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Full text of "Quittapahilla"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/quittapahilla1998leba 




Lebanon Ualley CoUec^e 

AnnviUe, ^A 17003^ 

Volume 83 





£astinc^ Impressions 



_'hc campus of Cebanon Oallci( College thrives on the talents and special c^ifts possessed bi| 
its students. Although it mai| seem impossible, each ijear, as new students move to campus 
and join the CVC familii, their new home becomes more pleasantlji different than it was onln 
a few months before. And, as the upperclassmen prepare to enter their new hves, thei; bec^in 
to leave the last bits of their influence, ideas and personalities with the school. lOithout these 
students, from the past, present, and future, Cebanon Ualleii would not continue to hold the 
unique character that draws such love from its people. Undoubtedlii, both the students and 
the school continuousli) provide one another with enerc^i) and positiviti), and in manii waqs, 
with incrediblii stron^^'^istin^ impressions," that can, and will, be embraced for centuries. 
— Carrie L CO. Stull 

i 






, ia^it^ . 



© 














Student £ife 

fiichycar, the cam pus community is entertained 
and informed by tlie students ii/io get involved. 
Tliese events and activities are successes due to 
tlie hard iio/A of talented and dedicated students. 
And as these students plan each project, they 
learn the lessons only these kinds of experiences 
can bring, fhese experiences become wonderful 
memories to caiij into the future. 

In the past year. lAC has had the privilege of 
hosting successful Homecoming and Spring Arts 
Weekends, three ipiality productions in the thea- 
ter, a well-enjoyed and well-attended Children's 
Day. as well as many other special events such as 
Math Olympics and Wellness Week. It is truly the 
dedication of the students who plan and cany out 
these events, which are able to leave such lasting 
impressions on the campus and community. 
— Julie Repman and Carrie l. M. Stull 




Lasting Impressions 







Freshman Orientation 



Lebanon Valley Welcomes Students 



A 



.s the members of the 
Class of 2001 slowly 
streamed onto the campus, 
they began to experience 
some of the most memora- 
ble moments of their time 
at LVC. 

The new students spent 
the morning moving into 
their rooms and getting to 



know their roommates, and 
before long migrated to 
Miller Chapel, where they 
were welcomed to the cam- 
pus by the faculty. 

The high point of the day 
for everyone, was 
"Playfair," an event packed 
full of cooperation games 
and ice-breaking tasks. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




Keister Hall Staff members, Amv Borders, 

Cornell Wilson, Andv Stoner, Hollev 

Dobson, and Melissa-Ann Pero, prepare to 

help their freshman residents move into the 

dorm. 

Follovvinj; the tradition from years past, on 

Saturday afternoon, President Pollick 

addresses the students and their families at 

the Opening Convocation in Miller Chapel. 

College Administrators, upperclassmen, and 

community members alike welcome the 

new students to the campus during the 

Convocation. 








The students walk through the path made' 
by their professors and advisors, an event 
that will take place only one other time, at 
their Commencement Ceremony. 




Brock Kerchner and Kelly Roth wait for their next set of instructions for the game that they 
are playing. 



'K^'^^'M^s'i.. 



I nfflfiiH! 



/?=, 



Freshman Pat Bowman familiarizes himself with the Laiiipus 







During Playfair, the students are asked to volunteer to |oin the "Plavfair Lady" on the 
stage. 








Activities Fair 



Clubs Recruit New Members 



o 



nee again, early in the 
fall semester, the Student 
Activities Organizes the 
Activities Fair, as an op- 
portunity for all of the 
clubs and organizations on 
campus to both show the 
new students who they are 
and what they are about, 
and to hopefully recruit 



many nev^' members. 

The fair is an excellent 
way for students to get to 
know more about the cam- 
pus, because it helps them 
find those that they are 
most mterested m, rangmg 
from fraternities to reli- 
gious organizations to aca- 
demic clubs. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




-i <! ^■■ 



* - ' IT ■ I 




Sophomores Heather Strunk and Ken Horst 

hope to find new musicians to join their 

Contemporary Christian group, HIS. 

During the Activities Fair, President Pollick 

takes a stroll through the booths to see the 

displays set up by the various clubs and 

organizations. 

MENC members, Beth Golias, Amy 

Schimpf, and Meredith Price seek out the 

newest music majors on campus, to 

influence them to join the group. 



© 




Leslie Gardiner, a Phi Sigma Sigma sister, 
takes the time to answer questions about 
the sorority and its purpose. 




Dr. Arthur Ford, and active member of the International Student Organization, participates 
in the Fair, to help gain publicity for the group 




,-Hu>' 



*-v. 



;S?»^..JK 





Jt: 



Sigma Alpha Iota sisters, Lisa Fasold, Lori Mover, Melissa Rhodes, Kristin Chandler, Carrie 
Clinton and Jennifer Barna demonstrate their sisterhood, while at their display table. 







O 



Talent Show 

students Perform in BCC Show 



M. 



ulti-talented 
students joined to- 
gether on the evening 
of Friday, October 3, 
to perform in the 
Black Culture Club's 
4th Annual Talent 
Show. Comedienne 
Katsy Chappell hos- 
ted the event which 
featured a juggler, 
two bands, dancers 



and several singers, 
songwriters and in- 
strumentalists. 

Cornell Wilson, a 
judge said, "Since I've 
seen every talent show - 
1 believe this one had the 
most combined talent 
ever." 

Prizes given for third, 
second, and first places 
were distributed as fol- 
lows; Third Place, Matt 



Grzywacz; Grzywacz 
performed a juggling 
act. Second Place, 
Kimbrin Cornelius 
and Dawnie Weiser; 
On piano, Cornelius 
accompanied Weiser 
signing "Winter." 
First Place, Eva Saun- 
ders; Saunders sang 
the spiritual "His Eye 
is on the Sparrow." 
— Jennifer Yocom 




lason Drayer makes the last of his many 
performances on stage at the BCC Talent 
Show. 




In another one of the musical acts of the 

evening, guitarist Matt Stone plavs for 

Holley Dobson, as she prepares to sing. 

First Place winner Eva Saunders said, "1 

was shocked. After hearing about the show 

at the first Black Culture Club meeting, 1 

didn't think it was a big deal; then 1 started 

getting really nervous today. I never 

thought I'd win. 1 just thank God, He's 

showing me 1 have got to have faith " 



© 



Once again, Dawn Weiser brings her 
unique vocal talents to the stage and 
thoroughly entertains the audience. 




Peace Garden 

Garden Expected to Beautify Campus 



L 



'VC is under con- 
struction and ru- 
mored plans of ex- 
pansions are buzzing 
across campus, but 
few students are 
aware of the actual 
magnitude of reno\'a- 
tions until thev are 
completed. 

The Peace Garden 
behind Vickroy Hall 
is the first project to 
be completed. This 
iiarden is more than 



merely flowers and 
shrubbery. A fish-filled 
pond, stone patio, ducks, 
and "Hot Dog Frank" 
statue will make the spot 
more than an ordinary 
garden. 

To preserve this area 
of beauty the college is 
creating a full-time posi- 
tion available for a 
grounds person who will 
be in charge of main- 
taining the garden. In 
addition to these meas- 
ures, campus security 



will include the Peace 
Garden in their night- 
ly rounds. President 
Pollick added, "1 truly 
hope students will 
care for the envi- 
ronment as well." 

A celebratory dedi- 
cation of the new 
Peace Garden legend- 
ary "Hot Dog Frank" 
statue will take place 
during Homecoming 
weekend, October 18. 
— Cori Rife 



rhe entrance gates to the Peace Garden 
ire located between Vickrov and Center 
^alls. 

Dean Gregorv' Stanson speaks at the 
iedication ceremony during 
^omecoming Weekend. 








Homecoming 



Traditional Event a Success 



eorgous fallen 
leaves and crisp, fresh 
air greeted the family 
members and friends 
who visited Lebanon 
Valley College during 
Homecoming Week- 
end. 

It was a weekend 
filled with traditional 



events, such as the 
football game, crown- 
ing of the Homecom- 
ing Queen, and an ex- 
cellent performance 
from the LVC Mar- 
ching Band. Visitors 
were also able to visit 
the new Peace Gar- 
den. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 






1997 'J^omecominc^ Queen 
Con Tlolen 




Yvonne D'Uva, the 1996 Homecoming 
Queen, returns to campus to participate in 
the crowning. 



Members of the LVC Marching Band perform during the halftmie show, after the 
crowning of the Queen. 

The 1997 Homecommg Court poses with their escorts for a group shot. 




Students, LVC Akimni, parents, and guests fill the stands 
to watch the football game. 

President Pollick joins the Homecoming Court on stage. 



© 





Sophomore Gvven Lawson portrays Miss 

Ouiser, the ornery old woman who 

confronts M'lvnn (Lisa Epting) about her 

husband Drum. 



''Steel Magnolias'' 

Southern Belles "Steel" the Show in Leedy 



he Wig and Buckle 
Society's season got off 
to a running start with 
the opening of the play, 
Stce! Magnolins, by Ro- 
bert Harling. This much 
loved story of the tri- 
umphs and tragedies of 
six Southern women is 
being directed by Wayne 
Knaub and Carrie Stull, 
and features some of 
everyone's favorite faces 
from previous produc- 



tions. The cast includes 
Lisa Epting and Brooke 
Johnson as M'Lynn and 
Shelby, the dynamic 
mother/daughter duo; 
Kate Laepple as Truvy, 
the salon proprietor with 
a heart of gold and an 
ear for gossip; Jen Yo- 
com as Annelle, the new 
girl in town with a past 
that everyone's talking 
about; Julie Repman as 
Clairee, the town's be- 
loved matriarch; and 



Gwen Lawson as the in- 
describable Miss Ouiser. 
Freshman Annie Davis 
was the understudy. 

"Everybody has been 
working really hard, and 
we've been having a lot 
of fun. The cast has been 
working outside rehear- 
sal time to research their 
characters. ..I'm very 
pleased with what I 
see," says director, 
Knaub. 
— Danielle Boileau 





Shv and intmiidated, Annelle waiN 

anxiously as Miss Truvy decides 

whether or not she will hire her to work 

in the beauty shop. 

Shelby (Brooke Johnson), who is 

preparing for her wedding ceremony 

later that day, meets Annelle for the first 

time. 

Miss Clairee (Julie Repman), M'Lynn, 

and Truvy immediately jump into action 

when they realize Shelby has gone into 

diabetic shock. Annelle, confused and 

scared, offers to call the doctor. 



© 




During her visit to the beauty shop, Clairee 
and Truvy exchange recipes and gossip 
about many things, including the "new 
girl," Annelle. 



Resident Director Jon VVescott 
participates in ' LVC Squares" in Leedy 
Theater. 




National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week 

students Earn Prizes for Giving Up Alcohol 

D 



urint; the week of 
October 27th - October 
31st, LVC students par- 
ticipated in the annual 
Alcohol A w a r e n e s s 
Week. The Committee, 
complete with students 
and members of the Stu- 
d e n t S e r \' i c e s Staff, 



planned entertaining 
events for students who 
agreed to take the pledge 
and not drink alcohol for 
the entire week. 

Programs such as 
"How to Maximize Your 
Buzz," and "Virtual Re- 
ality Goggles" kept the 
students occupied for 



five days. 

The week was wrap- 
ped up with a reception 
for those who success- 
full \' completed the 
"alcohol-free" challenge 
and were wearing their 
b 1 u e w r i s t bands 
throughout the week. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





Rick Beard, Coach Murra\', Cornell Wilson, Professor Barney 
Raffield, Danielle Boileau, Cori Nolan, Gus Merkle and Andy 
Panko are only some of the LVC students and faculty 
members who participated in Alcohol Awareness Week. 

Dr. Stephen Specht speaks to n gatherini; of students about 
the use and abuse of alcohol. 



omm 



M' 



if 









© 



''Hello, Dolly!" _. 

Winter Musical a Smashing Success Despite Adversity 



A. f you happened to be 
passing through Mund 
College Center early in 
the spring semester, 
then chances are, you 
witnessed what many of 
LVC's student actors 
and actresses have liter- 
ally been sweating over. 
Things were rough 
from the start - the sec- 
ond start, that is. After 
auditions for Grease, the 
originally scheduled 
Spring musical, director 
Carrie Stull learned the 
rights for the show had 
been revoked. By the 
time a new show as cho- 
sen and cast, the staff, 
including assistant direc- 
tors Dan Post and Paul 
Vollberg, and music di- 



rector Mel Adam, had 
lost at least a week of 
rehearsal time. That left 
onlv enough time for a 
few quick read-throughs 
before the cast went 
home for Winter Break. 

When everyone retur- 
ned for the Spring se- 
mester, the cast had to 
deal with impromptu 
stages in Faust Lounge 
and the Underground 
for rehearsals, when 
L e e d V was in use. 
Scheduling the rehear- 
sals themselves around 
the thirty-plus cast 
members and the eight 
person staff was no easy 
task. 

In addition, members 
of the set crew had dif- 
ficulties as well. Luckilv, 



Jack Gottschalk served 
as the technical director 
and was there to lend a 
hand and expertise in 
sticky situations to stage 
managers. Gene Kelly 
and Jon Pentecost. 
Throughout the whole 
ordeal, the cast never 
gave up. 

Starring Leedv veter- 
an Lisa Epting, Hello, 
Dolh/! chronicles the 
wheelings and dealmgs 
of Jack-of-all-trades Dol- 
Iv Levi as she attempts 
to marry everyone off 
happily - including her- 
self. 

Wayne Knaub, who 
directeci this fall's pro- 
duction of Steel Magno- 
lias also stars as the not- 
so-loveable feed shop 



owner Horace Vander- 
gelder. His amusing em- 
ployees, Cornelius Hackl 
and Barnaby Tucker, are 
expertly played by Josh- 
ua Moyer anc"l Jason 
Lausch. Kelly Roth plays 
Vandergelder's whiny 
niece Ermengarde and 
Matthew Green, her ar- 
tistic beau, is Ambrose 
Kemper. 

From Vandergelder's 
Hay and Feed Shop, lo- 
cated in Yonkers, New 
York, the action moves 
to the hat shop owned 
by the widow, Irene 
Mollov, songstress Lori 
Moyer. Freshman Ann 
Davis portrays her 
flighty assistant Minnie 
Fay. 
— Ann Davis 




Horace Vandergelder (Wayne Knaub) tries 

to practice for the Fourteenth Street Parade, 

while his niece Ermengarde (Kelly Roth) 

wails in his ear. 

Frustration builds as Vandergelder tries to 
give instructions to his goofy employees, 
Barnaby (Jason Lausch) and Cornelius 
(Joshua Moyer 



© 



Chorus member Robert Groves, spends 
time working late hours, to help the crew 
build the immense set. 




Minnie Fay (Ann Davis) questions about Mrs. MoIlo\''s (Lori Mover) intentions of marrving 
Horace Vandergelder. 

While in Mrs. Molloy's Hat Shop, Dolly teaches Cornelius hoiv to waltz. 





In the upbeat number "So 
Long, Dearie," Dolly says 
good-b\e to Horace in an 
attempt to win him over. 



While in rehearsal, Co-Choreographer, Kirsten Stowell 
works with Charlie Troxel, Nate Davis, and James 
Franklin, as they try to learn the infamous "Waiter's 
Galop." 

Later, in performance, the waiters and cooks take their 
orders from the Head Waiter, Rudolph Reisenweber 
(And\' Rimbv), before they begin dancing. 





Math Olympics 

Post Founds Event for Fifth Graders 



o 



n Thursday, March 
12th, sixty-three fifth 
graders from Our Lady 
of the Valley School en- 
tered the Arnold Sports 
Center, eager in antici- 
pation of Math 
Olympics Day at LVC. 
Math Olympics Dav, 
sponsored by the Math 
Club in conjunction with 
the Elementary Educa- 
tion Department, was an 
opportunity for children 
to work together and 
have fun, all in the con- 
text of mathematics. The 
children arrived in the 
morning and were split 
up into twelve teams. 



each with an LVC stu- 
dent as a Team Leader. 
The teams earned points 
as they rotated to sixteen 
different events which 
combined mathematics 
and physical activity. 

More LVC students, 
the Event Leaders, were 
stationed at each event 
to explain the rules and 
to give out points. The 
events were all tied in to 
the theme of the Olym- 
pics: Discus, Sprints, 
Shot-Put, Tennis, Ar- 
chery, Table Tennis, 
Curling, Slalom, Hock- 
ey, Team Handball, 
Hurdles, Steal the Torch, 
and Olympic Number 



Tag. Each event was set 
up differently and incor- 
porated a variety of 
levels of mathematical 
thinking and problem 
solving. 

Math Olympics Day 
provided a hands-on op- 
portunity for children to 
explore valuable con- 
cepts ranging from basic 
math principles and cre- 
ative problem solving to 
team work and sports- 
manship. The most im- 
portant lesson of the 
day, however, is that 
thev had fun and enjoy- 
ed everything they did. 
— Dan Post, Founder 







Freshman Mollv Stachnik explains the rul 
of her event to the children. 

Member of the Men's Tennis Team, Dave 
Ferrari lends his experhse to the students 
the Tennis event. 




At the Sprints Event, Steve Chernov 
watches as the Light Blue Team earns 

points. 

Andv Rimbv, Josh Lindeman and Aaron 

Maskery help the Dark Blue and Citrus 

Teams through Team Hand the 



® 



Sophomores Gwen Lawson and Erin 
Paxson help their teams overcome the 
Hurdles. 



ronne Shepherd receives a relaxing 
assage during one of many 
ellness Week activities. 




Wellness Week 

Full-Filled Activities with a Serious Purpose 



very year Lebanon 
Valley dedicates a week to 
programs dealing with all 
types of health issues. This 
year's theme is "Mind- 
Body-Spirit, " the three 
most important parts of to- 
tal human well-being. A 
healthy mind can onlv 
function in a healthv bodv, 
and spiritual health keeps 
the bod\' in harmony and at 



peace. 

"Wellness is very impor- 
tant to successful human 
development," said Kim 
Saunders, Wellness Week 
Committee Chairperson. 
"There are three parts to 
wellness: wellness of the 
mind, body, and soul 
(hence the theme). Without 
all three of the com- 
ponents, vour well-being is 
not complete." 






Dtavta! 





Everyone is encouraged to 
participate in as many ac- 
tivities as possible. The 
strength in Wellness Week lies 
in the fact that it addresses 
so many different health is- 
sues. Students are sure to 
find at least one thing that 
they like and to which they 
can relate. 

"It's very important to 
make the students aware of 
the different issues. At least 
this way they are made 
aware that there are differ- 
ent thoughts out there on 
health," said School Nurse, 
Julie Wolfe. 
— Rayna Emily Schell 

.' ' Wellness Week. Events: 
' . ' f, ■ ;■•■ ': 

Country .Line Dancing 

;■ Student vs. Staff 

Basketball Game 

Tai Chi Workshops 

Yoga Workshops 

Handwriting Analysis 

Body Sculpting 
' Massage-Workshop 
' ^ Health Fair 
Aerobic Boxing 
Condom Bingo . , - . 



"•'.'iV\ 



At the most popular Wellness Week event. Condom Bingo, 
many students participate in the speaker's presentation. 

Marvlynne Duke and Elizabeth Geist sit at their display, 
which has a theme that centers around nutrition and the 
food groups. 





Maggie (Gwen Lawson) unloads her 

friistratiiins about their marriage on Jake 

(Nate Davis). 



// 



Jake's Women 

Simon Play a Hit at LVC 



rr 



he Neil Simon 
play entitled "Jake's 
Women" is the third 
and final play of the 
Wig & Buckle Theater 
Society's productions 
of the year. This com- 
edy, directed by Jody 
lacobetz and assistant 



directed by Julie Rep- 
man, captured its au- 
diences with laughter 
and even a little bit of 
sadness. 

"This play has been 
a wonderful way to 
complete my first 
year in the LVC thea- 
ter," said Gene Kelly, 




stage manager. "It 
makes you think and 
entertains you at the 
same time." 
— Came L. M. Stull 






Jake's daughter Molly, at the age of twelve, 
(Kristin Chandler) visits her father to console 
him in his time of confusion. 



"Jake's Women" is a play about a v/riter 

who always turns to the women in his life 

for help, his therapist, sister, first wife, 

current wife, daughter at two ages, and 

girlfriend. Whether on paper, in reality, or 

simply in his mind, the conversations that 

he has with these women manage to make 

him both neurotic and sane at the same 

time. Here, His first wife, Julie (Amy 

Borders), who died many years before, 

appears to him, as always, whenever Jake 

needs to escape from what is really going 

on around him. 

Edith (Danielle Boileau), Jake's counselor, 
listens "sympathetically " to his problems. 

In rehearsal, Nate Davis works with Emily 
Martin, the understudy for Molly. 




® 



Molly at age 21 (Alicia Way) also does her be>- 
to comfort her father in his time of need. 




Greek Week 

Greek Organizations Compete for First 
Place during Week Long Event 



hi Sigma Sigma sisters Slacy Lavin and 
hea Roomet compete in the 
'heelbarrovv race. 

lelissa Patterson and Danielle Hall hold 
le limbo stick as their fellow greeks 

ne up to give it a tr\'. 



A-/ ach year the members of the 
fraternities and sororities at LVC 
join together and compete against 
one another and earn points, to see 
which group will place first. The 
week is packed full of events that 
never cease to entertain not onlv 
the greeks, but also the rest of the 



campus. 

This year, as before, there were 
tug-of-war, limbo, and arm wres- 
tling contests, as well as hula hoop- 
ing, pie eating and wheel-barrow 
racing. The contestants were the 
members of each group affiliated 
with Greek Council 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




Members of the fraternities and sororities gather between 
Keister and Hammond Halls for some of the competitions. 

The Clio sisters work hard to win the lip synch contest. 

Jocelyn Norton gives hula-hooping a try, hoping to win 

points for Phi Sig. 




KE members work hard to bring down 
leir opponents in the tug-of-war event. 




Children's Day 

Elementary School Students Once 
Again Visit the Valley 



■ hildren's Dav has be- 
come an anticipated tradi- 
tion at Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. Each year, students 
from the Annville-Cleona 
School District are bussed 
to campus, so that they can 
participate in the activities 
that students in the LVC 
Eduction Department have 



planned for them. 

The goal of this day is to 
teach the children that ed- 
ucation can be and is fun 
and entertaining, but it also 
always brings great joy to 
the Lebanon Valley College 
students who volunteer 
their time, energy, and 
ideas to the event. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





1 1 



A nii'mber of Rainbow Troupe, Dave 
Shapiro, participates in Children's Da\' 




Children's Day coordinators, Trevor 

Enck and Tabitha Mains planned the 

successful events of the dav 

Senior Music Education ma|or 

Meredith Price dances with the 

children in the music workshop. 

Serenitv Roos spends the dav 
helping the children al her station. 



Hlementary Education major Amy Borders 
one of the student volunteers who escorts 
(he children from group to group. 



® 



Senior Jason Lausch joins in a game of ■'Simon Says." 

len Hershey and Kelly Ulricli participate in one of the story-telling workshops. 




onica Fitzgerald and Danielle Boileau volunteer their time and tell stories to a large group of children. 



© 



spring Arts Festival 

Alumni Weekend Brings Much 
Entertainment and Excitement 



X-/ebanon Valley's Spring 
Arts Festival continuously 
offers great music, food, 
and fun to the college com- 
munity. Throughout the 
weekend, live bands per- 
form, dramatic events oc- 
cur in the theater, and ven- 
dors set up booths full of 
food, games, and crafts. 



Although the weather 
was poor for the last day of 
the weekend, there were 
many activities held in- 
doors for the students to at- 
tend, such as the art exhi- 
bits, and the immensely 
popular Jazz Concert, fea- 
turing pieces by student 
composers. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





Freshmen Cheryl Lukeski and Curt Stanto 
visit the student art exhibit located in FauE 
Lounge. 




Sinl^onia brothers Steve Hunt and Jeremy 
Karacz run the stand for their fraternity. 



Most campus organizations sell food at 
the Spring Arts Festival, as their main 
fundraiser for the year. 




Cartoonist Gene Mater draws portraits of some students on Spring Arts Sunday. 









, # 





s 



eniors 



JL or four years, the members of the Class of 1998 
have worked hard and believed in themselves and 
one another. They have experienced the joys of 
friendship, success, change, and comfort, but 
most of all. the warm, glowing feeling of security 
that protectively surrounds Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. These young men and women have perse- 
vered and have been able to first discover them- 
selves, while within the boundaries of the school, 
and then the world around them, as the doors 
slowly opened, inch by inch, preparing to release 
them into their future. !\ow. as they experience 
both the joy and the sorrow of departure, they 
take the memories of their experience and ed- 
ucation at lA'banon \ alley College with them, 
knowing that they will forever be cherished and 
reflected upon. 
— Carrie L V/. Stull 



fT. 



j"^ 




^> 




Castinc^ Impressions 




Melissa J. Adam 

Music Education 

Music 

Brooke L. 

Anderson 

Elementary 

Education 

Aaron Aponick 

Chemistry - 

A.C.S. 






Gina M. Azzara 
Elementary 
Education 

Jason W. Badman 
Biology 

William E. Baker 
History 






Jennifer D. Barna 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Jason A. Beam 
Elementary 
Education 

Brian C. Berling 
Biology 




Anthony R. 

Bernarduci 

Physics 

Katherine A. 
Bernhardt 
Elementary 
Education 

Wendy E. Bieber 

Music Education 

Music 






® 







Michael A. Bodan 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Allison ]. Bogart 
Management 

Danielle L. 

Boileau 

Psvchology - 

Counseling 




\ 





Elizabeth A. 

Borders 
Elementary 
Education 

Eric A. Boyle 
Biology 

Nicole M. 

Breczewski 

Busmess - 

Human Resources 






Jeffrey L. 

Brenneman 

Mathematics - 

Secondary 

Education 

Giovanka 
Brignoni 
History 

Allison Faith 

Brunetti 
Elementary 
Education 






Ik 



Erin E. Buffington 
Elementary 
Education 

Brian D. Burke 
Histor\- 

Robin L. Capriotti 

English - 
Communications 



® 



Willy M. 

Carmona 

Music Education 

Music 

Stella Seung-Eun 

Choe 
Music Education 

Kathryn E. Clark 

English - 
Communications 






Stacey M. Clever 
Sociology 

John Michael 

Coles 

Political Science 

Kimbrin L. 

Cornelius 

Psychology 






Angela S. Coval 

Biology 

Psychology - 

Counseling 

Ashley E. Cox 

Hotel 
Management 

Lvnn M. 

Crumbling 

Computer Science 



Janell M. Cuddy 
Psychology 

Danielle M. 

Daniels 
Biochemistry 

Uros M. 

Davidovic 

Mathematics 








® 






Laura L. 

Davidson 

Biology 

Susan M. Douts 

Accounting 

Management 

Michael J. Duck 
Biology 






Sara L. Dukehart 
Elementary 
Education 

Mattlu-w C. 
Eicher 
Biology 

Rebecca M. Elliott 
Mathematics 






Lisa M. Epting 
English - 
Literature 

Lisa L. Evans 
Sociology 

Sandra J. Fausey 
Elementary 
Education 






Jon R. Fetterman 
Economics - 
Public Policy 

Matthew A. 

Flamisch 
Accounting 

Brock D. Ford 
Economics 



® 



Robert D. Ford 
Management 

Justin D. Foura 
Sociology 

Timothy A. 

Frantz 

Sociology 

Psychology - 

Developmental 






Joan E. Freeman 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Christine R. Fritz 

Chemistry - 

A.C.S 

Melissa A. Fritz 
Elementary 
Education 






Todd M. Gamble 
Physics 

Leslie A. 

Gardiner 

Management 

Jennie R. Geesey 
Elementary 
Education 






•^«??»" 



Andrew P. Geist 

Chemistry - 

A.C.S.' 

Keith A. 

Giaquinto 

Biology 

Tracie L. Gilpin 

Biology 

Psychology 




® 








Stephanie A. 

Gipe 
Management 

Beth A. Golias 

Music Education 

Music 

Nathan J. 
Greenavvalt 
Elementary 

Education 






Matthew T. Greth 

Hotel 

Management 

Konrad Gut 
Psychology - 

Counseling 
Psychology - 
Experimental 

Michelle L. Haag 
Business 






Danielle M. Hall 
Psychology - 
Organizational 

Brandy L. 

Harmon 

Music Education 

Christopher E. 
Hartman 
History 





Michelle K. 

Heffley 

Music Education 

L\-nne E. Heisey 

English - 
Communications 

Christina A. 

Henise 
Elementary 
Education 



© 



Allison E. Henry 

International 

Business 

Spanish 

Todd A. Henry 
Mathematics 

Donna M. 

Heverling 

Health Care 

Management 





■j^] 




Tina M. High 
Spanish 

Deena R. Hixon 
Chemistry 

Amanda E. 
Hoffman 
English - 
Literature 






Kimberly M. 
Hollich 
Music 

Joy E. Hoover 

Chemistry 

Music 

Wei Kai Huang 

Music Recording 

Technology 









Barrett M. Irons 
Music Education 

Steven 
Iwanowski 
Chemistry 

Shannon Jarmol 
Music Education 






® 






Jennifer R. 

Johnson 

Psychology - 

Counseling 

Shelby L. 

Kampka 

Elementary 

Education 

Ann Kane 
Accounting 






Deborah M. Katz 
Biology 

Douglas L. 
Kellogg 
Physics - 
Secondary 
Education 

Joshua C. Kesler 

Political Science 

German 





Amanda A. 

Killian 
Secondary 
Education 

Wayne R. Knaub 
Management 

Joshua T. Koch 
Music Education 





Angie L. Koons 

Psychology - 

Developmental 

Sociology 

Lisa A. Kostura 
Biochemistry 

Heather M. 

Krause 

Psychology - 

Dt'yelopmental 



® 



Brian ]. Kruzel 

International 

Business 

Michelle L. 

Krystofolski 

Elementary 

Education 

Peggy L. Lane 
English - 
Secondary 
Education 




Jason A. Lausch 
Elementary 
Education 

Stacy V. Lavin 

Sociology 

Psychology 

David K. Leahy 

Chemistry - 

A, C. S. 







Joel A. Lefferts 
Biology 
Spanish 

Jennifer R. 
Lehman 
Biology 

Stefani A. Leiser 

English - 
Communications 



Judith J. 

Luckenbill 

Music Education 

Michelle Y. 

Luecker 

Individualized 

Stephen M. 

Lynch 

Psychology - 

Developmental 



© 











Leslie A. Mader 

Psychology 

German 

Kellv A. Mall 
Management 

Enrico Malvone 
Management 






Cameron L. 

Manahan 

Psychology 

Allison D. Martm 
Biology - 
Secondary 
Education 

Joseph J. Martin 
Management 







Juanita ]. Martin 

English - 

Communications 

Management 

Kevin R. Martin 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Elizabeth M. 

Masessa 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Music 




Lisa M. Mason- 
Sanders 
Biology 

Kimberlv A. 

McCabe 
Biochemistr\' 

Amy R. McCoy 
Psychology 



® 



Michael Eugene 

Melocheck 

Management 

Gustav H. Merkle 
German 

Brian S. Merrill 

English - 
Communications 






Jaime L. Moore 

Psychology - 

Developmental 

Jennifer D. 

Negley 
Biochemistry 

Desiree J. Nguyen 

Psychology - 

Developmental 

Psychology - 

Counseling 






"^j^- re 



Cori R. Nolen 
Psychology 

Jocelyn A. Norton 
Actuarial Science 

Tina M. Oakes 
Psychobiology 
Psychology - 
Experimental 






Jesslyn G. 
Oberholtzer 
Elementary 

Education 

Melanie L. 

Osborn 

Computer Science 

Aaron M. Palmer 
Computer Science 






® 






Audra N. Palopoli 
Elementary 
Education 
Psychology 

Daniel P. Palopoli 
Elementary 
Education 

Amv Beth 

Parsons 

Psychology - 

Counseling 

Psychology - 

Developmental 






Melissa L. 

Patterson 

Elementary 

Education 

Beth A. Paul 
Political Science 

Joseph V. Pearson 
Biology 





Steven E. Perkins 
Elementary 
Education 

Melissa-Ann M. 

Pero 

English - 

Secondary 

Education 

James P. Pete 

English - 

Communications 






Malin E. 
Pettersson 
Economics 

Jerrv W. Pfarr 
Biologv 

Elizabeth M. 

Pond 
Elementarv 
Education 



® 



Jennifer L. 

Porbansky 

English - 

Communications 

Meredith H. Price 
Music Education 

Melissa Pupeck 
Psychology 






Stephen A. Raab 
Music Education 

Rachael M. 

Rascoe 

Mathematics - 

Secondary 

Education 

Laurie A. Redd 
Individualized 






Bryan D. Rehm 
Physics - 

Secondary 
Education 

Deneice O. Reider 
Elementary 
Education 

Jesse L. Reish 

English - 

Communications 






W^^^ -SP 




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V 


'4- 4 






Stacey L. Rine 
Psychology 

Laura Ann 
Robinson 

Elementary 
Education 

Kimberly R. 

Rodgers 

Sociology 




® 








Thea Rose 

Roomet 

Psychology - 

Counseling 

Sherri E. 

Rowland 

Elementary 

Education 

Michele L. 

Ruczhak 

Psychology - 

Counseling 





yf?®?^^? 




Patricia L. Rudis 
Political Science 

Tanya L. Sangrey 
Sociology 

Raymond E. 

Schaak 
Chemistry - 

A.C.S.' 






Melissa A. 

Schaeffer 

English - 

Communications 



Matthew C. 

Schildt 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Music 

Amy L. Schimpf 
Music Education 



?1tV 





Erin N. Schmid 

Psychology - 

Counseling 

John William 

Schmidt 

Political Science 

David G. Schott 
Economics - 
Public Policy 



® 



William M. 

Schwartz 

Political Science 

Jeanine M. 

Schweitzer 

Accounting 

Management 

Dyan L. Shannon 
Elementary 
Education 




*-^ 





Beth G. Shearer 
Biology 

Jeffrey A. Sherk 
Management 

Anni M. Shockey 

English - 
Communications 






© 



Kierstin A. 

Shumate 

Elementary 

Education 

Daniel M. 
Sigafoos 
Biology 

Jennifer J. 

Sinibaldi 
Chemistry 

Sociology 






Becky S. Slagle 
Psychobiology 

Jason Z. Slenker 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Jennifer L. Smith 
Biology 









Emilie J. Snyder 
Management 

Douglas A. 

Speelman 

Applied 

Computer Science 

Brian A. Stahl 

Music Education 

Music 






David J. Staub 
Management 

David H. Stauffer 

Biochemistry 

Psychobiology 

Denise A. 

Steiniger 

Mathematics - 

Secondary 

Education 








Tracey L. Stewart 
Sociology 

Aaron F. 

Strenkoski 

Management 

Carrie Lvn Maria 

Stull 

English - 

Literature 



Anthon\' I. 

Thoman 

Chemistry - 

A.C.S.' 

Helene M. 
Thomas 
English - 
Secondary 
Education 

]eanette T. Tobin 
Elementary 



Education 







Meghan J. Toppin 

Psychology - 

Developmental 

Jacob L. Tshudy 
Actuarial Science 

John J. Tuscano 

English - 
Communications 






Vlichael G. Uhler 

Business 

Economics 


t^' 




Erica L. Unger 
Biology 


_Ji_l. 


James S. Unger 
Elementary 
Education 


wSm 







Arthur W. 

Vespignani, Jr. 

Music Education 

Music 

John J. Vito 
Economics - 
Public Policy 

Cherrie Lynn 

Voda 

Biology 






Paul A. VoUberg 
Music Education 

Wendy A. 

Warner 
Psychology 

Matthew D. Wary 
Music 






® 





Michael D. 

Washkevich 

Music Recording 

Technology 

Jodi L. Weindel 

Elementary 

Education 

Dawn Nicole 

Weiser 

Philosophy 

Religion 






Kimberly C. 

Weitzel 

Religion 

Music 

Pamela M. Wert 
Music 

Barbara E. West 
History 





^-' 




Lance M. 

Westerhoff 

Biochemistry 

Applied 

Computer Science 

Heather J. 

Wevodau 

Biology 

Gregory M. 
Wilson 
History 





'1 




Jeremy D. Wilson 
Spanish 

Ashley E. 

Wineske 

Psychology - 

Counseling 

Melissa M. 

Witchey 

Music Recording 

Technology 







Amy M. 

Witmeyer 

Elementary 

Education 

Davada P. Yarlett 

Psychology - 

Developmental 

Sokthan S. Yeng 
Philosophy 






Jennifer L. C. 

Yocom 

English - 

Communications 

Mary E. Yoder 
Management 

Arianne Zeck 

English - 

Communications 






Kelly J. 

Zimmerman 

Psychology - 

Counseling 

Psychology - 

Developmental 




Lebanon Valley 

College 

Class of 1998 








4. ' " 









Faculty 



Ute Facult}, Administrators, and Staff members 
at Lebanon Valley College leave a particularly 
strong impression on each of their students. They 
provide encouragement and expertise in their spe- 
cific fields, while at the same time expecting ded- 
ication and hard work from each student. Pro- 
fessors teach not only ''textbook education," but 
also lifelong skills needed for survival in the "real 
world. " They attempt to prepare students for their 
lives after graduation. Their goal is to pass on 
knowledge to students so that ever} LVC graduate 
has the chance to be successful. Because they 
work so closely with each of their students, the 
professors offer unparalleled opportunities to the 
people they teach. The professors at Lebanon Val- 
ley leave a lasting impression on their students' 
minds and in their hearts. 
— Tara H. Leberknight 




Castinc^ Impressions 







;r 



Dr. William J. McGill 




1^' ^ 



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The 1998 Edition of the Quiitapahilla is 

dedicated to Dr. William J. McGill, Senior 

y ice President and Dean o f F acuity y in 

honor of his extensive al^d outstanding 

service to Lebanon^alley College. 



nt 



■fit ■' «>-. 










'W5(K ''•'Wf~-^-;am^'v_ 



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Dr. G. David Pollick - College President 

lu '".if 




\^ 



1 





Dr. Robert E. Hamilton 

Vice President for 

Administration 

Mrs. Deborah R. Fullam 

Vice President & 

Controller 

Mrs. Andrea F. Bromberg 
Executive Assistant to the 
1-. President 



-A 



J 



® 



Administrative Staff 



Mrs. Phyllis C. Basehore - ■. 
Assistant to the President , , 

Mrs. Barbara A. Smith - 
Assistant to the Senior Vice 
President & Dean of Faculty 

Mrs. Deborah JL.Lerchen, 

A-dministrative Support 

Secretary 

Ms: Gwendolyn W. Pierce - 

Assistant/Administration- 

and Controller's Office- 




Registrar's Office 



Mrs. Patricia A. 

Laudermilch, Assistant 

Registrar 

'' Mh. Karen D. Best, 
Registrar 

Mj^. Linda L. Summers, 
Secretary 



t'.: -^^ 



@ 







^^*^^-f 




htinuing Education Office 




Mrs. Cheryl L. Batdorf- 
MBA Academic Advisor 

Ms. Shirlej J. Hockley , 

Continuing Education 

Counselor 

Mrs. Susan M. Greenawalt 
Assistant, Continuing 
Education 

Mrs. Elaine D. Feather - 
Director, Continuing,- 
Education ; 



Business Office 



'.J 

v.. 




't*! 



\ 

Mrs. Jacqueline F. Shoivers 

Telephone Console 

Attendant /Secretary 

Mrs. Naiicy f. Hartwan^ 

Accounts Payable "'^ 

Coordinator /Bookkeeper 

I 

Mrs. Dorothy A. Brehin - 

Accounts Receivable 

Coordinator 

Mrs. Julia R. Forester - 
Student Receivables 
Assistant/Cashier. ^ 

Mr. Ben D. Oreskovich - 
Assistant Controller 4 



© 



t* -^r^. 



Student Services 



Mr. David C. Evans - Director, Career 
fe, Platmitig & Placement 

Mrs,, Juliana M. Wolfe - Director 
College Health Center; Head College 

.'H Nurse 

Dn^' Arthur L,^drd Jr. -.Associate Dean 
forXnternational Programs; Professor, 
^<; ' English 

I^r. William j. Broivn Jr. - Dean of 
'^^Admission and Financial Aid 

Miss Rosemary Yiihas - Dean, Student 
. ' ■■ > Services 

W'Mr. Gregory G. Stanson - Vice 
President, Enrollment & Student 
■X^ Services 

Mr. David W. Newell - Assistant. Dean 
of Student Services 




tf 



Mrs. Jennifer M. Evans - Director, Student Activities 

Mr. Richard L. Beard - Director of Arnold Sports Center; 
Derickson Hall Manager 



College Center 




Mr. David C. Evans - 

Director, Career Planning & 

Placement 

Mrs. Patricia A. Schools - 

Secretary, Student Activities 

Director and Career 

Planning & Placement 

Mrs. Jennifer M. Evanas - 
Director, Student Activities 

Ms. Kimberly A. Saunders - ^ 
Multi-Cultural Counsilor, 



Assistant Director of 
Student Activities 



^ 




52 



Vernon & Doris Bishop Library 







Ms. Julia L. Harvey - '- 
' Teelmical Services Librarian 

'' I^rs. Pamela /. Stoudt - 
■Secretary, Periodicals 
Assistant : ; 

Mr. Stanley A. Funnanak - 
... ' Systems ahd Reference^ 
Librarian 

. Mrs, Ella K. Siott - . ; 

Secretary /Cataloging '■ 

Assistant ^ 

Mrs. Susan R.*lAungstr 
Interlibrary Loan Assistant 

Mrs. Gloria J. Shutter -, 
Circulation Assistant 

Mr. Robert Paustian - 
j, Director 



Chaplain's Office 




^- 



^'r^ 



\ 

Mrs. G.Rosalyn Kujovsky - 
Secretary 

Rev. I^. Darrell Woomer I 
Chaplain -^ 




® 



Computer Services 



Ms, Crystal L. Egmi - User 
•^ Support Specialist 

Mrs. Dotfta L. Brickley - 
'■L-' Assistant 

Mrs. Sheryl A. Lemma - 

Assistant Director, 

Administrative Computing 

Mr. Eric M. Vlickinger - 
Network Support Specialist 

Mr. Michael C. Zeigler - 

Director of Academic 
Computing & User Services 

Mr. Robert J. Dillane - 
^rector, Administrative 



% 



Computing 



Mr. Robert A. Riley - Vice 
President ofXomputing and 
,; Telecommunications 



y, ^"^^ 4^ '"^ 



^^^'^^SSflfc? ' 







Art 



Ms: Marie E. Riegle-Kinch^r 
Adfitnct Instructor 

Ms. Patricia J. Fay - Chair 
and Assistant Proffssor 

% ' " ■ 

Ms. Leslie Bowen - Lecturer 

Dr:%eQ Mazow - Assistant 
Professor and Director of the 
I ' Gallery 





j^iijsi^sj^s^:d^-- 



Biology 




, ^ i;.^; * 




Chemistry 




Dr. Stacey A.Hazen - 
Assistant Prhfessor 

. Dr. Allan F. Wolfe - 
Professor 

Dr. Dale Ji Erskine - , 

Professor; Director of Yotitli 

Scholars 

Dr. Sidney Pollack - 
Professor 

Dr. PanlL. Wolf ^ Chair and 
Professor 

Dr. Susan E. Verhoek - 
Professor 



Mrs. Cyntftia R. fohnston - 
Adjunct Instructor 

Mr. ^arcus B. Home - 
Stockroom Coordinator & 
Chemical Hygiene Officer 

Dr. Phtbp /. Oles -Assistant 
Professor 

Dr. Carl T. Wigal - , 
Associate Professor • 

Dr. Richard D. Cornelius - 
Chair and Professor 

Dr. Owen A. Moe Jr. - ; 
■ Professor 



^iSf^ 



JLv 



55 






Economics and Political Science 



: Dr. Jeanne C. Hey - 
Associate Professor, 
Economics 

Dr. Paul A. Heise - Associate 
. Professor, Economics 

Dr. D. Eugene Brown - 
Professor, Political Science 

Dr. John p. Norton, III - 
Chair; Professor, Political 
' Science 




i: 



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>2»«Qs«a 



New Professors Join the Lebanon Valley Faculty 



w. 



1th a note to record, a 
strategy to teach, and a theory 
to ponder, Mr. Jeff Snyder, Dr. 
Donald E. Kline, and Dr. Eric 
Bain-Selbo, respectively have 
begun their first year here at 
Lebanon Valley College. Hop- 
ing to bring their experience 
and knowledge to campus, 
these men are three of the six 
new, full-time professors be- 
ginning or continuing their ca- 
reers at The Valley. 

Mr. Snyder, the most recent 
professor to join the Music 
Department, as the Assistant 
Director of Music Technology, 
and Dr. Kline, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Education, Blair's 



other major department's 
newest faculty member, have 
important characteristics in 
common. 

Both professors feel that 
they have much to offer their 
students because their many 
years of experience enable 
them to share with their clas- 
ses what real life is like in the 
career world today. 

As Mr. Snyder said, "I think 
I can bring the music industry 
to the students in a practical 
sense." 

Dr. Kline agrees. Having 
taught chemistry and physics 
at Annville Cleona High 
School, "My goal is to pass on 
what I've learned over the last 



30 years in the classroom. 1 
can give students first-hand 
experience - I've just been 
there." 

Dr. Bain-Selbo, Assistant 
Professor of Philosophy and 
Religion, has much to offer his 
students as well, and accord- 
ing to him, "I find every class 
a learning experience. I'm 
constantly learning from the 
students." 

These three professors' en- 
thusiasm about beginning the 
year here at LVC and their 
hopes to become both aca- 
demically and socially in- 
volved will certainly contri- 
bute to the growth of LVC. 
— Erin Rabuck 



© 



^- 



*•-*." 



Education 



? 


















-^■^MHHBHHE— ^L-H_A 



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English 



Ms. Linda L. Summers - 
Instructor 

Dr. Susan h. Atkinson -.^ 
Associate Professor 

Dr. Dale E. Summers -. ' 
Associate Professor 

Dr. Donald Kline - Assistant 
Professor 

Dr. Michael A. Grella - 
Chair and Professor 







Dr. John P. Kearney - 
Professor 

Dr. Ehylis C. Dryden - i 

Associate Professor; Director 

of Honors Program 

Dr. Kevin Burleigh Pry - 
Lecturer 

iPY. Gary Grieve-Carlson - 
Chair and Professor 

Dr. Mary K. Pettice - 
Assistant Professor ■ 

Dr. Phillip A. Billings - 
Professor 



® 



*?': 



Mathematical Sciences 



Dr. Bryan y. Hearsey -Chair 
and Prof essor 

f 
Dr. Patrick Brezver - 

Assistant Professor 

Dr. Jenny E. Dorringtoti - 
'^Assistant Prof essor 

Dr. Kenneth Yarnall - 
,^. Assistant Professor 

Dr. Mark A. Toxvnsend - 
Professor 

Dr. Michael D. Fry - 
,^,! Professor 



Ms. Mary L. Lemons - Assistant 
jg Professor 

% 

Mr-, Jeffrey S. Snyder - Instructor; 
f^^ssistant Director of Music 
^■f Recording Technology 

Dr. ^helly Moorman-StaMman - 
Assistant Professor; Cd-Director of ■ 
^ Church Music Institute 

Mr. Barry Hill -Director, Sound 
Recording Technology; Assistant 
L^ Professor 

Dr. Robert H. Hearson - Associath 
Professor; Quartet /Die Posaunen; 
f Director, Music Camp 

Mr- Phillip G. Morgan - Associate 

i^i-^ Professor ■ ,, 

B^Mark L. Mecham - Chair and 
•' Professor 

Dr. Scott H. Eggert - Profe&sor 

L Mr. Thomas M. Strohman - asf* * 
&mtsAssisfatitPr;£!fesso%,^^^,n^m 




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Music 








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^ New Professors Comment on LVC and Its Students 



:i 



10 



he psychology depart- 
ment has added Assistant Pro- 
fessor Dr. Kerrie Laguna to its 
full-time teaching staff, and 
Dr. Jenny E. Dorrington and 
Dr. Patrick Brewer have joined 
the math department as full- 
time assistant professors. 

Dr. Laguna said, regarding 
her new position, "This is an 
ideal job in a lot of ways - the 
students here, the location, 
LVC's reputation - everything 
fell into place." Dr. Dor- 
rington was hoping to return 
to the East Coast to work at a 
"four-year, relatively small 
college," while Dr. Brewer 
would only apply at a "small 
liberal arts college in a rural 
setting," although he had no 



specific area in mind. One 
of the most impressive char- 
acteristics about LVC that the 
new professors commented 
on was, according to Dr. 
Brewer, its "student-centered 
ideas." He continued bv say- 
ing that the facult\' members 
here "feel teaching undergra- 
duates is important - that is a 
rare and wonderful attitude." 
He speaks from the experi- 
ence he had attending larger 
universities where the stu- 
dents are not the school's top 
priority. 

Dr. Dorrington also remark- 
ed that, "I find the students 
very willing to work here, 
which is a contrast to some of 
the other schools at which r\'e 
taught." She said that in the 



future, after she gets to know 
her math students better, she 
would either like to teach a 
subject not in the regular cur- 
riculum or work with stuclents 
doing individual research. Dr. 
Laguna said, "I'd like to get to 
know the students personallv, 
not just as faces in the crowd." 
She has high expectations that 
she will be able to teach her 
students to "sort through all 
of the popular information re- 
lated to psychologv and ha\'e 
a sense of what is valuable 
and what is not. This is the 
theme that unites my teach- 
ing." 

These new professors will 
certainly contribute greatly to 
LVC's success. 
— Erin Rabuck 



■-'( 



f^ 



Psychology 




Dr. Stephen M. Specht -' 
Associate Professor 

Dr. Deanna L. Dodsou - 
Assistant Professor 

Dr. Salvatore S. Cullari - 
Chair and Professor , 

Dr. Louis Mauza - Assistant 
Professor 

Dr. Kerrie D. Laguna - 
Assistant Professor 



® 



r 



nir. Michael A. Day, Chair 
E- and Professor 

Dr. Barry L. Hurst, 
|. Associate Professor 




Physics 




Sociology and Social Work 






Dr, Carolyn R. Hanes - Chair 
pi: and Professor 

Mrs. Sherry H. Raffield - 
ii'^ssociate Professor 

I\^rs. Sharon O. Arnold - 
^xAssociate Professor 



M^. Marianne Goodfellow 
f' Lecturer 

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Athletics 



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■» •«•«. 




'oil will never know the meaning of the word 
''teamwork-' unless you attend an LVC athletic 
event. Once you cross the bridge to get to the 
William H. Arnold fields, you will see the veiy best 
in terms of athleticism, scholarship, and char- 
acter. The school year of 1997-98 was no ex- 
ception. 

In field hockey, there were standouts such as 
senior Casey lezzi and team, who were MAC cham- 
pions; in basketball, there was Andy Panko and 
team, who were EC AC Division III Southern Re- 
gional champions. Each of the members of their 
respective teams throughout the year gave the 
team their all and made LVC proud. It is the haid 
work put forth by every LVC athlete and their 
teammates that consistently gives them the thrill 
of knowing that every effort was invested in their 
success. 
— Joshua !\. Lindeman 






Castinc^ Impressions 






Sirfj 



Football 

Dutchmen Look for a New Tradition 



A 



new football season, new si- 
tuations, and a new coaching staff 
may be the change that will give a 
boost to the Flying Dutchmen's 
1997 strategy to succeed. Head 
coach Dave Murray and assistant 
coaches Mark Brezitsky, Michael 
Cerasuolo, Bert Conklin, Gary Moy- 
er, Jason Pettice, and Matt Schell are 
working together with the nearly 80 
member football team to make this 
season the start of a winning tradi- 
tion. 

Although there is "no magical so- 
lution to success, if we work hard 
everyday, we will get better every- 
day," said Murray. This hard work 



is making the transition to a new 
year smooth for both the coaches 
and the players. Senior Win Heisey 
said that even though there has 
been little time, adjustments are 
happening. "It seems like things 
will work well," said Heisey. Mur- 
ray echoed this statement by saying 
that it has taken time, but that the 
"team is working extremely hard. 
We have outstanding student ath- 
letes in the program which are en- 
joyable to coach." 

"The intensity level is higher, 
and people are enjoying it more. 
There seems to be a new enthusi- 
asm for the game," said Heisey. 
— Ellen Gehr 




^ 




Junior Randy Kostelac fights to run away from members of the opposmg team 

Dutchmen players rush m to tackle their opponent and stop his advancement with the 

hall 



© 




Students, parents, faculty members and 
alumni enjov the football game during 
Homecoming Weekend. 




^liMi 



i 





Coach Murray reviews a play with his team during a timeout from the game. 
After a successful turn m the game, Darry Yocum screams with excitement. 




65 



Gheerleading 

Squad Members Work Hard to Get 
Audience Excited and Involved 



i» i.iL-nitMiK£ 



w„ 



hen talking about teamwork, 
it is necessary to mention the cheer- 
leaders because they are re- 
sponsible for getting the crowd to- 
gether in cheers and chants for both 
the football and basketball teams. 
Their positivity and encouragement 
during the athletic events entertains 
the crowd and motivates the team 
members to put forth their best ef- 
fort. Although small in number, the 
fall and winter cheerleading squads 
definitely got crowds riled up, while 
working hard to improve their rou- 
tines and stunts even more than 
before. 

Under the leadership of senior 



members such as Jason Lausch, Kim 
McCabe, Greg Wilson, and Camer- 
on Manahan the team progressed 
steadily, game after game. Those 
seniors, along with all of the other 
members of the squad proved that 
cheerleading is most definitely a 
sport, deserving of recognition, par- 
ticularly because of the quantity of 
time and energy it requires. Only 
one aspect of cheerleading is that 
original dance routines need to be 
designed, learned, practiced and 
then performed under the heat of 
the moment at events. Fortunately 
the cheerleaders have been success- 
ful at accomplishing their goals. 
— loshua N. Lindeman 





During the Annual Homecoming Weekend celebration, the crowd watches both the 

football game and the cheerleaders. 



® 



Members of the squad concentrate on the action of the game. 



Kim McCabe, Jason Lausch and Lisa Becker 
cheer to the crowd, trying to get them 
interested in the action on the field. 




During the Winter Season, Jason Lausch cheers at one of the basketball games in his fourth 
and final year on the squad. 

The cheerleaders work hard to prove that their squad has improved throughout the year. 



® 



. . -., ... A^ 



'4 



i 



Field Hockey 

LVC Field Hockey Team Enjoys 
Extremely Successful Season 












_ -^r 



he women of the Lebanon Val- 
ley Field Hockey team worked per- 
fectly together in the 1997 season. 
They ended up with a 20-2 overall 
record. Due to the team's hard work 
and excellent sportsmanship, LVC 
qualified for the NCAA Division III 
Championships and, while there, 
advanced to the Final Four. This 
season was the finest in LVC ath- 
letic history, not only because of 
how far the school advanced within 
the division, but also because our 
campus was the home of the NCAA 
Final Four. Excited for the players, 
LVC students showed up in mas- 
sive numbers to every game pos- 



sible. 

Throughout the season, the list of 
individual awards grew to over a 
page in length: captain Cori NOlen 
participated in the MAC common- 
wealth League All Star 1st team. 
One of the highlights of the season 
was when Casey lezzi, forward, 
made it to the GTE Academic All- 
America College Division Women's 
Fall/Winter At-Large Team. Other 
senior contributors were captains 
Tanya Sangrey and Erin Schmid, 
both leaders in goals and assists. 
Becky Elliot and Joanna Bates were 
also recognized as distinguished 
athletes. 
— Joshua N. Lindeman 




V. 











Senior forward Casey lezzi watches the action, hoping to take control of the ball. 
Alicia Fioravanti, also a forward, scrambles to keep the ball away from the opposition, ^ 



® 



•i ffiL.*. * •<>■ Jj-J <^ -^ k 



Team captain Erin Schmid prepares to pass 
to a teammate. 

In one of her last LVC games, senior and 
co-captain, Tanya Sangrey puts the ball 
back into plav. 




j Con Nolen concentrates on carrying out the play at hand 



't«l^B After winning the game, Becky Elliot and other members of the team congratulate each 



other 



iiwiwiriiniiin^- 







Volleyball *^-^*- 

Lady Dutchmen Make it to Semi-Finals 
in Women's Volleyball Tournament 

O 



n Saturday, September 20, 
1997, over fifty ladies gathered to- 
gether in Lynch Gymnasium to par- 
ticipate in the fifth annual Flying 
Dutchmen Volleyball Tournament. 
The participating teams included 
Delaware Valley College, King's 
College and Ursinus College among 
others. LVC played exceptionally 
well in the tournament, making it to 
the semi-finals. Coach Wayne Perry 
was pleased with his team. He said, 
"We played ten games. Six of them 
we played very well, and four of 
them we just couldn't get through." 
Coach Perry felt that the team had a 
good defense, and good serving. 



What he feels the team needs to 
work on is passing the ball. 

LVC's first preliminary game was 
against St. Mary's College. They 
were able to defeat SMC in the 1st 
game, but lost the 2nd and 3rd 
games. 

Eventually, LVC advanced to the 
semi-finals to play DVC. In the first 
game, in spite of the hard work of 
sophomore center Greta Paucek, 
LVC lost with a score of 15-7. LVC 
started the 2nd game with power, 
taking a 5-0 lead, including an ace 
by center, freshman Allison Kabat. 
Despite great defense, DVC was 
able to win with a score of 15-11. 
— Vincent D'Aniello 




Coach Perry checks the score of the game being played on the court. 
Sophomore Melissa Smith jumps up to spike tlie ball, hoping to score a point. 



® 



' * 




■? 




In the midst of the game, Amy Reese 
pushes herself to control the ball. 

Greta Paucek sets the ball for her 
teammates. 




Face to face with an opponent, Melissa Smith tries to keep the ball from the other team. 
Amy Seker prepares to serve the ball. 



© 



Men's Soccer Team Victorious During 
Family Weekend 



O 



n the Saturday of Family 
Weekend, the Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege Men's Soccer team defeated 
King's College 2-1. Despite the vic- 
tory, head coach Mark Pulisic was 
very disappointed in the team. He 
feels that LVC is a much better team 
than KC's, and the game should 
have been better than a 2-1 victory. 
"KC should not have been in the 
game," he said. Coach Pulisic felt 
that the problem with the team was 
keeping a good performance 
throughout the game. 

The game began with an even 
match up. Both teams took turns 
attempting to mount an offense. 



and the respective team would 
successfully defend. Some good of- 
fensive attempts were executed by 
LVC players such as defender, 
sophomore Adam Johnston, and 
midfielder, junior Cory Thornton. 
Finally, team captain Chris 
Hartman scored a goal, assisted by 
defender Larry Larthey Jr. With 
7; 19 left in the half, he scored an- 
other goal, this time assisted by 
Johnston. After the half, LVC had 
17 shots on goal, and KC had only 
2. Although KC tested LVC's de- 
fense, LVC did a good job defend- 
ing including some good defensive 
maneuvering by players like Na- 
than Wade. 
— Vincent D'Aniello 






m 







W 



4 



4n> ., 



' — *'''*''"^^>nftss^»rr".; 




F \ 



M- ^• 



V 



ir 



.^i^ 

^ 



Midfielder Jason Piazza runs quickly to maintain control of the ball. 
Adam Johnston, a sophomore, prepares to pass the ball to a teammate. 



4 



© 




j<r^«*aL 



In his final year at LVC, forward Steve 
Raab works hard to bring success to 
Lebanon Valley's team. 

Newcomer, Eric Gervase is one of many 
freshman who contributes greatly to the 
team. 




Co-Captain Chris Hartman stretches to maintain control of the hall. 
Cory Thornton watches closely to see where the ball will land. 



® 




Pi:--V,1! 



-WI^<-#i 



"'j^'^g' , 



Women's Soccer Team Falls to 
Susquehanna University 



O 



n Saturday, October 4th, the 
Lebanon Valley College Women's 
Soccer team lost their MAC Com- 
monwealth League match to Sus- 
quehanna University at a score of 
16-1. The team has yet to win a 
league game and their overall re- 
cord is 2-7. 

The game began with both teams 
alternating on offense, with the re- 
spective team defending, until fi- 
nally Susquehanna managed to get 
one past LVC's defense. After the 
score, Suscjuehanna played strong 
defense, keeping LVC from getting 
near the goal. After Susquehanna's 
second goal, LVC continued to have 






i-V^ 



^ -^ 



« 



difficulty getting past the defense. 
Some good attempts were made, 
however, by players such as mid- 
fielder, senior captain Christina 
Henise. 

In the beginning of the second 
half, LVC played more aggressive- 
ly. They played good defense, and 
were able to mount a more power- 
ful offense over SU. Finally, with 
32:38 left in the half, back, fresh- 
man Michelle Hartman put the ball 
in the goal, making the score 3-1. 

It was not a terrible day for goal- 
keeper Michele Weber. Despite the 
six goals that got by her, 22 of them 
did not. 
— Vincent D'Aniello 









'^^ 



*jfc. 1 ' .if*.—*" 



© 



, ■^*SE,^A'^' ^ ^iS8!* ^*^*ia.-. 3fc».t K.v ^ .» 



Danica Brown pushes the hall closer and closer to the goal 
Senior midfielder Michelle Luecker throws the ball back into plav. 




^ $^ 



Serenity Roos attempts to get the hall past a 
memher of the opposite team. 

Senior Chrissy Henise stops the ball and 
skillfullv reverses its direction. 




Talitha Meyer tries to guess how close to her the ball will be when it lands. 
Senior forward Jeanette Tobin runs after the ball to maintain control. 



® 



.i:^ 



Cross Country 

Team Hosts LVC Invitational 



ort Indiantown Gap — 
Warm temperatures and sunny 
skies set the stage for the LVC 
cross country teams' one and 
only home meet of the year - the 
Lebanon Valley College Invita- 
tional, held Saturday, September 
13, at Memorial Lake State Park. 

Both women's and men's 
teams placed fourteenth 
teamwise, the women competing 
against 24 schools, the men, 25. 
The College of New Jersey 
claimed both team titles. 

Leading the charge for the La- 
dy Flying Dutchmen was fresh- 



man Melissa Black, who com- 
pleted the 3.1 mile course in 
21:42, good for an impressive 
40th place finish. 

Another freshman, James 
Mentzer, led the way for the 
men's squad, covering the 5-mile 
course in 28:44, 49th out of 246 
total runners. Sophomore Pete 
Lobianco came through with a 
54th place fmish. 

"I felt good; there were a lot of 
people, but it's a nice course, 
running over the dam and every- 
thing. It's a tough course, but it 
was a great day," said Mentzer. 
— Braden Snvder 













33^»;.*!feS»^x"iSSfe9V^, A.^ 




Freshman Anna Malocu runs in one of her first 
collegiate invitationals. 

Members of the Men's Cross Country Team 
prepare to begin their run. 



— Norton finishes 66th at the LVC Invitational. 






® 








lunior Cindv Perroth warms up before the race begins. 

At the LVC Invitational, senior Jason Badman finishes 202nd with a time of 34:23. 







'I'^A..' 



•" I 



m 



Women's Tennis 

Team of Six Works to Improve 
Attendance 



unior Karlin Schroeder concentrates on her next shot. 
Misty Piersol prepares to return the ball. 




he lady dutchmen look 
for team support, reliability 
and availability for all the 
matches this season, as 
they have come into it with 
only six players on the ros- 
ter. With six singles and 
three doubles that means a 
"no-show" equals a forfeit 
loss. 

However, for the first 
three matches of the sea- 
son, the girls all attended, 
and the results weren't bad 
at all. The lady dutchmen 
are 0-3, but with losses 
against well respected 
teams, including a tight 5-4 
loss against King's College. 
The rest of the season 
should fare much better. 



Coach Myers said, "Well, 
this season shouldn't be too 
bad, as long as our players 
can make it to every match. 
Actually, we improved 
over last season, despite the 
shortage of players this 
year." 

The lady dutchmen sm- 
gles line-up consists of 
Misty Piersol at the #1 po- 
sition, Karlin Schroeder at 
#2, Melissa Fritz at #3, Sta- 
cey Helhowski at #4, Bran- 
die May at #5 and Tara 
Casimiro rounding up the 
line-up at #6. With only six 
players, the idea of "team 
concept" should play an 
important role with the 
team this season. 
— Christopher Dean 




In one of her last matches, senior Melissa Fritz follows through and waits for the return. 
Schroeder jumps to make a shot. 



© 



V^ A /" 




en's Baskeifeall? 



Dutchmen Overpower Number Six 
Ranked Wilkes University 



A, 



.fter an up and down week fea- 
turing two wins in four tries, the 
men's basketball team took their 
frustrations out on February 9th on 
the sixth ranked team in the nation, 
Wilkes University, winning 104-78. 

Leading the way for the 
Dutchmen were All-American An- 
dy Panko and inside force Dan 
Pfeil, Panko led all scorers with 25 
points and added 10 rebounds, 
while Pfeil contributed 12 points 
and grabbed a game high 11 re- 
bounds. 

What made this blowout possi- 
ble, though, was a total team effort. 
Keith Phoebus and Joe Terch con- 



t r i b u t e d 18 and 12 points, 
respectively. Steve Horst and Ross 
Young also added 7 points apiece, 
and Jason Vogtman hit the Coloni- 
als up for 9 points. 

After a rocky week on the road, 
with losses at Moravian and FDU- 
Madison, the Dutchmen were hap- 
py to be back in the friendly con- 
fines of Lynch Gymnasium. Even 
with the rough week, the 
Dutchmen still hold a one game 
lead in the Commonwealth League 
of the MAC. 

Also, Panko was named to the 
ECAC honor roll for the week of 
February 3rd in the Metro region. 
— Eric White & Rav McCartv 





Sophomore center Dan Pfeil searches for a teammate to pass the ball to. 

As his opponent tries to take possession of the liall, Andy Panko prepares to pass the ball 

to an open teammate. 



© 




Joe Terch prepares to block a shot from 
Messiah. 




Mark Wisler watches the action, waiting for his chance to join in. 

Sophomore Keith Phoebus looks for an opening, so he can pass the ball and set up a shot. 



® 



'-*, ' ' 



Women's Baskdtl?all 

Women Follow in Men's Footsteps, 
Ending Fourth in MAC 



he Lady Dutchmen dosed out 
the regular season with a bang - 
winning three games straight, and 
also ended the MAC season tied 
with Moravian College for 4th pla- 
ce. The team's 16-7 record is be- 
lieved to be the best ever in school 
history. 

When looking at the table of re- 
sults that the Lady Dutchmen have 
achieved, outstanding players were 
fourth year players and seniors 
Kathy Ziga and Tricia Rudis, Ziga 
being the high scorer in about sev- 
enty percent of the games played. 
Also, Rudis was the leading re- 
bounder with 8.2 rebounds per 



game. Chrissy Henise was the top 
player in assists throughout almost 
eighty percent of the games. Melis- 
sa Brecht, Henise, Serenity Roos, 
and Ziga were all named the the 
MAC Winter All- American Team. 

Peg Kauffman, the team's coach 
in her fifth year, led these girls to a 
record-setting season. Kauffman, 
along with her three senior cap- 
tains, Chrissy Henise, Tricia Rudis, 
and Kathy Ziga, who were each in 
their fourth and final on the Leba- 
non Valley team, brought in a 14-7 
overall record for the season and a 
6-6 Leagues record, for the wom- 
en's basketball program. 
— Joshua N. Lindeman 




While running past obstacles on the court, Serenity Roos manages to maintain control of 

the ball. 




® 



Senior co-captain Kathy Ziga surveys her position and prepares to take a shot. 



Tricia Rudis tries to fight her wav out of a 
mob of opposing plavers. 

Senior Chrissy Henise dodges Messiah's 
players, and makes a move toward the 
basket. 




Serenity runs neck and neck with the other team, to take possession of the ball 

As fans look on, Kathy Ziga runs through her options about what move to make next. 












if^V>-<^v 



sc-.A 'M^^i 



Swimming 



Swim Team Works Hard to Improve 
Skills Throughout the Season 



X— /ebanon Valley's swim team 
once again met the challenges of 
two very competitive teams this 
week. Their first, at home, was 
against Drew University. In the face 
of the opposing team's immature 
antics, the Dutchmen stayed strong 
and although they did not win in 
the meet, won in maturity. 

The men's team kept up with 
Drew fairly well but in the end 
came out with a score of 34 to 
Drew's 77. Highlights include Da- 
mon Davis coming in second in the 
fifty meter freestyle with at time of 
27.88. This time ensured him a pla- 
ce in MAC'S. 



Keeping up with the men, the 
women remained strong but lost 
with a score of 63 to Drew women's 
104. Leading the fight with third 
place finishes were Katie Riddle in 
the 50 meter freestyle; Shannon 
Feather in the 200 meter individual 
medley, also qualifying for MAC's; 
Kris Haines in the 100 meter back- 
stroke; and the relay team of Katie 
Riddle, Janel Dennis, Kris Haines 
and Jessica Kindt. 

The dutchmen also went away to 
Widener University, where the men 
scored 12 against Widener's 106 
points, and where the women un- 
fortunately lost 29-107. 
— Tracie Miller 



-. lA.iffr 




Stiphomore swimmer Kristina Haines tries to overcome her opponents the race and win the freestyle event in orcJer to secure points for LVC 







In her second year on the women's 
swimming team, Kara Nagurny works to 
increase her speed in the ivater. 

Daria Kovarikova and Kara Nagurnv watch 
their teammates and congratulate their 
success. 




® 



Dutchmen's Loss Against 
Elizabethtoivn College Upsets Season 



he Lebanon Valley College 
wrestling team traveled to King's 
College on Saturday, February 7th, 
for a tri-meet which also included 
nationally ranked Elizabethtown 
College. Unfortunately, the team 
suffered two losses, losing 40-8 to 
King's and 42-15 to Elizabethtown, 
The lone bright spots were the per- 
formances of Ted Kemmerling and 
Kris Bailey, who each went 2-0 on 
the day. 

Against Elizabethtown, Kemmer- 
ling and Bailey each received for- 
feits. The other Dutchmen points 
came courtesy of Louis Chandler, 
who decisioned Rich Buchwald 9-4 



at 124. 

Against the hosts, Kemmerling 
gained a 27-11 technical fall win 
over Alan Mosca at 150 pounds. 
Bailey picked up an 8-2 decision of 
Liam Kingdon at 167. 

Earlier in the week, the 
Dutchmen hosted Gettysburg Col- 
lege in a non-conference meet and 
came up on the losing end again by 
the score of 43-6. Again Kemmer- 
ling won his match, but he was 
given his stiffest test of the season, 
downing Chris Beck 10-8. 

With three losses the Dutchmen 
finished the regular season with a 
record of 2-13. 
— Kirk Yagel 









Senior Joseph Howe works hard to pin his opponent in one of his last Lebanon Valley wrestling matche 



Each year, the members of the wrestling 
team work hard to improve their slcills. 




Joe Howe sl<illfiillv tal<cs the upper hand in his fight to win 

After a long match, the referee finally raises Howe's arm in victory. 



® 




T^'' &. "!. 



Basefeall 



LVC Baseball Improves from 1997; 
Seniors Shine Throughout Season 



he Flying Dutchmen dosed out 
their 1998 campaign with three 
more wins than in 1997, making 
head coach John Gergle proud of 
his fourth season with the team. His 
two assistant coaches, John Gabriel 
and Joseph Yacklovich contributed 
advice and leadership to the team as 
well . 

Senior Jon Fetterman was captain 
of the scjuad this year and had one 
of the highest batting averages. An- 
other senior, Doug Speelman, was a 
perfect 3-3 at the plate this season, 
giving him the highest batting aver- 
age of his career. 

Once again, the team also trav- 



eled out of state during break for 
spring training. This year, the trip 
was made to Florida, where the Fly- 
ing Dutchmen had the opportunity 
to play against teams such as, 
Christopher Newport, Loras Col- 
lege, Northwood University and the 
College of West Palm Beach. 

Overall, the club came in with a 
successful! 0-1 8 record for the sea- 
son, and an 8-6 MAC Common- 
wealth League record, playing 
against schools including Millers- 
ville, Juniata, York, Alvernia, and 
Gettysburg. Lebanon Valley fin- 
ished third in the MAC, five spots 
higher than expected for this year. 
— Joshua N. Lindeman 





Junior Greg Steckbeck jumps on the base after a successful hit 
Hoping to strike out the batter, pitcher Doug Speelman winds up to release the ball 



® 




■w w 




The players gather on the pitcher's mound 
to discuss their next strategy. 

Catcher Mike Kocher puts on his equipment 
and prepares to go back into the game. 





Senior Justin Foura follows through and watches his hit before beginning to run. 

Jon Fetterman moves quickly to trap the ball before it passes him and travels to the 
outfield. 



® 



&f^yifjiii-e.-!aish:-sSiKi:6^ 



Softball 



Women of Softball Team Complete Best 
Season in Lebanon Valley History 




he final game of the season 
versus Moravian proved to be a 
tough one for the Flying Dutchmen, 
but Lebanon Valley held together 
and completed the season with an 
18-20 overall record and a 6-8 MAC 
Commonwealth League record. 
Even before their last game, the 
team had already won five more 
games than any other team in 
school history. 

Freshman Jessica Lanclis came off 
the season with the highest batting 
average but she was not that far 
ahead of senior members Christina 
Henise, co-captain and Jeanette To- 
bin, both with high batting aver- 



ages. Pitcher, co-captain, and soph- 
omore Amy Zellers was a highlight 
of the season, as well, having the 
lowest ERA. 

Although the team will lose two 
top players, seniors Chrissy Henise 
and JEanette Tobin, the coaching 
staff and the players look forward 
to having an even more successful 
season in 1999. They hope to build 
a tradition of improvement, going 
from a record of 13-14-1 in the 
1997 season, to the current record, 
to one even more impressive. 

The team also traveled over 
spring break, and played against 
teams from schools such as LaSalle. 
— Joshua N. Lindeman 




Senior Chrissy Henise and her fellow teammates prepare to take their positions in the 

outfield. 







Amy Zellers winds up for the pitch 



I 



While at second base, Angel Galloway 
retrieves the ball and prepares to throw it 
in. 

Serenity Roos prepares to trap the ball 
before it passes her. 




Freshman plaver, Brandic May fields the ball in one of her first collegiate games. 
Short stop Kellv Pannebccker passes the ball hoping that the runner will be tagged out. 







' Track and Field *" 

LVC Teams to Compete at MAC's 



he LVC track teams, armed 
with four NCAA Division III na- 
tional qualifiers, will make another 
run for the MAC team cham- 
pionships on Friday May 1st and 
Saturday, May 2nd at Widener Uni- 
versity. 

The fight for the gold should be a 
nip and tuck battle on the men's 
side. The Flying Dutchmen appear 
to be in a position to win their first 
MAC track and field title ever, after 
back-to-back victories over rival 
Susquehanna. After edging them 
out by seven points at the 
Dutchmen Invitational on April 4, 
the Dutchmen then went on to 
squeak by the Crusaders by one 



point 123-122, in winning the Mes- 
siah Invitational. 

Senior Tony Bernarduci returns 
to defend his MAC title in the jave- 
lin. The three time national qualifier 
is ranked second in the javelin in 
Division III. 

The women's squad will be in the 
hunt of the team title as well. The 
team will be fronted by sophomore 
Ann Musser, who placed first in 
both the shot put and discus throws 
at last year's outdoor MAC meet, 
and won her second MAC indoor 
title in the shot put this winter. The 
two-time All-American is ranked 
fifth in Division III in the discus and 
eighth in the shot put. 
— Braden Snyder 




■ii^ A. ,4^ 




Sophomore Ann Musser winds up for a throw. 
Rick Hopf attempts to clear 6'9" in the high jump. 



® 




Senior Dan Palopoli paces himself during a 
distance race. 

James Unger puslies himself to complete a 
successful jump. 




Freshman Kelly Ulrich tries to regain her breath after a long run. 

In one of his last meets, Tony Bernarduci prepares to throw the javelin. 



® 



Men's Tennis 

LVC Tennis Team Finishes 11-17 




he LVC Men's Tennis team 
did something this year in league 
play that they haven't done in a 
long time. They lost. It took three 
gruelling seasons, but Albright, 
Messiah, and Elizabethtown fi- 
nally exorcised the demons and 
exacted revenge on the LVC 
squad. 

Despite losing their first match 
to Moravian in 1995, the men's 
tennis team rebounded to win 
their last five matches of the sea- 
son. They continued their inner- 
league dominance all of last year 
as well, destroying their oppo- 



nents and finishing undefeated, 
6-0. This year, such luck was no 
on LVC's side. 

After starting the season 2-0, 
with wins against Moravian and 
Widener, the men's tennis team 
ventured into unchartered terri- 
tory, keeping a 130 game inner- 
league win streak intact. Unfor- 
tunately for LVC, losses to Al- 
bright and Messiah, toward the 
latter part of the season, sealed 
the team's fate. The team ended 
at 3-3 in the league on the sea- 
son. 
— Christopher Dean 





Senior Sean Quinn follows through after returning 
the ball. 

Dave Ferrari looks up to a high ball, and prepares 
to send it back to his opponent. 

Brock Ford pushes himself to earn points during 
a/J^^^ his match. 




© 





Quinn takes a few practice swings before he begins. 

Josh Shellenberger opens the match by preparing to serve the ball. 




Golf 

1998 Team Breaks Records in 
MAC Competition 

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■ oming off an overall 
record of 7-7 in the regular 
season and 3-3 in the MAC 
Commonwealth League, 
the 1998 Golf team was 
ranked in 3rd place 
(missing 2nd place by only 
5 strokes) in the MAC 
Championships. This 
LVC's highest finish ever in 
the MAC Championships 
and 8 places better than last 
season's 11 th place final re- 
sult. 

LVC senior Mike Uhler 
was 10th overall in the 



MAC Championships, 
earning himself a top 10 
medal. Uhler had one of 
the lowest rounds in the 
regular season, too. Also re- 
ceiving a MAC medal was 
freshman member John 
Brennan who finished the 
regular season with the 
lowest average game. LVC 
says goodbye to six senior 
members of the team, but 
the 1999 season is just 
around the corner ready for 
new faces and another 
great performance. 
— Joshua N. Lindeman 



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Jeff Kashivvagi concentrates on the lining himself up perfectly. 
Dan Bricklev makes his way through the course. 



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Feature Athletes 

The Quittapahilla Staff proudly honors the 
following seniors as the 1998 Feature Athletes: 



Jason Badman 

Joanna Bates 

Brian Berling 

Anthony Bernarduci 

Dan Brickley 

Brian Burke 

Christopher Dean 

Paul Donahue 

Matthew Eicher 

Becky Elliott 

Jon Fetterman 

Brock Ford 

Robert Ford 

Cherie Forry 

Justin Foura 

Mike Frentz 

Melissa Fritz 

Patrick Groft 

Christopher Hartman 

Edwin Heisey 

Lynne Heisey 

Chrissy Henise 




Robert Horn 
Rick Hornberger 

Joe Howe 
Wei-Kai Huang 

Casey lezzi 

Shannon Jarmol 

Wayne Knaub 

Daria Kovarikova 

Eric Kurtz 

Jason Lausch 

Stacy Lavin 

Michelle Luecker 

Cameron Manahan 

Salim Mancho 

Kim McCabe 

Cori Nolen 

Jocelyn Norton 

Dan Palopoli 

Joe Pearson 

Jerry Pfarr 

Steve Raab 

Laura Robinson 



Thea Roomet 
Tricia Rudis 

Tanya Sangrey 
Erin Schmid 

John Schmidt 

Jeff Sherk 

Dave Smith 

Jennifer Smith 

Doug Speelman 

Dave Staub 
Anthony Thoman 

Jeanette Tobin 

Jake Tshudy 

Mike Uhler 

James linger 

Wendy Warner 

Greg Wilson 

Mark Wisler 

Gentarro Yui 

Kathy Ziga 

Kelly Zimmerman 




--«sa«*sfa .«*fca6,«<>'*ii 









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Orc^anizations 



rom the beginning of tlie academic year at tlie 
Activities Fair to tlie very end of tiie year at tlie 
annual Spring Arts Festival and Alumni Weekend. 
Lebanon Valley College's organizations keep busy 
planning activities and events. Tlien entire student 
body is welcome to become involved and there is 
an organization to interest everyone, ranging 
from service fraternities like Alpha Phi Omega to 
religious groups such as PROJECT. 

We majority of the campus activities are plan- 
ned and carried out by LVC's organizations and 
provide entertainment and education for the stu- 
dents and faculty alike. Tlie dedication and crea- 
tivity of each member leads to the success of each 
organization and its endeavors, which usually 
leaves a lasting impression in the minds of the 
students. 
— Julie Repman 



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The yearbook office not 
only serves as a meeting 
place but also as the 
home of copies of near- 
ly every LVC yearbook 
published from 1900 to 
the present day. 



Quittapahilla 




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Greenblotter Literary Society 



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Spring Arts Committee 







Programming Board 

Programming Board Attends Conference in Syracuse 




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n the weekend of October 23rd-26th, six LVC 
students accompanied bv Jennifer Evans and Dave 
Newell were thoroughly entertained and educated at 
the Stardatc '97 conference in Syracuse, New York. 

At this conference, repre- 
sentatives from other colleges 
and universities participated 
in various programming 
workshops and spent their 
time being critics to a line-up 
of comedians. Coffeehouse 
singers, speakers, and various 
bands. 

The weekend providecl sug- 
gestions for campus programs that seem to be failing 
or never getting off the ground. Chairperson of the 
Programming Board, Amanda Lee said that she 
wants people to know that she is in the process of 
organizing the ideas that she learned in one of the 




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educational workshops offered. 

An important phase in the search for the best 
comedians, singers, speakers, and bands includes 
narrowing down the field of performers in terms of 
economics. Since the majority of the programs range 
from $1,200 to $1,500, many 
times it is nearly impossible to 
get all the best acts for our 
budget. Lee commented, "I 
was very excited to see the 
interest of the other five stu- 
dents and two faculty who ac- 
companied me on this trip. I 
hope that this kind of enthusi- 
asm continues in the future." 
The conference offered the 
LVC representatives a chance to see what is out 
there and discuss the ways these programs can be 
successfully incorporated into the campus calendar. 
— Kate Clark 



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Class Officers 




Class of 2001 



Class of 1998 




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Class of 2000 



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Accounting Club 





Phi Beta Lambda 



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Chemistry Club 







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Biology Club 




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Psychology Club 



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Student Pennsylvania State 
Education Association 




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Music Educators National 
Conference 






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Sigma 
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Sinfonians warm up the grill for their annual 
hamburger and cheeseburger sale during Spring 
Arts Weekend 



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Alpha Psi Omega 



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Alpha Phi Omega 




APO 




LVC Alumni visit the APO table, 
manned by Jon Pentecost. 







Habitat for Humanity 



Group of Students Plans Second Trip to Circleville 



A 



group of 45 LVC students are planning to take 
a trip to Circleville, West Virginia to build houses as 
a part of Habitat for Humanity. This year marks the 
second year that a group from LVC worked at the 
Habitat site in Circleville. 

Elspeth Shumway is organizing 
the trip this year and said that they 
are going to Circleville because "it is 
one of the poorest and most de- 
pressed areas in West Virginia." 
She also added that "about half of 
the houses in Circleville don't have 
electricity or running vk'ater." While the group is 
there, thev will be helping with the building and 
renovation of houses. Some of the houses have been 
started, while others just need some finishing touch- 
es. The group will be assisted by 10-12 plumbers. 




electricians and other experts who will be there for 

assistance. 

Sophomore Kate Laepple went to Circleville last 

year and said the experience was "really uplifting 

because you were helping someone else who never 
had a house before get their first 
home." She also added that some of t^i^ 
the people for whom the group 
built houses for were living in trail- 
ers or their houses were destroyed 
and she commented that it was a 
good feeling to watch the families ^ 
get their own house. 

In addition to the Circleville trip, 

the group also travels to Harrisburg on the second 

Saturday of every month, where they mostly work ""^ 

on renovating houses. 

— Lynne Heisey 



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109 



Council of Religious 
Organizations 




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Jeff Brenneman enjoys 
himself, while fellow senior 
members, Joel Lefferts and 
Kim Weitzel make sure that 
the Delta Tau Chi fundraiser 
runs smoothly. 



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Fellowship of Christian Athletes 




FCA 





He Is Savior 



H.I.S. 



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HIS Celebrates Contemporary Christian Sounds 



' very Thursday night a group of eight students 
meets for dinner at Mund College Center to discuss 
the business aspects of their band, "He Is Savior/' 
better known as H.I.S. This contemporary Christian 
band's mission for over fifteen 
years has been to lift up the name of 
the Lord Jesus through song. The 
group keeps this theme in mind 
when they select their musical pro- 
grams. Their musical sets usually 
consists of a variety of praise songs 
with both fast and slow tempos. 
H.I.S.'s concert tour is compiled of many performan- 
ces at various churches as well as at LVC's Spring 
Arts celebration. 

Besides diverse music, there is also a variety of 
musicians, each whom offers his or her own unique 




styles. Jared Spidel, the band's president, also dis- 
plays his musical ability on stage as the bassist while 
Matt Stone plays the guitar. Doug Calaman can also 
be heard pounding on the drums when he is not 
busy coordinating the show as the music director. 
Sitting off on the wing is Hilary 
McLaughlin, the pianist, who plays 
the sweet melodies for the three 
singers: Heather Strunk (alto). Ken 
Horst (bass) and Trent Hollinger 
(tenor). 

H.I.S. is not a band about profit. 
"It's all bout showing people that 
praising God can be a lot of fun," 
explained Strunk. "My spiritual gift is in music, and 1 
want to share it with others by spreading the word 
of God," said McLaughlin. 
— Kelly Sonon 



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Praise Him with Dance 





Rainbow Troupe 





The members of Rainbow Troupe play an 
integral role in the events of Children's 
Day. 



Juggling Club 





Lvnn Crumbling, Jon Pentecost and 
Matt Grzvwacz demonstrate their 
juggling abilities, hoping to interest 
prospective members. 





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nvn before the fall semester begins each year, 
the Marching Band begins rehearsing for their 
upcoming season. Their performance at the first 
football game marks the start of the year for 
Lebanon Valley's Music Department. The various 
ensembles, comprised of both music and non- 
music majors rehearse during scheduled times to 
prepare for their recitals that occur throughout 
the year. 

Concerts such as Christmas at the Valley, Sym- 
phonic Band and Symphonic Orchestra attract not 
only students but also community members. At 
these performances, the professional sounds and 
attitudes of the musicians both entertain and ed- 
ucate the audiences who are attending the re- 
citals, and manage to satisfy the musical tastes of 
eveiy one of the listeners. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 




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Small Jazz Ensemble 




Jazz Band and Jazz Lab 



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Thf LVC liizz Band, pictured 
hore, performs on a Jazz Tour 
that is planned once a year. 
VVitli the Jazz Lab, they 
perform in an annual concert 
and at various other LVC 
functions, such as Spring Arts. 



116 





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Brass Quintets I, III, an^ III 




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Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble 





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Music Department Recitals 



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Students Bring Quality Entertainment to Campus 



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lair Music Center is famous 
for the events it offers through- 
out the semester. During recital 
evenings, it is not uncommon to 
see the music halls packed. Stu- 
dents and faculty agree that 
these recitals are a success. 

According to Dr. Mecham, 
there are several layers of recitals 
that students perform, including 
campus recitals, public recitals, 
or half or full recitals. All music 
majors must perform in at least 
one campus recital. Professors 
nominate students for half and 
full recitals. They meet in the 
spring to formulate a schedule of 



who will be performing for the 
following semester. The half re- 
citals run for 30 minutes and the 
full recitals run for an hour. The 
credit a student gets for partici- 
pating in one of the recitals goes 
toward private lessons. 

In the past, the recitals have 
been known to perform for larg- 
er than expected audiences. "1 
think the audiences are good," 
Dr. Mecham commented. "The 
advertising is good. We get cov- 
erage in the Courier, La Vic, and 
also in the local newspapers. 
There is also a marquee up in 
Blair where students can see up 
to two months of events posted." 



Students have different reac- 
tions to the crowds. "There are a 
lot of campus recitals going on. 
Guests are minimal, though, ' 
Hilary McLaughlin, a music ma- 
jor, responded. 

Opinions regarding the num- 
bers attending depend on how 
the performers are feeling during 
the day of the recital. "Most of 
the crowds are music majors, 
which is good when people get 
nervous, however, at some of the 
larger events we have a pretty 
good crowd," Amy Vituszynski, 
also a music major, replied. 

— Melanie Zartman 



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College Choir 



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College Choir Director, 
Victoria Rose, takes some 
time review the events of 
the past year with her 
students. 



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In Miller Chapel, Dr. Mecham begins 
rehearsal with vocal warm-ups. 



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Concert Choir 




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Concert Choir Tour 



Choir's Talent Entertains Audiences in Five Cities 



rom the 27th to the 31st of 
March, the members of the LVC 
Concert Choir traveled to five 
cities on the annual choir tour. 
Following their successful Home 
Concert, given only a week earli- 
er, the group visited churches in 
Virginia, South Carolina, Geor- 
gia, and Pennsylvania to perform 
their vocal selections. 

Along the way, the musicians 



had the opportunity to visit Cen- 
tennial Olympic Park and other 
sites in Atlanta, Georgia, as well 
as the beautiful and historic Co- 
lonial Williamsburg. A highlight 
of the tour was the chance to 
perform in a candlelit service in 
the Bruton Parish Church in Wil- 
liamsburg. 

On two occasions, the students 
were lodged with host families, 
manv of which took the time to 



introduce their guests to both the 
culture and the sights in the area. 
The music performed ranged 
from Leonard Bernstein's Chi- 
chester Psalms, to English folk 
songs such as Down Among the 
Dead Men. The selections and the 
students were extremely well re- 
ceived by the audiences, making 
the concert tour a great success. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 



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Alto Michelle Kercher takes a few moments to relax 
while the risers and instruments are being set up. 




Amy Schimpf and Kate Wilson 

enjoy the playground equipment •^' '' 

during a stop in Aiken, South 

Carolina. 



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Clarinet Choir 







Tom Strohman works closely with the 
group as they prepare for the "Evening 
of Woodwinds" recital scheduled to take 
place later that evening. 



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122 



Flute Ensemble 



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Music Recording Technology 

Department 




Music Recording Technology Department Makes 
Advancements and Increases Opportunities for Students 



he Music Technology Pro- 
gram has made revisions which 
will soon have LVC taking its 
place in the music industry with 
such well known school as Berk- 
lee School of Music. 

Over the past five years Mr. 
Barry Hill, Director of the Music 
Technology program has built 
this program up to the level it is 
at today. According to Mr. Hill, 
the main idea behind the music 
technology program is "to show 
students opportunities in the 
music and entertainment indus- 
tries by learning musical skills 
and learning how to use technol- 
ogy to produce entertainment 
product information - it's not just 
making records anymore." 

However, not until Mr. Jeff 
Snyder, the new Assistant Direc- 
tor of Music Technology, 
brought his connections to the 
music industry, did LVC make 
further technological advan- 
cements in this area. According 
to Mr. Hill, the "entertainment 
industry is based on networking 
and Mr. Snyder brought this to 
LVC." 

Before Mr. Snyder came to 
work at LVC he had a relation- 
ship with a global company cal- 
led Tascam, a large producer to 
technological products for the 
music industry. When he became 
a professor here, Mr. Snyder 
spoke with people at Tascam 
about exploring the future possi- 
bility of LVC and Tascam work- 



ing together. 

In preparation for the coming 
semester Mr. Hill and Mr. 
Snyder completely remodeled 
the Music Technology Depart- 
ment, located on the third floor 
of Blair. Recording Studio B, or a 
recording studio/classroom, is 
now a fully functioning studio 
which can hold an audience of 
30 people. Mr. Hill said that they 
needed a classroom/studio 
which could accommodate larger 
classes because of the increase of 
Music Technology majors. A dig- 
ital audio work sta- 
tion/classroom is another new 
room. Many new pieces of 
equipment that are used in the 
music industry today were added 
to the department's new rooms. 
It was not until the Friday before 
classes began that these rooms 
were completed. 

Mr. Hill and Mr. Snyder 
agreed that they spent at least 
1000 hours during the hot sum- 
mer building and setting up the 
Recording Studio B and the digit- 
al audio work station. They be- 
gan planning for these rooms by 
laying out general floor ideas and 
drawings, then slowly working 
to the finished products. They 
saved LVC tens of thousands of 
dollars by doing this work them- 
selves. 

Having new equipment that is 
actually used in the music indus- 
try is very important to these two 
professors, and according to Mr. 
Snyder, "we want students to be 



able to walk out of here and be 
able to find a job in the music 
industry itself, in a number of 
areas." 

Although it has not yet oc- 
curred, sometime in the near fu- 
ture LVC will be receiving equip- 
ment from Tascam in exchange 
for "offering to educate future 
industry professionals for them," 
said Mr. Snyder. 

According to Mr. Hill, "the 
uniqueness of this program is 
that it is a two-way street." If 
students can use Tascam's equip- 
ment, it will be a positive thing 
for students in gaining experi- 
ence as well as for Tascam be- 
cause they will have prospective 
employees who are already very 
knowledgeable about their pro- 
ducts. 

Jason Slenker, a senior Music 
Technology major, remarked, 
"The recent changes in the Music 
Technology program are really 
exciting. The program will defi- 
nitely provide promising futures 
for students after graduation." 
— Erin Rabuck 




Galen Kravhill, a Music Recording 
Technology major, sets up recording 
equipment before a recital in Lutz Hall. 






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Marching Band 






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Freshman Denise Grubb enjoys one 
of her first performances with the 
Marching Band. 





Trumpet player Dave Doll marches 
in the halftime show. 



Members of the pit, such as Andy Rimby, watch the drum major closely for cues 



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Greek £ife 

^he traditions that remain the backbone of all 
greek organizations are the same traditions that 
attract new members to the fraternities and so- 
rorities on the Lebanon Valley College campns. 
From animal events snch as Greek Week to the 
yearly occnrrences during the month of pledging, 
the greek happenings on campus always manage 
to draw new students into the greek family on 
campus. 

Open socials and smokers are designed to in- 
troduce prospective pledges to the fraternities and 
sororities, as well as to acquaint the current mem- 
bers with the people who will cany on their tra- 
ditions in years to come. And, pledging is a month 
long experience which teaches and reminds every- 
one of the significance of brotherhood and sis- 
terhood for every greek organization. 
— Carrie L M. Stull 




Greek Council 




Greek Council Plans Events for the Fall 




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X-Zebanon Valley College's Greek 
Council welcomes all new and retur- 
ning students to campus for the Fall 
1997 semester. Greek Council hopes 
that this will be an exciting year, espe- 
cially for freshmen who are experienc- 
ing the many facets of college life for 
the first time. 

"Meet the Greeks," which was the 
first chance for many freshmen to be- 
come acquainted with Greeks on cam- 
pus, was held Tuesday, September 3, 
1997 in the West Dining Hall. Greek 
Council considers this event a great 
success, but would like to remind stu 




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dents that there will be more chances 
to experience Greek life here at LVC. 

Throughout the semester, the 
Greeks will be sponsoring many open 
socials and opens smokers on campus. 
These events give students a fun eve- 
ning away from textbooks and compu- 
ters and the chance to meet new 
friends. Both the fraternities and soror- 
ities on campus invite all students to 
attend the fall socials and smokers. 
Greek Council President Chrissy Fritz 
also suggests that all Greeks wear their 
letters on Fridays, so they can further 
promote Greek organizations at LVC. 
— Tonia Cuff 



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Alpha Sigma Tau 



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The sisters of AST share 
friendship and gifts with 
one another- 



Gamma Sigma Sigma 




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Sue Meyers and Amanda 
Snol<e take their turn 
working at the Tic Tac Toe 
stand. 



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Kappa Lambda Nu 




Kim Rodgcrs and 
Allison Brunetti recruit 
new members at the 
Activities Fair 



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Kappa Sigma Kappa 




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Members of the 
Knights of the Valley 
sell Sno Cones at the 
Spring Arts Festival. 









Tau Kappa Epsilon 




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Phi Lambda Sigma 




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Senior Steve Lynch leads 
his Philo brothers in the 
tug-of-war event. 



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Pledging 



Pledging Update Reveals "Knight's" Plan to Donate Funds 



There is not much new to say 
about what has been going on 
with pledging. Pledges partici- 
pating in all types of activities 
can be seen and heard all over 
campus. Everyone is glad, 
though, that pledging is more 
than half over. Pledging requires 
hard work and dedication, which 
is becoming more apparent to 
the pledges every day. The prob- 
lem that most pledges are experi- 
encing is time-management. 
Mandatory study halls attempt to 



combat this problem, so that in 
the end everyone will be much 
better at balancing their time. 

One special activity coming up 
is the Lip-Synch sponsored by 
the brothers of Kappa Sigma 
Kappa. All of the details of the 
annual Lip-Synch have finally 
been settled. It will be held Tues- 
day, February 17, in Leedy Thea- 
ter. Admission is $L00 and it is 
open to the entire campus com- 
munity. Proceeds from admis- 
sion go to the Sunshine Founda 



tion. "The Sunshine Foundation 
is a non-profit organization 
whose goal is to make the 
tireams of children with life 
threatening illnesses come true, 
whether it be to go to Disney 
World or to meet their favorite 
professional athlete," explains 
Justin McCall, President of the 
Knights of the Valley. McCall ur- 
ges everyone to "come out and 
support not only Greek Life, but 
also the Sunshine Foundation." 
— Rayna Emily Schell 



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Phi Sigma Sigma 




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The Sisters of Phi SIg 
prepare for one of the 
many Greek Week 
events. 



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134 





Graduation 



0, 



'n tlw morning of May ninth. 1998, memhers of 
tlie giadnating class gatlicrcd logetlior in Ijyncli 
Gynmasium to prepare for tlie one Innulreil tiven- 
ty-ninth (commencement Sen ice at Lebanon \ al- 
ley College. 

The ceremony, complete hi7/i mnsic from the 
Symphonic Band, and an address from Mayor Ste- 
phen R. Reed of Harrishnrg. celebrated the ac- 
complishments and goals of the stndents ii/io 
spent fonr years working, learning, and achieving 
at Lebanon \ alley College. 

As they step an ay from LVC. these stndents take 
with them the memories of friendships, ex- 
periences and knowledge that have been created 
over the years. It is these memories that have 
made a lasting impression on each stndent and 
will be carried with them thronghont their lives. 
— Carrie L. M. Slull 



r^T»» 




£astin<^ Impression! 



135 



Phi Sigma Sigma sisters Danielle Hall, 
Leslie Gardiner, Melissa Patterson, Kate 
Clark and Erin Buffington gather together 
one last time before the ceremony begins. 

Tony Thoman takes a moment to exchang: 
addresses with friends. 




The seniors gather into their lines and prepare to 
begin their march to the tent. 

Volunteer staff and faculty members check to 
make sure the graduates are in the correct order. 



Field Hockey Coach, Kathy Tierney looks 
over the program with one of her star 
players, Erin Schmid. - 



136 






^^'"^^^ 



Members of the Symphonic Band perform "Pomp and Circumstance" bv Edward 
Eigar during the Processional. 





Faculty members lead the graduates mto the tent durmg the processional. 

While waiting in line. Amy Schimpf has an opportunity to take some pictures of 
friends. 





Judy Luckenbill, Kelly Mall and Joe Howe all 
get a chance to talk to friends and family 
members as they wait in line to take their 
seats. 



® 




Chaplain Woomer offers the Invocation at 
the start of the ceremony. 



Shelly Luecker and Rachael Rascoe hov 
their heads as the Chaplain speaks. 





Dr. Mark Mecham receives the Thomas Rhys 
Vickroy Distmguished Teaching Award. 

Dr. Gary Grieve-Carlson recognizes Dr. William 
McGill, Dean of Faculty 



Mayor of Harrisburg, Stephen Reed, is 
awarded an honorary Doctor of Laws by 
Dr. John Norton. 




« 




James Pete is recognized in the Commissioning 
Ceremony and ROTC Saber Presentation. 



139 



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President ot the Alumni Association, Donna 
Diehl Kuntz welcomes the graduation class 
to the association. 

Trade Gilpin waits to receive her diploma. 

Kate Clark videotapes the ceremony, 
hoping to catch some memorable moments. 





Escorted by Dr. Stephen Specht and her seeing- 

eye dog Sterling, Leslie Mader crosses the stage 

after receiving her diploma. 

Lynne Heisey is congratulated by President 

Pollick. 

Allison Bogart and Amy Borders wait anxiously to 

take the stage. 



In one of the ceremony's most touching 
moments, Kimbrin Cornelius receives her 
diploma, and a hug, from her proud father, 
chemistry professor. Dr. Richard Cornelius. 





Cori Nolen and Joceiyn Norton present 
President Rollick with the Senior Class Gift. 

Dean William McCill offers the Benediction at 
I the closing of the ceremony. 





»'-^„.il-iJ-- 



CI 



/although Lebanon Valley College is an Institu- 
tion tliat boasts of success and innovation, it is 
first and foremost a place tliat tlnives on tlie idea 
of family. Its students spend their days learning 
together with Imth their peers and tlieir profes- 
sors, in and out of the classroom. The success of 
the school's educational and social endeavors is 
without a doubt a direct result of the chain of 
support and posit ivity to which each member of 
the extended lAl^ family contributes. Students, 
parents, and faculty only succeed in making Leb- 
anon Valley's uniqueness stronger eveiy year, by 
attending events, supporting organizations, and 
working hard to promote all aspects of the col- 
lege. Each of these people gives LVC an opportu- 
nity to make a positive impact on its people, and to 
he remembered for its successes. 
— Carrie L. M. Stull 





m$. 




Castinc^ Impressions 



,143 



CUcssac^es ^^^^-^^^^^ 





MELISSA J. ADAM 

We love you! Dad, Mom & Sean 



JASON ALEXANDER BEAM 

Jason; Congratulations! We're proud of you! God Ble 
Love, Mom and Dad 



BRIAN BERLINQ 

Brian, Congratulations ^^^e are^very proud of you! 
Love, Mom and Dad 





.,j4^ t >r:>* 




You did it! Hope you had fun and learned a lot. You 
should be proud of yourself. Love you - Kathryn 



KATHRYN E. CLARK 



^ hJ^ ,'f^' Kate, We are so proud of you! Love, Dad, Mom & 
i-^obin ' ' ' 

^ ANGELk SUE COVAL 

^pl Angle, Congratulations! 4 years down and on to 
* graduate school and working in the real world. 
Goodluck! Love, Mom & Dad 

ASHLEY ELIZABETH COX 

Dear Ash, Congratulations - we knew you could do it! 
We' proud of you. The future is yours - "go for it." Be 
happy in whatever it is you choose. We love you, Mon" 
,and Dad 

CYNTHIA A. ENSMINGER 

Three years down, one to go - Love ya, M^pi_|iid Dad 

LISA M. EPTING 

Dear Lisa, Congratulations on your graduation! We're 
proud of you and all your accomplishments. Love, 
)m/Dad, and Lori 





144 



*■!.■.,. •»>^« V^S.^ 






Qear Lisa, Our wishes for you have taken wing into 



a happy and successful future. Love, Mom and Dad rS^^ I^il^ 



^J-< 



•J 






ti- 







. CHERIE ALISON M)RRY ^ -r: ,-^ 

One more semester andyou^ve completed ^ lasra' 
education to launch a caree*. What great #^;W 

opportunities can appear, tJ}isfollo>ving year! Love, '^° 

Mom' & Dad ^^im^::}fl,^^ll^^- ^^ ; -^^^ : 

TIMOTHY A. F^ANTZ 7r]^%-;^ -. 

vpe^r Tim, You have completed 6ne of yoid^ goals. I 
am so proud of you. All M^Lc^ye;^ Mora . - 

MELISSA ANN FRITZ ' '4^.i^;X;"' 

Melissa, Congratulations! We knew you could doij^^.'^J( 
. Love, Dad, Mom^endj^^; , '"^i^^.^ 

TODD GAMBLE-#§p:.^1^h^^"^: 

Todd; We're hoping all your Hrearhs cofi\e ' 

true... Love, Mom & Dad ■--ij*^ 



BETH A. GOLIAS 

Dear Beth, We asked you to make us proud*^£ncl ^ 
did. God bless'^you. Love, Mom, Dad, Eileen, Dave^^ \ 
and Andrea, ''^"^J^-^ ^ 

MATTHEW GRETH 

^"Congratulations Matt. Your profound courage and 
deterinination has inspired us all! Yout extremely ^^ 
proud family - Mom, Dad, Julie and Chris ^ ^-,-r 

CHRISTOPHER HARTMAN ikn' 









sparky, We're oroud of all^u liave accomplished! 
Love, Mom and Dad i^S^.^fef^-W' 

T*- 

t HEATHER LEE WKTT^S^B§^'-^-^i 
MMM! Jejly Beans! Love - Mom; 








i':h< i-Jk.iJ 



145 





MICHELLE HEFFLEY 

Michelle, You have been such an incredible best friend 
and roommate for four wonderful years. I will always 
cherish our time together and the memories that we 
have! With Love, Carrie 

TINA HIGH 

Dear Tina, YouVe made it! We are so proud of youl^^i 
Felicitaciones! Te amamos. Dad & Mom '• 

•4-"' 

^ DEENA R. HIXON 

-^ Deena, May your future be blessed with happiness, 
love and the passion to teach those who are willing to 
learn. Love Always, Mom, Dad and Otto 



KIMBERLY HOLLICH 

Dear Kim, We are proud of the way you directed yo^ 
life. May you have a happy and healthy future. Love J 
Mom, Dad, Joe, & Lori 





TRENT A. HOLLINGER 

Trent - WOW! What a great first year, both musically 
and academically! We're proud of you! Love Mom and 
i V Dad. 

i 

, JASON HOTCHKISS ^ 

Dear Jason, The last year is here, set your goals and « 

^^' "^ '%^^u then just do it! We love you and are very proud of ym! 

'"^- -,« '5^.»3 Mom, Dad, Jeff and Lindsay s 

K^ BARRETT MICHAEL IRONS \ 

Barrett, Congratulations on reaching another milestone. 
We're proud of you. Love, Mom, Dad, Matt & Justin 

JENNIFER RAE JOHNSON 

Dear Jenn Rae, You bring joy and love in our life. Lov^ 
Mom &.Dad , 




146 




r^i 




SHELBY KAMPKA 

Dear Shelby, Our hearts are bursting with jpride. We 
love you more than you know. Love, Mom and Dad 

DEBORAH KATZ 

^;Pear Deb, We love you! You can do it. 

Dearest Deb, My Hon ey^- Keep your dreams alive. 
Love, Gram 



JOSHUA CARL KESLER 

Lieber Josh! Wussten wir doch, dass der ,^.^. ^^ 

''Vogelmann" wuerde fliegen koennen! Alles Gute *5 
beim Absprung zum neuen Hoehenflug. Herzlichst, 
Mutti & Vati 

Dear Josh, Congratulations on the past - Good Luck 
for the future. Dave & Barb 

All the way - Clubber Jay! K Family, Jr. 

Dear J, The lion may seem bravehearted. But it's the 
wings of the bird that carries the brave one over tlje 
deepest canyons. Beks. 

MICHAEL SCOTT KOCHER 

Dear Michael, You've done a great job! We love you! i 
Mom, Dad and Jill 

AMANDA ANN KILLIAN 

Congratulations! Love, Mom & Dad 

BRIAN JOHN KRUZEL 

Congratulations Brianl (J!ontinue down life's road 
with God's presence & your dreams! We love yoU! 
Mom, Dad & Lori ^^ 

Ma. 



"Si 

1 




147 







^ MICHELLE KRYSTOFOLSKI 

I Michelle, We are very proud of you! Hope you get 
everything you really want in the future. We love you> 
Mom, Dad, Tina, and Raymond 

STEPHEN MARTIN LYNCH 

Dear Stephen - Congratulations. We are so very prou4 
of you. Love you so much. Mom, Dad, & Michael J 

Zm m -M Congratulations Stew! Good luck in evervthing vou do. 
*" *^ w Love, The Patricellis 

^ JU ANITA J. MARTIN 

. Dear Juanita, Congratulations on a job well done. Love, 
Mom & Dai^ 

JENNIFER LYNN MCGOUGH 

Dear Jennifer, Congratulalions on completing a 
successful freshman year! Love, Dad, Mom, Chris, and 
Checkers 



MICHAEL MELOCHECK 

Mike - You are such a hard worker and a fine young 
man that you art sure to succeed in life. Best wishes 
always! The Sherks 

KIMBERLY MEREDITH 

Kim, Halfway there. We are proud of your hard work. 
V™ Love Dad, Amy, Jake & Josh 






DOUGLAS MOSER 

f Halfway through. We're proud of you! Love, Mi mi ana 
Pappy Pete 



148 



DESIREE NGUYEN 

Desiree, You already know hpw much I love you, but 
do yott really know how proud I am of you? Love, 



'^mr^^m^ 



Desiree, I thought you waitted toBe a puppy dog Jj 
when you grew up. I'm glad you changed your ■^-c"'"'^ 
minds I am so proud of you. You amaze me. Love, 
Mom 



'-^li- 






Desiree, Melissa & Mel, It has beeVi'iSucha joy to" 
watch you grow and to share in all your ^;.<- .^».^^. 
accomplishments. Hors-D-Vors to you^ Lov^,^indy 

LAUREN M. NISH . -'^^hi^^ 

Dear Lauren, I'm^Droud oOBu.feve, Dad^^^''^ *>'*''*' 

JESSLYN GAYLE OBERHOLTZER : - #^ 

Congratulations Jesslyn! What an accomplishment! 
Love, Dad and Mother s -^S^ ' .; -^^i;-? --^^i 

AARON PaCMER J^r 

Dear Aaron, God Mess you always. Congratulations 
for successfully completing college. Love, Mom and 

Dad ^^- :r^^:,^x^:' 

MELISSA PERO, ANDY STONe1r;& HOLLEY 

DOBSON ^..-T' •^vs.-V;i^.A•<.;••v ' 

Thanks for all of your support this yearF^du'guys -^^ 
rock! ril miss you! Borders \ 

JERRY WILLIAM PFARR 

Dear Jerry, Congratulations on your graduation. We % 

know it was a high mountain to climb and^' f | 

sometimes it seemed unsurmountable, but you made |^| 

it! Words can't express how proud we are of you. We .^^^^^^^ 

love you, Mom, Dad, Bob, Baby Cheeky & Fajriess 1^^'^^^ 

ELIZABETH M. POND |^ 

Dear Liz, Congmtulations oifyo^Y graduation and 
our very best wishes {or continued success in your 
chosen field. We are very proud of you^ Psalrn 
119:105-106. ...^— — . ^^-.'^.... 






149 




.^ 



'/^ 









KIMBERLY ROSE RODGERS 

Dear Rosebud, We are so proud of you!!! ^ 

Congratulations on yOur graduation. The world is a :! 

\ better place because of you. Love, Mom & Dad * 

Dear Kim, Congratulations! We're very proud of you.^ 
Love, Aunt Jo, Shawn, and Uncle Ernie 



Dear Kim, Congratulations to my big sister!!! I'm so 
proud of you. Lov^, Pook - 



^ MICHELLE L. RUCZHiltK 

Michele, Words haven't been found yet to express oiii 
«,. love and pride in you. With all our hearts. Mom & Dad 






AMY SCHIMPF 

Congratulations, Amy, You are truly ready to face the^ 
future. Love, Mom, Dad & Scott 



3»s««| 




L DAVID SCHOTT 

Congratulcitions and good luck! Thanks for keeping us 
part of your life. Love, Mom & Dad 



WILLIAM M. SCHWARTZ 

Dear Bill, Congratulations. We're very proud of you. 
Love, Dad & Chris ^^ 

JEANINE SCHWEITZER I 

Jeanin^ - You made it! We are proud of you! Love, Dad 
& Mom 

Jeanine - You finished first again, but I'm right behind 
you! Love, Jacki 



D Y AN LEIGH SHANNON 

Congratulations, Dyan: We are proud of you and yl 
accomplishments at LVC. Always remember that a 
^ single dream pursued with energy has the potential t 
better the lives^oLmany. We anticipate your fuiure 
successes: with much love. Mom, Dad, & Robin 




JEFFREY ALAN SHERK 

Jeff, We^re so very proud of you and your success at 
LVC. We know you will work hard and succeed in 
the ''real world/' too! Love you always! Mom, Dad, 
Susie, and Grandma Sherk , ^ 

JOSEPH SHERUD A 

Let's go J.H., Only one more year of aggravation! 

JULIE KRISTIN SMITHv^ 

Julie: Fly, Peter Pan, fly! L(M| you, Mom and Dad 

DOUGLAS ALLEN SPEELMAN 

= ..Doug, Your accomplishments have made us very 
^roiid of you and grateful to God for his work in 
your life. Love, Mom and Dad 

BRIAN AUBREX ST AHL, 

Dear Brian, Your hopes and dreams have come true 
at LVC. We have been so proud to watch you grow 
from a music student to the music director. As a 
music teacher, you will enrich the souls of many 
children as you have enriched ours. Best wishes for a 
lifetime of joy. Love, Mom and Dad ^ ,., 

%AVID JAM^S STAUB 

Dear David, We are all so very proud of you! Love, 
Mom, Dad, Chris and Pat. 

I^ARRIE LYN MARIA STULL 

Sbear Carrie, Your hard work and accomplishments 
"^ver the past four years have made us so very proud! 
Congratulations on your graduation and good luck at 
graduate school, you'll do a^onderful job. All our 
love. Mom, DaJ, Todd and Adw^n 

CORY WHLLIAM THORNTON ^ 

Dear Cory, You have made us so mjpud and we*' love 
,«you ve*i^,much! Mom & Dad . -"^ 





® 





MARCIA TUMPEY 

Your dreams will be real one day - don't let them ^ 
We're proud of you! Love, Mom & Dad 

ERICA LUNGER 

Congratulations on achieving another rung in the 
ladder of life. If you hold fast to your dreams, dreamt 
do eome true. Love and best wishes — Mom and Da( 








•'ii\-i. 



PAUL VOLLBERd ' 

Paul - Congratulations -Superb job, college graduate! 
<(g^^ ^' We are so proud of you. Love, Mom, Dad, Annmarie 
"'^ and Beth 




MATTHEW D. WARY 

Dear Matt, Congratulations! We're very proud of you 
and all your accomplishments. God bless you in your 
plans for the future. Love, Mom & Dad 



KELLY ZIMMERMAN 

Kelly, This is it! We're proud of you & wish you the 
best in the future! Love, Mom & Dad 




Ai 4.J;«-'^Li&i Jlf 



152 



Special 
feature 



■^'■f^i. 



LVC Welcomes tJte ''Valley GirV' 




154 



he bronze sculpture, 
Cuewe-Pehelle, was un- 
veiled and dedicated on 
grounds between the 
Bishop Library and 
Lynch Memorial Hall, 
which now bares the 
name Carmean Plaza. At 
the ceremony, Audry 
Flack, sculptor of the 
statue. President PoUick, 
and the benefactors. Dr. 
D. Clark and Ediia J. Car- 
mean spoke about what 
the statue represented 
and brought to each. 

"She's a spirit of this 
valley - I hope she's a 
spirit of this college - of 
all of you," Flack stated 
as she spoke of creating 
her "valley girl," as she 
affectionately called 
Cuewe-Pehelle. Flack 
spoke of dreams she en- 
countered about leaving 
her statue, and giving it 
up to the school. She 
spoke of how much time 
and energy she spent in 
creating the piece. "\ cre- 
ated this piece specifical- 
ly for you - for the Leba- 
non Valley and everyone 
in ii. - . 

The statue'^ name, 
'• Cuewe-Pehelle, is the 
original form of the word 
''Quittapahilla," which 
not only names the 
stream which shaped the 
Lebanon Valley and still 
lies just beyond campus, 
but means "a stream that 



flows from the ground 
among the pines." The 
statue stands seven feet 
above the base on which 
she stands and her arms 
are extended as she ap- 
pears to be taking a step 
toward onlookers. She 
weighs 650 potmds and 
is cast in bronze with 
gold accenting belt, 
wings and headdress of 
corn. 

As the wind continued 
to tug at the purple drap- 
ing, the only covering 
which kept the audience 
from their first glimpse 
of the statue. President 
Pollick exclaimed that 
"the gods are eager — 
they are not going to wait 
for us." Unveiling was 
assisted by the Car- 
nieans, to whom the 
sculpture was dedicated. 
Edna Carmean spoke, 
''Isn't she beautiful? 
She's not just for one 
generation - she's for the 
ages. She will be in this 
spot when all of us have 
departed this earth." Her 
husband, D. Clark Car- 
^mean continued, "the 
Quittapahilla means a lot 
to us, ..I'm glad she is he- 
re now to supervise i;he 
activities, and I hope the 
college becomes the 
heart c)f-4he county and is 
available to all of you 
and all of Lebanon 
County." Flack also ex- 
plained that she hoped 



the sculpture would at- 
tract visitors in the cen-? 
tral Pennsylvania area,! 
"but really, she's for 
you," she concluded. 

Flack is a New York 
sculptor who is well 
known for her goddess 
figures. She appeared at 
the college in March of 
1996 when her work, en- 
titled "Women as Myth- 
makers/ was featured at 
the Suzanne H. Arnold 
. Art Gallery. Her career 
spans five decades and in 
recent years she has been 
commissioned for two 
major civic monuments, 
one in Rock Hill South 
Carolina and another (m 
progress) to Queen Cath- 
erine. 

The Carmeans have 
been active members fo 
the college as teachers, 
administrators, and col- 
lege historians for over 
sixty years. The couple, 
which resides in Ann- 
ville, are members of the 
Vickroy Society, serve as 
honorary co-chairs of th< 
college's Toward 20( 
campaign, established a 
scholarship endowment 
for students studying 
and performing string 
music, and made a 
$500,000 gift to establish 
the D. Clark and Edna I. 
Carman Distinguished 
Chair in Music. 
— Anni Shockey and 
Jaime McClintock 



^^The 1998 Quittapahilla Staff would like 
to sincerely thank the following people for 
^^ their patronage: 

' BRONZE GOLD 



'Patrons 



The Evans Family 
ichard and Sue Hollinger 

The Irons Family 
The Schwartz Family^ 

The Stahl FamMy 

The Unger Family 
,The VoUberg Family 



SILVER 



The Schmidt Family 
Fran & Agnes Tumpey 



The McGough Family 




W 



>..* 



/DIAMOND 




Clii-it S. Rudy 
Beth G. Shearer 

ANGEL 

The Patricelli Family 

The Schott Family 

The Stull Family 





U lib- 



155 



Candids 







■''''^^mm^ 



m^. Candids 



I 




Coloph 



on 







.Jta 



t 




The 'Xasting Impressions" Quittapahilla 1^98, Volume 83 of the Lebanon Valley, | 
College Yearbook was printed and published by the Taylor Publishing Company ofi 
Dallas, Texas and Malvern, Pennsylvania. The book had a press run of 300 copies. 

The cover was an original design including the Lebanon Valley College seal, 
executed on a base Blue Matte with silver foil stamped. Eighty pound high gjoss 
enamel was used throughout the book. 

Copy for the book was printed in the following fonts: Finesse, Freehand Script, 
Malibu. Body copy, caption, and headline point sizes varied throughout the book. ^' 

The staff consisted of: 
Advisor: Ms. Jane Paluda * ., ' ■ 

Editor-in-Chief: Carrie Stulli 
Assistant Editors: Heather Bair, Amy Parsons 
Secretary: Gene Kelly 

Business Managers: Kristin Chandler, Clint Rudy 
Publicity Manager: Michelle Heffley 
Photography Editor: Jennifer Porbansky 
Copy Editor: Julie Repman 
Layout Editor: Carrie Stull 
Fundraising Chairpersons: Ellen Gehr, Erin Rabuck 

Student Life Section Editor: Carrie Stull 

Student Life Staff: Beth Curley, Gene Kelly, Dez Nemec, Amy Patricelli, Jennifer 

Porbansky, Dan Post ' 

Senior Section Editor: Amy Parsons '} 

Senior Section Staff: Ellen Gehr, Gene Kelly, Tara Leberknight, Erin Rabuck, Beth 

Shearer ■ 

Faculty Section Editor: Tara Leberknight 

Faculty Section Staff: Ellen Gehr, Amy Parsons, Erin Rabuck 

Athletics Section Editor: Joshua Lindeman 

Athletics Section Staff: Kelly Cooney, Gene Kelly 

Organizations Section Editor: Laura Simolike 

Organizations Section Staff: Heather Bair, Gene Kelly 

Music Section Editor: Beth Shearer 

Music Section Staff: Kristin Chandler, Steven Perkins 

Greek Section Editor: Beth Curley 

Greek Section Staff: Heather Bair, Clint Rudy 

Graduation Section Editor: Carrie Stull 

Closing Section Editor: Carrie Stull 

Copy Writers: Ellen Gehr, Tara Leberknight, Joshua Lindeman, Dan Post, Erin s 
Rabuck, Julie Repman, Carrie Stull 

Layout Designers: Gene Kelly, Joshua Lindeman, Carrie Stull 

Photographers: Gina Azzara, Heather Bair, Kristin Chandler, Kelly Cooney, Beth 
Curley, Michelle Heffley, Gene Kelly, Tara Leberknight, Joshua Lindeman, Amy 
Parsons, Dan Post, Julie Repman, Clllwl Rudy, Beth Shearer, Laura Simolike, Carrie 

Stull, ■• - '^■■■>** r; 

The Taylor Representative is Ed JPatrick, Jr. and the Customer Service 
Represert^ative in plant is Melody Lundquist. 

The Lebanon ValleyX^^e Quittapahilla is produced entirely by a volunteer 
staff. 



e iy97-98 Qmttapahilla Staff: Thank you for your committment to making this 
fiarbook a success, your help has been so greatly appreciated and will always be 
remembered. \Yhether in your first or third year on the staffs your presence has been 
priceless, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. 

To my fellow officers: Your initiative and energy throughout the year has bfeen 
outstanding. Thank you for a job well done. . ■• 

Special thanks to Heather Bair and Amy Parsons for working with the book for three 
very long and interestitig years! Your fielp and support was a joy and a comfort throughout 
this experience. 

•- To Jane Pciluda, our advisor. Best of luck with everything you do. 
To fiiture' members of the Quittapahilla staff: Always remember to face each obstacle 
ith confidence and with pride in your abilities,, because it is only your ideas and creati\dty 
t can and will make the yearbooks improve ea^. time they are published. Rejoice in the 
itive aspects of the Quittapahilla ari8 think dfm^ gift you are giving to everyone who 
rns its pages. ,. _^ ' *" 

gjennifer Evans, Christopher Melusky, arid the LVC Student Government: Thank you 
' your trust and confidence in the staff, it has been a source of motivation for everyone 
Solved. 

lb the following La Vie Cellegieiiiie staff members and feature writers for allowing us to 
reprint their excellent articles: Danielle Boileau, Kate Clark, Tonia Cuff, Vincent D'Aniello, 
'^nn Davis, Christopher Dean, Ellen Gehr, Ray McCarty, Jaime McClintock, Trade Miller, 
Erin Rabuck, Cori Rife, Rayna Schell, Anni Shockey, Br'aden Snyder, Kelly Sonon, Eric 
f'hite ,-Kii'k Yagel, Jemrifer Yocoirf, Melanie Zartman. 

, bf tharvks to Mr. Robert Riley for once again being such a help to t^e staff. 



Editor's 
*Tlotes 




7'W^' 





incredible thank you to Ed Patrick Jr., our Taylor representative, for many, many years 
upport and encouragement. 

rhank )'ou to the staff and photographers at DaVor Photography. 

fc-eat themks to Mrs. Pam Lambert, the Senior Send-Off Fair Qpnunittee, Mr. Robert 
Barniah. the College Bookstore, staff, Mrs. Shirley Ritter,' and" the staff of the Registrai<§ 
3ffice for -their help. 

ank you to Pat Schools and the College Center Desk Staff for your help during the year. 

b the Members of the Faculty, thevMusic Department, and the Greek Organizations: 
ank you once again for your help in allowing us to honor each of you in your respective 

jhEtions. Your patience and understanding throughout the process .of obtaining 
olographs is greatly appreciated. 

all Lebanon Valley College Students, Faculty Members, Staff Members, and 
JifnlBistrators: Tliere is no doubt in my mind that the Quittapahilla exists only through 
J3i you. Your experiences, ideas and thoughts have always laid the foundation for 
h edition of the yearbook, and without all of yofl, i^^d your support and willingness to 
tribute, the Quittapahilla would most definitel^'not st^nd and consistently serve as a 
rd^ the memories you have created. I have ^veiftour years of rtiy creativity, 
Sperierite, and love for LVC to this bo<|k, wishing fb help each of you remember the 
easons why Lebanon Valley means so mu^ to everyone that its essence has touched and 
pipacted; f hope that4>y reliving the memories that aie recorded on these pagetft' you will 
ixperience the joy that I have felt while piecing them together for both you and myself. 
fhank you for giving me this incredible opportunity throughout my college career. 









Came btuU, Editor-in-Chiet 
















^':^'^^if^. 









EASt^Hie ICD-P'RESSIOTIS ~ 
1998 QUrc^A'PA'BICCA 

Cebanon Ualley Colkge :^lma CDater: 

"Go 'Ghee, dear Ahna CDater 

Ghis rini^irK^ sonc^ we raise, 

A son<\^ that's fraiic^ht with c^ladness, 

A sotK^ that's filled with praise, 

tOe cannot help but love Ghee, 

Our hearts are full and free, 

Tull well we know the debt we owe. 

Go dear old CDC, ' 

We come from old Tlevf 'Hampshire, 

^IDhere winter breezes blow, 

And from the sunnij Southland, 

U}here sweet mac^nolias c^row, 

IDe've suncf "Star Span<][led 'Banner," 

Go "'Dixie" c^ivcn a cheex'. 

And now we raise this sonc^ of praise. 

Go Alma 0}ater dear. 

'Put forth your stronc^est mic^ht. 

And let our Alma CDater 

IDin each and every fic;ht, 

£ift high its royal banner, „- 

And keep its honor clear, 

And let our sonc^ with voices stronc;; 

'Rinc^ down thro' many a year. 






Mi Ilii