(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Quittapahilla"

mmfm 
«.^ 








Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1956leba 



Published by Class of 1956 
Lebanon Valley College 
Annville. Pennsylvania 



\ 






r^ 



r 



r/^*; 




f- 




%4 



J3!P'-~'-- 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



We Will Carry 
On These Ideals ! 



nPHE ideals of the class of 1956 may best be 
-*- summarized as friendship with one another 
and loyalty to Lebanon Valley College. We as 
a class feel that these characteristics were per- 
sonified in "Peggy" Stoudt. Since she was a 
student for only a short time, some few may not 
have known her as an alert and genial freshman. 
"Peggy's" interests were numerous and centered 
principally around people. But her absorbing 
interest was in the cure of cancer which para- 
doxically caused her death. We will carry on 
toward her ideals to which we dedicate this rec- 
ord of three years' achievements. 



The Setting: 
Campus Views 



COLLEGE memories will always include the 
activities and mode of life associated with 
Lebanon Valley. Seat of much of these four 
years' living is the campus with the buildings 
we present here. With dormitories will be re- 
membered the roommates and friendships and 
the outbursts that proctors never seemed to ap- 
preciate. To the conservatory and the Admin- 
istration Building we owe much of our knowl- 
edge and the struggles to achieve it. Here then" 
are the scenes which the class of 1956 will most 
recall with college life. 



THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 




r 





NORTH HALL Dormitor> tor Girls 
SOUTH HALL: Dormitory for Girls 
ENGLP: HALL 





The Scenes 



We Remember 




Men's Dormitory 



Carnegie Library 





Lynch Memorial Gymnasium 



QUITTAPAHILLA 



PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1956 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



STAFF 

J. Elaine Buck 

Editor-in-Chief 

Literary Editors Audrey DaCosta 

Irene Urian 

Conservatory Editors . . . Naomi Sprenkle 
Joan Napoliello 
Gloria Ritter 

Boys' Sports Editor Gerry Steger 

Girls' Sports Editors . . . Shirley Heizniann 
Sandra Nelson 

Design Bruce Thompson 

Photography Richard Leonard 

John Cottrell 

General Staff Nancy Adams 

Rita Jean Castiglia 
Mildred Osinski 
George Wade 



TYPE: Baskerville PAPER: Wedgewood Coated Offset Enamel 
PHOTOGRAPHY: Charlotte-Lee, Hagerstown, Md. 
George E. Deininger, Reading, Pa. 
PUBLISHER: Campus Publishing, Philadelphia, Pa. 
COVERS: Kingsport Press, Kingsport, Tenn. 



CONTENTS 

9 Administration 

25 Seniors 

38 Who's Who 

41 Juniors 

71 Underclassmen 

77 Activities 

Organizations 

99 Societies 

109 Conservatory 

Drama 

127 Sports 

147 Advertisements 



The mainspring of 

Lebanon Valley College is its 



Educators and friends in need . . . sincere co- 
operation . . . deep friendships . . . but . . . 
never-ending assignments . . . those lullably lec- 
tures . . . "tremendous" finals . . . true-false, 
identification, and essay . . . bless 'em. 



ADMINISTRATION 




FREDERIC K. MILLER 
President of Lebanon Valley College 



Leadership: that quality 

which makes for greatness 



Dr. Howard M. Kreitzer, Dean oi 
the College, is responsible mainly for 
the academic coordination of Lebanon 
Valley. His guidance prevents students 
from choosing courses or curricula not 
suited to their aims and qualifications. 
He further seeks to maintain desirable 
student-faculty relations. 



In D. Clark Carmean Lebanon Valley 
has on its administration a man of many 
talents. Besides serving ably as a musi- 
cian and professor he acts as Dean of 
Admissions. Before his coming to this 
campus is a string of achievements in 
the field of music education and admin- 
istration. 




Pictured above are: Dr. Howard M. Kreitzer, Dean of the College, D. Clark Carmean, Dean of Admissions. 




ELIZABETH L. TAYLOR 
Acting Dean of Women 
Miss Elizabeth L. Taylor, acting Dean 
of Women, came to Lebanon Valley to 
serve in the absence of Dean Constance 
Dent. She easily assumed the role of 
Assistant Professor of Psychology and 
major trouble-shooter for the women of 
the College. Dean Taylor is a graduate 
of Skidmore College and Columbia Uni- 
versity. 




THEODORE D. KELLER 
Dean of Men 
To Dean Theodore D. Keller falls the 
task of guiding and governing the men 
on the Lebanon Valley campus. In his 
role of Men's Dormitory proctor and 
Dean he daily solves student problems. 
Mr. Keller serves also as Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English. He is an alumnus of 
Lebanon Valley College and Columbia 
University. 




Dr. Thomas S. May: Assistant to the Ivin B. Moyer: Business Manager Gladys M. Pencil: Registrar 

President 



A medal for these devoted workers 




Dr. Donald E. Fields: Associate 
Librarian 



James W. Parsons: Director of Public 
Relations 



Helen Ethel Myers: Librarian 



Gertrude L. Turner: Instructor in 
Remedial English 




Biology 



The biology department is equipped to train 
students in all phases of this subject. Its facili- 
ties are superior to those of many other colleges. 

The Tyrone Biological Museum, established 
in 1926, is a unique feature in a college the size 
of Lebanon Valley. The collection containing 
many thousands of specimens, is unexcelled. 

Graduates from this department are engaged 
in teaching, research, conservation, the the medi- 
cal professions. 



DR. FRANCIS H. WILSON 





MR. O. P.\SSE BOLLINGER 



DR. V. EARL LIGHT 

Head of the Biology Department 



^\ 







Dr. Samuel O. Ciimm: Professor ot Physics 

Chemistry 

The task of the chemistry department is to 
prepare the students for careers in medicine, 
nursing, teaching, graduate school, and, above 
all, the chemical industry. The department 
supervises the program leading to a B.S. in 
Chemistry degree. Through the years this divi- 
sion of the college has provided an excellent pro- 
gram—perhaps difficult at times but most re- 
warding. 




Robert O. Gilmore; Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
and Ph)sics 



Phy 



SICS 



Lebanon Valley's physics department is fa- 
miliar to all in the college who seek the B.S. 
degree. This department successfully integrates 
the cultural aspects of science with the practical. 
For physics majors, a useful course of study is 
designed in order to meet the needs of industry. 

Dr. Alexander R. Amell: Assistant Professor of Chemistry 




Dr. Howard A. Neidig: Associate Professor of Chemistry 
Hans Schneider: Insirnclor in Cheniistrv 





Right. Dr. Barnard H. Bis- 
singer: Associate Professor of 
Mathematics 

Left. Robert O. Gilmore: 
.Assistant Professor of Mathe- 
matics 



Mathematics 



Education 



This year the Mathematics Department has 
initiated a new program designed to include 
"analysis, appreciation, and study" of math- 
ematics to benefit majors, minors, and other 
students who at some time may be included 
in the department. This progressive step has 
already proved beneficial to all students in- 
volved in its curriculum. 



A great many Lebanon Valley students 
come in contact with the Education Depart- 
ment which prepares them to become teach- 
ers, both elementary and secondary, after 
graduation. Field trips, films, and other visual 
aids are employed by the department to gain 
the student's interest and enjoyment. 



Dr. Gilbert D. McKlveen: Professor of Education 




Elementary Education 

The Department of Elementary Education at 
Lebanon Valley is responsible for the protes- 
sional training of future teachers. Since its in- 
troduction into the Valley's course of study last 
year, the department has expanded considerabl) 
and now has an enrollment of more than forty 
students. The elementary personnel pride them- 
selves in the broad liberal arts background which 
is provided in their curriculum, stressing both 
the cultural phase and practical application of 
various methods and techniques. On this dual 
basis it is believed that students of high academic 
standing and versatility will be graduated from 
the department. 






. Rita Jean Castiglia: Senior in the Elementary 
Education Department and victim of lesson 
plans 




"Cluing in" spot for all students in history and sociology 
courses. 



Maud P. Laughlin: Professor of History 




Alex J. Fehr: Instructor in Political Science 




Social Studies 



The social studies department establishes con- 
tact with all students in the college through 
courses such as History 24 and Integrated Studies 
30. These courses are of great cultural benefit 
to non-social studies majors. For majors in this 
field the department affoWs both an interesting 
and intensive program. 



Ralph S. Shay: Assistant Professor of History 
Alice iVI. Brumbaugh: Assistant Professor of Sociology 





Business and Economics 



The Business Department, which prepares 
students for the very broad field of economics, 
has shown considerable growth and improve- 
ment during the past few years. 

Aided by seminars of successful economists 
which are held on campus at. the invitation of 
the department, our business curriculum has 
achieved a high standing among economics insti- 
tutions in the United States. 



C. F. Joseph Tom: Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Business Administration 



Robert C. Riley: Associate Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Business Administration 



Psychology 



Due to the endeavors of the Psychology De- 
partment, every graduate of Lebanon Valley is 
fully informed about the basic principles of this 
comparatively new field. Majors are further 
trained in methods of testing besides the par- 
ticulars of psychology. 




Dr. Jean O. Love: Assistant Professor of Psy- 
cfiology 



Elizabeth! D. Taylor: Assistant Professor of 
Psychology 





Dr. Carl V. Ehrhart; Professor of Philosophy 

Dr. G. A. Richie: Professor of Religion and 
New Testament Greek 



Languages 



Pre -Theology 

The purpose of the Religion and Philosophy 
Departments is to provide general knowledge 
and promote understanding of the theories be- 
hind these subjects. 

Courses in religion and philosophy are sup- 
plemented by studies in many other departments 
for those in preparation for church vocations, 
while for all stuclents there is provided a broad 
field of inquiry in certain required courses con- 
cerned with religious and philosophical knowl- 
edge. 

Graduates from these departments are at work 
in the mission fields, both at home and abroad, 
and in the ministry. 

Dr. W. Maynard Sparks: Assistant Professor of 
Religion 





l-rances T. Fields: Instructor in Spanish 

Luella Umberger Frank: Assistant Professor of 
French and Spanish 



The Department of Languages plays an im- 
portant part in the making of the Lebanon Val- 
ley graduate. For the student who wishes to 
specialize, there is a variety of courses— including 
great literature. In addition, this department 
trains those seeking a degree in the college. 



Dr. Alvin H. M. Stonecipher: Professor of Ger- 
man 




English 



The English Department is one part of the 
Humanities Division. The present trend at 
Lebanon Valley College is away from compart- 
mentalizing knowledge and breaking down 
knowledge into little separate vegetable gardens. 
The department is trying to see the whole field 
of knowledge as a single unit. Working toward 
that aim, they are stressing not so much depart- 
ment organization as divisional organization. As 
the English faculty sees it, the old-fashioned 
English teacher, who was a specialist in the field 
of English literature alone, is giving way to a 
new concept of a man who has a broad, human- 
itarian point of view, interested in all sorts of 
things beyond his own narrow department. He 
will have enthusiasm for continental European 
literature of the Greek and Roman classical 
linguists, medieval culture, religion, art, and 
music and the theater as social ihstitutions. And 
if he is alive and alert to what is going on in the 
world, he will always be curious about the ' 
scientific developments of the age and how they 
influence the cultural outlook of the age. This, 
of course, does not mean that he will throw over- 
board English literature, but he will also believe 
that culture begins at home, and therefore he 
will be likely to put more stress on American 
literature than he will on the literature of a 
foreign country. 



Left, Dr. Anna B. Dunkle: Assistant 
Professor of English 

Right, Mary \'irginia Bowman: Assist- 
ant Professor of English 




Dr. George G. Struble: Professor of 
English 




Theodore D. Keller: Assistant Profes 
sor of English 





Dr. Mary E. Gillespie: Professor of 
Music Education and Director of the 
Conservatory of Music 



Frank E. Stachow: Associate Professor 
of Theory and VVoodwuids 



Alexander Crawford: Associate Pro- 
fessor of Voice 




Music 



Reynaldo Rovers: Assistant Professor 
of Voice 



R. Porter Campbell: Associate Pro- 
fessor of Organ 



The Music Department offers a thorough cur- 
riculum for Music Education majors. These 
students are guided by a faculty whose aim is 
"to teach music historically and aesthetically as 
an element of liberal culture; to offer courses 
that will give a thorough and practical under- 
standing of theory and composition; and to train 
artists and teachers." The director of the con- 
servatory is Dr. Mary E. Gillespie who has 
earnestly devoted herself to the improvement of 
the high standards and esteem which are 
attributed to her department. 




William H. Fairlamb: Associate Pro- 
fessor of Piano 




Nevelyn J. Knisley: Instructor in 
Piano 




Physical Education 



The aim of this department is to encourage 
the student's participation in an all-around pro- 
gram and to develop the student's physical 
capacity. 

Health and hygiene as well as athletic activ- 
ities are emphasized. 

Football, basketball, and baseball are the in- 
tercollegiate sports offered for men, while 
hockey and basketball are offered for women. 

Miss Bowman, Mr. Marquette, and Mr. 
McCracken are the assistant professors of physi- 
cal education. 



Betty Jane Bowman: Assistant Professor of Phys- 
ical Education and Director of Athletics for 
Women 



■ 


1 


^^E 




■ 


^^^^^^^^^^1 






~n 


^^^^^^^^^^H 


^^^^^^H 


■1 


« 


^ i 


^^^^^^H 


^^^^^^[ 






'»<«^ i 


^^^^^^H 


^^Km^ 


V 




Ir 


^^^^H 


Hr^^v 




^ 


^^1 


^^^^^^^m/")*)) 


j^i 






'^^^^^^l 


^^m 


R 





P 




^^^K i 


in 






^NJ^^^H 


^KS^^^^0^ M 


\^tk 




^m^Ms/ 


^^^9HRRHH 


^^mW 


m 


i' ' 




^r^vsmm 


^^y 


^ 






te' 


^^E 


^x 




**^^B 



George R. Marquette: Assistant Professor of 
Physical Education 




At last we become . . . 



That last fun-packed year . . . looks toward the 
future . . . interviews and applications . . . 
student teaching . . . the Senior Prom ... a 
whirl of graduation activities . . . last farewells 
to old school chums . . . and finally the long 
sought degree. 



SENIORS 








■%■ 



Irl 



>,-*^ 



Senior Officers: 



President: GEORGE SEIFERT 
Vice-President: JOHN GIONELLI 
5ecre<ar)i; NANCY DAUGHERTY 
Treasurer: MARY LOU YOUNG 



Carol Neibert Achenbach 

128 South Hanovei Street 

Hummelstown, I'ennsyhania 

Sociology 



Fred William Arnold 

SSi/, Railroad Street 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Economics 





Dean Richard Artz 

Valley \'iew, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 






Frank Carl Bahsteter, Jr. 

Quentin, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 



Edward U. Balsbaugh, Jr. 

243 Swatara Street 

Steelton, Pennsylvania 

Biology 





Richard Edward Besecker 

R. D. 6 

Hagerstown, Maryland 

Music Education 



Frederick Paul Brandauer 

315 Harrison Avenue 

Elkins Park, Pennsylvania 

Greek 




Robert R. Burtner, Jr. 

301/4 North Harrison Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Political Science 



Rita Jean Castiglia 

64 North Seventeenth Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Elementary Education 



Peter Michael Crincoli 

328 Sotith Street 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Pre-Medical 



Nancy Carolyn Daugherty 

45 South West Street 
Carlisle. Pennsylvania 
English and French 



Richard Edgar Deitrich 

539 West Queen Street 

Aiinville, Pennsylvania 

Economics 



Arthur James Dukes 

513 Laurel Avenue 

Cresson, Pennsylvania 

Mathematics 



Roger L. Dundore 

203 South Lincoln Avenue 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

History 



Kenneth Eugene Ellis 

3832 North Smedley Street 

I'hiladelphia. Pennsylvania 

Music Education 






William Arthur Erby 

730 Walnut Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



Ross Wade Fasick 

South Twenty-second Street 
Hanishui'g, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 





Marian Louise Fortna 

R. D. 1 

I,ancaster, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Ardith Jeanette Gaumer 

467 Franklin Avenue 

Palmerton, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 




'^m'f-*^ 







John Joseph GiannelU 

1858 Holly Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Economics 



Richard Dale Gingrich 

223 West Cherry Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Joseph Louis Gorshin 

R. D. 1, Box 308 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Economics 



Nancy Catherine Gower 

R. D. 2 

Nazareth, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



D. John Grace, Jr. 

\alley Trust Building 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Economics 



Franklin Marshall Hall 

130 East Main Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Economics 





Joyce Dissinger Herr 

R. D. 1 

Quarry ville. Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Marian Lucille Hess 

Dillsburg. Pennsylvania 
Music Education 




^.^-^> 







Joyce Carol Hill 

Hawley, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 



Henry Boughton HoUinger 

351 West Ninth Street 

Front Royal. Virginia 

Chemistry 



Joanne Marie Hostetter 

R. D. 1, Rose View 
Hershey, Pennsylvania 
Elementarv Education 



Stanley F. Imboden 

152« Schuvlkill Axenuc 

Reading. I'ennsyhania 

Religion 






David Harold Jauss, Jr. 

64 North Eighteenth Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

English 



Anton Franklin Kiehner 

2 Parkway 

Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Howard Whitmoyer Hosier 

R. D. 1 

Grant ville, Pennsylvania 

Sociology 



Howard Victor Landa 

1801 Ashley Road 

Philadelphia. Pennsylvania 

Sociology 



Benjamin Vermont Lutz 

92 East Front Street 

Lititz, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Dorothy Crist Lutz 

105 East High Street 

Annville. Pennsylvania 

Biology 





Peter M. McCoy 

351 Lincoln Avenue 

East Paterson, New Jersey 

English 



Robert Burnell McFarland 

237 South Main Street 

Red I, ion, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 







Claude Joseph Miller 

39 Crescent Street 

Treinont, Pennsylvania 

I're-Medical 



John Stanley Mull, Jr. 

1113 Washington Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Econoniits 





Clair Wilson Noll 

131 West Pine Street 

Fleetwood, Pennsylvania 

Economics 



Rosalind M. Orbach 

2765A Green Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Elementary Education 



Adora Jane Rabiger 

434 Kathmere Road 

Havertown, Pennsyhania 

English 



Lois Lorraine Reedy 

151 South Spruce Street 

Lititz, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 





Florence Blanche Risser 

R. D. 4 

l.eljanon. Pennsylvania 

liiologv 



Beverly Jean Ross 

115 Franklin Street 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 



Biology 





Dorothy Anne Roudabush 

709 Landing Road 

Rochester 10, New ^ork 

Psjchology 



Donald James Rowland 

4r)9 East Main Street 

Ann\i'ile, Pennsylvania 

History 





Ann Drew Rydberg 

83 Demarest Parkway 
Elmira, New York 
Music Education 



John Raymond Sautter 

350 Broad Street 

Spring City, Pennsylvania 

Economics 







William Schmidt 

443 West Inman Avenue 

Rahway, New Jersey 

Economics 



George Morgan Seyfert 

1221 North Thirteenth Street 

Reading, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 





Frederick Lee Shaak 

134 Washington Avenue 

Mvcrstown, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



George Daniel Shaak 

200 Pershing Avenue 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Economics 



Elmer Parker Shambaugh 

R. D. 6 

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 

Greek 



Aaron Milton Sheaffer 

2710 Greenwood Street 
Harrisburg, Pennsyhania 
Greek 



Robert LeVoy Smith 

37 "West Main Street 

Ann\ille. Pennsylvania 

Psychology 



Richard Lee Sparks 

301 West Henry Street 

Linden, New Jersey 

Economics 








Melvin Guy Sponsler, Jr. 

33 East Main Street 

Elizabeth ville, Pennsylvania 

Greek 



Noel Z. Stable 

39 West Granada Avenue 

Hershey, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 





Gerald J. Stutzman 

Twentieth and Hill Streets 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Religion 



Ehna Jean Swope 
R. D. 1 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 






Jane Louise Taylor 

370 Bala Avenue 

Bala-Cynwyci, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Clarence Dougherty Ulrich 

■5301 Jonestown Road 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Psychology 



Lynette E. Waller 

1885 South Wood Street 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Fay-Ann Weiler 
R. D. 1 

Mohnton, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 



Mary Edith Werntz 

208 Pine Street 

Christiana, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Lenwood Boyer Wert 

959 Bryan Street 

Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania 

Pre-Medical 





Harold Ray White 

R. D. 4 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Biology and Chemistry 



Patricia S. A. Whitmoyer 

2 East Carpenter Avenue 

Myerstown, Pennsylvania 

English 







Joel John Wiest 

8 East Carpenter Avenue 

Myerstown. Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Nancy Reed Williams 

5757 North Fifth Street 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

English 





Richard Edward Williams 

5757 North Fifth Street 

Philadelphia,' Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



David Paul Willoughby 

38 North Twentieth Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



B. Joan Wingert 

5627 Monroe Street 
South Cheverly, Maryland 



Nancy Ann Wolf 

101 State Street 

Shillington, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Thomas Gordon Wolfgang 

18 South Market Street 

Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Hilda Lucille Yost 

R. D. 1 
Barto, Pennsylvania 

English 






Mary Louise Young 

200 West Main Street 

Middletown, Maryland 

Sociology 



William Anthony Zilka 
R. D. 20 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Biology 



DeWitt Philo Zuse 

Park Avenue 

Chambersburg,* Pennsylvania 

Music Education 






Lett to right: Joyce Hill, Nancy Wolf, Nancy Daugherty, Adora Rabiger, Elma Jean Swope, 
Aaron Sheaffer 



Who's Who 



Each year seniors from institutions all over 
the United States are honored by being chosen 
lor Who's Who in the American Universites 
and Colleges. To be so recognized one must 
have exhibited outstanding leadership, scholar- 
ship, and character. The students pictured above 
best personify this spirit on the Lebanon Valley 
College campus. 



' i 



Annville 
Landmarks 




and Fond Senior Memories 



Wherever you go you^ll remember . 



The thrill ot being an upperclassman . . . the 
way the future seems so close . . . yearbook 
headaches and junior prom bliss . . . coffee 
breaks and bull sessions . . . butterflies before 
the recital . . . never-ending library assignments 
. . . one more year to go. 



JUNIORS 



J* /^i r\IJl President: CLAIR KELLY 

unior L-lass Umcers : vke-president: lynn sparks 

Secretary: SHIRLEY HEIZMANN 
Treasurer: AUDREY DaCOSTA 





Nancy Jane Adams 


James Allen 


John Bowman AUwein 


48 Legion Place 


Box 180 


R. D. 21 


Closter, New Jersey 


Cornwall, Pennsylvania 


Lebanon, Pennsylvania 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 


Chemistry 




James Haas Balsbaugh, Jr. 


Dean A. Becker 


Edward John Billingham, Jr. 


243 Swatara Street 


534 York Street 


1240 Colebrook Road 


Steelton, Pennsylvania 


Hanover, Pennsylvania 


Lebanon, Pennsylvania 


Chemistry 


Spanish 


Chemistry 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



*^;-» 






Harold Eugene Bird 

257 Grove Street 
Somerville, New Jersey 
Economics and Business 



Norman Victor Blantz, Jr. 

31 East Queen Street 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

History 



Miriam Annabelle Blatt 
R. D. 1 

Mohrsville, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 





Elin Louise Blouch 

R. D. 1 

Millersville, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



James Norman Bollinger 

Route 1 

Richland, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



James Timothy Boltz 

R. D. 1 

Pine Grove, Pennsylvania 

Political Science 



JUNIOR CLASS 





Charles Edwin Boughter 


David Bosacco 


Carol June Bradley 


611 Columbia Avenue 


208 South Scott Avenue 


46 Wilson Street 


Lansdale, Pennsylvania 


Glenolden, Pennsylvania 


Carlisle, Pennsylvania 


Economics and Business 


Business 


Music Education 






Doris Jean Brandt 


Joseph Albert Brechbill 


Joyce Elaine Buck 


346 North Fourth Street 


104 North Center Street 


1330 North Fourteenth Street 


Lebanon, Pennsylvania 


Cleona, Pennsylvania 


Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 


Music Education 


History 


Biology 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



45 






Henry Theodore Chudzikiewicz 

747 Thomas Street 

Elizabeth, New Jersey 

Economics and Business 



Emily Eileen Clements 

348 North Tenth Street 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Elementary Education 



Louise Joyce Cody 

3214 North Fourth Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 





John Charles Cottrell 

3,531 Rutherford Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



Anthony Bennett Creamer, Jr. 

940 Cimiberland Street 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Economics and Business 



Audrey E. C. DaCosta 

408 Penwyn Road 

Wynnewood. Pennsylvania 

English 



JUNIOR CLASS 





Ronald Richard Day 

34 East South Street 

York, Pennsylvania 

Economics and Business 



Cyrus Russel Dietrich 

221 East Fulton Street 

Ephrata, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Kathryn Louise Dotts 

444 Wise Avenue 
Red Lion, Pennsylvania 

Sociology 





Joan Louise Eckenroad 

46 Cacoosing Avenue 

Sinking Springs, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 






David John Farling 

201 North Lincoln Street 
Palmyra, Pennsylvania 
Economics and Business 




Theodore George Fish 

2035 Penn Avenue 

West Lawn. Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 






Anna Lou Fisher 

R. D. 3 

Pine Grove, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Herbert Michael Forrest 

118 High Street 

Closter, New Jersey 

Chemistry 



Carole Elaine Fox 

108 North Thirty-First Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Sociology 





Eugene Ronald Geesey 

461 East Main Street 
Annville, Pennsylvania 
Economics and Business 



Nancy Jean Germer 

2207 North Fourth Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



David H. Gittleman 

238 Sunbury Street 

Minersville, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



JUNIOR CLASS 




John Ellis Goodman 

156 South Main Street 

Pine Grove. Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Dorothy Jane Grabau 

539 Comly Street 

Philadelphia 20, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Patricia Norma Greenjack 

2438 Bryn Mawr Avenue 

Ardmore. Pennsylvania 

Psychology 




Donald Neil Griffith 

106 Maple Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Fredric Leonard Hartman 

43 South Lingle Avenue 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



Shirley Ann Heiimann 

219 Hill Avenue 

Langhorne, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




Thomas Lee Hess 

1142 East Derry Road 

Hershey, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



Nicholas John Hill 

360 East Lehman Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



Sidney Lesser Holing 

423 Greenway Avenue 

Trenton, New Jersey 

Political Science 





Jocelyn Jones 

126 West Baltimore Avenue 

Lansdowne, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Lawrence Eugene Jones 

331 Hummel Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



Pius Henry Kaltreider 

16 Fair. Avenue 

Hanover, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



JUNIOR CLASS 





Ruthanne Kelchner 


Clair Leonard Kelly 


Nancy Lee Kirby 


944 Itaska Street 


231 Ramsey Avenue 


254 Seneca Street 


Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 


Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 


Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 


Elementary Education 


Chemistry 


Elementary Education 





Mm% 



Diane Lucille Kohr 

R. D. 1 

York, Pennsylvania 

Biology 



Ronald LeRoy Lehman 

7 West Washington Street 
Myerstown, Pennsylvania 
Economics and Business 



Richard David Leonard 

1515 Chatham Road 

Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 

Philosophy 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 





Louise H. Loeper 

636 North Eleventh Street 

Reading, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Jean Marie Lowry 

27 Hamilton Street 

East Orange, New Jersey 

Spanish 



William Bachman Lutz 

412 Park Avenue 

Laurel Springs, New Jersey 

Philosophy 





Margaret Eugenia Martin 

1948 Pennington Road 

Trenton, New Jersey 

Music Education 



Joan Katherine Napoliello 

20 Fairway Avenue 

Belleville, New Jersey 

Music Education 



Barbara Elsie Neatock 

201 Philadelphia Avenue 

Shillington, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



JUNIOR CLASS 





Sandra Nelson 


Dean Franklin Norris 


Mildred Johanna Osinski 


404 Tremont Avenue 


33 Main Street 


845 Olive Street 


VVestfield, New Jersey 


Red Lion, Pennsylvania 


Camden 4, New Jersey 


Psychology 


Economics and Business 


Biology 




Patricia Sue Oyer 

Harrisburg Hospital 

School of Nursing 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Nursing 



Howard Joseph Pachasa 

64 ^Vashington Avenue 

North Plainfield, New Jersey 

Biology 



Cynthia Jane Patton 

State Hopsital 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



53 





Thomas Vincent Quinn 


Bernard Henry Rightmyer 


Gloria Dawn- Ritter 


59 F Street 


R. D. 2 


57 Cacoosing Avenue 


Keyser, West Virginia 


Sinking Spring, Pennsylvania 


Sinking Spring, Pennsylva 


Education 


Music Education 


Music Education 




Karl Arthur Romberger 

516 North Gannon Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 





Sylvia Ann Rosenberry 

Fannetsburg, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 



Joyce Elaine Snyder 

Chewsville, Maryland 
Music Education 



JUNIOR CLASS 






Lynn Maynard Sparks 

32 West High Street 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 



Naomi Mae Sprenkle 

North East, Maryland 
Music Education 



Ronald Arthur Steele 

57 Portland Place 

Montclair, New Jersey 

Music Education 





Gerald A. Steger 

1243 Scotland Avenue 

Chambersburg, Pennsylvania 

Sociology 



Harvey Rodney Stoner 

72 North Main Street 

Manheim, Pennsylvania 

Religion 



Priscilla Diane Thomas 

Quakertown, New Jersey 
Music Education 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



55 




%- 





Bruce Getz Thompson 

205 Springfield Avenue 

Folsom, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



William Dale Trostle 

132 East Hanover Street 

Hanover, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Mildred Ann Trautman 

413 North Tenth Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 






•-%• 




M. Irene Urian 

530 Swarthmore Avenue 

Folsom, Pennsylvania 

English 



Howard Theodore Voorman 

87 Hudson Street 

Garfield, New Jersey 

Biology 



Geoi^e Harry Wade 

206 New Street 
Spring City, Pennsylvania 
Economics and Business 



JUNIOR CLASS 







Robert M. S. Walker 
R. D. 2 

Boonton, New Jersey 
English 



Shirley Ann VVarfel 

R. D. 3 

Quarryville, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 



Harold Reed Webber 

Stouchsbuig, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 





William Charles Wenrich 

102 North Lincoln Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Mathematics 



George Herbert Wolf 

503 Bellview Street 

Altoona, Pennsylvania 

Music Education 



Richard Charles Voder 

317 Second Street 

Shillington, Pennsylvania 

History 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 





John Bashore Yorty 
R. D. 1 

(.rantville, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 



Charles Lewis Zettlemoyer 

Box 457 Route 2 

Reading, Pennsylvania 

Political Science 



Eugene Walter Zimmerman 

1827 Herr Street 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Sociology 



JUNIOR CLASS 




"WELL, WE TRIED 




Elaine Buck 
Clair Kelly 



Norman Blantz 
Lynn Sparks 



Audrey DaCosta 
Irene Urian 



Sidney Hofing 
Charles Zettlemoyer 



Outstanding Students in the College 




Dorothy Grabau 
Cynthia I'atton 



Don Giiinth 
Joyce Snyder 



Joan Napoliello 
Ronald Steele 



Outstanding Students in the Conservatory 




MISS QUITTIE COURT: Jean Lowry, 

Shirley Warfel 



Miss Quittie and Court 



MISS QUITTIE: Cynthia Patton 



MR. QUITTIE: Henry Chudzikiewicz 



Mr. Quittie 



Miss L. V. C. 



MISS L.V.C.: Kathy Dotts 





Mr. L. V. C. 



MR. L.V.C.: Clair Kelly 





MISS ATHLETE: Irene Urian 



Miss Athlete 



Mr. Athlete 



MR. ATHLETE: Eugene Zimmerman 




ilj; 








QUITTAPAHILLA 



Until not too long ago the "Quittie" 
staff— editors, photographers, and re- 
porters—was busy trying to write stories, 
take pictures, meet deadlines. 

The editors of the "Quittie" began 
work last year before the rest of us were 
finished with our finals. All through the 
summer they worked setting up pages- 
discarding some, adding others. For the 
junior class, "Quittie" became a part 
of their activities upon the arrival of the 
photographer when portraits and group 
pictures were taken. Next came the vot- 
ing for "Miss Quittie", "Mr. Quittie", 
and others whose pictures we find on 
these pages. 

For the staff: write-ups, more pictures, 
more stories. But somehow everything 
found a way into the book. Here it is— 
the work of the "Quittie" staff. 




Doesn't anyone have any ideas? 




i'HOTOGRAPHERS: John Cottrell and Dick Leonard 





QUITTAPAHILLA STAFF 



Editor— J. Elaine Buck 

Literary Editors— Irene Urian 

Audrey DaCosta 

Conservatory Editors— Joan Napoliello 
Naomi Sprenkle 
Gloria Ritter 

Sports Editors— Shirley Heizmann 



Sandra Nelson 
Jerry Steger 

Business Manager— Sidney Hofing 

Staff— Mildred Osinski 

Nancy Adams 
George Wade 

Adviser— Dr. George Struble 



CONSERVATORY EDITORS: Joan Napoliello, Gloria Ritter, and 
Naomi Sprenkle 





The juniors' second home . . . term papers . . . New York Times . . . 
Chemical Abstracts . . . "Where's this" . . . "peace and quiet" of the con- 
ference rooms . . . the periodicals that are never there . . . research, research, 
research. 



The ^^Bubbling^^ Fountain of Youth 



The honors of being an underclassman . . . 
"wet" serenades . . . "formal introduction to Jig- 
gerboard and Senate . . . autobiographies . , . 
steadily steady, unsteady . . . humanities without 
humanitarianism ... 8 o'clocks . . . "Where's 
your L Book, frosh?" . . . dinks, ties, tug o' war 
. . . freshman orientation or "what we already 
knew." 



UNDERCLASSMEN 




This year's sophomore class can well be called "the class with an eye to the future." Their 
aim was activity, the result a benefit for the whole campus. The second semester was high- 
lighted by the presentation of Lost Horizon. In a more playful mood, the sophomores brought 
to the Lebanon Valley campus its own Mardi Gras complete with masks, balloons, and 
wishing well. Social life, however, is only supplementary to the academic achievements of 
many class members. Their diversity, too, is evident in that they are actively represented 
in nearly all campus organizations. 



The Class of 1957 




Class Officers 

President: Bill Workinger 

\'ice- President: Tom Teates 

Secretary: Grace Gorbey 

Treasurer: Bob Doster 




73 





For the Class of 1958, this year was one of organization. Making new acquaint- 
ances, learning to know each other, and becoming active in campus clubs was 
their first semester project. With the new term came elections and Dick Starr as 
class president. As sophomores they plan to begin immediately activities aimed 
toward a successful yearbook and upperclassman functions. 



Class of 1958 




OFFICERS 

of the 

CLASS of 1958 




To each his own with . . . 



Diversity . . . something for everyone . , . initia- 
tions formal and otherwise . . . getting to know 
each other . . . parties, projects, and parliamen- 
tary procedure . . . fun-filled spare time ... ac- 
tivities with the object of learning. 



ACTIVITIES 




Standing: Clair Knoll. President. Seated, first row: Sandy Nelson. Ann Rvdberg, Elaine Buck, 
Joanne Hostetter. Seated, second row: George Wade, Florence Risser, Don Reinhard, Howard 
Pachasa, Clair Kelly, Fred Brandauer, Dr. Sparks. Seated, third row: Aaron Sheafler, Adora 
Rabiger, Dean Elizabeth Taylor, Joan Wingert, Marian Marcus, Pat Bell, Roger Dundore. 



Student Faculty Council 



". . . to foster undeistanding and cooperation between the students and faculty 
of Lebanon Valley College, and to advance the welfare of the student body 
through the coordination of student activities . . ." The Student Faculty Council 
under the leadership of Clair Noll has this year worked in conjunction with the 
faculty in order to create a better working relationship between students, govern- 
ing bodies, and organizations. It has been in the past and will continue to be an 
essential asset to life at L.V.C. 



^^ 





^-^ * 



One of the four student governing bodies on campus, it is rarely seen in action by the dorm 
students, for its meetings are held during the lunch hour. However, perhaps this makes the 
Congressmen more congenial in the disposition of justice. 



Men's Day Student Congress 
Women's Commuter Council 



The Woman's Commuter Council is the governing body of the woman day students on campus. 
The activities of the W.C.C. are concerned mostly with co-sponsoring campus functions with 
other organizations. Each year they work with Jiggerboard to sponsor the Christmas Dance and 
Gander Weekend and with the Men's Day Student Congress to sponsor the Valentine Dance. 
Informal meetings at members' houses are a part of the activities of W.C.C. 














First row: Mel Sponsler, George Wade, Henry Holliiiger, Herb Forrest, Charles Brightbill, 
Howie Landa. Second row: Clair Kelly, Elmer Shambaugh, Aaron Sheatfer, Don Burkhart, 
Don Reinhard. 



Men's Senate 



Conceived to sei\e as the governing assembly 
for the Association of Men Dormitory Stucients; 
the Senate this )ear greatly enlarged its do- 
minion by bringing under its jurisdiction men 
students residing in private homes in town. 

Striving always to promote democratic prin- 
ciples, this combined legislative, judicial, and ex- 
ecutive body struggles every year to maintain a 
high level of equitable and unpartial jurisprud- 
ence. 

However, this council does not confine its ac- 
tivities to purely governmental matters. Although 
one of the smallest organizations on campus, this 
body is inversely one of the most active in con- 
structive work. Erring students are frequently 
employed in keeping the campus looking respect- 
able, but many times; the Senators themselves do 
a large share of this work. 

Inaugurating a new committee system this 
year, the Senate is continually trying to improve 
its own mechanism. 

As long as it receives the sincere backing of its 
constituents, the Senate will continue to uphold 
its responsibilities as a representative group. 




Clair Kelly, secretary-treasurer; Aaron Sheaffer, 
vice-president; Henry Hollinger, president. 




Left to right: Mary Lou Young. Lois Reedy, Jo Ann Grove, Adora Rabiger, Edith Werntz, 
Gloria Ritter, Rita Jean Castiglia, Nancy Kirby, Nancy Daugherty, Pinky Roudabush, Irene 
Urian, Nancy Gower, and Marian Hess. 

Resident Women's 

Student Government Association 



The Resident Women's Student Government 
Association, better known to all as "Jigger- 
board," is a group of thirteen Valley coeds who 
each week throughout the year meet for the 
purpose of maintaining decorum in all phases 
of the girls' dorm and college life. By democratic 
procedure Jiggerboard tries to consider each vio- 
lation of college rules and regulations fairly, and 
then decide upon a justifiable sentence for those 
girls who are brought before the board. 

Besides being a governing body, Jiggerboard 
each year contributes its services to many campus 
functions, two of which are: sponsering Gander 
Weekend and a sponser of the Annual Christmas 
Dinner Dance. 

Jiggerboard, in cooperation with the other 
three governing bodies, has succeeded in main- 
taining a high standard of student deportment. 




Left to right: Gloria Ritter, treasurer; Nancy Daughetry, 
vice-president: Mary Lou Young, president; Lois Reddy, 
secretary. 




OFFICERS: Sandy Nelson, President; Hazel Davis, Treasurer; Joan Sprague, Secretary; Peggy 
Martin, Vice President. 



New Jersey Club 



This year the New Jersey Club under the 
presidency of Sandra Nelson continued its 
many activities. Among them were a social 
and three dances open to the student body. 
As designated this club is open to those stu- 
dents on the campus from New Jersey; it also 
includes past members wjiich have formed an 
alumni association to the club. The relation- 
ship of the two is furthered during Christmas 



vacation when the students arid alumni come 
together in New Jersey for their annual 
dinner-dance. The objective of this club as 
stated in the constitution is to "bring together 
on the LVC campus the students from New 
Jersey in order to form an Alumni Association 
and to add to the social, academic and athletic 
life of the students on campus." 



First row: Sid Hofing, Pete McCoy, Bob Walker. Second row: Joan Sprague, Peggy Martin, Bar- 
bara Schwaghart. Third row: Jim Wright, Nathalie Davis, Hazel Davis, Sandy Nelson. 





Student Christian 
Association 



One of the most active organizations on Leb- 
anon Valley's campus is the student Christian 
Association. It is open to all, with encourage- 
ment for active participation in the student- 
centered religious program. 

The SCA started the 1954-55 school year by 
having a fall retreat for cabinet members at Mt. 
Gretna. Another privilege of this group is to 
welcome the incoming Freshmen in September. 

The Christmas cantata, The Child of Bethle- 
hem, under the direction of David Willoughby, 
was especially enjoyed this year. The cantata is 
always a main feature of the Christmas 'dinner- 
dance. 

Aaron Shaeffer was the able president this 
year. Those who were sent to the Kansas Con- 
vention were Donald Burkhart and Lynn Sparks. 

Wednesday night is usually associated with the 
SCA Fellowship. Outstanding during this year 
were the exchange programs with Elizabethtown 
and the panel cliscussion on chapel with Dean 
Keller as guest faculty speaker. Assisting in May 
Day activities round out the Student Christian 
Association's numerous duties. 



LIVING IN THE L.AP OF LUXURY 




.^Hk. 




THE NOBLE SAVAGES" 




Left to right: Standing, Aaron Sheaffer, Dr. Sparks, and Dr. Ehrhart. Seated, first row: Marian 
Marcus, Tom Teates, Don Burkhart, Dave Willoughby. Seated, second row: Mary Lou Young, 
Marian Hess, Dick Leonard, Dick Yoder. Seated, third row: Lynn Sparks, Cy Dietrich, Pinky 
Roudabush, Lois Reedy, Edith Werntz. Seated, fourth row: Irene Urian, Ruthanne Kelchner, 
Carol Dannattell, Nancy Gibson, Pat Greenjack, Clair Kelly. 





Left lo rig/il: Marian Hess, secretary; 
Lynn Sparks, vice-president: Aaron 
Sheaffer, president; Pinky Roudabush, 
vice president; Henry Hollinger, 
treasurer (not present). 



"AT THE END OF A WEARY DAY" 




La Vie 



Only one of the countless editorial conferences which 
make possible the La Vie. 



During the past nine months, La Vie Colle- 
giene has been issued thirteen times. As its 
French title suggests, this newspaper has por- 
trayed the life of the college in its pages. This 
work, has been possible only with the coopera- 
tion of the staff members. Some are reporters 
and typists, others take care of finances and cir- 
cidation, but each has contributed in some way 
to the success of the newspaper during the past 
year. 

A week before each issue, the editor posted 
assignments on a bulletin board in the Adminis- 
tration Building. On deadline night— usually 
Monday evening when the newspaper was issued 
on a Thursday— all of the news stories had to be 
typed and headlines had to be written for them. 
The pages were made up on Tuesday nights. 
Making up the paper means laying out the 
dummy, deciding what positions different stories 
will occupy on the pages. Wednesday night the 
pages were proofread. The staff worked in the 
La Vie office in Washington Hall. 



The Exchange Editor: an integral part of every publi Something new being cooked up tor Pinky 's specialty, 

cation. 





,4\ IW 




CoUegienne 



On Thursday afternoons the circulation man- 
agers distributed copies of the paper to all fac- 
ulty and students on campus. It was the duty of 
the exchange editors to mail over fifty copies of 
each issue of the paper to advertisers, subscrib- 
ers, and to other colleges with which La Vie 
would exchange newspapers. 

Many freshmen were included on this year's 
staff. There reporters were given regular beats 
as well as special news assignments. In covering 
their beats, they would check regularly with 
every department and organization on campus 
for news. 

Adora Rabiger was editor-in-chref for the 
1954-1955 school year. Other names on the mast- 
head included David Farling, business manager; 
Richard Shover, sports editor; Dorothy Rouda- 
bush, feature editor; and Ardith Gaumer, Mar- 
ian Hess, and Naomi Sprenkle, conservatory 
editors. 




i 



The sports team that never strikes out. 



And behind the scenes . 





Wig and Buckle 



Through the activities of Wig and Buckle 
participating students have the opportunity to 
take part in all phases of drama from acting to 
prompting to scenery. Under the leadership of 
Dr. Anna Dunkle, new adviser of the club, the 
members expect to have many successful and 
interesting productions. 



OFFICERS: Clair Kelly, President; Mildred 
Osinski, Treasurer; Pinky Roudabush, Secretary. 



First row: Mildred Osinski, Carole Fox, Kathy Dotts. Second row: Clair Kelly, Charlie Fitzgerald, 
Elmer Shambaugh, Jim Wright, Pinky Roudabush, Bruce Thompson, Shirley Warfel. 




Delta Tau Chi 



Delta Tau Chi, formerly Life Work Recruits, 
is an organization for those interested in ad- 
vancing the religious principles upon which 
Lebanon Valley is founded. Many of its mem- 
bers are those participating actively in prepara- 
tion for the missionary and ministerial fields; 
but, moreover, are those who wish simply to 
bring the word of God into everyday living. 




OFFICERS: Fred Brandauer, President; Nancy Germer, 
Secretary; Dr. Maynard Sparks, Adviser. 



Delta Tau Chi 1954-1955 
'If 





The Political Science Club 1954-1955. 




Political Science Club 



Although non-partisan so far as popular poli- 
tics are concerned, the interests of this very 
active campus club are largely centered in poli- 
tical techniques and activities. Aside from such 
local activities as the banquet and dinner-dance 
and the sale of programs at home basketball 
games, the Political Science Club annually sends 
a full delegation to the regional and state con- 
ventions of the Inter-Collegiate Government, the 
main object being to win the nomination for 
Lebanon Valley's candidate for speaker and to 
promote the passage of Valley bills. 

At these conventions as well as at the local 
meetings, members of the Political Science Club 
gain experience that may one day make them 
successes in the field of national and interna- 
tional politics. 



OFFICERS; Norman Blautz, Treasurer; Charles Zettle- 
moyer. Vice President; Carol Achenbach, Secretary; Don 
Rowland and John Giannelli. 



Pi Gamma Mu 



One might safely say that the membership of 
Pi Gamma Mu consists of the elite of the social 
science departments of the college. It attempts to 
enhance the students' knowledge and under- 
standing of the social sciences. This is achieved 
through the benefits derived from well-planned 
meetings. 

This incorporated national honor society, 
which publishes its own periodical, has the same 
motto as Lebanon Valley College: "Ye shall 
know the truth and the truth shall make you 
free." 

The general purpose of the society is to help 
solve our social problems by unifying the social 
sciences in order to create a better comprehen- 
sion of our society. 




Left to right: Officers— Aaron Sheaffer, Adora Rabiger, 
Chuck Zettlemover, Gerald Stutzman, Clair Knoll. 



Left lu right: Prof. Shay, Roger Dundore, Kathy Dotts, 
.\dora Rabiger. Chuck Zettlemoyer, Dave Farling, Gerald 
Stutzman, Clair Knoll, Aaron Sheaffer, Prof. Riley. 





OFFICERS: Bill Erby, Treasurer; Jo Anne Grove, Secretary; Henry Hollinger, President; Ross 
Fasick, Vice President. 



American 
Chemical 
Society 



The Chemistry Club, the hub of which is the 
Student Affiliate of the American Chemical 
Society, is composed of chemistry majors and 
others interested in chemistry. Activities include 
publications such as Filtrates and Residues and 
the Lab-Orator, a bi-weekly radio program, 
speakers, movies, and group participation. In 
December the club took a field trip to the 
F.B.I. Laboratories in Washington, D. C. 





The lecturer meew the Tri B's. 



Eating 



pretty basic biology. 



Tri Beta is a national biological honor so- 
ciety. The Alpha Zeta Chapter of Lebanon Val- 
ley College was organized in the spring of 1952. 
Membership is open to students who have com- 
pleted a minimum of ten semester hours in biol- 
ogy and who maintain a B average. Monthly 
meetings are noteworthy for their excellent and 
informative speakers from all fields of biological 
study. Tri Beta deserves congratulations for its 
work in the X-raying of all students and faculty 
as part of the drive against tuberculosis. 



Beta Beta Beta 



First row: Dorothy Lutz, Loretta Hosteller, Beverly Ross, Arlene Reynolds, Ed Balsbaugh, Bill 
Zilka, Richard Leonard. Second row: Dr. Wilson, Claude Miller, Florence Risser, Dr. Light, 
Harry Hall, Harold White, Pat Greenjack. 







Autumn, football, spirit. 



Cheerleaders 



This integral part of all inter-collegiate sports 
at Lebanon Valley became a full-fledged organi- 
zation only this year. The main activity of the 
cheerleaders is obvious to everyone vk^ho attends 
football and basketball games. Much of the 
spirit for which L.V. rooters are known can be 
credited to the efforts of these pep-raisers. This 
year's very able captain was Jane Taylor. 





^V /' 



Rt ^jf^.'^,^' 





Kneeling: John Giannelli, Drew Fetterolf, Jack Schwab, Bill Krick. Second row: Tom Uhrich, 
Jack Thomas, Benedict Salamandra, Skip Dyer, Mike Cupina, Skip Douglass, Ed Fancovic, Jim 
Boltz, Henry Chudzikiewicz, Joe Gorshin. On steps: Bob Mackrides, Tom Quinn, Bob Handley, 
Dave Cotton, Jim Maier, Bill Schadler, Darwin Glick, Anthony Creamer. 



With the arrival to Lebanon Valley ot Ko- 
rean veterans the Legionnaires was reorganized. 
Under President Joe Gorshin their first aim was 
achieved— to present to the school a plaque ded- 
icated to the memory of Lt. Stanley Dankowski 
who lost his life in Korea. Their efforts culmi- 
nated in Dankowski Day with a memorable 
chapel service and banquet. 



Legionnaires 



OFFICERS: Henry Chudzikiewicz, Adjutant; Jim Boltz, 
Secretary; Joe Gorshin, Commander. 



A post-basketball dance and just one o£ the activities 
which led to the Dankowski Memorial. 






"L" Club members— the lettermen of LVC. 




fUT 99 



L" Club 



The "L" Club is an organization notable in 
that its membership is made up entirely of letter 
winners. In addition to activities which remain 
largely behind the scenes, the club once a year 
sponsors the "L" Club Dance, a high spot on 
L.V.'s social calendar. This year the organiza- 
tion was under the leadership of Howie Landa. 



OFFICERS: Dick Sparks, Vice President; Howie Landa, 
President; Howie Kosier, Secretary. 




Left to right. Standing: Bev Ross, Pris Thomas, Peggy Martin, Kathy Dotts, Dot Book, 
Cynthia Patton, Jo Young, Carol Bradley, Terry Norris, Irene Urian, Shirley Heizmann, 
Sandy Nelson, Miss Bowman, Jeanne Winter, Lois Reedy, Mary Lou Young. Seated: Ruthanne 
Kelchner, Grace Gorbey, Carol Fox, Naomi Sprenkle, Gloria Ritter, Lynette Waller, Pinky 
Roudabush, Georgie Funk. 



Women's Athletic Association 



Under the capable leadership of Lois Reedy, 
the Women's Athletic Association has soared to 
new heights this year. They have undertaken 
numerous new projects. 

The girls have taken over the cloakroom at 
basketball games and have designed and sold 
Lebanon Valley Scrapbooks. The point system 
was also revised and insignificant sports, elimin- 
ated. Each of the girls receives a certain number 
of points for every sport she enters, these points 
to be accumulated and awards given on this 
basis.. 

A banquet for all of the WAA members was 
held at the end of the season when awards were 
presented. The new members provided the en- 
tertainment. Thus a prosperous year filled with 
activities was terminated with plans for an even 
bigger future, 




Left to right: Mary Lou Young, treasurer; Pinky Rouda- 
bush, secretary; Bev Ross, vice-president; Lois Reedy, 
president. 




Left to right; Mrs. D. 'Clark Carmean, Mrs. Louella Frank, Danny Marty, Irene Urian, Joan 
Conlin, Nancy Daugherty, Charles Zettlemoyer. 



French Club 



The French Club is made up of those students 
who are interested in speaking French and 
learning about France and its customs in an in- 
formal manner. 

Advised by Mrs. Frank and Mr. Struble, the 
club's program varies from slides taken in 
France to games and skits. The more successful 
meetings featured appreciation of French music 
and musicians, and the projection of colored 
slides showing various views and scenes in 
France. 



Life as it is lived fraternally . 



Kinship and cooperation . . . societies: the needed 
spark in campus life . . . rush week whirl then a 
pledge . . . mammies and natives . . . while under- 
neath the "props" of initiation still a lowly frosh 
. . . then candlelight and vows . . . smokers and 
open houses . . . "How are we going to raise 
enough money?" . . . K-D at the Penn Harris, 
Clio-Philo and Quentin . . . good-by to the 
seniors. 



SOCIETIES 



ti. 



^^. 



\ 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 1954-1955. 



Making life 

a little brighter 



"This is Delphian!" 

... a group of girls bound together in a tie of 
friendship, loyalty, and sisterhood to promote a 
greater degree of student leadership and college 
loyalty on the campus of Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. Our symbol is the triangle; our motto, 
"know thyself"; our color, scarlet; our flower, 
the poppy; our aims, to grow in wisdom and 
knowledge. 



The day we all went Dixie. 





OFFICERS: Nancy Daugherty, President: Lois Reedy, 
Vice President; Mary Lou Young, Corresponding Secre- 
tary; Edith Werntz, Recording Secretary; Naomi 
Sprinkle, Treasurer. 



iK. 



DELTA LAMBDA SIGMA 



Informal initiation with the theme of "Little 
Amish Girls" was followed by formal initiation 
held in Dephian Hall where each of the twenty- 
four initiates pledged herself to Delphian and 
received her membership card and carnation. 
An inter-society dance was the climax of the 
Rush Week. 

The society sponsored many socials during the 



Near. Kalo— Delphian Week-end with its play 
and banquet was, as usual, the high point of the 
spring's acti\ities. 

The officers for this year: President— Nancy 
Daugherty; Vice President— Lois Reedy; Record- 
ing Secretary— Edith Werntz; Corresponding Sec- 
retary—Mary Lou Young; Treasurer — Naomi 
Sprenkle; Advisor— Mrs. Donald Fields. 





Climax to K-D Week-end. 



The royal couple begin their reign. 




mmami 



tm 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 1954-1955. 



KAPPA LAMBDA SIGMA 



A member at last. 



Just a small spring get-together. 





Kalo, companion society to Delphian, is 
one of the oldest social organizations on cam- 
pus. Its activities successfully combine campus 
fellowship with inter-club pleasure to knit 
Kalo into a close working-body. Familiar to 
all Kalo members are the smokers designed to 
create a deep friendliness among members. 



Under Jim Dukes, the club initiated the Kalo 
newspaper. With the advent of March and 
K.-D. weekend Kalo and Delphian pulled re- 
sources and efforts to produce Sabiina Fair 
and as a climax the dinner-dance at the Penn 
Harris Hotel in Harrisburg. 



OFFICERS: Harold Bird, SergeanL at Arms; Lee Kun- 
kel, Chaplain; Jim Dukes, President; Jack Sautter, 
Recording Secretary; Jim Balsbaugh, Treasurer. 




Clio 



Clio, as Kappa Lambda Nu is called, is the 
sister organization of Philo. Meetings are held 
on the second Tuesday of each month. Clio's 
projects are directed toward helping others. 

Concerning social activities, Clio is the spon- 
sor of at least one dance each semester. Clio and 
Philo, the brother organization, participate in 
a formal dinner-dance for members and their 
guests each spring. This year Clio joined with 
Delphian, Philo, Kalo, and the Knights of the 
Valley in sponsoring a formal dance for new and 
old members following the formal initiation. 

Clio's activities include: speakers, movies, an 
impressi\e Christmas party, combined meetings 
with Philo, the fun of Rush Week and of the in- 
formal initiation, and the solemn dignity of the 
formal initiation. 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 1954-1955. 



OFFICERS: Diane Kohr, Vice President; Sandra Nel- 
son, Treasurer; Pinky Roudabush, President; Kathy 
Dotts, Secretary. 



Family portrait. 





i 



1^'- ■ 



n' 



KAPPA LAMBDA NU 



The performance for North Hall. 




105 




PHI LAMBDA SIGMA 



OFFICERS: Bob Walker, Recording Secretary; Dave Gittleman, Vice President; Herb Forrest, 
Chaplain; Howard Pachasa, President; Charlie Boughter, Treasurer; Tom Teates, Corresponding 
Secretary. 



,^ 






pi ^ 





Philo 



For male students interested in fellowship and 
social activities there is a very active and growing 
Phi Lamba Sigma — more commonly known as 
Philo. Almost an institution among its members 
are the socials complete with jam sessions. Under 
Howard Pachasa, this year's president, Philo has 
become an organization on the up-swing. Along 
with its sister society, Clio, Phi Lambda Sigma 
sponsoied the annual dinner-dance held at the 
Quentin Riding Club. 



This jam session turned out to be competition for "Chack" Haines. 





Seated: Howard Pachasa, Dick Shover, Don Reinhard, Bill Workinger, Jack Eby, Roger Dundore, 
Ed Balsbaugh, Clair Kelly, Ross Fasick, Elmer Shambaugh. Standing: Harold Weber, Aaron 
SheafFer, Dean Artz, Bill Kiick, Eugene Geesey, Dave Farling, Lynn Sparks, Bill Erby, Gene 
Adams, Jack AUwein, Henry Hollinger. 

KNIGHTS OF THE VALLEY 



Perhaps the most secretive organization on 
campus, largely because its members are not very 
talkative about its activities, the Knights of the 
Valley are at the same time one of the most con- 
structive student groups at Lebanon Valley. A 
prevailing spirit of co-operation, the desirable 
trait that so many otherwise successful organiza- 
tions lack and can not seem to draw from the 
majority of their membership no matter what 
means or wiles they may employ, is perhaps the 



most significant characteristic of this honorary 
fraternity. 

A notable accomplishment is the support of a 
scholarship awarded annually to some meritori- 
ous student attending school here at Valley. 

With new pledges carrying swords and shields 
evei7 year, the Knights promise to continue 
maintaining a strong, active organization for 
years to come. 



A harmony of musician and educator . 



Music education deluxe . . . courses designed to 
produce the best in teachers . . . long hours of 
practice . . . active organizations . . . those butter- 
flies before a recital, the praises and congratula- 
tions afterwards . . . perfect combination of work 
and play . . . holly, evergreen. Conservatory 
Formal . . . the Glee Club tour . . . student teach- 
ing . . . and finally a well-rounded musician and 
educator. 



CONSERVATORY 




¥ 






'• .'' 















'>'*, ,*^. 
V 







* * *>* — i"ii I II ip 



High standards in music 



LEBANON VALLEY CONSERVATORY 




Marching Band 



After the shrill whistle of the drum major and his "Forwa- 
a-a-rd 'arch," the marching band came down the field, ready to 
present their half-time performance. During time outs the band 
cheered the football team on with their peppy music. This was 
a year for "firsts"— Tom Silliman, drum major; Dr. Thurmond, 
band director; l>d Fish, in his second year as drill master— all 
combined their efforts to keep up the morale of our new football 
team and new coach. 



n 



v» 









1^ .^1 



With the arrival of a new director, Dr. James Thurmond, 
former director of the United States Navy School of Music, came 
a new type of band music— that written expressly for concert 
band and to bring out the rich tone qualities previously buried 
under symphonic transcriptions. 

Although the band did not go on an extensive tour, they spent 
much time preparing an outstanding program of marches, over- 
tures, and solo numbers to be presented on out-of-town appear- 
ances highlighted by the annual concert at the Forum in Harris- 
burg. The band also provided the musical accompaniment for 
May Day. 



Concert Band 





Girls' Band 



The girls show 'em how. 



The girls' band is exactly what its name im- 
plies—it consists of the weaker sex. In the past 
several years the band performances have im- 
proved greatly, and after this year's concert, 
these jolly lassies proved that they can really 
"blow up a storm." Many of the girls work 
double time by playing not only in- their own 
band, but also in the concert band. 

These are some of the selections played by the 
band in the concert March II: 
Chorale and Fugue in G. Minor. . . .Bach-Abert 

Autumn Overture Leidzen 

Annie Laurie a la Moderne Leonard 

Trumpet trio 

Gloria Ritter, Jane Hoffman, Helen Sauder 

Lisa's Procession from Lohengrin Wagner 

Pavanne Saint-Saens 

Cypress Silhouettes Bennett 

His Honor Fillmore 

Fortune Teller Overture Herbert 



THE GIRLS' BAND. 





The Brass Ensemble under the direction of Dr. James Thurmond 



The Brass Ensemble 




The Glee Club and Symphony Orchestra join for "Down 
in the \alley." 



spotlight on 
the 

SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 





The Symphony Orchestra is one of the most 
active organizations on campus. It is composed 
of both conservatory and college students. The 
director is Thomas Lanese, a competent musi- 
cian. The orchestra's December concert was a 
performance of musical satisfaction and inspira- 
tion for its listeners. The soloist was Elma Jean 
Swope, a mezzo-soprano and a conservatory 
senior. Whether in rehearsals or in concerts, the 
symphony members undoubtedly obtain unfor- 
gettable musical experiences. 



December Program: 

Finlandia Sibelius 

Mon Coeur Souvre A Ta Voix Saint-Saens 

Connais Tu Le Pays Thomas 

Three Dance Episodes from Rodeo. . . .Copland 
Symphony in E Minor New World Dvorak 





Singing in the chorus . . 




... an experience long remembered 



f^rA 






P,W' 



^ 



>i 



^ 



^ 



iif 



^ 



Ig,^!^ 



i DECEMBER W^^a(r^ 



>€ 



? 



W^^f and the CONSERVATORY FORMAL f^l^ 



— • ---^^^^^s 





Behind every recital 



are hours of rehearsal. 



Recitals . 



The solo performance . 



and the job well done. 




4 -■■■''' 


M 




k 


fBk^m 


1 





Musicians like Joyce Snyder 



and Bob McFarland 




are the result of 



. . . long hours of . 





practice 
practice 



. practice, practice, practice 



Kalo-Delphian Weekend and . . . 



Tryouts . . . memorizing those lines . . . hours 
of rehearsal . . . headaches for the director . . . 
powder, paint, and dress rehearsal . . . curtain- 
time jitters . . . the smooth performance and an 
appreciative audience . . . curtain-calls and con- 
gratulations 



.."SABRINA FAIR" 







The play's the thing 
and it's 



SABRINA FAIR 




As part of Kalo-Delphian weekend the two so- 
cieties presented the Broadway success Sabrina 
Fair with Charlotte Pierson in the leading role. 
Under the direction of Theodore D. Keller the 
cast and crew brought to Lebanon Valley all the 
charm of this delightful comedy. 



The chauffeur's daughter "wows" 'em 




SABRINA FAIR 




'Alls well that ends well," someone once said. 



Family conference. 



The cast takes a bow. 




Our own golden age of sports 



Autumn and football . . . homecoming . . . the 
tournament— to be or not to be . . . top grade 
play on the boards . . . hits, runs, and errors . . . 
victory and defeat, happiness and disappoint- 
ment . . . pep and spirit . . . the sportsmanship 
that marks Lebanon Valley players and fans. 



SPORTS 







PRACTICE— the key word to the rebuilding of the Dutchmen eleven. 



Football and the 1954 Dutchmen 



SCHEDULE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE vs. 


Wilkes College 


0-19 


Western Maryland 


0-32 


Muhlenberg 


0-32 


Moravian 


6-20 


Scranton 


6-19 


Albright 


14-21 



Coach Ellis McCracken, aided by Hank Di- 
fohnson, was faced with the task of rebuilding 
in his first year of college coaching. With the 
loss of eleven veterans of the 1953 season through 
graduation — including Lou Sorrentino one of 
the best passers in Pennsylvania college ball— 
the Dutchmen were forced to field an inexperi- 
enced team. Coach McCracken, thus, had to de- 
pend primarily upon twenty-four freshmen. 
Lebanon Valley, as a residt, did not taste victory 
in the '54 season; however, each game brought 
marked improvement with the gradual bringing 
up to par. of the new Dutchmen. 



129 






Gene Zimmerman 
End 



Rusty Owens 
Tackle 



Paul DiPangrazio 
Guard 



Lettermen 



The loss of eleven lettermen left much of the 
burden on the shoulders of a few veterans from 
'53. Jim Stanfield stood out in the Albright- 
LVC game with his ninety-two yard kick-off re- 
turn for a touchdown. Dave Bosacco, a junior, 
led the team in scoring with eighteen points— an 
accomplishment considering the total collected 
by the team for the season. Returning for their 
last year of play were George Radonovic and 
Dick Sparks. Honors must go also to the fresh- 
men who in the face of seasoned college players 
exhibited fight and spirit. 



LVC 




Gene Geesey 
Back 



Ross Plasterer 
Back 



Dave Bosacco 
Back 









Doug Miller 
End 



Dean Becker 
Guard 



Dick Sparks 
Tackle 




Bob Longenecker 
End 



George Radanovic 
End 






131 



FOOTBALL 




^wA^.;| 



/? 



Ki 



i; 




Practice and Saturday Afternoons 






f^ 



,4» •'*J3'^ 





FOOTBALL 



From the standpoint of scoring and winning 
or losing, the Dutchmen had a cUsappointing 
season. They opened the season by losing to 
Wilkes College 19-0 then bowed to Western 
Maryland 32-0. Muhlenberg invaded Lebanon 
Valley territory with a 32-0 victory. Not until 
the Moravian game, fourth of the year, could 
the Valley score, but it was our 6 against Mora- 
vian's 20. The home fans saw Scranton defeat 
L. V. C. the following week by a 19-6 score. The 
best game of the year and perhaps an indication 
of the future was the Dutchmen's fight against 
Albright. They fought all the way only to lose 
21-14 in a heartbreaker. Undefeated Pennsyl- 
vania Military College handed L. V. its final 
loss. 






The Flying Dutchmen 



The 1954-1955 LVC basketball team-, though 
not a tournament five, enjoyed a successful sea- 
son with the final record of seventeen vfins as 
against five losses. 

The opener was little indication of things to 
come. A fair Scranton team defeated LV 61-57. 
Lebanon Valley bounced back with six succes- 
sive victories— Gettysburg, Lycoming, Dickinson, 
Pennsylvania Military College, Western Mary- 
land, and Albright— until a 45-50 defeat by Mil- 
lersville. The Dutchmen led to the last minute 
of play only to have Joe LaBatch put Millers- 
ville ahead for the final seconds. With an 8-2 
record the team and hundreds of fans moved 
into Philadelphia to meet one of the nation's 
best— LaSalle. Outclassed but game, LVC lost 
70-112. 





BASKETBALL 



A week later came the Gettysburg game and 
an up-hill battle. On the very short side of the 
score for three quarters, the Dutchmen suddenly 
caught fire to outscore Gettysburgh 27-14 in the 
last quarter and win 79-78. Elizabethtown fol- 
lowed to be defeated 77-66. Plagued by injuries 
and illness, favored LV could do little against 
West Chester and lost 72-74. The odds were, 
thus, against Lebanon Valley in the game with 
Temple. The overtime score of 82-76 proved the 
odds wrong. The remaining few weeks of play 
saw the Dutchmen defeated by an excellent Vil- 
lanova team and victors over Drexel, Albright, 
Upsala, Franklin and Marshall, and Dickinson. 





BASKETBALL 




JUNIOR VARSITY 1954-1955. 



The Flying Dutchmen stand out among 
basketball teams as being one sparked by co- 
operation and teamwork. From this working 
body are certain players each adept in his par- 
ticular area. 

The spark plug of LV basketball for the past 
four years has been Howie Landa. In this short 
time he set sixteen records among which is 1936 
points for four years of active playing. In the 
1954-1955 season alone he scored 588 points for 
an average of 24.5 per game. His single game 
high was 45 against West Chester in a losing 
cause. He also holds the record for assists show- 
ing remarkable ability as a floor-man. 




Just a part ot the Lebanon \'aney spirit. 




Ken Schuler 



Joe Green 



Also to be noted was Chambersburg's Jerry 
Steger, an excellent player on the floor. Dick 
Shover and Bob Nelson stood out in scoring as 
well as on the boards. Rounding out a well- 
balanced team were Kenny Ellis, Howie Rosier, 
and freshman Jack Peepe, all offensive and de- 
fensive key men. 

Behind the team is Rinso Marquette who de- 
serves laurels in the field of coaching. In his 
three years with Lebanon Valley basketball he 
has won thirty games on the home court and 
holds a record of 77 wins as opposed to only 18 
losses. 



Gene Zimmerman 



Bill Wenrich 



SCHEDULE 






LEBANON VALLEY vs. 






Scranton 




57-61 




Gettysburg 




87-74 




Lycoming 




90-83 




Dickinson 




73-59 




PMC 




80-64 




Western Maryla: 


nd 


85-56 




Albright 




77-75 




Millcrsville 




45-50 




Elizabcthtown 




61-60 




Moravian 




78r67 




LaSalle 




70-112 




Moravian 




73-61 




Gettysburg 




79-78 




Elizabethtown 




77-66 




Scranton 




,93-69 




. West Chester- 




72-74 




Temple 




82-76 .. 




Muhlenberg 




83-82 




Drexel 




94r80 




Villanova 




65-86 ■ 




Albright 




87-61 




Upsala 




81-72 




Franklin and Mn 


rshall 


86-66 




Dickinson 




78-61 








*% 



j!\ 






Just sharpening the old eye. 




t/"*^ 




m 




BASEBALL 



When the "Quittie" went to press, this year's 
baseball team was practicing for the 1955 season. 
With an almost completely new roster, "Rinso" 
Marquette had strong hitting and a promising 
pitching staff backed by Howie Rosier. Pros- 
pects looked good for a steadily improving team. 





Pre-game conference. 



Girls' basketball is always an attraction on the 
LV campus. This year's team showed outstand- 
ing sportsmanship and ability in spite of a rec- 
ord of one win and hve losses. Particularly able 
players were Naomi Sprenkle averaging 14.1 
points a game and Beverly Ross with 9.4. Lois 
Reedy and Mary Lou Young, both seniors, stood 



out in the guard positions. Behind the team and 
responsible for their smooth play were: Betty 
Jane Bowman, Coach; George Funk, Head Man- 
ager; Grace Gorby, Dorothy Roudabush, Marcia 
Shirley, and Darlene Steiner, Assistant Man- 
agers; Charlotte Long and Sandra AVeit, Pub- 
licity Chairmen. 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 




1955 Varsity Roster: 

Forivards 

Naomi Sprenkle 
Beverly Ross 
Fern Liskey 
Irene Urian 

Guards 

Mary Lou Young 
Lois Reedy 
Jean Winters 
Arlene Reynolds 
Rachel Meyers 



SCORES 
LEBANON VALLEY vs. 

Shippensburg 28-49 

Moravian 19-39 

Millersville 30-49 

Albright 39-27 

Millersville 49-58 

Elizabethtown 30-39 




Standing; Arlene Reynolds, Shirley Wartel, Jeanne Winter, Charlotte Pierson, Charlotte Long, 
Miss Betty Jane Bowman. Seated: Naomi Sprenkle, Pris Thomas, Fern Liskey, Bev Ross, Jo 
Young, Barb Johnson, Linda Gordon, Donna Williamson, Sandy Weit, Grace Gorby, Jean 
Longenecker. 






BivtRLY Ross is well-known tor her ability in cheer- 
leading. Snappy and alert, Bev was the second highest 
scorer on the basketball team. Remember the mirac- 
ulous shot she made in the closing minutes of the 
Millersville game? 



Lois Reedy has participated in both inter-collegiate 
basketball and hockey and has added much spirit to 
both. Besides being president of W. A. A. this year, 
she also was co-captain of the Co-ed hockey team. 





M.\RY Lou Young, outstanding in field hockey as a 
full-back, has also played inter-collegiate basketball 
for four years. Mary Lou deserves praise for her ath- 
letic ability, leadership, sportsmanship, and diversity. 



Dorothy Roudabush receives honors for her persist- 
ence in being active in sports. Unable to participate 
in inter-collegiate sports after her sophomore year, 
"Pinky" turned her efforts into the organization of 
sports activities and, thus, made a strong contribution. 



Outstanding Senior Athletes 



Upon graduation, four girls will receive 
special recognition for their ability and inter- 
est in athletic competition and individual 
sports. These girls, participating actively 
throughout their four years at LVC in 
Women's Sports, have achieved the highest 



honors given by the Women's Athletic Asso- 
ciation. By receiving this distinction, these 
co-ed athletes have been awarded Blazer 
Jackets in the College colors, with the College 
seal. 



I ^' 





FINIS 



A collectors round-up of values . . . 

Sid's headache . . . the backbone of the Quittie 
. . . many thanks to a cooperative and energetic 
business staff . . . appreciation due to the ad- 
vertisers and patrons without whom the year- 
book would have been an impossibility. 

ADVERTISEMENTS 



HERSHEY'S HOMOGENIZED MILK 



Serving Lebanon Area for Over 40 Years 



HARRY L. MYER & SON 

YOUR MILK DISTRIBUTOR 



CLEONA Phone 2-6161 



WENGERT'S DAIRY PRODUCTS 
Vitamin D Milk 



i 

i 


mMaJtA 


^ 


i 


•r^^^^^oxA^^KyiXi. 





Serving 


Industry — Building — Agriculture 


Top Quality Courteous Service 


Reasonable Cost 


H. E. MILLARD LIME AND STONE CO. 


ANNVILLE, PA. 


••»*■ .- 



149 



Meet Your Friends- at . 






C 








Specializing in 




SPAGHETTI 


SUBMARINE SANDWICHES | 


PIZZA 


MANICOTTI IMBOTITTI 




RAVIOLI 


BAKED LASAGNE 




and 


Many Other Italian Dishes 




Dine In 


Our Beautiful Fiesta Room 




706 North Third Street 


Phones: 6-7554 - 


3-9395 



150 



Compliments of 

PETER HAWRYLUK 

JEWELER 
40 East Main Street • Annville, Penna. 


LOSER'S MUSIC STORE 

Everything Musical 

605 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


Signs and Display Material 

ROY H. DUNDORE 

129 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


Compliments of 

J. HENRY MILLER CO. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER 
President — 1914 

E. PETER STRICKLER 
Treasurer — 1947 

All Forms of Insurance 

Eighth and Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


UNION EMBLEM 
COMPANY 

High School and Fraternity Jewelry 

Felt Goods and Commencement 

Stationery 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 

P. H. NissLEY, Manager 



151 



Compliments of 

HAUER'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

A Good Place to Shop 
Phone 69-R Hummelstown, Pa. 



SHARMAN'S 

"The Finest in Music" 

534 Penn Avenue 
SINKING SPRING, PA. 



Phone 8-8336 



TAVERN 
BAR and GRILL 

Vincent B. Cummins 

Food and Drinks at Their Best 
HERSHEY, PA. 



C. B. SMITH 
HARDWARE 

22 East Main Street 
HUMMELSTOWN, PA. 



Phone: Annville 7-4852 

MAX LOVE 

Cleaning and Pressing 

109 W. Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



Complim,ents of 

SUNSET MARKET 

Wholesale Distributor 
LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA 



152 



College Outline Books 
Bibles, Religious and Text Book 

Compliments of 

THE WERT BOOK STORE 

43 S. 8th Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. 

Stationery — Greeting Cards 

Any Book Can Be Ordered at Request 



Open Daily 9 A.M. to 9 P.M. 

MOVER'S FURNITURE CO. 

232 W. Main Street 
PALMYRA, PA. 

A Complete Line of Home Furnishings 

Harvey M. Moyer Phone 8-6141 



Compliments of 
PACKARD 

H. S. WAGNER & SON GARAGE 

PALMYRA, PENNA. 
Sales and Service 



Phone 8-9201 



717 East Main Street 



Compliments of 

WEAVER'S FAMOUS LEBANON 
BOLOGNA, INC. 

p. 0. Box 525 
LEBANON, PENNA. 



LOUIS LEHRMAN & SON 

HARRISBURG, PENNA. 

Distributors of 
Buddie Fine Foods 



Venetian Blinds 
Window Shades 



Floor and Wall 
Linoleums 



SLAUGHTER'S 
CUSTOM FLOORS 

129 West Main Street 
PALMYRA, PA. 

Tiles of All Styles for Floor or Wall 
Rubber, Asphalt, Cork, Plastic or Metal 

Phone 8-2191 



153 



MILLIE'S 

Restaurant and Motel 

"The House of Home Cooking" 

East Main Street 
PALMYRA, PENNA. 


SEE YOU AT 

HOT DOG FRANK'S 

The Place Where Students Congregate 

For a Bite to Eat 

In a Cheerful Atmosphere 


RUGGIES FOOT TRAITS 
Compliments of 

THE W. L. KREIDER'S SONS 
MFG. CO., INC. 

PALMYRA, PA. 

Makers of Fine Juvenile Footwear 


MILLER'S SELF-SERVICE 
FOOD STORE 

Your One-Stop Food Shopping Center 

18 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Groceries, Meats, Produce, Frozen Food 

Phone: ANnville 7-3451 Free Delivery 


Building Supplies 

LEBANON 
READY MIXED CONCRETE 

lOth and Reading R. R. 
Telephone 2-4649 


BARRY'S FOOD MARKET 

Complete Food and Catering Service 
Telephone: 2-5628 or 2-5629 


Compliments of 

KARMEL KORN SHOP 

718 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 



154 



Compliments of 

WHITE DOVE PRODUCTS CO., INC. 




Restaurant and Institutional Foods 
HARRISBURG, PENNA. 



Dodge - Plym,outh 

Motor Cars and Trucks 

Sales and Service 



CASSEL BROTHERS 



246-248 W. Main Street 
PALMYRA, PENNA. 



Phone 8-5281 



Parties — Banquets 
Clubs Dealers 




ICE CREAM 

"The Cream of Matchless Merit' 

Manufactured only at 
Sixth and Maple Streets 

Phone 2-0231 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings Electrical Appliances 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 
Funeral Director 



155 



WRITE FOR FOLDERS 
1955 Student Groups to Europe 
All Personally Conducted 
From 32 Days — $540.00 
To 67 Days — $1,190.00 

LEBANON COUNTY TRAVEL BUREAU 

757 Willow Street Phone 2-6606 Lebanon, Penna. 


PALMYRA BANK AND 
TRUST CO. 

PALMYRA, PA. 

Serving the Community Since 1886 

Checking Accounts — Savings Accounts 

Safe Deposit Boxes 
Mortgage, Commercial Personal Loans 

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 


Compliments of 

GROY and HOUSER 

FLORISTS 

Palmyra Hershey 
Ph. 8-6451 Ph. 3-8301 


Compliments of 

BOWMAN'S 
Insurance Agency 

PALMYRA, PA. 


Compliments of 

THE VALLEY TRUST 
COMPANY OF 
PALMYRA, PA. 

The Bank With the Drive-In 
Member of F. D. I. C. 


DAVIS PHARMACY 

9-11 W. Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Prescriptions — Phonographs — Sheet Music 

Parker Pens and Pencils 

Schaeffer Pens and Pencils 



156 



ERNEST LATSHA FOOD CO. 

Bakery, Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Supplies 

2285 N. Seventh Street 
HARRISBURG, PENNA. 



Telephone: CEdar 6-9054 



DE ANGELIS SPAGHETTI SAUCE 
Ask for It at Your Favorite Food Store 

DE ANGELIS GRILL 

Steaks ■ Chops • Sea Food • Spaghetti - Pizza 
W. Chocolate Avenue • Hershey, Penna. 



FINK'S BAKERY 



DELICIOUS LAYER CAKES • PIES 

Filled and French Doughnuts 

PECAN BUNS • BREAD • SHOOFLY PIES 



157 



Phone 2-7666 

EUGENE BOASTER 

Insurance and Surety Bonds 

43 North Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 

Eugene Hoaster Donald J. Hoaster 
John C. Heisey, Solicitor 




Truetone Radios — Davis Tires 
Wizard Batteries 

WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 

"Everything for the Automobile" 

39 N. Railroad Street 
PALMYRA, PA. 

Charles S. Rowe, Prop. Phone 8-4031 


Compliments of 

E. E. HEIZMANN 

LANGHORNE, PA. 




Church Furniture Mill 
Store and Bar Fixtures White House Road 
Phone 3-4519 Phone 6-0949 

LOEPER BROTHERS 

Cabinet Makers 

1121 Chestnut Street 
READING, PA. 


Compliments of 

J. S. HERSHEY 
BAKING CO. 

For Unexcelled Delivery Service 
Call Palmyra 8-4291 




HERSHEY BROS. GARAGE 

DESOTO • PLYMOUTH 
612 E. Main Street • Palmyra, Penna. 
Telephone 8-8041 





158 



WEISS BROS. 

Food Service EQUIPME^T 

"From a Sandwich Plate to a 
Complete Installation" 

25 S. 13th Street 
HARRISBURG, PA. 


J. C. HAUER'S SONS, Inc. 

Wholesale Distributors 

Candy — Cigarette 
Vending Machines 

LEBANON, PA. 


Congratulations 

Class of 1956 

THE HUB CLOTHIERS 

LEBANON, PA. 


LEBANON AUTO BUS 
CO., Inc. 

Isaac Plasterer, President 

9th and Chestnut Streets 

LEBANON, PA. 

Bus Service to Cornwall, Mt. Gretna, 

Manheim, Lancaster, Marietta. 

Lebanon to Jonestown and Indiantown Gap 

Charter Service 

Serving All of Lebanon County- 


Compliments of 

LE VITZ 


Best Wishes 

STATE THEATRE 

511-515 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Firestone Products 

FUNCK'S GARAGE 

GENERAL REPAIRING 

Official AAA Service — Atlantic Products 

14-16 S. White Oak Street 

Official Inspection Station No. 3068 

J. C. FuNCK Annville 7-5121 


Preferred by Particular People 

L T ' S 

2nd and Cuniherland Streets 
Sanitone Dry Cleaning 
Phone 2-5633 



159 



ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive Shoes 


Compliments of 


FLORSHEIM SHOES 


Your Local Insurance Man 


"For the Man Who Cares" 


I. M. LONG 


34 N. Eighth Street 


ANNVILLE, PA. 


LEBANON, PA. 






Compliments of 


m^*^ '^^^^tMt^^mf^ 


SHANKROFF and SHULTZ 

601 Cumberland Street 


w^^ 


LEBANON, PENNA. 


Phones : 


For Service Phone 2-2851 


Annville Annville 7-3511 

Hershey Enterprise 1-0611 

Myerstown Enterprise 1-0611 


GOODMAN 
VENDING SERVICE 


Elizabethtown .... Enterprise 1-0611 


CANDY 


Middletown Whitney 4-3151 






223 E. Locust Street 




Lebanon 


PAUL H. KETTERING 

Sporting Goods 

Esso — Goodyear Service 

Hunting and Fishing Supplies 


OFFICE EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 

"Friendly Service" 


104 West Main Street 


223 North Second Street 


ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


HARRISBURG, PA. 


Phone 7-6231 


Phone: CE 4-6251 



160 



The Famous 

cJLodclt 

Automatic Boiler Unit 

"With the Warmth That Only Coal 
Can Give" 

Consult Your Dealer, or 

ARNOLD COAL & 
SUPPLY CO., INC. 

Distributors 

Com.plete Heating Systems • Steam 
• Vapor • Hot Water 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



Com,pliments of 
Pete and Ralph 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Compliments of 

BRANDYWINE IRON & 
METAL COMPANY 

SALVAGE MATERIAL 

Sam Clark, Class of '27 Abe Grosky 

LEBANON, PENNA. 

Telephone 2-4645 



Compliments of 

COLONIAL STUDIO 

Basement of Colonial Theatre 

9th and Cumberland Streets 

LEBANON, PA. 



THE FLOWER SHOP 

Corsages Our Specialty 

LEBANON, PA. 
Rear of Court House 

Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere, Anytime 

Elizabeth Bernstein, Prop. Phone 2-1931 



161 



GREETINGS AND BEST WISHES 
TO THE CLASS OF 1956! 



L^nuriotte-cJLee studio 

STYLISTS IN PORTRAITURE 



130 So. Potomac Street 
HAGERSTOWN, MARYLAND 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

FOR THE 

1956 QUITTAPAHILLA 



Compliments of 

J. HERMAN & SONS, INC. 

PALMYRA, PA. 


Compliments of 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 


WHITMOYER 

"Products of Scientific Merit" 

• Cod Liver Oils • Poultry and Livestock Health Products 

• Vitamin and Mineral Concentrates • Disinfectants and Insecticides 

WHITMOYER LABORATORIES, INC. 

Manufacturing Chemists • MYERSTOWN, PENNA. 
Branch Plants: Rockland, Maine Yarmouth, Nova Scotia 


SHENK & TITTLE 

C^ver^thin^ for JUport" 

PLAY MORE — LIVE LONGER 

313 Market Street • Harrisburg, Pa. 

BRAND NAME RETAILER OF THE YEAR 


Compliments of 

BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

Your College Store 

OPEN EVENINGS 

E. W. Wolfe, Owner 

37-39 West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


CO-ED 
LUNCHEONETTE 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Frank and Delia Marino, Props. 



163 



PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. Maurice Abramson 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald S. Achenbach 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. Luke Allen 

Dr. Alexander R. Amell 

Arrow Store 

Astoria Restaurant 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Ayers 

Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Bell 

Pat Bell 

Don Berkhardt 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward I. Besecker 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Besecker 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Billingham 

Edward Billingham, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bird 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles O. Boarts 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Boltz 

James Boltz 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Book 

Bosacco Family 

Mr. and Mrs. E. K. Boughter 

Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Bradley 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas N. Brightbill 

Mrs Linda S. Bryant 

Mrs. J. F. Buck 

Carl's Barber Shop 

Mr. Walter Carrender 

Earl F. Carwavy 

E. Chudzikiewicz 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Colcher 

Mrs. C. H. Cottrell 

The Curtain Center 

Mr. and Mrs. John C. DaCosta 

Mr. and Mrs. Q. Dannettel 

Mr. and Mrs. Simpson B. Daugherty 

Mrs. Mary Day 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Delter 

Dick and Patty 

Donough Pharmacy 

Kathy Dotts 

James W. Dougherty 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Dougherty 

Mr. and Mrs. F. R. S. Douglass 

Jim Dukes 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Dukes 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Dyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Eckenroad 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul L Eckenroad 

L. M. Eikner 

Mr. George G. Eisley 

Bill Etzweiler 

Mr. David F. Farling 

John H. Fetterhoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Elwood Fetterman 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Fitzgerald 

Mr. and Mrs. George Forrest 

Mr. Joseph E. Foster 

Carole Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold W. Fox 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Coleman Funk 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Geesey 

Mr. and Mrs. Isidore R. Gold 

James H. Gorbey 

Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Gower 

James R. Gravesanle 

Mrs. H. Green 

Mrs. Wilmer E. Grubb 

Isabel R. Held 

Mr. George Bruce Henninger 

Joyce Hill 



Mr. and Mrs. Sterling E. Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hoffner 

Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Hofing 

Cy Hollinger 

William E. Hook 

Mr. and Mrs. Lytle G. Horting, Jr. 

Russell R. Hostetter 

Dr. Robert A. Houston 

Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Johnson 

Larry Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence S. Kelchner 

Ruthanne Kelchner 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Keshner 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Kiick 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Kirby 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Eugene Klinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Krouse 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Hoyd Kunkel 

Mrs. Adam Kustman 

Dr. and Mrs. David E. Landa 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Landis 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Lantz 

Mr. Franck C. LaRue 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Lentz 

Dr. and Mrs. H. M. Leonard 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman C. Lightner 

Perry B. Liskey 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin S. Lutz 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Lutz 

Pat Lutz 

Mr. and Mrs. Austin A. McBride 

Frank R. McCulloch 

Frank W. McCulloch 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Linden Mcllvaine 

Lin Mcllvaine 

Jacob Maier 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Meyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph M. Meyers 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Miller 

Mrs. Elizabeth Miller 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederic K. Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark M. Miller 

James A. Mitchell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. I. B. Moyer 

Mr. and Mrs. George M. Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Nelson 

Mrs. K. Obert 

Mrs. John E. OUinger 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Owens 

Cynthia Patton 

James B. Patton 

Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Patton 

Mrs. Lillian V. Pellegrino 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Pepe 

Mr. and Mrs. George Peraino 

Pickels Drug Store 

Mrs. E. E. Pierson 

Mr. and Mrs. Casimir Pietreniak 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Posiadlo 

Adora J. Rabiger 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Rabiger 

Donald L. Reinhard 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Reinhard 

Charles Rhoads 

Richard's Men Shop 

Mr. and Mrs. George Rigtmyer 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Risser 



John S. Rittle 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Ross 

Mr. and Mrs. Rydberg 

Bill Schmed 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Schmed 

William Schmidt 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Schwab 

Mrs. Iva V. Shambaugh 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S. Shay 

W. H. Shirk & Son 

Marcia Shirley 

Esther M. Sholley 

Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Sholley, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Shover 

Mr. and Mrs. V. B. Silliman 

Mr. and Mrs. David P. Snare 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Snyder 

Mr. and Mrs. LeRoy H. Snyder 

Mr. and Mrs. Sherdell Snyder 

Paul Socha 

Harry Speece 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Vaughn Spencer 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Speck 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth B. Sprague 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Stahley 

Mr. Martin L. Stable 

Mr. and Mrs. William G. Stanfield 

Stein Bros. 

Mr. and Mrs. George L. Stephens 

Mrs. Ester G. Stole 

Rodney Stoner 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Stoudt 

Lutz's Superette 

Mr. and Mrs. William Swavely 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Engle Taylor 

Thomas G. Teates 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Thomas 

Jack Thomas 

Uhler Studio 

Rev. and Mrs. C. E. Ulrich 

Clare D. Ulrich 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Urian 

Anita Veasey 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Voorman 

George H. Wade 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Wade 

Miriam Waller 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester C. Wallick 

Shirley Warfel 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther F. Warner 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Watson 

August Wavner 

George C. Weaver 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Weit 

Rev. and Mrs. Paul R. Wert 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Weitzel 

Harold White 

Mrs. Josephine White 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren Wiest 

Mrs. W. Dewey Williamson 

Mr. and Mrs. George A. Wolf, Sr. 

Nancy Wolf 

Mrs. Joseph E. Wolfe 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Wolfgang 

Mr. and Mrs. Otto Wolpert 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Wright 

Miss Laura E. Yeager 

Mr. and Mrs. Austin N. Yerkes 

Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Yoder 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Zimmerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles V. Zettlemoyer 

A Friend 



164