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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

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Quittapahilla 

1990 

Uolumc CDXXU 

£-cbanon Uallei| Collec^e 
Annville, 'PA 17003^ 



HOMECOMING 




The candidates anxiously await the announcement of this year's queen. 



Lebanon Valley College's Homecoming 
Weekend, held October 13, 14 and 15, was full 
of activities for everyone on campus. 

The celebration opened with a bonfire and 
pep rally Friday night, preparing the Valley for 
the following day's game against Susquehanna 
University. During the festivities, Chris 
Schwartz was crowned Homecoming King. 

On Saturday morning, the traditional Home- 
coming Campus Carnival was held in the So- 
cial Quad, in conjuntion with the annual 
Homecoming Parade. Many students and 
alumni turned out to visit the booths spon- 
sored by college organizations. 

Before the kickoff of the football game, Ger- 
ry Petrofes, Edward Kress, Richard Furda, 
William Vought, Jan G. Schoch, and Anthony 
Calabrese were inducted into the 14th Annual 
Lvc Hall of Fame. 

During half time, the members of the Home- 
coming Court made an appearance, and Sandy 
Aumiller was Crowned the Homecoming 
Queen. 

The activities of Homecoming Weekend 
were rounded out by the student play "The 
House of Blue Leaves," a dance on Saturday 
night, and a jazz concert on Sunday evening. 




The candidates and their escorts pose for the camera. 




Bryna Vandergrift prepares to relin- 
quish her throne. 



1990 Queen Sandy Aumiller escorted by Ben 
Deardorff. 




Candidate, Holly Carey. 



Candidate, Diane Churan and escort Neil Madison. 



HOMECOMING FAIR & PARADE 




Tim Biltcliff earns his nickname of "Kong' 



Delphians man their float. 




LVC's spirited fans give a cheer. 



Dean Yuhas takes a swing at miniature golf. 



10 




Kelly Stuckey and Erica Allen enjoy the festivities. 



The Hispanic Culture Club sells LVC pennants. 




TKE sponsors their annual pumpkin sale. 



Boy, college is a jungle! 



11 



BAND 



Once again this year, the Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege Marching Band provided half-time enter- 
tainment at all of the home football games. 

Under the direction of newly elected drum 
majors Michael Slechta and Todd Mentzer, the 
Band spent many hours on the field perfecting 
their performance of several selections from the 
Broadway musical "West Side Story." As the 
football season progressed, the units' technical 
and artistic talents were further demonstrated 
with the addition of more difficult choreography 
requiring more skill from the band members and 
the silk squad. Numerous flags and other props 
were added to the silk squad's repetoire, pro- 
viding an eye appealing backdrop to the band's 
sound. 




The band belts out a tune. 




Drum Majors: Todd Mentzer, Mike Slechta; Band: Christy Milliken, Mark Benson, Brandon Weston, Doug Prowett, Marianne Boltz, Lisa Marotta, Lynn 
Schwalm, Amy Clewell, Lesley Laudermilch, Nancy Herman, Beth Moyer, Kristen Webster, Sally Fegan, Karen Beres, Dan Boyer, Aaron Daubert, Shawn 
Hackett, Tom Seddon, James Mclnnis, Diana Cook, John Scampton, Bryan Barbier, Dave Umla, Dr. Hearson, Shawn Snavely, Cathie Wheeler, James 
Hargrove, Rob Petro, Scott Askins, Malissa Noll, Kevin Mattos, John Diller, Laura Shepler, Jay Mills, Tawni Niklaus, Holly Hendrix; Band Front: Jennifer 
Bragunier, Jennifer Hanshaw, Kimberly Fames, Ann Cawley, Kate Eshbach, Sarah Thompson, Kim Sollenberger, Kim Shaffer 



12 




The band front shows their dedication. 



Excellent coordination and timing. 




They demonstrate their spirit from the stands too! 



The band provides music for the homecoming parade. 



13 



HOUSE OF BLUE 
LEAVES 



This year's Homecoming Play, John Guare's "The 
House of Blue Leaves", was a situation comedy which 
dealt with the trials and tribulations of an aspiring 
songwriter, Artie Shaughnessy (played by Jef Betz), 
who dreams of going to Hollywood to pursue his 
musical dreams. He has far too many personal prob- 
lems to let him do so, including a psychotic wife. 
Bananas, played brilliantly by Stacy Gilbert, and a 
flirtatious and vivacious next-door neighbor, Bunny 
Flingus. Bunny, played by Katherine Henry, was full 
of flaky antics and had a superb New York accent. Mr. 
Betz did a warm and realistic performance, as did the 
other satirical characters, including three hedonistic 
nuns. As Artie's son Ronnie, Scott Grumling played 
the bad boy to the hilt. The laughs were plentiful, and 
the last few moments of the play were definitely the 
most gripping of the evening. 




Seen once again on the LVC stage, are Kathryn Henry and Jef Betz. 




Row 1: Renato Biribin, Patty Fleetwood; Row 2: Scott Grumling, Jef Betz; Row 3: Stacy Gilbert, Sarah Thompson, Allison Rutter, Raymond Muller, Donna 
Longcoy, Kathryn Henry, Troy Neidermyer, Frank Heilman 



14 




Jef Betz wags a finger at Allison Rutter. 



When did you join the ROTC, Scott? 



15 



ON THE TOWN 



Written by Betty Comden and Adolf 
Green, On The Town describes the 
adventures of three sailors in New 
York City on a one day leave during 
World War II. They see a poster girl in 
a subway station and spend the rest of 
the day looking for her. The sailors, 
played by B.J. Checket, Renato Biribin, 
and Scott Grumling, eventually meet 
up with the girl, played by Tawni 
Niklaus and two other girls, played by 
Sharon Ban and Brendalyn Krysiak. 

The musical, sponsored by Alpha 
Psi Omega, Sinfonia, and SAI, was di- 
rected by Cathie Wheeler and Troy 
Neidermyer with Anne Kelly directing 
the music of Leonard Bernstein. The 
show proved to be "fun and youthful", 
just as director Cathie Wheeler had 
described it. 




16 




17 



SHAY 



Don't you just hate it when people interfere 
in your life and think that they are helping you 
out when they are actually making things 
worse? If so, you're not alone. Shay felt the 
same way. 

Alice Commire's play, Shay, was presented 
on LVC's Little Theatre stage on February 16, 
17 &18. 

Shay, played by Amber Hegi, is a woman 
who is successfully dealing with her problems 
when her children interfere and make her face 
things she wasn't ready to face. 

Kathleen Ryan, director, described the play 
as both "happy" and "extremely tragic". Other 
cast members included B.l. Checket, Tawni 
Niklaus, Tom McClain, Stacy Gilbert, Renato 
Biribin, Sarah Thompson, and Scott Grumling. 





Amber Hegi in the lead role of Shay. 



B.I. Checket displays his talent and love of theatre. 



18 




Up and coming actor Tom McClain. 



Shay has to deal with Scott Grumling. 




Usuals on the LVC stage are Tawni Niklaus and B.J. Checket 



19 



You're A Good Man, Charlie Brown 



Theatre Frontiers, a subcommittee of Wig & 
Buckle Society, presented the Christmas play 
this year, "You're A Good Man, Charlie 
Brown." The play was performed on Decem- 
ber 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. 

Alison Rutter, artistic director of the play, 
explained that Wig & Buckle sponsors these 
independent projects when a member comes 
up with the idea for the play. The music di- 
rector for the play was Bill Guntrum and it was 
co-produced by Marliese Miller and Katherine 
Henry. 

The cast did a great job portraying their 
characters, a number of whom were making 
their debut appearance on the LVC stage. The 
play turned out to be very successful and en- 
tertaining and it was enjoyed by all. It was a 
great way to wrap up the first semester. 



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Lucv let.s Charlie Brown and Linus know who's boss. 




Row 1: Tavio D'Angelis, Mark Benson, Bob Sherman: Row 2: Scott Grumling, Michelle Leddy, Tracey Hendrlckson, Kristen Curran, Brandon Weston, 
Amy Hutton. 



20 




21 




22 




23 



SPRING ARTS FESTIVAL 



Once again this year, Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege hosted its annual Spring Arts Festival. 
The weekend was a huge success. The tem- 
perature was a little too high, but it did not 
hinder the program. Everyone enjoyed the 
arts, crafts, music, and theatre performances 
that made up the contents of the weekend. 

Featured during the festival were the music 
groups Pond Scum, Concert Choir, the College 
Chorus, and H.I.S. Jack Veasey also gave a 
reading of his poetry and a pantomime was on 
hand. The college administration was also in- 
volved in the action; President Synodinos and 
Dean McGill performed "Mr. Emerson and 
Henry" which was written by Dr. Ford. 

The Spring Arts Committee deserves a 
hearty congratulations and thanks for an ex- 
cellent job. All of their hard work throughout 
the year certainly paid off. It was an excellent 
weekend. 




The Concert Choir perfoms in Lirtz Hall after their tour. 




Arts and crafts round out the cultural activities. 



Delta Tau Chi sponsored their Tye-Dye booth. 



24 




Artists were also able to exhibit their work. 



Todd Lenhart performs his sax solo. 




Taking time out from the heat. 



Many children as well as parents enjoyed the 
activities. 



25 



SPRING ARTS FESTIVAL 




lack Veasey gives a reading of his poetry. 



Amber Hegi performs with K.I.S. 



26 




Hi 



s; 




The Jazz Band was a wonderful highlight. 



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lust takin' a break between activities. 




A pantomime was an added attraction. 



Legal Graffitti on campus! 



27 



MUSIC EVENTS 




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28 




29 



STUDENT COUNCIL EVENTS 




Craig Karges — was he really a mind reader? 



The Student Council is a very 
hardworking and dedicated ogranization. 
Each year they spend a lot of time and 
money trying to serve the students on 
this campus in the best way possible; 
through entertainment and information. 
Many students don't stop to think about 
how many special events are sponsored 
by the Student Council. They run the 
movies every week and are in charge of 
each year's homecoming fair, and the an- 
nual Christmas Dance. They also bring 
performers to our stage such as Craig 
Karges, the mind reader and Phil Nee, 
the comedian. They brought a Reggae 
band and Dave Wopat to the Under- 
ground and they sponsored the Life 101 
presentation by Ellen Rosenberg. 

The amount of time and effort that it 
takes to plan and implement these serv- 
ices is often overlooked. We want to say 
thank you to the Student Council for all 
of their hard work and dedication. Al- 
though at times, it may not seem like it, it 
is very much appreciated. 




student Council also sponsored entertainer Dave Wopat. 



30 



CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS 










A face lift for Lynch Gymnasium. 




A new main entrance for Lynch. 






Renovations to the academic quad. 

Last Spring, Lebanon Valley College announced a 
$7.26 million campus improvement plan. Since that time, 
the three-year plan has been put into operation and some 
of the results can be seen today. 

The Administration Building is one of the first struc- 
tures that underwent refurbishing. Improvements made 
to offices, classrooms, and public areas include new 
lighting and carpeting. According to Robert Hamilton, 
Director of Campus Improvement, one reason for the 
refurbishing is sentimentality. The Administration 
Building is an old building and is the main classroom 
building and as such it represents the campus. They also 
intend to center the Humanities Department in the Ad- 
ministration Building once the Math Department is re- 
located to Lynch Gymnasium. 

The Gymnasium is another area that is undergoing 
renovation. The lower level will house improved fa- 
cilities for intercollegiate athletics as well as faculty 
offices. The upper level will provide offices for the math 
and computer science departments as well as two com- 
puter labs. 

As these pictures depict, the campus is in a shambles 
right now, but once all the renovations are done it will 
look great. These inprovements are long overdue and it is 
good to see that they are finally becoming reality. 



31 



WORLD EVENTS 



The Wall Crumbles 

For 28 years it had stood as the symbol of the division between Europe and the world, of Communist suppression,of the 
Xenophobia of a regime that had to lock its people in lest they be tempted by another, freer life — the Berlin Wall, thai 
hideous, 28 mile long scar through the heart of a once proud European capital. And then — poof! — it was gone. No' 
physically, at least yet, but gone as an effective barrier between East and West, opened in one unthinkable, stunning 
stroke to people it had kept apart for more than a generation. It was one of those rare times when the tectonic plates oi 
history shift beneath men's feet and nothing is ever quite the same. 




Noriega On 
Ice 

The last time 
Manuel Noriega 
was in the U.S. 
was in 1985 for a 
luncheon visit 
with the CIA. 
This time he ar- 
rived in hand- 
cuffs and the Jus- 
tice Department 
was his host. The 
U.S. is cracking 
down on drug 
traffickers. He is 
already charged 
with 15 felonies 
and if convicted 
faces up to 210 
years in jail and 
$1 million in 
fines. 




32 




Man of 

the 
Decade 

The 1980's 
came to an end 
in what 

seemed like a 
magic act. The 
shell of an old 
world was 
cracked, yet a 
new order re- 
mained to be 
built. The mas- 
ter politician, 
Mikhail 
Gorbachev, is 
responsible for 
the change in 
U.S. -Soviet re- 
lations. The 
Soviet threat 
isn't what it 
used to be — 
and may never 
be again. 



Vlurder Sparks 
Racism 



When white, affluent Bos- 
)nian, Charles Stuart ac- 
ised a black man of killing 
is pregnant wife, the police 
id media blew everything 
lit of proportion. Stuart's 
:cusation had the police 
isking every black man on 
18 street that looked slight- 
' suspicious and the press 
illing Carol Stuart's death 
racist killing. Stuart's story 
) completely convinced the 
ublic that he shouldn't be a 
aspect, that they held mass 
smonstrations on his be- 
alf. The end, however, 
lund Stuart guilty of mur- 
3r and a whole city that is 
aick to racist judgement. 




— pictures provided by Time 



33 



WORLD EVENTS 



Hugo Wreaks Havoc 



Hurricane Hugo struck South Carolina with a mighty force. This tropical storm caused millions of dollars in damage am 
ravaged the coastline. Inland cities were also hit hard. In fact, the historic city of Charleston was hit the hardest. It wil 
take the residents a long time to fully recover from nature's damage. 




Life for 
Life 

One family is 
fighting public as 
well as legal forc- 
es for what they 
feel is right. Their 
daughter has leu- 
kemia and is un- 
able to find a 
much needed 
bone marrow do- 
nor. The parents 
decided to have 
another baby in 
the hopes of a do- 
nor match. This 
brings up the 
moral issue of life 
for a life. The case 
is still pending. 




34 




^ Flint 


Lake 
Huron 


MICHIGAN 




Detroit > •;- 


CANADA 


20 miies 

1 1 




OHIO 




TIME Map by PJ.P. 



Hollywood 

Touches a 

Touchy 

Subject 



It seems that Hollywood has decided to make a major U.S. Corporation 
tad bit uncomfortable. A new movie release, called Roger & Me, depicts 
e trauma that the city of Flint, Michigan went through when General 
otors pulled out of the town and left most of its citizens jobless. It was 
g news at the time and GM would probably have rather let it drop, but 
is new flick will keep the story alive for a little while longer. 





fe K. 



Pigs for Pets 

What ever happened to owning a dog, cat, 
or even just a goldfish for a pet? One of the 
most popular pets in the last year has been 
the PIG! The poularity of having a pet pig is 
soaring. They are said to be much more 
loyal than dogs and easier to take care of. 
One thing that has to be taken into con- 
sideration, though, when thinking about 
purchasing a pet pig to protect your family, 
is the law. In some places pig ownership is 
illegal. 



Furor over Wearing Furs 

An increasingly common dilemma that 
women are facing today is wearing fur coats. 
Until recently, owning a fur coat, usually a 
mink, was an unquestioned emblem of luxury 
and social status. But lately a growing cadre of 
animal-rights activists have been aggressively 
denouncing such garments as "sadist sym- 
bols" that they say require the deaths of some 
70 million helpless creatures each year. 



35 



36 




37 




Marc Allen 
Spanish/lnt. Business 




SENIORS 



Matthew Andris 
Management 



Senior year in college always brings mixed emotions. 
One emotion is boundless joy at the thought of graduating. 
The other is desperate panic as you wonder how you'll ever 
get everything done in time to graduate. 

No matter what you plan to do after commencement, 
there are things to be done which take time. And one thing 
that college students have learned after four years, is that 
time is always in short supply. There's simply not enough 
time to apply to grad schools or companies, get measured 
for a cap and gown, address graduation announcements, fill 
out the order form for a senior mug, and study for classes. 
So most seniors give up on the whole idea of studying. 

As the year progresses, you develop a list of "lasts." For 
example, the last time you'll pack up for Winter Break. The 
last time you'll need to register for next semester's classes. 
The last time you'll walk past a table where people are 
selling the Quittie. 

In the end, though, after you've passed the last exam, 
written the last paper, had all the fun with your friends that 
you could, after all the lasts, there is a first. For the first 
time, you'll walk across the stage at commencement and 
become a college graduate. 




Robert J. Andrew 
Political Science 




Sandy Aumiller 
Biology 







Laura Baird 
Elementary Ed. 



Thomas Ball 
Recording Technology 



Scott Barlup 
English/Communications 



Lisa Biehl 
Elementary Ed. 






Renato Biribin 
Political Science 



Suzanne D, Bolinsky 
Chemistry 



Lora Bopp 
Elementary Ed. 




Wendy Bord 
Elementary Ed. 



38 




Paula Boyd 
English 




Kerrie Brennan 
Biology 




Stephen Butz 
Social Work 






Anette Boyles 
Sociology/ Psychology 



Kristen Brandt 
Elementary Ed. 




Paul Bruder 
Social Work 





Diane Lee Capece 
Mathematics 



IIdIIv C .irc\ 
Psychology 




Bradley Boyer 
Music 



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John Brenner 
Political Science 




Kirk Cambell 
Hotel Management 



Douglas Scott Carey 
Psychology 




James Carroll 
Management 



39 



SENIORS 



Diane Churan 
Management 




Camille DeClementi 
Biology 



Christine Dellinger 
Chemistry 



40 




Keith Oils 
General Studies 






Marjorie Early 
Elementary Ed. 



41 



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Berneice Eby 
Sacred Music 




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Maria Fenty 
Psychobiology/Psych. 




Peter J. Fowler 
Psychology 




SENIORS 





Maria-Elena Falato 
Political Science 



Melanie Fleek 
Biochemistry 




Sharon Faust 
Biology 





Christopher Frye 
Religion 



John Galvin 
Hotel Management 




Brian Engle 
International Business 




Stephen Ferruzza 
Computer Science 




Donald Friday 
Management 




Joann Giannettino 
Psychology 



Shawn Gingrich | 

Music Ed. /Sacred Music 



42 




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Jill classman 
General Studies 




Michelle Crube 
Psychology/Religion 




Andrew Hamann 
History 






Kathy Graver 
Social Service 



Erica Habel 
International Business 




Tamara Groff 
German 




Linda Hepler 
History 




Jean Marc Hese 
Management 




(,/ 



Allison Cow 
Hotel Management 




Matthew Cuenther 
German/French 




Hassler 
English 




Daryl Hess 
Mathematics 



Elaine Hibbs 
Biology 



43 



SENIORS 




Beverly Kreider 
Music Education 



44 



Glen Landrum 
Sound Recording 




Robert Mikus 
Psychology 



45 




Laura Miller 
Social Work 




Grace Mornsseh 
International Business 




Jennifer Nauman 
Biology 




SENIORS 





Actuarial Science 



Jill Morrett 
Actuarial Science 




Steven Murray 
Mathematics 





Susan Noel 
Management 



Harry S. Oliver III 
Recording Technology 




r 



Marliese Miller 
Sociology 









Timm Moyer 
English/Comm. 




Dwayne Nichols 
Religion 




Jeffrey Osborne 
Mathematics 



Kristie Painter 
Biology 



46 




Susan Partilla 
Hotel Management 




Kdrcn Reilly 
Elementary Ed. 



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Elizabeth Rosser 
Psychobiology 





Connie Pyle 
Psychology 



Sheree Rybak 
Biology 




Lorl Reed 
Music Education 




Chnslme Kissinger 
Biology 





Toni Salam 
English/Sec. Ed. 




Amy PaszkowskI 
Biochemistry 




Scott Richardson 
Social Studies/Sec. Ed. 




Kathleen Ryan 
English 




Pamela Schaadt 
Sacred Music 



Kathy Scheidegger 

Int. Business/Spanish 



47 



SENIORS 



Amy Schmid 
Elementary Ed. 





Brian Smith 
Music Education 




Steven Schrack 
Physics 



David Schell 
Biochemistry 







■J 


Christopher Schwartz 






Sherry Scovell 




Management 




Dawn Shantz 


Biochemistry 








Elementary Ed. 






Edward J. Smith 
Social Work 



Rachel Snyder 
Elementary Ed. 



48 



Michelle Sullivan 
Accounting/Management 




Matthew Vera 
Chemistry 



49 




Laura Wagner 
Social Service 




Catherine Wheeler 
Music Education 




Kenneth Wilson 
Comp. Inf. Sys./Acct. 




SENIORS 





Earl Weaver 
Computer Science 



Candace Wheedleton 
Music Education 




David Wilson 
Sound Recording Tech. 





Edward Wirth 
Biochemistry 



Annie Wolf 
English/Comm. 




Cynthia Watson 
Elementary Ed. /Psych. 




Stefanie Wilds 
Management 




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Mary Wilson 
Mathematics 




Jeffrey Wolff 
Computer Science 



Eyako Wurapa 
Biology 



50 



SENIOR AWARDS 



BAISH MEMORIAL HISTORY AWARD Scott Allen Richardson 

PI GAMMA MU SCHOLARSHIP AWARD Maria Elena Falato 

ANDREW BENDER MEMORIAL CHEMISTRY AWARD Melanie Ann Fleek 

SOUTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA SECTION, AMERICAN 

CHEMICAL SOCIETY AWARD Matthew Douglas Vera 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTRY AWARD (PHILADELPHIA CHAPTER) Amy Lynn Paszkowski 

M. CLAUDE ROSENBERRY MEMORIAL AWARD Susan Marie Spadjinske 

SIGMA ALPHA IOTA HONOR CERTIFICATE AWARD Pamela Beth Schaadt 

OUTSTANDING SENIOR OF DELTA ALPHA CHAPTER, SIGMA ALPHA IOTA AWARD Lori Ann Reed 

EDITH FRANTZ MILLS AWARD IN MUSIC Timothy J. Eck 

REYNALDO ROVERS MEMORIAL AWARD Beverly Kreider 

GOVERNOR JAMES H. DUFF AWARD John Stuart Brenner 

B'NAI B'RITH HENRY LEVIN MEMORIAL AMERICANISM AWARD John Stuart Brenner 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION CLUB AWARD Cheryl Lynn Lambert 

FRANCIS H. WILSON MEMORIAL BIOLOGY AWARD James F. Dillman III 

MARTHA C. FAUST MEMORIAL AWARD Camille DeClementi 

RHO ETA CAST OF ALPHA PSI OMEGA AWARD Catherine Ruth Wheeler 

SENIOR PRIZE IN ENGLISH Kathleen Marie Ryan 

WALL STREET JOURNAL AWARD Brian Lee Engle 

ACHIEVEMENT SCHOLARSHIP AWARD IN MANAGEMENT Brian Lee Engle & Rory Carl Hertzog 

SACRED MUSIC AWARD Shawn Michael Gingrich 

ELIZABETH MAY MEYER AWARD Bradley Paul Boyer 

BARBARA JUNE KETTERING AWARD Shawn Michael Gingrich 

OUTSTANDING SENIOR IN MATHEMATICS AWARD Mary Catherine Wilson 

OUTSTANDING SENIOR IN ACTUARIAL SCIENCE AWARD Amy Jean Himmelberger 

OUTSTANDING SENIOR IN COMPUTER SCIENCE AWARD Earl Robert Weaver II 

JEAN O. LOVE AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT 

IN PSYCHOLOGY Teresa Mary Kruger & Connie Lynn Pyle 

PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT LEADERSHIP AWARD Robert L. Mikus 

PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT AWARD FOR SERVICE Holly Lynn Carey 

ROBERT S. DAVIDON AWARD FOR RESEARCH IN 

PSYCHOLOGY Kevin Brian Dempsey & Robyn Marie Cashmore 

DAVID E. LONG/ ABRAM M. LONG MEMORIAL MINISTERIAL SCHOLARSHIP AWARD Lisa Kaye Kerlin 

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN BIBLICAL STUDIES AWARD Jane Hershey Mark 

TEUTONIA VALLIS AWARD Matthew Steinman Guenther 

CONRAD M. SIEGEL ACTUARIAL EXAMINATION PRIZE Amy Jean Himmelberger 

PRESSER SCHOLARSHIP AWARD Dina Michelle Carter 

WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS IN AMERICAN COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES: Robert Joseph Andrew, 
Matthew James Andris, Sandra Kay Aumiller, Renato R. Biribin Jr., John Stuart Brenner, Stephen Daniel Butz, Dina 
Michelle Carter, Angela Marie Davis, Benjamin Andrew Deardorff, Camille DeClementi, Kevin Brian Dempsey, 
Heidi Lynn Derhammer, William Dunfee Dietz Jr., James F. Dillman III, Brian Lee Engle, Maria Lynn Fenty, Melanie 
Ann Fleek, Shawn Michael Gingrich, Tamara Sue Groff, Michelle Sue Grube, Matthew Steinman Guenther, Amy 
Jean Himmelberger, Laura Carol Judd, Teresa Mary Kruger, Jennifer Lynn Nauman, Dwayne Dennis Nichols, Jeffrey 
Duane Osborne, Connie Lynn Pyle, Charles James Rusconi, Kathleen Marie Ryan, Sheree Lynn Rybak, Toni Ruth 
Salam, Stephen William Trapnell, Mary Catherine Wilson, Matthew Douglas Vera 





51 



GRADUATION . . . May 12, 1990 



This year's Baccalaureate and Commence- 
ment took place on May 12. It was a joyous yet 
sad occasion for all involved. Faculty mem- 
bers had to say good-bye to some of their 
favorite students; underclassmen had to say 
good-bye to some of their best friends; parents 
finally had to admit that their children have 
grown into fine young men and women, and 
the class of 1990 had to say farewell to the life 
they had built for themselves here at LVC and 
start all over again. 

The class of 1990 made many contributions 
to our small community. They were respon- 
sible for much of the leadership on campus 
and it will be difficult to replace them. Those 
of us left here at LVC wish all of them the best 
of luck and hope that they reach their goals. If 
they continue to follow the solid road that 
they began at Lebanon Valley, their destina- 
tion is sure to be the one of their dreams. 




Faculty and soon-to-be graduates process to their seats. 




Christy Milliken performs with the Symphonic 
Band. 



Laura Baird walks off the stage after having just received her degree. 



52 




Rev. Wurapa has the honor of pinning his son, Eyako, with the medal. 



Laurabeth Shearer and graduate, Lisa Biehl, cel- 
ebrate this day together. 



53 



CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 1990!! 




In the summer of 1987, Chris Fretz, a member of the 
class of 1990 died in a car accident. The graduates would 
like to remember Chris as part of their class and although 
hewasn't able to be with them physically, they know he 
was there in spirit. They knew Chris for less than a year, 
but in that time he became a very important part of many 
people's lives. He was the secretary of their Freshmen 
class, a Philo brother, and a member of the Track and 
Field and Cross Country teams. Chris was a very en- 
thusiastic and energetic person. While he was here, he 
became involved and made a difference. 

This photograph of Chris sitting on a bunk bed peering 
down at the camera seems to be the most appropriate for 
this dedication. Not only does it allow the seniors a way 
to remember Chris but it is almost as if he is looking 
down from above giving thumbs up to the graduating 
class of 1990. 




President Synodinos congratulates Bob Sherman. 




Edward Dema celebrates with his family 



I, *^ 

John Kline receives his diploma from President Synodinos. 



54 




President Synodinos welcomes the keynote speaker. Senator Paul Sarbanes. 



Dean McGill speaks to the audience. 




i- 



% 







.♦• ijf* 



class President, Kevin Dempsey, says a few words. 



President Synodinos presents the keynote speaker. 



55 



56 




57 




Jodi Bupp 




JUNIORS 




Joyce Attix 



ife. JlSt' 



Ian Bonner 



^ 


1 


^BV*^ ^ 


# ^ 


PBP^^ . ■*,- 




li; ^T'" A 


L 


.^.-V*.*/- . * «- * * « '■> '.A 



Tracey Brass 



Blaine Connor 



Keith Copenhaver 



Kristen Curran 



Ann Deitrich 



Melissa Askey 




Jennifer Devine 




Wendy Durham 



Jean-Paul Duvall 



58 







Thomas Ciovinazzo 



William Guntrum 



Glen Gangewer 




Kelly Green 



Rachel Crella 



Kristan Foster 



Scott Grumling 




lames Haine 



Wendy Halliday 




Katherine Henry 






Christopher Hills 



Adam Hostetler 



Brian Fernanies 




Kathy Guindon 




« •v.'^ 



^ 



Andrew Hildebrand 




Eric Howson 




59 



JUNIORS 




Tammy Knerr 



Michelle Leddy 



Douglas Mancini 



Alison Rutter 



/ J 





Michelle Kunz 








Michael Landis 






\ -"- 



Todd Lenhart 




Michael Lichtenwalner 



^^- "iS^ f " 



'* 



Sarah Miller 




William Moore 



Sean Phenicie 



Debra Reagle 



loan Landis 



Raymond Muller 



Brendalyn Krysiak 





Dave Sandler 



60 




Stephanie Schumaker 



Debra Stoudt 



David Stover 



^ -1 

t 

Michael Slechta 



a^ 



Albert Senft 



Lynn Smith 




Kelly Stuckey 



Kevin Thomas 



Michael Tighe 




Jay Yoder 



Steven Young 



61 



JUNIORS 





Michael Zettlemoyer 



Mary Beth Ziegenfuss 




Leslie Strauss and Judy Baron enjoy a break in the weather, 



^ud^ 



'iSLi 



Junior Deb Clarke chats with Susanna Fowler. 





Keith Copenhaver and Andy Wangman give their cameras a rest. 



There are two words that come to mind when one thinks 
about junior year; anticipation and apprehension. Junior year 
is tough. You can't wait for the year to pass just so you can say 
you're a senior yet you are quite apprehensive about what the 
future has in store. You've almost made it through, but the 
worst is still ahead of you. 

There are decisions to be made. Do you want to go to 
graduate school or work in the real world? Sure you have a 
year to decide what you want to do with the rest of your life, 
but that year goes by fast. What about all of those GE classes 
you've put off for two years? It's time to face them if you want 
to graduate on time. 

As juniors you're not on top yet, but your on your way. 
When you return in the fall and say you've made it to your 
senior year, just think, it's time to count down to the day you 
can say "I've made it, I've graduated!" 



62 



SOPHOMORES 




Michael Bodine 



Kimberly Bolden 



Marianne Boltz 



Danielle Bowen 



John C. Bowerman 




Jl^^ 


swr 


c^ 




/-^ t 




^ 


^ 




Jennifer Bragunier 



Byron Brought 



Tiffany Brown 



Daniel Bruno 



Angela Carl 





William Checket 



Laurie Clarke 



John Conrad 



63 



SOPHOMORES 




Hille Craig 



Kristin Davis 




Nicole Dennis 



1 ^ 

Sheryl Drake 




Michael Dubbs 



Gloria Dyer 



Travis Emig 




Sally Fegan 



Amy Ferree 



Danielle Fetters 



Patty Fleetwood 



Kathryn Ford 




Amy Glavey 



Joanne Grajewski 



64 




Nicole Grove 



.^^^Hp^^-. t ^H 


[ 


J^^HRE* *"*^ ■ 


^L 


^^■^ ^ 1 


^^B^ 


^^^^^1 ,^,'v ^M 


H 


DHhhH 


HPf^v ■ 


l^>^3 


s 



Amber Hegi 




William Hoefling 





Stephanie Juracka 



Wendy Kiehl 



Brad Kintzer 



65 



SOPHOMORES 





Laurie "L.J." La Barre 



Lesley Laudermilch 



Cherie Lingle 





Donna Longcoy 



Stacey Marker 



Eric Martin 



Michelle May 



Tom McClain 




Pamela Merther 



Alyson Neiswender 






^h. 




dwni Niklaus 



Gary Nolan 



Lori Nyce 




■*ii i 



Robert Petro 



Molly Rasmussen 



66 






Lori Rothermel 



Ridgley Salter 



Susan Sarisky 




Keith Schleicher 






Timothy Schwarz 



1 



i 



Kimberly Shaffer 



Andrew Shearer 



.. . 


•• * 


i-1it^^- 


r/Pv !*■ 





Michael Rose 




Laurabeth Shearer 



Michael Smith 




Shawn Snavely 



Kimberly Sollenberger Leanne Stansfield 




Jeffrey Stouter 




David Stimpson 





Stacey Straub 



t 



■^ 



Suzanne Szoszorek 



Stephen Teitelman 



67 



SOPHOMORES 




Sarah Thompson 



Diane Tuman 



Edward Vanlandeghem Christa Wachinski 




Robert Weaver 




Sophomore, Jill Hamilton smiles for the camera. 



What can one say about the sophomore class here at good ol' 
Lebanon Valley College? We feel as though we've been here 
forever, yet, class standing wise, we're still very low on the 
totem pole. But the fact that we feel so at home on campus and 
are still relatively young is a very good thing. We are in a 
position to help LVC change and grow in a positive direction. 
Our input and work will be very important in the future 
development of the college. And once we are seniors and look 
back at how our school has adapted and improved, we can 
take pride in knowing that we have helped change the course 
of LVC! 



Lesley Laudermilch looking "cool 



68 



FRESHMEN 




Jennifer Ambrose ' # -s 

Melissa Atkins 




W^ ^ 



1f \ 




Bryan Barbier 



Amy Batman 



nnifer Arnett 




Paul Dissinger 



Tracy Day 



Kimberly Eames 



69 



FRESHMEN 





Deborah Ferris 




Kate Eshbach 



Jennifer Finger 




Mark Fink 




Scott Fiscus 



Lori Folk 



Stacy Gilbert 



Christopher Graver 




Michelle Hnulz 



z'- 




^ A 



Tracey Hendrickson 




V 




John Hurd 



Theodore Jones 



70 




^>*s 




Marie Landis 



Gregory Kutz 



Challls Lee 




Heather Ondik 



Dreama O'Neal 



71 




Suzann Rajkovac 




Andrea Shaffer 



FRESHMEN 




Alicia Petruska 



Sharon Poplau 



■^'■*^ 






Heather Rimmer 




Ji^ 




Laura Shepler 



Richard Shoaf 



Denise Snyder 



Linda Sterner 




Paul Walters 



Ronda Weller 



72 




Jon Wescott 



David Wright 



Greta Yocum 



Christopher Yong 



Denise York 





Scott Stone wonders who was at his door. 



Justine Hamilton tries her hand at magic. 




pN POPCORN \^(m 




John Digiho and Mark Fink represent the French Club. 



Arriving at college is one of the most nerve-racking 
experiences one faces in their college career, second only 
to walking across the stage at graduation. The first day is 
tough but when you look back, you realize that even 
though there was a knot the size of Texas in your gut, 
you did have fun. 

You soon come to realize that everyone on your hall 
isn't a senior and you are no longer afraid to talk to them. 
You quickly learn from upperclassmen what classes to 
take with which professors, what fraternities and so- 
rorities are all about, and who is 21. You begin to get 
involved in different organizations, create solid friend- 
ships, and discover exactly who you are. 

Freshmen year starts out on shaky ground. You sud- 
denly have to live on your own away from home. It is 
nothing like high school and you wonder what is ex- 
pected of you. Slowly though, you begin to make friends, 
you get to know your professors, and you begin to con- 
sider college to be your home away from home. 



73 



74 




75 




It was on December 4th of 1988 that John A. Synodinos was inaugurated as the 
fifteenth president of Lebanon Valley College. Now, more than two years later, he is at 
the helm of a college that is going, and has gone, through many changes. 

Since his arrival here, two dormitories have been renovated, a new roof has been 
placed on Blair Music Center, the East Dining Hall has been renovated. Lynch Gym- 
nasium has received a face lift, and extensive work was done on the Administration 
Building; but the changes don't stop there. In the future, there are plans for over 
$500,000 worth of landscaping to be done and all dormitories are scheduled to be 
renovated. 

This is a fine list of accomplishments, and this list is not nearly complete; President 
Synodinos makes it very clear, though, that these are not his accomplishments alone, 
but accomplishments of the entire college. He hopes that these improvements will 
continue to better the college and benefit its students. (One of his plans is to slow down 
the rate of tuition increases — which is good news for anyone reading this yearbook!) 

Finally, as he looks back at his time here at LVC, the president has only good things to 
say: "I can't imagine a gift greater than being a part of this institution." 



76 





(tlv 



Dr, George A. Marquette 

Vice President for Student Attairs 

Dean of Students 



Dr. William |. McGill 
Vice President 
Dean ot f atullv 



Mr. Gregory G, Stanson 

Dean of Enrollment 
Management Services 



Miss Rosemary Yuhas 
Associate Dean ot Students 





n 




ADMINISTRATION 



Ms. Carol Admundsen 

Asst. Dir. of Student Activities & 

Residential Life 



Ms. Ruth E. Andersen 
Asst. Director of Financial Aid 



Miss Melissa J. Andrews 
Admissions Counselor 



Dr. Howard L. Applegate 
Secretary of the College 




"Nature abhors a vacuum so 
she fills some heads with saw- 
dust." 

--- sophomore class of 1907 



"The world knows nothing of 
its greatest men." 
— W. E. Harnish 




Mr. William J. Brown, Jr. 
Dir. of Financial Aid 
Asst. Dean of Admissions 



"Knowledge is proud that he 
has learned so much." 
— Unknown I 



ADMINISTRATION 



"Of their own merit modest 
men are dumb." 
— C.R. Bender 



Mr. David C. Evans 
Director of Career Planning & Placement 





Mr. Patrick J. Flannery 
Basketball/Asst. Baseball Coach 



Miss Jodi Lyn Foster 
Women's Basketball Coach 
Women's Track & Field Coach 



Mrs. Deborah R. Fullam 
Asst. to the President for Budget & Planning 



Mr. Ronald K. Good 
Assistant Dean of Admissions 




"Beholding the bright counte- 
nance of truth in the quiet and 
still air of delightful studies." 
— Milton 



Dr. Robert E. Hamilton 
Vice President for Administration, Controller 





Mr. Robert E. Harnish 
College Store Manager 



Miss Elaine D. Hayden 
Director of Continuing Education 





Mr. William E. Hough, III 
The Librarian 



Mr. George F. Lovell, )r. 
Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds 



f 




/' 



i 





ADMINISTRATION 




Mr. Daniel B. McKinley 
Dir. of Leadership Studies 
Asst. Prof, of Leadership Studies 



Mr. James P. Monos, Jr. 
Head Football Coach 
Admissions Counselor 



Ms. Judy Pehrson 

Director of College Relations 




Mr. Robert A. Riley 

Director of Computer Services 



Mrs. Donna L. Miller 
Readers' Services Librarian 




^^ 



\t m 



Mr. Russell J. Owens ' ^■" 
Supervisor of Program Services 
at Arnold Sports Center 



Mrs. Susan Caldwell Riehl 

Director of Community Services 

Adjunct Instructor of Music 



Mr. Stephen Shoop 
Technical Coordinator, Computer Services 








"We are such stuff as dreams 
are made on; and our little life 
is rounded with a sleep." 
--- Shakespeare 



Dr. John A. Smith 

Chaplain, Church Relations Officer 



Rev. Msgr. Thomas H. Smith 
Adjunct College Chaplain 



Ms. Virginia L. Solomon 
Assistant Director of Media Services 





Mr. Louis A. Sorrentino 
Director of Athletics 



Ms. Kathleen M. Tierney 
Women's Field Hockey Coach 
Softball Coach 



Mr. John J. Uhl 

Director of Media Services 

Lecturer in Sound Recording Technology 



"My mind to me a kingdom is. 
— Unknown 




ADMINISTRATION 



"Look at all things as they are 
but through a kind of glory." - 
- Unknown 



Mr. Dane A. Wolfe 
Associate Controller 





Miss Juliana M. Wolfe 
fe I ^ Head College Nurse 



"Tis better to have loved and 
lost than never to have loved 
at all." — Tennyson 



Office of Advancement 



Row 1: Richard F. Charles, Vice Pres- 
ident of Advancement; C. Paul Brubaker, 
Director of Planned Giving; Ingeborg M. 
Snoke, Records & Research Assistant; 
Marilyn E. Boeshore, Alumni Secretary; 
Diana L. Levengood, Annual Giving Sec- 
retary; Bonita L. Lingle, Communications 
Secretary; Ellen H. Arnold, Director of 
Annual Giving; Jo Lynn Gerber, Devel- 
opment Secretary; Row 2: John B. 
Deamer, Director of Public Information; 
Dawn T. Thren, Director of Publications; 
Mary Jean Bishop, Director of Alumni 
and Parents Programs; Naomi R. Emer- 
ich, Gifts Processing Coordinator; Monica 
E. Kreiser, Director of Special Events; 
Timothy M. Ebersole, Sports Information 
Director; Christine M. Reeves, Advance- 
ment Secretary; Matthew A. Hugg, Di- 
rector of Development; Not Pictured: 
Judy L. Pehrson, Director of College Re- 
lations 



84 





FACULTY 



Dr. Madelyn J. Albrecht 
Associate Professor of Education 



Mrs. Sharon O. Arnold 
Associate Professor of Sociology 




Dr. Susan L. Atkinson 
Assistant Professor of Education 



Dr. Philip A. Billings 
Professor of English 




Mr. Donald C. Boone 

Asst. Professor of Hotel Management 



Dr. James H. Broussard 
Professor of History/Dept. Chair 




"SUiW- 



"A document in madness, 
thoughts and remembrance fit- 
ted." 
— Shakespeare 



Dr. Donald E. Byrne 

Professor of Religion 

Director of American Studies 




FACULTY 




Dr. Voorhis C. Cantrell 
Professor ol Religion & Creek 



Dr. Sharon F. Clark »^5 ^_ 
Asst. Prolessor ot Mgmt./Dept. Chair m 




K 






Dr. Richard D. Cornelius 
Professor of Chemistry/Dept. Chair 




c 



Dr. George D. Curfman 
Professor of Music/Interim Chair 




Dr. Michael A. Day 
Associate Professor of Physics 
Director of Honors Program 



Dr. Salvatore S. Cullarl 
Asst. Professor of Psychology 



Dr. Donald B. Dahlberg 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Dr. Phyhs C. Dryden 
Asst. Professor of English 










Dr. Scott H. Eggert 
Asst. Professor of Music 



"I Dr. Dale]. Erskine 

Associate Professor of Biology 
DIr. of Youth Scholars Prograrr 



Miss Susan L. Egner 
Instructor of Spanish 




Mr William H. Fairlamb 
Professor of Music 





Dr. Arthur L. Ford 
Professor of English 




Ms. Eileen \. Frankland 
.Asst. Professor of Sociology & Social Work 



Dr. Michael D. Fry 

Asst. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 



Dr. Pierce A. Cetz 
Professor of Music 



"T 




FACULTY 



Dr. Michael A. Crella 

Associate Professor of Education/Dept. Chair 



.V 




^iil 




Dr. Klement M. Hambourg 
Associate Professor of Music 




Dr. Carolyn R. Hanes 

Professor of Sociology & Social Work 

Department Chair 



Dr. Bryan Hearsey 
Professor of Mathematical Sciences 




Dr. Robert H. Hearson 
Assistant Professor of Music 



Dr. John H. Heffner 
Professor of Philosophy/Dept. Chair 




Dr. Jeanne C. Hey 

Assistant Professor of Economics 








Dr. Barry L. Hurst 
Assistant Professor of Physics/Dept. Chair 





Dr. Diane M. Iglesias 

Professor of Spanish/Dept. Chair 




Mr. Richard A. Joyce 
Associate Professor of History 







Mr. Michael R. Kohler 
Instructor of Music 




Mr. Richard A. Iskowitz 
Professor of Art/Dept. Chair 




Dr. )ohn P. Kearney 
Professor of English/Dept. Chair 




Mr. Edward H. Krebs 
Assistant Professor of Economics 




Dr. David I. Lasky 

Professor of Psychology/Dept. Chair 



Mr. Robert W. Leonard 
Assistant Professor of Management 





FACULTY 




'^^ 



Dr. Frederick H. MaidmenI 
Associate Professor of Management 



Dr. Leon E. Markowicz 
Professor of Leadership Studies 






Dr. Joerg W. P. Mayer 

Professor of Mathematical Sciences 



^.-B- 



Dr. Owen A. Moe, |r. |), 
Professor of Chemistry 




Mr. Philip G. Morgan 
Asst. Professor of Music 



Dr. John D. Norton, III _ 
Professor of Political Science ~-^ ^ 
Political Science & Economics Dept. Chair 




Dr. Ian Pedersen 

Asst. Professor of Psychology 



Dr. Sidney Pollack 
Professor of Biology 











Mr. O, Kent Reed 

Assoc. Professor ol Phys. Ed./Depl. Chair 



Af^ ' 



Ms. Gail A. Sanderson 

Asst. Professor of Accounting 



Dr. Stepfien R Sexsmitti 
Asst. Professor of Chemistry 




Mme. loelle Lemerle Stopkie 
Asst. Professor of French 



Dr. C. Robert Rose 
Associate Professor of Music 




Dr. lames W. Scott 
Professor of German 




Dr. Stephen M. Spec hi 
Asst. Professor of Psychology 




Dr. Dennis W. Sweigart 
Associate Professor of Music 




FACULTY 



Mr. Warren K. A. Thompson 
Associate Professor of Phllosopliy 




Mr. [Horace W. Tousley 

Asst. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 

Department Chair 



Dr. Mark A. Townsend 

Asst. Professor of Mathematical Sciences 



Dr. Susan E. Verhoek 
Protessor ot Biology 




Dr. Stephen E. Williams 
Professor of Biology 




Dr. Perry |. Troutman 
Professor of Religion 




Mrs, lacqueline |. Vivelo 
Instructor of English 




Mrs. Barbara S. Wirth 
Asst. Professor of Accounting 





93 




In Memorium 



On November 1, 1989, Lebanon Valley College lost a dedicated member of its staff and a 
good friend, Mrs. Joyce A. Guerrisi. 

Mrs. Guerrisi began her career at the college ten years ago when she became a secretary 
in the Registrar's Office. After serving the college and its students for a decade, she was 
promoted to Assistant Registrar in the Spring of 1989. 

"It was a recognition of the major contribution she made to the office," said Dr. Howard 
Applegate, Secretary of the College and Acting Registrar. He added that Mrs. Guerrisi's 
new position was an indication of the leadership role she would play in making the 
Registrar's Office more efficient. Mrs. Guerrisi had a talent for balancing the demands for 
efficiency in the Registrar's Office with a concern for students. 

Mrs. Guerrisi's concern extended beyond the college and into the community. An active 
member of St. Paul the Apostle Church in Annville, Mrs. Guerrisi also attended Catholic 
Masses on campus. She enjoyed visiting art museums, amateur photography and traveling. 

She was the wife of Henry J. Guerrisi and the mother of five children. Mrs. Guerrisi also 
had three grandchildren. 

In addition to her own family, Mrs. "Guerrisi had an extended family here at Lebanon 
Valley College. Her committment and dedication to the college and its programs will live 
on in the memories of that family. 



DR. ARTHUR FORD: BRIGHT AND FULL OF 

EXPERIENCE 



■III!!! 




Dr. Arthur Ford, Professor of English at LVC and recently appointed Associate Academic Dean, has 
experienced two Fulbright Scholarships in the past five years. Dr. Ford, an LVC graduate, received his 
doctorate degree from Bowling Creen University in 1964 and soon returned to LVC to teach. 

In 1984, he was awarded his first Fulbright Scholarship and went to teach American Literature at 
Damascus University in Syria. Dr. Ford taught about 2,000 students there — between 400 and 500 students 
in each class. The only exam given was the final exam. According to Dr. Ford, only about 1,400 of those 
students took that exam, of which 65% failed. It took him nearly one month to correct all of the written 
exams. He says the failure had much to do with the students' lack of English skills. Nevertheless, he taught 
"whoever showed up." 

The Syrians took very well to Dr. Ford. "I was well-received. The students seemed fascinated with me." 
Dr. Ford also said, "The people never associated me with the American government and they didn't 
connect themselves with their government either. The students were very pleasant." 

After returning to LVC and continuing his teaching. Dr. Ford received his second Fulbright Scholarship 
in 1988 for a lectureship at Nanjing University in China. He decided to apply for this particular Fulbright 
since it had recently opened up. He describes his first semester, between September 1988 and January 
1989, as "fairly uneventful and ordinary." Dr. Ford said the students were very eager and enthusiastic to 
learn. "I spent many evenings with the students." 

In the middle of April, the student movement began. Class and group boycotts surfaced as well as 
hunger strikes in the streets. Students stopped coming to class and didn't finish the semester. "The 
students would still come over to my home to talk," Dr. Ford noted. 

Martial law was soon declared. "It became pretty obvious that the students were going to get clobbered," 
said Dr. Ford. When the first massacre took place on June 4, Dr. Ford said everyone was "stunned and 
shocked" with blank stares on their faces. 

Dr. Ford and his wife left China on June 9. 1989, a couple of weeks before their original departure date. 
During the last few days of their stay, they saw the cover-up begin on Chinese television. The Chinese 
government insisted that nothing happened — that there were "just a few revolutionaries killed." The 
U.S. State Department put a notice on "Voice of America" advising all Americans to leave the country. 

In June 1990, Dr. Ford headed a reunion of Fulbright Scholars which took place at LVC, marking the first 
anniversary of the massacre in China. 



95 



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i.i.j^i.5iis.Jla,: 








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96 





97 



SCIENCE ORGANIZATIONS 



Biology Club 




;S-mMgli^i3M^im»s.SSS^S^S^:; 



Row 1: Marianne Boltz, Tammy O'Roark, Sheryl Drake, Officer; Adam Hosteller, Treasurer 
Tracey Hendrickson, MarkeHa Saliaris; Row 2: Blaine Connor, Kenneth lones, Gloria Dyer, 
Kathy Guindon, John Perozich, Peter Fodor, Daniel Bruno, Kim Sollenberger, Kristie Zanga 
Mike Dubbs; Row 3; Amy Bonser, Dina Litzenberger. 




Row 1: Matt Vera, President; Amy Paszkow,ki. "i k e- President; |udy Barron, Carl Fortna, 
Treasurer; Row 2: Lori Rothermel, Denise Kulp, David Schell, |eff Stouter, Sue Kazinski, 
Blame Connor, Sue Bolmsky, Jeanne Adams, Stephen Sexsmith, Advisor; Not Pictured: 
Melanie Fleek, Secretary; Adam FHostetler, Travis Emig, Chris Dellinger, Bob Sherman, Karia 
Ritlle. 



Chemistry Club 



The Chemistry Club is Lebanon Valley Cc 
lege's student affiliate of the American Cher 
ical Society. All interested students of ai 
major are invited to join. Interested membe 
of the club travel to various chemistry co 
ventions and meetings such as the Easte 
Analytical Symposium and the Pittsburg Co 
ference. Such meetings allow faculty and st 
dents alike to keep abreast of new techniqu 
and equipment used in chemical researc 
The group often travels to commercial la 
oratories or chemical industries so that st 
dents can see how chemistry is being us 
outside the academic world. 

The Chemistry Club and the Department 
Chemistry sponsor a chemical instrumenlii 
tion workshop for high school students in ti 
spring of each year. The high school studei 
perform one of several experiments design 
by LVC faculty and students. 



98 




Society of Physics 
Students 

The Society of Physics Students (SPS) at 
Lebanon Valley College received its charter in 
1968 and is an academic organization with the 
purpose of expanding the knowledge of Phys- 
ics to its members and community. 

Our purpose is achieved by holding four or 
five public seminars on various topics, taking 
trips to other institutions or research facilities 
and holding Career Day for high schools stu- 
dents. 

The club consists mainl\- of Physics major, 
but any interested students are welcome to 
join. 



iw 1: Doug Zook, )oe Souders, Michael Bell, Rolt Steinke. Treasurer: |a\ Noder, President; 
:tavio D'Angelis: Not Pictured: Mike Home, Bill Woodward, Chris Pope, Durran Schultz, 
lacio Buriel. Dr. Da\ & Dr, Hurst Advisors 



Psychology Club 



The Psychology Club is open to both major 
id non-major students who are interested in 
e field of psychology. A growing organiza- 
Dn, the Psychology Club has sponsored guest 
leakers, picnics, and other events designed to 
(courage student interaction. This year the 
fjb sponsored seminars regarding careers for 
ychology majors and the process of selecting 
id applying to graduate programs. 
A major event for members of the Psychol- 
y Club was attending the Eastern Psycho- 
gical Association (EPA) Conference. This 
jar's conference was held in Philadelphia, 
pere students attended lectures, poster ses- 
pns, and seminars. They had an opportunity 
meet with well known psychologists as well 
■ other undergraduates from all over the 
jistern United States. 




Row 1: Connie P\ le. Treasurer; Bob Mikus, President; Rachel Grella, Secretary; Row 2: 
Annette Bovles, Tina Clymer, Maria Fent\', Teri kruger. 



SCIENCE ORGANIZATIONS 



99 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 



CRO 



The Council of Religious Organizations, 
formed late in 1984, has assumed responsi- 
bilities for coordinating religious life on cam- 
pus. The council meets bi-monthly and often 
more frequently. Current members are PROI- 
ECT, Delta Tau Chi, FCA, Newman Club, 
H.I.S, and Rainbow Troupe. 

The council is authorized to sponsor events, 
encourage joint planning, and assist member 
organizations with their own programs. The 
council is the official sponsor of campus wor- 
ship services, which are usually held on Sun- 
day evenings. The council is also responsible 
for "Light in the Valley," a March Weekend 
featuring Christian music, speakers, and sem- 
inars. 




Row 1; Laura )udd, Vice-President; Wendy Durham, Secretary; Brian Engle, President; Mar^ 
Catharine Wilson, Co-Treasurer; Row 2: Amy Paszkowski, Rachel Crella, Tricia Haeusler, 
Kathleen Ryan, Eric Howson, Tim Butz, Becky Snyder, Diann Tuman, Laurabeth Shearer; N 
Pictured; Dwayne Nichols, Co-Treasurer; Karen Beres, Kris Curran, Steve Butz, Ted |ones. 




Newman Club 

The Newman Club is a newly formed Cat 
olic organization on the LVC campus. Toget 
er we hope to grow in our spiritual lives 1 
planning programs and discussing topics pe 
tinent to the practice of our faith. Anyone 
welcome to join. 



Mary tllen Cvi|ic, Kathleen Ryan, President; |ohn Busedu, Treasurer; Kim Bolden, Secretary; 
Rachel Grella, Vice President; Not Pictured; Bob Mikus, Matt Andris, Ian Boner, Ken 
Krawchuk. 



100 




Fellowship of Christian 
Athletes 



:ow 1: \.\endv kiehl, Aiii\ P.ibzkuubki, Co-Preiident; Tricia Haeusler, Lu-Prcbidunl; Lviiii 
chwalm; Row 2; lay Yoder, Brian Engle, Ted lones, Keith Schleicher, ]enniler Leone, Tim 
lutz, Christopher Krpata. 



H.l.S. 

H.I.S. is a contemporary christian band com- 
)osed of students brought together by the love 
if music and the love of the Lord. H.I.S. stands 
or He Is Savior. They join to sing their praises 
the Lord in area churches and our own 
:ampus of LVC. 





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Row 1: |im Ruddy; Row 2: Rob Weaver, Nicole Grove, Karen Beres, President; Pam Schaadt; 
Row 3: |im Dillman, Ray Muller, Eric D. Martin, Dan Boyer; Not Pictured: Amber Hegi, 
Michelle Crube. 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 



101 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 



PROJECT 



PROJECT stands for People's Response on 
Jesus' Experience as a Community Together. 
AltJiougli PROJECT is a predominantly Chris- 
tian organization, one does not have to belong 
to a particular faith in order to be a member. 

As an organization, we try to promote a 
spirit of love throughout the LVC community 
as well as the world around us. We try to 
provide activities that are fun, but at the same 
time contribute to the spiritual growth and 
development of all who attend. 




Row 1 : Timothy Butz, CRO Representative; Becky Snyder, President; Dina Litzenberger, 
Vice-President; Lynn Schwalm; Row 2: Michelle Kunz, Michael Slechta, John Lauffer, Eric 
Howson, Keith Schleicher, Kathy Cuindon, Ted Jones, Amy Bonser, Robyn Ulmer 




Rainbow Troupe 



Row 1: Ray "Sunshine" Muller; Row 2: Beth "Blossom" Rosser, Diane "Sparkle" Tuman, 
Kristen "Harmony" Curran; Row 3: John "Maybe" Bowerman, Timothy "Dreamer" Butz; 
Not Pictured: Becky "Button" Snyder, Christy "Trill" Milliken 



102 




Class of 1990 Officers 



Kevin Dempsey, President; Sandy Aumiller, Secretary; Melanie Fleek, Treasurer; Not 
Pictured: Ben Deardorff, Vice President 



Class of 1991 Officers 




|ohn Busedu, Secretary; jean Paul Duvall, President; Brian Wassell, Treasurer; Mary Beth 
Ziegenfuss, Vice President 



STUDENT LEADERS 



103 



STUDENT LEADERS 



Class of 1992 Officers 




Suzanne Szoszorek, Treasurer; Ridgely Salter, President; Patty Fleetwood, Vice President; 
Jim Marion, Secretary 




Class of 1993 Officers 



Jennifer Carter, Treasurer; Melinda Wachinski, Secretary; Not Pictured: Timothy Mitzel, 
President; Douglas Kennedy, Vice President 



104 




Student Council 



?ow 1: Ben Deardorff, Vice President; Mary Catherine Wilson, Bill Dietz, President; Jim Maine, 
Secretary; Alyson Neiswender, Justine Hamilton; Row 2: )im MArion, Bill Hoefling, Kevin Arnold, 
^idgely Salter, )ohn Busedu, Khristian Snyder, Lance Dieter, Treasurer; Cretchen Harteis, 
Recording Secretary; CamI DeClementi, Lynn Smith, Matt Andris, Kelly May, Carol Admundsen, 
\dvisor 



Jazz Band 




Row 1: Jim Mclnnis, Lesley Laudermilch, Jeanne Adams, Denise Kulp, Todd Lenhart, Shawn 
Snavely; Row 2: Deb Reagle, Dave Umla, Jim Hargrove, Mike Lichtenwalner, Dave Wilson, 
Josh Diaz, Lee Umberger, Lori Reed, Keith Schleicher; Row 3: Edward Vanlandeghem, 
Buddy Oliver, Paul Paulson, Glen Landrum, Kevin Thomas, Tom Strohman, Director; Not 
Pictured: Todd Truntz 



ORGANIZATIONS 



105 



MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 



Symphony Orchestra 




Members are: Maria Abeleda, Jeanne Adams, Sharon Barr, Kristen Curran, Michael Flannery, 
Kathy Guindon, Laura Judd, Richard Kroth, Dina Litzenberger, Bonnie MacCulloch, Christy 
Milliken, Malissa Noll, Doug Prowant, James Ruddy, Jon Scampton, Michael Slechta, Kevin 
Thomas, David Umla, Ronda Weller, Greta Yocum, and Professor Hambourg 




Concert Choir 



Members are: Jeanne Adams, Mark Benson, Lara Berezin, Christina Best, Jef Betz, Brad 
Boyer, Dan Boyer, John Brenner, William Checker, Diana Cook, Keith Copenhaver, Kristen 
Curran, Lance Dieter, John Diller, Mark Dimick, Timothy Eck, Kathy Graver, Scott Grumling, 
William Cuntrum, James Hargrove, Amber Hegi, Frank Heilman, Kathy Henry, April 
Horning, Andrew Hosteller, Anne Kelly, Angela Krause, Melissa Linkous, Kathy Luckenbill, 
Eric Martin, Beth Meyer, Tawni Niklaus, Lori Nyce, Zoanna Payne, Karen Reilly, Elizabeth 
Rosser, Kathleen Ryan, Jon Scampton, Tracey Smith, Michael Tighe, David Umla, Kristen 
Webster, Jonathan Wescott, Brandon Weston, Cathie Wheeler and Michael Zettlemoyer 



106 




Symphonic Band 

Members: Missy Askey, Scott Askins, Laura 
Baird, Cory Boltz, Marianne Boltz, Dan 
Boyer, Annette Boyles, Jen Bragunier, Angie 
Carl, Dina Carter, Amy Clewell, Blaine 
Connor, Diana Cook, Kristen Curran, Aaron 
Daubert, Heidi Derhammer, Sally Fegan, 
Shawn Gingrich, Kelly Green, Kathy 
Guindon, Sean Hackett, James Hargrove, 
Nancy Herman, April Horning, John Hurd, 
Angie Krause, Brendalyn Krysiak, Michelle 
Kunz, Lesley Laudermilch, Todd Lenhart, 
Mike Lichtenwalner, Cherie Lingle, Bonnie 
MacCulloch, Lisa Marotta, Kevin Mattos, 
Kelly May, James Mclnnis, Todd Mentzer, 
Christy Milliken, Malissa Noll, Lori Nyce, 
Doug Prow^ant, Debra Reagle, Lori Reed, Jim 
Ruddy, Keith Schleicher, John Seddon, 
Mike Slechta, Brian Smith, Michelle Smith, 
Shavi'n Snavely, Sue Spadjinske, Cynthia 
Stine, Kevin Thomas, Lee Umberger, David 
Umla, Brandon Weston, Candace Wheed- 
leton, Greta Yocum, Steve Young, Mike Zet- 
tlemoyer, Mary Beth Ziegenfuss, Mary 
Catherine Wilson, Karen Beres, Glen 
Gangewer 




107 



CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS 



Hispanic Culture Society 




Row 1 : Marc Allen, President; Patti Shatto, Secretary; Lisa Burke, Treasurer; John Busedu 
Vice President; Row 2: lulie Frederick, Markella Salians, Heather Rimmer |enniter Lewis' 
Linda Sterner, Deb Pisano, Darcy Paul, Carrie Spangle, Kristen Webster, |anel Kughler Kathv 
Scheidegger; Row 3: Dena Owen, Andy Hosteller, Ian Bonner, Amy Bonser Brian Engie- 
Row 4: lean Marc Hese, Tim Mitzel; Not Pictured: Stacee Schotield, |amie Hemtzelman' 
Denise York, Laura Berezin, |en Leone. 




French Club 



Row 1: Lon Nyce, Secretary; Deb Stoudt, Treasurer; Erica Mabel, President; Mane Landis- 
Kow 2: Allison Cow, Mark Fink, Duane Goodling, |enn Bragunier; Row ? Steve Young Patty 
Fleetwood, |ohn Digilio, Or |. Stopkie, Advisor; Not Pictured: |oe Habel, Molly Rasmussen 
Brendalyn Krysiak. 



108 




Row 1 ; M, 
PresldenI: 



.itl Cuenther, Tami Groft; Row 2: Laurjbeth Shearer, Vice PrcMdent, Duinn I eiiker, 
I isa kerr, Treasurer; Row 1; Andy Wangnian, Hislorian; M.ilthi-w Vera 



Teutonia Vallis 



Lebanon Valley's German Club, Teutonia 
Vallis, is open to anyone vvbo is taking (German 
or who just simply has an interest in the Ger- 
man language and culture. 

The German Club's goal is to bring more of 
an understanding to the students about the 
German people and everything that goes into 
making up a culture. This is accomplished in 
several ways, one of which is by having a St. 
Nikolaus Tag dinner at the beginning of De- 
cember with real German food. 

We also try to spread an understanding of 
the German culture through our participation 
in International Cultures Day in March. The 
German Club hosts area CJerman students who 
compete with their knowledge of the German 
language and culture to win a prize. The Ger- 
man Club then performs a skit to expose the 
students to such things as German dance and 
literature. 



Black Culture Club 



The Black Culture Club is a young organ- 
ization, founded in the fall of 1988, that strives 
to increase the cultural awareness of its mem- 
bers, the campus community, and the world in 
general. This goal is realized through mini- 
presentations given at meetings, films, speak- 
ers, displays, and a variety of other events 
open to the general public. 

The aim of the Black Culture Club is not so 
much to accentuate the differences, but to 
accentuate the similarities by illuminating the 
differences. It's often easier to see when the 
lights are on. That's what the BCC strives to 
do: to turn on the lights and help people see 
each other for who they are — people. 

The Black Culture Club, as you might imag- 
ine, is a non-discriminating organization and 
is open to anyone who is truly interested in 
enlightening people and enabling them to see 
the good in everyone. 




Row 1: Caprece Carringlon, Secretary: Danielle Owens, Vice-President; Kenethia Staley, 
Treasurer; Maria Fenty, President; Row 2: Dave Calvario, Advisor; Mary Beth Ziegentuss, 
Amy Castle, Tracey Brass, Erika Allen, Dawn Hickman, Eyako Wurapa; Row 3: Plummer 
Bailor, Craig Lee, Reggie Hall, Melvin lackson, Challis Lee 



CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS 



109 



CAMPUS MEDIA 



La Vie CoUegienne 

La Vie CoUegienne, LVC's weekly student- 
run newspaper, provides the campus and its 
other subscribers with news, sports articles, 
features, and columns relating to college life. 

La Vie staff members get practical expe- 
rience in writing, editing, page design and ad- 
vertising while providing the campus with a 
valuable service. Staff members come from a 
variety of academic disciplines. 

The paper's name means "the life of the 
college," and La Vie strives to give its readers a 
better picture of life here at Lebanon Valley 
and at campuses across the country. 




Row 1. Slevt Trapnell, Publishing Editor; Tammy Knerr, Feature Editor; Timm Meyer, Sports 
Editor; Row 2: Ian Bonner, Doug Mancmi; Row 3: lennifer Benussi, Michelle May, Tim 
Schwarz, Rob Andrew; Row 4; Bob Sherman, A. Suzette V. Suarez, Patti Shatto, Mike 
McGranaghan; Row 5: Amy Waterfield, Keith Copenhaver 




WLVC 

LVC's radio station, WLVC, offers the stu- 
dents of Lebanon Valley an excellent oppor- 
tunity to experience the field of broadcasting 
firsthand. Each Dl formats, plans and broad- 
casts his or her own show. The styles of music 
offered cover all formats: Classic Rock, Chris- 
tian, Progressive, Top 40, Punk and others. 

We offer the campus community a great 
place to hear of campus news and events and, 
of course, 640 am offers entertainment for all. 

This year's staff is larger than ever, and with 
everyone working together, WLVC promises 
to keep on growing and improving. 



Row 1 : Scott Askms, Program Director; Jennifer Benussi, Vice-President; )ohn Bowerman, 
President; Mike McGranaghan, Treasurer; Row 2: Scott Eshelman, |erry Battaglia, Robert 
Petro, Stacy Gilbert, Debbie Gray, Markella Saliaris, Mitzy Linkous, Duane Goodling, Troy 
Neidermyer, Doug Prowant; Row 3: Jon Scampton, Donna Longcoy, Brad Norton, Eric 
Howson, Ian Bonner, Keith Schleicher, Kevin Mattos, Steve Trapnell, Dave Wright, Andy 
Wangman; Not Pictured: Dave Stimpson, Secretary 



110 




Row 1 Keith Copenhaver, Dreama O'Neil, L.J La Barre, Denise Snyder, Markella Salians; 
Row 2: Ann Dietrich, Janice Hartz, Ian Bonner, Travis Emig; Row 3: Michelle May, Mii<e 
Bodine, Steve Trapnell; Not Pictured: Joan Landis, Sue Leonard, Andy Wangman, Amy 
Waterfield, Doug Mancini, John Bowerman, Bob Sherman, Linda Sterner, Lynn Schwalm, 
Heather Ondik, Marie Landis, Alyson Neiswender 



Quittapahilla 

The Quittapahilla, LVC's yearbook, is a 
completely student-run organization. The staff 
works throughout the entire academic year as 
well as through the summer to produce the 
yearbook, which is distributed every fall. 

Members of the Quitte staff do many dif- 
ferent things such as photography, copy writ- 
ing, editing, layouts and transferring the lay- 
outs onto the computers. Students design 
every aspect of the book. Being on the staff 
does involve a lot of hard work and dedication 
but at the same time it is a very fun and 
rewarding experience. 



Greenblotter 




Row 1: Patti Shatto, Secretary; Amy Earhart, President; Michelle May; Row 2: Mike 
McCranaghan, Ian Bonner, Dave Wright, Steve Trapnell; Not Pictured: Ken Krawchuk, Dan 
Tredinnick, Michelle Klinsky 



CAMPUS MEDIA 



111 



BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS 



Accounting Club 




Brian Wassell, Treasurer; Donald K. Binner, |r., Jill Sanderson, Advisor; Mike Zettlemoyer, 
Secretary; Tracey Smith, President; Not Pictured; Drew Hildebrand, Vice President; Al Senlt. 




Row 1: lanice Hartz, Allison Cow, Mike Zettlemoyer, Sarah Thompson; Row 2: Jennifer 
Leone, Damon Naame, Sean Phenicie, |im Winters, Tadashi Hiroshige; Row 3: Kim Shaffer, 
Secretary; Holly Deemer, President; Andrew Hildebrand, Treasurer; Brendalyn Krysiak, Vice 
President; Sharon F, Clark, Advisor; Not Pictured: |im Horn. 



Business Club 

The purpose of the Business Club is to in 
troduce to all management, accounting, hote 
management, and international business ma 
jors relevant information to increase thf 
knowledge of their field of study. The clul 
also provides speakers, trips, and discussion: 
about business. 

This year the club has had speakers fron 
Hershey Chocolate, Garrity and Spangler 
Harpels, and K-Mart Apparel. Other activitie: 
included sponsoring the Underground and thf 
Dating Game. The major event for the club thi; 
year was their trip to Trump Plaza in Atlantic 
City. 



112 




International Business 
Club 

The International Business Club is com- 
prised of LVC's International Business majors 
and is also open to all those interested in the 
world of multinational enterprise. The club 
sponsors movies that focus on international 
issues in management and visits local mul- 
tinational corporations to supplement in-class 
learning. The club's major activity is the co- 
ordination of International Culture Day. an 
event which brings hundreds of high school 
student's to the college for a day of inter- 
national cultural experiences. 



ow 1: Andy Wangman, Treasurer, Kathy Scheidegger, Secretary; Brian Engle, President; 
ow 2: Dr. lames W, Scott, Advisor; Erica Habel, \4ark Fink; Not Pictured: Amy Castle, Marc 
ilen, Diann Lenker. 



History & Political 
Science Club 




Row 1: Linda Hepler, Vice President; |osue Diaz, President; Lynda Van Sant, Secretary 
Protemp; David Sheats, Treasurer; Row 2: Erica Habel, Laura Miller, lenniler Lewis, Sharon 
Poplau; Not Pictured: Sarah Thompson, Secretary. 



ORGANIZATIONS 



113 



POLITICAL ORGANIZATIONS 



College Republicans 





Row 1; Dave Stimpson, Vice President; Michelle LedcJy, Treasurer; Renato Biribin, 

President; Row 2: Jennifer Leone, Marianne Boltz, Sheryl Drake, Kenneth Jones, Douglas 
Mancini, Robert Andrew, Timm Moyer, Brad Rinehimer; Not Pictured; Denise York, 
Heather L. Rimmer, Troy Neidermyer, Scott Carey, |oe Rilolt, Rod Paul, Secretary; Brad 
Norton, Corey Zdanavage, Kirk Cremer. 



College Democrats 

The College Democrats was formed to en- 
courage and support the ideals of the Dem- 
ocratic Party. The club is open to any student 
who is interested in politics and wants to be- 
come more actively involved with the Party. 

The group is most active during election 
years and works very closely with the Party in 
Lebanon County, assisting in whatever way 
we can. 

The highlight of the year for the club is the 
annual College Democrats of America Con- 
vention. Last year we had a great time in 
Boston and also showed our muscle by having 
one of our own members elected to a national 
position. 



Row 1: Donna Longcoy, Secretary; Tim Biltclift, President; Matthew Vera, Vice President; |im 
Bradford, Treasurer; Row 2: josue Diaz, Vickie Davis, lennifer Lewis, Stacy Gilbert, Sharon 
Poplau, Sarah Thompson; Row 3: |ohn Digilio, Scott Askins, David Sheats, Keith Schleicher, 
Ian Bonner, David Cass, Kevin Sulovich. 



114 




.V 1: Kristin Davis, Stacv Straub, Marvann Lucvkanish, Vice President: Erika Allen; Not 
tured; Chervl Lambert, President: |odi Bupp, Secretary: len Leitao, Treasurer. 



Childhood Education 
Club 



The Childhood Education Club is Lebanon 
\'alley's branch of the Association for Child- 
hood Education International. The club works 
for the education and well-being of children 
and helps its members become better ac- 
quainted with regular teachers and other com- 
munity agencies. Members secure information 
related to elementary education by bringing in 
resource people. 

The club \'olunteers its time to the com- 
munity by visiting children in hospitals and 
sponsoring a Christmas party for economically 
deprived children in Lebanon. Other high- 
lights include Spring Art's Children's Day and 
a teacher panel consisting of recent elemen- 
tary education graduates discussing their first 
experiences in teaching. 



MENC 




Row 1: Bev Kreider, Secretary: Heidi Durhammer, Vice President: Shawn Gingrich, President; 
Cathie Wheeler, Treassurer; Rtjw 2: Angie Krause, Karen Beres, Nancy lean Herman, Lori Reed, 
Salley Fegan, Holly Hendrix, Amy Clewell, Diana Cook, Dina Carter: Row 3: Todd Mentzer, Shawn 
Snavely, Debra Reagle, Candace Wheedleton, Dave Umla, lames Hargrove, Michael Slechta: Row 
4: John Diller, Doug Prowant, Mark Benson, Dan Bover, Lesley Laudermilch, Tom Seddon, Brian 
Smith: Not Pictured: Sharon Barr, Tim Eck, Anne Kelly, Beth Moyer, Tawni Niklaus, Malissa Noll, 
Zoanna Payne, Sue Spadjinske, Brad Spitler, Cindy Sline, Greta Yocum 



EDUCATION ORGANIZATIONS 



115 



CAMPUS PERFORMERS 



Guild Student Chapter 




Berneice Eby, Diana Cook, Dan Boyer, Mr. Pierre Getz, Faculty Advisor; Shawn Gingrich, 
Secretary /Treasurer; Mark Dimick, Joyce Attix, Vice President; Pamela Schaadt, President; 
Kim Potocny, Michelle Kunz; Not Pictured: Mike Slechta 




Row 1: Kathryn Henry, Dave Plummer, Cathie Wheeler, Matt Guenther, Jennifer Lord; Row 
2: Kelly Snyder, Edwina Travers, Kristan Foster, Kelly Green Kathleen Ryan, Nadine Saada, 
Dave Andrews, Kenethia Staley; Row 3: Jef Betz, Scott Grumling, Alison Rutter, Bonnie 
MacCulloch, Donna Longcoy, Chad Saylor, Andrew Hildebrand, Bill Snelling, Ken Miller, Eric 
Howson 



Wig & Buckle 



Wig and Buckle Society is the student dran 
club open to all students and members of tl 
faculty. The theater group produces three re 
ular shows each year, as well as special pr 
ductions throughout the year. All shows a 
student-directed, produced by the group, aii 
are open to all students on campus. The pu, 
pose of the group is to stimulate involvemei 
in the dramatic arts by offering dramatic a 
tivities and productions, including the phy 
ical and/or financial support of any activi 
the majority of the club deems worthy. 



116 








Tennis Club 



omas Giovinazzo, Carl Fortna, President; Tadashi Hiroshige; Not Pictured: Mike Blimline, 
b McCready, Chuck RusconI, Bill Moore 



The Lebanon Valley College Tennis Club 
was founded in 1988 to promote interest in the 
sport on campus. It is open to all those in- 
terested in playing tennis on a competitive 
level. 

In the Spring of 1989, the Tennis Club had a 
strong membership and played exhibition 
matches against varsity teams from 
Elizabethtown College and Moravian College. 
This year the club plans to add matches 
against Western Maryland, Messiah and Dick- 
inson. 

In the future, with the addition of an ad- 
equate tennis facility on campus, the Tennis 
Club hopes to be recognized as a varsity team 
and compete within the Middle Atlantic Con- 
ference. 



Ski Club 




Row 1; David Cass, Tadashi Hiroshige, Casey Keibler, Chris Kissinger, Jack Malloy, President; 
Sheree Rybak, Denise York, Heather Rimmer, Jim Marion 



SPORTS ORGANIZATIONS 



117 



ORGANIZATIONS 



Underground Steering 
Committee 




i^JEiit^^^ ^^^^'-^smm 



Row 1: Scott Fiscus, Peter Fowler, Jim Marion; Row 2: Suzanne Szoszorek, Mjria Fents, 
Michelle Sullivan, Michelle Brailsford, Purchasing Agent; Rich Kroth, President; Carol 
Arimundsen, Advisor; Lori Folk, Vice-President; Molly Rasmussen, Secretary/Treasurer; |im 
Haine, Student Advisor; Not Pictured: Paul Walters, Chris Graver, Steve Carpenter, Chris 
Ziegler 




Row 1: Matt Guenther, Consultant; Glen Gangewer, Co-Coordinator; Diann Lenker, 
Secretary; Mike Zettlemoyer, Co-Coordinator; Drew Hildebrand, Treasurer; Row 2: Karen 
Beres, Doug Prowant, Linda Sterner, Timothy Butz, Amy Bonser, Andy Hostetler, Shawn 
Snavely, Bill Horst, Mark Benson, Kathy Cuindon, Allison Gow; Not Pictured; Paula Young 



Spring Arts Committee 

The Spring Arts Committee is a solely stu 
dent-run organization open to anyone on cam 
pus. The committee attempts, through the an 
nual Spring Arts Festival, to bring to the LV( 
campus an exposure to the arts that is nc 
easily accessable to the students and the sui 
rounding community. The Festival is a tim 
when students and area residents can not onl 
observe, but also take part in music, arts, an 
crafts. 

During the event, many of the campus oi 
ganizations participate in this celebration b 
selling food and other articles. Private vendoi 
and craftsmen from all over Pennsylvania als 
come to take part in this annual Spring ever 
which is held, every year, on the last weeken 
in April. 

The Spring Arts Committee organizes th 
entire weekend, plans the activities, an' 
makes the preparations for the festival whic 
is the college's largest campus event througl 
out the year. 



118 




Computer Club 



Randy Morgan, Stacey Marker, Ottavio D'Angehs, Tim Schwarz 



Math Club 

Open to all students interested in math- 
smatics, the Math Club is an academic and 
social group whose purpose is to increase in- 
teraction among students taking math courses 
tiere at LVC. Activities sponsored by the or- 
ganization include social functions, such as 
picnics and parties at Dr. Mayer's house, trips 
lO businesses to explore career opportunities, 
md educational lectures given by guest speak- 
ers. The highlight of the Math Club's year is 
he annual Math Quiz Bowl, when area high 
school students participate in a math com- 
)etition entirely developed and operated by 
|vlath Club members. 




Row 1: Jeff Osborne, Treasurer; Amy Himmelberger, President; |ulie Frederick, Secretary; 
Chris Hills, Vice-President; Row 2: Ted |ones, Stephanie Schumaker, Stacey Marker, Kimmi 
Eames, Ann Cawley, Jennifer Arnett, Melissa Askey, Ottavio D'Angelis; Not Pictured: Corey 
Zdonavage 



ORGANIZATIONS 



119 




120 




121 



GREEKS 



Gamma Sigma Sigma (r22] 




Row 1 |ill Hassler, Social Chairperson; Tina Clymer, 2nd Vice-President; Annette Boyles, Historian; Melanie Fleek, Corresponding Secretary; Rachel 
Shyder, Parliamentarian/National Liason; Angle Davis, 1st Vice President; Amy Himmelberger, President; Linda Hepler, Alumni Secretary; Row 2: 
Kristan Foster, Nicole Grove, Michele Filippone, Dawn Shantz, Jenn Bragunier, Diane Tuman, Laura Miller, Lynda Van Sant, Kristen Curran, Heidi 
Derhammer, Molly Rasmussen, Erica Habel, Pam Merther, Alison Rutter, Deb Stoudt, Dee Capece, Pam Collins, Kathy Scheidegger, Rachel Grella, 
Bonnie MacCulloch; Row 3: Marianne Boltz, Tammy O'Roark, Kim Sollenberger, Danielle Owens, Melissa Askey, Kathy Guindon, Ann Cawley, 
Alyson Neiswender, Sarah Thompson, Kim Shaffer, Tricia Haeusler, Katharine Henry, Kelly Green, Kerrie Brennan; Row 4: Kelly Snyder, Tami Groff; 
Not Pictured: Mary Catharine Wilson, Treasurer; Holly Deemer, Recording Secretary; Paula Young, Hille Craig, )en Benussi, Dina Carter 



Gamma Sigma Sigma is a national sorority that 
emphasizes service, friendship and equality 
both on campus and in the community. Leb- 
anon Valley's Beta Chi Chapter has approx- 
imately 60 enthusiastic members who busily 
perform service projects throughout the year. 
Every semester, each Gamma Sig sister must 
give 15 hours of service in the sorority's name 
to fulfill national requirements. Service proj- 
ects include Bake Sales every Tuesday, visits 
to Nursing Homes, Children's parties and Food 
Drives during Thanksgiving. Every Spring 
Gamma Sig works together with its brother 
fraternity, APO, to create Helping Hands, a 
carnival-like charity event at a local mall. The 
proceeds from Helping Hands are given to a 
different local charity every year. 




122 




Row 1 : Jeff Stouter, Timm Moyer, 1 st Vice President; Lance Dieter, Roy Williams, Sean Phenicie, Chaplain; Kenneth Jones, Kevin 
Gerchufsky, Social Chairman; Row 2: Michael Landis, Rich Kroth, Interfraternity Representative; Steve Teitelman, Adam Hosteller, Chris 
Zebrowski, Kirk Cremer; Row 3: Steve Ferruzza, Treasurer; Jef Betz, Corresponding Secretary; Chris Hills, Financial Chairman; Jim 
Dillman, Matt Cuenther, Historian 



Alpha Phi Omega (A$l]] 

GREEKS 



123 



GREEKS 



Kappa Lambda Nu (KAN) 




Row 1 : Dawn Martin, Treasurer: Sue Bolinsky, Vice-President; Cami DeClementi, President; Jill Classman, Pledge Captain; Sherry Scovell, 
Corresponding Secretary; Row 2; Joanna Wierman, Sheree Rybak, Dena Owen, Executive Council; Jen Devine, Social Chairperson; Wendy Halliday, 
Historian; Amy Ferree, Executive Council; Lisa Biehl, Michelle Simpson, Sue Kazinski, Parliamentarian; Kelly Stuckey, Assistant Pledge Captain; Lynn 
Smith, Recording Secretary; Beth Schalkoff, Stefanie Wilds, Sue Sarisky, Chaplain; Julie Frederick, Greek Letter Chairman; Cindy Watson 



Kappa Lambda Nu, a.k.a. Clio, is a social 
sorority which began in 1871 as the Clionian 
Literary Society. Gradually, new clubs and 
organizations took over the literary activities 
on campus and Clio's activities changed ac- 
cordingly, becoming a social sorority. 

Each year, the sisters of Kappa Lambda Nu 
participate in the Homecoming festivities and 
are active in the Spring Arts Festival and 
Greek Week Competition. 

Although Clio is a social organization, the 
members also participate in various commu- 
nity service projects. This year the sisters 
helped TKE with the Special Olympics, spon- 
sored a trick-or-treat in Vickroy Hall for Fac- 
ulty and Staff children and enjoyed Christmas 
Carolling on the terminally-ill children's ward 
at the Hershey Medical Center. 




124 




Row 1 : Joe Souders, Kent Weidemoyer, Troy Celesky, Steve Vajda, )ay Richmond, Renato Blribin, Brian Wassell, Ty Wilhide; Row 2: Chuck 
Funk, Doug Brown, Karl Liedtka, Dave Bentz, Chad McNaughton, Chris Schwartz, Joe Curran, Andy Stutzman; Row 3: Brian Donley, Keeper of 
the Keys; Scott Sturgess, Chaplain; John Russell, Tom McClain, Stephen Bobar; Row 4: Scott Carey, Historian/Assistant Pledge Master; John 
Busedu, Carey Moyer, Brian Sultzbach, Aaron Johnson, Brad Rinehimer, Tim Tobin, Ken Wilson, David Stover, Bob Mattoon 



Knights of the Valley (KSK) 

GREEKS 



125 



GREEKS 



Delta Lambda Sigma (AAS) 



. ^ "^K* 




Row 1: Teri Kruger, Treasurer, Donna Teator, Fundraiser, Cathie Wheeler, Parliamentarian Mria hcnty President; Row 2: Nikki Dennis, 
Dawn Hickman, Danielle Campbell, Chaplain; Chris Rissinger, Social Chairman; Holly Carey, Sandy Aumiller, Recording Secretary; 
Kristin Maize, Sarah Miller, Amy Schmid, Vice-President; Sharon Faust, Pledge Captain; Row 3; Tina Minotto, Assistant Pledge Captain; 
Jill Hamilton, Assistant Fundraiser; Annie Wolf, Corresponding Secretary; Michelle Brailsford, Michelle Sullivan, Historian; Erika Allen, 
Lora Bopp, Amy Hutton, Assistant Treasurer 



Delphians are a great group of totally unique 
individuals who come together through trust 
and friendship to gain strength, support, 
knowledge and fun. One of the Delphian's 
greatest strengths is our diversity. Our ability 
to unite, despite this diversity, is what makes 
the bond even stronger and more enduring. 

We are known for our fun-loving disposition 
and active involvement in campus activities. 
We provide for each other a sort of sanctuary 
where we can each be free to be ourselves 
away from the pressures that generally em- 
body college life. Consistent with the growing 
campus trend toward service, the sisters too 
are getting involved; doing good things and 
having fun at the same time. 




126 




Row 1: Douglas Terpstra, Philip J. Greco, Rob Miller, Buddy Oliver, Andrew Hamann; Row 2: Chris Kline, Casey Keibler, Pete Grindrod, 
Todd Hess, Dave Wilson, Neil Madison, Joe Shermeyer, Michael Bodine; Not Pictured: Mike Pontz, Jeremy Madaras, Mark Will, Tom 
Ball 



Phi Lambda Sigma ($A2) 

GREEKS 



127 



GREEKS 



Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) 




Row 1: Todd Truntz, Earl Weaver, Ben Deardorff, Jeff Osbourne, Bob Aubel, Bill DIetz, Jack Malloy, Mark Kapolka, Rod Baughman, 
Prytmis; Row 2: Mike Blimline, Corey Leiby, Hegemon; Jim Maine, Epiprytnis; Glen Cangewer, Brian Fernandes, Crysopheles; William 
Woland, Rob Wolfgang, Rip Hiester, Dave Esh, Ridge Salter, Histor; Ken Homin, Dave Laurer, John Jewel, Anthony Veraiti, Ed Wirth, 
Dave Stimpson, Greg Jackson; Row 3: Mark Gibson, Pylortes; Bill Woodward, Tim Biltcliff, Grammateus; Scott Bell, Kevin Sutovich, 
Matt Wood, Dave Schell, Carl Fortna, Hypophetes; John Consugar, Chris Esh, Todd Lenhart, Jim Marion 



Tau Kappa Epsilon is the largest social fra- 
ternity in the world. At Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, the Rho-Chi chapter was founded in the 
Spring of 1988, based on the ideal of the well- 
rounded student. The fraternity has been ac- 
tively involved in Special Olympics and Am- 
nesty International, and is often involved in 
service projects on campus. 

TKE also provides athletic and social outlets 
for its brothers and the campus community. 
Tau Kappa Epsilon was the intramural cham- 
pion during the 88'-89' school year. Socially, 
TKE holds annual alumni and parents picnics, 
has a stand at Spring Arts and sponsors the 
Underground often. 



128 





Standing for "Servants of Christ," Delta Tau 
Chi is a co-ed fellowship which is open to all 
students interested in consecrating their lives 
to Jesus Christ. 

Over the past few years, Delta Tau Chi has 
expanded its array of yearly activities. 
Through its deputations program, Delta Tau 
Chi's members are invited to area churches to 
lead worship services. Weekly campus devo- 
tions are also led by its members. A Love Feast 
is served near Easter. This year the fraternity 
added a blanket collection for the homeless to 
its annual clothing drive. Work with youth 
groups and missions are also part of the fra- 
ternity's agenda. 

In addition to service, fellowship dinners, 
picnics, a Spring formal and dances highlight 
the social calendar. Through service activities, 
social events and sports, the members of Delta 
Tau Chi seek to promote fellowship and Chris- 
tian growth and to share the love of Christ 
with everyone. 




Row 1: Eric Howson; Row 2: Brian Engle, President; Becky Snyder, Deputations Chairperson; Wendy Kiehl, Secretary; Beth Rosser, 
Mitzy Linkous, Laurabeth Shearer, CRO Representative; Jim Dillman, Vice-President; jay Yoder, Treasurer; Row 3: Marie Landis, Robyn 
Ulmer, Michelle Houtz, Robert Petro, Robert Weaver, Ann Dietrich, Lynn Schwalm, Mary Catharine Wilson, Jennifer Arnett; Row 4; 
Amy Bonser, Mary Ellen Cvijic, Beth Moyer, Keith Schleicher, Wendy Durham, Ted Jones, Christopher Krpetra 



Delta Tau Chi (ATX) 



GREEKS 



129 



GREEKS 



Sigma Alpha Iota (2AI) 




Row 1 : Pam Schaadt, Chaplain; Lori Reed, President; Anne Kelly, Vice-President; Sue Spadjinske, Recording Secretary; April Horning, 
Corresponding Secretary; Lori Nyce; Row 2: Erica Habel, Nancy Jean Herman, Brendalyn Krysiak, Treasurer; Sally Fegan, Candace 
Wheedleton; Row 3: Beth Rosser, Lesley Laudermilch, Holly Hendrix, Cathie Wheeler, Sergeant-at-Arms; Not Pictured: Christi Milliken, 
Bonnie MacCulloch 




■^^fi^*- 



y 



/ 









130 




Row 1: Matt Cuenther, Vice-President; Shawn Gingrich, President; Mike Zettlemoyer, Treasurer; Todd Mentzer, Corresponding 
Secretary; Robert Petro, Historian; Row 2: Glen Cangewer, Warden, Chaplain and Parliamentarian; Steve Young, Lee Umberger, Alumni 
Secretary; Shawn Snavely, David Umla, Bill Horst, James Hargrove, )im Ruddy, Kevin Thomas, Recording Secretary; Row 3: Andrew 
Hildebrand, Daniel Boyer, John Diller Doug Prowant 



Phi Mu Alpha ($MA) 



GREEKS 



131 



GREEKS 



Psi Chi ^X 




Row 1: Maria Fenty, Vice President; Rachel Grella, Secretary/Treasurer; Teri Kruger, President; Row 2: Connie Pyle, Annette Boyles, 
Bob Mikus, Beth Rosser; Not Pictured: Dina Carter, Jim Maine, Michelle Grube, Lynn Smith, Cindy Watson, Joan Landis 



Psi Chi is the national honor society in psy- 
chology. The purpose of this organization is to 
advance the science of psychology and to en- 
courage, stimulate, and maintain scholarship 
of the individual members in all fields, par- 
ticularly in psychology. 

Psi Chi serves two major goals. The first is 
the society's obligation to provide academic 
prestige to its initiates by the mere fact of 
membership. The second goal is the obligation 
of each of the society's local chapters to nur- 
ture members' abilities by offering a climate 
congenial to its creative development, with 
programs designed to augment and enhance 
the regular curriculum. 



132 





Beta Beta Beta, a national Biological Honor 
Society, is open to majors in the biological 
sciences. Membership is by invitation. To be- 
come a member one must have completed 
three courses in Biology and maintain an av- 
erage of 2.7 in Biology and a 2.5 overall. BBB 
hosts various speakers and panels presenting 
topics from Ecology to Medicine to Graduate 
Schools to just getting a job. Beta Beta Beta also 
presents Freshman and Sophomore Achieve- 
ment Awards to those students displaying ac- 
ademic excellence in Biology. Members of the 
organization present topics of their own in- 
dependent research at annual district Beta 
Beta Beta meetings. In addition to scientific 
pursuits. Beta Beta Beta has an annual banquet 
in the Spring and in the past has staged a major 
fund raising project each fall. 




Row 1: Sandy Aumiller, Secretary; Angle Davis, Vice-President; Jennifer Nauman, President; Blaine Conner, Historian; Row 2: Eyako 
Wurapa, Sheree Rybak, Beth Rosser, Melanie Fleek, Kerrie Brennan; Row 3: Ed Wirth, Dina Litzenberger, Kathy Guindon, Kristen 
Curran, Amy Paszkowski, Tricia Haeusler, Kristie Painter 



Beta Beta Beta (BBB) 



GREEKS 



133 



GREEKS 



Sigma Tau Delta 2TA 




Row 1: Timm Moyer, Treasurer; Toni Salam, Vice-President; Katharine Henry, Secretary; Steve Trapnell, President; Row 2: loanne 
Grajewski, Patty Fleetwood, Amy Earhart, Tammy Knerr, Michelle May, Elizabeth Lengle, Wendy Bord, John Bowerman, Kasey 
Sattizahn; Row 3: Mitzy Linkous, Kathleen Ryan, Jill Hassler, Scott Barlup, Jef Betz, Dr. Phil Billings, Assistant Advisor; Not Pictured: Mrs. 
Jacqueline Vivelo, Advisor 



Omicron Omicron is LVC's chapter of Sigma 
Tau Delta National English Honor Society. 
The group recognizes outstanding scholarship 
in English and the complete curriculum. 

At Lebanon Valley College, Sigma Tau Delta 
sponsors activities to enrich the lives of its 
members and other English majors on campus, 
such as trips to New York City and local 
theaters. One of the group's fundraisers is the 
publication of the annual student directory. 

This year, Sigma Tau Delta sponsored a cre- 
ative writing contest in a local elementary 
school in order to foster interest in English and 
creative w^riting. 




134 




Alpha Psi Omega is a National Honorary 
Theatre Fraternity. In order to pledge, one 
must show dedication to the theatre through 
hours worked on sets, lighting, acting, etc. 
Once these hours have been attained and the 
pledge process completed, one becomes in- 
ducted into our Rho Eta cast. 

Made up of talented and dedicated indi- 
viduals, our fraternity strives to employ and 
enhance all of these abilities. Together with 
the Wig and Buckle society, we hope to further 
excellence in theatre by holding workshops, 
improving the Little Theatre and by producing 
exciting and polished plays and musicals. 




Row 1: Bonnie MacCulloch, Michele Ann Klinsky; Row 2: Kathleen Ryan, President; Renato Biribin, Kelly Green, Scott Grumling, 
Katharine Henry; Row 3: Andrew Hildebrand, Historian; Cathie Wheeler, Vice-President and Pledge Mistress; Bill Guntrum, Alison S. 
Rutter, Secretary; Matt Guenther, Business Manager; Edwina Travers, |ef Betz 



Alpha Psi Omega (A^l]) 



GREEKS 



135 



136 




137 



FOOTBALL 



The Flying Dutchmen of LVC had their best season in 10 
years by finishing with a 6-4 record. It was the first winning 
season under the helm of Jim Monos. Ken Wilson became 
the third player in Lebanon Valley's history to rush for 
more than 1,000 yards in a single season. Wilson became 
the Valley's all-time single rushing record holder, sur- 
passing the previous record set in 1975 by Frank Tavani. 
The Dutchmen finished the season by defeating Bridge- 
water 63-14. 




Kenny Wilson intercepts! 



Go Defense! 



138 





Mike Rcif looks to make a pass 





Scores 




LVC 




OPP 


15 


Moravian 


17 


10 


Widener 


22 


17 


Juniata 





3 


Lycoming 


28 


49 


Albright 


19 


7 


Susquehanna 


37 


28 


Wilkes 


7 


38 


W. Maryland 


26 


38 


Del. Val. 


26 


63 


Bridgewater 


14 



John Wade heads lor a touthdoun 




3w 1: Daryl Stump, Rip Helster, Keith Dills, Mike Reif, Ken Wilson, Chris bchwartz, |im Carroll, Matt Andris, Kick Beard, Brad Rinehimer, Rory Hertzog, 
like Caputo, Tom Craver, Brian Sultzbach; Row 2: Bob Mattoon, Kent Weidemoyer, Brian Buckingham, Steve Va|da, |oe Souders, Aaron Johnson, Tim 
Dbin, Karl Liedtka, Brian Donley, Ron Hess, Dave Stover, Sandy Zettlemoyer, Mark Gibst)n: Row 3: Jeremy Madaras, Mike Spangler, Bill Shellenhamer, 
oug Zook, Scott Waugerman, Don Lappin, |ohn Wade, Brian Wassell, Chad McNaughton, Chris Pope, Heath Border, |oe Shermeyer, Pete Grindrod, Rich 
ngling. Coach Ebersole; Row 4: Coach Reich, Tom Campbell, Ryan Bietsch, Ty Wilhide, Cary Moyer, |ohn Russell, Doug Brown, Alex Doukas, Dave 
jllivan, Evan Evans, Larry Fry, |oe Curran, Rick Cottle. |im Kirka, Coach Monos; Row 5: Coach Calvario, Bob Kreider, Bob Lalena, Eric Shaub, Eric Stouch, 
elly Tulensa, Rob Snyder, )ohn Perozich, Chuck Funk, |im Marion, Mike Boyer, Tom McClain, Mike Smith, Brian Welsh, Jeff Lauer, Coach Barnhart: Row 
Wes Geib, Kevin Wagner, Tom Garr, Eric Anderson, Tom Stone, Nathan Avery, Pat Dorney, Charlie Reed, Dave Pinder, Doug Kennedy, Ken Kirchhofer, 
hris Barnes, Tim Mitzel; Row 7; Coach Jordan, Joe Marx, Steve Herr, Bob Schwenk, Brad Kleinfelter, Roger Beitel, Mike Tackett, Chris Long, Harrv Lilley, 
i Hartman, Eric Orndorf, Scott Davis, Robert Holford, Greg Martin, Coach Brezitski 



139 



FIELD HOCKEY 




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The Lad> Dutchmen fight for control. 





Scores 




LVC 




OPP 


15 


MORAVIAN 


17 


10 


WIDENER 


22 


17 


JUNIATA 





3 


LYCOMING 


28 


49 


ALBRIGHT 


19 


7 


SUSQUEHANNA 


37 


28 


WILKES 


7 


38 


W. MARYLAND 


26 


38 


DEL. VAL. 


26 


63 


BRIDGEWATER 


14 



















The team listens intensely to Coach Tierney. 



140 






g^s?y " " "'.' Sj^'^'"" " '-^ 



-^5#5^Efe*«i 




The Women's Field Hockey Team had an- 
other monumental season and finished the 
year with an impressive 13-7 record. The team 
also posted a 3-2 record in the Middle Atlantic 
Conference and finished with a second place 
overall in the FCAC Championship. 

Diane Churan led the team with 33 points, 
including 13 goals, followed by Sandy Aumil- 
ler with 27 points and 10 goals. 



Will it be .1 Kii.il? 







,:;"^ 



V 3 . .. 



Sue Partilla breaks out! 







Row 1: Amy Scibelli, Sue Partilla, Dawn Hickman, Diane Churan, Sandy Aumiller, Danielle Campbell, Sandy Fauser, Sue Leonard; Row 2: Lisa Biehl, 
Watson, Michele Filippone, Joann Graiewski, Kelly May, Sue Sarisky, Pam Grove; Row i: Coach hoarst, Kristen Brandt, Deb Pisano, Lois Lapp, April 
Meyers, Coach Tierney 



Cindy 



141 



SOCCER 



The LVC men's soccer team ended the '89- 
'90 season with the best record they've had in 
their 14 years of existence with five wins, 
eleven losses and one tie. However, even their 
improved record does not show how good this 
year's team was. 

The Flying Dutchmen played each of their 
17 games with fierce competitiveness and they 
showed their opponents just how tough The 
Valley can be. With another season's expe- 
rience behind them, the team appears to be 
poised for bigger and better things in the fu- 
ture. 



5.-Sirs»VS*5«SM- 





Ben Dcardorf fights for the ball. 



Bri.in H.ind bro.iks au.n 




Teamwork makes it all worthwhile. 



Steve Hand puts some kick into the j;.ime. 



142 




Nothing can stop The Valley! 



Corey Leiby is pumped to score! 




Row 1: |im McMenamin, Chuck Rusconi, Ben Deardortf, Kevin Dempsey, Bill Hoefling, Bill 
Woodward, Ed Wirth, Eyako Wurapa, Steve Hand; Row 2: Chris Yong, |ohn Jewell, Ted |ones, 
Plummer Bailor, Brian Hand, Kevin Kalb, Rob Wolfgang, Byron Brought, Craig Lee; Row i: Coach 
Hess, Steve Sanger, Corey Leiby, Ryan Tweedie, Challis Lee, Mark Evans, John Hurd, Coach Shirk 





Scores 




LVC 




OPP 


3 


Lycoming 


1 





York 


3 


1 


Lancaster Bible 





1 


Susquehanna 


2 





Albright 


4 


1 


Kings 


4 





W. Maryland 


4 


1 


Dickinson 


2 


1 


Widener 


1 





Gettysburg 


1 


1 


Ursinus 





1 


York 


3 


1 


F&M 





3 


Juniata 


3 





Muhlenburg 


1 





Allentown 


2 


1 


Moravian 


4 



143 



WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 



In only their third year of existence, the 
women's volleyball team here at Lebanon Val- 
ley caused quite a stir in the MAC. Although 
they started their season off on a down note, 
they turned it around and nearly captured a 
place in the MAC Volleyball Championships. 
This remarkable turnaround also included an 
impressive seven game winning streak in the 
middle of the season. 

Although the team will lose several key 
players and will also lack some needed height, 
women's volleyball here at The Valley is on 
the verge of becoming a Middle Atlantic pow- 
er to be reckoned with. 





Sharon Faust spikes it! 




Angie Carl decides her next move. 



Angie Carl and Sharon Faust prepare their next play. 



144 






Scores 




LVC 




OPP 


2 


Eastern 


3 





Dickinson 


3 


3 
3 
2 


Muhlenburg 

Albright 

Wilkes 




1 


2 


F&M 








Elizabethtown 


3 


3 


Del Val 


1 


2 
2 


Kings 
Moravian 



1 


3 


Messiah 


1 


3 

1 



Lycoming 

W. Maryland 

Susquehanna 

Juniata 



3 
3 
3 



Gretchen Harteis sets the ball. 




TEAM MEMBERS 

Angle Carl 

Caprece Carrington 

Jennifer Carter 

Lori Day 

Wendy Durham 

Sharon Faust 

Justine Hamilton 

Gretchen Harteis 

Sue Kazinski 

Jill Morrett 

Holly Taylor 

Head Coach: Wayne Perry 




Caprece Carrington goes for a block! 



The Lady Dutchmen celebrate a point. 



145 



CROSS COUNTRY 



The fall of 1989 marked the end of college 
cross country for four seniors; two men and 
two women. Kristie Painter, John Galvin, Amy 
Paszkowski and E.J. Smith completed success- 
ful seasons as well as successful cross country 
careers during their years here at the Valley. 
We wish these members luck in their future 
endeavors. 

Despite the loss of these team members, 
who will be sorely missed, the rest of the team 
looks forward to a strong recruiting year and a 
winning season in the fall of '90. 




^11 








,_1 ."'^' ■ 


- 



Kevin Gerchufsky goes it alone. 





Irish Haeusier struggles toward the finish line. 



Row 1 : Trish Haeusier, Sandy Easter, Lori Rothermel, Jennifer Bucher, Christian White, Gregj 
Jackson, Mike Home, Dave Sandler; Row 2: Chris Jenkins, John Galvin; Row 3: Kristie 
Painter, Amy Paszkowski, Shawn Auman, Scott Young, Jon Anderson, Coach Kelly, Kevin 
Gerchufsky, Al Senft, Carl Fortna, Coach Reed; Not Pictured: E.J. Smith 



146 




Already soaking wet, the runners await the start of the race. 







^.i5.:>*«»5f^ 



)ohn Calvin takes the lead. 



147 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 



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LVC fights for control of the tip off. 




LVC blocks the shot. 



Row 1 : Rich Tinucci, Michael Yordy; Row 2: Ken Lewis, Ray Kargo, Scott Sturgess, Daryl Hess, 
Scott Barlup, Scott Richardson, Melvin Jackson, Bob Aubel, Ed Jones; Row 3: Coach Friday, Coach 
Flannery, Reggie Hall, Ridgely Salter, Dave Bentz, Bill Moore, Joe Rilatt, Kevin Arnold, Brad Kintzer, 
Rodney Paul, Michael Bell, Coach Mailen, Coach Sorrentino 



148 



ECAC CHAMPIONS!!! 




LVC plays like true champions. 





SCORES 




LVC 




OPP 


53 


Buffalo State 


84 


91 


Oberlin 


76 


83 


Alvernia 


77 


94 


Misericordia 


63 


77 


Moravian 


71 


58 


Juniata 


57 


82 


Baptist Bible 


85 


77 


Messiah 


63 


53 


Dickinson 


66 


59 


Dickinson 


78 


67 


Muhlenberg 


78 


76 


York 


62 


77 


Western MD 


59 


63 


Gettysburg 


62 


63 


F&M 


66 


60 


Moravian 


63 


83 


Wetern MD 


79 


60 


Dickinson 


71 


82 


Elizabethtown 


69 


67 


Muhlenberg 


64 


64 


Albright 


54 


66 


Gettysburg 


62 


57 


F&M 


55 


67 


Dickinson 


71 


64 


Ursinus 


60 


72 


Dickinson 


59 



The Men's Basketball Team had an excellent season this year. Their 
hard work, persistance and style catapulted them to the ECAC tour- 
nament. The final win that got them into the tournament was their 
spectacular 57-55 victory over top-ranked Franklin & Marshall. 

The Dutchmen had the Pleasure of playing their first game of the 
tournament for a home crowd. They defeated Ursinus with a score of 64- 
60, and advanced to the finals of the ECAC Southern Division Cham- 
pionship. The final game was against Dickinson for the ECAC title. Once 
again LVC's team displayed extraordinary talent and dedication and 
pounded Dickinson into the ground with a 72-59 victory. The Dutchmen 
truly deserve the title; they did a fabulous job this year and we are proud 
of them. 

We would also like to salute the team members who graduated in June 
and to congratulate Daryl Hess and Scott Barlup for making their thou- 
sand points. You added even more excitement to this season and you 
will be missed. We wish you luck in your future endeavors and hope 
that your life is as exciting and victorious as the 1989-90 basketball 
season. 




Scott Barlup takes one of his famous jump shots. 



149 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 



Although this year's Lady Dutchmen basketball team had a 
somewhat disappointing season, they did show glimpses of 
great things to come. The team finished with a record of one 
win and nine losses and had a four-and-nineteen record over- 
all. While this was not the kind of results they were shooting 
for, they did realize that the 89-90 season was going to be a 
time of rebuilding. Now, the team looks to the future with an 
eye on greatness. 

This season did have some great highlights for the Lady 
Dutchmen, including a victory over Susquehanna University, 
who was seated first in its league at the time. Another mile- 
stone was the creation of LVC's first junior varsity squad. This 
new team went undefeated with a record of 3 wins and no 
defeats. This impressive showing bodes well for the future of 
Women's basketball here at the Valley. 

Next year's team will boast a solid core of returning un- 
derclassmen as the team loses three players to graduation and 
one to transfer. With the success of the JV squad and the 
experience gained this year, next year's team promises to be 
one of great potential. 





SCORES 




LVC 




OPP 


50 


Bryn Mawr 


51 


38 


F&M 


77 


68 


Alvernia 


40 


53 


Cabrini 


71 


54 


Salisbury State 


66 


63 


Eastern 


43 


46 


Frostburg State 


72 


45 


Western MD 


67 


42 


Johns Hopkins 


71 


40 


Gettysburg 


44 


59 


Del. Valley 


74 


61 


Shepherd 


79 


47 


Johns Hopkins 


62 


45 


Messiah 


60 


38 


F&M 


69 


58 


Gettysburg 


62 


50 


Dickinson 


62 


59 


Susquehanna 


42 


55 


Moravian 


80 


75 


Dickinson 


65 


45 


Albright 


61 


51 


Western MD 


54 




Row 1 : Andrea Shatter, Pam Grove, Danielle Fetters, Dawn Hickman, Paula Ritter, Amy Schabelly, Jen Leitao; Row 2; Coach Foster, Kathryn Ford, Wendy 
Kiehl, Sue Kazinsky, Caria Myers, Lisa Biehl, )an Ogurcak, Sue Partilla, Sandy Fauser, Coach Hamilton 



150 




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151 



WRESTLING 



The LVC wrestling team enjoyed a 
fine season, finishing 7-8-1. This was 
an improvement over last season's 0- 
19 record, fulfilling coach Larry 
Larthy's prediction of a better year for 
the team. 

Throughout the season, second year 
coach Larthey remained optimistic as 
he carried out his plan to rebuild the 
wrestling program with the hopes of 
once again achieving successful sea- 
sons like those seen in the 1970's. 

The wrestlers capped the season 
with a ninth place finish at the Middle 
Atlantic Conference Championship 
Tournament. A definite step up from 
last year's twentieth place finish, 
Coach Larthey was pleased with the 
performance. His dream of a better 
season- was fulfilled. 




152 




tow 1: Al Saloway, Chris Loy, Jeff Randazzo, Kevin Stein, John Whitehead; Row 2: Coach Larthey, J.R. Holchek, Ted Dailey, Johnny Wargins, Rodney 
(albach, Todd Rupp, Coach Reese 



153 



SWIMMING 




LVC gets ready for the take-off! 



The 1989-90 winter sports season brought a new sport 
to Lebanon Valley College: Men's & Women's Swimming. 
The men's squad had a very successful inaugural season 
finishing with an impressive record of five wins and two 
defeats. The men only need the addition of one or two 
strong swimmers to be a power to be reckoned with in 
the Middle Atlantic Conference. 

The women's team marked their first year with char- 
acter and determination. They were a very competitive 
team, much better than indicated by their one and five 
record. With no graduating seniors and the added ex- 
perience of the 89-90 season, the women are expecting to 
become a well respected team in the MAC in the coming 
years. 

Both squads sent several swimmers to the MAC cham- 
pionships and came away with very impressive show- 
ings. Look for swimming to continue to grow into one of 
the powerful sports teams here at The Valley. 




154 



'"■:'^ 


•^Br ^ 


And their off! 






, 




1 




Row 1: Becky Dugan, Alicia Petruska, Michelle Smith, Jen Arnette, Stacy Hollenshead, Stephanie Hassler, Dawn Didonato, )en Ambrose, John Brenner; Row 
2: Jeff Manning, Scott Carey, Raymond Wymer, Brian Hand, Jim Horn, Jim Marion, Coach Rusty Owens, John Bowerman, Brian Barbier, Glen Gangewer, 
Eric Martin, Jason Einsel 




I?'*'. 




^^^^1^5 




The swimmers give it their all 



^^ 



■ ~«5SX&;.-. 



"~'.^ 



^■^ 



«^ 




The team members time each other. 



155 



BASEBALL 





SCORES 




LVC 




OPP 


4 


Rochester 


2 


5 


Washington 


4 


9 


Haverford 


4 


3 


Belmont 


1 


2 


lUP 


5 





Cortland 


4 


4 


Alvernia 


3 


9 


Messiah 


13 


3 


Moravian 


8 


10 


Ursinus 


9 


3 


Gettysburg 





2 


Muhlenberg 


3 


2 


York 


15 





F&M 


2 


8 


Western MD 





5 


Moravian 


8 


5 


Elizabethtown 


6 


8 ■ 


Albright 


5 


4 


Swarthmore 


1 


3 


Wilkes 


1 


1 


Muhlenberg 


3 





Gettysburg 


6 


8 


Western MD 


3 


6 


Juniata 


11 


6 


F&M 


7 



M 





The team takes a much needed water break. 









Mike Rose makes sure he has that grounder. 



Senior captain William "Lumpy" Woland mans first base. 



156 




The Valley scores once again! 



Christian Faust is very serious about his pitching. 




; -4 t-i f% 1 






'IV 



.1 Y 



• ' * J i 



-— ^ >.- .'jr»*^-^v— •'^— 




« ^ 




^ VALLEY' 7 VAILFV ^ ' lEBANOS - . ';^,i£BANON ^ ^ UllEY 'P . uj • ** 




LEB\f,0)l -s 

VAILFV J^ ' lEBANOS 

>^ ^ VALLEY 1^ 











Row 1: George Welsh, Mike Rose, Scott Waugerman, Bill Woland, Jay Yoder, Todd Beasley, Rich TInuccI; Row 2: Christian Faust, Mark Zimmerman, Troy 
Celesky, Rick Cottle, Terry Lapin, Chris Esh, Ken Lewis; Row 3: Coach Flannery, Daryl Hess, Ken Wilson, Evan Evans, Dean Reigner, Larry Fry, Coach 
Ebersoie 



157 



SOFTBALL 




She darts toward fist base 



Sue Leonard throws a mean curve ball. 




Row 1: Sandy Aumiller, Jen Leitao; Row 2: Kristen Maize, Wendy Kiehl, Danielle Campbell, Dawn 
Hickman, Kathryn Ford, Toni Davis; Row 3: Jan Ogurcak, Coach Tierney, Sandy Fauser, Christy Engle, 
Nannette Bassininsky; Row 4: Sue Leonard, Caprece Carrington, Michelle Sullivan 



.' /J.M':'' 



^jT^'. .>^ .>.', /•>, V^.1:.V;,^^ 

Caprece Carrington hits a home run! [ 



158 





SCORES 




LVC 




OPP 


4 


Elizabethtown 


2 





F&M 


15 


1 


Juniata 


3 


5 


Dickinson 


9 


7 


Washington 


5 





Moravian 


11 


4 


Elizabethtown 


14 


3 


Juniata 


11 


7 


Allentown 


4 


10 


Gettysburg 





10 


Susquehanna 


7 





F&M 


4 


10 


Western MD 


20 


3 


Moravian 


4 


3 


Dickinson 


2 


13 


Washington 


3 




The Lady Dutchman slides gracefully into the plate. 



Wendy Kiehl runs In from the outfield. 



159 



MEN'S & WOMEN'S TRACK 



Men's 

LVC 
Albright 
Del. Val. 


Scores 


50 
38 
83 


LVC 

Lycoming 

Dickinson 




82.5 

10 

83.5 


LVC 

Stevens Trade 

York 

Elizabethtown 




96 

55 

30 




LVC 
Muhlenberg 




93 

52 


LVC 
Juniata 
St. Francis 

MAC Championships: 


70 
70 
33 

9th out of 16 teams. 


Women 

LVC 
Del. Val. 
Albright 


's Scores 


71 
74 
24 


LVC 

Elizabethtown 

York 




81 
31 
30 


LVC 

Lycoming 

Dickinson 




57.5 

33.5 

73 


LVC 
Muhlenberg 

MAC Championships: 


57 
79 

12th out of 14 teams. 




160 




ow 1: Jay Mills, Rich Yingling, Bob Kreider, Dave Sandler, Chris Yong; Row 2: Scott Young, John 
alvin, Tom Miskewitz, Jon Anderson, Greg Kutz, Ed Dema 



A=^'^' 










•4*- 



WOMEN'S TRACK TEAM 

Laura Baird 
Amy Cavanaugh 
Maria Fenty 
Joann Giannettino 
Michelle Grube 
Tricia Haeusler 
Beth Moyer 
Kristie Painter 
Alicia Petruska 
Lynn Schwalm 
Kenethia Staley 
Head Coach: Jodi Foster 



161 



MEN'S VOLLEYBALL 






^T ^.^*^^" 




. ifc^ - w. 




wL^ ^ 




^^0^ 




- x^^^ ..^;,:^;;v;; 


, 


What a save! 




-^. J- 



,^;:.;;. .r,_.-„_ ._--S®3iSS' .S 



The team prepares for a game. 




Spike it! 



Will it clear the net? 



162 




H 


i™ 


1 


■ ■^'^: 'l" •' 


r 


li>> 


\ 


__.. 


t^ 


L^ 


K 


% 


p^ 







what determination! 



Bump that ball! 




■siS;. f 



4.« 




4 




HWKiiWMftiilS^^^^S^. 



The guys anxiously wait for the ball to drop. 





~s,.„.. >S 



"SS- 




Row 1: Mike Blimline, Chuck Rusconi, Scott Bell, KEvin Sutovich; Row 2: Kristlan Snyder, Deron 
Schuler, Matt Wood, Ion Wescott, Coach Perry 



163 



CHEERLEADING 




Fall squa(i L to K: (hris Kissinger, Joanna Wireman, Kelly Stuckey, Wendy Halliday, Tiffany Brown, Jen Devine, Tina Minotta, Sherry Scovell, Cami 
DeClementi, Erika Allen, Sue Bollnsky 




Precision is the key. 



You can always count on the cheerleaders for a smile. 



164 




The squad performs for the audience during a time out. 



The cheerleaders went to the top along with the men's basketball team. 




Winter Squad — Row 1: Jen Finger, Bob Charles, Yvette Chappell, L.J. La Barre; Row 2: Patty Fleetwood, Leanne Stansfield, Wendy Halliday, Cami 
DeClementi, Tina Minotta, Jen Devine, Tiffany Brown; Not Pictured: Tamara Strike 



165 



GOLF 







SCORES 






LVC 417 


York 


435 






LVC 438 


E-Town 


433 






LVC 420 


Western MD 


393 Messiah 


442 




LVC 434 


Wilkes 


432 King's 


442 


Lycoming 458 


LVC 442 


Ursinus 


451 Johns Hopkins 


494 




LVC 441 


Albright 


440 






LVC 438 


E-Town 


415 F&M 


434 




LVC 440 


Muhlenberg 


429 Susquehanna 


432 


Swarthmore 461 


LVC 445 


Moravian 


435 Gettysburg 


447 




LVC 419 


Wilkes 


413 Scranton 


404 




LVC 408 


Widener 


407 Del. Val. 


422 




MAC Tournament: 15th out of 21 teams 









,^^:^ii.i^i:i:.v^i;..^aEi^ 



Row 1 ; |ell Kandazzo, Tom Glovinazzo; Tony Buglio, Chris Luc ( i, i ravis Emig, Mike Spangler 



166 




) wi»*w' wniU B Wi i " I n. H ii ' w umn wwwwii—iimip 



ium< mmmmmmmfKmi^ikmmmm\ \ -m _ iiiiiliiiliift. 




.:^^. 



••►•' >«M«M«^««|«.v 



vai«i*MiiMdWita«KdaMaNiNi«&iMfMM)ttMi|(^ 




«^ 





167 



SPORTS BANQUET 




168 




169 




170 




171 



COLOPHON 



A Thank You To: 



-Ed Patrick Jr. (and Peggy, Jennifer & baby #2) 

for all of his help, expert advice & hilarious stories. 

-Taylor Publishing Company 

for their patience and cooperation. 

-Mike Durinzi & Carl Wolf Studios 
for their photography skills. 

-LVC Student Council 

for their financial support. Thanks for coming through for us! 

-All of our advertising patrons. 

-Mr. Tim Ebersole 

for providing everything we didn't have. 

-College Center Desk Staff 

for answering all of our questions & helping us identify pic- 
tures. 

-Alice 

for mailing our mail when we couldn't or when we just didn't 

feel like it. 

-Mrs. Dawn Thren 

A special thanks to you, our advisor. You've done a great job. 

We couldn't have survived without you! 



172 



1990 QUITTAPAHILLA STAFF 



CO-EDITORS-IN-CHIEF 

Joan Landis 
L.J. La Barre 

PHOTOGRAPHY STAFF 

Keith Copenhaver 
Andy Wangman 
Sue Leonard 
Denise Snyder 
Bob Sherman 



COPY STAFF 

Editor: Steve Trapnell 
Staff: John Bowerman 

Ann Dietrich 

Ian Bonner 

SPORTS STAFF 

Dreama O'Neil 
Alyson Neiswender 
Lynn Schwalm 

ACADEMICS STAFF 

Editor: Michelle May 
Staff: Mike Bodine 

ORGANIZATIONS STAFF 

Editor: Amy Waterfield 
Staff: Doug Mancini 
Marie Landis 

SENIOR/UNDERCLASS STAFF 

Travis Emig 
Markella Saliaris 

EDITOR TRAINEE 
Linda Sterner 

COMPUTER STAFF 

Editor: Joan Landis 
Staff: Heather Ondik 
Janice Hartz 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
L.J. La Barre 

QUITTE ADVISOR 
Dawn Thren 



173 




Achievement 



The future belongs to our 
youth. Their education, physical 
development and general well-being 
are in the best interest of us all. They 
deserve our support in the form of 
well-planned and well-managed 
community programs. Programs 
where they'll learn about the pride 
of accomplishment. And the 
satisfaction of achievement. 

Meridian, one of Pennsylvania's 
strongest bank holding companies, is 
proud to support these activities. 

Because we don't just work here. 

We live here too.'" 



C^ Meridian 



Professionals with the personal touch. 




LOEHLE PHARMACY, 
INC. 



705-707 LEHMAN ST. 
LEBANON, PA 17042 



Founded 1881 
JOS. N. LOEHLE 



174 



WLVC640^ 



a 



OIC& 



ne va le 



v 



C wi5he5 ^-he b^5t of lucK to 

Lebanon Vaky^ 



raduatin 



lass 0- 



Serving Central Pennsylvania 

Since 1920 



Ebersoie. 



Pontiac-Oldsmobile-GMC Truck 

19th & Cumberland Sts., Lebanon, PA 17042-0539 

P.O. Box 539 

Phone (717) 273-7611 



Pontiac — Oldsmobile 
CMC Truck 

1900 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Honda 

2500 Cumberland St. 
Lebanon, Pa. 



Sales — Service — Parts — Body Repair & Paint — Rentals 



175 



the 


hair\A/orks 




styling salon 




445 east maple street, annville, pa 17003 




phone: 867-2822 



Swatara Creek 
Inn 



Bed & Breakfast 




R D 2, Box 692 (Jonestown Road) 
Annville, PA 1700} 

717-86S.3259 
Dick & Jeanneiie Hess, proprietors 



Patrons 



Jill Deitrich 



Barb, Bill & 

Brian 

Coates 



Hang in there, 

Anne. Love and 

Best Wishes from 

Paul Jr., Terri, 
Paul III & Michael 



Harold & Elsie 
Deitrich 



Best Wishes to the Class of 1990, Ellen Arnold. 

Good Job, Yearbook Staff! 

Congratulations and Good Luck to Daryl and his 
teammates; Scott, Scott, and Scott. 

Way To Go Fryeman! Knock 'em Dead. 

Best Wishes Chuck, you will reach your goal! 

Job well done Class of 1990 — Glen H. Woods 

Congratulations and Best Wishes to everyone in the 
class of 1990. Glenda Synodinos 

Good Luck Ann — John, Kathie, Lyle, and Jordan. 

Good Job Ann — Love, Curt, Sheri, and Shane 

Paul Kulp III 

Michael Kulp 

Class of 1990 — May you achieve your wildest 
dreams — and then some — Stephen Trapnell. 

Thanks to the Quittie Staff — Joan and L.J. 

Yvette — The House, Love + Friendship (enough 
said) L.J. 

Allie — Best of Luck! I'll miss ya. Love, L.J. 

Spring Break: Myrtle Beach Rules! 

Joan Jett — Florence "The Twightlight Zone" — The 
Tortoise 

Half Swedish Babe — A friendly tradition of shots! 
— Slash 

Clarkie — Hot Schnapps and Red Hot! Love, L.J. 

Brad and Dubbs — I'll miss ya! Love, L.J. 

Stef — Pink Flamingos! See ya Nov. 25! Love, L.J. 

Rew, Wrecks, Travis, and Keith — Next Year! the A- 
ettes. 



176 



]