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Full text of "Quittapahilla"




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1995leba 



QUITTAPAHILLA 

Lebanon Vattey Cottege 

Annvifle, Vcnnsywama 17003 

Volume 80 




Ij his year we broke new ground. The. library project embarked the coliege on its voyage to tfte future. We had a 

\_Jr groundbreaking introduction to hfe in China 2000-which encouraged us to explore beyond our national boundaries. 

But there was more to this year than the hbrary and Cftina. We broke new ground in our fives. We gained 

knowledge and achieved new goals. As we watched the library prepare for the new century, we realized tliat it symbolized our 

move as wed. The shed of the hbrary took on a new sfiape-as did we. We changed from high school grads to career minded men 

and women ready to take on anything that the future has to offer. There we profifents-tne fifirary construction crew shattered 

Gar6er Science Center's window. But each of us had at least one broken window to repair as weff-wnctfter academically, 

spiritually, or physically. Tfiat's fife. But mere is a rainfiow after every storm and after a few small repairs, we find ourselves 

better and stronger than before-ready to face what lies ahead. 

— KimBerfy Kettering 



The ntwfy redecorated Muud College Center 
is the site of die ptanl safe on the Saturday 
of FresftjTum Oneuuttioit weekend-. 

Lining tne a^cmij: qtuui is the Class of 
1998 as it greets its Orientation Leaders. 

Gathered in JTont of Lynch, tne Orientation 
Leaders ta&e time out front their busy week- 
end to pose for the camera. 




.Steve Young, the Residence Hail Director 
for Mary Green residence had, is caugftt as 
he exits his room. 

The members of the freshman ciass are 
supporting each other, hterauy. This trust 
and support activity was one of the many 
suXy things they had to do during Ptayfair. 



Breaking New Ground 




Freshmen 
Orientation 









ew surroundings, 
new faces, new 
ev-pcrienees. A fresdrnfln arriv- 
ing at Lebanon Vauey on Au- 
gust 27, 1994 easily could 
rm\'e 6een overwhelmed by it 
ail without the Freshman Ori- 
entation program. Resident stu- 
dents were assigned rooms 
within freshman communities 
located on afmost every floor of 
each dorm. This provided new 
students with the opportunity 
to five with their feliow doss- 
mates. Each freshman commu- 
nity had the 6eneftt oj having 
both a peer advisor and an ori- 
entation leader fiving on its 
floor. 

During the Freshman Orien- 



tation, the members of the 
Class of 1998 participated in 
activities such as Playfair. The 
activities organized by the Stu- 
dent Activities Office are de- 
signed to be iceBreakers, al- 
lowing the students to get to 
know one another in an infor- 
mal setting. 

Jennifer Evans, director of 
Student Activities, feit the en- 
tire orientation weekend was a 
great success. "I thought every- 
thing went ready well Ptayfair 
was a sueeess, as usual," Jen 
said. 

The class of 1998, the larg- 
est freshman class ever at LVC, 
started the year off right as they 
were 6reafeing new ground. 

— Meussa Howard 




Mahara Breunan, leader of Pfavfair, speaks to the Freshman eiass as Piavfair begins. 



Opening 



Her expression gives away Iter excitement as Tara Bennecoff, the 
1994 Homecoming Queen, stands witn fter escort, Ryan DiehX 

Afissa Mowrer stands proudly Before the crowd with her fiance 
after being tunned runner up. 




Sfcydivers provide an aerial tricfafiow Before the opening 

kickoff. 

Nate Hiikqas and 'Jason Heuery display their spirited creation. 



Breaking New Ground 



Homecoming 



9~ 



he 1994 Home- 
coming festivi- 
ties began Thursday, Oc- 
tober 20, with the second 
annual powder puff game. 
The Smas fling Pumpkins, 
composed of freshmen and 
juniors 6eat the Unknowns 
made up of sophomores and 
seniors 34-14. 

The celebration continued 
Friday evening with a 
schoo[-spirit-6oosting 6on- 
jire. The bonfire introduced 
all the Tail Sports teams' 
captains, as wed as the tra- 
ditional burning of an effigy 
of the rival team in the bon- 
fire. Friday evening featured 
Wig & Buckle's opening 
performance of Scapino and 
tfte comedy of Johnny 
Hardwicfc in the Under- 
ground. 



At hafftime of Saturday's 
game, the Homecoming Queen, 
Tara Bennecoff, was named. 
Ahssa Mowtct was the runner- 
up. A pig roast in the social 
quad, an Authors and Artist 
presentation, and the "Harvest 
Bad" topped off Saturday's fes- 
tivities. The crowning of the 
King, Andy Sensenig, took pla- 
ce at 11:30 p.m. 

The 1994 Haunted Home- 
coming was successful due to 
the heip of many people. At tfte 
top of the list is Laura Tothert, 
Homecoming Committee chair- 
person. Jen Evans, Director of 
Student Activities, commented, 
"I was very excited aoout 
Homecoming tins year. Laura 
ToCbert did' a great jo6." 

— Jasmine Amnions 




Melissa Raiding and Eileen Rossman carefuffv carve a pumpkin for the contest 

Before tfte fooxiaU game, Gina Fontana sells Psycft Cuih flowers in tfte social 

quad. 

Maria Svahr is caugftt upside down try tne camera during prcgatne festivities. 




Opening 



Torn Bennecofjf and Lori Sfieetz sing witft HIS 
on a sunny Saturday morning durinq the Spring 
Arts Festival 



Brooke Anderson and Tim Frantz 5it at tJxe 
Financial Aid tabic during lunch trying to encour- 
atjf students to send letters to Congressmen. 




Jenni Paiazziaitd Lisa Eptiug greet a visitor to toe Spring Arts Festival! 
Janice Bayer leads fur group during Children's Day on Aprif 28, 1995. 



Breaking New Ground 





War on Financial Aid 




ottfe lines were drawn at Leb- 
anon Valley tftis spring when 
the threat of student financial aid cuts 
became personal The Financial Aid office 
led the charge against Congressional pro- 
posed cuts by sponsoring a (etter writing 
campaign to Senators atuf Representatives 
in Washington. Tftis campaign received a 
Cot of attention on campus and (ocal news 
coverage. 

Contrary to the 6ehef that coGfegc stu- 
dents are apathetic, LVC students do not 
fit that motd. With 85% of students at 



LVC receiving some form of financial aid, 
student"; were more than willing to let 
their voices be heard on Capitoi Hut 

Unfortunately, the campaign was not 
met with complete support from the cam- 
pus comnrunity. Dissent /ram some ad- 
ministrators resulted in verbal warfare and 
soapbox theatrics. 

- Kimberly Taylor 

— Melissa Howard 



Opening 




Spring Arts 
Festival 








ike Peachey 
and Bill 
Safcer, co-coordinators of 
the 25t(t AnnuaC Spring 
Arts Festival, wished for 
two things at the opening of 
the weekend: that everyone 
enjoy their time at the fes- 
tival and "that the sun shine 
brightly alt weekend." 
Wed, judging from the reac- 
tions of the crowds of peo- 
ple that fitted the Social 
Quad both Friday and Satur- 
day night, the weekend was 
a success. As for the weath- 
er... that was a different sto- 

r y- 

Despite the fact that Sun- 
day's rain chased away a tot 
of people, it did not stop 
others from having fun. 
PHILO proceeded to make 
steak sandwiches in the rain 



during the early afternoon 
and loyal audiences watched 
as the LVC College, Con- 
cert, and Chamber Choirs 
and the LVC Symphonic 
Band performed in Lutz 
Hall 

Leedy Theater celebrated 
the arts this weekend with 
the dance routine of Cricket 
Dance and the entertaining 
production of Samuel Beck- 
ett's Waiting For Godot 

Despite the earfy ending 
of the 25 th Annual Spring 
Arts Festival, the weekend 
was a great success. Though 
disappointed aoout the 
weather, Peachy stated that 
"we had a great day on 
Saturday." All he could say 
afeout Sunday was "we real- 
ly got wet." 

— Jason Macoviafc 



Josfi Howard and feflow brothers, including 
alumni, prepare the famous Phuo cheeses- 
teak. 

He Is Savior performs on the Chanel stage 
thinm] the Saturday morning festivities. 

Rnau Powers is about to get it at the "Ciio 
Splash" booth. 



Breaking New Ground 





On. a beautiful Saturday momma, the wanaenna. comedian is caught in 
action under die balloon arch. 

The International Student Organisation food" stand, serving various 
foreign dciicacies, was popular with the crowcC 

Entertainment tfirouqhout the weekend was varied. Here a ventrilo- 
quist performs on the Chapel stage. 

Crystaf Crownover sits patiently as she has her caricature drawn. 




k#"AT 




Opening 




Breaking New Ground 



C indent Life 



o? 



ebanon Valley College students participated in the Haunted House 
^>C~~) sponsored by North College Hall and were involved in the Christmas 
at the Valley program. Theater productions throughout the year 
provided entertainment for the entire campus community. 

Several LVC students seized the opportunity to study abroad. There were also 
exchange students from other countries such as England and Sweden studying at 
Lebanon Valley. 

Student Council brought a big name group, Toad the Wet Sprocket, to campus 
on April 6. Perhaps the greatest ground breaking event, literally, was the 
beginning of construction on the new library. Students had to adapt to the 
changes forced upon them by the temporary library housed in the West Dining 
Hall. 




With Vickroy Hall all decked 
out for Halloween, Michelle 
Schmalzer and Dennie Spei- 
cher chat after the Homecom- 
ing football game. LVC stu- 
dents got in the decorating 
mood during the holiday sea- 
sons throughout the year. 



Miller Chapel is the site of many events in a student's life. Classes, religious services, 
Opening Convocation and Graduation Baccalaurate all take place in the Chapel. 



Student Life 




Decking the Halls 

Decorating for the Holidays 



Q/1/1 

W W I . aybe it is just an 
* ' \s excuse to put off 
studying, but decorating for the 
holidays seems to be a popular 
activity on campus. Halloween 
this year was especially decora- 
tive because the holiday coincid- 
ed with the Homecoming week- 
end. Organizers of the weekend 



chose a Haunted Homecoming 
theme. Black and orange decora- 
tions covered the campus. 

During the Christmas holiday 
season, many students pulled out 
all the stops as they decorated dorm 
rooms and hallways. The strings of 
lights hanging in the halls lit up the 
dorms even on the gloomiest of 
winter days. 

— Melissa Howard 



12 



Breaking New Ground 




Amv Bowman, Rachael Shattuck, Kim Tavlor, and Joanna Toft 
pose with Santa Claus during the Holiday Dinner. 

Mary Green residents were among the holiday decorators. 



The front entrance of Vickroy Hall is dressed up with posters, 
balloons and other Halloween decorations. 




Erica 


Schneck and Lynne 


Dettore 


converse in 


the social 


quad. 


The 


ive nativity scene is ; 


special 


part 


of the 


Christmas 


at the 


Valley celebration. 













Student Life 



13 



It may have looked like slow progress, 
but there was a lot of work to be done 
underground. Fortunately the weath- 
er cooperated throughout the winter. 



Construction had definitely begun 
once the brick of the old building was 
torn down. 



Huang Wei Kai "Mike" 




Faust Lounge was transformed into a temporary library. 
The structure of the old library was used for the new one. 



14 Breaking New Ground 




-^^<aafl ǤgS2figS 




Getting a Facelift 

Construction Abounds at the Valley 




erhaps the most noticable 
change on the Lebanon 
Valley campus was the construction 
of the new library. After moving all 
of the contents of the Gossard Me- 
morial Library to temporary sites in 
the West Dining Hall, Faust Lounge 
and one of the lounges in Vickroy 
Hall, the construction was un- 



derway. 

The temporary library caused mi- 
nor problems. Books were not al- 
ways immediately accessible mak- 
ing it difficult to finish research at 
the last minute. There was also a 
decrease in space for studying. 

The minor inconveniences of the 
past will be forgotten when LVC 
students have their new state-of- 
the-art library at their disposal. 



Mike Huang 



Student Life 



15 



Several LVC students perform on the Leedy stage during Spring Arts festivities. 

The Zimmerman Recital Hall was also a new addition to campus. Tatjana Cuic and 
Amy Shollenherger perform during Spring Arts. 



Scapino was another successful fall 

play. 

Another newly renovated building is 
the Art Gallery located on Route 934. 




The audience listens attentively to Tamsin Levine. 
An art display outside the Leedy Theatet attracts attention 



Breaking New Ground 





Acting Out at LVC 

A Stage for All Occasions 




he newly renovated Leedy 
Theater serves many pur- 
poses at LVC. Students, faculty, and 
the community are entertained by 
the shows produced by the Wig and 
Buckle Society such as Scapino and 
the musical, Carnival. However, 
someone venturing into the Leedy 
Theater might also find anything 



from a lecture to a psychic. 

Open house sessions for prospec- 
tive students are sometimes held in 
the theater. The facility is also use- 
ful for Student Activities Office 
events. The stage was also used a 
few times for the Authors and Ar- 
tists series during the year. Leedy 
Theater is the perfect setting for 
cultural events or other entertain- 
ment. 



Student Life 



17 



Mike Huang 



Andy Simms hits the ball during Late 
Night at Arnold, a Student Activities 
Office event. 



A popular 


Late N 


ght 


ac- 


tivity was 


SCUBA. 


Arnold 


Pool was 


the site 


of 


this 


event. 










1 g Breaking New Ground 





■**c 




Wellness Week 

More than Sneakers and Sweats 



\/\ / hat do massages, sex, 
V V stress, and aerobics all 
have in common? According to Pam 
Lambert, they are the ingredients for 
Wellness Week, February 6-10. Across 
the campus a wide array of activities 
were planned that encompassed, as 
Lambert pointed out, "physical as well 
as mental" wellness. 

Some of these events included mas- 
sage therapy, self-esteem workshops- 
hosted by Millersville University stu- 
dents, question and answer sessions 
with a state trooper about alcohol 
awareness, and a forum about sex and 
violence and dating. 



Jen Evans, the coordinator of the 
event, said that Wellness Week is an 
annual event geared toward "helping 
you feel well." It achieves this, said 
Evans, "through different programs 
on how to relax" and how to provide 
the best care for your body. "Of 
course," she said, "those who need the 
program most will probably be too 
busy to come." 

Wellness Week concluded on a more 
entertaining note featuring Friday's 
Late Night At Arnold Sports Center. 
It's ,i week of fun, I \ ans said, thai 
hopefully has underlying educational 
themes." 

— Natalie McDonald 



Huang Wei Kai 
"Mike" 



Student Life 







20 



Breaking New Ground 




tfiietlcs 



<ZP 



<r?C^ ebanon Valley athletic teams are supported by students, faculty, 

the surrounding communities, and parents. 
LVC is a Division III college in the NCAA. The Men's Basketball team 
came into the season as the 1993-1 994 National Champions. Although the 
team lost in the first round of the tournament this year, the season was still 
a success. 

The Field Hockey and Volleyball teams also faired well against their 
competition. Each LVC team represented the school with class and sports- 
manship. 




The 1993-94 Division III NCAA basketball champions again advanced to National 
competition for the 1994-95 season under the leadership of new coach. Brad McAlester. 



Lebanon Valley College's 
women's sports have long pro- 
duced many fine athletes. One 
of the top women's teams for 
the 1994-1995 season was the 
field hockey team. Several 
players were named Ail- 
American and All-MAC team 
players. 



Sports 



21 




m 



i 



* m 





Record: 3-6-0 



Johns Hopkins 

Wilkes 

Delaware 

Valley 

Moravian 

Susquehanna 

Juniata 

Lycoming 

Albright 

Widener 



LYCOm 



Thanks to a good block. Andy Sensenig carries the ball for the first down in 
the Homecoming game against Lycoming. 

After his interception. Ed Boyer is congratulated by Jason Lutz as he takes 
the field with the rest of the offensive team. 











Breaking New Ground 




Football 



T 

|| he 1994 Flying 
~*~ Dutchmen finished a 
frustrating season with a record 
of three wins and six losses. The 
lone out-of-conference game, 
against Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity, resulted in a win with a final 
score of 10-0. This first game 
gave the team hope of a suc- 
cessful season. Unfortunately, 
this win was followed by four 
consecutive losses. 




An especially disappointing loss 
came on October 22. when the 
Dutchmen were defeated by 
Lycoming College. 14-12. in the 
Homecoming game. In attendance 
that day were 3.500 fans including 
many students and alumni. 

Attendance throughout the sea- 
son was good. Home game attend- 
ance totaled 13,500, with a home 
average of 2,700. Support of the 
team was obvious even during 
rough times. 

Guided by head coach. Jim 
Monos. the Dutchmen were led by 
several players. Offensively, senior 
Andy Sensenig led the team with a 
net gain of 471 rushing yards, at- 
tained in his nine starts. Senior Ja- 
son Lutz, with 391 yards had the 
longest run of the season for LVC. 
His 29 yard run was against Del- 
aware Valley College. 

Starting quarterback, senior 
Mark Lapole. had a total of 1,237 
passing yards and 1 1 1 net rushing 
yards. Ed Donley, also a senior, led 
the team with 44 receptions and an 
average of 5 1 .4 yards per game. 

Defensively, junior Ed Boyer 
stood out with five interceptions 
during the season. Following close- 
ly behind were juniors Mike Susi 
and Cory Mattern. both with four 
interceptions. 

— Melissa Howard 



With the offensive team on the field. Cory 
Mattern contemplates his next play. 

Mark Lapole fires a spiral pass to a waiting 
receiver. 

Coach Jim Monos gives instructions to #84. 



Sports 



23 



Good cheerleading requires precise movement, good projection and a 
constant smile. 

Jackie Wevodau smiles encouragingly at the crowd during the Home- 
coming game. 

Tonya Showers is determined to rouse the quiet crowd into a frenzy. 




94 Breaking New Ground 




Cheerleading 



T 

I he Cheerleading squads 
"*" at Lebanon Valley play 
important roles during football 
and basketball games. In forma- 
tion on the track, in front of the 
LVC bleachers, the football 
cheerleaders provide inspira- 
tional chants and cheers. Al- 
though the crowd does not al- 
ways respond when called on to 
do so. the cheerleaders root on 
the team strong and loud. 
During the basketball season. 



the basketball cheerleaders are 
present at all the games. The 
cheers and dances performed 
add spirit and enthusiasm to the 
game. 

Throughout the fall and win- 
ter, the cheerleaders practice 
their routines and cheers. With 
the help of their adviser. Jen- 
nifer Evans, the cheerleaders are 
able to perform at almost every 
game. 

— Melissa Howard 




Who says a good cheerleader has to be a 
emale, as demonstrated by Jason Lausch. 

Dennie Speicher tells the crowd to "get fired 



Sports 




Record: 11-8 



Millers ville 

Wilkes 

Gettysburg 

Juniata 

William Smith 

St. Lawrence 

Moravian 

Haverford 

Franklin & 

Marshall 

Drew 

Bloomsburg 

Albright 

Susquehanna 

Ithaca 

Elizabethtown 

Eastern 

Mennonite 

Messiah 

Widener 

Wilkes 



LVC Orjrj.. 



Head Coach Kathy Tierney and assistant Sandy 
Fauser give instructions during a game. 

Senior back Julia Foose races the opponent to the ball. 

Dana Centofanti, senior back, does her part on de- 
fense. 



:■-, . ' 






\\J 



fi mWi**>»«*** 



!jtJ*WMW»*** 



26 



Breaking New Ground 




Field Hockey 



T 

j he Lebanon Valley Field 
■"** Hockey team returned 
to the MAC playoffs this year, 
but suffered a first-round loss 
against Wilkes. It was the first 
time in three years that the Lady 
Dutchmen did not make the 
NCAA playoffs. 

LVC finished the season 1 1-8 
overall and 6-1 in the Mid- 
Atlantic Conference Common- 
wealth League. 
Senior Alissa Mowrer led the 



team with 2 1 goals. She also had 
eight assists, senior Becky Wiest 
was the Dutchmen's assist leader 
with nine. 

LVC's first victory of the season 
was in the home opener against 
Wilkes. Junior goalie Angie 
Harnish made five saves in the 2-0 
win. 

When the Lady Dutchmen com- 
peted in the William Smith Invi- 
tational in Geneva, New York the 
weekend of September 17. they 
were defeated by William Smith, 
the 1992 Division III champion. 
Freshman goalie. Joanna bates, 
playing in her first game as a 
Dutchman, made six saves. 

Later in the season, LVC defeat- 
ed Albright at home on October 4. 
They outshot the Lions 69-2 in the 
6-0 win. 

LVC secured their spot in the 
MAC playoffs by defeating 
Elizabethtown 3-0 at home on Oc- 
tober 13. The Dutchmen won their 
last game of the regular season on 
October 22, during Homecoming 
weekend, against Widener. 

— LVC Sports Information 



Alissa Mowrer congratulates teammate Joda 
Glossner on her goal. 

Cima Hollmger gets a chance to rest during a 
game. 

With an open shot on goal. Becky Wiest gets 
reach to fire. 



Sports 



Mike Houck carefully stays with the ball. 
Defense is a strong part of the Dutchmen 
game. 




Record: 3-17 






LVC Odd. 


Misericordia 


3 


Randolph Macon 


7 


Lynchburg 


2 


Elizabethtown 


5 


Western Maryland 


3 


York 


4 


Wilkes 


2 1 


Goucher 


3 


Ursinus 


3 4 


Moravian 


1 6 


Washington 


2 


Widener 


4 3 


Susquehanna 


1 2 


Juniata 


1 2 


Messiah 


5 


Kings 


3 


Franklin & Marshall 


1 2 


Dickinson 


2 4 


Allentown 


4 


Albright 


1 3 



28 



Breaking New Ground 




Soccer 



/ % struggling Men's Soccer 
"*- ■"- team, with head coach 
Mark Pulisic. ended the season 
with three wins and seventeen 
losses. Seven games were played 
against Middle Atlantic Confer- 
ence Commonwealth League 
teams. The remainder of the op- 
ponents were non-league teams. 
Freshman Robb Ford had 163 
saves in the goal. Keith Stryker 
had 109 saves. Leading the of- 
fensive attack was Rongrig 




tiiLi'x; ■■ 







Sangpo with six goals. Rostislav 
Kopylkov and Greg Glembocki 
were not far behind with five and 
four goals, respectively. Chris 
Hartman and Chris Kirchner each 
had two goals during the season. 
Glembocki led the team in assists 
with a total of six. 

The Dutchmen Soccer team is in 
the building process. With the ex- 
ception of three juniors and a sen- 
ior, the team is composed entirely 
of freshmen and sophomores. With 
experience playing together, the 
Dutchmen have potential to be 
contenders in the future. 



Greg Glembocki. holding off the de- 
fender, dribbles the ball downfield. 

Dutchman midfielder is on the at- 
tack. 



In the middle of a crowd of the op- 
posing team"s players. Brian Stanilla 
frees the ball. 



Sports 



29 




Stacey Clever competes in the women's event. 
Dan Palopoli and Ed Brignole run in the men's race. 



30 Breaking New Ground 




Cross Country 



! ebanon Valley's men's 
* ■ and women's cross coun- 
try squads did not have a great 
deal of team success during the 
season. There were, however, 
several strong individual perfor- 
mances. In the first meet of the 
season, the Millersville Maraud- 
er Invitational, held on Satur- 
day. September 3, the men's 
team had a fourth place finish. 
Senior Jeff Koegel led the 




Dutchmen runners by finishing 
first. Ed Brignole finished fifth. 

On September 10, Lebanon Val- 
ley hosted its own invitational at 
Indiantown Gap. The LVC men 
finished ninth, while the women's 
team was sixteenth. Lisa Frey, the 
standout of the women's team, had 
a seventeenth place finish. She was 
number one in the Baptist Bible 
College Invitational. 

In the October 1 meet against 
Allentown. Muhlenberg, and 
Swarthmore, Koegel and Brignole 
finished first and second, respec- 
tively. Frey was the first-place fin- 
isher in her race. 

The Middle Atlantic Conference 
cross country championship was 
held October 29 at Susquehanna. 
Koegel won his sixth race of the 
season there. Brignole tied for 
eighth in the men's race and Frey 
placed fifth in the women's. 

The highlight of the season for 
Koegel came on November 19 
when he placed 36th in the NCAA 
Division III Cross Country cham- 
pionship held at Lehigh University. 
Koegel was competing against 1 84 
other finishers in the race and im- 
proved from his 1 18th-place finish 
in 1992. This time in the 1994 
championship was just four and a 
half seconds from earning him a 
NCAA ail-American selection. 

— Ann Schlottman 

— Melissa Howard 



Jason Badman and Jen Smith show the en- 
durance it takes to run cross-country. 

Lisa Frey. Jeff Koegel, and Ed Brignole pose 
with their trophies from the Susquehanna 
Invitational. 



Sports 



31 









1 Record: 22-8 








Team 


Scores 






Cabrini 


15-8, 15-9 


2/0 




Ursinus 


15-2, 15-5 


2/0 




Susquehanna 


15-9, 15-11, 15-7 


3/0 




Elizabethtown 
Scranton Tourn. 


3-15, 7-15, 10-15 


0/3 






Gallaudet 


13-15, 15-10, 15-13 


2/1 




Delaware Tech 


15-5, 15-5 


2/0 




U. of Albany 


15-11, 16-14 


2/0 




King's 


15-12, 8-15, 15-12 


2/1 




Cortland St. 


15-6, 10-15, 16-14 


2/1 




Goucher 


5-15, 13-15 


0/2 




Moravian 


15-4, 15-12, 15-8 


3/0 




LVC Tourn. 




■ 




St. Mary's 


12-15, 15-7, 15-9 


2/1 




UPJ 


15-13,0-15, 15-12 


2/1 




Wilkes 


15-5, 15-12 


2/0 




Lycoming 


15-7,9-15, 15-8 


2/1 




1 UPJ 


8-15, 15-9, 10-15 


1/2 




Alvernia 


15-6, 15-7, 15-8 


3/0 




Dickinson 


15_4, 16-14, 15-13 


3/0 




King's 


15-13, 15-5, 13-15, 15-4 


3/1 




Delaware Valley 


15-0, 15-1, 15-8 


3/0 




Albright 


16-14, 15-13, 15-12 


3/0 




Goucher Tourn. 








Marymount 


15-9, 15-5 


2/0 




! Wash. & Lee 


13-15, 15-5, 13-15 


1/2 




Messiah 


3-15,4-15 


0/2 




Sweet Briar 


15-5 15-2 


2/0 




I Juniata 


4-15, 3-15, 10-15 


0/3 




Widener 


15-4, 15-12, 12-15, 15-4 


3/1 




Messiah 


14-16,13-15,15-3,15-10,8-15 


2/3 




Allentown 


15-10,15-9,9-15,2-15,11-15 


2/3 




1 Wilkes 


15-11, 15-10, 15-11 


3/0 



39 Breaking New Ground 




Volleyball 



T 

he Dutchmen Volleyball 
"*■ team finished the season 
with an impressive 22-8 overall 
record. They were 4-3 in the 
Mid-Atlantic Conference Com- 
monwealth League. 

LVC opened the season with a 
non-league win over Cabrini. 
The Lady Dutchmen palyed in 
the Scranton Tournament and 




eh n 





won five matches and lost only one. 
The loss was against Goucher Col- 
lege. 

The LVC Tournament was also a 
good show by the Dutchmen. THey 
won four of five matches, losing 
their second match-up against the 
University of Pittsburgh- 
Johnstown. 

In the Goucher Tournament. 
LVC split the matches, winning 
two and losing two. 

The Dutchmen profited from a 
good season from senior Angie 
Shuler. She had 698 assists during 
the season. Sophomore Natalie 
Baruka led the team with 319 kills, 
58 solo blocks and 28 assisted 
blocks. 

Becky Slagle also boosted the 
team with her 41 service aces and 
138 digs. 

— LVC Sports Information 



Christi 


e Burger 


help 


:d 


the team with 


her 


kills an 


d digs. 














Coach 


Wavne 


:> err\' 


,m 


d the 


team 


hu 


ddle 


during 


a match. 















Sports 



33 



Record: 22-6 



Alaska-Fairbanks 

Hawaii-Pacific 

Millersville 

Moravian 

Averett 

Randolph-Macon 

Albright 

Ursinus 

Wesley 

Gwyndd-Mercy 

Swarthmore 

Juniata 

Susquehanna 

Widener 

Elizabethtown 

Messiah 

Moravian 

F&M 

Juniata 

Albright 

Widener 

Susquehanna 

Messiah 

Elizabethtown 

Upsala 

Scranton 

Wilkes 

Goucher 



LVC Orjrx 



Senior guard Keith Adams was LVC's high 
scorer in their 92-58 win over Juniata. 



r»> 



r #r 









Kiif 







j&. 



Tri-captain center Mark Hofsass goes for a 
jump shot. His scoring and rebounds contrib- 
uted to the success of the team. 



34 



Breaking New Ground 




Men's 
Basketball 



T 

|| he 1993-1994 NCAA 
"*" Division III Champion 
Dutchmen began the 1994-1995 
season with The Tournament of 
Champions in Fairbanks. Alas- 
ka, on November 1 8 and 1 9. The 
third annual tournament was 
hosted by the University of Alas- 
ka-Fairbanks. 




The Dutchmen lost the first round 
game to UAF. But LVC defeated Ha- 
waii-Pacific in overtime in the con- 
solation game and became the first 
Division III team to win a game in the 
tournament. 

Closer to home, the Dutchmen had 
a successful season and won the MAC 
title, with a 3-0 record in the playoffs. 
Unfortunately, the team suffered a 
loss to Goucher College in the first 
round of the NCAA Division III tour- 
nament. 

During the season, the Dutchmen 
were defeated by non-league rival 
Franklin and Marshall in an away 
game played before 2500 fans. 

Before the loss to Goucher. LVC 
had won 9 consecutive games. 

The team finished the season with a 
22-6 overall record and a 12-2 recored 
in the MAC in Head Coach Brad Mc- 
Alester's first year with LVC. Senior 
Mike Rhoades was named a National 
Association of Basketball Coaches- 
Sears Division III First Team Ail- 
American. 

— LVC Sports Information 

— Melissa Howard 



Mike Rhoades is met by teammates John Lazicki, Phil 
Campbell and Jason Say during the introduction ofthe 
game's starters. 

Senior guard Rhoades was a standout during his four 
seasons with the Dutchmen. 

The bench watches intently during a close game. Re- 
serve players added depth to the team. 



Sports 



;-, 



Record: 11-13 



York 

Western Maryland 

Marywood 

Moravian 

Albright 

Gallaudet 

Frostburg 

King's 

Washington 

Juniata 

Western Maryland 

Susquehanna 

Widener 

Elizabethtown 

Messiah 

Moravian 

Juniata 

Gettysburg 

Albright 

Widener 

Franklin & 

Marshall 

Susquehanna 

Messiah 

Elizabethtown 



LVC OrjrjL 



Sophomore guard Missy Bleyzgi; 
manuevers around the defense. 









33 



\ 



Susan DuBosq calls for the pass. She led 
the team in scoring. 



36 



Breaking New Ground 




Women's 
Basketball 



T 

he Lady Dutchmen Bas- 
-** ketball team concluded 
their 24 game season with an 
overall record of 1 1 wins and 1 3 
losses. The team was 5-9 in the 
Middle Atlantic Conference 
Commonwealth League. 

The season began with two 
awav losses to non-league teams. 




in 



The team won their home 
opener against Marywood. 

A disappointing loss came 
in the thirteenth game of the 
season against host MAC op- 
ponent Widener. The Lady 
Dutchmen lost 58-61 in over- 
time. 

Unfortunately, the team 
suffered three losses to finish 
their season. 

Sophomore Missy Bleyzgis 
was the only Dutchman to 
start all 24 games. She aver- 
aged 10.1 points per game. 

Susan DuBosq. also a soph- 
omore, led the team with an 
average of 10.7 points per 
game. The 5' 10" forward also 
led with 120 defensive re- 
bounds and seven offensive 
rebounds. 

Freshman Tricia Rudis 
pulled down 1 1 1 defensive re- 
bounds during the season. 

The 1994-1995 team was 
fairly young. All the women 
were freshman and sopho- 
mores with the exception of 
senior Joda Glossner. 



Tricia Rudis attempts a field goal. She add- 
ed support with her defensive rebounds. 

Jennifer Emerich goes up for an offensive 
rebound in the Juniata game. 

Head coach Peg Kauffman, in her second 
year with LVC. goes over the plays during a 
timeout. 



Sports 



37 






Paul Richarson swims the butterfly m a 
meet. 

Here, freshman John Schmidt swims the 
backstroke portion of this individual med- 
ley. 





Record: 3-8 








LVC 


Opp. 


Lycoming 


84 


101 


Albright 


31 


64 


Washington & 


35 


59 


Jefferson 






Elizabethtown 


94 


103 


College of 


109 


59 


j Misericordia 






Western Maryland 


37 


57 


Juniata 


111 


68 


King's 


108 


68 


Scranton 


82 


118 


1 Susquehanna 


88 


105 


Widener 


91 


108 



Mike Huang swims his primary stroke, freestyle, during a meet in the Arnold Sport: 
Center pool. 



38 



Breaking New Ground 




Men's 
Swimming 



1 he 1994-1995 LVC Men's 

■*■ Swimming Team finished 

the season with a 3-8 record. The 

wins came against the College of 

Misericordia, Juniata and King's. 

Eight LVC men qulaified for the 
Middle Atlantic Conference Cham- 
pionship. Senior Howie Spangler 
placed first in the 100-yard and 
200-yard freestyle events and the 
100-yard backstroke. Spangler and 




two other MAC swimmers 
won the David B. Eavenson 
Award for the Outstanding 
Swimmer. 

Junior Bob Twining place 
second in the 100-yard and 
200-yard breaststroke. Twin- 
ing also finished sixth in the 
200-yard individual medley. 
John Schmidt, a freshman, 
finished sixth in the 200-yard 
butterfly and tenth in the 100- 
yard butterfly. He also fin- 
ished ninth in the 400-yard 
individual medley. 

Senior Scott Mongo fin- 
ished seventh in both the 100- 
yard and 200-yard breastroke. 
Sophomore Jason Kopp was 
seventh in the 1 00-yard back- 
stroke and ninth in the 200- 
yard backstroke. 

Allen Keeney, a sopho- 
more, was 12th in the 100- 
yard back and 1 9th the the 
100-yard fly. Jason Tesche, 
also a sophomore, placed 
14th in the 50-yard freestyle. 

The LVC men's 200-yard 
medley relay team of Kopp. 
Twining, Schmidt, and Span- 
gler finished fifth as did the 
400-yard freestyle relay team 
of Kopp, Tesche, Twining, 
and Spangler. The 800-yard 
freestyle relay team of Kopp. 
Keeney. Tesche, and Spangler 
was seventh and the 200-yard 
freestyle relay team of Span- 
gler, Kopp, Twining and 
Tesche was eighth. 



Wayne Knaub cheers on fellow team mem- 
bers during a meet. 

Senior Scott Mongo competed in the breast- 
stroke in the MAC championship. 



Sports 



39 



Record: 0-11 



LVC Orjrj, 



Freshman Wendy War- 
ner takes a breath dur- 
ing her freestyle event. 



Lycoming 

Albright 

Washington and 

Jefferson 

Elizabethtown 

College of Misericordia 

Western Maryland 

Juniata 

King's 

Scranton 

Susquehanna 

Widener 




40 



Breaking New Ground 




Women's 
Swimming 



T 

I he L V C Women's 
-*- Swimming team's sea- 
son came to an end with a 0-1 1 
record. Although the regular sea- 
son was a bit disappointing, sev- 
en LVC women were qualifiers 
for the Middle Atlantic confer- 
ence Commonwealth League 
Championship. 




Junior Gina Fontana, who 
qulaified for seven events, fin- 
ished fourth in both the 200- 
yard and the 400-yard indi- 
vidual medley events. 
Fontana also placed fifth in 
the 200-yard breaststroke. 
Nancy Seidel, a sophomore, 
was 1 5th in both the 50-yard 
freestyle and the 100-yard 
backstroke. Junior Sandy 
Bambrick finished 17th in the 
50-yard freestyle and 19th in 
the 100-yard butterfly. 

Freshman Wendy Warner 
was 18th in the 200-yard free- 
style and 25th in the 100-yard 
backstroke. 

Wendy Zimmerman, a 
sophomore, had qualified for 
six events. She was part of the 
800-yard freestyle relay team 
but later dislocated her shoul- 
der during her first individual 
event and missed the rest of 
the meet. 

Fontana. Seidel, Bambrick 
and Warner made up LVC's 
200-yard and 400-yard free- 
style relay teams and the 400- 
vard medley relav team. 



Shannon Jarmol. a freshman swimmer, competes 
in the hreaststroke during a home meet. 

First year coach Patty Wilson reviews the lane 
assignments with members of the team. 

An LVC swimmer dives off the block to begin the 
race in the meet with Washington and Jefferson. 



Sports 



41 



12 



Simone Attieh 


Jr. 


6'3" 


Hwt. 


Marc Attivo 


So. 


5'11" 


177 


Robert Heim 


Fr. 


5'6" 


142 


Joseph Howe 


So. 


5'9" 


190 


Brian Kampf 


So. 


5'11" 


Hwt. 


Patrick King 


Jr. 


5'7» 


190 


Chad Lutz 


Sr. 


5' 10" 


167 


Jonathan Lutz 


So. 


5'11" 


134 


Justin Motz 


Jr. 


5'11" 


150 


Sean O'Doherty 


So. 


6'0" 


Hwt. 


Jon Smith 


Fr. 


6'0" 


158 


Breaking New Ground 









WRESTLING 



T 

fj he 1994-1995 Lebanon Valley College Wrestling team was 

**- comprised of eleven men. Head coach Larry Larthey was 

assisted by alumnus Chris Lloyd and student Chad Miller. Although 

the team finished the season with a 1-10 record, there was reason for 

individual team members to celebrate. 

Four members of the LVC wrestling team competed in the NCAA 
East Regional tournament at Ursinus College. Freshman Bob Heim lost 
two matches at 142 in the tournament. He finished the season with a 
13-12 record. Highlights of his season include placing fourth at the 1 3th 
Annual Mount Union College Purple Raider Invitational on January 6 
and 7, and placing seventh in Lebanon Valley's 25th Annual Gerald J. 




Petrofes Invitational held on De- 
cember 2 and 3. Sophomore Brian 
Kampf lost two matches in the 
NCAA tournament at Heavy- 
weight. He finished the season with 
a 2-1 1 record. 

Sophomore Joe Howe placed an 
impressive second at the NCAA 
Regionals at 190 with four wins 
and one loss. He concluded the sea- 
son with an overall 27-8 record, 
finishing third in both the King's 
College Monarch Invitational on 
November 12 and the Petrofes In- 
vitational. He placed fourth in the 
Mount Union Invitational. Howe 
finished second in the Middle At- 
lantic Conference Championships 
held at King's College on February 
4. 

Senior Chad Lutz also competed 
in the NCAA East Regional tour- 
nament. He placed fifth at 167 
pounds with four wins and two 
losses. He was third in the King's 
College Invitational and fifth in the 
Petrofes Invitational. Lutz placed 
third at the MAC Championships 
and finished the season with a re- 
spectable 27-8 record. 

— Ann Schlottman 

— Melissa Howard 



Chad Lutz stares down his opponent in a match 
during the Gerald J. Perofes Invitational held 
December 2 and 3 at LVC. 



Sports 



l:'. 



Mike Huana 



Nate Hillegas easily strides over the hurdles during the 400 
Meter Hurdles. 

Freshman Julie Stenger is caught taking a break during prac- 
tice. 




II 



Breaking New Ground 




Track & Field 



J : n the Middle Atlantic Con- 
-*- ference 1995 Indoor Track 
and Field Championsips. the 
LVC Men's team finished 95 
points that earned them third 
place. The LVC Women's team 
accumulated 54 points and fin- 
ished in fourth place. 

Lebanon Valley teams may 
not have finished in first place; 
however, sophomore runner 
Nate Hillegas took fourth place 




in the 55 meter hurdles and 
first place in the 400 meter 
race and the 200 meter race. 
Jen Nauss. also a sophomore, 
placed first in the Women's 
Long Jump, the 55 Meter 
Dash, and the Women's 200 
Meter. Hillegas and Nauss 
were named MVPs of the 
championship meet. 

The Middle Atlantic Con- 
ference Championships for 
Outdoor Track were held on 
May 5 and 6. The LVC men 
placed third out of nine teams 
with 128 points. 

Senior Jeff Koegel placed 
first in the 5,000 Meter Run 
and the 10.000 Meter Run. 
Hillegas was first in the 400 
Meter Dash and in the 400 
Meter Hurdles. LVC senior 
Ross DeNisco was named the 
outstanding male athlete of 
the meet. He placed first in 
the Discus and first in the 
Shot Put. DeNisco was the 
1994 champion of these two 
events. 

The LVC women placed 
fourth out of nine teams with 
104 points. Nauss placed first 
in the 1 00 Meter and 200 Me- 
ter Dashes and second in the 
Long Jump. Thea Roomet 
was second in the High Jump. 
Bryn Metcalf took second in 
the 100 Meter Hurdles and 
Cori Nolen was second in the 
400 Meter Hurdles. 



The LVC Women's and Men's Outdoor Track 
Teams 



Sports 



i:> 



Golf 



j! VC's 1995 Golf team 
* ' was coached by Lou Sor- 
rentino. The team had an overall 
regular season record of 1 1-5-1. 
Junior Craig Sharnetzka 
played in 8 matches. His low 
round was 75 and he average 
82.1 strokes on the season. 

Jim Zerbe played in 1 2 match- 
es. He averaged 81.5 strokes and 
had a low round of 76. Scott 
Maier's low round was also 76. 

Five members of the team 
played in the MAC Golf cham- 
pionships April 29 and 30 at 
Mountain Laurel Resourt. LVC 
finished fourth out of 1 3 teams 
in 3 round. Jim Zerbe had the 
lowest score for the LVC team 
with a total of 243 strokes. 



Brett Duvall jokes around after a spring 
practice on the courts. 

Gentaro Yui, Tony Nyugen, and Hal 
Fero watch a match through the fence. 




Hi 



Breaking New Ground 





jM 





Tennis 



T 

l| he 1995 LVC Men's 
"*■ Tennis Team, with 
Head Coach Cliff Myers, had a 
4-8 overall record and a 1-6 rec- 
ord in the MAC Commonwealth 
League. 

LVC's number one seed, 
freshman Chris Dean, had a 6-6 
record. Jason Henery, number 2, 
had a 6-5 record. 

Both competed in the MAC 
singles championships played 
Friday May 5 at Elizabethtown 
College. Dean lost his match. 6- 
1,6-1 to an opponent from Mes- 
siah College. Henery also lost his 
match. 7-5, 6-2 to an FDU- 
Madison player. 



Members of the LVC men's tennis team. 
George Hollich and Jason Henery show 
off their powerful swings during practice. 



Sports 



17 



Dutchmen 

Baseball 

Facts 

** Lebanon 
valley finished 
the season 8-21 
overall, and 4-10 
in the MAC 
League. 

** Senior 
shortstop Mark 
Lapole went 3- 
for-5, including 3 
straight triples, 
with 2 RBI and 2 
runs scored in 
the 8-1 victory at 
Swarthmore. 

** Senior Brad 
Krock went 2-for- 
3 with a double 
and one RBI in 
the 6-3 loss at 
Susquehanna. 

** Junior 
LF/Pitcher John 
Lehman went 2- 
for-5 in a 8-1 
victory at 
Swarthmore. 

Junior 3rd 
baseman Aaron 
Weston went 2- 
for-4 in the 17-12 
win at Juniata. 



Record: 8-21 








LVC i 


Opp. 


Northwood 


7 


8 


Concordia 


8 


4 


RIT 


7 


6 


RIT 


1 


9 


Northwood 


4 


5 


Concordia 


3 


6 


St. Scholastica, MN 


1 


5 


1 Swarthmore 


8 


1 


Juniata 


17 


12 




9 


4 


Binghanton 


5 


8 


Wilkes 


5 


11 


i Elizabethtown 





4 




3 


7 


1 Albright 


7 


4 




3 


17 


Millersville 


11 


16 


Widener 





8 







5 


College of Misericordia 


12 


5 


Millersville 


8 


9 


Messiah 


8 


3 




1 


8 


| Moravian 


1 


4 




4 


11 


York 


1 


8 


j Susquehanna 


3 


6 




3 


4 


Gettysburg 


2 


4 



IS 



Breaking New Ground 




Baseball 



T 

]■ he 1995 Dutchmen 
-*■ Baseball team, with 
Head Coach John Gergle. con- 
cluded the season with an 8-21 
record overall and a 4-10 record 
in the Middle Atlantic Confer- 
ence Commonwealth League. 

During Spring Break, the team 
traveled to Florida where they 
won two games and lost five. 
After their return from the warm 
Florida sun. the Dutchmen won 




R3 ■ \ 



at Swarthmore on March 15. 

A March 18 doubleheader 
at Juniata was swept by the 
Dutchmen and improved 
their record to .500. 

The Dutchmen split an 
April 1 doubleheader against 
Albright, a MAC league op- 
ponent. 

LVC defeated the College 
of Misericordia, a non-league 
team, at home on April 1 1 . 

LVC senior shortstop, 
Mark Lapole, was named a 
first-team MAC all-star. He 
finished his senior season 
with 40 hits in 104 at bats for 
a .385 batting average. His 
slugging percentage was an 
impressive .730 with six dou- 
bles, three triples, and eight 
home runs. Lapole also had 
28 runs batted in this season 
and a fielding average of .866. 




Pitcher Trevor Ritter reads the sign 
from the catcher. 

Your' re out! Freshman pitcher Doug 
Speelman makes the tag at home and 
shows the umpire he has the ball in 
his glove. 

Corey Thomas is congratulated by 
the rest of the team after he scores a 



Sports 



I'l 



Record: 8-28 

RIT 
RIT 

Western Maryland 
Lynchburg 
Methodist 
Ursinus 

King's 

Juniata 

Alvernia 
Elizabethtown 

Pace 

Moravian 

Albright 

Widener 

Franklin & Marshall 

Susquehanna 

Gettysburg 

Messiah 

Washington 

Dickinson 

Western Maryland 



LVC 


Opp. 


3 


5 


1 


4 


1 


13 


3 


8 





12 





6 


8 


13 


3 


2 


5 


10 


9 


8 


5 


10 


6 


7 


3 


6 


2 


8 


3 


1 


4 


16 


1 


4 


3 


5 


10 


1 


14 


2 


2 


4 





10 


11 


2 


2 


3 





10 


5 


3 


2 


5 


8 


13 


3 


4 


4 


8 


3 


4 


7 


9 


2 


9 


3 


6 


8 


7 


6 


10 



Breaking New Ground 



MAC ALL- 
STARS 



Three members of the Lebanon Val- 
ley College softball team were 
named Middle Atlantic Conference 
Commonwealth League all-stars. 

Named to the first team was junior 
second baseman Sharon Murray. 
Named to the second team were sen- 
ior shortstop Joda Glossner and jun- 
ior designated hitter/third baseman 
Tonya Showers. 

Murray finished the 1995 season 
with 43 hits in 1 14 at bats for a .377 
batting average. With seven doubles 
and two home runs, she had a slug- 
ging percentage of .49 1 . She also had 
18 runs batted in. 14 stolen bases, 
and a fielding average of .928. 

Glossner ended her senior season 
with 28 hits in 111 at bats for a 
batting average of .252. She had 
three doubles and a triple for a .297 
slugging percentage. She also had 14 
RBI. 16 stolen bases, and a .894 
fielding average. 

Showers began the 1995 season at 
third base, but was moved to the 
designated hitter position due to an 
injury. She had 32 hits in 82 at bats 
for a .390 average. With six doubles 
and three triples, her slugging per- 
centage was .537. She had 21 RBI. 
four stolen bases, and, while playing 
third base, a fielding average of 
.842. 



Softball 



T 

! he Lebanon Valley College lady sluggers fin- 

-*- ished their 1995 season 8-28 overall and 4-10 
in the Middle Atlantic Conference Commonwealth 
League. The first win of the season was a 3-2 nonleague 
vicotory at King's College in the first game of a dou- 
bleheader on March 23. 

In the first game of a doubleheader against Juniata 
College on March 25. the Lady Dutchmen won their 
first MAC game of the season. The April 1 dou- 
bleheader against Pace University, a Division II 
school, was split. LVC won the first game but lost the 
second in five innings. 

A highlight of the season was the sweep of a MAC 
League doubleheader at Albright College on Saturday, 
April 8. 

April 13 brought the split of a non-league dou- 
bleheader against Franklin and Marshall. Again the 
Dutchmen won the first game, but lost the second. 

On April 19, the team split a MAC doubleheader at 
Susquehanna. They were defeated in the first game, 
but came back to win the second game. 

The final games of the season were played on April 
29. The doubleheader was split with Centennial Con- 
ference champion. Western Maryland College. LVC 
won the first game, but lost the second. 

— John Deamer 

— LVC Sports Information 



Sports 



51 



MIKE 
RHOADES 



Lebanon Valley College's Mike Rhoades, a 
senior guard from Mahanoy City, Pa., was 
named a National Association of Basketball 
Coaches-Sears Division III First Team All- 
American. 

Rhoades was a NABC All-America for the 
second straight year. He was the first NABC 
First-Team All-America at Lebanon Valley 
since Don Johnson in 1972-73. 

Rhoades averaged 21.3 points per game and 
6.8 assists per game this season. The Flying 
Dutchmen finished 22-6, winning their sec- 
ond straight Middle Atlantic Conference title 
and making their third consecutive appear- 
ance in the NCAA Division III Tournament. 



LVC 



FEATURE 



ATHLETES 




JEFF 
KOEGEL 



LVC senior Jeff Koegel of Wood- 
Ridge, NJ, finished 36th in the 
NCAA Division III cross country 
championship, held at Lehigh Uni- 
versity, Saturday, November 19. 

Koegel, competing against 1 84 other 
finishers in the men's race, ran a 
time of 25:51 .9 to improve from his 
1 18th-place finish in 1992. Koegefs 
time was just four and a half seconds 
from earning him a NCAA All- 
American selection. 

Koegel qualified for the national 
race by placing fourth at the NCAA 
Mideast Regional Championship. 



52 



Breaking New Ground 



JODA GLOSSNER 

Joda Glossner. a letter winner in three sports at Lebanon Valley, finished a successful 
collegiate athletic career. 

Glossner, from Duncannon, Pa., was named a First-Team MAC All-Conference player. She 
was also named to the Academic Honor Roll for the MAC Conference. In addition to these 
honors, Glossner was recognized as a South Atlantic Regional AU-American and a Second 
Team College Field Hockey Coaches Association All-American. 

During the basketball season, Glossner started 15 games. She averaged 7.3 points per game. 

Glossner finished her senior season in softball with a .252 average. She had three doubles and 
a triple for a .297 slugging percentage. 

For her efforts, Glossner was awarded a post-graduate NCAA scholarship. 




Sports 



53 




54 



Breaking New Ground 



r\ rganizations 



c~0 

V f ebanon Valley College students are involved in a variety of 

^rJ L^^} organizations on campus. Clubs range from academic organiza- 
tions such as the Math Club and Chemistry Club to the cultural 
organizations such as the Black Culture Club and the International Stu- 
dent Organization. 

New to the LVC campus this year was the Gay/Bi/Lesbian support 
group. Another organization new to campus was the religious dance 
group, Praise Him with Dance, otherwise known as P.H.D. 

LVC is also home to various service and social fraternities and sororities. 




LVC's Marching Band performs at every home football game. Participation in the 
organization increases each year. 



Music fraternity Sinfonia sells 
hamburgers during the annual 
Spring Arts Festival which is 
organized by the LVC Spring 
Arts committee, a very hard 
winking organization on cam- 
pus. The Spring Arts commit- 
tee members work all year to 
plan for the three day festival. 



" 



Organizations 



55 



Toad Plays in Annville 



^ m n April 6, the music of 
tlie popular group. 
Toad the Wet Sprocket, filled 
Lynch Gymnasium. The open- 
ing hand for the evening was the 
Figs. Student Council sponsored 
the concert which was attended 
by LVC students and the sur- 
rounding community. 



Despite a smaller turnout than 
expected, members of Student 
Council and their advisor, Jen- 
nifer Evans, were glad to see that 
those who attended had a good 
time. 

The students that volunteered 
their time selling tickets, setting 
up, and acting as security helped 
to make the event possible. 



Student Council 




56 



Breaking New Ground 



Class of 1997 




Class of 1998 




( )rganizations 



57 



Quittapahilla 




58 



Breaking New Ground 



A New Beginning 



rhe Quittie's Consulting Advisor, Kim Tay- 
or, reads her poetry in Zimmerman Recital 
Sail. 



/ % few vears ago, the Quit- 
tapahilla, LYC's year- 
book, was in danger of becoming 
defunct. A lack of student in- 
volvement was jeopardizing the 
future of the Quittie. However, 
a small group of students man- 
aged to keep the publication 
alive, although the effort was not 
always easy. 



Support from the administra- 
tion and Jane Paluda, the ad- 
visor, helped to continue the 
organization's existence. The 
college hired Kim Tavlor, a res- 
dential director in Silver Hall, to 
be a consulting advisor for the 
year. She was the editor of her 
college yearbook and offered 
advice and her knowledge of 
yearbook journalism to the Quit- 
tie staff. 




( )rganizations 



Mike Huang 




As a fund-raiser for 
World Vision, members 
of Project spent the 
night in the social quad. 
Experiencing condi- 
tions that homeless peo- 
ple live in was an eye 
opening experience for 
the students that partic- 
ipated in the event. 




Project members passed the time singing songs and playing games. The night of the hunger fast in the quad turnec 
out to be one of the coldest of the winter. 



hi I 



Breaking New Groin 



Fellowship of Christian 

Athletes 




PROJECT 




Organizations 



Praise Him With Dance 




Delta Tau Chi 




62 



Breaking New Ground 



Sigma Tau Delta 




MENC 




( )rganizations 



i, \ 



LVC Hosts PA 
Intercollegiate Band 



I 1 11 March 17-19, the 
^ < ~*^ members of the 48th 
Annual Pennsylvania Intercolle- 
giate Band rehearsed at LVC. 
The concert was held on Sunday 
afternoon. Anthony Maiello, 
Professor of Music and Director 
of Bands at George Mason Uni- 



versity, was the guest conductor. 

There were 136 students from 
32 PA colleges that participated. 
Eighteen of these musicians rep- 
resented Lebanon Valley. 

This was the first time since 
1981 that LVC was selected as 
the host site for the Festival. 

— Melissa Howard 



SYMPHONIC BAND 





ORCHESTRA 




(VI 



Breaking New Ground 




Hey Upsala! We were READY... where were Y< )l ! 



SIGMA ALPHA 
IOTA 




MARCHING 
BAND 



PHI MU ALPHA 
SINFONIA 




$ $ 






Organizations 



65 



Gamma Sigma Sigma 




Alpha Phi Omega 



66 




Breaking New Ground 



Service With A Smile 



%/ I anv L\'C students 
-*- -*- are involved in ser- 
vice organizations. 
The sisters of the Beta Chi 
chapter of Gamma Sigma Sig- 
ma, a National Service Soror- 
ity, do service for the campus 
and the community. Activities 
include Adopt-a-Highway, and 
visiting with residents of the 
U.C.C. Home on Main Street. 
Gamma Sisc sisters also raise 



money for the Red Cross, and 
the Agape House. 

The National Service Frater- 
nity on campus is Alpha Phi 
Omega, Nu Delta chapter. The 
organization is co-ed and, un- 
like other Greek organizations 
on campus, has both fall and 
spring pledging periods. Broth- 
ers of APO are best known on 
campus for coordinating the 
Blood Drive for die Central PA 
Blood Bank. 



Jackie Wevodau and Paul Richardson sell 
ice cream sandwiches and Italian ice to 
raise money for the Class of 1996. 




Class of 1996 



Organizations 



67 



Alpha Sigma Tau 



The brothers of Kappa Sigm 
erwise known as the Knights 
(luring Spring Arts. 



i Kappa, oth- 
sold hotdos 



| n 1992, Alpha Sigma Tau 
"^ became the first and only 
national social sorority to receive 
recognition on the campus of 
LVC. The sisters of the Gamma 
Tan chapter are a group of fun 
loving girls dedicated to encour- 
aging social life on campus, spon- 
soring activites open to everyone 
in addition to the sisters. Events 
such as bowling, parties, and ice 
skating allow students to have 
fun off campus as well. 

The sisters have held car wash- 



es for two years in a row in order 
to raise money, but most of all 
just to get the chance to splash 
each other. Throughout the 
year, AST also participates in so- 
cial service projects to help out in 
the surrounding community, like 
remaining on call for Operation 
Snow and handing out Valen- 
tine's Day cards in the local nurs- 
ing home. In short, AST sisters 
are always working towards cre- 
ating a happier place to live. 

— Sharon Possessky 




PHILO 



Greek 
Council 




6S 



Breaking New Ground 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



j he Rlio Chi Chapter or 
Tau Kappa Epsilon is 
part of the world's largest un- 
dergraduate social fraternity. 
There are over three hundred 
active chapters in the nation and 
over sixteen thousand alumni, 
including Ronald Reagan and 
Terry Bradshaw. Rho Chi chap- 
ter is comprised of twenty broth- 
ers, with various backgrounds, 
majors, hobbies, and interests. 

TKE is built upon a strong 
brotherhood among its members 
based on the values of love, char- 
ity, and esteem. Rho Chi chapter 



prides itself in maintaining 
one of the highest grade point 
averages among the fraterni- 
ties and sororities at LVC. 
TKE also promotes several 
service activities such as rak- 
ing leaves for Easter Seals, 
tournaments for the Special 
Olympics, car washes for 
AIDS Awareness in Lebanon 
County as well as the new li- 
brary fund. 

Some social events TKE has 
participated in are camping 
trips, Halloween parties, pic- 
nics, Spaghetti Dinners, and 
trips to see the Hershey Bears. 

— Cornell Wilson 



Kappa 

Lambda 

Nu 

Clio 





Alpha 

Sigma 

Tau 



Organizations 



69 



Academic Clubs 



Russian 
Club 



U he Biology, Chemistry, 
Math, and Psychology 
Clubs extend membership to all 
interested students. Accounting 
Club, affiliated with the National 
Association of Accountants, pro- 
vides field trips and guest speak- 
ers. All five of the clubs program 
social gatherings such as picnics 
and Holiday parties that serve to 
increase interaction among 
members. 

According to Kathy Ryan and 
Karen Paul, officers of the cam- 
pus Biology Club, "Membership 
has expanded this year and we're 
always looking for new students 



who want to join and get in- 
volved!" Some of the activities 
that the club has planned and 
carried out this year are pizza 
parties and dinners at area res- 
taurants. The officers greatly en- 
courage more students to be- 
come involved in not only the 
Biology Club, but also any or all 
of the academic clubs on cam- 
pus. 

Above all, the main goal of 
each academic club on campus is 
to increase and to maintain stu- 
dent interest in the disciplinary 
areas. 

— Carrie St nil 




Members of the Russian Club and friends journeyed to New York City for a day. 



7D 



Breaking New Ground 



Chemistry 
Club 




Organizations 



71 



Diversity is Welcome 

Here 



Black 

Culture 

Club 



I he purpose of the Black 
Culture Club is to 
heighten awareness of the Black 
culture and to promote diversity 
among students as well as the 
entire campus community. The 
club also tries to increase the 
feeling of fellowship and com- 
munity among its members. 
B.C.C. sponsors many activities 
on campus including the annual 
Talent Show, which occurs in 
the fall. One of the acitivities 
held this year was Kwanza, a cel- 
ebration of African- American 
heritage. 

Also, during Black History 
Month, the club showed movies, 
such as "The Color Purple" and 
"Glory," featuring some prom- 
inent Black actors in today's 
society. As well as providing ac- 



tivities for students on campus to 
participate in, the club also plans 
and completes community ser- 
vice projects. This year a Sat- 
urday morning Bingo game was 
played at the Lebanon Valley 
Home of the United Church of 
Christ. 

In addition to these activities, 
a year-end picnic was held at 
Kreiderheim for members, fac- 
ulty, and friends of the club. The 
Black Culture Club strives to 
promote unity and friendship on 
campus, and welcomes any and 
all interested LVC students fac- 
ulty, and staff genuinely inter- 
ested in the purpose of the club. 

— Heather Wilson, Vice Pres- 
ident 

— Carrie Stull, Public Rela- 
tions Officer 




Breaking New Ground 



Wig and Buckle 




Alpha Psi Omega 




Organizations 



73 




71 



Breaking Mew Ground 




enters 



T 

I he Class of 1995 is made up of a diverse group of students. They 

-™~ are from different parts of the country and the world, have 

different majors, and have different interests. One thing they all 

have in common is graduating from Lebanon Valley College. 
Each member of the Class of 1995 will pursue their own goals and 

careers. As they grow older, they can remember the times spent at LVC. 

Entering as sheltered freshmen or slightly more experienced transfers, 

the LVC senior emerges more mature and ready to face the world that 

confronts them. 







Jeff Drummond talks on the 
phone in his nearly empty 
dorm room just before gradu- 
ation. 



Matt Dickinson shares his musical talents with the campus and community during a 
Spring Arts outdoor concert. 



Seniors 



75 



Elizabeth V. 
Aitken 

Individualized 

Stephanie L. 
Allen 

Music 
Spanish 

Melissa M. 
Anderson 

Mathematics 



Kristin N. Arnold 

Biology 

Peter F. Bauer 

Music Education 

Timothy A. Bean 

Chemistry 



Tara A. BennecofF 

Music Education 

Celia C. Billman 

Elementary 
Education 

Kristina A. Brault 

Business 
Management 



Russell W. 
Britting 

History 
Secondary 
Education 

Richard D. 
Bruggeman HI 

Biology 

Deborah A. 
Bullock 

American Studies 



76 






«**""". *"-*\l 






mF>f9F' '■''■'■ '^^ 1 






M& 'm,? v J 






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B 


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Susan Lucille 
Bunty 

Sociology 

Craig S. Campbell 

French 

James V. Campbell 

English 



Matthew S. 
Campbell 

Political Science 

Dana M. Centofanti 

Individualized 

Donna M. 
Centofanti 

English 
Communications 



Crystal B. 
Crownover 

Sociology 

Brian C. Davis 

Biochemistry 

Michelle M. Davis 

Elementary Education 



Susan Delgado 

International 
Business 
Spanish 

Ross A. DeNisco III 

Chemistry 

Stephanie K. 
Deppen 

Chemistry 

Spanish 

Secondary Education 



77 



Robert Diaz 

History 
Secondary 
Education 

Karen Linda Dick 

Biology 

Matthew D. 
Dickinson 

Music Education 



Ryan M. Diehl 

Actuarial Science 
Economics 

Heather L. 
Donnachie 

Psychology 

Jeffery Phillip 
Drummond 

English Literature 





Stephanie Allen, along with other members of the Band Front, shows her 
grace and determination as she executes another perfect move. 

Queen candidate, Melissa Anderson, and King candidate, Howie Span- 
gler enjoy their time in the spotlight during half-time of the Homecoming 
football game. 




78 




Brad J. Dukehart 

Psychology 

Stephen R. 
Eickhoff 

Sound Recording 
Technology 

Michael J. 
Eshleman, Jr. 

Business 
Management 



Christopher S. 
Everett 

Music 

Hal M. Fero 

Business 
Management 

Nicole M. Fidler 

English 



Mark L. Flamisch 

Mathematics 

Julia A. Foose 

Psychology 

Susan D. Fuchs 

Individualized 



Tricia L. Galati 

Psychology 

A.J. Geiss 

Business 
Management 

Michael G. 
Gibbons 

Economics 



79 



Joda L. Glossner 

English 

Julie A. 
Gunshenar 

English 

Daniel T. Hahn 

Business 
Management 




Stephanie E. 
Hanke 

Business 
Management 

Heather L. 
Harbaugh 

Political Science 

David S. Hastings 

Music Education 



Rent E. Heberlig 

Political Science 

Deborah S. 
Heidlauf 

Motel Management 

Melvin R. Hellem 

Political Science 



Michael A. Hoke 

Mathematics 
Computer Science 

Michelle A. Hoke 

Sociology 

George J. Hollich 
III 

Psychology 



80 







MBS\ 


I |'*»'- j^^ff 


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m K^ _^ 


A t ihfeHH 


_^H iH^^^> 


"'IB Hk^v fit 










_ 





Lisa Karen 
Hollowbush 

English 
Pre-Law 

Stephanie L. 
Hostetter 

Interior and 

Environmental 

Design 

Heather E. Hurst 

History 



Jana R. Hurst 

English 

Colleen L. Jackson 

Biology 

Barbara L. 
Jankowski 

Motel Management 

International 

Business 




Senior Field Hockey player, Dana Centofani. drives the ball downfield. 

Roni Russell. Homecoming Queen candidate, is escorted to the platfomi 
by Jason Zitter. 



M 



Kimberly S. 
Katcavage 

Music Education 

Karen G. Kessler 

English 

Weon Bae Kim 

Sound Recording 
Technology 



Rachelle L. 
Kindig 

Accounting 

Jeffrey G. Koegel 

Mathematics 

Catherine L. 
Kollet 

Psychology 





-<* *■ 



Senior swimmer, Scott Mongo, cheers his fellow teammates on. 

Homecoming Queen candidate Barrie Stoudt poses with her escort, 
senior Mark Hofsass. 




r ivl if 



82 




h 


W sv »r> J 
\ J - 




! ill 


1 r' 


\ 




Jeffrey E. Kostura 

Physics 

Brad A. Krock 

Physics 

Jennifer A. Krysak 

Business 
Management 




Cynthia L. Lerch 

Social Work 
Religion 

Jennifer Sarah 
Lightner 

Elementary Education 

Bridget A. Lohr 

Elementary Education 



Sean P. Lutz 

International 
Business 

Scott A. Maier 

Hotel Management 

Fietro A. Mancino 

Business 
Management 



Robert G. 
Meisenhelter 

Psychology 

Jennifer J. Mellott 

Elementary Education 

Rachel Doris 
Merritt 

History 
Secondary Education 



*:', 



Duane A. Meyer 

Mathematics 

Matthew Philip 
Minnich 

Business 
Management 

Timothy W. Mitzel 

Elementary 
Education 




Scott A. Mongo 

English Literature 

Alissa S. Mowrer 

Mathematics 

Michael R. Neff 

Sociology 



Daniel R. Neyer 

Biochemistry 

Joan Ortiz 

Spanish 

Michael T. 
Peachey 

Chemistry 



Andrew D. Phipps 

Sociology 

Douglas II. Pike 

Business 
Management 

Kevin J. Poole 

Biology 



si 











Michael P. Putnam 

Biochemistry 

Richard D. Ragno 

Music Performance 

Jeffrey S. Reazor 

Business 
Management 



f" 






j 


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m 


Sxli 


J^ v 




W ^"y 




^■1 tek. **% 


LJ4 




Stephanie L. 
Rehrer 

Elementary Education 

Michael D. 
Rhoades 

History 

Roni J. Russell 

Psychology 





Senior football player, Jason Lutz, stretches for that extra yard to gain a 
first down. 

Deborah Bullock, candidate for Homecoming Queen, stands with alum- 
nus Jon Wescott. 



85 



Julie L. Schirmer 

Elementary 
Education 

Nancy L. Schorr 

Elementary 
Education 

Christopher 1*1. 
Seiler 

Psychology 






Robert T. Shaffer 

English 

Angie L. Shuler 

English 

Melissa A. 
Shuman 

Music Education 







Harold L. Spangler, 

Jr. 
Actuarial Science 




Class 

of 
1995 



ou Know You're a Senior 
When... 

1. Your college loan debt is larger than the 
National Deficit. 

2. You remember Michael Jackson with an Afro. 

3. You join clubs so that you can have 
something to put on your resume. 

4. You start thinking that laugh lines are not a 
laughing matter. 

5. You wonder what is wrong with kids today. 

6. You finish your professors sentences for them 
during lectures. 

7. You remember life before MTV and CD's. 

8. You start believing the old adage, "Early to 
bed, early to rise... ". 

9. You begin identifying with your parents. 

10. Two beers put you to sleep. 

11. You think that the college freshmen look like 
high school freshmen. 

12. You start creating a professional wardrobe. 

13. You glue your mouth shut from licking all 
. those resume-filled envelopes. 

14. You begin regarding the people that you 
date as "possible spouse material ". 

— Kimberly D. Taylor 



86 




Amy L. Stanson 

Psychology 

Barrie L. Stoudt 

Individualized 

Daniel K. Tucci 

Elementary Education 



Danielle E. Vernet 

Biology 

Claudia E. Wehbe 

Psychology 

Timothy W. 
Welliver 

History 
Secondary Education 



Michelle M. White 

Elementary Education 

Eric M. Wilson 

Physics 

Craig A. Wolfe 

Business 
Management 



Kathryn E. Yost 

Psychology 

Nicole M. Zanotti 

Sociology 

James S. Zerbe 

Business 
Management 



87 



Lorrainne H. Abati 


Celia C. Billman 


Crystal Crownover 


500 N. Front Street 


40 Flanagan Road 


840 E. Chocolate Avenue 


Minersville, PA 17954 


Richland, PA 17087 


Hershey, PA 17033 


Keith M. Adams 


Melissa J. Boyer 


Brian C. Davis 


227 W. Market Street 


R.D. #2 Box 969 


713 Maple Drive 


Orwigsburg, PA 17961 


Schuylkill Haven, PA 17972 


West Chester, Pa 19382 


Elizabeth V. Aitken 


Kristina A. Brault 


Michele M. Davis 


13 Bradford Drive 


10 Shady Lane 


1112 Woodward Street 


Tabernacle, NJ 08088 


Annville, PA 17003 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Stephanie L. Allen 


Elmer A. Brice 


Ross A. DeNisco 


37 Virginia Avenue 


634 Siddonsburg Road 


211 Salem Street 


Shrewsbury, PA 17361 


Dillsburg, PA 17019 


West Pittston, PA 18643 


Melissa M. Anderson 


Russell W. Britting 


Charlotte E. Deane 


241 Morthridge Drive 


228 Cocoa Avenue 


Hamden Road 


Landisville, PA 17538 


Hershey, PA 17033 


Ebenezer 

St. Philip, Barbados 


Lynn F. Appleby 


Richard D. Bruggeman 


Barbados 


350 Swope Street 


3511 Rock Creek Drive 




Bethel, PA 19507 


Dover, PA 17315 


Susan Delgado 

95 Keene Neck road 


Kristin N. Arnold 


Deborah Bullock 


Medomak, ME 04551 


427 E. Pine Street 


15 Harris Road 




Lebanon, PA 17042 


Salem, NJ 08079 


Stephanie K. Deppen 
34 Fairland road 


Randy A. Baker 


Matthew S. Campbell 


Manheim, PA 17545 


4089 Hilltop Drive 


333 Newberry Road 




R.D. #3 


Middletown, PA 17057 


Shelley A. Derfler 


Mount Joy, PA 17552 




P.O. Box 73 




James V. Campbell 


Pine Grove, PA 17963 


Lloyd D. Balman 


110 Haverford Road 




P.O. Box 416 


Wynnewood, PA 19096 


Robert Diaz 


43 W. Main Street 




14 Reservoir Road 


Brownstown, PA 17508 


Donna M. Centofani 
810 Garnet Drive 


Parsippany, NJ 07054 


Peter F. Bauer 


Burlington, NJ 08016 


Karen L. Dick 


25 Old Ponsett Road 




73 Winnifred Road 


Haddam, CT 06438 


Dana M. Centofani 
810 Garnet Drive 


Brockton, MA 12401 


Cynthia T. Bauman 


Burlington, NJ 08016 


Matthew D. Dickinson 


53 Oak Ridge Drive 




19 Stewart Place 


Lancaster, PA 17603 


Curtis H. Clark 
120 West End Drive 


Shippensburg, PA 17963 


Timothy A. Bean 


Manheim, Pa, 17545 


Ryan M. Diehl 


3118 Mottingham Road 




34 Westview Manor 


Morristown, PA 19403 


Rosalyn J. Cole 

2939 Lincoln Highway East 


York, PA 17404 


Tara A. Bennecoff 


Gordonville, PA 17529 


Heather L. Donnachie 


40 Deysher Road 




2531 Blarney Drive 


Fleetwood, PA 19522 




Harrisburg, PA 17112 



88 









Jeffery P. Drummond 


Tricia L. Qalati 


Melvin R. Hellem 


L7 Frog Ocean Road 


25 Deerfield Drive 


56 Baltimore Street 
Staten Island, NY 10308 


Salem, NJ 08079 


Forest Hills 




Pottsville, Pa 17901 




5rad J. Dukehart 




Mark W. Henry 


15902 Jacob's Church Road 


Anthony J. Qeiss 


206 Lombard Street 


Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 


3028 Octagon Avenue 
Sinking Spring, PA 19608 


Tamaqua, PA 18252 


Brett D. Duvall 




Jamieson L. Hoffman 


9 N. Harrisburg Street 


Michael Q. Gibbons 


R.D. #1 Box 408-A 


Steelton, PA 17113 


P.O. Box 594 

Mt. Wolf, PA 17374 


New Bloomfield, PA 17068 


Stephen R. Eickhoff 




Mark R. Hofsass 


R.R. #3 Box 115 


Rhonnda L. Qiovino 


556 Mt. Gretna Road 


Richland, NY 13114 


126 Millview Court 
Lebanon, PA 17042 


Elizabethtown, PA 17022 


Michael J. Eshleman 




Michael A. Hoke 


18 Carlin Drive 


Joda L. Qlossner 


708 Lentz Avenue 


Coatesville, PA 19302 


35 Susquenita Hill Road 
Duncannon, PA 17020 


Millersburg, PA 17061 


Christopher S. Everett 




George J. Hollich 


10430 Big Stone Road 


Linda L. Qrudi 


212 W. Orchard Drive 


Millington, MD 21651 


1351 Cambridge Court 
Palmyra, PA 17078 


Palmyra, PA 17078 


Thomas C. Feltman 




Dorothy 1. flollinger 


R.D. #1 Box 407 


Daniel T. Hahn 


980 E. Oak Street 


McAlisterville, PA 17049 


6654 Baltimore Pike 
Littlestown, PA 17340 


Palmyra, PA 17078 


Hal M. Fero 




Lisa K. Hollowbush 


1309 Kingsbury Road 


Stephanie E. Hanke 


203 Oberholtzer Road 


Owings Mills, MD 21117 


43 Sunset Lake Road 
Blairstown, NJ 07825 


Gilbertsville, PA 19525 



James S. Fisher 
462 Buchanan Drive 
Ephrata, PA 17522 

Mark L. Flamisch 
515 Debbie Lane 
Nazareth, PA 18064 

Julia A. Foose 
211 Faculty Road 
Duncannon, PA 17020 

Tracy L. Fomwalt 
155 Melrose Lane 
Lancaster, PA 17601 

Janell K. Frazier 
144 E. Walnut Street 
Ephrata, PA 17522 

Susan D. Fuchs 
2 Vaughn Avenue 
Bel Air, MD 21014 



Heather L. Harbaugh 
601 E. Main Street 
Waynesboro, PA 17268 

Marilyn F. Hartman 
3137 Chryst Circle 
Lancaster, PA 17601 

David S. Hastings 
807 Bear Cabin Drive 
Forest Hill, MD 21050 

Kent E. Heberling 
4473 Enola Road 
Newville, PA 17241 

Deborah S. fleidlauf 
363 Rock Hill Road 
Millersville, PA 17551 



James R. Horn 
1160 Park Drive 
Palmyra, PA 17078 

Stephanie L. Hostetter 
552 Norlam Drive 
Lancaster, PA 17601 

Barbara A. Hoyer 
2098 Walnut Street 
Lebanon, PA 17042 

Michael D. Hummel 
26 Schmecks Lane 
Temple, PA 19560 

fleather E. Hurst 

400 7th Street P.O. Box 378 

Mt. Gretna, PA 17064 

Jana R. Hurst 

400 7th Street P.O. Box 378 

Mt. Gretna, PA 17064 



89 



Colleen L. Jackson 


R.D. #1 Box 603 


Jason M. Lutz 


3910 Dennison Avenue 
Drexel Hill, PA 19026 


Pine Grove, PA 17963 


103 Elm Street 




Reading, PA 19606 




Jeffery E. Kostura 




Cory P. Johns 


111 Arlene Street 


Scott A. Maier 


35 M. Market Street 


Minersville, PA 17954 


620 Park Avenue 


Elizabethville, PA 17023 


Brad A. Krock 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Joan E. Johnsen 


R.D. #2 Box 222 


Heather E. Marston 


3001 Molt Road 


Elysburg, PA 17824 


244 F Street 


Lancaster, PA 17601 


Janine L. Kroh 


Carlisle, PA 17013 


Marc D. Johnson 


285 W. Walnut Tree Drive 


Karen L. McConnell 


20 Dogwood Lane 


Blandon, PA 19510 


108 S. 22nd Street 


Cleona, PA 17042 


Jennifer A. Krysak 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Kimberly S. Katcavage 


84 Quaker Hill Road 


Ingrid J. McGee 


Box 243 


Levittown, PA 19057 


636 E. Birch Street 


Bear Creek, PA 18602 


Mark L. Lapole 


Palmyra, PA 17078 


Debra L. Keller 


4747 Ft. Loudon Road 


Sylvia J. Meals 


114 W. Ridge Road #1 


Mercersburg, PA 17236 


241 Troon Way 


Palmyra, PA 17078 


Luanne A. Lentz 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Weon-Bae Kim 


201 E. Queen Street 


Robert G. Meisenhelter 


119 Qreentree village 


Jonestown, PA 17038 


332 Ellis Lane 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Cynthia L. Lerch 


West Chester, PA 19380 


Rachelle L. Kindig 


683 Valley View Drive 


Jennifer J. Mellott 


2620 Willapa Drive 


Boiling Springs, PA 17007 


R.D. #3 Box 307 


Dover, PA 17315 


Barbara J. Leskie 


Everett, PA 15537 


Paul E. Kisner 


3201 Linden Parkway 


Rachel D. Merritt 


710 Hellam Street 


Harrisburg, PA 17110 


15 Phelps Road 


Wrightsville, PA 17368 


Gregory P. Lieberman 


Marlborough, CT 16447 


Diane M. Klinger 


1311 Howard Avenue 


Duane A. Meyer 


32 Qinna B. Drive 


Pottsville, PA 17901 


174 Long Lane 


Robesonia, PA 19551 


Tracey A. Light 


Wallkill, MY 12589 


Jeffrey Q. Koegel 


220 W. Penn Avenue 


Chad C. Miller 


62 Lincoln Avenue 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


2052 Coventryville Road 


Wood-Ridge, MJ 07075 


Jennifer S. Lightner 


Pottstown, PA 19464 


Catherine L. Kollet 


9810 Greenbrier Lane 


Matthew P. Minnich 


1345 Barry Drive 


Walkersville, MD 21793 


1402 Lafayette Street 


Bethlehem, PA 18017 


Bridget A. Lohr 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Rostislav V. Kopylkov 


161 M. 69th Street 


Timothy W. Mitzel 


Bolshevikov Prospect 3/1 


Harrisburg, PA 17111 


3868B Fox Chase Drive 


Ap80 St. Petersburg 




Dover, PA 17315 


Leningrad, Russia 1933-13 


Jill L. Loshnowsky 




Cmwlth Indep States 


155 S. Poplar 
Apt. #213 




Tara L. Koslosky 


Elizabethtown, PA 17022 





90 









Scott A. Mongo 


Damian J. Ponzio 


Susanne E. Ryan 


105 Coopers Kill Road 


1999 Keswick Way 


843 Melissa Court #202 
Enola, PA 17025 


Delran, NJ 08075 


Morristown, PA 19403 


Christine F. Morello 


Kevin J. Poole 


William R. Saltzer 


11 Lookout Road 


10826 Brentwood Terrace 


1410 Marene Drive 


Randolph, PU 07869 


Hagerstown, MD 21740 


Harrisburg, Pa 17109 


Alissa S. Mowrer 


Michael P. Putnam 


Julie L. Schirmer 


323 Windgate Court 


303 River Avenue 


915 Skyline Drive 


Millersville, PA 17551 


Point Pleasant, MJ 08742 


Lebanon, PA 17046 


Steven P. Mowrer 


Kristie M. Radetzky 


nancy L. Schorr 


18 N. Fifth Street 


1706 Julie Court 


206 n. Third Street 


Columbia, PA 17512 


Bensalem, PA 19020 


Muir, PA 17957 


Thomas J Murray 


Richard D. Ragno 


Jeffrey R. Schott 


113 Vista Drive 


345 Steere Farm Road 


1009 Quentin Road 


Akron, PA 17501 


Harrisville, RI 02830 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Michael R. NefF 


Christina A. Ranker 


Anne M. Sebastian 


449 Miriam Avenue 


1909 Laurel Glen Drive 


682 Gentry Drive 


Leesport, PA 19533 


Harrisburg, PA 17110 


Lancaster, PA 17603 


Gary L. Hey 


Kimberly A. Rankin 


Christopher M. Seiler 


324 Summer Mountain Road 


541 Truce Road 


676 Donnertown Road 


Bernville, PA 19506 


new Providence, PA 17560 


Duncansville, PA 16635 


Daniel R. never 


Jeffrey S. Reazor 


Andrew L. Sensenig 


250 Hilltop View Way 


114 Kay Street 


85 Greenville Road 


Elizabethtown, PA 17022 


Stowe, PA 19464 


Denver, PA 17517 


Ann M. O'Shea 


Kelly L. Reese 


Meredith L. Shaffer 


70 Valleybrook Drive 


1813 Sterretts Gap Avenue 


R.D. #3 Box 301 


Lancaster, PA 17601 


Carlisle, PA 17013 


Annville, PA 17003 


Joan Ortiz 


Michael D. Rhoades 


Michelle L. Shaub 


540 Pi. Tenth Street 


1000 E. Center Street 


19 Fresh Meadow Drive 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Manahoy City, PA 17948 


Lancaster, PA 17603 


Thomas S. Palancia 


Jacqueline L. Rieker 


Lori W. Shepler 


1514 Beta Avenue 


905-C W. Fairway Drive 


821 Chestnut Street 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Lancaster, PA 17603 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Michael T. Peachey 


John C. Rudegeair 


Angie L. Shuler 


322 High Street 


R.D. #\ Box 24C 


105 Rhonda Dr 


Stafford, VA 22554 


Fredericksburg, PA 17026 


York, PA 17404 


Andrew D. Phipps 


Robert C. Rush 


Melissa A. Shuman 


1190 Hunter Hill Drive 


827 Old Road 


P.O. Box 263 


Lansdale, PA 19446 


Strasburg, PA 17579 


Blandon, PA 19510 


Douglas H. Pike 


Roni J. Russell 


Kelli A. Sorg 


9217 Sprinklewood Lane 


3679 Spring Road 


5 Lincoln Drive 


Potomac, MD 20854 


Carlisle, PA 17013 


Reading, PA 19606 



91 









i 


Harold L. Spangler 


Claudia E. Wehbe 


Nicole M. Zanotti 




226 W. Main Street 


105 S. Lingle Avenue 


77 Pearl Street 




Leola, PA 17540 


Palmyra, PA 17078 


Bridgewater, NJ 08807 




Thomas J. Sposito 


Tina 1. Weikle 


James S. Zerbe 




5564 Edsel Street 


127 Harvey Avenue 


107 E. Pershing Avenue 




Harrisburg, PA 17109 


Lancaster, PA 17602 


Lebanon, PA 17042 




Amy L. Stanson 


Shannon L. Weller 


Holly L. Zieber 




960 E. Walnut Street 


552 Willow Street 


4927 Harman Drive 




Palmyra, PA 17078 


Pottstown, PA 19464 


Harrisburg, PA 17112 




Barrie L. Stoudt 


Timothy W. Welliver 






218 Perkasie Avenue 
West Lawn, PA 19609 


R.D. #2 Box 102A 
Watsontown, PA 17777 










nancy J. Strohl 


Michelle M. White 


r* 


156 Crestview Avenue 


608D Lake Drive 


i. 


Annville, PA 17003 


Douglassville, PA 19518 




Timothy J. Terrell 


Rebecca L. Wiest 


c 


866 Rundale Avenue 
Yeadon, PA 19050 


1125 Marilyn Avenue 
Ephrata, PA 17522 


M*m 


ts 


Corey B. Thomas 


Michael D. Wiggins 


r\ 


224 E. Chestnut Street 


233 N. Cherry Street 


c 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


Lancaster, PA 17602 


b 


Robert J. Trombetta 


Eric M. Wilson 


c 


20 Silver Mine Road 


240 Westover Drive 


o 


Conestoga, PA 17516 


New Cumberland, PA 17070 


^te^ 


John M. Troxel 


Linda I. Wink 




22 Eastfield Drive 


501A S. 18th Street 




Lebanon, PA 17042 


Camp Hill, PA 17011 


o 


Daniel K. Tucci 


Craig A. Wolfe 


\j 


1868 Market Street Extended 


123 S. Third Street 


T 


Middletown, PA 17057 


Lebanon, PA 17042 


r 


Christine C. Updike 


Thomas S. Wolfe 




3414 Old Orchard Road 


2285 Powells Valley Road 




Harrisburg, PA 17109 


Halifax, PA 17032 




Danielle E. Vemet 


Timothy R. Yingling 


1 


4750 Lawntara Street 


1522 Macintosh Way 


Harrisburg, PA 17111 


Hummelstown, PA 17036 


9 


Robert Wagner 


Kathryn E. Yost 


305 Cocoa Avenue 


301 E. Russell Street 


9 


Hershey, PA 17033 


St. Clair, PA 17970 


Jennifer D. Walls 


Debra L. Youse 


5 


201 Tuscarora Street 


823 E. Madison Street 


Port Royal, PA 17082 


Lancaster, PA 17602 


^■^ 





92 



Mark Mofsass was a tri-captain of the 
basketball team. 

Becky Wiest demonstrates her skill on 
the field. 





Donna Centofanti greets hei Family after the 
graduation ceremon) . 

Stephanie* Hankr is happy the commence- 
ment c\ct( iscs at v ovci 



93 




94 



Breaking new Ground 




raduaiion 



On a beautiful Saturday morning, May 13, 1995, LVC seniors 
crossed the stage in the 126th Baccalaureate and Commence- 
ment Exercises. 
Excitement, sadness, and trepidation filled the air. The Class of 1995 
was faced with leaving behind their secure and comfortable lives at LVC 
and entering the "real"world. 

It was a time of emotional goodbyes as friends and roommates wished 
each other luck and success. 

George Hollich, a stand out in many areas at LVC, especially drama, 
music and psychology, was awarded the Howard Anthony Neidig Award. 




Graduates, family and friends 
gather in the social quad for 
refreshments. It gave the 
newest members of LVC 
Alumni a chance to say good- 
bye- 






After the commencement cermony, Mike I'eachev looks around at what he's leaving 
behind. 



Graduation 



95 



As president of the Class of 1995, Howie 
Spangler reads the psalm during the Bac- 
calaureate Service. 

Kevin Poole returns to his seat after receiv- 
ing his diploma. 




Chaplain Darrell Woomer gives the Invoca- 
tion before the Commencement Service 
begins. 

A group of friends gather on the chapel 
steps after the ceremony. 



96 



Breaking New Ground 




Chris Seiler checks his diploma to 
make sure it is not a mistake. 

Tom Reinhart, Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees congratulates graduate 
Mike Putnam. 

Ryan Diehl pays close attention during 
the Commencement Address. 




President John Synodinos presents the speaker, Rev. Judith Craig, during the 
Baccalaureate. 

During the Commencement ceremony, President Synodinos confers the degrees. 
Here he presents Lloyd Balman with his diploma. 



Graduation 



97 



Claudia Wehbe always had a way with 
words. 

Susan Delgado poses for a picture with 
her family. 

Karen Best goes over the order of ac- 
tivities with senior Tara Koslosky. 




Members of the faculty and administration and honored guests join in the singing of 
the Alma Mater. 

Mike Eshleman stops to think about leaving LVC while he waits for the processional to 
begin. 



98 Breaking new Ground 



Graduates and their families meet on 
the chapel steps after the Baccalaure- 
ate Service. 

George flollich was the recipient of the 
Howard Anthony Meidig Award which 
was presented during the Commence- 
ment. 




Brad Dukehart, a new LVC alumnus, is 
happy to see his family. 

Roni Russell, class treasurer, makes 
the presentation of the Senior Class 
Gift. The Class of 95 raised over 
$20,000 during the gift drive. 



Graduation 



<i<i 




100 Breaking New Ground 



CD csideniiat Life 



[\ esidential life on the Lebanon Valley College campus has been through 

several changes over the last several years. The newest additions to the 

campus are Derickson A and Derickson B. Mary Green Hall, a co-ed dorm, 

had two floors of females and one floor of males this year. Keister Hall, also a co-ed 

dorm, increased its female population. This year the first and third floors were 

females and the second was males. 

Although not a part of the residential life, the commuting LVC students add a 
great deal to the campus. Participating in activities and organizations helps to make 
the commuters part of the LVC community. 




First floor Mary Green residents 
Angie Coval. Jen Negley, Danielle 
Boilleau, and Arianne Zeck enjoy a 
beautiful spring day 






Residential Life 



KEISTER, 1st Floor 




KEISTER, 2nd Floor 




102 Breaking New Ground 



KEISTER, 3rd Floor 




NORTH COLLEGE 




Residential Life jq3 



SILVER, Basement 




SILVER, 1st Floor 




104 Breaking New Ground 



COMMUTERS 



'W^SHI'&l 




SILVER, 3rd Floor 




Residential Life JQ5 



FUNKHOUSER EAST , 
Basement 




FUNKHOUSER EAST, 

1st Floor 




106 Breaking New Ground 



FUNKHOUSER EAST, 

2nd Floor 




FUNKHOUSER EAST , 

3rd Floor 




Residential Life IQ* 



FUNKHOUSER WEST, 

Basement 




FUNKHOUSER WEST, 

2nd Floor 




108 



Breaking New Ground 



FUNKHOUSER WEST, 

3rd Floor 




The dorm picnics and the commuter picnics are always enjoyable. Here, Resident Assistant, Aaron Weston grills hamburgers for his Mary Green 
residents- 



Residential Life 



109 







I 1 q Breaking New Ground 




(osing 



hroughout the year, the library was transformed from a hollow 5 Red into 
an impressive structure. Although there was still work to be done when 
the spring semester ended, the. progress on the Braiding was apparent. 
Everyday there are changes in our lives. We may consider most of these changes 

to be minor and insignificant; however, every event, action, arufaccompfisfiment has 

an effect on our fives. We learn from our mistakes, improve on our shortcomings, 

aruf savor our victories. 

Every LVC student is somehow shaved by their college e?cverience. We're 

always looking forward to our bright ^rtures as we are BREAKING NEW 

GROUND. 







A2T sisters, Dennie Spcic/ier, Ann 
Grim, Karen Paul, ana 1 Jen Yohn sit in 

the social quad to talk after lunch. 



Closing 1 j j 



To Tricia Lyne Qalati- Here's to One Who Proved Her Worth With Undying 
Dedication- AND now We're PROUD as PROUD Can Be as we Celebrate he 
GRADUATION!!! CONGRATULATIONS TRICIA! LOVE MOM, DAD and MELIS 
SA 

Congratulations Bubba! Love Mom, Dad, Renee & Rory 

Steven, You're always in our hearts! Congratulations on "all" your achieve 
ments. Love Mom and Dad P. 

To Colleen Jackson- Success is not a place at which one arrives but rati 1 
er...the spirit with which one undertakes and continues the journey. Lov 

Mom & Dad 

i 

Dear Danielle, Sometimes in life we must endure hardships in order to grow 
Remember that those who love you always will. Love, Your Family 

Dear Johnny, With three years behind you, and one more to go, you are on 
terrific son, and we are proud of you. Love, Mom & Dad 

Deena- We are very proud of your 1st year accomplishments. Keep up th 
good work. Love, Mom & Dad 

To Jason Say- Jas, Congrats on a great B-ball Career. Good Luck-Love, Dae 
Mom, Eric, Tiz, Misty 

Dear Scottie, We're very proud of your first year. Keep on growing! Love, Mor 
&Dad 

Dyan-Enjoy the next three years as much as the first! Love, Mom, Dad, I 
Robin 

Dear Jen Walls, All your hard work is going to reward you in life. Keep afte 
your goals and you will succeed. We're proud of you. Love, Mom & Dad 

Dear Lisa, It's been quite a busy, exciting first year! We're very proud of yc 
many accomplishments. Love Mom, Dad & Lori 

DEAR JOAD, YOU DID IT ALL! WE LOVE YOU. "ELVIE AND THAT GEN 
CHARACTER'' 

Dear Hal, You did it! We are all so proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad & Marcie 



, , n Breaking New Ground 



Shelly, Keep following your dreams. We're proud of you! Love Mom Dad and 
rracey 

ro Mel Hellem- Dear Mel, Good Luck. Mom, Dad & Sis 

Dear Jen, Congratulations on completing your first year. We're very proud of 
'ou. Love, Mom, Dad, & Paul 

>teph- You have accomplished so much in the past 4 years. We are very 
>roud of you. Keep following your dreams. Love, Mom & Dad 

o Jerry Pfarr- Jerry, We know it was a hard year for you, but you did great' We 
ire so proud of your accomplishments. Love, Mom, Dad, Bob, Sandi & 
'rincess 

ient, Congratulations to you as you receive your degree. We love you & are 
roud of you. Prov. 3: 5-6. Mom, Dad, Katie, Kris 

ro Jeff! Don't look back! Love, Mom, Dad, and Jennifer 

o Jana Hurst, Congratulations to a future owner of the Jiqqer Shop Love 
he Folks 

o Heather Hurst, Congratulations. We knew you could do it ! Love Mom 
ad and Aretha 

ear Diane, You've made us very proud over the last 3 years. Keep up the 
'eat work. Love, Mom & Dad 

ongratulations Brad Dukehart! We are very proud of you. Love, Mom Dad 
ara and Suzanne 

^ar Dana, May you future be bright and prosperous. Congratulations. Love 
om 

sar Donna, May all your future years be fullfilling and happy. Love, Mom 

ang in there Tina. We know you can do it ! Just think, 1 down, 3 to go Your 
oud Parents & Chuckie too! 



Closing 



J 13 



Dear Trey, Congratulations on four great years of college. We're proud of you 
as always! Love, Mom and Andy 

Congrad-u-lations Jeff! 6 Years down, to go-Hooray! Yipee! Great successes 
are built on taking your negatives and turning them around. Love, Youi 
Proud Mom 

To Eric M. Wilson-Eric, Congratulations! You've done well and we're proud 
Make a difference. Love, Mom & Dad 

Dear Deb, You are the best! All our love, Mom, Dad and Jon 

Celia, We wish you the best. We're proud of you! Love, Mom and Dad 

Dear Howie, We are very proud of everything you have accomplished. Love; 
Mom & Dad 

To Alissa Mowrer- Congratulations and thanks for giving me the privilege o) 
being your mom and being a beautiful person in my life. Love you, Mom 

Dear Stephen, Were all very proud of you this first year. We love you, Mom, 
Dad, Joe, & Mike 

Dear Brian #71, We are very proud of you. Love, Mom, Dad, Kathy, Becky, 
and Steven 

Dear Kevin, Graduation from college is a special time in your life. Thank yoij 
for allowing us to share it with you. We are so proud of you! Good Luck! Love^ 
Mom, Dad & Erick, Granny, Nanny & Pappy 

Steph, you have achieved much in four years. Our love is with you always* 
May God bless you. Love, Dad, Mom, Jim, Ben, Matt 

Dear Jackie, We love you Bird! We couldn't be more proud. Love, Mom & Dacj 

To Jen Byers- How fast time lies, Jen! Only two more to go (?) Keep up the 
good work! Love, Mom & Dad 

To Mike Putnam- A job well done! We are proud of you. Mom & Dad & Becky 



224 Breaking New Ground" 



Dear Barrie, Congratulations on your graduation from LVC. Best wishes on all 
future endeavors! We love you! Mom, nana & Steve 

To Christine Morello- Chrissie, You've reached another milestone! We're so 
proud of you! Love, Mom & Dad 

Dear Vern, We are so very proud of you. Where did the first year go? Love, 
Mom, Dad, Laura, April, & Frosty 

To Brian C. Hughes- Dear B. In the next two years-do as you did the first two 
years-"Be Good, Study Hard, Have Fun." Love, Mom & The Bird'' 

Dearest Claudia: You make me very proud with your excellence and hard 
work. Love, Mom 

Dear Joanna, You're an inspiration. We are proud of you. Keep on dreaming 
and you'll be able to achieve your dreams. We have confidence and faith that 
you will succeed. Love, Mom and Dad 

Lisa Karen-Your gifts of love, laughter and caring have been a special 
blessing to us. never stop learning or going that extra mile. May God be your 
guide as you walk into the future. You will always be in our hearts. We love 
you, Mom, Dad, and Beth. 




Closing 



115 




\ j g Breaking New Ground 




A very special thank you goes to Kim Taylor, our consulting advisor for the 94-95 year. We could not have done this 
without you. Thank you Jane Paluda, our advisor. Also, thank you Lisa Hodowbush, my co-editor for the past three years. 

To President Synodinos, Deans Yuhas and Stanson and the rest oj the administration: Tour .support is aeepfy appreciated. 
Thank you for your concern. 

To Jen Evans, Ben Ruby and Student Council: Thank you forgiving the yearbook another chance. 

A big thank you to the 94-95 Quittie staff: Davada Tarfctt, Leslie Gardiner, Carrie Stuff, Cornell Wilson, Kim Ketterinq. 

Thank you to Kelly Fisher and the LaV'ie staff, especially Jasmine Ammons, Natalie McDonald, Jason Maco\'iak, and Mike 
Huang, for the use of copy arui pictures. 

Many thanks to Ann Schiottman & John Deatner, LVC Sports Information. Thank you also to Jim Monos. 

A huge thank you to Erf Patrick, Jr., our Taylor representative. Without Ed, Melody Luudquist and the Taylor support staff, 
we would tun have a 6ook. 

A thank you aoes to Mark Huff and Davor photography. 

To the LVC student 6ody: Tour cooperation is appreciated. It takes everone's effort to produce a yearbook. Thank you. 
— Melissa Howard, Editor 



Closing 




-Qg Breaking New Ground 



Colophoru 



The "Breaking New Ground 1 ' Quittapafiifla 1995, Volume SO of the Lebanon Vailey College yearbook was printed 
and published by the Taylor Publishing Company of Dallas, Texas and Malvern, Pennsylvania. The book had a press run of 
150 copies. 

The cover was an original design executed on a base Blue Oil Lithocote with gold foil stamped. The end sheet was bhie 
parchment Eighty pound high gloss enamel paper was used throughout the 600k. 

Copy for the opening and closing sections was printed in Chancery with initial letters in Riveria Script Student Life used 
Malibu with the initial letters in Amaconia. Sports used Times Roman and Seniors used Nouveau. Copy in Organizations was 
in Seville and Residential Life copy was in Souvenir. Body copy was in 10 point, captions in eight point, folio ta6s in 12 point 
Headline point sizes varied throughout the 600k. 

The staff consisted of Ms. Jane Vaurda, Advisor 
Ms. Kimberly D. Taylor, Consulting Advisor 
Melissa Howard, Editor — Layout and Copy 
Lisa HoQowhush, Editor — Photography and Business 
Leslie Gardiner — Photography 
Kim Kettering — Copy 
Carrie Stuff — Photography, Copy 
Cornell Wffson — Photography, Copy 
Davada Yarktt — Photography 

The Taylor Sales Representative is Ed Patick, Jr. and the Customer Service Representative in plant is Melody Lundquist 

The Le6anon Valley College Quittapahilld is produced entirely by a volunteer stajff. 






franklin 

■ 





Closing 



119 




120 



Breaking New Ground