . 
interests in Harrisburg . . . tennis enthu- 
siast . . . reliant . . . Soggy, the second . . . 
junior "vice" commander of Lebanon Legion 
. . . lots in common with Prof. Fisher. 



^■k) 

^W» 




DEAN SAYLOR MOORE 

A quiet Business Ad. major who divides 
his time between studying accounting, and 
flying . . . misogynist — he says . . . has 
definite plans for the future, but he won't tell. 



ERMA ROMAINE MURPHY 

"Irish" . . . doubly protected by 
"Bobbies" . . . musical versatility 
quiet . . . hails from Peach Bottom 
cello charmer. 



the 







JOANNA H. NORRIS 

Striking red hair . . . classical dignity . . . 
magnificent soprano . . . faithful devotion 
to Yale . . . skirt and sweater addict . . . 
tall and stately . . . procrastinator. 



-67- 




// 






^ 



.^/ 

^ 



MARY ALICE O'DONNEL 

Capable drum majorette . . . favorite of 
the Conserv profs . . . Jim's her man . . . 
enticing eyes . . . winning smile . . . her 
kettle drums know who's boss . . . proud of 
her home, Waynesboro. 





BRYCE OXENRIDER 

Loval Philo member . . . assistant student 
manager of basketball team . . . full of tricks 
. . .the "Ox". . . always talks of the week- 
end with Red . . . always gets in that last 
word . . . self-stvled comedian. 




CHARLES ELMER POMERANING 

"I just flunked another one 
tempered . . . "But, Dr. Lotz' 
Dutch Club . 
of personality 
gifts of ties. 



. . even 

Oh, that 

and those dreams . . . lots 

. the economics brain . . . 




RICHARD GEORGE PYE 

English major ... an all-round guy . . . 
Philo . . . Wig and Buckle . . . main inter- 
ests, a Chevrolet and Nancy . . . Gilbert and 
Sullivan fiend . . . apple polisher . . . 
"Where's my riders?" . . . amazing discus- 
sions with Huft. 





JOSEPH LEO RADAI 

"Radar" . . . accepted for medical school 
. . . talks wisely on many subjects . . . quiet 
. . . studious . . . ex-Navy goldbraid . . . 
dislikes publicity . . • strives for exactness 
in the lab. 



fgy 



f^ 






ELMER LEON REAMER 

Eager chess enthusiast . . . hobby is radio 
. . . Harrisburg jokester . . . part-time disc 
jockey . . . nuclear physicist . . . recently 
became a papa . . . drums up business for 
WABX . . , highway menace. 




JANE ESTHER REED 

Transfer from Randolph Macon . . . glis- 
tening blond hair . . . original wardrobe . . . 
psych major . . . horn-rimmed glasses . . . 
an inhabitant of West Hall . . . that co-ed 
look . . . knits beautiful argyle socks. 




STUART KINSEL REMLEY 

Calls Hummelstown home . . . terrorizer 
of women . . . pin ball artist . . . lab. 
jokester . . . pre-med . . . one track mind 
. . . "Howya doin', Mack?" 




ANDREW RENNER 

The silver flash ... all night radio listen- 
er .. . "Got a dollar?" . . . future medical 
missionary to his home: Africa . . . the early 
bird, up at five . . . careful with his passport 
— a British subject . . . amateur photog- 
rapher. 








RICHARD PAUL REYNOLDS 

Chemistry major . . . Mechanicsburg com- 
muter . . . plavs bridge with the best of 
them . . . whiz in calculus . . . plays in that 
famed axe league . . . excels in his studies 
. . . his future lies in the scientific world. 



IRWIN JOHN ROEMIG 

Former Air Force man . . . ofl^ we go into 
the wild blue yonder . . . wife is a nurse 
. . . "We only live once" . . . "How's my 
boy today?" . . . looking for snap courses 
. . . slinger of history books. 



LA\'ERNE EUGENE ROHRBAUGH 

Friendly . . . excellent student . . . sin- 
cere Christian . . . sharp eye on Shirley in 
York . . . ardent follower of sports . . . ad- 



mmistrator of 
student pastor. 



room 206 



-70- 



successful 





ROSE MARIE ROOT 

'"Rosie" . . . petite . . . expert with the 
cards . . . jitterbug fiend . . . assortment of 
fur coats . . . record enthusiast . . . pleasing 
personality . . . always eager for Friday's 
evening meal . . . unlimited wardrobe. 






WILLIAM ALGER ROTHROCK, III 

A plugger who knows where he's going 
and how to get there ... a true sportsman 
with rod or gun ... an open hearted fellow 
who'd literally give you the shirt off his back 
. . . his residence in Harrisburg is a second 
home to his friends. 




PAUL H. SADLER 

"Ohhhhhhhh" . . . man about town . . . 
smooth dresser . . . P-way gab session . . . 
"Say, did you hear the one about" . . . 
blushes easily . . . loads of fun . . . depend- 
able . . . that's our Pablo. 




MARYCAROL SALZMAN 

Danseuse extraordinaire . . . life of the 
party ... a dozen nicknames and a man for 
every mood . . . devotee of Dorothy Parker 
. . . La Vie's morale-builder . . . always 
has a snappy come-back . . . vivacious per- 
sonality . . . "It must be sack!" 



— 71 — 





7^-r 




''E^ ^^. 




.'ft WizJ^ 

m 



MARIAN ELEANOR SCHWALM 

Intellectually stimulating . . . possesses 
career-woman qualities . . . Green Blotter 
. . . debating . . . social work her supreme 
objective . . . shy until you know her . . . 
engaged recently. 



CHARLES R. SHOLLENBERGER 

Man with ideals . . . conservative gentle- 
man . . . versatile . . . dependable . . . 
studious . . . "Let's talk it over after class" 
. . . Business Ad. major . . . long distance 
commuter. 



CHESTER JOHN SHERMAN, JR. 

Partial to Fords . . . engaged to Betty Ann 
. . . enjoys the quiet life . . . junior execu- 
tive . . . blinding socks . . . free taxi service 
to Lebanon . . . model airplane bug. 



VINCENT ALLEN SHERMAN 

Waring's associate . . . frequenter of the 
P-way . . . flashing red hair . . . holder of 
two copyrights . . . sergeant at "arms" . . . 
plays terrific guitar . . . has definite ideas 
. . . moody . . . borrows from Baker and 
Baker borrows back — confusing, ain't? 




— 72 — 




PAUL O. SHETTLE, JR. 

Friendly . . . sociology major . . . ( 
nithology is his hobby . . . interested 
philosophy . . . proud family man . 
right at home in Annville. 






ELLA MAE SHULTZ 

Typical American girl . . . rare com- 
bination of Conservite and athlete . . . 
Blondie from Boston . . . two male interests, 
George and brother, Bob . . . keeps the 
post office buzzing. 




DOROTHY MARIE SMITH 

"Dot" . . . faithful assistant of Dr. Huth 
. . . easy going . . . pleasing personality . . . 
lover of civilization . . . frequent occupant 
of the library . . . roots for the "Philadelphia 
Athletics" . . . favorite pastime — sleeping. 




JOSEPH DORSET SMITH, JR. 

"Just call me Joe" ... a sparkling per- 
sonality . . . let's give 'em a charge, huh? 
. . . contagious laugh . . . capable leader 
. . . has qualities of a spiritual minister . . . 
Y. M. C. A. enthusiast. 



-73- 







GILBERT DONALD SNYDER 

Played an excellent role in The Fool . . . 
genial Gil . . . "Have a Kool?" . . . student 
teacher . . . another one of those Palmyra 
bovs . . . married . . . blond . . . sociable 
. . . community minded citizen. 




PAUL J. SP ANGLER 

Biology and Phyllis consume most of his 
time ... a good lab assistant . . . answers 
to a certain whistle outside the Men's dorm 
... a sportsman at heart . . . his bug's on 
display at Smithsonian. 



RUSSELL IRWIN STEINER 

Charter member of the Gas House gang 
. . . sports fan . . . slow and sarcastic con- 
versationalist . . . Chem brain . . . lab cut- 
up .. . high scorer in the axe league . . . 
nocturnal meanderer . . . Harvey, the second. 



CAWLEY RICHARD STINE 
"Dick" . . . can always be found in the 
Chem. lab ... a pleasing personality . . . 
married man . . . preparing for graduate 
school ... an ardent member of the piinball 
06 class . . . knows something on all subjects. 



-74- 






JOHN DAVID STINE 

Family man . . . reformed musician . . . 
Business Ad. ma|or . . . future graduate 
student in political science . . . always cut- 
ting classes and not getting a cut ... a 
graduate of pinball 76. 



RUTH PATRICIA SUTTON 

Favorite pastimes: sleeping and knitting 
SOX for Steele — Bob, that is . . . patriotic 
New Jersey-ite . . . political science student 
. . . she'd be a good lawver. 




FREDERICK SYDNEY TICE 

"Fred" ... a personality that would sell 
the Brooklyn Bridge ... a future Wall Street 
broker . . . one of L. V.'s many married men 
. . . interested in politics of Lebanon. 



CHARLES W. TOME 

Mel Torme . . . sports ed. . . . standing 
reservation for love seat with Sid . . . L. V.'s 
self-appointed football scout ... a place for 
everything and everything in its place. 



— 75 — 




NICOLA VERNI 
"Nick" . . . "Get out of my sight" . . . 
conscientious . . . hard working . . . sure 
to get ahead in the business world . . . owner 
of the iron head . . . "you're up." 





DEAN THOMAS WALTERS 

Medicine or bust ... a very able student 

. great collector of jazz records . . .would 

like to know more about astronomy, with a 

woman, if possible . . . "Oh, that stupid 

game." 




LUZETTA JANE WARFEL 

"Lu" . . . faithful to Sheridan Hall . . . 

gorgeous black hair . . . petite . . . obliging 

waitress . . . pianist superba . . . jolly . . . 

easy to know and like . . . romance with Bill. 




JANET KERR WEAVER 
"Jannie" . . . enviable curls . . . inex- 
haustible supply of skirts and sweaters . . . 
seldom seen without Marsh . . . superb 
talent for playing popular music . . . mama 
for jewelry . . . unusual athletic ability. 



-76- 




R 



"^^ 
Cf 





LOIS MAE WENGER 

A new face on our campus . . . quiet . . . 
ambitious . . . sweet disposition . . . con- 
scientious student . . . cherishes high ideals 
. . . carries an air of efficiency . . . future 
social worker. 




DOROTHY ELIZABETH WERNER 

"Dot". . . our Palmyra pride . . .always 
dependable . . . studious . . . charming 
personality . . . always willing to help . . . 
dean's list standby. 



VIRGINIA MAE WERNER 

Our little radical idealist . . . concerned 

with the troubles of humanity . . . wants to 

go into social work and politics . . . likes 
people who are different. 




RAYMOND JOHN WIDMANN 

"Sleepy" . . . comfort can be found only 
in sleeping ... a Hershey Jr. College alum- 
nus . . . preparing for a career in medicine 
. . . talks without encouragement . . . 
"As I was saying." 



— 77 — 



J 






If^ 




CLARENCE WITT 



Chem. major 
. . . married . . 
key" Weiman . 
as his name . 



advocate for more Chapel cuts. 



. . pinball machine addict 
shares house with "Whis- 
. mad driver ... as witty 
. "Yawker" . . . strong 




KARL L. WOLF, JR. 

Terrific tenor sax . . . flashy clothes and a 
new Chewy ... a Kenton fan . . . speed- 
runs from Lebanon to South Hall . . . "Hi", 
Man." 





MARY CATHERINE WOLF 

Ephrata accent . . . short girl with long 
eyelashes. . . Glee Club contralto . . ."My 
lands, you mean you don't like limburger 
cheese?" . . . waitress . . . witty conver- 
sationalist . . . flutist. 




JOSEPH HUGHES YEAKEL 

His heart belongs to Lois . . . energetic 
worker . . . one of our football men . . . 
good sport . . . Philosophy major . . . red- 
nosed Bardolph of Henry I\^. 



-78- 





WILLIAM JAMES YINGST 

Industrious business manager of the Qidttie 
. . . Chem major and lab assistant . . . not 
only on the ball but chained to it, i.e. ring- 
wise . . . "Oh! I guess you want Paul" . . . 
next year's class treasurer . . . cares little for 
tradition . . . his future rests on the behavior 
of molecules. 






%^ 



MELVIN RAY ZEIGLER 

"Mel" ... a married man . . . one of 
Lotz's star pupils ... a personality that is 
hard to beat . . . adjutant of the Conner- 
Streicher Post ... a local man and proud of 
it . . . his place is in high finance. 




THOMAS MILTON ZIMMERMAN 

One of Dr. Black's boys . . . intends to 
teach Math or Chemistry . . . ready sense of 
humor . . . consistently witty . . . blond 
. . . married. 




DOROTHY ELIZABETH ZINK 

"Dottie" . . . beautiful blue eyes . . . 
conductor of group singing . . . extremely 
co-operative . . . seven piano pupils . . . 
faculty waitress . . . knitting novice. 



-79- 




P^-.TJtXfm^^K 




Sophomore Class Officers 

President Salvatore Fiorello 

Vice-President John C. Smith 

Secretary Geraldine Rothermal 

Treasurer Stephen Crowell 



■81- 




Sophomore Class History 

Never in the history of Lebanon Valley has one class brought about so many changes — both tangible and intangible — 
as the class which entered in September, 1946. In opening its doors to hundreds of ex GI's the college, in common with every 
institution of higher learning in the country, felt the impact of a freshman class almost as large as its entire pre-war enroll- 
ment. 

With the expansion of the physical plant and enlargement of the faculty came other changes which were destined to 
have a profound effect upon everyone associated with the college. Gone were many of the time-honored traditions long 
held to be an indispensable part of campus life. Serious-minded Joe Veteran replaced easygoing Joe College as the personi- 
fication of the average college student; and the freshman class, because of its size and maturity, commanded enough respect 
to bring about virtual abandonment of freshman rules. 

Early in its first year the Class of 1950 elected John Charles Smith to its presidency, and defeated the sophomore class 
7 to 6 in their annual football game. The "Frosh Frolic" was held in the Annville High School gym in April. 

At the beginning of this year the newly elevated sophomores reorganized, elected Sal Fiorello president, and set about 
formulating a class constitution. 

In November the sophomores dragged the freshmen into the Quittie to win the annual tug-of-war, and defeated a younger, 
lighter freshman football team, 13 to 6. 

Whether or not the tremendous influence the Class of 1950 has had upon the college in the two years just passed has brought 
about changes of a permanent nature is a matter of conjecture — but it is certain that it will continue to have a profound 
effect on campus life during its two remaining years at Lebanon Valley. 



— 82 — 



■H^ .J^ 



I. 





freshman Class Officers 



President Robert Shultz 

Vice-President William Miller 

Secretary Elizabeth Zimmerman 

Treasurer David Miller 



•87- 




freshman Class History 



Almost equal in size to last year's record-shattering freshman class, the class of 1951 at first was uncertain 
of its social status as freshmen. An abortive attempt on the part of the upperclassmen to revive some of the 
defunct freshman rules met with defeat chiefly because the prestige of the veteran was still to be felt among 
both freshmen and upperclassmen. 

Shortly after the beginning of the school year the class organized and elected Robert Shultz as its president. 

For the first time in many years the freshman class was spared the ritual of feigning shock and horror at 
the drama of a not-so-secret campus murder. 

As a class the freshmen have been at a disadvantage: the stiotlight has continued to focus on the predom- 
inantly veteran upper classes. 



eoveisxuxae 





■93- 




Senate 



Because of the fine cooperation on behalf of the male dorm students, the Senate, as a gov- 
erning body, was able to "walk softly and carry a big stick" during the '47-'48 term. 

Outside of a few minor incidents the male dorm students caused the Senators little concern, 
thereby permitting much more freedom to each individual and allowing the Senators to 
be freed from the role of "trouble hunters." The faculty gave fine cooperation to the Senate 
during the past term, allowing the Senate to do just as it saw fit. By this means, much of the 
traditional trivial friction between student and Senate, and in like manner, between Senate 
and faculty, was eliminated. 

Cooperating with the Jiggerboard, the Senate helped stage the Christmas banquet and 
dance. The Senate also supervised the intramural program in football and basketball. 



94- 




Jiggetboaret 



Jiggerboard, the organization referred to occasionally as the "Gestapo," is the Women's 
Student Government Association. This group of girls entertains — usually Mondays before 
dinner — a chosen few of the freshman girls and others who accidentally (to give them the 
benefit of the doubt) break the rules made for them. Friendly, capable, and efficient, this 
group corrects all shortcomings after having discovered them. Some of its more pleasant 
activities include sponsoring the annual Christmas dance and "Gander Weekend." 



■95- 




Women's Commuters' Council 

The duty of the Women's Commuters' Council, or W. C. C. as it is commonly known, is 
to generally direct and control the women day-students and to try to solve their problems. 

In the fall of the year a mild initiation and a test of the "L" Book were planned by them 
for the new freshmen. The initiation was followed by a party for these same young women. 
As is the custom, a Christmas party was held in the day-student rooms on December eight- 
eenth. The Christmas decorations, put up by the freshmen, greatly added to the spirit of 
the affair. Delicious refreshments were served. Christmas presents, which were exchanged 
by the girls, were placed under the Christmas tree. 

Another party was held on February thirteenth at which time the "Heart Sisters" were 
revealed. 

On March fifth the day-students held their annual semi-formal dance in the Spanish Room 
of the Hershey Hotel. This was, as usual, one of the high spots on the Lebanon Valley social 
calendar. 



■96 — 







Ate/f's Day Student Congress 

This governing body is composed of four seniors, four juniors, three sophomores and one 
freshman. Its purpose is to promote day students' activities and to act as intermediary in 
disputes between the students and the administration. This year the Congress, in cooperation 
with the Women's Commuter Council, has held a dance at the Hotel Hershey, run a ping-pong 
tournament, held the annual "axe league" and dealt with a number of issues arising from 
problems peculiar to the day student. Also, upon obtaining faculty approval, the 
Congress has rewritten its constitution so as to enable the students to nominate their own 
candidates for election to the Congress. 

The attempt to reinstitute freshman rules met with indifferent response from the students. 
It is felt by the Congress that one way to engender more school spirit and solidify the freshman 
class is to have a freshman program beginning in early fall. 



■97- 




Student faculty Council 

The need for a centralized coordinating body on campus has become exceedingly im- 
perative. The Student Faculty Council is now laying the foundations to alleviate this con- 
dition. With the approval of its new constitution it hopes to do more than serve merely as 
a channel to register dates for activities and as a clearing body for suggestions and criti- 
cisms from the student body. 

The Council is composed of a representative from each organization and three faculty 
members. Its officers are Glenn Hall, Pres.; Karl Miller, V. Pres.; Elaine Heilman, Sec; Vir- 
ginia Vought, Treas. 



cMGHnxzsmxoiis 




■99 — 




(kuittie Staff 



Editor 

Art Editor . . . 
Conservatory Editor 

Assistants . . . 



Martha J. Matter 
. . Nancy Meyer 
. Betty Ruth Jones 



George Ely 
Dorothy Werner 
Glenn Hall 
Martha Miller 
Marycarol Salzman 
Leonard Cohen 
Mary O'Donnell 
Betty Ann Briody 



Associate Editor . . . 
JAen s Sports Editor 
Women's Sports Editor 

Assistants 



Robert H. Miller 
. . Ronald Baker 
. . . Esther Bell 



Photography 

Photography Assistants 



. . Richard Pye 
Frank Huff 

William Yingst 

John Marshall 
Robert McCoy 
Michael Kurilla 
James Gregg 



Business Manager William Yingst 

Advertising Manager .... Beatrice Meiser 

Assistants Chester Sherman 

Robert Bashore 
Dennis Funck 



■100- 



The Qitittie, like every other organization on campus this year, has suffered from the general 
apathy; however, there are always a faithful few who are willing to work and sacrifice that 
a dream might come true. Handicapped by the late elections, the staff, when finally chosen, 
set to work with enthusiasm. After a while copy slowly dribbled in, lines began to appear on 
blank sheets of paper, and the pile of photographs rose higher and higher. As the hectic 
months passed — too quickly so far as getting an infinite amount of things done, too slowly, 
inasmuch as the work seemed without end — the enthusiasm was slightly dampened, but 
never the determination. 

Bill Yingst deserves all possible praise. Not only did he serve as business manager, but 
also solicited advertising, and performed many of the duties of an editor. Nancy Meyer is 
especially to be commended for her carefully executed drawings, as is Beattie Meiser for her 
splendid results with the advertising. 

Bob Miller, George Ely, and Marycarol Salzman gave unstintingly of their time to help 
with the layout, do an enormous amount of typing, and write some of the articles. Bob Miller 
is also responsible for the cartoons. Ronnie Baker proved a very able, cooperative, and hard- 
working sports editor, while Martha Miller and Glenn Hall were the mainstays of the writ- 
ing staff. Bob McCoy went out of his way to help with photographs and informals during 
the last minute rush. 

All in all, the staff, though small, accomplished amazing things in the face of difficulties, 
including a minor war with the Student-Faculty Council, and deserves the praise and recog- 
nition of the student body. 





La Vie Collegienne 



La Vie Collegienne is put out by a handful of galley slaves whose toil is 
never ending and never rewarded. Once a bi-weekly, then a weekly, the 
paper's appearances this year have been more or less sporadic, according to 
its financial status and the whims of its editors. Lack of funds, and lack of 
interest on the part of the students during the second semester constituted 
great handicaps for the staff, but it is hoped that matters will improve next 
year. 



— 102 — 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE 



Established 1925 



Vol. XXIV— No. 11 



Thursday, February 12, 1948 



LA VIE COLLEGIENNE is published weekly throughout the college year, except 
holiday vacations and examination periods, by the students of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pennsylvania. 

LA VIE is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press and the Intercollegiate Press. 
National advertising is secured through the National Advertising Service, Inc., College 
Publishers Representative, New York, N. Y. 



EDITOR 

Martha Matter 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
Doris Clements George Ely 

DEPARTMENTS 

News Editor Glenn Hall 

Feature Editors Marycarol Salzman, Nan Urich 

Sports Editors Charles Tome, William Fisher 

Exchange Editor Ruth Gearhart 

Staff Photographer James Gregg 

Art Editor Robert Sourbier 

Cartoonist Robert Miller 

Advisors Drs. Struble, Wallace, and Rutledge 

MANAGING BOARD 

Business Managers Melvyn Bowman, John Marshall 

Circulation Managers Robert McCoy, Howard Kreider 

Advisor Dr. John F. Lotz 

REPORTERS 

Esther Bell Rhoda Zeigler Donald Paine Vivian Werner 

Robert Howard Irving Mall Russell Getz John Saylor 

James Parsons Helen Nicoll Robert Bomgardner Richard Moller 

Frank Huff Jeanne Bozarth Joanne Kessler Louis Fried 

Glenn Woods Jay Flocken Richard Pye Samuel Rutherford 





Wig and Buckle 



It is to the Wig and Buckle Club that aspiring Thespians turn for outlet of their talents. 
Among the younger clubs on campus, it was organized in 1935 and has been increasing in 
popularity since its beginning. 

Every phase of theater work is afforded to members of the Wig and Buckle Club. Mem- 
bership participation in acting, directing, make-up, scenery, properties, or one of the other 
activities connected with presentation of a play is required. However, any student interested 
in dramatics is invited to club membership and the monthly meetings. 

The club presented two one-act plays as part of the entertainment during home-coming 
weekend. "Who Killed Me?" and "The Bronze Lady and the Crystal Gentleman" provided 
a direct contrast to each other, the first being a serious study, while the second brought much 
laughter from the audience. 

As its major production for the year the club chose Eugene O'Neill's "Ah, Wilderness," 
which, under the direction of the club's advisor Dr. George G. Struble, was very much 
enjoyed by the students 

The newcomers to Lebanon Valley's stage along with the tried and true members have 
cooperated to complete another year of dramatic activities. 



104- 




Green Blotter 



This campus institution holds forth intellectually every month during the school year as, 
at the meetings, the roll call moves inexorably on to each member for a reading of his latest 
effort, whether his muse has worked or not. 

On these Wednesday nights are heard original poems, essays, short stories, and literary 
discussions where inspiration is the keynote and preparation is the password. 

Criticism, by members, of each other's works, though vigorous and often unrelenting, is 
nevertheless impersonal and constructive. 

Creative endeavor is made more enjoyable by the informal atmosphere of Dr. Struble's 
fireside and the hostess, Mrs. Struble. 



105- 




Religious Coordinating Council 

The Religious Coordinating Council has two duties to perform during the school year. 
They are: the coordinating of all Religious activities on the campus, and sponsoring the an- 
nual Religious Emphasis Week. The latter of these is the council's outstanding project. 

Religious Emphasis Week on the campus is increasing in popularity each year. The council 
is doing its best to meet the special needs created by the increase in the college population. 
The council depends upon the student body to make its program a plus on campus. It is 
one of the few organizations on the campus which, although directed by a few, is run by and 
for the many. 

It is composed of the following: President, Joseph H. Yeakel; Secretary, Erma Gainor; 
Virginia Vought, Roger Keech, Joseph Smith, Alvin Hildebrand. 



-106- 




Philokosmian 



Philo's hope for a stronger organization has, in part, been realized. At the close of this, 
its seventy-ninth year of existence, Phi Lambda Sigma has at last made its long-awaited 
comeback? 

Early in the year twenty-two men were initiated into the society. In their honor a hay 
ride and a joint dance with its sister society Clio, were staged. One of the year's outstanding 
activities was the gala dinner-dance held by Philo and Clio. The affair took place at the New 
Brunswick Hotel in Lancaster. Music for the occasion was provided by Johnny Adams' band. 
During the year the new constitution was written and presented to the faculty for approval. 
Pins and blue sweaters with gold insignia were ordered. The election of next year's officers 
was held in April. 

With the help of the foothold it has obtained this year, Philo hopes in time to regain its 
former position of eminence on the campus. 



-107- 




Clionian 



Clio, observing its 75th anniversary, is theoldestof the women's literary societies. Through- 
out many years it has possessed the ancient traditions of Minerva as its patron goddess, and 
has retained the owl, the svmbo! of wisdom and the olive branch of unchallenged victory. 

Clio's rush week was the scene of many activities. Members and their guests, the freshman 
girls, hiked to the banks of the Quittie where they found a delicious lunch awaiting them. 
The annual tea held in Clio Hall featured a fashion show which presented a wardrobe es- 
pecially designed for the college girl on L. V.'s campus. The models were attired in clothes 
for everything from hikes to dances. The hall was beautifully decorated with fall flowers, 
leaves, and ivy, while candles on the table lent a romantic atmosphere. 

During the past year Clio Hall has been redecorated and the constitution revised. It was 
decided that in the future officers will not be changed at the end of each semester, but will be 
retained for the entire year. Clionians look back upon the Anniversary dinner dance held 
jointlv with Philo at the Hotel Brunswick in Lancaster with pleasant glowing memories. 



— 108 — 




Kalozeteati 



Kalo is again going strong after the interruption due to the war. Some of the highlights 
for the year are: a smoker with Andy Kerr present to show movies of the East- West game, 
the Kalo sign at football games (no opposition from Philo), the potential excitement of a 
duel with Philo (dramatic of course), and then, the initiation with last year's pledges pre- 
siding. Incidentally, they proved to be quite an ingenious group! Night of January 16th, 
the play for Kalo-Delphian weekend, brought some new talent on the stage of L. V. C. The 
biggest event of the year came in January with the invasion of the campus by Kale's new 
idea— L. V. JACKETS, designed by Kalo. 



■109- 




delphian 



"I want to be a friend of yours, zoom, zoom, and a little bit more." That's the way the 
Delphians greeted their "rushes " with a hike to Kreider's, w^here the ceremonial candles 
floated obligingly down the Quittie, and a tea, Chinese style, complete to tapestries on the 
walls and fans on the curtains. The initiation was a gruesome event, but miracle of miracles, 
everyone survived. 

In March, during the long-planned and awaited anniversary weekend, an audience-jury 
gave the Kalo-Delphian cast of Night of January 16th its surprise climax. There are many still 
debating that decision. Could a weekend terminate in any better way than in a ballroom 
with happy couples in formal attire taking full advantage of the music of Johnnie Eckert? 
And so, this year is remembered, not only for its successful social functions, but for the friend- 
ships and ideals formed in so doing. 



— 110 — 




Psychology Club 



Organized in 1945, the Psychology Club of Lebanon Valley has been ever growing in 
strength and scope of activity. Although the club was originally designed for those majoring 
in Psychology, anyone professing an interest in this field is welcome to attend and participate 
in the monthly meetings. This year the club program included a revision of the constitution, 
varied and interesting topics for discussion, and lectures — all pertaining to present day prob- 
lems and opportunities in the many different phases of Psychology. In the future it is con- 
templated that the club's activities will be supplemented by field trips, and that new books 
will be added to the club library. 



Ill- 




Chemistry Club 



One of the most active organizations on campus, the Chemistry Club, under the energetic 
and capable advisorship of Dr. Bender, provides both entertainment and enlightenment for 
its members. Composed of students having an interest in the field of Chemistry, the club 
offers them the opportunity of keeping abreast of the latest developments in the chemical 
world. In addition to the "news," which is a part of every meeting, movies, guest speakers, 
and actual field trips, give the members an inside view of the chemical industries. Through 
the policy of having student speakers, the club offers its members the opportunity of gaining 
valuable experience in the preparation and presentation of reports. 



112- 




Student Affiliate Chapter of A. C. S. 

On December 6, 1947 a charter was granted by the American Chemical Society to the 
Lebanon Valley College Chapter of Student Affiliates. This marked the beginning of the first 
organization on campus with national affiliation. The Student Affiliate Chapter is one of the 
first places in which persons anticipating a career in Chemistry have the opportunity of work- 
ing with those of like training and ambitions, thus starting the development of the profes- 
sional side of the student. 

Well organized under the direction of Dr. Bender, the Student Affiliate Chapter promises 
to become a "must" for those whose interest is "better things for better living through 
Chemistry." 



113- 




Rifle aub 



The Robin Hoods of the powder horn are represented on campus by members of the newly- 
formed Rifle Club. The club boasts membership in the National Rifle Association of America. 
Members may shoot on any N. R. A. range in the country. Intercollegiate matches are to be 
planned and dreams of an indoor range on campus grow with the treasury. The shooting this 
year was done at the National Guard indoor range in Lebanon. 



114- 




Legionnaires of L I/. C 



Although less than three years have elapsed since its inception, the campus veterans' 
organization, for all intents and purposes, has ceased to exist. This year marked the disso- 
lution of the Legionnaires of L. V. C. as an official campus organization, following a waning 
of interest which began last year. It is possible that the disinclination of Lebanon Valley 
ex-GLs to retain their identity as a campus entity is proof of their complete assimilation into 
civilian — and particularly, college — life. 

Before its demise the Legionnaires made an abortive attempt to petition the college to 
extend the length of this year's summer session to twelve weeks instead of the six weeks 
originally planned. 

Plans for its annual dinner-dance were abandoned largely because of a dearth of paid-up 
memberships. A last-minute fund-raising campaign produced negligible results, and those 
who had paid their dues had them returned. 

With the closing-out of its accounts, the brief history of the Valley's most exclusive or- 
ganization came to its unpublicized end. 



115- 




debating Club 



This year for the firs: time in a decade, L. V. C. organized a debating society. Rev. Souders, 
the advisor, and Frank HufF, student manager worked hard to form some effective machinery 
with the hope of a permanent campus organization. 

Debating the accepted topic for this year, "Resolved, that a Federal World Government 
should be established," the nuclear orators argued with teams representing Elizabethtown, 
Lock Haven State Teachers College, Juniata, Albright, and Temple University. 

Members of the society alternated positions on the teams in actual debating. In their many 
sessions of argument, they managed to eliminate useless ideas and were able to include many 
new thoughts in the debates. 

In spite of their inexperience, the debaters have shown promise and expect to bring home 
a few laurels for L. V. C. in the future. 



116- 




Life Work Recruits 



"And whatsoever ye do in word or deed, do all in the name of the Lord Jesus — " Col. 3: 17. 

The Life Work Recruits is one of the religious organizations on campus which carries on 
a two-fold purpose. It seeks, first of all, to enrich and stimulate Christian activities within 
the group through various religious programs. It endeavors to advance the spiritual atmos- 
phere of Lebanon Valley College by a renewing of the mind and heart in the lives of all its 
members . 

In addition to this, its members reach out to the Evangelical United Brethren Church, and 
various other churches in this vicinity, where they send deputations to conduct special 
musical numbers and the "spoken word." This service may only be for Sunday morning, 
it might be for the entire day, or it might be a service during the week. 

The Life Work Recruits have also carried on some social action programs this year. They 
conducted a service at the Lebanon County Old People's Home in November and cooperated 
with the Y's in a service at the Masonic Homes in Elizabethtown just before the Christmas 
Holidays. 



— 117 — 




y. w. c. A. 



The Y. W. C. A. is the outstanding religious group on campus for women. The activities 
of the "Y" begin with a week-end retreat, held prior to the opening of school in the Fall, 
during which time plans are laid for Freshman Week as well as for the whole school year. 
During Freshman Week every effort is made to welcome the new members of our student 
body and help them to get acquainted with one another and with the school. Throughout 
the year the Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. work in cooperation to present weekly Thursday 
evening Fellowship Hour and Sunday evening Vesper services. They also sponsor the three 
pre-holiday early morning sunrise services. In addition to the religious work the Y. W. co- 
ordinates a social and recreational program and helps sponsor the Annual May Day fete. In 
the spring the Y. W. C. A. has charge of Heart Sister Week and Mother's Weekend. 



■118- 



^,' w mM''---:TV^'.a'', 




y. At. C. A. 



"And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man." 
The Y. M. C. A. has always been a dominant force in college affairs. The Men's "Y" 
Cabinet has tried to plan a well-rounded program, physically, morally, and socially on the 
Lebanon Valley College campus. Each year it sponsors Dad's Day, keeps the "Y" room in 
the Men's Dormitory functioning and cooperates with the Y. W. C. A. and faculty in spon- 
soring the activities of Freshman Week as well as various programs throughout the school 
year. The " Y " has done its best to create a richer Christian spirit on the campus . The programs 
have been geared to the needs of every student, and its aim has been to be a benefit to the 
entire student body in every possible way. 



119- 




freshman "Y" Cabinet 



The Freshman "Y" Cabinet consists of members of the Freshman Y. W. C. A. and Y. M. C. A. 
who work together as a unit under the guidance of their advisors, Hattie Cook and Harry 
Hoffman. They helped to arrange the activities for "Heart Sister Week," "Mother's Week- 
end," and "Dad's Day," and took charge of the Vesper Services and Fellowship Programs 
assigned to them. 

Members of the Cabinet are: Pat Riihiluoma, Florence Dunkleberger, Detty Edelman, 
Dorothea Lynn, Jeanne Stine, Nancy Lutz, Miriam Fuller, and Ruth Gluck of the Y. W. C. A., 
and John Heck and Glenn Woods of the Y. M. C. A. 



■120- 




Red Cross 



The American Red Cross College Unit provides an organization through which students 
are enabled to help to plan and administer their volunteer activities in the community, na- 
tional, and international Red Cross programs. 

Participation of Lebanon Valley students is under the guidance of the Lebanon chapter 
of the Red Cross. Members of the campus unit have gained experience in the development 
of a sense of social responsibility through the opportunities they have had for acquiring 
skills in planning, participation, and administration of civic activities. 

One of the services of the Lebanon Valley unit this year was a class in swimming and 
water safety. Members served as instructors for students and others who were interested in 
this phase of safety. 

An outstanding achievement was the work done for the Veterans' Administration Hospital 
in Lebanon. The Conservatory's dance-band and other campus talent cooperated in bringing 
entertainment to hospitalized ex-GI's. A number of card-parties were sponsored at the hos- 
pital for the patients. 

Children at the Jonestown Orphanage were guests at an Easter party held for them by the 
campus unit. 

The feeling that their work is appreciated by those to whom the Red Cross extends a help- 
ing hand will continue to keep the Lebanon Valley College Unit a motivating force for ser- 
vice to campus and community. 



121- 







■ ' 

■' 

■ 

d 



i'^«4> 



Kim 



>>>j 



'W ^w 



x 



^^^/i) Workshop 



Appearing for the first time this year, the Radio Workshop is one of hundreds of similar 
organizations which have sprung up on college campuses throughout the nation as the result 
of the war-proven value of radio — not only as a powerful cultural, educational, and enter- 
tainment force, but as a career worthy of the consideration of college graduates. 

With thecooperationofStationWLBR in Lebanon, Workshop members have had an oppor- 
tunity to study the intricacies of commercial radio through actual broadcasting experiences. 
At the time of his enrollment in the Workshop each member is placed in a specialized group 
according to his interest in one or more of the manifold aspects of radio production, such as 
script-writing, announcing, producing, dramatics, music, or sound-effects. Under the guid- 
ance of WLBR staff personnel, and faculty members with radio experience, members are in- 
structed in the preparation and production of a variety of types of radio programs. 

Although its primary purpose is to provide its members with a practical working-knowl- 
edge of radio. Workshop broadcasts have had a secondary effect in bringing Lebanon Valley 
College into the homes of the people of nearby communities, thereby further acquainting them 
with the college. 



— 122- 



r'mw* 




Der Deutsche Verein 



This year witnessed the rebirth of the Deutsche Verein, which for several years had been 
extinct due to World War II. The club is under the able advisorship of Dr. Huth, a new 
German professor on L. V.'s campus. 

Since the reorganization meeting of the club, the group has sponsored varied activities. 
Meetings are held semi-monthly, at which the German language is used in conversation, 
German songs are sung, and interesting anecdotes are related by those members, who through 
war service, have had the opportunity of visiting Germany. 

The outstanding project of the first semester was the presentation of a German Christmas 
play. Das Krippenspiel. The cast was well chosen, costuming was extremely realistic, acting 
was superb — in short, it was judged an overwhelming success by everyone present. The pro- 
ceeds from the play were contributed in their entirety to the World Student Service Fund. 

The second semester was devoted to the broadening of the members' appreciation of Ger- 
man culture through the medium of several Kaffeeklatschen and other interesting programs. 
During the Kaffeeklatschen German phonograph records furnished background music for 
German conversation over the coffee cups. 

This organization has been the means of renewed interest in German tradition and culture. 



— 123 — 




ENGLE HALL 



GofmmvHGom 




-125- 




French Horn 

ROBERT STREEPY 



Voice 

MARY JANE ECKERT 




126- 




Organ 

CHARLES P. YEAGI.EY 



Piano 

DOROTHY KAUFFMAN 




127- 




Piano 

BETTY RUTH JONES 



Bass Clarinet 

LESTER YEAGER 




— 128- 




drum Majorette 

MARY O'DONNEL 



Voice 

RUSSELL GETZ 




— 129 — 




flute 

KATHERINE WERSEN 



Clarinet 

JACK SNAVELY 




130- 




Piano 

PATRICIA RIIHILUOMA 



french Horn 

BRUCE WISER 




131- 




Symphony Orchestra 



The Symphony Orchestra is the most advanced of the instrumental music groups on Leba- 
non Valley's campus. Membership in the orchestra is indeed an honor, making any Conservite 
swell with pride at this attainment. The Symphony concerts are anticipated by Conservatory 
students, alumni, and lovers of good music. 

Members are taken from all classes, the criteria of selection being the ability of the student, 
and the needs of the orchestra in maintaining well-balanced instrumentation. 

The concerts given in the past year, including such compositions as the "Overture to Ober- 
on," by Von Weber, and Morton Gould's "Revival," were among the most difficult ever per- 
formed by the group. Professor Rutledge's demands for the best from every member, both in 
class periods and in long evening rehearsals, seemed to intensify each one's determination to 
present a highly successful performance. 



— 132 — 




Glee Club 



The Glee Club deserves much praise, borh for professional-like performances, and for the 
beautiful blending of its trained voices. This organization gave programs at Reading, West 
Lawn, New Holland, Philadelphia, Allentown, Lykens, and Millersburg, which were in- 
cluded in the spring concert tour. The Glee Club was also heard in a Sunday afternoon con- 
cert at the Forum in Harrisburg, and was featured in the Spring Music Festival. 

The annual tour is a highlight of the year for members of the group, and is packed with 
good times (remember Asher and his umbrella?), good food, and good folks. It provides 
bull session material for weeks afterward. 

A great honor was paid the Glee Club in being chosen to represent Pennsylvania at the 
Meeting of the Eastern Division of the National Music Educators Association, which was 
held at Scranton, Pa., last spring. "Dry Bones," and all the other fine numbers were met 
here, as elsewhere, with enthusiastic approval. 



133 — 




Girls' Band 



This smart-stepping, streamlined group furnishes a real added attraction at our football 
games, and the girls work hard to perfect the colorful drills that are performed. Occasionally 
we hear a sour note, but practice (even at 8 a. m.) makes perfect, is their motto. 

Under the capable baton of Professor Rutledge, the Girls' Band add that "extra touch" 
to all appearances of combined bands. 



134- 




College Band 



Worthy of much praise is the precisely-coordinated Marching Band, which enlivens all 
our football games. The band provides harmonious and peppy strains for the college rooters, 
and at the same time performs the drills with precision. Behind this scene are many hours of 
hard practice. 

This year under the direction of Bandmaster Rutledge and the twirling Drum Majorette 
O'Donnell, the band was better than ever. 

The Concert Band, which is supplemented by concert instruments, presents an equally 
striking picture in their blue and white uniforms; and their concerts receive much praise 
from critical audiences. 



■135- 




Chorus 



The Lebanon Valley College Chorus, which is made up of approximately 100 voices, is 
a credit to Professor Rutledge's skilled leadership. The Music Festival performance included 
Mendelssohn's oratorio. The Elijah, and was notable for fine interpretation and fervent spirit. 

Thursday afternoon rehearsals may feature a Conserv Formal skit, or even a generous 
visit from Santa Claus (in the person of Dick Moyer), and are open to all Conservatory stu- 
dents and any other interested college students. 



136 — 



SPOKES 




— 137 — 



,el 



.© 



34 76 J^3Z 

42 38 44 25 41 ^ 3V fiTS^ 37 

4# f 3B ! 4B « «« - 



fiSsa*; ..L«.-_-*^-^ ' JtefcTs»'wj?''s?'. -■ 



football 



With Coach "Andy" Kerr, former Colgate University master mind, at the helm, Lebanon Valley 
College experienced its best season in almost ten years, winning five games, losing two, and tying one. 
It was a hectic and thrilling season made especially memorable bv its utter unpredictability and topsy- 
turvy twists and turns. 

Squeaking past Moravian, 21-20, in its opening contest, the Blue and White was resoundingly 
thumped 41-0, by Franklin and Marshall, but then went on to chalk up four straight victories, 
including a well-deserved and very satisfying triumph over the Albright Lions, 31-7. 

The highlight of the season, along with the victory over Albright, was the Dutchmen's sensational 
13-7 upset of Scranton University, a team which seemed slated for a bowl bid until disaster struck it 
in the form of a Blue and White thunderbolt. 

The low-water mark of the year was the 41-0 lacing handed out by the rough-and-ready aggre- 
gation of Franklin and Marshall and the stunning 20-6 jolt delivered so neatly by the Juniata Indians; 
but the redeeming factor in the whole picture was the acquisition of "Andy" Kerr as head coach and 
the thought of his return next year with almost his entire squad. The future appears bright, indeed, 
for Lebanon Valley's pigskin warriors. 

Brilliant line plav by Captain Paul Mateyak, at tackle, and guards Walt Gage and Bill Keeler featured 
the activities of the fast, hard-charging forward wall, while the superb passing, kicking, and general- 
ship of quarterback Herb Eckenroth provided the outstanding magic in the backfield as well as kept 
the Valley grid machine moving. 

Walt Gage, speedy sophomore guard, whose "educated toe" was solely instrumental in one Blue 
and White victory, was honored in the All-State selections by being picked for the All-State third team. 



138 — 




1H7 football Season 

L. V.C. Opp 

October 4 — Moravian at Lebanon 21 20 

October 11 — Franklin and Marshall at Lancaster 41 

October 18— Mt. St. Mary's at Lebanon 35 

October 24 — Hofstra at Lebanon (Night) 27 6 

November 8 — Albright at Reading 31 7 

November 15 — Penna. Military College at Lebanon 

November 22 — Juniata at Huntingdon 6 20 

November 27 — Scranton at Scranton 13 7 

SCORING TD EP Total 
Bob Hess 4 24 

Charles Witman 4 24 

Hank DiJohnson 3 18 

Walt Gage 13 13 

Guy Euston 2 12 

Marsh Gemberling 2 12 

Jim Magee 2 12 

Peter Gamber 1 6 

Jim McWilliams 1 6 

Bill Keeler 1 6 



139- 







140- 







— 141- 




Varsity Basketball 



Encountering the keenest competition in years, Coach Ralph Mease's "mitey mites" redeemed 
what might be called a spotty, although fairly successful season, by their positively colorful and at 
times, sensational performances. Off to what seemed like a fine start, the Flying Dutchmen dropped 
two games after winning their first two, then won another, floundered and dropped three more straight, 
bounced back with an impressive 80-64 victory over Moravian, and went on to conclude a rather 
successful but erratic season. 

Of the five games that the Mease-men lost early in the season, four of them, with the exception of 
the LaSalle debacle, were dropped by a total of only ten points. 

Leading the way for the Dutchmen were Captain Rinso Marquette, a veritable whirlwind at guard, 
and Flashy Floyd Becker at forward, whose colorful floor play and uncanny shooting highlighted even 
the dullest games and worst defeats. 

Fine support from Bobby Hess, Hank Dijohnson, and Marsh Gemberling added to the sharp-shoot- 
ing of Marquette and Becker, and a plentiful supply of reserves that grew stronger as the season pro- 
gressed hold glittering promises for the future. 

The low point for the team was its engagement with LaSalle College's crack artists of the court 
who dazzled the fans with their brilliant shooting and slippery-smooth passing. Working together 
like a well-oiled machine and possessing tremendous height, the LaSalle quintet completely out- 
classed the Dutchmen, whose prestige was partially restored by their performance against Moravian. 
Playing a free, wide-open style of ball with the accent heavily on offense, the Mease-men outpointed 
Moravian's supposedly point specialists, beating them at their own game, 80-64, to distinguish them- 
selves for the first time during the year. 



— 142 — 




Junior Varsity Bas/cetba// 

Under the splendid tutelage of Coach Danny Seiverling, Lebanon Valley's Basketball understudies, 
the Junior Varsity, chalked up a very successful season with but two losses to mar the record. Playing 
a steady, deliberate brand of ball, the Junior Varsity ran up scores that made even the Varsity stand 
up and notice them. 

Starting at one time or another on the team were Larry Kinsella, George MayhofFer, Charley Zim- 
merman, Jack Hoak, Ray Kline, Charley Witman, and Bob Fischer. Kline eventually moved up to 
the Varsity and was succeeded by Witman and Fischer, who held down the pivot point alternately. 

Although Kinsella and Zimmerman bore the major brunt of the scoring, the team was well-balanced 
with everyone proving a potential threat. 

With these players and the varsity holdovers, Lebanon Valley's team for the coming season will be 
a threat in the Middle Atlantic Conference. 



-143- 





H^^F' "^ '% W^ 


L- f 




■^^f;-: 


4, 




^gi ^2B^ W' 


r^ 


J 


m 4L. ^^^^^^^^^Hff ' 


^^BS^ '^' ' >^^l^^^^l 


f \ 


'J 





-144- 







145- 




Baseball 



Turning in the best record in baseball in the history of the college, the Lebanon \^alley College 
diamond stars posted an impressive eleven victories as against but two defeats for its 1947 season, 
as the Blue and White found itself knee-deep in all material except pitchers. 

Although handicapped early in the season by the loss of Marsh Gemberling, the Dutchmen's stellar 
hurler, Charlie Miller, and Herm Seigel stepped into the breach and filled it in fine form. Handling 
the hitting chores were Hank Dijohnson, Al Hildebrand, Rinso Marquette, and "Shorty" Fields. 

Coach Ralph Mease's Dutchmen ran into trouble only twice during the season, dropping one game, 
8-3, to a very fine Franklin and Marshall outfit, and losing the other one, 8-7, to a scrappy Juniata club. 

Composing the first nine were Charlie Miller, Herm Seigel, and Marsh Gemberling, pitchers. Hank 
Dijohnson, catcher, Alvin Hildebrand, first base, Rinso Marquette, second base, Bobby Hess, short- 
stop, Jim McGraw, third base, and Floyd Becker, "Shorty" Fields, and Walt Gage in the outfield. 



— 146 — 







■147 — 




///// 



L" Club 



The "L" Club is composed of athletes who have received their letters from the Director of Athletics 
in one of the three major varsity sports. In order to be eligible for membership a sports participant 
must meet the requirements set up by the Athletic Council for a varsity letter award. He automatically 
becomes an "L" Club member upon receipt of this award. 

The main function of the "L" Club is to raise money to purchase sweaters for its members. It is 
one organization that solicits no money from its members. The group works as a whole to build up 
its award fund. 

This past year the Club had charge of the football programs and by this medium raised enough 
money to meet all expenses. On November 15 the annual Homecoming Dance was held in the Ann- 
ville High School Gym, and in early May the annual "L" Club dinner was held, at which time senior 
awards were presented to the following graduating athletes: Benny Penturelli, Herb Eckenroth, Jim 
McGraw, PeteGamber, Marsh Gemberling, and "Rinso" Marquette. 



— 148 — 




Girls' Hockey 

The candidates who reported for the 1947 hockey season consisted of a few experienced upper- 
classmen, and several willing but inexperienced freshmen. The prospects for the season looked glum, 
but the new^ and capable coach ordered persistent practice and gave excellent advice which resulted 
in a semi-successful season. 

In the first game of the season the girls suffered a defeat at the hands of their opponents. Profiting 
by the mistakes made in the first game, they were victorious in their second encounter. After having 
had their first taste of victory, the girls began playing as a powerful unit, and at the close of the season 
the team had won two and lost three games. 

L. \'. Opp. 

Oct. 25— Lock Haven at L. V 6 

Nov. 1— Penn Hall at L. V 3 1 

Nov. 12 — Shippensburg at L. V 2 

Nov. 15 — Moravian at L. V 5 

Nov. 17— L. V. at Millersville 2 7 



— 149 — 




Girls' Basketball 



The 1947-1948 girls' intercollegiate basketball season could be classed by the onlooker as a very 
poor one. However, the spirit and enthusiasm which made the girls stick by the team in the face of 
many defeats, compensated for the lack of victories. The characteristics of true sportsmanship and 
sheer enjoyment of the game were displayed by everyone who participated in the sport. 

Intra-mural basketball gave all girls who were interested in basketball a chance to display their 
ability and also to earn those needed athletic points. 

Here's hoping next year's basketball team will show as much spirit and enthusiasm as their pre- 
decessors. 

L. V. Opp. 

Jan. 14 — Albright at Lebanon Valley 32 36 

Jan. 17 — L. V. C. at Elizabethtown 19 44 

Jan. 31 — L. V. C. at Lock Haven 33 62 

Feb. 9 — Elizabethtown at L. V. C 23 34 

Feb. 12 — Shippensburg at L. V. C 29 46 

Feb. 16 — L. V. C. at Moravian 43 21 

Feb . 19— L. V. C. at Millersville 23 28 

Feb. 28— Millersville at L. V. C 34 38 

Feb. 24— Lock Haven at L. V. C 31 51 



— 150 — 




Women's Athletic Association 

The Women's Athletic Association consists of the girls on campus who are interested in sports, 
and who have displayed this interest by earning the required number of athletic points for membership. 
Founded in 1937, the W.A.A. has come to be one of the largest women's organizations on campus. 
Under the capable advisorship of the new physical education instructor, Mrs. Drescher, a program of 
varied indoor and outdoor sports and activities has been introduced. Doris Hyman, a popular and very 
enthusiastic senior, was its able and well-liked president. 

During the past year the W. A. A. sponsored "Club 13, " a night club dance, held on Friday, Feb- 
ruary 13, in Annville High gym. That evening will be remembered as one of the most entertaining 
of the year. The association also sponsors two hikes throughout the year, the spring hike being the 
annual initiation hike at which time new members are taken into the organization. 



— 151 — 




Cheerleaders 



After three hard years of planning and perspiration, one dream of the not-so-long-ago-organized 
Cheerleaders has at last been realized: new uniforms. To that they — and they hope the whole student 
body — say Hallelujah! This year, for more practical functioning, the squad has been cut down. Plans 
are being made to set seven — three boys and four girls — as the official number, with a freshman squad 
trained in the fall to replace any outgoing members. 

Those in the Senior Class agree that this year the spirit and support of the student body have in- 
creased immeasurably. For a while they were nearly discouraged . . . but who ever heard of Cheer- 
leaders being discouraged? 



152- 



me sflLQ^e- 




153 — 



Miss Ciuittie 




Martha Miller 



154- 




Janet Weaver 



Nancy Meyer 











1 


II 


^^^^^^HP^^ 




IP 




1 


u 






^^ 


\ ^ 


1 


1 




\ 






y 


1 




4- 




■ra«r. 


' "i^iAm 



155- 




Rufina Ba/mer 





Phyllis Vale 



Elaine Froc/c 



— 156- 



m ^ 




mo's mo 



"Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges" is a nation-wide honor organization to which, 
every year, ten seniors from Lebanon Valley College may be elected. This year's outstanding seniors 
are: Melvyn R. Bowman, Mary Jane Eckert, Mary Elizabeth Frank, Nancy Elaine Heilman, Theodore 
D. Keller, George Reynolds Marquette, Thomas J. Schaak, Virginia M. Vought, Rhoda Mae Ziegler, 
and Robert A. Zimmerman. 

Representatives are chosen from both the College and the Conservatory. Selection is made not 

, only on the basis of scholarship, but also for service rendered to the school in the campus activities 

and all honor and social organizations of which the student may be a member. One of the features 

of the organization is the Student Placement Service, through which the students are recommended 

to American employers who are seeking capable college graduates to fill positions. 



— 157- 




CAMPUS 



Men's Sports Leader 

PAUL MATEYAK 



Women 's Sports Leader 

JANET WEAVER 




158 — 



LEAVERS 



Outstanding Man Leader 

GEORGE R. MARQUETTE 





Outstanding Woman Leader 

MARY ELIZABETH FRANK 



159- 




CAMPUS 

LEAVERS 



Best Looking Man 

ROBERT H. MILLER 



Best Dressed Man 

ROBERT STREEPY 




■160 — 



Best Dressed Woman 




JOANNE KESSLER 



-161- 




May Day 



The morning of May 3, 1947 was cloudy and bleak and caused much concern about the activities 
for the afternoon. However by noon the sun shone through and the May Day program went on as 
per schedule. 

Set in a background of riotous color the pageant of King Richard and Robin Hood was enhanced 
by the lavish satins worn by the girls and the deep velvets of the costumes for the men. Selections from 
Don Juan, Don Quixote, Robin Hood, and Swan Lake, used as musical backing, were ably rendered 
by the college band under the baton of Professor Edward P. Rutledge. 

Near the end of the events the May Queen, Pearl Miller, and her court, with Virginia Stonecipher 
as maid of honor, made their appearance. For the first time the identity of the Queen and her court 
had been kept secret until shortly before the proceedings. The Queen and court presided over the Swan 
Lake ballet as interpreted by Miss Jesse Haag, producer, director, and choreographer for the program. 
The impressive and colorful may pole dance followed by the recessional comprised by the entire cast 
concluded the ceremonies. 

The crowning of Queen Pearl bv Robert Zimmerman as King Richard, the lively fencing match, 
gay antics of the tumbling clowns, and thrilling archery contest with John Henry Light as Robin 
Hood will remain as highlights to a successful May Day — 1947- 



■162 — 



*J^§Bf:2e^ ^T" 




r 



\M^.-jy/Mm^i 



OOOS HW GRDS 






— 165 — 



^■■K 




h'j^M 


^fs- 




ft 


F'^TT 




WM' ■ 


t - f :,;ij| 


\d 




v^'i'M 


^^^v - iSt^r 


w^- 


t«rai^ ' ^fc 








COUEGE CHURCH 



— 168 — 




WASHINGTON HALL 






PAY STUDENT ROOM 



W'^ 




€^.:^^^ 




vfiW'i^A 



special Mention to 



Alvin Hildebrand, Abba Cohen, "Rinso" Marquette, Betty Frank, Virginia Vought, 
Samuel Rutherford, Ruth Keech, Joseph Smith, Ruth Gluck, Bertha Barbini, Robert 
Grover, William Albrecht, Robert Baker, Albert Moriconi and Joseph Yeakel who, 
while not on the staff, contributed write-ups of some of the organizations. 

Paul Yingst and Eddie Englehart, last year's editor and business manager, for their 
helpful advice. 

Professor Rutledge, without w^hose assistance it would have been impossible to obtain 
pictures of the Conservatory organizations. 

Professor Carmean, for allowing us to use his May Day pictures. 

Dave Gockley, for valuable assistance in digging up last year's cuts and pictures. 

Miss Pencil, for answering innumerable questions and compiling endless lists. Also for 
helping to locate wandering students. 

Mrs. Yingst, for her valuable assistance in copyreading. 

Doris Whitman and Gladys Books, for the tremendous job of retyping all of the copy. 

Professor Fisher, for forecasting the weather. 

Mr. Herr, for having change for cokes during those long nocturnal sessions. 

The Night Watchman, for not throwing us out of Washington Hall after ten o'clock. 



— 170 — 



Patrons 



*HAROLD T. LUTZ 
*E. N. FUNKHOUSER 
*W. C. PLUMMER 
*HARRY M. IMBODEN 
*CHARLES L. BITZER 
*LLOYD A. SATTAZAHN 
*J. BALMER SATTAZAHN 
MR. AND MRS. HARRY T. REMLEY 
MR. AND MRS. ANTHONY FIORELLO 
MRS. MARY KURILLA 
MR. AND MRS. HARRY HOFFMAN 
MR. AND MRS. JERRY MURPHY 
MR. AND MRS. BURR O'DONNELL 
MR. AND MRS. MORRIS MEYER, JR. 
MR. AND MRS. WM. PAUL YINGST 
MR. AND MRS. AMON FUNCK 
MR. AND ROBERT B ASHORE 
MR. AND MRS. FRED B. MILLER 
MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM A. ROTHROCK II 
MR. AND MRS. CHARLES MEISER 
*Members of the Board of Trustees 



— 171 — 



1949 QUITAPAHILLA 



^ 



Engraving 
Printing and Binding 



by 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 



Moa/ft Pleasant Press 



HARRTSBURG • PENNSYLV/VNIA 



— 172 



SHENK & TITTLE 

"•Everything for Sport" 
Play More - - Live Longer 

313 Market St. HARRISBURG, PA. 



Compliments of 



Donmoyer's Book Store 



41 N. EIGHTH ST. 



LEBANON, PA. 



BOOKS - - STATIONERY 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 



Exterminating Fumigating 

Termite Control 

J, C, EHRLICH CO, 

Rear: 136 N. Mary Street 
LANCASTER, PA. 

Phone: 3-2489 



Moving ... Storage 

H. A. HARTMAN & SON 

5 37 N. Front Street 
STEELTON, PA. 



To and From Everywhere 



Compliments of . . . 

BRANDYWINE IRON & METAL 
COMPANY 

Salvage Material 
LEBANON, PA. 



173- 



We Build for Eternity 


it 

HALDEMAN AND SAVASIIO 


* 
Designers & Builders 


Phone: 278 


103 W. Chocolate Ave. 
HERSHEY, PA. 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER, Pres. - - 1914 
E. PETER STRICKLER, Assoc. - - 1947 


Lebanon News Agency 


"Insure in sure insurance" 


• 


Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Penna. 


SAMUEL S. ETTER, Prop. 


You have a completed house 


"""As near as your nearest telephone'' 


When you furnish with Westing- 




house 


SAYLOR^S DRUG STORE 


You never get stuck 

When you buy from BEN TUCK. 


PRESCRIPTIONS 




47 South 8th Street, Near the Post Office 


120-122 N. 8th St. Lebanon, Pa. 


Phone: ucj LEBANON, PA. 



174 — 



Compliments of 


MURRAY'S 


The DARI'DEL 


Ladies Wearing Apparel 


Dispensers of Delicious Dairy Delicacies 


Dresses, Evening Gowns, Coats, 


and Downy Fla\e Doughnuts 


Suits, Fur Coats, Sportswear 


781 Cumberland St. Lebanon, Pa. 


729 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 


Compliments of 


Henry G. Carpenter 


CALCITE QUARRY 


Inc. 


CORP. 


Mount Joy, Pa. 


Lebanon, Pa. 


General Agent for 


i^ 


Mount Joy Mutual Insurance Company 




City Mutual Insurance Company 


Stone, Sand and Transit 


• 


Mixed Concrete 


Represented locally bji; Fred G. Gilbert 


-k 


• 


Phone: Lebanon 1201 


318 South First Avenue "Lebanon, Pa. "Phone: 3150 




Phone: 2453 1125 Willow Street 


EBERSOLE INC. 


WALTER L. HARTZ 


Pontiac . Oldsmohile 


Philco RADIO Motorola 


Sales and Service 


Television 


CLEONA, PA. 


Philco Warranty Service 




Electrical Appliances 



175- 



1 


Compliments of 


■ 

1 


Fink^s Bakery 


' 


i^ 




Have 




You 




Tried 




Our 




Filled 




Doughnuts? 



176 — 



AU-American Dress Co» 

Manufacturers of 

DRESSES, BLOUSES and 
SPORTSWEAR 



Sixth and Willow 



LEBANON, PA. 



Compliments of . . . 

JOSEPH DOOLEY Est. 

Fresh Fruit and Vegetables 

7th Street and Reading R. R. 
LEBANON, PA. 



Tke place for GIFTS ■ STATIONERY • LUGGAGE 

Harpe 

LEATHER GOODS ■ GREETING CARDS 



Portrait and Commercial 
Pliotography 



1 Developing and Printing 

O Enlarging and Framing 



757-759 Cumberland St. 



LEBANON, PENNA. 



Compliments of . . . 



McCrory's 

LEBANON, PA. 



DIAMONDS 



JEWELRY 

HOFFER'S 



5 North Ninth Street 
LEBANON, PA, 



WATCHES 



GIFTS 



Compliments of 

Palace of Sweets 

and 

Restaurant 

LEBANON, PA. 



177- 



JAY'S FLOWER SHOP 

on the square 

Any occasion is only complete with flowers. 
Between occasions give her some just because she's wonderful 



PALMYRA 



Phone: 8-6451 



Compliments of . . 



yourHERSHEY MILKdist 



HERSHEY HOMOGENIZED MILK 
"CREAM m EVERT DROP" 



Phone: 2216'J 



Harry L. Meyer 



CLEONA, PA. 



SIMON S. KETTERING 



Goodyear Tires ♦ 

1 6th and Cumberland Streets 

At ESSO Station 



Life Guards 
LEBANON, PA. 



— 178- 




More Than 3,000,000 Legionnoires 
Say: YOU'RE INVITED ! ! 

There's always room for one more in the greatest veterans' outfit. 

There's sport . . . There's fun. 

And there's SERVICE ... to your nation, your state and your community. 



The American Legion's key to success is active 
Americanism. The Legion donated the first 
radium to veterans' hospitals. It has given 
$62,500,000 for relief of needy families. It spon- 
sors nation-wide Junior Baseball and 3,000 Boy 
Scout troops. It operates 2,000 citizenship 
schools for foreign born. That's just a sample 
of the fine service program you'll oe supportina 
when you join your buddies in the Legion. 




Prestige goes with your Legion button. The 
President ... 8 justices of the U. S. Supreme 
Court . . . 252 members of congress ... 28 
governors are Legionnaires. 

Your Post is the heart-beat of your town. You'll 
find the fellows you like there, doing the things 
you like to do. Come in and help yourself and 
your country. 



Conner -Strcichcr Post No. 559 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



— 179 — 



LAUNDERERS CLEANERS and FURRIERS 



PHONE: Annville: 7-3511 
Hershey: I-O6II 

Myerstown: 1-0611 
Middletown: 74 



J^eluxe J>ert)ice 



If your chosen calling, or the inscrutable ways of Providence, leads you 
to New York City, and you find yourself (as have millions before you) 
founding a home here — remember that the workaday routine of homes 
is the business of CLEANART, Incorporated. 

You'll find life happier, easier, smoother with our trucks rolling 



regularly to your door. 



CLEANART 



incorporated 



11-23 St. Casimir Avenue . . . Yonkers, New York 



LAUNDERING DRY CLEANING 

PILLOW CLEANING 



RUG SHAMPOOING 
COLD FUR STORAGE 



180 — 



Automatic Heating 
Stoker, Oil, and Gas 



Sherwin Williams 
Paints and Varnishes 



mm\ CASSEL 



PLUMBING 

209 N. Railroad Street 

Palmyra, Pa. 

Phone: 8-5341 



HEATING 



HARDWARE 

14 East Main Street 
Annville, Pa. 
Phone: 7-5131 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

EXCLUSIVE SHOES 

Collegebred Shoes 
^^For College girls" 

Florsheim Shoes 
"For the Man Who Cares" 

34 N. Eighth Street LEBANON, PA. 

"A Fashion Institution" 

LOGAN'S 



816 CUMBERLAND STREET 
Phone: 836 LEBANON, PA. 

George V/ashington Tavern 

STEAKS SEAFOOD 

ITALIAN SPAGHETTI 

loth and Cumberland Streets 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



WOLF FURNITURE CO. 

Appliances, Furniture 
Floor Coverings 

754-756 Willow Street Lebanon, Pa. 

Phone: 326 

Spinet Pianos 

LESTER 
KRANICH & BACH 

LLOYD V. FEGAN 

428 North 10th Street Lebanon, Pa. 

Phone: 873 

When in need of Flowers 
think of 

VAVOROUS 

335 Guilford St. 512 Cumberland St. 

LEBANON, PA. 



— 181 — 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture • Floor Coverings • Electrical Appliances 

Modern Funeral Home 

ANNVILLE PENNSYLVANIA 



"Demand Fresh Ice Cream" 

Gollam's Supreme Ice Cream 

Made Fresh Daily 

Specializing for Parties, Picnics, Clubs, 
Banquets or any other social functions. 



C. B. GOLLAM SONS MFRS. 

"Master Ice Cream Service" 

6th and Maple Streets Lebanon, Pa. 

PHONE: 21 



Compliments of . . . 

BAILEY'S 

Cocktail Lounge and Bar 

922 CUMBERLAND STREET 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Hammond Organ Music Nightly 

SPECIAL DINNERS and LUNCHES 
SERVED DAILY 



THE BOK^rOTi 

"Lehanons Greatest Store' 



182 — 



DIAMONDS of 
DISTINCTION 

1 II r 1 


In Lebanon it's 

HAAK BROS. 

Department Store 

Headquarters for 

Berkshire Nylons, 

Carol King Frocks 


^^H stoll^tuncf^ ^^ 


<'HJIil'rM1«)liHaEEP 

Jewelers 

20 N. Ninth Street Lebanon, Pa. 


Compliments of . . . 

TED KLOPP 

Furniture Co. 

1001 CUMBERLAND STREET 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST AND DECORATOR 

"THE FLOWER SHOP" 

Corsages Our Specialty 
Rear of Court House LEBANON, PA. 

Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere, Anytime. 
Phone: 592 


Compliments of . . . 

M. BRATTON 

Quality Shoes 

848 Cumberland Street 
Lebanon, Pa. 


Home-Cooked Meals 

STONY'S RESTAURANT 

Downy Flake Donuts 
See Them Made — Ahvays Fresh 

Fountain Service, Magazines 

ANNVILLE PENNSYLVANIA 


FUNCK'S GARAGE 

General Repairing 

OFFICIAL A. A. A. SERVICE ATLANTIC PRODUCTS 

J. C. FUNCK 

14-16 South White Oak Street Annville 7-5121 
Official Inspection Station No. 3068 



183- 



Refrigeration and Appliances 



HAUER'S 



Kelvinator Bendix Stromberg-Carlson 



Commercial and Domestic Freezers 



ABC Oil Burners Electric work of all kinds 

Authorised Sales and Service 

23 S. 6th Street LEBANON, PA. 

PHONE: 2923-J 



184- 



H. E. MILLARD 
LIME and STONE CO. 



SERVING 



Industry-Building— Agriculture 

TOP QUALITY COURTEOUS SERVICE 
REASONABLE COST 



Annville, Pa. 



GOLD CROSS CAROLYN 

R. E. KREIDER 

Shoes jor the Entire Family 

Fitted by X-Ray 

PALMYRA . PENNA. 

FLORSHEIM WEYENBERG 

DAVIS PHARMACY 

103 W. Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

Parker Pens and Pencils 
Schaeffer Pens and Pencils 
Eversharp Pens and Pencils 
Whitman s Candy 
Double K Nuts 
Prescription f 



T. H. HEILIG 

Local and Long Distance Moving 

Phone: 55 
543 Weidman Street LEBANON, PA. 

Compliments of . . . 

BOWMAN'S 
Insurance Agency 

Palmyra Bank Bldg. PALMYRA, PA. 



185 




SEE 

J. B. BOWMAN 

Palmyra, Pa. 



If it's a Hit— It's Here 

Compliments of 

STATE THEATRE 

511-515 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



When building or buying a home . . . 
Arrange Your Mortage or Loan Thru 

Palmyra Bank and Trust Co. 

PALMYRA, PA. 
The Bank with the Chimes 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 



VISIT 



''Hot Dof FRANK 

Light Lunches 
and Sandwiches of all kinds 



BREYER'S ICE CREAM 

"It' s the Talk of the Town" 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



Compliments 

LAUCK BROS 

Palmyra, Pa. 
GIFTS STATIONERY 




SHOES 



(7^ 



MODERN 

HEALTH 

SHOES 

J\'anujactured by 



KREIDER SPORTS 



"500" Juveniles 



s^^%^^^^^^^^ 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



■186- 



To a Graduate . . . 



OUR WISH FOR YOU IS THIS: 

MAY YOUR GOAL BE A WORTHY ONE, 

MAY YOU HAVE THE COURAGE AND SELF- 
CONFIDENCE TO STRIVE FOR IT, 

MAY YOU HAVE SUCCESS AND HAPPINESS 
WHEN YOU HAVE ATTAINED IT. 



THE PENNWAY 



— 187- 



LOJAY SHOP 

7th ^ Cumberland Streets Lebanon, Pa. 

Millinery Sportswear 
Hand Bags Lingerie 


Compliments of 
an 

IRISHMAN 


Compliments 0/ 

JOHN H. LONGfe? SONS 

Quality Lumber Millwork 

Phones: 2200, 2201 
CLEONA, PA. 


H. W. KREIDER 

CLOTHIER 

Nationally known good 
merchandise 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 


Compliments of . . . 

RELIABLE COAT 

AND 

DRESS SHOP 

761 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 


Compliments oj . . . 

lien Franklin Stores 

YOUR College Store 

open Friday and Saturday Evenings E. W. Wolfe, Owner 

37-39 W. MAIN ST. ANNVILLE, PA. 



•188 — 



J. Edward Gantz 

photographer 



LEBANON 



PENNA. 



189- 



CONDUCTED STUDENT TOURS OF EUROPE-May to October 1948 

These tours are of interest to teachers as well as students. Visit 
aU of Europe either on an economy tour or the Standard Five 
Country or Continental Tour. 

For injormation call 

LEBANON COUNTY TRAVEL BUREAU 

Willow at Eighth St. Phone: 1753 LEBANON, PA. 


Harrisburg 
COCA-COLA 

Bottling Works, Inc. 

I 7th and Holly Streets 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Phone: 4-41 5 ^ 


S. A. BOMGARDNER'S 
Dairy 

TRY OUR ICE CREAM 

Phone: 8-5521 
40 East Main Street Palmyra, Pa. 


Compliments of the • 

ASTOR THEATRE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


Watch the Dutchmen fly 
this year . . . 

Support your Team 


La Vie is Having its 
Face Lifted . . . 

Watch for it 



190 —