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http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1963leba 



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1963 
TTAPAHILLA 




KiymiL 




ANNVILLE, PENNSYLVANIA 



JOHN FRANCIS ZOLA 



It IS with sense of devotion and humility that we dedicate 
the 1963 Quittapahilla to a cherished friend and beloved 
classmate, John Francis Zola. We make this dedication not 
to one who has departed from us, but to one who lives on in 
our minds and spirits as a man of principle, vigor, rugged- 
ness, and religious discipline; for John's life demonstrates to 
each one of us those qualities which help to make life more 
noble, more challenging, and more meaningful. 

We dedicate this yearbook to John's life as a life of com- 
petition and fair play. His conduct on and off the football 
field; his spirit of determination, out of all proportion to his 
short but husky stature, his enthusiasm: all these are examples 
of a life lived to the full. 

We dedicate this yearbook to John's life as a life of ser- 
vice, for he distinguished himself not only on the football 
team, but as a valued member of the L-Club and the Knights 
of the Valley. His willingness to go the extra mile, his ready 



acceptance of responsibility are indicative of a life well- 
progressed on the road to success. 

We dedicate this yearbook to John's life as a life of scho- 
lastic achievement. It was not always an easy road, this 
road to knowledge. It required hard study and continuous 
application — a conscious effort to obtain his good academic 
standing. For the example of a disciplined mind, we are 
grateful. 

Finally, we dedicate this yearbook to John's life as a life 
of religious conviction. In the deep fiber of his spiritual be- 
ing; in his manly submission to the God of Love; in his devo- 
tion to religious duty and his faithfulness to religious tradi- 
tion, we find the well springs of on abundant faith and an 
eternal life. 

To a classmate whose very life embodied those qualities 
and those characteristics which we ourselves should like to 
claim, we dedicate this yearbook. 

GEORGE G. HILTNER 






College consists ultimately of intangibles — course 
materials and presentation, dormitory bull sessions, 
the awakening of our minds to new ideas and ideals 
— all of those ingredients which go into the acquisi- 
tion of that arch-intangible which we came to college 
to seek: the truth. Yet our first impression of college 
is a physical one — a glimpse of the material structure 
of the campus — and our search for truth occurs with- 
in and around the physical structures on campus. For 
this reason the 1963 Quittapahilla reviews the year's 
events through the medium of the buildings which 
help to compose the external appearance of Lebanon 
Valley College. We see the administration and faculty 
against the background which we are most likely to 
associate with professors and administrators, the Ad- 
ministration Building; and we view classes from the 
place where we often prepare for term papers and 
examinations, the Gossard Memorial Library. Engle 



Hall naturally suggests to us recitals, band rehearsals, 
and other musical activities; and the Lynch Memorial 
Gymnasium signifies sports events. Carnegie Lounge, 
as the hub of extra-curricular activities, represents 
student life; and as a popular off-campus business 
establishment which recalls club banquets and infor- 
mal dates, the Dutch Diner introduces advertisements 
and patrons. 

In recalling our lives at college, we tend first to 
visualize our alma mater as we originally saw it: a 
physical plant comprising various material structures. 
From here we go on to remember the persons and 
activities we came to associate with these buildings, 
and thus to reconstruct the memories of our college 
years. In much the same way, the 1963 Quittapahilla 
endeavors to present Lebanon Valley College, 1961 
-62. 




College 
Dining Hal 



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ADMINISTRATION AND 

FACULTY 

CLASSES 



South Hall 




THE CONSERVE 



CAMPUS LIFE 



Mary Capp Green Ho! 




SPORTS 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



~~ Kreider Hoi! 



ADMI 




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Mtion 




ULTY 





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Dr. Frederic K. Miller 
President of the College 



ADMINISTRATION 



DR. FREDERIC K. MILLER 



In November, 1961, Dr. Frederic K. Miller began 
his second decade as President of Lebanon Valley 
College. Previous to his inauguration on November 
13, 1951, Dr. Miller had served as Acting President 
of the College for the year following the death of Dr. 
Clyde A. Lynch and had held positions here as assis- 
tant to Dr. Lynch and as professor of history. 

In tribute to President Miller on completion of his 
tenth year in LVC's highest administrative position, 
the Board of Trustees held a testimonial dinner for 
him during Graduation Week. Held in Lebanon's 
Treadway Inn on June 2, 1961, the dinner culminated 
in the presentation of an engraved silver tray to the 
President and his wife. Of particular mention during 
the ceremonies were the extensive campus building 
program, widespread administrative reorganization, 
and overall academic growth which have occurred 
during the ten years since 1 951 . 

All of these accomplishments are readily recogniz- 



able by Lebanon Valley students. In addition to ex- 
pressing its appreciation for these tangible achieve- 
ments of President Miller's administration, the stu- 
dent body would like to add its own tribute to that 
of the Trustees for the unusually warm personal re- 
lationship which the President has fostered between 
administration and students. Closely tied to the cam- 
pus both as alumnus and as former professor, he has 
never allowed his extensive administrative duties to 
create barriers between the Presidential office and 
campus life. Performing his official duties with dignity 
and diligence, President Miller nonetheless finds time 
to attend sports events, social affairs, and campus 
meetings. He commands the respect of the students; 
more important, he also enjoys their friendship. With 
the Trustees, we extend our appreciation and con- 
gratulations to President Miller on the commencement 
of his second decade as President of Lebanon Valley 
College, 



Left to Right: Mr. E. D. 
Williams, Jr.; Mrs. Fred- 
eric K, Miller; Dr. Fred- 
eric K-. Miller. 




11 




Martha C. Faust 
Dean of Women 



Dr. Corl Y. Ehrhart 
Dean of the College 




George R. Marquette 
Dean of Men 




Irwin R. Schaak 
business Manager 




ADMINISTRATION 



Gladys M. Pencil 
Administrative Assistant 



Mrs. Marion H. Starr 
Registrar 



D. Clark Cormean 
Director of Admissions 



13 




Library Staff: SEATED, Ellen Hoffman; Left to Right: Mrs. Francis H. Wilson, 
Mrs. M. A. Brown, Dr. Donald E. Fields, Librarian,- Isabelle R. Smith, Mrs. 
Donald E. Fields. 



Mrs. P. Rodney Kreider 

Executive Secretary of Alumni 

Activities 



Bruce C. Souders 
Director of Public Relations 

Walter L. Smith, Jr. 
Assistant Director of Public Relations 



Wayne V. Strasbaugh 
Director of Development 




14 




HEAD RESIDENTS: Left to Right: Mrs. William Brooks, Loughlin Hall; Mrs. 
Ruth Watson, Vickroy Hall; Mrs. Mary Alexander, College Lounge; Mrs. 
Margaret Sullivan, Mary Capp Green Residence Hall. 

George Mills, Edward 
Wilson, Mrs. Margaret 
Millard. 

Dining Hall 



Jonnie Book, Mrs. William Tredick, 
Carol Baxter. 

Nurses 




Mrs. George G. Struble 
College Bookstore 



Mrs. Frances M. Zarker 
Housekeeper 








15 




Left to Right, John F, Hough,- Robert E. Griswold,- Howard A. Neidig, Chairman; Karl L. Lockwood; Hans 
Schneider, 



CHEMISTRY 



Recognized for its high academic standards, the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry of Lebanon Valley College has specific 
aims around which its courses are designed. These aims of 
the department ore: i l' to provide students ma|oring in 
chemistry with rigorous training in the principles and appli- 
cations of modern chemistry,- i2' to provide students interested 
in the teaching profession an opportunity to become ac- 
quainted with the teaching of science, and l3i to offer stu- 
dents interested in advanced study or m industrial employ- 
ment professional training in chemistry. The department is 
approved by the American Chemical Society and may grant 
certified ACS degrees to qualified students. 

The curriculum is one of diversified study with emphasis 
placed upon a rounded education. General inorganic, gener- 
al organic, and analytical chemistry are basic required 
courses for all students in the department. Forty-four semes- 
ter hours are available. In the students' junior and senior 
years of college, through a special problems course, majors 
in chemistry are able to pursue the study of a specific project 
of their own choice involving individual laboratory work, 



written reports on their research, and seminars. 

A special feature of Lebanon Valley's Chemistry Depart- 
ment is its summer research program in which the faculty and 
selected students participate. In this program faculty and 
students work each summer on a number of problems in 
chemical research. Both the faculty and the students have re- 
ceived support from the National Science Foundation and 
from the Petroleum Research Fund of the American Chemical 
Society. These two sources of old also help in the purchasing 
of equipment for the department. 

Another association with the American Chemical Society 
IS the Student Affiliate Chapter of this professional organi- 
zation. The Lebanon Valley College Affiliate Chapter has 
monthly business meetings in which the members learn through 
guest speakers of areas of interest and possible future 
schooling or employment. Field trips to industrial sites help 
acquaint the chemistry ma|ors with areas of employment and 
attempt to show the activities of the professional chemist in 
his scientifc society. Employment is available in graduate 
schools, industry, high school and college teaching, and 
government work. 



16 



BIOLOGY 



This year the Biology Department has been concerned 
with the accumulation and effective utilization of scientific 
equipment, especially of various types of microscopes. Ac- 
cording to Dr. Francis H. Wilson, department head, Lebanon 
Valley is unique among colleges of its size in that its lab- 
oratories have not only sufficient compound microscopes but 
sufficient binocular dissecting microscopes so that each be- 
ginning student has his own with which to work. Ordinarily 
such equipment exists in limited numbers which necessitates 

sharing except in smaller classes of advanced students. During 
this year enough binocular microscopes were purchased to 
bring the total to forty-five. Additional phase microscopes 
have also been made available. 

Yearly, the Biology Department graduates approximately 
sixteen majors, half of whom continue their studies in medical 
or dental school. The department has the second largest stu- 
den^ population in the school with ninety-one ma|ors including 
students enrolled in cooperative programs with other schools. 

This year marks the retirement of Dr. V. Earl Light, pro- 
fessor of biology since 1929. Dr. Light, an alumnus of LVC, 
taught genetics, geology, and animal physiology. Extracurn- 
cularly, he has an interest in music as shown by his member- 
ship in the Glee Club in his student days and in the College 
Church Choir. His students have found pictures of the flowers 
and shrubs on his farm breathtaking. 




Left to Right: O. Pass Bollinger; V. Earl Light; Francis H. Wilson, Chairman. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



The year 1961-62 marks the assumption of a new appear- 
ance in facilities, program, and staff for the Department of 
Psychology. Permanent quarters have now been completed 
for the department and have been equipped for an expansion 
of laboratory and other direct-experience facilities. Animal 
experimentation is an added feature of special interest. There 
is an increased emphasis on independent investigations and 
research by psychology majors, a program which will be 
augmented greatly by the institution of an Independent 
study program next year. The extended field experience in 
clinical psychology continues to provide unusual opportunity 
for students to work with and learn to know mental patients. 
In addition to the other changes, the department has in- 
creased instruction in developmental psychology. Finally, in 
keeping with the overall program of expansion and improve- 
ment, the department faculty has added a third full-time 
member and hopes to increase faculty activities in instruction, 
research, and counseling. 

JEANO. LOVE 



Left to Right; Mrs. Elizabeth H. Pottieger,- Richard D. Magee,- Jean O. Love, 
Chairman. 




17 




MATHEMATICS 



In order to provide a balanced program, the Mathematics 
Department enlarged its curriculum this year to include a course 
in probability. According to Dr. Barnard H. Bissinger, depart- 
ment head, the curriculum of a department of mathematics 
must include the three major areas of mathematics — pure 
mathematics, applied mathematics, statistics and probability — 
in order to provide on adequate background in the field. In- 
cluding the nevvly-added course, there are now three courses 
offered in the third category, a bare minimum according to 
Dr. Bissinger. 

Since July 1, 1961, the faculty has been engaged in the 
preparation of a handbook on group physical mortality as a 
preliminary to statistical inventory on a research grant from the 
United States Navy. Such grants are generally designated for 
large universities. This project has involved primarily faculty 
members, but Dr. Bissinger anticipates involving students in 
future projects from the same source. 

The departmental library has been increased until it now 
contains 193 mathematical journals from almost every country 
in the world. Forty of these journals are received regularly; 
the remainder have been supplied by the library of Congress 
and by private industry. 



SEATED: Barnard Bissinger, chairman; STANDING left to right; Paul F. 
Henning, Jr., Homer Bechtell. 



Under the chairmanship of Dr. Rhodes, the Physics Depart- 
ment received a grant of $9800 from the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission. According to the terms of that bequest, equipment was 
purchased for the atomic and nuclear physics courses including 
a neutron source, a gamma-ray spectrometer, and several 
scintillation and geiger-tube counters. In addition, the Atomic 
Energy Commission has granted the Physics Department a long- 
term loan of plutonium for use in the neutron source. Auxiliary 
equipment, consisting of a powder camera and a back-reflec- 
tion camera, has been purchased for the large x-ray diffraction 



apparatus, also a part of the atomic physics laboratory. 

To the laboratory for the electrical measurements conducted 
by Dr. Grimm, a $1060 precision impedence-measuring bridge 
network has been added. This network may be used in the 
analysis of circuits of specific frequencies. 

A new laboratory manual, written by Mr. O'Donnel for the 
general physics course, has been introduced this year. It is in 
loose-leaf form so that new experiments may be added when 
necessary. 

JACOB L RHODES 




PHYSICS 



Left to Right: Samuel O. Grimm; Jacob L. 
RhocJes, chairman; J. Robert O'Donnell 




Left 



to Right: Theodore D. Keller, Anna D. Faber, Jesse Matlock, Jr., ond George G. Struble, chairman. 



ENGLISH 



To be sophisticated without being cynical, to be lofty without 
losing the human touch, to be cosnnopolitan without being less 
American, to be scholarly without being pedantic, to be serious 
without being solemn — these are some of the items in the 
creed of the English Department. To attain our ends, we stand 
ready to recognize intellectual achievement, but we prize 
artistic achievement even more. We admire the man who can 
formulate theory, but we admire even more the man who can 
demonstrate in his evety-day speech and action the principles of 
the good life. We cultivate the life of the intellect, but we are 
not insensitive to the call of the heart. 

We teach English as a tool which, like atomic energy, men 
may use to attain ends, worthy or unworthy. But we also teach 
English as an instrument of delight, an open door through which 
one may pass to encounter the deepest yearnings and the 
highest aspirations of the human spirit. We teach students who 



are woefully deficient in their knowledge of gerunds and ir- 
regular verbs and the techniques of library research; and we 
also teach students who have no need for the mealy-mouthed 
distinctions between relatives and absolutes, between apposition 
and parataxis, but whose intellectual hungers are such that we 
have this year created a special section of freshman composi- 
tion where we shape custom-made shadows for their psychic 
caverns. 

To be all things to all men is not the aim of the English De- 
partment. Rather, we try to serve all in varying degrees of use- 
fulness; but our most precious droplets of wisdom are hoarded 
for the fit though few. As to those others, we are the Great 
Enigma, seen through o glass, darkly. 

GEORGE G. STRUBLE 



19 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 



More Americans are in communication of one kind or an- 
other with foreign countries today than ever before. Foreign 
travel, residence, and study which ore almost completely 
subsidized are made possible through grants, fellowships, 
exchange plans. Junior Year Abroad arrangements, work 
programs, the Peace Corps, etc. The Mutual Educational and 
Exchange Act, signed by the President in 1961, authorizes 
financing of visits to foreign countries by teachers or pro- 
spective teachers in order to improve their language skills 
and to become acquainted with foreign cultures. If the visitor 
to a country con speak to its inhabitants in their own tongue, 
his experience is much more meaningful; and the fact that 
he has learned the language is appreciated. Mutual under- 
standing and esteem are furthered. 

The language requirement at our college is a minimal 
one. We are much concerned with giving our students the 
best possible training to meet their needs in this rapidly- 
shrinking world in the short time at our disposal. We believe 
that language is a means of communication and should be 



taught as such. For this reason we have adopted the audio- 
active approach which means that the student first hears, 
then speaks, and only later reads and writes the language 
he is studying. We have just installed a f ne laboratory which 
will enable the student to have many additional hours of 
practice in hearing and speaking. With the use of this valu- 
able complement to the classroom, the student can advance 
at his own pace and can accomplish surprising progress in 
speaking and understanding. We sincerely hope that our 
students will never say that they have studied a certain lan- 
guage but are unable to speak it. 

In our language and literature courses we are making a 
determined effort to acquaint the student with the cultural 
background of the country whose language he is learning. 
We know that knowledge leads to understanding, and thus 
we hope to make a small contribution to the great task of 
international understanding and to join the ranks of those 
who are striving for world peace. 



SARA ELIZABETH PIEL 



Seated: Soro Eliza- 
beth Pie[, Cn:iirman 
Left to Right: Mrs 
Frances T. Fields, 
Donald E, Fields, 
Ferenc Schwonauer, 
Mrs Johanna K. 
Schwanauer, David 
T, Chestnut, 




RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY 



"Freedom through truth," the college motto, provides the 
major purpose of the academic program of each department 
at Lebanon Valley College. In keeping with the motto, this 
department aims to provide an opportunity for the study of 
our philosophical and religious heritage. It is felt that such 
study is of special importance in an age such as our own 
which, in carrying specialization of knowledge to on extreme, 
tends to ignore the whole person and his relationship to God 
and other men. 

In the study of philosophy students are encourged to de- 
velop interest in the most universal questions about man and 
his world and to philosophize for themselves. Vocationally 
the study of philosophy, begun in college and continued in 
graduate school, prepares one for a teaching career at the 
college and university level. 

Religiously, the department seeks to orient the student to 
o Christian world-view providing an understanding of the 



Scriptures and the heritage of the Christian Church as a means 
to this end, as well as to enhance Christian living as a dy- 
namic experience. 

This year a freshman honors section in the course in English 
Bible was introduced into the program of the department. 
Also, Carl B. Rife, a senior, was selected as a student teaching 
intern. Throughout the year the department staff has been 
meeting in an effort to evaluate the curriculum and to deter- 
mine what revisions will improve the courses now offered. 

Students majoring in this department are for the most part 
following a pre-theologicol program. In preparation for their 
continuing study on the graduate level, careful planning is 
made for those seeking admission to theological seminaries, 
church music schools, and universities. The curriculum revision 
IS expected to offer opportunities, within the liberal arts con- 
text, for more intensive program for students who are in- 
terested in the expanding area of church vocations. 



JAMES O. BEMESDERFER 




Left to Right: Carl 
Y. Ehrhart, Chair- 
man; Perry J. Trout- 
mon; Benjamine A. 
Richards; James O. 
Bemesderfer; Mortin 
Foss. 



Left to Right: Jame; 
S. Leamon, Elizabeth 
GefFen, Alex J. Fehr, 
Ralph S. Shay, chair- 
man. 




HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



A new face was added fo the staff of the Deprtment of His- 
tory and Political Science as the academic year opened in 
September. Dr. James S. Leamon replaced Mr. John H. Fritz 
who resigned during the early summer to assume a position at 
Fairleigh Dickinson University. Dr. Leamon received his graduate 
training at Brown University and had filled a one-year apoint- 
ment at Wortburg College in Iowa prior to coming to our 
campus. 

The offices of the department were moved during the summer 
from the Infirmary Building to South Hall where the staff has 
available a small classroom for conducting small classes and 
for holding conferences. 

This year the department offered several new courses in 
accordance with the recently-revised departmental curriculum. 
Among these were ancient history and medieval history, both 
taught by Dr. Leamon, and the year course in the history of the 
United States and Pennsylvania, taught by Dr. Geffen. The 
department's one-semester survey course in American and Penn- 
sylvania history became one of the new general college re- 
quirements. Dr. Richards of the Department of Philosophy and 
Religion aided the departmental staff by teaching the course in 
city government. 



Other innovations were the inauguration of an independent 
study program in political science and plans for the 1962-63 
establishment of an honors section in American and Pennsyl- 
vania history. 

Several individual departmental achievements deserve recog- 
nition. Philadelphia Unitarionism, 1796 — 1861 by departmental 
staff member Dr. Geffen was published during the summer. 
Three students in the Source Problems in American History 
course wrote papers on separate periods of the history of the 
college to supplement two papers written last year. These 
papers will be of significant value as the college prepares for 
its centennial observance in 1966. 

The departmental committee for the campus observance of 
the Civil War Centennial, Dr. Geffen and Dr. Leamon assisted 
by departmental majors, arranged several displays in the 
library during the year. Over twenty students accompanied the 
history instructors to the Fifth Annual Civil War Conference at 
Gettysburg College in November. The theme of the Inter-Society 
Council dance, "Southern Cotillion," held in the same month 
originated in the committee. 

The staff of the department attended a number of meetings 
of professional organizations during the course of the year. 



RALPH S. SHAY 



22 




SOCIOLOGY 



With the conversion of South Hall into classrooms last fall, the 
Sociology Department gained a new office and a room for 
seminar-size classes. 

The Social Work Practicum, an honors program for qualified 
sociology majors, was a part of the department's offerings again 
this year. This program, which also encompasses the Psychology 
Department, enables seniors who ore leaning toward social work 
to observe for twelve weeks the practices of the Family and Chil- 
dren's Service, the Veterans Administrations Hospital (both in 
Lebanon), and the Lebanon County Board of Assistance. In certain 
instances the students ore encouraged to take part in actual case 
work under professional supervision. 

Sociology attempts to understand the social structure and rela- 
tionships by which man functions in his culture. Institutions, such as 
religion, family, and schools portray much of the inner quality of 
a society. The reasons why man searches for life's meaning, why 
children become delinquent, or why some individuals are not ac- 
cepted by their society is not the concern of just American sociolo- 
gists, but of those in the profession everywhere. 



ALICE M. BRUMBAUGH 



Alice M. Brumbaugh 



The aim of the Department of Economics and Business Ad- 
ministration is to give its students a thorough training in the 
essential principles and fundamentals of economics and busi- 
ness. 

The fundamentals of economics generally concern the promo- 
tion of economic welfare in our society. Economics students at 
Lebanon Valley College learn to approach this goal in three 
major ways; the first is to use resources to the best possible 
advantage; the second is to strive toward full employment; the 
third is to encourage an all-around economic growth. 



Principles of business administration aim for the same goals 
within a narrower and more specialized area. The Business 
Administration segment of Lebanon Valley's Economics and 
Business Department seeks to train students in the mangement of 
business establishments in order to reap the highest possible 
dividends from those establishments. 

Students who graduate from this department utilize their 
training to pursue degrees in graduate schools and to acquire 
positions in industry, government service, college professorships, 
and in accounting and banking employment. 



ECONOMICS 



AND 
BUSINESS 



Left to Right: C. F. Joseph Tom, Chairman; 
Robert C. Riley; D. John Grace 




MUSIC 



The educational objectives of the Music Department are 
three-fold: to train artists and teachers, to teach music his- 
torically and aesthetically as an element of liberal culture, 
and to offer courses that give a thorough and practical under- 
standing of theoretical subjects. The curriculum offers leads 
to a Bachelor of Science degree with a ma|or in Music Ed- 
ucation. 

A recent major change v^as made in the Music Education 
curriculum which incorporates additional academic course 
work. This was necessitated by a newly established policy by 
the Commonwealth's Department of Public Instruction which 
requires a minimum of sixty hours in general education courses 



for all future certified teachers. The Class of 1964 will, be the 
first group to be graduated under the new program. Although 
the intensified curriculum is extremely demanding, depart- 
mental majors are now provided with a more liberal ed- 
ucation along with the established standards of their pro- 
fessional preparation. 

In addition to its major offering, the department also pro- 
vides for a minor in music. College students of other major 
disciplines are encouraged to participate in the various musi- 
cal organizations, for which a maximum credit of eight se- 
mester hours may be counted toward their degrees. 



ROBERT W.SMITH 



Seated: Ma re i a M. Pick well, Mrs, 
Ruth E, Bender. Left to Riqht; Pierce 
A. Getz, James M. Thurmond, Alex- 
ander Crawford, Thomas A. Lanese, 
George D. Curfmon, William H. 
Fair lamb, Reynaldo Rovers, Robert 
W. Smith. 

Missing; D, Clark Carmeon, R. 
Porter Campbell, Harold Malsh, 
Frank E, Stachow, E. Joan Reeve, 
Linda L. vanSteenwyk, 




24 






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.jg.... ,-_iT- M^^^^^Mt 




Robert W. Smith, Chairman 

Director of Division of Teacher Education 

Associate Professor of Music Education 



25 




Left to Right: Chairman 

Gilbert D. McKlveen, 

June M. Herr, Cloyd H. 
Ebersole. 



TEACHER EDUCATION 



The year 1961-1962 marked a forward look at the whole 
program of teacher training at Lebanon Valley. Particularly 
was the area of student teaching on the secondary level care- 
fully scrutinized. 

At the beginning of the year, the Division of Teacher Educa- 
tion met and appointed Professor Robert Smith as its chairman. 
It was agreed that a study would be made of NCATE (National 
Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education) and its rela- 
tionship to our college. 

The Academic Affairs Committee allotted a great deal of time 
to the proposal of the Department of Education to put student 



teaching on the secondary level on a full-time eight or nine- 
week basis during the first semester of the senior year. Such a 
policy is still under consideration. 

Moving forward on its own, the department established a 
program of student teaching stronger than that of former years. 
Students were placed, where possible, to an all-morning or all- 
afternoon assignment for a full twelve-week period. This has 
greatly increased the participation of our students in the public 
schools and enriched their knowledge of the requirements and 
qualifications prerequisite to becoming effective teachers. 

GILBERT D. McKLVEEN 



26 



Left to Right: Charles E. 
Poad, George R. Mar- 
quette, chairman; Donald 
M. Grider, Elizabeth Jane 
Bowman, William 0. Mc- 
Henry. 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



The faculty members of the Department of Physical Education 
are committed to the proposition that only through "a sound 
mind in a healthy body" can an individual experience the good 
life. This department is a two-pronged service department at 
L. V. C. On the one hand, it devises the curriculum for the two- 
year required program in physical education which is required 
of all students for graduation; and on the other hand, it ad- 
ministers the widely varied voluntary program in intramural 
athletics. 

Of special note in the physical education program is the 
prominent place given to individual sports activities. The 
objective of this emphasis is to develop skill in and appreciation 
of activities of one's own choosing to the end that each student 
will desire to engage regularly in strenuous physical activity 
during his professional years. 

The L. V. C. Department of Physical Education has been en- 
gaged in physical fitness testing for a number of years. The 
nationwide concern for physical fitness which has received 
urgent attention recently was anticipated here at L.V.C. Ac- 
cordingly, L. V. C cooperates with the State of Pennsylvania 



during the school year as a resource station for the gathering 
of data from selected local schools to be used in a pilot study 
on the present status of physical fitness of school children in 
this state. 

The Intramural Council — composed of representatives from 
each organization actively engaged in campus-wide intramural 
competition — aids in the planning and directing of the intra- 
mural program for men, while the W.A.A. contributes compara- 
ble efTort to the women's intramural activities. This is a vital 
area of the total college program wherein maximum student 
planning, directing, and participation is encouraged. In recent 
years more than fifty per cent of the student body has partici- 
pated consistently in one or more activities in the intramural 
program. 

The activities of the department come to a close in May in a 
most appropriate manner, i.e., championship gomes and 
matches in all sports on Sports Night and final physical fitness 
tests for all students in the required physical education pro- 
gram. 

BETTY JANE BOWAN 



27 




F!f ITS, H:E:ESF Ef! 

WW WW WWFWW WW 

IG^FE^ F!!^FE^F ^ 




CLAS 




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te-x « 





Kreider Hal 




SENIORS 



Graduation will remove from our college ranks the Class of 
1962, whose members have ably staffed Valley's numerous 
campus organizations and athletic teams throughout the past 
four years. During that time the Class of '62 has sponsored 
many dances and other social activities, among the most memo- 
rable of these, their Junior Prom. At this time they set a prece- 
dent by bringing Maynord Ferguson's nationally-known band 
to campus. This year, their last at Lebanon Valley, the seniors 
held a class party in the fall and the traditional Senior Boll and 



Banquet in the spring. Climaxing their four years on Lebanon 
Valley's campus was a formal dinner given annually for seniors 
by Dr. Miller. 

George Hiltner again served his class this year in the ca- 
pacity of president. Also returned by class vote to executive po- 
sitions were Carl Rife, vice-president; Gloria Fitzkee, secretary; 
Don Drumheller, treasurer; and Lowell Brogon; student-faculty 
representative. 



ROW 1: Carl Rite, vice-president; 
Don Drumheller, treasurer; ROW 
2: George Hiltner, president; 
Gloria Carter, secretary; Low- 
ell Brogan, Student-Faculty 
Council representative. 






JOHN E. ADAMS 

Chemistry B.S. 

Closter, NJ. 



DONALD E, BACASTOW 

Economics B.S. 

Hummelstown, Pa. 



ROWLAND WAYNE BARNES 
Economics B.S, 
Lebanon, Pa. 




RUTH ANN BARRY 

Nursing B.S. in Nursing 

Quincy, Pa. 



CAROL RUSSEL BAXTER 

Nursing B.S in Nursing 

Aldan, Po. 



GLORIA ANN BECHTEL 

Music Education B.S. 

Borto, Po- 



RICHARD NELSON BLAIR 
Economics B.S. 
Penbrook, Pa. 



■^^^. 




ROBERT BOLLINGER 

Politicol Science A,B. 

Annville, Pa. 



MARY BOLLMAN 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Sinking Springs, Pa. 




KARL WILBUR BORDNER 
Economics B.S. 
Palmyra, Pa. 



ARTHUR F. BOWMAN 

Chemistry B.S. in Chemistry 

Hopeland, Pa. 



32 




EMILY JANE BOWMAN 

Music Education B.S. 

Plainfield, N.J. 



THOMAS BRANDT 
Physics B.S. 
Annville, Pa. 



DONNA RAE BRESSLER 

English A.B. 

Selinsgrove, Pa. 



LOWELL B, BROGAN 
Economics B S 
Sheridan, Pa 




BRENDA B, BROWN 
Mathematics A.B. 
Bergenfield, N.J. 



CONSTANCE MYERS BROWN 

Elementary Education B.S, 

Horrisburg, Pa. 



MICHAEL MATHISON BROWN 
Biology B.S. 
Palmyra, Pa. 





SYLVIA Z. BUCHER 

Music Education B.S. 

Lonsdale, Po. 



JUDITH G, BUCK 
Mathematics A.B. 
Somerville, N.J. 



GLORIA FITZKEE CARTER 

Elementary Education B.S. 

York, Po. 



33 




KAYE CASSEL 
Biology A.B. 
Telford, Pa- 



LARRY FOSTER CISNEY 

History A.B. 

McConnellsburg, Pa. 



GARY H. CRONRATH 

Economics B.S. 

Watsontown, Pa. 



DAVID CZIRR 

Chemistry B.S. in Chemistry 
Kresskill, N, J. 




STANLEY M DANIELS 
Economics B S, 
Palmyra, Po, 



PATRICIA LOUISE DAVIS 

Music Education B.S. 

Salem, N, J. 



WOODROW S. DELLINGER, JR. 
Chemistry B.S. 
Red Lion, Pa. 



TERRY AUSTIN DeWALD 
Music Education B.S. 
Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 




SYLVIA ANN DILLMAN 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Jonestown, Pa. 



HAROLD DOM 
Psychology A.B, 
Stoystown, Pa. 



GEORGIANA DOf^TFR 
Sociology A.B. 
Lancaster, Pa. 



ELMER W. FABER 
Sociology A.B. 
Annville, Pa. 




THOMAS LEE DONLEY 
History A.B. 
Lebanon, Pa. 




JAMES R. DRESSEL 

Mathematics B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



DONALD R, DRUMHELLER 

Philosophy A.B. 

Schuylkill Haven, Pa. 





CAROL FELTY EARP 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



RALPH NORMAN EARP, JR. 

Greek-Religion A.B. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



GABRIELLE A. ECKENROTH 
Physics B.S. 
Annville, Pa. 




GERALD H EDRIS 


JUDITH KLINE FEATHER 


KENNETH R, FEATHER 


HIRAM EARL FITZGERALD 


Chemistry B.S. 


History A.B. 


Chemistry B.S. In Chemistry 


Psychology A.B. 


Lebanon, Pa. 


Lebanon, Pa. 


Lebanon, Po. 


Columbia, Pa. 





DEAN A FLINCHBAUGH 

Industrial Chemistry BS in Chemistry 

Dallastown, Po. 



ARTHUR FORSTATER 

English A,B, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



DAVID H, FORTNA 
Biology B.S. 
Palmyra, Pa. 




HARRY FREDERICK 

Music Education B S, 

Annville, Pa 



JOANNE R FREED 

Elementary Education B S 

Liverpool, Pa. 



R MICHAEL GEPHART 
Biology A.B. 
Carlisle, Pa. 




FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT GINGRICH 

Religion A.B 

Campbelltown, Pa. 



JOAN OLIVIA GLUYAS 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Collingswood, N.J. 



LARRY LEE GODSHALL 
History A.B. 
Ephrato, Po. 



FRANCIS D GROVE 

Chemistry B.S. 

Felton, Pa. 



36 





ROBERT L HABIG 
Chemistr/ B.S. in Chemistry 
Middletown, Pa. 



GEORGE JOSEPH HILTNER, III 

Greek A.B. 

Baltimore, Md. 



CLEE HAGAMAN 

Medical Technology B.S. In 

Medical Technology 

Palmyra, Pa. 



JANE HICKS 

Nursing B.S. in Nursing 

Lebanon, Pa. 



KAY LUCILLE HOFFER 

Music Education B.S, 

Lititz, Pa. 



JOSEPH R, HOOPER 

Chemistry B.S. 
New Cumberland, Pa. 




DOYLE WATSON IVEY 
Mathematics B.S. 
Horrisburg, Po. 



REGINA MARIA JUNO 

Medicol Technology 8.5. in 

Medical Technology 

Bristol, Pa. 

37 



BRUCE ROBERT HILL 

Business Adminlstralion B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 




YVONNE KAY HUGHES 

Medical Technology B.S. in 

Medical Technology 

Lewisberry, Pa. 



r; 




v<C ^ «? 




RICHARD L <AHAN 

Biology B.S. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




JEAN MARIE KAUFFMAN 

English A.B, 

Landisville, Pa. 



BONNIE FIX KELLER 

Music Education B.S. 

Annville, Pa. 



GLORIA A. KISTLER 
Music Education B.S, 
West Hamburg, Pa. 



RICHARD E. KLINEDINST 

Music Education B.S. 
Annville, Pa. 




SUZANNE GRACE KLINEDINST 

Music Education B S, 

Annville, Pa. 



JOHN F. KOBYLARZ 
Chemistry B.S, 
Passaic, N. J. 



DORIS ELAINE KOHL 

Music Education B.S. 

Irvington, N. J. 




WALTER A. KRUEGER, JR. 

Biology A.B. 

Bergenfteld, N. J. 



ANNETTE S. KURR 

Music Education B.S. 

Robesonio, Pa. 




MARY LOUISE LAMKE 
English A.B. 
Steelton, Pa. 



38 





HARRY MARTIN LEHN 

Physics B.S. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



RAY C, LICHTENWALTER 

Music Education B-S. 

Palmerton, Pa. 



BARRY W. LIGHT 
Economics B.S. 
Palmyra, Pa. 




KENNETH K LIGHT 

Chemistry B.S. in Chemistry 

Palmyra, Po. 



MARILYN A. LOY 

English A.B. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



A, HAKIM LYS 
Economics B-S. 
Java, Indonesia 



JON E MARSHALL 
Economics B.S. 
Chatham, N. J. 




JANE E, McCANN 

Music Education B.S. 

Blackwood, N. J. 



BARBARA ANN McCLEAN 

Music Education B.S. 

Philadelphia, Po. 



LARRY ELDEAN McGRIFF 

Music Education B.S. 

Arcanum, Ohio 



LOIS E. McKINNEY 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 




H EUGENE MILLER 

Music Education B.S. 

Myersville, Md. 



ISOBEL MARY MILLER 

Music Education B.S. 

Horrisburg, Pa. 



MARJORIE JANE MILLER 

Music Education B.S. 

Phoenixville, Pa. 





ELIZABETH ANN MOORE 

Music Education B S 

Hovertown, Po. 



EDGAR G E MORGAN 

Political Science A.B. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



NORMA JANE MORRIS 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Clayton, N. J. 



DELORES ANITA MOUNSEY 

Medical Technology B.S. in 

Medical Technology 

Washington, D.C. 




H LEE MOYER 
History A.B. 
Hershey, Po. 



DAVID B. MULHOLLAND 

Political Science A B 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



GARY CARL MYERS 

Biology B.S. 

Yoe, Po. 



DENNIS PHILLIPPY 

Chemistry B.S. 

Hershey, Po. 




ANITA JUNE PINGEL 

Medicol Technology B-S. in 

Medical Technology 

Wyomissing, Pa. 




CECELIA ANN KEEHN 

Music Education B.S. 

Annville, Po. 




<^' 





NANNETTE RETTIG 
Biology A.B. 
Clork, N.J. 




CARLIN RICHARD RHINE 
History A.B, 
Annville, Pa. 







CARL BRUCE RIFE 


MARILYN E, RINKER 


WILLIAM R ROHRBACH 


Philosophy Religion A.B. 


English A.B. 


Political Science A.B 


York, Po. 


Annville, Pa. 


Harrisburg, Pa. 




^ ^^'; 




LARRY RUDY 

Chemistry B.S. 

New Cumberland, Pa. 




GAYLE CHRISTINE SCHLEGEL 

Music Education B,S. 

Reading, Pa. 



CHARLES R, SEIDEL 
Economics B.S. 
Annville, Pa. 



41 




DEANNA JEAN SEILER 


GENE SERGENT 


Music Education B.S. 


Economics B.S. 


Northampton, Pa. 


Metuchen, N.J. 



JOHN K. SEYMOUR 
Mathematics A.B. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



MARYLIN RUTH SHAVER 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Hooverville, Pa. 




DANIEL F. SHEARER 


M BLAINE SHIRK 


PHILIP BROOKS SLATCHER 


WILLIAM WAYNE SLIKE 


Music Education B.S. 


Biology A.B. 


Psychology A.B. 


Spanish A.B. 


Ephroto, Pa. 


Paradise, Pa. 


Havertown, Pa. 


Lebanon, Pa. 




CAROL ANN SMITH 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Ephrata, Pa. 



G. EUGENE STAMBACH 
Sociology A.B. 
Mt. Wolf, Pa. 



KAY LORRAINE STEINER 
Sociology A.B. 
Lampeter, Pa. 



42 





AGLAIA STEPHANIS 
Biology A.B. 

Marietta, Pa. 



SANDRA STETLER 
Music Education B S- 
Wormleysburg, Pa. 



ROBERT STULL 

Biology B.S. 
Fleetwood, Pa. 





VIRGINIA MEA TEMPLETON 
Psychology A.B. 
Hellertown, Pa. 



LEE JACKSON TURNER, JR. 

Music Education B S 

Wilmington, Del. 



RUSSELL R, UREY 

Chemistry B.5. 

Red Lion, Po, 






HENRY F. VAN de WATER 


JEANNE ELIZABETH VOWLER 


WILLIAM J. WALKER 


ROGER NELSON WARD 


Chemistry B.S. 


Elemenfory Education B.S. 


Physics B.S. 


Biology B.S. 


Malvern, Pa. 


Upper Darby, Po. 


Annville, Pa. 


Lafayette Hill, Pa. 




GEORGE M WEAVER, JR 

Philosophy, Greek A B. 

New Holland, Pa. 



LINDA JEAN WEBER 

English A B, 

New Holland, Pa. 



D RAY WENGER, JR. 
Physics B S 
Annville, Pa. 





ROSALIE BETTY WIDA 

Language Major A B. 

Rexmont, Pa 



BONNIE LYNN WILLIAMS 

Elemenfary Education B.S. 

Butler, N J 



PATSY LARUE WISE 
Mathematics A.B. 
Middletown, Md. 




BARBARA HELEN WOGISCH 

Chemistry B.S. in Chemistry 

Bergenfield, N.J. 



ELLIS W WOLFE 
Economics B.S 
Annville, Pa. 



RICHARD T. YINGLING 

Chemistry B S. in Chemistry 

Hershey, Pa. 



HARRY B. YOST 
Biology B.S. 
Etters, Pd. 



44 



SENIORS NOT PICTURED 



a 



ass 



ROBERT BRILL 

Mathemotics A,B 

Sugarloaf, Pa. 

JOHN DICK 
Biology B.S. 
Califon, N.J. 

JOSEPH FOX 
Physics B.S. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



WILLIAM REIGHTER 

Englis.h A.B. 

Horrisburg, Pa. 

HARRY VOSHELL 

Music B S. 
Wyoming, Del. 

DAVID WEEKLEY 

English A.B. 

Pottstown, Pa. 




BARBARA HORST 

Nursing B.S. in Nursing 

Wyomissing, Pa. 



RUTH WOOD 

Nursing B.S. in Nursing 

Lebanon, Pa. 



JOSEPH MICHAEL 

Physics B.S. 
Stewartstown, Pa. 



JUNE YEAGLEY 

Elementary Education B S. 

Mystertown, Pa. 



EDWARD MIRMAK 

Mathematics B.A. 

Lancaster, Pa. 





GARY L, ZELLER 


DUNN PAUL ZIMMERMAN 


Hi Fitzgerald in psychology. Corl Rife in philosophy and religion, and Bob 


Music Education B.S. 


History A.B. 


Brill in mathematics hove demonstrated their initiative and capabilities as 


Mf. Joy, Pa. 


Horrisburg, Po. 


Senior Student Interns. 



45 




Left to Right: George Hiltner, Donna Bressler, Mary Louise Lamke, Carl Rife. Not Pictured: Connie 
Myers Brown. 



PHI ALPHA EPSILON 



Phi Alpha Epsilon has adopted its name from the Greek 
initial letters of the phrase meoning "Love of Learning the 
Truth," This honor society was founded in 1935 to honor out- 
standing students. In order to be elected to membership, a stu- 
dent must hove achieved a grade-point overage of 3.30 or 
better for at least five semesters. New members, elected by 
the faculty in the spring of their Senior year, are formally 
accepted at a banquet held in their honor. 

1 963's additions to Phi Alpha Epsilon are Donna Bressler, 
Connie Myers Brown, George Hiltner, Mary Lousie Lomke, and 
Carl Rife. Donna, an English major from Selinsgrove, Pennsyl- 
vania, has supplemented her academic record by member- 
ship in Kappa Lambda Nu, Wig and Buckle, Student Pennsyl- 
vania State Education Association, and Quittaphilla. Connie, 
from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, holds a B.S. in elementary ed- 
ucation. She has been active in Student Pennsylvania State 



Education Association, Elementary Education Club, La Vie CoJ- 
legienne, and Quittapahilla. George, a pre-ministerial student 
and philosophy and Greek major from Baltimore, Maryland, 
and president of Men's Senate, has been active in French Club, 
White Hats, Delta Tau Chi, Quittapahilla, Wig and Buckle, 
Knights of the Valley, and Alpha Psi Omega. Mary Louise 
from Steelton, Pennsylvania, holds on internship in the depart- 
ment of her major, English, and presides over Green Blotter 
and Wig and Buckle besides participating m La Vie Collegi- 
enne, Quittapahilla, and Student Pennsylvania State Edu- 
cation Association. Carl, from York, Pennsylvania, is a phi- 
losophy major and an intern in the Philosophy Department. 
Besides being president of the Student Christian Association, 
he is active in Delta Tau Chi, Kappa Lambda Sigma, Beta 
Beta Beta, LV Club, Quittapahilla, and Men's Senate. 



46 



WHO'S WHO 



Fourteen seniors, the maximum number for Lebanon Valley 
College, were honored by Who's Who in American Colleges 
and Universities by their inclusion in the organization's pub- 
lication this year. The students were recommended by the 
faculty and approved by Who's Who on the basis of scholar- 
ship, extracurricular activities, citizenship in school, and prom- 
ise of future usefulness. Approximately seven hundred fifty 
colleges and universities are represented in this directory of 
distinguished American students. Free placement service and 
the right to wear the official Who's Who key are part of the 
honor of being selected. 

Donald Bacastow, economics and business administration, is 
president of Pi Gamma Mu, vice president of the Investment 
Club, and was an intern in business during December and 
January. Rowland Barnes, economics and business adminis- 
tration, is member of the football and track teams and is 
president of the Men's Day Student Congress. Mary Bollman, 
elementary education, is vice president of Delphian, secretary 
of RWSGA, president of WAA, and active in Faculty-Student 
Council, Student Pennsylvania State Education Association, 
and the Elementary Education Club. Donna Brassier, English 
and sociology, makes a regular appearance on the Dean's 
List and is a member of Pi Gamma Mu, Clio, and Phi Alpha 



Epsilon. Sylvia Bucher, music education, is president of Mary 
Green Hall and is active in Concert Choir and Delphian. 
Hiram Fitzgerald, psychology, was co-coptoin of the basket- 
ball team, a member of the football and track squads, coun- 
selor of West Hall, and president of the Psychology Club. 
George Hiltner, philosophy and Greek, has been class presi- 
dent for four years, on assistant in the Foreign Language 
Department, and a Knight of the Valley. Jean Kauffmon, 
English and philosophy, is editor of La Vie Collegienne and a 
member of the Green Blotter and of Faculty-Student Council. 
Mary Louise Lamke, English, is president of Wig and Buckle 
and Green Blotter Clubs, holder of a straight Dean's List rec- 
ord, and president of Alpha Psi Omega. Barry Light, econom- 
ics and business administration, is vice president of Pi Gamma 
Mu, a member of the Men's Day Student Congress, and a 
past intern in business, Carl Rife, philosophy, was the editor 
of the 1962 Quittapahilla and is president of SCA and vice 
president of the Senior Class. Kay Steiner, sociology, is the 
student assistant in the Sociology Department, a member of 
Pi Gamma Mu, and active in SCA and Delta Tau Chi. Sandra 
Stetler, music education, is president of Delphian and a mem- 
ber of SAl, Faculty-Student Council, and RWSGA. Patsy Wise, 
mathematics, is president of RWSGA, a member of Delphian, 
and was associate editor of the 1962 Quittapahilla. 



Left to Right, STANDING: Sylvia Bucher, Patricio Wise, Mary Bollman, Sandra Stetler, Kay Steiner, 
Donna Bressler, Jean KaufFman, Mary Louise Lamke SEATED: Rowland Barnes, George Hiltner, Carl 
Rife, Hiram Fitzgerald 




47 



KtS. 






mStSmmm 



t^M 



■SS 



,mmm^^ 



mmmmmKim^ 




J»«""'-5*a«(!«MWB»««B 





to^' 





Mary Capp Green Hall 



Left to right: Bob Andreozzi, 
president; Jerry Bowman, vice- 
president; Linda Breeze, secre- 
tary; Jim Cash Ion, treasurer. 




JUNIORS 



Under the direction of Bob Andreozzi, president, the Junior 
Class contributed to the 61-62 campus social calendar by spon- 
soring an informal fall dance, the annual spring Junior Prom, 
and a Powder PufT football game. The latter, originally planned 
as a class project, met with success which warranted its con- 
tinuation OS on annual event. In regard to the prom, however, 
the class voted not to continue the practice, initiated by last 
year's juniors, of providing music for the affair by a big-name 



band. 

The class of 1963 was saddened by the death of one of its 
members, John Zola, who died as a result of an injury sustained 
in one of Valley's football games. 

OfTicers for the class in addition to President Andriozzi are 
Gerald Bowman, vice-president; Linda Breeze, secretary, Jim 
Cashion, treasurer,- and Greg Stanson, class representative on 
the Student-Faculty Council. 



K'V 



J 




MR. AND MISS LVC 



'63 honors Lecinn Grebe and Kenneth Girard for exemplifying 
all-around L.V. College students through loyal participation in 
a variety of college activities. 

Leann, especially outstanding for her work in SCA and 
Quittie, has also attained a high level of academic achievement 
at Valley. She represents the Junior Class in R.W.S.G.A. and is 
an active member of Clio. 



Ken shows his leadership ability by serving as president of 
Faculty-Student Council, He is an active member of the Knights, 
represents his class in Men's Senate, and holds membership on 
the varsity basketball team. 

Ken and Leann have indeed earned the title of Mr. and Miss 
L.V.C. 



50 





MR. AND MISS ATHLETE 



For three years the fine sportsmanship and athletic abilities 
of Vance StaufFer and Patricia Shonk have sparked our Blue 
and White teams. The Junior Class, recognizing their valuable 
contributions in this area, have elected Pat and Vance Mr, and 
Miss Athlete of 1961-62. 

Pat's record is filled with many basketball and hockey games, 
supplemented by a variety of intramural competitions. She 



rounds off her athletic activities with active membership in the 
Women's Athletic Association. 

Vance has shown outstanding performance as tackle on our 
football team, has given L.V.C. many wrestling honors in the 
heavyweight division, and holds active membership in L-Club. 

Our hats off to you, Vance and Pat! 



51 





':». 



MR. AND MISS QUITTIE 



Poise, courtesy, friendliness, and attractiveness were the 
bases on which the Junior Class selected fellow-class members 
Patricia Boyer and John Yajko as Mr. and Miss Quittie of 1963. 
These pleasing personality traits also distinguish the members 
of Patty and John's court: Linda Breeze, Nancy Dutro, Millie 



Evans Dolores Koncar, Kristine Kreider, and Jo-Ann Whitman. 
Net only do these juniors exemplify outstanding social charac- 
teristics but they also display leadership and academic ability 
on campus. '63 expresses its heartiest congratulations to Pat 
and John and the six members of their court. 



52 




Kristine Kreider 




Jo-Ann Whitman 




Linda Breeze 




Millie Evans 




Dolores Koncar 



Nancy Dutro 




OUTSTANDING 
STUDENTS 



Bob Andreozzi 




Paul Young 



Tom Bolsbaugh 



Among the highest honors that a student can attain in the 
Junior year is selection as one of the ten most outstanding students 
of the class. Chosen on the basis of creditable academic achieve- 
ment, noteworthy service to class and campus, leadership through- 
out the college community, v^ell-rounded personality, and charac- 
ter of high moral quality, these ten reflect in their achievements 
the entire range of campus activities, 

Joyce demonstrated versatility in Green Blotter and varsity 
sports endeavors; Mary Lu, Charlotte, and Sue utilized their crea- 
tive English ability in La Vie and Quitte; Judy was active in Child- 
hood Education Club and Delphian Bob showed his leadership 
qualities as Junior Class president, Tom as vice-president. Bruce 
achieved recognition as recipient of both mathematics and chemis- 
try awards, Greg as an active member of the Political Science and 
Debating Clubs, and Paul as a leader in SCA and Knights. 

These achievements, supplemented by high academic records, 
indicate the preparedness of these students to be judged "most 
outstanding" by future associates as well as by their classmates of 
'63. 



54 



Joy Dixon 





Sue Smith 



Mory Lu Haines 



Judy Snowberger 



Chorlotte Hemperly 



Greg Stanson 






ri 




Bruce Lidsfon 





H WILLIAM ACKER 
Economics B,S. 
Intercourse, Pa. 



ROBERT J, ANDREOZZI 

Pre-Medicol B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 





BARBARA H. BAILES 

Sociology A.B. 
South Plainfield, N.J. 







G THOMAS BALSBAUGH 

Pre-Medical B.S. 

Steelton, Pa. 



WINIFRED E BARNHART 

Music Education B.S. 

Greencastle, Pa. 



KATHLEEN BAUERNFEIND 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Glen Rock, N.J. 






KENNETH C BECK 
Biology B.S. 
Baldwin, N.Y. 



THOMAS C. BENDER 
Biology B.S. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



OLIVE ANN BINNER 
History A.B. 
Easton, Pa. 






BARRY V. BISHOP 

Chemistry B.S. 
Elizabethtown, Pa. 



MARGARET S. BLOMQUIST 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Fort Washington, Po. 



BARBARA ANN BONGART 

Music Education B.S. 

Columbia. Pa. 






JONNIE E. BOOK 

Nursing B.S. in Nursing 

Mechonicsburg, Pa. 



GERALD LEE BOWMAN 
Physics A.B, 
Cleono, Pa. 



PATTY RAE BOYER 

Elementary Education BS. 

Allentown, Pa. 





JAMES L. BOYLE, JR. 

Mathematics B.S. 

Tamoquo, Po, 



LINDA M, BREEZE 

History A.B, 

Sugarloaf, Pa. 



JAMES E. BROMMER 
Chemistry A.B, 
Pine Grove, Po. 



t 



^"^ 

j-%/^^~i 





There's room for all in Vickroy Hall! 



SHIRLEY ANNE BROWN 

Music Education BS. 

North Wales, Pa. 








GERALD E BROWNAWELL 


GAIL M BULL 


JAMES H. CASHION, JR. 


Motbematics A.B. 


English A.B. 


Business Administration B.S 


Dillsburg, Pa. 


Hamburg, N.Y. 


Rahway, N.J. 



PHILIP H CASTOR 


MICHAEL W CHABITNOY 


CAROL ANN CLEMENS 


Philosophy A.B. 


Music Education B.S. 


Music Education B.S. 


Sheridan, Pa, 


Lebanon, Pa. 


Lancaster, Pa, 



58 







JAMES D. CORBETT 


RONALD C. CORSON 


JUDITH BARBARA COY 


Philosophy, Religion A.B. 


Economics ond Business 


English A.B. 


Lancaster, Pa. 


Administration B.S. 
Absecon, NJ. 


Lititz, Pa. 




R. FRED CRIDER, JR. 

Philosophy, Religion A.B. 

Chambersburg, Pa. 





JAMES W. DAVIS 

Mathematics A.B. 

Annville, Pa. 



PATRICIA H. DERBYSHIRE 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Huntingdon Valley, Pa. 




^^ <;: 






JOHN P. DETWILER 


JAMES P. DEVINE 


ADAM DIEBUS 


Political Science A B. 


Physics B.S. 


Economics B.S. 


Lebonon, Po. 


Annville, Pa. 


Annville, Pa. 



59 






WILLIAM A, DISSINGER 
Spanish A.B. 
Lebanon, Po. 



JOYCE W. DIXON 
English A.B. 
Red Lion, Po. 



BRUCE A. DOCHERTY 

Music Education B.S. 

Somerville, N.J. 




ALYCE SHOWERS DUGAN 

Medical Technology B.S. in 

Medical Technology 

Harrjsburg, Po. 




NANCY LEE DUTRO 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Harrisburg, Po. 




RONALD J, EARHART 

Physics, Chemistry A.B. 

Lancaster, Pa. 





DIANE ELAINE EHRHART 
English A.B, 
Palmyra, Pa. 



WAYNE FREDERICH EICHEL 

Chemistry B.S in Chemistry 

Rockoway, N.J. 



BRENDA M. ERDMAN 

Music Education B.S. 

Dunellen, N.J. 



60 




J' 





i 



MILDRED A, EVANS 


RICHARD GLENN FELTY 


WILLIAM W. FOCHT 


Music Education B.S. 


Philosophy, Greek A.B. 


History A.B. 


Richmond, Pa. 


Carlisle, Pa. 


Lebanon, Pa. 





RAYMOND E. FOLEY 

Music Education B.S. 

Langhorne, Pa. 



ARBELYN ADELE FOX 

Medical Technology B.S. in 

Medical Technology 

Lebanon, Pa. 



M. CONSTANCE FULLERTON 

Elementary Education B-S, 

Myerstown, Pa. 





WILLIAM A, GARRETT 

Political Science A.B, 

Lebanon, Pa. 



L. ROBERT GERBERICH 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Jonestown, Pa. 



KENNETH ROBERT GIRARD 

Pre-Dentol B.S. 

Pitman, N.J. 



61 



a 



ass 






QUIRING GONCALVES 


BRENDA LEE GRAHAM 


ROBERT ALEXANDER GRAY 


Political Science A,B 


English A B, 


Biology B.S. 


Elizabeth, N J. 


Red Lion, Pa. 


Lebanon, Pa. 




LEANN R GREBE 

Elementary Education B S. 

Potfstown, Pa 



ALLEN CURTIS GREEN 

Mathematics A B 

Lehighton, Pa 




JEANNE L. GROSSI 
Biology B S 
Medio, Pa. 






NN ROMAYNE GROVE 


MARY LU HAINES 


CAROLYN YVONNE HAKE 


Spanish A.B 


English A B. 


Medical Technology B.S. in 


York, Pa. 


Upper Darby, Pa. 


Medicol Technology 
Red Lion, Pa. 



62 





ROBERT S. HAMILTON 
Chemistry B S. in Chemistry 
Pitman, NJ. 



RONALD C. HARING 

Biology B,S. 
Rockville Centre, N.Y. 



MERRILL A. HASSINGER 

Greek Religion A,B 

Halifax, Pa. 





ALLEN M, HAVEN 

Biology B.S. 

Fair Lawn, N.J. 



MARK C HAVEN 

Politico! Science A.B. 

Fair Lawn, N.J. 



A. RICHARD HEBERLY 

Psychology A B. 

York, Pa 




TAP-A-KEG- A 



CHARLOTTE ANN HEMPERLY 

English A.B. 

Oak Ridge, Tenn. 







JAMES F HOGAN 

Chemistry B S. in Chemistry 

Westbury, N.Y. 



THOMAS J HOLMES 

Philosophy A B, 

Lebanon, Pa. 



SHIRLEY J. HUBER 

Music Education B.S. 

Lancaster, Pa. 





G. THOMAS KEEHN 

Music Education B S. 

Annville, Pc. 



M SUE KELLY 

Elementary Education B S. 

Chambersburg, Pa. 



SANDRA LEE KELLY 

Music Education B S 

Jonestown, Pa. 






THOMAS JOHN KNAPP 

Psychology A.B. 

Annville, Pa. 



DOLORES CATHERINE KONCAR 
English A.B. 
Steelton, Pa. 



SLIZANNE KRAUSS 

Biology B.S, 
Upper Darby, Pa. 



64 






JAY KREIDER 

B.S. in Chemistry 

Lancaster Pa. 



KRISTINE LOUISE KREIDER 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Lancaster, Pa. 



RALPH R, KREISER 

B.S. in Ciiemistry 

Lebanon, Pa. 





SALLY LANE 

Elementary Education B.S. 

New Paltz, N.Y. 



ITALO LAPIOLI 

Mathematics A.B. 

Tucupido, Venezuela 



ROBERT A. LEE 

Political Science, A.I 

Garfield, N.J. 







RALPH L. LEHMAN, III 

Music Education B.S. 

Elizabethville, Pa. 



BRENDA ANNE LIDDLE 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Havertown, Pa. 



BRUCE M. LrOSTON 
Pre-Medical, B.S. 
Old Tappan, N.J. 



65 





What else but milk at Lebanon Valley College? 



JOHN A LUKENS 
Economics B.S. 
Woodstown, N.J. 






VERNON C. LYTER, JR. 

Physics A.B. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 



CAROLYN REBECCA MAGEE 

Mathematics A.B. 

Front Royal, Va. 



THOMAS E. MANN 

Music Educotion B.S. 

Annville, Pa. 





SARAH LYNN MARSHALL 
English A.B. 
Bradford, Pa. 



VIRGINIA YELTON McCAULEY 
History A.B. 
Annville, Pa. 



ELLIS W, McCRACKEN, JR. 

Political Science A.B. 

Linden, N.J. 



66 





LYNNE FRANCES McWILLIAMS 


HERMAN J, MEYER 


SUSAN SMITH MILLER 


English A.B. 


Philosophy-Religion A.B. 


Psychology A B. 


Pitman, N.J. 


Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. 


Annville, Po. 






BYRON MEAL MOCK 

Physics A.B. 
Schaefferstown, Po. 



LAWRENCE R, MOSS, JR. 


NANCY HELENE NAPIER 


Economics B.S. 


English A.B. 


Pitmon, N.J. 


Westfield, N.J. 





.— W^- >• 





JUDITH ANN NEWTON 

Music Education B.S. 

Pennsauken, N.J. 



JUDITH IRENE NICHOLS 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Great Notch, N.J. 



FRANCES S. NIEDZIALEK 

Psychology A.B. 

East Peterson, N.J. 



67 






BARBARA ALYCE OLSON 

B,S. in Nursing 

Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



FRANCES MILDRED PAGE 
Music Education B.S. 
Mechanicsburg, Pa. 



GLEN E. PEIFFER 

Music Education B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 







BETTY ANN PERKINS 


ERIC L. PETERS 


DAVID WAYNE PIERCE 


Music Education B.S. 


Political Science, A.B. 


Psychology A.B. 


Wilmington, Del. 


York, Pa. 


Ephrato, Pa. 






GEORGE R. PLITNIK 


RONALD JAMES POORMAN 


Physics B.S. 


Music Education B.S. 


Leonardo, N.J. 


Palmyra, Pa. 



FRED PORRINO 

B.S. in Chemistry 

Fort Lee, N.J. 



68 





THOMAS RICHARD PREVITE 


DAVID RABENOLD 


JAMES NELSON RICE 


Economics & Business B.S. 


B.S. in Chemistry 


Economics B.S, 


Lebanon, Po. 


Fullerton, Po. 


Berwyn, Pa. 






JOY DIXON RICE 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Mountainside, N.J. 



RICHARD STEVEN ROCAP 

Music Education B.S. 

Bridgeton, N.J. 



C. EDWARD ROGERS JR- 
Economics B.S. 

Harrisburg, Po. 






RICHARD H. ROTZ 


PRISCiLLA M. SCHARADIN 


DENNIS R, SCHNADER 


Music Education B.S. 


Spanish A.B. 


Music Education B,S. 


McConnellsburg, Pa. 


Cleona, Pa. 


Reamstown, Po. 



69 




.^"W- 



'^f<~ 







SARA KATE SCHREIBER 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



ROBERT JAMES SCOTT 

Economics B.S. 

Woodlioven, N.Y. 



WILLIAM A. SHEEHY 
Political Science A.B. 
Orodell, N.J. 




'^'. 





DAVID JOHN 5HENK 


WILLIAM A, SHERMAN 


Spanish A.B, 


German A B, 


Myerstown, Pa. 


Lebanon, Pa, 



PATRICIA SHONK 

Mu5ic Education B.S. 

Manheim, Pa. 







ROBERT RONALD SHORE 
Economics B.S. 
Camp Hill, Pa. 



KATHRYN SABINA SKEWIS 
Music Education B.S. 
Schoefferstown, Pa, 



BARBARA ANN SMITH 

Music Education B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 






PATRICIA SUE SMITH 


JUDITH ANN SNOWBERGER 


GARY KENNETH SPENGLER 


English A.B 


Elementary Education B S* 


Music Educotion B.S. 


York, Pa. 


York, Pa. 


Strausstown, Pa. 






GREGORY G. STANSON 


VANCE R STOUFFER, JR 


JUNE STRINGER 


Political Science A.B. 


Chemistry B.S. 


Music Education B S 


Pottstown, Pa, 


New Cumberland, Pa. 


Wilmington, Del. 






MERTIE KATHLEEN SWARTZ 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Hershey, Pa. 



DENNIS W. SWEIGART 

Music Education B S- 

Reinholds, Pa. 



JANET ELIZABETH TAYLOR 

Music Education B.S. 

Wilmington, DoL 






FORD S. THOMPSON, JR, 

Political Science A.B. 

Wilmington, Del. 



MAGDALENE M. L. TJHIN 

Psychology A.B. 

Sumatra, Indonesia 



DOUGLAS KENNETH TROUTMAN 

Music Education B.S. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 






REBECCA ANN LINGER 

Music Education B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



ELIZABETH W. VAN DE WATER 
English A.B. 
Malvern, Pa. 



NANCY LEE WARNER 

Sociology A.B. 
Rockville Centre, N.Y. 






GARY R. WASSON 
Economics B.S. 
Tamaqua, Pa. 



JOHN RILEY WEABER 
Biology B.S. 
Annville, Pa. 



MARGARET ANNE WEINERT 

Elementary Education B.S. 

Havertown, Pa. 



72 




HARRY E. WELCH 

Political Science A.B. 

Harrisburg, Pa. 




J 




DONNA L. WERNTZ 


MARK H. WERT 


B.S. in Nursing 


Political Science A.B 


Christiana, Pa. 


Abington, Pa. 




JOANN RUTH WHITMAN 

Elementory Education B.S. 

Lebanon, Pa. 



LAWRENCE W. WITTLE 

Biology B.S. 

Florin, Pa. 




JOHN A. WOLFE 

Physics B.S. 

Myerstown, Pa. 






PHILIP B. WOLF 

Business Administrotion B.S. 

New Cumberland, Pa. 



GARY L. WOLFGANG 

Pre-Medical B.S. 

Palmyra, Pa. 



JOHN A. YAJKO 

Economics & Business Administration B.S 

Leechburg, Pa. 




PAUL ROBERT YOUNG 

Pre-Engineer A.B. 

Camp Hill, Pa. 



73 




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Vickroy Hall 



Kmama\itm—i^-''—~— '—••'■' — 







Le^t to Right: Judy Tanno. secretory; 
Ken Whisler, president; Ken Lee, 
treasurer; Marvin Hendrix, Faculty- 
Student representative; Harry Kehler, 
vice president. 



SOPHOMORES 



Last year's Frosh, returning to campus in September as 
upperclassmen, spent the first few weeks here savoring their 
advanced status as they watched members of the Class of '65 
undergo initiation by the White Hats. At the some time, they 
took on the new responsibilities which come in the sophomore 
year: increased participation in extra-curricular activities, ad- 
vanced studies in classroom and laboratory, particular duties 
as members of the Class of 1964. During the first week of 
school, class members held their first meeting, re-electing 



last year's officers and forming committees for their first 
dance, the "Bonfire Bounce." Preceding the dance on Friday 
night was o combined bonfire and pep rally, also sponsored 
by the Sophs, which spurred the Flying Dutchmen to their frst 
victory in a championship season. Following the dance on 
Saturday night was a hayride. During second semester, with 
initiation rites in the post, '64 and '65 joined in sponsorship 
of the traditional Freshman-Sophomore Dance. 




ROW 1: M Colgon, L. Bell, N Dahringer, J, Cossel, L. Beckner, C, Derk, 
C, Deichert, S, Beltz, E, Black, R Blauvelt. ROW 2: S, Deiner, J, Baker, 
B Williams, S- Rouse, B, Robinson, E Sobaka, S, Weimer, ROW 3: E, 
Conrad, C, Deitzel, R. Corroll, J. Clork. ROW 4: H. Smith, R. Beistline, 



B Burkett, J. Cromer, J. Bitner, W. Altlond, J. Beck, D. Burns, J. Dunn. 
ROW 5: L. Stein, F. Eiler, K, Anderson, L. Arnold, G, Soder, G. Costrischer, 
T, Bonsall, C, Burkhardt, B, Albon. 




76 




ROW 1: B. Speicher, P, Zimmerman, L. Stoudt, N. Wagner, C. Tipton. 
ROW 2: E Vastine, J. Tanno, S. Schreiber ROW 3: R. Greim, K. Resch, 
B. Shupp, L. Schlegel. ROW 4: D. Walker, R. Schmerker, K. Whisler. 
ROW 5: T. Schwolm, W. Stump ROW 6: G, Stack, J. Yost, C. Schwalm, 
L. Spancoke, W. Selcher. 




ROW 1: J. Keiper, D. Evans, L. Ensminger, S. Leonard, C- Klock, H. Haskell, 
L. Gatchel, C. Jiminez, C. Knarr, C. Laskey. ROW 2: D. Ingle, P. Jones, 
S. Hock, J. Lied, L. Lewis, P. Hallett, S. Gerhort, J, Johnston. ROW 3: 
J, Huey, D. Hively, R. Kresge, B. Lewis, L. Ledebur, D. Kaufman, T. Kent, 



K. Horst, D Gibe. ROW 4; H Bessel, B Lidle, H. Kehler, M. Lenker, F. 

Eppley, J. Earley, G, Kersetter. M. Houct ROW 5: K. Lee. C. Ebersole, L. 

Garnet, J. Goidos, D Shaw. ROW 6: K. Homan, J. Etter, W. Hinkle, J. 
Green, L. Funk, D. Grove, W. Hnn-.sher, T Hurphreys, M Hendrix. 




ROW 1: J. Ruhl, E. Naylor, P. McDyer, F. Meng ROW 2; H. Pisle, E. 
Orchard, E. Miller, D. Mallory. ROW 3: R. Moore, C. Martin, W. Newcomer, 
J. Spoonhour. ROW 4: C. Miller, E. Spohr. C. Sayers ROW 5: R. Orndorf, 
W. Monicol, W. MocMillon. 



77 




I 







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Keister Hall 



_^. -* . . -i:..S;rT"-5»^-i£a.»i 



FRESHMEN 



That the Class of '65 will be remembered as a symbol of 
unity is the goal of the Freshmen of 1961-62. Like its ninety- 
five predecessors, '65 probably differed little more than those 
first Frosh of 1866. They were excited at the prospect of 
college, needed the guidance and friendship of faculty and 
upperclassmen, had much maturity to achievej sought — in 
addition to degrees and job opportunities — to know the 
truth. Yet in other ways the members of this class were diFf- 
erent, aside from their modern customs and appliances: As 



members of an anxious age they sought the fraternity of a 
united class; they realized that underlying the alienations 
threatening the future lay lasting ties of friendship and unity. 
After a vigorous election campaign, '65 laid the ground- 
work for the achievement of its projected goals — to 
strengthen the weak spots in L.V.'s social calendar, to bolster 
class and college spirit, and to nurture devotion within the 
Class of 1965 and toward its alma mater. 




Left to Right: Malcolm Lazin, presi- 
dent,- Dorothy Hudson, secretory; J 
Lindon Hickerson, treasurer; Stephen 
Roberts, vice president 







ROW 1: D, Nelson, M Olmsted, D Hudson, S, Louboch, F. Mazzilli, C. 
Miller, V. Metz, M. Eorley ROW 2: D, Richter, D. Orefice, F, Niblo, K, 
Mellinger, L. Plequette, C, Moore, K. Mundis ROW 3: D. Tomlinson, S. 
Roberts, E. Ruth, G. Mosher, G, MocGregor, E. Nogle, G. Moritz. ROW 
4: R Lucas, R. Manner, D, Jones, D, Martin, N Dick, R Pawling, B. English. 
ROW 5: T. Smith, R, London, W. Foss, W. Oris, A. Horst, T. Herr, C, 
Miller, D. Muller. ROW 6: H. Peachey, P. Kohlhoos, W. Smith, E. Nowatorski 
D. Thompson. 




ROW h S Close, J, Brown, N Bintliff, C Conly, J Bogart, M Beard, C. 

Aldridge, J. Borckley, J. Bowman, C. Bottcher, D. Boker, N. Dice, R. Carlson 

ROW 2: M. Allemon, B. Alley J. Dugon, V. Bergey, D. Cole, C. Carpenter, 

V. Dilkes, B Benner, C. Duncan, B. Batson, W. DiGiacomo, V. Caprio, J. 



Code. ROW 3: H. Derk, T. Devlin, A. Bolastar, W. Berry, W. Alsted, J. 
Althouse, T. Crisman, A. Cohen, M. Bottomley, R. Achenbach, T. Bowers, 
M. Cochran. 




iBiaatti^uft 





ROW 1: E Stoner. B Shifter, S Slocum, M. Walsh. M, Von Horn, L. Royohn. 
ROW 2: B. Weirich, S Rouscher, J Seregely, L, Slonoker, D, Steward, B, 
Walker, H. Roos. ROW 3: J Scott, C- Zechman, N Shroyer. N. Woolston, A 
Wahler, J. Sheilhommer, ROW 4; H Wockerman, J. Klinedlnst, B, Reichard, H. 
Woodruff, D, Schmid, P, Stonillo, D, Sousser ROW 5: G. Smith, A, Yocum, T 
Weover, A Toylor, W, Scovell, P Strunk, ROW 6: D Mills, B, Lutz, J. Rutter, B, 
Zink, C, Sovldge- ROW 7: H. Witmer, R. Zweitzlg. R, Stone, 



ROW 1: D. Kimball, K. Loudermilch, D, Kriebel, B, Hudglns, A, Frye, J 
Kllngler, R. Johns, K. Fontenoy, M Lentz, L. Foster, J. Farro, D. Lindenmuth, 
M. Gottschalk, A. Hortenstlne, V. Jenkins, M, Horbaugh, G Holllch ROW 2: 
M, Jones, J. Hennessy, M. Kondrat, E, Loper, B, Lorenz, S. Leonard, L. 
Gardner, K. Lutz, C. Leitner, J. Llngermon, W. Luce, M, Lazin, L. Gordon, 



C. Gessner, D. Enterline, G. Grimm, R. Gregory, J Hall, L Huntzberry. 

ROW 3: H, Jones, D. Leigh, W. Hlllman, D, Keim, E. KrIII, J, Lontz, B, 

Hughes, W, Koch, G, Kline. D. Gouger, L. Hickerson, J. Hunley, W. 
Grove. M Grivsky. W. Felty, R Lau. G Grelder. 




^ 





DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 



Although the emphasis in Music Education is of a pro- 
fessional nature with teaching as the ultimate goal, the de- 
partment endeavors through private instruction to develop 
the individual's solo performance to its highest potential. 

The department's contribution to the cultural life of the 
campus reached a new high during the current school year. 
In addition to the annual faculty recitals and concerts by the 
instrumental and vocal organizations, twenty-three student 
recitals were programmed. The versatile talents of the Senior 
Class contributed fourteen solo appearances. The three lower 
classes were equally well represented in a commendable 
demonstration of their developing talents. 

Such achievement is indicative of a growing student accept- 
ance of responsibility, the development of leadership, and 
a positive attitude toward self-improvement. These qualities, 
coupled with the ever-increasing evidence of improved in- 
telligence and talent among new students, predict a bright 
future for "Music at Valley." 






ROBERT W. SMITH 



The dorm president . . . Art thou an SAI pledge? 



BOB RHINE 



TOM KEEHN 



RALPH LEHMAN 




84 



i 



^ 




what happened to my mattress? 



Dr. Miller's 
favorites 






On tour 




Shirley Huber 




Millie! Wake up! 



W 









^P 


«'^^f 




f 


^^_ 




^4^ 


fe 





85 




ROW 1, Left to Right: Doris Kohl. Elizabeth Moore, Annette Kurr, Sandi 
Stetler, Janet Tayloi' ROW 2: Judy Newton, Patricia Shonk, Emily Bowman, 



Patricia Davis. ROW 3; Cece Reed Keehn, Margaret Zimmerman, Penny 
Hallett, Winefi-ed Barnhart, Betty Perkins, Shirley Brown, 



SIGMA ALPHA IOTA 



Sigma Alpha Iota, a national music sorority for women, 
is the largest professional sorority of its kind in the United 
States. Here at Lebanon Valley the Delta Alpha Chapter was 
chartered on May 20, 1961. At that time the group included 
Miss Pickwell, advisor; Mrs. Kurtz, faculty member,- and eigh- 
teen student charter members. As their first Patroness, the 
girls chose Mrs. Puth Bender, 

Annette Kurr, Delta Alpha's first president, led the group 
in many and varied activities throughout the year. Last summer 
the girls triggered a successful year by selling address labels 
m order to begin 1961-62 with a treasury "in the black." 
The Executive Committee returned to campus two days early 
and between dips at nearby swimming spots held informal 
meetings to formulate plans for the coming year. Added ef- 
forts at money-making included selling chocolate bars and 
boxed candies. 

Since Chapter membership had dropped to fourteen girls 
after 1961 graduation, £Ai sponsored a September rush 
party at Hershey Park. From a number of interested girls who 
shared in the fun of the doggie roast, fve received formal 
pledge invitations. After enduring a lengthy period of pledg- 
ing, passing pledge exams, and giving a musical for the 



chapter, these five girls were formally initiated on the evening 
of November 16, 1961. Also in November Delta Alpha was 
privileged to entertain its Province President, Mrs. fHelen May. 
Included in the activities then were a tea and musical held 
in Carnegie Lounge in celebration of Sigma Alpha iota's 
Incorporation Day. 

Sigma Alpha Iota has worked closely with its brother or- 
ganization, Sinfonia. On October 13, 1961, the ^AI girls 
gave a reception for their brothers in Carnegie Lounge fol- 
lowing the Sinfonia Jazz Concert. In December came the 
jointly-sponsored Music Department Dinner-Dance, There some 
fifty couples enpyed a full-course turkey dinner, blended their 
voices in singing Christmas Carols, and danced to the music 
of Don Trostle's Band. Recently the fraternal organizations 
again combined their talents to present the Ail-American 
Concert. 

Second-semester pledging activities began with a rush 
party at Mrs, Bender's home; and the spring pledges, in- 
cluding few freshmen, were formally initiated on April 9, 
1962. The Delta Alpha Chapter of ^Al is looking forward, 
with the addition of these initiates, to a second successful year. 



86 




ROW 1, Left to Right: D, Troutmon, R, Rocap, T. DeWold, G. Zeller, Schwolm, L. McGriff. R. Poorman, R Rotz, R. Schmerker. ROW 4: J. 

R. Lehman, G. Spengler, H, Frederick. ROW 2: K. Anderson, J. Dunn, T. Hutchcrod, D. Shearer, B. Docherly, B. MonicoL ROW 5: R. Smith, F. 
Keehn, R. Lichtenwolter, J. Turner, A. Green. ROW 3: J Homan, T. Stochow, R. Rovers. 



PHI MU ALPHA 



Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, a national professional music 
fraternity, fosters as its main ideal the desire to advance 
appreciation of music in America while developing mutual 
welfare and brotherhood among music students. Certainly 
Lebanon Valley's year-old Iota Chapter upheld these 
national standards in the activities which it undertook this 
year. 

With application for membership open to men interested 
in music and meeting minimum standards of musical perfor- 
mance and academic achievement, Sinfonia holds pledge 
periods during both semesters to enable both upperclassmen 
and freshmen to join the group. Lasting approximately two 
weeks, the pledge period consists of an informal initiation 
filled with humorous incidents such as scrubbing the steps of 
the Conservatory with toothbrushes and a formal initiation of 
a more serious nature. 

Opening Sinfonia's events in the fall was a jazz concert, 
an annual affair sponsored tor the first time this year by Sin- 
fonia and conducted by Sinfonion Harry Voshell. Using tran- 
scriptions and arrangements by Sinfonia members Ron Poor- 
man, Richard Rotz, Kenneth Anderson, and Tom Schwalm, 
the sixteen-piece band played selections ranging from pro- 
gressive tunes to dance-style numbers with a male quartet 



adding variety. After a successful presentation on campus, 
the band then traveled to local high schools and colleges 
to perform. 

"Pigskin Previews" during football season and a pep band 
for basketball games were Phi Mu Alpha's contributions to- 
ward enthusiasm in the sports program. Early in January came 
the second annual Minstrel Show with end-men Terry DeWald, 
Ray Lichtenwolter, Ralph Lehman, and Tom Keehn telling the 
jokes while Richard Rocap acted as interlocutor. All the 
fraternity brothers contributed much time and effort to this 
production which featured the Dixieland Bond, Sinfonia Min- 
strel Chorus, and special solo acts. Culminating the efforts of 
Sinfonia for the year was the All-American Concert given in 
coordination with Sigma Alpha Iota, its sister fraternity. Pre- 
sented with a mixed chorus ond soloists, the concert included 
only works of American composers. 

To Sinfonians the outstanding occurrence of the 1961-62 
year was Sinfonia's winning of the Charles E. Lufton Me- 
morial Award given annually to the most outstanding chapter 
of Phi Mu Alpha in its province. The award of this honor took 
place at the Province Workshop held at Carnegie Institute of 
Technology with the officers of the Iota Kappa Chapter in 
attendance. 



87 



THE 



CONCERT 
CHOIR 




"God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen 





V 



■!sm 






Left to Right, ROW 1: S Kelly, B. Smith, E, Bowmon, F, Page, M. Miller, 

C. Keehn, S. Bucher, A. Horlenstine, I, Miller, N, Dohringer, S. Brown, 

G. Bechtel, ROW 2: P, Zimmerman, W. Barnhart, D, Ingle, B. Perkins, 

B. Keller, B. Shupp, P. Jones, J. Taylor, S. Huber, P. Shank, J McCann. 



ROW 3: D. Sweigart, J. Lantz, G Moser, T, Schwalm, H, Frederick, D 
Martin, L, McGriff, T. Keehn, J. Turner, D, Mohler, G Hollich. ROW 4: 
S, Noit, R. Rhine, M, Houck, D. Shearer, W. Monical, R. Foley, R, Hiler, 
B. Schmerker, H. Kehler, K. Anderson. 



Under the capable leadership of Mr. Pierce Getz, with assist- 
ance from piano accompanist Dennis Sweigart, the Lebanon 
Valley College Concert Choir launched another successful 
year of choral work by performing two expressive hymns at 
the dedication of Vickroy Hall. This was the first appearance 
of the fifty mixed voices which were selected by special au- 
dition in the early fall. 

From a vast volume of musical literature at its disposal, 
the group learned music by Gabrieli, Scarlatti, Bach, Berger, 
Stanton, Brahms, Debussy, Ravel, and Menotti. Having such a 
wide range of choral compositions from which to select their 
repertoire, members of the group were able to expand their 
knowledge of vocal music, grasp an improved understanding 
of vocal techniques, and gain valuoble experience in singing 
with a large group, thus achieving and maintaining both 
individual and group standards of excellence. 

During the Christmas season the Concert Choir entertained 
the Ladies' Auxiliary with a program in song. Throughout the 



year they gave performances in areas sponsored by the EUB 
Council of Churches such as Lancaster, Chambersburg, Read- 
ing, and Harrisburg. The greatest thrill of the organization's 
season was the annual week-long four during February. This 
year the musicians traveled along the Eastern seaboard 
visiting such cities as Wilmington, Philadelphia and New York 
City. Touring with the group was a specially-chosen group 
of instrumentalists who formed a small chamber orchestral 
accompaniment for several numbers. Singing for the American 
Guild of Organists in Philadelphia was a distinguished honor 
for the group. Closing out the year was traditional partici- 
pation in Commencement exercises. 

Rehearsals for these varied programs demanded a great 
deal of hard work and time spent on dissecting many of the 
compositions in order to learn and perfect each segment. 
Even though and perhaps because such finesse was exacted, 
choir members considered Concert Choir membership both 
an honor and an enjoyable experience. 



89 



SfK^ 




CHORUS 



Comprising approximately one hundred fifty students, the 
Lebanon Valley College Chorus includes all music majors 
plus other interested college students. Under the capable di- 
rection of Pierce A. Getz, assistant professor of organ and 
choral director, the chorus sings to the accompaniment of 
Kathleen Bauernfemd at the organ console. 

At its weekly rehearsals during the fall, the Chorus works 
diligently to perfect its selections for the community Christmas 
Program held in Engle Hall. This year's December 12, 1961 
program was televised in its entirety over WLYH, Channel 15, 
Lebanon and broadcast over radio station WJWR, Palmyra. 
With the best in Christmas musical literature from which to 
choose, the Chorus selected the following anthems for its pro- 
gram; Jesus the Christ is Born by Niles, Morryott's The Search- 
ing Carol, Norden's God is With Us, Christ is Born by Ger- 
hardf and Ebeling, Sowerby's The Snow Lay on the Ground, 
What Strangers ore These by Purvis, Still, Still by Sumner, 
Christian's Lullaby on Christmas Eve, and Nelson's Glory to 



God. Performing as vocal soloists were Betty Perkins, soprano; 
Sylvia Bucher, alto,- and Eugene Miller, baritone. Supple- 
menting Kathy Bauernfeind's organ accompaniment were 
flutist Deanna Seller, a string trio, and a brass ensemble. 
Other participants in the program were Dr. James Bemesder- 
fer. Chaplain, who interspersed the choral anthems with 
Biblical narrative and the entire audience, who participated 
with the Chorus in carol-singing. 

Following Christmas relaxation, the Chorus again plunged 
into serious work for its next program, the annual Spring 
Music Festival. Here the group sang two well-known works, 
the Bach Motet and the Brahm's Requiem. Under the baton 
of conductor Thomas Lanese, the Symphony Orchestra ac- 
companied the latter composition. 

Sight-reading sessions at the remainder of the year's re- 
hearsals gave Chorus members valuable practice in vocal 
techniques and tips on conducting. 



90 




Opposite Page 

ROW 1: N. Shroyer, B. Keller, A. Bogart, P, Zimmerman, L. Gard- 
ner, W. Grove, G. Grimm, D, Enterline, J. Hutchcroft. ROW 2: 
M. Miller, W. Barnhart, S- Klingler, K. Resch, D. Hudson, D. 
Schnader, R, Rotz, A. Cohen, W. Monica!, ROW 3: L. Weber, C. 
Moore, J. Dixon, G, Moritz, B Smith, D. Shearer, L, McGriff, 

D. Sweigart, T. Weaver. ROW 4: D. Kohl, B. Perkins, L, Moore, 

E. Bowman, A. Kurr, R. Lichtenwalter, M. Cochran, R. Lou, J. 



Bowman. ROW 5: F. Page, C Keehn, B. Thorrpson. J. Bisbing, 
L, Stoudt, T, Schwolm, R. Foley, S. Nolt, M. Houch ROW 6: S. 
Klinedinst, S, Rouse, R. Unger, A Grove, S. Kelly R. Gregory, R. 
Schmerker, M. Chobitnoy, R. Rocap. ROW 7: E Nogle, M Evons, 
M, Fehr, D Ingle, D Orefice, T. DeWald, P, Castor, H, Fredrick, 
G, Spengler, ROW 8: C. Zechmon, W, Luce. D. Martin. T Mann. 
B. Docherty. ROW 9: R Lehmon, K. Laudermilch 



This Page 

ROW 1: T. Keehn, R. Hiler, J. Code, R. Klinedinst. M. Olmsted, 
S. Bucher, R. Johns. J. Garvin. B, Lorenz. J. Dubbs. ROW 2; 
A. Boloster. K. Blekicki. S. Turner. D. Reed. J. Taylor. B. Benner 
P. Davis. S. Huber. C. Gessner, G. Bechtel. ROW 3: J, Huey, 
K. Anderson. R. «chenbach. H, Voshell, I. Miller. A. Frye, R, 
Greim, M. Kandrot, J. Newton. S. Louboch, ROW 4: D. Trout 
man. J, Dunn. G, Peiffer. W. Higgins. C. Clemens. N. Woolston 
D. Seiler. S. Leonard. S. Brown. B. Bongart, ROW 5: G. Ker 



sletter. H Kehler. R. Poorman. J. Klinedinst. A, Hortensline. S. 
Leonard. D, Zetuski, K. Schreiber. K. Bouernteind. G. Schlegel. 
ROW 6: D. Mahler. J. Althouse. T. Bowers, B. Meyer, J. Ryon, 
J. McConn, P. Shonk, J. Vowler, K. Hoffer. ROW 7; M. Rinker, 
C. Smith, B. Erdmonn, J. Baker, N. Dahringer. B. Bailes, ROW 8: 
L. Schlegel. B, Shupp. R. Blauvelt, P. Hallett. H. Pisle. ROW 9: 
G. Kisller. N. Dice. K. Skewis. 



91 



CONCERT 



Under the direction of Dr. James M, Thurmond, members 
of the Concert Band rehearsed the music of well-known com- 
posers in preparation for a vast variety of musical perfor- 
mances given throughout the year. Through access to an 
extensive library of high-quality band repertoire ranging 
from that of the classical period to modern music, this selec- 
tive group of musicians was able to enhance its musician- 
ship and proficiency with such numbers as Bach's Toccata 
and Fuge in D Minor, transcribed for the band by Dr. Thur- 
mond, and the Symphony in B-Flct by fHindemuth. Appearing 
as piano soloist with the musicians was Bonnie Fix Keller. 




ROW 1. K. Sl<ewi5, K. Hotter, D. Klinedinst, P. Hollett. ROW 2. J. 
Heuy, R, Poorman, J. Dunn, K Anderson, J. Klinedinst, C. Clemens, P. 
Davis, R. Lehman. 



ROW 1: R. Klinedinst, P Hollett ROW 2: L Clemens, P. Davis, A, Frye, Hiler, G. Spengler, D. Schnoder, M. Chabitnoy, ROW 5: G. Schlegel, 
R. Lehman, ROW 3: S. Brov^n, A, Hartenstine, R. Blouvelt, S. Leonard. S. Huber, B. Lorenz, T. DeWald, G. Kerstetter, G. Zeller, D Troutmon, 
ROW 4: D Salerno, C, Gessner, L. McGriff, J, Code, J, Klingler, R. H. Kehler 



li;_":-H#. 




92 




BAND 



With such a wide scope of current musical literature from 
which to choose, the group was able to play for many different 
occasions. Highlights of the varied concert schedule included 
appearances in Harrisburg where the Concert Band performed 
to a capacity crowd in the Forum, Chambersburg, and Lan- 
caster. The musicians were also honored by a request to 
entertain an audience of distinguished military personnel 
with special program at Indiantown Gap. Later in the 
year, the President's Concert was held on campus with the 
audience eating picnic lunches to the strains of Sousa marches 
and other familiar melodies. It is of special note that this 
year's band members played a port m a very important first 
in the history of their musical group: The performance of the 
annual Spring Music Festival Concert was broadcast live on 
television. Culminating the band's busy year was its traditional 
participation in the May Day. 



ROW 3: G, Grimm, W. Higgins, L. Stoudt, S. Klinedinsf, K. Mellinger, 
B. Jenkins, S. Brown, A. Hartenstine, R. Blauvelt. ROW 4: R. Slioap, K. 
Laudermilch, T. Bowers, J. Aitliouse, A. Cohen, D. Salerno. C. Gessner, 
L. McGrilT. ROW 5: B Keller, R. Greim, G, Schlegel, S Huber. 



ROW 1: R. Klinedinst, P. Hollett, M. Houch. R. Johns ROW 2: A. Frye, 
R. Lehman, C. Zechman, A. Hartenstine, B. Benner. ROW 3; S. Leonard, 
T. Schwalm, J. Taylor. ROW 4: R. Lichtenwalter B Bongort, R. Achen- 



bach. P. Shonk, H. Voshell, ROW 5; D Reed, R. Gregory, B. Schmerker, 
J Hutchcroft, W. Grove, B. Docherty, T, Keehn, D. Martin, S Nolt, R, Rotz. 




93 




ROW 1; D. Seller, B Shupp, S Bucher, B Boiles, B Benner, J Bogart, 
R Johns, M Olmsted ROW 2: K. Skewis, K Hoffer, C Clemens, D 
Kohl, A Hartenstine, R Unger, S. Brown, M Miller, R Blouvelt, G 
Bechtel, 5 Leonard, A Frye, J Taylor, C. Zechmon, P Davis ROW 3: 



K, Mellinger, B. Lorenz, B Keller, M Evans, R. Greim, W Bornhort, C. 
Gessner, P Shonk, G Schlegel, E Moore, M, Loy, A Kurr, I, Miller, 
B, Weirick, N. Dahringer, M Wemert, J, Bisbing, D Ingle, B Perkins, 
L Stoudt. 



GIRLS' BAND 



Acting CIS ci training ground for those girls interested in 
acquiring instrumental proficiency Girls' Band provides ex- 
perience in ensemble playing and public performance. Al- 
though consisting of a ma|orify of music students who are 
amateurs on certain brass and woodwind instruments, this in- 
terested group of girl musicians also contains experienced 
performers who are quite proficient on instruments in their 
fields of mci|or interest. 

Under the direction of Dr, James M. Thurmond, the musi- 
cians gam valuable insight regarding practical theories of 
group performance and receive opportunities to learn how to 
enhance their individual musicianship. Encouraged by in- 



teresting explanations at rehearsals, the bond works diligently 
to produce a pleasing blend of tone qualities. 

With a vast and varied repertoire of music from which to 
select a program, the group practiced intensely this year for 
the presentation of a successful concert. Meeting once every 
week, the girls strove to perfect their performance of compo- 
sitions ranging from semi-classical numbers and lyrical old 
favorites to rousing symbol-crashing marches. Regular in- 
tensive proctice throughout the year culminated in the annual 
Spring Concert in Engle Hall, which was considered a high- 
light of achievement by both band-members and audience. 







11- 



Blow out the candles, Liberace, Mother's waitinc 



94 



Ladies and Gentlemen, we direct your attention to 
the North end of the field. 




ROW 1: E. Bowman, A. Kurr, P Brush, E. Moore, J. Bisbing, W, Monical, ROW 2: B Shupp, D, Seller, 
K. Hoffer, D Klinedinst, J Huey, R, Lehman, K. Blekicki, S Rouse, G, Kerstetter ROW 3: A Hartenstine, 
R. Blauvelt, S, Leonard, N. Binlliff. 



SYMPHONY 



Responding to the baton of Mr. Thomas Lanese, assistant 
professor of strings, conducting, and theory, approximately 
forty student musicians of the Symphony Orchestra presented 
concerts in Engle Hall during fall and spring. Featuring works 
by Beethoven, Mozart, and Frescobaldi m its fall concert, the 
symphony appeared live on television for the first time in 
196l. At this performance guest soloist Pierce Getz, organist 
and Conservatory faculty member, played to accompani- 
ments of stringed and brass instruments. 



In addition to presenting two concerts of its own this year, 
the Symphony joined the Chorus at its spring concert to 
augment the singing of the Brahms Requiem with an instru- 
mental accompaniment, and symphony members appeared in 
the televised Christmas concert of the choral group. To the 
selective group of chorus members who make up the Concert 
Choir, the symphony added its own specially-selected group 
of instrumentalists who accompanied the vocalists on their 
week-long February tour. 



ROW h E. Bowman, A, Kurr, P. Brush, E Moore ROW 2: R, Lau, S Huber ROW 3; R. Rhine, D. 
Troutmon, D Reed, B Docherty, T. Keehn, J Dunn, B. Smith, P Davis, M. Houcli, B Shupp, D- Seiler. 
ROW 4.- G, Zeller, D. Schnoder, M, Chabitnoy 



r- 




.(N 



ENSEMBLES 



Lebanon Volley's Department of Music presents many 
opportunities for fellowship in musical activities. Among the 
most valuable of these is ensemble playing. 

Here the student meets with fellow-musicians who are in- 
terested in the same areas of musicianship as he is. Many of 
these students are working with their major instruments, while 
a few join to explore a less familiar instrument more thor- 
oughly than they have been able to do before. Woodwind, 



clarinet, brass, string, and percussion ensembles expose their 
participants to a wide range of music literature, whose study 
and performance enables them to achieve and surpass high 
standards of musicianship. Concerts off campus and informal 
on-compus performances enable ensemble members to demon- 
strate the proficiency that they have achieved through close 
coordination in these small groups. 




ROW 1: R Hilei, H Fredrict, G Spengler, D Sclinader, M. Chal3itnoy, R Lichtenwalter ROW 2: T 
Keehn, B Docherty, J, Hutchcroft, D Reed, R Sclimerker, D Troutman, H Kehler, R Rotz, A. Harten- 
stine, R Blauvett, G. Kistler, S Leonard, 



BRASS ENSEMBLE 




STRING ENSEMBLE 



Left to Right: E Bowman, S. Huber, A Kurr, E. 
Mooie. Missing: D- Kreider. 



PERCUSSION ENSEMBLE 



T, DeWciId, R Foley. G. Schlegel, G, Zeller. B. Lorenz, 
B, Smith, B Keller. 





ROW 1: K Skewis. S Stetler. K Hoffer. T Mann. J Huey ROW 2: R Kline- 
dinst, R. Poorman, K. Anderson, J. KImedinst. ROW 3: R Lehman. H. Vo- 
shell, L. Stoudt, K. Mellinger, R, Achenboch. ROW 4; h Blehch P Shonk. 



B Pertins, C Zeckmon, W Higgins ROW 5. J Dunn. J. Taylor. B Bon- 
gart. B Monicol 



CLARINET CHOIR 



WOODWIND QUINTET 



D Seller, P Davis. S Leonord. R Lehman, K Hoffer. 





Picture Identification; ROW 1: P Martin, W, Grove, R Schmerker, R Greg- 
ory, D. Reed, B. Docherty. ROW 2: R. Greim, S. Leonard, R Blauvelt, A, 
Hartenstine, S, Brown, P. Shonl( ROW 3: H. Kehler, J. Bogert, R Rbtz, R, 
Achenbach, S. Nolt, D, Troutman. ROW 4: K, Hoffer, B. Bongort, L, Stoudt, 
R. Lichlenwalter, R. Hiler, D, Schnader ROW 5: W, Higgins, M. Chabitnoy, 



C. Zechmon, T, DeWald, R. Foley, G. Kerstetter. ROW 6: R. Johns, A. Co- 
hen, G, Spengler, L. McGr.ff, J. Althouse, J. Code. ROW 7: P. Hallett, J. 
Klingler, C. Gessner, K, Loudermilch, D. Salerno, R- Shoop. ROW 8: B. 
Lorenz, J. Dunn, B. Benner, T, Schwolm, B Jenkins, J. Klinedinst. ROW 9: 
K. Anderson, K. Mellinger, J. Bongort, M, Houck, K. Skewis. 



MARCHING BAND 



Color, variety, and precision characterized the pre-game 
and half-time entertainment provided by the Blue and White 
Marching Band during this year's championship football sea- 
son. Drutn major Gary Grimm, strutting with baton held 
high, led the blue-uniformed, gold-braided musicians onto 
the field. As a shrill whistle sounded across the stadium a 
snappy command was ordered, gleaming instruments come 
swiftly into position, and four herald trumpeters blared forth 
the fanfare. With a roll of drums, the band marched down 
the field to the strains of a familiar march. Preceding the 
symmetrical blue and white ranks of the marching musicians, 
stepped five baton-swinging majorettes and the seven-mem- 
ber Color Guard beneath brightly-blowing flags. At a second 
shrill whistle-blow the marchers halted, stepped with case 
into formation, and band members provided a rhythmic ac- 
companiment to the vigorous display of the Color Guard's 



98 



snappy gun salutes and the majorettes' sparkling baton- 
twirling routines. Then stepping to the forefront, the band 
moved quickly through self-accompanied drills and maneu- 
vers. Completing the half-time display were the solemn strains 
of the Alma Mater and at its end, the cheers and applause 
of the spectators. 

Behind the color and excitement of this college scene lay 
weeks of planning of precision drills and hours of grueling 
repetitive practice each day. Band members arrived on cam- 
pus before academic work began to practice their maneu- 
vers under the leadership of John Hutchcroft, drill master. 
When L.V.'s Flying Dutchmen became a championship team, 
the high-stepping musicians considered their determined 
efforts had been well spent In contributing to spirited en- 
couragement of their title-winning team. 




STUDENT 
LIFE" 



DELTA TAU CHI 




To be what its title's Greek initials stand for, Ser- 
vants of Cfirist, is tfie aim of Delta Tou Cfii's mem- 
bers. Dedication to tfie purpose of futhering Cfiristian 
ideals and fellowship is focused on those students 
who plan to enter full-time Christian service, but mem- 
bership is in no way restricted. Delta Tau Chi is an 
organization which appeals to all students who are 
genuinely interested in serving Christ through the 
organized church. 

Delta Tou Chi's activities are many and varied. As 
inspirational guides to busy students the organiza- 
tion provides Morning Prayers each weekday morn- 
ing and free copies of the devotional booklet, The 
Upper Room. On the lighter side, it fills its pro- 
gram with retreats and picnics as well as more seri- 
ous activities such as Thanksgiving, Christmas, and 
Easter communion services. Its members also sacri- 
fice their time in service projects to help the poor 
and handicapped. 

Deputations are the means by which a major part 
of Delta Tau Chi's work is done. Any member of the 
Pennsylvania or East Pennsylvania Conference of the 
Evangelical United Brethren Church may request a 
deputation for its services. These deputations range 
from single student speakers to groups who take 
over the entire service. On any Sunday morning one 
may see a group of students taking time from their 
schedules to serve Christ in this way. They feel them- 
selves amply repaid by the invaluable experience 
which the trips offer them. Whether the field is 
preaching, devotion leading, or music there is always 
a place to fill and a person needed to fill it. Serv- 
ices and meals at various churches and church 
homes provide a meaningful fellowship for students 
and church members alike. 

Through striving to encourage and develop true 
Servants of Christ, Delta Tau Chi has done and is 
doing much to enrich the religious atmosphere of 
Valley's campus and to spread its influence to other 
areas. 



Left to Right: S. Wolfe, F. Crider, M. Shaver, R. Felty, M. Hos- 
singer, F. Meng, M. Olmsted, hi. Dom, R. Lucas, N. Shroyer, B. 
Weirick, B. Benner, P. Hallett, J. Klingler, D. Drumheller, E. Con- 
rad, W. Newcomer, C. Rife, J. Snowberger, H. Wackerman, L. 
Huntzberry, J. Corbett, N. Butler. 



102 



STUDENT CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



SCA, the Student Christian Association, desires to meet 
the spiritual, intellectual, and social needs of the entire cam- 
pus community. Theoretically, membership in this single cam- 
pus religious organization consists of all students enrolled 
in Lebanon Valley College and, accordingly, its activities 
are planned to serve not only those united by common 
Christian beliefs but also those of other faiths and those who 
are still searching for a faith. 

Engaged in the task of planning such a brood program 
are the members of SCA Cabinet. Elected officers, appointed 
committee and commission chairmen, representatives to the 
YMCA and YWCA, and SCA affiliates comprise this governing 
body of SCA. Besides planning the overall program of the or- 
ganiza'tion, Cabinet members arrive on campus early each fall 
to greet the incoming freshmen and to help vvifh Freshmen 
Orientation through such services as working in the dining 
hall, proctoring tests, and taking part in the freshmen's 
initial convocation. During this period of orientation SCA 
also sponsors the Big-Little Brother-Sister Program, arranges 
faculty-student reception, and presents a musical skit writ- 
ten, directed, and acted by SCA members. This year's skit. 
No Time for Counsellors, by SCA president Carl Rife assisted 
by Judy Snowberger, satirized college life at the Valley and 
gave new students, underclassmen, faculty, and ad- 
ministration members a humorous view of situations en- 



countered at LVC. 

Each Wednesday night SCA presents a program or inter- 
est to the entire campus. Topics are varied and timely, 
ranging this year from a series on sex and morality to one 
on the significance of music and drama in religious services. 
Programs repeated annually include discussion groups in 
faculty homes and informal hymnsings. 

Along with its Wednesday night program^ SCA carries 
a full schedule of other activities. For those interested in music, 
SCA has a choir which under the direction of Larry Cisney 
presented a Christmas cantata and an Easter Chapel pro- 
gram this year, besides performing at area church services 
and youth group meetings. Weekend activities of SCA in- 
clude retreats and social weekends in the spring and fall and 
an annual International Weekend at which foreign students 
from area colleges visit LV. This year SCA continued the 
practice initiated last yeor of conducting a symposium de- 
signed to concentrate campus interest on a topic of relevant 
interest. This year's symposium, "Conservatism versus Liberal- 
ism," featured authorities representing both sides of this 
question in the fields of politics, morals, and theology. Dor- 
mitory devotions, the annual Campus Chest drive, and Re- 
ligious Emphasis Week ore other activities originating in and 
directed by the Student Christian Association. 



ROW 1: D, Drumheller, C, Rife, P. Young, L, Grebe ROW 2: M. Shaver. S. Wolfe, G Bull, F. Meng, E 
Sabaka. ROW 3: N. J. Morris, D. Pierce, M, Hendrix, L, Cisney, W. Newcomer, ROW 4: R Felty, D. Zim- 
merman, F. Eppley, P. Castor. 





'^^^'■^"^■"■^^^^^ssa^aasi^^jis^^ 



CHAPEL CHOIR 



May, 1962, marked the completion of the Chapel Choir's 
second full year of providing weekly Chapel services with 
special musical presentations. Begun in the spring of 1 960 
with the encouragement of President Miller and under the 
direction of Mr. Pierce Getz of the Department of Music, the 
choir has contributed weekly to the fulfillment of its primary 
aim: to provide an atmosphere conducive to worship during 
Chapel programs. Mr. Getz chose the choir's weekly selec- 
tions to parallel the themes of the weekly services, and those 
anthems sung during 1961-62 included works by composers 
of many nationalities and faiths, ranging from Renaissance 
motets to recent musical adaptations of Biblical passages. In 
addition to providing special sacred music almost weekly, 
the choir took their places in the choir loft even on occa- 
sions when they were not scheduled to sing in order to lead 



the student body in hymn singing and to furnish choral 
responses and benedictions. Various student organists from 
the Department of Music accompanied the group throughout 
the year, and on several occasions other instrumentalists 
furnished background accompaniments to the choral pre- 
sentation. 

Chosen through voluntary individual tryouts, the thirty- 
some members of the choir spent one to two hours in re- 
hearsal each Monday afternoon and sacrificed many of 
their cherished Chapel cuts to appear in the choir loft of the 
College Church each Tuesday morning, A pleasant culmina- 
tion to the hours of practice and performance was the social 
highlight of the choir's season — the annual banquet given 
to choir members by President Miller in the spring. 



ROW 1: L. Weber, H Roos, J, Stringer, C. Moore, S. Smith, M, Olmsted, 
C. Duncan, M. Bollmon, B Williams, K Schreiber ROW 2: C Conly, N. 
Shroyer, J. Bisbing, A. Grove, J. Klingler, R. Greim, J. Newton, J. Dixon, 



N, Dice, J. Dubbs, M, Gottscholk, B Erdmann, J Baker, ROW 3; R, Felty, K. 
Smith, E. Ruth, P, Castor, D. Troutman, J. Lingermon. 




FACULTY - STUDENT COUNCIL 




SEATED: G Thomas, M, T|hin, J. Snowberger, B Brown, J Nichols, K Kreider, J. Kauffman, G. Stanson, 
STANDING; G Weaver, C Seidel, L Brogon, H. Fitzgerald, E McCracken, R Rhine, K. Girord, E, Morgan. 




Recognized as one of the most influential bodies on campus, 
the Faculty-Student Council, comprising one elected representative 
from each campus organization, serves as a voice for student 
suggestions to the faculty and administration. Distribution of the 
Student Activity Fee into areas which will benefit every college 
student is the major duty of the council. 

Some of the uses made of this fee are the provision of daily 
newspapers for each dormitory and monthly magazines and re- 
cords for Carnegie Lounge. This year the Council invested in 
"non-removable" coot hangers for the Dining Hall and acted as 
the central agency for collection of contributions to the John 
Zola Memorial Fund. Future projects include an amplification sys- 
tem for the gymnasium and chapel and a sign at the campus en- 
trance publicizing the College 

Along with its financial responsibilities, the Council organizes 
elections for campus organizations ond sponsors two dances 
each school year. 



Officers: L. Brogan, Treasurer; J. Feather, Secretary; K. Girard, 
President; Not pictured, E. McCracken, Vice-President. 



106 



WOMEN'S COMMUTER COUNCIL 




Dedicated to the goal of furthering the cooperative spirit be- 
tween commuting and resident women, the Women's Commuter 
Council works with the Jiggerboard in preparation for Gander 
Weekend. With Dean Martha C. Faust as advisor, the council en- 
forces the college rules and standards for day students. 

WCC met every other Tuesday noon in the co-ed recreation 
room of Mary Green Hall where it planned such affairs as the 
fall party for Freshmen commuters. In December, 1961, WCC 
participated in the annual County Fair and also threw a party 
for the men day students, hiighlighting this year's social activities 
was the annual Valentine Dance, which the Men's Day Student 
Council co-sponsored. A king and queen, chosen from the com- 
muting students, were crowned during the February dance. Re- 
cently, the council held elections and ended the year with a 
picnic. 



SEATED, Left to Rigint: Connie Fulierton; Judy Kline Feather, president; Sandra 
Kelly, vice president, STANDING; Rosalie Wida; JoAnn Dubbs, secretory- 
treasurer. 



MEN'S DAY STUDENT CONGRESS 




Acting as a Peace Corps of the men commuting students, the 
Men's Day Student Congress strove this year to settle disputes, to 
foster good will among both day and resident men, and to add 
to the social calendar of LVC. The Congress is composed of rep- 
resentatives elected from each class, in addition to officers. 

Hayrides plus the annual February Valentine Dance, co-spon- 
sored with the Women's Commuter Council, were hosted by the 
organization. Two lucky commuters were crowned king and queen 
of the February dance. Orphan children were special guests at a 
party held for them at Christmas by these men and the Elementary 
Education Club. Recently, a farewell party sponsored by the 
MDSC honored graduating Senior day men. 



Left to Rigfit ROW 1: Ralpfi Kreiser, vice president; Rowland Barnes, president; 
Curtis Miller, secretary; Gerald Bowman, treasurer. ROW 2: Joseph Clork; 
Charles Seidel, Faculty-Student Council representative; Robert Andreozzi. 



107 




SEATED, Left to Right: S. Bucher, L. Grebe, S, Gerhart, M. Bollman, B. 
McClean, P. Wise, S. Stetler, E. Moore, J Snowberger, M Shaver, K. 



Kreider- STANDING, I. Miller, E. Saboka, J, Keiper, N. Dutro, C. Hemperly, 
L, Bechner. 



RESIDENT WOMEN'S STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION 



The Resident Women's Student Government Association 
acts in cooperation with the faculty to enforce the regula- 
tions governing resident v^omen and to promote annually at 
least two service projects and two social events. Although 
all resident women students are members and may assign 
demerits for infraction of regulations, the executive board, 
more commonly known as Jiggerboard, is responsible for 
hearing coses and alloting constructive restrictions. 

Jiggerboard members, who are elected by members of 
their respective classes, officiated at the girls' contests on 
Underclassmen's Day. At County Fair their sale of extra one 
o'clock permissions and special two o'clock permissions net- 




ted more money for Campus Chest than did any other 
booth. In cooperation with the Women's Commuter Council, 
they sponsored Gander Weekend, the annual turnabout 
which was called Finn's Frolic this year. Jiggerboard and 
Men's Senate sponsored the Blue Christmas Bail, the Christ- 
mas dinner dance on December 14, 1961. In the spring of 
1961 Sandra Gerhart was elected Freshman Girl of the Year. 
OfTicers for 1961-62 were Pat Wise, president; Barbara Mc- 
Clean, vice president; Sandra Gerhart, recording secretary; 
Mary Bollman, judicial secretary; Sandy Stetler, treasurer; 
and Judy Snowberger, Faculty-Student Council representa- 
tive. 



Ken and Nan were all dolled up for Finn's Frolic on 
Gander Weekend, sponsored by RWSGA ond WCC. 




SEATED: G- Stanson, H. Yost, B. Stull, K, Girord STANDING: R. Ward, C Rife, L. Godshall, J. Brogon, T. 
Balsbough, K. Lee, K, Whisler. 

MEN'S SENATE 



"Which is the best government? That which teaches us to 
govern ourselves." Goethe. 

Students at Lebanon Valley College find more than ample 
opportunity to learn how to follow Goethe's advice. One ex- 
ample of their self-government Is the Senate, ofRciolly known 
OS the Resident Men's Student Government Association, which 
maintains disciplinary and judicial power over the men stu- 
dents who reside in the dormitories and in town. President 
Frederic K. Miller, the faculty, and the advisor to Senate, 



Dean George R. Marquette, stand by to assist the student 
Senators whenever they are called upon. 

Membership of this body is composed of one freshman, two 
sophomores, three juniors, and five senior representatives, 
along with the dormitory counsellors. 

Several activities of the Senate include Upperclassmen's 
Day, an annual inter-dorm track meet, and the co-sponsor- 
ship with the Resident Women's Student Government Asso- 
ciation of the Christmas Dinner Dance. 



Officers: H. Yost, Vice-President; R. Stull, President; G. 
Hiltner, Secretary-Treasurer. 




BETA 
BETA 
BETA 




ROW 1: R Andreozzi, Mr. Bollinger, Dr Light, Dr Wilson, A Stephonis ROW 2: K Girord, C, Hoffman, 
S, Gerhort, A Fox, K. Cossel, R Kohon ROW 3: R. Hanng, H Fitzgerald, D, Pierce, F. Eppley. T Bals- 
bough 



Beta Beta Beta, a national honorary biological society, is represented at LVC by 
the Alpha Zefa Chapter, headed by Aglaia Stephonis, President. Because of the 
difficulty in obtaining speakers from this area, the club's agendo for the year con- 
sisted of movies. Several members toured Hahnemann Medical College during a club 
field trip. The annual banquet took place in the spring. 

To attain full membership in Tri-Beta, students must hove a minimum of B in 75 per- 
cent of their biology courses, a B in at least 50 percent of all courses, and must 
rank as fourth semester students. Provisional membership may be accorded to students 
having at least a B average in 40 percent of their courses after one semester's attend- 
ance. 

Beta Beta Beta was established in 1922 at Oklahoma City University by Dr. Frank 
G, Brooks. The Alpha Zeta Chapter was established in 1953. Its purpose is to "encour- 
age scholastic attainment in the field of learning for those who achieve superior aca- 
demic records and who indicate special aptitude for the. subject of biology." it en- 
deavors to promote interest in and appreciation for natural science. The society, which 
is affiliated with the American Association for the Advancement of Science, quarterly 
publishes its own journal known as Bios. 



110 



PI GAMMA MU 



Through its Nu chapter, established at Lebanon Valley 
in 1939, Pi Gamma Mu recognizes students outstanding for 
attainments in the field of social sciences. This organization 
is a notional honor society for those college students major- 
ing in political science, sociojogy, and related fields. Re- 
quirements for membership include the achievement of a 



B overage in twenty credit hours of social science subjects 
and passing grades in all other college subjects. 

Meetings take place at the home of Professor C. F. Joseph 
Tom, faculty advisor, where members of the group conduct 
discussions on subjects pertinent to the various fields of social 
science. 



r 





ot> t^ Rioht' L Moyer, J. Feotiier, D Bacastow \^ Steiner, B. Light. Not pictured; G. Stanson, D. Bressler. 








'^ 1 






Left to right: R, Burl<e, N. Napier, J. Kauffmon, M, Lamke, J. Dixon, E. Nagle, L. Slonaker, Not pictured; 
C. Deitzol. C. Collins, 



GREEN BLOTTER 



Greer Blotter aims ot recognize and develop literary crea- 
tivity on Lebanon Valley's campus. Membership in this or- 
ganization is selective, based on literary merit and potential 
illustrated by manuscripts submitted to present members for 
evaluation and is limited in number according to class quo- 
tas. At present two representatives from each class comprise 
the group. 



The home of Dr. George Struble, advisor, is the meeting 
place of Green Blotter members. Here members submit their 
creative productions for critical evaluation and exchange 
ideas on literary techniques. Inkspots From the Green Blotter, 
written and edited by members of the organization, exhibits 
the successful results of Green Blotter and the ripening po- 
tentials of its members. 



Ill 



U VIE COLLEGIENNE 




La Vie Collegienne greeted this year's fall term with a new 
office and a change in type. Newly-situated in the renovated 
second floor of Carnigle Lounge, the bi-weekly newspaper 
used a larger type for headlines and editorials. One editor, 
OS opposed to the co-editors of former years, headed the 
publication. One of the largest staffs m the paper's history 
compiled the sixteen issues distributed during the year. Home- 
coming Weekend and May Day called for special eight-page 
editions and, in an attempt to improve the standard high 
quality of La Vie, the paper featured more pictures in every 
edition. Discussed in editorial, feature, and "Letters to the 
Editor" columns, the question of national fraternities and 
sororities on L.V.'s campus involved the 1961-62 La Vie in a 
lively debate. In addition to other highlights and innovations 
which '61 -'62 brought to La Vie, a tradition began last fall 
with the initiation of a La Vie banquet for staff members and 
their guests. 



SEATED: Jean Kauffman, Editor-in-chief. Left to Rigint; Kristine Kreider, As- 
sistant Editor; Judy Cassel; Ciiuck Seidel, Business Manager; Dean Flinch- 
bough, Judy Snowberger, Betsy Miller. 



STANDING: M. J. Earley, M, Kondrot, N Bintliff, L. Royafin. P. Sfionk, H. 
Rocs, B. Weirick, J. Keiper. SEATED: N. Napier, J. Hennessy, B. Grofiam, 
E. Nagle, J. Ruhl. 




W/G AND BUCKLE 



Through Wig and Buckle the theater world comes to 
Lebanon Valley's campus. This dramatic organization 
presents to its members opportunities to discover, de- 
velop, and pursue their particular talents or interests in 
the theater. 

Students will remember Wig and Buckle's production 
of Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap, presented under 
the direction of Mr. Robert Newall during Homecoming 
Weekend. Such a production comes to Engle Hall under 
the auspices of Wig and Buckle each semester. These 
presentations — full-length dramas, series of one-act 
plays, or dramatic excerpts — range in kind from trag- 
edy through mystery and melodrama to satire. In addi- 
tion to public productions, entertainment provided at 
weekly meetings of the group of amateur theater de- 
votees encourages and improves dramatic achievement. 
Workshops now being planned will soon provide those 
students interested in directing plays with the oppor- 
tunity to do so. 

A never-to-be-forgotten event for Wig and Buckle 
members is the annual party with its traditional game 
of charades. Fast becommg another tradition is the 
annual end-of-the-yeor trip to New York City during 
which members attend Broadway plays. Throughout the 
year small groups make independent trips to nearby 
cities to witness additional dramatic productions. 




ROW 1: G- Bull, Secretary; M. L. Lamke, President ROW 2: J. Krall, L. Shu- 
brooks, Treosurer; C. Deitzel, Vice PresicJent and Faculty-Student Representative; 
B. Speicher. ROW 3: E. Nogle, C. Losky, Mr Robert Newall, K. Baurenfeind, 
L, McWillioms ROW 4: B Shiffer, C, Jimenez, L Gorden. D, Kohl, H Wocker- 
man. ROW 5: G. Hollich, R. Burke, R Barnes, H, Derk, R, Carlson, R. London. 



ALPHA PSI OMEGA 



The Rho Eta Cast, Lebanon Valley's division of the national 
dramatic fraternity. Alpha Psi Omega, became affiliated with Wig 
and Buckle in 1960. Wig and Bucklers distinguished for special 
dramatic achievements may now receive recognition by election 
to this national organization. 



SEATED: M. L. Lomke, President; K. Bauernfeind, Secretary. 
STANDING: G. Bull, Vice President; D. Kohl; G. Hiltner; V. Mc- 
Coulley. 




Left to Right: Bonita Shifter as Miss Casewell; Fran Page, Mrs. Boyle, Doug Shaw, Giles Ralston; Mary 
Louise Lamke, Mollle Ralston; Charles Dietzel, Detective Sgt, Trotter,- Bob Mariner, Christopher Wren; 
George Hollich, Major Metcolf; Ron Burke, Mr. Poravicini. 



"THE MOUSETRAP" 

The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie is a mystery set in on old 
English manor. Under the direction of Mr. Robert Newall and stu- 
dent assistant, Lynn Shubrooks, with a set designed by Lynn Mc- 
Williams, the players enacted the chilling story of a group of 
people tortured by the snowfall that has isolated them from out- 
side communication and by the knowledge that one in their midst 
is a schizophrenic murderer. Tension mounts when the whistling 
maniac claims one of their number as his victim. Caught in a maze 
of mutual suspicion, the people bare their secrets to save their 
lives. 

Wig and Buckle presented The Mousetrap on Homecoming 
Weekend, October 27, 28, 1961. Parents, guests, and students 
enjoyed a tension filled presentation. 



Left to right: Fran Page, Mrs. Boyle; Doug Show, Giles Ralston; Mary Louise Lomke, 
Mollie Ralston. 





Left to Right: Doug Shaw, Giles Ralston; Mory Louise Lamke. Mollie Rolston; Charles Dietzel, Detective 
Sgt. Trotter; Bob Moriner, Christopher Wren; Ron Burke, Mr, Poravicini; George Hollich, Major Metcalf. 



115 




ROW 1: J. Weaber, R. Kreiser, F. Eiler, B. Bishop, J. Earley/ R. Shoap, D. Mills, D, Czirr. ROW 2: L. 
Spancake, R. Harjng, J. Brommer. ROW 3: J. Clark. 



ACS STUDENT AFFILIATES 



The year's activities of the Student Affiliates of the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society under the direction of Dean Flinch- 
bough, president, have included field trips to the Winthrop 
Pharmaceutical Company in Meyerstown, to the Millard lime- 
stone quarries, and to the graduate school of chemistry at the 
Pennsylvania State University. Dean Carl Y. Ehrhart was the 
speaker for the annual dinner-dance at the Palmyra Ameri- 
can Legion. Club members were also responsible for various 
projects in the Chemistry Department during Science for a 
Day. Regular club meetings featured guest speakers such as 
Thomas Kingsley, a representative of the Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration and faculty speakers such as Dr. John Hough, who 
related some of his experiences in industry. The year was 
opened with Monte Carlo Night at which all freshman chemis- 
try studnts were invited to try their skills at determining 



chemicals by smell, at manipulation of laboratory equipment, 
and at the estimation of various weights. The LVC Chapter 
was host for a joint meeting with the Student Affiliates 
Chapter from Franklin and Marshall College. 

The club, which underwrites its activities with dues and pro- 
fits from the sale of soda in the departmental stock room, is 
engaged in the collection of pictures of all LVC alumni who 
hove obtained their PhD's in chemistry. The pictures are 
being hung in the departmental conference room. 

Affiliates of the ACS are entitled to attend meetings of the 
various local chapters of the ACS and to use the personnel 
services offered by the parent organization. Other club officers 
are Art Bowman, vice president; Bobbie Wogisch, secretary; 
Bob Hobig, treasurer; and Ken Light, Faculty-Student Council 
representative. 



ROW 1: Dr. Hough, Dr. Locl<wood ROW 2: Dr Griswold, F, Niblo, M. Alleman, E. Loper, S Krouss. ROW 
3: H. Smith, L. Edwards, W, Hillman, K Feather, J, Lantz. Right Side, Left to Right: R Hobig, D. Flinch- 
baugh, K. Light, B. Wogisch 




^ ^.m 



MATH 
CLUB 







Si-- ^^^^^Im^ 



SEATED: J. Boyle, B, Brown, H, Haskell, P. Wise, B. Williams. STANDING: N, Butler, A. Green, G. Stach, 
R. Ehrhart, J. Brownowell, D. Kauffman, P. Young, J. Davis, L. Lapioli, Mr. Henning. 



Organized in 1958 under the supervision of Dr. Barnard 
Bissinger, the Math Club hopes to promote interest in the 
development of mathematical concepts and thereby to in- 
crease the role of mathematics in modern life. The club makes 
available to all its members specific concepts and recent 
developments in mathematics, and a monthly seminar pro- 
gram encourages students to co-operate in solving problems. 
Through sponsorship of social activities, the club hopes to 
foster friendship among those united by a common interest 
In mathematics. 



Monthly meetings, which ore scheduled throughout the 
year for both club members and other interested students 
and faculty members, feature outside guest speakers, lectures, 
and demonstrations by club members themselves and movies 
of relevant interest. This year the Math Club helped to sponsor 
a program v^hich gave area students and teachers an oppor- 
tunity to hear Professor Pettis, a distinguished visiting lecturer 
in mathematics. Also on the club's 1961-62 agenda were a 
trip to the University of Pennsylvania Mathematics Department 
and week end trip to I.B.M. Laboratories in New York. 



Providing the esprit de corps of the Physics Deparement is 
the year-old Lebanon Valley Student Section of the American 
Institute of Physics or, as it is better known, the Physics Club. 
This year the club boasted of a membership of thirty-one stu- 
dents — all either physics majors or students enrolled in ad- 
vanced physics courses. 

One of their most important activities was their complete as- 
sumption of responsibility in the Science-for-o-Day Program 
lost December. Because no professors were available that day, 
club members presented all lectures and demonstrations. With 
faculty advisor J. R. O'Donnell, the club gathered twice this 

SEATED: T, Brandt, J. 
Zimmerman, B. Lutz, A 
B. Reichort, R. Bechtold 



year for banquets, one held in the fall and a recent one which 
bid farewell to graduating senior members. At their monthly 
meetings club members heard several outside speakers and 
papers on modern physics written by the members. Field trips 
to industries and research plants were also made. 

Three advantages of afRliation with A. I. P. are the members' 
qualification for the services of the national placement bureau, 
free subscription to A.I.P.'s magazine Physics Today, and the 
right of access to the national group's meetings. Through this 
organization students interested in physics con pursue aspects 
of the subject formerly limited to the classroom. 

Fox, Mr. O'Donnel, G. Eckenroth, J. Nichols, R Wenger. STANDING: L. Orwig, J, 
Green, G. Plitnick, P. Young, J. Boyle, B. Orndorl, T. Crisman, R. Hertzog, D. Mills, 



PHYSICS 
CLUB 




PSYCHOLOGY CLUB 




Left to Right: ROW 1: C. Smith, N, Warner, H, Fitzgerald, F, Niedziaiek, C. Hemperly, V. Templeton, M 
Tjhin. ROW 2: B Williams, R Heberly, M Weinert, J. Bitner, D Koncor, H Wockerman, M Bollmon, T. 
Webb, J. Beck, T. Kent, B. Slatcher, H. Dom. 



The psychology Club has as its purpose the acquaintance of 
its members with the extent to which psychology is used in 
everyday life and thought. Its membership is open to all — 
psychology majors and others — who have an interest in 
psychology. 

Dr. Jean O. Love, head of the Department of Psychology 
and club advisor, has opened her home to the club numerous 
times. At the beginning of the year she held a get-acquainted 
party for Freshmen and old and new members. Here the new 
members came to know the aims of the club and the people 
comprising it. 



In order to gain a better knowledge of psychology and its 
many applications, the club invites various outside speakers to 
its bi-monthly meetings. Dr. Smolinksy of Wernersville State Hos- 
pital interested many students with his lecture on "Hypnosis and 
Psychotherapy." Relating psychology to English literature. Dr. 
Love presented a lecture on "The case of Virginia Woolf." Club 
members had an opportunity to see applied psychology at work 
on their visits to Pennhurst State School and Vineland State 
Hospital, New Jersey Demonstrations on laboratory equipment 
were also a part of these field trips. Closing the year's activities, 
a spring picnic provided fun and relaxation for all. 



118 



POLITICAL SCIENCE CLUB 



jft© 




ROW 1: G. Stanson, K. Miller, T. Kent, J Detwiler, C. Martin, R. Lee, M, Wert ROW 2: J Yost, G. 

Thomas, D. Koncor, L. Breeze, Mr, Fehr, J Kline, S, Bessei. ROW 3: E. Morgan, E, Wolfe, M. Haven, L 

Meyer, W. Hinkle, F. Thompson, E. Peters, R. Rohrboch, W. Sheehy, A. Bowman, H, Welch, C- Collins, J, 
Beck, B. Light. 



Any student on campus who is interested in learning parlia- 
mentary procedure, in taking part in politics, and in discussing 
the significance of current events is eligible for membership in 
the Political Science Club. Founded in 1947 by the late Mrs. 
Maud Laughlin, the club has expanded its activities into many 
areas, and now boasts a membership which exceeds thirty. 

Mr. Fehr serves as advisor to the group, and through his 
leadership club members are drilled in the principles of parlia- 
mentary procedure in order to prepare the LVC delegation for 
the annual Intercollegiate Conference on Government. Held in 



Harrisburg in April, the conference has seen active participation 
from Valley's annual delegation, which has in the past produced 
successful candidates for the offices of State Speaker and Clerk. 
Other traditional activities of the club are its annual Spring 
Banquet and, in election years, its campus-wide polls and spec- 
ial programs. Programs held this year to benefit all students in- 
cluded "News in Review" featuring panelists Hy White of WLBR, 
John Price of WHP; Mr. Fehr; and the presentation of D. Fenton 
Adams, Assistant Dean of Dickinson School of Law, who dis- 
cussed the impact of legal action TV programs on the public. 



119 




CHILDHOOD 

EDUCATION 

CLUB 



ROW 1: K. Schreiber, secretary; K, Baurenfeind, vice president; K- Kreider, treasurer; J. Snowberger, presi- 
dent; J. Nichols, faculty-student representative. ROW 2: S. Schreiber, J. Shellhammer, C Smith, B. Lidle, 
M, Weincrt, S. Lane, L, Grebe, J. Keiper. ROW 3: J. Johnston, M. Bollman, J. Brown, M. Shaver, M. Lentz, 
E. Saboka, P, Boyer, Steps: B, Williams, M. Olmsted, S. Kelly, C. Bottcher, C. Miller. 



To work for the education and well-being of children is the 
purpose of the Childhood Education Club, known familiarly 
on Valley's campus as the El-Ed Club. Membership in this or- 
ganization is open to all students preparing for future service 
in the field of elementary education. The club helps its mem- 
bers to become acquainted with professional teachers, to ex- 
chang ideas dealing with teaching methods, and to acquire 
practical training through working directly with children. 



Emphasis is placed on the development of modern tech- 
niques in the field of primary education, and programs at- 
tempt to deal with subjects in this field which the classroom 
curriculum of the Department of Education cannot cover. High- 
lights of this year's activities included speakers on various 
phases of elementary education and a Christmas party given 
by the club for the Special Education Class at the Annville 
Elementary School. 



S2-^ 



William A. Batchelor, instructor in 
art, comes to Valley's campus 
weekly to teach Beginning Painting, 
an introductory course in the 
techniques of oil painting. In 
addition Mr. Batchelor, an artist in 
his own right who has contributed 
entries to many exhibitions, heads 
the newly-required course in 
History and Art Appreciation. 
Experienced himself in teaching art 
to grade-school children, he also 
contributes his talents to the 
Elementary Education Department. 




If 




120 



STUDENT 

PENNSYLVANIA 

STATE 

EDUCATION 

ASSOCIATION 




STANDING: Julie Johnston, Leann Grebe, Marylin Rinker, Lynn McWillioms, Betty Robinson. Left Table: 
Fran Mazzilli, Solly Slocum, Nancy Shroyer, Bonnie Weirick, Carole Duncan, Lois Ensminger, Linda Weber. 
Right Table: Bonnie Williams, Olive Binner, Kothy Baurenfeind, Jock Turner, Mary Ellen Olmsted, Barbara 
Hudgins, Ray Foley, Margaret Lentz, Pot Jones. 



Better known as PSEA, the Pennsylvania State Education 
Association is a professional association for all college stu- 
dents preparing to enter the field of teoching. This organiza- 
tion hopes to instill in its members a respect for the educa- 
tional process and a desire to become effective teachers in 
order that they gain those qualities requisite to useful mem- 
bers of the teaching profession. 

Under the leadership of Bonnie Williams, president, and the 



guidance of Dr. Gilbert McKlveen and Dr, Cloyd Ebersole, 
advisors, L.V.C.'s George D. Gossard Chapter of PSEA plans 
its meetings v^ith the intention of developing its members into 
first-class educators. Of special importance in this respect is 
the annual Student-Teacher Panel in which students give a 
critical analysis of their student teachers. Other highlights of 
this year included a Christmas party, participation in the Coun- 
ty Fair, and a Sundae Night. 




Left Table: Kristine Kreider, Pot Derbyshire, 
Nancy Dutro, Judy Snowberger, Peggy 
Blon^quist, Meg Weinert, Patsy Wise. Right 
Table; Jeannette Brown, Carol Bottcher, 
Corolyn Miller. Millie Evans, Judy Keiper, 
Judy Bowman, Jud/ Ruhl, Lovello Nay lor, 
Jeanne Bogert. 



President: 

Vice President: 

Recording Secretary 

Corresponding Secretary 

Treasurer: 

Publicity Chairmen: 



Student PSEA Officers: 

Bonnie Williams 
Judy Snowberger 



Shirley Huber 

Olive Binner 

Jock Turner 

Kristine Kreider 



121 



FRENCH 
CLUB 



Left to Right; M. Grjvsky, L, Naylor, L, 
A. Grove, S. Gerhort, G. Hiltner. 



Stein, 








Recent expansion in the Language Department is reflected in 
the French Club. This organization is open to both present stu- 
dents of French and to those interested in the language and 
culture of the French people. Lectures, films, slides, and discus- 
sions held in French increase the members' knowledge of France, 
its native tongue, its sciences and arts. Tope recordings enable 



students to hear the language as it is actually spoken and to re- 
cord their own French conversations. At Christmas the group 
joins the Adult French Club of Annville in the singing of French 
carols. In past years, the French Club has traveled to New York 
City to view French films or plays and to dine on France's fa- 
mous cuisine' 



9i^SB ^< 



DEBATE 
CLUB 



SEATED; S. Hock, B. Shifter, 
K Milller, D Hively. STAND- 
ING: R Wida, S Werni, J. 
Dressel, R. Barnes. 




f 

i 





Celebrating its second anniversary this spring, the Debate 
Club continued to expand its on-and off-campus activities. 
Under the advisorship of Mr. Jesse Matlock, the group com- 
prises approximately ten members. "Resolved: That Labor Or- 
ganization Should Be Under the Jurisdiction of Anti-Trust Legis- 
lation" was this year's debating topic. Colleges with which Le- 
banon Valley debated on this subject were Elizabethtown, Mes- 
siah, and Gettysburg. At the Temple University Tournament, our 
affirmative team was undefeated. 



In February Lebanon Valley's Debate Club participated in 
the Inter-Collegiate Debate Tournament at Franklin and Mar- 
shall College. During the following month the club sponsored a 
similar tournament here on campus. Club members again ar- 
ranged an Annual Speech Day for all interested students and 
entered a panel discussion with the SCA. An improvement in 
the members' grasp of the principles of debate from its partici- 
pation in these activities is evident from the number of wins 
achieved this year. 



122 




ALPHA 

PHI 
OMEGA 



ROW 1; D, Flinchbaugh, G, Cronrath, M, Hassrnger, R Foley, K Whisler ROW 2: R Shope, T Crisman, 
C, Martin, D. Gouger. ROW 3: R. Orndoff, R. Crider, J, Spoonhour, F Filer ROW 4: M Grivsky, G. 
Wasson, D. Salter, W. Stump, R. Haring, L. Spancake. 



A<|)n 




ROW 1: J, Brommer, G. Cronrath, M. Hossinger, ROW 2: D. Flinchbough, 
R. Foley. 



Alph Phi Omega, the only service organization on campus, com- 
prises twenty-five men who ore or were associated with the Boy 
Scouts of America. Our Nu Delta chapter is one of three hundred 
twenty-five national chapters. 

Chapter service projects include a used book exchange, con- 
ducted this year in connection with the Folliette Book Company 
of Illinois; a blood bank, available year-round to all students, pro- 
fessors, end their immediate families,- Civil Defense drills on cam- 
pus; and ushering at Chapel services. Baccalaureate, and Com- 
mencement. APO members also set up bleachers for the May Day 
pageant and raise and lower the American flag each day. APO 
IS perhaps best known on campus for its annual Ugly Man on 
Campus contest and dance held each March. 

Alpha Phi Omega has its headquarters in the redecorated 
Knights room in the basement of Kreider Hall. Officiating at meet- 
ings are President Gary Cronrath, Vice President Jim Brommer, 
Recording Secretary Merle Hossinger, Corresponding Secretary 
Ray Foley, Treasurer Dean Flinchbaugh, Sergeant at Arms Ken 
Whisler. 



123 



WHITE HATS . . . 




Organized in 1960, the White Hats hove as their main objective 
the development and administration of the freshman initiation pro- 
gram. Under their leadership, the Class of '65 underwent a two- 
week ordeal of Frosh Frolics and other initiation activities, such as 
the traditional Air Raid Day designed to foster in them a sense of 
class unity and college loyalty. 

Composed of sophomores, juniors, and seniors representing their 
respective classes and various campus organizations, the White 
Hats were identifiable by their symbolic headgear and notorious 
for their issuing of demerits for freshman disobedience of orders. 
At the accumulation of seven or more such demerits, freshmen ap- 
peared before a tribunal at which the White Hats reviewed of- 
fenses and dealt out punishments accordingly. A sampling of these 
included running to classes, downtown duty for the girls' dorms, 
and performing in various ways in front of the Dining Hall. To the 
surprise of the freshmen, a party concluded the two weeks of less 
enjoyable activity. 

Besides serving as freshman initiators, the White Hats also act in 
coordination with the Department of Athletics as a reception com- 
mittee for visiting athletic teams. Thus this group helps to further 
intra-class, inter-class, and infer-collegiate relations. 



Head White Hats: Mary Bollmon, Dick Rhine 



ROW 1: L Vastine, S Marshall, N Wagner, R Wida ROW 2: L Breeze, 
J. Nichols, E. Moore, J Lied ROW 3: C Ebersole L Beckner L, Lewis, 
J. Cassel, P. Jones, ROW 4: D. Burns, R, Andreozzi, R. Lichtenwalter, K. 



Lee, K. Whisler, M, Hendrix ROW 5: E Peters, J Beck, S. Hildreth, C. Mil- 
ler, E. Spahr ROW 6; J Kobylarz, R. Kresge, J. Davis. 




124 



AND INITIATION 



Not far from this ... to the real thinq: 




The trials of the Frosh: 




AUTHORITYI 




125 



INTER-SOCIETY COUNCIL 




Left to Right. SEATED: I Miller, 5, Stetler, F, Niedzialek, P, Shonk, A. Kurr, STANDING: G. Hiltner, P. 
Young, L. Brogon, N Butler, H Yost, G Zeller, G Miller 



Uniting all the social societies on campus, Inter-Society Council 
combines efforts in order to provide social affairs for all students 
and to better inter-society relationships. Member societies include 
Clio, Delphian, Philo, Kalo, Knights of the Valley, and the two 
newly-organized music organizations, Sigma Alpha Iota and Sin- 
fonia, representing all together over three-hundred students. Each 
member society is represented by its president and one elected 
representative, but the Council itself functions as an independent 
organization having its own constitution and officers. Acting in an 
official capacity for the organization during the 1961-62 year were 
frances Niedzialek and Brenda Brown. 

The highlights of the year's activities included the Inter-Society 
Council formal dance, "Southern Cotillion," held in the Dining Hall 
on November 18,1961; informal dances after each Saturday night 
home basketball game and the frammises held throughout the 
year accommodating everyone's taste with combos, records, 
dancing, refreshments, and twisting contests. 



The Peppermint Lounge of Lebanon Valley 
College. 




126 



KNIGHTS OF THE VALLEY 




ROW 1: H. Meyer, G. Weover, R, Rhine, C Ebersole, G. Stambach, J. Kreider. ROW 2: K Whisler, M. 
Hendrix, R. Brill, P. Young, K, Blekicki, J. Hooper, W. Dellinger. ROW 3; E McCrocken, J Davis, R. Rhine, 
H. Fitzgerald, J. Whitter, F Eppley, R. Urey, F. Thompson, D. Rabenold. 



Chuck Moston award to Hiram Fitzgerald. 




Knights of the Valley history begins with its organization in 1941 
OS chapter of the national fraternity. Kappa Sigma Kappa. In 
1950 the charter dropped its national afFiliation, and in 1961 the 
Knights became residents of the first house on campus to be 
granted to an organization. 

Throughout these years the Knights hove shown outstanding 
leadership and service to our campus. Heading the list of services 
to the resident students are the weekly distribution of linen for 
the Gordon-Davis laundry service and the weekly dry cleaning 
service. Two students on our campus receive awards from this 
fraternity annually. The Knights of the Valley John Zola Memorial 
Award, begun this year, goes to a deserving student; and the 
Chuck Moston Award is presented to the outstanding male athlete 
of the year. Trophies to the outstanding athlete in each major 
sport supplement this award. 

Knights of the Valley Alumni are very well organized and take 
part in many of the fraternity's social affairs. This year present 
Knights gave a dinner for the alumni on the evening of Home- 
coming Day, and many alumni guests attended the annual spring 
dinner-dance. 

George Hiltner, president, and Dean George Marquette, advisor, 
lead the Knights. Qualifications for membership in the fraternity 
are scholarship, leadership, campus service, and loyalty. 



127 





I 



L^'# 


















KNEELING: C. Sayers, D. Bacastow, R. Andreozzi, J. Adams, D- Kauf?man, J- Cromer, H, Bessel, G. Thomas, 
T, Kent, B. Bishop, L. Ledebur. STANDING: T. Bonsall, H. Smith, B, Albam, D, Geib, K Homon, J. Sey- 
mour, J, Beck, H. Yost, R, Scott, B, Lidston, K. Lee, J. Yost, W Altlond H, Lys, 



Officers 

KNEELING: H. Lys, G. Thomas, H, Bessel. 
STANDING: D, Kauffmon, B. Lidston, H. 
Yost, K. Lee, R. Andreozzi. 



.*S 



^ ,. K 






^AL 



Pledges 

ROW 1: B Zink, J Early, G Kline. ROW 2: C. Burkhardt, V. Caprio, 
B. Yocum, W. Koch. ROW 3: W. Alsted, D. Krueger, A. Taylor. 





Phi Lambda Sigma, the oldest fraternal organization on campus, 
sponsored and participated in numerous activities throughout the 
past year. Dr. Jacob L. Rhodes again served as the advisor to 
Philo. 

Beginning in the fall was rushing, resulting in the initiation of 
twelve new pledges into the society. Philo sponsored the "Victory 
Bowl" dance in the evening after one of the football games, and 
its members organized the annual Alumni-Varsity basketball game. 
Another service was the provision of flowers on special occasions 
on the school calendar such as Homecoming Weekend. Each week 
during the school year Philo boys delivered one hundred hoagies 
to the dormitories. The college's intramural program was well sup- 
ported by members of the group. Highlighting the school year for 
the organization was the Clio-Philo dinner dance held in the 
spring. 

Philo is hoping to become a national fraternity next year. Along 
with applying for national membership, the society is seeking to 
hove a separate building on campus to house its members. 




SEATED, Left to Right: L. Breeze, D. Kohl, L. Grebe, P. Derbyshire, M. Rinker, A. Kurr, D, Koncar, L. Nay- 
lor. STANDING; L. Ensminger, S. Marshall, C. Magee, N. Napier, V. McCauley, M. Colgon, N, Dutro, 
C. Smith, A. Grove, S. Gerhart, J. Freed, D. Bressler, L. McWilliams, P. McDyer, F. Niedziojek. 




Left to right; P. Derbyshire, treasurer; 
N. Dutro, vice-president; M, Colgan, Fa- 
culty-Student Council representative; B, 
Brown, president; F. Niedziolek, ISC repre- 
sentative; D. Koncar, corresponding secre- 
tory. Absent: L. Breeze, recording secretary. 



KAN 



Clio Entertains 



1961-1962 was a busy college year for Kappa Lambda Nu, 
commonly called Clio. In the fall the organization revised its con- 
stitution and decided to limit its membership in order to preserve 
the closeness enjoyed in post years. Rush V^eek vv'os scheduled 
for second semester instead of the traditional fall season. Bi- 
weekly meetings under the guidance of Dr. Sara E. Piel com- 
menced at a later hour. 

Clio girls sponsored a dance with Philo, their brother organiza- 
tion, in September, sold Christmas wrapping paper, and under- 
took a Twisting Party after a February basketball game. In addi- 
tion, the club cooperated with the Inter-Society Council in plan- 
ning for the November ISC Dance. 

In December an open-house featuring two skits introduced 
interested girls to Clio members. During Rush Week Clio held a 
tea and fashion show. Initiates dressed as Minerva, patron god- 
dess of the society, as part of their informal initiation,- and the 
formal initiation followed on March 1, 1962. Clio-Philo Weekend, 
April 27-28, climaxed the year's events for both initiates and 
seasoned members with the annual Saturday-night dinner-dance. 





Left to Right: P. Jones, Sophomore Representa- 
tive; M. Boll man. Vice President; M. Wei n art. 
Recording Secretory,- S. Stetler, President; I. 
Miller, Treasurer; L. Vastine, Student-Faculty 
Representative. 



Candids of the Delphian Coed i 



AM 




Delta Lambda Sigma restricted its membership this year in 
an effort to cut down on the growing size of the organization. 
It selected at least twenty and no more than twenty-nine new 
pledges during second semester Rush Week. 

Delphian celebrated its fortieth birthday in November with 
its brother society, Kalo. As usual, the annual K-D Weekend 
was the climax of the year's activities, Cosponsored by the two 



organizations, the second annual variety show, judged by im- 
partial critics, awarded prizes to the contesting campus organi- 
zations during the Friday night performance. The dinner-dance 
on Saturday night provided a queen to grace the dance. 

The Delphian girls kept busy again this year by initiating a 
doughnut sale, continuing the sale of contemporary cards, and 
scrubbing down dirty cars in two yearly car washes. 



Membership^ S, Leonord, E. Robinson, B, Shupp, D, Ingle, C. Hemperly, K. 
Resch, J. Stringer, J Baker, J. Bronyon, E. Block, S. K. Schreiber, S. 
Schreiber, R, Greim, S, Kelly, N, Dohringer, B. Speicher, B. Wogisch, M, 
Evans, J Nichols, K, Kreider, C. Hoffmen, J. Tonno, L Bell, J, Ruhl, J. 
Snowberger, L. Weber, J. Dixon, B. Udle, C. Deichert, L. Schlegel, J. Cassel, 



H. Pisle, L. Lewis, B. Williams, M. Weinert, N. Warner, P. Wise, B. Smith, 
C. Derk, B. Williams, S. Lane, J. Johnston, E. Orchard, J. Keiper, C. Klock, V. 
Beckner, V, Templeton, D. Sieler, C. Keehn, S. Bucher, J. Grossi, S. Rouse, 
S Deiner, K. Baurenfeind, S. Stetler, I. Miller, E. Moore, M. Bollman, E. Vas- 
tine, P. Jones. 




SEATED: J, Cashion, L. Brogan, L. Godsholl, R. 
Stull. STANDING: T Balsbough, V. Stouffer, D. 
Drumheller, R. Ward, B. Shirk. 





KNEELING: J Rutter, G, McGre- 
gor, S. Roberts, R, Shope, D. 
Kimball. STANDING: E, Ruth, B, 
Hughes, H, Woodruff, D. Leigh, 
J. Davis, G. Cosfricher, M. Lazin, 
D. Sousser, D. Stroh. 

KM 



Kappa Lambda Sigma, with its sister society, Delta Lambda 
Sigma, opened this school year with the traditional K.D. Kick- 
ofF Dance. This fraternity, commonly known as Kolo, is out- 
standing in its contribution to the campus social life. Along with 
the K.D, Kickoff Dance, Kalo members also sponsor a stag 
banquet for its seniors, a K.D. Weekend highlighted by a for- 
mal dinner-dance, and an annual jazz concert enjoyed by 
the entire campus. 



LVC college students find their lives brightened by the Kalo 
salesman who has in his brief case samples of mugs, pretzels, 
stationery, and Christmas cards. This year the resident women 
anxiously waited for the Tuesday night each month when this 
fraternity serenaded its Sweetheart of the Month. The fraternity 
also publishes its witty newspaper. Kappa La Lig, which keeps 
its members and the campus in smiles. 



KNEELING: L, Sponcoke, B. Shirk, T. Balsbough, M. Linker, R. Lewis, L. Bro- 
gan. STANDING: K. Horst, S. Hildredth, N. Butler, E. Spohr, R, Kresge, V. 



Stouffer, J. Bowman, R. Ward, J. Cashion, L. Godshall, D, Drumheller, R. 
Stull, L. Wittle. 





LEBANON 
VALLEY 



COLLEGE 



DAY 



Left to Right: Barbara Alley, Dorothy 
Hudson, Lynne Foster. 



A day when alumni return; on opportunity for parents to see 
the campus in action; a chance for freshmen to wreck their re- 
venge on upperclossmen — this is Lebanon Valley College Day. 
To odd gaiety and sparkle to the campus, students made floats, 
festive campus displays, and dormitory decorations. 

Rudely awakened from a deep sleep, the upperclossmen dis- 
covered the Frosh band playing strains of "Go Lebanon Valley" 
at 6 a.m. Beginning the festivities were underclassmen sports 
events including novelty races, softball throws, and touch foot- 
ball. Then on a bright, crisp morning, the students took a quick 
hike to the Quittie for the annual tug-of-wor between the 
strong men of the Sophomore and Freshman classes which the 
former, as always, won. 

Immediately following was a highlight of this year's day: the 
dedication of Vickroy Hall. Included in the ceremonies were a 
tribute to the first president of Lebanon Valley, T. R. Vickroy, 



and presentation of keys to the hall president, Isobel Miller. All 
of the dorms and Knights of the Valley fraternity house were 
open for visitation and informal teas. 

In the afternoon Lebanon Valley met Dickinson in the annual 
Homecoming game which ended with a victory for the Dutch- 
men. The coronation of the Homecoming Queen took place at 
halftime with Miss Dorothy Hudson reigning over the day. Miss 
Barbara Alley and Miss Lynne Foster were the court attendants 
with several members of the Knights of the Valley acting as 
escorts. 

In the early evening the Wig and Buckle dramatics club 
presented a mystery-filled production entitled The Mousetrap. 
Climaxing the events was the annual Homecoming dance, "Har- 
vest Boll." In addition to entertainment by "The Legends," the 
couples danced to the music of Gene Soles in a festive fall 
atmosphere. 



132 




•f« 



"# That looks p^et^y good, 
Greg. 






Wait till we get to the 
other side. 



Just like Registration 
Day. 



Save one for me. 



We was robbed. 




Look mean. Barb. Watch where you're puttin' your feet. 

Music for the Homecomina Dance orovided bv Gene Soles. 



Homecoming Queen, Dotty Hudson, and attendants, 
Barbara Alley and Lynne Foster accept gifts from Gene 
Stambach, President of the L— Club. 




CHRISTMAS 



Christmas, 1961, was celebrated in many of the traditional 
ways at Lebanon Valley College,- but like all Christmases, it 
earned itself a special niche in the event-tilled memory of 
study and shennanigans which each student stores for him- 
self^ 

Three short weeks of classes and exams ofTicially compose 
the Christmas season. Yet by virtue of its unique brevity, this 
period IS olive with spirit and activities. Caroling groups, 
club parties, the Chorus Concert, and the Christmas Dinner- 
Dance again offered seasonal enjoyment at LVC. Ever- 
present gripes turned to grins with each new celebration of 
the coming holiday. Each dorm tried to outdo the others in 
decorations, and each arbitrarily declared itself the winner. 
Sparkling lights and Christmas trees transformed the aca- 
demic face of LVC. Snow was the sole missing ingredient, 
but only until students hod scattered to their separate 
homes. There, during that best part of a college Christmas 
season known as vocation, LVC students enjoyed an au- 
thentically white Christmas. 




Miss Patricia Ann Jones 
Christmas Queen 



Pat Jones and Bob Stull 



Recognize anyone? 



Blue Christmas Ball 






. . PARTIES AND DECORATIONS 



WAA Chorus 






J 




Left to Right; SEATED: N. Fenstermacher, A. Hartman, STANDING: S. Witte, J. Mumper, B. McClean, 
L- Koerper, C. Bronson, E. Black. 



I^AY DAY 



Laughter, happiness, and gaiety reign everywhere, for this is 
"Mardi-Gras" — the theme of the Lebanon Valley College May 
Day Pageant. Drawing many parents, alumni, and friends to 
witness the festivities, this day is an annual highlight of the 
spring season. 

Leading the processional was May Queen Nancy Fenster- 
macher with Amelia Hartman as Maid of Honor. The Queen's 
Court included Elizabeth Block, Carol Bronson, Linda Koerper, 
Barbara McClean, Joan Mumper, and Sonia Witte. Presented 
as an homage to the Queen were a footstool, orb, scepter, and 
finally the crown. Mrs. Jean Cunningham Catlin, 1960 May 
Queen, performed the coronation. 

Under the direction of Miss Betty J. Bowman of the Physical 
Education Department and Dr. James M. Thurmond, band di- 
rector, the pageant rotated around the festivities found in the 
New Orleans celebration. Greeting the approach of the Queen 



was a mole glee-club performing several lilting tunes of "Dixie." 
Adding capers and chaos to the events were the hilarious jokes 
of the end-men from the Sinfonia Minstrels plus several rousing 
numbers by the colorfully arrayed Dixie Land Band. Demon- 
strating their skill were a group of students on the trampoline 
along with a clown act. The traditional May-pole dance 
around the multi-colored, streamer-entwined pole captivated 
the attention of the audience. Students performed several other 
dances depicting various other sets of people on the Mardi 
Gras scene — the elegant minuet, joyous can-con, and modern 
dance of the dreamers. 

In the evening the Junior Prom was held in a gaily-decorated 
scene with a fountain and waving palms. The renowned band 
of Maynard Ferguson — the first big-name band to appear on 
campus — created a true "Mardi Gras" spirit. 



136 



The Queen with her flower girl, Miss 
Erika Fairlamb. 



Fran Niedziaiek and Gordon Wentz. 




JUNIOR 

PROM 

WITH 

MAYNARD 

FERGUSON 



1 





GRADUATION - 7 967 



On June 4, 1961, the center of Valley's campus once 
again became the scene of Commencement. Dr. Roy I. 
Nichols, Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 
and Vice Provost of the University of Pennsylvania, told the 
Seniors of 1961 that "We Do Things By Tens." For them 
the coming decades are to be filled with challenges and 
the background against which the Class of 1961 will be 
given opportunities to demonstrate that men can achieve 
undreamed-of feats. 



Following Dr. Nichols' address. President Frederic K. 
Miller conferred Baccalaureate degrees on one-hundred 
twenty-three students. Honorary degrees went to Dr. Nich- 
ols, Doctor of Social Sciences,- Reverend Thomas May, Doc- 
tor of Divmity; and Mr. Albert Watson, Doctor of taws. 

In tribute to Dr. Miller upon the completion of his first 
decade of outstanding leadership as President of Lebanon 
Valley College, the Board of Trustees held a testimonial 
dinner for him during Graduation Week. 



Left to Right: Ensign Elaine Walter, Lt. Bess Bryant, Commander C. W. Se- Left to Rigfit; Dr. Roy I. Nichols, Dr. Frederic K. Miller, Dr. Thomas May, 

bring. Dr. Carl Y. Ehrhort, Dr. Albert Watson. 






Fer a provincial campus, it seems durn sophisticated to me! 



You college guys'll just hove to find some other lond to build o still on. 



"NO TIME FOR COUNSELORS" 




Now, look, when 
soy nine o'clock, 
mean nine o'clock. 



While we're standing 
let's all learn the 
Alma Mater. 

Ah, yes! Besides 
speaking Chacucer's 
language fluently, 

I've olwoys wanted 
to lead a porade- 



140 





QUIET HOURS 



141 






Is it really worth it to sing for your supper? 



Objective 6: "To provide, in on atmosphere of liberal culture, train- 
ing for certain professions , . ." 




142 




The Legends 
Left to Right: L. Godshall, R. Lee, H. Fitz- 
gerald, K, Girard, E, McCracken. 



THE BROTHERS FOUR 

Renowned folk-singing quartet, the Brothers 
Four, appeared at Valley for the first time in 1962. 
Kappa Lambda Sigma, sponsors of several campus 
firsts this year, originated and carried out the plan 
to bring the former University of Washington 
fraternity brothers here on March 16, 1962. 
Unable to read music, the Brothers Four neverthe- 
less have performed in every state of the union 
and on the Ed Sullivan Show. They enjoy a wide 
following in colleges and universities. Here they 
presented a two-hour concert in the Lynch Memor- 
ial Gymnasium, including "Yellow Bird," Molly 
Malone," and, of course, the rendition of "Green- 
fields" which made them famous. 




143 



RELIGIOUS 

EMPHASIS 

WEEK 





Dr. Samuel Gandy 



FIRST ROW: L. McWilliams, S. Wolfe, Dr. Lockwood, Dr, Bemesderfer, S. Smith, J, Snowberger, SECOND 
ROW: W. Newcomer, D. Pierce, J, Corbett, R, Felty, C, Rife, G, Hiltner, 



"I and Thou," Religious Emphasis Week, 1962, focused attention on the individual's 
relationship with God. As an introduction to the week's theme, Wig and Buckle mem- 
bers opened the week with a religious drama, Christ in the Concrete City. The three-day 
program considered first the I: "I look at Myself," and then the Thou: "I Look at God." 
Activities included daily convocations, informal interviews and discussion groups with 
the speakers, dormitory discussions, and Communion and Consecration services. 

Dr. Samuel Gandy, this year's guest leader, presently pastor of Kenwood Ellis Com- 
munity Church of Chicago, Illinois, has served in the past in the chaplaincy of several 
colleges including Fisk University and Virginia State College. Other guest leaders were 
Rev. Richard H. Crawford of the York County Council of Churches, banquet speaker,- 
Rev. Clair L. Wagner of Denver, Pennsylvania, Trinity EUB Church, Consecration service 
speaker; and Rev. John Winter of York Junior College, Communion service liturgist. 



FRESHMAN HONORS PROGRAM 



"To provide opportunities for gifted students to pursue in- 
dependent study for the purpose of developing their intellec- 
tual power to the maximum" — is the most recently-adopted 
object of Lebanon Valley College. Thus 1961-62 marked the 
initiation of a college-wide honors program here. Twenty 
members of the Class of 1965 qualified for participation in 
the program on the basis of previous high academic standing. 



superior performance in entrance tests, and personal inter- 
views with members of the College Honors Committee. These 
Freshmen participate in seminar and conference courses aimed 
at offering opportunities for intensive study and research, de- 
veloping skill in thought and expression, and fostering aware- 
ness of their cultural heritage. 



FIRST ROW; Joanne Scott, Linda Slonaker, Virginia Dilkes, Marion Walsh, 
Moris Gottscholk, Ethel Nagle, Linda Plequette. SECOND ROW: Judith 
Bowman, Karen Lutz, Audrey Frye, Nancy Bintliff, Mary Ann Beard, Cheryl 



Zechmon, Beth Jenkins. THIRD ROW: Dennis Martin, Thomas Crismon, 
Robert Gregory, John Hall, Thomos Devlin, Barry Lutz. Not pictured: Dale 
Gouger. 





Weil gosh, It's happened 
before. 



Fie on Humonities. 



Some of us aren't going to make it through the year. 



Whaddoya mean this 
is a formal dining 
room? 



;^>«^a!J»««*^**^ 






SWEETHEART OF THE MONTH 

Strains of serenades drifted across campus one nigfit eacfi montfi 
from October to April, signifying the selection of a lucky coed as 
Sweetheart of the Month. Kalo, initiating what will no doubt become 
a Valley tradition, elected from Lebanon Valley women each month 
one "sweetheart" on the basis of personality, personal appearance, 
and campus service. Kalo men serenaded each choice of the month 
and presented a corsage to her. At the year's end, one of the seven 
became Sweetheart of the Year. The project hoped to achieve one of 
Kalo's major goals — the creation of a better social atmosphere on 
campus. 



Wow, what a plot! 



November Sweetheart, Miss Patty Boyer. 



I'd like to turn the page, but the book's too cold 




t 






150 




Left to Right; P, Derbyshire, N. Dutro, F. Niedziaiek, O, Gluyas, D. Kohl, J. Tono, J. Barcl<ley. 



CHEERLEADERS 



"Lebanon Valley Blue, Lebanon Valley White, Lebanon Val- 
ley Blue and White, Fight Team Fight!" This cheer has a famil- 
iar ring to Flying Dutchman fans. They immediately picture 
the hulking frames of heavily padded players, confetti-sprinkled 
bleachers crammed with screaming spectators, and leading this 
organized confusion, yelling themselves hoarse, the cheer- 
leaders. Faithful despite rain or snow, this agile squad, eight 
strong, is present at all home football games and at those 



away gomes in close proximity to Lebanon Valley. 

During Freshman initiation, the cheering squad introduces 
school cheers to the new students. At pep rallies and bonfires, 
they encourage school spirit, twisting pom poms and dancing to 
the music of the pep band. The cheerleaders' presence at foot- 
ball games is on essential; and with the conclusion of football 
season, they take the floor to adapt their chants to basketball. 



Left to Righ: N. Dutro, P. Derbyshire, J. Tono, F. Niedziolek, O, Gluyas, J. Barckley, L. Vostine, D. Kohl 




151 



SPORTS SCOREBOARD 



Sept^ 30 
Oct. 7 
Oct. 14 
Oct. 21 
Oct. 28 
Nov. 4 
Nov. 1 1 
Nov. 18 




FOOTBALL 



Drexel 

Thiel 

Muhlenberg 

Moravian 

Dickinson 

Albright 

Ursinus 

PMC 



WRESTLING 



TRACK 



April 4 




Albright 


April 7 




Franklin and Marshall 


April 10 




Dickinson 


April 28 




Lycoming at Susquehanna 


May 4 




Western Maryland 


May 5 




Muhlenberg 


May 9 




MASCAC Championships 


May 10 




Ursinus 


May 1 1 - 


2 


PMC at Juniata* 


*Triangu 


lar 


Meet 



We 

17 

15 
37 
16 
7 
27 
15 



They 
6 

Cancelled 
6 

14 
7 

33 
6 

14 







We 


They 


Dec. 9 


PMC 


26 


6 


Jan. 3 


Muhlenberg 


11 


15 


Jan. 10 


Elizabethtown 


16 


11 


Jan. 13 


Dickinson 


6 


18 


Jan. 16 


Ursinus 


9 


25 


Feb. 3 


Albright 


13 


14 


Feb. 10 


Juniata 


14 


13 


Feb. 24 


Moravian 


3 


25 


Mar. 2-3 


MASCAC Championships 







Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



5 

9 

11 

13 

3 

6 

9 

13 

15 

20 

2 

3 

6 

8 

13 

17 

19 

24 

28 



April 5 
April 7 
April 9 
April 12 
April 24 
April 26 
April 28 
May 3 
May 5 
May 7 
May 9 
May 12 
May 14 
May 16 
May 19 




BASKETBALL 



TENNIS 



April 2 


Franklin and Marshall 


April 4 


Rider 


April 7 


Elizabethtown 


April 12 


Western Maryland 


April 26 


Dickinson 


April 28 


Wilkes 


May 3 


Lycoming 


May 5 


Albright 


May 8 


Muhlenberg 


May 9 


Moravian 


May 12 


PMC 


May 15 


Juniata 


May 19 


Susquehanna 






We 


They 


Elizabethtown 


47 


66 


Upsalo 


92 


67 


Susquehanna 


62 


67 


Army 


61 


79 


Muhlenberg 


85 


62 


Moravian 


74 


71 


Wilkes 


84 


57 


Gettysburg 


60 


71 


Albright 


33 


81 


Elizabethtown 


64 


72 


PMC 


79 


80 


Washington 


72 


51 


F. and M. 


71 


49 


Moravian 


59 


76 


Dickinson 


95 


81 


Albright 


68 


77 


Drexel 


52 


86 


Dickinson 


90 


51 


Lycoming 


80 


70 


BASEBALL 






Gettysburg 






Elizabethtown 






Franklin and Marshall 






Juniata 






Johns Hopkins 






PMC 






Wilkes 






Susquehanna 






Albright 






Dickinson 






Moravian 






Elizabethtown 






Western Maryland 






Drexel 






Ursinus 







LV CLUB 




L. to R..- ROW 1: S. Dellinger, J, Kobylarz, G, Stambach, R. Stull, R 
Rhine, B. Slotcher, B. Shirk, H. Fitzgerald. ROW 2: J. Kreider, C. Ebersole, 
L. Brogon, R. Ward, H. Meyer, G. Sergent, J. Yajko, T. Balsbaugh. ROW 



3: C. Burkhardt, J. Eorley, L, Stein, D. Rabenold, J Bowman, J, Witter, E. 
McCracken. ROW 4: G. Weaver, J. Sheaffer, F. Porrino, R, Urey, R- Blair, 
K. Girard, V. Stouffer, L, Godshali. 




Letter-winning athletes find recognition for their sports' skills by 
election to the LV Club. Membership requires the earning of a let- 
ter in at least one varsity sport. With Gene Stambach as presi- 
dent, the club sponsored many activities on campus this year. 

First on the agenda were the annual Homecoming events. This 
year the L Club presented Dorothy Hudson, freshman, as Queen of 
the Homecoming festivities, which included a football game with 
Dickinson and the Home-coming Dance. Sponsorship of the Danish 
Gymnastic Team was a new project by the Club this year. The ath- 
letes continued, as in past years, to sell refreshments at home 
basketball games. To conclude its '61 — '62 activities, the entire 
club as well as all coaches of varsity sports held a buffet at the 
Cocoa Inn in Hershey and then attended a hockey game in the 
Hershey Sports Arena. In addition to presenting annual senior 
awards to those seniors who graduate in good scholastic stand- 
ing, the L-Club presented this year the John Zola Memorial Award 
to the football player who showed the most spirit during the sea- 
son. This perpetual trophy will be placed in the lobby of the Lynch 
Memorial Gymnasium. 



G. Stambach, president; R. Rhine, vice-president; Coach McHenry, F. Porrino, 
secretary; J. Kreider, treosurer. 




/*"■ 



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■•*Li>,v^SiJ&J?^i.'-->:i|«lLV 



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ROW K Left to Right: R Ward, R. Barnes, L Godshall, R. Stull, B. Slafcher, 
H Fitzgerald, V Stouffer, E. McCracken ROW 2: J, Kreider, V Lyter, R 
Brill, J Bowman, F. Porrino, J Zola, J Ya|ko, J FHogan, W, MacMillan. 
ROW 3; B Shirk, manager, G, Stanson, manager,- G Steck, B, English, W. 



DiGiacomo, E. Nowotarski, J. Stone, R. Zweitzig, h. WoodruFT, D. Mulholland, 
trainer ROW 4: Mr McHenry, head coach; Mr, MayhoFFer, assistant coach; 
Mr Poad, assistant coach; I Roemig, equipment manager. 



FOOTBALL 



Before giving due creidit to this year's championship football 
team, tribute should be paid to John Zola, a member of the 
Junior Class, who was fatally injured in this year's first football 
gome with DrexeL John was on asset both physically and 
mentally to his teammates as well as to Lebanon Valley College. 

The 1961 football team completed the best season in the 
history of the college by winning the Southern Division Champ- 
ionship of the Middle Atlantic Conference with a record of six 
wins against one loss. The success of the team con be greatly 
attributed to the new coach and athletic director, Mr, William 
D. McHenry. This year's team members think very highly of 
Coach McHenry and consider his football know-how and over- 
all spirit among the main ingredients which led them to their 
championship. One must also give a great deal of credit to the 
assistant coaches, Mr. George Moyhoffer and Mr. Charles Poad, 
for their efforts in coaching and scouting for the Lebanon Valley 
gridders. 

Recognition should also be paid to Jay Kreider, Bob Stull, 
and Brooks Slafcher, who were named to the All-Eastern Col- 
legiate Athletic Conference for their outstanding performances 



in several contests. Wes MacMillan, the team's outstanding 
quarterback, was selected as Sophomore of the Gome in six of 
seven games. 

Next year's team will certainly feel the loss of co-captains 
Bob Stull and Brooks Slatcher along with the other graduating 
team members — Hi Fitzgerald, Larry Rudy, Rowland Barnes, 
and Larry Godshall. 

The LVC squad went into a greater percentage of their 
gomes as underdogs and should certainly be commended for 
their hard competitive spirit in emerging victorious. It was a 
small squad of twenty-five members who had to fight hard in 
every game because they were outnumbered in team depth 
and usually outweighed. The offensive concentrated its attack 
on the ground with fast-running backs going up the middle be- 
hind a light but rugged front wall. The LVC defensive eleven 
allowed only ninty-three points, which brought them top laurels 
in the Middle Atlantic's Southern Division. 

LVC students are grateful to the championship Valley grid- 
ders for endowing them with exciting memories and a new- 
found spirit which we hope will continue as their memories re- 
main with them. 



154 



PORTRAIT: 1961 SOUTHERN 
DIVISION CHAMPIONS - MASCAC 




Left to Right: H. Fitzgerald, V. Stoufter, J, Kreider, R. Stull, J. Yaiko, E, Mc- 
Crocken, B. Slatcher. 



"A light, rugged front line 



'% 



J 



teamed with fast-running backs." 



J, Zola, F. Porrino, W, MacMillon 
J. Bowman. 




i'^ 



Head Coach McHenry (centerii Assistants Moyhotter 'lefti and Poad 'right) 
captains Bob Stull and Brooks Slatcher. 



were ably assisted by co- 




Wes MacMillan plows through. 




Jerry Bowman tackles. 




Valleyites displayed initiative 
and determination rarely found 
in the classroom during their 
campaign for an extension of 
the Thanksgiving holiday. Per- 
suasive tactics included letters 
written to the faculty by repre- 
sentatives of every campus 
organization and culminated in 
o spirited rally during a faculty 
meeting. THE STUDENTS TRI- 
UMPHED. 



^Sx^l 








ROW 1, Left to Right; W. Gingrich, manger,- A Forstater, R. Urey, H Van de Water, co-captoin; H. Fitz- 
gerald, co-captain; D. Mulhollond, R Rhine, J- Early, manager. ROW 2: Mr Grider, coach; C, Ebersole, T. 
Knapp, W. Koch, K. Girard, D. Mains, Mr. Mayhoffer, assistant coach. 



BASKETBALL 



The 1961-62 basketball season at Lebanon Volley College 
marked the second season as a college coach for Mr. Donald 
Grider. In his initial campaign in 1960-61 as head of the Flying 
Dutchmen, his team logged a record of ten victories against 
nine defeats. Mr. George Mayhoffer served as assistant coach 
for the Varsity team, although his duties during the season were 
mainly with the JV team. 

This year seven lettermen returned to the court, around whom 
the team built its offense throughout the season. Included in 
these former lettermen were Hi Fitzgerald (the leading scorer 
and rebounder last year) and Hank Von de Water, who served 
together as team captains for 1961-62. Other lettermen were 
Seniors Chuck Ebersole, Art Forstater, and Russ Urey and 
Juniors Ken Girard, and Tom Knapp. Also returning with varsity 
experience was Senior Dick Rhine. Freshman Bill Koch supple- 
mented the experience of the returners with scores which went 
into double figures in nearly every game, and Freshman Dale 



Hains also saw and initiated quite a bit of action. 

Coach Grider's chargers brought the '61 -'62 season to a 
close with on 88-39 victory over Rutgers (South Jersey), com- 
pleting the season with a 10-10 log. Rebounding from some dis- 
appointing losses, the team came through strongly for three 
consecutive wins at the end of the season to bring their sea- 
sonal record to .500. The team's final appearance took place 
at a faculty-student game in March sponsored by the Class of 
1965. 

With the close of the season came the close of the college 
basketball careers of five seniors. Art Forstater from Central 
High School in Philadelphia, the team's leading playmaker, 
and high-scorer Hi Fitzgerald of Columbia bowed out along 
with Russ Urey, Hank Van de Water, and Dick Rhine. Although 
the '62-'63 team will certainly feel the loss of these graduates, 
returning players, especially the strong freshmen, indicate a 
good chance for L.V.'s future seasons. 



158 



b 







Art Forstater 



Bill Koch 



THE VARSITY 

POSES: 



Chuck Ebersole 



Russ Urey 




Dave Mulholtand 



Dick Rhine 



Coach DonalcJ M. Grider 



Tom Knapp 



Co-captains Hi Fitzgerald and Honk Von de Water 



Ken Girard 



Dole Hoins 





Free ball at the LVC — Susquehanna 
game. 





Honk Von de Water trying hard. E-Town 
players Jim Sclichter (31 ) and Roy Diener '42). 



Elizabeth town player Barry Boyer attempts to block 
Hi Fitzgerald. 



162 




ROW 1: Left to Right: R. Rhine, L. Miller, T. Lenker, D. Sausser, C. Stroh. ROW 2: W. Gingrich, manager; 

B, Moyer, J. Witter, T. Herr, A. Kreider, Mr. MoyhofFer, coach. Missing: J, Davis. 

JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 



JUNIOR VARSITY SCHEDULE 



Coach George Mayhoffer's Junior Varsity basketboll teams hove 
hod better than .500 record for the last five years, and in Jan- 
uary it appeared that this year's club was going to be no ex- 
ception to the rule. The JV five had v^on their first three consecu- 
tive gomes at that time, and all indications implied that they 
would continue their season with much success. The spirit and de- 
termination which these players showed this season and hove dis- 
played in the past are definite assets to LVC. 

Four freshmen and seven sophomores composed the 1961-62 
JV team. Early in the season the outstanding players were John 
Witter, Dole Mains, Terry Herr, Bob Rhine, and Terry Lenker. 

In following the JV team, one con observe the potential players 
develop into future Varsity men. The experience that these players 
gain as JV team members should prove to be a tremendous asset 
to themselves as well as to Coach Don Grider's Varsity as they 
join the ranks of his team in the future. 



Dec. 5, 1961 Elizabethtown 

Dec. 11, 1961 Hershey Jr. College 

Jon. 6, 1962 Moravian 

Jan. 13, 1962 Gettysburg 

Jan. 15, 1962 Albright 

Jan. 20, 1962 Elizabethtovvn 

Jan. 31, 1962 Hershey Jr. College 

Feb. 6, 1962 Franklin & Marshall 

Feb. 8, 1962 Moravian 

Feb. 13, 1962 Dickinson 

Feb. 17, 1962 Albright 

Feb. 21, 1962 University of Po. 

(Freshmen) 
Feb. 24, 1962 Dickinson 

Mar. 3, 1962 Intramural All Stars 



WE 


THEY 


95 


74 


62 


55 


62 


50 


59 


54 


70 


54 


63 


42 


58 


53 


65 


63 


55 


65 


86 


72 


54 


64 


67 


68 


78 


58 


77 


64 



163 



WRESTLING 




Coach Charles Poad started his third season this year as head 
coach of the Flying Dutchmen matmen. In his two years of coach- 
ing, the team has been slowly improving with a better record each 
season. 

The 1961-62 Wrestling Team appeared to be headed for its 
best season since its formation five years ago. In January, the team 
had won two of its first three matches with Jay Kreider leading the 
way with a very commendable 3 and record. 

The only two members of the large team this year who will be 
lost through graduation ore George Weaver and Mike Gephart. 
The remaining members of the team, including four freshmen, 
have had previous experience and show much promise for future 
successful seasons at the Valley. With an encouraging start such 
as this year's team experienced, wrestling fans looked forward to 
an exciting and eventful season. 

Credit should be given to Jim Reilly, Dave Miller, Paul Longreen 
and Barry Keinord who were the graduating members of last 
year's team. Also to be recognized is Mr. Carr, the new assistant 
coach this year whose able instruction alongside Coach Poad 
greatly aided this year's team throughout the season. 



Captain: Vance Stouffer. 

Left to Right: H. Meyer, J. Rutter, V. Caprio, M, Hossinger, B. Lidston, M. Gephart, Mr. Poad, KNEELING; 
D. Mahler, G. Weaver, D. Koufmann, R. Brill, J. Kreider. 




164 




STANDING Left to right: W. Smith, T. Bolsbough, G. Sergent, J. Witter, R. Urey, J. Yaiko, L. Hol- 
stein, Coach Efchberger. MIDDLE ROW; D. Wetzel, R. Rhine, C. Ebersole, G. Bowman, G. Weaver, H. 
Meyer, R. Bonsall. SITTING: E. Spahr, R. Stull, J. Schaffer, E, Stambach, 



BASEBALL 



Off to a slow start, the Lebanon Valley 1961 Baseball Team 
suffered four consecutive losses before snapping bock to turn 
n a creditable season record of five wins, six losses, and one 
tie. The valuable experience of the members of the team, 
which included sixteen lettermen in its number, provided for a 
well-rounded squad. 

Deserving commendation is Coach Frank Etchberger, indus- 
trial arts teacher at the Annville-Cleona High School, who has 
been the coach for Valley's squad for the past five years. The 
team as a whole has shown considerable steady improvement 
during the lost few seasons and should continue with even 
greater success in the future. 

For his outstanding efforts as a left-fielder, John Ya|ko had 
the honor of being selected to the first team of the All Middle 
Atlantic Conference. A Junior this year, John should prove to 



be a valuable asset to the team in the seasons ahead. Another 
junior, Tom Balsbaugh, did an excellent job filling in for sen- 
or Co-Captain Brooks Slatcher behind the plate. John Witter 
and Bob Stull led in batting, each having two home runs on 
their records at mid-season. 

The fine all-around playing of Co-Captain Bob Stull led the 
team. Bob, an unusual combination of pitcher and strong hitter 
who rated special mention as a freshman player, continued 
to merit commendation with his display of versatility and team 
spirit which was a definite contribution to the 1961 ball club. 

Graduation took only one player, Steve Wisler, from the 
squad. The Dutchmen were fortunate in having a good crop 
of Freshman ball players on the team lost year; and with the 
return of these and other experienced men this season, the 
team anticipates a highly-successful season in 1962. 



165 



D. 




s •?g>^e.jv-';j'<»iS: 



ROW 1: L. Holstein, V. Magnuson. ROW 2; W. Garrett, 0. Drumheller, R, Ward, B. Shirk, D. Burns, J. 
Kobylarz, J. Brommer, Coach Mayhoffer. ROW 3: G. Steck, W. Selcher, H. Fitzgerold, L. Spancake, L. 
Godsholl, E. McCrocken. 



TRACK 



Cold weather and persistent snow forced Lebanon Valley's 
1961 track team to carry on their pre-season workouts indoors, 
but this inconvenience evidently did not handicap them. George 
Mayhoffer's trackmen finished with a record of three wins and 
five losses, a record which turned out to be the best in the 
history of the school. This was on especially encouraging sign 
for Coach Mayhoffer in his frst year with the team. The versa- 
tility of Les Holstein and the f ne consistent performance of Vern 
Magnuson were valuable ingredients contributing to the team's 
success. The loss of these two outstanding seniors along with 
Harry Vanderbach by way of graduation was certainly expected 
to be felt by the team in the 1962 season. As a freshman dur- 
ing the '61 season, John Witter also was a contributing factor 
to the success of the team. With a new mark of 1 39'8 1/2" in 
the discus event, John topped Leon Miller's standing record of 
1 39'6" at the Penn Relays in 1952. This was the only record 
that was broken during the course of the '61 season. 



In the running events, the team was quite strong with the 
consistent performances of Les Holstein, Vern Magnuson, and 
Roger Ward in the sprints and the hurdles. With Les and "Mag" 
graduating, Roger had his work cut out for himself this spring. 
Dove Rabenold, Jim Brommer, and Lorry Godsholl turned in 
consistent efforts in the 880, the mile, and the two-mile runs. 
With their valuable experience, these three were looked to as 
definite assets to this year's team. 

The field events were also well represented by various mem- 
bers of the L.V.C. squad. All of these men turned in commend- 
able performances throughout the season, demonstrating sincere 
team spirit while participating in their individual events. 

Looking ahead to the '62 season, the LVC trackmen hoped to 
continue to show the steady improvement which they accomp- 
lished durmg the past three years. Coach Mayhoffer counted on 
a well-rounded squad with perhaps greater experience to be 
found in the field events. 



166 







ROW 1: R, Bell, R. Kilmoyer. ROW 2: R Andreozzi, L. Stem, C. Burkhardt, R Blair, H, Lys ROW 3: Coach 
Grider, B Albon, R, Garwood, J Weaber, W Krueger, W. Thomas. 



TENNIS 



Lebanon Valley's tennis team finished its 1961 season with a 
record of three wins and eight losses. Coach Donald Grider 
made his first appearance as an L.V.C. tennis coach under 
rather difficult conditions. Of the some sixteen men who came 
out for the team, only four had had any previous experience 
on organized tennis teams, and four first year men were among 
the starting six. In attempting to overcome this handicap of in- 
experience, team member spent doily grueling hours of prac- 
tice on the courts and retreated indoors to the gymnasium when 
weather conditions cancelled outdoor practice. Much credit 
should be given to Coach Grider and the players for their hard 
competitive performance under these cirumstances. 

Ron Bell and Bob Kilmoyer are to be recognized as the only 
two graduating players, Ron played in the number one position 
with Bob following him. The '62 team v/as expected to feel the 
loss of these men, who held key positions which would be diffi- 



cult to fill with the relatively new remaining team members. 
During the ten-meet season, Captain Ron Bell, Freshman Larry 
Stein, and Dick Blair achieved the best singles records. Ron and 
Bob led in doubles play, while other duos were Larry Stein with 
Chip Burkhardt and Dick Blair and partner Hakim Lys. 

Looking forward into 1962, the team anticipated a very suc- 
cessful season under their newly-elected captain, Dick Blair. 
The experience that most of the players gained during the past 
season was counted a great contributing factor toward their 
future success. Freshman Lorry Stein showed very promising re- 
sults in 1961 and was expected to have a good season in 
front of him. With the nucleus of the team returning, an upturn 
in the record of Coach Grider's team seemed highly probable. 
As a relatively new varsity sport at Lebanon Valley College, 
tennis has been and, it is hoped, will continue on the upgrade. 



167 



GIRLS' SPORTS 




SCOREBOARD 





HOCKEY 














Sept. 29 


Millersville 


We 

1 


They 

3 


















Oct. 4 


Elizabethtown 





4 




BASKETBALL 






Oct. 9 


Muhlenberg 


2 


2 










Oct. 14 


Shippensburg 


3 


2 






We 


They 


Oct. 18 


Dickinson 


3 


1 


Feb. 15 


Millersville 


24 


26 


Oct. 26 


Moravian 


4 


1 


Feb. 17 


Shippensburg 


32 


46 










Feb. 22 


Elizabethtown 


22 


31 










Feb. 26 


Millersville 


29 


30 










March 2 


Muhlenberg 


39 


42 










March 8 


Moravian 


28 


24 











168 



WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 




L, to R., SITTING: B. Williams, N. Dutro, M. Bollman, O. Sinner, N, Warner, 
ROW 1: W. Barnhart, E. Saboka, S, Kelly, M. Shaver, K. Miller, P. Shonk, 
L. Grebe, C. Hoffman. ROW 2: S. Lone, J. Tanno, L. Weber, B. Williams, E, 
Moore, K, Bauernfeind, N, Rettig, R, Wogish, L McWilliams. ROW 3: L. 



Ensminger. J. Freed, F, Niedziolek, N, Wagner, B. Graham, L. Vastine, J, 
Bisbing, N, Napier, P, Derbyshire, A, Grove. ROW 4; M, Colgan, J. Johnston, 
D, Koncor, S. Schreiber, O. Gluyas, E. Orchard, L, Schlegel, J Garvin, J. 
Baker, K. Resch, 



N. Warner, Student-Faculty Representative; 
ner. Vice President; M. Bollman, President. 



Williams, Treasurer; O. Bin- 



The Women's Athletic Association is an organization established 
to provide opportunities for all women to porticiopte in sports in 
on atmosphere of constructive competition and good sportsman- 
ship. Coeds may gain membership by accumulating 200 points, 
and a blue blazer after 3000 points. 

Among the intramural sports in which a girl may participate are: 
archery, badminton, basketball, bowling, dancing, golf, hiking, 
officiating, ping pong, riding, skiing, Softball, stunts and tumbling, 
swimming, tennis, volleyball, and shuffleboord. Varsity sports in- 
clude hockey and basketball. Other activities of WAA are a hike 
for Freshmen in September, a booth for County Fair in December, 
sponsorship of co-recreational swimming, cloak room duty at home 
basketball games, a spring initiation hike for new members, and 
an annual sports banquet. Two members also attended the WAA 
State Convention at Penn State University on November 3,4, and 
5. This year Lebanon Valley was elected Vice-President College of 
the state WAA. The main duty of this office is the editing of the 
Sportspark, an intercollegiate magazine giving information about 
women's sports at various colleges. 

For the first time this year WAA organized a chorus. In De- 
cember this group mode its first appearance at the Christmas Din- 
ner Dance and later participated in Kalo-Delphian competition 
and May Day 




169 




^-^t'^ji^^„^ ^^,j^^^v< ^ '5^-^«.«artii^rs«y£y- j^ '^<e«',ri^*>v Z'^Ji^-*^ j,^^ 



KNEELING; S. Rauscher, M Kondrot, L, Plequette, J Freed, K, Cassel, M, E, VanHorn, D, Lindenmuth, C 
Gessner, E Sterner, STANDING: C Tipton, Miss Bowman, N Bintliff, L Weber, O, Gluyas, M Loy, J Hen- 
nessey, V Beckner, A Fox, S Beltz, R Wido, J Dixon, D Evans 



<^Sidtj2~,ll-^ 



HOCKEY 



Starting with only a handful of veterans and some eager 
freshman novices — numerically not enough for a varsity hockey 
team — Coach Betty Jane Bovvman added to this nucleus enough 
recruits to field both Varsity and Junior Varsity Hockey teams. 

Captained by Joanne Freed and Kaye Cassel, the Varsity 
players compiled a record of three wins, two losses, and one 
tie. Perhaps the season's most exciting game was the tying of 
the Muhlenburg eleven, who had previously boasted an unde- 
feated record. Senior Gloria Fitzkee, who spurred team efforts 
by getting all three of Valley's goals in the first three games, 
scored the two goals of this contest to give us a 2-2 tie. The six- 
game season was supplemented by scrimmages with such 
groups as the Lancaster Hockey Club, Working behind the 
scenes throughout the season were managers Joy Dixon, junior, 
and Carol Tipton, sophomore; and sophomore trainer Dottie 
Evans, 

Inexperience hampered the Junior Varsity squad which lost 
all of its games, but increasingly higher scoring with each suc- 



ceeding game indicated progress for these beginners. 

Many laughter-provoking incidents occurred on the field in 
the '61 season. During the Elizabethtown JV gome, injury to 
two of the Lebanon Valley players forced managers Carol Tip- 
ton and Joy Dixon into service. Time out was called on the 
field while the team formed a huddle in which the managers 
donned tunics donated by Varsity players. In the annual post- 
season hockey game between the girls' team and the Lebanon 
Valley football team, Kaye Cassel inadvertantly threw a cross- 
body block which leveled Bob Stull, The boys soon mastered 
the basic skills of the game and won if in the final minutes of 
play. Their opponents were laughing too hard to score. 

Miss Bowman will be faced with the task of rebuilding her 
squad again next year since more than half of the Varsity team 
will be lost through graduation. Sophomore Sandy Beltz, one 
of the team's leading scorers, should be of great help to next 
year's team along with Juniors Peggy Blomquist and Pat Shonk, 



170 



THE POWDER PUFF GAME — 

THE GIRLS PLAY FOOTBALL 



Sheepish LV gridders appeared at PMC in November in uni- 
forms which sported lipstick stains and reeked of Chanel No. 5. 
This situation, rare in the annals of college football, proved to be 
due to generosity rather than idiosyncracy on the part of the 
Flying Dutchmen. Our squad members had contributed their uni- 
forms to the Lillies of the Valley and the Kalo Kids, Valley's first 
female football teams. In their only contest of the season, these 
unique squads met on November 11, 1961 in the Powder Puff 
Football Game, sponsored by Kalo and the Knights for the benefit 
of the Junior Class. A frenzied and unprecedented battle took 
place on the practice field between Joy Dixon's and Pat Shonk's 
rival teams, culminating in a hilarious but inconclusive finish. 




Coaches and captains. 





And she makes a smash- 
ing serve to the for court. 




L. 





^ 



It's 50 hard to be graceful 

in this gome. 



Outta my way, peons. 



r 




Anybody know what to do 
next? 





Left to Right: KNEELING, J, Dixon, S. Gerhort, J. Freed, K. Lutz, L, Plequette. STANDING, S. Beltz, 
P. Shonk, L. Beckner, Miss Bowman, O Sinner, V. Bergey, E, Orchard. 




Jo Freed 
and Sallie 

Gerhort 



172 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL 



Led by Co-Captains Liz Gluyas and Jo Freed, seniors, the 
Women's Varsity Basketball Team began its 1962 season on 
February 5 with a scrimmage against Harrisburg Polyclinic 
Hospital. The Polyclinic girls proved to be too powerful for 
the Valley lasses as they suffered their first defeat muffling 
their hopes for a winning season. 

Besides Liz and Jo, returnees to the line-up included Senior 
Kaye Cassel, Juniors Nancy Dutro and Pat Shonk, and Sopho- 
more Sallie Gerharf. Joining the line-up this year and prov- 
ing to be valuable aids to Miss Betty J. Bowman's girls are 
Junior Joy Dixon, Sophomores Vinnie Beckner and Evelyn 
Orchard, and two new recruits. Sophomore Sandy Beltz and 
Freshman Ginny Bergey. 

Jo Freed was the outstanding scorer for the season, and 
outstanding guards were Liz Gluyas, Nancy Dutro, and Ginny 
Bergey. 

Despite the fact that the Junior Varsity Team lacked college 
basketball experience, this team opened the 1962 season by 
defeating Harrisburg Polyclinic JV's on February 5 in a 
scrimmage game. Inspired by this victory, the girls' hopes 
were uplifted for a winning season. The JV team could always 
be depended on to render aid to the varsity squad whenever 
needed. 




Left to Right: KNEELING, B. Hudgins, C. Bottcher, L. Royahn. STANDING, J. Shellhammer, M. Loy, 
Jenkins, M- Swartz, J. Seregely. 



JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL 



The young ladies of Lebanon Valley College; 



4 



ALL-SPORTS 
BANQUET 
1961 



Hi Fitzgerald receives congratulations from George 
Hiltner on the presentation of the Chuck Moston 
Award OS speaker Donald Nelson looks on. 




Lebanon Valley's 1961 All-Sports Banquet which annually 
honors the male athletes of the college also saw the retirement 
of Athletic Director and Coach Ellis R. McCracken. At the same 
time the banquet heralded the introduction of our present Ath- 
letic Director and Head Football Coach William D. McHenry. 

Donald Nelson, Head Football Coach of the University of Del- 
aware, served as guest speaker for the occasion. Mr. Nelson 
presented his audience with an enlightening speech on the 
value of athletics. 

The main function of the annual banquet is to give just recog- 



nition to all those who compete in sports for Lebanon Valley. 
Rings were presented as Senior awards to the graduating mem- 
bers of the various teams. Awards, jackets and letters were also 
presented during the evening's proceedings. Hi Fitzgerald was 
honored as Athlete of the Year in being presented with the 
Chuck Matson Award for his outstanding performance during 
the year in football, basketball, and track. Another of the high- 
lights of the evening was the announcement of next year's team 
captains. 



Everybody tried 



THE BIG GAME 




174 




You mean twenty-two guys fight over thh 
for two hours? 



DANISH GYM TEAM 




175 




TISEMENTS- 



PATRONS 



Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Acker 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Alsted 

Mr. and Mrs, John Althouse 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Evans Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. Simon P. Bacastow 

Mr. and Mrs. E, L. Boiles 

Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Barckley 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph M. Binner 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Bongart 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Bonsall, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Bowman 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert A. Boyer 

Mr. and Mrs. James Boyle 

Mr. Lester C. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bucher 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Bull 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Cashion 

Mr. R. U. Cassel 

Mr. Samuel K. Clark 

Mr. and Mrs. C. J Code 

Mr and Mrs, Robert F. Crider, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl H. Czirr 

Mr. William T. Davis 

Mr. Fronkhn Derbyshire 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Diener 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Docherty 

Mr, Guy B, Drumheller 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel L. Dutro 

Col. and Mrs. Ralph N. Earp, Sr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry L. Ebersole 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Eichel 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy F. Filer 

Mr, Lawrence Erdmann 

Mr. and Mrs. Cyril K. Feather 

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Felty 

Mr, and Mrs, Harry E, Fitzgerald, Sr 

Mr, and Mrs. Edward L, Foley 

Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Funck 

Mr. and Mrs. Abram W. Geib 

Mr. and Mrs. George D. Gephart 

Mr. Robert R. Gerhart, Jr. 

Mr. N. G. Godshall 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Graham 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl Grebe 

Mr. and Mrs, M, H, Green 

Dr and Mrs, D Dwight Grove 



Mrs, Samuel W. Grove 

Mr and Mrs. Dan M. Hallett 

Dr. and Mrs. L. A. Hamilton 

Mr. and Mrs, W, S, Hamsher 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Horing 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Haven 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon C. Hemperly 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hildreth 

Mr. and Mrs. G. J. Hiltner, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sterling E. Hoffman 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Homan 

Mrs. Philip Jenkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony L. Jimenez 

Mr. Samuel R. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. George L. Keehn 

Mr. Ross Kimball 

Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Klock 

Mr. John Knapp 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kobylarz 

Mr. and Mrs. Lozo Koncar 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Krauss 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Kreider 

Mrs. L. J. Kreiser 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Kriebel 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Krueger 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Laich 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Lambert, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Norman Lazm 

Mr. Ralph Lehman, Jr. 

Dr. Kermit L. Leitner 

Mr. and Mrs. Roland H. Lenker 

Mr. and Mrs. N. R. Lichtenwalter 

Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Loper 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon C. Lyter 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. MocGregor 

Mr, and Mrs, Harold E Martin 

Mr, and Mrs, Joseph Mazzilli 

Mr. and Mrs. C. McDyer 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H McWilliams 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meyer 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Mulholland 

Mr. and Mrs. James B. Napier 

Mr, and Mrs, Austin R, Naylor 

Mrs, Fanny H, Niblo 

Mr, and Mrs, Emil G, Nichols 

Mr, Willis S, Nolt 



Dr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Perkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Poorman 

Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Rabenold 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon D. Reed 

Mrs. Hester B. Reichard 

Mr. and Mrs. James N. Rice 

Mr. Walter H. Rice 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin S. Rife 

Mr. and Mrs. Irwin J. Rinker 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Robinson 

Mr. and Mrs. F. P. Rocap 

Mr. and Mrs. Horry E. Ruhl 

Mr. and Mrs. George Sabaka 

Dr. and Mrs. Nelson S. Scharadin 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Schmerker 

Mr. Inez M. Schwalm 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Sheehy 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Shenk 

Mr. John H. Shirk 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Shonk 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald R. Shope 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Shreffler 

Mr. and Mrs. John E. Shroyer 

Mr. Enos E. Shupp, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip B. Slatcher 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Snowberger 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Foster Stambach 

Mrs. George Stanson 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Taylor 

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Templeton 

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Thomas 

Mr. and Mrs. Elvin K. Troutman 

Mr. Lester A. Unger 

Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Van de Water 

Dr. and Mrs. Frederick Vastine 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Vowler 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter S. Walker 

Mr. Rowland N. Ward 

Mrs. Mark A. Wert 

Mr. and Mrs, A, R, Williams 

Mr, and Mrs, William H, Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Wittle 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Wolfe 

Mr. Edwin B. Yost 

Rev. and Mrs. P. C. Young 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Zimmerman 



178 



Yearbook Photography 

by iV 



i^ ^^ 



iV ij %^ Portrait and Commercial 
Photographers 

Our large modern facilities enable us 

to offer unlimited photographic sen ice 



ALL TYPES OF PHOTOGRAPHY 

• PORTRAITS • FAMILY GROUPS • BANQUETS • COMMERCIAL 

• FORMAL AND CANDID WEDDINGS • COPY SERVICE 



W. E. BUSER, Manager 

757-759 Cumberland Street 

Dial CR2-6689 Lebanon, Pa. 




DMRIES 

* 



AT YOUR""" 



AT uniin nnnn * 



OIUI\i:*MI TUUI\ UUUI\ 



EBANON ^^ALLEY DAIRIES 

lOTH & ELIZABETH STS., LEBANON PHONE CR 3-3741 



180 




DAVIS PHARMACY 

9-1 1 West Main Street 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Prescriptions — Greeting Cards — Records 

School Supplies 

Sheaffer Pens end Pencils 




Kingsley and Brown, Inc. 

Launderers — Cleaners 

Dyers — Furriers 

801 East Main Street, Annville, Pennsylvania 

Phone: Annville UN 7-351 1 

Middletov/n WH 4-3151 
Hershey ENterprise 1-061 1 
Myerstown ENterprise 1-0611 



H. L MEYER, INC. 

Gasoline, Fuel Oil, Kerosene 

Distributor of Cities Service Products 

Armstrong Tires 

Burner Service Oil Heats Best 

Cleona, Pennsylvania 



THE CHAR-LET MOTEL 

500 East Main Street 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania 

Route 42 2, Opposite Dutch Diner 

Telehone TEmple 8-3751 



SHERWIN-WILLIAMS PAINT CO. 

610 Cumberland Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

"For the Best in Art Supplies" 

CR 3-2989 



181 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
BOOK STORE 



FINK'S BAKERY, INC. 

Enriched Bread 
Decorated Cakes 

Layer Cakes 

Hand-Cut Cookies 

French and Filled Donuts 

Sweet Buns 

25 East Main Street 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



LEBANON VALLEY 
NATIONAL BANK 

Oldest Bank in Lebanon 

Member of the 
Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Offices in: 

Annville 

Lebanon 

Cleona 

Schafferstown 

Palmyra 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 
SNACK BAR 



Compliments of 

WENGERT'S 
DAIRY 

R. D. #4 
Lebanon, Pennsylvania 









PETER 


'■'i ~' ■',■■■■ 




HAWRYLUK 


' ' l' 




Jeweler 




40 East Main Street 
Annville, Pennsylvania 



Compliments of 

KING-KUP CANDIES, INC. 

Hershey, Pennsylvania 
"Famous for Quality" 



GREEN TERRACE 
RESTAURANT 

Catering to 

Private Parties and Banquets 

Best in Food and Cocktails 

Dancing 



OUR MOTTO: 
Lower Prices — Courteous Service 

KREIDER'S 
FOOD MARKET 

318 West Main Street 

Annville, Pennsylvania 

Phone: UN 7-5071 



KREAMER BROS. 

Furniture 

Floor Covering 

Electrical Appliances 

Annville, Pennsylvania 



183 




Compliments 
of 



AND JOHN 

Best of Luck in the Future 



Originator and Largest Producer 

of 

Packaged Boilers 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania Milwaukee, Wisconsin 

CLEAVER - BROOKS COMPANY 





LILY ANN SHOPPE 

207 West Main Street 
Dial UN 7 9021 Annville, Pennsylvania 



KARMEL KORN SHOP 

"Quality Confections" 
In the Lebanon Valley Everybody Knows 
Where the Kormel Korn Shop Is." 



JOHN H. BOGER and SONS 

Fuel Oil and Coal 

Railroad Street 

Annville, Pennsylvania Phone UN 7-1211 




Phone 
UN 7-2851 



MAX LOVE 

Cleaning and Pressing Plant and Store 

147 West Main Street Annville, Pennsylvania 



Shoes for the Entire Family 
Clothing for Men and Boys 

HOSTETTER'S 

27 West Main Street On the Square 

Palmyra, Pennsylvania Hummelstown, Pennsylvania 




BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

Your College Store 

E. W. Wolfe, Owner 

37-39 West Main Street Annville, Pennsylvania 



184 



FARMERS' PRIDE 

Poultry Specialists 

5 South Eighth Street 

Lebanon, Pennsylvania 

Telephone CR 3-3177 



Compliments of 

Your Local Insurance 

Man — 

I. M. LONG 

Annville, Pennsylvania 




SINCE 1899 



d^*>*^ 



LEBANON, PA. 



Open Tues. & Fri. 'til 9P.M. 
Quality Men's Wear — Traditional Styling 



PAUL H. KETTERING 

Sporting Goods 

ESSO — Goodyear Service 

Hunting and Fishing Supplies 

Sherwin-Williams Paints 

104 West Main Street 

Dial UN 7-6231 Annville, Pennsylvania 



Compliments of 

THE BON TON 

Lebanon's Greatest Store 



Compliments of 

AUTOMOTIVE TRADE 

ASSOCIATION 

OF 

LEBANON COUNTY 



BUSINESS PATRONS 

ALJIM AND SPAYD COMPANY, INC. 

BATDORF'S DEPARTMENT STORE 

CO-ED LUNCHEONEHE 

SMITH'S SHEET METAL AND 
HARDWARE, INC. 



Electro-Bond Recapping 

SIMON S. KETTERING 

Distributor — Goodyear Tires Deico Batteries 

North Side of 16th and Cumberland Streets 

Phone: CR 2-5771 Lebanon, Pennsylvania 



JUNIOR DIRECTORY 



ACKER, WILLIAM H., Economics, Intercourse, Pennsylvania, 
French Club, Investment Club, Quittapahilla, Intramurals. 

ANDREOZZI, ROBERT, Biology, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Beta 
Beta Beta, Faculty-Student Council, Junior Class President, 
L-Club, Men's Day Congress, Phi Lambda Sigma, White 
Hats, Tennis, Intramurals. 

BAILES, BARBARA H., Sociology, Plainfield, New Jersey, Chorus, 
Girls' Band, Marching Bond, Quittapahilla. 

BALSBAUGH, THOMAS G., Chemistry, Steelton, Pennsylvania, 
Beta Beta Beta, Kappa Lambda Sigma, Senate, White Hats, 
Baseball, Intramurals, 

BARNHART, WINIFRED ELIZABETH, Music Education, Green- 
castle, Pennsylvania, Chorus, Concert Choir, Girls' Band, 
W A.A,, Sigma Alpha Iota, REW. 

BAUERNFEIND, KATHLEEN, Elementary Education, Glen Rock, 
New Jersey, Alpha Psi Omega, Chorus Accompanist, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, Elementary Education Club Vice President, 
Guild Student Group, May Day, PSEA, SCA, WAA, Wig 
and Buckle, Quittapahilla, Intramurals. 

BECK, KENNETH C, Biology, Baldwin, Long Island, New York, 
Phi Lambda Sigma, Track, Intramurals. 

BENDER, THOMAS, Biology, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Beta Beta 
Beta, PSEA, Intramurals. 

BINNER, OLIVE ANN, History, Easton, Pennsylvania, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, PSEA Corresponding Secretary, Quittapa- 
hilla, WAA Vice-President, White Hats, Basketball Manager, 
Intramurals. 

BISHOP, BARRY V., Chemistry, Elizabethtown, Pennsylvania, 
Alpha Phi Omega, Chemistry Club, Marching Band, Phi 
Lambda Sigma, Baseball, Intramurals. 

BLOMQUIST, MARGARET STEWART, Elementary Education, 
Washington, Pennsylvania, Delta Lambda Sigma, May Day, 
PSEA, Psychology Club, Quittapahilla, WAA, Hockey, Intra- 
murals. 

BONGART, BARBARA ANN, Music Education, Columbia, 
Pennsylvania, Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Concert Band, Girls' 
Band, Intramurals. 

BOOK, JONNIE, Nursing, Mechonicsburg, Pennsylvania. 

BOWMAN, GERALD LEE, Physics, Cleona, Pennsylvania, Jun- 
ior Class Vice President, Kappa Lambda Sigma, L-Club, 
Men's Day Student Congress Vice-President, Baseball, Foot- 
ball, Intramurals 

BOYER, PATTY RAE, Elementary Education, Allentown, Penn- 
sylvania, Childhood Education Club Publicity Editor, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, PSEA, SCA, Intramurals. 

BOYLE, JAMES L., JR., Mathematics, Tamaqua, Pennsylvania, 
French Club, Math Club, Physics Club, Intramurals. 

BREEZE, LINDA MEREDITH, History, Sugarloaf, Pennsylvania, 
Chorus, Class Secretary, Kappa Lambda Nu Secretary, Po- 
litical Science Club, Quittapahilla, White Hats. 

BROMMER, JAMES E., Chemistry, Pine Grove, Pennsylvania, 
Apha Phi Omega, Chemistry Club, L-Club, Track. 



BROWN, SHIRLEY ANNE, Music Education, North Wales, 
Pennsylvania, College Chorus, Concert Choir, Chapel Choir, 
Girls' Band, Kappa Lambda Nu, Marching Band, Sigma 
Alpha Iota. 

BROWNAWELL, JERRY E., Mathematics, Dillsburg, Pennsylvania, 
Math Club, Intramurals. 

BULL, GAIL M., English, Hamburg, New York, Alpha Psi Omega, 
Delta Tau Chi, French Club, La Vie, Quittapahilla, SCA 
Cabinet, Wig and Buckle Secretary. 

CASHION, JAMES H., JR., Business Administration, Rahway, 
New Jersey, Class Treasurer, Kappa Lambda Sigma Secre- 
tary, Investment Club, Quittapahilla, Intramurals. 

CASTOR, PHILIP H., Philosophy, Sheridan, Pennsylvania, Delta 
Tau Chi, SCA Cabinet, Intramurals. 

CHABITNOY, MICHAEL W., Music Education, Lebanon, 
Pennsylvania, Band, Brass Ensemble, Chorus, Orchestra. 

CLEMENS, CAROL ANN, Music Education, Lancaster, Pennsyl- 
vania, Band, Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Girls' Band, La Vie. 

CORBETT, JAMES D., Philosophy and Religion, Delta Tau Chi, 
Faculty-Student Council, REW General Student Chairman, 
SCA Cabinet, Intramurals. 

CORSON, RONALD C, Economics and Business Administra- 
tion, Absecon, New Jersey. 

COY, JUDITH BARBARA, English, Lititz, Pennsylvania. 

CRIDER, R. FRED, JR., Philosophy and Religion, Chambersburg, 
Pennsylvania, Alpha Phi Omega, Beta Beta Beta, Delta Tau 
Chi, President, SCA, Intramurals. 

DAVIS, JAMES, Mathematics, Annville, Pennsylvania, Knights, 
Math Club, Quittapahilla, Tennis, Intramurals. 

DERBYSHIRE, PATRICIA H., Elementary Education, Huntingdon 
Valley, Pennsylvania, Cheerleading, Childhood Education 
Club, Kappa Lambda Nu, May Day, PSEA, WAA, Quittapa- 
hilla, Basketball Manager, Intramurals. 

DEVINE, JAMES P., Physics, Annville, Pennsylvania, Legion- 
naires, Physics Club. 

DIEBUS, ADAM, Economics, Annville, Pennsylvania, Investment 
Club. 

DISSINGER, WILLIAM A., Spanish, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 

Legionnaires. 
DIXON, JOYCE WYNNE, English, Red Lion, Pennsylvania, 
Chapel Choir, Chorus, Color Guard, Green Blotter, La Vie, 
Quittapahilla, WAA, Basketball, Hockey, Intramurals. 
DOCHERTY, BRUCE ALLEN, Music Education, Somerville, New 
Jersey, Band, Brass Ensemble, Chorus, Phi Mu Alpha Sin- 
fonia, Symphony, Intramurals. 
DUTRO, NANCY LEE, Elementary Education, Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania, Cheerleader, Childhood Education Club, 
Chorus, Inter-Society Council, Kappa Lambda Nu Vice- 
President, May Day, PSEA, RWSGA Floor President, WAA 
Secretary, Basketball, Intramurals. 
DUGAN, ALYCE SHOWERS, Biology, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 
EARHART, RONALD, Physics and Chemistry, Lancaster, Pennsyl- 



186 



vania. Math Club, Physics Club, Intramurals. 

EHRHART, DIANNE ELAINE, English, Palmyra, Pennsylvania, 
PSEA. 

EICHEL, WAYNE FREDERICK, Chemistry, Rockaway, New Jer- 
sey, Chemistry Club, Track, Baseball, Intramurals. 

ERDMANN, BRENDA, Music Education, Dunellen, New Jersey, 
Chapel Choir, Chorus. 

EVANS, MILDRED A., Music Education, Richmond, Pennsylvania, 
Chorus, Delta Lambda Sigma, Girls' Band, Inter-Society 
Council, Majorette, Qulttapahillo, PSEA. 

FELTY, RICHARD GLENN, Philosophy and Religion, Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania, Chapel Choir, Delta Tau Chi, REW, SCA 
Cabinet, Intramurals. 

FOCHT, WILLIAM W., History, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Intra- 
murals. 

FOLEY, RAYMOND E., Music Education, Langhorne, Pennsyl- 
vania, Alpha Phi Omega, Band, Chapel Choir, Chorus, Con- 
cert Choir, Delta Tau Chi, Percussion Ensemble, SCA Choir, 
Wig and Buckle. 

KNAPP, THOMAS JOHN, Psychology, Annviile, Pennsylvania, 
Knights, Psychology Club, Basketball. 

KONCAR, DOLORES CATHERINE, English, Steelton, Pennsyl- 
vania, French Club Secretary, Kappa Lambda Nu Corre- 
sponding Secretary, PSEA, Political Science Club, Psychology 
Club, Qulttapahillo, WAA, Intramurals. 

KRAUSS, SUZANNE, Biology, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, Beta 
Beta Beta, Chemistry Club, RWSGA Floor President, Quitt- 
cpohilla, REW. 

KREIDER, JAY J., Chemistry, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, Knights, 
L-Club, Football, Wrestling. 

FOX, ARBELYN ADELE, Medical Technology, Lebanon, Pennsyl- 
vania, Beta Beta Beta, Girls' Band, WAA, White Hats, Field 
Hockey, Basketball, Intramurals. 

FULLERTON, M. CONSTANCE, Elementary Education, Myers- 
town, Pennsylvania, WCC. 

GARRETT, WILLIAM, Political Science, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 
Football, Track, Intramurals. 

GERBERICH, L. ROBERT, Elementary Education, Jonestown, 
Pennsylvania, Legionnaires. 

GIRARD, KENNETH ROBERT, Pre-Dental, Pitman, New Jersey, 
Beta Beta Beta, Class President, Knights, L-Club, SCA Cabi- 
net, Senate, Faculty-Student Council President, White Hats, 
Basketball, Intramurals. 

GONCALVES, QUIRING, Political Science, Elizabeth, New Jer- 
sey, French Club, L-Club, Politcial Science Club, Basketball. 

GRAY, ROBERT ALEXANDER, Biology, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 
PSEA. 

GREBE, LEANN R., Elementary Education, Pottstown, Penn- 
sylvania, Childhood Education Club, Faculty-Student Coun- 
cil Secretary, Kappa Lambda Nu, May Day, Quittopohilla, 
PSEA, REW, RWSGA, SCA Cabinet, SCA Choir, WAA, 
Intramurals. 



GREEN, ALLEN CURTIS, Mathematics, Lehighton, Pennsylvania, 
Math Club Secretary-Treasurer, President; Quittapahilla, Phi 
Mu Alpha, Physics Club, PSEA, Intramurals. 

GROSSI, JEANNE L., Biology, Media, Pennsylvania, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, WAA, Intramurals. 

GROVE, ANN ROMAYNE, French, York, Pennsylvania, Chapel 
Choir, Clio, French Club, PSEA, Intramurals. 

HAINES, MARY LU, English, Upper Darby, Pennsylvania, 
Chorus, Kappa Lambda Nu, La Vie, Quittapahilla, SCA Cab- 
inet, WAA, Intramurals. 

HAKE, CAROLYN YVONNE, Medical Technology, Red Lion, 
Pennsylvania, Beta Beta Beta, Kappa Lambda Nu, SCA 
Choir, Intramurals. 

HAMILTON, ROBERT S., Chemistry, Pitman, New Jersey, Chem- 
istry Club, Quittapahilla Business Manager, Intramurals. 

HARING, RONALD C, Biology, Rockville Centre, New York, 
Alpha Phi Omega, Beta Beta Beta, Chemistry Club. 

HASSINGER, MERRILL, Greek-Religion, Halifax, Pennsylvania, 
Alpha Phi Omega, Delta Tau Chi Chaplain, Vice-President, 
REW, SCA, SCA Choir, Intramurals. 

HAVEN, MARK C, Political Science, Fairlown, New Jersey, 
Political Science Club, Intramurals. 

HEMPERLY, CHARLOTTE ANN, English, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 
Delta Lambda Sigma, French Club, La Vie, Psychology Club, 
Vice-President, Quittapahilla Editor, RWSGA, Intramurals. 

HOGAN, JAMES, Chemistry, Westbury, New York, Political 
Science Club, Football, Intramurals. 

HOLMES, TOM J., Philosophy, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, La Vie. 

RUBER, SHIRLEY J., Music Education, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, 
Chapel Choir, Concert Band, Chorus, Concert Choir, Delta 
Lambda Sigma, Girls' Band, La Vie, Marching Band, MENC, 
PSEA Recording Secretary, Sigma Alpha Iota, Quittapahilla, 
String Ouintet, Symphony Orchestra, WAA, Intramurals. 

KEEHN, G. THOMAS, Music Education, Lititz, Pennsylvania, 
Bond, Brass Ensemble, Chorus, Concert Choir, Symphony 
Orchestra, Phi Mu Alpha Treasurer. 

KELLY, M. SUE, Elementary Education, Chambersburg, Penn- 
sylvania, Chorus, Concert Choir, Delta Lambda Sigma, Ele- 
mentary Education Club, SCA, Quittapahilla, WAA, Intra- 
murals. 

KREIDER, KRISTINE LOUISE, Elementary Education, Lancaster, 

Pennsylvania, Childhood Education Club Treasurer, Color 
Guard, Delta Lambda Sigma, Faculty-Student Council, French 
Club, La Vie Associate Editor, May Day, PSEA President of 
Southern Region, Quittapahilla Associate Editor, RWSGA, 
White Hats, Intramurals. 

KREISER, RALPH R., Chemistry, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Chemis- 
try Club, Men's Day Student Congress Vice-President, Intra- 
murals. 

LANE, SALLY, Elementary Education, New Paltz, New York, 
Childhood Education Club, Delta Lambda Sigma, Girls' Band, 
Marching Band, PSEA, WAA, Intramurals. 



187 



LAPIOLI, ITALO, Mathematics, Tucupido, Edo, Guarico, Vene- 
zuela. 

LEE, ROBERT A., Political Science, Garfield, New Jersey, Politi- 
cal Science Club, Intramurals. 

LEHMAN, RALPH L., III., Music Education, Elizobethville, Pennsyl- 
vania, Band, Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Woodwind Quintet, 
Symphony, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Treasurer. 

LIDSTON, BRUCE MALCOLM, Chemistry, Old Tappon, New 
Jersey, Beta Beta Beta, Quittapahilla Photography Chairman, 
Phi Lambda Sigma Secretary, Intramurals. 

LUKENS, JOHN A., Economics, Woodstown, New Jersey, In- 
vestment Club, Intramurals. 

McCAULEY, VIRGINIA YELTON, History, Annville, Pennsylvania, 
Alpha Psi Omega, Faculty-Student Council, Inter-Society 
Council, Kappa Lambda Nu, WAA, SCA Choir, Wig and 
Buckle, Intramurals. 

McCRACKEN, ELLIS W., JR., Political Science, Linden, New 
Jersey, Faculty-Student Council Vice-President, Knights, L- 
Club, Political Science Club, Football, Track, Intramurals. 

McWILLIANS, LYNNE FRANCES, English, Pitman, New Jersey, 
Kappa Lambda Nu, PSEA, Quittapahilla, REW, WAA, Wig 
and Buckle, Intramurals. 

MEYER, HERMAN J., Philosophy and Religion, Dobbs Ferry, New 
York, Delta Tau Chi, Knights, L-Club, SCA, Baseball, Wres- 
tling, Intramurals. 

MAGEE, CAROLYN REBECCA, Mathematics, Front Royal, Vir- 
ginia, Kappa Lambda Nu, Math Club, WAA, Intramurals. 

MANN, THOMAS E., Music Education, Annville, Pennsylvania, 
Band, Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Jazz Band. 

MARSHALL, SARAH LYNN, English, Bradford, Pennsylvania, 
La Vie, PSEA, WAA, Kappa Lambda Nu, White Hats, Intra- 
murals. 

MILLER, SUSAN SMITH, Phychology, Red Lion, Pennsylvania, 
Color Guard, Delta Lambda Sigma, Physhology Club, WAA, 
Hockey Manager, Intramurals. 

MOCK, BYRON NEAL, Physics, Schaefferstown, Pennsylvania, 
Track, Intramurals. 

MOSS, LAWRENCE R., JR., Economics, Pitman, New Jersey. 

NAPIER, NANCY HELENE, English, Westfield, New Jersey, 
Green Blotter, Kappa Lambda Nu, La Vie, May Day, Wig 
and Buckle, WAA, Quittapahilla, Basketball Manager, Intra- 
murals. 

NEVv'TON, JUDITH ANN, Music Education, Pennsauken, New 
Jersey, Chapel Choir, Chorus, Delta Lambda Sigma, Delta 
Tau Chi, Sigma Alpha Iota. 

NICHOLS, JUDITH IRENE, Elementary Education, Great Notch, 
New Jersey, Childhood Educotion Club, Delta Lambda Sig- 
ma, Faculty-Student Council Secretary, May Day, PSEA, 
WAA, Intramurols. 

NIEDZIALEK, FRANCES, S., Phychology, East Poterson, New 
Jersey, Cheerleader, Inter- Society Council President, Cheer- 
leading, Kappa Lambda Nu, WAA, Psychology Club Secre- 
tary-Treasurer, Quittapahilla, May Day, Wig and Buckle, 



Intramurals. 

OLSON, BARBARA ALY„E, Nursing, Mechanicsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, Psychology Club, Dalta Lambda Sigma, SCA Choir. 

PAGE, FRANCES MILDRED, Music Education, Mechanicsburg, 
Pennsylvania, Chorus, Concert Choir, Delta Lambda Sigma, 
Girls' Band, RWSGA, Wig and Buckle. 

PEIFFER, GLEN E., Music Education, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 
Chorus. 

PERKINS, BETTY ANN, Music Education, Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Concert Choir, Girls' Bond, 
Sigma Alpha Iota. 

PETERS, ERIC L., Political Science, York, Pennsylvania, Political 
Science Club Sergeant-ot-Arms, White Hats, Intramurals. 

PIERCE, DAVID WAYNE, Psychology, Ephrata, Pennsylvania, 
Beta Beta Beta, Debate Society Vice-President, Delta Tau 
Chi, Faculty-Student Council, Psychology Club, SCA Cabinet, 
SCA Choir, Track, Intramurals. 

PLITNIK, GEORGE R., Physics, Leonardo, New Jersey, Alpha 
Phi Omega, Math Club, Chemistry Club, Physics Club, Intra- 
murals. 

POORMAN, RONALD JAMES, Music Education, Palmyra, Pean- 
sylvania. Band, Chorus, Clarinet Choir, MENC, Phi Mu Alpha 
Sinfonia, PSEA. 

PORRINO, FRED, Chemistry, Fort Lee, New Jersey, L-Club, 
Football. 

PREVITE, THOMAS RICHARD, Economics and Business Adminis- 
tration, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, French Club, Intramurals. 

REBENOLD, DAVID A., Chemistry, Fullerton, Pennsylvania, 
Knights, Chemistry Club, L- Club, Track, Intramurals. 

RICE, JOY DIXON, Elementary Education, Mountainside, New 
Jersey, Childhood Education Club, Delta Lambda Sigma, 
PSEA, Psychology Club, WAA, Intramurals. 

ROCAP, RICHARD STEVEN, Music Education, Bridgeton, New 
Jersey, Band, Brass Ensemble, Chorus, Phi Mu Alpha Sin- 
fonia Secretary. 

ROGERS, C. EDWARD, JR., Economics, Horrisburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, Investment Club, Intramurals. 

ROTZ, RICHARD, Music Education, McConnellsburg, Pennsyl- 
vania, Band, Chorus, Brass Ensemble, Faculty-Student Coun- 
cil, MENC, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. 

SCHARADIN, PRISCILLA M., Spanish, Cleona, Pennsylvania, 
Kappa Lambda Nu, PSEA. 

SCHNADER, DENNIS R., Music Education, Reamstown, Pennsyl- 
vania, Chorus, Concert Band, Symphony, Orchestra, Jazz 
Bond. 

SCHREIBER, SARA KATE, Elementary Education, Lebanon, Penn- 
sylvania, Chapel Choir, Chorus, Childhood Education Club 
Secretary, Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, Quittapahilla Secre- 
tarial Chairman, WCC Secretary-Treasurer. 

SCOTT, ROBERT JAMES, Economics, Woodhaven, New York, 
French Club, Phi Lambda Sigma, Quittapahilla, Intramurals. 

SHEEHY, WILLIAM A., Political Science, Oradell, New Jersey, 



188 



Debating Club, Phi Lambda Sigma, Political Science Club, 
Track, Intramurols. 

SHENK, DAVID JOHN, Spanish, Myerstown, Pennsylvania, 
PSEA, Intramurols. 

SHERMAN, WILLIAM A., German, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, 
PSEA, Intramurols. 

SHONK, PATRICIA, Music Education, Monheim, Pennsylvania, 
Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Concert Bond, Concert Choir, Girls' 
Bond, La Vie, Sigma Alpha Iota, White Hats, Basketball, 
Hockey, Intramurols. 

SHORE, ROBERT RONALD, Economics, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, 
SCA Choir, Investment Club, Alpha Phi Omega, Intramurols. 

SKEWIS, KATHRYN SABINA, Music Education, Schaefferstown, 
Pennsylvania, Delta Lambda Sigma, Chorus. 

SMITH, BARBARA ANN, Music Education, Lebanon, Pennsyl- 
vania, Chorus, Concert Band, Concert Choir, Delta Lambda 
Sigma, Girls' Band, MENC, PSEA, Sigma Alpha Iota, Sym- 
phony Orchestra, Quittapahilla. 

SMITH, PATRICIA SUE, English, York, Pennsylvania, Chapel 
Choir, Kappa Lambda Nu, Chorus, Lo Vie, SCA, WAA, In- 
tramurols. 

SNOV/BERGER, JUDITH, Elementary Education, York, Pennsyl- 
vania, Delta Lambda Sigma, Delta Tou Chi, Elementary Edu- 
cation Club President, Faculty-Student Council, French Club, 
La Vie, PSEA Vice President, RWSGA, SCA Cabinet, Intra- 
murols. 

SPANGLER, GARY KENNETH, Music Education, Strousstown, 
Pennsylvonio, Band, Brass Ensemble, Chorus, Phi Mu Alpho 
Sinfonia. 

STANSON, GREGORY GEORGE, Political Science, Pottstown, 
Pennsylvania, Faculty-Student Council, La Vie, Men's Senate, 
Pi Gamma Mu, Political Science Club, Quittapahilla, SCA, 
Football Manager. 

STOUFFER, VANCE, R., JR., Chemistry, New Cumberland, 
Pennsylvania, Inter-Society Council, Kappa Lambda Sigma, 
L-Club, Football, Wrestling. 

STRINGER, JUNE, Music Education, Wilmington, Delav/are, 
Chapel Choir, Chorus, Delta Lambda Sigma, Girls' Bond, 
MENC, Intramurols. 

SWEIGART, DENNIS W., Music Education, Reinholds, Pennsyl- 
vania, Band, Chorus, Concert Choir, Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia. 

TAYLOR, JANET ELIZABETH, Music Education, Wilmington, 
Delaware, Chapel Choir, Chorus, Clarinet Choir, Color 
Guard, Concert Choir, Girls' Bond, MENC, PSEA, REW, Sig- 
ma Alpha Iota, WAA, Hockey, Intramurols. 

THOMPSON, FORD S., JR., Political Science, Wilmington, Dela- 
ware, Knights, Intramural Council, Phi Lambda Sigma, Intra- 
murols. 

TJHIN, MAGDALENE M., Psychology, Medan, Sumatra, Indo- 
nesia, Psychology Club 

TROUTMAN, DOUGLAS KENNETH, Music Education, Horris- 
burg, Pennsylvania, Concert Band, Marching Bond, Phi Mu 
Alpha Sinfonia Secretary, PSEA, Symphony, Brass Ensemble, 



Chapel Choir, Chorus. ^ 

UNGER, REBECCA ANN, Music Education, Lebanon, Pennsyl- 
vanio, Chorus, Concert Choir, Delta Lombdo Sigma, Girls' 
Band, Intramurols. 
VAN de WATER, ELIZABETH, W., English, Malvern, Pennsyl- 
vania, Concert Choir, Koppa Lambda Nu, PSEA, WAA, In- 
tramurols. 

WARNER, NANCY LEE, Sociology, Rockville Centre, New York, 
Delta Lambda Sigma, PSEA, Psychology Club, WAA, Hockey 
Manager, Intramurols. 

WASSON, GARY R., Economics and Business Administration, 
Tamoqua, Pennsylvania. 

WEABER, JOHN RILEY, Biology, Lebanon, Pennsylvania, Chemis- 
try Club, Phi Lambda Sigma, Quittapahilla, Tennis, Intra- 
murols. 

WEAVER, GEORGE M., JR., Pholosophy-Religion, New Holland, 
Pennsylvania, Knights, Delta Tau Chi, Baseball, Wrestling, 
Intramurols. 

WEINERT, MARGARET ANNE, Elementary Education, Hover- 
town, Pennsylvania, Childhood Education Club, Delta Lambda 
Sigma Recording Secretary, Girls' Bond, PSEA, Symphony, 
Intramurols, Quittapahilla. 

WERNTZ, DONNA L., Nursing, Christiana, Pennsylvania, 
Chapel Choir. 

WERT, MARK H., Political Science, Abington, Pennsylvania, L- 
Club, Phi Lambda Sigma, Political Science Club, Baseball, 
Intramurols. 

WHITMAN, JO-ANN, Elementary Education, Lebanon, Penn- 
sylvania, Koppa Lambda Nu, PSEA, Intramurols. 

WITTLE, LAWRENCE W., Biology, Florin, Pennsylvania, Kappa 
Lambda Sigma, White Hats. 

WOLFE, JOHN A., Physics, Myerstown, Pennsylvania, Physics 
Club, Intramurols. 

WOLF, PHILIP B., Business Administration, New Cumberland, 
Pennsylvania, Intramurols. 

WOLFGANG, GARY, Chemistry, Palmyra, Pennsylvania, Beta 
Beta Beta, Chemistry Club, Intramurols. 

YAJKO, JOHN, Economics, West Leechburg, Pennsylvania, L- 
Club, Baseball, Football. 

YOUNG, PAUL ROBERT, Mathematics, Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, 
inter-Society Council, Knights Treasurer, Math Club, Physics 
Club, SCA, White Hots, Track, Intramurols. 

ZOLA, JOHN FRANCIS, Hozleton, Pennsylvania, Knights, 
L-Club Secretary, Football, Intramurols. 



189 




Lebanon Valley College Day, October 28, 1961, was the occasion for the official dedication of Vickroy 
Hali, Lebanon Valley's new women's dormitory. The program, attended by parents, students, and alumni, 
included selections by the Concert Choir and the presentation of keys to Isobel Miller, dormitory president. 



West Hal 




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I — 1 



n 





i.-v-V-A-'"^' 



;*s^; 




Keister Hall 



Laughlin Hal 







Infirmary 





SEATED, Left to Right; K. Schreiber, L, Grebe, C. Heraperly, M, L. Hoines, 
K. Kreider, R. Hamilton. STANDING: S. Krauss, B. Groham, B. Boiles, L. Mc- 
Williams, I, Breeze, M. Evans, H. Welch, N. Napier, J. Cashion, R, Shope, F. 






Niedziaiek, H, Me 

K. Baurenfeind, G. Bull, O Sinner, S Kelly 



Koncor, M. ^ranerf 



QUITTAPAHILLA STAFF 



CHARLOUE HEMPERLY 

Editor-in-Chief 



ROBERT S. HAMILTON 

Business Manager 




LEANN GREBE KRISTINE KREIDER 

Associate Editors 



MARY LU HAINES 

Copy Chairman 



BRUCE LIDSTON 

Photography Chairman 



SARA KATE SCHREIBER 

Secretarial Chairman 



The 1963 Quittapahilla staff wishes to express appreciation to Mr. Neal 
Layser of the American Yearbook Company for his production help and en- 
couragement; to Mr. W. E. Buser and Mr. T. I. Price of Harpels' Studio for 
their patience and speed when it was needed; and to Miss Fran Niedziaiek 
for her original ideas and hard work in posing pictures.