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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

Table of Contents 

Student Life 8 

Seniors 36 

Academics 56 

Athletics 86 

Underclassmen 114 

Student Activities 126 

Greek 148 





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A Year in the Life 



Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, PA 17003 



Autumn 




There is a time 
for everything and a 
season for every 
activity under 
heaven. 





A time to laugh . . . 



Winter 




A time to embrace 





A time 

to tear down 




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A time to dance . 



A time to 
build . . . 







A time to plant 
and a time to 
uproot . . . 



Spring 



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A time to be born . . 



A time for 
love . . . 
And a time 
for peace. 





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Student Life 




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A Day in the Life: Band Camp 

On Wednesday August 26th, LVC's 53 
piece band gathered together to prepare for 
the oncoming season. The dedicated mem- 
bers were on the field every morning at 
8:30 am., and their day wasn't completely 
over until 9:00 in the evening. 

This was the first year for Band Camp, 
and its purpose, as described by Cathie 
Wheeler, was to "regroup the upperclass- 
men, and to incorporate the fresnmen. It 
gave the band a chance to get a head start 
on the season." 

Christy Milliken, a freshman here at 
LVC], said that the camp was very beneficial 
because "it allowed the newcomers to get 
iicquainted with the older members of the 
band and with the campus." 

The Football team as well as the fans 
greatly appreciated the band's enthusiastic 
stand music and their very peppy perfor- 
mances. As Dave Bolten said, "It was a 
memorable experience for all of us." 




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HOMECOMING: The Greatest Show 



On Earth! 




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10 



The Parade and Carnival . . . 








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11 



A Queen for a Day 

Jenny Gehrig, LVC's 1987 Homecoming Queen, is a senior ac- 
counting major. Being very energetic and enthusiastic, she is a mem- 
ber of LVC's cheerleading squad, belongs to the accounting club, and 
is a Clio sister. The other members of the court were Erin Eshleman, 
Des Vlaisavljevic, Kristel Yoder, Mary Giannini, and Liana Hendrix. 








12 






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13 



LVC Alumni: Past, Present, and Future 






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15 



The Fall Play: Crimes of the Heart 





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The 


Playe 


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Lenny Magrath 








Kathleen Ryan 


Meg Magrath 








Laurie Devine 


Babe Botrelle 








Cathie Wheeler 


Barnette Lloyd 








Ken Krawchuk 


Chick Boyle 








Jeanne Weidner 


Doc Porter 








Doug Nyce 




16 



Review: Crimes of the Heart 

The Magrath sisters certainly had the right stuff. As far as I know, they could have been sisters in real life. It wasn't so 
much in their looks, but in their slightly insane personalities and wonderful display of affection. 

The sisters, Lenny. Meg and Babe Botrelle, played by Kathleen Ryan, Laurie Devine and Cathie Wheeler dem- 
onstrated a true "Three's Company" entourage and flawlessly displayed their personality flaws. Babe, who has shot and 
wounded her lawyer husband, never ceases to show her humorous insanity and maintain such a steady affection for 
her sisters. Lenny, celebrating her 30th birthday, seems to blow mid-life crisis way out of proporlion and does so 
brilliantly. Meg plays a slightly psychotic, yet understanding washed-up singer. 

And there's nobody more snobbish than the busy-body, gumchewing cousin. Chick Boyle, played by jeane VVeidner. 
Her contrast highlighted this spectacular performance. 

Doug Nyce plaved Meg's down-to-earth ex-beau (Doc Porter) and the naive, young lawyer. Barnette Loyd. was played 
by Ken Krauchuk. As Babe's defense in her crime, his interests were more than legal and definitely romantically 
inclined. 

The plot of Babe shooting her husband was kept simple amidst the array of absurdity. It was only when I began to 
digest the first performance that I became hungry for another. 

Congratulations to Director lennifer Lord on her first (and hopefully not last). It was a blast! 

by Ian Bonner 




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Autumn and 
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ter Scenes 







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20 



*A Thousand Clowns" 



by Mike McGranaghan 

The recent production of Herb Gardner's "A Thousand Clowns" 
here on campus took me by surprise. When I entered the Little 
Theater, I didn't know what to expect. I had never heard of the 
play, but was sure that it would be at least pretty good. That was an 
understatement. The play was hysterically funny in parts, poig- 
nant, and extremely well acted. 

It is the story of Murray Burns (played to perfection by Bill 
Snelling), an unemployed comedy writer who has custody of his 
nephew, Nick (Kelly Green). Despite Nick's proddings, Murray 
refuses to look for a job, preferring to go to the Statue of Liberty one 
more time. One day, an uptight social worker (David Andrews) and 
a psychologist (Katherine Henry) pay a visit to Murray's cluttered 
apartment. They inform him that if he does not soon find work, he 
will lose Nick. 

Murray goes to see his sister Abagail (Sue Toland) who convinces 
him to take his old job back. That job was writing comedy for an 
obnoxious television kids' show host named Chuckles the Chip- 
munk (Ken Krawchuck). Murray certainly doesn't want to go back 
to working for Chuckles, but he doesn't want Nick to be taken 
away, either. Slowly he learns to accept responsibility and make an 
adult choice. 

Bill Snelling was just right as Murray Burns. He effectively 
captured the sarcastic attitude that makes Murray such a likable 
protagonist. He also interacted well with Kelly Green, who had the 
difficult task of playing the opposite sex. She did it successfully, 
always making the audience believe that she was a twelve year old 
boy. 

The supporting performances were good, too. Katherine Henry 
brought the proper amount of humor and sexiness to her role of the 
psychologist who becomes Murray's lover. This was her first LVC 
production, and you can bet you'll see her again soon. 

Sue Toland was very convincing as Abagail. She slowly forces 
Murray to face maturity. This is a particularly demanding role, 
since she gradually grows more and more angry at him until she 
finally explodes. 

Ken Krawchuck was very well cast as Leo Herman a.k.a. 
"Chuckles." He made his character a jerk without ever losing the 
sympathy of the audience. He knows he's a jerk, but he's too busy 
trying to make kids happy to do anything about it. 

But as good as all these performances were (and they were 
excellent), David Andrews nearly stole the show as the stuffy social 
worker. His speech and mannerisms had the audience in hysterics. 
It was a great comedic supporting performance. 

Since this is a review, I feel that I should point out something that 
went wrong, or just didn't work. But in all honesty, I can't think of a 
thing about the play that I didn't like. It was that good. The actors 
were enjoyable, and Dr. John Kearney did a nice directorial job. If 
you missed "A Thousand Clowns," you missed what is surely one 
of the best plays ever to be put on the LVC stage. 

Here's a look at those behind the scenes: Director: Dr. John 
Kearney; Producer/Costumes: Tara L. Thomas; Set Design: Ken- 
neth Miller; Lighting Design: Jennifer Lord and M. Brent Trostle; 
Stage Manager: Kathleen Ryan; Make-up: Laurie Devine; Stage 
Crew: Bill Adams, Kelly Snyder and Cathie Wheeler; Set Con- 
struction: David Andrews, Matt Guenther and Doug Nyce; Props 
Mistress: Sue Toland. 





21 




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Seven Brides for 



Seven Brothers 






24 



Seven + Seven = 4 1/2 

by Ian Bonner 

It's 7:10 P.M. in the dressing room. The cast of Seven Brides for Seven Brothers 
shuffles and scurries in anxious preparation for the opening night 8 o'clock curtain. 
Everyone chatters and giggles as they make-up in front of the mirrors and the girls 
touch up their hair with curling irons. In minutes, they change from street clothes 
into dainty and colorful dresses, fit for the 19th century setting of the spring musical. 
The men, dressed in modest, country decor of blue jeans and flannel shirts, eagerly 
wait to take the stage to meet their lovely brides. 

As the show is about to begin. Director Michael Steckman paces the vicinity with 
the look of hope and confidence on his face. But no need to worry here because his 
feelings were certain to match the outcome of the play as he expressed: "It's going to 
be wonderful!" 

The next two hours were filled with a pleasant down to earth story: boy meets girl 
and six other boys meet six other girls in a small Oregon town. Adam, played by |ef 
Betz. falls for leading lady Milly, played by Wendy Noll, and thus leads his six 
younger "alpha-biblical" brothers Benjamin, Caleb, Daniel, Ephraim. Frank and 
Gideon played by Drew Hildebrand, M. Brent Trostle, Bill Guntrum, Scott Carter, Ken 
Krawchuck and Bill Snelling, respectively, to pursue the six innocent brides-to-be 
who are instantaneously swept off their feet, despite unsuccessful sweeps by the 
townies. The adorable and fun-loving brides were played by Kathy Henry, Linda 
Powell, Sharon Bedner, Lisa Russoniello, Sharon Barr and Heidi Walter. 

The tunes are fun, snappy and as old-fashioned and sentimental as "You Are My 
Sunshine." The brides sing with clear, unblemished voices as the brothers belt out 
the melodies in a macho a:nd gusty manner. The chemistry between the brides and 
brothers is also genuine and convincing. There is no doubt that this musical is good, 
clean fun with somethingjor everyone (**** 1/2 out of five). 





25 



Spring Arts 



On April 22nd, 23rd & 24lh. our annual Spring Arts 
Festival took place and once again it was a success. 
Despite the bad weather, everyone managed to have a 
good time. There were a number of various activities 
throughout the weekend to keep everyone busy and 
everyone was able to find something that captured 
their interest. Although the weekend passed us by 
rather quickly, all the time and effort that it took the 
Spring Arts Committee to put it together was def- 
initely worth it. 






26 








27 



The Ban 







28 






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Row 1: George Stockburger, Dave Bolton, Dr. Robert Hearson, Bobby Schalkoff Row 2 (drumline): Sharon Barr, Wendy Noll, Heidi Derhammer, Mike 
Dueh, Kevin Thomas, Cathie Wheeler, Bill Snelling, Mike Slechta Row 3 (uniforms): Karen Burt, Missy Askey, Christy Milliken, April Horning, Steve 
Young, Bonnie MacCulloch, Brenda Lynn Krysiak, Rob Gangemi, Mary Catherine Wilson. Dina Carter. Angle Krause. Cindi Stine. Sue Spadjinske. Kathy 
Karschner Row 4: Annette Boyles, Candy Wheedleton, Todd Lenhart, Amy Earhart, Deb Reagle, Mike Lichtenwalner, Lee Umberger, Todd Mentzer, 
Rich Haney. Dave Umla, Michele Kunz, Mary Beth Ziegenfuss Row 5: Anne Kelly, Jay Mills, lef Betz, Shawn Gingrich. Lori Reed. Glen Gangewer, 
Blaine Connor. Michelle Leddy Row 6 (flags): Dee Capece. Julie Matthews. Icy Mummert. Dave Bush. Michele Durkin, Kathy Henry, Kim Weisser 



29 



A YEAR IN THE NEWS . . . 



1987 Top Ten Stories (as 

selected by Associated Press 

member editors and 

broadcasters in the U.S.) 

1. Iran-Contra Hearings 

2. Stock market plunge 

3. Reagan. Gorbachev summit 

4. U.S. involvement in Persian Gulf 

5. Senate's rejection of Bork for Supreme Court 
seat; Ginsburg's withdrawal 

6. T.V. ministry scandals 

7. Hart and Biden withdraw from presidential race 

8. AIDS virus 

9. Airplane crashes 

10. lessica McClure rescued from well 




By James McCartney, 

Owen Ullmann 

and David Hess 

Inquirer Washington Bureau 

WASHINGTON — In the splendor of the 
White House East Room. President Reagan 
and Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday signed an 
unprecedented treaty to eliminate interme- 
diate-range nuclear missiles, pledging that it 
would be only a first step in a larger quest to 
end the nuclear arms race. 

Coming 42 years after the explosion of the 
first atomic bomb, the treaty is the first in 
history, as Reagan put it, "that will rid the 
world of an entire class of U.S. and Soviet 
nuclear weapons." 

"We can be proud of planting this sapling, 
which may one day grow into a mighty tree of 
peace," Gorbachev said. 



30 



Reagan, Gorbachev Sign 
Nuclear Weapons Treaty 



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Highlights of the 
Treaty 




NAME: Intermediate-Range Nuclear 
Forces (INF) treaty 
TERM: 13 years. 

RANGE: Covers all ground-based nu- 
clear missiles with ranges of 300 to 
3,400 miles. Long-range intercontinen- 
tal missiles capable of reaching one 
another's countries would be covered 
in a separate strategic weapons treaty 
yet to be negotiated. 
WEAPONS: A total of 2,243 missiles 
and 3,605 nuclear warheads would be 
eliminated, most based in Europe. 
U.S. would destroy 860 missiles and 
860 warheads; weapons are U.S. Per- 
shing 2 missiles in West Germany and 
ground-launched cruise missiles in 
Britain and Europe. 
SOVIETS would destroy 1,383 mis- 
siles, with 2,745 warheads; weapons 
are SS-20, SS-4, SS12-22 and SS-23 
missiles in the Soviet Union and East- 
ern Europe. 

VERIFICATION: Each side would be 
permitted to station permanent inspec- 
tors at missile production plants in the 
other's country. Soviets would put a 
team in Magna, Utah, where Pershing 
2 missile propulsion systems were pro- 
duced; U.S. would put a team in Vo- 
tinsk, 630 miles east of Moscow, where 
SS-20 missiles were made. The treaty 
also includes specific arrangements for 
surprise on-site inspections; inspectors 
from each country would be able, on 9 
hours' notice, to enter the suspected 
area to ensure that there was no cheat- 
ing. 

RATIFICATION: The treaty would be- 
come law if two-thirds of the U.S. Sen- 
ate approve. 



...A LOOK BACK 



31 



Swaggart Admits Sin, 

Steps Down 

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Church leaders left the door open for 
evangelist Jimmy Swaggart to resume his TV ministry after he delivered a 
tearful confession of sin and stepped down from the pulpit. 

"I think he is a man of integrity. I think he made a mistake. I don't think 
it's a fatal mistake," Cecil Janway, district superintendent of the 2 million 
— member Assemblies of God, said late Sunday. 

Swaggart did not describe his misconduct Sunday in his confession, 
which drew gasps and tears from his congregation. An overflow crowd 
packed his 7,500-seat family worship center after reports that church 
officials had been given photographs purporting to show Swaggart and a 
known prostitute going into and out of a motel room. 

The evangelist was expected to meet this afternoon in Alexandria with 
the district presbytery, which Janway said would report its findings pri- 
vately to the general council of the country's largest Pentecostal de- 
nomination, in Springfield, Mo. "He confessed to specific incidents of 
moral failure," Poorest H. Hall, secretary-treasurer of the Assemblies' Lou- 
isiana District, told Swaggart's congregation. "In the opinion of the officers 
of the Louisiana District, he has shown true humility and repentance and 
has not tried to blame anyone else for his failure." 

Eleven months ago, Swaggart scathingly denounced fellow Assemblies of 
God evangelist Jim Bakker for committing adultery, comparing him to a 
cancer that had to be excised. 

Swaggart, tears streaming down his face, said Sunday he would step 
down from the pulpit "for an undetermined, indeterminate period of time. 
We will leave that in the hands of the Lord." 

He said he was cooperating with the Assemblies' investigation that will 
determine his future as a minister. 

"I do not plan in any way to whitewash my sin or call it a mistake," he 
said. "I call it sin." 



The Pope in America 

U.S. News and World Report 

When Pope John Paul II kisses the tarmac in Miami this week, 
he undertakes a U.S. tour marked by considerable controversy. 
At every stop along the way, he will be greeted by firsthand 
evidence of the pluralism and independence that make Amer- 
ican Catholics unique. 

The Saga of Little 

Jessica 

U.S. News and World Report 

For 58 agonizing hours, rescue workers raced the clock, chipping slowly 
through solid rock toward 18-month-old Jessica McClure, trapped 22 feet 
below ground in an abandoned well. A world spellbound by the televised 
drama in the West Texas town of Midland joined in the cheers as a 
paramedic finally lifted [essica out of the dark hole — hungry and hurt but 
alive. 

During the long ordeal in the 8-inch pipe, Jessica — warmed by hot air 
piped down the shaft — sang nursery songs called for her mother and, when 
she tired of the incessant jackhammer noise, screamed "like a banshee." 

Older viewers were haunted by a 1949 California tragedy — the first 
unfolding news event ever covered live on TV — when rescuers struggled 
for 54 hours to save 3-year-old Kathy Fiscus from a 120-foot-deep well, only 
to find that she had drowned. 
32 





AIDS: 
HEN FEAR TAKES CHARGE 




WASHINGTON — The Stock Mar- 
ket collapsed, for reasons still being 
investigated. On October 19th, "Black 
Monday," the Dow [ones average fell 
508 points in a frenzy of trading. Com- 
puters dumped stocks faster than a 
broker could twitch, and an estimated 
$1 trillion in wealth worldwide simply 
disappeared. 

In the aftermath of the crash, Reagan 
abruptly dropped his "make my day" 
opposition to tax increases and cut a 
deal with Congress on a package of 
deficit reductions. 



Uiew York: Dow Jones Industrial Average 



2500 



EXCHA.VUE OPENS 
930 AM, (ESTi 




Oct.12 13 14 15 16 19 20 21 22 23 



Staring Into 
the Abyss 

Blame Reaganomics or herd psychology, but last 
weeks crash is a shocking warning that the econ- 
omy is living on borrowed time. 




33 




A Man with a lot to 

Lose 



You're thrilled you lost two inches from your waist? How 
about four inches from your . . . knee? Walter Hudson, 42, 
started dieting last month, and his right knee is down from 
55 inches to 51. He's probably the world's heaviest human 
[his weight is unknown, but he broke a 1,000-pound scale); 
with the help of nutritionist Dick Gregory, he hopes to drop 
to 190 pounds. A typical dinner — consumed in bed, where 
Hudson has spent tne last 27 years — consisted of several 
steaks, pasta, rice, vegetables and dessert(s): "I enjoyed 
eating," he explains. Now he eats fruit and salad — and just 
wants "to see my mother's grave and put my footprint in 
the snow." 



Getting 

Down and 

Dirty 






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DIED: 



Pop singer ANDY GIBB, 30; of a heart 
inflammation, in Oxford, England, Marchf 
11. Gibb, youngest brother of the Beei 
Gees, had two No. 1 singles in the latei 
'70s: "I Just Want to Be Your Everything',' 
and "Shadow Dancing." He had been 
hospitalized for stomach pains. 



34 



THROW MOMMA 
FROM THE TRAIN 



Cool as Ice, 



OLYMPICS 




Witt 
Hits 
Gold 





Alpine extremes: The glamorous Zur- 
briggen made himself airborne — then 
crashed back down to snowy earth. 



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35 




36 



A Day in the Life: Theresa Martin 



Being a senior is a great feeling and it involves 
many different things. Academics have to be put 
on the back burner and everything else, such as 
putting a resume together and doing job inter- 
views, become top priority. In the last two weeks 
of school you develop an incredible social life 
because you want to have as much fun as you 
possibly can before it is all over. During my 
senior year I ate Happy Meals at least twice a 
week and Dairy Queen Blizzards at least four 
times a week. I tried on my cap and gown at least 
once a day, wondering if I'd trip across the stage 
at graduation. My friends and I had countdowns 
for everything: how many days of school left, 
how many lectures left in each class, how many 
meals left to put up with in the dining hall; you 
name it, we had a countdown for it. Some of us 
also developed an intense paranoia that we 
wouldn't graduate due to a 25 cent library fine. 

Seriously , though, my senior year was great. I 
had a lot of fun and I have many great memories. 
I will miss it at times, I'm sure, but I am ready to 
move on. 



Seniors 




A Day in the Life: M. Brent Trostle 

Being president of the class of '88 is the craziest 
thing that I've ever done. Luckily, I had lots of 
help from the other three officers. Nothing hap- 
pens for two months, then twelve deadlines for 
fundraisers come down on our heads, then noth- 
ing again. Suddenly it is April and we are going to 
the Stroh's Brewery and to Atlantic City on Se- 
nior class trips. Next we're going to the pres- 
ident's dinner, the senior party, the senior picnic, 
etc. The final project is graduation day, then we 
are out of here. What can I say? Being president 
of the class of '88 is more fun than watching 
television. 



37 



Karen Albert 
Elementary Education 



Roberta Arbogast 
International Business 



Kelly Artz 
Actuarial Science 






Janice Bechtel 
Medical Tehnology 



Lynette Benedick 
Accounting 



Richard Bittinger 
English 







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38 








Thomas Bowman 
Accounting 



Kimberli Bregler 
Psychology 



Sharon Breisch 
Biology 



Ted Brosius 
Management/ Accounting 



Stacey Brundin 
Actuarial Science 



Lore-Lee Bruwelheide 
Elementary Education 






X'incent Bulik 
Management 



Kimberly Burd 
Psychology 



Herb Burns 
Biologv 




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Nanette Burns 
Biology 



39 



Lisa Camburn 
English 



Rebecca Chamberlain 
Music Education 



Laura Clugston 
Music Education 






Desmond Coffey 
Biology 



Tracy Cox 
Accounting 



Christopher Craig 
Political Science 







HFOff 



40 






Donna Dager 
Music Education 



Kim Daubert 
Music Education 



Laurie Devine 
Psychology 






Dawna Didden 
General Studies 



Francis Docherty 
History 



Sharon Dubble 
Sociology 






Susan Dunkle 
Psychology 



Michele Durkin 
Spanish/Psychology 



Alison Dursthoff 
Psychology 



41 



Erin Eshleman 
Social Service/Psychology 





Deborah Fike 
Recording Technology 



Shawn Fitzgerald 
Psychology 



Wendy Ford 
Music Education 






Diane Fuss 
History 



)anet Gehrig 
Accounting 



Mary Giannini 
Elementary Education 






42 





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William Giovino 
Mathemalics 






David Godleski 
Managemeiil 



Karen Good 
Music Education 



Georgia Haines 
Social Service 






Christian Hamann 
Chemistry 



Douglas Hamm 
Accounting 



Amy Hammerstone 
Music/Music Education 



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43 



Amy Hannah 
Elementary Education 



Clinton Harrow 
Management 



David Hawk 
Chemistry 






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Liana Hendrix 
Music Education 



Joan Hevel 
Chemistry /Biochemistry 



Michael Hintenach 
Chemistry/C.I.S. 






Monica Hobbs 
Music Education 



Joanne Hoffman 
Actuarial Science 



Donald Hosteller 
Management 






Samuel Huber 
Biology 



Melissa Huffman 
English/Philosophy 



loDee Huratiak 
Accounting 






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Lissa lennings 
Chemistry 



Karen Jones 
History 



Robyn Keough 
Biology 






Jill Klingman 

Travel Administration 



Barry Koklefsky 
Actuarial Science 



Robert Krause 
Management 






Amy lo Kresen 
Biology 



Mariann Lamoreux 
Mathematics 



LeaRae Lewis 
Psychology 






Rebecca Long 
Biology 



Chris Lubold 
Psychology 



Brian Luckenbill 
Music Education 



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45 



Kim Luthy 
Management 



Donna Mackneer 
Psychology 



Tami Marrone 
Chemistry 



Theresa Martin 
Actuarial Science 



Julie Matthews 
Music 



Stacie Micheel 
Biology 







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46 






Melissa Miller 
Elementary Education 



Tracy Montgomery 
Sociology 



Catherine Mover 
Accounting/Management 






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Lisa Moyer 
Elementary Education 



Carolyn Murren 
Mathematics 



Gary Nagg 
Management 



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Lydia Neff 
Elementary Education 



April Oertel 
Psychology 



Beth O'Neill 
Social Service 





Tobias O'Neill 
Biochemistry 



47 



Jim Pierzga 
Management 



John Plummer 
C.I.S. 



Tony Porrino 

Mathematics/Computer 

Science 






Linda Powell 
Music Education 



Rob Redman 
Accounting 



Louanne Reifsnider 
Music Education 





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Denise Roberts 
Managempiil 



Lisa Russoniello 
Music Education 



Kathleen Ryan 
Music Education 





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loanne Saltzer 
International Business/Ger 



Randall Sattazahn 
C.l.S. 



leffrey Savoca 
Management 






Robert Schalkoff 
Music Education 



Marjorie Schubauer 
Biology 



Daniel Schultz 
Music Education 



49 



Urs Schwabe 
History 





Susan Scott 
Spanish 



David Sekula 
Biochemistry 



Olga Semanchick 
Psychology 






Charlene Shaffer 
Sociology /Management 



Lance Shaffer 
English 



Bonnie Shartle 
Elementary Education 





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Management 




Glenda Shelter 
Mathematics 



Lynne Sinsabaugh 
Biology 



Delia Sitaras 
Social Service 




Paul Smith 
Recording Technology 



Steven Smith 
Management 



Michael Steckman 
Elementary Education 



51 



Martha Stockbridge 
Social Service 



Denise Stohler 
Management 



Cheryl Stoltzfus 
Actuarial Science 






Tara Thomas 
English 



Susan Toland 
Biology 



Brent Trestle 
Actuarial Science 







Roselyne Truhilla 
Psychology 



Richard Umla 
Music Education 



Beatrice Vagyoczky 
Actuarial Science 






Desanie Vlaisavljevic 
Social Service 



Brenda Wakefield 
Accounting 



James Walak 
Physics 






52 






Paul Walsh 
Management 



Catherine Waltermyer 
Elementarv Education 



Christina Weber 
EngUsh 






Kristin VVeible 
Elementary Education 



leane Weidner 
Mathematics 



Maria Wheeler 
Social Service 






William Wright 
Actuarial Science 



Pamela Wyman 
Biochemistry 



Kristel Yoder 
Actuarial Science 





Ci»-,' 



^ai, 





Gary Zimmerman 


IB '•' 


History 








Rochelle Zimmerman 




Music Education 


^-\ ' .*■ 


Debra Zurat 




Music Education 


,^>ni 





53 



Senior Superlatives 



^ * 





MOST LIKELY TO SUCCEED: Bill Wright & Teresa Martin 
MOST DEPENDABLE: Bill Wright & Amy Jo Kresen 
NICEST SMILE: Paul Walsh & Delia Sitaris 
BEST LOOKING: Mike Monighan & Kristel Yoder 
ALL AMERICAN: Bill Wright & Maria Wheeler 
BEST DRESSED: V.J. BuHk/Gary Nagg/Bill Wright & 

Kristin Weible 
CLASS COUPLE: John Plummer & Mary Giannini 
MOST TALENT: Bob Schalkoff & Amy Beth Hammerstone 
CLASS CLOWN: M. Brent Trostle & Bonni Shartle 
CLASS FLIRT: Bill Giovino & Jody Saltzer 



54 



CUTEST: Bill Giovino & Tracy Montgomery 
MOST ATHLETIC: Don Hosteller & Glenda Shetter 
MOST FRIENDLY: Bill Giovino & Delia Sitaris 
TYPICAL LVC: Mike Steckman & Dawna Didden 
CLASS DANCER: Mike Monighan & Lisa Russoniello 
CLASS LAUGH: Jim Pierzga & Denise Roberts 
BEST BODY: Andy Krall & Kristel Yoder/Melanie Babcock 
CLASS ACTOR/ACTRESS: M. Brent Trostle & Lisa 

Russoniello 
CLASS NON-CONFORMIST: Fran Docherty & Donna 

Summers 
MOST LIKELY TO BECOME 

NEXT PRESIDENT OF LVC: M. Brent Trostle & Erin 

Eshleman 





55 



/^""Vr 







A Day in the Life: Dave Calvaho 



Being the Director of Student Activities is a fun 
yet hectic job. I work closely with the Student 
Council in planning and scheduling educational 
and social events for the campus community. I 
work with the Underground Steering Commit- 
tee. I am involved in homecoming and many staff 
projects such as new student orientation, alcohol 
awareness and wellness week activities. I also 
supervise the overall operation of the college 
center. No day is ever the same when you have a 
job like mine, but I enjoy the variety of respon- 
sibilities that I have and I love working closely 
with the students on many different projects. 
They keep me motivated and young at heart. 



56 



Academics 




A Day in the Life: Dr. Michael Day 



Each day at LVC is demanding, challenging, but 
most importantly, rewarding. LVC has an ex- 
cellent student body, faculty, and administrative 
staff. I enjoy teaching Physics; from Introductory 
Physics to Advanced Mechanics. Directing the 
honors astronomy seminar this year has also 
been a most enjoyable experience. The most viv- 
id symbol that comes to my mind, of the ded- 
ication of the LVC community to its overall mis- 
sion, is the Quiz Bowl. I was impressed by how 
well it was done, and by the support given to it by 
students and staff. 



57 



A Day in the Life of . . . 









Graduation is a time for the seniors to say good- 
bye to the college life here at LVC and to begin a 
new and exciting life on their own. It is also a time 
for the faculty to say goodbye to the students that 
they have taught, guided and become friends with 
throughout the past few years. They not only cel- 
ebrate with the graduates but they also wish them 
luck and success in the future. 




58 



the Faculty and Administration 








59 



Acting President 

William J. McGill 




Search Still On 



by Steve Trapnell 

The Presidential Search Committee has continued to look for the best candidate to lead Lebanon Valley 
College. In the course of this search, it brought about six of the candidates to the college for a campus 
visit. 

Recently, Mr. John A. Synodinos, the consultant who had been helping the Presidential Search 
Committee locate candidates, applied for the position of president of the college. 

Dr. Arthur Ford, a member of the committee, commented that the search is an ongoing process. While 
one candidate is visiting the college, another may be involved in interviews with the committee. The 
committee is also constantly reviewing records of different candidates. According to Ford, when the 
proper person is found, all stages of the search will end. 

Ford said that the search committee is looking for individuals who are in demand at other places. 
Naturally, the college will lose some of those candidates to other job offers. Since the committee is not 
willing to settle for second best, the search has been extended. 

According to Ford, the Presidential Search Committee is trying to find someone with experience in 
higher education, experience in development work, a committment to the Leadership Initiative and 
good administrative skills. 



60 







61 



Dr. Robert Clay 
The Registrar 



Dr. George Marquette 

Vice President of Student Affairs 

Dean of Students 




Dr. Howard Applegate 
Dean of Continuing Education 



A Day in the Life of . . . 



i 





4 



I ^%4PJ 



mi ii 





Ms. Rosemary Yuhas 
Associate Dean of Students 



Mr. Gregory Stanson 

Dean of Enrollment Management 

Services 



62 



Administration 




Mr. Robert Dillane 
Administrative Coordinator 



Mr. Dane Wolfe 
Associate Controller 






Mr. David Calvario 

Director of Student Activities 



Mr. David Evans 

Director of Career Planning and 

Placement 




Mr. William Brown 
Director of Financial Aid 
Associate Dean of Admissions 



63 




Dr. D. Clark Carmean 
Director Emeritus, Admissions 



Mr. Kevin R. Yeiser 
Director of Grounds 




\.^ 



Additional Lebanor 






Dr. Robert E. Hamilton 

Vice President and Controller 



Mr. Matthew Hugg 
Director of Development 



Mr. Victor R. Zack, Jr. 

Vice President of Institutional Advanc 



Valley Staff 



Mr. M. Steven Borlner 
Director of Annual Giving 





Ms. Marilyn A. Weister 
Director of Communications 




Ms. Dawn T. Greene 
Publications Specialist 



Mr. lohn B. Deamer, |r. 

Assistant Director of Communications 



Mr. Robert E. Harnish 
Manager of College Store 












# 



n 



65 



Lebanon Valley College Staff 




Ms. Christine Hopple, Ms. Doris Gerlach; 

Librarians 










Mr. William E. Hough, III; The Librarian, Mrs. 
Alice S. Diehl; Catalouging Librarian 




Mrs. Jean W. Zalek, Mrs. Veronica S. Fabian; 
College Nurses 



66 



Secretaries 





P'ood Service 



Snack Shop 





Housekeeping and Maintenance 



67 




Mr. Richard B. Arnold 
Assistant Professor of Management 



Ms. Gail A. Sanderson 
Assistant Professor of Accounting 




Accounting and ManagementI 



SAiM 



.±ssa 






Mr. Dennis E. Creeden 
Instructor of Management 



Dr. Sharon F. Clark 

Assistant Professor of Management, 

Chairman 



Mr. David S. Seitz 

Assistant Professor of Accounting and 

Management 



68 



Religion and 
Philosophy 




Mr. Warren K. A. Thompson 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 

Director and Associate Professor of Leadership Studies 



Dr. lohn H. Heffner 
Professor of Philosophy 




Dr. Donald E. Byrne (r. 
Professor of Religion. Chairman 




Dr. Voorhis C. Cantrell 
Professor of Religion and Greek 




Dr. Perry J. Troutman 
Professor of Religion 




69 



Economics, 
Political 







Dr. C. F. loseph Tom 
Professor of Economics 



Ms. Donna M. Anderson 
Assistant Professor of Economics 





Dr. John D. Norton III 
Professor of Political Science 



70 



History and 
Science 



I5r. lames H. Broussard Associate Professor of History 
Chairman of History and Political Science 





Mr. Richard A. Joyce 
Assistant Professor of History 



Dr. D. Eugene Brown 
Associate Professor of Political Science 




71 



Mathematics 




Mr. Horace W. Tousley 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 

Chairman 




Dr. Mark A. Townsend 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 




Dr. Bryan V. Hearsey 
Professor of Mathematics 



72 



Computer Science 
and Art 




Dr. loerg W. P. Mayer 
Professor of Mathematics 





Dr. Michael D. Fry 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 



Mr. Richard A. Iskowitz 

Associate Professor of Art, Chairman 



73 



Music 





Dr. Klement M. Hambourg 
Associate Professor of Music 



Dr. Pierce A. Getz 
Professor of Music 



Mr. lohn J. Uhl 

Lecturer of Sound Recording 

Technology 




Dr. Robert C. Lau 

Professor of Music, Chairman 





Mr. Philip G. Morgan 
Assistant Professor of Music 



Dr. Robert H. Hearson 
Assistant Professor of Music 





Dr. George D. Curfman 
Professor of Music Education 




Dr. C. Robert Rose 
Associate Professor of Music 



Mr. William H. Fairlamb 
Professor of Music 



Dr. Scott H. Eggert 
Assistant Professor of Music 





75 



Psychology and Leadershi 




Dr. David I. Lasky 

Professor of Psychology, Chairman 



Dr. Salvatore S. Cullari 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 




Dr. Barbara ]. Denison 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 
Director of Leadership Institute 





Ur. Leon e,. iviarKowicz 
Professor of Leadership Studies 



76 



Sociology 












Dr. Carolyn R, Hanes 
Associate Professor of Sociology, 
Social Service, and Leaderstiip 
Chairman of Sociology 




Mrs. Sharon O. Arnold 
Associate Professor of Sociology 



Ms. Eileen N. Frankland 

Instructor of Sociology and Social Service 



77 







Biology 



Dr. Allan F. Wolfe 
Professor of Biology 

Dr. Paul L. Wolf 

Professor of Biology, Chairman 



Dr. Michael A. Day 
Associate Professor of Physics 



Dr. Dale J. Erskine 
Assistant Professor of Biology 





Dr. Stephen E. Williams 
Professor of Biology 



Dr. Michael F. Gross 
Visiting Instructor of Biology 



78 



Chemistry and 
Physics 



Dr. Richard D. Cornelius 
Professor of Chemistrv, Chairman 



Dr. Donald B. Dahlberg 
Associate Professor of Chemistrv 






nAI.ARAmit.MI»HVT1>RtlV IV 



//■ ^- 



"V^l 





Dr. Owen A. Moe Jr. 
Professor of Chemistry 



Dr. Barry L. Hurst 

Assistant Professor of Phvsics, Chairman 




Mr. Richard C. Bell 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



Dr. Victoria C. Ukachukvvu 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 




79 



U^MI 







■p-i- 

'>-;-■■ t 

I, .-t 



EnglishE 



Dr. John P. Kearney 
Professor of English 



Ms. Phyllis C. Dry den 
Assistant Professor of English 



Mrs. Jacqueline J. Vivelo 
Instructor of English 



Dr. Arthur L. Ford, Jr. 
Professor of English, Chairman 





Dr. Phillip A. Billings 
Professor of English 



Mr. Glenn H. Woods 
Associate Professor of English 



Education and 
Foreign Language 



Dr. Susan L. Atkinson 
Assistant Professor of Education 



Dr. Madelyn |. Albrecht 
Associate Professor of Education 



Dr. lames W. Scott 
Professor of German 



Dr. Michael A. Grella 

Associate Professor of Education, 

Chairman 



Ms. Beatrice M. Guenther 
Instructor of French 



Dr. Diane M. Iglesias 

Professor of Spanish 

Chairman of Foreign Language 









81 



Lebanon Valley 




Mr. Ronald K. Good 
Assistant Dean of Admissions 



Ms. Ruth E. Andersen, Assistant Dean of 
Admissions; Ms. )anet E. Lyons, Assistant Dean 
of Admissions; Ms. Monica Lomax, Admissions 

Counselor 





Ms. Grace Morrisey 
Secretary of Chaplain 



82 



College Staff 



*--«>.VVv--V«\'\^>''>^ 




Mrs. Delia M. Neidig 
Director of Housekeeping 



Ms. Virginia L. Solomon 

Assistant Director of Media Services 





Mrs. luliana M. Wolfe 

Director of College Health Center 



Mr. Mark Manno 
Mailroom 




83 




Mr. Gerald Petrofes 

Associate Professor of Physical 

Educaation 

Wrestling and Golf Coach 



Mr. Gordon Foster 

Admissions Counselor 

Men's Basketball Head Coach 




A Day in the Life of . . jl 






Mr. Kent Reei 

Chairman and Associate Professor o 

Physical Educatioi 

Men's/Women's Cross Country an( 

Men's Track Coacl 



Mr. Lew Cook* 
Equipment Manages 



Mr. James Stark 
Athletic Trainei 



84 



The Athletic Department 



Mr. Timothy Ebersole 
Sports Information Director 
Assistant Football Coach 






Ms. lodi Foster 

Head Coach of Women's Basketball 

Head Coach of Women's Track & Field 



Mr. Louis Sorrentino 
Director of Athletics 
Assistant Men's Basketball Coach 




Mr. James Monos 
Admissions Counselor 
Head Football Coach 



Ms. Kathleen Tierney 

Head Coach of Field Hockey and Softball 





85 




A Day in the Life: Field Hockey 



A normal day in the fall semester at LVC just 
would not have been the same if I had not been a 
member of the women's field hockey team. Al- 
though much of my time was tied up in practices 
and games, I would never have changed a thing. 
After attending my classes, I would try to get 
some homework done before practice. Most of it, 
however, had to be finished in the evvening, 
sometimes early into the next morning. On game 
days, I was lucky if I got any work accomplished, 
yet I always found the time to do my work and to 
do it well enough to make the Dean's List. Play- 
ing hockey more or less forced me to discipline 
my time while also being a decent athlete. 
Throughout the four years I participated in this 
sport, I made many new friends, experienced 
memorable trials and tribulations, and most of 
all, learned what being part of a team is all about. 



86 



Athletics 



f 



< 



^ 



_^^\SWBt^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




f 


A Day in the Life: Baseball 


During baseball season, free time is hard to find. 
We begin our season during Spring Break and we 
play our first eleven games in Cocoa Beach, Flor- 
ida. After we return, we have 29 more games in a 
seven week span, not to mention practices every 
day except Sundays. Baseball players should try 
to work their schedules so that their afternoons 
are as free as possible. Practices usually run from 
3:30-6:00pm. On game days, as many as ten hours 
can be spent on the road and on the field. Stud- 
ying, sleep and any other activities must be 
worked around the games, so that total concen- 
tration can be given to this sport. With proper 
self-discipline, and the ability to stay on top of 
things, everything can be accomplished without 
much trouble. 



"%-. - 
•S^' 




87 



FOOTBALL 



LVC 

27 

3 

7 

10 

6 

3 

18 

20 

16 





Bridgewater 

Moravian 

Widener 

Juniata 

Lycoming 

Albright 

Susquehanna 

Wilkes 

Upsala 

Delaware Valley 



OPP 
17 
17 
24 
31 
7 
7 
47 
41 
14 
15 





,■'?• T"-*^-v> y - •• 




Row 1 — Clint Harro, Mike Betz. lohn Plummer, Paul Levingood, Walt Sheets, Mark Phillips. Mark Holmes, Shawn Fitzgerald, Bill Giovino, 
Ted Brosius, Tom Reich, Paul Van Houten, |im Pierzga, Tom FClukowski, Bill jester; Row 2 — Don Lappin, Glenn Lostritto, Andy Hower, 

Karl Conrad, Mike Dryden, lim Carroll, Mike Caputo. Matt Andris, Mark Gibson, Earl Weaver, Ron Vladyka, George Partilla, Rory Hertzog, 

Rich Yingling, Brian Toomey; Row 3 — Tony Porrino, Dave Marsteller, Mike Reif, Tony Buglio, Heath Border, Todd Smith, Matt Lawrence, 

Mark Mead, Rip Heister, Peter Grindrod. Charles Sorrentino, Brett Hoffman, Kent Weidemoyer, Guy Dente; Row 4 — Brad Scherer, Steve 

Vajda, David Sostak, Bob Gregg, Bob Mattoon, Chad McNaughton, |ohn Wade, Scott Pimental, Dirk Markil, Chris Lucci, Ken Wilson, foe 

Shermeyer; Row 5 — Sean Hunter, |eff Osborne, Robert McCarthy, Tim Tobin, David Stover, Paul Meholchick, Todd Grill; Row 6 — jay 

Richmond, Mark |unkerman, Ron Hess, Chris Pope, Brian Donley, Brian Buckingham, Bob Mikus, |oe Buehler, Chris Schwartz, Rich Beard, 

Chris Kastel, Carl Liedtka; Row 7 — Coach Brezitski, Coach Barnhart, Aaron lohnson, Ion Celio, |im Hall, John Ross, Sandy Zettlemoyer, 

Troy Celesky, Todd Eppley, John Greene; Row 8 — Lew Cooke, Coach Smith, Coach Jordan, |oe Souders. |ereniy Madaras, Dave Bentz, 

Walt Dietz, Brian Wassell. Steve Kirschnick, Daryl Stump, Coach Reich, Coach Ebersole, Coach Monos, Coach Walsh 



88 









89 



FIELD HOCKEY 



LVC 




OPP 


1 


Gettysburg 


2 


3 


F&M 


4 


2 


Wilkes 


1 


1 


Elizabethtown 





2 


Susquehanna 





2 


Swarthnrore 





3 


Dickinson 


1 


3 


Muhlenberg 


4 


3 


Widener 


2 


8 


Albright 





6 


Haverford 





3 


Washington 


1 


1 


W. Maryland 





2 


*U. of Scranton 





1 


*Gettysburg 


2 





*Messiah 


1 


1 


**Drew 





1 


**Millersville 


2 




"MAC Playoffs **ECAC Playoffs 




Row 1 — Robyn Ulmer, Kristan Brandt, Lyiine Smith, Kelly May, Bonni Shartle, Amy Hannah, Tracy Cox; Row 2 
— Diane Churan, Glenda Shelter, Cindy Watson, Amy )o Kresen, Mariann Lamoreux, Rochelle Zimmerman; Row 

3 — Sue Partilla. Sandy Aumiller, Lisa Gary, Denise DePalmer, Helen Filippone, Karen [ones, Dani Campbell; Row 

4 — Coach Batz. Coach Tierney, Lisa Biehl, Patty Moll, Barb Lowie, Bryna Vandergrift, Maria Wheeler 



90 



■"mpiiw 









The' Women's field hockey team had its 
most successful season yet as their unde- 
feated record took them to the MAC 
playoffs as well as to the ECAC tournament. 
Three of the team's members, Diane 
Churan, Bryna Vandergrift, Glenda Shetter. 
received high individual recognition. The 
success of these women reflects their 
coaches' and teammates' high degree of 
skill. Unity and closeness played an im- 
portant role in the team's success and was 
quite evident both on and off the field. 




f. 



"-'■■am- '••"■:'- ' 



> 



* .K«J***' 









1?- 



<l?^S" 






91 



This year's women's cross country team brought home 
several trophies and individual honors. They placed 2nd 
out of the 36 teams competing at the King's College In- 
vitational and at the Baptist College Invitational. Cindy 
Sladek and Sue Yingst brought home various medals and 
placed in the top 20 at the Middle Atlantic Conference 
Meet. 1987 proved to be a very successful year. 




WOMEN'S 

CROSS 

COUNTRY 




Row 1 — Cindy Sladek. Sue Yingst, Laura Berzkalns; Row 2 — Kristie 
Painter, Maryann Lucykandish, Joann Giannettino, Trish Haeusler 




LVC 




OPP 


27 


Elizabethtown 


29 


27 


Elizabethtown 


29 


30 


Dickinson 


27 


25 


Albright 


30 


16 


W. Maryland 


44 



92 




MEN'S CROSS 
COUNTRY 




The 1987 men's cross country team had a respectible season 
despite the loss of two key figures who graduated last year. 
Freshmen Dave Sandler and Al Senft combined with soph- 
omore tri-captains Renato Biribin, John Galvin, and E.J. Smith 
to become the top five runners. The biggest win was at the 
King's College Invitational. Out of the 19 teams that par- 
ticipated, the successful "pack-running" technique of the 
Dutchmen enabled them to capture the 1st place trophy. 




Row 1 — Al Senft. Carl Fortna, Jack Malloy. John Galvin; Row 2 — Renato 
Biribin. Dan Tredinnick. E.|. Smith. Dave Sandler, Mike Home 




LVC 




OPP 


24 


Muhlenberg 


31 


23 


Elizabethtown 


25 


23 


Alvernia 


32 


48 


F&M 


15 


36 


Elizabethtown 


23 


25 


Dickinson 


30 


32 


Albright 


24 


22 


W. Maryland 


35 


15 


Washington 


48 




93 



SOCCER 



The 1987 season brought many changes to the LVC soccer program, including 
Harry Shirk as new head coach. Joining him and senior captain Joel Kline 
were many talented players, mostly underclassmen. During the season, the 
Dutchmen doubled their goals since last year and cut the goals scored against 
them by more than 30. The team broke their 78 game loss record early in the 
season and went on to win one more game. 



LVC 




OPP 





2 


Penn State Hazelton 


3 








Ursinus 








3 


Lane. Bible College 


1 





1 


York 


8 


1 





Susquehanna 


4 


2 





F&M 


5 





1 


Allentown 


5 







Widener 


1 





W. Maryland 

Juniata 

Dickinson 

Muhlenberg 

Washington 

Moravian 

Gettysburg 



4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
6 




Row 1 — Steve Sanger, Bryan Maun, Ben Deardorff. Mark Evans, Jean- 
Paul Duvall, Ben Smith; Row 2 — Randy Morgan, Chuck Boohar, Eyako 
Wurapa, Ed Wirth, Rob Kinney; Row 3 — |im McMenamin, Rob Wolfgang, 
Carl Miller. Brian Hand, Kevin Dempsey, Heather Huff; Row 4 — Joel 
Kline, Carl Mohler, Coach Shirk 




<^ 



:;s ss^ss! . ,■} JSSS5SSS-J! 





-J 
I 






94 



i 



Golf 




Match 




I. 


Dickinson — 


413 




LVC — 


457 




W. Maryland — 


461 


II. 


LVC—" 


421 




King's — 


465 




Lycoming — 


476 


III. 


P'hiia. Textile — 


428 




LVC — 


451 




Albright — 


461 


IV. 


Muhlenberg — 


424 




Susquehanna — 


430 




LVC — 


471 


V. 


Moravian — 


429 




LVC — 


439 




Gettysburg — 


441 


VI. 


Scranton — 


433 




LVC — 


442 




Wilkes — 


449 


VII. 


Del. Valley- 


416 




LVC — 


418 




Widener — 


455 



-5^ 



'i?' '* '"^ ^' ""W** 




Tony Buglio. Phil Greece. Chris Arnold. Chris Lucci. Gary Zimmerman. Andy 
Potter. Matt O'Beirne, Tom Giovinazzo. |eff Randazzo. Coach Petrofes 




95 



WOMEN'S 
VOLLEYBALL 

The women's volleyball team, coached by Wayne 
Perry, was pleased to finish their season with an 8- 
10 record. In the first year as a varsity team, their 
captain Alison Dursthoff consistently turned in 
good performances, as did other seniors: )oanne 
Hoffman, Byrdie Keough, and Sue Scott. All the 
seniors will be missed next year. 





Opp 

Dickinson 

Lincoln U. 

Lane. Bible 

Albright 

Muhlenberg 

Swarthmore 

Wilkes 

F& M 

Elizabethtown 

Spring Garden 

Gettysburg 

Delaware Valley 

King's 

Moravian 

Spring Garden 

Bloomsburg 

Susquehanna 

W. Maryland 



Win/Loss 

L 

W 

W 

W 

L 

W 

L 

L 

W 

W 

L 

W 

w 

L 
W 
L 
L 
L 




Row 1 — Robyn Keough, Joanne Hoffman, Alison Dursttioff; Row 2 — Amy 
Paszkowski. Caprece Carrington. Maria Fenty. Sue Scott, Lottie Leakey, Chris 
Kissinger; Row 3 — Coach Perry, Wendy Durham, Holly Carey, Sue Kazinski, 
Sharon Faust, |anet Montanaro, |ill Morrett. Coach Houser 



96 







t»^ 



— SC- 






97 



CHEERLEADERS 












■«? k_ '/' 



•^^,Ati 



Karen Rauenzahn. Daphne Ferster, Cami DeClementi, Sue Bolinsky, Bobbie Arbogast, Theresa 
Leach, Doreen Simmons. |enny Gehrig 



98 



A.RNOLD SPORTS CENTER 



This year's most striking addition to our campus' landscape will provide 
students and faculty with countless leisure and fitness options. The 
Arnold Health and Fitness Center, made possible primarily through the 
contributions of Mr. Edward H. Arnold, officially opened for use on 
February 19. less than one year after the ground-breaking ceremony- 
Arthur Peterson, former college president, swam the inaugural laps in 
the Center's Olympic-sized pool. Wallyball, racquetball, volleyball, bas- 
ketball, indoor track and swimming are some of the activities now open 
to the campus community. 





^^p-'s:!. 





JiCJ-- 



99 



Men's Basketball 






Row 1; Don Friday. Ken Latorre, Scotl Barlup, Wes Soto, Gary [urosky, Ray Kargo, Bob Aubel, Jim Catagnus; Row 2: Daryl Hess. Bill 

Kline. Shawn Shreffler, Bryan Esoldo, Mike Esoldo. Rob George. Kevin Arnold, Willard Perkins; Row 3: Coach Foster. Ron Fevola, 

Dave Bentz. Scolt Wood. Bill Moore, Chris Bornstad, Don Hosteller, loe Rilatt, Scott Richardson, Scott Sturgess, Len Bolinsky, Coach 

Sorrentino 



100 






Team 


LVC 


OPP. 


Shenandoah 


92 


79 


Emory & Henry 


68 


90 


Allentown 


79 


80 


Alvernia 


94 


56 


West Maryland 


81 


65 


Juniata 


76 


84 


Moravian 


75 


84 


Johns Hopkins 


68 


85 


Shippensburg 


63 


79 


Messiah 


69 


78 


Lincoln 


100 


89 


DicJcinson 


100 


76 


Muhlenberg 


76 


84 


York 


89 


98 


Gettysburg 


85 


67 


F&M 


62 


77 


Moravian 


n 


81 


West Maryland 


72 


76 


Dickinson 


68 


80 


Elizabethtovvn 


86 


72 


Muhlenberg 


76 


94 


Albright 


84 


74 



101 



Women's Basketball 





m'^^m 



iCBAHQi 



if^ 



•s^MT' 



Row 1: Sue Yingst, Theresa Leach. Cindy Watson, LesUe Keller; Row 2: Michelle 
Grube. Sue Kazinski. Lisa Biehl. Carla Myers. Coach Foster 



Team 


LVC 


OPP. 


Haverford 


55 


34 


F&M 


62 


77 


West Maryland 


52 


66 


Dickinson 


55 


89 


Eastern 


62 


53 


Wilkes 


52 


59 


Cabrini 


60 


65 


Lincoln 


2 





Johns Hopkins 


58 


49 


Gettysburg 


40 


53 


Del. Valley 


49 


56 


lohns Hopkins 


49 


67 


Messiah 


59 


71 


F&M 


55 


77 


Gettysburg 


56 


72 


Susquehanna 


39 


70 


Moravian 


60 


71 


Dickinson 


55 


64 


Albright 


55 


64 


West Maryland 


51 


66 



102 




Ai^^ 




'P9ir 






T-^- ' i^i^ut 




"I ' ^ 



103 



Wrestling 



Team 


LVC 


OPP. 


Kings 





45 


Allegheny 


9 


33 


Widener 


24 


25 


E-Town 


12 


35 


Messiah 


10 


35 


Baptist Bible 


28 


15 


USCGA 


3 


41 


Swarthmore 


9 


40 


VV&L 


12 


30 


Gallaudet 


32 


24 


Mansfield 


9 


40 


Muhlenberg 


21 


24 


U. ofPenn. 





54 


Moravian 


14 


31 


Scranton 





52 


Susquehanna 


20 


32 


Swarthmore 


16 


39 


Haverford 


9 


41 


Gettysburg 


18 


41 


Albright 


32 


08 


West Mary. 


18 


37 


Ursinus 


16 


32 









Row 1: Neil Madison, Ben Deardorff, Jeff Randazzo, Rod Kalbach, Glenn Lostritto' Row 2- Pat 
Eckman. Doug Walters, Jeff Gruber, Ron Vladyka, Timm Mover, Coach Petrofes 



104 










105 



Men's Track 




Row 1: Ed Senft, John Galvin. Carl Miller, Joe Rilalt. Ed Dema, Dan Reichenbach. Mike 
Pontz; Row 2: Rich Yingling, Bob Loughney, Brian Fernandes, lay Mills, Dan Tredinnick, 
E.I. Smith, Mike Home 



Meet 


Team 


Apr. 5 


Ursinus 




LVC 




West Maryland 




Baptist Bible 


Apr. 13 


Swarthmore 




Muhlenberg 




LVC 


Apr. 16 


Del. Valley 




Albright 




LVC 


Apr. 20 


Shippensburg 




Dickinson 




LVC 


Apr. 27 


luniata 




LVC 



Score 

106 

38 

37 

14 

94 

54 

31 

46 

28 

14 
110.7 
54.3 

26 

85 

59 




d# 



si*- 




106 



Women's Track 




Meet 


Team 


Apr. 6 


F&M 




LVC 




Swarthmore 


Apr. 13 


LVC 




Swarthmore 




Muhlenberg 


Apr. 16 


Del. Vallev 




LVC 




Albright 


Apr. 20 


Shippensbur 




Dickinson 




L\'C 



Score 

80 

51 

38 

86 

67 

8 

60.5 

60 
48.5 
106 

40 

24 






J* te::^*^ 



Row 1: Sue Yingst, Laura Baird. Joann Giannettino, Maryann Lucykanish. Trish Haeusler, 
Cindy Sladek; Row 2: Sue Partilla. Maria Fenty. Laurie Mutz, Michelle Grube. Helen Filippone, 
Coach Foster 



107 



Baseball 




Row 1: Scott Waugerman, Bill W'oland, Lance Shaffer, Shawn Shreffler, 
Chris Smith; Row 2: Mike Caputo, Kevin Arnold, Ken Wilson. Bob 
Baker, Daryl Hess; Row 3: Ed Jones, Troy Celesky, Don Lappin, Chris- 
tian Foust, Daryl Keller; Row 4; Steve Murray, George Partilla, Britt 
Mowery, Mike Spangler, Kevin Arnold; Row 5: Gary Zinirnerman. 
Coach Spittle 











.f' 



SV<'^ > 



- / 



108 




Team LVC 

Mil. Sell. Eng. 5 

Bermicigi 4 

Roch. Inst. Tech. 10 

Nazareth 

Belmont 3 

Wesley 6 

Mil. Sch. Kng. 7 

Mil. Sch. Eng. 7 

Rose Hulman 4 

Roch. Inst, Tech, 11 

Wesley 3 

York ' 8 

York 9 

Alvernia 6 

Alvernia 4 

Millersville 3 

Swarthmore 4 

(jettysburg 

Gettysburg 8 

Allentown 16 

Dickinson 14 

Muhlenberg 7 

Muhlenberg 

Susquehanna 7 

Susquehanna 5 

Elizabethtown 6 

Albright 9 

F & M 7 

F & M 20 

luniata 10 

luniata 7 

West Maryland 6 

West Maryland 5 

Messiah 15 

Moravian 1 

Moravian 8 

Penn State/Capitol 13 



OPP. 

3 

9 

9 

9 

5 

13 

4 

5 

5 

13 

11 

6 

4 

3 

5 

11 

19 

1 

6 

1 

9 

11 

4 

1 

4 

11 

3 

11 

2 

13 

25 

7 

1 

3 

2 

5 

10 









^i?mm 





# 



.•»rr rii!-!')!llK^K*fflf'.-^y#lfl^l<ti'*^^. 




109 



Softball 




Row 1; Sharon Bemier. Robyn Ulnier. Mariann Lamoreux. Nanetle Bassininsky. 
Sandy Auniiller; Row 2: Diane Churan, Glenda Shelter, Amy Paszkowski. Barb 
Lowey, Danielle Campbell; Row 3: Coach Tierney, Kenethia Staly, Sharon Kausl, 
Michelle Sullivan, Caprece Carrington 




110 



Team 

King's 

King's 

Messiah 

Allentown 

Susquehanna 

Susquehanna 

Wesl Maryland 

West Maryland 

Gettysburg 

Gettysburg 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabelhtown 

F & M 

F& M 

luniata 

luniata 

Washington 

Dickinson 

Dickinson 

Moravian 



LVC 


OPP. 


14 


9 


8 


3 


2 


12 


6 


9 


2 


12 


4 


5 


10 


11 


7 


5 


2 


12 


1 


11 





11 


1 


15 


10 


17 





14 


7 


13 


11 


8 


19 


8 


8 


10 


8 


7 





15 




I 





iM'<>;-l.: 








t'^. 



■-=^... 



■■V'^>«.. 



Ill 



Sports Award Banquet 





i i i £. A{ 






112 





Special Awards of 1988 

Women's Sportsmanship Award Suzann Yingst 

Outstanding Woman Athlete Glenda Shetter 

Scott Wallace Memorial Award Paul Levengood 

F.C.A.'s Athlete of the Year Award Suzann Yingst 

Zola Memorial Award Mark Phillips 

Maston Memorial Award Donald Hosteller 

The Year's Most Valuable Players 

Football Rick Beard & Ted Brosius 

Soccer Kevin Dempsey & Joel Kline 

Cross Country John Calvin & Al Senft 

Basketball Donald Hosteller & Len Bolinsky 

Wrestling Mike Rusen & Jeff Randazzo 

Baseball Lance Shaffer & Chris Smith 

Track Dan Reichenbach & John Calvin 

Coif Tom Ciovinazzo & Jeff Randazzo 

Field Hockey Clenda Shetter & Maria Wheeler 

Volleyball Alison Dursthoff & Robyn Keough 

Women's Cross Country. . . . Cindy Sladek & Suzann Yingst 

Women's Basketball Carta Myers 

Softball Clenda Shetter 

Women's Track Joann Ciannettino & Cindy Sladek 





113 




A Year in the Life: John Busedu 



Being a Freshman is one's first step to a better 
future. The campus life, activities, and academic 
work are far different from high school. You feel 
like you're finally in the big leagues, but you 
know you've still got a long way to go. I'm proud 
to be a freshman and I hope that my future years 
here are as fun as this year has been. 



114 



Underclassmen 



A Day in the Life: Beth Ann Kester 



Every day is a challenge at lA'C. Preparing for 
classes, keeping up with the workload, and taking 
exams exerts a lot of pressure on me. But though it 
seems that I'm always busy and that my work is 
never done. I thrive on the challenge. My greatest 
joy each day is knowing that I've accomplished 
something — be it just surviving an exam, or ex- 
celling in a certain area. Each day I renew my thirst 
for knowledge and strive to quench it. After all. 
that's whv I'm here. 




115 



JUNIORS 



Bill Adams 

Melissa Andrews 

Lisa Bauermann 

Deirdre Benney 

Martha Berdic 



David Bolton 
David Bush 

Daphne Ferster 
Ron Fevola 

Helen Filippone 










^ 



'.'■f 





Rob Gangemi 

Pamela Green 

Marjorie Haak 

Andrew Hamann 

Melissa Haunton 





r 






lason Herr 

Mark Hoffsommer 

lanelle Klunk 

Drue Koons 

Kristine Kropp 



Theresa Leach 

Lottie Leakey 

Joseph Lipinsky 

Lac Longson 

Christopher Lonie 



Jennifer Lord 

Barb Lowle 

Robin Maccrindle 

Leslie Mario 

Todd Metzler 






%^, 







"fS 




116 













Ken Miller 
Patricia Moll 
Erik Muehlhevser 
David Myers 
Frederick Neiswender 






^ 



W 




..4J* 





Anna Nissley 
Wendy Noll' 
Duoglas Nyce 
Patricia Paterick 
Patricia Pontari 



.-■,v.i4ife3« 











r 



■w 


HF 


•'Tl 






Michael Pullman 
Eric Rabenold 
Debhi Rauanheimo 
Michele Reichert 
David Reinhart 



Christine Richmond 
Jay Ridehart 
Brian Robinson 
Jill Ross 
Nadine Saada 








Regina Santas 
Letitia Saylor 
Renee Schuchart 
Lori Shenk 
Doreen Simmons 




** 






Benjamin Smith 
William Snelling 
Jeffrey Snook 
Debra Spancake 
Lisa Starsinic 



117 



Linda Stine 

George Stockburger 

Lori Stortz 

Christopher Strohl 

Beth Trout 








Bryna \'andergrift 

Kim Weisser 

Rebecca Werner 

Jeffrey Wolff 

David Wonderly 

Christine Wynkop 








118 





SOPHOMORE 








Mark Allen 
Robert Andrew 
Sandy Aumiller 
Laura Baird 
Scott Barlup 








Sharon Barr 
Lisa Biehl 
Neil Biser 
Sue Bolinsky 
Annette Bovles 



rs^ 








Mary Brannon 
Kerrie Brennan 
lames Carroll 
Dina Carter 
Diane Churan 





^ ^ / 













Tina Clymer 
Rob Crow) 
Angela Davis 
Camille DeClementi 
Christine Dellinger 



Kevin Dempsey 
Heidi Derhammer 
Lori Deward 
lames Dillman 
Kevin Downs 



Brian Engle 
Maria Fenty 
Stephen Ferruzza 
Peter Fowler 



119 






■^^^ 




John Galvin 

loann Giannettino 

Shawn Gingrich 

Allison Gow 

Kathy Graver 



Kelly Careen 

Tamara Groff 

Michelle Grube 

Scott Grumling 

Matt Guenther 



Erica Habel 

|ill Hassler 

Ralph Heister 

Jean-Marc Hese 

Daryl Hess 








w^^f 




i ■"'^ .-.^ 










Elaine Hibbs 

Amy Himmelberger 

Bill Horst 

Suzanne Jefferies 

Jennifer lolly 



120 







^ 



J7,«<.i<3^»*- .*-t» -.^V^^^ 













Laura |udd 
Susan Kazinski 
Anne Kelly 
Beth Ann Kester 
Angela Krause 



John Loeffler 

|ohn Malloy 

lane Mark 

Michael McGranaghan 

Robert Mikus 






. i 




j^^ 




Laura Miller 
lay Mills 
Timm Moyer 
Steve Murray 
Dwayne Nichols 








Susan Noel 
'Asa Olafsson 
leff Osborne 
Susan Partilla 
Lori Reed 




121 



Karen Reilly 

Chris Kissinger 

Elizabeth Rosser 

Sheree Rybak 

Pamela Schaadt 








David Schell 

Steven Schrack 

Sherry Scovell 

Dawn Shantz 

Rachel Snyder 



Peter Stegman 
Michelle Sullivan 

Kathy Supplee 
Mechelle Thomas 
Stephen Trapnell 



Lynda Van Sant 

Matthew Vera 

Cindy Watson 

Candace Wheedleton 

Cathie Wheeler 



Stefanie Wilds 

Kenneth Wilson 

Mary Wilson 
















C\ 










122 




FRESHMAN 







#1 




leanne Adams 
Melissa Askey 
Howard Bampton 
lulie Barbush 
ludv Barron 














loanne Beattie 
David Bentz 
lef Betz 
Ian Bonner 
Chuck Boohar 



lohn Busedu 
Barry Calhoun 
Danielle Campbell 
Caprece Carrington 
Blaine Connor 








Keith Copenhaver 
Kristen Curran 
Ann Dietrich 
losue Diaz 
Dawn DiDonalo 






^ 

"'5* 








I 






Shirley Dietz 
Kriszta Dorn 
Wendy Durham 
lean-Paul Duvall 
Amy Earhart 



Brian Fernandes 
Carl Fortna 
Kristan Foster 
Katie Giberson 
Tracy Gressman 



123 



Kathy Guindon 

William Guntrum 

Tricia Haeusler 

Jim Haine 

Karen Hausman 








Catherine Henry 

Andrew Hildebrand 

Christopher Hills 

Michael Home 

April Horning 








Adam Hosteller 

Heather Huff 

David kim 

Richard Kroth 

Brendalyn Krysiak 








Janel Kughler 

Michael Landis 

Michelle Leddy 

Melissa Linkous 

Dina Litzenberger 








Kathy Luckenbill 

3onnie MacCulloch 

Doug Mancini 

Donna McElwee 

Sarah Miller 



Christy Milliken 

Britt Mowery 

Carla Myers 

Rick Paterick 

Debra Reagle 





124 




1^ 



^ 



%^ ' 






gijgil 





t 













Alison Rutler 
lohana Schaum 
Sue Schumaker 
Albert Senft 
David Sheats 








Michael Slechta 
Lynne Smith 
Tracey Smith 
Kelly Snyder 
Rebecca Snyder 








Kenethia Staley 
Rolf Stainke 
Debra Stoudt 
Kelly Stuckey 
Kevin Thomas 







iiii 







Michael Tighe 
Robyn Ulmer 
David Umla 
Heidi Walter 
Andrew Wangman 



Brian U'assel 
Amy Waterfield 
lay Yoder 
Steve Young 
Ildiko Zank 






Chris Zebrovvski 
Michael Zettlemoyer 
Mary Beth Ziegenfuss 



125 




A Day in the Life: F.C.A. 



As the president of the Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes organization, I am responsible for plan- 
ning and speaking at the meetings. I also organize 
the refreshment stand for the men's basketball 
games. The F.C.A. promotes a sportsman-like 
and Christian attitude on and off the athletic 
field. We also organize the intramural teams for 
both men and women. This is a good way to 
develop team closeness, and to demonstrate what 
we believe in and what the F.C.A. is all about. 



126 



Activities 




A Day in the Life: 

Underground Steering Committee 



Being president of the Underground Steering 
Committee has surely made this year interesting. 
There were times when I had to worry about 
whether or not there would be sponsors for the 
Undedrground, followed by a time when there 
were too many sponsors and I had to decide who 
got what. I feel this was a growing year for the 
Underground. This Campus night club has ex- 
isted for over three years now, and the objective 
that I have tried to point this organization toward 
is one of bringing something new to the club. 
Granted, we are only in the preliminary stages, 
but by the time everyone returns in the fall, there 
should be a new Underground and a new at- 
mosphere. 




127 



Class of 1991: 



John Paul Duvall. president ■ 

Kelly Snyder, vice- ' 

president ■ 




Class of 1990: 



Kevin Dempsey, vice- 
president; Cami DeClemen- 
ti. secretary; Renato Biribin, 
president 




128 



Class of 1989: 




Renee Schuchart, treasurer; 
Jenn Lord, secretary; Debbi 
Rauanheimo, vice- 

president; Fred Neiswender, 
president 



Class of 1988: 







Brent Trostle, president; 
Delia Sitaris, vice-president; 
Glenda Shelter, secretary; 
Bill Wright, treasurer 



129 



Young Democrats: 



Row 1 — Jeane Weidner, 
Pam Collins, Michele 
Reichert, John Brenner, 
president; Row 2 — Ken 
Krawchuk, vice-president; 
Chris Frye, treasurer; Ian 
Bonner, Carl Mohler, Rob 
Wolfgang, Fred Neiswender, 
Peter Stegman, Matt Vera 




WLVC: 



Row 1 — Mike McGran- 
nahan, treasurer; Becky 
Werner, Mitzy Linkous; 
Row 2 — John Brenner, vi- 
ce-president; Rob Andrew, 
Mark Allen, Edwina 
Travers, secretary; Row 3 — 
Ken Miller, Ian Bonner, 
Chris Hills, Carl Fortna, 
Mike Dueh, Steve Ferruzza 




130 



l\ 



Wig and Buckle: 




Men's Volleyball: 



Row 1 — Kelly Green, 
Laurie Devine, Scott 
Grumling, Kristen Foster, 
Ken Krawchuk, Stacie 
Micheel, Nadine Saada, An- 
drew Hildebrand; Row 2 — 
Sue Toland, Mike 
Steckman, president; Linda 
Powell, David Plummer, 
Lisa Russoniello, David 
Bush, Matthew Guenther, 
vice-president; Row 3 — 
Heidi Walter, Kelly Snyder, 
Kathleen Ryan, secretary; 
Ian Bonner, Brent Trostle, 
lenn Lord, Ken Miller, Sonja 
Compton, treasurer 




Row 1 — Chuck Rusconi, 
president; Ben Smith, secre- 
tary and treasurer; Row 2 — 
Eric Rabenold, Michael Lan- 
dis, Neil Biser, Scott Carter, 
Brett Hoffman, lohn Loef- 
fler, vice-president; Row 3 
— Kenny Wilson, Chris 
Hills, Jay Rinehart, Doug 
Hamm, Dave Hawk 



131 



Underground Steering 

Committee: 



Row 1 — Karen Jones, vice- 
president; Scott Carter, Je- 
ane VVeidner, president; 
Denise Roberts, treasurer; 
Row 2 — Beth Trout, Janelle 
Klunk, Lisa Bowerman, 
Dave Calvario, Jim Haine, 
Steve Ferruzza 




Student Judicial Board: 



Row 1 — Dawna Bidden, 
DapJine Ferster, Jenn Lord; 
Row 2 — Jay Mills, Patricia 
Haeusler, Brent Trostle, 
Theresa Leach, president 




132 



Student Council: 







Row 1 — )ohn Brenner, vi- 
ce-president; Scott Carter, 
president; Row 2 — Delia 
Sitaris, Karen Jones, Denise 
Roberts, Beth Trout, Deb 
Spancake, secretary; Row 3 
— Kevin Dempsey, Kelly 
May, Mark Cibson, Bryna 
Vandergrift, Dave Calvario, 
advisor; Debbi Rauanheimo, 
Fred Neiswender, vice- 
president; loe Lipinsky, sec- 
retary; David Bolton, Bill 
Dietz, treasurer; Brian Was- 
sell 



Spring Arts Festival: 




Row 1 — Cheryl Stoltzfus, Ton! 
Salam, Edwina Travers, Patricia 
Haeusler; Row 2 — Lori Stortz, 
Sue Toland, Patti Pontari, Barry 
Koklefsky, Tara Thomas; Row 3 
— Bea Vagyoczky, Tricia Pater- 
ick, Debbi Rauanheimo, Laurie 
Devine, Andrew Hildebrand, 
Matthew Guenther, David Bush, 
Steven Butz 



Traditionally held in late April, 
the Spring Arts Festival 
presents an opportunity for 
campus and community to sur- 
round themselves with a vari- 
ety of cultural events. Along 
with music, dance, and drama, 
there are also offerings in po- 
etry, crafts, food, and juried 
arts. With yearly crowds ex- 
ceeding 30,000, this year's goal 
is to provide an even broader 
spectrum of art in its various 
forms. 



133 



Row 1 — James Czarnecki, 
Mike Pullman, Barry 
Koklefsky, Jay Mills; Row 2 
— Dee Capece, Dr. Fry, ad- 
visor; Steve Ferruzza 



Society of Computer 

Software: 




Row 1 — Robyn Keough, Joan 
Hevel; Row 2 — 'Asa 'Olafs- 
son, Brynja 'Olafsson 



134 



Ski Club: 




i 



Rainbow Troupe: 




Julie Matthews, Chris 
Wynkop, Becky Snyder, Liz 
Rosser, Kris Curran, Kim 
Bregier, Chris Lonie 



Quittapahilla: 




Row 1 — Joan Landis, Cher- 
yl Stoltzfus, Bobbie Arbo- 
gast. Rose Trubilla, Tracy 
Montgomery, lodi Saltzer; 
Row 2 — Michelle Durkin, 
Tami Groff, 'Asa 'Olafsson, 
Brynja 'Olafsson, Debbie 
Darchi; Row 3 — Leslie 
Mario, co-editor; Tara 
Thomas, Kathy Luckenbill, 
Lori Stortz, Robyn Keough, 
Martha Bordic, Anna 
Nissley, co-editor; Row 4 — 
Jim Haine, Steve Trapnell, 
Ian Bonner, Steve Ferruzza, 
Brian Luckenbill 



135 



Quad: 



Row 1 — Kathy Johnson, Lisa 
Camburn, Sarah Miller; Row 2 
— Christopher Craig, Barry 
Koklefsky, Mike McGra- 
naghan, Rob Andrew, Bryna 
Vandergrift; Row 3 — Chris 
Frye, Ian Bonner, Dwayne 
Nichols, secretary; Steve 
Trapnell, vice-president 




Row 1 — Melissa Haunton, vi- 
ce-president; Donna Mack- 
neer, president; Lisa Starsinic; 
Row 2 — Joan Landis, Shawn 
Fitzgerald, treasurer; Michelle 
Durkin, secretary 



Psychology Club: 




136 



Project: 




Row 1 — Dwayne Nichols, 
vice-president; Row 2 — 
Lore-Lee Bruwelheide, 
treasurer; Row 3 — Wendy 
Durham, Becky Snyder; 
Row 4 — Mike Slechta, Dina 
Litzenberger, Kim Bregler, 
secretary; Chris Lonie 





137 



Photography Club: 



Row 1 — Sam Huber; 
Row 2 — Daniel Nudo, 
Stacie Micheel, Ilm 
Haine; Row 3 — Jim 
Walak, Lore-Lee Bruw- 
elheide 





138 



Math Club: 




Row 1 — Todd Met- 
zler, Stephanie Schu- 
maker, Bill Wright, 
treasurer; Stacy 
Gangewer, secretary; 
Lori Stortz, president; 
David Bolton, vice- 
president; Eric Rabe- 
nold, |enn Lord; Row 2 
— Debbi Darchi, Ann 
Deitrich, lill Hassler, 
Amy Himmelberger, 
Mary Catherine Wil- 
son. Jeane Weidner, 
Kristel Yoder, Bea 
Vagyoczky, M. Brent 
Trostle 



International Business 
Club: 




Row 1 — Mark Hoffsommer, 
treasurer; Jill Ross, vice — pres- 
ident; Brian Engle, president; 
Amy Waterfield; Row 2 — Andy 
Wangman, Diann Lenker 



International Business Club is a 
young but growing organization 
which provides opportunities to 
become familiar with aspects of in- 
ternational business outside of the 
classroom. Films and speakers are 
sponsored to cover the many facets 
of international business. Much 
time and preparation are devoted 
to the organization of their Inter- 
national Culture Day, when nearly 
1,000 high schools that offer foreign 
languages will assemble on our 
campus for an exciting day of com- 
petition and presentations in Span- 
ish, German, and French culture. 



139 



History/Political Science Club: 



Row 1 — Diane Fuss, pres- 
ident; Maria-Elena Falato, 
Michele Reichert, Pam Col- 
lins; Row 2 — Josh Diaz, 
Rob Andrew, vice- 
president; John Brenner, 
Carl Mohler, Urs Schwabe, 
David Sheets, Peter 
Stegman, treasurer 




Hispanic Culture Club: 



Row 1 — Jill Ross, Sheree 
Rybak, Michelle Durkin; 
Row 2 — Marjorie Haak, Ian 
Bonner, Laura Berzkalns, 
Brian Engle 




140 



H.I.S.: 




Row 1 — Marie Garnett, 
Amy Evans, Ed V a n- 
Landeghem, Lisa Mover. 
Heidi Derhammer; Row 2 — 
Rich Umla, Lydia Neff, Li- 
ana Hendrix, David Godles- 
ki, David Bolton 



Guild Student Group: 




Row 1 — Pamela Schaadt, 
vice-president; Brian Robin- 
son, Berneice Eby, Karen 
Brummer, Joyce Attix, 
Wendy Pearre; Row 2 — Dr. 
Getz, advisor; Shawn Gin- 
grich, secretary and treasur- 
er; Kathleen Ryan, Brian 
Luckenbiil, president 



Guild Student Group is a stu- 
dent branch of the American 
Guild of Organists. On campus 
they hold recitals each semes- 
ter and help to organize organ 
— choral workshops. GSG also 
travels to organ manufacturers 
and to local churches to further 
their education in the field of 
church music. 



141 



Greenblotter: 



Row 1 — Tara Thomas, 
Edwina Travers, Delia 
Sitaras; Row 2 — Heidi Wal- 
ter, Patti Pontari, Becky 
Werner 




German Club: 



Row 1 — Donna 
Teator; Row 2 — 
Cheryl Stoltzfus, 
April Oertel, Ta- 
mi Groff, Mat- 
thew Guenther, 
Stacie Micheel, 
L o r e - L e e 
Bruwelheide; 
Row 3 — Ken 
Krawchuk, Andy 
Wangman, Diann 
Lenker, Dr. Scott, 
advisor; Mark 
Hoffsommer, Bri- 
an Engle, Matt 
Vera 




142 



French Club: 




Row 1 — Lottie Leakey, 
freasurer; April Oertel, vice- 
president; Nadine Saada, 
president; Amy Hammer- 
stone, secretary; Row 2 — 
Paula Cali, Brian Engle, Deb 
Stoudt, Ann Deitrich, Lisa 
Russoniello, Mrs Guenther, 
advisor; Brendalyn Krysiak, 
Matthew Guenther 



F.C.A.: 




Row 1 — Helen Filippone, 
president; Row 2 — Brian 
Engle, Eric Rabenold, vice- 
president; Bill Wright; Row 
3 — Todd Metzler, Scott 
Richardson, Willard Perkins 



143 



Helen Filippone, Lydia Neff, 
Chris VVynkop, vice — pres- 
ident; Lore-Lee Bruw- 
elheide, president; Laura 
|udd, Chris Lonie, Mitzy 
Linkous, David Godleski 



Council of Religious 
Organizations: 




College Republicans: 



Row 1 — Rob Andrew, pres- 
ident; George Stockburger, 
vice-president; Peter 
Stegman. Chris Strohl, 
treasurer; Row 2 — 
Michelle Leddy, Diane Fuss, 
Carolyn Murren, Kim 
Weisser, secretary; Tina 
Weber, secretary; Kim 
Luthy, Edwina Travers, Josh 
Diaz, Jay Yoder, Mike Horm; 
Row 3 — Jim Haine, Mr. 
Harnish, advisor; Urs 
Schwabe, Joe Rilatt, Rolf 
Steinke, Scott Carter, Todd 
Metzler, Earl Weaver 




144 



Childhood Education Club: 




Row 1 — Bill Dietz; Row 2 
— Laura Baird, Karen Reil- 
ly. Cheryl Lambert, Wendy 
Bord 

The Childhood Education 
Club participates in many 
activities throughout the 
year. A sample of these in- 
clude their visit with chil- 
dren at nearby Hershey 
Medical Center, a Christmas 
party for needy children. 
Make and Take Night, and a 
pizza party, as well as Chil- 
dren's Day and Spring Arts. 
The club also hosts a teach- 
ers' panel to enable the pre- 
vious year's seniors to share 
their tales of the "real 
world" with undergradu- 
ates. 



Chemistry Club: 



"«?^.^^f/ 





Row 1 — Lissa Jennings, 
Joan Hevel, Chris Dellinger; 
Row 2 — Dr. Moe, advisor; 
James Warren, president; 
Melanie PTeek, Tami Mar- 
rone, Sue Kazinski, Jeanne 
Adams, Jason Herr, David 
Sekula, David Myers; Row 3 
— Bob Sherman, David 
Hawk, Pam Wyman, Toby 
O'Neill. Neil Biser, Bill Ad- 
ams, Chris Hamann 



145 



Business Club: 



Row 1 — Ms. Anderson, ad- 
visor; George Stockburger, 
vice-president; Kim We- 
isser. president; Denise Rob- 
erts, secretary; Dr. Clark, 
advisor; Row 2 — Brendalyn 
Krysiak, Mike Pullman, Jill 
Ross, Andrew Hildebrand 




Row 1 — Linda Stine, Jack 
Malloy; Row 2 — Kris Cur- 
ran. Beth Ann Kester, Elaine 
Hibbs, Joan Hevel, presi- 
dent; Row 3 — Kathryn 
Guindon, Bill Adams, Tina 
Clymer, Angle Davis, Sam 
Huber 



Biology Club: 




146 



I 



Accounting Club: 




lanet Gehrig, Mike Pullman, 
Lynette Benedick, secretary; 
Andrew Hildebrand 



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147 



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I 





A Day in the Life: Philo 



My recent induction into the fraternity Phi 
Lambda Sigma has made a considerable impact 
on my daily life. Before pledging, I had friends, 
but not as close to me as my brothers are now. 
Being from out-of-state, this newly acquired fam- 
ily has given me a sense of belonging. It has 
shown me the importance of unity and respon- 
sibility in everyday life, which I think can be 
reflected in my studies as well. Pete Grindrod 



148 



Greeks 




A Day in the Life: Delphians 



One of the greatest things that I gained was many 
new friends. As a pledge, my life was contin- 
uously busy. I was always running to and from 
Mary Green. My days were planned around the 
various activitiesand every moment of my time 
was filled. Any free time was spent either catch- 
ing a catnap or studying. Now that I am a Del- 
phian, my days are a little less hectic. It is hard to 
travel across campus to Mary Green all the time, 
but whenever I visit the sisters I feel special and 
I'm glad that I pledged. There are many extra 
obligations that you don't think about. Now I 
have a meeting every Wednesday night, I must 
help with fundraising, and the organization of 
activities. Nothing is ever like or as time con- 
suming as pledging, but I loved getting to know 
the sisters and would do it all over again. I feel 
that the rewards by far outweigh the rest. 




149 



Alpha Phi Omega 

A$0 





150 



Alpha Psi Omega 





151 



Beta Beat Beta 

BBB 







152 



Delta Lambda Sigma 

AAS 






153 



Delta Tau Chi 

ATX 





154 



Gamma Sigma Sigma 

rs2 



Gamma Sigma Sigma is a national 
service sorority based on friendship, 
equality and service. Events for this 
year included their sorority week- 
end, grandmother \'isits to a local 
nursing home and the helping 
hands weekend with APO. their 
brother fraternity. Although service 
is the main objecti\e, fun can be 
found in all that thev do. 




■:sssn09!):#si»^. 




155 



Kappa Lambda Nu 

AAN 



Founded in 1871, Kappa Lambda Nu is the oldest 
social sorority on the LVC campus. P'ollowing the 
motto "\'itue et Fide", Clio's aim is to create friend- 
ship, to promote loyalty and leadership among its 
members, and to further develop good character 
through both social and service activities. 









156 



Kappa Lambda Sigma 
KA2 





157 



Knights of the Valley 

KSK 






158 



Phi Lambda Sigma 






159 



Phi Mu Alpha 






160 



Phi Gamma Mu 

#rM 





161 



Psi Chi 



Psi Chi is the national Honor Society in Psy- 
c;liology. This year the chapter became more 
active by incrtsasing students' awareness of 
opportunities available after graduation and 
by providing students with a tutoring service, 
inductions took place in both the fall and 
spring semesters and some members off Psi 
Chi took a trip to the Eastern Psyc:hological 
Association ('onvenlion in Buffalo New York. 





162 



1 



Sigma Alpha Iota 
SAI 





163 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 

TKE 



The second year in the hfe of Tau Kappa Epsilon, 
the only national social fraternity on the LVC cam- 
pus, has been active and growing through partic- 
ipation in the Homecoming parade and carnival. 
Intramural sports, and many other campus-wide 
activities. Tau Kappa Epsilon has demonstrated its 
desire to be a moving force at Lebanon Valley. As a 
large social fraternity, TKE offers numerous social 
events for its members and provides brotherhood to 
assist members in achievements far beyond the 
college years. 






164 



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165 



Greek Week 




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166 









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167 



In Memory of 





168 



Chris Fretz 




In the summer of 1987, a valued member of our 
student body, Chris Fretz, died in an automobile 
accident. We would like to honor Chris by re- 
membering the year that he spent with us and to the 
many contributions he made to student life. He was 
active in the campus community in a number of 
different areas. He was a member of the Track and 
Field and Cross Country teams, he was a Philo 
brother and he was the secretary of the Freshman 
class. 

During pledging this year, the Philo brothers set 
aside a day to Chris' memory. We too, would like to 
dedicate these two pages to him. These pictures 
represent Chris in many different aspects of his life 
here at LVC. Chris was a very enthusiastic and 
energetic person. He got involved and he made a 
difference here. He had many friends, ideas and 
goals. It is tragic that Chris had to leave us before 
his potential could be fully realized. He made a 
definite difference on this campus and will be sore- 
ly missed by all. 





169 



Graduation 



On May 8th. 1988 another senior class graduated and 
became ahimni of Lebanon Valley College. We dedicate 
these next few pages to them and their special day. 
Throughout the past four years they have studied, worked 
and sacrificed so that they could one day reach their ul- 
timate goal here at I.VC — to graduate and move on. While 
trying to achieve this goal, they have grown to mean very 
much to our campus community. We are sad to see them go, 
yet liapp\- that they have earned their degrees and can now 
begin the life that they have strived for. It is time for us to 
say goodbye to these men and women whom we have 
grown to know and love, and to wish them luck and success 
in the future. 







170 








171 







172 




A Year in the Life . . . 














173 








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174 




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175 






176 







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