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"Rickety, Rackety! Rhe! Rah! Rah! 
Kasaki, Kasaki! Zim! Zu! Zah! 
Rickety, Rackety! Zip! Zah! Zun! 
ZuRah! ZuRah! 1901!" 

1901 — the beginning of the Twentieth Century. 

1951 — the mid-point of the Twentieth Century. 

Wedged into the corner of one of the private shelves for old QUITTIES in the Library are 
a half dozen nondescript thin volumes with the printed banner, THE BIZARRE. One of them, 
with an orange and black cover and yellowed pages that have not been scanned by students 
for decades, tells the story of life on the Lebanon Valley College campus in 1900 — it is THE 
1901 BIZARRE, third of the series bearing its name and forerunner of the modern QUITTA- 
PAHILLA. Traditionally published by the Junior Class, THE 1901 BIZARRE was the first in 
which individual pictures and writeups of Junior Class members were used. Lebanon Valley 
in 1901 is described like this in a college ad in THE BIZARRE: "Courses — Classical, Scientific, 
Music, Art, Elocution; Advantages — Thoroughness, Cheapness, Completeness, Four Commodious 
Buildings; Standing — Among the best." 

The classes were small: 23 in the Senior Class, 1 7 in the Junior Class, 20 in the Sophomore 
Class, and 25 in the Freshman Class. A faculty of 23 worked in the "four commodious buildings," 
teaching students in the three year courses offered. 

In 1901, Clio was in its 28th year and boasted 24 members; Kalo, 23 years old, had 36 
loyal sons; and the even then respectably aged Philo (33), ruled the campus with a total mem- 
bership of 54 and published the "College Forum," campus newspaper. Wearing prison- 
striped jerseys and stockings, the mustachioed Football Association presented a rogues' gallery 
picture and a record of four wins and five defeats. 

Student cartoons filled several pages and were devoted to subjects as "An Occasional 
Scene in the Dining Hall," "A Two Base Hit", "Looking for her Mascot," "Picking a Lilly," 
and "A Race for Life." Another section of the book discussed membership in these clubs: The 
Ante Portum Society, which talked about topics on Loveine, Courtology, Spoonethology, Jolly- 
ism, Matrimonialism, and Scrapism; the Anti-Whisker Society; the Inebriate Association; the 
Euchre Club, the Married Men's Club, and the College Avenue Gastronomic Association. 
From the literary section of the 1901 BIZARRE, we quote from a poem by E. M. Balsbaugh, 
"The Dying Century": 

"When such vent to our grief has been given, 

Then we may bid a final farewell. 
And mid the twilights of future years, 

Devout mothers to children will tell 
Of the Nineteenth Century's Death; tears 

Will show their sorrow, but oft they'll do 
Braver deeds than their sires, and wonder 

If the old were better than the new." 

Fifty years have seen L. V. grow in every respect so proudly hailed as "among the best" 
in 1901. Fifty years have seen two major world wars of untold savageness, which have left 
unsolved problems facing the world with uncomfortable nearness in the second half of the 
century. Fifty years have seen greed, ignorance, and prejudice rule man and his world. Fifty 
■"ears of tremendous industrial improvement and scientific achievement now place into man's 
hinds weapons of disintegra'ion. 

The role of liberal arts colleges, to correlate living with science, has consequently been 
magnified. We propose to picture life in this typical liberal arts college, in relation to this 
problem, by . . . 



PRESENTING 





Challenging opportunities to better the welfare of mankind 

in science, industry, economics, and political and social relations 

face the world today. 

As before, barriers of greed, ignorance, and prejudice 

loom between man and the realization of these opportunities, 

keeping them ever on a distant horizon. 



Lebanon Valley College and its students are contributing 
toward final achievement of this goal: 

taking these opportunities from the ever beckoning horizon 
down into every roadstead of the world 




THE 1951 



of LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, Annvillc, Pennsylvania 












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QUITTAPAHILLA 



May, 1950 



A Junior Class Publication 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 



©ebtcateb to 




MAUD P. LAUGHLIN 



. . . Professor Laughlin, head of the Sociology and Political Science Depart- 
ments, occupies a position of esteem among students and faculty members: 
. . . her spirit of awareness and interest inspires every study and activity under- 
taken; her keen, analytical lectures create a fresh, invigorating atmosphere, 
directing attention to both sides of every issue; it is the rare combination of aca- 
damician professorship and sympathetic understanding which makes Professor 
Laughlin at the same time authoritative in class and a confidante to her students 
. . . particularly, this edition of the QUITTAPAHILLA is dedicated to honor 
the work Professor Laughlin is doing toward preparing Lebanon Valley College 
graduates to face intelligently the "enigma" of government, social, and inter- 
national relations. 

. . . "It is my job to tell you of these things ..." 



ADMINISTRATION 



AND FACULTY 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



CLYDE A. LYNCH, A.B, A.M., D.D., B.D., Ph.D., LL.D. 
President 



FREDERICK K. MILLER, Ph.D. 
Assistant to the President 

A. H. M. STONECIPHER, Ph.D. 
Dean of the College 

ROBERT C. FAGAN, M.A. 
Dean of Men 

CLARA CHASSELL COOPER, Ph.D. 
Dean of Women 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



Accept my best wishes for success, but have no delusions concerning 
the world in which you are to have a larger participation. Battle-scarred 
veterans know the price of victory, and others have been scratched and 
bruised in the preliminary struggles of life. Accept the high cost of hfe with 
courage and self-determination . 

You have heard much about "freedom from," but "freedom for" is a 
rapidly vanishing concept. Individual initiative and free enterprise belong 
to our American heritage, and to surrender them would rob the world of 
its last great hope. Totalitarian "security" involves the loss of basic human 
freedoms. People who let the state do everything for them are finally com- 
pelled to do everything for the state. 

Free spirits must unite to keep our country untrammeled by the old 
laissez-faire capitalism and the new laissez-faire labor organizations. What 
is not good for all the people cannot be good ultimately for any special class, 
for freedom is a cooperative enterprise. 

The College motto indicates that freedom is both received and achieved 
through truth. As exponents of the truth and in harmony with the best 
American tradition, may you leave our campus with the optimism that the 
sickening game of alternating chaos and cosmos will have a happy ending. 



May God's richest blessings be upon you. 



CLYDE A. LYNCH 



ADMINISTRATION 1950 



**K. 






Q UITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




Registrar 
GLADYS FENCIL 



Secretary of the 
Finance Committee 

CLAUDE 
DONMOYER 



Deanoi Admissions 
CLARK CARMEAN 



Librarian 
HELEN E. MYERS 





1951 



Q UITTAPAHI LLA 




Religious Activities 
Director 

DAVID W. 
GOCKLEY 



Public Relations 

Director and 
Alumni Secretary 

RICHARD F. 
SEIVERLING 



Library Staff: MRS. FIELDS, MISS SHENK, MISS 
MEYERS, DR. FIELDS, MRS. STARR, MRS. SHAY 



Associate 
Librarian 

DONALD E. 
FIELDS 




10 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Representatives from the 
East Pennsylvania Conference 

E. W. COBLE Lancaster, Pa. 

REV. W. A. WILT AnnviUe, Pa. 

REV. H. E. SCHAEFFER Harrisburg, Pa. 

C. L. BITZER Harrisburg, Pa. 

ROY GARBER Columbia, Pa. 

J. B. McKELVEY Philadelphia, Pa. 

REV. EDGAR HERTZLER . Harrisburg, Pa. 
HON. MILES HORST Lebanon, Pa. 

A. S. SP ANGLER Campbelltown, Pa. 

REV. S. C. ENCK Harrisburg, Pa. 

REV. P. B. GIBBLE Ephrata, Pa. 

REV. O. T. EHRHART Lancaster, Pa. 

REV. D. E. YOUNG Harrisburg, Pa. 



Representatives from the 
Pennsylvania Conference 

REV. P. E. V. SHANNON York, Pa. 

REV. F. B. PLUMMER Hagerstown, Md. 

E. N. FUNKHOUSER Hagerstown, Md. 

R. G. MOWREY Chambersburg, Pa. 

REV. C. GUY STAMBACH.DaUastown, Pa. 

HAROLD T. LUTZ Baltimore, Md. 

H. W. SHENK Baltimore, Md. 

REV. IRA S. ERNST Washington, D. C. 

REV. MARVIN WELTY York, Pa. 

J. STEWART GLEN Red Lion, Pa. 

REV. F. T. KOHLER Williamsport, Md. 

ALBERT WATSON Carlisle, Pa. 

HUBER D.- STRINE York, Pa. 



Representatives from the 
Virginia Conference 

REV. CARL W. HISER Winchester, Va. 

REV. E. E. MILLER Harrisonburg, Va. 

REV. J. PAUL GRUVER Martinsburg, W. Va. 
REV. PAUL J. SLONAKER . . . Broadway, Va. 

REV. J. E. OLIVER Winchester, Va. 

G. C. LUDWIG Keyser, W. Va. 



Trustees at Large 

BISHOP J. B. SHOWERS.. Harrisburg, Pa. 

H. M. IMBODEN New York, N. Y. 

MAURICE R. METZGER.. . Middletown, Pa. 

HON. J. PAUL RUPP Steelton, Pa. 

LLOYD SATTAZAHN Lebanon, Pa. 

W. H. WORRILOW Lebanon, Pa. 



Alumni Trustees 

WARREN H. FAKE Ephrata, Pa. 

E. D. WILLIAMS AnnviUe, Pa. 

MISS ALMA MAE LIGHT. AnnviUe, Pa. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




CLARA CHASSELL COOPER 
Psychology 




ROBERT C. FAGAN 
Psychology 




HOMER E. COOPER 
Economics 




MRS. ROBERT C. FAGAN 
Spanish and French 




CARL Y. EHRHART 
Philosophy 




LUELLA UMBERGER FRANK 
Spanish and German 




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FLORENCE E. HOUTZ 
English 



THEODORE D. KELLER 
English 



ANDREW KERR 
Head Football Coach 



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HELENE KOSTRUBA 
Russian 




GILBERT D. McKLVEEN 
Education 




MAUD P. LAUGHLIN 
Sociology and Political Science 





RALPH MEASE 
Director of Physical Education for 
Men; Acting Director of Athletics; 
Basketball and Baseball Coach 




LENA LOUISE LIETZAU 
German 




FREDERICK K. MILLER 
History 




MARIAN MILLER 
History 



G. A. RICHIE 
Religion and New Testament Greek 



ROGER ROBINSON 
Physical Education and Hygiene; 
Track and Asst. Football Coach 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



KATHLEEN K. ROULETTE 
Psychology 




ERNESTINE JAGNESAK SMITH 
Coach and Physical Education for 
Women 





RALPH S. SHAY 
History 



STELLA JOHNSON STEVENSON 
French and Spanish 




HIRAM H. SHENK 
History 




ALVIN H. M. STONECIPHER 
Latin and Greek 




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GEORGE G. STRUBLE 
English 



DR. WILLIAM A. WILT 
Pastor of College Church 



MARVIN E. WOLFGANG 
Sociology 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



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JOHN A. ALDRICH 
Physics and Mathematics 





SAMUEL H. DERICKSON 
Biology 




ANDREW BENDER 
Chemistry 



WILLIAM H. EGLI 
Business Law 



JOHN I. CRETZINGER 
Biology 




ROBERT L. ERICKSON 
Mathematics 




RICHARD E. FOX 
Economics, Asst. Football Coach, 
Asst. Basketball Coach 



SAMUEL O. GRIMM 
Physics and Mathematics 



V. EARL LIGHT 
Biology 



QUITTAPAHILLA 






HILBERT V. LOCHNER 
Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration 




HOWARD A. NEIDIG 
Chemistry 




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ANDREW P. ORTH 
Economics and Business Adminis- 
rahon 



D. L. TRAUTMAN 
Mathematics 



J. ARNDT WEIKSEL 
• Chemistry 



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QUITTAPAHILLA 



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MARGARET 

BARTHEL BAXTRESSER 

Piano 



RUTH ENGLE BENDER 
Piano 




R. PORTER CAMPBELL 
Organ 




W. MERL FREELAND 
Piano 



MARY E. GILLESPIE 
Director of the Conservatory of Music 



JANE M. HOLLIDAY 
Theory and Cello 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



ELIZABETH E. KAHO 
Theory and Piano 



REYNALDO ROVERS 
Voice 







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NEVILLE LANDOR 
Voice 






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HAROLD MALSH 
Violin 




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EDWARD P. RUTLEDGE 
Director of Musical Organizations 



FRANK E. STACHOW 
Theory and Woodwinds 



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QUITTAPAHILLA 




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QUITTAPAHILLA 



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QUITTAPAHILLA 



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Robert Uhrioh, Betty Slifer, Pauline Stoner, David Wallace 



President ROBERT UHRICH 

Vice President DAVID WALLACE 

Secretary PAULINE STONER 

Treasurer. . BETTY SLIFER 



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This is the year for taking stock of the 20th century. The "Times" and the "Lifes" are knock- 
ing themselves out to name the "biggests" and the "bests" of its first fifty years and to predict 
the probable trends of its second fifty. The role of half-time commentator falls naturally to the 
Class of 1950, which swept into the Valley on the crest of the GI flood four years ago and sweeps 
out this year on the crest of the wave of the future. 

In 1946, when the Class of 'SO descended on and nearly innundated L. V. C.'s campus, the 
Valley still wore her war-time aspect. Enrollment was low, women were comparatively nu- 
merous and veterans, though increasing in numbers, were still in a minority. September '46 
saw all that changed. Almost overnight veterans — mostly men, and mostly day students — 
upset the sex ratio and turned the campus into a factory; Freshman rules became obsolete 
because the freshmen outnumbered the other three classes put together; and classrooms be- 
came virtual sardine cans. 

In the years that have followed, the Class of '50, with its high percentage of war-matured 
men, has displayed an unusual talent for leadership. Leavened by the influence of its female 
members and that of the progressively younger incoming classes of '51, '52, and '53, the Class 
of '50 has helped gradually to restore the Valley to a more normal collegiate life. 

As the century enters its second phase, the era of the veteran joins the era of the coon-skin 
coat and hip flask. The Class of '50, as that tumultuous era's typical spokesman, bequeathes 
to its successors a tradition of activity and leadership, exemplified in the revivification of Student 
Government, the Quittie, the Societies, and student social life. Upon this service to the 
campus community, already taken up by its successors, the Class of '50 lays its hopes for re- 
membrance when it will have passed into the limbo of the alumni. 



Q UITTAPAHILLA 




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QUITTAPAHILLA 



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1st row: Robert Ullrich, Charlotte Rohrbaugh, Nancy Bowman, Audrey Geidt, Betty Slifer, Jack Bitner. 
2nd row: Paul Shultz, Jeanne Hull, J. Ellis Wood, Valentine Sica, Richard Gates, Phyllis Dale, Joseph Layser. 

3rd row: Donald Beitzel, Arthur Bacastow, Richard Schiemer, Joseph Markley, Mary Daugherty, Nancy Bright, Dale Snyde 
4th row: John Krieg, Donald Steinberg, Karl Baum, Richard Burrell, Kenneth Lewis, Daniel Fraunielter, William Jones. 
5th row: Donald Anglemeyer, George Bartels, James Lebo, Harold Madeira, Elliot Nagle, Harold Yingst, Hugh Eberly. 
6th row: Fred Fore, Richard Light. 



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CLASS OF 1950 



Luke Albert 
Glen Aldinger 
John Allwein 
Donald Anglemeyer 
Arthur Bacastow 
Franklin Bachman 
George Bartels 
Carl Baum 

Charles Beamesderfer 
Donald Beitzel 
Richard Bemesderier 
lack Bitner 
Lewis Bowman 
Nancy Bowman 
Harry Bricker 
Nancy Bright 
Allen Brown 
Norman Bucher 
Ronald Burd 
Richard Burkholder 



Truman Cassel 
Richard Checket 
Phyllis Dale 
Mary Daugherty 
William Davey 
Hugh Eberly 
George Eiceman 
Elizabeth Eicherly 
Robert Fischer 
Fred Fore 
Daniel Fraunfelter 
Richard Gates 
Audrey Geidt 
George Geyer 
Charles Goodyear 
Jack Gramm 
Kenneth Grimm 
Richard Haines 
John Heckendorn 
Robert Hess 



Jeanne Hull 
John Ilgenfritz 
William Jones 
Stephen Jordan 
Harold Kadle 
Harry Keller 
Russell Kettering 
Dean Kinkel 
Frank Kirchner 
Robert Kline 
Elbridge Knowlton 
John Krieg 
Anthony Kutchever 
Joseph Layser 
Perry Layser 
Ray Layser 
James Lebo 
Kenneth Lewis 
Clifford Light 
Richard Light 



Paul Lightner 
John Lingle 
Richard Mackey 
Harold Madeira 
Alonzo Mantz 
Joseph Markley 
Kenneth Marks 
John McClure 
Simon Meyer 
Lyle Miller 
Elliot Nagle 
Charlotte Rohrbaugh 
Charles Roland 
George Roman 
Grover Russman 
Lyle Schwalm 
Robert Shaak 
Edwin Shay 
Paul Shultz 
Gerald Shupp 



Valentino Sica 
Betty Slifer 
John Smith 
Dale Snyder 
Richard Spangler 
John Staub 
William Steely 
Carl Stein 
Donald Steinberg 
Robert Uhrich 
William Wertz 
James Wilhelm 
Earl Williams 
Henry Wolfskeil 
Walter Womer 
John Wood 
Donald Yeatts 
Harold Yingst 
Alfred Zangrilli 
Robert Zuver 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




1st row 


: Vivian Werner, Ruth Kramer, Barbara Christianson, Janet E] 


2nd ro' 


m Robert Uhrich, lean Bozarth, Betty Slifer, Raymond Kline, Wi 


3rd rov 


t: Joseph Markley, Norman Bucher, Donald Paine, Paul Kauffi 


4th rov, 


r: Robert Eigenbrode, John Beddall, Glen Aldinger. 



CLASS OF 1950 



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Milton Baker 
Harold Batdorf 
Ethel Beam 
Edwin Beaver 
Floyd Becker 
John Beddall 
Robert Bowman 
Jeanne Bozarth 
Perry Bruaw 
Barbara Christianson 
Carl Cope 
James Davis 
Henry Dijohnson 
Francis Eigenbrode 



Robert Eigenbrode 
Robert Englehart 
Janet Eppley 
Guy Euston 
Alex Fehr 
William Fisher 
Walter Gage 
Rachel Gerhart 
James Gregg 
Lewis Heminway 
Frank Hockley 
Russel Hoffman 
John Horn 
Elmer Horst 



John Housman 
Mary Louise Jagnow 
Paul Kauffman 
Robert Kauffman 
Richard Kaylor 
Roger Keech 
John Kennedy 
Anna Kettering 
Kenneth Kirkpatrick 
Dorothy Kline 
Raymond Kline 
Ruth Kramer 
George Mayhoffer 
Bernard Mazzoni 



William Merriman 
Donald Miller 
James Murray 
John Nilan 
J. Donald Paine 
James Parker 
James Parsons 
Donald Potter 
Lillian Keller Pratt 
Sylvester Renner 
Ralph Roberts 
Joseph Rojahn 
Herbert Rowe 



Herman Siegel 
Howard Smith 
Richard Swartz 
Robert Thompson 
Charles Tice 
David Wallace 
Charles Weber 
Vivian Werner 
Edgar Wert 
Lorraine Wert 
Harold Wolfe 
Paul Youse 
Raymond Zimmerman 



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1st row: Isabel] Haeseler, Betty Myers, Doris Eckert, Mary Edelman, Barbara Kleinfelter, Janet Kreider, Doris Klingensmith, Evelyn Habecker. 
2nd row: Betty Miller, Mary Frey, Sidney Garverich, Dorothy Thomas, Geraldine Miller, Geraldine Rothermel, Pauline Stoner, Annette Reed, 

Katherine Noll 
3rd row: Harry Forbes, Frederi 

Fisher 
4th row- LeRoy Evans. Paul Br- 



wn, Joseph Campanella, Ellen Jepsen, Jack Sn 
Lloyd McCurdy, Carl Gibson. 



ely, George Alwood, Donald Trostle, Charles Kreis, Robert 



CLASS OF 1950 



George Alwood 
Paul Broome 
Frederic Brown 
Joseph Campanella 
Doris Eckert 
Mary Edelman 
Leroy Evans 
Robert Fisher 



William Forbes 
Mary Frey 
Miriam Fuller 
Sidney Garverich 
Carl Gibson 
Evelyn Habecker 
Isabelle Haeseler 
Ellen Jepsen 



Barbara Kleinfelter 
Doris Klingensmith 
Janet Kreider 
Charles Kreis 
William Lemon 
Lloyd McCurdy 
Betty Miller 
Geraldine Miller 



Betty Myers 
Kathryn Noll 
Annette Read 
Geraldine Rothermel 
Jack Snavely 
Pauline Stoner 
Dorothy Thomas 
Donald Trostle 



Q UITTAPAHILLA 




David Wallace, Janet Eppley, Charlotte Rohrbaugh, John Charle 
: Alex Fehr, Raymond Kline, Norman Bucher. 



1950 WHO'S WHO 



As is customary in many colleges in the United States, Lebanon Valley annually selects a maximum of ten seniors, 
on the basis of scholarship and contribution to the school, to be listed with those chosen from other colleges in Who's 
Who in American Colleges. Lebanon Valley's 1950 Who's Who are: 



NORMAN BUCHER 
JANET EPPLEY 
ALEX FEHR 
ROBERT FISHER 



RAYMOND KLINE 



BARBARA KLEINFELTER 
CHARLOTTE ROHRBAUGH 
JOHN CHARLES SMITH 
DAVID WALLACE 



PHI ALPHA EPSILON 



Phi Alpha Epsilon, outstanding honor society in the college, is composed of seniors who have maintained an average 
of 88% or better in three and one-half years of study. Election to this society is a signal acknowledgment of high 
scholastic achievement, and members are feted at an annual spring banquet. New Phi Alpha Epsilon members chosen 
from the Class of '49 are: 

RONALD L. BAKER 
EUGENE S. BUCHER 
MARTHA JEAN ELY MARTHA MILLER MARIAN SCHWALM 

DENNIS FUNCK RALPH OSWALD DOROTHY SMITH 

SYLVAN GROVE LAVERNE ROHRBAUGH DOROTHY WERNER 



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1951 



CONTINUATION OF JUNIORS FROM 1950 
QUITTAPAHILLA 




4 ? 
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Glenn Aldinger 
York, Penna. 




Edwin Beaver 
Hershey, Penna. 




W*. 



Floyd Becker 
Lebanon, Penna. 




John Beddall 
Shenandoah, Penna. 



Donald Beitzel 
Harrisburg, Penna. 



Robert Bowman 
Lebanon, Penna. 




Richard Burkholder 
Union Deposit, Penna. 



James Davis 
Lebanon, Penna. 



Hugh Eberly 
Sheridan, Fenna. 





Fred Fore 
McConnellsburg, Penna. 






Isabelle Haeseler 
Bloomfield, N. J. 




Paul Kauffman 
Dallastown, Penna. 




Bernard O'Gorman 
Harrisburg, Penna. 



Joseph Rojahn 
Dallastown, Penna. 



Paul Shultz 
Marysville, Penna. 



"Pfe 




Donald Yeatts 
York, Penna. 



QUITTAPAH ILLA 



1951 




Q UITTAPAHILLA 




William Miller, Helen MacFarland, Joyce Carpenter, Richard Schiemer 



President WILLIAM MILLER 

Vice President RICHARD SCHIEMER 

Secretary JOYCE CARPENTER 

Treasurer HELEN MacFARLAND 



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QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 









CHARLES ALFIERI 
Lebanon, Pa. 

History . . . spent one semester at Millersvil 
State . . . easy-going, good-tempered i 
his six feet plus frame . . . Alf belongs 
"Gassy Gang" . . . marital-minded. 



ROBERT ALLEN 
Cornwall, Pa. 

Pre-Medical . . . dynamo of the 
"Axers" ... a Hot Dog Frank patr< 
high among most popular, best dress 
ing student. 



HOWARD ANCELL 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



Psychology . . 
nultitude of idea; 



speaker . . . has a 
multitudinous subject; 
sand talks with author. 





DONALD ARNOLD 
Lebanon, Pa. 



. tall and handsome . 



HAROLD BAER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Social Science . . . people fascinate this 
navy gob . . . wants to teach in college . 
"Hmm!" . . . likes ice cream and sports . 
leader of discu 



RUFINA BALMER 
Lititz, Pa 

captivating beauty 
parkling personality . 
o advantage . . . ace 




HAROLD BATDORF 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Political Science . . . amicable . 
and yet very easy going . . . concerned 
contemporary affairs . . . loves to speak Ge 
. . . craze for collecting classical records. 



FLOYD BATURIN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Economics . . will be an efficiency expert . 
"Pull yourself together, it could be worse" . 
spends a lot of time on "the green" ... a yen 
Latin American history. 



ROBERT BEAR 
Lemoyne, Pa. 



Pre-Medical . . 
board to the lab 
leisurely- student. 





A. HILTEN BENNETT, JR. 
Hagerstown, Md. 



LYNN BLECKER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Psychology . 
inson College 
day classes . 
Gardner Ian. 



JOHN BOAG 
Clearfield, Pa. 

. a Greek letter man fr< 

. Jack likes trie idea of r 

. "I've got to study" . 



n Dick- 
. Ava 






Physics . . . madman 
work merely a sideline 
"cultural" education . 
traffic with his cigarette 



DAVID BOMGARDNER 

Sheridan, Pa. 

. madman at the whee 



i wheel . . . home- 
. believes in strictly 
directs conversational 
. ambling walk. 



HERBERT BOOZ 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

siness Administration . . . 
"Sarge" . . . avid promote 
ne Corps . . . always working 
. . . "I've won my spurs." 



irdent listener 
of the U. S. 
on the "Chev- 



RICHARD BOTHWELL 
Lebanon, Pa. 

-Medical . . . Hail fellow, well met . . . 
:ts stamps . . . favors veal cutlets . . . talk- 
such a naturalthing! . . . "I have a lab now." 






i 



MARGARET BOWER 
Chambersburg, Pa. 



oust have her little joke 



WILLIAM BOYD 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Pre-Medical ... cut over a small pattern . . . 
partial to Fords . . . can frequently be found 
in Washington Hall playing ping-pong . . . 
enthusiastic . . . often mistaken for a freshman. 



MARY RUTH BRANDT 
Campbelltown, Pa. 

Pre-Medical . . . drives to college every day 
. . . loquacious . . . usherette in spare time . . . 
magnetic personality . . . loves to tell jokes . . . 
you should see her do the Charleston. 




PHYLLIS A. BRIGHTBILL 
Lebanon, Pa. 

English . . . extrovert . . . rights the wrongs 
on Frosh English papers . . . "I've got so much 
English to read!" . . . interested in children. 



RUTH ANN BROWN 
Lebanon, Pa. 



JACK BRYSON 
Ephrata, Pa. 



Biology . . 
talented songst 

for laughter, a 1 



eager conversationalist . . . 
ss . . . May Day Imp . . . easy 
athletically inclined ... a jest 
re for clothes, a love for excite- 



usiness Administration 
he life of the party . . 
ndly disposition 



"Smilin' Jack" 



: package of energy. 





JAMES BURCHFIELD 
Hummelstown, Pa. 

Biology . . . bears an impressive name well 
. . . Burch's geniality creates friendly relations 
... a bowling fan . . . widely traveled the Pacific 
with the Marine Corps . . . preparing for veter- 
inary work. 



JOYCE CARPENTER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Music . . . "Little Joyce" . . . fun-loving . . . 
small but mighty Glee Club soprano . . . curly 
hair attributed to nature . . . lovely to look at, 
delightful to know . . . outstanding leader. 



GEORGE CHARLES 
Lebanon, Pa. 




E. DOROTHEA COHEN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Music . . . Dolly . . . pianist versatile and 
proficient, from Bach to Be-bop . . . "Why, 
naturally!" . . . rarely hurries . . . appreciative 
of the wee hours ... La Vie staff. 



DONALD COLDREN 
Mifflintown, Pa. 



Music . . 
recital partn 
bulls 



JOHN COYLE 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Business Administration . . . "I'm open for 
offers" . . . pro-labor . . . democratic . . . "Jack" 
is rarely seen without a companion. 





CLEMENT DAUBENSPECK 
Rockville Centre, N. Y. 

Political Science ... he of few w 
islikes publicity . . . spends his lei: 
iding horses, especially on moonlit n 
in of Cleveland Indians. 



DEAN DOUGHERTY 
Dallastown, Pa. 



better half at ho 



WILLIAM DAVEY 
Marys ville, Pa. 

Business Administration . . 
salesman . . . determined to 
of his ambitions . . . "Billy's" hi 
. . . asset to library staff. 



a high-pressure 
ach the heights 
i-working daddy 




DONALD DEGLER 
Manheim, Pa. 

Business Administration . . . dark eyes that 
spell plenty of mischief . . . favors South Hall . . . 
dashing Don . . . exuberant . . . dining hall 
prankster . . . buoyant and chipper . . . wrestler. 



PAUL DEINER 



Pre-Mmisterial . . . never 
brief-case . . . busy with his "c 
sit in history class all day long 



GEORGE DELONG 



English . . . 
Loves Mary 
favors Sheridai 
this one." 



thespian artist . . . hit in John 
. . . magnetic personality . . . 
Hall . . . "Stop me if you heard 




DONALD DEXTER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PAUL DOWNEY 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



: Administration . . 

f brings good res 
teaches his child] 
commutes via thur 



believes haunting 



Biology . 
French fried potatoes . 
high . . . wants to be 
. . . snappy dresser. 



inded . . . "P.D." likes 
. Esther Williams rates 
n osteopathic physician 



FLORENCE DUNKELBERGER 
Newville, Pa. 

Biology . . . "Rusty" ... a Newvillite with a 
Maine accent . . . "the umbrellah and the 
vanillah" . . . captivating dimple and dancing 
eyes . . . biology major and capable lab ass't. 




BETTY EDELMAN 
Robesonia, Pa. 

Biology ... so proud of Robesonia . . . one o 
the old West Hall gang . . . all-round sports 
. characterized by her lilting laughtei 
aspires to be a doctor . . . "Look, ma, I'm 



JEANNE EDWARDS 
Lemoyne, Pa. 

y . . . possesses a charm tt 
. . has many heart interests . 
glamazon . . . swings a i 



HAROLD ENGLE 
Palmyra, Pa. 

Chemistry . . . molecules become ill at 
in his presence ... a "Reddy" friend 
earnest, quiet and steady. 





"«*** ■* 




PAT ESPOSITO 
Garfield, N. I. 
Administration . . . c 



SARA ANN ETZWEILER 
Columbia, Pa. 

Chemistry . . . always willing to help . . . 
leads a lively life as the undertaker's dauahter . . . 
talkative ... a true Clio supporter . . . LV fashion 
plate . . . sings the "cuddle up" songs. 



GUY EUSTON 
Pottstown, Pa. 

Business Administration ... a fellow liked by 
everyone . . . always willing to help . . . out- 
standing on the gridiron . . . reserved sense of 
humor . . . "Lefty" is never "down" . . . Quittie's 
finance wizard. 






ROBERT FEASTER 
Hagerstown, Md. 



RICHARD FIELDS 
Lebanon, Pa. 



JAMES L. FISHER 
Thurmont, Md. 



Pre-Ministerial . . . member of Thursday night Education . . . determined student . . . "Of Music . . . Prof's right-hand man . . . watta 

bowling team . . . will attend Bonebrake Theologi- course, it's a car; it runs, doesn'tit?" . . ."Shorty" tenor . . . ah, those rolling hills and winding 

cal Seminary after graduation . . . dry wit. patrols right field . . . gashouse great . . . ar- roads of Dixie . . . has the wink that calls them 

dently works for L Club. hither . . cordial collegian. 






WILLIAM P. FISHER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

(-Medical . . . Massachusetts accent . . 
and retentive mind . . . determined golfer 
alert . . . top-notch student . . . reserved 
. dependable . . . envisions taking 
the Hippocratic oath. 



PAUL JAY FLOCKEN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Political Science . . . exemplifies the term 
student . . . creative interests . . . Yankee fan 
. . . conservative tastes . . . sandlot athlete . . . 
pipes, music, books . . . "Have you seen Section 
Four of The New York Times?" 










HARRY FOX 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry . . . the Whistler . . . victim of 
malicious gossip . . . "You wanna bet, lad?" . . . 
studies foreign languages as a hobby . . . "Pear- 
shape" likes all kinds of food and plenty of it. 






JOSEPH FRANK 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Biology 
ambitious ^ 



JEAN FRANTZ 
Myerstown, Pa. 

Music . . . agreeable disposition ... a true 
friend . . . enjoys listening to baseball games 
. . . outstanding organist and pianist . . . "Jubi- 
lant Jean" . . . pinochle fiend. 



MIRIAM FULLER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Music . . . makes rhythm on the bass . . . likes 
vacations and "Lemon" aid . . . "Sleepy-time 
Gal" . . . ya-ta-ta, ya-ta-ta . . . infectious smile 
. . . versatile. 




- ■■v- 






CLARENCE FUNK 
Lebanon, Pa. 

. P. I. A. A. referee . . . vital interest 
. . devoted and faithful church 
. active supply preacher . . . friend- 
. . . a quiet, steady student with a 




CHARLES GARRETT, JR. 
Hershey, Pa. 

Chemistry . . . promoter of Junior Class . . . 
ticket taker at Hershey Park . . . hopes to become 
a dentist . . . likes "good musicals." 



ROLAND GARVIN 
Taneytown, Md. 

History . . . third-floor hermit . . . transfer 
from Shenandoah College . . . "Deacon" . . . 
hopes to become a pulpiteer. 








CAROLYN GASSART 
Palmyra, Pa. 



ROBERT GEIB 
Tower City, Pa. 



JAMES GEISELHART 
Rutherford, N. J. 



Music . . . long, wavy tresses . . . pleasing English . . . "Wanna buy a car?" . . . sub' 

personality . . . musical talents . . . interested wit . . . "I should have stayed with physics" . 

in a certain teacher . . . not enthusiastic about bachelor type . . . writes poetry, plays based 

sports . . . enjoys playing cards . . . taciturn. Shakespeare class. 



. . easy going . . . 
eight in there" ii 
minine pulse quicke 



"Joisey" ' 






MILAN GERASINOVICH 
Lebanon, Pa. 

1 to compen- 



Biology . . . burning midnight > 
sate for a year's absence . . . that 
. . . does baby sitting for wife . . 
position . . . "Mickey" gives good 



PIERCE GETZ 
Denver, Pa. 

Music . . . tall and lanky lad . . . tops as ivory 
tickler . . . droll humor . . . frequent recitalist 
. . . dependable and bland . . . church organist 
. . . asks countless questions. 



GEORGE GEYER 
Middletown, Pa. 

re-Medical . . . Mr. Geeser of physics class 
. Mumble's rival . . . sought-after bachelor 
. everybody's favorite . . . reserved intellect 
. composed air . . . Green Blotter. 






KERRY GINGRICH 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Biology . . . never without a smile . . . Ge 
Club enthusiast . . . spare moments in the 
try as gentleman farmer . . . frequent 
anatomy lab . . . attractive wife . 
student. 



BERNARD GOLDSMITH 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



JAMES GREENE 
Folsom, Pa. 



Pre-Medical . . . 
clothes make the man 
relation to Oliver . . 
burg has everything!" 





JOHN I. GROSNICK 
Hershey, Pa. 

Social Science . . . "life" of public speaking 
class — using dog tricks ... a "copper" . . . 
mature manner . . . confident speaker with 
definite ideas. 



History 
waffles and most prof; 



FLOYD GRUBB 
Williamstown, Pa. 
big man with a lit 



MARGARET HALBERT 
Rutherford Heights, Pa. 



Music . . . ardent card fa 
. . . always buying cat food 
a choral instructress . . . pre 
addict . . . cheerful and core 



. . ambition to be 
astinator . . . diet 
I . . . neat appear- 




Biology . 



ANNA FAY HALL 
Palmyra, Pa. 

. full of life . . . Hank's 
stay of Day Student intra 
gyles perpetually . . . 
. blithe companion. 



RICHARD HAWK 
Reading, Pa. 



RAYMOND HEBERLIG 
Shamokin, Pa. 

Biology . . . "Let's face it" . . . c 
assistant . . . takes things as they 
diligent student . . . versatile athlete. 





JOHN W. HECK 
Reading, Pa. 



ing water for Albright footballer: 



lifted treason by i 



HAROLD HEISEY 

s Administration . . . his one ambition — 
to own a Cadillac . . . favorite subject in and out 
of school: Philadelphia Phillies . . . pitches for 
the Dutchmen . . . "Could be!" 



ELVIN V. HELLER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

History . . . always a good-natured quipster 
except about his Forlorn Athletics . . . enveloping 
personality ... a serious history student . . . 
Oh! No girls! Oh, no . . . contagious, adven- 






LEWIS CLIFTON HEMINWAY 
Woodlynne, N. J. 

English . . . admirer of Byron . . . 
humor . . . enthusiastic about horse ra< 
bridge . . . persistent . . . vacation-time i 
in Wildwood . . . retiring 



JOHN HESS 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Education . . . youngest of the famous athletic 
Hess brothers . . . commendable impersonation 
of "Scratch Pigskin" and "Confucius" . . . well 
dressed ... a school teacher in the making. 



JOHN HOAK 



re-Medical . . . terrific man c 
. this "Gentleman Prefers 
s the "human treatment" re 
. hopes to become an M.D. 



i the hard wood 

Blonde" . . . 

:eived at L. V. 






MARLIN NEAL HOFFER 
Palmyra, Pa. 

Pre-Medical . . . tall, gangling fello 
od humor . . . Fisher's lab partne: 
us make him ping-pong expert. 



IRA HOSTETTER 
Palmyra, Pa. 



JOHN HOUSMAN 



Political Scienc 
. . . easy talker 
interests. 



Liberal Arts . . . 
"Captain of the Clo 
doors . . . received i 
ite School, Virginia. 



efined gentleman ... is a 
ds" . . . enjoys the out-of- 
B.A. from Eastern Mennon- 






RICHARD K. HUNTZINGER 



CYNTHIA JOHNSON 



STEPHEN F. JORDAN 



Biology 
stamps . . 
actually se> 



. . . "What's that?" . . . 
striving to become a doctor 
n (the) South Pacific. 



English . . 
was in the Hex . . . fe 
. . . likes to argue . . . 
think I'll cut this class." 



Harrisburg, Pa. 

attractive blonde . . . her picture 
y's constant companion 



gentlemen 
sonality . .' 



. . the library i 
lough for Stev 
of the jury — " 
. "The Importa; 



t open early enough 
. .. . ''Ladies and 
. . unaffected per- 
• of Being Earnest.' 







RICHARD KAYLOR 



English . . . d 
member of The 
get my major?" 
intelligence. 



RAY KAUFFMAN 
Oley, Pa. 

. has the settled look of I 
r from Muhlenberg and frc 
ic . . . proud Chevrolet 



ROBERT L. KAUFFMAN 
Lititz, Pa. 



English . 
"Ike's" mai 

student. 



. wants to do fre< 
interests are Ar 
public speaker 



-lance writing . . . 

i. Lit. and football 

. . . outstanding 






BERNARD L. KECKLER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Administration . . . Bernie's ve 
agreeable — few dislikes . . . has seen the U. 
and the South Pacific, thanks to Uncle Sam . 
sociology appeals to him. 



MIRIAM KELLER 
Ephrata, Pa. 



Psychology 
"Who? Me?" . 






THOMAS F. KIRCHOFF 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Chemistry . . . pleasant personality with the 
gift of conversation . . . mild voice and friendly 
manner . . . Tom is an earnset and willing stu- 
dent . . . "doin' what comes natchurally" — 
chemistry. 






Music 
Romeo . . 
those Gle 



KERMIT KIEHNER 
Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 

. . stands up for Kalo 
. well groomed . . . low 
Club tours. 



LARRY KINSELLA 
Linden, N. I. 

Political Science . . . tall, blond man of many 
fords . . . "dribble and shoot" . . . on the waiter 
jrce . . satanic grin . . . characteristic walk. 



CALVIN G. KIPP 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 

Religion . . . ambition lies in the ministry . . . 
devotes spare time to active church work . . . 
fond of ice cream . . . habitually quotes favorite 
sayings from the Bible. 







CHARLES KISCADDEN 
Lebanon, Pa. 

German . . . collects the "works' 
Jones . . . great interest in languages 
to teach them . . . favors musical coi 
breaded veal cutlets. 



of Spike 



RICHARD KLINE 
Fleetwood, Pa. 



rifted with gab 



JOAN KLINGLER 
Hershey, Pa. 

Mathematics . . . former Susquehanna Univ. 
co-ed . . . winsome ways . . . becoming haircut 
. . . sweet and petite . . . knows her numbers 
and figures . . . pleasing disposition . . . comely 
addition to our class. 





ROBERT C. KNOWLTON 




RICHARD KOHLER 


ANNA MAE KREIDER 


Harrisburg, Pa. 




Allentown, Pa. 


Cleona, Pa. 


Chemistry . . . avid chemist and synthesizer 
of strange compounds . . . knows a lot about 
Dicumorol . . . brother to L.V.C.'s Mose . . . 
summers at Pine Grove Furnace. 


English . 


. . Glee Clubber . . . grows a blond 
ne of Miss Becker's men . . . studious 
iplished pianist . . . booster of his 
. . . ideal roommate . . . good worker 
fan. 


Music . . . diminutive pianist . . . anxious to 
do her practice teaching . . . bewitching eyes 
. . . cute little Clionian . . . dainty . . . peppy 






CHARLES KREIS 
Cleona, Pa. 

Music . . . perpetual tardiness . . . trombone 
modernist and dance-band enthusiast . . . makes 
a unique entrance to a symphony concert . . . 
matrimonially bonded . . . questionable mode o£ 
transportation. 



Chemistry 
Fiction" thin 
pipes, pipes, . 



JOHN KRIEG 
Newark, N. J. 

. wears the pages of "Sc: 
. sports a "porcupine cut" 
i more pipes. 



ELAM S. KURTZ 
Elverson, Pa. 

Pre-Medical . . . efficient and studious . . . 
ex-farmer; still interested in pure-bred Holstein 
cattle . . . has traveled with male quartet . . . 
"First things first." 




ANDREW B. LAUDER 
Great Neck, N. Y. 

rounting . . . Andy, automobiles, account- 
nd Ava (Gardner movies) . . . quiet lauder 
i bridge man . . . C.P.A. future. 





JEAN LEESER 
Auburn, Pa. 

History . . . life of the party 
. . . loyal to South Hall ... da: 
feet . . . oh, so talkative . . . pr 
spirit . . . "No kiddin'." 



WILLIAM LEMON 
Middletown, Pa. 

lodge worker . . . Fred Waring 
likes football, cars, seafood and 
plays a "hot" cornet . . . under- 
. . . detests motorcycles and reck- 





ALLEN LIGHT 
Avon, Pa. 

Pre-Medical . . . congenial . . . never tires of 
talking . . . sleeps in English class . . . wavy hair 
. . . student who delights in looking at the world 
through a microscope. 



LOUISE LIGHT 
Lebanon, Pa. ' 

usic . . . sports-minded . . . 
alto in Glee Club . . . mistress 
thoughtful . . . works in a n 



ANNA LIND 
Westhampton, L. I., N. Y. 

Chemistry . . . crisp appearance . . . invigorat- 
ing addition to Junior Class . . . Dagwood sand- 
wiches . . . future chemist . . . loves L. V. chem. 
labs . . . troop train to Florida. 






ETHEL LONG 
Hershey, Pa. 



this is funny" 
j fan of Mrs. Jols 



College transfer . . . 
. . follows world series 
n's son . . . pert, petite, 



EVELYN J. LONG 
Jonestown, Pa. 

History . . . commutes in a convertible . . 
has those Scarlett O'Hara eyes . . . father's sec- 
retary during vacations . . . inexhaustible supply 
of clothes . . . vivacious . . . doing practice 
teaching — in Sunday School. 



ROBERT LONGENECKER 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Psychology . 
lives by Matthe 
Nth degree . 



. quiet, reserved fellow who 
7: 12 . . . conscientious to the 
'ill do missionary work. 






RICHAHD LUKASIEWICZ 
Schenectady, N. Y. 

Music . . . handsome and quiet . 
bear" cut . . . "Real fine" . . . likes wc 
electrical gadgets . . . enjoyed mov 
Red Shoes" and "Henry V." 



NORMAN LUKENS 
Wormleysburg, Pa. 

Business Administration . . . amazingly quiet 
—in class . . . hard-hitting third-sacker . . . 
crew cut . . . popular gridiron center . . . ring- 
leader of pinochle 



NANCY LUTZ 
Lititz, Pa. 

c ... the "Jenny Lind" of Sheridan Hall 
.r top Bill-ings follow a southern trend . . . 
o" ... a contagious giggle and dimples 
dth it. 




DOROTHEA LYNN 
Pottsville, Pa. 

Music . . . blonde bombshell ... a North Hall History . 

diet addict . . . procrastinates profusely . . . Scotch . . . 

attired in the latest Vogue styles . . . pertly Sisters' aci 

pretty . . . constant cry: "Telephone for Dottie." talented, ta 



HELEN ANNA MacFARLAND 
Glenside, Pa. 

all-star athlete . . . glory of the 

od sport . . . Patty of the Andrews 

Mac's always busy . . . tall, 



JOHN MARKS 
Richland, Pa. 







KENNETH I. MARKS 
Richland, Pa. 

Physics . . . interested in politics and physics 
. . plans include grad school . . . "Kenny" 
aises Irish setters ... a sweet tooth. 



JOAN MATTERN 
Miners ville, Pa. 



. infectious laugh . . . burns the mid- 
. hash-hoister . . . quiet? . . . always 



'illing to lend a helping hand . 



ROBERT MEALS 



Pre-Medical ... an accomplished fire-escape 
artist . . . unexpected visitor at a New Year's 
Eve party on North Hall's third floor . . . can't 
get enough of Miss Becker's sandwiches. 






ROBERT H. MECKLEY 
Penbrook, Pa. 

Administration . . - goes in lor con- 
ventional jazz and "westerns" ... a handy 
woodworker . . . ambition is to travel. 



JOHN C. MESSERSMITH 
York, Pa. 

Pre-Dental . . . keen sense of humor . . . "Do 
you have that down?" . . . excellent scholarship 
. . . conscientious . . . ping-pong lessons given 
free of charge. 



BARBARA METZGER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



t't understand that!" . 
. had so much trouble 
3 in Puppets. 



n, Vigor ... "I just 
. mistress of repartee 
dth her one and only 






Chemistry 
heavens" . . 
of chemistry 



EUGENE E. MEYERS 
Dallastown, Pa. 

. . . man of colleges . 

. delights in the surp 
. . . taking educatic 



ZOSIA MIECZKOWSKA 
Reading, Pa. 

. cute little Zosh . . . likes reading' 
d sewing . . . spark of English Lit 



of hu 






GERALD D. MILLER 
Rohrersville, Md. 

Business Administration . . . discerning in- 
dividual ... at home in Aanville . . . second 
floor of Washington Hall a favorite spot . . . both 
cooperative and confident . . . ready to act. 






ROBERT K. MILLER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Chemistry . . . "Let's hit the 
awarded Chemistry research fello 
isolationist . . . who else could take c 
class? . . . "Scruff" has a lab at 
handsome. 



WILLIAM MILLER 
Roebling, N. J. 

Biology . . . gallant, good-natured, good stu- 
dent . . . manner of a gentleman embodied in a 
leader . . . terrific torso . . . Romeo-instinct . . . 
willing helper. 



ROBERT E. MOLLER 
Morris ville. Pa. 

Political Science . . . campus politico . . 
balletomane . . . B.M.O.C. ... the last of the 
Montclair Mollers ... a political science convert 
. . . president of Kalo and Pol. Sci. club. 





RICHARD MOORE 
Ridley Park, Pa. 

Music . . . dislikes spiritless students 
tumbling cheerleader . . . keen sports fan 
winning smile . . . cigarette bun 



ALBERT F. MORICONI 
Morrisville, Pa. 



i of L. V. C. 

al . 



olinist pa 



cleated shoe 
ellenc 



Political Scienc 
. . mainstay of ] 

n demand . . . 
adiates culture. 



. . diligent La Vi. 
i workshop . . . e-r 



CHARLES J. MORINCHIN 



. . usually with hometown gang . . . 
suffered with "Beans" in French class 
ch of Minersvillage. 





HORACE F. MOYER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Business Administration . . . quiet, reserved 
appearance . . . accomplished trumpet player 
. . . keen baseball fan . . . intellectual, cultural 
quahties an asset to L. V. and class ... a friendly 
disposition . . . will enter business. 



RICHARD MOYER 
Sellersville, Pa. 



ROBERT MRGICH 
Steelton, Pa. 



Business Adrr, 
business world 
varied subjects . 
industrious aca 
steady worker . 



. . . future asset to 
urses intelligently on 
in college library . . . 



mpetitive . . . "Anything 
lo, Prof." . . . Steelton's 
representative on L. V. 






FRANK A. NICKEL 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Pre-Ministerial . . . inspires confidence 
gets around— in a Ford . . . willing worker . 
"I guess I'll take another Ehrhart t 



FRANCIS A. NOGLE 
Waynesboro, Pa. 

Music . . . always wears a big smi 
. . . well supplied with gray matter 
for oboe . . . enjoys married life. 



DONALD A. POTTER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Education. . . tall man . . ."Dee" 
ball balmy * . . incipient pedagogue . 
a new ping-pong service. 





JOHN N. PATTERSON 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Pre-Medical . . . distinguished voic« 
keeps the books for the French Club . . . 
as choir director . . . orator . . . optimist. 



EUGENE PATRICK 
Palmyra, Pa. 



f-Ministerial . . . sense 

. . works part time 
■tempered thinker . . . 



umor, frank i 

drug store 
jus student. 



RICHARD I. PEIFER 
Reading, Pa. 

English . . . Dick ... the man v, 
bass . . . Saturday night jobs . . . f 
sationalist . . . always ready to prove his point 
. . . available, but questionable ta 





***&***** 




LOIS PERRY 
Northfield, N. J. 

. . "Mouse" . . . blue jeans 

. just a-sittin' and a-knittin' 
. . hilarious imitations . . . bl 
active in campus life. 



GALE B. PLANTZ 
Enola, Pa. 



many moods . . . endles 
ways forgetting his coat 
le pulchritude. 



RALPH T. PORTER 
Stony Creek, Pa. 

Music . . . proud papa of baby Bonita . . 
uiet addition to music field . . . clarinetist 
le ranks of the blue and white. 





GERALD PRATT 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

. veteran of love 
argue than eat . . 

:m in good spirits. 



MARK RAESSLER 
Palmyra, Pa. 

English . . . minister's son who drivt 
Ford convertible . . . intellectual type 
about town . . . industrious and cor 
. . . never goes to class unprepared . 



PATRICIA RIIHILUOMA 
"Finlandia" Pembroke, Bermuda 

Music . . . dark, attractive senorita . . . out- 
standing pianist . . . charming personality . . . 
Pat and Zosh . . . "Sugar 'n' spice and everything 
nice" . . . has a glint in her eye . . . writes poetic 








EARL E. REDDING 
York, Pa. 



CHESTER L. RICHWINE 
New Cumberland, Pa. 



Business Administration . . . newcomer to our Music . . . plays cornet with gusto . . . the 

class from York Junior College . . . hopes to be- Gregory Peck type ... an extra addition to the 

come a C. P. A. . . . "Some guys have it, and Glee Club tour . . . congenial . . . has that 

some guys don't" . . . finds working on waiter musician's haircut, 
force relaxing. 



GEORGE RITNER 
West Lawn, N. J. 

Music . . . congregates classical records 
magnificent tenor . . . enjoys camping and i 
trips . . . inspires sighs when he sings those 
ballads . . . ambition: concert and opera wc 




Mil 





BARNET ROETENBERG 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



CHARLES E. ROLAND 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



Adn 



"Ba 



like 



linistration ..." 'Barney' ' 
his steaks well done . . . hopes to have his own 
business some day . . . "Many are called, but 
few are chosen" . . . has traveled — with the 
Army Infantry. 



BEATRICE ROYER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Music . . . can pick her own corsages . . . 
efficiency plus . . . outstanding vocalist . . . that 
certain touch on flute and piccolo . . . "Oh, that 
Methods class!" 




CLYDE JOHN SAYLOR 
Lebanon, Pa. 

English. . . man about town . . . tennis, bridge, 
and symphonies . . . critical tastes ... a genial 
host . . . "Saylor's Pharmacy" . . . HAP-ily mar- 
ried . . . namesake of the president of the Class 
of 1900. 



RICHARD SCHIEMER 
Rochelle Park, N. J. 

Administration . . . asset to his class 
. . . striking good looks . . . guardian of '51's 
purse-strings ... a well of wit that never runs 
dry . . . dresses to a T. 



C. RUSSELL SCHNECK 
Lebanon, Pa. 

c . . . man of baffling questions . . . sweet 
v clarinet player . . . friendly and congen- 
. sense of humor . . . "Adolph" has a long 
1 background. 





i 



EDITH ROMAINE SHANAMAN 



[usic . . . makes a hobby of dressmaking . . . 
ambition is to become a music teacher . . . 
n instrumental interest is organ . . . happy 
> who likes serious movies best. 



WILSON SHEARER 
Dillsburg, Pa. 



History . . . anothe 
206. . . forever in sea 
with a slow smile . . 



P.K. . . . sur* 
rchoffood. . 
. "Gotta' go 



MYRNA SHENK 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Sociology . . . soft-spoken . . . sports fan . . . 
drives to school . . . will succeed with her stand- 
ards . . . interests outside of school . . . "angelic 
smile" . . . model of dignity. 






1 




LOIS SHETLER 
Jenkintown, Pa. 

Music . . . knitting enthusiast . . . frequents 
the Conserv and the Penway . . . rapid conversa- 
tionalist . . . even temperament . . . nightly 
pincurls . . . wounded bloomer girl. 



ANNE SHROYER 
Annville, Pa. 

Music . . . never too busy to do one more tl 
. . . talented Conservite . . . blues-chaser 
stage siren . . . that vivacious co-ed look 
fascinating peepers. 



ARLENE SHUEY 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Music . . . "Sporty" . . . classic clown with a 
giggle to match . . . stanch supporter of Sheridan 
. . . member of the dining hall's "order of the 
white jackets" . . . she "fiddles" in her spare 




i*P : :- ^RF^ 





GERALD SHUPP 




ROBERT SHULTZ 




New Cumberland, Pa. 




Reading, Pa. 




Business Administration . . . "Jerry" . . . tall, 
blond, impeccably dressed . . . classic profile 
. . . shrewd sense of humor . . . pet peeve: 
English Lit . . . passion for dazzling sweaters 
. . . "curses on the Romantic Movement." 


Music . 
minded . 

attractive " 


. as tall as they come . 
distinct chuckle . . 
. . friendly disposition . . 
ro-operative . . . low bass 
rau." 


collects 
. marital 




Pre-Medical . . . Carl's determination i 
itable . . . reliable student and frien< 
voices logical, effective conclusions in ^ 
voice . . . dabbles in ping-pong. 





HERMAN SMITH 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Pre-Ministerial . 
It. . . . ardently n 
n acting minister . 



enjoys hunting at Peter 
s gladiolus . . . already i 
. sparkling pleasantry . . 











GEORGE . 


STARR 










Llwellyn 


, Pa 


Mathei 


nat 


ici 


i ... rod 


and c 


Nh 


at s; 


iron 


ii f 


irst name?" 


. . . m 



DONALD STEINBERG 
Newport, Pa. 



cholarly 



■ientiii< 



edical . . . handball tyro . . . s 
nee . . . keenly interested in s 

. . the very height of naturalness . . . 

Newport — " . . . indulges in the impon- 
; of thought. 




JEANNE STINE 



JOSEPH M. STUBBS 



loses hei 
Quittie. 



. . . keeps Sherida 
way to the practic 
for gay parties . 



faithful typist for 



sense of humo 
. . . ambition 
. . . enjoys fri« 



inistration . . . "Jimmy Stewart" 
. . . steaks and mystery movies 
5 further travel in Africa, Europe 
ndly atmosphere of L. V. and real 



RAYMOND SWINGHOLM 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Education . . . Saturday morning lak 
ss in "Beamie's" fresh-air taxi . 
. "Let's go out for a smoke." 




FRANCENE SWOPE 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Education . . . wears tailored clothes to per- 
fection . . . active day student . . . "Where's 
Dick?" . . . knits during every spare minute . . . 
sterling qualities . . . essence of friendliness . . 
lilting laugh. 



follov 



DONALD L. TROSTLE 
Hanover, Pa. 

ic . . . cute accent man with a bs 
3 the Kenton style ... oh, thos. 
lEnglishLit' . . . wrote L. V.'s jazzy 



MARTIN TROSTLE 
Dillsburg, Pa. 



om addict" . 
always on the i 
indeed that ba 





' 



LEE R. THIERWECHTER 



Pre- Veterinarian . . . anticipates further study 
at U. of P. . . . reserved individual . . . choir 
boy. . . knows his "Deutsch" . . . hopes to have 
his own animal hospital . . . would make a good 



JOHN E. VOGEL 



h . . . daily pilgr 
olutionize busines 
. . two Spanish c 



THEODORE E. WAGNER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Business Administration . . . ex-G.I. . . . 
married. . . believes L.V.'s size creates informal- 
ity, a vital element in liberal education. 





English . 

appearance 
ward to her rr 



NORMA WEAVER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

well-groomed tresses 
. . happy-go-lucky . . . 



PAUL WEAVER 
Middletown, Pa. 

fancy to French 
. . . always relating hi: 
... a true sportsman 
about wife and daughter 



GEORGE WERNER 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Physics . . . dark, quiet, handsome, and rr 
ried . . . high idealist . . . tremendous voca 
lary . . . math whiz . . . interesting in bull ; 




PATRICIA WERNER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



WILLIAM O. WERT 
Palmyra, Pa. 



CHARLES WILLIAMS 
Portland, Pa. 



French . . 
. . . bridge is his 
"(Censored)" . . . i 
rugged individualist 



L.V.C.'sNo. 1 

i his minor . 

lways ha 



ay-sayer of F.D.R 
favorite saying 



History . . . me 
,ding in summer. 
. . "Spence" ha 





BRUCE WISER 



Music . . . always the center of good fun . 
capable leader ... our slender, blonde-ha 
baton twirler and bandmaster . . . Bud ha; 
interest in the Registrar's Office. 



RUTH WITHERS 
Dallastown, Pa. 

. very shy, quiet person . . , 
short, dark-haired tray-toter . . . 
warm smile for everybody . . . 
lomer . . . studious . . . modest 





RONALD WOLF 
Jonestown, Pa. 

Social Science . . . abundance of friends . . . 
keen warbler . . . immaculate dresser . . . 
talker . . . plays the cornet . . . business minded 



Affiliate c 
attends class- 
pipe in hand 



HARRY W. WOLFE 
Lebanon, Pa. 

his little black Chevy to 

. . member of Student 

Chemistry Society . . . 

spare time . . . lectures — 



ery day 




HENRY F. WOLFSKEIL 
Roselle Park, N. J. 

Pre-Medical . . 
experiences . . . 

scoop 



NEAL WOLL 
Reinerton, Pa. 



always relating his hospital 
akes his own records . . 
hopes to be an ob- 



Administratton 



basketball-base- 



"Doc 









GLENN WOODS 
Charabersburg, Pa. 




HAROLD YINGST 
Lebanon, Pa. 


English . 
bersburg" . 
Workshop e 
. . . Trostle 
ested in jour 


. authority on "burning of 
. . an Esquire dresser . . 
nthusiast . . . complicated lc 
s side-kick . . friendly . . 
nalism. 


Cham- 
Radio 

ve life 
inter- 


Mathematics . . . flashes a winning smile . . . 
abstract thinker and individualist . . . physics 
and Harold are related . . . "Let me explain it 
scientifically — " ... a member of that dwindling 
race— students- 




CHARLES L. ZIMMERMAN 
Lebanon, Pa.' 

Mathematics ... a team-player i 
sports . . a clear thinker, who lets £ 



life, as in 
>: "to thine 




RAYMOND S. ZIMMERMAN 
Lemoyne, Pa. 

Psychology . . . versatile man — dual major 
. . . affinity with college administration . . . 
short, dark, stocky . . . taciturnly affable . . . 
potential iconoclast . . . leans toward Lemoyne 



RICHARD H. ZIMMERMAN 
Hershey, Pa. 

Chemistry . . likes any movie with a good 
story . . . hopes to go into research chemistry 
. . . sports are his hobby . . . intellectual. 



UNDERCLASSMEN 



Growing aware of the barriers looming 

between man and the realization of these opportunities, 

students are preparing to surmount them . . . 



Q UITTAPAHILLA 




Edward Tesnar, Dorothy Whitmer, Larry Guenther 



President EDWARD TESNAR 

Secretary DOROTHY WHITMER 

Treasurer LARRY GUENTHER 



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60 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




The "Renaissance" class which entered Lebanon Valley College in September 1948, brought 
with it a partial rebirth of school spirit and revival of vivacity and animation which are synony- 
mous with college life. From its first college days, this fun-loving class has engaged whole- 
heartedly in campus activities. 

The addition of many athletes from the class to Valley sports was keenly noticeable; even 
the women turned out in large numbers to give their support to the growing interest in athletics. 

Highlights of the freshman year of the Class of '52 included the election of Bob Burtner to 
the presidency and "The Cherry Hop," held in the Hershey Community Inn. . 

In its sophomore year, the class, headed by Edward Tesnar, climaxed a successful football 
season with its equally successful dance, "The Foot-Ball." 

As a class, the sophomores have helped to bring back to L. V. C. the youthful vigor so typi- 
cal of pre-war college days. 



. 1951 



QUITTAPAH ILLA 




QUITTAPAHILLA 




Q U I T T A P A H I L L A 




Donald Hedgecock, Grace Mohn, Charles Kagey, Charles Blaich 



President CHARLES KAGEY 

Vice President CHARLES BLAICH 

Secretary GRACE MOHN 

Treasurer DONALD HEDGECOCK 



F 
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QUITTAPAHILLA 



F 
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The Class of 1953 is the first class wholly and typically "freshman" to come to the Lebanon 
Valley Campus since the end of the Second World War — no veteran influence, all of high school 
age and filled with high school spirit. It was a gang of bright-eyed teenagers, eager for the 
college life, respectful of upperclassmen, and almost anxious to abide by the strictly re-enforced 
freshman rules. They undertook the tasks and responded to the regimentation with an air that 
the more mature, veteran-dominated classes of recent years refused to generate. 

Its members also demonstrated that they are worthy of trust and leadership in the years to 
come by the lively and efficient campaigns waged in the election of class officers, the active 
participation in campus activities, and the well planned, beautiful Frosh Hop. 

Lebanon Valley, by the signs of the times, is back on the road of typical college life with 
the influx of youthful energy and vigor supplied by the Class of 1953, freshmen. 



•1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




QUITTAPAHILLA 




ACTIVITIES 



Daily, students are working and playing — 

developing the attributes of unselfishness, understanding, and tolerance, 



; ignorance, a 





QUITTAPAHILLA 



67 





MISS QUITTIE 



Ruth Ann Brown 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




MISS QUITTIE COURT 



Cynthia Johnson 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




MISS QUITTIE COURT 



Rufina Balmer 



QUIT TAPAHI LLA 




MR. LEBANON VALLEY 



Albert Moriconi 



MAY DAY 




QUITTAPAHILLA 




Ella Mae Shultz, Nancy Meyers, Beatrice Meiser, Martha Miller, Janet We 
Paul Freeland, Janet Miller, Raymond Stachow. 



, Mary O'Donnell, Joanna Lawhead, Vera Boyer; Children: M 



It was a glorious spring day, May 7, when the Royal Queen of May, Janet Weaver, with her Maid 
of Honor, Martha Miller, and her attendants, Ella Shultz, Beatrice Meiser, Nancy Meyers, Joanna Law- 
head, Vera Boyer, and Mary O'Donnell ascended the throne in the preliminary ceremonies of the 
1 949 May Day Pageant. 

The Supreme Court had set aside this day to select the Bride of the Eagle, a girl to represent all 
America at the forthcoming 1976 World's Fair at Washington, celebrating the admission of Alaska 
into the Union and the 200th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence. She was 
to preside at the ceremonies granting statehood to Alaska, present the new National flag to the President 
and the new state flag to Alaska. All this had been the plan of Senator Hoskins, the first senator from 
Alaska. But he died suddenly, leaving half a million dollars to the still-to-be-selected-girl, and the head- 
ache of picking the girl to the Supreme Court. 

Each group descended from the early settlers — Indian, French, English, Spanish, Negro, Irish, 
Italian, and Filipino (Hawaii was the 49th state) — brought their claims and performed native dances 
representing the part they had in the making of America. The Court heard them all, but could reach 
no decision. 

Finally, among a group of children from an orphans' home, was a girl named Estelle Dawn. She 
had obscure origins, and so because she belonged to no special group, but could represent them all 
and all America, they chose her. 

And that is how Estelle Dawn became the Bride of the Eagle in the Alaskan Grand Igloo at the 
Washington Exposition. 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILL A 







- ,, 



ORGANIZATIONS 




QUITTAPAHILLA 




1st rov 


r. Margaret Bower, Wilma Stambach, Pascal Esposito, Charles Kagey, William 


2ndro 


w: Betty Shfer, Nancy Bright, Dave Bomgardner, Dale Snyder, Robert Khne. 


3rdro 


w: George DeLong, Edward Wert, Dr. Cooper, Rev. Gockley, David Wallace. 


4th ro 


v: Janet Eppley, Norman Bucher, John Nilan, Donald Steinberg; Charles Garret 


5th ro 


«: Donald Paine, Albert Moriconi, Pres. Raymond Kline. 



STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL 



Beginning the year with another grand attempt at reorganization, the Student-Faculty 
Council has begun to attain the stature necessary for a campus coordinating agency. Paced by 
an active president and genuinely interested faculty members, the Council has been more 
effective in achieving its purposes on campus than it had been in some time. 

The policy of the Council has been to inaugurate more all-campus affairs and to stimulate 
intercollegiate activity. It has progressed in the move to strengthen student government and 
has formulated a leadership training program to ensure stronger campus government in the 
years to come. 

Many original projects designed to help distressed students were successfully concluded 
and the various college-wide functions have served the invaluable purpose of integrating 
campus society into a more compact group. 

Using the Student-Faculty Council as a yardstick, this has been an exceptional year for 
student government. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




1st row: Robert Hess, President John Charles Smith, Pascal Esposito. 
2nd row: William Fisher, George Geyer, William Miller, George Ca 



Lukens, Fred Sample, Walt Gage, Kenneth Rozelle. 



The Men's Senate and the Jiggerboard, more formally known as the Executive Board of the 
Resident Women's Student Government Association, with the fine spirit of cooperation on the 
part of students, provide a splendid example of what good student government can accomplish 
for campus life. Members to these bodies are elected by the men and women of the dormitories 
as their representatives in the program of student participation in the administration and or- 
ganization of the college campus. 

Aside from their disciplinary duty, the organizations initiate and sustain many social and 
athletic functions. They jointly conduct campus Christmas festivities, and- Jiggerboard sponsors 
Gander Week-end, during which the girls become escorts on dates. Jiggerboard's most recent 
project is the adoption of a ten year old Greek girl, through the Foster Parents' Plan for War 
Children. 

The Senate has succeeded in making numerous physical improvements in the Men's Dorm 
this year, and has conducted the men's intramural sports program with efficient hands. 



M 
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J 
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1st row: Helen MacFarland, Mary Edelman, President Charlotte Rohrbaugh, Pauline Stoner. 
2nd row: Barbara Kleinfelter, Jeanne Stine, Barbara Metzger, Isabelle Haeseler, Janet Eppley, Nancy Meyer, Mary Daugherty, Dorothy Tho 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



M. 
D. 
S. 
C. 




1st row: Pres. Ray Kline, Bob Uhrich, Ronald Wolf, Fran Nogle. 

2nd row: Paul Lowry, John Walter, Bob Lowry, Prof. Shay, Richard Bothwell, lay Flocke 
Wallace. 



. George DeLong, Norm Bucher, Jim Trimble, David 



The Men's Day Student Congress and the Women's Commuter Council, the elected repre- 
sentatives of the day students, serve as leaders in day student affairs and problems. 

Emerging from its status of inactivity for the past several years, the Congress sprang forth 
with surprising vigor in 1949 in the field of student government. It very effectively directed a 
most intensified Freshman program, and retrieved many governing powers lost in the past 
five years due to student apathy. 

This year, the W. C. C. co-sponsored the "Gander Dance"; held Freshman parties at Christ- 
mas and on Valentine's Day; again supported the Seeds for Europe campaign of the World 
Friendship Project. In addition, a vigorous program was conducted in the women's intramural 
basketball tourney. 

A beautiful Valentine Dance, highlighted by the crowning of a Queen of Hearts in the Hotel 
Hershey, planned and sponsored by the two bodies, certainly was one of the successes on the 
college social calendar. 



w. 
c. 
c. 




Dale. 
2nd 



Barbara Christian son, 
Nancy Bright, Phyllis 



QUITTAPAHILLA 79 




RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES 

One of the chief aims of Lebanon Valley College is to maintain an atmosphere in which students may find 
ample experience in the Christian way of life. A more noble aim does not exist. As a Christian institution 
of learning, Lebanon Valley provides a wide program of religious activities; and several organizations on 
campus have as their express purpose the provision of training and leadership in the various religious projects. 
While students initiate the immediate plans for these activities and carry them to completion, Rev. Dave 
Gockley, the popular Director of Religious Activities, provides the link which correlates and integrates the 
program. Rev. William A. Wilt, pastor of the college church, serves as a genial advisor on all matters of 
concern to the students, both personal and in connection with the religious program. 

The Young Men's Christian Association and its counterpart, YWCA, carry on the greater part of the 
program with which the student on campus comes in contact. During the annual pre-school retreat at 
Mt. Gretna, the Y Cabinets plan the entire devotional, charitable, social, intellectual, and recreational program 
for the coming year. Each year the Ys seem to add to the list of activities which now includes publication of 
the L Book, the Big Brother- Big Sister program, freshman orientation, Mother's Weekend, Dad's Day, the 
Great Books Discussions, the annual County Fair, the maintenance of a Y recreational room, the World 
Friendship Project, the World Student Service Fund Drive, hikes, vespers, and holiday candlelight services 
The Ys also plan for the weekly Chapel services, at which ministerial members of the faculty, local ministers, 
special guests, and students serve as speakers. Special music is provided by the Glee Club or soloists from the 
Conservatory. 

This year, climaxing a year of fund raising among students, the Ys succeeded in bringing a Displaced 
Person student, Felix Viro, to the campus. Felix, from Geislingen (Steige), Estonia, U. S. Zone in Germany, 
was one of the first DP students to enroll in a college of central Pennsylvania. 

The Life Work Recruits is an organization of students who are interested in religious work and plan to 
devote their lives to Christian service as ministers, missionaries, or lay workers. Through their deputation 
program, they serve in local churches as preachers, Sunday School teachers, song leaders, or soloists. The 
members also aid the needy, conduct services in homes during holiday seasons, and distribute copies of the 
daily devotional guide, "The Upper Room," to all college students. 



80 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




Pres. Roger Keech, Janet Eppley, Martin Trostle. 
w: Joan Matters,- Dianne Randolph, Geraldine Rothermal. 



RELIGIOUS CO-ORDINATING COUNCIL 

A very important cog in the religious organization on campus is the Religious Co-ordinating Council. One of its activities is the 
coordination of all the work planned by the other religious groups so that the entire program achieves a definite end, through con- 
centrated and cooperative efforts. 

The principal project of the Council is planning and conducting the annual Religious Emphasis Week. This year was the fifth con- 
secutive observance of the emphasis week, which has become an institution of great spiritual and intellectual stimulus among the entire 
student body. Speaking on the theme, "The Christian View of Man," Rev. George D. Kelsey, Ph.D., delivered inspirational, provoca- 
tive messages which faculty members and students alike found practical and helpful.' 

While it is only one of many projects under the direction of religious groups, Religious Emphasis Week certainly is one of the most 
influential and satisfying among the college student body. 




1st row: Russell Hoffman, Lois Ort, Mrs. Edgar Wert, Pres. Edgar Wert. 
2nd row: Dianna Randolph, Wilma Stambach, Ruth Stambach. 

3rd row: Mable Gerhart, Myrna Shenk, Robert Longenecker, Glenn Dietrich. 
4th row: Roger Keech, Martin Trostle, Roland Garvin, Rev. David Gockley. 



LIFE WORK RECRUITS 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




1st row: Charlotte Rohrbaugh, Nancy Bowman, Pres. Janet Eppley, Pauline Stoner. 

2nd row: Barbara Kleinfelter, Florence Sanders, Mary Edelman, Elma Breidenstine, Margaret Bower, Betty Miller, Ethel 



y. w. c. a. 




2nd 
3rdr 



Bill Steely, Martin Trostle, Pres. Norman Bucher, Robert Lowry. 
/: Larry Guenther, Glen Dietrich, Robert Daugherty, Donald Pa 
: Frank Nickel, William Miller. 



y. M. C. A. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 



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OFFICERS 
President 

Robert Moller 
Vice President 

Pascal Esposito 

Secretary 

Kenneth Grimm 

Treasurer 
John Charles 
Smith 




I Yeatts, Bob Moller, Pat Esposito, John Charles Smith, Dan Fraunfelter. 

3reen, Bob Glock, Paul Schultz, Bob Zuver, George Knoble, Bob Eigenbrode, Dick Lukasiewicz, Melv 



1st row: Sterling Strauss, 1 
2nd row: Gerald Pratt, Jii 

Nipe. 
3rd row: John Stomato, Jack Hoak, Earl Redding, Walt Gage, Guy Euston, Gerald Miller, Al Zangrelli, Joe Shemeta, Nick Bova, 

Bill Boyd, Bob Fischer, Bill Tomilen. 
4th row: Haddy Brown, Clyde Baver, Arthur Bacastow, Dick Stewart, Lee Ranck, Alvan Morris, Leonard Casper, Andy Persinko, 

Don Coldren, Ed Tesnar, Ronald Wolf, Bill Miller. 
Sth row: George Rowe, John Juppenlatz, Val Sica, Dick Schiemer, Harry Graham, Bob Mrgich, Don Degler, George Charles, 

Elvin Heller, Harold Engle, Joe Parker. 
6th row: Philip Seltzer, Don Anglemeyer, Harry Bricker, Gale Plantz, Stanley Billheimer, Michael Palazzo, Jim Zangrelli, Paul Downey. 



For the first time in more than 50 years, the younger of the men's literary societies, Kalo, operated under 
a new constitution, designed to broaden its scope of activities and to permit it to function more efficiently in 
this widened sphere. 

Because of its position as the largest society on campus, 47 new members, and the excellent coordinating 
efforts of its executive committee and officers, Kalo's influence in campus affairs increased many fold this 
year as it followed a bold program of activities. Assuming a great deal of leadership, Kalo men made the 
full weight of their well organized group vitally felt in every undertaking. 

Closely cooperating with sister Delphian, Kalo men enjoyed a highly successful social year, climaxed by 
the production of "Belvedere" and the Kalo-Delphian dinner-dance in March. 



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1st row: Lillian Pratt, Ruth Kramer 
2nd row: Mickey Begg, Jean Hutchi: 

Ruth Stambach. 
3rd row: Arlene Shuey, Joan Matte: 



nne Bozarth, Evelyn Gehman, Nancy Linne 
, Betty Slifer, Joan Gilbert, Ruth Evans, Lois P 



Lee Whitman, Betty Edelman, Lois Shetler. 
ry, Jeanne Hull, Nancy Kline, Gerry DeLong, 



an Schenk, Sara Latsha, Ethel Mae Beam, Jean Wenger, Elizabeth 



1 row: Grace Mohn, Florence Saunders, Betty Bakely, Liz Beittel, Joan Ricedorf, Nancy Pauler, Virginia Wagner, Lois Ort, Miriam 

Keller, Leslie Mansley, Mary Ellen Greth. 
1 row: Nancy Myers, Darlis Hobbes, June Finklestein, Helen Erickson, Wilma Stambach, Peggy Bower, Joan Bair, Grace Frick- 



The Delphian Literary Society, whose Greek name is Delta Lambda Sigma, is the largest women's social 
organization on campus. Quite active in social events, it initiates some itself and cooperates on others with 
its brother society, Kalo. 

Delphian meetings are held on the first Thursday of each month for purposes of business discussions and 
social affairs; the annual birthday party is the most outstanding "fun" meeting. A formal initiation was 
held in October, at which time the new members were welcomed into the society and presented with carna- 
tions. 

In collaboration with Kalo, the Delphian women have created three important social events of the year. 
The first was in the form of an original radio skit, "It Pays To Be Kalo-Delphian." Kalo-Delphian Week-end 
featured a three act comedy, "Belvedere," on Friday night, March 3, and a formal dinner-dance at the Hotel 
Brunswick in Lancaster on Saturday night, March 4. The final major social affair of the year was a joint 
picnic with Kalo held in April at Mt. Gretna. 



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OFFICERS 
President 

Jeanne Bozarth 
Vice President 

Ethel Mae Beam 
Secretary 

Barbara Klein- 

felter 

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Ruth Kramer 



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1st row: Bernard Goldsmith, Paul Kauffman, David Bomgardner, Robert Ha: 
2nd row: Mark Schneiderhan, Larry Guenther, George Haines, Robert Hoffs 

Wilmer Perry, Robert Kline. 
3rd row: David Wallace, George Woli, Claude Seiirit, John Messersmith, Donald M 

Alsberge, Richard Einsel, Allan Light. 
4th row: Charles Blaich, Robert Meals, Wilson Shearer, Paul Stambach, Charles Willi 

Rothenberger, Richard Kline, Raymond Heberlig. 



Martin Trostle, John Krieg, Richard Kohler. 

3r, Glenn Woods, Robert Feaster, Robert Kauffma 



Quick, Joseph Rojahn, Victor 



, Russell Hoffrr 



OFFICERS 

President 

Robert Haines 

Vice President 
Martin Trostle 

Secretary 
David Bom- 
gardner 

Treasurer 

George Krieg 



Continuing its recent upsurge after adopting the name Phi Lambda Sigma, the still more popularly known 
Philo has vigorously endeavored to maintain and enhance its fine reputation for leadership on the L. V. C. 
campus. Hardly teetering in its age (84), Philo actively sponsored dances, parties, and hayrides in conjunc- 
tion with other societies. A sure sign of its virility was the "colorful" initiation given the new members this 
fall, which was designed to impress the Philophytes with the significance of the slogan, "Once a Philo, 
always a Philo!" 

The society emphasizes the spirit of true comradeship and promotes this policy through joint sessions, 
periodical meetings, and smokers. Philo's cultivation of the gentlemanly arts met a real test in the dinner- 
dance held jointly with its sister society, Clio, but needless to say, the Philomen came through unscathed. 

Also continuing a traditional activity, Philo produced and presented in Engle Hall Noel Coward's play, 
Hay Fever, a production which added new prestige to the hoary head of the campus organizations. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




1st row: Edith Shannon, Beatrice Royer, Julia Thatcher, Lois Ada 

2nd row: Pat Woods, Jean Leeser, Betty Miller, Jean Staley, Do 

3rd row: Thelraa McKinstry, Evelyn Long, Carolyn Gassert, Jai 

Joanne Spangler, Jane Martin, Dorothea Lynn, Alma Marian 



s, Mary Fry, Dorothy Gingrich 

s Smith, Pauline Rittle. 

> Lutz, Barbara Metzger, Loui.' 



s Light, Gloria Dresler, Rita Staley, 



"I want to be a friend of yours," . . . that's how Clio, oldest women's literary society, greeted the "Frosh" 
on a hike to Liskey's early in the fall. Throughout many years it has preserved the ancient traditions of 
Minerva as its patron goddess, and has retained the owl, symbol of wisdom, and the olive branch, symbol of 
unchallenged victory. 

Rush Week on campus was enlivened by many Clionian activities; among others were the tea, the hike, 
and the most gruesome of events, initiation. But miracles do happen — even to Freshmen — and Clio's new 
sisters were inducted without casualty. 

After long, careful planning and expectant waiting, Clio observed its anniversary weekend with brother 
Philo, presenting a cast from the two societies in Hay Fever. Climaxing the successful weekend with the 
glamorous Philo-Clio anniversary dinner-dance, the organization ended a year that will long be remembered 
for its well-rounded participation in all campus affairs, and the new friendships it helped to foster. 



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President 

Betty Miller 
Vice President 

Phyllis Dale 
Secretary 

Ruth Ann Brown 
Treasurer 

Sara Etzweiler 



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1st row: Vivian Werner, Betty Bakely, Dorothy Thomas, Albert Moriconi, Dorothea Cohen. 
2nd row: Phil Hayes, Robert Rhein, Victor Alsberge, Marianne Shenk, Martin Trostle. 



THE STAFF 

Editor ALBERT MORICONI 

Associate Editor DOROTHY THOMAS 

Sports Editors BILL FISHER 

JIM PACEY 

Conservatory Editor ROBERT RHEIN 

Exchange Editor BETTY BAKELY 

Photographers JIM GREGG 

MARTIN TROSTLE 

Business Manager VICTOR ALSBERGE 

Advisors G. G. STRUBLE 

E. P. RUTLEDGE 
A. P. ORTH 



REPORTERS 



JEANNE HULL 
LOIS PERRY 
JOAN ORLANDO 
BILL MILLER 
DAVE SNYDER 
BILL FISHER 
LEE WELLS 
ALEX FEHR 
JEANNE BOZARTH 
JOHN NILAN 



DICK KAYLOR 
KERMIT KIEHNER 
MARIANNE SHENK 
AUDREY GEIDT 
GLENN WOODS 
VIVIAN WERNER 
CARL DAUGHERTY 
NANCY MYER 
DONALD PAINE 
MARDIA MELROY 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




Ronald Woli, Ruth Ann Br 



Trostl. 
2nd row: Jean Leeser, Richard Kline, Evelyn Long, Franc' 



n, Anne Shroyer, Jay Flocken, Glenn Woods, Charles 
aver, Mary Ruth Brandt, Patrj 



mmerman, Martin 
i Werner, Barbara 



THE STAFF 

Editor JAY FLOCKEN Writeups RICHARD KLINE 

Associate Editor GLENN WOODS H^™ ^9,™ 

NORMA WEAVER 
Business Manager . CHARLES L. ZIMMERMAN PATRICIA WERNER 

Photography MARTIN TROSTLE BARBARA METZGER 

LOIS SHETLER 

Athletic Editors RUTH ANN BROWN FRANCENE SWOPE 

RONALD WOLF MARGARET BOWER 

Conservatory Editor.. BRUCE WISER JEAN EDWARDS 

Special Editors MARK RAESSLER Photography Assts. EDWARD TESNAR 

RUTH BRANDT WILLIAM MILLER 

ELVIN HELLER WILSON SHEARER 

JEAN LEESER GLORIA DRESSLER 

PHYLLIS BRIGHTBILL Financial Manager. GUY EUSTON 

Art Edit ° r ANNE SHROYER Typ . st JEAN STINE 

Advertising Staff DAVID BOMGARDNER Ad Q Q STRUB LE 

ANN FAY HALL A P ORTH 

HELEN MacFARLAND D c CARMEAN 

PASCAL ESPOSITO 



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1st row: Elizabeth Beittel, Dorothea Cohen, loan Ricedorf, Julia Thatcher, Jeanne Hull, Dorothy Dando, Dorothea Lynn. 

2nd row: Elizabeth Dewees, Jane Lutz, Doris Eckert, Virginia Wagner, Audrey Geidt, Betty Bakely, Auguste Broadmeyer, Nancy 

Paules, Janet Weidenhammer. 
3rd row: Robert Eigenbrode, Charles Kagey, George Haines, James Murray, George DeLong, Donald Kreider, Glenn Woods. 



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OFFICERS 
President 

James Murray 
Vice President 

George DeLong 
Secretary 

Elizabeth Beittel 
Treasurer 

Jean Hull 



Open to all students who wish experience in dramatics, the Wig and Buckle Club limits its membership 
to those who show a real proficiency by taking part in college thespian productions. 

Continuing activities after the spring play of 1949, "John Loves Mary," the club has provided Lebanon 
Valley with a year of unusual entertainment. 

Under the direction of Prof. Keller, it presented the first major play, "Blithe Spirit," a Noel Coward 
farce featuring the disturbing and troublesome influence a band of ghosts bring into the household of an 
innocent English gentleman. 

The two homecoming plays, "Dear Departed" and "Puppets," unique in plot and presentation, were well 
received by old grads and collegians alike. 

Ringing down the curtain with "The Hasty Heart" in the spring of 1950, Wig and Buckle ended another 
successful and gratifying year of dramatic activities. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




Julia Thatcher, Doris Eckert, David Wallace, Delores Zarker. 
v: Auguste Broadmeyer, John Heck, Janet Weidenhammer. 



// 



BLITHE SPIRIT 



// 



Charles Condomine invites into his country home a lady medium to learn the occult language. Instead the breezy 
lady summons back Charle's first wife, seven years departed, who tormentingly reminds him of their days and nights 
together, embarrassing him before his lovely second wife, Ruth. 

Wife No. 1 has a ghostly plot in mind: if she can get Charles into an automobile accident and make a ghost of him, 
life in the spirit world will have more appeal for her. Mistakes occur, and it is Ruth who takes the fatal ride — only to 
return with the first wife to plague the now utterly bewildered astral bigamist. The obvious and hilarious conclusion 
is that Charles somehow manages to escape from these two very blithe spirits. 





BLITHE SPIRIT' 




JOHN LOVES MARY 




HOMECOMING PLAY CASTS 



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QUITTAPAHILLA 



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2ndi 
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Elizabeth Beittel, Betty Bakely, Ann Blecker, Vivian Werner, Audrey Geidt. 
: Glenn Woods, Mark Raessler, Albert Moriconi, Wilson Shearer. 
Martin Trostle, David Bomgardner, Robert Geib, George DeLong, Charles Kagey. 



The Radio Workshop is now in its third year as a functioning campus organization. Originally 
conceived as a means of exhibiting dramatic and literary abilities of its members, the Club 
expanded its scope of operations to include all phases of campus activity. For two seasons it 
presented regularly scheduled programs spotlighting Lebanon Valley College, its students 
and faculty. This year, however, conflicting schedules forced the Workshop to relinquish its 
radio time. At present, the organization is exploiting the idea of a campus radio station. This 
station, the members feel, would enable further practical experience in radio as well as a public 
service to the students, faculty, and the community. 



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OFFICERS 
President 

Robert Moller 
Vice President 

Ray Kline 
Secretary 

Jay Flocken 
Treasurer 

Gerald Miller 




1st row: Jay Flocken, John Nilan, Alex Fehr, Jeanne Bozarth, Guy Euston, Ronald Wolf. 
2nd row: Gerald Miller, Ellis Wood, Charles Reed, Bob Glook, Ray Zimmerman, Bob Eigenbrode. 
3rd row: (standing) Bob Moller, Jim Murray, Earl Redding, Gale Plantz, Paul Kaufiman, Jim Da- 
4th row: Dave Bomgardner, Clyde Baver, Charles Kagey, Evelyn Toser, Jim Gregg, Miss Houtz. 
5th row: Dorothy Dando, Al Moriconi, David Wallace, Virginia Wagner, Herbert Rowe, Ray Kline. 



s, Vivian Werner 



Figuring by chronological age, the Political Science Club (a mere two years old) should still be in the 
infant stage of campus esteem and influence. However, those two years have seen the growth of this club 
to a stature which now threatens the hoar encrusted old timers with a decline in position. Behind this success 
lies the creative interest of its membership, efficient leadership, and an able, devoted advisor. 

Certainly participation in the Inter-Collegiate Conference on Government, held each Spring and at- 
tended by similarly interested groups from the campuses of the colleges of Pennsylvania, is the high spot 
of the club's activities and the driving force behind its meetings, which train members in parliamentary pro- 
cedure and prepare committee work for the functioning committees of the conference itself. 

The L. V. C. delegation to the conference for the past four years has played an extremely active role 
in the workings of model legislatures — both Federal and state, political party conventions, and state con- 
stitutional conventions. The aim of ICG is not to teach, not to preach, but to afford a means of expression 
in government and politics to interested college students. The excellent training and experience club mem- 
bers have gained have gone far in putting L. V. C. on the inter-collegiate map of Pennsylvania in this field. 

Besides the ICG preparations and the usual campus activities, the club enjoys numerous social meetings 
throughout the year, featuring prominent speakers on current affairs; stages unusual and original programs 
by club members; and sells basketball programs at L. V. home games. 

It is certain that the esprit de corps of this club is unrivalled among campus organizations, and its active 
membership and consistent program are ample proof that campus bodies can create college spirit if they are 
instituted with a definite goal, endowed with a conscientious membership, and sincerely interested advisors. 



' 1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



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1st row: Francis Eigenbrode, Miss Houtz, James Gregg, Ellis Wood, Vivian Werner, David Wallace, Jay Flocken, Dr. Shenk, Dr. 

Cooper, Alex Fehr, Dr. Lochner, Clifford Light. 
2nd row: Howard Smith, Herbert Rowe, Prof. Shay, Frank Hockley, Joseph Markley, Miss Shenk, Dr. Orth, Russel Kettering, Harold 

Heisey, Donald Beitzel, Arthur Bacastow, James Wilhelm, Bernard Keckler. 
3rd row: Edward Wert, Roland Garvin, Robert Eigenbrode, Robert Moller, George Roman, Raymond Kline, John Nilan, Prof. Fox, 

Anthony Kutchever, Henry Woliskeil, Dr. Erhart, Donald Paine. 



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"You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free." 

The Pennsylvania Nu Chapter of Pi Gamma Mu, National Social Science Honor Society, was reactivated 
in September, 1948, after a number of years of inactivity. Prof. Hilbert V. Lochner of the Department of 
Business Administration and Economics, a charter member of the chapter, sponsored the reorganization, and 
has ably guided it through two years of successful activity. The membership is limited to the outstanding 
upper classmen and women in the departments of History, Economics, Political Science, and Sociology. 

The club has sought to engage in a program of informative and stimulating discussion meetings on topics 
of current social significance, such as "The Welfare State," "Federal Aid to Education," and "Socialized 
Medicine." 

Dr. Louis P. Lochner, noted AP foreign correspondent and our own "Uncle Louie," was guest speaker 
at the Annual Banquet at Hershey in April 1949 — the high point of the first year's activities. 



OFFICERS 
President 

David Wallace 
Vice President 

Jay Flocken 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Hilbert Lochner 



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'arsons, Donald Paine, Al Moriconi, Barbai 
Struble, Mrs. Struble, Joan Orlando, Ma 



son. Jay Flocken. 
Pat Riihiluoma, George Geye 



OFFICERS 

Head Scop 
James Parsons 

Keeper of Word 
Hord 
Jeanne Bozarth 



In the comfortable, firelit atmosphere of Dr. and Mrs. Struble's living-room, the pet literary creations of 
Green Blotter members are lovingly read by their authors, intoned with all the mystic quality possible. 
Usually the reaction among the others present ranges from cold-hearted disapproval to luke-warm-hearted 
indulgence. While the Official Critics of the evening perform last rites over the "work of art," everyone 
but the author prepares his own list of derogatory remarks. After this ordeal, the rebuffed writer slinks away 
to a shadowed corner, licking his wounds and sobbing remorsefully, until the inviting odors from Mrs. Struble's 
kitchen lure him out into society again. 

Of course, the details above are slightly exaggerated, but Mrs. Struble's refreshments would be enough 
to persuade a rejected author to rejoin the company which cast aside his product. Actually Green Blotter 
is a literary organization of currently very congenial members, who meet twice a month in Dr. Struble's 
home to read their poems and stories, constructively criticize each other's work, and bask in the cheery 
hospitality of the Strubles. 

By a revision of the rules governing the club, manuscripts of new applicants will be considered at any time 
during the year when there is an opening in the membership. 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




1st row: Francene Swope, Lois Adams, Ruth Withers, Ann Blecker, Paul Yous 
2nd row: John Patterson, Betty Bakely, Nancy Ann Meyers, Charlotte Kling. 
3rd row: Thomas Israel, Nancy Kline. 



OFFICERS 

President 
Paul Youse 

Vice President 
Nancy Meyers 

Secretary 

Francene Swope 

Treasurer 

John Patterson 



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1st row: Donald Steinberg, Robert Eigenbrode, Ruth Kramer. 

2nd row: Vivian Werner, Raymond Zimmerman, Mabel Gerhart, George Geyer, Myrna Shenlc, Elizabeth 
Beittel, Margaret Bower, Dorothy Kline, John Beddall, Milton Baker, Robert Englehart. 





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Donald Steinberg 


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Ruth Kramer 


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OFFICERS 

President 

Robert Uhrich 

Vice President 
Dale Snyder 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Charlotte Rohr- 
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1st row: Bob Uhrich, Charlotte Rohrbaugh, Nancy Bright, Sara Etzweiler, Dale Snyder. 
2nd row: William Jones, Harry Wolie, Thomas Kirchoff, Donald McGurdy, Robert Meals. 
3rd row: John Patterson, Larry Guenther, Robert Hoffsomer, Sterling Strause, lack Bitner. 
4th row: Victor Alsberge, lack Gramm, lames Lebo, John Kozura, Donald Hedgecock. 
5th row: Carl Stein, Alonzo Mantz, Elliot Nagle, George Bartels, Louis Bowman. 

Standing: Robert Haines, Richard Bothwell, John Allwein, John Krieg, William Boyd, Kerry Gingrich, 
Charles Garret, William Miller. 



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OFFICERS 

President 

Robert Uhrich 

Vice President 
Dale Snyder 

Secretary-Treasurer 
Charlotte Rohr- 
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1st row: Bob Uhrich, Charlotte Rohrbaugh, Dale Snyder. 

2nd row: William Jones, Harry Wolfe, Thomas Kirchoff, Richard Bothwell, Robert Meals. 
3rd row: Robert Haines, Larry Guenther, Robert Hoffsomer, Sterling Strauss, John Allwein. 
4th row: Victor Alsberge, John Krieg, James Lebo, William Boyd, Jack Bitner, Carl Stein, Alonz 
Elliot Nagle, George Bartels, Louis Bowman. 



CONSERVATORY 




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1st row: Robert Fisher, I 
2nd row: Wilbert Hartn 

Moeckel, John Wuert: 
3rd row: lean Wenner, Joan Bair, Augusta Broadmeyt 

wine, Eugene Tritch, John Heck, Charles Kreis, C 

Barber, George Ritner. 
Standing: Louis Smith, Miriam Fuller, Allen Koppenh 



ice Royer, E. P. Rutledge, Ray Kauffman, Geraldine Rothermel, Annette Reed. 
Holliday, Robert Clay, George Rutledge, William Cagnoli, Jack Snavely, Louise 
ma Breidenstine, Richard Moore. 



r, George Alwood. 



The Symphony Orchestra is the finest organization of musicians in the Conservatory, 
and its work borders on perfection. 

Presenting a varied program at its annual Winter Concert, January 1 3, the Orchestra 
delighted a capacity audience of music lovers with "Kunihild", by Kister, "Orpheus", 
by Offenbach, and the unusual, entertaining composition by Morton Gould, "Hillbilly" 
George Ritner was the vocal soloist with the orchestra and Louis Smith was the violin 
soloist. 

This year a group of the outstanding musicians from the Symphony represented 
Lebanon Valley in the Intercollegiate All State Orchestra, held at Lock Haven, Penn- 
sylvania. 



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1st row: Betty Miller, Ann Shroyer, Barbara Metzger, Miria 

Annette Reed, Nancy Lutz. 
2nd row: Mary Funck, Elma Breidenstine, Joan Enck, Mary Edelman, Gloria Dr< 

Joyce Carpenter. 
3rd row: John Ralston, George Eschbach, Paul Broome, Joseph Campanella, George Ritner, P 

Richard Kohler, Richard Miller. 



4th 



Harry Forbes, James Fisher, Richard Kline, Euge 
Kermit Kiehner, Alden Biely, George Rutledge. 



Fuller, Louise Light, Delores Zarker, Sidney Garverich, Beatrice Royer, 
Eckert, Mardia Melroy, Geraldine Miller, 
Getz, John Heck, Jay Heisey, 
Fisher, Martin Trostle, Robert Shultz, William Shoppell, Robert Rhein, 



Counterpart to the Symphony Orchestra, the College Glee Club is the outstanding 
vocal group at the Conservatory. Having strict qualifications for membership, the Glee 
Club represents a most select group of vocal talent. Under the direction of Prof. E. P. 
Rutledge, it merrily sings its way through a busy and exacting schedule. 

Among a few of its many performances, the Glee Club provides music for all Chapel 
services, sings at the annual Pennsylvania Educators' Convention, and presents its 
major work in the yearly concert during the Spring Music Festival. 

This year, the Lebanon Valley Conservatory was host for the first Intercollegiate 
Chorus, held from February 15 to 17. Many of our own Glee Club singers were selected 
to attend. 



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row: Robert Fisher, Doris Kli: 
i row: Wilbert Hartman, Rich 

row: Arlene Shuey, Geraldii 
Eschbach, John Wuertz, Loui 

row: Jean Wenner, Joan Bai 
Hanoi, Augusta Broadmeyer, 
George Wolf, Anne Shroyer, 



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i Mohn, Richard Kline, Mardia Melroy, Robert Clay. 



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ma Breidenstine, William Cagnoli, Richard Hawk, Melvin Schiff, Mary Frey, George 
;e Moeckel, Annette Reed, Richard Lukasiewicz, Elizabeth Kemmerling, Jane McMurtrie. 
, George Ritner, Joseph Campenella, Harold Rothenberger, Pauline Stoner, Evelyn Habecker, Ira 
Harry Keim, John McKenzie, Donald Coldren, Betty Miller, Robert Shreffler, Jay Heisey, John Heck, 
Dean Dougherty, Kermit Kiehner, Louise Light. 



i Sendi, George Alwood, Jed Dietrich. 



This musical organization is composed of college students as well as "Conservites", 
which facilitates fulfillment of its purpose: to familiarize more people with many dif- 
ferent types of better music. 

Under the direction of Prof. Carmean, the College Orchestra presented a program 
of music in its annual concert, ranging from works by Mozart to Shostakovich. The 
highlight of its program was the Concerto in E Flat, by Liszt, with Prof. Freeland as 
soloist. Other outstanding selections played were Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 6, 
"Pathetigue", and the "Introduction to Act III from Lohengrine" by Wagner. 



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The climax of the Spring Music Festival was the evening this group of more than 1 00 
voices, supporting vocal soloists from New York City, presented "Mirtil in Arcadia", a 
pastoral by Hadley. 

The Lebanon Valley Chorus is composed of all Conservatory students and is open to 
college students wishing to attend the regular practices. 



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Cornets: Richwine, Coldren, Bausher, Kendig, Dundore, Hoffman, Timberlin, Seifrit, Shreffler; Clarinets: Snavely, Blecker, Hawk, 
Lukasiewicz, Schiff, Rutledge, Vansant, Rothenberger, Porter, Evans, CasseL Schneck; Saxophones: Daugherty, Kiehner, Davey, 
Shoppell; French Horns: Keim, McCurdy; Baritones: Getz, McKenzie; Trombones: Heck, Heisey, Kreis, Wolf, Tritch, Trostle; 
Basses: Koppenhaver, Giachero, Hornberger, Fisher; Piccolos: Wuertz, Kauffman; Percussion: Alwood, Sendi, Casper, Dietrich, 
Williams, Fisher, Biely; Color Guard: Murray, Rhein, Brown, Eschbach, Haines; Herald Trumpets: Lemon, Kreider, Gibson; Major- 
ettes: Zarker, Stoner, Etzweiler, Habecker; Drum Major: Wiser. 



Lebanon Valley College Band is beyond a doubt one of the finest small college 
bands in the state. The flashy Blue and White Band made its first appearance of the 
year, one week after school began, at the Chocolate Bowl game in the Hershey Stadium. 
Consisting of 48 members, a color guard, herald trumpets, drum majorettes, and a drum 
major, they presented an inspiring spectacle. Indeed, their presence and marching 
drills at each L. V. home football game added that dash of color so necessary to the full 
enjoyment of a college football game. 

The Band also participated in two parades, three concerts, and the very special 
engagement all members look forward to each year, the May Day program. 

This was the third consecutive year that the Band was represented in the Inter- 
collegiate All State Band. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



103 




1st row: Ruby Helwig, Betty Miller, Nancy Lutz, Beatrice Royer, Clair Hoffman, Pauline Rittle, Jean Staley, 

Gloria Stager, Mabel Gerhart. 
2nd row: Mary Edelman, Annette Reed, Edith Shanaman, Barbara Kleinfelter, Joan Mattern, Julia Thatcher, 

Dorothy Witmer, {Catherine Noll, Doris Klingensmith, Geraldine Miller. 
3rd row: Nancy Klein, Ann Shroyer, Mary Frey, Mary Kurtz, Joan Spangler, Virginia Wagner, Sidney 

Garverich, Betty Myers, Grace Mohn. 
4th row: Sophie Mieczkowska, Rufina Balmer, Joan Enck, Doris Eckert, Louise Light, Gloria Dressier, Janet 

Weidenhammer, Augusta Broadmeyer, Elma Breidenstine, Florence Sauder; Majorettes: Pauline Stoner, 

Delores Zarker, Evelyn Habecker, Sara Etzweiler. 



G 

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1st row: Charles Rohland, Robert Rhein, Melvin Schiff, William Caqnoli, Lynn Blecker. 

2nd row: Bruce Wiser, John Heck, Charles Kreis, Eugene Tritch.- 

3rd row: Chester Richwine, William Lemon, Scott Hamor, Ralph Bausher, Lloyd McCurdy, Leonard Caspe 

Standing: Donald Trostle, Miriam Fuller. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



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1951 



QUITTAP_AHILLA 



BEATRICE ROYER 

Soprano 




OUTSTANDING VOCALISTS 



GEORGE RITNER 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




LOUISE LIGHT 

Piano 



OUTSTANDING INSTRUMENTALISTS 



BRUCE WISER 

French Horn 




SPORTS 





QUITTAPAHILLA 











L. V. C. FLYING DUTCHMEN 



COACH ANDY KERR, CO-CAPTAINS DIJOHNSON, BOWMAN 




Q UITTAPAHILLA 





HENRY DIJOHNSON . . . Senior 
. . . rugged, pile-driving back from 
Lebanon . . . voted Most Out- 
standing Player of Small Colleges 
in Pa. . . . led Dutchman offense 
with 9 TDs ... ran a 102 yard TD 
against Moravian. 



c 
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BOB BOWMAN . . . Senior . . . 
Lebanon blocking back whose de- 
fensive and offensive play will be 
hard to replace . . . best game 
against Western Maryland . . . 
back fie Id starter since Freshman 
year . . . team's spirit- builder. 



In what proved to be his "swansong" to college football coaching, "Andy" Kerr guided his Valley 
Dutchmen through 5 victories and 3 defeats in the 1949 football campaign. The peppery and pleasant 
Kerr, a popular and favorite figure among students and players, tutored three L. V. teams to 15 vic- 
tories, 8 defeats, and 2 ties. The Valley juggernaut in those three years ground out a total of 445 points, 
and the defense gave up 327 points to the opposition. 

Kerr's '47 aggregation upset a bowl-bound Scranton U. club, 13-7; the '48 team "defeated" mighty 
Temple in a 7-7 tie at Philly; and in the three year span, whipped Albright, archrival, twice: 31-7 in 
1947, and 26-13 in 1949, and lost one to JOHNNY KROUSE, et al, in 1948, 19-13. A gratifying and 
thrill-packed record it is, and Valley grid fans bid a sad farewell to the figure of "Andy" Kerr, but pride- 
fully tuck a bit of his fame into their own memory books . . . 

The Hershey Chocolate Bowl game, early in the year, started the Dutchmen off on the wrong foot 
and the wrong end of a 33-14 score, piled up by Gettysburg College, but the team bounced back from 
this bruising game with a well-earned victory over Mount St. Mary's College, 14-7, on a last minute 
touchdown pass from Fred Sample to Jerry Makris. 

A huge, well-conditioned Western Maryland team opened the Valley home stand with a humiliating 
victory over the Annville Collegians, 39-7. Picking up the pieces and hitching onto the cleats of Ham- 
mering Hank The Tank DiJohnson, the Flying Dutchmen found their stride and really flew through their 
next three games, rolling up a 34—13 victory against Moravian College, drowning the Albright Lions 
in their own lair of water and mud, 26-13, and completely annihilating a scrappy, but impotent, Lin- 
coln University eleven, 49-0. 

Scranton U. then unhitched the cart, and left it standing still to watch a smoothly oiled machine 
administer a "Royal" drubbing to the tune of 22-"Skidoo"-0. But finding the lead reins again, the 
Dutchmen ended the season's toil with a chilly victory over Upsala College, 22-7. 

And so ended the collegiate football careers of Bob Shaak, George Roman, Walt Gage, Bob Bowman, 
and Henry DiJohnson. DiJohnson, soon to be a legendary figure in the annals of L. V. C. sports, closed out 
four years of terrific football, and received showers of honors and special awards. 

So end the Kerrmen teams; so ends the reign of DiJohnson as King Football at L. V. Future teams 
and coaches have something to shoot at: the enviable records of achievement and success that such 
performers, bowing out of the football scene this year, have left behind them. 



Q UITTAPAHILLA 



1951 





BOB FISCHER 

terrific end from 
"Glue Fingers" 



. . Senior 
Little F 
snared 20 passes 



for 239 yards and 2 TDs . . . out- 
standing against Gettysburg . . . 
an aggressive defensive end. 



GEORGE ROMAN . . . Senior 
. . . man from Manville leaves a 
big gap at end . . . superb on the 
defense . . . upset countless plays 
with slashing tackles ... a reliable 
pass receiver. 




BOB SHAAK . . . Senior . . . 
tough fighting tackle from Leb- 
anon . . . serious injury ham- 
pered him . . . key blocker . . . 
unsung hero of L. V. line . . . 
played sensational defensive 
game against Moravian. 



NORM LUKENS . . . Junior . . . dependable 
Wormleysburg center and line backer . . . un- 
usual knack at breaking through to block 
, punts . . . charging play cost opponents plenty 
of yardage. 



WALT GAGE . . . Senior 
. . . Railway foot specialist 
. . . successfully converted 1 9 
of 25 bonus point attempts 
. . . 7 for 7 in Lincoln game 
. . . booted a 25 yard field 
goal in a windy Upsala game. 




JOE OXLEY . . . Sophomore 
. . . long quarterback from Long 
Branch . . . heaved 21 passes for 
381 yards . . . scored 2 TDs . . . 
pulled brother act for lone L. V. 
TD in W. Md. game. 



'1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



DALE SHELLENBERGER 

. . . Sophomore . . . smart, 
tricky speedster from Red 
Lion . . . gathered in 9 passes 
for 1 1 8 yards, gained another 
193 on the ground . . . best 
game against Albright . . . 
picks his holes. 




JERRY MAKRIS . . . Sophomore . . . 
promising end From Long Branch . . . 
spectacular defensive play set up sev- 
eral Valley TDs . . . receiving end of 
"Sample to Makris". . . groomed to 
take over Roman's spot. 




ED TESNAR... Sophomore... 
offensive guard from Elizabeth 
. . . sound blocker . . . consistent 
fighting game ... his fast, clean 
tackling bogged down many of- 
fensive threats to the Dutchmen. 



FRED SAMPLE . . . Soph- 

omore . . . went over for 3 
TDs . . . gained 239 yards in 
completing 21 passes . . . top 
notch safety man ... 1 55 lb. 
scat back from Columbia . . . 
scored winning TD in last 
minute against Mt.St. Mary's. 




FRANK DEANGELIS . . . Freshman . . . youngest 
and one of the heaviest team members . . . Orange . 
tackle . . . plays hard, serious football on the defense 
... tough linesman destined to be a key man. 




Q UITTAPAHILLA 



1951 



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1949 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 24 

-L. V. 14-33 Gettysburg 
Sept. 30 

L. V. 14- 7 Mt. St. Mary's 
Oct. 8 

*L. V. 7-39 Western Maryland 
Oct. 22 

*L. V. 34-13 Moravian 
Oct. 28 

L. V. 26-13 Albright 

Nov. 5 

*L. V. 49- Lincoln University 

Nov. 12 

L. V. 0-22 Scranton 

Nov. 18 

*L. V. 22- 7 Upsala 
jHershey Chocolate Bowl Game 
*Home Games 





1. DiJohnson blocks for Shelly against Mt. St. Mary's. 

2. Hammerin' Hank and Bowman turn end in Lincoln U. slaughter. 

3. Bowman leaps high, while Fischer circulates deep in Lincoln 
territory. 



?4 of Valley backfield— Shellenberger, Sample, DiJohnson — 
take off against Western Maryland. 

Shellenberger runs into Marylanders, as Quinn moves into block. 
Coaches Kerr, Fox, and players glumly watch Western Maryland 



1951 



Q UITTAPAHI LLA 




1st row: Richie Furda, John Hess, Floyd Beck 
Back row: Harry Cooper, Mgr., Chuck Z: 



ik DiJohnson, Ed Frazier. 
Bill Tomelin, Red Langstaff, Larry Kinsella, Coach Ralph Me 



L. V. C. VARSITY BASKETBALL 



1949-1950 BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



With a highly geared scoring machine clicking on all pistons, the 1949-1950 version of the Lebanon Valley Flying Dutch- 
men flashed through a busy season with a final log of 12 wins and 8 defeats. Stressing speed, points, and a fast passing attack, 
Coach Mease's aggregation of scorers racked up a 1530 point total in 20 games for a scorching average of 76.6 per game. 

Add the two-man offense of Floyd Becker, 352 points, and Larry Kinsella, 272, to the terrific freshman trio of Eddie Frazier, 
Al Murawski, and Richie Furda, who piled up together 562 points, plus the healthy 324 points garnered by the reserve 
crew of DiJohnson, Langstaff, Tomilen, Zimmerman, and Hess, and you can understand why no matter who played, that score 
always pushed the 70 mark. With all that scoring to do, the 
Valley had little time for a defense, and opponents' total scores 
soared over the thousand mark — 1417. 

Outstanding thrills of the season are hard to sift, but the 
sharpshooting contest with King's College was one of the L. V. 

better games. High scoring night was against Moravian, when *L. V. 

Valley fans roared constantly in a last period which saw the L. V. 

onrushing juggernaut crack the century mark, 102-79. t y 

Probably the most exciting game — and the most satisfying to 
Dutch pride — was the first Scranton U. game, when the boys 
came from way behind in almost nothing flat to tie up the 
game. Hysteria reigned as they then maintained possession 
of the ball throughout most of the extra period to sew up a 
hard won 85-76 victory. Whew! 

The novelty of the University of Mexico game was matched 
by the good humor and sportsmanship of the Mexicans; they 
displayed what is now considered an "old fashioned" brand 
of ball, and were properly chastised, 86-66. And last on the 
thrill list is the home Albright tussle, a ding-dong affair, which 
kept Valley rooters up on their feet. The antics of Eddie 
Anlian and Hot Dog Frank were entertainment enough for 
one night, but the ace from Reading could well afford a little 
clowning, as he finally led the Lions to a squeaky 68-62 win. 

Loyal Valley fans were treated to a dish of 2947 points in 
all L. V. games, and such scoring alone would have been 
enough for a successful year, but the added features of sharp 
passing and clean, but rugged play well rewarded supporters 
of the '49-'50 Dutchmen. "Home Games 



*L. V. 
*L. V. 

L. V. 
*L. V. 
*L. V. 

L. V 
*L. V. 

L. V. 

L. V. 
*L. V. 
*L. V. 

L. V. 
*L. V. 

L. V. 

L. V. 
*L. V. 



.79 
63 
89 
.54 
.77 
.84 

.56 
102 

.85 
67 

.86 

.65 

.63 
64 
62 
.90 

.93 



Western Maryland 77 

Lincoln University 73 

Susquehanna 53 

Gettysburg 60 

King's College 73 

Elizabethtown 77 

West Chester 77 

Moravian 79 

Scranton University 76 

Albright 74 

University of Mexico 66 

PMC 70 

Scranton University 64 

Juniata 51 

Albright 68 

Moravian 94 

Franklin and Marshall 63 

Juniata 74 

Elizabethtown 67 

Upsala 81 



QUITTAPAHILLA 







FLOYD BECKER . . . Senior , . . guard . . . 
co-captain . . . scored 352 points to hike 
his 4 year total to an L. V. all time high of 
1016 .. . averaged 17.6 per game . . , sen- 
sational ball-hawk and play-maker . . . truly 
L. V.'s finest net performer. 



EDDIE FRAZIER . . . Frosh . . . forward . . . 
experienced court performer turned in a bril- 
liant first year . . . threw in 228 points . . . 
worked opponents for 1 20 fouls with his 
terrific faking and fast dribbling shots. 






LARRY KINSELLA . . . Junior . . . forward 
. . . hard-working sureshot on one-hand stabs 
. . . driving, spectacular layups are his spe- 
cialty . . . runnerup in scoring with 272 . . . 
averaged 13.6 . . . tricky ball handler. 

HANK DUOHNSON . . . Senior . . . for- 
ward . . . co-captain ... a natural for the 
pivot spot with beautiful floor work and 
close faking . , . came up with 121 points 
. . . successfully made the quick shift from 
the body contact sport to the Fancy Dans 
on the hardwood . . . Di-Day at Upsala 
game. 

CHUCK ZIMMERMAN . . . Junior . . . 
forward . . . highest percentage of accuracy 
on the team — .528 . . . plays a smooth floor 
game ... a dead-pan ball handler . . . good 
on one-handers or set shots . . . dependable 
bankboard performer. 




1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




"RED" LANGSTAFF. . . Soph 

. . . center . . . shoots 'em right- 
handed . . . save the Valley some 
needed height , . . excells on 
tap-ins . . . Fighting play under the 
basket won plaudits from fans . . . 
119 points . . . worked well in 
the pivot. 



JOHNNY HESS . . . Junior . . . guard 
. . . dependable reserve guard . . . rugged 
but clever ball handler . . , saw action in 
only 9 games . . . able play-maker and set 
shot . . . plenty of basketball know-how. 






BILL TOMILEN . . . Soph . . . center . . . 
first year varsity man ... . 6' 5" frame towers 
over teammates ... fan favorite . . . Big Bill 
tallied 50 points; 18 of them in the F. & M. 
game . . . improved greatly as the year 
progressed . . . great spirit. 



RICHIE FURDA . . . Frosh . . . guard 
. . . pint-sized dynamo of the back- 
court . . . best percentage on foul 
shooting . . . used a flying one-hand 
stab and set shot to net 164 points . . . 
played almost every minute of each 
game . . . came through in grand style 
in college ball. 




QUITTAPAHILLA 



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Pandemon 


mm reigns a 


Dutchmen sc 


ore points 


100 


and 101 or 


DiJohnson's 




n Morav 


ranga 






Becker bags a deuce 


from 










Scranton. 














Kinsella leaps from the 


oacki 


l E-town 


game 


lose 




on an ove 


-head shot. 













Frazier cans a peep in Scranton game; he converted 
15 of 17 fouls to ice an extra period game. 

i adds to the 100 plus score against Mor- 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




Bill Jones, Robin Moore, Ray Dankowski, Jim Colucci, Marty Gluntz. 
w: Coach Dick Fox, Leon Miller, Jim Hanley, Bill Vought, Sherdell Snyde 



L. V. C. JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL SQUAD 



Playing in the early-crowd preliminaries to the Varsity games and trying hard to earn recognition for next year's varsity 
team, the Lebanon Valley Junior Varsity wound up a successful 18 game 1949-1950 schedule with 13 wins and but 5 defeats. 
Performing for the first time under the direction of Coach Dick Fox, the freshman-dominated team piled up a .722 percentage 
against their varied opponents. 



Of the 5 games the team dropped, none was by a score of 
more than 6 points. Although they far outclassed their non- 
collegiate rivals, there were plenty of fast, spine-tingling 
intercollegiate contests. Outstanding of this latter sort were 
the first Scranton game, which the Valley Juniors lost by 2 
points, and the second Moravian clash, which they added to 
their 13 game win total by 1 point. 

Leading the scoring parade was Leon Miller, hard working 
freshman, with 172 points. Just behind him were Joe Oxley, 
with 162 points garnered after missing the first 4 games; 
Robin Moore, with 161; and Marty Gluntz, with 101. The 
remaining points were fairly equally divided among Colucci, 
Vought, Hanley, Jones, Dankowski, Fischer, and Sawyer. 

In summary, the Junior Varsity racked up 995 points and 
allowed 709 to their opponents, played a steady, deliberate 
brand of ball — occasionally flashing a spark of real class, and 
give promise of future interesting Varsity Dutchmen teams. 



1949-1950 JAY VEE SCHEDULE 



*L. V. . . 


52 


Reading Air Force 


20 


L. V. . . 


83 


Susquehanna 


....28 


L. V. . . 


42 


Hershey Junior College . . . 


...48 


*L. V. . . 


56 


Indiantown Gap 


....12 


*L. V. . . 


55 


Elizabethtown 


.37 


*L. V. . . 


57 


Moravian 


40 


*L. V. . . 


36 


Scranton 


.38 


L. V . . 


36 


Albright 


39 


*L. V. . . 


57 


Hershey Junior College. . . . 


.34 


L. V. 


56 

48 


P.M.C. . . 


. . ..47 


L. V. . . 


Scranton 


... 52 


*L. V. . . 


56 


Juniata 


....41 


*L. V. 


62 


Albright 


. ... 35 


L. V. . . 


61 


Moravian 


. . .60 


*L. V. . . 


42 


Franklin and Marshall 


...46 


L. V. . . 


33 


Juniata 


.26 


L. V. . . 


62 


Elizabethtown 


.59 


*L. V. . . 


59 


Upsala 


. .47 




'Home Games 





QU ITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




1st row: Dale Shellenberger, Norm Lukens, Fred Sample, Shorty Fields. 

2nd row: Wally Hess, John Kennedy, Floyd Becker, Bob Fischer, Jack Hoak, Hank Dijohnson, Fred Fore, Mike Zaja 
3rd row: Bob Hess, Sherdell Snyder, Chuck Zimmerman, Hal Hetsey, John Stomata, Neil Woll, Coach Mease. 



L. V. C. BASEBALL TEAM 

Batting in 68 runs to their opponents' 49 and playing .571 ball, the Lebanon Valley fence-busters won eight and dropped 
six during their 14 game 1949 season. 

Although there were four games in which the total score topped 11 runs, in one of which the Valley alone scored 11 runs, it 
is the thrill-packed victory over Elizabethtown that brings back sweetest memories. The winning run was pushed across by Norm 
Lukens' single with two down in the last of the ninth, in the person of Bob Hess, on second base through a pass and an error. 
The hit ended eight and two-thirds innings of no-hit, no-run pitching by the Elizabethtown hurler, but the 1-0 victory was well 
earned by the three hit twirling chore of Fred Fore, L. V.'s strong-armed flinger. 

With eight varsity holdovers to bolster the offensive and defensive game of his club, Coach Ralph Mease's toughest nut to 
crack was shuffling his green pitchers to rest his veteran moundsmen. Hats off to a swell coach and a grand club who played a 
hustling brand of ball all season! 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE 



April 9 
April 20 
April 25 
April 26 
April 30 
May 3 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 



May 21 



*L. V 

*L. V 

L. V 

*L. V 

*L. V 

L. V. 

*L. V 

*L. V 

*L. V 

L. V 

L. V 

*L. V 

L. V 

L. V 

'Home Games 



Susquehanna 4 

Elizabethtown 

Franklin & Marshall. . . 4 

Moravian 6 

St. Joseph 5 

Temple 3 

Kutztown 7 

Juniata 7 

Albright 1 

Juniata 2 

Moravian 4 



La Salle 

Albright 5 

Elizabethtown 1 



1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




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1. E-town's Frank Keath completes a pu 

2. DiJohnson, Zimmerman, and Hess conter; Mea 
pen in Juniata battle. 

3. Pitcher Fore tries swinging end of firing line i 



. blocked ofi by DiJohn 



rly in 6-4 victory i 



1 
9 
4 
9 



Juniata slugfest. 



Wally Hess tries a slide, but Keath nips him at first, too. 
Jack Leeds rounds third to cross the plate in 11-0 victory i 
La Salle. 



WOOMER 



QUITTAPAHILLA 
LEBEGERN 



1951 



GRIMM 




TENNIS, 1949 



ELLIOT 



Laboring under the handicaps of being both a minor and 
a not too fan-popular sport, tennis dragged through a 
season in which the L. V. faithful few dropped eight in a 
nine match schedule. But that isn't the whole story, as 
Coach Donmoyer's proteges won one match from Mora- 
vian, and extended Susquehanna, La Salle, and the same 
Moravian team later to 4-5 match scores. 

Even in defeat the Valley netmen forced the set scores 
to 10 to 12 games, but the superior play and deeper wealth 
of seeded players consistently presented by opposing 
teams hounded the heels of the Dutchmen from the very 
beginning. 



TENNIS 
April 26 *L. V. . 6 Moravian. . 3 
April 27 L. V. . 1 St. Joseph.. 8 

April 30 *L. V. . . Lafayette 9 

May 3 *L. V. . . .4 Susquehanna 5 

May 7 L. V....0 F. &M 9 

May 9 *L. V. Albright 9 

May 14 L. V. . . .4 Moravian. . . .5 

May 17 *L. V....4 La Salle 5 

May 19 L. V. . Albright 9 

'Home Games 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




tXlr%l±Sik 



Kreider, Reber, Creamer, Guenther, Fried, Conrad. 
r. Elmore, Billheimer, Kirkpatrick, Howarth, Plantz, Bova, Tomilen, Brown, Coach Robii 



L. V. C. VARSITY TRACK 1949 

For the first time in many years, track was introduced in the L. V. C. athletic program in the spring of 1949 with 
hopes of developing it into a major sport. During the regular season, Coach Robinson's field and cinder men partici- 
pated in several practice meets, but conditioning — not competition — was emphasized in order to prepare for a pro- 
posed schedule of intercollegiate track and field meets in the season of 1950. 

It is to be hoped that this great college sport will successfully "take hold"in Lebanon Valley. 




Q UITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




n, Libby Roper, Mickey Begg, Helen MacFarland, Betty Slifer, Ruth Kr. 



r, Jane McMurtrie, Peg 
Joan Orlando 



HOCKEY TEAM 



The good looking group of female 
athletes on this page, not to be outdone 
by the male athletes of the college, 
established a new record in the history 
of women's field hockey at L. V.- C. 
For the first time since field hockey has 
been an inter-collegiate sport here, 
the Dutch Girls finished their season 
undefeated, winning six games, losing 
none, and tieing one. 

Under the able coaching of Mrs. E. 
I. Smith, the "Hockettes" brought new 
honor and distinction to the L. V. C. 
campus. 

Although next year's team will have 
lost Ruthie Kramer and "Betz" Slifer, 
two seniors who starred on the forward 
line for the past four seasons, their 
places will be filled by experienced 
players from this year's squad. 

A banquet by the administration 
honored the team for its outstanding 
achievement at the conclusion of the 
regular season. 







HOCKEY 


1949 


Oct. 


1 


L. V. 


5 


Gettysburg. . .2 


Oct. 


15 


L. V. 


3 


Albright., . 2 


Oct. 


22 


*L. V. 


8 


Moravian. . . .0 


Oct. 


29 


*L. V. 


2 


Perm Hall... 


Nov. 


5 


L. V. . . 


2 


ShippensburgO 


Nov. 


12 


L. V. 


2 


Millersville . . 2 


Nov. 


19 


*L. V. 


10 


Susquehanna 






'Home 


Games 





1951 



QUITTAPAHILLA 




1st row: Elaine Fake, Dolores Zarker, Betty Slifer, Betty Edleman, Dottie Witmer. 

2nd row: Coach Smith, Jean Hutchinson, Willie Stambach, Helen MacFarland, Joyce Hammock, Libby Roper, DianneRandolph. 



WOMEN'S VARSITY 
BASKETBALL 



GIRL'S BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



L. V. 


65 


*L. V. 


42 


L. V. 


46 


L. V. 


38 


*L. V. . 


28 


*L. V. 


65 


L. V. 


20 


*L. V. . . 


48 


L. V. 


37 


L. V. 


23 


*L. V. . . 


59 




'Home Games 



Moravian 33 

Elizabethtown 60 

Millersville 18 

Gettysburg 54 

Shippensburg 40 

Millersville 23 

Shippensburg 45 

Susquehanna 27 

Elizabethtown 31 

PennHall 26 

Albright 63 



Carrying the banner of L. V. C. into the field of women's inter-collegiate basketball competition, the satin-suited 
Dutch coeds have again demonstrated their athletic ability. Bolstered by the addition of some much needed height in 
the person of several freshmen, the varsity played just under the .500 mark during the 1950 season, but furnished their 
loyal following many moments of entertainment. 

Under the able coaching of Mrs. Ernestine Jagnesak Smith and led by the reliable scoring of Jean Hutchinson, 
212 points, the varsity and junior varsity sextettes finished their schedule with 5 wins and 6 defeats. The season pro- 
vides valuable opportunity for participation and training to all interested women, in one of the outstanding sports pro- 
grams on campus. 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




1st row: lane Lutz, Dottie Bontreger, Helen Erickson, Elizabeth Kemmerling. 
2nd row: Coach Smith, Mickey Begg, Joan Orlando, Margaret Anders, Ruth Stambach, Lois Ort, Dianne Randolph. 

WOMEN'S JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 



C 
H 
E 
E 
R 

L 
E 
A 
D 
E 
R 
S 




QUITTAPAHILLA 




w. 

A. 
A. 



1st row: Betty Slifer, Margaret Bower, Helen MacFarland, Betsy Myers, Dianne Randolph ,Libby Roper, Mrs. Smith, 
Claire Caskey, Ruth Kramer, Jean Hutchinson, Elaine Baron. 

The L Club is an organization of athletes who meet the requirements of the college Athletic Council and who have received a letter 
in one of the three major sports. Membership in the Women's Athletic Association is limited to those women having the necessary 
points from varsity or intramural athletic participation. Both function socially, and the annual Homecoming Day L Club Dance is the 
largest college dance held. 



c 

L 
U 
B 




1st row: Bob Fischer, Walt Gage, Ed Tesn 
2nd row: Jerry Makris, Bill MiUer, Tom Qui 
3rd row: Francis Eigenbrode, Bob Shaak. 
4th row: Don Langstaff, Neal Woll, George Ca 
5th row: Joe Oxley, Norm Bucher. 



e, Dale Shellenberger, Hank Dijohnson, Guy Euston. 



WHO'S WHO IN THE JUNIOR CLASS 




Q UI TTAPAH I LLA 



1951 





JEAN EDWARDS 



Best Dressed 



-1951 



Q UI TTAPAHI LLA 



PASCAL ESPOSITO 

Best Dressed 





ROBERT MILLER 

Best Looking 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 




JOYCE CARPENTER 



OUTSTANDING LEADERS 



ROBERT MOLLER 




Q UITTAPAHILLA 



131 



HELEN MACFARLAND 




OUTSTANDING ATHLETES 




CHARLES ZIMMERMAN 



132 QUITTAPAHILLA 1951 



THANK YOU 



. . . Mr. Dale Fohl of the J. Horace McFarland Company 
for your generous technical advice. 

. . . Mr. William Buser and Mr. Yost of the Harpel 
Studio for your painstaking work in all special photog- 
raphy. 

. . . David Wallace and Raymond Kline, editor and 
business manager of the 1950 Quittapahilla, for your 
unselfish, experienced aid. 

... Dr. Struble, Professor Carmean, Mr. Donmoyer, 
Mr. Gockley, and Mr. Seiverling for your time, patience, 
and technical assistance. 

. . . Miss Fencil, Miss Shenk, Mrs. Fields, Mrs. Gerald 
Miller, and Miss Erma Gainor for your valuable help 
in identification, secretarial work, and cooperative 
attitudes. 

. . . everyone . . . faculty members, students, and 
friends . . . for all the many "little" favors that lie be- 
hind the pages of this 1951 Quittapahilla. 



1951 QUITTAPAHILLA 133 



OUR PATRONS 



MR. and MRS. LESTER G. BALMER 
MR. and MRS. J. H. BOMGARDNER 
MRS. SARAH BOOZ 

MR. and MRS. A. G. BRANDT, JR. 
MR. and MRS. GEORGE S. BROWN 
MR. and MRS. WM. D. BRYSON 

MR. and MRS. KOHLMAN K. COHEN 
MRS. MABEL DeLONG 

MR. and MRS. B. A. EDELMAN 
MR. and MRS. RALPH ESPOSITO 
MR. and MRS. C. A. ETSWEILER 
MR. and MRS. WM. GUY EUSTON 
MR. and MRS. P. J. FLOCKEN 
MR. E. N. FUNKHOUSER 

REV. and MRS. ARTHUR W. GARVIN 
MR. and MRS. WM. M. GETZ 

MR. and MRS. E. JAMES GREENE 
MRS. PAUL R. HALBERT 

MR. and MRS. RAYMOND S. HEBERLIG 
MR. and MRS. ELLIOTT HEMMINGER 
MR. and MRS. FRANKLIN M. KIEHNER 
MR. and MRS. LEROY KLINE 

MR. and MRS. MARTIN KLINGLER 

MR. and MRS. ROBERT C. KNOWLTON 
MR. and MRS. WALTER R. KOHLER 
MRS. ANDREW LAUDER 

MR. and MRS. W. K. LEMON, JR. 
MR. and MRS. C. P. LONG 

MR. and MRS. FRANK A. LONG 
MR. and MRS. HAROLD LUTZ 



134 QUITTAPAHILLA 1951 



OUR PATRONS 



MR. and MRS. JOHN B. McKELVEY 
MR. and MRS. C. E. MECKLEY 

MR. and MRS. JOHN H. METZGER 
MR. and MRS. WM. MILLER 
MR. and MRS. HORACE G. MOYER 
MR. and MRS. FRANK A. NICKEL 
MR. and MRS. ARCHIE A. RAESSLER 
REV. and MRS. EARL E. REDDING 
MR. and MRS. GEORGE E. RITNER 
MR. LLOYD A. SATTAZAHN 

MR. and MRS. JOSEPH W. SHANNAMAN 
MR. and MRS. K. R. SHETLER 
MR. and MRS. D. K. SHROYER 
MR. and MRS. STANLEY SHUPP 
MR. and MRS. A. C. SPANGLER 
REV. and MRS. CAWLEY H. STINE 
MR. and MRS. HARRY W. STUBBS 
MR. and MRS. JAMES C. TROSTLE 
MR. ALBERT WATSON 
MR. PAUL B. WEAVER 

MR. and MRS. LLOYD P. WERNER 
MR. E. D. WILLIAMS 

MR. and MRS. HERMAN W. WOLF 
MR. V. S. WOODS 

MR. W. H. WORRILOW 

MR. and MRS. JOHN H. ZIMMERMAN, JR. 
MR. and MRS. RAYMOND S. ZIMMERMAN 
MR. and MRS. BERNARD F. O' GORMAN 



136 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



1951 







' "; 



V* 



1951 QUITTAPAHILLA 137 



It is true that contributions from social science alone 
will not create the "good society". 

It is true that war cannot be banished 
until the hearts of men change. 

It is true that racial tensions will not be eliminated 

until men in their hearts believe in the common humanity of all peoples. 

Yet it is also true that achieving 

the goal of understanding in the problems of 

living and working together in contemporary society 

is the greatest need of society. 

This book is a pictoral attempt to show the college life of 
Lebanon Valley students in a blueprint 
which implies that that life is developing 
an understanding of this great social need. 

The story cannot end with the last page: 

whether Lebanon Valley College is succeeding in this role as a social educator, 

and whether its students are following our blueprint 

is a story just beginning. 

The ending of the story — and the actual approach 
to a solution of the problems — 
rests upon you, the reader . . . 



1951 QUITTAPAHILLA 

Engraving 
Printing and Binding 



by 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 

Mount Pleasant Press 
HARRISBURG • PENNSYLVANIA 



138 — 



Yearbook Photography 

by ft ft ft 



Studto 



^ M ft Portrait and Commercial 
Photographers 



Our large modern facilities enable us 

to offer unlimited -photographic service 

<— ^-3 ALL TYPES OF PHOTOGRAPHY e^*^ 

• PORTRAIT ©FAMILY GROUPS "BANQUETS 

• FORMAL AND CANDID WEDDINGS «COPY SERVICE • COMMERCIAL 



757-759 CUMBERLAND ST. Phone: 332 LEBANON, PA. 



139 — 



Compliments of 

fiotd annuillc 



Excellent Food 

in the 

Bavarian Room 



ANNVILLE . PENNSYLVANIA 



Visit the 

FIESTA ROOM 



AT 



George Washington 
Tavern 



LEBANON . PENNSYLVANIA 



SIMON S. KETTERING 



Goodyear Tires 



Phone: 1994M 



1 6th and Cumberland Streets 

At ESSO Station 



Goodyear Tubes 
LEBANON, PA. 



CONDUCTED STUDENT TOURS OF EUROPE— May to October 1950 

These tours are of interest to teachers as well as students. Visit 
all of Europe either on an economy tour or the Standard Five 
Country or Continental Tour. 

For information call 

LEBANON COUNTY TRAVEL BUREAU 

757 Willow St. Phone: 175 3 LEBANON, PA. 



— 140 — 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 


DIAMONDS of 


Exclusive Shoes 


DISTINCTION 


COLLEGEBRED SHOES 

"For College Girls" 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 




t ii r i 






st6!!#timc!< 






«.HJ=M.VM!|*iLM=aiM* 




"For the Man Who Cares" 




34 N. Eighth Street LEBANON, PA. 


Jewelers 


Telephone: 1715 


20 N. Ninth Street LEBANON, PA. 




In Lebanon it's 




HAAK BROS. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


Department Store 




"The Store with the Escalator" 




Headquarters for 


Automotive 
Trade 


Berkshire Nylons, 

Carole King Frocks 


JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 




FLORIST AND DECORATOR 


Association 


"THE FLOWER SHOP" 




Corsages Our Specialty 




Rear of Court House LEBANON, PA. 


of 


Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere, Anytime. 


Phone: 592 


Palmyra Bank and Trust Co. j 


Lebanon County 


PALMYRA, PA. j 




Che 

Moi 
MEMBER 


Serving the Community Since 1886 




eking Accounts — Saving Accounts 


Safe Deposit Boxes 




tgage, Commercial, Personal Loans 


OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP. 



— 141 — 



JAY'S FLOWER SHOP 

on the square 

Any occasion is complete only with flowers. 
! Between occasions give her some just because she's wonderful 

PALMYRA Phone: 8-6451 


Compliments of . 

HALL'S 

• 
PALMYRA, PENNA. 


Compliments of 

JOE'S RESTAURANT 

• 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 


Kreamer Bros. 
Furniture 

FLOOR COVERINGS 

ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

• 

Modern Funeral Home 

• 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


COMPLIMENTS OF j 

Ben Franklin Store 

Your College Store 

Open Friday and 
Saturday Evenings 

E. W. WOLFE, Owner 

• 

37-39 West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



— 142 — 



Compliments of . . . 



RICE and WEIDMAN 

INCORPORATED 



QeMelal Catttkactail 



? 



LANCASTER, PENNA. 



143 



"Demand Fresh Ice Cream" 

Gollam's Supreme Ice Cream 

"The Cream of Matchless Merit" 
Made Fresh Daily 

Catering to Parties, Picnics, Clubs, 

Banquets or any other social 

functions. 

88 

C. B. GOLLAM SONS MFGRS. 

"Master Ice Cream Service" 

6th and Maple Streets Lebanon, Pa. 
PHONE: 21 


Compliments of . . . 

BOWMAN'S 
Insurance Agency 

Palmyra Bank Bldg. PALMYRA, PA. 


DIAMONDS JEWELRY 

HOFFER'S 

5 North Ninth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 

WATCHES GIFTS 


Compliments of 

KREIDER MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of Hosiery 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


A. R. SHEARER 

Mobilgas • Mobiloil 

Service Station 

U. S. Tires 

Car Washing 

MAIN AND WHITE OAK STREETS 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Telephone: 7-4801 


If it's a Hit — It's Here 

Compliments of 

STATE THEATRE 

511-515 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



— 144 — 



To You Seniors of 1951 
May We Humbly say: 



Use your knowledge knowingly, 

your Wisdom wisely, 

your Courage courageously, 

for the betterment of self 
and mankind. 



THE PENNWAY 



145 



For Good Appearance 

H. W. KREIDER 

CLOTHIER 

Nationally known good 
merchandise 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 


Compliments of . . . 

RELIABLE COAT 

AND 

DRESS SHOP 

761 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 


S. A. BOMGARDNER'S 
"Dairy 

VISIT OUR DAIRY SNACK 

Route 422 — 1 Mile East of Palmyra 

Phone: 8-5521 or 8-0791 
40 East Main Street Palmyra, Pa. 


SHANK'S 

Meats .... 

Groceries .... 

Produce .... 

Ill East Main Street 
PALMYRA, PA. 


Phone: Lebanon 2657 

HERBERT L. BOWMAN 

Graduate Tree Surgeon 

Member NSTC 314 E. Maple Street 
Cleona, Penna. 


The Finest in Footwear 

R. E. KREIDER 

"Shoes for the entire family" 

• 
PALMYRA, PA. 


Compliments of . . . 

BUCKWALTEfVS 

Fancy Fruits • Vegetables 
Sea Foods 

123 East Main Street 
PALMYRA. PA. 


JOHN H. BOGER & SON 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Coal • Feed ■ fertilizer 

• 

TELEPHONE: 7-4111 



146 



Compliments of 

PETER HAWRYLUK 

JEWELER 

NATIONALLY ADVERTISED WATCHES FINE JEWELRY ART-CARVED DIAMONDS 

RONSON LIGHTERS 

WATCH REPAIRS TESTED ON WATCHMASTER 

40 East Main Street • Annville, Penna. 



Compliments of . . . 
YOUR HERSHEY MILK DISTRIBUTOR 
HERSHEY HOMOGENIZED MILK 

'''Cream in Every Drop" 



Phone : 22 16 'J 



Harry L. Meyer 



Cleona / Pennsylvania 



DAVIS PHARMACY 

103 W. Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

Parker Pens and Pencils 
Schaeffer Pens and Pencils 
Eversbarp Pens and Pencils 
Whitman s Candy 
Double K Nuts 
Prescriptions 



Compliments of 



J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER, Pres. - - 1914 
E. PETER STRICKLER, Assoc. - - 1947 

"Insure in sure insurance" 



Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Penna. 
Telephone: 5477 



Phone: 2453 . 1125 Willow Street 

WALTER L. HARTZ 

Philco RADIO Motorola 

Television 

Philco Warranty Service 
Electrical Appliances 

Compliments of 

Lebanon News Agency 



SAMUEL S. ETTER, Prop. 



— 147- 



".4s near as your nearest telephone" 

SAYLOR'S PHARMACY 
PRESCRIPTIONS 

• 

49 South 8th Street, Near the Post Office 
LEBANON, PENNA. 
Phone: 104 


Compliments of . . . 
Your Local Insurance Man 

I. M. LONG 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


THE 

BOJi'TOH 

"Lebanon's 
Greatest 

Store' 


WOLFE FURNITURE CO. 

Appliances, Furniture 
Floor Coverings 

754-756 Willow Street LEBANON, PA. 

Phone: 4010 


We extend our best wishes 
to the Class of 1951 

83 

ASTORIA 
RESTAURANT 


WHITE'S Food Market 

FRESH MEATS 
VEGETABLES 
FRESH FRUITS 

Phone: 2291 Cleona, Penna. 


Compliments of 

KARMEL KORN SHOP 

LEBANON, PA. 



148- 



H. E. MILLARD 
LIME and STONE CO. 



SERVING 



Industry -Building- Agriculture 

TOP QUALITY COURTEOUS SERVICE 
REASONABLE COST 



Annville, Pa. 



FINKS BAKERY 

DELICIOUS LAYER CAKES • PIES 

Filled and French Doughnuts 
PECAN BUNS . BREAD . SHOOFLY PIES 



— 149 — 



FUNCK'S GARAGE 

General Repairing 

OFFICIAL A. A. A. SERVICE ATLANTIC PRODUCTS 

J. C. FUNCK 

14-16 South White Oak Street Ann vi lie 7-5121 

Official Inspection Station No. 3068 



Compliments of , 



Donmoyer's Book Store 

41 N. Eighth Street Lebanon, Pa. 



BOOKS • SCHOOL SUPPLIES 

GREETING CARDS 

COLLEGE OUTLINE SERIES 



VISIT 



"Hot Dog" FRANK 

Light Lunches 
and Sandwiches of all kinds 



BREYERS ICE CREAM 

"It's the Talk of the Town" 

Annville, Pa. 



When in Talmyra, Stop and Shop at . . 

LAUCK BROS. 

30-34 E. Main Street 
UNUSUAL GIFT SELECTION COMPLETE STATIONERY LINE 



Compliments of . 



BRANDYWINE IRON 
& METAL COMPANY 



SAM CLARK, Class of '27 

Salvage Material 



ABE GROSKY 

LEBANON, PENNA. 



Tel.: 130 



— 150 



ttmgsilep $c Proton, arte. 

LAUNDERERS CLEANERS and FURRIERS 

PHONE: Annville: 7-3511 
Hershey: 1-0611 
Myerstown: 1-0611 
Middletown: 3151 

* deluxe ^eririce ♦ 


D. L. SAYLOR 

and SONS 

Contractors • Builders 

SPECIALIZED 
CABINET WORK 

ALL BUILDING MATERIALS 

• 

Annville, Penna. 


Compliments of . .': 

THE GREEN TERRACE 

featuring 

JIMMY MARTINI 

and bis 

GREEN TERRACE BAND 

FRANK DINUNZIO, Prop. 


♦ 

— A Friend — 

♦ 



151 



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