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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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QUITTAPAHILLA 



acknowledgements 



Photography. George E. Deininger 
Reading, Pennsylvania 

Henry Abramson 
Student Photographer 

Lithographed and Serviced by: 
The Kutztown 
Publishing Company 
Kutztown, Pennsylvania 



Q 
U 

T 
T 

A 
P 
A 
H 



L 
L 
A 



PUBLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1957 

lebanon valley college 



ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



Books— how our lives have been changed by them! 
We'll never forget the ones we had to read for Human- 
ities, and found to be interesting! The ones that are so 
heavily underscored in red, the covers well-worn with 
use. The dusty ones that we discovered in a hidden cor- 
ner of a library shelf and took to our hearts as old 
friends. For this Quittie— our own book of memories— 
we follow the familiar, but ever-new path where we 
are led by the books of the centuries. 



/ 

table of contents 

FACULTY 6 

SENIORS 20 

JUNIORS 38 

UNDERCLASSMEN 76 

MUSIC . . . . . . 82 

ACTIVITIES 98 

ATHLETICS 134 

FEATURES 164 

ADVERTISEMENTS . . . . .179 




dedication 










^Jhe class of 1957 reSpectfullu dedicated this, its Ljearbooh, to 
^rrelen C^thel itliuers, oLebanon Ualleu 07, since 1921 ^Librarian 
of ^Lebanon Ualleu L^olleae. Ulnder her leadership the libraru had 
trulu become the heart of the colleae. ^rrer wide choice off boohs, her 
interest in her profession, and her awareness of the students as 
individuals, have left an indelible impression upon the institution. 
~~Jhe i^laSS of 1957, the student bodu, and the alumni who have 
received the benefits of her devoted Service, wish her all happiness 
in her approachina retirement. 




\ --. i it ' »i ;i 



FREDERIC K. MILLER 

President of the College 

"They can't score if you have the ball." 



D. CLARK CARMEAN 

Director of Admissions 

"The main thing to ask for is sights; there 
is light enough." 

John Ruskin 





HOWARD M. KRIETZER 
Dean of the College 

"And — which is more — you'll be a man, 
my son!" 

Rudyard Kipling 



CONSTANCE P. DENT 

Dean of Women 

"It is better to light one candle than to 
curse the darkness." 

Anonymous 





THOMAS S. MAY 

Assistant to the President 

"The eye is not satisfied with seeing.' 

Ecclesiastes 1: 



THEODORE D. KELLER 

Dean of Men 

"As universal a practice as lying is, and 
as easy a one as it seems, I do not re- 
member to have heard three good lies in 
all my conversation, even from those 
who were most celebrated in that fac- 
ulty." 





Dr. V. Earl Light 

Biology 

"Anyone who doubts the value of on edu- 
cation should try putting a youngster 
through school." 

G. H. Patt 



Mr. O. P. Bollinger 

Biology 

"Let us not pursue truth too closely froi 

behind, lest we get kicked in the teeth." 

Anonymot 



Dr. Francis W. Wilson 

Biology 

"In Nature nothing is insignificant, nothing 
ignoble, nothing sinful, nothing repeti- 
tious/' 

Donald Culross Peattie 



Dr. Howard A. Neidig 

Chemistry 

"The trouble with most folks is not so much 
their ignorance as their knowing so many 
things as ain't so." 

Josh Billings 



Mr. Richard W. Neithamer 

Chemistry 

"But find you faithful friends that will 

reprove. 
That on your work may look with careful 

eyes 
And of your faults be zealous enemies." 

Boileau-Despreaux 



Mr. James Lynn Kline 

Chemistry 

"I've now realized for the first time in my 

life the vital importance of being earnest." 

Oscar Wilde 





Mr. Robert C. Riley 

Economics and Business 

"Nothing is constant but change." 

Anonyn 



Mr. C. F. Joseph Tom 

Economics and Business 

"Men are men before they are lawyers or 
physicians or manufacturers; and if you 
make them sensible men they will make 
themselves capable and sensible lawyers 
and physicians." 

John Stuart Mill 



Miss Alice M. Brumbaugh 

Sociology 

"That person is most cultivated who is able 
to put himself in the place of the greatest 
number of persons." 

Jane Addams 



Dr. Cloyd H. Ebersole 

Education 

"There is so much good in the worst of 
us, and so much bad in the best of us, 
that it hardly behooves any of us to talk 
about the rest of us. 

Edward Wallis Hoch 



Dr. Gilbert D. McKlveen 

Education 

"It's all in the way you look at it, and if 
you don't look at it, it's all in the way." 

Original 



Dr. Jean O. Love 

Psychology 

"Imperious Caesar, dead and turned to 

clay 
Will stop the hole to keep the wind away." 
Shakespeare 




Jr/ 





Dr. George G. Struble 

English 

"Le coeur o ses raisons que la raison ne 
connaii point/' (The heart has its reasons 
which reason knows not.) 



Dr. Anna Dunkle Faber 

English 

"Hon; soit qui mal y pense." (Shamed be 
he who thinks evil.) 

Edward III 



Mr. Samuel M. Bradley 

English 

"Destiny has laid upon our country the 
responsibility of the free world's leader- 
ship." 

Dwight D. Eisenhower 



Miss Gertrude L. Turner 

English 

"Flag of the free heart's hope and home!" 
Joseph Rodman Drake 



Dr. A. H. M. Stonecipher 

Languages 

"Es bildst ein Talent sich in der Stille, 
Sich ein Charakter in dem Strom der Welt.' 
(Talent develops in quietude, character it 
the current of life.) 



Miss Ruth Butler 

Languages 

"Man is but a reed, the weakest 
ture, but he is a thinking reed." 





Mrs. Maud P. Laughlin 

History 

"Except the Lord build the house, they 
labour in vain that build it." 

Psalm 127:1 



Mr. Ralph S. Shay 

History 

"Attention to detail is the difference b< 
fween mediocrity and superiority." 

An Old SoldU 



Mr. Alex J. Fehr 

Political Science 

"The peculiar evil of silencing the expres- 
sion of an opinion is, that it is robbing 
the human race . . . if the opinion is 
right, they are deprived of the opportunity 
of exchanging error for truth; if wrong they 
lose, what is almost as great a benefit, 
the clearer perception and livelier impres- 
sion of truth, produced by its collision with 
error." 

John Stuart Mill 



Dr. Barnard H. Bissinger 

Mathematics 

"Two apples and three oranges ain't five 
of anything." 

Original 



Mr. Robert O. Gilmore 

Mathematics and Physics 

"/ therefore stand and work in the world 
as one who aims at making men less 
shallow and morally better by making them 
think." 

Schweitzer 



Dr. Samuel O. Grimm 

Physics 

"For there was never yet philosopher 
That could endure the toothache p 
tiently." 

Shakespea 





Dr. Carl Y. Ehrhart 

Philosophy 

"God grant me the serenity to accept the 
things I cannot change, the courage to 
change the things / can, and the wisdom to 
know the difference." 

Reinhold Niebuhr 



Dr. W. Maynard Sparks 

Religion 

"It is no use walking anywhere to preach 
unless we preach as we walk." 



Dr. G. A. Richie 

Religion 

"Study to show yourself approved unto 
God, a workman that needs not to be 
ashamed." 

2 Timothy 2:15 



Mr. Ellis R. McCracken 

Director of Athletics 

"Waste not, want not, is a maxium I would 
teach. 
Let your watch word be dispatch, and 

practice what you preach. 
Do not let your chances, tike sunbeams, 

pass you by 
For you never miss the water until the 
well runs dry." 

Gross* 



Miss Betty Jane Bowman 

Health and Physical Education 

'The pleasantest things in the world are 
pleasant thoughts; and the great art of life 
is to have as many of them as possible." 
Montaigne 



Mr. George R. Marquette 

Health and Physical Education 

"Pride goeth before destruction, and a 
haughty spirit before a fall." 

Proverbs 16:18 





Mr. Ivan B. Moyer 

Business Manager 

"There are few ways in which a man can 
be more innocently employed than in get- 
ting money." 

Samuel Johnson 



Miss Gladys M. Fencil 

Registrar 

"Blessed is he who has found his work; let 
him ask no ofher b/essedness." 

Thomas Carlyle 



Mr. James W. Parsons 

Director of Public Relations 

"To thine own self be true, and it must 
follow, as the night the day, 
Thou canst not then be false to any man." 
Shakespeare 



Mrs. P. Rodney Kreider 

Alumni Secretary 

"Truly, this world can get on without l 
if we would but think so." 

Longfello 



Mrs. Margaret S. Millard 

Dietitian 

"Let today open our minds to new views, 
new methods, new friends and new 
thoughts. This is the way to progress, pros- 
perity and happiness." 

Anonymous 



Rev. William A. Wilt 

Pastor of the College Church 

"We ore so related to God that the will of 
God, as revealed in Christ, is the law of 
our own life." 

E. Stanley Jones 





Miss Helen Ethel Myers 

Librarian 

"Should not the heart beat once 
'How good to live and learn'?" 

Robert Bn 



Mrs. Frances T. Fields 

Language and Cataloguing 

"Quien a Dios tiene, nada le fa/fa, solo 
dios basta." 

(He who has God lacks nothing, God 
alone suffices.) 

Santa Teresa de Jesus 



Dr. Donald E. Fields 

Associate Librarian 

"In ten years either the king v 
or the donkey will be dead, 
dead." 



ill be dead, 
or I will be 



Miss Isabelle R. Smith 

Assistant Librarian 

"Every true friend is a glimpse of God.' 
Anonymo 



Mrs. Francis Wilson 

Assistant in Library 

"Learning without thought is useless; 
thought without learning is dangerous." 
Confucius 



Mrs. Lillie Struble 

Manager of College Book Store 

"To thine own self be true . . ." 

Shakespeare 





Dr. Mary E. Gillespie 

Director of Conservatory of Music 

"Start where you ore, with what you have. 
Do the best you can, but never be satis- 
fied." 

Carver 



Dr. James M. Thurmond 

Music Education 

"I'm sure I shall not pass again this 
Ellen H. Unde 



Mrs. Ruth E. Bender 

Music Education 

"Then give to the world the best you have 

And the best will come back to you." 

Mary Ainge de Vere 



Mr. R. Porter Campbell 

Music Education 

"Why did you do that?" 
(A comment in teaching— organ regi: 



Mr. Alexander Crawford 

Music Education 

"Music is the shorthand of emotion. Emo- 
tions which let themselves be described in 
words with such difficulty are conveyed to 
man in music, and in that is its power and 
significance." 

Tolstoy 



Mr. William Fairlamb, Jr. 

Music Education 

"How did you practice this piece?" 





Mr. Thomas A. Lanese 

Music Education 

"Let me never forget that behind each and 
every manifestation of nature works the 
divine will." 

Rudolph Steiner 



Mrs. Nevelyn J. Knisley 

Music Education 

"What you are to be you are now be 



Mr. Harold Malsh 

Music Education 

"/ never practice passages I already can 
play." 

Artist pupil of Louis Bostelmann 



Mr. Frank E. Stachow 

Music Education 

"Music is an excellence of the 
not the muscles." 



Mr. Robert W. Smith 

Music Education 



nd, and "The richest heritage a man can leave the 

world is a well educated family." 
James Mursell (From f acac ) e f s, a1e Education 

Building, Harrisburg.) 



Mr. Renaldo Rovers 

Music Education 

"Beauty is truth, and truth beauty, — that 
is all ye know on earth, and all ye need 
to know." 

Keats 





senior class officers 



KATHRYN DOTTS 
SHIRLEY HEIZMANN 
SIDNEY HOFING 



President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 








GENE ROGER ADAMS 

HEGINS, PA. 



NANCY JANE ADAMS 

CLOSTER, N. J. 




JAMES ALLEN 

CORNWALL, PA. 



JAMES HAAS BALSBAUGH 

STEELTON, PA. 



DEAN A. BECKER 

HANOVER, PA. 



EDWARD JOHN BILLINGHAM 

LEBANON, PA. 




HAROLD EUGCNE BIRD 

SOMERVILLE, N. J. 



NORMAN VICTOR BLANTZ 

ANNVILLE, PA. 





1 




MIRIAM ANNABELLE BLATT 

MOHRSVILLE, PA. 



ELIN LOUISE BLOUCH 

MILLERSVILLE, PA. 




JAMES NORMAN BOLLINGER 

RICHLAND, PA. 



JAMES TIMOTHY BOLTZ 

PINE GROVE, PA. 




DAVID N. BOSACCO 

GLENOLDEN, PA. 



CHARLES EDWIN BOUGHTER 

HARRISBURG, PA. 




CAROL JUNE BRADLEY 

CARLISLE, PA. 



DORIS JEAN BRANDT 

LEBANON, PA. 





JOSEPH ALBERT BRECHBILL 

CLEONA, PA. 



JOYCE ELAINE BUCK 

HARRISBURG, PA. 





HENRY THEODORE CHUDZIKIEWICZ 

ELIZABETH, N. J. 



JOHN CHARLES COTTRELL 

PAXTANG, PA. 






■ >K*-' 



M^f 



ANTHONY BENNETT CREAMER, JR. 

LEBANON, PA. 



AUDREY E. C. DaCOSTA 

WYNNEWOOD, PA. 



RONALD RICHARD DAY 

YORK, PA. 



w$^l 



CYRUS RUSSEL DIETRICH 

EPHRATA, PA. 




KATHRYN LOUISE DOTTS 

RED LION, PA. 



JOAN LOUISE ECKENROAD 

SINKING SPRING, PA. 




DAVID JOHN FARLING 

PALMYRA, PA. 



THEODORE GEORGE FISH 

READING, PA. 





ANNA LOU FISHER 

PINE GROVE, PA. 



HERBERT MICHAEL FORREST 

CLOSTER, PA. 




CAROLE ELAINE FOX 

PAXTANG, PA. 



EUGENE RONALD GEESEY 

ANNVILLE, PA. 





NANCY JEAN GERMER 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



DAVID H. GITTLEMAN 

MINERSVILLE, PA. 




JOHN ELLIS GOODMAN 

PINE GROVE, PA. 



DOROTHY JANE GRABAU 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 





DONALD NEIL GRIFFITH 

LEBANON, PA. 



MARTIN J. GROCHOWSKI 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 




FREDRIC LEONARD HARTMAN 

PALMYRA, PA. 



SHIRLEY ANN HEIZMANN 

LANGHORNE, PA. 





THOMAS LEE HESS 

HERSHEY, PA. 



NICHOLAS JOHN HILL 

LEBANON, PA. 





SIDNEY LESSER HOFING 

TRENTON, N. J. 



LAWRENCE EUGENE JONES 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



PIUS HENRY KALTREIDER 

HANOVER, PA. 



LOUISE CODY KARAPANDZA 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



RUTHANNE KELCHNER 

BETHLEHEM, PA. 



CLAIR LEONARD KELLY 

CHAMBERSBURG, PA. 










NANCY LEE KIRBY 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



DIANE LUCILLE KOHR 

YORK, PA. 




RONALD LeROY LEHMAN 

MYERSTOWN, PA. 






RICHARD DAVID LEONARD 

CAMP HILL, PA. 





LOUISE H. LOEPER 

READING, PA. 



WILLIAM BACHMAN LUTZ 

LAUREL SPRINGS, N. J. 




MARGARET EUGENIA MARTIN 

TRENTON, N. J. 



ELEANOR JUNE MEYERS 

HERSHEY, PA. 






. 



JOAN KATHERINE NAPOUELLO 

BELLEVILLE, N. J. 



BARBARA ELSIE NEATOCK 

SHILLINGTON, PA. 



SANDRA NELSON 

WESTFIELD, N. J. 



DEAN FRANKLIN NORRIS 

RED LION, PA. 






MILDRED JOHANNA OSINSKI 

CAMDEN, N. J. 



HOWARD JOSEPH PACHASA 

PLAINFIELD, N. J. 




CYNTHIA JANE PATTON 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



THOMAS VINCENT QUINN 

KEYSER, W. VA. 





BERNARD H. RIGHTMYER 

SINKING SPRING, PA. 



GLORIA DAWN RITTER 

SINKING SPRING, PA. 





KARL ARTHUR ROMBERGER 

LEBANON, PA. 



SYLVIA ANN ROSENBERRY 

FANNETTSBURG, PA. 






JOYCE ELAINE SNYDER 

CHEWSVILLE, MD. 



LYNN MAYNARD SPARKS 

ANNVILE, PA. 



NAOMI MAE.SPRENKLE 

NORTH EAST, MD. 



RONALD ARTHUR STEELE 

MONTCIAIR, N. J. 





GERALD A. STEGER 

CHAMBERSBURG, PA. 



HARVEY RODNEY STONER 

LEBANON, PA. 



*»=* 




PRISCILLA DIANE THOMAS 

QUAKERTOWN, N. J. 



BRUCE GETZ THOMPSON 

FOLSOM, PA. 




^f.. 




MILDRED ANN TRAUTMAN 

LEBANON, PA. 



WILLIAM DALE TROSTLE 

HANOVER, PA. 







M. IRENE URIAN 

FOLSOM, PA. 



HOWARD T. VOORMAN 

GARFIELD, N. J. 






GEORGE H. WADE 

SPRING CITY, PA. 



ROBERT M. S. WALKER 

BOONTON, N. J. 



SHIRLEY ANN WARFEL 

QUARRYVILLE, PA. 



HAROLD REED WEBBER 

STOUCHSBURG, PA. 





WILLIAM C. WENRICH 

PALMYRA, PA. 



JOCELYN JONES WHITE 

LEBANON, PA. 




GEORGE HERBERT WOLF 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



JEAN LOWRY WOLF 

ANNVILLE, PA. 





RICHARD CHARLES YODER 

SHIUINGTON, PA. 



JOHN BASHORE YORTY 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



CHARLES L. ZETTLEMOYER 

READING, PA. 



EUGENE W. ZIMMERMAN 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



EMILY CLEMENTS SNYDER 

LEBANON, PA. 




RICHARD E. DEITRICH 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



CHARLES WALTON RHOADS 

POTTSTOWN, PA. 



GEORGE WILLIAM STRONG 

BERGENFIELD, N. J. 



MERVIN AMOS EPPLER 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



BENEDICT C. SALAMANDRA 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



JACK HERR THOMAS 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



JUNE ELIZABETH MARKLEY 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



DALE L. SHELLENBERGER 

RED LION, PA. 



CURTIS CALVIN TROUTMAN 

WOMELSDORF, PA. 



ROBERT BREWSTER PALMER 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



WILLIAM H. SCHREIBER 

LEBANON, PA. 



JOHN HENRY WUERTZ 

ARDMORE, PA. 



•>,,.'./ 




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4* : 




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'"''v.'':i>*v.' • : i f: ' v •" '.' v ij- ••>•"'■''''. iv' ;■:'■, 

" .-. •■{•;•: ' , i&'-VA- :.-■ 








V 





JACQUELYN F. DeBENEDETT KATHRYN LOUISE DOTTS DAVID JOHN FARLING 



who's who 



DOROTHY JANE GRABAU RICHARD DAVID LEONARD LOUISE HELENA LOEPER 






GLORIA DAWN RITTER 



M. IRENE URIAN 



CHARLES L. ZETTLEMOYER 








EDWARD J. BILLINGHAM, JR. 
Chemistry 



DAVID J. FARLING 
Economics 



phi alpha epsi/on 



JUNE MARKLEY 
English 



MILDRED IRENE URIAN 
English 



CHARLES L. ZETTLEMOYER 
Political Science 







You cuf the cake — /'// watch! 



This doesn't look like Chemistry to me! 




You Freshmen better do as we say- 



I'm a big bad boy. 




Pose pretty, majorettes! 





junior class officers 




DONALD BURKHART 
Vice President 



RUTH SHEETZ 
Corresponding Secretary 




GRACE GORBEY 
Recording Secretary 



JO ANNE GROVE 
Treasurer 



THOMAS TEATES 
President 




outstanding 





GEORGIANNE FUNK 




JO ANNE GROVE 




RUTH SHEETZ 



college 



MARIAN MARCUS SCHWAB 





THOMAS TEATES 



RICHARD SHOVER 



students 





PATRICIA LUTZ 



JOAN CONWAY 



conservatory 




THOMAS SILLIMAN 




WILLIAM WORKINGER 





Henry M. Abramson 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Pre-Medical 

Beta Beta Beta National Honorary Bio- 
logical Society, Chemistry Club, Phi Lamb- 
da Sigma Executive Council, Quittapa- 
hilla Student Photographer. 

"Silence, when nothing need be said, 
is the eloquence of discretion." Bovee 



Theodore L. Blumenthal 

Hanover, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Brass Ensemble; Campus, Television Reci- 
tals; Chapel, Concert Band Soloist; Fizzle 
Follies; Glee Club; Jazz Concert; Opera; 
Symphony Concert; Intramural Basketball. 

"Music washes away from the soul the 
dust of every-day life." Auerbach 





Larry Bennetch 

Newmanstown, Pennsylvania 
Psychology 

Baseball, Day Student Congress, Future 
Teachers of America, L Club, Psychology 
Club. 

"If ever I am a teacher, i* will be 'o 
learn more than to teach." Mad. De- 
/uzy 



Russell W. Barr 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Religion 

Delta Tau Chi, Student Christian Associa- 
tion, Student Christian Association Choir, 
Student Pastor. 

"The best perfection of a religious 
man is to do common things in a per- 
fect manner." Bonaventura 



Ramon Barry Boehler 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

L Club, Legionnaires, Varsity Basketball. 

"One should believe in marriage as 
in the immortality of the soul." Balzac 





-<% 







Dorothy Marie Book 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
English 

Band, Future Teachers of America, Kappa 
Lambda Nu, Quittapahilla, Student Chris- 
tian Association Choir, Varsity Basketball 
and Hockey, Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion. 

"The heart's hushed secret in the soft 
dark eye." L. E. London 




Roy E. Boush 

West Lawn, Pennsylvan 
History 



Future Teachers of 
Volleyball, Softball 
Knights of the Val 
Club, Track. 



srica, Intramural 
and Basketball, 
Political Science 



"He who labors diligently need never 
despair; for all things are accom- 
plished by diligence and labor." 
Menander 



Raloy E. Brown 

Fredericksburg, Pennsylvania 
History (Pre-Theol.) 

Legionnaires, Student Christian Associa- 
tion. 

"Good humor is one of the best ar- 
ticles of dress one can wear in so- 
ciety." Wm. Thackeray 





James Boyer 

Quentin, Pennsylvania 
English 

Day Student Congress. 

"He had occasional flashes of s/7ence, 
that made his conversation perfectly 
delightful." Sydney Smith 



Martha Brubaker 

Millersville, Pennsylvania 
Med.-Tech. 

Kappa Lambda Nu, La Vie Collegienne, 
Quittapahilla, Tri Beta. 

"A kind heart is a fountain of glad- 
ness, making everything in its vicinity 
to freshen into smiles." Washington 
Irving 





1*.**t*.''*i . 





Donald Samuel Burkhart 

Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 
English (Pre-Theol.) 

Delta Tau Chi, Phi Lambda Sigma, Stu- 
dent Christian Association, Quittapahilla 
Business Staff. 

"By living according to the rules of 
religion a man becomes the wisest, the 
best, and the happiest creature that 
he is capable of being." Bp. Burnet 



Phyllis Ann Dasher 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Nursing 

Basketball, College Nurse, Intramural 
Sports, Wig and Buckle, Women's Ath- 
letic Association. 

"Do thy duty that is best; leave unto 
the Lord the rest," Longfellow 





^St^?^ 



A 



Joan Clare Conway 

Dallastown, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, Future Teachers of America, Glee 
Club Accompanist, Kappa Lambda Nu. 

"Music, the greatest good that mor- 
tals know. And all of Heaven we have 
below." Addison 



Frank Catanzaro 

Ambler, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

Football, Intramural Basketball and Soft- 
ball, Kappa Lambda Sigma, L Club, Po- 
litical Science Club. 

"The only way to have a friend is to 
be one." Emerson 



Hazel Ann Davis 

Salem, New Jersey 
Music Education 

Chorus, Clarinet Quartet, College Band, 
Future Teachers of America, Girls' Band, 
Kappa Lambda Nu, New Jersey Club, Stu- 
dent Christian Association Choir, Sym- 
phony. 

"The most perfect humor and irony is 
generally quite unconscious." Butler 




)«^k 



■^"v 








Nathalie Alice Davis 

Bridgeton, New Jersey 
Music Education 

Chorus, Delta Tau Chi, Future Teachers of 
America, Girls' Band, Student Christian 
Association Choir, QuittapahNla. 

"Music hafh charms, we all may find 
ingratiate deeply with the mind." 
Matthew Green 




Jacquelyn Fetterhoff DeBenedett 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Sociology 

Kappa Lambda Nu, Political Science Club, 
Student-Faculty Council, Women's Com- 
muter Council. 

"Nothing is impossible to a willing 
heart." John Heywood 



Robert F. Doster 

Rothsville, Pennsylvania 
History 

Brass Ensemble, College Band, Future 
Teachers of America, Kappa Lambda Sig- 
ma, Political Science Club, Symphony Or- 
chestra. 

"Man must be prepared for every 
event of life, for there is nothing that 
is durable." Menander 





Ronald Dissinger 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry 

American Chemical Society, Chemistry 
Club, Men's Day Student Congress, Stu- 
dent Christian Association. 

"From the crown of his head to the 
sole of his foot, he is all mirth." 
Shakespeare 



Cameron G. Drum 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Religion 

"He that is thy friend indeed, he will 
help thee in thy need." Richard Barn- 
field 








Bruce Weik Eberly 

Sheridan, Pennsylvania 
Psychology 

Future Teachers of America. 

"Better late than never." John Hey- 
wood 



Georgianne Bowman Funk 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
English 

Basketball and Hockey Manager, Delta 
Lambda Sigma Secretary, Editor of Or- 
ganizations of Quittapahilla, Future 
Teachers of America President, Majorette, 
Political Science Club, Student Christian 
Association Cabinet, Women's Athletic As- 
sociation Treasurer. 

"Ambition is the germ from which all 
growth of nobleness proceeds." T. D. 
English 





Drew T. Fetterolf 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Pre-Engineering 

Baseball, Legionnaires, Phi Lambda Sig- 
ma. 

"A little nonsense now and then is 
relished by the best of men." Anony- 
mous 



John K. Feaser 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
History 

"As upright as a cedar." Shakespear 



Dominic J. Garda 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Mathematics 

Football, Intramural Basketball. 

"Brains well prepared are the monu- 
ments where human knowledge is most 
surely engraved." Rousseau 





L 




Nancy Adella Gibson 

Everett, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, College and Girls' Band, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica, Student Christian Association Officer 
and Cabinet Member. 

"Devote each day to the object then 
in time, and every evening will find 
something done." Goethe 

Grace Jane Gorbey 

Prospect Park, Pennsylvania 
English 

Delta Lambda Sigma, Editor of Junior 
Section of Quittapahilla, Freshman, Soph- 
omore, and Junior Class Secretary; Future 
Teachers of America Recording Secretary, 
Majorette, Political Science Club Secretary, 
Varsity Basketball and Hockey Manager. 

"Happiness consists in activity. Such is 
the constitution of our nature. It is a 
running stream, and not a stagnant 
pool." J. M. Good 





M. Elaine Goodyear 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Nursing 

Basketball, College Nurse, Hockey, Intra- 
mural Sports, Women's Athletic Associa- 
tion. 

" v ou have not fulfilled every duty un- 
less you have fulfilled that of being 
cheecful and pleasant." C. Buxton 



Lois Anne Gingrich 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Elem. Ed. 

"The truly generous is the truly 
and he who loves not others, live 
blessed." Home 



Patricia Ann Gordon 

Camp Hill, Pennsylvania 
Med.-Tech. 

Chorus, Kappa Lambda Nu, La Vie Col- 

legiene, Quittapahilla. 

"When o girl ceases to blush, she has 
lost the most powerful charm of her 
beauty." Gregory 




j^BT* 



<dfl 



. i a—muff 



^tej|a*~. 



1 




? "jj&** r 




Mildred Irene Greybeck 

Windber, Pennsylvania 
Elem. Ed. 

Childhood Education Club, Delta Tau Chi, 
Future Teachers of America, Kappa Lamb- 
da Nu, Quittapahilla Staff, Women's Ath- 
letic Association. 

"We cannot be \ust unless we ore 
Jcindfiearred." Vauvenargues 



Luke Kauffman Grubb 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chapel Organist, Chorus, Glee Club. 

''Music is the thing of the world that 
I love most." Samuel Pepys 





Jo Anne Grove 

Red Lion, Pennsylvania 
Pre-Medical 

Beta Beta Beta — National Honorary Bio- 
logical Society, Chemistry Club, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, La Vie Collegienne, Resi- 
dent Women's Student Government As- 
sociation. 

'7nfe//igence is the highest virtue; 
honesty, kindness, and the like comes 
with it." Anonymous 



Murray Bernard Grosky 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Pre-Medical 

Beta Beta Beta — National Honorary Bio- 
logical Society, Chemistry Club, College 
Band, Intramural Basketball, Jazz Con- 
cert, Kappa Lambda Sigma. 

"A rhapsody of words." Shakespeare 



Robert William Handley 

Trenton, New Jersey 
Economics 



Legionnaii 



"Blessings on him 
sleep." Cervantes 



vho first invented 






A 




Marion Elaine Henderson 

Upper Darby, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, Color Guard, Delta Lambda Sig- 
ma, Future Teachers of America, Intercol- 
legiate Orchestra, Intramural Volleyball 
and Softball, String Quartet, Student 
Christian Association, Symphony Orches- 
tra. 

"The one exclusive sign of a fhorougfi 
knowledge is the power of teaching." 
Aristotle 



Jane Magnuson Hoffman 

Ickesburg, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Brass Ensemble, Chorus, College Band, 
Delta Lambda Sigma, Future Teachers of 
America, Quittapahilla Staff, Varsity Bas- 
ketball, Women's Athletic Association. 

"The tones of human voices ore 
mightier than strings or brass to move 
the soul." Klopstock 





Michael W. Heynio 

Kearny, New Jersey 
Forestry 

Baseball, New Jersey Club. 

"The more we do, the more we can 
do; the more busy we are the more 
leisure we have." Hazlitt 



Emma Elizabeth Herr 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, Clarinet Quartet, College Band, 
Future Teachers of America, Girls' Band, 
Student Christian Association Choir, Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Quittapahilla Staff. 

"If silence were golden she'd be a 
millionaire." Richard Steele 



Cyrus Lee Hollinger 

Front Royal, Virginia 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club, Einstein Club, Phi Lamb- 
da Sigma. 

"The integrity of men is to be meas- 
ured by their conduct, not by their 
professions." Junius 







Loretta Ruth Hostetter 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Med.-Tech. 

Beta Beta Beta — National Honorary Bio- 
logical Society Secretary, Chorus, Wom- 
en's Commuter Council. 

Soft hair, on which light drops a dia- 
mond." Massey 



George B. Johnson 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Psychology 

Intramural Sports, Kappa Lambda Sigma, 

Legionnaires. 

"To be a wan in a true sense is, in the 
first place and above all things, to 
have a wife." Mkhelet 





James E. Houston 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Pre-Dental 
Brass Ensemble, Chemistry Club, College 
Band and Orchestra, Intercollegiate Or- 
chestra, Men's Day Student Congress, 
Quittapahilla Staff. 

"The better part of va/our is discre- 
tion." Shakespeare ■ 



t 



Frank Peter Hottenstein 

Myerstown, Pennsylvania 
Pre-Medical 

Men's Day Student Congress. 

"I shall lough myself to 
Shakespeare 



Doris Yvonne Kane 

Easton, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, Concert Band, Delta Lambda Sig- 
ma, Fizzle Follies, Future Teachers of 
America, Girls' Band, Glee Club, Inter- 
collegiate Chorus, Opera, Quittapahilla 
Music Editor, Wig and Buckle. 

"Come sing now, sing: for I know ye 
sing well, I see ye have a singing 
face." Fletcher 




. ; v-T» <Q% 





Carol Ann Kelly 

Towson, Maryland 
Music Education 

Chorus, Delta Lambda Sigma, Future 
Teachers of America, Girls' Band, Quitta- 
pahilla Staff, Resident Women's Student 
Government Association, Student Chris- 
tian Association. 

"A good heart's worth gold." Shakes- 
peare 



William H. Kiick 

Glen Rock, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

Basketball Statistician, Intramural Sports, 
Knights of the Valley, Men's Senate, Po- 
litical Science Club, Quittapahilla Business 
Manager. 

"Dare to do your duty always; this is 
the height of true valor." C. Simmons 





Nancy lee Kettle 

Hopewell, New Jersey 
Elem. Ed. 

Future Teachers of America, Kappa Lamb- 
da Nu, Varsity Hockey, Women's Athletic 
Association. 

"if my heart were not light, I would 
die." Joanna Baillie 



Thomas Frank Kershner, 

Vineland, New Jersey 
Music Education 



Ch< 



rus, Glee Club. 
"Men of few words 
Shakespeare 



R. Lee Kunkel 

East Petersburg, Pennsylvania 
Political Science 

Intramural Basketball and Softball, Kap- 
pa Lambda Sigma, Men's Senate, Pi Gam- 
ma Mu, Political Science Club. 



"Character is a diamond that : 
every other stone." Bartol 



afches 







I 




*sr £ 



George E. Kupchinsky 

Minersville, Pennsylvania 
Pre-Dental 

Student Affiliate to American Chemistry 
Society. 

"An honest man's the nob/est work of 

God." Pope 



Jerry E. Lego 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Brass Ensemble, Chorus, Coll 
Kappa Lambda Sigma. 

"With malice toward none 
ity for all." Lincoln 




ana char- 




Wilbur F. Lantz 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Religion 

Chorus; Delta Tau Chi, Vice President; Re- 
ligious Emphasis Week Committee. 

"The voice of the people is the voice 
of God." A/ Cuin 



K 



June Lykens Lantz 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Delta Tau Chi Secretary, Girls' Band and 

Chorus, Glee Club. 

"The highest graces of music flow from 
the feelings of the heart." Emerson 



Dorothy Lentz 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Elem. Ed. 

Chorus, Elementary Education Club, Kap- 
pa Lambda Nu, Quittapahilla Staff, Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 

"Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and 
low, an excellent thing in woman." 
Shakespeare 






^p www M P 



J 



Willard L. Light 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
History 

"The intellect of the wise is like glass; 
it admits the light of heaven and re- 
flects it." Julius Hare 



J ere R. Martin 

Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
History (Pre.-Theol.) 

Delta Tau Chi, Political Science Club, 
Quittapahilla Staff, Student Christian As- 
sociation Cabinet, Student Council. 

"A life that will bear the inspection 
of men and of God, is the only cer- 
tificate of true religion." Johnson 





James R. Maier 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Economics 
Legionnaires. 

"A good name is better than precious 
ointment." Old Testament 



Patricia Ann Lutz 

Lititz, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Captain of the Cheerleaders, Chorus, Col- 
lege Band, Delta Lambda Sigma, Fizzle 
Follies, Future Teachers of America, Girls' 
Band, Glee Club, Student-Faculty Council. 

"She walks in beauty, like the night 
of cloudless climes and starry skies; 
And all that's best of dark and bright 
meet in her aspect and her eyes." 
Bryon 



James M. McArdle 

Port Jervis, New York 
English 

Basketball Manager, Intramural Basket- 
ball and Softball, La Vie Collegienne, Phi 
Lambda Sigma, Political Science Club, Wig 
and Buckle. 

"In arguing, too, the person own'd 
his skill. For even though vanquished 
he argued still." Goldsmith 




A 





TH 



-*^»^ 




Gerald Allen McCormick 

Johnstown, Pennsylvania 
Religion 

Delta Tau Chi, Student Christian Associa- 
tion. 

"I believe that in the end the truth 
will conquer." John Wyc/iffe 



Larry Mentzer 

Myerstown, Pennsylvania 
Psychology 

Baseball, Basketball, Knights of the Val- 
ley, L Club. 

"For when the One Great Scorer 
comes to write against your name. He 
marks — not that you won or lost — 
but how you played the game." Grant- 
land Rice 





Linden Mcllvaine, Jr. 

Georgetown, Delaware 
Music Education 
Band, Chorus, Glee Club. 

"Studies serve for delight, for orna- 
ment and for ability." Francis Bacon 



Frank R. McCulloch 

Havertown, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

Baseball, Basketball Scorekeeper, Football 
Manager, Intramural Basketball, L Club, 
Political Science Club. 

"He who has a firm will molds the 
world to himself." Goethe 



Robert Gordon Miller 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 

Affiliate of the American Chemical So- 
ciety, Intramural Basketball. 

" '77s only noble to be good." Jenny- 






William R. Minnich 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Elem. Ed. 

Childhood Education Club, Legionnaires, 
Future Teachers of America, Student 
Christian Association. 

''Every man is the maker of his own 
fortune." Richard Steele 



Robert James Nelson 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

Baseball, Basketball, Future Teachers of 
America, L Club. 

"A sound mind in a sound body." 
Juvenal 





Ronald Joseph Mosemann 

Manheim, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, Fizzle Follies, Glee Club, Jazz 
Concert. 

"We are more sociable and get on 
better with people by the heart than 
the intellect." Bruyere 



Stanley H. Molotsky 

Camden, New Jersey 
Economics 

Basketball Scorekeeper, Intramural Sports, 
Phi Lambda Sigma, Political Science Club, 
Quittapahilla Staff. 

"Men of courage, men of sense, and 
men of letters are frequent: but a true 
gentleman is what one seldom sees." 
Steele 



Carl Peraino 

Bergenfield, New Jersey 
Chemistry 

Beta Beta Beta— National Honorary Bio- 
logical Society, Chemistry Club, Kappa 
Lambda Sigma. 

"The great hope of society is in in- 
dividual character." Charming 





i 






Ronald Arthur Pieringer 

Bergenfieid, New Jersey 
Chemistry 

Beta Beta Beta — National Honorary Bio- 
logical Society, Chemistry Club, Kappa 
Lambda Sigma, La Vie Collegiene, New 
Jersey Club. 

"Much wisdom often goes with fewest 

words." Sophocles 



J. Carl Radcliffe 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 

'This is such a serious world that 
should never speak at all unless 
have something to say." Thomas C 
lyle 





Wilbur M. Priester 

Athol, Massachusetts 
Political Science 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, Political Science 
Club, Quittapahilla Staff. 

"Character is perfectly educated will." 
Novalis 



Ross Stanley Plasterer 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

Baseball, Football, L Club. 

"/ have no superfluous leisure.' 
Shakespeare 



Donald Reinhard 

Pine Grove, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 

Baseball, Chemistry Club, Knights of the 
Valley, L Club, Senate, Quittapahilla Staff, 
Varsity Basketball. 

"To live is not to live for one's self 
alone; let us help one another." Men- 
ander 



A 




tp 






1 



Jack AA. Repert 

Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 
Sociology 

"Silence is the ecstatic bliss of souls 
that by intelligence converse." Thomas 
Otway 



Helen Louise Sauder 

Highspire, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Brass Ensemble, Chorus, College Band, 
Delta Lambda Sigma, Future Teachers of 
America, Girls' Band, Quittapahilla Staff. 

"Sincerity is the indispensable ground 
of all conscientiousness, and by con- 
sequence of all heartfelt religion." 
Kant 





Polly Ann Risser 

Lititz, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

Delta Lambda Sigma, Girls' Band, Politi- 
cal Science Club, Quittapahilla Staff. 

"The hand that hath made you fair hath 
wade you good." Shakespeare 



Arlene Maria Reynolds 

Media, Pennsylvania 
Med.-Tech. 

Intramural Sports, Kappa Lambda Nu, La 
Vie Collegienne, Quittapahilla Staff, Tri 
Beta, Varsity Basketball and Hockey, 
Women's Athletic Association. 



"The hair is the 
women." Luther 



chest 



ent of 



Leo J. Savastio 

Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 
English 

Baseball, Basketball, Football, Future 
Teachers of America. 

"The glass of fashion, and the mold 
of form, The observed of all observ- 
ers." Shakespeare 





Jack Fields Saylor 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 
Biology 

Legionnaires, Phi Lambda Sigma Presi- 
dent. 

"A happy marriage is a new begin- 
ning of life, a new starting point for 
happiness and usefulness." A. P. Stan- 
ley 



John J. Schwab 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Economics 
Legionnaires. 

"All other goods by Fortune's hands 
are given; A wife is the peculiar gift 
of Heaven." Pope 





Kenneth W. Schuler 

Columbia, Pennsylvania 
Economics 



Future Teacher 
litical Science 
and Track. 



of America, L Club, Po- 
Club, Varsity Basketball 



"I never think of the future. It come 
soon enough." Albert Einstein 



▲ 



William E. Schadler 

Richland, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 

Baseball, Chemistry Club, L Club, Legion- 
naires. 

''Splitting the air with noise." Shakes- 
peare 



Marian Marcus Schwab 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
English 

Chorus, Delta Lambda Sigma, Freshman 
Class President, Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica, Girls' Band, La Vie Collegienne, Po- 
litical Science Club, Quittapahilla Staff, 
Student Christian Association Cabinet, 
Student-Faculty Council. 

"A mind once cultivated will not lie 
fallow for half an hour." Bulwer 






Barbara Elaine Schwaghart 

Rahway, New Jersey 
Elem. Ed. 

Delta Lambda Sigma, Future Teachers of 
America, Elementary Education Club, New 
Jersey Club, Women's Athletic Association. 

"Good humor is the health of the 
sou/." Stanislaus 



luth Sheetz 

Reading, Pennsylvania 
English 

lolor Guard, Basketball Manager, Chorus, 
Hockey Manager, Junior Class Corre- 
sponding Secretary, Quittapahilla Editor, 
Women's Athletic Association. 

"Seeing much, suffering much, and 
studying much, are the three pillars 
of learning." Disraeli 





Geraldine Yvonne Sheaffer 

Terre Hill, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, Delta Lambda Sigma, Future 
Teachers of America, Girls' Band, Student 
Christian Association Choir, Quittapahilla 
Staff. 

"The heart has eyes that the brain 
knows nothing of." Parkhurst 



Elizabeth Powers Shatto 

Hagerstown, Maryland 
Elem. Ed. 

Childhood Education Club, Chorus, Delta 

Lambda Sigma. 

"The voice is celestial melody." Long- 
fellow 



Lanta A. Sholley, Jr. 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Elem. Ed. 

Childhood Education Club, Future Teach- 
ers of America, La Vie Collegienne. 

"High aims form high characters, and 
great objects bring out great minds." 
Tryon Edwards 




*e%ff% «r*r 



%^^ 



A«*^ 



Richard L. Shover 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
English-Philosophy 

Baseball, Basketball, Green Blotter, 
Knights of the Valley, La Vie Collegienne, 
L Club, Men's Day Student Congress, Stu- 
dent-Faculty Council, Quittapahilla Staff. 

"Should the whole frame of nature 
round him break, In ruin and contu- 
sion hurled, He, unconcerned, would 
hear the mighty crack. And stand se- 
cure amidst a falling world." Joseph 
Addison 



Paul Socha 

Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania 
History 

Intramural Basketball, Phi Lambda Sigma, 
Political Science Club. 

"A light heart lives long." Shakes- 
peare 




Thomas Edward Silliman 

Allentown, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Chorus, College Band, German Band, Glee 
Club, Kappa Lambda Sigma, Symphony, 
Woodwind Quintette. 

"Music is a prophecy of what life is 
to be; the rainbow of promise trans- 
lated out of seeing into hearing." 
T. M Childs 



s 





Henry W. Shuey 

Ono, Pennsylvania 
History 

Future Teachers of America. 

"Silence is the element in which great 
things fashion themselves." Thomas 
Carlyle 



Bonnie Lou Speck 

Huntingdon, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Brass Ensemble, Chorus, College Band, 
Girls' Band, Quittapahilla Staff, Sym- 
phony. 

"We can do nothing well without joy 
and a good conscience which is the 
ground of joy." Sibbes 









Elaine Sproul 

Lansdowne, Pennsylvania 
Elem. Ed. 

Basketball, Childhood Education Club, Fu- 
ture Teachers of America, Kappa Lambda 
Nu, Student Christian Association. 

"The earnestness of life is the only 
passport to the satisfaction of life." 
Parker 



Thomas Gilbert Teates 

Front Royal, Virginia 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club, Einstein Club, Phi Lamb- 
da Sigma, Men's Senate, Student Chris- 
tian Association, Student-Faculty Council. 
"/ dare do all that may become a 
man; who dare do more is none." 
William Shakespeare 





Jack Stearns 

Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

"The unspoken word 
harm." Kossuth 



Richard T. Stone 

Grantville, Pennsylvania 
Philosophy 

"The domestic hearth — there only is 
real happiness." Anatole France 



Glenn Thomas 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Baseball, Football, Intramural Sports, L 
Club, legionnaires, Quirtapahilla Staff. 

"That man lives twice who lives the 

first life well." Herrick 






Thomas Uhrich 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
History 

Legionnaires, Phi Lambda Sigma, Men's 
Day Student Congress, Political Science 
Club. 



"Good nature is the very 
good mind." Goodman 



of a 



Thomas W. Weible, Jr. 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
English 

French Club, Green Blotter, Quittapahilla 
Staff, Student Christian Association. 

"The temple of our purest thoughts is 
silence." S. J. Hole 





Calvin J. Wacker 

Roselle Park, New Jersey 
Music Education 

College Band, Glee Club, Legionnaires, 
Student-Faculty Council President, Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Wig and Buckle. 

"In all deportments of activity, to 
have one thing to do, and then to do 
it, is the secret of success." Anonymous 



William Veasey 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
English 

Band, Green Blotter, Legionnaires, Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Wig and Buckle. 

"Waste neither time nor money, but 
make the best use of both." Franklin 



George Martin Wentling 

Annville, Pennsylvania 
Chemistry 

Chemistry Club, Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica, Kappa Lambda Sigma, Student Chris- 
tian Association, Quittapahilla Staff. 

"Fair words never hurt the tongue." 
George Chapman 






Jeanne Winter 

Reading, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Basketball, Chorus, Future Teachers of 
America, Girls' Band, Political Science 
Club, Quittapahilla Staff, Women's Ath- 
letic Association. 

"What do we live for, if it is not to 
make life less difficult to each other?" 
George Eliot 



M. Robert Yorty 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

"Conversation is on art in which t 
man has all mankind for competitors.' 
Emerson 





William Workinger 

Red lion, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Band, Chorus, Clarinet Ensemble, Knights 
of the Valley, Symphony Orchestra, Wood- 
wind Quintette. 

"Knowledge itself is power." Bacon 



Otto Wolpert 

Ambler, Pennsylvania 
History 

Football, Intramural Basketball and Soft- 
ball, Kappa Lambda Sigma, Political 
Science Club. 

"Repose and cheerfulness are the 
badge of the gentlemen." Emerson 



Joanne Young 

Havertown, Pennsylvania 
Music Education 

Basketball, College Band, Chorus, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, Future Teachers of Amer- 
ica, Girls' Band, Hockey, Intercollegiate 
Orchestra, Intramural Sports, Quittapa- 
hilla Staff, Student Christian Association, 
Symphony, Women's Athletic Association. 

"There's many a good tune played 
on an old Fiddle." Butler 





Harvey Webster Ebright 

Jonestown, Pennsylvania 

Mervin Amos Eppler 

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Emelie Ann Ludwig 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



Larry Ziegler 

Red Lion, Pennsylvania 
Economics 

Football Manager, Intramural Sports. 

"A good disposition is more valuable 
than gold; for the latter is the gift 
of fortune, but the former is the dower 
of nature." Addison 






Gove showers, such as this one. 



Supported LVC's sports' teams. 




typical valley ites, 



Boys dressed up for dinner. 



- ITS wfT'i $ m S- 8 i- v'* Ik 



'«- •-SvS'F -■- ■'* i 




t 



kA£ViC*\kMKV**nVls f t \ it S it \f 

m 

lis ill, 
9fi 




Crammed for exams/ 



w* • • • 



Affended soc/efy dances. 





Went into business. 
Gave parties in the dormitory. 




Girls helped the Kalo Pledges. 





MiMive 




GEORGIANNE FUNK 



Ml IV Q 





RICHARD SHOVER 



Mi. 2udtie 





LEO SAVASTIO 



Mm, 2aitiie 




PATRICIA LUTZ 



MiM. 2uMie C&Wit 





POLLY ANN RISSER 



MiAA- 2uittie G&wit 






GRACE GORBEY 




We're sunbathers! 



sophomore class 



Aren't I a cuf/e? 




The gang 




Row One: Judy Swavely, Jack McDonald, John Ollinger, Jean Henninger, Jean Blocher, Ruther Obert, Sandy Weit, Charles Bright- 
bill, Dorother Jones, James Tyson, Beverly Walp, Sally Crobaugh, Robert Dinnerman, James Laverty, Elizabeth Speicher, Marie Meyer, 
Evelyn Krammes. Row Two: Charlotte Long, John Hoffman, Thelma Hauer, Carol Mark, Ethel Thomasco, Harriet Mickey, Janet Blank, 
Barbara Johnson, Chester Rebok, James Wright, Joseph Snare, Phyllis Homer, Myrle Elkner. Row Three: Richard Humbert, Joseph Nas- 
saur, Beverly Hemperly, Marshall Cook, Barbara Carrander, Virginia Smedley, Nancy Baker, Roberta McBride, Mary Risser, Janet Tingley, 
Linda Gordon, Rachel Meyers, Barbara Klinger, Roy Bowman, Helen Epting, Kenneth Fegan, Lester Miller, Aubrey Kershner, Jerald 
Bachman, John Bell, Robert Landis, Anthony Pellegrino, Gerald Wingenroth, Tausuo Hoshina. 






Richard Starr, President; Virginia 
Smedley, Secretary; Lester Miller, Treas- 
urer; David Teates, Vice President. 



Wake up, sleepy head! 




That was a funny joke! 






Row One: Sandy Stover, President; 

Rosalyn Rogers, Secretary. Row Two: Karl 

Schmidt, Vice President; Oliver Cromwell, 
Treasurer. 



Well, look at us! 



freshman class 



Row One: Ann Rohland, Elizabeth Ritter, Susan Trostle, Marilyn Hafer, Linda Shirey, Susan Artz, Joanne Grubb, Rosalyn Rogers. 
Row Two: Richard Rothenberger, Lawrence Sass, Charles Wernert, Clair Paul, Joseph Mitchell, Frank Argenziano, Mark Schaffer, George 
Lewis, Marian Brooks, Richard Hart, Veronica Evans, David Dick, Ruth Howell, Mary Beaver, Estelle Berger, Flora Rhen, Joan Eaby, Grace 
Lennox, Carolyn Schirer, Mary Spancake, Ruth Miller, Susan Oaks, Linda Heefner, Margaret Robinson, Louise Gay, Janet Zuse, Sue Hartz, 
Doris White, Anne Lyter. Row Three: Alexander McCullough, Fillman Fry, Waldo Rich, Thomas Kunkle, George Fillmore, James Lebo, 
Philip Niosi, Norman Gray, John Morris, Ned Heindel, Vincent Crudele, Kenneth Piatt, Albert Edwards, Ronald Hartranft, Paul Rauch, 
James Barr, Stanley Winarski, Sandy Stover, Richard Bird, Kenneth Troutman, Neil Aharrah, Arthur Ford, Richard Bartlett, Helen Gra- 
ham, Richard Morrison, Dale Kreider, June Morroni, Marie Sponsler, William Shesser, Patricia Evans, John Colangelo. 



o 




£5 



(SI 



ij^ft^JHCZ tv v!5I6w» 







1 

1 


lei' •' ]tfi 






E5fr j | IT ■£* 








We finally got settled in our rooms. 



We met the upperclassmen. 




We made friends. 




Freshman, answer that phone! 



Oh, when that first test is returned. 





One dink, please. 




Row One: Dr. Thurmond, G. Gorbey, T. Silliman. Row Two: H. Lauman, 
M. Shirley, S. Trostle, G. Fonk, B. Hemperly, R. Spencer. Row Three: R. 
Sheetz, S. Miller, C. Long, M. Eikner, E. Henderson. 



marching 



"Lebanon Valley, Lebanon 
Valley, fight against the foe!" 
The strains of our fight song are 
heard at every home football 
game as the Marching Band, at- 
tired in their blue and white uni- 
forms, high-step onto the field 
before the game. At half-time, 
the band gives an excellent per- 
formance, always concluding 
with the traditional "I" forma- 
tion. 

Dr. James Thurmond, who is 
the director of this group, has 
been assisted by Thomas Silli- 
man, drum major, and Theodore 





Row One: L. Heefner, N. Gibson, A. Seifarth, D. Grabau, L. 
Loeper. Row Two: H. Weitzel, R. Miller, E. Herr, B. Klinger, 
H. Davis, R. Bartlett. Row Three: J. Colangelo, A. McCullough, 
W. Workinger, L. Mcllvaine, C. Wacker, R. Rothenberger. 



band 



Fish, drill master. They have 
done a commendable job in co- 
ordinating and perfecting this 
year's marching band. The half- 
time performances were nar- 
rated by Calvin Wacker. 

Preceding the band onto the 
football field were our five color 
guards, led by Sally Miller, ser- 
geant-at-arms. The majorettes 
also added to the before-game 
and half-time spirit by their 
fancy twirling. They were head- 
ed this year by Rita Spencer, 
with Robie Laumen as solo twirl- 




Row One: T. Fish, B. Rightmyer, J. Eckenroad, M. Beaver, J. Tyson, J. 
Ragno. Row Two: H. Webber, C. Dietrich, H. Sauder, J. Hoffman, G. 
Ritter, S. Poet. Row Three: P. Homer, D. Kurr, K. Fegan, R. Bowman, C. 
Wernert. Row Four: D. Moyer, J. Hoffman, J. Smith, J. Checket, J. Stearns, 
D. Hole. 








Row One: L. Gay, D. Tobias, L. Shirey, P. Kaltreider, R. 
Doster, J. Goodman, H. Dunn. Row Two: J. Spearing, G. Cun- 
ningham, F. Rhen, B. Speck, T. Blumenthal, P. Niosi. Row 
Three: R. Powell, L. Alutius, J. Rubba, C. Sharman. Row Four: 
L. Seibert, R. Schott, J. Yorty, R. Morrison, R. Perez. 



Director: Dr. James Thurmond; Piccolos: D. Grabau, A. Seifarth; Flutes: N. Gibson, L. Loeper, R. McBride, P. Thomas; 
Oboes: L. Gay, T. Silliman; Saxophones: R. Bartlett, L. Heefner, P. Lutz; Bassoons: R. Perez, C. Wacker; B-Flat Clarinets: 
D. Book, J. Colangelo, H. Davis, E. Herr, B. Klinger, A. McCullough, L. Mcllvaine, R. Miller, R. Rothenberger, W. Shesser, 
H. Weitzel, W. Workinger; Alto Clarinet: J. Young; Bass Clarinet: S. Zimmerman; Baritones: L. Alutius, R. Powell, C. Shar- 
man; Cornets: R. Bowman, J. Checket, K. Fegan, J. Hoffman, D. Kurr, S. Poet, G. Ritter, H. Sauder, J. Stearns, H. Webber, 
C. Wernert; French Horns: M. Beaver, J, Eckenroad, D. Kane, F, Kreider, J. Ragno, B. Rightmyer, S. Trostle, J. Tyson; Trom- 
bones: T. Blumenthal, G. Cunningham, T. Fish, J. Lego, J. Spearing, B. Speck; Tubas: B. Monroe, R. Morrison, R. Schott, L. 
Seibert, J. Yorty; Percussion: R. Doster, J. Goodman, P. Kaltreider, L. Shirey, D. Tobias; String Bass: W. Trostle. 



concert band 



The Concert Band, formed mainly from the marching band, begins its rehearsals after 
football season is over. The band in the past two years, under the direction of Dr. James Thur- 
mond, has proved itself capable of producing a fine sound and of playing high quality band 
literature. 

Mr. William Fairlamb, professor of piano, was the soloist with the band this year, giv- 
ing an outstanding rendition of Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue." Among other numbers the 
band played "Celebration Overture" by Paul Creston, "Penny-Whistle Song" by Leroy Ander- 
son featuring the flute section, and "Overture for Band" by Mendelssohn. 

As well as giving a concert on campus and providing the music for May Day, the band 
gave its annual spring concert at the Forum in Harrisburg and a concert in Ephrata. 





Director: Dr. James Thurmond; Flutes: N. Gibson, C. Kelly, L. Loeper, R. McBride, E. Ritter, P. Thomas; Oboes: L. 
Gay, J. Napoliello; Saxophones: D. Grabau, P. Lutz; Bassoon: H. Epting; B-Flat Clarinets: H. Davis, E. Herr, B. Klinger, 
R. Miller, S. Prugh, C. Shairer; Bass Clarinet: S. Zimmerman; Baritones: L. Alutius, C. Bradley, G. Sheaffer, M. Swope; 
Cornets: E. Berger, J. Hoffman, P. Homer, G. Ritter, H. Sauder, S. Warfel; French Horns: J. Eckenroad, S. Heizmann, D. Kane, 
R. Obert; Trombones: R. Howell, B. Neatock, F. Rhen, B. Speck, N. Sprenkle, J. Winter; Tubas: N. Davis, J. Lantz, J. Young, 
Percussion: F. Liskey, O. Rhoads, L. Shirey, B. Weaver. 



girls' band 



This group, composed of forty-five girls, performs commendably without the assistance of 
the male members of the Conservatory. Under the direction of Dr. James Thurmond, they gain 
experience on their instruments and also have the fun of playing in an ensemble. Many of 
the girls are also in the Concert Band. 

This year's concert was held in Engle Hall March 13. The program was highlighted by a 
cornet trio composed of Gloria Ritter, Helen Sauder, and Jane Hoffman playing "Bolero" by 
Walter E. Smith. Some of the other numbers played were "Ballet Egyptien," "Side Show," a 
humorous number; "Brazil" featuring Latin American rhythms; and "Chorale: St. Antoni" by 
Haydn-Brahms. 




ensembles 



In addition to the larger musical organizations here at the Valley, 
there are several small ensemble groups. These groups have the pleasure 
of playing lesser known and performed but very worthwhile and beau- 
tiful music. 

The clarinet quintet is made up of three types of clarinets — three 
B-Flats and an alto and bass. The ensemble performed in two recitals 
this year, playing pieces both written and arranged for this instrumen- 
tation. This year each member of the group has done some of this type 
of arranging. Several other Conservatory students have also made ar- 
rangements for the group. 

The smallest of the ensembles is the string quartet under the direc- 
tion of Professor Thomas Lanese. This year the group has played on 
television for the "College of the Air" program and has provided music 
for several organizations in this area. 

The woodwind quintet, which is steadily growing in importance as 
en ensemble, is composed of flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, and French 
horn. The Lebanon Valley quintet was reorganized just this year; they 
have played several selections in recitals. This ensemble, as is the 
clarinet quintet, is under the direction of Professor Frank Stachow. 

Thirty-two students are in the brass ensemble, which is led by Dr. 
James Thurmond. The ensemble includes a large number of brass instru- 
ments, assisted by a percussion section. They played several special 
numbers in the band concerts. 




Brass Ensemble: Director: Dr. James Thurmond; Cornets: R. Bowman, J. Checket, K. Fegan, J. Hoffman, D. Kurr, S. 
Poet, G. Ritter, H. Saucier, J. Smith, J. Stearns, H. Webber; French Horns: J. Eckenroad, J. Ragno, B. Righmyer, W. Trostle, 
J. Tyson; Baritones: L. Alutius, R. Powell, C. Sharman; Trombones: T. Blumenthal, G. Cunningham, J. Lego, F. Rhen, B. 
Speck, G. Wolf; Tubas: B. Monroe, R. Schott, J. Yorty; Percussion: J. Goodman, P. Kaltreider, R. Perez, D. Tobias. 



•'•^fcjff**' 



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Clarinet Quintet: W. Workinger, H. Davis, E. Herr, H. Weitzel, S. Zimmerman 




String Quartet: R. Steele, C. Bradley, E. Henderson, T. Lanese 




Woodwind Quintet: T. Silliman, R. Perez, J. Ragno, W. Workinger, L. Loeper 




Director: Thomas Lanese; Violins: C. Bradley, L. Cody, A. Kierstead, B. Neatock, C. Pierson, S. Prugh, C. Schairer, R. 
Steele, S. Trostle, J. Young; Violas: F. Liskey, C. Moyer, J. White; Cellos: E. Berger, S. Crobaugh, E. Henderson, E. Stahle 
Bass Viol: W. Trostle; Flutes: D. Grabau, L. Loeper, R. McBride; Oboes: L. Gay, T. Silliman; Bassoons: R. Perez, C. Wacker 
Clarinets: H. Davis, E. Herr, H. Weitzel, W. Workinger; French Horns: J. Eckenroad; J. Huston, J. Ragno, B. Rightmyer 
Trumpets: J. Checket, K. Fegan, G. Ritter; Trombones: T. Blumenthal, T. Fish, B. Speck; Tuba: J. Yorty; Percussion: P. Kalt 
reider, L. Shirey, D. Tobias. 



symphony orchestra 



The Symphony Orchestra has maintained and improved its high standard this year un- 
der the leadership of Professor Thomas Lanese. The group is composed of the best instrumen- 
talists from both the College and the Conservatory. 

A large audience attended the December 5 concert and was well repaid by an outstand- 
ing program. Ronald Steele, the soloist, performed the first movement of Mendelssohn's Violin 
Concerto in E Minor in masterly style. The remainder of the program is as follows: Overture to 
Egmont by Beethoven, three "Dances" from Henry VIM Suite by Edward German, first move- 
ment of the Symphony in D Minor by Cesar Franck, and "Rumanian Rhapsody" by Georges 
Enesco. 





TATSUO HOSHINA 




WILLIAM WORKINGER 



recitals 




The culmination of many months of hard work and study 
is seen in performances on the stage of Engle Hall. The recitals 
which have been given this year — campus, public, full, and 
faculty — have been outstanding. Attendance at these recitals is 
an excellent way to improve one's technique as well as to 
broaden one's knowledge of music of masters. Pictured on this 
page is a group representative of those who have given half 
or full recitals this year. 

An innovation this year was the Woodwind Festival. This 
program, presented with the assistance of the Symphony Or- 
chestra, featured solo numbers by Harold Weitzel, clarinet; 
Thomas Silliman, oboe; Renato Perez, bassoon; Dorothy Grabau, 
flute; Louise Loeper, flute; and Patricia Lutz, saxophone. 



HAZEL DAVIS 





MRS. NEVELYN J. KNISLEY 



JOAN CONWAY 



BRUCE THOMPSON 




fizzle follies 



This is one time when the Conservatory students take over and "show their stuff." This 
year, under the capable direction of Jack Goodman, they did themselves proud by producing 
the biggest and best Fizzle Follies ever. The purpose of this annual affair is to help meet the 
expenses of the Conserv Formal. The performance was given twice with an overflow crowd 
on the second night. 

The navy theme was carried out in song and dance through seven scenes. Much of the 
music was arranged especially for the show by Pius Kaltreider and William Trostle, and the 
choreography was done by Bruce Thompson. 




Left: "The Last Time I Saw Paris" — Patricia Lutz. Center: 
Right: "Mandy" — Sally Miller and Donald Hole. 



"Basin Street Blues" — Doris Kane, Donald Griffith, and Jeanne Winter. 




chorus 



Over one hundred sixty voices, including all the Conserva- 
tory and a few College students, comprise the College Chorus. 
The group, led by Mr. Reynaldo Rovers and accompanied by 
Joyce Snyder, becomes acquainted with the best in sacred choral 
literature, presenting a cantata for the annual community Christ- 
mas program and an oratorio in the spring Music Festival. This 
organization is open to anyone who enjoys singing and is inter- 
ested in this type of musical performance. 

This year the Chorus sang The Story of Christmas by H. 
Alexander Matthews, with Doris Kane, Sally Miller, Mary Swope, 
Cynthia Patton, Anna Lou Fisher, Donald Griffith, Bernard Right- 
myer, Luke Grubb, Tatsuo Hoshina, and Charles Brightbill as 
soloists. The oratorio Stabat Mater by Antonin Dvorak featured 
two New York soloists, Walter Fredrick, tenor, and Chester Wat- 
son, baritone, and several Conservatory students: Sally Miller, 
soprano; Anna Lou Fisher, alto; Tatsuo Hoshina, tenor; and Ber- 
nard Rightmyer, baritone. 



f- I "F ^ r fS 
















JOYCE SNYDER, 
Accompanist 



MR. REYNALDO ROVERS, 
Director 



"THE MESSIAH" 
1954-1955 





Sopranos: E. Blouch, K. Fisher, B. Geltz, D. Jones, D. Kane, C. long, M. Martin, S. Miller, C. Patton, C. Pierson, S. 
Warfel. Altos: L. Altrtius, P. Evans, A. Fisher, J. Howard, F. Liskey, P. lutz, R. Rodgers, J. Swavely. Tenors: C. Brightbill, 
C. Dietrich, L. Grubb, T. Hoshina, L. Mcllvaine, R. Moseman, R. Rothenberger, R. Shaffer, C. Wernert. Basses: G. Cunning- 
ham, D. Griffith, D. Hole, R. Perez, B. Rightmyer, T. Silliman, J. Stearns, C. Wacker, G. Wingenroth, J. Yorty. Accompan- 
ist: J. Conway. 



glee club 



These carefully chosen singers under the direction of Dr. James Thur- 
mond comprise one of the hardest working organizations on campus. 
Much intensive practice goes into making their annual tour a success. 
This year the forty-member group, accompanied by a fourteen-piece 
orchestra, toured the southern part of Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, 
and the District of Columbia. The tour program, which was also presented 
on campus, included music ranging from the sixteenth century to Victor 
Herbert favorites, all rendered in professional style. 

The Glee Club also gave a two-evening performance of the three- 
act opera "The Bartered Bride" by Bedrich Smetana in conjunction with 
part of the symphony orchestra for the annual Music Festival. The leads 
were Charlotte Pierson as the bartered bride and Tatsuo Hoshina as her 
lover Jenik. 




Lots of work 



For the big day. 





Places we stopped 



Along the way. 




En route . . 



For another short stay. 





¥ 



Ti 



Row One: C. Fox, R. Sheetz, C. Pierson, G. Ritter. Row Two: K. Dotts, C. Bradley, J. DeBenedett, 
P. Lutz, M. Risser. Row Three: J. Martin, C. Wacker, J. Saylor, L. Sparks. Row Four: R. Shover, J. Allen, 
G. Wade, A. Cramer, R. Leonard, S. Stover. 



student faculty council 



The Student Faculty Council is the organiza- 
tion which serves as a connecting link between 
the faculty and the student body of Lebanon 
Valley College. The policy of the Council has 
been to inaugurate more all-campus affairs and 
to stimulate intercollegiate activity. Every spring 
the Student Faculty Council plans the social cal- 
endar for the coming year. 

The council is composed of one representa- 
tive from each recognized student organization 
and members of the faculty. 

The council is not yet perfected; it is hoped 
that future years will see it so. Because of the 
council there is now a closer understanding be- 
tween students and the administration. 



Officers: G. Wade, Treasurer; P. lutz, Sec- 
retary; C. Wacker, President; G. Ritter, Vice 
President. 





Left to right: J. DeBenedett, L. Hostetter, B. Hemperly, B. Carrender. Absent: J. Markley, 
E. Blouch, K. Fisher, M. Kreider, J. Dove. Advisers: Constance Dent, Frances Fields, Ruth 
Bender. Officers: J. DeBenedett, President; J. Markley, Vice President; B. Carrender, Secretary- 
Treasurer. 

women's commuter council 



men's day student congress 



Women's Commuter 
Council, which is the gov- 
erning body of the women 
day students, has the duty 
of helping to integrate the 
girls into the campus activ- 
ities as well as enforcing 
the rules set for them. 

Under their president, 
Mrs. Jacqueline DeBene- 
dett, the group has been 
given more opportunities 
for campus life. In the be- 
ginning of the year, 
W.C.C., together with Jig- 
gerboard, held a program 
for the freshmen girls. 
They also sponsor the 
W.C.C.-Jiggerboard Ban- 
quet in the spring. 

The men day students 
sponsored with the women 
a movie, a Christmas din- 
ner at the Annville Ameri- 
can Legion, and the tradi- 
tional Valentine Dance. 
These activities were 
among the outstanding 
events on the social calen- 
dar. 



J. Allen, J. Boyer, J. Houston, L. Savastio, P. Hottenstein, L. Bennetch, D. 
Farling, E. Billingham, E. Hitz, T. Carmany. 



The Men's Day Student 
Congress is the governing 
body of the Association of 
Men Day Students. The 
purpose of the Congress is 
to promote cooperation 
and harmony among the 
male day students. 

A large part of the ac- 
tivities of the Congress are 
the disciplinary actions 
taken during the indoctrin- 
ary period for Freshmen. 
Such actions are more dif- 
ficult to enforce among the 
day students than among 
the dormitory students be- 
cause of the looser ties 
among men of the associ- 
ation. 




Officers: C. Kelly, President; W. Kiick, Sec 
retary-Treasurer; T. Keller, Adviser. 



D. Reinhard, I. Jones, D. Teates, C. Kelly, H. Forrest, W. Kiick, R. 
Kunkle, S. Hofing. 



£1 1 %\{ if 1 s >* -t .r-4 -Vi *$ ill? ^H'* *#f JMHNWP 





men's senate 



The Men's Senate, the governing body of the men's dormitories, 
during the year followed the competent leadership of President Clair 
Kelly, and strove to solve the many complexing problems of resident 
students. Along with tackling some of these difficulties, the Senate 
provided many hours of amusing entertainment and much-needed 
recreation. 

This has been the second year in which student proctors have 
been used when Dean Keller is absent from the dorm. No Senatorial 
job could be accomplished without the full cooperation of the men in 
the dormitory, and this spirit of unity reached a new high this year. 



jiggerboard 

Jiggerboard is the Resident Women's Student Government Association. This 
group of conscientious girls works for the betterment of regulations and rules, 
and the enforcement of those already accepted. The group meets every Monday 
evening in North Hall parlor and functions with a strong arm of justice. 

Together with the WCC, they held the fun-filled Gander Weekend in Octo- 
ber, when the girls ask the boys for dates. On December 14, the Jiggerboard 
and Senate sponsored the Christmas Dinner-Dance, with guest speakers Dr. 
Howard Neidig and Dr. Carl Erhart. 




Left to Right: N. Kirby, L. Loeper, N. Sprenkle, J. 
Snyder, C. Kelly, D. Steiner, J. Eckenroad, J. Grove, S. 
Rosenberry, G. Ritter, S. Heizmann, I. Urian. Absent: 
D. Kohr, J. Napoliello. Adviser: Constance Dent. 



Officers: Left to Right, V. Pres., I. Urian; Sec. J. 
Grove; Pres., G. Ritter; Treas., N. Sprenkle. 



quittie staff 




One: D. Book, S. Molotsky, C. Kelly, W. Kiick, R. Sheetz, J. Hoffman, H. Sauder, G. Sheaffer, J. Young, J. Houston. Row Two 



B. Speck, P. Lutz, B. Schwaghart, N. Davis, P. Risser, D. Kane, G. Funk, M. Schv 
D. Lentz, R. Shover, J. Winter, M. Greybeck. Row Three: T. Weible, E. Hendersc 
Schwab, C. Wacker. 



b, A. Reynolds, E. Meyers, P. Gordon, M. Brubake 
, J. Martin, H. Abramson, L. Kunkle, W. Priester, J. 



The work of the staff and the editor of this 
year's Quittie has been one of cooperation and 
dependability on the part of each who realized 
the importance of this project. Ruth Sheetz, as 
editor-in-chief, has, with the help of her co- 
workers, given us a yearbook of high quality. 
Business Manager William Kiick, with a combi- 
nation of fortitude and a cooperative crew of 
ad-seekers, made the yearbook financially pos- 
sible. 

The staff rrtembers will long remember the late 
night sessions, the disappointments, the friendly 
contacts with photographer and publisher, and 
finally the finished product, the 1957 Quittapa- 
hilla. 




Left to right: Associate Editor, M. Schwab; Associate 
Bus. Mgr., J. Schwab; Editor-in-Chief, Ruth Sheetz; 
Business Manager, William Kiick. 




Sectional Editors, Row One: P. Lutz, Seniors; P. Risser, Paste-up; D. Kane, Music; E. Hender- 
son, Features. Row Two: G. Funk, Activities; R. Sheetz, Editor-in-Chief; D. Book, Art and Assistant 
Editor; M. Schwab, Associate Editor; T. Weible, Literary; H. Abramson, Photography; A. Reynolds, 
Girls' Sports. 





*% w 



Front Row: J. McArdle, M. Brubaker, R. Shover, D. Williamson, L. Sholley, A. Reynolds, B. Geltz 
Back Row: S. Bradley, D. Farling, L. Sparks, M. Rice. 



La Vie Collegienne carries out its stated aims of entertaining and informing the Val- 
ley student body, and of providing its selected staff with practical training in manage- 
ment and writing. 

La Vie depicts just what its name implies — college life, as seen through the eyes of 
the several student representatives who contribute to the publication. In addition to its 
primary aims, it provides an excellent opportunity for a thorough journalistic experience 
for those planning to enter any kind of literary profession. 

This year's staff has contributed much to the development of a high standard of 
campus journalism. Many innovations will remain permanent parts of the policy of the 
Lebanon Valley College newspaper. 

J!a Vie GoUeqJ&nne 

ESTABLISHED 1925 
LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, ANNVTLLE. PENNV 

32nd Year — No. 11 Friday, March 23, 1956 

Editor-in-chief Lanta A. Sholley, Jr. '57 

Assistant Editor Lynn Sparks '56 

Sports Editor Arthur Ford, *59 

Conservatory editor Barbara Geltz '58 

Business manager David Farling '56 

Exchange Editors Martha Brubaker '57, Arlene Reynolds '57 

Reporters Donna Williamson '58, Joan Heindel '58 



. Y N A* <,ons -'* cl " y "her « '* POe «- 



<Sj** 



V 



^ 



^- 




*X 









"7? 



Editors: L. Sholley, R. Sho 



*t/> 



*& 



°tt, 



■sAr SP "l«£VtZ y 




S. Winarski, R. Shover, R. Walker, T. Weible, A. Ford, M. Cupina, W. Veasey 



green blotter club 



Green Blotter Club is the campus literary organization 
for aspiring playwrights, poets, novelists, essayists, jour- 
nalists, and other members of the literary world. Each year 
four members are chosen from the freshmen class. Mem- 
bership is chosen on a selective basis, with club members 
voting on the manuscripts submitted by potential members. 

It is becoming a Lebanon Valley tradition for the 
Green Blotter Club to write the script for the annual May 
Day program. This year's program was written under the 
leadership of club adviser Mr. Samuel Bradley and Head 
Scop Richard Shover. 



wig and buckle 



Officers: R. Perez, Publicity Manager; C. 
Pierson, President; C. Rebok, Treasurer; M. 
Beaver, Secretary. 




The Wig and Buckle Club, the campus drama- 
tics organization, provides participating students 
with experience in all phases of drama including 
acting, lighting, staging, and directing. Several 
successful and interesting productions were com- 
pleted by the organization which is under the 
capable leadership of Miss Charlotte Pierson, 
President. 

This past year the Wig and Buckle produced 
Antigone as one of their outstanding plays. The 
thespians also gave a play on Scholarship week- 
end. Many will remember the fine production of 
Gammer Gurton's Needle held early in the fall 
on Parents' Weekend. 




Row One: M. Beaver, P. Luckens, C. Shairer, M. Osinski, B. Geltz, D. Williamson, J. Blank, S. Artz, C. Pierson, M. 
Shirley, A. Mclnnes. Row Two: C. Wacker, S. Winarski, J. McArdle J. Wright, C. Rebok, O. Cromwell, S. Stover, Dr. 
Faber, Mr. Kline. 




Front Row: G. Funk, C. Dietrich, M. Schwab, J. Eckenroad. Middle Row: J. Heindel, S. Weit, J. Martin, V. Smedley, 
Kelchner. Back Row: R. Leonard, N. Germer, D. Burkhart, R. Yoder, L. Sparks. 



student christian association 



This organization includes all full-time students of Lebanon Valley College. All students 
are urged to support and to actively participate in the functions of this religious group. The 
activities of this association begin immediately with Freshman Week in September and are 
concluded with the May Day Pageant in the Spring. 

A dramatic Christmas Cantata and an Easter Cantata were given by the SCA Choir un- 
der the direction of Cyrus Dietrich. Both of these productions were extremely successful. Under 
the capable leadership of Richard Leonard, president, and Dr. Sparks and Dr. Ehrhart, the SCA 
also sponsored a Christmas Carol hike and an all-campus spiritual retreat at Camp Swatara. 
Active participation in the planning of Religious Week and in the execution of the May Day 
program were other functions of this group. 




V. Smedley, Secretary; D. Burkhart, Vice President for Men; M. Schwab, 
Vice President for Women; R. Leonard, President. 





delta tau chi 



To provide for a Coordinated program of religious and social activities, and to 
advance the welfare and common interests of the students and of the college are 
the aims of the Student Christian Association. 

Membership in this organization is open to those students who are preparing 
themselves for the Christian ministry, missionary work, and other church vocations. 
Also included in this group are associate members who are interested in the organ- 
ization and its activities. 

The year is inaugurated by a Consecration service held in the College Church. 
After worshipping together, members partake of the Sacrament of Holy Communion. 

The main activity of the organization is its Deputation work. Through this en- 
deavor, members serve as preachers, Sunday school teachers, song leaders, and so- 
loists almost every week in various churches. This experience is truly advantageous 
for all those who participate. 




Kneeling: R. Barr, M. Coppenhaver, R. Stoner, J. Marti 
Standing, Row One: R. Kelchner, N. Davis, R. Leonard, ( 
Germer, J. Howard, J. Lantz, W. Lantz. Row Two:* R. Starr 
S. Weit, M. Hartenstein, H. Graham, D. Steiner, R. KaufFman 
R. Landis, S. Stover, J. Stearns, J. Lebo. Row Three: D. Burk 
hart, M. Rice, E. Hostetter, G. McCormick, R. Yoder, J. Bach 
man, P. Rock, K. Piatt. 



Front Row: J. Martin, President; R. Yoder, Deputation 
Chairman; D. Steiner, Music Chairman; W. Lantz, Vice 
President; J. Lantz, Secretary. Back Row: J. Lebo, Assis- 
tant Music Chairman; i. Bachman, Assistant Deputation 
Chairman; G. McCormick, Chaplain; R. Stoner, Treasurer. 



future teachers of america 



Officers: S. Heizmann, Member-at-Large; 
G. Funk, President; C. Long, Correspond- 
ing Secretary; B. Geltz, Member-at-Large; 
G. Gorbey, Recording Secretary; R. Bouch, 
Treasurer; C. Patton, Vice President. 




Row One: G. Lennox, G. Gorbey, N. Davis, G. Shaeffer, B. Geltz, B. Walp, S. Zimmerman, P. Lutz, S. Hiezmann, J. Mor- 
roni, D. Kersbner, L. Shirey, V. Evans, S. Artz, R. Rogers. Row Two: Dr. McKlveen, O. Wolpert, C. Fox, D. Book, J. Young, E. 
Henderson, J. Winters, D. Grabau, G. Ritter, P. Thomas, J. Eckenroad, M. Risser, M. Robinson, L. Gay, T. Weible, F. Funk. Row 
Three: G. Wentling, S. Warfel, J. Howard, E. Herr, H. Davis, N. Kirby, E. Sproul, C. Long, C. Bradley, N. Sprenkle, R. Miller, 
C. Patton, C. Shairer, T. Reinhart, R. Drum. Row Four: R. Rothenberger, K. Dotts, R. Ruhl, T. Hauer, N. McDonald, F. Rhen, P. 
Luckens, S. Oaks, Joan Eaby, J. Checkett, J. Colangelo, A. McCullough, T. Ulrich. Row Five: D. Moyer, N. Blantz, R. Boush, C. 
Breckbill, G. Steger, P. Dipangazio, E. Berger, R. Howell, F. Landis, R. Morrison. Row Six: D. Hole, J. Boltz, D. Tobias, G. Zim- 
merman, R. Doster, C. Wernert, R. Bartlett, S. Poet. 



The George D. Gossard Chapter of the Future Teachers of America of Lebanon 
Valley College has completed its fifth year as a member of the college activities 
program. This group, which is dedicated to the advancement of the teaching profes- 
sion, has in this last year created a program of meetings which are used to be a 
direct aid in teaching. Most outstanding were the F.T.A. Day and the club pro- 
gram of seeing a teacher in a classroom situation. The club continues under the able 
student leaders and the adviser, Dr. Gilbert McKlveen. 




Officers: D. Glick, Vice President; S. Hofing, 
ICG Chairman; N. Blantz, Treasurer; G. Gor- 
bey, Secretary; C. Zettlemoyer, President; O. 
Wolpert, Sergeant-at-Arms. 



political science club 



Participation in the Intercollegiate Conference 
on Government, held each Spring and attended 
by similarly interested groups from the cam- 
puses of the Colleges of Pennsylvania, is the 
high spot of the club's activities and the driving 
force behind its meetings. The club trains mem- 
bers in parliamentary procedure and in prepar- 
ing committee work for the functioning commit- 
tees of the conference itself. 

In addition to the ICG preparations and the 
usual campus activities, the club enjoys numer- 
ous social meetings and banquets throughout the 
year, featuring prominent speakers on current 
affairs; and sells basketball programs at the 
Lebanon Valley home games. 



Back Row: D. Glick, J. Mitchell, W. Priester, R. Kunkel, S. Molotsky, O. Walpert, G. Wade, J. Martin, D. Farling, A. 
Fehr, N. Blantz, W. Kiick, C. Zettlemoyer. Middle Row: S. Hofing, G. Funk, J. Winter, G. Gorbey, P. Risser, C. Fox, K. Dolts, 
R. Ruhl, O. Cromwell. Front Row: J. Snare, F. McCullough, R. Bouch. Absent: J. Boltz, J. DeBenedett, F. Kreider, D. Shell- 
enberger, P. Socha, M. Zakis. Faculty Members: A. Brumbaugh; R. Shay; M. Laughlin, A. Fehr, Adviser. 



tmmtweGKmtf* 



\ 



f^ 




Front Row: C. Fox, D. Farling, Vice President; K. Dotts, President; N. Blantz, Secretary-Treasurer; 
C. Zettlemoyer. Back Row: R. C. Riley, Adviser; J. Thomas, G. Wade, L. Kunkel. Absent: J. Markley, I. 
Urian, J. Breckbill. 



pi gamma ma 



Pi Gamma Mu is a national social science honorary society. Mem- 
bership is open to those students who have displayed special ability in 
the social studies field. Meetings are held monthly and are sponsored 
by one of the four departments of the social studies division: economics, 
history, sociology, and political science. Through this organization, mem- 
bers obtain a better understanding of society and its many aspects. 

The high point of the year's activities was the annual banquet held 
March second in the Palmyra American Legion Home. This year's banquet 
was of special significance since the National President of Pi Gamma 
Mu, Dr. Leon Godshall, was the speaker. 




Officers: N. Adams, Secretary; E. Billingham, President; D. 
Teates, Treasurer; G. Adams, Vice President. 



Row One: D. Teates, J. Grove, N. Adams, H. Forrest. Row Two: T. Carmany, E. Billingham, C. 
Ditzler, L. Jones, G. Wentling, T. Teates, S. McLinn, J. Wright, G. Adams, H. Abramson, R. Hipp. Row 
Three: H. Neidig, G. Adams, C. Peraino, L. Sparks, K. Romberger, M. Grosky, R. Pieringer. 



chemistry club 



The Chemistry Club, which is a branch of the Lebanon 
Valley Chapter of the Student Affiliates of the American 
Chemical Society, is composed of students majoring in chem- 
istry or those who display a special interest in the chemical 
field. Meetings are held monthly, at which time lectures 
are delivered. Activities include several field trips to in- 
dustrial plants and governmental laboratories, and pub- 
lication of the bi-monthly "Filtrates and Residues." Chem- 
istry hand books and lab aprons are sold by the members. 

The year's activities were climaxed by a dinner dance 
at the Palmyra Legion. 



beta beta beta 



The Alpha Zeta Chapter of Beta Beta Beta National Biological Society is 
open to those students who have completed a minimum of ten semester hours 
in the biological field and who maintain a B average. 

The outstanding activity of the club was the Tri-Beta Weekend held No- 
vember 11 and 12. Highlights of the weekend were a private dinner-dance and 
an all-college dance. The club also labeled the trees on the campus in the Spring. 

The aim of Tri-Beta is to stimulate interest in the biological field among 
both its members and non-member students. 




Standing: V. E. Light, J. Bollinger, H. Pachasa, M. Grosky, C. Peraino, E. Buck, H. Abramson, O. P. 
Bollinger, R. Pieringer, J. Cottrell, G. Adams, M. Osinski, F. H. Wilson. Seated: A. Reynolds, R. Leonard, 
L. Hostetter, M. Brubaker. 




Officers: J. Cottrell, President; J. Bollinger, His- 
torian; L. Hostetter, Secretary; M. Brubaker. 




Front Row: W. Heidelbaugh, P. Luckens, J. Conlin, B. He 
Weible, T. Hauer, V. Smedley. 



iperly, C. Rebok. Back Row: J. Zuse, T. 



f tench club 



This year the French Club has increased its membership and has been able 
to acquire a new advisor, Miss Ruth Butler. The club is for all people who are 
interested in studying French and in learning to speak the language fluently. 
All meetings are conducted entirely in French. 

During the first semester the club took a trip to New York City to see La 
Comedie Francaise, Le Jeu de L'amour et du Hazard, by Beaumarchais, which 
proved to be very successful. Their second semester activities included a movie 
and a talk by Mrs. Lanese on education in France. 




L. Sholley, B. Schwaghart, E. Krammes, N. Kirby, R. Kelchner, D. Lentz, J. Tingley, V. Smedley, N. Baker, T. 
Hauer, M. Risser, M. Stineman, B. Walp, J. Henninger, W. Minnick. Absent: M. Greybeck, J. Zuze, P. Luckens, R. 
Landis. Adviser: C. Ebersole. 



childhood education club 



During the past year, the elementary teach- 
ing students have formed and activated a club 
which they call the Childhood Education Club. 
Under the able advising of Dr. Cloyd Ebersole 
and the cooperation of the new officers, this club 
has become not only active, but also extremely 
helpful to instruct its members. Observing an 
elementary school, hearing teachers' experiences, 
and holding a party for the children's home were 
some of their varied programs. With a success- 
ful first year, the club is looking forward to a 
long life among the campus organizations. 



Publications Repre 


entative 


M. Risser 


President 




N. Kirby 


Treasurer 




V. Smedley 


Vice President 




B. Schwaghart 






J. Tingley 




cheerleaders 



One of the most active groups on campus is 
the Cheerleaders. These Valleyites are present at 
every football and basketball game to help cheer 
the boys on to a good game. In the fall at foot- 
ball games they are assisted by the Lebanon 
Valley Marching Band and in the winter at bas- 
ketball games by the German Band. This year 
the cheerleaders had a unique and very profit- 
able booth at County Fair, which included a 
horse and buggy ride around Annville through 
the snow. 

Thanks are extended to the cheerleaders for 
their service to their school and classmates. 




R. Rogers, B. Johnson, R. Rothenberger, C. Dietrich, P. Lutz, P. Thomas. 
Absent: R. Leight. 



Captain: PATRICIA LUTZ 



!»r.» 





Row One: W. Kiick, R. Boush, C. Kelly, D. Bosacco, H. Webber, R. Starr, L. Sparks, D. Glick. Row Two: R. Weinel, 
L. Mentzer, G. Adams, W. Workinger, G. Strong, D. Reinhard, R. Shover, D. Farling, H. Pachasa, G. Thomas, E. 
Geesey. Absent: J. Peepe. Adviser: G. Marquette. Officers: L. Sparks, President; C. Kelly, Vice President; R. Boush, 
Treasurer; J. Peepe, Sergeant-at-Arms. 



knights of the valley 



The Knights of the Valley, serving this year under President Lynn Sparks, have fur- 
thered their purpose of promoting fellowship and good will. In this, their sixth year of 
organization, the Knights have proven their worth by their contribution to all campus 
activities and the promotion of a better college spirit. During the year many social activ- 
ities were held, which not only served as entertainment for the members, but also af- 
forded an opportunity for the advancement of fellowship. The Knights participated in 
the intramural sports program and are the defending basketball champions from 1954-55 
and volleyball champions from 1955-56. Through the sale of Christmas cards, funds were 
raised for the annual dinner-dance which climaxes the year's activities. This was the first 
year in which the Knights awarded an annual scholarship. The Chuck Maton Memorial 
Award recipient for 1955 was Howard V. Landa. 



phi lambda sigma 



Philo, older brother of the Valley societies, show unmistakable signs of 
rebirth of vigor as it celebrates its eighty-ninth year. This fraternal organization 
has realized the value of friendship, good-will, and cooperation, and has fos- 
tered the standards of true comradeship which are indispensable for a well- 
rounded life. Through such agencies as joint sessions, meetings, and smokers 
for freshman, true comradship has been nurtured. Philo has participated in the 
intramural sports programs of volleyball, football, basketball, and baseball. 
Their rushing season was very successful, resulting in an active and growing 
membership. Philo, along with their sister-society Clio, sponsor an annual 
play and dinner-dance held in April. 



Philo Men, Row One: J. Wright, J. Saylor, D. Fromm, E. Pietreniak, J. Allen, H. Abramson, C. Boughter, H. 
Pachasa, D. Fetterolf. Row Two: P. Socha, C. Hollinger, S. McLinn, S. Molotsky, C. Ditzler, J. Nassaur, H. Voorman, 
S. Gold, H. Forrest, C. Brightbill, D. Burkhart, E. Stahley. 





Officers: H. Abramson, Chap- 
lain; D. Burkhart, Correspond- 
ing Secretary; C. Boughter, Re- 
cording Secretary; J. Saylor, 
President; J. Allen, Treasurer; 
H. Pachasa, Vice President. 



Philo Initiates, Row One: D. Teates, M. Schaeffer, J. McDonald, J. Ollinger, D. Dick. Row Two: S. Winarski, L. 
Kelly, A. Edwards, K. Piatt, V. Crudele, J. Hoffman. 






kappa lambda nu 




The sister organization to Phi Lambda Sigma is Kappa 
Lambda Nu, or Clio. This group of girls, under the presi- 
dency of Diane Kohr, conducts its meetings every month 
in the Clio-Philo room. 

Opening the year's activities were the rush week 
programs. With a theme of "Stinkers", the Clio girls held 
for the initiates a tea and an open house. Following the 
pledging and informal initiation were the formal initia- 
tion and the intersociety dance. Clio, together with Philo, 
held their traditional Halloween Dance, which is always 
a favorite with the students. Rounding out their many 
activities, Clio held a Valentine's Day party for the Leba- 
non County Home for the aged and St. Patrick's Day 
Dance. On April thirteenth and fourteenth, Philo-Clio 
held their Dinner-Dance to complete their year's activities. 




Officers: B. Johnson, Treasurer; C. Long, Corresponding Sec- 
retary; S. Rosenberry, Recording Secretary; D. Kohr, President. 
Absent: A. DaCosta, Vice President. 




Initiates: E. Tomasco, J. Grubb, J. Blank, L. Heefner 
Mark, B. Hemperly, M. Robinson, L. Gay, E. Sproul. 



Initiates: J. Swavely, L. Bartram, J. Grubb, B. Hemperly, C. 
Mark, M. Kreider, M. Robinson. Back Row: J. Blank, D. Kirch- 
ner, E. Sproul, L. Heefner, L. Gay. 



Standing: H. Davis, D. Kohr, J. Wolf, M. Brubaker. Seated 
Row One: B. Walp, S. Weit, A. Reynolds. Row Two: P. Gor 
don, L. Gordon, V. Smedley. Row Three: B. Johnson, C. Long 
M. Osinski. Row Four: M. Greybeck, E. Speicher, D. Lentz, S 
Rosenberry. Row Five: D. Jones, D. Book, C. Fox, J. Swavely 
Row Six: E. Blouch, S. Warfel, M. Blatt. Row Seven: H. Epting 
B. Klinger, R. McBride. Row Eight: K. Dotts, I. Urian, J. Con 
way. Absent: N. Adams, S. Nelson, A. DaCosta, J. DeBene 
dett, N. Kettle, J. Tingley, J. Demko, N. Baker, P. Bell. Ad 
viser: Mrs. Ruth Bender. 





Kalo Men, Row One: H. Bird, L. Jones, G. Wade, J. Mitchell, J. Bell. Row Two: T. Silliman, R. Doster, G. Wentling, W. 
Schmid, M. Grosky, W. Priester. Row Three: C. Kelly, C. Rebok, R. Kunkel, R. Humbert, G. Strong, M. Grochowski, T. Rein- 
hart. Absent: J. Balsbaugh, J. Lego, L. Miller, B. Rightmyer, D. Sheaffer, C. Sipe, C. Zettlemoyer, S. Hoflng, G. Johnson. 



Officers: R. Kunkel, Sergeant-at-Arms; C. Rebok, Corresponding Secre- 
tary; G. Wade, President; J. Mitchell, Recording Secretary; J. Bell, Chap- 
lain; W. Priester, Treasurer. Absent: J. Balsbaugh, Vice President. 



























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kappa lambda sigma 



Kalo is the younger of the two original men's societies. Because of its activities 
it now refers to itself as the "progressive organization on campus." Its activities in- 
clude smokers designed to create a deep bond of friendship between the pledges 
and the older members. Kalo has been very active in intramural sports, participat- 
ing in volleyball, football, basketball, and baseball. They have joined with Delphian, 
their sister society, in bringing cheer to the Jonestown Orphanage before each 
Christmas. This year the K-D weekend started off with the joint production of Har- 
vey by Kalo-Deiphian dramatists, and was climaxed by their annual dinner-dance 
held at the Reading Country Club. A stag banquet is held at the conclusion of the 
year in honor of those members who are leaving the club. 




Kalo Initiates, Row One: R. Schott, R. Rothenberger, G. Fillmore, O. Cromwell. Row Two: W. Shesser, P. Rock, H. Hart, F. 
Giovinazzo, C. Lightner. Row Three: O. Wolpert, R. Bird, S. Stover, J. Colangelo, J. Laverty, K. Troutman. Absent: S. Dim- 
on, N. Lavorini, B. Rissmiller, D. Savidge. 






Standing: M. Schwab, G. Gorbey, J. Hoffman, P. Risser. Seated, Row One: E. Buck, D. Kane, B. Neatock. Row Two: 
J. White, E. Shatto, R. Kelchner. Row Three: C. Patton, E. Henderson, L. Cody. Row Four: P. Thomas, J. Young, L. Loeper. 
Row Five: J. Eckenroad, P. Lutz, M. Martin. Row Six: C. Bradley, C. Kelly, N. Sprenkle. Row Seven: S. Heizmann, B. 
Schwaghart, G. Ritter. Adviser: Mrs. Frances Fields. 

Row One: S. Miller, M. Stineman, J. Heindel, B. Geltz, Row Two: R. Spencer, G. Funk, P. Homer. Row Three: M. Shir- 
ley, S. Prugh, J. Henninger. Row Four: D. Williamson, C. Anderson, R. Obert. Row Five: M. Eikner, M. Risser, K. Fisher. 
Row Six: H. Sauder, M. Meyer, G. Sheaffer. Row Seven: N. Gibson, J. Howard, J. Winter. Absent: D. Grabau, J. Grove, 
N. Davis, B. Weaver, E. Tittle, M. Swope. 







Initiates, Row One: E. Berger, M. Beaver, G. Lennox, M. Hafer, S. Oaks. Row Two: P. Ev 
A. Lyter, S. Hartz, S. Artz, C. Schairer, J. Morroni, R. Rodgers, R. Howell, F. Rhen. 



delta lambda sigma 



Delta Lambda Sigma, better known as Delphian, is the younger of the so- 
cial organizations for women. A group of girls, a room, and a leader, are the 
three essential parts of this organization. The President, Miss Shirley Heizmann; 
the group, some seventy girls, and the room, Delphian Hall, is the combination 
with which the club progressed this year. 

In addition to their regular monthly meetings, they hold the annual rush 
week and initiation. During this time there was held a tea and an open house. 
The year-round project is that of befriending a church home for children. To- 
gether with the Kalo men, the girls gave a Christmas party for the home. This 
year the K-D weekend started off with the joint production of Harvey by Kalo- 
Delphian dramatists, and was climaxed by their annual dinner-dance held at 
the Reading Country Club. 



Initiates, Row One: R. Rodgers, S. Oaks, D. White, S. Trostle, M. 
Hafer, E. Ritter, S. Artz, G. Lennox, J. Morroni, L. Shirey, A. Lippen- 
cott, P. Evans, M. Beaver, R. Howell, A. Lyter, C. Shairer. Row Two: 

E. Berger, M. Brooks, V. Evans, J. Zuse, P. Luckens, N. McDonald, 

F. Rhen. 




Officers: R. Meyers, Treasurer; G. Funk, Recording 
Secretary; N. Sprenkle, Vice President; J. Winter, 
Corresponding Secretary; S. Heizmann, President. 




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Front Row: J. Ragno, J. Schwab, J. Thomas, D. Glick, G. Murphy, T. Ulrich, D. Fetterolf, 
R. Zimmerman, H. Pachasa, H. Chudzikiewicz, R. Wise, L. Shearer, W. Krick, J. Maier, R. 
Brown, R. Walker, C. Wacker, M. Cupina, W. Veasey, J. Saylor. Middle Row: R. Boehler, K. 
Swisher, A. Ill, W. Minnick, C. Brestovansky, H. Douglass, D. Shellenberger, R. Snyder, D. 
Cotton, G. Thomas, W. Schadler, J. Boltz, G. Johnson, R. Mackrides, M. Grochowski, A. 
Creamer. Back Row: G. Strong, R. Bowman, S. Poet, R. Handley, G. Layser, G. Jackson, A. 
Deitz, S. Orel, R. Palmer, H. Sellers, M. Cook, E. Geesey. Absent: E. Fancovic, W. Lutz, M. 
Miller, J. Sproul, B. Salamandra. Advisers: J. Thurmond, T. Keller, R. Shay. 



legionnaires 



During the last two years the Legionnaires have risen to become one 
of the leading organizations on campus. The membership of this group 
consists of veterans of the United States Armed Forces. These men, work- 
ing together for the club and the college, have not only helped to create 
a better feeling among the students, but also provided many activities to 
swell the college calendar. 

Opening the list of the big dances of the year was the Vets' September 
dance. They also sponsored five dances after the home Saturday night 
basketball games. The football game and basketball game with the girls' 
hockey and basketball teams, which always create school spirit, will long 
be remembered. In order that they may find fellowship, the Legionnaires 
hold two dinners in the course of the year, for members only. 




Officers: J. Maier, Finance Officer; R. Palmer, Sergeant-at-Arms; A. 
Creamer, Commander; W. Schadler, Vice Commander; D. Glick, Chap- 
lain. Absent: E. Fancovic, Adjutant. 



«9*» I i 






Row One: J. Ollinger, K. Schuler, D. Becker, J. Steger, A. Pellegrino, P. DiPangrazio. Row Two: D. Shellenberger, F. 
McCulloch; D. Boascco, M. Grochowski, B. Barnhart, R. Weinel. Row Three: P. McEvoy, H. Douglass, R. Shover, R. Plas- 
terer. Row Four: D. Shaffer, L. Mentzer. Row Five: E. Pietreniak, J. Stauffer. Row Six: G. Zimmerman, R. Longenecker. Row 
Seven: G. Thomas, T. Reinhart. Row Eight: E. Geesey, A. Kershner. Row Nine: J. McDonald, R. Palmer. Row Ten: W. Schad- 
ler, W. Wenrich, R. Nelson. Row Eleven: D. Reinhard, L. Bennetch, J. Peepe, R. Bowman. 



"L" club 



The "L" Club is composed of athletes who have received their 
letters from the Director of Athletics for participation in one or more 
of the varsity sports. In order to be eligible for membership, a sports 
participant must meet the requirements set up by the Athletic Council 
for a varsity letter award. 

The club sells football programs, and this year inaugurated "tag 
day," in order to raise money for their jackets. They sponsor the 
Homecoming Dance each fall, one of the most popular of the informal 
dances held at Lebanon Valley. 



women's athletic association 



Row 
Weit, S. 
viser: Mi: 



All intramural sports and intercollegiate sports on campus are conducted 
and guided through the Women's Athletic Association. After the girls have par- 
ticipated in a required number of sports and have the amount of points neces- 
sary for awards, the club has an annual banquet, at which time they present 
the chenille "L", gold "L", and blazer jackets. 

Once again this year they held their famous veterans'-girls' football game, 
and veterans' and boys' varsity basketball games with the girls. The club has 
other activities such as hikes and a square dance, which are very popular with 
the girls. 

One: S. Warfel, J. Eckenroad, J. Winter, I. Urian, N. Sprenkle, R. Meyers, A. Reynolds, P. Homer, J. Heindel, S. 
Heizmann, M. Martin. Row Two: J. Young, D. Book, P. Thomas, L. Gordon, B. Johnson, G. Ritter, S. Nelson. Ad- 
ss Betty Jane Bowman. 




MiU Athlete 




JEANNE WINTER 



Mi. Athlete 





GLENN THOMAS 






iebanon valley football team 

Coaching Staff THE FLYING DUTCHMEN 

1955 

J. DUNLAP G. MAYHOFFER E. TESNAR FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Head Coach — Ellis McCracken 

LVC v. Millersville (A) 6-6 

(Bi-Centennial Bowl) 

LVC v. Wilkes (H) 41- 6 

LVC v. Penn Military (H) 0-33 

^EK " "*fc (Bologna Bowl) 

LVC v. Muhlenberg (A) 0-32 

„ LVC v. Moravian (H) 7-33 

<S»Y< v^'^n ' li/ \ (HOmee ° m inSD ° y) 

^ W ftf W*^^i ** LVC v. St. Vincent (A) 14-52 

CQLLbS ^g LVC v. Albright (H) 12-27 

(Parents' Day) 

LVC v. Ursinus (A) 26-21 

LVC v. Lycoming (A) 7-25 

§> V *& Lebanon Valley College: Won 2 

Nfife^ N L ° st 6 

Tied 1 





''On the fields of friendly strife 
Are sown the seeds, 
Which in future years 
On different fields 
Will bear the fruits of victory." 



GRANTLAND RICE 



The Lebanon Valley football depression which set in 
in full force after Lou Sorrentino's departure two sea- 
sons ago continued to dominate the Flying Dutchmen 
gridiron scene during the 1955 season. Any attempts at 
pump-priming or hopes of more prosperous Saturday 
afternoons in the future seem to have trickled away. 

Despite a returning group of veterans including Dale 
Shellenberger, Bob Palmer, Tom Quinn, Gene Geesey, 
"Red" Grochowski, and Glenn Thomas Coach Ellis Mc- 
Cracken's team fell back into the groans of inertness 
after a spirited season start. 

Lead by freshman quarterback Bill DeLiberty and Gene 
Geesey, LVC manufactured a late third period drive 
which resulted in a fourth quarter TD to tie Millersville 
STC at Middletown in the Bi-Centennial Bowl. John Ol- 
linger's x-fra point try was slightly wide. 

LV poured on the end zone in its 41-6 drubbing of 
Wilkes in the home opener as Shellenberger and Thomas 
scored to give LV an early lead. Leo Savastio and John 
Ollinger countered in the first half while Bosacco and 
Shelley added bonus TD's in the second half. 

Valley hopes ran into a Pennsylvania Military Col- 
lege cyclone, however, the next week in the Bologna 
Bowl game. Power and speed churned LVC 33-0 as the 
Cadets registered their tenth straight win. The next week 
Muhlenberg came close to duplicating the score by 
handing the Valley its second loss, this one 32-0. 

Playing before Coach McCracken's old home town 
fans in the Leechburg Lions-Rotary Bowl, LV was 
swamped by St. Vincent's mudders. The Dutchmen scored 
twice in the 52-14 rout with DeLiberty passing to Thomas 
for one and Dale Shellenberger scoring the other. 

Against Albright in LVC's Parents' Day game, Lebanon 
Valley lost 27-12. Gene Geesey scored both TD's . . . 
one a 97 yard gallop. 

LV went into the locker room at half time against 
Ursinus on the short end of the score. A memorable, 
straight-to-the-point, stirring, fighting, inspiring talk by 
co-captain Dale Shellenberger brought a fighting Valley 
team back onto the field. In seven minutes time they had 
scored three touchdowns and went on to win their sec- 
ond game of the season by a 26-21 count. 

At Willamsport against Lycoming Ross Plasterer took a 
fumble in the air and lateraled to Clair Paul who went 
over for LV's only score in the 25-7 loss which ended the 
Flying Dutchmen season. 




DALE SHELLENBERGER 
Senior— Red Lion 



BOB PALMER 
Senior — Syracuse 



Co-Captains Elect 



'For when the One Great Scorer 
Comes to write against your name — 
He marks — not that you won or lost — 
But how you played the game." 

GRANTLAND RICE 



Managers 

LARRY ZEIGLER FRANK McCULLOUGH 




PAGE SIX 



LebanoirVaJurT 7 " - ^^ 



S Co,,e Se in Middle- 



JOHN OLLINGER- 
Soph.— Ford City, 



hack, hau 
, on 'he Mil 
I leaked dow] 
I 75 yards 



f5oWaN Teain 
Closes Season W* 

25-7 Loss To Lycommg 




ped or? 



Proved 

JPortant 
fhman qu 
F'ghts, p a _ 5 

- f ' er F '«ano^ ^ 
L V 45 yard ,; ne . 



anc 



Battling snow 
I."..- Lebanon Va«ey—^ 

lan k with a lo- j§* igte, f; 
non P one t^. ,. ^ 
1 Wiik. 

Du Heads; 



3 Lycomir 



'' f - /Plays, p'al°" ^J as l THOMAS KUNKLE-T 
"the vSs dOPWd Fr - Apo "°' P °- 
drive of h m ° St su cc esstu, 
eot rij e evening. — —= = 

After receiving trj£ | 
handed off to r* 1 

varrf Gene CI 

f ard gam. The next ,1 
to the halt t.- 'I 

Geesey p ; cked ^ 
thTn'ir ** «J 



en t down to 



on 

up Hs 1 
six 



Saturday 



los 



stringer! 1; '~ Jalu ilne - /down in h, ~~~~, " y lz } l 

f Hnn„'7 beWnd Leo the 13 a ° Phys »oJ 

Lege b 7 n Potass, handled , I" 3S the *ird perio 

S bac ^eld composed of Joe fa °f ibe ^ handed off J 

( to start the fn tf, 

hp;k, «,-„« « Sained another "l" qUat 



-7 d' 
No- 

:ason 
and 



DEAN BECKER— G 
5 Hanover, Pa 




the 



Valley kept Ly- 
■■Kutout. -R 

retuta- 



pus hed out nf , yards m BM. 

- d the line again h, «-£ Geese y 




razV .; 



"* u >Jwn and 
Cra ^ed the line again 
£" • DeLihert/J; 
te et closer to their firj 
SOn * hitting th, ' 

The TD cam- ' 
DeL,berty tafa - 

Pau! DiPangraz\ 
a '°ng the hne an . 

h °le between co-ca? 
( Ross Plasterer, right 
hn ^s try for (he w ' 
For rh» ^_., n 
51e 

ROSS PLASTERER— E ... 
Jr. — Lebanon, Pa. 

--- at the tacfclf 
^0. Tom Q uinn 
Grochowski, 6.!'.__ 
Howie Sellers and' 
eUard *- Both are 

"/•veteran of ««e J 
veteran of v a „ e y , 

57 -159; Sellers,/ 

Di Pangra 2 io han 

■Leo Savastio, t* 

* M > carrying ■ ' W , - -"«. f 

star ted at the oiT^FP S 0n his 6'1" 

DeLiberty. " Dou elass and Bill 




80. 
"* center spot. 
, stude nt from p 
'ids on his 6'1 ' 




FRANK GIOVINAZZO— C 
Fr.— Closter, N. J. 



f y br o Ps H 





Un 9 G< 



r Q/» e 7- 



o'an, 



%e <>* ft. 



Another }^ 

1 man peer: , 
•sherds'. "M, 
whale, hidden f« 

Jthose The sV.ppe 

jyjrales. 1 w]tf 



leather cW»-. - 

loud and long. 

fi watehes west 
\ e But though 
on shE. 




,«•* 



J:'; away awash . *£ croW >s nest 

ae ^ ,k ClY Han the oars. Ag»« 
^^- ; , that cry to ma again lhe 

Wboats over h e -p^ not her 
L cuts that hide, J m wthe 

a nddee P . Anothc. m^ 

long sougn,? ^ galc3 

"" ,as wortV * .• ., 

blows'. SV 



I 



BOB PALMER— T 
Sr.— Syracuse, N. Y. 



DALE SHELLENBERGER— HB | 
Sr. — Red Lion, Pa. 



GLENN THOMAS— E W EUGENE GEESEY-HB P^ MARTIN GROCHOWSKI— fl TOM QUINN— T I HOWIE SELLERS-G 
Jr.-Red Lian, Pa. Sr.-Dalla 5 town, Pa. » Sr.-Camden, N. J. | Sr.-Keyser, W. Va. Soph.— Hummelstown, Pa. 




lttey } \ \ Victory famine 

Break long ^ M i rr ^ 

. ,.. , .banon Val-U*|L eesoV recovered. On of 



GLENN THOMAS— E 
Jr. — Red Lion, Pa. 



v.-.vs Lebanon VaV 

'man l^t So 
**, Leoanon High. « 
— ,„„„(! Wilkes lc 

ime since Ife J 

to football shoef 

Viewed m orj 

o{ a team w^ 
. meeting theV 

do nothm/ 



about eyjf Jl 



tbe 

the Va 

- but 



PAUL DiPANGRAZIO — C 
Soph.— Clifton Heights, Pa 



RON WEINEl— G 

Soph. — Apoll 



I on (he 45 

! Gene Geo. 

Play of (he 

'acfcJe. cut 
i &ies, ;ind (h$ 
j some forty-thj 





' veiytb'mg 
W called back, 

,■ u it was 
.thcr 1»S>*. * 
_L y the lcne th ( 

m MW Glenn Thomas on 
especially «J 

oitch out. , . it wa s a case- 

P Yet in another l^ l a . mc ^ 

««*« hitting tbe Valley ^ Q 

ft en were 3" sl a fe „ brea k1 . 
ne « Piay. L zeros. They go uged 

if On (he seeond ey made the breaks an ^ 
genbergr broke off ; lL\ hc y got them. As so 
■Wed for the side- f what they were 
ttotne goaUin e L like stopping-, 
^^ U game from 04 
galloped those last' 



Pa. 



.., i iheir next play- 
l5 but fumble Mho ond 

^.^Senbergvbvokeon 
Sen£ ' Theadcd for the s>dc- 
^ htan vaStotne g oaltoj 
% t0 1ads and two second 

converted^VC34-6. 

***** Tiered one of 

immerman ret t0 

. I fumbles wh|^ * c ^^ 

.■ C0UW n^B^ y UP fiHosacco broke 
led j uSP aU °° l i firS down on the 
.~ J C0,U HF 19 yards and IB« ■ DeLib . 

^covered lo« 19 t y wo line plays l«^ ^ 
>«lli to Dave hea ^ conve rted 

lc1 astTD. ° lb "fl ed up their 
wing Dutchmen racked 

to SPBl oint , , lhis no one player 
'"^ am % S t"the^ycontribuUng 
can be singled out as tn ^^onalW 
? t r A" the backs ai . and 

£a Tshdenberger showed ta» «P up 
" -dlafternoon^^^ 

L caries. Oen^ ,___, „,«. t 

| of BOB LONGENECKER— E 
! Acr Soph. — Progress, P" 

£? downs, | i e ft i n tnf . 



NELLO LAVORINI— . 
Fr. — Tarentum, Pa. 



: Shellcnberger 

lore than six 



|e fmne v lley DeLiberty g* 
- KheV n he next Play P'\ 
I tion; on the pU X 

f nberger on an ov wilke \ 
l M Dale outran ^° lh6 fi>j 

^ tWe 1e2fs Verted tor * 
H0W,CS tt, Two: Th-as 

in the end zone for 

Hut, Three: Savas 

here were eleven 

Before here q , 

in > he ha '' S and chugged 




ns> ! left in the first quarter, Bob Lon 
plajpunted to the Wilkes 17. On 



mir 

igene 

On the 



las recovered a fui 

-Valley. DeLiberty gained 3 o 

pn the next play pitched to J 

r on an option play to 



1 U1V lit. M [ ' I ct \ i.'ILLl 

r on an option play to the i 
e outran three Wilkes defen 
:,nty-yard race for the first Tl 
m -« Sellers converted for 7-0. 

\ Hut, Tw' T».n~.«= 



third 



'o: Thomas 

and four i 




third and four on the nine t 
lut, but Glenn Thomas go 
batted it down and recov 
1 zone for a TD. 
Hut, Three: Savastio 
re there were eleven minutes 
half, Leo Savastio intercepts 
the 30 and chugged it over 
eo booted the point and: 20- 1 
Hut, Four: OUinger 
llinger climaxed a circus- 
ive by crashing over from 
picked himself up, dusted 
line and his kicking toe. 



x-tra 
th 



e ana nis KicKing toe, 
ra point to make it 27-* 

wiis time Wilkes scored 

died the half. 
Five: Shellenberger 
to Wilkes to open the I 




CHARLES McKERNS— HB 
-Mahanoy City, Pa 



TONY PELLEGRINO— C 
Soph. — Creighton, Pa. 



PR. — Mahanoy City, Pa. Soph. — Creighton, Pa. | 

Tonal Boin , ° ctob er 7 Pj *G / a / 

t. mh / men V 

VINCE MARTIN1CCHIO— FB / 

Fr — Clifton Heights, Pa. ,ed to ifc / ' 

y^ar I c nt 

Pro ^ed tne T & and a " air « u / 6 C< 4 

' ga «e y nfo e a d " 6Ve ^ Period t/° Pe ^« 
Mc CracW Ut / and »e M 

OUi nger "1 Crew vvo„ tb / tte second^ 

> w, g r ret "rned «, p e toss Dick r " 

Ibpr*., 8 !" ° ff to GENE ZIMMERMAN— E P J_ 

. — Harrisburg, Pa. - _, 

& fi»«_t t k Pelt* 

at! 




.tbatt ^ u 



Sat' 



oaeh^' 
CoUeS- *>° 

; 1 e banon M1 - u , 

' artened putehmf 
iittVe Lou 



■avterve' 




A^" S,-Ha rri5bur g, Pa. - 

""> John Get *» 

OPhoa P% for S ^/ T ^ 2ve ^ We «* 
aV-i *°* **"?££**•»*< 



Bifl J>eZh e,v 

:c ^ered n er,y fl 
fr tee fir „f ihe ' SP ' 




, Vat- ' c Wane 

ebatioO > . faster stn^t / f ercen 







afternoon 

,1 a as Same 77, l tv/ o tall; 

41-6 , to , T ne extra / ta "'e s ^ 

titst / re specfjv e j y / 

\ for ced the th -e t en , S ' 




• res will appre- , 
Le gionrv al res ^ rest 

\ e more tn ^^ as an , 

etn it can MU itary t 

r,lf Bets- Bowi^ 



^Pered J3 

\cy\ Af ter a 

^cV. i Til oni. 



JIM WOLFE— T 
7 Soph. — Dallastown, Pa 
tbe *or e \ o ;'; o nit for 

^!-/ s '°n -. <hP biKgest thing 
romUen. 




tck ? aiJ on 
Vtte 
V on 



R— HB 



JOE STAUFFER- 
Soph. — Red Lion, P 



as ; 
they 



;tnpus 

ly advertise 
leader 




felt— 

' CadC, f '"the C^ets 
:l Throughout^ 

continued to ._ 

^ s ^rrsi 

^ V l.ndthey 



sV-ed to 



" „cked w "« ■ 

^ ar6 Q^n,^ 
?aATO and Thomas 1 
PlaSteie 'elTes a point ' 
m r the eoaches; 
and some of the 
great victory- 




flying dutchmen basketball team 



Coach, "RINSO" MARQUETTE 
Statistician, BILL KIICK 



"Nice guys NEVER LOSE.' 



GRM 




THE VALLEY'S 1955-56 
BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

LVC v. Dickinson (H) 77-67 

LVC v. Gettysburg (A) 70-73 

LVC v. Penn Military (H) 72- 57 

LVC v. Muhlenberg (A) 91-109 

LVC v. Shippensburg (N) 89-79 

LVC v. Lycoming (H) 88-62 

LVC v. Drexel (A) 55-77 

LVC v. Gettysburg (H) 85-67 

LVC v. F. & M (A) 78- 66 

LVC v. Elizabethown (H) 80- 69 

LVC v. Moravian (A) 59-85 

LVC v. Elizabethtown (N) 56- 74 

LVC v. West Chester (H) 76- 72 

LVC v. Wilkes (H) 88-62 

LVC v. Moravian (H) 79-78 

LVC v. Upsala (H) 87-59 

LVC v. Albright (A) 70-99 

LVC v. Temple (A) 68-72 

LVC v. F. & M (H) 72- 60 

LVC v. Albright (H) 75-70 

LVC v. Dickinson (A) 62-73 



Lebanon Valley College: Won 
Lost 



13 
8 



To the victory-drugged LVC campus the 1955-1956 
basketball season was "so-half." The thirteen wins and 
eight losses were a little distant from the past winning 
numbers of nineteen and twenty-three. And yet the sea- 
son was not a disappointing one; the wins added to 
Coach Marquette's LV record in four seasons to seventy- 
four wins against only twenty-two losses. 

Two outstanding accomplishments for the Flying 
Dutchmen also contributed to making this a "good" year. 
The brightest spot was safeguarding the consecutive 
home-court victory streak. Eleven of the LV victories were 
on the hard Lynch Memorial hardwoods and ended the 
year with forty-one straight home triumphs. Several 
opponents were pointing at this streak and a few came 
"too-close" to upsetting it. West Chester and Moravian 
must be given credit for coming the closest while Eliza- 
bethtown and Albright provided anxious moments. 

The other high point of the year was the Valley's 
"scare" against nationally ranked, NCAA representative 
Temple University. As background for this contest LV had 
defeated Temple twice in the past two years on the 
Lynch floor, both times in overtime games, while the high- 
ly-regarded Owls had beaten LV once in Philadelphia. 
This year's contest was scheduled for the Temple home 
court at South Hall. Two days before the meeting LV 
was routed by Albright 99-70. 

In their best team-effort of the season the Valley 
jumped to an early lead, lost it to Temple's fast break 
just before the half, gave more ground at the start of 
the second half and then picked up steam to close with 
a rush and force the Owls into a Rodgers freeze and a 
scant 72-68 victory. A few different plays here and there 
and the outcome could have been . . . 

Throughout the court season the Valley presented an 
unsteady alignment of players. Shortly after the Christ- 
mas holidays the "bench" was hard hit by what Bob 
Keller, the WLBR sports announcer, so aptly described 
as the "battle of the books." Big Bob "Buck" Bowman, 
Larry Mentzer, Ken Schuler, and Bill Wenrich, all first- 
line reserves, became ineligible for the latter half of 
play. Four freshmen were rushed into their positions to 
give the "bench" strength. That these players handled 
themselves in good style and did not provide merely 
"bulk" can be attested by their fine showing against 
Albright when they along with Pete McEvoy saved LVC 
from a humbling rout. 

Gerry Steger and Jack Peepe finished their playing 
time for Lebanon Valley and will be missed next year 
when the Dutchmen take to the floor. While this was 
hoped to be "THE year" there is still sufficient potential 
returning next season to realize one of the Valley's 
greatest cage teams. They have no greater foe than 
themselves on the schedule. 




Co-Captains Elect 

DICK SHOVER GERRY STEGER 



Managers 

GEORGE WADE JIM McARDLE 

"/ was studyin' " "Co-ax!" 




L!JC Dutchmen LVC Dutchmen Do 
ily Defeat Penn IVIilitary, 72- 
oming, 88-6!To Hike Home Stre 

HI 



Lycoming O 

88-62 score at 
! their fourth 
1 starts to dat< 

It was als«AV£SJ'4'fc}rd strai 
I victory on tlierr' Home floor 
| extend a streak that has Ii 
i been a record for college plaji An 1 
1 this entire area. Last night's 4 attest 
| also closed out the 1955 phjthrou 
i of the LVC season, and the B;fore 



oml 
enh MilitaJ 



.Jt^ Lebanon D aily News/Ls) 



and White collegians now 
their cage toggery until Januj 
i when they tackle Drexel on 
latter's Philadelphia court. 
LVC Takes Early Lead 
With Gerry Sieger and Bob 

son setting DON REINHARD— Jr 
I Dutchmen f! Pine Grove, Pa. 

lead before i 

| the ice for tt_ .;_^..1^1 , .-_i!' id 
! of foul conversions, pair 

Jack Peepe then collabojman' 
| with Steger in' the latter pi] drive- 
of tho first half as the Dulcl| But 
ran 

aek McBrS 
Retnhard paced thej^nned ; 
13 all. 
This was 
?et in the a^ 
foals to put 
, lain, 15-13. 
stringers with the gaime wj from the left sii, 
hand. j of six 

The Dutchmen finished the | haJJ^vened thinj 
! with an entirely reserve tea' ^Tclson really 



I fe, 72-57, lafet night in Lynch Memorial Gymnasiui -. 
« \e. 

i \ The victory was the 
K 

Th Setback marred the seaso 
Gh\ \i 

cage addicts 
and they sat 
moments be 
were sure of 




scS^mg pace as th 
score 

Reinhard, th 
d the individua. 
^ and Nelson c 




LVC Dutchmen Delea 
Shippensburg, 89-79 



Stege 



n Valle 




nd Bob Nelson 

..■■. ■ •-- ■"»«r*uollege Dutcl 

*Tg State Teacher^B«w?f9!79 ctH 
"bYhuth Fund benefit game at Ste 



K-foot, five-inch center fronTpine^c? 
ormg with 27 points as Steger ran* 

id in with 99 /. m ,nt n ,.,. _£J 

I mif ii i i l! 



ed in with., JS 

/UetteaUere 
fclay to som 
*§pover in th 
^•'the 



BOB NEtSON— Jr 

Harrisburg, Pa. 

"What? Me Foul! 

the scorin; 
however, wh 
clutch per! 
second hall 
shaved IhJ 
ad to onl 



Lebanon Valley 

eaten, 109-91, 

uhlfyg 

ej /on 




checked Safe 
long set, they wi 
sparge, at the 1 
t pulled berg 

fairly, Until \ J$ 

which er went\ vbf t 
'the half, howev 
r put on a had not only s 
wn right in favored Mules, 
Ja"ke Cor- holding a 51-47 
burg High Muli 

15 in a losj With the w 
i the rival lea 
ird in five. Mutes took 
i, and they' chance to 
hosts .to Ly-: turned the tid- 
Annvil'lc into the lead t< 
M in their. The Dutchm! 
y sea-| game until t! 

\ Htes. hnwtf 
BOB KERSTETTER— Fr 
Hazleton, Pa. 



of kef Aon foul 

,ond haB\ * the Let 
■y Co-lies 



Wh( 



„ rs Vowed ... 
nkcrbrook Dairymen by an 87-7", 
>re as Ray Naccarato, forraei 
rnsburg Catholic High wizard 
:ed_the winners with 28 points 
inkie Keath was top hand fot 
locals with 27 points. 



ley 

ieffl 

-e' S uonr; „ r a 

handily. In fact! 
a 20-point attacl 
final moments toy 
commanding lead) 
Clint Jeffries a/ 
that closing,- 




Shover, Steger Pace .. 

IVC 0**tT&M, 78-66 Leban ° n Valle Y 



With co-capt 
ing up 45 points bet 
Dutchmen downed the 
78-66, last night on 

It was the ValJ 
and their fifth cof 

Although the 
tttSL|ield, it was th 
iJfferencf 
fest was 




/of the fli 
_._ J tied set 
iast being at the lj 
stage. At this point, the Dutch rj 
put on the pressure and reeled. 
12 straight points to the Dips ijr 
and went ahead 25-17. • r 

Lebanon Valley held an ei g 
point, 35-27 lead at the end of, 
first half. 

Within a few minutes 'after 
start of the second half the Dii 
arieu had increased their teaif 
39-30. It was here that the 
high-scoring forward, W a r 
Chase, decided to make a i 

DICK SHOVER— Jr. 

Annville, Pa. 

'/ knew where it was goin', Rinse" 

hand stab shots and added a j 
throw to bring the Diplomat 
within two points of the D/ 
men, -11-39. / 

Kudy Koenig's twir 
tied the score at 43-ai 
looked as though the Dips we 
going to poll the game from tl 
lire. The Dutchmen refused 
panic, however, and- continued tol?^ 
match the Diplomats score for 
score. 
P, & II. was never able to- ge 




■H.nd Gerry Steger rarj 
Nanon Valley's Flyii 
\nklin and Marsha 
\ Lancaster. 

\tarts this seasi 
pmats. 

s 27-25 fro 
6, that mai 



Extends Temple 



At P 




Lebanon 
the "breather 
were forced t 
basketb 
down 
Temple's Sout' 
Both Did- 
H ords for visit 1 




ive, 

|e, I 

The iff 

.ifoints at: 

lair hail, 

^ood on I 

foot strip| 

Peepe's" 

s best j 

ints aga 

pin his firs^ 



ger added 
tchmen a 10-pi 



Valley ahej 

ier and Soudj of 
Ive field goals'; went 

52-50. 
me through ag| 
igoals and 

tossed ,, in , a | Steger "tallied" "^ 
?for a visiting p 

What was term 
for the highly rega: 
became a disaster 
ing, scrapping and 
men quintet played 
eign-court game of 

What actually hap 
Hall was that 
a more balanced attae 
with their famous twin 
gers and Hal Lear. 



Its got within 
[but Peepe was 
again and m 
|ances from the 
?ke the score 66 
high and topj 
is effort of 
ettysburg last yt 
fearance as a 




72-68 



$ | \fc*"clo®e to taking the breath 

it n | as the tenth-ranked Tempi 

\ deep freeze in the closing r 

'fore the "upstart Annvilli 

The game was pla 

about 1000 fans. 

terry Steger set new flo; 

Jshover scored 25 poin 

I record set in 1952—22 



Most of the glory, howe 
to the visiting Lebanon V* 
as Shover converted on v; ' 
free throws, the most ever 
a visitor at South Hall. 

That the early Lebano 

■^tack stunned the Owls ci 

.by the 16 minutes it too! 

ateh the Dutchmen, tt 

court. 

Sanon Valley gained 

1 orestige in last ni 



Peepe-Led Dutc^ 
WkhA 40th Victr 

*\_ -55- i Uying Dutchmen of Lei Shover and Steaep only Jack Pe 



the lead in the second half and inj 
the closing minutes Shover, Stegi 
er, Bob Nelson- and Jack Peepe; 
tossed in baskets to ice the 
game for Lebanon Valley. 

-The Lebanar. Valley J\^s defeat-; 
ed the F. & M. Fresh by an iden-; 
tieal scores 78-66, in the prelimi-; 
jiary game as Ted Pounds and 
Bill DeLiberty led the way with 
and 18 points respectiv 

Lebanon Valley 
lion on its home 
night when the P 
play host to the Biul 
bethtown College 
mortal Physical Edfl 
ing, Annvill-e. 




f & m . 

Lebanon Valley 
Refere&s; O'oodm 



Bennei-.f 4 2 lOiPounds.f 

Lazaroxitz.C 4 1 SDiraon,! 

Newton. f 3 A 6 Ker^etter <• 

Swetma'n.e 4 2 10 DeLibcu ,e 




By winning the 

their season r 
against seven i 
now hold a 31 
Diplomats, in g 
the years. It alsf 
consecutive LVs 
F and M. 

Lebanon Va! 
home portion of \ 
night by enterta 
Lions at Annville| 
game this seasoi 
the measure of 
White. 

Saturday the D/i 

to a 4-0 leaden" 1 

J? and Peepe-^^ 

«; fouls. T**^— = 



\ 
Shover and Stegep only Jack Peeped 
was able to contribute sufficiently to:j^ 
the Dutchmen off..-- „ r ;~^- ! 
That the Dut<j GERRY STEGER ' 

manned is easily] Chambersburg, Pa 

seven men wen "Hail Mary . . ." 
"Rinso" Marquette, anu tut awn- 
ing five went most of the way. 
Lebanon Valley wasn't long for 
urprising the Owls last night 
id quickly ran up a 20-12 lead 
the opening minutes, 
jtunned by the -speed of the 
schmen attack, Temple struck 
k and gained a 30-30 tie with 
minutes remaining in the 
Jst half. Hal Lear then scored 
n a fast break to put the Owls 
in front to stay. 




Getting over their early game f 61 shots and Temple i 



fof Shover 
Thel irts of the 1 
were jus,. Enough to u 
game better than it hat 
to be. 

Steger had the crc 

with emotion as he hit 

straight set shots and ca 

17 field goal attempts. 

The Dutchmen c o u n j 



n shot 
fy Ste 
,a pai» 
ahead-' 



shock the Owls kept up the pace 
and stretched their lead to 40-32 at 
lj half time. 

ti The nationally ranked Temple 
' quintet turned the game into a one 
\sided affair in the early part of the 
\econd half as they built a 15 point 
cad, 56-41. 
Th? JACK PEEPE— Soph. 

' lavi i Pine Grove, Pa. 
ifiurf 

"All right, who's the wise guy?" Cohen,£ a 2 o 

, , , -«,-., . . Fleming^ 3 6 

'emple lead. With live minutes to|sm«h,c o o o 

|o, Lebanon Valley crept to with-:^ g £ a s fg oM 1 ? \ 2 6 4 
fe five points of the Owls at 66-61. ;Lear.g ' 7 * it 
With the Dutch on the prowl, |Goidstein,g 
Wple went into a freeze and shot! Totals si in 72 
• ly when good shots were avail-| 



on 31 of 60. 

- But, "when it was all 
done, there was only om 
Guy Rodgers who led t! 
quintet from their lethai 
Owl Ail-American was t 
force behind the winnii 
close as it may have b« 

Temple 



F P 

elnfield,£ 3 6 
12 4 



Leban 

Nelson.f 

Shover ,i 

Smith,£ 

Reinhard 

Peepe.fi 

Kerstette 

Steger.g 



▼▼■II 



JJltl ni I 1WIH5 



LVC D^fomen Extended 
ToDefe^ ^ 





own, 8 



arked 
41 Feb*/^ 
/ill pre, 
4ys both - 



Although the Lebanor- 
once in their game with ' 
Lynch Memorial Gymna? 
ed all the way before cc 
80-69__ 

i Ja. extend 

gt:~ 

h 

tel 

intfe. 

towhi^gppFgames 

In posting tl B , LL wenrich— Sr. 
ten starts, the „ , B 

led by Dick Sj Palmyra ' Pa - 

Son, two jurat "Watch those Palms" 

Harrisburg. Snover poorea <sh 
points through the hoops aside 
from playing a tremendous floor, 
game. Nelson, although hamperedA t^XjlC 
by personal fouls, found time to \ *^_. — 
net 20 points, including 16 In the 
first half, and be was a strong re- 
bounder. 

is, who like nothing 
lefeat Lebanon Val- 
hg a host of rooters 
|ym to capacity /» 
tee time. The pf > 
|e was 2200 spa* 
ust have beei| 
age addicts 
ain admission 
d PhH Lowell 1 
\who hai 
fct th 



. j "tnf neu ue\m 
>r trailee jump in fashioning 
tiight ir fore the. Dutchmen f« 
■extend tlie c& unfc, and the visr 

Wrned' a brief lea<i agai " at ^ 
..: t [ The Dutchmen theri 

.4 44-32 half lime .lead a 

Wllj counted for fifteen ri 

ice al first half. and. Stegef 

IChes'with fourteen. 

[n thj Dickinson rallied agv 
second half to pull up t^ 
two points of a tie at 49-h 
that was the ( cue for Ste"- 
Dkk Shover to - 
and be**~ 




len flashed plenty of hu 
ight foot in the presenc 
.veral occasions were fot 
:;ors. 

*C home floor winning 
e games, and with each 
record is broken. 



PETE McEVOY-Soph. 

Sewell, N. j. ees n 

"C'mon, George" Dickin 

iuu«c «u« *,uj distich 
HersCiey High cage star, 
pace with 18 marl 
up two scores L 

Dickin: 



Tfae Blue Ja 
better than t^ 
ley, broughV 
who filled tk i 
hour before' 1 
mated attend 
tors and thet 
least 500 mo, 
were unable : , 
Duke Maroi 

the two offid, 

the game, ne\ 

out of control \ 

capable job tha 

criticized. V 

It was a farp 

than the previ> 

Getty sltorg and 

tangled in a g 

resembled a vr\ 

times. 

Shover got th 
wih a one-ha 
and Nelson ca: 
the score, 3-0. 
didn't look lik 
who played aga t 
then pushed 01 
The Bine Ja 
by one point, 
bit four time; 
Peepe eonnec 
canned two el 
make the scori 
During fee r| 
Lebanon Vallel 
and never led 
points. Shover 
ing the first 20 
chimed in with 
Neither team 
any degree of 
the first ten m: 
half but Lebani 
to increase its 
about 11 minuti 
Seventeen por 
to be a comfo: 
the Blue Jays/ /ft 'in/ 
to give up the L The' 
playing a fuLL<**art prei. 




61 

pl\ 

vi*^ 

tha\ 

ipoit. 

: witb> 

r fou\ 

(/mm «,tter ""^"A w* i 

(entort ae Ss SlV d V; 






WaVHaV^^e 






t \vto 



Coa' 



■jl-ftiA r0 ,«v 



tos 



> . <\oor &1V »,i-ns\„,deT. *>•;-„ V 



Lebafl\YveW^. 

$st of ttestff^* seasons. ^ tot f£\Jffc W 

"ng 22 rebped *« ^ S e*f ^tc^f e * a fr v \**L * e / 

Llbanon ■ V^ a W *>*^ \?S '* / 

iARRY BOEHLER-jr. ^e O^. . ° ft V **\u Vft °^ 




ce «e « V atv . 
W ft. % 

sec 



Sate-. V teS t . n «ie 



Lebanon, Pa. 

"The Old Man . 
BUI rounms, 5 
made tfie nigh- 
from a honn 
the prelimin 
tory was th< 
for the jayv 

Eliiabethtot 
G 

Stine.E 1 

PensyM * 

Arcuri,f 1 

WerW 3 

Chaste 3 

Noel.c 3 

Paone.g 2 

Sarbaugh,g 5 
Goadie,g ? 

Totals 24 

Fouls Missed: 
Score by Per 
Lebanon Valley 
Elizabethtown . 
Officials: Dul 

LVC JVs 

G 

Pounds. f 5 

Kerstetter^ 
Dimon,f 2 

KerschnerJ 3 
Smith.c 6 

Dougherty.c 
DeLiberty.g 3 
Kristich.g 3 
Savidge.g 

Buzgon.g 1 

Totafu 23 



dUT»» g 






ePttf 



o»W 



tto* 



ft\e 



/V 10 , e i«b«S »*° 



VaUeV J. 1 * jgdff 



w>a s 



\ f * tt a .**• 



tied ^^^W a > Ta ^\rc^- fo acU-r Ntv d -^ 




riome arreaic inracr 



DefeaP-Moravian In 



Double 

Lebanon Valley's home-court vi 
tory string is still intact, at 
straight games, but it 

® LARRY MENTZER— Jr. 

:i Myerstown, Pa. 

I "Lei's play ihe wufafao go 
0.— ,„.. 

It was Gerry Steger's o: 
push shot from the foul cir 
only two seconds remaininj 
second overtime period th 
the Dutchmen their han 
victory. Just 10 seconds 
this, Bob Jones' lay up 
Moravian out in front, 7| 

The game was a real th, 
the way for the approxijnf 
spectators who saw it, a| 
time did either team leaif 
than five points. The Is ' 
hands no less than 2S* 
the score was tied onf ; 



Lebanon Valley str 
ing a 1-0 lead on i 
free throw, but M^ 
Fegiey countered r 
field to put the Grt? 
front. It was nip a; 
the remainder of 
with Moravian fmi 




I UU V-IUiC I Ul VWfii" 



-ie, 79-78 

tain on a'by mauling the Moravian 
|>nds re- (studies 84-58 in the preliii 
■Connected j game. 

* * -k 

Lebanon Valley I , Moravia 

10 5 25 Fegiey ,t 

6 12IHearn,f 

5 2 j2!CausIey,£ 

Oljones.c 

8 3 19 Toner ,g 

2 7 lllPotter.g 
|Davis,g 

... 31 17 79] Totals 

~ s Score by Periods: 

at ! Lebanon Valley, 36 31 

'Moravian ,,■>' iv ' 




on Valley A] 
At Home, 76-72 



rst, tak 

Steger'. 1 £ ames Saturday ai 
/m's Rusithe Flying DutelrJ 
I from th< Valley College wl 
indsoutiu he limit befol < 
ck lEirouS! 
'■ first hai speedy and shar S - 

Jking a 37Chester Rams, 76-W. ^ '1 " 

36 half time lead oh The' basis of i Only a slim gathering of 600 
last - second, 40 - foot desperatioi fans braved the k d j 

heave by Russ Causley th,-*- 
4he hoop just as the buzze 
Russ Fegiey was the 
for Moravian in the firs 
19 points, while little G 
kept the Dutchmen i 
game by notching 14 cou 
• • •• 
K was in the see ! 
«ach of the' teams/ 
largest leads. Th<i 
men pulled out tol 
Vantage at 47-43 j 
the Greyhounds pq 
margin at 63-58 at 
Dick Shover, | 
only four points if 
really found his 
orid stanza and < 
markers on nine 
$hree charity tosi 
sonally ran the V 
54 to 67 points 



to put LVC in 

The Rams cloi 
points, 72-70, 
minute . to play 
tive points from, 
Shover and Peep; 
tory. 

.The gam* 
with* the ..' 
and the 
,10 occa' 
hat turned out to be the mostJLebanoi 
rious threat to the LVC streak getting 
is season. Not since, the Dutch- J Peepe 
._ squeezed past Muhlenberg, | " l f sr sc 
*82, last year did any' opponent j ml! ] utes 
'me as close to upending j Tfle D 
Marquette's crew on the | were 
mortal boards as West I s * u *> ° ° f 



i JgMfe 




game into overtim 
jump shot with 1:5$ 
regulation time, 

t Moravian's Bob 
nomenal rebounder 
all six Greyhound 
first overtime period 
nected on two field goa! 
Peape converted two bi 
tojjyeh the count at 73-' 

of the first overtime. 

• • • . 
Fegiey started the secft 
period with a jump shot j 
er replied with a perfect* 
Jones converted a fr/ 
then Shover got into the ; r~ 




other night. ! hm « s 
utes remaining in! Portion 
on Valley trailed j anead . 
62-55^ and things 
lie home forces, 
sed that the 
minded when 
ay a deliberate 

BUI "DeUBERTY,— 'Fr."'"'"^ 1 * 

Swatara, Pa. ' r 

Of 

Where's fbe Roys' Club?" Xt- 

a three-man press to iry to 

^session of the ball. The 

I paid off and LVC was 

ipk in the running. ' j 

Steger made good twice 

foul line and with 4:17 

Bob Nelson canned a 

a follow-up shot. Steger 

ed a pass at midcourt 

d in for a layup, and 

|ft to play Jack Peene 

je lead when he «ank 

land a foul on a three- 







Ihmen never trailed 
pt Charlie Huebner's 
jhander knotted the 
I all. At 1:58 Dick 
fcthe stalemate with 
\ and one second 
"Sniled and cashed 



the Ra 

gained 

. Then 

Shover 

PeeAe 

in doublets 

ley, a 47-40 
bogged down 
were soon tra 
difficult situati 
With about 1 

the Dutchmen 

point edge, 51 

went' on a 12?p 

at this juncturj 

lead which pi 

the hosts 
It's now hist 

men battled 

their streak, 

threatened fou| 

fore this camp 
. Shorthanded $ 
four varsity 
scholastic. inehV 
ley played most of; 
just five players. Tin ... 

to see action was Bob-- 

a freshman moved up last week from 
the jayvee squad 



I in scoring with 22 points 

to two game honors with Terr 

; fl LLOYD SMITH— Fr. :V eral long I 

irj Lebanon, Pa. sensational 

r. Steger 1 

imarsers ana Peep* got 

Nut| m g nine in the final te 

? J Both teams made 20 of Z, 

Vnd they w^ere almost eve 

West Chester 

""-^ 8 for L 

VV ^nary till 

abt.^ v v levees 

* gam"e in nine 

g West Chester' 

Vill DeLibertv lee 

different! f rs , with „ 17 P ^. \ nd ' 

e latter ^t' fT^/^F Hlgh D c 
ev s jj . | tnbuted 14. Bernie Bu 

23 but' Llo5 ' d Smitn > wao playec 
'anon High las: year, scoi 
I'l points, respectively. 

This week Lebanon Vj 
its . streak two times, 
night tlie Dutchmen. 
Wilkes College and Satu 
host Moravian. 

Lebanon Valley West- 

G F PI 
Nelson,? 
Shover,f 
Kerstetter.f 
Reinhard.c 




8 6 22 Bordi.f 
3 7 13 German.f 
0iCoward,f 

5 10'Carr.c 

6 3 15:A!len,c 
6 4 I6!Chiaeeh'r< 

iHuebner.g 
I Thompsori 

Totals " 28 26 76j Totals 

Score by periods: 

Lebanon Valley 

West Chester 

Referees: Duke Ma'ronic k 
ericb. 

Foals missed: LVC 7, West't 

West- Ch 

F P] 

4 S^Hopton.f 
1 l!Coward>f 
1 13lV3rrato,t 
1 ll!A!len,c 

5 17 Kingsmor* 

6 14 Laskin..g 
l'McGiiuiis,j 



Score 

LVC .'-' : . 

West Chester 



22 19 S3I Totals 



/in 39th At Home 



Dutchmen Defeat Upsala 
fo Extend Streak, 87-59 




boards movst of the time with! 
hard turning in one, of his 
performances of the sease 
tapped-in tforee doublets in th! 
half and fust missed 
others. Nelson and Sho 
good reboi inders, and 
stetter and Lebanon's Li 
also showed to advant 
they were in the game. 

Lebanon .Valley had 
haH shooting perp*""\\ 
21 of 42 shots £ 
the second ha/ 
sank only 15 off 
an average of 
converted 18! 
the foul line. 

Upsala hit 
field on 80 
centage of 27 
the Vikings m 



Step- 



h a 75-70 
tit rivals 
Lebanon 
— \ extend- 
W streax' through 
jgames. 
The win -alsrTcbnchidsd a second 
raight h KEN SCHULER— Jr. )ut de- 
;at for tl Columbia, Pa. at the 
ime time „„ .. . , „ avenge 
previous .. Keep j'.™ ov '" offered 
t the hands of their Albright ri- 
als earlier this season. 
Steger Leads Way 
Jeiyry Steger made his final 
home appearance as a collegian 
as the team's lone senior an im- 
pressive one in leading the 
Dutchmen to victory with a 24- 
point performance. He was well 
supported by Jack Peepe and 
Bob Nelson, however, with 19 
and 20 points, respectively, as 
the three of them collaborated 
in carrying the scoring burden 
for the Dutchmen. 

• * * 

In the first half it was Peepe 

vho shared the spotlight with Steg- 



the Lions put 
that merely 
deficit. Jim 
Riddell also hit^ 
the Lions, and i 
only ex-Cedaf~ 
tributed six 
bright caus^ 
termittenti 
hand. 

Conrad, 
Albright 
record i 
to datei 
501 set J 

It waf 

contest : 
ing spun. 
LVC spluri 
of the secon? 

The DutchmV 1 
to a 6-0 lead asT 
his only doublet\ 
a pair of one-han^ 
Lions made it 6-4, 
them to a 16-6 lea 
of set shots. 

Then it was Al> 
the Lions roared ' 



In the prel! 

Kristich, for} 
eager, scored', 
LVC reserves) 
over Hershey 

The jayvees ..^ 
time lead and; 
visitors point-!]! 
cond half when 5 



n W 
t 75 

with less than fo 
Big -Don Rein| 
bounding was a | 
liis stay in the g| 
fouls about that tf: 
staged a belatj 
Dutchmen relaxf 
some extent. 

* V •*' 

For the night the horf 
for thirty doublets and 
fifteen of 25 free tries 
Lions, with 26 doublets 




jj — JjBUdUUU JJCmy n = »vo, us 

LVCDul 
jDefeate 
In Seasc 

With Gerry Steger s 

ion Valley College t 

down to a 73-62 upse 

College Red Devils 

seasQJ 5 - finale. 



ded his 

N a sopl 

f collej 

ichool i 

'ySBStart Gam 

darquette stE 

mly Steger i 

ilars in the 

Devils made 

chances to j 



ir\ \ 
consk 



and thv 
ft of their H[_ 

l$o a commanding 15-4 leac 
jrned out they finished wit 
m-point victory margin, 
by a late-game scoring I 
ulled them out of danger 
when the regulars 
into action, the Dutct 
turn the tide as expe 
>re still on the short ei 
count at halftime. 
y did whittle away at 
ison lead, however, a 
ired to be well on their 
victorious comeback in ] 
Ip to within one point c 
\59-58. 

' 2nd Dickinson Win 
threat fired up tbe 
'again, however, and 
/ay steadily to wind up 
scond triumph in si 
I They also snapped a 
ling streak with the ups< 
fcnged a season-openinj 
Dutchmen at Annviile 
jjteggett, Jim Connor 
tihlmaier were the 1« 
\ fashioning the somi 
* victory, with L; 
setk-jr-tne home team pace 

BOB "BUCK" BOWMAN— Rt. 

. , D unters 

Palmyra, Pa. ^ & f 

"The big bear" [er, COnt 

with 26 doublets puu «j ec j 18 markers to the winning i 
,m mam oi uncanny foul shooting exhibitw Peepe Led Scoring 

m in 1949-50. canning 18- of 22 chances, con* individual honors went to I 
L ted pouNDS^Fr "? st f(>u rt een tnes 1 with 26 points in his farew 

P f a ! ,, _ , p „ ! " I LVC basketball, while Stegei 

Iterna Upper Darby, fa. binary game saw \ ed his t col i ege care er 

ams, 
natc 




defens 



|the story. 

Bumped out 

fn^er hit for 

game on 

/After the 

(er sparked 

'ii a series 

/s turn and 
Ao tie up the 



• Darby, fa. ^,j nar y game saw 

Chomps . . •" iyvees ete out an j ten poin t s as the Dutchmen 
win over ine LVC understudi* their season with a 13 . 8 re 



aveng 
ing. 

Lebanon 

Shover.f 

Nelson.f 

Reinhard.c 

Kerstetter.c 

Peepe .g 

Steger.g 



an earlier defeat at E 



• • 



their season with a 13-8 rec 
The preliminary game s 
Sj pattern for the night when the 
iibright-' ' ns <>n Jayvees outshot the 
Qn^on Valley understudies by 

2 4 8Pryor,f )«. srflrp 

9 2 20 Fore man, f ' ' ' Store. 

1 2 4 Krlck.f J „, _, i T i. ™ v 

Firestone ,f 1 Dickinson | Lebanon Vi 

8 3 19 Conrad.c U , « F PL, _ , ' 

10 4 24iRiddell.g 4W.eaver,f 4 8 McEvoy,f 

JDePaul,! SUeggetU 9 4 22!Nelson.f 

IMvercf t> OiBoehler.f 

30 15 751 Totals 2SKohlmaicr,c 7 4 18]Peepe.e 

vriorl*- . IConnor.g 9 3 21!Reinhard.c 




S -9 



5b 



o ^ -a 



" (U Q 
>» O £ 



~ "D TJ 1) 
» ® « m 



ID O ^ 





Coach 

"RINSO" MARQUETTE 



lebanon valley baseball team 



"Whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball . . . 

"The wonderful purging of the passions that we all experience in baseball gives us some idea of 
what Greek tragedy was like. Baseball is Greek in being national, heroic, and broken up in the rivalries 
of city-states. 

"That baseball fitly expresses the powers of the nation's mind and body is a merit separate from 
the glory of being the most active, agile, articulate and brainy of all group games. It is of and for our 
century. 

"I said Baseball was Greek. Is there not a poetic symbol 4/? Lv( _ y Susquehanna (H) 

in the new meaning — our meaning — of 'Ruth hits Homer?' 4/1Q lyc v F & M ( H ) _ 

"Accuracy and speed, the practiced eye and hefty arm, the 4/u LV( _ y Moravian (H ) 

mind to take in and readjust to the unexpected, the possession 4/]fi LVC y E lizabethtown (H) 

of more than one talent and the willingness to work in harness 4/]8 Lyc y Western Md (A) 

without special orders — these are the American virtues that shine 4/2] LV c v. Millersville (H) 

in baseball." 4/26 LVC v. Moravian (A) 

JACQUES BARZUN, God's Country and Mine 4/2g Lyc y Drexe| (A) 

4/30 LVC v. Albright (H) 

..,., . _ , 5/5 LVC v. Scranton (H) 

There was ease in Casey s manner 

.,,.,... 5/8 LVC v. Wilkes (A) 

As he stepped into his place; 

T , ., . _ / . ■ 5/10 LVC v. Gettysburg (H) 

There was pride in Casey s bearing, 

. , .. _ / , 5/12 LVC v. Elizabethtown (A) 

And a smile on Casey s face. 

... ,. ' lL , 5/14 LVC v. Dickinson (A) 

And when, responding to the cheers, 

u I- U*l J a J U- U» 5/15 LVC v. Ursinus (H) 

He lightly doffed his hat, 

.. • xi_ J uj u. 5/17 LVC v. Albright (A) 

No stranger in the crowd could doubt 

- , . ,, 5/19 LVC v. Drexel (H) 

Twas Casey at the bat. 

ERNEST L. THAYER Lebanon Valley College: Won 

"Casey at the Bat" Lost 

Rained Out 





Coach 

"SPIDE" SPANGLER 



flying dutchmen track squad 



"This track, this race ... of man, of times . . . around this oval cinder . . . when once completed, 
traversed . . . before the crowd, beneath the clouds of suns . . . ah! then the sigh, the tape-breaking 
thrill. They start together, even, save some have the inside lane. But for awhile they all run together, 
fresh . . . confident. Throughout there is someone in front ... to be caught, to be passed . . . and there 
is always someone behind ... to keep ahead . . . They run in a pack, but they see themselves apart . . . 
they run in a circle, hugging the inside . . . they run in fear and fury . . . their eyes ahead, always ahead 
think back but never look back . . . the backstretch is the glide of ease, the homestretch the hateful kick 
the leg-weary final turn ... at the end, wai-ting, the timers with their clocks of spent seconds . . . meas- 
ures of man's race against his men and his time, those 
who finish the strongest are those who have paced them- 
selves the best, paced themselves within their race, with- 
in their time . . . thus winners all." 



LEBANON VALLEY 
1956 TRACK SCHEDULE 

April 10 LVC v. F. & M (H) 

April 21 LVC v. Millersville ...(H) 

April 24 LVC v. Albright (A) 

April 27-28 LVC-Penn Relays, Phila. 

(Individual members only) 

May 2 LVC v. P.M.C (A) 

May 5 LVC v. Stevens Trade (A) 

(Freshmen only) 

May 8 LVC v. Ursinus (A) 

May. 11-12 LVC-Middle Atlantics (A) 

May 16 LVC v. Dickinson ... .(A) 

Gettysburg 

May 19 LVC v. Juniata (H) 

Flying Dutchmen: Won 
Lost 



News Item: the great Australian 

John landy holds the world's record for the mile. 

Three times be has broken the four-minute bar- 
rier his best time being 3 minutes 58 seconds. He 
has all along asserted that he could run it in 3.55 or 
3.56. 

In the Olympic tryouts at Australia this winter, 
Landy decided to make his supreme effort. He 
wanted to represent Australia in the Olympics and 
he wanted to run a record-shattering mile. 

A friend of his was his pacer. For nearly three- 
quarters of the race Landy was running in better 
time than his record, then his pacer, his friend, fell 
to the track in front of Landy. 

Landy hurdled the body . . . THEN stopped, went 
back to his friend and helped him off the track. The 
action took about 5 or 6 seconds, several runners 
had passed him . . . Landy continued the race and 
won it in 4.04. 




Co-Captains Elect 

BILL WENRICH GLENN THOMAS 



Lebanon Valley's 1956 diamond niners hope 
to get out of the rough this season and shine 
their hidden brilliance over a successful baseball 
year for Coach George Marquette. For the past 
two years great things have been expected of 
the LVC squad but both years they just managed 
to squeak through with winning records. 1954's 
6-5 total was followed by last year's 7-6 record. 

This year looked to be THE year. It is still 
hoped to be the BIG YEAR for LVC baseball, but 
the doubtful availability of clutch pitcher Bill 
Wenrich and steady infielder Larry Mentzer may 
be blows too serious for LV to overcome. 

With the loss of Wenrich as Coach. Marquette's 
"stopper", LVC may become a team cursed with 
good hit, good field, no pitch. From last year's 
pitching crew Kosier has. graduated, Stanfield 
transferred, Wenrich lost, and co-captain in- 
fielder-pitcher Glenn Thomas underwent an ap- 
pendectomy early in the year. 

Glenn probably will be able to retain his team- 
leading hitting form but chances are he will not 
be able to take a turn on the mound. 

The Flying Dutchmen will have a real job on 
their hands this spring but "Rinso" can be 
counted on to come up with some game-winning 
solution. 



This spring Lebanon Valley will be heading 
into its third year of track competition since that 
sport was reactivated after a few years lapse. 
The past two seasons have seen the LVC runners 
fighting against overwhelming odds in all of its 
meets. Prospects for this year do not appear any 
brighter from a winning standpoint. 

Ken Schuler and Jerry Steger, co-captains, 
along with freshman point gatherer Aubrey 
Kershner will head a small but valiant band of 
Dutchmen through a difficult track schedule. 
Track talent has been scarce around the Valley 
in all departments: running, weights, coaching. 

At this writing there is no definite word on 
this year's coach. "Spide" Spangler possibly will 
rise to the occasion and fill in this important post. 
In the participating line it is too much to expect 
that LVC will suddenly come up with enough 
experienced trackmen to give the college an out- 
standing representative. 

While depth must be written-off at once, it is 
hoped that enough freshmen will report this 
spring to at least give Schuler, Steger, and Kersh- 
ner some front line aid. The important thing is 
to keep the blue-and-white colors in the race, 
not necessarily to always win the race. 



Co-Captains Elect 

KEN SCHULER GERRY STEGER 















\d I °«4-W f ayrj e c. ( . K .. , 

- par • 

ortur T 
l e s *a fn VanC °°k sottbaj; - 

coirffV. C - Condors, and W ■ * S ' Mod ei 

'"-'■'■"gJL'*?*-. 



fa y-Q6 Unden 



»vay 



'S year' 



Dietrich Squash King 
Victorious Over McLinn 



S&&' 




feated J lm lnt tamural 1 or hav 

claim the . tim e to 

charnpiC TTa relatively easver y ^ 

Sam ba 4e title than b* * ^ m e4y don 
» nncX,ng v, McLinn and Graven as • 

* d ' B ° tb Ution intneir y*Ug* meet it,g.ney pfc 
aiff comP etll ?° u r< ,A ets beiorC : . ?/ ,nn o use 

LE6IONAfAIReS 
BASHST0AI.I. ... 1^55-5 



,£ Mi 

s( mo 
i for 

, tion Squash Tournament held recently 



Cy Dietrich, class of '56. defeated 
freshman Sam McLinn two games to 
one in the finals of the single elimina- 



m in the Lynch Memorial Gymnasium 

loss - Dietrich edged McLinn 15-12 in the 

W' r - p,a y-> first game of the two-out-of -three match. 

W { Tht McLinn came hack to even the count 

ml ' rerro ' at one S lime a P iece wi,n a beautifully 

ft ^s th\ mastered 15-9 win. In the final and 
I r °rs. 7 deciding game Dietrich dropped Me- 



ter i n (Linn by the identical score: 15-9. 








c offe 




eronica Evans, Marian Brooks, Fern Liskey, Joanne Young, Irene Urian, Sandra Nelson, Nancy Kettle, Arlene Reynolds, 
, Sandra Weit. Row Two: Miss Bowman, coach; Elizabeth Ritter, manager; Grace Gorbey, manager; Shirley Heizmann, 
Elaine Goodyear, Kathryn Dotts, Estelle Berger, Dorothy Book. 



varsity hockey 



The hockey team closed its 1955 season with a record of two wins and four losses. Co- 
captained by Irene Urian and Sandra Nelson, the team showed fighting spirit, but not quite 
enough to delete the loss column. The addition of two freshmen, Marian Brooks and Veronica 
Evans; and a transfer student, Nancy Lee Kettle; gave new vigor to the veterans of previous 
years — Joanne Young, Fern Liskey, Barbara Johnson, Arlene Reynolds, Dorothy Book, Sandra 
Weit, Barbara Klinger, and the co-captains. The team had able substitutes in Katherine Dotts, 
Shirley Heizmann, Ruthanne Kelchner, Estelle Berger, and Elaine Goodyear. Also notable this 
year was the addition of a cheering section for the home games. To be sure, the rooters were 
not disappointed with such games as Albright and Moravian! 

Miss Bowman's "psychological safety pins" were collected by Marian Brooks, with seven 
goals for the season; Sandy Nelson, with four; and Fern Liskey, with one. With only two of the 
starting line-up graduating in June, the prospects for next year are looking up. If the spirit is 
high, you can be sure the girls will be in there fighting! 

The article wouldn't be complete without a special tribute to the capable managers — 
Grace Gorbey, Ruth Sheetz, and Elizabeth Ritter. Mention must be made of Don Reinhard also, 
who missed his Saturday morning sleep many times to line the field. 





Info action 



Baffle scars 



LVC Opp. 

Shippensburg 4 

Moravian 5 

Millersville 

S.T.C 5 

Albright 3 4 

Gettysburg 3 1 





flying dutchgirls 



The Girls' Varsity Basketball Team 
started its season February 4 under the 
coaching of Miss Betty Jane Bowman. 
With several members of last year's team 
returning and many good candidates to 
fill in the vacancies, it seemed that L.V. 
would have a successful season. How- 
ever, the end of the season showed a 
record of one win and six losses. Al- 
though the team lost, they did not be- 
come discouraged, but tried harder with 
each game. Probably the game which 
the Dutchwomen will remember best is 
the game that they lost to Albright by 
one point. 

Naomi Sprenkle, forward, and Jeanne 
Winter, forward, were the co-captains of 
the team. Also in the forward spot were 
Phyllis Dasher and Marie Sponsler, an 
able freshman who was the high scorer 
of the team, averaging eighteen points 
per game. Naomi Sprenkle aided the 
scoring column by averaging almost fif- 
teen points per game. In guard position 
were Rachel Meyers, center; Arlene Rey- 
nolds, right; and Peggy Barbour, an- 
other newcomer to the team this year, 
at left. Jeanne Winter and JoAnne 
Young also helped at times in the guard 
position. 

We must not forget our able managers 
who helped and gave their services to 
the team. They were Dorothy Book and 
Ruth Sheetz. 

Although the record is not too impres- 
sive, the girls enjoyed playing together 
and came through with some fine play. 
Since they will be losing only two play- 
ers this year, we are looking forward to 
seeing next year's team come through 
with many victories. 




Row One: Ruth Sheetz, Manager; Jeanne Winter, Co-Cap- 
tain; Naomi Sprenkle, Co-Captain; Dorothy Book, Manager. 
Row Two: Elaine Goodyear, Rachel Meyers, Peggy Barbour. 
Row Three: Joanne Young, Arlene Reynolds. Row Four: Phyllis 
Dasher, Marie Sponsler. Row Five: Fern Liskey. 




^0 TSii \Z) ta " w '— 

^H&% Shipp«rvsbu.cg W ^k 






Starting Line-up 

JEAN WINTER Forward 

NAOMI SPRENKLE Forward 

MARIE SPONSLER Forward 

ARLENE REYNOLDS Guard 

PEGGY BARBOUR Guard 

RACHEL MEYERS Guard 



Moravian 




5"o -3fc 



Mll\cr«y}|t« 

^^^^^^r E-YirateVWum 




junior varsity basketball 



The Junior Varsity Team had a successful season with four wins and three losses. 
The team was composed mostly of freshmen, and showed great capabilities for the com- 
ing seasons. The forwards were Marian Brooks, Ruth Howell, Doris White, and Mary 
Beaver. The season's high scorer was Marian Brooks with 11.7 points per game. Filling 
in the guard positions were Veronica Evans, Louise Gay, Joanne Young, and Elaine Good- 
year. 

The most exciting game of the season was the second game with Millersville, played 
on the M.S.T.C. floor. The score was tied 30-30 with only a few seconds to go when a 
foul was committed by a Millersville player. Mary Beaver made the shot at the foul line. 
Time ran out while Valley still had possession of the ball, and the Dutchwomen won the 
game 31-30. 

The junior varsity girls showed enthusiasm and spirit, and ended with a good record. 




Row One: Doris White, Estelle Berger. Row Two: Mary Beaver, Marian Brooks, Louise Gay. Row 
Three: Joan Heindel, Elaine Sproul, Ruth Howell, Charlotte Long, Veronica Evans. 





battle of the sexes 



The girls' hockey team 
turned "pigskin crazy" in a 
post season football game with 
the Vets. Better all-around field 
play and good physical condi- 
tion of the "shin-guard" girls 
proved too much for the inex- 
perienced Veterans. Although 
the Vets had the Jack Sproul- 
John Murphy pass combina- 
tion, the girls came through 
with several Young-Kettle TD 
passes. Rough play was called 
when Elaine Goodyear tried to 
tackle Drew Fetterolf and suf- 
fered a slight brain concussion 
— she played an improved 
game after that! Whatever the 
score, (no one ever found out) 
a good time was had by all. 

Again the Vets wanted to 
try their skill, this time against 
the girls' varsity basketball 
team. The students of the Val- 
ley witnessed the most colorful 
and exciting game of the sea- 
son. Many a laugh was had 
when the Vets came onto the 
floor wearing various styles of 
costumes; who could forget 
Willie Lutz and his Napoleon 
outfit, and 'Pee Wee" Fetterolf 
and his sombrero! The boys 
were handicapped in so far as 
they played girls' rules. How- 
ever, the girls had to compen- 
sate for the speed and crazy 
antics of their opponents. The 
score was close throughout the 
game, and it ended in a tie. 
In the overtime period, every- 
one joined in and played boys' 
rules. The girls were the vic- 
tors, winning by one point, 31- 
30. The girls had overpowered 
the Vets again! 






HOCKEY: Dot Book, Leader 




PING PONG: Arlene Reynolds, Leader 



intramural 
sports 




BADMINTON: Shirley Warfel, Leader 
ARCHERY: Libby Speicher, Leader 





SOFTBALL: Peggy Martin, Leader 




.Jr:;v -a*"-" 




STUNTS AND TUMBLING: Grace Gorbey, Leader 



SWIMMING: Gloria Rifter, Leader 





TENNIS: Ruthanne Kelchner, Leader 



VOLLEYBALL: Sandra Weit, Leader 




> 



the 
development 
program 




A snow storm doesn't harm the enthusiasm of school officials 
at ground breaking ceremonies for the new girls' dormitory. 




This year marks the beginning of visible evi- 
dence of the Lebanon Valley College develop- 
ment program. For many years, trustees, admin- 
istration, alumni, students, and friends of the 
college have realized the need for new, modern 
buildings and equipment to take care of the 
needs of the ever-expanding student body. For a 
long time plans have been under consideration 
to help take care of these needs. The academic 
year 1955-1956 is an important one in the hi- 
tory of LVC, for it is in this year that construc- 
tion on the new girls' dormitory was begun, a 
science building was purchased, and ground was 
broken for the new school library. 



Future residents 
ew dorm. 



LVC's present library, built 
xpanding student body. 





West Hall celebrates Christmas 
with a party. 



Did Santa leave that? 





The annual dinner-dance is a cherished LVC tradition. 

(form life at Christmas 




That one must have been some party I 





"they lived happily ever after." 

. . . and through the year 

Lesson plans finished, Pris? 



Carol's shrine. 




Sitting Bull of West Hall. 




Be there in a second! 



Sleepytime gal. 



Watch the birdie. 





;: !t^a 




homecoming day 



The annual Homecoming Day 
was an unusually successful one. 
Despite the fact that the football 
team was not victorious, spirits 
of students and alumni were not 
dampened, even with all the 
displaced water down by the 
Quittie. There were few tears 
shed when the jubilant fresh- 
men came home from the tug- 
of-war bareheaded, their dinks 
floating down the river. The day 
came to a pleasant climax when 
the L Club presented their dance 
in honor of the football team. 



Ken Platl shows Football Queen Sue 
Trostle the special Homecoming displays. 







A few minutes' relaxation between the football game and the evening meal. 
At last the Homecoming luncheon is served. 



Kathryn Dotts, Way Qu 



may day 1956 



Shirley Warfel, Wad of J4o 





A 





Cynthia Patton 




Jean Lowry Wolf 





1955 May Queen, Elma Jean Swope is crowned by the 1954 Maid-of-Honor, 
Gail Edgar Ritrievi. The 1955 court included Marian Fortna, Mary Lou Young, 
Alice Bomberger, Ann Rydberg, Nancy Dougherty, Lois Reedy, and Maid-of- 
Honor Jane Taylor. 




The May Queen and her Court take their places to observe La Danse. 



may day 1955 



The May Pole dancers wind the ribbons in a perfect 
pattern. 



"Charleston, Charleston 





LVC's Bermuda Club 




Marriage is a very popular institution! 
Where I come from — 





The German Band performs at half-time. 




Now let me see- 




a 




Lights out, girls. 




And we'll build the biggest snow- 
man they've ever seen around these 
here parts. 

Sue was a lovely football queen. 





Surely there will be a letter for me today! 



This sport suits Dick and Charley to a fee. 




patrons 



Mr. and Mrs. Donald Achenbach 

Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Acker 

Mrs. Helen Adams 

Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Albright 

Mr. and Mrs. James Argenziano 

Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Avoletta 

Mr. and Mrs. Lavere E. Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Barbour 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest H. Barlow, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Barnhart 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Beaver 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. F. Becker 

Mr. and Mrs. Hiram Bennetch 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Billingham 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bird 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren B. Blatt 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. Boltz 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Book 

Mr. and Mrs. Anson J. Boush 

Mr. and Mrs. Eden S. Bowman 

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Bowman 

Mr. and Mrs. Thos. N. Brightbill 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster Brinser 

Mrs. Verna H. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Paul Brubaker 

Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Burkhart 

Mr. and Mrs. Earl F. Carmany 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Carrender 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Chudzikiewicz 

Mr. and Mrs. Everette H. Cline 

Mr. and Mrs. Salvadore Colangelo 

Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Conway 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S. Cook, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Copenhaver 

Mrs. Catharine H. Cottrell 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence A. Crobaugh 

Mrs. Marian Crudele 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Davis 

Mrs. Mary (Kaltreider) Day 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Deiter 

Mr. and Mrs. Eugene DeLiberty 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. Dimon 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dinerman 

Mr. and Mrs. Franklin M. Doster 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Dougherty 

Mr. and Mrs. F. R. S. Douglass 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul I. Eckenroad 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Epting 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert W. Erickson 

Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Evans 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick T. Evans 

nCt. and Mrs. David F. Farling 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Fetterhoff 

Mr. and Mrs. George Fillmore 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Fitzgerald 

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Foster 

A Friend 

A Friend 

Mr. and Mrs. Lerue D. Fromm 

Mr. and Mrs, F. Coteman Funk 

The Gardas 

Mr. and Mrs. Luther Geesey 

Mr. and Mrs. Giovinazzo 

Mr. and Mrs. Isidore R. Gold 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Gorbey 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W. Gordon 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl E. Grabau 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Gray 

Mr. and Mrs. Emil Greybeck 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Grochowski 

Jo-Anne Grove 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert W. Grove 

Mr. and Mrs. Luke R. Grubb 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold M. Hafer 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Hauer 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred A. Heck 

Mr. and Mrs. Emlen Heidelbaugh 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Myles Heindel 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman Hemperly 

Geo. Bruce Henninger 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Heynio 

Mr. and Mrs. Sterling E. Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hoffman 

Frank N. Hole 

Mr. and Mrs. Claude A. Hollinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hollinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Luke Hostetter 

Mr. and Mrs. Russell R. Hostetter 

Dr. and Mrs. R. A. Houston 

Mr. and Mrs. Cloyd A. Howard 

Mr. and Mrs. Clinton C. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Kane 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Kelly 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry R. Kelly 

T. Franklin Kershner 

Mr. and Mrs. James P. Kettle 

Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Kiick 

Mr. and Mrs. David B. Kirby 

Lt. Col. W. R. Kirchner 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Eugene Klinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Krammes 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Krant 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kristich 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Floyd Kunkel 

Grace H. Lambert 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer K. Landis 

Ginevra Lavorini 

Mr. and Mrs. Oliver I. Lebo 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Lego, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Leight 

Mrs. Helen Lennox 

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Lentz 

Dr. and Mrs. Harry M. Leonard 

Helen and George Lewis 

B. C. Light 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman C. Lightner 

Dr. and Mrs. John W. Lukens 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Lutz 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent A. Maclnnes 

Mr. N. Mackrides 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Maier 

Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Marcus 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Mark 

Lester B. Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. M. V. Martin 

Mr. and Mrs. Austin A. McBride 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. McCulloch 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Linden Mcllvaine 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin Mentzer 

Arabella O. and A. E. Meyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis R. Michael 

Mr. and Mrs. James Mitchell 

Mr. and Mrs. Abe Molotsky 

Dr. and Mrs. Archibald Morrison 

Mr. and Mrs. George M. Nelson 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Niosi 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Clyde Oaks 

Mrs. Paul K. Obert 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Ollinger 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ottinger 

Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Peifer 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Pellegrino 

Mr. Carmine Pepe 

Mr. and Mrs. George C. Peraino 

Arthur Pieringer 

Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Pierson 

Mr. and Mrs. Casimir Pietreniak 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer W. Piatt 



Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Powell 

Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Ragno 

Mr. and Mrs. Burton E. Ray 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis J. Reinhard 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Reynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Littleton Rich 

Mr. and Mrs. Leon B. Risser 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rock and Son 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Rodgers 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank A. Romberger 

Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Rosenberry 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Rubba 

Dorothy S. Ruhl 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Sass 

Mrs. Kathryn Savastio 

Mrs. Harold Saylor 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Scarani 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. SchaefFer 

Henry H. Schell 

Mr. and Mrs. William Schmid 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Schott 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles F. Schwab 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Schwaghart 

Mr. and Mrs. Nevin L. Seibert 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Seifarth 

Fred W. Sellers 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry W. Sheaffer, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lester Sheaffer 

Mr. and Mrs. Byron W. Sheetz 

Mr. and Mrs. Nolan Shellenberger 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Shirey 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul W. Shirley 

Lanta A. Sholley, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vian B. Silliman 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund Slezosky 

Mr. and Mrs. Leroy H. Snyder 

Mr. and Mrs. John J. Socha 

Mr. and Mrs. Mervin Spancake 

Mr. and Mrs. Ollie R. Spearing 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Speck 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Muller Sproul 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar N. Stahley 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy J. L. Stauffer 

Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Stearns 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Steele 

Mrs. Anna M. Steger 

Rev. Edward Steiner 

Dr. and Mrs. George B. Stineman 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred O. Stonaker 

Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Teates 

Mr. and Mrs. A. N. Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry R. Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl E. Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne R. Tobias 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Toy 

Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Wacker 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Wade 

Dr. and Mrs. J. Stanley Walker 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Walp 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilmer B. Weinel 

Mr. and Mrs. Chester Weit 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Weitzel 

Mr. and Mrs. Kline S. Wernert 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul White 

Mr. and Mrs. Dewey Williamson 

Mr. and Mrs. George H. Wolf, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Wolfe 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Yoder 

Mr. and Mrs. M. R. Yorty 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Young 

Mr. and Mrs. George Zakis 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. J. Zettlemoyer 

Mr. and Mrs. Ivan Ziegler 



HERSHEY'S HOMOGENIZED MILK 



Serving Lebanon Area for Over 40 Years 



HARRY L. MYER & SON 

YOUR MILK DISTRIBUTOR 



CLEONA Phone 2-6161 



WENGERT'S DAIRY PRODUCTS 
Vitamin D Milk 



M. L. HALDEMAN & SON 

Kjenerat {contractors 

We Build for Eternity 

Phone: Keystone 3-9181 

103 W. Chocolate Avenue 
HERSHEY, PENNA. 



FINK'S BAKERY 



DELICIOUS LAYER CAKES • PIES 

Filled and French Doughnuts 

PECAN BUNS • BREAD • SHOOFLY PIES 



Compliments of 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



Dodge - Plymouth 

Motor Cars and Trucks 

Sales and Service 



CASSEL BROTHERS 



246-248 W. Main Street 
PALMYRA, PENNA. 



Phone 8-5281 



Parties — Banquets 
Clubs Dealers 




ICE CREAM 

"The Cream of Matchless Merit' 

Manufactured only at 
Sixth and Maple Streets 

Phone 2-0231 



RUGGIES 



FOOT TRAITS 
Compliments of 



RUGGIE-ETTES 



THE W. L. KREIDERS SONS 
MFG. CO., INC. 

PALMYRA, PA. 
Makers of Fine Juvenile Footwear 



Compliments of 

BRANDYWINE IRON & 
METAL COMPANY 

SALVAGE MATERIAL 
Sam Clark, Class of '27 Abe Grosky 

LEBANON, PENNA. 

Telephone 2-4645 


Compliments 

of 

RICHARD'S 

Men's Store 

Twenty-eight North Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA 


ARNOLD'S BOOT SHOP 

Exclusive Shoes 

FLORSHEIM SHOES 
"For the Man Who Cares" 

34 N. Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA. 


Signs and Display Material 

ROY H. DUNDORE 

129 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. 


SHARMAN'S 

"The Finest in Music" 

534 Penn Avenue 
SINKING SPRING, PA. 

Phone 8-8336 


KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 
Floor Coverings Electrical Appliances 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 

Funeral Director 



Compliments of 

J. S. HERSHEY 
BAKING CO. 

For Unexcelled Delivery Service 
Call Palmyra 8-4291 


Compliments of 

BOWMAN'S 
Insurance Agency 

13 W. Main St. 
PALMYRA, PA. 


ERNEST LATSHA FOOD CO. 

Bakery, Hotel, Restaurant and Institution Supplies 

2285 N. Seventh Street 
HARRISBURG, PENNA. 

Telephone: CEdar 6-9054 


WHITMO YER 

"Products of Scientific Merit" 

• Cod Liver Oils • Poultry and Livestock Health Products 

• Vitamin and Mineral Concentrates • Disinfectants and Insecticides 

WHITMOYER LABORATORIES, INC. 

! Manufacturing Chemists • MYERSTOWN, PENNA. 

Branch Plants: Rockland, Maine Yarmouth, Nova Scotia 


PALMYRA BANK AND 
TRUST CO. 

PALMYRA, PA. 

Serving the Community Since 1886 

Checking Accounts — Savings Accounts 

Safe Deposit Boxes 
Mortgage, Commercial Personal Loans 

Member of Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. 


Compliments of 

GROY and HOUSER 

FLORISTS 

Palmyra Hershey 
Ph. 8-6451 Ph. 3-9559 



(EljunrJj (&mtn flr^s, Jnr. 

Publishing House oi the Evangelical Congregational Church 

MYERSTOWN. PENNA. 


SEE YOU AT 

HOT DOG FRANK'S 

The Place Where Students Congregate 

For a Bite to Eat 

In a Cheerful Atmosphere 


Phones : 
Elizabethtown .... Enterprise 1-0611 


Compliments of 

J. HENRY MILLER CO. 

PAUL L. STRICKLER 
President — 1914 

E. PETER STRICKLER 
Treasurer — 1947 

All Forms of Insurance 

Eighth and Willow Streets 
LEBANON, PENNA. 

Call 3-2641 


Compliments of 
Your Local Insurance Man 

I. M. LONG 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



MILLIE'S 

Restaurant and Motel 

"The House of Home Cooking" 

East Main Street 
PALMYRA, PENNA. 

Phone 8-2701 


THE FLOWER SHOP 

Corsages Our Specialty 

LEBANON, PA. 
Rear of Court House 

Flowers Telegraphed Anywhere, Anytime 

Elizabeth Bernstein, Prop. Phone 2-1931 


WEISS BROS. 

Foon Service Equipment 

"From a Sandwich Plate to a 
Complete Installation" 

25 S. 13th Street 
HARRISBURG, PA. 


COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

^Jne Ualleu ^Jruit 

of f^almuru, / a. 

Member of F. D. I C. 


J. C. HAUER'S SONS, Inc. 

Wholesale Distributors 

Candy — Cigarette 
Vending Machines 

LEBANON, PA. 


Preferred by Particular People 

2nd and Cumberland Streets 

SANITONE DRY CLEANING 

Phone 2-5633 
MARK S. BRANDT, Prop. 


Compliments of . . . 

BOYER BROS. 

Fancy Fruits Vegetables 
Sea Foods 

123 East Main Street 

Palmyra, Penna. 


THE BON-TON 

"Lebanon's Greatest Store" 



For Service Phone 2-2851 

GOODMAN 
VENDING SERVICE 

CANDY 

119 Cumberland Street 
LEBANON 


College Outline Books 
Bibles, Religious and Text Book 

Compliments of 

THE WERT BOOK STORE 

43 S. 8th Street 
LEBANON, PENNA. | 

Stationery — Greeting Cards 

Any Book Can Be Ordered at Request 


Compliments of \ 

HAUER'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

A Good Place to Shop 
Phone 69 -R Hummelstown, Pa. 


SMITH SHEET METAL 
& HARDWARE 

R. S. SMITH, Proprietor 

Roofing Supplies — Stove Repairs 

Manufacturers — Sheet Metal Products 

York Heat & Air Conditioning 

31 North King Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 


LOUIS LEHRMAN & SON 

HARRISBURG, PENNA. 

Distributors of 
Buddie Fine Foods 


Phone: Annville 7-4852 

MAX LOVE 

Cleaning and Pressing 

109 W. Main Street 

ANNVILLE, PA. 


The Famous 

LOSCH 

AUTOMATIC BOILER UNIT 
Consult Your Dealer, or 

ARNOLD COAL & 
SUPPLY CO., INC. 

Distributors 

• Complete Heating Systems • Steam 

• Vapor •Hot Water 

HARRISBURG, PA. 



HERSHEY BROS. GARAGE 

DESOTO • PLYMOUTH 
612 E. Main Street • Palmyra, Penna. 
Telephone 8-8041 


OFFICE EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 

"Friendly Service" 

223 North Second Street 
HARRISBURG, PA. 

Phone: CE 4-6251 


COLLEGE HILL POULTRY, INC. 

FREDERICKSBURG, PA. 

Phone: Office and Plant — Jonestown 5-2413 
Phone: Retail Store — Lebanon 2-7231 


CO-ED 
LUNCHEONETTE 

ANNVILLE, PENNA. 
Frank and Delia Marino, Props. 


Compliments of j 

PETER HAWRYLUK 
JEWELER 

40 East Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


Phone 2-7666 

EUGENE HOASTER 

Insurance and Surety Bonds 

43 North Eighth Street 
LEBANON, PA 

Eugene Hoaster Donald J. Hoaster 



George E. Deininger 

J^noloaraaner 

PORTRAITS, WEDDINGS, COMMERCIAL 

phone: 3-2482 studio — 3-1282 home 
522 WALNUT STREET READING, PA. 



Compliments of 

WHITE DOVE PRODUCTS CO., INC. 




Restaurant and Institutional Foods 
HARRISBURG, PENNA. 



Compliments 
of 

Sunset Shopping Center & Farmers Market 
LEBANON, PENNSYLVANIA 



A. R. SHEARER 


PAUL H. KETTERING 


Mobilgas • Mobiloil 


Sporting Goods 
Esso — Goodyear Service 


Service Station 

U.S. Tires ! 


Hunting and Fishing Supplies 


Car Washing 


104 West Main Street 


MAIN AND WHITE OAK STREETS 


ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


ANNVILLE, PA. 

Telephone: 7-4801 


Phone 7-6231 


DAVIS PHARMACY 


9-11 W. Main Street 


ANNVILLE, PENNA. 


Prescriptions — Phonographs — Parker Pens and Pencils 


Schaefjer Pens and Pencils 


WRITE FOR FOLDERS 


1956 Student Groups to Europe 


All Personally Conducted 


From 32 Days — $555.00 J 


To 67 Days— $1,190.00 


LEBANON COUNTY TRAVEL BUREAU 


757 Willow Street Phone 2-6606 Lebanon, Penna. 


Compliments of 






PICKEL'S DRUG STORE 


J. Berman & Sons, Inc. 


The REXALL Store 


Alan-Barr Aluminum Co., Inc. 


The most completely stocked 
Prescription Department in town 




Palmyra Phone 8-7811 


PALMYRA, PENNSYLVANIA 





Electro-Bond — Recapping 

SIMON S. KETTERING SONS 

Distributor — Goodyear Tires 

N. Side 16th & Cumberland 
LEBANON, PA. 

Phone: 2-5771 



Compliments of 



CARL'S BARBER SHOP 



MARKET 7-8450 



Puree & f?e 



lerce CV r\,eede 

Just Consistently Fine 

Meats — Poultry — Provisions — Frosted Foods 

130-132 N. Delaware Avenue 

PHILADELPHIA 6 

24-Hour Service Around the Clock 



DIAMONDS of DISTINCTION 

(stollfffuttcfo 

CDEPEflDABLE SjflCE 1888) 

Jewelers 

20 N. Ninth Street LEBANON, PA. 



Compliments of 

BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

Your College Store 

OPEN EVENINGS 

E. W. Wolfe, Owner 

37-39 West Main Street 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



THE KUTZTOWN PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. 

J rinters — f^ublidlterS — cJLitnoarapnerd 

KUTZTOWN, PA. 

This Edition of Quittapahilla was produced by the offset process in our plant