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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1954leba 

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oLeaend oj- tne ^luina oDiitcn 




The fate of the romantic Flying Dutchman of legend 
was to sail throughout eternity in search of a woman 
who would redeem him through her love from the curse 
of eternal wandering. His history is a sad, overwhelming 
sweep of eternity and death. 

The fate of today's Flying Dutchmen, the class of 1954 
of Lebanon Valley College, is to live in a whirling world 
of constant change. Their history is a complex pattern of 
everything that has happened to them since September 
11, 1950 when they first viewed Lebanon Valley as their 
college. Each faculty member, dorm session, date, class- 
mate, test, football or basketball game, play or concert, 
as well as each poignant period of homesickness, con- 
fusion, or bewilderment has subtly effected a change 
in each student. 

This QuiTTAPAHiLLA is Our record of those forces of 
change; it is our attempt to put into concrete form the 
wondrous abstracts of living and learning, of thinking 
and doing, of growing and changing that have been our 
four years at Lebanon Valley College. 



Published by the 
CLASS OF 1954 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



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?54 



QUITTAPAHILLA 

Quittapahilla! Lovely Indian name! 
Quittapahilla — rippling on the tongue 
An incantation, or a song once sung 
By dancing maidens in the mellow flame 
Of nioontime. Hilla! Hilla! Warriors came 
To answer, Hilla! Quittapahilla! — flung 
Into the dusk while yet the stars were young — 
And challenge Death for some avenging shame. 
And now she lives the spirit of the stream 
Weeping amid its willows when they sigh. 
Or calling through the lowlands green with 
corn: 
Quittapahilla! — shadow of a dream 
In forests olden: and the wailing cry 
Crosses the meadows like a silver horn. 

Harvey Carson Grumbine 




f?^^ 




cJ^edi 



Hi 



Lcaiion 



To the class of 1954, this QuiTTAPAHiLLA is its symbol 
of four years at Lebanon Valley College. To dedicate it 
to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Aftosmes is a sincere reflection 
of the good-will toward them visible on the faces of all 
who come in contact with "Hot Dog" and Mary. 
Therefore, Frank and Mary, 

. . . for your ever new interest in us, 
. . . for your fervent support of us, 
. . . for your sincere pride in us, 
. . . for your constant friendship to us, 
we, the Class of 1954, proudly and lovingly dedicate 
our book to you, the best loved and most vividly re- 
membered friends in our four years at Lebanon Valley. 



Administration Building 





Frederic K. Miller 

President of Lebanon Valley College 






Library 




Howard M. Kreitzer 

Dean of the College 



10 




Mary E. Gillespie 

Director of the Conservatory of Music 





IviN B. MOYER 
Business Manager 




Helen Ethel Myers 
Librarian 




William A. Hays 

Dean of Students 




Constance P. Dent 
Dean of Women 





Gladys M. Fencil 

Registrar 




D. Clark Carmean 

Director of Admissions 




James W. Parsons 

Director of Public Relations 




John Charles Smith 

Alumni Secretary 





ALF.XANUhR R. AmELL 

B.S., University of Massachusetts 
Ph.D., I'niversity of Wisconsin 



Ruth E. Bkndkr 

A.B., l.ehanon Valley College 

Professor of Theory and Piano 




(). P. Hol.LIM.KR 

U.S., l.elianim Valley College 

\I..'^., Pennsylvania State College 



B.S., We'.l ChesKT Stale Teachers" College 



\llfl \1 HKlMBAliCH 

B s , shi|)|)ensburg State Teachers" College 
\l \ , I niversity of Maryland 




R. PoKTKR Campbell 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

Associate Professor of Organ 



Alexander Crawford 
Associate Piofessor of Voice 



5, 



uc utt u 



Constance P. Dent 
B.A., Bucknell University 
M.A., Temple University 




William H. Fairlamb, Jr. 

B. Mus., Philadelphia Conservatory of Nfusic 

Assistant Professor of Piano 



14 





Clark Carmean 

5., Ohio Wesleyan University 

(V., Columbia University Professor of Music Education 




LLIAM II K(,LI 

I, Penn-vlvdnid '^Idle ( ollcfie 
B , I iiiverMt) of Pennsylvdnid I aw School 



Carl Y. Ehrhart 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary 




Alex J. Fehr 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 



Donald E. Fields 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College Ph.D., University of Chicago 

.M.A., Princeton A.B. in L.S., University of Michigan 



Era NCI s T. Fiklds 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

A.B. in L.S., University of Michigan 




Mak\ F Gillespie 

K S , M \.. Columbia University 

Professor of Music Education 



Robert 0. Gilmore 
A.B., Brown University 
M.A., Yale University 



Samuel Oliver Grimm 

B.Pd., Millersville State Normal School 

A.B., A.M., Sc.D., Lebanon Valley College 



Byron Lynn Habriman 

A.B., M.E., University of New Hampshire 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania 




Suzanne Lecarpentier 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Theory and 'Cello 



V. Earl Light 

A.B., M.S., Lebanon Valley College 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 




Harold Malsh 
Institute of Musical Art 
Associate Professor of Violin 




Howard A. Neidig 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College 

M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware 

16 



G. A. Richie 

A.B., D.D., Lebanon Valley College 
B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary 
A.M., University of Pennsylvania 



Robert C. Riley 

B.S., Shippensburg State Teachers' Colle 

M.S., Columbia University 



THEonoRE D. Keller 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

A.M., Columbia University 



Neville Landor 
Instructor of Voice 



Mawd p. Lauchlin 

B.S., 'M.A., Columbia University 






■'.-.#i>" 



ilbert D. McKlveen 

.B., Juniata College 

I.Ed., D.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 




George R. Marquette 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

M.A., Columbia University 



Sylvia M. Muehlinc 

B. Mus., M.M., Eastman Conservatory of Music 





Reynaldo Rovers 
Assistant Professor of Voice 



Edward P. Rutledge 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 



Hans .Schneider 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College 

17 




Ralph S. Shay 

A.B., Lebanon Valley College 

.\I.A., University of Pennsylvania 



Charles Sloca 

B.S., Rutgers University 

M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 



Robert W. Smith 

B.S., Lebanon Valley College 

i\LA., Columbia University 




Roy Scott V,'. Snider 

B.S., Pennsylvania State College 

M.S., University of Southern California 



W. Maynard Sparks 
A.B., D.D., Lebanon Valley College 
B.D., Bonebrake Theological Seminary 
Ed.M., University of Pittsburgh 



Frank E. Stachow 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 

.Associate Professor of Theory and Woodwind 




Shirley E. Stacc 
B.S., Julliard School of Music 
M.A., Columbia University 
Instructor of Piano 



Alvin H. M. Stonecipher 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 



George G. Struble 

B.S., M.S., University of Kansas 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 



18 




(l3oard of ^ruiteeS 



Representatives from the East Pennsylvania 
E. W. Coble 
Reverend W. A. Wilt 
Reverend H. E. Schaeffer 
C. L. Bitzer 
J. B. McKelvey 
Reverend Edgar Hertzler 
Honorable Miles Horst 
A. C. Spangler 
Paris Hostetter 
Reverend D. E. Young 
Reverend O. T. Ehrhart 
Reverend P. B. Gibble 
Reverend Thomas S. May 



E.U.B. Conference 

Lancaster 

Annville 

Harrisburg 

Harrisburg 

Philadelphia 

Harrishurg 

Lebanon 

Campbelltown 

Mount Joy 

Harrisburg 

Washington Boro 

Ephrata 

Hershey 



Representatives from the 
Reverend P. E. V. Shannon 
Reverend F. B. Plumber 
E. N. Funkhouser 
R. G. Mowrey 
Harold T. Lutz 
H. W. Shenk 
Reverend Ira S. Ernst 
Reverend Mervie H. Welty 
Reverend S. B. Daugherty 
Reverend J. Stewart Glen 
Reverend Paul E. Horn 
Albert Watson 
Huber D. Strine 



Pennsylvania E.U.B. Conference 

York 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Chambersburg 

Baltimore. Maryland 

Dallastown 

Washington, D. C. 

Red Lion 

Carlisle 

Baltimore, Maryland 

Shippensburg 

Carlisle 

York 



Representatives from the Virginia E.U.B. Conference 



Reverend Carl W. Hiser 
Reverend E. E. Miller 
Reverend J. Paul Gruver 
Reverend J. Paul Slomaker 
Reverend J. E. Oliver 
George C. Ludv^ig 

.Alumni Trustees 
Warren H. Fake 
Ernest D. Williams 
Mrs. Louisa Williams Yardley 



Winchester, Virg 

Dayton, Virg 

Martinsburg, West Virg 

Berkeley Springs, West Virg: 

Winchester, Virg: 

Keyser, West Virg: 



Ephrata 

Annville 

Philadelphia 



Trustees 
Bishop G. E. Epp 
Honorable J. Paul Rupp 
Lloyd A. Sattazahn 
W. H. Worrilow 
Roy K. Garber 
Reverend DeWitt P. Zuse 
Bishop D. T. Gregory 
Lawton Shroyer 
John F. Matsko 



It La 



Harrisburg 

Steelton 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Columbia 

Chambersburg 

Pittsburgh 

Shamokin 

Harrisburg 




College Church 



19 




Samuel Yeacley 

John Walter 

Gail Edcar 

Donald Hedcecock 



Mrs. Luella Frank 
Dean Constance Dent 



20 



^tuuen r- ^J'ctcultu (^ouncli 



^ 




At desk, standing: S. Yeagley; at desk, seated: J. Walter, G. Edgar, D. Iledgecock 

1st Row: G. Tritch, T. Stagg, M. Young, D. Roudabush, Dean Dent, W. Daniels, Mrs. Frank 

2nd Row: F. Sander, B. Swisher, S. Schaefler, N. Daugherty, S. Latsha, H. Ancell 

3rd Row: J. McMurtrie, D. Neiswender, W. Jones, W. Vought, B. Ranck, Dean Hays 

4th Row: W. Gorgone, V. Lupo, H. Pachasa, G. Dietrich 



One of the most up-and-coming organizations on Lebanon Valley's campus this year 
is the Student-Faculty Council. The organization, which for some years had been lost in 
obscurity and veiled under the maze of a rather complicated system of student govern- 
ment, is now coming into its own, realizing the tremendous potential power and responsi- 
bility which it does possess. 

The council is composed of the president or appointed representative of each organi- 
zation on campus plus three faculty advisers — Dean William Hays, Dean Constance Dent, 
and Professor Luella Frank. These inembers strive to create better relations ainong organ- 
izations and between students and faculty through discussion of problems which pertain 
to the entire student body. The organization may also be thought of as a co-ordinator of 
the duties of the other four governing bodies: the Resident Women's Student Government 
Association, the Men's Senate, the Women's Commuter Council, and the Men's Day Stu- 
dent Congress. 

Some very specific duties of the Student-Faculty Council are to approve new or re- 
vised constitutions of organizations, to make up the social calendar, and to appropriate 
money to groups which sponsor non-profit activities. The council ineets twice a month 
under the chairmanship of President Samuel Yeagley. 



21 




f Resident l/l/omen i student L^ouernment ^^diociation 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Advisors 



Florence Sauder 

Rl'TH Dalbeck 

Gail Edgar 

Grace Mohn 



Dean Constance Dent 
Dean William Hays 
Mrs. Llella Frank 



"Jiggerboard" 




1st Row: J. Walker, J. Bair 

2nd Row: R. Helwig, R. Dalbeck, F. Sauder, G. Edgar, G. Mohn 

3rd Row: J. McMurtrie, B. Ranck, J. Hammock, G. Gulliver, M. Toung 



22 



en 6 



i oLjaii S^iudent C-< 



onareiS 



President 

Donald Hedcecock 
Vice-President 

Leon Miller 
Secretary 

James Fry 
Treasurer 

Robert Boyd 
Advisor 

Mr. Alex Fehr 



en d 



A S^ en ate 



President 

William Jones 
Vice-President 

William Voucht 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Robert Tarantolo 
Advisors 

Mr. Theodore Keller 

Mr. George Marquette 

Dean William Hays 






y'1 




1st Row: R. Boyd, L. Miller, D. Hedgecock, J. Fry, M. Heberling 

2nd Row: C. Yingst, D. Neiswender, J. Grace, R. Wagner, R. Fasick 

J. Mull, W. Daniels, W. Johnson 




1st Row: W. Vought, R. Tarantolo. W. Jones, A. Carelli, R. Ayres 
2nd Row: W. Diehm, H. Hollinger, W. Fry, W. Gorgone, W. Kelly 




1st Row: F. Risser, D. Cortright 

2nd Row: M. Heidbreder, J. Smith, M. Trautman, P. Williams 

3rd Row: M. Boltz, P. Taylor, S. Whitmoyer, D. Brandt 



m 



omen 6 



y^ommuter i^ouncli 



President 

Doris Cortricht 
Vice-President 

Jean Stahle 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Florence Risser 
Advisors 

Dean Constance Dent 
Mrs. Frances Fields 
Dean William Hays 



23 




That's Viow 



Seniois are . 



Class of 1953 




24 



Howie's Honev 



Hear no evil, speak no e 



Before the test . 



That man's here again. 




President 




EllCENE TrITCH 


Vice-President 




John Ralston 


Secretary 




Ruth Dalbeck 


Treasurer 








G 


EORCE CllRFMAN 


Advisor 






M 


R. 


0. p. Bollinger 



Shall I? 




" "> leave 



25 





Howard R. Ancell 

Sociolopy 

2236 Penn Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Robert W. Ayres 
Economics 
^18 Locust Avenue 
Long Branch, New Jersey 



Joan Ruth Bair 
Music Education 
2117 Walnut Street 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



James Rupert Baker 

History 

215 N. College Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Gerald Rodger Boyer 

History 

Box 42 

Campbelltown, Pennsylvania 

Harold G. Brandt 

Economics 

240 S. 6th Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



Lee Kulp Baker 

Econo/nics 

Berrysburg, Pennsylvania 



Charles F. Blaich 

Chemistry 

11 Arlington Avenue 

Bergenfield, New Jersey 



Phyllis M. Barnhart 
Music Education 
209 S. Potomac Street 
Waynesboro, Pennsylvania 



Allen Chester Boyer 

Chemistry 

Quentin, Pennsylvania 






^^r» 





Robert A. Brandt 

Economics 

517 Spruce Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



Harry Arthur Brown 

Chemistry 

243 S. 3rd Avenue 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



PvOBERT YORTY ClAY 

Music Education 
227 Walnut Street 
Palmyra, Pennsylvania 



Albert F. Carelli 

History 

79 Morrell Street 

Long Branch, New Jersey 

Ruth Evans Dalbeck 
Music Education 
1320 Oak Street 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Glenn Mark Dietrich 

Sociology 

R. D. 2 

Ephrata, Pennsylvania 



ernon Watt Corby 
olitical Science 
1 W. Catawissa Street 
esquehoning, Pennsylvania 



George Curfman 
Music Education 
R. D. 2 
Williamsport, Maryland 



Frank R. DeAngelis 

History 

119 Summer Street 

Orange, New Jersey 



Mark Diethelm 
Political Science 
611 N. 9th Street 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 







Henry Richard Early 

Religion 

219 E. Maple Street 

Annville, Pennsylvania 



Mervin Ross Evans 
Music Education 
19 E. 2nd Avenue 
Lititz, Pennsylvania 



William Ward Frazer 

Economics 

436 N. Railroad Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 



Richard John Furda 

Economics 

115 Court Street 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 



Aaron K. Gingrich 

Economics 

Box 343 

Annville, Pennsylvania 



Warren Luther Early 

Chemistry 

745 Walton Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



Joseph Ferrer 

Mathematics 

58 Spring Street 

White Plains, New York 



Grace Helen Frick 

Spanish 

418 W. Maple Street 

Hazleton, Pennsylvania 



Donald R. Garverich 

Economics 

610 Seney Avenue 

Mamaroneck, New York 



Ralph Rocco Giordano 

Economics 

85 E. Lincoln Avenue 

White Plains, New York 



Martin L. Gluntz 

Ch^mislTj 

30 N. Front Street 

Steelton, Pennsylvania 



Harry E. Graham 

Chemistry 

229 Forrest Avenue 

Narberth, Pennsylvania 




S»». 



John I. Grosnick 

History 

107 E. Areba Avenue 

Hershey, Pennsylvania 



Gloria D. Gulliver 

Biology 

R. D. 1 

Catawissa, Pennsylvania 





Robert A. Gustin 

Economics 

2119 S. Second Street 

Steelton, Pennsylvania 



Joyce C. Hammock 
Music Education 
133 Luray Avenue 
Front Royal, Virginia 





James D. Handley 

Economics 

665 Rutherford Avenue 

Trenton, New Jersey 



Mark W. Heberling 

Economics 

Orwin, Pennsylvania 





Donald L. Hedgecock 

Chemistry 

415 34th Street N. E. 

Washington, D. C. 



William H. Heffley 
Political Science 
710 Hill Street 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 




C«rft 1^ 



""^SSfT 



1 





Allen Homer Heim 

Biology 

104 Center Avenue 

Cleona, Pennsylvania 



Ruby Martha Helwig 
Music Education 
32 E. Main Street 
Mount Joy, Pennsylvania 



Frank Kenneth Hoffer 

Religion 

31 W. Ferdinand Street 

Manheini, Pennsylvania 



Richard Hornberger 
Music Education 
R. D. 1 
Mohnton, Pennsylvania 



Melvin E. Hostetter 

Economics 

R. D. 1 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Charles Hughes 
Music Education 
245 Main Street 
Wilmore, Pennsylvania 



Thomas Harry Israel 
Music Education 
242 W. Locust Street 
Cleona, Pennsylvania 





WiNSLOw Johnson 

Economics 

1602 Center Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 





William L. Jones 

Economics 

573 S. Main Street 

Red Lion, Pennsylvania 



30 



Robert L. Kaufman 

Economics 

4817 36th Street N. W. 

Washington, D. C. 





John George Keiser 

English 

2ir South Market Street 

Mount Joy, Pennsylvania 



Kenneth R. Keiser 
Music Education 
250 N. Fourth Street 
Hamburg, Pennsylvania 



Allen Koppenhaver 
Music Education 
1019 Laurel Street 
Pottsville, Pennsylvania 



Donald L. Kreider 

Mathematics 

R. D. 3 

Lititz, Pennsylvania 




«@^ 










Edgar Landis 

Economics 

9 N. Railroad Street 

Myerstown, Pennsylvania 



Sara Elaine Latsha 

Psychology 

Hickory Corners. Pennsylvania 



Abram Lincoln Leaman 

Chemistry 

33 W. Sheridan Avenue 

Annville, Pennsylvania 



Keith Henry Lebo 

Biology 

339 South First Avenue 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



Walter S. Leffler 

Chemistry 

1935 Center Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



James S. Lewis 

English 

R. D. 1 

Pahnyra, Pennsylvania 




Daniel McGary 

Biolos;y 

229 Walnut Street 

Steelton, Pennsylvania 



John McKenzie 
Music Education 
4203^ York Street 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Thelma G. McKinstry 
Enjilish and Psychology 
46 Sprague Street 
Wilmerding, Pennsylvania 



Jane E. McMurtrie 

Music Education 

Kennett Square, Pennsylvania 

Bruce F. Morrow 

Mathematics 

919 Mifflin Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

John D. Ralston 
Music Education 
4409 N. Front Street 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Leon Mason Miller 

Chemistry 

325 W. Main Street 

Palmyra. Pennsylvania 

Grace Arlene Mohn 
Music Education 
187 E. Main Street 
Adamstown, Pennsylvania 



Albert Edwin Moser 
Music Education 
641 >4 E. Main Street 
Annville, Pennsylvania 

David Neiswender 

Chemistry 

113 W. Cherry Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 





James M. Ressler 

Economics 

4915 14th Avenue 

Brooklyn, New York 



Pauline E. Rittle 
Music Education 
R. D. 2 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



George Lester Rowe 

l'sycholoii,y 

If! Sylvan Avenue 

Metuchen, New Jersey 



Mario Joseph Russo 
Music Education 
459 E. Main Street 
Annville, Pennsylvania 




"'^^iRmnf 




Florence M. Sauder 
Music Education 
413 Second Street 
High Spire, Pennsylvania 



Prowell M. Seitzinger 
Music Education 
504 Park Avenue 
Hershey, Pennsylvania 




r w ^ 





Shirley F. Schaeffer 

Sociology 

121 Poplar Avenue 

Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 

Markus Schneiderhan 
Music Education 
2341 Noble Street 
West Lawn, Pennsylvania 

Philip H. Seltzer 
Political Science 
445 S. 10th Street 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

William Shoppell 
Music Education 
461 N. 12th Street 
Reading, Pennsylvania 



33 






Joan M. Spangler 
Music Education 
603 Philadelphia Avenue 
Cliambersburg, Pennsylvania 



Grace A. Snyder 

Nursing 

50 S. Main Street 

East Petersburg, Pennsylvania' 



J\NET E. Straw 

Music Education 

352 High Street 

High Spire. Pennsylvania 



Jean Arlene Stahle 
Music Education 
126 Cedar Avenue 
Hershey, Pennsylvania 



Robert J. Tarantolo 

Economics 

37 S. Broadway 

Long Branch, New Jersey 



Eugene C. Tritcii 

Music Education 

R. D. 1 

Middletown, Pennsylvania 



Stanley C. VanSant 
Music Education 
1313 N. Franklin Blvd. 
Pleasantville, New Jersey 



34 



William S. Vought 

Chemistry 

2721 Banks Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 





4iiKsr 



*^ i>i| 





William Walborn 

Political Science 

R. D. 20 

Lebanon. Pennsylvania 



Russell Walters 

Religion 

R. U. 1 

Grantville. Pennsylvania 



John Alden Walter 

Chemistry 

361 N. Eighth Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



David H. Wetzel 

Economics 

343 Anion Terrace 

Linden, New Jersey 



Alicia J. Wiiiteman 
Music Education 
526 Lincoln Avenue 
Hawthorne. New Jersey 



Paul H. White 
Music Education 
1236 E. Derry Road 
Palmyra. Pennsylvania 





Merle Leon Wise 

Economics 

404 Fourth Street 

New Cumberland, Pennsylvania 





^ 




David Neiswender Donald Kreider William Vought 



1953 




Howard Ancell 




Allen Koppenhaver 




Shirley Schaeffer 




Eugene Tritch 



36 



Mario Russo 



wl: wl 



1952-53 











WiLLiAM Jones 



Donald Kreider 



William Shoppell 





Joyce Hammock 



William Voucht 



David Neiswender 



37 




Dr. Lietzau crowns May Queen Dorothy Witnier 




A 




The 1952 May Court: Dolores Zarker. Nancy Ann Mvers. Betty J. Bakley. Jeanne 
Hutchinson, Dorothy Witiner, Peggy J. Rook, Elizabeth Beiltel, Jeanne Bonigardner 






'dom emi 




most unusual tree. 



^ 



V6 '51 



i\ 




Alumni, Welcome. 




Class of 1954 




They're twins 



Oh yeah. 



oVes a return, 
■Wiley n>a«-^* 



__Buthediau<- 



42 




Gail Edcar 

Charles Yincst 

Barbara Ranck 

Paul Hollican 

Mr. Robert Riley 



Faithfuls 



43 






Paul Francis Alepa 
Chemistry Club 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Men"s Senate 
Student-Faculty 

Pre-medical . . . one of the Jer- 
sey boys . . . enjoys life . . . 
campus leader . . . analytical 
mind . . . has an easy going 
manner . . . "Oh, yeah" . . . am- 
bition is to be a famous doctor. 



William Forrest Atkins 
Life Work Recruits 
"Bill" . . . one of the pre-min- 
isterial gang . . . from the other 
end of the slate . . . friendly . .. 
capable leader for Religious Em- 
phasis Week . . . driver of a 
school bus . . . busy student 
pastor. 



Joanne Onato Bachman 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
Future Teachers of America 
Student Christian Association 
Chorus 
Band 

Symphony Orchestra 
College Orchestra 
"Jo" . . . an Eastman transfer 
. . . resides in Lancaster . . . 
excellent flutist . . . wants to 
play duets with a bass after grad- 
uation . . . tasteful dresser . . . 
capable student. 



Bruce Allen Baver 

Band 

Chorus 

Conservite . . . particularly inter- 
ested in woodwinds . . . shy un- 
less he's with friends . . . recent 
father . . . Ford coupe his spe- 
cialty . . . New Jerseyite. 



Robert Elliot Blakeney 
Phi Lambda Sigma 
Political Science Club 
Intramural Sports 
Varsity Basketball 
Waynesboro, Georgia . . . enjoys 
life . . . "Bob" . . . at home in 
Landa's room . . . one of the 
Valley's taller basketeers . . . So- 
ciology major. 




Robert Henry Boyd 
Chemistry Club 
Day Student Congress 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Einstein Club 

Intent student . . . pleasant per- 
sonality . . . lover of chess . . . 
Dean's List material . . . has an 
affinity for beat up cars . . ."Bob" 
. . . majoring in Chemistry. 



44 





JoANN Nancy Butt 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
Wig and Buckle Club 
Student Christian Association 
Glee Club 
Chorus 

A "P.K." from Lancaster . . . 
Music major . . . beautiful con- 
tralto voice . . . plays a mean 
tuba in Girls' Band . . . always 
a smile on her face and a plot 
up her sleeve ... a member of 
West Hall's "fat rats." 




Robert Bruce Campbell 

Future Teachers of America 

Chorus 

Band 

Symphony Orchestra 

"Minsker" . . . good all around 

musician . . . piano, oboe, sax, 

clarinet, and radio . . . modest 

about everything except the nurse 

he is engaged to . . . calm . . . 





Jack Richard Celeste 

Chemistry Club 

Einstein Club 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 

New Jersey Club 

Enthusiastic Kale member . . . 

keeps his heart in New Jersey 

. . . photography his hobby . . . 

expert car simonizer . . . Chem 

major . . . "Nothing like a drink 

to help things along." 



Raymond Henry Coble, Jr. 
Future Teachers of America 
Pi Gamma Mu 

Small but mighty . . dry sense of 
humor . . . hails from Middle- 
town . . . side-kick of Seltzer . . . 
drives a sporty convertible . . , 
future teacher. 



Stanley Edwin Cohen 
Phi Lambda Sigma 
Intramural Sports 
Statistician 

"Stan" . . . Howie's buddy . . . 
frustrated athlete . . . compat- 
ible roommate . . . William Penn 
forever . . . Chemistry . . . "It 
was turrible." 



Doris Nannette Cortrighi 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
Student-Faculty 
Women Commuters Council 
Chorus 
Band 

Symphony Orchestra 
Inter-Collegiate Orchestra 
Redhead from Manheim ... en- 
gaged . . . plays up a storm on 
the drums . . . plays and sings 
with dance bands . . . plans to 
get married and teach . . . likes 
to march in band. 







George David Councill 

Future Teachers of America 

Band 

Chorus 

Drum major of the marching 

band . . . knows how to keep the 

band in line . . . "Dave" . . . 

plays the piano, clarinet, and 

drums ... a friend in need. 




Betty Carolyn Criswell 

Delta Lambda Sigma 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Political Science Club 

Quittapahilla 

Intramural Sports 

Glee Club 

Chorus 

Inter-Collegiate Chorus 

"Betts" . . . likes to laugh, sing, 

and dance ... a practical lass 

. . . expert cook . . . lively 

hostess . . . musical, but sings 

only after coaxing . . . busy and 

harassed with "Quittie" Ads. 




Robert Franklyn Cummings 
Band 
Chorus 

New Yorker . . . "Bob" . . . the 
guy with the question mark eye- 
brows . . . a chow hound . . . 
good buddy . . . blessed with 
perfect pitch . . . trumpet in 
Band and Orchestra. 




John B. Dando 

Transfer from Moravian . . . Bus 
Ad student . . . smooth dancer 
. . . "Beetle Bailey" . . . indus- 
trious worker . . . ambition — to 
own "Minersville Journal" . . . 
left L.V. to serve Uncle Sam. 





Alice May Daniel 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
French Club 

Future Teachers of America 
La Vie Collegienne 
The New Jersey redhead . . . 
conscientious . . . quiet . . .styl- 
ishly dressed . . . French teach- 
er in the making . . . often seen 
wearing Kelly green . . . has a 
ready smile. 



Wiley Edgar Daniels 
Chemistry Club 
Day Student Congress 
Quittapahilla 

Abundance of wit and intelli- 
gence . . . perpetual smile . . . 
chess and ping pong . . . helper 
to many . . . gets a real kick out 
of life . . . mad chemist . . . visits 
Hot Dog's. 



46 



Thomas Edward Davis 
Band 
Chorus 

Drives a familiar Oldsmobile . . . 
Music major . . . woodwind spe- 
cialist . . . experienced combo 
man . . . with Mozer he's known 
for his wit and clowning . . . 
married . . . "Tom" . . . some- 
times "Pop." 



Donald DeBenedett 

Future Teachers of America 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 

"L" Club 

New Jersey Club 

Intramural Sports 

Varsity Football 

Track 

A New Jersey special . . . the 

Alan Ladd on campus . . . speed 

demon on the gridiron . . . smooth 

dancer . . . future teacher and 

coach . . . female interest in 

Lebanon. 



Janice A. DeLonc 

Biology Club 

Psychology Club 

Intramural Sports 

Sprightly nurse on campus . . . 

works hard in lab . . . interested 

in lit courses . . . Psychology fan 

. . . rational . . . considerate . . . 

smiles readily. 






Robert Evan Deppen 
Reading's gift to Neidig's Chem- 
istry Department . . . easy going, 
but serious in his work . . . Mari- 
lyn Monroe Fan Club . . . quick 
thinking . . . plans a future in 
chemical sales. 



Kenneth Cassel Donmoyer 
"Ken" . . . Music major from 
Hershey . . . knows L.V. methods 
Irom way back . . . church or- 
ganist . . . would like to be a 
music supervisor . . . dabbles at 
composing . . . favorite saying 
"Wasn't that test just awful?" 



Evelyn Margaret Eby 
Future Teachers of America 
Life Work Recruits 
Quittapahilla 
Intramural Sports 
Student Christian Association 
Women's Athletic Association 
Girl's Basketball 
Girl's Hockey 

Always on the go . . . Soc major 
. . . active participator in reli- 
gious and athletic activities . . . 
star hockey performer . . . will 
go into missionary work. 







Nancy Yvonne Eckenroth 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
Chorus 
Girl's Band 
Girl's Hockey 

"Ecliie" . . . Music major from 
Mohnton ... a guardian of 
North Hall's third floor ... en- 
gaged — goes home week-ends . . . 
Delphian rooter . . . piano and 
flute . . . sports enthusiast . . . 
wants to teach. 





^0^ 




Gail Gwendolyn Edgar 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
French Club 
La Vie Collegienne 
Quittapahilla 

Resident Women's Student Gov- 
ernment Association 
Student-Faculty 
Intramural Sports 
Girl's Basketball 
Girl's Hockey 

Class president with a plus per- 
sonality . . . always has a cheerie 
hello . . devilish eyes . . . life 
of the party . . . well known cam- 
p us leader . . . studious, depend- 
able, linguistic, athletic. 



James Robert Enterline 
Symphony Orchestra 
Band 

Einstein Club 

Salunga, Pa. . . mathematician 
. . . reserved . . . "Let's go about 
this in a logical manner" . . . 
wears Navy blues in his spare 
time . . . takes pleasure in philo- 
sophical debates . . . Physics 
major. 



John Thomas Ervin 

Quittapahilla 

Chorus 

Talented pianist who lives in the 

conserve . . . "Jack" . . . Presser 

Scholarship holder . . . pleasant 

addition to the waiter force . . . 

Music Education . . . "Jackson" 

. . . Hagerstown, Maryland. 



Katherine May Eschenbach 

Kappa Lambda Nu 

Wig and Buckle 

Chorus 

Band 

Symphony Orchestra 

Inter-Collegiate Orchestra 

Music major from East Strouds- 

burg . . . Dean's List ... a 

sleepy waitress . . . practically 

lives in room no. 2 at West Hall 

. . . quiet, except after eleven . . . 

one of the famous "fat rats." 






Stuart Reichert Feeser 
Engaged business student who 
resides in Harrisburg . . . has 
wavy, blond hair . . . drives a 
black Chevy . . . enjoys talking 
. . . coffee after dinner at the 
Astoria . . . "Stu." 



45 







Jay Allen Felty 
Chemistry Club 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Intramural Sports 
Fan-loving Lebanonite . . . as a 
Kalo pledge he made a fine Mata 
Hari . . . neat dresser . . . likes 
sports . . . especially hunting 
dear — oops, deer . . . Chemistry 
and Biology . . . future in indus- 
try? 



Herbert Finkelstein 

Chemistry Club 

"L" Club 

Quittapahilla 

Intramural Sports 

Varsity Basketball 

Track 

Amiable guy and a fast talker 

. . . high scoring basketeer . . . 

a sure bet for the rebounds . . . 

"Fink" . . . "Hi Doll" to his 

female fans . . . struggling for a 

degree to hand out pink pills. 



Donald Samuel Fleming 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Knights of the Valley 
Intramural Sports 
Knows the post office system . . . 
excess ambition . . . flashy green 
Studie . . . How do you do Eco 
and Eco and Eco all in one 
night? . . . misses home cooking. 



Boyd Carl Flickincer 
Biology Club 

Smiling habitant of Hot Dog's 
. . . photo snapper . . . good- 
natured and considerate ... in- 
terested in government work . . . 
lives for hunting and fishing 
seasons. 




Ralph William Fortna 
Life Work Recruits 
Married man . . . preparing for 
the ministry . . . one of Dr. 
Richie's Greek students . . . 
ready to lend a helping hand at 
all times . . . travels from Har- 
risburg. 




James Kenneth Fry 
Day Student Congress 
Political Science Club 
Earnest student . . . able Politi- 
cal Science Department assistant 
. . . protege from New Cumber- 
land . . . sensible at all times 
. . . "Jim" . . . his Olds is the 
daily bus to Harrisbure. 





Walter H. Fry, Jr. 
"L" Club 
Men's Senate 
Intramural Sports 
Track 

Happy-go-lucky . . . crew cut . . . 
eager sense oj humor ... a fast 
man on the track . ..Big Busi- 
ness beware . . . "Walt" . . . 
there's never a lull when he's 
with the "mob" in 214. 




Donald Joseph Gingrich 

Student Christian Association 

Band 

Chorus 

Direct to the conserve . . . cornet 

player . . . impatient waiter . . . 

"Red" . . . follows the quintet in 

fair weather or foul . . . owner 

of car with only one set of keys. 



#8^ 




Louis Gittleman 
"L"' Club 
Intramural Sports 
Varsity Football 

Soft-spoken . . . brilliant blue 
eyes . . . businesslike . . . clear 
thinking . . . attentive student 
. . . Economics major . . . specu- 
lative . . , interested in football 
. . . "Lou" . . . quiet but friendly 
— always courteous 




William Dominick Gorcone 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Knights of the Valley 
New Jersey Club 
Men's Senate 
Student-Faculty 
Intramural Sports 
Varsity Football 
Varsity Baseball 
L.V.C.'s dashing Romeo with a 
knightly manner . . . flirtatious 
eyes . . . sharp dresser ... a 
dance floor smoothie . . . indus- 
trious . . . special interest back 
home . . . Pol Sci major. 



Martin Jacob Grochowski 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 

"L" Club 

La Vie Collegienne 

Intramural Sports 

Varsity Football 

Track 

Towering football player . . . 

"Red" . . . ever ready with a 

wise crack . . . "terrific" student 

in General Education 30 . . . 

businessman of tomorrow . . . 

habitant of Hot Dog's. 



S^ 



^ 



Donald Bruce Grosser 
Chemistry Club 
Intramural Sports 
Pre-dental student . . . Chemis- 
try major . . . "Don" . . . black 
Chrysler . . . Kay Woody Fan 
Club member . . . well dressed 
. . . occasionally seen entering 
post office before dawn . . . next 
stop — Temple University. 




Harry Wesley Hall, Jr. 
Biology Club 
Chemistry Club 
"L" Club 

Phi Lambda Sigma 
Intramural Sports 
Track 

An L.V. track star . . . day stu- 
dent from Hummelstown . . . 
afternoons spent working in lab 
. . . Biology major who plans to 
continue with lab work . . . seri- 
ous and dependable Philo mem- 
ber. 




Donald Lee Harbaugh 
Life Work Recruits 
Student Christian Association 
Newcomer to our class . . . from 
the Southland . . . Bob's room- 
mate . . . "Don" . . . has a 
charge of his own . . . never lets 
an opportunity to laugh pass by 
him. 




Gene Irwin Helms 
Chemistry Club 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Political Science Club 
Intramural Sports 
Tall, dark, and handsome . . . 
alert student . . . Pol Sci major 
. . . wheels around in a little jeep 
. . . weakness for auburn haired 
women . . . calls Myerstown his 
home. 



Calvin Bushey Haverstock, Jr. 

Life Work Recruits 

Quittapahilla 

Intramural Sports 

Student Christian Association 

Varsity Baseball 

Hard ivorking, but easy going 

... a ministerial student from 

Lemoyne . . . always carries his 

briefcase . . . baseball fan . . . 

plans include Bonebrake. 



Sara Anne Herr 

Kappa Lambda Nu 

Intramural Sports 

Chorus 

"Sally" . . . one of the "fat rats" 

of West Hall ... a dramatic Cli- 

onian . . . one of Crawford's pet 

peeves . . . that vague look . . . 

chili and hamburgers in the wee 

hours of the morning. 



Bakbara Ann Hess 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
Einstein Club 

Future Teachers of America 
Life Work Recruits 
Student Christian Association 
"Barbs" ... a quiet member of 
West Hall . . . daily letters from 
Bonebrake . . . begins to study 
after 11:00 P.M. . . . boosts re- 
ligious activities on campus . . . 
plans a Golden future. 



nt&T ^ 






51 





Mary Rosella Hollinger 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
Future Teachers of America 
Psychology Club 
Intramural Sports 
Women's Athletic Association 
Girl's Basketball 
Girl's Hockey 

Diligent, active and always hun- 
gry . . . one of the Sheridan Hall 
noisemakers . . . can always find 
time for hockey and basketball 
. . . Soc major with a wide vari; 
ety of interests. 



Paul Edward Holligan 

Kappa Lambda Sigma 

La Vie Collegienne 

Quittapahilla 

Cheerleader 

Stage designer of renown . . . 

class treasurer . . . enjoys racket 

games — tennis and badminton . . . 

math . . . avid reader . . . smooth 

dancer . . . quick witted . . . 

Kalo supporter. 



Robert Alexander Houston 
Biology Club 
Chemistry Club 

Biology major . . . studious . . . 
spends his spare time playing 
handball . . . easy going . . . 
faithful fan of the Valley's quin- 
tet .. . "Mind your own busi- 
ness." 



Robert George Hower, Jr. 
Life Work Recruits 
Quittapahilla 

Student Christian Association 
Studious pre-ministerial . . . proud 
of his Pottsville home . . . quiet, 
but reliable . . . carries a brief- 
case everywhere . . . pals around 
with Don and Cyrus. 



Carol Adelaide Johnstone 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
New Jersey Club 
Glee Club 
Chorus 

Sometimes referred to as "Sam" 
. . . Music major . . . responsive 
member of Delphian . . . Glee 
Cluber . . . another trustee of 
North Hall's third floor . . . am- 
bition rather vague. 




Edward Joseph Hutchko 

"L" Club 

Intramural Sports 

Varsity Football 

Track 

Willing worker . . . "Ed" . . . 

loves to play football . . . going 

steady . . . Business student from 

the coal regions . . . power 

packed . . . "Sam". 



52 




William Henderson Kelly 
Chemistry Club 
Einstein Club 
La Vie CoUegienne 
Phi Lambda Sigma 
Men's Senate 

Dr. Neidig's ready helper . . . 
reader of Science Fiction . . . 
usually makes Dean's List . . . 
Alice's sidekick . . . craves green 
and purple trousers . . . ambi- 
tion is Doctor's Degree in Chem- 
istry. 




Barbara Ann Kreiser 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
Pi Gamma Mu 
Quittapahilla 
Intramural Sports 
Women's Athletic Association 
Accurate Accounting student... 
of the Bus Ad department . . . 
day student from Lebanon . . . 
active member of Pi Gamma Mu 
. . . "Oh, those Biology tests" 
... a fine friend. 




Glenn WOOD H. Krill 
Thoughtful Navy veteran . . . 
'ransfer from Hershey Junior Col- 
lege . . . appreciates a philosophi- 
cal discussion . . . uniquely at- 
tractive. 




^•^ -C^' 



L( 



Elizabeth Jane Lower 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
Future Teachers of America 
New Jersey Club 
Student Christian Association 
Chorus 

Jane . . . one of three from 
Florence, N. /.-... Music mafor 
. . . "Liz" . . . plays clarinet and 
piano . . . of the North Hall 
gang . . . Delphian s correspond- 
ing secretary . . . Flibberty Gib- 
bet . . . ambition? 



J 




Vincent Paul Lupo 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
New Jersey Club 
Political Science Club 
Student-Faculty 
Intramural Sports 
Happy-go-lucky . . 
serious moments . 
talking . . . slow, 
there . . 
what he tells us 
nomics major . 



Robert Louis Krieg 

La Vie CoUegienne 

New Jersey Club 

Phi Lambda Sigma 

Quittapahilla 

Student-Faculty 

Wig and Buckle Club 

Intramural Sports 

Band 

Ambitious sense of humor . . . 

Wig and Buckle supporter . . . 

steady Philo worker . . . famous 

repertoire of songs . . . yodler 

from Jersey . . . he aims to make 

his living as a businessman. 



but has his 
. . flair for 
but he gets 
man? that's 
another Eco- 
Vince". 



53 





William Albert Lutz 

Band 

Glee Club 

Chorus 

College Orchestra 

Symphony Orchestra 

"Bill" ... a Neiv Cumber/and 

boy . . . .Music Education . . . 

Prof. Roller's protege . . . church 

soloist in Harrisburg . . . French 

horn player in orchestra. 



Ruth Anne MacFarland 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
Future Teachers of America 
New Jersey Cluh 
Political Science Club 
Everybody knows her 
"Ruthie" . . . willing to help 
whenever needed . . . likes to 
sleep . . . constant letter writer . . . 
North Hall occupant . . . Biology 
major . . . New Jersey forever! 




Ralph Raymond Minnich, II 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Chorus 
Band 

Symphony Orchestra 
Brass Sextette 

"Fido" . . . music student from 
Harrisburg . . . recently engaged 
. . . trumpeter in band and sym- 
phony ... Kalo booster . . . 
Ralph and Elaine. 



Vernale Darlene Moyer 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
French Club 

Future Teachers of America 
Quittapahilla 
Wig and Buckle 
Women's Athletic Association 
Intramural Sports 
Featured dancer in May Day 
pageants . . . ivell planned ward- 
robe . . . star in L.V. stage pro- 
ductions . . . her time occupied 
by Richie, but she makes the 
Dean's List . . . master linguist. 




Frank Waring Mulheron 
Phi Lambda Sigma 
Chorus 

Duncannon, Pa. . . . church or- 
ganist in Harrisburg . . . terrific 
.sight reader . . . extremely fond 
0/ eating . . . excellent accom- 
panist . . . wants to work with 
church music after graduation. 




Richard Mi sselman 

Biology Club 

Knights of the Valley 

"L" Club 

Intramural Sports 

Varsity Football 

Track 

Married and a proud papa too 

... a determined football whiz for 

gaining yardage . . . sincere . . . 

earnest student . . .someday he'll 

be teaching Biology. 



54 





Gkraldine Rayola Nichols 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
Wig and Buckle Club 
Student Christian Association 
Glee Club 
Chorus 
Band 

Symphony Orchestra 
"Jerry" . . . jrom Wyoming (Del- 
aware) . . . fourth of West's "/at 
rats" . . . POGO fan . . . temper 
to match her hair . . . allows ten 
minutes to make her eight 
o'clock classes. 




Ikmcard Plessman 
French Club 

Student Christian Association 
Our exchange student from Ger- 
many . . . an accomplished musi- 
cian . . . especially likes piano 
and organ . . . inclined to be 
homesick ... a South Hall ad- 
dition . . . although quiet, very 
sincere. 



LiciE Adele Marie Portier 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
French Club 
Green Blotter Club 
La Vie Collegienne 
Pi Gamma Mu 
Political Science Club 
Ouittapahilla 

Student Christian Association 
Abundance of ambition ... in- 
terests vary from English to pol- 
itics to philosophy . . . baby sitter 
"par excellence" . . . dependabil- 
ity personified . . . future includes 
a trip to Paris. 



Barbara Grace Ranck 



Delta Lambda Sigma 
French Club 

Future Teachers of America 
La Vie Collegienne 
Quittapahilla 

Resident Women's Student Gov- 
ernment Association 
Intramural Sports 
Student Christian Association 
Women's Athletic Association 
Chorus 



Campus mademoiselle with plenty 
to do . . . combination oj looks 
and brains . . . never misses the 
Dean's List . . . qualified campus 
leader . . . quiet, reserved man- 
ner. 



Charles Allen Reed 
Political Science Club 
Future lawyer . . . another re- 
cently married . . . rebel accent 
. . . good-natured . . . ambitious 
lor the Political Science Club . . . 
can usually be found in the li- 
brary. 



Joan Rincle 

Kappa Lambda Nu 

New Jersey Club 

Student Christian Association 

Chorus 

Girl's Band 

Music major from Midvale, N. J. 

... a majorette . . . the Fizzle 

Follies Flapper . . . Clio's hard 

working secretary . . . faithful 

worker for the New Jersey Club. 





i _ 






^mk. ' ^ 



Frank Anthony Ritrievi 
Future Teachers of America 
Knights of the Valley 
Quittapahilla 
Intramural Sports 
Varsity Football 
Varsity Baseball 

Excess supply of ambition . . . 
driver on the gridiron . . . one 
oj Hot Dog Frank's boys . . . 
"These history courses" . . . he's 
from Bressler, Pa. and proud 
of it. 



Charles Abert Roseberry 

Chemistry Club 

Einstein Club 

Quittapahilla 

Smiling Chem major who brags 

about his department . . . can be 

relied upon to help out when, 

needed . . . likes models . . . 

capable and avid shutter-bug . . . 

likes to argue — in a friendly way. 



Joan Rosenberry 

Delta Lambda Sigma 

Future Teachers of America 

Student-Faculty 

Wig and Buckle Club 

Band 

Friendly gal . . . loves to talk 

. . . witty . . . one of our star 

stage performers , . . intriguing 

voice . . . will go into teaching 

profession . . . "Jo". 






Richard Louis Rotunda 
Political Science Club 
Student-Faculty 

Amiable felloiv from Annville . . . 
quiet, but always knows what's 
new . . . married . . . calm and 
level headed at all times . . . 
loyal and active Pol Sci politico. 



Harold Yorty Sandy 
Life Work Recruits 
Quittapahilla 

Student Christian Association 
Serious student . . . hails from 
Grantville . . . owns a neat 
Chevy . . . English major ... a 
gentleman and a scholar . . . 
trustworthy . . . belongs to the 
briefcase crew. 



John Sant Ambrogio 
New Jersey Club 
Intramural Sports 
Symphony Orchestra 
College Orchestra 
"Brogie" . . . ace musician . . . 
tendency to be forgetful . . . his 
cello is his life . . . Jerseyite 
who is glad to admit it . . . gen- 
erally quiet, but witty when he 
feels at ease. 



56 



Patricia Vivian Satterthwaite 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
La Vie Collegienne 
Wig and Buckle Club 
Glee Club 
Chorus 

"Pat" . . . Music major from 
Wynnewood, Pa. . . . very active 
in dramatics . . . student direc- 
tress of plays . . . Delphian de- 
votee . . . coloratura of the Fizzle 
Follies . . . ambition — housewife. 



Glenda Ann Scott 
Delta Lambda Sigma 
Future Teachers of America 
La Vie Collegienne 
Psychology Club 
Intramural Sports 
Chorus 

Would rather sleep than even 
mention the word "woodwind" 
. . . always full of pranks . . . 
often goes home. New Cumber- 
land, to play the organ . . . future 
plans are to teach children to 
sing. 



Marion Marie Sentz 

Life Work Recruits 

Intramural Sports 

Student Christian Association 

Chorus 

Girl's Band 

"Sentzie" . . . conserve student 

. . . still rooting for West Hall 

. . . "Oh, really?" . . . future 

songbird of America . . . creamy 

complexion and winning smile 

. . . quiet and sincere. 






Bernard Lee Shaak 
Future Teachers of America 
Chorus 

Day student . . . piano "excel- 
lente" . . . sociable and easy to 
talk to . . . "Bernie" . . . class 
clown . . . frequently seen in 
recitals on Engle Hall stage. 



Light Wilson Shearer 
Chemistry Club 

Tall, curly haired day student 
. . . amiable person . . . well 
liked by the opposite sex . . . 
chauffeurs a beat up Studebaker 
. . . enterprising. 



Frances Jean Shroyer 

Delta Lambda Sigma 

Psychology Club 

Intramural Sports 

Women's Athletic Association 

Glee Club 

Girl's Basketball 

Girl's Hockey 

Cheerleader 

Congenial . . . has that vim and 

vigor . . . "Fran" ... a good ref 

. . . her home is a refuge . . . 

Day Student representative on 

"Jiggerboard" . . . one of the 

college music fans. 







Jane Mellin Smith 

Glee Club 

Chorus 

Majorette 

Xransfer from West Chester . . . 

conserve artist . . . chief likes: 

her husband and married life 

. . . outstanding dancer , . . 

high-stepping majorette . . . chic 

hair style. 





Lee Cbist Smith 
Pi Gamma Mu 

A quiet man from Myerstown . . . 
conscientious student . . . made 
headlines by representing Pa. 
colleges at National convention 
of N.A.M. . . . active member of 
Pi Gamma Mu. 



Chester Edward Snedecker 

Einstein Club 

New Jersey Club 

Intramural Sports 

Track 

Always on hand to help with 

stage equipment and lighting... 

welt-mannered and friendly . . . 

"Chet" . . . usually accompanied 

by his roommate. Jack . . . Math 

major who knows his figures. 



Robert Eugene Snyder 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Varsity Football 
Graduate of York Junior College 
. . . speculative . . . Bus Ad 
major from Red Lion, Pa. . . . 
J. V. Basketball ... a tidy 
dresser . . . "Bob". 



Louis Angelo Sorrentino 

Future Teachers of America 

Knights oJ the Valley 

"L" Club 

Quittapahilla 

Student-Faculty 

Varsity Basketball 

Varsity Football 

Varsity Baseball 

Sharon Hill contribution to L.V.'s 

championship quintet ... a 

football player "par excellence" 

. . . "Lou" . . . Phys. Ed. major 

. . . three letter winner . . . busy 

with extra curricular activities. 






Elwyn Fisher Spangler 
Future Teachers of America 
Chorus 

A Lebanon lad . . . pals around 
with George . . . Harmony en- 
thusiast . . . church organist . . . 
likes music conventions . . . 
drives a green Chevy . . . wants 
to live in New York and be an 
organ professor. 



58 





Joan Ruth Sprecher 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
Intramural Sports 
Chorus 

Sports a flashy convertible . . . 
the cute blonde from Cleona . . . 
shy, but congenial at all times 
. . . conserve member . . . faith- 
ful basketball fan. 





Theodore Stagg, Jr. 
Green Blotter Club 
La Vie CoUegienne 
New Jersey Club 
Psychology Club 
Student-Faculty 
Wig and Buckle Club 
Import from Lehigh . . . "Tennis 
anyone?" . . . possesses a mag- 
netic speaking voice — would be 
great as Cyrano . . . impressive 
dresser . . . smooth mannered. 



William Henry Starkweather 
Chemistry Club 

Trampoline artist and diver . . . 
Chemistry major from down in 
Maryland . . . usually on his way 
to or from work — at the Gap. 



Allison Charles Stella 
La Vie Collegienne 
Phi Lambda Sigma 
Wig and Buckle Club 
Student Christian Association 
Guardian of Gockley Hall — when 
he's there . . . drives a bright 
blue Kaiser . . . Naval Reserve 
. . . Soc major . . . Wig and 
Buckle asset . . . "Al". 




George William Strong 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Intramural Sports 
Business Administration student 
. . . considerate . . . blond, wavy 
hair . . . always arrives on time 
without hurrying . . . his home 
is in Jersey. 



^S^K" 




Richard George Styrinc 

Quittapahilla 

Impeccable dresser when not in 

khakis . . . Navy vet with a yen 

jar Hawaii . . . likes popular 

music . . . good photographer . . . 

Connecticut gentleman. 








Betty Jane Swisher 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
Quittapahilla 
Student-Faculty 
Intramural Sports 
Chorus 
Girl's Band 

West Hall's marimba player . . . 
the blonde with the sparkling 
smile . . . Clio's competent presi- 
dent . . . permanent fixture on 
the waiter force . . . "B.J.". 



Philip Henry Thierolf 
Phi Lambda Sigma 
Quittapahilla 

Student Christian Association 
Band 

History major . . . outstanding 
ping pong player . . . top Ger- 
man student . . . "Terrible Tiger" 
. . . another Richie protege . . . 
deliberate . . . trumpet player 
. . . ardent baseball Jan. 



Leah Katherine Thorpe 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
French Club 

Future Teachers of America 
Political Science Club 
Quittapahilla 

"Lee" . . . tall girl with ambi- 
tion . . . transfer from California 
State . . . enjoys night life . . . 
studies — for tests . . . "I'm going 
down the street now" . . . loyal 
to her friends . . . witty. 



Masami Uchida 
Intramural Sports 
Student Christian Association 
Chorus 

Education major . . . "Mitzie" 
. . . she came to us from Yoko- 
hama, Japan . . . pleasant face 
and disposition ... a hard work- 
ing waitress . . . someday she 
will return to her native land. 



Julia Ann Ulrich 

Delta Lambda Sigma 

Future Teachers of America 

La Vie CoUegienne 

Quittapahilla 

Intramural Sports 

Women's Athletic Association 

Student Christian Association 

Glee Club 

Girl's Band 

Chorus 

Dean's List student . . . conserv- 

ite from Reading . . . assistant 

to Prof. Rutledge . . . conductor 

of the S.C.A. chorus . . . likes 

dramatics . . . friend at Penn . . , 

ambition—teacher. 







Donald Lester Van Cook 
La Vie CoUegienne 
Phi Lambda Sigma 
Quittapahilla 

Rigid Yankee fan . . . firechief 
of the Men's Dorm . . . short 
curly hair , . . intramural base- 
ball whiz . . . woodcarver of re- 
nown . . . would like to become 
a foreign diplomat. 



Samuel Adam Yeagley, Jr. 
Political Science Club 
Student-Faculty Council 
Able leader of the Student-Fac- 
ulty Council . . . works diligently 
for the Pol Sci Club . . . future 
member of the legal profession 
. . . ready with a witty remark 
. . . lives just off campus. 



Robert John Wagner 
Chemistry Club 
Day Student Congress 
Einstein Club 
Kappa Lambda Sigma 
Lebanon . . . a man of few words 
. . . has an eye for women . . . 
conscientious . . . individualist 
. . . terror of the day student 
checker players . . . likes classi- 
cal music . . . says "It takes two 
heads to drive." 



Janice Eleanor Walker 
French Club 
Green Blotter Club 
Life Work Recruits 
New Jersey Club 
Quittapahilla 

Resident Women's Student Gov- 
ernment Association 
Student-Faculty Council 
Intramural Sports 
Spontaneous, yet rarely combus- 
tible . . . the good-natured prexy 
of West . . . wise with bright 
sayings . . . "let" and "leave" 
. . . on hand whenever she is 
most needed . . . works, studies, 
and lives with zest. 



Sylvia Mae Wolfskill 
Kappa Lambda Nu 
La Vie Collegienne 
Chorus 
Girl's Band 

"Syl" . . . the tall redhead of 
North Hall . . . Music major 
. . . Wyomissing is her home . . . 
Clio worker . . . pleasant per- 
sonality . . . extremely well 
iressed. 



^^ ^sw* ^^ 



Charles Edward Yincst 
Day Student Congress 
Einstein Club 
Quittapahilla 
Intramural Sports 
"Charlie" . . . industrious lab- 
oratory assistant . . . appreciates 
good music . . . pleasant smile 
... a Valley basketball "die- 
hard" . . . Chemistry and Math 
. . . earnest Class worker. 



Robert Shannon Zimmerman 

Life Work Recruits 

Pi Gamma Mu 

Student Christian Association 

Glee Club 

Chorus 

Bonebrake Seminary next stop . . 

"Bob" . . . History major . . 

has a smooth bass voice . . 

likes to kid . . . busy with reli 

gious activities on and off cam 

pus. 




^m^ 





61 




Wr. Quittie 



Richard Musselman 




/r//jJ y^uitiie (^ouri 



Barbara Ranck 



62 




/f //JJ ics^ulttie 



Darlene Mover 



l/l/li66 ycs^uittie (^ourt 



Gail Edgar 



63 




,4 ;ia*i:iri' IS 



MIM 




r 



-^, 



Wr.XV.C. 




Donald DeBenedett 




Evelyn Eby 



64 




Wis.XV.C. 



Gail Edgar 




Louis Sorrentino 



Kyutdtctncii 



ina 



eS 



65 



^he S^tuuents Select... 




Robert Boyd 




Paul Alepa 




^lie ^.y^ima I V later 

To thee dear Alma Mater, 

This ringing song we raise 

A song that's fraught with gladness, 

A song that's filled with praise 

We cannot help but love thee, 

Our hearts are full and free, 

Full well we know the debt we owe. 

To dear old L.V.C. 

We come from old New Hampshire, 
Where winter breezes blow. 
And from the sunny Southland, 
Where sweet magnolias grow. 
We've sung "Star-Spangled Banner," 
To "Dixie" given a cheer; 
And now we raise this song of praise 
To Alma Mater, dear. 

Yes sons of Lebanon Valley, 

Put forth your strongest might 

And let our Alma Mater 

Win each and every fight. 

Lift high her royal banner. 

And keep her honor clear, 

And let our songs with voices strong 

Ring down through many a year. 



Julia Ulrich 



Paul Holligan 



66 






Charles Yingst 



Herb Finkelstein 





Frank Ritrievi 



William Kelly 




67 




the Joy Boys of Radio 




■ Q V^*"* 



2)oi^f 



Roomy, you've changed! 

3 



Good-old General Ed. 



Cancelled test! 




The plumbing — again. 





I never thought of that. 




One way to get in — or out. 




Armed! ! 



Say, Jay 



69 




Cia65 of 1955 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Advisor 



Ross Fasick 
George Seyfert 
Nancy Wolf 
Henry Hollinger 
Mr. Robert Smith 



70 



Laugh, I thought I'd di( 




We begin to give 



S^opn 



>pj 



omoreS 



The Class of 1955 — the winners of two annual tug-of-wars — busied themselves early 
in the year with indoctrinating the Frosh — teaching them the cheers, acquainting them 
with the surrounding countryside, and showing them various odd jobs to do on campus. 
In April, they joined with the Frosh to sponsor Underclassmen Week-end which in- 
cluded the presentation of the play Joan of Lorraine and the informal dance, "In a 
Spring Garden." 

At the end of the year they impatiently and eagerly await the summer miracle after 
which they return to campus as upperclassmen, who will be concerned with their year- 
book, the 1955 Quittapahilla, and their Junior Prom. 




1st Row: W. Erl>y, \1. Forma, J. Hill, C. Achenbach, B. Ross, M. tifss, ,N. Cowrr. F. Arnold 
2nd Row: j. Grace. R. Dunilorr. J. Mull, J. Herr, A. Rahifier, R. Fasick, J. Giannt-lli 
.ird Row: F. Hall, D. Burkholder, C. Noll, W. Diehni, S. Imbodt-n, T. Kiehner 
4th Row: H. Mollin};er. R. McFarland, R. Besecker, F. Brandauer, A. Gingrich 



72 



, r^-i 




1st Row: N. Williams, M. Young, I.. Reedy, E. Werntz. D. Koudalju,h, S. Wliiliiicyer, N. Wolf, 

K. Swope 
2nd Row: K. Risser, P. Miller, I.. Waller, J. Taylor, R. Smith, W. Zilka, D. Roland 
3rd Row: M. Sponslor, J. Gorshin. A. Sheaffer, D. Zuse, J. Weist, (;. Seyfert 
4th Row: J. Sautter, C. LUrich, E. Shamhaugh, C. Walter, N. Stahle 
5th Row; G. Stutzman, D \^ dloufihhv, J Re|)frt, H White, (, ^haalc 




See what those blooming cor'^ets do for 
you! 




What, no rain ! 



All ready for a night of dancing. 



Housecleaning Day. 



4 







■r'«^^ 



Cfa33 of 1956 




to the dance: 




High C, after a low D. 




Quick, while his hack is turned. 



Care for a swim? 



74 




Howard Pachasa 



Vice-President 



Lynn Spauks 



Secretary 



Advisor 



Shirley Heizmann 



Audrey DaCosta 



Dr. Charles Sloca 



Aw, shut up! 




on must sleep with his beard under the blanket. 



And then HE said to me 



75 




1st Row: J. Napolifllo, B. Neatock, N. Sjirenkle, M. Blatt, J. Lowry, P. Martin, S. Rosenberry, 

P. Thomas, M. Troutman, P. Oyer, J. Snyder 
2nd Row: W. Lutz, J. Yorty, B. Rightniyer, C. Zettlemoyer. L. Loeper, M. Over, L. Strickler, 

J. Patterson, J. Gorshin, K. Lewis 
.3rd Row: L. Sparks, R. Yoder. C Kelly, P. Kaltreider, J. Bollinger, J. Allwein, L. Foreman, 

R. Schoonmaker. T. Price, I,. Jones 
4th Row: B. Sleeker, P. Shannon, G. Bittle, H. Forrest, E. Balshangh, S. Hofing, D. Bosacco, 

E. Buck 
5th Row: D. Griffith, R. Walker, D. Becker, D. Gittleman, H. Chudzikiewicz, L. "Bell, H. Voorman, 
H. Pachasa, W. Trostle, H. Weber 



^srredh 



men 



This year's Frosh — the Seniors of 1956 — good-naturedly wore 
their dinks and conformed to other upper-classmen notions of proper 
Frosh behavior, such as always carrying their "L" Books and 
matches and leading cheering teams in front of North Hall before 
meals. On Homecoming Day they fought valiantly but bowed to the 
weight and height of the Soph team. 

During the year, they lost both their initial shyness and brashness, 
took the routine of classes and studies — including the traditional 
autobiography and term paper, and continued to break forth sudden 
spurts of fun-making and havoc-raising — much to the delight of the 
campus. On April 23 and 24, they joined with the Sophs for "Under- 
classmen Week-end" which centered about the presentation of Joan 
of Lorraine and the informal dance, "In a Spring Garden." 



76 



1st Row: S. Nelson, P. Greenjack, A. Fisher, J. Eckenroad. S. Heizmann, B. Reitz, E. Blough, 

E. Buck, D. Brandt 
2nd Row: G. Ritter, A. Fisher, J. Jones, N. Adams, D. Grabau, C. Bradley, R. Castiglia, 

N. Heidbreder 
3rd Row: R. Kelchner, E. Clements, S. Warfel, A. DaCosta, D. Kohr, M. Osinski, I. Urian, 

T. Kreiser 
4th Row: R. Leonard, R. Stone, P. Hostetter, T. Riley, J. Bollinger, C. Kennick, J. Allen, T. Mann, 

D. Umberger 
5th Row: J. Cottrell, R. Ruth, C. Stroh, C. Boughter, D. Farling, L. Fromm, N. Blantz, K. Rom- 

berger 



May I borrow your corn pad? 




Should we have done it' 



These Frosh grow up. 



Improved Soph-Frosh relations. 



ittta H aftWOT'i»i^^ ii tinKa&mf ' ? ii 



a e, a n '^ «^ <^'^- 





Doesn't the sun fee] wonderful? 



V F/iC 



'*;- 





He's my pupil' 





Critics p 



anel. 



We are the . . . chorus . 





i 

Nice performance, partner 



Glamour duet. 



This is- more fun than the dining hall. 







onderucitori 



¥ 



V::^^^ 





Couples ai 



„d mistletoe. 



Christmas 



Cheer for ConservUes. 



Music and iun. 




80 



One and two and three and . . . 




Right on the beat. 




flofe? 



Success ! 



81 




First violins: Ronald Steele, Joyce Hill, Barbara Neatock, 
John Starr 

Second violins: Louise Cody, Carol Bradley, George Seyfert 

Violas: Joan Bair, Jocelyn Jones 

Cellos: John Sant Ambrogio, Robert Clay, Jane McMurtrie 

Flutes: Joanne Bachman, Jane Taylor, Grace Mohn, 
Dorothy Grabau, Ruby Helwig 

Clarinets: Harold Rothenberger, Stanley VanSant 

Oboes: Robert Campbell, Geraldine Nichols 

Bassoon: Mark Schneiderhan 

Horns: Anton Kiehner, James Enterline, William Lutz, 
Joan Eckenroad 

Trumpets: Ralph Minnich, Richard Gingrich, John 
McKenzie, Joel Wiest 

Trombones: Gene Tritch, Florence Sauder, Barbara 
Stephenson 

Percussion: Doris Cortright, May Eschenbach 

Bass violins: Allen Koppenhaver, David Willoughby, Wil- 
liam Trostle 

Conductor: Professor Edward P. Rutledge 



(^olleae K^rcki 



f 



st 



eStroL 



This organization, open alike to conservatory and college students, 
presented its annual concert on February 27, 1953, providing musical 
entertainment for the visiting students competing for scholarships 
to L.V.C. The College Orchestra specializes in lighter symphonic 
works which delight the listening audience. 
College Orchestra Program 

Ballet Music from "Faust" Charles Gounod 

Suite, The Christmas Tree Vladimir Rebikov 

March of the Gnomes 
Silent Night 

Dance of the Chinese Dolls 
Dance of the Clowns 
Slavonic Dance. No. 3 Antonin Dvorak 



82 



S^umpnonu vyrckest 



The Symphony Orchestra attains a place of prominence on campus 
as the outstanding exponent of classical works. The annual concert, 
held in Engle Hall on December 12, 1952, was highlighted by the 
expert performance of the Liszt Piano Concerto No. 2 in A Major 
by Miss Shirley Stagg, professor of piano in the Conservatory of 
Music. This year in the presentation of Brahms" Requiem, the 
Symphony provided the instrumental accompaniment to the Chorus. 
Symphony Program 

Overture, Euryanthe 
Symphony No. 1 in C Major 
Piano Concerto No. 2 in A Major 

Shirley E. Stagg, Soloist 
Symphonic Poem, The Moldau 



von Weber 

Beethoven 

Liszt 



Smetana 




83 



^he KJiee i^lub 




1st Row: E. Swope, P. HfSfnhart, F. Shrover, A. Fisher, P. Rittle 

2nd Row: C. Johnstone, J. Ulrich, R. Dalbeck, J. Butt 

3rd Row: B. Lutz, J. Ralston, C. Dix, M. Russo 

4th Row: C. Dietrich, D. Griffith, B. Rightniyer, G. Seyfert, J. Yorty 



"Here they come, the whole gay procession," the music and words of the 
famed opera Carmen fill the auditorium as the Glee Club reaches the climax of 
its concert. This year, the Glee Club, composed of forty select voices, presented 
a very successful tour with concerts in Mount Joy, Lancaster, New Holland, 
Wyomissing, Reading, Allentown, Philadelphia, and Elizabethtown. The Glee 
Club was accompanied by a small orchestra and piano for all its concerts. 

In addition to the concert tour, the Glee Club has presented numerous local 
concerts in Palmyra, Lebanon, York, and Harrisburg, as well as on campus 
where they performed during scholarship Week-end, the Future Teachers of 
America convention, the Annual Music Festival, and Commencement. 




1st Row: J. Hammock, P. Satterthwaite, B. Criswell, J. Shuler, N. Wolf, M. Hess 
2nd Row: C. Patton, J. McMurtrie, J. Spangler, G. Nichols, J. Smith, R. Reitz 
3rd Row: W. Lutz, D. Willoughby, A. Kiehner, R. Hornberger, S. Imboden 
4th Row: R. Besecker, S. VanSant. W. Shoppell, G. Curfman, K. Ellis 



85 




DL War 



Exhibition Twirler: Ben Lutz. Majorettes: J. Hill, J. Ringle, P. Thomas, J. Smith. 
Drum Major: David Councill. 1st Row: N. Slahle, T. Fish, E. Tritch, B. Baver, 
H. Rothenberger, D. Zuse, T. Davis, R. Campbell, L. Fisher. 2nd Row: R. Be- 
secker, F. Sauder, P. .Seitzinger, C. Noll, A. Kiehner, W. Lutz, J. Goodman, P. Kalt- 
reider, R. Hornberger. 3rd Row: G. Curfman, R. Cummings, J. McKenzie, W. Shop- 
pell, R. Evans, D. Cortright, M. Eschenbach, D. Willoughby, A. Koppenhaver. 4th 
Row: R. Minnich, R. McFarland, D. Gingrich. 5th Row: R. Gingrich, J. Wiest, 
A. Hoch. 6th Row: T. Price, K. Reiser, W. Trostle. 7th Row: C. Sloyer, 
M. Russo, L. Foreman. 8th Row: S. VanSant, B. Baver, P. White, M. Schneiderhan. 

Color Guard: W. Diehm, T. Wolfgang, J. Ralston, B. Thompson 
Director: Professor Edward P. Rutledge 




yiina (iJand 



f 



"Lebanon Valley, Lebanon Valley. Fight against the foe — " The 
strains of L.V.C.'s fight song by the Marching Band cheer our foot- 
ball team on to victory. The Band takes active part in the fall foot- 
ball program. Under the able direction of Professor Rutledge and 
drill master, "Joe" Russo, this group delights fans at half-time with 
their novel and intricate drill formations. 



87 



^ '^ 




■^rd Row: B- I-""' c , R Besecker, W. ^" " 

4lh Row: L>- ^"^i' 

R. Hornberger ■ _ 




^^^■^^■■1^^^^^^^ B Swisher, 

^^^^^^^^^^gle, A. Whiteman, B- ^ ^^^^ 

^ ^ ,„,„,,,, H. CanUshaw, • ^ SprenWW C B.^f , ^^ ^^^^^„ 

1st Row. L. Taylor, J- '^'ir „' & Moser, *-.- ;'"{\„^ p Seitzmger, j. 

1 Reedy „ . -v M. Blatt, J- '"'.,, R. Evans, A- - Ruth. L. Hoy, r- 

4lh Row: M. ^'^ 



DLt 



The chorus, the !.■ 
campus, is composed 
the Conservatory anc 
lege. Every year th 
oratorio, mass, or othe 
For the annual Musi' 
April 16, 1953, the 
Requiem, by Johanii 
fortunate in having i 
with them, Hallie Nc 
the opera and conce 
Keast, a baritone f 
Chorale. This Spring 
the chorus and soloi: 
orchestra, and directe 
is one of the most 
periences ever heard 



I 



oru6 



St choral group on 
all the students in 
veral from the Col- 
group performs an 
ajor choral selection. 
5stival on Thursday, 
lorus presented the 
Brahms. They were 
outstanding soloists 
nd, a soprano from 
stage, and Raymond 
I the Robert Shaw 
istival, presented by 
accompanied by the 
y Professor Rutledge 
norable musical ex- 
Lebanon Valley. 




j-st Row s u ''~ -^--MWBEiasgi^^&fjSB^BH^^Hf ^^^^^I^^^^^I^^^Bk^B 

3td k ^ewpher '^'^'^f nroth I n ' ■'• Straw Q r , ^^^^^^^H^^^^B 

'v»!'s€ ;■•"■ ^' "•'■ -^^ «*. ■;*""■ '■ -^--^^i.a^.?»K^,„ 

•wnenberger "'"''gang p jl^ ,, ' ^- White. W T . ' •'• ^Prech 

""' J • Davis, D 7,. T, i^Jecter, 4 h l 




G.ngr,ch, p. Tho);",' 



89 




1st Row: P. Bamhart, S. Rosenberry, J. Sprecher, J. Lower, J. Herr, J. Ringle, J. Ulrich, D. Brandt, A. Ryd- 

berg, B. Swisher 
2nd Row: J. Smith, M. Sentz, R. Helwig, J. Stable, P. Rittle, J. Spangler, G. Ritter, D. Grabau, L. Loeper, 

P. Thomas, G. Mohn, Professor Rutledge 
3rd Row: S. Herr, F. Sander, S. Wolfskill, A. Whiteman, J. Hammock, N. Eckenroth, B. Stephenson, R. Dal- 

beck, J. Bair, J. Eckenroad, J. McMurtrie, S. Heizmann, J. Butt 



^ne L^iris (I5anci 



This is an organization composed entirely of female instrumentalists of the Con- 
servatory and College. This year the Girls' Band did not participate in any of the 
half-time entertainment during the football season because of the lack of proper uni- 
forms. In order to raise money for the uniforms, the girls presented varied vocal 
programs as well as a program of band numbers and specialties on May 15, 1953 in 
Engle Hall. 

THE GIRLS' BAND PROGRAM 
Band 

Thunderer March John Phillip Sousa 

Fiesta — Paso Doble March E. 0. Geneva, F. L. McAllister 

A Trumpeter's Lullaby Leroy Anderson 

Gloria Ritter, trumpet soloist 

Rainbow March J. J. Richards 

Ballyhoo March J. J. Richards 

Blue and White March J. J. Richards 

Special Numbers 
Majorettes 

Solos 
Ensembles 
Vocal Selections 
Adoration, Break Forth. Beateous Heavenly Light 
Joshua Fit de Battle of Jericho 
Comin' Through the Rye 
Open Thy Heart 
Younger Generation 
Go Song of Mine 



Johann S. Bach 

Arr. by Noble Cain 

Arr. by Harry Sineone 

Georges Bizet 

Aaron Copland 

Frank B. Cooksen 



90 



L^onceri (I3und 



After the completion of the football season, the Marching Band is dissolved into a larger or- 
ganization — the Concert Band. By their annual concerts, the Concert Band is an important 
vehicle to demonstrate the superior instrumental musicianship of the Valley's Conservites. After 
several local concerts, cTimaxed by the performance at the Forum in Harrisburg, the Concert Band 
takes its place on campus as the musical foundation for the annual May Day Festival. 



PROGRAM OF THE CONCERT BAND: 



Chorale 

(a) The Irish Washerwoman 

(b) Irish Tune from County Derry 

(c) The Rakes of Mallow 
Czardas, Cornet Solo 

Ralph Minnich, Soloist 
Andante, from Pathetique Symphony 
American Salute 
Concerto Grosso (Allegro), Woodwind Trio 

Joanne Bachman, Flute 

Jane Taylor, Flute 

Harold Rothenberger, Clarinet 
Zanoni 

Guys and Dolls 
March of the Steel Men 



Franz Josef Haydn 

arr. by Leroy Anderson 

arr. by Percy Grainger 

arr. by Leroy Anderson 

arr. by Charles Kofi 

P. I. Tschaikowsky 

Morton Gould 

George F. Handel 



Paul Creston 

Frank Loesser 

Charles Belsterling 




Clarinets: Harold Rothenberger, Stanley VanSant, Mario Russo, Paul White, DeWitt Zuse, Bruce Baver, Bruce 

Blecker, G. Lamar Foreman, Rodney^ Ruth 
Flutes: Joanne Bachman, Jane Taylor,. Dorothy Grabau 
Oboes: Robert Campbell, Geraldine Nichols 
Bassoon: Mark Schneiderhan 

Saxophones: William Shoppell, Clair Noll, Ross Evans, Thomas Davis 
Cornets: Ralph Minnich, Richard Gingrich, Clifford Sloyer, Kenneth Reiser, Robert Cummings, Donald Gingrich, 

Gloria Ritter, Robert MacFarland, Alfred Hoch, Joel Wiest 
Horns: Anton Kiehner, William Lutz, George Seyfert, Joan Eckenroad 
Baritones: John McKenzie, George Curfman 

Trombones: Gene Tritch, Richard Besecker, Prowell .Seitzinger, Florence Saudcr, Theodore Fish, Noel Stable 
Tubas: Allen Koppenhaver, David Willoughby, Richard Hornberger, Larry Fisher 
Percussion: Doris Corlright, May Eschenbach, Pius Kaltreider, David Councill, Jack Goodman 
Conductor: Professor Edward P. Rutledge 



91 



These instrumental ensembles give their members op- 
portunity to explore music literature not performed 
by the larger orchestra and band groups. In addition, 
playing in such a group develops independence, and 
self-assurance as well as a cooperative team spirit. 
These groups were called on throughout the year to 
perform in Chapel, at banquets, teas, and other social 
functions. The Brass Ensemble was a featured part 
of the Glee Club Tour. 



^ke C^nSemate 





Cf e 




Flute Ensemble: J. Tavlor. D. Grabau, L. Loeper, J. Bachman 



92 




Brass Ensemble: J. McKenzie, baritone; D. Willoughby, tuba; A. Kiehner, French horn; 
E. Tritch, trombone; R. Cummings, Ralph Minnich, trumpets; standing, A. Koppenhaver, 
director. 




Woodwind Ensemble: M. Schneiderhan, bassoon; D. Zuse, clarinet; A. Kiehner, French 
horn; R. Campbell, oboe; Jane Taylor, flute 



93 





Frank Mlilheron 



Joanne Bachman 



i/L/no 6 l/l/fio in ike L^c 



onderue 





Robert Campbell 



Julia Ulrich 



94 



* - ^ 




/ 



;< 



John Sant Ambrocio 




Jack Ervin 




Doris Cortricht 




May Eschenbach 



95 






BilCi:STilGE 




96 







«ii*<^ 



Ch* 



30^^ 



oF 



M»»«'^'-'' 



M 



M>i^ 




fHKENn ™ Club 



23ied«r« 









^ 



Friday 



November It 






iK< 






#1 

Mi 







97 



The 

Presents 



Wig and BucWe Club 




JOAN OF LORRAINE 



by 



,^WELL ANDERSON 



THUBSDAY 

Entfe HflB 



APBIL 23, 1953 

8:15 P. M- 



98 





"I believe in democracy, and I believe the theatre is the temple of democracy." 



Jack of all trades — Jack Goodman 






"Yes, if we set this fire, her ashes and 
her words will blow abroad like seeds and 
take root on deserts and pavement. This 
will be her age, her century, and all the 
rest of us, priests and kings, will be minor 
figures in her tragedy!" 



"Is there a voice then? 
"Will St. Michael speak to 
me, or St. Catherine, or 
St. Margaret?" 



Our dear Tremoille used to have a veto 
power by withholding the soldiers' money. 
But now they don't give a damn whether 
they're paid or not. They follow Joan!" 





"You, you baby King of England, and 
you, Duke of Bethfort, who call yourself 
regent of the Kingdom of France!" 



"Will the lamb live?" 



99 



1§.apP^ 



ai^« 



atitsf^)^ 



^igwa 



Cottest 




c. ^' ^^ 



^^ ^. ^- ^^^^^ 

Ssicdltectexiby ^^ 



Tl^ri'in vvbo ^'"'f'chbistiop of ^"^^^ ^^ the pn|° 



licae 












^ta Otdev oi ^PP 





\Robett V/'^i^i' ■" 



Kni^^* 



100 



"The poor, poor women of Canterbury 
living and partly Ii\ing . . ." 




Now What?? 



We have said the prayers . 



101 




"Your reception committee." ^***^^'"^S^^|j|^^|^^^^^^J^^^J^^m Ya got to do it this way. 

"You've got a certain hardness about you, more like a man." 



102 




103 



The Wjo. o J 



Friday 










^^o^einberi4 



«-wi.. J 



iU 



104 




"Only last week, as I got on the Number Seventeen 
Street Car, I saw one of her mice sitting on the cow- 
catcher. We exchanged glances." 




"We looked at the pigeons, as if they had just come 
down from the sky. As if there had never been birds 
before. As if they came to be with us." 




'Every life in the world is a miracle, and it's a mir- 
acle every minute each of us stays alive." 




■'Wee sleekit, tim'rous beastie! 




The backstage, beautiful people. 



105 




106 




Be careful, you're spilling some.' 



107 



l^lubi 




Where's the engineer? 




108 




Mais oui, c'est vrai. 




out to dine. 




Can't we do it this way? 




Don't fdrget the stage. 







How often do you kids eat? 




Christmas festivities. 



So what, my ears are cold. 



109 



I'^^hl cJLcimbdci S^l 



% 



met 



President (y^^^xxs Bl^cH 
Vice-Presiden\^„ HedgecocK 
Recording Secretary^^^ ^^^^ 
Correspondi^g^S^«'^^";^CooK 
Treasurer ^^^^^ HoLUf"^^" 
Chaplain deWwt Zuse 

Advisor ^^^^ Y. EHBHM^T 




Phi Lambda Sigma, or Philo, is the oldest society on campus. 
Its motto is "All for one and one for all," its colors gold and 
royal blue. With their new constitution, the Phi Sigmas are 
observing their most successful year since their reorganization 
four years ago. 

On April 11, at the Allenberry near Boiling Springs, the Phi 
Sigmas, along with their sister society Kappa Lambda Nu, held 
their annual Spring dinner-dance at which Mr. and Mrs. Ehr- 
hart, Dr. and Mrs. McKlveen, and Mrs. Bender were guests. 
Charles Blaich, president of Phi Lambda, was toastmaster. Other 
events in the Phi Lambda schedule were the Spring picnic, 
the stag-night, and the formal installation of next year's officers. 

Not satisfied to rest on past achievements. Phi Lambda 
Sigma is planning a program for next year which will pro- 
mote even more successful activity than before. 



1st Row: D. Zuse, W. Kelly, R. Krieg, D. Hedgecock, C. Blaich, D. VanCook, H. Hall 
2nd Row: S. Cohen, P. Thierolf, D. Gittleman, T. Wolfgang, G. Shaak, H. Voorman, R. Blake- 
ney, K. Lewis, C. Boughter, R. Walker, T. Reilly, H. Pachasa. 



110 




^\appa cJ^ctmbda 1/ m 



Kappa Lambda Nu, affectionately known as Clio, is the 
oldest of the women's societies on campus. Its motto is "Virtue 
et Fide;" its colors, gold and white; its patron goddess, 
Minerva, goddess of wisdom; and its symbols, the owl of 
wisdom and the olive branch of unchallenged victory. 

The most outstanding project which the Society undertook 
was the production, along with its brother society, Phi Lambda 
Sigma, of T. S. Eliot's masterful play Murder In The Cathedral, 
a dramatization of the martyrdom of Thomas a Becket, Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury. The play was the first of its type to be 
attempted on the Lebanon Valley stage, but was a decided suc- 
cess and earned many compliments for its cast and director, 
Mr. T. D. Keller. 

Rush Week activities included a tea and fashion show 
at Mrs. Bender's, the informal initiation based on "By the Sea 
in the '90's", and the formal initiation on January 17. 



Cor. ^'^^^eta^'"^ Bt/rr 





1st Row: S. Wolfskin, M. Eschenbach, J. Nichols 

2nd Row: L. Portier, F. Risser, A. Rabiger, B. Swisher, J. Butt, D. Roudabush, S. Herr, 

J. Sprecher 
3rd Row: J. Lowry, 1. Urian, S. Nelson, P. Oyer, E. Blouch, N. Adams, S. Whitmoyer, 

A. DaCosta, D. Kohr, M. Osinski, M. Blatt, P. Greenjack, S. Rosenberry, J. Hostetter 



111 



v^^ 



fs p C >^ 



K n ^ Jpl^ 




1st Row: R. Minnich, R. Williams, G. Wert, E. Balsbaugh, S. Hofing, W. Erby, C. Kelly, B. Rightmyer 
2nd Row: D. Willoughby, R. Boyd, P. Holligan, P. Alepa, T. Keihner, M. Grochowski, H. Brown, J. Felty 
3rd Row: D. Garverich, G. Strong, R. Sparks, R.' Snyder, R. McFarland, N. Blantz, J. Mull, W. Gorgone, 

W. Shoppell, R. Snyder 
4th Row: D. Wetzel, H. White, T. Price, D. Fleming, G. Rowe, B. Shaak, C. Zettlemoyer, J. Sautter, G. 

Seyfert, G. Radonoyic. 



President 

Paul Alepa 
Vice-President 

Vincent Lupo 
Recording Secretary 

Paul Holligan 
Corresponding Secretary 

Anton Kiehner 
Treasurer 

Robert Boyd 
Chaplain 

John Walter 
Sergeantat-Arms 

Martin Grochowski 
Advisor 

Dr. Earl Light 



^\appa cJ^umbda S^i 



ipp 



f 



ma. 



"The Society shall foster the intellectual and social interests of its members in this order 
of importance: weld them into a common union; assist the College and its students when- 
ever called upon; promote knowledge, morality, and friendship." 

Cherishing the traditions developed since its founding in 1877, Kappa Lambda Sigma 
celebrated its 75th Anniversary and instituted a program of "reconstruction" designed to 
better integrate its membership and to reemphasize the purpose for which it exists. This 
program included a revision of the Constitution, the adoption of a new pledge program 
which included the performance of some constructive work for the college, and the com- 
piling and publication of a history of the Society. 

Chief among the several social functions sponsored by the Society was the Anniversary 
Week-end which included the presentation of the comedy Good-bye, My Fancy and the 
twentieth annual Kalo-Delphian dinner dance on March 7 in the Berkshire Hotel in 
Reading. 




]^]^2 Smile for the picture. 



England has nothing on us. 



Vince and his gal — let's dance. 



President 

Jane McMurtrie 
Vice-President 

Ruth Evans 
Recording Secretary 

Nancy Daucherty 
Corresponding Secretary 

Jane Lower 
Treasurer 

Joan Bair 
Advisor 

Mrs. Donald Fields 




1st Row: R. Hollinger, L. Loeper, P. Thomas, G. Edgar, G. Prick, B. Neatock, M. Hess, D. Moyer, L. 

Whiteman, F. Shroyer 
2nd Row: J. Eckenroad, L. Waller, L. Reedy, A. Daniel, J. Lower, J. Bair, N. Daugherty, P. Satterthwaite, 

M. Kern, N. Gower 
3rd Row: G. Ritter, M. Over, R. MacFarland, R. Castiglia, B. Ranck, J. Jones, A. Rydberg, D. Grabau, 

C. Bradley, J. Taylor, J. Ulrich, N. Williams, M. Young, S. Heizmann. 
4th Row: F. Weiler, B. Reitz, J. Rosenberry, F. Sander, P. Martin, E. Buck, N. Wolf, J. Bachman, J. Hill, 

R. Kelchner, B. Ross, G. Mohn, F. Thomas 



<^Detia c^ambdu S^i 



f 



ma 



"The purposes of Delta Lambda Sigma are to promote a greater degree of friendship, to 
train in student leadership, to further college loyalty, to promote better social relations 
among the students." Its name was taken from the oracle of Delphi and its colors are 
purple and white. The triangle is the Society's insignia; its popular name, Delphian. 

This year the annual Rush Week was in January. Each Delphian member was given a 
Freshman "little sister," to whom she gave daily remembrances and whom she escorted to 
Rush Week activities. The initiates dressed for one day as "Flying Dutch Girls," and on 
January 17 were formally initiated into the Society. 

The highlight of the Society's social year was the annual Kalo-Delphian Week-end of 
March 6 and 7 which featured the presentation of Fay Kanin's Good-bye, My Fancy, and 
the dinner-dance at the Berkshire Hotel in Reading. Other activities included a dance with 
Kalo in October, a bake sale, and a book sale of dime novels. 





The Happy Time 



Ah, you shouldn't have, but I'm glad you did. 



113 



^Snlaktd of the {Jatieu 




1st Row: R. Musselman, W. Jones, D. Neiswender, G. Seyfert, W. Gorgone 

2nd Row: R. Tarantolo, D. Fleming, M. Heberling, M. Wise, R. Jenkins, W. Vought, F. Ritrievi, R. 

Fasick 
3rd Row: E. Balsbaugh, M. Gluntz, D. McGary, R. Furda, D. Kreider 



This year the Knights of the Valley proudly completed the "Chuck" Maston Memorial 
Award, an award in memory of "Chuck" Maston — a Knight of the Valley, an athlete 
who wore his letters in football and track. This award to an outstanding athlete is based 
on sportsmanship, leadership, cooperation, and school spirit. The committee, composed of 
the President of the Athletic Council, the director of Athletics, the head coaches of each 
varsity sport, and the president of the Knights of the Valley, presented the award to Leon 
Miller at the All Sport's Banquet on May 11. 

The other principal activity of the Knights was their annual dinner dance held on March 
21 at the Hotel Yorktown in York. 

Leon Miller was recipient of the "Chuck" Maston Memorial Award 1953. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Chaplain 

Sergeant-at-Arms 

Advisor 



William Jones 
Richard Musselman 
David Neiswender 
Martin Gluntz 
Richard Furda 
Mark Heberling 
Mr. George Marquette 




114 



l/Uia cind (I3uchle (^lub 



f 



The Wig and Buckle Club, the dramatic club on campus, attempts, 
mainly through actual productions, to give its members experience 
in all phases of the thespian art — acting, directing, stage design, 
and lighting. 

Joan of Lorraine, the moving portrayal of the life of Joan of Arc 
prepared for the theater by Maxwell Anderson, was produced 
on Lebanon Valley's stage on April 23 as the climax of a year's 
activities. The play was directed by Dr. Charles Sloca, the club's 
advisor, and starred Joan Rosenberry. 

William Saroyan's The Beautiful People was the club's major Fall 
production. In addition, the two one-act plays // Women Worked 
As Men Do and // Men Played Cards As Women Do were presented 
on Homecoming Day. Both of these plays were 'student acted, 
student directed, and student produced. 



President 

Joan Rosenberry 
Vice-President 

Theodore Stacg 
.Secretary 

Darlene Mover 
Business Manager 

Dorothy Crist 
Advisor 

Dr. Charles Sloc* 




1st Row: Dr. Sloca. 2nd Row: D. Moyer, J. Rosenberry, T. Stagg. 

3rd Row: B. Thompson, J. Hill. L. Reedy. 4th Row; C. Kelly, M. Osinski, P. Satlerthwaite 



115 



1934 ^<\ulttapakiiic 



ct 



Editor: Lucie Porfier 

Assistant Editor: Wiley Daniels 

Business Manafier: Frank Ritrievi 

Conservatory Editors: Julia Ulrich, Doris Cortright 

Personals: Janice Walker, Betty Criswell, May Eschenbach, 

Calvin Haverslock, Robert Kreig, Claude Miller, Darlene 

Moyer, John Sant Ambrogio, Betty Jane Swisher, Charles 

Yingst 
Clubs: Barbara Ranck, Herb Finklestein 
Table of Contents: Allen Kopoenhaver 
Phologiaphv ( liarb «. Roseberrv, Barhara Stephenson, Boyd 

i'lickniger. Ri(hard stviing 
ai ull\ John Ervin, Barltara He-'. 
Religious \ctivitie-: Robeit Hower, Harold Sandy 
l'ld>- Paul Holligen, Joan Ro>.enl)erry 
'^J)ort-,• Donald \ an Cook, 1 ouis Sorrentino (Men's) 

(>ad Edjiar, EveKn Ebv (Women's) 
Senior-- Leah Thorpe, Philip Thierolf 
\d\ertising '^tafI Bt tt\ Crisvull, Barbara Kreiser, Samuel 

\iagl(\, Riihard Rotunda, Ra\niond Coble, Charles 

'I ing-t 




Think we ought to cut it 



-ssj- 



116 



1st Row: E. Eliv. B. Swisher, L. Portier, F. Ritrievi, W. Daniels. D. Moyer. J. Walker, G. Edgar 
2nd Row: J. Rosenberry, B. Hess, L. Thorpe, B. Ranck. B. Criswell, J. Ulrich, D. Van Cook, 
P. Holligan, C. Roseberry 




The 1954 QuiTTAPAHiLLA has been an experiment — an experiment for the class in 
the use of offset printing, for the printer in the publication of yearbooks, for the 
photographer in the use of large numbers of informal snaps. It is a product of the 
class, a heady mixture of captions, lost pictures, unknown persons, hastily typed 
write-ups, planned lay-outs, and the much needed assistance of the business men 
and friends who helped to publish the book. 




Wonder if this thing's set right? 



Pity the poor photographer - 
he's got to develop them. 



117 



^"acation 

Begins 

March 27 



Allhoneh Lebanon VaJl.v ,■ , ■ ,' 'OrtV-FlVp A^L' 

T"l^«t Honors 



^, 



ersily, werrs,;;;;™," ,rel'"«,'" '°"'"" "> ">= Tigers of r ■ ■ 
A( the ou,se. ,he „„,e, but mth, n""" '"'"""'■" "'" «="= ^'^hola-^hip S J" ' "'e" "ve^ge i„' 

or was able ,o stop Pet„f, effeol,vf '- ^- "=■ with 26) s. ^."*- *"" '"'"'■ R°«lla H„,r ' ''^ '"^'' Eseher ' 

"o m favor of Lebanon v'tf ""'' ^'^'-'ily, ,he rcf„ '"'=''" '■"''''s '"n. W/ll/amt ^ ''"«"• Robert Hotis 

ctrr /"r^'^"'^ p°«<aMoTsnt'°= ^^'- " oS""c "J"""'- i ^"» «-t S^'i?;- "°^^^ «- 1 ^^ 

"'"= ag^tnst th,. »,,.. ._ . .^f,.,""- It might be said Ih, / '^""ference :rieh. "'« ^='■•'1. and Ju|,a U|. C T A -r „ ' 

refs proved tnote i The ^o.,een^_,„,,„„„^^, ^„ J, ^-C-A. To Entertain 



^T~ r~ — :. '""■'day, M 



""Embody of ^'''""«'«.ed by 



'ese 



^-^'ive against the i 

■ebanon Valley in 

"«: Sreatesl team.. 

a 22-i record ,- 

"l^y might eomp 
crforming one of i 
""eee baslceiball 
's "le fourth qua 

as three points. 
= Dulclimen led 

points. And' 
ahead. Bill Vc 
""■i Lancia wit 

"otled the score 

"c second qu,- 

; hit to give t 

'="<'■ Miller c 

r at .15-41. 

S Ae third ,< 

nccting, but ; 

°' ""I Leon ' 
'he Valley 

"" Dutchmen 
"■ 64-6 



J^^e than diti'S;;. ..^..„ more ; the ^ ,,„ ■ .-■^.^. I O tntCrtain 

La Vie Collegienne our .. "° '""' "' "^- '^■* '^"^e'Sn Student. P 

^^•eil made-up paper tCin IQ.o^"' "'^''""^J sfaff fabo,?. "''"« '^''^ O'-gani 

a first class Co'r ratt^ " '''' --'-^ from leAsllZ'T' \^J-^"ews'in a 

^ addition to news coverage , Collegiate Press 

=r, "'-"|-So;°:Si^r„«- -rsl^el-'enls^nttoth '^ '^^"«^' 



, - J reign as Mav n"" """=>■ Col 
'^,=.'■1 of honor Will b^f"«" for ,953, 
^'^•" Shirley Sch X 'r '^'*''™^". 

°'-''« Mohn, a„1^ -rt '"'' B^r-tarf, 

^r,""- .he Ma; Con*"" '"^'" '^■i" 
' '"ese senior girl, ,^,.,, . 

r:,,t^°'^--"'hS"onT ■'= 

, ,. "'ember oT w r, ' ''"™-- She 
Ph.an and has „l '^f'^hoard and Del 

N='h»"fertee"S/''*''™™>hat 
P'Mist, Joyce has ,7 ^" ""Islanding 
■f"' hy a'ccompa„"Cr "" "»"' 
h'"' on various oec.;"^„ '"t ""=«= 8lee 
J-*^s Chosen for" ™;„,i"^-™her 

Who Among S.„de„bT' i '" "*»■' 

/hcia Whiteman bitter 1 
'" campus, was i, ^"°»'" as Lee 

™'- las, erwhe^r '^^ "^^ *- 
M"' Q"'"ie. Lee „^ '' *"' her as 
Nv for three year ati'? t™"''"' hock- 
Ph.an and .he Wo^e^ a,m "'' '" °'"- 

' 'Hawthorne 



- ■--oi, m the final f, """■'•-raion ivill be ,■ 

"■■<= "he game ^iJl'„T, I """"'"' "^ "5=^ 
.' °" '" hreak an Nc ! A T ""=. '"'°"' 'hought , 
'Corinf Ro _.. -""-AA re- so that tu.. ^ . ^^ ' 



— threat an nAIa 
'"™s 8' points ^^'^ 

[^?^ETS TO COACH 
for the Valley steuid fet 

'^o Marquette "r,- , ' 

"On Vdllei ,1, ""i»o has 

^-^'«h ^' t°oT '" "'-' 

■' '"= 'earn r the"' "'^ 
™rospec, after LVcT''r 
'="herg thiv h,J , *='' 



j """'"ess concerning th', "" '"""=" "no 
i 'convention m7I be ,i, """"« "'^c 
members are urged to "■"' °^- ^" 



iltend , 
electing , 



.hat the FuiurJ t '">,' - 

may continue as . '"""'^ of Amei 

home of Dr r,T *'" "•"" at the 

- 3 s/aiv Of ofTio.„ J".-- 



he Pos".eV:„"-°'f«" Th,s l,:t"„,„ stat.st,, 

"'«"' '" .h.- mentb '"" '"'"'' next ' ■"-- 
^""'"onal nomtnaton," """"erat. 
'epted from the «„ """ "■"> he a, 

'"« hefor. hi °„°" ;' '""■ ^Pnl mee 



students went to the M 
( ™' Supply Depot for "[""''^'hurg Na- j service' after dinner Th . 

-^t:'s„f fp"" M-f-fe - ;e.i:i tr 

;" 'he Naval Supply ^r„,"T --'. Sate " °" -^--P- - Plo 

Ll Gut,h.,l. „..'^'^'^°'CP<" ■^"'ll.orium, r 

■lescnpt.on of the m ' 

= 'f Memories of Easter 



-- -ava, Suppi 
I ■-' .Sotshall gave 



of Ihe Nava c," T"' 

• eo'eer „g th'r''"™ f«» »nd ' 

i.allat.on ^ "^ opention of the 

^ series of len,,™ 

■ng ihe Untied St2 ff"™"'^' eoncern. 
Fir, n " ■""' 'he 

Finn TRIP _ 



AM EASTER CA.\TAT 
"' 'he S.C.A. Choir 

.o be presented 
■^'-^KCH 25. „53 _ 8130 , 
College Chiirrh 





-™k;. from (tf* /„ . T ■"^'••'eioaJl souarf 
'""er, Bob B,ata'° TJ. Coaeh -RiS' 



^'«'- Bil, VoSr^Sf'^'f .Sr^^"S:ys 'he hes, 



'«"e„speakerM"V°"='^^»'''"si, 

|M "orler E^e.u^vfv"'"'-'^'*" 
'";=';rstN,,,;;;,t;^V,ce^residen,„, 

"■■ Parker spoke o„ ,k ^^''""on. Pa, 
"1 banking for coll opportunities 

The sn^ , ^° Sradua,es. 

' ne speaker, who it . 
, ^mertcan In„„u,e of B,m ""'^ °^ ""= 
Ph.a Chapter; the EvL .'"-°' ''''"''''el- 
'=OM,s and F nances '?',? ^"'°°' "^ ^e- 
Pennsylyania "a„d ,/ 'c' }'"''^™'>' of 
of Banting, Rutgt ,, °"'"""» Sehool 
■="=" .he audience o„^™""">'' ''""shl- 
Ple.vil,es of banking He s«%°^ "" """- 
, "eational possibilities in the ^','} "" '^''- 
'ong run advantages of fl """ 'he 

'"semind'str? '""'"'hanh-ng 



of 




Let's gel starteil 
on the next issue . 



^AGE TWO 



Sports EduorV;- " 
Conservatory Prf/fA' " 
Exchange EdiSf '^ 
igfS'ness Manager " " 

Advisers 





That page doesn't look so bad after al 



1st Row: W. Kellv, A. Rabiger, B. Ranck, T. Stagg, D. Roudabush 

2nd Row: S. Imboden, A. DaCosta, D. \ anCook, Dr. Struble, J. L'lrich, P. Holligan, A. Daniel, J. McMurtrie, 
P. Oyer 




student (^kndii 



lan 



^. 



lutii 



SSociuuon 



"For God hath not given us the spirit of fear, but of power, and of love, and of a 
sound mind." II Timothy 1 :7 

One of the most active and fruitful organizations on Lebanon Valley College 
campus is the Student Christian Association. Each Wednesday night this group 
gathers for a Fellowship program in Philo Hall. It is here that much of tomorrow's 
Christian leadership is being developed and that young men and women learn to 
know God in a deep and more loving way. 

With the advice of Dr. Sparks and Professor Ehrhart, Glenn Dietrich has guided 
the group through the year. To begin the year, the group convened at the annual 
Fall Retreat at Mount Gretna and, after planning the year's program, returned to 
campus to welcome the incoming Frosh and help them get settled in their rooms. 
During Freshmen Week they sponsored outdoor devotions and a hymn sing. During 
the Christmas season the Student Christian Association Chorus, directed by Julia 
Ulrich, presented a cantata in Engle Hall. On the eve of vacation the group hired two 
wagons in which the entire student body rode through the town singing carols at the 
homes of professors and friends. 

International Week-end with representatives from China, Colombia, Egypt, Ger- 
many. Japan, Korea, Latvia, Panama, Switzerland, and Syria, was held on March 
21 and 22. Earlier in the month. Religious Emphasis Week, lead by Dr. E. Fay Camp- 
bell, the Reverend Gayraud S. Wilmore, and other guest ministers, brought three 
days of chapel services, seminars, banquets to campus which was climaxed on the 
final day by the presentation of the play The Lamb in the Window, directed by Dr. 
Gilbert McKlveen. 




"The First Noel, the Angels Did Sing 



Cook jour own at Fall Retreat. Last relaxation before committee meeting 



120 




1st Row: M. Hess, M. Young, Mr. Ehrhart, H. Hollinger, G. Dietrich, B. Ranck, Dr. Sparks, J. Lower 
2nd Row: D. Roudabush, R. Zimmerman, H. Sandy, J. Walter, L. Portier, J. Ulrich, D. Zuse, E. Sham- 
baugh, B. Hess, P. Oyer, E. Eby, R. Helwig, H. Crankshaw 




President 

Glenn Dietrich 
Vice-President for Women 

Barbara Ranck 
Vice-President for Men 

Henry Hollinger 
Secretary 

Marian Hess 
Treasurer 

David Willoughby 
Advisors 

Dr. Sparks, Mr. Ehrhart 




Cabmet meptmg and that agen 



Work coming up. Who'll volunteer? 




International Week-end. 



121 





Helms ralL- r. r^^^ V^ 
• "^"^ a point of ordeP 
Thorpe Jooks doub.fu 




■ That the Political Science Club 
goes on record as favorintr 




1st Row; L. Portier. M. Young. H. Ileffley, J. Fry, W. Gorgone, Mr. Fehr 

2nd Row: H. Smith, S. Hofing, H. Ancell, L. Thorpe, C. Achenbach, B. Criswell 

3rd Row: D. Rowland, N. Blantz, C. Zettlemoyer, L. Baker, V. Corby, C. Helms, R. Brandt 

4th Row: E. Landis, F. Arnold, S. Yeaglev, P. Seltzer, C. Reed. F. Hall, H. Ely, R. Col)le 



Point of Parliamentary inquiry 



/"^^otiucai Science i^lub 



President 

Hf.rbert Hefflky 
^'ice-President 

JAME^ Fry 
Secretary 

Mary Loii.se Yoinc 
Treasurer 

William Gorcone 
Parliamentarian 

Lucie Portier 
Advisors 

Miis. Maid Lait.hlin 
Mr. Alex Fehr 



"The purposes of the Political Science Club shall be fourfold: (1) to 
give practical training in the mechanics of government and to stimulate 
thought in all fields of political science, (21 to secure information relating 
to the political sciences through addresses by guest speakers, (3) to train 
students of Lebanon Valley Colle2:e for participation in the Inter-Collegiate 
Conference on Government, and (4) to foster friendships by means of 
social activities." 

In the pre-election meetings members analyzed current problems and 
gained training in the use of Robert's Rules. In the second term, the club 
began active preparation for the Inter-Collegiate Conference on Govern- 
ment and sent full delegations, headed by student-chairman Charles Reed, 
to both the Regional meeting on March 14 at Dickinson and the State Con- 
vention in Harrisburg from April 29 to May 2. 

On January 15, on the eve of the exam period, the club held its annual 
"Blue Book Social," arranged bv social chairman, Betty Criswell, at the 
Green Terrace with Dr. Miller as guest speaker. 



122 



We'JJ 




no:'r.'"'-"'y 



niinutps- 
yourJunches. 



liss Toralballo. our guide Ready to take the tour. <>"^ hrst >mpresMon Where did the rest go? 

, ,, . , -, . but the guards wouldn t let us in. 

at the United INations 





Cha- Nat.ona 
> . an> sample- 



h$o 



Jiome Bound 



1st Row: J. Walter, H. Heffley, H. Ancell, L. Smith, B. Criswell, J. Lewis, Mr. Riley, Miss 

Brumbaugh, B. Kreiser, L. Portier 
2nd Row: R. Zimmerman, D. Wetzel, L. Baker, W. Jones, M. Heberling, P. Seltzer, R. Coble, 

V. Corby, A. Gingrich 






/ / Ljumma illHu 




General Assembly Chamber 



W50 



President 

James S. Lewis 
Vice-President 

Lee Smith 
Secretary-Treasi— er 

Betty Criswell 
Advisor 

Mr. Robert Riley 



"The purpose of Pi Gamma Mu is to improve scholarship in the social 
studies and to achieve synthesis therein: to inspire social service to 
humanity by an intelligent approach to the solution of social problems: 
to engender sympathy towards others with different opinions and institu- 
tions by a better mutual understanding; and to supplement and to support, 
but not to supplant, existing social science organizations by promoting 
sociability and attendance at meetings." 

The high point of the society's activities was the field trip to New York 
City on March 30 and 31. The first afternoon was spent at the Lnited 
Nations where they toured the building and attended a session of the 
General Assembly. The next morning the group visited the Federal 
Reserve Bank of New York, the Stock Exchange, the exhibit of monies of 
the world at the Chase National Bank. The trip was concluded with visits 
to the Wall .Street Journal and to Lever House, the modern house of glass 
and steel. 



123 



Ah, lumbrum lerrest 




Sc 



cience i 



The things on 



(iJiotoau i^lub 



'n 



With the aid of Dr. Light, the cluh's advisor, the 
Biology Club was able to establish on campus a 
chapter of the Beta Beta Beta, the National 
Biological Society which is affiliated with the Amer- 
ican Association for the Advancement of Science. 
Charter members of the Lebanon Valley Alpha 
Zeta chapter of the Tri Beta are Richard Schmick. 
Gloria Gulliver, Allen Heim, Keith Lebo. Daniel 
McGary, Harry Hall, Robert Houston. Richard 
Musselnian. Edward Balsbaugh, Dorothy Crist. 
Florence Risser. Beverly Ross, Harold White. Dr. V. 
Earl Light, and Professors 0. P. Bollinger and R. 
W. Snyder. 




President 

Daniel McGary 
^ ice-President 

Keith Lebo 
Secretary-Treasurer 

Robert Hoi">tov 
Advisor 

Dr. Earl Light 



Isl Row; Dr. Light, E. Balsbaugh, R. Musselnian 

2nd Row: H. Hall, D. McGary, Mr. Snyder, H. White 

3rd Row: G. Gulliver, F. Risser, B. Ross, Mr. Bollinger, R. Houston 



124 



Who said that you can't 
catalyse with pipe ashes? 



Now, when I press this button 



This calls for consultation 




Student ^^fflilate (^kapter oP tin 




The Three ^S ise Men. 

This year, for the first time since their inception, the Chemistry Club and the Student Affiliate Chapter 
of the American Chemical Society are united under one constitution. 

The club has sponsored field trips to places of interest to students studying chemistry, and has visited 
the Armstrong-Cork research and development station near Lancaster and the DuPont experimental station 
at Wilmington. Delaware. 

Another activity of the club during the year was the production of the bi-weekly radio program. "Head- 
lines in Chemistry." over WLBR. Lebanon, and the publication of the bi-weekly newspaper. Filtrates and 
Residues, and the semester publication The Lab-Oratory. The club also completed the Andrew Bender 
Memorial Award in Chemistry, which is awarded to the outstanding senior chemistry student. 




President 

David Neiswendkr 
\'ice-President 

Donald Hedcecock 
Secretary 

Gloria Gi lliver 
Treasurer 

Abram Leaman 
Advisor 

Du. A. Amkll 



1st Row: G. Gulliver. D. Neiswender. D. Hedgecock. A. Leaman 

2nd Row: W. Nought, R. Wagner. C. Roseberry, J. Celeste, W. Kelly 

3rd Row: H. Hall, J. Walter, R. Boyd, S. Ajay, H. Hollinger 

4th Row: J. Felty, C. Kelly, J. Balsbaugh,- L. Sparks, H. Forrest 

5th Row: C. Walters, R. Houston. F. Weiler, H. Finkelstein 

6th Row: Dr. Neidig, R. Jenkins, T. Kreiser 

Standing: L. Miller, M. Gluntz, W. Early, W. Kreiser, R. Erby 



125 



Q' 



Teen 




ep 



(^^lub 



The Green Blotter Club, the honorary writing club, meets monthly 
at the home of Dr. Struble. Its meetings are delightfully informal 
sessions in which the members and faculty advisor discuss and 
criticize one another's work or that of newcomers, and frequently 
branch off onto such subjects as art, folk legends, travel, and history. 

Each Spring, the group publishes a Spring Supplement contain- 
ing a selected piece from the work of each member. Senior members 
of the club are Howard Ancell and Allen Koppenhaver; junior mem- 
bers, Janice Walker, Ted Stagg, and Lucie Portier; sophomore 
members, Adora Rabiger, Dorothy Roudabush, Frances Thomas, 
and Roger Dundore. 



French (^iui? 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Advisors 



Nancy Daucherty 

Darlene Moyer 

Gail Edgar 



Dr. George Struble 
Mrs. Luella Frank 



The French Club, an organization 
which had been dropped from Leba- 
non Valley's campus several years 
ago, was revived under the direction 
of Dr. George Struble and Mrs. 
Luella Frank. 

Outstanding among the meetings 
of the year were the visit by the 
native Frenchman who was traveling 
in the United States, the discussion 
by Dr. Struble and Mrs. Frank of 
their studies at LaValle University in 
Quebec, and Mary Lou Young's de- 
scription of her trip to Europe. 



126 




1st Row: D. Moyer, N. Daugherty, G. Edgar 

2nd Row: N. Wolf, J. Hostetter 

3rd Row: B. Ranck, L. Portier. L. Thorpe, A. Daniel 




1 1 


Head Scoop 




i^' m 


Lucie 


PORTIER 


Keeperof-the-Word-Horde 




^iiim M 


Janice 


Walker 


f^lb> ^ 


Advisor 




i'Wf~"-^S^ 


Dr. George 


Struble 


y%-^ 











1st Row: J. Walker, D. Roudabush, L. Portier 

2nd Row: Mrs. Struble, A. Koppenhaver, A. Rabiger, F. Thomas 



f-^^^ucfioioau (^iub 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Advisor 



Sara Latsha 
Theodore Stacc 
rosella hollincer 
Professor Lynn Harriman 



The purpose of the Psychology Club is 
to give each student member a clearer 
picture of psychology at work. At the 
January meeting. Dr. Galen C. Kilhefner, 
Professor of Sociology and Psychology at 
Elizabethtown College, addressed the group 
concerning "Student Personnel Services in 
Small Colleges": in March, Dr. John D. 
Walmer of the Mental Patient Section of 
Lebanon Veteran's Hospital spoke concern- 
ing "The Rehabilitation of Psychiatric 
Patients". Other speakers have been Mr. 
Edward C. McGerren of the Lancaster 
Plant Division of R.C.A. who dealt with 
"The Application of Psychology in In- 
dustry"; Mr. Geisinger of the Milk Dealers 
Trade Association of Harrisburg who spoke 
on "Sweet Milk and Sour Gripes": and Dr. 
Ficca, chief clinical ps\ chiatrist at Lebanon 
Veterans' Hospital, who lectured on 
'Group Therapy". 




1st Row: II. Ancell, G. Mohn, Mr. Gingrich 

2nd Row: Mi^s Brumbaugh, Dean Dent, J. Herr, R. Herr 

3d Row: P. McCoy, Mr. Harriman 



127 



Einstein L^lub 




1st Row: R. Wagner, D. Kreider, L. Sparks 

2nd Row: C. Snedeker, H. Hollinger, C. Roseberry, J. Enterline 



President 
Vice-President 
Secretary-Treasurer 
Advisor 



Donald Kreider 

James Enterline 

Philip Krouse 

Professor Gilmore 



Better known by its title the Math-Physics 
Club, the Einstein Club has attempted to foster 
and maintain interest in mathematics and 
physics outside the classroom. 

A film on electronics, entertainment in and 
on mathematics, lectures abundantly inter- 
spersed with cokes, and — just for variety — a 
philosophical discussion or two have com- 
prised some of the activities of the year. Al- 
though the field trip did not materialize dur- 
ing the year, members from the previous 
year remember the excursion to the Bureau 
of Standards in Washington, D. C, and are 
planning for such a trip again. 



r lew AepSeu (^lub 



With the objective of bringing together on the Lebanon Valley campus the stu- 
dents from New Jersey in order to form an Alumni Association and to add to the 
social, academic, and athletic life of New Jersey students on campus, a small group 
of students in 1951 took the initiative in discussing the possibility of forming a New 
Jersey Club. The club's organization meeting was held at the Meadowbrook in New 
Jersey during Christmas vacation in 1951; a constitution was drafted later that year. 

At the Club's Christmas social at La Pree's in Roselle on December 27, 1952 which 
was attended by representatives of the classes of 1929 to 1956, the New Jersey Alumni 
Association was formed. Joseph Kania of Elizabeth. '46, was elected president; War- 
ren Sechrist of Butler, '40, vice-president; and Adele Begg of North Arlington, '52, 
secretary-treasurer. In May the club sponsored a New Jersey Club Week-end which 
included a havride and dance. 



128 



cJLife l/Uorh r\ecrultd 



"Go ye into all the world and preach the 
Gospel"— Mark 16:15 

Under the guidance of Dr. Sparks, these 
students quietly and without fanfare do 
much to spread the Good News of Life 
through Jesus Christ. On campus these 
hard-workers distributed The Upper Room 
to all students. 

During the year, deputation groups com- 
posed of a speaker, a soloist, an accom- 
panist, and a song-leader have served in 
various churches. These student conducted 
services were given at Coatesville Grace 
E.U.B., Lebanon Bethany E.U.B., Balti- 
more (Md.) Third E.U.B., and Harrisburg 
Sixth Street E.U.B. Larger groups have 
visited the County Home and the Crippled 
Children's Hospital at Elizabethtown. 

Nearby seminaries entertained the male 
members of the group on two visits and an 
inspection trip of the Hershey E.U.B. 
Church showed the working of a large 
church establishment to the group. 

By spreading good cheer and spiritual 
gifts, these students who are the future 
ministers, missionaries, and lay workers of 
the church live their motto: "Christianity 
is our business." 




1st Row: B. Hess, P. Oyer, R. Kelchner, E. Blouch, W. Cowfer, D. Harbauah, 

E. Eby, S. Warfel 
2nd Row: H. Sandy, R. Hower, R. Besecker, R. Zimmerman. E. Shambaugh, 

G. Dietrich 



Melvin Sponsler 

Elmer Shambaugh 

Barbara Hess 




President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Donald Harbauch 
Deputation Chairman 

Fred Brandauer 
Advisor 

Dr. Maynard Sparks 



President 

WlLLL^M GoRCONE 
Vice-President 

Theodore Stacc 
Recording Secretary 

Ruth MacFarland 
Corresponding Secretary 

Joan Rincle 
Treasurer 

Jane Lower 
Advisor 

Dean Constance Dent 



St Row: T. Stagg, W. Gorgone, J. Lower, J. Ringle, R. MacFarland 

nd Row: J. Lowry, S. Hofing, B. Stephenson, R. Walker, L. Whiteman, R. Schmidt, J. Napoliello 

rd Row: D. Wetzel, F. Chamberlain, R. Krieg, G. Rowe, G. Strong, P. McCoy 



129 



future ^eacnerd oP _y(n 



menca 



The George D. Gossard Chapter of the Future Teachers of America widened its 
horizons until its name was nationally known when its president, William Shoppell, 
served as State and national F.T.A. president during the 1952-53 term. Bill was elected 
to the state office at the state convention at East Stroudsburg in April, 1952, and to 
the national presidency at Ypsilanti, Michigan during the summer. 

Several hundred college and high school students from all over Pennsylvania 
were entertained at Lebanon Valley by the chapter at the annual F.T.A. State Con- 
vention, April 17 and 18. The program included a keynote address by Dr. Gilbert 
McKlveen; a banquet at which Reverend Richwine, pastor of the Annville Lutheran 
Church, was the speaker; and a dance Saturday evening. 

F.T.A. Day, February 3, was given over entirely to F.T.A. activities. During the 
Chapel Hour, Dr. Don McGary of the Education Department of Penn State presented 
the morning address on the subject of the need for world-mindedness in our day. 
The day was climaxed by an evening's entertainment which included the presentation 
of the one-act play The Old Lady Shows Her Medals, by James H. Barrie. 

Another outstanding meeting was that in which Mr. Gaskins, principal of Lebanon 
High School, and three of his teachers "talked shop" before F.T.A. members. In 
March, Mr. Walter Kearney, state director of television and director of Penn State's 
placement bureau, addressed a joint meeting of the F.T.A. and the Annville High 
School Parents-Teachers Association. 





F.T.A. booth at Country Fair- 



F.T.A. Day guest, Dr. McGarey 



Howdy 



130 




1st Rem: M. Wurstcr. R. Helwig, W. Dit-hm. E. Ehy, Mr. Harriman. M. Fortna 
2nd Row: R. Herr, J. Herr, R. Clay, R. Campbell, W. Shoppell, D. Zuse, F. 

Sauder 
3rd Row: B. Thompson, E. Werntz, N. Daugherty, P. Barnhart, N. Blantz, B. 

Rightmyer, Dr. McKlveen 
4th Row: R. MacFarland, A. Daniel, D. Councill, N. Sprenkle, S. Whitmoyer, 

R. Musselman, J. Reiser 
5th Row: B. Ranck, F. Ritrievi, L. Sorrentino. J. Bair. A. Rabiger, E. Blouch, 

S. Warfel 
6th Row: T. Wolfgang, C. Dietrich, D. Grabau, C. Bradley, G. Mohn 





President 

William Shoppell 
Vice-President 

Lou Sorrentino 
Recording .Secretary 

Barbara Ranck 
Corresponding Secretary 

Ruth MacFarland 
Treasurer 

William Diehm 
Members-at-Large 

Gail Edgar, Frank Retrievi 
Program Chairman 

DeWitt Zuse 
Reporter 

Adora Rabicer 




?\T..'\. Christmas Party included basketball games- 
the teams rest between contests. 



"The Old Lady Shows Her .Medals, 
stars Joyce Hill and Tom Wolfgang 




Darlene Mover, 

lancer in F.T.A. Variety Show. 

rests after the show. 



131 




1st Row: B. Ross, J. Taylor, S. Schaeffer, G. Edgar, B. Ranck, L. Reedy 

2nd Row: Miss Bowman, N. Gower, M. Young, F. Shroyer, R. Hollinger, L. Whiteman, E. Eby, D. Moyer, 
F. Thomas 



l/Uomen 6 ^^ihietlc ^>^66ociatl 



w.. 






K^ 


^ 


BT'i' ^-^ai 


—————""""— 1 


m^\ 


L^'^^i ^1 


s&f '^p-- 


^^^Hhj^ 


2 



Recognizing the need for a well integrated sports program, the 
W.A.A. offered such old favorites as hockey, basketball, volleyball, 
Softball, and hiking, and added swimming, archery, badminton, 
handball, and tennis. 

In addition to scheduled sports events, the club sponsored a hike 
for Freshmen, several sports activities between boys' and girls' teams, 
and a banquet in the Spring at which all awards — the chenile and 
gold "L's" and the coveted white blazers — were made. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Advisor 



Shirley Schaeffer 

Gail Edgar 

Joyce Hammock 

Barbara Ranck 

Miss Betty Bowman 



132 



(^neerteaderd 



John Walter, Captain 
Jane Taylor 
Beverly Ross 
Paul Holligan 
Lee Whiteman 
Darlene Moyer 




L^iub 



Led by its executive council, the "L" Club's forty-three 
members finished an active and successful year. One of the 
major acts of the club was to relinquish to the Administration 
the presentation of all athletic awards. This year, however, 
desiring to commemorate their last presentation of awards, 
the club chose a new style jacket — blue suede with leather 
collars and a white monogram. 

The social activity spotlighting the school year for the club 
was the annual "L" Club Homecoming Day Dance which was 
based on the theme Give your girl an "L" and which 
featured as favors small chenile "L's". The year ended with the 
annual "All Sports" Banquet where awards in recognition of 
their activity and perennial membership in the "L" Club 
were presented to participating athletes. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Advisor 



Richard Furda 

Mark HEBERLrNc 

Robert Tarantolo 

Ralph Giordano 

Mr. 0. P. Bollinger 




1st Row: W. Fry, R. Gustin, J. Ferrer, M. Heberling, R. Tarantolo, R. Furda, R. Giordano, R. Kauffman 
2nd Row: C. Schildhaus, G. Radonovic, H. Hall, M. Gluntz, H. Finkelstein, F. DeAngelis, A. Carelli 
3rd Row: H. Landa, H. Kozier, L. Gittleman, R. Fa sick, L. Miller, W. Vought, W. Jones 
4th Row: R. Sparks, M. Grochowski, L. Sorrentino, R. Kreiser, M. Wise, J. Handley, F. Ritrievi 



133 




S^Dorts 



134 




Here comes the band . . . 




Congratulations. 



135 




LVC Faces Fordham, 
Furda Out of LineuE 



NEW YORK (ff)-I-*Xa 
V.UW' ""'^f ' [ ,h. NCAA 
basketball ■="»'"'', .j,^ «perts 

to th= ""P"",'. me »*<"='' 
„ho thought on^y^j^,„t,„f,e\d 

wouM D* a^ J .J to 16 teams 

had beer, reduced 

The F1V..18 """^'Lrwt* 
heart oi . , size i« M' 

.„ked Ford-a" »^;^ „hlch re. 



,,. Ore— Washington 
■Se ""d s"nU Clar- - 



/"citv and 
I an v:, Oklahoma Agg 




Junior paced ^"^^ ^^ ^^ jhe P"3.^,^ ,. , . „,,u. n^r, .r„ -^ 

Ke Totdbams Rams Mt^'^^llJCAA. Richie Furta, New Jersey j^^^J.,- "T^ 1 "• M €1 11 

•'", ,,,th a Iree throw in "gsenior. also won't be available. I — Ml •l'*/^^!! 

i made 8°°'! ° _ .,^-»^ W rt/V*"^''^ •/ ' ^ u. Carolina Stale Geor 

SiS T pnau^*-*- ^. -^^'Hir ^...t-* * ■ 






lohio The Dutchmen reolly 
iO to 51. 



the ^"^~l„^-~'' 




Ub. ValUy's Howie lania 
Wins All-NCAA Team Ber 

"teamaitnouncedtoday.^^^.^^^ 
Pettlt. whose 29 poiri 



Tournament 





Dutchmen Raus^ v*, m- « 

Sorrentmo 
Leads Win 



Mit 'Em in NCAA, 

I W ■ ■ mj -■ — "^ ^_^— m-j , J i."""'!"^--!; ineligible for the NCAA ) 

X ■ -■--■- -rrnmy-aTSndslide here tonight. ^^^^^ y,^ ^^^ ^^^^ 



Going all the way wit|i 

starting lineup, the Flying Dutch-] So; with Furda's loss, 
men turned their NCAA victory' | first-string squad that 
playing virtually all th«-o 



^:^^^"°- - 



Scoring 



Progrcssii f, gr 
Of Lebani 
Diplomat 

lEBANOS 




Speed Against f or Jjam 
Height In NCAA Clash 

. 1**'*0 T_ ,..hanoi. Valley 



ovetcome .ts ack of_hetSJtt^^^ j,^^^.„ 
1 ALu:un- -- , „i-pei bustle v.ri' 




^^^''" 'lack ot lieiRbl 



Lebanon Valley 
4ce on NCAA 
Ml-Star Team 



II-NCAA Eastern Regional Tourn- 
Tient basketbaU team, it was an- 
lUDced today. 

Landa, was the sparkplug of the 
alley's first entry In the NfAA 
lurney. which was defeated Sat- 
rday night in the consolation game 
ir third place by Wake Forrest, 91- 
.. They have previously been de- 
>ated by Louisiana State 



Le banon Valle y D efeats Franklin 

Flying Dutchmen Notch 16th 
Victory By 80-66 Margin 



And Marshall 



Hold Early Lead 



Roily In Second Half To Overcome Eight-Point Diplo- 
mat Lead— Crowd Of 2000 Pocks Lancaster Armory For 
Crucial Game — Full Court Press Befuddles F & M — 
Victory May Get NCAA Bid For Lebanon Valley 



with th. 

midway in the opening p 
Miller's foul conversion m 
1,111 for LVC. Leo PHtod 
ned a net shot, but Bill V' 
ono-hander from in do 
gained the lead for _ 
tfy. And the Dutch 



mythical five as 

on every first tei 

. Togo Pal!"-^ 



Trailing by eight pnint_ . 
amazing comeback in the last 
regarded Franklin and Marshall 
which packed the Larr- 



Cagets 



at halftime, the Lebanon Yf"- * ^"vC? 

St two periods tn *- -. « 1 ^-v1«1 4-•^^ 

t ^\y^-^ "^ ^ ^- Tmarges nf Coach J ^ 

K^ „ record "of IS wins and five setl ^^^^ 








ANNVILLE— The Flying Dutch- 
len of Lebanon Valley, sailing 
long at an 85 points-a-game slip 
;ad for Huntingdon aijd their 18th 
in in 19 contests 

Only Juniata, tomorrow night, 
nd Dickinson, Saturday night at 
arlisle, stand between the Dutch- 
len and the conclusion of the most 
iccessful season in the college's 

However, the pair of 

II over for the Blue and White 
\ge forces. 



.VC Holds On In Final Period 
h Squeeze By Juniata 83-81 

HUNTINGDON, Pa., March 4— Lebanoii_Va«e>' College 
leld off a tremendous last period sui-ge bs 
lere tonight to squeeze through with a 





onai gym and their 


20th victory i 


ri their last 21 home 


games. 




In racking 


up 25 points against 


Lincoln, Leon 


Miller increased his 


output in 17 


;ames to 298 for an 


average of 17 


5 a contest. Follow- 


ing closely is 


Howie Lands with 


287 for Ifi.g a 


game. Herb Finkel- 


stein's 262 is 


next aifd Bill Vought 



^ * * ^^Uey Tr, It 
South, «^ ^^ckles To 







BaiLtUii 1953 





f ,- -J 



r^rs t^ rs ^ ^Mf^ ^ 



^Jl^^:^^^ 



t, 'c \ \ \ \ 



Mr. Marquette, R. Furda, M. Gluntz, H. Landa, L. Sorrentino, H. Finkelstein, D. Grider, B. Blake- 
ney, L. Miller, W. Vought, J. Handley, H. Kozier. 



138 



Fielding the greatest^rtHHWl" team over to don 
the Blue and White, Lebanon Valley's speedy 
hoopsters swept the Middle Atlantic Conference 
Championship with a season record of 19 wins and 
1 loss. To climax this, the Flying Dutchmen were 
selected to represent the Conference in the nation 
wide NCAA tournament where they won th 
claim of all who heard of them even though they 
were eliminated in .the fiSgt round ^^fej^leigh. 
North Carolina. 



N 





Primarily the team consisted of seveij men: co-captafiag^iclu^ Furda and Leon Miller; Bill 
Vought, Howard Landa, Herb Finkelstein, Lou Sorrentino and Don Grider. Rounding out the 
varsity were Howard Kozier, Bob Blakeney, Marty Gluntz, and Jim Handley. Coaching this 
mighty five was George "Rinso" Marquette\in his first year as a college coach. 

Stressing speed and driving ability in their colorful play, the Dutchmen started their season 
with a 69-58 win over Dickinson. Previous to this they had administered an 88-56 pre-season 
beating to Mount Saint Marys. Then after a 78-67 win over Upsala, the Dutchmen met Juniata and, 
as the hoops burned, racked up a 116-75 victory over the Indians, creating a new scoring record. 
Their final victory of 1952 was against West Chester 97-80. 





Following Christmas vacation, Lebanon Valley 
continue^ its torrid pace as they trounced Penn 
Military M2-87. In these three games, the Dutch- 
m^Tscored 7?15 points for an average of 105 points 
a game. Albright, however, found a way to cool 
the\Valley and kept control of the ball throughout 
most of the final quarter, thereby limiting the score 
to 74-49. This aiition, ho\^5ever, merely proved to 
the audience thatlthe Dutcj^men possess keen senses 
of humour, for the team 'posed for pictures, took 
short rests, anwtalked to fans during the frozen 
period. / ' 

The Dutchmen breezed through their next three 
games beating Scranton ,'80-65, Elizabethtown 70-58, 
and Scranton again 91-76. Lebanon Valley then 
met its first serious threat of the year at Gettysburg. 
It was a close, hard-fought game until Valley finally 
downed the Bullets 94^84. 

Next after an easy 78-61 win over Moravian, the 
Dutchmeii faced what was then considered their 
toughest game as they pl^^yed host to the powerful 
Muhlenberg Mules. This team, which had beaten 
Temple and other major colleges, was outfought 
and out-hustled by the Flying Dutchmen as proven 
by the 86-77 score. 



139 




ron twelve "^^f 



Up until this time the Valley had won 
games straight. The inevitable defeat came, and was 
given by the arch-rival Albright. In a heartbreaker 
at Reading in which the Dutchmen could no nothr 
ing right and the Lions nothing^wrong, the twelve 
game streak was broken by a score of 82-74. Not 
daunted by their loss, the Valley hoopsters snapped* 
back to down Elizabethtown for the first time in\ 
years, 65-56. This was followed by a smashing \ 
84-48 win over Moravian. Immediately after this 
word was received that the Dutchmen were being 
considered for the NCAA tournament. 

Franklin and Marshall, who was also in the run- 
ning for the NCAA bid, was Valley's next rival. 
The winner of the game was almost certain of the 
invitation. In the thrilling game F.&M., shot out 
at halftime to a 42-34 lead which the Flying Dutch- 
men overcame by using an all court press. In the 
last quarter, Lebanon Valley completely outclassed 
the tired Diplomats to win 80-66 — and clinched 
the invitation. 

The news of the NCAA invitation was made 
official on February 27 — and Valley was scheduled 
to play Fordham in Philadelphia on March 10. In 
the interim, the Dutchmen beat Lincoln 102-79, 
Juniata 83-81, and Dickinson 65-54. 




1953 BASKETBALL SCORES AND SCHEDULE 



L.V.C. 


88 


Mount St. Mary's 52 


L.V.C. 


69 


Dickinson College 58 


L.V.C. 


78 


Upsala 67 


L.V.C. 


116 


.luniata 75 


L.V.C. 


97 


West Chester 80 


L.V.C. 


102 


P.M.C. 87 


L.V.C. 


74 


Albright 49 


L.V.C. 


80 


Scranton 56 


L.V.C. 


70 


Elizabethtown 58 


L.V.C. 


91 


Scranton 76 


L.V.C. 


94 


Gettysburg 84 


L.V.C. 


78 


Moravian 61 


L.V.C. 


86 


Muhlenberg 77 


L.V.C. 


74 


Albright 82 


L.V.C. 


65 


Elizabethtown 56 


L.V.C. 


84 


Moravian 48 


L.V.C. 


80 


F. & M. 66 


L.V.C. 


102 


Lincoln 79 


L.V.C. 


83 


Juniata 81 


L.V.C. 


65 


Dickinson 54 


L.V.C. 


80 


Fordham 67 


L.V.C. 


76 


Louisiana State 89 


L.V.C. 


71 


Wake Forrest 91 




On March 10 an overconfident Fordham Ram 
team found the depleted Lebanon Valley team too 
much for them. Playing without the aid of Richie 
Furda and Don Grider who were declared in- 
eligible, the scrappy Dutchmen played Fordham 
on even terms in the first half 32-32, but ran 
away from them in the second half to win 80-67 in 
one of the greatest upsets of NCAA competition. 

The cry of "On to Raleigh," was heard on cam- 
pus and over half the student-body converged on 
the town as Lebanon Valley and its Flying Dutch- 
men set out to prove that they could make a show- 
ing against powerful "big-time" teams. They gave 
"tall" Louisiana State University a serious scare 
for three periods before bowing to the Tigers' 
superior height 89-76. The next night, the Tired 
I|)utchmen dropped the consolation game to Wake 
Forest Deacons 91-71. 

,' Thus ended Lebanon Valley's finest season, a 
campaign which saw a small, unheralded school 
come out of the Lebanon Valley of Pennsylvania 
to battle court titans in a national tournament. 
The Dutchmen captured the hearts of the fans 
everywhere they went, for the "iron midgets" as 
they were termed and their young, enthusiastic, 
coach captured the imagination of the nation. 



Personal Scoring Records: 

Leon Miller 17.2 points per game 

Howard Landa . . . 16.9 points per game 

Herb Finkelstein . 14.7 points per game 

Bill Vought 12.3 points per game 

Lou Sorrentino . . 10.5 points per game 

Richie Furda .... 6.5 points per game 

Don Grider 5.0 points per game 





KicHiE 





Howard Landa 




LOU SoRM«"^° 




'"^^ VoacH^ 



142 




Herb Finkelstein 





Jim Handley 




Robert Blakeney 




Martin Gluntz 



143 



^luina cdjutcn 



uina 



men 



7' \ f Q 







'^■^13^ ' >^ -s-V»SdgE*ii 



l^<? 



STO'^W^''''"^'^^ ' '^, 



1st Row: Mr. Fox, L. Sorrentino, D. DeBenedett, A. Leaman, J. Ferrer, F. DeAngelis, A. Carelli, E. Hutchko, T. Snukis, 

G. Radonovic 
2nd Row: D. Umberger, B. Salsen, M. Wise, R. Sparks, F. Ritrievi, J. Handley, R. Tarantolo, M. Grochowski, R. Musselman 
3rd Row: R. Wagner, K. Lewis, C. Hetrick, D. Becker, E. Zimmerman, R. Hughes, R. Kreiser, R. Kaufman, L. Gittleman, 

R. Gustin 



144 



Lebanon Valley's 1952 football team, though its ranks were somewhat 
depleted by the loss of graduated seniors, still had a successful season, 
winning four games and dropping three. Under the new head football 
coach, Dick Fox, the Flying Dutchmen swept through their first three 
games before losing. 

The first game was. played on Homecoming Day against a strong Penn 
Military College team which had evolved a new type of formation called 
the "flying saucer." The "flying saucer", however, was grounded by the 
Flying Dutchmen. Spearheading the Valley's attack, Lou Sorrentino 
flipped to Don DeBenedett for the Valley's first score of the season with 
forty-eight seconds remaining in the first period. The Valley scored once 
more in the first half as Sorrentino threw a twenty yard pass to Roy Kreiser 
from the twenty-three yard line and then booted the remaining yards for 
the score. A forty-two yard pass from Sorrentino to Frank Ritrievi scored 
the third touchdown for Valley in the third period. Despite the fact that 
the Cadets came to life in the final stanza, the score stood Lebanon Valley 
19, Penn Military 7. 

The following week the Dutchmen played host to the Vikings from 
Upsala and whipped them in a close, hard fought game 13-7, a score not 
guaranteed until the final minutes of the game. Lebanon Valley scored 
first with a Sorrentino pass to Dick Musselman; and in the final period 
Frank Rogers electrified the crowd by sprinting up the field for the goal 
to tie the game. However, the Valley rose up and with only forty-four 
seconds left to play, completed a sixty-five yard drive with a Sorrentino 
pass to Retrievi for the winning touchdown. 





The Dutchmen then took the winning streak up to Moravian College 
where they triumphed 20-7. The only scoring done in the first half was 
by the Greyhounds as they completely blocked Valley's attack. However, 
in the second half, the Greyhound line began to crumble and the Dutch- 
men drove for three touchdowns from DeBenedett, Sorrentino, and the 
final one as Giordano plunged through the line. 

Taking their three game winning streak down to Gettysburg, Lebanon 
Valley experienced their most heartbreaking game of the season. Leading 
at halftime by an overwhelming score of 25-0, the Dutchmen succumbed 
to the Bullets' superior manpower in the second half and lost 35-25. The 
Dutchmen capitalized on three Gettysburg fumbles in the opening minutes 
of the game and scored on each. In the second half, however, a pass 
intercepted by the Bullets opened the flood gates. After that Gettysburg 
was unstoppable. Making the most of the two blocked kicks and ripping 
the exhausted Dutchmen, the Bullets pulled the game out of the fire by 
scoring a touchdown practically each time they had the offensive. 




•-V*. 



146 



^ i' 



The next week Lebanon Valley lost a close game to their arch-rival Al- 
bright by a score of 21-19. The stirring comeback of the last quarter fell 
short by the victory margin of two points. Touchdowns by Tony D'Apo- 
lito and Bruce Eickhoff made the score 14-0 at the half. A pass from Sor- 
rentino to DeBenedett which was deflected into Ritrievi's hands set the 
score at 14-6; but Albright matched it immediately. In the last quarter 
Sorrentino took to the air and passed to Ralph Giordano and Dick Mus- 
selman for a touchdown which put the Dutchmen back in the game. How- 
ever, time ran out before Valley could execute another drive. 

Two heartbreaking defeats in a row seemed to have affected the Dutch- 
men as they traveled to Western Maryland to absorb a 26-0 beating. The 
Dutchmen could do nothing that day and the Green Terrors romped all 
over them. The Western Maryland defense held the Valley attack to 
eighteen yards in the air and the goal line was never threatened during 
the long afternoon. 

In the final game of the season, Valley played in the mud and rain, but 
won their fourth game of the season over Juniata 13-6. The game was 
made notable by a sixty-nine yard touchdown run by Don DeBenedett. 
Sorrentino had thrown a touchdown pass to Musselman for the other score. 

In retrospect, one can say that although they won but four out of seven, 
the Dutchmen never lost their fighting spirit or sportsmanship. Next year, 
with the abolition of the two-platoon system, Valley ought to have a better 
chance. 








Robert Gustin — Tackle 



li 



/^.^A 



^: 



James Handley — End 



<^ 



Merle Wis^-Fullback 



^^ 



148 



^2 

Albert Carelli — Guard 



V 



%*-^ 



AA 



^ 



>►, 



^ 



Ralph Giordano— Fullback K € 



^Qy ^^ 



Frank DeAngelis — Tackle 







Robert Kaufman — Center 




Joe Ferrer — Guard 




Lebanon 
Lebanon 
Lebanon 
Lebanon 
Lebanon 
Lebanon 
Lebanon 



FOOTS 
Valley 19 
Valley 13 
Valley 20 
Valley 25 
Valley 19 
Valley 
Valley 13 










Robert Tarantolo — Quarterback 




Robert Snyder — End 




IRES— 1952 

vania Military College 7 

Upsala 6 

Moravian 7 

Gettysburg 34 

Albright 21 

Western Maryland 26 

Juniata 6 



mis Sorrentino — Quarterback 



MSNl 



Louis Gittleman — Center 





Edward Hutchko — Center 




Martin Grochowski — Tackle 



Richard Musselman — Halfback 



149 



1953 CjirU Uarditi 






E. Eby, R. Hollinger, I. Urian, M. Young, J. Straw, S. Schaeffer, Miss Bowman 







Varsit 


y Schedule 


L.V.C. 


Place 


Opponent 


44 


H 


Moravian 25 


25 


H 


Elizabethtown 49 


26 


A 


MillersviUe 27 


33 


A 


Albright 54 


29 


H 


MillersviUe 33 


40 


H 


Lock Haven 52 


21 


A 


Shippensburg 47 


20 


H 


Gettysburg 56 


29 


A 


Elizabethtown 48 



Personal Scoring Records 

Janet Straw 17.7 points per game 

Irene Urian 6.2 " " " 

Evelyn Eby 5.3 " " " 



150 



'^ashetbail 



Coach Betty Jane Bowman in the 1952-1953 season had the advantage of having approxi- 
mately twenty girls from which to choose her basketball team. Her decisions were wise ones 
for the team for although they did not win the majority of the games, they showed good 
ball handling and exceptional teamwork. 

Janet Straw, captain of the team and spark on any basketball court with an average of 17.7 
points per game, will really be missed as one of the big six next year. Evelyn Eby, rugged 
and fast forward, will enjoy her senior year in her left forward role. Irene Urian, clear-headed 
and capable right forward, showed her outstanding athletic ability in this, her freshmen year. 
In the varsity guard positions Shirley Schaeffer, Rosie Hollinger, apd Mary Lou Young held up 
the other end of the court under rough, aggressive situations with outstanding ability and de- 
termination. 

There is much that can be said about a team in its embryonic stage, its trials and tribula- 
tions, its strong and weak moments. Omitting details, a prediction will have to fill the bill 
— let's foresee a team that will come through with successful seasons in the very near future. 



(/basketball ZrolileS o^ 1953 




151 




FLYING ^ 



^'^' 



C"* 



^J^ocke 



1 



Emily Clements 
Goalie 



Irene Urian 
Left Halfback 




Mary Lou Youni 
Left Fullback 



Gail Edgar 
Center Halfback 



152 



^ 



v^ 



V^ashetbaii 



Shirley Schaeffer — Center Guard 




Mary Lou Young — Right Guard 



Lebanon Valley 


1 


Shippensburg 


4 


Lebanon Valley 


1 


Moravian 


4 


Lebanon Valley 


1 


Gettysburg 


7 


Lebanon Valley 





Millersville 





Lebanon Valley 


1 


Elizabethtown 


1 


Lebanon Valley 





Albright 


2 




1st Row: E. Eby, E. Clements, P. Greenjack 

2nd Row: R. Kelchner, L. Reedy, S. Heizmann, L. Waller, A. DaCosta, R. HoUinger, S. Nelson 

3rd Row: Miss Bowman, L Urian, M. Young, Gail Edgar, S. Warfel, S. Schaeffer, S. Latsha 



^J^ochi 



J 



154 



Whether it is a disadvantage or advantage to have an altogether new team and coach to work 
with and build will be a question that should be answered in the 1953 season. The past season has 
been one of new fundamentals and acquaintances with the game of hockey and with the team that 
plays the fast, exciting "game of finesse," as the coach. Miss Betty Bowman, tells the group. 

The team itself — how else can it be described than "a great bunch of girls, which the right atti- 
tude, determination, and coaching can turn into a strong, smooth field hockey team." 

Rosie Hollinger, veteran left-wing who can be counted on to send the ball into the center at the 
right moment, will be back for the '53 season to enjoy her last year on the college field. Evelyn 
Eby, strong, capable right halfback, is what the team needs for confidence in the tight defensive 
play. Gail Edgar, this year's captain and center half, is looking forward to the new season, deter- 
mined to be part of a good ball team in her last year at Valley. 

The sophomore members of the team are Mary Lou Young, left fullback and one of the best 
potentials the team has; Lois Reedy, who with a tremendous, accurate hit fills the right wing spot 
to the "T"; Lynnette Wall, center half who with more experience will direct that ball into the 
cage every time. 

Unusual as it may seem, the freshmen equal the upperclassmen on the team. The Frosh have 
Audrey DaCosta at left inner, the girl with the most avid determination of the entire team; 
Shirley Heizman at right inner, a little girl with amazing endurance and sparkle on the field; Irene 
Urian at left half-back, the confident member of the team who displays terrific stick work and 
experience, carry-overs from her high school hockey career; Pat Greenjack at right fullback, the 
defensive player who can stop that ball and send it back toward home goal; and Emily Clements 
in the goalee cage, the pride and joy of the team who received honorable mention in the try-outs 
for the 1952 Mid-East Team. Next year she'll make that team! Sandra Nelson, Ruthann Kelchner, 
and Shirley Warfel served as promising substitutes. 



SCHEDULE 




L.V.C. 




Opponent 


11 




Elizabethtown 37 


38 




Millersville 41 


17 




Albright 26 


19 




Millersville 17 


17 




Lock Haven 41 


16 




Shippensburg 34 


4 




Gettysburg 60 


15 




Elizabethtown 27 
Personal Scoring Records 


Naomi Sprenkle 


6 points per game 


Priscilla 


I Thoma; 


3 5.5 " " " 


Beverly 


Ross 


5.1 " " " 




1st Row: P. Oyer, R. Kelchner, P. Martin, S. Nelson, B. Ross, E. Clements, S. Latsha 
2nd Row: G. Edgar, G. Ritter, A. Rabiger, C. Patton, N. Sprenkle S. Warfel, P. Thomas 



LjiHd A. \J. djasheiball 



The Junior Varsity, captained by Gail Edgar and Bev Ross, wrestled with the 
difficulty of mastering the art of teamwork and smooth ball handling. Naomi Sprenkle, 
Bev Ross and Priscilla Thomas covered the forward positions while Shirley Warfel, 
right guard, Gail Edgar, center guard, and Emily Clements, left guard, tried their 
hand at the defensive zone. 



155 




1st Row: P. Lindermuth, M. Gluntz, R. Furda, K. Hoffer, R. Schoonmaker, A. Boyer. 

2nd Row: W. Gorgone, H. Landa, R. Guston, M. Wise, R. Tarantolo, R. Fasick, M. Heberling, G. Seyfert 

3rd Row: S. Imboden, L. Sorrentino, F. Ritrievi, H. Kosier, B. Webber, J. Ferrer, Coach Marquette. 



1953 Ea^eUit 



The 1953 Lebanon Valley baseball team consists of Mark Heberling at first base; Ross Fa- 
sick, second base; Howie Landa or Frank Ritrievi, third base; Lou Sorrentino, shortstop; Richie 
Furda, left field; Marty Gluntz, center field; Bob Tarantolo, right field; and Merle Wise catcher. 
The pitching arm of Coach "Rinso" Marquette's team is Howard Kozier, Allen Boyer, Ken- 
neth Hoffer, and George Seyfert. 



1953— SCHEDULE AND SCORES 




April 11 


L.V.C. 


5 


Temple 


7 


April 16 


L.V.C. 


4 


Juniata 


7 


April 20 


L.V.C. 


9 


St. Joseph's 


1 


April 24 


L.V.C. 


3 


Muhlenberg 


4 


April 25 


L.V.C. 


5 


Juniata 


6 


April 29 


L.V.C. 


1 


Moravian 


5 


May 2 


L.V.C. 


4 


Elizabethtown 


7 


May 5 


L.V.C. 


6 


F. & M. 


5 


May 9 


L.V.C. 


3 


Moravian 


4 


May 12 


L.V.C. 


11 


Elizabethtown 


9 


May 16 


L.V.C. 


7 


Albright 


8 



156 



PATRONS 

Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Alepa 

Mr. and Mrs. T. Ancell 

The Arrow 

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Bachman 

Mr. Theodore Beshore 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Boyd 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Butt 

Mrs. Evelyn Carpenter 

Mrs. Emma Cessna 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Clemence 

The Colonial Restaurant 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cortright 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Criswell 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Duke 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Edgar 

Mr. and Mrs. William Egli 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Ely ^^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen Felty 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Fry 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Genuth 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Gitschier 

Mrs. Almeda Gruber 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Herr 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul O. Hess 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Lloyd HoUinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Hower, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Kern 

Mr. Stanley Kettering 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Lester Kreiser 

The Kushner Family 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. McClure 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. McClure 

MGM Lab Coal Testing 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L Moyer 

Mr. Harry Murphy 

Murray's 

Mr. and Mrs. Maynard R. Nichols 

Miss Irmgard Plessman 

Mr. Pierre Portier 

Rev. and Mrs. Ezra H. Ranck 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Renn 

T/Sgt. William D. Renn 

Mr. and Mrs. David Ringle, Jr. 

Mrs. Mary M. Ritrievi 

Mr. and Airs. Joseph H. Rotunda 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl B. Sholl, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. K. Shroyer 

Mr. and Mrs. DeWolf Silberman 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul M. Sipe 

Mr. and Mrs Nathan Smith 

Sorrento Restaurant 

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Sprecher 

Mrs. Ray B. Stone 

Mr. and Mrs. William Styring 

Mr. and Mrs. John S. Thorpe 

Mr. and Mrs. Delbert Turner 

Mr. Calvin A. Ulrich 

Mr. and Mrs. Riley Weaber 

Mr. and Mrs. William K. Whitewood 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Wolfskill 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Yeagley, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Paul Yingst 

Zengerle's Cut Rate 



157 



Compliments of 

PETER HAWRYLUK 

JEWELER 
40 East Main Street • Annville, Penna. 


Compliments of 

KARMEL KORN SHOP 

718 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Compliments of 

Shankroff and Shultz 

601 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon, Penna. 


Compliments of . . . 

BOWMAN'S 

Insurance Agency 

Palmyra Bank Bldg. PALMYRA, PA. 


Best wishes 

STATE THEATRE 

511-515 CUMBERLAND ST. 
LEBANON, PA. 


Compliments of 

MILSAN MILLS, INC. 

12th & Walnut 
LEBANON, PA. 



158 



THE BON-TON 

"Lebanon's Greatest Store" 


HARRY FISHER 

Contractor and Builder 

Maryland Cabinets 
Cleona, Pa. 


Webb and Wolfe 

YOUR SPORTING GOODS STORE 

210 N. 2nd St. 
Harrisburg, Pa. Phone 2-1955 

"Outfitters of the official "L" Club Jackets" 


Compliments of 

BAHNEY'S FURNITURE CO. 

Myerstown, Pa. 


Compliments of 

The Valley Trust Company 
of Palmyra, Pa. 


Compliments of 

GEORGE K. GIBBLE & SON 

Painting and Decorating Contractors 

1001 E. Lehman St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 

Dial 3-1161 

PAINTING 
PAPERHANGING FLOOR SANDING 


Lebanon Auto Bus Co., Inc. 

Isaac Plasterer, Pres. 
9th & Chestnut Streets, Lebanon, Pa. 

Bus Service to Cornwall, Mt. Gretna, Manheim, 
Lancaster, Marietta. 

Lebanon to Jonestown and indiontown Gap 

Charter Service 

Serving ail of Lebanon County 



159 




160 



Yearbook Photography 

hj ^ ^ ^ 



Studd 



i^ ^ ^ Portrait and Comtnercial 
Photographers 



Our large modern facilities enable us 

to offer unlimited photographic service 



•-^►« ALL TYPES OF PHOTOGRAPHY »-^^* 

• PORTRAIT • FAMILY GROUPS • BANQUETS 

FORMAL AND CANDID WEDDINGS • COPY SERVICE • COMMERCIAL 



757-759 CUMBERLAND ST. LEBANON, PA. 



161 



CONDUCTED STUDENT TOURS OF EUROPE 

These tours are of interest to teachers as well as students. Visit 
aU of Europe either on an economy tour or the Standard Five 
Country or Continental Tour. 

For information call 

LEBANON COUNTY TRAVEL BUREAU 

757 Willow St. Phone: 1753 LEBANON, PA. 


Compliments oj . . . 

A FRIEND 


Congratulations 

Class of 1954 

IheliuL 

CLOXHIERS 

LEBANON PA 


Paul H. Kettering 

Esso - Goodyear Service 
Hunting and Fishing Supplies 

104 West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Phone: 7-6231 


See You at 

HOT DOG FRANK'S 

The place where students congregate 

for a 
Bite to eat in a cheerful atmosphere 


MILLER'S SELF-SERVICE 
FOOD STORE 

Your One-Stop Food Shopping Center 

18 EAST MAIN STREET 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Groceries, Meats, Produce, Frozen Food 

Phone: Annvillc 7-3151 Fuee Delivery 


Compliments of 

Gingrich Construction Co. 

Westmont Farm 
Lebanon, Pa. 



162 



Visit the 

FIESTA ROOM 

AT 

George Washington 
Tavern 

LEBANON . PENNSYLVANIA 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

Ben l' ranklin Store 

Your College Store 

open Friday and 
Saturday Evenings 

E. W. WOLFE, Owner 

• 

37-39 West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


A. R. SHEARER 

Mobilgas • Motiloil 

Service Station 

U.S. Tires 

Car Washing 

MAIN AND WHITE OAK STREETS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Telephone: 7-4801 


dundore 

129 Cumb. St. • Lebanon, Pa. 

Telephone: 2-5121 ' " 


PHONE: Annville: 7-3511 
Enterprise Hershey: 1-0611 
Enterprise Myerstown: 1-0611 
Middletown: 3151 


ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive Shoes 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 

"For the Man Who Cares" 

34 N. Eighth Street LEBANON, PA. 



163 




SERVING 
INDUSTRY — BUILDING — AGRICULTURE 



TOP QUALITY COURTEOUS SERVICE 

REASONABLE COST 



H. E. MILLARD 
LIME AND STONE CO. 

Annyille, Pa. 



164 



£8 

We extend our best wishes 
to the class of 1954 

ASTORIA 

RESTAURANT 


For Good Appearance 

H. W. KREIDER 

CLOTHIER 

Nationally known good 
merchandise 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 


THE TIDES(/ 

305.307 EAST PINE AVENUE 
WILDWOOD.BY.THE-SEA. N. J. 


Compliments of . . . 

BOYER BROS. 

Fancy Fruits Vegetables 
Sea Foods 

123 East Main Street 

Palmyra, Penna. 


Compliments of 

Lebanon News Agency 

• 

SAMUEL S. ETTER, Prop. 


Kreamer Bros. 
Furniture 

FLOOR COVERINGS 

ELECTRICAL 
APPLIANCES 

• 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


Palmyra Bank and Trust Co. 

PALMYRA, PA. 

Serving ibe Commmily Since 1S86 


Checking Accounts — Savings Accounts 


Safe Deposit Boxes 


Mortgage, Commercial Personal Loans 


MEMBER OF FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORP. 



165 



WHITMOYER 


"Products of Scientific Merit" 


• Cod Liver Oils • Poultry Health Products 

• Vitamin and Mineral Concentrates • Disinfectants and Insecticides 


WHITMOYER LABORATORIES, INC. 


Manufacturing Chemists * Myerstown, Penna. 


BRANCH PLANTS: ROCKLAND, MAINE YARMOUTH, NOVA SCOTIA 


BOMGARDNER'S 




l^airy 


See Our New Diner 


VISIT OUR DAIRY SNACK 




Route 422 — 1 Mile East of Palmyra 




Phone: 8-5521 or 8-0791 
40 East Main Street Palmyra, Pa. 


Q U 1 N N 'S 


Compliments of 


One-half mile East 


SLUG'S 


of Middletown 


MIDDLETOWN, PA. 




Ruggies Foot Traits 


Compliments of 


The W. L. Kreider's Soes Mfg. Co., Inc. 


Palmyra, Pa. 


Makers of Fine Juvenile Footwear 


Saddle Mates Sky Hostess 



166 



JOHN H. BOGER & SON 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Coal ■ feed • fertilizer 

TELEPHONE: 7-4111 



Compliments of 

J. BERMAN & SONS, INC. 

PALMYRA, PA. 



QfmmllM 

Manufacturers of 

PREFERRED LINGERIE 

• 

722 Walnut Street LEBANON, PA. 



Electro-Bond 
Recapping 

SIMON S. KETTERING SONS 

Distributor — Goodyear Tires 

N. Side 16th & Cumberland Lebanon, Pa. 

Phone: 2-5771 



Compliments of 

LEBANON DRESS COMPANY 

8th & Water Streets 
Lebanon, Penna. 



Kohr's Book Store 

Books — Rental Library — Greeting Cards 
Stationery — Zipf's Candy — Playskool Toys 

Near the Post Office Lebanon, Pa. 



Firestone Products 

Funck's Garage 

General Repairing 

Official AAA Service Atlantic Products 

J.C. FUNCK 

14-16 S. WHITE OAK ST. ANNVILLE 7-5121 

Official Inspection Station No. 3068 



167 



JAY'S FLOWER SHOP 

on the square 

Any occasion is complete only with flowers. 
Between occasions give her some just because she's wonderful 

PALMYRA Phone: 8-6451 


In Lebanon it's 

HAAK BROS. 

Department Store 

"The Store with the Escalator" 

Headquarters for 

Belle Shaemeer Nylons 
Carole King and L'aiglon Dresses 


Annville Lumber Co. 

Dealers in 

LUMBER and MILLWORK 
BUILDER'S SUPPLIES 

750 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Phone 7-6611 


Compliments of 
Joe and Tom 

"For that well-groomed look" 

PENNWAY BARBER SHOP 

No waiting 
Annville, Pennsylvania 




Compliments of 




4 
4 


f Ejnrray^g 


t 




ON THE SQUARE 
PALMYRA, PENNA. 




Compliments of 

Harry T/* Meyer and Sons 

YOUR MILK DISTRIBUTOR 

Hershey's Wengert's 
Homogenized Dairy Products 

CLEONA, PA. 



168 



FINK'S BAKERY 



DELICIOUS LAYER CAKES • PIES 



Filled and French Doughnuts 



PECAN BUNS . BREAD . SHOOFLY PIES 



MAX LOVE 

Dry Cleaning and Pressing 
12 W. Main Street Annville, Pa. 

Phone: 7-4852 



Compliments of 



J. Henry Miller Co. 

PAUL L STRICKLER, Pres. - - 1914 
E. PETER STRICKLER, Treas. - - 1947 

Eighth and Willow Streets Lebanon, Penna. 



Toey's Mem Shop 

Haberdasher — Custom Made Clothes 

EMAUS STREET — PHONE 9461 
MIDDLETOWN, PA. 

"The best in haberdashery" 



DAVIS PHARMACY 

9-11 W. Main Street ANNVILLE, PA. 

Parker Pens and Pencils 
Schaeffer Pens and Pencils 

Sheet Music 

Phonographs 

Prescriptions 



IQd 



C. B. GOLLAM SONS 

Manufacturers of 

Gollam's Supreme Ice Cream 
"The Cream of Matchless Worth" 


Geraee^s 

Fancy Fruit and Fresh Vegetables 
Dates — Figs — Nuts 

21 North 8th St. Lebanon, Pa. 
Phone 2-1301 

Fancy Fruit Baskets for all Occasions 


Master Ice Cream Service 

Phone 21 
6th and Maple Streets Lebanon, Pa. 


Kreider Mammfacitiuiriaig 

Co, 

Manufacturing of 

HOSIERY 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


Annville Shoulder Strap Co. 

345 West Queen St. 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


Compliments of . . . 

RELIABLE COAT 

AND 

DRESS SHOP 

761 Cumberland Street LEBANON, PA. 


Compliments of . . . 

BRANDY WINE IRON 
& METAL COMPANY 

SAM CLARK, Class of "27 ABE GROSKY 

Salvage Material LEBANON, PENNA. 

Tel.; 2-4645 



170 



Compliments of 



Wholesale Distributor 

Sunset Market 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



EBERSOLE, INC. 


CO-ED 
LUNCHEONETTE 


Oldsmobile — Pontiac 


ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


TWO LOCATIONS 




LEBANON CLEONA 


Frank and Delia Marino, Props. 


WALTER L. HARTZ 


Compliments of 


Philco RADIO Motorola 
Television 

Philco Warranty Service 
Electrical Appliances 


Raymoed H, Coble 

Milk Distributor 
Fromm's Ryder's 


Phone: 2-6421 1125 Willow Street 


MIDDLETOWN 



Fountain Service 



Phone 8-5121 



MAGEE'S SQUARE GUT-RATE 

19 East Main St., Palmyra 

Patents Toilet Articles Sundries 



171 



Compliments of . . . 


For Service Phone 4047-W 


Your Local Insurance Man 


GOODMAN 




VENDING SERVICE 


I. M. LONG 


Candy 


ANNVILLE, PA. 


119 Cumberland Street 




LEBANON, PA. 


Hank DiJohnson Sports Supplies 




Everything in Athletic, Hunting, Fishing 
Equipment 




538 Cumberland St 
Lebanon, Pa. 


Compliments of 


Hank DiJohnson '50 




Albert DiJohnson '49 
Phone 2-1881 


ANNVILLE 




PRODUCTS, INC. 


J. C. Hauer's Sons, Inc. 


Wholesale Distributors 


Annville, Pa. 


Candy Cigarette 




Vending Machines 




LEBANON, PA. 




DIAMONDS of DISTINCTION 


Compliments of . . . 


COEPEnoABLE < nCE 1886) 


Pete and Ralph 


i^ottl 3lnn\3il(c 


Jewelers 


• 


20 N. Ninth Street LEBANON, PA. 


ANNVILLE . PENNSYLVANIA 



172 



Compliments of . . . 




The Flower Shop 

Elizabeth Bernstein, Prop. 
Corsages our specialty 

LEBANON, PA. 
Rear of Court House 

Flowers telegraphed anywhere, anytime 

Phone 2-1931 



173 



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176 



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