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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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Digitized by tine Internet Arcinive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1952leba 




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THE Q U I TTA PA 



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Published by the 

junior class of 
Lebanon Valley College 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



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Editor-in-Chief . , . LOIS ADAMS 
Associate Editor . . ANNE BLECKER 





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DEDICATED TO 

THE MEMORY OF 




CLYDE ALVIN LYNCH 



CLYDE ALVIN LYNCH 

1891 to 1950 

(PREPARED BY DEAN A. H. M. STONECIPHER) 

Clyde Alvin Lynch was born in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, August 24, 1891, the son of John Henry Lynch and 
Carmina Blanche (Keys) Lynch, and departed this life on August 6, 1950. He is survived by his widow, Edith L. (Base- 
hore) Lynch, a daughter. Rose Eleanor (Hemperly), a son John Howard, and four grandchildren: Charlotte Ann Hem- 
perly, John Cecil Hemperly, Patricia Joanne Lynch, and John Howard Lynch, Jr.; also a brother and four sisters. 

He received his pre-college education in the public schools of Pennsylvania and the Lebanon Valley Academy. 
In 1918 he was graduated with the A.B. degree from Lebanon Valley College and later received the B.D. degree from 
the Bonebrake Theological Seminary (1921), the A. M.from Lebanon Valley College (1925), and the A.M. (1929) and 
the Ph.D. (1931) from the University of Pennsylvania. He was also honored with the D.D. degree (1926) by his alma 
mater and with the LL.D. degree by Albright College (1937). 

His professional career was divided between the pastorate and educational service. 

He early dedicated his life to the ministry, receiving the Quarterly-Conference License in 1909, the Annual-Con- 
ference License in 1910, and was ordained by Bishop ^N . M. Weekley in 1916. He served the following pastorates: 
CenterviUe Circuit, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1911-1912; Linglestown and Rockville, Pennsylvania, 1912-1918; 
Antioch and Pyrmont, Montgomery County, Ohio, 1918-1921; Ephrata, Pennsylvania, 1921-1925; and Second Church, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1925-1930. 

From 1928 to 1930, while he was doing graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Lynch also served as 
Assistant Instructor m Psychology, and m 1930 he was called to serve as Professor of Homiletics and Practical Theology 
at Bonebrake Theological Seminary, which position he held until he was elected to the presidency of Lebanon Valley 
College in 1932. 

Dr. Lynch's interests and connections were many and varied, and he occupied a large place in the organizations 
of which he was a part. 

He represented his church at large as a member of the Board of Christian Education and Chairman of the Committee 
on Educational Instituhons; as Delegate to four (1933, 1937, 1941, 1945) General Conferences and to the merging 
General Conference of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ and the Evangelical Church at Johnstown in 1946, 
which formed the Evangelical United Brethren Church, and was the Chairman of the Committee on Episcopacy. 

In the East Pennsylvania Conference (U.B.) he was Chairman of the Committee on Conference Relations and a 
member of the Council of Administration and of the Finance Committee. 

He was an ardent believer in interdenominational cooperation, and was Vice-President of the Pennsylvania Council 
of Churches, a member of the Pennsylvania Council of Religious Education and of the Executive Committee of the State 
y.M.C.A. He was also denominational representative of the Federal Council of the Churches of Christ in America, 
alternate member of the Executive Committee and member of the Committee on Research and Education. 

In the field of Education he occupied a large place. In the Pennsylvania State Educational Association he was a 
member of the Execuhve Committee for a number of years (1937-1938, 1948), and at different times was President of 
the Department of Higher Education (1948), President of the Southern Convention District (1937), delegate totheNattonal 
Education Associatton (1947, 1948), and Chairman of the College and Universtty Section (1947). He was also a member 
of the National Educational Association and the Department of Higher Education; of the American Association of School 
Administrators; a member of the Pennsylvania Commission on Area Colleges and Chairman of the Advisory Committee, 
Area No. 2 (1946-1948); and member of the Executive Committee of the Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and 
Universities (1948-1950). 

His purely intellectual interests were expressed in his membership in the American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science, the American Psychological Association, and the Pennsylvania Academy of Science. He was the 
author of numerous articles in psychological, religious, and educational publications and was much in demand as a 
speaker on varied subjects. 

His participation in civic activities was extensive. He was a member of the Lebanon Chamber of Commerce, Chair- 
man of the Board of Management, Lebanon U.S.O., during the war years, and was honored with the Distinguished Ser- 
vice Medal from La Societe des 40 Hommes et 8 Chevaux, La Grande Voiture de Pennsylvania for the Development of 
Good Will and Americanism. He was Chairman of the Pennsylvania Commission on Displaced Persons since 1948 
and National Chairman of the Commission on the Resettlement of Displaced Persons with Professional Skills, in which 
capacities he rendered exceptional service to suffering humanity. A member of the faculty of Lebanon Valley College, 
Dr. Helene Kostruba, herself a displaced person whom he aided, requested in her own name and in the name of others 
thus assisted, that a special tribute be paid to the hearttelt interest and unselfish devotion which Dr. Lynch put into this 
service to human misfortune and suffering. 

He was a member of the Lebanon Rotary Club and past president and member of its Committee on International 
Understanding and Good Will; and of the Executives Club and Torch Club of Harrisburg, and of The Newcomen Society 
of England. 

He held a prominent place in the Masonic fraternity. He was a member of Ephrata Lodge No. 665 Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Lancaster Lodge of Perfection and Harrisburg Consistory; and an honorary member of the Supreme 
Council 33' of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry; of Hermit Commandery, Knights Templar; 
of Trinity Conclave No. 4, Red Cross of Constantine; of QuittapahiUa Forest No. 25 Tall Cedars of Lebanon; of Zembo 
Temple of the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine and of the Lebanon County Shrine Club. 

At the time of his death he was Chaplain of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania and Supreme Chaplain of the Supreme 
Forest of the Tall Cedars of Lebanon. He was a past president of the Lebanon County Club of the Harrisburg Con- 
sistory. 

President Lynch lived intensely, and this long account of his activities tells only part of the story. Whatever he did, 
he did with an emotional warmth and enthusiasm which greatly enhanced the value of all his services. His was a rich 
and many-sided personality, and he will be remembered variously by people in the various relationships of life. In 
the family he was a devoted son, brother, father, and grandfather; in the Church he was the devout servant and prophet 
of God; in civic relations he was the friend of man; in the College he was the intellectual leader, dedicated to the ad- 
vancement of learning and the development of young people in wisdom and godliness. But to all who knew him in 
whatever way, his passing has come as a profound shock and grief and leaves a vacancy difficult or impossible to fill. 

With faith in God, in whom he put his trust, we bow in humble submission and say farewell, not forever, but only 
until the sunrise of that new day in which he now lives. 




QUITTAPAHILLA 




ROLL CALL OF THE GODS 



ZEUS — Ruler of the world and chief of all the gods 

ATHENE — Goddess of wisdom 

APOLLO — God of poetry and music 

AMOR — God of fellowship and love 

VESTA — Goddess of the hearth and home life 

FORTUNA— Goddess of chance 

HARMONIA — Goddess of order and association 

VENUS — Goddess of beauty and charm 

ARETE — Goddess of virtue 

HERCULES— God of strength 

MARS — God of war 

ATLAS — God of the globe 

MERCURY — God of speed and travel; fleet-footed 
messenger of the gods 

DIANA — Goddess of the chase and women 








ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 






,„•,!,«» 



# 





BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Representatives from the East Pennsylvania U. B. Conference 



Roy Garber 

J. B. McKelvey 

Rev. Edgar Hertzler, A.B., B.D., S.T.M. 

Hon. Miles Horst, M.S., LL.D, 

A. C. Spongier 

Rev. S. C. Enck, A.M., B.D., D.D. 

Rev. P. B. Gibble, A.M., B.D., D.D. 



Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, A.B., D.D. 

Rev. D. E. Young, A.M., B.D., D.D 

E. W. Coble 

Rev. W. A. Wilt, D.D. 

Rev. H. E. Schaeffer, A.M., D.D. 

C. L. Bitzer 




Representatives from the Pennsylvania U. B. Conference 



Rev. C. Guy Sfombach, A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Horold T. Lutz, LL.D. 

H. W. Shenk, A.B., A.M. 

Rev. iro S. Ernst, A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Rev. Mervin H. Welty, A.B., B.D., D.D. 

J. Stewart Glen, LL.B., D.D. 

Rev. F. T. Kohler, A.B., B.D., D.D. 



Albert Watson 

Huber D. Strine, A.B , M.A. 

Rev. P. E. V. Stionnon, A.B., B.D., D.D. 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, A.B., D.D. 

E. N. Funkhouser, A.B., LL.D. 

R. G. Mowrey, A.B., Ped.D. 



Representatives from the Virginia U. B. Conference 



J. Paul Gruver, A.B., B.D., D.D. 
Paul J. Slonaker, B.S., B.D. 
J. E. Oliver, A.B., B.D. 



G. C. Ludwig 

Rev. Carl W. Hiser, A.B., D.D 

Rev. E. E. Miller, A.B., D.D. 



Alumni Trustees 



E. D. Williams, A.B. 

Miss Alma Mae Light, B.S., M.S. 



Warren H. Fake, A.B., M.D. 



Trustees at Large 



Bishop J. B. Showers, A.B., D.D., LL.D. 
H. M. Imboden, A.B., M.D., Sc.D. 
Maurice R. Metzger, A.B., LL.B. 



Hon. J. Paul Rupp, A.B., LL.B., LL.D. 
Lloyd A. Sattozahn 
W. H. Worrilow, LL.D. 





10 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE ADMINISTRATION 

1951 





FREDERICK K. MILLER 
Acting President 




A. H. M. STONECIPHER 
Dean of the College 




WILLIAM A. HAYES 
Dean of Students 




CLARA CHASSELL COOPER 
Dean of Women 

11 





GLADYS FENCIL 
Registrar 



CLAUDE DONMOYER 

Secretary 
of Finance Committee 




CLARK CARMEAN 
Dean of Admissions 





■**»'• 



k 



DAVID GOCKLEY 

Director of Religious and 
Social Activities 




12 



JAMES PARSONS 

Alumni Secretary and 
Director of Public Relations 




HELEN E. MYERS 
Librarian 



*sS^ ^■ 




DONALD FIELDS 
Associate Librarian 




LIBRARY 



LIBRARY STAFF 

Left to right: Mrs. Fields, 
Miss Dunkle, Miss Myers, 
Miss Shenk, Mr. Fields. 






COLLEGE FACULTY 



Ablett, Charles 
Bender, Andrev. 
Bollinger, O. Pa 



nd Spanish 
sisfant Footbc 



j\ Sci< 



iistant Professor Mathematics and Physics 

essor of Chemistry 

sistant Professor Biology 
Cooper, Mrs. Clara C, Dean of Women; Professor Psychology 
Derickson, S. H., Professor Emeritus, Biology 
Egli, William H., Instructor in Business Low 
Ehrhart, Carl Y., Professor of Philosophy 
Erickson, Robert L., Professor of Mathematics 
Pagan, Robert C, Professor of Psychology 
Pagan, Mrs. Violet B., Assistant Professor of Fi 
Fox, Richard E., Instructor, Economics and Busir 
Fronk, Mrs. Luella U., Instructor, French and German 
Gockley, Warren, Assistant Professor of Physical Educat 
Grimm, Samuel O., Professor of Physics and Mathematic 
Harriman, Byron L, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Keller, Theodore D., Instructor, English 
Kerr, George T., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Kostruba, Mrs. Helene, Instructor in Russian 
Laughlin, Mrs. Maud P., Professor of Sociology and Polit 
lietzau, Lena L., Professor of German 
Light, V. Earl, Professor of Biology 

Lochner, Hilbert V., Assistant Professor of Economics ond Busines! 
McKlveen, Gilbert D., Professor of Education 
Mease, Ralph R., Director of Athletics 
Miller, Mrs. Marion S., Instructor in History 
Neidig, Howard A., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Orth, Andrew Pork, Professor of Business Administration and Ecoi 
Richie, Gustov A., Professor of Religion and Greek 
Ricker, Ralph R., Football Coach; Instructor in History 
Scholz, John Paul, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
Shay, Ralph S., Assistant Professor of History 
Shenk, H. H., Professor Emeritus, History 
Sloca, Charles, Assistant Professor of English 
Smith, Mrs. Ernestine, Director and Coach of Women' 
Sparks, W. Maynord, Assistant Professor, Religion 
Stevenson, Mrs. Stella J., Professor of French and Sp 
Struble, George G., Professor of English 
Wolfgang, Marvin E., Instructor in Socioiogy 
Woodland, John T., Assistant Professor of Biology 



i Athletics 





14 




CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC FACULTY 

Bender, Mrs. Ruth E., Piano, Piano Pedagogy 

Campbell, R. Porter, Organ 

Crawford, Alexander, Voice 

Fairlamb, William H., Piano 

Gillespie, Mary E., Director of the Conservatory 

Holliday, Jane M., Music Theory, Cello 

Koho, Elizabeth E., Theory, Piano 

Landor, Neville, Voice 

Malsh, Harold, Violin 

Rovers, Reynaldo, Voice 

Rutledge, Edward P., Director of Musical Organizations 

Stochow, Frank E., Professor of Musical Theory, Woodwinds 

Stagg, Shirley E., Piano 



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15 




16 



VIEW FROM MOUNT OLYMPUS 








17 




WASHINGTON HALL 




MEN'S DORMITORY 



18 




NORTH HALL 




SOUTH HALL 



19 




WEST HALL 




SHERIDAN HALL 
20 




21 





SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

President BRUCE WISER 

Vice-President JAY FLOCKEN 

Secretary JOYCE CARPENTER 

Treasurer RICHARD KLINE 



22 





0^ 




CHARLES ALFIERI 
Lebanon, Pa. 



ROBERT ALLEN 
Cornwall, Pa. 



HOWARD ANCELL 
Harnsburg, Pa. 






DONALD ARNOLD 
Lebanon, Pa. 



HAROLD BAER 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



RUFINA BALMER 
Lititz, Pa. 






HAROLD BATDORF 
Lebanon, Pa. 



FLOYD BATURIN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



ROBERT BEAR 
Lemoyne, Pa. 



23 




A. HILTEN BENNETT, JR. 
Hagerstown, Md. 




mt- 




LYNN BLECKER 
Lebanon, Pa. 





JOHN BOAG 
Clearfield, Pa. 






DAVID BOMGARDNER 
Sheridan, Pa 



HERBERT BOOZ 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



RICHARD BOTHWELL 
Lebanon, Pa. 






MARGARET BOWER 
Chambersburg, Pa. 



WILLIAM BOYD 
Lebanon, Pa. 



MARY RUTH BRANDT 
Campbelltown, Pa. 



24 






PHYLLIS A. BRIGHTBILL 
Lebanon, Pa. 



RUTH ANN BROWN 
Lebanon, Pa. 



JACK BRYSON 
Ephrata, Pa. 






JAMES BURCHFIELD 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



JOYCE CARPENTER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



GEORGE CHARLES 
Lebanon, Pa. 






E. DOROTHEA COHEN 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



DONALD COLDREN 
Mifflmtown, Pa. 



JOHN COYLE 
Lebanon, Pa. 



25 






CLEMENT DAUBENSPECK 
Rockville Centre, N. Y. 



DEAN DOUGHERTY 
Dallastown, Pa. 



WILLIAM DAVEY 
Marysville, Pa. 




DONALD DEGLER 

Manheim, Pa. 





GEORGE DELONG 
Annville, Pa. 






DONALD DEXTER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PAUL DOWNEY 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



FLORENCE DUNKELBERGER 
Newville, Pa. 



26 



** 




BETTY EDELMAN 
Robesonia, Pa. 




JEANNE EDWARDS 
Lemoyne, Pa. 




HAROLD ENGLE 
Palmyra, Pa. 





#»# 




PAT ESPOSITO 
Garfield, N.J. 



SARA ANN ETZWEILER 
Columbia, Pa. 



GUY EUSTON 
Pottstown, Pa. 




ROBERT FEASTER 
Hagerstown, Md. 




*^ 15^ r 




RICHARD FIELDS 
Lebanon, Pa. 




JAMES L. FISHER 
Thurmont, Md. 



27 






WILLIAM P. nSHER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PAUL lAY FLOCKEN 
Lebanon, Pa. 







JOSEPH FRANK 
Lebanon, Pa. 



lEAN FRANTZ 
Myersfown, Pa. 



MIRIAM FULLER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 




CLARENCE FUNK 
Lebanon, Pa. 




'M^ m^ 



\ r 



CHARLES GARRETT, JR. 
Hershey, Pa 







ROLAND GARVIN 
Taneytown, Md. 



28 




CAROLYN GASSART 
Palmyra, Pa. 





ROBERT GEIB 
Tower City, Pa. 




JAMES GEISELHART 
Rutherford, N.I. 






MILAN GERASINOVICH 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PIERCE GETZ 
Denver, Pa. 



GEORGE GEYER 
Middletown, Pa. 






KERRY GINGRICH 
Lebanon, Pa. 



BERNARD GOLDSMITH 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



lAMES GREENE 
Folsom, Pa. 



29 




JOHN I. GROSNICK 
Hershey, Pa. 








FLOYD GRUBB 
WiUiamstown, Pa. 




MARGARET HALBERT 
Rutherford Heights, Pa. 



^ 




ANNA FAY HALL 
Palmyra, Pa. 




RICHARD HAWK 
Reading, Pa. 




<*?P^ 0&%t 



) 




RAYMOND HEBERLIG 
Shamokin, Pa. 






JOHN W. HECK 
Reading, Pa. 



HAROLD HEISEY 
Lawn, Pa. 



ELVIN V, HELLER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



30 




LEWIS CLIFTON HEMINWAY 
Woodlynne, N.J. 








MARLIN NEAL HOFFER 
Palmyra, Pa. 



IRA HOSTETTER 
Palmyra, Pa. 



JOHN HOUSMAN 
Manheim, Pa. 



RICHARD K. HUNTZINGER 
Lebanon, Pa. 




CYNTHIA JOHNSON 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



STEPHEN F. JORDAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 



31 






RICHARD KAYLOR 
Harrisburg, Pa 



RAY KAUFFMAN 
Oley, Pa. 



ROBERT L. KAUFFMAN 
Lititz, Pa. 




BERNARD L. KECKLER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 




MIRIAM KELLER 
Ephrata, Pa. 



ii*'*JfSft i^^Br**^ 



>c- 




THOMAS F. KIRCHOFF 
Lebanon, Pa. 






KERMIT KIEHNER 
Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 



LARRY KINSELLA 
Linden, N. J. 



CALVIN G. KIPP 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



32 






CHARLES KISCADDEN 
Lebanon, Pa. 



RICHARD KLINE 
Fleetwood, Pa. 



JOAN KLINGLER 
Hershey, Pa. 






ROBERT C. KNOWLTON 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



RICHARD KOHLER 
Allentown, Pa 



ANNA MAE KREIDER 
Cleona, Pa. 




CHARLES KREIS 
Cleona, Pa. 





ELAM S KURTZ 
Elverson, Pa. 



33 










ANDREW B. LAUDER 
Great Neck, N. Y. 



JEAN LEESER 
Auburn, Pa. 



WILLIAM LEMON 
Middletown, Pa. 






ALLEN LIGHT 
Avon, Pa. 



LOUISE LIGHT 
Lebanon, Pa. 



ANNA LIND 
Westhampton, L. I., N. Y. 



"C^ 




ETHEL LONG 
Hershey, Pa. 




EVELYN J. LONG 
Jonestown, Pa, 




ROBERT LONGENECKER 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



34 






^Xu-/ .,..,^ 



RICHARD LUKASIEWICZ 
Schenectady, N. Y. 



NORMAN LUKENS 
Wormleysburg, Pa, 



NANCY LUTZ 
Lititz, Pa. 






DOROTHEA LYNN 
PottsviUe, Pa. 



HELEN ANNA MacFARLAND 
Glenside, Pa. 



lOHN MARKS 
Richland, Pa. 








'1^ ^i^ 




KENNETH I. MARKS 
Richland, Pa. 



JOAN MATTERN 
Minersville, Pa. 



ROBERT MEALS 
Newville, Pa. 



35 




ROBERT H. MECKLEY 
Penbrook, Pa. 





EUGENE E. MEYERS 
Dallastown, Pa. 




r 



- -f 



^^- / 




JOHN C. MESSERSMITH 
York, Pa. 




If*-: 



ZOSIA MIECZKOWSKA 
Reading, Pa 





BARBARA METZGER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 






-*•> 



4 




GERALD D. MILLER 
Rohrersville, Md. 






ROBERT K. MILLER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



WILLIAM MILLER 
Roeblmg, N. J. 



36 



ROBERT E. MOLLER 
Morrisville, Pa 




RICHARD MOORE 
Ridley Park, Pa. 




ALBERT F. MORICONI 
Morrisville, Pa. 




t 



f 



'"%•»' 




CHARLES J. MORINCHIN 
Cornwall, Pa 




HORACE F. MOYER 

Lebanon, Pa. 




RICHARD MOYER 
Sellersville, Pa. 







^^>i 

^■^ 




ROBERT MRGICH 
Steelfon, Pa. 




FRANK A. NICKEL 
Lancaster, Pa. 




FRANCIS A. NOGLE 
Waynesboro, Pa. 







DONALD A. POTTER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



37 



^^^ 



f . .0am 



"w? 




JOHN N. PATTERSON 
Harrisburg, Pa. 




EUGENE PATRICK 
Palmyra, Pa. 




RICHARD J. PEIFER 
Reading, Pa. 




l,*^I^T~«v 



LOIS PERRY 
Northfield, N. J. 




GALE B. PLANTZ 
Enola, Pa. 





RALPH T. PORTER 
Stony Creek, Pa. 






GERALD PRATT 
PhUadelphia, Pa. 



MARK RAESSLER 
Palmyra, Pa. 



PATRICIA RIIHILUOMA 
"Finlandia" Pembroke, Bermud 



38 




EARL E. REDDING 
York, Pa. 




.iir^> 




CHESTER L. RICHWINE 
New Cumberland, Pa. 




>l^' ." 




GEORGE RITNER 
West Lawn, N. J. 






BARNET ROETENBERG 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



CHARLES E. ROLAND 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



BEATRICE ROYER 
Lebanon, Pa. 






CLYDE JOHN SAYLOR 
Lebanon, Pa. 



RICHARD SCHIEMER 
Rochelle Park, N. J. 



C. RUSSELL SCHNECK 
Lebanon, Pa. 



39 






i 



EDITH ROMAINE SHANAMAN 
Hummelstown, Pa. 



WILSON SHEARER 
Dillsburg, Pa. 



MYRNA SHENK 
Lebanon, Pa. 




,.%•*► 



9 




LOIS SHETLER 
lenkintown, Pa. 



ANNE SHROYER 
Annville, Pa. 



ARLENE SHUEY 
Harrisburg, Pa. 








GERALD SHUPP 
New Cumberland, Pa. 



ROBERT SHULTZ 
Reading, Pa. 




40 






HERMAN SMITH 
Lebanon, Pa. 



GEORGE STARK 
Llwellyn, Pa. 



DONALD STEINBERG 
Newport, Pa. 





JOSEPH M. STUBBS 
Steelton, Pa. 



RAYMOND SWINGHOLM 
Lebanon, Pa. 




FRANCENE SWOPE 
Lebanon, Pa. 




DONALD L. TROSTLE 
Hanover, Pa, 




^^^ «^%» ' "^-^ 




MARTIN TROSTLZ 
Eillsburg, Pa. 



41 




LEE R THIERWECHTER 
Lebanon, Pa. 




JOHN E. VOGEL 
Hummelstown, Pa. 





THEODORE E. WAGNER 
Harrisburg, Pa. 






NORMA WEAVER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



PAUL WEAVER 
Middletown, Pa. 



GEORGE WERNER 
Lebanon, Pa. 






PATRICIA WE.WER 
Lebanon, Pa. 



WILLIAM O. WERT 
Palmyra, Pa. 



CHARLES WILLIAMS 
Portland, Pa. 



42 





BRUCE WISER 
Annville, Pa. 



RUTH WINTERS 
Dallastown, Pa 



#5k 



ji 



J^A 




/ 



RONALD WOLF 
Johnstown, Pa. 







HARRY W. WOLFE 
Lebanon, Pa. 





HENRY F. WOLFSKEIL 
Roselle Park, N. J. 



NEAL WOLL 
Reinerton, Pa. 



43 






GLENN WOODS 
Chambersburg, Pa. 




HAROLD YINGST 
Lebanon, Pa. 




CHARLES L. ZIMMERMAN 
Lebanon, Pa. 




RAYMOND S. ZIMMERMAN 
Lemoyne^ Pe, 





RICHARD H. ZIMMERMAN 
Hershey, Pa. 



44 




LLOYD ACHENBACH 
Lebanon Pa 



WILLIAM CAGNOLI 
Hershey, Pa. 



CARL GERBERICH 
Hershey, Pa. 




RUTH McCartney jones 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



HARRY KEIM 
Lebanon, Pa. 







--MgKr 



RICHARD LENOX 
Washington Boro, Pa. 



ROBERT MORHAUSER 
CoUingswood, N. I. 



ROBERT RHEIN 
Reading, Pa. 



45 



^1 




i'S 







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47 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

President EDWARD TESNAR 

Vice-President FRED SAMPLE 

Secretary BETTY BAKLEY 

Treasurer STERLING STRAUSE 



48 




LOIS ADAMS . . Williamstown, Pa. . . . 

English a go-getter "Quittie" editor 

progressive lots of spirit . , works 

hard at anything full of fun and repartee . 



in Enqhsh with lots of br, 



I future Miss Houtz 



ELAINE BARRON 
Education . . "Little Ela 
with lots of pep . - . talks 



busybee 
Ihpuhan 
. good 






MARGARET ANDERS , , Annville .Bus Ad 
. . . one of the married group . tall and 

poised . . . strawberry blonde . , keeps house 



CLYDE BAVER . . Fanwood, N. I ... 
Sociology major . . craves purple ties . . . 
smooth dancer . . "You know il" . . . 
strictly a party man (social, that is) . . . Kalo 
enthusiast. 



BETTY BAKLEY 


Pitman, N J 


Enghsh 




La Vie Editor 


diligent sti 


udent . . 


tern 


lie personality 


South lersey' 


s contnbu- 


hon 


to South Hall . 


ready smile . 


. L V.s 


Jinx 


Falkenberg 


did most for 1: 


ler college 




always ready for 


■ a good time 


. . . "Mel, 


you 


joker, youl" 








ADELE BEGG 


1 . . North Arhngton, N I . . 




Sociology . . 


attractive . . 


. spontaneous . 




dynamic per! 


sonahty . 


a philosophy ft 




everything . 


. . "You knov 


1 how It is" . . 




athletic . . . 


always the ext 


rovert . . . drivt 




a yellow coi 


nvertible . 


. the essence , 




friendliness . 


. . "Mickey's" 


tops with all. 



ARMEN BANKLIAN . . . Weehawken, N. I. . . . 
Chemistry . . star of many of our stage per- 
formances . . . ready to join the fun, but is more 
often the creator . . , knows Annville from the 
east to the west, from the south to the north ends. 
. . . 'Belvedere' . . . friend of Frank . . . fastidi- 
ous and styhsh dresser. 



ELIZABETH 


BEITTEL 


. . . loh 


nstow 


n. Pa. 


Psychology 




"Liz 




tall. 


stately. 


tractive . . 


. tasteful di 


resser 


re= 


served 


sense of hui 


mor 


. . fi 


nendly i 


smile 


. . . su 


charm . . . 


asset 


to W 


ig and 


Buckl. 




director for 


K.D. 




. Delphi 


lan booster 


afternoon promer 


ladei 


! with 


Herb 




scientious student 




•Oh, this 


iSpan 


ish aga 



49 
















/"-flN, 



ANTHONY BERING . . . Lebanon . . . Chem- 
istry . . . Tony , . "Ai Yi Yi" . . . future pro- 
tector or puller of molars . friendly fellow 
, . , "Would you like to be a carbon atom in our 
T-butyl alcohol club?" 



DONALD BLANKEN . Lebanon , , . Bus. 
Ad . "Don" . . - Day student . . . good- 
natured-happy-go-lucky . . . always full of pep, 
yim and vigor . . . cheerful smile . . . fnendly 
. .weU hked by aU. 



Lebanon . . Pre-Med 
■ombination . plans to 
ime sign in the Chem lab 
s destined . . abundant 

. it's a merry life for Joe. 



ANNE BLECKER . . . Harnsburg, P^ 
French . . language brain . . . folic 
philosophy, "Better late than never 
always cutting classes to make poste 
Alarm clock blues . visitor of the Dea 
good-natured . . talented artist . . . 




ALDEN BIELY . , Lebanon . Music educa- 
tion . . . "Olhe" . . friendly . . keyboard 
killer . . . Glee Clubber . , . Crawford's pro- 
tege . - . liked by everyone . . . energetic and 
ambihous. 



JEANNE BOMGARDNER . . . Palmyra . . . 
History - . . "windblown leannie" . . pebte, 
pert, attrachve . . . bubbhng with enthusiasm 
. . . conscientious student . . , ardent con- 
versationalist . . . congerual . . . varied 
interests . . . likes dancing, dramahcs and Cal. 





SAMUEL BLACK 


... He 


shey, Pa. . . 


Pre- 


Med, . 


. . Sam IS 


a newco 


mer to the cla 


s this 


year 


. . Dean's 


list . . . 


a right nice pr 


oduct 


of Her 


hey Junior 


College 


. - that quiet 


calm 


manne 


r releases a 


might of 


action in those 


knife 


shcing 


anatomy la 


bs . . . h 


andy with the 


mile. 




DOROTHY BONTREGER . B 


elleviUe . . 




History rr 


aior 


"Dotty" . 


South HaU 




little spark of perso 


lality . . petil 


e . . . giggle 




. Na 


ncy's bu 


ddy . . am 


bitious . . 




"Terrible 


Trigger,' 


the May Day 


wrestler . . 




reserved 


seat in So 


uth Hall parlo 


. . . there 




Sleelton i 


n her futu 


re! 





50 




,--^ 



ROBERTA BOWMAN . . . Lemoy: 

Lsh . quiet and calm . plans 

pixie-Iike . , day student . - neat 
artistically inclined. 



'^b*- 




-^^^ 



ELMA BREIDENSTINE . Lancaster, Pa 

Music , , conscientious efficient 

Prof R 's assistant variety of talents 

"Oh, my gosh! I must practice" .a viVc 
redhead . . . Dean's list 



NICHOLAS BOVA . Rahway, N I . Bus, 
Ad . Nick will always take a ride , switch- 
ed from Dodge to Pontiac recently , . Kalo 
actor - "Grubie" goes tor his foreign expres- 
sions , , "There IS no place Uke Rahway", . . . 
New Jersey that is- 



lOAN BROWN . . . Lebanon . , . English . . . 
"Pussy" . . , Indiana State transfer . - , classic 
beauty . . . vivacious . . . talented artist vrith 
a {lair for writing , . , keep things ahve in the 



. cheerful dispositio 




ROBERT BOWSER Hummelstown 

"Bob" . . Day student F and M transfer 

. , . future undertaker , Heart interest? , 
Philadelphia the quiet type . , . furniture 

salesman in free bme , easy to get along 

with. 



GEORGE CARDONE . Endicott, NY 

Education , quiet, conservative, and peaceful 

- hails from New York state and is proud of it 

- wants to teach George is a handy 

helper for any chef South HaJJ frequenter. 



GERALD BOYER . . . Lebanon Pohtical 

Science . . . goes to night school . . transfer 
from Furman . . drives a new Ford . . . 



CLAIRE CASKEY . . . Harrisburg, Pa. ... 
Biology . taU likes to knil . , talented 

seamstress likes Jersey soil . . . dimples 



51 





"18^- 



Good boy with the 



DOROTHY DANDO 



nth a flare for Shakespeare (') . 
llotterite . . . Ready to help everyl 
Now Really!" . . . Always lots of fun 



HARRY COOPER 
French , , "Coop' 
managerial staff anc 
of efhci. 



. a sohd South I 
lat South Hall visit. 



of the basket- 



ROBERT DAUGHERTY . , . Harnsburg . . 
Pre-theological . . . future bishop . . . "Wha 
no more Ehrhart courses to take?" . . . Grei 
Books for sale - - - "Any Greek to translate? 
. , . dark . , . good looks. 



HAROLD COOPERSMITH . . . Philadelphia 
. . . "Hal" . . . really enjoys life behind the 
wheel of his' convertible chevy . - - has a port- 
able garage for his baby . . . Kalo-man . . . 
great love for sleep , . . great sense of humor. 



GLORIA DRESSLER . . , MiUersburg, Pa, . 
Music ... on stage with Cho and Wig 
Buckle , . . Arlene's accompanist . . . 1 
sewing and photography . . "Let's make 
we know" . . . plans to teach. 



WILLIAM CRAIGHEAD . . . Harrisburg, Pa. 
. . . Biology . . . Ex-gob ... a big smile and 
friendly personality . . . rooms with the rev- 
erend , . . "Why, oh, why did I ever leave 
Wyoming" . . . Takes movies in spare time - , . 
lover of the out-of-doors . . . Birdie. 



DAVID DUNDORE . . . EUzabethtown, Pa. . . . 
Music . . - bee bop feehng . . . great worker 
in Kalo . . . keeps an eye on things from the 
corner of the second floor . . . able and ready. 



i«^ 





52 



LEE DUNKLE 




BERNARD FOGLE ^ . Fre 
Sociology - . "Bern" is or 
ditions to Ihe class this year 
ground ol knowledge , . 
boisterous third tloor crew 

friend. 



JAY DUTWEILER Lebanon Bus Ad . . 

dark wavy hair , - good looking Day- 

Student , . . spirited - - sense of humor , . . 



JOANNE 


FOX 


. Paxlang, Pa 


. . . Engh 


. . bio 


nd bo 


mbshell 


from No 


rth Hall . 


neat dres 


ser 


loves t 


o have a good time . 


Madame 


Slever 


son's fa 


vorite . . 


. "What a 


that was 




. Admi 


er of Ma 


k Twain . 


chief gl 


utton 


at the 


birthday 


parbes 


magnani 


nous 


. . easy going 


... a go 




MARY ELIZABETH FUNK , , 
Music . . - loved the piano 
companist for the Glee Club 
combo of beauty and brains . 



ELAINE FAKE . 


. . Ephr 


ata, Pa 


. Bu 


s Ad 


expert on 


argyles 


. , Orth 


majo 


r , . 


pohtical science 


student 


- . goes 


home 


every 


week-end . . . t 


errific guard on th 


e bas 


ketball 


court , . - unfo 


gettable 


in the mo 


nkey 


dance 


last May Day. 











GOLDEN GAITHER . . . Martinsburg, W, 

- . Sociology . . a new member of the c 
of '52 and a right nice addition , "Gol 





College of the 


'Dutchmen" . 


of information 


on mantal affa 


that straight frc 


m the heart adv 




53 




MAXINE GARVIN . . . Taneytown, Md. . . . 
Biology . . sweet and winsome smile . . 
South'an drawl . . . transfer from Shenandoah 
cuts up the kilty in lab , . . active in re- 
ligious activities . . . curls . . . nice gal to have 
around . . . many friends. 



LAWRENCE GUENTHER . Philadelphi 
Chemistry major . . . live wire , . Axe 1 
terror . . , woman-hater (?),.- labor! 
the hot test tubes . . . great talker. 






lOHN GIACHERO , . 

Ed , garrulous . , . 
last night!" . . Drive 



"Dit yoo see television 
a car with a seating 



SYLVIA GUERRISI .... Lebanon . . . dead- 
pan humorist . . . transfer from Indiana Stale 
. . . tlair for tailored things . . . gentle eyes . . . 
attractive . . . family of many brothers. 



^ 



DONALD GINGRICH . . . Hummelstown . 
Music Ed. . . . plays piano hke mad 
favorite expression — censored . . . capable 
sistant to Mr. Rogers . . . 'Oh, I hate everyo 



SCOTT HAMOR . . . Bainbridge . . Music 
"Kenton's the end" . . . president of 



ROBERT GLOCK . . . Maywood, N. I. . . . 
Political Science . . . bridge and bull sessions 
ardent boogie woogie fan . . . cuts a 
mean rug on a dance floor . . . with Mickey life 
of the party . . . dorm hfe with Arata . . . 
. Jersey accent . . . Hot Dog's M.C. . . . 
A cup of coffee plus a few jokes . . . frequent 
chats with Shortie. 



WILBUR HARTMAN . . . Harrisburg . . . 
Music Ed- . . "Harp" . . . concert- 

master . . . fiddles his way through life . . . 
Glee Clubber . . . choir director . . . hearty 




54 



%s*^' 




ROBERT HEATH . . . York , . , Bus. Ad. 
"Bob" , . . jolly . . , good natured . . . 
some smile . . makes fnends easily 
ophmishc . . . has big plans for the future. 



ROBERT HOFFSOMMER . . . Harnsburg . 
Chem ... a top prop man . . . quiet but 
dynamic . . found either in lab or at "Hot 
Dogs" . . . Philo-man . . . bashful blonde. 




od . . laugh- 



ROBERT HOWARTH ... ex- 

perience in Uncle Sams Air Corps . a 
great sense of humor . star of the physics 

class , might go to work for the US again 

in forestry work. 



A:=^. 




HENRY HOFFMAN . . York , , Music Ed. 
. . . 'Marches sound better an octave higher" 
- . - treasurer of Snyder A. C. , . "Do they 
have money?" . . , sleeps in most of his classes 



FRANK HOWE . . . New York . . . Bus Ad. 
. , . spurt of energy all of the hme , . plays 
a mean game of basketball and volleyball . . . 
star of the intramural league . . , that city air 
. . . tells of the many pleasures of the city . . . 
Nick's buddy. 



£■ 



LEMOYNE HOFFMAN . . . AnnviUe 

genial . . . good looking . 

. . easy to get along with . , . wins friends 



JEANNE HUTCHINSON . . . lacobstown. } 
. . . Enghsh . . The Valley's bombshell of i 
personahty and pulchritude ... a ter 
gal . . . talented . . magnetic appeal 
beauty of face and form that inspires glance 
admiration . . . Walt's constant companion . 
chic dresser . . , natural athlete . . . su 
disposihon . . . Coed personihed . . . wf 
there's "Hutch" there's life. 




55 







JAMES KENDIG . - . Lancaster . . . that Amish 
country , . Music Ed. . . Snyder's A. C. . . . 
just what instrument does he play? . . . Navy 
lad . . . sense of humor . , . dark . . . good 
looking . . . friendly smile. 



JOHN KOZURA . . . MioersviUe . . . Pre-Med 
. . . steady patron of Smitty's . . . known by 
his Cadillac . . . married man . . . neat dresser 
. , . intriguing smile . . . sincere student. 



GEORGE KNOBL , . MiUersburg, Pa, . . . 

Chem . . - spends spare time in Chem lab . . . 

Mel's roommate . . . quiet sense of humor - . . 

pleasant personahty . . . future maker of A- 
bombs . . . thrives on dinmg-haU milk. 



DONALD LANGSTAFF . . . Roselle Park, N J 
. . . Bus, Ad, . , . "Red" . , . stands a mean 
six three in this atmosphere . . . ternfic dresser 
. . . smiling and willing to do any easy job . . . 
engaged . . . known the campus over for his 
hardwood performances . . . one can't help 
but hke him . . . that Irish Charm and good 



n 



f "^"^ \ 



j^ 



( 



EUGENE KOBYLAPZ , . . Passiac, N. J. . . . 
Chemistry major .the silent type . . . "It's 
Umenlable" . . . Kalo man . . . aims for Med 
school . , . smooth . . . does a nice rhumba. 



DAVID LEVIN . . . Lebanon . . . Bus. Ad. 
. . . performed as first violinist under Prof. 
Erickson . . . witty . . . subtle sense of humor 
. . . constantly seen with a little brown hat . . . 
a transfer from Temple . . . "Yash". 






MELVIN KOHUDIC . . . Fraokville ... CI 
. . . Philoman . . . dependable worker . 
dark, quiet type . . . always ready to help . 



SIDNEY LEVITZ . , , Lebanon , . . Bus. Ad. 
. . . "Sid" . . . amiable . . . dark, wavy hair 
. . . pleasant smile . . . conscientious student 
... an asset to the Valley. 




56 



M -*^ ^t 












PAUL LOWERY . . . Neffsville . . . History 
maior . future missionary . . quiet . . . 

enjoys tishing , - handsome blonde . . . tiappy 
when talking religion . . . nice smile. 



SYLVESTER MACUT . . . Steellc 



' y 



Med . "Shoake 



South Hall . . . future doc 



"Daddy" . . . needs 




pals with Zangri 



ROBERT LOWERY . . . Neffsville ... His 



JEROME MAKRIS . . . Long Branch, N. J , 
Pol. Sci. . . . Jerry is loaded with hobbies from 
music to hanging on the telephone . . that 
unusual rabbit stride of the New Jersey lad is hard 
to figure out , , . one of those AnnviUe High 
admirers, . . good looking lad, . , capable end 
for the Flying Dutchmen. 




^f^ 



JANE LUTZ . . . Baltimore, Md, . . . French 
and Spanish . . . "Little Caesar" ... one who 
love life . . . raises her own corn . . . talkahve 
and jolly . . . Arthur Godfreys understudy on 
the "uke" ... she of the short hair . . one 
of the "bloomer girls" and basketball scorers. 



JANE MARTIN . . . Waynesboro, Pa. . . 
Music . . . "Let's brave the elements" 
handles the four manual well. . . wants to teach 
organ . . . envied for those natural curls 




JOSEPH LUTZ . . . Columbia . . . companionable 
always the optimist ... a ready smile . . . 
friendly conversationahst. 



DONALD McSURDY . . . WilHamsto 
. . . Chemistry . . . what Don does i 
right . . . conservative . . . quiet . . 



57 




GERALDINE MEASE . 
. . . happy-go-lucky 
friendliness plus . . . 



. Avon . . . Pre-Med 
en tempered . . . gay 




,^ 




ROBERT MORHAUSER . . . Collingswood, N. J 
. . . Economics . . . baton-thrower . . . future 
stock exchange broke 



. has the jokes, to 
efficiency expert. 



, Lochner's headache 



^^^ 



MARDIA MELROY . , . Lansford, Pa. ... 
amiable . - . dependable worker . . . con- 
scientious student . . . stauncti supporter of 
Delphian . . . impersonator , . . cheerful dis- 
position . . . friendly smile . . . talented con- 



ALVAN MORRIS . . . Camden, N. I. . . . Pre 
Dental . . . determined student . . . Mike's 
nutty buddy . . . future dentist . . . 1 12's 
representative at breakfast . . , South Hall's 
host , . . "Come on, Palazzo, we'll be late foi 
class" . . . nice guy. 



/JT:^ 



DONALD MILLER . . . New Cumberland . . . 
Bus. Ad, . . . what an underhner! . . . Com. 
muter . . . Groom to be . . . Library's South 
basement his hangout. 



BRUCE MORROW . . . Lebanon . . . full of 
spirit . . . staunch friend . . . dark, good look- 
ing . . . friendly eyes. 



J*h 




RICHARD MILLER . . . Reading . . . Music Ed. 
. . . L. V.'s answer to Robert MerriU . , ."What 
do you think?" . . . driver of a flivver . . . good 
looking blond. 



NANCY ANN MYERS . . . York, Pa. ... 
French . . devihsh . . . Yorkite with an eye for 
fashion , . . proper . . . earnest worker for 
"Jigger Board" . . . always in fun . . . S.C.A. 
Cabinet . , . "What did you say?" 




58 



i|»Hi' 




ts^^^ 



/ "^-^^ 



kVV 



MELVIN NIPE . - . Carney's Point, N. I . . . 
Pre-Med. . . . ex-armyman . . personality 
smile . . . lively sense of humor . . Jersey 
joker . . , can be found behind the wheel of his 
snappy black Chevy , . , quite a guv with the 
gals. 



ROBERT PALMER Syracuse, N Y. . . . 

if you are in doubt whether to play the King or 
Queen see Bob , . a great competitor in the 
Ajte League . . . in the movies, rain or shine . ,, 
Ace on the gridiron . . , handsome "Pam" . . . 
sadly missed by all. 



JOSEPH OXLEY . . . Long Branch, N I . , 
Bus Ad. swimming enthusiast . Ice 

has an undecided future, but he has a hne (or 
business, "Got anv cleaning'" , , He and 
brother Barret able handlers cf the pigskin . . . 
rough and ready basketball player. 



JOSEPH PAflKER , , , Neptune, N, I , , 
English major . . whiskey tenor . . . "Where' 
Springer?" . . future prof . - . "How's th 
bnde'" , "Who carried off my Crosley" 



JAMES PACY , , , Manville . , , History major 
LV's Bill Stern . . . happy when talking sports 

. 'Boy Bear' . - . "In jersey, we . , " . , 
"I'm going to resign." . . . fast boy with the 
chatter . , . tells a good story . . Prof Shay's 
history brain ... an asset to the Valley 



JAMES QUICK . . . New Cumberland . . . 
Bus. Ad, . . , active commuter . . . 
amiable . . cooperative , . energetic . . . 
Jim's a man of sound principles . . , frequents 
college library , . , never too busy to help out 
. . . indispensable member of the Quittie staff 



MICHAEL PALAZZO . . . Philadelphia . . 
Pre-Dental . . . Mike . . Hey' Morns' . . 
letters from Mary . . . pipe smoker . . . Jim' 
roommate . , . booster of South Philadelphia 
, . , those striped pajamas , . , "You guys hea 
this joke?" . . . HkedbyaU, 



THOMAS QUINN , , . Keyser. W Va. . . . 
Ed, , , quiet, calm, cool, and collected except 
for an explosion here and there on the girdiron 
. , , knock on Tom's door for that Southern 
hospitahty. 




59 




DIANE RANDOLPH . . . Harrisburg, Pa. . . . 

English . . . "Randy" . . . South HaU's president 
. . . active in church work . . . most active 
member of the Hockey team, the goahe . . . 
enviable hair . . . long eye lashes . . . orig- 
inal . . , witty . . . lover of poetry. 



WALTER RUHL 



nd chess given in 



1 first class . . . le 



. diligent student , 



happy while driving his Lincoln 



^M 




lOAN RICEDORF 



burg, Pa. . . . 
■ • happy-go- 



GEOFGE RUTLEDGE , . . AnnviUe 
Music education . . . enjoys teaching da 
. . . Glee Clubber ... a chip off the 




PEGGY ROOK . . . NewviUe . . . History 
major. . ."Peg". . . the girl with the corduroy 
jackets . . . fluttering eyelashes . - . never a 
dull moment . . . active member of South Hall's 
third floor . . . "Hello, babe". 



BENEDICT SALAMANDRA . . . Trenton, N. J. 
. . . Pre-Med. . . . intramural athlete . . . friendly 
. . . an epicure . . . hopes to become an M. D. 
... a transfer from Univ. of Magura . . . 
Nancy . . . plays piano . . . Member of Kalo, 
Chemistry Club, and Biology Club. 



ELIZABETH ROPER . . . Dover, Delaware , . . 
History . . . httle Leprechaun . . Mrs. Smith's 
assistant . . wants to teach Phys. Ed. . . . 
terrific right half-back on the hockey team . . . 
guardian of the basket on the court . . Student 
Faculty Secretary . . . smiles little but wins 
friends easily. 



FREDERICK SAMPLE . 
Math . . . outstanding 
F.T.A-'s capable presid. 



Columbia, Pa 



the backfaeld 




60 






DALE SCHEIE . . , Tower City, Pa . .". Bus. 
Ad. ... a member of the classes select group 
of fathers . . quiet . . conservative . . . 
efficient . . a whiz with the books . . . great 
addition to the class of '52. 



RUTH SHEAFFER . . . Cumberland, Md . . . 
Enghsh , . . fine behind the footlights . . . 
■■Our Town" . . . transfer from Shenandoah 
. . sparkling brown eyes . . . slaves over 
Shakespeare. 



MELVIN SCHIFF . . . Schenectady, N. Y . . 
Music . . ■'Mel ' is a conserv man from the 
lowest key to the top one of that red hot sax 
. . . tall, dark, and a vet . get the full dope 
from Paul . . . call North Hall for Mel's where, 
abouts . . . "Schenectady is all right but it's 
all business " 



DALE SHELLENBERGER ... Red Lion, Pa 
. . . History . . . man of few words and plenty 
achon . . . his football playing is hard to top 
. . . should be a great member of the coach- 
ing field . . . man in blue (navy) 







RICHARD SCHWANG . . . Lebanon . . . 
"Mouse" . . . diligent commuter . . . plays 
basketball ... a convert to the English de- 
partment . . . dates a girl from home. 



JOSEPH SHEMETA . . . Ehzabeth, N, I. . . , 
Jog is a whiz on any dance floor . . what the 
well dressed man wears is right down his alley 
Kalo President and one of their finest 



actors . . . bright s 
litter-bug team 
Pol. Sci. Club. 



Jog and Ann. Treasurer of 



/-^^ 



NANCY SEIDERS - . . ... Biology 

. . . Mrs. Degree . . . patient mother . . . 
auburn hair . . . minister's wiie . . . intends to 
teach . . . saddle shoes . . . easy^to know . . . 
. . . great interest i 



ROBERT SHIRATO . . . Lebanon . . . History 
, . . terror of Washington Hall . . . always on 
the go . . . ambidextrous . . . good ball 
player . . . easy to know . . . friend to every- 




i^"^^ 

•w--*-'-:)^ 




61 



I 




WALTER JOSEPH SHONOSKY . . . Endicoll 
NY.... History . . the Mr. Alias of the 'S2 
class . . . our bruisinQ, hard hitting football 
hero . . . frequenter of North Hall . . . im- 



lOHN SPRINGER . . . Philadelphia . ■ "lack" 
gymnast extraordinaire , . . drives a fine 
looking (?) car . - Ukes to be different , . , 
talker . . . Joe's buddy. 



ROBERT SHREFFLER . , Harnsburg . . . 
Music Ed,. . . "Have you seen my cousin?" . . , 
Runs a close second to Gabriel . , , "Hot Rod 
Happy" . . . member of the National Guard 
Air Force Band. 



RICHARD STEWART , , . Reading . , . Music 

, "The only place in the world is Reading" 

. , , quite attached to a clarinet and saxophone 

. , . hne musician . . . captures scholastic 



RUTH SHUMATE . , Quarrvville. Pa, . . . 
Enghsh , always has German to do . . . 

an adaptable addition to any group . . . easy- 
going , "No kidding?" . . . always "inner" 
scoring during a hockey game . . . even-tem- 



STERLING STRAUSE . . . Summit StaHon . . . 
Chem . . , deans list , , . L,V,-s Jack Haines 
, , . divides his time between food and his 
httle jig-saw . , sheep farmer . , . good sport 
. . enjoys bull sessions in 2 I 3 . , . "Let's 



SHERDELL SNYDER , , . Felton, Pa, . , , Pol. 
Sci. . the "Felton kid" with that Brooklyn 
knowledge . . , York County's contribution to 
Valley's scrappy ends . . . changes hair style 
frequently . . has that politician's air. 



THOMAS SULLIVAN . . . Harnsburg . . 
Liberal Arts . tall, dark and handsome . . 

engaging smile . ready wit . . , plans for 

career in Journahsm . . . commutes from Harri 




/^ *V-' ^ 



62 





FRANCIS SUPENO . . Jersey City . , . Chem- 
istry Frank spends all his time, extra time 
that is hunting the exciting spots of Annville . 
does a mean job in the Chem lab . . . wears 
white shoes , , carries a large hearty chest 
with him 



WILMA STAMBACH . Ml Woll, Pa. 

Bus Ad "Wilhe" . Charter member o( 

West Hall sticks with her cousin Ruth 

hyes for weekends 



RfTA STAILEY New Cumberland, Pa 

Education . loves to trip the hghl fantastic 

, soft spoken la francaise sa specialile 

, trim miss with the laughing eyes . . . 
jolly as her hair is red 



ROBERT SWANGER . . . Lebanon . . . 
Med "Bob" , , dihgent student 

friendly smile , . . hard worker , . . 
friends easily . . . good natured. 





PAUL STAMBACH , . Dallaslown, Pa. . 
Greek . leads a busy life in a busy atmos 

phere . a great man on the hfe of Bill Shake 

speare . a Philo mainstay .a man witl 

many talents which reach the pubho . cleve 

with the vocal chords 



ends most of the 




RUTH STAMBACH . . , York, Pa. , . English 
quiet ... a Ukeable girl . . . appears to 
be shy . . everyone her friends . . . ever 
ready to help others . make an excellent 

Enahsh teacher . . . pure in heart . . will 
always be a success 



MICHAEL SZOLLOSE . Lebanon, Pa . 

Pre-Med ... a progressive man in the phys 
lab . . . those gym class basketball games i 
rough, tough, and hard to bluff .. he is o 
of the loe Fulks' of the sechon . . . quite a ser 
of humor goes with all of this talent. 



63 




^ -«# X 





'W^ ^^ 








EDWARD TESNAR . . . Elizabeth, N. I. . . . 
Math . . . "Tes" . . . exceUs on the gridiron 
. . . tall, handsome, well-groomed . . . two 
loves: photography and Jeanne , . . winning 
smile . . . class leader . . . active in campus 
activities . . . Kalo man . . . hopes to teach or 
coach. 



EVELYN TOSER . . . Harrisburg . . . English 
- . . Commuter . . . capable president of the 
PoUtical Science Club . . , sometimes she locks 
her car with the keys inside and the motor 
running . . . ICG gal . . . busy. 



JULIA THATCHER . . , Traumbauersville . . . 
Music education . . . "JuUe" . . . West Hall's 
keeper of the flock . . . Always ready to laugh 
. . . friendly . . . ambitious promoter of CUo 
. . . Wig and Buckle-ite . . . one of the "Bhthe 
Spirits." 



'!^^ 



VIRGINIA WAGNER . . 
Ad. . , , Canasta major 
. . . collector of ads for 
. . . active . . . willing ' 
. . . Bermuda Queen. 



nversationahst 
organizahons 
, . "Ginger" 





STERLING THOMPSON . . . 
FeUgion . . . active minister 
worker . . . tall and handson 
man . . . excellent speaker . . 
rummages in the reserve shelf. 



RUSSELL WALTERS . . 
Pre-Theo . , . "Man-o-D. 
man , . . active in church work 
carries a big briefcase. 



Palmyraite . . , 
spy . . . 



WILLIAM TOMILEN . . . Bayonne, N. I. . . . 
Bus. Ad. . . . "Wilhe" ... big and tall . . . 
packs a mean wallop on the basketball floor . . . 
"Wee Willie" is the people's choice ... a 
fighter for Kalo and a rabid competitor in any 
field. 



JANET WEIDENHAMMER . . . Highspire . . . 
Music education . . . expects to teach . . . 
very conscientious . . . Wig and Buckle-ite 
. . . "Did I get a letter?" . . . betrays an extra- 
curricular interest. . . friendly conversationalist 
. . . hked by aU. 



64 





LOIS WHITE . . . Sheridan, Pa. . . . Biology 
- . . future prescnber of pink pills - . . musical 
talent galore . . everybody's p=il - . - diligent 
student . . , usually headed for the lab . . . 
"Sheridan is TOO on the map." 



lAMES ZANGRILLI , Pittsburgh, Pa, . , . 

Pre-Med . the L V representahve of the 
lack Benny show , that talent with the 

comic effect turns rapidly to business when 
Iim hits the chem lab , - will not get married 
until he builds up his bank account 



•^» '^ 



DOLORES ZARKER . , Harnsburq . 
Music educahon , . "Don" , . , baton twirl 
. , Glee Clubber . . . Gifted with a love 
soprano voice . , helped build up SCA 
music cfiairman . . jolly . loves to pun . 

keeps her eye on a little red Ford, 




DOROTHY WITHER , Harnsburg , , . 

Music education , attractive Maid of Honor 
for the Homecoming Queen . , , a ready smile 
. , talented on the piano , , . church organist 
at home , , , has served as secretary of her 
clas,s, W.A.A., and Delphian. 







65 




69 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

President CHARLES KAGEY 

Vice-President WILLIAM SHOPPELL 

Secretary JOYCE HAMMOCK 

Treasurer DONALD KREIDER 



70 




SOPHOMORE CLASS 




71 




73 



■^1 

s 



i 




FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

President LOUIS SORRENTINO 

Vice-President CALVIN HAVERSTOCK 

Secretary GAIL EDGAR 

Treasurer JACK IRVIN 



74 




FRESHMAN CLASS 








75 



Wk Applaud . . 




77 




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MISS QUITTIE 



Jeanne Hutchinson 



79 




MISS QUITTIE COURT 



Dorothy Witmer 



80 




MISS QUITTIE COURT 



Joan Brown 



81 




MISS L. V. C 

Betty Bakley 




X7 



MR. L. V. C, 

Edward Tesnar 




82 





Jil^ 



BEST DRESSED WOMAN 

Jeanne Hutchinson 



83 




BEST DRESSED MAN 

Nicholas Bova 



BEST LOOKING MAN 

Edward Tesnar 




84 



WHO'S WHO 



These members of the Class of 1951 have been accepted from Lebanon Valley College for 
recognition in the 1950-51 Edition of Who's Who Among Students in American Universities 
and Colleges: 



Bruce Wiser 
Barbara Metzger 
Robert K. Miller 



Martin Trostle 
Ruth Ann Brown 
Paul Jay Flocken 
Louise Light 



Ann Shroyer 
Margaret Bower 
Pierce Getz 



PHI ALPHA EPSILON 

This honorary scholarship society gives recognition to those who have achieved a high 
scholarship record during their college course. Those who have attained an average of 88 per 
cent during the first three and a half years of their college course and are of good moral char- 
acter are eligible for membership from the class of 1950: 



Lewis Wilmer Bowman 
Nancy Hafer Bright 
Norman Bauman Bucher, Jr. 
Phyllis Louise Dale 
Alex Joseph Fehr 



William Granger Jones 
John Benjamin Lingle 
Alonzo Lester Mantz 
Jay Donald Paine 
James WiUiam Parsons 



Charlotte Elaine Rohrbaugh 
Dale Richard Snyder 
David Harold Wallace 
John Ellis Wood 
Harold Elton Yingst 



GRADUATES CUM LAUDE 

CLASS OF 1950 



David Harold WaUace 
James William Parsons 
Charlotte Elaine Rohrbaugh 



Norman Bauman Bucher, Jr. 
John Ellis Wood 
Alex Joseph Fehr 



Lewis Wilmer Bowman 
Nancy Hafer Bright 
George William Bartels 



85 




MAY DAY 



86 




MAY DAY 



"Come to the Fair" was the glad cry of the annual May Day Pageant of 1950 as the campus 
of Lebanon Valley College burst forth with all the gaiety, color, and confusion of the exciting 
spectacle of the Fair, Clowns, fortune tellers, horses, side shows, tumbling acts and all the bril- 
hance of the circus contended with each other for prominence and popularity. 

A somber note shadows the glitter of the Fair as httle Nell, attracted by the gaudy posters, 
joins the show. She is lavished with attention by Mortimer Witherspoon, the dashing ringmaster. 
Nell takes part in the circus as the daring bare-back rider. This is viewed with consternation 
by her father, Roscoe Bean, her brother Hi, and her faithful lover Harold, who have followed her 
to protect her from the cruel world. In the nick of time she is saved by True Blue Harold, her 
faithful lover. They return home to the peace and quiet of farm life. 

Ruling over the gay scene was the beautiful May Queen, Jeanne Bozarth, lovely Maid of Honor, 
Phyllis Dale, and the Court of Beauties: Evelyn Habecker, Pauline Stoner, Mary Edelman, Jeanne 
Hull, Nancy Bovranan, and Ellen Jepsen, who gave a feminine touch of majesty to the sparkling 
circus atmosphere. 



87 




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MAY DAY 



-^■tl^lM^ 



m^^ 





mw^'-' 



JEANNE BOZARTH, QUEEN OF THt MAY 




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91 




STUDENT-FACULTY COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

President WILLIAM WERT 

Vice-President MARTIN TROSTLE 

Secretary ELIZABETH ROPER 

Treasurer PAUL STAMBACH 

The purpose of the Student-Faculty Council is to foster understanding and cooperation be- 
tween the students and the faculty of Lebanon VaUey College, and to advance the welfare of 
the student body through the coordination of student activities. 

The Student-Faculty Council is composed of one representative from each recognized student 
organization and three representatives from the faculty. 

The Council attempts to bring about a closer understanding between the students and the 
faculty. 



92 




RESIDENT WOMEN'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

OFFICERS 

President BARBARA METZGER 

Vice-President RUTH WITHERS 

Secretary LOIS ADAMS 

Treasurer NANCY ANN MYERS 

Jiggerboard, the "Gestapo" to most campus coeds, is the Resident Women's Student Govern- 
ment Association. This group of girls aids in the making and carrying out of rules. Each Monday 
night you can find them behind closed doors in North Hall parlor entertaining offenders. 

Some of the more pleasant activities sponsored by liggerboard are the annual Christmas 
dinner-dance and "Gander Week-end." 



93 




MEN'S SENATE 



OFFICERS 

President ROBERT GEYER 

Vice-President MARTIN TROSTLE 

Secretary-Treasurer FRED SAMPLE 

Ths Men's Senate, the governing body of the men's dormitory, during the year followed the 
competent leadership of President Robert Geyer, and strove to solve the many complexing prob- 
lems of the men resident students. Along with tackling some of these difficulties, the Senate 
provided many hours of amusing entertainment and much needed recreation. No Senatorial 
job could be accomplished without the full cooperation of the men in the dormitory, and this 
spirit of unity reached a new high this year. 



94 




WOMEN'S COMMUTER COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

President RUTH ANN BROWN 

Vice-President LOUISE LIGHT 

Secretary-Treasurer ALMA MARIANI 

The Women's Commuter Council is the governing body that regulates the discipline and 
activities of women day students at Lebanon Valley College. 

Among the highhghts for the day student girls this year were the Christmas Party, Heart 
Sister Week, and the Valentine Dance, which the day student girls, co-sponsors with the Men's 
Day Student Congress, present annually. 

Of special note was the tea given by Mrs. Clara Chassell Cooper, advisor, for the executive 
board of the WCC. This year the girls enjoyed newly painted walls and fluorescent lighting in 
their campus quarters. 



95 




MEN'S DAY STUDENT CONGRESS 

OFFICERS 

President JAY FLOCKEN 

Vice-President ROBERT MILLER 

Secretary JOHN WALTER 

Treasurer LLOYD ACHENBACH 

One oi the first organizations with which the male day student becomes acquainted when he 
arrives on campus is the Men's Day Student Congress. During the first part of the school year 
this governing body devotes most of its efforts to guiding and disciplining the Freshman class. 
When this task is completed, the Congress moves its attention towards the improvement of 
campus hfe and its own internal efficiency. In co-operation with the Women's Commuter Coun- 
cil, the Congress promoted a weekend of activity for the entertainment of the entire student body. 

The Men's Day Student Congress, as the other three governing bodies, is undergoing a struc- 
tural change with the hope that in the future it will operate more effectively with greater ef- 
ficiency. 



96 




CLIONIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

President SARA ANNE ETZWEILER 

Vice-President JULIA THATCHER 

Secretary FLORENCE DUNKELBERGER 

Treasurer LOIS ADAMS 

Clio, the oldest of the women's literary societies, strove for a successful year, and with the 
aid'of Minerva, its patron goddess, achieved it. The year's program began with Rush Week, at 
which time the "Frosh" were taken on a hike to Liskey's. The annual Clio tea, held in North 
Hall parlor set the style for the year by featuring a stunning fashion show. 

One night many of us shall never forget was the big square dance, sponsored by Clio in 
co-operation with her brother society Philo. 

After many weeks of planning and hard work, a cast from Clio and Philo presented the play 
Kind Lady, the first dramatic hit of the year. 

In early spring, to chmax a fun-packed year, Clio and Philo held their annual gala dinner- 
dance at the Allenbury Country Club. 



97 




PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



OFFICERS 

President DAVID BOMGARDNER 

Vice-President CHARLES WILLIAMS 

Secretary PAUL STAMBACH 

Treasurer ROBERT HOFFSOMMER 

Chaplain ROBERT FEASTER 

Enriched by its eighty-four year history, Phi Lambda Sigma continues to hold a place of 
prominence among campus organizations. Marked by their blue, gold-lettered sport coat, its 
members have made many valuable contributions to the whole of campus Hfe. 

Philo's activities have progressed from Rush Week to its dinner-dance which is staged with 
the sister society, CUo, in April. Outstanding among the year's activities was the play Kind Lady 
which was produced in conjunction with CUo. Several of Philo's weekend activities, featuring 
dances and a hayride, provided an active program for its own members. 

Undergoing a constitutional change at the present time. Phi Lambda Sigma is certain that 
in coming years this organization wiU achieve new heights never before attained by a society 
on campus. 

98 




DELPHIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 



OFFICERS 

President ANNE SHROYER 

Vice-President RUFINA BALMER 

Corresponding Secretary DOROTHY WITMER 

Recording Secretary ELIZABETH BEITTEL 

Treasurer MARDIA MELROY 

"To that spirit which ennobles us and raises us from our meaner selves; to that spirit which 
helps to make us the social creatures we were intended to be; to thee, O Spirit of Delphi, we 
make obeisance." 

With these lauding words resounding from the banks of the Quittapahilla, freshmen and 
members of the Delphian Literary Society, or Delta Lambda Sigma, left the scene of the tradi- 
tional candle-floating ceremony and wove their way slowly back to campus, where a surprise 
awaited them. Tiny candles forming the Greek letters emblazoned the green. This glowing spec- 
tacle chmaxed a successful rushing season. Initiation proved that these efforts were not in vain, 
for the membership of Delphian shot up to only a little under the 100 mark. 

Thus Delphian continues to be the larger of the women's social organizations. Brand-new 
white blazers and navy blue zipper jackets worn by its members are pervading college lanes, 
and will soon be as famihar as the jackets of the members of Kalo, Delphian's brother. 

The highhght of the social calendar for the year was the annual Kalo-Delphian weekend, 
held early in March. A psychological thriller, Night Must Fall, featured excellent dramatic 
talent. The dinner-dance was enjoyed by members and guests at the Hotel Brunswick in Lan- 
caster, at which Delphian's president, Anne, deservingly reigned as Anniversary Queen. 

99 




KALOZETEAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 

President JOSEPH SHEMETA 

Vice-President JAMES ZANGRILLI 

Treasurer STERLING STRAUSE 

Recording Secretary GERRY MILLER 

Corresponding Secretary DAVID DUNDORE 

Chaplain WILLIAM MILLER 

Again Kalo experienced a successful year. The society, whose main purpose is the further- 
ance of social life on the campus, presented as its main event, in conjunction with its sister so- 
ciety Delphian, the annual K-D weekend. It included a play Night Must Fall, with Armen 
BankHan and Joyce Carpenter, presented on March 2. The weekend was completed with a 
dinner-dance in the Hotel Brunswick. During the year the society proffered such other forms 
of entertainment as picnics, hayrides, smokers and skits. The society boasts the largest member- 
ship in its history and the largest on the campus today. Kalo men made their influence felt through- 
out the campus life, many of them being elected or appointed to various chairships in other 
organizations. 



100 



rs O h r< 1^ 





KNIGHTS OF THE VALLEY 

OFFICERS 

Lord of the Castle GUY EUSTON 

Lord High Steward FRED SAMPLE 

Scribe EDWARD TESNAR 

Keeper of the Monies RICHARD SCHIEMER 

Friar MARTIN TROSTLE 

Keeper of the Gate SHERDELL SNYDER 



The Knights of the Valley, one of the newest 
organizations on the campus, broke into the news 
when it aided the S. C. A. in its clothing drive. It 
was organized because it was felt that the societies 
on campus were not meeting the need for fellow- 
ship. Guy Euston (not in the picture) was elected 
Lord of the Castle and reigned for the first semester, 
after which he turned the gavel over to Fred Sample. 

The year was climaxed with the first annual 
Dinner-Dance, held at the Berkshire Hotel in 
Reading, Pennsylvania. 




101 




QUITTAPAHILLA STAFF OF 1952 

Editor LOIS ADAMS Advertising Editor JAMES QUICK 

Associate Editor ANN BLECKER ^^^'^'^ i^^Sf..^?™„T^' 

RICHARD SCHWANG 

Business Manager HARRY COOPER ROBERT SHIRATO 

Literary Editor BETTY BAKLEY Photography Editor EDWARD TESNAR 

Assistants GLORIA DRESSLER 

, _ , MARTIN TROSTLE 

Assistants 

MELVIN NIPE DOROTHY BONTREGER ^'' ^^'^°' ^"^" SHUMATE 

Assistants JANE LUTZ 

FRED SAMPLE DIANE RANDOLPH DOROTHY WITMER 

MARDIA MELROY PAUL STAMBACH JANET HUGHS 

JANET WEIDENHAMMER LEONARD CASPER ^!l,'^^^Hf.f>^ 

JOAN BROWN 

GERALDINE MEASE ELIZABETH ROPER Conservatory Editor JANE MARTIN 

ALDENBIELY LOIS WHITE Sports Editor . . HM PACY 

NANCY ANN MYERS JULIA THATCHER Girls' Sports Editor JEANNE HUTCHINSON 

ELIZABETH BEITTEL JOANNE FOX Typists DOROTHY BONTREGER 

ELIZABETH BEITTEL 



102 




LA VIE COLLEGIENNE STAFF 



ESTABLISHED 1925— 27th YEAR 

LA VIE COLLEGIENNE is published throughout the college year, except holiday and exam- 
ination periods, by the students of Lebanon Valley College, Annville, Pennsylvania. 

LA VIE is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press. 

LA VIE is represented for National Advertising by National Advertising Service, Inc., College 
Publishers Representative, 420 Madison Avenue, New York. 



Editor 
Associate Editor 

in charge of Sports 
Conservatory Editors 

Exchange Editor 
News Editors . . 



Columnist 
Business Manager 
Circulation Manager 
Photographers 



BETTY BAKLEY 



Reporters 

PEG BOWER 
CARL GERBERICH 
BOB CLOCK 
MARY ELLEN GERTH 
JACK HOAK 
JOHN KEISER 
DICK KOHLER 



BETTY BAKLEY 

JIM PACY 
DOTTIE COHLE 
MARDIA MELROY 
LUCIE PORTIER 
. BARBARA GROSKY 
HELEN FETTERS 
BARBARA RANK 
PAT WOOD 
GLENN WOODS 
HILTEN BENNETT 
JOE PARKER 
ED TESNAR 
MARTIN TROSTLE 

Radio Extension Staff of LA VIE COLLEGIENNE 

GEORGE DeLONG Acting Chairman 
JAY FLOCKEN ROBERT GEIB 

DICK PEIFFER MARK RAESSLER 



JERRY MEASE 
RUTH SCHAEFFER 
LOIS SHETLER 
JO SPANGLER 
JULIA THATCHER 
JOHN WALTER 
JAN WEIDENHAMMER 



HARRY WOLFE 

Faculty Advisers G. G. STRUBLE 

T. D. KELLER 
E. P. RUTLEDGE 

A. P. ORTH 



ROBERT GEYER 



Business Adviser 



103 



BIOLOGY 
CLUB 




CHEMISTRY 
CLUB 



. " ;% 

OFFICERS 

President RICHARD BOTHWELL 

Vice-President JOHN PATTERSON 

Secretary ANNA FAY HALL 

Treasurer FLORENCE DUNKELBERGER 

""""HlMIOmmi 1 




OFFICERS 

President ROBERT MILLER 

Vice-President THOMAS KIRCHOFF 

Secretary-Treasurer ANNA MAY LIND 

104 




POLITICAL 

SCIENCE 

CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President EVELYN TOSER 

Vice-President ROBERT CLOCK 

Secretary DOROTHY DANDO 

Treasurer JOSEPH SHEMETA 

Parliamentarian SAMUEL YEAGLY 




PI GAMMA MU 



President 
Secretary- Treasurer 



OFFICERS 

ROLAND GARVIN 
PROFESSOR HILBERT LOCHNER 



105 



PSYCHOLOGY 
CLUB 




First Semester 
MIRIAM GOTTLIEB 
RAYMOND ZIMMERMAN 
MARGARET BOWER . 



OFFICERS 

Second Semester 

President ARLENE SNYDER 

Vice-President ELIZABETH BEITTEL 

Secretary-Treasurer CLYDE BAVER 



FRENCH 
CLUB 




OFFICERS 

President FRANCENE SWOPE 

Vice-President NANCY ANN MYERS 

Secretary ANN BLECKER 

Treasurer JOHN PATTERSON 

106 




OFFICERS 



STUDENT 
AFFILIATE OF 
THE AMERICAN 
CHEMICAL 
SOCIETY 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary-Treasurer 



ROBERT MILLER 

THOMAS KIRCHOFF 

. ANNA MAY LIND 




FUTURE 

TEACHERS OF 
AMERICA 



OFFICERS 

President FRED SAMPLE 

Vice-President RAYMOND SWINGHOLM 

Corresponding Secretary RAYMOND HEBERLIG 

Recording Secretary ELSIE ROENIG 

Treasurer DOROTHY DANDO 

107 



GREEN BLOTTER CLUB 

OFFICERS 

Head Scop JAY FLOCKEN 

Keeper-of-word-horde BETTY BAKLEY 




108 




WIG AND BUCKLE CLUB 

OFFICERS 

President GEORGE DeLONG 

Vice-President ELIZABETH BEITTEL 

Secretary BARBARA METZGER 

Treasurer DAVID JAUSS 









Wig and Buckle Club is a haven for all students who express a desire for experience in any 
phase of dramatics, including acting, writing, directing, make-up, staging and set construction. 

The Club presents two major productions annually, two homecoming plays, and provides 
the Lebanon Valley campus with entertainment throughout 
the year. ^ , "! 

The spring play of 1950 was "The Hasty Heart," a play 
by John Patrick which tells of a wounded Scotch soldier whose 
few remaining weeks of life are spent in a convalescent ward 
of a hospital in the Orient. 

The first major production of this year was "Our Town" 
by Thornton Wilder. This play is unique in that it requires 
no stage scenery. It is the down-to-earth story of the residents 
of Grover's Corners. 

The two homecoming plays, "Fantasy On An Empty Stage" 
and "Saved From the Fate of Her Sister" were student directed 
and were weU received by students and alumni. 

The final curtain of the second major production is usually 
the final scene of the Wig and Buckle Club's activities. How- 
ever, this year the club is co-sponsoring "Hamlet" as it plays 
host to a professional group from New York. The members 
of the Club will participate in the mob scene of this famous 
Shakespearian play. With this new experience the club will 
terminate another successful year. 




109 




no 




o 
u 

R 

T 
O 
W 
N 



111 




FANTASY ON AN EMPTY STAGE 



HOMECOMING PLAYS 




afe>»» ■ 



SAVED FROM THE FATE OF HER SISTER 



112 




COLLEGE CHURCH 



113 



-r/':'.^: 




RELIGIOUS CO-ORDINATING COUNCIL 




LIFE WORK RECRUITS 

OFFICERS 

President PAUL STAMBACH 

Vice-President ROBERT DAUGHERTY 

Secretary DIANE RANDOLPH 

Treasurer ROBERT FEASTER 

Deputation Chairman ROLAND GARVIN 

Religious Coordinating Council ROBERT LONGENECKER 

114 









STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

OFFICERS 

President MARTIN TROSTLE 

Vice-President— Men EARL REDDING 

Vice-President— Women MARGARET BOWER 

Secretary PHYLLIS BARNHART 

Treasurer WILLIAM MILLER 

It was Henry Ward Beecher who said, "Only those who live for others achieve success." 
This can truly be said of the year-old Student Christian Association on L.V.C.'s campus. The 
S.C.A. arose from the merger of the Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A., forming a more compact and work- 
able cabinet. The organization now has an executive committee of a President, Vice-President 
for Men, a Vice-President for Women, a Secretary and a Treasurer; and sub-chairmen such as a 
Fellowship Hour Chairman, Music Chairman, Social Chairman, Great Books Chairman, Publicity 
Chairman, Calendar Chairman, Sunday School Chairman, Bible Study Co-chairman, Inter- 
collegiate Co-chairman, Inter-Church Co-chairman and the Commission Chairman (Christian 
Heritage, Personal and Campus Affairs, Social 
Responsibihty, and World Relatedness). 

During the year, it has provided for a coor- 
dinated program of religious and social activities __„^.^^_ ^^_^ 

to the advancement of the welfare and common ^^^^ "timff'-y^ ▼ «li3i 

interests of students and of the college. Some of 

its activities in the year were: Freshmen Week, 

Campus Chest Plan, County Fair, Dad's Day, ^^^^^B^^^ L ^V-zl'irirT^ . ,^ ?i 

Mother's Week-end, International Week-end, week- " 

ly Fellowship Hour, sponsoring the D.P. on campus, ^^^^^H^^^^^'^ftsjUV^^^I / 

and Special Services around hohdays. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^2^^^ J, 

In every way it has sought to inject the college ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^" ^l^-^^B' 
veins with a deeper faith in God, clearer devotion 
to the "things of the spirit," and mutual under- 
standing and sympathy with students of various H^B. .^^■^^^^■■""'^^^^■B \__S-''- 
countries. 

115 




f * ^* * * % 



CONSERVATORY 




ENGLE HALL 



117 



HISTORY OF ENGLE HALL 



The Lebanon Valley Conservatory of Music began in 1881. Benjamin H. Engle, uncle of Mrs. Ruth Bender, donated 
the money for the building known as Engle Hall. 

Until 1928, the music courses were offered without Pennsylvania accreditation, and were chiefly cultural in content. 
A Diploma in Music was granted at the end of the three year course. In 1928, Mrs. Ruth Bender, head of the Conserva- 
tory, began negotiations, and in 1931, Miss Mary E. Gillespie completed plans for the granting of a Music Education 
degree. Professors Alexander Crawford, Harold Malsh, R. Porter Campbell, and Mrs. Bender constituted the Con- 
servatory faculty in 1928. In 1931 this group was retained as a nucleus, and other faculty members were added as the 
need arose. Four graduates comprised the first Music Education class of 1932. The four classes in the Conservatory at 
that time had a total of thirteen students. 

In November of 1941, Lebanon Valley Conservatory appUed for membership in the Accrediting Agency of the 
National Association of Schools of Music. This Accrediting Agency is the only organization for evaluating music schools, 
and the Conservatory was granted membership shortly after application. 

In the beginning, only the Erst two floors of Engle Hall were needed for classrooms and practice rooms, the third 
floor being used for dormitory space. Now every available space in Engle Hall is used, and an Annex of four rooms has 
been added. Pianos available to all students total thirty-six, including thirteen grand pianos. The organ department 
includes four Moller organs: two two-manual, one three-manual, and one four-manual. 

Each student graduating from the Conservatory is trained in both vocal and instrumental music, and before grad- 
uation has played individually and in ensemble all the band and orchestral instruments. In connection with instruments, 
the Care and Repair course is an unusual feature of the curriculum. Instrumental and vocal student teaching has 
always been done in the Hershey, Pennsylvania, schools. For the past five years instrumental teaching has been done 
in Annville as well as in Hershey, and for the past two years limited vocal work has been done here. 

Joseph Battista, recent Professor of Piano, was chosen to represent the youth of the United States at South America. 
In 1950, Mrs. Margaret Barthel Baxstresser, a member of the Conservatory's piano department, received the coveted 
Walter Naumburg Scholarship Award. This award consisted of a New York Town HaU recital which Mrs. Baxstresser 
gave on December 13, 1950. 

At the present time the Conservatory enrollment totals one hundred fifty-six. This number includes forty-three 
Seniors, twenty-five Juniors, thirty-seven Sophomores, and fifty-one freshmen. 



118 




CHORUS 



The Lebanon Valley Chorus, composed of all conservatory members, climaxed the years's work with a presentation 
of Handel's Messiah. This outstanding oratorio was performed in Engle Hall on Wednesday, April 11, and Thursday, 
April 12, in conjunction with the annual Spring Music Festival. Glee Club members served as a nucleus for both eve- 
nings' performances. The entire work was accompanied by the Symphony Orchestra of the Conservatory. Soloists 
were Barbara Troxell, soprano, Mary Hopple, alto, Paul King, bass, and George Ritner, conservatory senior, tenor. 
Professor E. P. Rutledge served in the capacity of director. 

COLLEGE ORCHESTRA 

The Lebanon Valley College Orchestra, under the direction of Professor E. P. Rutledge, occupies a position of prom- 
inence as one of the major instrumental organizations on campus. The annual winter concert was presented on Thursday, 
February 22, in Engle Hall. The program, extending from the Finale from Beethoven's Fifth Symphony to Weinberger's 
Czech Rahpsody, featured Mary Elizabeth Funck, piano soloist, in Mendelssohn's Concerto in G Minor for Piano and 
Orchestra. 









1 


WikM 


^^^^■^ ^^m 


w 




\Xj 


'^W 




— 


"""" ^^ 



119 




SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Under ths expert leadership of Professor E. P. Rutledge, the Symphony occupies a place of 
prominence as the outstanding instrumental organization on campus. The annual Symphony 
concert was given in Engle Hall on Thursday, December 14. Jchn Sant Ambrogio, ceUist, was 
featured in Boccherini's Concerto tor Violincello (First Movement). The varied program 
ranged from the seasonal First Noel arranged by Morton Gould to the familiar tone poem, 
Finlandia by Jan Sibelius. 

Symphony musicians were used to accompany the Chorus production of Handel's Messiah 
on April 11 and 12. 



120 




GLEE CLUB 



The Glee Club, representing the best vocal material on campus, took an active part in the 
life of the Conservatory during the 1950-'51 college year. The annual tour, extending from 
January 24 to January 28, included singing engagements at Ephrata, Fleetwood, Philadelphia, 
New Holland, Denver, Reading, and Wilson Boro High School. 

On January 31, the club appeared on its first Television program. Bringing the year's activ- 
ities of the club to a close were the following spring events: the Spring Music Festival on Friday, 
April 13, in combination with the College Band, the concert at the Harrisburg Forum on April 22, 
and concerts in York, Myerstown, and the Lebanon Veterans' Hospital. 



121 




COLLEGE BAND 




122 




GIRLS' BAND 

For the annual Albright game on Homecoming Day, October 28, the Girls' Band combined 
with the regular Band to provide the half-time held entertainment. 

Again combining with the Band, this organization participated in the Spring Music Festival 
Concert on April 13. 

DRUM MAJORETTES 




1" *•« "1 





JAZZ BAND 



JAZZ CONCERT 




124 




^ 0^ 




Harold Rothenberger Richard Hawk, Stanley Vansant, William Shoppell, Richard Slewart, Melvin Sc 

CLARINET QUARTETTE 






wH^ 




.wfr**- 





1 ^ \ k 




\ ^\ 



Stanley Vansanl, Richard Stewart, Dean Daugherty, Markus Schneiderhan, Melvin Schiff 

SAXOPHONE OUARTETTE 



125 




Ray Kauffman, Harold Rothenberger, Scctl Hamor, Richard Hawk, Melvin Schiff 



WOOD WIND QUARTETTE 




Wilbert Hartman, Richard Moore, Roberl Clay, Joan 



STRING QUARTETTE 



126 



WHO'S WHO 




ALDEN BIELY 





GEORGE RUTLEDGE 



127 




ELMA BREIDENSTINE 






RICHARD STEWART 




128 




129 




OUTSTANDING WOMAN 
ATHLETE 

Jeanne Hutchinson 



OUTSTANDING MALE 
ATHLETE 

Fred Sample 




130 




RALPH R. MEASE 

Director of Athletics, Professor of Physical Educati( 

Head Basketball and Baseball Coach. 



The Flying Dutchmen 
of 19^0-ici^i 



Lebanon Valley's 1950 football 
season opens as the Lebanon Valley 
College band marches down the 
turf of Hershey Stadium during the 
halt-time festivities of the Chocolate 
Bowl game with Franklin & Marshall. 




131 



LEBANON VALLEY FOOTBALL COACHES 






RICHARD E. FOX 
Assistant Coacti 



RALPH R. RICKER 
Head Coach 



WARREN W. GOCKLEY 
Assistant Coach 



THE LEBANON VALLEY FOOTBALL TEAM 




132 




The S 




Co-Captain 

BOB FISHER 

Little Falls, N. J. 



Co-Captain 

NORM LUKENS 

Camp Hill 



eason 

Lebanon Valley's 1950 football record does not 

glitter as brilliantly as those of other years but never- 
theless the Blue and White colors were carried into 

gridiron battle by a valiant squad of Flying Dutchmen 

who won four games while dropping the same number. 
The season opened with Coach Ralph "Dutch" 

Ricker, who replaced Andy Kerr as Lebanon Valley 

mentor, sending his charges against Franklin and Mar- 
shall in Lebanon Valley's second consecutive Chocolate 

Bowl game. The Diplomats scored on a fluke pass 

interception m the first period and then registered on a 

one-yard buck which gave the F & M crew a 13-0 lead 

at half-time. A rejuvenated band of Rickermen appeared 

on the field in the second half, however, and sent Walt 

Shonosky over m the final period to make it 13-7 after 

John Buffamoyer placekicked the extra point. It was a 

case of coming to life too late and the Lebanon eleven 

walked off the field with a defeat at the hands of a team 

that went unbeaten and untied for the remainder of 

the season. 

The following Saturday night saw the Flying Dutch- 
men playing host to Mt. St. Mary's Mountaineers and 

this was an easy one for the Blue and White as they 

ripped the Marylanders for a 39-0 triumph. Lou 

Sorrentino, LV's freshman quarterback, prominently 

established himself in this one as he and Dale Shellen- 
berger combined their porkhide talents to administer the major portion of the drubbing by their great play. However, it was a team 
victory with Ray Dankowski, Ralph Giordano, and Shonosky also figuring in the scoring of six-pointers while Buffy kicked two extra 
points and Tom Quinn accounted for one. The game was overwhelmingly one-sided as can be attested by the fact that the Flying Dutch- 
men rolled up an offense of 430 yards to the visitor's 129. 

The highlight of the season and one of the best games of the day took place the next Saturday when Lebanon Valley rose to the heights 
by kicking favored Muhlenberg 20 13 before 6,000 amazed fans in AUentown's beautiful stadium. From the opening kickoff the Dutch- 
men were a ball of fire and "upset" seemed to be in the air. It first showed itself when the hard charging Valley line blocked Muhlen- 
berg's initial punt attempt and shortly thereafter Sorrentino continued his eagle-eyed football pitching by hitting Bob Fisher with a pass 
which the Blue and White end carried twenty yards for a touchdown. In the second quarter Sharon Hill's sensation, Sorrentino, let 
loose with a heave . '.. rh end Glenn Thomas gathered in on the Mule 35 and romped the rest of the way for a TD. With near-hysteria 
reignmg in the Lebanon Valley rooting section the scoreboard read 13 and remained that way until after halftime. Muhlenberg tied 
it up with two second half touchdowns and it was at this time that Valley play reached unbelievable perfectness as Sorrentino passed to 
SheUenberger for a first down, handed off to Shonosky for ten more yards, gave to Fred Sample for still another ten, and then flipped an 
aerial to Shelly m the clear on the left who then raced down the turf for forty yards to an LV touchdown. With the Valley fans now hoarse 
and almost limp with excitement Quinn booted the bonus marker and the upset was complete. This was truly the game of the season and 
the greatest happening in Valley football since the 7 7 Temple tie of 1948. 

After an open date the Rickerites treked to Bethlehem where they met and defeated Moravian 14 8. Once again Sorrentino was a 
leading factor in the victory as early in the game he set the fans agog with a 32-yard heave to Fisher who caught it amid several Grey- 
hound backs and churned downfield for a score. Tom Quinn booted successfully and it looked as though the Dutchmen were off on a 
rout. Moravian, however, retaliated and notched a six-pointer but missed the PAT and the Blue and White held a skimpy 7 6 halttime 
edge. Then Ray Dankowski really brought the spectators to their feet as he intercepted a Greyhound pass on his own seven and zig- 
zagged 93 yards through the entire home team for a touchdown, after which Qumn converted. Moravian added two points en a safety. 
Arch rival Albright came to town for the annual Homecoming game and the Red Lions wasted no time in "going to town" on the Rick- 
ermen as they posted a 26 13 win. Albright marked up a 13 halftime lead and was out front 20 6 at the three quarter marker when the 
Valley scored as Fisher took a short pass from Sorrentino for a TD. Both teams made touchdowns in the final period, Lebanon Valley 
scoring on a spectacular toss by Dankowski as he ran to the right and fired to Fisher who barely grabbed the oval while tearing into the 
end zone for a TD. Quinn added the point to keep hope alive as the LV eleven trailed 20 13 but the Reading men scored again and that 
was that. 

Rebounding from this defeat the men of the VaUey squeezed by Penn MUitary 7 6 on the ensuing Saturday night with playing conditions 
at their worst due to the fact that the field was rain-soaked before and during the game. Barrett CDxley scored the touchdown in this one 
when Nick Bova blocked a Cadet punt which Barrett recovered for a touchdown in the end zone. Quinn's kick was the margin of victory. 
Western Maryland, conqueror of previously undefeated Drexel, won out over Lebanon Valley at Westminster, Maryland, the next 
weekend by a 19 7 count. The Valley possessed a 7 6 bulge on Sample's touchdown and Quinn's tow but the Green Terrors roared 
back strong and suprisingly overtook the visiting Pennsylvanians. 

The last game of the season was simply a story of never being outfought but the fact that Scranton University's powerful grid con- 
tingent had too many big guns for the Blue and Vlfhite. SheUenberger scored on a Sorrentino pass in the first half when the Dutchmen 
completely held the upper-hand before the Royals scored. Leaving the field on the short end of a 7 6 count the Scrantonians countered 
with three touchdowns in the second portion of the fray and won handily 27 7. Scranton had lost only to the great Eddie Le Baron's 
Quantico Marines. 

Thus ended the 1950 football season of Lebanon Valley. With but Lukens and Fisher leaving by graduation Coach Ricker would have 
had much to look forward to next season. The global situatton, however, has become a problem and only time can tell what the future 
holds for Lebanon Valley football. 



133 




Quarterback Rav Danko'.vski being rushed as he attempts 
to get off a pass m the Chocolate Bowl game with F & M. 



Fred Sample gains yardage as he goes around end against 
Muhlenberg. 




134 




Dale Shellenberger stumbles as he carrys the ball through Touchdown! Co-Captain End Bob Fisher steps over the line 

the tough Scranton line while Tom Quinn blocks Scranton's for a TD against arch-rival Albright. 
Little All-America Al Applegate. 




135 




Sample, wet and muddy, circles end against Penn 
Military in a driving rain for a Valley gain. 

Fumble! Fumble! Somebody has the ball and the 
Dutchmen are giving the F & M gridders a fight for it. 

George Cardone handles the phone from the press 
box where one of the assistant coaches is watching the 
game. Down the line it's B. Oxley, Giordano, Edwards, 
Gustin, and Sorrentino. 



Although lineman Bob Gustin is paving the way, LV's 
fullback Walt Shonosky is meeting up with trouble as 
Western Maryland closes in. 

Shellenberger's race towards paydiit is soon to be 
halted by Western Maryland's huge safety man Ed 
Rydzewski. 

The Flying Dutchmen of the gridiron huddle for the 
usual cheer before they take to the field against Scranton 
in season's finale. 



136 




ji^m 



137 




Lebanon Valley's Football Managers: Danny McGary, Steelton; Bill Frazer, Endicott, N. Y.; 
Neal WoU, Reinerton. 




Cheerleaders Lee Whitman, Fran Shroyer, John Walter, 
Dick Moore, and Jeanne Hutchinson in a photographic study 
of "hope he makes it" at the M-berg clash. 



A portion of the Blue and White football squad as they are 
resting at halltime. A well deserved rest too as it's during the 
Scranton battle. 




114 



SEASON RECORD 

Franklin and Marshall Hersheyt 13 

Mt. St. Mary's H* 

Muhlenberg AUentown* 13 

Moravian Bethlehem 8 

Albright Homecoming 26 

Penn Military H* 6 

Western Maryland Westminster, Md. 19 

Scranton H* 27 



112 



*Night game 



i Chocolate Bowl 



138 





PETER GAMBER, JR. 
Supervisor of the Athletic Plant 



basketball 



Lebanon Valley's basketball- 
ers, in conference with Head 
Coach Ralph Mease, prepare to 
take the floor for another session 
of thrilling Valley basketball. 




139 



The 1950-51 Lebanon Valley Basketball Team 




Coach Ralph R Me 



MiUer, Bill Ton 



Atski, Herb Finkel- 



TheS 



eason 

- The 1950 51 basketball season marked the beginning of a new era in Lebanon Valley athletics since the Flying Dutchmen of the 
court now play their games in the new physical education building on the campus. Alumni, students, townspeople, and persons from 
the area, all came to witness the cage contests and to admire the new gymnasium. It was something different, something new, for now 
Lebanon Valley had a gym to be proud of and it instilled a new playing spirit in both players and fans. 

The season opened at Orange, N. J. where the Blue and White lost out in a high-scoring affair to Upsala 89 81. They then returned 
home to pry the lid off their home campaign and Albright made it two in a row as the Red Lions won 76 -65. The next contest, which 
proved to be one of the season's closest, occurred on December 11 when the charges of Coach Fialph Mease edged by previously un- 
beaten Lincoln University 67 66 in a game that was thriUingly played down to the wire. 

During the Christmas vacation the college sponsored the First Lebanon Valley Invitation Basketball Tournament which saw eight 
teams and host LV compete. The first round of play saw Elizabethtown trounce Dickinson 58-34, Albright trim Moravian 64-61, Scranton 
slam Lehigh 66 46, the Flying Dutchmen trip F&M 78 73, and E-town closed out the day's activity with her "iron men" gunning Penn 
Military 54 47. The next evening Albright knocked out E-town 47 38 and Scranton beat the Valley 59 50 in the semi-final matches. 
Albright won the tourney title by besting Scranton 76 65 on the ensuing evening while LVC copped third place by downing E-town 
62 53. The Valley's great Al Murawski was named the most valuable player of the tournament and also scored the most points as 
the result of his 35 point effort against F&M. The Tournament All-Star team consisted of Murawski, Lenz of F&M, Potts and Ruoff of 
Albright, and Rittenhouse of Scranton. 

The Dutchmen resumed activity after the holidays and upon dropping the year-opener to E-town they took the next four by ripping 
Susquehanna 91 77, outlasting Scranton m a well-played game at Scranton 75-66, battering Juniata 74 60, and nipping Moravian 
83 80. This last fray saw Murawski establish a new LVC scoring record as he scorched the silk for 40 points against the Greyhounds. 
Gettysburg took the measure of the Measemen but they rebounded from that loss to roll up their highest total of the season by blasting 
PMC 92 72. The Dutchmen then embarked upon a disastrous seven game losing streak which saw the Blue and W^hite drop some tough 
ones. West Chester eked by the Valley 79 7'7 in a hectic game on February 10 and then on February 21 Juniata also won by a one goal 
margin at Huntingdon 74 '72 after a determined LV rally fell short. 

Of all the thrills and exhibitions of basketball the Dutchmen quintet displayed all season, however, none were as thrilling as the last 
home game of the season when Muhlenberg's tall court wizards rolled into town and took home a hair-raising 64 63 overtime verdict 
over an inspired Valley team. Apparently still burning from that one the Measemen traveled to Bethlehem for their finale and with 
Murawski acting as "Chief Greyhound Muzzier" with 37 points, the Annville dribblers buried Moravian 91 78 to wind up the campaign. 

The basketball season saw the Valley's Co-captains Larry Kinsella and Chuck Zimmerman retire their uniforms after three years of 
service on the Blue and White fives. Red Langstaff, although a Junior, ended his third year on the Valley varsity demonstrating his fine 
basketball know-how and was one of the great assets contributing to LV success this season. Richie Furda, the little sophomore courtster, 
concluded his second season with the Measeman and he greatly aided the Valley cause. Herb Finkelstein, who joined the Annville 
quintet at the outset of the second semester, proved his worth as did the other freshman member of the team, Lou Sorrentino. Rounding 
out this team that won ten and dropped thirteen were Joe Oxley, Leon Miller, Bill Tomilen, and Marty Gluntz. 

Al Murawski, without question, was the star of the combine as he tantalized the crowds with his superior point producing and play 
no matter where the Dutchmen went. The big fellow alternated at center and forward and wound up the season with 617 points during 
which time he paced the nation's scorers or was at least in the top three. He ended up third in the country behind Temple's Mlkvy and 
J. Millikin U.'s Steagall, with an average of 26.8 per game. In conclusion, it can be said that Coach Mease certainly has a great season to 
look forward to next year with the team returning intact with the exception of the two graduating captains. That is a shaky "intact" 
however, since Uncle Sam may have something to say about it. 

140 




LARRY DINSELLA . . . Linden, N. J. . . , Co-Captain forward 
. Three years on varsity . . . 203 points this season . . . 
registered 751 points in college career for 61 game average of 
12.3 . . . good one-hander . . . terrific dnve-in shot . . . 
dependable for "the points." 



CHUCK ZIMMERMAN . . . Lebanon . . . Co-Captain guard 
. . . Three letterman in basketball . . . conscientious player 
. . . consistent on defense . . . plays determined game . . . 
as serious as any player can be when on the floor. 



DON LANGSTAFF . . . Roselle Park, N. J. . . . Junior playing 
third season at center . . . dropped in 252 markers during the 
campaign . . . highest percentage of shots made, 44.7 . . . 
possesses all sorts of beautiful shots . . . lanky ball-handler 
. . . works well in the pivot , . . battles. 



RICHIE FURDA . . . Elizabeth, N. I. . . . Sophomore play- 
making guard . . . diminutive floor general . . . Mr. Per- 
sonality of the hardwoods . . . loves his basketball . . . dead 
one-hander . . . 200 points this season . . . never gives up . . . 
played almost every minute of every game . . . should really 
go next season. 



AL MURAWSKI . . . Elizabeth, N. J. . . . Our All-Pennsylvania 
sophomore sensation . . . wonderful, wonderful, wonderful 
ball player . . . amazing hook shot . . . 74.1 per cent of his 
foul tries . . . holds VaUey basketball records . . . definitely a 
natural . . . the sky's the limit for this boy's honors. 



141 




JOE OXLEY . . . Long Branch, N. I. , . . Junior forward . . . LEON MILLER . . . Palmyra . , . Sophomore forward ... up 

first year on the varsity . . . one of the foul drawers . . . plays from the JavVees . . . plays a fine game of basketball . . . 

rugged brand of ball . . , reliable . . . scores on one-handed dependable man on the floor . . . neat under-the-basket layup 

stabs for majority of his points , . . promising dribbler. shot . . . shows cage savvy. 

BILL TOMILEN . . . Bayonne, N. J. . . . Junior center . . 
second year on the varsity . . . tallest man on the squad at 
6'5 . . . spirit galore . . . proud of his high school which won 
New Jersey cage title . . . another Garden State dribbler. 



LOU SORRENTINO . . . Sharon Hill . . . Frosh guard . . . 
from football quarter-back to varsity netman . . . played three 
games with Junior Varsity then moved upstairs . . . came 
through in fine style . . . scored 82 points . . . sank some 
beautiful sets. 



HERB FINKELSTINE . . . Second Semester Freshman guard 
. . . joined Valley Varsity immediately upon arrival . . . 
possesses second best average of points per game at 12.3 . . . 
rebound-getting specialist . . . variety of shots . . . good all- 
round player ... a guy to keep your eye on. 



142 




That's Leon Miller laying one up as Langstaff, Mur- 
awski and Elizabethtown gaze on. 

The camera catches Co-Captain Chuck Zimmerman 
shooting one in the E-town fray. 

Al Murawski drives in lor one of his unique shots as 
two Albright cagers watch. 



Richie Furda lets one of his one-handers fly against 
Albright. 



Joe Oxley drives in for a shot against Lincoln. 



Don Langstaff in the process of delivering a beautiful 
over-the-head hook in the session with Elizabetntown. 



143 



The 1950-51 Lebanon Valley Junior Varsity Basketball Team 




\ 



H V 








Kneeling Bob Handley, Bob Tarantolo, Noel Beebe, Marty Gluntz, BiU Frazsr 

Standing, Coach Dick Fox. Merl Wise, Jim Handley, Bill Vought, Manager Danny McGary. 




SEASON RECORD 



LV . . . . 


44 


Upsala , . 


56 


LV . . . . 


54 


•Albright 


53 


LV . . . . 


58 


'Craftsman Insurance Co 


46 


LV . . . . 


57 


Dickinson 


52 


LV . . . . 


49 


'Hershey Junior College 


34 


LV . . . . 


43 


'Elizabethtown 


45 


LV . . . . 


55 


Susquehanna 


32 


LV . . . . 


40 


Scranton 


50 


LV . . . . 


47 


'Juniata 


30 


LV . . . . 


56 


'Moravian 


37 


LV . . . . 


35 


Myersiown Legion 


30 


LV . . . . 


58 


Hershey Junior College 


52 


LV . , . . 


66 


•PMC 


38 


LV . . . . 


53 


F&M 


59 


LV . . . . 


66 


'Hbg. Penn St, Center 


31 


LV . . . . 


60 


Elizabethtown 


46 


LV . . . . 


73 


'Scranton 


62 


LV . . . . 


45 


Albright 


38 


LV . , . . 


49 


Juniata ... 


47 


LV . . . . 


39 


'Muhlenberg .... 


43 


LV . . . . 


50 


Moravian 


. 58 




1097 




939 




'Home Games 





Noel Beebe shoots a one-hander against Moravian's J-V's. 



144 



The 1950 Lebanon Valley Baseball Team 



-^ , 













TheS 



eason 

Lebanon Valley's 1950 diamonders turned in a good record when they hung up their cleats at the season's conclusion as they 
registered nine wins against four losses. The Flying Dutchmen had originally scheduled fifteen games but inclement weather saw the 
final two games with Juniata and Albright postponed time and time again until they were cancelled and the season was officially over at 
Elizabethtown on May 16 where the Blue and White tossers completed their schedule on a victorious note with a 4 2 triumph over the 
Blue Jays. 

The baseball season produced some fine twirling and excellent hitting with the latter being demonstrated by the fact that four 
double-figured scores were recorded. The first game was highlighted by Tom Sawyer's three hits for five times at bat against Juniata 
as the Dutchmen romped 10-3. Going to Scranton for their second game the AnnviUe horsehiders rallied with four runs in the ninth 
and Al Murawski's relief hurling to squeeze by the Royals 9 8. Lebanon Valley continued undefeated as Fred Fore flipped a beauhful 
two-hitter and his team males hopped on two opposing pitchers for eleven hits as Temple was whitewashed 6 0. The next on the list 
was always powerful Lafayette and the Leopards took the Dutchmen into camp by a 9 2 score. Arch rival Albright was met at Reading 
in the ensuing game and the Red Lions racked up a 5 1 wm over the Valley. 

Philadelphia was the scene of the following game and there Murawski struck out fifteen as La Salle was whipped 8 2. Moravian 
at Bethlehem was next and the Greyhounds good ball club belted the Measemen 6 1. From this point the Dutchmen hit their stride 
and rang up four straight wins. First on the string was St. Joseph's Hawks who were battered at their Philadelphia nest 13- 6 as the Fly- 
ing Dutchmen gathered 13 hits. Elizabethtown appeared here on May Day and a 12 run third inning killed the Jays as the Blue and 
White handed out a 15-2 pounding. Bob Forstburg, Franklin and Marshall's mound star, was the next Valley victim as the Dip- 
lomats were downed 8 5. Western Maryland came here on May 10 and this one saw the Dutchmen register a dozen runs in the first 
two innings and then toy with the unterrifying Green Terrors in a shortened game for an easy 19 10 slaughter. Moravian's array 
stopped this LV streak as they came up with a bizarre 8 run seventh inning and outslugged the AnnviUe nine 15 8. With three games 
supposedly left the Blue and White trimmed E-town and that is where "ole man weather" intervened to abruptly end the season. 

Valley fans were treated to some fine hitting off the booming bats of second baseman and catcher Henry Di Johnson, shortstop 
Tom Sawyer, thirdbaseman Chuck Zimmerman, firstsacker Bill 
Schadler and the twirling staff of Fore, Murawski, and Glenn 
Thomas. As for the pitching end of it the victories were rather 
evenly divided among the aforementioned three with Bill Frazer 
and NeU Krall assisting. 

The other positions saw Mark Heberling rotating at first with 
Schadler, Neal WoU on second, and the outfield safe with Richie 
Furda, Floyd Becker, and Shorty Fields. Merl Wise, a freshman, 
took over very nicely when Di Johnson left catching to play sec- 
ond and he should be well prepared to take over that spot during 
the 1951 season. 

Di Johnson, Lebanon Valley's great, versatile athlete, received 
honorable mention as a catcher on the District II NCAA baseball 
team. Other catchers named along with Hank were Irons of 
Army, Dotterer of Syracuse, Prior of Princeton, Graham of Penn, 
and Snyder of Lafayette. Of LV's opponents Killmger and Bird of 
Lafayette were named to the first string. 



145 



SEASON RECORD 



LV . 


10 


Juniata 


3 


LV . . . 


9 


Scranton 


. . 8 


LV . . 


6 


'Temple 


. . 


LV . . 


2 


Lafayette 


. . 9 


LV . 


1 


Albright 


5 


LV . . . 


8 


La SaUe 


. . 2 


LV . . . 


1 


Moravian ... 


. . 6 


LV . . . 


13 


St. Joseph . . . 


. . 6 


LV . . . 


15 


'Elizabethtown 


. 2 


LV . . . 


8 


'Franklin and Marshall 


5 


LV . . . 


19 


'Western Maryland 


10 


LV . . . 


8 


'Moravian 


15 


LV . . . 


4 


Elizabethtown ... 


. . 2 


LV . . . 


. . . cancelled 


'Juniata 




LV . . . 


, . . cancelled 


'Albright 






104 


'Home Games 


73 




^,-'A 






'^iLji^. 



Valley first baseman Mark Heberling chalks up a put- 
out against Temple. 

Al Murawski, Blue and White Hurler, in the bull pen. 

Chuck Zimmerman strides happily home in 15-2 
rout of E-town. 



1^ -■--■- _-^>ir:-^ 



Floyd Becker, Dutchman centerfielder, at bat in the 
Elizabethtown game. 

Outfielder Richie Furda takes a cut at Temple pitching. 

Catcher Merl Wise warming up before one of the 
diamond games. 



146 



The 1950 Lebanon Valley Track Team 







Kneeling Gene Geesey, Charles Maston, Truman Cassel, Glenn Thomas, Barrett Oxiev, Ed Walton 

Standing Manager Don Langstall, Harry Graham, Dick Schwang, Charles BiUheimer, Bill Tomilen, Ken Kirkpalrick, loe Oxley. Dan McGary, 

Ed Kreider, Coach Roger Robmson. 



TheS 



eason 



The year 1950 marked the second year thai track has been a 
major sport at Lebanon Valley and the sport has captivated 
the interest of students more and more with the 1951 season 
expected to draw the largest number of participants yet. The 
1950 cindermen, coached by Roger Robinson, dropped all 
four dual meets due to the fact that they lacked depth and 
experience in the positions. However, several outstanding 
individual performers did represent the Valley well. Truman 
Cassel, senior sprinter, led the squad as he showed excellently 
in the dashes and was also a standout in the broad jump. 
Along with Cassel in the running events Barrett Oxley and 
Chuck Maston certainly did their bit while Gale Plantz also 
came in for his share of footwork. Glenn Thomas was another 
broad jumper while Ken Kirkpatrick did the high jumping. 
Big Bill Tomilen, Dan McGary and Joe Oxley took care of the 
field events. 

The team dropped its meets to the experienced and fine 
clubs of Albright, St. Joseph's and Franklin and Marshall. 
Juniata was also met and here the Dutchmen almost upset the 
Indians but the entire LV squad did not make the trip and lost 
out that way. The team also participated in the Penn Relays 
and the Middle Atlantics at the University of Delaware. 

Coach Warren Gockley, the new track mentor, is expected 
to have a fine squad this season but, like the other coaches, is 
hampered by the draft situation and the fact that some track- 
sters have already left for the service. 



3^* 



'•^j^r^* 



■^ 
*^«.^« 



1^; 




Lebanon Valley's tracksters working out on their new track while 
the Dutchmen diamonders are in action to the right. 

Ken Kirkpatrick goes over in the high jump during one of the prac- 
tice sessions. 



147 



/ - 

^ ^ rf nif^ 




Glenn Thomas broad-jumping in the Albright meet. 

Big Bill Tomilen lets the discus fly in a practice run. 

The gun goes off at the start oi the 440 during the 
Albright meet. 



Barrett Oxley working out for the Penn Relays. 

Gale Plantz bringing home the bacon in the Albright 
meet. 

Truman Cassel and Jack Saylor running hard to over- 
take Albright. 



148 




WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



President 
Vice-President 



OFFICERS 

HELEN MacFARLAND Secretary 

DIANE RANDOLPH Treasurer 



DOROTHY WITMER 
MARGARET BOWER 



The Women's Athletic Association consists of the girls on campus who are interested in sports and who have dis- 
played their interest by earning the required number of points for membership. Under the capable advisership of the 
physical education instructor, Mrs. Smith, a program of varied indoor and outdoor sports and activities has been 
introduced. 



L-CLUB 



OFFICERS 

President NORMAN LUKENS Secretary 

Vice-President CHARLES ZIMMERMAN Treasurer 



FRED SAMPLE 
, NEAL WOLL 





HOCKEY TEAM 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE 






Opp. 


L.V.C 


Moravian 





3 


'Shippensburg 





1 


Penn Hall 





5 


Albright 





6 


Millersville 


2 





Lock Haven 


1 





Susquehanna 


. 


4 


'Gettysburg 


1 


3 


'Denotes Home G 


imes 





The Lebanon Valley "Hockettes" continued their winning streak 
from last year's undefeated squad, until the final game of the season 
when they were conquered by Millersville State Teachers College. 
Under the efficient coaching of Mrs. E. J. Smith, the Dutch girls 
remained undefeated throughout a series of seventeen games. Our 
efficient captain, playing right inner, will leave us with a vacancy, 
but we have hopes of filling this position with rising players of this 
year's squad. The squad's right and left fullbacks, Ruth Ann Brown 
and Peggy Bower, also will leave positions to be filled by aspiring 
players. 



150 



The Central Pennsylvania Field 
Hockey Association held an All- 
College Tournament in which 
six colleges participated. Lebanon 
Valley College was invited to 
play at Harrisburg. After the 
tournament four members of the 
Lebanon Valley hockey team 
were placed on the All-College 
Team.. Those members were 
Jeanne Hutchinson, Mary Eliza- 
beth Roper, Diane Randolph, 
and Ruth Ann Brown. The 
following week the All-College 
Team continued the tournament 
by taking part m the C.P.F.H.A. 
tournament at Lancaster. Jeanne 
Hutchinson and Elizabeth Roper 




moved up to take a position on the 
C.P.F.H.A. team. This team 
travelled to Harrisburg to enter 

into the Mid-Easl tournaments, 
which included Pittsburgh As- 
sociation and Rochester As- 
sociation. At the tournament a 
team was chosen as the Mid-East 
Team, to participate in the Na- 
tional Tournament to be held in 
Rochester, New York. Jeanne 
Hutchinson was awarded a po- 
sihon on the Mid-East Team and 
went to Rochester during the 
Thanksgiving vacation to par- 
ticipate m the National Tourna- 
ment. 



JEANNE HUTCHINSCN 






DIANE RANDOLPH 



ELIZABETH ROPER 



RUTH ANN BROWN 



151 



% 





Capable Mickey Begg, junior, rugged center forward blocks 
opponent as team-mate drives for a goal against Shippensburg. 



Determined Jean Garvench, freshman, left inner, gives her 
best to bring her team to victory. 



HOCKEY TEAM IN ACTION 




! I 




Ruth Shumate, junior, dangerous left halfback, fights furiously 
to upset the opposing team. 



Equally efficient on offense and defense, Jeanne Hutchinson, 
junior, never gave up when the going got tough. 



152 




CHEERLEADERS 

We must never forget the shouting lungs of L.V.C.'s faithful 
cheerleaders who are always there, rain or shine, to cheer the 
team to victory. They had the usual pep rallies and they organized 
what is called the "Hollering Hundred" which added atmosphere 
end inspiration to football and basketball games. Captain Dick 
Moore's team included Darlene Moyer, Fran Shroyer, Lee White- 
man, Jeanne Hutchinson, and John Walter. 




153 




WOMEN'S VARSITY BASKETBALL 




This squad of good-looking coeds ended the season with a series 
of ten wins, one tie, and one loss. Under the coaching of Mrs. Ernestine 
Jagnesak Smith, the sextette brought honor and prestige to L.V.C.'s 
new gymnasium. Although next year's team will lose their co-captains 
Helen MacFarland and Betty Edelman, their places will be filled by 
uprising players. 



MRS. ERNESTINE JAGNESAK SMITH 
Girls' Basketball Coach 



VARSITY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 



Opp. L.V.C. 



Opp. L.V.C. 

'Moravian 10 33 

*Elizabethtown 33 36 

MiUersville 25 33 

•Gettysburg 28 28 

MiUersville 22 27 



Shippensburg 41 37 

Susquehanna 18 41 

Elizabethtown 24 42 

•Penn Hall 31 33 

Albright 32 41 

'Denotes Home Games 



154 




WOMEN'S JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 

SCHEDULE 

Opp. L.V.C. 

Susquehanna 16 45 

MiUersvUle 17 28 

Albright 25 44 

•Elizabethtown 37 20 

•Millersville 11 12 

'Shippensburg 27 8 

Elizabethtown 14 10 

'Gettysburg 23 25 

'Denotes Home Games 

'4 




155 






-RS. 



.^. 



PATRONS 



MR. and MRS. FRANK TESNAR 

MR. and MRS. STEVE TOMILEN 

MRS. NANCY J. ZANGRILLI 

MR. and MRS. ALBERT J. SNYDER 

MR, and MRS. NICHOLAS BOVA 

MR. and MRS. KENNETH ROPER 

MR. and MRS. JOHN LANGSTAFF 

MR. and MRS. ARTHUR SCHEIB 

MR. and MRS. JOSEPH SHAMETA 

MR. and MRS. NOLAN SHELLENBERGER 

MISS M. E. (MEYERSI CRAFT 

MR. and MRS. J. LANDIS WEIDENHAMMER 

MR. and MRS. KENNETH H. CASKEY 

MR and MRS. WILLIAM SAMPLE 

MR and MRS. WILLIAM A. BARON 

MR. and MRS. JOHN D. BEITTEL 

MR. and MRS. HAROLD W. FOX 

MR and MRS DANIEL McSURDY 

MR and MRS M E CRAIGHEAD 



MR. and MRS. JOHN N. BAKELEY 

MR. and MRS. LEROY K. LEGAY 

MRS. LAURA MAKRIS 

MR. and MRS. CLYDE BAVER 

MR. and MRS. AARON G. BREIDENSTINE 

MR. and MRS. FRANK J. GLOCK 

MR. and MRS. ANDREW KOZURA 

MR. and MRS. JESSE C. HOFFMAN 

MR. and MRS. CARL SALAMANDER 

MR. and MRS. AMMON B. FUNCK 

MR. and MRS. THOMAS BEGG 

MR. and MRS. HAROLD WILLIAM BLACK 

MR. and MRS. R. G. MARTIN 

REV. and MRS. ARTHUR W. GARVIN 

MR, ond MRS. LAWRENCE G. GUNTHER 

MR. and MRS. BERT L. HAMOR 

MR. and MRS. J, FOSTER STAMBACH 

MRS. MEDA THATCHER 

DR. and MRS. HAROLD T. LUTZ 



v„masmmti« 





156 



1952 QUITTAPAHILLA 






Engraving 
Printing and Binding 



by 



J. HORACE McFARLAND COMPANY 

Moa/it Pleasant Press 
HARRISBURG • PENNSYLVANIA 



157 



H. E. MILLARD 
LIME and STONE CO. 



SERVING 



Industry — Building— Agriculture 



TOP QUALITY COURTEOUS SERVICE 
REASONABLE COST 



Annville, Pa. 



158 



Compliments of 

i^otcl annoillt 

Ex'cellent Food 

in the 

Bavarian Room 



ANNVILLE . PENNSYLVANIA 



Visit the 

FIESTA ROOM 



AT 



George Washington 
Tavern 

LEBANON . PENNSYLVANIA 



IN ANNVILLE 

IT'S "THE THINC 



The Home of the Whisthng Pig" 



CONDUCTED STUDENT TOURS OF EUROPE— May to October 1951 

These tours are of interest to teachers as well as students. Visit 
all of Europe either on an economy tour or the Standard Five 
Country or Continental Tour. 

For injormation call 

LEBANON COUNTY TRAVEL BUREAU 



757 Willow St. 



Phone: 1753 



LEBANON, PA. 



ANNVILLE LUMBER COMPANY 

DEALERS IN 

LUMBER AND MILL WORK 
BUILDER'S SUPPLIES 

750 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

PHONE: 7-6611 



159 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive Shoes 
COLLEGEBRED SHOES 

"For College Girls" 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 

"For the Man Who Cares" 

34 N. Eighth Street LEBANON, PA. 

Telephone: 1715 



D. L. SAYLOR 

and SONS 

Contractors • Builders 

SPECIALIZED 
CABINET WORK 

ALL BUILDING MATERIALS 



Annville, Penna. 



Compliments of 



Lebanon News Agency 



SAMUEL S. ETTER, Prop. 



DIAMONDS of DISTINCTION 

(st0ll$^fuT1ck) 

CDEPEnOABLE s'ltlCE 1886) 

Jewelers 

20 N. Ninth Street LEBANON, PA. 

in Lebanon it's 

HAAK BROS. 

Department Store 

"The Store with the Escalator" 

Headquarters for 

Berkshire Nylons, 

Carole King Frocks 

JOHN L. BERNSTEIN 

FLORIST AND DECORATOR 

"THE FLOVf'ER SHOP" 

Corsages Our Specialty 

Rear of Court House LEBANON, PA. 

Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere, Anytimt. 
Phone: 592 



Palmyra Bank and Trust Co. 

PALMYRA, PA. 

Serving the Community Since 1886 



Checking Accounts — Savings Accounts 



Safe Deposit Boxes 



Mortgage, Commercial Personal Loans 



MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP. 



160 



JAY'S FLOWER SHOP 


on the square 


Any occasion is complete only with flowers. 


Between occasions give her some just because she's wonderful 


PALMYRA Phone: 8-6451 


Complitnents of 


Kohr's Book Store 


HALL'S 


Books — Rental Library — Greeting Cards 


• 


Stationery -- Zipf's Candy -- Playskool Toys 


PALMYRA, PENNA. 


Near the Post Office Lebanon, Pa. 




COMPLIMENTS OF 


Kreamer Bros. 
Furniture 


Ben Franklin Store 

Your College Store 


FLOOR COVERINGS 


open Friday and 
Saturday Evenings 


ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 




E. W. WOLFE, Owner 


ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


• 
37-39 West Main Street 




ANNVILLE, PENNA. 



161 



Compliments of . . . 



RICE and WEIDMAN 

INCORPORATED 



Qef^^e/uU Qo4ii^u:u:toAA. 



? 



LANCASTER, PENNA. 



162 



J. C. Hauer's Sons, Inc. 

W holesalo Distributors 

Caiidv Cigarette 
Vending Machines 

LEBANON, PA. 


Compliments of . . . 

BOWMAN'S 

Insurance Agency 

Palmyra Bank Hid-. P\LMYRA. P.\. 


DIAMONDS JEWELRY 

HOFFER'S 

5 North Ninth Street 
LEBANON. PA. 

WATCHES GIFTS 


Compliments of 

KREIDER MFG. CO. 

Mannfacturers of Hosier'j)^ 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


A. R. SHEARER 

Mobilgas • Mobiloil 

Service Station 

U.S. Tires 

Car Wasning 

MAIN AND WHITE OAK STREETS 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

Telephone: 7-4801 


// it's a Hit — It's Here 

Compliiiifiils of 

STATE THEATRE 

511-515 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



163 



To You Seniors of 1952 
May We Humbly say: 



Use your knowledge knowingly, 

your Wisdom wisely, 

your Courage courageously, 

for the betterment of self 
and mankind. 



THE PENNWAY 



164 { 



For Good Appearance 

H. W. KREIDER 

CLOTHIER 

Nationally knotin good 
merchandise 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 

S. A. BOMGARDNER'S 
T)al ry 

VISIT OUR DAIRY SNACK 

Roule 422 — 1 Mile East of Pilmyn 

Phone: 8-552! or 8-0791 
40 East Main Street Palmyra, Pa. 

z: CITIES SERVICE = 



m\m mm petkiileim, inc. 

DISTRIBUTORS 
CLEONA, PENNSYLVANIA 

Telephone: Lebanon 5414 

Compliments ot . . . 

BUCKWALTER'S 

Fancy Frmts • Vegetables 
Sea Foods 

123, East Main Street 
PALMYRA, PA. 



Compliments of . . . 

RELIABLE COAT 

AND 

DRESS SHOP 

761 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 



MILLER'S SELF-SERVICE 
FOOD STORE 

i our One-Stop Food Shopping Center 

18 h:a,st main street 
annville. pa. 

Grocerie.s, Meats, Produce, Frozen Food 

Phonk: AiiMvilI»' T-IU.il Khkk Dklivehy 



The Finest in Footwear 

R. E. KREIDER 

"Shoes for the entire family" 
PALMYRA, PA. 

JOHN H. ROGER & SON 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Coa/ ■ feed • fertilizer 

TELEPHONE: 7-4111 



165 



Compliments of 

PETER HAWRYLUK 

JEWELER 

nationally advertised watches fine jewelry art-carved diamonds 

ronson lighters 

watch repairs tested on watchmaster 

40 East Main Street • Annville, Penna. 


Compliments of . . . 

YOUR HERSHEY MILK distributor 

HERSHEY HOMOGENIZED MILK 

''Creayyi in Every Drop'' 
Phone : 2216'] Harry L. Meyer 

Cleona r Pennsylvania 


DAVIS PHARMACY 

9-11 W. Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

Parker Pens a>id Pencils 
Schaejfer Pens and Pencils 
Whitman's Candy 
Double K Nuts 
Prescriptions 


SIMON S. KETTERING 

North Side, 16th & Cumberland Sts. 
LEBANON, PA. 

Distributor oj 
GOODYEAR TIRES 

Phone: 1994-M 


Compliments oj 

J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER, L.V.C. - - 1914 
E. PETER STRicKLER; L.V.C. - - 1947 

"Insure in sure insurance" 

Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Penna. 
Telephone: 5477 


A Friend 



166 



For Service Phone lOlT-V* 

GOODMAN 


Compliments of . . . 
Your Local Insurance Man 


VENDING SERVICE 

Candy 


I. M. LONG 


114 Cumberland Stri'et 


AWVILLE, PA. 


lp:ba\()\. p\. 






WOLF FURNITURE CO. 


THE BON-TON 


Appliances. Finn i in re 


"Lebanon's Greatest Store" 


Floor Corerings 




:.-, )-:.-,(. \\ ill( ,w St rert LEBANON . PA. 




I'lidiie: tdld 


SHENK & TITTLE 


Wc extend our best wishes 
to the Chiss of 1952 


''Everything for Sport"' 


83 


Play More — Lire Longer 

;513 Market Street 


[ ASTORIA 


HARRISBLRG. PA. 


RESTAURANT 


The Finest in Photography . . 
Studio of 


' ^ ■ ' ' "■* ' Compliments of 


J. Edward Gantz 


KAHMEL KORN SHOP 


R. William Wiles 

781 Cumberland Street 


718 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


LEBANON, PA. 





167 



Yearbook Photography by 

GEHRET 

STUDIO 

Portraits of Distinction 

Masters in Art of Photography 

SPECIALIZING IN 

• Portrait and Commercial 

• Children and Baby Portraits 

• Weddings — Formal and Candid 

• Aerial Photography 

• Restoring and Copying Old Photographs 

'''^E:'S!Jr!Ti^t 132-136 S. Front St., STEELTON, PA. 



FINK'S BAKERY 

DELICIOUS LAYER CAKES • PIES 

Filled and French Doughnuts 
PECAN BUNS . BREAD . SHOOFLY PIES 



168 



FUNCK'S GARAGE 

General Repairing 

OFFICIAL A. A. A. SERVICE ATLANTIC PRODUCTS 

J. C. FUNCK 

14-16 South White Oak Street Amiville 7-5121 
Official Inspection Station No. 3068 


Compliments of . . . 

Dontnoyer's Book Store 

41 N. Eighth Street Lebanon, Pa. 


See You at 

Hot Dog Frank's 

The Place Where Students Congregate 

for a 
Bite to Eat in a Cheerful Atmosphere 


College Outline Series 

BOOKS . GREETING CARDS 
GIFTS 


When in Palmyra, 
Stop and Shop at . . . 

LAUCK BROS. 

30-34 E. Main Street 

Unusual Gijt Selection 
Complete Stationary Line 


HENDERSON'S 

C^rc^ aud QifU Shop 
42 N. Eighth St. 

LEBANON 

:^ 

Summer Shop at Mt. Gretna 


CompXimenU of . . . 

BRANDYWINE IRON 
&' METAL COMPANY 

SAM CLARK, Class of "27 ABE GROSKY 

Salvage Material LEBANON, PENNA. 

Tel.: 150 



169 




PHONE: Annville: 7-3511 

Enterprise Hershey: 1-0611 

Enterprise Myerstown: 1-0611 

Middletown: 3151 




H 



OCKLEY'S 
OUSE of BEAUTY 



Flowers for all Occasions 

nS So. 8th. St. Phone: 478 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Compliments of . . . 



Astor Theatre 



Annville, Pa. 



170 



MAX LOVE 

Dry Ckinii)ig and Pressing 
12 W. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

Phone: 7-4S52 


Compliments of 

r^Athertou Ci> Svaiis 

Engineering -Surveying 

26 E. Mam St. 
Annville, Pa. Phone: Annville 7-5051 

SpecidUzed engineering service for lime and 
other 11011 inetjIliL industries 


PAUL H. KETTERING 

Service Station 

ON THE SQUARE, ANNVILLE, PA. 

ESSO PrODL-CTS GOODYE.'^R TlRE SERVICE 

Wheel B.^lancing 

Phone: 7-6231 


Compliments of . . . 




Compliments of 

The Valley Trust Company 
of Palmyra, Pa. 


Congratulations 

Class of 1952 

CLO-TKIIERS 

LEBANON PA 


Lily Ann Shobbe 

Dresses ■'-•*■ Blouses 
Suits L.^dies" We..r,ng Apparel ^^^^^^^. 

Skirts Lingerie 

^ 207 W. Main St. Phone: 7-9021 

Toppers ' Accessories 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



171 



PHILIP R. SCHMIDT 

vSuilaer • Contractor 

416 East Penn Avenue • CLEONA, PA. 

TELEPHONE ; LEBANON 416 


A. D. LEHMAN SONS 

Contractor^ and Jiuilaeri 

103 North Franklin Street • PALMYRA, PA. 

PHONE: 8-6251 


at Your 

Headquarters 
J.H.TROUP MUSIC CO. 

15 South Market Square 
HARRISBURG, PA. 


Compliments of 

ANNVILLE FROZEN FOOD 
SERVICE 

Ice Cream . Locker Service 
Meats and Groceries 

400 E. MAIN ST. Phone: 7-7141 


HARPELS STUDIO 

Portrait and Commercial 
Pnolo^rapnerA 

Our large modern facilities enable us to offer 
unlimited Photographic Service 

PHONE: 322 

757-739 Cumberland Street, LEBANON, PA. 


Compliments of 

TOSER'S CAFE 

• 

Third and Hamilton Sts. 
HARRISBURG, PA. 



172 




mA