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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

CARNEGIE LOUNGF 



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Q-u.i"t"teLpa]:iil let 




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Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa. 




CONTRASTS 




FOREWORD 



I ife manifests itself in many contrasting forms. As we look at life we 
see within it such opposites as the dark of night and the light of day, the 
sorrow of death and the joy of birth, the terror of war and the tran- 
quility of peace. These opposites, however, do not stand as distinct and 
separate entities, but are drawn toward one another as black and white 
blending into gray. College — the microcosm of life — exists, too, not 
without many contrasts. 

It is the purpose of the Class of 1962 of Lebanon Valley College, to 
present in the following pages the contrasts of our college years, the be- 
ginnings and endings of memorable events and between these events the 
infinitely divisible moments. 



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^Administration 



'Classes 



'Campus Life 



Sports 



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WORK AND PLAY 



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STUDY AND 
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THE ONE AND THE MANY 






THE LARGE AND 





THE SMALL 





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10 




Dr. Frederic K. Miller, president of the college, handles his leviathan 
responsibility with dignity and sensitivity to the needs of those he serves. 

An alumnus of Lebanon Valley College, the president taught high school 
upon receiving his master's degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 
1931. He became a professor of history at his alma mater, and then was 
promoted to the office of assistant to President Clyde Lynch. Dr. Miller's 
inauguration as the twelfth president took place in 1950, the year of Dr. 
Lynch's death. 

During Dr. Miller's administration, the college has known progress in 
many areas. Campus improvements and high academic standards, along 
with social and spiritual innovations, have consistently been championed 
by him. His part in making Lebanon Valley College a worthy training 
ground for the lives and careers of students has been a large one. 



Deans 




Carl Y. Ehrhart 

Dean of the College 

Director of Auxiliary Schools 

Chairman, Department of Philosophy and 

Religion 




Martha C. Faust 

Dean of Women 



George R. Marquette 

Dean of Men 

Chairman, Department of Health and Physical 

Education 




D. Ciark Carmean 



Director of Admissions 




15 



ADMINISTRATION AND PERSONNEL 





BUSINESS OFFICE, SEATED: Irwin R. Schoak, Business Manager; Dorothy Ovecko. 
STANDING: Helen Bell, Gloria Featherstone, Mary Hartmon, Louise Boyer. 




Gladys M. Fencil, Administrative Assistant 



DEVELOPMENT OFFICE: Lois Wisler; Wayne V. Strasbaugh, Director of 
Development 




LIBRARY STAFF: Ellen Hoffman; Donald E. Fields, Li- 
brarian; Elizabeth Wilson. 

REGISTRAR'S OFFICE AND DEPARTMENT SECRETARIES, STANDING: 
Doris Hower; Barbara Melhorn; Morion Starr, Registrar. SEATED: 
Marion Loy, Charlotte Allwein. 




PRESIDENT'S AND DEANS' SECRETARIES, SEATED: M. Alma Heilman, Lillian 
Ditzler. STANDING: Jeanette Bender, Naomi Venzke. 




« 



16 





RESIDENT HEADS: Marie Hall, Lounge Hostess,- Mrs. J. E. Alexander; Mrs. O. R. Brooks; 
Mrs. William Brooks; Absent: Margaret Sullivan. 



DINING HALL: Charlotte Reese; Margaret Millard, 
Dietition. 



INFIRMARY: Carol Baxter, Nancy Ford; Absent: Mrs. William Tredick, 
College Nurse. 




PUBLIC RELATIONS AND ALUMNI OFFICE: Moble Ulrich; Beverly Dohner; Bruce C. Souders, 
Director of Public Relations; Mrs. Rodney Kreider, Alumni Secretary. 




MANAGER OF BOOKSTORE: Lillie Struble. 

GROUNDS: Frances M. Zarker, housekeeper; 
Absent: Ralph B. Shanomon, Superintendent 
of Buildings and Grounds. 




DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 



The Division of Humanities introduces the student 
to "man's quest for values." In these departments — 
art, foreign languages, religion and philosophy, Eng- 
lish, and music — the student experiences and pon- 
ders the thoughts and expressions that influence the 



world culture in which he is immersed. He finds the 
opportunity to enhance his knowledge of the subject 
matter in his particular area of study and to attain, 
too, a wider perspective for understanding the intel- 
lectual and aesthetic development of man. 



Art 

Art instruction at Lebanon Valley College is pro- 
vided through the current course in beginning 
painting and the projected course designed to 
familiarize the student with the history and appre- 
ciation of art. While the former features the appli- 
cation of the principles of art, the latter offering 
will stimulate an appreciative attitude toward art 
by a study of the major trends of the Western 
tradition; by attention to the significant artists in 
painting, sculpture, and architecture,- and by em- 
phasis upon the inter-relation of art, music, and 
literature. 

William A. Batchelor 
Art instructor 




Foreign Languages 




The goal of the Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages is the student's practical knowledge of the 
languages he chooses to study. By providing the op- 
portunity for him to investigate foreign literatures, 
the department enables him to achieve understand- 
ing of the cultural patterns of other peoples and 
appreciation for his ideas that have shaped these 
peoples and the roles they hove played — and 
are playing — in history. The student specializing 
in one or more of these languages — French, Ger- 
man, Spanish, Greek, Russian, and Latin — may 
prepare for a career which requires a thorough 
language background. 



Frances T. Fields, Ruth E. Butler, Sara E. Piel, chairman, Ferenc Schwanouer 



18 



Religion and Philosophy 



The separate departments of religion and philosophy 
have been combined, and they are now in their second 
year of operating as one. This department develops 
the student's interest in the universal questions about 
man and his world and provides him with a knowledge 
of the religious and philosophical context in which man 
has meditated, philosophized, and worshipped. Orien- 
tation of the student to the Christian world-view and 
heritage, to the dynamism of Christian living, is the con- 
cern and goal of the department, which, offers, too, 
basic professional courses for the student anticipating 
a church vocation. 



II \w 



James O. Bemesderfer, Perry J. Troutman S 





D. Martin Foss, New York Visiting Professor, came 
to Lebanon Valley College to serve, for this school year, 
as a professor of philosophy under the auspices of the 
John Hay Whitney Foundation. Teaching humanities and 
philosophy courses, participating as the central figure 
of informal "conversations" in the lounge, speaking for 
student organizations, and counselling with individual 
students. Dr. Foss has contributed to the realization of 
the department aims and policies, standards which in- 
clude the encouragement of the student's capacity to 
philosophize for himself. 



Carl Y. Ehrhart, chairman; Benjamin A. Richards, Martin Foss 



19 



English 




Theodore D. Keller, Anna D. Faber, Robert H. Newall 




Students come into vital contact with the literature of 
our language and find instruction for writing and 
speaking effectively through the efforts of the Depart- 
ment of English, hiere they encounter courses in lan- 
guage history, public speaking, composition, word 
study, prose literature, poetry, and drama. All students 
of the college participate in the humanities course, 
which is also under the administration of the English 
Department. They trace man's intellectual trail and the 
development of his aesthetic and ethical values as re- 
corded in the literature, music, and art of the Western 
world. 



Jesse M. Matlock, George G. Struble, Chairman 



20 



Music 



SEATED: E. Joan Reeve, Marcia M. Pick- 
well, Geraldine H. Kurtz. STANDING: Har- 
old Malsh, Reynoldo Rovers, Pierce A. 
Getz, Alexander Crawford, William D. 
Fairlamb. 




A member of the National Association of Schools 
of Music, the Lebanon Valley Music Department is 
widely known for its quality training of future music 
teachers and music supervisors. 

To meet state requirements, this year's freshman 
doss was the first to be exposed to a new curriculum 
which provides for more extensive education in the 
liberal arts and sciences in addition to the present 



music training program. The degree conferred upon 
completion of the four year course, however, will re- 
main the same — Bachelor of Science in Music Edu- 
cation. 

Throughout the year, music is supplied by students 
and faculty of the Department for football games, 
weekly chapel services. May Day, commencement, 
campus concerts and various social functions. 



SEATED: Ruth E. Bender. STANDING: D. Clark Carmean, R. Porter Campbell, James W. Thurrrond, Fronk 
W. Stachow, Robert W. Smith, chairman,- Thomas A. Lonese. 




21 



DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Formal education holds the further attainment of tions, the goals, desired. Increasing the students' store 

the objectives of society as one of its most important of information, it is hoped, will improve his ability to 

purposes. The social sciences endeavor to support this choose as wisely as possible from among the various 

purpose by building an understanding of the institu- policies proposed to attain these goals. 



History and Political Science 




The history and political science departments aim 
to provide the student with background for an objec- 
tive study of man's activities. 

History involves the study of the past development 
of human societies. Courses are designed to show 
that major historical events are the results of many 
smaller ones. 

Political Science concerns the function of govern- 
ment and current world afTairs. The evolution of 
governmentol structures and current problems is 
surveyed. 

These social sciences, therefore, strive to foster a 
scientific attitude of careful consideration for all as- 
pects of our increasingly complex world. It is hoped 
that such an attitude will lead men to responsible 
citizenship. 

Alex J. Fehr, political science; Elizabeth M. Geffen, history; Ralph S. Shay, 
chairman,' John H. Fritz, history. 



Sociology 



An understanding of the social structure and the 
social relationships in and through which man func- 
tions is the objective which the sociology department 
of Lebanon Valley College works to achieve. Courses 
provide preliminary training and knowledge for 
those preparing to enter social, religious and com- 
munity work. Institutions such as the family, industry, 
and schools are observed for their evolution, struc- 
ture, and effect on men. 



Alice M. Brumbaugh, Sociology 




22 



Economics and 



Business 

Economics is that branch of the social sciences 
which deals with the problems of optimum alloca- 
tion, full employment and stable growth of a society 
for maximum human satisfaction. A complex of busi- 
ness exists to aid in attaining these goals. 

Through study of post and present economies and 
practice in accounting and others tools of business 
the student becomes familiar with both theory and 
practice. Students preparing for careers in busi- 
ness, government civil service, teaching, or law have 
time to supplement these courses with electives to 
attain c general education. 



Robert C. Riley, Chairman; C. F. Joseph Torr 





Psychology 



The Department of Psychology has as its aims a 
development in the student of an understanding of 
the bases and role of human behavior and a foster- 
ing in him of a corresponding adjustment through 
application of psychological principles. In pursuit 
of these aims, the department has recently moved 
into the north end of the third floor of the adminis- 
tration building, where modern laboratories and 
equipment are located for efficient study and ob- 
servation. 

The department aims to acquaint not only the 
psychology major but also the liberal arts student 
with its field, for such a study will aid in both 
specific occupations and in the general process of 
day-to-day living. 



Elizabeth Pottieger, Jean O. Love, Chairman 



23 



DIVISION OF SCIENCE 



The search for understanding of the natural laws of 
the universe goes actively onward in the growing sci- 
ence department of Lebanon Valley College. Modern 



facilities are utilized by students and professors to gain 
insight into the technical and theoretical aspects of the 
natural sciences. 



Biology 



The biology department emphasizes the develop- 
ment of an appreciation of man's relation to his 
universe, the acquisition of those fundamental facts 
necessary to the proper interpretation of the phe- 
nomena manifested by living things, and the laying 
of a broad foundation for specialization in profes- 
sional courses concerning biology. 

Many potential medical technologists, doctors, 
nurses, teachers and others utilize the slides, micro- 
scopes, greenhouse, field trips, and display case 
materials provided by the department to gain es- 
sential knowledge and experience. 



v. Earl Light, Francis H. Wilson, Chairman, O. Pass Bollinger. 




Chemistry 



Henry B. Hollinger, Robert E. Griswoid, James L. Kline, Karl L. Lockwood, 
chairman. 




The vigorous schooling in techniques and princi- 
ples of modern chemistry which its students receive 
has helped the chemistry department of Lebanon 
Valley College to become known for possessing a 
high degree of excellence. 

Students interested in the teaching profession are 
given an opportunity to study chemistry and the 
various techniques of teaching science. Students 
preparing for industrial work, the medical sciences, 
and advanced study in chemistry are given training 
which will enable them to become both good sci- 
entists and good citizens. 

Individual work and scientific thinking is encour- 
aged. A summer program has been set up to give 
opportunity for extra training. Students working for 
departmental honors must prepare and defend a 
thesis based on extensive laboratory investigation of 
an original problem. 



24 



Mathematics 



A record enrollment of fifty mathematics majors 
this year shows the increasing importance of the 
mathematics department at Lebanon Valley College. 
Turning out mathematics teachers, actuaries, and 
aspiring engineers annually, the math department 
includes in its curriculum classical mathematics 
courses as well as courses corresponding to more 
recent developments. 

A series of eight evening lectures on modern 
mathematics by Mr. Robert J. Wagner, assistant pro- 
fessor of mathematics, indicates the extension of the 
mathematics department out of the classroom. Along 
the same line, a research contract from the United 
States Navy has authorized Lebanon Valley's math 
department for research in statistical aspects of in- 
ventory control. 



Robert J. Wagner, Barnard H. Bissinger, chairman; Paul F. Henning. 




Physics 




Increased understanding of the basic laws of 
nature as they relate to our physical environment 
and an indication of the possible extent and limita- 
tions of our knowledge of the physical world are 
aims of the Department of Physics. 

To attain these goals, recent developments in 
nuclear and atomic physics, as well as traditional 
fields of physical phenomena, are emphasized. The 
relationship of physics to other sciences for industrial 
and medical advances is stressed and frequently 
utilized. Mathematics, in particular, is an important 
tool of the young men and women in the well- 
equipped physics laboratories and classrooms. 



Jacob L. Rhodes, chairman; J. Robert O'Donnell, Samuel O. Grimm. 



25 



DIVISION OF TEACHER EDUCATION 



Prospective teachers at Lebanon Valley College are 
offered courses designed to meet certification require- 
ments for teaching in the public schools. Courses in 
methods of teaching, principles of guidance, philoso- 
phy of education, and audiovisual techniques are 
included in the curriculum. 



The division attempts to instill in its students a sound 
knov^'ledge of classroom skills, an understanding of the 
high academic and ethical principles necessary to a 
teacher, and an appreciation of the value of the 
teacher's contribution to society. 




Cloyd H, Ebersole, June M. Herr, Gilbert D. McKlveen, chairman. 



Elementary Education 



Secondary Education 



The elementary education department is the 
responsibility of Dr. Cloyd Ebersole, Mrs. June Herr, 
and Mr. William Batchelor. Elementary education 
majors are given a background not only in the vari- 
ous subjects taught in primary schools, but in the 
fundamentals of music, art, and recreation as well. 

Through these studies and wWh the practical ex- 
perience gained in observing actual classes and in 
student teaching, Lebanon Valley College sends 
forth men and women well-prepared to give chil- 
dren a meaningful start in the nation's classrooms. 

The Elementary Education Club is afFIIated with 
this department, and affords on opportunity for stu- 
dents who wish to acquire further experience in their 
field to do so. 



Secondary education courses supplement a future 
junior or senior high school teacher's knowledge of 
the subject matter which he will teach. This is ac- 
complished through a student's observation of genu- 
ine classroom situations, his study of principles and 
techniques of teaching, and student teaching. 

Dr. Gilbert McKlveen, head of the division of 
teacher education, supervises those entering secon- 
dary education and acts of adviser to the campus 
Student Pennsylvania State Education Association, 
an organization to which both secondary and ele- 
mentary education majors may belong. 



26 



Health and Physical Education 



Seventy-five percent of American youth nnay be under- 
developed physically, but the Men's Physicol Education 
Department is doing its best to correct this situation. Com- 
pulsory gym classes for freshmen and sophomore men teach 
the rules and regulations of various individual and team 
sports. Sponsoring intramural basketball, volleyball, and 
Softball teams, and elimination tournaments in table tennis, 
handball, squash, and badminton, the department seeks to 
keep Valley students strong and fit. 

Of equal importance are the physical activities available 
to all co-eds. An extensive intramural program is conducted 
throughout the three seasons of our school year. Team com- 
petition comes to the fore in varsity hockey and basketball. 
We have indeed met the demand of our society to value 
more highly the physical development of its citizens. 



Charles E. Poad, Ellis R. McCracken, Betty J. Bowman, Donald M. Grider. 




27 




s 




SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



The graduating class of 1961, for four years under 
the leadership of Roy Badgely, president, has enjoyed 
many accomplishments at L.V.C. It has done its share 
of sponsoring social activities and dances, and, too, it 
has seen many innovations on the Lebanon Valley 
campus. Positions of importance in major campus or- 



ganizations v^ill be vacant upon the class' departure, 
demonstrating the large port many members play in 
college functions. 

Other officers are vice-president, Les Holstein; sec- 
retary, Carol Bronson; and treasurer, Ira Bechtel. 



Left to right: Ira Bechtel, treosurer; Carol Bronson, secretory; Lester Holstein, vice-president; Roy Bodgley, 
president. 





f 



30 



SENIORS 




CHARLES LEE ARNEH MAY EVANS ARNOLD ROY MARTIN BADGLEY 

B.S. Pre-Medica! B.S. Music Education B.A. Economics 

Cochranton, Po. Easton, Pa. Chatham, NJ. 

WILLIAM LOWRY BAKER IRA ALBERT BECHTEL, JR. RONALD BRUCE BELL 

B.S. Economics B.S. Biology B.A. History 

Middletown, Pa. Elizabethville, Pa. Lancaster, Pa. 

JAMES ORVILLE BEMESDERFER ELIZABETH C. BLACK JOHN B. BOWMAN JOHN C. BRITCHER 

B.A. Political Science B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Physics B.A. Philosophy 

Annville, Pa. Marlton, N.J. Lebanon, Po. Shermansdale, Pa. 






31 




LOIS FLORA MAY BRONG CAROL ANN BRONSON 

B.S. Music Education B.A. English 

Allentown, Pa. West Redding, Conn. 



GEORGE ANDERS BRUBAKER 
B.S. Pre-Veterinarian 

Palmyra, Pa. 



BRUCE W. BUCKWALTER MARJORIE ANNE BURCHE 

B.S. Economics B.A. English 

Lancaster, Pa. Camp Hill, Pa. 



RICHARD WILLIS BURKHOLDER 
B.S. Chemistry 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



JOAN DEDEE CHAPMAN DALE MATTHEW CHERNICH GLENN WILLIAM COATES JOSEPH CRISTOPHER COEN 

B.S. Music Education B.A. Psychology B.A. History B.S. Biology 

York, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. Steelton, Pa. Reading, Pa. 






32 




CALVIN HARVEY COLE GARY BRADELY CRAUN SIDNEY BYRON DANFELT 

B.A. Religion B.A. Political Science B.A. English 

Shermansdale, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. Chambersburg, Pa. 

ANNEHA JANE DARKES MARY FLORENCE DAVIES JOAN BARBARA DeCONNA 

B.A. Sociology B.S. Music Education B.S. Elementary Education 

Annville, Pa. Lincoln University, Pa. Moplewood, N.J. 

GARY V^AYNE DEHART RICHARD DANIEL EICEMAN NANCY MAE FENSTER/AACHER PAULINE MAY FITZ 

B.A, Economics B.S. Pre-Dental B.S. Music Education B.S. Elementary Education 

Hagerstown, Md. Lebanon, Pa. Lancaster, Pa. Hagerstown, Md. 






#8* 




33 






NANCY IRENE FORD RONALD INGOLF FREDRIKSEN RICHARD NORMAN GARWOOD WILLIAM CARL GLASER 

B.S. Nursing B.S. Music Education B.S. Biology B.A. Religion 

Milton, Del. Reading, Pa. Bryn Mowr, Pa. Greencastle, Pa. 



JAMES DUNCAN GRUBER 
B.S. Physics B.S. 

Hershey, Pa. Hatboro, Pa 



SARAH ANN HAIGLER LARRY QUENTIN HALL 

Chemistry B.S. Chemistry 

Hummelstown, Pa. 



JAN RUTH HAMMERSCHMIDT GEORGE HENRY HARMAN AMELIA LOUISE HARTMAN 

B.S. Music Education B.S. Chemistry B.A. English 

Telford, Pa. Harrisburg, Pa. Port Royal, Pa. 






i 






34 






WILLIAM BRUCE HAWK KENNETH CHALMERS HAYS JAMES MEALY STERLING ELMER HOFFMAN 

B.A. Economics B.S. Music Education A.B. Psychology B.A. English 

Harrisburg, Pa. Chambersburg, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. Annville, Pa. 



AMOS GRAHAM HOLLINGER LESTER SAMUEL HOLSTEIN JOHN MICHAEL HOMAN 

B.S. Physics B.A. Psychology B.S. Music Education 

Front Royal, Va. Palmyra, Pa. Terre Hill, Pa. 

MELVIN JACOB HORST ROBERT MORTON HURST CARL JOSEPH JARBOE 

B.S. Pre-Medicol B.A. History B.S. Chemistry 

Annville, Pa. Annville, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. 



,4H - - 



fi |Mii#('^*- 






35 




STANLEY JOHN KACZOROWSKI BARBARA ANN KARLHEIM BUHRMAN GEORGE KEIM 

B.A. Political Science B.S. Pre-Medical B.S. Chemistry 

Elizabeth, N.J. Harrisburg, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. 

BARRY L. KEINARD ROBERT WILLIAM KILMOYER ROSALYN ROCHELLE KNAPP 

B.A. Psychology B.S. Mathematics B.S. Music Education 

Reading, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. 

LINDA ELLEN KOERPER ALFRED JOHN KREISER JUDITH ANN KRESSLER SHIRLEY ANN LANDIS 

B.S. Music Education B.S. Biology B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Music Education 

Cressona, Pa. Ono, Pa. Ea5ton, Pa. Pottsfown. Pa. 







36 




JANE LEVINE PAUL LONGREEN CHARLES LOWERS 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Chemistry B.A. Economics 

Closter, N.J. Grantville, Pa. Freeport, Pa. 

DAVID MAGNELLI VERNARD MAGNUSON MARY ANN MAGUIRE 

B.S. Chemistry B.A. Economics B.A. English 

Steelton, Pa. Horrisburg, Pa. Harrisburg, Po. 

JACK MARKER! SALLY ANN MARMAZA MARY LOUISE METZGER ROBERT BOYER MEYER 

B.S. Music Education B.S. Biology B.S. Music Education B.S. Music Education 

Lititz, Pa. Harrisburg, Pa. Lancaster, Pa. Harrisburg, Pa. 




37 




ROGER WALKER MICHAEL DAVID ROSWELL MILLER JACQUELINE LOUISE MILLER NOLAN EUGENE MILLER 

B.S. Chemistry B.5. Chemistry B.S. Music Education B.S. Music Education 

Stewartstown, Pa. Annville, Pa. Chambersburg, Pa. Hamburg, Pa. 



FRANK ROY MONTGOMERY L. ADELE MOSS JOAN IRIS MUMPER 

B.A. Economics B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Music Education 

Media, Pa. Old Tappan, N.J. Horrisburg, Pa. 

DONALD ELWOOD MURRAY JOAN ELIZABETH MYERS WINNIE HAZEL NEAL 

B.S. Mathematics B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Elementary Education 

Harrisburg, Po. Ardmore, Pa. North Bergen, N.J. 





38 





FRED LeROY NEISWENDER H. WILLIAM NIXON KATHLEEN JANICE PATTERSON MARCIA VIRGINIA PAULLIN 

B.A. History B.S. Music Education B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Elementary Education 

Palmyra, Pa. Hershey, Pa. Bergenfield, N.J. Bridgeton, N.J. 



KENNETH LEE PEIFFER MARJORIE ANN PETERS LARRY MARTIN PLYMIRE 

B.A. English B.S. Music Education B.A, Pre-Theological 

Palmyra, Pa. Bloomfield, N.J, York, Pa. 

DAVID GARY POFF LYNN BRILL RAVER JAMES THOMAS REILLY 

B.S. Music Education B.A. Economics A.B. Political Science 

Leacock, Pa. Columbia, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. 




39 




WILLIAM FERRAR REN2ULLI PETER H. RIDDLE WILLIAM DAVID RIGLER 

B.S. Pre-Medical B.S. Music Education B.A. Political Science 

Londisville, N.J. Oceonport, N.J. Woodbury, N.J. 

LOIS ELAINE SHOLLEY SAMUEL J. SHUBROOKS ALBERT PIERRE SILLDORFF 

B.A. Sociology B.S. Pre-Medical A.B. Political Science 

Lebanon, Pa. Willow Grove, Pa. Lebanon, Po. 



GEORGE WILLIAM SMITH JACQUE A. SMITH KARL RICHARD SMITH WALTER LAKE SMITH 

B.S. Pre-Medical B.A. History B.S. Music Education B.S. Music Education 

Lemoyne, Po. Ephrota, Pa. Hummelstown, Pa. Pleasantville, N.J. 






40 





BARBARA ELAINE STORAKER BRUCE ALLEN STRAUSS EILEEN JOANNE SWEIGART 

B.S. Elementary Education B.A. Economics B.S. Elementary Education 

Brooklyn, N.Y. Myerstown, Pa. Denver, Pa. 

MARY JANE R. SYPULA SHEILA TAYNTON CHARLES JOHN TOBIAS 

B.S. Pre-Medicol B.A. Sociology B.S. Music Education 

York, Pa. Falls Church, Va. Hamburg, Pa. 



AlONZO RICHARDO TRUJILLO HARRIET ETHEL UMHOLTZ HARRY WALTER VANDERBACH FORREST ROBERT VOGAL 

B.A. Philosophy B.S. Elementary Education B.A. Pre-Law B.A. Economics 

Santa Fe, N. Mex. Gratz, Pa. Guttenberg, N.J. Annville, Pa. 





41 







ELAINE JANE WALTER FAYE LaRUE WEIK DEAN GEHRED WETZEL MIRIAM FOREMAN WIKER 

B.S. Biology B.S. Music Education B.S. Biology B.S. Elementary Education 

Easton, Pa. Denver, Pa. Pitman, Pa. Harrisburg, Pa. 

DONALD T. WINTER KEITH BURNELL WISE STEPHEN LUECKE WISLER 

B.A. History B.A. Philosophy B.A. Psychology 

N. Babylon, L.I., N.J. Kinzer, Pa. Columbia, Pa. 

SONIA HELEN WITTE VICKY VIRGINIA WORK CAROL ELIZABETH YODER 

B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Elementary Education 

Calumbio, Pa. Rushland, Pa. Schuykill Haven, Pa. 




42 




MARY A. GREBE 
B.S. Nursing 

Lebanon, Pa. 



JANICE NOLL 
B.S. Nursing 

Fleetwood, Pa. 




Seniors Not Pictured 



ELMER WILLIAM FABER 
^.B. Sociology 

Annville, Pa. 



PAUL WILLIAM LINDEMUTH 
A.B. Biology 

Cleona, Pa, 



DONNA JEANNE GRUN 
B.S. Elementary Educofion 

Annville, Pa. 



BEVERLY FREASE MOVER 
B.S. Elementary Education 

Annville, Pa. 



JOHN PHILIP HAMM 
A.B. Psychology 

Mt. Wolf, Pa. 



MARY ELLEN MURPHEY 
B.S. Elementary Education 

Lebanon, Pa. 



ROBERT DANIEL HARNETT, JR. 
A.B. Political Science 

Annville, Pa. 



KATHRYN K. ROYER 
B.S. Elementary Education 

Richland, Pa. 



WILLIAM HUGH MOLLIS 
B.S, Chemistry 

Lebanon, Pa. 



CHARLES WINFIELD SHARMAN 
B.S. Music Education 

Sinking Spring, Pa. 



RENA AWE LAWRENCE 
B.S. Nursing 

Lebanon, Pa. 



STANLEY EDWARD SMITH 
B.S. Elementary Education 

Lebanon, Pa. 



Phi Alpha Epsilon 




SEATED: A. Moss. STANDING: R. Bell, S. Shubrooks, G. Smith. 



Phi Alpha Epsilon is an honorary society for students initial letters of the phrase, "Love of Learning the 

who have achieved a grade-point average of 3:300 Finder of Truth," v^as established in 1935. Members are 

or better for a period of at least five semesters. elected by the faculty in the spring of each year, and 

The group, which adopted as its name the Greek are formally inducted at a banquet held in their honor. 



44 



Who's Who 



"Who's Who in American Universities and Colleges," 
the directory of distinguished American students, annu- 
ally honors eleven — fourteen seniors who, after being 
recommended by the faculty, are approved by the 
"Who's Who" organization. 

Students awarded this distinction are listed in the 
publication for the year in which they are elected. 
They receive free placement service offered by the 
organization, and they are entitled to wear the official 



"Who's Who" key. 

The number of students admitted depends upon the 
enrollment of the college and the qualifications of the 
recommended seniors. This enables the group to be 
small and select, yet including a cross-section of out- 
standing students from all departments. 

This year fourteen seniors, the maximum quota for 
LVC, were recognized in this way. 



SITTING: K. Pofterson, M. Paulin, S. Taynton, A. Hartman, M. Burche. STANDING: G. Smith, R. Bell, C. 
Arnett, P. Riddle, L. Holstein, B. Buckwolter, W. Nixon, S. Shubrooks, Absent: Barry Keinard. 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




Left to right: George Hiltner, president; Gloria Fitzkee, secretary. Don Drumheller, treasurer; Carl Rife, 
vice-president. 



The Class of 1962 has contributed much to the 
campus in the way of leadership in both academic 
and social organizations. The class has sponsored a 
number of social events such as sock hops, dances 
and hayrides, and was in charge of the 1961 Junior 



Prom arrangements. 

Present officers are George Hiltner, president- 
Carl Rife, vice-president; Gloria Fitzkee, secretary, 
and Donald Drumheller, treasurer. Representing the 
class on the Student Faculty Council is Carol Smith. 



46 



JUNIORS 



Class of 1 962 



For further information concerning Junior 
Students consult the Junior Directory on pages 
160 to 163. 




JOHN E. ADAMS DONALD E. BACASTOW 

chemistry B.S. Economics B.S. 

Closter, N.J. Hummelstown, Pa. 



ROWLAND WAYNE BARNES RUTH ANN BARRY CAROL RUSSELL BAXTER 

Economics B.S. Pre-Nurslng B.S. in Nurs. Nursing B.S. in Nurs. 

Lebanon, Po. Quincy, Pa. Aldan, Pa. 




GLORIA ANN BECHTEL 
Music Education 

Barto, Pa. 



SHELVY J. BIXEL 
B.S. Elementary Education 

Dillsburg, Pa. 



RICHARD NELSON BLAIR 
B.S. Economics B.S. 

Penbrook, Pa. 




47 




"Gee, I'm sorry. I didn't think that the whole waste basket would catch on fire." 



ROBERT BOLLINGER 
Political Science 

Annville, Pa. 



MARY BOLLMAN 
A.B. Elementary Education 

Sinking Spring, Pa. 



KARL WILBUR BORDNER 
B.S. Economics B.S. 

Palmyra, Pa. 




ARTHUR F. BOWMAN EMILY JANE BOWMAN 

Chemistry B.S. in Chemistry Music Education 

Hopeland, Pa. Plainfleld, N.J. 



THOMAS BRANDT 



B.S. Physics 

Annville, Pa. 



B.S. 




48 




DONNA RAE BRESSLER 
English A.B. 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



LOWELL B. BROGAN 
Economics 

Sheridan, Pa. 



BRENDA B. BROWN 
B.S. Mathematics A.B. 

Bergenfield, N.J. 




MICHAEL MATHISON BROWN SYLVIA Z. BUCHER 

Biology B.S. Music Education 

Palmyra, Pa. Lonsdale, Pa. 



JUDITH G. BUCK 
B.S. Mathematics A.B. 

Somerville, N.J. 



KAYE CASSEL LARRY FOSTER CISNEY LETITIA E. CRISPEN GARY H. CRONRATH 

Biology A.B. History A.B. Nursing B.S. in Nursing Economics B.S. 

Telford, Pa. McConnellsburg, Pa. Annville, Pa. Watsontown, Pa. 





DAVID CZIRR STANLEY M. DANIELS 

Chemistry B.S. in Chem. Economics 

Kresskill, NJ. Palmyra, Pa. 



PATRICIA LOUISE DAVIS WOODROW S. DELLINGER, JR. 

B.S. Music Education B.S. Chemistry B.S. 

Salem, NJ. Red Lion, Pa. 



TERRY AUSTIN DeV/ALD SYLVIA ANN DILLMAN HAROLD DOM 

Music Education B.S. Elementary Education B.S. Psychology A.B. 

Schuylkill Haven, Pa. Jonestown, Pa. Sfoystown, Pa. 




THOMAS LEE DONLEY JAMES R. DRESSEL 

History A.B. Mathematics 

Lebanon, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. 



DONALD R. DRUMHELLER 
B.S. Philosophy A.B. 

Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 




50 




ROBERTA ANN DUDAS RALPH NORMAN EARP, JR. GABRIELLE A. ECKENROTH 

Biology B.S. in Med. Tech. Greek- Religion A.B. Physics B.S. 

Lake City, Pa. IndianTown Gap, Pa. Annville, Po. 




GERALD H. EDRIS 



Chemistry 

Lebanon, Pa. 



KENNETH R. FEATHER 
B.S. Chemistry B.S. in Cherr 

Lebanon, Po. 



NANCY CAROLYN FELSBERG 
Music Education 

Pennsauken NJ. 



Hove cards; won't study! 





LINDA CAROL FELTY 
Elementary Education 

Lebanon, Pa. 



HIRAM EARL FITZGERALD GLORIA ANN FITZKEE 

B.S. Psychology A.B. Elementary Education B.S. 

Columbia, Pa. York, Pa. 








BONNIE JEAN FIX 


Mus 


c Education 




Yoe 


Pa. 










DAVID H. 


FORTNA 


Biolc 


gy 






Palrr 


yra. 


Pa. 





B.S. 



B.S. 



DEAN A. FLINCHBAUGH 


ARTHUR FORSTATER 






Industrial Chemistry B.S. in Chem. 

Dollastown, Pa. 


English 

Philadelphia, Pa. 


A.B. 




HARRY FREDERICK 


JOANNE R. FREED 




R. MICHAEL GEPHART 


Music Education B.S. 


Elementary Education 


B.S. 


Biology 


Annvilje, Pa. 


Liverpoo!, Pa. 




Carlisle, Pa. 



A.B. 




52 




"Oh-h-h-h-h-h" 

FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT GINGRICH JOAN OLIVIA GLUYAS LARRY LEE GODSHALL 

Religion A.B. Elementary Education B.S. History A.I 

Ccmpbelltown, Pa. Collingswood, N.J. Ephrata, Pa. 




SUZANNE K. GRACE 
Music Education 
Annville, Pa. 



B.S. 



FRANCIS D. GROVE 



Chemistry 
Felton, Pa. 



ROBERT L. HABIG 
B.S. Chemistry 

Middletown, Pa. 



B.S. 




53 




CLEE HAGAMAN JEROME W. HAUPT, III JAMES T. HEATH, 111 

Med. Tech. B.S. in Med. Tech. Greek-Religion A.B. Philosophy A.B. 

Palmyra, Pa. Columbia, Pa. Wyckoff, N.J. 




JANE HICKS BRUCE ROBERT HILL 

Nursing B.S. in Nurs. Business Administration 

Lebanon, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. 



GEORGE JOSEPH HILTNER, III 
B.S. Greek A.B. 

Baltimore, Md. 



"Come on, Gary! I'll catch you." 





KAY LUCILLE HOFFER 
Music Education 
Lititz, Pa. 



JOSEPH R. HOOPER 
B.S. Chemistry 

New Cumberland, Pa. 



YVONNE KAY HUGHES DOYLE WATSON IVEY 

B.S. Med. Tech. B.S. in Med. Tech. Mathematics B.S. 

Lewisberry, Pa. Harrisburg, Pa. 



REGINA MARIA JUNO 
Med. Tech. B.S. in Med. Tech. Biology 

Bristol, Pa. Philadelphia, Pa 



RICHARD L. KAHAN 



JEAN MARIE KAUFFMAN 
B.S. English A.B. 

Landisville, Pa. 




GLORIA A. KISTLER 
Music Education 

West Hamburg, Pa. 



JUDITH FAY KLINE 
B.S. History 

Lebanon, Pa. 



RICHARD E. KLINEDINST 
Music Education B.S. 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 




55 




JOHN F. KOBYLARZ 
Chemistry B.S. Music Education 

Passaic, I^.J. Irvington, N.J. 



The Cat's not away, but the mice still play. 
DORIS ELAINE KOHL 



WALTER A. KRUEGER, JR. 
B.S. Biology A.B. 

Bergenfield, N.J. 




GEORGIANA KUNZLER 
Sociology 

Lancaster, Ka. 



ANNETTE S. KURR 
A.B. Music Education 
Robesonia, Pa. 



MARY LOUISE LAMKE 
B.S. English 

Steelton, Pa. 



A.B. 




56 




HARRY MARTIN LEHN PHILIP DAVID LEVINSON RAY C. LICHTENWALTER 

Physics B.S. Biology B.S. Music Education B.S. 

Harrisburg, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. Palmerton, Pa. 




BARRY W. LIGHT KENNETH K. LIGHT 

Economics B.S. Chemistry 

Palmyra, Pa. Palmyra, Po. 



MARILYN A. LOY 
B.S. English 

Harrisburg, Po. 



A.B. 



A. HAKIM LYS 
Economics 

Java, Indonesia 



JANE E. McCANN 
B.S. Music Education 

Blackwood, N.J. 



BARBARA ANN McCLEAN 
B.S. Music Education B.S. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



LARRY ELDEAN McGRIFF 
Music Education 

Arcanom, Ohio 



B.S. 





LOIS E. McKINNEY 
Elementary Educarion 
Lebanon, Pa, 



JON E. MARSHALL 

B.S. Economics 

Chatham, N.J. 



H. EUGENE MILLER 
B.S. Music Education 

Myersville, Md. 



ISOBEL MARY MILLER 
B.S. Music Education 
Harrisburg, Pa. 



B.S. 



MARJORIE JANE MILLER ELIZABETH ANN MOORE NORMA JANE MORRIS 

Music Education B.S. Music Education B.S. Elementary Education 

Phoenixville, Pa. Hovertown, Pa. Clayton, N.J. 



B.S. 




DELORES ANITA MOUNSEY H. LEE MOYER 

Med. Tech. B.S. in Med. Tech. History 

Washington, D.C. Hershey, Pa. 



DAVID B. MULHOLLAND 
A.B. Political Science A.B. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




58 




CONSTANCE FAITH MYERS GARY CARL MYERS 

Elementary Education B.S. Biology 

Horrisburg, Pa. Yoe, Pa. 



DENNIS PHILLIPPY 
B.S. Chemistry B.S. 

Hershey, Pa. 




ANITA JUNE PINGEL CECELIA ANN REED NANNETTE RETTIG 

Med. Tech. B.S. in Med. Tech. Music Education B.S. Biology 

Wyomissing, Pa. Schuylkill Haven, Pa. Clark, N.J. 



A.B. 



"And just what makes you think that we're not loyal to Lebanon Valley." 





CARLIN RICHARD RHINE CARL BRUCE RIFE 

History A.B. Philosophy Religion 

Annville, Pa. York, Pa. 



MARILYN E. RINKER 
A.B English A.B. 

Annville, Pa. 




WILLIAM R. ROHRBACH 
Political Science 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



LARRY RUDY 
A.B. Chemistry 

New Cumberland, Pa. 



GAYLE CHRISTINE SCHLEGEL 
B.S. Music Education B.S. 

Reading, Pa. 



CHARLES R. SEIDEL 
Economics 

Annville, Pa. 



DEANNA JEAN SEILER 
B.S. Music Education 

Northampton, Pa. 



GENE SERGENT 
B.S. Economics 

Metuchen, N.J. 



JOHN K. SEYMOUR 
B.S. Motemctics 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



A.B. 




60 





"If you think this is good, you should see me swing by my toil." 

MARYLIN RUTH SHAVER DANIEL F. SHEARER M. BLAINE SHIRK 

Elementary Education B.S. Music Education B.S. Biology A.B. 

Hooverville, Pa. Ephroto, Pa. Paradise, Pa. 




PHILIP BROOKS SLATCHER WILLIAM WAYNE SLIKE 

Psychology A.B. Spanish A.I 

Havertown, Pa. Lebanon, Pa. 



CAROL ANN SMITH 
Elementary Education 

Ephrata, Pa. 



B.S. 




61 





G. EUGENE STAMBACH KAY LORRAINE STEINER AGLAIA MARIA STEPHANIS 

Sociology A.B. Sociology A.B. Biology A.B. 

Mt. Wolf, Pa. Lampeter, Pa. Marietta, Pa. 




SANDRA LEE STETLER 
Music Education 

Wormleysburg, Pa. 



ROBERT H. STULL 
B.S. Biology 

Fleetwood, Pa. 



BELA JANOS TAKACS 
B.S. Biology B.S. 

Annville, Pa. 



"I knew I shouldn't have eaten that Bermuda Onion with Chocolate syrup on it.' 





VIRGINIA MEA TEMPLETON LEE JACKSON TURNER, JR. RUSSELL R UREY 

Psychology A.B. Music Education B.S. Chemistry 

Hellertown, Pa. Wilmington, Del. Red Lion, Pa. 



HENRY F. VAN de WATER 
B.S. Chemistry B.S. 

Malvern, Pa. 



JEANNE ELIZABETH VOWLER WILLIAM J. WALKER 

Elementary Education B.S. English 

Upper Darby, Pa. Gap, Pa. 



ROGER NELSON WARD 
A.B. Biology B.S. 

Lafayette Hill, Pa. 




LINDA JEAN WEBER 
English 

New Holland, Pa. 



D. RAY WENGER, JR. 
A.B. Physics 

Annville, Pa. 



ROSALIE BETTY WIDA 
B.S. Language Major 

Rexmont, Po. 



A.B. 




63 




BONNIE lYNN WILLIAMS PATSY LARUE WISE BARBARA HELEN WOGISCH 

Elementary Education B.S. Mathematics A.B. Chemistry B.S. in Chem. 

Butler, N.J. Middletown, Md. Bergenfield, N.J. 



ELLIS W. WOLFE RICHARD T. YINGLING 

Economics B.S. Chemistry B.S. Biology 

Annville, Pa. Hershey, Pa. Etters, Pa. 



HARRY B. YOST 



B.S. 




GARY L. ZELLER 
Music Education 
Mt. Joy, Pa. 



D. PAUL ZIMMERMAN 
B.S. History 

Horrisburg, Pa. 



A.B. 




64 




"Brother! One of these days I'm going to grow a 
beard." 



1 


JOSEPH FOX 


Physics 




Lebanon, 


Pa. 


1 


EDWARD MIRMAK 


Physics 




Lancaster 


Pa. 



Juniors Not Pictured 



B.S. 



B.S. 



GEORGE WEAVER, JR. 
Religion A.B. 

New Holland, Pa. 



BARBARA HORST 
Nursing B.S. in Nursing 

Wyomissing, P.A. 



WILLIAM REIGHTER 
English A.B. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



DAVID WEEKLY 
English A.B. 

Meadville, Pa. 



Philosophy 
Cleona, Pa 




HARRY VOSHELL 
Music Education 

Wyoming, Delaware 



RUTH WOOD 
Nursing B.S. in Nurs. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



It is always best not to relax while studying. 




65 



JUNIOR PERSONALITIES 







QUITTIE COURT: SEATED: Anette Kurr, Jeanne Vowler. STANDING: Carol Felty, Sandra Stetler, Carol 
Smith, Harry Yost, Brenda Brown. 



66 



and Court 




nd Miss Quittie 



MISS QUiniE: Carol Smith 

Carol Smith and Horry Yost, as Mr. and Miss 
Quittie, depict the essence of charm and grace on 
the Lebanon Valley campus. They were chosen on 
the basis of personal appearance and courtesy. The 
girls composing the Quittie court likewise possess 
a high degree of charm and poise. Along with the 
qualities of personal character, these display the 
leadership inherent in those who continue to make 
progress the main objective of the college. They have 
set the standard which we hope will be followed 
in the years to come. We, who have selected these 
students, are proud to be a part of the campus which 
they enhance. 



MR. QUITTIE: Harry Yost 




67 




Mr. and Miss L. V. C. 

Liz Gluyas and George Hiltner have been chosen 
by their classmates as the two students who best rep- 
resent L.V.C. Their "all-around" character — a com- 
bination of pleasing personality, continuous service, 
and outstanding leadership — have won for them 
this honor. Active in social organizations, compet- 
itive sports, cheering, and academic clubs, Liz typ- 
ifies the ideal college co-ed. George, president of 
the class for three years, likewise fills a position of 
leadership in both the academic and social aspects 
of campus life. 



68 




Mr. and Miss Athlete 

Joanne Freed and Hi Fitzgerald are the Junior 
class contribution to the L.V. Athletic Hall of Fame. 
Participating in both inter-collegiate and intramural 
contests, these athletes display outstanding ability 
and the competitive spirit which is a credit to any 
college. A year-round sports enthusiast, Hi is the 
spark of the Dutchman teams. Jo champions the 
women's intramural events as well as the girls' bas- 
ketball team. The class of '62 is proud to claim these 
two as its representatives of sportsmanship. 



69 



Outstanding Students 



One of the highest honors that con be bestowed 
upon a junior is to be chosen as one of the outstanding 
students of the class. This position requires the stud- 
ent to have maintained a commendable academic 
record, to have rendered his services toward further- 
ing the college community, to have served in posi- 
tions of leadership throughout the campus, to exhibit 
a likable personality, and to possess a character of 
the highest quality. These students represent nearly 



all the major departments of the college, significant 
of the varied program offered at Lebanon Valley 
College. Adding to the spiritual emphasis of 
the community, these chosen ten keep alive the 
objectives toward which our school is continually 
striving. In this advancing world, the need for super- 
ior academic achievement is evident, but we must not 
minimize the importance of character development 
embodied in the qualities of our campus leaders. 



3glj^ 





John Adams 



Don Bacastow 





Sylvia Bucher 



Don Drumheller 



70 




1962 




Jean Kauffman 



Anita Pingel 





Carl Rife 



Morylin Shaver 





Bob Stull 



Pot Wise 



71 



SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 



Sophomore class members, having undergone one 
initiation program as initiates, returned to campus 
early in the fall to aid in the new White Hot program 
as initiators. Upperclassmen for the first time, in- 
dividual class members participated in diversified 
activities; and the class as a whole undertook the 
sponsorship of several social events, including the 
Autumn Leaves Dance in the fall and a second-semes- 



ter informal dance planned jointly with the freshman 
class. Three class members elected last spring — Le- 
ann Grebe, Jim Cashion, and Mary Lu Haines — 
assisted as sophomore representatives on the Quittie 
stafT. The class was led by officers Ken Girard, presi- 
dent; Tom Balsbaugh, vice-president; Linda Breeze, 
secretory; and Jim Cashion, treasurer. 



SEATED: Ken Girard, president; Linda Breeze, secretary. STANDING: Tori Balsbaugh, vice-president; Jim 
Cashion, treasurer. 




72 



Sophomore Class 




SOPHOMORES ROW 1: B. McElwee, J. Newton, F. Niedziaiek, N. Dutro, L. 

Grebe, M. Bean, O. Binner, P. Boyer, J. Dixon, S. Kelly, W. Barnhart. ROW 2: 

D. Koncar, M. Evans, M. L. Haines, S. Marshall, P. Derbyshire, K. Krieder, J. 

Brighthaupt, K. Bauernfeind, S. Lane, N. Napier, S. Brown, A. Grove, B 
Graham. ROW 3: T. Balsbaugh, J. Cashion, J. Motsko, R. Crider, R. Felty, 

Foley, M. Hassinger, J. Corbett, J. Boyle. ROW 4: R. Ehrhalt, J. Bowman, J, 
Davis, J. Boitinger, H. Acker, G. Kling, R. Herring, D. Boertschy. 



SOPHOMORES ROW 1: K. Schreiber, M. Weinert, L. Ranck, S. Smith, B. Wil- 
liams, R. Ranck, J. Stringer. ROW 2: P. Shonk, J. Snowberger, J. Rice, B. Per- 
kins. ROW 3: L. Wittle, V. Stouffer, D. Shenk, P. Young, G. Stanson, D. Trout- 
man, R. Rotz, R. Shope. ROW 4: J. Weober, J. Winand, W. Sheeny, G. Plit- 
nick, R. Recap, F. Thompson, M. Wert. 




FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 




Left to right: Harry Kehler, vice-president; Judy Tanno, secretary; Ken Lee, treasurer; Ken Whisler, presi- 
dent. 



The Class of '64 was in many ways the "guinea pig" 
for much experimentation and innovation during 1960- 
61. The first class-members who were not initiated in 
the traditional manner by the sophomore class, fresh- 
men successfully tested the White Hat program. Scho- 
lastically, the Class of '64 officially began a new and 



diversified curriculum in accordance with the ever- 
broadening liberal arts theory of education. Leaders of 
this pioneering group were officers Ken Whisler, presi- 
dent; Harry Kehler, vice president; Judy Tanno, secre- 
tary; Ken Lee, treasurer; and Wes MacMillan, Faculty- 
Student Council representative. 



74 



Freshman Class 



ROW 1: E. Sabaka, J. Aungst, M. Greenfield, C. Klock, C. Jiminez, D. Ingle, 
M. Colgan, L. Gatchel, H. Haskell, B. Miller. ROW 2: S. Wolfe, C. Deichert, J. 
Keiper, J. Nichols, J. Johnson, N. Dohringer, L. Beckner, L. Ensminger, D. Mol- 
lery, F. Meng, C. Knorr, P. Hollett. ROW 3: K. Anderson, J. Spoonhour, T. 
Kent, C. Martin, D. Burns, S. Hildreth, F. Eppley, D. Geib, D. Kauffman, L 
Arnold, J. Krorrer, T. Bonsol. ROW 4: R. Beistline, D. Hively, B. Alban, L. Lede- 
bur, R. Herwig, M. Houck, J. Etter, K. Horst, T. Humphreys, J. Deinn, J. Heish- 
man, N. Butler, C. Burkhart, W. Hamsher. 



ROW 1: J. Baker, S. Gerhart, L. Noylor, E. Black, B. Speicher, L. Schlegel, J. 
Cassel, B. Robinson, R. Greim, H. Pisle, J. Ruhl, L. Bell. ROW 2: E. Orchard, S. 
Deiner, E. Vastine, C. Derk, P. McDyer, J. Lied, L. Stoudt, B. Williams, L. Shu- 
Brooks, M. Zimmerman, L. Lewis, P. Jones. ROW 3: J. Tano, S. Schreiber, N. 
Wagner, K. Resch, R. Blouelt, S. Leonard, J. Bisbing, B. Shope, S. Weimer, S. 
Gerhart, C. Hoffman, C. Loskie, S. Williams, C. Rouse. ROW 4; E. Spancake, 
W. Stump, J. Prentice, K. Whisler, K. Sayres, T. Kent, G. Thomas, M. Lenker, 
R. Moore, K. Blekicki, W. Newcomer, E. Conrad, C. Miller, C. Deitzel, S. Nolt, 
R. Hiler, D. Grove, T. Overly. ROW 5: F. Tyson, W. White, G. Woltz, G. Wentz, 
L. Stein, H. Kehler, R. Herwig, W. Altland, W. MocMillon, R. Schmerker, D. 
Shaw, T. Schwolm, R. Orndorf. 




DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



By sponsoring a number of events throughout the 
year, the students and faculty of the Department of 
Music stimulate social activity within the department. 

An innovation last year, the spring outing held by 
the Concert Choir promises to be an annual occur- 



rence. In December the Conserv Formal — a dinner 
and dance for music majors and their guests — once 
again highlighted, not only the Christmas season, but 
the entire year. 



Chorus 



The L.V.C. Chorus, of approximately one hundred- 
fifty people, is composed of every member of the 
Music Department and several other students outside 
the Department who have an interest in choral singing. 

Mr. Pierce Getz, of the Music Department faculty, 
this year completed his first year as director of the 



Chorus. He was assisted by David Poff, accompanist, 
a senior in the Music Department. 

Rehearsals are held once a week in preparation for 
the annual Christmas and Spring concerts presented 
in Engle Hall. 




Concert Band 



At the close of the football season, the Marching 
Band, with slight changes in personnel becomes the 
Concert Band, directed by Dr. James M. Thurmond. Its 
repertoire consists of the highest quality band litera- 
ture and is almost unlimited in its scope — from Stra- 
vinsky to Sousa. 



Highlights of the Concert Band year were concerts 
at Lancaster, the Forum in Harrisburg, the Spring 
Music Festival, and the May Day Program here at Val- 
ley. Lost year the band had the honor of playing at 
Indiantown Gap for a sizeable audience of service- 
men and ranking military personnel. 




K. Anderson; M. Arnold; G. Bechtel; L. Bell; C. Bingman; R. Blauvelt; K. Ble- 
kicki; B. Bongart; S. Brown; M. Chobitnoy; N. Dohringer; M. Dovies; P. Davis, 
T. DeWold; B. Docherfy; J. Dunn; B. Fix; R. Foley; H. Frederick; S. Grace; R 
Greim; P. Hallett; W. Higgins; R. Hiler; K. Hoffer; M. Houck; S. Huber; J. Huey, 
J. Hutchcroft; T. Keehn; H. Kehler; G. Kerstetter; G. Kistler; R. Klinedinst; L 
Koerper; R. Lehman; S. Leonard; R. Lichtenwolter; B. Liddick; D. Mallery; T 



Mann; L. McGriff; R. Meyer; N. Miller; W. Nixon; S. Nolt; M. Peters; D. Poff; 
R. Poorman R. Rhine; P. Riddle; R. Rocop; R. Rotz; S. Rouse; J. Ruhl; G. Schle- 
gel; L. Schlegel; R. Schmerker; D. Schnader; G. Schwalrti; C. Seidel; D. Seller; 
C. Shorman; D. Shearer; P. Shonk; B. Shupp; K. Skewis; B. Smith; K. Smith; G. 
Spengler, S. Stetler; L. Stoudt; D. Sweigart; J. Taylor; C. Tobias; D. Troutmon; 
H. Voshell; P. Wolf; G. Zeller. 



79 



Ensembles 



Ensemble playing by its very nature exposes the 
players to a great deal more music literature than 
does orchestral playing, making it necessary that only 
our finest musicians participate in these groups. With 
few exceptions, consequently, Lebanon Valley's en- 



semble players are majors on their instrument and are 
veteran performers. 

Concerts by the various ensembles are given 
throughout the year, both on campus, and off campus. 




MEMBERS OF 
PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 

B. Fix, G. Schlegel, G. Zeller, Doris 
Kohl, T. DeWald, J.Markert. 



PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 



STRING ENSEMBLE 



MEMBERS OF 
STRING ENSEMBLE 

M. Peters, E. Bowman, L. Moore 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H^ 


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I I 




..'V^ 





80 




MEMBERS OF BRASS ENSEMBLE: 

R. Blauvelt, M. Chabitnoy, T. Dewald, 
B. Docherty, B. Fix, H. Frederick, R. 
Hiler, J. Hutchcroft, T. Keehn, H. 
Kehler, G. Kistler, D. Kohl, A. Kurr, 
S. Leonard, R. Lichtenwalter, J. Mar- 
kert, L. McGriff, N. Miller, R. Rhine, 
R. Rocap, R. Rotz, G. Schlegel, R. 
Schmerker, D. Schnader, C. Shar- 
man, K. Smith, G. Spengler, D. Trout- 
man, G. Zeller. 



BRASS ENSEMBLE 



MEMBERS OF WOODWIND 
QUINTET: 

D. Seiler, N. Miller, P. Davis, C. To- 
bias, S. Stetler. 




CLARINET CHOIR 



WOODWIND QUINTET 




MEMBERS OF CLARINET CHOIR: 

G. Bechtel, L. Bell, B. Bongart, C. 
Bingmon, K. Blekicki, L. Brong, J. 
Dunn, S. Grace, K. Hoffer, J. Huey, 
R. Klinedinst, R. Lehman, T. Mann, R. 
Meyer, Miller, R. Poormon, J. Ruhl, 
K. Skewis, P. Shonk, S. Stetler, S. 
Stoudt, J. Taylor, C. Tobias, H. Vo- 
shell. 



81 




It may not be the sweetest music this side of heaven or filled with Champagne bubbles, 
but Dr. Thurmond gets the best from his Instrumentalists. 



Dr. James Thurmond, conductor 



Girls' Band 



The Girls' Band, directed by Dr. James Thurmond, is group, however, does have among its membership 

an organization v^/hose primary aim is to provide ex- several of our school's most accomplished female in- 

perience in ensemble playing to girls who are not pro- strumentalists. The girls work all year toward the 

ficient players of any particular bond instrument. The Girls' Band concert in March, given in Engle Hall. 



MEMBERS: 

C. Bingman, G. Bech- 
tel, R. Blouvelt, B. Bon- 
gart, E. Bowman, L. 
Brong, S. Brown, S. 
Bucher, J. Chapman, 
N. Dahringer, M. 
Davis, M. Evans, N. 
Felsburg, N. Fenster- 
mocher, R. Greim, P. 



Hallett, J. 
schmidt, K. 
Huber, D. 
Kelly, G. 



Hammer- 
Hoffer, S. 

Ingle, S. 
Kistler, R. 



Knapp, L. Koerper, D. 
Kohl, S. Lane, S. Leon- 
ard, J. McCann, B. 
McClean, M. Metzger, 
I. Miller, M. Miller, E. 
Moore, J. Mumper, E. 
Perkins, M. Peters, C. 
Reed, E. Robinson, S. 
Rouse, J. Ruhl, G. 
Schlegel, D. Seiler, P. 
Shonk, B. Shupp, K. 




Skewis, B. 
Stetler, L. 
Taylor, R. 
Weinert. 



Smith, S. 
Stoudt, J. 
Unger, M. 



82 




ROW 1: M. Peters, S. Ruber, E. Bowman, A. Kurr, E. Moore, N. Felsburg, J. 
Bisbing, M. Arnold, S. Rouse, W. Monical. ROW 2: J. Myers, B. Docherty, M. 
Bean, T. Keehn, E. Walter, B. Smith, P. Davis, M. Houk, B. Shupp, D. Seller, C. 



Tocbias, R. Klinedinst, K. Hoffer, R. Lehman, S. Stetler, G. Kerstetter, D. Grove. 
ROW 3: J. Markert, M. Weinert, B. Fix, G. Zeller, M. Chabitnoy, R. Lichtenwal- 
ter, K. Smith, R. Blauvelt, S. Leonard, G. Kistler. 



Symphony 




The Lebanon Valley College Symphony Orchestra 
is, for the most port, mode up of students from the 
Department of Music. Membership, however, is open 
to anyone who is able to meet the high performance 
standards set by the organization, under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Thomas Lonese. Concert mistress, Mar- 
jorie Peters, a senior in the Department of Music, 
has ably filled this position for two consecutive 
years. 

The orchestra this year gave a performance in 
November and also presented their annual concert 
in the Spring Music Festival. 



Conductor: Mr. Thomas Lonese 



83 



Concert Choir 



The Concert Choir is mode up of a limited number of 
mixed voices selected through audition by Dr. James M. 
Thurmond, director. Choir members annually look for- 
ward to the week-long tour in February, which takes 
them through Pennsylvania and several neighboring 
states. Throughout the year the choir continually pre- 
pared for performances, some of which were the Lan- 
caster concert, the Forum concert in Harrisburg, several 
campus concerts, and a particular honor this year — 
the concert in Harrisburg for the Pennsylvania Music 



Educators Association Convention at which time they 
song to a vast audience of leading music educators 
throughout the state. 

This is the second year the Choir has had elected 
officers to handle the numerous details involved in the 
smooth functioning of any group which is "on the move" 
as much as the Choir. President Ken Hays and his cabi- 
net were at the wheel this year and did an outstanding 
job. 





ROW 1: B. Fix; S. Stefler, Student-Faculty Representative; M. Metzger; M. 
Miller; E. Williams; C. Reed; R. Unger; S. Bucher; R. Knopp; J. Mumper; J. 
McConn; N. Fenstermacher; L. Brong; Recording Secretary; P. Jones. ROW 2: 
E. Perkins; F. Page; D. Kohl; M. Zimmerman; E. Bowman; W. Barnhart; B. 
Smith; S. Grace; J. Chapman; S. Huber; P. Shonk; M. Arnold, Corresponding 
Secretary; M. Rinker; J. Taylor; L. Schlegel. ROW 3: D. Grove; T. 
Schwolm; L. McGriff; W. Nixon; R. Schmerker; E. Robinson; Sue Kelly; S. 
Kelly; I. Miller; J. Turner, Vice-President; R. Meyer; K. Anderson; T. Keehn. 
ROW 4: W. Monical; D. Shearer; K. Hoys, President; H. Frederick, Publicity 
Manager; J. Homan; J. Hutchcroft; S. Nolt; D. Poff, Business Manager; R. 
Rhine; J. Long; J. Dunn; E. Miller; H. Kehler; R. Hiler; W. Higgins. At 
piano: B. McClean. 



"Now, this is the situation, people!" 



84 



Travel along with a 

Song W^' 




^■PMIII 





"Baby, it's cold outside.' 



"Keep your eyes on the rood 





85 



Marching Band 



Valley's Marching Band adds the spirit to our football 
games that only a bond can add. Drill master Bill Nixon, 
Student Director Dave Poff, and the band members came 
through this year with some of the most spirited and 
original precision performances Valley has seen. Re- 
member the half-time satire on political campaigning? 
We would like to see that one again. 

The long and frequent rehearsals this group held is 
attested to in the apparent ease with which they per- 
formed on the field, with Horry Frederick, Drum Major, 
out in front. 

In a group of this size and nature it is necessary that 
there be organization and leadership. The Band offi- 
cers this year, elected by the members, were Skip To- 
bias, President; Sandra Stetler, Vice-President; and 
Harry Frederick, Business Manager. 



TOP, Color Guard: B. Brown, L. Ronck, K. Kreider, E. Bowman, H. Pisle, B. McElwee, 
S. Bucher. 

MIDDLE, Drum Major: Horry Frederick. 

BOTTOM, Majorettes: B. Wogisch, C Bingmon, B. Block, M, Evans, R. Dudos. 





86 




BAND PERSONNEL: K. Anderson, M. Arnold, G. Bechtel, C. Bingmon, R. Blouvet, 
B. Bongart, S. Brown, M. Chobitnoy, N. Dahringer, M. Dovies, P. Davis, T. De- 
wold, B. Docherfy, J. Dunn, R. Foley, H. Frederick, S. Grace, R. Greim, W Hig- 
gins, R. Hiler, K. Hoffer, M. Houck, J. Hutchcroft, S. Huber, J. Huey, R. Keehn, 
H. Kehler, G. Kerstetter, R. Klindinst, R. Lehman, S. Leonard, R. Lichtenwalter, 



B. Liddick, D. Moliery, T. Mann, L. McGriff, R. Meyer, N. Miller, S. Nolf, M. 
Peters, W. Nixon, D. PofI, R. Poormon, R. Rhine, P. Riddle, R. Rofz, S. Rouse, J. 
Ruhl, G. Schlegel, L. Schlegel, R. Schmerker, D. Schnoder, C. Schwalm, C. Seidel, 
D. Seller, D. Sheerer, P. Shonk, B. Shupp, K. Skewis, K. Smith, G. Spengler, L. 
Stoudt, C, Tobios, D. Troutmon, H. Voshell. 



87 



RELIGIOUS LIFE 



Religious Emphasis Week 



Rev. Richard E. Sigler, Director of Admissions at Pittsburgh Theological 
Seminary. 



The religious activities at L.V.C. are numerous and 
varied. This year, as in other years, a number of 
S.C.A. retreats and Delta Tau Chi deputations were 
held. "Courage to be . . ." provided the theme for 
the 1961 Religious Emphasis Week in March. At 
special Chapel services on three consecutive days, the 
Rev. Richard E. Sigler, speaker for that week, spoke 
on the topics "Interested," "Yourself," and "Chris- 
tian." A highlight of the spring calendar. Interna- 
tional Weekend was held again this year. A total 
of nine colleges were invited to participate in the 
event. From these colleges came students represent- 
ing Africa, Germany, Hungary, Korea, India, and 
Indonesia. 




\ 






ROW 1: C. Arnetr, L. Plymire. ROW 2: Mr. Fritz, Rev. Bemesderder, K 
ferffer, P. Fitz, L. Cisney, K. Wise, Chairman. 




Chapel 
Programs 



Religion and Life Speoker, Dr. Ernest W. 
Lefever, Research Associate of the Wash- 
ington Center of Foreign Policy Research of 
Johns Hopkins University and teacher of 
international politics at the school of Inter- 
national Service of American University. 




Dean Ehrhort speaks in chopel after being appointed Academic Dean. 



Sheila Toy ton relates her summer experiences in the Union of 
Soviet Socialist Republics. 



89 




Religious Activities 
and Retreat 





Shelia and Dick join in songfest at 
S.C.A. Cabinet Retreat. 



Dr. Harry S. Buck, Director of Asian 
Studies and Professor of Religion at 
Wilson College, speaks on Job at All- 
Campus Retreat. 



These fellows don't seem too inter- 
ested in hearing the D.T.C. Business 
Report. 



Group discussion provides chance for questions during D.T.C. Retreat. 



Morylin and Norma Jane would give anything for that steam 
heat back at the college. 




ORGANIZATIONS 

Student-Faculty Council 



One of the most active and influential organizations 
on campus, the Student-Faculty Council functions as 
the integrative body for all college life and thought. 
By one elected delegate, each organization is repre- 
sented in this body. 

At the top of the activity list this year was the co- 



sponsorship of the Junior Prom featuring a big-named 
band. To aid in centering campus activity around the 
College Lounge, the Council purchased a stereo set and 
a variety of records designed to appeal to every fre- 
quenter. Newspapers were again distributed to each 
dorm daily as a service of this capable organization. 





OFFICERS: Leann Grebe, Secretary; William Rigler, Vice-president; Barry Keinard, President; John Bow- 
man, Treasurer. 



ROW 1: M. Rinker, W. Rigler, L. Grebe, J. Bowman, L. McKinney. ROW 2: C. Smith, S. Taynton, B. Mc- 
Elwee, E. Moore, M. Bollmon, L. Giuyos, S. Stetler. ROW 3; J. Corbett, S. Shubrooks, L. Plymire, D. Pierce, 
G. Myers, K. Wise. 




Resident Women's Student Government Association 



Order is required when a large group of girls live 
together. The resident women's governing body is de- 
signed to maintoin the well-being and protection of 
the women students through the establishment of cer- 
tain rules and regulations. 

The Association is composed entirely of women stu- 
dents elected by their classmates. They are advised by 
Dean Martha Faust. The group has judicial power and 
considers cases of women who have accumulated a 
given number of demerits,- penalties are also meted 



out by the students on the board. All women dormi- 
tory residents and women students living in town are 
under the jurisdiction of this body. Except in unusual 
situations, the board acts independently of faculty and 
administration. 

Besides its governing duties, this year the Associa- 
tion sponsored Gander Weekend, the annual Christ- 
mas banquet and dance in cooperation with the Men's 
Senate, and other social functions. 




SEATED: J. Mumper; A. Hartman; A. Pingle; M. Paullin; S. Stetler; S. Bucher. STANDING: C. 
Smith; P. Wise; K. Patterson; F. Page; S. Krauss; M. Shaver; J, Snowberger; B. McElwee, C. 
Hemperly; B. McCleon. 



OFFICERS, SEATED: Amelia Hartman, Vice-President; Mar- 
cia Paullin, President. STANDING: Sylvia Bucher, Record- 
ing Secretory; Sandra Stetler, Treasurer; Anita Pingle, 
Judicial Secretary. 



93 




Men's Senate 



The Senate promotes the decorum necessary on a 
college campus and has jurisdiction over resident men 
students in the dormitories and in town. It operates 
democratically, having elected representatives from 



each class and counselors from the men's dormitories. 

The inter-dorm track meet and Underclassmen's Day 
are both Senate projects, along with the Christmas 
banquet and dance co-sponsored by R.W.S.G.A. 




OFFICERS, Left to right; Alonzo Trujillo, Vice-president; George Hilt- 
ner. Secretary-treasurer; Steve Wisler, President. 



SEATED: A. Trujillo; S. Wisler; G. Hiltner. STANDING, ROW 1: K, Wise; 
W. Hawk, K. Girord; R. Stull; G. Stanson. ROW 2: G. Myers; C. Rife; 
H. Fitzgerald; B. Buckwalter; H. Yost. 




Women's Commuter 

Council 

The Council is responsible for the actions of women 
day students. It sees that the women commuters uphold 
college rules and standards. 

WCC and Jiggerboard organize Gander Weekend; 
with the men day students, the Council has a Christmas 
luncheon. The Valentine Dance is also the result of the 
efforts of the two commuting groups, and a picnic is 
held at the close of the year. 



Left to Right: Judith Kline; Sara K. Schreiber, Secretary- 
Treasurer; Lois Sholley, President; Lois McKinney, Vice- 
President ond Student Faculty Representative. 





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p 1 M.- jjMBL.J^^B <- 


^^1 


K^^^H 


wjl I'l 




fwm 


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Wtm.'^^JW^'Sr l^L 




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Men's Day Student Congress 




Left to Right: F. Neiswender; K. Light; B. Light; W. Baker, President; R. Barnes, Vice-President; R. Andreozzi, 
Secretary-Treasurer; G. Bowman, Student Faculty Repesentative. 



The mole counterpart of WCC, the Congress enforces Dance. They participate in a Christmas party for or- 

meosures to ensure harmony among men commuting phoned children, in cooperation with the Elementary 

students. The congressmen cooperate with women day Education Club, and they seek to promote other social 

students in planning activities such as the Valentine activities. 



95 



Student Christian Association Cabinet 




ROW 1; M. Shaver, L Cisney, Vice president for Men; W. Rigler, Treasurer; 
L. Plymire, Student-Faculty Representative; C. Arnett, President; S. Taynton. 
ROW 2; M. Haines, R. Felty, <. Peiffer, N. Morris, G. Bull, K. Wise, D. Drum- 



heller, L. Grebe. ROW 3: Dr. Bemesderfer, Advisor; S. Shubrooks, C. Rife, H. 
Fitzgerald, P. Young, J. Miller. 



The Student Christian Association of Lebanon Valley 
College, including those united by a common loyalty 
to Jesus Christ and those of various o+her creeds, feels 
its responsibility to meet the spiritual, intellectual, and 
social needs of the entire campus community. In this 
fellowship the members ore encouraged to seek to 
understand the will of God through worship, study, 
and action, and strive to express this will in personal 
living and community life." 

With these guiding words stated in its newly revised 
constitution, the Student Christian Association carries 
out its many programs. It has sponsored informal dis- 



cussion groups, dormitory devotions, weekend retreats, 
Campus Chest, International Weekend and numerous 
other activities. 

The organization, which is theoretically composed of 
all students, is affiliated with YMCA and YWCA on a 
national level. Its governing body, SCA Cabinet, re- 
turns to campus early each year to greet the freshmen. 
The annual skit, a meet-the-faculty reception, and the 
Big and Little Sister and Brother program are among 
the interesting devices utilized to introduce freshmen 
to many aspects of college life. 



96 



Delta Tau Chi 



Delta Tau Chi (Servants of Christ) is consecrated to 
the ideal of Christian service and fellowship. Its mem- 
bership includes students v^ho are interested in church 
vocations or active lay leadership. 

The activity of Delta Tau Chi is evidenced in tangible 
ways both on and off campus. Morning Prayers during 



the week and the Upper Room are provided as inspi- 
ration for the busy college student. 

Carrying music, meditation programs and mirth, 
members of DTC go out from Lebanon Valley to wide- 
ranging churches on Sundays and to various institu- 
tions for monthly meetings. 




OFFICERS, ROW 1: Fred Crider, Deputations Chairman; Larry Plymire, President; Kenneth Peiffer, Vice- 
President. ROW 2: Merrill Hassinger, Chaplain; Morylin Shaver, Treasurer; Kay Steiner, Secretory; James 
Corbett, Student Faculty Repesentative. 



ROW 1: J. Corbett, R. Crider, M. Shaver, L. Plymire, K. Peiffer, K. Steiner, 
M. Hassinger. ROW 2: W. Newcomer, E. Conrad, N. Butler, R. Felty, S. Taynton, 
H. Dom, D. Pierce, G. Bull. ROW 3: W. Closer, C. Myers, N. Morris, H. Myer, 



■^s» wmmsi 



JSii"*^, 





i»#* 



J. Newton, R. Foley, G. Weaver, C. Arnett. ROW 4: R. Beistline, J. Britcher, 
C. Rife, Dr. Bemesderfer, S. Shubrooks, D. Drumheller, G. Smith, K. Wise, 
J. Haupt. 




WT' 



Chapel Choir 




ROW 1: P. Sue Smith, J. Bisbing, D. Ingle, S. K. Schreiber, B. Shupp, S. Brown, M. Bollman, J. Stringer, J. Newton, G. Fitzkes. ROW 3: R. Felty, R. Fredriksen, 
R. Grim, G. Bechtel. ROW 2: S. Landis, A. Grove, J. Kressler, N. Dohringer, M. Hendrix, R. Foley, F. Eppley, W. Smith. 



The need has been felt for several years for a choir 
to handle all the music each Tuesday in Chapel. Mr. 
Pierce Getz, of the music department, organized just 
such a group at the end of last year. This year, under 
his direction, the Chapel Choir delivered the musical 
portions of our chapel services, accompanied at the 
organ by various organists from the Music Department. 



In view of the fact that the Chape! Choir is an in- 
novation to our campus and is a volunteer group of 
approximately thirty-two voices, their quality of per- 
formance is especially worthy of praise. Membership 
is not limited to music majors, but is open to, and in- 
cludes at present non-music majors. 



98 



La Vie Collegiene 




Co-Editors-in-Chief: Peter H. Riddle, Jean M. Kauffman. 



SEATED: D. Flinchbaugh, Photography Editor; D. Poff, Exchange Editor; C. Myers, 
Feature Editor; K. Kreider, News Editor; P. Riddle, Co-Editor-in-Chief; J. Kauffman, 
Co-Editor-in-Chief; W. Hawk, Business Manager. STANDING: B. Graham, G. Bull, 
P. Shonk, N. Napier, M. Haines, S. Huber, C. Bingman, M. Lamke, S. Smith. 




La Vie Collegienne is a growing newspaper striving 
to report interestingly and accurately all events which 
take place on our growing campus. Editorials, features, 
photographs, cartoons, and Letters to the Editors as 
well as news articles are included in this publication. 
All these attempt to stimulate student interest in and 
action on collegiate, national, and international affairs. 
Often they serve to demonstrate the humor of college 
life. 

With the help of many students, faculty, and admin- 
istrative personnel, copy is collected and prepared for 
La Vie. The four-page, five column newspaper is pub- 
lished bi-weekly except during examination periods. A 
one-page "extra" as well as six- and eight-page editions 
appear occasionally to inform the campus of special 
events. 



99 



Quittie 



STAFF, KNEELING: V, Templeton, C. 
Myers, N. Morris, D. Bressler, M. 
Shaver, M. Lamke, R. Juno. SIT- 
TING: M. Haines, J. Vowler, L. Grebe, 
I. Miller, S. Stetier, B. McCiean, J. 
Freed. STANDING: J. Adams, <. Hof- 
fer, L. Gluyas, B. Williams, C. Seidel, 
M. Bollman, R. Barnes, A. Stephonis, 
J. Kline, G. Conrath, J. Kauffmon, J. 
Cashion. 



Contrasts can be found even in the production of the 
1962 Quittapohillo. Many features of its history vary 
significantly from the histories of preceding Lebanon 
Valley yearbooks. 

Along with the junior staff members, three sophomore 
staff members were chosen in the spring of 1960. Editor- 
in-chief, Carl Rife, attended the Columbia Press Con- 
ference in the spring and visited the publishing com- 
pany in the summer of 1960. He found there many new 
ideas on modern yearbook publication. 

It is hoped that some of these new ideas, the experi- 
ence gained by the sophomore staff members and the 
filing cabinet presented by the class of 1962 will facili- 
tate the production of future Quittapahillas. 



EDITORIAL STAFF, Left to right: B. Shirk, M. Rinker, D. Bacostow, C. Rife, P. Wise, 
G. Hiltner, C. Smith. 





Editor-in-chief: Carl Rife 
Associate Editors; Patsy Wise, Blaine Shirk 
Business Manager: Donald Bacastow 
Layout Chairman: George Hiltner 
Copy Chairman: Marilyn Rinker 
Photography Chairman: Carol Smith 
Secretarial Chairman: Patsy Wise 
Faculty Advisor: Rev. Bruce C. Souders 



BUSINESS STAFF, SEATED: D. Bacostow, J. Adams. 
STANDING: G. Conrath, C. Seidel, R. Barnes. 




Psychology Club 

The Psychology Club utilizes many interesting stimuli 
to create interest in its field. With the assistance of 
advisor. Dr. Jean Love, several prominent speakers, 
including Dr. McKeachi of the University of Michigan 
and Dr. Prentice, Dean of Sv^arthmore College, have 
been secured. To the newly enlarged and redeco- 
rated psychology laboratory the club donated a new 
coffee pot. A springtime trip to a mental institution or 
a New York play with a psychological basis was antic- 
ipated as a final reward for a year of hard work and 
much pleasure. 





ROW 1: A. Hartman; L. Holstein, B. Williams, A. Sfephanis, H. Fitzgerald, 
A. Moss, B. McElwee, M. Bollman. ROW 2: K. Potterson, L. Weber, D. Pierce. 
ROW 3: S. Wisler, F. Niedziolek, B. Slatcher. 



OFFICERS: Hiram Fitzgerald, President; Stephen Whisler, Vice-President; 
Kathy Patterson, Secretory-Treasurer. 



Political Science Club 




ROW 1: W, Rigler, L. Weber, J 
Kline, R. Bell. ROW 2: B. Buck- 
waiter, G. Crown, A. Haven, A 
Bowman, E. Wolfe, G. Stanson 
E. Peters, T. Donley. ROW 3: W 
Rohrbach, M. Haven, D. Cher 
nich, Q. Goncalves, L. Moyer, B 
Donfelt. 



OFFICERS: James Bemesderfer, 

Treasurer; Doris Kohl, Secretory; 

Mr. Fehr, Advisor; James Reilly, 

President; Peter Silldorff, Vice- 
President. 



The presidential election year of 1960 found the 
Political Science Club one of the busiest organizations 
on campus. In an effort to give practical training in the 
mechanics of government and stimulate interest in all 
phases of political science, the club added a mock 
national election, a joint panel discussion with Student 




Christian Association, and the late-hour viewing of 
election returns in the College Lounge to its regular 
activities. Outstanding among the latter was partici- 
pation in the annual Intercollegiate Conference on 
Government. 



101 



Math Club 



The rapid growth of the mathematics and physics 
department is reflected in the increasing member- 
ship and activities of the Math Club. Founded in 
1958, the organization provides interesting and use- 
ful information to its members through student- 
planned programs, lectures, demonstrations and dis- 
cussions by guest speakers, and field trips through 
industries and agencies. A monthly seminar system 
has also been established in which students assist 
each other in solving mathematical problems. 



OFFICERS, Left to right: J. Bowman, Vice-President; Mr. Henning, Advisor; 
H. Lehn, President; A. Green, Secretary-Treasurer. 




SEATED: B. Brown, B. Liddicl<, J. Boyle, A. Green, D. Murray, 
P. Young, R. Brill, G. Brownowell, H. Hossel, H. Lehn, J. 
Bowman, J. Green. STANDING: Dr. Bissinger, Mr. Henning, 
G. Plitnik, D. Hively, K. Hurst. 




OFFICERS: Mr. Lockwood, Advisor, D. Magnelli, 
Treasurer; R. Michael, President; B. Wogish, Sec- 
retary; S. Shubrooks, Student-Faculty Represen- 
tative; D. Flinchbaugh, Vice-President. 



Chemistry Club 



KNEELING: F. Filer, C. Jorboe, R. Hofer, R. 
Kahon, G. Smith, K. Whisler, D. Czirr. STAND- 
ING: Mr. Lockwood, J. Adams, M. Rodriguez, 
L. Sponcake, B. Williams, J. Brommer, F. Grove, 
P. McDyer, A. Bowman, R. Hobig, K. Feather, K. 
Light. 



Science and socializing are integral elements compounding the 
Chemistry Club as reflected in "Filtrates and Residues," the club 
newspaper. 

Field trips to various industries and to graduate schools of chem- 
istry as well as programs presented by guest speakers and helping 
in the "Science for a Day" program contribute to the technical 
aspect. 

"Monte Carlo Night," the annual Dinner Dance, and the spring 
picnic provided balance to the formula for learning and pleasure. 




Left to right: J. Boyle, President; L. 
Stein, S. Diener, L. Naylor, H. Hos- 
Kell, G. Hiltner, S. Gerhort. 




French Club 



The French Club appeals to all students interested in 
the language and culture of France. The members 
augment their interest by attaining an understanding 
of the French -- their civilization, their aesthetics and 



culture, and their mother tongue. Guest speakers and 
discussions further this development. Caroling in French 
with the Adult French Club during the Christmas season 
is a favorite activity. 



Green Blotter 



Green Blotter, L.V.C.'s creative writing organization, 
encourages the literary inclinations of its members, 
who are chosen on the merits of their try-out man- 
uscripts. Gary DeHart, hleod Scop, and Dr. George 
Struble, advisor, lead the informal discussions of past 



and contemporary literature,- and members read their 
own writings for idea and criticisms by the group. This 
year a pamphlet was planned to exhibit these crea- 
tive efforts. 




SEATED: G. DeHart, Head Scop; J. Kauff- 
man, M. Lomke. STANDING: R. Garwood, 
N. Nopier. 




ROW 1: O. Binner, L. Weber, J. Vowler. B. Shupp, D. Shearer, D. Ingle. ROW 2: J. 
Snowberger, H. Umholtz, S. Witte, J. Johnston, B. Speicher, H. Kehler. ROW 3; F. 
Weik, M. Weinert, N. Rettig, K. Patterson, B. Williams, E. Moore, B. Brown. ROW 4: 
J. Levine, E. Black, N. Fenstermacher, X. Hoffer, S. Kelly, K. Baurenfeind. ROW 5: E. 
Miller, S. Brown, J. Hommerschmidt, S. Schreiber, K. Schreiber, B. Smith, B. McClean. 



SEATED: J. Melnick, M. Bollman, J. Turner, G. Zeller, L Rank, S. Bucher, 
President. STANDING: K. Kreider, S. Hjber, A. Hartmon. 



Student PSEA Club 



Future teachers turn to their professional organiza- 
tion, the Student PSEA, for opportunities to develop 
their teaching practices and growth as educators. The 
George D. Gossard Chapter at LVC provides such 
opportunities through programs directed at their 



professional consciousness and through its membership 
in the PSEA and the Notional Education Association. 
The Christmas Party, Sundae night, and contribution 
to County Fair highlight the group's yearly activities. 



Childhood Education Club 



Interest in teaching primary school children unites 
the members of the Childhood Education Club. Meet- 
ings aim toward directing this concern into the develop- 
ment of modern teaching techniques. 



The program this year enhanced such development 
by featuring speakers with backgrounds in education. 
The Annual Christmas Party provided members with a 
unique professional and personal experience. 



KNEELING: K. Patterson, E. Sa- 
baka, J. Kressler, J. Snowberger, 
H. Umholtz, E. Sweigart, P. 
Beyer, L. Rank, S. Schreiber. 
SiniNG: K. Baurenfeind, L. 
Grebe, Student-Faculty Represen- 
tative; K. Kreider, publicity chair- 
man: J. Melnick, secretary: S. 
Witte, vice president; C. Myers, 
president; J. Myers, treasurer. 
STANDING: K. Schreiber, B. Wil- 
liams, A. Moss, S. Kelley, N. Mor- 
ris, M. Shaver, J. Nichols, J. John- 
ston, B. Speicher, E. Vastine, P. 
Fitz, C. Smith. 





SEATED: R. Barnes, treasurer; W. Baker, president; D. Pierce, vice president; R. Wenger, secretary. STAND- 
ING: S. Hock, L. Schlegel, J. Dressel, Student-Faculty representative; C. Seidel, J. Reilly. 



Debate Club 



The Debate Club was formed in the spring of 1960 
to encourage forensic activity at Lebanon Valley. Knowl- 
edge of principles of debate and excellence in de- 
bating practices are additional aims of club members. 

Moving toward a realization of these goals, mem- 



bers participated in the college's first inter-collegiate 
debate since 1948, arranged an Annual Speech Day 
open to all students, and made plans for a debate 
tournament featuring six schools. 



Ski Club 



The Ski Club brings skiing activities to the students 
in the hope of not only attracting those already famil- 
iar with the sport, but also introducing other adven- 
turous persons to the joys of the snowy slopes. These 



ski enthusiasts plan to make their winter trip to the 
Poconos an annual activity, in addition to their usual 
excursions to local ski areas. 




Left to right: J. Coen, B. Wil- 
liams, J. Bisbing, S. Lane, B. Wil- 
liams, E. Walter, M. Rodriguez. 



Wig and Buckle 




"Everytime I try to propose, she gets o phone 



The world of the theatre enters the campus 
through the activities of Wig and Buckle. Members, 
each of them interested in some phase of dramatics, 
practice their specialties by participating in the pro- 
ductions and develop their interests by joining their 
fellow thespians in jaunts to theatrical events in the 
area. 

Entertainment planned by — and often featuring 
— club members, frequently highlights the meetings. 
The annual party, too, emphasizes dramatic ingenuity 
and includes the famous Wig and Buckle brand of 
charades. The yearly trip, with New York City as its 
tentative destination, offers opportunities for mem- 
bers to scrutinize current developments in their art. 

An atmosphere of mutual recognition of talent 
and of fellowship in enjoying and understanding the 
theatre is the outstanding contribution of the club to 
its participants. 

The society provided LVC Day with Three for the 
Show, Volume II, an evening of three one-act plays 
directed by Mr. James L. Kline. Members anticipated 
the spring airing of a three-act musical. 



SEATED: G. Bull, Secretary; G. Smith, Presi- 
dent; J. Kline, Advisor; G. Hiltner, D. Bou- 
renfeind, M. Sypulo, D. Kohl, B. Speicher. 
STANDING: N. Rettig, F. Niedziaiek, J. 
Earley, L. Weber, S. Diener, J. Johnston, 
J. Green, K. Blekicki. 




"Here I am again, woiting for her to hang up the phone.' 



k 





"So, friends, buy a Volkswagon bus and you'll 
have all the room you'll ever need." 




"One too many or once too often?" 




"See, gang, we went to church, tool" 




"Gee, this kid must have I.S. 301" 





ROW 1: J. Freed, C. Smith, K. Baurenfeind, S. Kelly, K. Hughes, K. Patterson, I. 
Miller, M. Paullin, B. McElwee, O. Binner, E. Moore. ROW 2; B. Williams, N. 
Dutro, W. Barnhart, A. Moss, G. Fitzkee, S. Smith, J. Kressler, L. Grebe, A. 
Horfmon, S. Bucher, R. Juno, B. Wogish. ROW 3: S. Marshall, J. Myers, N. 
Napier, F. Niedziaiek, N. Morris, M. Shaver, S. Lone, O. Gluyas, S. Stetler, M. 



Bollmon, B. Williams, G. Schlegel. ROW 4: S. Huber, J. Taylor, C. Bingmon, P. 
Derbyshire, D. Koncor, D. Kohl, N. Fenstermacher, M. Metzger, P. Cotter, J. 
Rice, L. McWilliams, N. Warner, M. Rinker, M. Blomquist, M. Haines, S. Tayn- 
ton, B. Brown. 



Women's Athletic Association 



OFFICERS: ROW 1: Kothy Patterson, President; Koy Hughes, Treasurer; Iso- 
bel Miller, Vice-President. ROW 2: Marcia Paullin, Secretary; Liz Moore, 
Student-Faculty Representative. 




For the active campus co-ed, the Women's Athletic 
Association offers unlimited opportunities to participate 
in a variety of intramural sports as well as in varsity 
basketball and hockey. Volleyball, ping-pong, archery, 
basketball, badminton, swimming, hiking, softball, and 
bowling round out the extensive intramural program. 
Upon accumulating the required number of points for 
participation, any member is eligible to receive a gold 
"i" pin or a blazer. 

In October two delegates attended the state W.A.A. 
Conference, returning with a greater possession of skills 
and a fund of new ideas for the improvement of our pro- 
gram. New members, received in May, joined in a 
rugged, but enjoyable, initiation period and were re- 
worded for their enthusiastic attitude with a picnic held 
in their honor. The annual banquet at the close of the 
second semester offered the new initiates an opportunity 
to display their talent and creativity by participating in 
the freshman skit. At this affair also, the new officers 
and sport leaders were chosen and the awards were 
presented. In the spring an All-Sports Night, at which 
the intramural champions were honored, was a fitting 
climax for a year of perpetual sports activity. 



108 



ROW 1; R. Uchtenwalter, C. Rhine. ROW 2: D. Winters, H. Yost, D. Mulhol- 
land. ROW 3: L. Holstein, V. Magnuson, I. Bechtel. 



L-V Club 




Under the capable leadership of Vern Magnuson, 
the L-Club has become one of the most active organi- 
zations on campus. Membership in this club requires an 
athlete to have earned a letter in at least one varsity 
sport. Anyone seen outfitted in a navy blue jacket with 
a chenille "LV" is bound to be one of this select group. 
As a display of their versatility, talented members have 
formed a chorus which performs throughout the year at 
such events as the Homecoming Dance held in October 
and the May Day pageant in spring. 

The annual Homecoming Day events were a product 
of the LV-Club's efforts — the selection of the campus 
queen, her coronation at the football gome, and her 
reign over the Homecoming Dance. To climax the year's 
activities a banquet was held in honor of the outstanding 
athletes, and the coveted awards were distributed to 
deserving players. 



ROW 1: L. Brogan, secretary; R. Stull, treasurer; S. Wisler, vice president; V. 
Magnuson, president; G. Stombochi, assistant secretary; R. Urey, G. Weaver. ROW 
2: D. Winters, B. Hawk, C. Rtiine, H. Yost, C. Lowers, B. Slatcher, A. Tru- 
jillo, W. Dellinger. ROW 3: D. Mulholland, R. Earp, H. Yajko, J. Zola, C. Rife, 
V. Stouffer, H. Von de Water, R. Ward, L. Godshall. ROW 4: M. Gephart, B. 
Keinard, J. Kreider, F. Porrino, R. Bornes, J. Heath, S. Koczorowskl, Mr. Mc- 
Cracken, L. Holstein. 



I -^^M 




I "■ \ 



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Cheerleaders 



Leading the cheers which encouraged our teams this 
year were two veteran members and five new members 
of the Lebanon Valley cheering squad. During both 
football and basketball seasons, in rain or in shine, and 
at home or at away games, these enthusiastic girls 
helped stimulate the spirit of the many fans. In the 
course of the year, several new cheers were intro- 
duced, and band accompaniment was added to these 



as well as to some of the already-known cheers. Led 
by the squad, pep rallies on campus and parades 
through the town did much to incite enthusiasm within 
the student body. These girls, headed by Liz Gluyas, 
will all return to their positions next year and with the 
addition of only one freshman the 1961-62 squad will 
be complete. 



Olivia Gluyas 



Doris Kohl 



Francis Niedziolek 





Elizabeth Vastine 



Judy Tonno 



Patricia Derbyshire 



Nancy Dutro 




SOCIETIES 



Inter Society Council 




OFFICERS: Barry Danfelt, Liz Gluyas, Harry Yost. 



Social events reflecting the interests of the 250 mem- 
bers of the five social organizations on campus attested 
to the success of the Inter-Society Council, which began 
experimentally in 1959. ISC, composed of two represen- 
tatives each from Clio, Philo, Delphian, Kalo, and the 
Knights of the Valley, has as its major aims the pro- 
motion of social affairs on campus and the betterment 
of club inter-relations. 

Seeking to make the College Lounge a campus cen- 
ter, ISC has undertaken the sponsorship of several 
frammises — a campus innovation consisting of an in- 
formal social affair at the lounge with a jazz combo, 
records, and refreshments. The fall dance following 
formal society initiations was also a co-operative effort by 
which the separate Rush Week activities of the societies 
culminated in a joint social event. 

Through frequent meetings and the requirement of 
100% society approval for major decisions, the Inter- 
Society Council has created enthusiasm and support in 
its effort to strengthen L.V.C.'s reputation of friendship. 



KNEELING: B. Buckwalfer, S. Kaczorowski, S. Wisler. STANDING: C. Bronson, N. Dutro, 
Williams, L. Gluyas, B. Danfelt, H. Yost. 



Bechtel, B. 




Ill 



A AL 



SEATED: S. Stetler, Vice-president; C. Bronson, President; 
STANDING: B. Williams, Recording secretary; I. Miller, 
Treasurer; M. Bollman, Corresponding secretary. 




November 19 marked the formal initiation of fresh- 
men into Delta Lambda Sigma. This formal initiation 
highlighted Delphian's Rush Week activities of a hat 
show, open house, pledging, informal initiation, and 
dress-up day. 

The new members helped to participate in Del- 
phian's many money-making projects — a car wash. 



sale of contemporary cards, and hat shows — and 
many aided Kalo, their brother organization, in the 
sale of Kalo mugs and pretzels. Throughout the year, 
Delphian also co-operated with Kalo in several social 
affairs, the most important being the annual K-D Din- 
ner Dance. 




Seated: ROW 1: P. Boyer, B. Lidle, J. Dixon, P. Bean, J. Snowberger, G. Fitzkee, 
C. Reed, J. Vowler, C. Hemperly, J. Kressler, E. Walter, M. Weinert, J. Bright- 
haupt. ROW 2: M. Evans, K. Hoffer, S. Engle, R. Juno, J. Miller, L. Rank, O. 
Binner, J. Meinick, P. Blomquist, P. Cotter, K. Schreiber, K. Bauernfeind, J. 
Myers. ROW 3: A. Hartman, B. Smith, A. Pingel, B. Storoker, J. Grossi, P. 




Davis, L. Moore, D. Seller. STANDING: S. Lane, P. Fitz, K. Kreider, J. Hammer- 
schmidt, J. Chapman, S. Bucher, G. Bechtel, G. Kressler, N. Felsburg, G. Sch- 
legel, J. Stringer, L. Weber, K. Skewis, B. Wogisch, P. Wise, L. Sfephanis, 
K. Potterson. 



ROW 1: J. Nichols, L. Vastine, 
C. Tipton, L. Hill, J. Cossel, H. 
Pisle, R. Greim, L. Schlegel, E. 
Orchard, L. Bechner, N. Dah- 
ringer. ROW 2: J. Lied, B. 
Robinson, S. Schreiber, J. 
Tanno, C. Klock, B. Williams, 
S. Willman, D. Hosier, M. 
Greenfield, K. Resch, J. Keiper, 
J. Ruhl, C. Deicher, J. Baker, S. 
Diener. STANDING: S. Gerhardt, 
C. Hoffman, P. Jones, D. Ingle, 

B. Shupp, S. Leonard, C. Lasky, 
L. Shubrooks, L. Lewis, J. Aungst, 

C. Derk, B. Speicher, J. Johns- 
ton. 




KAL 



SITTING: Barry Danfelt, Gary DeHort, Bill Hawk. 
STANDING: Donald Drumheller, Stan Kaczorowski, Vance 
Stouffer, Joseph Coen, Dean Wetzel, Lowell Brogan. 



The overwhelming majority of L.V.C. dormitory rooms 
adorned with Kalo mugs and Kolo pretzels pays tribute 
to the success of the high-pressure salesmen of Kappa 
Lambda Sigma and its helpful sister, Delphian. Sale of 
contemporary cards and a car-wash were also joint 
endeavors. 



In addition to such money-making projects, Kalo con- 
tributed to campus life with a jazz concert, the fall 
K-D Kickoff Dance, and the witty newspaper, Kapp La 
Sig. 

Highlights of the Kalo year were the annual formal 
dinner-dance and the stag banquet. 







ROW 1: D. Shearer, R. Ward, M. Gephart, G. DeHart, D. Drumheller. ROW 2: 
L. Brogan, L. Sheaffer, B. Hawk, B. Danfelt, S. Kaczorowski, T. Balsbaugh, B. 
Shirk. ROW 3: R. Lichtenwalter, B. Tackas, L. Rover, C. Lowers, V. Mognuson, 



D. Wetzel, B. Stull, J. Cashion. ROW 4: C. Rife, J. Kobylorz, B. Meyer, B. 
Slatcher, H. Vandeboch, V. Stouffer, J. Coen, R. Garwood, L. Godshall. 




Left to right: R. Kresge, E. 

Spohr, S. Hildreth, T. Lenker, L. 

Copland. Absent: M. Lenker, L. 
Wittle, K. Showers. 



KAN 





SEATED: P. Derbyshire, Treasurer; E. Black, Vice-President; 
O. Gluyas, President; B. McElwee, Corresponding Secretary. 
STANDING: C. Smith, M. Rinker, N. Dutro, L. Breeze, B. 
Brown. 



SEATED: C. Hock, S. Gerhort, E. Noylor, I. Gotchel. STANDING: P. Schorodin, J. Witmon, 
A. Kurr, H. Hoskeil, P. McDyer, M. Colgon, L. Ensminger. 



This year's Clio initiates traditionally familiarized 
themselves v^ith the patron goddess of Kappa Lambda 
Nu by scrubbing Clio's statue of Minerva v\/ith tooth- 
brushes. Formerly a literary society, Clio has aban- 
doned its scholarly endeavors for social ones,- but 
Minerva continues to v^atch over the Clio room. 

Under the guidance of their new advisor, Dr. Sara 



E. Piel, Clio members throughout the year engaged in 
several moneymaking projects in order to sponsor 
social events which were climaxed with the annual din- 
ner-dance with their brother organization, Philo. Bi- 
weekly business meetings were supplemented with 
skits, outside speakers, fashion shows, and teas. 



SEATED: J. Freed, E. Bowman, E. Gluyas, M. Metzger, N. Fenstermocher, B. Williams, S. Marshall. 
STANDING: D. Koncor, C. Hake, L. McWiilioms, A. Grove, S, Brown, C. Mogee, L. Grebe, M. Haines, D. 
Bressler, M. Miller, B. Hawkins, F. Niedziolek, D. Kohl, S. Smith. 



1 





SEATED: W. Atland, B. Andreozzi, G. Thomas, G. Waltz, K. Homan, W. Suddeth, L. Ledebur, 
H. Bessel. STANDING: B. Albon, J. Cromer, J. Beck, B. Kauffrran, T. Prentice, K. Lee, J. 
Etter, J. Yost, T. Bonscll. 




KNEELING: H. Lehn, Vice-president; H. Yost, President; 8. 
Rigler, Recording Secretary; STANDING: B. Lidston, Chap- 
lain; J. Bechtel; R. Michael, Treasurer; S. Shubrooks, Cor- 
responding Secretary; A. Hollinger, Student-Faculty. 



Phi Lambda Sigma celebrated its ninety-third anni- 
versary this year, signifying its position as the oldest 
fraternal organization on campus. 

This year Philo assumed the sponsorship of dances 
after the basketball games and as in the past, organ- 
ized the annual Alumni-Varsity basketball game. Philo 



members participated actively and successfully in the 
campus intramural program. Highlights of the year 
v^ere Clio-Philo weekend, planned in accord with 
Philo's sister organization, and a "Philo only" affair 
— the stag banquet, where graduating seniors were 
honored. 



ROW 1: S. Shubrooks, R. Michael, J. Bechtel, H. Lehn, H. Yost, B. Li.idstrom, Dr. Rhodes. ROV\/ 2: J. 
Seymour, H. Lys, D. Winters, K. Beck, D. Magnelli, R. Kahon. ROW 3: D. Bocostow, F. Thompson, J. Adams, 
A. Hollinger, M. Wert, L. Rudy, B. Rigler. 





Knights of 
the Valley 



STANDING: Joseph Hooper, Russel Urey, Woodrow Dellinger. SIT- 
TING: George Weaver, Eugene Stombach, Bruce Buckwalter, Hiram 
Fitzgerald. 



Scholarship, leadership, campus service, and loyalty 
are the basis for non-voluntary membership in the 
Knights of the Valley. Organized in 1941 as a chapter 
of the national fraternity. Kappa Sigma Kappa, the 
1 950 charter dropped the national affiliation. 

Advised by Dean Marquette and led by Bruce 
Buckwalter, president, the Knights serve the campus 
population weekly by distributing linen for the Gordon- 
Davis laundry service. They are active in strengthen- 
ing alumni ties, and, to this end, hold the annual 
Alumni Banquet in the evening of Homecoming Day 
each year. 



In accordance with its aims of scholarship and serv- 
ice, this service organization presents two awards an- 
nually to students who have demonstrated these 
qualities. The Chuck Maston Award is a trophy given 
each spring to on outstanding athlete, and the Knights 
of the Valley Award is a monetary stipend awarded 
annually to a deserving student. In addition to these 
awards, the Knights present yearly trophies to the 
outstanding athletes in each major sport. 

Promoting fellowship and good will among its mem- 
bers as well as among the student body at large, the 
Knights hold a dinner-dance in the spring of each year. 



ROW 1: W. Renzulli, S. Wisler, L. Holstein, B. Bucl<walter, K. Wise, A. 
Trujillo. ROW 2; J. Zola, B. Keinard, G. Weover, R. Bell. ROW 3: K. 



Girard, H. Fitzgerald, R. Rhine, J. Hooper, G. Hiltner, G. Sfarrbach, 
R. Badgley, R. Urey, W. Dellinger. 




White Hats 



Head White HatS: Amy Hartman, Joe 
Coen. 




SEATED: O. Binner, K. Kreider, J. Freed, 
5. Stetler, B. Williams, I. Miller. STAND- 
ING: B. Storaker, L. McKinney, M. Evans, 
B. McElwee, P. Shonk, P. Cotter. 




SEATED: J. Walker, E. Peters, L. Wittie, B. 
Danfelt, W. Renzulli, B. Baker, A. Trujillo. 
STANDING: H. Lehn, K. Girard, G. Hiltner, 
P. Young, T. Bolsbough, R. Andreozzi, B. 
Keinord. 



Another innovation at Lebanon Valley this year was 
the formation of an initiating body known as the 
White Hats. This group consisted of twenty-six members 
representing the senior, junior, and sophomore classes 
and each organization on campus. The purpose of this 
Senate-backed body was to plan and to carry out a 
freshman initiation program which would instill within 
the class a feeling of unity. 

To the freshman who was found "out of order" by a 



White Hat, demerits were given. Upon accumulating a 
specific number of demerits, this freshman would ap- 
pear before a Tribunal of White Hats where he would 
plead his case. After hearing his plea, the White Hats 
would mete out his punishment. 

Throughout the initiation period, the White Hats con- 
ducted Frosh Frolics and, at the close of the final Frosh 
Frolic, held a party for the entire freshman class. 



117 



Alpha Phi Omego 




ROW 1: G. Myers, J. Brammer, D. Flinchbaugh, Secretary; D. Winter, President; Krueger. ROW 3; R. Shope, L. Miller, W. Stump, L. Spancake, R. Habig, R. Herwig, 

H. Vanderbach, Vice-President; D. Czirr, F. Crider, A. Kreiser. ROW 2: J. Haupt, C. Martin, G. Cronrath, F. Eppley, M. Hassinger. 

J. Matsko, G. Plitnik, R. Foley, J. Winond, D. Burns, T. Kent, R. Haring, W. 



With a formal ceremony on May 22, 1960, Nu Delta 
chapter of Alpha Phi Omega received its notional 
charter. Long before it received its national recogni- 
tion this Service Fraternity received campus recogni- 
tion. It is this group of male students who have 
had previous training as scouts and who still desire to 



maintain a service relationship with the scouting move- 
ment which set up the school's Civil Defense program. 
APO sponsors the Ugly Man on Campus contest and 
dance and holds a used-book sale each spring. This 
year it is credited with initiating the Lebanon Valley 
College Blood Bank. 



118 



ROW 1; L. Sholley, secretary- 
treasurer; D. Bacastow, J. Re illy, 
president; Mr. Tom, advisor. ROW 
2: S. Taynton, Student-Faculty 
representative; J. Smith, R. Hurst, 
W. Rigler, vice-president. ROW 3: 
B. Light, R. Bell. 




Outstanding students of the social sciences are hon- 
ored and further educated in Nu chapter of Pi Gamma 
Mu. This national social science honor society has 
existed in the United States since 1924 and at Leba- 
non Valley College since 1 939. 



At least twenty credit hours and a "B" average in 
the social sciences as well as class rank and a college 
record devoid of "F's" are membership requirements. 



Pi Gamma Mu 



Alpha Psi Omega 



This notional honorary dramatic fraternity elects 
students to membership as a means of recognizing their 
attainment in college theatre. Specific standards of 
participation in dramatics determine such election to 
membership, and students who so qualify ore inducted 
in an impressive ceremony prescribed by the Grand 



Cast of the national society. The Rho Eta Cast of LVC 
was "assembled" in the spring of 1960 in affiliation 
with Wig and Buckle. It purposes to stimulate interest 
in dramatic activities at the college and to secure for 
Lebanon Valley the advantages provided by a large 
national honorary fraternity. 



Left to right: Mr. Kline, advisor; 
G. Hiltner, D. Kohl, M. Burche, 
vice-president, secretary; M. Lamke, 
treasurer; G. Smith, president. 





SITTING: J. Bowman, J, Fox, B. Miller, G. Eckenroth, A. Hollinger. STANDING: J. Bowman, J. Tyson, G. 
Ehrhart, J. Gruber, G. Plitnick, R. Orndorf, R. Wenger. 



Newly-formed last fall, the Physics Club is a student 
organization affiliated with the American Institute of 
Physics. Membership in the club, open to all physics 
majors and students taking advanced courses in the 
physics department, entitles interested participants to 
receive Physics Today and other publications of the 
A. I. P. Meetings are planned with the co-operation of 



the mathematics, chemistry, and physics departments 
with the aim of encouraging the study of these aspects 
of physics not encouraged in the classroom. One of the 
future aims of the club is the direction of the annual 
Science-for-a Day Program, formerly undertaken by 
the physics department. 



Physics Club 



Tri Beta 



Helping to stimulate interest in the field of biology 
for all students is the Alpha Zeta Chapter of Tri- 
Beta, a national honorary biological society. Member- 
ship in this society is of two types — provisional mem- 
bership, which is open to all students having an inter- 
est in biology and who, after one semester of residence, 
have maintained at least a "B" average in forty per- 
cent of their grades; and active membership, which 



can be obtained after four semesters of residence by 
those who have a grade of "B" or above in at least 
eighty percent of their biology courses and in at least 
fifty percent of all subjects. 

Activities undertaken by this group include the 
showing of films, the assistance at "Science for a Day," 
and the sponsoring of an annual banquet. 



KNEELING: G. Myers, G. Smith, R. Andreozzi, B. Shirk, B. Stull, R. Kahan. STANDING: R. Haring, A. 
Pingel, A. Fox, C. Hake, S. Marmaza, Dr. Wilson, Mr. Bollinger, Dr. Light, M. Sypula, R. Juno, S. Haigler, 
K. Hughes, B. Bixel, E. V\/alter, B. Renzulli. 






rf^. 





ROW 1: D. Poff, President; W. Nixon, Vice-President; C. Tobias, Student- Faculty 
Representative; T. DeWold, R. Lehmon, G. Zeller, Secretary; A. Green, R. Rotz, 
K. Hoys, L. McGrifF, J. Turner, M. Homon. ROW 2: G. Spengler, N. Miller, R. 



Lichtenwalter, pledgemoster; B. Docherty, D. Troutman, Alumni secretory; R. 
Poorman, R. Rocap, J. Hutchcroft, G. Miller, D. Shearer. 



Sinfonia 



The Iota Kappa Chapter of Phi Mu Alpha was an 
innovation to the Valley campus in the spring of 1960. 
Sinfonia, as it is more commonly known, is one of 
Valley's few national fraternities. It is a professional 
music fraternity whose membership is open to any male 
having an interest in music and a medium of musical 
performance. Highlights of this year's activities were 
the Minstrel show in January and the All American 
Concert in April, both of which promise to be annual 



events. 

Phi Mu Alpha holds two pledge periods. First semes- 
ter pledging is open to upperclassmen only. Second 
semester pledging is open to both freshmen and up- 
perclassmen. 

A "C" average is necessary to become a pledge. 
David Poff, as senior in the Music Department, was 
Sinfonia's very able president this year. 



121 






Society 




H^H|pk .. v^Ng|iwM||| Xp ''vtHflBK 


■■■■,■ ^■■. ■■-» 




hHhH^Hk liv w ^ ^ - 



Do we have to conform? 



Mr. Kolo and Miss Delphian: Dick Garwood and Amy Hart- 
man. 



But we just came from the beauty shop. 



TOP: Kleenex, Kleenex everywhere, but please don't use to 

blow! 

BOTTOM: Please, Mrs. Sullivan, I don't wanna clean. 





Life 





The three little lambs who have gone astray — ba, boa, baa. 



TOP: Charles Sherman directs the jazz band at an Inter-Society Council Frammis. 
BOTTOM: Yg gotta have charm! 




Don't you wish everybody did? 



And here the young sophisticates who moke all this possible 



li^-^ 




WHAT HAPPENED IN . . . 



MARCH, 1960 

1—3: Looking around the chapel one finds a peculiar sight. Even the usual 
letter-writers ore completely absorbed in the words of the speaker. 
Rev. James M. Singer. This doesn't happen often, 

4: All the girls on campus swoon as they get a look at some of the 
"he-men" from other colleges — those handsome MASCAC wrestlers. 

5: L.V. claims the heavyweight champ. Who? Why, "Tiny" Longenecker, 
who else! 

— L. V. will have a new academic dean. Dr. Carl Y. Ehrhart has been 
appointed to replace Dr. Howard M. Kreitzer. 

10: It's not Stan Kenton or Les Elgart; it's not even Lawrence Welk, but 
it is the Lebanon Valley College Girls' Band. Well, isn't that music? 
18—19: "And Then" there was K-D weekend — a variety show with all kinds 
of talent (?), a dinner-dance at Allen bury, and 2:30 permissions. 

— The 1962 Quittie stafT is getting a head stort; the editors have been 
named; the staff is completed, and things are ready to roll. 

31: The top brass at Indiantown Gap has an opportunity to hear the 
top brass of the L.V.C. Symphonic Band. 



APRIL, 1960 

7—8: There's music in the air as the Department of Music presents its spring 
festival. 
9: This is the Night of the Knights — their dinner-dance, that is. 
13: Overheard today — "Man, am I ever stiff!!" Why? The W.A.A. initia- 
tion was held lost night. 
— This seems to be a month for pranks. The center of campus has be- 
come a private parking lot for a black V.W.; some poor, defense- 
less rabbit isn't going to make it for Easter, and "What in the 
World?" are the hammer and sickle for? 
13—19: Well, home for Easter vacation — with colored eggs, ham. Jelly beans, 
egg nog, chocolate rabbits and, afer all that, 10 more pounds added 
to your weight. 
22—23: Shakespeare's "All Shook-up" for Clio-Philo weekend. Dean Faust and 
Professors Kline and Hollinger put forth their best dramatic efforts in 
a somewhat revised Shakespearian play. Society members and their 
dates dine and dance at the Holiday Motel. 
30: The Seniors "have a ball" at the Palm.yra Legion. 




MAY, 1960 

7: Scottish Lass, Jean Cunningham as May Queen pleases spectators; 

"Tiny" on the trampoline amuses sports fans; and the "Mystic Isle" 

enchonts dancers. Only the goldfish aren't impressed — but then 

would you like to be a centerpiece? 
15; Something new has been added to Valley — 

Fraternity. Something new has been added to 

members. 
JUNE, 1960 

4: There are big plans for the Alumni today 

and croft exhibit to the President's reception. 
5: They all finally made it — (graduation). At least most mode it. Well, 

some did, anyway. 



Pi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 
Sinfonia — twenty-six 



everything from an art 



SEPTEMBER, 1960 

11: Summer is now over, and a new kind of fun begins. The green frosh 

are arriving, not knowing what to expect from the upperclassmen and 

the White Hats. 
14: Moss confusion, as usual, marks the beginning of the semester. This 

confusion is commonly known as Registration. 
15: Today starts that old grind again — study less than you eat, and 

sleep less than you study. 
16: "Mock the profs and deans night" (or the S.C.A. skit) provides more 

amusement for the upperclassmen than for the freshmen. 
17: Many freshman gals snag freshman guys at the Faculty-Student 

Dance — and some keep them, too. 
23: Enthusiastic spirit is seen at the first pep rally and the K-D kickoff 

dance. 
24: And increasing the school spirit is L.V.'s 14—8 win over Wilkes. 



OCTOBER, 1960 

I : The referee signals for a time out, and the football fans see both 

Drexel and L.V. players on their hands and knees. What happened? 

Well, it seems that Fred Porrino lost a contact lens. Contact or no, 

L.V. still won. 
3: In what year was the college founded? Write two verses of the Alma 

Mater. Does that sound familiar, frosh? That's right — the L-Book 

test. 
8: If you want your car to be really clean, you had better get to the 

Quittie early. Those Delphian girls get pretty tired by the end of the 

day. 
15: There are big doings on campus today — the traditional tug-of-war 

and the traditional freshman loss; the crowning of Pat Jones as 

Homecoming Queen; the L.V. — Muhlenberg gome; the Wig and 

Buckle presentation of "Three for the Show"; and "Autumn Carousel," 

the College Day dance. Oh yes, one more detail — Valley lost to the 

Mules 27-12. Well, at least it didn't rain. 
24: The mad rush is now on for society pledges. 
28: What is this jazz? Why it's Charlie Sharman's jazz band swinging in 

a wild jazz preview at the Intersociety Frammis. 



NOVEMBER, 1960 

5: Between the rain and tears there's not a dry eye to be seen at Al- 
bright. Valley goes down to defeat by a score of 7—6, in the heart- 
break game of the season. 
8: Future Clionians get another dose of initiotion, as Minerva looks on. 
10: Delphian pledges, too, find another initiation hard to take. 
11 — 13: That "turn about" weekend is here again — Gander Weekend, when 
the rules of common courtesy are reversed. Some fellows think every 
weekend is Gander Weekend. 
18: Jazz goes to Engle as Kalo presents the Kap La Sig jazz band. 
19: In the dining hall, you say? That's right. That's where the ISC Dance 
was held. 
23—28: That long awaited vacation is upon us. It's a shame that there's so 
much studying to be done over Thanksgiving. 




124 



DECEMBER, 1960 

2: Any kind of entertainment and amusement can be found at the 
County Fair. The auction is of particular interest, especially if you 
want something that someone else wants. This is a big day for the 
Concert Choir ~~ an evening concert at the PMEA Convention in Har- 
risburg. 
9; Music majors and minors take time out from the practice room to 
attend their annual dinner-dance at the Palmyra Legion. 

10: Science teachers and would-be scientists swarm the campus for the 
Science-for-A-Day program. 

13: The community is invited to attend the Chorus Christmas Con- 
cert. Note to the chorus; "Your mediocrity is showing." 

14: Strains of "O Come All Ye Faithful" or "On flombeau Jeanette Isa- 
belle" might drift in your window tonight. Both S.C.A. and the 
French Club are braving the cold and the snow to spread Christmas 
cheer. 

15: Many couples find themselves in a "December Dreamland" — and 
that's an awfully nice way to spend your last evening on campus. 

16: Homeward bound, again, with three suitcases (one with clothes, two 
with books), and on overflowing laundry bag. 



FEBRUARY, 1961 

3: Girls of Minerva hold another open house. 

11: Campus lovers, here's your chance — the Valentine Dance. 

12: The campus becomes slightly depleted as sixty-seven members of the 
Concert Cnoir and Or^hesTra begin Iheir annual tout — hoping that 
this year they won't hove to get out of the bus and walk across any 
snow covered bridges, or eat HAM for every meal. 

17: Another one, you say? Certainly, why not? The Kalo Jazz Concerts 
are always enjoyable. 
18—19: No, rhose aren't L.V. students inat you never saw before. This is in- 
ternational weekend, and they ore foreign students. 

23: The Concert Choir really sounds great — but then they should — 
they've given the same concerr on iour for a v/hole week, 

24: This is really A.P.O.'s day — the UMOC contest and a dance and 
country fair. 



MARCH 

3: 



6-8: 



Sponsoring another dance. (See 



1961 

The Sophomores are at it again 
January 13). 

The spiritual side of the Lebanon Valley campus is shown in the ac- 
tivities of Religious Emphasis Week. The speaker for this week is Rev. 
Richard E. Sigler. 

I.S.C. is also a busy organization. It's holding another frammis. Point 
of interest: frammis is the singular for frammisi. 

It's still rot Stan Kenton or Les Elgart; and it's still not even Law- 
rence Welks. It's still the Lebanon Valley College Girls' Bond, and it's 
still music. 
17-18: As far as Kolo and Delphian ore concerned, this is their weekend — 
Breakfast and hat show at the Carnegie Lounge and, of course, the 
dinner-dance. 
24: No, it's not the start of a long weekend, but the start of a real 
Easter vacation. (See April 13—19, 1960. That was a long weekend.) 



10: 
16: 




JANUARY, 1961 

3: It's time to hit the books again. Exams are rapidly approaching. 
6: If you've been wondering why you haven't seen any elephants 
around here lately, it's because "Bones" has been keeping them away. 
But he certainly can't keep the crowd away from the Sinfonia min- 
strel. 
13: The Frosh-Soph Hop is tonight and this may be your last chance for 
a little fun. You know, you may not be bock next semester. 
16—24: Activities tend to slacken during this period. In fact, activities ore nil 

during this period. 
25—30: "Sleep, Sleep, Sleep" or "What I haven't done in Ages." 

31 : Isn't it thrilling to begin a new semester, to try something new — 
such as passing more courses than you flunk!! 




APRIL, 1961 

7—8: Philo and Clio, being brother and sister organizations, act as brother 
and sister — they continually disagree. However, for one weekend, 
Clio-Phi lo weekend to be exact, they are in complete accord. 

II: W.A.A. is busy initiating again. Incidentally W.A.A. is not the ab- 
breviation tor Women's Alcoholics' Anonymous. 
13—14: The music presented by the Symphonic Band and the Chorus this year 
is, as usual, on a par with the music presented by the Symphonic 
Band and the Chorus last year. Now the only problem is — What's 
par? 

20: Shrimp cocktail — in our dining hall? Sure, why not? Every year 
that's the appetizer on the menu for the W.A.A. banquet. 

21: It is the consensus of opinion that one of I.S.C.'s purposes is to hold 
frammisi (plural). Well, again they have succeeded in this purpose. 

29: It is still necessary to get to the Quittie early if you want a really 
clean car. Although they've been doing doily exercises, the Delphian 
girls still get tired. 



MAY, 1961 

6: The real highlight of this year is May Day and the annual Junior 
Prom. Why is this year's Prom so different? Well, it seems that the 
Junior Class, in co-sponsorship with the Faculty-Student Council, has 
gone all out and hired o big-nome bond. Enjoy the dancing coeds!! 
It's not every day that MAYNARD FERGUSON comes to Valley. 
9: No women allowed? Of course not! It's the Kolo Stag Banquet. 
14: Luck is with the band as clear weather prevails for the outside con- 
cert. 
16: Outstanding athletes ore honored at the annual sports banquet. 
21— 31 : You're now back in that rut again — trying to read in a hurry in 
May what you should have read in a hurry in February. Don't let 
exams get you down,- quit school now. 
JUNE, 1961 

3: Alumni again invade the campus, and the many planned activities 

keep them stepping all day. 
4: Another class has reached the end; but yet, it is really only the be- 
ginning. 



125 



Registration and Orientation 




Freshmen and faculty listen intently to convocation message. 



Coming to the L.V.C. campus on September 12, the 
recently graduated high school seniors found them- 
selves in the midst of freshman orientation and regis- 
tration. There was never a dull moment as the entire 
Freshman Week was filled with activities. At regis- 
tration the freshmen found that the mass of tables in 



the gym meant nothing but confusion. By the end of 
the week, better acquainted with their new environ- 
ment, the frosh were very appreciative of the Student- 
Faculty Council Reception and dance held in their 
honor. 



"I'll gladly take your money." 




Language major finds she has quite a heavy schedule. 




Initiation 



"Okay, Frosh, tip those dinks!" were familiar words 
to the freshmen at the beginning of their initiation 
period. Many evenings found the class of 1964 in the 
center of campus, participating in what the White hiats 
termed Frosh Frolics. At this time the freshmen were 
required to do practically anything from duck walking 



to singing the Alma Mater. After the final Frosh Frolic 
a party was held in their honor by the White hIats. 
On LVC Day the freshmen lost the traditional tug-of- 
war to the sophomores and thus sported their dinks 
for another two weeks. 




L. V. C . DAY 



A traditional synthesis of athletic, social, and 
dramatic activity resulted in L.V.C. Day, 1960, en- 
joyed by students, parents, and alumni, on October 
15. The annual Sophomore-Freshmen Tug-of-War 
began the day's activities. Afternoon events in- 
cluded the football game, in which Valley's team 
met a formidable rival, Muhlenberg, and the Knights 
of the Valley Alumni banquet. Wig and Buckle Club 
presented its second series of three one-act plays 
in Three-for-the-Shov^: Volume II, preceding the cul- 
mination of the day in the annual L-Club Homecom- 
ing Dance. Patricia Jones, Homecoming Queen, and 
attendants Peggy Zimmerman and Nancy Wagner 
presided over the evening festivities. 




Steve Wisler, LV Club vice-president, crowns Pot Jones Homecoming Queen, 
OS escort Gory DeHart looks on. 




Gander Weekend 





Don't just stand there, dance around that Totem Pole. 



Modern Minnie-Ha-Ha fashions headdress. 




"Avon colling.' 



"Now the fun begins.' 



"Now you're oil set for the big pow 
wow." 



'I'm here Gen. Custer, now what?" 



November 10—12 found the L.V.C. campus in a 
peculiar situation. The dating and etiquette customs 
were reversed; the girls were doing the inviting, chair- 
holding, door-opening, and bill-paying. The arrival of 
Gander Weekend, a novelty v^eekend sponsored by 
the women's student government bodies, once again 
gave the girls an opportunity to get a taste of the 



effort usually put forth by men. 

Highlighting this year's Gander Weekend was the 
"Squaw Scramble," the Saturday night dance held in 
the teepee-decorated gym. For their dates the girls 
were asked to make Indian headdresses, a prize being 
awarded for the most original. 



129 



I. S.C. Dance 



INTER-SOCIETY DANCE 

November 19 saw the transformation of the College 
Dining Hall into the setting for the annual Inter- 
Society Dance. The dance, sponsored by the five 
societies making up the Inter-Society Council — Clio, 
Knights, Philo, Kalo, and Delphian — followed the 
formal initiation ceremonies of these societies. 
Johnny Leffler and his orchestra provided the music 
for the first event of this sort to be held in the dining 
hall, its success indicates that future Inter-Society 
dances will take place there annually. 



"And then I told her 




TOP: A cho cha number adds some swing to the dance. 
BOTTOM: The atmosphere is just right for dancing. 





Christmas Season 

"Over the ground lies a mantle of white . . ." 
setting the perfect background for the commencing 
holiday festivities. During the two weeks preceding 
Christmas, the L.V. campus underwent a remarkable 
change. Adorning the roofs of the library and the 
dining hall were lighted Christmas trees, and each 
girls' dorm was gaily decorated both inside and out. 
Adding the final touch of joy to the season was 
December Dreamland, the annual Christmas Dinner- 
Dance. 



Carol Smith crowns Betsy McKlwee to reign over December Dreamland. 




TOP: Santa is stuck up . . . behind! 
BOTTOM: "But we don't have a fireplace." 




131 



"And I repeat, please stay off the gross.' 
"Pass me the purple one next." 




""h^ 




May Queen, Court, and Pages. 



May Day and Junior Prom 



"Cherchez la Femme" was the theme of May Day as 
music heralded the approach of the May Queen, or 
"la femme" of the L.V. campus, Jean Cunningham. 
Upon her mid-campus throne, she heard the music of 
the band and the men's glee club, and watched the 
choreography of her fellow students. 



In the setting of a beautiful "Mystic Isle," the Junior 
Prom in the evening climaxed the annual celebration. 
To the music of Ray Carr, two hundred couples danced 
beneath billowing palms and gazed with awe at the 
snow-capped mountains, the quaint Hawaiian hut, and 
the towering waterfalls. 



The damn thing stalled again! 



Tiny defies law of gravitation. 



Men's Chorus lends its voices to the May 
Day festivities. 





L.V.C. students get wrapped up in their work. 



Niagara Falls has nothing on the Junior Prom 



Jean Cunningham Is crowned Queen of the May by last year's queen, 
Mary Beaver. 







^^.W.^i 



-v.-^- «a^ 






.MV.Vi 



i^:- 



':» 



i.,, 




m: 



133 




Exams and 
Approaching Vacation 

The eternal conflict, student versus quality point, has 
reached the peak of its tension. Midnight oil and emo- 
tional stress has resulted in a student body character- 
ized by the flashing eyes of a mad scientist, the carriage 
of a martyr, and the weary sneet of a skeptic convinced 
of the total worthlessness of human knowledge. 

Into this dim sphere cascades an overwhelming tide 
of comedy relief. Tension is resolved in hilarity as youth 
gains temporary liberation from the tyranny of the bell- 
shaped curve! 

The ultimate reward, the magnificent compensation 
for these eight days of penance, is yet to come — vaca- 
tion. Note the lilting lyrical quality of those three magic 
syllables. Together they spell paradise! 



talk about Dante's infemo!" 



"Only three more shopping days until the end of the semester!" 



'This is better than digging ditches?" 



"It'll oil come out in the wash.' 





"Okay, Gang. After all it is six o'clock!" 




Graduation 

an End and a Beginning 



"Swing it, Georgel" 



Grandstands on center campus, strains of "Pomp 
and Circumstance," sheepskins, and speeches — 
traditional signs of graduation at Lebanon Valley 
College. One stands now at the end and can look 
back to see, to hear, to know again the laughter, the 
tears, the professors, the tests, the ball games, the 
dances. One stands now at the beginning and can 
look ahead to find the tasks, the thrills, the pains, 
the pleasures that these college days have prepared 
one to meet. 



That's my son up there.' 





Et Cetera 



L. V. on T. V. 



"I'll give you three hours to stop that.' 



"How deep is the ocean; how wide Is the skies?" 
(Aristotle knew) 



"Say dere Gabriel, blow dot horn,' 




"This time I'll do it without water." 



"Come now; you're pulling my leg.' 



"Jackie Kennedy has nothing on us.' 






It was all so peaceful, and then . . . 



"Okay, who's the clown who moved the driveway?" 



Of "Can you hear me in the rear?" fame. 



They're about to head for the hills. 




... And the sun on the breast of the new fallen 
snow. 



How to spend a quiet Sunday afternoon. 



"Allow me to help you up.' 



suddenly it really snowed! 



137 




ROW 1: R. Ward; P. Longreen; D. Miller; S. Kaczorowski; V. Magnuson; L. 
Holstein. ROW 2: L. Rudy; G. Sergent; P. Slotcher; H. Fitzgerald; R. Barnes; 
R. Stull; L. Godsholl; J. Haupt. ROW 3: C. Lowers, student manager; J. Zola; 
J. Kreider; W. Garrett; E. McCracken; V. Stouffer, F. Porrino; J. Yajko; G. 



Bowman; R. Gephart, student manager. ROW 4: G. Mayhoffer, assistant 
coach; C. Stroh; J. Lubans; G. Steck; J. Goidos; E. McCracken, head coach; 
J. Keil, J. Heishman; W. /lacMillan; R, Carrol; C. Road, assistant coach. 



FOOTBALL 



Lebanon Valley's "Ironmen" became tempered 
steel in the forge of football combat this past fall. 
With a season's record of seven wins and two losses, 
the team bested the won-lost tally of any previous 
Valley eleven. A hard-charging line and speedy 
backfield, supplementing the never-say-die spirit of 
the team, were the secrets of success. 

The ability of the team to recover when on the 
short end of the score was perhaps its most outstand- 
ing attribute. Many times during the season the 
team got off to a slow start in games which it later 
won through superior stamina and will to win. 

Graduating seniors will of course be sorely missed 



on next year's team. No longer will the hard nose 
line ploy of Dave Miller and Stan Kaczorowski or the 
fine running of Vern Magnuson, Les fHolstein, and 
Paul Longreen be seen on the local gridiron; we can,- 
however, look forward to the development of our 
many fine underclassmen football players. 

Retiring coach Ellis R. McCracken is to be congrat- 
ulated, along with assistant coaches Charles Poad 
and George Mayhoffer and all those connected with 
the team, on a splendid season. We should like to 
wish Coach McCracken's successor the some success 
in the years to come. 



140 



COLLEGE H^^ LVC OPP 

Wilkes 14 8 

Drexel 40 8 

Upsaia 6 

Muhlenberg 12 27 

Moravian 22 16 

Dickinson 10 8 

Albrighl 6 7 

Washington and Jefferson ..23 14 

PMC 36 14 




r 




/r^-> 



f 




Our Graduating Seniors; (left to right) Les Holstein,- Dave Miller; Paul 
Longreen; Vern Magnuson; Stan Koczorowski. 




The Quick and the Dead 





Larry Godsholl pulls down a pass in the Wilkes game. 




"These young fellers are a might fast.' 



Brooks Slatcher gets set for a tackle against Muhlenberg. 



142 



*^^. 









'>f¥-;' 









J^ ^<^: ^S 



>-^ 












:^- 



Action everywhere on the field as Les Holstein throws a pass. 




Halftimes are interesting. 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE COACHING STAFF STANDING: Charles Pad 
(left) and George MayhofFer. KNEELING: Ellis McCracken. 



The best seat on the field. 




Varsity Basketball 



Under the tutelage of new head coach Don Grider, 
the Lebanon Valley College varsity basketball team 
completed its second consecutive winning season. 
While not improving any on the previous year's record, 
the team nevertheless played several exciting games, 
and in all its games had at least a fair chance of 
winning. 

Balance was the keynote of this year's team, but 
practically every game had its individual standouts. 
Art Forstater hit for thirty points and Hank Van de 
Water for twenty-five in the opening game win over 
Muhlenberg. Hi Fitzgerald with his driving layups 
nudged Van de Water to be high scorer for the season. 
Steve Wisler played dependable basketball through- 
out the season. Sophomores Tom Knapp, Ken Girard, 



and Ken Showers, along with freshman Chuck Eber- 
sole, played outstanding games. Kit Goncalvez was 
a 6'5" tower of rebounding strength, although he 
played only the latter part of the season. 

The Drexel game was carried locally on live tele- 
vision, and the Dutchmen responded by soundly beat- 
ing the southern division Middle Atlantic Conference 
titlewinners. Rutgers of South Jersey was the victim 
as the Valley broke the century mark for the first time 
in several years. 

LVC partisans are looking forward to next year. 
With the loss of only two seniors, Steve Wisler and 
Glenn Coates, the Valley appears headed towards a 
good year. 



KNEELING: J. Kobylarz, manager; Q. Goncolvez; H. Fitzgerald; H. Van de Water; S. Wisler, A. Forstater; 
J. Early, manager. STANDING: D. Grider, head coach; C. Ebersole; K. Girard; K. Showers; R. Urey; T. 
Knapp; R. Rhine; G. Mayhoffer, assistant coach. 




144 



LVC 

Muhlenberg 73 

PMC 76 

Washington 73 

Lycoming 60 

Upsala 69 

Hofstro 65 

Moravian 59 

Wilkes 86 

Elizabethtown 66 

Elizobethtown IS 

Dickinson 75 

Moravian 56 

Gettysburg 62 

Albright 51 

Rutgers (S.J.) 100 

Albright 48 

Drexel 53 

Susquehanna 52 

F&M 74 



OPPONENT 
72 
68 
65 
54 
62 
91 
75 
55 
77 
55 
79 
74 
82 
61 
58 
61 
49 
65 
61 



fovt) 



"The King" puts a hand up for one 




Hi Fitzgerald stops a shot in Washington game 

LVC's Portable Scoreboard 




145 




Forstater hits on a layup against Washington 



Fitzgerald hooks against Washington defender 



146 



FIRST ROW: J. Beck; T. Lenker; G. Mayhoffer, Coach; K. Showers; L. Miller. SECOND ROW: J. Kobylarz, 
manager; G. Sergent; L. Copelond; J. Whitter; K. Girard; J. ShoefFer; J. Early, manager. 




Junior Varsity Basketball 





LVC 


OPPONENT 


YMCA 


. . . . 77 


74 


Hargrove Military 


. . . . 73 


7S 


Hershey JC 


. ... 59 


71 


Moravian 


. . . . 64 


66 


Hershey JC 


. . . . 74 


64 


Elizobethtown 


. . . . 42 


51 


Elizobethtown 


. . . . 52 


51 


Dickinson 


. . . . 80 


65 


Moravian 


. . . . 54 


84 


Albright 


. . . . 68 


72 


Albright 


61 


69 


YMCA 


. . . . 66 


60 


F&M 


. . . . 73 


64 


York JC 


. . . . 82 


79 


Intramurol All-Stars 


77 


52 



Close games were the stock in trade of the junior 
varsity basketball team. Eleven of fifteen games saw 
margins of less than ten points, as Coach George 
Mayhoffer's squad chalked up eight wins versus 
seven losses. 

Several of the players developed varsity potential 
during the season. The fine ploy of freshmen John 
Whitter and Terry Lenker, sophomores Ken Girard 
and Ken Showers, and junior Gene Sergeant, im- 
pressed spectators throughout the campaign. 

The junior varsity's losses ore, of course, the var- 
sity's gains, and varsity coach Don Grider con look 
forward to the addition of several experienced 
players next year. 



148 




Getting into position for o rebound against F&M. 



Action under the basket in one of YMCA games. 



149 



Wrestling 




ROW 1: D. Kaufmann; J. Reilly; B. Keinord; D. Winter. ROW 2: H. Myer; M. Gephart; J. Kreider; Irv Romig, 
trainer. ROW 3: J. Matlock, assistant coach; P. Longreen; V. Stouffer; D. Miller; C. Pood, coach. 



Coach Charles Poad's wrestlers ended the '60-61 
season with a record of two wins, six losses, and one 
tie. Only three wrestlers had winning records over 
the season — Barry Keinard, Jay Kreider, and Paul 
Longreen. But the future looks brighter for wrestling 
at the Valley. 

Just three of the regular nnembers of the team, 
Dave Miller, Barry Keinard, and Paul Longreen, will 
be lost this year via graduation. The two freshman 
team members, Tom Kent and Don Kaufmann, 
showed increasing skill and confidence over the 
season, and should be definite assets to next year's 
squad. The experience gained by all team members 
should stand them in good stead when they return 
to the mats next fall. 



Elizabethtown 


LVC O 

5 


PPONENT 

20 
30 
14 
15 
12 
14 
12 
17 
22 


Wilkes 





Dickinson 


12 


Albright 

Juniata 


9 

12 


Muhlenbera 


15 


PMC 

Moravian . . 


18 

9 


Ursinus 


8 







150 



StoufFer rides his man against Muhlenberg 




Coaches and wrestlers congratulate Vance StoufFer after deciding match 151 

with Muhlenberg. 



Paul Longreen works on his man's arm. 




KNEELING: D. Rhine; B. Slatcher; K. Wesolowski; B. Sfull; M. Wert; D. Ross. STANDING: Frank Etchberger, 
coach; B. Bishop, manager; H. Meyer; J. Yajko; W. Eichel; S. Wisler; R. Urey; F. Porrino; J. Sheaffer; G. 
Stambach; W. Smith, manager. 



Baseball 



The Lebanon Valley baseball team completed the 
1960 season with a record of 4 wins and 7 losses. 
Hampered by unseasonal weather, the team had 
three of its games canceled, and one, at Dickinson, 
was played in a blinding snowstorm. Nevertheless, 
the Dutchmen attracted many fans to their games. 
The timely hitting of Jack Sheaffer, Brooks Slatcher, 
Bob Stull, and Mark Wert, along with occasionally 
fine pitching, provided many exciting moments. 

Graduation took only two players, Doug Ross and 
Karl Wesolowski, from the squad. A nucleus of ex- 
perienced players returns this year, and an upturn 
in the fortunes of Coach Etchberger's charges is 
indicated. 



Gettysburg 

Dickinson (2) .... 


LVC 

6 

3 


OPPONENT i 

5 

5 

3 

3 

8 

9 



7 

9 

18 

canceled 

canceled 

8 

5 
canceled 


Elizabethtown 
Moravian 


4 

.... 10 
4 


Juniata 


3 


Wilkes (2) . . . . 
Millersville 


.... 8 
3 

'1 


Albright 

F&M 

Susquehanna .... 


4 


Elizabethtown 

P.M.C 

Ursinus 


.... 7 
.... 3 







152 




Tennis 



Left to Right; R. Musser,- L. Strait; H. Good. Missing; R. Bell; F. Eckelman; 
N. Eig; R. Kiimoyer; T. Myers; J. Weaber; J. Zoic. 



LVC's most successful team recordwise in 1960 was 
its tennis team. With an impressive 8 wins to its credit 
against two losses, the team certainly is to be praised. 
Making the record doubly impressive is the fact that 
tennis is relatively new as a varsity sport here. 

The hard competitive play of Howie Good, Ron 
Bell, Bob Musser, and all the other members of the 
team, brought tennis to its present position of esteem. 
It is to be hoped that future Valley tennis players will 
continue in the path blazed by lost year's team. 



LVC OPPONENT 

Gettysburg 8 1 

Dickinson 2 7 

Moravian 9 

Elizabethtown 9 

Drexel 7 

Juniata 7 2 

Wilkes canceled 

W. Maryland 6 3 

Lycoming 7 2 

F&M 3 6 

Susquehanna canceled 

P.M.C 6 1 



153 







KNEELING: D. Drumheller; J. Kobylarz; J. Healy; J. Brommer; J. Winard; R. Ward; D. Zechman; F. Meisel- 
man. STANDING: C. Lowers,- V. Magnuson; L. Holstein; C. Rife; R. Earp; H. Fitzgerald; H. Vanderbac; J. 
Heath; D. Rabenold; L. Godshall; D. Mulholland 



Track 



In what was touted to be "our year," Lebanon 
Valley's trackmen had a mediocre season. Despite a 
burgeoning interest in the sport, lack of consistent win- 
ners in the javelin throw and long distance running, 
and a lack of depth in various other events, caused 
the Valley to register only one win. 

But, individually, LVC trackmen had their moments 
of glory. Les Holstein's versatility, Dick Harper's rec- 
ord-breaking pole vaulting, Fred Meiselman's con- 
sistency in the weight events — all made on interesting 
show for the spectator. Their determined practice 
might be a hint to other members of the team not so 
dedicated. 

LVC's track banners were carried to Gettysburg for 
the Middle Atlantic Conference competition. Fred 
Meiseimon and Dick Harper each earned points to a 
luster to their personal records. 

The addition of several freshmen to the team and 
the seasoning of veterans should give the Valley an 
improved team this year. 





LV 


OPPONENT 


F&M 


471/6 




78% 


Dickinson 


3672 




891/2 


W. Maryland 


57 




65 


Susquehanna 


911/2 




341/2 


Albright-Susquel- 


lanna 


A 


S 




521/2 


69/2 


32 


PMC-Juniato 




PMC 


J 




401/2 


551/3 


57% 


Muhlenburg 


60% 




651/4 


MASCAC 


* 






Ursinus 


36 




90 


*Meiselman tied for fifth 


in shotput 


1/2 


Harper tied for fourth in 


pole vault 





154 




Retiring coach Marquette is presented gifts by Barry Skaler and Howie Landa. 



All-Sports Banquet 



Lebanon Valley's male athletes are annually feted 
at an All Sports Banquet held in their honor. This past 
year "Tiny" Parry of the Lebanon Daily News acted 
as toastmaster, and "Tick" Hurst of Lancaster was the 
guest speaker. 

The main function of the banquet is to give just rec- 
ognition to all those who compete in sports for Leba- 
non Valley. Added this past year was the presentation 
of a gift to retiring basketball coach George R. Mar- 
quette. Howie Landa, member of the team from '52 
through '55, and Barry Skaler, co-captain of the 1960 
team, made the presentation. 

Athlete of the year honors went to Lester Holstein 
in the form of the Chuck Matson Memorial Award. Les 
excelled during the year in both football and track. 



155 




GIRLS' SPORTS 

Two varsity sports, basketball and hockey, are en- 
joyed by the Valley girls. Games scheduled on an 
intercollegiate basis provide opportunities to visit, 
observe, and participate in the campus life of neigh- 
boring schools. Any qualified enthusiast may become 
a member of these teams. 




A rear view into girls' sports 



Hockey 




KNEELING: A. Fox, L. Weber, G. Fitzkee, J. Myers, P. Shonk, P. Juno, E. Walter. STANDING: Coach Bow- 
man, K. Hughes, S. Gehrhart, M. Bollman, J. Lied, V. Beckner, J. Johnston, L. Vostine, K. Patterson, B. 
Speicher. 



Despite the loss of nearly half of last year's team, the thusiasm. Although the record may not be as impressive 

L.V. lasses managed to attain a 2 and 3 record this as the team had v^ished, the more important enthusiasm, 

season. The leading Valley scorer, Joan Myers, piloted good sportsmanship, and clean fun were never lacking 

the team and may be credited with stimulating its en- for a moment. 



156 



L 






LVC Opp. 


Millersville . . . . 


....2 4 


Shippensburg 


....3 4 


Elizabethtown 


.... 8 


Dickinson 


.... 6 2 


Moravian 


....4 1 



"I dare you to bring that boll over here.' 



She walked with a wiggle 



Kay Cassel returned to the line-up this 
year adding much to the defense. Five fresh- 
men braved the exhaustive training weeks. 
Among them Vinnie Beckner proved to be 
the real heroine of the season when, having 
donned the goalie pods in September as a 
novice, she allowed only a total of 19 tallys 
to be chalked up against L.V. 




"Line 'em up!" 






"I want that ball!" 



157 



Girls' Varsity Basketball 




KNEELING: P. Cotter, J. Freed, Co-captain; K. Patterson, co-captain; S. Gerhart, STANDING: D. Evans, 
Manager, K. Hughes, N. Dutro, Coach Bowman, O. Gluyas, K. Cossel, O. Binner, Manager. 





L.V. 


OPP. 


E-town 


24 


40 


Moravian 


22 


28 


Shippensburg 


28 


55 


Millersville 


33 


42 


E-town 


25 


43 


Millersville 


33 


53 



With only a hand full of veterans returning to the 
1961 varsity team, the L.V. lassies suffered heart- 
breaking setbacks at the hands of each league 
opponent they faced. At the onset of v^^hat seemed 
to be a promising season, the Valley girls drubbed 
Harrisburg Polyclinic in the opening scrimmage, a 
non-league game. However, such was not the trend. 
E-town proved to be more than the inexperienced 
Dutch lasses could handle,- so, too, Shippensburg 
and Millersville. But B.J.B.'s gals put up a gallant 
fight against their Moravian opponents and nearly 
walked away with a victory. Throughout the season 
co-captain, Jo Freed, paced the forwards in the goal 
race. With a season's experience behind them, the 
Valley gals look forward to a more rewarding year 
in '62. 



158 



Girls' Junior Varsity Basketball 




KNEELING: K. Steiner, S. Gerhart, J. Johnston, Captain; E. Orchard, E. Walter. STANDING: J. Dixon, V. 
Beckner, Coach Bowman, C. Hoffman, C. McGee. 



The junior varsity faired the same as the first 
team, due to their inexperience as teammates. Cap- 
tain Julie Johnston, and Joy Dixon contributed most 
of the field goal counters, but this stimulus was not 
enough to overcome the scoring gaps. Toward the 
close of the season these gals became a more ag- 
gressive ball club and left the fans with a vivid hope 
for an improved season next year. 



SCORES 

LVC OPPONENT 

E-town 13 39 

Shippensburg 22 70 

Millersville 11 55 

E-town 17 35 

Millersville 25 55 



159 



JUNIOR DIRECTORY 



Adams, John E,, B.S., Chemistry, Closter, New Jersey 

Phi Lambda Sigma, Alpha Phi Omega, French Club, Quitta- 

pohilla, Intramurals 
Bacastow, Donald E., B.S., Economics, Hummelstown, Penn- 
sylvania 

Phi Lambda Sigma, Alpha Phi Omega, French Club, Quitta- 

pahilio, Intramurals 
Barnes, Rowland Wayne, B.S., Economics, Lebanon, Penn- 
sylvania 

Wig and Buckle, Men's Day Congress, Debate Society, 

L-Club, Quittapahilla, Football, Track, Intramurals 
Barry, Ruth Ann, B.S., Nursing, Quincy, Pennsylvania 

Kappa Lambda Nu, Math Club, Student Christian Assoc- 
iation, Intramurals 
Baxter, Carol Russell, B.S., Nursing, Aldan, Pennsylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma 
Bechtel, Gloria Ann, B.S., Music Education, Barto, Pennsylvania 

Chorus, Band, Clarinet Choir, Chapel Choir, Intramurals 
Bixel, Sheivy J., B.S., Elementary Education, Dillsburg, Penn- 
sylvania 

W.A.A., Intramurals 
Blair, Richard Nelson, B.S., Economics, Penbrook, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Baseball, Intramurals 
Bollinger, Robert, A.B., Political Science, Annville, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Bollman, Mary, B.S., Elementary Education, Sinking Springs, 
Pennsylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, Chapel Choir, W.A.A., Hockey, 

Basketball, Intramurals 
Bordner, Karl Wilbur, B.S., Economics, Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Men's Day Student Congress, Intramurals 
Bowman, Arthur F., B.S., Chemistry, Hopeland, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry Club, Intramurals 
Bowman, Emily Jane, B.S., Music Education, Plainfield, New 
Jersey 

Kappa Lambda Nu, Symphony Orchestra, Chorus, Concert 

Choir, String Quartet 
Brandt, Thomas, B.S., Physics, Annville, Pennsylvania 

Debate Society, Intramurals 
Bressler, Donna Rae, A.B., English, Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania 

Kappa Lambda Nu, Wig and Buckle, PSEA, Quittapahilla, 

Intramurals 
Brogan, Lowell B., B.S., Economics, Sheridan, Pennsylvania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, L-Club, Intramurals 
Brown, Brenda B., A.B., Mathematics, Bergenfield, New Jersey 

Kappa Lambda Nu, Color Guard, Math Club, W.A.A., PSEA, 

Intramurals 
Brown, Michael Mathison, B.S., Biology, Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Intramurals 
Bucher, Sylvia Z., B.S., Music Education, Lonsdale, Pennsyl- 
vania 

R.W.S.G.A., Student Faculty Council, Delta Lambda Sigma, 

PSEA, W.A.A., MENC, Concert Choir, College Chorus, 

Girls' Band, Color Guard, Intramurals 



Buck, Judith B., A.B., Mathematics, Somerville, New Jersey 

Math Club 
Cassel, Kaye, B.S., Biology, Telford, Pennsylvania 

W.A.A,, Hockey, Basketball, Intramurals 
Cisney, Larry Foster, A.B., History, McConnellsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Delta Tau Chi, Student Christian Association, Intramurals 
Crispen, Letitia E., B.S., Nursing, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Cronrath, Gory H., B.S., Economics, Watsontown, Pennsylvania 

Alpha Phi Omega, Student Christian Association, Quitta- 
pahilla, Intramurals 
Czirr, David L., B.S., Chemistry, Cresskill, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry Club, Alpha Phi Omega 
Daniels, Stanley M., B.S., Economics, Palmyra, Pennsylvania 
Davis, Patricia Louise, B.S., Music Education, Salem, New 
Jersey 

Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, Bond, Orchestra, Woodwind 

Quintet, Girls' Band, Chorus, Intramurals 
Dellinger, Woodrow S., Jr., B.S., Chemistry, Red Lion, Penn- 
sylvania 

Mens' Senate, La Vie, L-Club, Knights of the Valley, Foot- 
ball, Intramurals 
Devine, James Patrick, B.S., Physics, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
DeWald, Terry Austin, B.S., Music Education, Schuylkill Haven, 
Pennsylvania 

Bond, Chorus, Symphony Orchestra, Percussion Ensemble, 

Sinfonia 
Dillmon, Sylvia Ann, B.S., Elementary Education, Jonestown, 
Pennsylvania 
Dom, Harold, A.B., Psychology, Stoystown, Pennsylvania 

Delta Tau Chi, Student Christian Association, Intramurals 
Donley, Thomas Lee, A.B., History, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Intramurals 
Dressel, James R., B.S., Mathematics, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Debate Society, Math Club, Intramurals 
Drumheller, Donald R., A.B., Philosophy, Schuylkill Haven, 
Pennsylvania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, Delta Tau Chi, Student Christian 

Association, Track, Wrestling, Intramurals 
Dudas, Roberta Ann, B.S., Medical Technology, Lake City, 
Pennsylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, Majorettes, W.A.A. , Intramurals 
Earp, Ralph Norman, Jr., A.B., Greek, Indiantown Gap, 
Pennsylvania 

L-Club, Track, Intramurals 
Eckenroth, Gabrielle A., B.S., Physics, Annville, Pennsylvania 
Edris, Gerald H., B.S., Chemistry, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Legionnaires, Intramurals 
Feather, Kenneth R., B.S., Chemistry, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry Club, Intramurals 
Felsberg, Nancy Carolyn, B.S., Music Education, Pennsauken, 
New Jersey 

Bond, Symphony Orchestra, Girls' Bond, Chorus, Delta 

Lambda Sigma, PSEA, PMEA 
Felty, Linda Carol, B.S., Elementary Education, Lebanon, Penn- 



160 



sylvania 

Beta Beta Beta, Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, Childhood 

Education Club 
Fitzgerald, Hiram Earl, A.B., Psychology, Columbia, Penn- 
sylvania 

PSEA, Mens' Senate, Knights of the Valley, Psychology Club, 

L-Club, Student Christian Association, Football, Basketball, 

Track 
FItzkee, Gloria Ann, B.S., Elementary Education, York, Penn- 
sylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, W.A.A., Chorus, Chapel Choir, 

Basketball, Hockey, Intramurals 
Fix, Bonnie Jean, B.S., Music Education, Yoe, Pennsylvania 

Concert Choir, Concert Band, Girls' Bond, Kappa Lambda 

Nu, Chorus, Intramurals 
Flinchbaugh, Dean A., B.S., Chemistry, Dallastown, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Student Faculty Council, Chemistry Club, Alpha Phi Omega, 

La Vie Colligienne, Intramurals 
Forstater, Arthur, A.B., English, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Student Christian Association, Basketball 
Fortna, David H., B.S., Biology, Palmyra, Pennsylvania 
Fox, Joseph A., B.S., Physics, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Frederick, Harry, B.S., Music Education, Annville, Pennsylvania 

Concert Choir, Band, Chorus, Sinfonia, Brass Ensemble, Per- 
cussion Ensemble 
Freed, Joanne R., B.S., Elementary Education, Liverpool, Penn- 
sylvania 

W.A.A., Quittapahilla, PSEA, Kappa Lambda Nu, White 

Hats, Hockey, Basketball, Intramurals 
Gephart, R. Michael, A.B., Biology, Carlisle, Pennsylvania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, L-Club, Wrestling, Track, Intra- 
murals 
Gingrich, Franklin Roosevelt, A.B., Campbelltown, Penn- 
sylvania 

Gluyas, Joan Olivia, B.S., Elementary Education, Collings- 
wood. New Jersey 

Kappa Lambda Nu, Inter-Society Council, Quittapahilla, 

PSEA, Cheerleaders, Hockey, Basketball, Intramurals 
Godshall, Larry Lee, A.B. History, Ephrota, Pennsylvania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, L-Club, Football, Track, Intramurals 
Grace, Suzanne K., B.S., Music Education, Annville, Penn- 
sylvania 

Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Girls' Band, Band 
Grove, Francis D., B.S., Chemistry, Felton, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry Club 
Habig, Robert L., B.S., Chemistry, Middletovi'n, Pennsylvania 
Hagaman, Clee, B.S., Medical Technology, Palmyra, Penn- 
sylvania 

Womens' Commuter Council 
Haupt, Jerome W. Ill, A.B., Greek, Columbia, Pennsylvania 

Delta Tau Chi, Alpha Phi Omega, Football, Wrestling, 

Intramurals 
Heath, James T. Ill, A.B., Philosophy, Wyckoff, New Jersey 

Quittapahilla, Track, Intramurals 



Hicks, Jane, B.S., Nursing, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Hill, Bruce Robert, B.S., Business Administration, Lebanon, 
Pennsylvania 

Hiltner, George Joseph, III, A.B., Greek, Baltimore, Maryland 
French Club, Mens' Senate, White Hots, Delta Tau Chi, 
Quittapahilla, Wig and Buckle, Knights, Alpha Phi Omega, 
Intramurals 
Hoffer, Kay Lucille, B.S., Music Education, Lititz, Pennsylvania 
Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, Bond, Chorus, Symphony 
Orchestra, Clarinet Choir, Girls' Band, Quittapahilla, Intra- 
murals 
Hooper, Joseph R., B.S., Chemistry, New Cumberland, Penn- 
sylvania 

Beta Beta Beta, Knights of the Valley, Basketball, Track, 
Intramurals 
Horst, Barbara, B.S., Nursing, Wyomissing, Pennsylvania 

W.A.A. Kappa Lambda Nu, Intramurals, Hockey 
Hughes, Yvonne Kay, B.S., Medical Technology, Lewisberry, 
Pennsylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, W.A.A., Beta Beta Beta, Hockey, 
Basketball, Intramurals 
Ivey, Doyle Watson, B.S., Mathematics, Harrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Juno, Regina Maria, B S., Medical Technology, Bristol, Penn- 
sylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, W.A.A., Beta Beta Beta, Quittapa- 
hilla, Hockey, Intramurals 
Kahan, Richard L., B.S., Biology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
Beta Beta Beta, Phi Lambda Sigma, French Club, Intramurals 
Kauffman, Jean Marie, A.B., English, Landisville, Pennsylvania 
Green Blotter, La Vie Collegienne, Quittapahilla, Student 
Christian Association 
Kistler, Gloria A., B.S., Music Education, West Hamburg, Penn- 
sylvania 

Chorus, Brass Ensemble, Girls' Band, Symphony Orchestra, 
Marching Band, Concert Band, Delta Lambda Sigma, PMEA 
Kline, Judith Fay, A.B., History, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Womens' Commuter Council, Political Science Club 
Klinedinst, Richard E., B.S., Music Education, Mechanicsburg, 
Pennsylvania 

Clarinet Choir, Band, Chorus, Symphony Orchestra, Intra- 
murals 
Kobylarz, John F., B.S., Chemistry, Passaic, New Jersey 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, Chemistry Club, Basketball, Track, 
Intramurals 
Kohl, Doris Elaine, B.S., Music Education, Irvington, New Jersey 
Political Science Club, Kappa Lambda Nu, W.A.A., Wig and 
Buckle, PSEA, MENC, Concert Choir Intramurals 
Krueger, Walter A. Jr., B.S., Biology, Bergenfield, New Jersey 
Alpha Phi Omega, Student Christian Association, Tennis, 
Intramurals 
Kunzler, Georgiana, A.B., Sociology, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

Chorus 
Kurr, Annette S., B.S., Music Education, Robesonia, Pennsyl- 
vania 



161 



Kappa Lambda Nu, Political Science Club, Intramurals 
Lamke, Mary Louise, A.B., English, Steelton, Pennsylvania 

Wig and Buckle, Alpha Psi Omega, La Vie Collegienne, 

Green Blotter, Quittapahilla, PSEA, Student Christian Asso- 
ciation 
Lehn, Harry Martin, B.S., Physics, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Phi Lambda Sigma, Math Club, White Hats, Intramurals 
Levinson, Philip, B.S., Biology, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Intramurals 
Lichtenwalter, Ray C, B.S., Music Education, Palmerton, Penn- 
sylvania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, Sinfonia, Band, Chorus, Symphony 

Orchestra, Jazz Band, Intramurals 
Light, Barry W., B.S., Economics, Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Men's Day Student Congress, Intramurals 
Light, Kenneth K., B.S., Chemistry, Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry Club, Mens' Day Student Congress, Intramurals 
Loy, Marilyn A., A.B., English, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
Lys, A. Hakim, B.S., Economics, Java, Indonesia 

Phi Lambda Sigma, Intramurals 
McCann, Jane E., B.S., Music Education, Blackwood, New 
Jersey 

Kappa Lambda Nu, PSEA, Concert Choir, MENC, Chorus, 

Girls' Band 
McClean, Barbara Ann, B.S., Music Education, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 

Concert Choir, Chorus, La Vie Collegienne, Quittapahilla, 

Girls' Band, Kappa Lambda Nu, MENC, PSEA, Intramurals 
McGriff, Larry Eldean, B.S., Music Education, Arcanom, Ohio 

Chorus, Concert Choir, Marching Band, Concert Bond, Brass 

Ensemble 
McKinney, Lois E., B.S. Elementary Education, Lebanon, Penn- 
sylvania 

Womens' Commuter Council, Student Faculty, White Hats 
Marshall, Jon E., B.S., Economics, Chatham, New Jersey 

Intramurals 
Melhorn, James Irvin, A.B., Philosophy, Cleona, Pennsylvania 
Miller, H. Eugene, B.S., Music Education, Myersville, Maryland 

Concert Choir, Political Science Club, PMEA, Sinfonia 
Miller, Isobel Mary, B.S, Music Education, Harrisburg, Penn- 
sylvania 

W.A.A., Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, Chapel Choir, White 

Hats, PMEA, Concert Choir, Chorus, Quittapahilla, Hockey, 

Basketball, Intramurals 
Miller, Marjorie Jane, B.S., Music Education, Phoenixville, 
Pennsylvania 

Concert Choir, Chorus, Girls' Band, Kappa Lambda Nu, 

W.A.A., Intramurals 
Mirmak, E.V., B.S., Physics, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
Moore, Elizabeth Ann, B.S., Music Education, Havertown, Penn- 
sylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, W.A.A., PSEA, Student Faculty, Band, 

Intramurals 
Morris, Norma Jane, B.S., Elementary Education, Clayton, 
New Jersey 



Childhood Education Club, Student Christian Association, 

W.A.A., Quittapahilla, Hockey, Intramurals 
Mounsey, Delores Anita, B.S., Medical Technology, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

W.A.A., Delta Lambda Sigma, Hockey, Basketball, Intra- 
murals 
Moyer, H. Lee, A.B, History, Hershey, Pennsylvania 

Political Science Club, Intramurals. 
Mulholland, David B, A.B., Political Science, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania 

L-Club, Basketball , Track, Intramurals 
Myers, Constance Faith, B.S., Elementary Education, Harris- 
burg, Pennsylvania 

PSEA, Elementary Education Club, La Vie Collegienne, 

Quittapahilla, Intramurals 
Myers, Gary Carl, B.S., Biology, Yoe, Pennsylvania 

Alpha Phi Omega, Beta Beta Beta, Intramurals 
Phillippy, Dennis, B.S., Chemistry, Hershey, Pennsylvania 
Pingel, Anita June, B.S., Medical Technology, Wyomissing, 
Pennsylvania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, R.W.S.G.A., Beta Beta Beta, French 

Club, W.A.A., Intramurals 
Reed, Cecelia Ann, B.S., Music Education, Schuylkill Haven, 
Pennsylvania 

Concert Choir, Chorus, Girls' Band, W.A.A., PSEA, MENC, 

Delta Lambda Sigma 
Reighter, K. William, A.B., English, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Green Blotter, Wig and Buckle, La Vie Collegienne 
Rettig, Nannette, A.B., Biology, Clark, New Jersey 

Wig and Buckle, Orchestra, W.A.A., Student Christian Asso- 
ciation, Intramurals 
Rhine, Carlin Richard, A.B., History, Annville, Pennsylvania 

Student Christian Association, Knights of the Valley, L-Club, 

Baseball, Intramurals 
Rife, Carl Bruce, A.B., Philosophy, York, Pennsylvania 

Student Christian Association, Delta Tau Chi, Kappa 

Lambda Sigma, Beta Beta Beta, L-Club, Quittapahilla, Track, 

Intramurals, Mens' Senate 
Rinker, Marilyn E., A.B., English, Easton, Pennsylvania 

Band, Concert Choir, W.A.A., Kappa Lambda Nu, Chorus, 

Intramurals 
Rohrbach, William R., A.B., Political Science, Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania 

Intramurals 
Rudy, Larry, B.S., Chemistry, New Cumberland, Pennsylvania 

Phi Lambda Sigma, L-Club, Football, Intramurals 
Schlegel, Gayle Christine, B.S., Music Education, Reading, 
Pennsylvania 

La Vie Collegienne, Concert Band, Marching Band, Per- 
cussion Ensemble, Girls' Band, Delta Lambda Sigma, W.A.A 

PSEA, PMEA, Intramurals 
Seidel, Charles R., B.S., Economics, Annville, Pennsylvania 

Band, Quittapahilla, Debate Society, Intramurals 
Seller, Deanna Jean, B.S, Music Education, Northampton, 
Pennsylvania 



162 



Band, Orchestra, Woodwind Quintet, Girls' Bond, Delta 
Sigma, Chorus 
Sergent, Gene, B.S., Economics, Metuchen, New Jersey 

Football, Basketball, Baseball, Intromurals 
Seymour, John K., A.B., Mathematics, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Phi Lambda Sigma, La Vie Collegienne, Quittapahilla, 
Intramurois 
Shaver, Marylin Ruth, B.S., Elementary Education, Hoovers- 
ville, Pennsylvania 

Student Christian Association, PSEA, Delta Tau Chi, Child- 
hood, Education Club, W.A.A., Quittapahilla, R.W.S.G.A, 
Intramurois 
Shearer, Daniel F., B.S., Music Education, Ephrata, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Band, Concert Choir, Kappa Lambda Sigma, Sinfonio, PSEA, 
Intramurois 
Shirk, M. Blaine, A.B., Biology, Paradise, Pennsylvania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, Beta Beta Beta, Quittapahilla, Intra- 
murois 
Slotcher, Philip Brooks, A.B., Psychology, Hovertown, Penn- 
sylvania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, Psychology Club, L-Club, Football, 
Baseball, Intramurois 
Slike, Wayne William, A.B., Spanish, Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
Smith, Carol Ann, B.S., Elementary Education, Ephrata, Penn- 
sylvania 

Quittapahilla, Wig ond Buckle, Color Guard, PSEA, El- 
ementary Education Club, Kappa Lambda Nu, W.A.A., 
R.W.S.G.A., Intramurois 
Stomboch, G. Eugene, A.B,, Sociology, Mt Wolf, Pennsylvania 

L-Club, Knights of the Valley, Baseball, Intramurois 
Steiner, Kay Lorraine, A.B., Sociology, Lampeter, Pennsylvania 
Student Christian Association, Delta Tau Chi, Chorus, Bond, 
Basketball, Intromurals 
Stephonis, Agloio, Mario, A.B., Biology, Marietta, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Delta Lambda Sigma, Quittapohillo, Psychology Club, Ski 
Club, Intramurois, Beta Beta Beta 
Stetler, Sandra Lee, B.S., Music Educotion, Wormleysburg, 
Pennsylvania 

Bond, Chorus, Concert Choir, Symphony Orchestra, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, White Hots, R.W.S.G.A., Woodwind Quin- 
tet, Quittapahilla, Intramurois 
Stull, Robert H., B.S., Biology, Fleetwood, Pennsylvania 
Koppa Lambda Sigma, L-Club, Beta Beta Beta, Mens' 
Senate, Football, Baseball, Intromurals 
Tokocs, Belo Jonos, B.S., Biology, Annville, Pennsylvania 
Green Blotter, Koppa Lambda Sigma, Debate Society, 
Chemistry Club, Intromurals 
Templeton, Virginia Moe, A.B., Psychology, Hellertown, Penn- 
sylvania 

Psychology Club, Delto Lambda Sigma, Quittapohillo 
Turner, Lee Jackson, Jr., B.S., Music Education, Wilmington, 
Delaware 



Concert Choir, PSEA, Sinfonio, Chorus, MENC, Intramurois 
Urey, Russell R., B.S., Chemistry, Red Lion, Pennsylvania 
Knights of the Valley, L-Club, Baseball, Wrestling, Intra- 
murois 
Van de Water, Henry F., B.S., Chemistry, Malvern, Pennsyl- 
vania 

L-Club, Basketball, Track, Intromurals 
Voshell, Horry Milton, B.S., Music Education, Wyoming, Dela- 
ware 

Vowler, Jeanne Elizabeth, B.S, Elementary Education, Upper 
Darby, Pennsylvania 

PSEA, Delta Lambda Sigma, Quittapohillo, Chorus, Intra- 
murois 
Walker, William J., A.B. English, Gap, Pennsylvania 

Intromurals 
Ward, Roger Nelson, B.S., Biology, Lafayette Hill, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Kappa Lambda Sigma, L-Club, Football, Track, Intromurals 
Weaver, George M., Jr., A.B., Religion, New Holland, Pennsyl- 
vania 

Knights of the Valley, L-Club, Baseball, Wrestling, Intro- 
murals 
Weber, Linda Jean, A.B., English, New Holland, Pennsylvania 
Chorus, Girls' Bond, W.A.A., Wig and Buckle, Delta Lambda 
Sigma, Political Science Club Hockey, Intromurals 
Weekley, David M., A.B., English, Meadville, Pennsylvania 
Wenger, D. Roy, Jr., B.S., Physics, Annville, Pennsylvonio 

Debate Society, Moth Club, Intromurals 
Wido, Rosalie Betty, A.B., Foreign Languages, Rexmont, Penn- 
sylvania 

Womens' Commuter Council, Hockey, Intramurois 
Williams, Bonnie Lynn, B.S., Elementary Education, Butler, New 
Jersey 

Elementary Education Club, Ski Club, Delta Lambda Sigma, 
W.A.A., PSEA, White Hots, Quittapohillo, Psychology Club, 
Intromurals 
Wise, Patsy LoRue, A.B., Mathematics, Middletown, Maryland 
Delta Lambda Sigma, Quittapohillo, Moth Club, R.W.S.G.A., 
PSEA, Wig and Buckle, Intromurals 
Wogisch, Barbara Helen, B.S., Chemistry, Bergenfield, New 
Jersey 

Student Christian Association, Delta Lambda Sigma, Chem- 
istry Club, W.A.A., Wig and Buckle, Majorettes, Intromurals. 
Wolfe, Ellis W., B.S., Economics, Annville Pennsylvonio 

Intramurois 
Wood, Ruth S., B.S, Nursing, Lebonon, Pennsylvania 
Yingling, Richard T., B.S., Chemistry, Hershey, Pennsylvania 
Yost, Horry B., B.S., Biology, Etters, Pennsylvania 

Chemistry Club, Phi Lambda Sigmo, L-Club, Inter-Society 
Council, Baseball, Intromurals 
Zeller, Gory L., B.S., Music Educotion, Mt. Joy, Pennsylvonio 
Sinfonio, Band, Orchestra, Chorus, Percussion Ensemble, 
PSEA 
Zimmerman, D. Paul, A.B., History, Horrisburg, Pennsylvania 



163 



i 

IP. 











E 




Quittapahilla Yearbook Photography 

by . . . 

CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA'S 

OLDEST 

LARGEST 

MOST OUTSTANDING 

STUDIO 

THE ENSMINGER STUDIOS 

Harvey L. Ensminger, Proprietor 

A locally owned and operated studio. 

Our new modern facilities 

bring you the most complete photographic service 

in natural color and black & white 

photography. 

Second & Walnut Street 

Dial CE 6-7968 Harrisburg, Penna. 



— 


PATRON PAGE 





Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Adams 


Mr. and Mrs. Karl A. Grebe 


Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Pingel 


Mr. Clifford B. Alban 


Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Green 


Mr. and Mrs. Melvin D. Poff 


Mr. and Mrs. J. Evans Anderson 


Mrs. Samuel W. Grove 


Mr. ond Mrs. LeRoy M. Rabenold 


Clarence and Sarah Aungst 


Mr. and Mrs. Irvin J. Gruber 


Gorden D. Reed 


Mr. Arthur Bacastow 


Mr. and Mrs. Harold S. Hagaman 


Mr. and Mrs. S. Renzulli 


Lois Bacastow 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Hall 


Walter H. Rice 


Mr. and Mrs. Simon P. Bacastow 


Mr. and Mrs. Dan M. Hallett 


Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Rife 


Mr. and Mrs. L V. Badgley 


Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Haring 


Carl Rife 


Edward H. Baertschy 


J. T. Heath, Jr. 


Russell L. Rineer, Sr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Harvey H. Baker 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Hehman, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Irvin J. Rinker 


F. R. Baxter 


Mr. and Mrs. V. C. rieniperly 


Raymond V. Robinson 


Mr. and Mrs. Ira A. Bechtel, Sr. 


Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hildreth 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Ruhl 


Dr. and Mrs. James 0. Bemesderfer 


Mr. and Mrs. George J. Hiltner, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. George Sabaka 


Arthur M. Binner 


Samuel 0. Hock 


Dr. and Mrs. Nelson S. Scharadlh 


Mr. and Mrs. C. N. Blair 


Mr. and Mrs. Sterling E. Hoffman 


Glenn C. Schlegel 


Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bollman 


Mr. and Mrs. John S. Horst 


Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Schmerker 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph M. Bongart 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Homan 


Richard D. Schreiber 


Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bonsall, Jr. 


Fred B. Hooper 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Schwalm 


Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Bowman 


Clyde Hutchcroft 


Mrs. A. E. Seidel 


Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Bowman 


Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Jarboe 


Dr. B. Marea Seller 


Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Boyer 


D. J. Karlheim 


Mr. E. D. Shaw 


Mr. and Mrs. James Boyle 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Kaufmann 


J. J. Sheehy 


Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Brighthaupt 


Luther C. Kling 


Mr. and Mrs. John B. Shenk 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Brong 


John Knapp 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul Sholley 


Mr. and Mrs. Donald G. Brown 


Mr. and Mrs. James H. Knarr 


Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Shubrooks 


Mr. and Mrs. Lester C. Brown 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry F. Koerper 


Enos E. Shupp, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bucher 


Mr. and Mrs. Lazo Koncar 


Mr. and Mrs. Philip B. Slatcher 


Rev. and Mrs. J. Lester Buckwolter 


Mr. and M's. Ira Kreider 


Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Spengler 


Mr. and Mrs. Harold M. Bull 


Mrs. L. J. Kreiser 


Mrs. Howard L. Smith 


R. U. Cassel 


Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Krueger 


Mr. and Mrs. Cletus W. Snowberger 


Samuel K. Clark 


Mr. and Mrs. Albert L. Lambert, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster Stambach 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Crider, Sr. 


Mrs. Louise E. Lamke 


G. Eugene Stambach 


Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Crispen 


Cynthia M. Lamke 


Aksel T. Storaker 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul E. Cronrath 


Mr. and Mrs. Karl E. Landis 


A. M. Tanno 


David Czirr 


Edna Ledle 


Mr. and Mrs. Clarence W. Templeton 


Sidney B. Danfelt 


David K. W. Lee 


Mr. and Mrs. Lester A. Unger 


Mr. and Mrs. Smith B. Davis 


Mr. and Mrs. Roland Lenker 


Mr. and Mrs. George A. Urey, Jr. 


Woodrow S. Dellinger 


Mr. and Mrs. Norman R. Lichtenwalter 


Clara Vanderbach 


Mr. and Mrs. F. Derbyshire 


Mr. and Mrs. John T. Maguire 


Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Van De Water 


Mr. and Mrs. Austin R. DeWald 


John F. Matsko 


Dr. Frederick Vastine 


Mr. and Mrs. John W. Docherty 


Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. McCann 


Mr. Robert Vogel 


Mr. Herbert Dom 


Mr. and Mrs. William A. McClean 


Mr. and Mrs. James H. Vowler 


Guy 3. Drumheller 


Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius McDyer 


Mr. and Mrs. Carl S. Walter 


Col. and Mrs. Ralph N. Eorp 


Mr. and Mrs. C. H. McWilliams 


Mr. and Mrs. Peter S. Walker 


Mr. and Mrs. George H. Eiceman 


Mr. and Mrs. Jacob F. Melnick 


Rowland N. Ward 


Mr. and Mrs. Roy F. Filer 


Mr. and Mrs. Lewis R. Michael 


Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Weber 


Lawrence Erdmann 


//r. and Mrs. Harold S. Miller 


Capt. and Mrs. Hans Weih 


Mr. and Mrs. Cyril K. Feather 


Mr. and Ms. Nevin Miller 


Mr. and Mrs. Clarence C. Wiker 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Fitzgerald, Sr 


Mr. end Mrs. Frank R. Montgomery 


Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Williams 


Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Flinchbaugh 


Robert C. Moore, Jr. 


Reuben 0. Willman 


Mrs. 1. C. Ford 


Mr. and Mrs. Carl Myers 


Mr. and Mrs. William H. Williams 


Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Funck 


Mr. and Mrs. George Myers 


Mr. and Mrs. Harry D. Wisler 


Mr. and Mrs. Abram W. Geib 


Mr. and Mrs. Henry F. Nixon 


Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wittle 


Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Garwood 


Willis S. Nolt 


Mr. and Mrs. John A. Wolfe 


Mr. and Mrs. George 0. Gephart 


Mr. and Mrs. George Patterson 


Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Wolfenden 


Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. G3rhart, Jr. 


Mr. and Mrs. Evan R. Peiffer 


James Work 


Mr. and Mrs. Paul K. Girard 


Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Perkins 




Ouirino Goncalves 


Mr. and Mrs. Truman B. Peters 







Compliments of 


Compliments of 


KING-KUP CANDIES, INC. 




Hersey, Penna. 


BUCHART ASSOCIATES 




Architects — Engineers 


"Famous for Quality" 






JOHN H. BOGER & SONS 


914-16 Columbia Avenue 






Fuel Oil and Coal 


Lancaster, Pennsylvania 


Railroad Street 




Annville Phone UN 7-4111 


ANDREWS PAPER HOUSE 




OF YORK, INC. 




"If It's Made of Paper 


ROSE SINGER SHOP 


We Can Supply It" 




Phone 6807 - 33-49 N. Pershing Ave. 


734 Cumberland Street 


York, Penna. 




Compliments of 


Lebanon, Penna. 


THE BON TON 






"Definitely First in Fashion" 


Lebanon's Greatest Store 





PAUL H. KETTERING 






SPORTING GOODS 






ESSO — GOODYEAR SERVICE 


KREAMER BROS. 




HUNTING AND FISHING SUPPLIES 






SHERWIN-WILLIAMS PAINTS 






104 West Main Street 


FURNITURE 




Dial UN 7-6231 






Annville, Pennsylvania 


FLOOR COVERING 




"For the Finest in Ladies' 




and Children's Wearing 






Apparel" 


ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 




LILY ANN SHOPPE 






207 West Main Street 


Annville, Pennsylvania 




Dial UN 7-9021 






Annville, Pennsylvania 






KINGSLEY AND BROWN 


Compliments of 




Incorporated 


Your Local Insurance Man 




Launderers — Cleaners 


1. M. LONG 




Dyers — Furriers 






801 East Main Street 
Annville, Pennsylvania 


Annville, Pennsylvania 










DAVIS PHARMACY 




Phone: 


9-11 West Main Street 




Annville — UNdertiil! 7-3511 


Annville, Pennsylvania 




Middletov^n — WHitney 4-3151 


Prescriptions — Greeting Cards — Records 




Hershey — ENterprise 1-0611 


School Supplies 




Myerstov/n 








ShcefFer Pens and Pencils 





CO-ED LUNCHEONETTE 


FINK'S BAKERY, INC. 


Frank and Delia Marino, Props. 


ENRICHED BREAD 


Annville, Pennsylvania 


DECORATED CAKES 




LAYER CAKES 


THE CHAR-LET MOTEL 




HAND CUT COOKIES 


500 East Main Street 




Palmyro, Pennsylvania 


FRENCH & FILLED DONUTS 


Route U.S. 422 Opposite 


SWEET BUNS 


Famo,us Dutch Diner 




Phone: TEmple 8-3751 




' 


SNYDER APPLIANCE 


THE HUMMELSTOWN SUN 


FRIGIDAIRE APPLIANCES 




DESIGNED WITH YOU IN MIND! 


Established 1871 


GIFTS FOR ALL OCCASIONS 


ISSUED WEEKLY ON FRIDAY 


13 West Main Street 




Annville, Pennsylvania 


— COMMERCIAL PRINTING — 




MAX LOVE'S 


South Water Street 






CLEANING & PRESSING 


Dial LO 6-0551 






103 West Main Street 


Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 




« 


Annville, Pennsylvania 




Phone: Annville UN 7-4852 



PETER HAWRYLUK 



JEWELER 



40 East Main Street 



Annville, Pennsylvania 



For the Finest Men's and Boys' Clothing 



HOSTETTER'S 



27 West Main St. 



Palmyra 



On the Square 



Hummelstown 



LEBANON VALLEY NATIONAL BANK 



OLDEST BANK IN LEBANON COUNTY 



Member of Federal Deposit 



Insurance Corporation 



Offices in 



LEBANON — CLEONA — SCHAFFERSTOWN 



ANNVILLE — PALMYRA 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



LEBANON VALLEY 



BEN FRANKLIN STORE 



YOUR COLLEGE STORE 



E. W. WOLFE, Owner 



37-39 West Main Street 



Annville, Pennsylvania 



COLLEGE 



THE MODERN 



BOOK STORE 



j^«^ 



CLOTHING SHOP 



Lebanon, Pennsylvania 
SERVING MEN AND YOUNG MEN SINCE 1899 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

LEBANON VALLEY 

COLLEGE 

SNACK BAR 


KARMEL KORN SHOP 

"QUALITY CONFECTIONS" 

"In the Lebanon Valley, 

Everybody Knows Where the 

Kormel Korn Shop Is." 


Compliments of 

E. M. WARNER INC. 

DESOTO 

PLYMOUTH 
VALIANT 


BUSINESS PATRONS 

D. L. SAYLOR & SONS 
REITZ'S TEXACO SERVICE 

HAROLD H. HERR 

PENNSYLVANIA HOTEL 

BATDORF'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

BROOK'S ICE CREAM BAR & RESTAURANT 

SMITH'S SHEET METAL & HARDWARE INC. 

OTTO'S CLOTHING 

A FRIEND 
HARPEL'S STUDIO 


FARMERS PRIDE 

POULTRY SPECIALISTS 

5 South Eighth Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Telephone Number Cr 33177 



^