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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

I 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1950leba 



i 



TO THE READER 

This Figure, that thou here seest put. 

It was for gentle Shakespeare cut; 
Wherein the Graver had a strife 

With Nature, to out-doo the Hfe; 
O, could he but have drawne his wit 

As well in brasse, as he hath hit 
His face, the Print would then surpasse 

All, that was ever writ in brasse. 
But, since he cannot. Reader, looke 

Not on his Picture, but his Booke. 

Ben Jonson 



MR. WILLIAM 



SHAKESPEARE'S 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



A HISTORY 

Here published tor the tirst time, 
according to the True Ongmall Copies. 




.^^^^*^>; 



^s^^^m'i'- 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

Published by The Class of 1950 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




To unpdthed waters, undreamed shores. 

THE WINTER'S TALE 



MAY 1949 



ig^o .- QUITTAPAHILLA 



TO THE MEMORIE 

ot the deceased Authour Maister 
W. SHAKESPEARE 

SHake-speare, at Ungth thy pious jeUowes give 
The worJd thy Wor}{es: thy V^or\es, bv which, out-hve 
Thy Tombe, thy name innst when that stone is rent. 
And Tvne dissolves thy Stratford Motmnent, 
Here we alive shall view thee still. This BooJ^e, 
When Brasse and Marble jade, shall nial{e thee loo}{e 
Fresh to all Ages, when Posteritie 
Shall loath what's new, thinke all is prodegif 
That IS not Shake-speares; evry Line, each Verse 
Here shall revive, redeeme thee from thy Herse. 
7\[i)r Fire, nor can}{ring Age, as Naso said, 
0} his, thy wit'jraught Boo}{e sliall ontce nu'dde. 
JN(o shall I e"re beleei'e, or thinl{e thee dead 
{Though mist) nntill our han}{roHt Stage he sped 
(Impossible) with some new straine font-do 
Passions of Juliet, and her Romeo; 
Or till I heare a Scefie more Jioblv tal{e. 
Then when thy halj-Sword parhmg Romans spa}{e 
Till these, till any of thy VoIuiTies rest 
Shall with more fire, more feeling he exprest. 
Be sure, our Shake-speare, thou canst never dve, 
But crown'd with Lawrell, live eternally. 

L. DiGGES. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



The QUITTAPAHILLA of 
WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 



containing Three Acts and an Interlude: 
Truely set forth, according to the first 

ORIGINALL 



The Names ot the Principal Actors 
in the Play 

£ditor-i7i-c)iie/ David H. Wallace 

Associate Editor James Parsons 

Business Manager Raymond A. Kline 

Assisttnit Business Managers Robert Uhrich 

J. Ellis Wood 
Ralph Quarry 

Fniancial Manager Robert Kline 

Art Photograjjhy 

Jeanne Bozarth John Charles Smith 

Sports J^^=^ Gregg 

William Fisher J- Donald Paine 

Betty J. Slifer Norman Bucher 

Mary K. Frey 

Music 

Barbara Kleinfelter Societies and Clubs 

Sidney Ann Garverich Janet Eppley 

Jjrama Francis Heckman 

Jane Reed „ i a 

Special Activities 

Religious Activities Annette Read 

Ethel Mae Beam Ralph Oswald 

Special Activities Salvatore Fiorello 

Nancy Bright Alex Fehr 

Phyllis Dale Audrey Geidt 

Frank Huff Henry Hostetter 

George Ely Ruth Kramer 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



A CATALOGUE 

of the severall Acts and Scenes 
contained in this Volume 



ACT THE FIRST: AS YOU LIKE IT 

Scene I: The Stage 

Scene II: The Inner Stage 

Scene III: Gentlemen and Ladies 
Scene IV: The Pit 
Scene V: Sport 

Scene VI: The Rite ct May 

INTERLUDE: A MIDSUMMER JilGHTS DREAM 
ACT THE SECOND: MUCH ADO ABOUT HOTHIHG 

Scene I: The Prompters 
Scene II: The GroundHngs 
Scene III: The Understudies 
Scene IV: Cliques and Claques 
Scene V: More Sport 

Scene VI: Masques and W'lgues 

ACT THE THIRD: ALL'S WELL THAT EHDS WELL 

Scene I : Te Deum and Non Nobis 
Scene II: Play Bills 

Scene III: Still More Sport 
Scene IV : The Players 
Scene V: Curtain Calls 

EPILOGUE: THE MERCHANT OF VENICE 



QUITTAPAHILLA 8 1950 



To The Great Variety of Readers 

FROM the most able, to him that can hut spell It had bene a thing;, we confesse, worthie to 
have bene wished, that the Author himselfe had liv d to have set forth, and overseen his owne writings; 
But since it hath bin ordain'd otherwise, and he by death departed from that right, we pray you do 
not envie his Friends, the office of their care, and paine, to have collected is' pablish'd them; and so 
to have publish'd them, as where (before) you were abus'd with diverse stolne, and surreptitious copies, 
maimed, and deformed by the frauds and stealthes of iniurious imposters, that exposd them: even those, 
are now offer'd to your view cur'd, and perfect of their limbes; and all the rest, absolute m their numbers 
as he conceived them. Who, as he was a happie imitator of Nature, was a most gentle expresser of it. His 
mmd and hand went together: And what he thought, he uttered with that easinesse, that wee have scarse 
received from him a blot in his papers. But it is not our province, who onely gather his works, and give them 
you, to praise him. It is yours that reade him. And there we hope, to your divers capacities, you will finde 
enough, both to draw, and hold you: for his wit can no more lie hid, then it could be lost. Reade him, 
therefore; and againe, and agame: And if then you doe not like him, surely you are m some manifest danger, 
not to understand him. And so we leave you to other of his Friends, whom if you need, can bee your guides: 
if you neede them not, you can leade your selves, and others. And such Readers we wish him. 

John Heminge 
Henrie Condell 



1950 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE FIRST 

As Tou Li\e It 




In the springtime, the only pretty ringtime. 
When birds do sxng. 

AS TOU LIKE IT 



QUITTAPAHILLA lo 1950 



ACT THE FIRST 



As Tou Li\e It 



SCENE I 



1950 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



THE STAGE 




The wide and universal theatre. 



AS TOU LIKE IT 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1950 



North Hall 



Frayned in the prodigahty of nature. 

KIHG RICHARD III 




QL'ITTAPAHILLA 




This castle hath a pleasant seat: the ai 
l^unhly and siveetly recommeiids itself 
Unto our gentle senses 



MACBETH 



Men s Dorm 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1950 







I do hve at my house: and my house 
doth stand by the church. 

TWELFTH KIGHT 



South Hall 



QL'ITTAPAHILLA 



Y 



West Hall 



lou have a ooodlv duellniq. 



HZXKY IV 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



t6 



1950 




I am for the house with the narrow gate. 
Which I ra^e to he too little for pomp to enter. 

ALLS WELL THAT EHDS WELL 



Sheridan Hall 



QL'ITTAPAHILLA 




"Thou u'dll, O u'dll, O succt and lovdy wall' 

A MIDSUMMER HIGHTS DREAM 



South Hall Walk 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE FIRST 



As Tou Li\e It 



SCENE II 



Ql'ITTAPAHILLA 



THE INNER STAGE 




Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors, 
My very noble and approvd good masters. 



OTHELLO 





The President 



CLYDE A. LYNCH 



Assistant to the 
President 

FREDERIC K. MILLER 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



Dean of the College 

A. H. M. Stonecipher 






Dean of V/omen 

Clara Chassell Cooper 



Dean of Men 

Robert C. Fagan 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1950 



Board of Trustees 

OFFICERS 

President E. N. Funkhouser 

Vice President Charles L. Bitzer 

Secretary and Treasurer S. H. Derickson 



Representatives from the East Pennsylvania 
Conference 



Roy Garber 

J. B. McKelvey 

Rev. Edgar Hertzler , 
Hox. Miles Horst . . . 



Columbia, Pa. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Harnshurg, Pa. 

Lebanon, Pa. 

A. C. Spanc.ler Campbelltown, Pa. 

Rev. S. C. Enck Harnsburg, Pa. 

Rev. p. B. Gibble Ephrata, Pa. 

Rev. O. T. Ehrhart Lancaster, Pa. 

Rev. D. E. Young Harnsburg, Pa. 

E. W. Coble, Lancaster, Pa. 

Rev. W. a. Wilt. Annville, Pa. 

Rev. H. E. Schaeffer Harnsburg, Pa. 

C. L. Bitzer Harnsburg, Pa. 



Representatives from the Pennsylvania Conference 

Rev. C. Gl'y St.ambach Dallastown, Pa. 

H.arold D. Lutz Baltimore, Md. 

H. W. Shenk Dallastown. Pa. 

Rev. Ira S. Ernst Washington, D. C. 

Rev. Mervin H. Welty York, Pa. 

J. Stewart Glen Red Lion, Pa. 

Re\'. G. I. Rider Hagerstown, Md. 

Albert W.atson Carlisle, Pa. 

HuBER D. Strine York, Pa. 

Rev. p. E. V. Shannon York, Pa. 

Re\'. F. B. Plummer Hagerstown, Md. 

E. N. Funkhouser Hagerstown, Md. 

R. G. Movi'REY Chambersburg, Pa. 



Representatives from the Virginia Conference 
Rev. J. Paul Gruver Martmsburg, W. Va. 

Rev. Paul J. Slonaker Broadway, Va. 

Rev. J. E. Oliver Winchester, Va. 

G. C. LuDwiG Keyser, W. Va. 

Rev. Carl W. Hiser Winchester, Va. 

Rev. E. E. Miller Harrisonburg, Va. 



Trustees at Large 

Bishop J. B. Showers Harrisburg, Pa. 

H. M. Imboden New York, N. Y. 

Maurice R. Metzger Middletown, Pa. 

Hon. J. Paul Rupp Steelton, Pa. 

Lloyd A. S.attaz.ahn Lebanon, Pa. 

W. H. Worrilow Lebanon, Pa. 



Alumni Trustees 
E. D. WILLIAMS Annville, Pa. 

WILBUR C. PLUMMER Philadelphia, Pa. 

WARREN H. FAKE Ephrata, Pa. 



Ql'ITTAPAHILLA 



In the College 




REGISTRAR 
Samuel O. Grimm 

I have no su^erjiuoiis 
leisure. 

MEASURE FOR MEASURE 

ASS1STA\T REGISTRAR 
Gladys Pencil 





^. ^-\ 



SECRETARY OF THE 

PIHA.\CE COMKUTTEE 

Claude Donmoyer 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



1950 



In the Library 





LIBRAR1A\ 
Helen' E. Myers 



Carnegie Library 



Knowing I lov'd my booJ(s, he furnished nie 
From mme own library with volumes that 
I prize above my dukedom. 



THE TEMPEST 



LIBRARY STAFF 
L. to R.: Dr. and Mrs. Fields, Mrs. St.arr, Miss Myers (seated) 
Miss Dunkle, Miss Shenk. 



ASSOCIATE LIBRARIAH 
Donald E. Fields 





QUITTAPAHILLA 



In the White House 




This IS thy office. 

MUCH ADO ABOUT HOTHIHG 




DIRECTOR OF RELIGIOUS 

ACTIVITIES 

David W. Gockley 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC RELA- 
TIONS A.\D 
ALUMNI SECRETARY 
Richard F. Sei\-erlixi; 




QUITTAPAHILLA 26 



ACT THE FIRST 



As Tou Li\e It 



SCENE III 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



GENTLEMEN AND LADIES 



.-r 




The hopeless word of — 7:ei'er to return. 

RICHARD U 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Class of 1949 




CLASS OFFICERS 



PRESIDENT 

Glenn Hall 



SECRETART 

Betty Ruth Jones 



VICE-PRESIDENT 
Joseph Yeakel 

TREASURER 

William Yingst 



NIarian Jean Achenbach 
Hummelstown, Pa. 




John E. Adams 
Clinton, Ohio 




Mark R. Arnold 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Margaretta E. Bailey 
Lebanon. Pa. 




Robert E. Baker 
Shiremanstown, Pa. 




Ralph T. B.arnes 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



9 



\ 



James L. Barto 
Lebanon, Pa. 




H.-\ROLD W.^YNE Be.AM 

Annville, Pa. 



> 



me 



Ronald L. B,\ker 
MiUerstown, Pa. 






Donald A. Behney, Jr. 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Esther R. Bell 
Hummelstown, Pa. 




Harry E. Benedick 
Lemasters, Pa. 





Eugene R. Bieber 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Russell J. Bixler 
Chambersbura, Pa. 




Dean H. Bohr 
Tower City, Pa. 




Joseph R. Bolger 
Martinsburg, Pa. 




NiCHOL.AS H. BOROTA 

Steelton, Pa. 




Peter P. Boyer 
Quentin, Pa. 




M:^^... 



VhRA J. BOYER 

Annville, Pa. 




Foster M. Brinser 
Middletown, Pa. 




Paul E. Broome 
Columbia, Pa. 




WiLLIANI J. BrUNNER 

Enhaut, Pa. 




Mary Ellen Budeshein 
Seven Valleys, Pa. 




John K. Carl 
Palmyra, Pa. 



Raymond J. Clodoveo 
Lebanon, Pa. 




^^ ^^ 



Abba D. Cohen 
Han-ishm a, p,i 




\ , % 



WiLLLAM T. Conway 
Cleona, Pa. 






Hattie Ruth Cook 
Perkasie, Pa. 




Glenn E. Cousler 
York, Pa. 




Michael F. Crincoli 
Elizabeth, N. }. 



1^' 



V 




Harlan A. Daubert 
Pme Grove, Pa. 




Albert P. DiJohnson 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Ralph A. Downey 
Litit:, Pa. 



'K 







Joseph C. Dubs 
Harrisbursj, Pa. 




Richard Y. Eby 
Palmyra, Pa. 




Herbert A. Eckenroth 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



ai 



ASHER S. EdELMA> 

Hagerstown, Md. 





Martha J. M. Ely 
Lebanon, Pa. 




DwioHT C. Fake 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Harold L Fe^step 
Palmyra, Pa. 




Charles R. Ford 
Harnsburg. Pa 




Donald N. Fridinger 
Martinsburg, W. Va. 



Dennis L. Funck 
Palmyra, Pa. 




Erma S. Gainor 
Mt. joy. Pa. 




Marshall Gemberli> 
Mt. Joy, Pa. 



Paul J. Gerhart 
Jonestown, Pa. 




Russell P. Getz 
Denver, Pa. 




Anne Gilbert 
Lebanon, Pa. 





Mary Lee Glover 
Harpers Ferry, W. Va. 




Sylv.^n D. Grove 
Red Lion, Pa. 




Robert R. Grover 
Bradford, Pa. 



' ^ f '*«rf* jHKt 







V 



George G. Haines, Jr. 
Catasauqua, Pa. 




Glenn L. H.all 
Windsor, Pa. 




Ruth E. Harnish 
Hershey, Pa. 




Fran'cis a. Heckman 
Schuylkill Haven. Pa. 




Robert E. Hess 
Lebanon. Pa. 




Walter W. Hess 
Lebanon, Pa. 




William L. Hick 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Alvin S. Hildebrand 
Grantville, Pa. 




Donald R. Hoffer 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Henry G. Hostetter 
Palmyra, Pa. 




Frank B. Huff 
Cieona, Pa. 




George R. Hunter 
Harrisburg, Pa. 







Betty Ruth Jones 
Philadelphia, Pa. 






Howard B. Kreider, Jr. 
AnnviUe, Pa. 



Stanton H. Keller 
Annville, Pa. 



Peter P. Kane 
Lebanon, Pa. 







Wesley R. Kreiser 
Ono, Pa. 



Joan L. Kessler 
Mohnton, Pa. 



Earl F. Kauffman 
Annville, Pa. 






Edith R. Krokenberger 
Paulsboro, N. J. 



Hazel J. Kinney 
Farmingdale, N. Y. 



/^ 



Audrey C. Lau 
Red Lion, Pa. 




Joanna R. Lawhead 
Womelsdorf, Pa. 




Howard F. Lebegern 
Lancaster, Pa. 




Cora F. R. Leshef 
Palmvra. Pa. 




Slade S. Lixdem3n, Jr. 
Baltimore. Md, 




Amos W. Long, Jr. 
C'.eona, Pa.. 




'V' 



IWAN V, M.^G.AL 

Brusfcl?, Belsjium 




DoN.ALD V. M.-\LICK 

Chester, Pa. 



f 



Robert H. Marquette 
Mverstown, Pa. 




John E. Marshall 
Lebanon, Pa. 



^1^'f 




Paul Mateyak 
Coaldale, Pa. 



'^^fe 




Robert P. McCoy 
York, Pa. 




Gerard J McKenna 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 





Be.atrice M. Meiser 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Nancy R. Meyer 
Lebanon, Pa. 




A. Marlan Millard 
Annville, Pa. 



Roger M. McKinley 
Myerstown, Pa. 




Martha M. Miller 
Harrisburc;, Pa. 




Richard J. Miller 
Palmyra, Pa. 




Sidney S. Miller 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Richard W. Moller 
Montclair, N. j. 




De.an S. Moore 
Stovstown, Pa. 




Erma R. Murphy 
Peach Bottom, Pa. 




Jo.'^NNA H. Norris 
Harnsburw, Pa. 




Mary A. O'Donnell 
Waynesboro. Pa. 



$!^l 



William T. Moore 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Bryce C. Oxenrider 
Tower Citv, Pa. 




George F. Patterson 
Harnsburg, Pa. 




•v 



, t^«~«>™i^;/'"!*v^^|^ 



Maggio p. Pechini 
Hershey, Pa. 





Charles E. Pomraning 
York, Pa. 




Richard G. Pye 
Harnshurg Pa. 




Elmer Leon Reamer 
Harrisburg, Pa. 




Jane E. Reed 
Harrisburg, Pa. 




Stuart K. Remley 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 




S. St. Andrew Renner 
Freetown, Sierra Leone 



■1^ ■ s 



Richard P. Reynolds 
Harnsburg, Pa. 




Earl E. Rhine 
Lebanon, Pa. 




IrvIN J. RoiMIG 

Annville, Pa. 




La\erne E. Rohrb.^ugh 
Codorus. Pa. 




Charles S. Ruhl 
Harnsbura:, Pa. 




Charles R. Schollenbergeb 
Fleetwood. Pa. 




M.^rlan E. Schvv..\lm 
Vallev View, Pa. 




Ernest Shindel 
Annville, Pa. 



'"% 



-«5 



Paul H. S.adler 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



Ella Mae Shultz 
Melrose. Mass. 




Betty A. K. Skiles 
Harnsburg, Pa. 




James W. Skiles 
Harrisburg, Pa. 





Dorothy M. Smith 
Palmvra, Pa. 




Joseph D. Smith, Jr. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 




Gilbert D. Snyder 
Palmyra, Pa. 






Paul J. Spangler 
York, Pa. 




Russell I. Steiner 
Lebanon, Pa. 




John D. Stine 
Lebanon, Pa. 



> 



% 



"!S^55| 



""*»*. 



X'^^:-- 



Robert H. Stolte 
Newburg, Pa. 




iERT G. Strohman 
Palmyra, Pa. 




Ruth P.atricla Sutton 
Toms River, N. J. 




Charles W. Tome, Jr. 
Red Lion, Pa. 




NicoL.A Verni 
Springfield Gardens, N. Y. 





Dene T. Walters 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



Elvin W. Walters 
Lebanon, Pa. 




Luzetta J. Warfel 
Williamstown, Pa. 




Janet K. We.aver 
Lansdale, Pa. 




1 



Lois M. Wenger 
Annville, Pa. 




Dorothy E. Werner 
Palmyra, Pa. 




Virginia M. Werner 
Harrisburg, Pa. 





Clarence W. Witt, Jf 
Stoystown, Pa. 




Karl L. Wolf, Jr. 
Lebanon, Pa. 




M.-\RY Katherine Wolf_ 
Ephrata, Pa. 



Joseph H. Yeakel 
Pottsville, Pa. 




Harold E. Yingst 
Lebanon, Pa. 




William J. Yingst 
Lebanon, Pa. 






Melvin R. Zeigler 
Annville, Pa. 



Thomas M. Zimmerman 
Stovstovvn, Pa. 



Dorothy E. Zink 
Obci-Im, Pa. 



RicH.ARD E. Seltzer 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Richard D. White 
Harnsbursj, Pa. 



Who's Who 1949 




Front TO 


I- M.iry O'Donnell. Marth.i Ely 


M.in 


in Schw.ilm. Dr.rothv Z, 


S<:conii T 


w P.iul M.«ev.ik, Joseph Yenke 


, Rus, 


ell Get: 


Xot P,a 


.reJ Fr.ink Huf 








Toimg in limbs 


111 


judgment old 



nk, Bottv Ruth Jonc; 



MERCHAHT OF VEHICE 

The seniors pictured above have been chosen on the basis of outstanding effort and achievement in all aspects of 
college life, to represent Lebanon Valley College m the 1948-40 edition of Who's Who m Anienciin Universities and 
CoUeges. 

Phi Alpha Epsilon 

With a membership limited to seniors whose three and one-half year average is eighty-eight per cent or better, 
our honor society, Phi Alpha Epsilon, represents the acme of scholastic achievement at the Valley. Recipients of this 
coveted honor in 1948 were entertained at the annual banquet in the spring. The following were thus honored : 

William Albrecht Doris Clements Theodore Keller Virgini.o. Vought 

Alvin Berger Anna Dunkle Karl Miller James Wert 

Melvin Bowman Helen H.'^rtz David Sheetz Rhoda Ziegler 



QUITTAPAHILLA 46 1950 



ACT THE FIRST 



A5 Tou Li\e It 



SCENE IV 



OUITTAPAHILLA 



THE PIT 




Let rich music^s tongue 
Unfold the imagined happiness. 

ROMEO AJiD JULIET 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



48 



THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 




DIRECTOR OF THE COXSERVATORT 

OF MUSIC 

MARY E. GILLESPIE 



Engle Hall, notorious to Valleyites as the source 
of weird and incessant noises, is winning plaudits 
throughout a wide area for the fine calibre ot its 
inmates. The vocal and instrumental pyro- 
technics which rend the campus air morning, 
noon, and night are, therefore, an evil very 
necessary for the maintaining of the high reputa- 
tion of Lebanon Valley's Conservatory of Music. 

Preparation for concerts and recitals is only 
a part of the ]oh of a conscientious Conservite. 
There are, in addition to practising and class-work, 
the important and interesting sessions of practice- 
teaching at Hershey, where there is, according to 
a well-informed and usually reliable source, "never 
a dull moment." Work and concentration are 
disregarded by the budding musicians for one 
night at least each winter, however, when they 
don their gowns and tuxedos tor the Conserv 
Formal. The big affair was held this year at the 
Yorktowne Hotel in York, Pa., and, m the 
familiar words of Miss Gillespie, "It was superb!"" 



The Glee Club 



This body of the finest singers m the Conserv opened its n^S 40 season with a splendid rendition of 
Waring"s "Song of Christmas"", highlighting the pre-holiday festivities. And then in February came a repeat 
performance of the annual Glee Club tour, with visits to various large and small cities and towns of Pennsyl- 
vania and neighboring states. As m previous years this trip was a pleasure to audiences and singers alike, 
and has left with the latter fond memories of warmest hospitality. 



The Symphony Orchestra 

And then there is the Philharmonic; that is, the Lebanon Valley College Symphony, also a select group of 
musicians. The Symphony presents each January a fine program of symphonic music of the first order. The 
concert this year was highlighted by a performance of Schumann"s Co7icerfo for Piano and Orchestra 111 A 
Minor with Margaret Barthel Baxstresser as soloist. Maestro Rutledge conducted the orchestra also m a 
delicate intepretation of Beethoven"s charming Symphony Xo. i. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Symphony Orchestra 

As sivcct and innsical 
As bright Apollo's lute, strung with his hdir. 

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST 




Glee Club 



I than}{you for your voices' tha)i/(>'ou, 

Tour most sweet voices. 

CORIOLAHUS 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



College Orchestra 



Here we will sit and let the sounds of inusic 
Creep i7i our ears. 

MERCHAW OF VENICE 




Mixed Chorus 

Soft stillness and the iiight 
Becoyne the touches of sweet harinony. 

MERCHA?iT OF VENICE 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Music Festival 

Perhaps the outstanding musical event ot this year was the spring Music 
Festival. One should really say two outstanding events, tor the Music Festival 
IS a two-night affair with something tor every musical taste. 

The tirst evening the Lebanon Valley College Band, under the baton of Pro- 
fessor Rutledge, presented a splendid program of band music. Among the many 
excellent numbers on the program the following were outstanding: Sal{untdld 
Overture by Karl Goldmark; Headlines. A Moderji Rhdfisodv. and the brilliant 
Espana Rhapsody ot Emmanuel Chabrier. 

The following evening Haydn's great oratorio. The Creation, was performed 
by the College Chorus and Orchestra, again under the direction of E. P. Rut- 
ledge. The soloists m this stirring work were Miss Barbara Troxel (soprano), 
Mr. Kayton Neshitt (tenor), and Mr. Paul King (bass). 

The mammoth choral group used m this work was recruited not from the 
Conserv alone, but from the whole college. The performance ot The Creunoii was 
received by a capacity audience, with an enthusiasm scarcely accorded even to 
previous performances ot The Messiah and £/iiah. 

Though not so widely known and attended, faculty and student recitals 
presented from time to time throughout the year also offer the campus and com- 
munity constant opportunities to hear good music well interpreted. 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE FIRST 



^5 Tou Li\e It 



SCENE V 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



SPORT 




A hit, a very palpable hit 

HAMLET 

Tenms halls, my liege .... 
When we have matched our racl^ets to these halls. 
We will, in France, hy God's grace, play a set. 
Shall stride his father's crown into the hazard. 

HEHRT V 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1950 









j^""^ 




itmnj rou Mirquctt, B Hi". OilrhriMn W Hess, Miller. Loose, Buchcr, 
Third roil. Becker. Heise\ . Gage. Kinsclli, Zimmcrm.in, Gemherling. Coach Me, 



Baseball 1948 

Coach Ralph Mease 

Cdptdin G. R. Marquette 



X 






\35I^4bw^~* i^^^ 



WON 

6 

LOST 

5 



^ 



^iSssaSfc* 



Captain "Rinso" Marquette at bat against 
Lafayette 



- i^V^V . 




Co.'^CH Ralph Mease 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Tennis 1948 



Coach . . . . 
Won 



Claude Donmoyer 
Lost -6 




QUITTAPAHILLA 56 



ACT THE FIRST 



As Tou Like It 



SCENE VI 



THE RITE OF MAY 



QLHTTAPAHILLA 




More matter for a May niorning. 

TWELFTH HIGHT 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1950 



May Day 1948 



On a bitterly cold, windy May 8, 1948, gooseflesh and eyebrows were raised when it was rumored about 
that "The Devil Is an American!" and that Old Nick was actually on the Valley campus. His Satanic Maj- 
esty, however, came not to raise Hell, but rather to pay his court to the beautiful Queen of the Valley, 
Mary Jane Eckert ; her charming Maid of Honor, Elaine Frock; and those fair lilies of the Valley, her Court — 
Mary Jane Flinchhaugh, Betty Frank, Elaine Heilman, Joyce Meadows, Mildred Neff, and Virginia Vought. 
A throng of students, alumni, families, and friends braved the unseasonable weather to witness the festivities 
attendant upon the crowning of the Queen of the May. 




For her own person. 
It beggared all description. 

AHTOHT AHD CLEOPATRA 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



May Day 1948 



Highlighting the afternoon's festivities was an entertaining pageant, "The Devil Is an American," written 
by Dr. George Struble, directed by Mrs. Dons Drescher, and performed by the students of the college, with 
music by Professor E. P. Rutledge and the College Band. The pageant was divided into three scenes, of 
which the first, "The Devil Is a Shyster Lawyer," was adapted from Benet's story. The Devil and Damcl 
Webster, and featured Pete Barcia and Jim Murray as the Devil and Dan, respectively. "The Devil Is a Slave 
Trader" followed, based on the well-known Uncle Tom's Cabin, with Simon Lcgree (Joseph Yeakel), Uncle 
Tom (Russell Get:), Topsy (Caroline Boeddinghaus), The Devil, Y.iller Gal (Marycarol Sahman). Annie 
Oakley's exciting lite furnished the background tor the concluding section, "The Devil Is a Merry Gambler," 
Peter Cartwright (James Yeingst) and Annie Oakley (Joanne Kessler) holding the tield with Simon Legree 
and the Devil. From this last contest the Devil, as always, retired in defeat to the nether region, sourly ad- 
mitting that "crime does not pay." 




Sweets to the sweet. 



HAMLET 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



60 



May Day 1948 




6i 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



INTERLUDE 




O wonderful, wonderful, and most wonderful! and 
yet again ivonderful, and after that, out 
of all u'hooping! 

AS rOU LIKE IT 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



62 



1950 



The Quittie 




In dale, forest, or mead. 

By paved fountain or b}' rushy hrooh. 

A MIDSUMMER RIGHTS DREAM 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Miss Quittie 




PHYLLIS DALE 

"Ti5 beauty truly bent, whose red and white 

J^ature^s oivn sweet and cunnmg hand laid on. 

TWELFTH HIGHT 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



^M 




JEANNE BOZARTH 

A inaid 
That paragons descnpuon and wild fame; 
One that excels the qmr\s of blazoning pens. 

OTHELLO 



1950 



(S-; 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




POLLY STONER 



The hand that hath made you fair 

hath made you good. 

MEASURE FOR MEASURE 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



66 



1950 



LOVERS' LANE 




Lord, luho would live turmoiled ni the court, 
And may enjoy such quiet ival}{s as these. 

HEHRT VI 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE SECOND 

Much Ado About Js[othing 



rrsTi^^^ 




A?i autumn 'twas 

That grew the more b)! reaping. 

AHTOKT AHD CLEOPATRA 



QUITTAPAHILLA 68 



1950 



ACT THE SECOND 



Much Ado About 7S(othmg 



SCENE I 



1950 



6g 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



THE PROMPTERS 




We must not ma^e a scarecrow of the laiv, 
Setting ;t up to fear the birds of prey, - 
And let it keep one shape, till custom make it 
Their perch, and not their terror. 

MEASURE FOR MEASURE 



QUITTAPAHILLA 70 1950 



Student Government 



I u'lll teach the children then hehavwrs. 

MERRY WIVES OF WIHDSOR 



During the present term the Valley's tour student governing bodies — the 
Jiggerhoard, Mens Senate, Women Commuters' Council, and Men Day Stu- 
dents' Congress — have exhibited increased activity m response to increased stu- 
dent interest, but it is still too early to sing paeons of praise. 

With the notable exception of the Jiggerboard, which has never slipped from 
its respected position, the governing bodies have continued to labor under severe 
handicaps inherited from the first post-war years. Lack of interest in student 
government on the part ot both governors and governed and consequent lack of 
respect for the work of the governing bodies have robbed them of the stability 
and eificiency demanded ot such organizations. 

There was a time in the tall when it seemed that these hurdles had been 
safely passed. The process ot orienting the freshmen in the lo e ot the "L Book" 
started like a house afire and the newcomers generally cooperated splendidly. 
But the first flush of enthusiasm quickly faded and gave way to upper class lethargy 
111 the face of frosh defiance. Intra-mural athletics, however, thrive under the 
administration of the governing bodies; similar activity in governmental functions 
IS "a consummation devoutly to be wished," a worthy aim for next year. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Student-Faculty Council 



Responsible for coordination of all student activities and policies, the Student- 
Faculty Council IS composed of fourteen voting members, representing the four 
governing bodies, the four classes, the four societies, the two Y"s. and the faculty 
(three members). Representatives of other recognized student organizations are 
invited to join m the Council s deliberations, though they do not enjoy the 
privilege ot voting. 

The Student-Faculty Council began the 1948-49 term with a new constitu- 
tion, new otEcers, and fresh ideas and ideals. In addition to passing on to the 
faculty many student suggestions and requests, the Council has striven to un- 
tangle conflicting campus rules and to put campus recreation on a sound and 
orderly basis, through a program of subsidies and careful scheduling. Repre- 
sentatives were also sent, under the Council s auspices, to a state-wide conference 
on student government problems. 

The Council is not yet perfected; it is hoped that future years will see it so. 
To build well, however slowly, is the aim of the Student-Faculty Council. 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



1950 



STUDENT 



President 



IIGGERBOARD 



3etty Ruth Jones 




MEN'S SENATE 
Prt:side7Tt Asher Edelman 



1950 



QL'ITTAPAHILLA 



GOVERNMENT 



WOMEN COMMUTERS" COUNCIL 




President . 



MEN DAY STUDENTS" CONGRESS 
Eugene Bucher 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE SECOND 



Much Ado About Toothing 



SCENE II 



75 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



THE GROUNDLINGS 





Ah, my tender hahes! My unbloiun flowers, 
new-appearing sweets. 

RICHARD III 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



76 



1950 



Class of 1952 

THE FROSH 

President Robert Burtner 

Vice-President Lawrence Guenther 

Secretary Dorothy Witmer 

Treasurer Richard Hawk 

CLASS ROLL 



ACHENBACH, LlOYD ThOMAS, Jr. 

Adams, Lois LaVerne 
Alsberge, Victor LeRoy 
Arata, John Joseph 
Arbegast, Sara 

AUGHINBAUGH, HaRRY ElWOOD 

Bakley, Betty June 
Banklian, Armen 
Barron, Elaine 
Bartels, George 
Bausher, Ralph Alfred 
Baver, Clyde Byron, Jr. 
Begg, Adele Janet 
Beittel, Elizabeth Jeanne 
Bennetch, Marlin Edward 
Bering, Anthony K. 
Bering, Joseph Paul 
Bertolet, Grant Russell 
Biely, Alden George 
Billheimer, Charles Stanley 
Blackwood, Charles Alfred 
Blanken, Donald 
Blecker, Ann Marie 
Bomberger, John Christian 
Bontreger, Dorothy Ann 
BovA, NicHOL.\s, Jr. 
Br.^ndt. Robert Allen 
Breidenstine, Elma Jane 
Brown, Harrison Robert 
Burtner, Robert Rauch, Jr. 



C.^GNOLi, William 
Caprio, Ernest, Jr. 
Cardone, George John 
C.ASKEY, Claire Bernice 
Casper, Leonard Alvin 
Caulker, Arthur 
Chupick, Donna M.arie 
Conrad, Grant Junior 
Conr.ad, Lucille Mary 
Conrad, William Floyd 
Cooper, H.arry 
CoRALLO, Joseph Philip 
Creamer, Anthony Bennett, Jr. 
Cummings, Robert F. 
Daubert, James Hartz 
Daughenb.augh, Gertrude Cleo 
D.AUGHERTY, Robert Mowry 
Dexter, Donald Woodrow 
DeYoung, Leonard John 
Doering, Mona Lee 
Donelon, Frederick 
Douglass, Francis Robert 
Dow, Earl Leland 
Dressler, Glori.'K Mae 
DuNDORE, D.^vid Samuel 
Dunkle, Lee Charles 
Dutweiler, Jay Neil 
Eck, Ralph Henry, Jr. 
Edwards, Paul Floyd 
Elliott, William Matthew, Jr. 




Elmore, Thomas, Jr. 
Emerich, Edward Frank 
Eschbach, George Albert, Jr. 
Esterline, Marilyn Ruth 
Fake, Elaine Grace 
Fasnacht, Daniel William 
Fazekas, Ronald 
Ferenczy, Arthur John 
Fetter, James Thomas 
Fisher, James Long 



1950 



QLHTTAPAHILLA 



Class of 1952 



Fisher, Meredith Eugene 
Flaherty, Thomas Joseph 
Fossa, Albert 
Fox, Harry Alvin, Jr. 
Fox, Joanne Valerie 
Frantz, Priscilla Evans 
FuNCK, Mary Elizabeth 
Funk, Carl Landis 
Gerhart, Mabel Lucille 
Giachero, John Edward 
Gingrich, Donald Spencer 
Glock, Robert Frederick 
Goldstein, Donald Sheldon 
Greer, Donald Kleva 
Grubb, Roy Aaron 
Guenther, Lawrence Allan 
Hamm, Elmer, Jr. 
Hamor, Ir.a Scott 
Hartman, James Rufus 
Hawk, Richard Vincent 
Heath, Robert J.^mes, Jr. 
Heisler, Curtis D.aniel 
HoFFM.AN, Clara Luella 
Hoffman, Henry Louis 
Hoffman, Lemoyne W.arren 

HOFFSOMMER, RoBERT DuBOIS, Jr. 

Hopple, Jack Kohr 
HoRST, Gene Roy 





Hutchinson, Jeanne DeCon 
Jones, Edwin Marshall 
JoNOvicH, Donald 
Kapp, Marijuette Irene 
Kauffm.\n, R.ay 
Keim, Harry Franklin 
Kendig, James Robert 
Kern, Joseph Kauffman 
Kirchoff, Thomas Frederick 
Kissinger, Harry Philip III 
Knobl, George Martin, Jr. 
Kobylarz, Eugene Fr.ancis 
Kohr, GEORt;E Roy 
Kohr, Gerald R.^y 
Kreider, Daniel W. 
Kreider, Edwin Ulrich 
Kre:s, Ch.arles Harold 
Lambros, Pec;gy Ann 
Langstaff, Donald Rich.ard 
Larkin, Ruth 
L.AYSER, Donald Carl 
Leeds, John Ch.arles 
Lesosky, Lawrence Joseph 
Levin, David 
LiLLEY, Henry Eugene 
Lorenz, Robert Henry 
LowERY, Robert Burtner 
LuTZ, Diana J.ane 



Macut, Sylvester 
Moeckl, Anna 
M.akris, Jerry Spyros 
Malask, Irene 
Manley, Francis Joseph 
M.ANTON, Charles Whittle 
Martin, Jane Louise 
Martzall, Rhesa Fry, Jr. 
McGarry, Don.ald Eugene 
McSurdy, Donald James 
Meals, Donald Ch.arles 
Me.ase, Ch.arles Henry 
Mease, Ger.aldine El.aine 
Melroy, Mardi.a 
Michael, William Bubb 
Miller, H,-\rry Robert 
Miller, Richard Walter 
Miller. William Philip 
Minnich, Kay Virginia 
Monteith, Jack Elmer 
Morris, Alvan Morton 
Moyer, Nancy Mae 
Murphy, Marilyn Ruth 
Murphy, P.aul William 
Murray, Donald James 
Musselman, Thelma Jean 
Myers, Nancy Ann 
Neubert, How.ard Carl 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



78 



1950 



Class of 1952 



NiPE, Melvin Ralph 
NoGLE, Francis Allen 
Orlando, Joan Rose 
O'RouRKE, Edward Joseph 
Ort, Lois Marie 
Ovates, John Andrew 
OxLEY, Joseph 
Pacy, James Steven 
Palazzo, Michael Gilbert 
Palmer, Robert Brewster 
Papp, Michael J. 
Parker, Josef Gilbert 
Patterson, John Nelson 
Paules, Nancy Anne 
Plasket, George Kellum, Jr. 
Porter, Ralph Tyrl's 
Oltck, James Grier 
Qltnn, Thomas Vincent 
Randolph, Diane Marie 
Reber, James Heilman 
Reed, Charles Allen 
Reimert, Dorothea Mildred 
Rhein, Robert Frederick 
RicciARDi, Frank 
Ricedorf, Joan Garber 
Rishel, Earl Clarence 
Roane, Thomas Wesley 
Robinson, Alice Jean 
Rook, Peggy Jean 
Roper, Mary Elizabeth 
RossMAN, Kenneth Eugene 
Sample, Frederick Palmer 
Schadler, William Edward 
Scheie, Dale Lamar 
Schiff, Melvin 
Schirato, Robert John 
ScHOEN, Annette Marilyn 



ScHWANG, Richard Earl 
Sebastian, Joseph Francis 
Sellers, Gerald Alan 
Shaak, Clyde Joseph 
Shaak, Thomas Albert 
Shellenberger, Dale Lindberg 
Shemeta, Joseph John 
Shenk, Marianne 
Sherk, Boyd Russel 
Shonosky, Walter Joseph 
Shreffler, Robert Isiah 
Shumate, Ruth 
Smaltz, Roy George 
Snyder, Sherdell Albert 
Sobolesky, Walter Joseph 
Springer, John William 
Stager, Gloria Virginia 
Stamato, John Anthony 
Stambach, Ruth Marie 
Stambach, Wilma June 
Staneck, Frank Alexander 
Steiner, Paul Norman 
Stewart, Dorothy Marie 
Stewart, Richard Harry 
Strause, Sterling Franklin 
SuPENO, Francis Joseph 
SwANGER, Robert Frederick 
Sweigard, John Irvin 
Tesnar, Edward Frank 
Thatcher, Julia 
Thierwechter, Lee Robert 
Thomas, Jack Herr 
Thompson, Sterling Duane 
Thompson, William Wesley 
ToMiLEN, William 
TosER, Evelyn 
Trostle, Donald Lee 
Trostle, Herbert George 



Uhler, Robert Binner 
Wagner, Virginia Anne 
Walters, Russell Eugene, Jr 
Warfel, Barbara Louise 
Weidenhammer, Janet Lucile 
Wells, Eleanor Lee 
White, Kenneth Jasper 




White, Lois Louise 
WiTMER, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Zaiac, Michael John 
Zangrilli, James Garfield 
Zarker, Dolores Ann 
Zeiders, Elmer Huber 
Ziegler, Erma Elizabeth 
Zimmerman, Richard Ernest 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



THE UNDERSTUDIES 




Though not clean past your youth, hath yet 
some smacl{ of age m you. 

HEHRT IV 



QL'ITTAPAHILLA So 

Class of 195 1 

THE SOPHS 

President William Miller 

Vice-President Charles Garrett 

Secretary Joyce Carpenter 

Treasurer Richard Schiemer 

CLASS ROLL 

Alfieri, Charles Dante Burkholder, Richard 

Allen, Robert Luke Carpenter, Joyce Adele 

Ancell, Howard Charles, George Dickson 

Baer, Harold Richard Cohen, Esther Dorothea 

Balmer, Rufina Fay Coldren, Donald Eugene 

Barrick. Harry Weller Coyle, John William 

Bashore, Beryl Y. Miller Dasher, William 

Batdorf, Harold Christian Daubenspeck, Clement Roy, Jr. 

Bear, Robert Souders Daubert, Donald Arthur 

Beaver, Edwin W. Davey, William Alfred 

Beaver, James William Davis, James Kenneth 

Becker, Floyd Degler, Donald Arnold 

Beddal, John Deiner, Paul William, Jr. 

Beitzel, Donald Calvin DeLong, George Albert 

Blecker, Owen Lynn Dougherty, Dean Rodger 

Blecker, Ray Harry Downey, Paul Lester 

Bomgardner, David Henry Dunkelberger, Florence Josephine 

Booz, Herbert Leeds Eberly, Hugh 

Bothwell, James Richard Edelman, Betty M.ae 

Bower, M.argaret Annett.a Edw.^rds, Je.anne Louise 

Bowman, Robert Elia, Charles Joseph 

Boyd, William Joseph Engle, H.arold Glenn 

Brandt, Mary Ruth Erdley, Anna Frances 

Brightbill, Phyllis A. Esposito, Pascal John 

Brown, Ruth Ann Etzweiler, Sara Anne 

Bruaw, Perry Miller Euston, Guy Junior 

Bryson, Jack J. Evans, Charles Daub 

Burchfield, James Shope Feaster, Robert Keith 



1950 




Fisher, William Paul 
Flocken, Paul Jay 
Fore, Fred Barmont 
Fr.antz, Jean Elaine 
Fried, Louis 

Fuller, Miriam Audrey 
Funk, Clarence Russell 
Garrett, Charles Richard, Jr. 
Gassert, Carolyn Margaret 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Class of 195 1 



Geib, Robert Smith 
Geiselhart, James Michael 
Gerberich, Carl Luther 
Getz, Pierce Allen 
Geyer, George Robert 
Gingrich, Kerry Harlan 
Goldsmith, Bernard Binom 
GoLOFF, Herbert Sol 
Greene, James Lewis 
Grubb, Floyd Henry 
Haeseler, Isabelle Virginia 
Halbert, Margaret Mae 
Hall, Anna Fay 
Hartz, Ann Louise 
Heberlig, Raymond Dale 
Heck, John Wilbur 
Heisey, Harold Glen 
Heller, Elvin Vanlaird 
Heminvvay, Lewis 
HoAK, John Charles 
Hoffer, Marlin Neal 
Hostetter. Ira L., Jr. 
HowARTH, Robert Chadwick 
Huntzinger, Richard Kenneth 
Jauss, David Harold, Jr. 
Johnson, Cynthla McF.adden 



PLEASIi-^iS 




Johnson, Willi.am Conr.^d, Jr. 
Jordan, Stephen Francis 
Kauffman, Paul 
Kauffman, Robert 
Kaylor, Rich.^rd Lee 
Keckler, Bernard LeRoy 
Keller, Miri.am 

KlEHNER, KeRMIT FrEEM.AN 

KiNKEL, De.an Emerson 

KiNSELLA, L.AWRENCE MiCH.'^EL 

Kiscadden, Ch.arles Samuel 

Kline, Richard LeRoy 

Knowlton, Robert Ch.'^ndler, Jr. 

Kohler, W.alter Rich.ard, Jr. 

Kreider, Anna Mae 

Krieg, John William 

Krodel, Ch.arles Henry 

KuRY, Fr.ancis Steven 

L.AUDER, Andrew Ballantyne 

L.AYSER, Ray Allen 

Leeser, Jean Arlene 

Lemon, Willi.am Kemp, III 

Levick, Lewis 

Levinsky, W.alter 

Levitz, Sidney A. 

Light, Allen Herbert 

Light, Kathryn Louise 



Lingle, John B. 
Long, Evelyn J.ane 

LONGENECKER, RoBERT PeIFER 

Loose, Fr.anklin James 
Lukasiewicz, Rich.ard Joseph 
LuKENs, Norm.an Gilbert 
Lutz, N.^ncy J.ane 
Lynn, Dorothe.-^ 
M.^cF.ARL.AND, Helen Ann.a 

M.AGEE, J.^MES THOM.^S 

M.ALZ, Phyllis 
Marks, John Henry 
M.ARKs, Kenneth Is.a.ac 
M.attern, Joan Louise 
McAllister, Margaret Joyce 
McCuTCHEON, Harold Bruce 
McD.aniels, Fr.ank S.amuel 
Meckley, Robert Hoover 
Merriman, William 
Metzger, B.^rb.ar.a Sue 
MiECZKOwsKA, Sophie Barbara 
Miller, David LaVerne 
Miller, Ger.ald D.aniel 
Miller, Robert Kenneth 
Miller, Willi.am Fr.ancis 
MoLLER, Robert Edw.ard 
Moore, Rich.ard Louis 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



82 



Class of 195 1 



MoRicoN'i, Albert Francis 
MoRiNCHiN, Charles Joseph 
MoYER, Horace Franklin 
MoYER, Richard Beaver 
Mrgich, Robert 
Munsell, Fred 
Murphy, Richard William 
Nickel, Frank Abraham, Jr. 
Obediente, Carlos 
O Gorman. Bernard 
Parmer. Larry Arvin 
Patrick. Melvin Eugene 
Peifer, Richard James 
Perry, Lois Kathleen 
Plantz, G.ale Bernard 
Potter, Donald 
Pratt, Gerald Ed\v.-\rd, Jr. 
Raessler, Mark G. 
Rice, R.ay Edward 
RicHwiNE, Chester Leach 
Riihiluoma, Florence Patricia 
RiTNER, George Edward 
Roetenberg, Barnet 
Rojahn, Joseph D. 
Rol.and, Charles Elmer 
Royer, Be.atrice Mae 
Rulewich, Peter Frederick 
Rutherford, Lilli.an Carpenter 
Schiemer, Rich.ard James 
ScHNECK, Clayton, Russell 
Shahmoon, Maryellen Eleanor 
Shanaman, Edith Rom.aine 
Shannon, Patricia Sue 
Sharkey, John 



Shearer, Wilson Augustus 
Shenk, Myrna June 
Shetler, Lois 
Shott, Jean Louise 
Shroyer. Anne Eliz.-\beth 
Shuey, Arlene M.arie 
Shult:. Gerald Leon 
Shultz, Paul Guise 
Shultz, Robert Edward, Jr. 
Shupp, Ger.ald Guistwhite 
Smith, C.^rl Stew.art 
Smith, Herm.^n Edg.ar 
Spangler. Leon P.arker 
St.ambaugh, Lloyd Eugene, Jr. 
Steinberg, Donald Bruce 
Stine, Jeanne Marjorie 
Stubbs, Joseph Merkel 

SwINGHOLM, R.AYMOND J.AMES 

SwoPE, Francene Mary 
Syn.an, Bobbie Leo 
TiLLsoN, Mary Irene 
Trostle, Martin William Alton 
Turner, Michael Peter 
VoGEL, John Edwin 
Wagner, Alice Mary 
W.AGXER, Theodore Eugene 
Wartluft, Mildred Elv.a 
Weaver, Paul Blair, Jr. 
Weaver, Norma Louise 
Werner, George Edward 
Werner, P.atricia Ann 
Wert, Willi.^m Otterbein 
WiLLi.A\is, Ch.arles Spencer 
Wiser, Bruce Duane 



Withers, Ruth El.aine 
Wolf, Ron.ald Wenger 
Wolfe, H.arry W.alter, Jr. 
WoLFSKEiL, Henry Frederick 
Woll, Ne.al Eugene 
WoMER, W.alter Arthur 




Woods. Glenn Herbert 

Ye.atts, Don.ald 

Yeingst, J.AMES Lee 

Zeiders, Don.ald 

Zimmerman, Charles Lindbergh 

Zimmerman, Raymond S., Jr. 



^■; 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1952 FROSH'SOPH 195 1 




-'S'Sft. .,..<..; -*^.- 





OUITTAPAHILLA 84 1950 



ACT THE SECOND 



Much Ado About Toothing 



SCENE IV 



1950 



S.- 



QL'ITTAPAHILLA 



CLIQUES AND CLAQUES 



C6LPHmK']> 










.^ 




I count myself in nothing else so happy. 
As in a soul remembering my good friends. 

RICHARD U 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



86 



Phi Lambda Siema 




President 



.Abba Cohen 



We feu\ ue happy few, ive hand of brothers. 

HEKRT V 



Philo, elder brother of Valley societies, shows unmistakable signs of a rebirth of vigor as it celebrates its 
eighty-third year. This renaissance has been symbolized during the year now ending by the dissolution of 
the old Philokosmian Literary Society in the Greek alphabet soup, to emerge as Phi Lambda Sigma. Shaking 
off Its war-time cobwebs and following in the paths of its honored predecessors of the Literary Society, 
Phi Lambda Sigma has engaged in a year of unwonted activity, heralded by an energetic membership drive 
in October and climaxed by a delightful dmner-dance in March, held jointly with Phil's sister Clio. Philo 
has indeed returned to its old and respected position as a campus leader, thanks to the hard work of its mem- 
bers, old and new, bound together in loyalty to the past and m devotion to the Philo Blue and Gold. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Clionian Literary Society 




President Dorothy Zink 

. . . the counsel that we two have shared, 
The sisters^ vows, the hours that we have spent. 

A MIDSUMMER HIGHTS DREAM 



Clio, observing this spring its scvcnty-sixth anniversary, yields only to Philo in point of age. Though it 
was found necessary to convert Clio Hall into living quarters for six girls this year, because of crowded con- 
ditions in the dormitories, Clio earned on the work ot Minerva, goddess of wisdom, sharing the use ot Philo 
Hall through the generosity ot the brother society. The year's program has been a busy one, indeed, from 
Rush Week through to Commencement. The annual Clio tea, featuring a fashion show, was a special suc- 
cess. Models attractive enough to wring a whistle from the most jaded "wolf" paraded a wide array of 
clothes suitable for a Valley wardrobe. North Hall parlor, scene of the tea, presented a "heavenly" appear- 
ance, what with clouds, candles, angels, and cherubs tor decoration and soft music tor atmosphere. An 
equally delightful Clio-Philo dinner-dance in March proved a grand finale to a splendid year for Clionian 
Literary Society. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Kalo2,etean Literary Society 




... , .,,j 



President Glenn Cousler 

Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried. 
Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel. 



HAMLET 



Kalo, also up in its seventies, is enjoying its middle age with unparalleled vigor. For many years a smaller, 
as well as younger brother of Philo, Kalo has forged well ahead of the latter. A highly successful membership 
campaign in the fall netted Kalo sixty-five new members, carrying the society's roll well over the hundred 
mark and into first place among the societies. As a result Kalo-blue jackets are giving the campus greenery a 
run for the money to see which color is to dominate the scene. Kalo's social season opened early with a gala 
open weekend sponsored jointly with Delphian, of which the highlight was a riotous quiz show in Engle Hall 
and the capstone a very successful hayride. Other activities of the year included smokers, a showing of movies 
of the memorable LVC-Temple game, and several Kalo-Delphian dances. A Kalo-Delphian production of 
Tou Can't Ta}{e It With You and the annual Kalo banquet brought to a close a most successful year. 



So 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Delphian Literary Society 




President Martha Miller 



Soaety, saith the text, \s the happiness of lije. 

LOVE'S LABOUKS LOST 



"Take it away!" The words of the announcer ushered in not only the Kalo-Delphian qui: show but Del- 
phian's mad, glad rush season as well. The program was only the bouncing beginning of a year of divers 
activities for Delphian, including a hike out to Fink's grove, where the freshman girls were treated to an 
evening of fun, food, and frolic m an atmosphere of spicy ghostery, heightened by the eery charm ot the 
traditional candle-floats on the Quittie. A United Nations tea, for which the Delphian waitresses dressed in 
appropriate international costumes, climaxed the rush season. "We're going Delphian," declared an en- 
couraging number of pledges, who were promptly subjected to the suspense and peril of initiation. The play 
and dmner-dance, held jointly with Kalo in the spring, proved the high points of a grand year. Memories of 
those and other events will serve always as reminders ot the fun that members have had as Delphians. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE SECOND 



Much Ado About ?^othing 



SCENE V 



IQ50 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



MORE SPORT 







This sport, well carried, shall he chronicled. 

A MIDSUMMER XIGHTS DREAM 



QUITTAPAHILLA 






DICK FOX 

End Coach 



F 


I 


O 


9 


O 




T 


4 


B 


8 


A 




L 




L 






ROGER ROBINSON 

Assistant Coach 




Dijohnson. Euston, Shaak, Eckenroth, Andy Kerr, Bill Kerr. Robinson 



COACH 
ANDY KERR 

"Dutchmaster". . . is building up the Dutchmen . . . dabbled in a new formation, the "Double T," with 
some success . . . held in high regard by his players . . . knows football backwards and forwards . . . always 
seeking success with new plays . . . patterns much Valley Football after the big colleges . . . overheard at 
practice, quote . . . "Herb toss that pitch out to Henry overhanded, that's the way Tucker does it. What's 
good enough for Earl Blaik is okay for Lebanon Valley" . . . ranks high m the Football world . . . mixes 
with football bigwigs the country over . . . much m demand as a Banquet Speaker . . . the Valley is honored 
to have Andy. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




CO-CAPTAINS 



BILL KEELER -50 



Left Guard . . . Senior . . . The rallying force ot the 
Valley Line ... A serious, determined, capable 
leader . . . played 60 minutes against Scranton. 
Moravian, and Albright . . . defensive standout . . . 
made numerous tackles in opponents backfield. 



Right Tackle 
L. V. Line . 
minute man 



PAUL MATEYAK -jg 

. Senior . . . Bulwarked the staunch 
A spirited, tireless leader ... 60 
. rough and rugged ... a savage 



tackier . . . magnificent defensive play against Western 
Maryland and Juniata. 



THE FLYING DUTCHMEN 



^ a 



« - -.a 



f* o *^ '^ ^ 



<^ 



r^ o 







BOB FISCHER 

End . . . Junior . . . Runnmt; Back Kick-ofF at;amst Western Maryland 
. . . brilliant pass catcher . . . sound blocker . , . terrific against Temple 
and Moravian . . . equally good en ctFense cr defense . . . All-State 
Honorable Mention. 



BOB BOWMAN 

Halfback . . . Junior , . . 2g 1S5 pounds ot determined runner and 

omnipresent defender ... a defensne demon . . . scored iS points 
. . . ran wild against Juniata . . . bruising blocker . . . Co'Captam next 
year. 





BOB SHAAk 

Tackle . . . Junior . . . providing key block for Bob Bowman 
touchdown run against luniata ... a guy with guts, and plenty ot 'em . . 
troubled in early part of season with a bad knee but never gave up . . 
sturdy and dependable . . . plays a rough, tough tackle. 




HANk PiJOHNSON' 
Fullback . . . Junior ... on the move against Hotstra . . . 3,5 . . . the 
best running back at L. V. in many years . . . All-State Honorable 
Mention . . . authored the Valley's stunning upset of Temple with his 
slashing, explosive runs . . . scored 36 points. 




NORM LUKEKS 
26 . . . Center . . . Sophomore . . . leading interference in Moravian 
game . . . Defensive Dynamo . . . rugged line backer . . . blocked punt 
in Upsala game and went 47 yards for a T.D. . . . promising future. 



DALE SHELLENBERGER 
Halfback .Freshman 21 rolling up yardage against Albright 

a svelte little streak who ripped opponents lines to shreds on quick 
oneners . . . can spot the tiniest holes and elude tacklers. 







-•"V .i 



HERB ECKENROTH 
Quarterback . . . Senior ...;•;... Handing-oft to Kess in Juniata 
Game ... He poured the L. V. "T" . . . polished ball hanaler . . . nng- 
iraster in the Valley Aerial Circus . . . passed tor six touchdowns. 




GEORGE ROMAN 
End . . . Junior . . . Catching Pass against Hotstra . . play smasher 
. . . plavs hard, serious tootball . . . never lets down . tine lineman 
... on the receu mg end ot many passes. 




i:i V LI S TON 
Fullback . . . Sophomore - - . 4 yards away trom the V'.illey's Touchdown 

against Temple A shifty, hard lunmrg back . . dangerous once 

through the line ... A slippery-hipped, break-awav, thrill runner. 



TOM QUINN 
Tackle . . . 4; . . . Freshman . . . covering a play in Hotstra game ... a 
rough and tumble fighter . . . should develop into an outstanding lineman 
. . . rough on runners, dumps them hard . . . best when play gets tough. 




BOB HtSS 
Senior. . . Halt jack . . . 20 . . . Running back punt agams: Moravian . . . 
■"Rubberlegs Robert" ... A scrappy Uttlc scrap ot meat who can really 
fly . . . scored jo points ... a real tirebrand . . . performed well on the 
gridiron while being cheered on by daughter Susie. 



WALT GAGE 
Guard . . . Junior . . . ji . . . moving up to throw block against Temple 
. . . adept at kicking points after touchdowns . . . kicked 13 out ot 10 
... a fiery determined lineman . . . hampered by a dislocated shoulder, 
but always gave his best. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



96 



WITH THE DUTCHMEN By BILL FISHER 



TEMPLE TIE 

LOOKING BACK ONE WILL remember longest the Temple game. 
A 7-7 tie - - . Temple Stadium, Friday night, Sept. 24 in Philadelphia . . . 
10,000 people, the largest crowd to witness a Lebanon Valley game in years. 

ANDY KERR had the Dutchmen suped up to their mental and physical 
peak and they exploded with a dazzling display of strength, speed, decep- 
tion and sheer power. 

BOB HESS provided the dramatic spark in the first quarter that sent 
faithful Valley followers into spasms of joy. Late in the period Bob picked 
off a Temple pass, swung down the right sideline, outraced the entire 
Temple team 85 yards for a Valley "touchdown." But he was ruled out- 
of-bounds on the L. V. 3,5. Game movies later showed that he was not 
out-of-bounds. 

The Dutchmen scored after 11 minutes of the second period w^hen 
"LEFTY" EUSTON took a hand-off and swept right end for 12 yards 
and the T.D. He shredded would-be tacklers all the way to the goal line 
as he ]ust made it to the corner of the end zone WALT GAGE kicked 
the extra point. 

Temple scored in the last period when Dijohnson tumbled as he at- 
tempted to kick out of the end zone and the Owls recovered . , . L.V.'s 
scoring drive was engineered by JOE OXLEY, then an unheralded, almost 
unknown freshman quarterback. His pin-point-pegs to BOB FISCHER 
were of the spectacular . . . HANK DiJOHNSON did the heavy work 
for the Dutchmen with his strong, slashing off-tackle smashes and explosive 
end runs . . . We'll never forget it' 

DISMOUNTED 

OUR FIRST HOME GAME, under the lights in Lebanon Stadium, 
was with Mount St. Mary's of Emmitsburg, Md. The Dutchmen packed 
too much all-around power and beat the Mounties. 25-0. 

L.V.'s lightning and thunder backfield combination of BOB HESS and 
HANK DiJOHNSON had too much class for the Mounts as the Valley 
scored twice in the first quarter on a four yard plunge by DiJOHNSON 
and a four yard run on the end of a flat pass by HESS ... In the second 
period BOB FISCHER got a touchdown on a four yard pass from ECKEN- 
ROTH . . . And HESS scored once again in the third quarter on a 28 
yard run over right guard. 

FLYING DUTCHMEN CHAMPIONSHIP 
HOFSTRA WAS NEXT, and what a game' 41-0 Lebanon Valley. 
This game was billed as the "Battle of the Flying Dutchmen" since both 
teams go by the same nickname. It was played at Hempsted, Long Island 
on a warm afternoon before a gathering of 2,000. 

Valley backs ripped through and around the Hofstra line in flamboyant 
fashion . . . Two touchdowns in the first period . . . Both by HESS, the 
first on an 8 yard run on the end of a j2 yard pass from ECKENROTH, 
and the second on a 7 yard dash through center . . . DiJOHNSON ran 
rampant as he piled up 147 yards rushing on 8 attempts . . . Hank scored 
a touchdown in the second period on a j7 yard romp around left end . . . 
BOB BOWMAN tallied on a i yard buck in the third quarter . . . GUY 
EUSTON also scored in the third period on a ij yard jaunt around right 
end . . . And ED TESNAR, frosh center, intercepted a Hofstra pass 
and went j8 yards for the final T.D. , . . WALT GAGE hit for ■; extra 
points . , . Truly a great day for the Dutchmen — Valley variety. 

THOSE RUGGED ROYALS 

AND THEN IT CAME. The mighty football forces of Scranton 
University came to Lebanon on the sunny Saturday afternoon of Oct. 16 
with vengeance in their hearts, remembering the previous year when the 
Dutchmen knocked them out of a bowl game. Before 7,000 Valley faithful 
the Royals unleashed their big guns and boomed for four touchdowns to 
down the Dutchmen, 26-0. 

Scranton presented the most awesome array of footballers seen by the 
Valley all season . . . The Royals line, averaging 210 per man, out-weighed 
the Valley forwards by 25 pounds . . . They were headed by captain 
Len Mozelesky, All-Pennsylvania tackle . . . L.V.'s chances of victory 
were greatly lessened when ECKENROTH suffered a nose injury at the 
start of the game . . . Scranton's backfield was a powerhouse of potent 
pigskinners . . . The Dutchmen will be a long time forgetting the likes of 
Mike DeNoia, Tony Orsini, and Gene Marrazzo, a trio possessed of 
talents galore, 

GREYHOUNDS WHIPPED 

A NIGHT GAME with Moravian was next. The Dutchmen won, 
14-6. Moravian, fortified by Frank Weaver, the Greyhounds ace passer, 
had the better aerial weapons. The Valley, equipped with a spirited, 
staunch line and the running of DiJOHNSON, SHELLENBERGER. and 
RULEWICH, had the better going on the ground. 



DiJOHNSON scored on a 27 yard end run in the first period, and ran 
up over 100 yards rushing . . . JERRY MAKRIS, freshman end, got the 
other T.D. on a 3 yard hook pass from ECKENROTH . . . DALE SHEL- 
LENBERGER, the new Frosh backfield sensation, ripped through the 
Moravian line time and again on quick openers . . . DiJOHNSON was a 
dandy . . . Hank raised hob against the "Hounds" and drew bravos from 
the 3,000 spectators with his strong running ... A grand game to watch 
. . . Spirited, rough and tumble all the way. 

THE MOURNING AFTER 

HOMECOMING DAY— and the traditional game with Albright. 
Perish the memory' 

It was a warm, sunny afternoon and the game attracted 8,000 . . . 
Albright scored in the first quarter on a ji yard pass play . . . DiJOHN- 
SON scored the first L.V. touchdown in the first period on an 8 yard end 
sweep . . The Dutchmen were behind 13,-7 "i the final period when 
GEORGE ROMAN caught an ECKENROTH pass that was good for 
17 yards and a touchdown, and it looked as if the Valley was going to pull 
this one out . . . But on the following kick-off, Johnny Krouse, a lithe 
Albright halfback, took the ball and swirling through the whole Valley 
team went 95 yards and won the game for Albright, 19-13. 

THE DEATH OF A BRAVE INDIAN (Juniata Tribe I 
THE DUTCHMEN WERE ON THE REBOUND when they met 
and decisively defeated the Juniata Indians, 27-8 on a gloomy Saturday 
afternoon in Lebanon Stadium before 2,^00. It was a hard fought game of 
long thrilling runs and spirited, fiery play. 

BOB BOWMAN had a day and came into his own as a runner . . . 
Bob stepped out of his customary role as a blocking back and bolted for 
two touchdowns on runs of 34 and 47 yards ... It was in the third period 
that the Dutchmen really exploded . . . First, ECKENROTH fired a 19 
yard pass to BOB FISCHER who made a leaping over-the-shoulder catch 
in the end-zone . . . The touchdown parade continued when DiJOHNSON 
smashed off-tackle, cut down the right sideline and went 63 yards for a 
T.D. . . . Then BOWMAN boomed again . . . Around left end for 47 
yards and touchdown number four . . . Juniata scored on the last play 
before the half when their highly ballyhooed hack, Mike Dzvonar, went 
89 yards for a touchdown . . . The Indians registered a safety when a 
Valley back was tackled in the end-zone. 

"TERROR" STRICKEN 

WESTERN MARYLAND'S GREEN TERRORS upset the dope 
against the Dutchmen when they defeated the Valley, 13-0 at West- 
minster on a cold rainy Saturday before 3,000. L.V. failed to get going on 
the ground . . . The game turned out to be a dismal affair for the Dutch- 
men. 

PAUL MATEYAK and TOM QU INN stood out head and shoulders 
above any linemen on the field . . . MATEYAK made at least 40% of 
all the tackles . . . QUINN, a freshman who is destined for greater days 
at L.V., was also tremendous on defense 
frosh end, at times shone brilliantly . . . 
afternoon. 

FINIS 

THE END CAME on Saturday Nov 
the Dutchmen downed Upsala, 19-13 before 7,000. NORM LUKENS, 
soph center, and a mighty good one too, scored the winning T.D. when he 
blocked a Viking punt and went 36 yards for the winning tally. 

BOB HESS sprang loose on the year's longest touchdown run; late in 
the first period he rocketed down the middle 64 yards for L.V.'s first 
touchdown . . . HANK DiJOHNSON added to the Valley point pro- 
duction when he sliced 5 yards around left end to tally TD number two 
. . . Upsala came back in the third period and ran for 13 points to tie the 
score . . . Then LUKENS supplied the clincher with his chmactic run on 
the end of a blocked punt. 

THE FINAL FLING 

IN 1948 ANDY KERR'S FLYING DUTCHMEN played before the 
largest L.V. football crowds ever, about 50,000 in nine games . . . The 
price of admission to our home games largely responsible . . . Just 85c per 
pew . . . Great going on the part of the athletic department . . . Frosh 
came up with a terrific pair of tackles m TOM FLAHERTY and TOM 
QUINN . . . WALT GAGE kicked 14 extra points . . . L.V. scored 
146 points to opponents' 92 . . . We'll miss the four seniors — KEELER, 
MATEYAK, ECKENROTH and HESS . . . A great gang of footballers 
. . . Final count — won 5, lost 3, tied 1. 

This, then, is the brief picture. This is the fleeting glimpse, the mem- 
orable events highhghting Lebanon Valley football in '48. 



And PAUL EDWARDS, 
The Marylanders had a good 



20 at East Orange, N. J. when 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Lebanon Valley Bands 







^S:?^ 



:M: 



^-^^^^ 



iSWr if 



%iJ im 




r. 



"^'g/^^f^^ 



dhiM^ lit 




Music with her silver sound. 
With speedy help doth lend redress. 



ROMEO AND JULIET 



Cheerleaders 




My lungs begnz to crow U\e chanticleer. 
AS YOU LIKE IT 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



L 

Club 




Come the three corners of the world in artns. 
And we shall shoc}{ them. 

KIHG JOHH 



Women's Athletic Association 




1 f 



Daughters of the game. 

TROILUS AND CRESSIDA 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




Hockey 1948 

Under their new coach, Mrs. "Jackie" Smith, the women's 
hockey team managed to turn m a very successful season, with a 
record of six wins, one tie, and a single loss. The hilarious post- 
season game between the hockey team and the football team 
resulted in a clear victory by a score ot j to i tor the men. 

To celebrate the close of this victorious season, the hockey 
squad held a banquet at the Green Terrace on December 15. 
The affair was highlighted by the showing of motion pictures 
of the team's exploits. 



Coach Ernestine I.agnes.ak Smith 



Lebanon Valley 
Lebanon Valley 
Lebanon Valley 
Lebanon Vallev 



1948 SCHEDULE 

.4 Harnsburg Hockey Club.. 2 Lebanon Valley. 

. Lock Haven 2 Lebanon Valley. 

. 2 MiUersville 2 Lebanon Valley 

. Q Moravian o Lebanon Vallev 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE SECOND 



Much Ado About Toothing 



SCENE VI 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



MASQUES AND WIGUES 




The pildy, I remember, pleased not the million; 
'twas caviar to the general. 



HAMLET 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Wig and Buckle Club 



f^f^*^. 




President . 



:is Heckn 



The 1948-49 program of Wig and Buckle, hatchery for young actors, actresses, and stage technicians, has 
given Lebanon Valley a year of unusual dramatic activity. In addition to the production of O'Neill's Ah! 
Wilderness m April, the club has offered two recent Broadway hits and a number of one-act plays for special 
occasions. 

It has been interesting to note the recent prominence m Valley dramatic fare of contemporary American 
nostalgic comedy. This trend has been most pleasantly represented in the above-mentioned play of Eugene 
O'Neill and in Ruth Gordon's autobiographical comedy. Tears Ago, produced in Engle Hall m November, 
1948. Both plays are delightful comedies of the Life with Father genre, characterised by gentle satire at the 

expense of the turn-of-the-century era. 
The presentation of the recent Broadway 
romantic comedy hit, John Loves Mary, 
in the spring of 1949, is a further indica- 
tion of the popularity on the campus of 
current plays. 

In a lighter vein were the two one- 
act plays, A QjLiiet Home Wedding and 
The Happy Journey, presented the eve- 
ning of Homecoming. 

Under the leadership of Dr. Struble 
and the club officers and with the co- 
operation of all members. Wig and 
Buckle is proud to record in its annals a 
busy and successful year. 



HOMECOMING CASTS 




QUITTAPAHILLA 




AH! WILDERNESS 



bv Eugene O'T^eil! 



}{in Mil/er, owner ot the Ei'tjunig Globe 

James Murray, }k. 

Essie, his wife Jane Reed 

Arthur, their son George Sanborn 

Richard, their son Ted Keller 

Mildred, their daughter, . Carmela Yannacci 

Toiiiiiiv, their son Robert Eigenbrode 

LJticle Sid, Essie's brother. . , Francis Heckman 

Au7it Lilly, Nat's sister Elaine Heilman 

Dand McConiter, dry-goods merchant .... 

Paul Kauff.m.^n 



Muriel MeCoiiiber, his daughter. . Rl'th Peiefer 

VV'iiit Selb\' Harry Hoffman 

Bclk Katherine Wersen 

.^^ora Dorothea Cohen 

Barte7ider , Albert Moriconi 

Salesniaji Samuel Rutherford 

ProductiDii Manager Peter Barcia 

BusDiess Manager Pascal J Esposito 



Directed bv 
Dr. George Struble and Mrs. R.alph Mease 
April 2j, 1048 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



104 



1950 









YEARS AGO 

bv Ruth Gordon Jones 

M>' Father Paul Kauffman 

Mv Mother Eleanor Wells 

Me Anne Shroyer 

M\' Best Frimd A.J. Robinson 

M>i J^ext Best Friend Donna Chupick 

Fred Whitmarsh, A Beau Paul Murphy 

Mr. Sf^iirrow, Who Owned A Wag07i , . 

Hov.'.ARD KrEIDER 

Mr. Bagley, From the TMCA Raymond Kline 

Miss Glavin, From Out to Brookjine Lois Adams 

Punk, d Cat A Cat 

ProductiO)! Mdjwger J.ames Murray, Jr. 

Business Manager Phyllis Malz 

Directed by Dr. George G. Struble 
November iq, 1948 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Radio Workshop 




President Salvatore Fiorello 

Those . . . that slwU play to you 

Ha^lg m the air a thousand leagues hence. 

HEHRT IV 



The Lebanon Valley radio clab, now in its second year, provides a medium for students interested in 
radio work and offers practical experience in almost all phases ot broadcasting. In cooperation with Station 
WLBR, ""The Voice of Lebanon Valley," the Radio Workshop presents a weekly series ot programs written, 
for the most part, by members and produced under the auspices of the Public Relations Department of the 
college. The difficulties involved in organisation, along with the time and talent problems connected with 
the writing, directing, and acting of radio scripts, have handicapped this young organization, but the Work- 
shop has made a commendable start. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1 06 



1950 




More water glideth b)i the mill 

Than wots the miller of. 

riTUS AHDROKICUS 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



ACT THE THIRD 

Alls Well That Ends Well 




A}' )7'ie, what act 
That roars so loud and thunders in the index. 



HAMLET 



QUITTAPAHILLA io8 



ACT THE THIRD 



Alh Well That Ends Well 



SCENE I 



1950 



QL'ITTAPAHILLA 



Te Deum and Non Nobis 







There's nothing ill can dwell m suth a temple. 



THE TEMPEST 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Religious Activities 



^ 




Valor of the Co/legt" Church 
DR. WILLIAM A. WILT 

members ot the tacultv 



The Bible makes it clear that every Christian must grow 
spiritually and must develop, through formal knowledge and 
rich experience, the skill of living. Lebanon Valley, a Christian 
college, endeavors to provide an atmosphere conducive to such 
growth and development. In order to foster among the student 
body the recognition of their duty to God and society, the college 
has instituted a far-reaching program, designed to secure the most 
effective correlation of spiritual and social activities on the campus. 

The guidance ot this new program is m the hands of many 
people, students and faculty members alike giving of their time 
and talent to further the work. The central figure, however, is 
Dave Gockley, the friendly and helpful Director of Religious 
Activities, whose responsibility it is to see that everything 
■works smoothly. On hand to give counsel and encouragement 
are Dr. Wilt, pastor of the College Church, and the ministerial 
The burden of the actual work, however, is carried by student organizations. 



First in respect to age, sue, and scope are the two Y's. The Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. serve many 
student needs — devotional, charitable, social, intellectual, recreational. Usually the first friend a Freshman 
makes on campus is a Y member, for the combined cabinets are charged with the responsibility of freshman 
orientation. The scope of Y activities is constantly widening; today it includes publication of the "L" Book, 
the Big-Brother, Big-Sister program, maintenance of a Y recreation room, the World Friendship Project, the 
World Student Service Fund drive, the Great Books discussions, teas, hikes, special candlelight services for 
potential members, and many other things. A highlight of the program last fall was the Y retreat held at 
Camp Greble, v.'here the year's agenda was outlined and plans laid for Freshman Week. 

At this fall retreat it was decided by the Y cabinets that the campus worship program was m need of 
reorganization. By the new plan, Ethel Mae Beam was appointed general chairman of the Campus Worship 
Committee, and under her direction there were set up three sub-committees, to plan Sunday evening Vespers, 
Wednesday evening Fellowship, and the special pre-holiday dawn services. Of these sub-committees the 
chairmen were, respectively, Joanne Kessler (ist semester) and Betty Bakley (2nd semester), Betty Miller, 
and Robert Stolte. Student participation is the distinctive feature of all services, though from time to time 
guest speakers are invited. 

Another unit of the Y organization is the Freshman Y cabinet, whose chief function is to assist m arrange- 
ments for Heart Sister Week, Mothers" Weekend, and Dads' Day. 

The part of the worship program with which the student body as a whole is most familiar is, of course, 
the weekly chapel service in the College Church. The speakers at these services are faculty and guest min- 
isters. The Lebanon Valley Glee Club regularly provides special music for the chapel programs, and occa- 
sionally the devotions are conducted by students. 



Y. M. C. A. Cabinet 

Joseph Yeakel 



President . 




Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

President Erma Gainor 



Life Work Recruits 

President ." Roger Keech 




Religious Coordinating Council 

President • Russel Getz 



Ql'ITTAPAHILLA 



Religious Activities 

The Religious Coordinating Council has two distinct functions to pertorm. the coordination of all campus religious 
activities and the sponsorship of Religious Emphasis Week. The latter is an annual obsen,-ance which during its four 
years of existence has come to occupy an important place in campus religious life. Under the direction of Student 
Chairman, Russel Get:, and the Coordinating Council, the two hundred student committee members prepared a com- 
prehensive program this year, with special speakers, chapel sen.'ices, classroom lectures, dormitory discussion groups, 
special seminars, personal interviews, meditation hours, luncheons and banquets — all devoted to the stimulation of 
student interest and activity in religion. Religious Emphasis Week, held this term m December. 1048, featured as 
guest speakers Dr. Frank Adler, of Ocean City, N. J., Dr. William R. Barnhart, of Hood College, and Mr. Robert 
James, regional secretary ot the Student Christian Movement. The addresses of these leaders and all of the week's 
activities were centered about the following theme: "We Woidd Be Buildmg Better Personal Foundations, Better Social 
Relations, a Better World Order." 

Those students who are deeply interested in religious work and plan to devote their lives to Christian service as 
ministers, missionaries, or lay workers in the church are banded together in another campus organization, the Life 
Work Recruits. It is the aim of this group to prepare themselves for Christian leadership, chiefly by participating m 
the Deputation Program. Each week Recruits give their services on request to neighborhood churches as preachers, 
Sunday-school teachers, song-leaders, or soloists. Another Life Work Recruit project is the helping of those m need. 
This past Christmas a Christmas program and treats were presented by the Recruits to the residents of the Lebanon 
County Home and a needy Lebanon family was enabled to enjoy a cheery Christmas through the efforts of the Recruits 
in selhng LVC scar\'es and ties. A further service of the organization is to give to all college students living m Annville 
copies of the daily devotional guide. "The Upper Room," six times during the year. 

The Student World Friendship Project is designed to support a student missionary in the foreign field. At present 
this student missionar>' is Miss Florence Barnhart, a graduate of Lebanon Valley, class of '47. now serving in Sierra 
Leone. 

Still another service project to which the Valley lends its support is the World Student Service Fund drive, con- 
ducted annually under Y auspices. WSSF at Lebanon Valley raised about one hundred seventy-five dollars this past year 
through the sale of football badges and through the lively County Fair conducted in the Ad Building one evening m 
November. The money so raised has been forwarded to the fund to be distributed abroad to provide needy students 
with food, clothing, medical care, and books. 

This record of accomplishment in all lines of religious endeavor is evidence ot careful planning and growing interest. 
Our religious program is not moving spectacularly, but it is moving. 




QUITTAPAHILLA 114 1950 



ACT THE THIRD 



Air5 Well That Ends Well 



SCENE II 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



PLAY BILLS 




They are the abstracts and brief chroiucles of the time. 



HAMLET 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



La Vie Collegienne 

Editor George Ely 

Business Manager John Marshall 

Ld Vie. like many another campus organization, has been faced during the last few years with the problems of in- 
creased demand and reduced supply. The task of gathering a staff of students with time as well as talent to give to a 
campus newspaper has posed difficulties which have not yet been solved. 

Despite these handicaps. La Vie's journalists have struck out along new paths, introducing to the paper innovations 
in line with modern journalistic trends. Among these were typographical streamlining and the use of by-lines with all 
feature articles and columns. A reduction in page sue has facilitated the return to weekly publication. 

Thus La Vie Collegienne carries out its stated aims of entertaining and informing the Valley student body and of 
providing Its selected staff with practical training in management and writing. 



Tidings do I brnig and lucl{y joys, 

A7id golden times and happy news of price. 

HEXRT IV 




Ql'ITTAPAHILLA 




This IS the short and the long 
of it. 

MERRY WIVES 
OF W1>IDS0R 



1950 QLuttapahilla 

Editor David H. Wallace 

Business Mandger Raymond A. Kline 

An ever-recurnng theme of Valley life is the Quittapahilla. The 
freshman will, perhaps, first learn to know it as a chummy little stream 
winding about AnnviUe. along whose willow-shaded banks fishermen 
and lovers stroll and picnickers spread their festive board. In her rolling 
bosom, too. many a Frosh — yes. and even a few Sophs — have had more 
than their spirits dampened by the loss of a tug-o-war. 

To a Valleyite. however, there is another significance m the name 
"Quittapahilla"' hterar\' rather than literal, for under that title appears 
every spring the yearbook ot Lebanon Valley College. Prepared by a 
statf drawn from the junior class, under the direction of an editor and 
a business manager elected by their classmates at the close of the sopho- 
more year, the QUITTAPAHILLA is a project of the juniors, by the 
juniors, tor the entire student body of Lebanon Valley. The SJ,UITTA- 
PAHILLA (or SlUITTIE. as it is called nine times out of ten) is one of 
the most active of campus activities; many take part in its actual creation, 
all take pleasure in it as recreation. 




QUITTAPAHILLA iiS 1950 



ACT THE THIRD 



All's Well That Ends Well 



SCENE III 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



STILL MORE SPORT 




^.j-^" 



Pleasure and action ma}{e the hours seein short. 

OTHELLO 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




^t row : Bob Hess, Hank Di Johnson, Floyd Becker, Buzz Levick, Mike Zaiac. 
Second row Mike CnncoU. Mgr., Chuck Zimmerman, Bill Brunner, Ray Klme. 



■ Kinsclla, Ralph Me; 



Varsity Basketball 1948-49 




WON 10 



LOST 8 



L V 
L \\ 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L. V^ 
L, V. 
L^ V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 
L, V. 
L. V. 
L, V. 
L, V. 
L. V. 
L. V. 



6t Western Maryland 44 

7S Juniata 54 

42 Lafayette 71 

73 Scranton 64 

^9 Scranton 80 

79 Elizabethtown 69 

61 Moravian 73 

47 Lincoln 64 

65 Baltimore 60 

45 Lincoln 61 

41 Albright 59 

86 Susquehanna 73 

88 Juniata 78 

84 Moravian 73 

?9 Elizabethtown 60 

, 59 Albright 50 

84 F. &?M 53 

57 Upsala 72 



Codch, Ralph Mease 



MIDDLE ATLANTIC CONFERENCE TOURNAMENT 

60 Penna. Military 48 

- 67 Gettysburg 77 

65 Wagner 73 



L. V. 
L. V. 
L. v.. 





FLOYD BECKER . . . forward . . . 
junior . . . passing against Lafayette . . . 
the Valley Virtuoso . . . pride and ioy 
ot all home tans with his slick ball 
handling and clever passing . . . scored 
266 points for an average ot 15 per game 
. . . sure set shot ... hit double num 
bers 16 times ... a spectacular crowd 
pleaser. 



LARRY KINSELLA . . . forward . . . 
sojihomore . . . driving in tor lay up 
shot against Juniata . . . caught tire 
after first five games and averaged nearly 
16 points for remainder of season . . . 
scored 2J0 points . . . plenty ot drive 
. . . hits on one handed stabs. 



CHUCK ZIMMERMAN . . . forward 
. . . sophomore . . . one handed push 
shot against Moravian . . . shoots 
strictly off the right hand . . . scored 86 
points . . . best game ot the year against 
Eluabethtown when he scored 16 points 
. . . consistent, able all-round player 
. . . should "go" next season. 



BILL BRUNNER . . . guard . . 
senior. . . getting off one hander against 
Juniata . . . L. V."s blond battler be- 
neath the hoards . . . scored in every 
game . . . 147 for season ... 20 against 
Scranton . . . brother act when Dutch- 
men played E-town . . . best shot one 
handed push-up . . . accurate toul 
shooter . . . good on offense and defense. 



HANK DijOHNSON . . . guard . . . 
lunior . . . taking in Albright game . . 
the "Bull of the Boards" . . . masterful 
taking drew "ohs" and "ahs" from all 
Valley spectators . . . handles ball with 
plenty of zip . . . scored g6 points . . . 
worked well under basket . . . good floor 
man . . . teamed with Becker to put on 
spectacular show. 



BOB HESS . . . guard . . . senior . . . 
throwing up one hander in Lafayette 
game . . . fast, agressive ball hawk . . . 
held Valley de.ense together ... 59 
points . . . had no peer as a foul shooter 
. . . usually drew assignment ot holding 
down opponents' scoring ace . . . turned 
in a masterpiece against Albright at 
Lebanon. 








BUZZ LEVICK . . . forward . . . lun- 
lor . . . passing in F. ^ M. game . . . 
good reserve . . . went in the game when 
Becker came out and could usually be 
counted on for some points . . . good 
shot from outside and could also click 
under the basket. 



RAY KLINE . . . center . . . junior 
. . . rebounding against Lincoln . . . 
"Rebel Ray" . . . best under the boards 
. . . scored iji points . . . big night 
against Baltimore when he poured in rS 
. . . scored in every game . . . team 
morale man ... his height a factor in 
manv Vallev victories 



RED LANGSTAFF . . . center . . 
freshman . . . one handed jump shot 
against Susquehanna . . . carrot -topped 
court wizard from Jersey . . . began 
season with J. V.'s but soon showed 
style and class to merit varsity role . . . 
smooth, clever ball handler . . . variet>' 
of slick shots. 



JACK HOAK . . . sophomore . . . 
guard . . . shooting in Juniata game . . . 
reliable reserve . . . can shoot best on 
sets from the outside . . . can also drive 
on the inside for one handed stick-ups 
. . . got seasoning this year for future 
Valley teams. 



MIKE ZAJAC 



freshman 



ward 

Maryland 
promise . 
sity games 
J. V.-s . . 
hanna . . 
also hook 'em in 
in the future. 



dribbling against Western 
. . a little lei^ty with a lotta 

scored 15 points in 6 var- 
. . showed strong with the 

29 points against Susque- 

dead one-hander . . . can 

keep an eve on him 



DON GREER . . . guard . . . freshman 
. . . dribbling against Moravian J. V.'s 
. . . one of the sparks that fired this 
season's Junior Varsity squad . . . ex- 
ceptional spring in legs . . . shoots 'em 
up lefthanded . . . good hook shot from 
the left side ... a future comer. 






QUITTAPAHILLA 




Junior Varsity 1948 -49 



WON 7 



LOST 8 



L. \' 59 Western MarvlanJ 3S 

L. V 50 Hhjj. Penn State Center 37 

L, V 44 Scranton 46 

L. V 56 Scranton 65 

L. V J7 Eli:ahethtown so 

L. V 5 J Moravian J5 

L.V 71 Hershey Junior College 39 

L. V 44 Hershey Junior College . . . 4S 

L. V 35 Albright 48 

L.V 70 Susquehanna ^2 

L.V 45 Moravian 57 

L.V 52 Eliiabethtown S9 

L. V 45 Aronght 58 

L.V 37 F. &>M 46 

L. V 45 Upsala 43 




Coach, Roger Robinson 




K7i«Img, ie/t to right : Elaine Fake, Betty Edelman, E.rh ■ V.. ' I i ; W'civer, Betty Jean Slifer, Dorothy Witmer. 

Srandmg: Mrs. Smith, Louise Light. Jeanne Hutchinson. Eh^aLvth Rupcr. Joyce McAlhster. Dolores Zarker, Helen MacFarland. 



Women s Varsity Basketball 



L.V.C 

4 Moravian , . , . 

i8 MiUersviUe. . 

52 Gettysburg . . . 

4^ Lock Haven . . 

25 Shippenshurs . 

28 MillersviUe \ 



OPP. 



LAC OPP. 

5 2 Moravian . . 21 

25 Albright j9 

23 Shippensburg 37 

44 Elizabeth town ji 

29 Penn Hall 41 

2S Elirabethtown 29 



Women s Junior Varsity Basketball 



L.V.C. OPP 

28 MiUersviUe 2] 

37 Lock Haven 

43 MiUersviUe 



29 



LV.C. 

41 Albright, . . 

2C Shippensbur 



OPP. 

...48 



31 



Kiiceli.ig, Ifji to nghi Wilma Stambach, Dorothy Bontreger, Jean Leeser, Loib Ort, Elaine Barrnn, Dorothy Rcimert. 
Stii.idi.ig, kji to right Mrs Smith, Jane Lut:, Ruth Stambach, Adele Begg, Joan Orlando, Claire Casky, Diane Randolph, Ethel Mac 




s 
p 
o 

R 
T 




S 
H 
O 
R 
T 



The New Athletic FielJ 




QUITTAPAHILLA 126 1950 



ACT THE THIRD 



Alls Well That Ends Well 



SCENE IV 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



THE PLAYERS 




All the u'orld's a stage, and all the me7i and women merely players. 

AS rOU LIKE IT 



LIBERAL 
ARTS 




Mrs. Robert C. Fagan 
Spanish and French 




Clara Chassell Cooper 
Psychology 



Carl Y. Ehrhart 
Philosophy 



Robert C. Fagan 
Psychology 




Chester A. Feig 
Education 




Frances T. Fields 
Spanish 




FACULTY 






FACULTY 



-^ 



LouELLA U. Frank 
French 





Florence E. Houtz 
English 



Helene Kostruba 
Ri^ssuin 




Maud P. Lauchlin 
Political Science and Sociology 



Mari L. Huth 
German 




Lena L. Lietzau 
German 



LIBERAL 
ARTS 






LIBERAL 
ARTS 






^. 



Ralph Shay 
History 



Frederic K. Miller 
History 



H. H. Shenk 
History and Political Science 




Mrs. F. K. Miller 
Hi5torv 



Bruce C. Souders 
English 




G. A. Richie 
Religion and GreeX 



FACULTY 




Stella J. Stevenson 
French and Spanish 



FACULTY 




Alvin H. M. Stoxecipher 
Grcely and Latin 



"U^" V 



-5a^ 




George G. Struble 
£)igli.sh 



Paul A. W. Wallace 
Enghxh 




LIBERAL 
ARTS 



Marvin E. Wolfgang 
Sociology 



■^\ * 



Liberal 
Arts 



BARBARA CHRISTIANSON . . . Lebanon 
. . . honor student . . . light-haired model of 
efEciency . . . member of the Green Blotter 
Club . . . sunny disposition . . . certain to be 
a very successful English teacher. 





ETHEL MAE BEAM . . . "Beamie" . . . 
Washington, D. C. . . . affability plus . . . 
active religious worker on campus . . . helpful 
. . . hard worker . . . future missionary . . . 
former Waynesboro resident . . . "What can 
I do for you. honey?" 



CARL E. COPE . . . "Jeff" . . . proud 
father of two . . . veteran hawker at Hershey 
Sport's Arena . . . advocates married life 
. . . Palmyra's Lefty Grove . . . will be a 
teacher. 



ROBERT LEE BOMGARDNER . . . usu- 
ally a broad grin . . . another of the myriad 
host from Palmyra . . . most interesting and 
absorbing hobby; women . . . we wonder? 
. . . swell fellow, well-liked ... if personality 
IS indicative of success, he's "m" . . . has left 
the Valley for the Air Force. 



HENRY A. DiJOHNSON . . .Lebanon. . . 
"Hank" . . . bull-dosing backfield man . . . 
circumfusive grin . . . all-round athlete 
. . . magnetic personality . . . the body 
beautiful . . . persevering student . . . Foot- 
ball, Baseball, Basketball. 









JEANNE BOZARTH . . . Cressona's fair- 
haired child of nature . . . rare combination 
of beauty, brains, and talent . . . Classic 
remark: "I wish I didn't have sex!" . . . dev- 
astating smile . . . aspires to creative writing 
career . . . "Sketches by Boz." 



TERESA 
"Betty" . 
burg . . . 
note-taker 
and board. 



ELIZABETH DOLAN . . . 
. . diligent commuter from Harris- 
air of efficiency . . . voluminous 
. . . should pay the library room 




ROBERT D. DOYLE . . . Lemoyne . . . 
blond hoy with the short hair-cut . . . pros- 
pective Enghsh teacher . . . modest grin 
. . . Cheerleader, Glee Club, YMCA Cabi- 
net. 



Class of 
1950 






GEORGE ELY. JR. . . ."Pete". . . La Vie's 
innovating editor . . . absent minded . . . 
his best triend. his vvite . . . the retort proper 
. . . small "d" democrat trom Lebanon. 



DOUGLAS R. EARICH . . . Bethlehem 
. . . "Doug" . . . future courtroom orator 
. . . rare blend ot musician and politician . . . 
all-out Democrat . . . stentorian voice . . . 
high-speed notctaker . . . hobby; outwitting 
Maud. 



ROBERT N. ENGLEHART . . . Harris- 
burg . . . "Doc" . . . takes psych courses 
seriously . . . meticulous . . . diligent student 
. . . numerous social calls in men's dorm . . . 
man of many moods . . . hopes to do per- 
sonnel work. 



C. ROBERT EIGENBRODE . . . Braddock 
Heights. Md. . . . "Little Ike" . . . excep- 
tional mind . . . diligent student . . . en- 
gaging smile . . . e.\pects to do graduate work 
in sociology. 



JANET EPPLEY . . . "Jan" . . . Mech- 
anicsburg . . . active, friendly and helpful 
. . . sweet smile . . . late snacks . . . future 
French teacher . . . even tempered . . . hard 
worker . . . nice to know. 



R. FRANCIS EIGENBRODE . . . Braddock 
Heights. Md. . . . "Ike" . . . has his own 
definite ideas on coaching . . . the larger of 
the Eigenbrode duo . . . plans a teaching or 
business career . . . manager of football team. 




^«B^ 



y 



ALEX J. FEHR . . . awesome intellect . . . 
growing family in Lebanon . . . labor's 
spokesman . . . loves to argue . . . regional 
chairman of ICG . . . resembles Edward 
Arnold . . . sees a teaching or writing career. 



R. GRACE GERHART . . . tail, taciturn 
brunette . . . industrious . . . lives in the 
library . . . address mail : Jonestown . . . 
career along librarian or teaching lines. 







WILLIAM D. FERGUSON . . . "Shmgle- 
house Bill" . . . determined student . . . keen 
mind . . . "the deerslayer" . . . sports analyst 
. . . "Johnny One-note" . . . future legal 
eagle. 



JAMES E. GREGG . . . Harrisburg . . . 
another Hex maniac . . . affection divided 
between his camera and his Plymouth . . . 
knows how to make a buck . . . loud socks 
. . . graduate work and teaching. 





WILLIAM G. FISHER . . . Lemoyne . . . 
scholarly appearance . . . LVC's Hex fiend 
. . . constant stream of sports jargon . . . 
checkerboard shirt . . . letters to he editor. 



GLENN E. GRUBER , . . Rilmynte . , . 
blond bomber of the axe league , , , pinochle 
and bridge major , , , Peck's bad boy , , , 
plans to enter teaching profession , , , "What 
Buick?" 





WALTER G, GAGE , , , "Walt" , . . out- 
standing football star from Rahway, N, J, 
, . , strong and sometimes silent . , , phone 
calls to South Hall , , , Senator with the 
turned-up collars , , . the happy outfielder. 



MARIAN FERN HACKMAN , , , Ober- 
Im , , , Smiling English major , , , past and 
future teacher . , , happiest at the organ , , , 
romantic about the Romantic Movement , , , 
one of Gladys', girls , , , "I'm the worrying 
type." 








MARY LOUISE JAGNOW . . . Lebanon 
. . . "Wcczie" . . . well-dressed ... re- 
served?^ . . . visits day students" room once 
a month . . . light of Frank's (opposite) life 
. . . "What's the date ot the Louisiana 
Purchase?"" 



HOCKLEY . . . Lebanonian 
. . aspires to teach historv' . . . 



FRANK W 

. . .-Hank"" 

well-groomed ... on the alert for fun . . . 

attractive quaUties . . . popular . . . knows his 

way around women. 



S!^^ 




LILLLAN KELLER . . . Argyles and hand 
knit sweaters . . . athletic outdoor girl . . . 
long, long tresses . . . frank . . . midnight 
snacks . . . funny "Bunnie"" . . . language 
major from Harrisburg . . . "You should see 
all the German I have to do!"" 



RUSSEL L. HOFFMAN . . . Halifax . . . 
"I think ril take a philosophy course"" . . . 
sincere . . . hard working . . . preparing tor 
Bonebrake Seminary. 





JOHN \V. KENNEDY . . . "Johnny"" . . . 
altruistic . . . tall . . . quiet manner . . . 
basketball enthusiast . . . wants to exchange 
student"s status for that of the teacher . . . 
another Harnsburger. 



ELMER H. HORST . . . Avon . . . Flying 
Dutchman on a motor-bike . . . conscientious 
Christian Youth worker . . . Deitsch flavor 
... "I must studv." 




ANNA L. KETTERLNG . . . Warm smile 
for everybody . . . keen commuter from 
Palmyra destined for foreign mission field. 



ROBERT C. HOWARD . . . Massepequa, 
N. Y. . . .the Senator with the Van Johnson 
Look . . . History major . . . coach . . . red 
haired waiter . . . cheerful . . . football 
enthusiast . . . what a smile! 




^ 



SrOs. 





RAYMOND A. KLINE . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Tmy"" . . . belies the title . . . grin from 
here to Lebanon home ... a very creditable 
addition to the roster of future politicians. 



KENNETH KIRKPATRICK . . . Upper 
Darby . . . leather-lunged arguments with 
roommate . . . clitf-dweller . . . inveterate 
prankster ... his room a haven for itinerant 
bull sessions. 



JEAN MARIE KOSTENBAUDER . . . 
Aristes . . . "Kosty" . . . active in campus 
religious activities . . . individualistic per- 
sonality . . . West Hall standby . . . quiet 
disposition . . . post graduate plans include 
religion and pedagogy. 



DOROTHY KLINE . . . Lambertville, N. J. 
. . . "Dottic" . . . reparteeser . . . pert bru- 
nette . . . amiable . . . psychology her big 
interest . . . extremely nubile . . . fluent 
conversationahst . . . Marian's pal. 




Liberal 
Arts 




French 
Club 



President 

Helen Nicoll 




Glass of 
1950 



RUTH ARLENE KRAMER . . . "Ruthic" 
. . . Capital City cutie . . . she of the giggle 
, , . trips over anything . . . hockey and 
basketball . . . confused but happy . . . psych 
major ... 4 year duet with "Betts" . . . 
bright eves . . . "Oh. I don't know what to 
do""" 



BERNARD MAZ20N1 . . . ■■Bernie" . . . 
Conscientious Rexmont commuter . . . still 
single . . . education major with a desire to 
teach in Texas . . . yearns to travel. 



GEORGE P. MAYHOFFER . . . crew cut 
. . . big. hearty laugh . . . Lebanon family 
man . . . interested m athletics . . . fre- 
quently seen playing cards m Washington 
Hall . . . enjoys a good old "bull" session, 
determined to be a history teacher. 



DONALD MILLER . . . Methodist minis- 
ter from Hummelstown . . . family man . . . 
unusual ping-pong style . . . genial disposi- 
tion . . . will move on from here to seminarv. 




\ 




German 
Club 



President 

Charles Kisc.=idden 




JIM MURRAY. JR. . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Irish" . . . square-shouldered, pipe-smoking 
Junior Class president . . . easy self-confidence 
. . . resonant voice ... "I affect them all that 
way" . . . hopes for newspaper or radio work. 



JAMES E. PARKER . . . Harnsburg . . . 
boisterous humor . . . devotee of flannel sport 
shirts and moccasin-type shoes . . . history 
puts him to sleep days, keeps him awake nights. 




HELEN NICOLL . . . Harnsburg . . . 
"Nicky" . . . interested m teaching French 
. . . delightfully witty . . . affable and pleas- 
ant to talk with . . . glorious soprano . . . 
divers other talents. 



JAMES W. PARSONS . . . Harnsburg 
inteUigentsia . . . subtle sense of humor . . . 
journalistic aspirations . . . English authority 
. . . father . . . pipe smoker . . . worthy 
comments . . . AND unlimited cuts ! 






JOHN R. NILAN . . . Recent importation 
from Harnsburg area . . . known as "John- 
meeee" . . . tall and lean . . . well-trimmed 
mustache . . . discusses current affairs know- 
ingly . . . intends to do post-grad work in 
international law and diplomacy . . . wife 
from "Down Under." 



RALPH R. ROBERTS, JR. . . . engrossed 
with neural patterns, curves of learning, et al 
. . . buzzes between Hummelstown and 
Annville . . . wild blue yonder boy . . . 
plans indefinite. 




^ 




J. DONALD PAINE . . . Lebanon . . . 
father a pain-kiUer. J. Donald just another 
Paine . . . socially active on the campus . . . 
devotee of history and philosophy . . . akvays 
on the go . . .a whirlwind of energy and 
enthusiasm . . . constant visitor to the lib- 
rary ... a distaste for idling. 



HERBERT A. ROWE . . . Williamstown . . . 
"Herb" . . . note of high seriousness . . . 
avid nimrod . . . pro-labor . . . wants to get 
into foreign branch of civil servic-e. 





ROBERT THOMPSON . . . Williamstown 
. . . "Tom" . . . man with a purpose . . . 
one of those with marital obUgations . . . 
thoughtful . . . determined student . . . 
SoePsyeh major looking to government work. 



MONROE SHEARER . . . Spring Grove 
. . . married to former LVC coed . . . deter 
mined jaw belies his curlv hair . . . history 
paves the way to" the seminary. 




CHARLES TICE . . . Annville . . . Owns 
a blue Plymouth and a brown mustache . . . 
disagrees with Miss Hout: on Shakespearean 
interpretations . . . married . . . plans to 
teach history. 



HERMAN SIEGEL . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Herm" . . . capable athlete . . . soft-speak- 
ing . . . that Latin charm . . . future history 
teacher . . . Football, Baseball. 




V fl 




■^^ 



DAVID H. WALLACE . . . Annville . . . 
scholarly son of a scholar . . . Quittie's 
efficient editor . . . tnendly dignity . . . 
Dean's List perennial . . . tond of his pun 
. . . future historian. 



HcnVARD H. SMITH . . . Lebanon . . . 
"How" . . . jolly Lebanonian . . . hearty 
laugh . . . already an active minister . . . 
married . . . historian . . . contemplates 
seminary sojourn. 



CHARLES B. WEBER . . . "Contemplative 
Bill" . . . long stares in philosophy . . . likes 
discussions . . . lives in Lebanon during 
school . . . has a quaint Southern accent . . . 
religion his intended career. 



RICHARD W. SWARTZ . . . Linglestown 
. . . "Dick" . . . provocative laugh . . . 
Psych and Dot his majors . . . expects to con- 
tinue training at Seminary. 



--i^ 





Pi Gamma 
Mu 



President 

Paul Mateyak 



VIVIAN J. WERNER . . . Sparkling blue 
eyes . . . "Pee-wee" from Palmyra . . . 
conscientious and quiet . . . Sociology major 
with grad plans . . . faithful La Vie staff 
member ... "I have sooo much to do." 



EDGAR D. WERT . . . Millersburg . . . 
"Ed" . . . faithful visitor of West Hall . . . 
studious . . . "Sweet Lorraine" . . . solid 
pillar of Life Work Recruits . . . will coiv 
tinue studies at seminary. 





Psychology f^ 
Club 



President 

Ronald B.aker 




Political 

Science 

Club 



President 

Raymond Kline 






HAROLD C. WOLFE . . . "Squirrel'- . . . 
A wolf in Dodge's clothing ... "I believe in 
driving the big cars" . . . dead-eye for Mvers- 
town Legion team. 



PAUL M. YOUSE . . . Lebanon . . . "Bud" 
.^ . . hardly a noisy lad . . . smile radiates 
friendliness . . . barely perceptible bi-labial 
V's . . . preparing to enter the ministry . . . 
discerning dresser. 




Green 

Blotter 

Club 



President 

RoN.\LD B.AKER 



Alexander Crawford 
Voice 



MUSIC 



Margaret Barthel 

Baxtresser 

Fiano 






D. Clark Carmean 
Music Education 




WiLLLAM H. FaIRLAMB, Jr. 

Piano 



Ruth Engle Bender 

PkJIlO 



W, Merl Freeland 
Piano 



R. Porter Campbell 
Organ 





FACULTY 






MUSIC 



Mary E. Gillespie 

Director of 

Conservatory of Music 



FACULTY 




Harold Malsh 
VioJni 



Elizabeth E. Kaho 
Theory and Piano 



Edward P. Rutledge 

Director of 
Musical Organizations 



Neville Landor 
Voice 



Frank E. Stachow 
Theory and Woodwinds 



Reynaldo Rovers 
Voice 





h 





MUSIC 



JOSEPH G. DICKERSON . . . Binghamton, 
N. y. . . . Empire State product . . . bebop 
bug . . . well-liked . . . "Let's face it, man!" 
. . . holds a distinguished track record . . . 
really a good "Joe." 




Jg^ 





GEORGE D. ALWOOD . . . Red Lion . . . 
"Bud" . . . beats a mean drum . . . roguish 
pleasantry . . . conserv artist . . . straight- 
forward and sincere . . . ex-gravel agitator 
. . . plans to follow a musical career. 



DORIS L. ECKERT . . . Remholds . . . 
"Don" . . . glorious soprano voice . . . full 
of vim. vigor, and vitality ... an unfailing 
friend . . . life of the party. 



FREDERICK W. BROWN . . . Wyoming, 
Del. . . . "Brownie" . . . Conserv's number 
one bassoonist ... a great guy with person- 
ality plus . . . snappy dresser . . . quiet 
and affable. 



MARY C. EDELMAN . . . Hagerstown, 
Md. . . . Miss Kaho's able assistant . . . 
dignified . . . "Let there be Light" . . . lovely 
shining tresses . . . amiable . . . extremely 
meticulous . . . knitting enthusiast. 





JOSEPH CAMPANELLA . . . "Smily" . . . 
poor man's Pagliacci . . . thinks there's no 
place like home (York) . . . friendly . . . 
operates a Columbia taxi service . . . smooth 
dancer . . . "Can you prove it?" 



LEROY EVANS . . . "Frank" ... his 
Waterloo: stop-signs . . . Steelton product 
. . . dreams of a perpetual vacation . ..Dance 
Band pianist. Symphony bassoonist. 



4- 




ROBERTH. FISHER. JR. . . . Annville . . . 
violinist superb . . . keenly interested in his 
work . . . cooperative . . . Conserv's con- 
certmastcr . . . ever-present humor . . . 
practice makes perfect . . . smooth swimmer. 



Class of 
1950 



CARL GIBSON . . . pmg • pong star . . . 
sports minded . . . Herald Trumpeteer from 
Fleetwood ... a Barney Oletield when 
driving his black Ford . . . even temperament 
. . . dance bandman . . . radio mystery de- 
votee. 



W. HARRY FORBES . . . Chambersburg 
. . . "Pete" . . . preparing tor graduate work 
ill music . . . hard-working student . . . 
amiable . . . Glee Club tenor . . . jovial . . . 
transferee from Wilson . . . every desk has 
one — joker, that is. 



t. 





EVELYN M HABECKER . . . Hershey 
.... "Ev" . . . multitude of friends . . , 
cheerful ... a stunning blonde ... an array 
of clothes . . . music is her chosen field . . . 
that co-ed look. 



MARY K. FREY . . . Harnsburg . . . 
"Mary Kay" . . . always game for a good 
time . . . Fred Waring admirer . . . cheerful 
and obliging . . . enthusiastic LVC cheering 
fan . . . genuine friend . . . efficient harmony 
assistant. 



ELLEN JEPSEN. . . Wyomissmg . . . Trans- 
fer from Indiana State Teachers . . .glamorous 
"Jeep" . . . ready smile . . . inhabits "Co- 
ed Dorm" . . . sharp clothes . . . weekends 
at Muhlenburg . . . "Gee, do you think so?" 



SIDNEY ANN GARVERICH . . . Paxtang 
. . . "Sid" . . . fronts the "Sid 'n Babs" act 
. . . soulful soprano . . . early to bed, early 
to rise . . . likeable personality . . . delights 
in her weaving . . . attractive . . . "Oh, I'm 
just puttm' around." 



^jtf^^CiPl' 





Music 



^s>\ 



LLOYD F. McCURDY . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Dutch" . . . hearty proponent of the cut 
system . . . H.LS. grad. . . . flare for arrang- 
ing . . . athletically inclined . . . care and 
repair maniac . . . Stan Kenton enthusiast. 



• I 




BARBARA KLEINFELTER 



Biglervi 



P 




. . . "Babs" . . . accompanist deluxe . . . 
vivacious . . . outstanding campus leader . . . 
loads of fun . . . here, there, and everywhere 
. . . capable . . . sparkling personality with 
sense of humor to match. 



BETTY M. MILLER . . . Mohnton . . 
"Squeakie" . . . competent cornetist . . 
energetic . . . sees the funny side of life . . 
night owl . . . eats one meal a dav — all dav. 





DORIS L. KLINGENSMITH . . . Harnsburg 
. . . "Done" . . . always ready, willing and 
able . . . dry wit . . . violinist by trade . . . 
congenial . . . future lies in the music world 

. . . versatile . . . kind and constant friend. 



GERALDINE A. MILLER . . . Seven Val- 
leys . . . "Gerry" . . . twinkle in her big 
brown eyes . . . pleasant personality . . . 
winning smile . . . planning to lead a note 
worthy life . . . Glee Club Soprano. 





JANET KREIDER . . . leads a double life m 
form of twin sister Jean . . . always on the 
job . . . ingenious . . . conscientious . . . 
church worker . . . prim Conservite . . . en- 
joys vocal work . . . lovely eyes . . . Palmyra. 



BETTY J. MYERS . . . Mercersburg . . . 
"Betsy" . . . ebony-black hair . . . contin- 
ually joking . . . sports-minded . . . aspires to 
become a teacher . . . alert and active . . . 
cinema frequenter . . . always' well-dressed. 





KATHRYN M. NOLL . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Kathy" . . . quiet and reserved . . . "poet 
of the piano" . . . friendly manner . . . plans 
a teaehmg profession. 



Class of 

1950 




» '■*'V% 



3n: 







JACK SNAVELY . . . Harnsburg . . . ter- 
ritic clarinet artist . . . dry sense of humor 
. . . little man with big ideas . . . dance band 
devotee . . . one of Mr. Stachow's boys . . . 
practices persistently. 



MARTIN PEIFFER . . . Lebanon . . . 
musician through and through . . . dry sense 
of humor . . . "the Whistler" . . . versatile 
string player . . . unassuming friendliness 
. . . strictly a family man . . . enjoys student 
teaching . . . business-like manner. 



PAULINE M. STONER . . . Lancaster . . . 
"Polly". . . campus beauty . . . popular . . . 
on the waiter force . . . sincere . . . everyone's 
friend . . . asset to her class . . . always 
smiling . . . talented pianist . . . South Hall 
resident. 



ANNETTE READ . . . "Tom" . . . de- 
pendable . . . little girl with a big laugh . . . 
magnificent set of vocal chords . . . ebullient 
musical enthusiasm . . , teaching and domestic 
plans. 



DOROTHY J. THOMAS . . . Camp Hill 
. . . "Tommie" . . . lots of pep and energy 
. . . hard working assistant to Mr. Stachow 
. . . friendly ... on the cheerleading squad 
. . . striking red hair . . ."Uh-oh! I see a lion." 



GERALDINE ROTHERMEL . . . Reading 
. . . "Gerry" . . . deeply interested m music 
. . . cheerleader ... a friend worth having 
. . . studious . . . outstanding on campus . . . 
always willing to lend a helping hand. 




SCIENCES 

and 
BUSINESS 



Homer Cooper 
Economics 



John Aldrich 
Mathematics and Physics 





I 





Edward M. Balsbaugh 
June 28, 1948 
Mathematics 



John I. Cretzinger 
Biology 




Andrew Bender 
Chemistr\ 



Samuel H. Derickson 




William Bond 
Mathematics 



FACULTY 



y 



JHf 



#c^ 




William H. Egli 
Biiiine.';? Laic 



FACULTY 








r.-^ 



I?" 




1 ^v 



V. Earl Lh.;hi 
Biology 



Robert Erickson 
Mathematics 




John F. Lotz 

business Administration 

and Economics 



Samuel O. Grimm 
Physics and Mathematics 



Howard Neidig 
Chemistry 



SCIENCES 

and 
BUSINESS 



HiLBERT V. LOCHNER 

Susmt'ss Ad77miisrrdtion 
atid Economics 






Science and 
Business 



FRANKLIN I. BACHMAN . . .Jonestown 
. . . "Bickel" ... his stocky, black-haited 
figure familiar to Bus Ad students . . . hopes 
to find his milieu m the business world . . . 
cheerful optimism. 




w^- 




\ 




LUKE S. ALBERT . . . Palmyra . . . dry wit 
. . . quiet . . . a-\e-league standout . . . love- 
light in hometown . . . probably go for Mas- 
ters Degree. 



LEE K. BAKER . . . Berrysburg . . . Quiet 
with a unique sense of humor . . . diligent 
student . . . deep hearty laugh reveals hidden 
depths . . . incipient high-school teacher. 



DONALD K. ANGLEMEYER . . . Bangor 
... as essential to day-student's room as the 
furniture . . . favorite topic of discussion: 
Helen . . . Kalo man . . . football player . . . 
versatile . . . will test free enterprise system. 



CARL R. BAL'M . . . "Beber" . . . Hershey 
golf enthusiast . . . married . . . transferred 
from Hershey Jr. . . . spare-time usher at 
Sports Arena . . . hopes to do biological 
research. 



ARTHUR J. BACASTOW . . . hopes to do 
graduate work m business at U. ot P. . . . 
"Art" . . . hails from Hummelstown . . . 
good student . . . debonair . . . well-tailored. 



CHARLES R. BEAMESDERFER . . . 
"Beamy". . . divides his time between chem 
lab and Lincoln Republican Club . . . Yule- 
time mailman in Lebanon . . . avoids en- 
tangling . . . alliances with women . . . 
happy-go-lucky. 






ii 



\ 



^\ 




^-^^ ^ % 




RICHARD L. BEMESDERFER . . . has 
heard the tinkling of wedding hells . . . day 
student hailing from Lebanon . . . plans to be 
a mathematics instructor . . . engaging smile. 



HARRY L. BRICKER . . . Camp Hill . . . 
speaks fast, speaks often . . . Bus. Ad. major 
. . . musical talent . . . "What's cookin' doc?" 
. . . /airl}; equable disposition. 



JACK L. BITNER . , . has worn a groove 
between Hbg. and Annville . . . "anybody 
have an extra quart ot oil?" . . . expects to do 
graduate work in chemistrv. 



NANCY H. BRIGHT . . . Palmyran . . 
golden locks . . . friendly and cooperative 
. . . classic clothes , . . Pre-Med . . . active 
. . . knitting . . . "Oh. Gad!" 



LEWIS BOWMAN . . . Hopeland . . . 
"Lew" . . . Prof. Neidig's blonde, husky 
assistant . . . plans to enter industrial chemi- 
cal work . . . Chem Club. 



ALLEN BROWN . . . "Brownie" . . . 
sports enthusiast . . . commuter from Bethel 
. . . still unattached . . . one of the math 
"click" . . . teaching is his probable des- 
tination . . . cooperative. 



NANCY BOWMAN . . . "Nance" . . . 
Palmyra . . . pajamas of the Dorm . . . 
"Candy" . . . blushes . . . exponent of rural 
life . . . common sense . . . letters from U. of 
P. . . . optimist . . . equestrian . . . "And 
someday he'll he a VETERINARIAN!" 



Class of 
1950 





-%>«-.--^ 




^■-_:^ 



EUGENE S. BUCHER . . . "Beany" . . . 
AnnviUe . . . proud pop . . . Men Day 
Students" Congress prexy . . . brain m any 
course . . . future biology instructor . . . dis- 
ciple of Nimrod . . . second kaak Walton. 



TRUMAN S. CASSEL. JR. . . . Hummels- 
town . . . "Tru" . . . Biology major . . . 
usually a twinkle in his eye . . . fine mi.xer 
... a loyal L. V. C. rooter . . . enterpris- 
ing and obliging . . . trim dresser . . . dis- 
tinctive stride. 



NORMAN B. BUCHER, JR. . . . Annvillc 
. . . "Hobie"" . . . sincere smile . . . math 
marvel ... his sights set on the ministry . . . 
not exactly "wasting away." 



RICHARD A. CHECKET. . .Lebanon. . . 
industrious . . . unusual green corduroy 
jacket . . . helped build VA hospital . . . one 
of Stoney's perennials . . . visualizes work in 
pharmaceutical company. 



RONALD M. BURD . . . Harrisburg . . . 
"Ron" . . . m the first full flush of marital 
bliss . . . Legion habitue . . . "You can say 
that again" ... on the pre-med trail. 



STEVEN S. CROWELL . . . Rahway, N. J. 
. . . "Daddy" . . . sharp . . . connoisseur of 
femininity . . . future Veterinarian . . . wit 
with sdvov /dire . . . unpredictable . . . "See 
vou at the Tavern" . . . back m the Armv. 



'5=^- 





RICHARD E. BURRELL . . . Harrisburg 
. . . paragon of classroom comportment . . . 
strong silent type . . . exponent of connubial 
bliss . . . wresthng with the intricacies of 
drives, motivation, IQ tests, and emotional 
aberrations. 

PHYLLIS DALE . . . Lebanon . . . "Phil" 
. . . tall, stately beauty . . . ready blusher 
. . . immaculately groomed . . . top-drawer 
student . . . apprehensive of organic . . . 
hilarious mimicry . . . her heart belongs to 
daddy . . . unassuming and affable . . . 
"Miss Quittie 1950." 




i^^^l'v \ / 



«^^ 



"X^-- 




mm mKIIKKI^' 




GEORGE H. EICEMAN . . . comech from 
Palmyra . . . headed for Jetf . . . contounds 
Prof. Wolfgang in classroom discussions . . . 
married . . . dark curly hair . . . axe-league 
commando. 



MARY FRANCES DAUGHERTY . . 
York . . . "Doc" . . . hewitchmgly attractivt 
winning smile . . . interested m Dan . . 
wants to be lab technician. 



'% 

c 



k. 






i 



ELIZABETH E. EICHERLY . . Well liked 
R. N. from GrantviUe . , . . as efficient in 
anatomy lab as in the o.r. . . . feline fancier, 
owns about a do:en of them . . . contagious 
zest for living . . . cooperative . . . stagger- 
ing correspondence . . . indescribably gentle. 



HENRY C. DEENS . . . Chain 
. . . pre-med . . . military minded . 
Forge grad . . . always prepared 
ot soph-upper-classmen football 
. . . kills frogs the hard wav. 



:tter fame 
. .Vallev 





RALPH S. ESPENSHADE . . . Palmyra . . . 
"'Bunny'" . . . Gene Autry tan . . mighty 
phrases . . . constant wit . . . expects to do 
advanced work in Botanv. 



ELLIS DIAMENT . . . Cedarville, New- 
Jersey, lad . . . chem major . . . cautious 
driver?? . . . plays havoc with molecules in 
organic lab . . . conscientious, quiet spoken 
. . . always ready for a "good" joke. 



SALVATORE FIORELLO . . . ""Sal"' . . . 
campus politician extrjordiiidiie . . . teller ot 
tall tales . . . future D.D.S. . . . hustler . . . 
women . . . Trenton, N. J. "has it" ... on 
the inside track . . . "Let's put a little life in 
it, huh?" 



JAMES ECKENRODE . . . Route 422 
trailbla:er . . . transportation by Nash . . . 
transferee from Harrisburg Area . . . big and 
blond . . . chemistry his big interest. 




,j*^^ '•5't^ I ■^ 





^^ 



ROBERT FISCHER . . . -Fischuu" . . . 
Jersey joker from Little Falls . . . friendly . . . 
full of tun . . . Colgate T-shirt . . . top flight 
football end . . . table- tennis expert. 



CHARLES M. GOODYEAR . . . Hams- 
burg . . . silent . . . loosens up with proper 
encouragement . . . youngest Mason on 
campus . . . one of Sukey's regulars . . . 
"When I was m China . . .'" 





^f^ 




^~ ji"-> 



DANIEL H. FRAUNFELTER . . . Shoe- 
makersviUe . . . "Dan" . . . the type to turn 
women's heads ... his ma]or; Daugherty 
post graduate work m math. 



JACK D. GRAMM . . . Chem major 
friendly, generous . . . first year husband 
IQ42 gray Hudson, boon to hitch-hikers . 
future teacher . . . slim, athletic. 



RICHARD GATES . . . Biology major . . . 
"Wie gelit's' Gates" . . . stake m Lebanon, 
hometown . . . conscientious . . . old jalopy 
. . . always loaded down with books . . . 
helpful and friendly. 



CHARLES K. GREENAWALT . . . 
"Greeny" . . . good conversationalist . . . 
Business Ad. major . . . father's little helper 
during the summer . . . gentlemanly ways 
with the ladies . . . "Oh, well, tomorrow 
is another day." 






AUDREY P. GEIDT . . . Harnsburg . . . 
"Audie" . . . West Hall enthusiast . . . 
giggle . . . prominent Aramatis persona . . . 
Pre-Med with all kinds of worries . . . "Oh 

No!" 



K. RICHARD GRIMM . . . Annville . . . 
"Young Soggie" . . . tennis team . . . Math 
homework in odd places . . . oh, those 
Physics trips! . . . amateur radio technician 
. . . those eyes . . . "Well, I just can't see 




I 



JEANNE C. T. HULL . . . dorm student 
from Hagerstown, Md. . . . deceptively quiet 
manner . . . industrious and conscientious 
. . . aspires to be an accountant . . . active in 
campus society . . . tasteful dresser . . . wit 
and affabilitv. 



ROBERT W. HAINES . . . Catasauqua. Pa. 
. . . unforgettable Peter Lorre . . . South Hall 
frequenter . . . witty . . . Pre-Med . . . curly 
blonde hair ... a pipe . . . "So, I took out 
the other eve!" 





JOHN H. ILGENFRITZ. JR. . . . Hummels 
town . . . "Red" . . . budding dentist . . 
tall . . . adept at ping-pong . . . enjoys the 
company of the opposite sex . . . single, bu 
for long? . . . companionable . . . inexhaust 
iblc fund of humor. 



JOHN J. HECKENDimN . . . reserved 
Lehanonian . . . determined student . . . still 
thawing out from service in Aleutians . . . 
learning linoleum business from the floor up 
. . . looks to a business career. 





WILLIAM G. JONES . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Bill" . . . tall man with the scholarly mien 
. . . lives in the chem lab . . . one of the tour- 
mile commuters . . . nascent medico. 



ROBERT W. HESS . . . Ephratensian . . 
"Tall, dark and handsome" . . . warm smi 
. . . Senator . . . intramural athlete . . . pe 
sonality . . . biology major . . . "Whatta > 
know!" 




HAROLD A. KADLE . . . Mercersburg 
. . . "Hal" . . . not given to verbosity . . . 
jaunty walk since engagement . . . will be 
satisfied with position in office of a major 
industry. 




^^ 



CLYDE E. HOWER . . . Annville . . . dili- 
gent Bus. Ad. student . . . recently married 
to a school marm . . . thoughtful conversa- 
tionalist . . . usually chewing on a pipe. 




^''•^. 




/ 



ROGER E. KEECH . . . York . . . active 
and hard worker . . . merits our cheers as 
cheer-leader deluxe . . . friendly . . . minister- 
to-be . . . "Whatever Ma says."" 



FRANK R. KIRCHNER . . . Lebanon . 
red hair, freckles, and a wide, wide grin . 
plays a mean cornet . . . proud papa . 
wife accomplished the nigh-impossible 
domesticating him. 



|\Ws\ 



■«*(8%. 




WILLIAM J. KEELER . . . Pottstown 
fast and rugged footballer . . . handsome 
taciturn . . . terror of the axe-league 
married. 



ROBERT M. KLINE . . . Schaefferstown 
. . . that unruly black forelock . . . voluble 
talker . . . post graduate work . . . holds 
Dostoyevsky and Wagner in high esteem. 






HARRY E. KELLER . . . Congenial ... de- 
voted to lovely wife . . . continual trouble 
with his car . . . Richland's part-time insur- 
ance salesman . . . checkers and ping-pong 
zealot. 



ELBRIDGE N. KNOWLTON . . . Hams- 
burg . . . "Mose" . . . rugged build . . . 
quick v.'it . . . mumbles about "Mumbles"" 
. . . owns a beret but yearns for a Jeep . . . 
golf enthusiast ... his footprints on Baker"s 
door. 






RUSSELL L. KETTERING . . .Shock of un- 
ruly sandy hair ... to and fro" Lebanon . . . 
conscientious when lightning strikes . . . 
friendly . . . usually seen with "Tony"" . . . 
keen observer of the feminine. 



ANTHONY J. KUTCHEVER . . . Leba- 
non . . . "Tony"" . . . stocky . . . aggressive 
in a friendly way . . . devilish grin . . . fre- 
quently growls out of the corner of his 
mouth . . . frequent visitor to the "White 
House.'" 





"tfii. 



CLIFFORD J. LIGHT . . . rather on the 
quiet side . . . unassuming . . . future busi- 
ness tycoon from the metropolis of Annvilie 
. . . "Good things come m httle packages." 





JOSEPH W. LAYSER . . . commutes from 
Richland . . . chemist . . . "German is a 
snap" . . . future with the atoms . . . off- 
campus activities. 




RICHARD H, LIGHT . . . Lebanon . . . 
recent switch to Business Administration 
. . . neat dresser . . . head packed with tine 
ideals . . . very likeable . . . became a family 
man last summer . . . habitual bow tie. 



PERRY LAYSER . . . Lebanon . . . One of 
"Daddy" Lots's boys . . . proud owner ot a 
new Kaiser . . . married . . . dark wavy hair 
. . . attractive personal qualities . . . honor- 
able addition to anvbodv's list oi friends. 



PAUL W. LIGHTNER. JR. . . . York . . . 
"Jim" . . . over the river and 'cross the 
mountains . . . profit and loss mechanic . . . 
expects to manage a fruit market. 



JAMES E. LEBO . . . ElizabethviUe . . . 
married man . . . avid ping-pong player . . . 
prediliction tor his pipe . . . one of Wash- 
ington Hall's bridge votaries . . . post grad- 
uate work. 





RICHARD K. MACKEY . . . Harnsburg 
. . . "Mack" . . . quiet and reserved . . . 
there's a place for him m the business world 
. . . agreeable commuter . . . not addicted to 
wasting words. 



KENNETH L. LEWIS . . . New York, N. Y. 
. . . diligent Bus. Ad. major . . . debater 
with Mr. Shay on the historical significance of 
Sag Harbor . . . slight touch of his little, old 
hometown m his talk . . . friendly . . . in- 
quiring mind. 



%.'\ 




JOSEPH L. MARKLEY . . . New Castle 
. . . noted mural artist . . . vicious poker 
and pinochle games with Parker and Hess . . . 
easy to get along with . . . business career. 



HAROLD G. MADEIRA . . . Known to 
his friends as '"Curly" . . . very easy to get 
along with ... a good follower . . . silence 
and reserve camouflage latent pow^ers . . . 
resident of ShoemakersviUe. 



JOHN E. McCLURE . . . Annvillite . . . 
"Johnnie" or "Mac" . . . one of Dr. Derick- 
son's boys . . . plans to attend medical 
school . . . always ready for a good time . . . 
satanic grin. 



ALONZO L. MANTZ . . . Lehighton . . . 
"Pickles" . . . tallboy with the Lil' Abner 
stride . . . deliberate manner of speech . . . 
juke-bo.x trouble at Kannch's. 







Science and Business 




^ «-.?^> Chemistry 

0P^^: Club 



President 

Wesley Kreiser 




Wk If.O . I 



SIMON J. MEYER . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Monk" . . . neat dresser . . . always seems 
to be going some place . . . loquacious . . . 
likes an evening out . . . proficient in math. 



ELLIOT V. NAGLE . . 
"Bud" . . . one ot the boys 
of Chcm lab explosion . . . 
in store for him. 



Annville . . . 
. . perpetrator 

.irch 



arcer m resi 



LYLE C. MILLER . . . Valley View . . . 
"Hickory" . . . unpredictable . . . "Big 
Dutch" . . . lets his teet wander aimlessly at 
times with very emhrarrassmg results . . . 
tall and fair-haired. 



RALPH A. OSWALD. JR. . . . Clcona 
. . . Quiet, competent student . . . shy grin 
. . . striking good looks . . . merry Pontiac 
. . . looks to a career m accounting. 



Class of 1950 




\ 




L.V.C. 

Affiliate 
National 
Chemical 
Society 









ppn r '^ '^ n. n <^< 



^ (f^ 




««s» 



Jv 




FRANK PULLI. JR. . . . Easton . . . Aptly 
nicknamed "Chief" . . . robust . . . sports 
fanatic ... his questions are usually sticklers 
. . . earnest . . . mirthful . . . fascinated by 
off-campus activities. 



GEORGE ROMAN . . . Manville, N. J. 
. . . tail and lean . . . gridiron star . . . 
affable . . . North Hall, second home . . 
loves to sing . . . double rings for Ella soon 
. . . vacations in Boston . . ."This one fellah." 



RALPH J. QUARRY. JR. . . . Lebanon 
. . . "Wanna buy some pots "n pans" . . . 
going to grad school . . . chem major . . . 
smokes like a defective furnace . . . ardent 
Legionnaire . . . salty tongue. 






CLIFFORD P. ROTHGABER . . . "Clitf" 
. . . fast acquiring that domesticated look 
. . . impeccable dresser . . . affable . . . com- 
mutes from Lebanon by convertible . . . sales- 
work IS beckoning. 



CHARLOTTE ROEN4IG . . . Attractive, 
but married . . . salty in a friendly way . . . 
ex-Army nurse . . . champion of the up-sweep 
. . . "Let's talk about the Profs" . . . witty 
. . . alert . . . "Bud" and she live in Annville. 



GROVER C. RUSSMAN . . . "Russ" . . . 
ov.-ner of a sleek Buick convertible , . . from 
New Cumberland, Pa. . . . children"s-wear 
business after graduation . . . good taste m 
clothing . . . "dashing" figure about the 
campus. 



CHARLOTTE ROHRBAUGH . . . Harris- 
burg . . . tall . . . sense of humor . . . 
science brain . . . always busy . . . third floor 
whirlwind . . . friendly . . . diligent . . . 
cooperative. 



LYLE R. SCHWALM . . . Tremont . . . 
"Red" . . . most eligible bachelor? . . . 
flaming red hair, ice-blue eyes . . . envisions 
taking Hippocratic oath . . . Bachelors Club, 
Chem Club. 




^mt 



s\ 



BETTY JEAN SLIFER . . . "Betts" . . . 
Spring City, Pa. . . . enthusiastic Math 
major . . . vivacious . . . sincere . . . knits 
like mad . . . homework anywhere, anytime 
. . . athletic . . . 6sh bowl inmate . . . q p.m. 
food trips . . . "We have more fun in that 
Phvsics Lab!" 



ROBERT S. SHAAK . . . Lebanon . . . 
Scrappy member ot the football team . . . am- 
bition to be a teacher and coach . . . rather 
quiet, but sociable . . . keeps a torch burning 
. . . dependable. 






JOHN CHARLES SMITH. . . Berwyn . , . 
"Smitty" . . . friendly . . . knows everyone 
by his first name . . . administrative type . . . 
Wharton School in the future . . . Mim's 
the word . . . knack for wearing clothes. 



EDWIN H. SHAY . . . Lebanon . . . quiet 
affability one of his virtues . . . corner man 
m calculus . . . avid sports fan . . . a.xe-league 
. . . assiduous alchemist. 








DALE R. SNYDER . . , Lebanon . . . dis- 
pleased with election results . . . militant 
voice . . . dogmatic . . . looks to med school 
and bio-chcmical research. 



ROBERT H. SHEETZ . . . Lebanon . 
stocky build . . . terrific used-car salesman . , . 
seldom seen without coat and tie . . . pleasant 
voice . . . Cupid hasn't caught him yet. 



... t 





DEAN SNYDER . . . Seven Valleys . . . 
"Studs" . . . exceedingly conscientious and 
industrious . . . httle sleep and little play 
. . . feminine interest at Jonestown . . . 
nostalgia for early days on the farm. 



VALENTINE SICA . . . "Val" . . . new- 
comer from Hackensack, N. J. . . . aspiring 
medic . . . quiet sort of a guy . . . says he'll 
"wear that brown suit out yet?" . . . dili- 
gent worker. 




\ 



"^V 



Science and 
Business 



WILLIAM D. STEELY, JR. ... Shyly 
reserved . . . native ot Berrysburg . . . im- 
peccable decorum . . . engaging grin . . . 
a thoroughly swell fellow . . . behind the 
veil of taciturnity. 






LORRAINE B. SPANGLER . . . "Rainy"' 
. . . York . . . sweet and quiet . . . biology 
major looking toward Med School . . . 
friendlv smile . . . nice to know. 



CARL STEIN . . . ardent chemist . . . 
votary of "Science Fiction" . . . pipe collector 
. . . dates "Chick" . . . hates neckties . . . 
faithful deutsch student. 



RICHARD SPANGLER . . . Lebanon . . . 
possessor of "Joe College's necessity: a "48 
Chewy for those eight o'clocks" . . . neat 
. . . shy and reserved . . . talent for drawing 
. . . expert fisherman . . . mounts fish for a 
hobby . . . sport enthusiast. 



DORIS M. THOMAS . . . "Tom" . . . 
AnnviUe . . . flirtatious eyes . . . infectiojs 
giggle . . . athletic . . . avid follower of L V 
sports . . . on-campus day student . . . 
Sheridan Hall Gang . . . "Oh you're kidding!" 





*** 



M 



JOHN H. STAUB . . . Camp Hill ... Bob 
Howard's tall, thin "roomie" . . . basketball 
and football enthusiast . . . teaching career 
looks good . . . math student with a tremen- 
dous interest in figures. 



ROBERT A. UHRICH . . . Cleona . . . 
conservative chem major . . . the finer things 
. . . track . . . conscientious . . . active . . . 
loquacious . . . saddle shoes from the year 
one . . . grad school plans . . . intramural 
football terror . . . "Bo;" addict . . . Senior 
Class president-elect. 






L 



r 






\ 




'^S^ 




Class of 
1950 



WILLIAM WERTZ . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Snake" . . . one of the gas-house gang . . . 
easy-going . . . affable . . . unobtrusive mem- 
ber of our class . . . man with latent abilities. 



J. ELLIS WOOD . . . Annville . . . 
'"Woodie" . . . future C.P.A. . . . Kinney's 
canny companion . . . "The way I see it" . . . 
ruddy complexion . . . speakcs with authority 
. . . derives satisfaction from a "hot" debate. 



JAMES A. WILHELM . . . Lebanon . . . 
married to attracti%'e former LVC coed . . . 
political apprenticeship with alderman . . . 
wotta build . , . reaching out tor a business 
career. 



ALFRED G. ZANGRILLI . . "Al" . . . 
secret ambition to be mayor of Pittsburgh . . , 
pundit on Frankie Lane records . . . clothes 
make the man ... his goal — a "shingle." 




EARL K. WILLIAMS 

culating math man . . . 
"Fve stopped, but V 
for a sandwich" . 
Tommy Manville. 



. . . Lykens . . . cal- 
. always smiling . . . 
go along to the Hotel 
. life ambition: beat 




ROBERT 2UVER. . . Hails from York . . . 
gets acquainted quickly . . . slow, but ex- 
pressive smile . . . good Bus. Ad. student 
well-groomed . . . peering into the future, 
we see a success. 



EDWARD WILLIAMS . . . MerchantviUe, 
N. J. . . . football fiend . . . biological work 
after graduation . . . Kirkpatrick's curly- 
haired friend. 




QUITTAPAHILLA 164 1950 



ACT THE THIRD 



All's Well That Ends Well 



SCENE V 



ifis 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



CURTAIN CALLS 




I would applaud thee to the very echo 
That should applaud agaui. 

MACBETH 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1 66 



Class of 1950 




But soft! what light through yonder window breads'? 

ROMEO AHD JULIET 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Class of 1950 




The glass of fashion, and the mould of form. 

BEST DRESSED WOMAN 

lEANNE BOZARTH 



HAMLET 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



i68 



Class of 1950 



Best-Loo\ing Man 
BILL KEELER 








Class of 1950 



Best-Dressed Man 
JOHN CHARLES SMITH 



The rnark^ and glass, copy and hoo}{, 
That fashioned others. 

HEHRT V 



iCx) 



QIIITTAPAHILLA 




Class of 1950 



Outstanding Woman Leader 
BARBARA KLEINFELTER 



Class of 1950 



Outstanding Man Leader 
RAYMOND KLINE 




v-^1 



The world hath noted, and your name is great 
In mouths of iv\sest censure. 

OTHELLO 



QL'ITTAPAHILLA 



170 



1950 



Class of 1950 



V/omens Sports Leader 
BETTY SLIFER 





>'^l^llf$^^'^ 




HENRY DiJOHNSON 
Men's Sports Leader 



Class of 1950 



. . . whum opinion crowns 
The sinew and the forehand of our host. 

TROILIUS AND CRESSIDA 



Ol'ITTAPAHILLA 



EPILOGUE 




We are adverused b}' our hvmg friends. 



HEHRT VI 




Come on, come on, conie 
on, sir: 

HEKRT IV 



OUR 

THANKS 




Thy }{notted and conihined 
loc\s to part, 

A7id each particidar hair to 
stand on end. 

HAMLET 



... to Mr. Dale Fohl of the J. Horace McFarland Company and Mr. J. Edward Gant: of the Gant: 
Studio tor their splendid cooperation; 

... to Professors Struble, Lot:, Carmean, and Hout:, Miss Gladys Pencil, Mr. Claude Donmoyer, Mr. 
David Gockley, Mr. Richard Seiverling, and Mrs. Gerald Miller for timely help and advice; 

... to all the faculty and students of Lebanon Valley College for their loyal support of the 1950 ^uit- 
tdpahiUa. 



I 1 



What IS the end of study 
Let me \noiv' 



LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST 





As loo}{s the mother 
on her lowly babe . . . 

HEHRT VI 



Put on 
Tour boldest smt of mirth, 

for we have friends 
That purpose mermnent. 

MERCHANT OF 
VEHICE 




17? QUITTAPAHILLA 



OUR PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. Willi.'\m Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Norm.an Bucher 

Mr. H.^rry C. C.assel 

Mr. and NIrs. E. L. D--\l'i-;herty 

Mr. and Mrs. Levi Eckert 

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Epi>ley 

Mr. and Mrs. W.alter G.^ge 

Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Geidt 

Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Gruber 

Mr. and Mrs. S. F. H.^becker 

Mr. and Mrs. H.arry Ho\v.a,rd 

Mr. and Mrs. P. T. Hull 

Miss Mari Louise Huth 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jepsen 

Mrs. H. p. K.adle 

Mr. and Mrs. W.alter Kirkp.atrick 

Mr. and Mrs. GEORt;E Kline 

Mrs. H.arold Kline 

Mrs. H. M.arie Kline 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Kr.amer 

Mr. George W. Lewis 

Mr. Harold Ll't: 

Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Markley 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. McKelvey 

Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Mowrey 

Mr. and Mrs. James P.arker 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd S.-ktt.a:.-iiHN 

Mr. and Mrs. P.aul Sh.-\nnon 

Mrs. Luther Slifer 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. Smith 

Mrs. N. Flo Smith 

Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Sp.angler 

Mr. and Mrs. Fr.-\nk Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. H.arry Uhrich 

Mr. John A. Wood 

Mr. and Mrs. Ch.arles Zuver 



1950 QUITTAPAHILLA 






Engraving 
Printing and Binding 



by 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 



Mount Pleasant Press 



HARRISBURG • PENNSYLVANIA 



174 



]Ve Build for Eternity 



HALDEMAN AND SAVASTIO 



Designers & Builders 



Phone: 278 



10 3 '^''. Chocolate Ave. 
HERSHEV, PA. 



Coniplii)ie}its of 

J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER. Pres. - - 1914 
E. PETER STRICKLER. Assoc. - - 1947 

"Insure hi sure insurance" 

Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Penna. 
Telephone; 5477 



\ou have a completed house 
When YOU furnish uith W esting- 

house 
You never get stuck 
When YOU buy from BEN TVCK. 

Tcl.-p|],.n.': 78-4 



120-122 >. 8th St. 
:?8 W. Main St. 



Lebanon. I*a. 
F*alnivra. I»a. 



Compliments of 



Lebajioj2 News Agency 



SAiMUEL S. ETTER. Prop. 



^ 



^^-w- 




-y 



— 175- 



FUNK'S GARAGE 

General Repairing 

OFFICIAL A. A. A. SERVICE ATLANTIC PRODUCTS 



J. C. FUNCK 

14-16 South White Oak Street 

Official Inspection Station No. 3068 



Annville 7-5121 



Compliments of 



Donmoyer's Book Store 

41 N. Eighth Street Lebanon, Pa. 



BOOKS . STATIONERY 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 



VISIT 



"Hot dog" FRANK 

Light Lunches 
and Sandwiches of all kinds 



BREYERS ICE CREAM 

-It!, the Talk of the Touii" 

Annvjlle, Pa. 




MODERN KREIDER SPORTS 

HEALTH 

'SHOES ^^^^^ "300" Juveniles 

Manujiictured hy 



5tv; 



AW^S^»^'AQj U2xa^)u. e9> 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



Co^npXuncrxls o] 



BRANDYWINE IRON 
& METAL COMPANY 



Sd.Ii'dge Material 



LEBANON, PENNA. 



Tel. : 1 027 



176- 



Compliments ot 

The DARI'DEL 

Dispensers of Delicious Dairy Delicacies 
and Downy Fla}{e Doughnuts 

78 1 Cumberland St. Lebanon, Pa. 



Compliments of 

CALCITE QUARRY 
CORR 

Lebaxox, Pa. 



Stone, Sand and Transit 
Mixed Concrete 

Phone: Lebanon 1201 



DAVIS PHARMACY 

103 W. Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

Parker Pens and Pencils 
Schaeffer Pens and Pencils 
Eversharp Pens and Pencils 
Whitman's Candy 
Double K Nuts 
Prescript/on 1 



Honio-CJuokeil Meals 

STOWS RESTAURANT 

Do^vnv Flake Domils 
Sf'c ihrtn Made — Aliaivs h rcsli 

Fountain Service. Magazines 

WW IMF PFWS^ L\ \M A 










'M^^rmm^^ 



PlMinr: 215:5 



I 12.5 Willow Street 



WALTER L. HARTZ 



Philco 



RADIO 
Television 



Motorola 



Philco W arraiity Service 
Electrical Appliances 



— 111 — 



H. E. MILLARD 
LIME and STONE CO. 



SERVING 



Industry — Building— Agriculture 

TOP QUALITY COURTEOUS SERVICE 
REASONABLE COST 



Annville, Pa. 



FINK'S BAKERY 



DELICIOUS LAYER CAKES • PIES 



Filled and French Doughnuts 



PECAN BUNS . BREAD . SHOOFLY PIES 



178 



The place for GIFTS ■ STATIONERY • LUGGAGE 

Portrait and Commercial | 1 1 Developing and Printing 
Pkotography J^ XcLX TjCi S Enlarging and Framing 

LEATHER GOODS • GREETING CARDS 

757-759 Cumberland St. LEBANON. PENNA. 


JOHN H BOGER & SON 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

Co a/ • feed • fertilizer 

• 

TELEPHONE: 7-4: 11 


COMPLIMENTS 

OF AN 

IRISHMAN 


D. L. SAYLOR 

and SONS 

Contractors • Builders 

SPECIALIZED 
CABINET WORK 

ALL BUILDING MATERIALS 

• 

Annville, Penna. 


DIAMONDS JEWELRY 

HOFFER'S 

5 North Ninth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 

WATCHES GIFTS 


A. R, SHEARER 

Mobilgas • Motiloil 

Service Station 

U.S. Tires 

MAIN AND WHITE OAK STREETS 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

Telephone: 7-4801 



179- 



JAY'S FLOWER SHOP 

on the square 

Any occasion is only complete with flowers. 
Between occasions give her some iust because she's wonderful 



PALMYRA 



Phone: 8-64^1 



Compliments oj . . . 

YOUR HERSHEY MILK distributor 



HERSHEY HOMOGENIZED MILK 

'^ Cream vt Every Drop" 



Phone : 2216T 



Harry L. Meyer 



Cleona / Pennsylvania 



Kreamer Bros, 
furniture 

FLOOR COVERINGS 



ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 



Modern funeral Home 



ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Ben Franklin Store 

Your College Store 



open Friday and 
Saturday Evenings 



E. W. WOLFE, Owner 



37-39 West Mam Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



•180- 







More Thon 3,000,000 Legionnaires 
Say: YOU'RE INVITED ! ! 

There's always room for one more in the greatest veterans' outfit. 

There's sport . . . There's fun. 

And there's SERVICE ... to your nation, your state and your community. 



The American Legion's key to success is active 
Americanism. The Legion donated the first 
radium to veterans' hospitals. It has given 
$62,500,000 for relief of needy families. It spon- 
sors nation-wide Junior Baseball and 3,000 Boy 
Scout troops. It operates 2,000 citizenship 
schools for foreign born. That's just a sample 
of the fine service program you'll be supporting 
when you join your buddies in the Legion. 



Prestige goes with your Legion button. The 
President ... 8 justices of the U. S. Supreme 
Court . . . 252 members of congress ... 28 
governors are Legionnaires. 

Your Post is the heart-beat of your town. You'll 
find the fellows you like there, doing the things 
you like to do. Come in and help yourself and 
your country. 




Conncr-Streicher Post No. 559 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



181 — 



feingsilcp Sc 2^roU)n, anc. 



LAUNDERERS 



CLEANERS and FURRIERS 



PHONE: Annville: 7-3511 

Hershey: 1-0611 

Myerstown : 1-0611 

Middletown : 74 



J^eluxe ^erbicE ♦ 



THE ^OK^rOK 

"Lebanon s Greatest Store' 



Compbments oj 

PETER HAWRYLUK 

JEWELER 

NATIONALLY ADVERTISED WATCHES FINE JEWELRY ART-CARVED DIAMONDS 

RONSON LIGHTERS 

WATCH REPAIRS TESTED ON WATCHM ASTER 



40 East Main Street 



Annville, Penna. 



— 182- 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

KXCfASIlE SHOES 

Collegcbred Shoes 
"For College girls'' 

Florsheini Shoes 
"For the .Man W ho Cares" 

31 N. Ei-hlh Str,<l LKFUNON. V\. 



"A Fiishio)! Institution' 



LOGANS 



816 CUMBERLAND STREET 
Phone: 8 36 LEBANON. PA. 

DIAMONDS oj 
DISTINCTION 

I II r I 



st6ll|ft"^cf< 



Jeivelers 

20 \. Ninth Street Lebanon, P.i 








In Lebanon it's 

HAAK BKOS. 

Department Store 



Headqudrters for 

Berkshire Nylons, 

Carole Kin'G Frocks 



JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST AND DFCORAIOK 

"THE FLOWER SHOP" 

Corsages Our Specialtv 
Rear of Court House LEBANON, PA. 

Flouer_\ Tele^rjfheii Anyuhere, Anytime. 
Phone: 592 



When building or buying u home . . . 
Arrange Your Mortgage or Loan Thru 

Palmyra Bank and Trust Co. 

PALMYRA, PA. 

The Bank with the Chimes 

MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT 
INSURANCE CORPORATION 



•183- 



To You Seniors of 1950 
May We Humbly say: 



Use your knowledge knowingly, 

your Wisdom wisely, 

your Courage courageously, 

for the betterment of self 
and mankind. 



THE PENNWAY 



184- 



"Denicind Fresh Ice Creiim" 

Gollam's Supreme Ice Cream 

■■The Cre,im of M,itchless Merit" 
Made Fresh Daily 



Catering to Panies, Picnics, Clubs, 

Banquets or any other social 

functions. 



C. B. GOLLAM SONS MFGRS. 

"Miister Ice Cream Sert/ce" 

6th and Maple Streets Lebanon, Pa. 

PHONE: 21 



Cotnplitnents of 



BOWMAN'S 
Insurance Agenov 



I'ahiiMu l^aiik \\\diz. PALMYRA, PA. 



C(n)iplime)iti of 

PALMYRA LUMBER CO. 

Quality Lumber 
Millwork 



Telephone: 8-4181 



PALMYRA, PA. 



Refrigeration and Appliances 

HAUER'S 

KELVIN ATOR < BENDIX / STROMBERG - CARLSON 

Commercial and Domestic Freezers 



ABC OIL BURNERS 



ELECTRIC WORK OF ALL KINDS 



Authorized Sales and Service 



23 S. 6th Street LEBANON, PA. 

PHONE: 2923-J 



185 



J. Edward Gantz 

photographer 



LEBANON 



PENNA. 



—186— 



For Good Appearance 

H. W. KREIDER 

CLOTHIER 



Nationally knoun good 
merchandise 

PALMYRA. PENNA. 



S. A. BOMGARDNER'S 
'Dai ry 

VISIT OUR DAIRY SNACK 



Route A22 ' 1 Mile East of Pain 

Phone: 8-5521 



40 East Main Street 



Palmyra, Pa. 



Compliments oj . . . 

RELIABLE COAT 

AND 

DRESS SHOP 



ifn Camberland Street 



LEBANON, PA. 




COMPLIMENTS OF 



Automotive Trade Association 



of Lebanon, Pa. 



-187- 




""Shop at Sears and Save'' 

SEARS, ROEBUCK 

and C O. 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Compliments of. . . 

GRUBB'S Ice Cream 

WHOLESALE * RETAIL 
Phone: 1110 CLEONA. PENNA. 



Compliments of 



KREIDER MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of Hosiery 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



■188 — 



Compliuiaits of 

iaotcl annoillc 



Excellent Food 

in the 

Bavarian Room 



ANNVILLE . PEiNNSYLVANIA 



Visit tlie 

FIESTA ROOM 



AT 



George Wcisbnigtoii 
Tdverji 



LEBANON . PENNSYLVANIA 



SIMON S. KETTERING 



Goodyear Tires ♦ 

1 6th and Cumberland Streets 

At ESSO Station 



Life Guards 
LEBANON, PA. 



CONDUCTED STUDENT TOURS OF EUROPE— May to October 1949 

These tours are of interest to teachers as well as students. Visit 
all of Europe either on an economy tour or the Standard Five 
Country or Continental Tour. 

For information cull 

LEBANON COUNTY TRAVEL BUREAU 



Willow at Eighth St. 



Phone: 175 3 



LEBANON. PA. 



— 189 — 



"As near as your iiearesl telephone" 

SAYLORS PHARMACY 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

• 

49 South 8tli Street, Near the Pust Office 
LEBAXOX. PEXNA. 

Plinrie: 101 


Compliments of . . . 
low;' Local Insurance yjan 

L M. LONG 

AXNMLLE, PA. 


Compliments of the 

ASTOR 
THEATRE 

AnnviHe, Pa. 


WOLF FURNITURE CO. 

Appliances. Furniture 
Floor Coverings 

754-756 WiUnw Street LEBANON, PA. 

I'll. me: 326 


If it's a Hit — It's Here 

r'omplinients of 

STATE THEATRE 

511-515 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


WHITE'S Food Market 

FRESH MEATS 
VEGETABLES 
FRESH FRUITS 

Phone: ??.97 Cleona, Penna. 


Compliments of 

KARMEL KORN SHOP 

LEBANON. PA. 



— 190 — 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF THE 



Class of 1949 



TO THE 



Class of 1950 



191