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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

■• re 



i ! i CM VALLEY COLLEGE 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1997leba 



Quittapahilla 

Lebanon Valley College 
Annville, Pennsylvania 1 7003 

Volume 82 




Uuring the summer of 1996, the Olympic Games captured the hearts 
of people around the world. That overwhelming spirit, which began 
with the lighting of the first torch, has persevered throughout the 
triumphs and the tragedies of every person and place that has been 
touched by the Olympics. Although the torch is gone from Atlanta, its 
light remains - in each of us. Each student, professor, and administrator 
at Lebanon Valley College possesses that spirit, and with it comes the 
ability to make every endeavor a positive and fulfilling experience. In 
spite of the official closing of the games, it has clearly been proven at 
LVC that "the torch is gone, but we are the light." 
— Carrie Stull 



mm 



Student Life 



1 hroughout the academic year there are a variety of 
events and activities that fill the campus calendar and 
entertain both students and faculty. Each of these proj- 
ects, which are all usually sponsored by student or- 
ganizations, require an incredible amount of dedication 
and time from the people who plan them. That devotion 
and hard work is apparent when the event becomes a 
success. After the curtain closes or the booths are torn 
down, those involved, such as the members of the Spring 
Arts Committee, get an opportunity to reflect upon the 
positive outcome. That positivity in turn instills within 
their minds a new spark of inspiration that will carry 
them successfully through their next endeavor. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





1997 




(§ WP ) 



Freshman 
Orientation 

A First Taste of College Life 



Jl illed with excitement 
and nervousness, the 
freshmen arrived on 
campus to begin an un- 
forgettable journey. Led 
by orientation leaders, 
they unpacked their be- 
longings, got acquainted 
with their roommates, 
and purchased their 
books. 

At the Opening Con- 
vocation, the Class of 
2000 officially became 
students of Lebanon 
Valley College. 

Parents soon departed 
as students bes:an to ad- 
just to their new home. 
They became more at 
ease as their Resident 
Assistants and Peer Ad 



visors prepared them for 
the college academic 
and social experience. 
Events such as Playfair 
and the dance brought 
the whole class together. 
The next few days in- 
volved First Year Expe- 
rience Seminars where 
students met and in- 
teracted with their aca- 
demic advisors and pro- 
fessors. Two programs, 
Power Plays and Strange 
Like Me informed stu- 
dents of the realities of 
rape and racism. Other 
dances and programs 
were scheduled to keep 
the students entertained 
throughout the week- 
end. 
— Clint S. Rudy 




Along with their new classmates, Maureen Haynes, Jimmy 
Baylor, and Mike Gloss get a chance to do some teamwork. 




To kick off Playfair, the freshmen and their orientation leaders 
cheer for one another while taking a few laps around the 
Academic Quad. 




The students learn rather quickly to trust their new friends! 

Juniors Willy Carmona and Mike Washkevich provide some 
musical entertainment for the students, parents, and faculty 
members after the Opening Convocation. 




@KP> 



Jon Pentecost and Mike Keisinger put on a juggling 
performance while trying to find new members for their club. 

To add to the Activities Fair, Dining Services provides a 
Seafood picnic over the dinner hour. 





While running the Black Culture Club table, Angie Koons takes 
a moment to talk with Vicki Gingrich. 

Alpha Psi Omega and Wig & Buckle members Alicia Way and 
Bob Bednarczyk hope to find new students with a passion for 
theater. 




Activities Fair 

Annual Event Invites New 
Students into Organizations 



Wc 



ednesday, Septem- 
ber 4 marked the day of 
the annual Activities 
Fair, an event in which 
organizations on campus 
get a chance to show 
what they have to offer 
and in some cases try to 
enlist new members. 
Along the walkways of 
the Academic Quad 
were tables laden with 
sign-up sheets, photo al- 
bums, and the various 
literature of the differ- 
ent clubs. There were 
approximately 4 1 tables, 
each representing an or- 
ganization or club on 
campus. Some, like the 
Psychology and German 



clubs were academic, 
others were religious 
like Project and H.I.S.. 
Sororities and fraterni- 
ties even came out, 
along with other new 
and unique organiza- 
tions like the Juggling 
Club. 

There were quite a 
few added attractions, 
like the pseudo-Sumo 
wrestling, the Cartoonist 
doing free portraits, and 
the seafood. The weath- 
er may not have been 
one of those attractions, 
but mercifully, the rain 
that had started to fall 
did not last very long. 
— Malaika Cheney- 
Coker 



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Lead singer of Polyester Chicken, Jason Drayer, entertains the crowd in 
his first appearance of the evening. 

"Bad Medicine," consisting of musicians such as Jason Drayer and Mike 
Bodan, bring down the house with their revival of the group Bon Jovi. 



Second Place Winner Steve Rosenfeld captivates the 
crowd by juggling not only balls, but also knives, 
rings, and flaming torches. 

Ben Farrell adds variety to the mostly musical show, 
by enlightening the audience with his own poetrv. 





Comedian and host, Vince Morris, 
successfullv warms tip the audience 
with his opening monologue. 

Heather Wilson. BCC Vice President 
awards the prizes to the top three 
acts of the show. 



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Talent Show 

Displaying a Variety of Talents 



JLieedy Theater was "a buzz" 
with students swarming to the 
College Center and filing in to 
their seats to witness the 
Fourth Annual Talent Show 
sponsored by the Black Cul- 
ture Club. Leedy reached its 
full capacity with spectators 
sitting in the aisles and stand- 
ing by the doors. 

A few minutes after 8 p.m, 
the show began with Angie 
Koons, BCC President, an- 
nouncing the comedian and 
host for the evening, Vince 
Morris. The crowd was recep- 
tive to Morris and warmed up 
quite quickly once he began 
his opening monologue. 

The judges for the Talent 
Show were President Pollick, 
Dave Newell, Kim Saunders, 
Beth Anne Zielsdorff, Cornell 
Wilson, and Gentaro Yui. The 
judges based the participant's 
scores on creativity, audience 
appeal, organization, appear- 



ance, and talent. 

Most of the groups in com- 
petition were musical groups 
including Fxlipse, and Polyes- 
ter Chicken. Some other peo- 
ple chose to reveal talents oth- 
er than musical ability, such as 
Ben Farrell's poetry reading, 
Steve Rosenfeld's juggling act, 
and the dance group Praise 
Him with Dance. 

The top three winners for 
the night received prize mon- 
ey in the amounts of $25, $50, 
and $75 respectively. The 
winners for the evening were 
Polyester Chicken in third pla- 
ce, Rosenfeld in second place, 
and first to Jason Lausch and 
Jennifer Wentzel for their 
dance act, to which they con- 
fessed that they spent a lot of 
time on. Wentzel added that 
"the competition was stiff... we 
were really surprised by the 
outcome." 
— Anni M. Shockey 





First Place Winners Jason Lausch and Jennifer Wentzel 
dance to a mix of music ranging from "Staying Alive" to 
"Scream." 




The vast crowd responds to one of the many jokes made 
by the comedian. 

One of last year's most popular acts, Dawn Weiser, 
returns to the stage to sing "Stay." 



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Yvonne D'Uva and her 
escort, David Gottschalk 




Tenneil Daniels and her 
escort, Michael Price 





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Kimberly Leister and her 
escort, Robert Shaffer 



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Erica Schneck and her 
escort, Larry Larthey 



Heather Wilson and her 
escort, Gerald Wilson 



Wendy Zimmerman and 

her escort, Brant 

Shoemaker 



Homecoming 

Council Sponsors Olympic Weekend 



A he Olympic torch lit 
LVC's campus Home- 
coming Weekend, Octo- 
ber 25-26, as the festivi- 
ties of an Athens 
Homecoming began. The 
committee diligently 
worked on a multitude 
of activities for students. 

Thursday night mark- 
ed the beginning of the 
line-up when Freshman 
and Seniors took on the 
Sophomores and Juniors 
in the annual powder 
puff game. On Friday 
night, a bonfire and pep 
rally were held on Ar- 
nold Field. 

On Saturday, stu- 
dents, and alumni 
crowded the stands to 



watch LVC Dutchmen 
take on Moravian Col- 
lege and to see Yvonne 
D'Uva crowned Home- 
coming Queen at half- 
time. 

Before the event took 
place, chairperson of the 
Homecoming Commit- 
tee, Leslie Gardiner sa- 
id, "Inspired by the 
Olympics theme, the 
West Dining Hall will be 
decorated with Olympic 
Rings, grapes, and pil- 
lars." To match the 
theme, students were ur- 
ged to wear togas to the 
dance. That evening, 
Brian Blanford was 
crowned Homecoming 
King. 
— Lynne Heisev 




During the game against Moravian, Greg Kohler receives a pass 
and tries to escape the opposition. 




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Dave Schott leads his fellow TKE brothers in their parade to 
the field. 




Drum Majors Meredith Price and Michele Weber battle for 
control over the Marching Band during the half-time show. 

The Band's "space" theme appeals to the spectators. 




<§hp> 



9 



Crimes of the 
Heart 

Play Offers Opportunities for 
Female Actors 



A lie cast of this year's 
Homecoming play Crimes 
of the Heart worked hard on 
stage to prepare for their 
opening night in Leedy 
Theater. 

"I'm really excited about 
this show. We have made a 
lot of progress, and there is 
a lot of intense acting," 
stated Lisa Epting, director 
of the play. Crimes of the 
Heart is a comedy-drama 
that takes place in the 
kitchen of the Magrath 
house in Hazlehurst, Mis- 
sissippi. The story is about 
three Magrath sisters and 
how each deals with the sui- 
cide of their mother and 
the "murder" of the family 
cat. 

The oldest sister, Lenny 
Magrath, played by Julie 
Repman becomes an old 
maid. The middle sister, 
Meg Magrath, played by 
Brooke Johnson goes off to 



Hollywood to find fame 
and fortune, but finds nei- 
ther. And, the youngest sis- 
ter. Babe Botrelle, played 
by Gwen Lawson shoots 
her wealthy politician hus- 
band. The other cast mem- 
bers include, Chick Boyle, 
played by Danielle Boileau, 
the family's cousin. Babe's 
lawyer, Barnette Lloyd, is 
played by Brandon Flatley 
and Meg's old boyfriend, 
Doc Porter, is played by 
Wayne Knaub. 

One valuable quality of 
this play is the emphasis it 
giyes to women actors. 
"Crimes of the Heart is one 
of the few available plays 
lor production that has 
more women than men in 
it," stated Dr. Pry. "This 
play gives a lot of nice op- 
portunities for women ac- 
tors because it is centered 
around females," said Ep- 
ting. 
— Ellen Gehr 




To be sure that Babe will stay out of jail, Meg talks to Barnette 
(Brandon Flatley) about how to best go about the case. 




Lenny (Julie Repman) and Meg (Brooke Johnson) argue about 
how to deal with Babe's predicament. 




Meg tries to get Babe (Gwen Lawson) to talk to her about how 
and why she shot her husband. 




Chick (Danielle Boileau) bursts into the kitchen to spread the 
latest vicious gossip. 






10 



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Members and guests enjoy the refreshments at the reception. 
Amie Kabia prepares to be interviewed about Kwanzaa. 




Following the actual ceremony, the audience is entertained by 
an area storyteller. 

Shanda Finney gives her input about the success of the Third 
Annual Kwanzaa Celebration at Lebanon Valley College. 




Kwanzaa 

African American Holiday 
Celebrated by BCC 



O 



"n Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 20, the Lebanon Valley 
College Black Culture Club 
sponsored the Third An- 
nual Kwanzaa Celebration. 
The event was held in 
Leedy Theater and was fol- 
lowed by a reception in 
Faust Lounge. 

Entertainment for the 
evening included music, 



storytelling, and a candle- 
lighting ceremony which 
explained the meaning and 
principles of Kwanzaa. 
Black Culture Club mem- 
bers educated the audience 
by explaining that the Afri- 
can American holiday fo- 
cuses on things such as 
strength, family unity, and 
culture. 
— Carrie L. M. St till 



<Sfjp> 



11 



A Girl's Guide to 
Chaos 

The Endless Search for "Mr. Right" 



.TXlpha Psi Omega presented A 
Girl's Guide to Chaos by Cynthia 
Heimel on Valentine's Day week- 
end, February 14-16. It is a witty 
play about the plight of the single 
woman in the 1990s. The play 
focuses on the lives of three 
friends, Cynthia, Rita, and Cleo, 
and some of the men they en- 
counter. The man is not the bad 
guy in this play, he is just seen 
through the eyes of the woman. 
He does however, get to say his 
peace, even if it is just for a mo- 
ment. 

Cynthia, played by Kate Laep- 
ple, is the central character. She 
is a woman of the 1 990s: works, 
sleeps, eats, and is forever in 
search of the perfect man. 

Cleo, played by Jody Jacobetz, 
is an upper-class girl. She is a 
scientist who becomes convinced 
that her intellect scares away any 



chance of a suitor. 

Rita, played by Brooke Ander- 
son, is a spitfire Texan artist who 
knows way too much about what 
not to look for in a man. Married 
and divorced three times, she just 
can't seem to find a man who can 
deal with her demands. 

Lurene, played by Danielle 
Boileau, is a waitress. She appears 
a couple of times throughout the 
show to lend a little bit of sanity 
to a not-so-sane set of dialogue. 

Finally, there is Jake, played by 
Wayne Knaub, who actually plays 
a couple of different men in the 
show. As Jake, he is Cynthia's ex- 
boyfriend who becomes interest- 
ed in Cleo as the play progresses. 
He is the man who gets to say his 
peace about women in order to 
show that men are not bad guys, 
just a little misunderstood. 
— Arianne Zeck 




While Rita and Cleo playfully battle over an article of clothing, Lurene 
(Danielle Boileau) works to earn a paycheck at just one of her many jobs. 



12 



mm 




During his monologue, Jake (Wayne Knaub) 
discusses the frustrations that come with dating in 
the 1 990s - from the male perspective. 




Although previously betrayed by men in her life, 
Rita (Brooke Anderson) puts on a brave front and 
tackles each day with strength and an unbelievable 
sense of humor. 

Cleo (Jody Jacobetz) and Cynthia (Kate Laepple) 
make one of their frequent visits to Rita's kitchen, 
where she entertains them with the thought 
process of the "typical male." 





Sister Hubert (Jody Jacobetz), Reverend Mother, and Sister 
Amnesia present the cookbook, "Baking with the B.V.M 
(Blessed Virgin Mother)." 



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Leo (Kate Wilson), and the others recount the tragic events 
surrounding the vichyssoise. 



Sister Robert Anne (Jessica Smith), the troublemaker of the 
Order, shows Reverend Mother (Kelly Roth) her "Convent 
Miranda Look." 

The Sisters try to ignore the outrageous conversation between 
Sister Mary Amnesia (Andrea Hendricks) and Sister Mary 
Annette (Lori Moyer). 




Nunsense 

Leedy Theater Hosts the Little 
Sisters ofHoboken 



Uan Goggin's musical 
comedy Nunsense reached 
the L.V.C. stage this semes- 
ter. 

The play centers around 
five nuns who are desper- 
ately in need of raising 
money to officially bury the 
last four of the fifty-two sis- 
ters who died after eating 
Sister Julia Child of God's 
Vichyssoise soup. It seems 
that Reverend Mother, 
played by the exceptional 
Kelly Roth, used the rest of 
the money they raised to 
buy a VCR for the convent 
instead of burying the re- 
maining sisters. 

Jody Jacobetz played Sis- 
ter Mary Hubert, who 
serves the Order as Mis- 
tress of the Novices, train- 
ing the recruits. Her phi- 
losophy is to be gentle on 
her Novices, yet firm. Jody 
took the cake with her 



spiritual revival. 

Sister Robert Anne, 
played by Jessica Smith, 
was the child of a disadvan- 
taged Brooklyn family. Her 
devilish grin invites you to 
explore the nunnery from 
the "wild side." 

Sister Mary Amnesia, 
played by Andrea Hen- 
dricks, has a tendency to 
forget more than she re- 
members after a crucifix 
fell on her head. Her dy- 
namic voice and back- 
ground in dance became 
apparent as she performed. 

Finally, we have Sister 
Mary Leo, played by Kate 
Wilson, who has come 
from an Illinois Farm to 
"dedicate her life to God 
through the dance." 

Overall, the five talented 
actresses provided an en- 
tertaining evening. 
— Arianne Zeck 



<§up> 



13 



Greek Week 

Events Entertain Campus 



O, 



'pening ceremonies for 
Greek Week were held on 
Sunday April 13. During 
this week long event, the 
Greek organizat ons com- 
peted in numerous events. 

The event filled week 
was kicked off with a cook- 
out followed by a God and 
Goddess ceremony. Each 
organization chose one of 
their members to portray 
their favorite God or God- 
dess. The night was then 
topped off with the events 
of musical chairs, an egg 
drop and a pie eating com- 
petition, which were held 
between the Hammond 
and Keister dormitories. 

Each day of the week was 
packed full of events and 
tough competition with 
each organization hosting 
an event of their own. Fol- 
lowing the opening cere- 
monies were events such as 
tug-of-war, an obstacle 
course, kickball, arm wres- 
tling (women only), belch- 
ing contest (women only), a 
beauty contest (men only), 
assassins, greasy watermel- 
on contest, mud volleyball, 
wheelbar 



row race and the famous 
gong show. 

Even though only 
Greeks participated in 
these events, the entire stu- 
dent body and faculty were 
invited and encouraged to 
attend and support the or- 
ganizations. An event that 
attracts a large portion of 
the student body each year 
is the gong show. "Even 
though I am not Greek, a 
lot of mv friends are and I 
like to support them. I en- 
joyed watching the gong 
show. It is always good for 
a few chuckles," said soph- 
omore Matt Franks. 

The week came to a 
roaring end and closing 
ceremonies were held on 
Thursdav April 17. During 
the ceremony, the final re- 
sults were announced. Al- 
pha Sigma Tau and Kappa 
Sigma Kappa placed first. 

It was a close competi- 
tion throughout the whole 
week. The competition was 
real good and next year we 
hope to win," said Dave 
Schott, President of TKE. 

— Stef Leiser 




The "Philo Phreaks," Steve Lynch and Josh Howard, model in 
the beauty contest. 




The Knights of the Valley are "Staying Alive" as they once 
again win the Gong Show. 

Clio sister Ashley Cox coaches Heather Wilson, as Janell Cuddy 4 
tries to keep her steady. 




Marcia Tumpey, Rick Hopf, and Jessica Bostdorf try to get 
clean after a match of mud volleyball. 



14 



<5fip> 







Students such as Meredith Price and Rachel Rascoe, who 
chaired the Music Committee, teach songs to the children. 

Keirsten Shumate directs the children to their next activity. 



Children's Day 

Area Students Learn that 
Education can be Fun 



O 



April 25 students 
from the Annville-Cleona 
School District were invit- 
ed to the campus to experi- 
ence a day dedicated speci- 
fically to them. Children's 
Day is quickly becoming a 
well-loved tradition at 
L.V.C. thanks to the plan- 
ning and organization of 
students like Audra and 
Dan Palopoli. The junior 
Elementary Education ma- 
jors gathered together 



classmates and volunteers, 
who proceeded to plan 
workshops and activities 
that would entertain the 
children all day. 

Some of the workshops 
included music and songs, 
crafts, storytelling, games, 
and a special performance 
by the Rainbow Troupe. 

The day's events taught 
the children one particular 
lesson - that learning is fun. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




Elementary Education major. Amy Borders, takes some time to 
talk to the kids in her group. 




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The children enjoy a day of activities 
that includes games and stories. 



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15 



Poots - Sp/iing Jks 1QQ7 




Kevin Neidig, a freshman, and his band are just one of many groups to perform on the main stage throughout the Spring Arts weekend 



16 



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Spring Arts 

nnual Festival Offers Entertainment 
for Students and Alumni 



he annual Spring 
Vrts/Alumni Weekend began 
m Friday, April 25 and ex- 
ended through Sunday, April 
>7. 

The preparations for this 
extraordinary event were co- 
ordinated by Sarah Eckenro- 
le, who advised all the com- 
nittee members. 

One of the main products 
hat ensured financial success 
vas the sale of the t-shirts. 
rhis year the t-shirt design 
vas created by three LVC stu- 
lents, Chris Edwards, Jamin 
vlcKee, and Mike Newman. 

To kick off the weekend, 
here was a festival of college 
>ands. Then, on Saturday af- 
ernoon was the cardboard 
culpting contest. Six groups 
xeated some art of their very 



own in this unique event. Star- 
ting at 7:00 p.m. there were 
more live bands performing. 

On Sunday, the festivites 
continued when students 
could have attended the sec- 
ond annual student art show, 
or taken part in Children's 
Theater. 

Students such as Jody 
Jacobetz, leader of drama 
events, and Jason Drayer, 
chairperson for music enter- 
tainment helped greatly in 
planning. 

Jacobetz also performed, 
along with other students. 
The Alpha Psi Omega pledge 
class performed skits on Fri- 
day evening, and the Theater 
and Performance class presen- 
ted A?itigone. 
— Kelly Sonon 





Wig and Buckle members Gina Azzara and Gwen 
Lawson take part in Children's Theater on 
Sunday Afternoon by acting out the story of "Jack 
and the Beanstalk." 




The booths set up by many campus organizations 
provide a variety of activities, such as sand art. 

Yvonne D'Uva takes a group of alumni on a tour, to 
show them the changes and new additions to the college. 



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17 




18 



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'ii'i- 






Seniors 



1 his year, the senior class of Lebanon Valley College 
accomplished many things. As individuals, each of them 
excelled by meeting their own personal goals. In particu- 
lar, the young men and women used their lifetime of 
training to their advantage as they faced their final year 
of undergraduate education. Many were student teach- 
ers, who brought their knowledge and energy to the 
students whose lives they touched. Some completed 
internships which brought them more valuable educa- 
tion that would prepare them for their future jobs, but, 
collectively, they spent their final year at L.V.C. creating 
memories and gaining experiences that will last them a 
lifetime. 

— Carrie L. M. Stull 





1997 




"WiP 



19 



Nicole L. Adams 

Political Science 

Economics 

Jessica A. Albert 
Biology 

Kristi J. Ames 
Elementary 
Education 



Jasmine L. 

Ammons 

English - 

Communications 

Marc V. Attivo 

Applied Computer 

Science 

Tara L. Auman 
Psychology 



Rebecca L. Avers 

English - 
Communications 

Jessica L. Ayers 
Economics 

Natalie Baruka 
Elementary 
Education 



Brian P. Blanford 
Elementary 
Education 

Mary E. 

Blankenmeyer 

Psychology 

Spanish 

Melissa Bleyzgis 

Elementary 

Education 




20 



^ImP 




Melissa B. Blouch 
Music Education 

Tiersha T. 

Bomberger 

Spanish 

Brian P. Botella 

Music Recording 

Technology 



Amy R. Bowman 
Psychobiology 

Lisa M. Brandt 
Elementary 
Education 

Eric V. Bricker 
History 



Edward J. Brignole 
Biochemistry 

Stephanie R. Brown 

English - Secondary 

Education 

Jennifer L. Bryan 

Psychology 

Spanish 



Mary T. Bullock 
Elementary 
Education 

Christie M. Burger 

Psychobiology 

Psychology 

Anthony P. Burke 
Biology 



«up> 



21 



Susan C. Butler 
Elementary 
Education 

Jennifer L. Byers 
Management 

Jennifer C. 

Calabrese 

English - 

Communications 



Russell J. Ciliento 
Psychobiology 

Regina E. Cocco 
Biology 
French 

Renee L. 

Concodora 

Hotel Management 



Nicole M. Connors 
Sociology 

Letizia J. Conway 
Management 

Thomas P. Cornish 
Accounting 



Yvonne A. D'Uva 
Psychobiology 

Cathleen M. 

Damms 

Music Education 

Music 

Tenneil L. Daniels 

Psychology 

Sociology 




22 



<§fip) 




Chad A. Davis 
Management 

Diane D. Dickey 
Biology 

Joseph R. Dillon 

Individualized 

Major 



Corrina L. Doerge 
Music Education 

Livingstone S. Dore 
History 

Susan G. DuBosq 
Elementary 
Education 



Jennifer L. Echard 
Mathematics 

Kerri A. Eckenrode 
Management 

Sarah E. Eckenrode 
Biology 



Jennifer L. 

Eichelberger 

Management 

French 

Jennifer L. Emerich 
Elementary 
Education 

Edward C. Erie 
Mathematics 



SfflP 



23 



Denise M. Falcone 
Elementary 
Education 

Tara L. Fickert 
Biochemistry 

Brandon W. Flatley 

Music Recording 

Technology 



Holly C. French 
Management 

Dawn S. Friday 
Accounting 
Management 

Lavinia M. Garcia 
Psychology 



Gregory J. 

Glembocki 

Management 

Jennifer S. 

Gominger 
Elementary 

Education 

Benjamin S. 

Goodhart 

Psychobiology 

Psychology 



Todd J. Goshert 
Management 

Matthew A. Gross 
American Studies 

John M. Gruber 
Mathematics 




24 



<5ffp> 




^itifcMifc 



Michael L. Guyer 
Sociology 

Christopher T. 

Haak 

Management 

Jessica C. Haas 
Chemistry 



Laura A. Hain 
History 

Carolyn A. 

Hallman 

Psychology 

Jennifer L. Hand 
Elementary 
Education 



Bradley S. Harris 
Biology 

Scott F. Henck 
Actuarial Science 

Daniel P. 

Henderson 

Music Recording 

Technology 



Andrea S. 

Hendricks 

Music Education 

Music 

Jason D. Henery 
Chemistry 

Brant A. Hershey 
Chemistry - A. C. S. 



<S WP ) 



25 



Nathan A. Hillegas 
Management 

Christina L. 
Hinderliter 
Elementary 
Education 

Joyce Hodacz 
Psychology 



Lori M. Horst 
Elementary 
Education 

Michael A. Houck 
Economics 

Josh E. Howard 

Management 

Economics 



Brian C. Hughes 

English - 
Communications 

Stephen C. Jayne 

International 

Business 

Stephen C. Jenks 
Music Education 



Matthew S. Jones 
Physics 

Roy D. Jones 
Music Education 

Brian J. Kampf 
History 




26 



Sfjp) 




Allen C. Keeney 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Chad T. Keiser 

Music Education 

Music 

Nicki J. Kienitz 

Elementary 

Education 



Michael T. 

Kiesinger 

Mathematics 

Tammi J. Kiick 
Elementary 
Education 

Jeffrey M. Kimmel 

Applied Computer 

Science 



Patrick M. King 
Accounting 

Chris L. Kirchner 
Actuarial Science 

Christopher J. 

Klimchak 

Music Education 

Music 



Roberta L. 

Kmiecinski 

Management 

Jason B. Kopp 
Psychology 

Staci L. Kowalczyk 
Elementary 
Education 



@up> 



27 



Danielle S. Kraft 
Mathematics 

Nicoletta E. 

Lagonis 
Psychology 

Joseph C. Lambert 

IV 

Philosophy 



Nicole L. Lancieri 
Psychology 

Holly M. Landis 

International 

Business 

Spanish 

Alana H. Laskowski 
History 



Amy E. Leeser 
Psychology 

Trisha R. Leffler 
Biology 

Kimberly A. Leister 
Management 



Matthew S. Leonard 
Management 

Shelly M. Levan 
Elementary 
Education 
Psychology 

Angela L. Lewis 
Chemistry 




28 



SffiP 




Meredith L. Lutz 

Mathematics 

Economics 

Dawn S. Mahan 
Mathematics 

Martha R. Mains 

Music Education 

Music 



JfK ~"""N 




muTm 




A **' A 


^1 




1 





Michelle D. Malloy 
Spanish 

Lisa F. Martin 

English - 

Communications 

Philosophy 

Colleen M. 

McClafferty 

English 

Spanish 



Susan M. McCurdy 
Biology 

Natalie H. 

McDonald 

English - 

Communications 

Steven L. McElroy 
Management 



Michael S. 

McGreevy 

Accounting 

Management 

Tara K. Mehalick 
Elementary 
Education 

Sarah F. Metallo 

Elementary 

Education 

French 



^mp 



29 



Bryn A. Metcalf 
Elementary 
Education 

Debra A. Meyer 
Political Science 

Jennifer J. Mihalov 
Psychology 



Stacey L. Miller 
Elementary 
Education 

Jenna C. Mitchell 
Individualized 

Major 
Management 

Heather Moran 
Music Education 



Melissa S. Morgan 
Biology 

Ross W. Mowery 
Religion 

Bethany D. 

Mummert 

History 



Robert A. Murin 

English - 
Communications 

Jennifer A. Nauss 
Management 
Accounting 

Elizabeth M. 

Nissley 
Mathematics 




30 



<mm 







Josiah J. Novack 

English - 
Communications 

Sean T. O'Doherty 
Management 

Denise A. Oraboni 
Elementary 
Education 



Timothy M. Ostrich 

Actuarial Science 

Psychology 

Sally A. Padilione 
Psychology 

AimeeJ. Padula 
Biology 



Jennifer M. Palazzi 
Elementary 
Education 

Katoora L. Patches 
English - Literature 

Pamela A. Pedrick 

Psychology 
English - Literature 



Steven E. Perkins 
Elementary 
Education 

Traci A. Petrino 
History 

Courtney A. 
Polance 
Biology 



<§up> 



31 



JoAnn R. Ponessa 
American Studies 

Sharon L. Possessky 
Biology 

Brian P. Powers 
History 



Ana J. Prewitt- 
Rodriguez 
Sociology 

Andrew J. Prock 
English - Literature 

Jeffrey C. Raber 

Biology 

Chemistry 



Melissa L. Redding 
Psychology 

Dawn M. Redensky 
Sociology 

Casey A. Reed 
Political Science 



Melinda W. 
Reichard 
Sociology 
Religion 

Denise L. Reinoehl 
Elementary 
Education 
Psychology 

Robert H. Reiss 

Philosophy 

Religion 




32 



Gfjp> 




Scott A. Root 
Music 

Eileen M. Rossman 

English - 

Communications 

Kyle R. Roth 

Music Recording 

Technology 



David K. Russell 

Psychobiology 

Psychology 

Elizabeth L. Salter 

Music Education 

Music 

Allyson L. 

Schneider 

Elementary 

Education 



f% 


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Tanya J. Schuler 
Spanish 

Robert C. Searfoss 
History 

Poh F. See 

Actuarial Science 

Economics 



Nancy R. Seidel 
Elementary 
Education 

Rachel L. Shaak 
Elementary 
Education 

Brent E. Shoemaker 
Management 



GBJP 



33 






Coye E. Shoop 
Economics 

Gina M. Shull 
Management 

Cristina S. Simmers 



Biolo 



gy 



Meredyth E. 
Slingwine 

Biology 
Chemistry 

Heather L. Smith 
Psychology 

Jessica L. Smith 
Elementary 
Education 
Psychology 



Cory J. Snook 
Political Science 

Brandon S. Snyder 
Management 

Greta C. Snyder 
Music Education 



Neil F. Sokola 

Management 

Philosophy 

Paul R. Sorrels 
Philosophy 

Travis A. Spurley 
Music 




34 



<§fjp> 







Vicki N. Starr 
Management 
Accounting 

Christina L. 

Steinbacher 

Elementary 

Education 

Andrea L. Stetler 
Elementary 
Education 



Holly M. Stevens 
Chemistry 

Jennifer L. Taylor 
Management 

Tina M. Teichman 
Psychology 



Jason D. Tesche 
Psychology 

Lynn D. Thompson 
Elementary 
Education 
Psychology 

Jill R. Trenn 

English - 

Communications 



Thomas L. Trone 
Elementary 
Education 

Brett W. Troutman 
Biology 

Charles W. Ulrich 

IV 

Music Education 

Music 



(§J}P> 



35 



Melissa A. Vargo 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Christina J. Watts 
Psychology 

Ann E. Weicksel 
Elementary 
Education 



Robyn P. Welker 
Elementary 
Education 

David K. Wentzel 
History 

Bridget C. Williams 
Management 



Heather N. Wilson 

Applied Computer 

Science 

Gregory C. Wirth 
Psychology 

Nathan A. 
Wisniewski 

Biology 
Chemistry 



Tara E. Wolownik 
Sociology 

David W. Wright 

English - Secondary 

Education 

Carol S. Zearing 

Applied Computer 

Science 




36 



®InP 




Magdalene C. 

Zeppos 
Management 

Christopher D. 

Ziegenfuss 

Chemistry - A. C. S. 

Beth Anne 

Zielsdorff 

Accounting 



Tina D. 

Zimmerman 

Actuarial Science 

Wendy J. 
Zimmerman 
Management 

Jill E. Zwiesdak 
Management 



Lebanon 



1097 



<§ijp> 



37 



Faculty 



1 he Faculty, Administrators, and Staff Members at 
Lebanon Valley can easily be compared to the coaches of 
Olympic Athletes. Coaches provide encouragement and 
expertise in their sport while also expecting strict disci- 
pline and dedication from their athletes. Professors at 
L.V.C. do the same. They spend every day, teaching not 
only 'textbook education,' but also personal experien- 
ces and philosophies. Over a four year span, professors 
attempt to prepare each student for the future; there- 
fore, they set high expectations that each student must 
meet. Their goal is to transfer their knowledge to the 
minds of others and their wish is that every student will 
have learned how to teach themselves as well. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





1997 




<5ffp> 



39 



The Presidential Inauguration of 
Dr. G. David Pollick 




Dr. Scott and the other members of the Quittapahilla Highlanders lead 
the processional to Miller Chapel. 

Faculty members, students, delegates, and community members, listen 
attentively as the new president is inaugurated. 



President Pollick makes 
his inaugural address. 

Senior Jason Henery 

welcomes Dr. Pollick 
on behalf of the 
student body. 





Throughout the Inaugural weekend, President 
Pollick takes many opportunities to meet new 
people. 



Hundreds flock to LVC for Presidential Inauguration 



flours of committee work, thou- 
sands of dollars, tons of ideas, in- 
tricate plans, and a great deal of 
foresight went into the inaugura- 
tion of Dr. G. David Pollick as the 
16th President of Lebanon Valley 
College. Pollick assumed the presi- 
dency on July 1, 1 996 after serving 
as the Co-Chief Executive Officer 
and President of the Art Institute 
of Chicago and The School of the 
Art Institute of Chicago. But he 
symbolically received the honor of 
President during Friday's festivities 
that kept the LVC campus rocking 
well into the night. 

The day began with the arrival of 
the delegates from colleges and 
learned societies such as Duke Uni- 
versity, Franklin & Marshall Col- 
lege, Harvard University, The Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, and many 
other well respected institutions. 
The delegates toured the campus, 
including the newly remodeled and 
recently completed Social Quad, 
and then ate together in a luncheon 
held in the West Dining Hall. 

After the luncheon, less than 1 00 
trustees, facultv members, and stu- 
dents gathered in Lutz Hall for the 
Academic Symposium "The World 
as Campus." The Symposium was 
called to order at 1:35 p.m. by Dr. 
Gene Brown, Professor of Political 
Science, moderator for the event. 
Some of the topics discussed includ- 
ed important international changes, 
and the position of the United Sta- 
tes as the superpower in the future. 

The inaugural procession and 



ceremony followed the symposium 
at 4 p.m. in Miller Chapel. Preludes 
on the organ were Cortege et Litanie, 
Rhosymedre, and Festival Intrada. 
The Quittapahilla Highlanders, a 
Scottish bagpipe band, led the Pro- 
cessional with The Green Hills of 
Troll, When the Battle's O'er, Gaude- 
amus Igitur, and Lord, Save Thy Peo- 
ple. 

The Invocation was performed 
by Dr. D. Darrell Woomer. He ur- 
ged God to help the president with 
the tough decisions that would fol- 
low the the positions. Also, he asked 
that God help Pollick to keep an 
open mind with minority students 
and their needs - especially that of 
freedom of expression. 

The inaugural address was of- 
fered by President Emeritus John 
Synodinos. He was introduced by 
Thomas Reinhart who said that this 
is a unique experience to have a 
new president ask his predecessor 
to speak at the ceremony. "Those 
of us who know John, questioned if 
this was a wise move," he joked. 

Synodinos expressed his happi- 
ness with the choice of Pollick as his 
successor. "Every time we talk, I eo 
away knowing this institution is in 
good hands." He also spoke of the 
many challenges that will undoubt- 
edly face the new president. Four 
challenges in particular that small 
colleges face are over filling their 
capacity, affordabilitv, prospects 
for federal and state funding, and 
the costs and consequences of tech- 
nology. Each of these things, Syno- 
dinos felt, would cause Lebanon 
Valley College problems in the fu- 



ture in some way. There will be "no 
shortage of challenges or opportun- 
ities," but he feels that Pollick is the 
leader that the college needs. Be- 
cause of Pollick's journeys and ex- 
periences, "You're well prepared," 
he said. 

Dean William McGill echoed 
Synodinos' feelings while delivering 
a greeting to the president on be- 
half of the faculty, administration, 
and staff. The decision to have 
Synodinos speak at the inaugura- 
tion "says much about John, it says 
much about David, and it says 
much about Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege." 

Jason D. Henerv, President of 
the Student Council, welcomed the 
president by offering him chal- 
lenges like, "leading our football 
team to victory... and more pages in 
our college newspaper." He asked 
for a more involved campus com- 
munity and a bridging of the gap 
between faculty and students. 

Following the Inauguration exer- 
cises faculty, students, family mem- 
bers and delegates moved to the 
Lynch gym for the catered buffet 
dinner that lasted until 8 o'clock. 

From the dinner luminaries tra- 
ced the pathways to Arnold field 
for a concert from the band and 
fireworks. 

At 1 o'clock the day was ended 
with the Pizza party with the Pol- 
licks, sponsored by student council, 
held in West Dining Hall. Students 
enjoyed food, drinks, and music 
with the new president. 
— Wayne Knaub and 
Anni Shockey 



KJn behalf of the students of Lebanon Valley College, the 1997 Yearbook 
Staff proudly dedicates this edition of the Quittapahilla in honor of Dr. G. 
David Pollick, and wishes him much success and happiness at LVC. 





Dr. Susan L. Atkinson 
Associate Professor, Education 



Mrs. Susan R. Aungst 
Interlibrary Loan Assistant 




Mr. Larry G. Barber 
Tennis Instructor 




Mrs. Karen D. Best 
Registrar 



"Wi • <# 


Jjte 1 




• . Ji»Jwi 


! i 

1 m 

1 M 


% "^^Jm?' 


■ : || : 





Dr. Phillip A. Billings 
Chair and Professor, English 



42 



(Sfjp> 



— 




Ms. Leslie Bowen 
Lecturer, Art 








Mrs. Andrea F. Bromberg 
Executive Assistant to the President 




Ms. Sheryl A. Campbell 

Assistant Director, Administrative 

Computing 




.,,.*■ ■** 



Dr. Lee A. Chasen 

Assistant Professor, Mathematical 

Sciences 




Dr. James H. Broussard 
Professor, History 




Ms. Donna M. Centofanti 
Resident Hall Director 








Willi li# 



Dr. Sharon F. Clark 
Professor, Management 



®mp 



43 




Dr. Richard D. Cornelius 
Chair and Professor, Chemistry 




Rev. Timothy M. Dewald 

Adjunct Instructor, Mathematical 

Sciences 





Dr. Scott H. Eggert 
Associate Professor, Music 



Mrs. Elaine D. Feather 
Director, Continuing Education 




Mrs. Deborah R. Fullam 
Vice President and Controller 



44 



(§fjp) 




Mr. Stanley A. Furmanak 
Systems and Reference Librarian 





Dr. Michael A. Grella 
Chair and Professor, Education 



Dr. Bryan V. Hearsey 

Chair and Professor, Mathematical 

Sciences 





Dr. Robert H. Hearson 
Associate Professor, Music 




Dr. John H. Heffner 

Chair. Religion and Philosophy; 

Professor, Philosophy 




Dr. Paul A. Heise 
Associate Professor, Economics 




Dr. J. Noel Hubler 

Assistant Professor, Religion and 

Philosophy 



<5ffP> 



45 





Mrs. Cynthia R. Johnston 
Adjunct Instructor, Chemistry 



Mrs. Maria W.Jones 

Program Coordinator, LVC Science 

Education Partnership 




m 

Kin* ""'I'"!!! 

t' ui HIIU 

T.ntiiiiitMMi 
-jiiiiitttiiiiiiii 

■•.Kttunttsw 

HIIW 



11H11 

MP-* 



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Ms. Peg Ann Kauffman 
Head Coach, Women's Basketball 



Dr. John P. Kearney 
Professor, English 






Mrs. G. Rosalyn Kujovsky 
Secretary, Chaplain's Office 



46 



mm 




Mr. Walter E. Labonte 
Adjunct Instructor, English 

— w 




Mrs. Patricia A. Laudermilch 
Assistant Registrar 




Dr. Louis Manza 
Assistant Professor, Psychology 




Mr. Robert W. Leonard 

Chair and Associate Professor, 

Business Administration 




Dr. Leon E. Markowicz 

Professor, Business Administration; 

Coordinator, Academic Support 






Dr. William J. McGill 

Senior Vice President and Dean of 

Faculty 



Mr. Daniel B. McKinley 

Director, Freshmen Programs; 

Coordinator, L.V.E.P. 





Dr. Mark L. Mecham 
Chair and Professor, Music 



Mrs. Donna L. Miller 
Readers Services Librarian 




Dr. John D. Norton III 

Chair, Political Science/Economics; 

Professor, Political Science 



48 



<5fjp> 





Mr. Robert A. Nowak 
Adjunct Instructor, Music 




Mr. Robert Paustian 
Director, Library 




Dr. Barney T. Raffield III 

Associate Professor, Business 

Administration 




Ms. Marie E. Riegie-Kinch 
Adjunct Instructor, Art 




Dr. Kevin Burleigh Pry 
Lecturer, English 





Mrs. Sharon H. Raffield 

Associate Professor, Sociology and 

Social Work 




Ms. Victoria Rose 
Adjunct Instructor, Music 



^BTrP 



49 




Mrs. Denise D. Sanders 

Secretary, Business Administration 

and Humanities 



Dr. James W. Scott 
Professor, German 




Mr. Matthew P. Sinopoli 
Networks Manager 




Ms. Gail A. Sanderson 
Associate Professor, Accounting 




~^ — **\ w 




Ms. Gloria J. Shutter 
Circulation Assistant, Library 




Mr. Gregory G. Stanson 

Vice President, Enrollment and 

Student Services 



c 


h 


^„,^__wl-k-m 







50 



efm® 






^■■r 






. I * 



Dr. Jodie L. Stopkie 
Associate Professor, French 




Mrs. Pamela J. Stoudt 

Secretary and Periodicals Assistant, 

Library 




Mrs. Linda L. Summers 
Secretary, Registrar's Office 





Mrs. Ella K. Stott 

Secretary and Cataloging Assistant, 

Library 




Mr. Thomas M. Strohman 
Instructor, Music 






Ms. Kathleen R. Tierney 

Associate Athletic Director; Head 

Coach, Field Hockey 



IP 



51 





i 



Ms. Barbara S. Vlaisavljevic 
Assistant Professor, Accounting 



Mrs. Juliana M. Wolfe 

Director, College Health Center; 

Head College Nurse 




Rev. D. Darrell Woomer 
Chaplain 





Miss Rosemary Yuhas 
Dean, Student Services 



52 



<§J|p) 




Mr. Michael C. Zeigler 

Director of Academic Computing 

and User Services 




Admissions and Financial Aid Staff: Mrs. Karen R. McLucas-Coordinator, Enrollment Services, Mrs Vicki J. Cantrell- 

Financial Aid Technician and Bookkeeper, Mr. William J. Brown Jr.-Dean of Admission and Financial Aid, Mrs. Susan K. 

Borelli-Wentzel-Assistant Director, Admission, Ms. Susan Sarisky-Assistant Director of Admissions, Mrs. Susan B. Zearing- 

Assistant, Admission Office, Ms. Cindy A. Plasterer-Secretary, Receptionist, Admissions Office, Mr. Mark A. Brezitski-'' 

Assistant Director of Admissions, Ms. Jennifer S. Peters-Assistant Director, Financial Aid, Mr. Ronald K. Good-Associate 

Director, Admission, Ms. Karin L. Right-Nolan-Director. Financial Aid, Ms. Dawn E. Murray-Admission Counselor 




Advancement Staff: Mrs. Ellen Arnold-Director of Development, Mrs. Marilyn E. Boeshore-Secretary, Alumni Programs, 
Mrs. Shanna G. Adler-Director of Alumni Programs, Ms. Jane Marie Paluda-Director, Publications, Mr. Richard F. Charles- 
Vice President, Advancement, Mrs. Christine M. Reeves-Financial Coordinator, Gifts Processing, Mrs. Pamela V. Lambert- 
Assistant Director of Annual Giving, Mrs. Susie Harvan-Secretary, College Relations, Mrs. Deborah L. Atkins-Secretary, 

Development, Mrs. Ingeborg M. Snoke-Campaign and Research Assistant, Advancement, Mrs. Charlene R. Kreider- 

Assistant to the Vice President for Advancement, Mr. John B. Deamer Jr. -Director of Sports Information and Athletics 

Development, Mrs. Mary Beth Hower-Director, Media Relations, Mrs. Carolyn Ainge Lauver-Director, Annual Giving; 

Associate Director, Development, Mr. C. Paul Brubaker Jr.-Director, Planned Giving 




^mrP 



53 




kflmp 



Athletics 




.No other group of people can better symbolize the 
spirit of the Olympic Athletes. Each year thousands of 
young men and women train and practice to make the 
dream of athletic stardom come true for themselves and 
their teams. They dedicate themselves to their sports 
and wholeheartedly support their teammates. At Leba- 
non Valley College, that tradition becomes stronger and 
stronger each year. Players like Andy Panko and Chrissy 
Henise spark new hope for the future of sports like 
Men's Basketball and Softball, while seniors like Natalie 
Baruka and Brian Blanford leave behind career suc- 
cesses that will inspire new Volleyball, Football, and 
Track and Field team members each year. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





1997 




<=UP> 



55 



us 

14 
14 

7 

12 

16 

7 
48 



Opponent 


THEM 


Albright 


49 


Widener 


41 


Susquehanna 


35 


Juniata 


56 


Moravian 


17 


Lycoming 


35 


elaware Valley 


33 



MAC Commonwealth Record: 1-6-0 




Freshman Tailback Mortez Sellers cuts through the King's College 
defensive line. 









Football 



Dutchmen Suffer, But New Coach 
Brings Hope for the 1997 Season 



Head Coach |im Memos observes the team, in his 
last year at the Dutchman helm. 



1 lie 1996 Football Team 
had one of their most disap- 
pointing seasons this year with 
a 1 -9 Overall Record and a 0- 
6 MAC Record. The 
Dutchmen's only win was the 
last game of the season, 
against the Delaware Valley 
Team. 

Sophomore offensive line- 
man Jason Hotchkiss was the 
only team member elected 
Middle Atlantic First Team 
All-Star. Junior Defensive 
Lineman Edwin Heisev was 
named to both the MAC Sec- 
ond Team and the ECAC Sec- 



ond Team. 

Also, Sophomore tailback 
Greg Kohler and Sophomore 
punter Greg Steckbeck were 
also named to the Middle At- 
lantic Conference Second All- 
Star Team. 

In an interesting turn of 
events, head coach Jim 
Monos, who coached for the 
past eleven years, was re- 
placed at the conclusion of the 
season bv David Murray. 
Coach Murray previously 
coached at SUNY Cortland 
where he had led nationally 
ranked teams. 
— Nathan A. Hillegas 




Concentrating on finding the best strategy- and hoping to strengthen the whole team, Coach Felix draws up a play for the defensive unit. 



I 




rSfflP 



57 





Winter 


Fall 






Lisa Becker 


Lisa Becker 


Lisa Brandt 


Kelly Brown 






Tonia Cuff 


Tonia Cuff 




Cynthia 


Cynthia 

Ensminger 


Ensminger 


Rafael Lee 


Jason Lausch 




Jason Lausch 


Katoora Patches 




Kim McCabe 


Traci Petrino 






Katoora Patches 


Jennifer Wentzel 




Traci Petrino 




During her first season on the squad, senior Jennifer Wentzel prepares to 
begin a cheer during the Homecoming weekend game. 

The squad lifts Katoora Patches as part of their formation. 



Freshman Kelly Brown demonstrates perfect balance 
as the other cheerleaders hold her. 






Cheerleading 

Squad Works Hard to Improve the 
Quality of Performance and Uniforms 



D 



Jason Lausch, Katoora Patches, and Lisa Brandt 
cheer for the basketball team during the winter 
season. 



'unng the Football and 
Basketball Cheerleading Sea- 
sons, both squads worked 
hard to improve the quality of 
their routines and equipment. 

At the bonfire that was held 
for Homecoming Weekend, 
the squad performed for the 
other students. The dance 
routine that was developed by 
Jason Lausch was the first one 
to be seen in at least three 
years. The cheerleaders also 
performed this dance at the 
football games. 

According to Lausch, "The 
squad has improved overall 



during the last few years be- 
cause more dance routines are 
being incorporated into the 
performances." 

Their stunting ability has 
improved greatly as well. Dur- 
ing the basketball season, one 
of the high points was the suc- 
cessful building of a two and a 
half person pyramid. 

Also, the squads carried out 
a car wash and held a sub sale. 
Both of these fund-raisers 
brought in money that was 
used to buy new and updated 
equipment and uniform parts. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




The 1996 Football Cheerleading Squad gathers to cheer for the football players and to get the spectators more involved in the game. 




<3ffp> 



59 



us 


Opponent 


Them 


2 


Moravian 


1 


6 


Albright 





2 


Susquehanna 





7 


Widener 





3 


Elizabethtown 








Messiah 


1 


2 


Juniata 







MAC Commonwealth Record: 


6-1-0 




Cori Nolen, a junior, tries to score a goal for the 
team. 



WAY TO 




Senior All-American Angie Lewis pushes herself to outrun a Moravian 
player. 





Goalie Joanna Bates prepares to defend the goal and prevent a score. 




Field Hockey 

LVC Field Hockey Program Gains 
National Recognition 



Freshman standout Amanda Ott shows off her 
talent during her first year on the team. 



-fYfter many years of success, 
the Valley Field Hockey 
Team took the next big step, 
becoming one of the nation's 
elite programs, by reaching 
the NCAA semi-finals. Al- 
though they lost to Hartwick 
3-2, they still had a season to 
be proud of, by capturing 
fourth place. 

The Lady Dutchmen's 16 
wins in 1996 matched the 
program's previous best set in 
1988. 

Senior Andrea Stetler, who 
led the team with 1 9 goals, 



and senior Angie Lewis, who 
led the team with 8 assists 
both received First Team All- 
Middle Atlantic Conference 
honors. They were joined by 
Erin Schmid and Tammy 
Demmy. 

Juniors Cori Nolen and Jo- 
anna Bates were MAC Second 
Team All-Stars. 

Other post season accolades 
went to Amanda Ott, MAC 
Rookie of the Year and Kathy 
Tierney, MAC Coach of the 
Year. 

— Ryan J. Bevitz & Nathan 
A. Hillegas 




Lebanon Valley's defense gathers together to protect the goal and to watch the action that is happening on the other side of the field. 



i 



<§UP> 



61 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 


4 


Juniata 


1 





Elizabethtown 


9 


9 


Messiah 


6 


1 


Albright 





1 


Susquehanna 


9 


4 


Widener 


9 





Moravian 


1 




MAC Commonwealth Record: 


3-4-0 





Men's Soccer 

Team Breaks Records and Plays a 
Successful Season 



Junior striker Steve Raab works his way to the 
goal. 



1 he 1996 edition of LVC 
Soccer broke much new- 
ground. Its ten non-losses 
were the most ever in the 21 
year history of the program 
and their eight wins tied 
1995's mark for most wins. 

Senior Greg Glembocki al- 
so broke several records. His 
eleven goals and 27 total 
points both broke team and 
season records. He finished 
off his career as a two time 
MAC All-Star (1995 and 
1 996) and the school's all time 
leading scorer. 

Tony Burke, a senior de 



fender, also had a solid sea- 
son. He started 76 straight 
games during his tenure at 
Lebanon Valley. Center mid- 
fielder Jason Piazza and mid- 
fielder Chris Kirchner also 
made the MAC All-Star 
squad. 

Coach Mark Pulisic saw 9 
different Dutchmen score at 
least one goal and 13 
Dutchmen have at least one 
assist. 

The defense was skillfully 
anchored by Tony Burke, 
Jaime Cascarino, Nate Hil- 
legas, and Adam Johnston. 
— Ryan J. Bevitz 







In his final year on the team, Greg Glembocki, the Lebanon Valley scoring leader, attempts to score versus EMzabethtown College. 



I 



^fPes 



US Opponent 




THEM 


Moravian 




6 


2 Albright 




2 


1 Juniata 




2 


1 Susquehanna 




3 


MAC Commonwealth Recoi 


d: 


0-3-1 





. ■'- ■:■ 



Jeanette Tobin out duels Albright players for the 
ball. 



Serenity Roos sets up a play. 

Goalie Michele Weber punts the ball out of the danger zone. 







Women's Soccer 

1996 Season Marks Opening for 
Women's Soccer at LVC 



Danica Brown passes the ball to her teammate 



A lie 1996 season was the in- 
augural one for the Lady 
Dutchmen Soccer Team. Jun- 
ior Chrissy Henise led the 
team in both goals and assists 
with nine and two respective- 
ly. She scored a hat trick in 



the first game of the season 
which was a win against Allen- 
town. 

In the 1997 season, the 
women's soccer team will offi- 
cially compete in the Middle 
Atlantic Conference. 
— Nathan A. Hillegas 




Surrounded by opposing team members, junior Chrissy Henise concentrates on maneuvering her way past the strong defensive lii 




<Sfjp> 



65 



Invitational 


Men 


Women 


Kutztown 


8th out of 8 


8th out of 8 


Baptist Bible 


4th out of 1 


4th out of 8 


LVC 


18th out of 35 


22nd out of 35 


Susquehanna 


1st out of 7 


2nd out of 7 


Dickinson 


24th out of 32 


1 7th out of 27 


Allentown 


4th out of 4 


4th out of 4 





Jon Lutz pushes himself to catch up to the opposition. 

The LVC's Women's Cross Country Team members try to 
outrun Lock Haven. 



Junior Bob Horn takes an early lead in the race. 

Teammates Pete LoBianco and Jason Badman stick 
together during their run. 






Cross Country 



Vaughan and Deliberato Finish on 
TopforLVC 



Maria Deliberato concentrates on pacing herself 
throughout the race. 



J-jVC's Cross Country season 
ended at the NCAA Mid-East 
Regionals. There they fin- 
ished 28 out of 42 in the 
Men's Division and 29 out of 
43 in the Women's Division. 

Glenn Vaughan was LVC's 
top men's placer. He crossed 
the finish line 131st. Maria 
Deliberato finished 133rd for 
LVC in the women's race. 

At the MAC's the men's 



and women's teams finished 
8th and 1 1th respectively. 

The highlight of the 1996 
season for LVC was the Sus- 
quehanna Invitational. The 
men finished 1st out of 7 
teams. Vaughan placed 7th 
for LVC at that meet. The 
women finished 2nd. Deli- 
berato finished 6th, followed 
closely by junior Jocelyn Nor- 
ton who finished 7th. 
— Rvan I. Bevitz 




The 1996 Lebanon Valley Cross Country Team takes a time out from a practice session to pose together for a picture with Coach Kelly. 



I 




<SffP> 



67 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 


3 


Susquehanna 





3 


Albright 








Juniata3 




3 


Widener 


1 





Moravian 


3 


1 


Elizabethtown 


3 


3 


Messiah 


1 




MAC Commonwealth Record: 


4-3-0 




Senior Tara Fickert has control and prepares herself 
to serve the ball 



VOfcsY 





Freshman Hollv Dalton watches the game intently and waits for the ball 
to come to her. 

The team practices daily, to perfect their techniques and skills. 



BALL 



68 



gfjp) 



«^e,;r:^.- 




Volleyball 

Baruka and Team Bring Solid 
Season to the Valley 



Senior MVP Natalie Baruka waits for the serve. 



Wi 



ith an MAC Common- 
wealth record of 4-3-0 and an 
overall season record of 19- 
16, the Women's Volleyball 
Team, led by Captain Natalie 
Baruka, worked hard 
throughout and ended the 
season on a positive note. 

Team veterans like Christie 
Burger and Denise Reinoehl 
were joined by new players, 
f r e s h m e n Holly D a 1 1 o n , 
Becky Harrison, Greta Pau- 
cek, Amy Reese, and Melissa 
Smith. 

Some of the season high- 
lights include placing third in 
the Haverford Tour 



nament, and Third in the Fly- 
ing Dutchmen Tournament, 
where Baruka made the All- 
Tournament Team. The 
women placed second at the 
St. Mary's Tournament, 
where Becky Slagle made the 
All-Tournament Team. 

In addition to regular sea- 
son highlights, Baruka was 
named to the MAC All-Star 
First Team. She also set new 
individual LVC records for 
the highest number of attack 
attempts and kills in a season 
and career, and the highest 
number of assist and total 
blocks in a career. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




Amy Reese, a freshman and new addition to the Volleyball Team, jumps to hit the ball to the other side of the net and scores a point. 






^mP 



69 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 







Moravian 


9 







Susquehanna 


9 




1 


Elizabethtown 


8 




4 


Widener 


5 




2 


Messiah 


7 







Albright 


9 




6 


Juniata 


3 






MAC Commonwealth Record: 


6-1-0 





giK 



■ 







r. 



Top singles player Melissa Fritz returns the ball. 

Misty Piersol slams a high ball back to the other side of the net. 



Holly Stevens practices her follow-through after a 
shot. 

Junior Chrissy Henise prepares to unleash her 
powerful stroke. 



70 



<5fjp> 




Women's Tennis 



1996 Tennis Season Echoes 1995 
Final Standings 



Karlin Schroeder plans her attack as she waits for 
the ball to return. 



A he Women's team ended 
their 1996 season the way 
they ended their 1995 season, 
with an overall winning per- 
centage of .39. Their last 
match, a 6-3 MAC Common- 
wealth win at Juniata shows 
hope for the 1997 season. 
This was the Lady 



Dutchmen's only league win. 

The top singles player, Me- 
lissa Fritz, sported a 5-5 re- 
cord. 

The top doubles team for 
LVC was made up of senior 
Jill Zwiesdak and Misty Pier- 
sol. Their team record was 2- 
6. 
— Ryan J. Bevitz 




The 1997 Women's Tennis Team members, Jill Zwiesdak, Misty Piersol, Danielle Daniels, Holly Stevens, Melissa Fritz, Karlin Schroeder, 
and Chrissy Henise are pictured here with their coach, Cliff Myers. 



k 




@mm> 



71 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 




111 


Juniata 


87 




75 


Moravian 


84 




80 


Susquehanna 


88 




81 


Elizabethtown 


82 




64 


Messiah 


54 




61 


Widener 


76 




98 


Albright 


92 


85 


Juniata 


66 




85 


Moravian 


75 




77 


Susquehanna 


72 




79 


Elizabethtown 


73 




73 


Messiah 


62 




56 


Widener 


70 




95 


Albright 


84 




MAC Commonwealth Record: 


9-5-0 






Keith Phoebus passes the ball to a teammate. 

Ail-American Andy Panko prepares to make a shot that could add to his 
career point record. 





Men's Basketball 



Team Returns to NCAA Tournament 



Sophomore starter Dan Strobeck surveys the 
competition and prepares to pass. 



A he Men's Basketball team 
ended up back where the) be- 
long. After a one year hiatus, 
LVC returned to both the 
MAC Title Game and the 
NCAA Tournament for the 
fourth time in five years. 

The Dutchmen were led by 
All-American forward Andy 
Panko. Panko averaged 25.1 



points per game. He scored 
his 1000th career point in his 
sophomore season. 

Panko also led the team in 
rebounds with 7.4 a game. 
Center Dan Pfeil was a close 
second, averaging 7.2. 

Panko, Joe Terch, and Dan 
Strobeck started all 28 games 
for LVC. 
— Ryan T. Bevitz 




Hoping that the play will be successfully completed, Mark Wisler gains speed as he charges down the court and prepares to shoot the ba 



ball. 



\ 




®m® 



73 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 


62 


Juniata 


58 


50 


Susquehanna 


71 


50 


Moravian 


61 


44 


Elizabethtown 


70 


53 


Messiah 


55 


53 


Widener 


57 


38 


Albright 


25 


58 


Juniata 


48 


54 


Moravian 


66 


55 


Susquehanna 


70 


58 


Elizabethtown 


63 


60 


Widener 


58 


51 


Messiah 


50 


45 


Albright 


57 




MAC Commonwealth Record: 


5-9-0 




Jennifer Emerich prepares to shoot the ball. 

Quick-thinking is necessary as Serenity Roos looks for an open player that 
can receive the ball. 





Women's Basketball 

Season Filled With Injuries Slows 
Success of Lady Dutchmen 



Senior Missy Bleyzgis looks for an teammate to 
pass to. 



injuries took away what was 
supposed to be a break- 
through season for the Lady 
Dutchmen. 

Melissa Brecht led the team 
with a 10.5 points per game 
average. Kathy Ziga and Su- 
san Dubosq were a close sec 



ond and third with 9.7 and 
9.4 averages respectively. 

Dubosq was the top re- 
bounder for Lebanon Valley 
with a 7.2 per game average. 
Also, Tricia Rudis was second 
on the team with a 6.1 aver- 
age. 
— Ryan J. Bevitz 




While at the bench, members of the team, such as Susan Dub 



osq, support their fellow Lady Dutchmen with cheers of encou 



ragement. 




Sfjp> 



75 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 


54 


Elizabethtown(M) 


105 


59 


Elizabethtown(W) 


98 


60 


Juniata(W) 


123 


65 


Susquehanna(M) 


88 


57 


Susquehanna(W) 


83 


57 


Widener(M) 


121 


51 


Widener(W) 


97 


54 


Albright(M) 


105 


53 


Albright(W) 


116 


66 


King's(M) 


44 


80 


King , s(W) 


58 





Junior John Schmidt and Senior Jason Kopp take a seat on 
the sidelines to cheer on their teammates. 




.Swimming in his fourth and final year with the Dutchmen, Jason Kopp pushes himself to win the race and score points for the team. 



76 



<§fjp> 







Swimming 

Meets Against King's College Result 
in Success 



Every member of the 1997 team worked hard to 
bring the team to victory. 



1 he LVC Men's and Wom- 
en's Swim Teams went 1-9 
and 1-10 respectively during 
their 1996-97 seasons. 

For the women, the win of 
80-58 over King's was their 
first in two seasons. The men 



also beat King's for their lone 
victory, 66-44. 

The team MVP for the men 
was senior Jason Kopp. For 
the women, Jen Gominger, al- 
so a senior, was their team 
MVP. 
— Ryan J. Bevitz 




The men and women of the swimming team gather together to encourage one another in the last few moments before the meet begins 



I 




<SfJP> 



77 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 


13 


Elizabethtown 


37 


4 


Messiah 


50 


10 


King's College 


29 


4 


Delaware Valley 


46 





Lycoming 


49 


34 


Albright 


16 




78 



<S WP ) 




Wrestling 



Howe Passes Torch of Success to 
Transfer Student Ted Kemmerling 



Senior and Captain, Joe Howe easily pins his 
opponent. 



At was the changing of the 
guard for LVC Wrestling. 
Senior Joe Howe passed on 
the torch to Ted Kemmer- 
ling. 

Howe missed Nationals by 
only one match for the third 
straight year. He finished with 
a 25-4 record. 

Kemmerling transferred in 
mid-season. He sported a 1 2-4 



record for the Dutchmen. He 
was runner up in both MAC's 
and Regionals en route to Na- 
tionals. Larry Larthey and 
Doug Weigle also had win- 
ning seasons ending with 14- 
1 1 and 10-12 respectively. 

J.H. Sheruda took home 
the sixth place medal for 158 
pounds at the Regionals. He 
finished with a 12-14 record. 
— Ryan J. Bevitz 




To benefit the Lebanon Valley team, Freshman Biff Wade does everything in his power to get a take-down that will increase their score. 



. 




«hp> 



79 




Junior Lynne Heisev battles for pole position during the relay race. 

Ed Brignole passes a Gettysburg athlete to gain the lead in the steeple 
chase. 







Decathlete Nate Davis performs one of his many 
events. 

NCAA Qualifier Nate Hillegas focuses on the finish 
line. 




80 



<mp 







Senior Jen Emerich prepares to throw the shot put early in the meet. 




Track & Field 

Stunning Season Reveals Variety of 
Athletic Talents on the Track 




Junior Middle Atlantic Conference Champion Jake Tshudy sets a new school record in the pole vaulting event for Lebanon Valley. 






I 



^■np 



81 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 


7 


Juniata 


8 


3 


Juniata 


4 


5 


Moravian 


2 





Moravian 


1 


3 


Widener 


11 


14 


Widener 


7 


2 


Albright 


3 


5 


Albright 


10 


4 


Messiah 


15 


6 


Messiah 


16 


3 


Susquehanna 


4 


1 


Susquehanna 


6 


1 


Elizabethtown 


9 


5 


Elizabethtown 


8 


MAC Commonwealth Record: 


2-12-0 





Baseball 



Dutchmen Set New Season Records 



*- 



Mike Kocher hits a double in a spring training 
game. 



A he 1997 Season started 
out with high hopes for the 
Dutchmen, but it ended with 
unfilled dreams. 

LVC was led by first base- 
man Jon Fetterman. Fetter- 
man, an MAC All-Star, re- 
wrote several LVC season 
records. His .482 average, 53 
hits, and 39 RRI's are tops for 
a Dutchmen season. He also 
collected his 100th career Hit 
in only his junior year. 

Other Dutchmen highlights 
included freshman Jaime 
D'Angelo hitting for cycle in a 
19-6 win over Misercordia. 

The pitching staff was an- 
chored by Chad Slabach. He 
was joined in the rotation by 
Doug Speelman, Fetterman, 



Dave Staub, and Scott 
Gehres. Len Oriel and Scott 
Myers were the top relievers 
for the Valley. 

Six Dutchmen, Staub, Jeff 
Brenneman, Slabach, Chris 
Yeagley, D'Angelo, and Fet- 
terman all batted over .300 
for the season. The lone sen- 
ior. Brent Shoemaker batted 
.299. 

Center-fielder Justin Foura 
crossed the plate 23 times to 
lead LVC in that department. 
Second sacker Mike Kocher 
scored 19 times and knocked 
in 13. Infielder Gehres and 
Greg Steckbeck each hit three 
round trippers trailing Fet- 
terman's 5 for the team lead. 
— Ryan J. Bevitz 




Professional baseball star Cecil Fielder poses with the members and the managers of the Lebanon Valley College Baseball Team 







<mp 



83 



us 


Opponent 


THEM 


2 


Kings 




5 


7 


Kings 




7 


2 


Susquehanna 




3 


9 


Susquehanna 




8 


8 


Elizabethtown 




9 


1 


Elizabethtown 




7 


3 


Widener 




1 


3 


Widener 




11 


3 


Juniata 




4 


11 


Juniata 




10 


8 


Albright 







4 


Albright 




1 





Moravian 




6 





Moravian 




7 




MAC Commonwealth Record: 


6-8-0 






The team turns to watch as the ball is passed to Jill Zwiesdak at first base. 

MAC All-Star Chrissy Henise watches the ball intently and waits for it to 
be passed in her direction. 




Utifc 



;. . - ■ ,.,.. ■ ■ 



t~ 







ft 



.V 



c 



Softball 

Lady Dutchmen One Game Shy of 
Winning Season 



Senior Tina Teichman takes a swing at the ball. 



Wi 



ith an overall season re- 
cord of 13-14-1, Lebanon 
Valley's Softball Team was 
one game shy of its first win- 
ning season. 

Their 6-8-0 MAC Com- 
monwealth Leasrue record in- 
eluded sweeps of Elizabeth- 
town and Albright. 



Five Lady Dutchmen made 
the MAC Second Team All- 
Stars. They are junior infield- 
er Chrissy Henise, senior 
catcher Tina Teichman, sen- 
ior outfielder Tammy Dem- 
my, and junior third baseman 
Jeanette Tobin, and freshman 
pitcher Amy Zellers. 
— Ryan I. Bevitz 




Allison Henry winds up and prepares to release a pitch, while freshman Amanda Ott watches the action and guards third base. 



I 




<5ffP> 



85 



us 




Opponent 




THEM 


8 




Kings 






1 


8 




Moravian 






1 


5 




Widener 






4 


6 




Susquehanna 






3 


6 




Albright 






3 


7 




Elizabethtown 






2 




MAC C 


Dmmonwealth Recoi 


d: 


6-0-0 






Sophomore Dave Ferrari concentrates on his game. 





Senior Captain Jason Henerv hits a powerful backhand winner at the net. 



4~*W^. 




Men's Tennis 

Team Captures League Crown for 
First Time in LVC Tennis History 



Judd Santry prepares to serve the ball to h 
opponent. 



A he Men's Tennis team 
went 6-0 in the Common- 
wealth League en route to 
winning their first League 
Crown in team history. They 
won 5-2 in the MAC Semi- 
final only to lose to Drew in 
the Finals. 

Josh Shellenberger, Judd 
Santry, and Chris Dean point- 
ed the way in singles competi- 
tion. Their records were 



13-3. 14-2, and 14-3 respec- 
tively. Senior Team Captain 
Jason Henery advanced one 
round in the MAC Singles 
Tournament. He had a 12-5 
regular season record. 

Shellenberger and Santry 
had a 10-1 regular season 
doubles record. They went all 
the way to the Semi-Finals in 
the MAC Doubles Tourna- 
ment. 
— Ryan J. Bevitz 




Josh Shellenberger finds time to enjoy himself during practice, 
unior Sean Quinn volleys with his opponent. 



1 



Gfljp> 



87 



Golf Roster 

Eric Boyle 

Brett Chottiner 

Josh DiFIorio 

Donald Dougherty 

Rick Hornberger 

Erik Olson 

Jerry Pfarr 

Dan Pfeil 

Keith Phoebus 

Mike Ridler 

Ryan Smith 

Mike Uhler 

Glenn Vaughan 

Jason Vogtman 

Mike Weist 

Rvan Williams 

Chad Zarger 






■: 




Dan Pfeil places the golf ball on the tee. 

Sophomore Ryan Williams watches as the ball travels. 



88 



<sjjp> 



7 





Golf 

LVC Golf Team Finishes Thirteenth 
at MAC Championships 



Dan Pfeil measures the distance that he has left. 



A he 1997 athletic season 
proved to be a challenge for 
the men of the LVC Golf 
Team. Sporting an overall 
season record of 4-10, the 
team competed in matches 
against schools such as Miser- 
cordia, Ursinus, and Lycom- 
ing as well as tournaments at 
Moravian, Elizabethtown, and 
Susquehanna. 



Lancaster native and sopho- 
more Brett Chottiner was the 
captain of the team in 1997 
and was named the MVP for 
the season. 

At the MAC Cham- 
pionships, the team finished 
13th out of 15 teams.. Chot- 
tiner earned a 7th place All 
Conference Medal while at 
the Championships. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




Freshman Keith Phoebus lines up for a shot and hopes to get a hole-in-one that will promise a considerable win for Lebanon \'c 









@hp> 



89 



Senior Feature Athletes 







Gregory J. Glembocki 

The 1996 Team MVP 
and member of the MAC 
All-Star Team, Greg Glem- 
bocki holds the highest 
number of career goals and 
assists for LVC, in the sport 
of Men's Soccer. 






jr.- 



90 



<3Up> 



Natalie Baruka 






An athlete for four years 
on the Women's Volleyball 
team, Natalie Baruka has 
brought unparalleled spirit 
and success to Lebanon 
Valley. She is the all time 
kill leader for the school. 



~~* 





Nathan A. Hillegas 

During the 1997 season, 
Nate Hillegas qualified for 
Nationals in Track & Field 
events. He is the first per- 
son in MAC history to win 
4 Gold Medals in the same 
event, 400 meter hurdles. 



" 



Six Seniors Bring Pride and Success to LVC Athletics 



Angela L. Lewis 

A member of the MAC 
All-Star First Team, Angie 
Lewis helped to bring the 
1997 Field Hockey Team 
to great heights in 1997. 
She was also a Regional Ail- 
American player. 





, L I 



Jennifer A. Nauss 

In 1997, Jennifer Nauss 
brought success to the 
women of LVC Track and 
Field. She was named the 
Most Outstanding Woman 
Athlete at the Middle At- 
lantic Championships. 



Andrea L. Stetler 

Also an MAC Field Hock- 
ey All-Star and All- 
American, Andrea Stetler's 
talent and efforts helped 
bring the 1997 Lebanon 
Valley Team to victory at 
the NCAA Championships. 





92 



<mm> 



Organizations 



A wide variety of organizations are available to the 
students at Lebanon Valley College. There is something 
for everyone, ranging from service groups to religious 
groups to publication groups. Campus organizations 
welcome everyone to join them and encourage all mem- 
bers to become actively involved. 

Many activities are sponsored by these hard-working 
clubs, such as dances, movies, educational programs, 
and they try to involve the entire student body in events. 

A spirit of dedication and enthusiasm runs through all 
of LVC's organizations. They are carrying the torch of 
innovation and creativity forward into the twenty-first 
century. 
— Heather Bair 



i 






m% 



t 




1997 




Student Council 





Class of 1997 



94 



<sjjp> 



Council Sponsors Special Events tf^lacc of 1 QQQ 



X he LVC Student Coun- 
cil was under the presiden- 
tial leadership of Jason 
Henery for the 1996-97 
year. This year's executive 
officers were: Tenneil Dan- 
iels, Vice President of Stu- 
dent Concerns; Amanda 
Lee, Vice President of Pro- 
gramming; Chris Melusky, 
Treasurer; Beth Paul, Re- 
cording Secretary; and Ma- 
ry Bullock, Publicity Sec- 
retary. 

In addition to regular 
programming events, Stu- 
dent Council sponsored 
Homecoming and the Holi- 
day Dinner Dance. This 
year's Homecoming com- 
mittee, Leslie Gardiner, 



Becki Jeffers, and Melanie 
Orth, transported the cam- 
pus to Greece with an 
"Athens Homecoming." 
Events included an out- 
door Concert with the 
band Cosco, Gladstone, 
and Cosco, the Coronation 
of the Homecoming 
Queen, and a dance Satur- 
day evening. 

The Holiday Dinner 
Dance, chaired by Nancy 
Seidel, was held at the 
Eden Resort in Lancaster 
on November 22. A roam- 
ing photographer was 
hired for the evening. Each 
guest was able to choose a 
picture, compliments of the 
Student Council. 
— Amanda Lee 





Class of 2000 




<3fjp> 



95 



Quittapahilla 





WLVC 



95.3 WLVC On the Air and 
On-Line 



1 he Voice of the 
Valley" is on the air 
and in better shape 
than ever. There 
have been numerous 
changes made to the 
studio itself, as well as 
changes in it's opera- 
tion. And WLVC has- 
n't missed taking ad- 
vantage of the world's 
latest communication 
medium. 

"WLVC is now on 
the web," says pro- 
gram director David 



Shapiro. Shapiro 
worked diligently for 
several weeks to get 
the new web page up 
and running. Those 
who visit the page will 
be able to access a cal- 
endar of shows and 
individual pages for 
most of them. Stu- 
dents connecting to a 
show's page can get a 
description of the 
show, and are able to 
make requests for the 
show from the page. 
— David Kotschessa 




96 



Sffp 



Greenblotter 







Greenblotter Celebrates Creativity 



o 



ne of the many goals of a 
liberal arts education is to cul- 
tivate an understanding and 
appreciation of the literature 
and art that is such a large part of 
our society today. This is accom- 
plished not only through our ed- 
ucation, but through an individ- 
ual effort as well. Greenblotter is 
a direct result of that effort. It's 
goal is to promote an awareness 
of this side of our culture as well 
as to support each member's cre- 
ative endeavors. 

Greenblotter meets regularly 
to read, discuss, and criticize 
original poems, short stories, and 
artwork. Anybody is invited to 
join, and he or she may simply 
decide to just sit and observe. 

This year Greenblotter dis 



tributed its annual Spring Arts 
Publication, which features vari- 
ous creative works from its mem- 
bers. This year, faculty members 
added to the club. The profes- 
sors joined the students in activi- 
ties such as poetry and short sto- 
ry readings which are given four 
times each semester. All students 
were invited to attend the read- 
ings and watch presentations of 
the original works. 

Greenblotter also had a car 
wash this year as part of its need 
to raise funds. A portion of those 
funds went to the Ronald Mc- 
Donald House. Along with this 
contribution went a poem, writ- 
ten especially for the House, as a 
collaborative effort by its mem- 
bers. 
— David Kotschessa 




Fate's hand 

Tomorrows come, tomorrows pass. 
And faithfully the seasons cross. 
The never-ending hour glass 
Starts filling with uncaring loss. 

With Fate's strong hand that does not yield. 
We fight for life and its power. 
And though we act with mask and shield 
The hand refuses to cower. 

Ironically, we stop and see 
Yesterday's mistakes invented. 
And so, we all, with bending knee 
Pray for our lives we have rented. 

And so, my friend, keep this in mind; 
The hour glass will fill with sand. 
For, like a clock that can not wind, 
Our lives slow down and take the Hand. 

— Melissa Schaeffer 



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97 



Council of Religious Organizations 




A 
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I Delta Tau Chi 




98 



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Fellowship of Christian Athletes 




He Is Savior 




F 
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99 




raise Him With Dance 




I PROJECT 




100 



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Rainbow Troupe 




During Children's Day, members of the Rainbow Troupe 
played a key role. 



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101 



Psychology Club 




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Psi Chi 



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102 



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Biology Club 




Beta Beta Beta 




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Accounting Club 







Math Club 




104 



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Phi Beta Lambda 








PAi Zteta Lambda Expands Business 
Horizons 



A hi Beta Lambda is a national 
co-ed business fraternity. The 
reason that it is open to anyone 
on this campus, according to Kris 
Kelley, the president of the or- 
ganization, is "because everyone 
will probably come in contact 
with business throughout the 
course of their life." Phi Beta 
Lambda does many things to 
promote business awareness and 
knowledge of the behind the 
scenes activities of a business. 

Some of the activities that Phi 
Beta Lambda engages in are fun- 
Braising and trips to businesses to 
see what goes on. They also get 
involved in workshops across the 
state and compete in competi- 
tions that relate to business ac 



tivities. This year, some of the 
things they planned were work- 
shops at Alvernia College and 
Bloomsburg University, a career 
day, and a fundraiser to sell the 
Entertainment Book which con- 
tains discounts to area business- 
es. Some social events included a 
Halloween party. 

The goal for the fall semester 
was teamwork, according to Kel- 
ley. "Every year, we try to ex- 
pand to get out of our comfort 
zone," says Kelley, "We try to 
get more of the campus and 
community involved in our ac- 
tivities." To end the year, they 
attended a state leadership con- 
ference, held in Pittsburgh. 

— Debra Meyer 



B 

A 




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105 



History and Political Science Club 




French Club 



106 



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International Student Organization 




Spring Arts Committee 



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Student Pennsylvania State 
Education Association 




Music Educators National 
Conference 




108 



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Juggling Club 





Using Juggling to Teach and to Learn 



A he juggling club is a new organ- 
ization at LVC this year. Dr. 
Chasen, who originally started the 
club, has been juggling since col- 
lege and has even used juggling for 
demonstrations in his classes here at 
LVC. 

The club's first major event this 
year was a visit to the 1 5th Annual 
Jugglers Convention in Philadel- 
phia, where students purchased 
new equipment for themselves and 
the club, and had the opportunity 
to watch and learn from other jug- 
glers in the area. They learned dif- 
ferent techniques such as passing 
clubs and juggling a variety of ob- 
jects from rings to cigar boxes 

Members of the juggling club 
have been spotted around the Allen 
Theater, providing entertainment 



for those who find themselves wait- 
ing in line outside. Also at the Allen 
Theater was their biggest fundrais- 
er of the year, "Mark Allen's 
World of Magic." 

The group's proudest achieve- 
ment this year was passing their tal- 
ent down to the next generation of 
jugglers. They made numerous vis- 
its to places including the Chil- 
dren's School in Lebanon, Cub 
Scout Pack 104 in Mastersonville, 
and Northern Lebanon Jr. High 
School, where they taught twenty- 
seven seventh grade students the 
basics of juggling within an hour. 
According to Michael Kiesinger, 
President of the Juggling Club, 
"Young children learn how to jug- 
gle very quickly and appreciate the 
time we spend teaching them." 
— David Kotschessa 




Rainbow Troupe member Dave 
Shapiro proves that juggling 
entertains people of all ages, as he 
performs at Children's Day. 



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109 




Wig and Buckle Theater Society 







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Alpha Psi Omega 



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Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 




Alpha Phi Omega 



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Music 




During the year, the students and professors within the 
Music Department provide the campus with quality en- 
tertainment. Whether the Chamber Choir is performing 
in Zimmerman Recital Hall, or the Clarinet Choir and 
Small Jazz Ensemble are performing during the Evening 
of Woodwinds, audience members can be assured that 
the performance they are attending will capture their 
attention and satisfy their musical tastes. Through 
performing at their individual recitals and with others in 
the larger ensembles, the students involved gather val- 
uable knowledge that enhances their educational ex- 
perience, while they also enlighten the campus com- 
munity with their talent and expertise. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





1997 




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113 



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The Alexander Technique 

Relaxation Technique Workshop Offers Help for Musicians 



L uesday, September 17, Martin Webster held an 
hour long workshop on the Alexander Technique. 
"The Alexander Technique is relearning to use our 
bodies in the way they are really designed to work. We 
try to use our joints and muscles in a free and support- 
ive way," said Dr. Hannes Dietrich, a professor in the 
Music Department, who coordinated the workshop. 

Those who spend hours practicing a musical instru- 
ment often complain about their stiff, sore muscles. 
Dietrich asked Martin to come to LVC so students 
could get a glimpse of what the technique is about, and 
to see that there is a way to stay relaxed while playing. 
It is not just for musicians, though, Dietrich stressed. 
"It's for everybody. You can learn to sit, stand and 
walk without fighting your own muscles." 

Webster spent a large part of the workshop making 
the students aware of their own bodies, and how they 
move. To challenge the popular belief that our arm 
movements use only three joints (shoulder, elbow, and 
wrist), he asked each student to feel a partner's shoul- 
der blade and collar bone while the partner moved his 
or her arm. Many students were surprised to find that 
when the arm is moving fully, much more than just the 



arm joints are moving. Later, he talked about the; 
spine. When he asked the workshop attendees to imag- 
ine their spine as thick and supportive deep into their I 
backs, many began slowly and unconsciously adjusting , 
their posture. 

At the end of the workshop, Webster worked "hands I 
on" with a few volunteers. For several moments, Web- 
ster alternately placed his hands on the neck, upper l 
back, and lower back of one volunteer, Alex Lang. 
When he was finished, he asked Lang to walk around. 
Astonished, Lang cried, "I've never used this little ef- 
fort to walk in my life!" Later, Lang commented, "It's I 
the most relaxed I've ever felt." When asked howl 
Webster's hands changed how his body felt, he replied, 
"It makes you think about your body and where things 
should be, and the muscles just relax themselves." 

Webster warned everyone, though. "This is not just i 
about finding a position and holding it for the rest of] 
your life. Then it would just be another way of being 
stiff, really." 

Dietrich was pleased at the turnout of twenty stu- 
dents. "I plan on having him back in about a month," 
said Dietrich. 
— Kimbrin Cornelius 




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114 



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Brass Quintet I 




Brass Quintet II 




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115 



College Choir 




Cast 

(In Order of Appearance) 

Conductor 

Dr. Johannes Dietrich 

Orchestra 

L.V.C. Symphony 

Orchestra 

Greek Chorus 

L. V. C. College Choir 

Narrator 

Stephen Jenks 

Oedipus Tex 

Mr. Phillip Morgan 

Billie Jo Casta 

Mrs. Victoria Rose 

Madam Peep 

Elizabeth Salter 




Rehearsal accompanist Mabel Chandler fits herself into a cartoon patterned toga. 



116 



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Choir's Third Year Brings 
Togas and Rave Reviews 



In the fall of 1994 the 
Music Department faced 
a problem. There were 
too many students inter- 
ested in being a member 
of the Concert Choir. In 
order to accomodate the 
large numbers, the de- 
partment created the 
LVC College Choir 
which was placed under 
the direction of Mrs. 
Victoria Rose. Although 
the choir got off to a 
rocky start in its first 
year, it has made consid- 
erable progress since in 
three years time. 

During; the fall semes- 
ter, the members of the 
choir, affectionately 
known amongst them- 
selves as the "Jaguars," 
began working on a new 
project 



with the LVC Symphony 
Orchestra. Under the 
direction of both Mrs. 
Rose and Dr. Johannes 
Dietrich, the choir re- 
hearsed diligently for a 
featured performance of 
the comedic piece Oedi- 
pus Tex. This composi- 
tion, by P.D.Q. Bach 
spoofs the ancient greek 
dramatic tale of Oedipus 
Rex. The choir members 
assumed the role of the 
greek chorus and were 
costumed in togas. 

Much to the pleasure 
of Mrs. Rose and her 
choir, the performance 
received much positive 
feedback from the audi- 
ence, which in turn has 
given the group new 
confidence in their musi- 
cal ability. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




Mr. Philip Morgan, Oedipus Tex, can usually be Found 
leaching voice lessons in his studio. Here, he takes on a "new 
look" - cowboy attire. 




The "Jaguar" Secretary, Alicia Way, relaxes before the time comes to assemble everyone on the stage. 




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117 




Flute Ensemble 




Jazz Band 




118 



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Jazz Lab 





Low Brass Ensemble 




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119 






Marching Band 




Pit members. Alicia Way and Matt Wary watch closely for their cue. 

Senior Cherrie Voda takes the field in one of her final performances with I 
the band. 



120 



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Band Proves that Education Reaches Outside the Classroom 



A here are few things in this world 
as unique as a marching band. It 
requires coordination, athleticism, 
lots of memorization, and most im- 
portantly, musicianship. The only 
thing that rivals the marching band 
is the color guard and the twirlers. 
Lucky for us, we have all three. 

This season the marching band 
did a space show. The show started 
with the fanfare from Twentieth 
Century Fox as a warm up. That 
went into the trumpet solo from 
Apollo 13, performed by Dave Doll. 
Also, Sprack Zarathustra, more 
commonly known as the theme to 
2001: A Space Odyssey, was the next 
piece which built up into the theme 
from E.T.. Mars, from Hoist's The 
Planets was the next song in the 
show, followed by Canteena Band 
from Star Wars: Return ofthejedi. 
At this point the show got inter- 



esting. The band split into two 
groups for a little war. One group 
played the theme to Star Trek and 
the other group played the theme 
to Star Wars. After the war was 
over the band regrouped and then 
ended the show with the theme to 
Battlestar Galactica. 

The band also performed at a 
competition for local high schools. 
The band did not compete, it was 
just there to play while the judges 
tallied up the scores and to show 
people what they do here in the 
Valley. 

The people in marching band 
had a variety of things that they 
liked best about it. "It's a break 
from everyday activity. No other 
group in school, no sport or subject 
will ever teach you what you can 
earn here." said Michele Weber, 



who was one of the drum majors in 
the marching band. Kelly Sonon, a 
twirler, said "It helped me as a 
freshman to get to meet people." 
Overall, the members enjoyed 
marching band for the people and 
that it was different than other 
classes. 

The marching band is student 
run organization for the most part. 
Dr. Hearson is the band director 
but it is student run as far as staff 
and teaching goes. This past year, 
Dalinda Knauth was the marching 
coordinator and she was in charge 
of style. Joy Hoover and Liz Mases- 
sa were the drill designers, Mere- 
dith Price and Michele Weber the 
drum majors, and percussion was 
done by Mike Washkevich. Also, 
Color guard was taught by Deena 
Hixon and Rachel Rascoe. 
— Dan Morneau 





The color guard marches to the 
field, flags in hand. 

Band members like Samantha 
Bolognese and Amy Schimpf 
enjoy their time off of the field. 






mm 



121 



Music Recording Technology 

Music Recording Students Learn Through Video Conferencing 



A his year, some LVC students are 
taking part in a special program 
that allows them to take courses 
from the University of Massachu- 
setts. It's not a transfer or study 
abroad program; in fact, the stu- 
dents aren't leaving campus. 

This is made possible by a new 
video conferencing system located 
in the Lynch Memorial Hall. Leba- 
non Valley belongs to an organiza- 
tion called Center for Agile Penn- 
sylvania Education (CAPE), a local 
organization that has agreed to con- 
nect their campuses. Several dozen 
colleges, universities and other in- 
stitutions associated with CAPE are 



able to link and exchange informa- 
tion via a high speed modem con- 
nection, and several phone lines be- 
tween the remote locations. 

For a classroom session, students 
crowd into a small room equipped 
with three screens, several cameras, 
and special microphones placed at 
every table. Students are connected 
to the remote location, with two- 
way audio and visual communica- 
tion. Class proceeds as usual, except 
that the professor is miles away. 

"It feels different because the 
professor is not actually in the 
room," says Melissa Witchey, relat- 
ing her experience in Music Busi- 
ness I, one 



of the classes that is using this tech- 
nology. Although it does allow for 
communication in both directions, 
it is not quite as reliable as meeting 
in person. Another student, Steve 
Swope said, "You lose the one on 
one interaction you normally 
have," but as for the advantages, 
"It's better than flying down to see 
the professor." 

The increased availability of re- 
sources is what makes this tech- 
nology valuable. The fact that this 
technology exists is exciting 
enough, but to be putting it to use is 
promising for the future of educa- 
tion at Lebanon Valley. 
— David Kotschessa 



Quartet/Die Posaunen 









122 



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Symphonic Band 




Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble 




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124 



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Greek Life 



It all begins with "Meet the Greeks." Then there are 
signs promoting socials and open smokers during the 
fall, and after Christmas, students get invitations to 
rushes for every fraternity and sorority. During the 
following weeks, students witness some strange activities 
that ever take place on campus, but these occurrences 
happen every year. It is that phenomenon called pledg- 
ing, and it brings every new member close to their fellow 
pledges and their future sisters or brothers. The strong 
heritage of each greek organization carries them success- 
fully through each pledging season, and brings to them 
new faces and minds that will continue to carry on the 
torch of greek tradition year after year. 
— Beth Curley 





1997 




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125 



Greek Council 




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Greek Organizations 
Pleased with Pledging 



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X here was a lot of singing, silence, 
calling out of names, carrying of 
strange objects, and keeping of se- 
crets throughout the LVC campus 
early in the spring semester. The 
pledging season started and all the 
fraternities and sororities began the 
four week period in hopes of ad- 
ding new members to their ranks. 
Overall, rush went extremely well 
for each Greek organization and 
they were very hap- 



py with their pledges. 

Alpha Sigma Tau (AST) was the 
first national sorority on campus. 
They had nine pledges who were 
taught the ideals AST deems im- 
portant. "We influence the ethical, 
social and cultural development of 
the girls and encourage bonding 
between the pledges," said former 
president, Sharon Possessky. 

Phi Lambda Sigma is a social fra- 
ternity which had five prospective 
members According to Pat 



Loughney, everything went well 
and PHILO had a lot of fun. 

There are a few rules that the 
college enforces over the Greek or-: 
ganizations. "Students who desire 
to pledge a fraternity of sorority 
need to be full-time students with a 
GPA of 2.0 in their last semester, 
said Dean Yuhas. 

Overall, pledging in 1997 proved 
to be a positive experience for those 
involved. 
— Julie Smith 



126 



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Alpha Sigma Tau 




Gamma Sigma Sigma 




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127 






Kappa Lambda Nu 




Knights of the Valley 




128 



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Jello Wrestling 

Greek Council Jello Wrestling Draws Many Spectators 



Slippery. ..very slippery," said 
Chrissy Fritz about the 100 gallons of 
cherry Jello that students rolled around 
in during the Jello Wrestling event 
sponsored by Greek Council during the 
last week of September. The event was 
held behind Vickroy Hall in a makeshift 
wrestling ring of a clear plastic tarp and 
padding that surrounded the edges. 

Most of the wrestlers were fraternity 
brothers or sorority sisters, but other 
students could participate as well. An 
audience of close to 100 students, facul- 
ty, and community members gathered 
to watch this phenomenon that was new 
to the Valley. "Turnout was really 
good," said Dave Newell who worked 
as an organizer for the event as well as a 
referee. 

The first match pitted two TKE 
brothers, Lee Madden and John Vito, 
against one Gamma Sig sister, Chrissy 
Fritz, in a tag-team bout. Fritz's white 
shorts were soon red as Vito and Mad- 
den tossed her throughout the ring. 
Occasionally Fritz would gain the upper 
hand, but soon afterwards she'd eat a 
handful of Jello. The shocking climax 
of the match happened later when Vito 
attacked his own partner. 

The second match featured a 6'5" 
Rick Hopf of TKE against a well-under- 
six-foot Sharon Possessky of Alpha Sig- 
ma Tau. During the match, Possessky 
yelled, "You're too tall. You're all arms 
and legs boy!" Hopf dominated Round 
1. During Round 2, Fritz hopped into 
the ring to assist Possessky in her battle 
with Goliath. However, the was not a 
day for the "underdogs." Hopf con- 
tinued to overpower them until the end 
of the match. 

Some frosh students decided to wres- 
tle for the third match. The tag-team 
combo of Kim Bard and Emily Fager 
challenged Scott Bowman. When the 
match began, Bard attacked her own 
teammate. She and Bowman dragged 
Fager through "the deep end" where a 
lot of the Jello was. Then the match 
became a free-for-all with no team 
distinctions. 

At this point, Ryan Bevitz began his 
search for a competitor. He took off his 



shirt, much to the dismay of the crowd, 
and stood alone. His opponent would 
arrive in a few minutes. 

Meanwhile, the next match featured 
Dave Schott of TKE against Megan 
Miller and Liza Brandt of Alpha Sigma 
Tau. Miller and Brandt brought Schott 
to his knees within the first ten seconds 
of the match, and before too long he 
was on his back. The dynamic duo of 
Miller and Brandt maintained camara- 
derie throughout the match, unlike the 
previous tag-team combination, and 
controlled most of the battle. After- 
wards Schott said, "It was a rough fight, 
and my ultimate dream!" 

Fager and Madden, the two victims 
of unfaithful teammates, wrestled each 
other in the fifth match. 

Then Yvonne D'Uva and Erica 
Schneck challenged their own sister, 
Sharon Possessky, to a dual in the ring 
of gelatin. Possessky tossed her sisters 
around like yesterday's garbage, unlike 
her previous match with Hopf. Pos- 
sessky held one sister in each arm, and 
then proclaimed, "I like this game!" 

Towards the end of the match, Casey 
Reed was walking by the festivities 
when his brothers, of Kappa Sigma 
Kappa, convinced him to wrestle Bev- 
itz. Despite the weight difference of 
Volvo station wagon and a Volkswagen 
Bug, Bevitz agreed to the challenge. 
Neither man was dressed for Jello wres- 
tling - Bevitz wore blue jeans and Reed 
wore denim shorts. The match began 
and Reed pinned Bevitz in less than ten 
seconds. While Reed laved on top of his 
opponent, Bevitz flailed his arms and 
could do nothing more than smear Jello 
in the hair of Reed. Newell let the 
match continue, and Reed pinned Bev- 
itz three more times before Newell fi- 
nally ended the slaughter. Alii 
Brunetti of Clio challenged John Vito 
in the next match. Brunetti and Vito 
exchanged handfuls of Jello, but Vito 
primarily had control until Brunetti's 
Clio sister, Janell Cuddy, leaped into 
the ring to assist her. The two women 
gave Vito quite a fight. 

The grand finale of the event pitted 
Reed up against Possessky. Reed once 



again had a weight advantage in his 
favor as well as height, but Possessky 
was a trooper. Then Fritz, Brunetti, 
and Cuddy all entered the ring to assist 
Possessky. The women didn't overpow- 
er Reed, so Fritz jammed a handful of 
Jello down his shorts. 

There were plenty of mixed feelings 
about rolling around in a pool of Jello, 
but the predominant emotion was ex- 
pressed by Fager, "It was freezing." 
Fritz added, "It tasted really good" 

Newell said, "I was pleased. We'll do 
it next year early in the semester when 
the sun is out and warmer." He also 
added a thank you to Hallmark (Dining 
Services) for preparing the Jello. 

After the event, wrestlers, spectators, 
and Newell tipped a dumpster and 
pushed the ring and Jello into it. 
— Wayne Knaub 




Kappa Lambda Nu sister Allison 
Brunetti survives her messy match of 
|ello Wrestling. 




^p> 



129 




Tau Kappa Epsilon 




Phi Lambda Sigma 




130 



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VI 



Phi Sigma Sigma 






New Sorority Sponsors Entertaining "Jail and Bail" Fundraiser 



I hi Sigma Sigma is an interna- 
tional sorority that was established 
in 1913 at Hunter College in New 
York. The Theta Tau Chapter of 
Phi Sigma Sigma, here at Lebanon 
Valley College, was just installed as 
a chapter on November 23, 1996. 

The opportunities that a Phi Sig- 
ma Sigma sorority affiliation can of- 
fer a woman are immeasurable. 
The advancement of womanhood 
through a close union of congenial 
friends of great character is the ba- 
sis of Phi Sigma Sigma member- 
ship. 

This year, on November 7, they 
brought their "Jail and Bail" fun- 
draiser outdoors to the gazebo in 
order gain attention from the cam- 
pus community. Mary Blankenmey- 
er, chair of Phi Sigma Sigma's fun 



draising committee, said she got the 
idea for the fundraiser from her 
high school, and it really seems to 
generate a lot of student interest. 

The Jail and Bail rules were such 
that students, faculty and staff were 
given the chance, during lunch and 
dinner hours, to pay three dollars 
to put "a criminal" in jail. Then it 
was in the hands of the criminal to 
beg spectators for pocket change 
until they had raised five dollars, 
enabling them to get out of the 
gazebo jail before common hour 
was over. 

While some were able to raise 
their bail in a matter of minutes, 
other weren't as fortunate and re- 
mained in the gazebo for almost the 
whole time. Among those less for- 
tunate were Coach Jim Monos, 
Coach Matt Kujovsky and Coach 



Mike Susi of the football team, and 
Coach Kathleen Tierney of the 
field hockey team.. Their athletes 
seemed to enjoy watching them 
plead for every spare penny they 
could get, and basked in the re- 
venge of refusing them money to 
get out. One of the other familiar 
faces that could be found in the 
gazebo jail was Assistant Dean, 
Dave Newell. 

Meghan Toppin said she was 
pleased with the response and stu- 
dent participation of Jail and Bail. 
Involving as many students as possi- 
ble while having a good time was 
one of the goals of the fundraiser. 
Erin Buffington said they picked 
this event because, "It involves the 
whole student body as well as facul- 
ty members and coaches." 
— Beth Curley and Lynne Heisey 



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Graduation 



Imagine spending year after year working toward a 
goal, and think about the committment and dedication 
that is required in order to meet that goal. For four 
years, at Lebanon Valley College, the members of the 
Class of 1 997 faithfully trained and worked to be able to 
reach receive their ultimate reward - a college diploma. 
They attended classes, completed papers and exams, 
and read an endless number of pages - all because of 
their dream to graduate from college. On May 10. 
1997, that dream came true for each of those students. 
The cold and blustery weather became distant as the 
graduates, their families, friends, and professors basked 
in the successes and triumphs of the entire class. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




<§fjjp 



133 




Members of the Board of Trustees talk amongst themselves while they 
wait for the graduates to enter the tent. 



Nancy Seidel and Poh See process to the ceremony with their 
classmates. 



134 



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Early in the ceremony. Chaplain D. Darrell Woomer delivers an inspirational invocation to the graduates, faculty members, and guests. 





Chairman of the Board 
of Trustees and a 1958 
graduate of L.V.C., 
Thomas C. Reinhart 
recognizes the faculty. 

The band performs 
The Ascension (from the 
'Divine Comedy') by 
Robert W. Smith. 




®fjp> 



135 




Susan U'olte Hassinger, Member of the Class of 1964, receives a an honorary degree, the Doctor of Divinity, sponsored bv Dr. Applegate. 




Dr. Michael Grella and President Pollick present June Ebv Herr '34 
with a Doctor of Humane Letters. 

President G. David Pollick addresses the members of the Class of 1997 
at his first Lebanon Valley Graduation Ceremony. 






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136 



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The audience watches as Sarah makes her way 
to the podium. 







Senior Vice-President and Dean of the Faculty, William J. McGill takes part in the conferring of degrees, as does President Pollick. 



<§up> 



137 




Todd Goshen and John Gruber wait in line to go to the podium 
Jennifer Gominger applauds the academic success of her friends. 



138 



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^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




1997 Graduates Sharon Benton, Rvan Bevitz, Mary Blankenmeyer and Matthew Gross stand proudly during the ceremony. 




Kimberly Leister's message is one that is on the mind of every graduate. 



<Sf[p> 



139 




Dr. Barney Raffield, Dr. Paul Heise and the other faculty members give their sincere congratulations to their former students. 




140 



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Co-Chairpersons of the Class of 1997 Senior Gift Drive, Ed Brignole and Jennifer Wentzel prepare to present the senior class gift. 




Kristen R. Angstadt, a member of the Class of 1974, welcomes the Class of 1997 into the Alumni Association, of which she is president. 



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Closin 




"The torch is gone, but we are the light." No other 
words could better capture the vivacious energy that 
continues to fuel Lebanon Valley College year after 
year. When reflecting upon the events, situations, and 
successes of this past academic year, it becomes obvious 
that the LVC community has a light full of hope and 
spirit that continues to burn stronger and stronger every 
day. That light encourages each student to work hard to 
meet their goals. It inspires each professor to enlighten 
his or her students with facts, opinions, and ideas. And, 
it creates a positive environment where everyone can 
learn from one another, while making valuable mem- 
ories and relationships that will last a lifetime. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




143 



Messages 



Jeffrey, Your Mother would be very proud of you. I am. Love, Dad 

Jen - Congratulations on your graduation! You've made us proud through 
every step of your journey in life! Love, Mom 8c Dad 

Dear Ann, Here's to your high energy and positive attitude! May it last a 
lifetime! Much Love, Mom and Dad 

Dear Bryn, It was thought by some that it couldn't be done, you did it your 
way and we're proud of you. Love, Pop-Pop 8c Grandmom 

Congratulations Carrie - the first grandchild to graduate from college. 
Love, Mom, Dad, and Mike 

Dear Brian - Three down and one to go. Have a great senior year. The real 
world awaits!!! Love, Mom 8c Dad 



144 




Denise Steiniger gets 
acquainted with the 
freshman on their first 
day at college. 

After their match of 
Jello Wrestling, Sharon 
Possessky, Rick Hopf, 
and Chrissv Fritz 
attempt to get clean. 

At the Activities Fair, 
senior Jason Henerv 
prepares to Sumo 
Wrestle. 




Keyboardist, Dave Ferrari concentrates on the music 
that he is playing. 



Alex Lang, Lori Mover, and Dave Doll perform an original song 
written by Alex. 

As part of the group "Bad Medicine." Jason Drayer dons a Jon 
Bon Jovi costume. 

Judges and spectators watch the performers closely. 





Good Luck Joe and the men of Kalo. The Lamberts 

Dear Brian - Congratulations on a job well done. We are proud of you. 
Your future is bright. Love, Mom, Dad and The "Ps" 

Jerry - We're so very proud of you. Good luck in your senior year. Never 
give up on your dream or settle for second best. We love you. Mom, Dad, 
Bob, Sandi, and Princess 

Dear Maureen, Best wishes on your college journey. Love, Mom, Dad, 
Shannon & Ross 

Dear Lisa, Three down, one to go! Keep up the good work. We're so proud 
of you. Love, Mom, Dad, & Lori 

Dear Eileen, It is hard to believe that 4 years have passed so quickly. Love 
and congratulations! Lewis, Jessica, Jon, Meredith, Mom and Dad 



sup) 



145 



Meredith - You are a wonderful gift we received and have treasured every 
day of our lives. Follow your dreams for you can do anything you want to in 
life. Our love and support will always be there for you. Congratulations! 
Mom & Dad 

Tim '97, Best wishes from your Best Sister! #2 F.O.T.O. Paula 

Timothy, God Bless you in all you do. Love, Grandma 

Tim, Congratulations and Good Luck in all you do! Aunt Bonnie & Uncle 
Don 




Students have an opportunity to see a long distance view of 
he NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt. 

The "Healing Circle" is just one of the many beautiful 
squares that remembers those lost to the devastating disease. 

The quilt is being displayed in Washington D.C. for its final 
complete viewing because it has grown too large to be seen 
all at once. 






Tim, Congratulations on your graduation and Good Luck at Graduate 
School. Love, Your Father 

Tim '97, Congratulations! You always make us proud. #1 F.O.T.O. Mom 
and Dad 

Dear Natalie, Congratulations to our future teacher on four excellent years 
at LVC. Love, Dad, Mom, John, Jen, and Brian 



Lisa: You did it! We're proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad & Bob 



Dear Alicia, Keep up the good work. You're on your way! Love, Mom 8c 
Daddy 

Marcia Samantha, Keep holding on tight to your dreams - don't let them 
go! We're proud of you! Love, Mom 8c Dad 

Dear Danielle, We can't believe your 4 years are over already. We are so 
very proud of you. Love 8c Happiness in the future. Love, Mom 8c Dad 

Deena, Through all that you have learned this past year, may you become a 
better person, in mind, body, and strength. Love, Mom, Dad and Otto 




The 1997 
Homecoming 
Court poses 
together before 
the crowning of 
the queen. 

Following the 
band, Josh 

Howard leads 
his fellow Philo 
brothers as well 
as the other 
greeks onto the 
field, as part of 
the "'Athens 
Homecoming." 

Megan Wertz, 
Heather Wilson, 
and Carrie 
Champ gather 
to talk after 
halfiime. 



Let's go J.H., Only two more years of aggravation! 

Dear Kelly, We're very proud of you! Lots of love, Mother and Dad 

Dear Jenny, What a wonderful daughter you are. You've worked so hard 
for this day and we are very proud! Happy graduation - the best is yet to 
come. Love always, Dad and Mom 

Hey Heather, Two down, two to go! Keep up the good work! Love, Mom & 
Ron 




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147 



Dear Brandon, Seems like it was 
only yesterday you started L. V. 
I'm very proud of you. Love, 
Dad 

Dear Jody, Keep it up - you're 
doing great! You Glow Girl. 
Love, Mom & Dad 

Kim, We love you and are proud 
of you. Best wishes. Love, Dad, 
Amy, and Joshua 

Good Luck, Kim. Hang in there. 
Love, Mom-mom and Pop-pop. 

Dear Mimi, Kyle and Tommy 
sure think you're special, and we 
agree. Love, Lori, Ed, Kyle, & 
Tommy 

Dear Kim, We are so proud of 
our favorite granddaughter! 
Love Grandma 8c Granddad 

Dear Kim, You have made us 
proud. We love you! Love, Mom, 
Jake, and Matt 

Dear Lin, Three Words: EAR 
TRAINING - AARRRGH!!! 
Love, Mom, Dad, Ali & O.G. 

Cherie Alison, College - moving 
along - a senior already? We're 
not that old! Keep working hard - 
we're very proud! Love, Mom & 
Dad 




During the halftime show, Dave Doll performs his trumpet solo. 

Junior Brian Heydt watches the game while sitting on the bleachers 
with the rest of the band. 




148 



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The band gives a solid performance on Homecoming Weekend. 
James Unger runs up and down the stands to start the wave. 




Dear Dorinda, You'll always 
have our support and love. Keep 
up the good work! Love, Mom 8c 
Dad 

Congratulations Scott, God bless 
you in your new endeavor. Love 
Always, Mom and Dad 

Dear Jenn, Congratulations! You 
are a special person and you've 
made us all so proud. We know 
your future will be as successful 
as your years at LVC. We love 
you very much, Mom, Dad & Jon 

Dear Jenn, You are a grand- 
daughter to be proud of. May 
God bless your life with much 
love, happiness and success. We 
love you very much, Grandma & 
Grandpa Tobin. 

Craig - Congratulations on a 
great sophomore year! We are so 
very proud of you. Love, Mom 8c 
Dad 

Dear Andrea, We're proud of 
you and all your accomplish- 
ments. Thanks for being such a 
beautiful person. Love, Mom 
and Kim 

Brian, What an accomplishment! 
We're so proud of you. God 
bless. Love ya, Mom 8c Dad 



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149 



Jason: You're half way home and we are very proud of what you have 
accomplished so far. Keep up the good work. We can't wait for Football 
season!!! We love you!!! Mom & Dad 

To Bridget C: From a homesick Freshman in '93 to a mature adult in '97, 
with a lot of hard work in between. Congratulations and much love, Dad 
and Mom 

Todd, LVC #33 We're very proud of you! Love, Mom and Dad 

Big Brother, Congratulations! I'm proud of you. Love, Tammy 

Congratulations, Brian! Best wishes in all you do. Love, PopPop Huey & 
Aunt Fran 

Brian, Let a smile be your umbrella & sit back and enjoy the weather. Love 
Uncle Les 



Santa Claus conducts the Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble 
during the Christmas Dinner. 

Kelly Roth and Jessica Smith amuse themselves while 
selling raffle tickets to support Nunsense. 

During Greek week, Jen Mihalov gives some 
encouragement to her AST sister, Sharon Possessky. 



150 



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Shelby Kampka and Monica Fitzgerald give the 
children some pointers. 

During her time with them, Karen Taylor stops to 
work with each child in the group. 

Freshman Laura Cooper helps with the music 
workshop. 




Congratulations, Little Bro! You did it! Best of luck. Rock on!! Love, Scott 

Brian, Congratulations! Good luck in all you do. We love you. Wendy and 
Scott 

Brian, Way to go! Does this mean you can now sit at the adults table? Love, 
Jen 8c Tom 

Brian, We're proud of you. Congratulations! Love Uncle John, Aunt Vicki, 
Dawn 8c Stephanie 

Brian, I knew you could do it. Congratulations on a job well done. Love, 

MomMom 



Brain, To one of my favorite second graders. I knew you could do it. Love, 
Aunt Sallie & Uncle Jim 

Brian, Good going! We love you. We're proud of you. Grandma & Grandpa 




©J|Jp2) 



151 



#84, What are we going to do with our weekends? No more tailgates. How 
will we survive? Your Fan Club 

Dear Angie C, Three down and one to go. Keep up the great work. Love, 
Mom & Dad 

To Dave: You've met all our expectations, even saw an English Dawn - 
Love Mom, Dad, Wendy! 







Dvan Shannon reads the book A Color of His Own with the childr 



Junior Music Education Major, Brandy Harmon volunteers her time to 
help teach some songs. 



Melissa Patterson tells a story to a group of children 



"Raise a song, sound a timbrel..." Elizabeth Lesher Salter did it, and she 
did it very well! Beth, we're so proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad, & The 
Family 

Alana, You've made us very proud parents. What a wonderful daughter! 
Love, Mom and Dad 

Aunt Wendy, Congratulations on a job well done. We love you. Now can 
you play with us? P.S. How about those Packers! Love, Evan & Dane 



152 



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Dear "A" Wendy, Remember all the fights we had? The kidney-punching 
and hair pulling ones were most effective, weren't they? I can't believe my 
little sister is graduating! Congrats! W'Amy 

Wendy, The little girl who didn't grow because she didn't sleep all night is 
now a college graduate. Congratulations and best wishes. All our love goes 
with you. Mom & Dad 

Jenna, We are very proud of you - Best of luck. Love, Mom & Dad 




Students and alumni look at the items for sale in the 
craft tent during Spring Arts Weekend. 

Deena Hixon prepares to throw at TSS's bean bag 
toss booth. 

Art lovers get an opportunity to look at pottery made 
by students in the Ceramics class. 



Heather, You are my inspiration. You have worked hard to reach your 
goal. Keep looking up, for there are greater things ahead. The joys of your 
heart are love, peace, happiness and contentment. Congratulations and 
Mother's blessing to you in all. Love, Mom & Family 

Allyson - Congratulations! I am very proud of you - May all your dreams 
come true - you deserve the best. Love, Mom 



i ■ 



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153 



Allyson - Congratulations to a 
wonderful Granddaughter. 
Love, Grandmom 

Allyson - You did it Bu Budnick!! 
We knew you would! We're very 
proud of you. Love, Aunt Gert & 
Uncle Vince 

Bryan B - Congratulations! I wish 
you the best always. Love, Mom 
Schneider 

JENNIFER, Congratulations on 
your college career at LVC. We 
are very proud of you. Lots of 
love, Dad, Mom, Derek, Becky, 
Jim & Devon. 

Daniel Patrick Henderson - The 
Lord knows you well; therefore, 
he has opened a door to you that 
no one can shut. Run with en- 
durance the race that is set be- 
fore you. We wish you a wonder- 
ful life. With utmost pride and 
love, Mom, Dad, and Andrew 




Wig and Buckle member, Wayne Knaub gets ready to 
fry a pierogie. 




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Liz Pond, Jill Fleming, and their AST sisters decide which 
sweatshirts to buy. 

Many people enjoy the exhibit on display in the Gallery. 

Students listen to the bands performing on the Second Stage, 
behind Vickroy Hall. 



154 



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Colophon 



The "The Torch Is Gone, But We Are the Light" Quittapahilla 1997, Volume 82 of the Lebanon Valley 
College Yearbook was printed and published by the Taylor Publishing Company of Dallas, Texas and Malvern, 
Pennsylvania. The book had a press run of 300 copies. 

The cover was an original design executed on a base Black 00 1 Matte with gold foil stamped. Eighty pound 
high gloss enamel paper was used throughout the book. 

Copy for the entire book was printed in variations of Seville. Body copy, caption, and headline point sizes 
varied throughout the book. 



The staff consisted of: 
Advisor: Ms. Jane Pallida 
Editor-in-Chief: Carrie Stull 
Assistant Editor: Heather Bair 
Secretary: Amv Parsons 
Business Manager: Jason Lausch 
Publicity Manager: Michelle Heffley 
Photography Editor: Matthew Hintz 

Student Life Section Editor: Carrie Stull 

Student Life Staff: Jason Lausch, Clint Rudy 

Senior Section Editor: Carrie Stull 

Senior Section Staff: Michelle Heffley 

Faculty Section Editor: Amy Parsons 

Faculty Section Staff: Matthew Hintz 

Athletics Section Editors: Ryan Bevitz, Nathan Hillegas 

Athletics Section Staff: Matthew Green 

Organizations Section Editor: Heather Bair 

Organizations Section Staff: Dave Kotschessa 

Music Section Editor: Steven Perkins 

Music Section Staff: Kristin Chandler 

Greek Section Editor: Beth Curley 

Residential Life Section Editors: Heather Draper, Melissa 

Mowrer 

Graduation Section Editor: Carrie Stull 

Closing Section Editors: Carrie Stull, Michele Weber 

Copy Writers: Heather Bair, Ryan Bevitz, Beth Curley, 

Matthew Green, Nathan Hillegas, David Kotschessa, Clint Rudy, Carrie Stull 

Layout Designers: Heather Bair, Ryan Bevitz, Nathan Hillegas, Jason Lausch, Carrie Stull 

Photographers: Heather Bair, Ryan Bevitz, Kristin Chandler, Beth Curley, Heather Draper, Michelle Heffley, 
Nathan Hillegas, Matthew Hintz, Jason Lausch, Melissa Mowrer, Amy Parsons, Steven Perkins, Michele Weber 

The Taylor Sales Representative is Ed Patrick, Jr. and the Customer Service Representative in plant is Melody 
Lundquist. 

The Lebanon Valley College Quittapahilla is produced entirely by a volunteer staff. 




i?S 



r 




Editor's Notes 



To the 1996-97 Quittapahilla Staff: Your dedication to and interest in this book was unbelievable. Thank you all 
for vour hard work, input, and desire to create an excellent publication. 

To my fellow Quittapahilla Officers: Thank you for your organization, patience, and leadership throughout 
the year. 

To Ryan Bevitz and Nate Hillegas: Thank you for going far and above the call of duty when needed. Best of 
luck in the future - the Athletics Section will never be the same without you! 

To Heather Draper and Melissa Mowrer: Many thanks for working so hard on the Residential Life Section 
despite the problems - your efforts are much appreciated. 

To David Kotschessa and Clint Rudy: Thank you for your inspiring energy and willingness to learn! 

Special Thanks to Liz Borges and Rose Ugliuzza for originating the theme for this edition of the Quittapahilla. 

To Jane Pallida, our advisor and to the College Relations Office for helping us to gather photographs. Also to 
photographer, Dan Marschka. 

To Jen Evans, Jason Henery, Christopher Melusky and the LYC Student Council: Thank you once again for your 
trust and positivitv as we work to make each yearbook better than the last. 

To Wayne Knaub: Thank you for the use of articles from the La Vie Collegienne . Also, special thanks to the 
following La Vie staff writers: Malaika Cheney-Coker, Kimbrin Cornelius, Ellen Gehr, Lvnne Heisev, David 
Kotschessa, Amanda Lee, Stef Leiser, Deb Meyer, Dan Morneau, Anni Shockey, Kelly Sonon, and Arianne Zeck. 

Many thanks to Mr. Robert Riley for helping us keep the lines of communication open throughout the year. 

An enormous thank you to Ed Patrick, Jr., our Taylor representative for the endless support and encourage- 
ment. 

Thank vou to staff and photographers at DaYor Photography. 

To the Music Faculty and Students: Thank you for allowing us to honor your talents and accomplishments with a 
new section. 

To the Greek Organizations: Many thanks for allowing 
us to recreate the Greek Life Section after its absence 
of many years. 



Heartfelt thanks to Pat Schools and all of the College 
Center Desk Workers for your help throughout the 
year. 

To all LYC Students, Faculty Members, Staff Mem- 
bers, and Administrators: Without your undying sup- 
port and cooperation, the Quittapahilla would not 
exist. Thank you. 

— Carrie Stull. Editor-in-Chief 




The Torch Is Gone 




But We Are the Light 



LVC 



To Thee, dear Alma Mater 

This ringing song we raise, 

A song that's fraught with gladness, 

A song that's filled with praise, 

We cannot help but love Thee, 

Our hearts are full and free, 

Full well we know the debt we owe, 

To dear old LVC. 

We come from old New Hampshire, 

Where winter breezes blow, 

And from the sunny Southland, 

Where sweet magnolias grow, 

We've sung "Star Spangled Banner," 

To "Dixie" given a cheer, 

And now we raise this song of praise, 

To Alma Mater dear. 

Put forth your strongest might, 

And let our Alma Mater 

Win each and every fight, 

Lift high its royal banner, 

And keep its honor clear, 

And let our song with voices strong 

Ring down thro' many a year. 



1997 



160 



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