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Full text of "TV Radio Mirror (Jan - Jun 1963)"

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AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




PDBMSHER'S BINDING 



HY DIANNE LENNON IS ADOPTING A CHILD! 

T 




ICKIES 



JACKIE 



LUCY 

can't escape 



/// 



If 








>** 



yours so easily with Ivory's cheek-to-cheek mildness 



Just change to regular care with the same pure, 
mild Ivory Soap that helps keep baby's skin 
so soft and smooth. And use it right! Use it 
the same way you do for baby . . . with warm 
water, not skin-drying hot water. Ivory is one 
soap that doesn't need hot water. You'll be 
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smoother— younger looking. You'll have That 
Young Ivory Look— thanks to this mild Ivory 
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by more doctors than any other soap — for 
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For That Young Ivory Look 




jvoior 






MACFADDEN BOOKS 

entertaining. . . stimulating. . . informative 





WOMAN 





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BORN FREE 75* LIVING FREE 75* 

Another best-selling 
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Manya Xahn's New 
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This frank study by 
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women how to un- 
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THE 

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Mouth-watering 
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Easy -to - follow in- 
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BEANE 



35* 



An irresistible tale— 
in text and draw- 
ings—of an under- 
age chick who shares 
a pad in Greenwich 
Village with her 
beatniek poet father 
and sculptress 
mother. 



These Other Macfadden Books Are Also Available . . . . 

NURSE ELLEN by Peggy Gaddis (35*) INSIDE THE NEW FRONTIER 

THE GIANT HOBBY HANDBOOK by Dorothy Goodwill (40*) by Senator Vance Hartke & John M. Redding (50*) 

HOW TO GET MORE FOR YOUR MONEY A PROGRAM FOR CONSERVATIVES 

by Sylvia Porter (60?) by Senator John G. Tower (50*) 

NO LOVE LOST by Margery Allingham (50*) THE OLD BUNCH by Meyer Levin (95*) 

On Sale Now Wherever Paperback Books Are Sold . . .or Mail Coupon Today 



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Please send me the following books: 



MACFADDEN BOOKS 

205 E. 42nd St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. 



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Nurse Ellen (35*) • • • Born Free (75*) 

The Giant Hobby Handbook (40*) Living Free (75*) 

How to Get More For Your Money (60*) Reduce, Relax, Rejuvenate (75*) 

No Love Lost (50*) Woman (50*) 

Inside the New Frontier (50*) The Can-Opener Cookbook (60*) 

A Program for Conservatives (50*) The Old Bunch (95*) 

Suzuki Beane (35*) 




NAME 



ADDRESS 



CITY STATE. 



(PLEASE PRINT) 




JANUARY, 1963 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 59, NO. 2 



Thirty is an important year— a turn- 
ing-point year for a woman ... or a 
magazine. But it's a birthday we 
don't mind admitting to. We're 
proud to be the oldest magazine in 
our field — and even prouder that 
after all these years we're still the 
first and the biggest! 

This year, we're bigger than 
ever. This year, we bring you two 
magazines in one! Just flip through 
our pages. You'll find more stories 
and more stars than any other TV 
or radio magazine. That's not new 
— we've always given you more. 
What's new is that we're bigger 
than even we used to be, that 
we're giving you more than even 
we used to give you. And we know 
you've noticed — our circulation 
figures are bigger than ever, too. 

In addition, this year we are 
bringing you a magazine within a 
magazine. Each month we bring 
you "On the Record," the complete 
and authoritative guide to what's 
new and who's new in the world of 
records. 

If we sound like we're blowing 
our own birthday horn — we are. 
We can't help it . . . we're excited 
about this year. It's going to be our 
biggest and best one yet. We hope 
you'll enjoy it with us! 




IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 



''Candid Camera" 17 

R ichard Chamberlain 1 8 

Lucille Ball 20 

Vincent Edwards 22 

Hollywood Mystery 26 

Jackie Kennedy 28 

Book Bonus 32 

Eddie Fisher 35 

Bruce Dern 38 

"The Guiding Light" 40 

Beauty 43 

Godfrey — Powell 46 

Ernie Ford 48 

Lennon Sisters 50 

Dianne Lennon 52 

James Drury 54 

Carol Burnett 66 

Pernell Roberts 88 



Is This a New TV Scandal? Did "Candid Camera" Lie? 
What I Want for My Wife and Son. . . .George Carpozi Jr. 

The Triangle Lucy Can't Escape Ruth Waterbury 

Those Las Vegas Nights. Elena Forest 

We Find Gardner McKay ! Alan Somers 

The Illness That's Breaking Her Heart .... Chrys Haranis 

Six Real Tests for Real Love Connie Francis 

How Much More Can He Take From Liz? . . . .Flora Rand 

Death of a Child Paul Denis 

Are You Asking Too Much of Marriage? . .Henley — Wolk 

Are You Going to Pieces? Barbara Marco 

"I Beat Cancer — So Can You ! " James Hoffman 

"I Had To Get Away from Hollywood". . . .James Gregory 

The Baby That Changed Their Lives Kathleen Post 

Why She's Adopting a Baby ! Beatrice Emmons 

A Man Trying to Ruin Himself Eunice Field 

New Year's Resolutions You'll Want to Keep. .Jan Price 
Scoop! His Secret Marriage! Milt Johnson 



BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 



9 The New Sounds 
10 Music Makers in the News 



12 Album Reviews 
16 Tops in Singles 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 



4 

6 

72 



What's New? 76 

Earl Wilson's Inside Story 85 

New Designs for Living 86 



Your Monthly Ballot 
Photographers' Credits 
New Patterns for You 



SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 



Ev Sutherin 57 Have You Heard (WGL) 

Beverly Garland 58 "Get Me Beverlv" (CBS-TV) 

Rush Evans 60 Rush Hour in Topeka (WIBW-TV) 

Marc Howard 62 "Me Tarzan" (WFMJ-TV) 



CLAIRE SAFRAN, Editor 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
CAROL ROSS, Regional Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



JACK J. PODELL, Editorial Director 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
ALEXANDRA TARASEWICH, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty -Fashion Editor 



BOBBY SCOTT, Music Editor 



Editor 



TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office, 434 North Rodeo 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President; Lee B. Bartell, Executive Vice- 
President; Frederick A. Klein, Executive Vice-President for Publishing-General Manager; Michael J. Jackson, Vice- 
President; Sol N. Himmelman, Vice-President; Melvin M. Bartell, Secretary. Advertising offices also in Chicago 
and San Francisco. 

Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its possessions and Canada, one year, $4.00; two years, $7.00; three years, 
$10.00. All other countries, $6.00 per year. Change of Address: 6 weeks notice essential. Send your old as well 
as your new address to TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Manuscripts and Photographs: Publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 

Foreign editions handled through International Division of Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, 205 East 42nd Street, 
New York 17, N. Y. Gerald A. Bartell, President; Douglas Lockhart, Sales Director. 

Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Copyright 1962 by Macfadden- 
Bartell Corporation. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Convention and International 
Copyright Convention. Copyright reserved under Pan American Copyright Convention. Title trademark registered 
In U.S. Patent Office. Printed in U.S.A. Member of Macfadden Women's Group. 



WArNer bros. prEsenTS all tHe hEarT and happiness of the BroAdway hit. 




i-l 



...tHe gin_ who becaivie thE grEatEST show \n show busiNess. 



Russeu- vuoqd iMaLoem 



as Gypsy Rose Lee 



ti'QEJQ^Qi 






A I'lLKV I IN LEKU I PRODUCTION Based upon the play'Gypsy." Book by Arthur Laments • Music by Jute Styne • Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim • Screenplay by Leonard Spigelgass L, 
Directed and Choreographed by Jerome Robbins ■ Based upon the Memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee - Directed by Mervyn LeRoy - TECHNICOLOR* '• TECHNIRAMA* ■ Presented by WARNER BROS, f 



by EUNICE FIELD 



What with illnesses, accidents, her 
Warner Bros, feuding and the death of 
her beloved pooch, Connie Stevens 
would just as soon wipe 1962 off her 
slate. To cap the pile-up of bad breaks, 
her "big romance," Gary Clarke, 
recently forgot to close the door of 
her convertible. A truck came by and 
side-swiped the new car. But Connie is 
still keeping her sunny side up. "One 
bright spot in 1962," she smiled, "was 
my dad's success in talent managing. 
He just signed Eric Matthews, 
twenty-two and six-feet-two, and when 
I met him, all I could do was stare and 



the fast-starting new series have sched- 
uled six shows without guest stars to 
concentrate on the brotherly theme. 
. . . Night clubs coast to coast are 
willing to wait for a 1964 booking, so 
great is the demand for George Ma- 
haris now that his records have hit 
the heights. . . . Lazy Tommy Kirk 
is hung up on California's latest fad, 
body surfing. Says Tommy, "You ride 
the waves, but with nothing under you 
but yourself. It's the only sport in 
which I can remain in my favorite posi- 
tion — horizontal." 

Wonder what Bob Fuller has to say 



week he signed with Bob, Rod signed 
with a cuter manager, marrying his 
Fresno sweetie, Gayle Earley. 

In A Rut: That Eddie Hodges can 
sure take direction. In a scene for 
Disney's "Summer Magic," he had to 
drive an injured Burl Ives away. The 
director pointed to the pickup truck 
circa 1909 and told Eddie, "Drive right, 
just miss that tree, and then off the 
set." So Eddie, aiming to "just miss" 
the tree, stopped every heart on set by 
just missing it by three inches at fifty 
miles per. . . . Newsome twosomes: 
Johnny Crawford and Lori Martin, 




Bad breaks: Gary Clarke and Connie. 



Wedding : Chuck Connors and Kamala. 



say 'Man, like wow!' " Watch for Eric! 
Sign at Revue calls "It's a Man's 
World" the "BBBC." Reason? In honor 
of stars Ted Bessell, Randy Boone, 
Mike Burns and Glenn Corbett. An 
English visitor thought there must be 
some link with the BBC of England 
"until they opened their mouths and 
then I knew they weren't from Blighty. 
But after viewing them on the set," 
she added, "I'm convinced BBBC stands 
for Big, Beautiful Bachelor Corps." 
. . . Earl Holliman and Andy Prine 
so good as "brothers" on the preem 
of "Wide Country," the producers of 



about ex-girl Kathy Nolan's engage- 
ment to Richard Heckenkamp, ac- 
tor's agent? . . . They say a yell can 
cause a landslide, and Radio Station 
KM PC nearly started one when they 
announced on their "daily bundle" that 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Chamberlain 
were parents of a newborn girl. It took 
four deejays a week to abate the wires, 
phone calls and letters, asking if it 
was "our Dr. Kildare." Apologetic an- 
swer: No! . . . Bob Marcucci signed 
three more to his stable of singers: 
Dean Randolph, 16; Mark Valen- 
tino, 20; and Rod Lauren, 24. Same 



Tommy Kirk and Annette Funicello. 

. . . For her show, Lucy has been 
rounding up the most attractive men 
in town, like Dick Rowan of Rowan 
and Martin, Frank Aletter of the old 
"Bringing Up Buddy," Del Moore, 
Chris Warfield and William Win- 
dom. . . . One of TV's most gifted 
producers, Bob Herridge, slated for 
"The Fighters," new weekly series deal- 
ing with great Americans of integrity. 
Dateline: 1963. 

Chuck Connors and Indian beauty 
Kamala Devi have set the date for 
February. It's a case of East meets 



West, and let's hope the twain live 
happier ever after than Chuck and his 
first wife did. . . . Carl Ballantine 
of "McHale's Navy" is making a ca- 
reer out of failure. As "The Amazing 
Mr. Ballantine," he has put stitches in 
many a side by the brilliant feats of 
magic that never quite come off. "One 
success," he sighs, "and I'd be ruined 
for life." . . . June Blair comes back 
as David Nelson's TV spouse — which, 
of course, she is, in real life. But Ozzie 
has ruled out bringing their baby, 
Danny, on the show. He looks too 
young to be a grandpop, says Ozzie. 



rewrites and Tennessee his hit. Now a 
musical based on her life is in the 
works, starring Mary Martin as 
the talented "Laurette." 

A pal of Lucy Ball and Vivian 
Vance was watching the "Christmas 
program" being shot at the new sound 
stage that had been fixed up for his 
ex-wife by Desi Arnaz. The place is 
replete with bleachers for studio audi- 
ences, light fixtures and dressing rooms 
all done in Lucy's pet colors, blue 
and green. Viv was showing off the 
new gold and jade medallion her hus- 
band gave her, and Lucy was in her 



Davis Jr., wouldn't sign autographs 
at hubby's Cocoanut Grove opening. 
"I haven't worked in years," said May, 
"and don't care if I never go before 
the cameras again." She's one actress 
who really meant "I'll retire." 

Andy Prine and Lynn Loring are 
in the quarreling stage. Wonder if the 
subject is Andy's dates with Tuesday 
Weld. . . . Shecky Greene, as ex- 
pected, pulled out of "Combat" in 
favor of night clubs, and will stake his 
claim again to the title, "Top Cock o' 
The Tropicana Yoks" in Las Vegas. . . . 
While Judy Garland was doing SRO 




Reunion: Harpo, Fred Astaire, Randy Scott, Walter Brennan. Financial twist: Keenan Wynn has good reason to say no I 



The turn of the year will see a new 
play by Tennessee Williams, "The 
Milk Train Doesn't Stop Here Any- 
more." If it is added to his hit parade, 
some of the credit ought to go to 
Laurette Taylor, dear-departed star 
of his first big show, "The Glass Mena- 
gerie." Seems Williams had cluttered 
up a good play with stage effects and 
lines of heavy poetry. Laurette, an old 
pro, demanded rewrites. Williams said, 
"I wrote your lines and you'll have to 
stand for them." Laurette's retort pop- 
per was: "If I can't say them, the audi- 
ence won't sit for them." She got her 



usual glow about her better half, Gary 
Morton. The friend said wryly, "Their 
men spout just as blissfully about them. 
They're an adoresome foursome and, 
in this case, you can really say they're 
bridled and groomed . . ." 

Rising young Bob Dowdell read 
this sign in a bookstore window: "Help 
Stamp Out TV— Buy A Book!" And 
mustachioed, motorcycling Keenan 
Wynn, cavorting at Keith Jones' val- 
ley bistro, says he isn't interested in 
another TV series — he's making too 
much loot just freelancing. . . . And 
May Britt, ever-loving of Sammy 



biz at the Sahara, daughter Liza was 
visiting dad Vincente Minnelli in 
Hollywood. One of the few genuine 
talents in the second-generation crop, 
Liza helped dad out by teaching the 
"bump V grind" to a young actress 
supposed to do it in Vincente's MGM 
film, "Courtship of Eddie's Father." 

Fabian squired pretty Hedy Son- 
tag, Polish artist-thrush, to the pre- 
miere of "The Longest Day." Darryl 
Zanuck came up to compliment Fabe 
on his performance, saw Hedy, and im- 
mediately ordered a screen test. How's 
that for a lucky break? — The End 



The "Hello Dere" comedy team of 
Marty Allen and Steve Rossi 
could be the Martin & Lewis of 

tomorrow. Keep your eye on this 
pair! 

Carol Burnett's helping them 
. . . Garry Moore's helping them 
. . . and Marty — the plump, wild- 
haired chap with the penguin walk 
— has caught the fancy of Abner 
Greschler, who managed Martin 
& Lewis into fame and fortune. He 
wants to star them in three big 
movies. "We need a slapstick team 
. . . there hasn't been one since 
Dean and Jerry," says Greschler, 
who's feeling his oats now because 
he happens to be managing Vince 



Edwards and Tony Randall also. 

Allen & Rossi have come up from 
the night clubs. They've transferred 
their humor to Garry Moore's show, 
primarily, without great alteration. 
I'm especially fond of their so-called 
interviews: Good-looking singing 
Steve Rossi playing the interviewer, 
with Marty being the subject . . . 
it doesn't matter which subject — 
anybody from Khrushchev to a 
lion-tamer — but always the inter- 
viewee must say "Hello dere" to 
the interviewer. 

Marty (playing a lion-tamer) : 
Hello dere! 

Steve: I know you're a famous 
lion-tamer. Do you hunt with a rifle? 



Marty: No. I hunt with a club. 
Steve: Aren't you afraid to hunt 
with a club? 

Marty: No. There are fifty of us. 
Steve: But you are carrying a 
gun. 

Marty: Yes. If a lion comes near 
me, I'll kill myself. 

Steve: I heard you crossed a lion 
with a skunk. What did you get? 
Marty: A dirty look from the 
lion. 

After which, Marty, on a recent 
show, recited a poem: 
"Early to bed, 
Early to rise, 
Until I get money 
To do otherwise." 



EARL 





WILSON'S 










/. .<■■■■■■. 






.: ■ 



: ; ; 

■.:.-.-..'-., 

,:■,:■ . 



Special gossip section: Read it here first! Read it here right! Each and every 
month, TV Radio Mirror brings you the scoopiest column in any magazine! 



Lucille Ball's husband Gary 
Morton is playing it very cool, try- 
ing in a most sincere manner to 
make the marriage work, and win- 
ning the admiration of their friends. 
Though Gary does the warmups for 
Lucille's new show when he's in 
Hollywood, he's never tried to inject 
himself into her program — nor has 
he tried to wangle an acting assign- 
ment out of the sprawling Desilu 
empire. 

Rather, he's heading the other 
direction: He's leased a golf center 
that's to be developed — and he's 
hoping to acquire books, plays and 
scripts and possibly become a pro- 
ducer. 

Even- his mother asked Gary how 
he and Lucy were getting along. Did 
they have any quarrels? 

"Honest, Mama," he crossed his 
heart, "we've never even raised our 
voices ! " 

In his popular night-club act, Gary 
seldom mentions Lucille, whom he 
calls "Lucy." He has occasionally 
said that "she's a wonderful cook 
. . . she cooked me a surprise dinner 
last night — she took the labels off 
the cans, so everything I ate was a 
surprise." But that's about as far as 
Gary's gone in an area where he 
could get plenty of laughs, at his 
wife's expense. 

As for Lucy's ex, Desi Arnaz, 




Art-Jackie feud is just a fake. 



the latest word from him is that he 
"thinks" he's going to marry Edie 
Mack Hirsch. 

FEARLESS FORECASTS: Ed 

McMahon is going to become a very 
big man in TV as Johnny Carson's 
announcer — -you can look for him 
eventually to get his own show, as 
Hugh Downs did with the help of 
Jack Paar's show. McMahon's got 
a quick wit and was one of the few 



able to shush Insultin' Sultan Jack 
E. Leonard recently at a party for 
Carson. McMahon told Jack E., "I 
thought you might favor me with 
one of your rare moments of cour- 
tesy." . . . CBS is trying to corral 
Keely Smith and Eydie Gorme 
for a spring spec. Bob Hope wanted 
Keely for his Christmas show but 
she begged off. explaining she 
wanted to be with her family. . . . 
Phil Everly will carry on solo. 
until brother Don recovers from his 
exhaustion, and will be booked sim- 
ply as The Everly Brother. . . . 
Chubby Checker fans predict the 
"Limbo Rock" will replace the fad- 
ing "Twist." . . . Perry Como's 
crew expect big things from young 
comic Bill Hinnant. 

"There's an awful lot of confusion 
and animosity on 'Route 66,' " we 
were informed by a source close to 
the program. And yes, "Route 66" 
has developed more bumps than a 
backwoods mud road. 

Part of the trouble was George 
Maharis' illness. Though he licked 
hepatitis in a couple of months 
(when normal recuperation often is 
six months), he was then restricted 
to a three-hour working day by his 
doctors. 

Courageously, he carried on. but 
producers (Please turn the page) 



But this bliss is for real! Cara isn't raising son John to be an actor, in spite of his dad — or is it because' 




EARL 






WILSON'S 



continued 



were eager to get as much footage 
of George as possible . . . frequently, 
he went beyond the three-hour day 
ordered just for him . . . and so 
then George wasn't always in the 
best of health — nor spirits. 

It didn't help things any. 

Then there was the animosity be- 
tween Maharis and co-star Marty 
Milner . . . Milner having been 
quoted saying he wasn't getting his 
fair share of the publicity. 

That seemed to date back to the 
filming of a segment in Dallas. A 
gal reporter for one of the papers 
came on the set and interviewed 
Maharis. The reporter then walked 
over to somebody on the set and 
announced: 

"I'm looking for Marty Milner." 

The person she asked just hap- 
pened to be Marty Milner. It re- 
portedly brought home to Milner 
most forcefully that he wasn't pub- 
licized sufficiently to be recognized. 

Jackie Gleason said it well when 
he claimed that "doing a TV series 
is a little like fighting a civil war. 
You don't rehearse any of it very 
much. Do you think they had much 
time to have a run-through of the 
Battle of Gettysburg?" 

That was Jackie's answer when 
Sue Ann Langdon complained that 
she didn't have much time to re- 
hearse with him. 

But Sue Ann sympathized with 
Jackie's problems and even realized 
why she didn't get as much to do as 
she had hoped. "Let's face it, tele- 
vision is a man's medium," she said. 
"It's very hard to find a situation 
for a woman on TV." 

How about, instead of Charlie the 
Barman, something like "Charlotte 
the Barmaid"? 

INSIDE STUFF: People used to 
have the idea that Jackie Gleason 
and Art Carney didn't like each 
other — didn't get along. The truth 
is just the opposite. Recently, I 



found Carney in Gleason's dressing 
room on Jackie's taping night. I 
figured Carney was on the show that 
night. No, he had just dropped in to 
sit around, chat with Jackie, and 
watch as much of the taping as he 
could before going to his own Broad- 
way show. 

We asked Steve Allen whether 
he watches much television. His an- 
swer: "I don't have much time . . . 
I'm working. But, as a matter of 
fact, I didn't watch much when I 
wasn't working." 

"They never come back" has been 
an accepted truism in baseball and 
boxing — but it's getting to be true 
in TV also. Not anxious to hurt 
anybody who's trying, we mention 
no names . . . yet, in a couple of in- 
stances recently, when veterans at- 
tempted to return after some years 
away, we sadly felt that they were 
merely passe. 

(I hope they had saved their 
money.) 

DON'T PRINT THAT!: A well- 
known Broadway actor didn't work 
out as a regular on a variety show 
and was dropped: "No reaction in 
the mail" was the reason. (You're 
supposed to get reaction from the 
viewers!). . . . Cara Williams, 
who doesn't want her son John 
Barry more III to be an actor, makes 
no secret of the fact she doesn't 
think her husband John Barry- 
more Jr. was much of an actor, 
either — even if he does like to wear 
beards. . . . 

Now's the time to tell the net- 
works how to run their business. So, 
how come they stack top shows 
against top shows . . . while, in 
other time slots, they must stack low 
shows against low shows — because 
there's nothing worth seeing? Why, 
Why? 

Danny Thomas has been trying, 
for three or four seasons now, to get 
a big TV series for Jan Murray. 
Danny wants to produce it. Recently 
there was a New York tribute to 
Danny which Jan got out of a sick 
bed to emcee. And when he spoke, 
Danny said, "Jan, you didn't have 
to do that. We're going to sell your 
show, anyway ! " 

Observing the declining ratings of 
"The Real McCoys," there are some 
viewers who say: "Kathy Nolan is 
very much missed." 

But speaking of ratings, what do 



they mean now — if anything? We 
phoned the Perry Como office and 
asked: "How's Perry doing with the 
ratings?" 

"Just a second. . . ." 
Much later: "Nobody knows." 
"Nobody knows!" (Echo.) 
"Years ago," the Como represen- 
tative said, "there was a big thing 
with the ratings. But nobody cares 
much about them anymore. We feel 
the best rating is the sponsor's open 
invitation to sign Perry for ten years 
more. Not just a few phone calls to 
an obscure little town in the Middle 
West." 

(However, on some of the net- 
works, when they want to argue how 
much better they are than a rival 
network, they drag out the ratings— 
I've seen it done recently.) 

Specialization? Sure! We were 
talking with "Marx Magic Midway" 
clown Doug (Mr. Pocus) Ander- 
son, and he remarked that his wife 
Gayle was trained in college to do 
what she does. 

"She has a master's degree in 
puppetry from Ohio State," the 
clown said, not clowning. 

I'll merely say that Ohio State 
has changed a lot since veterinary 
medicine was a big course, back in 
my day. .- 

The spot to see the celebrities of 
TV in New York is around "Kookie 
Korners" at 53d and Broadway. Ed 
Sullivan, Garry Moore, Jackie 
Gleason, Ted Mack, "What's My 
Line?" and some other shows are 
done there regularly, in the space 
of one block. The autograph hunters 
gather there constantly — especially 
at Ed Sullivan's stage door. It's 
called "Kookie Korners" because it's 
a section where the characters hang 
out . . . the Palladium, Birdland, 
Roseland, the International (home of 
"Minsky's Follies"), Lindy's, the 
Stage Delicatessen . . . and now the 
new Americana is only a block away. 
That's where you find the action. 

Frank DeVol, who got an Oscar 
nomination for his musical score of 
"Pillow Talk" and has done many 
big assignments in musical record- 
ing, turns up as an actor on the popu- 
lar new show, "I'm Dickens . . . 
He's Fenster." 

He prefers acting to composing. 
"In composing," he says, "it takes 
about two hours of work to produce 
a minute of music. That's a pretty 
long 'working day.' " 

—That's Earl! 



WHV OMNNE LtHHOH IS ADOPTING A CH1LOI 




JAN. 1963 



Bobby Scott, Music Editor 




MTBOBD 

/a\©/a\SDRD[1 




ThG NOW SOUndS « I sometimes wonder, what is really at the core 
of the recording industry. Is it all impulses? Are we being made, 
through Freudian suggestion, to buy certain recordings? Are the 
jackets really jackets? Are the trends contrived? Or do they occur 
naturally? 

Well, answers to all these questions would require extra-sensory 
knowledge, which would be better put to finding a way to bring down 
the Berlin Wall. But, I will try to offer a few explanations. 

Trends, as they relate to Latin-American dance rhythms like the 
Cha-Cha, Mambo — and the now-current Bossa Nova — are, relatively 
speaking, normal occurrences in a business which is constantly looking 
for new styles and relief from the usual. This area is very much like 
the fashion world's fleeting romances with material, style and lengths. 
The usual, that is the importing of a Latin pulse, has been made the 
unusual through the mixture of an exceedingly lyric jazz attitude, as 
in Stan Getz's "Desafinado." Here again we find something that ap- 
pears unusual. A jazz artist with a hit. But it really isn't. The jazz 
player is sort of an enigma because, of all the branches of the recording 
industries (with the exception of classical music), he is the mainstay 
of the catalogue. Or. as you would say more (Continued on page 16) 






Above: TV shows are bidding for Gordon and Sheilc 
MacRae to guest with their song-end-spoof act. . . 
Below: Don Everly collapsed in Europe, came home 
to recoup. Wife Venetia Stevenson expects a baby 






Above: Bobby Vinton and Buddy Greco drop by for an advance listen to George Ma- 
haris' latest for Epic. It's "Baby Has Gone Bye Bye" — and a new kind of sound for 
versatile George. . . . Below: Lome Greene, Dan Blocker and Pernell Roberts have hit a 
"bonanza" with their first album of the same name. It hasn't hurt them on TV, either. 



bove: Sandra Dee and Bobby Darin deny those 
>litsville rumors. . . . Below: "Sick" comic Lenny 
ruce may be sicker than anyone knew. Arrested on 
3rcotics charge, he hid in coat, bopped a photog. 





ON THE RECORD 




Your Monthly 

ON RECORD Gu/de 



POPULAR 

••••Oh! Look at Me Now, Bobby 
Darin; arr. and cond. by Billy May 
(Capitol) — This is Bobby's first album 
for Capitol, and it's unquestionably the 
best singing, in my humble opinion, 
I've heard Bobby come up with. The 
level is extremely high, professional 
and consistent. The tunes are all vintage 
standards done in a fresh mode. The 
decoration supplied by Billy May is 
a bubbly and swing-y background for 
Bobby to lean against, when the ma- 
terial calls for quiet pulsing. But it 
gets warm, too, as in "The Party's 
Over" and several other slow tracks. 

The most impressive tracks are the 
ones which build up to great shouting 
last choruses like "In Berkeley Square" 
and "I'm Beginning to See the Light." 
Bobby, ever so diligently, holds back 
the "Sunday punch" until it absolutely 
builds to it. (This is in direct opposi- 
tion to early Atco Records where he 
felt compelled to start strong.) 

His reverse in presenting his message 
is just another sign of his growing 
capabilities and sense of the dramatic. 
It shall indeed be interesting to see 
what effect this attitude has on his 
night-club performing. (If the public 
could only get over wanting a home run 
every time a performer gets up to bat, 
they might find themselves enjoying 
the more rewarding experience of 
watching a performer build an act to 
fever pitch "over the haul.") I'm sure it 
will mean some important new changes. 
Present here are classic tunes like 
"Blue Skies," "Always," and others. 

Aside from a more mature Darin, 
the album is a pleasurable way to spend 
your time. I'd look into it. 



12 




••••The Golden Hits of the 
Everly Brothers (Warner Bros.) — 
I make no bones about liking these 
lads. The fact of the matter is, they 
are among my favorites of the younger 
set of performers. Always consistent 
and always exhilarating, ihey possess 
the confidence of seasoned performers. 
Their rhythmical sense is uncanny. 
This album is a compilation of the 
hits, "That's Old Fashioned," "How 
Can I Meet Her" and "Cathy's Clown," 
to name a few. The magic of the 
Everlys permeates every groove of the 
album. "Lucille" is the capper! This 
album, I'm sure, will not be lying 




around the record shop long, so pick 
up on it. The young past-masters in 
action. 

••••Rapture, Johnny Mathis; arr. 
and cond. by Don Costa (Columbia) — 
There is no questioning Mr. Mathis' 
message here. His strongly personal 
style does not hinder his reading of 
the lyrics. He is, also, so tasteful in his 
choice of material. No doubt he could 
stick with the more simple market-type 
material, but instead he chooses the 
beautiful, the difficult vehicles, the songs 
with thoughts worth hearing about. 
With the aid of Don Costa's magnifi- 
cent arrangements, everything attempt- 
ed here is realized. 

The descending chromatic tones on 
the front of "Stars Fell on Alabama" 
certainly simulated the falling stars, 
and the way in which the orchestral 
colors were used in general did nothing 
but heighten the already moving ex- 
perience of Johnny singing his heart 
out. (May we have more like this from 



Columbia. This is real professionalism.) 
I can easily recommend this album. 
It's bewitching. Tunes herein are: "Rap- 
ture," Kurt Weill's "Here I'll Stay," 
the very rarefied "Lament," standards 
like "Stella by Starlight," "Love Nest,". 
'T Was Telling Her About You" and 
"Lost in Loveliness." All smooth and 
warm, rich and rare. Please buy it. 

•••One Is a Lonely Number, 

Adam Wade; arr. and cond. by Marty 
Manning (Epic) — Aside from the un- 
intentional fact that his vibrato — or the 
rate at which he pushes air through 
his vocal mechanism — is, relatively 
speaking, close to Johnny Mathis' pro- 
duction of sound, Adam is quite his 
own man. This album is highly profes- 
sional. The tunes are nearly all first- 
rate and the arrangements by Marty 
Manning are all unobtrusive and com- 
fortably laid out, so as to enhance the 
subtleties of Adam's musical expression. 

The strong tunes on the album are 
"One Is a Lonely Number," which 
Adam reads so poignantly, "Someone 
Mentioned Your Name," "Eight Million 
Stories," the lovely theme of TV's 
"Naked City" show, "I'm Gonna Laugh 
You Right Out of My Life," "I'll Never 
Be Free," with its blues quality, and 
"The Key to Love." 

I look for this lad to continue his 
climb up the ladder to the golden cir- 
cle. With vehicles like this album, he 
doesn't look like he can miss. 

•••Bobby Vee's Golden Greats 

(Liberty) — Well, there is not too much 
to say about this, other than that 
you've probably heard most of these 
big ones. If you want them all in one 
album, here's your chance. Instead of 
liner notes, this particular package has 
a questionnaire that Mr. Vee has so 
kindly filled out — biography, likes, dis- 
likes, etc. For those who will not buy 
it, here are some facts about young 
Bobby: 19 years old, born in North 
Dakota; five feet, ten inches tall; one 
hundred and fifty pounds on the scale. 
He likes girls and, as it would figure, 
his weakness is pretty ones. His cur- 
rent activity is the study of acting. 

This album has such hits on it as: 
"Take Good Care of My Baby," "Shar- 
ing You," "Walkin' With My Angel," 
and others. Check this one. 



'-MC-MC GREAT! 
-K-K-K GOOD LISTENING 



-JC-K FAIR SOUNDS 
-K IT'S YOUR MONEY 



JAZZ 

Vk"*VHtCircle Waltz, Don Friedman 
Trio (Riverside) — This is the most 
compelling jazz piano album I've heard 
in a dog's age. Considering Thoreau's 
reflective words about "Each of us is 
listening to our own drummer," one is 
comforted by the knowledge that the 
"'individual," who may not be strutting 
up front, is still very much with us. Don 
Friedman is such an individual. To 
draw another analogy, he's a pacifist 
in the intensely war-like protestations 
of the contemporary jazz world. This 
album secures for this reviewer the 




feeling that the personal hasn't left jazz. 

The tunes in the album which were 
the most rewarding, I'm happy to say, 
were Don's originals. The title tune 
"Waltz," which sets the pace of the 
album so beautifully, is a finely wrought 
tapestry of small-ish harmonic masses. 
(This track also shows bassist Chuck 
Israels to advantage.) "Sea's Breeze" 
is another of Don's gems. 

Don has been influenced by Bud 
Powell, but has gone on to his own 
message. Still evident is Powell's bal- 
ladic style where Don plays in an ad- 
lib fashion. It's not imitation, but rather 
a natural occurrence of tradition and 
admiration, no doubt. Melodically, Don 
seems his own entirely! 

There is no doubt that Friedman's 
jazz playing will never become vogue. 
It does require your coming to it. It's 
not the resounding din of shouting, but 
more like a murmur. Subtle, elegant, 
and unassuming. . . . This is one of the 
finest jazz albums this year. 



*** Benny Goodman in Moscow, 

recorded in Russia during his recent 
tour (RCA Victor, 2 L.P.s)— The tour 
of Russia in some ways was a fiasco. 
The band mutinied on the closing day, 
and nothing but extremely distasteful 
stories have come from the members 
of the orchestra about Benny's megalo- 
maniacal behavior. (Byron Janis, the 
most talented of the young American 
classical pianists, performed a Gersh- 
win piece with the band at one concert 
and failed miserably. As the members 
of the band relate it, it was because of 
a near amateur-ish accompaniment that 
the band complemented him with. The 
reason, say the band leaders: Benny.) 

The band that toured Russia was full 
of very large talents . . . Zoot Sims 
and Phil Woods, two first-rate jazz 
players, ex-Kenton drummer Mel Lewis, 
along with legendary Teddy Wilson. In 
the brass section, we find two ex-Basie- 
ites, Joe Newman and Joe Wilder. On 
the whole, a band that only the govern- 
ment could afford to pick up the tab for. 

Side One has the Goodman theme 
"Let's Dance" leading off in terse form. 
The high point is the band's ensemble 
playing in "Meet the Band" and Phil 
Woods' and Zoot Sims' soloing on "Tit- 
ter Pipes." Side Two has some small- 
band, inner-group things, which show 
Benny to no advantage. (As a matter 
of fact, the high register playing of the 
leader started to grate on this reviewer. ) 
Teddy Wilson turned in some admirable 
pianistics on this small band medley. 
(Oh! spare us those screeching repeti- 
tive phrases.) Joe Newman's vitality 
on "Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen" saved the 
tune. Side Three finds the band shout- 
ing again. "Feathers," a romping origi- 
nal by pianist John Bunche, Zoot Sims' 
stimulating solo on "On the Alamo," 
Joe Newman's blues riff "Midgets" and 
the band's settled groove on "One 
O'Clock Jump" brings the album back 
to the Side One groove. The last side 
finds the material a bit more modern. 
Two originals by arranger-composer 
Tadd Dameron. A swinger called "Swift 
as the Wind" and an impressionistic por- 
trait of "Fontainbleu." (Some players 
in the band mentioned some very well- 
written arrangements by Oliver Nelson. 
None are on this album.) The band is 
a surprise. Considering the publicity, 
I thought it would be chaotic, but it 
isn't. It's a sound musical offering. 



***Mose Allison Takes to the 

Hills (Epic) — Mose Allison is cer- 
tainly a pick-up. Being Mississippi-born- 
and-bred, he knows what he's talking 
about. Unfortunately, not all the cuts 
on this album are first-rate — but where 
Mose excels, something really happens. 
The interpretation of "Baby, Please 
Don't Go" is darn near classic. But the 
album also has some standard tunes 
and jazz piano solos that easily could 
be done without. This chap is capable 
of a complete individual musical identi- 
ty. Why the producers of Mr. Allison's 
recordings can't see where his talent 
lies is beyond this reviewer. 



MOSE AU1SON 
TAKES TO THE HILLS 



# 




Still, if you haven't heard Mose, you 
should investigate this rural rascal. The 
cover is a prize winner, if I've ever 
seen one. It's a reprint of a painting 
by Robert Gwathmey. Take a look at it ! 

FOLK 

***Songs from the Hills of Done- 
gal, Margaret Barry (Washington) — 
This album was very close to being a 
four-star effort, but Miss Barry's ban- 
jo playing, the harmonic .structures 
(chords) in particular, made a great 
mess of things at times. "Lagan Love," 
which is one of the most beautiful ex- 
amples of the modal Gaelic literature, 
was musically clobbered. On the other 
hand, Miss Barry's unaccompanied sing- 
ing is enchanting. The two examples 
here, "The Galway Shawl" and "The 
Factory Girl," are very impressive. Her f 
biting quality is more suited for ma- v 
terial apart from the developed, lieder- " 
type, Irish repertoire. The high point 



ON THE RECORD 




ON RECORD Guide 



14 



of the album is an interesting modal 
tune, called "The Turfman from Ar- 
dee," on which Miss Barry uses the 
appropriate chord changes. Also in- 
cluded is a beautiful melodic air called 
"The Flower of Sweet Strabane." (It's 
also known in Scotland as "The Banks 
of the Nile.") The album is worth hav- 
ing as part of your collection. Miss 
Barry is the "real article." 

MOOD MUSIC 

••••The Man with the Blue Gui- 
tar, Johnny Smith, guitarist (Roost) — 
Johnny Smith can never be heard from 
too much! Due to some personal trag- 
edy, he is no longer seen around New 
York and rarely ever puts his small 
jazz group together anymore. He now 
resides in Colorado and does very little 
traveling. (He recorded at his school.) 
The album is an enchanting and re- 
warding experience. It's a solitary and 
subtle guitar, with wind blowing over 
the strings and bringing all the shades 
of blue with it. Yet Johnny's "Blue 
Guitar" is not an oppressive one but 
rather one embracing the essence of 
simple understatement. He weaves 
through "Shenandoah," Gershwin's 
classic "Porgy," Debussy's masterpiece 
"The Maid with the Flaxen Hair," and 
some wonderful Richard Rodgers tunes 
which include "My Romance," "Little 
Girl Blue," "My Funny Valentine" and 
"Wait Till You See Her." It's indeed 
unfortunate that Johnny is not con- 
stantly before us, brewing his magic, 
but be grateful for his recorded efforts. 

••••So Pretty, Herb Steward with 
The Dick Hazard Strings (Choreo) — 
As mood albums go, this month has 
seen the best. Between Johnny Smith's 
"Blue Guitar" and this warm and won- 
derful package, no one could ask for 
more. Herbie Steward turns in a won- 
derful job of playing. Jumping from 
clarinet to tenor and from time to time 
playing alto, he keeps the professional 
level high. Dick Hazard's arrangements 
are more than decoration. He has 
searched the harmonic schemes of each 
tune and brought out its message. 
The tunes are every bit up to Hazard's 
writing and Herb's playing. Some are 
infrequently heard, such as the Hoagy 
Carmichael gem "Memphis in June" 
and Louis Armstrong's favorite "Do 



You Know What It Means to Miss New 
Orleans." "Indian Summer" is here, so 
is "Among My Souvenirs." 

The quality of the record need not 
be searched for. Just play it! 

CLASSICAL 

••••Masterpieces for Violin and 
Piano, Arthur Rubinstein, pianist, and 
Henryk Szeryng, violinist; Sonatas No. 
2 and No. 3 by Johannes Brahms (RCA 
Victor) —Although Mr. Szeryng (pro- 
nounced: Sheer-ing) did not show him- 
self to advantage on the recently re- 
leased Brahms Violin Concerto on 
Mercury, here he is heard in a chamber 
music area. He is definitely much more 
at home in such a setting, and with the 
living legend of Rubinstein on hand, 
the works here achieve a level of emo- 
tionality and performance unmatched. 
This album is the third in a series of 
important violin and piano works. The 
first album covered Beethoven's con- 
tribution to this area, the "Spring" and 
"Kreutzer" sonatas. The second album 
contained Beethoven's Eighth Sonata 
and Brahms' First. As remarkable as 
this second album is, I believe the 
third even more worthwhile. The First 
Brahms Sonata is heavily laden with 
Schumann-esque qualities; in this al- 
bum we hear the later works, and in 
the interim Brahms discovered himself. 
Szeryng and Rubinstein in their per- 
forming do not pay lip service to one 
musical attitude at the expense of an- 
other. Throughout both works, they let 
the music chart its own course. When 
there are ritardandos, they rarely are 
lavish and do not propel these works 
into another category. Rubinstein seems 
the stabilizing element. His conscious- 




i , 



dDt.J 



ness of the parts in which even metric 
units are required, helps keep intact 
Brahms' sinewy scheme. In the slower 
movements, both artists exercise their 
lyric sides without the excesses. Of 
these two sonatas, I believe the later, 
No. 3, is a much more integrated work. 
It seethes with a passion not unlike the 
tzigane of the gypsies. No. 2 is a more 
reflective work. Here, in No. 2, Brahms 
had no little problem marrying the in- 
struments. Whereas the Third Sonata 
seems to see the end of Brahms' prob- 
lem of marrying elements and instru- 
ments. The rhythmical elements in the 
Third alone prove his disenchantment 
with saccharine statements. He is core 
from the first to last page. 

For those interested in possibly 
the most difficult area of composition, 
chamber music, these are a must. 

••The Sound of Lincoln Center 

(first recordings made at the new Phil- 
harmonic Hall) : Brahms' Symphony 
No. 2 in D Major; The New York Phil- 
harmonic, Leonard Bernstein conduct- 
ing (Columbia) — As of yet, your re- 
viewer, who has been caught in a maze 
of activities, has not been able to get 
to Lincoln Center, so I have no valid 
opinion of its acoustical qualities. But 
if this recording is any indication, they 
are in trouble. The only other reason 
for the strident sound of this album 
could be the recording setup itself. I'm 
sure, though, Columbia has efficient 
engineers, so it must have something 
to do with the Hall. Bernstein conducts 
this marvelous Brahms work with very 
little fire. It constantly bogs down. 
There are deliberate moments where 
the flow of Brahms is lost through over- 
reading-into the work. At other times 







-MC*-fc GREAT! 
-K-K-K GOOD LISTENING 



-Mc ra if? ^oc/Af o« 

-K IT'S YOUR MONEY 



the underpinnings, when fitted out with 
important lines, remain undercover. One 
important strand of this tapestry is a 
phrase of four notes, which is played 
by the cellos — it opens the work and 
is repeated constantly throughout the 
First Movement with Variation. On one 
such part, your reviewer found some 
ponderous, middle register brass figures 
completely covering this major part of 
the organic whole. Oh, well, the record 
has its moments, but the work has been 
performed better. About the acoustics 
in Lincoln Center, only heaven knows 
what can be done about them. 

SPECIAL 

****Ten Great Bands: Glenn Mil- 
ler, Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, Duke 
Ellington, Count Basie, Larry Clinton, 
Louis Armstrong, Hal Kemp, Lionel 
Hampton and Benny Goodman. (Spe- 
cial package — limited price offer, RCA 
Victor, 5 L.P.s) — This kind of pack- 
age, I hope, is what we'll be getting 
from here on in, as the recording indus- 
try comes out of its infancy: History! 
This special package is a document of a 
period. A stirring period called the 
swing era. A time during the Thirties 
and early Forties when the "dance 
band" was king. (When Tommy Dorsey 
counted among his vocal company Jo 
Stafford, Connie Haines and a thin 
chap called Sinatra!) A period in big 
band dance and jazz music which 
couldn't help outdoing itself year in 
and year out. 

An early Goodman, then later in '38 
another re-vitalized and resurgent Good- 
man . . . Jimmy Lunceford and Fletcher 
Henderson setting a pace which was 
caught and surpassed by Count Basie 
... (a Basie who, as recently as five 
short years ago, was sitting on top of 
the world with a roaring band and the 
vocal talent of Joe Williams). . . . The 
semi-forgotten voices which persist 
quietly. . . . The brass style of Hal 
Kemp, the arranger-bandleader Larry 
Clinton and other short-lived, worth- 
while, excursions. . . . The tangents off 
Goodman which produced Krupa, 
Hampton and Harry James. ... It was 
an exciting time full of dynamic musi- 
cal moments. In this "Ten Great Bands" 
package, it all comes alive again. Each 
band has one side of an L.P. (six 
tunes, that is. from each band). 



As a whole, this mammoth package is 
a rewarding experience. An anthology, 
a glimpse, a thread leading back twenty- 
five years. RCA is certainly deserving 
of applause for this monument to an age 
x that, surprising as it may seem, is a 
mystery to the large bulk of young 
people in America. (The cover is in 
keeping with Victor's Soria Series. 
Built for wear. The booklet of notes 
could be more enlightening.) 

JAZZ: MOOD 

****Desmond Blue, Paul Des- 
mond with Strings; arr. and cond. by 
Bob Prince; featuring Jim Hall (RCA 
Victor) — The reason for the category 
is simply that this album is large in 
spectrum. It's probable that record fans 
of a generalized taste can easily enjoy 
it. It's a warming example of fine taste 
in choice of material and glowing- 
ly direct in its intent. Paul Desmond, 
who is by far the most popular saxo- 
phonist in America, is here heard in an 
entirely different setting from the Bru- 
beck group, with which we are so ac- 
customed to hearing him. 

Here, there are woodwinds, and 
strings, splashes from the harp and per- 
cussion section and an attempt by ar- 
ranger Bob Prince to write organically, 
so that each piece realizes itself com- 
pletely. Paul's own two compositions 
are delights. "Desmond Blue," though 
rooted in blues material, is an ele- 
gantly fragile cobweb of blues-type 
melodic trajectories. His "Late Lament" 
is another example of his fine composi- 
tional sense. The other tunes are all 
standards dressed up like every day was 
Sunday. Paul's wonderful lyric concep- 
tion could hardly find a better comple- 




ment. He soars over the strings and con- 
verses with the woodwinds. 

This is a much more honest and valu- 
able expression than what is heard on 
many new jazz albums. Whether your 
niche is jazz, mood or the warm and 
embracing musical experience gen- 
erally, I suggest you take a listen to 
what I like to think of as the nightin- 
gale of jazz, Paul Desmond. 

CHORAL: CHRISTMAS 

***It Came Upon a Midnight 
Clear, The Roger Wagner Chorale 
with the Sinfonia of London; Roger 
Wagner, cond. (Capitol) — There is 
more of the momentous Christmas feel- 
ing in this album than in several others 
this reviewer has received this season. 

Roger Wagner, being a gifted con- 
ductor as well as master of the choral 
idiom, brings us refreshing new ver- 
sions of some traditional material. He 
does not skirt the counterpoint (or 
descant style, as the hymnals call it) 
but brings us the traditional form with 
an injection of new but unobtrusive 
harmonies and melodic invention. 

The orchestral writing is wonderfully 
integrated into the choral scheme. It 
never shrouds the voices, but is always 
there to enhance as well as set the 
mood. Wagner's arranging can only be 
called economic in material and glori- 
ous in dramatic intent. On the title 
tune the chorus begins singing as if in 
the distance, then grows — and finally 
fades as if the singers had passed on 
to sing their carols at the next house. 

I hate to use the word respectable, 
but it seems the logical one when one 
considers the respect that is given here 
to this music. A lovely Yuletime album. 







SINGLES 



1) Further More/Saturday Night at the Movies, 

Ray Stevens (Mercury) — Well, old "Ahab" has come off 
them burning sands and is strongly in the running again 
with his belly-laffin' "Further More." The flip is good, but 
a little long drawn. 

2) Chains/Stranger in My Arms, The Cookies (Di- 
mension) — "Chain" looks like a winner, the ladies sure belt 
it out. The flip is just a filler. This could be another "Loco- 
motion." 

3) No One Can Make My Sunshine Smile/Don't Ask 
Me to Be Friends, The Everly Brothers (Warner Bros.) — 
If this isn't a hit, I'll eat the record. The lads are in fine 
fettle here. "No One," I believe, is the stronger, but the flip 
has a message the teenagers will dig. 

4) Spanish Lace/Somebody's Waiting, Gene McDan- 
iels (Liberty) — This chap may be on his way to another 
big one with "Lace." It's a tune composed by Tin Pan Alley's 
great team of Pomus and Shuman. Gene, aided by the Johnny 
Mann Singers, turns in a fine performance. The flip is im- 
probable. Look for this one to be big. 

5) The Payoff /Cast Your Fate to the Wind, Martin 
Denny (Liberty) — Martin Denny, riding high on the L.P. 
charts with his latest album, "Taste of Honey," now has the 
follow-up to his single "Honey." Liberty informs me "Cast 
Your Fate" is the strong side, but this reviewer sees more 
potential in "The Payoff." Some fine Denny piano. 

6) Hercules/I'm Gonna Clip Your Wings, Frankie 
Vaughn (Philips) — This record is the kind that could sneak 
up on you. Frankie turns in a shouting performance as the 
man who, when in love, is "Hercules." The flip will not set 
the world on fire, but, with some deejay help, "Hercules" 
could be a monster hit. 

7) Every Step of the Way/Blues Stay Away From 
Me, Pat and Shirley Boone (Dot) — Although Pat and Shirley 
turn in an exciting performance on "Blues," "Every Step" 
seems the stronger competition for hit honors. Both mem- 
bers of this talented Boone family carry their own weight. 

8) I Am/Earthquake, Roy Hamilton (Epic) — Here 
again the record company feels "I Am" is the strong side, 
but I take issue with them. Roy's original "Earthquake" has 
much more market value. It's a winner from the arrangement 
and voices to Roy's vital rendition. 

9) Come to Me/Weddin' Bells, Richard "Popcorn" 
Wylie (Epic) — Epic again climbs the chart with this com- 
parative newcomer, "Popcorn" Wylie. He's sort of a cross 
between Fats Domino and Sam Cooke. His voice is not his 
meat and potatoes, but rather his stylizing is his trump. 

10) Cold, Cold Heart/I Don't Hurt Anymore, Dinah 
Washington (Mercury) — Well, the "Queen" is on the scene! 
The Hank Williams' classic "Cold, Cold Heart" looks as 
if it can get more mileage than "I Don't Hurt Anymore." As 
usual, Miss Washington turns in a glowing performance. 



THE NEW SOUNDS 

Continued from page 9 

simply, he's an album-maker, not a 
single record maker. He can experi- 
ment, due to the fact that, if his repu- 
tation and sales value are strong, he is 
presold. Of course, huge success can 
sometimes kill the chances of opening 
new avenues of expression. 

Another large trend seems to be the 
"Nashville sound." Many artists have 
been flying to Nashville to make their 
single efforts. Aside from the fact that 
Elvis, the Everly Brothers and Brenda 
Lee make all their records there (to 
say nothing of Patti Page, Clyde Mc- 
Phatter, Damita Jo and Brook Ben- 
ton ) , the reason for Nashville, I believe, 
is that rock 'n' roll and country-and- 
Western have found a denominator and 
have blended. Evidence of each is ap- 
parent on the other's shining examples. 
There is now growing a new style, an 
individual attitude, which will one day 
no longer be a middle ground. For the 
present it's called "the Nashville sound." 
Geographically, the reason for it being 
"Nashville" is simply that, in that fair 
city, reside musicians who have ab- 
sorbed two styles and can marry them 
without it becoming a disconcerting mo- 
rass. These players, who do ninety 
percent of the accompanying, also have 
the capabilities to improvise arrange- 
ments, in the same sense as gypsy musi- 
cians in Europe and our own jazz 
players. To those watching the music 
scene, this amalgamation has been in 
the coming since the world started 
shrinking after World War II. 

Another thing that appears to be 
a trend is the large album. This, too. 
seems to be part of a natural sequence 
of events. The recording industry just 
now begins to leave its infancy behind. 
It's older and broader in its backlog. 
Subsequently, Decca, for instance, can 
put out a Crosby package with numer- 
ous L.P.s and cover twenty-five years 
of Crosby's career. Yes, soon, as with 
other developed mediums of expression, 
you will find the historic element in 
L.P. packages. I cheer it. I think that 
it opens the door to possibly the best 
way, with the exception of the film art. 
to look back and absorb the past. 
Through this medium, it can remain a 
vital expression. A living one. All in all, 
a marvelous achievement and one that 
cannot be developed or extended 
enough. — Till next month. 



A New York man, caught unawares in the subicay by "Candid Camera," has given his 
candid opinion of the show by hurling a $100,000 damage suit against all concerned. 
Here is the evidence the court will hear. Read both sides, and judge for yourself. 



Perhaps you remember the show. 
The plaintiffs, Richard and Pauline 
Marshall, will never forget it. The 
scene opened inside an IRT subway 
train. On your TV screen, you saw 
a crowded (Continued on page 63) 



CBS, Arthur Godfrey (the show's 
original emcee) and Allen Funt (its 
creator) deny all charges and allega- 
tions that relate to the "doctoring" 
or "rigging" of "Candid Camera." 
The fourth (Continued on page 64) 



What I Want for My Wife. 



"My marriage will not be like 
my parents' marriage . . ." 

These words were spoken 
openly by Dick Chamberlain, 
and he meant what he said. He 
wasn't complaining. He doesn't 
find anything wrong with the 
way his mother and father led 
their lives — for them. 

But it's not for him. 

Dick was leveling on a sub- 
ject near and dear to his heart, 
for he is now closer than ever 
to marriage. He admitted that. 

And the lucky girl is Clara 
Ray, who has been Dick's best 
girl for more than two years. 

I asked Dick how close to 
marriage he really was. 

"I don't want to answer that 
question just yet," Dick said. 
"I'll answer it before you go, 
but first I want to give you 
some of my thoughts about mar- 
riage. That's what you asked me 
in the first place, isn't it?" 

Dick was right. I had seen 
him making friends with a little 
boy in the park — and this had 
set us both thinking. There must 
have been something about that 
child which reminded Dick of 




his past — and his future. Some- 
thing that set Dick to talking 
more frankly than ever before. 

"To begin with," he said, 
"any person who thinks of get- 
ting married must be able to 
analyze himself honestly and 
ask: 'Am I ready for it?' 

"You've got to have a little 
stable spot within yourself 
which is always there, always 
to be counted on. Just as you 
can count on it when you pound 
your fist on a coffee table. It's 
solid wood. It's there. It's 
real." 

Dick paused. This was impor- 
tant to him. "Am I getting 
through to you?" he asked in 
a half-puzzled tone. 

"I'm with you," I assured 
him. 

"Okay," Dick continued with 
relief. "Let me say that mar- 
riage is a responsibility. That's 
not a new thought, but it doesn't 
hurt to remember it. Too many 
husbands and wives don't real- 
ize their obligations — they don't 
realize them before they've 
taken the step, and they don't 
realize (Continued on page 85) 



What I Want for My Son. 



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Dick and Clara Ray haven't 
set a ddte yet, but a chance 
meeting with a little boy in 
the park may bring it closer. 





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In center stage was Lucv 
Ball, clowning for her new 
TV show. She had never 
looked better or been 
funnier. But two men, 
watching from opposite 
ends of the set, practi- 
cally stole the scene from 
her. At one side was 
Gary Morton, her present 
husband — laughing. At 
the other was Desi Arnaz, 
her past husband — and he 
was not laughing. Of 
course, Desi could alibi 

(Continued on page 68,) 



She Cant Escape 



21 



VINCE EDWARDS 
AND THOSE 




No one can talk him out of it. Vince Edwards is laying his life on 
the line. The place: the lush Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas. "I'm taking 
the biggest gamble of my life," he told us, "and I don't mean the 
tables or the slot machines going full blast in the casino!" Of course, 
it's no news that Vince has always liked a fair risk, that he has on 
occasion played the ponies. But this time it's different; this time there's 
much more at stake for him than a cash jackpot. (Please turn the page) 



22 



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continued 

Vince will climb up on that famous 
stage, open his mouth and sing. It 
sounds simple, and it would've been 
before "Ben Casey." It isn't now. 

"I know I have a lot to lose if this 
thing goes sour," he said. "It's 
taken me many hard, bitter years to 
make it as a TV star. I'd hate to 
see all I've gained this past year, 
especially the respect of the public, 
go down the drain because I didn't 
measure up. Let's face it, this Riviera 
stage has seen some of the greatest 
talent in the world." 

It would not be the first time in 
recent months that Vince has risked his 
hard-won fame and fortune. With 
"Ben Casey" leading the popularity 
polls, he had still insisted on taking 
time off to do a movie in Europe. 
Against the advice of cooler, more 
cautious heads, he flew to Italy to 
play a starring role in "The Victors." 

Advance word is that, in the case 
of the film, the gamble has paid off. 
According to producer Carl Foreman: 
"Vince's fans may not recognize the 
image of their favorite doctor in the 
role he plays, but a new image will be 
created, perhaps even a more 
important one in the sense of his 
theatrical career. Edwards has proved 
himself as a dramatic star." 

Having proved himself twice over, 
Vince might have decided to let well 
enough alone. But he couldn't. For 
Vince, there was a compelling reason 
to risk it all again by facing a live 
and tough audience in one of the 
best-known hotels in the country. 

To a friend he wrote: "I had trouble 
making up my mind about going 
to Las Vegas. It sounded risky. Then 
one night in Rome, I needed to . 
think. I took a walk up the Palatine 
Hill and then to the Colosseum. 
Sherry was far away in California and 
I had no one to talk things over 
with. I looked (Continued on page 73) 



In Italy . . . alone . . . without 
Sherry .. .Vince knew he could 
never back out. He had 
to gamble with his own life! 




24 







25 



Why w£is Ixe hiding' 



"rom what? W*irom wVkoni 



Gardner McKay had walked out of Hollywood — perhaps "run" is a better word — without leaving so much as a for- 
warding address. He had disappeared, too, out of the lives of all but a few close friends — you could probably count 
them on one hand and still have fingers left over. But when a man like Gard disappears, there are bound to be ques- 
tions. The answers came to us in a letter postmarked Paramaribo, Surinam — port of entry to one of the wilder and 
more uncivilized sections of South America. As Gard explained, when he paused there long enough to write, "I've re- 
turned to civilization for a while." He had grown a beard and he enclosed a picture of his new gone-native look. "Next 
Wednesday," he continued, "I go back into the jungle for ten days. I'll be with a Bush Negro and an Amerindian — 
good company for the hostile areas. We were four days on the Maronijne River, which seems to be wider than the Mis- 
sissippi. Wide, flat, mysterious. And the jungle . . . the eagres and piranhas . . . Bush Negroes who are descended 
from escaped slaves. . . . The Amerindians are wonders — I saw one stand in fire for thirty seconds! . . . I'm going back 

tonight . . . this time I want to reach the Amazon ... I shot some film 
here — Surinam and a couple of experiences such as a wild boar hunt 
and catching piranhas (fish). We're leaving at 2200 hours by boat and 
will go from the Surinam River to the Coesewejne to the Coppenaime (?) 
to the Tibiti River. I love the jungle. Sleeping at 
night (Brazilian hangmat with mosquito net so thick 
you can hardly see through it) and hearing the 
sounds is thrilling. There are boa constrictors, and 








fB I have seen them and 

^^ they don't want to make 

trouble. But if you cross 
the path of an animal 
while he's hunting, you're on your own! There are tapirs, wild boar, deer, jaguars and plenty of monkeys and parrots. 
I've never been closer to animals than I am here. I want to tell you more but can only give you vague impressions — 
the river, big ... the trees high and spreading ... the people good ... the air can be fine and dry, and then again 
humid. I'll try to shoot a pakira, which is the best pork around. . . . It's nearly nine and I'm off on a beautiful night 
of river travel, followed by several days of wandering in untouched, deep, fantastic country. . . . All my love to you 
and to the dog (Pussycat). Gard." It's strange . . . Gard's letter was like a promise kept. When he was filming 
"Adventures in Paradise," he was always saying that one day he would do this — take off for parts unknown and un- 
tamed. But with a career like he had going — in high-gear — nobody had thought he would really do it, perhaps not 
even those of us who thought we knew him best. Gard never hid the fact that he felt there were serpents in Hollywood, 
that the pace people lived at, the compromises they had to make, the fronts they thought they had to put up, spoiled 
this "paradise." Yet it's, too easy to blame Hollywood for too much. There was another reason Gard had walked out 
of the town and into the jungle. And that was himself. Not yet thirty, Gard has had a crowded life — as a writer, a 
painter, a professional photographer and, last of all, an actor. Perhaps he has been so busy doing, he hasn't had 
the time he needs for simply being. And perhaps only the deepest jungle was big enough and lonely enough to give a 
man like Gard the protective cover he needed while he hid from his own false selves and worked at discovering who he 
really was. . . . We found Gardner McKay ... we can only hope that his own search for himself has the same happy 
ending. Reading between the lines of his latest letter, we think it has. Gard says he's coming home! The End 



27 









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- 

Perhaps the hardest pain to bear is not our own but that of the ones we 
love. Jacqueline Kennedy has been living with this for a year now, ever 
since that awful Tuesday when, like a giant oak crashing down, Joe Ken- 
nedy fell ill. For Jackie, it was a heartbreak many (Please turn the page) 



rat, 



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REAL 




FOR 
REAL 
LOVE 




plus 



Out in the rain — with Teddy Randazzo. 




THE 




YOU 
CAN'T 



Left and above: Connie, Mark Damon. 




Exclusive! From Connie Francis' new book . . . for every heart 
that ever questioned its choice— or wondered where the thrill 
has gone. Whether you're married, engaged— or just looking— 
Connie's tests reveal some surprising answers. See next page! 



33 



Do You Respect Each Other Enough? This 
doesn't mean hero worship. This doesn't mean 
you're impressed with each other's looks or talent 
or anything superficial or material. It means you 
respect each other as human beings. ... In order 
to build that lasting love we all want, two people 
must respect each other's feelings, intelligence and 
ideals. Without respect, you have nothing. With 
it, a wife can make her husband happy — and it 
works both ways. . . . This doesn't mean that you 
wear perpetual rose-colored glasses when you 
look at each other, or that you tell each other 
things that aren't true, or that you build one an- 
other up into something you're not. . . . How- 
can you tell when there's enough respect? You 
might give yourself this little yes-or-no quiz: 1. 

Are you interested in each other's interests? 

2. Do you like to hear him talk? 3. Do you 

ask each other's opinion in practical matters, such 
as what movie to see, whether to get a pizza or a 

hamburger afterward, etc.? 4. Do you think 

he's at least as smart as you? 5. Do you have 

faith in his abilities to find work that will satisfy 
him and provide the necessities of life for his wife 

and children? 6. After dating several nights 

a week for a year, can you still find something new 

to talk about? Something to do besides neck? 

7. Do you trust each other's judgment? 8. 

Does he try to change your mind in matters of 

morals? 9. Do either of you lose interest 

quickly in what the other's saying? 10. Is it 

easier to fib to each other than tell the truth? 
(You can check your answers at the end!) 



Can You Accept Each Other? You can, if you 
never think of marrying a boy with the idea of 
changing him. Sometimes you hear people say, 
"You know, he's completely changed since he met 
her!" I say there's no such thing. Your basic per- 
sonality, your major likes and dislikes are formed 
during childhood. You can change for a person 
you love only in small, unimportant ways. . . . 
Falling in love has been called everything from 
pure bliss to a state akin to neurosis, and when 
we're in love, we're willing to blind ourselves to 
each other's faults for the duration. . . . Everybody 
who stays in love deeply enough to get married 
does this to a certain extent. You like certain 
qualities about your loved one enough to minimize 
his faults, thinking, "Well, I don't like the way he 
rushes through dinner, but I guess that's a pretty 
small fault." ... If people didn't do this, they prob- 
ably wouldn't get married in the first place. But, 
if you blind yourself to basic problems or dislike 
qualities or habits that are rooted in the other's 
personality, these are things that can gnaw away 
at your marriage later. . . . The test is this: Can 
you see him as he really is, then accept him for 
it? Don't be in for a rude awakening after mar- 
riage. Don't think the little things you try to con- 
vince yourself don't matter now will disappear. 
They won't. Only the smallest things can change — 
if he loves you enough to take the trouble. ... If 
you don't accept each other's odd little ways or 
personal foibles at the start, you certainly won't 
be able to afterward, when practical, everyday 
problems force you to be more practical every day! 



love 



Do You Feel Right Together? It's been said that 
"when you're in love, the ugliest places become 
beautiful." I believe that, too. A place — whether 
it's a house or a room or a mansion — isn't impor- 
tant in itself. Neither are the circumstances, or the 
situation — wealth or poverty, glamour or plain- 
ness. What counts is the person you share that 
room or house or mansion with. I have some won- 
derful memories of places I used to think were 
ugly when I first saw them, but when I was in 
love they seemed to have a new and lovely aura. 
. . . It's not enough to respect each other, though 
that's the cornerstone. It's not enough to accept 
each other — because you must do that with friends, 
family, and anyone in fife you expect to know and 
get along with. But with the man you love, there 
has to be the feeling of being right together, at 
home together, in any circumstances. ... At a 
party, with friends or strangers, alone with each 
other for one hour or ten — you've got to feel com- 
fortable and at ease together. You can be yourself 
. . . you're not afraid to let him know you're not 
sophisticated or witty all the time . . . you can talk 
for a couple of hours or just read without having 
to go check your hair in the mirror every five 
minutes . . . you can wear pin-curls or go without 
lipstick. But this doesn't mean that you become 
careless, either about your person or the things 
you say. . . . Feeling at home and right with a 
boy is very much like feeling at home and right 
with your own family, except for the aura that 
turns plainness into beauty. . . . That aura makes 
the difference. And the difference is being in love. 






Do You Bring Out Extras in Each Other? When 
you're with a boy you love, you'll never have 
talked so much about yourself before, or listened 
so hard! You'll admit things you never told any- 
body about yourself — incidents that made you se- 
cretly happy or miserable, personal traits that 
you're unsure of or ashamed about. And you'll 
never discover so much about yourself — so many 
surprising, wonderful discoveries that you both 
make together. . . . What happens is that you bring 
out something extra in each other — new dimen- 
sions. The relationship doesn't set like a gelatine; 
it remains fluid and dynamic, like sparkling water. 
If a love has only one or two dimensions, it's not 
going to remain fluid very long. To keep that 
sparkling quality, you have to be a combination of 
things to him and he has to be many things to you. 
You have to preserve some of that first excitement 
together. . . . The most successful relationships are 
the ones in which we can be many people — or 
perhaps more completely ourselves — to someone 
else. When two people can satisfy many needs for 
each other, they can preserve variety and excite- 
ment in their relationship and keep their marriage 
dynamic. When they share many things they both 
enjoy, they just naturally have more things to do 
and say together. . . . The difference is that you 
can go out with a dozen other people and things 
they say don't seem really important. But with 
the person you love, everything becomes important 
— everything you see and think and feel. And you 
see and think and feel much more because you 
share with each other. (Continued on page 76) 



34 



From the book "For Every Young Heart" by Connie Francis. © 1962 by Connie Francis. Published by Prentice-Hail, Inc.. Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. 



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DEATH 



Bruce Dern 
and 

Diane Ladd 

were just 

finding out 

how good life 

could be. 
Then tragedy- 
cruel and meaningless 

-turned it 
all to ashes 



Life was good, Bruce Dern thought 
• as he glanced around the Arena. 
It was a cool, clear evening. Just 
right for a track meet. A former ace 
half-miler himself, Bruce enjoyed a 
good meet. And good company. 

His companion tonight was Leslie 
Stevens. Good company indeed — and 
also the writer-producer who was 
giving Bruce a featured role in the 
television series, "Stoney Burke." 

And that was best of all. At last, 
things were breaking right for the 
acting Derns. Bruce with a regular 
TV assignment . . . Diane Ladd, his 
blonde, brown-eyed wife, just start- 
ing to meet the top producers — may- 
be guesting soon on "The Untouch- 
ables." In fact, she was out with 
Walter Winchell himself, right now. 

Bruce grinned. Winchell — who'd 
known Diane since she was a child — 
had taken her to the Dodger game. 
Not that Diane cared a hoot about 
baseball! But she'd be sitting in Wal- 
ter O'Malley's box and meeting pro- 
ducer Mervyn LeRoy. . . . 

Suddenly, Bruce was aware of an 
insistent tug on his sleeve. 

He turned and saw a policeman. 

"Is your name Bruce Dern?" 

Bruce nodded amiably. But his 
half-smile faded, as the policeman 
continued: "Been searching for you. 
Please come outside. Emergency!" 



Outside, the first cold sweat of ap- 
prehension turned to icy prickles of 
fear, as he answered yes to further 
questions: "You live in North Holly- 
wood? 

"You have a baby daughter?" 

Diane Jr., he thought. Oh, God, 
don't let it be that anything has hap- 
pened to our baby. . . . 

He hardly heard the policeman's 
words: "Got a call from the police 
station. Accident at home." He was 
beyond hearing, or seeing, in the blur 
of fast driving that followed. 

At last, they were home. Only, it 
didn't look like home. Policemen and 
doctors everywhere. Oxygen tanks. 
Strange machines. And, somewhere in 
the background, the Derns' maid 
weeping hysterically. 

For Dern himself, there was only 
a dreadful silence all around him. 
Just one incredible fact echoing in 
the empty chambers of his mind. 

Baby Diane was dead. 

Eighteen months old — and dead. 

It wasn't until later that, bit by bit, 
the grim irony of it all emerged. 
While the maid was answering the 
phone — taking a message about a job 
for Diane Sr.! — the baby had slipped 
out of the house and run eagerly to- 
ward the forbidden, fenced-in pool. 
Somehow, the active little mite had 
managed to push the gate open. Had 



38 



OF A CHILD 



scampered gaily toward the bright, 
shining water. . , . 

All attempts to revive the small, 
limp body had failed. 

And now his wifd was phoning 
from the Stadium. The police had 
reached her, too. Though she couldn't 
believe the word they brought, she 
had screamed and collapsed. While 
she was being revived, Mervyn Le- 
Roy had run out to find Winchell, 
who was wiring items to New York 
for his column. 

The heartbreaking task of confir- 
mation was up to Bruce. "Yes, it's 
true," he told her gently. 

"Our baby's dead." 

And, as he waited for Diane Sr. to 
come home, he thought of all that had 
happened to bring them to this mo- 
ment. Not the good times that had 
seemed to be just starting now, but 
those earlier years of heartbreak. 

They had wanted a child so much. 
But when Diane Jr. actually arrived, 
it was one of the bleakest Novembers 
of their lives. Bruce was studying at 
the Actors' Studio — and driving a 
cab in a desperate attempt to eke out 
a living for them both. 

When the time came he rushed 
Diane to the hospital. Fifteen hours 
of labor! And no progress. The doc- 
tors decided she wasn't dilating. De- 
cided to operate. Caesarean section, 



they called it. Finally — after what 
seemed hours of agony — the words: 
"Congratulations! You have a little 
actress in the family." 

They had their baby. And no 
money to pay for her. When the 
usual six days were up, Diane was 
not permitted to check out until the 
hospital had been paid in full. It took 
three more days — with the bills grow- 
ing daily — before Bruce was able to 
"ransom" his wife and child. 

Three days of nightmare he hated 
to remember. His income from taxi- 
driving simply wasn't enough. And 
there was no one he knew from whom 
he could borrow what he needed. No 
one in New York, that is. 

At last, he had to do what he'd 
sworn he would never do. 

He had to phone his mother in Chi- 
cago and tell her of his plight. And 
his mother agreed to send him a hun- 
dred dollars — payable in thirty days. 
She was that businesslike. Or per- 
haps it was her way of reminding 
him how angry she still was at his 
wanting to be an actor. 

A funny thing, that. He and Diane 
had come from such different back- 
grounds, but they'd both had to give 
up so much for their careers — and 
their life together. Maybe he'd given 
up more, in material things, such as 
money. But Diane had been excom- 



municated by her church for marry- 
ing him — a divorced man. 

He'd been separated from his first 
wife, when Bruce and Diane met 
while appearing in "Orpheus De- 
scending," off Broadway. It hadn't 
been easy, getting married. For either 
of them. Not for Diane Elizabeth 
Ladd (born Ladner), a deeply re- 
ligious small-town girl from Lumber- 
ton, Mississippi. And not for Bruce 
Dern, scion of a prominent Chicago 
family, who had to turn over his en- 
tire inheritance from his father — 
$38,000— to get his divorce. 

That's how they were married. 
Broke. Without a cent. But that's how 
he'd been living, ever since he'd quit 
college and started acting. Once a 
rich man's kid. His father a famous 
lawyer. His mother a judge's sister. 
His grandfather a governor and a 
member of Franklin D. Roosevelt's 
cabinet. 

No actors in the Dern family — 
until Bruce came along. And, oddly 
enough, he'd reached his momentous 
decision while on the University of 
Pennsylvania track team. The coach 
had ordered him to shave his side- 
burns. Angry at this "infringement" 
of his rights, he'd quit! Later, he en- 
rolled at the American Foundation of 
Dramatic Art in Philadelphia . . . 
on his way to (Continued on page 87 ) 



39 



ARE YOU ASKING 

TOO MUCH OF 
YOUR MARRIAGE? 




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Robin (Nancy Malone) wants the best of two marriages! Second husband 
Alex Bowden [Ernest Graves) is the "strong father" she never had . . . 



by ARTHUR HENLEY 

with 
Dr. ROBERT L.WOLK 



It's a perfect marriage — they need 
each other." How often you've 
heard this; maybe you've said it your- 
self. But is it true? Is a need for each 
other all it takes to make marriage 
work? Indeed, isn't it possible that, 
for some couples, marriage may be 
just an excuse to avoid facing up to 
deeper, personal problems? 

Such questions come readily to 
mind, watching Robin Bowden in 
"The Guiding Light," as seen on CBS- 
TV (weekdays at 12:45 p.m. est). 
Young as she is, Robin has been mar- 
ried twice. Each time, she wed to sat- 
isfy an individual need. Each time, 
she found only unhappiness. 

By treating Robin and her hus- 
bands as real people with real prob- 
lems, we'll try to explore some of the 
delusions about marriage that so 
many people still cling to. As usual, 
my remarks will be in regular type, 
with Dr. Wolk's professional analyses 
in italics like the following: 



Every month, a doctor looks at TVs daytime dramas and tells you what 




But first husband Mike Bauer (Gary Pillar) is "more romantic" — as he proves to Julie Conrad (Sandy Smith) !■ 
Have Robin and Mike demanded too much . . . and given too little? Will they make Alex and Julie suffer, too? 



Marriage is never a solution to per- 
sonal problems and, in fact, can serve 
to intensify those problems. The cou- 
ple who marry for neurotic reasons — 
because they fear being doomed to 
spinsterhood or bachelorhood, or be- 
cause all their friends have married, 
or because their parents want them to 
— will sooner or later find their mar- 
riage turn to dust. 

The best of marriages requires a 
great deal of personal adjustment in 
its early period. One based on other 
things, rather than honest love, may 
not be able to survive this stress and 
strain. The hope that love will grow 
after marriage may soon prove to be 
only a delusion. 

If marriage could solve personal 
problems, one out of four wouldn't 
wind up in divorce. The experiences 
of Robin and her first husband, Mike, 
prove this point most effectively. 

Let's first consider Robin, now mar- 
ried to Alex Bowden — but previously 



the bride of Mike Bauer and still in- 
fluenced by that romantic relation- 
ship. Reared without a father, Robin 
had been neglected while her emotion- 
ally disturbed mother flitted about, 
working and searching for love her- 
self. When her mother remarried, 
Robin enjoyed the warmth of a real 
home for a short time. 

Then her mother died. Fortunately, 
Robin eventually found wise and lov- 
ing foster parents in Meta and Bruce 
Banning. But the scars of her earlier 
catch-as-catch-can existence were very 
deep. Family ties, a sense of belong- 
ing . . . these may have come to 
Robin too late. 

The brief glimpse Robin had of a 
happy home life may keep her search- 
ing for more of the same eternally. It 
seems likely that she will seek out a 
father-substitute — to make up for the 
steady, stable father she never had. 
But anyone she marries is apt to fall 
short of her expectations, as substi- 



tutes invariably do. The fact that her 
mother's marriage brought her the 
little happiness she enjoyed could 
lead Robin to follow the same pattern 
— to marry, not once but twice, per- 
haps even more. 

Girls such as Robin rarely make 
good marriages. They marry for false, 
neurotic reasons — usually, security 
not love — and if they don't find what 
they want the first time around, they'll 
try again and again. 

Now let's consider Mike, a hand- 
some young engineer and an old 
friend of Robin through his aunt, 
Meta. Dominated all his life by his 
mother, Mike didn't court Robin — he 
stole her away from his best friend 
under dramatic circumstances! 
Though he was shyer than his friend, 
Robin soon discovered that — of the 
two — Mike was the more exciting, the 
more romantic . . . the one more apt 
to fulfill her childhood dreams of 
"real" love. (Please turn the page) 



ou can learn about yourself from them. This month-The Guiding Light" 



41 



ARE YOU ASKING TOO MUCH OF YOUR MARRIAGE? 

continued 



Since Mike's mother didn't approve 
of Robin, he had to see her secretly. 
And, since he was so desperate for a 
home he could call his own, he al- 
lowed Robin to talk him into eloping. 
His friend became furious, engaged 
Mike in a fight — and met his death, 
purely by accident. Mike's mother, 
who still objected vehemently to his 
marriage, then played on his feeling 
of guilt to destroy that marriage. 

Mike was obviously a very con- 
fused, immature young man when he 
married Robin. For one thing, he had 
to cut out his best friend to prove his 
masculinity to others, to Robin and 
to himself. In addition, he used mar- 
riage to rebel against his mother's 
domination. No doubt, he was able 
to do this only with the help of Robin. 

Marrying Robin was a sign of 
weakness, not strength. He went 
about it sneakily, and seemingly with- 
out real convictions about his love 
for her. Add to this his feeling of 
guilt, and it becomes clear that Mike 
won't find the courage to shake off 
his mother's influence. The marriage 
is doomed — as are all such marriages, 
entered into under false pretenses. 

It didn't take long for their mar- 
riage to go to pieces. A determined 
woman like Mike's mother didn't find 
it too difficult to bring about an an- 
nulment. Meanwhile, Robin herself 
was disappointed to find that she'd 
married — not a strong, gallant knight 
in shining armor — but a weak, con- 
fused, rebellious son. 

Though Mike felt he really did 
love Robin — and pleaded with her to 
wait while he went off by himself to 
try to gain perspective and maturity 
— she took this only as an outright 
rejection. and soon became involved 
with another man: Fortyish, good- 
looking Alex Bowden, who was as 
sophisticated as he was wealthy. 

Robin adored Alex's little atten- 
tions, his lavish gifts and awesome 
maturity. He became a kind of pro- 
tector to her — the "knight in shin- 
ing armor" she had hoped Mike 
would be. 

The marriage of Mike and Robin 
just couldn't last. Two such immature, 
neurotic, frightened young people as 
these are unable to offer the emo- 
tional support each requires. 

Robin saw Mike only as she wanted 
him to be, not as he was. The slight- 
est deviation from this image would 
be enough to make her feel rejected. 
His decision to leave her for a while 
could only spell total rejection to 
someone so insecure. 

On the other hand, the older, more 
42 worldly-wise Alex would appear as an 



ideal "father-substitute" to her. But 
a father-substitute does not make a 
husband. Chances are, too, that Alex 
was not as strong as he appeared to 
Robin — for he courted her as an ob- 
viously dependent woman who made 
him feel superior and dominant. 

All three married, not because of 
love, but to meet their own neurotic 
needs. Each has used the other. Robin 
is only repeating the same mistake 
in her relationship with Alex. All 
she will succeed in doing is to prove 
that you cannot use marriage to side- 
step personal problems. The problems 
will remain . . . but the marriage will 
disintegrate. 

Although Alex had once been 
charmed by Robin's dependent at- 
titude, time dulled its shine and he 
now demanded more. When he finally 
rebelled against her behaving as a 
"child bride," instead of a grown-up 
wife, Robin became frightened. 

Mike's sudden re-appearance — and 
his manipulations to see Robin again 
— complicated matters. Obviously, 
neither had put the other out of their 
hearts completely and for all time. 

This situation aroused intense jeal- 
ousy in Alex, and he developed a 
painful ulcer. Nothing could convince 
him that his jealousy was unfounded 
and his wife wasn't actually eager to 
return to her old love. 

Alex was bound to rebel — because 
the reasons for his marriage were 
neurotic. Now he discovered he 
couldn't satisfy Robin and she couldn't 
satisfy him. Because he "internalized" 
his frustration and anger, his jealousy 
of Mike and dissatisfaction with him- 
self brought on an ulcer. 

Robin exhibits her immaturity by 
wanting it all: Alex's love and adora- 
tion, plus Mike's attentions and af- 
fection. She doesn't realize Mike is 
using her for his own selfish purposes. 
Actually, he makes fewer demands on 
her than Alex does — because he is 
attracted to the very weakness and im- 
maturity from which Alex expects her 
to "grow up." 

Robins marriage at last reaches 
that point where decisions have to be 
made. Alex demands a showdown, al- 
though his earlier jealousy has been 
replaced by mere curiosity as to 
whether she truly loves him. 

Mike — who's been waiting on the 
sidelines "to pick up the pieces," for 
reasons he himself doesn't quite com- 
prehend — has begun to care less and 
less about Robin and about his moth- 
er's concern. He moves into a bache- 
lor apartment and begins dating a 
girl named Julie Conrad. 

Suddenly, the roof all but caves in 



on Robin. Her husband's ex-wife 
enters the picture and — although Alex 
no longer has any feeling for her — 
even his impersonal interest arouses 
Robin's antagonism. Now that her 
own sense of security has been threat- 
ened, she becomes the jealous one. 
She begs Alex to take her away on a 
vacation, to give her a child ... to 
help "save" their marriage. 

But he refuses to do either. 

Robin is still using marriage as a 
"crutch." She clings to false delusions 
in believing that such measures will 
save a marriage. Neither will. A va- 
cation will only delay the day of 
judgment until they return to their 
normal pattern of life. A baby will 
probably make the situation worse, 
creating a new responsibility which 
will make them both feel trapped and 
resentful . . . and bring nothing but 
misery to the real victim: The child. 

Robin has become jealous, not be- 
cause she is so much in love with 
Alex, but because she still reacts as 
a little girl. She's afraid that she is 
losing her "father"! 

Although Mike has shown some 
semblance of maturity in breaking 
away from his mother and taking an 
apartment, there is no way of telling 
how sincere his motives are. He is 
apparently toying with the affections 
of both Robin and Julie. It seems 
reasonable to speculate that, through 
Julie, Mike is hopeful of hurting — 
not his mother, this time — but his 
ex-wife . . . in a continuing rebellion 
against women in general. 

Love — the real and the false — are 
used interchangeably by Robin, Mike 
and Alex. This can only lead to dis- 
appointment and despair. Few, if any, 
marriages can survive such false re- 
lationships . . . even on TV. 

Robin, Mike and Alex are far from 
unique. Their counterparts exist in 
real life. Countless marriages are 
based on foundations just as flimsy. 
Countless couples never grow up in 
time to breathe new life into such 
neurotic alliances. And countless well- 
meaning relatives and friends con- 
tribute their two-cents' worth, only to 
make the situation worse. 

On TV, Robiri and Mike may be 
able to get away with the mistake of 
asking too much of marriage — and 
giving too little. In real life, it isn't 
that easy. The remnants of a broken 
marriage invariably tag along at our 
heels to make our future happiness 
so much more difficult. 

Next month, we'll take on another 
of your favorite daytime dramas and 
try to make its stories meaningful to 
you in terms of your own life. 



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If your face has you puzzled ... if you can't do a thing with your 
eyes or nose or mouth, this jigsaw is the answer for you. It's 
made of the best features of the most beautiful women on TV. (For 
what's whose, see end of story.) All you have to do is to pick 
the pieces that fit your special beauty puzzle. Then turn the page 
and let an expert show you just how beautiful you can really be! 



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"The perfect face? Why, that's a rarity!" Mr. Law- 
rence, Director of Makeup for the House of Revlon, 
told us. "There are perfect features, though. Sally 
Ann Howes has a lovely mouth, Mary Tyler Moore's 
eyes are simply gorgeous and Loretta Young's high 
cheekbones give her an ageless look that can't be 
equalled. Naturally, every woman must make a few 
corrections for the better. It's all done with makeup ! 
The whole point about makeup is this: You create 
the illusion of perfect features by enhancing all the 
good points and minimizing the faults. Highlight and 
shadow techniques and the use of color are both 
very effective." 

Lawrence demonstrated on a model. "Always start 
with makeup base," he told us. He dotted foundation 



exactly the same color as the model's skin on cheeks, 
nose, forehead and chin, blending the color over her 
entire face and throat. "If the complexion is on the 
olive-y side, I usually recommend a pinker base; for 
ruddy skin, a beigier shade. It's a matter of toning 
down the extremes." Next, Lawrence reached for a 
second bottle of makeup base that looked about two 
shades lighter. "You use this to add vitality to the 
expression." He smoothed this foundation over her 
cheekbones and under her eyes, then added a dot 
under the outer curve of each eyebrow and blended it 
skillfully into nothing. "Highlighting need not be con- 
fined to the eyes," he went on. "If the chin or jaw- 
bone needs extra emphasis, it too can be highlighted. 
So can a turned-up nose. It's bound to look straighter 
if a light base is smoothed along the bridge and 
blended gradually to nothing at the tip." Next, Law- 
rence reached for a makeup base about two shades 
darker than the model's skin. "You have to be careful 
with this," he cautioned. "Too much will look 
smudgy." He told the model to suck in her cheeks, 
then shadowed the hollows. (See picture below.) Next, 
he smoothed a bit of dark base along the sides of her 
nose and blended it to the tip. "If her nose were too 
long or too thin, I would have darkened the bridge, 
instead," he added. 

Rouge was the next step. Lawrence dotted a pearly 
coral color across the cheekbone, smoothing it out 



44 





toward the hairline. "Rouge is really a highlight," he 
explained, "but it must be applied sparingly. Never 
carry it too close to the nose or below the earlobe, 
especially if the face is thin." A light dusting of 
powder was Lawrence's finishing touch on the model's 
complexion. By now all that remained to remind us of 
the three makeup bases was the beautifully sculpted 
contours of her face. There was not a color line 
in sight. 

Lawrence turned his attention next to the model's 
eyes. He gathered eyeshadow — in both deep and 
pastel tones — mascara, cake eyeliner with a brush and 
eyebrow pencil. "I'm going to lift the eyebrows a 
bit, too," he said, tweezing away several hairs that 
marred the otherwise perfect curve. "Almost 99% 
of all women need their eyebrows lifted just a fraction 
for a younger appearance." With short strokes of a 
very sharp pencil that matched the model's eyebrows 
exactly, Lawrence began to fill in the arch. "It's im- 
portant for eyebrows to look natural," he cautioned. 
"Pencil that's too dark is harsh and overpowering." 
When he finished, the eyebrows looked as if they had 
grown that way. Next, he applied eyeshadow — strok- 
ing pastel blue above the eyelid, deeper blue on the 
eyelid itself. "The darker shadow minimizes the 
eyelid and makes the eye more luminous," he ex- 
plained, "while lighter shadow above the eye enlarges 
it." Lawrence continued with the eye, brushing black 
eyeliner along the base of the lashes and extending 
it beyond the outer corner with an upward tilt. 
"Choose eyeliner that harmonizes with the complexion 
and hair," he ruled. "Brunettes and brownettes with 
dark skin often prefer black, while redheads and 
blondes who want a natural look usually like brown 
eyeliner. Of course, personality is important, too, in 
deciding which color is best." The eyes were really 
beginning to look enormous now. After drawing in a 
very fine line along the base of the lower lashes that 
reached almost to the outer corner, Lawrence started 
to brush on black mascara. "It's vital that the lashes 
never get stuck together, so I use two thin coats rather 



than one thick one," he explained. "If the model's 
eyes were deeper set, I would touch only the tips of 
the lashes with mascara to emphasize them a bit." 
I Compare the madeup eye and "naked" one, at left. I 

Lawrence assembled makeup for the mouth next — a 
lipliner pencil in a shade that looked rather like 
auburn (we found out later that it was), lipstick 
about two shades lighter and much pinker. "The per- 
fect mouth looks like this," he said, drawing a gently 
bowed upper lip, a lower lip that was curved but not 
too pouty. "If lips are less than ample, draw the out- 
line just outside the natural lipline. If they're very 
full, the outline should fall just inside." He filled in 
the outlines with the lipstick. (See finished perfect 
mouth below. I "I usually prefer light lipstick," he 
said, "but of course there are instances when darker 
shades are essential." 

The model was completely made-up now — her eyes 
looked twice as big as before, her mouth was perfectly 
shaped and softly colored, her complexion flawlessly 
smooth. That perfection can be yours, too. All the 
tricks Lawrence used in his salon you can use at 
home. You'll find it easier than you think to be more 
beautiful than you ever dreamed. — Barbara Marco 

Did you know the answers to our puzzle? 1. Mary 
Tyler Moore: 2. Donna Reed; 3. Sally Ann Howes; 
4. Betsy Palmer; 5. Lucille Ball; 6. Loretta Young. 




45 



II 




A message 

from 

Arthur Godfrey 

to 
Dick Powell 




Arthur Godfrey had had dinner with Dick Powell a 
month before the day that Powell, with his wife June 
Allyson steadfastly by his side, revealed to the press 
that he had been stricken by cancer, the reporter re- 
called. Perhaps at that dinner Dick might have con- 
fided in Arthur, told him of his pain, his torment, his 
fear — for what better man to turn to than Godfrey, 
who himself had been stricken with cancer, who had 
come within a pulse beat of death and who had 
somehow managed to survive? 

The reporter shook his head as he watched the 
rain beating against the glass-enclosed airport wait- 



ing room. Only Godfrey would be in a position to dis- 
close what had happened — if anything — between 
Powell and himself out there on the Coast; but if 
this heavy rain and blustering wind kept up, they'd 
close down Boston Airport and Arthur, piloting his 
own Convair up from Washington, would be forced 
to land some place else. 

On the off-chance that Godfrey might still manage 
to land before the field shut down, the reporter re- 
checked his notes on Powell. The notes were terse, 
cold, a summary. Only Arthur, through his insights, 
through his own experience, could bring them to life. 



46 




Powell's announcement that he has cancer: 
Powell, 57, and wife June Allyson, 37, invite news- 
papermen and photographers to their Beverly Hills 
home. "I always insist on the truth because there is 
so much at stake," he begins, and goes on to say 
that he wouldn't even be talking about his illness 
except that "all these rumors got all over town. One 
rumor had me having a tremendous heart attack." 
Then calmly Powell tells the representatives of the 
press that a cancerous malignancy had developed 
on a gland on the right of his neck and another in a 
pocket in his chest. "It's like a wart on the back of 



my neck," Powell says, pointing to his collar. "Who's 
going to get upset about a thing like that?" 

Irony of June Allyson being present: 

If it hadn't been that during the summer of 1962 
Powell himself thought that his wife was suffering 
from cancer of the throat, June wouldn't be sitting 
next to him at the press conference. At that time, 
June had brought a $2,500,000 divorce suit against 
Dick. Then, in rapid succession, June underwent 
three major operations: two for removal of nodes on 
her vocal cords (that's when Dick believed she had 
Cancer of the throat, but, (Continued on page 81) 



47 



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He just didn't like what the town was 
doing to his family — and to him. Grimly, 
Ernie Ford explained: "When your sons 
start thinking of you as a show-business 
personality rather than a father, you're 
in trouble." And so — even though it 
meant giving up a top-rated TV show — 
Ernie got his wife and two sons out of 
Hollywood last year. He found a brand- 
new ranch house set on some fifteen 
acres of rolling hill country near San 
Francisco, in a place called the Portola 
Valley. It's four hundred miles from 
Hollywood. "It feels like three thou- 
sand," Ernie says with relief. Although 
he's on TV again — and on a daily show, 
at that — he's arranged things so that he 
only has to work three days a week. The 
rest of the time he spends with Betty and 
their boys — Buck is twelve now, and 
Brion's nine. 

It's made all the difference in the 
world. "We've slowly become the Fords 
again," Ernie said. "We've got enough 
acreage now to raise cattle," he ex- 
plained, "and Buck has a calf that he's 
raising for his project this year. The 
boy paid for it out of his own savings, 
and it's coming along pretty good." The 
fatherly pride was evident as he spoke. 
"He keeps his own books and pays his 
bills, and when he sells we'll see how he 
comes out." It was easy to see that Ernie 
confidently expected Buck to come out 
ahead. 

But then the whole family has come 
out ahead in (Continued on page 82) 



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They broke the news quietly. Dinner at the Lennon house was just over, and Dianne 
Lennon Gass nodded to her husband in one of those wifely signals that other people, 
even family, never notice. Then Dick made the simple announcement: 

"DeeDee and I are going to adopt a baby." 

Sis Lennon, her eyes misted over with tears, was the first to speak. "It will be good," 
she said, "to hold a baby again." Then, everybody was talking at once, hugging Dianne, 
slapping Dick's back, laughing happily at the thought of the first Lennon grandchild. 
Nobody, of course, even pretended to be surprised. 

There was no denying that DeeDee and Dick would have preferred to start their 
family with a child of their own creation. But if this hadn't happened in the first two years 



THE LENNON SISTERS AND THE 





D 
D 



THAT CHANGED THEIR LIVES 



of marriage, then their family and their friends had pretty well accepted the fact that they 
would adopt one. It was only a question of how long they would wait. 

When, finally, they came to their decision, father Bill Lennon couldn't have been more 
proud. "The important thing," he said, "is that they didn't sit around feeling sorry for 
themselves, because the big event didn't happen. They are acting to start their family now. 
These kids have so much love in their hearts, they have to share it with a child." 

Sis felt the same way. "It seems only yesterday that we were cradling DeeDee .in our 
arms," she said. "And now she's a wife and soon she'll be cradling her own child. I'm so 
happy . . . and so grateful to them both for doing this." Yet as much as the baby meant to 
Dianne's parents, it meant even more, in a way, to her sisters. (Continued on page 84) 



For Peggy, Kathy and Janet, 
the news had special meaning. 



50 



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Who can pierce to the depths of young love, of young wedded love, and put into 
words the urgent marvel of that moment when a husband and wife stare awestruck at 
their first-born? Who can describe that compelling desire to see in living flesh and 
bone an image, so tiny and helpless, of themselves and their love? 

Ah, find us a word for that hope, that expectation, that prayer. 

Yes, and find us a word for the frustration of this hope . . . this expectation . . . 
this prayer. Two years, and as yet no cry from the little room that Dianne Lennon 
and Dick Gass had so carefully prepared as a nursery. 

They had been good years, and Dianne and Dick had been happy in the discovery 
of each other. And yet — "Something's missing," Dianne finally told her husband. The 
words came slowly, falteringly. "I can't put it off any longer," she said. "I want to 



WHY D IANNE LE NNON I S ADOPTING A 



hear a baby's voice in our house. I want it more than anything in the world." 

She knew it was what Dick wanted, too. Both of them had <;orae from big families, 
and children meant as much to Dick as to Dianne. If his answer did not come quickly, 
if the words did not tumble out, it was only because they were the most important 
words he had said to his wife since they pledged their love before God. 

"There's nothing I want more than to get our family started," he told her. "I've 
only been waiting for you to say it first." 

Dick's arms went around his wife and, tenderly, he kissed her. "Sure, let's adopt 
a baby," he said. "Let's adopt two or three . . ." 

"We'll love them as our own." 

This, then, was how it started. When Dianne and Dick were (Continued on page 74) 



Dianne and Dick agreed: The 
crib had been empty too long. 



52 





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RUIN HIMSELF! 



(Please turn the page) 



55 



We publish this story in the hope that it may still not be too late for James Drury 



56 



This is the most unpleasant story I 
have ever written. It is not the story 
I wanted to write. It is not the one 
I went after. 

This is the story of a man with some- 
thing to hide. It is the story of a man 
who, having worked hard for what he 
has, seems intent on throwing it all 
away with both hands. It is the story 
of a man trying to ruin himself, trying 
to commit professional suicide. 

And the sad thing is that, as The Vir- 
ginian on TV, James Drury has every- 
thing to live for. 

When I started this story, I didn't 
know about the past that haunts Drury. 
I had heard that he was a violent man 
and I had talked with people who 
have felt the lash of his temper. I went 
to our interview in the hope of finding 
out what kind of a man he really was. 
He came to the interview in the hope 
of not telling me. As it turned out, 
he told me more than he realized. 

As the old saying goes, actions speak 
louder than words. 

Our interview in the studio commis- 
sary went something like this: 

Question: Are you married? 

Answer: No comment. 

Question: Surely you must know 
whether or not you're married? The 
reason I ask is because there is con- 
siderable confusion on the question. 
Naturally, I'd like to be right on the 
facts. The official biography issued 
three years ago on you states quite 
definitely that you are married and a 
father. Yet you have been passing your- 
self off as a bachelor in your new bio. 

Answer: No comment. I admit to 
nothing. And unless I say it's so, it's 
not a fact. 

Question: Well, are you or aren't 
you married and the father of two chil- 
dren? Surely there's no reason to deny 
your children? 

Answer: I couldn't care less. 

As the press agent grew more and 
more shaken, Drury continued to give 
off with explosive answers. From time 
to time, he pounded the table. At one 
point, when the waitress didn't bring 
him a fork fast enough, he jumped up 
to get one himself. To give him credit, 
he did appear a bit embarrassed when 
he discovered there had been a fork 
on the table all the time. But he didn't 
apologize to the girl. 

Here are some of the things he 
lashed out at: 

Of his fans: "I don't give a damn 
about the fans. I'm not easily flustered 
by time limits, pressures, the public or 
the American press — and please quote 
me on that." 

Of TV: "I never watch TV. I con- 
sider it an idiotic waste of time." 

Of the other stars on "The Vir- 
ginian" — Lee J. Cobb, Doug McClure, 
Gary Clarke : "I'm the head man here." 

Of reporters: "If reporters don't 
write as I want them to, then I'll never 
give them another interview. I expect 
to okay everything about me before it's 
printed." 

Well. I don't think Mr. Drury will 



approve this story. And it's not likely 
that he'll ever give me another inter- 
view. But then again, it's not likely 
that I'll want to interview him again. 

If this sounds angry, it is. But it is 
also written out of sadness. It is always 
sad to see talent wasted — and Drury 
has talent. Unfortunately, he is no ex- 
ception to the rule that nobody has 
ever made it to the top without a lot 
of people behind him — and nobody has 
ever stayed on top for very long with- 
out the loyalty and love of the public. 
That loyalty and love has to be earned. 

Drury ought to know this. He ought 
also to know that when you act as if 
you have something to hide, this is an 
open invitation to all comers to go out 
and find what it is. 

Here, then, is what we found out. 
There is nothing really shameful . . . 
nothing really that awful . . . nothing 
to make a man run headlong down the 
disaster road in an effort to hide it: 

The actor was born April 18th, 1934, 
in New York City. His father, James 
Child Drury Sr., was and still is a pro- 
fessor at New York University. His 
mother, Beatrice Crawford Drury, has 
been at one time or another an editor 
of The Dairymen's League News, an in- 
terior decorator, a real-estate broker, 
a blueberry rancher, cattle and horse 
rancher, and a lumber and logging ex- 
ecutive. While Professor Drury seems 
to be fairly settled in his New York 
niche, his wife is far more peripatetic. 

James and his mother, brother and 
sister were continually on the move 
during his early years. His own biog- 
raphy admits that "he is an alumnus 
of more schools than practically any- 
body." Long Island, Oregon, California. 
New York University — where he seems 
to have made a point of staying away 
from his father's classes. 

Drury's theatrical background is typi- 
cal of many young players. Beginning 
with drama courses in school, he went 
on to summer stock. While on vacation 
in Hollywood, he was given a reading 
by MGM and signed without a test. In 
1955, after a series of small parts in 
such films as "Blackboard Jungle," 
"Tender Trap" and "Forbidden Planet," 
MGM dropped his option and he signed 
with 20th-Fox. There he played in "Love 
Me Tender," "The Last Wagon" and 
"Bernadine." He was then signed by 
Disney but dropped after a few months. 

He was working as a garage mechanic 
in the San Fernando Valley when his 
agent called in with the news that he 
was to test for "The Virginian." 

While at Fox, Drury stated that there 
had been but one big romance in his 
life. At the time, he seems to have 
meant Cristall Orton, a young Greek 
actress whom he married on February 
7th, 1957. They eloped to Mexicali, 
Mexico, after a three-year courtship. 

Currently. Drury is separated from 
Cristall and their two sons, James 
Drury III, going on five, and Timothy, 
who's one year old. They have been 
separated off and on, as a matter of 
fact, since, they married. 



These days, James is seen quite often 
in the company of an attractive brunette 
by the name of Phyliss Mitchell, and 
she frequently visits him on the set 
of "The Virginian." One rumor is that 
he and Phyliss are actually married — 
but since Drury's own family insists 
that there has been no divorce from 
Cristall, this seems to be one rumor 
that doesn't check out. 

Drury makes a point of cloaking his 
life today in mystery. Nobody, possibly 
not even his studio, has his address. He 
insists that he has no telephone and 
you must reach him through his agent. 

Even in his brief career at Disney, 
he was regarded as the loner to end 
them all. According to a couple of peo- 
ple who worked with him on "Polly- 
anna," he kept mainly to himself and 
seldom socialized with the cast or crew. 
In fact, he made the other troupe mem- 
bers nervous by "showing off his well- 
developed temper." While the film was 
shooting on location in Santa Rosa, his 
wife Cristall and their eldest boy visited 
Drury, but, according to one member of 
the crew, they were having marital 
troubles even then. 

The last item in our story on Drury 
is an item that appeared January 13th, 
1961, on page thirteen of the Los 
Angeles Mirror: "Pre-Dawn Fusillade 
Books Cowboy, Writer," the headline 
read. 

"A cowboy actor and a writer were 
arrested early today," the story reported, 
"after several shots were fired from 
their West Los Angeles apartment. 
James Drury Jr., 27, and William A. 
Lewis, 28, denied firing a revolver 
which was found in their apartment 
at 1302 Amherst Ave. But five squads 
of police who responded to a call from 
an alarmed neighbor said three bullet 
holes in the men's front door had been 
made from the inside. One bullet lodged 
in a house across the street and a street 
light was shot out. The men were 
booked on suspicion of assault with fire- 
arms in an inhabited dwelling." 

My story on Drury stopped there. I 
would much rather have written a story 
of the inspirational charm of the Len- 
non Sisters or of the romantic glow 
surrounding Dick Chamberlain and 
Clara Ray. I went to my interview with 
Drury hoping sincerely that he would 
respond civilly to known facts. I wanted 
to support the show and the cast, and 
to soften some of the criticism that had 
already been leveled against Drury. Had 
he not shown such crude contempt for 
the American public, had he been less 
arrogant and offensive in his attitude 
toward his co-workers and, in particu- 
lar, had he not thrown down his dicta- 
torial challenge to the rights of the free 
press and those who read it, this story 
would never have been written. 

To the readers of TV Radio Mirror, 
I submit this report on James Drury 
with genuine sorrow and regret. 

— Eunice Field 

"The Virginian" (colorcast) is seen on 
NBC-TV, Wed., 7:30 to 9 p.m. est. 




H 



Have you Heard? 

Station WGL in Fort Wayne might ivell ask if you've 
heard about Ev Sutherin, radio hostess ivorth knoiving 







MIDWEST 

©IT® EDS© 




Paint-by-number becomes a co-op hobby in Evs family. Husband 
Bill joins right in with sons Phill (left), 10, and Will, 14. 



The singing Chordettes visit Ev on her radio show. 



Getting a job was no trouble at all for Ev Sutherin. 
The owner of Fort Wayne, Indiana's Station WGL sug- 
gested to Ev that she do a show, and the Program Di- 
rector hastened to hire her. The Program Director is 
her husband! But Easy Street ended right there. Now 
that she has her show. "Have You Heard?" — broad- 
cast every weekday morning from 10:15 to 10:30 — Ev 
spends many long hours working to make her program 
both worthwhile and entertaining. This she has done, 
and she loves every minute of it. "I'd be lost without 
my show," Ev says, "because it gives me the opportunity 
to meet many interesting people, to be an active part of 
the community, and also gives me the personal satisfac- 
tion that I am. perhaps, making some small contribu- 
tion." . . . She certainly has made a contribution — and 
a large one — to her community. Ev received a special 
commendation for a series of programs on the subject 
of protecting children from sex deviates, and also 
helped the local Christmas Bureau obtain gifts for 
needy youngsters by mentioning the Bureau on her 
show. For her efforts and for her talent she has achieved 
the second highest rating on WGL. (\ou'll never guess 
who walked away with the number-one rating — her 
husband ! ) She and Bill met when both were attending 
a radio class at Muskingum College. As Ev puts it: 
"It was a gloomy January morning at 8 o'clock. I had 
my hair in curlers and he needed a shave. Neither of us 
had had our coffee. Where can you go from there but 
up? !" They now live with their two children and a tem- 
peramental cat in a comfortable home in Fort Wayne 
which they "can almost afford." . . . Ev spends most of 
her free time promoting jazz. Any time left over from 
that is devoted to refinishing antiques. Of course, there 
isn't much free time in the life of a busy wife, mother 
of two active boys and hostess of a daily radio show. 
. . . "Have You Heard?" touches on everything from 
recipes to politics, and features interviews with local 
personalities and visiting celebrities (Ann Landers, 
Fran Allison, Efrem Zimbalist Jr. ) . Have you heard 
— that "Have You Heard?" hostess is a real whirlwind! 




Beverly, Ross Martin (I.) and Sebastian Cabot have 
a great time on CBS-TV's weekly "Stump the Stars." 






The cry of the day for any TV producer anxious to make 
a success of a new series is, "Get me Beverly Garland!" 
Blond, vivacious Bev has appeared in the pilots of 12 
television shows this season. And 11 were sold. But making 
things move, including TV products, is nothing new for 
Beverly. The very earth shook when she arrived in the 
world. . . . "I'm not sure I can really take credit for it," 
laughed Beverly, whose CBS panel show, "Stump the 
Stars," is seen Monday nights at 10:30 est, "but when I 
was born in Santa Cruz, California, it was in the midst 
of an earthquake. The nurse carried me in to my mother 
because they were moving everyone out of the hospital. 
Mom looked at me and said, 'You've brought me the 
wrong baby. The doctor told me I would have a boy. This 
isn't Jimmy.' " It was weeks before Mrs. James Fessenden 
accepted the fact there was no "junior" in the family. . . . 
While on the subject of names, Beverly made it clear 
that she's very pleased with her married name of Mrs. 
Fillmore Pajeau Crank. "It has," she said, her eyes twin- 
kling, "a ring to it. When I go into stores and charge 
something, invariably salesgirls will say to me, 'Well, 
you don't look like a crank.' "... Good-natured Beverly 
has been migrating all her life. From Santa Cruz her 
family went to San Francisco, then to Glendale, California, 
on to Phoenix, Arizona, and finally to Los Angeles. Her 
husband's a builder, and as soon as they get a house in 
"shape," they sell it. So she's still on the move. "We've 
had six homes in less than two years," she explained, 
"and in between we've had two 'temporary' places in Palm 
Springs. I just make sure to keep my track shoes handy. 
As for possessions, I learned long ago not to attach im- 
portance to objects and things that can be replaced. And 
even if they can't be — they're not important compared to 
human or animal life." . . . Beverly has been married for 
nearly three years to Crank, a widower. She gets along 
fine with her stepchildren (Kathleen, 18; Smokey, 14), 
she says, because "I can talk faster — and louder. We're 
very strict," she admitted, "but it's paying off because 
they're great kids. My daughter calls me Mother, but my 
son usually says, 'Hey you,' or 'What do you think?' That's 
all right, too, because it means he thinks enough of me 
to ask my opinion. When I married Fillmore, I told the 
children that the most important thing was their respect 



and that if I got their love that would be an added bonus. 
But I have a feeling that I've finally got that." . . . Bev- 
erly isn't getting too fond of her hilltop home because, 
she says, "That look is in Fillmore's eyes again. Moving 
this time may pose a little problem, however. In the back 
yard we buried my son's pet rat. Over the grave is the 
marker, 'Here Lies George, A Rat.' I've seen a few people 
look peculiarly at it. I'm sure they think we've buried an 
agent, and I just know that whoever buys the house 
will dig up the grave before signing the papers." . . . 
There are those who know Miss Garland best who choose 
to believe that the earth really did shake because of her 
arrival, though there are a few stick-in-the-mud geologists 
who steadfastly attribute the quake to slippage of the 
unpredictable San Andreas seismic fault. In any event, 
since arriving amidst a pile of rubble, Beverly has moved 
to the top of the heap in the entertainment world. She's 
appeared in more than fifty television shows, including 
episodes of "The Twilight Zone," "Checkmate," "The 
Nurses" and "Dr. Kildare." Beverly also stars as a police- 
woman in a nationally syndicated series, "Decoy," most of 
it shot on location in New York City. She has appeared 
in over twenty-five features films, including "D.O.A.," 
"Desperate Hours," "The Joker Is Wild" and, recently 
released, "The Hate Within." She can portray anyone from 
a tough policewoman to a fragile glamour girl. It all 
began while she attended Glendale Junior High. There 
she studied dramatics under Anita Arliss, sister of the 
renowned English actor George Arliss. With an eye on 
Broadway, she financed herself the hard way — with no 
help from home. She worked as a drug store clerk, an 
elevator operator in a department store, a model and a 
waitress in a Hungarian restaurant. "I picked up some 
good recipes there," she adds. "In fact, I do 'almost all 
the cooking at home." After landing a role in the road 
company of "Happy Birthday" starring Miriam Hopkins, 
she got her first film role ("D.O.A." with Edmund 
O'Brien) when the show ended its tour in Los Angeles. 
Since then she's been kept very busy answering that 
incessant call: "Get me Beverly!" . . . It's a great life, 
indeed, when you're in demand in the field of your 
choice. And it's nice to see someone succeed who real- 
ly tried hard — especially when it's someone like Bev. 




Beverly at home with her most attractive — and fun — family. Below, 
"Joey" the dog plays with "Ichibon" the cat. Top right, Smokey gives 
Mom a guitar lesson, then both give "Joey" a bath. Next Bev helps 
Kathy with her homework, Kathy helps Bev with a new hairdo. 





Rush Hour is a popular 

time in Topeka. Rush Evans' "Rush Hour," 

we mean, seen daily on WIBW-TV by thousands of viewers 



60 



Rush Evans made quite a switch in his young life. After two years of 
pre-dentistry, he decided that he preferred tonsils to teeth and had 
a try at using his voice. He auditioned for a summer job as a radio 
announcer, and the rest, as they say about successful "show biz" people, 
is history. . . . Rush finished school in Northwestern's Speech Department 
and now has his own morning show, "Rush Hour," seen Monday through 




Left, baby Rush has a walking lesson. 
Above, Mama has a lesson, too — in 
Daddy's number-one favorite sport, golf. 




Golf-pro Pat Conn (left) is interviewed 
by Rush during a local tournament. 



Friday mornings from 7 to 8 on WIBW-TV in Topeka. The show really 
keeps Rush on his toes — his guests, too. It's strictly ad-lib. "Something 
unusual and unexpected happens almost every day," Rush says. One 
of his favorite stories recalls the time a guest on the show opened his 
mouth to speak. It seems there was a fly buzzing around who couldn't 
resist the temptation to fly in and crawl around a while. It was one 
of the more interesting "Rush Hours." . . . But whatever happens, and 
no matter how much time and energy Rush has to expend, he loves his 
work. In addition to his TV show, Rush is also Program Manager at 
WIBW and teaches at the local university. His only problem, he says, is 
finding enough time to spend with his family and enough time to sleep ! 
. . . He met his wife Helen when she came to the station one day to visit 
her uncle. They now live in a "conservative but comfortable" home in 
Topeka with Tina Louise, 2, and Rush III, nine months. "The kids are 
terrific," Rush says. "Every man should have a bunch!" . . . Rush has 
his own strong convictions on almost every subject. But this is fine, 
because he's usually right! Judging from the awards he has received 
and the stacks of mail that pour in from his delighted viewers, Rush is 
certainly right about keeping the show's format relaxed and completely 
spontaneous. And he's right about another thing, too : Every man should 
marry a "prize-winning girl" and have a bunch of terrific kids! 



61 



He's a real six-letter man — ■ 
Marc Howard earned those 
block initials the hard way, with 
his nightly labors for Station 
WFMJ-TV— but he cheerfully 
admits that any personal re- 
semblance to the characters he 
impersonates, as host of "Five 
O'Clock Show Time," is purely 
hilarious! Marc couldn't make 
the weight for Tarzan wearing 
Ma's fur coat ... on the other 
hand (or larynx) his vocabulary 
is vastly more extensive and 
New World: He "goes ape" very 
easily, but it's strictly "like — 
man!" Actually, he goes bug- 
eyed for science fiction on Tues- 
days and Thursdays (Wednes- 
day is when he swings through 
the TV trees) . . . dese-dem- 
and-dose for the Bowery on 
Mondays . . . and completely 
mad for comedy on Fridays. It's 
all part of getting in the mood 
for the types of movies he in- 
troduces at 5 p.m. Youngstown 
has learned to live with it and 
like it . . . but Marc's not so sure 
they dig him on "Weather Win- 
dow" at 11 p.m. "Gardeners want 
rain, girls want sun," he moans 




Man of few words? Not Marc 

Howard-he has lots to 
say to Youngstown viewers! 



— brightening to add, "but my 
mother loves me!" The latter 
lives in Sharon, Pennsylvania 
. , . where Marc was born twen- 
ty-six years ago as of next Feb- 
ruary 13th (just missed being a 
Valentine, but he'd love a way- 
out birthday card). He went to 
high school in Sharon, started 
broadcasting on WPIC. Today, 
he describes himself as "a re- 
tired deejay" who is now "an 
opera fan." Music, he likes. 
Even has the hi-fi going while he 
studies math . . . seems that 
in his saner (daytime) moments, 
he's a junior at Youngstown U. 
His other current love is his TR- 
4 (see below) . . . ask him about 
romantic interests or incidents 
in his life and he says: "Many 
incidents — minimal interests!" 
His idea of a dream girl? "Like, 
if I knew, I'd be married to her!" 
. . . Maybe it's because he 
smokes six to ten cigars a day. 
More likely, it's the heavy sched- 
ule he carries at college and 
studio — plus Army Reserve 
duty. Compared with Marc, Tar- 
zan's a lazy, hammock-swingin' 
loafer slower than molasses! 



62 




Marcs homework includes study (in theory) for Youngstown University — and research (in practice) on his Triumph. 



"CANDID CAMERA' —YES 

{Continued from page 17) 

car. A man was seated alongside a wom- 
an with a white babushka. The narrator 
characterized the couple as man and 
wife. 

The man was Richard Marshall, a 
postal employee, of 1317 St. Lawrence 
Avenue, The Bronx, New York. 

A stranger appeared suddenly in 
front of Marshall and the woman, and 
asked Marshall to move over and make 
room so he could sit between them. 
Marshall looked up surprised. He told 
the stranger to sit elsewhere, that there 
were plenty of empty seats in the car. 
But the man, who it later developed 
was a "Candid Camera" actor, insisted 
he wanted to sit in the narrow space 
between Marshall and the woman, say- 
ing he was going to read and he liked 
the lighting in that particular spot. 

Marshall replied that the lighting was 
just as good everywhere else in the 
car, where there was also plenty of 
room. As the stranger fumed, another 
man came along, injected himself into 
the argument by taking the intruder's 
side, and shouted there was lots of 
room for him to sit between Marshall 
and the woman. 

When viewers saw the show, they 
were given the impression Marshall was 
made to yield to the intruder, much to 
the embarrassment of the woman in 
the white babushka who appeared to be 
Marshall's wife. The impression the 
audience got of Marshall — or so he 
complains — was one of a helpless, con- 
fused, harassed, embarrassed and un- 
gentlemanly individual, because he had 
failed to react to the intrusion by ris- 
ing to defend his rights — and those of 
the woman in the babushka, the woman 
characterized as his wife. 

Actually, Marshall never was given 
much of a chance to strike back at 
either the man who tried to squeeze be- 
tween him and his "wife" or the other 
intruder. Before Marshall could gather 
his wits, he was told by the first stran- 
ger, the actor, that the whole episode 
was staged for "Candid Camera." 

Marshall then broke into a smile of 
relief. 

The actor identified himself as "Mr. 
O'Malley," introduced the intruder as 
"Ben," and brought over the others in 
the car, including the photographer 
who had shot the scene, to meet 
Marshall. 

Asked if he would agree to allow 
the scene to be shown on "Candid 
Camera," Marshall consented. Then 
"Mr. O'Malley" thrust an authorization 
form in Marshall's hands and asked him 
to sign. Without reading it, Marshall 
signed. No copy of the form was given 
to him. 

On the night of April 9th, Marshall 
watched the show and saw himself in 
the subway scene. He says that what 
he saw was something that struck hor- 
ror in him, as well as his wife, Pauline, 
and ultimately took them to attorney 
Nathan Amchan of Brooklyn. 

First of all, Marshall never dreamed 
"Candid Camera" would represent the 
woman in the white babushka as his 




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wife. That, Marshall said, caused peo- 
ple who know him to believe he was 
out with another woman — and had be- 
haved ungallantly and cowardly in her 
presence. 

Moreover, Marshall insisted, he looked 
stupid and ridiculous for being caught 
in public with a woman held out to be 
his wife. 

Marshall claimed "Candid Camera" 
added, falsified and doctored the sub- 
way incident. In just one word, it was 
"rigged." 

He said the train was made to appear 
fully occupied with passengers when 
actually it had very few riders. Some 
of the conversation between the woman, 
the actors and himself was omitted from 
the telecast, thus putting a different 
tenor on the episode — a tenor that 
Marshall says made him sick and caused 
his wife similar great anguish. 

Within ten days after she saw her 
husband depicted in the role of an un- 
gallant subwayite, Pauline came down 
with dermatitis herpetiformis, a skin 
condition. She was forced to take medi- 
cines and tranquilizers to bring the 
condition under control, but couldn't. 

Marshall claims he was beside him- 
self. July 30th, he suffered a nervous 
breakdown and had to be confined to 



Veterans Hospital in Northport, Long 
Island — a confinement that continued 
through summer and fall. At press 
time, he was still a patient there. 

As for Mrs. Marshall, she says she 
has continued to suffer humiliation be- 
cause her relatives, friends, neighbors 
and acquaintances believe her husband 
is "either unfaithful or is actually mar- 
ried" to the woman in the white ba- 
bushka. 

This conclusion, Mrs. Marshall says, 
comes about because of the public's be- 
lief and assumption of the absolute 
truthfulness of the facts set forth in 
"Candid Camera." 

Therefore, in everyone's eyes, she is 
"improperly, shamefully, and dishon- 
orably continuing in a state of question- 
able or bankrupt matrimony." She says 
she is compelled constantly to defend 
her husband's faithfulness, integrity 
and good character, and the validity of 
their marriage and sanctity of their 
home. 

Thus far, Pauline has incurred hos- 
pital expenses amounting to $85, a 
physician's bill of $10, and a drug tab 
of $40. 

Taking all this into consideration, 
Attorney Amchan prepared and filed 
a suit for damages, asking $50,000 for 



Marshall and $50,000 for his wife, to- 
gether with costs and disbursements 
of the action. 

The suit made one point crystal clear : 

Marshall is not and never was mar- 
ried to the woman passenger; that 
Marshall has been married to Pauline 
since July 1st, 1947, and that they have 
a son, 13, and a daughter, 12. 

Therefore, the suit claims, the tele- 
cast induced "an evil opinion" of Mar- 
shall "in the minds of right-thinking 
persons in the listening and viewing- 
television audience." 

And, finally, his breakdown and his 
wife's condition are said to be the result 
of the shame and humiliation they have 
been made to suffer among their family 
and relatives, and the ridicule and pub- 
lic disgrace he has been made to suffer 
in his community and on his job. As 
the suit said, Marshall "will continue 
to sustain . . . mental suffering and 
severe emotional distress." 

All because the telecast "was pre- 
sented to the listening and viewing pub- 
lic in reckless disregard of the rights, 
reputation, and good, fair name of 
plaintiff Richard Marshall." 

(Editor's Note : Be sure to read the oth- 
er side of this story, starting on page 17. ) 



"CANDID CAMERA"— NO 

(Continued from page 17) 

paragraph of the complaint filed by 
Richard and Pauline Marshall stated 
that "defendant, Arthur Godfrey, is a 
beloved and respected star in the tele- 
vision and radio world, of great pres- 
tige and influence in the United States." 
In answer, the defendants, CBS, God- 
frey and Funt, stated that they hadn't 
the knowledge or the information to 
form opinions on the allegations con- 
tained in paragraph four of the com- 
plaint except to admit that "defendant 
Godfrey is a well-known radio and tele- 
vision personality." 

Paragraph five of the complaint paid 
similar tribute to Funt, saying he was 
"a television personality of great pres- 
tige and influence in the United States." 
The attorneys for the defendants, Cou- 
dert Brothers of 488 Madison Avenue, 
New York City, replied with a denial 
of that claim, except that they yielded 
"Funt is a well-known television per- 
sonality in the United States." 

They conceded, however, that they 
had filmed Marshall in a sequence in 
which Tom O'Malley had tried to sit 
in Marshall's seat. They said it hap- 
pened in the I.R.T. subway on March 
17th, 1961. 

"After indicating that he wished to 

sit in said seat," the answer went, "Tom 

O'Malley eased his way into the row 

of seats, thus causing plaintiff and a 

woman occupying the seat next to him 

to move apart, and Tom O'Malley sat 

down." 

T The defendants then got down to an- 

v swering specific charges in Richard 

r Marshall's complaint which alleged he 

had been held up to ridicule by "Candid 

Camera." In the complaint, in para- 

64 



graph eight, it was charged that "Can- 
did Camera" personalities have repeat- 
edly told the audience that "we like 
to catch people doing things" and "peo- 
ple are caught in the act of being 
themselves." The complaint said fur- 
ther that the show is represented as 
a portrayal of completely honest and 
authentic occurrences that took place. 

"Deny each and every allegation con- 
tained in paragraph eight," replied the 
defendants, "except admit that on cer- 
tain broadcasts of the 'Candid Camera' 
show ad-libbed remarks similar in 
substance to those alleged in said 
paragraph were uttered by defendant 
Godfrey and that said series is repre- 
sented as depicting honest and authentic 
occurrences that in fact occurred." 

But CBS, Godfrey and Funt denied 
they had enough knowledge or informa- 
tion to confirm Marshall's claims that 
the listening and viewing public believes 
all scenes and incidents on "Candid 
Camera" are truthful, accurate, and 
genuinely authentic, and totally free 
of deception, untruth, inaccuracy, and 
fictitious characters. 

Replying to Marshall's claims that 
in the authorization he signed he did 
not consent to changes or additions of 
the actual situations, the defendants 
asked that the authorization which Mar- 
shall signed be referred to. It would, 
they stated, speak for itself. 



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And how does it speak for itself? 
Let's quote from the document which 
Marshall signed: 
"Gentlemen : 
"This will acknowledge receipt of a 

sum of $ in exchange for my 

consent to your using the motion pic- 
tures taken of me by you on the date 
and place set out below in any way 
you see fit in perpetuity throughout 
the world, including use on television. 
I also, agree that you may edit such 
film in any way you think proper 
without obtaining any further con- 
sent from me or making any addi- 
tional payment to me." 
The document was dated in a hand- 
written "3/17" without indication of 
the year. The "location" blank was filled 
in with what appears to be the descrip- 
tion of the scene : "Subways — Squeezing 
In." The blank alongside "description" 
read "glasses, sports coat buttoned at 
top, 40s (Irish looking) at Tom's right." 
The signature is "Richard Marshall" 
and is similar to the signature on the 
complaint filed in Bronx Supreme 
Court. 

The defendants also referred to Mar- 
shall's claim that the program depicted 
the woman in the white babushka as 
his wife, but CBS, Godfrey, and Funt 
preferred to leave that answer up to 
an audio-video of the program taken 
from the actual broadcast, which would 
be shown in court if the suit came to 
trial. 

Thus, in view of all this, the defend- 
ants insist, they are not liable to Rich- 
ard Marshall's action. 

In effect, what they're saying is that 
Marshall has no basis for an action 
against them — and have demanded that 
the court dismiss the complaint. 

(Editor's Note: Be sure to read the oth- 
er side of this story, starting on page 17.) 




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CAROL BURNETT isn't likely to forget 1962. 
This was the year she fell in love again ... the 
year she won TV's highest award, the Emmy . . . 
the year she signed a CBS contract with a price 
tag followed by more zeros than she can count. 
It was also the year she wowed them in night 
clubs — and you can see why, from these 




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pictures taken during her act. All in all, it was 
a good year. You can't blame Carol for resolv- 
ing to make 1963 as good — if not better. Here 
are some New Year's resolutions any girl might 
want to keep — including one for the picture on 
the opposite page. That one resolves: Don't for- 
get where you hid your list of resolutions! 

-The End 



LUCILLE BALL 

(Continued from page 21) 

that he had good reason for looking 
solemn. He's executive producer of the 
new "Lucy Show" and TV is a serious, 
million-dollar business. 

But there could well be another rea- 
son, Hollywood suspects. A more per- 
sonal and pressing reason, based on 
that old familiar pattern of a triangle: 

Lucille Ball . . . Gary Morton — to 
whom Lucy has been wed for just a 
year . . . and Desi Arnaz — divorced 
from Lucy, after almost twenty years 
of marriage, and father of her two 
children. 

That's the delicious triangle, the 
goose-for-the-gander sauce which is in- 
triguing Hollywood. They wonder: 

What's going to happen, as the show 
goes on and week after week, Monday 
through Thursday, Lucy works a twelve- 
to-fourteen-hour day with Desi at her 
side? What's going to happen to that 
urbane, witty Gary Morton when — as 
a top comedian himself — he goes to far- 
away places to fulfill his bookings? 

What's going to happen to Mr. and 
Mrs. Morton's precious weekends, when 
Lucy sends Lucie Jr. (almost fourteen) 
and little Desi (not quite ten) to stay 
with their father? And Lucy takes that 
lull as her much-needed opportunity 
to rest up between shows? 

Trouble— and $12,000,000 

Can this truly wonderful dame — who 
is the real Lucille Ball — be the bright 
bride who can eat her wedding cake 
and have it, too? 

If you really want to know, Holly- 
wood would find it enchanting if she 
could. They know what she suffered 
with Desi. 

That doesn't mean Hollywood doesn't 
like Desi. It admires him tremendously. 
In fact, he is regarded as a veritable 
genius of a showman. Besides, he only 
acted like many a Latin husband. He 
loved her wildly. He adored his chil- 
dren. He was infatuated with his own 
home — the beautiful home where Gary 
Morton lives now. 

There were only two small troubles. 
(1) They say he liked a nip every now 
and then. (2) They say he liked to 
flirt. He also worked too hard, but you 
can scarcely call that a trouble, even 
if it did begin to trouble Lucy terribly. 

In fact, it bothered her so much she 
got a divorce and about twelve million 
dollars as her split of the Desilu assets. 
Whereby hangs a tale which tells you 
a lot about Lucy: 

She and Desi had wound up "I Love 
Lucy." They both believed it had ex- 
hausted its popular appeal, which at 
the time Desiderio Alberto Arnaz de 
Acha IV had been born to them — in 
1953 — had attained the highest rating 
any TV show ever had. (They were 
wrong. Today, in re-runs, "I Love Lucy" 
T is one of the top-rated shows, even in 
v competition with brand-new produc- 
r tions.) Lucy . . . depressed over the 
breakup of her marriage . . . depressed 
over facing that most distressing of 
68 



feminine birthdays, her fiftieth . . . 
uncertain of her future . . . felt she 
had to prove herself. 

Years ago, on Broadway, she had 
been just a chorus girl. At the end of 
1959, she determined she'd go back 
to Broadway as a star. She'd conquer 
a brilliant new world. That was when 
she accepted "Wildcat." She packed up 
Lucie and little Desi and moved to New 
York. At that time, she believed she'd 
not miss it if she never saw Hollywood 
again. 

Now, Lucy is a perfectly wonderful 
mother, and one reason is that she has 
such a wonderful mother of her own. 
Her kids know she is always there, 
with love and understanding, when they 
need her, just as Lucy knows her moth- 
er is there, looking after all of them. 
So, of course, Grandma Ball became 
a member of the household in New 
York. 

To this day, Lucy has never said a 
word against Desi to her children. Prac- 
tically speaking, she's never talked 
against him to anyone. But, there in 
New York, she tried to do things with 
just her daughter, her son and her- 
self. No husband. No father. 



Statement required by the Act of Auqust 24, 
1912, as amended by the Acts of March 3, 1933, 
July 2, 1946, and June 11, 1960 (74 Stat. 208) 
showing the ownership, management and circu- 
lation of TV RADIO MIRROR, published monthly 
at New York, N. Y., for October 1, 1962. 

1. The names and addresses of the pub- 
lisher, editor, manaein? editor, and busi- 
ness managers are: Publisher, Macfadden- 
Bartell Corporation, 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y.; Editorial Director, Jack J. 
Podell, 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, 
N. Y.; Editor, Claire Safran, 205 East 42nd 
St., New York 17, N. Y.; Executive Vice- 
President, Frederick A. Klein, 205 East 
42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

2. The owner is: (If owned by a corpora- 
tion, its name and address must be stated 
and also immediately thereunder the names 
and addresses of stockholders owning or 
holding 1 percent or more of total amount 
of stock. If not owned by a corporation, the 
names and addresses of the individual 
owners must be given. If owned by a part- 
nership or other unincorporated firm, its 
name and address, as well as that of each 
individual member, must be given.) Mac- 
fadden-Bartell Corporation, 205 East 42nd 
St., New York 17, N. Y.; Gerald A. Bartell, 
205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y.; 
David Bartell, 205 East 42nd Street, New 
York 17, N. Y.; Lee B. Bartell, 205 East 
42nd Street, New York 17, N. Y.; Melvin 
M. Bartell, 205 East 42nd Street, New York 
17, N. Y.; Ralph & Rosa Evans, 3500 North 
Sherman Blvd., Milwaukee 16, Wisconsin. 

3. The known bondholders, mortgagees, 
and other security holders owning or hold- 
ing 1 percent or more of total amount of 
bonds, mortgages, or other securities are: 
(If there are none, so state.) None. 

4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases 
where the stockholder or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company as 
trustee or in any other fiduciary relation, 
the name of the person or corporation for 
whom such trustee is acting; also the state- 
ments in the two paragraphs show the 
affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
circumstances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who do 
not appear upon the books of the company 
as trustees, hold stock and securities in a 
capacity other than that of a bona fide 
owner. 

5. The average number of copies of each 
issue of this publication sold or distributed, 
through the mails or otherwise, to paid 
subscribers during the 12 months preceding 
the date shown above was: (This informa- 
tion is required by the act of June 11, 1960, 
to be included in all statements regardless 
of frequency of issue.) 677,217. 

(Signed) FREDERICK A. KLEIN, 
Executive Vice-President 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 
27th day of September, 1962. 

[SEAL] 

TULLIO MUCELLI, Notary Public 

State of New York No. 03-8045500 

Qualified in Bronx Co. 

Cert. Filed in New York Co. 

Commission Expires March 30, 1964 



Ask any woman who has had a fam- 
ily, and a home, and a husband, what 
that's like. It's the loneliest. It's a con- 
stant dagger in the memory, an eternal 
reminder of what has been so terribly 
lost. 

Put on top of that the awful empti- 
ness of a person who for years has 
been working sixteen hours a day — as 
Lucy had on "I Love Lucy" — and now 
has nothing but time, time, time. It's 
a dragging hell. 

Thus at first, when the rehearsals 
of "Wildcat" started, she was pleased. 
But presently, with her sense of show 
business — which is almost as sharp as 
Desi's — she realized that it wasn't a 
good show, and she could not make it 
into a Broadway hit unless she per- 
sonally galvanized it by an almost im- 
possibly great performance. 

So she started to do that, and it very 
nearly killed her. She began working 
hours on end to sing better, dance 
better, make the laughs come louder 
and longer. She would collapse into 
bed, when she got home nights, and 
sleep as though drugged for hours. 
There even came a time, on the out- 
of-town tryout, when she slept over the 
entire weekend, and her mother and 
her maid, both shouting and pulling 
at her, could barely arouse her. 

They did, in fact, drag her out of 
bed and started dressing her while she 
was still asleep. In a taxi, heading to- 
ward the theater, she was only half- 
awake. It wasn't until she was in the 
backstage hallway, heading toward her 
dressing room, that Lucille became com- 
pletely aware of her surroundings. 

Leaning wearily against the dingy 
wall, she stared at her mother with 
tears rolling down her cheeks. "Mom, 
why am I doing this?" she sobbed. "I've 
got twelve million dollars. Why am I 
doing this?" 

She couldn't stop now 

That morning, there had been head- 
lines in the New York papers about 
Desi Arnaz, in Hollywood, being up 
on a drunk-driving charge. There had 
been a bunch of girls with Desi. That 
was his fashion. He rushed around with 
girls in bunches. 

For Lucille, the show "Wildcat" had 
to go on. She was a complete triumph 
in it, though every critic said the show 
itself was terrible. By the sheer force 
of her skill and personality, Lucille 
made audiences roar with delight. Only 
her mother knew how she was exhaust- 
ing herself every night. Only her mother 
knew how, every weekend, Lucy did 
things with her children, just the three 
of them, all making believe they had 
forgotten when they were a complete 
family. 

There were even a couple of weeks 
when Lucy had to be out of the show. 
She was sick. Her mother knew that 
she was really sick of her heart's free- 
dom, her heart's emptiness. 

But one evening, Lucy's pal Paula 
Stewart asked her to go along with her 
and Paula's husband, Jack Carter, to 
a pizza parlor. A night-club comedian, 
Gary Morton, was at the same pizza 
parlor. Alone — but (Lucy knows now) 



by pre-arrangement with Paula. Gary 
Morton, aged forty-four. Also divorced. 

About five minutes after their intro- 
duction, Lucille heard herself laughing 
as she hadn't laughed in a couple of 
years. A little later, she heard Gary 
saying, "It's ages since I've laughed 
as much as I have this evening." Pres- 
ently, Paula and her husband were 
saying they really must go home, but 
Gary was suggesting didn't Miss Ball 
want to stay on and have another 
drink? It was then Lucy noticed that 
Mr. Morton had had only one drink. 
They had another one together, then he 
took her home and asked if he might 
call her. 

He did call her the next morning. 
The next afternoon, too. And she did 
join him for supper after the show 
that evening. And the next, and the 
one after that, and the one after that 
one, too. 

Naturally, then, he had to meet her 
mother and the kids. 

The difference in men 

All the time, Lucy felt her whole 
personality beginning to come back to 
warmth. She noticed, with a steadily 
rising hope, that Gary Morton — for all 
his ability to make her laugh and to 
laugh with and at her — was a quiet, 
moderate man. Desi had never been 
moderate about one single thing, not 
life or food or drink or love or flirta- 
tions. She had got into the habit her- 
self of eating too much, drinking a bit 
too much. The difference between her 
and Desi was that she could carry a 
lot of alcohol. Desi couldn't — which did 
nothing but make him fiercely angry. 

But with Gary Morton holding down 
to one drink, obviously by choice, Lu- 
cille began cutting down to one drink, 
too. Today, she doesn't even drink that 
one. She began holding down on food, 
too, and her beautiful figure began 
coming back to her. 

The closing notice of "Wildcat" went 
up and she was only glad. She had 
held it up, by her battling performance, 
enough to prove to the world what 
bhe could do, but she began to dream 
of a mature, quiet happiness . . . some- 
thing she'd never had with Desi, some- 
thing she came to believe she never 
could have had with him. 

She had her children. She had her 
mother. She had all the money she 
could ever want, and Gary was offer- 
ing her love, and she was a very fem- 
inine woman who loved love ... so 
on the nineteenth of November, she 
and Gary were married. 

Lucy was very happy. She was go- 
ing to have a beautiful, quiet life. Gary 
could work in night clubs whenever 
he wished, but he wasn't crazily am- 
bitious. He worked to earn enough to 
live on graciously. He liked a gracious 
leisure, too. So did Lucy. Desi had been 
the crazily ambitious one. 

Only. 

Only, early in 1962, discussions be- 
gan about Lucille doing a new TV show. 
At that time, Lucille Ball Morton was 
a very happy woman. She had peace 
and quiet and faithful devotion, and 
(Continued on page 72) 




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APPRECIATION 



This is one of the thousands of "thank-you" letters that Arthur receives from his fans. If you're \ 

one, you know why. If not, find outlTune in weekday mornings onThe CBS Radio Network. 

71 



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(Continued from page 69) 
laughter, too, with Gary. Her children 
were very happy with her new hus- 
band. Life was placidly delightful. 

Only, when that new show was men- 
tioned, Lucille suddenly knew why she 
had done "Wildcat" despite her twelve 
million dollars. In the actor's phrase, 
she had to be "on." Yes, she was very, 
very happy in her private life, but she 
was also used to a public life. She is 
too modest a person, actually, to admit 
to herself that she is an artist. But 
she is a great comic artist, and needs 
an outlet for creative expression. 

Everything— versus nothing 

A new TV show, if it was a hit, would 
let her have everything — a beautiful 
marriage, her beautiful children, fun 
in a studio. And besides! Miss Ball 
grinned to herself. A cat who has just 
made away with a particularly fat 
canary couldn't have looked any more 
sly. Desi, you see, was still going 
around with girls in bunches. He hadn't 
settled down to any particular one. 

The more Lucy thought of her old 
beautiful home in Beverly Hills, that 
great, magnificent rambling house 
where she'd raised little Lucie and Desi, 
the more glorious it seemed. She de- 
scribed it to Gary. He kissed her lov- 
ingly and indicated he wouldn't mind 
living in it one bit. Near to Jack Ben- 
ny's, huh, and very close to a golf 
course? Nothing could suit Gary more. 

So Lucy Morton came back to a 
new show — and Desilu. After all, she 
was still vice-president of Desilu. It 
would have made no sense going into 
competition with herself by working at 
any other studio. As for a producer — 
everybody knew Desi was an absolute 
genius at it, which would make it 
idiotic for her not to make that genius 
available to herself. 

Besides, she and Desi were civilized 
people. They could be business part- 
ners, business friends. And if Desi con- 
tinued to get loaded, practically every 
night, so what? She wasn't drinking 
at all. She was sticking to her diet. She 
had her lovely, quiet evenings, full 
of laughter and romance, at home with 
Gary. He didn't give a hoot about go- 
ing to night clubs or parties. She didn't, 
either. They had each other, her chil- 
dren, her mother. 

And now she'd have a new show, too. 
What a big, fat, wonderful life. 

Only — after Lucy had signed for the 
show and she was back at Desilu work- 
ing — she and Vivian Vance discovered 
that making a show without Desi and Bill 
Frawley in the cast was twice as much 
work as they had anticipated. Without 
TV "husbands," Vivian has many more 
lines to learn and Lucy has three times 
as many! With one or both in almost 
every scene, rehearsals and actual 
shooting took lots of time. Too much 
time. Twelve to fourteen solid hours a 
day, for at least four days a week. 

Gary Morton told his happy wife 
he thought it wouldn't be professional 
for him to come to rehearsals, but he'd 
come watch each show as they re- 
corded it. She loved him for that, for 
being so considerate, for not being 



jealous. Desi always blew his stack if 
a man so much as smiled at her. 

Gary and Desi behaved like well-bred 
gentlemen of the great world whenever 
they did meet — particularly the night 
the first show was taped, with an audi- 
ence looking on. And when the show 
was over, Lucy ran into Gary's arms 
and he kissed her warmly and told her 
and the whole room how terrific she 
had been. 

Yes, it was a charming sight, and that 
shrewd, select audience was happy for 
Lucy, their own, unspoiled darling. 
Only. . . . 

Only now, as the show goes on, she 
necessarily is spending more waking 
hours with Desi than she does with 
Gary. For, over the weekends, she 
sleeps and sleeps to rest up. 

Don't get the impression that there 
is a single cloud in her sky, because 
there isn't. She is very much in love. 
And she is also having the kind of 
larksome revenge that is granted to 
very, very few women who once loved 
too much. 

Nevertheless, Hollywood keeps think- 
ing about Desi. Desi, the little Cuban 
musician who had barely a dime when 
he came to Hollywood and now has 
many, many millions. You don't get 
to be a millionaire unless you hit gold 
or oil . . . or unless you know how 
to get around obstacles. 

Two sides of a triangle 

Besides, there are two small stories 
about Lucy and Desi that stand out. 
One happened recently, when a weary 
Lucy, going home from the studio, 
stopped by to see a friend who lives 
in one of the few private dwellings in 
Hollywood that have elevator service. 

The elevator operator asked, rather 
coyly, "And how's Mrs. Morton?" 

Half knocked out with fatigue, but 
always obliging to her public, Lucy 
said, "Gee, I've been so busy since I've 
got back, I haven't seen a soul." Then 
she sucked in her breath. "Oh, gosh," 
she gasped, "I'm Mrs. Morton." 

The Desi story is simpler. The eve- 
ning after they had taped that first new 
Lucy show, he was charming to all the 
guests. He chatted. He talked. He is, 
naturally, a very charming man. He 
stood aside and saw his ex-wife, the star 
of the show he's not in, go laughingly 
out on the firm, strong arm of her new 
husband. 

Finally, there was no one left at all 
except Desi. There was no sound. There 
was simply nothing. Only Desi sitting 
there, all alone. 

All alone and thinking, thinking. 

— Ruth Waterbury 

"The Lucy Show" is seen over CBS-TV, 
Monday evening — at 8:30 p.m. est. 



Mental Health 



Campaign 



Give! 



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«V VfiT 



VINCENT EDWARDS 

(Continued from page 24) 

around at that pile of stones. I'm alive 
today, I thought, but tomorrow I may 
be a ruin, a memory like those stones. 
What kind of life is it that's afraid 
to test its powers to the utmost? That's 
when I made my mind up. I'd take the 
plunge. I'd accept the Las Vegas offer. 
I'd put all Ben Casey's chips, all 'The 
Victors' chips, on a night-club act — 
and winner take all." 

A silent partner 

A few days after Vince wrote this, 
Sherry arrived in Rome with Vince's 
manager, Abner Greshler. Her future 
is so tied up with Vince's that, in a 
way, she is a silent partner in any 
gamble he may take. She sensed at 
once that something was up. 

"Well, what is it now?" she asked, 
a trifle worried. 

Vince grinned sheepishly. After a 
little hesitation, he told her that he 
was going to sing in Vegas. Sherry 
pursed her lips in a low whistle. 

"Look," he said, "in the days when 
the going was really rough, I learned 
one thing. An actor's first duty is to 
survive m his profession. And that's 
what I did. I stuck it out until my 
break came with 'Ben Casey.' But be- 
fore this break came, I made a promise 
to myself. I swore that, if I ever got 
the chance to show what I was capable 
of, I'd give all I had and I wouldn't 
stop halfway. I've always been both 
a singer and an actor, and while I've 
proved myself to some degree on TV 
and in the movies, I owe it to myself 
and all the people like you, who had 
faith in me, to prove what else I can 
really do." 

"But you did prove that when you 
sang on 'The Dinah Shore Show' last 
winter," Sherry pointed out. 

"It isn't the same as doing a live 
show, twice a night, in a top spot," 
he said with quiet resolution. "Maybe 
I'll just make a fool of myself . . . 
maybe the people won't like me. But 
it's one risk I'll have to take." 

It was big, brave talk, but later, back 
in Hollywood, Vince's fears returned. 
This time, for a new reason. Where 
would he find the time to whip up an 
act that could pass muster before the 
discriminating and sometimes jaded 
audiences of Las Vegas? Only a cocky 
novice would fool himself on that score, 
and Vince is no novice to any phase 
of show business. He was well aware 
that an act of real merit demanded 
many hours of careful thought, self- 
search and preparation. 

It may sound simple, but there are 
dozens of seemingly small decisions 
which trouble the sleep of the most ex- 
pert performers. What should he wear, 
for instance? Generally, the preference 
is for something that can be distinc- 
tive and memorable. Judy Garland 
wows them with a simple black dress; 
Marlene Dietrich makes five changes, 
going from slacks to the sexiest of 
gowns; Tony Martin uses a cane; Bela- 
fonte is most effective in tight pants and 



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73 



open-necked shirt. These gimmicks — 
these "shticks," as they are known to 
performers — did not attract Vince. He 
felt that, in his case, the best approach 
to an audience was to be sincere. 

"They'll be coming to find out if 
Ben Casey can really sing — and that's 
what I'll have to rely on to impress 
them. If I don't sing up a storm, noth- 
ing else will help. . . ." 

When Vince appeared on "The Dinah 
Shore Show," he did not wear the tra- 
ditional dinner jacket. "I'm not coming 
out with a yo-yo suit on," he said then. 
Instead, he wore a black shirt, black 
trousers and a wide black belt. The fans, 
used to seeing him in doctor's whites, 
reacted agreeably to this change of 
appearance, as they did to the startling 
fact that their Ben Casey actually had 
a voice, a big voice, a voice of pro- 
fessional range and flexibility. The re- 
sponse was, by all polls, an unprece- 
dented and overwhelming approval of 
his fans. 

"I don't see why I shouldn't wear the 
same outfit in Vegas," Vince half-asked 
Sherry. 

"I don't either . . ." she assured him. 

As rehearsals got under way, advisers 
were urging Vince to quit scowling "and 
practice up a nice mellow smile." 

"Everyone knows that would be out 
of character," he growled back. "I'm 
no laughing boy. And I don't plan to 
make with the jokes. If one comes to 
me naturally, I'll say it. But it's my 
honest opinion, the people who come 
to hear me will want me to be myself. 



I don't intend to snarl or make faces 
to frighten the kids. But I'm not going 
to put on a big artificial grin like a 
clown. That's final." 

The other gamble 

Vince made several trips to Las 
Vegas to get the feel of the place, but 
while there he made few appearances 
in the casinos. He did not feel in the 
best of humor. Word had reached him 
that Sherry was .still exhausted from 
her trip to Rome and still under a 
strain from the constant limelight she'd 
been in during those weeks. It had been, 
she confided to a friend, more than 
an exhausting experience. The demands 
made upon stars and everyone close 
to them, she had discovered, were terri- 
fying to her. She and Vince had not 
been able to do any normal sightseeing. 

Even when they'd arrived back in 
Hollywood, after hours of plane travel, 
photographers and fans were waiting. 
"I felt and looked a wreck, I know it," 
she said. "Perhaps it's best if I don't 
accompany Vince's friends to Vegas for 
his opening night." But since Sherry- 
is now working as Vince's secretary, it 
seems probable that she will have to 
spend at least part of the time with 
him in Vegas — and will find she 
wants to. 

And as for the gambling, did Vince 
intend to give the tables the go-by com- 
pletely? 

"No," he told us frankly. "But if I 
do throw the dice once or twice, it'll 



be in the wee hours, after the late show. 
And I'll only play until I unwind from 
the strain, and then take off for bed. 
I want to get plenty of sleep and sun. 
I owe it to the gang at 'Ben Casey.' 
They're doing everything possible to 
help me by rearranging the shooting 
schedule." 

The gang at "Ben Casey" point out 
that, in spite of the efforts by all to 
cooperate, Vince's original opening date 
had to be postponed. When he does 
open, Vince will still have to make 
some trips back and forth from Vegas 
during the month he plays there. He 
will be needed on the sound stage for 
certain scenes that cannot be done in 
advance. He will have to dash from 
the stage of the late show to the air- 
port, grab a few hours' sleep at his 
Hollywood home, rush to the set to do 
his stint, then back to the airport and 
another rush to make his first Riviera 
show. 

It'll be rough but, to Vince, it'll be 
worth it. "I know I've got the reputation 
for being the big bad wolf who huffs 
and puffs, growls and scowls," Vince 
said. "But when you come right down 
to the fundamentals, I'm like everyone 
else in show business. I want to be good, 
to give my best, and that's the most 
important thing. But ... I want them 
to like me, too. . . ." Elena Forest 

"Ben Casey" is seen on ABC-TV, Mon., 
10 to 11 p.m. est. Vince also stars 
in "The Victors" (Columbia Pictures) 
and records as a singer (Decca label). 



DIANNE LENNON 

(Continued from page 52) 

first "going together" — and begin- 
ning as far back as their early teens 
— it has been clear that they considered 
children the major aim of marriage. 
Dick's family consists of eight brothers 
and sisters; Dianne's of eleven. Both 
have always found "a comfortable, se- 
cure sensation" in the mere presence 
of family. 

During the period of their engage- 
ment, there were some who accused 
them of being lacking in romantic fer- 
vor. Peggy once explained it to a friend 
who complained of that. "Dick and Dee- 
Dee are terribly in love," she told the 
girl. 

"Well, they never talk about love," 
the girl defended herself. "It's all about 
how they'll furnish their home, the chil- 
dren they hope to have, and how they'd 
like to have a bigger family than their 
parents. . . ." 

Because of this, there was a certain 

amount of speculation — not only within 

the circle of friends and family but 

also among Lennon fans — when the 

young Gass couple did not have a child 

right away. Some people wondered if 

the trouble was of a medical nature. 

For the benefit of those who might 

T think this, there is nothing wrong with 

v either Dianne or Dick. Undoubtedly, in 

R the future they will have their own 

children. Adoption on their part does 

not mean thev cannot have children of 

74 



their own or that they've given up that 
hope. Rather, it is evidence of the im- 
patience and eagerness of Dianne and 
Dick not to waste more time going 
childless until the miracle of concep- 
tion does occur. It is evidence of hearts 
too full of love not to share that love 
with a child — now. 

Some fans have hopefully suggested 
that perhaps, since DeeDee has had no 
children, she would be willing to return 
to the entertainment field. "Never!" she 
answers. "The girls often tour and that 
would mean being away from Dick. I've 
had some happy moments in the past 
when I sang with the Welk group, but 
that's definitely over for good. After 
all, a husband needs attention just as 
much as a child. I wouldn't untie my 
apron strings for a gown made of gold." 

A helpless child 

Once, when the younger Lennon kids 
were up to some mischief, and DeeDee 
was baby-sitting, she was asked if she 
ever "got mad" at the youngsters. 
"Sure!" she admitted. "Who doesn't 
get mad at kids and their little tricks? 
But it's not a real mad, you know. The 
little pests make up for lapses in a 
hundred different ways that tug at your 
heartstrings. From the parents down, 
each member of a family relies on the 
others, and, of course, the smaller ones 
do the most leaning. But in some ways, 
the elder ones rely on the younger 
ones, too, for their pep, their fun, their 
warm hugs and kisses, their changing 
moods — and. above all. for their help- 



lessness. This is a kind of deep thought, 
about relying on their helplessness. 

"My father pointed it out to me once. 
Because the sweet kids depend on us 
so much, we don't dare show them that 
we may be in a weak, depressed or de- 
pendent mood ourselves. We have to 
measure up to what's expected of us, 
and be stronger than we might be other- 
wise. Mom always told us that, when- 
ever she felt blue, just the sound of 
the kids coming home from school or 
rushing in for dinner or needing a dress 
mended or whatever . . . that alone 
pulled her out of herself and she be- 
came too busy and interested to brood 
or worry. It's one reason, one among 
a dozen, that Dick and I can't picture 
anything more wonderful than being 
part of a big family . . . unless it's be- 
ing parents of a big family." 

On another occasion, speaking of the 
success of the Lennon Sisters, shortly 
after she and Dick were married, she 
spoke about the family's standard of 
living. "You know," DeeDee said, "we're 
not rich and we've never been rich. Up 
until three years ago, nine of us were 
living in a two-bedroom house in Ven- 
ice. We four girls slept in one bedroom, 
the three boys in the other, and Mom 
and Daddy slept in the living room. 

"It's funny, the more crowded we got, 
the closer we were to one another. I 
mean that. You can't imagine the fun 
we had. And that's why Dick and I, 
even if we don't make a lot of money, 
are not afraid of having a lot of chil- 
dren. We know from personal expe- 
rience in our own homes that it doesn't 



hurt a bit to do without some things 
so that all the family can have a share 
in the goodies. In fact, it may do real 
good in the long run. And if Dick and 
I were to have a lot of money, what 
better use could we put it to than to 
spend it on our children? 

"When I say this, I want to make it 
perfectly clear that, even in homes 
where there is money, it is foolish and 
wrong to spoil children by giving them 
everything with no effort on their part. 
First of all, I believe kids like to earn 
their gifts. They take pride in working 
for their spending money. They like 
the sense of contributing something to 
their family. It's a feeling of achieve- 
ment that many people unfortunately 
never let their children enjoy. And I 
imagine parents must get a big lift out 
of seeing their children put their shoul- 
ders to the wheel. It's an experience 
Dick and I would love to have. 

"Some people say, 'Oh, if I could 
only be a kid again!' Dick and I say, 
'Wouldn't it be marvelous to look on 
a bunch of kids playing in the yard and 
be able to say, 'They're ours!'" 

When DeeDee and Dick married, they 
were grateful for the wonderful start 
they had. Friends, relatives and fans 
gave them all the linens, silver, glass- 
ware and household utensils they could 
possibly need. They moved into the 
house Dick had purchased from his 
parents when they went on to larger 
quarters, and both worked together re- 
finishing furniture, painting, and mak- 
ing their honeymoon cottage into a 
true home. Though DeeDee had a nest- 
egg as a result of the money set aside 
from her salary each week of the three 
years she was on the Welk show, she 
did not spend it recklessly in order to 
"keep up with the Joneses." Neither 
she nor Dick were brought up to believe 
in such false values. Instead, she has 
kept most of her money intact, carefully 
invested for a future day when it might 
be needed for important things — such 
as the education of her children. She 
and Dick budget carefully — and the 
budget has always included saving for 
the family they will have. 

That DeeDee and Dick are happy to- 
gether, even without a child in the 
house, is obvious to all who know them. 
DeeDee's excitement each evening as 
it gets time for her husband to come 
home . . . the thoughtful little gifts of 
flowers or a book that Dick often brings 
for no special occasion . . . these are 
only small evidences of their love for 
each other. DeeDee still helps care for 
the younger Lennons, and they often 
come to spend the night at Dick's and 
DeeDee's, sleeping in the baby bed that 
was once Dick's. DeeDee is far from 
lonely — but seeing her younger broth- 
ers and sisters daily has only intensified 
her desire to have a baby of her own. 
This decent young pair has a com- 
pelling urge to bring a child into the 
world. A child, after all, is in itself a 
sort of guarantee of immortality. This 
is what a parent gets from a child, but 
for DeeDee and Dick, what they can 
give is even more important. They want 
to give their hearts and their home to 
a child who needs them. This act of giv- 
ing will make that child theirs. 

— Beatrice Emmons 




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75 



CONNIE FRANCIS 

(Continued from page 34) 
Test Number 5 

You Want to Be Good for Him. 

When you love a person and respect 
him, you want to do little kind things 
that don't seem to pop into your mind 
with other people. You want to be good 
for him and to him. . . . You can enjoy 
spending time with some boys, and after 
you get to know them better, you can 
find yourself becoming careless in front 
of them. But with someone you love, 
you want everything to be right. Most 
of all, you want to be right, because 
his loving you brings out the softest, 
most feminine side of you. 

When you're in love, your own ego 
becomes much less important. I don't 
mean you suppress it entirely, because 
then you'd be a nothing. But things 
you used to emphasize seem less im- 
portant. . . . This doesn't mean that you 
have to bring yourself down to make 
him feel big. You just want to do things 
that are tender and kind instead of 
selfish. 

Does this attitude make you lose or 
sacrifice any part of your own per- 
sonality? Not for one second, because 
doing something for someone else 
makes you more of a person. So, when 
you're really in love, you want to do 
things for your loved one. But the test 
isn't complete unless you can do things 
for him without his knowing it. . . . 
The only way to give lovingly is to do 



it freely, without having to talk about 
your great generosity all the time. 

None of this means you're less of a 
person. It just means you're a better 
person. . . . When you love someone 
enough to be unselfish, you can stop 
thinking "/" all the time. It's then you 
can start thinking "we." 

Test Number 6 

Put Him to The Test. Now, when 
you're dating a boy, you see each other 
under special circumstances. Even when 
it's just a date to do homework or 
watch television or go for a walk — that 
is, when you're most likely to be your- 
selves — it's still special, for one essen- 
tial reason: You're not married. And 
that makes a big difference. 

You can look at a boy you date and 
see a relatively carefree young man 
who wouldn't know how to define words 
like "mortgage." . . . But suppose you're 
really serious about him. You're really 
considering him as a marriage partner. 
You seriously wonder how he'll rate as 
a husband. . . . 

Well, there's just one way to find out: 
Put him to the test, too. And he'll never 
even have to know about it. You can 
start by asking yourself a few pointed 
questions. For instance : What would he 
be like if you saw each other every day, 
morning and night, week after week, 
year after year? 

What would he be like after you've 
gone out and rented that honeymoon 
apartment, and then the bills start flood- 
ing in? . . . What would that tan, care- 
free face be like with a frown of irri- 



tation or wrinkles of worry about 
money, office conflicts or the furnace? 

Finally, remember the day you had 
that awful toothache (or whatever) : 
What if you didn't live with your par- 
ents anymore ... if you had to get up 
and make this boy's breakfast before he 
went to work . . . care for one or two 
babies all day. . . ? 

Would he still look as good to you 
as he does today? Would he under- 
stand? Could you count on him to help? 

In other words, how would he 
measure up as husband, father, family 
man? 

My Kind of Man 

First of all, I think a man who'd 
make a good husband has to be a per- 
son with great love and respect for his 
own family — not just for his father and 
mother, but for family traditions. He 
shouldn't be a swinger to such a point 
that everything traditional about mar- 
riage is "square" and "corny." 

Any man you consider as a husband 
has got to love children. He's got to be 
interested in them and able to play with 
them, and he shouldn't consider them a 
waste of time, a nuisance, or threat to 
his own freedom. 

A man should love things that aren't 
just material. Even though he may be 
the roughest, toughest businessman in 
the world, he's got to have a tender 
side, too. He can't be afraid to show 
some sentimental feeling, and in order 
for him to be a warm, gentle husband, 
this warmth and gentleness have to be 
there in the first place. 



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MY FAVORITES ARE: 



MALE STAR: 1. 




2. 










3. 


FEMALE STAR: 1 


2. 










3. 


FAVORITE STORY 


IN 


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Y • Name Age 

v : 

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■ 1-63 

76 



The Test You Can't Use 

Six tests for lasting love! You'll find 
many boys who can pass one or two, 
maybe even three or four. But all six 
— well, he won't be so easy to find, and 
that's the way it should be. 

I'd just like to add one test you can't 
use, no matter how much you're tempted 
— and you'll soon see why. 

Here it is : Do you feel as if you can't 
live without him? 

"Oh, yes," I would have said once. 
"I'm miserable when we're apart. I'm 
only happy and complete when we're 
together. Surely, this must be real love." 
But the reason it wasn't is that I've felt 
exactly the same way at least half a 
dozen times since then — just as lonely, 
just as miserable, just as incomplete 
without half a dozen different boys. So 
even if you don't feel quite as happy 
or quite as interesting or quite as alive 
when he's not with you — don't use it as 
a test for marriage-type love. It's not. 

You can be infatuated and feel the 
same way. You can have a crush on 
Frankie Avalon and feel the same way. 
You can worship the chemistry teacher 
and feel the same way. And when you 
meet the boy you'll marry, you'll feel 
the same way. 

But the difference is this: He can 
pass the six real tests for real love be- 
sides, and measure up to every one! 

—The End 

Key to first test: Questions 1 to 5, yes. 
Question 6, double yes! Questions 7, 8, 
and 9, no. And Question 10, triple no! 



JACKIE KENNEDY 

(Continued from page 31) 



ceived her love for her husband's par- 
ents, Joseph and Rose Kennedy. Always, 
from the time that Jack and Jackie 
emerged in the political spotlight, the 
elder Kennedys remained in the back- 
ground. Always there was the impres- 
sion that the head of the clan had taken 
a more or less detached attitude on the 
political fortunes of his son. 

Consequently, an impression was es- 
tablished in the public mind, and ru- 
mors abounded that Jack and Jackie 
had "given a boot to the old man." How 
repugnant and untrue this concept was 
may be gleaned from an episode at the 
1961 convention in Los Angeles, when 
Jack Kennedy took the Democratic nom- 
ination by storm. 

Just before Kennedy was nominated, 
the late Speaker of the House Sam Ray- 
burn was asked, "Where's Joe?" It was 
an obvious attempt to develop the Re- 
publican theme that Jack was keeping 
his father bottled up somewhere because 
of his isolationist views during the early 
days of World War II and his tradition- 
ally conservative outlook on the political 
scene in general. 

Rayburn, a silver-tongued orator, was 
hardly pressed for a ready reply. 

"I haven't seen him but he's in the 
bushes around here somewhere," he 
snapped. "Those of us with other can- 
didates felt his power." 

There is little doubt that Joseph P. 
Kennedy, as head of the dynasty, had 
not yielded his great influence in the 
strategic drive that powerhoused Jack 
Kennedy into convention hall as the 
Democrats' favorite-son candidate. 

The elder Kennedy preferred to re- 
main in the background, far from the 
seething political arena. If, as many 
charged, Papa Kennedy opened his 
money bags to "buy the election" for 
his son, then he did it with a finesse 
and tact that must remain everlastingly 
to his credit as a diplomat. 

Beyond all the hyperbole about Joe 
Kennedy's role in his son's election, over 
and above the insinuations that Jack 
didn't want his father around, the truth 
of the matter is that the Kennedy clan 
had not for even one moment abandoned 



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its respect, admiration, love, and friend- 
ship for the "Old Chief." 

The course of their intense, unremit- 
ting closeness was demonstrated pri- 
vately again and again, not only through 
the trying and profound struggles of 
the campaign, but when the Kennedys 
took title to the Executive Mansion. 

Papa Joe, stage center 

After Jack and Jackie moved into 
the White House, there never was a 
question about the Kennedy clan's 
strong family ties — or who is the domi- 
nant personality when the household 
foregathers. 

Did you say the President? 

Not on your life. While Jack Kennedy, 
as it is true of each member of the 
family, is respected for his opinions and 
expresses them without constraint, it is 
Papa Joe Kennedy who holds the cen- 
ter stage. He is still the ruling head of 
the household — and beloved by all. 

At 73, life indeed had been pleasant 
for Joe Kennedy, and after a year had 
passed since his son took office, the 
"Old Chief" had followed the weather 
to Palm Beach for a pleasant spell of 
sunshine and some rounds of golf. 

The President, who had been in South 
America on a highly successful good- 
will tour, stopped in Palm Beach to 
visit his father en route to Washington. 
Even now, December 19th, the family 
was gathering at the palatial Kennedy 
mansion for Christmas. Jackie, with 
Caroline and John Jr., already had ar- 
rived and the others were due at any 
moment. 

It was going to be the greatest of all 
Christmases for the Kennedy clan, but 
especially for the "Old Chief," who was 
looking forward eagerly to the reunion 
with his flock of grandchildren. 

Even Santa Claus, in deference to the 
new high status of the Kennedy family, 
secretly made a special trip from the 
North Pole with the children's and 
grownups' presents and stored them in 
closets for Christmas Eve. 

After his brief stopover, the Presi- 
dent (alias Santa) started for the air- 
port. He came out of the mansion with 
his father and together they strolled 
to the waiting limousine. Just then, 
four-year-old Caroline sauntered from 
the house ahead of her mother. 

"Where are you going, Grandpa?" 

"I'm going to the airport with your 
father," smiled Joseph Kennedy. 
"Would you like to come along?" 

"Oh, yes," Caroline shouted jubilant- 
ly. She broke away from her mother, 
scampered down the walk, and bounded 
into the car ahead of her father and 
grandfather. As the limousine was 
driven away, Jackie stood at the door 
smiling and waving. 

Caroline and her grandfather saw the 
President off and returned to the house 
to spend the next half hour playing 
games. Then Joe Kennedy donned a 
sport shirt and golf shorts and set out 
again for the Palm Beach Golf Club 
for eighteen holes. Ann Gargan, his 
favorite niece, went along. 

On the fairway to the sixth hole, Ken- 
nedy suddenly weakened. His face 
paled. He eased himself slowly down on 
the grass and sat motionless. 



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"What's wrong, Uncle Joe?" Ann 
asked with alarm. 

"I don't feel well," Kennedy said 
weakly, 

Ann quickly took hold of her uncle's 
arm, helped him to his feet, escorted 
him to a motorized golf cart, and took 
him to the clubhouse. After a brief rest 
that failed to bring back Joe Kennedy's 
"second wind," Ann drove him back to 
their ocean-front mansion. 

Jackie Kennedy and Caroline were 
the first to see the "Old Chief" as he 
lurched through the foyer on wavering 
legs. His unexpected early return from 
the course, and his obvious ill condition, 
startled Jackie. With a sinking heart, 
she questioned Ann. 

"We'll get the doctor," Jackie said 
after Ann related what had happened. 

"You'll do nothing of the kind," Ken- 
nedy snapped sternly. "I'll be all right. 
Don't call any doctors." 

He then announced that he was go- 
ing to his bedroom to rest, and went off. 

Jackie was frantic with worry. She 
had never seen her father-in-law this 
way. She held a hurried consultation 
with her mother-in-law, who had just 
come from the second-floor bedroom in 
a near state of collapse. Their decision 
was immediate — call the doctor! 

The prognosis: bleak 

v At 1:25 p.m., the patriarch of the 

R Kennedy clan was lifted from his bed 
onto a stretcher and carried to a pri- 
vate ambulance. With a motorcycle es- 
78 



cort leading the way, Kennedy was 
rushed to St. Mary's Hospital. Minutes 
after his arrival, a chaplain gave him 
the last rites of the Catholic Church. 

The diagnosis was obvious — Kennedy 
had suffered a stroke! 

A blood clot had become lodged in 
an artery in the brain, cutting off the 
blood supply. Rapidly he lost the use 
of his limbs on the right side — hand, 
arm, leg and foot. He also failed in his 
speech. There was no doubt about his 
condition — grave ! 

As doctors administered drugs and 
prepared to x-ray the brain to locate 
the clot, Jackie, shaken and nearly 
white with worry, phoned Washington 
to notify her husband. But the President 
had not yet arrived at the White House. 
Jackie spoke to Bobby in his office in 
the Justice Department. 

When the President reached his of- 
fice, Bobby was on the "hot" line — the 
special phone for cabinet members and 
other urgent callers. After a tense con- 
versation, the Chief Executive turned 
to Press Secretary Pierre Salinger grim- 
faced and said: 

"Dad's gotten sick." 

Within the hour, Jackie was back 
on the wire, this time directly with 
Jack. She reported what the doctors 
had told her. Her somber tone must 
have told him how grave the situation 
was, however hopeful she might have 
tried to make the actual words for her 
husband's own peace of mind. 

"I'm going," the President told Sal- 
inger after speaking with Jackie. With 
brother Bobby and sister Jean Kennedy 
Smith, the Chief Executive boarded the 
big presidential jet, Air Force One, and 
flew to Florida. 

In Palm Beach, Kennedy met his wife 
Jackie and his mother, talked to the 
doctors, then went to Room 355 to see 
his critically-ill father. The elder Ken- 
nedy was under sedation and asleep. 

When they left the room, the Presi- 
dent, Jackie and his mother were grim- 
faced and seemed very near tears. It 
was a shock the President least ex- 
pected, for he had left his father only 
hours before in apparently excellent 
health. Together, Jack, Jackie and Mrs. 
Kennedy went to the hospital chapel to 
pray, then home. 

Even before the next day dawned, 
members of the tightly-knit Kennedy 
clan gathered from all parts of the na- 
tion — Ted came down from Boston, ac- 
companied by vascular specialist Dr. 
William T. Foley; Pat Kennedy Law- 
ford flew in from California, and Eunice 
Kennedy Shriver rushed down by plane 
from Washington. 

The speed with which the family re- 
sponded to the "Old Chief's" bedside 
was a heart-tingling demonstration that 
impressed even the cynics. One Presi- 
dential aide, known for his icy aloof- 
ness to emotion, was impelled to com- 
ment: 

"A homey human drama of this kind 
could have no greater appeal than it 
does at this particular time. When a 
family like the Kennedys rally around 
the Old Man the way they did, it makes 
it seem that all is right with our world." 

If Joe Kennedy could have seen them 
then, he could not have done less than 
burst with justifiable pride, for the 



spirit demonstrated vividly what he had 
been saying right along: 

"The real measure of success is to 
get a family that does as well as mine. 
I don't know what you can throw on the 
table that is better than that." 

The days ahead were critical ones 
and the Kennedy hearts throbbed with 
sick fear as they kept vigil around the 
clock at the patriarch's bedside. 

A desperate measure 

On the fifth day, December 24th, Joe 
Kennedy, critical as he was, took a turn 
for the worse. He contracted pneu- 
monia. The following day, Christmas, 
which was to have been a time of joyful 
celebration for the family, was cast in 
even deeper shadow by a new and grim 
development at the hospital. Kennedy's 
breathing became labored and the phy- 
sician was forced to perform a trache- 
otomy — a slit in the throat to admit an 
air tube that would enable the patient 
to breathe. 

The crisis lasted until the 28th. On 
that day, Joe Kennedy rallied. He sat 
up in bed for the first time. At last, the 
immediate danger of the illness was 
past. There was still a long road ahead, 
a road paved with painful, tedious re- 
habilitative training. It began mildly 
with efforts to sit on the edge of the 
bed, then in a wheel chair. 

Later, physicians would re-train his 
paralyzed limbs by allowing him to 
stand, to balance himself, then walk. 

But the therapy proved the most bene- 
ficial in that crucial period of con- 
valescence was not furnished by the 
teams of specialists. The treatment was 
manifested by a team which had never 
taken the Hippocratic Oath — Jackie, 
Caroline and John Jr. 

In their good and tender hands, Joe 
Kennedy began a remarkable improve- 
ment. Once and sometimes twice a day, 
Jackie came to her father-in-law's bed- 
side, accompanied most of the time by 
Caroline, once in a while with little 
John in her arms. 

Caroline sang songs for her grand- 
father or helped push his wheel chair 
when he was permitted out of bed. At 
other times, as her mother looked on 
approvingly, Caroline sat beside her 
grandfather and carried on a buzzing 
one-way conversation. She kept the 
patient informed on such news items 
as the weather outside, the scuttlebutt 
along the beach, and the latest doings 
of her dolls. 

When Caroline stopped the gab mar- 
athon to catch her breath, Jackie 
picked up the conversational ball and 
posted Kennedy on -more serious mat- 
ters of the world. 

The process in its overall effect was 
so beneficial that the patient's recovery 
almost leapfrogged. On January 8th, 
just twenty days after he had been 
stricken, Joe Kennedy went home. He 
had made a remarkable comeback. 

He had made it with the help of the 
curative powers that stemmed from 
the deep and abiding faith of his fam- 
ily — family prayer, family fortitude, 
family encouragement, family spirit. 
This was Joe Kennedy's family react- 
ing to a crisis as he had taught them. 
They were Joe Kennedy-trained and 



they rose to the occasion. 

In many respects, however, a special 
salute belongs to Jackie. To her goes 
the credit for the therapy provided so 
ably by little Caroline. It was quite 
apparent how well Jackie had taught 
Caroline to love and respect her grand- 
father, for how else could a mere four- 
year-old contribute so unselfishly, so 
eagerly, to Joe Kennedy's recovery? 

The golden opinion of Jackie gets 
further accreditation from the reflec- 
tion of her own personal deeds during 
her father-in-law's illness. While Joe 
Kennedy's plight lay like thick cotton 
wool over the lives of the Kennedys, 
Jackie overcame her own discourage- 
ment and despair, camouflaging it with 
an inspiring smile and a hopeful voice. 
She helped give the "Old Chief" heart 
and ardor to live on. 

Jackie's sacrifices were many during 
this period. In late April, Joe Kennedy 
was flown to New York City for fur- 
ther treatment and rehabilitation train- 
ing under the personal direction of 
Dr. Howard Rusk, at the Institute of 
Medicine and Rehabilitation of New 
York University. Jackie made several 
special trips up from Florida and Wash- 



FIGHT 




MINUTE 
MARCH 



ington to visit her father-in-law. She 
took him out in his wheelchair into the 
fenced-in garden of his special quarters, 
known as Horizon House. From the out- 
side, one could see Jackie and Joe Ken- 
nedy completely absorbed in their con- 
versation — despite the fact that the 
President's father still was greatly ham- 
pered in his speech. 

"The way the 'Old Chief was strick- 
en, virtually in front of Jackie's eyes, 
was one of the most severe shocks she's 
ever suffered," a White House source 
reported. "His illness is breaking her 
heart. She smiles, but inside she feels 
as empty as the Ambassador's own 
children do in their grief over this." 

But the weight on Jackie's heart — 
and Jack's and the rest of the Kennedy 
dynasty's — was lifted considerably on 
July 8th when the "Old Chief" was 
sent home from Bellevue to continue 
his convalescence at his home in Hy- 
annis Port on Cape Cod. 

The "emperor" returns! 

Jack Kennedy himself picked up his 
father at the airport and drove him to 
Squaw Island, a neck of shoreline 
shaped roughly like a lobster's claw. 
This is not the Kennedy home but the 
residence of singer Morton Downey. 
The Kennedys had chosen to stay at 
Downey's place — he was on vacation 
in Europe — because they had become 



somewhat of a tourist attraction the 
previous summer at their own place 
in Hyannis Port. Downey's secluded 
"island" afforded the Kennedys the 
quiet and privacy they sought for the 
elder Kennedy's return. 

Jackie and the children were waiting 
when Papa Kennedy came home. He 
was smiling broadly and had a great 
command of his faculties: as the family 
greeted him. His stay in New York had 
worked wonders. He was now able to 
walk with the aid of a cane and spoke 
with considerable coherence. 

The elder statesman's return to Cape 
Cod marked the beginning of another 
phase of his convalescence — the ad- 
vanced stage. Part of that rejuvenes- 
cence called for a regular schedule of 
swimming in the outdoor heated pool 
that was built for that express purpose 
at the family's home on the Cape, as 
well as expert therapy. 

On his return, the "Old Chief" was 
besieged with warm and endearing 
kisses from everyone, including Jackie, 
but most especially the grandchildren, 
Caroline and John Jr. 

It was a moment of supreme happi- 
ness for all the Kennedys, for at last 
Papa Joe had returned home from an 
ordeal few men survive so well. 

In the days, weeks, and months that 
followed, the patriarch of the Ken- 
nedy dynasty continued to make re- 
markable advances on the road to re- 
covery. In midsummer, he was visited 
by Richard Cardinal Cushing of Bos- 
ton, who chatted with the elder Ken- 
nedy for about three hours. 

"I think," said Cardinal Cushing 
after the visit, "his progress is due to 
the prayers from children and others 
whom he has helped over the years." 

Indeed, the prayers had helped. The 
prayers of those whom Kennedy had 
helped — and the prayers of his own 
children, the prayers of Jackie and the 
other members of his family. 

On September 6th, Joseph Kennedy 
marked his 74th birthday with Jackie 
and the grandchildren at his side. Jack 
was in Washington, but on the week- 
end he, too, came home to take part 
in a formal celebration that marked 
not only his father's birthday, but his 
own ninth wedding anniversary. 

The observance was one of the more 
jubilant in recent Kennedy affairs, for 
there had not been much cause up to 
then to spill over with joy and thanks- 
giving. Now there was. 

No one knew better than Jackie how 
close her father-in-law had come to 
spending the rest of his life as an in- 
valid. Now, he was on the road back 
to health. She might look at him and 
know -that there was still a long way 
to go; but she also knows that the 
worst of the heartbreak is past. 
Warmed by the love and affection of 
his family, Joe Kennedy is more like 
his old self as each day passes. As 
Jackie knows, the patriarch had writ- 
ten his own best prescription for health 
a long time ago. 

"You hear a lot today about to- 
getherness," he once said. "Long be- 
fore it became a slogan, I guess we 
had it." — Chrys Haranis 



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GODFREY— POWELL 



(Continued from page 47) 

fortunately, the growths turned out to 
be non-malignant) and one on the kid- 
neys (infection set in afterward, and 
she almost died). 

Later, after June recovered and she 
and her husband were reconciled, she 
said, "I was stricken with kidney trou- 
ble up in Monterey, and he was down 
in Hollywood making a picture. Well, 
he flew up there — about 300 miles — 
every day after work for ten days, just 
in case I needed him. A girl doesn't 
find a man like that very often." 

A man doesn't find a girl like June 
very often, either. She sat next to him 
at the press conference, smiling con- 
fidently, showing none of the fear and 
anxiety for him she must sometime feel. 
She helps him with his shirt (he is un- 
able to button it around his neck). She 
cheers him up. nurses him, sustains him. 

Onslaught and history of Dick's ill- 
ness: 

Powell first became aware that some- 
thing was wrong while in New York 
for guest appearances on the "Today" 
and "What's My Line?" TV shows. He 
woke up one morning but couldn't open 
his eyes. "My face was all puffed up." 
he says, "but I went on and did the 
shows. I went to a doctor who told me 
I had some kind of allergy. 

"The same thing happened later in 
Cincinnati." he says. "I went to see 
another doctor who also said I had an 
allergy. He gave me some pills. Then 
I cancelled some other engagements 
and came home." 

At home he checked into a hospital 
for seven days. His personal physician 
ordered laboratory tests and biopsies 
taken, which disclosed the malignan- 
cies on the right side of the neck and 
in the chest area. 

Treatment and prognosis: 

Powell is receiving radiation therapy 
(the so-called Linac treatment by means 
of a linear acceleration device) and re- 
ports that his doctor "is pleased with 
my progress and told me he expects 
to eliminate the condition." 

Present activities and future plans: 

"I feel healthier now than I ever 
have." Powell informed his press confer- 
ence. "I get eight or nine hours' sleep 
a night. Formerly, I was getting five 
hours. 

"Do I look like a terminal case? 

"I'd rather have cancer than pneu- 
monia. I'd miss more work if I had a 
cold. What the hell good does it do to 
complain about a small cancer I'm go- 
ing to get rid of? When I told NBC 
about it, they said, 'What's the dif- 
ference? Stop talking and keep work- 
ing.' 

"I've got six more shows to act in this 
season and a lot more to produce. I'm 
going right back to work. I feel healthier 
now than I ever have. 

"There's no reason for bothering 
people with your problems. I would 
never have said anything about it if 
some newspaperman hadn't forced me 
into it." 

Powell did go right back to work. 
He'd swallow a few pills, kiss June 



goodbye, and speed off to the studio. 
And he even had the time and the 
energy left over to take in a baseball 
game. "I just came home from a Dodger 
night game." he informed a newsman 
who reached him with a late phone call. 
"I feel wonderful. It's the first time I 
got out to watch a game at night. I 
enjoyed myself and all I thought about 
was: The Dodgers are going to lose." 

But Powell was more interested in 
talking about winning than losing. 
"June feels wonderful," he said. "She 
was worried, of course, but it's fine 
now. Dr. Stein is very encouraging and 
he thinks we can eliminate this con- 
dition completely. I know I'll beat it. 

"I'm looking forward to the spring 
now. I've got a 63-foot cabin cruiser 
and I'm going to Seattle from Los 
Angeles. 

"It should be a wonderful trip." 

A brave man. Dick Powell, a coura- 
geous woman. June Allyson. the reporter 
thought. He put away the notes and 
went out to meet Arthur Godfrey's 
plane. He climbed into the Convair at 
Godfrey's invitation. 

A big smile lit up Godfrey's healthy 
face as he shook hands firmly. But his 
expression became grave when he was 
asked to comment on Powell's illness. 

Yes. he'd heard about Dick's having 
cancer. No. he wasn't aware of Dick's 
trouble when he'd had dinner with him 
a month before in a "wonderful reunion 
in Hollywood.'" 

"I've since heard of his trouble." 
Arthur stated. "«and have written him a 
letter welcoming him to a club he 
never thought he'd join — the Cancer 
Club. I hope to get him into the gradu- 
ate club — Cured Cancer." 

All at once it was silent in the plane. 
It was obvious that Arthur Godfrey no 
longer heard the lash of the rain 
against the wings or the whoosh of the 
wind against the cockpit. Perhaps he 
was listening to words in his own head 
— words that had been said to him and 
words that he had said to others four 
years before when he. too, was initi- 
ated into the Cancer Club. . . . 

How cancer starts 

"I was in Hawaii doing a telecast 
when I first noticed the pain. It wasn't 
severe or steady, but it made me uneasy. 
I decided it was my heart. So whenever 
it got out of hand. I'd dive into the 
Waikiki surf, swim out, and tell my- 
self: 'If it's a coronary, okay, let it 
come now.' 

"Since it didn't. I changed my diag- 
nosis to gas pressure. I thought it was 
indigestion." 

But the chest pains, recurring and 
frequent, increased in severity, and he 
checked into a hospital for X-rays. The 
doctor said that "there was a spot on 
my lungs and that he didn't know what 
it was. The doctor told me. after the 
examination, that there were only two 
chances in a hundred that it wouldn't be 
malignant. I thought that, if I didn't do 
anything about it. I would be dead in 
six months, anyway. Maybe less. But 
what's the sense of living six months 
and being sick and wasting away? I 
said to my doctor friends. 'Let's go to 
work.' and they sent me to a surgeon 



they thought was one of the finest in 
the world. He examined me and said 
that it looked rough but he would oper- 
ate. That was the greatest news to me— 
for then I knew I had a chance." 

Now it was time to put his house in 
order and to say farewell to his radio 
and TV audiences, just in case. . . . 

After breaking the bad news on a TV 
show — "This old Irish ruin has got some 
ivy growing in the chest. Next week- 
end I'm going to a hospital and maybe 
get it trimmed out" — he taped a final 
telecast from his Leesburg. Va.. home. 
Standing next to his wife Mary, he said, 
"Mary and I love every blade of grass 
and every little heart that beats on this 
farm. . . ." 

At the end of the program, his eyes 
misty and his voice breaking, he signed 
off by saying. "Thanks for your prayers 
and good wishes. God bless you and I'll 
see you again soon." 

To his radio listeners he said simply, 
"You never know what it is until you 
operate and go in there and get it. So 
that's what we're going to have to do 
next week." He signed off by asking 
his audience to "keep your fingers 
crossed." 

In the hospital shortly before the 
operation, several reporters asked him, 
"How do you feel?" In the answer 
which he pecked out on a typewriter 
himself, he insisted that he felt very 
well physically but added. "Mentally, 
however. I'm a mess. You've heard of 
mixed emotions? Man. this is rough. No 
pain anywhere — look good — feel good — 
but some of the best brains in the medi- 
cal profession have discovered a 'thing' 
in my left lung. Can't tell what it is — 
this 'thing' — but. whatever it is. it 
doesn't belong there. It must be re- 
moved. If it's a benign tumor of some 
sort, hurray for our side — no more 
sweat. If the damn 'thing' is malignant 
— cancerous — then there's real trouble. 
Maybe have to take the whole lung out. 

"All the things we had planned to 
do and now there is this 'thing." Sud- 
denly, out of nowhere. Never felt better 
in my life. Then, boom: this 'thing.' 
This horrible, skulking "thing.' visible 
only as a ghostly shadow on an X-ray 
negative. This 'thing' that no longer 
gives pain probably because I can't feel 
it through the cold, clammy, clutching 
fear that's gnawing at my vitals." 

Under the knife 

One more question. One more answer. 
Just before he was wheeled from his 
tenth floor room in Harkness Pavilion 
through a corridor and into Presby- 
terian Hospital, a reporter asked, "Are 
you worried about the operation?" He 
snapped back, "Sure, I'm worried. 
Wouldn't you be?" 

7:25 a.m. Pre-operative preparation 
begins in the operation theater. In at- 
tendance are three doctors, three nurses 
and an anesthetist. 

8:25 a.m. Exploratory surgery starts. 

10:20 a.m. Tissue from the lung has 
been rushed to the laboratory for tests, 
and one of the attending surgeons has T 
informed the patient's wife, Mary, of v 
the findings. Now comes a terse medical R 
bulletin : "The lesion in Mr. Godfrey's 
left lung has been identified as being 

81 



a malignant tumor. The section of the 
lung containing the tumor is being re- 
moved." 

10:22 a.m. The word is flashed to the 
world. Cancer. 

10:23 a.m.-12:25 p.m. The actual 
operation continues. The entire left side 
of the patient's chest is opened to the 
surgeon's scalpel for removal of the 
cancerous section of his lung. 

The lobe and the cancerous tumor 
are found to be adhering to the aorta, 
the large vessel of the heart. Carefully, 
oh, so slowly, the cancer is cut out. 

12:30 p.m. An official announcement 
by Alvin J. Binkert, executive vice- 
president of the Columbia Presbyterian 
Medical Center, after consultation with 
the attending physicians: "The upper 
lobe of the lung was successfully re- 
moved with the contained tumor." 

12:47 p.m. An unofficial statement by 
a doctor. "It could have been worse. It 
could have been inoperable." 

Three hours after the operation, the 
patient opened his eyes, blinked for a 
second, was given heavy sedation to 
relieve his pain, and immediately fell 
back into sleep. 

The next day his physicians, his wife 
and his lawyer were with him when he 
was told that because of cancer a por- 
tion of his left lung had been removed. 

"Did they get it all out?" he asked 
one of his doctors. 

"Yes, we think we did," the physician 
replied. 

His lawyer inquired, "How do you 
feel?" 

The patient roared back. "I feel like 
hell!" 

Everyone smiled. That sounded like 
the old Arthur Godfrey. He was going 
to be all right. 

It wasn't quite the same old Arthur 
Godfrey who prepared to leave the hos- 
pital fifteen days later. He smiled when 
a photographer asked him to smile. His 
clothes were natty and colorful: a two- 
tone, greenish-gray sports jacket and 
slacks outfit and a green-flowered Ha- 
waiian shirt. But his face — as he sat, 
leaning on a black cane, in an easy 
chair in the hospital lobby — was hag- 
gard and drawn. And his powerful voice 
quavered and broke as he talked to the 
crowd of almost 100 reporters, photog- 
raphers and television cameramen who 
surrounded him. 



"I don't know if you know this — that 
'thing' — that damnable 'thing' — was not 
only in my lungs but was also wrapped 
around the aorta, which is the large 
blood vessel," he revealed. 

"The surgeon was within his rights to 
have said that he was sorry, sewed me 
up and let me go. But because of his 
confidence and courage I got a break. 
He got it out. 

"It was so trying that with one slip 
of the knife one way or the other, I 
wouldn't be here. I don't know why I 
got a break, but I'm grateful for it, 
and I'll do my damnedest to deserve it." 

He knew why he got his break, of 
course. "My doctor performed a mir- 
acle," he stated. A miracle made pos- 
sible by messages of good wishes from 
two hundred thousand men, women and 
children, and by the prayers of millions. 
"I know why I got the break. I got it 
because so many people prayed for it." 

A letter to Dick 

Those were the words, the scenes, the 
feelings that Arthur Godfrey might 
have recalled as he sat there in the cock- 
pit and thought about cancer and about 
life and about death. But when he spoke 
again, his words were directly about 
Dick Powell. "He's a good soldier," he 
said. "He's facing a very tough situa- 
tion with great courage. I know." 

Then he bowed his head for a few 
seconds. 

Perhaps he was thinking of the con- 
tents of that letter he had written to 
Powell. 

The letter in which he might have 
written about June, and about Dick's 
and June's two children, 13-year-old 
Pamela and 12-year-old Ricky, and 
about the new granddaughter which 
his son Norman's wife (Dick's son from 
his marriage to Joan Blondell) had just 
brought into the world. 

The letter in which he might have 
repeated his words about how it feels 
to be a graduate of the Cancer Club. "I 
do everything better than I ever did 
before. I fly better, I ride better. And 
I am twenty times the performer I have 
ever been. It can be fun to live on 
borrowed time." 

The letter in which he might have 
echoed the message he delivered to 



people, through the reporters, that day 
he left the hospital after his operation. 
"The reason for fear is because you 
don't know. I figure this way : I had the 
finest surgeons, the best nurses, and 
thank God I live in this age." 

The letter in which he might have re- 
stated his feelings about death — and 
about life. "Don't let me give you the 
idea that I don't give a hang about 
death. I don't want any part of it either, 
but let's face it. Death is something no- 
body ever escapes. 

"But anyone who neglects to live in 
the full meaning of his life makes a 
mockery of it. I try to live life to its 
fullest. That's something most of us 
don't do until we've been on the brink 
of death. I have. I feel as if I'm living 
on borrowed time, and sometimes that 
makes me do silly things. I can look at 
a bouquet of flowers, for instance, and 
get all choked up. I become grateful to 
God for the privilege of being alive to 
enjoy it. If you look at a bird, a tree, 
the miracle of birth, how can you deny 
the existence of God? Everywhere you 
turn, you see this everlasting life. 

"Every year in winter, I look out at 
the bare woodlands, and then in spring 
I see it all bloom into the most beauti- 
ful mass of greenery ever conceived. 
Everlasting life? You're darn tootin'. 
What is will nurture what is to be." 

The letter in which he might have 
cited the hopeful statistics brought 
about by the magic of modern medi- 
cine: 170,000 cancer patients are saved 
each year; there are more than 1,500- 
000 men, women and children in the 
United States who once heard the 
dreaded diagnosis, "cancer," but who 
after treatment have lived on to hear a 
doctor say, "Well, you've passed the 
five-year checkup. Guess we can both 
relax." 

Or perhaps, when Arthur Godfrey 
bowed his head for a few seconds there 
in the plane, he was praying for another 
miracle — this time for Dick Powell, 
even as a few years before millions of 
people had said a prayer for him. 

— James Hoffman 

"Arthur Godfrey Time" — heard on CBS 
Radio, M-F, from 9:10 to 10 a.m. est. 
"The Dick Powell Show" — seen on NBC- 
TV, Tues., 9:30 to 10:30 p.m. est. 



ERNIE FORD 

(Continued from page 48) 

its move from Hollywood, as far as 
Ernie is concerned. And the move was 
none too soon, he feels. "It's very easy 
for your children to become impressed 
with what other people say you do, 
rather than becoming impressed with 
you as a father," he emphasized again. 
"And this is bad. It draws you further 
and further away from your family. An- 
other bad thing is the attention that's 
T directed toward one member of the 
v family, excluding the other members." 
R He smiled wryly. "Then, too, the op- 

posite can be just as bad. When your 
kids start getting attention for some- 



thing that's none of their doing — when 
photographers are all over the house 
taking pictures of them — that's un- 
healthy, too. First thing you know, your 
boys are tearing out pages of maga- 
zines and carrying them to school. 

"Then what happens? The other kids 
resent it, of course. I mean, here's a 
little guy who's just as good as my kid, 
but his dad happens to pump gas in a 
filling station. That shouldn't make any 
difference — the boy should have as 
much respect for his dad as my son has 
for me. Or take the son of a real- 
estate man. How does that boy feel to- 
ward my sons, when he sees that their 
dad is getting all kinds of publicity? 
His own dad may have just swung a 
five-million-dollar deal with a six-per- 
cent commission, hut does his picture 



get in the paper? No, sir! Kids notice 
these differences, and it can leave a last- 
ing impression on them — a bad one. 

"But now things are different. The 
boys are in school when my show's on 
the air and they don't get to watch it. 
We don't have any more photographers 
out to take their pictures, even though 
I appreciate the value of publicity. I'm 
home every evening, and they can be 
with me and talk to me about anything 
that's on their minds." His voice grew 
warmer, and he was smiling. "And 
when the boys are showing the calf, or 
playing baseball, I can be there to 
watch. And if there's a school outing 
that includes the parents, I don't have 
to apologize and say, 'I've got to go to 
a rehearsal.' I think this is very im- 
portant to them. 



'"And it's certainly important to me" 
he added firmly. "Because I think the 
one really big loss for some people, even 
though they may be wonderful enter- 
tainers and wonderful human beings, 
is that they don't give themselves the 
time to do everyday things. 

"I'll tell you one example." he con- 
fided. "He's a very dear friend of mine, 
and I lived next door to him for five 
years, even though he was never home. 

"I'm talking about Bob Hope. 

"This January, Bob and I played in 
the Bing Crosby Golf Tournament. At 
the time. I hadn't worked since June, 
because I had nine months off between 
the time I finished my old show and the 
time I started this one in March. I was 
already living up here, though. We 
were walking along the fairway, and 
suddenly Bob said to me. 'All right — 
tell me what you're doing now." 

"And I said. 'Nothing.' 

"He said. 'What do you mean, noth- 
ing?' 

"I said. 'Well. I'm just playing with 
the kids.'- 

"And he just shook his head in 
amazement and said. 'I'd have to have 
an applause machine in my bedroom!' " 

"Obviously you don't feel that way." 
I said to Ernie. 

"No, I don't," he replied. "Not that I 
dislike doing TV. It's a lot of fun! But 
when you start to think there's nothing 
else in the world, and that you can't get 
along without it, you're headed the 
wrong way. Because there is something 
else. That's why Perry Como always 
keeps his barber tools handy!" 

Then his voice grew serious again, as 
he added, "I'd rather look forward to 
taking my kids deer hunting for the 
first time than win nine Emmys. Really 
. . . honestly! If I ever win an Emmy, 
fine. But if I don't, I'm not going to sit 
in the corner and suck my thumb and 
cry that I've been a failure.' 

He leaned forward intently. "Don't 
get me wrong. I don't want to be 
under my boys' feet all the time. Betty 
and I are able to get by ourselves more, 
too. We're really getting acquainted 
again. The change has been good for all 
of us. 

His own boyhood 

"Now I can really plan things with 
the family. We may want to go up to 
our ranch at Clear Lake for some fish- 
ing or hunting — we have 540 acres up 
there. There's time for it — because, 
in addition to having four days off a 
week, I get three months off every sum- 
mer, what with pre-taping. ABC really 
gave me everything I wanted, and I've 
got no complaints." 

Ernie had more to say about the boys' 
new life away from Hollywood. "They 
go to school right here in the Portola 
Valley, and Buck attends classes at a 
little red schoolhouse that's been there 
since 1894," he said. There was pride 
in his voice — and there was something 
else, too. 

Perhaps one of the reasons he moved 
was that he wanted his sons to get back 
to the kind of life he had led as a boy? 

He nodded. "Yes . . . although Port- 
ola in 1962 is a lot different from Ten- 
nessee thirty years ago! When I lived 



on a farm, there was no electricity and 
no plumbing. And I have to keep fight- 
ing the temptation to cram my past life 
down the boys' throats. I'd like to pre- 
serve some of the values we were taught 
in those days, without being too literal 
about recapturing the past." 

He grinned. "Let's face it . . . my 
boys don't have to go to the bathroom 
out in back of the house or carry water 
like I did. or light an oil lamp to go 
to bed. But they've been back home and 
seen how I used to live, because our 
farm is still there. And I see that they 
have plenty of chores to do. They keep 
the barn clean, feed three head of 
horses, take care of the calf, and keep 
the stalls clean. And they know that 
when you fish you've got to clean 'em, 
and when you hunt you've got to dress 
it out. They're not spoiled — no. sir!" 

Show business? Maybe . . . 

Right now. neither of the boys seems 
to want to follow Ernie into show busi- 
ness, but if the yen comes later on, he 
wouldn't try to stop it. 

"Not if they were in earnest." he said. 
"On the other hand. I wouldn't try to 
shove it down their throats. If they want 
to get into this business, they're going 
to have to pick it for themselves. Right 
now, both of the boys are interested 
in sports. And their 4-H work keeps 
them pretty busy." He paused, and then 
he added thoughtfully, "I'm only glad I 
can be around to share their interests 
with them now.* Because there's that 
one great question that comes to those 
kids, when another boy comes up and 
says, 'Where's your dad?' ' 

Ernie wants to be sure his sons al- 
ways have an answer to that one. 

He remembers back to his own boy- 
hood. "I never had the opportunity to 
make any really bad mistakes, because 
I was working too hard," he says. "But 
I had things that I wish they had. The 
outdoors . . . the things that were free, 
and for which appreciation today is 
dwindling. That's why every window in 
our house has got a view. And you 
know what? They're beginning to ap- 
preciate it! They appreciate the trees 
and the hills, and the deer coming by 
so close that you can almost touch 
them." 

His eyes shone . . . part of it was 
the reminiscing, part of it his delight at 
the life to which he was introducing his 
boys. He was saying, "Sometimes it's 
hard to realize that it's 1962, when you 
see your boy getting up at 6:30 in the 
morning and putting on an old pair of 
jeans to go down and clean out the 
horse barn. I did it over thirty years 
ago, and now he's doing it. . . . 

"You love to see them become wor- 
ried over little things, too — things 
which to some people may not have any 
importance. To worry if the calf is sick. 
And you're glad that they know at last 
what the rain means. It doesn't mean T 
can't go out to play.' It means that 
things are going to grow. It means 
they're going to grow, and be all 
right. . . ." — James Gregory 

"The Tennessee Ernie Ford Show" is on 
ABC-TV. M-F. 11 a.m. (all time zones) . 





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83 



THE LENNON SISTERS 

(Continued from page 50) 

"I'm so glad ... so thrilled for Dee- 
Dee and Dick," Peggy said. "They've 
been so anxious to have a baby. They 
want a big family, as everybody knows. 
I guess they simply didn't want to wait 
any longer for one of their own, so this 
is the perfect solution." 

"It's the most wonderful news, really 
. . . they're both so ideally suited to 
be parents," Kathy agreed. "The child 
who comes into their home will have 
great parents. They're both so warm 
and kind and full of fun. A child just 
has to be happy in their home." 

Janet, for once, was almost too ex- 
cited to speak. When at last she found 
her voice, it was to say, in all serious- 
ness, "I wouldn't mind adopting one, 
too. ... It must be a fabulous expe- 
rience." 

"Okay, fabulous," Peggy teased her. 
"Just don't get ahead of yourself. It's 
not so long since you were being 
cradled." 

"Maybe you're forgetting I'm now 
sixteen!' 

"Yes, Peggy, how could you forget 
that?" Kathy laughed. "You just go 
right ahead, Janet honey, and adopt 
a few . . ." 

"Oh, hush up," said Janet. "All I'm 
trying to say is I just love the idea of 
DeeDee and Dick with a baby. I mean, 
they used to come over and help with 
all our kids. Now we'll be going over 
there to help with their baby . . ." 

"I know," Kathy suddenly grew seri- 
ous, too, "and it will have a meaning 
for all of us. The first niece or nephew 
is always important to an aunt. Speak- 
ing for myself, I'm sure that when I 
see DeeDee with her baby in her arms, 
I'll want more than ever to get mar- 
ried and raise a family, too." 

Peggy thought it over dreamily. "Dee- 
Dee and Dick have been so happy in 
their little home. Now they'll be even 
happier. Their greatest wish will be 
coming true. And you know, Kathy, 
when your turn comes, we all pray that 
you will be equally happy." 

'I hope and pray the same for you, 
Peggy.'' 

A wistful dream 

This is not the first time Peggy, 

Kathy and even the still-tender-aged 

Janet have spoken of their desire to 

emulate their big sister. Each has mused 

rather wistfully over the time when she 

would settle down to marriage and 

homemaking. "After all, isn't that the 

best vocation for a woman . . . unless 

you have a call to the Sisterhood," 

Peggy reasoned. "But down deep, I have 

a strange feeling this baby is going 

to change all our lives, not just those 

of DeeDee and Dick. And I don't mean 

that we'll be baby-sitters again." 

"I think I get what you mean," Janet 

put in. "You think the baby's going to 

T make us feel older, more mature . . ." 

v "Well, that partly, sure," Peggy 

R continued. "But what I actually had 

in mind was that we're going to feel 

more impatient than ever to follow 
84 



DeeDee's path. Of course, it's probably 
not in the cards for us to marry our 
high-school sweethearts as she did, but 
just seeing how excited DeeDee and 
Dick are about the adoption has made 
me realize that I, too, would rather 
be a wife and mother than a profes- 
sional singer." 

Her sisters nodded solemnly. They 
had come to this viewpoint long ago. 
To entertain others is something they 
respect and enjoy. But they do not see 
it as a lifetime career. They love their 
fans, love being loved by them. Yet 
they have never been, nor are they 
likely to become, dedicated performers. 

Like DeeDee, they are domestic crea- 
tures. Washing dishes, cooking, sew- 
ing, caring for their younger brothers 
and sisters — these are the things that 
hold the loftiest significance for the 
Lennon girls. Their household chores, 
under the efficient eyes of Sis, are con- 
sidered as training for ihe duties they 
wait eagerly to assume in their own 
homes, for their own families. Long 
ago, too, they made the decision to 
forego college. Partly it was necessary 
because of their travels with the Welk 
band and on personal appearance tours. 



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Still, as Kathy once pointed out, "If 
W2 had wanted a college education, 
we'd have found a way through corre- 
spondence courses while on the road." 

If they didn't care to go on to college 
themselves, they did see the importance 
of sending their younger brothers to 
schools of higher learning. "Billy, Dan- 
ny, Patrick, Joey and Chris will be men 
some day, with wives and children to 
support. For them, an education is al- 
most a necessity," they explained. 

So, with their sights set long before 
on marriage, family life and the home, 
the news of the adoption has only 
heightened their desire to leave show 
business and get on with the serious 
business of living a fulfilled and cre- 
ative private life. 

While "Baby" will bring much pleas- 
ure to his lovely aunts and chortling 
uncles, it is clear that they in turn 
will bring much to him — or her, as the 
case may be. Janet, by the way, has 
already been betting anyone who'll lis- 
ten that it will be a girl. In fact, she 
has already hinted broadly to DeeDee 



and Dick that she "wouldn't mind one 
bit" if the baby bore her name. "I 
guess there isn't a bigger compliment 
than to have a child named after you 
— or for you to be named its god- 
mother," she said. 

"Hint, hint, hint," Kathy laughed. 
"Don't forget you're third in line around 
here ..." 

Baby-sitters, Inc. 

There can be no doubt that any of 
the girls would make an excellent god- 
mother. They have been brought up to 
face responsibilities and do what is ex- 
pected of them. When Bill was stricken 
with a heart attack, Sis joined him in 
Toledo and remained at his side for 
several weeks, until he was well enough 
to travel back to their home in Venice, 
California. Sis had no fears for her little 
ones. She knew her girls would take 
over in her absence, and they did. They 
not only ran the household smoothly, 
but filled in as parents. Not once was 
their authority questioned by the small- 
er children. 

This happened before DeeDee's mar- 
riage. Naturally, she acted as temporary 
head of the family then. Baby Chris, 
still bottle-fed, was her particular 
charge, while the other sisters joined 
forces in caring for Mimi, Annie, Joey, 
Danny, Pat and Billy. Danny, ten at 
the time, showed that he was not a 
Lennon for nothing. He assisted his 
older sisters as "man of the house" 
and saw that the boys showered and 
were in bed at the right hour. Sundays, 
just as when their parents were home, 
the entire family went to church. Ob- 
viously, a family so well-taught and 
harmonious would not take lightly their 
obligations as godparents. Whoever is 
chosen for this honor by DeeDee, if it 
is a Lennon, will automatically and 
enthusiastically accept the obligation 
to see that the child receives the proper 
instruction and training in the Catholic 
faith, should anything happen to Dick 
and DeeDee. 

Thus, before the wheels of the adop- 
tion system began moving, the child 
who is destined to enter the home of 
DeeDee and Dick Gass is already guar- 
anteed a basic lift toward the good and 
happy life. It will be surrounded by 
love, given every chance to express in- 
dividuality, but also it will be encour- 
aged to sink deep roots in the healthy, 
vital soil of personal obligation to God, 
the church, the nation as a whole re- 
gardless of race, color or creed, and to 
the family as the essential unit for 
growth and security. This is the Lennon 
tradition. 

The parents of this lucky child will 
be lucky, too. They'll never have to 
search for a baby-sitter. In fact, they'll 
have to arrange that "honor" by turns. 

As the new, excited aunts have in- 
timated, the current of their lives may 
be somewhat reversed. Instead of the 
flow of family always to the Lennon 
home, there will now be an eager flow 
of Lennons to the Gass home to share 
in DeeDee's and Dick's bundle of joy. 
— Kathleen Post 

"The Lawrence Welk Show" is seen on 
ABC-TV. Sat., from 9 to 10 P.M. EST. 



RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN 

(Continued from page 18) 

them afterward. So they end up in the 
divorce courts and with broken families. 
That's not for me! I want my marriage 
to last and last and last. It's going to 
be forever." 

Dick went back to dwell on "stabil- 
ity." "A person must ask himself, 'Who 
am I?' I think that's a way of finding 
out whether you have what it takes for 
marriage. It's a question some people 
can answer early. They find out early. 

"I've asked myself that question. I 
couldn't answer it, for a long time. I 
didn't know. Do you know why I didn't 
know? Because I'm just getting ac- 
quainted with myself." 

Dick looked at me questioningly. The 
furrows around his eyes grew deeper. 

"Are you still with me?" he mur- 
mured. 

"All the way," I said, writing furi- 
ously on my note pad. "I'm not missing 
a word." 

Dick took a deep breath. "It must 
sound silly to say that I'm just getting 
acquainted with myself, but that's the 
absolute truth. And do you know what? 
It's a fascinating process." 

I interrupted to ask how Dick liked 
this new-found acquaintanceship. 

His own worst friend 

"I'm not sure," he replied with a 
wry expression. "I think I'm beginning 
to feel a little unfriendly toward the 
person I am." 

We both laughed at that bit of self- 
appraisal. 

"I'm not like my parents." Dick told 
me. "They were quiet, settled people, 
even as far back as I can remember 
as a little boy. 

"I'd like my marriage," Dick said, 
almost in a hushed tone, "to be a kind 
of live thing, full of animation and 
spirit. 

"It should be the kind of marriage 
where my wife and I would take off 
on the spur of a moment for a desert 
island just for the heck of it — and 
have a ball. 

"I'd want it to be as exciting as 
possible — but. when the spirit moved 
us. to have absolute tranquility. If my 
wife and I decided to read, we'd read. 



PHOTOGRAPHERS' CREDITS 

Jackie Kennedy cover by Pictorial Parade; 
Dick Chamberlain and Clara Ray by John 
Hamilton; Dick Chamberlain color by 
Jack Stager of Globe; Lucy and Desi by 
Wide World; Gary Morton by Pictorial 
Parade; Vince Edwards color by Bill 
Kobrin of Globe, black-and-white by Leo 
Fuchs of Vista; Jackie Kennedy by Pais e 
Sartarelli of Pix; Connie Francis by 
Globe; Eddie Fisher by Steve Schapiro of 
Black Star; Juliette Prowse by Steve 
Schapiro; Bruce Dern and Diane Ladd by 
Bill Kobrin; "Guiding Light" series by 
CBS; Arthur Godfrey by Wide World; 
Dick Powell and June Allyson by Wide 
World; Lennon Sisters by John Hamilton; 
James Drury by Gene Trindl of Topix; 
Carol Burnett by Gilloon; Pernell Roberts 
by Del Hayden of Topix. 



We'd read our own books and mind our 
own business then. But that doesn't 
mean we couldn't get excited about a 
book. 

"What I'm trying to say is that I'd 
want a wife who felt the things that 
are important to me are just as impor- 
tant to her. And the feeling must be 
mutual. I would have to respect her 
feelings and sentiments about things, 
and share in her joy or sadness about 
matters that are close to her heart." 

Suddenly, Dick leaned forward, very 
intent. "You know, it's so wonderful 
when you get a sudden, inspiring in- 
sight into something. It could be any- 
thing. That's a moment you want to 
burst out and tell someone. Certainly 
I would want to tell my wife. 

"But just imagine what it's like when 
it falls on deaf ears — when you can't 
seem to reach that person." 

Dick shook his head at the prospect. 

"Go on," I urged. "Tell me more 
about what you want your marriage to 
be like." 

"Adventurous!" Dick almost shouted. 
"Everything about it would have to be 
adventurous. 

"Take children, for instance. I would 
want children, lots of them. My wife 
would have to want them, too. Arid 
both of us must look upon having chil- 
dren as an adventure — not an unfortu- 
nate, unexpected burden. 

"I didn't always feel this way," he 
admitted. "Success has changed me. It's 
a good change. I feel that I'm growing 
up, and that has made me look for a 
different kind of wife than I would have 
looked for — if I were looking — three 
years ago. 

"I would have been afraid—" 

"Now, I want my wife to have a di- 
rectness, an openness, a maturity that 
I would have been afraid of three years 
ago." 

He paused. Then: "What sort of ma- 
turity is that?" 

Dick answered his own question. 
"Well. I think as we grow up we play 
different games. Ideally, the games be- 
come more real as we mature. I wouldn't 
have wanted that maturity in a woman 
a few years ago. 

"I used to play Mr. Wholesome-nice- 
guy-never-ask-questions. That was the 
game I played. Well, no more." 

He almost gritted his teeth. "What's 
the game you're playing now?" I asked. 

"I don't quite know." he answered 
straightforwardly. "All I can tell you 
is that I'm more me. This is a difficult 
area to speak about . . ." 

His words drifted off. I waited. 

"You see," he continued almost hesi- 
tantly. "A woman is not just a con- 
venience^ — just to date, to go places 
with, to talk to . . ." 

Again he thought a moment. 

". . . but the truth of it is that a 
woman is a convenience, let's face it. 
A convenience, and much more." 

"How much more?" I cut in. 

"The girl for me has to be pretty, of 
course. She doesn't need the classic 
beauty of a younger Liz Taylor. She 
doesn't have to be physically perfect. 
She just has to add up to a pleasing 




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sight. And have a nice skin texture, too. 

"And she'd have to love show busi- 
ness, to be tolerant of its eccentricities." 

I asked Dick if he knew such a girl. 

"Clara Ray!" The answer came quick- 
ly, before he had time to think about 
being discreet. "Clara is like that. Clara 
is most of these things." 

"So," I interrupted again, "it looks 
like it's Dick Chamberlain and Clara 
Ray to the altar we go. Eh?" 

"Hold on, boy, hold on!" Dick bolted 
forward in his chair. "I'm not quite 
ready to say that. With my schedule 
of work, I barely get to see Clara once 
or twice a week. 

"So. if I can't date the girl steady, 
how am I going to establish an engage- 
ment? What girl would put up with it? 
Everything I do these days is work, or 
is tied up with my work. Going here 
and there for publicity purposes, re- 
hearsals, singing lessons. 

"It's rough, man, and that kind of 
a schedule doesn't lead to marriage — 
not my kind of marriage." 

The hope that lies ahead 

Dick's ideal kind of marriage may 
be a mirage. He may have set goals 
that are too difficult to reach. After all. 
in the years ahead his career promises 
to be even busier and more demanding. 
If that is his future, then what will he do 
about marriage? 

"I can adjust to my career," he said 
hopefully. "I can slow down the pace 
without losing the momentum — but it'll 
take a little doing." 

Dick feels obligated to give his wife 
and his children a lot of his time. There- 
fore, he won't barge into marriage with- 
out the guarantee that he'll be able to 
give his family all that he can of him- 
self — of body and physical presence at 
the old homestead. 

If, as Dick says, he has no intention 
of having his marriage patterned after 
his parents, then is there any person 
in the world he would like to follow? 

Yes, there is — his brother, Bill. 

Bill is happily married, has a lovely 
wife. Pat, and three wonderful chil- 
dren: Carol, 8; Bill Jr., 7; and Mi- 
chael, 4. 

"I've seen my brother's marriage from 
the beginning," Dick says. "And the 
best thing about it is that it's got a lot 
of spirit. They like to run up to the 
lodge and ski, or rush down to the 
water and skim over the waves in Bill's 
boat. 

"They also love to entertain. I re- 
member going there not too long ago 
with a date. I was taking a girl to the 
beach and we dropped by Bill's for a 
minute. It turned out they were having 
a birthday party for Bill Jr. They in- 
vited us back for a drink after the 
beach. We went — and we had a ball. 

"At one point, Patty mentioned a 
record I'd given her last Christmas. It 
was an African record with much drum- 
beating. A really very sexy thing. We 
played it and danced to it. It went on 
like that for quite a while. I'm sure 
the neighbors heard us. 

"But Bill didn't care. Nor did Pat. 
Their relationship is so free, and there's 
no self-consciousness. That's the main 



thing I like about my brother's family 
— it's relaxed enough, and it's not self- 
conscious. 

"My own family was not nearly so 
adventurous when Bill and I were kids. 
It seems that it was too much trouble 
even to go horseback riding. A pity!" 

Naturally, a guy who marries must 
have ideas on what he'd want for his 
wife and for his son. Dick is beginning 
to have very explicit ideas now, which 
may be an indication that he is as ready 
as any bachelor ever was. Listen to him 
talk about these things and see if that 
isn't so. 

"I would want to give my wife the 
freedom to be herself. I wouldn't marry 
a girl unless I loved her. And it is im- 
plicit in love to have a complete accept- 
ance of what a person is, and not to 
try to make that person over. 

"I also would try my best to be 
around enough to be a part of the 
family, rather than a kind of visitor. 

"The one quality of my brother's 
marriage I'd certainly want in my own 
is that knack of being able to have fun. 
fun, fun. 

"With my own family, again, when 
we were kids — partly because of the 
times, I guess — the thought always 
seemed to be: 'We'll have our fun later, 
when we can afford it.' 

"But with my brother everything is 
now. Now we're going to have fun ! And 
I think that's a healthier attitude. 

"Moreover, Bill and Pat are very good 
with the kids. They give them a lot 
of independence, and a lot of oppor- 
tunity to take care of things, like pets." 

"Everything I can give" 

So that brought up the question of 
what Dick would want for his own son. 

"It's got to be everything I can give 
him." Dick said with deadly serious- 
ness. "I've got to give him discipline 
but also freedom. That may sound con- 
tradictory, but it isn't if you analyze 
it and think about it. The discipline 
is inherent in the way you bring up the 
boy, training him to think for himself 
and to act intelligently on his own. If 
you do a good job of it, then he has 
merited his freedom. 

"I think also that I would give my 
son the opportunities that were never 
opened to me. I'd give him what he 
wants when he wants it — not later. Life 
is too short. Miss out on something to- 
day and you find that you can't have 
it tomorrow. At least not with the same 
glee and satisfaction you would expe- 
rience if you had it when you wanted 
it." 

It seemed to me, as I left Dick, that 
he was a guy who had at last found 
himself indeed. He had told me he had 
just begun to get acquainted with him- 
self and only recently had figured out 
the answer to "Who am I?" 

Perhaps very soon Dick will also have 
the answer to the problem of marriage. 

And when he does, marriage will not 
be a problem to him. 

— George Carpozi Jr. 

Dick stars in "Dr. Kildare," NBC-TV. 
Thursday, from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. est. 
He's also a singer — on MGM Records. 



BRUCE DERN 

(Continued from page 39) 

his chosen career. . . . Diane's chosen 
career, too. How well Bruce remembered 
the way he'd proposed. The way she'd 
answered, "Let's get one thing straight, 
when you put that ring around my fin- 
ger. I'm going to continue to be an 
actress! I can't stop now." 

He remembered how he kissed her 
and reassured her, "Of course. . . . I'm 
not one of those guys who insists a wife 
must stay home in the kitchen. You've 
got talent. And I want to encourage it! 
You keep your career going. ... So I'll 
make my own breakfast! So what?" 

He had added, "I believe love is a 
beautiful union of two people, and no 
one has a right to kill his wife's creative 
talents, her right to express herself." 

And he had never gone back on his 
promise, even after the baby arrived. 
He was happy for his wife, when she 
went to Chicago to do the lead in a 
play while he came to Hollywood to 
look for TV work. Happier still, when 
they were together in Hollywood, and 
he was starting to teach his own drama 
workshop, which would bring him extra 
income while he waited for that "break." 

The big break had come with the role 
of E. J. Stocker in "Stoney Burke." The 
role about which they'd been so elated 
earlier that day — how many eons ago? 
For now it was night indeed. For now 
Diane was home. A white and shaken 
Diane. Their eyes stared blankly, un- 
comprehendingly at each other. The 
silence pressed in upon their ears. 

"Why did it happen now?" 

For hours, they were too stunned to 
say anything. And then they asked the 
eternal questions: "Why did God take 
her away? . . . Why did it have to be 
her?" They searched their hearts for 
answers, and they kept thinking, "Why 
did it happen now, when everything was 
working out so well for us? Why?" 

In time, the blackness of their sorrow 
turned to gray, and they began to think 
of tomorrow rather than yesterday. One 
thing they were sure of: A house with- 
out a child was unthinkable, and they 
knew they wanted to have another baby. 

"God is humane," Bruce kept reas- 
suring himself. "I believe it. In His own 
way, He will give us light." 

Throughout this time, their best 
friend was Walter Winchell. Bruce had 
never met him until the tragic night of 
the drowning, but he immediately ac- 
cepted Winchell as a great and dear 
friend. He brushed aside Winchell's 
lament : "If I hadn't taken Diane to the 
ball park to meet Mr. LeRoy, her baby 
wouldn't have been lost!" 

And Winchell told him, "I lost a 
daughter, when she was eight — on 
Christmas Eve. I know how you feel." 

Then Winchell started calling his 
Hollywood pals to tell them about 
Diane. He knew Bruce was all set with 
"Stoney Burke," but Diane's career 
needed a boost — especially now. "This 
kid can act!" he told them. "She re- 
minds you of Tallulah Bankhead. when 
she was Diane's age." 



\\ ith Winchell prodding, Tony Curtis 
ordered his writers to create a role for 
Diane in "40 Pounds of Trouble." Win- 
chell called Tony to thank him for 
arranging the bit part for Diane, then 
added, "Thanks, and all that jazz; but 
she's no bit player. She's an actress!" 

Stanley Kramer's office called to ask 
Winchell to have Diane report to Revue 
Studios. Broadway producer David Mer- 
rick phoned from New York to say he'd 
try to find a role for her in one of his 
new shows. The third week after the ac- 
cident, Hugh Benson of Warner Bros, 
called Winchell to say, "You've done it 
again ! Miss Ladd is everything you said 
she is. She'll be in the next '77 Sunset 
Strip.' " 

Diane also appeared in two plays. 
"The Wall" and "Toys in the Attic," 
in Hollywood. She had to keep busy 
every moment. 

Another heartbreak 

And then, one weekend. Bruce and 
Diane decided to have a much-delayed 
honeymoon. They put aside three days 
and drove 1,200 miles north into the 
breathtaking High Sierras. But they 
were tired, and tense, and got into an 
argument. They decided to try another 
setting, so they drove to beautiful Yo- 
semite National Park. But they had 
more trouble. They had neglected to 
phone in for a motel reservation, so 
they had no place to sleep. They drove 
to Lake Tahoe. finally checked in at a 
motel. 

It was a tiring weekend, yet it was a 
change. They needed the change. There 
was so much to forget. . . . 

Now Bruce and Diane are moving into 
a new house. It has that extra bedroom 
for a baby, and a guest room. And Bruce 
can be happy in the knowledge that his 
relatives, who originally denounced his 
need to be an actor, are now proud of 
his career. 

Yet heartbreak and disaster can't 
seem to leave Bruce and Diane alone. 

Pregnant again, Diane was rushed 
to Hollywood's Presbyterian Hospital 
for surgery during the summer. She 
lost the baby. 

But their old heartbreak has brought 
them new courage. 

"When we first lost Diane Jr.," says 
Bruce, "we were heartsick. But, after a 
while, you begin to get your emotions 
under control. 

"You begin to think clearly, and you 
realize it's your selfishness at work when 
you cry over your loss. You are really 
being selfish about missing what the 
baby could have given you. 

"When you understand that . . . then 
you realize that you are just beginning 
to understand what happened. . . ." 

— Paul Denis 

"Stoney Burke" is seen over ABC-TV, 
on Mondays, from 9 to 10 p.m. est. 

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87 




ON October 15th, 1962, we learned 
that Pernell Roberts had applied 
for a wedding license. The bride's 
name: Judy LeBreque. The news 
startled many of Pernell's closest 
friends, as well as the publicists of 
NBC-TV's "Bonanza," on which he is 
a co-star. Pernell has always been 
"close-rnouthed" about his personal 
life. Now that he was marrying again, 
he stuck close to form. 

The following Friday, Pernell noti- 
fied the production office that he'd 
need a little longer lunch hour than 
usual — to take care of a personal mat- 
ter. By 1 :30, he was back on the set. 
A production assistant remarked casu- 
ally that Pernell hadn't taken as much 
extra time as expected. Pernell re- 
plied, just as casually, "Well, it 
doesn't take that long to get married. 
It was all over by 12:45." 

Later, a reporter asked for the de- 
tails. The actor shrugged and said, "I 
don't know what you're talking about." 
The reporter persisted : Pernell had 
just gotten married, hadn't he? Per- 
nell said : "Maybe yes — maybe no. It's 
strictly between theyoung lady and me." 

Did Pernell and the dark-haired 
Judy, whom he has steady-dated for 
over a year, actually tie the knot? 
Even their best friends didn't know 
for sure. According to one friend, Per- 
nell had stated some time ago that he 
and Judy would marry as soon as they 
could legally do so. But he refused to 
say what technicality was holding up 
the ceremony. 

Pernell has never divulged details 
of his marriage and separation from 
his first wife, Dr. Vera Mowry, by 
whom he has a son, Jonathan Christo- 
pher, going on eleven. They had met 
in 1951. when Pernell was affiliated 
with the Arena Stage in Washington, 
D.C. Dr. Mowry was a speech teacher 
at Washington University, and also 
a consultant for the Arena Stage. They 
reportedly wed sometime in 1952, but 
Pernell has always refused to say 
where or when. He has heen just as 
reticent about any discussion of a di- 
vorce, but they separated before he 
went to New York late in 1953 to join 
the "Shakespearewrights," an off- 
Broadway group. During his next four 
years in New York, before he came 
West for Paramount's "Desire Under 
the Elms," Pernell dated many girls. 

When Pernell came to Hollywood, 
his most frequent date was Jan Far- 



PERNELL ROBERTS' 




MARRIAGE! 



rand, who had made somewhat of a 
name for herself on Broadway. She 
and Pernell had appeared together in 
productions of "Othello" and "Henry 
IV," and they had headed West to try 
their luck at about the same time. For 
a number of months, Pernell went 
about introducing Jan as "Mrs. Rob- 
erts." For over two years they were al- 
most constant companions, and neither 
dated anyone else. Then, suddenly, Jan 
seemed to disappear from the picture. 
One of her friends said she left Holly- 
wood after breaking up with ^ernell. 

About the middle of 1961, Pernell 
first appeared in public with Judy 
LeBreque, an attractive brunette who 
seems almost the opposite of both 
Vera and Jan. On several occasions, 
he has introduced her as "Mrs. Rob- 
erts." The title, says one of Pernell's 
friends, was meant as a joke at the 
time. But, just as with Jan, Pernell 
wanted no one asking Judy questions 
about them. At parties — the ^are times 
they went to them — Pernell stayed 
close by her side. 

In fact. Pernell was even more se- 
cretive about Judy than Jan. Where 
Jan. had occasionally joined him at 
the Paramount commissary for lunch, 
Judy had never done so. All of the 
permanent cast members had met her 
at one time or other and knew she was 
the Number One girl in Pernell's life, 
but their co-star had never confided 
any marriage plans to them. 

"We all get along fine and have a 
great working friendship," reports 
Lome Greene. "But we respect each 
other's privacy. What Pernell doesn't 
tell us is none of our business." 

Michael Landon reports he has met 
Judy and she's a lovely, quiet-spoken 
brunette with lively eyes and a sense 
of humor. Dan Blocker also met Judy 
and thinks her a charming young girl. 

Pernell has told various stories 
about Judy. He has at times said she 
is 1) a schoolteacher, 2) an actress, 
3) a socialite and 4) an opera singer. 
It was this last that she listed as "oc- 
cupation" on their marriage license. 

As we go to press, Pernell himself 
is still not giving out with any details. 
He's not saying "yes" and he's not 
saying "no." We pass along an opin- 
ion from one crew member, obviously 
not a Roberts fan. "I don't think he'd 
have spent the money for a license if 
he didn't intend to use it." 

— Milt Johnson 






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the 1st Set of Puzzles ^^ pR|NT) 



Name_ 



Address. 



City,. 



-Zone State. 







FEBRUARY, 1963 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 59, NO. 3 




Dinah Shore 


36 


Connie Stevens 


38 


Lennon Sisters 


40 


Dr. Ben Casey 


42 


Eddie Fisher 


45 


Dick Van Dyke 


SO 


Jackie Kennedy 


52 


Raymond Massev 


55 


Lucille Ball 


57 


George Maharis 


60 


Beauty 


62 


Bob Hope 


64 


Donna Reed 


66 


"'Young Dr. Malone" 


68 


Prine & Loring 


70 



1 IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH I 



Her New Husband Henley — Wolk 

The Day the Bubble Burst Jeff Cronin 

The Fears That Haunt Them Cindy Adams 

The Beverly Hillbillies Epidemic Jim Hoffman 

How 1 Sinned As a Man Chrys Haranis 

"The Day I Was Scheduled to Die!". .George Carpozi Jr. 

The Women Who Like Her Irene Storm 

Haunted ! Jae Lyle 

Desi Loses Lucy — Again ! Kathleen Post 

"I've Got It . . . Whatever It Is" Jan Price 

You Don't Have to Be a Bride Barbara Marco 

Why He Has to Leave His Wife Again. . . .James Gregory 

The Love Threat to Your Marriage Eunice Field 

Can a Child Be a Curse? Henley — Wolk 

Lovers ! Micki Siegel 



BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE m 



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27 Speaking Personally 30 Album Reviews 

28 Music Makers in the News 33 Pieces of Eight 

34 Tops in Singles 



WHAT'S NEW? WHATS UP? 



4 

6 
12 



Information Booth 
What's At the Movies? 
What's New? 



16 Earl Wilson's Inside Story 
75 Your Monthly Ballot 
80 Photographers' Credits 



SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES ■ 



Sid Perry 21 

Edmundo Ros 22 

lane Fonda. Bobby Morse 24 

Louise Weiller 26 



The Two-Gun Kid! (WCIA-TV, WMBD-TV) 
Broadway Goes Latin (Ind. TV Corp.) 
Birth of a TV Special (Westinghouse) 
The 17- Year Lark! (WAVE) 



CLAIRE SAFRAN. Editor 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
CAROL ROSS, Regional Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



JACK J. PODELL, Editorial Director 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
ALEXANDRA TARASEWICH, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty-Fashion Editor 



BOBBY SCOTT, Music Editor' 



TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office, 434 North Rodeo 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerold A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President; Lee B. Bartell, Executive Vice- 
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Second-class postage poid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
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jay Ward and Bullwinkle winner. 



Lucky Contest Winner 

Elsie Kliner of Dayton. Ohio, was 
the lucky winner of our Bullwinkle 
Party Contest. The party was at 
Wampler's Hall in Dayton — and 
everybody had a ball, even Elsie, 
who was almost too excited to talk! 
Andy Martin of WLW-D TV emceed 
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though it certainly was a hard one 
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A Million Thanks 

Thanks a million times for the 
story about Dianne Lennon planning 
to adopt a baby. I know this may 
sound corny . . . but my husband and 
I have been in the same predica- 
ment as Dianne and Dick — wanting 
a baby so badly. I showed your 
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marriage. And — P.S. — I wish Dianne 
and Dick the best of luck! 

Mrs. L.W.. Dallas, Tex. 








Sot. Nicholson, Who Are You? 

Could you please tell me some- 
thing about the man who plays Sgt. 
Nicholson in "Car 54, Where Are 
You"? Like who is he and what else 
has he done? 

L. Scott. Boulder. Colo. 

Hank Garrett's your man, a good 
actor, a good comedian — and a 
darned nice guy, too. He was born 
in Monticello, N.Y., went to high 
school in the Bronx, briefly attended 
the University of North Carolina and 
was a professional wrestler before 
carving his successful career as a 
night-club comedian, a summer stock 
performer and a TV star. He's been 
married for two years. His hobby? 
Weightlifting. of course! — En. 




Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you're interested, write 
to the addresses given below — not to 
TV Radio Mirror. 

Frankie Avalon Fan Club, Dianna 
Baremore, 29 East Olive Street, 
Westville, N.J. 

Dion Fan Club, Sue Linn, Ventura, 
Iowa. 

Sue Thompson Fan Club, Norman 
E. Livingston, 2211 Washington Ave.. 
Silver Springs, Md. 

Raymond Burr Fan Club, Patricia 
Cooper, 48 Holly Dr., Leola, Pa. 



Write Information Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 
205 E. 42 St., New York 17, N.Y. We regret 
we cannot answer or return letters received. 



Here he is — Sergeant Nicholson. 



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To see or not to see: George Guttingham answers your movie questions 



kW Mutiny on the Bounty 

mcm; ultrapanavision, technicolor 
Eighteen million dollars and a few 
ulcers later, "Mutiny on the Bounty" 
has arrived: Three hours of old-fash- 
ioned Hollywood spectacle and ad- 
venture. Marlon Brando will surprise 
you as Fletcher Christian — aloof, snob- 
bish, elegant. Richard Harris, the Irish 
artor who insisted on co-star billing 
I and was ready to slug Brando to get 
it) plays the leader of the seamen. The 
top acting honors, though, go to Trev- 
or Howard, who makes the hated 
Captain Bligh understandable if not 
exactly likable. As for Tarita, the na- 
tive Tahitian girl who plays Brando's 
island sweetheart, she is a lesson in 
what sex is all about. Wearing only 
a skirt slung low on her hips, plus 
some carefully arranged long black 
tresses, she does a dance that the men 
in the audience will find worth the 
price of admission all by itself. The 
color photography is splendid: The 
high seas in good weather and bad. 
and that beautiful Tahiti. The story 
runs down toward the last as if every- 
one were getting tired, and the ending 
is inconclusive and unsatisfying. But 
there's been a lot of good entertain- 
ment before it gets to that point. 

I'W Two For the Seesaw 

UNITED ARTISTS 

If you think an illicit love affair is all 
that much fun, this film about a Green- 
wich Village girl and a runaway hus- 
band from Omaha may well change 
your mind. It's worth seeing if only 
to meet Gittel Moscowitz, the funny, 
dopey, pathetic girl from the Bronx 
who wants to be a modern dancer. It's 
a great part for an actress, and Shirley 



MacLaine does well by it. She's cute, 
warm-hearted and sometimes hilarious. 
I wish I could say the same for Robert 
Mitchum. He's miscast in the first 
place and then he makes things worse 
by just walking through the part. It 
doesn't matter, though, for this is really 
Gittel's show. Filmed on location in 
New York, the movie has an authen- 
tic feel of Greenwich Village housing. 

fW Taras Bulba 

ua; eastmancolor AND PANAVISION 
I usually avoid pictures that have 
hundreds of extras waving swords and 
falling off horses, but I sure enjoyed 
"Taras Bulba." This is a well-directed 
action spectacular, interesting and ex- 
citing most of the way. The story is 
pretty familiar Romeo-Juliet stuff: 
Tony Curtis' love for Christine Kauf- 
mann turns him against his own peo- 
ple. (And when you see Christine in 
color, you understand why Tony fell 
for her in real life, too.) Yul Brynner 
is Taras Bulba, leader of the Cossacks, 
and he has all the virility and manly 
pride that the role needs. A colorful 
and interesting two hours of enter- 
tainment. 

fV^Arturo's Island 

titanus-metro; Italian, with 

english titles 
I hesitate to review this one, because 
it's strictly a moody, offbeat little art 
film about a lonely adolescent and his 
peculiar father living on an island in 
the Mediterranean. But the acting and 
the photography are so beautiful that 
you may find it an interesting change 
from your usual movie diet. It's a 
shocker, though, so don't say I didn't 
warn you. 



v'V Diamond Head 

COLUMBIA; PANAVISION, EASTMANCOLOR 

This is a b-i-g soap opera about racial 
prejudice in Hawaii. The writing and 
the acting are not likely to win any 
prizes, but a lot of people may enjoy 
the sudsy drama. Charlton Heston 
plays a bigoted land baron who won't 
permit his sister (Yvette Mimieux) 
to marry her Hawaiian boyfriend 
(James Darren), even though he him- 
self (Heston) has a native mistress 
(France Nuyen) — who is pregnant, 
yet. George Chakiris, of "West Side 
Story," is good as a young doctor, and 
the color photography of Hawaii is 
just plain beautiful. 

^V Days of Wine and Roses 

WARNER BROS. 

This is the "Playhouse 90" drama of 
a few years ago about the marriage of 
two young alcoholics. Lee Remick 
plays an average pretty secretary who 
had never had a drink, and Jack Lem- 
mon is the Goodtime Charlie who 
introduces her to booze. In the begin- 
ning, the picture is a pleasant and be- 
lievable romance of two attractive 
people, but 'when the drinking starts, 
their lives and the picture become al- 
most unbearably depressing. The act- 
ing is Academy Award material : 
Lemmon writhing in a strait-jacket, 
screaming incoherently; Lee Remick 
lying wasted and faded across a motel 
bed. It's a serious picture, and a lot of 
good talent went into its making — but 
I feel I must warn you that after a 
while you may wish you were some- 
where else. Home having a drink, for 
instance. 



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OUGINAL 

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LOVE LETTERS 

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i? London 




THE 
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OF 
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CASH 




85. Starring William 242. "Appealing 93. The best-selling 44. Also: Lili Mar- 50. "It soars and it 61. The Second Time 252. "Performances 14. Sing It Pretty, 17. Themes from 
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Misty 


M 


8 MORE (HT 


m 



103. It's "Hooray 286. "A top-notch 63. Also: Hurt, You 138. Stranger On the 6. Also: Twelfth of 9. Also: Singin' In 162. Also: I'm Just 231. "Relentless mo- 115. Also: Tonight, 
for lose Jimenez!" performance. "Amer. Can Have Her, Don't Shore, Midnight In Never, No Love, the Rain; Ida; Toot, Here To Get My Baby tion... excitement." Moon River, Volare, 
-N.Y. Journal-Amer. Record Guide Let Go, etc. * Moscow, 12 in all Come To Me, etc. * Toot, Tootsie!; etc. Out of Jail, etc. — S.F. Chronicle Cry Me A River, etc. 





The Ventures! 
WALK 
DON'T jtff 
RUN 

Raunchy 
Night Train 
Caravan • 
9 MORE 




227. It's All In the 239. A cornerstone 296. Cathy's Clown, 297.Also:Comanche, 53. My One And Only 258. This is "an ex- 129. Also: Home, My 
Game, Full Moon and of every well round- Lucille, A Change of Johnny Reb, The Man- Love, Wait Till You traordinary chorus." Own True Love, Mor- 
Empty Arms, 10 more ed classical library Heart, 12 in all sion You Stole, etc. See Him, 12 in all -New York Times gen, The McCoy, etc. 



LERNER 4 LOEWE 

Omefof 

RICHARD BURTON 
JULIE _,A^ 
| ANDREWS ^^ 



GREAT SONGS OF 
LOVE AND FAITH 




MAHALIA 
JACKSON 












JCOLUMIHAJ 





BILLY BUTTERFJELD ■ SOLID GOLD GUITAR 
THE GOLDEN HORN I AL CAIOLA 



You Made Me Love You 

Stardust 
Oh, Mein Papa 

Tenderl* J^ i5f j 
8 more 

190. Also: Pretend, 




EXODUS 

NEVER ON SUNDAY 

THE APARTMENT 

plus 13 more 



91. "Most lavish and 60. Trees, Because, 190. Also: Pretend, 170. Vaya Con Dios, 
beautiful musical, a Danny Boy, My Task, And the Angels Sing, Jezebel, Guns of Na- 
triumph."— Kilgallen My Friend, 7 more Cherry Pink, etc. varone, 12 in all 



293. Two of Richard 12. Also: Gunfight 107. Also: Some Like 
Strauss's most pop- at O.K. Corral, Raw- It Hot, Magnificent 
ular tone poems hide, etc. Seven, Smile, etc. 



Bobby Vinton sings 

CTfct ROSES are RED 
**|Hk and other 
-!» songs lor 
? lffip the young and 
*£& sentimental 




173. Crying, I Can't 268. Includes catchy 403. Mama, Come 404. 
Help It, True Love, trumpet tunes, airs, Back To Sorrento, '0 bum. 
Mr. Lonely, 8 more marches, etc. Sole Mio, 12 in all style, 

HERE IS THE GREATEST SELECTION OF BEST-SELLING RECORDS 
EVER OFFERED TO READERS OF THIS PUBLICATION ... 92 

outstanding recordings from every field of music — popular, 
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attached postage-paid card. Be sure to indicate whether you 
want your 6 records (and all future selections) in regular 
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Broadway, Movies, Television and Musical Comedies; Jazz. 
HOW THE CLUB OPERATES: Each month the Club's staff of 
music experts selects outstanding records from every field 
of music. These selections are fully described in the Club's 
music Magazine, which you receive free each month. 

You may accept the monthly selection for your Division . . . 
or take any of the wide variety of other records offered in 
the Magazine, from all Divisions ... or take no record in 
any particular month. Your only membership obligation is 



'A beautiful al- 284. Mr. BrailowsKy 402. "A rousing per- 128. Love Is A Many 
.lovely, lilting is "a poet of the formance... verve and Splendored Thing, A 
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true-to-life fidelity on your present phonograph and will 
sound even more brilliant on a stereo phonograph if you 
purchase one in the future. 



COLUMBIA RECORD CLUB • Terre Haute, Indiana 



*The stereo version of this record is electronically re-channeled 



ALFRED DRAKE 
KISMET X 




Original 

BroadWAjr 

Cut 



BRAHMS ,f 

piano jjjsc 

CONCERTO SEP 
No.1 /■$& 

SERKIN " 



FIRST TIME! 

DUKE ELLINGTON 

MEETS 

COUNT BASIE 




Folk Songs of Our Land 

FLATTfi? SCRUGGS 






BOBBYlQjJs 

VEE 

TAKE GOOD 

CARE OF 

MY BABY 

•Jul Run te Him 
Wilkin' With 
_ H| Aejtl 




94. Stranger in Par- 276. "Something no 215. "Walloping en- 57. Nine Pound Ham- 260. Gay and effer- 145. Happy Talk, My 187.Summertime.Ani 241. "Two of the 299. Twelve big hits 
adise, And This Is one should pass up." sembles and stirring mer. Hear the Wind vescent, this one is Little Grass Shack I Blue, Down By the greatest singers." by one of America's 
My Beloved, etc. * —Washington Star solos? "-High Fidel. Blow, 12 in all a real treat Cha Cha Cha, etc. Riverside, 14 in all -N.Y. Herald Trib. hottest singers 




JIMMY DEAN 

BIG BAD 

JOHN 

and other 
laiuloos 
stings 



195. Oklahoma Bill, 
Make the Water- 
wheel Roll, 10 in all 




OOPS! The Swinging 

Sounds of 
BILL DOGGETT M 
and Ms combo ~ 



RACHMANINOFF 



Piano Concerto No. 2 



IK-ENTREMONT 




N.Y. PHILHARMONIC 




OICK VAN DYKE 
CHITA RIVERA 




FLAMENCO 
PURO 

SABICASi 




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Fall In Love, etc. fidelity. "-Atlantic Lagoon, 12 in all I Do, Buster, etc. geous."-Hi Fi Rev. vating."-N.V. News lovely!"— S.F. Chron. Excellent, "-HiFi Rev. 

® "Columbia." (JJ), "Epic." (§> Marcas Reg. © Columbia Records Distribution Corp., 1963- 307 



11 



by EUNICE FIELD 



On Dick Chamberlain's dressing- 
room wall, there's a plaque making him 
a member of "The Rat Surgeons of the 
World." Oddly enough, it's signed by 
Louis Pasteur! And no doubt presented 
by Sigmund Freud! . . . Eric Fleming 
won't admit he's engaged to bubbling 
Barbara Bricker. Her NBC-TV news- 
casts start in January. . . . Standard 
gag on "The Nurses" set: "Who's Miss 
Bedpan of this week?" . . . Ef Zim- 
balist and Kay Gable still arm-in- 
arm. She gave him a pair of white 

cockatoos Julie Payne, big John's 

offspring, plucked a prize acting plum 



ford in the nightmarish "Baby Jane"? 
. . . How time does fly! It's hard to 
believe that little Lauren Chapin of 
"Father Knows Best" has been married 
for a full year! ... A pretty sharp 
cookie is Abby Dalton, now Mrs. 
Jack Smith. Her contract with Joey 
Bishop has a clause, in fine print, 
that if she becomes pregnant, her con- 
dition will be written into the scripts 
and Abby won't lose a day's pay. 

Tommy Sands, doing a guest spot 
on "Wagon Train," and his pretty wife, 
Nancy Sinatra, going into real 
estate. They've just bought a lot with 



a million. . . . Lome Greene, bulging 
with loot from the "Bonanza" album, 
building a home on the Mesa, Ariz., 
golf course. 

Morey Amsterdam, second banana 
on the Dick Van Dyke show, has 
plunked down $100,000 in cash for a 
Trousdale Estates home. He will be a 
neighbor of Nixon. ... At Harrah's 
in Tahoe, hubby points to Chinese mop- 
pet who plays piano, sings and dances. 
"Hey," he nudges well-stewed wife, 
"Ginny Tiu!" Sez wifey in her best 
hiccup, "Shhh, if we don't tell on her, 
maybe she won't tell on us." 




Romance: Eric Fleming and Barbara. 



More romance: Carol Burnett and Joe. 



during the casting of "Irma la Douce." 
"Ben Casey," which has been tem- 
porarily nosed out by "The Beverly 
Hillbillies" over here, is now tops in 
Japan. "Laramie" used to be Number 
One. . . . Loretta Young's LYL Pro- 
ductions countersuing Pam Mason 
over the charge that the Mason doll, 
Portland, was heave-ho'd for not buy- 
ing clothes at the shoppe run by Lor- 
etta's sister, Georgianna Montalban, 
Ricardo's spouse. 

Was it acting or was that a really 
pleased grin on Bette Davis' face 
when she put the boots to Joan Craw- 



a view, "but we won't build," says Tom- 
my, "until we have a family." . . . Mills 
Bros, at Las Vegas Sahara still a click 
loud enough to shatter chandeliers. 
... A star-studded cast (Jo Van 
Fleet, Kim Hunter, Sam Wana- 
maker and others) will probe the 
Russian soul in a CBS-TV hour-long 
special early in '63. . . . From Dave 
Barry: "My wife doesn't stop for a 
red light anymore. She says once 
you've seen one, you've seen them all." 
. . . More discs than wives: Artie 
Shaw, after 25 years with RCA, gifted 
with eight gold records that sold over 



Jack Carter, pepped up by his Las 
Vegas stint with Eddie Fisher, will 
produce and star in an original, "The 
Man Who Thought He Was Jolson." 
He should correct that to read "men." 
. . . Arthur Godfrey's second TV spec 
in February looks good enough to get 
him a third in late March. . . . Format 
of the new Phil Silvers show is a re- 
vamp of Sgt. Bilko, with Phil wheeling 
and dealing in a factory. A corn can- 
ning factory, maybe? 

Mexico slapped a ban on Elvis . . . 
"because, alas, he is too popular 
here." Seems (Please turn the page) 



12 




"It's easy," says Don Bolander... 

"and you don't have to go back to school! 



u 



How to Speak and Write 
Like a College Graduate 



<<T~\o you avoid the use of certain 

\_J words even though you know 
perfectly well what they mean? Have you 
ever been embarrassed in front of friends 
or the people you work with, because you 
pronounced a word incorrectly? Are you 
sometimes unsure of yourself in a conver- 
sation with new acquaintances? Do you 
have difficulty writing a good letter or 
putting your true thoughts down on paper? 

"If so, then you're a victim of crippled 
English," says Don Bolander, Director of 
Career Institute. "Crippled English is a 
handicap suffered by countless numbers of 
intelligent, adult men and women. Quite 
often they are held back in their jobs and 
their social lives because of their English. 
And yet, for one reason or another, it is 
impossible for these people to go back 
to school." 

Is there any way, without going back 
to school, to overcome this handicap? 
Don Bolander says, "Yes!" With degrees 
from the University of Chicago and North- 
western University, Bolander is an author- 
ity on adult education. During the past 
eight years he has helped thousands of 
men and women stop making mistakes in 
English, increase their vocabularies, im- 
prove their writing, and become interesting 
conversationalists right in their own homes. 



BOLANDER TELLS 
HOW IT CAN BE DONE 

During a recent interview, Bolander said, 
"You don't have to go back to school in 
order to speak and write like a college 
graduate. You can gain the ability quickly 
and easily in the privacy of your own 
home through the Career Institute 
Method." In his answers to the following 
questions, Bolander tells how it can be 
done. 

Question What is so important about a 
person's ability to speak and write? 

Answer People judge you by the way you 
speak and write. Poor English weakens 
your self-confidence — handicaps you in 
your dealings with other people. Good 
English is absolutely necessary for get- 
ting ahead in business and social life. 



You can't express your ideas fully or 
reveal your true personality without a 
sure command of good English. 

Question What do you mean by a "com- 
mand of English"? 

Answer A command of English means you 
can express yourself clearly and easily 
without fear of embarrassment or mak- 
ing mistakes. It means you can write 
well, carry on a good conversation — 
also read rapidly and remember what 
you read. Good English can help you 
throw off self-doubts that may be hold- 
ing you back. 

Question But isn't it necessary for a person 
to go to school in order to gain a com- 
mand of good English? 

Answer No, not any more. You can gain 
the ability to speak and write like a 
college graduate right in your own home 
— in only a few minutes each day. 

Question Is this something new? 

Answer Career Institute of Chicago has 
been helping people for many years. 
The Career Institute Method quickly 
shows you how to stop making embar- 
rassing mistakes, enlarge your vocabu- 
lary, develop your writing ability, 
discover the "secrets" of interesting 
conversation. 

Question Does it really work? 

Answer Yes, beyond question. In my files 
there are thousands of letters, case his- 
tories and testimonials from people who 
have used the Career Institute Method 
to achieve amazing success in their busi- 
ness and personal lives. 



Question Who are some of these people? 

Answer Almost anyone you can think of. 
The Career Institute Method is used by 
men and women of all ages. Some have 
attended college, others high school, 
and others only grade school. The 
method is used by business men and 
women, typists and secretaries, teachers, 
industrial workers, clerks, ministers and 
public speakers, housewives, sales 
people, accountants, foremen, writers, 
foreign-born citizens, government and 
military personnel, retired people, and 
many others. 

Question How long does it take for a per- 
son to gain the ability to speak and 
write like a college graduate, using the 
Career Institute Method? 

Answer In some cases people take only a 
few weeks to gain a command of good 
English. Others take longer. It is up 
to you to set your own pace. In as 
little time as 15 minutes a day, you will 
see quick results. 

Question How may a person find out more 
about the Career Institute Method? 

Answer I will gladly mail a free 32-page 
booklet to anyone who is interested. 

MAIL COUPON FOR FREE BOOKLET 

If you would like a free copy of the 32-page 
booklet, How to Gain a Command of 
Good English, just mail the coupon be- 
low. The booklet explains how the Career 
Institute Method works and how you can 
gain the ability to speak and write like a 
college graduate quickly and enjoyably at 
home. Send the coupon or a post card today. 
The booklet will be mailed to you promptly. 



DON BOLANDER, Career Institute, Dept. 36202A, 30 East Adams, Chicago 3, 111. 

Please mail me a free copy of your 32-page booklet. 
name : 



STREET^ 



CITY- 



-ZONE- 



-STATE- 



13 



when "G.I. Blues" was shown below the 
border, fans tore out seats, broke win- 
dows and danced like crazy in the 
aisles. But if "Blue Hawaii" is on the 
"no welcome" list, Elvis is not con- 
cerned. His fans, if anything, are big- 
ger than ever. On the "Untouchables" 
set, famed thespian Nehemiah Per- 
soft confided to actor Kelton Gar- 
wood that he is an "Elvis buff." Said 
Persoff, "When I first heard him do 
'Hound Dog,' I thought he sounded 
like a sick hound and should be put 
out of his misery. But now I buy all his 
records. Talent will tell." 

Judy Garland and Vic Damone 
were reported eye-in-eyeing it the 
same day on 57th Street, Manhattan, 
and in front of Lowry's on La Cienega 



surprised therefore to get a letter from 
Ann which made it clear he was still in 
her heart, not as a swain but as an 
actor. After seeing his "Empire" series, 
she sat down and wrote her first fan 
letter to her old boyfriend. 

Lucille Ball's TV daughter, blond 
16-year-old Candy Moore, got shook 
up aplenty when Desilu clamped the 
"verboten" sign on dates. All set to 
attend a preem with Johnny Craw- 
ford of "Rifleman," she was a sad 
youngster when the bad news came. 
Cheer up, Candy, another year, anoth- 
er date! . . . And Tony Dow in his 
seventh year on "Leave It to Beaver," 
has got his problems, too. Now 17, he 
must still be chaperoned to the set by 
his mom, even though he's inches taller 



Carol Burnett. Meanwhile, no further 
developments on Carol's romance with 
producer Joe Hamilton. . . . Another 
sprig of the stars to make the big try 
on stage, Gyl Roland, 19-year-old 
daughter of Constance Bennett and 

Gilbert Roland Marty Milner 

genuinely heartsick over the health 
problems of George Maharis. He 
will do eight episodes of "Route 66" 
alone. "They say this is what actors 
dream about, hogging the whole show, 
so why do I feel so lost?" said Marty. 
If anyone thinks Rock Hudson's 
new film, "Man's Favorite Sport," is 
about skirt-chasing, forget it. It's about 
fishing. . . . Don't look now, but knick- 
ers are on the comeback route. Next 
step, spats! . . . The two Richards, 




Par for Lome Greene and wife Nancy. 



"Fixer" Dick Rust with Sandra Lynn. 



in Beverly Hills- . . . Joanie Sommers 

and bridegroom househunting in the 
hills. . . . Molly Bee busy as her name. 
. . . And peachy Myrna Fahey has 
fallen in love! With New York and the 
Actors Studio. . . . Jill St. John gave 
guests at Sinatra's "Come Blow Your 
Horn" party a gander at what Lance 
Reventlow's missing — by appearing 
in a low-cut, black chiffon nightgown. 
She was a happy sight, even though 
guests had to pass three guards to 
enter the Paramount soundstage — the 
better for Sinatra to see his friends, 
ignore his enemies . . . and why not? 
Ten years ago Rich Egan and Ann 
Sofhern were a hot item. Now Rich 
t is happily wed to lovely Pat Hardy 
v and father of young Trish. He was 



than she is. It's the law. Also, Tony's 
friends have their own cars while his 
parents insist he wait for his, as they've 
invested his loot in apartment houses. 
So cheer up, Tony. Another year, an- 
other house! 

A teener, drooling over handsome 
twins Dirk and Dock Rambo, of the 
Loretta Young show, sighs blissfully 
"I love him both." . . . Exotic Tarita of 
"Mutiny on the Bounty" will do her 
film dance at the drop of an eyelid. 
. . . Joining the line of stars telling all 
is Basil Rathbone with "In and Out 
of Character." . . . Have you noticed, 
there's been a revival of poetry on 
TV, but only in the titles? The rest of 
the scripts remain foot-dragging prose. 
. . . New Broadway comedy to star 



Chamberlain and Rust, went to the 
aid of MGM buddy Gary Lockwood 
when he bought an old house. The fixer- 
uppers did such a great job they're 
both on the hunt for old dumps to 
repair and transform for themselves. 
Tony Butala, Bob Engermann and 
Jim Pike, "The Lettermen," are 
swamped by letter sweaters pouring 
in from every college in the country. 
So far they've gotten sweaters from 75 
schools. . . . From Rick Jason of 
"Combat" comes this "lag gag." An 
African rep to the U.N. spotted a 
headline in a TV column about "The 
Eleventh Hour." It said, "Headshrink- 
ers wowing TV." Snapped the diplomat 
from the dark continent, "U.S.A. seems 
to be hundred years behind Congo." 



14 



NOW... Start Enjoying "THE BEST of TWO WORLDS" 



2/2 


CITY 1 WESTERN 1 

vmntmp ono • • • jttM LIVING 


ACRES 


■ ■ 


JUST r/z MILES from ELKO, NEVADA 



$10 down/ $10 



PER MONTH 



/FULL PRICE $ 595 00 
NO INTEREST NO CARRYING CHARC 



CHARGES 



3yCE3-A.3DO^AT ■V.A.JL.HL.EIY R,^.3STCTiOS 




BOOMING NEVADA IS EQUALED BY ONLY A FEW PLACES IN THE WORLD. Population has surged Westward 
in ever increasing numbers. Westward to Nevada, where the air is fresh and clear, taxes are low or non- 
existent and opportunity is open to all. Yes, Nevada is booming and real estate investors are prospering. 
It is a proven fact that many purchasers of Nevada acreage have realized fabulous profits from small 
investments. Now, a NEW Nevada Real Estate Opportunity exists for you. This Ground Floor Opportunity is 
MEADOW VALLEY RANCHOS, located only 1V 2 miles from the thriving city of Elko, Nevada. 



THE VERY BEST FEATURES OF TWO WORLDS 

... THE WORLD OF THE WEST Located in prosperous Elko County, the ranchos 
have the backdrop of the majestic Ruby Mountains. The sparkling Humboldt 
River is a short Vz mile away. Every Rancho fronts on a graded road that 
leads into coast to coast U.S. Highway 40. Amidst these spectacular sur- 
roundings MEADOW VALLEY RANCHO owners can relax and enjoy the won- 
derful life of the Golden West. 

...THE WORLD OF CITY CONVENIENCES The bustling city of Elko with its 
modern schools, shops, theaters, hospital and airport is only IV2 miles away. 
The Experienced, Successful Developers of MEADOW VALLEY RANCHOS are 
not offering remote land where purchasers have to hope for progress and 
expansion. They offer you the opportunity of a life time, a chance to par- 
ticipate in Nevada's continuing boom . . . Minutes from the conveniences 
of hospitable Elko, in the midst of current growth and progress, MEADOW 
VALLEY RANCHOS has all the necessary ingredients to skyrocket in value! 

RECREATION UNLIMITED: 



FISHING: In jewel like lakes, 
and mountain fed bottom 
streams you'll catch trophy 
size German Browns, Rainbow 
and Brook Trout . . . large 
mouth fighting Bass. RANCHO 
owners can catch their din- 
ner within easy driving dis- 
tance of the property lines. 



HUNTING: Hunters from all corners of the globe come to Elko County to 
hunt the big game species Mule Deer . . . Quail, Chukar, and Partridge are 
found in abundance. 





At 



fjfc 



GOLF: A mere one mile from MEA- 
DOW VALLEY RANCHOS is the Ruby 
View Golf Course. No rush for start- 
ing times on this city owned and 
maintained golf course, but golfing 
as it should be enjoyed. Play a leis- 
urely 9-18 or 36 holes surrounded 
by breathtaking scenery, minutes 
from your rancho. 

FOR ALL THE FAMILY: MEADOW VALLEY RANCHO owners enjoy the FREE use 
of Nevada's many state recreation areas. Swimming, Camping, Boating, Pic- 
nicking, Rock Hunting, Horseback Riding and many many more recreational 
opportunities are available. 

PROVEN OPPORTUNITY: Yes, individuals are taking advantage of Nevada 
opportunity. But the countries financial experts, our leading corporations are 
also investing in their Nevada futures. Industrial giants build plants where 
Increasing Land Values and Population demand them. Anaconda Copper has 
completed a $32,000,000 plant. North American Aviation, Kaiser Steel and 
Curtis-Wright are building plants or have secured large acreage. 

LOW OR NON-EXISTENT TAXES: As a result of Nevada's low realistic tax 
structure, Profits And Wages Are Kept; not paid out to the state. NEVADA 
HAS NO STATE INCOME, INHERITANCE, CORPORATION OR GIFT TAX. The low 
real property tax is definitely limited by the state constitution. YES, NEVADA 
IS ONE OF OUR LAST FRONTIERS OF TAX FREEDOM! 

TOTAL COSTS: The full price of the title to your 2Vi acre Rancho is only 
$595.00. Complete payment schedule is $10.00 down and $10.00 per month. 
No interest, no carrying charges. Live, Vacation or Retire on your land, or 
simply hold for investment security. Wise men like Andrew Carnegie said, 
"More money has been made in Real Estate than in all industrial investments 
combined." Make MEADOW VALLEY RANCHOS' PROSPEROUS FUTURE — YOUR 
FUTURE. DON'T MISS THE GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY! 




' Ruby like 

MEADOW VALLEY RANCHOS 
1521 Stockman Bldg., Elko, Nevada 



MEADOW VALLEY RANCHOS 
1521 Stockmen Bldg., Elko, Nevada 



MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Yes! — Reserve acreage at MEADOW VALLEY RANCHOS for me — 2V2 acre parcel, $595 — payable $10 down, and 
$10 a month, no interest no carrying charges. Send purchase contract and map showing exact location of my holding. 
You will return my deposit if I request same within 30 days. I enclose deposit for each 2Vi acre rancho desired. 



SIZE 




PER 


ACRES 


OOWN 


MO. 


2Vi 


$10 


$10 


5 


$15 


$15 


7Vi 


$20 


$20 


10 


$25 


$25 



Name:. 



Address- 



City:. 



_Zone:_ 



-State:. 



Indicate No. of Ranchos Total enclosed $- 



In a little Chinese restaurant on 
Broadway, near the CBS-TV stu- 
dios, I met a member of the Jackie 
Gleason staff who was groaning 
and moaning about his very sad life. 
"If Jackie would only give up the 
idea that he must always be a gen- 
ius," he lamented, "and just be sat- 
isfied to be goodV 

Gleason's anxiety about always 
being practically perfect — about liv- 
ing up to the reviews that have said 
he is Chaplinesque — have made it 
hard for those around him. 

"If he would just compromise a 
little and say, 'Well, this isn't the 
greatest thing in the world, but it'll 
be okay. . . .' But he throws out 



something that's pretty fair, orders 
something else done in a hurry, and 
maybe the new piece of business 
isn't as good as the first one would 
have been if it had been well re- 
hearsed." 

Gleason doesn't blame directors, 
performers or writers for something 
not measuring up to the standards 
he wants. He'll usually say: 

"It'd be fine for somebody else, 
but I can't do it." 

And with a big smile, he'll ask for 
some other idea. 

Gleason's desire for high stand- 
ards — in a field where standards 
aren't always high — frightens some 
of those around him. They constant- 



ly tremble that one day he will say, 
"Oh, to hell with doing a show every 
week" — and devote his time to 
movies. 

"What does he need this for, any- 
way, with his money?" they con- 
stantly ask. 

Don't Print That: One of the 

biggest stars is demanding so much 
from his stagehands, aides and 
everybody around him now, that 
some are convinced he knows they 
can't do it and thus he'll find an 
alibi to throw in the towel. . . . Jack 
Carter and Red Buttons are great 
pals but they're different. Jack 
grabs nearly every offered job, 



EARL 







WILSON'S 






;;A Sm 




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Special gossip section: Read it here first! Read it here right! Each and every 
month, TV Radio Mirror brings you the scoopiest column in any magazine! 



16 



Red's selective. Result, Red does 
more movies, Jack does more TV, 
and they're both making plenty. . . . 
Hollywood claims one of the biggest 
TV stars of a couple of years ago 
broke up not only his marriage but 
that of a friend. His circle strongly 
disapproves. . . . Will the Eddie 
Fisher TV specials, so freely pre- 
dicted a couple of months ago, ma- 
terialize? The chance to do a rous- 
ing show at the Winter Garden 
passed without anybody making a 
deal for Eddie's services. ... A dra- 
matic show which was to have been 
a closeup of a man going to the elec- 
tric chair was scrapped at the last 
moment — "too gruesome." ... A 
Hollywood star doing a show in 
New York, in which he was sup- 
posed to drink poison, really shook 
up the stagehands. He insisted that 
the "poison" be champagne. 

Adoration, where are you? 
Thanks to the hilarious shennani- 
gans of "Car 54, Where Are You," 
an organization called The Friends 
of Bronx Culture took it into their 
minds to conduct an "Adore the 
Cops Day" — and for the benefit of 
any other groups around the coun- 
try who would like to follow suit but 
are stumped as to what to do, here- 
with the suggestions: 

Help a policeman across the 
street; pick up a call box phone 
and say hello; leave Valentines on 
the windshields of patrol cars; cook 
a twelve-course dinner and leave it 
on the Precinct House stoop; strew 
roses at the feet of traffic cops; sere- 
nade the policemen when they 
change shifts; walk along a way 
with the cop on your beat; refrain 
from robbing banks. 

Woody Woodbury, emcee of 
ABC's "Who Do you Trust," tells of 
the goofy character trying to fit his 
key to a lamp-post when a passerby 
kidded him, "I'm afraid there's no- 
body home there tonight." 

"Must ' be," came the reply. 
"There's a light upstairs." 

The electronic age: The produ- 
cers of one show had racked their 
brains for weeks, but finally came 
up with a machine gun that sounded 
like a machine gun instead of a 
cap pistol. It was an electronic gun 




Gleason: He's The Greatest but . 



and, when the trigger was pulled, it 
set off a sound picked up in the con- 
trol room by a high-frequency ap- 
paratus, thereby producing a terrifi- 
cally authentic sound of a machine 
gun. 

The only catch was that the sen- 
sitive piece of equipment in the con- 
trol room also picked up the squeak 
in Betty Furness' shoes as she 
was doing her commercial. Unfortu- 
nately, this wasn't discovered till the 
show was presented "live," so all 
during Betty's commercial spiel, the 
crackle of the squeaky shoes drowned 
out the message. 

"My goodness," someone said. 
"How did Betty react to all the 
racket? She must've been scared out 
of her wits." 

"Nothing fazes Betty Furness." it 
was pointed out. "She acted as if 
nothing in the world was going on." 

Cara Williams, being carefully 
groomed by CBS to become another 
Lucille Ball, was doing "The 
Jackie Gleason Show" and shaking 
her head at the organized chaos on 
stage. Jackie's show always looks 
like it'll never make it to air time, 
but somehow everything falls into 
place at the last minute. 

"I don't know my cues," Cara 
confessed. "Anybody hear anything 
about how I'm going to be cued in — 
will they be visual or what?" 

"The cues aren't due in till Fri- 
day," someone cracked (the show was 
to be taped Wednesday previous). 

"That sounds like the pilot I'm 



supposed to do," said Cara. CBS 
wants her for a situation comedy 
series, and they're supposed to shoot 
the pilot any day now, but as far as 
Cara knows the script hasn't even 
been written yet. 

Cara got to talking about food — a 
very sore point for her. 

"I'm like Gleason," she said. "I 
don't go for these vegetables or 
fruits — stuff I should eat. I'm a fiend 
for pizza or spaghetti. I eat like a 
man." 

But she looks very much like a 
woman. 

An ABC spokesman was kidding 
about plans to make a series called 
"Ready for the People," which 
would glorify the prosecution's 
stand in court. There's entirely too 
much glorification of the defense 
counsel, the district attorneys main- 
tain; hence, the campaign to sink 
Perry Mason. 

"I can see it now," the spokesman 
said. "The lawyers on both sides are 
brilliant . . . but the poor defendant 
is sent to the electric chair!" 

The story on Garry Moore and 
F. Scott Fitzgerald bears repeat- 
ing, because it sheds light on the 
kind of guy Garry is. 

Garry, nineteen at the time and 
working in his native Baltimore, 
writing continuity things for the ra- 
dio station, met Fitzgerald there, 
and the two hooked up to write a 
play. The great author was in his 
declining years, and the result was 
something less than Fitzgerald's 
best. 

The play, in short, was so bad it 
was never even produced. 

Since then, Garry's been ap- 
proached by several magazines to 
reprint the old manuscript, which 
Garry still keeps out of nostalgia. 
But the Crew-Cut One steadfastly 
refused to have it printed because, 
as he says: "Fitzgerald wrote so 
many beautiful things in his life, it 
would be a shame to print this piece 
of junk. It would just demean Scott's 
well-deserved reputation." 

The magazines reportedly offered 
up to $10,000 for the manuscript, so 
that's real sentiment in dollars-and- 
cents terms. 

Gone but (Continued on page 20) 



18 



JOIN THESE SUCCESSFUL 

MEN AND WOMEN OF ALL AGES! 



MAKE $ 

UP TO 






1100 A MONTH 

revealing HOLLYWOOD 
GLAMOUR SECRETS! "-- 






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, studio dill Cotmttle* 



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■ 9 



$250 IN A WEEK! 

"Averaged $250 profit 
per welk last 4 weeks 
Wish, I'd started years 

ag0 " Anita Born 

E. Alton, III. 



\fe 



$20,000 IN A YEAR! 

■•Earned $180 yester- 
day. Expect to hit 
$20 000 this year. 
VU| Bill Morton 

Litchfield, III. 



. $39.82 IN AN HOUR! 

fk "Earned $39.82 in an 

■^■\ hour today. A great 

family business. 

Jack Terwilliger 
Fresno. Calif. 




O Would you like 
to be in this 
big profit 
picture? 
The message 
below tells 
how you can! 



o< f>* 



MOTHER OF SIX 
NETS $1414.39 IN TWENTY OATS! 

Until recently I had only sold Studio Girt 
Cosmetics to the regular customers supplied 
me and to my friends, relatives and neigh- 
bors. I had been satisfied with making up 
to $100 a week spare time. I have six chil- 
dren, and plenty to do around the house. 
But when President Harry Taylor an- 
nounced the contest giving all Studio Girls 
a free trip to Hollywood with side trips to 
Disneyland, Las Vegas, etc., 1 decided that I 
was going to be on that jet! 
It was easy to get people to invite their 
friends over for Beauty Clinics when I told 
them they had a chance to win a S1000 
mink stole. In just one afternoon I "booked" 
15- Beauty Clinics. And every time I gave my 
demonstration, I made several appointments 
with the women who were there. 
I averaged about $65 a day for just four 
hours work, during the first twenty days. And 
each of us Studio Girl Advisors who won our 
trip to Hollywood pocketed over $1400 
apiece in clear profit for our 20-day efforts 
plus wonderful Magic Carpet trips to 
California. It proves to me that anyone who 
follows the instructions from Studio Girl's 
Home Office can earn $15,000 every year, 
. . . Ida Segesman 



NEVER WORKED BEFORE. NOW 
SHE'S THE FAMILY BREAD-WINNER 

My husband always made a 
fine living. I never had to 
work. Then my husband was 
struck down by illness. He 
couldn't work. The doctor bills 
■were eating up every penny we had saved 
during twenty years of marriage. 
One day I saw an article in. a magazine re- 
porting that thousands of Studio Girls with- 
out previous experience were making up to 
$25 and $50 in a day for easy work. I felt 
that anything would be worth a try. Believe 
me, that was the best decision I ever made! 
Last week I made over $250.00! Although 
my husband will never be able to go back 
to his regular job, he helps me by writing 
Tip orders and keeping my stock. My career 
as a Studio Girl is bringing us more money 
than my husband was able to bring in work- 
ing alone. Any 'woman who has a little time 
on her hands can add to her enjoyment of 
life as a Studio Girl . . . Marie Seeyer 



JjZ $>wMtf CjOU <£¥(%? .'Easy to follow step-by-step instructions! Customer Lists Furnished! 



The few minutes it takes to read this page 
may change your whole concept of the 
amount of money you can make in a glamor- 
ous, respected business. No matter what your 
age, previous experience or education, I 



show you how easy it can be for you to join 
15,000 happy people from all walks of life 
who enjoy big cash profits, security and a 
steadily growing repeat order business as 
Studio Girl Beauty Advisors and Managers. 



Fastest Growing Field in Direct Selling. . . Cosmetics Can be Your Gold Mine! 



A recent survey of the direct selling cosmetic industry 
shows that it's ten times as big as it was just a few years 
ago. Market Research authorities forecast that volume 
will double every year for the next five years because 



WHAT OTHER BUSINESS 
PAYS YOU BIG, 



women want personal cosmetic service at home — plus a 
chance to "try out" their cosmetics before buying them. 
You can cash in on this big swelling demand. Mail 
coupon below for free samples and full information. 



BIG PROFITS 



FULL OR SPARE TIME? 



Having tried to sell things for others all of 
my life, when I founded my own business in 
11)43. I vowed to put the welfare of my 
representatives first. I knew that if I paid my 
representatives bigger profits and gave them 

YEAR 'ROUND REPEAT PROFITS 

An estimated !t0% of Studio Girl customers on 
the lists I supply you repeat and increase their 
purchases month after month, year after year! 
And you get big, healthy profits each time 

I TELL YOU WHO TO CALL ON, WHAT TO SAY! 
I FURNISH YOU WITH CUSTOMER LISTS 

Along with the beautiful Demonstration Kit 
and exclusive Hollywood Beauty Care Methods. 
I sen.l you without cost all the closely guarded 
Hollywood make-up secrets proven to be so 
successful. My profusely illustrated "Career 
Manual" gives you simple step-by-step instruc- 
tions, and a dozen magic words on each of the 
300 cosmetics in the glamorous Studio Girl 
line. I furnish everything, show you what to 
do and how to do it . . . give you names of 
regular-buying Studio Girl customers in your 
territory. No tedious study. Merely follow the 
simple, proved and pictured instructions and I 
guarantee you'll be making profits right from 
the start! Many Studio Girls have exceptional 
earnings of more than $25 their very first day! 
So can i/ou! 



bigger territories, they would have an incen- 
tive to do a better job — so I worked out a plan 
where I pay them big, big profits on every 
penny of the business they do! 



NO RECESSIONS, NO FLUCTUATIONS 

they do! Ours is not a seasonal business — not 
one that is affected by recessions. In fact, 
during the recent recession, Studio Girl's 
business was up 165%J 

YOU NEED NO SELLING EXPERIENCE. 
NO FORMAL EDUCATION 

You may be in your 20's, or in your 50's or 
HO's. You may never have sold a thing in your 
life. You may want to work full or part time. 
It doesn't matter! If you want to earn up to 
$10 an hour ... up to $250 a week in a 
glamorous, respected business, all you need is 
ambition and willingness to follow a few 
simple instructions. I furnish everything, send 
you customer lists and reveal to you Holly- 
wood's most closely guarded beauty secrets! 

DO YOU QUALIFY AS A MANAGER? 

If you have been a crew or area manager, or 
if you have had experience giving parties, 
rush picture and details. Earn up to $2500 a 
month! Win free trips to Honolulu, San Juan. 
Puerto Rico, Paris! 





I USED TO THINK $15,000 A 
YEAR WAS A FORTUNE — THEN t 
TOOK IN $20,000! When I was 
working on a time-clock job 
my $80 a week didn't go very 
far. I thought I rould give 
my family some of the better 
things in life if 1 could only make $30 a 
week extra. When I considered Studio Girl as 
an opportunity to make needed extra money, 
1 was only thinking about $5 or $10 an even- 
ing or maybe $20 or $30 on weekends. 
You can imagine my big surprise when I 
made almost $80 my very first week just 
workinir nart-time! It was so easy that I 
could hardly believe it — particularly the big 
profit plan. Alter making up to $80 a week 
for six straight weeks working just evenings 
and week-ends, I quit my regular job. 
Last year I hit almost $20,000. This year 
1 expect to top $25,000. There is no other 
way I know that an average person with no 
Urevious experience or specialized education 
can earn such a tremendous income.. I am 
actually making more money than the presi- 
dent of our local bank: .... H'illiam Nail 




THIS FARMER'S WIFE STRUCK IT 
RICH When I finished school. 
I decided that taking care of 
thickens and doing chores was 
not what I wanted to do the 
rest of "my life. Our farm was 
too far from town for me to 
have a job, so I had to look around to see 
what else I could do. Although 1 had never 
done any selling in my life I made up my 
mind that, if I ever wanted to be anything 
other than a hard-working farm wife, I 
would have to do something about it myself. 
When I received all of my illustrated in- 
structions from Studio Girl, they were so 
simple and complete, that I went out my 
very first day and made $27.00 just calling 
on four of the list of established Studio Girl 
customers the Company furnished to me. 
I never realized how anxious other women 
were for advice on their beauty problems. 
When I come around they are always looking 
forward to my visit. Almost everyone I call 
on has become a regular customer. There is 
hardly a call I make that I do not take a 
good order on which I keep a big profit out 
of every dollar . . . Alma Hanna 



I MADE $ 385 



IN A SINGLE WEEK 

...with no previous experience! 







$102 IN A DAY! 

•■My profits were $102 
today Thrilled beyond 
words with your gen- 
erous profit Plan nljnl . r 
Tucson, Art*. 




$80 IN 2 HOURS 

"Pocketed $80.14 in 2 
hours- following step- 
by-step directions. 
BeautyClinicsareeasy, 

Dorothea Hughes 
Cincinnati, Ohio- 



$800 IN A MONTH 

"$800 00 month profit 
anTswarnpedwitriord- 
p rs Didn't think an 
^experienced house- 
wffecould earn a new 

car so quick. 



MARION BLEECKER 



SfadcO ^3#/0FFERS YOU SECURITY WITH A 
BIG SUCCESSFUL INTERNATIONAL CORPORATION 

Established nearly 25 years ago, Studio Girl-Hollywood owns 
its own magnificent 40,000 square foot administration build- 
ing and factory in the beauty capital of the world — just 
minutes away from the major movie studios. 'There are other 
mammoth plants and shipping headquarters in Chicago, 
Philadelphia and San Juan, Puerto Rico; fashionable Studio 
Girl salons and offices in major cities the world around! The 
company subscribes 100",', to the principles of the great 
United States Chamber of Commerce. . .your banker will 
tell you of Studio Girl's top financial rating. 
Yet despite its tremendous success. 
Studio Girl has always remained a family-like 
organization where everyone is friendly, coopera- 
tive, happy and prosperous. 



i 

! 




When Marion Bteecker moved to Northport, Washington in her 
late thirties she gave up a big city position as office supervisor. 
But she soon discovered that living in a small town did not reduce 
living expenses to the point where her family could be happy with 
only her husband's income. 

The only available job was as a short-order cook and waitress. 
The work was hard with long hours and her paltry paycheck 
brought nothing but discontent. Her temper was short, her time 
with her children was limited, she wasn't happy. 
The turning point in Marion Bleecker's life came when she an- 
swered a Studio Girl ad. As a Studio Girl Beauty Advisor, Marion 
made money at once, found financial security and happiness. The 
easy step-by-step directions from the Company brought her success. 
After just a few short hours, Marion made $54.80 in sales for a 
clear profit of $30 in a single day. In less than 6 months Marion 
Bteecker had over 200 regular monthly buying customers and 
was so busy she started training new Studio Girls. Now they 
bring her an endless chain of $50 and $100 overwrite checks 
each month. 

Today, Mrs. Bleecker has won lifetime security, a lovely home, 
hundreds of friends, happiness and an income rivaling that of 
many bank presidents. 



OVER TWO MILLION CUSTOMERS LAST YEAR! 
35,000,000 GOOD NEW PROSPECTS! 

More than two million women bought I 
Studio Girl cosmetics last year, and at 
our present rate, we will double that I 
figure this year! In fact, top ■ market 
research authorities tell us we have 
35,000,000 excellent new prospects — women 
who prefer to select and purchase cosmetics 
from a trusted confident in the privacy of 
their homes. You can become a part of 
this exciting business. You can earn up to 
S10 an hour part time — up to $250 a week 
full time — helping me supply this growing 
demand! Mail coupon today for Free 
Samples and full details. 

HIRE OTHERS, MULTIPLY EARNINGS 
Studio Girl representatives are encouraged 
to appoint others to take orders with and 
for them. You get an overwrite commis- 
sion on all orders taken by those you ap- 
point, you can easily multiply your earnings 
in a very short time. We supply every- 
thing. Many Studio Girls are enjoying 
profits on 25 and 30 others. I show you 
how! 

A FRIENDLY. PRESTIGE LIFE 
As a Studio Girl Advisor, you'll win new 
friends and take tiemendous pride in 
rendering a service every woman needs so 
ilesperately. You'll become a respected and 
sought-a.fter member of your community. 
Scores of our representatives are asked 
every day to demonstrate Studio Girl's 
short cuts to beauty and make talks to 
women's clubs, PTA meetings, etc. 






5g^SSSSPWSB , " ; ' 



use these secrets 

■• week long 

of Charm 



»■ ssft-sisas &es&£s?%i 






°loaay 



t- \AJi\V OPPvJr* ,,J 



py 

full 



MEN 



big-money-making I 

°,rne Beauty Ad- 1 



" or "Thousands more I moM" » , « = D , 

arning up. to $10 per \ ffiTnf their own. 



ake up to $1/3"."" . rt ct u dio Girl urgaiii 
onthly working. ,,1°.,- Jed » u Managers and 
..L, in a family bust- "is, . d isors . 



OKLY STUDIO GIRL 
OFFERS THESE 5 
BIG EXCIUSIVES! 

1 Big P«> w P ian 

*) Established customer 

L lists 

3 Big, big territories 

4 Full color catalogs 

5 Lifetime recruiting 
benefits & overwrites 



I Beauty Advisory 



earn _ 

ho ur part time 

OUR NATIONAL ADVERTISING SELLS FOR 

YOU National TV. radio and maga- 
zine advertising have made the 
name of Studio Girl known and re- 
spected throughout the world. More 
than 1,000 Radio and TV stations 
have carried the story of Studio Girl 
into the homes of countless millions. 




MADE OVER $450.00 A 
WEEK SPARE TIME WHILE 
HOLDING FULL-TIME JOB 

I have worked full time 
in a glass factory here 
for the past twenty-six 
'years. About two years 
ago. since I needed some extra 
money, although I had never sold 
before, I became a Studio Girl. 
Putting in six hours every day at 
the factory doesn't leave much free 
time, but I can honestly say that 
many weeks I make more money 
part time with Studio Girl than I 
do on my regular full-time job. 
My biggest thrill came just re- 
cently when I made $1431.1!! — over 
$450 a week for three straight 
weeks, and I didn't miss a single 
minute of work at my job in the 
factory. This won me a free trip to 
Hollywood, Disneyland and Las 
Vegas. I find that it is easy to av- 
erage up to fifteen dollars for every 
hour I put in as a Studio Girl 
. . . FlorenceZN utter 




LOSING OUR BUSINESS 
WAS THE BEST THING 
THAT EVER HAPPENED 
FOR US! I never felt 
bluer than the day my 
husband and I realized 
our restaurant had 
failed. The habits we formed were 
too strong to allow us to take or- 
ders. Our savings were dwindling. 
Then I saw an ad telling Studio 
Girls could make up to $1100 a 
month without experience. 
That was the best decision I ever 
made! The first week, I grossed 
almost $100 just by calling on 
neighbors and the list of customers 
the Company furnished. In two 
months I was making twice as 
much money as we used to make. 
My husband and I are now work- 
ing together and are very happy 
and prosperous. We have plenty of 
time for our family, are running 
our own business, and make enough 
money to provide our family with 
every luxury. . . . Evelyn Jones 



A COMPLETE LINE OF 300 GLAMOROUS COSMETICS HELP BUILD BUSINESS! 

In addition to the famous line of 300 beautifully packaged, 
moderately priced, daily-used cosmetics, you have more than 50 
Holiday gift packages. There's a handsome line of men's 
toiletries, etc. Each cosmetic is beautifully packaged. Each is 
manufactured of the finest medically-approved salon-tested in- 
gredients, in our own modern laboratories. Studio Girl cosmetics 
have earned the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval and won the 
right to display the American Medical Association Seal of Acceptance. 
Every Studio Girl cosmetic is backed by a written unconditional 
guarantee of satisfaction. 

DETAILS, BOOKLET, 3 SAMPLES -ALL FREE! 
If you want to have plenty of money, lots of friends and enjoy 
life's luxuries, send your name for 3 free samples, complete details, 
booklet, exciting Studio Girl "success stories;' No cost or obligation, 
ever! Mail coupon today. 



CANADIANS: ATTENTION! 



/mty /ayfa^ 



PRESIDENT 



FREE! MAIL TODAY! Receive Free Usable STUDIO GIRL SAMPLES! 



| STUDIO GIRL, Dept. 85632 
| 3618 San Fernando Rd., Glendale, Calif. 
I *ln Canada: 850 La Fleur Ave., Montreal 

i" Your Studio Girl opportunity sounds wonderful! Satisfy my curi- 
J osity. Send assortment of 3 FREE useable Cosmetic Samples 
and rush information without obligation. 



I 



Name: Miss □ Mrs. □ Mr. Q_ 



Address:_ 



I City:. 



_Zone State- 






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WILSON'S 




(Continued from page 17) 

not forgotten: Carol Burnett is 

being missed more than anyone on 
the Moore show will admit- — and 
this is never more evident than 
on those few occasions during this 
season's tapings when she is being 
used. 

"Carol adds ten points to the rat- 
ings," one source said bluntly. 

And when Carol does appear on 
the show, the writers and everybody 
seem so pleased to have her, that 
they write everything around her. 
Sitting in on one such taping, some- 
one cracked : " 'The Garry Moore 
Show'? This is more like 'An Eve- 
ning With Carol Burnett!'" 

Meanwhile, there are no new de- 
velopments regarding her romance 
with the Moore show's ace producer. 
Joe Hamilton. Carol will talk 
about virtually anything but Joe. 
He still has to make some decision 
about his wife and eight children. 
No small decision, that. 

Talk still persists, of course, that 
some comedienne, somewhere, will 
move into the slot vacated by Carol 
Burnett, and one ^prominent actress 
would've been most distressed to 
hear the reaction when she had been 
reportedly signed to do the show. 

"I hear . is going to do 

the show," I said. 

"Oh yeah?" replied one of the 
big-wigs, unimpressed. "Who's she?" 

Fearless Forecasts: Merv 
Griffin will be the next daytime star 
to get a crack at night TV. He's al- 
ready got some of the older chaps 
worried. . . . Though Lucille Ball 
will not install husband Gary Mor- 
ton in an executive spot in Desilu. 
he will probably appear in the pic- 
ture eventually as producer of some 
special TV properties. The report 
that Lucy might change the name of 
the studio to "Garylu" is strictly a 
gag by their pal Jack Carter. . . . 
ABC is gauging the reaction to its 
"Hootenanny" (a jam session for 
folk singers) to determine whether 
the idea would go on a weekly basis 
next season. Our fearless forecast is 
that it would go — with a title 
change. Maybe something like "Sing 
Along with Seegar" (Pete, you 
squares). That's Earl! 




MIDWEST 



Sheriff Sid broadcasts direct from "Hammerhead Mine. 



Sid Perry's sixteen years in radio and TV have brought 
a great deal of enjoyment to a great many people. But most 
important is the enjoyment — the love of the broadcasting 
business despite the hard work and the struggles — that he 
himself has derived from doing something he believes is 
right. He believes in children, in entertaining them and help- 
ing them. And anyone observing Sid visiting the children's 
ward of a hospital can plainly see that he is doubly blessed. 
Through his easy-going manner and his broad, friendly smile, 
he has brought joy to the children and, in so doing, to him- 
self as well. . . . His "Popeye and Sheriff Sid" is seen on 
WCIA-TV, Monday through Friday at 4 P.M. "Noon 
Weather" is also on WCIA-TV weekdays. "Tinker Time" is 
seen Monday through Friday at 7:30 p.m. on WCIA-TV and 
WMBD-TV. . . . Champaign is rightfully proud of Sid. And 
so is his wife Margie; their son Perry, 15; and their 14-year- 
old dog, who's been convinced for years that he's a cat! 



Sheriff Sid 

The Iwo-Gun Hid! 

He's the man from Champaign who's 
got just about the biggest smile 
— and biggest talent — in Illinois 




Sid works on his stamp collection against a background of pictures he painted himself. At right, he, Margie and Perry 
gather for some music. Perry, a prize-winning snare drummer, organized the family into the Perry Percussion Group. 



21 




XAVIER CUGAT, ABBE LANE 



MARGIE RAVEL 



\ Music 
money * 



^ e U* *'t Re. 0-^^ P-n,e and ^ ^o^— ^ 

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c ° urS \ Toni M*\ ,, s one s*°* ^^^^^* 
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24 



Westinghouse Broadcasting Company has come up with a television series more 
than deserving of the word "special." It's creative, ingenious and entertaining 




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1. Producer Michael San+angelo gets an idea and 
sets it in motion: An animal show. 2. Director Jim 
Elson and production assistant Seri Maxwell dis- 
cuss Ivan Sanderson, noted naturalist, explorer and 
writer. He will narrate the show. Title? "People and 
Other Animals." 3. The stars: Jane Fonda and Bobby 
Morse. 4. Mike and Jim discuss last-minute details 
before" the rehearsal. 5. "Okay, kids, got it? We'll 
have a quick run-through without props." 6. "Ivan, 
Bobby's playing with my . . . uh . . . tell him to 
stop." 7. "Look, buster, I don't care if you are an 
ocelet, you're not supposed to behave like one." 8. 
"Ivan, do I have to smile?" 9. "I'm ready . . ." 10. 
"Jane baby, we're on. This is it." 11. "This is it?" 



"People and Other Animals" is one in a series 
of Westinghouse Broadcasting Company's Chil- 
dren's Specials shown each month on the fol- 
lowing stations: WBZ-TV, Boston; KPIX-TV, 
San Francisco; KDKA-TV, Pittsburgh; KYW- 
TV, Cleveland; and WJZ-TV, Baltimore. 
"People" is scheduled for a February airing 
(check local TV listings for time and date). 
In January, the history of puppets is being ex- 
plored in "Baird's Eye View," starring Bil 
Baird, America's foremost puppeteer. ... Be 
sure to watch for these and future Westing- 
house Broadcasting Specials, because, in our 
opinion, they are worth seeing— and re-seeing. 



Photographed by Martin Blumenthal 
at the Videotape Center, New York 



95 




The 17-Year Lark! 

Radio was a "lark" at first, but 

now it's sheer success and joy for Louise 

Weiller of Louisville's WAVE 





Louise is a director of the Louisville Civic Ballet, one of her 
great loves. Here she chats with Jean Lee Schock (I.) of 
the Ballet and Fernand Nault from the American Ballet Theater. 



In her spare time, Louise is a Red 
Cross Gray Lady and assists in the 
speech clinic at Veterans Hospital. 



Seventeen years ago, Louise Weiller went into radio as a "lark" and has been enjoying it ever since. 
She says now that she hopes to stay with it at least another seventeen years, which is mighty good news 
for Station WAVE in Louisville and the fans of "Woman's Way," heard Monday through Friday. . . . 
Many an interesting guest has appeared with Louise on her show, including Lee Bowman, Joan Craw- 
ford, Carol Channing, the late Duchess of Mountbatten and Burl Ives — plus "hosts of other fabulously 
interesting representatives of other fields." All Louise's memories of guest appearances are pleasant 
ones — except for the time a local civic leader appeared on the show and froze completely at the begin- 
ning of the interview. She couldn't make a sound and could barely nod her head. That day Louise 
set a record for one-sided conversation! . . . Today, she and her husband live in a brick house with 
"glass walls" nestled into the side of a hill — the first "contemporary" home built in the Louisville area. 



26 






MIKIKH! 



FEB. 1963 



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JACKIE KENNfBV- £= 

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Bobby Scott, Music Editor 






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Speaking Personally: That's the title of a new album which 
may well be the most important one you will ever listen to — and that 
holds whether you agree with what Bertrand Russell says on it or not. 

Bertrand Russell is probably the most remarkable man alive to- 
day. At the age of ninety, his mind and actions are youthfully idealis- 
tic. His entire posture, mental and physical, is a testament to a life 
of discovery. A mathematician, master of logic, philosopher, a moral- 
ist of distinct individuality, a writer and at present a leader of a world- 
wide peace movement, his life has been one great assault upon con- 
vention and hypocrisy. He has championed only what he believes to 
be the truth. This Riverside package of two L.P.s is historically 
important as well as topically argumentative. 

The subjects covered here include Russell's memories of many 
great personalities, his thoughts on education, politics, war, morality, 
neutrality and a great many backward looks at his childhood and 
adolescence. His humor and wit, in addressing himself to personal 
matters, is one of downright parlor performing. His imitations are 
hilarious. 

When he reflects on his pacifist stand during World War I, he 
makes a sharp delineation between it, (Continued on page 34) 




27 



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'%S 



MUSIC 

MAKERS 

IN THE 



1. Jackie Kennedy followed Bolshoi Ballet (impresario Sol 
Hurok above) with jazz at the White House. 2. Pert Joanie 
Sommer is honeymooning with Jerry Steiner. 3. Rod Lauren 
dates Barbara Adams here but is steadier with Gayle Earley. 




jHHHKi 






4. May Britt and Sammy Davis Jr. adopted a brother, Mark Sid 
ney, for little Tracey. 5. Milton Berle, Vince Edwards, Dino helped 
honor Sammy -for "humanitarian endeavors." 6. It's serious between 
Sal Mineo and Jill Haworth. 7. Ditto Shelley Fabares, Lou Adler. 






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ON THE RECORD 




ON THE RECORD 




Vocit- Monthly 
4 RECORD Guide* 



POPULAR 

***Piano, Strings and Moon- 
light, The Many Moods of Dave Grusin 
(Epic) — This is Dave Grusin's second 
album and it is much more impressive 
than his first, "Subways Are for Sleep- 
ing" (also on Epic). Here Dave shows 
his much more valuable talents for 
arranging and composition. The tunes 
are all the very best of the "standards" 
backlog: "Love Is Here to Stay," "My 
Funny Valentine," "The More I See 
You" and "When Your Lover Has 
Gone" — to cite a few. Included also is 
a Grusin original called "Sara Jane." 
(It is my particular favorite here.) 

Dave ambles comfortably through 
the material. Always with ease of ac- 
tion. The right hand weaving constantly 
through the accompanying body of 
strings. It is very much in the Previn 
groove, when one thinks of levels of 
taste and performance. Tasty is the 
word. Tasty and subtle, with a dash 
of enchantment. This one is a charmer. 



The Frank Loesser tune from "How 
to Succeed," "I Believe in You," was 
also chosen for vital Martin-izing. The 
arrangement is musical and invigorat- 
ing, with Tony gilding all the edges. 

Unfortunately, there are other vehi- 
cles here of very little value. On the 
tune, "I'll Be Seeing You," Tony over- 
comes the rather crass arrangement; he 
sort of sings in spite of it. The arrange- 
ments on side-two are largely insensi- 
tive and cliche-ridden. In some cases, 
Tony finds it hard not to be drawn into 
an over-dramatic obviousness of expres- 
sion. (On "To Be Alone," we find him 
speaking to a saccharine strings back- 
ground.) Tony is at his best, a winner 
always. Four stars for Tony — two stars 
for the album. 

POPULAR: BLUES 

infr^r-fr Count Basie Swings and Joe 
Williams Sings, Count Basie Orch.; 
Joe Williams, vocalist (Verve) — This 
is a re-issue of some classics of 1956, 



Have the Blues," "Alright, O.K., You 
Win," "The Comeback," "Teach Me To- 
night" and "In the Evening," to cite a 
few. 

Here Joe exhibited possibly his fin- 
est recorded moments. For Basie, this 
period was a throw-back to the legend- 
ary times of his association with Jimmy 
Rushing, the past-master of the blues. 
At any rate, these sides are very much 
classics, on all counts. 

The band is a seething machine of 
excited outpourings. The solos of trum- 
peter Joe Newman and saxophonist 
Frank Foster are highly stimulating 
excursions. The pulse of the band is — 
to sound contradictory — a settled agi- 
tation. Drummer Gus Johnson (who 
later left the band to be replaced by 
Sonny Payne) made all the difference. 
His constant desire to keep ordered 
time, by declining to showboat, gave 
the band a subtle and enduring under- 
current. I find this album to be like 
a captured moment of jazz history, big- 
band variety. I trust you will, too. 





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**Fly Me to the Moon, Tony Mar- 
tin (Dot) — Tony Martin is a talent this 
reviewer has never undersold. The rea- 
son for the sad rating has nothing to 
do with Tony's performance. Rather, 
it's the direction and intent of the 
album. Included are cuts easily of four- 
star rating level — the title tune, for in- 
stance. Tony does this Bart Howard 
standard like he'd written it. The clos- 
ing part struck me strongly. A beauti- 
ful and unusual change of key, with 
Tony's resonant voice reading so pro- 
fessionally that it creates a moment of 
rare richness for the ear and heart. 



a year which saw a new Basie orches- 
tra rise to prominence. Much of this 
surge can be attributed to new Basie 
arrangements, a band full of players 
who could play weU together— as well 
as singly — and the shouting talents of 
Joe Williams, which gave the band a 
final thrust upward into the popular 
market. 

This monumental year of '56, with 
its output, has not been capped yet by 
Basie plus band or Williams on his 
own. It still seems a shame that this 
parting took place. All the real big hits 
are here under one roof: "Every Day I 



POPULAR: CHORAL 

***Choral Spectacular, Norman 
Luboff cond. 100 voices and the RCA 
Victor Symph. Orch. (RCA Victor) — 
Here's an album that is an impressive 
offering by one of the industry's finest 
choral directors. As I am used to hear- 
ing Luboff's part-writing and clarity 
of voice mixes, this album did take me 
back for a moment, but Mr. Luboff — 
not to be outdone by the technical prob- 
blems involved with putting one hun- 
dred voices and a symphony orchestra 
onto the tape — wrote a bit differently to 



30 



-K-K-K^C GREAT! 

1-K GOOD LISTENIISI 



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compensate. Instead of using his voices 
as a complete organ of expression, here 
he utilizes them as another orchestral 
family. Although they are featured, 
they share the limelight with the mem- 
bers of the orchestra. 

The writing for the voices is entirely 
of ensemble variety. No soloists. They 
pace themselves through male or female 
masses of sound. Mostly, it's as one 
instrument that they function. 

The tunes are all standards of long 
duration that have not worn out their 
welcome: "Where or When," which 
conjures memories in me of when such 
a sound could be a hit record (it could 
hardly happen now! ) ; "Bali Ha'i," 
done in a marvelous fashion and filled 
with the aura of the Islands; "Falling 
in Love with Love;" "In the Still of the 
Night;" and a dose of the Latin in the 
striking "Granada." 

The album, on the whole, is a tonic. 
It's a magic carpet to float away on. 
The cover reads: "Choral Spectacular." 
To that, I'd add the word : Pleasurable. 



air. The tunes were written by Bill 
Monroe, with some help from Tommy 
Collins and Johnny Horton. The ac- 
companying group includes the great 
talents of Don Reno and Red Smiley. 
As you country fans, in particular, can 
see, this album is loaded from every 
angle. 

Rose very comfortably jumps from 
swingers to ballads. She is never caught 
napping! Her preacher-like style on 
"Blue Moon of Kentucky" and "Cotton 
Fields" is invigorating, without being 
too strong. "Uncle Pen," another Mon- 
roe gem, is treated with subtle humor. 

All in all, the album is a joy. Good, 
healthy singing, a romping country 
band behind, and some of "Bluegrass- 
dom's" finest songs. I'd check this al- 
bum out, if I were you. 

FOLK MUSIC 

••••The Boys Won't Leave the 
Girls Alone, The Clancy Brothers and 
Tommy Makem (Columbia) — Well, 



bit of humor out of Scotland's classic 
"Rothsea-O." 

Wonderful thing about the Clancy 
Brothers is they enjoy what they are do- 
ing so much that the listener can't help 
but be pulled in, and it's a great ride 
when you tune in. Let's have more like 
this one. It's a great day for the Irish. 

FOLK MUSIC: GOSPEL 

•••The Twenty-Fifth Day of De- 
cember, The Staple Singers (River- 
side) — I realize that the Christmas sea- 
son has passed, but this album is still 
worthy of attention. Unlike some glitter- 
ing and tinsel-wrapped Christmas al- 
bums, this one will still sound good on 
the first day of spring. 

The Staple Family singers, led by 
Father Roebuck, have captured here 
more than just Christmas. They have 
provided us with an enriching spiritual 
experience. The joyous birth is the 
fount. One can hear, though, in these 
pieces — as in "The Virgin Mary Had 




'i-KASS 








POPULAR: COUNTRY 

••••Rose Maddox Sings Blue- 
grass, Rose Maddox (Capitol) — There 
is nothing more delightful than fine 
country singin' and playin', and this 
album is nothing but the finest. Rose 
Maddox makes mincemeat out of these 
tunes. She makes them sound like she'd 
written them. Her voice is real. Noth- 
ing's affected. Natural is the word, and 
well it ought to be. 

Rose looks back on a bagful of ex- 
perience, dating back to when she was 
a girl singing with her brothers on the 



these Irish "lads have done it again. 
They've come up with a gem of an al- 
bum. A collection of Scottish and Irish 
tunes, all perfectly suited to their direct 
and pointed style. The chaps excel 
where there's gusto. Give them a tune 
chock-full of excitement and they'll 
draw every drop out of it. In this album, 
though — as much as I like the "shout- 
ers" — it's the more tender interpreta- 
tion of "Will Ye Go, Lassie, Go?" and 
the enchanting chirping on the Scottish 
walking song, "Marie's Wedding." 

The boys turn in a finely chanted por- 
trait of "Bold O'Donahue" and a choice 



One Son" — the pending anguish of the 
Christ Child's later life. (It does strike 
me strange that only the Gospel litera- 
ture of Christmas, as opposed to many 
other types of Christmas literature, has 
in it a profound sadness as well as joy.) 

Though the Staple Singers do not en- 
tirely embrace the general gospel style, 
there is in evidence the priceless litany 
form. 

This question-and-answer-type form 
is the rock on which gospel music 
stands. Two interesting examples of this 
litany-style music are "Holy Unto The 
Lord" and "The Saviour Is Born." Mak- 



ON THE RECORD 




Your Monthly 
O IM R ECO RD Guide 



ing a comparison, ' as one follows the 
other on side-one, you find "Holy" is a 
twelve-bar blues in structure. It also 
sounds more like secular music than 
folk music. "The Saviour," on the other 
hand — though utilizing this same ques- 
tion-and-answer style — is most pointed- 
ly sacred. 

Roebuck's lead singing on "Holy" is 
sort of the key. It's more florid than the 
conventional gospel style. It harkens to 
country blues singing. I, personally, 
feel the admixture is a healthy and re- 
warding one. Young Mavis Staple turns 
in some vital lead-singing on "Sweet 
Little Jesus Boy" and "The Virgin 
Mary Had One Son." She is definitely 
a singer to watch. Possessing both talent 
and beauty can only mean stardom in 
time. Her voice is one of dark and strik- 
ing moments. Loose and florid her 
style, and strong her intent. 

Brother Pervis and sister Yvonne fill 
out the rest of the group. Other Yule 
tunes included are: "Go Tell It on the 
Mountain," the very spirited "Last 
Month of the Year," "There Was a 
Star" and three classic Christmas gems, 
"Joy to the World," "Silent Night" and 
"Little Town of Bethlehem." Of these 
standard Christmas vehicles, only "Si- 
lent Night" is realized to the same de- 
gree as the "Gospel" tunes herein. 

I hasten to add, the material is diffi- 
cult to mold into their style. As albums 
of the Christmas variety go, this is a 



MOOD MUSIC 

■A"Ar*In a Sentimental Mood, Hugo 
Montenegro and His Orch. (Camden) 
— When you think of rain pattering on 
, your window, a warming drink in your 
hand and reflective thoughts in your 
head, this album is just the added dash 
of music to complement your solitude. 
Found here are charming melodies with 
arrangements which do them credit, and 
an unobtrusiveness rarely found among 
the current output of high-powered 
albums. 

Several classic Ellington tunes are 
done beautifully. The title tune, with its 
subtly mournful alto saxophone blanket- 
ed against choirs of strings and wood- 
t winds, sets the attitude for what fol- 
* lows. It's all highly professional and 
R tasty. "Sophisticated Lady" finds a solo 
violin singing the melody, as does the 
32 



beginning of "In My Solitude." The one 
change of character occurs on the 
overly-Latin "Lady of Spain"; this cut 
utilizes the usual paraphernalia of 
castanets, Spanish-type unamplified gui- 
tar, tambourine, etc. The rest of the 
standards — such as "My Old Flame," 
"Lady in Blue," "Sleepy Time Gal"— 
all stay in the relaxed groove of the 
other tracks. The one arrangement this 
reviewer thought most enchanting was 
the beautiful classic, "Sweet and Love- 
ly." This album is, incidentally, on RCA 
Victor's Camden label and, if I'm cor- 
rect, is their $1.98 line. If so, it's cer- 
tainly a good buy. 




CLASSICAL 

****Mozart Concertos, No. 21 in 
C, K. 467, and No. 23 in A, K. 488, 
Artur Rubinstein, pianist; Alfred Wal- 
lenstein, cond. (RCA Victor) — It ap- 
pears Artur Rubinstein has discov- 
ered the fountain of youth, if we are 
to believe our ears. Here, playing the 
music of Mozart, his years of maturity 
express themselves through his marvel- 
ous readings, but also present is the 
enigma of a youthful spirit, which is 
present and obviously also Rubinstein. 
I must confess that he has an uncanny 
knack of pointing the way to the core 
of a work. In the andante section of 
the Concerto in A Major, he has realized 
the poetic and sorrowful Mozart as 
no one else has, to my knowledge. It's 
not that he plays them in a syrupy way, 
but rather that he simply deliberates 
and is ever so conscious of dynamic 
levels. In this same work, in the finale, 
he sets not just a tempo but a pulse. 



Strangely, because of Mozart's rather 
difficult piano writing, these piano 
works sometimes are played in a "rat- 
tling-off" manner. It is a tragedy, but I 
believe recordings like this will in some- 
way rectify things. (It certainly will in- 
fluence younger pianists.) 

Wallenstein is one of the finest (and 
most under-rated) conductors in Amer- 
ica today. The orchestra — which I have 
no doubt is the Symphony of the Air, 
without name — works beautifully here 
in both roles of soloist and accompanist. 
The recording technically is first-class. 

About the genius of Mozart, one need 
only add that he was the most naturally 



RUBINSTBN 


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gifted musician-composer ever to have 
lived. Clarity is his hallmark. A clarity 
unrivaled. Lines that weave in and out 
and never tangle. Form so clear and 
meaningful that both Concertos are 
marvels of expression. 

As to my own taste, I prefer the A 
Major. This is definitely an album to 
add to your collection. 

*100th Anniversary Frederick 
Delius: Brigg Fair/ On Hearing 
the First Cuckoo in Spring/In a 
Summer Garden and Dance Rhap- 
sody No. 2, The Philadelphia Orch., 
Eugene Ormandy cond. (Columbia) — 
This album, ever so pointedly, brings to 
light the fact that Sir Thomas Beecham 
is no longer with us. When one listens 
to Mr. Ormandy's completely insensi- 
tive handling of these fragile and re- 
flective glimpses of life set to music, 
you are suddenly and overwhelmingly 
brought to re-evaluate . . . how impor- 
tant is the conductor? In this particular 



-MC-MC GREAT! 
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-MC FAIR < 
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case, whatever is Delius, the essence 
. . . the tranquility . . . the deliberation 
. . . all is skirted and skimmed over. 
This orchestra, I hasten to add, is the 
finest musical organization in the world. 
It is capable of technically bringing the 
maximum of realization to any work. 

These Delius works cry for the very 
best of dynamic playing. Their form 
resides, almost entirely, in coloristic 
and textural relief. These pieces are 
not rigidly-wrought intellectual works 
which can stand up to a mediocre read- 
ing. 

Delius's music is a highly personal 
and stylistic expression. It requires in- 




vestigation and love. The fact that it is 
structurally-weak musical expression 
should make the searching into it more 
intensive. Obviously, Mr. Ormandy did 
not discover the Delian secrets, for very 
little of what is on this album is what 
I like to think Delius is. "In a Summer 
Garden" was done horribly. 

Some of the tempos were out of 
hand. One, in particular, was so fast 
that it literally bypassed a climax which 
is possibly one of the most beautiful 
parts of the work. However, the easi- 
er places in all these pieces are con- 
ducted competently enough. They could 
play themselves. 

It's the variations of volume, rhythm 
and texture, the seeking out of Delius's 
strands of leit-motiv and making them 
prominent, that can make these works 
continue to live. That alone. 

I suggest, if Columbia Records 
would like to honor Frederick Delius, 
that they re-issue the classic Beecham 
interpretations and sell them at a dis- 



count, or make a 3-L.P. set, contain- 
ing "Appalachia," "North Country 
Sketches" and "The Mass of Life." 
This, with Beecham conjuring the re- 
activation of Delius's truths . . . this 
would be a proper honoring of Delius. 

JAZZ 

***Sonny Stitt and the Top 
Brass, Sonny Stitt; arr. and cond. by 
Tadd Dameron and Jimmy Mundy 
(Atlantic) — Sonny Stitt, though one 
of the great jazz-players, has never 
really got the credit due him. This 
album, although Sonny has some sen- 




sational moments, doesn't help much 
towards getting him that credit. Musi- 
cally, the written music doesn't hold 
up as it should. It's scant and anything 
but organic. Sonny is constantly saving 
the tracks; his solos make you forget 
how sad some of the writing on this 
album is. 

Of the better tracks, "Souls Valley" 
is the strongest. It's a root-y kind of 
blues, wrought with agitation. This is 
the one track that's up to Sonny's vital 
improvising level, in its written com- 
ponents. In spite of his bland and often 
dated settings, Sonny drives through- 
out showing his power and talent. 

The logical inheritor of the Charlie 
Parker mantle, Sonny has rarely ever 
been put into a situation where his 
talents have had a 24-karat setting. He 
is a ruby constantly surrounded by a 
rhinestone setting. Time and far-sighted 
producers of recordings, I hope, will 
one day honor his talent by presenting 
it properly. (The stars are for Sonny.) 



PIECES OF EIGHT 

• Bobby Darin quite busy producing 
recordings for his own record label. 
The Newton Brothers are one of 
Bobby's "finds." . . . Vic Dana touring 
the South Pacific. 

Mel Torme looks like he's done it 
with a single record finally. "Comin' 
Back, Back," I believe it's called. 

Bob Crewe has made it two hits in 
a row with his group, The Four Sea- 
sons. This time, it's "Big Girls Don't 
Cry." . . . Little Eva is getting mar- 
velous comment on her new album. 

Creed Taylor, of Verve Records, is 
the fella responsible for the newest 
surge, "Bossa-Nova." He produced the 
Stan Getz record of "Desafinado." . . . 
Adam Wade is getting closer and 
closer to the "Bright" circle. 

If you haven't heard the score of 
Japan's prize-winning film, "Yojimbo," 

tune in. It's the wildest! On MGM 

Timi Yuro's deejay tour has done 
wonders for this lassie. 

Capitol Records has just bought its 
way into Broadway through a fund 
which will be used for Feuer and 
Martin productions. 

Mercury A&R-man Sheldy Single- 
ton has been booted up to a vice- 
presidency. . . . Does this mean that 
Nashville is supplanting New York and 
California as the record center? 

Peter, Paul and Mary did stand- 
ing-room-only at Carnegie Hall. . . . 
Jackie Paris and his lovely and tal- 
ented wife Ann Marie working on 
their new supper-club act with dancer- 
teacher Steve Condos. 

How about that "First Family" al- 
bum on Cadence? Something else, I 
tell ya! 

Why is spoken word not getting the 
needed action? I find such albums 
priceless when done well. The com- 
panies are goofing. . . . Twist albums 
no longer come in. What can that 
mean? 

Sorry to say I received a Bobby Vee 
album and Connie Francis album, 
both Christmas vehicles, too late to re- 
view them. My regrets for not having a 
chance to salute their fine efforts. 

What do you think of a poll? Best 
singers, instrumentalists, etc. ... I t 
think it would be a good way of sum- V 
marizing each year. Let me hear from R 
you about it. . . . Till next month. 

33 



ON THE RECORD 




SINGLES 



1) Keep Your Hands off My Baby/ Where Do I Go, 

Little Eva (Dimension) — Well, Little Eva looks destined 
for one hit after another. "Keep Your Hands" is the stronger. 
"Where Do I Go" is subtler, but definitely in the running. 

2) Still Water Runs Deep/Hotel Happiness, Brook 
Benton (Mercury) — Brook will certainly have another hit 
in "Still Waters." It's a haunting melody, very much for 
today's record charts. Flip is not bad, either. 

3) The Loneliest/Beautiful Dreamer, Tony Or- 
lando (Epic) — This young lad will be one of the big record 
artists, if he can keep them coming at this strong level. 
"Loneliest," a tune also written by Tony, will get to all the 
kids. It's a sad tale, and you know how sad tales make it! 
The flip is an adapted Stephen Foster tune. 

4) Love Song from "Mutiny on the Bounty" /Theme 
from "Mutiny on the Bounty," Manuel and His Orch. 
(MGM) — The love song, which is also called "Follow Me," 
is the better side here. It is very reminiscent of "Return to 
Paradise." It's that "Archipelago" sound, unison voices, 
strings like wind and jungle drums. Flip is not strong. 

5) Zero-Zero/Night Theme, Lawrence Welk (Dot) — 
This may be the bubbler's next hit. "Zero-Zero" is a Euro- 
pean import. It has that sound. It sounds like somebody is 
even playing a comb with tissue. Well, it doesn't matter 
much how it happens, as long as it does. And it does. 

6) Kentucky Means Paradise/Truck-Driving Man, 
The Green River Boys (Capitol) — Although this record is 
very heavily leaning into the country-and-Western dept., I 
still feel it could mean something. It's awfully entertaining. 

7) Loved and Lost /Santa Claus Is Watching You, 
Ray Stevens (Mercury) — Although this was a single effort 
geared for Christmas, I think "Loved" could be a big record, 
given half a chance. On "Loved," which Ray also wrote, 
we hear "OF Ahab" singing "straight." Could be. . . . 

8) Theme from "Long Day's Journey into Night"/ 
Song from "Two for the Seesaw," Andre Previn and His 
Orch. (Columbia) — Not that this will be a hit, but I hope 
I'm entitled to some wishful thinking now and then. For 
musical reasons, I put this on the list. Both sides are in- 
teresting and "Long Day's" is a very imposing piece of 
music. Andre Previn proves he's one of Hollywood's most 
consistent conjurers of dramatic music. I like this record. 

9) Dear Hearts and Gentle People/Gotta Travel 
On, The Springfields (Philips) — The Springfields, of "Sil- 
ver Threads and Golden Needles" fame, look like they 
could sneak in with "Dear Hearts." Flip is a ? however. 

10) Turn Around/My Glory land, The Wanderers 
Three (Dolton) — These lads are the possessors of the 
sleeper record. Watch out for "Turn Around," 'cause you 
might find yourself singing it. It has that sound. "Glory- 
land" is an adaptation of the folk tune "Wayfarin' Stranger." 
It's not for the market, but its neighbor might do it. 



SPEAKING PERSONALLY 

Continued from page 27 

the war, and its successor, the Second 
World War. In the case of the Second. 
Russell felt that it had to be fought as 
Hitler "was a devil." He feels the First 
could have been avoided. 

In his ramblings, Lord Russell gives 
us short, sometimes barbed comments 
on his contemporaries. Eisenhower: "A 
silly man." Tennyson: "A fraud." 

Of course, Lord Russell's greatest 
concern now is what he feels could be 
a race toward death by the entire hu- 
man race. He thinks that though we 
have weathered power struggles in the 
past, we will not lift ourselves out of 
the ashes of this one. As a course for 
his own country, England, to follow, he 
feels that, if it may be no longer mili- 
tarily or politically strong, it can at 
least be morally strong and lead the 
"preservation" movement. First, by 
neutrality. ("If I could talk with Mac- 
millan for a week, I could convince 
him of my arguments.") 

Incidentally, Lord Russell does not 
see the "cold war" as being one of 
ideologies. In fact, he states, "if Rus- 
sia was still Czarist," the situation 
would not be altered much and pos- 
sibly be worse. Power is the reason. 

He also feels, as this reviewer defi- 
nitely does not, that Russian policy 
and attitudes have been created through 
"fear." (As a reviewer, I find a subtle 
double standard lurking in back of 
Lord Russell's policy ideas. It would 
appear, he does not always look at 
both sides of a coin with the same 
amount of intensive investigation.) 

Lord Russell, as you can see, is a 
man who holds his opinions strongly, 
no matter how seemingly unpopular 
they are. He is like Socrates of An- 
cient Greece, a gadfly. A man who 
stings us into being more than what we 
are. He asks for more understanding 
from us. He is, by the very nature of 
his life, worthy _ of our respect. I dis- 
agree strongly with some of his obser- 
vations, but his points are never with- 
out, some validity. 

You may, and it's more than prob- 
able, disagree with some of his con- 
tentions. But for myself, I would not 
be without this reco- ied dialogue. Rem- 
edies aren't easily found and the truth 
more often than not hurts. But it is fool- 
ishness to turn a deaf ear to someone 
of Russell's greatness. 



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by ARTHUR HENLEY 
with Dr. Robert L. Wolk 



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"I get along without you very well . . ." sang the ex-Mrs. George 
Montgomery on her first TV show of the season. But the words 
didn't ring true — at least not then! Variety, the show-business 
weekly, called her "nervous and self-conscious." 

If her real feelings had betrayed her in front of 35,000,000 
viewers, who could blame her? No woman can wash eighteen 
years of marriage out of her hair and her heart so quickly — not 
even Dinah Shore! 

But a few short weeks later, if Dinah had chosen to repeat that 
song, it might have been more convincing. Suddenly, she looked 
different — bouncier, zingier, younger than ever. A few short 
weeks before, some people had looked at her, remembered the 
divorce and asked, "Well, where does she go from here?" Now, 
they had the answer. Dinah was on her way to be married. It just 
had to happen. A woman like Dinah has to be married. 

Who's the man? We hope that the following will answer some 
of your questions about Dinah's new husband. We hope, too, 
it will answer some of his questions about Dinah as well. We'll 
take a long, hard look at Dinah — as a girl, a singer, a wife, a 
mother — and try to add up the facts psychologically. 

America's "first lady of the blues" first saw the light of day 
on March 1st, 1917, in the little Southern town of Winchester, 
Tennessee. Born Frances Rose — "Fanny" to her family and 
friends — -she was a skinny, homely, sickly youngster and con- 
tracted polio at the tender age of eighteen months. 

Although few, if any, scars of the affliction still remain, her 
handicap proved embarrassing to Dinah as a little girl. But 
her mother, a wise, strong-willed woman, gave her no chance 
for self-pity. "Pedal up!" she'd order sternly when Dinah had 
trouble riding her tricycle. In those years, Dinah didn't realize 
that her mother was so severe only to prevent her from using 
her disability as a psychological "crutch." She has ruefully ad- 
mitted: "I never felt that I completely measured up to what my 
mother was or what she wanted me to be." (Continued on page 75) 



Who is he ? What's he like ? Why is he the man 
Dinah must marry— or else? Don't miss this 
revealing story of a woman's search for love! 



37 



■'■ ; - 




It was a wonderful, wacky world! Every day was sunny, every night was 
moonstruck for Connie Stevens . . . while it lasted. Now a frightened, 
disconsolate little Cricket sits alone by her hearth, wondering if — and 
why— that big, bright Cinderella bubble has blown up in her face . . . 
wondering about the dark blue world around her, trying desperately to 
hold together what she fears are the broken fragments of her life. For 
Connie, it seems tragically like the harrowing, (Continued, on page 94) 






THAT 




THE LENNON SISTERS 



<«* 




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ALennon Sister without a smile is a little 
like Liz without a man — a very rare sight, 
indeed! But there they were — all three singing 
sisters — and not a tooth showing. And frankly, 
I couldn't blame them. 

They were on tour with Lawrence Welk 
and company. The dressing room was a cement 
floor; the doors were rolling metal slabs; the 
whole setup was sort of Early Quonset Hut. 
It was freezing outside — and in. 

There had been no time for dinner before 
the show and there would be no place for it 
between shows — unless you chose between 
underdone hot dogs or overdone hamburgers 
at a snack stand. So the girls did without al- 
together. Janet gnawed at cookies. Peggy made 
a bag of potato chips disappear. Kathy avoided 
everything, including the hot chocolate back- 
stage. 

As she peeled off her knee-length blue socks 
and plaid skirt and began to dress for the 
show, Kathy said, "I'm the one wlm really 
should eat. Keeping my weight up is a problem 
for me — but so is my skin. I have to avoid 
chocolate, candy, all kinds of sweets and fried 
foods, because it's bad for my face. To me, 
even the littlest blemish is a spotlight. I'm 
very self-conscious about it." 

Peggy- — who already had on the long white 
pantaloons which the girls wear in case their 
skirts fly up- — nodded. "On tour, my skin gets 
worse," she said. "Partly it's mental, because 
I hate touring. It's lonely. We're away from 
home. And it's hard work. Besides, the food's 
different, the hours are different, the air's dif- 
ferent. You don't eat properly. Don't sleep 
properly." 

"I have still another problem," said Janet, 
wriggling into a crinoline over her pantaloons. 
"I break out when I'm excited. Whenever I 
have to do a solo, my chest gets a rash." 

Kathy, who was feeling around her chin, 
sighed, "I can always tell when I'm getting 
one and I'll try to hide it by sitting like this." 
She cupped her hand over the chin. 



Because the girls are in the public eye, some 
people think they've "got it made." That they 
have no problems. Yet — not only do they have 
problems like anybody else — theirs are more 
magnified. If they sprout a strawberry on their 
gorgeous faces, a few million eyeballs focus 
on it at one shot. But they've learned to over- 
come their difficulties — and not let their dif- 
ficulties overcome them. 

Show business matures one in a fat hurry. 
There are worries, fears, insecurities, schedules, 
situations and etceteras. Besides skin problems, 
weight problems, loneliness and homesickness, 
there's the flying. The girls are deathly afraid 
of flying. They've had several close calls. But, 
since they're forced to fly, it makes for great 
strength. 

"Once, coming into San Antonio," Janet 
shuddered in retrospect, "the pilot announced 
rocky flying ahead. We'd just finished lunch 
and had to pass our trays back over our heads. 
Kathy got so sick she didn't even know what 
was happening. The tower cleared us for land- 
ing — but, coming in, we saw another plane 
unable to get off the runway. We were petri- 
fied. We couldn't gain altitude, and we some- 
how got sandwiched eight feet above a plane 
on the ground — and just thirty feet below the 
one trying to take off. Even the pilot admitted 
it was the closest he ever came to . . . well, 
anyway, it was the closest he ever came." 

Janet, in a masterpiece of understatement, 
added, "It wasn't really a very nice day for any 
of us." 

And what's their recipe for fear? They hold 
hands. They sing hymns to themselves. They 
pray. And they apply some Instant Positive 
Thinking. As Peg put it: "I say to myself when 
I'm scared, 'Now this just shows lack of faith. 
Either you believe or you don't. If you do, 
there's nothing to fear because everything's 
under God's will and He doesn't want to hurt 
any of His children.' " 

Their dressing room — the size of a walk-in 
closet — was shared by (Continued on page 89) 



by Cindy Adams 



41 



FIRST VICTIM: 
DR. BEN CASEY! 



)r. Casey's blood pressure, normally 
20 over 75, has shot up to 190 over 
00. The expression on his face is 
o ominous that it makes his usual 
cowl look like a sweet smile. 

Dr. Zorba is muttering his usual 
Ben Casey, Ben Casey" — but not 
or the usual reason. He's muttering 
ecause he can no longer speak 
learly, and his "Ben Casey, Ben 
]asey," is a call for help. 

Across town at Blair General Hos- 
ital, Dr. Kildare (normal blood 
iressure, 130 over 80; present blood 
•ressure, he won't sit still for meas- 
iring) is . . . is . . . well, we can 
tardly believe our ears! 

Dr. Gillespie is ignoring the young 
ntern, for the simple reason that he 
an't hear him; the medical chief of 
Jlair General is too apoplectic to 
lear a word. (Please turn the page) 




EPMG 






While the doctors look for a cure, 
the Beverly Hillbillies keep thinking 
of new ways to keep the fever high! 
Above: Grannie (Irene Ryan), Jed 
(Buddy Ebsen), Elly May with Big 
Jethro (Donna Douglas, Max Baer Jr.) . 



continued 

What's bugging Doctors Kildare, Casey, Zorba and 
Gillespie? The same overpowering seizure, a new, 
threatening fever for which they have no cure: The 
contagious Beverly Hillbillies epidemic. 

As scientists, the good doctors depend on charts, 
graphs and precise measurements for their diagnoses 
of disorders, and as scientists, therefore, they were 
amazed and dismayed when they examined the Na- 
tional Nielsen Report — by which networks, sponsors 
and actors judge the relative popularity of TV shows 
— and found that something called "The Beverly Hill- 
billies" was suddenly the most popular television pro- 
gram in the United States. It had taken only five brief 
weeks for the fever to climb to the Number One spot. 

And then, perhaps even as you and I, the doctors 
held a top-level medical consultation during which 
they asked the highly unscientific questions: "What 
in the heck are the Beverly Hillbillies? Why is the 
public so susceptible to this epidemic? What, if any- 
thing, can we do about it?" (Placid Perry Como, 
whose own show is on in the same time slot oppo- 
site the Hillbillies, paced restlessly up and down the 
corridor outside the consultation room, waiting for 
the diagnosis-prognosis. After all, Casey and Kildare 
had merely slipped in the ratings, but he was getting 
clobbered — by both "The Beverly Hillbillies" and 
"The Dick Van Dyke Show," which follows right after 
it in the second half-hour.) (Continued on page 100) 






44 



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a visit home brings a hundred memories: 





With boyhood pals Joey Forman and Bernie Rich, Eddie sought out his early roots in South Philadelphia. 
He'd had such dreams here, when they were kids, he mused ... as he sat in front of his old apartment 
at 2524 South 5th Street (below). He'd been so poor then, in material things . . . but as Bernie's father 
embraced him (right), Eddie remembered how rich those days had been — in everything that really counted! 





continued 

How had he sinned? . . . Where had he failed? . . . Whom had he failed? . . . Eddie Fisher 
agonized for many months in silence after his farewell to Liz. He ducked reporters — even 
when they were old friends. But when I finally saw him I knew, almost from the minute we 
sat down together, that he was ready to talk at last, that he had found his answers. . . . 
My interview with Eddie was in New York City's renowned Winter Garden, where he was 
passing a new milestone in his lifework. He was engaged in pure and unadulterated singing. 
It was his voice which had made Eddie Fisher a great star of radio, (Please turn the page) 



46 





II V 



IF A MAN GIVES UP HIS IDENTITY, HE'S IN AN AWFUL LOT OF TROUBLE 




m 





A 



the old faces... the old places: 
I DON! UNDERSTAND WHAT'S HAPPENED TO ME... 3 




continued 

television and records in the earlier 
stages of his career when girls swirled 
and swooned every time Eddie crooned. 

Then, as we all know, came his mar- 
riage to Liz Taylor — and the almost im- 
mediate nose-dive of his popularity as a 
singer. 

Perhaps the scandal attendant upon 
his abrupt and seemingly cruel divorce 
from Debbie Reynolds was the biggest 
contributing factor to his loss of esteem 
in the eyes of the public. There's no 
question that many wrote off the sweet, 
unaffected young man they had thought 
he was. 

But more significantly, I think, Eddie 
just seemed to have lost it — call it the 
voice, call it the melody, call it the tune, 
call it anything. {Continued on page 78) 



Mr. and Mrs. Bendroff greeted him 
with a warmth years couldn't change. 





This was Forman's Candy Store — 



The chocolate cherry sodas at Levy's — once Eddie's favorite hangout — were just as good as ever. 



48 




THE CHANGE IN ME 




Good old fire hydrant! It gave Eddie and Bernie 
a cooling shower on many a hot day in the past! 



lere Eddie worked as a soda jerk. Now, he and Joey could only clown outside. 



Friendly hellos— cutting up at Ruby Gold's barbershop — the playground at Thomas Junior High. Could Eddie find his answers here? 

Oh 




It happened so close to the spot where Ernie 
Kovacs had had his life snuffed out ... so 
close to the same Dead Man's Curve that you 
might almost think Death had made an ap- 
pointment to claim Dick Van Dyke's life, too. 
And yet . . . "Why am I alive?" Dick kept re- 
peating over the long-distance phone. "Why? 
That's what I ask myself every minute of the 
day. I should be dead. I'll never know how I 
got out of it with my life . . ." Dick's voice 
choked and faded as he talked. His reaction 
to that intimately close brush with death was 
so taut and tense, I could feel it over the hum- 
ming wires — even 3,000 miles away, in New 

York. "It *WaS a [Continued on page 92) 





Why was 

Dick Van Dyke spared? 

We urge you to read his answer 

and to remember it - 

it could mean the difference 

between life and death for 

someone you love! 



k 




51 




The tall-tall man with a body like a giant question-mark and a face 
like a relief map of Colorado (all peaks and crags and gullies) folded himself 
into the chair opposite me. We were there to talk about ghosts, and even 
though Raymond Massey may be Dr. Gillespie — Dr. Kildare's doctor — he 
was not about to pooh-pooh these haunts with scientific explanations. 
Raymond Massey has lived with ghosts for too long. He knows they're real. 

He has been fighting ghosts — his own and other people's, including 
Richard Chamberlain's — for a long time. Looking back, he thinks it 
probably began when, like many young men during World War I, he sailed 
off to Europe to "get in on the excitement," convinced it would be a 
"romantic adventure"! But, as a lieutenant in the Canadian Field Artillery 
at Ypres, France, he soon discovered war can be dull. Digging trenches 
is not adventurous. Being buried in dirt churned up by enemy mortar 
fire is not romantic — especially when it happens several times a week. 

Then, one day in 1916, young Massey also discovered war is hell. 
A German shell came through the roof of his shelter — killing a major, 
badly wounding another officer, and "clobbering three of us." Massey was 
wounded in the hand and arm, and suffered from shell shock. For 
months, he lay in a hospital near death, before recovering completely. 

The ghost of Massey the would-be hero never recovered. But this is not 
the one that haunted him. That was to come later. Once out of the 
hospital, Ray was sent to Siberia as a member of (Please turn the page) 




54 



story about a man who couldn't be bad-Raymond Massey! 







9 



The tall-tall man with a body like a giant question-mark and a face 
like a relief map of Colorado (all peaks and crags and gullies) folded himself 
into the chair opposite me. We were there to talk about ghosts, and even 
though Raymond Massey may be Dr. Gillespie— Dr. Kildare's doctor— he 
was not about to pooh-pooh these haunts with scientific explanations 
Raymond Massey has lived with ghosts for too long. He knows they're real 

K^TrTl f f ting gh ° StS - his own and *her people's, including 
Richard Chamberla,n's-for a long time. Looking back, he thinks it 
probably began when, like many young men during World War I, he sailed 
off to Europe to "get in on the excitement/' convinced it would be a 

romantic adventure"! But, as a lieutenant in the Canadian Field Artillerv 
at Ypres, France, he soon discovered war can be du.l. Digging t enc 
■s not adventurous. Being buried in dirt churned up by enemy mortar 

Tn :;r ™r ally r jt happens --"ii 

badly wounding another officer, and "clobbering 7 ^ ma '° r ' 
wounded in the hand and arm. and sTj VlZ I ho" £"* *" 
months, he lay in a hospital near death h.i„ ' 

The ghost of Massey the woo d rhe„„? ,eC0,e " n6 '^^ 
.he one tha, haunted L. T^ZZ^^T* *"' "* " "« 
nospital. Kay was sen, to Sihetia as a n^Er^ ^ 



SOL 



host story about a man who couldn't be bad-Raymond Massey! 



continued 

the Canadian Expeditionary Force sup- 
porting the White Russians against the 
Bolsheviks, after the Armistice. "Every- 
one forgot about us," he recalls. "We 
were rotting." There was no U.S.O., no 
Bob Hope, no visiting entertainers. 

The commanding general— having 
heard that Massey had put on a skit 
on the boat coming over ("I liked to 
show off," Massey admits) — called in 
the young lieutenant and snapped, "I 
want you to put on a show for the 
troops in two weeks. That's an order!" 
And, two weeks later to the day, Ca- 
nadian, American, English, Japanese 
and Czech soldiers packed the officers' 
ness hall to see the minstrel show 
Massey had assembled. 

"There were songs, tap dances and 
skits. Lots of corn, and all pretty raw. 
The language barrier didn't matter. 
Most of what we did was visual, and 
dirty jokes are the same in any lan- 
guage." Raw — crude — dirty: It didn't 
matter. The soldiers, starved for enter- 
tainment, gorged themselves and then 
yelled for more. "The bug really bit 
ne then," Massey confesses. And. this 
time, he never really recovered. 

But his father also saw ghosts on the 
itage — most unwelcome ones! "We 
were very Methodist and my uncle was 
a bishop." Ray says. His father was 
haunted by the firm belief that there 
was something irreligious about actors 
and acting, but finally gave his reluc- 
tant consent — so long as Ray "didn't 
rehearse on the Sabbath." 

Massey's romantic ideas about show 
business were soon shattered. He went 
to England and applied for work at 
twenty-eight stage doors, and twenty- 
eight stage doors were slammed shut 
in his face. Then stage door twenty- 
nine opened for him. The play was 
Eugene O'Neill's "In the Zone," and 
Massey's American accent made him 
a natural. There followed ten years of 
steady theatrical employment as actor, 
director and manager. All the ghosts 
seemed laid to rest — particularly, on 
that night in 1924 when he opened in 
the world premiere of George Bernard 
Shaw's "Saint Joan." As he took cur- 
tain call after curtain call, there in the 
audience — applauding along with the 
others — was his father! 

It was playwright Robert Sherwood 
who introduced Ray to his longest-lived 
ghost when he brought him to Broad- 
day for the title role of his play, "Abe 
Lincoln in Illinois." As one writer re- 
corded it, "Raymond Massey took the 
face of Lincoln off the penny and put 
it into the hearts of millions of Ameri- 
cans." He played the Lincoln role on 
Broadway for two seasons, starred in 
the national tour and repeated the part 
in the film version. 

From then on, millions of people 
were sure that Raymond Massey was 
Abraham Lincoln. He couldn't order a 
drink in a bar without inviting a super- 
patriotic admonition that "Lincoln 
wouldn't do that." He couldn't walk 
down the street without someone com- 
ing up to him and saying, "Stay away 
from Ford's Theater." or "Don't sit in 
a box tonight!" 
i-o The question now became: What 



will they let you do, after the public 
insists you're Abe Lincoln? Or, as 
Massey himself said some years back, 
"Once you've trod the boards in Lin- 
coln's shoes, you cannot abdicate so 
easily." 

Massey could joke about his identi- 
fication with Lincoln, he could try to 
walk away from the image the public 
had of him as Lincoln, but the shadow 
of Lincoln stuck close to his heels. 
Oh, he worked all right, but the ghost 
of Honest Abe diminished the number 
— and the importance — of the roles he 
was called upon to play. 

The low point in Massey's career 
came about four or five years ago. 
"That's when there were more dull 
patches than bright spots," he con- 
fesses. "Life is like a fever chart, and 
the reading on mine was subnormal. 
Every actor, no matter how old he is, is 
convinced that his present job will be 
his last one. But I was sure of it. My 
age made me difficult to cast — it's a 
myth that there are lots of juicy roles 
for older men. Besides, they had to pay 
me more." 

But the fever chart was rising again 
— he was in constant demand for TV 
guest shots — when Norman Felton, ex- 
ecutive producer, and David Victor, 
producer, of "Dr. Kildare," contacted 
him and offered him the role of Leonard 
Gillespie, senior staff physician of Blair 
General Hospital. He wasn't sure that 
he should accept: He'd have to make 
the public forget Lionel Barrymore, 
who had played the same part in thir- 
teen "Kildare" movies; he'd have to 
breathe new life into the stereotyped 
role of the gruff old doctor; he'd have 
to cut out almost all other work. 

But the factors that finally made 
him say "yes" were his realization that 
"you don't get many chances to do nice, 
intelligently conceived characters at 
my age" and his delight over working 
with Dick Chamberlain again: "I'd 
done a Hitchcock with Dick and was 
very impressed." Impressed by Dick's 
ability as a performer, impressed by the 
fact that Dick wasn't a method actor. 
"Give me someone I can play scenes 
with!" 

After accepting the part, he still had 
a problem. "I needed some basis for 
the character I was to play," Massey 
says, "some pattern that would give 
Gillespie constancy and continuity. A 
model, if you will. So I looked into my 
own life and discovered one." 

His model was a woman, Dr. Sara 
Jordan of the Lahey Clinic in Boston, 
whom he'd consulted when he suffered 
from gall-bladder trouble in the '30s. 

"When they wheeled me into that x- 
ray room in Boston, I was scared. There 
I was, upside down in a vague red 
darkness, wondering if they'd catch me 
if I jumped up and bolted down the 
hall, when suddenly this beautifully- 
dressed queen wearing big rubber 
gloves came in and smiled at me. A 
delicate, gray-haired queen with a re- 
assuring smile. That was Dr. Jordan. 

"Yes, Sara's been quite an inspira- 
tion to me, though her death was tragic. 
She diagnosed herself too late. Can- 
cer. She was just too busy taking care 
of and healing others." 



The other inspiration in Massey's 
life is his wife for the past twenty-three 
years, Dorothy Ludington Whitney 
Massey, a former corporation lawyer. 
(He was previously married to Peggy 
Fremantle and to English actress 
Adrianne Allen, and he is the father 
of two sons and one daughter.) 

"My wife knows more about my 
business than I do. She's the smartest 
woman in the world, and that makes 
her the smartest human being in the 
world. All women are smarter than 
men. 

"How is she smart? Well, she was 
smart enough to ask me to get her 
some chicken at a cocktail party — 
that's when we first met. 'Are you go- 
ing to come back?' she asked me. 'Yes,' 
I answered. I guess the fact that I did 
bring it back sort of helped our ro- 
mance." 

On the set, Ray does some haunting 
of his own — as a practical joker. 

In one scene, Dick Chamberlain was 
seen in a showdown confrontation with 
veteran actor George Voskovec. As 
Massey explains it, "I had just done a 
little bit of Lincoln in MGM's 'How the 
West Was Won' and had come over to 
the 'Kildare' set while Dick and George 
were playing their big, four-and-a-half 
minute scene. 

"I ducked in back of some scenery 
and then, just as Dick and George were 
going at it hot and heavy, I entered the 
back of the lab and walked slowly to- 
wards them — or, rather, Abe (I had on 
my Lincoln wig and full makeup) 
walked towards them. 

"Voskovec looked up, saw me, but 
didn't bat an eye. And he didn't drop a 
line. But Dick thought he'd seen a ghost 
and blew higher than a kite!" 

Jokes or no jokes, patience or no pa- 
tience, smile or no smile, Massey will 
continue to be identified with the parts 
he plays. That's the penalty he pays for 
never giving a bad performance. So 
long as Dr. Gillespie keeps operating 
on the TV screen, people will be com- 
ing up to Raymond Massey on the street 
and begging him, "Doctor, I know you 
can help me — even if those other doc- 
tors have the nerve to tell me nothing's 
wrong!" 

It's long been said that the surest 
best-seller in the world would be titled 
"Lincoln's Doctor's Dog," because peo- 
ple worship Lincoln, idolize doctors and 
love dogs. Well, Ray has played both 
Lincoln and Dr. Gillespie and — since he 
couldn't be bad if he tried — he could 
undoubtedly play a dog so convincingly 
that people would stop on the street to 
pat his head and give him a biscuit! 

One indication of what could happen 
has already taken nlace in Hollywood. 
In "Dr. Kildare," Massey keeps a pho- 
to of his wife and dog on his desk. And 
recently, when the actor was taking the 
dog for a walk, a woman ran up, knelt 
down and oohed, "Why . . . why . . . 
you're Dr. Gillespie's dog!" Then, look- 
ing up at the tall-tall man who hovered 
over them, she squealed, "And you must 
be Dr. Gillespiel" — Jae Lyle 

"Dr. Kildare" is seen over NBC-TV, 
Thurs.. from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m.. est. 




ESI LOSES LUCY! 










Lucy subtracts Desi from Desilu! Here's how she did it— and why! 



The announcement that Desi was out caught 
Hollywood offguard. There hadn't been so 
much as a whisper of warning, and most peo- 
ple were still smacking their lips over what 
seemed a delicious triangle — Lucy Ball with 
a present husband and a past husband . . . and 
both of them often present at the same time 
and place: The rehearsals for her TV show! 
Then, in terse newspaper paragraphs, they 
read the news: 

Desi Arnaz had resigned as president and 
director of Desilu Productions, Inc. 

Miss Ball was elected the new president by 
the board of directors. 

Miss Ball announced that she would buy 
the 300,350 shares of stock owned by Desi at 
a price "considerably in excess of the current 
market value." 

Miss Ball would thus own fifty-two percent 
of the company's stock. She was now officially 
the big boss. 

Thus was "finis" written to the corporation 
Lucy and Desi had formed back in 1954, the 
corporation which, for a time, comprised the 
largest TV studio in the world. It was a studio 
about which Desi, in happier times, once said, 
"I'll never give it up. It is like a baby to me." 
And, in truth, for several years nothing ever 
went out of the organization without Desi put- 
ting his fine Cuban hand to it. 

Why then the breakup? Is it because of 
Lucy's marriage to Gary Morton, which un- 
doubtedly upset Desi's Latin pride? Or is it 
because Desi himself now plans marriage to 
Edie Mack Hirsch, wealthy socialite-horse- 
woman? Or was it the dwindling profits of 
the past two years, when Lucy was absent 
from TV and Desi was unable to come up 
with a show that could fill the vacuum? 

With the opening of the new season, Desi's 
nose, it is said, was further put out of joint 



when Lucy made a triumphant return to the 
studio with another hit show. Certain observers 
advanced the opinion that Desi did not seem 
to share the general joy of Lucy's new success. 
Some felt his pride as an entertainer was hurt 
and that even the prospect of new big profits 
did not salve his wounds. 

Another theory — perhaps only an educated 
guess — holds that, in the course of recent 
years, Desi's interests have swerved radically 
away from show business. His almost daily ap- 
pearance at the race tracks or the casinos of 
Las Vegas had been noted. It was also whis- 
pered that Desi was drinking more than he 
should. The problems and pressures of run- 
ning a major multi-million-dollar operation 
seemed to weigh heavily on him. He seldom 
smiled. 

In the past few weeks, since his exit as 
president of Desilu, there has been a remark- 
able change in Desi's manner. He seems more 
like the old Desi, full of "joie de vivre," a 
twinkle in his eyes, a joke on his lips. A load 
seems to have dropped from his shoulders. 
And Lucy, even with her new responsibilities, 
also seems more carefree. 

There are a number of reasons for these 
changes. As early as two years ago, when the 
air was thick with news of their looming di- 
vorce, one fact went largely unnoticed. The 
Desilu empire had slipped badly since "I Love 
Lucy" closed shop. By the end of another year, 
Desi had quarreled wtih Martin Leeds, an ex- 
ecutive vice-president and a bulwark of the 
studio, and had bought him out. Two new 
shows, trotted out with much fanfare — "Guest- 
ward Ho" and "Harrigan and Son" — had sunk 
like rocks in the sea. The sound stages that 
had boasted thirteen solid hits — like "The 
Texan" and "The Ann Sothern Show" — were 
darkened and only "The (Continued on page 102) 



What will the new split with Desi 
mean to Gary Morton? Lucy's an- 
swer to that one shows just how well 
the redhead has learned her lesson! 



9 



58 




ittv f cu-ztcttit nuo tci*/ «cu rtc» tcoaun 



58 



* 



Lucy subtracts Desi from Desilu! Here's how she did it-and why! 



The announcement that Desi was out caught 
Hollywood offguard. There hadn't been so 
much as a whisper of warning, and most peo- 
ple were still smacking their lips over what 
seemed a delicious triangle — Lucy Ball with 
a present husband and a past husband . . . and 
both of them often present at the same time 
and place: The rehearsals for her TV show! 
Then, in terse newspaper paragraphs, they 
read the news: 

Desi Arnaz had resigned as president and 
director of Desilu Productions, Inc. 

Miss Ball was elected the new president by 
the board of directors. 

Miss Ball announced that she would buy 
the 300,350 shares of stock owned by Desi at 
a price "considerably in excess of the current 
market value." 

Miss Ball would thus own fifty-two percent 
of the company's stock. She was now officially 
the big boss. 

Thus was "finis" written to the corporation 
Lucy and Desi had formed back in 1954, the 
corporation which, for a time, comprised the 
largest TV studio in the world. It was a studio 
about which Desi, in happier times, once said, 
"I'll never give it up. It is like a baby to me." 
And, in truth, for several years nothing ever 
went out of the organization without Desi put- 
ting his fine Cuban hand to it. 

Why then the breakup? Is it because of 
Lucy's marriage to Gary Morton, which un- 
doubtedly upset Desi's Latin pride? Or is it 
because Desi himself now plans marriage to 
Edie Mack Hirsch, wealthy socialite-horse- 
woman? Or was it the dwindling profits of 
the past two years, when Lucy was absent 
from TV and Desi was unable to come up 
with a show that could fill the vacuum? 

With the opening of the new season, Desi's 
nose, it is said, was further put out of joint 



when Lucy made a triumphant return to the 
studio with another hit show. Certain observers 
advanced the opinion that Desi did not seem 
to share the general joy of Lucy's new success. 
Some felt his pride as an entertainer was hurt 
and that even the prospect of new big profits 
did not salve his wounds. 

Another theory — perhaps only an educated 
guess — holds that, in the course of recent 
years, Desi's interests have swerved radically 
away from show business. His almost daily ap- 
pearance at the race tracks or the casinos of 
Las Vegas had been noted. It was also whis- 
pered that Desi was drinking more than he 
should. The problems and pressures of run- 
ning a major multi-million-dollar operation 
seemed to weigh heavily on him. He seldom 
smiled. 

In the past few weeks, since his exit as 
president of Desilu, there has been a remark- 
able change in Desi's manner. He seems more 
like the old Desi, full of "joie de vivre," a 
twinkle in his eyes, a joke on his lips. A load 
seems to have dropped from his shoulders. 
And Lucy, even with her new responsibilities, 
also seems more carefree. 

There are a number of reasons for these 
changes. As early as two years ago, when the 
air was thick with news of their looming di- 
vorce, one fact went largely unnoticed. The 
Desilu empire had slipped badly since "I Love 
Lucy" closed shop. By the end of another year, 
Desi had quarreled wtih Martin Leeds, an ex- 
ecutive vice-president and a bulwark of the 
studio, and had bought him out. Two new 
shows, trotted out with much fanfare— "Guest- 
ward Ho" and "Harrigan and Son"— had sunk 
like rocks in the sea. The sound stages that 
had boasted thirteen solid hits— like "The 
Texan" and "The Ann Sothern Show"— were 
darkened and only "The (Continued on page 102) 



What will the new split with Desi 
mean to Gary Morton? Lucy's an- 
swer to that one shows just how well 
the redhead has learned her lesson! 



58 




Ive got it... whatever it is," 

George Maharis said 
through clenched teeth. 

"Even the doctors 

don't know right now, 

bnt they're trying to find out. 

But, believe me, 

I'm not faking . . . 

Tm really sick. 

Who the hell knows . . . 



• 99 



I may even die. 



(Continued on page 96) 



YOU 

DON'T 

HAVE TO 

BE A 



HP 

■■Hi 






Honeymooning is a state of mind — 
and heart. Just ask Sue Ann Langdon, 
who kept two honeymoons going at 
the same time when she was Jackie 
Gleason's wife in his "Honeymooners" 
skits on CBS -TV — and the brand-new 
real-life wife of a handsome actor- 



m 



t 




Avoid the June rush-start your honeymoon now! Sue Ann Langdon shows you how 



Sue Ann gets into that bridal mood 
with a perfumed bubble bath, then slips 
into a white negligee that's guaranteed 
to tickle him pink! Next comes a thor- 
ough face cleansing. Tip: Scoop the 
cream out with the back of your hand 
to avoid getting it under your nails. 



The bridal look — and this year's big 
beauty news, too — is pink and white. 
Sue Ann starts with a rosy foundation, 
then just a blush of rouge. The finish- 
ing touch and the finished look come 
from the lightest dusting of powder 
that she applies with a fluffy puff. 



The mouth that whispers "I love you" 
should be perfect. Sue Ann believes a 
lipstick brush is a must for that — 
rest a finger on your chin for a steady 
hand. Sue Ann uses true red to outline 
a curvy bow, then fills in with lighter 
color. For a luscious finish, lipgloss. 




"':'"• 



I 



...TO 

GO ON 



HONEY 
MOON! 



writer. Now she's off to the movies 
for "Honeymoonshine" ! How does she 
do it? "It's easy," says Sue Ann. 
"Just act like a bride." Another tip: 
Think like one. Take a long look at 
your man and remember all the good 
reasons that first made vou love him! 



■■■'■■■< 



to look like a bride— and feel like one— in a beauty story that may change your life! 



To put love-light in her eyes — and 
his — Sue Ann draws an eyeline along 
the base of her lashes. Next, she dark- 
ens her lashes with black mascara. 
Says Sue Ann : "I think blondes should 
always have dark eyes." She uses brown 
pencil to give brows a graceful arch. 



Sue Ann keeps her head — and beauti- 
fully. She brushes vigorously before 
combing, uses the brush again to coax 
the last wave in place. Next step: A 
light mist of hair spray. Her hair 
is baby fine, so she uses milk ("Yes. 
milk!" I as a rinse for extra body. 



Final (and vital) touch — perfume and 
plenty of it, behind her knees, on her 
wrists, under her nose. '"I like to 
smell it, too." she smiles. Now all 
that's left to do is turn the music on 
and the lights down. Then the stage is 
set for a life-long happy honeymoon. 

Negligee by Odette Barsa 



HSnEBTTaCTT- 



'■ >'*« 



■-.*■■«';■'•'' 



YOU 






.TO 
GO ON 



Honeymooning is a state of mind — 
and heart. Just ask Sue Ann Langdon. 
dio kept two honeymoons going at 
the same time when she was Jackie 
Gleason's wife in his "Honeymooners" 
skits on CBS-TV — and the brand-new 
real-life wife of a handsome actor- 



HONEY- 
MOON! 



writer. Now she's off to the movies 
for "Honeymoonshine"! How docs she 
do it? "It's easy." says Sue Ann. 
"Just act like a bride." Another tip: 
Think like one. Take a long look at 
your man and remember all the good 
reasons that first made you love him! 



Avoid the June rush-start your honeymoon now! Sue Ann Langdon shows you how 



Sue Ann gets into that bridal mood 
with a perfumed bubble bath, then slips 
into a white negligee that's guaranteed 
to tickle him pink! Next comes a thor- 
ough face cleansing. Tip: Scoop the 
cream out with the back of your hand 
to avoid getting it under your nails. 



The bridal look — and this year's big 
beauty news, too— is pink and white. 
Sue Ann starts with a rosy foundation, 
then just a blush of rouge. The finish- 
ing touch and the finished look come 
from the lightest dusting of powder 
that she applies with a fluffy puff. 




The mouth that whispers "I love you" 
should be perfect. Sue Ann believes a 
lipstick brush is a must for thai- 
rest a finger on your chin for a steady 
hand. Sue Ann uses true red to outline 
a curvy bow, then fills in with lighter 
color. For a luscious finish, lipgloss. 



to look like a bride— and feel like one— in a beauty story that may change your life! 



To put love-light in her eyes — and 
his — Sue Ann draws an eyeline along 
the base of her lashes. Next, she dark- 
ens her lashes with black mascara. 
Says Sue Ann: "I think blondes should 
always have dark eyes." She uses brown 
pencil lo give brows a graceful arch. 



Sue Ann keeps her head — and beauti- 
fully. She brushes vigorously before 
combing, uses the brush again to coax 
the last wave in place. Next step: A 
light mist of hair spray. Her hair 
is baby fine, so she uses milk ("Yes, 
milk!") as a rinse for extra body. 



Final land vital I touch — perfume and 
plenty of it, behind her knees, on her 
wrists, under her nose. "I like to 
smell it, too," she smiles. Now all 
that's left to do is turn the music on 
and the lights down. Then the stage is 
set for a life-long happy honeymoon. 

Negligee by Odette Barsa 





WHY BOB 



HAS TO LEAVE 




IS WIFE AGAIN and again and am 



"Home is a nice place to visit — but I wouldn't want to live there!" 

That's what Bob Hope said jokingly on one of his recent TV shows. But, even 
though the line was delivered strictly as a gag, a few in the audience couldn't 
help wondering whether there wasn't a grain of truth in it. 

After all — isn't Bob Hope always leaving home? In the past six months alone, 
he's spent days or weeks in Seattle, Las Vegas, Banff, New York, Korea, Thai- 
land and Viet Nam— and months in merrie olde England. His brother told me, 
"Every time Bob comes home, he has to be introduced to his family." 

I talked to Bob himself, plus many of the people around him — including his 
wife, who turned out to know him quite well — in order to learn just why Bob 
keeps leaving home so often that he makes a Fuller Brush Man look like Alice- 
Sit-by-the-Fire. 

In the course of my investigations, I was surprised to learn that: 

(1) Bob has been leaving home regularly since he was old enough to walk. 

(2) There's something about Bob's trips that the public completely misunder- 
stands. 

(3) In a way, Bob's wife is glad that he can take these trips! 

I started by talking to George Hope, Bob's younger brother, who now works 
for him. "It's in his blood to travel," George told me. "When we were kids in 
Cleveland, Bob thought nothing of hopping on a freight train and taking off. 
Our mother was always looking for him. But when he got hungry, he came home 
. . . and fast! 

"We were always a close-knit family, though, just as Bob and his own family 
are today." He grinned. "Of course, he didn't know he had four children until 
his son Tony graduated from Georgetown last summer and Bob was invited 
there to accept a degree. He took one look at Tony and said, 'You're my son? 
With an education, yet?' " 

Then George added, "Seriously, Bob keeps on the go even when he's at home. 
He hates to sit still. He'll shoot billiards, play golf, take a walk, work on a book, 
go fishing, go swimming, do a benefit. He's always 'on' (Continued on page 86) 

In a rare and exclusive series of interviews, 
we get Bob's side of it— and Dolores's, too! 



65 




HIS WIFE AGAIN and again and a J 



"Home is a Dice place to visit-but I wouldn't want to live there!" 

That's what Bob Hope said jokingly on one of his recent TV shows But even 
though the line was delivered strictly as a gag, a few in the audience couldnl 
help wondering whether there wasn't a grain of truth in it. 

After all-iWt Bob Hope always leaving home? In the past six months alone, 
he's spent days or weeks in Seattle, Las Vegas, Banff, New York, Korea, Thai- 
land and Viet Nam— and months in merrie olde England. His brother told me, 
"Every time Bob comes home, he has to be introduced to his family." 

I talked to Bob himself, plus many of the people around him— including his 
wife, who turned out to know him quite well— in order to learn just why Bob 
keeps leaving home so often that he makes a Fuller Brush Man look like Alice- 
Sit-by-the-Fire. 

In the course of my investigations, I was surprised to learn that: 

(1) Bob has been leaving home regularly since he was old enough to walk. 

(2) There's something about Bob's trips that the public completely misunder- 
stands. 

(3) In a way, Bob's wife is glad that he can take these trips! 

I started by talking to George Hope, Bob's younger brother, who now works 
for him. "It's in his blood to travel," George told me. "When we were kids in 
Cleveland, Bob thought nothing of hopping on a freight train and taking off. 
Our mother was always looking for him. But when he got hungry, he came home 
. . . and fast! 

"We were always a close-knit family, though, just as Bob and his own family 
are today." He grinned. "Of course, he didn't know he had four children until 
his son Tony graduated from Georgetown last summer and Bob was invited 
there to accept a degree. He took one look at Tony and said, 'You're my son? 
With an education, yet?' " 

Then George added, "Seriously, Bob keeps on the go even when he's at home. 
He hates to sit still. He'll shoot billiards, play golf, take a walk, work on a book, 
go fishing, go swimming, do a benefit He's always 'on' (Continued on page 86) 

In a rare and exclusive series of interviews, 
we get Bob's side of it -and Dolores's, too! 




A ." 



c c 
I 




it. 



vo id in 



* 














tl 







I 






67 




fc#p 




How much should Faye Koda (Chase Crosley) 
reveal to Lisha (Patty McCormack) about her 
birth? Did she wait too long to tell the truth? 



A doctor looks at TVs daytime dramas and tells you what you can 



68 




Tmo tragic questions have haunted Jerry and Tracer 
Malone (William Prince and Augusta Dabney): Did 
she fail him — as a wife— by giving birth to a baby- 
like Jonathan? Was he right — as doctor or husband — 
in concealing the child's true condition from her? 



) 



\ 







by ARTHUR HENLEY with Dr. ROBERT L.WOLK 

To most people, the birth of a baby is a "blessed event." Unfortunately, this happy phrase doesn't 
always apply. Children are sometimes born imperfect . . . illegitimate ... or simply unwanted! 
In such cases, are they more likely to weaken or strengthen a marriage? Are they — and their 
parents — foredoomed to unhappiness? Let's take a revealing look at the popular NBC-TV daytime 
drama, "Young Doctor Malone." By considering Jerry and Tracey Malone and their family as 
real people — with real problems — Dr. Wolk and I may find some surprising answers to these 
questions which can help viewers in their own lives! As usual, my remarks (Continued on page 84 j 



learn about yourself from them. This month- Young Doctor Malone" 









They had known love before -both Andy Prine and 
Lynn Loring. But never like this . . . Never before 
the sea-salted kiss that tasted like drowning . . . 
Never before the foaming waves that washed away 
all thoughts of tomorrow. And never again -they 
both knew that. Whatever (Please turn the page) 



■ 





Whatever happened, Andy Prine and Lynn Loring would know that, at this moment, 



happened, they both knew there would never again 
be a moment of love quite like this. 

It was a brief moment. Soon each would be re- 
membering the past pain of other loves . . . and 
forgetting that — whatever the pain — if you run away 
from love, you may lose even the hope of it. 

Andy Prine had met Lynn Loring several months 
before at a Hollywood party. He hadn't even wanted 
to go, but his agent convinced him some important 
people would be there. So, dutifully, Andy went. 



But he never got past the entrance. Lynn was 
standing in the hallway. 

They spent the evening right there, talking about 
their work. When the party was over, Andy said, 
"Why don't we talk about this some more over lunch 
. . . someday?" That was on a Friday. 

On Monday, he called. 

And all this time Lynn thought: He's very nice, but 
he's only interested in business. So, when he called, 
she told him she had to work, but they could have 



72 




they held love in their arms ... at this moment, they tasted life's sweetest promise 



lunch at her studio, if he wanted. Then she forgot 
about it. Forgot even to leave a pass for him to get 
into the studio. That was the first time she saw him 
angry. But he calmed down and they had lunch and 
he said, "Where do you want to go for dinner to- 
night?" She answered, "I don't care. You decide." 
And just like that, without any real spoken agree- 
ment, their romance began. 

But . . . 

"We're both playing it cool," Andy kept insisting. 



"We don't want to get entangled," he explained. 

"There's no reason for us to get deeply involved," 
Lynn insisted, just as strongly. "That's the impor- 
tant thing." 

And, underneath every word, both seemed to say: 
But we are involved . . . and we're afraid of it. 

Andy Prine and Lynn Loring have good reason to 
be afraid. He's already scarred by a marriage of six 
weeks' duration, and she's had a broken engagement. 
Andy's parents were both (Continued on page 90) 



73 




"Proportioned ? 
How?" 






Proportioned in width and depth as well as length. 

Yes, now Kotex napkins come in 4 proportioned sizes 
so you can select the one that meets your special needs. 

Each has the new moisture-proof shield. 

That's why nothing protects quite like Kotex. 



Which proportioned Kotex napkin protects you best? 




REGULAR JUNIOR SLENDERLINE SUPER 

Medium width, Regular length and Narrowest, deepest, Regular length, 

depth and length depth— less width shorter than Regular deeper, wider 



KOTEX and SLENDERLINE are registered trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Corporation. 



Now more than ever, Kotex is confidence. 



DINAH SHORE 

(Continued from page 37) 

Looking at Dinah today, her new 
husband might find it hard to believe 
that, during her growing years, Dinah 
was often overshadowed by her older, 
brilliant sister Bessie. Or, that, on reach- 
ing dating age, her lack of prettiness 
was a problem to Dinah. "The boys I 
liked didn't even seem to notice me," 
she once remarked. "Only the ones I 
didn't care for seemed to want to date 
me." 

Dinah's father, a Russian immigrant 
and rabbi's grandson, ran a small de- 
partment store which prospered despite 
occasional bursts of anti-Semitism 
leveled at the family. Unlike his much 
younger wife, he believed in saving for 
the future. As Dinah has expressed it. 
"Mother wanted us to have everything 
right now. Daddy wanted us to have it 
— but later." 

She was always torn between her 
desires to please both parents — her 
serious-minded dad who wanted her to 
study hard, and her ambitious mom 
who favored a singing career. What- 
ever their differences, her mom nearly 
always won out. In fact, when she died 
of a heart attack in her early forties, 
her doctor is said to have commented. 
"She lived like a man and died like 
one." 

Analysis: Dinah's childhood experi- 
ences and emotional conflicts were 
bound to affect, not only her future 
career but also her personal life — es- 



pecially her attitude toward love, mar- 
riage and men in general. 

Her new husband must understand 
that three things over which Dinah had 
no control must have made her feel 
"different" from other girls: She was 
afflicted by polio, her family was Jew- 
ish, and she wasn't especially pretty. 
As a result, she may have felt a deep 
need to prove herself to both herself 
and her family, as well as to the world 
at large. Luckily, she had the talent 
and. courage to do so. 

Very likely, she got her strength from 
her mother, ivho dominated their home. 

Dinah's circumstances made it easier 
for her to try to conform than to rebel. 
If she conformed, she would be liked 
and accepted. This is what helped her 
gain acceptance as an entertainer — by 
pleasing her public, fust as she pleased 
her folks. 

Many times, money and success be- 
come equivalent to love and approval 
in a person's mind. Such feelings, to- 
gether with the personalities of her 
mother and father, have a lot to do with 
the sort of man a girl chooses to marry. 

Love at first sight 

"Fanny" became Dinah — temporarily 
— when, as a sophomore at Vanderbilt 
University, she sang "Dinah" as* her 
theme song on a local radio program, 
and her school chums began using it 
as a nickname. Years later, when disc- 
jockey Martin Block called her "that 
Dinah girl," she adopted the name 
permanently and legally. 

But after she obtained her degree 



Vote Today-A Gift Is Waiting For You! 

We'll put your name on one of 400 prizes — and all you have 
to do is fill out and mail this ballot. This month the prize — 
for the first 400 ballots we receive — is "Princess Margaret," 
the first complete biography of Britain's beguiling Princess 
Meg. Also included are many intimate pictures of the Royal 
Family. Be sure to mail your ballot today to win this book. 

Paste this ballot on a postcard and send it to TV Radio Mirror, 
Box 2150, Grand Central Station. New York 17, New York. 




MY FAVORITES ARE: 



MALE STAR: 1. 



2. 3. 


FEMALE STAR: 1. 


2. 3. 


FAVORITE STORY IN THIS ISSUE: 1. 


2. 3. 


THE NEWCOMER I'D LIKE MOST TO READ ABOUT: 




THE FAMOUS PERSON, NOT IN SHOW 
BUSINESS, I'D LIKE TO READ ABOUT: 









2-63 



in sociology, the lure of the entertain- 
ment world became irresistible and, de- 
spite her dad's objections, Dinah re- 
visited New York, determined to find 
success as a singer. 

Little by little, she began to "go 
places." She sang with Leo Reisman's 
band, with Xavier Cugat and then — 
her big break — on Eddie Cantor's NBC 
Radio show. After that came Hollywood 
and motion pictures, but here she was 
no rousing success. Neither very pretty 
nor sexy, nor even a very good actress, 
she could only be herself — and. at that 
time, it wasn't enough for the movies. 
But it was enough for a handsome 
young movie star named George Mont- 
gomery. 

Of Russian extraction like her father, 
George grew up as a cowboy in Mon- 
tana, where he was the youngest of 
fifteen children. He worked his way up 
from stunt man to leading man in 
Western films and, the first time Dinah 
saw him in a movie, she just flipped. 
"That's the man I'm going to marry!'" 
she bragged to her friends. 

Fate stepped in and made their meet- 
ing possible. It was 1943. We were at 
war. Dinah was pouring coffee for the 
servicemen at the Stage Door Canteen 
in Hollywood and among them was — 
you guessed it — George Montgomery. 

For both, it was love at first sight. 
It's important for Dinah's new husband 
to know that. This handsome movie star, 
who'd been romantically linked with 
such glamorous leading ladies as Hedy 
Lamarr. Linda Darnell. Ginger Rogers. 
Lana Turner and Marlene Dietrich, 
dropped them all for Dinah. 

"What attracted me to Dinah was the 
same quality I saw in my mother," 
George has said. "She was so generous." 

As for Dinah, she's candidly admitted. 
"My career was progressing, but Dinah 
as a person wasn't. Because, above all. 
I also wanted and needed love. Every- 
thing else seemed pretty second-rate. 
And I knew that if it hadn't been for 
George. I would have been finished in 
two years." 

Analysis: How much more glamor- 
ous "Dinah" must have seemed to 
Fiances Shore than fust plain "Fanny" ! 
Aside from its marquee value, this new 
name probably gave Dinah an emotion- 
al boost and helped her to feel accepted. 
(Will her new married name do the 
same? ) 

In her early years Dinah may have 
wanted so much to be told what to do 
by a strong, dynamic father that she 
willingly put off chasing after a show- 
business career until after she finished 
college. It's quite a tribute to Dinah that 
she managed to do this, and quite a 
tribute to her intelligence, as well. But 
the drive in her to "make good" in the 
entertainment world undoubtedly was 
stronger than her desire to continue to 
please her father. 

Her attraction to George Montgomery 

seems to be based on several factors. 

For one thing, George ivas handsome 

and glamorous . . . he was a virile man 

— formerly a cowboy and a stunt man T 

. . . in all these ways, he was able y 

to make Dinah feel important as a ivom- s 

an. At this stage of her life and career, 

she needed all the self-assurance and 

75 



love she could get, just to keep going. 

But just as George seemed "made 
to order" for Dinah, so did she seem 
just right for George. For he may not 
have been as self-sufficient as his repu- 
tation made him out to be. He liked 
Dinah's warm, generous qualities. 

In time, however, the success of both 
Dinah and George was almost certain 
to affect their relationship as each one's 
need for the other changed and this 
"need" became confused with their love. 

The "perfect" marriage 

On December 5th, 1943, Dinah Shore 
became Mrs. George Montgomery. And 
not long afterward, Dinah's popularity 
began to zoom to new heights. Then TV 
came along and she became a top star. 

And here's something else her new 
husband should know: "Much of 
Dinah's success must be credited to her 
marriage with George," commented a 
close friend. "He has made her so se- 
cure at home that she can tackle her 
career without any worries." 

Acknowledging their differences, 
George has said, "I was a rancher from 
Montana. Dinah was a Southern girl, 
trained to walk on velvet. For my sake, 
she learned to walk on grass." 

Like Dinah's father, George was care- 
ful about money matters. Dinah, on the 
other hand, had more generous spend- 
ing habits. "I've always been a 'today' 
sort of person," she once wrote. "Yester- 
day never happened and tomorrow 
never will." 

Sometimes this caused their "per- 
fect" marriage — as the columnists 
called it — to strain at the seams. One 
time, for instance, George refused to 
buy a washing machine because: "If 
my mother could do the laundry by 
hand, so can you." 

Nevertheless, Dinah — beloved by her 
fans for her magnificent wardrobe — 
insisted on having a walk-in closet 
larger than the average room and filled 
to bursting with dozens of evening 
gowns, robes, shoes, blouses, suits, 
sweaters, skirts, belts and handbags. 

Dinah and George shared many in- 
terests — tennis, checkers, even cooking 
— but most especially their children: 
Melissa Ann, affectionately known as 
"Missy," who's now fourteen — and John 
David, nicknamed "Jody." 

Analysis: Dinah's career began to 
skyrocket after she married George. As 
her friend suggested, she undoubtedly 
required the assurance and feelings of 
adequacy that a good-looking, success- 
ful husband gave her. 

But, as her new husband should rec- 
ognize, they were competitors as well 
as partners. Soon their personality and 
career differences began to affect their 
marriage. Like her mother, Dinah be- 
came the dominant one while George 
turned in early. His reluctance to buy 
a washing machine was most likely 
motivated by his need to assert himself, 
for money was certainly no object. 

They shared interests, yes, but these 

are not very personal interests. The 

v children, however, are something else. 

„ George seems to have all but_ insisted 

on being a man. Dinah used clothes to 

enhance her own feelings of femininity. 

76 



They appear to have been in a constant 
struggle to maintain their own identi- 
ties in spite of their affection for one 
another. This was their conflict. 

The "other" woman 

"I am surrounded by love," Dinah 
used to say over and over — but sudden- 
ly love flew out the window after eight- 
een wonderful years! 

Dinah sued George for divorce on 
grounds of mental cruelty. No reasons 
were given, no court battles made the 
headlines. But while some of their 
friends began to say that they "could 
see it coming," many placed the blame 
squarely on the glamorous shoulders 
of Israeli actress Ziva Rodann. She'd 
been George's co-star in a movie — ap- 
proved for the part by Dinah herself! 
— and she and George were seen in 
each other's company abroad. 

But Ziva replied to criticism by say- 
ing that, whenever they were together, 
"George was always talking about 
Dinah." She did, however, confess to 
reporters, "I had the feeling that the 
Montgomerys really 'reached' each 
other only when they were talking 
about their respective careers. If you 
look for reasons behind their troubles, 
I think one is to be found in the fact 
that George is much more capable 
than people give him credit for." 

Perhaps it wasn't a sudden thing, 
after all. George had been constantly 
referred to in the press as Dinah's 
"escort" when he accompanied her to 
this or that event. And often, Dinah had 
gone out of her way to insist on being 
called Mrs. Montgomery, not Miss 
Shore — but this kind of protectiveness 
could also cause a man to be resentful 
of his wife, as one of their mutual 
friends suggested. 

While Dinah's star shone brighter 
and brighter, George turned toward he- 
man roles and now he seemed to be 
showing interest in "he-man type" girls 
— not the winsome, wholesome type 
he'd married. Dinah, meanwhile, was 
beating out even the male stars in the 
popularity polls. Perhaps George felt 
this when he once remarked about 
Dinah's ability at tennis: "She plays 
like a man." 

Dinah, the aggressive one, and 
George, the quiet one. After eighteen 
years, the idyllic fate that had brought 
them together now split them apart. Or 
had they simply grown apart? Or was 
it the "other" woman that caused the 
break? Or was it ever really that 
idyllic, after all? 

Analysis: Dinah's next husband 
should understand that this break was 
not sudden. In a way, it had been 
growing for all of the eighteen years. 
It became almost inevitable as Dinah's 
fame soared to greater heights — while 
George kept more or less to the side- 
lines. Dinah, the sophisticate, and 
George, the outdoor man, began slowly 
but surely to have less and less in 
common. 

The more that Dinah strove to at- 
tain acceptance — in terms of her public 
following and income — the less certain 
George must have felt of being "the 
man of the house." Perhaps this is why 



he might need someone like Ziva Ro- 
dann — to reassure himself of his man- 
liness. 

He seems to point up this need in 
his remark about Dinah playing tennis 
"like a man." In being referred to as 
Dinah's "escort," and often deprived 
of the privilege of his wife being known 
as "Mrs. Montgomery," it would seem 
that his own sense of identity was be- 
ing submerged in favor of Dinah's. 

As much as Dinah craved a loving 
and adoring husband, her own drive for 
success and popularity may have been 
so great that it blinded her to the satis- 
faction and enjoyment of those very 
things she thought she wanted most of 
all — husband, home and family. Per- 
haps she is a true artist, in that she 
made the supreme sacrifice: Choosing 
her work and career over all else. 

This urgent drive is no doubt neces- 
sary in the up-and-down world of show 
business — but it nearly always makes 
marriage take second place. Only a 
very special kind of man could help 
Dinah have it both ways. 

The next "Mr. Shore" 

Dinah has said, "Always it seemed, 
if I liked somebody a lot, he didn't like 
me. Or, if he liked me for a while, he'd 
soon drop me. Eventually, I found out 
the end of a romance isn't the end of 
the world. Either the one I wanted 
would come back, or I'd meet some- 
body else I liked better." 

Currently, she has been rumored 
"engaged" to Maurice Smith, a Palm 
Springs builder and Dinah's favorite 
tennis partner. "I don't deny I like him 
better than anyone else," Dinah told a 
columnist, "and he is the only man I 
date. But I can't talk about marriage 
yet. 

"I come from old-fashioned stock, 
and couldn't say I am going to marry 
Maurice, because I'm not free yet. My 
divorce decree won't be final for some 
months." 

Dinah has said over and over again 
that she needs to be loved. When she 
throws kisses to her fans on TV, she 
sends out tokens of her love — but is 
asking for their love in return. This 
means so much to her that she once 
confessed, "If the time comes when the 
public no longer demands me and be- 
ing a wife becomes a full-time job, I'll 
not make as much a success of it as I 
have of the part-time one." 

Marriage and raising her family may 
not be enough for Dinah, for she's ad- 
mitted, "If I did quit, I'd just have 
the problem of what to do with my 
time." 

Analysis: How terribly unsure Dinah 
is of being loved! In order to insure 
her being loved as a woman, she tries 
to prove her worth as a human being 
by striving for success in her career. 
So, in many ways, her failure is the 
result of her striving against failure. 

Such contradictions seem to be the 
essence of Dinah Shore. She is so fear- 
ful of failing as a wife and mother 
that she puts more and more emphasis 
on her career. Still, she needs a man 
who can be a pillar of strength to her 
(Continued on page 78) 



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(Continued from page 76) 
when she is emotionally let-down. In 
short, he has to be there when she needs 
him. To this strong-willed woman, his 
needs aren't apt to be as important as 
her own. For Dinah seems to be the 
sort of woman who wants what she 
wants when she wants it. 

What Dinah seems to need most of 
all is an inconsistent kind of love — 
always present, there when she needs 
it, wants it and demands it, but able to 
withstand her spurning of it when she 
is too preoccupied with her career. 

This means that she needs, as a new 
husband, a man with a strong ego, 
probably in a field unrelated to show 
business, a "settled" man who will love 
her for what she is, not for what he 
wants her to be or what he feels that 
he has to become in order to win her 
respect and affection. In many ways, this 
must be a man who can give more than 
he gets. 

To such a man, Dinah herself will 
be able to give in return more easily, 
more generously, more frequently. For 
in such a relationship there would be 



EDDIE FISHER 

(Continued from page 48) 

Eddie just didn't seem to have it after 
he married Liz Taylor. Marriage to 
movieland's most beautiful woman 
changed Eddie's life in more than a 
physical way. 

It seemed to alter his attitudes, his 
values, his sense of obligation to his 
fans, and his desires. Most important, 
I believe, the last — the change in his 
desires — brought Eddie catapulting to 
the brink of oblivion. Eddie didn't 
seem to give a hang for himself any- 
more. His entire life seemed geared to 
the whims and wiles of the woman who 
gave all the outward appearances of 
having taken him over, body and soul. 

Perhaps that was where he had 
served as a man. Perhaps that was 
where he had failed himself and also, 
in a way, failed Liz. 

Eddie continued to grind out a rec- 
ord here, a record there; he sang in a 
night club here, a night club there; he 
also appeared on television. And he 
filmed "Butterfield 8" with Liz, which 
won her an Academy Award — and 
Eddie, more discouragement. 

For the most part, the critics were 
kind to Eddie, praising his efforts as 
a serious actor. But what they left un- 
said was that Eddie was not in the 
proper sphere. He was treading on 
strange, dangerous terrain when he 
tried to become something he was not. 

That may be the entire key to Eddie 
Fisher's failure in his career after he 
married Liz Taylor — the loss of his 
desire to be himself. He was trying to 
be someone else, a person whom even 
Eddie himself sometimes didn't know. 

For proof, all you need do is see 
Eddie today, as I saw him in the 
Winter Garden during an afternoon 
rehearsal soon after the show had 
opened. He was not the Eddie Fisher 



no competition, only mutual respect, 
admiration and emotional dependence. 

Such a man — ideally — would be the 
perfect match for Dinah. But if she has 
not yet put away her childhood fears, 
she may — as have so many other 
prominent personalities — still select a 
second mate only on the basis of his 
youth and good looks, just to keep 
proving how really feminine she is. 

Will Dinah make a second mistake in 
her second marriage? We don't think 
so. She may have looked nervous and 
uncertain in her first show but, a few 
short weeks later, it was a very differ- 
ent Dinah Shore who sang those love 
songs. She no longer looked like a 
woman afraid. What had happened in 
that time? Perhaps Dinah had found 
her new husband or perhaps, even more 
important, she had found herself. That, 
after all, is the first step — the big step 
— that every woman must take before 
sh2 marries. — The End 

"The Dinah Shore Show" is seen once 
each month — in color — over NBC-TV. 
on Sundays, from 10 to 11 p.m. est. 



I knew after he took Liz for his bride 
and promptly lost his identity. 

Now he was alive, vibrant, pulsating. 
There was fire in his eyes, the fire of a 
flaming desire to hit the pinnacle of 
success that he once held — and to rise 
to greater heights. 

The afternoon I visited him was a 
particularly anxious one for Eddie. He 
was working feverishly to improve his 
so-called "one-man show." Actually it 
was not a one-man show in the true 
sense, for there were others who per- 
formed, among theiru Juliet Prowse. 

Critics who reviewed the opening 
night show found fault with the other 
performers, but not especially with 
Eddie. Eddie received a preponderance 
of rave notices, and more than one 
critic observed that the voice was like 
"the old Eddie Fisher." Eddie sang 
with heart, with feeling, with all his 
soul. 

When he came on stage and ren- 
dered a series of ballads, there was no 
doubt in anyone's mind that Eddie was 
singing without the old frustrations 
and worries and phobias which had 
bogged him in the mire of anonymity 
for the past several years. It was, in 
fact, incredible the way he leaped back 
from that abyss. 

And the question on everyone's lips 
was: How? 

Obviously, many said, he had finally 
unshackled himself of the heavy chains 
of marriage to Liz Taylor. He was no 
longer stuck to her orbit but was rock- 
eting along now on his own trajectory. 
He was as free as the breeze, and 
happy to be. 

He was himself again. 

That's what his fans and the public 
at large were saying. 

But what did Eddie himself have to 

7? 

'It's wonderful," Eddie said to me 
with feeling. He was speaking not 
about losing his career, but about hav- 
ing found it again. 



say.' 



"When I started out after I returned 
from Italy, I didn't know what to ex- 
pect. I was sure about myself, of 
course. I knew I had the voice and 
the stuff to make the songs go over. 
But I wasn't certain how the public 
would go for me. I simply hoped for 
the best." 

Eddie promptly went into rehearsal 
and opened a brief engagement at the 
Cocoanut Grove in Hollywood. He was 
an instant success. 

"I was greatly encouraged," Eddie 
said. "When guys like Frank Sinatra 
came over and slapped me on the back, 
plying me with words of encourage- 
ment. I knew I couldn't fail. 

"How could I let them down? I had 
to give my all — and I did." 

Eddie's "all" was so good that he 
was signed almost at once for a month's 
singing engagement at the Sands in 
Las Vegas. Again, there was wonder- 
ment in the minds of the public and 
the experts who "study" the stars. 

Could Eddie hold the sophisticated, 
sometimes unresponsive and belliger- 
ent audiences of the gambling mecca 
in the palm of his hand the way he 
had at the Cocoanut Grove? That was 
the big question. 

Dogging his trail were urgent ru- 
mors that purported to minimize 
Eddie's anxiety to sing at the Sands. 
The stories stated that Eddie accepted 
a booking in Vegas merely to establish 



a Nevada residency so he could divorce 
Liz Taylor. 

But Eddie made no move to file for 
divorce in Nevada. In fact, it was from 
Las Vegas that Eddie stunned the 
world with his open declaration of love 
for the woman who had seemingly 
given him the boot for Richard Burton, 
her co-star in "Cleopatra." 

After that, audiences added another 
dimension to Eddie's comeback. They 
listened to his ballads with a keenly 
perceptive ear. reading into each lyric 
a special love message from Eddie to 
Liz! 

I asked Eddie if he were singing to 
Liz. but he shook his head. 

"I'm just singing," he smiled. "I'm 
singing with my heart. I'm putting 
everything I have into each song. I'm 
singing to the people." 

Eddie said if anyone wanted to read 
special love messages to Liz in his 
songs, that was all right with him. Be- 
cause he still loves her. But in all con- 
sciousness, he insists, his songs are 
"from the heart because that's the 
only way I can sing." 

It was a different Eddie Fisher. He 
was — as Joe Morgenstern had said 
in the New York Herald Tribune — a 
singer with heart. Morgenstern said 
there are a few such singers. Judy Gar- 
land is one. Ethel Merman is arlother. 
So is Frank Sinatra. And Eddio Fisher. 

All these people, as Morgenstern put 



it. had suffered personal unhappiness. 
The point he was making was that 
temporary setbacks eventually give 
singers like Garland and Merman and 
Sinatra and Fisher an added quality, 
a new note of mellowness. 

Eddie couldn't agree more. 

"Anything you experience in life," 
he offered, "teaches you something. 
Any kick in the mouth, any knock on 
the head, anything that happens to you 
is good — if you turn it to your ad- 
vantage. If you use it in the right way, 
it can help you. It gives you a better 
point of reference about life and how 
to handle yourself in the future. 

"You get into trouble when you 
don't have that point of reference, or 
standard." 

The kick in the mouth, the knock on 
the head he suffered at the hands of 
Liz, was Eddie's "point of reference." 
It was the turning point in his life. 

When Eddie came East after his 
smashing success at the Sands, he 
opened his show in the Winter Garden 
for a month's stand. Some of the Broad- 
way wiseacres gave Eddie a week. They 
said he wouldn't go over in a cavern- 
ous theater which completely lacked 
the intimacy of night clubs. 

But Eddie fooled them all. He 
opened to a packed house and kept 
right on packing them in. night after 
night, week after week. He was sensa- 
tional. He had made his comeback in 



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phenomenal style which was the talk 
of the show-business world. 

No singer in recent memory had ne- 
gotiated the hazardous comeback trail 
so expertly. 

Many attributed Eddie's success to 
the public's curiosity. They said he was 
a sort of freak — like the midget, Tom 
Thumb, whom P.T. Barnum exploited. 

They said people were going to the 
Winter Garden to see what Eddie 
Fisher looked like in the flesh — to leer 
at the wounds and scars inflicted by 
Liz Taylor. 

But these people were surprised, too. 
They didn't see Eddie bleeding. They 
didn't see any black-and-blue marks 
on him from the "kicks in the mouth 
and knocks on the head" he suffered 
from his marriage to Liz. He didn't 
even have a scratch on him. 

What the people saw was the new 
Eddie Fisher, who was really the old 
Eddie Fisher, the Eddie Fisher we 
all once knew, shorn of all inhibitions 
and reluctances, stripped of every vir- 
ulent influence and distraction, devoid 
of all fears. 

He was a free man, singing with 
joy and exhilaration, and enjoying 
every vestige of the new-found ac- 
ceptance with which he was welcomed 
back in show business. 

As he basked in the warmth and sin- 
cerity of this brand-spanking-new ado- 
lation, I asked him how it felt to have 
regained his identity as Eddie Fisher. 
He looked a bit puzzled. 

Back to his first love? 

"Did I ever lose it?" he asked half- 
kiddingly. "You know I had other 
things to keep me occupied up until 
now — matters of business concerning 
my life. I couldn't very well concen- 
trate on my singing career. The work 
I was in didn't help me, it's true. 

"But I'm doing what I really want. 
This is my first love — singing. 

"And I've never felt better in my 
life. I hope it never stops." 

Eddie's voice had a lilt, an unmis- 
takable tipoff to the truth and sincerity 
of the feelings he was expressing. 

It was the same lilt I also detected 
in his singing during the rehearsal I 
watched. I was impelled to ask Eddie 
about it. 

"It's my style," Eddie confided. "I've 
changed it substantially. I used to look 
for the big high notes in a song so I 
could belt it all the time. Now I look 
for the lyric, the words of the song. 
I try to identify something with them 
in every way I can. That puts more 
feeling in the song. That's what makes 
me different now. I'm not just a mel- 
ody man anymore." 

There were reports that Liz was 
coming to New York to take in Eddie's 
show, and that raised a question about 
how he would react. Would he be 
nervous? Eddie giggled. 

"I'll tell you," he said lightly. "When 
I walk out on the stage, I get nervous 
if I know anyone in the audience. The 
truth of it is that I like that feeling. I 
like to have someone I know in the 
audience, because I try to perform for 
that person." 

What Eddie was saying was that, 



if Liz were to suddenly show up for 
one of his performances, he would 
turn and sing to her. As the record 
now shows, Liz never did come to the 
Winter Garden to hear Eddie sing. If 
she had, she would have seen what 
everyone else observed — Eddie Fisher 
lighting up the whole theater with his 
voice. 

Eddie explained what feeling pos- 
sessed him to make him sing that way. 

"I felt like I was in Philadelphia 
during a four-week tryout. . . ." 

Eddie's voice seemed to tense. Mem- 
ories of Philadelphia raced dizzily 
through his mind. He had rehearsed in 
Philly prior to the Winter Garden 
opening and spent many days with his 
parents. 

He broke into thought about his 
mother. 

"She's wonderful," he said. "My 
mother is the one who encouraged me 
the most in my singing career— I owe 
her so much." 

Sentimentality had gripped Eddie 
now. His mind flashed to other warm 
memories of Philadelphia. He thought 
about his first date. 

"It wasn't really a date," Eddie said 
with a smile. "But she was the first girl 
I remember ever liking. Her name is 
Anita and she lived at 526 Emily 
Street. I lived at 522 McKean Street 
then, right around the corner. Her 
father was a policeman. She was a very 
pretty blonde and we went to school 
together. I used to carry her books 
and I used to put her pigtails in my 
inkwell. 

"When I played the Latin Casino in 
Philly. just before I opened here in the 
Garden, a whole bunch of my relatives 
and friends came to see me. I never 
dreamed a guy had J so many relatives 
and friends as I. And Anita was there, 
too, that night. But I didn't get to see 
her. She sent a note backstage and 
told me what table she was at — but I 
didn't get to see her." 

Eddie shook his head sadly. He had 
really wanted to see Anita. 

There were many other fond memo- 
ries that Eddie carried away from Phil- 
adelphia. For example, when he was 
on stage, he heard voices — voices out 
of the past. There was one voice Eddie 
heard and he cried out, "Bubbie, my 
barber!" 



PHOTOGRAPHERS' CREDITS 

Lennon Sisters cover by Frank Bez of 
Globe Photos; Dinah Shore by Win Mul- 
drow; Connie Stevens color by Gene 
Trindl of Topix; Lennon Sisters by Frank 
Bez; Vince Edwards color by Leo Fuchs 
of Vista; Beverly Hillbillies by CBS; Ed- 
die Fisher by Orlando; Dick Van Dyke 
by Larry Barbier; Jackie Kennedy by Elio 
Sorci of P.I. P.; Raymond Massey by Bill 
Kobrin; Desi Arnaz by Gilloon; Lucy Ball 
and Gary Morton by Globe; George Ma- 
haris by Gene Trindl of Topix; Sue Ann 
Langdon by Jack Stager; Donna Reed 
and family by Don Ornitz; "Young Doc- 
tor Malone" by Bill Kobrin; Andy Prine 
and Lynn Loring by Bill Kobrin. 



Someone else yelled, "Hey, Sonny!" 
And Eddie yelled back, "Elfy, the 
cop ! " 

"All those voices," Eddie said, "were 
the wildest experience I ever had." 

In a sense, he had failed those 
voices from the past, those people who 
believed in him. His mother. His neigh- 
bors. His old friends. Yet there they all 
were, welcoming him home. 

He hadn't realized how far away he 
had been — and at a distance you don't 
measure by miles. Memories came 
flooding back. 

"I remember being on relief," Eddie 
mused. "And I remember being 
ashamed when I went to school wear- 
ing the relief shirts with the stripes, 
and the blue sweaters with the yellow 
cuffs. 

"I was very ashamed. And I had to 
go down to the railroad station with a 
baby carriage to pick up the flour and 
potatoes and the food for the house. I 
was so ashamed, I used to hide around 
corners." 

Eddie smiled faintly as he came out 
of the past in a philosophical mood. 

"When I look back like this, I think 
that all of that is very good, and I 
often wish I could remember it some- 
times even more than I do." 

Eddie Fisher was a million miles 
from his dreary Depression Years ex- 
periences now as he sat in the Winter 
Garden. So much had happened to him 
in the years since. He had made a 
million dollars when he was only 
twenty-six years old. Then he let his 
career slip. A poet, going blind and 



fearful of the poems he might leave 
unsung, had written: ". . . that one 
talent that is death to hide." I won- 
dered if Eddie knew that line from 
John Milton. 

I wondered, too, if he'd ever again 
give up his career for any woman in 
the world. 

Eddie turned to me with a dour ex- 
pression. 

What no man should ever do 

"I don't think any man should ever 
give up his career for anything. He 
must never lose his identity. His career 
is his personal identity. He must be a 
man on his own first, before he can do 
anvthing else. 

"If a man gives up his identity for 
anything — he's in an awful lot of 
trouble. 

"I believe in fate myself. I think I 
was born to be in show business — born 
to sing. I was given a gift, and I have 
misused my gift at times. 

"Something happens to a man in his 
life, and a drastic change can take 
place. That's what happened to me. I 
can't put it into words right now. But 
I hope to someday — when I write my 
book, and try to explain it all. 

"Honestly, I can't fully understand 
the change that has taken place in me. 
as yet, but I hope to figure it all out 
someday. 

"I gave up my career as a singer for 
a while, which was something I should 
not have done. It was almost a sin. 

"Yet I don't regret anything I have 



done. I have made mistakes, as I think 
'most everyone in life has. So the only 
thing I can do is always try to improve 
and try making myself better. 

"This is one of the great aims of my 
life today — to make myself a better 
person, a better performer, and to give 
of myself in every way I can, in the 
best way I can. 

"What I'm doing now— singing — is 
what I want to do. And that is what 
I will do so long as I can." 

I suggested to Eddie that we write a 
song together and entitle it, "The 
Comeback from the Dead." 

He smiled sweetly. It was tacit ac- 
knowledgement of the widening belief 
that Eddie Fisher had, indeed, come 
back from the dead, reincarnated in a 
new career which promised greater 
achievements, greater fame, greater 
happiness than he'd ever known. 

There was only one last thought in 
my mind as I spoke with Eddie about 
his return from the cemetery where his 
career had been interred the past few 
years. I wondered what would happen 
if and when he and Liz were reconciled 
— as had been rumored so strongly. 

I wanted to ask Eddie, but I didn't 
have to. He must have read my mind. 

"You know," he said. "I'll never let 
anything ever interfere with what I'm 
doing now. I've never realized it as I 
have now — singing is really my whole 
life." 

He had sinned. He had paid dearly 
for it. And, at those prices,^ it's not 
likely Eddie Fisher will fail himself 
again. — Chrys Haranis 



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DONNA REED 

(Continued from page 66) 

Donna and her family had to carry 
water for miles to keep their livestock 
from dying of thirst. Donna had to 
learn how to milk cows, bake bread 
and drive a tractor. 

On the other hand, Tony was a Chi- 
cago newspaperman, a sports fan, a 
man with a penchant for interesting, off- 
beat and sometimes rather strange 
friends. Donna loves a quiet evening at 
home, relaxing, reading or watching TV. 
and, when she goes out, prefers the 
opera or theater. Tony cares little for 
the opera, delights in partying, and in 
cheering his head off at ball games. 

From these extreme points, Donna 
and Tony have come together, each 
making allowance for the likes and dis- 
likes of the other, until they share a fine, 
clear, tender communion of interests. 

"One of the biggest threats to mar- 
riage." Donna adds, "is the idea that 
you marry someone with the plan to 
make him over. I speak out of expe- 
rience. 

"When I married Tony, he was a 
'night person." He was used to staying 
up till all hours and then managing 
with just a few hours of sleep. I must 
have my eight hours. Well, if we had 
been obstinate, our marriage might 
have gotten into trouble right from the 
honeymoon. But look at us. Tony still 
gets along on five hours of sleep, I with 
eight. Nor has he given up his passion 
for sports. I still prefer a night at a 
good play rather than at a ball game. 
We've each yielded a little. The adjust- 
ment wasn't hard, once we accepted the 
premise that our love, our living to- 
gether, our family life, was far more 
important than personal idiosyncrasies." 

And in support of this, Tony is quick 
to growl. "It seems to me our diversi- 
fication of interest is very good for our 
children. They're not growing up with 
narrow ideas. They're being exposed to 
both the thrills of sports and the deep 
enjoyment of art and entertainment." 

The Owen youngsters are Penny, 16; 
Tony Jr., 15; Timothy, 13; and Mary, 
5-plus. If the Owens differ on some 
points, they are as one on the basics of 
raising their brood. "Tony and I both 
believe that a good whack across the 
backside — only occasionally — not only 
enforces discipline but makes the child 
understand that he is not being ig- 
nored," Donna explains. "The whack of 
disapproval is a symbol that the parents 
do not look at him or his actions with 
indifference. 

"Recently, when I delivered one such 
whack to Mary, she complained, 'Mom- 
my, you hurt my feelings.' I had to care- 
fully explain that the 'whupping,' as 
she calls it, was not merely to insult her 
dignity but to impress on her the fact 
that she had done wrong and we weren't 
fooled by her innocent expression one 
bit. It all ended with a hug, a kiss, and 
her promises to do better. . . ." 

Tony met Donna just after World 
War II. He'd been part-owner of the 
Detroit Lions football team but, rest- 
less with the course of his career, he 



came to Hollywood and became a talent 
agent. One of his first clients was a 
young and charming actress with a 
sweet smile and well-distributed curves. 
"This was Donna," he recalls, "and the 
minute I set eyes on her, I decided that 
someday she'd be my wife. We fought 
like a cat and dog in those days. . ." 
"I'd been in the film business longer 
than Tony," Donna says, "so naturally 
I felt I knew more about scripts than he 
did. I was also not self-possessed then, 
and I used to raise my voice a lot more 
than Tony did. He'd seldom get mad. 
When I'd fly off the handle, he'd listen, 
smile and say, 'Calm down, Donna . . . 
when you get right down to it, I'm on 
your side." 

A world she'd never known 

After several months of association 
as agent and client, Tony asked Donna 
for a date. She accepted. For a farm girl 
who had studied acting while working 
in Hollywood as a dishwasher, librarian 
and secretary, anything resembling 
night life was bound to be exciting and 
novel. Donna found herself introduced 
to a whole new world she'd never 
known existed. 

"I admit, I was impressed," she re- 
calls. "It was awesome and overwhelm- 
ing. But I knew it was all part of Tony's 
world, a world I wanted to enter. So I 
let nothing stand in the way of meet- 
ing him halfway on this score, and, 
after a while, I really began to enjoy 
sports and sports people. It makes my 
husband happy — and, most important, 
it softens him up for a trip to the opera, 
a concert or an art show!" 

It is said that Donna's professional 
status is divided according to "B.E." 
and "A.E." — which is to say, "Before 
Eternity" and "After Eternity." Her 
portrayal of a tarnished lady in "From 
Here to Eternity" was the turning point 
in a seesawing career. Up to then. 
Donna had appeared mainly in namby- 
pamby parts. 

After "Eternity," however, Donna's 
position became more secure. As an 
Academy Award winner, she was able 
to show more selection in the roles she 
did — especially since she was being be- 
sieged by producers But, of all those 
knocking on her door, none had as clear 
a go-ahead sign as her husband, Tony 
Owen. 

"We had a dream of teaming up in 
a good show," she says. Together, they 
formed Todon Productions and, under 
the banner of Todon-Briskin, produced 
the fabulously successful "Donna Reed 
Show." 

And that's when they came face to 
face with one of the hidden icebergs 
that wrecks many marriages. Finances! 
When there is a shortage of money, dif- 
ferences of opinion add up to problems. 
But a rising income can prove danger- 
ous, too. "Luckily, we both have taken 
a sensible attitude," says Donna. "If 
Tony likes to live it up occasionally — 
why, good. He's no spendthrift. And if 
I prefer a comfortable home, rather 
than an overly luxurious one, why, Tony 
let it be known that he was with me." 

If Tony wanted to buy her a square- 
cut diamond ring for their fifteenth wed- 



ding anniversary — to replace the en- 
gagement ring she'd lost — Donna en- 
thused over it. Her taste, however, runs 
to a plain wedding band and a gold 
charm bracelet to which her husband 
adds, from time to time. If Tony hints 
that he would like to add to her col- 
lection of jewels, Donna laughs him out 
of it. "My dad would say I looked like 
Mrs. Astor's pet horse," she tells him — 
and Tony gets the message and buys 
something for the children or the house 
— antique furniture, for example. 

Both Tony and Donna know, through 
hard knocks, the value of money. They 
intend that their children shall know 
this, too, though by an easier route. 
Here again, they have made certain 
compromises with each other and come 
to a happy meeting ground. "We have 
instilled in them an understanding of 
money," Donna points out. "They know 
it is to be used to buy what is needed. 
They have confidence in our ability to 
provide, and they never have to be 
afraid that their appetites and other 
needs will not be taken care of — as 
well as their desires, if they are deemed 
worthy. But a child, thinking his par- 
ents are rich and successful, may holler 
for toys of gold. I say they may do 
this, but they aren't about to get it — not 
from us, anyway. A time may come for 
them, as it did for Tony and me when 
we were young, when certain 'tightening 
of the belts' must take place. It is then 
that a knowledge of the value of money, 
and how to use money, will rid them of 
the fears, doubts and humiliations that 
lack of money can bring." 

There is another danger which Tony 
and Donna have had to face. This 
menace may be described in two words: 
"Working together." In the entertain- 
ment world, working together can some- 
times mean a twenty-four-hour day — 
and each hour can bring its own con- 
flicts and quarrels. 

Donna and Tony have worked out a 
system to bypass this danger. They have 
seen to it that the "Donna Reed Show" 
is as well-organized and efficient as a 
football team. Tony, as executive pro- 
ducer, is like a coach, while Donna is, 
of course, star quarterback, running 
with the ball! A chain of command has 
been established at the studio, with each 
member of the cast and crew assigned 
to his job and responsible for it. Things 
run smoothly and, as a result, Donna 
and Tony do not have to bring the 
studio into their home. 

According to Tony, no problems are 
dwelt on during the family dinner ses- 
sion. "We all sit down to dinner to- 
gether, and talk is restricted to pleas- 
ant and off-the-cuff matters. If some- 
thing serious has come up with the 
children, we wait and take it up later. 
The dinner table is no place for ten- 
sion." 

Learning to be on her own . . . 

For the last few months, Penny has 
been away at school. "This hasn't been 
easy," Donna admits. "We miss her 
deeply — but we're glad we made the 
decision. She is enjoying the new small 
school much more than the old, much 
larger one. I guess it was a painful 




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thing for both of us to let her go — Tony 
perhaps more than me. Fathers are so 
tied to their daughters' pinafores. But, 
when the time comes to step up to ma- 
turity, Penny will be grateful we ac- 
customed her to being on her own 
gradually" 

Donna has a keen sense of humor. "I 
need it," she remarks. "Tony gets so 
involved in his work that he often walks 
by me without so much as a nod. On 
occasion, he's forgotten my name!" 

A frequent excuse for Hollywood 
breakups is that "our careers keep us 
separated so long and often." Donna 
and Tony, by working in the same show, 
have no such problem. About eight years 
ago, Tony did spend three montbs in 
Europe, producing a film for Columbia, 
Donna remained in Hollywood with the 
children, who were going to school. It 
was their first extended parting, and it 
taught her a king-sized lesson. She 
found that her preoccupation with 
work and her home had left her with- 
out hobbies to fall back on when alone. 
"I felt terribly lonely, and in the wee 
hours I'd wake up scared and miser- 
able." When Tony returned home, she 
told him, "I can't go through that 
again." They talked about it and agreed 
it was time for them to participate in 



"YOUNG 
DOCTOR MALONE" 

(Continued from page 69) 

setting the scene will be in regular 
type, like this, and Dr. Wolk's profes- 
sional analysis will be in italics, like the 
following : 

The unwanted child is frequently 
doomed to an unhappy life. His parents 
may take out their disappointment and 
annoyance on each other, straining the 
marriage to the breaking-point. If the 
marriage eventually collapses, they're 
likely to blame the child — who is the 
innocent victim, not the cause of their 
trouble. This holds true, no matter what 
their reasons for not wanting the child. 

The couple who can't afford a child 
may resent having to deprive themselves 
for his sake. The emotionally immature 
couple may resent having to cater to a 
child's needs and whims. Such a wife, 
for example, might turn against him 
because he's getting the attention from 
her husband she wants for herself. 

The unplanned child, or so-called 
"accident," can survive the fate of be- 
coming unwanted if the parents are a 
truly loving couple. The one kind of 
"accident" that rarely survives such a 
fate is the illegitimate child, whose 
birth causes his mother to be shamed 
by society. 

But the child who bears the heaviest 
burden of all is the one who's born im- 
perfect — physically disabled or mental- 
ly retarded. Such a youngster becomes 
a source of embarrassment to immature 
parents, a drain on their emotions and 
perhaps on their pocketbook, too. If he 
is refected, he becomes doubly handi- 
capped. Such a child tests his parents' 
love and courage — and can actually 



P.T.A., church and civic affairs. Then, 
if Tony had to leave again, Donna 
would have some activity to fill the gap. 

A friend quite recently asked Donna 
what was the worst mistake married 
people make. Binnie Barnes, who was 
doing a guest shot on Donna's show, 
chimed in with the idea that: "It's al- 
ways a mistake to go to bed mad." 

Donna said thoughtfully, "Yes, that 
is so true . . . which is one reason Tony 
and I don't believe in separate bed- 
rooms. We feel it is harder to go to 
bed mad when you occupy one bed- 
room. One or the other is sure to bring 
the issue into the open and reduce the 
gripe to its proper size by discussion. 
Usually, its proper size is minute, trivial 
and inconsequential. But — after a night 
of harboring the gripe — it puffs up into 
a bitter and spiteful brawl. Thank God, 
Tony and I abide by the principle I 
spoke of before. We move, even in ex- 
asperation and anger, toward each other 
rather than away. Somewhere between 
his feeling and mine, we know there 
will be a common ground on which we 
can give a little, take a little, and love 
a lot . . ." — Eunice Field 

"The Donna Reed Show" is seen over 
ABC-TV, Thursdays, at 8 p.m. est. 



bring new strength to their marriage, if 
they open their hearts to him. 

If ever a baby was wanted by his 
mother, that baby was Jonathan, born 
to Tracey in her middle forties. She 
wanted this baby for Jerry — to revive 
his hopes (badly shattered by several 
professional setbacks) ... to rekindle 
his love (all but buried under personal 
problems) . . . and' to make up for 
disappointments their two older chil- 
dren had caused them. 

As Tracey herself expressed it, "Both 
our children had made bad marriages. 
I suppose that's what started me want- 
ing a new one — one that we'd never 
make mistakes with." 

But Jonathan came along at an in- 
appropriate time for Jerry. Busy fight- 
ing for his professional life, preoccupied 
with a dozen other difficulties, he all 
but ignored Jonathan's birth — regard- 
ing him as an added complication. 

Trouble piles on trouble. Tracey and 
the baby contract meningitis and Jerry 
discovers that Jonathan was born deaf. 
The effect on Tracey is electric and she 
tells friends, "By becoming a mother 
again, I failed Jerry as a wife." 

Tracey obviously wanted the baby for 
purely neurotic reasons: To re-awaken 
her husband's love and prove she 
doesn't always make "mistakes." When 
Jonathan was born deaf, she felt she 
had failed again — failed Jerry as a wife, 
failed Jonathan as a mother. Burdened 
with "guilt," such a woman is likely to 
feel that she must be punished and may 
unconsciously behave in such a way 
that she wrecks her marriage: "That's 
my punishment for being a failure!" 

But the one who's truly punished is 
the baby. Already handicapped, he's al- 
most sure to be either over-protected or 
bluntly refected. And, in this case, his 
father is not helping matters any. One 



wonders why Jerry agreed to have a 
child, this late in their married life. 
Perhaps he agreed simply to please his 
wife — which is not reason enough for 
a man to seek fatherhood. 

Deafness becomes a major handicap 
only when the parents become obsessed 
with such imperfection, over-do their 
attempts to find a miraculous "cure" 
and thus make the child extremely 
aware that he is "imperfect." 

What Jerry did not tell Tracey was 
that Jonathan also turned out to be 
hopelessly retarded mentally. He tries 
everything medically possible to correct 
or arrest the condition, but to no avail. 
Meanwhile, he keeps Tracey and the 
baby separated, hoping against hope 
that some remedy may yet be found 
before Tracey discovers the truth. 

But, while they are apart, Jonathan 
dies at the age of six months. When 
Tracey is told, she bitterly accuses 
Jerry of putting his child away because 
he was deaf — and letting him die be- 
cause he resented his son: "That's what 
I'll never forgive!" 

Still, Jerry refuses to explain his 
real reasons to Tracey, although he tells 
friends Jonathan would have died "a 
much more lingering and devastating 
death" had he not succumbed so sud- 
denly. He won't tell Tracey the truth 
because "this way, I bear all the guilt 
as far as Tracey is concerned." He feels 
she'll never believe she wasn't respon- 
sible for Jonathan's death and chooses 
to let her blame him for the tragedy. 

But Tracey withdraws into herself 
and the marriage begins to crack. 

When a man practices this sort of 
deception on his wife, it usually in- 
dicates a lack of confidence in the mar- 
ital relationship. Jerry's readiness to 
assume the guilt over loss of the baby 
leads one to suspect that he really does 
feel guilty. When he tries so hard to 
spare his wife, he is protecting her as 
if she were a child. 

No wonder the marriage began to 
crack! Tracey has someone to blame 
for all that has happened — her hus- 
band — and she turns her own feelings 
of guilt into hostility against him. Al- 
though a good marriage is built on mu- 
tual trust and honesty, this marriage 
seems to be held together by dishonesty, 
concealment and distortion. If some- 
thing isn't done quickly, it will fall 
apart. 

The responsibility for Jonathan's un- 
timely death doesn't rest on either Jerry 
or Tracey — they certainly gave him the 
best of medical care and attention. 
When parents blame themselves for 
what has happened, it's generally be- 
cause they feel guilty about other things 
and focus on the death of their child 
as an excuse. They might, for example, 
feel guilty because in their hearts they 
rejected the child. 

In the event of such a tragedy, when 
parents cannot control their emotions 
after a reasonable period of time, they 
may need to seek professional guidance 
to regain their peace of mind. 

Another "unwanted" child has been 
fighting an uphill battle against her- 
self in "Young Doctor Malone." She is 
Tracey's teen-age niece, Lisha, who was 
born illegitimately. Her G.I. father had 



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been killed before he could marry her 
mother, Tracey's sister Faye. And Faye 
had allowed Lisha to be raised abroad 
by close friends. 

Not until she reached thirteen was 
Lisha told the identity of her real 
mother, who had since married. Lisha 
first rejected Faye and the stepfather, 
then learned to love them — but was 
constantly torn between her affection 
for them and her loyalty to the couple 
who had brought her up. As she grows 
older, she begins to mature, learn the 
meaning of forgiveness and understand- 
ing, and now thinks twice before hurt- 
ing either set of "parents." But Lisha 
still has a long way to go before really 
adjusting to her situation. 

The illegitimate child is usually de- 
scribed as the perfect example of an 
unwanted child. Sometimes, however, it 
is only society that doesn't want the 
child, and not the parent. Some illegiti- 
mate children, like Lisha, are only 
cheated of their right to legitimacy by 
fate. 

Faye made a mistake in not divulg- 
ing the circumstances of her child's 
birth years before she reached the age 
of thirteen. Lisha ivould probably have 
been able to understand by the time she 
ivas about ten. At that age, the impact 
of such information ivould not have 
been so profound. 

She subsequently rejected her mother 
because she felt refected herself. She 
was fortunate to have found a home 
with devoted foster parents, but her at- 
tachment to them accounts for her con- 
fusion of loyalty. With help now from 
her real mother, she should be able to 
overcome her confusion and perhaps 
become pleased to have two sets of lov- 
ing "parents." 

As Margaret Sanger has remarked, 
"There are no illegitimate children, 



BOB HOPE 

(Continued from page 65) 

— always 'up.' He's never bored, be- 
cause he's always moving." 

He frowned. "We were all very con- 
cerned when he developed eye trouble 
while he was entertaining the troops 
on one of his annual Christmas trips. 
It happened in Spain, in 1958. 

"At the first warning of trouble, the 
doctors put him in the hospital. But 
he left his bed against their orders and 
finished the tour, even doing shows in 
the rain. That aggravated his high 
blood pressure, and a blood clot on his 
left eye was the result. Since then he's 
tried to slow down, but I don't hon- 
estly think he has. 

"You see, Bob really loves his work," 
George said. "Otherwise he wouldn't 
be as big a star as he is." 

"Do you think he'll ever retire?" 

George shook his head. "He really 
doesn't have to work, but he keeps on. 
1 don't know what he'd do if he re- 
tired." Then he brightened. "But I 
know what I'd do if he retired— I'd 
starve to death!" 

Frank Liberman, whose firm does 



only illegitimate parents." Sometimes a 
child may be better off for having been 
created out of love, out-of-wedlock, than 
to have been born without love, un- 
wanted, within marriage. Unfortunately, 
most illegitimate children are born out 
of passion, not love. These are the real 
losers. 

Whatever the circumstances, children 
must be made to feel wanted — to be 
loved and respected, appreciated for 
their achievements, accepted in spite 
of their shortcomings and failures. Par- 
ents shouldn't have to grow up with 
their children. They should be grown 
up by the time they have children. 

Parents owe it to their children, and 
themselves, to give their youngsters a 
solid sense of belonging. If children get 
this, they'll feel wanted. 

Without this sense of belonging, the 
squabbles that invade even the best of 
marriages will rub off on the children. 
When a wife and husband become an- 
gry with each other, they may take it 
out on the kids — who may grow up to 
feel responsible for their parents' un- 
happiness, and wish that they'd never 
been born. 

Both the wanted and the unwanted 
child are drawn larger than life on TV. 
their troubles over-dramatized and the 
solutions over-simplified. Still, such 
portrayals serve to call attention to the 
problem and perhaps make viewers 
more aware of similar problems in their 
own lives. 

That has been our aim in this series. 
to make the characters and stories of 
your favorite daytime dramas meaning- 
ful to you so that you might learn from 
them for your own good — and the good 
of your family. — The End 

"Young Doctor Majone" is seen over 
NBC-TV. M-F, from 3:30 to 4 p.m. est. 



publicity for Bob, pointed out that the 
family goes with Bob on his trips 
whenever possible. "The children went 
along when Bob entertained the troops 
in Alaska, and Tony accompanied him 
on the Japan trip. The whole family 
went to England with him when he 
made 'Road to Hong Kong' — they 
took a house there with Bing Crosby's 
family and had a ball. Last summer, 
he took Dolores and the kids for a 
yacht cruise in Canada." 

Onnie Morrow, assistant to the pro- 
ducer of Bob's TV shows, told me that 
she has been on every one of his 
Christmas junkets, which began a doz- 
en years ago. "He has an enthusiasm 
for traveling. That's why he doesn't 
get tired easily," she said. "Five min- 
utes of rest does him more good than 
an hour for someone else. He slides 
down in his airplane seat, covers his 
head with his big Texas hat, and goes 
off to sleep. 

"But don't forget," she added, "the 
trips are fun in spite of all their hard- 
ships. And of course the greatest sight 
in the world is to see Bob in front of 
those servicemen. He loves them and 
they love him. and the rapport is just 
great. He feels, strangely, that they 
are doing something for him. Because 



Bob feels he's no greater than his 
audience. The better they feel, the 
better he feels." 

Onnie wasn't the only one to say 
that more than mere patriotism impels 
Bob to make his trips. That certain 
mysterious energy that Bob draws 
from his audiences is very important 
to him — perhaps the very fuel that 
keeps him going. 

The only woman for Bob 

Bob's wife understands this, accord- 
ing to Onnie. "I don't think Bob could 
be married to anybody but a Dolores 
Hope." she admitted. "She's a woman 
who has the empathy to understand 
him. She stays home, raises the chil- 
dren, and does a beautiful job of it. 
And yet, when Bob is home, he chips 
right in and helps. He makes the most 
of every minute of his time." 

Bill Larkin, one of Bob's writers, 
admitted, "For the first ten years of his 
marriage. Bob's wife thought he was a 
United Air Lines pilot. But don't forget: 
For Bob, going to New York is like 
you taking a bus to Encino. Everything 
is done for him — his tickets, his pack- 
ing — and when he gets to the hotel, all 
his clothes have been laid out. Every- 
thing is done to conserve his energy." 

One of those entrusted with the task 
of conserving Bob's energy is Jan King, 
his motion picture and television secre- 
tary. "You sense when he's tired and 
doesn't want to talk business," she told 
me. "Those of us who work for him 
can sort of play it by ear. But, by and 
large, he's happier when he's busy." 

When I talked to Bob himself, he 
was preparing to leave for England to 
film "Call Me Bwana," then on to 
spend Christmas in the Far East — 
Korea. Thailand and Viet Nam. "The 
family and I were just discussing my 
traveling today, since I'm leaving for 
England in the morning," he told me. 
"They said, 'Well, why don't you 
leave a few pin-ups for us?' You know 
— the regular routine that's been going 
on now for twenty years or so. 

"But we have so much fun when we 
are together that it works out all right. 
Actually, I think it's good for the peo- 
ple in a family to get away from each 
other once in a while. It's always sur- 
prising to get home and see how nice 
they are! 

"Of course, that's not my reason for 
leaving home so often! There are many 
reasons, actually. For one thing, I've 
always traveled, and I got used to it. 
When I started in vaudeville, I was 
traveling constantly. But I'm marked 
as a traveler mainly because of our 
Christmas trips. 

"You really have to go on the trips 
to know what they mean to everybody. 
It's a sentimental thing with everybody 
concerned. Not only is there great 
gratification connected with them, but 
they're exciting. I've never taken any- 
body on a Christmas trip who didn't 
want to go again. There's so much 
friendship connected with it — so much 
general fun in every way, despite the 
hard work. There's a real family spirit 
about the whole thing." 

"How does your wife feel about it?" 



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"Well, she understands about the 
Christmas trips, because she's been on 
a couple of them. But she doesn't 
actually like me to go abroad to make 
pictures. Last year, she was able to 
come with me to England, and that 
was great. She's not looking forward 
to this trip, because I'm going over at 
schooltime and she's got to stay home 
with the kids. But she'll probably jump 
over to see me a couple of times." 

"Do you try to make up for your 
absences when you're home?" 

"Sure! We party it up and have a 
ball. We have our own Christmas party 
as soon as I get home from my Christ- 
mas trip, and then we have a big New 
Year's Eve open house. 

"And don't forget," he grinned, 
"Dolores and I have been together for 
twenty-eight years — so we've seen a 
lot of each other!" 

He added, "And when I'm gone, she 
keeps busy. She does so much charity 
work, and she plays a lot of golf." 

"Do you think that, if more women 
let their husbands out of the house for 
an occasional trip, there would be less 
divorce?" I asked. 

He nodded. "I think so. But it de- 
pends on the individual situation. It 
might break up some homes, too. As 
far as our own marriage goes, I don't 
think it's made much difference. 

"The hardest time was when the 
kids were very young. That's when I 
really wished I could be home — you 
know, we started playing hospitals 
even before we began doing the over- 
seas shows. Now two of the four kids 
are away at school. But, in those 
days, they were all at home." He 
smiled. "When I'd get back they 
would greet me with signs that read: 
'Welcome Stranger!' 

"One thing I've been grateful for — 
none of the family has ever been seri- 
ously ill during one of my trips. The 
only one who got sick was me! And 
that eye trouble was a warning to me." 

"Is your eye all right now?" I asked. 

"Pretty good," he said, with what 
seemed like deliberate casualness. "I 
get by with it." 

"How do you keep in shape when 
you're traveling?" 

"I just try to take care of myself," 
he said. "I usually take my trainer 
with me — I have, the last couple of 
years, since I had that problem with 
my high blood pressure. He gives me 
rubdowns and sees that I rest. I have 
to keep in shape, because these Christ- 
mas trips are rigorous. 

"But it's worth it. I get a bigger 
kick out of those Christmas trips than 
out of anything else I do. And I know 
that Dolores understands that, because 
we've talked about it many times. Oh, 
when I start to get ready, she'll say, 
'You're going again, huh?' But in her 
heart she realizes that it's worth it." 

His face was sober now. "Many 
times she doesn't want me to go away 
. . . but I know she's happy that I can 
still do it." 

After all the praise that I'd heard 
directed at Dolores Hope for being an 
"understanding wife," it was almost 
surprising to find her flatly refusing a 
martyr's role. When I talked to her, 



she tried to play down Bob's travels. 

"Don't forget that, when he travels 
alone, it's only in connection with his 
business," she pointed out. "When he 
travels to relax, we all go with him. 
After all, work is work. I've often 
thought that it's strange that people 
single Bob out so much because of his 
traveling. During the war, many wives 
had to do without their husbands for 
years, while Bob would only be away 
for a few weeks, at most. And today 
his trips are rarely longer than a week. 
This trip to England is his longest 
absence since the war, actually, and 
it's only for two months. 

"Yet most people look at me with 
pity," she said scornfully, "because 
Bob takes a lot r i trips. Naturally, we 
don't feel that way as a family. I ap- 
preciate their sympathy, but it's a little 
annoying to have people say, 'Oh, he's 
away again! Oh, isn't it awjulV 

Dolores' side of the story 

"When they do, I reply, 'No, it's not 
awful. It's fine. That's his business, and 
he does a wonderful job.' But nobody 
asks me what I do when he's gone. 

"Here's what I do: I keep busy! If 
a woman's husband travels, I think the 
wife has to stay active. If she's inter- 
ested in her home, in her children, in 
her hobbies, and in helping her neigh- 
bor, that should keep her occupied. 

"Naturally," she admitted, "we'd like 
it better if he were here. That goes 
without saying. But it's pointless to 
worry about it when that's a part of 
his business. I don't think any hus- 
band wants to have a clinging vine for 
a wife. 

"That's why we don't all drape our- 
selves in mourning whenever Bob 
leaves. Because if we did, he'd never 
leave! He wouldn't go away if he 
didn't know that we were all happy 
and contented and active while he was 
gone. ... Or if he did leave," she 
added with a wry smile, "he'd never 
come back. It would be too gloomy!" 

That's when I realized that Bob can 
leave home because of Dolores's under- 
standing — that and her ability to keep 
herself and her family happy while 
he's gone. Dolores's attitude enables 
Bob to do the traveling he feels impelled 
to do for business reasons ... for rea- 
sons of patriotism . . . and simply be- 
cause traveling is in his blood. 

As Onnie Morrow said, "I don't 
think Bob could be married to anybody 
but a Dolores Hope." 

"Please remember this," Dolores 
Hope told me as we finished our inter- 
view. "We are happy — thank God! I'm 
happy, and so is Bob. He's happy to 
know that the home fires are kept 
burning while he's gone, so that he has 
a home to come back to. And I'm 
happy because I know that he's doing 
what's important to him. So please — 
don't pity me! I don't deserve it." 

— James Gregory 

Bob celebrates his 25th anniversary 
with NBC in "The Bob Hope Show" seen 
Wed., January 16th, from 9 to 10 p.m. 
est. His new movie, "Call Me Bwana," 
is being released by United Artists. 



THE LENNON SISTERS 

(Continued from page 41) 

the three girls, me, Norma Zimmer, 
Janet's tutor and several assorted mu- 
sicians who joined our cozy group to 
distribute presents from the benefit 
they'd done that afternoon. Topping 
our guest list was "Pop" Lennon, known 
to all as "Bill," who doubles as man- 
ager and is so used to a house of a 
dozen or more that this all seemed 
quite normal to him. 

The girls, who claim show business 
is "dreary," have threatened to quit for 
the past few years. Each season, there's 
another solemn blood oath to quit with- 
in the next few years. But they keep 
rolling along. 

Bill explained that his girls are 
roughly in the neighborhood of the 
ninety-percent tax bracket . . . which, 
when you smooth it out, is a pretty 
classy neighborhood. But with the 
built-in baker's dozen the family has 
— with college for this one, a future 
for that one — it's tough to stash away 
cash for even a slight drizzle, let alone 
a rainy day. 

Happy to be has-beens? 

Meanwhile they've paid off the family 
home, paid off the family beach home, 
paid off the family cars. When they 
finally retire to become has-beens — 
around the age of twenty-three — Peggy 
wants to teach kindergarten. Bill yearns 
to earn a hot fifty bucks a week as a 
golf pro at a driving range. Janet may 
hate flying, but she's "crazy about air- 
planes" and wants a ground job at an 
airport. Kathy wants only to get mar- 
ried and raise the population. 

And would Kathy want her own chil- 
dren in the wild and woolly world of 
show business? "I'd tell them the good 
parts and the bad," she answered. "How 
you're up one day and down the next. 
Then, if they still want it, what can 
you do? You know, I've met so many 
celebrities. Their lives are sordid. Un- 
happy. They're such phonies." 

The girls mentioned a young, hand- 
some star who's the hottest thing on 
TV today and, after conceding "he's 
conceited" and "he makes girls feel 
like dirt under his feet," their uniform 
comment about him was — quote — 
"Ug-g-gh!" 

Over the years, the girls have de- 
veloped a sense of humor. Learned to 
laugh when things go wrong. As a re- 
sult, they laughed when Peggy backed 
off, misgauged her distance and sat 
smack in the lap of a surprised clarinet 
player. And when Norma stepped on 
Kathy's shoe — and, for the rest of the 
song, embarrassed Kathy was hobbling 
to get back into it. They giggled that 
time Janet's zipper gave way in the 
middle of her big number. And when 
Kathy flopped over the microphone cord 
on stage, just as Janet was giving her 
all in a solo. 

"I was nearly dying," Janet said. "It 
was all I could do to control myself. 
I had to, though, because Mr. Welk was 
standing right behind me." 

"And would Mr. Welk really have 



minded if you started to giggle on- 
stage?" asked the innocent reporter. 

"Ohhh . . . no-o-o," said Jan slowly. 
"I don't think he'd really have minded." 
And with that she looked casually at 
Kathy who glanced obliquely at Peggy 
who gazed offhandedly at Norma who 
stared steadily at the floor. 

Quickly changing the subject, the 
girls remembered another time they 
chose to giggle rather than pull their 
brownette hair out. "We travel light," 
explained Janet, who'd hoisted the win- 
dow to hear their cues more clearly. 
"So we do a lot of laundry while we're 
touring. And anybody who thinks that's 
glamorous — forget it! 

"We checked into Omaha with one 
night off, so we thought what a great 
chance to wash clothes. We bought de- 
tergent, washed tons of things and 
plastered them all over the walls to 
dry. We hung them on light globes, 
bedsteads, walls, lampshades — every- 
thing. Our clothes were plastered all 
over the whole room, dripping, sopping 
wet, when the desk clerk informed us 
there was some mistake and we'd have 
to change rooms!" 

Just then, Janet cranked her head 
in from the window, yelling, "Hey, 
we're on!" and the corsage of Ameri- 
can beauties known as the Lennon Sis- 
ters dashed out. 

When they clattered back several en- 
cores later, Peggy remembered one in- 
cident when she really broke down and 
cried. They didn't cry when they were 
on the road twenty-four days and it 
rained every day and nobody could get 
dry or warm and their shoes turned 
up from the puddles. . . . They didn't 
cry when one of them spilled coffee 
down the front of her gown just as 
they were due on stage. . . . The time 
they broke down was in Minneapolis. 
Their first day on tour. Alice Lon was 
along in those days, and Alice had 
trouble with her hands. From nerves, 
they dried up, cracked and split. 

The day they cried 

The show was playing an open ball 
park infested with mosquitoes. Every- 
one was bitten severely, their hair was 
falling down and they felt sick for 
Alice, whose hands were bleeding. They 
made for the dressing room, but peo- 
ple were pushing and pulling at them 
for autographs. It was terrible. They 
just finally sat down and bawled. All 
of them. They simply sat there and 
cried and cried and cried. 

Even when things aren't coming up 
roses, the trio always tries to present 
the sunny side in public. They feel they 
owe it to their audience. They know, 
too, that when you're a celebrity, you're 
open to criticism from everybody and 
anybody. 

Bill recalled one bad letter. He even 
recalled the woman's name. A Mrs. 
Nietzsche. "She wrote she couldn't un- 
derstand how I dared let my girls make 
a living for me . . . and how could 
a grown man sit home and sponge off 
his daughters . . . and what was I do- 
ing having so many kids in the first 
place . . . and blah-blah-blah and all 
that stuff." 

Bill's not the kind to praise himself, 



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was white. The beets were red. And 
somewhere between the plate and her 
mouth, one playful kiddie let go a 
healthy nudge and in one large splat! 
the red beets hit the white cloth. But 
nobody cried or got angry! 

Today, Bill knows the name of every 
one of his girls' suitors within three 
hundred miles. However, if the hapless 
swain is named Tom — for instance — 
he'll coach one of his brood to go in 
and ask, "What time is it, Dave?" 

Or another will careen into the par- 
lor where the poor fellow is doing his 
best to coo and woo, and announce — 
in a top sergeant's tone — "No. Dad, 
they're not holding hands." 



LOVERS! 

(Continued from page 73) 

married three times, and Lynn's par- 
ents have recently separated after more 
than twenty years of marriage. 

But Andy's fears come from more 
than just seeing love gone wrong. There 
was also his childhood. . . . 

He was born in West Jennings. Flori- 
da (population 600), in 1936. He was 
ten years old when his parents sepa- 
rated. "It was a pretty bad time for 
me," Andy says. "They didn't know 
how to tell me. Children never can 
understand things like that." 

He stayed with his father for a while, 
then his mother, then his grandmother. 

Eventually, each of his parents was 
to marry three times, giving him four 
brothers and three sisters. 

Andy still finds it hard to talk about 
his family and his childhood except to 
say, "They always married the nicest of 
people and had the loveliest of children. 
We all love each other very much." On 
another occasion he told this writer, "I 
can't talk about those days. Things were 
very tangled in my family, but I do love 
them." 



No one to listen 

It would be a fair guess, though, 
that living in a town so small, where 
everybody knew everything about every- 
body else, Andy was made acutely aware 
that he and his family were "different." 

"I was alone so much as a boy," Andy 
says. "I couldn't cope with society. 
There was no outlet for my feelings. 
No one to listen to me." 

Alone, bottled inside himself, Andy 
struggled through his teen years. He 
was seventeen before he found a way 
to communicate. "A touring company 



When it comes to Operation Lennon, 
Kathy says, "Our dates either have to 
have a sense of humor or they get 
kicked out." 

Once, Peggy's date, Len, was helping 
with the dishes. They'd had chocolate 
pudding for dinner. Janet suddenly 
flicked the spoon with the chocolate 
pudding. Len ducked but it landed on 
the wall. He scooped it up, grabbed 
another fistful and shmeared it all 
over Janet's happy face. 

Remembering these antics, the girls 
seemed to forget how tired and hungry 
they were. Suddenly, there were three 
smiling Lennons, after all. 

A man named Irving Berlin once 
wrote, "There's no business like show 
business." Well, at least three-twelfths 
of the Lennon family don't agree. But 
the girls are troupers, and until the 
day they retire — or someone figures out 
an easier way to make $254,000 a year — 
they're doing it Irving Berlin's way. 

— The End 

"The Lawrence Welk Show" is seen on 
ABC-TV, Sat., from 9 to 10 p.m. est. 
(Style Note: The Lennon Sisters are 
wearing Jantzen sweaters on our cover 
— and Catalina sweaters on page 26.) 



of 'Show Boat' came through town," 
he remembers. "I saw the play and 
immediately fell in love with the whole 
idea. This was for me, a skinny, awk- 
ward little misfit. If I couldn't get along 
with the world, this was the way for 
me to get out of it." 

He won a college scholarship to study 
theater arts, but left after a year-and- 
a-half. "I just wanted to go," he says. 
"I was always a goer. It felt like I was 
getting too comfortable. In this busi- 
ness, if you don't start moving by the 
time you're nineteen, you never move. 

"Besides, I always want to change 
things. I don't like things to stay the 
same. Life is just like you were run- 
ning; just keep on running, keep chang- 
ing, keep doing things." 

He got a job at Eastern Airlines, 
sweeping out the planes, and worked 
until he saved one hundred dollars. "I 
took off for New York with my bank- 
roll, and then hit the streets. Odd jobs 
kept me going while I made the rounds. 
I was so inarticulate and embarrassed, 
and all I had to show were some 
scrawny pictures I had. But I always 
knew I'd make it. I don't mean that 
I'd get famous, but that I'd act. To 
me, it's almost like stealing if you get 
paid for acting." 

After three months in New York, he 
had his first appointment with a book- 
ing agent and got his first job. "She 
looked at me and said, 'Well, you're 
kind of skinny.' And I said, 'Yeah, 
well, I'm not eating too good.' And, 
clumsy and tall, I turned to leave — 
and fell all over my feet. She got me 
a job a month later. It was a film 
for the Army about a skinny, bumbling 
boy. 

"I made one hundred and fifty dol- 
lars on that film and I thought I was 
rich. It cost me two hundred dollars to 
join the union, but I was rich. 

"After that, I got, let's say, 'infre- 



quent' jobs. At first I lived pretty ele- 
gantly — on ' Riverside Drive — in the 
maid's quarters of somebody's apart- 
ment. Then I moved to a cold-water flat 
on Bleecker Street. It had a bathtub in 
the kitchen, and I had to heat my own 
water on the stove, but I loved it. Life 
was so simple then. I had nothing to 
lose, I was already at the bottom. If 
I had fifty dollars a month, I could 
make it. Now everything is very com- 
plicated. You make so much money, 
and living takes so much money. 

"The struggle is never over, it just 
gets bigger. It's a phony dream that 
things get easier with success. The re- 
sponsibilities get bigger. You have to 
watch everything and figure everything 
out very carefully. 

"But I don't mean that those days 
weren't hard. They were — but I've never 
been afraid of things being hard. One 
day I'll be dead and I won't feel any 
pain or anything. So I better feel it 
now." 

Six weeks of love 

Out of the "infrequent" jobs came 
the lead in "Look Homeward Angel" 
on Broadway, TV roles and, finally. 
"Wide Country." Also, a special girl. 
Andy knew actress Sharon Farrell for 
a few years in New York. In March 
of 1962, when he went to the Coast, 
he took her with him. 

They were married. 

They split up six weeks later. 

When Andy doesn't want to talk 
about anything — things that might be 
too personal or painful — his face goes 
blank and the questioner feels sud- 
denly willed out of his existence. He 
draws a curtain and goes back inside 
himself, and it's only after some per- 
sistence that he'll come out again. 

"It [the marriage] just wasn't an 
important thing in our lives. Just a mis- 
take. It wasn't her goal in life or mine. 

"I'm a wild cat and it was a wild 
decision. We were both moving too fast 
and just couldn't make it together. 
Right now, I'm too close to it and I 
don't know what really broke us up. 
I do know that I'm often confused 
about who I am and where I am, so 
I just have to stay alone until I know 
more about myself. 

"I'm too emotional. I get either very 
high or very low. I run till I have to 
fall down dead at night and sleep till 
I think I'll die of hunger. 

"And, at this point, I don't even 
think marriage and a career can mix. 
I never go home from my work. When 
I'm not acting, I get irritated and fight 
with whoever's around me. At the end 
of each job, I go out of my head. I'm 
up all day and all night and I act ugly. 
People tell me to relax, but I can't. I 
have no use for myself when I stop. 

"I know it's all just for a moment 
and it doesn't matter really, but I just 
feel when I finish each job that part of 
my life is over. And these thoughts 
frighten me. 

"I really want to create, to give some- 
thing to the world, and I think any- 
body who can do that gets hurt. It 
burns them out." 

Andy Prine, as a serious artist, has 
not yet been proven. But he is not the 



first creative person to have feelings 
of this kind. 

So it was this moody, distrustful, 
already hurt-by-life boy who met Lynn 
Loring at that party. 

Growing up fast 

Lynn comes from a fairly wealthy 
New York family which could afford 
to send her to private schools and 
Barnard College. Still, Lynn was driven 
by some of the same needs as Andy. 
She was a Conover model at age three 
and, by the time she was eight years 
old, she was on "Search for Tomor- 
row," playing a part that was to last 
for eight years. 

At sixteen, Lynn was part of the 
Cafe Society set, but gave that up as 
a phase. Now, she says, "I wanted to 
grow up too fast. But with that group, 
you stop learning and growing as a per- 
son. They're too jaded." 

At seventeen, she became engaged. 
"All my friends were two years older 
than I and were getting married," she 
says, "so I thought I'd do the same 
thing. But I woke up quickly. I'm still 
growing mentally and I want to be 
sure how I feel." 

At eighteen — just about the time her 
parents broke up, after twenty years of 
marriage — she met Andy. 

"She's an awfully good girl," Andy 
says, "very independent and great to be 
with. I'm not thinking of marriage now. 
I did that so badly. But Lynn and I do 
do a lot of concentrating on each other. 
I guess she's my number-one chick. 

"We see each other about three times 
during the week, and on weekends. But 
we don't do much, just have a quiet 
dinner and that's it. We both like a 
quiet time. We don't like a lot of peo- 
ple around. Neither of us goes out with 
other people very much, but we both 
could. We have no spoken agreement. 

"I don't want to get in her way emo- 
tionally, and she doesn't want to get 
in mine. You see, I'm afraid of hurt- 
ing anyone's feelings. Neither of us 
wants to get entangled. This way, we 
have a constructive effect on each other. 
There are no scenes, no panics, no 
arguments. That's because she's so very 
womanly. She has a great understand- 
ing of a man, and I like that." 

"We have a lot in common," Lynn 
says. "We both love funny things and 
we enjoy good books and the arts. But 
we're both very moody and sensitive. 
If I'm feeling good when he's in a 
bad mood, I can get him out of it 
quicker than anybody. He says he's 
basically not a happy person, but I 
can make him happy. 

"And if he's feeling good when I'm 
feeling bad, he can quiet me down. He 
says, 'It's okay, baby, everything's fine.' 
And I believe him and feel better. 

"But if he feels bad — about anything 
— when I feel bad, I immediately as- 
sume I did something wrong. So I get 
even moodier and I withdraw. That's 
when things aren't too good. Maybe I'm 
too young for him. I'd like to make him 
happy with me and I'd like to bring out 
the best in him. I think I do, but I think 
almost any girl could. There are so 
many good things about him." 

But there are problems — such as: 




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"I want to be the best artist I can 
be," Andy says, "and whenever I find 
myself getting too close to anybody, 
I back off. I get afraid that I'm soak- 
ing up too much of them and maybe 
it'll make me relax and be swayed from 
ambition." 

To this, Lynn says, "I never want to 
be in a position where someone says, 
'Okay, baby, this is it.' I would want 
to pull back faster than he. That's why 
it's best not to get involved. I'm just 
not old enough to face the responsi- 
bilities of marriage, I guess. 

"I really miss him when I'm not 
with him. I'm possessive and I have to 
be very careful, because that's the last 
thing to do with Andy Prine. 

"Andy's basically not a jealous per- 
son. Because of his past, he has a way 
of disassociating himself with people, 
of closing up. But he has got jealous 
because of me a few times, and it's very 



DICK VAN DYKE 

{Continued from page 51) 

Monday night." he had begun matter- 
of-factly. "The time was about eleven 
o'clock. I was on my way home from 
taping my show. Everything had gone 
off as usual. No hitches. I was driving 
my sports car, a Jaguar, down Sunset 
Boulevard. I wasn't going particularly 
fast— 35, maybe 40 . . ." 

Dick's voice trailed off . . . then he 
added — almost to himself — "Why am I 
alive?" "Dick," I broke in, "how bad 
was it? The news stories said your car 
was demolished." 

"Yes — completely demolished. It's in- 
credible. I was rounding a long and 
sharp curve on Sunset where the boule- 
vard passes in front of U.C.L.A. That's 
in the Bel-Air section. 

"There'd been quite a few accidents 
along that curve, so I always take care 
... I never let myself forget Ernie 
Kovacs and what had happened to him 
— not very far from this scene. He never 
had a chance. He died instantly. His 
car went out of control and hit a 
pole . . ." 

Dick sighed, as though the memory 
of Ernie Kovacs' death had been haunt- 
ing him. "I can't possibly tell how care- 
fully Ernie was driving, but I know 
about myself. I was extra-cautious. Yet, 
for all my care, I suddenly found my- 
self helpless behind the wheel. 

"There was something on the road. 
Grease, perhaps, or an oil slick. . . 

"Suddenly, I felt the car swinging 
around. I knew it was happening — fast. 
Yet I seemed to shift mental gears, to 
be living in slow motion within my 
brain, as my physical body was en- 
meshed in split-second motion. 

"The wheel under my hands twisted 
one way, then the other. I don't think 
I even tried to steer, although I must 
have. 

"But I realized at once that I had 
no control . . ." Dick's voice tightened 
again, as he relived that moment, the 
moment when — for the first time in his 
young life — he was careening toward the 
precipice of death. He could see it with 



funny and very sweet to see." 

Obviously, while both say they're not 
thinking of marriage, they do seem 
to care about each other more than 
they admit. "We have had some serious 
talks," Lynn says. "Andy's been hurt 
before, by the life he lived and by his 
marriage, and he doesn't want to leave 
himself open to that again. I can't 
predict, what will happen. It would 
cramp our relationship to try. I'll just 
say we're in no hurry." 

If they take it slow, does this romance 
have a chance? Maybe ... if Andy can 
stop running. How awful it would be 
to discover one day that he ran away 
from his chance for happiness. . . . 

— MlCKI SlEGEL 

See Andy in "Wide Country," NBC-TV, 
Thurs., from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. est. 
Watch for Lynn in the new half-hour 
version of CBS-TV's "Fair Exchange." 



his very eyes — a light pole looming 
bigger, bigger, bigger . . . and beyond 
it, the rigid, indestructible stone wall! 

"As the car skidded out of control 
toward the pole — and the stone wall — 
everything went black. ' 

"When I woke up, I was standing in 
the street. The car was in front of me. 
It had hit the pole and rammed into 
the thick stone wall. 

"I couldn't believe it had happened 
to me. 

"Funny, I remember now that I was 
thinking the same thing when the car 
was spinning out of control. I wasn't 
able to believe it was happening to me, 
after being so careful." 

I couldn't see Dick, but I could en- 
vision him shaking his head in disbelief 
at this point as he gpoke. 

"My first thought as I scanned the 
wreckage was: Why am I alive? That 
was what went through my mind then 
and every minute since then. 

"You can't believe it unless you've 
seen it. The car was demolished. Com- 
pletely demolished. It was scattered for 
twenty yards around. 

"I was wearing a suit. It was ripped 
to shreds up the back. There were rips 
in the front, too. 

"The seat I had sat in was twisted 
and torn to bits. 

"The steering wheel had buckled and 
was twisted awry. 

"Why was I alive? I should have 
been dead . . ." 

A miraculous escape? 

As Dick stood beside the wrecked 
Jaguar in a stupor, a police car, siren 
screaming, hove into view. The car 
screeched to a stop at the wreck scene 
and a patrolman jumped out. 

"Where's the driver?" the cop asked 
Dick. 

"I'm the driver," Dick replied. 

"The cop just looked at me," Dick 
related. "His face went as white as 
mine. He didn't believe me. But he 
took a good look at my suit, especially 
the back. He shook his head as if he, 
too, were saying, 'Why is he alive?' " 

The cop asked Dick if he were hurt. 

"My head hurts," Dick said, "but I 



think I'll make it home. I'll call my 
wife." Meanwhile, he asked the police- 
man to call a wrecker to tow away the 
$12,000 Jaguar, now reduced to a pile 
of junk. 

"I called Margery," Dick told me. "I 
didn't want to frighten her. I told her, 
'There's been an accident, but I'm 
okay.' 

"She came down in our other car. 
When she looked at the wreck, she al- 
most fainted. 'Are you all right?' she 
cried. I assured her I was. I told her 
to stay calm. After all, she had to drive 
us home. 

"When we reached the house in West 
Los Angeles. Margery made me lie 
down and she gave me coffee, then 
brandy. It didn't help much. I was ter- 
ribly shaken up. I could only talk in 
thick, slow tones. 

"Then I felt a pain stabbing in my 
head. I put my hand there and detected 
a bump. We decided a doctor ought to 
look at it. So Margery drove me to the 
hospital. They found that I had suffered 
a mild concussion. It wasn't serious. 
They gave me some sedatives and sent 
me home." 

All the way back, Dick and Margery 
talked about his lucky escape. 

"When I ask that question — Why am 
I alive? — I have an answer that goes 
with it," Dick told me. 

"The answer is pure and simple. I am 
alive because I was wearing a seat belt ! 

"The seat belt saved my life! 

"I had seat belts put in both cars 
when I bought them. I had heard of so 
many accidents where lives were saved 
because the people wore seat belts. 
That was why I had them installed be- 
fore I drove the cars out of the show- 
rooms. 

"They hadn't done much for us up 
till the accident, because both Margery 
and I are careful drivers. Occasionally, 
we felt their usefulness when we had 
to stop quickly in traffic. But other than 
that, they were just there — just in case. 

"It saved my life" 

"Well, when it happened — when I 
cracked up — that seat belt that I had 
around my waist saved my life. No 
question about it. I would have gone 
through the windshield — into that stone 
wall. I would have died instantly . . ." 

Dick stopped and asked for a favor. 

"Do this for me, do this for everyone 
who reads TV Radio Mirror," Dick 
said. "Write that the seat belt saved 
my life. Tell the people that I wouldn't 
be alive today if I didn't have that belt 
around me. 

"I'll tell you something," Dick went 
on. "I've arranged to do spot announce- 
ments for seat belts on television." 

I remarked that it was a great idea. 

"Great?" he said. "Why, it's sensa- 
tional. I'm an advertisement for them 
you can't deny. Just being alive is proof 
of it. Who can deny what I'll be say- 
ing? I'm living proof that seat belts 
save lives." 

I asked Dick if the accident had done 
anything to him, or to change his life. 

"Has it!" he practically shouted. 
"Why, these past few days have been 
completely different from any others 
in my life. I catch myself doing some- 



thing I've done a million times — strik- 
ing a match, turning on a light, playing 
with the kids . . ." 

Dick mentioned the children by 
name: Christian, 12; Mary, 11; Stacey, 
7, and Carrie Beth, one year. "They're 
all blond and they all have blue eyes," 
he said with feeling, as if he had sud- 
denly discovered how they looked and 
how much they all mean to him. 

"And they're so talkative," he 
laughed. "But so well-behaved." 

Dick paused. 

"My God," he suddenly cried to me 
from 3,000 miles away. "Without that 
seat belt — I'd never hear their voices 
again. I'd never see them laugh, never 
have to struggle to answer their ques- 
tions anymore . . . My God . . ." 

Dick went silent again, before try- 
ing to describe his wife: 

"Margery . . . she has green eyes and 
brown hair. She's awfully pretty. If I 
hadn't come back . . I wouldn't have 
her anymore . . . 

"And she wouldn't have me . . . they 
wouldn't have me . . ." 

The precious joy of living 

Haltingly. That's how Dick Van Dyke 
was speaking now. Dick — the glib, art- 
ful comedian with the fast-flowing ora- 
torical repertoire — was unable now to 
rattle off words and phrases as he does 
in his comedy scenes on television. The 
stark and frightening truth of a brush 
with death so close that it would have 
brought an end to everything that was 
the joy of living, was just too much for 
him. 

"Just think," he went on, regaining 
his composure. "Isn't it wonderful to 
feel, to talk, to laugh — even to get 
mad? It's great to be alive!" 

I could sense the shudder coursing 
through Dick, as he stepped back into 
the memory of that terrible moment. 

"It's a date to remember, Monday, 
October 15th, 1962. Under a clear, 
black sky. The empty road. The curve. 
The steering wheel going all slippery... 

"Then that second when I awoke . . . 

"And the cop is there asking me who 
the driver was . . . 

"If I hadn't been wearing that seat 
belt, I would have been thrown through 
the windshield — and crushed against 
that stone wall. It shattered my car. 

"Oh, Lord. The impact would have 
broken every bone in my body . . ." 

It was crystal-clear by now that Dick 
Van Dyke realized how lucky he was to 
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jgeitytfeUtt Co4ltUticA Memphis' 2. Tenn. 



CONNIE STEVENS 

(Continued from page 39) 

still-unforgotten night when her be- 
loved Grandmother died . . . and, 
shaken and bereft, an eight-year-old 
Connie wailed: "What's happening to 
me all of a sudden? Where has every- 
thing gone?" 

Is it merely a ghost that Connie sees 
these days? Or is it the countdown for 
disaster? 

Obviously, there's more troubling 
Connie than her continuous and lacerat- 
ing series of David-and-Goliath battles 
with her studio — though these have car- 
ried her to the ragged edge of despair. 

"If a single cross word upsets her," 
a close friend said, "you can imagine 
how these quarrels have shaken what 
little faith she has in herself!" 

Yet Connie's intimates can't help won- 
dering if she isn't a little like the pro- 
verbial man who kept beating himself 
over the head with a mallet "because it 
felt so good when he stopped!" 

They know that all too often, lately, 
they have encountered a strangely-tor- 
mented, uncertain Connie — a girl curi- 
ously moody, brooding and achingly 
aware of her empty, hungry arms. This 
Connie is still so desperately unsure of 
herself and her future ... so despair- 
ing, despite her abundant youth, her 
powder-blue Cadillac, her spectacular 
$70,000 house . . . that she leaves friends 
troubled when they are unable to dispel 
her fears. 

Famed movie director Delmer Daves 
(who worked with Connie in both "Par- 
rish" and "Susan Slade") knows the all- 
too-sensitive Stevens miss perhaps even 
better than she knows herself. "Hidden 
behind that kid face of Connie's," said 
Daves, "is another Bette Davis. And yet 
Connie can look at her photograph in a 
cosmetic ad — she's a girl who simply 
can't take a bad picture — and still say, 
'I wish I really looked like that!'" 

Too many times, these past weeks, 
Connie has been the girl on the roller 
coaster : Atop a peak of elation one day 
— sunk in an abyss of depression the 
next. 

"Things pile up on Connie," says a 
woman who has known her for years, 
"and she begins telling herself that her 
world has come to an end. Men by the 
score have always panted after her, 
but — outside of Gary Clarke, her oldest 
beau — there's been no new man recent- 
ly she could really call her own. So 
she's been seeing only the dark side of 
her life and telling herself that her days 
will always be like this. She forgets that 
the clouds pass, and things get better. 

"It's like that crazy Ireland story she 
once told me, when even Connie had to 
laugh at herself." 

As her friend remembers it, Connie 
was on her very first trip to Europe with 
her companion, a cousin from Brookyln. 

Suddenly, the cousin nudged Connie, 
pointing to the mist-shrouded, dun- 
colored island lapped by the dark sea 
some ten thousand feet below their jet's 
bouncing wing. "It's Ireland, Connie," 
she thrilled. "We're almost there!" 

"Ireland?" Connie echoed. 



"Well, for goodness sake,' if that's the 
famous Emerald Isle, why on earth isn't 
it green?" 

And today, it seems, an even more 
perplexed Connie asks over and over: 

"Shall I marry Gary Clarke, or let 
him go?" "Can I afford to keep fighting 
with the studio, or had I better give in? 

"If what I really have is fame, why 
on earth is happiness such a sometime 
thing?" " 



Haunting 



and haunted 



All Hollywood was aware, recently, 
that Warners' "Hawaiian Eye" company 
had departed for Honolulu filming with- 
out Connie . . . and with a new blonde 
— nineteen-year-old Tina Cole — appear- 
ing in the show. ("It's not our fault," 
the studio countered. "Connie simply 
refused to report for work.") Suspended 
once again — how many times was it 
now? — Connie paced away the days at 
home, restless and unfulfilled. 

Did this mean that Connie, Every- 
body's Girl-Next-Door, was really 
through, this time — that she would 
never be Cricket again? 

Was her stubborn, unyielding career 
quarrel the only reason Connie was 
suddenly fearful for her future, even 
seemed to be avoiding her friends? 

Even more than this — was it Connie's 
new unhappiness that began triggering 
a spate or rumors which said Connie 
was now ready to marry Gary Clarke? 

Throughout the six long years of 
their storm-tossed, off-again, on-again 
romance, marriage had never seemed 
so close. Never before had there been 
so much talk of wedding dresses and 
bridesmaids and trips to the altar. 

Everyone could see that Gary's career 
was now launched in a new and bright- 
er orbit. His current co-starring role in 
NBC-TV's "The Virginian" had made 
him news; a promising Columbia re- 
cording contract was still another boost. 
Flying frequently on weekends to New 
York for recording sessions ("Gary 
feels more comfortable doing his rec- 
ords in New York," friends said), he 
had company in ever-restless Connie, 
who came East to be with him. 

Apparently, with so much new free 
time on her hands, Connie was some- 
how in a changed role in her relation- 
ship to Gary. For the first time, Connie 
was adjusting her life to Clarke's. It 
was now his star that appeared to be 
in the ascendancy . . . while hers was 
drifting off in an all-too-clouded sky. 

Perhaps there was a wry and bitter 
truth in what one friend said. "Connie," 
this woman remarked, "has been in 
search of happiness all her life. And 
now, for some unfathomable reasons 
of her own, she clings like a little lost 
child to her repeatedly patched-up at- 
tachment for Gary Clarke. Unwilling, 
all this time, to take him as a husband 
— after all, she's Catholic, and he's a 
divorced man — Connie seems even more 
afraid to let Gary go. It's as though 
there wasn't another man in the world." 

Whether this is true or not, there are 
signs that point to a sudden and impul- 
sive marriage, despite disavowals on 
both sides. "Sure, I'd like to marry 
Connie," Gary has said, "but the time 



has to be just right." And a curiously 
aloof and unrevealing Connie (once she 
had murmured, "Gary and I should have 
married long ago. but now the peak of 
what we had has long passed") would 
say little beyond a reluctant "I hope 
this new quarrel with my studio will 
manage to resolve itself somehow." 

With a wrenching sadness in her 
voice, Connie declared, "You know, I 
love being Cricket; she's part of my 
life. And yet this fresh disagreement 
with Warners is probaby the worst 
we've ever had. I don't know when — or 
if — I'll be coming back." 

Was it the old trouble all over again? 

For a long moment. Connie was si- 
lent. "Well," she said at last, "there 
are other, more personal problems, too. 
Of course, I want to do more movies, 
not just snap a camera and sing a song 
or two in 'Hawaiian Eye.' I want a 
chance to be on the top TV shows, like 
Ed Sullivan's and others, and yet I can't 
make the studio see things my way. 

"Oh, well," she went on — and it took 
a ton of courage to force the tiny smile 
— "our quarrels have always been set- 
tled before this, and perhaps they will 
be again. Only I'd be an awful lot hap- 
pier — and make more money — if War- 
ners would just tear up my contract." 

All-of-a-sudden marriage 

Intimates believe that the longer Con- 
nie mopes at home, away from the 
challenge and excitement of the work 
that is her life, the greater the chances 
that she will impulsively decide to be- 
come Mrs. Gary Clarke. 

It's also possible, of course, that this 
tiny, storm-tossed, fists-up Connie — the 
Connie who is never more than "al- 
most happy" — will be back working 
again and on an amicable basis with 
Warners and even before this sees print. 

For Connie is not a vengeful girl, 
nor an implacable one. "Connie just 
can't stay mad for too long," a co- 
worker said. "Oh, she can explode all 
right, or have* a knock-down, drag-out 
battle with her studio boss on Monday. 
But on Tuesday, dare to say something 
unpleasant about him, and she might 
well bop you with her purse!" 

But Connie does bring many of her 
problems on herself. 

"Those periodic physical breakdowns 
of hers — three in the past twelve months 
— are largely Connie's fault," one man 
said. "She can't sit still; she's got to 
be going all the time. She often knocks 
herself out just for kicks." 

"She seems desperately afraid of 
growing up," says another friend. "She 
can't bear the thought she's twenty- 
four." 

Still a third man shakes his head, 
pointing out that Connie doesn't seem 
to know exactly where she's going these 
days, or what she really wants. "When 
Troy Donahue went into 'Hawaiian 
Eye,' " this observer remarked, "War- 
ners began building up Connie's part, 
giving her bigger and many more roman- 
tic roles with Troy. But when I asked 
her how she felt about the improvement 
in the stories, Connie rocked me by say- 
ing, 'Well, I don't really care. It doesn't 
mean much to me except more work. 



I'd rather have more time for records 
. . . and other things.' " 

And was Connie unconsciously re- 
vealing a hidden, secret wish when she 
jokingly told a questioner: "I don't 
want to be an actress, just a singer. I'm 
really too busy to be an actress — I 
think." 

Too busy ... or too afraid? 

"Oh, yes," Connie confessed on still 
another occasion, "I prefer singing to 
acting, unless I could develop a really 
strong character who is nothing like me. 
But I went to Las Vegas a couple of 
weeks ago, when some friends of mine 
were singing there, and they got me up 
on the stage for one number — and gee, 
there's nothing like the goose-pimply 
feeling of working in front of a real, 
live audience. I just love that." 

For all the surface glamour of her 
life, Connie today is the often harassed, 
frequently harried, moody, brooding, 
yet curiously ebullient (at times) vic- 
tim of her own popularity: Unable to 
sleep without a light burning all night 
in her room . . . unable — or unready — 
to settle for the kind of man she knows 
she ought to marry . . . vexed and im- 
portuned and too often emotionally torn 
apart by frantic demands to be a teen- 
ager's oracle while she is as yet un- 
equipped to channel her own life. (Con- 
nie still gets more than 4,000 letters a 
week clamoring for "advice on love.") 

No. long ago, in a poignant moment 
of self-appraisal, Connie confessed that 
"my life just isn't that Cinderella dream 
anymore. 

"Being a star is work : Hard, exhaust- 
ing, grinding work. And when I dis- 
covered this, I was as depressed as a 
human being could be." 

Shadows on the rainbow 

Sensitive, tender-hearted Connie was 
a long time forgetting the night she en- 
countered Marilyn Monroe at a Holly- 
wood party, only a week or so before 
Marilyn's untimely death. "I noticed 
how feverishly gay she seemed," Con- 
nie remembers. "This was a desperately 
unhappy girl." 

In Connie's emotionally and physical- 
ly depleted state, the encounter with the 
already doomed Marilyn affected Con- 
nie more even than she was able to 
assess . . . her adored dog "Nui" died, 
and she blamed herself for the accident 
that caused its death . . . and a serious 
operation left her in a melancholy 
mood fa too long. 

It was no wonder, then, that despite 
the last uneasy truce she and the studio 
signed, Connie blew up once again. The 
point at issue was whether she'd go 
on a p. a. tour with Troy Donahue, Bob 
Conrad and others of the "Hawaiian 
Eye" troupe. Connie refused. Within 
twenty-four hours, she was suspended. 

"Look, we all have to go to work, 
whether we like it or not," a studio 
spokesman said. "It's terribly foolish of 
Connie to stay away from the series like 
this. This new girl, Tina Cole, isn't 
exactly replacing Connie, but Tina's 
being seen, Connie is not. If she's 
off the show another three or four 
months, she could be forgotten." 

Aware of this (Connie may be stub- 





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born, but she has a sharp sense of 
double-entry bookkeeping) , and plagued 
by self-doubts, Connie turned, almost in 
desperation, to her patched-up love for 
Gary Clarke. Gary, she must have 
thought, could be her new "pattern for 
survival" — a solid anchor to cling to. 
Yet friends are aware that unpre- 
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rel with Gary almost as often as she 
sees him. The battles are so constant 
that the joke around Filmtown is: 
"What's wrong with Gary and Connie? 
They've been speaking to each other 
now for two whole days!" 



GEORGE MAHARIS 

(Continued from page 61) 

George Maharis wasn't kidding. His 
dark, brooding eyes were like beads, his 
complexion wan, his expression deadly 
serious. He looked really sick. He had 
just returned to New York from St. 
Louis, where he had been filming se- 
quences for "Route 66." 

Rumors abounded that George had 
walked out on CBS and that he wasn't 
going to do any more "Route 66" shows, 
because he wasn't happy with the script, 
wasn't pleased with the pay, and was 
feuding with his sidekick in the script, 
Martin Milner. 

"All lies," George told me, after I 
tracked him down in the Big City short- 
ly after he got there. "I'm really sick. 
The doctors are trying to find out what 
it is that I've got. All they'll tell me is 
that my liver's acting up. The tests 
show it. And they also show I'm on 
the borderline of collapse . . . 

"How many times does a guy have to 
contract hepatitis to have people believe 
he's really sick and not pulling an act?" 
he asked me. "Didn't I do all right for 
them the first time I had it?" 

He was talking about how quickly he 
returned to the chalk marks in front of 
the cameras after being hit as hard as 
anyone can be by the dangerous — some- 
times fatal — illness. 

"I came down with it on April 12th," 
George said. "I was in real bad shape — 
like gone, man. But I came back like a 
trouper. On June 8th, I was shooting 
again. I wasted no time for a long 
period of convalescence as I should 
have. 

"Right away I put in 86 hours and 40 
minutes on the first show, 55 hours and 
15 minutes on the next week's produc- 
tion." 

George shook his head in thorough 
disgust as he pondered what he had just 
said. His words brought back memories, 
bad memories racing through his mind. 

"I was a nut. I shouldn't have gone 
back. I should have taken off on a long 
vacation." 

Then he shrugged his shoulders as if 
in resignation to the unchangeable char- 
acter and spirit which makes him the 
rugged, tumultuous, driving force he is. 
The guy's just born to be the way he is, 
and if he's going to change, it will be a 
change wrought by a threat as serious 
as the one hanging over his head now. 



Only Connie knows now if the wacky, 
glorious, once-wonderful world of Con- 
nie Steven:; has irreparably fallen 
apart. But she can put it together again 
— become once more the Girl with the 
Built-in Dream ... if she remembers 
it's forever within herself to discover 
that "the Emerald Isle is really green." 
— Jeff Cronin 

"Hawaiian Eye" is on ABC-TV, Tues., 
from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. est. Connie's 
records are on the Warner Bros, label. 
Gary is Steve in "The Virginian," on 
NBC-TV, Wed., from 7:30 to 9 p.m. est. 



"The doctor told me that my liver was 
affected by the hepatitis," George said 
slowly. He was saying it as though the 
physician's diagnosis conveyed a real 
meaning to him now. "He told me 
there's no medicine for what I've got. 
Only rest. So that's why I'm here in 
New York." 

George was repentant. 

"I should have listened to the doctor 
back in the spring. He told me after I 
got out of the hospital that I should do 
only three hours of work a day. But I 
couldn't follow his advice. I had to work 
more. You can't do a TV show on 
twenty-one hours a week. So I worked 
like a dog, and look at what's happened 
to me . . ." 

He looked at a couple of clippings on 
the table which were from the New 
York newspapers, columnists' ramblings 
about George "walking out" on "66." 

"If I was trying to get out," George 
said caustically, "the time was last June 
when the doctor advised me about tak- 
ing it easy. I could have told my pro- 
ducers that I couldn't work long hours 
and do the rugged work required each 
week for the show. I could have gotten 
released right then and there. 

"But I didn't want out. So I went 
back and worked as hard as ever, be- 
cause it's the only way you can do a 
weekly show." 

At first, he said, he went along as 
though he were the George Maharis of 
old. That is, it seemed like that to 
everyone on the set. But he knew he 
wasn't up to snuff. Deep down inside 
he felt different — weak, uninspired, dull. 

"I was getting tired easily. I had to 
push hard when I did an action scene. 
Something had happened to me. I 
couldn't figure it out. It wasn't like me 
at all. I had never been sick before in 
my life. And now I was and I was find- 
ing it hard to get used to it." 

Maharis was always very active, on 
the go all the time. And what an eater! 

George laughed — it was his first de- 
parture from the serious side — as he 
talked about his appetite. 

"You know, I used to eat anything 
and everything — Chinese food, spicy 
food, meat to nuts. But I also ate health 
foods. Wheat germ, that sort of stuff. 
Only, I never was a big dessert man. No 
gooey stuff. A melon or strawberries 
for dessert. That was it. 

"Then I came down with hepatitis. 
Ever since, I've been on a special diet. 
It's high in protein, low in fat. That 



means plenty of rare meat, vegetables, 
tons of salad. I eat salad by the pound 
— doused in lemon juice. Then apples or 
bananas, for carbohydrates. I need a lot 
of that, too." 

But dieting alone couldn't cure 
George Maharis after his illness. His 
strength still sagged. His body was 
capped of its energy and vitality. 

"I guess it was the routine." George 
offered. "It was a hectic fight from the 
moment I got back. There were a lot of 
outdoor scenes which called for con- 
siderable physical exertion. I did every- 
thing the directors wanted. I never 
squawked at the amount of work or 
about the kind of action, rough as it 
was." 

George went through the final phases 
of filming the series for the 1961-62 sea- 
son, took a short vacation, then went 
right back to the grindstone, churning 
out weekly shows for the 1962-63 sea- 
son. His rest hardly did him good. 

"I came back to work dragging as 
badly as I'd been when I left. I couldn't 
shake it," George said in voice tinged 
with dismay. "I kept saying to myself 
that I would begin to feel better to- 
morrow. But tomorrow was just as bad. 
There was no improvement. I was get- 
ting tired too easily. I had to push hard, 
too hard." 

What the doctors feared 

At twenty-nine, George Maharis felt 
like an old man. 

"All of a sudden, I began to run a 
temperature. It was going from 99 to 
101 degrees. I saw the doctor. He told 
me it wasn't a virus or a cold. It was 
my liver acting up. He ordered tests 
immediately. 

"The results confirmed what the doc- 
tor feared. He told me I was on the bor- 
derline of collapse — and he said in no 
uncertain terms that I had to have com- 
plete rest. 

"He also told me that if I didn't take 
his advice — I might not be around 
much longer . . ." 

George was deadly serious as he re- 
traced the doctor's warning. 

" 'Your health, at least, and even 
your very life are in danger from the 
after-effects of the hepatitis infection,' 
the doctor told me. Tf you have a re- 
currence of the illness, you'll wish you'd 
taken my advice sooner. Chronic hepa- 
titis is nothing to kid with. 

" Tf you don't get better, you die ! ' 

"Believe me, that was enough warn- 
ing. I didn't have to be hit on the head 
— I got the message loud and clear. I 
wasted no time telling the studio I was 
taking off for a long, very desperately 
needed rest. 

"And that's why I'm here in New 
York . . ." 

I asked George when he might go 
back to work. 

"Maybe months," he said with can- 
dor. "I intend to get my strength back — 
and it could take me into next year be- 
fore I do. 

"The least I expect to be out of action 
is three weeks, but that's the minimum." 

ActuaUy, George emphasized, it 
wasn't up to him as much as it was up 
to the doctor. 



was certain — 
going back to 



"The doctor may decide that I've got 
to take a complete rest of several 
months. That's what he told me. I can't 
tell just yet because the doctor is check- 
ing me every day. He's watching my 
progress. If I respond, then it'll be a 
shorter time. If I don't, then it'll be 
longer." 

One thing, however, 
George Maharis wasn't 
work like he has in the past. 

"I'm through with the seventeen- 
hour-a-day routine." he said emphatical- 
ly. "If I try it again, I know it'll fold 
me up. 

"And no more of that panic of work- 
ing all hours in all weather. I need 
peace of mind and peace of body . . . 
and that means no more swimming in 
the cold. I've had it. I've worked too 
hard to die in a pool of water." 

He was referring to the scene in the 
show" last season which George believes 
might have brought on his current cris- 
is, the episode that perhaps might have 
triggered his hepatitis. The way Maharis 
told it seemed plausible enough. 

"The only way I can figure out how I 
got this hepatitis." George related, "is 
that it came on when we were down in 
Texas. I'd been going along for many 
months doing hectic outdoor scenes. 
Then we hit this spot in Texas. The tem- 
peratures were down to as low as 17 
degrees. 

"That's cold — especially when you've 
got to jump into a lake and haul a girl 
out, for the cameras, the way I had to. 
Well, that gave me a mild case of bron- 
chitis. 

"I didn't feel well but it didn't seem 
important to quit work or anything like 
that. I stopped at a doctor's office and 
got a shot. It was after that when I 
began to feel real lousy and had to go 
to the hospital in Santa Monica finally. 

"When I found out I had hepatitis — 
it w r as so bad they put me in isolation 
— I racked my brain trying to figure 
how a guy like me could come down 
with that disease. 

"Me — a guy who never drinks or 
smokes or dissipates! 

"Then it came to me — as one possi- 
bility. It could have been the doctor's 
needle. The doctor down in Texas who 
gave me a shot when I had bronchitis 
might have had a dirty needle." 

George said he was also told the lake 
in which he jumped to save the girl in 
the "Route 66" story might have been 
polluted, and the infection might have 
been caused by the water. 

But whatever it was that brought on 
George Maharis' hepatitis, there's one 
thing for certain — it'll never recur if 
George can help it. 

"I want to get well," George told me 
in parting. "I am going to stay put right 
here in New York until I feel like my 
old self again. I'm going to rest and 
paint some still life in oils. That relaxes 
me. I love to paint . . . 

"They're not getting me back on 

"Route 66' until I can take the pace. I 

don't want to crack up. 

„."If I don't take it easy, it could mean 

my life. . . ." — Jan Price 

"Route 66" is seen on CBS-TV, Friday 
nights, from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. est. 



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IIIIIIIMIIIIillliHIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIiillllMlrlimmililllilHIriJIIHIIiHllllilll I in 

JACKIE KENNEDY 

■IIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIIU! 

(Continued from page 53) 

Why do women like our First Lady? 
Why do they dislike her? Let's look 
at what the famed Gallup Poll found 
out, in a nationwide survey reported 
in the New York Herald Tribune, 

These are the words most often used 
to express admiration of Jackie: 

1. Attractive, pretty, good-looking 

2. Good personality 

3. Intelligent, educated 

4. Makes a good impression abroad 

5. Interested in culture 

6. Good mother 

7. Friendly, warm 

8. Good mixer 

9. Poise 

10. Sweet, nice 
And here's what they don't like: 

1. Travels too much, away from family 

2. In the limelight too much 

3. Don't like her hairdo 

4. Her taste in clothes 

5. Undignified 

6. Her voice, way she talks 

7. Spends too much, ivastes money 

8. Pictures in a bathing suit 

9. Doesn't wear right attire to church 
10. Too much social life, parties, etc. 

George Gallup, director of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Public Opinion, sums 
up: "The public likes Jacqueline Ken- 
nedy for what she is. They criticize her 
for what she does." 

Well, any woman wise in the ways of 
her sex could tell you that's a truly 
female reaction to Jackie! When one 
woman feels "challenged" by another, 
does she go around attacking what her 
"rival" is — thus inviting comparison on 
the basis of looks or personality? 

You bet she doesn't! She chips away 
at what the other woman does — the 
clothes she wears, the people she pals 
around with, the places she goes. 

There's a strong tang of sour grapes 
about many criticisms of Jackie. But 
there are very honest differences of 
opinion, too — not all of them political, 
though politics may enter into it. Would 
anyone expect Pat Nixon, for instance, 
to write fan letters to the wife of the 
man who defeated her husband for the 
Presidency? 

Or is it surprising when Clare 
Boothe Luce — former Congresswoman 
and Eisenhower-appointed Ambassador, 
as well as a chic playwright who has 
appeared on "best-dressed" lists — 
writes disapprovingly about where and 
how Jackie buys her clothes? 

Differences in religious observances, 
in standards of dress and deportment — 
in concepts of the dignity required by 
public office or a woman's place in the 
home — also account for some of the 
criticism. 

As one well-known teenager — Ro- 
berta Shore of "The Virginian" — puts 
it. politely but frankly: "I must admit 
I admire Mamie Eisenhower much 
more because she stayed in the back- 
ground. I feel Mrs. Kennedy is too 
much in the limelight, and I don't 
believe that's the function of a First 
Lady." 

There are bound to be fine women 
who don't approve of what Jackie does 



— and aren't afraid to uphold their 
own standards by saying so openly. 

But by and large, as the gals get to- 
gether in the powder room or the 
supermarket, they're apt to note that 
the really "catty" remarks come from: 

The local beauty who thinks praise 
of any other belle implies something 
lacking in her own looks or dress . . . 

The harassed young mother who 
feels "tied down" to her busy home . . . 

The acknowledged "leader" who re- 
sents any threat to her status as a 
style-setter or patron of the arts . . . 

The hard-working girl who can't 
save enough for all those vacation trips 
she's going to take "someday" . . . 

The envious soul who distrust* 
wealth and social position, because she 
never had either — or has lost both . . . 

These are the women who don't like 
Jackie and try to do her harm! 

Among them, incidentally, you'll find 
few ladies of show business. Almost 
to a woman, they like Jackie — for rea- 
sons both eternally feminine and pe- 
culiar to their trade. Let's listen to 
June Lockhart, who has not only carved 
out a career on stage and screen — as 
well as the "Lassie" TV series — but 
whose husband, John Lindsay, is an 
architect : 

"Not long ago," says June, "my hus- 
band and I had occasion to tour the 
White House. I had been through it 
before, in 1950, and at that time it had 
no cohesion, didn't make the kind of 
impression the most important home 
in the land should. Now it is beautiful, 
something for all of us to be proud of. 
I do so admire Mrs. Kennedy's initia- 
tive in stepping in right away and re- 
decorating! 

"I believe her greatest asset is the 
fact that she is what — in vaudeville — 
they referred to as a /class A act.' Her 
charm, her womanliness, her style, all 
add up to this. But she is not, as they 
say in TV, 'an -overnight package deal.' 
It's true she is the product of her 
heredity, environment and education, 
and she had many advantages to begin 
with — but there have been many other 
women with these same assets who 
didn't develop into the person she is." 

Show biz gives Jackie credit 

As a singer, Connie Francis says : 
"I've been impressed most by the way 
Mrs. Kennedy is bringing the per- 
forming arts to the forefront in the 
White House. She's done more to en- 
hance the performing arts than any 
other member in Government in the 
past score years." 

Many other femme performers pay 
tribute to what little Leslie Uggams, of 
"Sing Along With Mitch." calls the 
"great advances in culture for this 
country which never would have been 
possible without Mrs. Kennedy." 

Says Carol Lawrence, "Her time and 
energy devoted to things artistic have 
been one of the most encouraging signs 
of our time to all performers." 

"She has done more than anyone 
else," says Nancy Malone of "Naked 
City," "to bring the cultural aspects of 
American life to world attention." 

"She is doing for art what Leonard 
Bernstein does for music with his 



Young People's Concerts," says Susan 
Kohner — who also defends Jackie's 
clothes. "They're not my taste, but 
they're right for her. And even a Presi- 
dent's wife has to wear a bathing suit 
when she goes swimming!" 

Rose Marie, of "The Dick Van Dyke 
Show," is even more outspoken: "She's 
got the figure for it, so why not? May- 
be she'll inspire other women to do 
a few bending exercises. . . ." 

Lynn Loring, of "Fair Exchange," 
speaks for American teenagers. 
"Wouldn't it be better," sighs Lynn, 
"if more young girls dressed as Mrs. 
Kennedy does — rather than the way 
their kid brothers do?" 

Diana Chesney, the English lass of 
"Fair Exchange," scores a different 
point for Jackie. "I particularly re- 
spect her for her marvelous skill with 
languages and her gracious way of try- 
ing to make speeches in the language 
of any country she visits." 

Another actress from foreign shores, 
Ina Balin, also salutes Jackie's way 
with languages— and adds a pertinent 
defense of her traveling: "It's good for 
children to travel with their mother, no 
matter how young they are. 

Why stop living? 

"Mrs. Kennedy should not be criti- 
cized for getting publicity," says Ina. 
"It's fine to have a First Lady who is 
so active. She represents the new idea, 
the jet-age generation, that gets things 
done quickly. Just because she's the 
First Lady doesn't mean she should 
stop living!" 

Peggy Lennon, of the singing sisters, 
takes the international view of Jackie, 
too. "The way she went to other coun- 
tries and spoke to the women in their 
native tongues was marvelous. She 
made them better acquainted with the 
people of the United States. This was 
a great contribution — because men are 
usually swayed in their opinions by 
the way their wives and sweethearts 
think and feel." 

This thread of "womanliness" runs 
through show-biz comments — though 
few vary as widely as Emmaline 
Henry's and Sue Ann Langdon's! 

Says Sue Ann, unexpectedly, "She is 
a very sexy-looking woman — and that's 
a novelty in the capital, where men 
are more glamorous than women." 

Emmaline speaks from the opposite 
pole: "Because I play a housewife in 
'I'm Dickens . . . He's Fenster,' I ap- 
preciate the fact that Jackie Kennedy 
is also a housewife — with the same 
responsibilities, many times multiplied! 
I feel she's done a great deal toward 
making the average housewife take 
stock of herself and take pride in her- 
self." 

Young, lyrical Molly Bee observes, 
"I believe Jacqueline Kennedy is every- 
thing a woman wants to be. She is not 
only a man's woman but also a wom- 
an's woman, and this is something very 
difficult to achieve." 

Teen-aged Shelley Fabares, of "The 
Donna Reed Show," is equally ecstatic; 
"What I admire most about her is the 
fact that she has a mind of her own. 
It's wonderful having someone like her 
in the White House — someone the 



youth of the country can identify with." 
Sparkling Norma Zimmer, of "The 
Lawrence Welk Show," puts her ad- 
miration in a more mature perspective: 
"I would imagine the only women who 
don't like Jackie Kennedy are envious 
of all the attributes she has to offer." 

Republicans to the rescue! 

Even differences of political opinion 
have little effect on show-business ap- 
preciation of Jackie. From the East 
Coast, a strong vote in favor: "I'm an 
avid Republican," says Carol Knox of 
"The Merv Griffin Show," "but I have 
great respect for Mrs. Kennedy. I don't 
agree with those who criticize her for 
'spending too much money.' Her fi- 
nances are her personal affair, so long 
as she's not spending Government 
money. She's also been criticized for 
her very active social life, yet she has 
no choice but to attend most of these 
functions. I'm sure she would rather 
give them up. Let's not forget that 
she's a human being, as well as a First 
Lady!" 

And, from the West Coast, a more 
personal testimonial: "A few years 
ago," says Dale Evans (Mrs. Roy 
Rogers), "I was a fellow passenger 
with Mrs. Kennedy on a plane trip 
from Chicago to Los Angeles. I found 
her a delightfully refreshing person of 
great intelligence. Although I fre- 
quently differ with her on political 
issues, I admire the woman. I admire 
her humanitarian qualities, particularly 
in the field of the underprivileged. 
After her debut — long before she 
dreamed of reaching her present posi- 
tion — she was fighting like a tiger for 
little people." 

Delving even more deeply into the 
mysteries of character, young June 
Blair of "The Adventures of Ozzie and 
Harriet" observes sagely: "I most ad- 
mire in Mrs. Kennedy what appears to 
be her wonderful sense of total inner 
security. Having this, she seems able 
to enjoy any situation to its fullest." 

Another personality who has suc- 
cessfully combined a TV career with 
home and children puts it even more 
strongly. "What I like most about our 
First Lady," says "Queen for a Day's" 
Jeanne Cagney, "is that she answers 
the questions for herself of 'Who are 
you, where are you, what are you do- 
ing?' I think of her as being a very 
personal figure, rather than a political 
one. She has glorified the desire for 
intelligence and education. She's been 
like having that 'marvelous teacher,' 
somewhere along the way, who inspires 
you." 

But perhaps the best and 'simplest 
words were said by a late great First 
Lady herself. Speaking for NBC-TV 
cameras, not long before her death, 
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt said of Jackie 
Kennedy: "She is full of life." And: 
"Her complete naturalness makes her 
a most appealing young woman." 

No one ever knew better how difficult 
"liveliness" and "naturalness" can be 
to maintain in the White House . . . 
how much they can cost, in both friend- 
ship and enmity, in that historic gold- 
fish bowl . . . and what lasting memories 
they can leave behind. — Irene Storm 



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BEVERLY HILLBILLIES 

(Continued from page 44) 

It seemed easy for the doctors to 
answer their first question. All they 
had to do was to flick their TV dials 
to Channel 2 (CBS) on Wednesday 
night and watch. But what was it they 
saw? And how could they describe it? 

There were a bunch of hillbillies, 
that was for sure. A six-foot-three, 50- 
plus-years widower, Jed Clampett 
(played by Buddy Ebsen), complete 
with raggedy mustache, Ozark galluses, 
battered hat and one-gallon moonshine 
crock; Grannie (Irene Ryan), spirited 
(without benefit of moonshine) and 
sassy; daughter Elly May (Donna 
Douglas), a blouse-filling "sister" of 
Al Capp's Daisy Mae (hey, wait a 
minute, isn't something wrong here? 
didn't . . . wasn't . . . well, of course, 
this same actress, Donna Douglas — 
wearing something other than these 
two-sizes-small blue jeans — used to be 
a guest star on the Como show) ; plain 
Cousin Pearl (Bea Benaderet) ; and 
handsome, muscular nephew Big Jethro 
(Max Baer Jr.). So far, so what? 
What did they do? 

That was the trouble. In order to 
properly classify a new epidemic, a 
scientist must isolate it, study its eti- 
ology, ascertain what characteristics 
and qualities are constant in its growth 
and development, discover and define 
its basic pattern. But Kildare, Casey, 
Gillespie and Zorba could only con- 
clude that the pattern of this new 
epidemic was the fact that it was 
patternless. 

Or to put it much more simply: 
When the Clampetts burst onto the 
TV screen, all tarnation breaks loose 
and anything and everything can and 
does happen. Perhaps actor Buddy 
Ebsen himself, stepping out of his 
role of Jed Clampett, has best ex- 
plained it: "The audience can never 
predict the lines or what's going to 
happen next. It's the least obvious, 
most unpredictable material I've ever 
been associated with." 

"Unpredictable" because the Clamp- 
etts, suddenly transplanted from a 
backwoods, run-down shack in the 
scraggly Ozarks hills to the neon-lit, 
swimming-pool sophistication of lush 
Beverly Hills, go wild in their new 
surroundings. When hillbilly rustic 
runs into big city slicker, something's 
got to give — and it's usually the slick 
sophisticate who gives ground before 
the rustic rascality of Jed, the cussed- 
ness of Grannie, the luscious charms of 
Elly May and the callow "Li'l Abner" 
bumptiousness of Big Jethro. 

The action, as the scientists dis- 
covered, was unpredictable and un- 
subtle. Crude, you might even say. An 
explosive blending of corn and slap- 
stick. Why, these hillbilly hicks couldn't 
tell a sphygmomanometer from a oto- 
ophthalmoscope ... or encephalo- 
myelopathy from hypengyophobia . . . 
or logomania from palkinsesia. Why 
they probably thought streptomycin 
was a perfume used by stripteasers. 
Why . . . 



Why is the public so susceptible to 
the Beverly Hillbillies epidemic? (If 
you can't clearly classify and isolate 
the contagion, the next best thing is to 
find out why and how people contract 
it and then set about trying to immu- 
nize them against it.) Perhaps old Dr. 
Zorba, in his off-screen person of Sam 
Jaffe, once gave us a clue. "This is 
the age of anxiety," he said. "It's the 
age of neurosis, and people need help. 
Who can help people?" 

Jaffe's diagnosis of society's ills was 
undoubtedly true, but his own answer 
to his last question ("the doctor," he 
said) is not completely borne out by 
the findings of recent program popu- 
larity ratings. For the public, by mak- 
ing "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "The 
Lucy Show" more popular than "Ben 
Casey" — and by also ranking Skelton, 
Thomas and Andy Griffith ahead of 
"Dr. Kildare" — seems to be giving a 
resounding answer: "The comedian." 

This does appear to be the year in 
which the comic and the comedy show 
prevail. Carol Burnett is receiving 
more money than almost any other 
female in show-business history, Jackie 
Gleason has skyrocketed back onto 
the American scene. Jack Paar, Steve 
Allen, Jack Benny and Joey Bishop 
are showing no signs of wear. Laughter 
is to be found on every channel: "Car 
54, Where Are You?", "Dennis the 
Menace," "Dobie Gillis," "Don't Call 
Me Charlie," "The Flintstones," "Ha- 
zel," "I'm Dickens . . . He's Fenster," 
"Jetsons," "McHale's Navy," "Our Man 
Higgins," "The ReaLMcCoys" (a show 
that's a kissin' cousin to "The Beverly 
Hillbillies") and "Tonight" — to men- 
tion just some of them. 

Calling the psychiatrist! 

Okay. Okay. We're all anxious and 
we want to forget our troubles and the 
way for us to do this is by laughing. 
But the question remains: Why does 
the public 4augh louder and longer and 
more often at the Beverly Hillbillies 
than at anyone else? 

To arrive at an answer to this ques- 
tion, perhaps Zorba, Gillespie, Casey 
and Kildare ought to seek the advice 
of another member of their TV medi- 
cal fraternity, a psychiatrist, the ex- 
pert on mental health (and illness) 
played by Wendell Corey on "The 
Eleventh Hour." If Corey weren't too 
busy worrying, he might point out the 
significant fact that "The Beverly 
Hillbillies" is the Number One show 
in the nation despite the fact that "Ben 
Casey" still tops the polls in thirty of 
the largest cities in the United States. 
This seems to indicate that viewers in 
smaller cities, towns and rural com- 
munities tend to identify most closely 
with the Clampetts. 

Why? Couldn't it be that in a world 
grown too complex and difficult it's 
reassuring to see simple, uncompli- 
cated people win out over their less 
simple, more clever antagonists? Not 
that city dwellers can't and don't also 
envy the Clampetts. Who doesn't envy 
someone who's able to solve problems 
the direct, quick, easy way? You 
weren't invited to that party? — be a 




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Gampett; crash it. You're being ig- 
nored by the waiter? — be a Clampett; 
grab a pie from the next table and 
hurl it in his face. 

Awfully hard to immunize the public 
against an epidemic which does that 
for people, the doctors have found. So 
their problem now becomes purely 
selfish: How can we save ourselves 
(our popularity, ratings, prestige)? 

One answer, suggested by "Ben 
Casey's" producer, is "love." Not to 
"love" the enemy, the Hillbillies — that 
would be asking too much. But to put 
more love interest into the show: "Ben 
Casey will kiss anesthesiologists, nurses, 
women doctors and other girls in the 
hospital — but only if it comes natural- 
ly in the script." 

Another possibility, based on Vince 
Edwards' own statement about the 
show ("we're getting out of the hos- 
pital more"), would be for Dr. Casey 
to go to the Ozarks. Then he could 
have a big-big scene in which he de- 
livers a baby on a cabin table (flicker- 
ing lantern light; "hot water — more 
hot water"; the infant's first cry as the 
doctor smacks its behind) and asks the 
mother to name it after his inspiration, 
Dr. Zorba. Might even intrigue some 
Clampett fans by calling the episode, 
"The Hillbilly Doctor." 

Or perhaps the doctors can't be 
saved from the Beverly Hillbillies epi- 
demic. Maybe Mort Sahl wasn't kid- 
ding when he intoned solemnly, "Ben 
Casey, you . have thirty-nine weeks to 
live . . ." 

Ben Casey, Ben Casey . . . Dr. Kil- 
dare. Dr. Kildare, don't let what hap- 
pened this past Christmas fool you into 
complacency. We know that hundreds 
of thousands of girls bought Ben Casey 
blouses and that hundreds of thou- 
sands of boys received Dr. Kildare sur- 
gical smocks and masks. We know that 
the whole family now plays the Dr. 
Kildare Board Game (featuring "dis- 
eases, symptoms and hospital adminis- 
tration"), which they found under the 
tree, while Dad times each player's 
moves with his Ben Casey watch. We 
know that late at night, when the chil- 
dren are tucked in bed, father buries 
his nose in a Dr. Kildare paperback 
book, and mother gazes fondly at a 
Ben Casey statuette. And we know the 
two of you get royalties from all this. 

But Dr. Kildare . . . Ben Casey, all 
this could be fleeting. Already the 
manufacturers are figuring out ways to 
melt down miniature ambulances and 
recast them into one-gallon moonshine 
crocks. Already the designers are plan- 
ning to convert medical tunics into 
blue jeans. 

Birth . . . death . . . time . . . life 
. . . fortune . . . infinity. None of it 
matters except one thing, more impor- 
tant than Neilsen popularity polls, 
more significant than the plans of toy 
manufacturers and clothes designers: 
The Beverly Hillbillies are going to 
have their pictures on bubblegum 
cards. 

Ben Casey . . . Dr. Kildare, is this 
The End? — Jim Hoffman 

"The Beverly Hillbillies" run riot on 
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101 



LUCILLE BALL 

(Continued from page 58) 

Danny Thomas Show." "The Real Mc- 
Coys" and "The Untouchables" were 
still going strong. 

Stock in the corporation was drop- 
ping so fast, rumors were out that 
Desilu might fold. At one point in 
1960, its stock was selling at $5 a 
share, a sorry lapse from the $29 a 
share of two years before. Then Clint 
Murchison, the Texas oil tycoon, had 
ambled up to Desi at the Del Mar 
race track and casually offered him 
eleven million for the Desilu prop- 
erties. 

Those were the days when Desi could 
just as casually reply: "Not nearly 
enough." He was so wound up in prov- 
ing himself a businessman, it is doubt- 
ful that he'd have accepted twice that 
eleven million. In this respect. Desi 
had an added incentive to make good. 
Desilu had once been RKO Studios, 
and Desi had been fired by that stu- 
dio's front office. Its reins were now 
in his hands, and he grimly com- 
mented. "They think I'm just a bongo 
player . . . well. I will make them eat 
the bongos before I'm through." 

It was also a period when Lucy was 
quick to express her whole faith in her 
husband's acumen. "When Desi sets 
his mind to something, it's no laughing 
matter," she declared. "He's a tough 
competitor, and if he says he'll make 
a success of the studio. I believe he 
will. . . ." She went on to explain that 
between 1954 and 1959. when they 
were the undisputed king and queen 
of television, it was Desi who ruled the 
roost in matters of management and 
studio strategy. His advice and views 
were humbly sought, and he was re- 
spected by many who were famous as 
barons long before he'd made his mark 
in show business. 

A million-dollar mistake 

When Lucy was drifting on Cloud 
Nine, just prior to her marrying Gary 
Morton, she still came down to earth 
long enough to say: "Over the years, I 
watched a brilliant mind bloom. Desi 
was so ambitious, he learned every job 
connected with our show before he 
hired people to do them. He has some 
kind of inner radar . . . intuition, if 
you like. It tells him what show to pick 
and who'd be good in it. And he has a 
mathematical mind to go with this." 

It was this mathematical mind that 

earned Desi his first big plus-mark in 

the industry. When he and Lucy first 

went into TV, CBS tossed them the 

budget for the show. Desi refused to 

sign without studying the small print. 

Finally he told Lucy, "They have made 

a million-dollar mistake. Their figures 

are wrong." What's more, he proved it 

to CBS. From then on, people listened 

when Desi spoke. 

T Then what went wrong with the 

v brillance that was Desi's? There is a 

r danger here in oversimplifying. The 

truth will probably stay as much of a 

mystery as its twin question: "What 

102 



went wrong with the happiness that 
was Desi's and Lucy's?" Only they 
know, and even they probably aren't 
sure. Fires grow cold. There is no 
brightness that does not tend to tar- 
nish after a while. That's why fires 
must be refueled and silver polished 
from time to time. 

So with Desi, the studio chief. He 
was tops in his job, but he himself 
would be the first to grant that he be- 
came a businessman only because he 
had to. Like many other stars, he had 
to do this out of a need for self-pro- 
tection. Contracts, taxes, labor, capital 
investments, huge overhead, all of this 
is the headache now of producer-enter- 
tainers, where once it was entirely the 
burden of big studios. 

There is evidence that, at the start, 
Desi and Lucy had very modest plans. 
"We'll try it for five years," they 
agreed, "then we'll take our loot and 
run like the devil to where we can sit 
back and enjoy life. . . ." 

Alas, for the plans of mice and men. 
The small venture grew and grew 
until, when the five years were up, 
Desi was trapped. "How can we let 
all those people go?" he pleaded. 
"There are about two thousand who 
look to us for their jobs. . . ." So Lucy 
yielded, and the monster grew still 
more, until it towered over the world 
of television. There was no longer any 
talk of Desi's quitting. 

With the acquisition of new shows, 
new problems and harassments were 
also acquired. There was no time for 
relaxation, for enjoyment of home life, 
for the savoring of intimate family 
pleasures. Even when Desi took a vaca- 
tion in Europe, it was to scout new 
projects. The studio had become an 
obsession. Lucy's attempts to clown 
it up no longer made him smile. 

Lucy began to fret and feel the pres- 
sure building. She argued constantly 
that he was working too hard, that he 
ought to unwind by spending more 
time with the children. It was, she 
knew, her best argument. Desi adored 
his kids. If this failed to move him, 
obviously nothing would. "What can I 
do?" Desi would reply in desperation. 
"My desk, it is piled with work. . . ." 

Some time ago, a Desilu executive 
commented: "Desi has had it up to 
here . . . not with Lucy and her show, 
but with work in general. Why, even 
his horses are given more rest and feed 
time than he ever gave himself." This 
prediction was amply supported by 
Desi's strange behavior. His open ca- 
rousings, his flaunting of showgirls at 
the Las Vegas casinos, the track and 
on Sunset Strip, and his increasing 
"unavailability" at his office ... all 
this added up to a serious crisis with- 
in the man. He had worked too hard; 
now he was playing too hard. Lucy's 
happy re-marriage to Gary Morton 
didn't help. The abyss was opening un- 
der him. 

Whom does Desi love now? 

Then, so suddenly it took the breath 
out of Hollywood, Desi seemed to have 
found a measure of happiness. People 
who watched him at the races said 



that he seemed more like the old Desi. 
They attributed this in part to the 
vivacious company of Edie Mack 
Hirsch, pretty, red-headed ex-wife of 
multi-millionaire horse-breeder and 
dog-food tycoon Clement Hirsch. A 
new flock of rumors flew that this bud- 
ding romance would soon spell m-a-r- 
r-i-a-g-e. 

Desi only chuckled when asked. "We 
both like horses," he allowed, then fol- 
lowed this with his old quick, magnetic 
grin and a remark that had a sound 
of significance. "Edie likes to win 
races, but to stay out of the spotlight." 
Desi once bought a horse for $32,000, 
then said with a sigh, "Look who gets 
her picture on the front page with that 
nag? Lucy!" 

On Lucy's side, taking over as presi- 
dent of Desilu will not mean the type 
of frantic immersion in work that it 
did with Desi. She is of a more even 
temperament and more likely to resist 
the tensions and pressures of her job. 
She believes in delegating tasks, sav- 
ing herself for major decisions and 
her show, and giving "a healthy chunk 
of time to Gary and my children." She 
takes the stand that: "You only have 
a limited reserve of energy and emo- 
tional force. To squander that is fool- 
ish and risky to your personal happi- 
ness. I learned this from Gary." 

On the other hand, Lucy is a pretty 
fair business woman. "That's some- 
thing I learned from Desi," she points 
out. "But I don't intend to play Atlas 
and carry it all on my back." 

About Gary, she merely repeats his 
avowed intention "to stay out of studio 
affairs, strictly." With her new-found 
serenity and contentment, a condition 
she unhesitatingly puts to Gary's credit, 
and with the anxiety over Desi's latter- 
day handling of the business now done 
with, and the pilot's wheel securely in 
her hands, Lucy faces the future with 
confidence and aplomb. 

Desi, too, if once he did play Atlas, 
is now an Atlas who shrugged and let 
the troubles of his little world fly free. 
His immediate plans include "manag- 
ing my Indian Wells Hotel in Palm 
Springs . . . adding new stock to my 
horse-breeding farm in Corona . . . 
spending lots of time with my kids . . . 
and maybe, just maybe, after I have a 
long rest, going back into some TV 
production." 

How about marriage? What are his 
plans with regard to Edie Hirsch? 

"Who says we have plans? We both 
like horses. . . ." 

Desi was hedging. His friends think 
Edie will be the next Mrs. Arnaz, but 
that the marriage will be as sudden 
as his divorce from Desilu. 

There were no tears at this parting, 
no lingering goodbyes, and neither 
seems to be looking back over a shoul- 
der. If anything, both Lucy and Desi 
seem to feel a sense of relief. 

"Everybody's happy now," sighs an 
official at the studio. "Even the stock- 
holders — because we're flying again, 
up, up, up. . . ." Then, for luck, he 
crossed his fingers. — Kathleen Post 

Lucille Ball stars in "The Lucy Show," 
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MARCH, 1963 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 59, NO. 4 





The dress. The perfect dress. The dress 
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IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 



Connie Stevens 6 

Art Carney 25 

Richard Chamberlain 26 

Jackie Kennedy 28 

Donna Douglas 30 

Loretta Young 33 

James Philbrook 36 

Vincent Edwards 38 

Pay-TV 42 

Roger Smith 44 

Kathy Godfrey 46 

Fashion 48 

David Nelson 50 

Durward Kirby 52 

Bergen & Silvers 55 

Donna Reed 58 

Lawrence Welk 60 



The Wedding That Couldn't Wait Eunice Field 

Why He Was Arrested George Carpozi Jr. 

His Crowded Honeymoon Jim Hoffman 

Her Legacy from Eleanor Roosevelt Leslie Valentine 

What Country Girls Know About Love! . . . .Louise Ronka 

The Price She Paid Doris James 

Loretta's New Lover William Tusher 

He Finally Does It ! Ed DeBlasio 

What Do You Think? ... Is Pay-TV Worth Paying For? 
I Tried to Save a Murderer. . . .as told to Nancy Anderson 

Why Arthur and I Are Apart Jodie Andrews 

How to Have a Happy Ending! Barbara Marco 

His Answer to Dr. Spock Jerry Asher 

My Funny Valentine Mrs. Durward Kirby 

What Are These Stars Looking At? Bill Kobrin 

The Truth Will Surprise You! Favius Friedman 

Married Love Cindy Adams 



BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 



17 
18 



Folk Music 20 Album Reviews 

Music Makers in the News 24 Tops in Singles 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 



4 Information Booth 14 

8 What's at the Movies? 72 

10 Earl Wilson's Inside Story 96 



What's New? 
Photographers' Credits 
Your Monthly Ballot 



I SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 



Mike Douglas 

Mary Jo Tierney 

Anderson, Tully 

Grant Williams 



65 Mr. Mike (KYW-TV) 

66 The Girl With Go! (KMSP-TV) 
68 "San Francisco Beat" (CBS Films) 

70 Care and Feeding of Husbands (KMOX) 



CLAIRE SAFRAN, Editor 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
CAROL ROSS, Regional Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



JACK J. PODELL, Editorial Director 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
ALEXANDRA TARASEWICH, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty-Fashion Editor 



BOBBY SCOTT, Music Editor 



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Anita Kaye, Fresno, Calif. 

She does — and something did. 
Turn to page 61 — Ed. 

Whose New Husband? 

I thought the story about Dinah 
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Thanks for printing it — and for hav- 
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Alice Calb, Orange, N.J. 

Come on, now, who are you trying 
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D.M., Denver, Colo. 

You Sure Don't! 

You sure don't have to be a bride 
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Barbie Frankel, Sharon, Pa. 

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F.D.W.. Dodge City, Kan. 



Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you're interested, write 
to the addresses given below — not to 
TV Radio Mirror. 

Vince Edwards Fan Club, Shirley 
Ann Gasch, 9510 Nowell Drive, 
Bethesda 14, Md. 

Lucille Ball Fan Club, Ronald 
Yates Warden, 606 West Graham 
Road, Richmond 22, Va. 

Bobby Darin Fan Club, Gerry 
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Pat^Boone Fan Club, Florence 
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Robert Goulet Fan Club, Barbara 
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McGuire Sisters Fan Club, Linda 
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Brenda Lee Fan Club, Deb Wolin, 
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Your Favorite Stars' 
Hometowns 

Andy Williams — Wall Lake, Iowa 
Lome Greene — Ottawa, Ont., Canada 
Dan Blocker — Bowie County, Texas 
Pernell Roberts — Waycross, Ga. 
Dinah Shore — Nashville, Tenn. 
Jack Paar — Canton, Ohio 
Joey Bishop — Philadelphia, Pa. 
Abby Dalton — Las Vegas, Nev. 
Danny Thomas — Deerfield, Mich. 
Loretta Young— Salt Lake City, Utah 
Merv Griffin — San Mateo, Calif. 
Perry Como — Canonsburg, Pa. 
Bill Cullen— Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Shari Lewis — New York City 



Write Information Booth. TV Radio Mirror, 
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R.M.S., Wis. 




CONNIE STEVENS AND GARY CLARKE 



\ ] 



'i 1 



\ ] 



i 



I 





«Stai«. 



m 



T 
V 
R 



It's been on and off with us for five 
' long years," said Gary Qarke, "but 
now we're officially engaged." 

"Five years," echoed Connie Stevens. 
"People would say they knew I was 
Italian and then ask me why the Irish 
engagement." 

"I proposed Christmas Eve and Con- 
nie looked at me with those big eyes 
and said, 'Why, Gary, this is so sud- 
den ... I need time to think it over.' 
Okay, I told her, you've got one min- 
ute!" 

"But I didn't need a minute," Con- 
nie breathed. "I just said, yes, yes, yes. 
We both felt we'd waited much too 
long. We need each other . . ." 

Thus, as February 9th — the day set 
for the wedding — approaches, the 
families and friends of these popular 
young stars are keeping their fingers 



crossed that nothing happens this time 
to upset the applecart. The feeling is 
that this wedding has waited so long 
that it can't afford to wait one day long- 
er. If it does, it may never come off! 
Connie herself told us, "If I haven't 
married Gary by February 9th, I don't 
think I'll ever marry him!" 

Even Hollywood's skeptics, who have 
seen several wedding dates set and 
then broken by Connie and Gary, 
are convinced — almost — that this time 
nothing could make them back away 
from the altar. In fact, as we write 
this — or at any time between now and 
February 9th — it's possible that pony- 
tailed Cricket of "Hawaiian Eye" and 
dashing Steve of "The Virginian" may 
pull an elopement and become man 
and wife. But not probable. Connie and 
Gary are set on being married in the 



Catholic Church whose faith they share. 
It was three years ago, exactly, that 
Gary gave Connie a friendship ring for 
Christmas. "It was," said Gary at the 
time, "meant to be more than a symbol 
of friendship ... it meant she was 
mine." Yet within a few months, their 
happy dreams of marital bliss were 
shattered. Gary's career was seesawing, 
and just then he was on the downward 
trend. Rather than let Connie support 
him until he got a break — or salve his 
conscience, as so many husbands of 
Hollywood stars do, by "managing" the 
little woman's career — Gary told her 
the marriage would have to wait until 
he was on a par with her as a money- 
maker and a name. "I have nothing to 
offer but love," he told her. Connie, 
hurt, could only retort, "Love should be 
enough ... it (Continued on page 96) 



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To see or not to see: George Guttingham answers your movie questions 



eVW Lawrence of Arabia 

COLUMBIA; SUPERPANIVISION, 
TECHNICOLOR 

This is a fantastic show: Four hours 
(including intermission) of adven- 
turous episodes in the life of one of 
the oddball heroes of all time, filmed 
with really astounding beauty on the 
deserts of Arabia, with a cast that 
includes Alec Guinness, Anthony 
Quinn, Jack Hawkins, Jose Ferrer, 
Claude Rains, Arthur Kennedy, and 
an Irish newcomer, Peter O'Toole, as 
T. E. Lawrence, the British corporal 
who became a fabulous leader of the 
Arabs. If you like adventure films, 
this is the biggest and the best. If you 
don't like them, "Lawrence" may be 
the blockbuster to change your mind. 

W/V To Kill a Mockingbird 

UNIVERSAL 

A wonderful novel has been made 
into a fine movie. "To Kill a Mocking- 
bird" is a magic blend of "Tom 
Sawyer," "Frankenstein," "Tobacco 
Road" and "Counselor-At-Law." The 
story concerns a brother and sister, 
growing up in a small Alabama town 
of the 1930s, and their lawyer father 
who defends a Negro accused of rap- 
ing a white girl. Mary Badham and 
Phillip Alford are two of the best 
child actors you'll ever see. Thanks 
to their naturalness, many scenes cap- 
ture something that's very rare in 
movies — the truth of childhood. Greg- 
ory Peck does a fine job, too, as 
Atticus Finch, the widowed lawyer. 
Some of the people and events that 
you may have enjoyed in the novel 
have been left out of this screen ver- 
sion, and that's a shame. But enough 
of the good things are there to make 
this one of the best movies you'll see 
in a long time. 



I'W Forty Pounds of Trouble 

universal; panavision, color 
A fast-paced romantic comedy (with 
the emphasis on the comedy) that 
guarantees light-hearted entertain- 
ment for the whole family. Tony 
Curtis appears as a Nevada casino 
manager who's wanted in California 
for non-payment of alimony. Six-year- 
old Claire Wilcox plays an orphan 
left on his doorstep, and Suzanne 
Pleshette is a singer who would rather 
be a housewife. Their day at Disney- 
land, pursued by Tony's ex's detec- 
tives, is one of the funniest sequences 
I've seen in ages. Some moments have 
all the flavor of old-time Charlie 
Chaplin-Buster Keaton days. Phil 
Silvers and Larry Storch also con- 
tribute to the fun. 

*V Freud 

UNIVERSAL 

For the thinkers in the family. This is 
an interesting and thought-provoking 
film, but the script is often so wordy 
and pedantic that you may think you 
wandered into a lecture hall instead 
of a movie house. The story is con- 
cerned largely with Freud's discovery 
of the Oedipus Complex — the idea 
that a boy is attracted to his mother 
and jealous of his father. Maybe you 
buy it and maybe you don't, but in 
Freud's day, you learn, it was pretty 
hot stuff. Montgomery Clift is Freud, 
complete with thoughtful expression 
and whiskers. Larry Parks plays a 
colleague with whom he has long talks 
about hypnosis, hysteria, dream analy- 
sis and all. Susannah York does the 
best acting job, as an attractive nut. 

*V The Lion 

20th century; cinemascope, color 
Magnificent color photography, an 



interesting location (Africa), and in- 
ternational stars (William Holden, 
Trevor Howard, Capucine). But the 
story, about a little Nature Girl whose 
best friend is a lion, is more for 
children than for adults. (There's a 
second plot, about her divorced par- 
ents getting together again, but that is 
strictly for yawns.) Kiddies, especially 
kiddies who love animals, should find 
it enjoyable. The color shots — of the 
African landscape, the wild animals, 
and the actual natives — are truly 
wonderful. > 

W A Child Is Waiting 

united artists 
This film about retarded children and 
the anguish and bitterness of their 
parents is deeply touching and in- 
structive, but a spectator who is not 
immediately concerned with this par- 
ticular problem may find that con- 
stant sadness a little too much. Burt 
Lancaster, as a tough-minded doctor 
who fights to gain human dignity for 
the defective youngsters, and Judy 
Garland, as a lost woman who wants 
to help, are both excellent. 

** David and Lisa 

continental 
In a school for emotionally-disturbed 
adolescents, a handsome young psycho- 
neurotic meets an attractive young 
schizophrenic, and love — with a little 
help from psychiatry — leads the way 
to recovery. Believe it or not, this un- 
likely plot has been made into one 
of the most highly-praised movies of 
the year. Much credit must go to direc- 
tor Frank Perry for making a mediocre 
story look impressive, and to Keir 
Dullea, one of the most promising 
young actors around, for a really out- 
standing performance. 





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Merv Griffin's riding so high at 
NBC that some other stars are wor- 
ried about him getting "too hot" — 
for them. 

Because he certainly deserves to 
be promoted from afternoon to 
prime-time — and NBC knows he's 
got sex appeal as well as $ales ap- 
peal. But Merv swears he isn't after 
anybody's nighttime job. He would 
like to do some night shows of his 
own creation, but he doesn't hanker 
to try out on an after-dark schedule 
— so he insists — the Jack Paar 
formula that he handles so tri- 
umphantly in the daytime. 



Merv has one small worry of his 
own. 

Danny Kaye, Jerry Lewis and 

others who have been on his show 
have so loved the informal formula 
that they want to try it with shows 
of their own. 

"Suppose they all find they can 
do it . . . where will I be?" he asks. 

Then there's this thing called "ex- 
clusivity" — wherein one star (Ed 
Sullivan, Bob Hope or Jack 
Paar) can hire a guest star and not 
permit him to do another show for at 
least twenty-one days before or seven 
days after. 



It's legitimate — everybody does it 
■ — but sometimes it's forgotten by the 
big shows. Now that Merv's hot, he 
isn't getting the bigger boys to over- 
look it very often. 

"Robert Goulet can get $7,500 
or more from Jack Paar or Ed Sulli- 
van," Merv points out. 

"My scale is about $200. His 
agents can say, 'Why should he even 
bother to do your show for peanuts 
when he can get that kind of 
money?' They haven't said it — be- 
cause they're good friends of mine, 
and Bob's been on my show. But they 
could do it. They could work a 



KARL 





WM§^m 



WILSON'S 







£^::'?^-mv- 



/ 



■ :■■;■-■: ■ 



Special gossip section: Read it here first! Read it here right! Each and every 
month, TV Radio Mirror brings you the scoopiest column in any magazine! 



10 




Mark Goodson & Bill Todman, hostess Betty Furness — and the Bud Collyers — at TV Academy party for Mark & Bill. 



squeeze on me — and it would be 
legitimate." 

Danny Kaye's surely taking care 
of himself so nothing'll prevent him 
from being healthy for his fall TV 
series. After an appendectomy, he 
bowed out of the Second Inaugural 
Salute to President Kennedy, 
though it was a month later. A Holly- 
wood friend explained, "Don't you 
know Danny's a hypochondriac?" 
I'd never heard that — anyway, he's 
not as much of a hypochondriac as 
one of my friends, a Hollywood 
columnist, who has his offices in a 
drugstore and has made it famous. 
The Hollywoodians say, "He doesn't 
get a thing out of it, except all the 
pills he can take." 

When the "Nielsens" came in, the 
Kraft Players went out. 

That just about sums up why 
Perry Como scrapped the Kraft 



Players — Kaye Ballard, Sandy 
Stewart, Don Adams and Jack 
Duffy — from his regular Wednes- 
day night show. 

Perry this season has had the mis- 
fortune of being opposite the sea- 
son's biggest hit, "The Beverly Hill- 
billies," and though the Nielsen Rat- 
ings ordinarily don't pack much 
weight with someone who's been 
around as long as Perry has, the line 
had to be drawn somewhere. 

"I guess the show's writers are 
satisfied now," said Sandy Stewart, 
who was not angry about being 
dropped (she's now free to do big- 
ger things for bigger money) but 
was angry with the writers' refusal 
to write them into the show better. 

"It got worse as the weeks went 
by," said Sandy. "Finally, we were 
going into script meetings and find- 
ing out that we had next to nothing 
to do. When you find out the writers 
have given you two lines for the en- 



tire show, you can't help but feel 
that you're accepting money to do 
nothing. 

"But understand that I have ab- 
solutely no hard feelings about the 
decision at all. Being on the Como 
show gave me an opportunity to be 
seen and known publicly, and now 
I feel I can do more things — like 
with Andy Williams, Mitch 
Miller or Ed Sullivan. 

"There's one thing, though, that 
the producers may have overlooked. 

"Perry's regular audience may 
have grown used to the format of the 
Kraft Players, and there could be 
a bad public reaction when they dis- 
cover we're gone." 

The general feeling around the 
Como show is that the Kraft Players 
will give way to a blockbuster attrac- 
tion in order to recapture their old 
viewers — but this would be an out- 
right turn- (Please turn the page) 



11 




EARL ^ WILSON'S 



(Continued 



new all-purpose attraction on the 
basis of mail response, was used by 
"Candid Camera" last summer for 
a sketch in which her anonymity was 
essential. 

The show wasn't shown until re- 
cently — when she had already be- 
come a star in the viewers' eyes. 
But the point was that, at the time 
"Candid Camera" tapped her for the 
job, she was working in relative 
obscurity. 

The sketch involved Dorothy sit- 



bench-sitters, the show revealed, 
were too shy to return their "use- 
less" autograph. 

It's ironical that now these same 
shy bench-sitters have a valuable and 
treasured autograph from an "un- 
known." 

Jack Elam, a familiar TV and 
movie villain who's turned good-guy 
as a marshal in ABC's new show, 
"The Dakotas," boasts that there 
are few actors uglier than he — and 




Also at the star-studded party: Allen Ludden, Betty White — New York actors E. G. Marshall, Harry Belaver. 



about of Perry's philosophy, which 
was carefully developed on the basis 
of a sad experience. 

A couple of seasons ago, Perry 
shelled out an unprecedented $18,- 
500 to get Judy Holliday to appear. 
The result was one of Perry's lower 
ratings at the time — and, ever since 
then, he's been adamant about hir- 
ing high-priced talent. 

TV is like this: Dorothy Lou- 
don, the lovely singing comedienne 
who will become Garry Moore's 



ting on a park bench somewhere in 
New Jersey. While regular bench- 
sitters cast nary an eye on the un- 
familiar face, "Candid Camera's" 
hired hands ran up to her, yelling 
for an autograph "from the famous 
star." Dorothy complied. And, soon 
after, the regular bench-sitters de- 
cided to do likewise. 

A few minutes after, the same 
hired hands returned, held out their 
piece of paper with her autograph 
and said, "Here, we thought you 
were a somebody." The regular 



fewer still that work as steady as he 
does. 

"Do women think you're ugly?" 
I asked him. 

"In a word, yes. But there's an 
instinctive rejection that later turns 
to interest," he says. 

"Guys in the street come up to 
shake my hand, though. 'My wife 
sees you on TV,' they say, 'and 
hates you. By comparison, they think 
I'm Clark Gable.' " 

Jack paid his first visit to New 
York recently, and one of the sites 



12 



he wanted to see first was Central 
Park. 

"But it's night, and you're liable 
to get mugged," a friend protested. 

"What, are you kidding?" Jack 
replied. "I've been in Tijuana and 
plenty of tough places; the hoods 
leave me alone. They figure I'm one 
of them!" 

"Name-Dropping" Dept.: 
Peter Lind Hayes, who says he 
does his own teeth-gnashing bit when 



Don't Print That: The verdict 
on why one big-name show was 
dropped: Senseless violence (if it's 
violent, it's got to be meaningfully 
violent, see?). . . . Back in the days 
before video tape wiped out a sus- 
tained performance, one actor was 
bragging how he managed to inject 
a naughty word into a script be- 
cause he felt it fit his character bet- 
ter than the writer's softer term. 
Luckily, there was no public outcry 
afterward. . . . There's a rumor afoot 



Divide and Conquer: If you're 
one of those who suspect that CBS- 
TV's "College Bowl" and ABC- 
TV's "Alumni Fun" look suspi- 
ciously similar, you're right. 

But there won't be any suits 
brought to court, because both shows 
are the inspiration of one firm. 

Fearless Forecasts: CBS has 
now signed Judy Garland for a 

regular series, to stack her alongside 
Danny Kaye as a double-threat 




Cop" Horace McMahon brought his wife — so did Bill Cullen. All show biz saluted the panel-show "packagers" ! 



he's called "Mr. Healy," couldn't 
resist telling the story of how two 
ladies came up to him and Jack 
Lescoulie late one evening in Toots 
Shor's and heaped praise upon 
praise on both of them. As they 
were leaving, one lady said to Les- 
coulie : 

"Oh, I enjoy you so much on the 
Tomorrow show." 

Jack didn't have time to recover 
— because the other lady said: 

"Well, it was so nice meeting you, 
Mr. Lugosi." 



that one of TV's most highly-re- 
spected drama programs is going to 
bow out after this season. ... A high- 
ly controversial story that would 
bring the wrath of Washington down 
upon any network's neck has been 
politely turned down by all three 
networks for that reason. (It was 
brought to the attention of ABC 
News chief Jim Hagerty, just 
shortly after the much-publicized 
Howard K. Smith "Nixon Obitu- 
ary," and Hagerty 's comment was: 
"Good heavens, not now!") 



to ABC's landing of Jerry Lewis. 
. . . Brigitte Bardot's Paris TV 
stints will be a sensation in the 
U.S. if anybody can land them for 
here. . . . One big TV star is about 
to kill himself — drinking. . . . 
Jackie Gleason will hit 300 pounds 
on the scales — if he doesn't already. 
. . . Audrey Meadows shows little 
anxiety about returning to TV, and 
no wonder. She and her husband 
went around the world this past year 
- — twice. 

— That's Earl 



13 




by EUNICE FIELD 



Wedding Bells: "All it needs is a 
bride," quipped David Nelson, look- 
ing at his younger brother's home in 
the Hollywood Hills . . . and a bride it 
will get, when Rick Nelson, 22, weds 
Kristin Harmon, 18, this spring! The 
happy couple will live, at least tem- 
porarily, in the ranch-style five-room 
house (furnished in modern decor, with 
an outdoor playroom and swimming 
pool). . . . Time? "After Easter," says 
Kris, "since we can't marry during 
Lent." They plan a church wedding 
and Rick's taking instructions in the 
Catholic faith, though there's no talk 
of becoming a convert at present. . . . 
Proud parents Harriet and Ozzie 
have long been close friends of Kris's 



mother, former actress Elyse Knox, 
and father Tom Harmon, noted 
KTLA-TV and network sportscaster. 
Tom was Ail-American at the U. of 
Michigan, Ozzie was a first-string quar- 
terback at Rutgers ... so it's not sur- 
prising that their youngsters met at a 
"sports event" — a basketball match 
between Stage 5 Productions (the 
Nelson studio) and the Los Angeles 
Sportscasters. . . . That was five years 
ago. Rick was already tops on records 
and TV — and Kris, not yet 14, was 
"scared stiff" at meeting him! It wasn't 
until a year-and-a-half ago, when the 
Harmons were guests at the Nelsons' 
Laguna Beach home, that he took a 
really good look at her and decided 



she wasn't "too young" for him to date. 
. . . Honey-blond, gentle, soft-spoken, 
with "big blue eyes like a doe" (Rick's 
own words), Kris is a ballet student 
and a Marymount High School grad, 
currently painting and sculpting at the 
Otis Art Institute . . . but has no show- 
bir aspirations. Most of their dates 
have been spent watching games — 
Rick's roommate and best pal, Charlie 
Britt, is a Rams football star— or tak- 
ing part in such sports as water-skiing, 
swimming, boating. Kris's engagement 
ring, a solitaire in an antique Tiffany 
setting, is identical to the one from 
Ozzie which Harriet wears so proudly 
. . . and the one Dave gave his bride, 
June Blair, two years ago. The two 



Tommy Sands is proud of Nancy, but her mom is worried! 





14 






Making news this month: Rick and Kris . . . Paul Petersen (shown with Jay North) . . . Ann Sothern (with Cesar Romero). 



newly-engageds often baby-sit with 
Dave's and June's wee son Daniel — 
not yet one-year-old. "Too young to 
be ring-bearer," chuckles Rick . . . 
who admits that he and Kris are hoping 
for a family of "at least" three chil- 
dren. Danny's dad, of course, will be 
best man for the wedding— and his 
mom will be in the bridal party, too. 



In Memoriam: All Hollywood mourns 
the passing of Dick Powell and Jack 
Carson . . . both so long a beloved 
and creative part of TV and moviedom. 
Coming so soon after the loss of 
Charles Laughton and Thomas 
Mitchell, the string of tragedies 
topped even the dreaded show busi- 
ness axiom that "death comes by 
threes" for its greatest men. 



Weather Report: "Wide Country" 
hotting up fast; Andy Prine and 
Lynn Loring warm and sunny; Earl 
Holliman, Nikki Jamison and/or 
Judy Carne, Lynn's "Fair Exchange" 
co-star — mild, with variable winds. 
. . . The thermometer's really boiling 
for some others — aside from Rick and 
Kris, we mean! Singer Frankie Avalon 
also got himself engaged — to model 
Kay Diebel. . . . "Laramie's" Bob Ful- 
ler keeps denying that he and actress 
Patricia Lynn are married — and he 
should know! . . . There's a new 
star in the Ann Sothern family, and 
she's really been warming up the New 
York scene. Despite freezing weather 
and a long-lasting newspaper strike, 



Ann's 18-year-old debutante daughter, 
Trish Sterling, was a sizzling success, 
making her bow before High Society! 



So Who Needs Penicillin? John 
Simpson, TV's "Archie" (slated for 
next season), went to a party, met 
singer Judy Harriet, lent her his coat 
because it was a cold night and hers 
had turned up missing — then prompt- 
ly came down with wheezes, sneezes 
and coughs. But John has recovered 
nicely, and without antibiotics. How? 
Judy put a cool hand on his brow and 
fed him hot soup, that's how. . . . Ah, 
I'amour! Paul Petersen and Lori 
Martin have got to the cuddly stage. 
. . . The apple of Sinatra's eye, young 
Nancy, making a dramatic debut in 
"The Virginian." Frank Jr. also prov- 
ing himself a ringadinger like Dad, but 
giving his mother, Nancy Sr., some 
concern. She's afraid he may get hurt 
in the theatrical rat-race. . . . Milty 
Berle, producer-director of "A Dia- 
mond Is a Man's Best Friend," calls the 
film "a jewel of a baseball yarn." (And 
talking of baseball, what top movie 
queen was rumored that way about 
what already-wed Dodger star?) . . . 
Joe E. Brown will tour the country to 
tonic senior citizens-with-tired-blood. 



"Opening" Night: Suzanne Plesh- 
ette, Troy Donahue's doll, couldn't 
make the premiere of "Long Day's 
Journey" because she was attending 
another kind of opening — her mouth, 
at the dentist's. . . . Lee Cobb's be- 



lated Xmas gift to family — a new 
home. . . . From Bing to Bear: Mary 
Martin, a hit on Bing Crosby's TV 
spec, returned to New York to rest 
up for her fall Broadway show, "Jen- 
nie," in which she'll dance with a 
trained bear. Producer husband Rich- 
ard Halliday is hoping to get Dan 
Dailey to co-star. 



J.F.K.. Let's! Now wouldn't it be fun 
— and fair play besides — if Vaughn 
Meader was the first comic to be as- 
sassinated by a "First Family"? Mead- 
er, his album an all-time record- 
breaker, goes to Vegas Sahara in April 
at $20,000 a week! . . . Deejay Dick 
Whitinghill wants a sequel to that 
Warners' film hit. Calls it "Baby Jane 
Meets Lennon Sisters." . . . Bette 
Davis's fan mail was so heavy after 
her stint on the Andy Williams show, 
she's prepping a niteclub act. Bets are 
on her and Katie Hepburn to fight 
it out for an Oscar. But that miracle- 
worker Anne Bancroft may get thar 
fustest with the mostest. 



The Fall Guy: Snaps Hank Henry, 
Vegas burlesque star, "Gimme the old 
times. Red Skelton was tops in baggy 
pants. He's still tops, but on TV he's 
got to act refined, like an M.C. — 
Master of Ceremonies." "How about 
you?" he was asked. "Oh, I'm still 
an M.P.— Master of Pratfalls," he 
popped. . . . Blond Kathy Craw- t 
ford recently did a "Wagon Train" * 
drama-episode (Please turn the page) 



15 



continued 

with Fabian. It was titled "Good- 
bye to All That" but should've been 
called "Hello to All This"— 'cuz 
they've been dating since. . . . George 
Montgomery won't go to parties 
without first checking to see if ex- 
frau Dinah Shore will be there. If 
she will, he won't. ... As for George 
Nader and Kathy Browne, one 
word: when? . . . Jackie Kennedy led 
the best-dressed list again this year. 
The only actress to make it was Gloria 
Vanderbilt. 



The Old Order Changes: When 
"Prince" Mike Romanoff shut the 
doors of his famous eatery, it marked 
the end of an era. Said Mike sadly, 
"Nowadays we have actors, but no 
stars, no glamour. The new crop don't 
even know how to order a meal, let 
alone eat it." . . . Bob Horton and 
NBC ripped the millyun-dollar con- 
tract. He's signed for a B'way musical. 
. . . Hugh O'Brian and Soraya still? 



Doberman Pincher: Quoth Mau- 
rice Gosfield (he played Doberman 
on the old Phil Silvers show): "My 
agent calls me and sez, 'Hodja like to 
do a movie?' Seein' me as a sorta 
Yves Montand, oney more Conti- 
nental-like, I sez, 'Send quick the script.' 
I give it a look. Oy! It's a bit part. 
I calls him back and hollers, 'What 
gives? A dozen well-chosen words like 
dis and dat!' So my agent says, 'Nah, 
Morrie, it's what they calls a cameo, 
see?' ... 'A cameo,' sez I with dig- 
nity, 'is what I bought my mom in the 
five-and-dime when I was a kid.' Then 
he tells me what Ross Hunter, the 
perducer, is gonna shell out. I feels 
the loose change in my pocket and I 
sez, 'Cameo-shmameo. . . . For that 
kinda dough, I'll play a cigar-store 
Indian without even one woid.' So 
what'd dey do? Dey takes a Richard 
Burton type like me and puts him to 
shovelin" soap bubbles outta some 
crummy swimming pool. And this they 
got a nerve to call 'The Thrill of It 
All.'" 



Messin' Around: Judy Garland's 

charge that her ex, Sid Luft, has 

stolen a million of her earnings . . . 

t and the dirt-tossing fight of Ernie 

v Kovacs' mom against Edie Adams 

for custody of his kids and estate. . . . 




Gard's back — with Sharon Hugueny, too ? 




The Bob Hortons aren't missing TV! 




Still in the headlines — Judy and Sid. 



Question, please: Shouldn't networks 
be forced to quit with 4 ads every 15 
minutes when pay-TV gets the go-ahead ? 
. . . Travel may broaden the mind but 
it also squeezes the heart. So says 
Gardner McKay — so-o-o glad to be 
home from his jungle experiences. 



Time Doesn't March — It Rockets: 
Tommy Rettig, once Timmy of "Las- 
sie" — now father of two. . . . George 
Gobel's yearning for TV again. He 
wants to spend more time at home. 
"I'd much rather play golf than the 
niteclub circuit," he says, "and I miss 
home life — spooky old Alice telling 
me, 'Georgie wouldn't bathe, Leslie 
talked back and Greg broke a lamp. 
Hit 'em, George.' If I'm gonna whack 
a kid, at least I want them to know 
I'm their dad." 



Bulbs And Blurbs: Vivian Vance 

stays here in the "woods of holly" for 
one thing only — money! Her heart's 
in Connecticut, where she and literary 
agent John Dodds enjoy wedded bliss 
and the company of the Josh Logans, 
Mildred Dunnock and other neigh- 
bors. She and John coo daily over the 
telephone . . . and when he mentioned 
that he'd bought 60 white tulip bulbs, 
Viv hopped the next plane to Stam- 
ford, helped him plant the tulips, then 
jetted back — all in 48 hours. . . . Hal 
March has plucked a movie plum. He 
will star with peachy Doris Day in 
"Ex-Wife." 



Add Underarm "Dangers": Shel- 
ley Berman had his tailor make two 
suits with room under the arms to carry 
transistors used in his act. The tailor 
dates back to the gangster era, so he 
followed his old pattern of cutting 
out space for gun holsters. "But," he 
warned Shelley, "don't use liquid de- 
odorants or you'll get electrocuted." 
. . . Dwayne Hickman and Carol 
Christensen plotting a spring wed- 
ding mit mittel-European honeymoon. 
. . . Pam Mason sees much of and in 
Ed Fitzgerald, producer of her L.A. 
show. . . . Femme logic! Kay Stevens 
bought a lavender Cadillac, then 
found it had a rear "boat-tie." Now 
she's buying a lavender boat! . . . 
KHJ's Joe Dolan is proving that 
U.S.A. is still the land of free speech, 
even if it hurts. (Sometimes it does!) 



16 




MARCH, 1963 



Bobby Scott, Music Editor 





Gffl&@&£DRD 



FOlk MUSiC * This sound called folk music is many things to many 
people. The purist, or folk-nik, sees it as a completely unsophisticated 
expression — or it isn't folk music. "It's overblown or commercialized," 
he's likely to complain. The average fellow sees it as "sophisticated- 
primitive" — if you can understand such a contradiction — as belted by 
a Ray Charles. Then there are those who try to make the distinction 
between church and blues. And there are other voices to be heard 
from, too. All this is simply to say how unreasonable it is for anyone 
to say : "This is the folk music." And with that, I'll now begin my own 
unreasonableness by picking over last year's more rewarding moments 
— at least for American folk music and its not-too-distant cousin, the 
Anglo-Irish-Scotch folk music. 

The large bulk, of folk music recorded last year was by groups, as 
opposed to individuals. As a matter of historical note, this is one of 
folk music's prime functions. It's another common mode of expression, 
like our language, which is common to all of us. Unfortunately, this 
group singing rarely brings the expression to a virtuoso level. But 
quantity has very little to do with quality. 

This last year has added the name Joan Baez to the folk music 
"greats" list. This young lady, while remaining (Continued on page 24) 




17 




Valentines to two of the year's biggest hits — Andy Williams with his TV show, Allen Sherman with "My 
Son, the Folk Singer." From left: Wife Claudine and Andy, Bob Crane, Allen, Diane and Randy Sparks. 



Friends say Troy Donahue and Suzanne Pleshette will wed any day. 



Frank Sinatra with Molly Picon, his mom in "Come Blow Your Horn." 




Do you recognize these chips off the old blocks? Seated are William Bendix's daughter Lorraine, Paul Henreid's daughter Monica. Standing 
are Joan Davis' daughter Beverly Wills, Harold Lloyd Jr., Ted Lewis Jr., Preston Foster's daughter Stephanie and Lou Costello's daughter Carole. 

Fiddlers meet: Jack Benny, with wile Mary, talks with Isaac Stern. Julie Andrews introduces her newborn "Fair Lady." Isn't she loverly! 




ON THE RECORD 




Vbui- Mown thiy 
ON RECORD Guide* 



POPULAR 

•••The Best of June Christy 

(Star Line Series, Capitol) — I dig June 
Christy, and for a good many reasons. 
One is that she most definitely stamps 
everything she does with her special 
style. Her vocal mechanism is in itself 
unique. When I hear her, I know it's 
her. The reason this album is not rated 
higher is that Capitol did not fill this 
album with Miss Christy's very best. 
Oh! there's plenty here . . . but if the 
Star Line Series is to be what it is 
cracked up to be, then more of a dis- 
criminating look is needed, to insure 
the purchaser of each artist's best. 

If you don't have June's classic ren- 
dition of "Something Cool," it alone is 
worth the price of the album. (But this 
is not to get Capitol off the hook!) 
"Willow, Weep for Me," "My Heart 
Belongs to Only You" and "Nobody's 
Heart," are all here and justly so. But 
where are the other gems? Where is 
June's beautiful rendition of "I Didn't 
Know About You"? What about her 
haunting version of "The Wind"? How 
about "Beware My Heart"? Maybe I'm 
just a crank, but I feel these should be 
in the album. 

June has always been one of this 
reviewer's choice favorites. Ever since 
her Kenton days, when she was part of 
the jazz aura of that orchestra. It is 
indeed unfortunate that she is not a 
working performer. She does not work 
publicly at all. Only an occasional con- 
cert. But I'm happy she still records. 
For the good tracks here, you'll get 
your money's worth. I'm only sorry 
Capitol did not fill this package with 
all her greats. Well . . . 

•••Young and Lively, Vic Da- 

mone, orch. cond. by Johnny Williams 
(Columbia) — Well, another Damone 
album has come out and, as usual, it's 
palatable but unexciting. Somehow, Vic 
just misses climbing the biggest hill. 
His voice, as an instrument, may be the 
best among pop singers, but the polish 
can wear thin. His choice of material is 
always from the standard catalogue. 
What he does with it is, frankly, very 
little. I'm a Damone fan, admittedly, 
but I can see why some don't dig him. 



Let me clarify that the album is not 
all that bad. As a matter of fact, it's 
a heck of a lot better than most albums 
these days. I just keep hoping for some- 
thing else to start showing itself. It's a 
bit of a rut. Johnny Williams' arrange- 
ments are in keeping with each tune's 
attitude. Very professional. 

••The Original Soundtrack of 
"Girls! Girls! Girls!", Elvis Presley 
(RCA Victor) — If the tunes in this al- 




YOUNG AND LIVELY 




bum were up to the performance level, 
there would be a much higher rating. 
The best tunes here are the title song 
and the Otis Blackwell — Winfield Scott 
compositions, "Return to Sender" and 
"We're Coming In Loaded." The others 
are pure filler. I'm sure Elvis can vis- 
ually distract you in the theater from 
hearing some of these sad tunes with a 
fairly critical ear. In the living room, 
the odds are not in his favor. 

It's to be admitted that the three cuts 
aforementioned are very good. I'm more 
inclined to "We're Coming In Loaded." 
It has the effortless kind of swing that 
is spiritual-like — the vocal group (Jor- 
danaires, I believe) laying the scheme 
down and Elvis hollerin' in a preaching 
style. It's very effective and somewhat 
folk-y. "Return to Sender" is a hit and 
needs little in the way of explanatory 
notes. "Girls!" is a traditional blues 
format with cute lyrics. Elvis carries 
the ball here (the tune definitely needs 
him). Other than that, there is very 
little here to endear Elvis to the anti- 
Presley throng. For fans, it's a must! 

••The Big Ones, Bobby Vinton, arr, 
and cond. by Robert Mersey (Epic) — 
This chap may have a couple of hit 
singles under his belt, but this package 
won't get him into the select circle of 
album artists. (His high-register sing- 
ing is impossibly funny. Why does this 
chap have to sing in the wrong key? 
Why are they — the keys — set so high? 
He can't help sounding like a boy 
soprano sometimes.) Some of the tracks 
are friendly. He sings in tune and tries 
to read the lyrics to the best of his 
ability, but the yodel-like sounds he 
emotes with, from time to time, are en- 
tirely out of character with material 
like "Be My Love" and "I Remember 
You." The boy, I have no doubt, has 
talent, so why such nonsensical orna- 
mentation? 

He seems to establish a frame with 
"Rain, Rain, Go Away" and "My Heart 
Cries for You." Utilizing a vocal group 
to pace his solo spot, he carries them 
off well. The most compatible piece of 
material Mr. Vinton does here is "The 
Twelfth of Never," which is an adapta- 
tion of a traditional folk song. On this 
tune, one can hear his "country" sound 



20 



-K^MC GOOD LISTENING 



-K-K FAIR SOUNDS 
-K IT'S YOUR MONEY 



put to good use. On listening to this 
album several times, I can see that, if 
directed right, this lad can be one of 
the big winners. But first the super- 
fluous nonsense has to wear away. 

BOSSA NOVA 

****Big Band Bossa Nova, 

Quincy Jones and His Band (Mercury) 
— This is the new Latin order all 
dressed up "big band" style. And no 
one is more suited to do it than Quincy 
Jones. With his enlarged big band, 
bursting with brass (including French 
horns), reeds, an exciting Latin rhythm 
section — plus some fine solo work by 
Jim Hall, Phil Woods, Lucky Thomp- 
son, Clark Terry and pianist Lalo 
Schifrin — Quincy is every bit up to 
the task. The recorded sound (I have 
a stereo copy) is first-rate, too. 

The hybrid attempted here comes to 
realization. None of the elements in- 
fringes upon any other. Quincy's sense 
of distribution is one of a painter work- 
ing with oils. He is always aware, never 
overloading a path which cannot stand 
the burden. The choice of material is 
near-perfect. "Soul Bossa Nova" is a 
Jones original which has every chance 
of making the hit charts. The by 
now almost-standard Bossa Nova tunes, 
"Desafinado" and "Samba de Una Nota 
So" (One-Note Samba), are here in 
glorious attire. Quincy has injected 
enormous amounts of color, through 
sound, into each and every track. My 
particular favorites are "Carnival" and 
"Se E Tarde Me Pardoa" (Forgive Me 
If I'm Late). Both tunes contain that 
certain Latin quality which draws you 
in. Also included is Leroy Anderson's 
lovely Latin vignette, "Serenata." 

The band achieves an exceedingly 
high performance level, considering a 
great deal of the music is anything but 
"child's play." The big nod, though, 
goes to Quincy, who has unveiled some 
more of the mystery of this new Latin 
music for us. I would definitely look 
into this album. For dancers, too! 

****Bossa Nova Pelos Passaros, 

Charlie Byrd (Riverside) — The reason 
for the rating is that this is not at all 
a hybrid product. It leans more heavily 



on its source of expression: Brazilian 
music. The jazz-playing is a savor which 
does not disturb the main dish here. 
In fact, on some tracks there happens 
to be no "yanqui" -styled improvising. 
(Rather, the ornamental-like ramblings 
of Latin improvising.) 

Mr. Byrd is one of the finest guitar- 
ists in music today. He is quite capable 
of performing serious music, as well as 
hard, swinging jazz. He is, also, very 
much responsible for the initial success 




MERCURY" hi-fidelity ; 




of Bossa Nova. You may remember 
Stan Getz and Charlie Byrd sort of 
co-leadered an album called "Jazz 
Samba" for Verve, from which came 
the hit, "Desafinado." (Incidentally, a 
version of this tune is in this album, 
too.) 

This album may not be as striking 
as the "Jazz Samba," but it is also not 
as deliberate. Its flow may give it long- 
er life as to repeated listenings. The 
accompaniments here range from a trio 
(bass, drums and guitar) to a string 
ensemble, to a trio plus trombone and 
also saxophone. I believe the string 
cuts to be the most enchanting. Charlie 
Hampton's alto saxophone and flute 
playing are a high spot here, too. The 
tunes are all tightly fitted to the Bra- 
zilian idea, even when written by Byrd 
or Hampton — which goes to show how 
their immersion in this music can pro- 
duce tunes of its character and quality. 

Charlie's playing is very subtle. The 
collected-ness of his thought makes for 
a very mature presentation. The album 
is very relaxing fare. Even if you are 
not a jazz or Latin fan, I'm sure you 
would dig some of this album. The 
titles of the various pieces are of little 
value to those who don't know Portu- 
guese. However, the album calls for 
simply two ears to enjoy it. 

JAZZ 

***Kenny Dorham and Friends, 

Kenny Dorham, also featuring Cannon- 
ball Adderley and Sonny Rollins (Jazz- 
land) — The opening line of Peter 
Drew's liner notes states: Kenny Dor- 
ham is a man who has friends. I sub- 
mit that, to the contrary, he is very 
much in need of friends, if the jazz pub- 
lic is to enjoy his talent. He is partially 
a forgotten man in the midst of a gross 
of under-developed and/or mediocre 
young talents who are being greatly 
over-recorded. I'll cite one example. 
Here it is '63 and this album has re- 
cently been released. Side-one with 
Cannonball was recorded in '59, side- 
two with Sonny Rollins in '57! 

Where is the Kenny Dorham of the 
'60s? He has, to my knowledge, no 
critic championing his talent, and no 
record company interested enough to 



21 



ON THE RECORD 




Vow#- Monthly 
ON RECORD Guide 



let him stretch his musical legs. No 
doubt, he has genuine friends and 
well-wishers. Help, it would appear, 
does not always accompany goodwill — 
for goodwill costs very little — but, in 
spite of all, Kenny Dorham remains a 
first-rate jazz player. This album, as 
with the older ones, only proves it 
again. 

Side-one, which features Kenny's 
writing and arranging, as well as his 
horn-playing, is the stronger side for 
this reviewer. The general over-all 
level is higher. Kenny's originals are 
charming vehicles for development. 
"Blue Spring" is a minor blues in the 
traditional 12-bar form. Here Kenny's 
writing is direct. His sense of sonori- 
ties in this four-frame work — which in- 
cludes Cannonball's alto, with the 
French horn of David Amram and Cecil 
Payne's baritone saxophone giving deep 
support — is a joy to hear. 

"Spring Cannon" is melodically sim- 
ple and rooted in the diatonic scale. 
Its melodic line is quite lyrical, as op- 
posed to the motivic "Blue Spring." 
The last track, which is called 
"Passion," is very much like something 
Tadd Dameron would write in its scor- 
ing for the horns. It has a period qual- 
ity, '40s-ish, but vibrant— hardly old- 
hat. Kenny's improvising is, for the 
most part, reflective, sober and subtle. 
His improvising shows hardly any in- 
fluences. (This is the sign of a creative 
jazz-player.) 

Side-two finds Max Roach destroy- 
ing the best efforts of his colleagues. 
On "I'll Remember April," where the 
tempo is absurdly fast, Max's drum- 
ming is chaotic and episodic. Only half- 
way through Sonny Rollins' tenor saxo- 
phone solo does he remember what he 
was there in that studio for. "Falling 
in Love" finds the tempo moderately 
swinging. Here Roach's playing is so 
tight and un-swinging that things bog 
down. The late, great Oscar Pettiford 
tried to keep things cooking with his 
bass-playing, but could perform no 
miracles as relating to Roach— who just 
banged away as if playing by himself. 

Sonny Rollins turned in some strik- 
ing solo work on "April," and Petti- 
ford's bass solo on "Falling" is of in- 
terest. Side-two found Kenny's posture, 
music-wise, that of an extrovert. Bub- 



bling and bright! Side-one, though, 
has more thought in it. Four stars for 
Kenny. Three stars for the album. 

***The Modern Jazz Quartet 
and The Oscar Peterson Trio at 
The Opera House (Verve) — If the 
Peterson Trio were alone here, I would 
push the rating up a star. They are, 
with the exception of Milt Jackson, 
responsible for all the action that takes 
place on this disc. (As a matter of fact, 




the year this album was recorded, 
1957, was just about the peak year for 
the then-current trio of Peterson, Brown 
and Ellis. I made the tour in '56 with 
Krupa and even then felt they were 
near their collective height.) 

The quartet, on the other hand, is so 
deliberate that one begins to wonder 
if fraud is not afoot. Fortunately, Milt 
Jackson plays some choruses and we 
feel confident that they have not fallen 
asleep yet. The Oscar Peterson Trio is, 
on the other hand, a naturally swinging 



organism. Once the statement of melody 
is made, they commence to swing. 
(Granted, Jackson is possibly the giant 
improviser here, but his depth cannot 
sustain the weight of the quartet's op- 
pressive somnambulism.) 

Oscar tears through "Should I," 
pleasantly takes Clifford Brown's gem, 
"Joy Spring," through easy paces, and 
romps home with Gerry Mulligan's 
"Elevation." The intensity achieved 
from time to time is impossible to ex- 
plain in words. It's some of the best 
Oscar Peterson I've heard. 

CLASSICAL: BACH 

•***J. S. Bach: Orchestral 
Transcriptions by Schonberg, We- 
bern and Stravinsky, Utah Sym- 
phony Orch., Maurice Abravanel cond. 
(Vanguard) — There are a legion of 
purists who insist any transcription is 
bad. Your reviewer does not take this 
view. I further submit that it's possible, 
and probable, to enjoy the transcrip- 
tions more. Bach's period did not have 
the enlarged organism we now call a 
symphony orchestra. But his brand of 
writing, as it particularly relates to the 
Brandenburg Concertos, was one of 
orchestral dimension. 

As a matter of fact, some musicolo- 
gists see the Brandenburg Concertos as 
ushering in the symphonic and orches- 
tral period. It is not any wonder that 
Schonberg, Webern and Stravinsky 
scored these Bach pieces. Schonberg, 
for this reviewer's taste, seemed to re- 
alize more out of his "Preludes" than 
his colleagues did with their pieces. 
Firstly, he is soundly orchestral. We- 
bern's scoring of the "Ricercare" from 
"The Musical Offering" is in a chamber 
style — small orchestra-ish, single wood- 
winds and brass. Stravinsky utilizes 
voices, six brass- instruments and dou- 
ble woodwinds in his "Choral Vari- 
ations." Stravinsky's strings are unique, 
as the violin and violincello families 
are missing. 

All through Bach's music there is 
genius. Stroke after stroke, it resounds 
with an appalling righteousness of 
sound and structure. The one composer 
in which the magic formula of heart 
and head, of poetry and architecture, 
merged and married. Webern and Stra- 



22 



-M<-K-K GREAT! 
-K-K-K GOOD LISTENING 



~W FAIR SOUNDS 
-K IT'S YOUR MONEY 



vinsky have tried for a "characteristic" 
attitude, one of single-instrument, cham- 
ber style. Schonberg seeks, through a 
body of instruments playing one melo- 
dy, to neutralize and make the sound 
somewhat impersonal, as he obviously 
believes that what is characteristic 
about Bach's music is not just the 
"sound" (audio) but the characteristic 
soundness of his linear structures. 

Schonberg also equalizes the voices, 
which his compatriots fail to do. Sub- 
sequently, from time to time, their 
efforts are either top- or bottom-heavy. 
Here it's not a question of sonority, or 
sounding good, but the question of struc- 
ture. Bach, to be sure, saw very little 
difference in his Knes, except where it 
related to the reiteration of his basic 
motive. 

These pieces, if you'll pardon my 
slight criticisms, are well worth your 
buying. The Utah orchestra under Mr. 
Abravenel can be proud of its first-rate 
performance here. I'm also happy to 
add it to the list of better American 
symphony orchestras. 

Two other Bach works have been re- 
leased recently. Both are largely vocal 
works of the religious order. The 
"Magnificat," as done by Leonard 
Bernstein on Columbia, is a four-star 
album worth having in your collection. 
And Epic has released Bach's Cantata 
No. 76, a three-star album which is 
also a must for your serious collection. 
Both works were written in 1723. "No. 
76" in May; the "Magnificat" for 
Christmas services, while Bach was at 
St. Thomas' Church in Leipzig. 

The "Cantata No. 76," which is per- 
formed by Fritz Werner conducting the 
Schiitz Chorale and Pforzheim Cham- 
ber Orchestra, succeeds beautifully in 
its chorus and sinfonia sections. The 
soloists — with the exception of soprano 
Ingeborg Reichelt — keep the album 
from making the four-star rating. It 
must be confessed, though, that Bach 
did not write his best arias in this 
work, to begin with. The general sound 
of the Epic record is close to the sound 
one would hear in a church, which lends 
an aura to the proceedings. 

Bernstein's "Magnificat," which is a 
better compositional Bach, is helped 
considerably by the soloists. All are 
first-rate. Even above the general level 



of good singing is soprano Lee Venora, 
who is marvelous. The Philharmonic, 
under Bernstein, although on general 
terms performing perfectly, does lack 
that certain baroque quality that Maes- 
tro Werner and the Pforzheim ensem- 
ble exude. So far as the compositions 
are concerned, in my humble opinion, 
the greater Bach resides in the "Mag- 
nificat," but "No. 76" has exquisite 
moments in its tutti's (ensemble parts, 
as opposed to solo sections). The arias 



u 


I 


m 


i P* 

> m 


m 


15 




in "76" are not nearly up to the "Mag- 
nificat." 

I hasten to add, one must always 
bear in mind that, where Bach is con- 
cerned, his lighter moments are in- 
finitely more valuable than the greater 
utterances of many composers. History 
may never again be as favorably dis- 
posed to another composer as it is to 
Bach. He is, unhesitatingly, called the 
Greatest Composer. Only Mozart — be- 
ing graced with the title of Greatest 
Musical Genius — sits by Bach's side. 



At any rate, the star-rating levels 
generally relate to the performances. 
Other than that, I suggest you procure 
all three albums. (And if you find 
yourself captivated, read what Albert 
Schweitzer has written about Bach, his 
religious motives and his music.) 

FOLK: SPIRITUALS 

■AibfrClassic Negro Spirituals, 

Robert McFerrin, ace. by Norman 
Johnson (Washington) — This package 
will be a military secret, I have no 
doubts, but I'd like to tell at least 
a few people about it. Robert McFer- 
rin, who was the first Negro to become 
a regular member of the Metropolitan 
Opera Company, is one of the finest 
baritones America has produced. Here, 
he goes back to material very much a 
part of his youth, when he was the 
son of a Baptist minister. 

Throughout all these spirituals, one 
is struck by Mr. McFerrin's dynamic 
spectrum. He can belt and immediately 
come down to a near whisper. And 
fastidiously, too. No ragged ends. His 
pitch is also uncanny. During "His 
Name So Sweet," he is called upon to 
drop an octave and a third — from a 
forte top tone to a piano bottom tone 
— and he carries it off like it was 
nothing. He has all the equipment, 
right in that throat of his. 

His reading of the lyrics is first-rate 
throughout. The tunes are all spirituals 
of the first order, gems from start to 
finish. Accompanist Norman Johnson 
handles his end admirably. His job is 
not too difficult, as the arrangements 
here are mostly by Hall Johnson, with 
assists by William Grant Still (the 
noted American Negro composer) , 
William Lawrence and H. T. Burleigh. 

Mostly, this album is an inspiring 
experience. An experience that no one 
should deny himself. Classics included 
are: "Deep River," "Ev'ry Time I Feel 
de Spirit," "His Name So Sweet," "Ain't 
Got Time to Die," "Let Us Break Bread 
Together," and a number of others 
equally possessing that unique property 
of a different, and rewarding, musical- 
religious experience. 

Fourteen songs in all — some of Amer- 
ica's loveliest melodies — sung by one of 
this country's finest voices! 



23 



ON THE RECORD 



SINGLES 



1) The Love of a Boy/I Ain't Gonna Cry No More, 

Timi Yuro (Liberty) — Of the real shouters on the distaff 
side, I think young Timi has things wrapped up. "Soul" sing- 
ing is what it is! "The Love of a Boy" is a sure winner, writ- 
ten by Bert Bacharach, who also gave us Gene Pitney's big 
one, "Only Love." Flip is good, but not as pointed. 

2) Call on Me/That's the Way Love Is, Bobby Bland 
(Duke) — Here's, admittedly, one of my favorites with a pair 
of tunes that are both strong. "Call on Me" has more, if 
one is to be given the edge. The flip is one of those rollin' 
stones that keeps picking up volume and intensity. 

3) Where Does It Lead/Goin' to Boston, The Little 
Sisters (MGM) — The lyrics on "Where" make it, along 
with its style element, the strong side. It's an awful strong 
sound these ladies get while singing, but it's got just, maybe, 
the right sound for the hit charts. Who knows? 

4) I'm On My Way /Juicy Melon, Marvin Adams, vo- 
calist; Alonzo and the Boppers (Rojac) — These numbers 
jump off the record! Marvin Adams wrote "I'm On My 
Way" and contributed the vocal. The flip is an instrumental 
of the "Green Onions" variety, played by Alonzo and Co., 
who back up Marvin on "Way." The vocal, I believe, is the 
stronger. It's not straight pop, but more like country blues. 
I wouldn't sell Alonzo short, though. His "Melon" is a sound 
that can sneak up on you. 

5) Slop Time/Let's Stomp Again, The Sherry s (Guy- 
den) — Well, here is another group that confounds me! It's 
kind of like something you've heard, but you really haven't. 
Distressing as it may seem, this kind of record is some- 
times all one can see when looking at Top-Ten charts. 

6) Strollin' Home/Mess Around, King Curtis (Capitol) 
— A little rollin' music. Smooth, too? King really walks here. 
"Strollin' " is the baby ! Nice band, warm and blue tunes, 
and Curtis's big saxophone. Now there's a parlay! 

7) Wild Is Love/Do It Again, Shirley Horn (Mercury) 
— This lass is more of a jazz talent than pop, but she is so-o-o 
good that she should be included in the best singles on 
general principles. "Wild" is wild. Breathless and embracing. 
We could stand some non-conformists like Miss Horn. 

8) Bossa Nova U. S. A./This Can't Be Love, The 
Dave Brubeck Quartet (Columbia) — Another jazz artist 
bucking for pop honors. "Bossa" (How did you guess?) is 
the side. Paul Desmond, floating in and out lyrically with 
Joe Morello maintaining the rhythm. After "Desafinado" one 
can't tell! Flip is jazz. 

9) I Saw Linda Yesterday/The Girl I Can't Forget, 
Dicky Lee (Smash) — Well, for the teenagers, this is the cup 
of tea. The young sound, the young ideas, the young pulse. 
"Linda" is the one. 

10) Silly Rumors/I Got Nothing But Time, Timmy 
Brown (Imperial) — We'll close with another shouter. Brown 
is closer to a home run with "Rumors" but I even like the flip. 



FOLK MUSIC 

Continued from page 17 

highly stylized, has sought and un- 
earthed a natural and organic develop- 
ment out of oft-repeated folk tunes. Her 
musical area is the Southern Appa- 
lachian Mountain ballad — music which 
dates back to the British Isles. (Miss 
Baez is heard on Riverside Records.) 

Rose Maddox, though considered a 
country and Western artist, is very much 
a "folk singer," in my humble opinion. 
She is in the "Blue Grass" category, 
generally accompanied by a Blue Grass 
band, which is the American grandchild 
of the Scotch-Irish Ceili band (pro- 
nounced kay-lee). She sings recent, 
stylized Blue Grass tunes — but I say 
that what is popular today may be the 
folk Literature of some later date. (Miss 
Maddox records for Capitol.) 

In this same area, I would like to 
mention the Osborne Brothers and a 
chap called Tommy Jackson. Jackson is 
more the root sound. He excels the Os- 
borne boys instrumentally — but the 
Osborne Brothers have turned in some 
fine vocal work. (Jackson and Osborne 
are on Dot and MGM respectively.) 

Another artist, known better as a 
jazz-player, one Mose Allison, is also 
expressive of roots. His is a Deep South 
sound. Mississippi prison-farm hollers 
have a quality that sets them apart 
from other northerrtly-SoutheTn sounds. 
(He's recorded for Epic and Prestige.) 

A fairly new group called the Staple 
Singers arrived this last year. A fam- 
ily group, their repertoire embraces 
many folk areas, but this in no way 
limits their sparkling performances. A 
group to watch. (They record for 
Riverside.) 

Ewan McColl has rather let me down 
this last year. I feel he is taking less 
pains with the musical end of his ex- 
pression and belaboring the lyric mes- 
sage. Nonetheless, his is still the best 
voice doing Scotch-English material. 
(He's on many labels.) 

Unfortunately, too, this past year saw 
no new albums from Ireland's finest 
folk voice, Mary O'Hara. She is to folk 
music what a Beethoven is to classical 
music. (Miss O'Hara has recorded for 
London and Tradition.) 

This new year of 1963, I have no 
doubt, will find us surrounded by 
smooth-faced, crew-cut, guitar-playing 
college boys, all trying for the monetary 
jackpot. Caution will be thrown to the 
winds and a great deal of excellent folk 
music will get a sound clobbering. No 
permanent damage, though. The core 
of our folk soul is too deep for that. 



24 




ART CARNEY 

ARRESTED 



WHEN A MAN LIKE ART GETS INTO TROUBLE, HE GETS IN DEEPER 
THAN MOST.-' TURN TO PAGE 82 FOR HOW FT HAPPENED -AND WHY! 




The time — Saturday night; the place — a Chinese restaurant on La Cienega in 
Hollywood; the characters — a tall, wiry, boyish-looking man with blond hair and 
slightly slanting gray-blue eyes, and an unusually pretty girl with a push-button 
nose, wide brown eyes and a dimpling mouth; the action — the young couple is 
ordering dinner: wonton soup, egg rolls, two choices from column A, one choice 
from column B, and fortune cookies for dessert. 

Suddenly, there is an interruption. In comes a mob of high-school seniors for 
a special pre-prom dinner (chicken chow mein, pork fried rice, fortune cookies 
and tea). One of the students spots the young couple at the table. He grabs a 
souvenir menu and rushes over to them. The others follow. The man signs each 
menu, and so does the girl. . . . Finally, the seniors are all back at their own 
tables, clutching the autographed menus as if they were report cards with all A's. 
Each menu bears the signature "Richard Chamberlain" in big, bold letters — and 
also a smaller one, in feminine script, "Mrs. Kildare." 

Back at the tiny, lamp-lit table, Dick Chamberlain and Clara Ray, unaware that 
their food is cold, eat and chat and smile at each other. It takes more serious 
things — much worse things than cold soup, limp egg rolls or writer's cramp from 
signing autographs — to spoil a honeymoon, even a (Continued on page 78) 



26 



! 



Eleanor Roosevelt: October 11th, 1884 to November 7th, 1962 



November 10th, 1962, dawned gray and cold. It was 
a day for fireplaces and warm drinks and children's 
laughter; it was a day which Jackie Kennedy had orig- 
inally planned to spend at Glen Ora with her family. But 
instead she found herself with her husband Jack and a 
solemn party made up of Ambassador and Mrs. Averill 
Harriman, Supreme Court Justices Earl Warren and 
Arthur Goldberg and their wives, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Schlesinger Jr. boarding the Presidential jet 
and making a forty-eight-minute flight to Stewart Air 
Force Base in New York State. A waiting helicopter 
picked them up and carried them, through a heavy down- 
pour, to the Vanderbilt Estate at Hyde Park. Not long 
after, looking very young and very subdued in a dark 
suit and black mink hat, Jacqueline Kennedy sat at her 
husband's side in an old Protestant church, and lis- 
tened to the reading of a funeral service. 

The First Lady of the World was dead. 

The great of the nation and of the world were gathered 
in St. James Episcopal Church to say a last goodbye to 
Eleanor Roosevelt. Harry Truman was there with his 
wife Bess. Dwight Eisenhower had come from his farm 
in Pennsylvania. Adlai Stevenson, the only person out- 
side the Roosevelt family to visit Mrs. Roosevelt in the 
last weeks of her illness, was there, his face etched with 
grief. Members of United Nations delegations were there, 
too, and governors and statesmen and scholars. Long- 
time political enemies sat side by side, united in their 
sorrow. And at the same moment, all over the world, 
millions were bowing their heads, mourning a woman 




HER LEGACY TO 



28 




who had been a friend to the friendless, brought hope 
to the hopeless, become a symbol of compassion and 
peace to the trouble-weary of the world. 

They had known Eleanor Roosevelt well in their dif- 
ferent ways — the family, the friends, the statesmen, the 
care-worn multitudes — they had drawn inspiration from 
her and been helped by her, had been warmed by her 
goodness, had taken an almost personal pride in her 
honesty and her dignity. 

Of all the mourners, Jacqueline Kennedy knew her 
perhaps the least, for the two women had been separated 
by an abyss even wider and deeper than the ocean of 
time that lay between them. 

Jackie, the dimpled darling of her family, had known 
only love and praise in her childhood; Eleanor Roose- 
velt, born more than forty years earlier, had been so 
plain and ungainly that her disappointed mother nick- 
named her "Granny" and her family sent her away to be 
educated in Europe in the hope of softening the blow of 
a social catastrophe. As adults, and First Ladies, Eleanor 
Roosevelt and Jacqueline Kennedy presented an even 
more vivid contrast — the one, plainly dressed, had 
spent her time and energy espousing unpopular causes, 
had poked into working conditions in mines and facto- 
ries, had inspected sharecroppers' cabins and organized 
political reforms; the other, elegantly attired, devoted 
herself wholeheartedly to her home and her children, 
with occasional forays into her other fields of interest — 
art and antiques and music. Jacqueline Kennedy rarely 
left her husband's side; Mrs. {Continued on page 80) 



JACKIE KENNEDY 



29 






- 



28 



Eleanor Roosevelt: October 11th, 1884 to November 7th, 1962 



November 10th, 1962, dawned gray and cold. It was 
a day for fireplaces and warm drinks and children s 
laughter; it was a day which Jackie Kennedy had orig- 
inally planned to spend at Glen Ora with her family. But 
instead she found herself with her husband Jack and a 
solemn party made up of Ambassador and Mrs. Averill 
Harriman, Supreme Court Justices Earl Warren and 
Arthur Goldberg and their wives, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Arthur Schlesinger Jr. boarding the Presidential jet 
and making a forty-eight-minute flight to Stewart Air 
Force Base in New York State. A waiting helicopter 
picked them up and carried them, through a heavy down- 
pour, to the Vanderbilt Estate at Hyde Park. Not long 
after, looking very young and very subdued in a dark 
suit and black mink hat, Jacqueline Kennedy sat at her 
husband's side in an old Protestant church, and lis- 
tened to the reading of a funeral service. 

The First Lady of the World was dead. 

The great of the nation and of the world were gathered 
in St. James Episcopal Church to say a last goodbye to 
Eleanor Roosevelt. Harry Truman was there with his 
wife Bess. Dwight Eisenhower had come from his farm 
in Pennsylvania. Adlai Stevenson, the only person out- 
side the Roosevelt family to visit Mrs. Roosevelt in the 
last weeks of her illness, was there, his face etched with 
grief. Members of United Nations delegations were there, 
too, and governors and statesmen and scholars. Long- 
time political enemies sat side by side, united in their 
sorrow. And at the same moment, all over the world, 
millions were bowing their heads, mourning a woman 




HER LEGACY TO 



who had been a friend to the friendless, brought hope 
to the hopeless, become a symbol of compassion and 
Peace to the trouble-weary of the world. 

They had known Eleanor Roosevelt well in their dif- 
ferent ways-tie family, the friends, the statesmen, the 
care-worn multitudes-they had drawn inspiration from 
ber and been helped by her, had been warmed by her 
goodness, had taken an almost personal pride in her 
honesty and her dignity. 

Of all the mourners, Jacqueline Kennedy knew her 
perhaps the least, for the two women had been separated 
by an abyss even wider and deeper than the ocean of 
time that lay between them. 

Jackie, the dimpled darling of her family, had known 
only love and praise in her childhood; Eleanor Roose- 
velt, born more than forty years earlier, had been so 
plain and ungainly that her disappointed mother nick- 
named her "Granny" and her family sent her away to be 
educated in Europe in the hope of softening the blow of 
a social catastrophe. As adults, and First Ladies, Eleanor 
Roosevelt and Jacqueline Kennedy presented an even 
more vivid contrast— the one, plainly dressed, had 
spent her time and energy espousing unpopular causes, 
had poked into working conditions in mines and facto- 
ries, had inspected sharecroppers' cabins and organized 
political reforms; the other, elegantly attired, devoted 
herself wholeheartedly to her home and her children, 
with occasional forays into her other fields of interest- 
art and antiques and music. Jacqueline Kennedy rarely 
left her husband's side; Mrs. (Continued on page 80) 



JACKIE KENNEDY 



I 



What county girls know about 










1 i Jv' 



m 






. v ■ nil 



1 







1**- 



^^ 




In the game of love, is it more fun to win—or lose? This Beverly Hillbilly has the answer! 



30 



[LOVE that city girls ought to! 





The same thing happens with the birds and 
the bees in central Kansas as in Central 
Park, and the battle of the sexes is waged 
just as relentlessly in the Ozarks as in the 
Beverly Hills. 

Elly May Clampett can tell you that! 

She can also tell you that in the game of 
love — whether she's trying to tame a wolf 
or merely chase him from her dooi* — the 
country girl has an advantage over her city- 
bred sister. She has a natural asset that's 
both provocative and protective. 

Elly May, the prettiest of "The Beverly 
Hillbillies," television's top-rated show, is, 
in real life, Donna Douglas. Or, just as 
accurately, one could say that, in real life, 
Donna Douglas is Elly May Clampett, be- 
cause the two are one and the same. Their 
backgrounds are similar, their viewpoints 
are identical, and, long before the Clam- 
petts burst onto the home screen, Donna 
knew the secret of the Hillbillies' success. 

Namely: Genuine goodness and sincere 
innocence are irresistibly attractive and are 
their own best protection. 

A city girl can be good and can be (in 
one sense of the word) innocent. Of course 
she can be! She usually is. But, by the very 
nature of her environment, she may lose 
the wide-eyed naivety of Elly May. And 
losing that, she may enter the love fray 
minus a potent weapon. 

Donna, who had never been north of* 
Shreveport until four years ago, when she 



struck out for New York to become a model, 
can milk a goat, make a flying tackle and bait 
a hook. She is that identical to Elly. 

A picture of Jesus, standing in the center 
of her dressing-room table in Hollywood, is 
somewhat symbolic, because the principles 
she grasped on the farm still stand smack- 
dab in the center of her life. 

"If you do things a certain way," Elly — 
oops, we mean Donna — says, "I believe 
you'll be taken care of. I mean if you do 
what you know is right ... if you do things 
a certain way." Agreed — but what way? 
This way? 

Donna in the midst of Hollywood, work- 
ing just a few blocks away from the tinseled 
Sunset Strip, is as much a novelty to Glam- 
ourville bachelors as Elly May is to her 
television swain, Sonny Drysdale (alias 
Louis Nye). Unglamorously attired in her 
hillbilly togs, an old shirt and tight dun- 
garees, she frisks around the big soundstage 
at General Service Studios where "The 
Beverly Hillbillies" is produced, enchanting 
every man she meets into a state of shock. 
One and all — actors, writers, grips and even 
the man from the catering service ... 

"Here's my honey-cake man," she crows, 
greeting a middle-aged man with a box of 
baked goods. "He just brings the best honey 
cakes anybody ever ate," she breathes. "I 
don't know how I'd get along without him." 

She smiles upon the honey-cake man as 
appreciatively as if (Please turn the page) 



continued 



he's bringing her rubies — and he can't open his 
box fast enough to offer her first choice! A pint- 
sized gamin in blue jeans has won his devotion 
more completely than the most sophisticated or 
exotic glamour gal. And with Donna, it's not an 
act. That's the beauty of it. 

She bounces around the set, calling everybody 
''honey," kissing all the bald heads within reach, 
patting a hand affectionately if someone looks 
worried. And it's all real. To Donna, the whole 
world is her "kissin' cousin" and couldn't possibly 
want to do her any harm. 

Apparently without Donna's even realizing it, 
her warm, country-girl sincerity not only wins 
friends but disarms any possible enemy. Max 
Baer Jr. (who plays Elly May's honest-to-gosh 




cousin, Big Jethro ) tried to warn her against a 
certain man — in a casual, big-brotherly way — be- 
cause of something he'd heard him say about her. 
Donna just looked at him, her eyes as big as 
saucers, and said incredulously, "Why, Max honey, 
you know that just can't be true!" 

The way she said it, you knew it couldn't. 

Perhaps, if you don't suspect evil, that's your 
very best protection against it. If you're truly 
good — and as natural and unaffected about it as 
Donna is — the wolf at your door may turn out to 
be just a big, friendly sheepdog who'll roll over 
and play dead trying to please you. 

Certainly, simple honesty and sincerity have 
seen Donna through an early broken marriage 
without any visible scars. She eloped when she was 



only seventeen, and the hasty match burned out 
quickly. The boy has since married again, and 
everything's so friendly that Donna visited with 
his mother, last time she went home. 

"Children have no business marrying," she says 
now. "I said to my former mother-in-law, 'Do 
you know how old I really was when I married? I 
thought I was seventeen — but really I was about 
eleven! I thought all there was to getting mar- 
ried was to have a date when you wanted to go 
to the movies or go bowling.' " 

Experience hasn't made a dent in the shining 
shield Donna doesn't even seem to know she car- 
ries. Often, a city girl grows up in an environ- 
ment guaranteed to make her suspicious of men. 
("Oh-oh, here we go again!") Maybe a man feels, 
since she's expecting the worst, he's entitled to 
try it. ("After all, she knows what she's getting 
into!") But maybe he's thrown off-guard when 
he meets an unsuspecting country girl who grew 
up knowing everybody around her and thus meets 
everybody as a friend. 

This may not be the "worldly-wise" approach, 
but Donna hasn't found any reason to change it 
— even after she made the big leap to the Big 
City, for a career. "New York," as she remembers 
it, "was just like a little town. I lived in a girls' 
club, and, moving within the same group of peo- 
ple every day, I didn't think of New York as a 
big place at all." 

Truth to tell, she never really left home. Or 
— to put it another way — the girl came out of 
the country, but the country didn't come out of 
the girl. And in at least one case, without even 
realizing it, she triumphed over her "smarter" 
big-city sisters for that very reason. 

"Just listen to what happened," she beams. "I 
went to apply for a job and had to talk with a 
man I already knew. I didn't know it then, but 
he had a list of questions he was asking every girl 
who came in — I mean, I didn't know he was ask- 
ing every girl these things. 

"The questions were terrible. Just awful! 

"I was so hurt that this man who knew me would 
ask me things like that, tears came in my eyes. 
I was so disappointed. The job — well, I did want 
it — terribly. But I (Continued on page 90) 



32 





Why is this picture such a scoop? 



Why is this the first time in years 
that Loretta Young and her husband have 



been seen together? Why is it likely to 



be the last time in a long, long while? 



For Loretta s story, please turn the page 



the Loretta Young story 

continued 

Officially, they're Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
H. A. Lewis. (You know her, of course, 
as glamorous star Loretta Young. It's 
harder to recognize him, since Tom 
Lewis is a TV and advertising executive, 
very much "behind the scenes.") They've 
been married almost twenty-three years. 
They have raised three fine children. 
They're not divorced, and seemingly 
have never even discussed the possi- 
bility. 

So why should their picture be news? 
Because it's the first such candid por- 
trait in a year of Sundays! All Holly- 
wood whispers that this has long been a 
marriage in name only. In fact, five 
years ago — despite all the glimpses of 
happier days shown on these pages — 
Tom filed suit accusing Loretta of "dis- 
honesty, mismanagement and unfair- 
ness," while trying to dissolve their com- 
pany, Lewislor Films. And Loretta filed 
counter-suit. 

It took a very special occasion to bring 
the Lewises together before a camera — 
an anniversary testimonial to Father 
Patrick Peyton, the beloved priest with 
whom Loretta had been a founding spon- 
sor for the "Family Theater" religious 
series. 

It proved to be a reunion with Father 
Peyton only. Almost before the flash- 
bulbs faded, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis again 
went their separate ways: Loretta to the 
quiet apartment where she's all alone, 
except when seventeen-year-old son Peter 
isn't busy with studies or extra-curric- 
ular activities — Tom a continent away in 
New York, where their eighteen-year- 
old Christopher has been going to school. 
For Loretta, it's all a far cry from 
the role she's been playing, more than 
half-a-season now, on "The New Loretta 



Now only memories in a family album 
. . . what happened to end those days 
when Loretta and Tom were so happy? 



34 





Young Show." There, she's been TV 
mother to no less than seven children, 
ranging from six years old to college 
age. . . . Though she's a "widow" on TV, 
too — complete with ardent suitors — is 
this makebelieve household the lively 
home Loretta's always dreamed of? Is 
this a dream facsimile of all she's given 
up, in real life, for her career? Does she 
ever stop to wonder — particularly, now 
that production has ground to a halt on 
the just-canceled series — if the price 
she's paid for stardom isn't more than 
should be asked of any normal woman? 

To answer that, perhaps one should go 
back many, many years. To the youthful 
Loretta who loved children but had al- 
ready known heartbreak and a broken 
marriage. "I'm sorry I didn't have a 
baby," she told an interviewer then. 

"Here I am twenty-one . . . and I 
haven't a baby. . . ." 

Two years later, she found two charm- 
ing babies in a Catholic Foundling 
Home. They were sisters, one three years 
old, the other twenty-three-and-a-half 
months. Then, as final adoption proceed- 
ings got under way, an aunt appeared 
and wanted one of the children. 

Loretta parted with the older reluc- 
tantly and adopted the baby, Judy. She 
built a beautiful home and, with her 
mother, her sister Georgiana and little 
Judy, tried to build a tranquil woman's 
life to balance her busy pace as an 
actress. 

Yes, this is the same Judy Lewis 
you've recently seen on TV, in a regular 
role as Connie on "The Outlaws" or 
guesting in more glamorous modern 
roles on such series as "77 Sunset Strip." 
Pretty as Loretta at the same age, though 
not so experienced as an actress — and 
apparently less interested in a career 
than in her home life as wife of TV 
director Joe Tinney Jr. and mother of 
three-year-old (Continued on page 74) 



35 



The minute she 

saw James Philbrook 
Loretta decided: 




He took Loretta into his arms. She started to speak, 
but he silenced her with a kiss. His embrace was strong 
and protective. Afterward, Loretta rested her head 
serenely against his shoulder. Loving fingers explored 
his face, running across the invisible bristle of 
beard. 

James Philbrook was truly someone Loretta Young 
could lean on. He wasn't one of those namby-pamby 
assembly-line charm boys full of practiced sophistica- 
tion and sleek drawing-room manners. Jim Philbrook 
was unvarnished man. 

The scene came off beautifully. The big man grinned. 
Loretta purred. 

"That was fine, fine," she said. "It played just right." 

The director nodded, expelled a deep breath of 
satisfaction. 

"Like velvet," he said. "Print it." 

There are few frills to the story of how Jim Phil- 



Lorettas 



4* \ 



Now here is a man 

TV viewers would 

expect me 

to fall in love with! 



brook, overpowering six-foot-four, craggy-faced son of 
a fighting Episcopalian priest, became Loretta Young's 
lover — i.e., the full-time object of her affections on her 
television series. 

It started several years earlier, when Loretta was 
still sashaying through that door every Sunday night, 
skirts swirling. She acted only occasionally in the 
series, but, when she did, Loretta went through leading 
men faster than marshmallows at a Girl Scout outing. 
Her constant search was for the kind of male who gen- 
erated authority, who could stand up to her and treat 
her like a woman. In sum, she ached for a leading man 
who was a manl 

Her casting director, Jack Martin, and her producer, 
John London, kept presenting hopeful candidates — and 
Loretta kept shaking her head. Then one day Martin 
and London had her meet Jim Philbrook — a fellow 
practically no one had ever heard of. In his few brief 
years as an actor, his sex appeal record was a fat zero. 



36 



Hi 



He had never kissed a woman — or even a horse. And 
he had acted with horses a good deal more than with 
women. 

"For six years I was the bad man in every TV 
Western and movie I made," Jim says with a laconic 
grin. "I was the meanest man in town. I didn't even 
shave. 1 saved a lot of money on razor blades." 

He would have been the last to dream that Loretta 
Young could see anything romantic in a roughneck 
like him. But when she got her first glimpse of him. 
there was something about Jim that made Loretta stop 
short. 

They were introduced. Philbrook made no pitch. 
His voice had hair in it — and a touch of smile. His 
hazel eyes were merry and unafraid. He didn't court 
her approval — but rather seemed to be appraising her. 
There was something unmistakably gruff — yet warm 
— about this most experienced "newcomer." 



enough of a man to take on. week in and week out. the 
assignment of wooing a widow so encumbered, yet so 
independent, and at the same time hurdling the obstacle 
course of the seven children Loretta had surrounded 
herself with for the series. 

Loretta could think of only one man who could run 
that gauntlet without taxing anyone's credulity. Jim 
Philbrook. She didn't even hold auditions for the part. 

Oddly enough, the last time a leading lady saw 
through Jim's villainy to his romantic possibilities, he 
married her. That was sixteen years ago in Davenport. 
Iowa, and the young lady was Frances Cassling, a 
spirited blond beauty of Swedish antecedents. 

Although they had lived two blocks away from each 
other since grade school, Philbrook didn't take serious 
notice of Frances until he came home on leave from the 
Navy and observed how smartly she had grow 7 n up. 

"She'd combed out the pigtails. I think." he grins. 



New Lover! 



"Now there," Loretta thought, "is a man TV viewers 
would expect a woman like me to fall in love with." 

She hired Jim Philbrook on the spot. 

Philbrook was one of the few leading men who came 
back for return appearances. He started shaving again. 
His family started eating better and living better. 
Loretta gave him an entirely new image as an actor. 

A number of illustrious contemporaries, such as Ann 
Sothern and Barbara Stanwyck, began to compete for 
Jim's services as romantic foil. On the swiftly acceler- 
ating momentum of Loretta's discovery of his untapped 
sex appeal, he became the leading man in two TV 
series of his own, "The Islanders" and "The Investi- 
gators." 

Neither proved runaway successes. After eight years. 
Loretta closed shop on her old television show. But 
only long enough to put on the planning boards a new 
program. Immediately an old problem reared its frus- 
trating head: Where to find a leading man who was 



But it was not until they started appearing together 
in summer operettas in Davenport little-theater that 
Frances took serious notice of Jim. 

"I sang leads," explains Frances, a light-opera mezzo 
soprano, "and he usually was the villain. One time we 
were doing 'The Vagabond King.' I was the heroine 
and he was the heavy. But the hero had trouble playing 
the love scenes. Jim showed him how to kiss me." 

On the basis of Jim's kind demonstration, Frances 
was convinced that he was miscast as the man who fails 
to get the girl. Now that Loretta Young has seen the 
same overlooked qualities, Frances bravely insists that 
she finds nothing unsettling in the fact that Loretta has 
taken such a shine, albeit professional, to her husband. 

"Loretta let Jim get dressed up and shave," Frances 
explains. "I'm indebted to her. 

"I hope she loves him forever," Fran said — before 
news was out that the show was going off. "It does pay 
the bills. Besides, the fact that (Continued on page 85) 



37 



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IT! 



Please turn the page y 



39 



The kiss— and the girl— that made 




It happened not too long ago — in Salerno, one of 
the loveliest towns in all of Italy. 

It was nightfall. 

They stood in a doorway, Vince Edwards and the 
beautiful Italian girl — looking for a moment at the 
old town around them, and turning slowly then and 
looking at one another. 

They listened for a moment to the sounds of the 
night. 

And then, somehow, they found themselves in 
one another's arms. 

They kissed then — the longest of kisses. 

And as they did, and during the confusion that 
followed (with the man's voice yelling "Cut!" — with 
the woman's voice shrieking, "Rosanna, vieni qui, let 
me fix the hair" — with another voice shouting, "Okay, 



hold the music. Basta with the music!") . . . even 
with the confusion, Vince could only think that a 
dream, a wild and beautiful dream, a dream of twenty- 
seven long and hard years was finally coming true — 

The dream had started when he was seven years 
old. 

The dream had started on a Saturday afternoon. 
At a neighborhood theater called something fancy — 
if you paid any attention to marquees — but known by 
all the kids around as The Scratch. 

The dream had started on a dime, because that's 
all you had to pay in the old days in Brooklyn to see 
two pictures, two cartoons, a serial and a few more 
things thrown in. 

The dream had started quietly — with most of the 
other kids talking, laughing, giggling, chewing noisily 



40 



Vince's wildest dream come true! 



SB^H^UX ! ; " ' "" 




on their Jujyfruits, razzing the love scenes, cheering 
on the villains — but with Vince sitting there, in the 
middle of all this, quietly, very quietly, staring up at 
the screen and at that guy with the sword (who was 
fighting all those other guys so his country and king 
and girlfriend would be saved) — and thinking to him- 
self, "Boy, I know he's only making believe, that guy. 
But it sure takes something to pull it off so good like 
that — to be an actor, to be a movie star." 

The dream had continued that Saturday night, in 
bed, in the little apartment over on a drab little street 
named Pleasant Place where Vince's family lived. He 
lay in bed that night, next to his brother Anthony, 
who was sleeping already and who didn't hear the 
folks talking from the kitchen. But Vince heard — 
through the thin wall — the sad and soft voices talk- 



ing about this maledetto Depression and about how 
hard it was for Pop to find any decent work, about 
how things were getting tougher and tougher and how 
it looked like things would never be much good. And 
Vince, lying there that night, listening to this, found 
himself thinking, "Maybe, Mom . . . maybe, Pop . . . 
maybe things will be good, for you, for me, for all of 
us, when I get bigger and work and make all the 
money I'm gonna make. Because I was over at The 
Scratch today and I came to a decision. I'm gonna 
be a movie star when I get big." 

Vince didn't tell his parents about his decision, his 
dream— not till years later. 

He certainly didn't tell anyone in the neighborhood. 

After all, this was the East New York section of 
Brooklyn, and if you wanted (Continued on page 91) 



In Hartford, Connecticut, a housewife 
shows her late guest to a spot on the floor; she 
has simply run out of chairs. 

In Etobicoke, Canada, another housewife 
passes cheese and crackers to a dozen guests 
she has somehow managed to squeeze into a 
12-X-8 living room. 

In Denver, Colorado, a husband grumbles: 
"Where'd we get so many friends all of a 
sudden?" 

His wife simply smiles; they'd been 
through all this before, years ago when they 
were the first people on the block to get a TV 
set and all the neighbors had come to stare at 
Milton Berle mugging on a ten-inch screen. 

Now neighbors are making reservations for 
the coming months, when there'll be a new 
phenomenon to come and stare at. 



Pay television. 

Pay-TV is here — in at least these three 
cities. It is on its way to many more and it 
doesn't look as if anyone can stop it — even if 
they wanted to. In fact, the inside word is that 
even the networks, having found they can't 
lick it, may join it! 

What does this mean to you? Well, it's your 
money — you pay and take your choice. 

The people against Pay-TV have tried to 
claim that this system is one more way to pinch 
your pocketbook, that you'll be paying money 
for what you already see for free. 

The people for Pay-TV — or subscription 
TV, as they prefer to call it — claim that their 
system may be the best thing that ever hap- 
pened to your budget. Their idea is not to re- 
place the free TV that you already have, but 



to add to it a new theatre-in-the-home. They 
claim that you and your family — plus the 
neighbors you'll probably invite in as you did 
when there were only a few TV sets in the 
neighborhood — will see events in the living 
room that you would have had to go out to see 
before . . . that you'll see first-run movies, 
plays, night-club acts, concerts, big-time sports 
events, etc., for less than the cost of a single 
ticket at the box office — and without any of 
the cost of babysitters, parking and so on. 

Who's right — the people for or the people 
against? Is Pay-TV worth paying for — or not? 
Here are the facts. Why don't you decide for 
yourself? After all, when Pay-TV coriies to 
your city, that's what you'll have to do. 

Here's what they'll offer you — and what 
they'll charge you — based on what is now hap- 
pening in those three cities. 

In Hartford, they call the system Phone- 
vision and it costs a subscriber a $10 initial fee 
to be connected to it. In addition, there is a 
monthly service charge of $3.25. For this, a 
decoder and a billing system are installed in 
your home. Your television set is modified so 
that, with the decoder, you can unscramble the 
picture and the sound on the Pay-TV channel. 
A tape in the billing system shows what you 
have watched during the month. You tally up 
the tape at the end of the month and then send 
in your monthly bill. At a later date, a collector 
may visit you and audit the tape to see that you 
have been paying the correct bill. 

In Etobicoke, it's Telemeter, a closed-cir- 
cuit, coin-box operated Pay-TV system. With- 
out going into the technicalities, this system is 
installed in an area by cables strung along the 
existing telephone poles and works well in 
suburban and rural areas, though it would 
probably be impractical in cities. Installation 
in your home costs ten dollars and there is no 
monthly service charge, only a monthly mini- 
mum. With Telemeter, you tune in the Pay-TV 
channel and an announcer tells you what's on. 
If it's something you want to see, you deposit 
the appropriate coins in the box and in this 
way you get your picture and sound. The coins 
are collected at regular intervals. 

In Denver, they are launching a third sys- 
tem— Macfadden-Teleglobe. Installation costs 
$10, and consists of a speaker hooked onto 
an audio line — not onto your TV set. With 
Macfadden-Teleglobe, you turn to the Pay-TV 
channel and you can already see a picture. The 
theory behind this is that if it's a movie or a 
play or a concert you're interested in, you'll 
be teased into tuning in the sound, too. This 
comes in over a telephone-like party-line and, 
with this particular system, you are billed very 



^^PS^^ 



much the same way as with your telephone. 
By a scanning system, the Teleglobe people 
can tell when you're tuned in for sound and 
they then send you a monthly bill. Payment is 
through the mails rather than by collectors. 
There is a monthly service charge of $3.25, 
but this also includes all-day music like the 
kind you hear in restaurants who have Muzak. 
The only time there will be a scrambled pic- 
ture with Teleglobe is for sporting events — 
which you could presumably enjoy without 
sound — and for people interested in sports 
there is a Sportscoder, available at a nominal 
fee, to unscramble the picture. 

With all three systems, the charge for events 
is the same. 

A championship fight: $2 to $3.00 

A first-run movie: $1.00 

A night-club show: $1.00 

A performance of the Bolshoi Ballet: $2.00 

(To see how this compares to entertain- 
ment outside the home, a man and wife going 
out to a movie would probably spend at least 
$2 for the tickets, plus the cost of transporta- 
tion, parking and so forth. In most cases, the 
cost would also include 75 < to a babysitter for 
every hour away from home.) 

In practice, the Pay-TV people find that 
most subscribers spend an average of ten dol- 
lars a month. They urge you to compare yoiir 
current entertainment budget — and what it 
buys — with that figure. Then make up your 
mind on whether Pay-TV is worth it. 

The choice is yours — but, we'd like to 
know what you decide. Would you fill in the 
coupon below and mail it to: Pay-TV Poll, 
Box 3744, Grand Central Sta., N. Y. 17, N. Y. 

We'll send a gift copy of the sensational 
best-seller — "The Decline and Fall of Holly- 
wood" — to the first 300 people whose ballots 



we receive. 



I think Pay-TV is worth paying for: Q 



think it's not: □ 



My name_ 



by ROGER SMITH 




A beggar once approached a rich man and told him he knew the secret of eternal life. "Tell 

me," said the wealthy man, "and I'll pay you anything you ask." . . . The beggar smiled and 

said, "It will cost you nothing, for it is so simple." . . . "Then tell me, what is it?" the rich 

man pleaded. . . . "Go to the gas chamber and stay there." . . . "Why?" the 

wealthy man exclaimed "Because a rich man has never died there," the beggar told him. . . . 

A few weeks ago, my wife and I were photo- 
graphed by the F.B.I. I imagine our pictures 
have been filed under a classification that means : 
"Possible Goofs." In connection with the 
incident, I was also interviewed by local tele- 
vision newsmen and was cautioned by 
friends that my conduct was socially unacceptable, that, in fact, I might be 
courting disaster. Why? Because Vici and I had joined a picket line protesting 
a murder. The State of California and the general public didn't call the killing 
of Henry Busch a murder. They called it execution. But, to me, the taking of a 
human life is murder and violates the commandment: "Thou shalt not kill." 
My point of view, I realize, is controversial, and that's 
why I want to explain it myself — in the first person. 
The subject is so important and my conviction is so 
deep that I can't take a chance on being misquoted 
or quoted out of context. . . . My standpoint is very 
simple really. I just don't believe in taking human life. 
That's all there is to it, but a belief like that can place a man in circumstances in which he 
never expected to find himself. For example, I never expected to rate F.B.I, attention as a pos- 
sible nut. And a few years ago I never dreamed I'd ever risk ridicule or even ostracism to try 
to save the life of a strangler. That's what Busch was, a strangler. On the day that 
Caryl Chessman, California's so-called "Red Light Bandit," (Continued on page 64) 



TRIED 

TO 
SAVE 



MURDER 




44 



P3\ 







KATHY GODFREYS SIDE OF IT: 



"I don't hate being Arthur Godfrey's sister anymore," said Kathy God- 
frey. "You develop some sort of a sensitivity when you're related to 
a very famous person. It gives you complexes. I used to worry inces- 
santly that I'd be doing something which might reflect badly on him. It 
was always over me like some great, dark shadow. But l guess I've grown 
up a lot lately. I'm over all that." 

Kathy Godfrey and I were sharing a luncheon table to discuss the book 
that she and her kid sister, Jean, had written. The book is "Genius in the 
Family," and, in two hundred and fifty-six pages, Kathy explains that the 
Genius is not Arthur. 

It's Kathryn Morton Godfrey, their eighty-three-year-old mom. Kathy and 
Jean talk about their happy -go -poverty -stricken (Continued on page 72) 




47 



48 





HOW TO 
HAVE 
A HAPPI 
ENDING! 




Once upon a long time, something so won- 
derful happens that it becomes a classic. It 
happens in music ... in hooks ... in art. It 
happened in fashion when a clever woman 
copied the shirt off her husband's back. 
Clever women have been wearing it happily 
ever after. 

In this fashion story, Zina Bethune — of 
CBS-TV's "The Nurses"— starts with a shirt- 
top by Ship'n Shore and shows six different 
ways — all wonderful — to cure what ails your 
wardrobe. Wear the shirt loose with slacks 
. . . add an ascot for shopping . . . team it 
with another classic, a tailored suit, and add 
yards of chains . . . wear it starkly simple 
with Bermudas. The latest twist: Shirts for 
evening — with a demure long skirt to stay 
romantically at home, or the featheriest short 
one to go 'way out! — Barbara Marco 

These fashions are at your favorite stores: 

Blouse by Ship'n Shore 
Jewelry by Coro 
Hair bows by Ben Hur 
Plaid skirt by Garland 
Bermuda shorts by Jack Winters 





11KE most newlyweds, from the 
1 moment David and June Nelson 
were married — on May 20, 1961— 
they agreed to disagree, at intervals, 
with magnificent inconsistency. On 
one point, however, there was never a 
split decision. Both of them wanted 
to start a family early in their mar- 
riage. Both believed the sooner you 
have children, the closer you come to 
understanding and sharing the same 
problems you yourself had to face. 

It's typical of David's warm and 
generous nature that, each time they 
thought their dream had reached ful- 
fillment, he accompanied June to the 
doctor. He wanted to be there, to be 
by her side, when they heard those 
magic words. 

Finally, there came a day. 

"This time, it's true," the kindly 
Dr. A.C. Mietus informed them. "You 
may now consider yourselves expect- 
ant parents." 

Then — also like most newlyweds — 
they began to read all the books on 
parenthood and expectant parenthood. 
"According to one book," David re- 
members, "it was much better not to 
make an immediate announcement. 

"For the mother's sake, the book 
said, it made the period of pregnancy 
seem shorter. People wanted to be 
nice, it was also pointed out — but they 
were prone to offer advice. Some- 
times too much advice. So we waited 
two impatient months before we even 
told my parents." 

After Harriet Nelson gathered her 
children into her arms and bestowed 
her blessings, she exclaimed : "I know 
it's going to be a girl — and she's go- 
ing to be minel" Ozzie had his own 
prideful reservations: "Now, Har- 
riet," he (Continued on page 76) 






David and June found the books weren't 
always right — at least not about Danny. 



50 



j. 



David ivasons 
Answer to Dt\ Spoi'k 




51 



IKE most newlvweds. from the 





50 



11KE most newlyweds, from the 
' moment David and June Nelson 
were married — on May 20, 1961 — 
they agreed to disagree, at intervals, 
with magnificent inconsistency. On 
one point, however, there was never a 
split decision. Both of them wanted 
to start a family early in their mar- 
riage. Both believed the sooner you 
have children, the closer you come to 
understanding and sharing the same 
problems you yourself had to face. 
It's typical of David's warm and 
generous nature that, each time they 
thought their dream had reached ful- 
fillment, he accompanied June to the 
doctor. He wanted to be there, to be 
by her side, when they heard those 
magic words. 

Finally, there came a day. 
"This time, it's true," the kindly 
Dr. A.C. Mietus informed them. "You 
may now consider yourselves expect- 
ant parents." 

Then — also like most newlyweds — 
they began to read all the books on 
parenthood and expectant parenthood. 
"According to one book," David re- 
members, "it was much better not to 
make an immediate announcement. 

"For the mother's sake, the book 
said, it made the period of pregnancy 
seem shorter. People wanted to be 
nice, it was also pointed out — -but they 
were prone to offer advice. Some- 
times too much advice. So we waited 
two impatient months before we even 
told my parents." 

After Harriet Nelson gathered her 
children into her arms and bestowed 
her blessings, she exclaimed: "I know 
it's going to be a girl — and she's go- 
ing to be mine!" Ozzie had his own 
prideful reservations: "Now, Har- 
riet," he {Continued on page 76) 



David Nelson's 
Answer to Dm-. Spoil. 




David and June found the books weren't 
always rifjht - at least not about Danny. 








I used to think Durward was a hero — 

then I found out he was something much better! 

by MRS. DURWARD KIRBY 



Valentine's Day, 1941 ... a never- 
to-be-forgotten day for Durward 
and me . . . the day we got engaged. 
My dear, funny Valentine and I 
were practically kids when we first 
met. Just out of our teens. I was 
Mary Paxton Young back then, a 
singer with radio Station WLW, 
Cincinnati. Durward was an an- 
nouncer for the same station. He 
phoned me for a date one night 



52 




shortly after I started working 
there. 

I had another date and told him 
I couldn't make it. 

Well, Durward was having a ball 
back then. He was very tall and 
very cute and had so much charm, 
and he certainly didn't lack for 
other girls to go out with. So I 
guess he just kind of took me off 
his list after that first refusal. I 



hardly noticed it, though — be- 
cause I, too, was having a lot of 
dates and loads of fun. 

About a month later, a terrific 
flood hit Cincinnati — one of the 
worst floods in Ohio history. 

That's when I gave Durward a 
very close second look. 

In all the danger and confusion 
throughout the duration of that 
flood, Durward was on the job — 



from five in the morning until 
practically five the next — as calm 
and unruffled as though it were 
an everyday occurrence. 

I'll never forget it. We had all 
been recruited to make Red Cross 
appeals and to put on shows be- 
tween announcements. By 5 a.m., 
I was dead tired and one of my 
bosses said, "All right, Pax — go 
home and (Please turn the page) 



53 



r 






phoned me for a date one night 



52 





I used to think Durward was a hero — 

then I found out he was something much better! 

by MRS. DURWARD KIRBY 



Valentine's Day, 1941 ... a never- 
to-be-forgotten day for. Durward 
and me . . . the day we got engaged. 
My dear, funny Valentine and I 
were practically kids when we first 
met. Just out of our teens. I was 
Mary Paxton Young back then, a 
singer with radio Station WLVV, 
Cincinnati. Durward was an an- 
nouncer for the same station. He 
phoned me for a date one nigh 



started working 



shortly after 
there. 

I had another date and told him 
1 couldn't make it. 

Well, Durward was having a ball 
ba ck then. He was very tall and 
very cute and had so much charm, 
and ne certainly didn't lack for 
oth er girls to go out with. So I 
j> u «s he just kind of took me off 
hls ''St after that first refusal. I 



hardly noticed it, though — be- 
cause I, too, was having a lot of 
dates and loads of fun. 

About a month later, a terrific 
flood hit Cincinnati — one of the 
worst floods in Ohio history. 

That's when I gave Durward a 
very close second look. 

In all the danger and confusion 
throughout the duration of that 
flood, Durward was on the job — 



from five in the morning until 
practically five the next — as calm 
and unruffled as though it were 
an everyday occurrence. 

I'll never forget it. We had all 
been recruited to make Red Cross 
appeals and to put on shows be- 
tween announcements. By 5 A.M., 
I was dead tired and one of my 
bosses said, "All right, Pax — go 
home and (Please turn the page) 





That fateful Valentine's Day was more 
than twenty-one years ago . . . and I 
haven't regretted one moment. I'm 
glad that — after Randy's arrival and 
before Dennis was born — / left all the 
"career" to Durward. There's plenty 
of activity at home, as you can see! 



continued 

get some sleep now." Which is exactly what I did! 

Then, about two hours later, the phone rang. 

Somebody shouted into the receiver: "Hurry to the 
downtown studios. The Arlington Studio is on fire. 
Prepare to go right on the air." 

As I dressed, I turned on the radio and got WLW. 
And there was that voice of Durward's, calm as ever, 
talking about the fire and advising people what to do 
so they could get out of the area safely. 

I thought he was a real hero. 

And the next day, when he phoned and asked me 
for a date that night, I accepted — readily. . . . 

We had dates, off and on, for several months. Then 
Durward went to Chicago to work for a network. My 
mother was ill, so I went back to Indianapolis, my 
hometown, and worked on radio there. Durward came 
to Indianapolis often — his parents lived there, too — 
and we'd get together then. Occasionally, I went up to 
Chicago — where I was trying to sell a radio show — 
and we'd get together then, too. 

Finally, I sold my show and I moved to Chicago. 
Durward and I dated more often now, but we never 
went steady. I had a lot of other dates, and so did 
he. But, after a while, the time came when we just 
didn't seem to be happy except when we were togeth- 
er. And on Valentine's Day, 1941, we were engaged. 
It was a wild engagement, one of the funniest yet most 
beautiful nights of my life! (Continued on page 94) 



54 



O. O 



CD 9 



St 



^ 



■ m 



%. 



i 




nm», 




TUE 

THE 
TRUTH 

ABOUT 

DONNA REED 



There are times when her husband wails that she is "almost painfully shy" . . . and then there 
are days when the people who work with her call her "The Tiger" — and mean it! There are those, 
unacquainted with the real Donna Reed, who still think of her as . . . well, just another prosaic 
example of TV's "Mother Knows Best." "They're living in a dream world," hooted a big-muscled 
crew man on Donna's show. "This gutsy little blond doll is an awful lot of dame." Well, is Donna 
really the lady — or really The Tiger? Frankly, there are also those days when even her children 
don't know for sure! 

In a town where the voice of the self-enthralled dominates the smog, Donna Reed is a unique, 
compact, 113-pound package of feminine contradictions. She is, of course, a million leagues 
away from the froth-and-bosom star who makes a fetish of descending upon New York from 
Hollywood with a floor-length mink on her back and two more heaped (Continued on page 87) 



58 




Thirty years 
after the wedding, 
the Lawrence Welks 
are as much 
in love as ever. 
Here's how 
they did it! 



We were married in Sioux City, 
Iowa, where my band was 
working," Lawrence Welk remember- 
ed. "I had no money. Not a dime. 
Fern had none, either. We were so 
broke that we had to get married at 
five in the morning, because if the 
ceremony were at a decent hour, all 
my orchestra people would want to 
come. We were too poor for that. I 
not only couldn't afford to celebrate, 
but we didn't even have money for 
clothes to be married in." 

In those days, Lawrence wasn't ex- 
actly the picture of a future ABC-TV 
star. He had only recently burst upon 
an unsuspecting and unimpressed 
radio public with the excitement of a 
yawn. From the reaction, nobody fig- 
ured he had a future. Especially not 
his mother-in-law-to-be — who gave 
many a sniff when it came to mu- 
sicians and their reputations for wine, 
women and wrong. 

"Only the couple with whom Fern 
had previously been staying stood up 
for us," he continued. "Plus the one 
fellow who drove us to our wedding. 
But he was so tired at that hour that 
he fell asleep in the car and never did 
see the ceremony itself." 



Welk grinned cheerily and his gray- 
green eyes crinkled at the corners. 
"This was the first marriage that the 
priest had ever performed and he was 
so sleepy that he made a mistake. It 
ended up he forgot to bless the ring. 
We were nearly out the door when he 
remembered and called us back. 

"Back at my hotel, I splurged a 
bit. I allowed a bellboy to come get 
our suitcases. Our honeymoon was to 
be the next town where our band was 
booked. Just as I handed him the tip 
which I sure couldn't afford, the 
phone rang. It was our agent with 
news that the job had fallen through. 
. . . What did we do? What could we 
do ! . We traveled around from rela- 
tive to relative, dropping in on every 
single one we had and staying as long 
as each would keep us then. . . . 

"I repeatedly tried to get into some 
other business," Lawrence said. "But 
whatever I went into, I always went 
broke. I just had no talent to do any- 
thing else. This is where a good wife 
steps in. Mine knew I wasn't happy 
out of the band business. She used to 
tell me I was a changed man when- 
ever I wasn't working at being a 
musician. So, one day, she said it's 



better that I stay with the orchestra 
— no matter what." 

I asked if there were ever the prob- 
lem of jealousy, considering that his 
profession continually threw him into 
the company of beautiful women. 

As is natural for Lawrence, he an- 
swered me directly. "Yes," he ad- 
mitted. "We did have that problem. 
In the beginning of our marriage, I 
worked weeks at a time in those large 
ballrooms across the country where 
dance bands used to appear. 

"Women came in without dates and 
deliberately danced across the floor 
in front of the bandstand. Naturally, 
they would try to pick up the boys in 
the band. That was expected. We all 
were aware of it. But my wife wasn't. 
When she saw those flirty looks go by, 
she would get very unhappy. She 
didn't say anything, but I would con- 
stantly catch her with tears in her 
eyes. 

"I explained this is part of the busi- 
ness. The girls weren't interested in 
me personally. They'd act this way no 
matter who was on the bandstand. Of 
course, she grew to know my ways, 
what kind of a person I was, and she 
realized I was no part of this. Eventu- 



60 





y the wnole problem disappeared." 

Welk clasped his hands thought- 
fully and discussed another storm he 
and his wife weathered. "We had only 
one serious difficulty. A major un- 
happiness in many marriages is that 
it's very easy for a woman to fall into 
the business world. With us, it was 
especially easy. Being together so 
much, my wife became very friendly 
with the other wives in the band. They 
all talked to each other about condi- 
tions and things, and, before you 
knew it, my wife was getting involved 
in the business end. 

"Generally speaking, it's right that 
the husband should be the head of 
the business and the wife should be 
the heart of the family. That's the way 
God planned it. Therefore, in this 
case, I relied on God's law. I used my 
religious principles, plus a great deal 
of patience and good logic. 

"Today, Fern is very much in the 
background. She seldom comes 
around where I'm working. We both 
prefer it this way. My wife has all 
the jurisdiction over our home, in- 
cluding whatever expenses are in- 
volved in running it. Now. the rare 
occasions when she tells me some- 



thing about my career, I tell her what 
a wonderful homemaker she is — and 
that straightens things out." 

Neither Mr. nor Mrs. Welk are 
screamers, fighters or hollerers. They 
work out their troubles with "good 
thinking." Neither has an uncontroll- 
able temper. They've never had one 
of those strong knock-down, drag-outs 
you hear about. 

Mrs. Welk relates a story which 
just about giftwraps her husband. He 
never spanked his children. That is — 
except once. So traumatic is the mem- 
ory that he's even blocked out the 
reason why. After administering what 
positively hurt him more than it did 
them, he couldn't stand it. He gave 
each of the children fifty cents to go 
out and buy themselves something. 
They reported that at those prices 
"they enjoyed getting spanked by 
Daddy," but the parental violence was 
never repeated. 

When you meet Lawrence Welk in 
person, is he really as "square" as 
they say? He sure is. He's as square 
and as unhep and as plain as your 
favorite uncle or the father you've 
loved and respected all your life. He's 
just that sort of kindly gentleman 



(a proper translation for "square"). 

How does a woman keep a man in 
love with her for three decades? One 
answer is that Fern's a great "level- 
er." She's taught him that "real value 
does not lie in lights except the lights 
of one's home." He recalls that, in 
the early days, he was trying so hard 
to make friends, he invited everybody 
to his house every day. The Welks 
had no home life. Finally. Fern put 
her foot down. 

"We help each other a great deal," 
said Lawrence. "She has a sympa- 
thetic heart and good stable thinking. 
We talk things over. We discuss our 
problems together. This helps keep 
you close. I'm home every night for 
dinner, and that's when we have our 
little informal talks." 

Years ago, one of his staff caused 
him much sleeplessness. Night after 
night, he'd lie awake tossing with this 
problem, until his wife pointed out 
that he was making the person too 
important. "When I eventually real- 
ized that." said Welk, "I stopped mak- 
ing this great big to-do. Since then, 
whenever an employee goes wrong, I 
go up to him and say very quietly, 
'If you think {Continued on page 89 1 



61 








\ 








Tf 



m 












"Proportioned- for me ? 



» 



Yes, you. For new Kotex napkins give you a choice 
of 4 proportioned sizes. 

Not just different length napkins, but different depths 
and widths to meet your absorbency needs. 

Each has the moisture-proof shield under the 
new soft covering. 

Nothing protects quite like Kotex. 

That's why, now more than ever, Kotex is confidence. 



Which proportioned Kotex napkin protects you best? 





REGULAR MISS DEB SUPER 

Medium width, depth For young ladies. Regular Length of Regular, 

and length. Designed absorbency, less width. deeper, wider and 

for average needs. Soft pink covering. 16% more absorbent. 



SLENDERLINE 
Narrowest, deepest, 
shorter than Regular. 
Compact for comfort. 



New softness outside, new softness inside 



KOTEX and SLENDERLINE are trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Corporatio 




Everyone delights in the winning smile 

and twinkling eyes of Mary Jo Tierney, the girl who's been wowing the Upper Midwest 



66 



THE name Mary Jo Tierney has become a household 
word in the Upper Midwest. Television sponsors know 
her as "the gal with the sell" and keep coming back time 
and time again — with good reason. Any product Mary 
Jo mentions sells, sells and sells. Of course, this endears 
her to Minneapolis' and St. Paul's KMSP-TV. Not that 
her friendly smile and eagerness to do her best in any 
endeavor wouldn't be enough to make them love her! 
. . . She joined KMSP in 1955, as hostess of "The Early 
Show With Mary Jo." Now, for the first time, Mary Jo 
has teamed up with another personality, Bob Allard, 
KMSP-TV newscaster. They co-host the exciting new- 
show called "Random," seen weekday mornings from 
10:15 to 11. "Random" places the emphasis on people 
. . . what they think, what they do, what they agree on 
and what they disagree on. Experts from all fields ap- 
pear on the show to discuss their views on newsworthy 




Co-starring with Chuck Connors was quite a "coup." 




Mary Jo chats with Clifford Guest and "Ah & Oom" the do-gooder 
elves who "starred" in "The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm" 



and controversial topics of the day. "Random" also gives 
the viewer current news, weather and sports information. 
It's no wonder those ratings are going up-up-up! . . . 
Born in St. Cloud, Mary Jo began her career at the 
tender age of five when she emceed her first variety 
show — which required her to memorize over seventy-two 
introductions in verse. That was the beginning of a 
childhood filled with requests for Mary Jo to perform — 
doing skits, plays and readings of all kinds. That, plus 
majoring in English and speech at St. Catherine's in St. 
Paul, was ample background for a girl with Mary Jo's 
talent and drive to succeed in television. . . . She ap- 
peared with Chuck Connors on "The Rifleman" and is 
constantly in demand as an emcee . . . and it's no wonder ! 



Charlton Heston guested on Mary Jo's TV show. 




Last June, radiant Mary Jo married Ted Collins. 



67 



Tom Tuily (left) and Warner Anderson star in a true-to-life police drama 



gt>,i ) ai wi' , • **?****"** 



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"Realism," says Jaime del Valle, producer of "San Francisco Beat," popular TV series highlighting 
police activities in that city, "is what the public wants. You can't fool viewers anymore — they're 
too hep. They read too many newspapers and magazines, and, as a result, they recognize 
authenticity when they see it." . . . Because of this, del Valle's "Beat" scripts have always been 
reviewed by a three-man police board and an officer assigned to the show before filming began. 
These men checked to make sure everything was technically correct. . . . Veteran actors Warner 
Anderson, who portrays police Lieut. Ben Guthrie, and Tom Tully, who plays Inspector Matt Greb, 
spent weeks of observation at the Bay City police academy before the start of the series. As for 
"extras" on the show, del Valle often tapped strangers on the shoulder to ask if they would 
like to witness a bank robbery. After the initial shock, most agreed when they learned the crime 
was to be one supervised by the city's police force! . . . Warner Anderson brings forty-five years of 
acting experience to his role of Guthrie. He began his professional career in the Broadway play 
"Maytime," and also toured the country with Laurette Taylor in an early stage production of 
"Happiness." He has appeared in over fifty top motion pictures as a featured player, among them 
"Destination Tokyo," "Detective Story," "Caine Mutiny" and "The Star." Anderson also has a 
long background in radio and TV. On radio he narrated the "Court of Missing Heirs," and on TV 
has been seen in many top shows, including "Hallmark Playhouse" and "Lux Video Theater." 
. . . Born in Brooklyn, New York, Anderson has never limited his activities to acting, even though he 
entered the profession at the age of six. He once studied law and toyed with the idea of practicing 
professionally, and also has an engineering degree. He, his wife Leeta and their son Michael reside 
in Pacific Palisades, California, where he indulges in his favorite sport — golf. . . . Tom Tully, who 
plays Anderson's side-kick, Inspector Matt Greb, got his professional start in radio, oddly enough, 
as the police-dog aide to "Renfrew of the Mounted." He earned $7.50 per performance to "bark" 
on cue! Soon he graduated to such radio shows as "Mr. District Attorney," "Gang Busters" and 
"Famous Jury Trials." But he always counted his animal impersonations among his favorite jobs! 
. . . Tully played in a number of films, including "Destination Tokyo," where he and Anderson met. 
A native of Denver, Colorado, he is married to the former Ida Johnson, and they have a married 
daughter. . . . Anderson and Tully share a mutual respect for the police of San Francisco, whom 
they consider the "most polite cops in the world." Everyone on "San Francisco Beat" has striven to 
depict the force as they are — strong, intelligent men with a job to do. As a result, the show has 
brought new respect from the public for law-enforcement officers and for the job they're doing. 



M 





Know what they're doing 
in St. Louis? Listening to 
KMOX's Grant Williams for 





Grant relaxes after one of his public appearances. 








T 

v Mr. and Mrs. W. at home with Michael, 10; 
R Mary, 12; Mark, 5; and Margaret, 6 months. 

70 



Want to know the latest on the care and feeding of 
husbands and children? ... or perhaps you're 
interested in notes on the lighter side of today's and 
yesterday's news ... or maybe you just want to 
listen to music, smooth and easy. Citizens of St. Louis 
know they can satisfy any and all of these desires 
by turning on Station KMOX and listening to the 
"Grant Williams Shows," heard Monday through Fri- 
day from 9:25 to 9:55 A.M. and from 2:10 to 2:30 
p.m. The emphasis in Grant's programs lies in the 
realm of "let's take it easy and have a chuckle or some 
food for thought." He's an expert in that field, much 
to the delight of his many listeners — and especially 
the advertisers whose products he sells so well on 
his shows. His advertising technique is the personal 
touch — but it's no gimmick with Grant. He visits spon- 
sors, he and wife Rosemary try out products in their 
home in suburban Florissant. He delivers commer- 
cials in his own words after he's convinced himself 
of their worth. . . . We're convinced — he's great! 



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71 



KATHY GODFREY 

(Continued from page 47) 

childhood with this deliriously wonder- 
ful mom who'd smear some cleanser 
on the windows when things were so bad 
that they couldn't afford drapes. They 
tell how she'd make her five children 
say "tomahto" even when they didn't 
have one to eat. And how she'd insist 
her young ladies curtsy although they 
couldn't scratch even a dime together 
amongst all of them. With a typewriter- 
ful of love and affection for this mom 
who's still very much with them, they 
write about how she could make being 
stone-cold-busted-broke seem like fun 
despite her colorful newspaperman of 
a husband, who considered bill collect- 
ors highly rude when they demanded 
something besides conversation. 

This was the basic reason Kathy 
Godfrey and I were breaking bread 
together. To discuss her book and her 
sister and her mama and herself. But 
somehow, no matter what direction we 
headed in, the conversational needle 
always swung toward Arthur. 

"When we began writing the story, 
Jean informed Arthur about it. After 
all, it's only courteous to let him 
know," she said. "Anyway, he sent a 
note back offering his congratulations. 
The very first copy off the press went 
to Mother. The second one we im- 
mediately autographed and shipped to 
Arthur." 

Those blue eyes behind the glasses 
crinkled into a wicked grin. "I kind 
of have the idea the book annoyed him 
just a little. I mean, let's just say it 
was a funny feeling I had." 

The grin got wider. "You can al- 
ways kind of tell if someone's annoyed 
or not, you know. Let's face it, even 
if you're not closely related to a per- 
son, you can usually tell if they're un- 
happy or something." 

The grin had now come full circle. 
And she giggled, "Let's leave it lay by 
saying we somehow just gathered he 
wasn't too cheered. In fact, he told 
Mother he thought it was sickening." 

A handsome redheaded charmer 
who's never at a loss for a sassy line, 
Kathryn Godfrey the 2nd has laid up a 
substantial list of credits on her own. 
She has two children — aged eighteen 
and twenty-five — by her millionaire 
first husband who is kin to Alexander 
Graham Bell. She lives with her hand- 
some second husband, a successful 
merchant, in Connecticut and, from 
all appearances, the famous redhead's 
younger sister may be lesser known 
but she doesn't seem to be lesser off. 
In other words, Kathy Godfrey isn't 
roughing it any. Besides the blue cash- 
mere outfit which was far more casual 
in looks than in price, she sported a 
diamond solitaire the size of a soup 
bone on her third finger, correct hand. 
So, although being poor may have been 
"great fun" in the old days, it looks 
like maybe these days are a little better. 

"Kit" Godfrey not only has the same 
R coloring — including the ruddy com- 
plexion — but she has the same profile 



know-who. When told she and her 
brother look alike, her answer is a 
rousing, "Yes, I guess so." Then, she 
added, "Arthur and I are a lot alike. 
I'm very strong. Very opinionated. I 
have my own definite beliefs. Maybe 
that accounts for part of the reason that, 
when I see my brother, we don't al- 
ways get along. He may not like me 
saying that, but it's true. We're a great 
deal alike. 

"When I'm home of an evening and 
Arthur's on TV, I'll watch. If he's 
interviewing someone, just for kicks 
I'll ask aloud the next question that I 
would put to the person if I were 
doing the interview. Believe it or not, 
Arthur will ask exactly the same one. 
Nine times out of ten. It's uncanny." 

Too much alike? 

Besides the chromosomes, the genes 
and the looks that they share in com- 
mon, they parallel each other in many 
ways. The kid sister even has a soup- 
con of the mighty talent that her oldest 
brother has in abundance. At sixteen, 
Kathy had her first radio program. 
In Englewood, New Jersey. Her take- 
home pay was five dollars. Arthur's 
initial salary in broadcasting was the 
same. On that day so many years ago, 
when Arthur suffered his accident and 
was hospitalized in Washington, D.C.'s 
Walter Reed Hospital, his sister Kathy 
contracted polio and was taken to a 
New York hospital for fourteen months. 
She still walks with a cane. When she 
sits, she utilizes the strength in her 
arms to raise herself to a standing posi- 
tion. Like her brother, she has a zest 
for life and the determination that over- 
comes any handicap. 

She's even had a shot at network TV. 
"That might be where we began our 
difficulties together," she explained. 

"It all started with this radio pro- 
gram I had in Phoenix. I was using the 
name of Kathy Morton. I didn't want 
to trade on Arthur. Suddenly, one day, 
the station discovered they had 'a 
Godfrey.' They were furious that they'd 
had one in their backyard all this 
time without even knowing it. They 
gave me the alternative of either using 
the name Kathy Godfrey or losing my 
job." 

The fourth of the five little God- 
freys took a deep drag on her ciga- 
rette. "It was just after I officially be- 
came Kathy Godfrey on radio in 



72 



and cheery, infectious grin as you- 



PHOTOGRAPHERS' CREDITS 
Vince Edwards cover by Leo Fuchs of 
Vista; Art Carney by U.P.I.; Dick Cham- 
berlain color by Gene Trindl of Topix; 
Mrs. Kennedy at services for Eleanor 
Roosevelt by U.P.I.; Donna Douglas 
color and black-and-white by Frank 
Bez of Globe; Loretta Young and hus- 
band by Nat Dallinger of Gilloon; 
Vince Edwards by Leo Fuchs of Vista; 
Roger Smith by Frank Bez; Zina Beth- 
une by Roberta Booth; Dave Nelson 
and family by John Engstead; Durward 
Kirby by Jack Stager; children's party 
by Bill Kobrin; Donna Reed color by 
Don Ornitz; Lawrence Welk by Dick 
Miller. 



Phoenix that the front page of the 
theatrical weekly, Variety, came out 
with a headline about 'Modest Mor- 
ton.' Following that was when Arthur 
fired Julius LaRosa. Well, the re- 
porters were around me like flies. They 
didn't believe I didn't know LaRosa. 
Listen, I told them, I didn't even know 
Jeanette Davis. I hadn't even seen my 
brother in some while. 

"Arthur had sent word to the whole 
family that he absolutely forbade us to 
speak to reporters on this LaRosa thing. 
Well, I like reporters. Mother gave me 
a curiosity about people and an en- 
thusiasm for everything. So, I spoke to 
them. That's the angriest I ever knew 
Arthur to be. 

"Then I was offered this ABC-TV 
show out of New York. And Arthur 
was upset because I hadn't consulted 
him. It's for sure he likes to be con- 
sulted on everything. Well, he never 
asked me what he should do in his 
career, so I didn't see why I should 
ask him what I should do." 

Kathy readily admits she "loves 
her brother dearly" and would "love 
to see him every now and then" and 
would love nothing better in this whole 
world than to be a real, true-blue, 
honor-bright brother and sister team 
again. When an unkind newspaper 
story was about to be leveled against 
Arthur some years back, the loving 
instincts of a sister sprang to the fore, 
and she saw to it that many of the 
slicing cuts were given some instant 
first aid. 

After a few hours and a few more 
bold statements, you suddenly real- 
ize that the spicy dialogue with which 
she occasionally peppers her brother 
is not deliberate. She does the same to 
herself. Admire her shade of red hair 
and she'll crack, "You can have it, 
too. It's straight out of a bottle." Ask 
her about that ABC-TV show and 
she'll gag, "It was an old Bud Collyer 
retread." 

Kathy added this about her famous 
brother: "I don't feel he had anything 
but the protective instinct any older 
relative who's successful would have. 
Perhaps with all the millions of peo- 
ple who look up to him, he felt that 
maybe he'd have been a failure in 
the eyes of the public if he didn't act 
like a father to us. Anyway, there's no 
doubt that many doors opened to me 
just because I was his sister. 

"But being Arthur's sister can be 
difficult. When I came East for this 
show, which was sort of a copy of 
Arthur's 'Talent Scouts,' I had to 
prove myself. Everybody figured I was 
going to throw my weight around be- 
cause Arthur was so important. I 
could feel them ganging up on me. I 
could sense them saying, 'Watch her. 
She'll fire people like he does and 
she'll run to her big brother if some- 
thing's wrong.' " 

Whenever she discussed that ABC 
program, which had clung desperately 
to life for thirteen critical weeks, she 
squirmed goodnaturedly. "Whatever 
you do, don't ask me about that show. 
It was the worst. It was called 'On 
Your Way' and that's where it went 
after the first option came due." 



And how about Arthur all this time? 
Td heard that during this period, not 
only wasn't he a Big Bad Wolf, as 
his critics would have you believe, but 
that after she fell flat on her family 
tree with that ABC show, it was CBS 
who stretched out a helping hand. And 
in those days CBS spelled Arthur God- 
frey. 

The missing gift 

"That's true," says Kathy. "He's 
very generous. That's one thing no- 
body can take away from him. Every 
Christmas he sends all of us fabulous 
hams from his farm." And then — be- 
cause she couldn't resist — she added, 
"But last Christmas I didn't get my 
ham. Must be he was paying me back 
for not having consulted him! He has a 
thing about being consulted. 

"Arthur likes the opportunity of 
being able to help all of us. He's al- 
ways taken care of Mother, even when 
he was in the Navy and only making 
a few bucks a month. In those days, 
just when the gas was about to be 
shut off, Mother would always say, 
'Don't worry. We'll hear from Arthur.' 
And sure enough, next day we heard 
from him. Even if it was just a few 
dollars, we heard from him. 

"Oh, I used to love him so dearly, 
then, we all did. We worshipped him. 
When he came back from the Navy, he 
brought me a middy blouse. I wore 
it all the time. I was so proud. Arthur 
even taught me how to wash clothes on 
a deck like they did in the Navy. 

"When he came home from the Na- 
vy, he had changed. He became so 
efficient. He tried to organize us all. 
To neaten us all up. It was impossible. 
You couldn't organize a mother who, 
when the gas was shut off, would pre- 
tend it was Halloween, and hang up 
pumpkins with candles. You couldn't 
regiment a family who moved when- 
ever the bills piled up and who lived in 
twenty-six different houses during our 
childhood. Finally, Arthur left home 
and none of us heard from him for 
about eight years. This was when he 
began making his name. 

"Things were never the same after. 
But I guess the main problem was that 
he just wanted to help us. We have 
one brother that Arthur's been helping 
for many years. He even helped me 
once, years ago. It wasn't very much 
and I paid him back, but still he did 
come to my aid. We mentioned some 
of these things in the book. We thought 
we presented him in a very good light. 
That's why I can't understand why he 
told Mother he wouldn't plug the book." 

Plugs notwithstanding, the magic 
Godfrey name has rubbed off on 
"Genius In The Family" and it is still 
selling well. 

And what's Kathy 's next aim? It's to 
have a talent show on TV. And to have 
her first guest advertised as: "Arthur 
Godfrey — Kathy Godfrey's brother." 

— Jodie Andrews 

"Arthur Godfrey Time" is heard over 
CBS Radio, M-F, 10:10 a.m. est (on 
WCBS Radio, New York, 11:10 a.m.). 
His "specials" are seen over CBS-TV. 




WHO WILL WIN PHOTOPLAY'S 

>LD MEDAL 





SEE THE STARS YOU PICKED 

IN PEBSON ON 

THE TONIGHT SHOW 

STARRING 

JOHNNY CARSON 




THURSDAY NIGHT • FEBRUARY 28 
I\BC TELEVISION • 11:15 PM, E.S.T. 

CONSULT YOUR LOCAL TV LISTINGS FOR TIME AND STATION 



T 
V 
R 

73 



LORETTA YOUNG 

(Continued from page 35) 

Maria. Some people wonder if Judy's 
choice isn't a reaction to her mother's 
dedication to a career ... or is it the 
way Loretta brought her up, expecting 
Judy to shun the spotlight — and not pay 
the same terrible price for stardom? 
. . . Today, at forty-nine — or just past 
fifty, depending on which biography 
you consult — Loretta is still an enchant- 
ing woman and a more versatile actress 
than ever. She has never lost her youth- 
ful beauty, nor her legions of loyal fans. 
Yet Hollywood suspects she's the lone- 
liest woman in their often-lonely town. 
She has given her life to the public and 
taken so little from it. And this is what 
puzzles Hollywood the most. How could 
a woman give up so much for stardom 
— while spurning most of the advan- 
tages a star usually assumes as her 
right? 

Practically no one in Hollywood 
(with the much-publicized exception of 
Pamela Mason and her daughter Port- 
land ! ) has ever accused Loretta of be- 
having like a prima donna. She doesn't 
display temperament on the set. She 
doesn't sob out her heartbreaks to the 
press. She doesn't bedeck herself with 
jewels and set out to dazzle the town 
in a lavender limousine. 

First and last, she is an actress. One 
who has brought to her work a dedica- 
tion and concentration so complete that 
it has often cheated her cruelly as a 



A moment of truth 

Loretta confesses that once, while 
scanning a magazine questionnaire, she 
filled in the personal query, Who are 
you? — with the spontaneous answer: An 
actress. "When I turned the page, I 
found that I was thinking of myself as a 
job before thinking of myself as a per- 
son," she admits. "As soon as I knew 
what it meant, I'd have answered differ- 
ently . . . but the truth is, I love to act. I 
love it when the camera goes. That's why 
I enjoy television — the camera goes all 
the time. You listen, you think, you an- 
swer. You're on the beam." 

She's thought of herself as an actress, 
as a star, from the beginning. At four, 
when other children hadn't even seen 
a movie, she was galloping over the 
sands at El Segundo with Rudolph Val- 
entino on his horse. "The Sheik" was 
being filmed, and Gretchen Young was 
an "Arab" extra. The four small Youngs 
took part in half the films made in 1917, 
1918, 1919— sisters Polly Ann, Betty 
Jane (professionally known as Sally 
Blane) and Gretchen (Loretta) as ex- 
tras, brother Jackie as Wallace Reid's 
son whenever a picture called for one. 
Hollywood was Gretchen's school. 
Everything she learned, she learned for 
a picture, during the picture, and 
crammed that knowledge into it. Hers 
was a sponge-like capacity for knowl- 
_ edge, balanced by an ability to dismiss 
„ immediately whatever she didn't need. 
R Walking was something you did for an 
exit or an entrance. Tears were some- 
thing held back, except when you let 



them spill over for a tragic scene. At an 
age when other girls were struggling 
with their junior-high graduation dress- 
es, she was a leading lady, padded out 
with "symmetricals" to make her look 
more voluptuous than her too-slim four- 
teen years. 

She was already living in a starlit 
aura of attention. It's an aura in which 
she has continued to live, but one she 
was determined never to inflict upon her 
children. That's why you've read virtu- 
ally nothing about them. 

One of the Young legends is that 
Loretta never allowed herself to be 
photographed with them, in order to 
preserve her "ageless" image. That isn't 
really true. She's enjoyed being a 
mother and she never tried to keep her 
children babies, or herself a teenager. 

When Peter comes bouncing in from 
school, she sits wide-eyed sharing his 
hep chatter. She can hardly wait for 
letters from Chris. And you should 
have seen her at Judy's wedding. Loretta 
couldn't have been more proud. On 
Sunday, you have only to see her going 
to church with Judy, Joe and little 
Maria to know that Loretta is an under- 
standing and devoted mother. 

But the public will never see photo- 
graphs of such moments as these. Early 
in her adult life, Loretta drew a lonely 
line between her life as a star and her 
life at home. 

As she recalls: "When my little sis- 
ter Georgiana was about nine, she came 
home from school one day, sobbing, 
and threw herself across the bed and 
cried and cried. 'Honey, what's the mat- 
ter?' I asked . . . and she told me that 
it was all my fault . . . that the kids 
hated her because I was a movie star. 
They said she was stuck-up . . . they 
also said that we were only half-sisters, 
anyhow. You know how cruel children 
can be! 

"I took Georgie in my arms and ex- 
plained that God had made us sisters. 
We had had different fathers, but that 
didn't mean I loved her any the less. 
That took care of that, for then. But she 
must have been about eleven when I had 
a Cadillac town car specially made and 
hauled her out in front to see it. 
'Gretch,' she said solemnly, 'don't ever, 
ever send that car to school for me!?' 

"I chose my life. But . . ." 

"I knew what she meant. It isn't easy 
to be married to, related to, or the child 
of a movie star. We decided, long ago, 
that our children would never be used 
for my publicity. They're entitled to 
their own lives, their own anonymity. 

"I chose my life. But it mustn't ever 
intrude on theirs." 

Her attitude toward motherhood, her 
response to children, is something 
Loretta inherited from a mother who 
had a profound influence on all the 
Young girls. 

"We used to tease Polly Ann about 
being Mamma's pet," Loretta says. "We 
all loved each other, but we were totally 
different personalities. I was Miss 
Milquetoast, according to my mother. 
If I were playing in the backyard, I'd 
come in every little while with a flower 
for Mamma or a strawberry — I still re- 
member the flavor of those strawber- 



ries, warm from the sun. My brother was 
angelic, no trouble at all. And of course 
when Georgiana came along, she was 
so much younger, eleven years younger 
than I ... we all fussed over her. 

"One day, Bet was crying and insist- 
ing that Mamma didn't love her. I'll 
never forget it. Mamma sat down and 
said very calmly, 'Betty Jane, I'm a 
normal woman, I couldn't possibly love 
one child more than another. I love each 
of you for a different reason, but I love 
you all just as much. One child needs 
more attention, another needs very lit- 
tle supervision ... a mother's job is to 
give to each need.' 

"Obviously, one day my need was a 
spanking! She'd never spanked me be- 
fore in my life, but she did now — and 
I was sixteen. I was shocked. By then 
I was a big movie star, to my way of 
thinking, and quite able to take care 
of myself. But Mamma came in, as Pol 
and Bet and I were talking, and men- 
tioned that I looked pale and hadn't 
eaten a proper breakfast. 

" 'Go in and take some castor oil, 
Gretchen,' she said. 

"I had no intention of taking any 
castor oil and said so. I started out of 
the room, walking right past her — and 
as I did, Mamma slapped me across 
the bottom, stopped me cold ! 'Now take 
your castor oil,' Mamma said. And I did. 

Memories of happier days 

"Perhaps it sounds silly for a grown 
woman to keep talking about her moth- 
er," says Loretta apologetically, as 
though aware of how much her mind 
dwells on past happiness, "but ours is 
such a wise woman, and fun — easy to 
be with, always ready for anything. 
When I was nineteen or twenty, she 
and I went to Europe. It was our first 
trip and we were thrilled. But, after a 
few days in London, I had a tiff with a 
boyfriend, came back to the hotel, woke 
Mamma at one a.m. and suggested we 
catch the morning plane for Paris. 
That was fine with Mamma! We did 
just that. 

"You could tell her anything and. 
from her, I learned the important point : 
Parents can't allow themselves the lux- 
ury of being shocked. The greatest mis- 
take in the world is to over-react to 
something shocking your child tells you. 
Next time, the child won't tell. Disagree, 
but disagree agreeably — and without 
being prudish. 

"A parent can't live in the past or 
the future. She must live now. The now 
is all you can do anything about." 

Which is how Loretta has always 
lived. 

Years ago, when Judy was still small, 
Loretta was just leaving the house for 
a top studio conference, when she sud- 
denly heard sobs and turned back. 

Judy's little gray lizard had turned 
over on his back and died. "What's the 
matter with him?" Judy was sobbing. 
"Oh, Mamma, what's the matter?" 

Loretta took the child by the hand, 
took her to the Farmers Market, bought 
her another lizard, brought her back 
from the grim thought of death. 

Not until then did she keep the studio 
appointment. 

Children have never made her nerv- 



ous. She's gay and firm and interested 
in them — not only her own children but 
her friends' children, her sisters' chil- 
dren, all children. 

Children, romance, a happy home — 
Loretta yearns over them all. And yet 
. . . there are times she can't help see- 
ing them with a camera's eye. How will 
they advance the plot? How will their 
personalities surround and enhance the 
star? 

There seems little doubt that Loretta 
— who never before found a role inter- 
esting enough to entice her to do a 
continuing character on TV — fell in love 
with Cristine, in her new show, because 
of Cristine's happy home and children. 

And Cristine's opportunities for ro- 
mance. 

For here again is something for which 
Loretta has had little time personally 
. . . even though her 1940 marriage to 
Tom Lewis had a profound effect on 
her life. 

Actually, they met when Tom came 
West to produce a Screen Guild Theater 
series for Motion Picture Relief. Dress 
rehearsal for the show on which Loretta 
was to appear had been scheduled for 
a Sunday at 9 a.m. On Saturday, her 
agent came to Tom and explained. 
"Miss Young can't come at nine. Will 
you have the rehearsal at one, please?" 

Multiple stars were involved, an 
orchestra was being paid from 10 a.m. 
Tom explained that an afternoon re- 
hearsal was out of the question. A little 
later came the message . . . Miss Young 
was sorry, but she has lo go to mass . . . 
she's going to be out late tonight, and 
had planned to make twelve-o'clock 
mass . . . but she will make the eleven- 
o'clock and be at rehearsal by noon. 

"You tell Miss Young," said Tom, 
"that I'm going to be out late, too, but I 
can make eight-o'clock mass — and if I 
can, she can." 

"Miss Young doesn't believe you," 
came the prompt answer, "but if you'll 
come and take her to eight-o'clock mass, 
she'd gladly accompany you." 

To Loretta's surprise, Tom did just 
that. One year later — on July 31st, 1940 
— they were married. Since Tom's work 
was in New York, he assumed his wife 
would give up acting. That thought 
never occurred to her. 

Finally, he talked it over with her 
mother. 

"At least for a while" 

"You must let her go on, at least for 
a while," was Mamma's opinion. "This 
first year, going back and forth to New 
York has been exciting and new and 
she's enjoyed it. But if you expect her 
to settle down and be a full-time wife, 
you're putting her in competition with 
women who've been doing that all their 
lives. Don't take away too soon the 
things that are hers." 

Tom transferred his work to Cali- 
fornia. Loretta went on making pictures, 
but her life was different. She made 
fewer pictures. Chris and Peter were 
born. Seemingly, she built a whole new 
life with Tom. Through him, the girl 
whose world had been a movie set had 
new horizons opened to her. Tom in- 
troduced her to a full-scale world in 
which an actress could have a set of 








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values that meshed with her life as a 
woman. 

But did it "take"? 

As Tom once said, "We're both far 
different people than if we'd never mar- 
ried. We've forced on each other a great 
awareness, a depth of feeling. When two 
people with different personalities and 
ideas marry, there's no running along 
one track. There's going forward, losing, 
compromising, developing. God played 
us a neat little trick in our marriage. 
It's been charming, but not at all a 
Noel Coward comedy." 

Less than a year later, he moved to 
New York, where he's vice-president of 
an advertising company. Neither Tom 
Lewis nor his wife has ever discussed 



their separation. There has never been 
the slightest rumor of divorce. Friends 
of both feel that there never will be. 

Says Loretta's sister, Sally Blane, 
"In many ways, Gretch is still the skin- 
ny little girl who used to crawl into 
my bed at night in the convent, whisper- 
ing, 'Let me sleep with you, Bet, I'm 
lonely!' . . . the loyal child who'd go 
and stand with me, face to the wall, 
when I was punished. She's become 
strong, yes, and determined. At a mo- 
ment when most women slow down, she 
went into television with all the accelera- 
tion it demands. 

"When she's in a hurry, she's not 
always gentle, she won't explain. But 
there's nothing untouchable or aloof 



about her. If she's in a room full of 
actresses, she'll out-actress all of them. 
If she's with a family or friends or just 
people, the transition is immediate. 
She's no actress, but a woman — eager, 
sympathetic, warm and very sensitive." 

A lonely woman, a woman who has 
done most of her living before the 
cameras and brought a heart full of 
love to the characters she played. 

Isn't there some way she can bring 
all that love into her own life? Or is it 
too late now? Must Loretta Young pay 
the price of her stardom forever? 

— Doris James 

"New Loretta Young Show," CBS-TV, 
Mon., 10 p.m. est — through March 18th. 



DAVID NELSON 

(Continued from page 50) 

cautioned, "don't be too sure. I have 
a feeling it's going to be a boy, and 
I'd hate for you to be disappointed." 
For no reason they can explain — except 
maybe to please Harriet — David and 
June mostly picked out girls' names. 

But August 20th, 1962, Daniel Blair 
Nelson weighed in at seven pounds, 
five ounces. ("Don't forget to say he 
was 19^4 inches long!" David also told 
us.) 

While waiting for this day, David 
and June had also read a book on se- 
lecting names. It suggested that parents 
consider a child's future before sad- 
dling him with a misnomer that was 
either too cute — or so original, it might 
provoke ridicule in future years. They 
briefly considered the name of Jody. 
But they liked Daniel better. And, in a 
certain sense, it already belonged in 
the family . . . 

"/ was called Daniel for two weeks," 
the proud new father confesses, "and 
then my parents decided to switch to 
David. Somehow, our son just looked 
like he should be called — Daniel." 

Looking back nine months, the young 
Nelsons remembered how their married 
friends had kept telling them not to 
worry. Various and assorted mothers 
assured June her pregnancy would be 
over before she realized it. It was a 
simple, natural function and she'd go 
through it like a breeze. David, now 
that it was all over, told us in detail 
of June's "simple, natural" experience! 

"My wife was sick, just awfully sick, 
the entire nine months. It wasn't an 
easy pregnancy, at all, and the circum- 
stances only added to our dilemma. I 
like to think of it as being teamwork, 
all the way. But June really did get the 
full treatment, without reservation. Al- 
though I try, it's utterly impossible for 
me to express my deep feeling of ad- 
miration for the way she accepted 
everything. 

"The way it worked out, the baby 

was due about the time I had to report 

for my two weeks' active duty with 

the National Guard. All I hoped and 

„ prayed for was to be with June when 

her time came. Dr. Mietus informed us 

that a first baby could be either two 
76 



weeks early — or two weeks late. So 
there was that possibility hanging over 
our heads. 

"The baby was due on the 16th of 
August, and when that long day passed 
uneventfully, it was finally decided to 
try and induce labor. I am so grateful 
I was still home and could go to the 
hospital with June. But nothing hap- 
pened. June wasn't in strong labor and 
I'm sure it worried her, knowing I had 
to go away. We returned home and, the 
next day, I left for summer camp." 

June remained home from Thursday 
until the following Sunday, when Ozzie 
and Harriet took her to the hospital 
again. In the meantime, David — along 
with five other expectant fathers in the 
147th Communications Squadron at 
McClellan Air Force Base — believed 
he had cleared official decks for a fast 
getaway. He also had reservations on 
three airlines on three different days. 

Again in the meantime, the doctor 
had given June medication and it was 
beginning to take effect. Ozzie knew 
he was supposed to call Red Cross for 
a quick clearance for David. But, hav- 
ing gone through this experience twice 
himself, he promptly put in a call 
direct to David at the base ! 

Not according to the book . . . 

"All I could hear," David smiles 
ruefully, "was my father telling me June 
was in labor and having a rough time. 
The rest is rather hazy, but I do re- 
member confirming my flight after con- 
tacting the sergeant on duty and telling 
him what the situation was. He said he 
had no authority to grant my pass 
unless the order came through Red 
Cross! When I begged to speak to the 
major, he was out to lunch. Someone 
gave me a ride back to the barracks and 
I fell into my civilian clothes. Then I 
raced back to headquarters and — thank 
God — the major of my unit had re- 
turned. By this time, I had contacted 
Red Cross myself, but their confirma- 
tion hadn't come back. But then it was 
ten minutes to twelve — the time the 
next plane South was due to take off. 
Again the Lord was on my side. That 
major was well-versed on my particu- 
lar problem, and he gave me a tenta- 
tive two-day pass and permission to 
catch that flight. I'll never know how, 
but I made it on time!" 



Fortunately for his sanity, David 
met an old friend on the plane — 
U.C.L.A. coach Sam Boghosian. As 
luck or fate would have it, Sam's wife 
and a doctor friend were waiting to 
pick him up at the Los Angeles Air- 
port. The doctor knew the shortest 
route to the hospital and rushed David 
there. "Tell your son I'll reserve a place 
for him on the team," coach Boghosian 
called out, as they deposited a frantic 
David. 

By the time he reached her side, June 
had been in excruciating labor for four 
hours. David felt even more helpless 
and frustrated when they told him it 
might be another fourteen hours. 

"You see," David is careful to ex- 
plain, "June's case was unusual be- 
cause they couldn't give her anything 
to ease the pain. Then I got miffed 
because she wouldn't scream out in- 
stead of suffering in silence. It was a 
dry birth, and it might have relieved 
her just to yell the way other women 
did. At one point, she practically broke 
my heart when she sighed, almost apo- 
logetically, 'My poor baby is trying so 
hard to be born. He's doing his job 
and I'm not doing mine.' 

"No other woman could have done 
more. Why, most of the expectant moth- 
ers there pressed the buzzer many times 
to say their baby was on the way. My 
June did it exactly once — at the real 
time! I was so beside myself — to keep 
me in one piece, Dr. Mietus gave me 
little jobs. Like timing the labor pains." 

Ozzie, Harriet and Rick hung around 
the hospital until they were told there 
were still many hours of waiting ahead. 
So they went home, and David finally 
fell off to sleep in the doctor's quarters 
— now knowing the doctor might have 
to take the baby via Cesarean section. 
The next thing he knew, Rick was 
shaking him. 

"Better get on your feet, Dave," pros- 
pective Uncle Rick gulped. "The doc- 
tor says it will be in about a half-hour. 
Here's some coffee Mom made for you. 
Why don't you drink a quart!" 

David says he just somehow knew 
his baby was being born at that very 
moment. He sprinted toward the de- 
livery room and, as he got there, a 
doctor wheeled a baby out in a little 
cart. David's legs dissolved. He stood 
there stunned. 

"I actually didn't realize this was my 



son," he says, "until I recognized the 
doctor. Then I heard him saying it was 
a boy . . . that he was fine . . . that June 
was fine. Then I saw my son — my very 
own son. You know, I'd often wondered 
what my reaction was going to be, and 
I had visualized myself saying and 
doing the most fantastically dramatic 
things. So this was it — and you know 
what? Nothing happened at all. I was 
numb! 

"The doctor allowed me to wheel my 
son to the room where new babies get 
washed and polished. On the way, I 
stopped by another room where my 
family waited and they just stood there 
watching Daniel screaming and kick- 
ing. I don't recall if Mom and Rick 
said a thing. But I do remember my 
dad asking if I was sure it was a boy. 
I was sure!" 

Because June had been in labor 
around the clock, David had used up 
most of the two days due him. Realiz- 
ing this, he called the base to ask 
what time he was supposed to be back. 

"If you hurry, maybe you can make 
it," came the wry answer. "You're due 
back in — thirty minutes!" 

When he came out of shock, David 
called back. An Air Force ruling for 
new fathers gave him permission to 
take an extra day. David barely left 
June's side until his leave was up. Then 
he was gone for a full two weeks. "A 
full two years," is the way he describes 
the interlude. (While David was re- 
turning in a convoy, he found a stray 
kitten outside of Bakersfield and 
brought it home for June. They named 



him "Gus" — but Gus soon turned out 
to be "Gussie"!) 

June had been staying with Ozzie 
and Harriet and they, according to 
David, "were two feet off the ground!" 
As a surprise for David, his mother 
had found a house for her children. 
They adored it on sight, but when they 
heard the price, it lost some of its 
appeal. David sounds positively amazed 
when he tells about it: "Do you know, 
I offered the owner $10,000 less than 
he was asking? And he accepted!" 

Three's a new family 

Came the great day when Mr. and 
Mrs. David Nelson took Daniel Blair 
Nelson home. How they loved the very 
sound of that word! The doctor wanted 
June to remain in bed for a few weeks 
to regain her strength, and so they 
hired a nurse. Then the first night when 
they finally had the baby all to them- 
selves, there was a family conference. 
Result: It was agreed they'd work as 
a team and share every feeding every 
three hours. David made the first one, 
but, after that, June didn't have the 
heart to awaken him. 

Aside from changing diapers, giving 
bottles and putting drops in Daniel's 
eyes, their kick was watching brother 
Rick in his role of new uncle. David 
describes it with great amusement: 
"Rick must have bought out two stores 
of clothes for Danny — and all the 
wrong size! When he drops by — and 
that's frequently — he sits by the hour 
and watches my son with complete 



fascination. I think it must have given 
him ideas! 

"Rick says he can't get used to being 
an uncle, but he has nothing on us. 
June and I still sit and look at each 
other in complete disbelief. Becoming 
parents is a tremendous factor in mak- 
ing a marriage complete. We know 
we've matured by this experience." 

On the television's "Adventures of 
Ozzie and Harriet," June and David 
will continue to play their husband- 
and-wife roles, but there is no plan to 
include Danny-boy in the series. 

"We think we should wait until our 
son is old enough to decide for him- 
self," David sums it up. "In the mean- 
time, I hope my role allows me to have 
more maturity as we go along." Asked 
what kind of a father he thinks he's 
going to become, David is quick to 
convey the considerable thought he's 
given to his newest joy and happiest 
responsibility. 

"I can't say yet what kind of a 
father I'll be. However I do believe 
there's a tendency to over-analyze 
things nowadays. Until some special 
problem comes along, I think it's best 
to just go on giving Danny all the love 
in the world — and keep his tummy 
full!" 

Books on the subject are all very 
fine, Dr. Spock. But David and June 
think that no one knows a baby quite 
as well as his very own parents! 

— Jerry Asher 

"The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet" 
is on ABC-TV, Thurs., at 7:30 p.m. est. 



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78 



RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN 

(Continued from page 26) 

crowded honeymoon such as this! 

The time — Sunday afternoon; the 
place — a public beach at Santa Monica; 
the characters — Dick Chamberlain, a 
six-foot-one, 175-pound, athletic-looking 
fellow in bathing trunks, and Clara 
Ray, a petite girl in a figure-flattering 
swim suit (or maybe it's the other way 
around — her figure does things for the 
suit) ; the action — Dick's been signing 
autographs since one o'clock, and al- 
though it's now three-thirty, the smile 
on his face is still as bright as the sun 
that's broiling him. Clara's smiling, too, 
as she watches and waits — her smile a 
reflection of his smile, her love a reflec- 
tion of his love. A crowded honeymoon 
— sure, but soon, she knows, Dick will 
break away from the autograph-seekers 
and the two of them will slip away to 
what she calls "our wonderful hideout 
'way out beyond Malibu — a rocky bit of 
shoreline, very picturesque, with a cave 
and a spot where we can make a fire." 
A place, in short, where the crowds 
never go and "we can be alone." 

In the meantime, she waits patiently 
and watches the changing expressions 
play across Dick's face. He is incapable 
of hiding what he feels, and his face 
mirrors his mind and his heart — a fact 
that caused a writer to observe in Look 
magazine: "In public, he is probably 
the only star who signs autographs 
while looking surprised, bewildered and 
pleased, all at the same time." 

The time — a late summer night; the 
place — the lobby of a theater in Visa- 
lia, a town in northern California (the 
marquee reads "The Desert Song") ; the 
characters — Dick, grinning broadly, is 
signing autographs; he is presently 
joined by Clara (she has just come 
from her dressing room, where she re- 
moved her stage makeup and freshened 
her face after performing the lead role 
in the musical) ; the action — -he waves 
to her and shrugs his shoulders in mock 
helplessness, while the mob crowds 
around him and voices calk "Me, Mr. 
Chamberlain, me — please," as if to say 
to her, "What can I do?" (she laughs 
because she knows he's doing just what 
he wants to do), and she, at the urging 
of the teenagers — and middleagers and 
oldagers — who poke programs at her, 
takes a pen from her purse and starts 
signing, "Mrs. Kildare." 

For Clara, hearing the autograph- 
seekers call Dick "Mr. Chamberlain" is 
almost as strange as her signing — and 
their accepting without question — her 
name as "Mrs. Kildare." Dick's own 
explanation of why people treat him 
kind of formally makes sense. "I think 
the character of Kildare keeps them 
sort of subdued," he says. "I mean, 
I'm not a rock V roll singer or a pri- 
vate eye or anything like that." 

That's another way of saying the fans 
respect Dick. Or, as E. Jack Neuman, 
head writer for the "Kildare" show, 
puts it : "Chamberlain is merely a clean- 
cut, decent, polite, attentive, intelligent, 
college-educated young man who doesn't 
belong to the jet set with the nutty hair- 



cuts and who doesn't go for booze or 
kookie dames." 

It all adds up — these three scenes 
we have just witnessed — (and hundreds 
more just like them, all involving Dick 
Chamberlain and Clara Ray) — to a 
very crowded honeymoon. Not a honey- 
moon for Dick and Clara (although they 
act like honeymooners, they're not mar- 
ried yet; that could happen as soon as 
tomorrow, so in love are these two 
kids), but a honeymoon between Dick 
and his fans, Dick and the press, Dick 
and his fellow performers, Dick and 
the great American public. Everybody 
(well, almost everybody) loves him. 

A bashful bridegroom 

This love affair between Dick and the 
American public began when TV view- 
ers first saw him on their home screens 
and chorused (man, woman and child), 
"Oh, doctor!" (There was one critic 
who sniped that Dick resembled "an 
oversized white rabbit with a stethe- 
scope instead of a watch," but obviously 
he was a guy who hated doctors . . . 
or television ... or love. . . .) 

The marriage of Dick Chamberlain to 
the American public officially took place 



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the night of the Hollywood premiere of 
"West Side Story." All the other stars 
and celebrities were applauded by the 
waiting crowds, but when Dick arrived, 
sexy Rosanna Shiaffino on his arm (wait 
a minute before you jump to conclu- 
sions: Clara Ray was performing at a 
Chicago night club that night, so Dick 
accepted a studio-arranged date), the 
hooting and hollering could be heard all 
the way to Illinois. 

But Dick, like many another bashful, 
bewildered bridegroom before him, just 
couldn't believe it was all for real. Not 
even when the veteran waitresses at the 
MGM commissary gave him the "Ga- 
ble treatment" the day after the pre- 
miere; not even when the fan mail 
came pouring in, 12,000 letters and 
cards each month, making him the all- 
time champion mail-puller at the studio, 
more popular than Clark Gable, Frank 
Sinatra, Van Johnson or Peter Law- 
ford in their prime. 

Then one night it happened. The 
moment that every new husband reaches 
when he knows he's married because 
he feels married. The occasion — a party 
attended by movie and TV young stars 
— and, in Dick's own words, "They 
laughed at my jokes. They were the 
same jokes, and no one had ever 
laughed at them before." 

Much more sincere and infinitely 
more gratifying to Dick Chamberlain 
were the accolades he was given by the 
usually hard-boiled TV critics. The re- 



viewer for the Hollywood Reporter 
raved: "Once in a blue moon a face 
hits the screen, causing careful critics 
to prognosticate that a star is born. 
Such a face is Richard Chamberlain's." 
. . . The TV expert for Variety trum- 
peted, "Chamberlain proved himself a 
sensitive, unmannered actor capable of 
building an audience on his own." ... 
Louella Parsons proclaimed, "Not only 
the teenagers, but the adults find in 
young Dr. Kildare a symbol of the ail- 
American boy who has well-nigh be- 
come lost in all the maelstrom of juve- 
nile delinquency." . . . The Hollywood 
Women's Press Club nominated him for 
a Golden Apple Award, presented an- 
nually to the actor the group considers 
most cooperative with the press. (Sig- 
nificantly enough, television's other 
prominent young doctor, Vince Ed- 
wards, was nominated for the club's 
Sour Apple Award, a citation for the 
least cooperative actor.) 

But even more satisfying to Dick than 
praise from the press and adulation 
from the fans were the verbal bouquets 
of love and affection he received from 
members of his own profession. 

Actress Anne Francis, after appear- 
ing with him in a "Kildare" episode, 
said, "He has dignity and a sense of 
integrity, both as an actor and as a 
person." 

Raymond Massey, who as Dr. Gil- 
lespie knows Kildare-Chamberlain as 
well as anybody, declared, "He is stage- 
struck, not Chamberlain-struck. . . . 
He is one of the few actors who has a 
built-in gentlemanliness and goodness." 

Suzanne Pleshette, who was up for 
consideration for an Emmy for her 
performance on a "Dr. Kildare" seg- 
ment, insisted, "He listens instead of 
just worrying about which is his good 
side." 

Barbara Stanwyck, at a luncheon, 
told Dick to his face, "You think, you 
listen, then you react. And you don't 
mumble like those blank-blank method 
boys." 

Gloria Swanson swooned, "He is the 
most charming, unaffected young man 
I've met." 

A unanimous outpouring of affection, 
love and praise. Well, almost unan- 
imous. There are always a few who 
claim that Dick's too good to be true — 
too cooperative, too nice, too consid- 
erate, and they intimate that he turns 
on and off the charm at will, just as 
someone else turns on and off the water 
in the sink. 

What this unconvinced minority 
doesn't realize is that Dick was what 
he is and like he is today even back 
in high school. The Watchtower, the 
official yearbook of Dick's graduating 
class at Beverly Hills High School, 
records that his classmates voted Rich- 
ard Chamberlain "most reserved" and 
"most courteous." 

Unlike many actors, there are no 
skeletons hidden in Dick's childhood 
closets, no psychological trauma or ado- 
lescent wounds which he now covers 
with a smiling mask. No, his smile is 
natural and genuine. "My early child- 
hood was so placid and uneventful that 
I can scarcely remember it," he says 
almost apologetically. "I never hated 



my parents, I played with other nice 
kids in the neighborhood, and I wor- 
shipped my older brother, Bill." 

When he finally left home, he did so 
not out of a rebellion against parental 
authority, but because he figured it was 
time to stand on his own two feet. "I 
could have stayed at home with my 
parents, but I didn't want to," he ex- 
plains. "So I moved out and got my 
own little apartment in the Santa Mon- 
ica area. It was a depressing place but 
it was all I could afford. 

"I could have had a nicer place. My 
folks would have helped me out. But I 
figured if I wasn't making money my- 
self, I had no right to expect to live 
like a king. And after all, what do you 
really need, to live, when you're a bach- 
elor? Just four walls and a roof, a 
bed and some place to cook." 

Okay, okay. So Dick's trustworthy, 
loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, 
obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean 
and reverent. But what about fortune, 
fame and acclaim? Will success spoil 
Dick Chamberlain? 

How long will it last? 

Dick's been warned about the perils 
of success — by veteran observers of the 
Hollywood scene. Directly by columnist 
Hedda Hopper who, after assuring him 
that "you're going to be a big star in 
this town," warned, "if you ever let 
your head swell, I'll be the first to chop 
it down to size." Indirectly by actor 
Richard Boone, who said about him, 
"He's going to be a really fine actor, a 
star. I only hope he'll avert that chronic 
and persistent malady of young actors 
— inflammation of the head." 

Dick responds to these warnings with 
words. "People assume that my real 
nature must be nasty as hell, and that 
if I do make good as an actor, it's bound 
to come out blazing. I think, I hope, 
I'm not built that way. It wouldn't be 
worth much, all of this, if it were." 

And, more importantly, with actions. 
True, he did bust loose when it became 
evident even to him that "Kildare" 
would be around for a long time — and 
put himself temporarily in hock by 
buying a little gray Fiat-1200 sports 
car, a brand new wardrobe, and a tape 
recorder. But what did he do with 'em? 

He didn't go tooling off to Vegas in 
his Fiat to try his hand at the roulette 
wheels. (Actually, he was in Vegas 
just once in his life, lost three dollars 
in a slot machine, and resolved then 
and there never to gamble again.) No, 
he picked up Clara, drove with her to 
their favorite Sunset Strip hamburger 
joint, and ordered his usual hamburger- 
with-onions (it must be love!) plus a 
peanut butter sandwich. 

He didn't get all spiffed up in one of 
his new Ivy League suits (to this day 
most of them hang, still unworn, in his 
closet) ; instead he kept on his usual 
levis and sneakers ("they're comfort- 
able"). After all, a guy can't get 
dressed to the teeth when he does stuff 
like jog through the Hollywood Hills 
a few nights each week, march in Santa 
Claus Christmas parades, make furni- 
ture, paint pictures and relax with the 
gang. Again, in his own words: 



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"I take my car to be serviced. I pick 
up the laundry. I go to the market and 
the bank. One of these days I've got to 
find time to go to the dentist," Dick 
says, as befits a fellow who saves food 
stamps and lives in a $100-a-month 
house. 

He didn't take his new tape recorder 
to a Hollywood night club to record 
sophisticated songs and snappy chatter. 
He stayed home instead and had fun 
taping folk songs he sang himself. 
("I'm still a square, musically," he con- 
fesses. "I like folk songs.") Home for 
Dick is an unpretentious, out-of-the- 
way place. He does have a pool, but, as 
Look commented, "it is a small gall- 
stone-shaped swimming pool." About 
his hideaway he says, "I live in a tiny 
house, but in a huge room with a little 
kitchen and a sun deck overlooking the 
Hollywood Bowl. The place is hidden 
high in the Hollywood Hills. I like it 
that way." 



JACKIE KENNEDY 

(Continued from page 29) 

Roosevelt had traveled so widely and so 
often that a Washington newspaper had 
once splashed a headline across its front 
page: Eleanor Sleeps At White House 
Tonight! As a First Lady, Mrs. Roose- 
velt had been not only controversial but 
often the butt of cruel jokes and once an 
election issue; Jackie Kennedy has been 
almost universally admired. 

And yet Jacqueline Kennedy and 
Anna Eleanor Roosevelt — the fresh 
young beauty and the worn old lady 
now being laid to final rest — had much 
in common. Their lives, on the surface 
so different, had known similar sorrows. 
As children both had lost their fathers 
- — death had claimed Eleanor's, divorce 
Jackie's. Both had seen their husbands 
struck down in their prime — Eleanor's 
by the polio which crippled Franklin D. 
Roosevelt for the rest of his life; Jack- 
ie's by the back injury which tortures 
Jack Kennedy to this day. Both had 
known the ultimate agony of mother- 
hood — Eleanor lost her third child be- 
fore his first birthday; Jacqueline lost 
her first baby by miscarriage in 1956. 

Each woman had battled to make her- 
self a fit wife for a man who had an 
appointment with destiny; both women 
had fought against a basic shyness and 
reticence; both women had overcome 
the handicap of a high, small voice un- 
fit for public speaking. Both women 
knew what it meant to be married to 
the President of the greatest nation of 
the world. Both had known the loneli- 
ness of having to share her man, her 
marriage, her children's father with a 
world that had first claim on his time 
and energy. 

Jacqueline Kennedy was a mere baby 
when Eleanor Roosevelt first became 
mistress of the White House, a teenager 
when, after Franklin Roosevelt's death, 
Eleanor Roosevelt became a great per- 
sonage in her own right. Yet now, 
beneath the evergreens in the rose 
garden in Hyde Park, Jackie was not 



How long will the American public's 
honeymoon with Dick Chamberlain 
last? Forever — if it depends on the 
genuineness and consistency of Dick's 
words and actions. 

Once in a while, Dick recalls the be- 
ginning, when he first started on the 
"Kildare" show : "For the first week, the 
policeman on this gate didn't believe I 
was an actor, and I had to keep getting 
people to come down and identify me 
because I was too shy to ask for a 
pass." 

And today? Let's hear what that 
same policeman, George Joelson, vet- 
eran MGM gateman, has to say: "I've 
seen them come and go, and Dick is 
one of the nicest. I just hope he doesn't 
change. And somehow, I have a feeling 
that he never will." — Jim Hoffman 

"Dr. Kildare" is seen over NBC-TV, 
Thurs., from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. est. 
Dick also records on the MGM label. 



saying goodbye to a stranger, but to a 
woman she understood as well as she 
did her own heart. 

Last will and testament 

A few days later, the terms of Mrs. 
Roosevelt's will were made public. It 
was the testament of a simple woman 
who remembered affectionately a kind 
doctor, a loyal servant, a favorite god- 
child, who left carefully chosen heir- 
looms to each member of her beloved 
family. There was no great list of chari- 
ties — she had given her life to them; 
she had not waited until death to give 
her heart, her life's energy, her love. 
All mankind was her beneficiary. 

And in a special- way, Jacqueline 
Kennedy — too fortunate to have needed 
her help, too young to have known, per- 
sonally, her inspiration — was her bene- 
ficiary, too. In part, Eleanor Roosevelt's 
unwritten bequest to Jackie was a leg- 
acy of trails blazed, precedents shat- 
tered, examples set. 

It was Eleanor Roosevelt's example 
that prepared the nation to welcome 
Jacqueline Kennedy's rambunctious, 
formality-disrupting children to the 
White House — for Mrs. Roosevelt had 
turned the stuffy mansion into a family 
home for her own children and grand- 
children, had encouraged the sound of 
childish laughter in the solemn halls 
and invited not only dignitaries but 
friends to sleep in its formal bedrooms. 

It was Eleanor Roosevelt who forced 
the public to accept the President's wife 
as a person in her own right — for Mrs. 
Roosevelt was the first First Lady to 
hold a press conference, to write for 
magazines and newspapers, to vigorous- 
ly espouse those causes in which she be- 
lieved, to prove a First Lady could be 
more than First Hostess of the land. 

How might Jackie Kennedy's good- 
will trip to India have been greeted if 
Eleanor Roosevelt had not shattered 
precedent in 1942 by becoming the first 
President's wife to travel abroad with- 
out her husband, the first First Lady to 
fly the Atlantic? It was Eleanor Roose- 
velt who bore the brunt of the at- 



tacks by small-minded individuals — who 
proved that the First Lady could, more 
effectively than any ambassador, repre- 
sent her husband and her country in 
foreign lands. 

In her twelve years in the White 
House. Eleanor Roosevelt was subject- 
ed to more abuse than any woman in 
modern times; she was caricatured by 
cartoonists, mocked by comedians, re- 
viled by politicians. Always, her re- 
sponse was a model of dignity under 
pressure; she learned to laugh at and 
even to repeat jokes about herself, to 
meet slander with silence, to treat her 
tormentors with kindness and insight. 
Of one columnist who virtually made a 
career of belittling her. Eleanor Roose- 
velt said with indisputable sincerity: "I 
feel sorry for him; no one could write 
as he does and be happy inside." And 
so, for Jacqueline Kennedy. Eleanor 
Roosevelt left an example and a model 
for behavior in similar situations. They 
have already stood the younger woman 
in good stead, have shown her that it 
is best to ignore both publicly and pri- 
vately those who have chosen to criticize 
her clothes, her methods of child rear- 
ing, her way of life. 

The most precious gift 

Perhaps Eleanor Roosevelt's greatest 
bequest to Jackie Kennedy were the last 
years of her life. They were a gift of 
time and peace and privacy, for by de- 
voting herself to the ills of the world, 
by bearing on her aged shoulders the 
burdens and the sorrows of all nations, 
she freed Jackie (as she had freed Bess 
Truman and Mamie Eisenhower) from 
that responsibility, left them free to care 
for their families and follow their own 
lights with clear conscience. Jacqueline 
Kennedy received the benefit of that 
legacy for two long years — a time in 
which to grow, to adjust, to prepare for 
the day when the title of First Lady of 
the World would be vacant, waiting 
perhaps for her. 

To assume the mantle of true great- 
ness is not an easy task. Eleanor Roose- 
velt wore it at the cost of her rest, her 
privacy, her peace of mind; her own 
children paid to some extent for their 
mother's deep concern for the world's 
children. If Jackie Kennedy should 
choose to walk in Eleanor Roose- 
velt's footsteps among the friendless. 
the hopeless, the lost, the memory of 
Mrs. Roosevelt's dignity, her honor and 
grace, her warmth, her sense of free- 
dom and her abiding love of humanity 
will make the path a little easier. 

It rained on the day of Eleanor 
Roosevelt's funeral at Hyde Park. The 
skies were gray and a cold wind blew. 
Yet Jacqueline Kennedy, standing 
among the mourners, suspecting already 
the terrible beauty of Eleanor Roose- 
velt's legacy, did not shiver or tremble. 
She recalled Adlai Stevenson's words: 
"Eleanor Roosevelt." he had said, 
'"would rather light a candle than curse 
the darkness, and her glow has warmed 
all the world." 

In that glow, Jacqueline Kennedy, 

First Lady of the nation and perhaps. 

one day, of the world, stood unafraid. 

- — Leslie Valentine 



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ART CARNEY 

(Continued from page 25) 

It is a dismal scene, as always, in 
New York City's Night Court. The judge 
asks what he already knows. "Are you 
sober now?" 

"Like a judge," replies the bum, 
reeling, his legs buckling slightly be- 
neath his greasy, bagged trousers. He 
has trouble focusing his eyes on the 
judge. Laughter ripples through the 
half-empty courtroom. 

It is a scene from a long-running play, 
and the cast never changes. 

"Okay," says the judge after a mo- 
ment's reflection. "You can go, but 
don't come back again." He could 
have reached a different verdict, if mood 
and moment moved him so. He could 
send the bum to jail for ten, twenty, or 
thirty days. But the judge knows the 
city must pay for the drunkard's up- 
keep, if he does that. And the cells al- 
ready are bulging with his like, or 
worse. 

Suddenly, however — on the night of 
November 8th, 1962 — the mood of the 
courtroom changed. The reason: the ap- 
pearance before the bench of a straight 
slender man with a sensitive face and 
brownish hair that went back in tight 
waves. His tan suede jacket and gray 
slacks were immaculate and his striped 
black tie was knotted neatly in a Wind- 
sor centered perfectly in place in the 
clean white shirt's tab collar. 

If you were there, you might have 
thought for a moment that you were 
watching a play on TV or the Broadway 
stage. At any second you might have 
expected the defendant to throw the 
courtroom into a howl by walking up to 
the judge, chucking him lovingly under 
the chin with his fist, and growling: 

"Rowf, you a swee' kid!" 

But that isn't the way the defendant 
acted — for he was not on stage and 
the judge was not Jackie Gleason. 

To Art Carney this was a very seri- 
ous moment — he was in the custody of 
the law! 

Arrested on a real-life drunk-driving 
charge! 

It was a startling twist to see the re- 
nowned Ed Norton, the world's most 
famous sewer-worker, the bumbling, 
good-natured slob and pal of trigger- 
tempered bus driver Ralph Kramden, 
standing before the bar — the bar of 
justice, that is. 

Ironic, too, it was. Carney, you may 
recall, had once played the video role 
of the gentle boozer in "Harvey." 

How it began 

Carney's real-life trouble had started 
at 10:50 o'clock on that morning of 
November 8th as he was driving down- 
town in his little Porsche sports car 
along Broadway. As he passed 70th 
Street, Carney's car rammed into the 
back of a taxi which had stopped for a 
red light. It was a minor collision and 
damage to both Carney's car and the 
cab was slight. Neither the cabbie, Ed- 
ward Cherry, nor Carney was injured. 

As traffic laws require in all collisions 
of this type, the drivers got out to ex- 



amine the damage and to exchange 
license and registration information. 

As Carney left his car, he walked 
toward the taxi a bit unsteadily. There 
was just enough of a wobble in his 
walk to raise the cabbie's suspicions. 
Without knowing who the driver of the 
sports car was, the cabbie called out 
across the street to a policeman passing 
by on his post. The cop, Patrolman John 
Donnangelo, walked over. 

"This guy just hit me," the cabbie 
protested to the policeman. "I think he's 
intoxicated." 

Patrolman Donnangelo took Carney's 
license and registration and looked them 
over. Then he turned to Carney, who, 
by this time, was clearly recognized by 
both the cabbie and the cop. 

"Have you been drinking?" the cop 
asked Carney. 

"Yeah, a little," Carney replied non- 
chalantly. 

The answer was a little too noncha- 
lant. 

"Okay," said Patrolman Donnangelo, 
"we'll go down to the stationhouse and 
get this thing ironed out." 

Carney tried to tell the cop there was 
no need for that — that he was not drunk. 
And, moreover, he was willing to pay 
for any damage he might have inflicted 
on the cab. But the cop was adamant. 

Carney was taken in. 

Inside the West 68th Street Precinct, 
he was given the full treatment. Art was 
put on the "grill" to explain why he had 
banged into the back of the cab — which 
at the very worst was nothing more 
than an avoidable accident. Every day 
on New York City's streets, hundreds of 
such rear-end collisions occur. The 
principals are hardly ever escorted to 
the stationhouse, unless one of the 
drivers involved in the collision decides 
to press charges and sign a complaint 
against the others And even at that 
there must be a bona fide reason before 
the cop will take such action. 

As we shall see in this story, the 
driver of the cab never did sign a com- 
plaint. 

For now, let's see what happened in- 
side the police station. Here, from the 
official record, is the question-and-an- 
swer dialogue that took place: 

Q. Where were you coming from? 

A. Kelly's Bar. 

Q. When did you leave? 

A. 11:35 a.m. 

Q. Had you had anything to drink? 

A. Yes. 

Q. What? 

A. A couple of beers. 

Q. How many? 

A. A few. 

Q. All at Kelly's? 

A. I stopped at several places. 

Q. Is that why you are drunk? 

A. I'm not drunk. 

Q. You weren't steady on your feet. 

A. I've been taking medication. 

Q. What kind? 

A. Stuff to steady my nerves. 

Q. What do you mean by that? 

A. I've been under treatment for the 
last year. 

Q. What's wrong? 

A. I've been under tension. 

Q. Have you been going to a doctor? 

A. Yes. He's the one who prescribed 
the medicine. 



Q. What kind of medicine? 
A. Miltown. 

Q. When did you take it last? 
A. After Kelly's. 

Q. And you maintain that you're not 
intoxicated? 
A. Yes. 

The fatal question 

Then Carney was asked the one ques- 
tion put to all suspected drunk-drivers. 

"Will you submit to a drunkometer 
test?" the desk sergeant inquired. 

Carney shook his head. He said he 
would not. Carney well knew the im- 
plications. Such a refusal is often viewed 
as an admission of guilt. 

Carney was on the spot when the cops 
asked him to take the test. Since he had 
downed a few beers, his breath would 
have registered a level of alcoholic con- 
tent on the mechanism which determines 
drunkenness. How much, however, is a 
matter that will never be known since 
Art refused to submit to the test. 

The desk sergeant then had to turn 
to Patrolman Donnangelo for guidance. 

"Tell me, Patrolman," the sergeant 
asked, "is this man intoxicated in your 
opinion?" 

"Yes," Donnangelo replied. 

"Then arrest him," the sergeant di- 
rected. 

Donnangelo had no alternative but 
to bring Carney up to the desk and have 
him booked for driving while intoxi- 
cated. 

Carney was officially under arrest! 

This meant he could not leave the 
stationhouse. He had been there since 
around noon. The time now was 3:55 
p.m. Nearly four hours for questioning! 
And still he had to wait for his arraign- 
ment on the charge in Night Court — 
five hours hence. 

Carney was beside himself. He knew 
that his detention would prevent him 
from making the curtain for "Take Her, 
She's Mine," the Broadway comedy he 
was starring in. 

The law allows a "prisoner" to make 
one phone call. Carney chose to get in 
touch with his lawyer, Henry Wallach. 
Art told the lawyer what happened, and 
asked him to notify the theater that he 
would not be able to appear. 

The police kept Carney in a deten- 
tion cell until early evening, when it 
was time to go to court. He was then 
escorted into a Black Maria with other 
prisoners and driven to court. 

For the first time now, Carney saw his 
lawyer face to face and was able to talk 
with him at length. 

The proceeding in court was brief 
and almost unnecessary. The judge 
simply read the charge and adjourned 
proceedings to Criminal Court the next 
morning, when a full-scale arraignment 
could be held — with the office of District 
Attorney Frank S. Hogan in the act, 
too. 

Paroled in his attorney's custody, 
Carney went home to his wife and three 
children in Bronxville, a New York City 
suburb. 

The next day, Criminal Court was 
teeming with newspaper reporters, pho- 
tographers, and television crews who 
had been sent there to cover Carney's 
arrest as if it were a major criminal 



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case. Hundreds of spectators showed up 
to view the spectacle. 

Justice works in strange ways, and 
in Art Carney's case it seemed to have 
been put on overtime. The D.A.'s office 
assigned Assistant District Attorneys 
Frank H. Connelly Jr. and Richard Kuh 
to the case — a most unusual move. 

But it became apparent why two as- 
sistant prosecutors were needed, even 
before the proceeding got under way. 
Kuh, it seems, had been given the job 
of getting cabbie Cherry to sign a com- 
plaint against Carney. Without the cab- 
bie's charge, the case against Carney 
would be inherently weak. Unless, of 
course, the patrolman's testimony were 
forceful and damaging. 

Kuh approached Cherry, who was in 
court, and asked him to sign the com- 
plaint. Cherry replied : 

"Mr. Carney has had enough trouble 
and I won't add to it — I don't want to 
press this thing any further." 

"If you don't sign the complaint," he 
was told, "we'll subpoena you." 

"Do that if you want," Cherry said. 
"But I won't sign . . ." 

"We'll put you on the stand whether 
you like it or not and make you testify." 

"Go ahead." 

"If you don't sign the complaint," 
Kuh was heard to tell Cherry, "I'll do 
everything I can to have your hack 
license taken away . . ." 

A threat of this kind is serious. If 
Cherry loses his hack license, which is 
issued by the Police Department, he is 
out of business. He cannot drive a taxi 
in New York City. Worse yet, he loses 
approximately $20,000 ! That's the price 
a hack license goes for, these days. 

But Cherry was a man of his convic- 
tions. 

"You are trying to intimidate me," he 
fumed. "But you won't change my 
mind." 

Kuh's last words were. "Okay, we'll 
see . . ." 

But Kuh did nothing more about it. 
He turned to Patrolman Donnangelo 
and told him, "You'll have to sign the 
complaint." 

Donnangelo did, although he ap- 
peared somewhat reluctant. 

Suddenly there was a commotion out 
in the corridor, which could be heard 
in the courtroom. It was caused by 
Carney's arrival. 

"How ya gonna plead?" someone 
shouted. 

Carney, wearing dark glasses and un- 
smiling, didn't answer. 

"What'll they do to you?" called 
another bystander. 

Carney shrugged his shoulders in the 
mob that surrounded him. Finally he 
told them: 

"I'll do whatever they (court officials) 
tell me. They tell me to go to the men's 
room, I'll go there. I'll even go to the 
ladies' room if they tell me, and see if 
there's any action there." 

The crowd roared with laughter. 

Still somber-faced, Carney pushed his 
way through the crowd and entered the 
courtroom. 

It was a matter of a half-hour or so 
before the court attendant got around 
to calling Carney's case. 

After the charge was read by the 
court clerk, Patrolman Donnangelo was 



called to testify, since he had signed 
the complaint. 

Twisting his fingers nervously and 
playing with his dark glasses, Carney 
listened intently. 

Donnangelo told how he was called 
over to the accident scene, then de- 
scribed his conversations with the cab- 
bie and Carney. 

"He said something about hitting the 
other car," the patrolman related, re- 
ferring to Carney. "He said it was his 
fault." 

Then Donnangelo repeated Carney's 
statement about "having a few beers at 
Kelly's Bar," and told how he brought 
him in and booked the actor for drunk- 
en driving. 

"In your opinion was he intoxicated?" 
Assistant District Attorney Connelly 
asked. 

"I believe he was under the influence 
of liquor," replied the policeman, "but 
not to a great extent ... I say he was 
intoxicated, but unlike a de*d drunk, 
he could manipulate on his own." 

Justice Downing leaned forward on 
the bench with firmly fixed attention on 
every word of testimony. 

"How did he act?" the assistant pros- 
ecutor wanted to know. 

"His attitude," the policeman replied, 
"was cooperative, his speech clear, and 
his balance almost normal." 

Justice Downing then allowed the 
prosecution to read a transcript of the 
questions and answers taken down dur- 
ing Carney's stationhouse interrogation. 

The court asked if the prosecution 
had any other evidence. 

"No, your honor," Connelly answered. 
"That is our case." 

The verdict 

Justice Downing glanced down at the 
complaint for a moment, then looked up. 

"The District Attorney," he said, "has 
not submitted sufficient evidence. He 
has failed to establish a prima facie 
case. 

"Case dismissed." 

Carney was a free man! 

He had beaten the rap, and as he 
walked out of the courtroom Art was 
again besieged by the press and his 
fans. 

"I'm a married man with three chil- 
dren," Carney said in response to news- 
men's queries. "This is one of those 
unfortunate things that happen." 

He tried to shove his way through 
the crowd and get into the elevator. 
One of the more enthusiastic Carney 
followers followed Art into the elevator. 

"Mr. Carney," the man pleaded, "may 
I have your autograph? I love to see 
you in the sewer — on television that is." 

Carney looked at the man with a 
jaundiced look. "What a sense of hu- 
mor!" Carney cracked. 

Art Carney's ordeal had ended in 
New York City's Criminal Court, where 
justice finally prevailed. 

But the question remains for all to 
ponder : 

Would all this attention of the law 
have been given to any other citizen? 

Or is it possible that when a man like 
Art Carney, a celebrity, gets into trou- 
ble, he gets in deeper than the average 
citizen? — George Carpozi Jr. 



JAMES PHILBROOK 

(Continued from page 37) 

I've always worked helps. Had I always 
been a homebody, I probably would 
have been shaken up. Also, though 
Jim is a strong-willed Englishman, he's 
married to a strong-willed Swede." 

"I'd kiss her foot!" 

Jim made it plain — and in Fran's 
presence, no less — that nothing could 
bother him less than the possibility of 
his wife taking umbrage at his amorous 
relationship with Loretta in the series. 

"For the money Loretta pays me," 
he growled, "I'd kiss her foot." 

In discussing women and their habi- 
tat. Philbrook demonstrates the unas- 
sailable air of authority which Loretta 
has found so attractive. 

"I'm gentle when I'm supposed to 
be, rough when I'm supposed to be," 
he shrugs. "To be rough, you've also 
got to turn around and be sensitive. I 
sometimes get rough with Loretta on 
the show, but I turn around and act 
sensitive, too. I never get physically 
rough. I do it with the voice and gen- 
eral appearance. 

"You can represent a lot more au- 
thority with an attitude than you can 
by shaking a woman up. I look author- 
itative, to begin with. That always 
helps. It's kind of hard for someone 
who doesn't look authoritative to act 
it. With my size, it doesn't take much 
to look like you mean business." 

He doesn't think for a moment that 
he would pant after Loretta in real 
life if she had seven children! 

"Who would want to take on some- 
thing like that?" he groans. "You'd 
have to send all those kids to school." 

He also recognizes, without apology, 
that he manages to be more patient on 
the set with Loretta's seven children 
than he is at home with his own four 
youngsters — 13-year-old Bradley, 11- 
year-old Becky, three-year-old Kristin 
and one-year-old Andrew. 

"The kids on the show do what is 
written in the script," says Philbrook. 
"At home, the kids ad-lib. Like the 
three-year-old is fighting with the 11- 
year-old sister over the cat. It can get 
maddening once in a while when you 
come home tired. I get paid to be 
tolerant on the set. That tolerance puts 
food in my kids' mouths." 

Philbrook's preoccupation with his 
earnings is no accident. He knows what 
it is to worry about groceries. He's 
been in and out of more financial holes 
than a hyper-thyroid gopher, in and 
out of more jobs than you could shake 
an unemployment insurance applica- 
tion at. He's been fired and he's had 
to sue for his wages. He's had spells 
when he had to stay home doing the 
cooking while his wife went out earn- 
ing a living — as a music teacher. 

"I didn't care for it one bit," says 
Philbrook, grimly, of the times his wife 
brought in the paycheck. "It bothered 
the hell out of me." 

"I was darn glad," Fran said cheer- 
fully. "He's a good cook." 

"I am a good cook," Jim agrees with 



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FOR CERTAIN COINS WE PAY UP TO 


CERTAIN 




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Nickels Before 1945 


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Silver Dollars Before 1938 


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Half Dollars Before 1947 


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Pennies Before 1919 


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Dimes Before 1946 


Quarters Before 1941 


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Half Cents Before 1910 


3,500.00 


Lincoln Pennies Before 1940 . 


250.00 



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a crooked grin. "Most of the good 
cooks I've known have been men. I've 
never seen a good woman chef. I can't 
see a woman standing over sixty steaks 
on charcoal." 

There is little that Philbrook has 
not tried his hand at. The wartime 
heavyweight champion of the Navy 
and a combat Marine correspondent 
during the Korean fracas, Jim's kept 
creditors at bay by working as a lum- 
berjack in northern California, a dish- 
washer, electronics engineer, miner, 
rodeo performer, cowboy, newscaster, 
writer, photographer and, before he 
tackled acting, as a stunt man in 
Westerns. 

For many years he got little mileage 
out of his excellent family background 
and an education that took him as far 
as the University of Iowa and the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
But that failure has taken little notice- 
able steam out of Philbrook. 

"I never doubted myself," he says 
tersely. "I have a tremendous amount 
of overconfidence." 

Overconfidence or independence, this 
trait is nowhere in more impressive 
evidence than in his attitude toward 
acting. 

"I would have turned Loretta's show 
down if I didn't get the money I want- 
ed," Jim says bluntly, "but there wasn't 
any squawk about the dough. After 
this series, it will be a bloody long time 
before I do another — unless they give 
me a piece of the ownership. I'm in 
this for the money. I'm not a dedicated 
actor in any way. 

"I built my salary to a spot where 
I refused to take a reduction," he ex- 
plains. "I refused ninety percent of the 
jobs I was offered. I turned down jobs 
when I didn't have money. I was flat, 
bloody broke before 'The Islanders' 
came along. I'm a gambler. That was 
hard for Frances to understand some- 
times, I think." 

"You thinkl" Frances shoots back. 
"I thought I made it plain." 

How he got that way 

Jim is convinced that he comes by 
his independence and what manliness 
he may justly lay claim to because of 
his father, the late Very Rev. Roland 
F. Philbrook, who was a nationally 
prominent figure during his long tenure 
as head of the Trinity Cathedral in 
Davenport. 

"My father had guts," Jim says 
admiringly. "He wasn't any wishy- 
washy preacher. He fought for the 
repeal of Prohibition. He was active 
in the fight for better school systems, 
for mde honest running of the town 
and what have you. He was in on 
everything. My father wasn't afraid of 
a thing. He was well loved — and also 
well hated. He had enemies, but his 
enemies respected him." 

So much of his father rubbed off on 
Jim that at one time he toyed with the 
idea of going into the ministry himself. 

"I considered it strongly once," he 
says, "and I think I'd make a good 
one. If I were an Episcopalian priest 
I'd be the same as I am, no different. 
I was around it all my life, and never 
rebelled against it. My godfather is 



Bishop of Nebraska. There was never 
a time when I didn't have clergy 
around. I just never felt the call. But 
I'm not saying it's not possible I still 
couldn't go on to seminary." 

The fact that Jim grew into such a 
formidable man and the top prize 
fighter in the Navy was an end result 
in which his father had a considerable 
hand. 

"As a preacher's kid," Jim recalls 
with a grin, "I had to whip everybody 
in my class. A preacher's kid auto- 
matically starts out life as a sissy, you 
know. It's just lucky I grew up as big 
as I am because people let me alone. 
All preachers' kids go through a pretty 
wild period growing up. Most of 'em 
can handle themselves pretty well. 

"My brother, Robert, and I were 
well schooled on how to meet certain 
situations," he says. "We were taught 
how to behave in the public eye, more 
or less. A lot was always expected of 
us. It was always driven home to me — 
remember who you are and don't do 



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things wrong that may hurt not only 
yourself but everyone else involved. 

"But my father also knew there were 
some problems I wouldn't be able to 
talk myself out of. Actually, he was the 
first one who taught me how to box. He 
showed me in the basement at home 
when I was a kid. We had a lot of fun. 
Then I boxed in junior high school 
and on into high school." 

Jim Philbrook believes he's too set 
in his ways now to be mellowed by 
Hollywood prosperity. 

"I don't think there's been any par- 
ticular change in me over the last three 
or four years," he says, despite his 
emergence as a star and his fancy home 
and swimming pool in San Fernando 
Valley. "I've been able to give my 
family more, but I'm still the same 
ornery cuss I've always been. I don't 
tiptoe at home or on the set. I walk 
with a heavy foot in both places. I'm 
not a tiptoer." 

As for the new world that Loretta 
Young has opened up for him, Jim 
Philbrook all but genuflects with grati- 
tude. 

"I'm fortunate that I can work with 
the top leading ladies," he allows. 
"It's a lot better than riding horses all 
day long." — william tusher 



DONNA REED 

(Continued from page 58) 

conspicuously over her arm. "As a farm 
girl back in Iowa, the only real talent 
I could boast was a knack for long- 
range spitting through my teeth." She's 
improved a bit, though, since then — or 
perhaps Donna just never understood 
her own strength. 

"You know something," said one 
Hollywood columnist, "when a produc- 
er needs a dame that men buy dia- 
monds for, he gets a Bardot or a Mans- 
field. But when he needs a woman men 
commit mayhem for, he seeks out Don- 
na Reed." 

Well, perhaps not mayhem exactly, 
but anyway, something. 

There was, for long, a legend around 
the Screen Gems lot, where "The Don- 
na Reed Show" is filmed, that the 
mild-seeming Donna just never blew 
up, that the extent of her self-asser- 
tion rarely went beyond a curious dis- 
inclination to be filmed in a kitchen 
apron. "Gentlemen," she announced 
firmly one day, digging her heels 
stubbornly into the carpet of her dress- 
ing room, "I don't cook with an apron 
on in my own house, so why should I 
wear one as Mrs. Donna Stone, of 
Hillsdale, U.S.A.?" 

"Hmmm, a toughie," they mur- 
mured, but shrugged their shoulders 
and finally agreed to lay that apron 
down. "Blondes," they seemed to say, 
"how do you figure them out?" 

Once, too, a visiting fireman joined 
Donna and a friend at lunch, during a 
working day, and suggested that Miss 
Reed embellish her rather Spartan 
melted cheese sandwich with a bit of 
strong waters. "It will enhance your 
performance this afternoon," he said. 
"Make your eyes shine with sex." 

"Some eyes, not mine," Donna 
smiled, firmly clasping her tomato juice. 
"It would only make me look half 
asleep. You see, nobody thinks I'm 
terribly exciting, and a drink would 
be such a waste." 

Not exciting? Donna? 

The nice girl blows up 

Then came that never-to-be-forgot- 
ten day when Patient Griselda got fed 
up to her pretty teeth with an unreason- 
able director who thought — mistakenly 
— that he was the heir to Simon Le- 
gree. The nice girl really blew up. 

The specifics of the actual blast-off 
are as yet a highly classified secret 
(the unreasonable director, they say, 
is still running), but from that mo- 
ment, there was a new look of admira- 
tion in strong men's eyes. More even 
than this, though, the deceptively-mild 
Donna won her spurs as "The Tiger," a 
highly unlikely but seemingly delicious 
role for her. As a gag, the cast and 
crew members bought her a stuffed 
tiger for her dressing room, a bottle 
of Tiger perfume, and hung pictures 
of snarling tigers on the camera boom 
and on her personal chair. 

"Oh, yes," Donna laughed, "they 
still call me 'The Tiger,' but really, I 



don "t allow myself to blow up more 
than three or four times a year. Like, 
say, on Groundhog Day. Friday the 
13th, and St. Valentine's. But seriously 
I try to keep my temper in check; 
otherwise, the rest of the cast and crew 
would be demanding equal time. And 
that's impossible; it could not be al- 
lowed." 

The truth is, of course, that the real 
Donna Reed, as someone once said, 
"is far from being Hollywood's answer 
to Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm." Se- 
rene and sunny — most of the time — 
Donna's fresh, uncluttered look belies 
the strong and forceful person she is. 
The muscle is there, to be used only 
in crises. 

One observer, not long ago, watched 
her dash off at her lunch break to an 
Italian restaurant a block or so from 
the set. Donna was dressed in a skirt, 
flat heels, and a button-down, Ivy 
League plaid shirt, and over her shoul- 
ders she flung a soft, well-worn, tobac- 
co brown tweed coat. It was one of 
Hollywood's windier days, and as Don- 
na hurried along the short stretch of 
Gower Street, she cupped both hands 
around her meticulously-arranged 
blond hairdo — "She has the hardest 
hair in the world to work with," says 
her husband — to keep the wind from 
tearing it apart. 

Curb-bound at Sunset Boulevard by a 
red light, Donna still clasped both 
hands to her head, fearful of the rav- 
ages the wind might do. But not be- 
cause of personal vanity; it was for 
another reason altogether. "Oh, dear," 
she sighed, "my hairdresser will kill 
me if anything happens to my hairdo!" 
Yet, displaced hairdo or not, a covey 
of admiring males all but broke into 
cheers as Miss Whistle-bait hurried 
across the street. 

Later, back on the set, a visitor was 
moved to say, "I think there's been 
some grave miscasting around here, 
Donna. You should be playing the teen- 
ager on this show." 

The appraisal was not too far- 
fetched. For all her growing young- 
sters, her seventeen years of marriage, 
her actual age (it is unbelievable, but 
Donna is 41 ! ) , she still looks, even 
at ten o'clock in the morning, like some- 
one dewy enough to lead the cheering 
section for her high school team. Per- 
haps it's because, as she once revealed, 
she sleeps in shell-pink chiffon short- 
ies, with yards and yards of lace. "The 
joke is," she giggles, "that I'm 'in the 
pink.' I like jokes." 

But more than anything, Donna, for a 
long time, has been the dazzling proof 
that nice girls don't necessarily have to 
be dull. "What has TV given you?" a 
ponderous interviewer once demanded. 

"Money," said Donna brightly. 

Neither she nor anyone else on her 
show — Carl Betz, Paul Petersen, Shel- 
ley Fabares — are namby-pampy cut- 
outs, or one-dimensional ciphers 
stamped out by a cookie-cutter to 
emerge without a flaw. 

"We try to be affable people," Donna 
said, "but not syrupy-sweet. There are 
times when we even yell at each other, 
a little, but that's the kind of family we 
play. I don't portray the All-American 




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Mom, and Carl Betz isn't the Ail-Amer- 
ican Daddy, either. So help me, if we 
had to do that type of TV mother and 
father every week, I'd go off my rocker. 
Our stories do not revolve only around 
the kids." 

Ice and fire 

Moreover, Donna today is just about 
the only woman TV star who has sur- 
vived "all the perils of the rating wars," 
without compromise in her standards or 
her beliefs. "Let's not kid ourselves," 
one Hollywood executive said. "Donna 
is no prettier, no more talented than the 
other girls. But what she had was — and 
this is an old-fashioned word for an old- 
fashioned virtue — character. And be- 
sides, she does have a quiet kind of 
sex: All ice and fire." 

There is also the fact, as her husband 
is aware, that Donna is a rampant per- 
fectionist, and "it's no fun to be a per- 
fectionist." 

Donna's perfectionism, the tough- 
talking, wheeling-and-dealing producer 
admits, can be a drag at times. "There 
are days when nothing is ever quite 
right," says Tony, grinning wryly. "No 
matter how good the show is or how 
high the ratings have been the week 
before, Donna suffers; the good should 
have been even better. 

"Why is she so critical of herself? 
Well, she's essentially a pretty shy per- 
son — perhaps more than anyone except 
those really close to her are aware. 
She's sure that, no matter what anyone 
tells her, she's not very good. Donna 
could win five more Oscars in a row and 
she still wouldn't be convinced of her 
value as an actress. 

"Sometimes she's like that at home, 
too. She's curiously reluctant to get on 
the tennis court with the good players, 
or swim in other people's pools, be- 
cause while she does both of these 
things better than average, she doesn't 
think so. She's wrong, of course, but 
you try to change her opinion of Donna 
Reed; I can't. 

"And though she may not blow her 
top on the show very often, she'll sneak 
off the set when things are going wrong 
and get me on the phone and bang, 
bang, bang! But that's my Donna, my 
doll," Tony laughed. "It's part of the 
whole thing that makes her tick, makes 
her so very good at whatever she does." 

And Donna? "Well," says The Tiger, 
"I couldn't have done without Tony as 
the producer of the series. Without him 
there'd be nothing, except me in a sani- 
tarium." 

Yet for all her "whims of iron," 
Donna is still a warm, sensitive human 
being who is as concerned about the 
youngsters in her show almost as much 
as she is about her own family. 

In her own serene and humorous way, 
Donna demonstrates constantly her be- 
lief that one should "never let the busi- 
ness of acting interfere with the busi- 
ness of living." 

"I've been in Hollywood for . . . well, 
quite a while," Donna once explained. 
"And all I ever had to do was to look 
around me and see the tormented, un- 
happy women in this business. Perhaps 
I was just a wide-eyed kid from an 



Iowa farm, but I saw right from the 
start that the one thing I didn't need 
was stardom and unhappiness. All too 
often, the two seem to go together. 
Somehow, you can't be both 'star' and 
woman, not and still be what you really 
have to be — a whole person. 

"Please don't think I'm condemning 
other actresses. I'm not. It's just that 
this unhappiness seems to pervade the 
Hollywood atmosphere, and sometimes 
I think it can be pretty shattering. And 
yet, you don't have to fall into all the 
traps, although women in this business 
keep doing it over and over, so it must 
be hard to avoid. I've seen it happen. 
And then that's when I pinch myself. 
That's when I tell myself, 'Donna, 
vou've been a pretty lucky person, all 
in all.' " 

There have been rumors lately, that 
Donna is "tired" and would like to re- 
tire from her series at the end of this, 
her fifth season. There were rumors she 
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are. May I carry you out to your car?" 

Donna, to her credit, completely 
broke up. 

"But," says Donna now, "I'm not 
ready to say when I'll quit. There's been 
no decision as yet. But there's a pretty 
good chance I will be back. Anyway, 
I do know that I've been sort of — call 
it 'tapering off': Doing fewer entire 
shows, and letting the others do a little 
more. I must say, though," Donna 
laughed, "tapering off the show is like 
tapering off smoking or drinking. In 
fact, it's harder. I don't know why, but 
it is." 

And what would The Tiger do with 
herself if she were to retire? 

"Oh," she said jokingly, "do such ex- 
citing things as go to more P.T.A. meet- 
ings, help the kids with their home- 
work and meet oftener with their teach- 
ers. I want to dress up a little more at 
night — wear some of my fancy clothes. 
Lately, I seem to have forgotten how to 
do it. Why, I get dizzy just climbing 
into high heels! 

"Honestly, though," Donna went on, 
"I'd like to join my husband in pro- 
ducing the kind of pictures families can 
see, parents can take their children to. 
There are so few of them around these 
days. Almost nobody except Walt 
Disney seems to be making pictures 
that aren't sick, sick, sick, or boiling 
over with sex." 

All this is as yet in the future. Right 



now, Donna is infinitely more excited 
about the way she acquired "the first 
real vacation house we've had in years." 
"It's down in Palm Springs," she said 
gaily. "I've been dreaming of a place 
like this, but never had one. Then, just 
a few weeks ago, some friends put their 
tiny but perfect Palm Springs house on 
the market. It was beautiful, exquisitely 
decorated, and exactly what I've longed 
for. So, Tony and I walked through the 
place from front to back, and when our 
friends asked me if I liked it, I said, 



LAWRENCE WELK 

(Continued from page 61) 

you can be happier this other way, then 
by all means feel free to try it. And if 
you ever decide to come back, we'll be 
very happy to have you." My wife's 
point of view freed me for all the sub- 
sequent situations. 

"It wasn't really a fight, but the 
worst time Fern and I ever had was 
when we disagreed about moving to 
California, which is now our home. 
Around 1938, when the children were 
of school age, we realized the disad- 
vantages of traveling. In those days, 
apartments would take dogs but no 
children. It was sad and heartbreak- 
ing. I had terrible trouble getting us 
places to live. We'd stay in one town 
only two weeks. Another, eight weeks. 

"You see, I worked hotels where we 
played for noon sessions, then during 
dinner, then again beginning at ten 
at night. I had to get up very early in 
the morning to look for apartments, 
then work, then try to catch a little 
sleep, then work again. Those days 
were very rough. 

"My wife was so clean. She wasn't 
used to this. Our pay would be two 
hundred dollars for the whole band. 
Sometimes we'd have to accept an old 
dirty room that no one had been in for 
three years. She would take one look 
at it and start to cry. It was terrible. 

"Finally we settled in Chicago. After 
nine years, I got this opportunity to 
work at a ballroom in California and 
do a local TV show. I saw great oppor- 
tunities on the Coast. We certainly 
weren't progressing in Chicago. The 
ninth year, I wasn't making any more 
than I had the first year. 

"In those days they'd book you for 
months at one ballroom, so we were 
apart for some while. I couldn't come 
back and she wouldn't come out. She 
liked the schools in Chicago and she 
had read those stories about Holly- 
wood and was positive our children 
would turn out badly. She wanted no 
part of it. I had to bring her out sev- 
eral times for a look before she'd agree. 
It was a long struggle." 

The Welks disprove the theory that 
husbands should be older than their 
womenfolk. They're about the same 
age. They disprove the theory that 
couples must share similar interests. 
His is golf. Hers is bridge. 

"It's better to have separate hob- 
bies," answered Welk sincerely. "It is 



'Like it? I'm buying it.' I bought it the 
way I've always dreamed of doing 
things — inside of ten minutes!" 

"That's Donna," Tony Owen once 
quipped, "she just never stops amazing 
me." Nor anyone else, for that matter. 
There's just one thing this still-amazed 
Donna Reed enthusiast wonders about: 

How do you dare whistle at a tiger? 
— Favius Friedman 

"The Donna Reed Show" is seen over 
ABC-TV, Thursdays, at 8 p.m. est. 



not good to be together twenty-four 
hours a day. I don't know why, but 
people who are constantly together 
have some sort of reaction. They fight 
like cats and dogs. It happens even to 
married couples on the golf . course. 
The condition doesn't exist as much if 
you're apart all day long, because then 
you're anxious to get together. And I 
never read the papers at the dinner- 
table, either!" 

Welk is a devoted husband. On 
his wife's last birthday, he flew home 
from Sun Valley especially to celebrate 
with her. The week before, he'd 
dropped by the home of his youngest 
daughter with money to buy her mother 
"a complete bridge set — a suit with a 
jacket to take off, a hat — the whole 
outfit." (Donna and his other daugh- 
ter, Shirley, are married to doctors 
in California. The "baby," aged 22, is 
Larry Jr., who's currently in the Air 
Force.) Daughter did like Daddy 
wanted and, en route home from the 
airport, Lawrence scooped up the gifts. 

Even when there isn't a special oc- 
casion, he constantly brings home 
flowers, or the licorice Fern is so fond 
of, or some other little things she might 
enjoy. It's the most effective vaccine yet 
for combating the marriage bug of 
taking one another for granted. 

On the other hand, she pleases him 
by avoiding curlers and cold cream 
around the house, by canning his fav- 
orite fruits and by cooking what he'd 
like for dinner. Although Lawrence 
may only count "Ah-one-and-ah-two" 
when it comes to his music, it's ru- 
mored he might be able to count to 
"Ah-three-and-ah-four" when it comes 
to his millions. Nonetheless, they have 
a maid only once a week and his wife 
does all the cooking. 

Their Brentwood house is not the 
heme of a television celebrity and his 
worshipful spouse. It is the home of a 
happily married grandpa and grandma. 
It doesn't revolve around an egotistical 
star. It revolves around neatness and 
order. Dinner is always between 5:30 
and 6. It's served not when The Star 
is ready, but when The Roast is ready. 

Grins Larry Sr., "I am not a star in 
our home. It's better that way, too, be- 
cause if I were I wouldn't like me very 
much." He didn't need to add that he 
wouldn't have stayed married quite so 
long or so happily, either. 

— Cindy Adams 

"The Lawrence Welk Show" is seen 
over ABC-TV, Sat., from 9 to 10 p.m. 
est. Welk records on the Dot label. 



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DONNA DOUGLAS 

(Continued from page 32) 

just couldn't answer those things he 
was asking me! So I told him, 'Your 
job doesn't mean that much to me.' 

"And I got up to leave. But before I 
went out the door, he called me back. 

" 'You just got the job,' he said." 

The city girls who preceded her may 
have resented the questions every bit 
as much as she did — but they'd been 
too "smart" to say so. Does it take a 
country girl like Donna to recognize 
that, if you want honesty from people, 
you have to be honest yourself? 

"Being sincere," says Donna, "is one 
of the most important things in the 
world. If you're sincere, you can see 
through people who aren't. Sometimes 
when I meet a boy out here, he has 
the wrong idea about me at first. 

"This doesn't happen often, but it 
does occasionally. A boy may ask me 
to go out with him because he thinks 
I don't know very much and he'll have 
an advantage. But I tell him, 'You 
and I just don't think alike about 
things.' And that takes care of him. 

"I tell you," she adds confidentially, 
"in most situations, the girl controls 
the outcome. Men aren't pushy unless 
a girl is undecided in herself about 
how she wants to be treated." 

Being honest and sincere obviously 
doesn't mean a country girl can't flirt. 
Any daughter of Eve knows how to do 
that! And what can be more flirtatious 
— or flattering — than a warm, outgoing 
interest in other people? (And isn't 
it natural that people of the opposite 
sex are always more interesting?) 

Life with the birds and bees 

Before Elly May Clampett was even 
born on TV, Donna Douglas was learn- 
ing how to handle men in the fun-filled, 
rough-and-tumble summers on her 
grandfather's farm near Baywood, 
Louisiana. Baywood's where Donna 
was born — she was Doris Smith in 
those days and had an older brother 
and several cousins, all boys. "I was 
the only girl on either side of my 
family," she grins. 

"My brother and cousins simply ac- 
cepted me as I was and treated me 
just like another boy. Why, I was a 
pitcher on the boys' softball team for 
so long, I was fourteen before I found 
out there was a girls' team! And once 
I was the high scorer in a basketball 
game, with 34 points. 

"I was a tomboy, all right. See this 
scar?" Donna extends a small hand 
proudly. "I had my hand on a stump 
where one of my cousins was chopping. 
'You'd better move your finger,' he 
warned me, but I wasn't fast enough. 
He got me — chop, chop — right here!" 

But, most of the time, she and the 
boys were climbing trees, swinging on 
vines, riding, hunting, fishing, taking 
a dip in the ol' swimmin' hole. Or help- 
ing out with the farm chores, such as 
milking the cows and feeding the pigs. 

They weren't hillbillies, of course, 
but they reveled in the semi-wild free- 



dom of outdoor life and were a close- 
knit little clan who lovingly trusted 
each other and the goodness of nature. 

This trust is something Donna never 
lost, even after she discovered she was 
really a girl and stopped playing base- 
ball and football to root the boys on 
from the sidelines, as one of the cutest 
high-school cheerleaders ever. 

Or even after her teen-age beauty 
won her the titles Miss Baton Rouge 
and Miss New Orleans and led her to 
seek a career as model and actress in 
New York — where the allegedly blase 
(but plumb bowled-over) big-city re- 
porters promptly named her Miss By- 
line and gave her a crown which she 
wore on the Ed Sullivan show! 

Today, Donna shows her affection for 
TV's Clampett tribe just as naturally 
and warmly as she accepted her own 
childhood clan. "Hello, Granny," she 
beams, as she drops into Irene Ryan's 
lap and gives her a bear-hug. 

Granny is sitting in front of the 
Clampetts' Beverly Hills mansion (or 
that part of the set which represents 
this imposing facade), watching expen- 
sively-dressed performers portray the 
Hillbillies' elegant but conniving neigh- 
bors for the TV camera. 

How to trap wolves 

Everybody knows the Clampetts will 
come out ahead of the city slickers — 
no matter how elegantly they connive — 
because these simple country folk are 
protected by their native goodness. 
(Wasn't it the late W. C. Fields who 
said, "You can't cheat an honest 
man?") 

"These people aren't pretentious," 
says Donna, fondly, of her TV kin, "be- 
cause they don't have to be. They are 
so kind and decent, they don't have to 
pretend to be something else. Anyone 
who's seen the show knows it doesn't 
make fun of uneducated country peo- 
ple. It's really a compliment to them, 
the way the Clampetts always win over 
the people who try to outsmart them." 

Seemingly unaware that she's just 
described the unsophisticated secret of 
her own success at winning friends and 
outsmarting wolves in Ivy League 
clothing, she jumps off Granny's lap 
and romps into the Hillbillies' ultra- 
modern makebelieve kitchen. 

"Isn't it pretty?" she beams, as en- 
thusiastically as though everything in 
the sound-stage mansion is for real. 

She chatters away, happy as a jay- 
bird, but never lights in one place long 
enough for any formal kind of inter- 
view. Donna not only doesn't stick to 
the subject. She's apt to answer a to- 
tally different question from the one 
she's being asked. 

Does she actually know how effective 
this tactic can be? Well, whether she 
does it consciously or unconsciously, 
you somehow find yourself not minding 
a bit. And it's a dodge that works — 
particularly, when it comes to outfox- 
ing some elegantly conniving male who 
seeks personal data for his datebook! 

What red-blooded man could resist 
following Donna wherever her enthusi- 
asm might lead, when she looks up at 
him with wide-eyed innocence — and 



blissfully changes the subject he's been 
leading up to all evening? 

Guess this all goes to prove that it 
isn't so important whether you win or 
lose — it's how you play the game that 
counts! 

Is this Donna's own country-girl wis- 
dom? Or is it pure Elly May? 

Donna herself sees no difference. "I 
never have to ask the director — or any- 
body — why Elly May does so-and-so or 
stands one way or talks another. I al- 
ready know. You see, I know her. I 
am Elly May." 

Her faith in a Power that protects 
the pure-hearted may have been bol- 
stered by two personal experiences: 
The way big-city life turned out to be 
just as wonderful and friendly as she'd 
expected it to be — and her good for- 
tune in getting to be Elly May. 

She'd had good roles guesting on 
TV and had made three movies — 
"Career" (for which Hal Wallis offi- 
cially changed her name to Donna 
Douglas), "Li'l Abner" and "Lover 
Come Back" — but never played a con- 
tinuing part in a regular series. So, 



VINCENT EDWARDS 

(Continued from page 41) 

to get laughed out of that neighborhood 
fast all you had to do was mention 
something sissy like movie star. 

Truck driver? Stevedore? Loader 
down at the fish market? Hood? These 
were all okay. Sure. But movie star? 
Just mention something like that and 
hoooooooo would they laugh you out of 
the place. 

So Vince was quiet about his decision. 

Yet, as the next few years passed, he 
began to work on it. 

And, unknown to anyone but himself, 
he embarked on a program of study and 
preparation and self-improvement that 
he knew in his bones would pay off 
some day, would have to — please God 
— pay off some day. 

In school, for one thing — P.S. 73, a 
junior high over on Macdougal Street — 
he joined what they called the Story 
Telling Club. There were about a dozen 
other kids in the club. They'd meet in 
the auditorium Thursday afternoons at 
three o'clock, and one by one they'd 
stand on the stage and make up little 
things to say, stories to tell. There was, 
of course, the clown who'd just get up 
there and say stupid things, do stupid 
things — a waste of everybody's time. 
There was, of course, the girl with the 
big buck teeth and the moony eyes 
who'd always end up telling how her 
parents fought all the time, who'd al- 
ways begin to bawl and would have to be 
dragged to the girls' room to get her 
face dried. And then, of course, there 
was Vince, who'd get up there and start 
by saying strange and very dramatic 
things like "One time, in my past, I was 
in the country of England, a soldier for 
Her Majesty Queen Victoria — " and 
who'd spin a yarn this long and with 
so many heroics and feats of courage 
in it that you could never in a million 



naturally, she was bubbling over with 
eagerness when she was promised a 
chance to test for "The Beverly Hill- 
billies." 

Success— with a crash! 

Then, the very day of her big oppor- 
tunity, she was in an automobile acci- 
dent that almost ruined everything! 

"I was just half a block from my 
house," she sighs, "when somebody 
banged into the back of my car. 

"I was in the hospital sixteen days. 

"It seemed like just about every girl 
in the world wanted to be Elly May. 
So you can imagine my surprise when 
I got out of the hospital and discov- 
ered the part was still there!" 

Surprise? Why, Donna had to play 
Elly May because she is Elly May. 

And what chance did any of those 
big-city actresses have, once Donna 
turned on all her country-girl wisdom 
and charm? — Louise Ronka 

"The Beverly Hillbillies" go to town on 
CBS-TV, Wednesdays, at 9 p.m. est. 



years believe it all. Except that when 
he said it, somehow you did believe it. 
And sometimes you'd even clap, it would 
be such a good story he had told. 

There was, too, the candy store — that 
little place, over on Eastern Parkway — 
where Vince would hang around. "But 
not 'hang around' like most of the other 
kids," someone who works there recalls, 
"—spending an hour drinking their 
sodas and laughing it up and making 
the pain in the neck. Because Vince, 
instead, he would stand over there — 
where I keep all those magazines, see? 
— and he would read through them all, 
the ones about the movies, the ones 
about the action things, everything he'd 
read ... I remember one day my wife 
said to me, 'Hey, don't he ever buy 
none of those magazines?' And I said 
to her to never mind, to leave the kid 
alone, that here was a boy who was in- 
terested in learning things from his 
reading . . . and that it was good that a 
few people in this neighborhood at least 
wanted to learn a little something in 
life." 

Also important in Vince's program 
was health and body-building. Some- 
where in his readings he'd come across 
an article about the value of a good 
physique in show business. And so he 
joined a boys' club in Flatbush — where 
he swam a few hours a week. And so he 
joined the local "Y" — where he worked 
out with weights and barbells. And so, 
too, did he begin to get some awfully 
peculiar ideas about eating. At least, 
his mother thought they were peculiar. 
Like the time she asked him: 

"What was that again, Vinnie?" 

"I said, Mom, next time you go to 
the grocery store would you please buy 
me some wheat germ." 

"Do germs come in a box now?" his 
mother asked. 

"It's a food, Mom. An or-gan-ic food." 

"Hmmmm," his mother said. And 
then: "Vinnie, what's getting into you, 
anyway? Yesterday it was a whole pine- 



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apple you ate. covered with honey. The 
day before, you sat here munching on 
some kind of grass. And now germs you 
want to eat . . . What's the matter? 
Don't you like my macaroni any more?" 

"Mom . . . please?" 

"All right, all right," his mother said, 
not without the trace of a smile, " — but 
I don't know what the grocer's gonna 
think. He'll probably think we're all 
going out of our heads." 

Most important in Vince's program, 
however, was the simple act of going 
to the movies as much as possible and 
studying actors and their techniques and 
trying to learn from them. Though, 
really, it was not such a simple act. Be- 
cause as the years passed and the De- 
pression slowly ended, movies in the 
neighborhood no longer cost only a 
dime — not even at The Scratch, and 
certainly not at the Capitol or the Co- 
lonial or the Decatur or the Loew's 
Pitkin. A quarter was more like it now; 
sometimes even thirty-five cents — and to 
have this money handy Vince took on 
all kinds of odd jobs after school, from 
shoveling snow to sweeping out at the 
barber's. But it was worth it to him. 

Because he knew he could learn 
by going to the movies. "And," as a 
friend of Vince's recalls, "sometimes 
you'd go to the show with him and it 
wouldn't be no fun at all. You'd want 
to pass a crack about something or 
throw a spitball a few rows ahead of 
you, and Vince would say 'Pipe down' 
or 'Cut it out' — that that was Bogart or 
Gable up there and you should have the 
proper respect for them because they 
were great artists. And, believe me, if 
you didn't show the proper respect after 
a few minutes, you got a nice hard poke 
in the arm from Vince." 

A girl who knew him 'way back re- 
members: "We went to the movies to- 
gether this one Friday night when we 
were about fifteen. The Loew's Pitkin. 
We didn't know what was playing that 
night and when we approached the 
theater we saw the name of the picture 
and. above it, just the name Susan. I 
remember Vince said to me: 

"'Susan — who's she?' 

"And I said, 'Susan Hayward. She's 
a new young actress and this is her 
first picture.' 

" 'So why don't they put her full 
name?' Vince asked. 

" 'Because.' I said, 'it's like an honor. 
She comes from the neighborhood — 
from over across Saratoga Avenue — and 
it's the movie manager's way of making 
it something special by just putting her 
first name.' 

"I remember how after I said that 
there was a funny expression on Vince's 
face, a kind of smile. 

" 'Does it strike you stupid?' I asked 
him. 

" 'No,' he said, "it strikes me great.' 
Then he said, 'Can't you just see it 
someday up there — just the name 
Vincent?' 

"And he laughed. 

"And I laughed, too. 

"I mean, who had any idea at the 
time that he was being serious about 
it, that he wanted to be a movie star 
someday? I mean, who would have 
believed him . . .?" 

His mother believed Vince. when he 



finally told her. Although, and she's the 
first to admit it. she was a little bit 
skeptical about his chances at first. 

"They make the movies in Hollywood, 
Vinnie. You're way over here in Brook- 
lyn," she said to him that night. "Peo- 
ple start studying acting when they're 
twelve or thirteen years old. They go 
into plays, they sing at weddings, they 
get all kinds of experience. You're 
seventeen already, Vinnie, and you've 
never had a day of that kind of ex- 
perience in your life." 

But after her son had talked to her 
a while longer — after he'd explained 
that he'd been experiencing life, and 
that that was as good a start as any: 
after he'd told her about all the reading 
he'd done on the subject, the reasons 
for the exercise, for going to the movies 
so often; after he'd said, "Mama, this 



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is my dream, my dream!" — his mother 
nodded. And she said to him: 

"A dream's a good thing, Vinnie. 
Without them, after all, what would we 
be but pretty miserable people? The 
only trouble, though, is that a lot of 
people — they don't do anything about 
their dreams. But you — you be different, 
Vinnie. You get out there and work at 
your dream. Work at it hard. Be a 
movie star. Be a good movie star . . . 
And I'll tell you one thing" — she 
laughed through the tears that had 
somehow come to her eyes now — "if you 
don't send me an autographed picture 
of yourself when you are a movie star so 
I can show the people on the block, I'll 
come and I'll give you a slapping this 
big . . . !" 

It seemed, incredibly, as if it were all 
going to be a cinch at first. 

Only a few years later, Vince — who'd 
been working his way through the 
American Academy of Dramatic Arts 
(in the same class, incidentally, with 
three other young hopefuls named Grace 
Kelly, John Cassavetes and Anne Ban- 
croft) — got his first offer to make a 
picture; in fact, to star in a picture. 

Success, it seemed, was so close at 
that moment that, even before he read 
the script. Vince borrowed some money 
and went to buy himself a big and 
shiny-black Buick. 

But a few days later they showed him 
the script of the picture — "Mr. Uni- 
verse," it was called. And Vince won- 
dered seriously, very seriously, if he'd 



done right to buy that car so soon, and 
whether stardom — sweet stardom — was 
really just a fingertip away. 

Certainly the signs were not good 
during the making of the picture. 

Recalls Sal Sodano, an old hometown 
buddy of Vince's: "They made it in 
Sunnyside, Queens — not far from Brook- 
lyn. And I'll never forget when they 
dyed Vince's hair blond for that picture. 
We all went down with him to see what 
he'd end up looking like. And when it 
was over — the dye-job — we started to 
kid him and he was so ashamed, self- 
conscious, that he ran down the street 
to a hat store, bought a cap, put it on 
his head and wouldn't take it off for 
anything." 

Recalls another friend, beginning 
with understandable understatement: "I 
guess the picture didn't do so hot at 
the box office. Because a few months 
after it came out — Vince had to sell the 
Buick for the dough." 

The phony promise 

It was, too, a few months after the 
picture's release when Vince decided 
that if you wanted to be a movie star 
you didn't hang around a place like 
Sunnyside, Queens . . . but that you 
went out to a place like Hollywood, 
California. 

And so he did (in a big and not-so 
shiny blue-and-white bus). 

And so began ten long years of what 
turned out to be a monotonous sunshine, 
and phony promises — ten long years of 
a seemingly hopeless existence that 
would have twisted the guts of any other 
guy and sent him packing for the Mer- 
chant Marine or a job at Vic Tanny's or 
a stool at the nearest bar. 

Except that Vince had sworn to him- 
self, from the beginning, that he would 
stick with it, come what may — come all 
the lousy breaks and embarrassments 
and heartbreak and lies that they could 
load him down with. 

And it was hell for a while; for too 
long a while. 

"Sorry, Vince, but that interview I 
promised you at Metro for tomorrow? 
Well, it's off. Canceled. They just gave 
the part to somebody else." 

"Okay." 

"Vincent? Listen. You're not going to 
like this script — this thing they're call- 
ing 'Hiawatha.' And you're not going to 
like the big ugly Indian they're going 
to make you play. But here's the con- 
tract. I'd suggest you sign it. After all 
— gotta eat, you know." 

"Okay . . . Okay." 

For ten years this went on. For ten 
years Vince worked at every crummy 
movie job that came his way — when it 
came. 

And it's strange, and ironic, how 
when the big break finally did come for 
Vince — it came through another medi- 
um, called television. 

Says Vince's pal and stand-in, Ray 
Joyer: "He'd done a little TV for the 
past few years. Playing gangsters, most- 
ly — that was the only thing they seemed 
to want him for. And then one day, a 
year and a half ago, Vince called me 
up and said he was trying out for the 
lead in a series called 'Ben Casey.' I 
asked him what kind of series it was. 



And he said, 'This one's got something 
to do with a doctor.' " 

As we all now know, "Ben Casey" 
had a very definite something to do with 
Vince Edwards' career. In fact, it would 
be silly at this point to say anything 
less than that Vince has become — al- 
most overnight, as it were — one of the 
most popular personalities in the entire 
history of the home screen. 

As it would be untrue at this point 
to say that this enormous success had 
completely fulfilled Vince, and made 
him the happiest guy in town. 

Because, until recently, it hadn't. 

Why not? 

Well, we could begin to list the rea- 
sons, to talk about the hard work in- 
volved (memorizing fifteen pages of 
dialogue every night) , the long hours 
(from seven in the morning till seven, 
sometimes eight, at night), the lack of 
glamour (the story is told how on Mon- 
day nights at ten o'clock — at the begin- 
ning of what should be a gala hour for 
Vince — he's often so exhausted he falls 
asleep smack in the middle of his show) . 
We could list more reasons and talk 
about this and that and the other thing 
— and perhaps approach an answer. 

But the true answer came one day 
from Vince himself, in a talk with a 
Hollywood columnist. 

He said it all in rather few words, 
as is his way. 

He said it simply, and honestly. 

"I'm grateful to television," he said. 
"It gave me my big chance after the 
movies gave me a knocking around for 
years. Yet I've got to be truthful and 
admit that I'd still like to be big in 
movies. You know — the guy who stands 
there on that big screen, holding the 
girl. You know — the star. The movie 
star . . ." 

The dream comes true 

And finally it happened. 

Not too long ago. 

In Salerno — one of the loveliest towns 
in all of Italy. 

It was nightfall. 

They stood in the doorway, Vince 
Edwards and the beautiful Italian girl. 

They turned to look at one another. 
And then they held one another, and 
kissed — the longest of kisses. 

"Cut!" the director yelled after a 
while. 

"Vieni qui," a woman called out to 
starlet Rosanna Schiaffano, " — come 
here and I will fix your hair." 

It was between-takes time on a crucial 
love scene in a seven-million-dollar 
movie epic to be called "The Victors" — - 
and the confusion was rampant. 

"Buddy — can you adjust that second 
arc light?" 

"Fred, do you think you can bring 
the camera a little closer next time 
around?" 

"Mario, hurry with the coffee. Subito. 
Subito!" 

It was a hurry-time in normally slow- 
paced Italy because time was all im- 
portant, because the producer had bro- 
ken his neck to get Vince Edwards for 
the lead part in this expensive and im- 
portant motion picture and because 
Vince Edwards — the star of this picture, 
whose name would be listed first in the 







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credits, over Melina Mercouri's and 
George Peppard's and George Hamil- 
ton's and everybody else's— had to be 
back in America very soon to continue 
with his part in his TV series. 

"Carl, do you think she should come 
a little closer to Vince after that first 
line on page ninety?" 

"Dick, we'd better get moving soon. 
The sun's going to be completely gone 
in about fifteen minutes." 

"Mario. Where's Mario? Where's 
that coffee?" 

It was panic time, confusion time, 
crazy time, big-movie time. 

Yet, through it all, on this particular 



DURWARD KIRBY 

(Continued from page 54) 

You see, Durward wanted me to wear 
his grandmother's diamond, and he had 
it put into a beautiful platinum setting 
at a jeweler's in Indianapolis. Valen- 
tine's night. Durward and I went down 
to the local post office to pick it up. 
There were four middle-aged men on 
duty, and we had them hunting like 
crazy for a small box that was due in 
from Indianapolis. 

"Sorry, folks," they'd say over and 
over to us, "nothing here for you yet. But 
if you want to try in a little while — " 

So Durward and I went for a bite to 
eat. And returned to the post office. No 
luck. We went dancing for a while. Re- 
turned to the post office. No luck. We 
went to a movie. Returned. No luck. 

Finally — at about midnight — we had 
no sooner walked in, than one of the 
men called out: "Here it is! Just got 
here. And not such a small package, at 
that, hey?" 

Watching our every move like old bid- 
dies, the four men peered over the 
counter as we began to unwrap the 
package. We took off the brown paper. 
Then the white paper. Inside a large box 
was a huge red rose, pinned to a smaller 
box. I opened it, and there it was — the 
loveliest engagement ring in the world! 

Durward put it on my finger. And he 
gave me a big kiss, right then and there. 

The four men, obviously long married, 
just stood there and howled. "Is this 
what we've been going through all this 
trouble about?" they asked. 

But they didn't daunt us. We didn't 



Our marriage comes of age 

Sometimes, it's hard to realize that 
Durward and I have been married for 
twenty-one years now! Time goes so 
quickly, the years pass with such speed. 

Those first years, especially. In Chi- 
cago. With me in Chicago, I should say. 
Because Durward went off to the Navy 
when Randy, our first son, was thirteen 
months old. 

Little Randy, of course, helped make 
the war years pass more quickly. And, 
fortunately, I had wonderful help from 
a fine maid — Mattie Bolden — without 
whom I could never have done the radio 
shows which kept us going while Dur- 
ward was away. 



day, at this particular moment, Vince 
Edwards stood there quietly . . . almost 
dazedly . . . with an odd kind of smile 
on his face. 

And we like to think that he was re- 
membering, that moment, a little boy 
who sat in a crowded little theater in 
Brooklyn, twenty-seven years before, 
ignoring the confusion around him then 
. . . and dreaming the beginnings of his 
beautiful dream. — Ed DeBlasio 

"Ben Casey" is seen on ABC-TV, Mon., 
from 10 to 11 p.m. est. Vince also 
stars in "The Victors," a Columbia 
Picture, and sings on the Decca label. 



From the very beginning, Durward 
had told me: "Pax, you've worked hard 
to get where you are today. And, as long 
as you enjoy working, you can work. But 
one thing has to be understood — I'm the 
husband and I pay all the bills. You can 
save the money you earn. You can give 
it to charity. But / pay the bills." 

Actually, I worked for seven years 
after our marriage. But then, in 1949, 
when our second son — Dennis — was 
born, I decided to give it all up. I real- 
ized then that I had had to miss so much 
of Randy's babyhood. It would just be 
too much to miss again with our new 
little boy. 

So I quit. 

I said to Durward: "From now on, I'm 
just going to be Pax Kirby, housewife. 
And any talk of career is going to be 
yours, and yours alone." 

I think most men like marriage better 
that way. I'm sure Durward is no ex- 
ception. 

As you know, his own career has gone 
just fine since then. Of course, I'm 
rather prejudiced. I think my husband 
is an enormously talented man, that he 
possesses a lot of talent which is still 
untapped — like his marvelous ability to 
do pantomime. 

But you want to know more about the 
man than the performer — right? 

The lowdown on Durward 

He's a loving man. He loves me. And 
he loves his sons. Durward has always 
adored his parents and he loves my 
folks, too. They say that any man who 
loves his parents is bound to be a good 
husband. In Durward's case, it's true. 
He's a wonderful husband ! 

He's a reliable man. You can set your 
watch by Durward. 

He's not a temperamental man — at 
home, or at work. I believe Garry Moore 
will agree. Speaking of Garry — you 
probably know that he and Durward 
have been friends since 1939. In fact, 
Durward and I used to double-date with 
Garry and Nell back in our Chicago 
days. We are all still the very best of 
friends. It seems, in fact, as though 
Garry and Nell have always been a part 
of our lives. 

But about Durward . . . 

He's a good father to his sons. They're 
always having these man-to-man talks 
from which I'm naturally excluded. But 
. . . sometimes ... I do just happen to 
eavesdrop just a bit. And one of the 
nicest things I ever heard Durward say 



to the boys was this : "All I expect out of 
you both, when you set out for your- 
selves, is that you do an honest day's 
work. And if you choose to be bums — 
then be at least good bums; the best, in 
fact!" 

Durward is a very truthful man. I can 
still say, after all these years, he is one 
of the most truthful men I've ever met. 
He isn't undiplomatic enough to criticize 
a new hat I'm fond of — but where there 
is an important issue, you'll get nothing 
but the truth from Durward. 

Does he talk much about the future? 
Yes. Durward is not one of those com- 
pulsive actors who has to be "on" till the 
day he drops dead. He looks forward to 
a day when he can retire. His idea and 
mine for the ideal life, when we're older, 
is to go to our little place in Connecticut 
from May to October, and then some 
place warm for the rest of the year. And 
to break up this routine with another 
trip to Europe, or some place we've 
never been. 

Durward has always been able to leave 
show business on the steps when he 
walks into this house. When he's ready 
to quit, he'll do it the same way. He says, 
given the opportunity, he could be the 
laziest man in the world. That's not quite 
true. He'll always be busy — if it's only 
fixing something or puttering around. 

Durward is a man of great gentleness 
and kindness. Thoughtful and consider- 
ate. He can't stand a me-firster, the fel- 
low who's always pushing himself to the 
front of the line at the supermarket. 

If Durward is touchy about anything, 
it's about anybody prying into his truly 
private affairs. It irritates him when 
somebody asks: "How much do you 
make?" Or when somebody asks: "How 
much did the house cost you — the car — 
the summer place?" 

He's a sentimental man. Particularly 
about his childhood. He can sit and rem- 
inisce for hours about the things he. and 
his parents did together; about swim- 
ming with the gang in the Ohio River, 
camping . . . things such as that. 

He's a neat man. I've never seen any- 
one keep a closet in such perfect order. 
He could get up in the dark and pick out 
a certain tie, if he wanted to. 

A natural fixer-upper 

He's a man who always likes to be do- 
ing something around the house. Either 
this house here in Westchester, or our 
summer place in Connecticut. He loves 
to tear things out and put them back 
together. He grumbles when something 
gets out of order, but you can tell he 
enjoys making it work again. 

At the same time, he likes to relax. 
He loves fishing. He doesn't play much 
golf, but he's shown promise of being a 
good player — he's got a real relaxed 
swing. I guess you could say he has a 
natural talent for relaxation. One of 
Durward's greatest forms of relaxation 
after a hard day's work is to sit in a 
rocker and watch TV — and fall asleep! 

He's a good eater. He likes good cook- 
ing. He didn't have much of a chance 
for it in the first half of our marriage, 
with me working so much. But I've 
worked at my cooking since then, and 
nothing pleases me more now than when 
he compliments one of my dinners. He 



likes just about everything, from gour- 
met things to sauerkraut. 

He has a wonderful sense of humor — 
off the TV screen, as well as on — though 
some of our neighbors seem genuinely 
confused about this. I've heard them re- 
mark that, seeing Durward at the rail- 
road station about to catch a train for 
New York, he looks just like any other 
serious businessman on his way down to 
Wall Street or Madison Avenue. 

He loves parties. He's usually the first 
to arrive and the last to leave. People 
who know him have said that he brings 
fun with him wherever he goes. 

He loves people, even just talking to 
them. One of the funniest scenes I ever 
saw was in the plumbing department of 
the Galerie Lafayette, the big Paris de- 
partment store. Durward wanted to buy 
a shower spray. The salesman was 
happy to sell him one. The only trouble 
was that Durward spoke no French and 
the salesman spoke no English. 

Durward wanted to be sure that this 
spray would fit our type of faucet at 
home. Well, to hear him try to explain 
this to the man, to watch him get over 
the idea with his hands — it was just 
about the funniest thing I ever saw. Fun- 
niest of all was that the spray worked 
when we got back home! 

Durward is a religious man. But that 
doesn't mean he's without any frailties. 
Such as an occasional use of profanity. 
Oh, I don't mean that Durward is one to 
cuss a lot. But something's going to come 
out if he hits his thumb with a hammer. 

Like the time we were on vacation on 
a train in Italy. Like all women, I had 
bought souvenirs just about everywhere 
we'd stopped and I had a big straw 
basket loaded down with dozens of little 
packages. Well, we walked into the com- 
partment with all our suitcases, plus the 
straw basket. 

It was hot. We were tired. And to Dur- 
ward and Randy fell the burden of plac- 
ing the paraphernalia on the baggage 
racks overhead. As they did, I smiled a 
hello at the woman and the small boy 
already sitting by the window seats. 
They smiled back, then returned to their 
conversation in rapid Italian. 

Meanwhile, the train began to move. 
Just at that moment, the basket fell from 
the rack and landed smack on Durward's 
head. Now, I don't have to tell you that 
Durward didn't stay very calm about 
this! Matter of fact, he began to cuss 
away like a trooper. 

About fifteen miles later, the Italian 
lady took a cigarette from her purse, 
looked at Durward and said — in the 
most perfect English! — "I beg your par- 
don, but may I have a match?" 

Poor Durward ! He looked at me with 
that woebegone look of his on that rub- 
ber face. I just couldn't help it. I became 
absolutely hysterical — and so did Randy 
and Dennis. 

What more can I tell you about Dur- 
ward? Except to say that I love my 
husband . . . my dear and funny Valen- 
tine . . . and the lovely life we lead 
together. — as told to Michael Joya 

See Durward on "The Garry Moore 
Show," CBS-TV, Tues., 10 to 11 p.m. est. 
And hear him on "The Garry Moore Ra- 
dio Show," CBS Radio, M-F, 10:30 to 
10:40 a.m. est (WCBS Radio, 11:30). 



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95 



96 



STEVENS— CLARKE 

(Continued from page 6) 

would be if you were on top and I was 
only climbing." Gary stood firm against 
her anger, blandishments and caresses. 
For two years it seemed hopeless. 

It was a lapse of time in which Con- 
nie threw herself into her work. But 
it didn't help. Work could not erase the 
memory of Gary's tall, lithe figure, his 
honest hazel eyes and strong sensitive 
face. So, as hard as she worked, Connie 
began dating. She was linked with 
stars like Elvis Presley, Earl Holliman, 
Troy Donahue and Mark Damon. 

Finally, there was the much-publi- 
cized "transcontinental romance" with 
Glenn Ford, which had columnists 
speculating on a possible wedding 
when the pair returned from their 
jaunt to Europe. During all this "rash 
of hanky-panky," as one observer called 
it, Gary Clarke never wavered in his 
love for and faith in Connie. "She's 
mine," he said firmly. "No matter who 
she dates or where she goes . . . time 
will bring us together again." 

Then, too, her long battle with War- 
ner Bros, was in its initial stages. 
Connie yearned for grownup parts and 
a larger share of the profits from 
"Hawaiian Eye," which she had helped 
build into an outstanding hit. As a re- 
sult of her protests, she was "on sus- 
pension" and off the payroll. It was 
not likely to sweeten her frame of mind. 
She mused, "I sometimes wonder if a 
career is really worth it. Maybe I 
should throw it over. Gary would marry 
me then, and we'd be happy. This 



star stuff — I need it like I need my 
ponytail!" 

But the Warner Bros, hassle soon 
ended (briefly) and Connie was seen 
variously in the company of Ford, 
Mario Costello and Peter Brown. The 
dates and the work again proved an 
unsatisfactory substitute for love and 
marriage. She was soon on suspension 
at the studio again. Then, one black day, 
she was sitting at home, reading a 
book, drying her hair, and generally 
feeling sorry for herself, when her 
phone rang. Slowly, and without any 
real interest, she answered the call. It 
was Gary, his voice husky with ex- 
citement and joy. Connie felt the back 
of her neck begin to tingle. Instinct 
told her that the news was better than 
good. And so it proved to be. Gary had 
been signed for a co-starring role in 
TV's first ninety-minute series, "The 
Virginian." She felt her heart give a 
sudden huge thump when she heard 
him say, "Connie, you're the first per- 
son I'm phoning ... I wanted you to 
be the first to know . . . you've never 
stopped being first in my thoughts." 

In this way, Connie and Gary began 
seeing each other steadily again. 
Though they maintained it was "just 
friendship and nothing more," it was 
an open secret among their friends 
that there was "lots more to it than 
that." On Connie's last birthday (her 
24th on August 8th), Gary surprised 
her with a matching jewelry set, a 
bracelet and ring in gold and turquoise. 
In describing it, Connie demurely re- 
ported that it was "from my old beau 
and best friend, Gary Clarke." Her 
manner, to an unobservant eye, might 
have seemed casual and impersonal. 

Then came one of those small acci- 



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MY FAVORITES ARE: 



MALE STAR: 1. 



FEMALE STAR: 1. 



FAVORITE STORY IN THIS ISSUE: 1. 



2. 



THE NEWCOMER I'D LIKE MOST TO READ ABOUT: 



THE FAMOUS PERSON, NOT IN SHOW 
BUSINESS, I'D LIKE TO READ ABOUT: 



Name Age 

Address 

3-63 



dents that so often change the course 
of a relationship. Connie's beloved 
Yorkshire terrier, Nui, while gnawing 
on a porkchop bone, got a splinter in 
his throat, hemorrhaged and died. Con- 
nie was beside herself for days. Gary 
was near her continually. He took 
charge of the arrangements for the 
little dog's burial in a pet cemetery, 
and when Connie had at last calmed 
down, he brought her another York- 
shire puppy. With a touch of the 
humor he is known for, Gary told her 
the pup was named "Beau . . . from 
your old beau." Sighed Connie, "He 
can never take poor Nui's place, but 
you brought him, so I'll love him." 

Perhaps the final step toward ma- 
turity — and Gary — came after being 
hospitalized for surgery. It was then 
that Connie came to certain definite de- 
cisions. On emerging into the light of 
day, she promptly fired her manager, 
publicity man and agent. It was only the 
first of a number of steps indicating 
that she was taking the wheel of her 
life and business affairs into her own 
two capable hands. "Gary was wonder- 
ful during all this," Connie has said. 
"He never interfered, but encouraged 
me and made me feel there was no 
problem I couldn't handle if I tried." 

The first "problem" she tackled was 
the studio. "I feel silly at twenty-four, 
running around in a ponytail acting 
sickly sweet," Connie stormed, and she 
took a suspension rather than do any 
more "Hawaiian Eye" episodes. Since 
by terms of her contract she couldn't 
work in TV or the movies until this 
legal fight was settled, she accepted an 
engagement outside the country, to 
sing at the Chevron-Hilton in Sydney, 
Australia. But though she went all the 
way there, she didn't get a chance to 
warble a note. Warners slapped an 
injunction on her and stopped the 
show. However, at this writing, Connie 
and the studio are back on speaking 
terms. 

During her absence, Gary occupied 
his time dating comedienne Kay 
Stevens and actress Cheryl Holdridge. 
This time it was Gary who picked up 
the phone and felt his heart thump to 
the sound of Connie's voice. She missed 
him dreadfully, she confessed. Just 
talking to him made her feel better. 
"I think it's time we stopped going in 
circles," Gary suggested. He heard her 
gasp, then came a tremulous, "Oh, 
Gary ... I wish I were back there 
with you where I belong." A week later 
she was at his side, and they were 
telling the world they'd set the date. 

Can anything sidetrack this much- 
postponed wedding now? Who can tell 
with certainty? One thing that lends 
weight to the seriousness of their in- 
tentions is the fact that they talk about 
a church wedding. A Catholic, Gary was 
married once before and divorced (he 
is the father of three boys who live 
with his ex-wife, since remarried). But 
since this teenage union was a civil 
ceremony, and therefore not valid in 
the eyes of the Church, there seems no 
reason why Connie and Gary cannot 
have a Catholic wedding. Connie's 
dream of walking down the aisle in 
bridal white can come true — if she 
wants it to. — Eunice Field 



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APRIL, 1963 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 59, NO. 5 




IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 



Elvis Presley 26 

Vincent Edwards 28 

Debbie Reynolds 30 

Scott Miller 32 

Special Section 34 

Lucille Ball 36 

Carol Burnett 38 

Allyson-Powell 40 

Richard Rust 42 

Kay Deibel 45 

Milton Berle 50 

Michael Landon 52 

Frank Fontaine 54 

Dean Jones 56 

Fashion 58 

Zina Bethune 60 

Jack Paar 62 

Drama of the Month 66 



"Why I Changed My Mind About God". . .Jane Ardmore 

Who Does He Think He Is — Ben Casey? Paul Denis 

What She Tells the Kids About Eddie and Liz 

Janice Allen 

Does Love Have to Hide Its Face? Louise Ronka 

The Tragedy of Being Funny. . .Six-Page Love Section! 

The Love She Didn't Bargain For Eunice Field 

The Love She Waits For Fred Robbins 

Thank God. We Had This Last Year Jim Hoffman 

Nightmare ! Kathleen Post 

"The Day I Became Mrs. Frankie A valon". .Doris James 

Why They Stopped Laughing At Him Trish Jones 

Runaway Wedding Flora Rand 

I Promised My Wife a Big Family. Ed DeBlasio 

"Why My Divorce Failed" Tex Maddox 

Can You Find Your Picture Here? Barbara Marco 

The Dream That Got Away .Micki Siegel 

The Solid Gold Marriage Helen Martin 

Who's Who in "As the World Turns'' Donald Marsh 



17 
18 



4 

6 

8 

74 



BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 

How a Hit is Born 20 Album Reviews 

Music Makers in the News 24 Tops in Singles 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 



Information Booth 76 

What's New ? 80 

Earl Wilson's Inside Story 85 

New Designs for Living 92 



New Patterns for You 
Photographers' Credits 
Your Monthly Ballot 
What's at the Movies? 



1 SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 



Kenny Roberts 11 

Virginia Graham 12 

Jim Wood 14 

Stan Scott 16 



How High Is Up? (WNEM-TV) 

Shhh . . . It's "Girl Talk"! (ABC Films) 

Be My Guest (WJR) 

Try Happiness (WSTV-TV) 



CLAIRE SAFRAN, Editor 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
CAROL ROSS, Regional Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



JACK J. PODELL. Editorial Director 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
ALEXANDRA TARASEWICH, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty-Fashion Editor 



BOBBY SCOTT, Music Editor 



TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office, 434 North Rodeo 
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Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
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contest. It is sponsored by the National Book Club, Inc. All judging will be 
conducted in an impartial, impersonal manner to assure absolute equality of 
opportunity to all. All contestants will receive exact information on the out- 
come of the contest . . . including names of all winners, plus correct puzzle 
solutions. All prizes will be paid promptly, in full, IN CASH! 

NATIONAL BOOK CLUB, INC. 

________ BOX 1 IO, GLEN COVE, N. Y. _________ 



Paste Your Answer-Coupon on Postcard or Mail in Envelope 



MAIL COUPON TODAY 



National Book Club, Inc. 
Box 110, Glen Cove, N. Y. 



41 



My Answer to Puzzle No. 1 is 



-£r 



I want full particulars about the National Book Club's $40,000.00 "FAMOUS 
NAME" Game. Please mail me FREE the Official Entry Forms, Rules and 
thelstSet.ofPuzz.es. (pLEASE pR|NT) 



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I'm With Roger 

I'm not saying whether or not I'm 
in favor of capital punishment, but 
I do want to say that I admire 
Roger Smith for speaking out like 
he did in his story "I Tried to Save 
a Murderer." I think it's great that 
he wasn't afraid to speak his piece 
about something that he obviously 
feels very deeply about. And now 
that I've spoken my piece, how 
about having more stories on Roger? 
I think he's the greatest. Thanks in 
advance! 

L.W., Orange, N.J. 

In a Word . . 

There's only one thing to say about 

Donna Douglas — and that's WOW! 

A D.D. Fan, Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Zina Rates High 

My friends and I loved your 
fashion story about Zina Bethune, 
but we have one request. Could you 
please have a long story all about 
Zina? We watch her every week on 
"The Nurses," and we?d like to know 
more about her. 

B.J., Tucson, Ariz. 

Turn to page 60, B.J., for a story 
on guess whom! — Ed. 

What's in a Picture? 

I think P.K. Fields and Tracey 
Silvers should live forever, they're 
so cute. Their "lawn party" looked 
like so much fun — I hope they have 
one to celebrate every birthday just 
so I can look at the pictures! By the 
way, I wonder if anyone else noticed 
that the grownups seemed to be 
having just as much fun — if not 
more — than the kids? Anyway, their 
birthdays made me feel about ten 
years younger. 

Mrs. D.H., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Everyone's Happy! 

My answer to Dave Nelson's an- 
swer to Dr. Spock is — what a lucky 
baby to be born into that wonderful 
Nelson family. 

Mrs. B.L., Eugene, Ore. 



Oops, We Goofed! 

After receiving letters from peo- 
ple all over the U.S. and Canada 
asking how they could join the Ray- 
mond Burr Fan Club, I found an 
issue of TV Radio Mirror (Febru- 
ary) and found my name listed un- 
der "Calling All Fans." How my 
name got into your magazine is be- 
yond my knowledge, but I wish you 
would state in your next issue that I 
do not have a fan club for Raymond 
Burr. 

Patricia A. Cooper, Leola, Pa. 

We know how your name got into 
"Information Booth," Patricia. We 
received a letter signed "Miss Pat- 
ricia A. Cooper, 48 Holly Drive, 
Leola, Pa." However, the letter re- 
quested information about a Ray- 
mond Burr fan club. We mistakenly 
interpreted it as a request for mem- 
bers. For that, we apologize. — Ed- 

Did He or Didn't He? 

Please don't think I'm a real corn- 
ball, but your story about Vince Ed- 
wards ("He Finally Does It") really 
got to me. It's so fantastic how a 
dream can turn into reality if you 
really work at it. I think all the 
years of Vince's struggling and 
hoping should be an example for 
people who say they want some- 
thing, but are just too lazy or too 
frightened to fight for what they 
think will make them happy. Now 
that I've sounded off, I'd just like 
to say one more thing — I love Vince 
Edwards ... he finally did it, all 
right ! 

L.D., New York, N.Y. 

Did what? You have a story about 
Vince Edwards finally doing some- 
thing, but all I can figure out is 
that he finally kissed a girl in Italy. 
Or maybe you meant he finally be- 
came a star. Well, so did everyone 
else in Hollywood (