(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "TV Radio Mirror (Jul - Dec 1962)"

Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 




AUDIOVISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 



Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 

www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



flJBUSHER'S 8»Nf>l« 




E NEXT LENNON SISTER TO BE A BRIDE! 





IO 





IJULYl 

L25<t 



If W^^^^^^^ 

^ OPP6 ° in who can saveEdd«t> 
Jeet '-" " ,nma " ^rfi^^^^M 






ass' 













TWO NEW TYPES HAVE BEEN ADDED TO THE ORIGINAL 




Now three fine sprays, with lanolin, that hold hair softly, beautifully in place, never leave hair stiff, sticky or dry. 

— - > - — 



WtlrStln 



NEW SUPER HOLD 

for Firm Control 

New Super Hold Breck Hair Set Mist 
is especially made for you if 
you have hard-to-hold hair 
or a hard-to-hold hair style. 




ORIGINAL 

for Medium Control 

The Original Breck Hair Set Mist is 
V^um,' ideal for regular use. It has 

$$>r&ck a medium hold which suits most i®^^ you if you have easy -to -hold 
^dao* 1 hair types and hair styles best, c^^c* hair or a soft, casual hair style. 

(^Beautiful Qtair 



NEW GENTLE HOLD 

for Light Control 
j*J New Gentle Hold Breck Hair Set Mist 
«W/<*- has a 1! & ht hol< L just right for 



B R E C 

Copyright 1962 by John H. Breck, Inc. 

New Super Hold, New Gentle Hold, and the Original Breck Hair Set Mist: 2 oz. size 651; 8 oz. 



K 



.50. Plus tai 



For the Fun of Making EXTRA MONEY 

You've Never Seen Anything Like CREATIVE'S 

NEW CHRISTMAS CARD lino 




$ 75°° on Only 100 Assortments 

First, we want you to look at our most unusual selection 
of new Christmas Cards just to pick out the cards you 
yourself will be sending. If you aren't so excited about our 
gr cards and gifts that you'll want to show them to friends 
right away, we'll miss our bet. Just let friends see your 
samples and you'll quickly find yourself making good 
money in the little time it takes to accept the orders. 
No experience is needed. 

Creative Pays You More 
Two popular $1.25 Christmas Assortments pay you 75c profit 
per box — instead of the usual 50c — in any quantity. There are 
extra profits for you throughout our low wholesale price scale. 
So you're bound to make the money you want faster and easier. 
Of course, the big money is in the AMOUNT everyone buys 
from our amazingly irresistible variety of designs and ideas . . . 
Christmas and All Occasion Card Assortments showing every- 
thing from the daringly new and light-hearted to the traditional 
and religious. And your earnings double from our many small 
Gifts at $1 up, the very popular Personal Stationery and our 
big album of 53 Name-Imprinted Christmas Cards for indi- 
viduals and businesses. 

Extra Bonuses in Gifts Worth up to $100 

Big as your immediate cash profits are, you make even more with Creative! 
Extra bonuses of home appliances and other, gifts worth $5 to $100 are 
given FREE. No limit to the number of gifts. Organizations use Bonus 
Gifts to reward members FREE. 

Costs Nothing to See Samples 

Just send the coupon. We'll rush our two best-sellers worth $2.50 on free 
trial with complete money-making information and big Personal Christ- 
mas Card Album. You don't risk a cent and can keep everything FREE 
when you get started with us. Send the coupon now. 

CREATIVE CARD COMPANY 4 n 40 ! ST/fP* R 7°? d . 

Dept.l 15-C, Chicago 23, 1 



on Each $1.25 Box 

of our fast-selling "Old-Fashioned Christmas" 
and "Silent Night" Assortments of 21 deluxe 
folders. You make money 50% faster-$75.00 
cash on only 100 boxes. 




ALBUM OF 53 

PERSONALIZED 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

FREE! 

Gorgeous binder of low- 
priced, name-imprinted 
beauties puts folks on a 
Christmas buying spree. 



GIFTS GALORE 

like handsome ceramic 
Salt & Pepper Center- 
piece, Wt' wide, in 
life-like color and 
i detail, only $1. 



*s« 



5 Mas . 

4 kffmJfM 




*^*»*v. 



Exclusive New Idea in 
Personal Correspondence 

Clever punch lines, titles and 



«r* floral designs on raised gold 
**y*f seals spark up letters, 



\V 



notes and envelopes in 
Creative's own 151-piece 
$1 .25 Golden Rose Tree 
Ensemble with match- 
ing ink pen. Send 
coupon for 
sample. 



GET OUR KIT 

OF SAMPLES ON 

APPROVAL WITH OFFER OF 



i SELLING i boxes 

FREE 

WITH FIRST ORDER 



MAIL NOW FOR FREE TRIAL SAMPLES 





SEND 

NO MONEY 



ORGANIZATIONS: Fill your treasury easier, faster with 
our extra big profits. Members are proud to show our un- 
usual values and win our Bonus Gifts at no cost to you. 



This coupon 
brings everything 
postpaid on Free 
Trial. If not de- 
lighted with sam- 
ples, you may re- 
turn them at our 
expense and owe 
nothing. 



CREATIVE CARD CO., Dept. ns-c 
4401 West Cermak Road, Chicago 23, III. 

Please send money-making details with Free Personal 
Album, best-selling Christmas Card Assortment and 
Golden Rose Tree Ensemble on approval — mine to 
keep FREE when I get started per your offer. 



Name- 



Address- 
City 



_State_ 



I 
I 
I 
I 






/= 



Z/^Z 




IT COSTS SO MUCH LESS 

THAN YOU THINK 

TO GET PERFECT 

ALL-DAY PROTECTION! 




THERE IS NO FINER 
DEODORANT AT ANY 
PRICE...YETYOUPAY 
ONLY OHc 



29 



plus tax 



FOR THIS "USE-TESTED" 
JUMBO STICK! 

Delicately fragrant, this quality deodor- 
ant stick keeps you fresh and dainty. . . 
insures against perspiration odor all day. 
Absolutely safe and greaseless, it can- 
not harm your clothing. Convenient 
push-up holder 29c. 

Iander 

Jtar chlorophyll 
DEODORANTS 

T Available at your local variety store 
v Luxury ROLL-ON lotion deodorant 

stops perspiration odor worries. ONLY 39c 

LANDER CO. INC., FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 

2 




JULY, 1962 



Eddie Fisher 

Richard Chamberlain 

The Lennon Sisters 

Chuck Connors 

Comedians' Wives 

Vincent Edwards 

Sandra Dee 

David Nelson 

Tommy Sands 

Diane McBain 

Now Try This! 

Roger Smith 

"The Clear Horizon" 

Alfred Hitchcock 

Jack Linkletter 

Annette Funicello 

Arthur Godfrey 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 58, NO. 2 



IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 

25 The Woman Who Can Save Him. Lynn Jackson 

26 Dick's Seven Deadly Errors James Gregory 

28 The Next Sister to Be a Bride Eunice Field 

32 "I Did What I Did for My Boys" Marilyn Beck 

34 That's My Husband You're Laughing At!. .Cindy Adams 
36 A Lady Doctor Examines His Heart. .. .Betty e Ackerman 
40 The Bobby Darin Honeymoon Is Over. .Chris Alexander 

42 "Marriage Is Not What You Think!" David Nelson 

44 Who Says It's Easy to Love a Rich Girl?. .Mary Baldwin 
46 The Other Cleopatra in Burton's Life .... Dean Gautschy 

49 Is Your Face Your Fortune — or Misfortune? Cyro 

52 When the In-Laws Move In Jane Ardmore 

54 Can You Learn to Live with Death? 

Arthur Henley and Dr. Robert L. Wolk 

56 Why Grace Kelly Couldn't Say "No" June Morefield 

58 "I Won't Make Father's Mistakes" Favius Friedman 

60 It Happens Once to Every Girl Irene Storm 

63 Where Are Godfrey's "Friends" Now? Paul Denis 



BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 

17 Music Makers in the News 19 Pieces of Eight 

18 How to Rate a Record 19 Album Covers: Pro & Con 
18 Tops in Singles 20 Album Reviews 

24 The Wonderful World of Ed Sullivan 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 



4 Information Booth 
12 Earl Wilson's Inside Story 



6 What's New from Coast to Coast 
84 Photographers' Credits 



SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 



Gordon Hinkley 67 

Peter Graves 68 

Hal Murray 70 

Gene Fullen 72 



A Man of Note (WTMJ-TV) 
He Cracks the Whip ("Whiplash") 
On the Murray-Go-Round (KDWB) 
Calling on Gene (WTVN-TV) 



JACK J. PODELL, Editorial Director 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
LORRAINE BIEAR, Associate Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



CLAIRE SAFRAN, Editor 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
PAT BYRNE, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty Editor 



,,t». 




TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office, 434 North Rodeo 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President; Lee B. Bartell, Executive Vice 
President; Frederick A. Klein, Executive Vice President for Publishing-General Manager; Robert L. Young, Vice 
President; Sol N. Himmelman, Vice President; Melvin M. Bartell, Secretary. Advertising offices also in Chicago 
and San Francisco. 

Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its possessions and Canada, one year, $3.00; two years, $5; three years, $7.50. 
All other countries, $5.50 per year. Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. Send your old as well as your 
new address to TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Manuscripts and Photographs: Publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 

Foreign editions handled through International Division of Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, 205 East 42nd Street 
New York 17, N. Y. Gerald A. Bartell, President; Douglas Lockhart, Sales Director. 

Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Copyright 1962 by Macfadden- 
Bartell Corporation. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Convention and International 
Copyright Convention. Copyright reserved under Pan American Copyright Convention. Title trademark registered 
in U.S. Patent Office. Printed in U.S.A. Member of Macfadden Women's Group. 




Dr. Margaret Mead, noted authority on human relations, says, Every WOItiail 

who lives with the loneliness of her own emotional 
problems will want to read this understanding book." 




AVAILABLE N0W...0NLY FROM PUREX...AND FOR ONLY 25* 



Every woman will want to read this book! If 

you feel overwhelmed at times with the problems 
you face as a woman, a wife, a mother — reading 
this book will be like discovering a new friend 
who really understands you. Because this book 
brings out into the open the fears, the frustra- 



With a recognizable portion of any Purex package or label 

tions, the heartaches every woman must live with 
in our complex contemporary society. Based on 
the award-winning Purex TV Specials for Women, 
this book distills actual case histories, intimate 
conversations with many women. This is a book 
you just can't afford not to read ! 



SPECIAL FOR WOMEN 

P.O. Box No. 82, New York 46, N. Y. 

Enclosed is 25£ and a recognizable portion from a 
Purex product package or label. 

Please send my personal copy of 
"SPECIAL FOR WOMEN" 

NAME 



ADDRESS- 
CITY 




You'll find the Woman's Touch in every Purex product 



ZONE. 



.STATE. 



©1962, PUREX CORPORATION LTD. 
LAKEWOOD. CALIFORNIA 





/or x>\ 



A Dancing Start 

/ would like to know something about 
Sheila James, the young actress who 
appears as Zelda on the "Dobie Gillis" 
show. 

V.A.B., Toms River, N.J. 

Although she has become well known 
in the past few years as the man- 
chasing, nose-wiggling Zelda on "The 
Dobie Gillis Show," Sheila James has 
actually been acting since the age of 
seven. Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Sheila 
moved to Los Angeles at the age of 
two and began taking dancing lessons 
at seven. Impressed with her talent, her 
instructor sent Sheila to be interviewed 
by Penny Singleton for her new radio 
show. She got the part and scored a hit. 
While appearing on the road, the young 
actress was chosen for the role of 
Jackie on the Stu and June Erwin show, 
"The Trouble with Father." The part 
lasted five years. ... In addition to her 
running part on "Dobie Gillis," Sheila 
has appeared on "General Electric 
Theater," "My Little Margie" and "The 
Loretta Young Show," among others. 
. . . Sheila lives at home with her par- 
ents and teen-aged sister Jeri Lou, who 
is also an actress. In her spare time, 
Sheila writes novels and poetry, swims, 
plays tennis and the guitar. — Ed. 



Some Quickies 



Could you please tell me the birth- 
date of Dorothy Pr ovine? 

A.E., Bear Creek, N.C. 

She was born on January 20, 1937. 
—Ed. 

Please tell me if Betsy Palmer's hus- 
band is a doctor or a dentist. 

B.N., Reading, Mass. 
Her husband is an obstetrician. — Ed. 

Where was Dick Van Dyke born? 

A.F., Potter sville, Mo. 



He was born in West Plains, Mis- 
souri, and reared in Danville, 111. — Ed. 

How tall is Grant Williams? 

L.D., Rochester, N.Y. 
He is 6'1" tall.— Ed. 

Is Leslie Nielsen married? 

D.G., Sand Creek, Mich. 
He is married and has a two-year-old 
daughter. — Ed. 



a sj Dear Dick 

For all those readers who have writ- 
ten requesting information as to where 
they can write young Dr. Kildare, here 
is his studio address: 

Dick Chamberlain 
c/o NBC-TV Studios 
3000 West Alameda 
Burbank, Calif. 



Theme Songs 



IS ML SI 

For those readers who are especially 
interested, here is a list of the theme 
songs of some of the popular CBS-TV 
programs: 

Art Linkletter's House Party — "You" 
Captain Kangaroo — "Puffin Billy" 
Danny Thomas Show — "Londonderry 

Air" 
Garry Moore Show — "Thanks for Drop- 
ping By" 
Ichabod and Me— "Girl I Left Behind 

Me" 
Jack Benny Program — "Love in Bloom" 
Red Skelton Show— "Holiday for 

Strings" and "Our Waltz" 
Tell It to Groucho— "Groucho's Pad" 
Your Surprise Package — "Tick Tac 

Toe" 
The Brighter Day— "Prism" 
CBS Reports — "Appalachian Spring" 
Ed Sullivan Show — "There's No Busi- 
ness Like Show Business" 



Father Knows Best — "Waiting" 
Frontier Circus — "Frontier Circus 

March" 
G-E College Bowl — "Hurry Hurry 

Hurry" and "Second Elizabeth" 
The Guiding Light — "Romance" 
Ted Mack and the Original Amateur 

Hour — "Hurry Up and Wait" and 

"Stand By" 



Calling All Fans 



IS JUL si 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write to 
address given — not to TV Radio Mirror. 

Buddy Merrill Fan Club, Bill Sum- 
mers, 8815 E. Ivanhoe Rd., Indian- 
apolis 19, Indiana. 

James Shigeta Fan Club, Christina 
Schoblocher, 2951 N. Clark St., Chicago 
14, Illinois. 

The Lettermen Fan Club, Joyce Stan- 
ley, 140 S. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, 
California. 

Peter Brown Fan Club, Jean White, 
2112 Morning Glory, Fort Worth, Texas. 



An Inspiring Piece 

Thank you very much for publishing 
the poem, "Thou Shalt Not Fear," from 
Bud Collyer's book. This is one of the 
most inspiring pieces I have read in a 
long time. 

May I mention that this poem was 
read the other day to my husband, who 
had fust lost a dear aunt, and it made 
him feel so much better. 

This poem has meant so much to 
both of us that it has been cut out of 
your magazine, framed, and is now 
hanging in the living rom of our apart- 
ment. 

C.D.C., St. Catharines, Ontario 



Write to Information Booth, TV Radio Mirror 
205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. We regret 
we cannot answer or return unpublished letters. 




MACFADDEN BOOKS FOR ENTERTAINING... 
STIMULATING.. .INFORMATIVE READING 




BORN FREE 75$ 

The story of Elsa the 
lioness who bridged the 
gap between man and 
the jungle. The number 
one best seller of 1960. 
Contains all 116 pic- 
tures that were in the 
original hard-bound. 




A MACFADDEN 
BOOK of CROSS- 
WORDS AND 
PUZZLES 35$ 

Macfadden original. 
Crosswords, acrostics, 
cryptograms, word 
chains and diagramless 
puzzles plus a host of 
others — all of them 
challenging. 




SKYLINE 60$ 

Gene Fowler's last book 
recalls a happy-go- 
lucky reporter's life in 
New York during the 
Roaring Twenties. Over 
18 weeks on the New 
York Times best seller 
list. 



The Flr*t bo« 

Complete Bi£!#r»pfay 

of Britain's 
BAguttiiig Pr-f rn?e*6 

a* 




princess 

Margaret 

by Alice Hope 



PRINCESS 
MARGARET 50$ 

A story that gets be- 
yond the pomp and 
pageantry of the public 
life of Princess Mar- 
garet, and really shows 
the private personality 
of one of the most vivid 
and endearing royal 
figures of our time. 



M3 



These Of her Macfadden Books 
Are Also Available . . . 




CAN-OPENER 
COOKBOOK 60$ 

Mouth-watering dishes 
prepared in a minimum 
of time. Easy-to-follow 
instructions for making 
delicious meals so that 
you will have time to 
be with your guests. 




AMERICA— TOO 
YOUNG TO DIE 50$ 

Stark, brutal facts about 
America's true military 
strength and capacity 
for survival, revealed 
by Major A. P. de Sev- 
ersky, whose amazing 
prophecies have warned 
us before of perils fac- 
ing the nation. 



1 



W PKAR 

SIGN 



FEAR SIGN 50$ 

An Albert Campion mys- 
tery by an author con- 
sidered to be one of the 
very best in her field. 
A lost earldom, a dis- 
appearing crown, and 
a vast estate — these 
were the only clues. 




IT'S A RACKET 50$ 

This original book tells 
how over 150 swindles 
are operated. It covers 
such swindlers as the 
ones who offer you 
marvelous bargains . . . 
cures for loneliness or 
arthritis . . . repairs of 
all kinds. 



GIANT HOBBY HANDBOOK by Dorothy Goodwill 40* 

BERLIN EMBASSY by William Russell 500 

NORA WAS A NURSE by Peggy Gaddis 35* 

THE TRUTH ABOUT 

THE JOHN BIRCH SOCIETY by Richard Vahan 500 

HOW TO GET MORE 

FOR YOUR MONEY by Sylvia Porter 50* 

SUZUKI BEANE by Scoppettone & Fitzhugh 35* 

On Sale Now Wherever Paperback Books Are Sold ... or Mail Coupon Today 



Macfadden Books wg-7«2 

205 E. 42nd St.. New York 17, N. Y. 

Please send me the following books: 

Born Free (75«) Giant Hobby Handbook (40<) _ 

Skyline (60<) Nora Was A Nurse (35«) 

Fear Sign (50«) Berlin Embassy (50«) 

Can-Opener Cookbook (60«) The Truth About 

Crosswords and Puzzles (35«| The John Birch Society (50«) 

Princess Margaret (50<) How To Get More 

It's a Racket (50<) For Your Money (50«) 

America — Too Young to Die |50«) Suzuki Beane (35«) 

Name 



Address 
City ... 



State. 



(Please Print) 



Go West, Young Man: Memo to 
Robert Reed of "The Defenders" In 
New York: You may be Interested to 
know that a filmtown lovely, Carol 
Byron by name, has turned down oh- 
so-many dates on Saturday night, just 
to ogle nobody but you on TV. Says 
Carol, "We met when Bob came to 
Hollywood on a p.a. tour, and I'm 
hoping he comes again soon." . . . Sultry 
Ava Gardner, in Hollywood for a 
film, "twisting" from one date to an- 
other. Seeing the barefoot Ava on a 
dance floor is worth any cover charge. 
. . . Eyeful Sharon Hugueny is all 
eyes for Alan Pakula, young U-l pro- 
ducer. . . . Martha Raye's new beau, 
Bob Gallagher, tours with her in 
"Wildcat," as it makes the rounds. 



&M (jooki 

TV fioJjJD f^d)VlO>L 

oil ike, 'KeuJs —fbdkl 

by EUNICE FIELD 



Very Fair Exchange: 
Amy Fields, some- 
time date of Dick 
Chamberlain, has 

been playing the role 
of a Spanish exchange 
student on "The Brighter 
Day" and has been getting 
mucho fan mail in that Ian 
guage. Bostonian Amy no 
habla Espaiiol ... so 
she enlisted a linguist 
gal-pal to help her 
answer such letters 
in purest Castilian 
... on the promise of 
wangling a date for her 
with Dr. Kildare himself! 






A Case in Brief: If you want to give 
Roz Russell a gift, don't make it a 
briefcase. On the set of Warner Bros.' 
"Gypsy," Roz explained, "I did too 
many shows as a career woman lugging 
a briefcase. Since winding up my con- 
tract, I've never carried one of those 
symbols of monotony, on or off the 
screen." . . . Natalie Wood, who 
plays Gypsy Rose Lee, screened sev- 
eral films of the strip queen as home- 
work for her role. "You know," she told 
producer Mervyn LeRoy, "watching 
that Lee girl walk, I'm sure she was 
born with a built-in Twist."." . . . New 
"Have Gun' album features Johnny 
Western, composer of Paladin's theme 
song. . . . Are Dodie Stevens and Vic 
Damone singing for each other??? 




Like Too Troo, Man: TV's been 
slapped for being "too sexy" and 
"too bloody." Now they're griping 
it's "too true." Ernie Borgnine's role 
in "McHale's Men," due for fall 
showing, is said to be "hitting too 
close" to the most famous PT-boat 
skipper in the world, President Ken- 
nedy. Sez Ernie, " 'Tain't so, but it 
can't hurt the series, so let 'em yap." 
. . . Another Ernie is finding TV hit- 
ting close to home. Officer Ernie 
Gunther of Reseda, California — now 
assigned to Patrol Car 54 — has be- 
come the butt of precinct gagsters 
His radio no longer bleats "Calling 
Car 54," but "Car 54, Where Are 
You?" What's worse: One cop in TV's 
54 is also named Gunther (Toody)! 



Joan O'Brien — who 

really suffers from 
claustrophobia — 
was locked in a closet 
for fifteen minutes by 
Jerry Lewis, during the 
filming of his new movie, 
"It's Only Money." Upon 
emerging, Joan gasped, 
"How could you, Jer?" 
The comic said airily 
"Don't squawk — I just 
shrunk your head for 
free!" Joan pond- 
ered this analysis for 
a moment, then said, 
"You're right, so I'll take 
you to lunch — for a fee 



Curing A Ham: Feeling chipper 
again, George Maharis tells this on 
himself. "When they said it was the 
flu, I hollered for Dr. Kildare. When 
they found it was hepatitis, I yelled 
for Ben Casey. But when I heard 
Marty Milner would star by himself 
in the 'Route 66Y I'd be missing, I 
howled, 'Get me my pants and a 
taxi!' ". . . Rita Moreno, flying from 
the Manila set of "To Be a Man" to 
Japan for TV spec: "First an Oscar, 
then the Orient — just call me Happy!" 



Fair's Fare: The gamut of show busi- 
ness can be found at Seattle's World 
Fair. It has nudies, ice shows, ballet, 
opera, science and industrial exhibits, 
exciting rides, concerts, and a sky 
restaurant with revolving view of lakes 
and snowcapped peaks. But there's 
still no sight like a Hollywood pre 
miere — or a Broadway knight striding, 
lady on arm, into "Camelot." Busiest 
playwright is Edward Albee, with 
three new ones in the oven. . . . Eighth 
Annual "Genii" Award from radio and 
TV women of Southern California wenf 
to lovely and loved Spring Byington. 
. . . It pays to advertise? Robert <J>. 
Lewis bills himself as "the worst disc 
jockey in the world." Mm? . . . Troy 
Donahue to be an "Hawaiian Eye"? 



f( 



Rhinestones in the Rough: Vivian 
Vance — who said she wouldn't — did! 
She'll be back on TV, this fall, in a 
new Desilu series starring her pal Lu- 
cille Ball (seen at right with hus- 
band Gary Morton, strictly off TV). 
. . . Brags Jack Bailey, "Sure, 'Queen 
for a Day' has sob stories — but we can 
swap jolces with the best of them." . . . 
"Domestic differences," say Pat But- 
tram, on Radio KNX, "are much easier 
to iron out when they are dampened 
with tears." . . . Chic Myrna Fahey 
chirps, "I adore floral hats. When I'm 
tired of wearing them, I put them in 
a vase." . . . Some talking-horse sense 
from Mr. Ed: "That Connie Hines 
(who plays Alan Young's wife on the 
show) is the sweetest filly on TV!" 




Public post office: Gary & Lucy. 



Whacks Works: One of our younger 
generation, visiting Movieland's Wax 
Museum, shook her puzzled head at 
the figures of such old-time stars as 
Harry Carey, William S. Hart, 
Mary Pickford and Marie Dressier. 
"Who are they?" she said. "They're 
just a bunch of wax candles to me." 
The lass was shook-up plenty when, 
over his shoulder, Jeff Morrow 
snapped, "These candles once lit up 
a world of darknes and set men's hearts 
on fire." . . . Mike Connors — no 
longer walking that "Tightrope" — 
will reach the "Turning Point" of his 
career with his Screen Gems series. . . . 
A model family is Norma Zimmer's 
— mother was a Powers gal, sis and 
brother are both top-flight models. 






7m) r 



Star Stuff: Flash bulbs made Shelley 
Winters blink — actually, she's anything 
but blind to Ty Hardin's charms . . . 
even more excited about her dates with 
the handsome Bronco than about tak- 
ing over Bette Davis's role in the Broad- 
way hit, "The Night of the Iguana." 
Dramatic as all get-out — any way you 
look at it. . . . Petite young Davey 
Davison from Norfolk, Virginny — only 
three months in Hollywood — racking up 
TV credits like there's never gonna be 
no tomorrow . . . Keenan Wynn shed 
20 pounds for "Target: The Corrupt- 
ers". . . . Hope Holliday slimmed to 
102 .. . and Dick Boone — who once 
weighed in at 210 for "Have Gun" — 
is now down to 190, aiming for 180. 




Newsome twosome: Shelley & Ty. 



Multiplication Doesn't Mean Division: 
When David Janssen — alias Richard 
Diamond, etc. — was mobbed by fe- 
male fans, an astonished spectator 
turned to Dave's lovely wife, Ellie, and 
asked, "Aren't you jealous?" Ellie's 
spur-of-the-moment reply was a bit of 
star-wife wisdom. "One-plus-one," she 
said, "is a matter for jealousy — but not 
a hundred-times-one." . . . Burt Met- 
calfe, handsome groom in "Father of 
the Bride," met one female fan with 
unexpectedly devastating results. A 
lady motorist stopped alongside Burt's 
brand-new car, yelled, "Hi, Buckleyl" 
— and enthusiastically banged her um- 
brella on top of his convertible. Left 
a right good-sized gash in the roof. 






<- 






Has the Kookie Krumbled? Already 
feuding with the press — who helped 
boost him starward before he got top- 
heavy and began giving them a hard 
time — Edd Byrnes has now taken to 
speeding. He must face a jury trial to 
save his license from being lifted. . . . 
CBS-TV will go for 90 minutes of 
curves on July 14th — the Miss Uni- 
verse Pageant. . . . Rip Torn, done 
with "Gypsy," back East to give his 
all to Actors' Studio, whose fall plans 
include TV and Broadway. . . . Sylvia 
Fine (Mrs. Danny Kaye) going with 
a Broadway musical of "The Scarlet 
Pimpernel." . . . Sid Caesar's nine 
half-hour specials will by-pass Imo- 
gene Coca and Nanette Fabray. 
He'll husband an all-new team. 




Full speed ahead: Edd & his Asa. 



Once Upon A Time: There was a 
fisher boy who loved a tailor gal and 
decided to marry her. All his friends 
said, "Don't! A fisher boy and a tailor 
gal can't live happily in one place." 
But the fisher boy said, "There is a 
place where we can be happy — it's 
called Switzerland." Then the tailor 
gal said, "I'd be losing my burtons to 
go there." And she left the poor fisher 
boy. So he went back to Hollywood 
and bought a house on Edelweiss Drive 
where he can nurse his broken heart. 
The strangest part of the story: Edel- 
weiss is the national flower of Switzer- 
land, where the fisher boy once hoped 
to be happy. But the tailor gal isn't 
happy, either. Still trying to hold on to 
her burtons. (Please turn the page) 




ofmm 
youiegoifig 

onyout , 
wafloni. 




I 



PERMANENT DARKENED 

FOR LASHES AND BROWS 

• the ideal vacation-time 
eye make-up! 

• ifitisn'tSWIMPROOF 




Swim all day, dance the night away, shower 
at will, "Dark-Eyes" gives your eyes a natural, 
BORN BEAUTIFUL loveliness all day, all night, 
'round the clock ! Avoids looking "featureless" 
and washed-out at the beach ! 

Carefree "Dark-Eyes" really isSWIMPROOF! 
Soap-and-waterproof! Water makes mascara 
run, but "Dark-Eyes" never runs, smudges, 
or washes off. Ends all the bother of daily eye 
make-up . . . goes on once, STAYS-ON four 
to five WEEKS until lashes and brows are 
normally replaced by new hairs. 

"Dark-Eyes" permanently colors., .doesn't 
coat. It is never sticky, heavy, obviously 
"made-up" . . . always soft, dark, luxuriant 
and refined-looking! It is simple to apply, 
pleasant to use and goes on in the wink of 
an eyelash! Stays on all thru your vacation. 

"Dark-Eyes" is completely SAFE, use with 
confidence. Contains no aniline dye. 

Three shades: 
jet black, rich 
brown and 
light brown, 
•(for the hairs to 
which applied) 





continued 



Field's Choice: Male TV personali- 
ties wearing knee-length stretch socks, 
'instead of exposing "droopies" to the 
camera. . . . Inflation note: Famed 
Schwab's, where unemployed actors 
could sip a ten-cent cup of Java while 
waiting for the big break, now has a 
"counter charge" of 35 cents mini- 
mum at peak hours. . . . Hal Roach 
Jr. filed for bankruptcy. Once owner 
of the busiest TV lot here, Hal dis- 
closed his 1961 earnings were a mere 
$2500. He owes Charlie Farrell and 
Gale Storm over $100,000 each, on 
contracts. . . . An old Roman law, 
which says an engagement ring is 
merely a symbol of troth, forced Zsa 
Zsa Gabor to return Hal Hayes' 
{diamond — but Ann Miller kept hers. 






)W r 




The Conrads have reason to beam. 



Diane McBain salutes hero Quinn. 



<r-m +-m 



j ///// 



Eavesdroppings: After saving for 
seven years, Bob and Joan Conrad 

getting "our dream house." The hill 
lot, a hop from Clark Gable's Encino 
home, was cleared by Bob and pals. 
While they were grading, a neighbor 
drove up and chirped, "We hear a Lig 
TV star's gonna move in here — great!" 
Bare-waisted and masked with mud, 
Bob asked, "Why — you a fan of Con- 
rad's?" "Naw," said the neighbor, 
"but he'll raise property values here- 
abouts." ... Of "Saints and Sinners," 
Nick Adams gets 50 percent. John 
Larkin plays editor to Nick's repor- 
ter. . . . How does pert Brenda Scott 
— often seen in "Hazel" — feel about 
Fabian? She struggles out of bed at 
5 a.m. to go horseback riding with him! 



Medicine Show: The Roscoe of "It 
Sunset Strip," Louis Quinn, can't bear 
the sight of blood. Says Christine 
Nelson, his actress-spouse, "He 
fainted while getting the blood test 
for our marriage license, and now he 
runs when I whip out a needle to darn 
his socks." . . . Scott Brady is allergic 
to hosses and had to get shots during 
the shooting of "Shotgun Slade." . . j 
Earl Holliman, a rodeo champ in' 
NBC-TV's new fall series, "Wide 
Country," has a clause in his contract 
stating his workday must end by 5:45 
— so he can make his daily trip to Us 
analyst. . . . That's the voice of Sam 
JafFe himself you hear intoning TV's 
most profound opening: "Man . . . worn 
an . . . birth . . . death . . . infinity." 



Person to Person: Every agent told 
Doris Day she'd never get Monty 
Clift as her co-star ... so Doris put 
through her own call to Munich — 
where Cliffs doing "Freud"— and 
cooed, "Why haven't we done a pic- 
ture together?" Always in character, 
Monty retorted, "So you won't get a 
complex — let's!" . . . When Laurence 
Harvey first saw the ads for "A Walk 
on the Wild Side," he snorted, "They 
warned me I'd be lost among such 
lovely girls — but it seems the black 
cat has stolen the spotlight from all 
of us." . . . These movie people would 
really get complexes on TV, where 
female-impersonating dogs and talk- 
ing horses have the whole show named 
after them — and get most of the mail! 




"Blackie" Knight and Ed Begley. 



Convertible Blonde: Shirley Knight 

dons a black wig for "Caesar and 
Cleopatra" at Vancouver (B.C.) art 
festival. . . . Reports from Blinstrub's 
in Boston prove The Lennon Sisters 
are no show-biz "lemons" in their first 
nitery stint. An S.R.O. opening night 
and 8,000 patrons — at $5 minimum — 
all week. Father Bill, who devised the 
act, says this may start the girls on a 
new and profitable career phase. . . . 
Waiting for the day every American 
home has a color-TV set? Five of seven 
Los Angeles channels will be color- 
casting in the fall. Prices for sets ex- 
pected to drop as programs increase 
— we say hopefully. . . . From Rose 
Marie: "Never slap a child in the 
face — there's a place for everything." 




Married women 
are sharing this secret 

... the new, easier, surer protection 
for those most intimate marriage problems 



What a blessing to be able to trust in 
the wonderful germicidal protection Nor- 
forms can give you. Norforms have a 
highly perfected new formula that re- 
leases antiseptic and germicidal ingre- 
dients with long-lasting action. The 
exclusive new base melts at body tem- 
perature, forming a powerful protec- 
tive film that guards (but will not 
harm) the delicate tissues. 

And Norforms' deodorant protection 
has been tested in a hospital clinic 



and found to be more effective than 
anything it had ever used. Norforms 
eliminate (rather than cover up) embar- 
rassing odors, yet have no "medicine" 
or "disinfectant" odor themselves. 

And what convenience/ These small 
feminine suppositories are so easy to 
use. Just insert— no apparatus, mixing 
or measuring. They're greaseless and 
they keep in any climate. 

Available in packages of 6, 12 and 
24. Also available in Canada. 



Tested by doctors . . . 
trusted by women . . . 
proved in hospital clinics 



FEMININE SUPPOSITORIES 

Norforms 



FREE informative Norforms booklet 

Just mail this coupon to Dept.RT-27 
Norwich Pharmacal Co., Norwich, N.Y. 

Please send me the new Norforms 
& booklet, in a plain envelope. 



Name. 
Street- 
City — 



(PLEASE PPIN7) 



_Zone State- 



A NORWICH PRODUCT 




"What do we learn from . . 



...Adam and Eve?" 

"If a naughty girl tempts you to do something bad 
don't do it while God is watching." 



When Art Linkletter asks the questions, kids say 
the darndest things! (So do the grown-ups 
who join him in other fun and games.) Catch them 
all, every weekday, on radio's "House Party 
And while you're at it, enjoy radio's other 
top personalities— Arthur Godfrey, Garry Moore 
Rosemary Clooney and Bing— as one great show 
follows another every weekday morning on 



... 



■ w 



\1 . 




..Jonah and the Whale?" 

"People make whales sick." 



..David and Goliath?" 



"Duck!" 



CBS RADIO STATIONS: Alabama Birmingham WATV, Gadsden WAAX, Mobile WKRG, Montgomery WCOV, Selma WGWC. Tuscumbia WVNA Arizona Phoenix KOOL, Tucson KOLD Arkansas El Dorado KELO. Fori Smith KFPW, Little 
Rock KTHS California Bakersfield KERN, Chico KHSL, Eureka KINS, Fresno KFRE, Los Angeles KNX, Modeslo KBEE, Palm Springs KCMJ, Redding KVCV, Sacramenlo KFBK, San Diego KFMB. San Francisco KCBS Colorado 
Colorado Springs KVOR, Denver KLZ, Grand Junction KREX Connecticut Harlford-Manchester WINF, Waterbury WBRY District of Columbia Washington WTOP Florida Fori Myers WINK, Jacksonville WMBR, Miami 
WKAT, Orlando WDBO, Pcnsacola WDEB, St. Augustine WFOY, Sarasota WSPB, Tallahassee WTNT, Tampa WDAE, West Palm Beach WJNO Georgia Albany WGPC, Athens WGAU, Atlanta WYZE, Augusta WRDW, 
Columbus WRBL, Gainesville WGGA, Macon WMAZ, Rome WRGA, Savannah WTOC, Thomasville WPAX Idaho Boise KBOI, Idaho Falls KID Illinois Champaign WDWS, Chicago WBBM, Danville WDAN. Decatur WSOY, 
Peoria WMBD, Ouincy WTAD, Rock Island WHBF, Springfield WTAX Indiana Anderson WHBU, Fort Wayne WANE, Indianapolis WISH, Kokomo WIOU, Marion WMRI. Muncie WLBC, South Bend WSBT, Terre Haute WTHI 
Iowa Cedar Rapids WMT, Des Moines KRNT, Mason City KGLO, Oltumwa KBIZ Kansas Topeka WIBW, Wichita KFH Kentucky Ashland WCMI, Hopkinsville WHOP, Lexington WVLK, Louisville WKYW, Owensboro WOMI, 
Paducah WPAD Louisiana New Orleans WWL, Shreveport KCIJ Maine Portland WGAN Maryland Baltimore WCBM, Cumberland WCUM, Frederick WFMD, Hagerstown WARK Massachusetts Boston WEEI. Pittsfield WBRK, 
Springfield WMAS, Worcester WNEB Michigan Adrian WABJ, Bad Axe WLEW, Grand Rapids WJEF, Kalamazoo WKZO, Lansing WJIM, Port Huron WHLS, Saginaw WSGW Minnesota Duluth KDAL, Minneapolis WCCO 
Mississippi Meridian WCOC Missouri Joplin KODE, Kansas City KCMO, St. Louis KMOX. Springfield KTTS Montana Billings KOOK, Butte KBOW, Missoula KGVO Nebraska Omaha WOW, Scottsbluff KOLT 
Nevada Las Vegas KLUC New Hampshire Keenc WKNE, Laconia WEMJ New Jersey Atlantic City WFPG New Mexico Albuquerque KGGM. Santa Fe KVSF New York Albany WROW, Binghamton WNBF, Buffalo WBEN. 
Elmira WELM, Gloversville WENT, Ithaca WHCU, Kingston WKNY, New York WCBS, Pittsburgh WEAV, Rochester WHEC. Syracuse WHEN, Utica WIBX, Walertown WWNY North Carolina Ashev.lle WWNC, Charlotte 
WBT, Durham WDNC, Fayettevillc WFAI. Greensboro WBIG. Greenville WGTC North Dakota Grand Forks KILO Ohio Akron WADC. Cincinnati WKRC, Columbus WBNS, Dayton WHIO. Portsmouth WPAY. 
Youngstown WKBN Oklahoma Oklahoma Cily-Norman WNAD, Tulsa KRMG Oregon Eugene KERG, Klamath Falls KFLW. Medford KYJC, Portland KOIN. Roseburg KRNR Pennsylvania Altoona WVAM. DuBois WCED, 
Erie WLEU, Harrisburg WHP, Indiana WDAD, Johnstown WARD, Philadelphia WCAU, Pitlsburgh-McKeesport WEDO, Reading WHUM. Scranton WG3I, State College WRSC, Sunoury WKOK, Un.ontown WMBS, William 
WWPA Rhode Island Providence WEAN South Carolina Anderson WAIM, Charleston WCSC, Columbia-Cayce WCAY. Greenville WMRB, Spartanburg WSPA South Dakota Rap.d City KOTA, Yankton WNAX Tennessee Chat- 
tanooga WDOD, Cookeville WHUB, Johnson City WJCW, Knoxville WNOX, Memphis WREC, Nashville WLAC Texas Austin KTBC, Corpus Christi KSIX, Dallas KRLD. El Paso KIZZ, Harhngen KGBT, Houston KTRH. Lubbock 
KFYO, San Antonio KENS. Texarkana KOSY, Wichita Falls KWFT Utah Cedar City KSUB, Salt Lake City KSL Vermont Barre WSNO, Bratileboro WKVT Virginia Norfolk WTAR. Richmond WRNL. Roanoke WDBJ Washington 
Seattle KIRO, Spokane KGA West Virginia Beckley WJLS, Charleston WCHS, Fairmont WMHN, Parkersburg WPAR, Wheeling WWVA Wisconsin Green 5ay W8AY, Madison WKOW, Milwaukee WM'l Wyoming Casper KTWO. 



Begging Jack's Paar-don. . . . 
But Johnny Carson will success- 
fully succeed him. 

That's my prophecy about how 
Carson'll make out, taking over 
the "Tonight" show this fall. 
Johnny's a funnier guy, strictly 
as a comedian; he could be a new 
Will Rogers. Johnny's "weak- 
ness" is that he's not hot-tem- 
pered and given to making violent 
attacks on people. The frequently- 



uttered comment around Madison 
Avenue among those who dont 
expect him to be a satisfactory 
successor to Jack Paar is: "He's 
too nice a guy . . . he'd be better 
if he were more of a heel." 

First, to set the record straight, 
Paar has never been against Car- 
son taking over for him. Paar was 
for Carson. 

A year ago there was a rumor 
that Paar wouldn't use Carson 



on the Paar show because he 
thought Carson overshadowed 
him. 

"That can't be true," Johnny 
told me. "Because he has used me 
and I have subbed for him. Fur- 
thermore, Paar told me that he 
thought I was the one who should 
replace him when he leaves!" 

So Paar was in Johnny's camp 
ahead of nearly everybody. 

Grinning, easygoing, relaxed, 



■■:■: ..■ 



EARL 



•' 




.ffi-'/ft; 


:'■: ■ :^ 


m 




»*-*y;-: 




Wk 


*;<M 


•&"..a- 


■ 


il*xj'% 


///': 






■'. ..,. 


aIi 




■ ■. . . 




WILSON'S 



:;ifei 



: 7 



~y'-rM«. 




Another TV Radio Mirror Exclusive ! Another TV Radio Mirror bonus ! Beginning 
this month-and every month from now on-the scoopiest column in any magazine ! 



12 



accustomed to sitting around 
Sardi's having a drink, not above 
having a date with a young beauty 
(his marriage is broken up) , 
Carson's no controversialist. Peo- 
ple will not be watching him hop- 
ing to see somebody get massacred. 

The fact that he couldn't im- 
mediately take over for Paar is in 
his favor. Paar will have been 
off the "Tonight" show long 
enough that Carson'll escape some 
of the comparison that — regard- 
less of his show — would have gone 
against him just because people 
generally want the old, estab- 
lished product. 

Being "Mr. Nice Guy" worked 
pretty well for Perry Como. I 
say something approaching that 
will also work for Carson. 

There's a magic to that "To- 
night" show — due to the hour and 
the regularity. 

Don't forget that Steve Allen 
was gigantic when he was doing 
it. It was he who "changed the 
sleeping habits of the nation." It 
was Allen who "kept more people 
awake than coffee." Look at the 
stars Steve Allen made on his 




Kim Novak tells me she's changed 
her mind. Her "no" is now a "yes." 



show: Steve Lawrence, Eydie 
Gorme and Tom Poston, for 

example. And before Allen, there 
was Jerry Lester with the old 
"Broadway Open House." That 
program made Dagmar famous. 
It was only when they left that 



show that they had trouble. Not 
that I think Jack Paar will have 
trouble. He's going to be ingenious 
enough to keep the excitement, 
the battling, the blood-letting 
raging, even though on the air 
only once a week. That talent — 
for excitement — is the one that 
Jack possesses probably in great- 
er abundance than anybody on the 
TV scene . . . and the one that 
Johnny Carson lacks. 

Don't Print That! Though 
some friends of Lucille Ball have 
urged her to build husband Gary 
Morton into "another Desi 
Arnaz" on TV, he doesn't seem 
to want to do it. Fact is, there was 
a TV series available at Desilu Stu- 
dios for Gary, but he preferred 
not to get involved in any possi- 
ble conflicts with Desi. . . . One 
of the most brilliant TV careers 
right now is menaced by booze. 
. . . Jackie Gleason's still able 
to give some orders at CBS. When 
Jackie was working on his new 
show for the fall, between golf 
games at Palm Springs, CBS an- 
nounced it adored the new format 
and said: {Please turn the page) 



Johnny will need those muscles to take Paar's place. 



Glenn s away, Connie plays — here, with Bob Logan. 





T 
V 

I 



13 



EARL T± WILSON'S 




continued 



"Come back to New York and get 
to work on it at CBS." Jackie re- 
plied, "Send CBS down here and 
I can still play golf." CBS did 
send a squadron of writers, etc., 
and in that luxurious locale Jackie 
worked. . . . Some people think 
there's too much sex on TV, but 
Frank Sinatra thinks there isn't 
enough. 

Phil Harris loves to discuss 
the greatness of Jack Benny, for 
whom he worked for so long. He 
just remembered how Benny once 
told him, "Phil, I can't work for 
Jell-0 for another season. I have 
to go with somebody else." 

"You have to leave Jell-O!" ex- 
claimed Harris. "I thought they 
liked you and that you were sell- 
ing a lot of their product." 

"That's it," groaned Jack. "I 
am. They can't make it fast 
enough." 

Whatever happened to Liber- 
ace? He's coming back to TV 
in the fall — so he says — with his 
own half-hour show, like the old 
show "only more elaborate," per- 
haps with more candelabras or 
bigger sequins. "You don't an- 
nounce anything till you have 
everything down in black-and- 
white," he says mysteriously. 
Actually, Liberace has done him- 
self a lot of good in show busi- 
ness circles with his current night- 
club act. It's corny, hokey, and 
overdressed with all those real 
diamonds — but it's sensational en- 
tertainment. 

Wish I could ad lib like Garry 
Moore. He and Durward Kirby 



were running through a sketch 
when Kirby accidentally ripped 
his costume pants in the seat. 
"And I always thought he was too 
old for the draft," said Garry. 

Before the show, Garry chats 
with the audience. One tourist 
called out from the rear, "Why are 
you so dressed up tonight?" Garry 
said: "Well, in case I drop dead, 
I'll be ready for the undertaker." 

Some of those ordinary-looking 
folks- on the Mitch Miller sing- 
along (which is moving from 
Thursday at ten to Friday at 
8:30) have nice little bankrolls 
now. The average singer on the 
show is good for $25,000 to 
$30,000 a year, with records, com- 
mercials, etc., added. And one of 
the singers hiked his income to 
$90,000— he played the stock 
market. 

Quite an independent kid, that 
Connie Stevens. When I talked 
to her about her negotiations for 
a "Route 66," she said, "The trou- 
ble is, I find it so hard to believe 
those people. I hear one of the 
first scripts is a bomb. . . ." 

And she went back to chatting 
with some of her chums from 
Brooklyn who'd dropped into the 
Essex House to talk about all sorts 
of other things. 

Kim Novak, who once had 
some aversions to doing TV, says 
she no longer feels that way, and 
tells me she'd do some dramatic 
things if she found the right ones. 
"But there's no point in me going 
on the Ed Sullivan show," she said. 
"After all, I don't sing or dance." 

They're telling a story about 
Timi Yuro that you'll probably 
hear again and again. Just about 
a year ago, the little gal with the 
big voice had spinal meningitis. 
Doctors thought she'd never walk 
again. She surely proved them 
wrong. Anyway, the pint-sized 
one, who turned out the hit tune, 
"Hurt," had just met Frank 
Sinatra, who stared at her for a 
moment, then walked slowly 
around her. 




Next month: Exclusive story on 
D. Chamberlain and his Clara! 



"What're you looking for?" 
somebody asked Frank. 

"For the plug," said Frank. 
"She's gotta be plugged in some- 
where. No one has that big a voice 
naturally." 

You didn't hear much about it 
but Mahalia Jackson injured a 
foot in an auto accident. They 
arranged a special platform for 
her when she did the Ed Sullivan 
show. Sullivan made an amusing 
slip of the tongue when he told the 
audience, "Mahalia last year had 
an audition with Pope John." 
He meant an "audience," he ex- 
plained later. 

Teresa Brewer wouldn't allow 
her eleven-year-old daughter to 
wear high heels to the studio 
to watch her mother perform. 
"Heavens," exclaimed Teresa — 
who's anywhere from four-feet- 
eleven to five-feet-one, depending 
on her mood — "then she'd be big- 
ger than I am." 

(In an interview with us, 
Teresa revealed that her head's 
bigger than her waist. "And I am 
not a big head," she insisted.) 

Otto Preminger got badly 
miffed when doing the "Calendar" 



14 



show because he was cut off the 
air just as he was about to make 
his point. His speech had run 
overlong and off he went. 

"Why didn't you have one of 
those fellows stand in back of the 
camera and give me the zzzltttt 
(running his finger across his 
neck, signal for the cutoff) when 
time was running out?" Otto de- 
manded. Everybody apologized, 
he was asked to tape some more 
material for next day's show, but 
Otto shook his head and insisted 
there should have been a zzzltttt. 

Shelley Fabares, the flouncy 
youngster on the "Donna Reed 
Show," who's the niece of Nan- 
ette Fabray, has another song 
ready for her, to follow up the 
success of "Johnny Angel." It's 
the work of Lyn Duddy and 
Jerry Bresler, and it's tentative- 
ly titled, "I'm Sorry About It, Mrs. 
Johnson, But I Can't Baby Sit Any 
More." 

Fearless Forecasts : Eddie Fish- 
er isn't likely to do TV immedi- 
ately because he's too skinny. He's 
got to fatten up first. Curiously, 
some sponsors, who wouldn't have 
touched him when he broke up 
with Debbie Reynolds, now re- 
gard him as sympathetic, due to 
Liz having flung him out of the 
villa. . . . Word's around that the 
Carol Burnett — Julie Andrews 
special to be aired in June — hav- 
ing been taped at a Carnegie Hall 
concert — is so good that nobody, 
but nobody, could botch it up. 

All the way to Honolulu, I 
phoned Henry Kaiser about his 
plans for a new Tuesday night 
CBS show, "Kaiser Presents the 
Lloyd Bridges Show." 

I could picture the old boy sit- 
ting there with his feet in the 
Pacific — and I frankly wished 
I could be there again talking to 
him . . . drinking one of those 
rum drinks, the mai-tais, I think 
they call them. 

"Hello," he said. . . . Didn't 
offer me a trans-continental, trans- 
oceanic drink at all. 



All business! He said his other 
shows on ABC didn't hold up on 
their ratings, so he's trying Lloyd 
Bridges. He's just crazy about the 
guy when he's dried off and not 
under water. "He's going to play 
an author journalist," Kaiser said. 
"He gets into scrapes all over the 
world. . . ." It was a nice talk . . . 
but I'm still thirsty for a mai-tai. 

Shouldn't there be a loyalty test 
for some of the stagehands of the 
big shows? Do the bosses know 
that while some of the biggest 
dramatic stars are on the air be- 
ing dramatic, the stagehands have 
tuned to one of the auxiliary sets 
to watch the baseball games? 

One of the big stars got several 
writers to write him some night 
club material practically for free 
— by tossing them a little party. 
Afterward, big-heartedly, he gave 
them cuff-links. But, so the story 
goes, he said to two of the writers, 
who are a team, "Here, you two 
boys are so close together ... so 
I'll just give you one cuff-link 
apiece." — The End 

P.S. on Eddie: Losing weight — - 
but gaining TV-sponsor interest. 





Sure, I color 
my hair. . . 
with Nestle!" 



? S3 



Why look dull? It's easy to 

glamorize your hair color with 

Nestle Colorinse or Colortint 

Nestle's world-famous temporary 
hair colorings give your hair fresh, 
glowing color in minutes. . . leave it 
silky, radiant, easy to manage. 

Choose Nestle Colorinse to enliven 
dull, faded hair... to add sparkling 
color-highlights to your natural hair 
color... to restore the lustre that 
shampooing removes. Rinses in, 
shampoos out. 12 beautiful shades. 

Choose Nestle Colortin to add rich 
all-over color OR a glamorous new 
shade that lasts through 3 sham- 
poos. Blends in gray, streaked or 
faded hair. More than a rinse, not a 
permanent dye. 10 lovely shades. 



COLORINSE or COLORTINT 




C0L0 RINSE 



More women use Nestle than any 
other temporary hair coloring 



$15,000 CONTEST! 



/** 



*^ 



Starting with the July issue. 
True Story will offer monthly 

$ 2,500 in Cash Awards 

Plus 
25 Westinghouse Products 

First Prize $1,000 

Second Prize $500 

Third Prize $250 

Fourth Prize $50 

(4- winners) 

Fifth Prize 

(25 winners) 

Westinghouse Hair Dryer 




T 
¥ 
R 

16 



A complete beauty salon in a travel 
case. Queen -size hood — nail dryer. 

Sixth Prize $25 

(14 winners) 

Seventh Prize $15 

(16 winners) 

62 Easy-to-Win Prizes! 



WIN BIG 
CASH PRIZES IN 

True Story Magazine's 




ITS THE CHANCE YOU 
HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR! 

read the story... 
enjoy the story... then 

rxi^n 

aME 




C 



Look for complete details and entry rules 
in the July issue of True Story magazine... 

A wonderful way to win extra pocket 
money — and you don't have to be 
a writer to win. ,. enter the monthly 
Write a Title contest . . . 

Starting in July TRUE STORY Magazine and 
continuing for the next five issues. 






Ona of Hollywood's steadiest two- 
somes: Johnny Mathis, Miriam Colon. 




ON THE RECORD 



:.£* 



JULY 1962 



Bobby Scott 
Music Editor 



■<# 



} /A 



Judy Garland's on-again, ofT-again 
marriage to Sid Luff is now off. 



Margarita Sierra, with George Nader, 
cha-cha-ing from "SurfSide 6" into movie. 



MUSIC 

MAKERS 

IN THE 

NEWS 



'■¥■ 



*% 






^vhftT*. "^ 


•wj&fc' 


Fortifying themselves for the next 




Twist: Rod Lauren, Jenny Maxwell. 






Teen singer Dodie Stevens — busy again — 
talks behind back of date Russ Titleman. 






f 



| .-..'•■■':" . 




Edie Adams, picking up the pieces, 
has friend* like Milton Berle to help. 



Andy Williams, preparing for a fall 
TV show, takes his bride on the town. 



T 
V 
R 

17 




ON THE RECORD 



18 



HOW TO RATE 
A RECORDING 

• From time to time, in my record 
reviews, I'll use the word "reading." 
This pertains to the lyric exclusively. 
The question of what is a good or bad 
"reading" is sometimes very difficult to 
judge. The criterion is generally: "How 
well is the story told?" But, strangely, 
it's not all that easy to judge. The tune, 
itself, if very well-known, can be decep- 
tive; your brain already has the lyric 
laid out for you in front of each new 
phrase. Generally the artist, if a strong 
stylist (as opposed to a straight "singer- 
of-songs"), takes these familiar sur- 
roundings as a green light to indulge 
himself or herself in musical stylizing. 
This is as it should be. 

But, unfortunately, here is where am- 
biguity steps in. The standard, like 
litmus paper, changes its color. Now 
it's "Well, I know the tune" — but what 
comes across more pointedly, now? Is 
the stylization so freely sprung that we 
begin to hear words of no primary value 
exploited at the expense of the vital 
parts of the lyrical message? Are the 
rhymes being obscured? Or, are we 
aware that the new colorings, no matter 
how stylistic, are instilling words with a 
new and perhaps fresher and deeper 
meaning? These are some of the 
questions to ask. 

Good "reading," incidentally, has 
never been the property of any one dis- 
tinct branch of popular music. Sinatra, 
among the crooners, has repeatedly 
come up with marvelous readings. 
"Tennessee" Ernie Ford, in the country 
area, also reads exceedingly well. Nat 
"King" Cole, though strongly on the 
quiet side, is always considerate of the 
story he's telling. Ray Charles, in spite 
of his singular and personal style, 
rarely misses the mark. This list, I'm 
sure, comes as no great revelation to 
anyone! But, I've left off a multitude 
of story-telling talent. 

The highly stylized Dinah Washington 
and Sarah Vaughan always find ways, 
you'll notice, to make the story live. On 
the other hand, Vic Damone works 
closely with the melody but picks the 
words to shade, and always uses his 
dynamic range (from whispers to full- 
throated tones) to advantage. There 
are, of course, singers who read well, 
but have a limited range of dynamics. 
Subsequently, they are pleasant but 
hardly exciting. But, here we move 
into the area of taste. And that, decid- 
edly, is everyone's own business. 



_ 



TOPS IN SINGLES 

1) Don't Turn Around/Hush Now Sally, Journeymen (Capitol) — Both 
sides exceedingly strong! (See Special). Good group with long-lived potential. 
Great songs with the lean on "Don't Turn Around." You won't turn the dial 
much to hear this one. 

2) Lovers Who Wander /Born To Cry, Dion (Laurie) — Two sure bets 
for the hit charts from the driving voice of Dion. Awful good follow-up to 
"The Wanderer." The tunes also were written by Dion. Very strong. 

3) I Guess I'll Never Stop Lovin' You/Sneaky Alligator, La Rells 
(Liberty) — Here's one of the popular singing groups making a powerful bid 
for honors. "Never Stop Lovin' " is the side. Lead voice-and-group type arrange- 
ment. Watch this one. (Flip side is no winner.) 

4) Hassie/The Flame's Gone Out, Ronnie Isle and the Yo-Yo's (Okeh) 
— A very strange tune but possessing that quality. Strong on the rhythm side. 
Ronnie does a first-rate job of shouting! Rare, but strong! 

5) Wind-up Toy/ Caravan Of Lonely Men, Tony Richards (Carlton) — 
A strong coupling of good tunes and strong deliveries. "Wind-up Toy" could 
be a sleeper. Good arrangement on "Caravan." 

6) Walk On The Wild Side, Part I and II, Jimmie Smith and the Big 
Band (Verve) — A jazz artist bucks the. single market and in fine fashion. 
Definitely, Part II is the one to grab juke-box and air play. Very strong! The 
wild organ of Smith with a shoutin' band plus a great movie theme. Look out! 

7) Chapel Of Tears/Funny, Gene McDaniels (Liberty)— That "Tower 
of Strength" and "Chip, Chip" boy is at it again. "Chapel" is the side. Ray 
Charles-ish kind of ballad. Could get under the wire. Fine performances on 
both sides. 

8) Tell Me What He Said/I Apologize, Helen Shapiro (Capitol)— This 
record should be up high on the list. It's a great record. Good tunes and 
arrangements. Fine job of performing by this deep-throated, J. P. Morgan- 
styled thrush. Watch this sleeper! 

9) Mine All Mine/Look No More, Little Eddie (Liberty)— "Mine All 
Mine" definitely the stronger. Eddie gets a rendition favorably to the market. 
It's a bit underweight, but who knows! 

10) Love Theme From Lolita/Look No Further, Leroy Holmes 
(MGM) — An enchanting theme from the Hollywood studios. Sure to be a 
good runner. "Lolita" theme, the heavier. Flip-side pleasant but not for the 
charts. 

SPECIAL REVIEW SINGLES 



Don't Turn Around/Hush Now 
Sally, The Journeymen — (Capitol) — 
Here's a group that's like most of the 
newer folk-style groups in make-up, 
with one notable exception: they sing 
beautifully together, with a fantastic 
sense of pitch and clarity. They also 
have the magic ingredients: The right 
tune, "Don't Turn Around," which will 
hit the younger set as well as the old- 
sters, and an interpretation musical as 
well as commercial. The quality of the 
tune is in-between a folk-ballad and a 
regular pop song. The arrangement is 
"right as rain." The added plus is the 
lead voice, who sings well enough to 
sing on his own! If it ain't a hit, I'll 
eat the record! 




It's a big hit for The Journeymen, three 
young fellows who have turned out the 
best single disc we've heard in months. 




■■■"■• ■'■: M : ' '' 



tfi,. 




PIECES OF EIGHT 

• Jackie Wilson, well again, after accident, is shouting in fine form on 
his new Brunswick album release. . . . Another compilation of "Greatest Hits" on 
Capitol's "Starline" series features Kay Kyser and his gang rattling off his 
big ones, Tennis, anyone? . . . RCA Victor has Sam Cooke twistin' on his 
new album. ... On the classical .side, Angel Records has a marvelous piano 
album by the exceptionally talented Russian pianist, Sviatoslav Richter. 

Teresa Brewer's new Coral album is all slam bang, from the Gay '90s 
to the Rockin' style. . . . Camden, the $1.98 RCA Victor line, has the "Living 
Strings" traveling again. The title, "Souvenir D'ltalie." Good for the money. 

Command Records, possessors of the finest line of stereo recordings, added 
two more to the list. "Vibrations" with Enoch Light and the band and "Roman 
Guitar" with Tony Mottola's smaller ensemble. Both excellent sound ventures. 

Atlantic has added some new jazz packages to their already impressive list. 
"Herbie Mann," live from the Village Gate, and Charlie Mingus' always vital 
excursions in another. 

Gene Kelly, Judy Garland, Howard Keel and William Warfield are 
just a few of the stars on the new M-G-M album, featuring the best tunes from 
the movie screen. 

Steve Lawrence, with the able backing of Don Costa, came up with a 
heck-of-a-good single, "The Lady Twists," or something resembling that title. 
Should get a lot of air play. 

Rumor has it that this year's Newport Jazz Festival will be televised 
nationally. At least, a good part of it. 

The Twist albums have been coming in less frequently to your reviewer. 
(Not that they constitute a potion of pain to said reviewer, but a good ninety 
percent are second-rate attempts.) 

Dave Brubeck's FM station, WJZZ in Bridgeport, Conn., is having. some 
financial difficulties. Any help is graciously accepted. 

Bobby Darin is coming East for an engagement at N.Y.'s Copacabana. 
Film work has been keeping him busy. . . . George Maharis of "Route 66" is 
recording vocally. 



ALBUM COVERS: 
PROS AND CONS 

• It seems that, as we all build record 
libraries, some thoughts about the value 
and longevity of the containers of the 
records should be considered from time 
to time. 

Among the classical lines, it is your 
reviewer's humble opinion that Com- 
mand Records has the most outstand- 
ing packages. All double- jacketed, the 
covers are actually bound like a book 
and capable of withstanding a bit of 
punishment. (As to their beauty, their 
covers are generally first-rate, if not 
exceptional in the art department.) 

Columbia releases, from time to time, 
a gem of a package. Their "Swan Lake 
Ballet" package came with a booklet 
attached, of some twenty or so pages 
full of the history of Swan Lake per- 
formances and photographs of the bal- 
let artists involved. Of course, this is 
not a regular feature with their line. 
Angel always encloses a booklet of in- 
formation where necessary. The edgings 
on their albums, in the binding sense, 
are helpful to the life of the packages. 

The popular albums rarely get the 
long-lived treatment. It might be worth- 
while to write the companies of your 
favorites and ask that they be packaged 
for better wear. (I can't promise you 
they'll do anything, but who knows!) 
The jazz fans, after years of bad pack- 
ages, are finally getting the double- 
jacketed deluxe treatment. (At least 
from Verve and Impulse.) 

The option with flimsy covers is to- 
buy the regular albums for records. 
(You may recall keeping 78's in 
them.) You can throw the cover out 
and house them in these book-like jobs. 
Of course, it doesn't make for ease when 
you begin looking for something. 
(Catalogue-style would help. Keep a 
listing inside the front page.) At any 
rate, these album-holders are avail- 
able in a size that will cover LP 
records. 

One thing to remember is to be care- 
ful when buying an album that's cov- 
ered with a cellophane wrapper, to slit 
the paper just at the opening and there- 
by leave a protective covering over the 
rest of the jacket. Some people in haste 
rip all of it off. This is foolish. A thumb- 
nail will suffice to open it sufficiently 
enough to slide the record out. Keeping 
it intact will preserve the cover art 
work, if you so desire. It pays to treat 
them well. 



19 




ON THE RECORD 



Your Monthly ON RECORD Guide 




20 



BROADWAY STAGE 

••Cast Album of "No Strings" 

Written by Richard Rodgers, featuring 
Diahann Carroll and Richard Kiley — 
Musical Direction, Peter Matz — Orches- 
trations by Ralph Burns (Capitol) — 
This is the most lightweight work 
Richard Rodgers has ever come up 
with. Unfortunately, his lyric writing is 
on an entirely different level from his 
musical writing. It succeeds at times, 
but very infrequently. On the whole, 
this score couldn't even bump its way 
into the other shows Rodgers has par- 
ticipated in creating. It has added to 
the quantity of already sad Broadway 
shows running ("Subways Are for 
Sleeping," "Carnival," etc). 

Miss Carroll and Mr. Kiley, for all 
their performing ability and vitality, 
are not heard to advantage here. The 
show lacks, sorely, a first-rate voice. 
(In fact, Miss Carroll's flat and biting 
sound on "Loads of Love" and "You 
Don't Tell Me" is irritating to this 
reviewer.) 

The orchestrations have no spectrum. 
They remain in one groove with blurts 
of brass from time to time. Very little 
excitement in this area. 

I'm told the show (live) plays well 
and is playing to good houses. It's 
possible it could hurdle these obstacles 
in the theater. The recording medium, 
though, makes its own demands. 

The stronger tunes are "Loads of 
Love," "Be My Host" (melodically), 
"You Don't Tell Me," "Orthodox Fool" 
and "Look No Further." 



POPULAR 

•••Bobby Darin Sings Ray 
Charles (Atco) — Though I strongly 
disagree with the idea of Bobby doing 
these already "done-up" and warmed 
tunes, I'm happy to say the album suf- 
fers very little as compared to Ray's 
original records. Bobby is perfectly at 
ease with allthe material. His sound is 
remarkably close to Ray's on several 
tracks. (The band arrangements are al- 
most note-for-note imitations of the 
originals. This reviewer would have 
liked to see a change in that depart- 
ment.) 

Bobby takes care not to give out with 
the now famous Ray Charles' hollers, 
and justly so. The last thing Bobby 
would want anybody to think was that 
the album was not done with taste and 
respect for one of his favorite artists. 
(I assume the thought of someone 
thinking it mockery was considered 
strongly.) 

My favorite is "The Right Time." 
The vocal group of girls, who I believe 
worked with Ray originally, are here, 
too.. They work excellently with Bobby. 
The tunes are all winners. "Hallelujah, 
I Just Love Her So," "What I Say," 
"Drown in My Tears" and others. 

Bobby is certainly to be commended 
on his flexibility. Again, I find the idea 
a little strange. But the album — not at 
all! I have no doubts that it'll sell like 
hot cakes — it's an enjoyable tribute 
from one growing legend to another 
growing legend! 





•••Strange Enchantment, Vic 
Damone, Orch. conducted by Billy 

May (Capitol) — This is Vic's second 
effort for Capitol and it's way ahead of 
the first album in value. This album 
creates beautifully and totally the feel- 
ing of the tropical islands of the Blue 
Pacific. Billy May's highly pictorial 
arrangements, utilizing all the instru- 
ments of exotica, lead us through the 
magical archipelago with Vic's enchant- 
ing and resonant voiee, sitting comfort- 
ably, cushioned by the strings and the 
constant beguine beat. Like its source, 
this album is not flashy, but father per- 
meated with the quality of the climate. 
Warm and rippling. "Shangri-la," "Ebb- 
tide," "Beyond the Reef," "Flamingo" 
and "Bali Ha'i" are a few of the gems. 
Strong is the thread Vie weaves. Good 
photo of Vic on the back of the cover. 
Much. . . . Strange Enchantment! 



•••Stars in Our Eyes, The Four 
Freshmen (Capitol) — This is, a great 
group, but this is not a great album. 
The idea is a little limiting, considering 
these boys are head and shoulders over 
most of the vocal groups they pay 
tribute to. The most striking and un- 
conventional interpretation is the bow 
to the Kingston Trio's big hit "Tom 
Dooley." It's done a cappella and hardly 
folksy, but it's an excursion that few 
groups have, the ability to make. 

The tunes range through "Shangri- 
la," "Standing on the Corner," "Opus 
One," "Green Fields," "Love Is a Many- 
Splendored Thing" to distaff honors 






-K-K-MC GREAT! 
-K-)C^C GOOD LISTENING 



-K-K FAIR SOUNDS 
-K IT'S YOU ft MONEY 



STARS IN ®UR EYES/THE F®UR FRESHMEN 



? « 



,- 



like "In Apple Blossom Time," "Im- 
agination" and "Teach Me Tonight." 

All in all, an agreeable album but 
certainly not what the Freshmen are 
capable of doing. They are pace-setters 
musically and should be turned loose, 
but — it's worth your money. 

•••Show-Stopper! Diahann Car- 
roll (Camden)— This is on the $1.98 
Victor line and well worth the money. 
Diahann has been heard better, but 
bad this recording is not. (I'm sure 
these tunes were cut a while ago and 
Diahann has improved greatly.) The 
package has value, in that her per- 
forming still has the verve, even if 
lacking, at times, the polish we know 
her to possess now. The arrangements 
do little to help her. They are heavy- 
handed. She seems at times to conflict 
in attitude with them. (Possibly she's 
trying hard to pull the ends together.) 
The album's chock full of standard 
tunes, including "Easy to Love," the 
exciting "I May Be Wrong," "This 
Can't Be Love" and "Devil Moon." 
At this price, you could hardly get more. 

MOOD MUSIC 

•••The Music of Rodgers and 
Hammerstein, Melachrino Strings 
(RCA Victor) — Here is a compilation 
of certainly some of the best musical 
comedy tunes in existence, all scored 
and played with professional polish. 
The arrangements, at times, leave a bit 
to be desired, but Richard Rodgers' 



melodies can hold any arrangement to- 
gether. To be fair, though, they succeed 
more often than not, as in the case of 
"Bali Ha'i." Here the South Pacific is 
recalled in glowing terms. Exceedingly 
picturesque. 

The trouble with putting an album 
together with tunes by these aces is 
there's never enough room for all their 
classics. (I missed especially the 
"March of the Siamese Children" from 
the "King and I.") At any rate, herein 
will be found "Carousel Waltz" and "If 
I Loved You," "Hello, Young Lovers," 
"Oklahoma," "Surrey with the Fringe 
on Top," "It Might As Well Be spring" 
and a slew of gems wrought to perfec- 
tion by Rodgers and Hammerstein. For 
lovers of the musical stage and all gen- 
erally classified "relaxers," take a look 
into this album. 

•••"Love Embers and Flame" is 

a new package on Capitol presented by 
Jackie Gleason. Lush string settings 
with generally soloistic horn playing 
plus some vintage standards. All warm 
and embracing. . . . ••M-G-M's new 
"21 Channel Sound Series" brings 
us David Rose and his orchestra. An 
album chuck full of oldies recorded 
on a high level with a large orchestra. 
Arrangements are par-for-the-course. 
. . . ••Capitol also brings pian- 
ist Lee Evans into the spotlight. Sur- 
rounded by soaring strings and mellow 
French horns. The album title: "Piano 
Plus." A little over-done at times, but 
generally palatable offerings. . . . 





••Movie themes is the idea of Russ 
Conway's new album on M-G-M. The 
British pianist runs thru a flock of 
screen favorites. "All Time Movie 
Favorites" is the title. 

JAZZ SPECIAL 

••••The Bridge, Sonny Rollins 
(RCA Victor) — This is the most recent 
Sonny Rollins' recording. He has just 
returned from a self-imposed exile. He 
retired to "wood-shed," to use the 
player's vernacular. "Wood-shedding" 
is the searching and studying of new 
ideas and the reflective re-hashing of 
the old. It may not help everybody but 
it has helped Sonny. I remember shortly 
before he took himself out of the jazz 
scene, his playing had become static. 
He even appeared a bit unhappy. (Mind 
you, my conjecture.) This happens 
often to jazz players of stature, who 
are constantly expected to open new 
doors at the drop of a hat. It's in- 
credibly taxing. The mind and the 
heart are not machinery. Sonny sacri- 
ficed a lucrative string of bookings, 
cutting his throat economically, and re- 
tired to think. Certainly, a noble ges- 
ture. Such things would not be neces- 
sary if the jazz fans were more stable 
and less fad conscious. (As I recall, 
John Coltrane appeared the comer when 
Sonny packed in his playing engage- 
ments. Now, Coltrane is under fire.) 

The album title, "The Bridge," is 

where Sonny did his "wood-shedding." 

(Please turn the page) 



21 




ON THE RECORD 




Yes, the high pedestrian walk, above 
the traffic on the Williamsburg Bridge, 
in New York. He felt that all that play- 
ing would disturb his neighbors, so he 
used the bridge. A ' considerate chap, 
this Mr. Rollins! Well, after two years, 
he returns triumphant! 

His playing now seems more eco- 
nomical. Less of the former boppish 
phrasing (and hints even of Lester 
Young), more concentrated musical 
thought. The ballads are done as bal- 
lads with very little or no gymnastic3. 
He also appears to have absorbed 
nothing of the new nihilistic movement 
in jazz known as "The New Thing." His 
musical attitude seems now much more 
personal than contemporary, the solos 
are light and lean. The simplicity of 
these vehicles infers their directness as 
opposed to the current fad in jazz of 
beckoning us righteously into darkness. 
There is no doubt in this reviewer's 
mind that the retreat has paid off. 

His current group is heard here. The 
always fertile and sympathetic Jim Hall 
is heard on guitar, with Bob Cranshaw 
on bass, and Ben Riley and H. T. 
Saunders splitting the drumming. 

"Without a Song," usually heard as 
a ballad, is done in a light, swinging 
groove. Also here are "You Do Some- 
thing to Me," "God Bless the Child," 
"Where Are You" and two Rollins 
originals, "The Bridge" and "John S." 

All first rate. Nothing could make me 
happier than to see Sonny back again. 
I hope he'll not vacation again for a 
long, long time. 





COMEDY 

****Borge's Back — Recorded 
Live! — Victor Borge (MGM) — Borge 
the ad-libber, Borge of wrong notes, 
Borge of the absurdly funny demoli- 
tion of language, Borge the exception- 
al, Borge the Greatl This is a definite- 
ly unique talent. He has mastered even 
the use of silence! This album is mur- 
der! Having spent some time with Borge 
one evening in Omaha, Nebraska, I 
know how incredibly funny his facial 
expressions are. Believe me, that's the 
only thing missing in this package. The 
bits of business he covers range from 
his general introductory remarks to his 
audience, which I'm sure could make 
an album itself, to his own ideas about 
changing language, to the now famous 
Borge pianistic sojourns. Every bit of 
it instilled with Borge's own brand of 
marvelous nonsense. I could give you 
examples of some of it, but it would 
lose in the telling. Just go out and buy 
it! Highly recommended! 

CLASSICAL 

****Rachmaninoff — Piano Con- 
certo No. 3, Opus 30 — Byron Janis, 
Pianist, Antal Dorati, Cond. — London 
Symp. Orch. (Mercury) — This work 
is the baby brother of the Second Con- 
certo. It is an infinitely more subtle 
work, though it does not enjoy the 
Second's popularity. Rachmaninoff often 
echoes the Second here, but here it is 
a more integrated concerto we hear. 
The statements of theme are anything 
but rhetorical. It's a growing work. 



Slowly it appears, slowly it develops. 
Always in evidence, the brooding and 
melancholy, the constant use of the 
minor sub-dominant, in the major mode 
which has the quality of putting tears 
in the eyes of smiling faces, the flow- 
ing, rippling, pulsing lines, crossing 
from the piano into violins and back, 
always the emotional, the touching, al- 
ways Rachmaninoff! Byron Janis plays 
the work beautifully. His range of dy- 
namics, his fantastic ways of playing 
exceedingly hard things, with a quiet, 
crystal-like feeling, the attack, full of 
body, when needed. (It's this review- 
er's humble opinion that Janis is our 
finest young pianist.) He certainly 
brings it off. The recording is one of 
Mercury's 35mm. Series and has the 
finest sound. Highly recommended. 

****Wagner — (Magic Fire Music 
— The Ride of the Valkyries — Entry of 
the Gods in Valhalla — Siegfried's Rhine 
Journey — Siegfried's Funeral March) 
— William Steinberg Cond. The Pitts- 
burgh Symphony Orch. (Command 
Classics) — The marriage of the most 
updated recording techniques (like 
stereo and, in this case, 35mm. tape 
stereo) and the music of the romantic 
giant, Wagner, who, himself, was ob- 
sessed with dynamics, is one to investi- 
gate. Here the clarity and balance of 
sound on the recording definitely makes 
for a more enlightening look at the 
music. Your reviewer was struck dumb 
by the opening of "Dawn and Sieg- 
fried's Rhine Journey" (from the opera 
"Gotterdammerung") on side two of 
the recording. Aside from the absolute 
genius in the score of Wagner, William 
Steinberg's handling of this is beauti- 
fully controlled. It grows quietly into 
a surging mass of sound, building 
transparently through the dawn-like 
string figures which overlap in Wag- 
ner's natural leitmotiv fashion, to a 
stunning climax with the brass assum- 
ing the dominant role. Steinberg takes 
care to end each repetition of the strings 
quietly, so as to let the underneath 
strand come out at its beginning and 
conversely to edge the bottom and let 
the upper sing again. (Always build- 
ing in volume and intensity.) The 
35mm. recording technique adds to the 
beauty. It's what, to draw an analogy, 



MB? 



++++ GREAT! 
+++ GOOD LISTENING 



-K-K FAIR SOUNDS 
-K IT'S YOUR MONEY 



the wide screen is to films. Another strik- 
ing moment is the "Ride of the Val- 
kyries" (from "Die Walkiire"). A ring- 
ingly effective piece, which is brought 
to light with all its joy of orchestration 
intact] This recording surpasses Stein- 
berg's older album for Capitol im- 
measurably. The latter is, of course, 
quite old. Here, what happens at the 
recording session gets onto the vinyl 
and doesn't remain for posterity on 
tape shelves. This step ahead gives the 
phonograph the chance to stand next 
to tape, hurdling the transferral ob- 
stacle. A wonderful compilation, fine- 
ly brought to life by a first-rate con- 
ductor and orchestra and marvelously 
recorded. Recommended. (Incidentally, 
I could write a review of the cover- 
jacket. It's indestructible.) 

rSchubert-Symph. No. 9 in C 
laj. ("The Great")— Otto Klemperer 
]!ond. — Philharmonic Orch. (Angel) — 
This symphonic masterwork composed 
in the spring of 1828 foretells, musically, 
nothing of the foreboding death which 
is to come to Schubert in November of 
lat same year. His age, at passing, an 
incredible thirty-one years. This work 
fas considered in Vienna but passed 
off as too difficult to play. It waited 
patiently on the shelf for ten years 
ifter its creator's demise before Robert 
Schumann discovered it and prevailed 
lpon Mendelssohn to conduct it pub- 
licly. The work, as compared to the 
lozart and Beethoven monuments of 
form, is structurally weak — but it is a 
joy of lyric only expressed by the 
lasterwriter of Lieder. It bubbles with 
an unconventional lack of restraint. It 
long and, to people unprepared for 
the journey, it might be wearying. But 
to those interested in the beauty of 
line this is home. Otto Klemperer puts 
lie orchestra beautifully through its 
paces. Strong here, light there, and 
pointed when meeting and holding the 
iread of continuity. The recorded 
»und is not all it could be (mono) , but 
cannot hurt. Strangely enough, when 
lendelssohn rehearsed this work for 
its initial performance, the string play- 
rs laughed at the last movement, 
lendelssohn disgustedly withdrew it 
rom the program. Fate always has 
rony up its sleeve. Recommended. 




MOVIES 

•Original Soundtrack of "State 
Fair," Rodgers and Hammerstein — Pat 
Boone, Bobby Darin, Ann-Margret, Tom 
Ewell and Alice Faye (Dot) — This cer- 
tainly was a hopeless venture. It suffers 
terribly by comparison with the origi- 
nal. Pat Boone is utterly boring! The 
tune, "Willing and Eager," a duet by 
Mr. Boone and Ann-Margret, succeeds, 
unintentionally, to a level of high com- 
edy ! It seems a shame that these tunes, 
although not the very best Rodgers and 
Hammerstein, have to be clobbered like 
this. "That's for Me," the tune Haymes 
sang in the earlier flick, and Boone does 
here, is hopelessly bland. Strangely, 
Darin does a bit better than his cohorts, 
but even he seems like he's over-deliber- 
ate. His falsetto tones here are the first 
I've ever heard from him. About Ann- 
Margret there is little to be said, other 
than she is quite a looker. 

Certainly this is not the way to revive 
musicals on the screen, at least not with 
this kind of sound track. Lots of luck! 

SPECIAL 

••••The Midnight Special, Har- 
ry Belafonte (RCA Victor) — The great 
pro barrels through again with another 
driving folk album — an ail-American 
vehicle with overtones of blues, gospel, 
jazz, work-song and just plain hollerin'! 
But this album, mind you, is not just 
folk-fare. Harry, through his marvelous 
performing ability, hurdles the folk 
traditions and strikes at the heart of 
pure unbridled entertaining. He bends 



the material his own personal way, but 
takes care not to disturb the fundamen- 
tal directness of lyric or dilute the musi- 
cal fire inherent in this folk material. 
The projection is incredible when 
one thinks of how hard this recording 
medium is with its lack of the visual. 

The arrangements are all sympathet- 
ically written by Jimmy Jones. They 
range in sound and texture from Harry's 
personal small ensemble, which is char- 
acterized by guitars and rhythm, to 
blapket-Hke string settings and crash- 
ing brass. (The solos of Jerome 
Richardson on saxophone deserve much 
attention, as well as Bob Dylan's har- 
monica-playing.) Harry meets each 
level of the band skillfully. They are 
soft together and roar together. 

The tunes include "Memphis Tenn.," 
the log-rolling "Did You Hear About 
Jerry," "Crawdad Song," a decidedly 
different "On Top of Old Smokey," 
"Muleskinner," the gospel-like "Mi- 
chael, Row the Boat Ashore," the title 
piece and some other steamrollers] 

It would seem, if I'm allowed a hum- 
ble opinion, that Belafonte seems freer 
on this album than he has on several 
preceding ones, and it may possibly be 
the nature of the material here. His 
Calypso tunes are very demanding of 
form and to play with them in an im- 
provised fashion is "beckoning trouble 
to ya," to use a colloquialism. May we 
hear more of this unrestrained Bela- 
fonte ! Much credit due to all connected 
with this vital package. Don't miss it! 
I repeat: Don't miss it! 




23 




In the first three months of 
1962, Chubby Checker racked 
up about $376,000 in album 
sales, by-products and per- 
sonal appearances. Says his 
manager, Kal Mann: "Not 
long ago — July, 1960 — Chub- 
by and I almost flipped when 

I got him $100 per night for 

II nights, in Harry Levy's 
Wildwood, N.J., night club. 
That was $1,100 more dough 
than we'd ever seen, but I said 
to Harry: 'Suppose Chubby's 
new record — "Let's Twist 
Again" — becomes No. 1 in the 
country.' Harry chuckled and 
said in that case he'd triple the 
$1,100. And, by gosh, that's 
exactly what happened, so we 
got $3,300." . . . The Nick 
Mayos (Janet Blair) ex- 
pecting. . . . Pat Boone's 
wife recuperating, surgery. . . . 
Bob Young's daughter, Babs, 
and designer Tom Bebe set 
the date. . . . The Mickey 

1 Rooneys named him Michael. 
. ... Rick Nelson and Tom 



Harmon's daughter, Chris, at 
Arthur Murray's. . . . Juliet 
Prowse and Mike Garth a 
big deal. . . . Peggy Lee is 
the sultriest canary in show 
biz. Her eyes and her tones 
project a boudoir quality . . . 
even her musical arrangements 
accent the Lee mystique. No 
other girl singer projects so 
much sensuousness. Contrast 
the let's be pals, scrubbed-face 
technique of Mary Martin, 
Rosemary Clooney, the Mc- 
Guire Sisters, Dinah Shore, 
Connie Francis, Doris Day, 
Martha Wright, Teresa Brew- 
er. In the Peggy Lee league 
are Lena Home, Julie Wilson, 
Fran Jeffries, Diahann Car- 
roll, Polly Bergen, Jane Mor- 
gan, Carol Lawrence — but 
Peggy is No. 1 in that depart- 
ment. . . . Edie Adams Kovacs 
and Joe Mikolas a twosome. 
. . . Connie Francis European 
tour a blockbuster . . . Eliza- 
beth Taylor, now 30, has 
been married four times. Older 



men got along best with her: 
Mike Todd was 48, twice her 
age, when they were hitched 
in Acapulco; Michael Wild- 
ing was twice her age when 
they were wed in 1952. By 
contrast, Eddie Fisher is only 
four years older — and Rich- 
ard Burton only seven. . . . 
But I'm thinking back to 
Liz's first honeymoon in 
June, 1950, at Cannes with 
Nicky Hilton, because we were 
there. She was 18 and incredi- 
bly beautiful. But young Hil- 
ton hardly talked to her! Liz 
would ride out to the Eden 
Roc beach with Mrs. S. and 
our daughter, Betty; young 
Hilton would ride out later 
with me. At the beach, he 
spent no time with her. At 
day's end, he'd curtly signal 
her to go home with him. . . . 
Betty had been a bridesmaid 
at their Coast wedding. In a 
mag article, she analyzed Eliz- 
abeth. "Sensitive — generous 
and kind of heart — a fine sense 



of humor. Not malicious, cat- 
ty or mean. Easily hurt by un- 
kindness. Almost completely 
unaware of her own beauty 
and always praising her 
friends to the skies." The late 
Mike Todd would have en- 
cored that analysis of Liz; I 
doubt that Eddie Fisher now 
would rhapsodize over Liz's 
virtues. But, as in the case of 
Todd, who was a take-charge 
individual, Burton is equally 
positive in his approach, and 
Liz apparently goes for that 
kind of guy. . . . Bob Hope's 
son Tony now a Georgetown 
grad. . . . Sal Mineo and Lisa 
Kean a duet. . . . George Ma- 
haris prefers Mimi Weber. 
• ■ . The Red Buttons working 
out the settlement. . . . Big 
shakeup shatters 20th-Fox, any 
minute! Both in the East and 
the West. 

Published by permission of 
the Chicago Tribune — New 
York News Syndicate Inc. 



24 




WHO IS SHE??? MEET HER ON PAGE 78 






p 



4-* 

cd 


US 


1 

cd 


pH 

o 


O w 

4-> 00 


day 


1 

CD 


bo 
cd 

S 


4-1 
O 

cd 


CD °> 

4-> t 


H3 




cd 
no 


cd 
1 


J-l o 

Cd *e 

■*-* § 
CO § 

•p.. 


cd 


o 
no 


cd 


1 

4~» 

CD 


CD 1 


fl 


<D 


o 


s 


no 


(U 


o 




i-i 


cd 


<u 


• pi 

OS 


no 


CD 


CD 


-Q 


<u 


> 


pH 


n3 
cd 




4_) 
pi 

cd 

4-» 


CD 


CD 
P-Cj 


M 


6 


CO 


"O 


CO 


4-> 

• Pi 


S 


^ 


<D 


cd 


•% 


o 


13 

CO 

cd 


p-a 


4-* 


cd 

p— i 

CD 


4-» 

cd 


c 

cd 




»-« 


o 
Z 


o 


s 


• 


O 

4-» 


H3 
C 
cd 


cd 

4-> 


• pi 

no 
CD 


4-1 

c 

cd 


•> 
•» 

CD 

Pi 

cd 


u 

• pi 

cd 

-5 


3 

O 

pJ3 

cd 


* 

<D 
pi 
CD 

4-» 


p— H 
• pi 


s 

pH 


CO 

cd 


c 

• Pi 


• pi 
cd 

p— « 
>H 


• 

Q 


cd 


p— « 
o 

• PH 

4-» 


CO 

cd 


s 




H3 


CD 


cd 

pi: 


>•* 

o 

' 1 1 


cd 


pH 

cd 


J* 


<J 


o 

• Pi 

no 


O 

4-> 


<D 


pi 

o 




• p1 


£ 


£ 


• Pi 


4-» 


T3 




CD 


^ 


CO 


pi} 


• 


CO 


3 




4-» 
4-> 


CD 
C 

• Pi 



p£J 


n 


4-> 


CO 


N 



27 




E * ick Chamberlain wanted to relax, it had been a hard day at 
the studio for "Dr. Kildare." Now at home, he flicked on the hi-fi, 
settled into a deep armchair and casually started to read a maga- 
zine. The article was about a man he'd never met — an actor 
whose work he was interested in. But as he read, he started to 

(Continued on page 82 ) 



Dianne was first, just the way 
everyone expected. But you 
may be surprised at wh\ 
girl is next to marry! <£ 




The Next LennoiJ 



"You make it sound like 'Button, button, 
who's got the button,' " complained Janet, 
sixteen this June and youngest of the 
singing Lennon girls. "After all, falling in 
love and getting married isn't a game . . ." 
"You're right, honey," their mother, 
Isabelle ("Sis") Lennon, nodded approv- 



ingly. "Marriage is a serious matter." 
"Serious, sure," chuckled father Bill, "but 
let's not make it sound like a parachute 
jump. The question's only natural. After all, 
Kathy's almost nineteen and Peggy's twenty- 
one. Let's face it, DeeDee was twenty when 
she became Mrs. Dick Gass . . ." 



As the Lennons begin thinking about the next wedding in the family, they remember the day 

'""USUI 




2-J'P 



W/ 





Sister To Be A Bride 



Danny, twelve and eldest of the Lennon 
boys, came in with a teasing rhyme: 

"Peggy, Kathy, Janet— whoah! Which'U 
be the next to go?" 

So goes the latest pastime of the family 
and friends of the pretty and talented Len- 
non Sisters, mainstays of the Lawrence Welk 



shows. The provocative question of which 
will follow sister Dianne into matrimony — 
and probably retirement — looms more ur- 
gently as time goes by. Both the elder 
girls have been dating regularly for years, 
while pert Janet has just begun to give the 
subject of boys (Continued on page 74) 



For Your 

Full- Color 

BONUS 
► 

Turn The Page 



Dianne married Dick Gass. Seen here: Some of the moments none of the Lennons will ever forget. 




Dianne was first, just the way 
everyone expected. But you 
may be surprised at wh 
girl is next to marry !g 







The Next LennoiiSister To Be A Bride 



"You make it sound like 'Button, button, 
who's got the button,' " complained Janet, 
sixteen this June and youngest of the 
singing Lennon girls. "After all, falling in 
love and getting married isn't a game . . ." 
"You're right, honey," their mother, 
Isabelle ("Sis") Lennon, nodded approv- 



ingly. "Marriage is a serious matter." 
"Serious, sure," chuckled father Bill, "but 
let's not make it sound like a parachute 
jump. The question's only natural. After all, 
Kathy's almost nineteen and Peggy's twenty- 
one. Let's face it, DeeDee was twenty when 
she became Mrs. Dick Gass . . ." 



As the Lennons begin thinking about the next wedding in the family, they remember the 4# 



Danny, twelve and eldest of the Lennon 
boys, came in with a teasing rhyme: 

" Pe 6gy. Kathy, Janet— whoah! Which'U 
be the next to go?" 

So goes the latest pastime of the family 
and friends of the pretty and talented Len- 
non Sisters, mainstays of the Lawrence Welk 



shows. The provocative question of which 
will follow sister Dianne into matrimony — 
and probably retirement — looms more ur- 
gently as time goes by. Both the elder 
girls have been dating regularly for years, 
while pert Janet has just begun to give the 
subject of boys [Continued on page 74 1 



For Your 
Full-Color 

BONUS 

► 

Turn The Page 



"ianne married Dick Gass. Seen here: Some of the moments none of the Lennons will ever forget. 





i 



n 



.9 



*1 



r« 



* 




A 



n 






' 



■ ^ 1^^^^ 


* k'Jn 






lfc^Jk» 




7 ' \** 




1" "^P-* - 




ft * 


\m 4 ■•, 



▼ 




as*r 






• ^ 



r- * 




id* 



-f v 



» 



w 




f'f! 



^t 






j n»- 



m 






^L 



X. 
















►**>• 







- * £kf-x 



\A {J) 



■XH'KZZt 



A 




^1 



K£ 






* 



* 



L*U* 




« 



****** 



'/Hif* 



p*8i 



«h$ 




• 




i 



£ 



^s^ 



'■•> 



a TV Radio Mirror ,.-» 

SUMMER BONUS 1 



' 



' 






>T'ft 



flSM- 








^ 




L 



^s*» 



Jk 



■--■'* 



j 



\ 






■ 



r«£ 







■U*» 



- - 




• ■■■; -; •' • 



l* 












1 did what 

I did for 

the sake of my boys 

...I went through 



with the divorce 



■ 

for their sake. 
As Chuck Connors 
spoke, there w.as A 



a look of love iri%- 

<. 1 

his eyes -and also~J 
of pain. It had 

■ V 

not been easy. 










(Gontinued on page 96) 



H hatever it cost, moments like 
this with Jeff, Steve and Kevin 
are worth any price to Chuck. 



-- ' ■:>' 



1 








Whatever it cost, moments like 
this with Jeff, Steve and Kevin 
are worth any price to Chuck. 



I did for 

the sake of my boys 
...I went through 
with the divorce 
for their sake/' 

■ 

As Chuck Connors , 
spoke, there was ( 
a look of love in -' 
his eyes-and alscr 
of pain. It had . 
not been easv. , m 



m 




*&Ss»y" 



^ -"£? 



y 



V">£)-Uag 



Jlltl o 



» 9U£ 



«&>«&■ 



YffiiV 






Qonltnued on page 9o) 



, . t **> and **+ 
and •»«*• ^efviope; 4.0JJJ Thom as 

and N^^^WHPP 




C* 






^^MP^^ .comedian aS manage xu no \ ore s H°P e ' 

penary <* l spe \\ ^ s - ^ e ^eW-^ Mrs. Re ° tU >\, because .^ 

,i* sense ©i tefi v<eu no ^ai d He rw 

a" d ^1 rbara &***** con ^c s 

■*"** 6 Cn^ P*^" c|HO x ***** 



34 



i W0& 







IK ^^^^^ „«er * hat <ihe soon 

H^^^* „ r _-no «" atte , %hoU t one. Sh e 

■^ ^eoth"" 10 ' carried >N>* oUX . 

finds *e» okeS V^fl 




8 . joey a" d ° and Barbae 



35 



'A 



I 



I 



ill 


8H 


E3 



1 



I 



For Bettye Ackerman's own story, 
please turn the page 



3 


n IlIJ i \ 1 







■ 




>* 





' 






% 







ttiik 



A LADY DOCTO 
EXAMINES 

VINCE 
EDWARDS' 



I 



% 





For Bettye Ackerman's own story, 
please turn the page 



How the Lady Doctor 
Cured Vince Edwards 
of Being a Bachelor 

"I'm a bachelor who has 
urges, now and then," says 
Vince Edwards, "to make 
the big jump into matri- 
mony. Somehow, I always 
shied away when I got near 
the starting gate. But lately, 
working with Mr. and Mrs. 
Sam Jaffe, I've been get- 
ting a change of heart. 

"Those two make mar- 
riage seem like the best 
chance for happiness in this 
troubled world. It's easy to 
see they love each other 
and — what's more impor- 
tant — their love seems to 
spill over and touch every- 
one who's near them. 

"I admire them both, 
greatly. They are a well- 
read, much traveled and 
very cultured lady and 
gentleman of show busi- 
ness. I've never heard an 
unkind word leave their 
mouths. Each is exception- 
ally cooperative on the set. 
Their main concern is for 
the cast and crew, for the 
success of the show. Maybe 
when you're that happy, 
you stop thinking about 
yourself. 

"What more can I say? 
I guess by now it's clear 
that I respect, admire and 
am extremely fond of these 
two fine people!" 



continued 

There's a play making the rounds with the weirc 
title, "Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Mamma's Hung You 
in the Closet and I'm Feelin' So Sad." Well, with 
apologies to that little gem, I'd like to coin a title ex- 
pressing my feelings as the woman doctor, Dr. Maggie 
Graham, in "Ben Casey." I'd like to call it: "Oh Sam, 
You're a Lamb, and Vince, You're a Prince, and Poor 
Maggie's on the Rocks Between Two Such Darling 
Docs!" 

Sam, of course, is my husband, an actor of em- 
inence who plays Dr. Zorba in the series— Sam Jaffe. 
And Vince — well, Vince is that dark, angry, hand- 
some young man who has become, according to re- 
viewers, "the hottest thing on TV." Need I mention 
the magic name, Vincent Edwards? 

In many respects, despite the difference in age, 
I see great similarities between Sam and Vince. Per- 
haps it's why they are so fond of each other and hold 
each other in such high esteem. It may also explain 
my own fondness for the frowning young rebel of 
our makebelieve hospital. Vince reminds me of Sam, 
not in any physical resemblance, but in the sense of 
character and emotional depth. 

I asked my husband about the friendship that's 
grown between Vince and himself. He smiled and 
said, "He's the young man I once wanted to be." 
When I put the same question to Vince, he sounded 
as though he'd been eavesdropping. He said, "I like 
Sam because I see in him the man I'd like to become." 

All good and well, but how about me — Bettye 
Ackerman, a woman and actress — caught between 
them? I tell you, there are times when I feel literally 
trapped between Sam's hair and Vince's frown. If I 
were a more ambitious actress, I think I'd hate them 
both. Luckily I'm not, so I just do my best and hope 
my efforts won't get lost. 

I remember one "Ben Casey" episode where an 
alcoholic is admitted to our hospital for the thirteenth 
time but still can't break the habit. Something about 
that scene moved me deeply. I actually broke down 
and cried. It was one of the (Continued on page 87) 



38 



BEGINNING: A SPECIAL 7-PAGE SECTION ON YOUNG MARRIAGE 




In its first few years, a marriage can grow 
strong and sturdy, putting down roots that 
can last a lifetime. Or it can grow weak, 
wither and die. The sad truth is that one 
out of every four couples who walk away 
from a wedding ceremony, head and hopes 
high, will eventually walk their separate 
ways into the divorce courts. Why? What 
goes wrong in these marriages? What goes 
right in the ones that last? In the stories 
that follow, we think you'll find important 
and surprising answers to these questions. 



Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Sands 



Mr. and Mrs. David Nelson 




/ 







Mr. and Mrs. Bobby Darin 



A SPECIAL 7-PAGE SECTION ON YOUNG MARRIAGE 




A 






m 





Speaking for myself — and I'm 
sure June has her own ideas on 
tins — the most difficult thing for 
a young husband is to realize a 
woman's thinking. After the first 
two months, the naive fellow be- 
lieves he has the whole thing 
figured out. For example, wives 
often ask for opinions, but that 
doesn't necessarily mean that 
they want opinions. So you speak 
up — until you learn it would have 
been wiser to dodge the issue. 
Then again, sometimes you de- 
liberately give an opposite opin- 
ion to what you really think. Now 
it looks like you have the situa- 
tion licked when things work out 
your way. So you win that little 
A round — (Continued on page 92) 



by DAVID NELSON 



A 




V 



-Ay ^ '■ 



^ 



* 



* 



c 



> 



/ 





_ 







N ;* 



-.-i> 









42 



A SPECIAL 7-PAGE SECTION ON YOUNG MARRIAGE 




"It's funny," Sandra Dee Darin admitted, "but I 
thought the minute I saw the baby I would love him 
and feel like a mother. And-I didn't. The first time they 
brought him in to me, I loved the baby. But I didn't 
love this baby. I would have loved any baby they 
brought in, because I didn't know him yet. It was like 
I loved him more inside, because I carried him for so 
long. Then when they showed him to me, it was very 
hard to associate this with the baby I'd carried. 

"So I didn't love Dodd Mitchell like a mother the 
first time. It was about the third or fourth time I saw 
him that I started to love him. Because by then I knew 
what was coming. I knew the face that was going to 
come down the hall, and I knew the little body. . . . 

"You should have seen me the day I took the baby 
home from the hospital. I told Bobby, 'Send the nurse 
home.' He said, 'What?' I said, 'Send her home. I'm 
taking care of the baby myself.' So I had him send the 
nurse home and the maid, too — although the maid 
came back the next day to help with the cleaning. 

"So there were three people in the house when we 
entered — the baby, Bobby and me. I put the baby down 
and we were watching him like proud parents and, all 
of a sudden, he starts crying. He was hungry. Well, 
the nurse had made the formula before she left, so I 
just got the bottle out and — I can't figure out how to 
put the nipple on! I'm a mother now, taking care of 
my own child, and I can't figure out how to put the 
nipple on the bottle. 

"So I'm only home about an hour, and I'm on the 
phone with my mother. (Continued on page 85) 



- 




I 




For Sandra Dee and Bobby Darin, the love song is 
now a lullaby — and you'd hardly recognize their marriage! 




1 



/* 



> 





A SPECIAL 7-PAGE SECTION ON YOUNG MARRIAGE 



I 



% 








"It's funny," Sandra Dee Darin admitted, "but 1 
thought the minute I saw the baby I would love him 
and feel like a mother. And I didn't. The first time they 
brought him in to me, I loved the baby. But 1 didn't 
love this baby. I would have loved any baby they 
brought in, because 1 didn't know him yet. It was like 
I loved him more inside, because I carried him for so 
long. Then when they showed him to me, it was very 
hard to associate this with the baby I'd carried. 

"So I didn't love Dodd Mitchell like a mother the 
first time. It was about the third or fourth time I saw 
him that I started to love him. Because by then I knew 
what was coming. I knew the face that was going to 
come down the hall, and I knew the little body. . . . 

"You should have seen me the day I took the baby 
home from the hospital. I told Bobby, 'Send the nurse 
home.' He said, 'What?' I said, 'Send her home. I'm 
taking care of the baby myself.' So I had him send the 
nurse home and the maid, too — although the maid 
came back the next day to help with the cleaning. 

"So there were three people in the house when we 
entered — the baby, Bobby and me. I put the baby down 
and we were watching him like proud parents and, all 
of a sudden, he starts crying. He was hungry. Well, 
the nurse had made the formula before she left, so I 
just got the bottle out and— I can't figure out how to 
put the nipple on! I'm a mother now, taking care of 
my own child, and I can't figure out how to put the 
nipple on the bottle. 

"So I'm only home about an hour, and I'm on the 
phone with ray mother. (Continued on page 851 



For Sandra Dee and Bobby Darin, the love song is 
now a lullaby— and you'd hardly recognize their marriage! 



<f. 



ȣ*. 





A SPECIAL 7-PAGE SECTION ON YOUNG MARRIAGE 




smirs 







III GIRL 



"We wanted each other," Tommy 

Sands said. "We didn't let a little 

thing like her parents having a 

lot of money stand in our way." 

He glanced across to the kitchenette 

of the tiny New York apartment 

where a pretty girl was fixing a 

snack. Nancy Sinatra Sands caught 

the look, pursed a silent kiss and then went back to slicing the 

I (mm. WH/ ^P store-bought coffee cake. . . . They'd been married a year and 

ill ■ I if/ Wr^ a na ^' ^ ut not until now had they been willing to talk about 

ilPH}^^ \W/ IBB the special problems that had been theirs. They had come from 

such different backgrounds; perhaps at first 
look the only thing they had in common was 
that each came from a broken home. Tom- 
my's youth had been spent in poverty, and, 
when they met, he was just beginning to 
know — for the first 
time — what real money 
was. Still, he was far from 
being in the same finan- 
cial league as Nancy's 
father. Most girls, whether they're aware of it or not, weigh their husband's virtues against their 
father's. In Frank Sinatra's case, there was more than just money on his side of the scale. There 
was fame, success, power — and an almost legendary attraction for women. It would be a hard thing 
for any young man to balance out. At first, both Tommy and Nancy denied that this could have 
created any problems. But then Tommy thought it over. . . . "Getting back to that business of how 
hard it is to marry someone of a different background," he said, "I guess maybe some additional 
problems do arise that you wouldn't find between two people who are used to the same things. 

"Like, for instance, when I decided to move to New York. That was one of the most important 
decisions I had to make, and it was one of the first major readjustments Nancy had to make. 

"I had decided some time ago to ease off the singing and concentrate on becoming an actor. I 
did it by easy stages, you may remember, swearing off rock 'n' roll first. But then I found that saying 
I wanted to be an actor and being one are two different things. There was much to learn and the 
best place to learn is in New York, where the best legitimate-theater acting (Continued on page 86) 









44 




Tommy Sands' problem was how to support 
his bride Nancy Sinatra in the style 
she was used to — but he was not! 










This is the Cleopatn 




i 




I 




m 



0tg 4Afc 




n 





M M 



Diane McBain came flowing through the dressing- 
room door, wearing a blue sheath gown of the 
Roman era. It fit her with precision. The material 
was thin as paper, the neckline dangerously low. 

The cast and crew on the set of "77 Sunset Strip" 
stared open-mouthed at a Diane they hardly recog- 
nized. Even Elizabeth Taylor, playing "Cleopatra" 
thousands of miles away in Rome, might envy 
Diane's fresh beauty. In many ways, the costume 
and the black wig made her look like Liz. Oddly 
enough, their lives had been alike, too, in many 
ways — and one, in particular. They have a man in 
common. 

The script called for Diane to play a movie 
actress in an episode titled "Leap My Lovely" (to 
be seen next fall). Though the writer won't admit 
it out loud, the plot is heavily shaded with over- 
tones of Liz and her version of "Cleopatra." 

The shooting went on through the morning. 
Finally, the director called, "Cut . . . lunch, every- 
one." Diane, deciding it would take too long to 
change, went to the commissary in costume. The 
restaurant fell silent as she entered — dressed as Liz 
Taylor. Diane realized she was being stared at, but 
she thought it was because of the dress and wig. 
She tried to ignore it as she sipped iced tea. 

Yet it was quite a coincidence. Most people were 
unaware of how great an irony it was which had 
Diane playing Cleopatra on the same day that the 
names of Liz and Richard Burton were splashed 
across the headlines. A few, though, remembered . . . 

Diane had been linked with Richard Burton, too. 
They had met while making "Ice Palace" (now 
being re-released) and Diane's friends say she fell 
hard for him. Whispers filled the set all through 
the filming. People insisted they had seen them 
dining here, driving there — always together. What 
attracted her to him was natural and unavoidable. 
She was a Sleeping Beauty, (Please turn the page) 






who made all the headlines . . . 







but. . . 



(Now please turn the page) 

47 




This is the Cleopatn who made all the headlines... 






Diane McBain came flowing through the dressing, 
room door, wearing a blue sheath gown of the 
Roman era. It fit her with precision. The material 
was thin as paper, the neckline dangerously low 
The cast and crew on the set of "77 Sunset Strip' 
stared open-mouthed at a Diane they hardly recog 
nized. Even Elizabeth Taylor, playing "Cleopatra- 
thousands of miles away in Rome, might envy 
Diane's fresh beauty. In many ways, the costume 
and the black wig made her look like Liz. Oddly 
enough, their lives had been alike, too, in many 
ways-and one, in particular. They have a man in 

common. 

The script caUed for Diane to play a' movie 
actress in an episode titled "Leap My Lovely" (to 
be seen next faU). Though the writer won't admit 
it out loud, the plot is heavily shaded with over- 
tones of Liz and her version of "Cleopatra." 

The shooting went on through the morning. 
Finally, the director caUed, "Cut . . . lunch, every- 
one." Diane, deciding it would take too long to 
change, went to the commissary in costume. The 
restaurant feU silent as she entered— dressed as Liz 
Taylor. Diane realized she was being stared at, but 
she thought it was because of the dress and wig. 
She tried to ignore it as she sipped iced tea. 

Yet it was quite a coincidence. Most people were 
unaware of how great an irony it was which had 
Diane playing Cleopatra on the same day that the 
names of Liz and Richard Burton were splashed 
across the headlines. A few, though, remembered . . . 
Diane had been linked with Richard Burton, too. 
They had met while making "Ice Palace" (now 
being re-released) and Diane's friends say she fell 
hard for him. Whispers filled the set all through 
the filming. People insisted they had seen them 
dining here, driving there— always together. What 
attracted her to him was natural and unavoidable. 
She was a Sleeping Beauty, (Please (urn the page 





Other 
Cleopatra 



Burtons 
Life 



still a newcomer to Hollywood and all its prom- 
ises and challenges. He, a prince on a white 
horse, was a proven star on two continents. And 
his way with the ladies was well-known. Still, 
Burton was a married man; Diane had to ac- 
cept that reality. Abruptly, there were no longer 
reports of her being seen with him. 

"Diane was terribly crushed," a close friend 
said, "when she had to call the romance off. She 
became moody and kept to herself a lot." 

Time, however, seemed to help. Yet now time 



has caught up with Diane again. What does she 
remember? What does she feel about Burton's 
new Cleopatra? Diane is wisely keeping those 
answers to herself. Outwardly, she showed no 
emotion when she finally learned about Liz and 
Burton later that day. 

One thing, though, is certain. Diane McBain, 
although the junior in age and experience, could 
probably give Miss Taylor some solid advice. It 
is sometimes better to lose than to win — where 
a married man is concerned. — Dean Gautschy 



48 




FORTUNE- 
MISFORTUNE? 




You know what you like, when you look at 
other people — but do you really know what 
you see? Or what others see, when they 
look at you? You can have fun . . . make 
a fortune out of faces . . . learn a lot about 
yourself, your friends, the famous folk you 
see on TV! Physiognomy, it's called, this 
"science of reading character from the 
shape and lines of the face," and it's the 
fascinating hobby of an English banker 
who cloaks his true identity under the name 



IS YOUR 

FACE 
YOUR 



of Cyro while he shares his secrets with 
you. Read his analytic profiles of six out- 
standing figures from today's headlines. 
You may raise an eyebrow at some of the 
portraits — but they may open your eyes, 
at the same time. As Cyro points out, both 
social and business success depend on 
being able to sum up — on sight — the 
characters you meet. Such an ability can 
help you save face . . . choose your mate 
... or even explain why you chose the 
one you did. Just turn the page and learn 
the "rules" for judging true face-value! 




49 




PERRY COM©: This is a 
face you'd instinctively trust — 
and you'd be right. The laugh- 
lines at the eye-corners are a 
sign of a relaxed person with a 
keen sense of humor and a lively 
imagination. The wiry, naturally 
wavy hair indicates intelligence 
and stamina, and the rather 
flattish contour of the head in- 
dicates a capacity for enjoyment. 
The forehead — round, high and 
full at the temples — shows an in- 
quiring mind, an excellent mem- 
ory and an innate shyness. The 
nose, straight and clean-cut, de- 
notes great courage — and stub- 
bornness. The mouth, more often 
than not with parted lips, indi- 
cates energy and a need to be 
liked. The low-set, sparse eye- 
brows are a sign of an affection- 
ate and kindly nature. Overall: A 
well-integrated person who has 
had problems and solved them. 



DICK CHAMRER- 

LAIN: This unusually 
long face is a clue to adapt- 
ability — and moodiness. 
The chin is that of a some- 
what aloof person, who 
makes friends easily but re- 
sists deep friendships. The 
large well-shaped eyes show 
humor but also ambition. 
The straight, fine eyebrows, 
slightly lighter than his 
hair, denote a capacity to 
learn quickly. The ears, set 
high and irregular in shape, 
show generosity. The fine, 
wavy hair is a sign of a 
romantic. The suspicion of 
a dimple indicates a toler- 
ant nature. The large depth 
of jaw below the ear de- 
notes decisiveness and very 
strong will-power. To sum 
up: A person who doesn't 
say all .that he is thinking. 



50 





•JACKIE KENNEDY: 

This is obviously the face of a 
lively-minded, optimistic, tal- 
ented woman with a zest for life. 
From the wide gap between 
middle points of her eyebrows, 
and the wide bridge of her nose, 
you can deduce courage, grit 
and determination. The square- 
ness of the face and chin show a 
love of fair play and a forceful 
character. The short but well- 
shaped nose, above a narrow lip, 
is a sign of impulsiveness and 
fearlessness. The eyes, spaced 
much farther apart than average, 
indicate humor, straight thinking 
and loyalty. The fine, virile hair 
is that of a healthy though not 
robust person. Overall, this small, 
square face is that of a person 
who can make friends in every 
stratum of society, whose desire 
to see and do everything is lim- 
ited only by human endurance. 




CONNIE STEVENS: 

Here is an open and trustworthy 
face, guileless and friendly. The 
chin is broad and round with 
firm contours denoting forth- 
rightness and determination. The 
nose, finely molded with small 
nostrils and well-defined bridge, 
shows generosity and an even 
temper. The short upper lip and 
bow-shaped mouth indicate a 
happy disposition. The well- 
spaced eyes (precisely the length 
of an eye apart) are a sign of 
level-headedness and honesty. 
The eyebrows — low, well marked 
but irregular in shape — show she 
likes people and needs affection 
herself. The ears — set rather low, 
with small lobes and a well- 
defined rim — show sensitivity, 
tolerance and sympathy. The 
high round forehead shows in- 
telligence. The heart-shaped face 
is ambitious — likely to succeed. 



ELVIS PRESLEY: 

The finely molded, slightly 
pointed chin shows serenity 
— and also determination. 
The nose, a little short and 
broad at the nostrils, sug- 
gests he is impulsive. The 
short upper lip (with fuller 
lower lip) denotes kindli- 
ness. The mouth, with lips 
usually parted, is a sign of 
energy and courage. The 
way he holds his mouth 
indicates wit and an ability 
to make friends. His hazel 
eyes, deep set with low 
brows and soft laugh-lines, 
show a love of justice, as 
well as humor. The ears — 
with the tips slightly higher 
than the center of the eyes 
— show sympathy. The con- 
siderable depth of jaw be- 
low ears shows a capacity 
to make quick decisions. 





. 




Vincent edwards: 

The face of a hard-working, in- 
telligent, alert man. The low-set 
eyebrows, slightly irregular in 
shape, are evidence of an unusu- 
al self-sufficiency. The rounded 
chin, with its suspicion of a cleft, 
shows a strong masterful nature 
that wants its own way. The nose, 
with its deep bridge, shows toler- 
ance and the physical ability to 
achieve his ambitions. The lips, 
frequently pressed together, show 
determination and possibly re- 
serve. The dark brown eyes, well- 
spaced and deep-set, mean he's 
loyal to friends — and ideals. The 
straight, virile dark hair shows 
good health and a fiery temper, 
though it's slow to rouse. The 
overall impression: A man who 
.doesn't bother about public 
opinion as long as he knows he's 
right ... a romantic, sentimental 
man who pretends to be hard. 









51 








*r& 



\%>%: 



Jh 




CM 








The Roger Smiths 



^mHWbi 




&■' 



n 






M 



OH 
BROTHER! 



It'll go down in history as the Battle of the Thermostats. You see, Vici and Roger have 
always kept their house at seventy degrees. Sometimes they would vary as far as seventy- 
one. But when Vici's family moved in with them, they found that suffocating. "You can get 
pneumonia coming out of a hot house into the cool air," said Vici's mom. 

As for Roger's mother, she likes it hot. So, when Vici's family came from Australia and 
Roger's family came from New Mexico and they all piled into the house in the valley — 
you can imagine! There were now nine people in a house that was comfortable for two 
adults and two small children. 

They'd let the maid go, Roger and his father-in-law built an extra room onto the 
house, Roger bought five new beds . . . but someone was always sneaking out of one of 
them to jiggle that thermostat! No one ever actually saw anyone else do it, but the mercury 
sure wandered up and down. When Roger's mother and brother were comfortable and 
sleeping peacefully, the Aussies were smothering; when they could sleep, the rest of the 
household was freezing. 

It came to a climax the day everyone was sick. The kids had bronchitis (because the 
house was too hot, if you asked Vici's relatives) . . . Mrs. Elphick, Vici's mom, hurt her 
elbow . . . Mr. Elphick had the flu . . . and Vici collapsed with {Continued on page 91) 






*»d 



53 




The Roger Smith! 



OH 
BROTHER! 



It'll go down in history as the Battle of the Thermostats. You see, Vici and Roger have 
always kept their house at seventy degrees. Sometimes they would vary as far as seventy- 
one. But when Vici's family moved in with them, they found that suffocating. "You can get 
pneumonia coming out of a hot house into the cool air," said Vici's mom. 

As for Roger's mother, she likes it hot. So, when Vici's family came from Australia and 
Roger's family came from New Mexico and they all piled into the house in the valley — 
you can imagine! There were now nine people in a house that was comfortable for two 
adults and two small children. 

They'd let the maid go, Roger and his father-in-law built an extra room onto the 
house, Roger bought five new beds ... but someone was always sneaking out of one of 
them to jiggle that thermostat! No one ever actually saw anyone else do it, but the mercury 
sure wandered up and down. When Roger's mother and brother were comfortable and 
sleeping peacefully, the Aussies were smothering; when they could sleep, the rest of the 
household was freezing. 

It came to a climax the day eveiyone was sick. The kids had bronchitis (because the 
house was too hot, if you asked Vici's relatives) . . . Mrs. Elphick, Vici's mom, hurt her 
elbow . . . Mr. Elphick had the flu . . . and Vici collapsed with (CorUiaued on page 91) 



53 



Three, problems in i ne u'tear tionzon : 



1. Should a husband tell his ivife everything? 

2. Is (i lie. ever justified? 

3. Hon: much should a mother tell her son? " 



CAN YOU LEARN T 



54 



Every month, a doctor looks at TVs daytime dramas and 
tells you what you can learn about yourself from them 



It's often said that TV daytime dramas are so 
popular because they're so filled with problems — 
usually, with the inference that these problems 
would be wildly unreal in actual life! If you're a 
typical viewer, you'd be the first to say this isn't 
so. You follow your favorite serial because you 
"recognize" the characters and the basic dilemmas 
they face. Their success depends upon how closely 
they actually resemble you and your own problems. 
But — from the standpoint of modern psychology — 
do you really learn from their experiences? Can 
the solutions they find, on TV, 
help you in real life? Because 
millions look in on these pro- 
grams each day, and are often 
deeply affected by what they see, 
these are important questions. To 



by ARTHUR HENLEY 
with 

Dr. ROBERT L.W0LK 



get the answers, we'll analyze a different drama in 
these pages each month, treating the characters as 
real people and their problems as real problems — 
with my descriptions in regular text type, and Dr. 
Wolk's comments in italics. Our first subject is 
"The Clear Horizon," which presents several in- 
teresting aspects, morally and psychologically, as 
well as the general question of what you can learn 
about yourself while watching television. 

From the psychological viewpoint, it is perfectly 
healthy to watch a TV drama unfold and see others 
wrestle with problems similar to 
one's own; this makes one's own 
problems seem less serious and 
easier to cope with. In fact, this 
is the basis of group psycho- 
therapy. (Continued on page 94) 



Pictured in these scenes, in order of first appearance: Ed Kemmer and Phyllis Avery as Anne and Roy Selby ; 
Earl Hammond as a Russian officer and Michael Fox as injured Sig Levy; Charles Herbert as young Ricky. 




LIVE WITH DEATH? 



55 



sag* 



- ■ I 










THE ONE MAN 





P 




At a secret Paris meeting, Hitch- 
cock talked: his wife Alma and 
Prince Rainier listened. Finally, 
Grace got a word in. It was "Yes." 






[ Perhaps you wouldn't 

I believe it to look 

at him, but 

Alfred Hitchcock 

has a way wit h wo m en 



GRACE KELLY 

COULDN'T 
SAY 4 'NO" TO 



With the speed of a man losing a fortune at the gaming tables of Monte Carlo, the 
news spread. Grace Kelly was coming back to Hollywood! Just as quickly, the rumors 
began. Why was she doing it, people wondered. Why should Her Serene Highness want 
to be a working girl again? Noblesse oblige it certainly wasn't. Some said it was 
because Grace was finding life at the palace dull. Others blamed it all on Charles de 
Gaulle and the French Premier's threat to introduce carefree Monaco to the quaint 
custom of income tax. If that happened, they said, Grace would have to go to work in 
order to make the royal budget come out even. Still others said you couldn't blame 
everything on de Gaulle (wasn't Algeria enough?). They explained that the princess 
wanted to be a movie queen again so she could bring some of {Continued on page 89) 



57 




JACK LINKLETTER: 




f 





Art Linkletter hugs grandsons 
Mike and Dennis. Son Jack 
smiles — but he has his own 
ideas about how to bring up 
his two lively little boys! 




S9* 



ft\ 



c 



7 



w 



{ 







Same MISTAKES My Father Made 



11 



On a sun-dappled spring day a few years ago, when 
future "Here's Hollywood" host Jack Linkletter was 
at Emerson Junior High, heading into his blue-jeans- 
busting teens, he and a school chum decided to run 

away There was no good reason for the caper; Jack 

and his pal were no more "misunderstood" at home 
than any other thirteen-year-olds in their swaggering, 
boisterous crowd. Emerson did have a hard-nosed, fist- 
swinging, often troublesome element, and Jack was 
part of it. But for Art Linkletter's oldest son there had 
been no real panic at school, except perhaps for a few 
bad grades and his unwillingness to crack a book for 
months on end. . . . True, young Jack secretly resented, 
like so many Hollywood celebrities' kids, having to live 
up to Papa's fame. (His dad, Art Linkletter, was already 
a top entertainment star.) But mostly the running away 
was because the two lads were^-at (Continued on P a Se 76) 



59 




People 

are 

talking, 

but 
Annette's 

answer is: 



IT HAPPENS 

TO EVERY GIRL 




60 




Only yesterday, she was a child, a 
Disney Mouseketeer . . . playing with 
baby-brother Mike . . . roughhousing 
with bigger Joey, just three years 
her junior . . . leaving her room a 
wind-tossed heap of dolls. Today, she 
is a woman ... a Little tremulous 
at the thought of leaving her teens 
behind, next fall . . . but achingly 
eager to face the adult world. 

Annette Funicello is now nineteen, 
very much in romantic Rome and 
quite possibly in love! As days grow 
warmer and nights expand, Italians 
beam to see {Please turn the page) 







. 









61 



IT HAPPENS ONCE 

TO EVERY GIRL 



her walking hand in hand with a 
gallant cavalier. To them, it is most 
natural that it should happen here. 
Youth's the time for love, and Rome 
the very place to give it a never-to- 
be-forgotten setting. 

And how (even if she wanted to) 
could Annette resist one of their 
handsomest young men? Any girl 
(even a so-famous American) would 
enjoy making movies with Nino Cas- 
telnuovo. As for making love . . . ! 

But, to her many fans back here, 
it comes as something of a surprise. 
Just months ago, Annette was skip- 
ping lightheartedly through the fan- 
tasy of "Babes in Toyland." Now, 
she's a full-grown heroine in Walt 
Disney's "Escapade in Florence." 

Dates? Of course, she had them — 
but never while working on a film. 
Never any that led to speculation she 
might elope — even when Paul Anka 
was writing songs to her. Somehow, 
she seemed always to return to her 
old friends among the Mouseketeers 
... as though seeking reassurance. 

A parlor game, a good turn around 
the dance floor — a girl's first kiss 
can come and go before she knows it, 
when she clings to childhood pals. 
But a kiss in Rome is very differ- 
ent! As different as dating a boy 
you never set eyes on, till this year 
... a boy with melting eyes and 
the charming manners which make 
even a young European seem already 
wise in the ways of the world. . . . 

As for career, that's something 



continued 




i 



Annette and Nino: Is there a chance 
for this summer romance to last? 



Annette has always taken seriously 
— with a poignantly childlike inten- 
sity. Fans heard her say she'd rather 
act than sing . . . and thought of 
that as something far off in the fu- 
ture, while they went on cherishing 
her young-as-spring records. 

They saw her bob her hose (perma- 
nently) and bleach her hair (tempo- 
rarily) in search of "glamour." Like 
her Hollywood friends, they felt that 
the more "sophisticated" she became, 
the younger she looked. 

They noted all the signs of ado- 
lescence . . . and forgot it must all 
lead to maturity someday. 

When did Annette grow up? Per- 
haps her family noticed first. Mike, 
when her primping monopolized the 
bathroom for hours . . . Joey, when 
her calls monopolized the family 
phone . . . her mother, the morning 
Annette got up early and actually 
cleaned the kitchen "as a surprise!" 

Or perhaps Nino Castelnuovo was 
the first to realize it, the moment 
their hands touched. Here, in these 
exclusive, off-guard pictures, is no 
shy uncertainty, no wistful wavering 
between tomboy impulse and the 
eternal feminine. 

When Annette says, "A rivederci, 
Roma," will she leave a bit of her 
heart behind? Will she come back as 
a Signora ... or more receptive to 
the idea of becoming a Mrs.? 

It happens once to every girl. And 
no red-blooded male ever dreamed of 
changing that plot! — Irene Storm 



62 



WHEN HE NEEDS THEM, WHERE ARE 



T 



i 




«. 





For the answer, turn the page 








Do they remember the fame he brought them-or the tears? 

He had so many of them once, both TV shows and loyal members of "his gang." On mike and camera, day and 
night — no matter what the title — it was always "Arthur Godfrey and His Friends." All the Little Godfreys 
whom he helped to fame . . . and who helped make him the Mr. Big of CBS . . . where are they now? Some left 
in tears, some smiling. Some have flourished, some dropped out of sight. If he could gather them together again, 
would the story be different today? . . . It's no secret that the once-fabulous redhead still yearns for the spotlight. 
No secret that CBS-TV somehow couldn't find time recently for even a Godfrey special — and that this fact 
sent Godfrey flirting with another network. Now he has signed with CBS again (Continued on page 66) 



Starting as Arthur's announcer in 1945, 
Tony Marvin lasted longer than any other 
— until mid- 1 959 — on both radio and TV. 
Says Tony, "It was my job to keep a step 
ahead of Godfrey." Was that the trouble? 



Five years a symbol of Godfrey's in- 
terest in Hawaii, Holelolce stopped 
singing when he let her go. But she 
has a rare distinction: He hired her 
again this year — though not on-air. 



Sweet duets of Frank Parker and Marion Marlowe 
made them seemingly permanent Little God- 
freys, convinced many fans they were really in 
love. However, it was a romance with another 
man entirely which led to Marion's dismissal. 




~_ 




The Chordettes are an enduring quartet, but not always the same four 
girls. In their Godfrey heyday: Carol Bushman, Janet Ertel, Lynn Evans 
and Margie Needham. Matrimony is responsible for almost every 
change in the group — including their departure from Arthur's shows. 



All show biz was proud of Jim Lewis, Tom Lockard, Nat Dickerson and 
Martin Karl. ("There's always been an ideal behind The Mariners," 
said Nat.) First interracial "regulars" on any network, The Mariners 
joined Godfrey in 1945, for nearly ten years — have now disbanded. 




Top arranger and conductor from Broadway, Archie Bleyer committed 
two crimes in the redheaded impresario's code: He started his own 
business — using Godfrey stars — and also fell in love with one of them. 
As head of Cadence Records, he proved this kind of "crime" can pay! 



Young Lu Ann Simms and Julius La Rosa had audiences sighing of 
"young love" with their songs. But, off stage, Julie fell head-over-heels 
for the wrong girl. And — though Lu Ann kept her job after her own 
marriage — she found "maternity leave" turned into "walking papers." 







Of all the famous Little Godfreys, the McGuire Sisters — Christine, 
Phyllis and Dorothy — left Arthur on the best terms, have been the 
most successful. Could he get them back, if he wanted? Not likely, at 
current prices! And they have their own plans, romantic and otherwise. 



Janette Davis was with Godfrey a dozen years, from singing on radio 
in 1946 to helping produce his TV shows in 1958. Her loyalty's never 
been questioned — but could she be lured from retirement? Now wed, 
Jan says, "I'm content being a housewife and raising the children." 



65 



ARTHUR GODFREY 



(Continued from page 64) 
— in an unprecedented contract for one 
year only — with the assurance that his 
daily radio program will continue, and 
a "guarantee" of three TV specials dur- 
ing the coming season. 

But it's a far cry from the 1940s 
and '50s, when TV was dominated by 
"Arthur Godfrey Time" in the morn- 
ing, "Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts," 
"Arthur Godfrey and His Friends" and 
just plain "Arthur Godfrey Show" at 
night . . . when all the Little Godfreys 
seemed actual members of the family in 
living rooms from coast to coast. 

The fire in that family hearth is 
cold now, but does Arthur Godfrey ever 
remember the days when they all gath- 
ered, seemingly happy, around its 
warmth? Like any head of a family 
who wakes one day to find himself 
alone, Arthur might well wonder what 
happened — and how? One thing he 
can't forget: The members of his fam- 
ily did not run away from home; one 
by one, for many different reasons, it 
was he who sent them packing. 

Remembering those days, does he 
ever wonder what would happen if he 
asked them — now — to come back? 

Tony Marvin, for one, would prob- 
ably come a-running. He fondly recalls 
those years which brought him the 
mansion on Long Island where he still 
lives, with his wife Dorothea and daugh- 
ter Lynda Ann. Tony's now active in 
radio, but his heart's still in TV — the 
old Godfrey kind. They were good days. 
The only time Arthur spoke harsh 
words to Tony — on TV — was that 
moment in February, 1954: "You and 
that big fat mouth of yours! " More typi- 
cal was the excuse he gave, when he 
told Tony in June, 1959, that there'd be 
no place for him on his new series be- 
cause it would be so informal "a man 
of your high caliber would be a luxury." 
Tony said then, "That old flatterer! 
I hope he lives to be 9,000 years old." 
Today, he still admits he misses the 
Godfrey shows: "It was a challenge, 
but a great deal of fun. You never knew 
what was coming up." 

Julius LaRosa certainly never knew. 
Never suspected he'd become the first 
man in history to be fired right on TV. 
From the moment in November, 1951, 
when he started with Godfrey, until 
that fateful October 19th, 1953, this 
ex-sailor had endeared himself to the 
public with his singing, his naivete 
and youthful bounce. 

Unfortunately, he'd also endeared 
himself — or vice versa — to a lovely 
young lady on the program who was 
not yet divorced from her G.I. husband. 
The resultant publicity "embarrassed" 
Godfrey, who was already more than 
annoyed because Julie had hired him- 
self an agent and was seeking outside 
assignments at higher pay. Julie, said 
T Arthur, had lost his "humility." 
v LaRosa was then just 23. Starting 

r with a series of guest shots for Ed 
Sullivan, he made $302,000 the first 
year after leaving Godfrey. Now 32, 
66 



he s happily married to Perry Como's 
former secretary, Rosemary Meyer, and 
they live in a nice New York apart- 
ment with their baby, Marcia Lucia. 

He's been working hard to improve 
himself, as both singer and actor, and 
has done very well. "I'm just starting 
to be a real talent," he says. 

The McGuire Sisters were always on 
good terms with Godfrey — even though 
it was Dorothy McGuire who figured in 
the much-publicized "romance" with 
LaRosa. And anyone who buys rec- 
ords or goes to swank niteries knows 
how successful this singing trio has 
become. 

It's a little harder to keep up with 
their private lives. Dottie, 32 and long 
since divorced from her G.I., quietly 
wed a Canadian oil man, Lowell Wil- 
liamson, in 1959 and has a son, Rex. 
Christine, 34 and married to John 
Teeter, has two sons by a previous mar- 
riage: Harold, who's in the Navy; Asa, 
16 and in boarding school. 

Phyllis, 31 and divorced from Neal 
Van Ells, has been many times reported 
engaged but insists she hasn't married 
again. She went to a psychiatrist for 
three years, to straighten out her ad- 
mitted feelings of insecurity. Chris is 
now doing the same. Meanwhile, their 
careers continue to zoom. 

Shipwreck for four 

The McGuires don't need it, but God- 
frey has actually held out a helping 
hand to others whom he fired. The 
Mariners, for instance, who already 
had their own show on CBS Radio 
when they joined him — 'way back in 
'45. The group, first formed while all 
were members of the U.S. Coast Guard, 
consisted then of Tom Lockard, bari- 
tone; Nat Dickerson, tenor; Martin 
Karl, baritone; Jim Lewis, bass. 

These four had almost ten good 
years with Arthur, grossed $250,000 the 
first year after he let them go — then 
almost literally fell to pieces when re- 
placements had to be made. Tom was 
first to quit, tired of traveling and eager 
to spend more time with his wife Vir- 
ginia Osborn (who's also sung with The 
Chordettes). Then Jim left, subsequent- 
ly becoming a history teacher in 
Connecticut. 

Nat and Martin tried to keep the 
group together with two new men, Gabe 
Meinhardt and Coyle McMahon, but 
their bookings didn't cover traveling ex- 
penses. In January, 1959, they wrote 
their old boss, asking for help. Godfrey 
invited them to "drop in" on his pro- 
gram, kept them on for weeks, but 
the tide was ebbing fast. The Mariners 
finally washed out — and no one's sorrier 
than Arthur. 

Yes, Godfrey can be kind to former 
employees. He brought Haleloke Ka- 
hauolupua from Hawaii in October, 
1950, and she happily sang on his 
shows for the next five years. When 
her contract wasn't renewed then, she 
sat in the Manhattan apartment she'd 
leased — gazing at a solid wall-full of 
Godfrey snapshots — and resolutely told 
reporters that she was "neither hurt nor 
bitter." 

Yet she turned from performing and 



went into business, first a job with 
Orchids of Hawaii, then a gift shop. 

Last winter, Godfrey offered her the 
job of social director at his Kenilworth 
Hotel, in Miami Beach, and she ac- 
cepted gratefully. 

Arthur had discovered Hale in per- 
son, on his second vacation in Hawaii. 
He found LaRosa in the Navy, hired 
him immediately upon discharge a year 
later. Others were "Talent Scout" win- 
ners — but one never really auditioned 
at all. Arthur hired pert, redheaded 
Janette Davis, sight unseen, just from 
a recording of her voice. 

That was in April, 1946. When the 
last Little Godfrey contract expired in 
June, 1957, and Arthur decided to rely 
solely on guest appearances from such 
promising newcomers as Pat Boone and 
Carmel Quinn — plus occasional visits 
from some former regulars — Jan Davis 
stayed on salary. 

She did it by switching from perform- 
ing to producing — something she'd been 
dabbling in since 1949, at Godfrey's 
own suggestion. And it was backstage 
that Jan found lasting romance. In 
October, 1957, she married Frank Musi- 
ello, associate producer of "Talent 
Scouts." The following August — a week 
or so after Frank left to take a job 
on another network — CBS announced: 
"Miss Davis is retiring to private life." 
Her retirement seems permanent. She 
has a lovely home on Long Island and 
is devoted to Frank's son and daugh- 
ter from his first marriage. 

Marriage and the Godfrey program 
never seemed to mix well. Perhaps 
Arthur — like many a Hollywood V.I.P. 
— believed his starlets had more audi- 
ence appeal in single blessedness. Per- 
haps he felt their first and only loyalty 
should be to himself and the shows, 
just as he resented their taking on any 
outside interests — -particularly, going 
into business for themselves. 

Musical director Archie Bleyer, who 
came to him from Broadway in 1946, 
managed to run afoul of both rules, 
some seven years later. In 1953, he 
organized Cadence Records and re- 
leased discs by Julius LaRosa (the 
Unhumble) and Don McNeill (rival 
daytime host on another net) . Archie 
also took both a romantic and a pro- 
fessional interest in a singing group 
on "Godfrey Time." 

The Chordettes had come from She- 
boygan, Wisconsin, to win on "Talent 
Scouts" in September, 1949, and stayed 
to become Godfrey's favorite "female 
barbershop quartet." Until 1953, that 
is. By this time, two of the original 
members had retired to marriage and 
motherhood, but Janet Ertel and Carol 
Bushman were still singing "bass" and 
"baritone," augmented by Lynn Evans 
and Margie Needham as the "tenors." 

Carol was married to Janet's brother 
Bob, Lynn was the wife of an insur- 
ance man, and Margie was about to 
wed Walter Lazko, The Chordettes' 
musical arranger. But Janet was no 
longer married, and Archie was about 
to be divorced. 

In November, Bleyer was bounced 
from Godfreydom, hot on LaRosa's 
heels. Things happened fast in 1954: 
(Continued on page 73) 



A MAN 



MIDWEST 




A- 



^jj0^^^ 



A^Hr/ 



OF NOTE 



Gordon Hinkleys surrounded 
by them — musical ones and 
those written by fans. 
And they all have to do 
with his job as music 
supervisor of Station WTMJ 



"We hear and read a lot, these days, about 'good' music coming 
back. It never left our station." That statement comes from the 
man who basically determines what popular records are played 
on Milwaukee's WTMJ. He's Gordon Hinkley, Popular Music 
Supervisor, as well as a featured personality on several WTMJ 
and WTMJ-TV shows. . . . Gordon currently is featured on four 
programs: An early, early record show, "Top 0' The Morning," 
Monday through Friday from 6:30 to 9:30 A.M., on which he 
plays what he calls "lively" morning music while keeping south- 
eastern Wisconsin residents up-to-date on weather and road con- 
ditions, the correct time and other important information; "Ask 
Your Neighbor," a 25-minute weekday feature on which house- 
wives — -and an occasional male listener — call to ask for solutions 
to minor problems they have run into. ("I'm probably the world's 
best-informed male when it comes to such domestic problems 
and procedures," Gordon comments. "But it does create problems 
for me — Joyce [his wife] says, if I'm such an authority on home- 
making, how come I don't do more around the place?") ; "To- 
night—Milwaukee," WTMJ-TV's 15-minute prelude to NBC's 
"Tonight" show, on which he chats informally with top celebrities 
visiting Milwaukee; and "Invitation to Beauty," an hour-long 
classical and semi-classical music program sponsored by a fine 
suburban restaurant. . . . Gordon and Joyce — high-school sweet- 
hearts who were married in 1943, just before Gordon entered 
service — live in a modest Cape Cod home in suburban Whitefish 
Bay, with their three children (as seen in the picture below). 




Family musicale: Gordon, wife Joyce, children — Jeff, 13; Lynn, 11; List, 8. 



67 



This handsome star of TV's "Whiplash" wields 

a powerful whip hand at home, but 

it's made entirely of love 




It's obvious Peter is always 

surrounded by beautiful women and 

he loves every minute of it. Said women are 

wife Joan — daughters Kelly, 11; Claudia, 8; Amanda, 4 



68 



. 



Peter Graves, tall, blond, good-looking and successful, is a Hollywood phenomenon — a happy actor. 
Not only is he content with his job, but he's a devoted family man who shuns the usual star's social life, 
preferring to spend his evenings at home in Pacific Palisades. "I've got no complaints," he grins 
happily. "Why should I, with two series on TV, a wonderful wife and three daughters? I've also got 
good friends and I like my work. Could a man ask for more?" ... At 15, Peter was already one of 
the youngest full-fledged members of the Musician's Union. He played clarinet and saxophone with 
local groups in Minneapolis (where he was born "Aurness" — he's the brother of "Gunsmoke's" Jim 
Arness!) and occasionally got a chance to "sit in" with visiting big-name bands. At 16, he decided 
he wanted to be a radio announcer and talked WNIN into giving him a job after school. Upon grad- 
uation, he enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. . . . Two years later, taking advantage of the G.I. Bill of 
Rights, the ambitious Peter enrolled at the University of Minnesota as a drama major. To earn extra 
money, he continued playing the sax and radio-announcing parttime. He also fell in love with a viva- 
cious coed, Joan Endress. As soon as he collected his degree, he headed for Hollywood. There were 

times when Peter slept in his 
car because he had no rent 
money. But he doesn't think 
of those days as having been 
unpleasant. "A bit of strug- 
/^\\ )t^l *"~ """ __^g gling toughens you up," he 

™ ' "''•■-J™ ■ H?*SSn?*^B^^^^^^^^^^M points out, "and makes you 

more grateful for the break 
when it comes." . . . Mean- 
while, Peter was finding that 
the old adage about absence 
making the heart grow fond- 
er was true. He sent for Joan 
and they were married on 
the proverbial shoestring. It 
proved to be the turning 
point for him, as producer 
Frank Melford saw him in 
his first big TV role and cast 
him in "Rogue River." A 
number of important movie 
roles followed, in "Stalag 
17," "Beneath the Twelve- 
Mile Reef," "Night of the 
Hunter," and "Fort Yuma." 
. . . The actor was hesitant 
about accepting an offer to 
star in the Western TV se- 
ries, "Fury," because he felt his real future was in motion pictures. But he decided that a family 
man must consider the present, so he accepted. TV producer Ben Fox also had his eye on Peter and 
moved in with an offer: How would Peter like to star in "Whiplash," a story dealing with the ex- 
citing days of the gold rush in Australia? . . . The thought of six months' filming "down under" in- 
trigued Graves and he signed for the role of Freeman ("Chris") Cobb, an American from Boston 
who founds a stageline in Australia. . . . Stateside, the family lives in a Spanish-style house in Pa- 
cific Palisades with the family pet, "Mandy," a springer spaniel. Peter keeps his 6-foot-2 frame lean 
and hard through swimming, surfing and horseback riding, three of his favorite sports. 




69 




<m® 



Although Hal Murray loves doing his 
early-morning daily show for KDWB, 
he does admit that it sometimes gets 
a bit nerve-wracking. Says he with a 
grin, "I'm the only guy I know who 
can thread the needle of a sewing 
machine while it's still in motion!" 
Such is the brand of humor, thou- 
sands of listeners in the Minneapolis- 



St. Paul area are treated to every 
morning. . . . Hal actually began his 
career at WATL. One day, the an- 
nouncer on a show called "Afternoon 
Swing Session" was ill and Hal filled 
in, and gave it all he had in the way 
of gags, puns, etc. Soon, the switch- 
board was lit up like a Broadway 
marquee with queries of "Who is that 



nut?" The nut remained until he 
moved on to better things at various 
stations, finally arriving at KDWB. 
. . . While Hal was appearing at the 
Gallery Circle Theater in New Or- 
leans, he kept looking off-stage at a 
pretty prop manager named Elise 
Taylor. She eventually became Mrs. 
Murray and now there are two little 



70 




Hal and Elise pursue respective hobbies as often as possible. 




( 



V* 




Hal spends many hours preparing for his show. 




K 



Hal's wife Elise has to use ingenious methods to wake him. 



Meet KDWB's merry 
morning madman, who spins 
his show jest for fun 



comics in the family — Michael, 4, 
and Mark, 2. . . . All four Murrays 
figure ten must be their lucky num- 
ber. Hal was born on October 10; 
Elise on February 10; Michael on 
September 10; and Mark on Novem- 
ber 10. It's ten to one, too, that Hal 
Murray will be regaling his listeners 
for a long time to come! 




Here's the rest of the merry Murray clan — Michael, 4, Mark, 2. 



71 



Meet the busiest man on Columbus 
TV — WTVN-TV's Gene Fullen, 
who loves every minute of it 





The Fullen family: Gene and wife Ruth with 
David, 10; Sally, 12; Brian, 1; and Kevin, 5. 



emm. «iE/' 1 4 21 '£&' 
Bowling show: Gene tries keeping up with ladies. 



WTVN-TV's Gene Fullen is known around Columbus as "the 
busiest man on television" but that is not quite accurate. Oh, 
he does do an interview show, "Guest Room," and a bowling 
show, "Spare Time," and a quiz show, "Dialing for Dollars," 
and guest shots on shows like "The Real McCoys." But he is — 
believe it or not — even busier off television! For example, he 
raises fruit trees, flies a plane, takes colored movies, refinishes 
furniture, emcees at dance parties for young people, plays the 
bass viol, and runs a small ceramics business. His ambition? To 
retire at 55! Chances are Gene will be much too busy then! 



72 



(Continued from page 66) 
Archie signed The Chordettes for Ca- 
dence — their waxing of "Mr. Sandman, 
Send Me a Dream" hit the top of the 
charts — and Janet became Mrs. Bleyer. 

The Chordettes are still in harmony 
today, though there've been further 
changes. Margie's out and Ginny Lock- 
ard's in. Joyce Weston, former publi- 
cist for Frankie Avalon and Fabian, 
replaces Janet when the girls go on 
tour. Janet then stays home to fuss 
over her teen-age daughter and her 
busy recording-executive husband. The 
Bleyers are quite content, thank you, 
with their careers just as they are. 

So is Marion Marlowe, the statuesque 
singing beauty who also found romance 
"behind the scenes." Marion remembers 
vividly that "I started on the Arthur 
Godfrey show on January 9th, 1951, at 
8:22 p.m." She must recall, equally 
clearly, that she was fired on April 
15th, 1955, after falling in love with 
Larry Puck — who'd lost his job as pro- 
ducer of the Wednesday-night show, the 
day their engagement was announced. 

Marion's always expressed gratitude 
for her "wonderful years" with Godfrey, 
but has also confessed: "I felt the 
props were knocked out from under me 
when I was fired, but, thanks to Ed 
Sullivan, I went right back to work 
and I haven't stopped." She's singing 
and acting — and married to Larry. 

The happy-ever-after ending seemed 
to elude the real-life Cinderella of the 
"Godfrey gang" — Lu Ann Simms (Lu- 
cille Ann Ciminelli), who leaped to 
fame from a $33-a-week job behind a 
department store music counter, when 
she won on "Talent Scouts," April 21st, 
1952. 

All seemed smooth sailing and she 
kept her new job, after marrying her 
Prince Charming, Loring Buzzell, in 
1954. A year later, she took leave of 
absence to have her baby, Cynthia. 
Then, before she could return, Lu Ann 
was notified that her contract wouldn't 
be renewed. 

"If I only knew why!" she wailed, 
as she tried to pick up the pieces of her 
career and care for her baby, too. Lu 
Ann wanted lots of babies, felt real 
happiness was in sight when she be- 
came pregnant again. But when little 
Laura was born, in January, 1960, her 
mother was a widow. Loring had died 
unexpectedly of a heart attack — hand- 
some, talented and only 32. 

Lu Ann continued to live on in their 
midtown New York apartment, but went 
back more often to her hometown, to 
visit her parents and many relatives. 
She made new friends there, too — and 
married Casper Stolt, a local liquor 
salesman, just last October. 

She and Casper now live in New 
York, where she keeps an eye on her 
late husband's music publishing inter- 
ests. She makes frequent personal 
appearances, says she's happy, and 
seemingly bears no grudges against 
fate. "Without Godfrey," she says, "I'd 
still be working in a Rochester store." 

But the singer who may owe Arthur 
most of all is the one least likely ever 
to be a Little Godfrey again. Frank 
Parker had once been one of the big- 
gest and most romantic male stars on 



radio, but he was in his mid-forties 
and unemployed when Godfrey gave 
him another chance in 1949. 

It proved to be a most satisfying 
comeback, with TV added for good 
measure. Frank paid off old debts, saved 
money, revived his career. Then, in 
June, 1956, the inevitable came as it 
must to all Little Godfreys. His con- 
tract wasn't renewed. 

Frank guested on other shows, took 
night-club dates, did quite a bit of tele- 
vision — though he observed, in 1958: 
"TV, with its offers of higher stakes 
but threats of shorter life, has made 
beasts of normally nice people. I've seen 
what goes on behind the scenes of many 
big shows, and it isn't pleasant. . . . 

"I was one of the few who got along 
nicely with Arthur Godfrey, and I ap- 



preciate the almost seven years I was 
with him. But one day he'd overwhelm 
me with kindness and the next day he 
wouldn't even speak to me." 

In 1959, Parker moved to Hollywood, 
took a bachelor apartment. "I live 
alone," he explained. "This climate is 
good for my old bones." 

At this late date, it isn't likely Frank 
would want to appear regularly on a 
TV show. But his good wishes will al- 
ways go with the man who gave him a 
big "second chance" years ago. 

No, Arthur Godfrey's former 
"Friends" haven't forgotten him. If it's 
TV he wants, they hope he'll get it. 
With or without them. — Paul Denis 

"Arthur Godfrey Time" is heard on 
CBS Radio, Mon.-Fri., at 9:10 a.m. edt. 




LASTS YEARS 
only 




See For Yourself... 

Revolutionary New 

D 

See-Through Mouth-Piece 
Tells You The 



SMOKE IS SAFER 




HELPS END 
SMOKING WORRIES 

• TRAPS UP TO 80% 
OF IRRITATING TARS 

REDUCES TOOTH STAIN 

NO SACRIFICE IN FLAVOR 



World's first — and only - permanent cigarette filter ...pat- 
ented TAR GUARD traps up to 80% of all irritating, hot tars. 
Takes all the worries out of smoking, lets you enjoy it more. 



NO FILTERS 



NO CRYSTALS 



NO CARTRIDGES 



MAKE THIS FREE 30-DAY TEST 

MAIL COUPON TODAY 



Please send me 



Tar Gard holders at $2.95 each on a 30-day trial 



at your expense. My check or money order is enclosed. If at the end of 
30 days I am not convinced Tar Gard gives me a milder, more enjoyable 
worry-free smoke, I will return it to you and get a full refund. In addition, 
at no added cost, I will receive two extra mouthpieces which I may keep, 
even if I return the Tar Gard. 



Check color preference: □ Amber □ Clear □ Blue 

□ White □ Black Q Green 

Name 

Address. 



□ Pink 

□ Turquoise 



City. 



_Zone_ 



.State- 



TAR GARD CORP. 



P.O. Box 882 



San Diego 12, California 



THE LENNON SISTERS 



lirilPMMIIIlllMli 



IIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIII1IIIIIIIIII 



(Continued from page 29) 
her thoughtful and serious attention. 

Mrs. Kay Esser, a longtime friend 
and neighbor, was sitting in on this 
particular discussion. "I wouldn't count 
Janet out of the race," she laughed. 
"She just might beat these two oldies 
to the altar . . ." 

Young Janet turned pleased and 
grateful eyes on Mrs. Esser. "Well, I've 
read that, in some places, girls marry 
at a very early . . ." 

"We've all heard about those places," 
Sis Lennon interrupted, "but this 
isn't one of them. My opinion, speak- 
ing as their mother, is that Kathy will 
be first. Peg's older, but I have a feel- 
ing she'll shop around quite a bit first." 

Janet promptly dissented. "I think 
Peggy'll be first." But, when chal- 
lenged to give reasons, she shrugged, 
"I'm not sure why, but it seems to me 
Peggy's chances are better." 

"Gee, thanks," retorted Kathy, who's 
the most extroverted of the girls. 

"Well," said Janet, somewhat sub- 
dued, "that's my opinion and I'll stick 
by it." 

As for the two most likely candidates 
to go the route DeeDee did, Kathy and 
Peggy are divided in their views. 
"Peggy will probably take the big step 
first," says Kathy. But Peggy advises, 
"Put your money on Kathy." 

This goodhumored and, as Bill puts 
it, "natural" guessing game has in some 
way filtered out beyond the circle of 
family and friends, and the Lennons 
have received many letters asking ques- 
tions very much to the point. In answer, 
here is the situation as of now. . . . 

There is no one young man in the 
busy, happy life of either Peggy or 
Kathy. Unlike sister Dianne, whose 
heart was committed to a neighborhood 
boy she began dating when still in high 
school, Peggy and Kathy have a goodly 
number of boyfriends whom they date 
as often as their work schedules and 
inclinations allow. 

Bill — who, with sly humor, refers to 
himself as "Father of the Brood" — 
points out that "the phone never stops 
ringing for Kathy." He hastens to add, 
however, "I'll say this, though — she 
dates so many different types that it's 
hard to guess which type she really pre- 
fers. I doubt if she herself is sure. And 
that's probably why she hasn't yet be- 
come serious about any of them. But, 
Kathy has never led a boy on. From 
the start, she's straight from the shoul- 
der and makes it clear that marriage is 
not one of her pressing concerns at the 
moment. If the lad is willing to date on 
a friendly basis, and nothing more com- 
plicated, why, that's fine with her. Of 
course, one of these friendships might 
well develop into love." 

The theory some members of the 

family hold with regard to Peggy — that 

7 she will take her sweet time in picking 

y her mate — is explained this way by Sis 

r Lennon. "Peggy is the sort of girl who 

finds a world of serenity and happiness 

in herself. Sometimes she will go up to 

74 



her room and curl up with a book. I 
may look in on her and ask, 'What are 
you doing?' She'll smile and tell me, 
'Being happy, Mom. . . .' That doesn't 
mean she has no interest in outdoor 
sports and in dating young men. On a 
date, she's as active and has as much 
fun as Kathy, she's just not as gregari- 
ous. But at home she loves to listen to 
classical music, read or sketch. She had 
some art courses in school, and it's an- 
other hobby she enjoys." 

Peggy and Kathy, and in a limited 
sense Janet, too, have their own views 
on the qualities that for them would be 
"plus" in a prospective husband. Their 
tastes and opinions on character seem 
to coincide. "He needn't be wealthy or 
even successful," says Peggy, "but he 
should be a man who does the best 
that's in him at his job." 

"He must like children," muses Janet. 

"Yes," chorus her sisters, "and want 
a real honest-to-goodness home life." 

"And also," Kathy points out, "I'd 
want him to have the same religion. 
That way it's so much simpler, and so 
much better for the children, because 
then there is unity in the home and few- 
er problems develop concerning their 
education and upbringing." 

"Yes," adds Peggy, "too often, when 
parents aren't of the same faith, the 
children become confused and end up 
with no religion." 

"But he would have to be a man free 
of prejudice," Janet puts in. 

Dating and mating 

From Kathy comes the view that 
"There are small, casual and unimpor- 
tant matters where a boy and. girl don't 
really have to agree. They're not big 
enough to upset the balance and har- 
mony of the family, and there's lots of 
room for a little give-and-take on both 
sides. But on the basic things in life, 
there should be unity, for the sake of 
everyone concerned. Otherwise, you 
don't really have enough reason for get- 
ting married. I try to get to know each 
individual boy I date. I give him a 
chance to talk, to express what's in his 
mind and heart. It takes time to dis- 
cover if he has the same basic aims in 
life you have. I don't say he has to be a 
'me-too' type. But if you fight about 
basic things before you're man and 
wife, the chances are you'll keep on 
battling after marriage." 

"I hear some girls talk about chang- 
ing a boy before they'll say yes," Peggy 
says. "I myself don't approve of it. No 
girl has a right to expect a young man 
who's been brought up a certain way 
and is set in his style of living to change 
just for her, and the idea of reforming 
a man because he has a bad trait or 
unpleasant habit . . . well, I don't go for 
that much, either. To me, marriage is 
good when each party keeps his or her 
personality, and somehow both per- 
sonalities, as they mature, grow to- 
gether and become truly one. 

"Dating is great fun . . . and fun is 
the object of dating, mostly. But natu- 
rally, sooner or later, the talk has got to 
come around to conditions in the world 
and problems of life in this period of 
history. For instance, juvenile delin- 



quency is in all the papers and on radio 
and TV and it's only reasonable for 
young folks to discuss it." 

"That's how you lead into more seri- 
ous topics," Janet suggests importantly, 
and is greeted with a tolerant laugh 
from her older sisters. 

"She's right, you know," says Kathy 
after a pause. "Girls should learn how 
to communicate, not only with boy- 
friends, but their family, too. There 
isn't enough communication between 
people on dates . . . and often there isn't 
much of it at home." 

"I think what's happened," ponders 
Peggy, "is that many of the parents of 
teenagers passed through a very rough 
period. A lot of them were born during 
the first world war, then they went 
through a terrible depression, then an- 
other big war — and they didn't want 
their kids to have the tough time they 
did. This is a wonderful intention, but 
what some of them forget is that the 
hard times made them into the fine, de- 
cent people they are. A kid can find 
good values from the school of hard 
knocks. I'm not saying parents should 
constantly throw it up to their children 
that they are lucky to have it so easy. 
Teenagers don't like to be lectured even 
when they agree with the ideas behind 
the lectures. It makes them feel guilty 
and hurts their enjoyment of their own 
better conditions." 

"On the other hand," points out 
Kathy, "most children appreciate things 
more if they have to work for them. 
Almost all college boys I know want 
their own cars. And those who earn 
money with after-school jobs or week- 
end work — why, they seem to get more 
of a bang out of their cars than the boys 
who got one the easy way. Which brings 
up another trait I'd want my husband to 
have — a healthy respect for money and 
a willingness to work for it." 

According to the "mother of the 
brood" (there are eleven children in the 
immediate Lennon family including 
Dianne, a frequent visitor) all dates are 
welcome at the house "if they pass the 
first test." That test, Sis adds with a 
twinkle, is: "Can they feel relaxed in 
the midst of continual bedlam?" An- 
other point in a lad's favor would be a 
liking of sports. "We're all either base- 
ball or football fans or fans of some 
game where competitiveness is involved. 
A sense of humor wouldn't hurt his 
chances, either, of becoming a friend of 
the family." 

"Wouldn't hurt!" shrieks Janet. "In 
this family, you must have a sense of 
humor." 

"Bill and I have no fundamental 
objections to youthful marriages," Sis 
explains. "We follow St. Paul's advice 
on that. I was nineteen and Bill was 
twenty-four when we were married. But 
we were both very sure of what we 
wanted — a home, children, and spend- 
ing the rest of our lives together." 

It is significant that, though Kathy 
and Peggy agree on the qualities they 
prefer in young men, they do not seem 
attracted to the same boys. "Kathy 
goes more for the Latin type — dark 
hair and eyes — and, since she's so 
athletic herself, she likes a fellow who's 
outgoing and athletic," says Peggy. 



Their parents feel that Peggy likes 
the kind of lad who presents a chal- 
lenge in the intellectual sense. She 
likes to discuss books and music. And 
she's the first to ask the younger Len- 
nons if they need help with school work. 
But Kathy, as seen through the eyes 
of her family, is more concerned with 
the physical well-being of her little 
brothers and sisters. She encourages 
them in athletics and would rather be 
out playing ball with them than inside 
reading books. Nevertheless, she seems 
to have acquired a solid fund of in- 
formation through her sharp eyes and 
attentiveness. A practical girl, she 
makes her sister Peggy seem almost a 
dreamer. And their contrast is com- 
plemented by Janet, who is the prank- 
ster of the Lennons. 

Neither of the girls dates men in 
show business and, at this stage, it 
seems unlikely that they'd marry an 
entertainer. "About the only people 
we know in show business," says Kathy, 
"are those in the Welk band. And 
while the men are all wonderful, they're 
married and treat us like kid sisters." 

The girls have no hesitation in facing 
up to the great question: What if they 
fell in love, deeply in love, with young 
men who didn't have the qualities they 
stress or the parallel attitudes they 
prefer in husbands? 

Says Kathy, "Neither Peggy, Janet 
nor I have been really in love as yet. 
But to all of us, marriage is not a dress 
you can put on and throw away when 
you're tired of it. Marriage is a per- 
manent thing. I really don't believe I 
could marry a man who didn't have at 
least most of the qualities I admire." 

"I agree," says Peggy. "I'm sure 
love is a wonderful feeling, but you've 
got to ask yourself, 'Once I put aside 
my emotions, what do I feel? Do I 
really like this man, do I respect him, 
and will love still be there twenty-five 
years after the wedding bells have rung 
out?' I honestly believe it's more im- 
portant to like the person you marry 
than to love him — but I expect to wait 
until I find a man for whom I feel both. 
Just as DeeDee did, Peg and I plan on 
giving up singing and becoming home- 
makers. We both want to build a good 
life with a man who's interested in 
building a good permanent life for his 
family." 

But what if you weren't blessed with 
children? 

"Why," Kathy asserted flatly, "in 
that case, we'd adopt a few." 

And Sis, speaking out of the acquired 
experience and wisdom of her years 
with Bill and the rearing of their happy 
family, summed up with: "Not to share 
your warm, loving home life with little 
ones is to be single people within the 
state of matrimony. A place must be 
found for children even if the dollar 
comes hard. Take away the sound of 
children in the home, and the marriage 
is like a fruit that started out to grow 
nicely but never ripened because it was 
nipped by an early frost . . ." 

— Eunice Field 

The Lennon Sisters sing on "The Law- 
rence Welk Show," seen on ABC-TV, 
Saturdays, from 9 to 10 p.m. edt. 




Let's talk frankly about 

internal 
cleanliness 



Day before yesterday, many women hes- 
itated to talk about the douche even to 
their best friends, let alone to a doctor 
or druggist. 

Today, thank goodness, women are 
beginning to discuss these things freely 
and openly. But — even now — many 
women don't realize what is involved in 
treating "the delicate zone." 

They don't ask. Nobody tells them. 
So they use homemade solutions which 
may not be completely effective, or some 
antiseptics which may be harsh or in- 
flammatory. 

It's time to talk frankly about inter- 
nal cleanliness. 

Here are the facts: tissues in "the deli- 
cate zone" are very tender. Odors are 
very persistent. Your comfort and well- 
being demand a special preparation for 
the douche. Today there is such a prep- 
aration. 

This preparation is far more effective 



in antiseptic and germicidal action than 
old-fashioned homemade solutions. It is 
far safer to delicate tissues than other 
liquid antiseptics for the douche. It 
cleanses, freshens, eliminates odor, 
guards against chafing, relaxes and pro- 
motes confidence. 

This is modern woman's way to inter- 
nal cleanliness. It is the personal antisep- 
tic for women, made specifically for "the 
delicate zone." It is called Zonite®. Com- 
plete instructions for use come in every 
package. In cases of persistent discharge, 
women are advised to see 
their doctors. 

Millions of women al- 
ready consider Zonite as 
important a part of their 
grooming as 
their bath. 
You owe it ^ Gnod 
to yourself 
to try Zonite. 



Guaranteed by 
Honsekeepii 



n 8> 





I 



P/ay Right Away ! 

ANY INSTRUMENT 

Now it's EASY to learn ANY INSTRUMENT— even If 
you don't know a single note now. No boring exercises. 
You start playing delightful little pieces RIGHT AWAY— 
from very first lesson! Properly — by note. Simple as A-B-C. 
You make amazing progress — at home, in spare time with- 
out teacher. Only few cents per lesson. 
1,000,000 students all over the world. 
PBCC DAAV Shows how easy it is to! 
flltt DUUIV learn music this mod- 
ern wav. Write for it. No obligation; no 
salesman will call. U. S. School of Music, 
Studio 207, Port Washington, N. Y. (Est. 
1898.) Tear this out as a reminder. 



T5St«c« , 

a._sl£._J 




65 For $2.00 

(Include 25c for Mailing) 

Genuine Photographs 2%XgJ4 Glamorous 
Double-weight silk finish— Made from your 
Favorite Snapshot, Portrait or Negative- 
returned unharmed. Mail it today between 
cardboards. 



Depl. 15 4204 Troost 
Kansas City 10, AAo. 



GROSS COPY CO. | 



Mw,m 






THE LUCKIEST CHARM OF THEM ALL 



^ONLY 



1125 



««f% 



plus 75 1 for 

Air Mail postage 

and handling 



HOW WOULD YOU LIKE 
TO CHANGE YOUR LUCK? 

FREE GOOD LUCK TEST! 

Treasured in the magic Kingdom of the Pyramids for centuries, SOLOMON'S 

, SEAL now adorns the loveliest Hollywood stars. Skilfully reproduced by Oriental 

■ craftsmen, and heavily GOLD-PLATED in London, it is attached by my own 

; Romany hands to a GLEAMING FULL-LENGTH GLAMOUR NECKLACE. 

' In the mystic Temple of Fortune it is whispered that SOLOMON'S SEAL attracts 

GOOD LUCK like a magnet. PROVE IT with this miraculous GOOD LUCK 

TEST. Look at it . ... hold it . . . make a wish. If it does not CHANGE YOUR 

LUCK within seven days, send it back, and I will refund your money AT ONCE! 

Would I dare to give this GOOD LUCK GUARANTEE if I doubted the powers of 

SOLOMON'S SEAL? Strange secret history included in super cellophane-wrapped 

presentation pack. 

SOLOMON'S SEAL HAS LUCK APPEAL 

MAIL $2 IN FULL PAYMENT NOW. TODAY! 



W- 



GUARANTEED 
LONDON 

GOLD-PLATED 

ATTACHED TO) 
GLEAMING 

FULL-LENGTH 
GLAMOUR 
NECKLACE 



LAST CHANCE TO CHANGE YOUR 
LUCK BEFORE PRICE LEAPS TO fi 

TAJANA 87 (A8) WARDOUR STREET, LONDON, W. I , ENGLAND 
SI INCLUDES 75c FOR AIRMAIL POSTAGE AND HANDLING 
DOLLAR BILLS O.K. - NO C.O.D.'s 
RUSHED TO YOU BY RETURN AIR MAIL-TAKES FEW DAYS ONLY 



K£eALBi*™°A Y -l 
luomoue etpssr i 

I COtOft HOZOSCOPf 
i DISPLAYING YOUK I 
}0WH , 
HOME 



ffUBLL 



75 



JACK LINKLETTER 



(Continued from page 59) 
least in their own opinion — a pair of 
"real tough kids." And they wanted, or 
thought they wanted, to show their 
strictly-from-Squaresville, old-fashioned 
parents that they were big enough to 
make it on their own. 

"I guess," says Jack a bit ruefully 
now, "that running away was sheer 
bravado. I went into it without really 
thinking — or because the other guys 
at school had done it, too. I wasn't 
angry with Dad or Mother; in fact, I 
was careful to leave a little note on 
my pillow telling my folks not to worry. 
And I added, 'Remember, Dad himself 
hoboed around when he was a boy and 
a fellow sort of has to follow his 
father's example. Much love, Jack.' ' 

Jack and his friend took along a 
couple of sleeping bags and packed 
knapsacks with canned goods, K-ra- 
tions and a carton of cigarettes. "I don't 
know what I was going to do with the 
cigarettes," Jack laughs now, "but I 
took them along anyway. I understood 
that was the thing to do." 

In the frosty early dawn the boys 
were still plodding up Highway 101, 
footsore and weary, when Jack's dad 
and a couple of his friends found them. 
Rain had soaked their T-shirts, their 
sleeping bags were clammy and com- 
fortless, and cold K-rations were 
nothing like good warm, Mom-prepared 
breakfasts. Secretly, both kids were 
relieved that they had been caught. 
But Papa Art was furious with his son. 

"How could you do this to me?" 
Jack's father demanded. "Suppose we 
hadn't found you and we'd had to call 
the police? Wouldn't that have been a 
nice mess?" 

"Can it happen to me?" 

Today, twenty-four-year-old Jack 
Linkletter, a married man for some 
years and father of a growing family, 
looks back on that youthful escapade 
and asks himself: "What are Bobbie 
and I going to do [Bobbie is Jack's 
wife] if our boys Mike and Dennis bust 
loose when they reach their teens? How 
am I, their father, going to feel? Are 
they going to wish, as I did, that they 
could shed themselves of that too-well- 
known name of Linkletter? And can I, 
in handling my children, make use of 
the wisdom my father taught me — and 
avoid his mistakes?" 

Jack Linkletter, tall, husky, with his 
father's warm grin and business 
shrewdness — a fellow who had his own 
coast-to-coast, nighttime color TV show 
at twenty — is pretty sure he can profit 
by his own boyish errors. Or, for that 
matter, by his dad's more mature mis- 
takes, the mistakes that even the most 
loving, considerate, well-intentioned 
parent can sometimes make. 
T Human beings are fallible, as Jack 

V well knows, and if he and his dad 
r were occasionally at odds, the fault was 
largely Jack's. Father and son were 
basically affectionate and close — and 
76 



still are. "Remember," says Jack, "Dad 
never knew who his real parents were, 
while we kids had all the love and devo- 
tion we needed. And no one had more 
faith and confidence in me than my 
dad did. I'll never forget the time 
when I was in New York doing my 
'Haggis Baggis' show, and Dad wrote 
me a note I'll always treasure. There 
were other letters from home, almost 
daily letters, but this is the one that 
meant so much. 

" T can't begin to tell you' (Dad 
wrote) 'how proud I am of what you 
have done so far. With each appearance 
you are looking more like a champion, 
and I can see the growth in your poise, 
confidence and authority from week to 
week. Just keep on in the same direc- 
tion . . . and I won't be able to find 
much to complain about.' ' 

Young Jack grinned at the memory. 
Then he went on. "Of course, Dad, 
being Dad and a real perfectionist, had 
to put a little P.S. on the note. 'I have 
only one admonition,' he said. 'There 
were eight "wonderfuls" in your show 
last night. Go into a corner and repeat 
over and over again, at least twenty- 
five times, "I will not say 'wonderful' 
again." Then get a Roget's Thesaurus 
and write down all the other expres- 
sions that are fresher and more won- 
derful to use. Remember, this is your 
"wonderful" old Dad, signing off to his 
"wonderful" boy wonder on Broad- 
way.' " 

In the Linkletter home, the relation- 
ship between parents and children 
(Jack has a younger brother, Bob, and 
three younger sisters: Dawn, Sharon 
and Diane) was a fundamentally sound 
relationship, and Jack could usually 
go to his dad with his problems. "Even 
in high school," Jack said, "Dad and 
Mother, and I and my girlfriends, fre- 
quently double-dated. Since my mar- 
riage, we still do. Now and then, Dad 
even allows me the 'privilege' of pick- 
ing up the tab. We go cycling or play 
badminton; we're a close-knit family, 
and we've always had lots of fun to- 
gether." 

But Art Linkletter is pushing fifty, 
and Jack is twenty-four. The two have 
different viewpoints and lead different 
lives. Jack himself is the first to admit, 
"We're not at all the same, and we don't 
always think the same." 

Most of all, as Jack once said, "There 
is a special ground for friction that is 
steadily present between a Hollywood 
star and his offspring from the day the 
child is born: The famous name itself. 
A star's child wears a kind of hand- 
me-down prestige, and I, at least, re- 
sented it. In my junior-high days, that 
name 'Linkletter' became as unwel- 
come and as hurtful to me as the name 
'Lard' or 'Tubby' must be to an over- 
weight kid. My brother Bob, who is 
six years younger than I, took it fairly 
calmly, but with my hot, explosive 
temper, I got into trouble." 

From his own experience, Jack knows 
that, for the first dozen years or so, the 
life of a celebrity's son — or daughter — 
is a kind of magnificent fairy tale. The 
youngster is petted, fawned over, de- 
ferred to by older people who should 
know better, and often allowed extra- 



ordinary privileges. Even the most well- 
balanced child can get emotional indi- 
gestion. "As a Hollywood kid," Jack 
once remarked, "it seems to you that 
you have been created out of some par- 
ticularly fine clay. Even when you sit 
down at the breakfast table and you see 
a cluster of strange people staring in 
at you, you take it as a special mark of 
recognition in a friendly world. And 
then, when you're in your teens, every- 
thing suddenly changes, and you dis- 
cover you're strictly on your own. 
That's when resentment starts taking 
over." 

Friends close to Jack are aware that 
he will do his utmost to avoid this pain- 
ful kind of awakening for his kids — 
that he will try to give little Mike, 3. 
Dennis, 1%, and the new baby girl 
a truer sense of values. Jack and his 
wise Bobbie, too, don't want their grow- 
ing youngsters to take the tough-guy 
route to trouble that so many celeb- 
rities' kids take — and that Jack him- 
self took, until he found the beginnings 
of wisdom. 

A thundering rumble 

At Black-Foxe Military Academy, 
Jack had been an all-A student, though 
he didn't relish the rigid discipline. 
But when he transferred over to Emer- 
son Junior High, he got in with a rough, 
tough crowd, even though most of the 
students came from the better types of 
homes. And, as he says, "My grades 
slumped, because I didn't bother to 
study for almost two years." 

One time, Jack and his pals (Jack 
probably resented the close watch that 
was kept over him) got into a real 
rumble that brought out the law. Late 
one night, the gang rowdily barreled 
into a quiet, residential neighborhood, 
jumped yelling into the backyard 
swimming pools, overturned furniture, 
and kicked up such an unholy racket 
that the police were called and came 
screaming down the streets. When Jack 
finally got home, long after curfew, 
Father Linkletter was waiting — and 
with the police report in his hands. 

"If your purpose is to hurt me," 
Jack's dad said solemnly, "go ahead 
and do it. I just want you to know in 
your own mind what you're doing, and 
I want you to decide if that's why you're 
doing it." 

That was when Jack looked into his 
heart and discovered that he really did 
not want to punish his parents. He 
learned that his father was not so 
much worried about the bad publicity 
that might harm the Linkletter name, 
but about the kind of human being 
Jack was becoming. 

All this self-discovery took a while, 
and Jack had to be moved from the un- 
favorable climate of Emerson into 
Beverly Hills High. He continued to 
travel with some of the old, tough 
crowd, but his heart was no longer in 
it. As he has said, "I began to mix 
more with my classmates at Beverly 
Hills. I ended the year as president of 
the junior class, and I was master of 
ceremonies of our talent show. My 
final two years of high school are 
among the best years of my life." 



There were, of course, certain things 
that he still didn't like about his 
father's way of bringing up the chil- 
dren. "For instance," says Jack, "none 
of the five Linkletter kids was ever 
given a regular weekly allowance. 
What money we got, we had to earn. 
If I asked for a dollar to take a girl to 
the movies, Dad would say, 'All right, 
wash the car,' or, 'Go clean up the 
garage.' I won't say Dad's way was 
wrong, but personally, I don't relish 
price tags on things. My children will 
get regular allowances, but they'll also 
be taught the true value of money." 

When Jack married Barbara Hughes, 
he was then nineteen, and she about 
six months older. 

"No, I don't think I married too 
young," Jack said. "Dad and Mother 
weren't much older when they got mar- 
ried. Dad was the kind of lad, or so 
he once told me, who liked to skip 
around from girl to girl, while I was 
the more conservative type. I always 
went steady with my girls — at least 
for a couple of weeks. But when I met 
Bobbie . . . well, that was it." 

The two youngsters did a smart thing. 
Bobbie had come from a broken home, 
and she had a great feeling of in- 
security about herself and marriage. 
She had to be absolutely sure that her 
marriage would last. That's why she 
and Jack went together for a year and 
a half, and were formally engaged for 
nine months. Even more, the young 
couple decided that a "preparation for 
marriage" course would help them im- 
measurably. So they enrolled in, and 
faithfully attended, Dr. James Peter- 
son's "Family and Marriage" clinic 
at U.C.L.A. 

"We got so much out of it," Jack 
chuckles, "that we decided to have Dr. 
Peterson marry us, and he did. The 
ceremony took place at Pasadena's 
Oneonta Church. There were about 
five hundred people present, including, 
of course, both our families. I'll never 
forget the moment when Dr. Peterson 
came up to me, while I was nervously 
pacing the vestry, and demonstrated 
that he'd learned a little about show 
business. Til tell you one thing, Jack,' 
Dr. Peterson smiled, 'for this wedding 
of yours, you've pulled a great house!' ' 

Today, Jack and Bobbie are building 
a big new home in Brentwood, with 
four bedrooms alone for the children 
— those they have, and those they ex- 
pect to have. "We want at least four 
kids," Jack revealed, "and Bobbie and 
I have decided to have them all right 
away, one after another — boom, boom, 
boom. I want to have time with them 
as they grow. I don't want them spread 
out too far apart. That was the trouble 
in our own family at home. Dad and 
Mother, probably for financial reasons, 
had their five kids too many years 
apart. Take my youngest sister, Diane. 
There's almost a dozen years' difference 
between us, and sometimes I feel I 
hardly know her." 

Discipline his kids? Oh, yes, Jack 
will discipline his youngsters, all right. 
Little Mike and Dennis, and the other 
babies to come, may not be held by as 
tight a rein as Art Linkletter held his 
children — but Jack's children will 



POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Room 9P72 -121 S. Wabash, Chicago 3, III. 



V 



Name. 



.State- 



^\ 



FILL OUT THE COUPON ABOVE 
AND I WILL SEND TO YOU... 



FREE NURSES BOOKLET 
AND LESSON SAMPLES 



LEARN PRACTICAL NURSING 
AT HOME IN A FEW SHORT MONTHS 

THIS IS THE HOME STUDY COURSE that can change your whole 
life. You can enjoy security, independence and freedom from 
money worries . . . there is no recession in nursing. In good times 
or bad, people become ill, babies are born and your services are 
always needed. You can earn up to $65.00 a week as a Practical 
Nurse and some of our students earn much more! In just a few 
short weeks from now, you should be able to accept your first case. 

YOUR AGE AND EDUCATION ARE NOT IMPORTANT ... Good 
common sense and a desire to help others are far more important 
than additional years in school. Practical nursing offers young 
women and men an exciting challenging future . . . yet the 
services of mature and older women are also desperately needed. 

BUT THE IMPORTANT THING is to get the FREE complete in- 
formation right now. There is no cost or obligation and no 
salesman to call upon you. You can make your own decision to 
be a Nurse in the privacy of your own home. We will send you 
without obligation your FREE lesson samples and your FREE 
folder "Nursing Facts." 

POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Room 9P72 121 S. Wabash Ave. Chicago 3, 111. 



WANTED for Musical 
Setting & Recording by 
AMERICA'S LARGEST 
SONG STUDIO. Send 
poems. Free examination. 
FIVE STAR MUSIC MASTERS, 265 BEACON BLDG.. BOSTON. MASS. 



POEMS 

FIVE STAR MUSIC MASTERS, 2658 



Beauty WALLETPHOTOS 




2'/a"x3 l / 2 " genuine photos, 
for classmates, loved ones. 
Made from any photo on 
silk finish double weight 
paper. Send photo or neg 
25 for $1.25 plus Free5"x7" 
enlargement (60 for $2.25) 



Str* 



Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

ROY PHOTO SERVICE 



Dept. A7, GPO Box 644, N.Y. 1. N.Y. 



NEW, Tinu, Powerful _ - f>ff> 



NO COST! 



To get acquainted, I'll send you this 
superbly built Bulova super-powered 
7-transistor "slim line" portable radio. 
Guaranteed one full year. Features pre- 
cision tuning and jewelry styling. Simply hand 
out or mail only twenty get-acquainted coupons FREE to friends or 
relatives and help us get that many new customers as per our 
premium letter. I get so much enjoyment from my beautiful Bulova 
transistor radio that I'm sure you would love one for your home, too. 
Please send me your favorite snapshot, photo or Kodak picture when 
writing for your Bulova radio. We will make you a beautiful 5x7 
inoh enlargement in a "Movietone" frame and you can tell friends 
about our hand colored enlargements when handing out the coupons. 
Send today and pay postman only forty-nine cents and a few cents 
for our c.o.d. service plus postage on arrival. Your original returned. 
Also include the color of hair and eyes with each picture so I can also 
give you our bargain offer on a second enlargement hand colored in 
oils for greater beauty, sparkle and life. Limit of 2 to any one person. 
Send today for your 20 FREE coupons to hand out and please enclose 
your name, address and favorite snapshot. Our supply of Bulova 
radios is limited. Mrs. Ruth Long, Gift Manager. 

DEAN STUDIOS 

Dept. X-528, 913 Walnut St., Des Moines 2, Iowa 



ATTENTION: MAIL ORDER BUYERS 

New postal charges increase the cost of any item 
purchased COD by almost $1.00. Avoid this expense 
by enclosing payment with your order. Send check, 
cash or money order. Remember, it pays to prepay. 



When simple 
piles cause l 
discomfort and itch, 
enjoy fast palliative relief 
with De Witt's ManZan — 
now even more effective 
with Allantoin, a special 
healing agent. ManZan 
also contains a vasocon- 
strictor to help reduce 
swelling. For soothing 
action, buy ManZan . . 
ointment or supposi- 
tories. 



I DeWltt's I 

I ManZan | 

PILE 
lOfNTMENII 



THE ONE / 

GUARANTEED WAY iL 

TO LOSE WEIGHT 7 

is by eating less.. ^T 

No pills befo're every meat. 

JUST ONE B-SLiM CAP IN THE 
MORNING BEFORE BREAKFAST 

...acts gently with controlled 
release. Helps cut down your desire 
for food and caloric intake — 
naturally, harmlessly, effectively. 
What's more, on ly 1 capsu le per day 
means you pay less too. 

**. Full 3 weeks supply 

(21 capsules) only $1.93 

Economy 6 weeks supply 
(42 capsules) $2.98 

Now! Special Savings— 12 Weeks Supply 
(84 capsules) $4.98 

Order now. B-SLiM CAPS must do all we say, 
or money refunded. Save 470 on postage. 
Send cash, check or money order with order. 

El. 00 deposit MUST accompany C.O.D. orders, 
alance collect plus P.O. charges. 

MARSHALL DRUG REMEDIES, INC.© 
60-D, Box 188, Forest Hills 75. N. Y. 







Dept 



77 



learn to obey. And if they don't, their 
little bottoms will feel the strong hand 
of authority. 

Fond Mama Bobbie was the one who 
cringed from spanking little Michael 
— at first. "No spanking for my chil- 
dren," she used to say to Jack. But Mike 
can be a handful, as both young 
parents have discovered. He is spirited, 
anything but docile, and can be very 
stubborn. He needs a firm hand and 
guidance, and, as Jack grins, "I think 
Bobbie has finally learned how to 
spank." 

Yet Jack is sure that there is one 
course his father followed which he 
definitely will not adhere to. "Parents 
tend to over-protect their kids," Jack 
says. "That's why, I suppose, my 
brother Bob and I were sent to private 
schools. We hated it. But my children 
— I hope — will all go to public schools. 
I don't want them to have a hot-house 
life. They'll mix with all kinds. Chil- 
dren, during their vital formative years, 
should get their opinions right from 
life, first-hand, not second-hand. They 
should be exposed to both pain and 
pleasure, not wrapped in cotton-wool." 

No, Jack doesn't mind his young- 
sters following his footsteps — and their 
grandfather's — into show business. That 
is, if they want to. Little Mike has 
already racked up a long list of credits 
for appearances with both Jack and 
Art. "Really," says Jack, "I can't 
think of a better arrangement than for 
a son to follow in his father's path in 



any business. After all, he becomes 
accustomed to it and schooled in it 
very early. A carpenter's son should 
know more about building shelves and 
cabinets than a fellow who doesn't 
study carpentry until he's grown." 

Still, Bobbie Linkletter doesn't seem 
quite so enthusiastic about an enter- 
tainment career for little Michael. 
"Look, Jack," she keeps telling her 
husband, "let's not railroad our son 
into show business." 

Jack definitely will not. He knows 
that professionally it was all too easy 
for someone like himself to get a start 
in TV; after all, he was Art Link- 
letter's son. But he knows, too, that 
sometimes the carefree, happy years 
of the mid-teens get squeezed out or 
lost — and he is not going to let any- 
thing like this happen to his children. 
They'll be guided and counseled, and 
they'll learn both from their father's 
mistakes — and their grandfather's. 

"I think," said Jack, "it's the in- 
security of show business that dis- 
turbs Bobbie. True enough, you make 
good money while you're working. But 
when you're not working, that money 
has to stretch. I've had several shows 
canceled out from under me, and I 
know how it feels. I've got a big house 
with big payments." 

Canny Jack, however, has little real 
need to worry. He has just built, with 
an associate, a big apartment house in 
Santa Monica; he has interests in a 
chain of children's dance schools and 



in an entertainment packaging com- 
pany which handles and produces fairs 
and civic events. He is also a principal 
member of an insurance agency and is 
an investor and developer of tract homes 
in San Diego. But probably the most 
interesting of his extensive outside 
activities is his position as administra- 
tor of his father's far-flung enterprises. 

"That dad of mine is a real charac- 
ter," Jack laughs. "Why, he has oil 
wells and real estate he's never even 
seen. And what he does to his check 
book! He never enters the amounts in 
his stubs. When I call him on it, and 
I do, he says, 'Now, Jack, if I'm over- 
drawn, the bank will tell me about it.' 
That's my Dad. He revels in wheeling 
and dealing, but hates details. I love 
them." 

If Jack had his childhood to live 
over again, he might — just might — live 
it differently. But Art Linkletter gave 
family life a warm meaning, a close- 
ness that Jack and his brother and 
sisters will always treasure. And Jack 
is not really too concerned about any 
little mistakes his dad may have made. 
Art Linkletter, basically, did a grand 
job with his son, and that is the lesson 
Jack will carry with him, always. 

— Favius Friedman 

Jack Linkletter hosts "Here's Holly- 
wood" over NBC-TV, M.-F., 4:30 p.m. 
Art Linkletter's "House Party" — also 
M.-F.— is on CBS-TV at 2:30 p.m., on 
CBS Radio at 10:10 a.m. (All edt.) 



mini iiiiiuiiiMiujii 






EDDIE FISHER 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiinmiiKn 



(Continued from page 25) 
"If I ever needed you," he sang, "I 
need you now." The young man spread 
his hands in a gesture of appeal. The 
women in the studio audience rose, 
shouting and crying, in answer to his 
pleas. Millions of housewives, watching 
on television, turned to their husbands, 
remarking how much they liked that 
nice boy. And one woman, in particular, 
thought she'd never forget him. . . . 

The "nice boy" with the easy bari- 
tone ballad was young Eddie Fisher, 
and the year was 1954. At twenty-four, 
he was a phenomenal success. Four of 
his records had passed the million 
mark, and his personal appearances 
were sold out as soon as they were an- 
nounced. Eddie had come a long way 
in a short time. 

The Woman knew all about that. 
The early poverty in Philadelphia . . . 
the first tries for a career . . . the night 
at Grossinger's when Eddie Cantor dis- 
covered him . . . the big night at The 
Riviera night club when, filling in at 
the last minute, young Fisher proved 
that Cantor had been right. He was 
"going places." She knew, too, of the 
day in 1951 when Eddie Fisher opened 

T his mail and found, among the fan 

v letters, a notice of a very different sort. 

r For the next two years, he was booked 
solid with the U.S. Army. He was head- 
lined as soloist with the Army band, 

78 



singing at recruiting rallies, and enter- 
taining the troops in Europe, Japan 
and Korea. Private Fisher's vocal apti- 
tudes made a lot of girls forget briefly 
that they were lonely and their men 
were far from home. The men them- 
selves remembered the shy kid who kept 
smiling and singing in spite of his 
tedious journeys and impossible sched- 
ules. 

When Eddie came home in 1953, his 
fans clamored for more records, and 
TV and radio networks begged for his 
services. Less than a month after he 
left the Army, Eddie faced the cameras 
and mikes with a bottle of Coke in his 
hand. He looked sort of nice and shy, 
a skinny kid with dark eyes and a 
friendly smile. He wasn't a brilliant 
conversationalist or a great comedian. 
He didn't have to be. 

He simply sang the ballad-type songs 
he liked, and the whole country heard 
and saw in him the things they liked 
best. His style and material were in- 
offensive — no gimmicks or fads — a 
straightforward style and a fine bari- 
tone. And everyone listened, and 
bought records and Coca-Cola. Eddie 
had the universal appeal. Teen-aged 
girls liked Eddie. Obviously. He was 
both good-looking and shy, the kind of 
fellow who would hold a girl's hand and 
say something romantic . . . and maybe 
blush. They dreamed of marrying him, 
or someone like him. 

And teen-aged boys liked Eddie, who 
was like a teenager himself — one of 
the gang. He looked just a tiny bit 
puny, as if you could beat him up if 



he made a play for someone's girl. He 
looked a bit timid, too, as if he needed 
friends. 

Young wives liked Eddie. They could 
imagine being married to him ... or 
he could easily be a kid brother, or 
the type of a man "our Junior" will 
some day be. And young husbands 
liked him because he was not pretty- 
boy handsome . . . and because he had 
had a real struggle to become a suc- 
cess, such as they themselves were 
having. Moreover, Eddie was a soldier 
who had done his bit. 

Older people liked him. He might 
have been their own son. A nice 
religious boy who respected his parents. 
Excellent manners, and a clean-cut 
appearance. The kind of boy they'd 
want their daughter to marry. 

And the Woman thought about him 
often, glad for his success. 

Eddie Fisher was the ail-American 
boy . . . rags to riches . . . Horatio Alger 
. . . "Mr. Cinderella." By the time he 
was twenty-four, Eddie had rocketed 
to heights that few performers reach 
after an entire lifetime 

What more could a fellow want? 

Well, a fellow needs a girl, and the 
press was hot for Eddie to find romance. 
They linked him with one starlet after 
another . . . until he happened to meet 
Miss Debbie Reynolds, a national idol 
in her own right. In the following year. 
their friendship was the talk of Any- 
town, U.S.A. He loves her, loves her 
not . . . when would they marry . . . 
why such a long engagement? Only the 
two of them know the truth about when, 



if ever, they actually did fall in love. 

Perhaps the publicity confused them 
... or maybe, like many other young 
people, they were in love with love. 
There is no doubt, however, that this 
was a dream-come-true for their fans. 
Eddie Fisher, all-American boy, won 
and married Debbie Reynolds, the girl- 
next-door. 

The next thing on the fellow's agenda 
was the vine-covered mansion and the 
patter of little feet. Reporters flocked 
to see how many ways Debbie could 
make hamburger. All seemed blissful. 
Eddie defended his prenuptial hesita- 
tion by insisting that he had to be sure 
the marriage would last forever. 

In 1956, Mr. Fisher became the 
father of a baby girl . . . and Carrie 
Francis was the apple of his eye. He 
doted on his daughter, and thousands 
of pictures were printed of the happy 
Fisher threesome. But, even then, there 
were hints of trouble to come. No one 
can verify the stories, but it was said 
that all was not well . . . that Debbie 
was tight-fisted and Eddie a spendthrift. 
(What could be more natural for a 
boy who had never known how it felt 
to have a few bucks in his pocket?) 

They said that Eddie spent lots of 
time carousing with the boys, but 
Debbie didn't get along with his friends 
. . . and men usually will not stay away 
if things are peachy at home. People 
said he was jealous of his wife's suc- 
cess with her record of "Tammy" and 
her popularity in the movies. They said 
Eddie was growing stale. (If jealousy 
was a factor, why would Eddie turn to 
a more glamorous and popular woman 
than Debbie?) 

But the marriage continued, and 
Debbie gave birth to a son they named 
"Todd," after Eddie's dearest friend, 
Mike Todd, who was married to Eliza- 
beth Taylor. Eddie was twenty-eight. 
He had fame, fortune, friends, a pretty 
wife and two fine youngsters. 

Then Eddie shocked the world by 
throwing away everything he had 
worked for, to chase Elizabeth Taylor. 
The lovely actress was mourning the 
death of the fabulous Mike Todd . . . 
since Eddie had been his bosom friend, 
it was natural that, when Eddie went 
to New York on business, he would call 
on Liz and try to cheer her up. They 
dined together . . . and the whispers 
started immediately. Was it a love 
affair? What was going on? 

Fisher denied the gossip and returned 
to his wife. Whether Debbie accused 
him of infidelity, or whether she be- 
lieved in his innocence at that point, 
no one knows but the two of them. 
Eddie Fisher swore he didn't love 
Elizabeth — that he had no intention of 
seeking a divorce. Why he left, no one 
can really say. Was it the result of the 
previous troubles, as Eddie said? Did 
he fall in love with Miss Taylor only 
after his own marriage was on the 
rocks? Whatever their relationship had 
been, Eddie had always been respected 
as a wonderful and loving father. He 
hated to leave his two children. 

Eddie also deserves credit for his 
behavior between the parting and the 
divorce. The scandalous gossip of the 
"triangle" fell upon his shoulders, and 



REWARD $9,985.50 FOR THIS COIN! 

$500,000.00 SEARCH FOR RARE COINS! 



Stop spending valuable coins worth hundreds 
of dollars. New 1962 catalogue lists hundreds 




of coins we want to buy and gives the price 
range we will pay for these United States 
Coins. Certain half cent coins are worth up to 
$3,500.00 for Canadian Coins. Our valuable 
Coin Boole may reward you many thousands of 
dollars. Coins do not have to be old to be 
valuable. Thousands of dollars have been paid 
for coins dated as recently as 1940 to 1956. 
Now you too can learn the rare dates and how 
to identify rare coins in your possession with 
our new 1962 catalogue. A fortune may be 
waiting for you. Millions of Dollars have been 
paid for rare coins. Don't sell your valuable 
coins for less than they are worth! Hold on 
to your coins until you obtain our catalogue. 
Send $1.00 for 1962 Coin Catalogue Book to 
Best Values Co., Dept. 780, 285A Market St., 
Newark, N. J. 



ILLUSTRATED: 1804 Silver 
Dollar. 19,000 Minted, only 12 
accounted for — where are the rest? 



YOUR MONEY WILL BE REFUNDED IN FULL IF 
YOU ARE NOT SATISFIED WITH THIS CATALOG. 



FOR CERTAIN COINS WE 

CERTAIN 

Gold Coins Before 1929 
Pennies Before 1919 
Silver Dollars Before 1936 
Nickels Before 1945 
Dimes Before 1946 
Half Dollars Before 1947 
Quarters Before 1941 
Half Cents Before 1910 
Lincoln Pennies Before 1940 



PAY UP TO 

$10,000.00 
9,000.00 
8,000.00 
6,000.00 
5,000.00 
4,500.00 
3,500.00 
3,500.00 
200.00 



Best Values Co., Dept. 780 

285A Market St., Newark, New Jersey 

Rush your latest 1962 coin catalogue list- 
ing the actual price range you will pay for 
United States Coins listed in the cata- 
logue. I enclose $1. Send Postage Prepaid. 



NAME. 



ADDRESS 

CITY STATE. 



HOW TO PUBLISH 

YOUR 

BOOK 



Join our successful authors in a 
complete and reliable publishing 
program: publicity, advertising, 
handsome books. Speedy, efficient 
service. Send for FREE manuscript 
report & copy of Publish Your Book. 

CARLTON PRESSDept.TRG 
S* Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 



BUDDY BREGMAN 

■"* MUSIC PRODUCTIONS 



3 at SAM GOIDWYN 

f WANTS POEMS! 



I SAM GOIDWYN STUDIOS 

to be 

developed into NEW SONGS. Buddy 
Bregmon has been musical director for — 

* BING CROSBY 
• ELLA FITZGERALD 

. . . and many other top artists. 
Send POEMS today for free examination to: 



BU0DY BREGMAN MUSIC PRODUCTIONS 
Dept. 1201 7868 Willoughby, L.A. 46, Calif. 



Shrinks Hemorrhoids 
New Way Without Surgery 
Stops Itch - Relieves Pain 

For the first time science has found a 
new healing substance with the astonishing 
ability to shrink hemorrhoids and to relieve 
pain — without surgery. 

In case after case, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction (shrinkage) took place. 

Most amazing of all — results were so 
thorough that sufferers made astonishing 
statements like "Piles have ceased to be a 
problem!" 

The secret is a new healing substance 
(Bio-Dyne®) — discovery of a world-famous 
research institute. 

This substance is now available in sup- 
pository or ointment form under the name 
Preparation H®. Ask for it at all drug 
counters. 




in 



48 Page Shoe 

BOOKLET K 



It's Easy to be Fitted Direct via Mail I 

NO RISK TO YOU! MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Stars of stage, screen, TV and famous fashion models 
buy perfect fitting Shoecraft Fifth Avenue shoes by 
/*£ <- l^ ^H mail. Wonderful values priced as low 
( X, s~ *-^"— ^ as 55.95. We can fit all sizes 
' ' ' -«» 8 to 13, in widths AAAAA to C. 

SNEAKER only $5.95. White sailcloth or tan chino. 

SHOECRAFT 603 FIFTH AV., NEW YORK 17 

PHOTO BARGAINS 




CHOICE 




Lovely reproductions of 
your favorite photo on 
finest quality double 
weight portrait paper. 
Send any size photo 
or neff. (returned un- 
harmed). Add 25c for 
postage and handling. 



2-8x10 ENLARGEMENTS 
(1 Colored in Oil) or 
4-5x7 ENLARGEMENTS 
(1 Colored in Oil) or 
25 WALLET SIZE PHOTOS 
plus FREE 5x7 ENL. 

QUALITY VALUES, Dept. 606-A 
2 EAST AVENUE, LARCHMONT, N. Y. 

r - HIGH " 1 



I 



AT HOME IN SPARE TIME 

I Low monthly payments include stand- I 

■ ard text books and instruction. Credit ' 

ifor subjects already completed. ■ 
Progress as rapidly as your time 

and abilities permit, diploma awarded | 



I 



and abilities permit, diploma awarded 
SEND FOR BOOKLET— TELLS YOU HOW 

OUR 65TH YEAR 

AMERICAN school, Dept. HBS3 
Drexel at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois. 
Please send FREE High School booklet. 

NAME 



\ 



ADDRESS. 



T 

IV 
R 
Accredited Member national home study council 
MM — i — > Mi M "■" ■"■ ?9 



he bore it like a gentleman. Eddie 
accepted all the blame, and with quiet 
dignity. Perhaps the union could never 
work because of the differences in the 
two partners. But Eddie publicly said 
it was his fault, that Debbie had tried 
and he had failed. 

The love that failed 

He had failed to learn how to love 
his wife. (Can one learn to love?) So 
Eddie played the role of villain. And, 
through it all, Debbie was brave and 
truly acted like a little lady by not in- 
volving Liz in the divorce proceedings. 
And Eddie lost his kingdom. His 
record sales fell, his name was ruined, 
his sponsors dropped his TV show, 
and his network tried to squirm out of 
the remainder of his fifteen-year con- 
tract. He gave Debbie most of his 
savings and properties. Everything was 
gone. He felt the damage to his career, 
but the deepest pain of all was the 
separation from little Carrie and Todd. 
He had thrown it all away. 

He had also thrown away the respect 
of the Woman who would be most im- 
portant in his future. Shocked, hurt, 
disappointed . . . not wanting to believe 
. . . she turned away. Her "nice boy" 
had become someone she did not want 
to know. 

All this he threw away . . . for Liz? 
For love. Eddie said that he found love 
for the first time in his life. Where 
Debbie had been an efficient little 
manager and a dutiful wife, Eddie 
found strange and exciting qualities in 
Liz. Liz needed him like a woman ought 
to — has to — need her man. They were 
married in Las Vegas after Fisher was 
granted a quickie divorce. "This mar- 
riage will be for the rest of our lives," 
said Eddie. He said it sincerely, and 
hopefully. Liz said so, too. 

Eddie started producing, and bought 
his own recording company. He began 
managing his wife's career, which had 
not been affected by the gossip — except 
possibly to increase her allure at the 
box office. Earlier in his career, Eddie 
Fisher had played a command per- 
formance for England's Queen Eliza- 
beth. Now he was at the command of 
America's queen Liz. She insisted that 
Eddie appear with her in "Butterfield 
8." And so Eddie studied acting with 
Stella Adler, the New York drama 
coach. It didn't help much. Liz got an 
Academy Award for her portrayal, and 
her husband was named "Worst Actor 
of the Year" by the Harvard humor 
magazine, The Lampoon. 

For the most part, Eddie's singing 
career fell by the wayside, in favor of 
Miss Taylor's enterprises. Eddie Fisher 
decided to assist in producing "Cleo- 
patra" and his major job — for which 
he received a handsome salary — was 
simply to keep his wife happy. She was 
preparing her role when she suddenly 
fell ill ... a grueling climax to the 
many bouts both the Fishers had had 
with sickness in their brief marriage. 

T Eddie lost some thirty pounds with 

V the worry and watching at her bedside. 

r Nevertheless, he refused to leave, or to 
give up. He wouldn't let her die. Not 
the woman he loved! As Liz fought for 

80 



her life, Eddie fought, too. He asked 
the world to join him as he prayed by 
her deathbed. . . . 

He continued to pray with all his 
heart . . . and the prayers were 
answered. The crisis passed. The lovely 
Miss Taylor regained her health. Dur- 
ing her convalescence, Eddie took her 
to sunny Tesorts where he tried to revive 
his night-club career. The public saw 
that his adoration went far deeper than 
the voluptuous Taylor body and face. 

And the Woman, who had rejected 
him, began to see the good in this boy 
again. Still, when he made his first 
new recording in a long time, she 
didn't buy it. 

But a return to work could not re- 
place the emptiness Eddie felt without 
his children. The Fishers learned that 
Liz could never have another child. 
Debbie's little ones would see their own 
father very infrequently, and they 
would grow up under the guidance of 
Debbie's new husband and regard him 
as a father. Liz had three children . . . 
two boys from her second marriage, to 
Michael Wilding, and Mike Todd's 
daughter. Eddie loved all the children 
... if he could, he would have adopted 
all three of them. Instead, he was only 
allowed to become the daughter's legal 
parent. The adoption was arranged, 
and the little girl was named Liza Todd- 
Fisher. 

Eddie still desired a larger family; 
he was one of seven children himself. 
And he had a heartful of love to share. 
Liz made plans to adopt another child. 
Fisher knew he would be accepting a 
great deal of responsibility. Liz was 
always so busy. She needed time to 
relax in her room, to rest upon her 
feathery pillows. She would play with 
the children for a while — no one 
doubted that she loved them — but the 
majority of the attention had to be 
left to nursemaids and to Eddie. Still, 
he wanted a large family to love. . . . 

And now Eddie Fisher, the man who 
had everything, will have nothing. Liz 
Taylor will divorce him. There is not 
as much wealth as one might suppose, 
for the Fishers have lived like royalty 
and traveled in the greatest style im- 
aginable. Liz's illness cost a small 
fortune. But far worse than such losses 
is the extreme humiliation Eddie Fisher 
has suffered in the eyes of the world. 

Perhaps you feel that he deserves 
this treatment . . . that he dropped 
Debbie and is justly punished by having 
Liz jilt him. But he never treated 
Debbie with anything but the greatest 
consideration. He took care to consult 
her, and to make mutual agreements 
upon the stories they would give to the 
press. There was no shock or embar- 
rassment. 

Eddie doesn't seem to have had the 
vaguest knowledge that Liz had grown 
tired of him and wanted new romances 
and conquests. Despite all the rumors 
about Richard Burton, her co-star in 
the filming of "Cleopatra," Eddie 
denied the stories vehemently while 
still in Rome. 

When Eddie arrived in New York 
City, he still denied that Liz and Burton 
were carrying on. Fighting the divorce 
rumors, he stayed briefly in a local 



hospital. Finally, he was ready to face 
the newsmen and columnists. "There 
will be no divorce between — " In mid- 
sentence, the phone call came from Liz 
in Rome; she would not confirm his 
statement. 

Mr. Fisher looked very foolish in- 
deed. His wife would have been far 
kinder to have saved him the shame of 
being the last to know. Instead, she 
waited till he had left the country, to 
drop him and make a fool of him. As 
one journalist remarked, "Liz tossed 
him away like a squeezed lemon." 

Far worse for Eddie than the loss of 
the raven-haired Liz is the certain 
estrangement from the four children. 
He loved Wilding's sons, Todd's child 
and Liz's newly adopted one as if they 
were his very own. He had suffered so 
much with the parting from his own two 
. . . when he said goodbye to Carrie 
and Todd the last time he was per- 
mitted to see them, the pain in his heart 
was mirrored by the sorrow in his eyes. 
He watched them go and stood silently 
for a long time . . . then took a deep 
breath and turned back to Liz. 

Now Liz has turned Eddie away. 

Now it's up to the Woman 

Twice, Eddie Fisher had the world 
in his hands. And twice he lost it! He 
stands now with empty hands before 
the one woman who can help him. 

Or is he beyond help? Is Eddie 
washed up, at thirty-three? He has 
changed a good deal, from the "nice 
boy" we used to know. Eddie no longer 
looks shy and innocent. The burden of 
his sorrow and his rich living are dis- 
cernible in his once-boyish face. He is 
no longer the guileless kid from Philly. 
Or the guiltless kid, for that matter. 

He has been punished. The question 
is: Has he suffered enough? Has he 
been punished enough? 

The editors of this magazine ask you 
— for you are the Woman who has the 
power to help Eddie now. You — and 
the many others like you who once 
loved him and then, in anger, turned 
from him. We ask you to tell us what 
you think now. Does Eddie Fisher 
deserve another chance to prove his 
talent? Only you can give him that 
chance. We will send your ballots to 
the TV networks and producers. We 
will tell them how the public feels today 
about its fallen idol. 

How do you feel about him? Do you 
think it's time to give him another 
chance? — Lynn Jackson 



HOW DO YOU VOTE? 

Does Eddie Fisher deserve another 
chance? Check one square to ex- 
press your own opinion, then clip out 
this box and mail to: Eddie Fisher 
Ballots, TV Radio Mirror, P.O. 
Box 1937, Grand Central Station, 
New York 17, New York. 



□ YES 

□ NO 




WALLET PHOTOS 
FROM YOUR PORTRAIT 

for giving to friends and 
relatives. Send Black & 
White portrait, snapshot or 
negative; returned intact. 
20 (2V 2 " x 3V2") for $1.25; 
60 for $2.25. Made from 
one picture. 



Terrific Value 
3 for $2.49 



BEAUTIFUL4X5 
COLOR ENLARGEMENTS HIGHLIGHTED 
IN BEIGE & GOLD ANTIQUED FRAMES 

Now ... get beautiful 4x5 color enlargements 
from your color negatives or slides — in a rich 
beige & gold antiqued frame. 

Only 98<J each or 3 for $2.49 

packed in individual boxes, ready for 
shipment — a wonderful gift. 

Black & White enlargements also available 
from B&W negatives. Same price. 



Add state sales tax . . . if any 



We pay return postage 



FOR FASTEST SERVICE MAIL FILM TO CITY NEAREST YOU. 

24 convenient locations — Coast to Coast 



SOUTH 

ATLANTA 1, GA 
DALLAS 21, TEX. 
CHARLOTTE 1. N.C. 
MEMPHIS l.TENN. 
LOUISVILLE 1, KY. 
JACKSONVILLE 1, FLA. 
NEW ORLEANS 50, LA. 



WEST 

LOS ANGELES 54, CAL. 
PORTLAND 8, ORE. 
SAN FRANCISCO 26, CAL. 
PHOENIX 2, ARIZ. 
DENVER 1, COLO. 
SEATTLE 11, WASH. 



MIDWEST 

CHICAGO 80, ILL. 
KANSAS CITY 41, MO. 
CLEVELAND 1.0HI0 
MINNEAPOLIS 40, MINN. 
DETROIT 32, MICHIGAN 
ST. LOUIS 77, MO. 



EAST 

NEW YORK 1, N.Y. 
PHILADELPHIA 1, PA. 
BOSTON 4, MASS. 
ROCHESTER 3, N.Y. 
WASHINGTON 13, D.C. 



LOW DEVELOPING PRICES - United's developing 
prices are lower than those normally charged at stores . . . 
plus you get fresh Kodak Film . . . FREE. 

CUSTOM QUALITY DEVELOPING - United's labs 
use the latest Kodak electronic equipment . . . guarantee- 
ing you the best developing possible . . . anywhere ... at 
any price. 

HERE'S HOW IT'S POSSIBLE -you deal direct 
with us, eliminating the middleman's 40% profit. The sav- 
ings are passed along to give you FREE KODAK FILM and 
low cost custom developing. In addition, with each order 
you receive free safety envelopes for future use and the 
U.S. Mail is used for safe, fast delivery. 

OVER 1,000,000 SATISFIED CUSTOMERS have used 
United's service. It's the convenient, money saving way 
to take more pictures at less cost. 

NO FEES, NO DUES, NO OBLIGATION to participate 
regularly. Use United's service as seldom or as often as 
as you like. 

UNITED'S IRON CLAD MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. 
You cannot get better quality developing anywhere, at any 
price. The FREE film you receive is fresh, dated Kodak film 
. . .the same package that is sold in stores. You must be 
satisfied or your money will be promptly refunded. 

Stop buying film ... 
start using UNITED'S service today! 



UNITED FILM CLUB inc. 



// safety envelope has been removed 

write for extra envelopes to: 

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 

4130 No. Temple City Blvd., Rosemead, California 



?Untted Film Club Inc. 1962 



81 



82 



IHMIIiilllllllllHIIIIIIIMKIIIilMIIIII MMIIIIIIUIIIIIIIMIII 1 illlmil nil 



RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN 



(Continued from page 27) 
laugh. And the more he read, the more 
he laughed. Nobody, he decided, could 
be as ridiculous as the actor in that 
article. 

The story was about Dick Chamber- 
lain. 

When Dick had finished the article, 
his first reaction was to wonder why 
the author hadn't bothered to talk to 
him before writing it. 

His second reaction was to go back 
through the piece and pick out the 
worst mistakes. There were so many 
that it became almost a game — a very 
high-scoring game! But finally he nar- 
rowed it down to what he laughingly 
thought of as The Seven Deadly Errors. 

1. "As a child, Dick was so pain- 
fully shy that he always kept to him- 
self. He was a real loner." 

2. "He didn't get along with the other 
boys, because he was awkward and 
sickly." 

3. "He never dated during his school 
years — didn't have the nerve!" 

4. "He was so studious that the other 
kids called him a grind." 

5. "Even today his shyness still 
plagues him; he paints in his spare 
time — to get away from people." 

6. "He's ill-at-ease being a celebrity 
and wishes he were still unknown to 
the public." 

7. "Although he stars on a weekly 
television show, he lacks confidence in 
his ability and is very much afraid of 
the future." 

It wasn't all lies. It was something 
much more dangerous — a collection of 
half-truths, false guesses and bits of 
phony psychoanalysis that added up to 
a completely distorted portrait. 

And yet, he suddenly realized, if 
each of the errors were straightened 
out in turn, the result would be a 
fairly complete mosaic of the real Dick 
Chamberlain — a guy he'd gotten to 
know pretty well during the past 
quarter-century or so. 

He thought about that first state- 
ment: "Painfully shy child ... a real 
loner." It was true that he had been 
shy in school. Both at Beverly Vista 
Grammar School and in Beverly Hills 
High School, he'd been known as a 
person who never had too much to say. 

But it certainly hadn't made him a 
"loner"! There'd been six or seven 
guys who'd gone all through school 
with him from about the fourth grade 
on, all good friends of his. And when 
they'd reached dating age, an equal 
number of girls had joined the group. 

Of course, there had been the braces. 
. . . those ugly, prominent, awkward 
braces he'd had on his teeth for a few 
years during school. How he'd hated 
them — and tried to keep his mouth shut 
as much as possible. 

But it was true — he never did have 
much to say. However, in school that 
can be an asset; kids tend to resent 
anyone who comes on too strong. It 
had helped get him elected a class 
officer, as well as (in his senior year) 



"Most Sophisticated," "Most Courte- 
ous" and "Most Reserved." 

He'd also been chosen "Best Phy- 
sique" — which pretty well took care of 
the second claim, that he was "awkward 
and sickly" in school. He'd gotten that 
physique by swimming, riding — and 
by running on the school track team. 
Some of his best friends were the other 
boys on the team. Later on, at Pomona 
College, he'd starred on the college 
track team, too. 

Number Three : "He never dated dur- 
ing his school years — didn't have the 
nerve!" 

"I wish the three girls I went steady 
with in high school had known that," 
he thought. 

There had been difficulties, though, 
and embarrassments. One was the fact 
that he didn't have his own car, which 
forced him to double-date or have his 
father drive. 

A blow to his pride 

And there had been the time he was 
invited up to a girl's house at Arrow- 
head for a week, along with another 
couple. That was a week he preferred 
to forget. 

Everything had gone fine for the 
first days. But one night his girl's 
parents had gone to a party for the 
evening. Dick and the girl — her name 
was Anne — were sitting near the fire 
with the other couple, feeling pretty 
romantic, when the doorbell rang. It 
was Anne's ex-boyfriend, and for over 
an hour Dick had to sit quietly while 
the boy, who was older, dominated the 
conversation and made a play for 
Anne. To top things off, Anne and the 
boy went for a ride around the lake, 
leaving Dick without a girl. They 
didn't come back for hours. The next 
morning, Dick took a bus back to town. 

But even that hadn't really discour- 
aged him, and by the following fall 
he was back in the dating swing again. 

Error Number Four was really a 
whopper: "He was so studious that the 
other kids called him a grind." 

As a matter of fact, this might have 
been the cause of his shyness — not that 
he was a grind, but that he did rather 
poorly in school. He was afraid some- 
times that the other students would 
laugh at his disinterest, so he tended 
not to say too much if he could avoid it. 

It wasn't that he was stupid; he just 
wasn't very interested in school. And 
it showed up in his marks. In fact, he 
could trace the crowning embarrass- 
ment of his school years to his poor 
marks : When he was in the third grade, 
his entire class skipped ahead a half- 
year when the school changed its grade 
system. All except Dick. He was put 
back a half-year. It was like flunking, 
and the insult rankled for a long time. 
Fortunately, a patient and understand- 
ing teacher named Florence Mont- 
gomery had then entered the picture, 
and with her help — particularly in in- 
creasing his reading speed — Dick's 
studies were no longer a problem. 

But not until he entered Pomona Col- 
lege did Dick really become interested 
in school. That was when he discovered 
acting. For the first time, his interest 



was seized and held, and the change 
was remarkable. Suddenly, there wasn't 
enough time in the day to learn all he 
wanted to about acting, and with de- 
light he lost himself in preparations 
for a whole series of school plays. 

But in losing himself, he had found 
himself at last. This, he suddenly knew, 
was the way he wanted to spend his 
life. After college, a two-year interval 
serving in the peacetime Army in Korea 
seemed almost interminable because it 
kept him away from acting, and as soon 
as he was back in Los Angeles as a 
civilian, he began to search for work 
in TV and movies. Now he was some- 
thing of a "grind." As a year and a 
half went by, during which he lived 
frugally on the skimpy income from 
occasional television roles, much of his 
money went into dramatic lessons with 
Jeff Corey and singing lessons with 
Caroline Trojanowski. 

Dick looked at Error Number Five: 
"His shyness still plagues him; he 
paints — to get away from people." 

But that was the amazing thing. Al- 
though his shyness had never really left 
him, he'd somehow discovered the abil- 
ity to turn it from a handicap into 
an asset. It certainly didn't "plague" 
him. In high school and college, ap- 
parently, the other students had actu- 
ally found his reserve appealing and 
easy to take. And it had proved to be 
of real benefit in his career. For shy- 
ness, he had discovered, could really , 
become a kind of control — a control 
of the emotions, keeping them from 
getting out of hand, so that he could 
select the proper emotion when he 
needed it in his work. Other actors, 
he'd noticed, would sometimes get so 
carried away by their roles that they 
went overboard and threw their whole 
performance out of focus. He, on the 
other hand, could keep his power in 
reserve until it was needed. 

It was true that he still painted — he'd 
been a painting major at Pomona when 
he decided that his real interest lay 
in acting. But he had decided against 
painting as a career partly because it 
kept him away from people. The life of 
a painter, alone for hours every day 
with his canvas, was too lonely a pros- 
pect for a life's work, he'd decided. 
Now painting was a pleasant relaxa- 
tion, an added creative outlet, but noth- 
ing more. Certainly he didn't do it to 
avoid people. 

True, he did try to avoid typical 
Hollywood parties, with their hordes of 
guests. But that was mainly because 
they were so hectic you couldn't really 
get to know anyone. And now that 
acting had illuminated his life, he loved 
to talk about it to people who were 
willing to listen and to contribute their 
own ideas. That was why he'd been 
dating girls like Myrna Fahey, Carole 
Wells and dancer Vicki Thai. They 
were either actresses, like Myrna and 
Carole, or interested in show business, 
like Vicki. Dick hadn't gotten really 
serious with any of them, because right 
now he wanted to concentrate on his 
career. But he certainly enjoyed their 
company and hoped they liked him. 

Error Number Six was easy to dis- 
pose of. "Ill-at-ease being a celebrity, 



he wishes he were still unknown to the 
public." Unknown to the public was 
what he didn't want to be. Everything 
he'd done during the past few years 
— his studies, his struggles to find work 
and gain acceptance — all these had 
been directed toward the goal of achiev- 
ing success as an actor. And public 
approval was an indispensable sign of 
that success. 

Finally he thought about Error Num- 
ber Seven: "Although he stars on a 
weekly television show, he lacks confi- 
dence in his ability and is very much 
afraid of the future." 

He wasn't satisfied with himself — 
that was true. The day he became com- 
pletely satisfied was the day he'd stop 
growing, and he never wanted that to 
happen. But thanks to people like his 
singing teacher, Caroline Trojanowski, 
he'd gained a confidence in his ability 
and his potential that had enabled him 
to weather the bleak period before suc- 
cess came his way. And he hoped he 
had the perspective to weather success. 



COMEDIANS' WIVES 



(Continued from page 34) 
more of you than another man. Comedi- 
ans depend so deeply on their wives. 
They know you're not going to hurt 
them. 

"Our house revolves around Andy. 
Dinner is when he's ready. If he takes 
a day off, I cancel my plans. If he's 
home earlier than expected and I'm 
out, he's like a bull in a china shop. 
He wants me here when he's here. It's 
a form of selfishness. You must give all 
of yourself and not expect much in 
return." 

Having met Andy when both were 
music majors at the University of North 
Carolina, the green-eyed Southerner 
married him three years after he pro- 
posed — which was three days after they 
met. Her one-time theatrical itch now 
gets scratched with hobbies like choir 
work and poetry writing. 

Explains Barbara. "A comic has an 
absolute super-ego. It's up to a wife to 
appease this ego." 

In common with most comedians, her 
husband is a good family man, ex- 
tremely generous, gracious about her 
relatives. He tries to please, but: "It's 
a hard life in that there's a constant 
digging of yourself. A constant giving. 
A continual satisfying of the other's 
needs." 

Plainfield, New Jersey's Margie Little 
Durante, permanently engaged to Gen- 
tleman Jim some fifteen years, now 
married to him some eighteen months, 
says, "We're very happy, but generally 
if you marry a comedian it's rougher 
than if your husband is a butcher or 
baker. It's not a normal, routine, nine- 
to-five existence. 

"Jimmy usually gets up. eleven or 
twelve. Now he's up at six making the 
movie, 'Jumbo.' He usually goes to bed 
midnight, but when he's working night 
clubs, it's not until four a.m. Most men 



When Dick had finished going over 
his list, he was ready to throw the 
magazine away. 

"Wait!" he thought. "There must 
be something in this article that's com- 
pletely correct." 

There was. In fact, there were two 
things. One at the beginning and one 
at the end. He read them over: 

"Richard Chamberlain was born on 
March 31, 1935, in Los Angeles, the 
son of furniture manufacturer Charles 
Chamberlain and his wife Elsa. . . . 
He is now under contract to Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer, where he has appeared 
in a feature picture, 'A Thunder of 
Drums,' and is seen each Thursday in 
the title role of the 'Dr. Kildare' series 
over NBC-TV." 

Dead right, Dick had to admit. For 
the most part, the article was only 
wrong about the things that had hap- 
pened in between. — James Gregory 

"Dr. Kildare" time on NBC-TV, Thurs., 
is 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. — edt, that is! 



relax at night. Jimmy's relaxation is 
the races in the middle of the afternoon. 

"Then there's the traveling. We re- 
cently adopted our first child, a brand- 
new baby. With children, you can't 
leave town whenever your husband has 
to. Many wives worry when their hus- 
bands are away. You know, there are 
always younger women and stars al- 
ways attract the most beautiful ones. 
The first five years, this bothered me. 
It doesn't anymore. 

"Another thing," the redhead went 
on, "is Jimmy likes lots of attention. If 
he's suddenly hungry at four in the 
afternoon and I couldn't eat until seven, 
it makes no difference. He wants me 
to sit down and join him. ... Do I? 
Of course! 

"Or if he hurts his finger, it's a 
'catastastroke.' Instead of a Band-Aid. 
he'll have it bandaged with splints and 
keep rushing to the doctor. 

"A comic's wife needs nerves of steel. 
Especially if he's doing TV or open- 
ing in a night club. I'm terribly nervous 
then. I just sit there praying. He always 
insists he's not worried, but I know he 
is. To give him confidence, I say, 'Oh. 
honey. What are you worrying about. 
You know you'll be great.' And after 
each performance, he'll ask how he did. 
This is after fifty years in show busi- 
ness. But they're all that way." 

To love, honor and applaud 

One important element is that a wife 
be able to "speak the lingo," as Milton 
Berle put it. Comedians think, breathe 
and eat comedy. To them, it's serious 
business. The butcher and his wife 
rarely sit around the fire of an evening 
debating the merits of chuck steak vs. 
veal cutlets, but a comedian's frau is 
always consulted on which gag she 
likes, why she likes it, why she thinks 
everybody else will like it. etc. 

Result is. most of their wives come 
from some phase of show business be- 
fore giving it up to "love, honor and 
applaud." Ruth Berle was a press agent. 




Sunk 



BY 

PERIODIC PAIN 

Every month Deborah was sunk by 
functional menstrual distress. Now 
she just takes Midol and goes her 
way in comfort because Midol 
tablets contain: 

• An exclusive anti-spasmodic that 
Stops Cramping . . . 

• Medically-approved ingredients 
that Relieve Headache and Back- 
ache . . . Calm Jumpy Nerves . . . 

• A special, mood-brightening 
medication that Chases "Blues." 

"WHAT WOMEN WANT TO KNOW" 

FREE! Frank, revealing 32-page book, explains 
womanhood's most common physical problems. 
Written by a physician. Write Dept. B72, Box 
280, New York 18, N.Y. (Sent in plain wrapperj 




BY 



IDOL 




83 



Bob Hope's Dolores, a singer. Comedi- 
enne Kay Leonard married Jack E. on 
a U.S.O. "Hellzapoppin" tour. Morey 
Amsterdam's wife, Kay, was a model. 
Ditto Eden Marx and Mrs. Phil Foster 
(Joan Feather stone) . Montezuma, Geor-' 
gia's Kathleen Mann, who became Toni 
Kelly, the once-upon-a-night-club show- 
girl, is now Jan Murray's everlovin'. 
Sherry Dubois (nee Ethel Cohen) gave 
up being a dancing teacher to acquire 
Buddy Hackett and two little Hacketts. 
Sarah Herman, an actress, met Shelley 
Berman in a Chicago dramatic school. 
Ballerina since eleven and actress since 
twelve, Betty Lou Padoshek married 
Ken Murray after auditioning for his 
"Blackouts" revue. Patti Palmer Lewis 
sang with Jimmy Dorsey's band when 
Jerry found her. Arnold Stang's missus, 
Joanne, was a reporter who interviewed 
him. Orlando, Florida's Evelyn Patrick, 
on radio since age four, renounced her 
successful TV career six years ago to 
care for Phil Silvers' scrapbook. 

"Our wives need to be two things. 
One is a rock. The other is an ear," 
said Milton Berle. 

"With the pressures of the business, 
the uncertainties, always trying to per- 
fect new jokes, always having to be 
funny, playing different places, you 
need a woman who's a rock. I had this 
in my mother. Now I have it in my wife. 

"Comedians need plenty of guts, a 
built-in nerve, no inhibitions. They have 
to be calloused, able to flop. They need 
someone to lean on. They need what's 
called 'a stand-up dame.' And that's 
what Ruth is. 

"A comedian's wife needs to be 'a 
handler.' Ruth's a great handler. When 
I'm upset she gives me the 'just take 
it easy now' routine." He illustrated 
with what happened when he worked 
the Eden Roc in Miami Beach. The 
night before he opened, he'd promised 
to be in bed by two a.m.. but things 
just weren't going right. It was very 
late and he was still re-staging, pacing 
and getting generally more nervous and 
unstrung. A quarter to four, Ruth 
walked in. She took one look, called 
him over and said quietly, "Pack up. 
You're through for tonight. You're go- 
ing upstairs." And Berle packed up and 
went upstairs. 

One famous television wit maintains 
he and his confreres are not normal 
people. They're abnormal. But they 
need normal wives. He claims a comedi- 
an can't maintain a 50-50 marriage. 
It's 65-35. Sixty-five percent of the 
giving is on the part of the wife. Buddy 
Hackett also derides 50-50 marriage. 
"In my house," he crows, "I'm the 
boss and she's the subjects." 

One obvious fact about comedians' 
wives is that they love their husbands 
dearly, are extremely protective and 
generally happily r married. Mrs. Joey 
Bishop: "My only comment is, I love 
my husband very much. We all do. The 
whole family." 

Mrs. Bob Hope: "Our whole family 

loves Bob's business and everything 

T about it. But that's because we love 

y Bob. We all idolize him." 

r Mrs. Jan Murray: "Comedians are 

gentle people. Vecy sensitive. Easily 

wounded. A comic suffers great pain. 
84 



They require a lot of love. But marry- 
ing a comedian is wonderful because 
if you do something wrong, his reaction 
to it is funny ... I only wish every- 
body could be as happy as we are." 

Married 28 years, Dolores Hope, an 
erudite, highly intelligent conversation- 
alist, says Bob is unusual in that he's not 
temperamental. Admittedly, comedy is 
"a tough profession ... a precarious 
business." And Mrs. Hope's analysis 
of why Mr. Hope doesn't permit himself 
the luxury of temperament is that he 
approaches his work scientifically, 
much as any other business man. Says 
Dolores, "Bob works very hard and 
thinks very hard about his profession. 
He never lets down for a second, even 
though his popularity is 'way up." 

Dolores believes wives must indulge 
their individuality to prevent relying 
emotionally on their husbands for every 
inner need. She insists it's an obliga- 
tion to develop mentally and physically, 
to pursue hobbies and thus avoid being 
a drudge. When things get snafued, 
she takes it out on the golf course. 

To Dolores Hope, comedians aren't 



PHOTOGRAPHERS' CREDITS 

Dick Chamberlain color by NBC; Len- 
non Sisters black-and-white by Leon 
Beonchemin of Topix; Lennon family 
color by John Hamilton; Chuck Connors 
family by Dick Miller; Vince Edwards 
and Bettye Ackerman by Bill Kobrin; 
Bobby Darin and Sandra Dee by Lee 
Thody of P. I. P.; Nancy Sinatra and 
Tommy Sands by Larry Barbier; Eliza- 
beth Taylor and Richard Burton by 
P.I. P.; Roger Smith and wife by Globe; 
"The Clear Horizon" by CBS; Grace 
Kelly and Alfred Hitchcock by Pictorial 
Parade; Art Linkletter and family by 
Frank Bez of Globe; Annette Funicello 
and Nino Castelnuovo by Elio Sorci of 
P.I.P. 



a breed different from everybody, "ex- 
cept they're high above any other kind 
of people. Even entertainment people. 
They have great heart. Do unsurpassed 
charitable work. They're extremely tal- 
ented. They take your mind off prob- 
lems, make you laugh. They are the 
true entertainers." 

And are these true entertainers truly 
entertaining offstage? 

Q: (of Mrs. Morey Amsterdam) Is 
he funny around the house? 

A : Usually . . . until I ask for money. 

Q: Do you laugh at his jokes at 
home? 

A: Only when we have company. 

And can these true entertainers be 
truly entertained? 

Q: (of Mrs. Alan King) Does Alan 
enjoy your sense of humor? 

A: He never laughs at anything I 
say. He doesn't think I'm even capable 
of saying anything amusing. 

And what kind of entertainment en- 
tertains them? 

Q: (of Mrs. Marx) Does Groucho 
guffaw at other comics? 

A: I've never ever heard Grouch 
laugh out loud. 

Q: What kind of TV shows does he 
watch? 



A: Except for comedy specials or his 
friends like Jack Benny, he prefers 
shows like "Meet the Press," "Open 
End," "College Bowl." 

A big question is: Are comedians 
easier to live with before or after they 
make it big? Which is tougher, the 
frustrations and fears of failure or the 
anxieties and fears of success? When 
Danny Thomas was struggling and in- 
tent on working or looking for work 
or making contacts or perfecting mate- 
rial, Rosemarie never saw him. She 
used to pray nightly he'd make it soon 
so they'd have more time together. 
Now he's so busy keeping abreast of 
millions, they have even less time alone. 

Most professionals who are "very 
amusing persons" have several mutual 
qualities. One is insomnia. "Grouch 
has insomnia constantly," declares 
Eden. "He's tried everything from pills 
to showering in the middle of the night 
to an electric vibrator chair. Sometimes 
I stay up with him. Or try to, anyway. 
I even taught him Yoga, but nothing 
helps. 

"Getting laughs is more nerve-wrack- 
ing than other businesses. Grouch goes 
through all the moods. When he's really 
hurt, he doesn't show it. He shrugs it 
off with a quip. He's either very happy 
or very cool. Nothing halfway. That's 
when the good wife comes in. If I'm 
in the mood, I jolly him out of it. If 
not, I just keep quiet. We argue very 
little because I've learned to give in 
more. What else can you do?" 

And another thing, they're worriers. 
It's been said of Bert Lahr that he's 
not worrying about today because he's 
still worrying about what happened 
twenty years ago! The comedian's wife 
is often considered "the villain" be- 
cause, as the buffer between her hus- 
band and the outside world, she tries 
to preserve him. 

"Danny comes home so exhausted 
he's barely able to eat," complains 
Rosemarie Thomas. "He worries about 
everything and I worry about him. 
When I see he's neither gay nor amus- 
ing anymore, I lure him off for a week- 
end. We drive down to the desert so 
Danny can play a few rounds of golf 
and relax and be my happy husband 
again." She loyally insists his bad 
moods are few and far between, but. 
sighs Mr. Thomas, "If I were married 
to a person with my particular tem- 
perament, I wouldn't be living at all 
— and neither would she!" 

And the wives of these highly paid, 
highly amusing persons have several 
mutual qualities. One is the ability to 
laugh at themselves. What choice has 
Mrs. Henny Youngman when he cracks : 
"Take away Marilyn Monroe's eyes, 
take away her hair, take away her 
mouth . . . and what have you got? 
... My wife!" 

What other choice has Cindy got 
when Joey Adams sneers, "My wife 
wears so much cold cream at night that 
she keeps slipping out of bed!" (Au- 
thor's Note: I'll tell you what other 
choice she has. She can write this 
article and see what kind of a sense 
of humor he has ! ! ) 

And what can Jeanette King do but 
get a fixed smile on her face when Alan 



"ad-libs"— for the 4,000th time— "My 
wife's getting so high class lately that 
she forgets I knew her with her old 
nose." 

And Jan Murray's mother-in-law, who 
lives in, giggles loudly though a bit 
shrilly when her cornbreadwinner 
barks, "They wouldn't take my mother- 
in-law in the marines because she fights 
too dirty." 

See what I mean ? ? ? 



SANDRA DEE 



(Continued from page 41) 
'Mother, come quickly, I don't know 
how to put the nipple on the bottle!' 
And she had to come over. 

"By the time she arrived, I had the 
nipple on, all right, but backwards, so 
that it was too loose. The nipple was 
rolling all around, and my baby was 
getting a milk bath! 

"But the funny part is this: My 
mother came over and I said, 'Is this 
the way the nipple goes?' And she said, 
'Yes, I think so.' And we fed the baby 
like that. You see, I wasn't a bottle- 
fed baby, so how did she know how to 
put a nipple on? The next day we were 
sterilizing the bottle and reading the 
directions, and suddenly I said, 'Mom 
— the nipple's on wrong!' We were both 
surprised." 

She shook her head, "I don't know. 
I look at our little boy now and I don't 
know how I had the nerve — I'd never 
diapered a baby before in my life, or 
even held one in my arms. And yet I 
wouldn't let the nurse near him. But 
when his formula wouldn't agree with 
him and he had colic for a week, I 
naturally called the doctor down every 
day while he was sick, but I simply 
wouldn't call the nurse. I had more 
nerve! When I think about it now, it 
frightens me." 

Sandra admitted that Bobby had been 
a terrific help during that first month. 
"There are some people that are born 
to be fathers," she beamed. "Bobby's 
one. He just loves kids — any kid. When 
I brought the baby home, he used to 
take over the night feedings, when he 
wasn't working, and he'd even diaper 
the baby. I woke up one morning ter- 
ribly sleepy, and I looked and didn't 
see my husband in bed. We have a 
gigantic bed, you know, so I had to 
sit up and look around, and all of a 
sudden I saw him sleeping with the 
baby in his arm and the bottle in the 
baby's mouth. He is drinking his milk, 
and my husband's sleeping. 

For laughing out loud 

"You know, the baby looks so much 
like Bobby. There is nothing of me in 
the baby at all. In his face, in his hair, 
in his build, he's a miniature Bobby. 
In fact, I sit in the audience at night 
during Bobby's show, and I'll start to 
laugh hysterically sometimes. And no- 
body knows why. They all know who 
I am, and they look and wonder what's 



Shakespeare said it: "Laugh and the 
world laughs with you." The comedian 
laughs because he's getting paid to 
squawk publicly what he wouldn't have 
the nerve to squeak privately. The audi- 
ence laughs because for the first time 
somebody's saying what they're think- 
ing. And the comedian's wife laughs 
because she figures, "Nuts to all of 
you. I'm going to the furrier tomorrow." 

— The End 



so funny. I mean, he'll be doing a 
ballad, and I can look at Bobby and 
see the little baby's expressions on his 
face. And I sit at the table laughing 
all through 'I'm a Fool to Want You.' 

"At first, I didn't want the nurse at 
all. I was afraid the baby wouldn't 
know its mother if somebody else took 
care of it. But now I realize how really 
lucky I am. Because now, when I take 
that baby, it's only because I want to. 
It's a real pleasure — it's not a job any- 
more. By the end of that first month, 
I was taking care of him alone, when 
he'd wake up crying for his bottle, I 
couldn't wait to give it to him and have 
him go back to sleep, because I was 
so tired. I wasn't seeing enough of 
Bobby, either. The minute he'd come 
home from work, the baby would start 
to cry for his bottle, and Bobby would 
have to eat dinner alone while I fed 
the baby. Now I want to see the baby 
awake, and I want to play with it. 

"On the other hand," Sandra added, 
"if I hadn't taken care of the baby 
by myself that first month, I wouldn't 
have the self-confidence to turn it over 
to the nurse now. Because if I felt I 
couldn't take care of the baby as well 
as the nurse. I wouldn't feel happy. 

"As it is, I've gone through sickness 
with the little baby, and I've taken 
care of it myself, and now you should 
see me carry him! I'm so casual I 
carry him slung over my shoulder! 

The movie-star mother 

"You should have seen the sight the 
other day. I was doing fittings for my 
new picture, 'If a Man Answers,' and 
I had to go to Jean Louis' for them. 
Well, in this picture, I have thirty-two 
of the most gorgeous outfits you ever 
saw. Ostrich feather dresses and mink 
lined coats, and one dress is solid gold 
— well, all gold beads. Anyway, I'm 
standing there with the four fitters and 
Jean Louis, and I'm in this beautiful 
dress and they're pinning me up, and 
on the couch is my son. He's lying there 
with his bottle. 

"So there's the movie star, getting 
herself fitted and pinned up and all, 
and all of a sudden you hear me shout: 
'Hold it, folks! The baby's bottle fell 
out!' And I run over to the couch and 
put the bottle back in his mouth. Then 
the fitting continues. 

"The baby's going to come to the 
studio with me, every day," she said 
determinedly. "I have a dressing room 
bungalow with four rooms, and I'm go- 
ing to have them bring him in every day 
about noon. And he'll stay with me the 
rest of the afternoon. I have a little 



Amazing BOOK FREE!!! 




Lose ( 
Inches 



QUICK! 



NO DIETS! NO PILLS! 
NO EXERCISES! 

If your figure is mostly good, but you are just 
worried about HIPS or WAIST, LEGS, ARMS, 
etc., send for your copy of this FREE BOOK. 

It tells about an amazing method FROM ENG- 
LAND, used for almost 10 years by smart 
women in Paris, London, Scandinavia . . . and 
already being used by many thousands of 
women in this country. 

Get the free book today. Learn how STEPH- 
ANIE BOWMAN, England's leading authority 
on slimming, brought a new, slim figure and 
untold happiness to many women. No dieting 
... no pills ... no strenuous exercising. 
This method helps you SPOT REDUCE only 
WHERE YOU WANT TO LOSE . . . leaves 
the rest of your figure as is. It is truly amazing, 
safe, effective. It works for thousands ... IT 
CAN WORK FOR YOU. 

American Women Praise Results! 

"Lost 4 inches from hips in 2 weeks" 

-Mrs. H. S., Fla.' 
"Lost 3 inches off thighs!"-Mrs. E. L., N. Y. 
"Now have 36" hips, 21" thighsl" ' 

i ' - — Mrs. M., Miss. 

"Lost 2" from waist!"-Miss C. B., Colo. 

FREE BOOK! Rush your request for 
Miss Bowman's free book: "A SLIM, LITHE 
FIGURE ... for YOU!" Fully illustrated; in- 
cludes details on the method and facts on how 
many women lost inches from hips, waist, bust, 
legs, arms, chin, etc. The book is yours for the 
asking . . . and Miss Bowman will send extra 
copies to your friends and relatives if you in- 
clude their names and addresses. 

WRITE TODAY *'! you'll be started 
on the road to SELECTIVE SLIMMING be- 
fore Summer bathing-suit time. 

STEPHANIE BOWMAN, INC., 234 5th Ave., N.Y. 1 



Fill Out for FREE BOOK!!! 



■ / Check Where You Want to t 

TAKE OFF INCHES QUICK!" 

O Hips D Waist D Tummy □ Legs 
□ Thighs □ Buttocks D Chin, etc. 



Stephanie Bowman, Inc. (Dept. TSG-22) 
234 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, N.Y. 

Dear Mitt Bowman: Pleas* ruth your FREE BOOK 
telling how I, too, can REDUCE- measurement. . 



NAME- 



ADDRESS.. 



CITY ZONE STATE 

D Send extra copies for others. Names and 

addrestet encloted. 



85 



—L 



porch, and I'll put him out on the porch 
in the sun when I have to work, and the 
nurse will be there with him. Then I 
can see him all the time between scenes. 
He's a very good baby and I know it'll 
work out fine." 

The baby has already attended his 
father's rehearsals. "You see, he loves 
music!" she said proudly. "He's crazy 
about it. The day we brought him home 
from the hospital, whenever he'd start 
to cry, Bobby would play the guitar for 
him and he'd stop immediately. So 
when the band would come over to the 
house to rehearse with Bobby, I'd wheel 
the baby into the rehearsal room to 
listen. When the band was playing, my 
boy would sleep. But the minute the 
band stopped, he'd start to cry until 
the music came on again. 

"In fact, now he lies in his crib and 



listens to a little radio of his own — 
it's shaped like a baseball. At night we 
hang it up in the crib and he listens 
to it for hours. Why, he even knows the 
Top Ten! He can tell his father which 
is going to be a hit and which will be 
a miss. When he starts to cry, that 
record is out. 

"But he's not impressed by his 
father's records— I tell you!" she 
laughed. "So far, his favorite record 
has been 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight.' 
When the high part comes on, he starts 
to smile. The doctor saw him and didn't 
believe it! 

"When he grows up, I'd like him to 
go to military school," Sandra went on 
with a smile, "because the uniform's 
so cute. But Bobby says, 'The boy is 
going to a public school, and he's going 
to play in the street like every other 



boy, and he's going to get hit on the 
fanny.' I keep saying, 'Military school,' 
and Bobby keeps saying, 'Public!' 

"And then Bobby says, 'I grew up in 
a public school, and I didn't do so bad ! ' 
And I say, 'But / grew up in a private 
school, and I didn't do so bad, either!' 
But, you know, I think his father's going 
to win out." 

Would Sandra object if Dodd wanted 
to go into show business? 

"No," she said firmly. "I'm happy in 
it and Bobby's happy in it, and if this 
is going to make the baby happy, fine. 
You know, there's nothing about this 
business that I regret. It's not done any- 
thing to me that I'm ashamed of, or 
that I wouldn't want the baby to know. 
It's brought me nothing but happiness 
so far — knock wood!" And she rapped 
on the table. — Chris Alexander 






TOMMY SANDS 



(Continued from page 45) 
coaches in the country are always lo- 
cated. 

"I also didn't believe in sitting in 
Hollywood and waiting for the next 
role to come along. I felt I should spend 
my time working with a top coach, 
studying and evaluating scenes. And I 
knew it might be six or seven months 
between jobs. So I told Nancy we had 
to move to New York. 

"That came as quite a shock to her. 
It meant a complete change in her life. 
She would not only have to leave her 
family for the first time — and she's 
very close to both her mother and fa- 
ther, even though they're divorced — but 
she would have to get used to living 
in a little flat like this one, with just 
a bedroom, living room, kitchen and 
bath. And you know she was raised in 
a huge house." 

Tommy jumped up to help Nancy 
bring in the big tray of coffee and 
cake. Then when they were both set- 
tled, side by side on the couch, he went 
on. 

"She just told me that, if it was im- 
portant and necessary to my career and 
to our future, that's what we would do. 
"She made the change, just as she 
made all the other adjustments a young 
girl must resign herself to when she 
leaves her parents' home and goes off 
to make a home of her own with the 
man she marries. Changes like not be- 
ing able to buy a drawerful of cash- 
mere sweaters or a new dress for each 
party, like checking the prices on the 
menu at restaurants and planning and 
hoping for two, instead of one. 

"When we got here and discovered 
that it would cost a fortune to get a 
large apartment, Nancy decided it 
would be foolish for us to go into our 
savings to keep it up. We found living 
costs in New York are quite high. So 
T we scouted around for this smaller 
V place. It's nice, it's clean and real live- 
it able, now that we've fixed it up. And 
the best thing is that, with a limited 
income while I'm studying, we don't 
86 



have to dip into our savings to meet 
the budget." 

Nancy interrupted. "Honey, don't 
give the impression that I got into the 
swing of things right off the bat. 

"It wasn't easy, as you can under- 
stand. Those first few weeks were quite 
difficult. I was lonesome for California, 
for home, for my family, and it gave 
me a pretty bad feeling of depression 
more often than I cared to admit to 
Tommy. 

"But he was so good about it. He 
knew what I was going through and 
he never got mad at me. He helped 
me get used to this new life in the same 
calm, efficient way he adjusted to mar- 
riage and helped me to adjust to it. 

"For instance, Tommy has always 
been used to having dinner ready when 
he comes home at night from work. But 
I was always used to a relaxing sort-of- 
social period before dinner. So, when 
we were first married, I was in no hurry 
to fix dinner. 

"Of course, one of us had to change 
our habits. Tommy didn't get mad about 
it and yell at me over it. He just told 
me that he was good and hungry by 
the time he got home from a day's work 
and that he wanted to eat before doing 
anything else. So that's the way it is. 
And I don't mind. I didn't even con- 
sider it 'giving in.' This is the way it 
has to be for the man of the house — 
so that's the way I want it. 

"You know, he has a slogan that 
says: 'Marriage is composed of ninety- 
percent give on both sides.' This has 
done wonders in giving our marriage 
a solid foundation. It enables us to sur- 
vive the usual misunderstandings and 
overcome the crises that seem to crop 
up even in the most perfect marriages. 

A bride becomes a wife 

"We try to avoid making an issue 
of little things. We believe that there 
are enough big things in business and 
in life to worry about that you shouldn't 
bother getting concerned with the little 
ones. 

"Consequently, he doesn't holler at 
me when I leave the top off my lipstick 
on the dresser. I know it annoys him 
and I try not to do it, but sometimes 



I forget. When I do, he never men- 
tions it. 

"I guess he's learned how to be a 
husband, just like I've learned to be 
a wife. It's a new experience. Every 
bride must learn how to live with some- 
one else, just as she has to learn how 
to cook. She should learn to under- 
stand her mate's moods, when to en- 
courage, when to sympathize, when to 
respect his privacy." 

"And when not to interrupt," said 
Tommy, interrupting, with a grin. "But 
since you interrupted me, I guess it's 
okay if I interrupt you on the same 
subject. Okay?" 

Nancy grinned back. "Okay, boss," 
she approved. 

A husband's tribute 

"One thing Nancy was very good at 
was recognizing immediately that a 
married couple must live for two in- 
stead of living for one. That's her na- 
ture. She's always been a warm, con- 
siderate, thoughtful person, which is 
one of the reasons I was so very strong- 
ly attracted to her, the more I knew 
her. 

"But she is always thinking of my 
feelings and trying to understand me. 
When she makes decisions, it's on the 
basis of what I might like. For example, 
if we were still single and not going 
together, we could always readily give 
a yes or no answer without second 
thought. But now, when someone asks 
one of us if we'd like to go to a party 
or a movie or to an opening or out 
for any sort of evening at all, we try 
to think of whether the other is feel- 
ing well and whether it's something 
the other one wants or likes to do. That 
way, we don't put the blame on each 
other's shoulders for refusing, and we 
don't make each other responsible for 
these decisions. 

"You ask if there are problems in- 
volved in marrying a rich girl. 

"Sure, there are. Every marriage cre- 
ates problems. But intelligent, sensible 
people realize it and attempt to do 
something about solving their problems. 

"Nancy, like all wives, is a prob- 
lem. But I love my problem." i 
— Mary Baldwin 



VINCENT EDWARDS 



(Continued from page 38) 
times I managed to steal the spotlight 
from the two giants in my TV life. 

Then, in another segment, when Cliff 
Robertson died so beautifully, I again 
broke down and cried. The result was 
a protest from the American Medical 
Association. It seems doctors, female 
or otherwise, do not get so emotionally 
involved with their patients. When Sam 
heard about this, he chuckled, "Maybe 
next time you won't get so smart, young 
lady." And Vince, taking up his line, 
added: "Our phone call to the A.M.A. 
sure got action, Sam . . ." 

But, honestly, I do love the part of 
Maggie, the anesthesiologist. And so 
far — knock wood — I've had no big 
problems portraying her. She's uncom- 
plicated, really ... an intelligent, sym- 
pathetic person, competent as a pro- 
fessional but feminine to the core. Most 
of all, I like the subtle relationship 
that hovers between her and Dr. Casey. 
There is a hint of something more 
than affection, a trace of romance like 
faint perfume in the air . . . and yet 
it never intrudes on their friendly, medi- 
cal cooperation and their ardent dedi- 
cation to the saving of lives. Always, 
without preaching, a delicate message 
is put forth to the effect that, however 
they may secretly feel toward each 
other, it's all sublimated to the de- 
mands of their profession. 

Both Sam and Vince are from New 
York. Their backgrounds are alike, 
Vince hailing from the Brownsville sec- 
tion of Brooklyn and Sam from Man- 
hattan's East Side. Both their families 
were hard-pressed in making ends meet. 
Both worked their way through school 
and both had — and still have — an 
urgent desire for education. Though 
they lean toward "good art" and "long- 
hair music," they both have a lighter 
side. Their imitations are hilarious. 
Vince's mimicry of Dr. Zorba is price- 
less, topped only by Sam's retaliation 
as the uncompromising, unconvention- 
al Ben Casey. 

Sam and Vince are also alike in be- 
ing very masculine men, strong-willed, 
serious in work, idealistic in their de- 
fense of the underdog, and in their 
frank and generous attitudes. I have 
said they love music. Vince recently 
proved, on "The Dinah Shore Show," 
what a terrific singer he is. Sam once 
considered becoming a concert pianist. 
He has composed a number of works 
in the classical form. All this has helped 
foster their friendship. 

They have another trait in common. 
I'm afraid both are easy marks for a 
touch, and are sometimes taken ad- 
vantage of. Since his success on "Ben 
Casey," Vince has naturally been ap- 
proached for help by pals of the old 
tough days. And, in his generous way, 
he has tried to steer these struggling 
actors to jobs and has often made sub- 
stantial loans. Sam — who has suffered 
some unfortunate experiences with mak- 
ing loans of this kind — warned Vince 
to hand out money with discretion, lest 



he lose rather than hold such friends. 

Shortly after, an old acquaintance 
came by and asked Vince for a loan. 
Still mulling over Sam's warning, Vince 
decided to cut his loan to the mini- 
mum and gave the man a ten. So what 
happened? In a huff, the man ap- 
proached Sam and sang his song of 
woe. Sam's heart was promptly touched 
and it ended with him giving a sizable 
loan. Whereupon we heard a Zorba- 
type roar from Vince: "So! So, doctor, 
this you call medical ethics — to make 
a diagnosis of my condition, and then 
practice the exact opposite? Such a 
shnook!" For once, Sam had nothing 
to answer. He shrugged and looked 
like the kid with his hand caught in 
the cookie jar. 

My own background is quite far 
removed from these two New Yorkers. 
I was born in Cottageville, South Caro- 
lina, on February 28th — and I was a 
"Leap Year" baby. After I fell in love 
with Sam, I often toyed with the notion 
of using my "leaping" privilege to pro- 
pose. But I was saved that embarrass- 
ment. Sam beat me to it, and I accepted 
with alacrity. 

Afterward, I confessed to Sam that 
he'd come close to being proposed to, 
and his answer startled me. "It's a 
good thing you didn't," he said, his 
hair ruffling. "It might have been the 
end." Knowing him now as well as I 
do, I realize this is the simple fact. 
Sam's gentle and tolerant and wise as 
a man can be, but he is no one to be 
pressured into things. Not even by the 
woman he loves. 

My early life, I suppose, was real 
"small-towny." I went to Columbia Col- 
lege in South Carolina, where I studied 
drama with Mary Lou Kramer, then 
I switched to Columbia University in 
New York, where I studied pantomime 
and dance with Louise Gifford. Drama 
and dancing were my passions and I 
continued studying Spanish dancing 
with Carola Goya, and drama with 
Alexander Kirkland at the Theater 
Wing and in the studios of Stella Adler 
and Herbert Berghof. 

After five seasons of summer stock 
(I once toured with the Clare Tree 
Major Players as the Wicked Queen 
in "Snow White" ) , and some commer- 
cials on radio and TV, I was able to 
afford doing off-Broadway plays, one 
of which was Moliere's "Tartuffe" — 
which starred none other than Sam 
Jaffe. 

Sam is an accomplished mathema- 
tician, musician, actor, linguist — he is 
fluent in German, Italian, French, He- 
brew and English, and is currently 
studying Japanese — and, on the whole, 
an informed and cultured man . . . 
but when I looked at him in those days, 
all I could see, alas, was Gunga Dinl 
It was the one film I had seen him 
in, up to then, and I thought he was 
not only a masterly performer but the 
cutest thing in that little didie. (What 
am I saying? Now I will get the Dr. 
Zorba routine from Sam when he reads 
this!) 

Anyhow, six months later, I became 
Mrs. Jaffe and the Jaffes got married 
life off to a profitable start as mem- 
bers of the national touring company 



Liz' Butler 
Tells All: 

"HOW LIZ 
HUMILIATED EDDIE" 

An exclusive, inside story of 
what actually went on at the 
Fisher villa in Rome! 




A rabbi and three ministers 
discuss : 

LOVE... LUST 

AND 
LIZ TAYLOR! 

What four religious leaders 
think of America's "Love 
Goddess" from a moral point 
of view. 

OUR JACKIE 
CONQUERS 
INDIA . . . 

and India teaches Jackie to 
conquer loneliness! 

All this plus fascinating 
stories and full-color photos 
of other top Hollywood 
stars. Dick Chamberlain . . . 
ISatalie Wood . . . Warren 
Beatty.. . and many more in 

JULY 

PHOTOPLAY 

ON SALE NOW 




87 



T 
V 
R 

88 




TRUST YODORA 

For those intimate moments . . . don't 
take a chance . . . trust Yodora and feel 
confident. New Yodora is a delicately 
scented, modern beauty cream deodor- 
ant. Its fortified 
protection is 
protection you 
can trust. 




NEW 

YODORA 



POEMS WANTED 



To fie Set To Music 

Send one or more of yeur best poems 

today for FREE EXAMINATION. Any 

Subject. Immediate Consideration. 

Phonograph Records Made 

CROWN MUSIC CO., 49 W. 32 St., Studio 560, New York 1 



ANY PHOTO ENLARGED 



67 



Size 8 x 10 Inches 

en DOUBLE-WEIGHT Paper 

Same price for full length or bast 
form, groups, landscapes, pet ani- 
mals, etc., or enlargements of any 
part of a group picture. Original is 
returned with your enlargement. 

Send No Money 3 tor $1 so 

Jnst mail photo, negative or snap- 
shot {any size) and receive your enlargement, 
guaranteed fadeless, on beautiful double-weight 
portrait quality paper. Pay postman 67c plus 
postage— or send 69c with order and we pay post- 
age. Take advantage of this amazing offer. Send your photos today. 

Professional Art Studios, 544 S. Main, Dept. 32-H, Princeton, Illinois 






American Institute of Practical Nursing, Room 92 
120 S. State Street-Chicago 3, Illinois 


RTRFFT 


CITY 


70NE. 


STATE 



Clip and mall this coupon 
for your 10-page. 




EARN 
$70 00 

weekly 




Great need for Practical Nurses 
right now. Learn at home in 10 
weeks for Graduate Diploma. 
No age, no education limit. 
Enjoy new prestige, security. 
Wonderful opportunity. FREE 
offer: Nurse uniform and cap, 
Nurse's Medical dictionary, 
many needed accessories. 



of "The Lark," starring Julie Harris. 
Our "working honeymoon" took us 
around the world and lasted three won- 
derful years. 

It is now six years, come June, that , 
we are man and wife. The other day, 
Vince asked how we met. With a 
straight face, Sam said, "In a health- 
food shop." The fact is, Sam's a vege- 
tarian down to the last shred of spin- 
ach. I, Bettye Ackerman Jaffe, wish to 
make a point here. I am not a devout 
vegetarian, I'm merely a "non-meat- 
arian," which is purely an emotional 
carry-over from childhood. 

Sam summed it up for Groucho 
Marx when we were at the same table 
at a party. Groucho raised those famous 
eyebrows when he saw me filling my 
plate with greens and passing up the 
meat platter. "She won't eat anything 
she could pet," Sam explained. Groucho 
leaned over and whispered with his 
hungriest leer, "Well, chicken, I could 
eat you!" 

I haven't eaten meat since I was eight 
and my pet duck, "Waddle," disap- 
peared. At dinner, I stared in frozen 
horror at the dish my mother was serv- 
ing. I screamed, "Waddle!" — and ran 
to my room in tears. My brother did the 
same. To this day, my poor mother 
apologizes for having cooked Waddle. 
She hadn't realized that we'd been mak- 
ing a pet of the duck while she was 
fattening him for the kill. 

During our courtship, Sam and I 
took a walk through Central Park. A 
duck swam by on the lagoon and I 
gasped, "He's just like my darling 
Waddle." Sam gave a snort of disgust, 
"That's not a duck — it's a drake. I can 
see," he snapped, "that you don't eat 
meat, out of a sentimental error." I 
argued, "It makes no difference." His 
retort was: "It makes a lot of differ- 
ence to the drake." 

But for all his "reasons" of health 
and moral principles, Sam's real reason 
for not eating meat is as sentimental 
as mine. It began when he first saw 
a calf butchered on a farm where he. 
a kid from New York's East Side, was 
working the summer. (All this vege- 
tarian talk will probably come as a 
surprise to some of our dinner guests. 
We usually serve them meat or fowl.) 

Let me say here that I did not, as 
some people imagine, get my part in 
the series through my husband's inter- 
vention. It was completely accidental. 
I had just finished my first movie, "Face 
of Fire," and was at loose ends. I ac- 
companied Sam to a costume fitting for 
the pilot of this new series about doc- 
tors in a great metropolitan hospital. 
As I sat waiting for my spouse, the 
director, Fielder Cook, passed through, 
did a "take" and came up to me. He 
said, "You look like Maggie Graham, 
the woman doctor in our series — how 
about reading for our producer, Jim 
Moser?" 

I was in dungarees, totally unpre- 
pared, and felt uneasy. "Another time," 
I suggested. But Cook insisted. And, 
all at once, there stood Sam, backing 
him up. I did the reading and that's 
how I got to be Dr. Maggie Graham. 
If I'd known the role would stack 
me up against the formidable person- 



alities and dramatic talents of both 
Sam Jaffe and Vince Edwards, I might 
have thought much longer about try- 
ing for the part! 

Many fans don't realize I'm Mrs. 
Sam Jaffe in real life and think I'm 
in love with Vince Edwards. This is 
because they tend to mix Maggie Gra- 
ham and Ben Casey up with the people 
who play these parts. Sam and I have 
had many a laugh over this error. We 
see it as part of the illusion we have 
been trying to create. 

But my mother, bless her heart, gets 
quite snippy if she hears anyone won- 
der what gives with the lady doctor 
and Ben Casey, behind the scenes. She 
loses no time in explaining that her 
daughter is a loyal and devoted wife 
and not in the least interested in Vince 
Edwards except as a friend and co- 
worker. 

One recent letter gave me a thrill. 
A girl who'd been watching me on the 
show had decided to enter the medical 
profession. "I want to be an anesthesi- 
ologist like Dr. Maggie," she wrote, and 
very kindly added, "and I'd like to be 
that fine a human being." As an ac- 
tress, I'm flattered that she was influ- 
enced by the character I portray. 

I have mentioned several qualities 
Sam and Vince share. I'd like to offer 
an example in which they are radically 
different. Sam doesn't drive and has no 
desire to. Vince is madly infatuated 
with his new sleek black Continental. He 
feels about it much as I did about poor 
Waddle — it's his pet. Once when Benny 
Goldberg, a stand-in on the show who 
works for Vince personally, brought 
the wrong car back from the "wash- 
eteria," Vince acted as I did when I 
saw Waddle served up for dinner! 

But when Benny returned with the 
right car, Vince laughed, jigged, and 
even patted the hood of the car as if 
it were a horse in the winning circle 
and he were jockey Shoemaker. Sam's 
comment was: "A good thing to see. If 
he takes that good care of his posses- 
sions, now that he can afford them, he 
won't waste his success. He'll probably 
take as good care of his home, his wife 
when he gets married, and his children 
when be has them." 

Sam and I are extremly happy in our 
work. We're happy to be the sort of 
people who enjoy life, nature and 
people and who like to make our small 
contributions to enrich the lives of 
others. From what I've seen of him, I 
believe Vince is cut of the same cloth. 
At the moment, it is difficult for him to 
achieve the tranquil pleasures that Sam 
and I glory in. Someone recently said 
to Sam, "Your boy, Vince, is all nerves. 
Is he trying to play the angry young 
man in real life, too?" 

Sam looked this man squarely in the 
eye and said quietly, "Have you any 
conception of what it means to learn 
the equivalent of three-fifths of a Broad- 
way play every single week? That's 
what Vince has to do, to carry the 
burden of this show. Just picture the 
strain on him. Why, there isn't an actor 
alive who could keep on doing this and 
not show the tension." 

Sam is right, of course. Absolutely. 
Vince is in three-fifths of each segment 



oi the series. It s a wonder he hasn t 
lost all his sense of humor. He has a 
very keen one, I can testify to that! 
I recall the day we were doing our 
first episode. A woman tourist, who was 
visiting the set, rushed up to Ray 
Joyer, Vince's stand-in. She fussed over 
him, calling him "Vince Casey" one 
second and "Dr. Edwards" the next. 
Ray was helpless. She wouldn't give 
him a chance to explain that the gent, 
standing beside him, grinning broadly 
and saying nothing, was the star of 
"Ben Casey." After she had gone, Ray 
exploded, "Why didn't you tell her who 
you were?" Vince laughed, "She was 
happy with you, wasn't she? That's all 
that counts." And to this day, weighed 
down as he is with so many responsi- 
bilities, Vince has retained that large 
tolerance and the ability to smile chari- 



ALFRED HITCHCOCK 



(Continued from page 57) 
the glamour — and the tourist trade — 
back to her kingdom. 

It was all very intriguing and the 
rumors grew louder and louder — so 
loud, in fact, that hardly anyone heard 
when a short, rotund man said quietly: 
"I just asked her . . . and she said yes." 
The man was Alfred Hitchcock, and for 
him it's that simple. It always had been. 
It's easy for him to make a woman say 
"yes." You see, he has a way with them. 

Alfred Hitchcock first saw Grace 
Kelly in a test for a picture called 
"Taxi," at 20th Century-Fox. The test 
was not successful, Grace did not get 
the job. When she finally did get a 
picture, "Mogombo" at MGM, it 
showed her as a stiff school-marm 
creature with ice water in every vein. 
But in the "Taxi" test, Hitchcock had 
seen beneath that frozen exterior the 
promise of warmth, strength, sexual 
power and the ability to convey it all 
on screen. He snapped up Grace for 
"Dial M for Murder." It was an excit- 
ing performance. So was hers in "Rear 
Window." 

And after all that, after proof on the 
screen that Grace Kelly could be an 
exciting, provocative actress, she went 
back to her home lot and might have, 
by a narrow margin, missed her destiny, 
might never have become the Princess 
of Monaco. Her screen career hung in 
the balance while they put her into a 
languid "B" picture called "Green 
Fire," in which she was the frigid lady. 
But Hitchcock snared her again for "To 
Catch a Thief." 

To film that one, Hitchcock took her 
to the Riviera and the cameras turned 
in the very shadow of the palace Grace 
was later to call home. During that pic- 
ture, Grace met her Prince. The rest 
is history, except for the secret meeting 
years later in Paris. There, in a dimly- 
lit bistro, Grace found that Hitchcock's 
magic was still working. She couldn't 
say "no" to him. 

The man who defrosted Grace Kelly 
may not have had as many women in 
his life as some men. But his relation- 



tably at the toibles oi human beings. 

The other morning, I told him that 
TV Radio Mirror had asked me to 
write my impressions of Sam and of him. 
"Any comment, doctor?" I teased. 
Vince stared thoughtfully at me until I 
felt he wasn't going to answer. Finally, 
he said, "Bettye, don't sprinkle perfume 
over me. Just tell the unvarnished, 
down-to-earth truth as you see things 
around here." 

As Sam would say in his very best 
Dr. Zorba tone, "Such a boy!" Yes, I 
think Bettye Ackerman Jaffe is very 
lucky to be Maggie Graham, the woman 
in the lives of Dr. Zorba and Dr. Ben 
Casey. And, cross my heart, that is the 
truth as I see it. — Bettye Ackerman 

They're all doctors on "Ben Casey," 
on ABC-TV, Mon., 10 to 11 p.m., edt. 



ships have been long-lasting. As a 
matter of fact, once a woman gets in- 
volved with Hitchcock, she's rarely ever 
the same again. 

His wife Alma, for example, was a 
film cutter when Hitchcock met her, 
and not in the least domestic. During 
the years of their marriage, she has 
worked with him as a writer, as assist- 
ant director — and also become a 
mother, a gifted homemaker and a 
superb cook. But she still looks cool 
and blonde. 

"I've been accused," he says, "of 
always choosing this same cool blonde 
type as the heroine of my movies and 
perhaps that's true. My taste is based 
on English women, outwardly cold, in- 
wardly passionate — probably the most 
promiscuous of all. The trouble is, most 
Englishmen don't appreciate them. 
These lovely creatures are the product 
of their climate; Scandinavian women, 
from a similar climate, are similar 
emotionally — Bergman the apple- 
cheeked, but what seeds inside the 
apple! The type is most photogenic, 
most intriguing, and gives me the op- 
portunity of presenting a woman subtly 
and slowly to the public — not just 
putting it all on a platter. Look at the 
charm of the Victorian woman — but- 
toned up to the neck, the corseted 
torso — yet all that barricade had to 
come off sometime, you know. Consider 
the size of the Victorian family!" 

Madeleine Carroll . . . Grace Kelly 
. . . Joan Fontaine . . . Eva Marie 
Saint . . . Kim Novak . . . Vera Miles. 
To Hitchcock goes the credit for bring- 
ing these actresses to life. Strangely 
enough, he insists, it has nothing to 
do with teaching them to act. It's been 
rather a matter of giving them self- 
confidence. Though talented and lovely, 
they need the whispered word, a feel- 
ing of ease . . . like the words that 
changed Madeleine Carroll into the 
radiant creature of "The Thirty-Nine 
Steps." This picture was made at 
Gaumont British and the powers-that- 
be called Mr. Hitchcock in. Madeleine 
had only one picture to make under 
her contract and would he please use 
her for "The Thirty-Nine Steps." 

Hitchcock remonstrated, he felt the 
pretty blonde something of a stick, but 
they pressured him and there was 



OPPORTUNITIES 
FOR YOU 




For ad rates, write PCD 

549 W. Washington 

Chicago 6 



OF INTEREST TO WOMEN (P.W.—July '62) 

BEAUTY DEMONSTRATORS^TO $5.00 hour demonstrat- 



$300 PAID FOR Your Child's Picture by advertisers. Send 
small photo. (All ages). Returned. Print child's, parent's name, 
address. Spotlite, 1611-P7 LaBrea, Hollywood, California. 
SECOND INCOME FROM Oil Can End Your Toill Free 
Book and Oilfield Mapsl National Petroleum, Panamerican 

Building, Miami 32, Florida. 

MAKE $25-$50 week, clipping newspaper items for publishers. 
Some clippings worth $5 each. Particulars Free. National, 

81 -WM, Knickerbocker Station, New York City. 

DRESSES 24c; SHOES 39c; Men's suits $4.95; trousers 
$1.20. Better used clothing. Free catalog. Transworld, 164-A 

Christopher, Brooklyn 12.N.Y. 

$25-$50 WEEKLY possible, rewriting news items, Jokes, 
Poems, Recipes for publishers. Some worth $10 each. Details 
Free. Se rvi ce, 81 -FW, Kn ic kerbocker S tati on, New York City . 
CASH FROM NEWSPAPER clippingsl Detailed instructions 
$1 (refundable). Rejss, Dept. B-1, Box 94, New York 52. 
EARN UP TO $2.00 hour sewing babywearl Free Details. 

Cuties , Warsaw 1 , Indiana. 

EARN $50.00 FAST, Sewing Aprons. Details Free. Redykuf s, 

Loganville, Wisconsin. 

EDUCATIONAL & INSTRUCTION 

ATTEND BUSINESS SCHOOL at homel Save time and 
expense of attending classes, prepare for secretarial career 
in typing, shorthand, business procedures, bookkeeping. 
Write for catalog. Wayne School, 417 S. Dearborn, Dept. 

07-522, Chicago 5, III. 

COMPLETE YOUR HIGH School at home in spare time with 
65-year-old school. Texts furnished. No classes. Diploma. In- 
formation booklet free. American School, Dept. XB74, Drexel 

at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois. 

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA at home. Licensed teachers. 
Approved materials. Southern States Academy, Station E-1, 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

AGENTS & HEIP WANTED 

SHOW YOUR FREE Sample. I Give You amazing Leth'R- 
Test Footwear. Show on your feet to 10 people and 5 will buy 
on sight because of beauty, quality. You'll seel Only $1.99 to 
$4.99, none higher. Guaranteed for one whole year. Highest 
commissions. Rush your size, state if man's, woman's. 
Perfect-World Company, Dept. 153, Cincinnati 12, Ohio. 
60% PROFIT COSMETICS $25 day up. Hire others. Sam- 
ples, details. Studio Girl — Hollywood, Glendale, California, 

Dept. 30H27. Canadians: 850 LaFleur, Montreal. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY selling Advertising Book Matches. 
Free sample kit furnished. Matchcorp, Dept. WP-72, Chicago 

32, Illinois. 

BUSINESS & MONEY MAKING OPPORTUNITIES 
MAKE TELEPHONE SURVEYS Spare Timel Free home- 
business details. No selling, choose your own hours. Tele- 
phone Institute, Dept. HC2367, 1038 South La Brea, Los 

Angeles 19, Calif. 

PLASTIC LAMINATION AT Home. Earn $150 Weekly. 
Send $1.00 for Samples And Information. Plastics, 7240 

Ohio, Cincinnati 36, Ohio. 

EARN $3.00 HOUR — home sparetime. Easy Pump Lamps 
a ssem bling. No canvassing. Write: Ougor. Cabot 33, Ark. 
MAKE BIG MONEY invisibly mending damaged garments 
at home. Details Free. Fabricon, 1589 Howard, Chicago 26. 

STAMP COLLECTING 

GIGANTIC COLLECTION FREE— Includes Triangles- 
Early United States — Animals — Commemoratives — British 
Colonies — High Value Pictorials, etc. Complete Collection 
plus Big Illustrated Magazine all Free. Sena 5c for postage, 

Gray Stamp Co., Dept. PC, Toronto, Canada. 

PHOTO FINISHING 

FREE EXCITING GIFT with 25 Wallet Prints $1 (60 for $2). 
Beautifully Finished. Send Negative or Print (Returned). 

Direct Mail Photo, Box 8352, Pittsburgh 18, Pa. 

PERSONAL & MISCELLANE OUS 

Teeth, Watches, 
Rose Industries, 



CASH FOR OLD Gold, Jewelry, Gold 
Diamonds, Silverware. Free Information 
29-PWC East Madison, Chicago 2. 



MUSIC * MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

SONGPOEMS WANTED FOR Musical setting. Free exami- 
nation. Get "the Nashville Sound" in your songs and records. 
Send Poems: Music City Songcrafters, 6145-A, Acklen 

Station, Nashville, Tenn. 

SONGWRITERS. NEW IDEAS needed for recording. Send 
songs, poems. Starcrest Recorders, 6602-B Lexington, Holly- 

wood 38, Calif. 

SONGWRITERS, WITH PUBLISHER contacts, want song 
ideas. Share royalties. No fees. Send poems: Songwriters' 
Associates, 1650 Broadway, N.Y. 19-Y. 
POEMS NEEDED FOR songs and records. Rush poems. 
Crown Music, 49-PW West 32, New York 1. 



Poems Wanted 



NOW 



Popular, Rock & Roll, 
Country & Western, and 
Gospel poems for musical 
setting and recording with 
"the Nashville Sound". 
Send poems today for 
Free examination and, our 
best offer. 



MUSIC CITY SONGCRAFTERS 

Studio M, 6145 Acklen Station, Nashville, Tenn. 



89 



REMOVE 

WARTS! 




Amazing Compound 

Dissolves Common 

Warts Away 

Without 

Cutting or Burning 



Doctors warn picking or scratching 
at warts may cause bleeding, infec- 
tion, spreading. Now, science has 
developed an amazing compound 
that penetrates into warts, destroys 
their cells, actually melts warts away 
without cutting or burning. 

Its name is Compound W®. Pain- 
less, colorless Compound W used as 
directed removes common warts 
safely, effectively, leaves no ugly 
scars. 

MAKE $25 TO $50 A WEEK 
CLIPPING NEWSPAPER ITEMS! 

Clip newspaper items for publishers. Some clippings 

worth $5 each. Write for FREE particulars today! 

NATIONAL. Dept. 81 A 

Knickerbocker Station, New York 2, N. Y. 



Hotels and Motels Call for 
Trained Women 



Record-breaking tra- 
' vel means nation-wide 
opportunities and a sound, substantial future for trained 
women in the hotel, motel and hospitality field. Fascinat- 
ing work; quick advancement. You can qualify at home, 
in leisure time, or through resident classes in Washington. 
Previous experience proved unnecessary. Placement Service 
FREE. Write for FREE book. Approved for ALL Vet. Training. 

LEWIS HOTEL TRAINING SCHOOL 
Room HL-1 18-12 Washington 7, D. C. 46th Year 



FREE 




ft 5x7 PROFESSIONAL 

ENLARGEMENTS 

EVE RY ORDER FOR J 



25 WALLET PHOTOS 



made from any photo, 
snapshot or negative. SLndifno 
Send payment with order, t, poiuge 
FRAMED PHOTO SERVICE, Dept. M, 1204 B'way, N.Y. 1 



1 



SONG IDEAS 

WANTED 



Songwriters with publisher contacts want song 

ideas. Collaborate with professionals. 

SHARE ROYALTIES. NO FEES. 

Our Staff has written these Hits: 

LET THE LITTLE GIRL DANCE — OLD TOWN -BILLY HAND 
PRETTY LITTLE ANGEL EYES — DUNES — CURTIS LEE 
WHAT A SURPRISE — COED — JOHNNY MAESTRO 
HOMBRE — SABINA — THE BELMONTS 
VUT, VUT — CARLTON — IMPERIALS 
HOP IN MY JALOP — MGM — CHUCK ALAIMO 
PIUS MANY OTHER HITS! 

Send Poems — Free Examination. 

SONGWRITERS' ASSOCIATES 

Studio 21, 1650 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 




T 
V 
R 

90 



New version of the ageless curling 
iron, the "Electric Curler-Comb," 
$9.95. Can be used with or without 
"rollers" which come in three sizes. 
Set of 3 rollers only $3.25 Postpaid. 
QUINIO M7 
522 Beaver St., Sewickley, Penna. 



nothing to do but use Madeleine. Sud- 
denly, it occurred to him that, off the 
screen, she really might have a sense 
of humor. 

"Madeleine," he said, "let some of 
your own personality come through. 
Relax! After all, this is only a movie." 
That broke her up. He's used the 
line ever since. Most actresses are 
terrified of this director at first. They 
think him formidable and forbidding. 
Then they discover that he's really not 
fierce and they begin to find his dead- 
pan and calm rather soothing. 

Before his pictures start shooting, 
every minute detail of production has 
been worked out, from the angle of 
each camera to the placing of a pair 
of gloves on a table. When the day 
comes to shoot, the major work has 
been done. All is order, precision. 
There is absolute quiet on the set, an 
aura of calm; an actress has the ease 
of simply playing her part. 

On one occasion an actress, a top 
star, went off the deep end, raving and 
ranting about Hitchcock's direction. 
She was playing her anger to a room 
full of people, though, of course, the 
tirade was aimed at Hitchcock. What 
did he do? He quietly slipped out the 
door. Twenty minutes later, she dis- 
covered he was gone. 

"That's the trouble with him," 
stormed the star. "He won't fight." 

She's quite right. When they re- 
sumed work the next day, everything 
went smoothly enough, but that actress 
probably wonders why the great direc- 
tor has never suggested she work with 
him again. The answer is that he 
doesn't like trouble. He likes simplicity, 
directness and honesty. He likes foreign 
actresses because, as a rule, they're 
more candid. American girls are very 
likely to put on the trappings of sex, 
the plunging necklines, the sweaters 
— but let a man put his hand on her 
shoulder, she'll run screaming to 
mother. They ogle men, they play at 
sex, but they're terrified. Not all 
American girls. . . . There is Grace 
Kelly. 

"Make no mistake about this," the 
director says. "Ninety percent of the 
box office is determined by women, at 
least in this country. Women decide 
what movie they and their male escorts 
will see. Women stars are made by 
women and one of the reasons for poor 
movie attendance, I feel, has been the 
downbeat picture. From sink to sink, 
I call them. 

"My inclination is to give an audi- 
ence a different world, divert them. 
There's nothing new in the elements 
of shock and horror. Why have people 
from the beginning of time loved to 
visit a haunted house or ride the ghost 
train or visit the Chamber of Horrors? 
What I add are glamorous, important 
stars to the horror. You have to have 
important people at the top or the 
public will not worry about them. It's 
as if you saw, at the next intersection, 
a terrible accident. A girl has been 
thrown into the street and lies there 
inert. You are horrified, you feel com- 
passion. But suppose you take a second 
look, the girl is not just Jane Doakes, 
she's Doris Day?" 

A star, he feels, must be surrounded 



by glamour. During "North by North- 
west," he watched over every hair on 
Eva Marie Saint's lovely head. Eva is 
sensitive; like most actresses, she wor- 
ries about her appearance. Up until this 
picture she had always appeared on 
the screen as a sort of shy girl-next- 
door, someone's sister, a serious, wor* 
ried character. But Eva in life is bright, 
lively, witty and sophisticated. This is 
what he wanted to get on screen. 

"Perhaps you think of all actresses 
as exhibitionists," he says. "They are, 
to an extent. But they are also embar- 
rassed and sometimes tortured by the 
exhibit. What I help them achieve is 
a degree of objectivity. We sit in the 
projection room watching the rushes 
and I reassure them. 'That's not you, 
it's a shadow. See the mistakes and 
correct them. This is something you 
can't do on a stage, but you can in a 
movie. You can do what you want, 
there's always the cutting room floor.' 
Actresses are apt to take themselves 
too seriously, they're often on the de- 
fensive, they're inclined to lack humor. 
Above all, they worry." 

Doris Day worries. In "The Man 
Who Knew Too Much," she worried 
because she felt she wasn't getting any 
direction. Hitchcock reassured her, she 
was excellent. 

"What's the matter with you — it's 
only a movie. For the money you get, 
you should be happy." He's said this 
to many actresses and they have to 
laugh. He's suggested perhaps they'd 
like to take up nursing as a career in- 
stead. They have to laugh. Ingrid Berg- 
man is a worrier but she has a good 
sense of humor. Janet Leigh worries 
but she is an eager and apt pupil. 

Kim Novak gave a great deal to 
"Vertigo," once she had been lulled 
into a sense of confidence. She played 
a double role, and was particularly 
good as the girl from Kansas. She 
temporarily dropped her self-conscious- 
ness and let her self emerge into the 
girl. Joan Fontaine was able to achieve 
a real triumph in "Rebecca." She had 
existed before then but had received 
no real recognition — until Hitchcock. 

A woman may be strong and inde- 
pendent but Mr. Hitchcock says he's 
never met the woman who doesn't need 
a masculine arm to lean on. A woman 
needs to lean a little and a man must 
rise to the occasion. "In our household, 
for example, when Alma and I are 
sitting in the kitchen at night, having 
just relished one of her superb dinners, 
I cannot under any circumstances let 
my wife clear up, while I sit back and 
smoke a cigar. I have to be at it with 
her. I have made her depend on me 
through the years just as in our deep 
basic companionship she has become 
the other half of me. To some extent, 
my knowledge of feminine psychology 
has grown through my knowledge of 
her." 

How could Grace Kelly resist? Even 
if she finally can't make that picture 
for Hitch — this Princess business being 
what it is — she simply couldn't say 
"no" when this understanding man 
first asked her! — June Morfield 

TV-wise. "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" 
is on NBC, Tues., 8:30 p.m. edt. 



ROGER SMITH 



(Continued from page 53) 
ptomaine. The next day, not to be left 
out of things, Roger collapsed on the 
set of "77 Sunset Strip" and was carted 
home in an ambulance with a roaring 
fever. It was a toss-up to prove who was 
the more ill that night, Roger or Vici. 
And, all that night long, the thermostat 
jumped up and down and the Smiths 
alternately roasted and froze. 

The next morning, Roger called a 
meeting of the clan — or clans. Vici was 
the one about to have a baby, he said; 
she had to come first. From here on 
out, it was hands off the thermostat. He 
closed the vents in the Elphicks' room, 
left their windows open and their door 
shut. He piled an electric blanket and 
two extra wool blankets on his mother's 
bed. Then he went back to bed himself. 
And all was well; Well, almost . . . 
the pilot on the furnace kept blowing 
out. 

"If you ever invite your relatives to 
visit," Roger says, using the polite term 
for invaders, "just be sure they have a 
sense of humor — and that you have one, 
too. Every time I wanted my car, it 
was missing, my kid brother had it. We 
spent a lot of time with the kids, enroll- 
ing my brother Craig in Birmingham 
High (he's seventeen) and enrolling 
Vici's sister Frances at Lanai Junior 
High (she's fifteen). And do you sup- 
pose either one of them liked their 
schools or were happy? Heck, no. 
Frances had never had boys in her 
class and there were boys. Craig had 
left his friends behind in Nogales and 
he still hasn't adjusted to the loss of 
our father. He's finally begun to like 
school better because he's met a few 
cute girls." 

Life on an assembly-line 

Luckily, at the Smiths, the senses of 
humor were in operation. So were the 
appetites. The kitchen took on the 
aspects of an assembly-line operation. 
Say it was sandwich time on Sunday. 
They'd break open two-and-a-half or 
three loaves of bread on the kitchen 
counter . . . Vici's sister Frances spread 
the butter . . . Vici's mom spread 
mayonnaise . . . Mrs. Smith'd come by 
with slices of ham, cheese and pickle 
. . . Roger'd add lettuce . . . and Craig 
would flip on the top of the sandwiches 
— which his mother sliced in two. Roger 
bought a capacious freezer, seventeen 
loaves of bread a week, and he took to 
shopping every other day. 

The little house hummed like a hive. 
Roger and his father-in-law worked to- 
gether sawing and hammering at the 
new room . . . Mrs. Elphick did the 
cooking . . . Mrs. Smith was watching 
over the children, Jody and Tracey . . . 
Frances helped her mother with the 
cooking, and they all helped keep the 
house clean (so did the day worker) . . . 
Craig helped with the gardening . . . 
Mr. Elphick put a lock on the medicine 
cabinet so the children can never in- 
vade that, washed cars and repaired 



everything . . . Roger made a thousand 
decisions a day for everyone, shopped 
for groceries and helped with home- 
work . . . and Vici — in bed a good deal 
of the time — supervised everything like 
a little queen bee. 

There were four meals a day (three 
plus tea) and a constant clicking of 
cameras over the weekends. Roger 
wanted movies of everything so they'll 
have all their memories on film. And, of 
course, plans for the baby. 

"A boy," Roger said — he wanted a 
son for Jody to play with. Vici and 
Tracey have girl-times together but he 
felt Jody needed a playmate and he 
was looking forward to two sons. 

"A girl," Vicki said — and all the rela- 
tives agreed with her. 

But girl or boy, Vici was determined 
to have that baby before her dad had 
to return home. Fifteen days before the 
expected date, she told Roger that the 
time had come and insisted on going 
to the hospital. He was just as eager 
as she, but he didn't believe for one 
moment . . . and her mother said . . . 
and his mother said. . . . And when they 
got to the hospital, the doctor and 
nurses said, "False labor." But the 
very next day, determined little Vici 
had her baby — a boy — and two days 
later, she talked the hospital into letting 
her dad put on a cap and gown and 
hold the baby. Grandfather and father 
agreed that this was the most beautiful 
child they'd ever seen. "We were abso- 
lutely dumbfounded to hear another 
dad say the same thing about his." 

A few days later, Roger brought his 
wife and child home from the hospital. 
They had named the new child Dallas, 
after Roger's father, who died this year. 

"I couldn't help thinking," Roger 
said, "that just twenty-nine years ago, 
in this same city, a man named Dallas 
Smith was bringing a baby Roger home 
from the hospital. And now, twenty- 
nine years later, that man Roger was 
bringing home a new Dallas Smith." 

They'd asked for it! 

So, even when Vici's dad had left for 
home, they still had a house of nine! 
And then Vici's brother and sister-in- 
law arrived. Roger got his mother and 
Craig an apartment three minutes away 
from the house and they are still nine. 

Of course, make no mistake about 
this: Roger and Vici had asked for it. 
They'd planned on this visit for five 
years, ever since they were married. 
Roger had promised Vici then that, as 
soon as they could, he wanted her 
family to come for a good long visit. 
Of course, what he couldn't have 
known was that his father would die 
this year and that, at just the same 
time, he'd be wanting to bring his 
mother and brother here, too. 

What happens when all your in-laws 
move in on you? 

Well, it goes like this . . . 

One night Roger came home from the 
studio after a hectic day. But on the 
way home, he'd thought up a wonder- 
ful idea for a new episode for the show. 
He could hardly wait to tell Jeanette 
— he's taken to calling Vici "Jeanette," 
as her family does; it suits her. He 



U WEAR 

%$ to 52 



Cotton 

and 

Arnel 




CHECK CHARMER 
- Woven check 
pocket -coat 'dress 
in drip-dry cotton 
and Arnel tri- 
acetate. 

Colors: Black and 
White or Turquoise 
and White. 

Sizes: 14** to 24**. 
46 to 52. 



P&ITJ&TlS Fifth Ave. at 39th StJ 



Oep». 103 New York 18. N. Y. 

send me the Cheek charmer, f win" pay the 
postman the price plus postage and C.O.D. 
es. (If prepaid, add 35c to cover postage 
"(rig.) Style #5A106 



.Size. 



I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

I m Satisfaction Guaranteed or Your Money Back.* 



and handl 

How Many 

NAME_ 
ADDRESS. 
CITY 



.STATE. 



I 
I 
I 

I 
I 
I 

I 
I 




pPll into DOLLARS! 

sU£s NEW Songwriters, Poets, Composers may gain 
=-z-.s SUCCESS, FAME, WEALTH. Songs Composed, 
=£-= PUBLISHED. Appraisals, details FREE from . . . 

W NORDYKE SONGS & MUSIC 

f 6000 Sunset, HOLLYWOOD 28 7, California, U.S.A. 



HANDLED ENTIRELY BY MAIL 

BORROW$| QQQ 

REPAY $51.24 MONTHLY 



BORROW $100 TO $1000 ON 
YOUR SIGNATURE ONLY • 24 
MONTHS TO REPAY 

Enjoy life, end money worries! Confi- 
dential BORROW-BY-MAIL plan pro- 
vides cash for any purpose. Small pay- 
ments, fit your pocketbook. Private, 
entirely by mail. No endorsers, no per- 
sonal interviews. Fast service. State- 
supervised. Details sent in plain enve- 
lope. No obligation. Inquire now. 



t& 



«» 
W 



Amount 
ol Loin 


24 Monthly 

Payments 


{100 
$300 
$500 
$800 


$5.93 


$17.49 


$27.69 


$41.93 


$1000 


$51.24 



AMERICAN LOAN PLAN Dept. KA.222 
City National Bldg., Omaha 2, Nebr. 

Nlamo 
Arfrirccc 

City 

Age . Occupation 



«f.\ 



91 



100 to '800 



COMPLETELY 
CONFIDENTIAL 



Pay your bills, enjoy peace of mind! Borrow $100- 
S800 Cash— By Mail ! Fast, confidential service from 
privacy of home. No agents will call. Employed 
men and women— everywhere— use Postal's Cost- 
Controlled Loan Service to Pay their Bills! Free 
complete Loan Papers rushed Airmail in private 
envelope. 15-day Free Trial Guarantee. Trv us! 
POSTAL FINANCE COMPANY, Dept. 50- N 
200 KEELINE BUILDING* OMAHA 2, NEBRASKA 




FREE! 

ACT 
NOW 



, POSTAL FINANCE CO.. Dept.50-N 
J 200 Keeline Bids., Omaha 2, Nabr. 

J Rush FREE complete Loan Papers. 

I Vane ^ I 

I I 

| Address ,,, ■ 

^City Zone.... State [ 



Will, 




Both Rings for SI 



SIMULATED DIAMOND LADIES' 

Engagement and Wedding Rings 

ONLY $100 P" set 

/ ^ ■ of 2 rings 

.'You'll love these rings—the simu- 
lated diamonds look like a "million 
dollars" and sparkle with many 
stones. SEND NO MONEY. Pay 
postman only $ 1 plus postage 
for both rings. If you send SI 
cash with order we pav all postage. 
GUARANTEED: Wear rings 10 days. 
If not pleased return for refund. 
White or yellow gold color effect 
or sterling silver mountings. 

HAREM CO., Dept. A558 
30 Church St., New York 7, N. Y. 




THE BEST WAY TO 



KILL the HAIR ROOT 



is the MahUr Way! 

Thousands of women like yourself, after reading 
and following our instructions carefully, have 
learned to remove unwanted hair permanently the 
Mahler way. Re-discover the thrill of an excitingly 
beautiful complexion — don't delay another day! 
>Send 10c for 16-page illustrated booklet "New 
/, Radiant Beauty" . . . learn the secret for yourself. 



mj^jU^Dept. 602J, PROVIDENCE IS, H.l 




Don't Be 

GRAY! 



Now you can tint gray, streaked , 
faded, dull hair to natural-like 
beauty in the magic of one 12 min. 
easy home shampoo! The $1.60 
T1NTZ CREME COLOR SHAM- 
POO-TINT re-tints entire head 
of hair or gives 2 touch-ups at temples, roots, parting as oc- 
casionally needed. TINTZ gives lasting tint that won't rub or 
wash off. Shampooingspreadstintevenly. More gentle creme 
leaves hair soft, lustrous, natural-looking. Can be used over 
other analine tints and dyes (not metallic) . So don't be gray. 
For your 2nd chance at youth, get TINTZ CREME COLOR 
SHAMPOO-TINT today! At druggists. 
Select shade from full color chart on each 
TINTZ package. Fullyguaranteed.be sat- 
isfied or return empty carton for refund. 
Fleetwood Co.. 427 W. Randolph St.. Chicago 6, Illinois 



T^ts- 



m -mm IT'S OFF 

because IT'S OUT 

UNWANTED HAIR GONE. 

Face, Arms, Legs, Body 
MORE COMPLETELY 
MORE LASTING 
than any cream or lotion hair^ 
remover or razor, or your 

MONEY BACK 

Was $5.00 NOW $1.10 
Insist on ZiP Epilator 



24 



LARGE 

NEW 

TOWELS 



Less than 



5 



EA. 

UNWOVEN COTTON AND RAYON 

That's right! Two dozen large towels for only $1.00 
(plus 100 for extra postage & handling). Think of it 
-LARGE SIZE unwoven Cotton and Rayon towels for 
less than a nickel apiece! Terrific value you've got 
to see to believe. We had to buy more than a hundred 
thousand to get this special low price. Now we're 

t passing this savings on to you, our customers. All 
orders on a FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED basis, so be 

v sure and order all you'll need-you'll sure use all 

r you'll buy-and you'll never get a buy like this again. 
Thank you. ORDER NOW! MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE. 
MURRAY HILL HOUSE, Dept. T-964-D 
P. O. BOX 126, BETHPAGE L. I., N. Y. 

92 



dashed into the house and went straight 
to the bedroom. Vici, her hair tied up 
in pink ribbons, looked like a little 
girl as she lifted her face to his. Then 
he started telling her about his idea: 
"Listen to this, Jeanette, tell me what 
you think . . ." 

At that minute, Tracey rushed in 
and threw herself on Daddy — she had 
a new doll, he had to see the new doll. 
Roger picked her up and gave her his 
attention. A minute later, in came Jody. 

"You can tell me about the idea 
later, darling," Vici said, smiling up at 
him. So he sat down and played with 
the kids until his mother came to get 
them for dinner. More boiled beef. 

"Hey, you know, I'm getting to like 
it," Roger told his mother-in-law. 

After dinner, he went back to tuck 
Vici in bed again and maybe now they 
could have a minute or two alone. He'd 
just settled himself across the foot of 
the bed and was getting into the excit- 
ing part of his story when Craig popped 
in. 

"Hey, Rog, there's a test tomorrow 
in driver's science!" 

"Just a minute, Craig." 

"Okay, so I'll flunk the test!" 

So off he went with Craig. 

And after that it was Frances with 
American history, and his father-in-law, 
who was having trouble making change 
in foreign currency, and the drug-store 
delivery boy was at the door. 

"The drug-store delivery boy was 
always at our door," laughs Roger. 
"As a matter of fact, the drug store 
ran a shuttle service to our house. 
They're now adding a new wing to the 



DAVID NELSON 



(Continued from page 42) 
but you're pushing your luck if you 
think this gimmick will always work! 

Before our marriage, I lived in sort 
of an eagle's nest high in the Holly- 
wood hills. June had furnished up her 
own apartment. Naturally, we both 
loved our individual possessions, and 
naturally, combining two households 
under one roof provoked a challenge. 
Both of us thought we had good taste 
— but it was in different areas. I like 
wood paneling, for example, and hea- 
vier type things that are older and more 
substantial. June likes things that are 
decorative, comfortable and more mod- 
ern. It's funny, but you just don't think 
of things like this before marriage. We 
had many discussions about many 
things, but it never occurred to either 
of us that furnishing our own home 
could possibly present a problem. You 
live — you learn! 

Obviously, we've ended up being very 
happy with the results. First, however, 
there were compromises and a couple 
of times when no two newly weds ever 
agreed to disagree with more convic- 
tion. Sometimes a husband can forget 
that a wife has her likes, but still has 
to please him as well as herself. June's 
favorite color scheme is white and gold 
and that's what we used. But white and 



drug store with the Smith name in 
brass over the lintel as a tribute to 
our patronage." 

Roger jumped up, took care of the 
drug-store delivery boy, helped his 
mother get the youngsters into bed, 
stopped for a minute to help his 
mother-in-law put things away in the 
kitchen, then went back to see how 
Craig was doing with his homework. 

About nine-thirty, it seeemed to him 
that everyone in the house was talking 
at once. He stepped out in the patio 
for a minute to breathe the calm, quiet 
air, then went back in. His wife was 
waiting, propped up on pillows, but 
she was sleepy, he could tell, and so 
was he. 

"The idea'll wait until tomorrow, 
honey," he said. 

But so far, he hasn't told her yet . . . 
he'll do it soon, when the guests have 
gone and the house is quiet. 

It's going to be terribly quiet at the 
Smiths'. Vici and Roger are going to 
turn the intercom down low and listen 
to the silence, hold each other close, 
talk over all the memories of her 
family and his, and savor the flavor 
of their own little family unit, the 
miracle of their new son. Roger will 
tell, at last, his idea for a new episode. 
The thermostat will point to seventy- 
and-a-half — no more, no less. And after 
the children are asleep at night, Vici 
and Roger will watch television in each 
other's arms — not another sound. 

— Jane Ardmore 

Roger co-stars in "77 Sunset Strip," 
ABC-TV, Fridays, 9 to 10 p.m. edt. 

M III IIINIIIIIUIIIIlllllltllll Mill IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIiNlillllHIIIIIlllllllllllNIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItllllllllllllllltlllrl 

gold aren't my favorite colors, so June 
added other colors which I know she 
could live without. On the other hand, 
if we had done what I like completely, 
then I wouldn't have been happy know- 
ing June wasn't happy. See what I 
mean? 

In our rented home high up in the 
Outpost Estates, we have a closet in a 
dining room that was never meant to 
be a dining room. This sort of bugged 
us, but we couldn't agree on how to 
remedy the situation. Finally, we both 
went for the idea of turning the dining 
room-not-meant-to-be-a-dining-room in- 
to a more informal dining area. Con- 
verting that closet into a bar seemed 
to make sense and so I began building 
in storage cabinets and shelves. Now, 
our carport is barely big enough for 
two cars, so there is no room for me 
and the tools I enjoy using. So I had to 
do all my sawing and hammering in 
the middle of the house! June is a 
meticulous housekeeper and who needs 
a messy husband? I worked for ten 
minutes, then took off thirty minutes 
to clean things up. 

Speaking of closets, the big yak dur- 
ing my bachelor days was listening 
to my married friends complain that 
their wives took up all the closet space. 
So guess who ended up with a hall 
closet and a small portion of one in 
the den? Like every other wife, so they 
tell me, June still insists she has noth- 
ing to wear. Actually, learning to 
live with another person can be twice 



as taxing for someone like June. She's 
lived by herself for many years, while 
I've been accustomed to the warmth 
and camaraderie of family life. There- 
fore, June's adjustment has been more 
difficult and I try to remember this. 

Fortunately, we both have good, 
healthy tempers which enable us to 
let off steam when there is need. I've 
trained myself to hold my temper in 
when I can, but June has learned to 
watch for those tell-tale signs. Like 
seeing me start to get red in the face. 
Nine times out of ten when we blow 
up, the reason is almost too inconse- 
quential to mention. So we flip — but 
sometimes, when I start to laugh, that 
spoils all the fun of kissing and making- 
up. And may I add, our system of 
making-up is rather unique? We work 
backward — and I highly recommend it 
to all young husbands. 

If June starts the argument, it ends 
when she says: "Now you owe me a 
present!" When I start something, 
then she has to give me a present! Kind 
of wild, isn't it? But that's half the fun 
of being married. 

Both June and I love animals, so 
you'd never suspect that they t;ould 
become a bone of contention (no pun 
intended), now would you? 

June owned a dog and parakeet be- 
fore we were married. When we set- 
tled down, a cat came with our lease. 
Shortly after, when I went out on tour 
accompanied by June, we stopped for 
gas and my bride observed the station 
attendant feeding a stray kitten part 
of his sandwich. Don't ask me how it 
happened. I just know when we drove 
off, the kitten had joined our family. 
Our small menagerie now sleeps on our 
bed and this wouldn't be too bad if I 
had built that Doggie-Door — as prom- 
ised. Of course I'll get around to it 
— but, in the meantime, we have to leave 
a door open all night so our pets can 
go out. We shiver until morning! 

For many years, I've enjoyed the 
habit of staying up late and sleeping 
late in the morning whenever possible. 
You know, my parents were in band 
business, where they met, so late hours 
seem natural to our family. This pat- 
tern is understandably foreign to June, 
who feels I'm sleeping my whole life 
away if I sleep late. I guess she has a 
point and I've made her a promise. 
Regardless of what time I get to bed, 
I'm going to get up when June does. 
Luckily, we have no neighbors close 
enough who'll hear me moaning and 
groaning by dawn's early light. 

Before my marriage, I must admit 
I approached the possibility with cer- 
tain misgivings. Like my father, I have 
always loved athletics and participated 
in practically every sport. While film- 
ing "The Big Circus," I became fas- 
cinated with the trapeze. Del and Babs 
Graham were technical experts on the 
picture, and after studying with them 
I was able to appear with their aerial 
troupe on numerous occasions. When 
you're out on the road, you have to have 
some way of carrying rigging. I bought 
a flat bed truck and mounted two camp- 
ers on the back for living quarters. 
In thinking about marriage, I had 
to ask myself: Supposing my wife 



would object to this gypsy life? Al- 
though the circus is not my business, 
maybe a wife might consider my brief 
excursions too hazardous. Perhaps mar- 
riage would be too much of a drag. 
The more I thought about all this, the 
less enthusiastic I became. But then 
I met June. What a relief when I 
learned she, too, had her misgivings 
about marriage. Could she conform to 
a pattern way of living, she wondered. 
And she, too, was afraid of losing her 
independence. The answer is, so far we 
have had a ball because there's never 
a dull moment. Once a month at least, 
we go out camping in our truck and 
each trip is a new adventure. June loves 
the gypsy life and puts up with many 
discomforts without one little word of 
complaint. She's really the greatest. 

Now that I'm out of circulation, as 
it were, I suppose it's natural for peo- 
ple to ask me about Rick and his plans. 
I've also been asked what advice I'd 
give my brother. You know, things I've 
learned as a bridegroom that I'd tell 
Rick for his future use. He has always 
been quite a bit within himself, so 
we'd never have a long and serious 
discussion about marriage unless he 
was contemplating it. To my knowledge, 
he isn't. I think he feels he has a lot 
to see and do before settling down. 
But one evening when he dropped 
by the house unexpectedly, we did sort 
of talk around the edges. Rick's of that 
age where he has it all figured out. 
He said casually that when he got mar- 
ried, he was going to lay down the law. 
Just wait until you're married — that's 
what I should have answered! Accord- 
ing to Rick, a husband should be very 
consistent and take a stand about things 
immediately. Otherwise, he said, how 
can a wife learn to adjust to her hus- 
band? In marriage, I pointed out there 
are two people involved — not one. Two 
people who must learn to adjust to each 
other — and it's very difficult for each 
to retain individuality and still keep 
from clashing. 

Maybe it was better, I suggested, for 
Rick to marry someone in our business 
who would understand all our daily 
problems. However, if he did marry a 
non-professional, there could be many 
advantages, too. Being separated from 
each other's problems all day might 
give them greater objectivity, might cre- 
ate greater understanding as a basis 
for advice and guidance. Rick listened 
to my little speech, but I know my 
brother too well. When his turn comes, 
he'll have to find out all the answers 
for himself. And he will. 

How often it's been said: The first 
year of marriage is the toughest! Re- 
cently I ran into a friend who has 
been married for quite a long time. He 
kidded me about being trapped by a 
wedding ring. Then, as he shook hands 
and said goodbye, he added: "Oh, well 
— just remember it's only the first ten 
years that are the hardest!" Well, I'll 
say it again. With June by my side, 
I'm more than willing to take my 
chances. — as told to Jerry Asher 

All the Nelsons can be seen in "The 
Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet," on 
ABC-TV, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m. edt. 



CLEAR UP ACNE -PIMPLES 



with 2 tiny 
Capsules a day! 





IMPORTANT 

The HaLsion Plan is 
fully guaranteed. 
Because individual 
experiences may 
vary, you must get 
satisfactory results or 
every penny will be 
refunded. 

(Not available in Canada) 



' A wonderful new 

vitamin formula 
. No more sticky 

ointments 

No more greasy creams 
i Full 30 day supply 

$3.95 



The Halsion Plan 
for complexion care 
is enclosed with 
each order. 



< nm or mratiuu 
wDtunoi «*g cm 

PIMPLES 




[ALLAN DRUG CO. ~ o. pt . 1201 
I 5880 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

ID I enclose $3.95. check or money order, Halsion 
pays the postage. 
■ D Pl«se rush C.O.D. 30-day supply of Halsion, 
I I agree to pay postage. 

I It is my understanding that if I am not satisfied I 
may return the unused capsules or empty bottle for 
I prompt refund. 



Name. 



, Address. 



(please pr<nt) 



I City. 



Zone . 



State- 



rnrr framed 5x7 enlargement 

lIxCC COLORED IN OILS 



WALLET 
PHOTOS 



plus 25c 
handling 
& postage 



2Vi* 4 x 3'/i" photos made on profes- ] 
sional paper. Send photo, snapshot or I 
neg. today with $1.25 (originals re- j 
turned unharmed). State color of hair, 
eyes, clothing. DISCOUNT PHOTO SERVICE I 
Oept. 2, 835 B'woy, N. Y. 3, N. Y. 



50 SHELL TREASURES $ 1 



WJ$r''^ ! <^>\ l M-^*^^^^ 50 Treasure shells from all 
1 • ' l^^Wp'^/-- V' : 1 i V/ over the world -Haiti, Philip- 
%'v „• t J-i ^lt-di.f \ \\\ll/i pines, etc.- ideal forcollectors 
aquariums, or to decorate ash 
trays, lamps, pictures, etc. 
Dried Seahorse & Star Fish, 
Venetian Pearl shell, coral, 
purple Coquina shell (shaped 
like butterfly wings), many 
others, all sizes, beautiful 
colors . 1 set ( 50 treasures ) 
for $1. Two sets for $2 and 
receive 1 full set FREE ! Each set (50 shells) different assort- 
ment. Add 25c shipping any size order. Money back guarantee. 
Shells-of -the- World, Dept. 29, Box 1042, Miami Beach 39, Fla. 




Callouses 

Relief Starts in Seconds! 

No waiting for action when 
you use soothing, cushioning, 
Super-Soft Dr. Scholl's Zino- 
pads! Nerve-deep relief starts 
in seconds. Used at first sign 
of soreness, callouses are 
stopped before they can devel- 
op. The separate Medications 
included remove callouses 
one of the quickest ways 
known to medical science! At 
Drug, Dept., 5-10* Stores. 



D- r Scholls 

Zino pads 



Pain, 

Burning, 

Soreness? 




93 



> 







1 ttftStSff 

1 ■■■■■ , hat ug ly, bleached 

1 Without tints, rinses or *»t JiBW^ t0 life ! 



4^ UNKNOWNS ARE WRI1 

Songs 

HOUSE OF MUSIC ^^M-6,4 



brigntei, ^•'■r ' ■ , Con t a ins mw -~. , 

^^cr^or^-^e- 

UNKNOWNS ARE WRITING "HITS"-GAIN FAME! 

RECORDED • PUBLISHED 
Nationally Promoted 

• 2-Woy Royalty percentage 

• Words Set to Music FREE 
HOUSE OF MUSIC ^^M-6.4l9Boylston, Boston 16, Mass. 

ITCHING EARS? 

Money Back Guarantee 

Do your ears itch until you feel like tearing them off — 
I hen here is good news. TRYCO OINTMENT brings quick 
relief from the intense itching of this fungus infection of 
the outer ear lobes and kills the germ which causes it on 
contact. TBYCO is pleasant to use — simply cover affected 
area every other night or oftener if required. If you are 
not thoroughly satisfied with the results of TBYCO your 
money will be refunded in full. Send $1.00 today + 30c 
hdlg. chg. Tryco, 343 So. New Hampshire, Los Angeles 5, 
Calif. Dept. TV-I. 



5x7 Enlargement order 



Any Photo 
Copied ■ 




25 



BILLFOLD . 

icswPHOIOS* 



1 



ZVi x 3Vi in. size on dou- " 

ble weight, silk finish, [JsJi 

portrait paper . . . The I k „ H |: n „ I 
rage for exchanging with I """"'"* I 
friends, enclosing in letters or greet- 
ting cards or job applications. Orig- 
inal returned. Order in units of 25 
(1 pose). Enclose payment ($1.25) 
and we prepay or SEND NO 
MONEY. (Sent c.o.d. if you 
wish.) 4 day service. Satisfaction 
guaranteed. Send photo or snapshot today. 
DEAN STU DIOS 
Dept. 371, 913 Walnut St., Des Moines 2, Iowa 




YOUR CHOICE- 



$2 



97 




1-CARAT 
ZIRCONS 

SET IN l/30th 
14 K. YELLOW GOLD - 

not plated — or sterling silver 

They look like they cost a 
fortune; look like real 
diamonds. Newest modern 
styles. Send no money, pay 
postage plus 10% Fed. tax. 
Save postage — send pay- 
ment with order. 2 carat 
size $2 extra; 3 carat size 
$4 extra. Men's or ladies' Birth Stone rings $2.97. 
Men's initial or Masonic rings $3.95. ladies' cul- 
tured pearl rings $2.97. Money back guarantee. 
Stt ZIRCON COMPANY, Dept TF 
3615 Forest Garden Av . Baltimore 7, Md. 



94 



Woman Tortured 
by Agonizing ITCH 

"l nearly itched to death for 

7'Ayears. ThenI found anew 

wonder-working creme. 

Now I'm happy," writes 

Mrs. P. Ramsay ofL.A. Calif. 

Here's blessed relief from the 

tortures of vaginal itch, rectal 

itch, chafing, rash and 

eczema with an amazing 

new scientific formula called LANACANE. This 

fast-acting, stainless medicated creme kills harmful 

bacteria germs while it soothes raw, irritated and 

inflamed skin tissue. Stops scratching and so speeds 

healing. Don't surfer ! Get LANACANE at druggists . 




THE CLEAR HORIZON 



(Continued from page 55) 
Even the usual "happy ending" can 
serve to give hope to viewers and 
stimulate them to meet their difficulties 
courageously. 

On the other hand, it is unhealthy to 
substitute the makebelieve world of TV 
drama for everyday reality. Rarely are 
real children as obedient, real women 
as romantic, or real men as virile, as 
those portrayed on our screen. Once 
the program is over, it is time for 
viewers to become disenchanted and 
snap back to reality — or they are likely 
to become disillusioned, frustrated and 
unable to accept the circumstances of 
their own lives. 

Few women, for example, are mar- 
ried to Astronauts or space scientists, 
but all husbands must face similar 
tests of courage — physically, morally or 
emotionally. Captain Roy Selby and 
his wife are a case in point. They exist 
only on TV, as hero and heroine of 
"The Clear Horizon," working side by 
side in space research at Cape Canav- 
eral. 

They're happily married and have a 
son, Ricky, who is twelve. He was born 
in Morocco and has lived in Japan, 
Alaska. California and New Haven. 
Roy was in the Army when he first met 
Anne. He was raised on a farm in the 
Midwest, worked his way through col- 
lege and has all but lost track of his 
family. He's a natural athlete, enjoys 
competition, has a great sense of duty 
and likes to be by himself — reading, 
listening to music, or just thinking. 

Anne comes from New England, 
where her folks still live in the house in 
which she grew up. Her dad was a 
real estate agent who painted pictures 
on the side; artistic, impractical, 
weaker than his wife, he drew on her 
strength to survive. Anne was more 
like her mother and made her way in 
the business world at a young age. 

Anne works parttime at the billeting 
office of the air base. Roy is now an 
Air Force captain, assigned to various 
hazardous jobs connected with our 
space research program. His life is 
often in jeopardy and Anne lives, as 
they say, on "the razor's edge." 

These two are well-mated. Anne re- 
quired a strong masculine figure, un- 
like her father, for a husband. Roy re- 
quired the solid family roots he missed 
as a child. Anne — as well as the Army 
— offered him this kind of security. The 
Army — or the police force, a large cor- 
poration, or any major business enter- 
prise such as a supermarket chain — 
gives a man a sense of belonging ; he 
may find roots and a feeling of "home" 
which he never knew. 

Men like Roy choose hazardous work 
for any number of reasons: The appeal 
of the job itself, higher pay, excitement, 
the admiration of others. (IF hen a man 
in a dangerous job acts in a foolhardy 
fashion, however, he may have been 
driven to such work for neurotic 
reasons and unconsciously wish to be 
hurt or killed in performing his duty. 



But this is clearly not Roy's reason.) 
For any woman in Anne's position to 
accept the uncertainty that goes with 
marrying a man who's always on the 
go and forever courting danger, she 
must love her husband deeply and 
share something of his own excitement 
in undertaking risks. Anne seems to 
have met this challenge in a mature, 
healthy way, uncomplaining and work- 
ing by his side as much as her time 
allows — for she is also a mother and 
must pay extra attention to her son, 
who is growing up in a highly dramatic, 
uncertain, ever-changing environment. 
Ricky has never known what it 
means to have real friends, for his 
friendships never lasted more than two 
years, at the most. That's the longest 
his family ever stayed put in one place 
before his dad was moved elsewhere 
for military reasons. 

The Selbys live under tension at all 
times, never knowing when Roy will 
be separated from them, or for how 
long, or whether he'll ever return. 
Sometimes, his work may entail such 
secrecy that he can't even alert his 
wife as to what might happen. 

Ricky's feeling of emotional security 
is very much in the hands of his mother. 
If she is a warm, loving, strong person, 
the child can survive the tensions im- 
posed by his dad's job and any sudden 
separations from him. Even the child 
who attends a sleep-away camp or out- 
of-town school — 0/' is hospitalized 
through illness or injury — successfully 
copes with such separation from his 
family only when he lives in a home 
where he feels secure and knows that 
his parents love him, as well as each 
other. 

A boy, of course, needs masculine 
companionship in order to identify 
with a strong male figure: His father. 
If his father is away too long or too 
often, a boy is bound to be hurt, even 
in the best of families. Since his dad 
is a "soldier," Ricky may have less of 
a problem than do his civilian counter- 
parts, because he's growing up in an 
environment where it's not unusual for 
fathers to be away from their families. 
Anne Selby must have great faith in 
her husband in order to survive the 
anxiety that must plague her constantly. 
She must believe in his love and in his 
ability to take care of himself. The wife 
of America's famous Astronaut, Col. 
Glenn, showed as much courage, emo- 
tionally, as did her husband physically. 
This is the pattern Anne must follow. 
In a particularly exciting episode, 
Captain Roy Selby and his buddy. 
Lieutenant Sig Levy, are held captive 
on a Russian ship which picked them 
up at sea when they Were attempting 
to recover the pay-load of an exploded 
missile during a squall. Anne does not 
yet know that Roy and Sig are being 
detained as spies. All she knows is 
that they are missing. 

She doesn't tell even this to Sig's 
wife, Jeanette, who is her friend. She 
doesn't want to worry her and is wait- 
ing for more information before giving 
her the news. However, she does take 
her son. Ricky, into her confidence. 

Is this fair to her friend? Is it fair 
to the bov? 



Anne was wrong in revealing such 
news to her twelve-year-old son. He is 
too young to recognize the situation in 
its true perspective, and could be hurt 
emotionally. When a wife takes a 
youngster into her confidence this way, 
in real life, we are inclined to suspect 
that she is using him as a husband- 
substitute, viewing him as an adult 
rather than as the child he really is. 

Also, it is inconsistent for her to 
speak out to her son but withhold such 
information from her friend. Even 
though Jeanette is pregnant and Anne 
is presumably trying to protect her 
from worry, she is not playing fair with 
her. This situation deeply concerns the 
other wife, too, and she should know 
what's happened. 

Again, if a woman behaved this way 
in real life, we would suspect that she 
may be expressing some unconscious 
feeling of hostility to her friend under 
the guise of "protecting" her, or per- 
haps might want to play martyr and 
not share her martyrdom with anyone 
else — a selfish attitude, in any case. 

Learning to live with death 

Ricky is terribly upset. He can't 
sleep. He complains about missing his 
father even at those times when he 
normally wouldn't be with him; just 
knowing he's there, if he needs him, 
makes him feel secure. Anne smothers 
her own fears and bravely tries to re- 
assure her son. 

But what if Roy should never return ? 
How can a mother prepare her child 
for the possible loss of his father? 

This situation calls for great courage 
on Anne's part, and adult courage 
means recognizing things as they are, 
standing up to them and dealing with 
them forthrightly. Anne has shown 
courage here. She has fought back, in 
the face of stress and anxiety, in order 
to sustain her child. She has set him 
a good example, nourished him on 
hope and love and the truth of the 
matter. She has not broken down; if 
she had, then the last support of her 
child would have crumbled and Ricky, 
too, would have broken. 

This is all that any mother can do 
when her husband is threatened and 
may never return to the family fold. 
Of course, a very young child should 
not be exposed to as much of the facts 
as an older one. The emotional age of 
the child must be considered, too. 

A moral question is raised by Roy's 
imprisonment, and it reminds us that 
perilous situations sometimes lead to 
unwholesome, less than honest solutions. 
In this case, the problem arises because 
Roy and Sig have found a benefactor 
aboard their prison ship — an officer 
who shows a desire to defect and flee 
to America. 

When this officer inadvertently leaves 
the door open to Roy's cabin, Roy pro- 
tects him by going along with Sig's 
explanation to the ship's commanding 
officer that an innocent sailor named 
Kirov was the guilty party. 

No matter what the circumstances, 
this is not a moral solution. Kirov is 
innocent of wrong-doing — he is a 
human being, and likely to be punished 



for something he didn t do. Morality 
means distinguishing right from wrong 
in all situations, not fust when it's con- 
venient to act one way or another. It 
may be expedient to accuse Kirov, in 
order to save their friend's skin, but it 
is not moral. 

It is inconsistent with Roy's integrity 
to behave this way — his resourcefulness 
should have allowed him to come up 
with a more honest solution. Regardless 
of one's good intentions, it is dangerous 
to sink to the level of permitting the 
means to justify the end. In this par- 
ticular case, real-life actions must not 
model themselves after those of TV 
plays. We should be careful to avoid 
confusion between doing what's right 
and doing what's expedient. Modern 
society already suffers a great deal 
from such confusion. 

Roy, of course, does return safely 
and is re-united with his family. The 
closeness of his relationship with his 
wife is expressed again in an incident 
where, only through Anne's alertness 
and assistance, does he become able to 
clear an innocent man and prevent his 
being court-martialed. 

This is the kind of upright behavior 
completely consistent with Roy's 
character — and it is significant that 
Anne was of help to him. Marriage, if 
it is to be a good one, must be a part- 
nership which is equally shared. Those 
wives and husbands who cannot un- 
burden themselves to each other, and 
are forced to live separate, private, 
secret lives, are missing all the joys of 
marriage. Even when life is a con- 
tinual crisis — the more they have in 
common, the better they'll be able to 
cope with their problems. 

Anne has acted as a true wife here, 
by taking an active interest in her 
husband's work. Roy has responded as 
a true husband by accepting and 
acknowledging her interest. Both have 
shown their ability to share both the 
good and the bad that life has to offer. 
This ability to share is bound to have 
a healthy effect on their young son. 

Captain Roy Selby, his wife Anne 
and their son Ricky are pretty special 
people, in terms of the harum-scarum 
life they're forced to lead. But, deep 
down inside, they're not very different 
from other families. Even though most 
husbands aren't threatened by physical 
danger, they and their families are at 
the mercy of other just-as-frightening 
concerns. A man can lose his job . . . 
or become seriously ill . . . or be lured 
away by another woman's charms. 
Trouble can beset anybody's family at 
any time. A crisis can occur, without 
notice, about anything from health to 
finances. 

But remember: Though your prob- 
lems may be similar to those faced by 
your favorite TV heroes and heroines, 
your solutions may have to be quite dif- 
ferent. 

Next month, we'll analyze another 
popular daytime drama and try to make 
its story and its characters meaningful 
in your own lives and relationships with 
those you love. — The End 

"The Clear Horizon" is on CBS-TV, 
Mon.-Fri., 11:30 to 11:55 a.m. edt. 




i;m;ij 



IN 6 WEEKS 



Write 120 words per minute- 
Age no obstacle— LOWEST COST 

Famous SPEEDWRITING 
shorthand. No strange sym- 
bols; no machines. Uses 
ABC's. Easiest to learn and 
use. Fast preparation for a 
better position and a sound, 
substantial future. 

Nationally used in leading 
offices and Civil Service; also 
by executives, students, etc. 
120 words per minute — 50% 
FASTER than Civil Service 




Wins Fine Position 

As a Result of 

SPEEDWRITING 

Shorthand 



"A series of low-pay- 
ing jobs convinced me 
I needed shorthand to 
increase my earning 
power. A friend rec- 
ipe/* „«„ ommended SPEED- 

requirements. Over 500,000 writing shorthand 

and I was delighted 



. i. . L ^. . ana i was aeiigniecj 

taught at home or through how quickly and easily 

I .... .^i I learned it. Now I 

Classroom instruction. The have an important see 

very low cost will surprise 
you. TYPING AVAILABLE 

Schools in 443 cities 
throughout the world. 39th 
year. 

Write for FREE Booklet to: 



retarial position with 
a research firm at 
$1,300 more a year." 
— Jeannine Oster, New 
York, New York. 

(flnnrl Hi~urpok»»p<r>q 

**-, GU4MMKII - ' 





* SONGS-POEMS 



We need New Ideas 

FOR RECORDING . . . 

Your Songs or Poems could 

Pl*»- '■vwmmm EARN MONEY FOR YOU! 

S |W FREE EXAMINATION 
^^^^S*^ Mail to: STAR-CREST RECORDING CO. 

Dept. K-7, 6G02 Lexington Ave.. Hollywood 38, Calif. 



LIVE SEAHORSES 

Order a pair of MATED LIVE SEA- 
HORSES from Fla. Supply of food our 

catalog and simple instructions on how . 

to raise these fascinating little creatures | 

of the deep. All you need is a jar, J 

bowl or aquarium. Every one young or | 

old enjoys watching their bizarre move- ■ 

ments for hours. Educational, Interest- I 

ing and Hardy. Guaranteed Live Delivery j 

—Air Mail Postpaid — $3.50 a Pair — I 

$7.00 SPECIAL: Order TWO PAIR j 
and receive another PAIR FREE. 

F. F. MARINE LIFE, P. 0. Box 626-MW, Dania, Fla. { 

L. wb •— — — — — • — — ^ ^— ^— — — — — — — — — — — ' 




2 FREE ENLARGEMENTS O 
OF YOUR FAVORITE PHOTOS,/ 
NEGATIVES OR COLOR SLIDES §m 

Just to introduce our new gold-tone process we 
will make PROFESSIONAL 5x7 enlargements of 
your favorite 2 snapshots, photos, negatives or 
color slides ABSOLUTELY FREE. Be sure to include 
color of hair, eyes and clothing for prompt infor- 
mation on having your enlargements beautifully 
hand-colored in oil and mounted in FREE FRAMES. 
Limit 2. Originals returned with enlargements. Act 
now. SEND NO MONEY. Just send 2 photos, nega- 
tives, snapshots or color slides today. 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS Dept. X-213 
7021 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood 36, Calif. 




Ill 



NT 
BE FAT 

INTRODUCTORY OFFER 

Good for a short time only! 



f Reduce with KAL-X GUM and 

Plan. NO UNNATURAL LIQUID 

DIETS! EAT NORMAL SOLID 

FOODS, NO STARVATION 

DIETS! NO HARMFUL DRUGS! 

GUARANTEED SAFE! 




HEALTH AIDS CO. Dept. TK-2 
Box 1, Rugby Sta. • Brooklyn 



■r"i. ir\-£ 

Brooklyn 3, N. Y. 



T 
V 
R 

95 



CHUCK CONNORS 



(Continued from page 32 ) 

Chuck Connors stared lifelessly ahead 
for a moment and then closed his eyes 
a bit wearily, as if to wash away the 
vision of his ruined marriage. 

"This is a very hard time for me," 
he said hesitantly. "You've probably 
read that my wife was granted her 
interlocutory degree today. It's all been 
a terrible experience for me. I did it 
for the sake of our boys. My critics 
won't believe that but I don't care. I'm 
tired of trying to justify my actions 
to them. 

"The boys are my whole life. I went 
through with the divorce primarily for 
their sake. If I didn't think it was 
going to be best for them, I would never 
have agreed to the separation. 

"I know some people think I'm 
wrong, but I'm not concerned about 
that, any longer. All I care about is 
my sons and what is best for them. 

"I truly think the boys are happier 
than they've been in a while," he went 
on after a moment. "My relationship 
with them is stronger, too, for when 
I'm with them now I'm a whole person, 
not half a man wracked with worry and 
tension. I don't yell at them to cut out 
the noise because they're disturbing me 
while I'm trying to learn a script. I'm 
all theirs and I can devote my entire 
mind to them. 

"It's not the easiest job in the world 
being a father to four boys. It takes a 
lot of work and a lot of guidance to 
raise them. I'm proud of how close we 
are. I've tried hard to steer them in the 
right direction, but I've always allowed 
them to make their own decisions. Right 
now Mike, who's eleven, Jeffrey, who's 
nine, and eight-year-old Steven are con- 
vinced they'd like to be professional 
baseball players. Sure, that gives me a 
kick because of my background as a 
professional athlete, but I don't push 
them into sports or anything else. 

"I feel that each of them has to be 
himself, physically and psychologically. 
And they're each so different. Michael 
is a big, strong, virile boy who lives in 
a world composed almost entirely of 
sports. He does have an artistic side, 
however. Mike's sensitive. He has to 
be constantly reassured of my love. The 
others take it more for granted. 

"Jeffrey is the natural athlete in the 
family. My wife took him ice skating 
for the first time several months ago. 
Within two hours, the hockey coach at 
the rink had noticed him and wanted 
him for the team." Chuck's voice 
boomed with parental pride. "He's fast 
as greased lightning. I play basketball 
with the boys and Jeffrey can outshoot 
me, basket for basket." His voice 
lowered as he added, "Jeff's also very 
good looking. He takes after my wife, 
who is a beautiful woman. 

"Steve's the intellectual one of the 
crowd — but," Chuck hastened to add, 
"he's no bookworm. He's a pretty great 
j athlete, too. 

v "And Kevin — Kevin's the baby and 

R the little king in our house. Everyone 

makes a fuss over him and I guess he 

knows it. He's something special to us." 



The smile that had played at the 
lips of the tall, husky actor faded. "It 
hasn't been easy, but I think we're bet- 
ter off now. The boys are happy and 
well adjusted. No one can survive and 
grow in an unhappy atmosphere. 

"Of course it tears me apart. Why 
shouldn't it? Last weekend I took the 
boys to the ball game and afterward 
we stopped over at Ray Danton's house 
where we got into a football game with 
him and his kids. It was great. Ray's 
boy threw a pass to him for a touch- 
down and Mike caught one from me to 
tie up the score. It ended a tie game, 
but it was a father-son victory for both 
sides. After the game, Ray's wife fixed 
us all a batch of hamburgers for dinner. 
The day had been a wonderful one for 
the boys and me, a real family session. 
But then, when I got ready to drive 
the boys home, Kevin said, 'Daddy, I 
don't want to go home. I want to stay 
with you in your house tonight.' It 
tore me apart. I couldn't tell him, 'It's 
not in the settlement, son.' 

"Actually, though, my wife has been 
very good about allowing me to see the 
boys whenever I wish. I'm supposed to 
have them only every other weekend, 
but I always see them more often than 
that. I've rented a small house in 
Beverly Hills and I'm fixing it up so 
I can have the boys stay overnight. 

"I'm planning a lot of wonderful 
times with them. In a couple of weeks, 
I'm going to take them up to the moun- 
tains to hunt for arrowheads. If the 
weather is nice, we'll camp out. If not, 
we'll rent a motel room, but either way 
it will be a real family affair." 

The word "family" popped up fre- 
quently in Chuck's conversation, al- 
though he seemed unaware of it. "I'm 
also planning a special children's pre- 
view of my new picture 'Geronimo' and, 
of course, I'm going to take my boys to 
that. I'm excited about the movie and 
anxious for the children to see it. It's 
a real family picture." 

The things that trouble them 

Chuck shook his head as if to answer 
a silent question that had come to his 
mind. "No, I don't think our relation- 
ship will be much different than it's 
ever been. Oh, sure, I'm not with the 
boys constantly, but when we're to- 
gether they ask my advice about things 
that have been troubling them, and I 
still try to keep a close eye on their 
school work. Mike was having a prob- 
lem with arithmetic a short while ago. 
I had him go over some problems with 
me and I saw he had missed the basic 
principle. I worked with him for a 
couple of hours and it cleared every- 
thing up for him. 

"It's been eight months since I left 
home. I've had plenty of time to see 
how the boys are adjusting and I've 
found they've adjusted well. We talk 
together about everything — except the 
divorce. They were told when it all 
happened that I had to move away and 
they all seem to understand. So there 
is really no need for us to discuss it. 

"I make sure that the time we spend 
together is a happy time. We go hiking 
and fishing as we have in the past. 
Anyone who has worked with me knows 



how close the boys and I have always 
been. I've brought them on the set quite 
a few times and they're in heaven there. 
Of course, after about ten minutes of 
watching the show being shot they get 
bored and run off to the studio's back 
lot. That place is a kids' paradise. Dirt 
roads, mountains — it's like the Old 
West come to life. 

"I think the reason I've never had to 
work very hard to achieve a closeness 
with my sons is because they respect 
me. They know I love them, but they 
know, too, that I won't let them walk all 
over me. Kids are like colts. You have 
to ride them with a loose rein, but they 
have to know at all times that the rein 
is there." 

He laughed. "Of course, I don't al- 
ways do such a good job in the dis- 
cipline department. The boys were 
always asking me what a personal- 
appearance tour was like, so I decided 
to take them along with me on one last 
summer. Do you know what they liked 
most about the trip? Running up and 
down the halls in the hotel and sliding 
down the laundry chute. Kevin was 
real proud of himself when he told me, 
'Dad, we found the neatest slide in the 
closet.' 

"I'm going to tell you something. I 
don't believe discipline is really too im- 
portant. The most important thing is 
love. If children know you love them, 
everything else falls in place. I don't 
mean that you have to be constantly 
picking them up and kissing them, but 
you have to make them aware of, and 
confident of, your love. You can't fool 
children about this. They have an in- 
stinctive feeling that tells them who's 
on their side and who's not. 

"Love, that's the important thing. Oh, 
there's so much I can't say — don't want 
to say — but I will tell you this: The 
boys and I are a closer family now 
than we ever were before. Do you be- 
lieve that? It's true. I can't tell you 
how they act when we're separated, but 
when we're together I see them being 
happy and carefree. Their lives are no 
longer being torn apart. I'm sure my 
wife is happier, too. The times I've seen 
her, she's seemed more relaxed and 
better adjusted. She's now better able 
to cope with the boys and their prob- 
lems. Me? I know how I feel. Like a 
weight has been taken off my mind." 

Chuck suddenly sat forward and a 
note of urgency filled his voice as he 
asked, "Do you know what the most 
important entity in the world is? It's 
the family. Think about it. Certainly the 
ideal setup is a family with a mother, 
a father and children, but it can't al- 
ways be that way. Do you know why 
my television show, 'The Rifleman.' has 
been successful for so long? Because 
that strong family feeling comes across 
between Johnny Crawford and myself. 
It gets right to the viewer — the love of 
a father and son. I've no wife in the 
show, but Johnny and I, we're a family, 
aren't we? Well, that's the way it is 
with me and my boys. We're a family. 
Maybe no one else thinks of us as being 
a complete unit. Maybe we're not the 
picture the story books portray. But 
we are a family, and a close one. And 
you know something? That's the way 
we're going to stay." — Marilyn Beck 



Bathing suit, Sylvia DeGay for Robert Sloan 



Formal, Rappi Inc. 




In or out of the water.. . 



^oa ^ee/uu& cvm, tic^ clean, thi& AedA cvifih Qjcwwax 

Wear what you wish. Do what you want — even swim. On land, your every move reflects the cool- 
ness, the freshness, the freedom you feel in the water. That's because Tarn pax is unseen, unfelt, 
never a problem, never a bother. No wonder millions use internal protection. It's the modern way! 

TAMPAX 



so much a part of your busy life 

Tampax® internal sanitary protection is made only by Tampax Incorporated, Pa 




Don't 

promise me 

miracles... 

just 
give me 







IVORY 
LOOK 



The clear, sparkling look of your skin at its natural best! 



The wonder of Ivory is that it brings out all the natural freshness and 
radiance of your complexion . . .and needs no "special" added ingredients 
to do it. Ivory is all mildness ... and nothing means more to the natural 
beauty of your skin. Why, Ivory Soap is mild enough for a baby's skin . . . 
so mild it soft-cleans your skin without drying. 99 44 /ioo% pure.® Ivory is 
advised by more doctors for babies' skin, and yours, than any other soap. 

Ivory's mildness is the most important Ingredient ever built into a soap 




ck Chamberlain secretly married! TV's hottest rumor! 




iADIO 



NCE 
WARDS 

e next 
1st 

ling to 
larriage 



IE NIGHT 

IDIE 

OLE BACK 

TO DEBBIE'S HEART 




THE 
LENNON 
SISTERS 



Bathing cap, Kleinert. Suit and lounging outfit, Sylvia DeGay for Robert Sloan. Shoes, Capezio 




In or out of the water. 




The relaxed way you look mirrors the relaxed way you feel. You know your secret is safe with 
Tampax... nothing can show, no one can know. In fact, you're hardly aware that you're using 
it. Millions of women depend on Tampax internal protection. Try Tampax. It's the modern way! 



TAMPAX 



..so much a part of your busy life 

Tampax^ internal sanitary protection is made only by Tampax Incorporated, Palmer, Mass. 



! POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

i Room 9R.82 - 121 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

j Send me, without obligation, your FREE sample lesson 
' pages, and your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

j K1AMF 

= ADDRESS 

1 CITY ZONE STATE 
1 


j POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

| Room 9R82 - 121 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. \ 

, Send me, without obligation, your FREE sample lesson j 
1 pages, and your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

j | NAMF j 

ADDRFSS | 

1 1 CITY ZONE STATE 1 
1 » \ 




FILL OUT THE COUPON ABOVE 
AND I WILL RUSH TO YOU... 



FREE NURSES BOOKLET 




AND SAMPLE 
LESSON PAGES 




Y LEARN PRACTICAL NURSING AT 
HOME IN ONLY 10 SHORT WEEKS 

THIS IS THE HOME STUDY COURSE that can change your whole life. You can 
enjoy security, independence and freedom from money worries . . . there is 
no recession in nursing. In good times or bad, people become ill, babies are 
born and your services are always needed. You can earn up to $65.00 a week 
as a Practical Nurse and some of our students earn much more! In just a 
few short weeks from now, you should be able to accept your first cases. 

YOUR AGE AND EDUCATION ARE NOT IMPORTANT . . . Good common sense 
and a desire to help others are far more important than additional years in 
school. Practical nursing offers young women and men an exciting chal- 
lenging future . . . yet the services of mature and older women are also 
desperately needed now! 

HUNDREDS OF ADDITIONAL PRACTICAL NURSES WILL SOON BE NEEDED to care 
for thousands upon thousands of our older citizens as Medical, Surgical, Re- 
tirement and Pension benefits are made available. A tremendous opportunity 
to begin a new life of happiness, contentment and prestige is before you. See 
how easily you can qualify for choice of a career as a Practical Nurse, Nurses 
Aide, Nurse Companion, Infant Nurse, Psychiatric Aide, Hospital Attendant 
or as a Ward Orderly. 

BUT THE IMPORTANT THING is to get the FREE complete information right 
now. There is no cost or obligation and no salesman to call upon you. You 
can make your own decision to be a Nurse in the privacy of your own home. 
We will send you without obligation your FREE sample lesson pages, and 
your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ROOM 9R82 - 121 SOUTH WABASH • CHICAGO 3, ILL. 




IT COSTS SO MUCH LESS 
I THAN YOU THINK 
| TO GET PERFECT 
LALL-DAY PROTECTION! 



■^ 
•^ 




USE TESTED 

k McCall's .< 

••♦»••• 



THERE IS NO FINER 
DEODORANT AT ANY 
PRICE...YETYOUPAY 
ONLY OOC 



29 



plus tax 



FOR THIS "USE-TESTED" 
JUMBO STICK! 

Delicately fragrant, this quality deodor- 
ant stick keeps you fresh and dainty... 
insures against perspiration odor all day. 
Absolutely safe and greaseless, it can- 
not harm your clothing. Convenient 
push-up holder 29c. 

Zander 

fli CHLOROPHYLL. 

DEODORANTS 

A variable at your local variety store 

Luxury ROLL-ON lotion deodorant 

stops perspiration odor worries. ONLY 39c 

LANDER CO. INC., FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK 




AUGUST, 1962 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 58, NO. 3 



IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 



Eddie Fisher 14 Stealing Back into Debbie's Heart James Hoffman 

Richard Chamberlain 26 Secretly Married ! TV's Hottest Rumor ! . . Dean Gautschy 

Vincent Edwards 30 The Next Best Thing to Marriage Nick Dennis 

The Lennon Sisters 32 The Day God Answered No Eunice Field 

Perry Como 34 Why He Stopped Being a "Nice Guy" Irene Storm 

Peggy McCay 38 Twist — from Efrem Z. to Robert Q.! James Gregory 

Gracie Allen 40 "Am I Too Sick to Know the Truth?". . .Rocky Rockwell 

Second Honeymoons 43 Is Love Sweeter — the Second Time? Marilyn Beck 

Cara Williams 46 "He's No Barrymore!" Chris Alexander 

Michael Landon 48 "I'm Their Father Till I Die" Alan Somers 

Ted Mack 50 Are You Losing Out in Life? Betty Etter 

"Love of Life" 53 Does a Second Wife Have to Be Second Best? 

Kathy Nolan 56 My Fight to Save My Reputation, .as told to Tex Maddox 

Carol Burnett 58 Why She and Garry Moore Had to Part . . Chrys Haranis 

Arthur Godfrey 60 "Every Day I Live with Dying" George Carpozi Jr. 

George Maharis 62 Why They Warn You About Him Pat Richards 

Sebastian Cabot 64 "But Darling, We Can't Afford It!" Tricia Hurst 

BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 

17 Close-up on Bobby Darin 21 Tops in Singles 

18 Album Reviews 22 Music Makers in the News 
24 The Wonderful World of Ed Sullivan 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 



4 Information Booth 

6 Earl Wilson's Inside Story 



12 What's New from Coast to Coast 
82 Photographers' Credits 



SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 

Marc Alan 67 It's Kissin' Time (KLEO Radio) 

Connie Mitchell 68 This Is Work? (WBBM) 

Bill Kennedy 70 Meet "Mr. Movie" (CKLW-TV) 

"Ripcord" 72 They Fly Through the Air 



CLAIRE SAFRAN, Editor 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
LORRAINE BIEAR, Associate Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



JACK J. PODELL, Editorial Director 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
PAT BYRNE, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty Editor 



_»m 




TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office, 434 North Rodeo 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President: Lee B. Bartell, Executive Vice 
President; Frederick A. Klein, Executive Vice President for Publishing-General Manager; Robert L. Young, Vice 
President; Sol N. Himmelman, Vice President; Melvih M. Bartell, Secretary. Advertising offices also in Chicago 
and San Francisco. 

Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its possessions and Canada, one year, $3.00; two years, $5.00; three years, 
$7.00. All other countries, $5.00 per year. Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. Send your old as well 
as your new address to TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Manuscripts and Photographs: Publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 

Foreign editions handled through International Division of Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, 205 East 42nd Street, 
New York 17, N. Y. Gerald A. Bartell, President; Douglas Lockhart, Sales Director. 

Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Copyright 1962 by Macfadden- 
Bartell Corporation. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Convention and International 
Copyright Convention. Copyright reserved under Pan American Copyright Convention. Title trademark registered 
in U.S. Patent Office. Printed in U.S.A. Member of Macfadden Women's Group. 




NATIONAL BELLAS HESS 

Sail SlAfcte* 



• All the newest styles at lowest prices. 

• Amazing bargains in housewares, radio, TV, sport- 
ing goods, furniture and other household appliances. 

See hundreds of the newest styles designed in New 
York, Miami, Hollywood, Paris and Rome — the 
fashion capitals of the world, offered to you at prices 
guaranteed to be the lowest anywhere. 
Look through page after page of exciting new items 
for your home . . . vacuums, washers, TV, radio, 
tools, auto accessories, typewriters, furniture and 
hundreds of others . . . you'll be amazed at the ex- 
citing low prices, too! 

Shop by mail and join the millions who save by 
buying from this colorful 476 page catalog. Select 
from thousands of famous NBH bargains without 
leaving your easy chair. 

You can buy four ways at NBH: Cash,— CO. D., 
Charge-It or Credit. No Down Payment is required 
with any NBH Credit Account. 
All merchandise is absolutely guaranteed. Your 
money back if you are not pleased. 



i 




■■.' 




SAVE MONEY, SAVE TIME — ACT NOW! 



j NATIONAL BELLAS HESS, INC. 

I 247-88 Bellas Hess Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 



Please send me, free, the new National Bellas 
Hess Money-Saving Catalog. 



Name. 



NATIONAL BELLAS HESS 

247-88 Bellas Hess Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 



Address 

P.O. Box. 
State 



.City. 




r 



PERIODIC PAIN 

Every month Bonnie felt "blue" because 
of functional menstrual distress. Now 
shejusttakesMiDOLandgoesherwayin 
comfort because M idol tablets contain: 

• An exclusive anti-spasmodic that 
Stops Cramping... 

• Medically-approved ingredients that 
Relieve Headache and Backache... 
Calm Jumpy Nerves... 

• A special, mood-brightening medi- 
cation that Chases "Blues." 

"WHAT WOMEN WANT TO KNOW" 

FREE! Frank, revealing 32-page book, explains 
womanhood's most common physical problems. 
Written by a physician. Write Dept. B82, Box 
280, New York 18, N.Y. (Sent in plain wrapper.) 



J 




% 



.j.*»*M& 






(s 






**=«r-**., ! 



\ 



AUG. 



m< 



•"•»»., 



.-""•"•-••...^ 



■"•»•«.» 






S 



A Good Choice 

On "The Lawrence W elk Show" on 
Saturday, he announced that your maga- 
zine had awarded the Lennon Sisters 
a Gold Medal for being the best family 
entertainers. You chose the right girls. 
Eveline Marcello 
Flushing, N. Y. 



Does Scandal Pay? 



0*% 

(z AUG. S) 

\*o >y 

It is a deep insult to the many fine 
people of the theatrical profession that 
most magazines seek to promote those 
who do dishonor to their profession and 
to human values as well. Your TV Ra- 
dio Mirror presents refreshing articles 
on the fine people of the theater today. 
You have shown them as human beings 
with a special talent who work with it 
and enjoy their work. You have covered 
the life and ideals of public favorites 
without sensationalism or mistrust of 
the confidence placed in you by those 
you interview. I was especially grateful 
for the June article on Vincent Ed- 
wards which dispelled the rumors about 
his family relationship, and your earlier 
article by his charming girlfriend. 
Please continue to present your maga- 
zine in this fine form. It is a credit to 
you and the media you cover. 

Joan Evanish 
New York, N.Y. 



"Hawaiian" Native 



IZ AUG zl 

\*oo>y 

What can you tell me about Doug 
Mossman, who plays Moke on "Hawai- 
ian Eye"? 

J.S.B., Bronxville, N.Y. 



Very few viewers watching "Hawai- 
ian Eye," on ABC-TV, realize that 
Moke, who wears a police-like uniform 
and works for the "Hawaiian Eye" in- 
vestigators, is played by half-Hawaiian 
Douglas Kinilau Mossman. . . . Doug 




was born in the Islands, attended the 
famous Kamehameha school and was 
graduated from the University of Ha- 
waii. His father was three-quarters 
Scottish and one-quarter Hawaiian; his 
mother three-quarters Hawaiian and 
one-quarter Scottish. This, says he, 
makes him half-and-half. . . . Besides 
his role in the series, the versatile actor 
has two other connections with the 
show. He serves as technical director, 
working with the producer to make sure 
everything is accurate with regard to 
its island locale — clothes, props, cus- 
toms, and pronunciation of Hawaiian 
words. He also is an accomplished mu- 
sician and works with Connie Stevens 
and Poncie Ponce on the Hawaiian 
songs they sometimes do in the show. 
. . . Mossman is married to a Japanese 
girl who was born in Hawaii. . . . His 
middle name means "many thousands 
of relatives," which he really has. This 
may be one of the reasons the series is 
so popular in the Islands. — Ed. 



Calling All Fans 



: AUG. zl 

v^y 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write to 
addresses given — not to TV Radio Mir- 
ror. 

Ben Casey Fan Club, Vivian Owens, 
165 Marshall Lane, Derby, Conn. 

Connie Francis Fan Club, Eileen 
Weaver, 83 Cambridge Avenue, Saddle 
Brook, N.J. 

Michael Ansara Fan Club, Bonnie 
Tagami, 2472 Raggio Avenue, Santa 
Clara, Calif. 

Paul Anka Fan Club, Elaine Burke, 
6 High Street, Lawrence, Mass. 

Rick Nelson Fan Club, Sue James, 
8421 Boyne Street, Downey, Calif. 

McGuire Sisters Fan Club, Linda 
Moore, c/o McGuire Office, 157 West 
57th St., New York 19, N. Y. 



Write to Information Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 
205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. We regret 
we cannot answer or return unpublished letters. 



AVAILABLE IN LIVING STEREO AND MONAURAL HI-FI 




WITH 



riyic 



KISS ME QUICK • JUST FOR OLD TIME SAKE 

GONNA GET BACK HOME SOMEHOW 

{such AN) EASY QUESTION • STEPPIN' OUT OF LINE 

I'M YOURS • SOMETHING BLUE • SUSPICION 

I FEEL THAT I'VE KNOWN YOU FOREVER 

NIGHT RIDER « FOUNTAIN OF LOVE 

THAT'S SOMEONE YOU NEVER FORGET 




rca Victor 




M 



ANOTHER GREAT ALBUM 

FROM RCA VICTOR 

BY 



I 




RCA VICTORS 

f ■>. TMKiS ^BHt^^^B^BP 

fe$The Most Trusted Name in Sound ^ftj^ 



Can Jackie Gleason launch "The 
Honeymooners" on a new honey- 
moon — or is the honeymoon over? 

Oval-shaped, bouncing, bellowing 
Jackie is determined to lure Art 
Carney and Audrey Meadows 
back into regular performances on a 
new "Honeymooners" series when 
he returns to CBS-TV this fall. And 
a determined Jackie is hard to stop. 

But there are some skeptical peo- 
ple around — some who'll belly right 
up to Jackie and scream as loudly 
as he does and say it's not such a 
sensational idea. 

One happens to be wise, shrewd 
Bill McCaffrey, Art Carney's man- 
ager. He knows very well that Ed 
Norton, sewer worker, and Ralph 



and Alice Kramden have become 
classic figures of TV, thought by 
millions of viewers to be the best 
thing ever put on the home screen. 

"And that's the trouble with try- 
ing to bring them back as a family," 
he says. "The farther you get from 
the original, the greater it becomes 
in the public imagination and mem- 
ory. And therefore the harder to top, 
or even equal, in a new series!" 

But some sentiment, and perhaps 
even love, is involved here. Jackie 
helped make Art and Audrey the big 
people they are today. They both 
love Jackie. They loved working 
with him. They probably didn't love 
it as much at the time as they think 
they did now. But it was then that 



they came into greatness and there's 
a good chance now — as we slash this 
out on our typewriter — that there'll 
be three or four new "Honeymoon- 
ers" this season at least. 

"Art Carney is a star now in his 
own right," declares his manager. 

"Audrey Meadows is a star now 
in her own right," says her man- 
ager, Val Irving. 

It's true about them both. Strange- 
ly, Audrey has made it in the movies 
and Cary Grant wants herein an- 
other film following her success in 
"That Touch of Mink." 

And there are all kinds of starring 
offers at hand for Carney, whose box 
office appeal kept a Broadway show, 
"Take Her. She's Mine," going for 






KARL 




■jfe 




WILSON'S 




m 



Ife:,.' 





MM 



Special four-page gossip section: Who's in? Who's out? What's up? Each and 
every month, TV Radio Mirror brings you the scoopiest column in any magazine ! 



many weeks longer than had ap- 
peared likely. 

Having become big stars, they're 
worth more money than they were 
when they last worked with Jackie. 
That's another problem. But can 
Gleason do without them? There has 
been talk of finding "another Art 
Carney" and "another Audrey Mead- 
ows." But where do you look — and 
do you really want to look — and 
what's a few thousand bucks to 
Jackie Gleason Enterprises? That's 
why we predict "The Honeymoon- 
ers" isn't over. 

Did anybody happen to notice that 
Shirley Booth has now won the 

Grand Slam of acting? Quite a long 
time ago, she won a Tony and then 
an Oscar for "Come Back, Little 
Sheba"; now recently she won an 
Emmy for her "Hazel" series. That 
gives her just about all the prizes 
that are available. 

"Where do you keep all your 
trophies?" I asked her. 

"I have a little room 'way, 'way in 
the back," Shirley said. "I don't 
think it's nice to be ostentatious 
about it." 

Shirley likes to tell how she "fell 
right on my face" when she won the 
Oscar. She did, too. She tripped on 
her long dress and went kerplunk on 




Shirley Booth and Bobby Buntrock. 

her kisser as she plunged up to ac- 
cept the award. 

DON'T PRINT THAT! One of 

the young married TV singers came 
close to embarrassing his wife by 
being around New York not so dis- 



creetly with another gal. He was 
spotted smooching the other babe 
rather openly. . . . Several readers 
have written to me that they don't 
think Richard Burton should be 
permitted on American TV. (We 
think the decision on such matters 
as that shouldn't be too hastily 
reached; anyway, wouldn't that be 
some sort of a morals censorship?) 
. . . There's still some bad feeling 
simmering about the Emmy Awards 
— East vs. West, never-the-twain- 
shall-agree and all that. The West- 
erners are likely to draw their forces 
tighter next year. 

Do you remember Kenny Del- 
mar, alias Senator Claghorn? He 
who was the sensational comic on 
the Fred Allen radio show and then 
went on Fred's TV program, making 
famous such remarks as "That's a 
joke, son!" 

Still a young fellow, gifted at dia- 
lect, and an excellent actor, Kenny 
became famous almost overnight — 
and that's been his trouble. He 
wasn't able to sustain the incredible 
reputation that came so swiftly. But 
he's done quite well — and, interest- 
ingly, is about to make a movie in 
Greece, written by his 21-year-old 
son, Kenny Delmar Jr. 

Recently {Please turn the page) 



Gleason s back — and there's just one question: Is the "honeymoon" over? Some say yes, but Jackie says a loud no! 





PERMANENT DARKENER* 

FOR LASHES AND BROWS 

• the ideal vacation-time 
eye make-up! 

% mmm , * ifitisn'tSWIMPROOF 
it isn't "Dark-Eyes" 




Swim al! day, dance the night away, shower 
at will, "Dark-Eyes" gives your eyes a natural, 
BORN BEAUTIFUL loveliness all day, all night, 
'round the clock ! Avoids looking "featureless" 
and washed-out at the beach ! 

Carefree "Dark-Eyes" really is SWIMPROOF! 
Soap-and-waterproof! Water makes mascara 
run, but "Dark-Eyes" never runs, smudges, 
or washes off. Ends all the bother of daily eye 
make-up . . . goes on once, STAYS-ON four 
to five WEEKS until lashes and brows are 
normally replaced by new hairs. 

"Dark-Eyes" permanently colors., .doesn't 
coat. It is never sticky, heavy, obviously 
"made-up" . . . always soft, dark, luxuriant 
and refined-looking! It is simple to apply, 
pleasant to use and goes on in the wink of 
an eyelash ! Stays on all thru your vacation. 

"Dark-Eyes" is completely SAFE, use with 
confidence. Contains no aniline dye. 

Trfree shades: 
jet black, rich 
brown and 
light brown. 

(for the hairs to 
which applied) 



KARL 



ABOUT 12 
APPLICATIONS 

(normal year's supply) 
- at leading 

J drug, dept 
and variety 
chain stores 







tor L* «*>»» 




continued 



Kenny came out at a TV gathering 
"to see all my old friends in the 
business." He confided to this col- 
umnist: "And you're the only one I 
saw that I know! It's a new genera- 
tion!" 

Vince Edwards was reported to 
be marrying beautiful, blonde Cali- 
fornian Sherry Nelson — so I asked 
him about it. For once, the non- 
smiling Dr. Ben Casey grinned, just 
a little, and said, "I've been going 
steady with a gal" — Sherry — "and if 
I get married to anybody, it'll be 
her." But he indicated they were in 
no hurry. "She knew me well when 
I was busted," he said. 

Scarcely-known fact about Vince: 
He once waited tables in a sorority 
house at Ohio State University, 
while a freshman and sophomore 
there. 

Marty Ingels, who'll co-star on 
ABC's new show, "I'm Dickens, He's 
Fenster" (it's about a couple of 
comic carpenters), got his first big 
break on a Steve Allen show, win- 
ning a guest shot without so much 
as an audition. 

Actually, Marty was ready to go 
before the cameras to give his rou- 
tine for the brass, but then he got 
started talking about the National 
Guard and the nation's military set- 
up and was so funny before the au- 
dition that he was hired straight out. 

"War," Marty pointed out, "is a 
question of timing. See, everyone 
meets at night in their uniforms, 
ready to do battle. But," he lifted a 
finger, "if we get attacked in the 
morning or afternoon, we're fin- 
ished, because all the troops are at 
the office, dressed in civvies." 

Marty also cited a complicated 
battle plan, whereby each general 
calls so many colonels, each colonel 
calls so many majors, and so on 
down the line, till every private is 
alerted. He envisioned this telephone 
conversation : 

"Hello, is Colonel Schwartz there? 
Oh, he's sleeping? No, don't bother 



to wake him. Will you give him a 
message, please? Tell him to be sure 
to call all the majors because we're 
at war. No, that's W . . . A . . . R . . ." 

The return of "Talent Scouts'' this 
summer reminds us of the story Irv- 
ing Mansfield, the show's producer, 
tells of the time he went back to his 
old neighborhood, flush with the suc- 
cess of his first TV credit. He came 
upon an acquaintance, who asked: 
"What are you doing these days?" 

"I'm in TV," said Irving proudly. 

"Wholesale or retail?" came the 
squelch. 

Sam Jaffe, who got into a hassle 
with the "Ben Casey" people about 
having his part expanded, told me 
the dispute had been settled amic- 
ably, and it was agreed that Dr. Zor- 
ba would have a more prominent 
part next season. But Sam prefaced 
his remarks with an amusing word- 
play: "It's my only beef — and re- 
member, I'm a vegetarian!" 

No one had a greater appreciation 
of Ernie Kovacs' comic gifts than 
Sandy Stewart, the pretty singer 
on "The Perry Como Show." Sandy 
broke into TV as a regular on 
Ernie's old morning show, and she'll 
talk for hours on all the nutty things 
Ernie did. 

"He had some sense of humor," 
said Sandy in awe. "You had to be 
on your toes every minute of the 
show because you'd never know 
what he was going to do next. Some 
mornings, he'd come in and say, T 
don't feel like writing the show to- 
day. Let's ad-lib it. Sandy, camera- 
man, you just follow me.' ' 

Barbara Eden, now a big movie 
star, also got her start working for 
a star who wasn't one back then: 
Johnny Carson. Barbara figures 
he'll be as big a hit as Jack Paar 
ever was — as soon as the audience 
can identify with him. 

"Johnny's creatively funny — like 
Jack Benny," said Barbara, who 
worked with Johnny on the Coast. 
"Benny can stand up there and do 
almost anything and be funny, be- 
cause the audience has come to 
know Jack as a particular per- 
sonality. It'll be the same with 
Johnny when they know him." 

Sid Caesar's up to his old great 
tricks of tearing up the script and 
playing the sketch by ear. Sid, you 
know, will be back once a month 
next season with "As Caesar Sees It." 
One of "Caesar's Players," Andy 
Duncan, was talking about Sid's 
great improvisational talents in a 



sketch about two stuffy Engishmen 
playing billiards. 

The idea was to make firewood 
of the billiard table with razor-tip 
cues, and after Andy took a shot that 
virtually dissected the table, Sid 
piped up: "Ripping shot, ol' boy!" 

Who says TV viewers are asleep 
at the wheel? Garry Moore, re- 
cuperating from an operation on 
his right hand, was shaking hands 
left-handed on his shows — and no 
fewer than 4,000 persons wrote in 
one week to seek an explanation. 

It's simple enough, according to 
my crewcut counterpart: The hand's 
too tender (he even had it in a sling 
during rehearsals to keep the pres- 
sure off) to risk re-injury by being 
on the other end of a bone-crunching 
greeting. 

Speaking of Garry, he's been va- 
cationing in Maine, in what's de- 
scribed as the only "fiord" in Ameri- 
ca. A fiord, in case you haven't been 
to Norway lately, is a narrow inlet 
or arm of the sea bordered by steep 
cliffs. When Garry refers to it, he 
say slyly: "It's a fiord — and much 
as I'd like to say Oldsmobile (his 
sponsor), I can't." 

FEARLESS FORECASTS: Now 

that she's packing an Emmy for am- 
mo, CBS may consider more seri- 
ously Carol Burnett's request to 
do a spec. on "Calamity Jane," her 
pet project. . . . ABC, roundly criti- 
cized for using the slow-motion video 
tape in the Benny Paret tragedy, 
will stand firm on its use. . . . Tony 
Martin and Cyd Charisse will be 
united professionally for the first 
time for an hour-long TV spec. Our 
fearless forecast is that this'll mean 
thirty minutes less of watching Cyd's 
luscious gams. . . . Lassie will en- 
roll at Actors' Studio — now that 
Mr. Ed beat her out of the "Patsy" 
Award as TV's top performing ani- 
mal. . . . Those famous ex-Leather- 
necks, the Everly Brothers, won't 
be invading TV's "wasteland" 
much; they're determined to have 
their battle cries heard on the Holly- 
wood sound stages. 

Jack Weston, the papa nurse- 
maid to the Marquis Chimps on 

"The Hathaways," couldn't contain 
his delight over the fact that the 
show won't be renewed for next sea- 
son. It was fun and all that, Jack 
said, but, somewhere along the line, 
evolution got its signals crossed: 

"One day I walked on the set and 
saw one of the chimps sitting in 
the director's chair sipping a beer. 
That was a little too much!" 

— That's Earl! 




Married women 
are sharing this secret 

. . . the new, easier, surer protection 
for those most intimate marriage problems 



What a blessing to be able to trust in 
the wonderful germicidal protection Nor- 
forms can give you. Norforms have a 
highly perfected new formula that re- 
leases antiseptic and germicidal ingre- 
dients with long-lasting action. The 
exclusive new base melts at body tem- 
perature, forming a powerful protec- 
tive film that guards (but will not 
harm) the delicate tissues. 

And Norforms' deodorant protection 
has been tested in a hospital clinic 

Tested by doctors . . . 
trusted by women . . . 
proved in hospital clinics 

FEMININE SUPPOSITORIES 



and found to be more effective than 
anything it had ever used. Norforms 
eliminate (rather than cover up) embar- 
rassing odors, yet have no "medicine" 
or "disinfectant" odor themselves. 

And what convenience! These small 
feminine suppositories are so easy to 
use. Just insert — no apparatus, mixing 
or measuring. They're greaseless and 
they keep in any climate. 

Available in packages of 6, 12 and 
24. Also available in Canada. 



Norforms" 




FREE informative Norforms booklet 

Just mail this coupon to Dept. RT-28 
Norwich Pharmacal Co., Norwich, N.Y. 

Please send me the new Norforms 
booklet, in a plain envelope. 

Name 

(PLEASE PRINT) 

Street 

City Zone State 



A NORWICH PRODUCT 



IhH_ 






■pi 



MSB 







THE MOORE THE MERRIER 



What is it about Garry Moore that gives his listeners such a 
lift? That makes people feel good just for having tuned in? 

Garry, along with his pal and partner, Durward Kirby, 
conducts one of the most attractive programs in all radio on 
the CBS Radio Network every weekday morning. 

And all it is, really, is talk ! Candid, personal, completely 
engaging give-and-take about everything under the sun. 
What Garry likes and dislikes about show business, maybe. 
Or how it feels to be short. (Durward is apt to come in with 
how it feels to be so tall.) 

Garry will often surprise you. He doesn't believe in false 
modesty, yet he tells you right out that he doesn't consider 
himself a great comic, singer, dancer or anything like that. 

What Garry Moore is is a remarkable personality. That's 
why his audiences respond to him so. 

That's why you'll find his program brightens your day. 

Tune in on Garry and Durward tomorrow. Better still, 
make your morning even merrier. Catch the whole CBS Radio 
weekday morning lineup. You'll hear radio's greatest array 
of performers. 

Before and after Garry Moore, there are Arthur Godfrey, 
Art Linkletter, Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney. All dif- 
ferent, but each possessing a special magic that means spe- 
cial enjoyment and entertainment for you. They're all on the 
CBS Radio Network every weekday morning. Consult the 
list below for your local CBS Radio station. 

CBS RADIO STATIONS: 

Alabama Birmingham WATV, Gadsden WAAX, Mobile WKRG, Montgomery WCOV, Selma WGWC, Tuscumbia WVNA Arizona 
Phoenix KOOL, Tucson KOLO Arkansas El Dorado KELD, Fort Smith KFPW, Little Rock KTHS California Bakersfield KERN, Chico 
KHSL, Eureka KINS, Fresno KFRE, Los Angeles KNX, Modesto KBEE, Palm Springs KCMJ, Redding KVCV, Sacramento KFBK, 
San Diego KFMB, San Francisco KCBS Colorado Colorado Springs KVOR, Denver KLZ, Grand Junction KREX Connecticut Hartford- 
Manchester WINF, Waterbury WBRY District of Columbia Washington WTOP Florida Fort Myers WINK, Jacksonville WMBR, Miami 
WKAT, Orlando WDBO, Pensacola WDEB, St. Augustine WFOY, Sarasota WSPB, Tallahassee WTNT, Tampa WDAE, West Palm 
Beach WJNO Georgia Albany WGPC, Athens WGAU, Atlanta WYZE, Augusta WRDW, Columbus WRBL, Gainesville WGGA, Macon 
WMAZ, Rome WRGA, Savannah WTOC, Thomasville WPAX Idaho Boise KBOI, Idaho Falls KID Illinois Champaign WDWS, Chicago 
WBBM, Danville WDAN, Decatur WSOY, Peoria WMBD, Ouincy WTAD, Rock Island WHBF, Springfield WTAX Indians Anderson 
WHBU, Fort Wayne WANE, Indianapolis WISH, Kokomo WIOU, Marion WMRI, Muncie WLBC, South Bend WSBT, Terre Haute 
WTHI Iowa Cedar Rapids WMT, Des Moines KRNT, Mason City KGLO, Ottumwa KBIZ Kansas Topeka WIBW, Wichita KFH Kentucky 
Ashland WCMI, Hopkinsville WHOP, Lexington WVLK, Louisville WKYW, Owensboro WOMI, Paducah WPAD Louisiana New Orleans 
WWL, Shreveport KCIJ Maine Portland WGAN Maryland Baltimore WCBM, Cumberland WCUM, Frederick WFMD, Hagerstown 
WARK Massachusetts Boston WEEI, Pittsfield WBRK, Springfield WMAS, Worcester WNEB Michigan Adrian WABJ, Bad Axe 
WLEW, Grand Rapids WJEF, Kalamazoo WKZO, Lansing WJIM, Port Huron WHLS, Saginaw WSGW Minnesota Duluth KDAL, Min- 
neapolis WCCO Mississippi Meridian WCOC Missouri Joplin KODE, Kansas City KCMO, St. Louis KMOX, Springfield KTTS 
Montana Billings KOOK, Butte KBOW, Missoula KGVO Nebraska Omaha WOW, Scottsbluff KOLT Nevada Las Vegas KLUC 
New Hampshire Keene WKNE, Laconia WEMJ New Jersey Atlantic City WFPG New Mexico Albuquerque KGGM, Santa Fe KVSF 
New York Albany WROW, Binghamton WNBF, Buffalo WBEN, Elmira WELM, Gloversville WENT, Ithaca WHCU, Kingston WKNY, 
New York WCBS, Pittsburgh WEAV, Rochester WHEC, Syracuse WHEN, Utica WIBX, Watertown WWNY North Carolina 
Asheville WWNC, Charlotte WBT, Durham WDNC, Fayetteville WFAI, Greensboro WBIG, Greenville WGTC North Dakota Grand 
Forks KILO Ohio Akron WADC, Cincinnati WKRC, Columbus WBNS, Dayton WHIO, Portsmouth WPAY, Youngstown WKBN Okla- 
homa Oklahoma City-Norman WNAD, Tulsa KRMG Oregon Eugene KERG, Klamath Falls KFLW, Medford KYJC, Portland KOIN, 
Roseburg KRNR Pennsylvania Altoona WVAM, DuSois WCED, Erie WLEU, Harrisburg WHP, Indiana WDAD, Johnstown WARD, Phila- 
delphia WCAU, Pittsburgh-McKeesport WEDO, Reading WHUM, Scranton WGBI, State College WRSC, Sunbury WKOK, Uniontown 
WMBS, Williamsport WWPA Rhode Island Providence WEAN South Carolina Anderson WAIM, Charleston WCSC, Columbia-Cayce 
WCAY, Greenville WMRB, Spartanburg WSPA South Dakota Rapid City KOTA, Yankton WNAX Tennessee Chattanooga WDOD, Cooke- 
ville WHUB, Johnson City WJCW, Knoxville WNOX, Memphis WREC, Nashville WLAC Teias Austin KTBC, Corpus Christi KSIX, 
Dallas KRLD, El Paso KIZZ, Harlingen KGBT, Houston KTRH, Lubbock KFYO, San Antonio KMAC, Texarkana KOSY, Wichita Falls 
KWFT Utah Cedar City KSUB, Salt Lake City KSL Vermont Bane WSNO, Brattleboro WKVT Virginia Norfolk WTAR, Richmond WRNL, 
Roanoke WDBJ, Staunton WAFC Washington Seattle KIRO, Spokane KGA West Virginia Beckley WJLS, Charleston WCHS, Fairmont 
WMMN, Parkersburg WPAR, Wheeling WWVA Wisconsin Gieen Bay WBAY, Madison WKOW, Milwaukee WMIL Wyoming Casper KTWO. 

THE CBS RADIO NETWORK 



THE MOORE THE MERRIER 




Garry, along with his pal and partner DSffinrhv 

a j ,, ■ !° Network every weekday morning 
And all it is, really, is talk! Candid, personal! comnletelv 
engaging g,ve-and-take about everything under the sun 
SK?S7 ! lk f .? nd , diSlik6S ab0 "w g busT„ e r ss may™! 

L^Ktfir£r (D ™ d is ^ to — * wi* 

Garry will often surprise you. He doesn't believe in false 
modesty, yet he tells you right out that he doesn't consider 

wu . o great , C , 0mic ' singer > dancer or anything like that. 

What Garry Moore is is a remarkable personality. That's 
why his audiences respond to him so. 

That's why you'll find his program brightens your day 

Tune in on Garry and Durward tomorrow. Better still 
make your morning even merrier. Catch the whole CBS Radio 
weekday morning lineup. You'll hear radio's greatest array 
of performers. 

Before and after Garry Moore, there are Arthur Godfrey, 
Art Linkletter, Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney. All dif- 
ferent, but each possessing a special magic that means spe- 
cial enjoyment and entertainment for you. They're all on the 
CBS Radio Network every weekday morning. Consult the 
list below for your local CBS Radio station. 

CBS RADIO STATIONS: 

Alabama Birmingham WATV, Gadsdon WAAX, Mobilo WKRG, Montgomery WCOV, Selma WGWC, Tuscumble WVNA Aiiiom 
Phoeni* KOOL, Tucson KOLD Arkansas El Dorado HELD, Fort Smith KFPW. Little Rock KTHS California Bakorsfiold KERN, ChJco 
KHSL, Euroka KINS, Fresno KFRE, Los Angeles KNX, Modasto KBEE, Palm Springs KCMJ, Redding KVCV, Sacramento KFBK, 
San Diego KFM8, Son Francisco KCBS Colorado Colorado Springs KVOR, Danvor KLZ, Grand Junction KREX Connecticut Hartford- 
Manchester WINF, Watorbury WBRY District of Columbia Washington WTOP Florida Fort Myers WINK, Jacksonville WMBR, Miami 
WKAT, Orlando WDBO, Ponaneoln WOEB, St. Augustine WFOY, Sarasota WSPB, Tallahsssao WTNT, Tampa WDAE, Wosl Palm 
Beach WJNO Gaorgia Albany WGPC, Athens WGAU, Atlanta WYZE, Augusta WRDW, Columbus WRBL, Gainesville WGGA, Macon 
WMAZ, Roma WRGA, Savannah WTOC, Thomaavlllo WPAX Idaho Boiso KBOI, Idaho Falls KID Illinois Champaign WDWS, Chicago 
WBBM, Danville WDAN, Decatur WSOY, Peoria WMBO, Qulncy WTAD, Rock Island WHBF, Springllold WTAX Indians Anderson 
WHBU, Fori Wayne WANE, Indianapolis WISH, Kokomo WIOU, Marion WMRI, Muncle WLBC, South Band WSBT, Terra Hsute 
WTHf lows Cedar Rapids WMT, Dee Moinea KRNT, Mason City KGLO, Ollumwa KBIZ KonaaaTopeka WIBW, Wichita KPH Kentucky 
Ashland WCMI, Hopkins ville WHOP, Lo.inglon WVLK, Louisville WKYW, Owonsboro WOMI, Paducah WPAD Louisiana Now Orleans 
WWL, Shreveport KCIJ Main* Portland WGAN1 Maryland Baltimore WCBM, Cumberland WCUM, Frederick WFMD, Hagoratown 
WARK Massachusetts Boston WEEI, Pittsfiold WBRK, Springllold WMAS, Worcester WNEB Michigan Adrian WABJ, Bad A>» 
WLEW, Grand Rapids WJEF, Ko.lamar.oo WKZO, Lansing WJIM, Port Huron WHLS, Soglnaw WSGW Minnesota Ouluth KOAL, Min- 
neapolis WCCO Mississippi Meridian WCOC Missouri Joplin KODE, Kansas City KCMO, St. Louis KMOX, Sp.ingiiold KTTS 
Montana EHMnga KOOK, Butte KBOW, Missoula KGVO Nebraska Omaha WOW, Scotlsblulf KOLT Nevada Laa Vegas KLUC 
Near Hampshire Keono WKNE, Loconiu WEMJ Ne* Jersey Atlantic City WFPG Neat Metico Albuquerque KGGM, Santa Fe KVSF 
Nest York Albany WROW, Blnghamton WNBF, Buffalo WBEN, Elmlra WELM, Glovereville WENT, Ithaca WHCU, Kingston WKNY, 
Now York WCBS, Pluttsburgh WEAV, Rochosler WHEC, Syracuse WHEN, Utica WIBX, Walertcwn WWNY North Carolina 
Ashevillo WWNC, Charlotte WBT, Ourham WDNC, Foyettevlllo WFAI, Greensboro WBIG, Greenvillo WGTC North Dakota Grand 
Forka KILO Ohio Akron WADC, Cincinnati WKRC, Columbus WBNS, Dayton WHIO, Portsmouth WPAY, Youngstown WKBN Okla- 
homa Oklahoma City-Norman WNAD, Tulsa KRMG Oregon Eugene KERG, Klamath Falls KFLW, Medio rd KYJC, Portland KOIN, 
Roaobura KRNR Pennsylvania Altoona WVAM. DuBois WCED, Erie WLEU, Har.iaburg WHP, Indiana WDAD, Johnstown WARD, Phila- 
delphia WCAU Pillsburgh-McKeosport WEOO, Reading WHUM, Scranton WGBI, Stale College WRSC. Sunbury WKOK, Uni n nlo~ n 
WMBS Willlamsport WWPA Rhode Island Providence WEAN South Carolina Anderson WAIM, Charleston WCSC, Columbla-Ceree 
WCAY Greenville WMRB, Spartanburg WSPA South Dakota Rapid City KOTA, Yankton WNAX Tennessee Chattanooga WOOD, Cooke- 
villo WHUB Johnson City WJCW, Knosville WNOX, Memphis WREC, Nashvillo WLAC Tans Austin KT8C, Corpus Chrlatl KSIX, 
Dallas KRLD El Paso KI2Z, Ha.lingan KGBT, Houston KTRH. Lubbock KFYO, San Antonio KMAC. Te.arkan. KOSY, Wichita Falls 
KWFT Utah Codar City KSUB, Salt lake City KSLVermonl Barro WSNO, Brattloboro WKVT Vlrginle Norfolk WTAR, Richmond WRNL. 

S£r32£5KSE2».K^ 

THE CBS RADIO NETWORK 



Flirty Perties: Rick Nelson and Tom 
Harmon's daughter Christine play- 
ing ring-around-a-rosy-finger? . . . 
Brother Dave gifted wife June Blair 
with a white mink stole . . . Dwayne 
Hickman, from his sick bed, ogling 
Carol Christensen . . . Connie 
Stevens giving equal time to Gary, 
Barry and Glenn — Clarke, Bezorian 
and Ford, that is! . . . Frank Sinatra 
whistling again at re-glamorized 
Nancy Sr. . . . while Juliet Prowse 
and manager Eddie Goldstone call 
off mixing business with pleasure. . . . 
Ronnie Burns and Helene Crane 
"thinking it over." . . . Gardner Mc- 
Kay twisting with MM. . . . Geral- 
dine Brooks — who said "never again" 
saying "maybe" to Fredd Wayne. 



Sbpl Look! 
TV fioMo I^jjuuvl 

ail ^At 'wm's ~$)dk\ 

by EUNICE FIELD 



Teen Topics: Tony 
Dow and Brenda Scott 

— 'both I 7 — have 
been holding hands. 
And Tony has been 
trying to land Brenda 
a steady part in "Leave 
It to Beaver." . . . Holly- 
wood teens now have their 
own nitery, "The Peppermint 
Stick." It features danc- 
ing, pizzas, burgers and 
soft drinks. "It's dar- 
ling," chirps Dodie 
Stevens. Owner 
Dave Rosen vows to 
spread the idea 
all across the country. 



Careering Along: Robert Culp once 
felt "Trackdown" scripts cramped his 
style — now he has writer's cramp, de- 
veloping his own scripts. His "Rifle- 
man" two-parter will open that series' 
fifth season. . . . Warner Bros, dropped 
Anthony Eisley from "Hawaiian Eye" 
— but the howls from his many fans are 
giving him quite a lift. . . . Bob 
Mitchum's son Jim goes TV in a 
"Have Gun — Will Travel" and Lisa 
Lu, the show's Hey Girl, will beautify 
"The Ugly American" alongside Mar- 
lon Brando Hugh O'Brian, who's 

dated queens and stars aplenty, will 
settle for one to love, honor, etc. 
Meanwhile, he's making his first really 
big movie, MGM's "Champagne 

t Flight." A royal-type launching! 

v 




Naming Names: The same day Doug 
McClure checked out of "Check- 
mate," he signed for "The Virginians." 
Along with Lee J. Cobb, Gary 
Clarke and Jim Drury, he'll star in 
the 90-minute color series. . . . The 
trouble some men have finding their 
wallets when the bill is presented has 
been christened "shell-out falter" by 
Don Rickles . . . Mario Thomas and 
Ron Harper, touring in summer stock, 
yumming it up "Under the Yum Yum 
Tree." . . . Memo to G.J.: Most TV 
writers get names for characters from 
road maps. Examples: Warren (Ga.) 
Denvers (Mass.) and Mi lion (Vt.) 
Platte (S.D.). This gimmick insures 
against lawsuits by people whose 
names accidentally pop up in scripts. 



Overhearing Things: 

At launching rites 
of Hugh Hefner's 

ten - million - dollar 

Playboy Club, hotel 

and office building on 

Sunset Strip — "If she wears 

her neckline any lower and 

her hemline any higher, she'll 

have the dandiest waist- 

cincher you ever saw!" .. . 

At the SHARE party 

— "Marty Milner and 

George Maharis are 

the Mary Worth and 

Little Orphan Annie 

of the highways." But 

a little bit sexier, hmm? 



Oh, the Legals, They Fly High: 

In '62, TV doctors had a ball. In '63, 
lawyers will get their chance. With 
"The Defenders" a smash and "Perry 
Mason" A-OK, new courtroom dramas 
will appear on the TV scene. Two ex- 
amples: Joseph Cotten in "For the 
Defense" and Edmond O'Brien in 
"Sam Benedict." Ed — proud papa of a 
first son — has been haunting San Fran- 
cisco to get the lowdown on trial tricks 
of famed Jake Erhlich, after whom 
the new television series is modeled. 



Echoes of Emmy: Worried comic Don 
Knotts frowns, "Now that I won it 
again, I keep asking myself where do 
I go from here?" . . . Fearful "heavy" 
Peter Falk — whose emoting also won 
him an Emmy award — admits, "That 
walk from my table to the mike was 
the loneliest, longest journey I've ever 
made. By the time I reached my des- 
tination, I'd forgotten my carefully 
prepared speech of thanks!" . . . Mean- 
while, a jobless, nameless actor moans, 
"If Oscar married Emmy and they 
had a thousand offspring, I still 
couldn't get a job baby-sitting!" . . 
But New York TV is gloating: Swank 
Sardi's East has honored it — and the 
Academy of TV Arts and Sciences 
— with a namesake "Emmy" Room. 



12 



The Rising Generation: To critic 
Richard Coe of Washington, D.C., 
Bob Hope was far from "Critic's 
Choice" when he made personal ap- 
pearances there. But Ski-Nose's 21- 
year-old Tony copped raves from Coe 
for his staging of a Georgetown U. 
production. Young Hope — studying 
law, with no itch to follow in dad's 
footsteps — promptly mailed Bob the 
review, kidding: "If you try to make 
a comeback on my name, I'll sue!" 
Quipped Dad: "Hope was never a 
private name — it was always owned by 
the world." . . . Gene Kelly, starring 
in TV's new "Going My Way," reports 
his first son — Timothy, born March 
3rd — is a "born kicker, bound to be- 
come a song-and-dance man like me." 

1*n> »-> m-+ *»-> 
One Good Turntable Deserves An- 
other: Latest prank is to annoy crank 
neighbors by buying a laugh-and-talk 
record and tuning up the speaker. It 
gives the effect of a wild party — and 
baffles the snoops, when they find no 
parked cars or guests around. But what 
if said snoops retaliate by buying a 
disc with a loud siren and a police 
voice saying, "You're all under arrest"? 
. . Ty Hardin — with blond hair yet — 
too busy playing the field to note that 
is ex, Andra Martin, has wed . . . Mike 
nsara's "Infidel Caesar" Broadway 
ebut went blooey when the play 
olded before opening. But Mike's com- 
ensated. Revue's whipping up a 
series for him in the medical field. 




Wedding bells for Chris and Rick? 




Broadway Medley: At Zero Mos- 
tel's "A Funny Thing Happened, etc.," 
Sam Jaffe and wife Bettye Acker- 
man had a reunion with their old pal. 
"Gone Hollywood with a swimming 
pool, huh?" growled Zero. Shrugged 
Sam, "It's only an itsy pool — your 
avoirdupois couldn't fit in it." Roared 
Zero, "You have gone Hollywood! A 
year ago, you'd have said 'big fat car- 
cass.' Now it's avwah-doo-pwah." . . . 
Lady to gent, at Jason Robards Jr.'s 
"A Thousand Clowns": "What do you 
like most about Robards?" Gent to 
lady: "Bacall." . . . Grandma, leaving 
"How to Succeed, etc.": "It isn't that 
I used to enjoy Rudy Vallee more in 
the old days — it's just that I enjoyed 
myself more." Ain't it the truth? 



Darlene Lucht with blond Ty. 



Polly, Poppa & Pee-pul: "Honey, let's 
sing for the pee-pul," said Bill Bergen 
to daughter Polly, striking a chord on 
ye olde gee-tar. And a city-slicker 
crowd at the Las Vegas Dunes was 
moved to cheers when they sang such 
country classics as "Shall We Gather 
at the River" and "My Buckteethed 
Love." Proved to be the highlight of 
pretty Poll's great act. "He taught me 
all I know," she glowed. With the sim- 
plicity that has charmed rustic crowds 
in Tennessee for years, Bill answered, 
"I'm proud of you, daughter." Besides 
making music for the pee-pul, Bill helps 
manage Polly's dress business — which 
may go to 300 shops by 1963. All this 
and a best-selling beauty book, too! 



How's That Again? Lady lawmaker 
who's trying to bar Liz Taylor from 
returning to the U.S.A. — on a morals 
tut-tut — is named, of all things, Blitch! 
. . . Wonder horse Trigger making TV 
comeback with that American institu- 
tion, Roy Rogers, starting Sept. 29th. 
. . . Mickey Rooney is the latest to do 
a book. Does he tell all about his ex- 
wives? "All that is printable," grins 
Mickey. . . . Fans get their wish when 
Dick Powell and June Allyson do 
an all song 'n' dance show on his 
series. . . . And it will be a great day 
in the evening, Sept. 24th, when CBS 
teams five of its stars — Jack Benny, 
Danny Thomas, Lucille Ball, Andy 
Griffith and Garry Moore. That's 
some parlay on anybody's network. 



_ 




Benny and Lawford swap news. 



Bye Bye Buddy: Dick Van Dyke, 

top banana of Columbia's "Bye Bye 
Birdie," was on set when he got a 
message from his answering service. 
Said the operator, "One of your gag 
writers must talk to you at once. When 
I asked if it was important, he screamed, 
'Go down the hall, pass the door 
marked Crisis, then walk through the 
one marked Panic. You'll see me on 
the Titanic facing two icebergs!' " Dick 
chuckled, "Tell him the ship won't go 
down till tonight — I'll be sure to call 
him then." A few moments later, she 
rang back. "I told him the ship would 
keep till tonight and you'll talk to him 
then. Next, I heard a loud splash — and 
him mumbling glub, glub, glub. Then 
there was silence. . . ." That's all . . . 



13 












■AT* 






*■ 



Hs 



3(821 



*?k fe 



mm 



vM 



Perhaps it was the bright spot- 
lights that made Eddie Fisher blink 
and then nib his eyes. Or perhaps it 
was the enthusiasm and warmth of 
his reception. He had only wanted 
lo do his bit. And so, without any 
fanfare, he had made this surprise 
appearance at the annual party for 
Share, a group of Hollywood wives 
who stage a yearly benefit for han- 
dicapped children. He had never 
expected anything like this. A thou- 
sand people, crowded into the Mou- 
lin Rouge night club, jumped to 
their feet, applauding . . . cheering. 

And among all these people wel- 
coming Eddie home was Debbie 
Reynolds, his former wife. 

Slowly, the thunderous ovation 
quieted and the audience found 
their seats again. Debbie fixed her 
eyes on Eddie. He was smiling — 
that shy, boyish grin that had not 
changed through the years. Yet, in 
other ways, she could see how much 
he had changed. He was much thin- 
ner, for one thing. And for another, 
there were (Please turn the page) 






BnHm 

WmSfflam 



'mm 



mm. 



i 



little lines under his eyes — lines of worry and of strain — 
which his deep suntan and his shy smile couldn't quite 
conceal. 

He said something about "what a difference a few thou- 
sand miles makes," but his attempt at lightness didn't 
quite come off. 

A chorus of yells went up from the audience. "Sing 
'Arrivederci Roma.' 'Arrivederci Roma.' Sing 'Goodbye 
Rome.' " 

Eddie paled under his tan and he shook his head no. 
But the shouts continued. " 'Arrivederci Roma.' 'Arrive- 
derci Roma.' " (Eddie had recently admitted that the title 
of the song is "meaningful." He explained, "It means the 
end of a wonderful love.") 

Debbie, of all people, must have known what Eddie was 
feeling. For it had all happened to her, too. It was all 
crazy and jumbled up, as if Fate, having played a mean 
trick on her, had now turned around and was playing 
exactly the same trick on Eddie. 

Far away and long ago, she, Debbie, had been married 
to Eddie. One moment she was secure in her love for him — 
and their mutual love for Carrie and baby Todd. Then 
the next moment . . . the next moment, without warning, 
she was sitting alone in her living room, alone although 
she was surrounded by a mob of reporters to whom she 
was mouthing words. Actually, she was talking to herself, 
trying to explain to herself what had happened. "... I 
didn't believe it until he told me himself. Then I had to 
believe it." 

And now it had hap- 
pened again. Like a re- 
make of an old picture. 
New characters. New 
scenes. Same plot. The 
scene: Rome. The charac- 
ters : Eddie Fisher and Eliz- 
abeth Taylor, man and 
wife. One moment Eddie 
was secure in his love for 
Elizabeth — and their mu- 
tual love for the boys, 
Mike and Chris, and the 
girls, Liza and baby 
Maria — a love so deep 
that Eddie was able to 

say confidently, "Take it from me, our marriage will last 
forever." Then the next moment . . . the next moment, 
Eddie is alone in a crowd of reporters to whom he is 
mouthing the words, "I love her — I love her more than 
ever," as if by stating his feelings emphatically he could 
somehow, make her, Elizabeth, keep loving him, too. 

It must be almost the same for Eddie as it had been for 
her. Knocking herself out during the day on the set. 
Knocking herself out at night doing benefit performances. 
Killing herself so that she might kill her memories. Driving 
herself mercilessly until she'd fainted on the set one day 
and they'd shipped her off to a hospital. 

Eddie had also been in a hospital. The papers called 
it a "nervous breakdown" caused by the collapse of his 
marriage. His friends had insisted he was "just plain ex- 
hausted." 

Eddie had also thrown himself into work, recording 
songs, trying to prove to himself and the world that he 
wasn't just "Mr. Elizabeth Taylor," even while disc 
jockeys were announcing, "And now we'll play Elizabeth 
Taylor's latest release," and then playing old Eddie Fisher 
records. 

Eddie had also knocked himself out to appear at the 
Friars dinner in honor of comedian Joe E. Lewis even 
when he just wanted to run away somewhere and hide. He 
disappeared when he saw all the newspapermen waiting 
for him, and then courageously came back. His face was 
as white as the cloth on the head table and his hands 



THE MIGHT EDDIE 



{Continued) 



clenched and unclenched spasmodically as toastmaster 
Milton Berle introduced him from the dais: ". . . Here's a 
little guy with a big voice and a big heart. We all love 
him and respect him, Friar Eddie Fisher." 

Eddie had spoken for less than thirty seconds. His words 
hardly carried beyond the first row of tables. He'd fum- 
bled with his glasses, and at one point he choked up and 
could not continue. 

And now, in the big ballroom of the Moulin Rouge, the 
crowd was screaming for Eddie to sing "Arrivederci 
Roma," a song of love and of parting, and Eddie was 
shaking his head no. All at once he raised his hands, 
palms out, and the crowd was silent. 

Eddie wet his lips. Someone coughed. A few people 
ssh-ed. Then the music began and Eddie's voice, strong 
and sure, sang "You Made Me Love You." An old song. 
A slow song. A sad song. A special song. 

A special song for Debbie. A song Eddie used to sing 
back when they first met on the set of "Athena." A special 
song for Debbie. A song Eddie used to sing when they first 
started dating. . . . And on their third date, the night 
Eddie proposed . . . "You Made Me Love You." 

A special song for Debbie. A song Eddie used to sing 
when they were first married. . . . On their honeymoon . . . 
in their first house together ... for baby Carrie . . . and. 
later, for little Todd Emanuel. First love, unforgettable 
love, unshadowed love. . . . "You Made Me Love You." 
The applause broke like thunder. More than $100,000 

had already been raised 
for mentally retarded chil- 
dren by the time Eddie 
came on, but his unex- 
pected appearance sparked 
over thirty thousand ex- 
tra dollars. 

One of the guests of- 
fered $500 if Eddie would 
sing "Oh My Papa," and 
this time he didn't falter 
for a second. Confidently, 
he launched into the song. 
A sentimental song of a 
child's love for its father 
and a father's love for his 
child. A sentiment Debbie 
understood. She'd said, "I've brought Carrie and Todd up 
to respect and adore Eddie. They will always love him as 
you love only your father." 

That's what had accidentally brought them together 
again tonight, she in the audience and Eddie up on stage. 
Their love of kids. Not only their own kids, but less 
fortunate children, too. 

After he finished singing "Oh My Papa," Eddie plunked 
down exhausted in a seat next to Edie Adams, Ernie 
Kovacs' widow. A little while later, Debbie and Harry 
left, hand in hand. She couldn't stay too late. An ex- 
pectant mother needs plenty of rest. 

A few days later, Debbie read about Eddie's triumphant 
official return to the singing stage at the Cocoanut Grove. 
"Electric . . . exciting, he stopped the show colder than 
a faithless wife's heart . . ." 

None of the raves surprised Debbie. After all, she had 
heard Eddie's voice herself a few nights before at the 
Share party . . . the night when, as memories of a young 
first love came flooding back, Eddie stole back into her 
heart. And even in those horrible days right after they 
had split up, she'd said: "... I don't know of a better 
singer. God gave Eddie a gifted voice, and if I'm right, 
the public is wrong if they don't flock to hear him. If a 
talent can't survive and overcome something the public 
doesn't approve of, then the public is wrong." 

And Debbie was right. Hers was not the only heart 
Eddie found his way back to that night. — James Hoffman 



16 






ON THE RECORD 



• It's not often you'll find me writing 
about someone who doesn't like to be 
written about. Bobby Darin is that 
someone — quite an argumentative point, 
but Bobby is quite justified, generally 
speaking! 

Your reviewer, for one, has seen 
some hopelessly misguided approaches 
to Bobby's attitudes and personality in 
print. You won't find me stretching 
things or distorting them. Aside from 
accompanying and arranging for Bobby 
on occasion, I consider him a friend. 

He has his edges. There are things 
that bother the mildest of us, and Bobby 
is no exception. Unfortunately, a per- 
former's private life is public record. 
This easily becomes a thorn to many 
performers, who can hardly put a han- 
kie to their noses without someone 
starting a rumor that they are "down 
with pneumonia"! 

Bobby works as hard to please his 
audience as any performer I've heard 
or played for. His source of energy is 
his desire to be as good as he can — to 
develop every area he feels is native 
to his diverse talents. 

In the business, Bobby is what you 
call "heart": If you cut his throat, 
he'd figure a way to sing through the 
opening. The great misconception about 
Bobby is that he's a "toughie," with 
little or no humility. But here I think 
the surface isn't up to telling the story. 

The enigma is the product and the 
process. Having spent more than half 
my own life in the entertainment busi- 
ness, I can assure you there are easier 
axes to grind. (Contrary to what some 
journals would have you believe.) To 
push, to drive, to open your heart — and, 
in general, expose yourself to the pub- 
lic — is not the easiest thing to do in life. 

The process is a difficult one to live. 
An awful lot of work goes into every 
recording, every night-club engagement, 
to say nothing of the time spent laying 
things out for a television show. It's 
incredibly time-consuming. (Some per- 
formers turn around one day and find 
that the whole of life has got away 
from them during the process.) 



AUGUST 1962 

Bobby Scott 
Music Editor 



The rub is the "double standard" 
forced upon performers. They must 
beam, no matter how bad dinner was, 
how long the band rehearsal dragged 
on, or whether their child — who catches 
a cold like everyone else— kept them up 
all night with nursing. 

There are no exceptions to the rule 
that the lid has to blow off periodi- 
cally. Bobby, contrary to what is said 
about him in a great many cases, seems 
to have a good grasp of the problems 
the entertainment business has dropped 
in his lap. He always knows, firmly, 
what he wants in back of himself musi- 
cally. He has the happy faculty of 
enjoying other performers — I hasten to 
add, "who are talented." Make no mis- 
take that anyone who is as critical 
about himself, as Bobby is, could be 
easy with his peers! 

He's a wealth of information and 
advice. Very strongly does he hold 
his opinions. Believes emphatically in 
his own talent. That is the reason he 
is where he is today. A sage once 
said: Ten-percent talent, ninety-per- 
cent sweat. Work, hard work, never 
frightens those ready for it. Bobby has 
always "paid his dues," to cite a col- 
loquialism. He's beat the process, he 
has his product. 

The question that always remains is: 
Do we enjoy the product, or is picking 
the process apart the answer? There 
are many gifts performers give heartily 
and lovingly. Do we take them in, en- 
joy them and reflect upon being en- 
riched? Or do we want what we 
shouldn't expect and what can never 
be given — even by those people whose 
lives are at least partially an open 
book? 

Entertainers are to be enjoyed. They 
are not running for public office. The 
height of serving is giving your best. 
I've known hardly any performers who 
do not hold to this. Bobby is no excep- 
tion. I enjoy him immensely and you, no 
doubt, enjoy him immensely. But what 
you may not know is: He keeps faith 
with your trust. He gives his best. And, 
most important, he enjoys you, too! 



T 
V 
R 

17 




Voc#f- Monthly ON RECORD Guide* 



POPULAR 

•••Can't Help Falling in Love, 

The Lennon Sisters (Dot) — The Len- 
non Sisters are competent young ladies. 
Musically, their department isn't a very 
difficult one, but they do inject the per- 
sonal quality into what they perform. 
This quality is their edge. 

I don't hold with watering down the 
harmonies of a Victor Young tune to 
give it market value, but the girls do 
not make a career out of over-dramatiz- 
ing this simple approach. They always 
seem comfortable. They rarely exceed 
their vocal range, and that has the tend- 
ency to make one tune sound very much 
in the same groove as the one which 
preceded it — but it also has power to 
unify their total approach. 

The songs are all reasonably first- 
rate: "When I Fall in Love," "Moon 
River" and the title tune, to mention 
a few of them. The girls' musical atti- 
tude is deceptive. In this package, I 
think they were shooting for low-keyed, 
subtle expressions. And they got them. 
It's not my cup of tea — but then, again, 
they're persuasive. 

•••Latin and Hip, The Brothers 
Castro (Capitol) — Well if you don't 
think they're swinging, down Mexico 
way, you'd better tune in to this album. 
These chaps are really something else! 
Very much in the Four Freshmen — 
Hi-Lo's groove, they bring a Latin 
flavor which, at the outset, seems a bit 
incongruous to a lot of smart material, 
but they hurdle all the obstacles. The 
blend is wonderful. The highest voice 
in the group has an intriguing sound 
like a siren. 

The harmonies they run through are 
hardly simple. Rich would be more like 
it. They have a very wide range of 
dynamics which is shown to advantage. 
The tunes are all vintage : "I'll Remem- 
ber April," "Serenata," "Angel Eyes," 
the enchanting arrangement of "Sum- 



lllil 



y '■'■■ 



m^mmismium 



mertime, 



Terdido" — which cooks 



along in a highly Latin-swing fashion. 
This is a group to watch. Full of 
fire, talent, capable of finding a fresh 
way to do an old tune, and obviously 
enjoying what they are doing to the 
utmost. Ole! Olel 




\ 



&&Ww 



uumi 



TWISTF 

flOllIB 

in 





•••The Best of The Kingston 
Trio (Capitol "Starline")— This is a 
beaut of a compilation! All the win- 
ners: "Tom Dooley," "M.T.A ," "Where 
Have All the Flowers Gone," "A Wor- 
ried Man," "Scotch and Soda," to name 
a few. See what I mean? There's 
hardly much to say about these oft- 
heard hits, other than that, one after 



another, they are gangbusters. Humor 
is here, too! (The "Merry Minuet" is 
ridiculously funny.) As usual, the mu- 
sicianship is first-rate. 
An awfully good buy. 

•Twistin' Round the World, Chub- 
by Checker (Parkway) — Well, this is 
the capper ! Here's a mediocre idea, done 
in a mediocre fashion. For this reviewer, 
nothing happens here. In fact, the band 
doesn't even swing! The tunes are bru- 
tally beaten into something resembling 
a fourth-rate pop tune. Where the tune 
cannot be so nicely fitted, we hear Chub- 
by attempting to sing them in a 
straighter style. 

"Hava Nagela" gets a better-than- 
the-rest treatment, but "0 Sole Mio," 
"Alouette," "Miserlou" and the rest 
find difficult going! 

•••For Teen Twisters Only, 

Chubby Checker (Parkway) — Now 
here we find Chubby in his own back- 
yard ! This album is a cooker ! It's good 
for dancing and partying. The tunes in- 
clude "The Peppermint Twist," "Run- 
around Sue" and a gang of others all 
calculated to disarrange your vertebra. 

Chubby as a performing artist is be- 
yond the proper evaluation. He's sort of 
an aberration on the music scene. We 
shall wait, watch and see how he de- 
velops. 

As the Twist fades into the sun, we 
may discover his talent is much bigger 
than is currently being expressed. Time 
tells all. For you dancin' fools, this 
album has that twistin' message, so just 
go and buy it and — commence to 
wiggle! 

CLASSICAL 

••••Paul Whiteman Conducts 
George Gershwin, Leonard Pennario, 
pianist — "Rhapsody in Blue," "An 
American in Paris" (Capitol) — The 
premature death of George Gershwin 
left the American musical scene in a 
dither. The dither still remains, to a 
degree. No American opera, in your 
reviewer's humble opinion, has matched 
"Porgy." The only composer on Broad- 
way carrying the Gershwin mantle is 
Harold Arlen. whose successes have 



18 



-K-K-K-K GREAT! 
-K-K-K GOOD LISTENING 



^C-K FAIR SOUNDS 
-K IT'S YOUR MONEY 






not been numerous. Of course, many 
landmarks have occurred in music for 
the concert hall. But Gershwin, I'm 
sure — alive and growing — would have 
broadened even that area. 

These works, though familiar enough, 
have not lost their lustre. (Particular- 
ly the "American in Paris" opus.) 
These pieces are permeated with blues. 
Not the garden variety, but Gershwin's 
own special brand. A highly sophisti- 
cated type. The performances are very 
good. Pennario rarely has great prob- 
lems with any piano literature. (He is 
certainly underrated.) Whiteman, al- 
though no conductor in the classical 
sense of the word, carries his end credit- 
ably. The sound is good. (Mono.) 

Gershwin should be in everybody's 
collection. He's part of the American 
dream. From the tenement to world- 
wide renown in the musical world. It's 
indeed unfortunate that he didn't get 
the time to give us more of his personal 
look at ourselves: He knew us so well. 

***Romeo and Juliet Overture 
and Till Eulenspiegel's Merry 
Pranks, Tchaikovsky — Richard 
Strauss ; Charles Munch cond. The Bos- 
ton Symph. Orch. (RCA Victor) — 
Charles Munch is very sympathetic in 
his handling of the Tchaikovsky mas- 
terpiece, "Romeo and Juliet." The nat- 
ural build in the very opening is very 
effectively brought off. In making the 
first statement of theme material, the 
strings make its meaning come to the 
front through striking, articulated 
playing, without a noticeable forte. 
Munch also plays down the first state- 
ment of the lyrical theme. All in all, it's 
sensitively done. 

"Till," which is possibly Strauss' most 
important work, is a most interesting 
orchestrating wonder. It's full of the 
kind of writing only a master can come 
up with. Strauss, who was a marvelous 
pianist and a greatly underrated con- 
ductor, knew the orchestra from many 
angles. The materials never become ob- 
scure, no matter how profuse the color 
and action effects. Munch and the or- 
chestra seem to enjoy "Till," and well 
they should — it's a player's piece. If by 
some chance the pieces are not in your 
collection, I suggest you look into them. 








JAZZ 

****I Had the Craziest Dream, 

Manny Albam Orch. (RCA Victor) — 
This is surely one of the most charm- 
ing examples of taste I've come across 
in a while. It's chock-full of tidbits of 
adventurous sounds, plus the jazz play- 
ing of such-calibre musicians as Phil 



Woods and Bob Brookmeyer, Joe New- 
man and Clark Terry. 

The orchestra varies from the lush 
strings, sitting blanket-style and em- 
bracing the saxophone of Woods, to a 
shouting band fully equipped with 
brass, to a smaller brass ensemble 
which utilizes French horn and tuba. 

The writing is all jazz-orientated, but 
don't let that scare you jazz-shy people. 
It also embraces the best points of the 
"big band" tradition and the melody is 
in evidence. 

The tunes are all in the dream cate- 
gory: "I Can Dream," "A Kiss to Build 
a Dream On," "Wrap Your Troubles in 
Dreams," "Darn That Dream" — which 
features Brookmeyer's trombone and 
Miriam Workman's obligato voice line, 
sans lyric, and a shoutin' Woods solo. 

It always says something, this album. 
Good arrangements, first-rate players, 
good tunes and what more can I tell 
you? Manny Albam deserves his name 
on the front, too! He's done a great 
deal of wonderful creating and, to my 
knowledge, has never received the ac- 
ceptance due him. Recommended. 

****Jazz Samba, Stan Getz and 
Charlie Byrd (Verve) — To my mind, 
the biggest jazz pleasure of late has 
been the re-activated recording schedule 
of Stan Getz. Though he has always 
been a consistently first-rate jazz play- 
er, his few years' absence from the 
American jazz scene threw open wide 
the doors for a whole lot of new tenor- 
saxophone talent and his work was 
pushed into the background. 

In all honesty, Stan was, for some 
time, making recordings which were 
devoid of a unifying idea. Recently, he 
changed direction. He recorded an al- 
bum for Verve called "Focus," with a 
string ensemble. (The writing was done 
by Eddie Sauter.) This was his first 
departure of significance in a great 
while. It was all original Sauter ma- 
terial, constructed tightly but leaving 
room for Stan to improvise — without 
leaving him the burden of sustaining 
a unified whole. The writing stood on 
its own. And Stan, not pressed to create 
new edifices, just relaxed and floated. 
It is, by far, one of the most outstand- 
ing jazz albums. (Please turn the page) 



t 19 




ON THE RECORD 



Vocjf JVforitfilv ON RECORD Guid& 



20 



But here we find another direction. 
The Samba ! A fresh look at some Latin 
music, with the added plus of Stan's 
improvisation and the guitar-playing of 
Charlie Byrd. This album, as con- 
trasted with "Focus," is narrow. It's 
essentially an improvising album. Of 
course, the instrumentation of the group 
and the quality of the musical material 
offset the confined area. (Guitar, bass, 
two drummers and Stan.) 

On the whole, it's a rather enjoyable, 
non-hostile jazz effort. That, in itself, 
makes it unique. With so much — if 
you'll pardon me — marching going on, 
this flowing, warmly Latinesque, har- 
monically honest and intensely lyrical 
journey is a breath of fresh air. The 
titles are unimportant. They are, I 
gather, popular Latin vehicles. All are 
charming in their simplicity. The whole 
venture proves the universality of music. 
Recommended. 

**-fcBashin' : The Unpredictable 
Jimmy Smith (Verve) — Jimmy Smith 
is one heck of a talent. He is also able 
to bridge the gap to the hit-record 
charts. (His single record of "Walk on 
the Wild Side" — which, incidentally, 
was grabbed from this album — is doing 
very well.) 

This latest effort of Jimmy's is chock- 
full of gems. One side of the album 
finds Jimmy rumblin' with a big band. 
The arrangements — written by a largely 
underrated writer-saxophonist, Oliver 
Nelson — are played brittle-bright by a 
host of great jazz players: Phil Woods, 
Urbie Green, George Duvivier, Joe 
Wilder and Joe Newman among them. 
These big-band sides include the smash- 
ing "Walk on the Wild Side," "Old 
Man River" and "Step Right Up," 
among others. 

Side two features Jimmy's trio. This 
side almost steals the show. The beau- 
tiful and touchingly blue "Beggar for 
the Blues" is murder! "Bashin'," the 
title tune, is followed by — and I'm not 
kidding— "I'm an Old Cowhand." If it 
seems strange, it doesn't sound that way. 
It all cooks! Jimmy is the past mas- 
ter of the blues, truly the first real 
"jazz giant" of the organ, and always a 
pleasure and a delight to listen to. 
Much of the message resides in his 
own talented, flying fingers! 



***The Sweetest Swingin' Sounds 
of "No Strings," arr. and cond. by 
Billy May (Capitol) — It appears that 
when a talent like Billy May under- 
takes an album — even when the mate- 
rial is the worst example of Richard 
Rodgers' writing — he brings it off in 
that wonderful May-ish way. 

Billy is one of the few arrangers 



1E1PIEDHE 




1 >„.^>« . 








THE iwi&Mt'"- 
\ NEWEST 
f SOUND 


*'■€££»£•; 


sv:sr 


*ffe 


: r 




■; 




I 


J 


1 





around capable of injecting humor, 
warmth, vitality, into almost every one 
of his recording ventures. He uses a 
big band's instrumentation as if he 
had discovered it! Here we find a set- 
tled feeling prevailing, with occasional 
shouts from the brass. I think, though, 
humor is the call for the day. And no 
one exceeds Billy at that trick. Also, 
herein are a few saxophone solos of 
merit and the presence of the mighty 
May swing! 

All I can say is, Richard Rodgers 
ought to be happy about this album. 
His music from this show has hardly 
been recorded any better. Included: 
"No Strings," "Eager Beaver," "Look 
No Further," "Loads of Love," and 
eight more of the score. The stars are 
for Billy. 

*The Newest Sound Around: The 
Voice of Jeanne Lee— Ran Blake at 
the Piano (RCA Victor) — Anything 
is to be tried once. Well, ... it didn't 
happen. Here an approach quite, quite 
different from what one would expect 
— from a singer, plus a pianist, doing 
a lot of standards — shoots out at you 
trying to say something. Unfortunately, 
it's a vehicle only for the "in"-people. 
This album is the most successful 
attempt at obscurity I've heard yet. 
Modernity doesn't ever come under 
indictment by your reviewer, but, oh! — 
spare us this nonsense. Experiments are 
solely for science. There's only success 
or failure in art. 

SPECIAL 

****Billie Holiday: "The Gold- 
en Years" (Columbia) — Billie Holi- 
day is a legend because we are blessed 
so rarely with artists of her calibre. The 
individualism she possessed was titanic. 
The circle of admirers she had includes 
every jazz player of stature for the last 
thirty years. Everybody loved Billie — 
"Lady Day," as Lester Young dubbed 
her. She hurt no one in her whole life 
but herself. 

She was captivating, enchanting and 
irresistible. One night, your reviewer 
was playing in a jazz club in the Vil- 
lage, on New York's downside. I was 
rambling through "Willow Weep for 
Me" when I heard someone singing 



-K-K-K-K C Ft EAT! 
-+C-^ OOOD LISTENING 



-M< FAIR SOUNDS 
-+C IT'S YOUR MONEY 



from a table down front. At first, I had 
the feeling someone was having some 
fun at my expense. Then I heard that 
voice clearly and darned if it wasn't 
Lady Day! Well, right then and there. 
I turned the floor over to her. She 
wasn't just "hamming" it up; she 
wouldn't come up on the stage. Her re- 
tort was that she liked the way we were 
playing that tune and it was an old 
favorite of hers. She sang the tune from 
the table, finished it and uttered, "No 
more," fearing we should feel imposed 
upon. 

That was Lady Day. A beautiful hu- 
man being who fought a drug habit, a 
frail body, and had magnified insecuri- 
ties about her singing. Oh, if she only 
knew how appreciated she really was — 

This Columbia package of three LP's 
is a marvelous compilation of the Holi- 
day monuments. From "Your Mother- 
in-Law" (circa 1933) with the Benny 
Goodman band through to 1941 and ve- 
hicles such as "God Bless the Child"— 
which Billie wrote — "Love Me or Leave 
Me" and "Gloomy Sunday." The band 
personnel on these albums reads like a 
"Who's Who in Jazz"! 

You name them, they're here, com- 
plementing the master improviser her- 
self. 

The package is a chunk of history. 
A healthy chunk of inherent joy of 
playing jazz in those days. The car- 
ry over of the Cotton Club type of 
sophistication and ornamentation, and 
Lady Day in all her glory. Talking 
about love — the sad kind, the light 
kind, the supremely touching kind — 
or bubbling along, with the jazz giants 
keeping pace. For a collection to be 
without these is for it to be incomplete. 

Billie passed away with very little 
money or hope. Her grave had no stone 
to tell where the great lady rested for 
a year. Fortunately, a group of people 
held a benefit to raise the money for it. 
It seems ironic that the people she made 
so much money for were conspicuous 
by their absence at her untimely death. 

I treasure this package. Please go out 
and listen to it. The sound is the old 
sound of recordings made in the '30s 
and '40s, but no advances in technology 
can give you that heart: The heart of 
Billie Holiday. 



TOPS IN SINGLES 

1) All for the Love of a Girl/Old Kentucky Home, Al Harris 
(Capitol) — Both these sides are strong. The first side, "All for the Love," 
is the one that really kills your reviewer. The flip is a flying version of the 
Stephen Foster classic. No singing here. Just the tacky guitar-sounding 
piano with a big band. Should be a big one. 

2) Bluebird/These Are the Things, Jericho Brown (Chancellor) — 
"Bluebird" is the tough one. Same niche as Bobby Vee's efforts. Good ar- 
rangements, good shouting! The flip is a long shot. Watch for this one. 
It might take off! 

3) Wonderful Land/Stars Fell on Stockton, The Shadows (At- 
lantic) — "Wonderful Land" is a spacious piece bringing the quality of 
the Western movie theme to light. The flip side isn't in the running. Like 
our No. 1 record, this is an instrumental. 

4) Please Send Me Someone/ Another Dancing Pardner, Damita 
Jo (Mercury) — Both sides are very strong. In fact, it's hard to pick one. 
"Please Send Me" is a blues-type shout a la Dinah Washington, but Damita 
sets her own groove. And a walkin'-talkin' one, at that. Flip is country- 
style at the edges, with a cute lyric. Could be? 

5) The World's Greatest Man/Sweet Little Lovable You, Wink 
Martindale (Dot) — "Greatest Man" is clearly the stronger. Wink does a 
good job making known the fact! The flip is a fifty-to-oner. Watch "Great- 
est Man" — it'll get to the hit charts. 

6) Wild Flower/Express Train, Tico and the Triumphs (Amy) — 
This is for the kids. They'll shove it right up high on the hit chart. The 
lyric means next to nothing. "Flower" is sort of a Rocking Island song, 
of the Pacific variety. The flip is a traveling song, not quite as strong. 
The sound is what's happening these days. Look out. 

7) Yes, My Darling Daughter/ Sonny Boy, Eydie Gorme, Don 
Costa Orch. (Columbia) — All the earmarks of a big one, and Eydie's just 
about due for one. The groove of "Daughter" is somewhere between "Come 
On-A My House" and "Midnight in Moscow." Very strong Dixie back- 
drop. "Sonny Boy," the Jolson classic, is an added plus, but "Daughter" 
is the one you'll hear on radio. A goodie! 

8) Second Hand Love/Gonna Git That Man, Connie Francis 
(MGM) — "Second Hand Love" is in a wonderful groove, with Connie 
sitting right on top the proceedings, chirpin' away! The lyrics lay well. 
The tacky piano appears again in the orchestra. It's got to be a hit. Flip 
hardly stands up to "Love." 

9) Comin' Back to You/Mr. Hobbs, Richie Allen (Imperial) — 
"Comin' Back" is the sleeper this month. Sort of raggetty-type, guitar- 
playing, Western-theme-type material. I get a funny feeling listening to 
this. It keeps saying to me, "I'm gonna sneak in there." And well it 
might. Richie plays in the singing-guitar style. The background is nothing 
to shout about, but the melody has a charm. Flip is out of the running. 

10) "Route 66" Theme/Lolita Ya-Ya, Nelson Riddle Orch. (Capitol) 
— With all the exposure "Route 66" gets, anyway, this could mean some- 
thing. But the big side is "Lolita." Perfect for the market — right down 
to the chorus of girls' voices, cooking drums, clanging guitars and the 
repetitive theme. Ding-dong! 



21 







mm 



WSt 

¥§*?'■■ 






MAKERS 

IN THE 




■f 



mw 



Wis 



11 












1 Hfl 



.;:::. ' ,; '' : - ' ' 

■TflMltHfft 



1. Ann Bly+h, Debbie Reynolds (did you 
recognize her?), Marge Champion at 
the Thalian circus. 2. Tony Dow dating 
Brenda Scott. 3. Mr. and Mrs. Law- 
rence Welle meet Jay ("Dennis the 
Menace") North. 4. Judy Garland, 
who fled to London with Liza, Lorna 
and Joey, now faces a custody fight. 






THeM 



>iXR 



f /--' 








tUf "^ 




■■■■■'- 

WEBb 



mm 






5. Back from Europe, Connie Francis twists with Johnny 
Holliday, Joey Dee, Hank Ballard. 6. Jane Powell and Pat 
Nerney on family outing with Mono, Suzanne, Lindsey, 
Geary. 7. Rick Nelson's serious about Chris Harmon; Ozzie 
and Harriet approve. 8. Tommy Sands struts his Actors' 
Studio stuff in summer stock. Is that a "method" kiss? 




' 



h 




"I don't want to sound pom- 
pous or stuffy," said "Pajama 
Game's" Richard Adler, man- 
aging to sound both pompous 
and stuffy, "but the Madison 
Square Garden show to raise 
money for the Democratic Par- 
ty is another way of doing 
something for my country — 
outside of military service. 
And I've already done that." 
Showbiz always takes these as- 
surances with a grain of salt. 
. . . Time and again, ambi- 
tious people of showbusi- 
ness have worked every 
shrewd angle to establish 
such a White House con- 
nection. They covet it for ob- 
vious social and professional 
bonuses. ... So I would urge 
Pierre Salinger, now that he's 
returned, to tone down Adler. 
For instance, one star asked 
Adler to change the star's re- 
hearsal period at the Garden 
because it conflicted with his 
t TV rehearsal schedule. Thun- 
* dered Adler: "Is a TV show 



more important?" Said the 
star, simply: "Uh-huh." . . . 
Vince Edwards to wed 
Sherry Nelson. . . . Dave 
Garroway and Betty Furness 
resumed. . . . Eydie Gorme — 
Steve Lawrence named him 
Michael. . . . Vicki James, 
daughter of Betty Grable and 
Harry, and Keely Smith's bro- 
ther, Buster, bustin' out all 
over. ... A son for the Harry. 
Guardinos. . . . Ann Sothern 
and Bill Frye a duet. . . . Clif- 
ford Odets and Susan Oliver 
serious. . . . Johnny Mathis ser- 
enading Miriam Colon. . . . 
George Maharis and Inger 
Stevens something new. . . . 
Mrs. Johnny Carson getting a 
Mexican divorce. ... As re- 
sult of his smash, Louis Prima 
and Basin Street East ok'd 
$240,000 three-year deal. . . . 
Back in the early 1930s when 
I booked Louis Prima and his 
band for his first stage date at 
Loew's State, he always 
showed plenty of moxie. It's 



this same type of courage that 
enabled Prima to stage his 
fantastic hit at Basin Street 
East. That, plus his uncanny 
instinct for selecting unknown 
vocalists who promptly be- 
come sensations. . . . James 
Stewart gets Art Carney 
flicker role of "Take Her, 
She's Mine." . . . Mort Sahl 
and Anna Kashfi a twosome. 
. ... The Arnold (Bess Myer- 
son) Grants back from Euro- 
pean honeymoon. . . . Lori Nel- 
son Mann named the baby 
Lori. . . . Bob Hope's son, 
Tony, set for Harvard. . . . 
Doris Day's son, Terry, and 
Candy Bergen, Edgar's daugh- 
ter, an item. . . . Millie Perk- 
ins and Dean Stockwell sepa- 
rated. ... As you read in the 
gazettes, after Spyros Skouras 
had shown the rowdyish 20th 
Century-Fox stockholders 
twenty-one minutes of "Cleo- 
patra," predicted a $100 mil- 
lion gross, and sketched the 
expected harvest of Zanuck's 



"Longest Day," the stockhold- 
ers re-elected him as prexy. 
. . . Facing an operation. 
Skouras nevertheless taxed 
himself with five trips to Eu- 
rope to keep Liz from quitting 
the picture — then underwent 
surgery here at St. Luke's. . . . 
The Red Wests expecting 
(he's Presley's stand-in). . . . 
Anne Bancroft prefers Mel 
Brooks. . . . Jackie Gleason 
lost 45 pounds. . . . Carol 
Burnett and Richard Cham- 
berlain at Jilly's. . . . The Mike 
(Laraine Day) Grikhiles ex- 
pecting. . . . Hugh O'Brian 
switched to Dorothy Towns. 
. . . Robert Frost up for the 
1962 Nobel Prize. . . . "Gun- 
slinger's" Madlyn Rhue and 
Tony Young to marry. . . . 
Raymond Massey's daughter, 
Anna, and husband Jeremy 
Brett derailed. 

Published by permission of 
the Chicago Tribune — New 
York News Syndicate Inc. 



24 



-^ 




if 


IK 




■h 


^1 II ■ 


t^jU 




H v. ^J II 1 






D 


Mi 


RjQ 


nil 


H^ 1 


hill 


nil 



One look at TV's top doctors and the diagnosis is obvious : 
They're headed for the altar — and they're finding that 
half the fun is getting there ! Just turn the page and see ! 



SPECIAL T-PAGE SECTION 






- i 



\ i 




t 






First Ph®t®$8 
The GBrD Dock 
Tri@d Wo 





i&e 



A one-line item in a gossip column started the hottest rumor in Holly- 
wood. It also started a panic at the M-G-M studios where "Dr. 
Kildare" is filmed. Dick Chamberlain, it said, (Please turn the page) 



w 









First Photos!! 
The GGrD Dock 
Tried Tfo Me 

A one-line item in a gossip column started the hottest rumor in Holly- 
wood. It also started a panic at the M-G-M studios where "Dr. 
Kildare" is filmed. Dick Chamberlain, it said, (Please turn the page) 



■ 




Ws KteOftesO Kooooo®^ 



©DGtk GtaoOfltoOcSDGO 




®G[?®fiOw laffM 



has been secretly married for more 
than a year. If the item was true, 
there was no doubt who the girl 
was: She had to be Clara Ray. 

The studio was having a cor- 
porate nervous stomach as it 
moaned over the effects of having 
its new TV idol caught in a lie. 
Executives still haven't quite re- 
covered from the Yvette Mimieux 
caper. The same gossip column 
itemed, over a year ago, that she 
was secretly married. She had de- 
nied it, but the item turned out 
true. 

TV RADIO MIRROR knew that it 
was possible — even if not probable 
— that Dick and Clara were already 
married. Our double-checking sys- 
tem sprang into action. First, we 
tracked down Dick; we found him, 
still sleepy-eyed, reporting to the 
studio makeup department for an 
early-morning call. 

We put the question to him 
bluntly: "Are you and Clara mar- 
ried?" Dick woke up fast. "Are you 
serious?" he asked. We showed 
him the item. He stared at it for 
a long moment; then he broke into 
laughter. 

"It doesn't mention our chil- 
dren," he said between guffaws. 
"This item is hilarious. It's ridicu- 



continued 



lous." He was still laughing. 

Then, turning absolutely seri- 
ous, he said, "There is no truth 
to it whatsoever. I wonder why 
they'd print such a thing. They 
didn't check with me on it. When 
I get married, the whole world will 
know." 

Clara, too, denied the rumor, al- 
though she didn't think it was 



Rumor panicked everyone but Dick and Clara. 



28 





«£ 




Jm 


v . <T< t 


tl l£ 


,?tlL 


vMi 


WP ^ ^ 


v«T T n 


V J 


* "4J 


uM 


*Jt_ ^^fl 






I 


[** 


>. fl 






funny — even at first. She seemed 
puzzled as to why anyone would 
print such a thing without check- 
ing first. Her parents, as well as 
Dick's, maintained that no knot 
had been tied. 

A spot-check of the marriage 
license bureaus also failed to pro- 
duce any basis for the item. "Dick 
has taken out a license all right," 
one of his buddies cracked, "But 
it was a driver's license." 

Another close friend and TV as- 
sociate, Chuck Painter, remarked: 
"If Dick got married, it must have 
been in his sleep. I have been with 
him constantly since he became 
'Dr. Kildare.' I know where he lives. 
I know where Clara lives. It's not 
the same address." 

TV's hottest rumor checks out 
as false. The romance, though, is 
very much for real. It has been 
going on for some time — secretly 
— but, on the night of the Academy 
Awards, Dick brought it out into 
the open for the first time. 

He held Clara Ray's hand tight- 
ly as they stepped out of a limou- 
sine in front of the Santa Monica 
Civic Auditorium. Pandemonium 
broke loose. The thousands of 
spectators screamed wildly. The 
photographers' flashbulbs popped 



like machine-gun fire. Three high- 
school girls sitting together in the 
bleachers stretched forward for a 
better first look at Dick and Clara. 
They stretched too far, and started 
to fall to the ground six feet below. 
Two police officers grabbed them 
just in time. It was truly the big- 
gest reception of the night for any 
star. 

Those meeting Clara for the first 
time that night were quick to agree 
that Dick was a mighty lucky man. 
Even in a crowd of beautiful act- 
resses, she was outstanding. Clara, 
though, is no actress and doesn't 
want to be one. The twenty-one- 
year-old brunette has devoted 
years to preparing for a singing 
career. She prefers opera, but a 
year ago appeared at the Statler 
Hilton Hotel as a pop singer and 
later toured with Marie Wilson's 
nitery group. 

It was singing, in fact, that 
brought Dick and Clara together. 
Nearly three years ago, Dick re- 
ported for the start of a singing 
course at the Los Angeles Con- 
servatory of Music. At first, he 
hardly paid any attention to the 
girl sitting across the room. She 
was just another student in the 
class conducted by Carolyn Tro- 
janowski. 

However, as the weeks, months 
and then a year passed, Dick be- 
came fascinated with her talent — 
and her beauty. They found they 
had much in common: A hungry 
appetite for the arts, an apprecia- 
tion of the outdoors. They sipped 
coffee and chatted during class- 
room breaks; they took long walks 
together. 

Then Clara had to go on the 
road with a show and, overnight, 
Dick found himself a public idol 
as "Dr. Kildare." Yet they never 
irifted too far apart. Dick con- 




They have a secret that keeps them smiling. 



tinued to study twice a week at the 
conservatory. 

Suddenly, last September, they 
discovered it could be love. They 
appeared in a duet number at one 
of the showcase performances that 
the school stages once a year. It 
wasn't the first duet they had sung 
together, but after that night their 
dating was on a steady basis. 

Few knew about it, though. They 
never appeared in night clubs or 
at premieres. They enjoyed spend- 
ing what free time Dick had from 
filming at Malibu, walking hand in 
hand along the beach, or hiking 
in the Santa Monica Mountains. 
Or they would throw a small party 
for school friends. Or Dick would 
put on the horn-rimmed glasses 
he uses as a disguise and they 
would go to a movie or an opera. 
Success is still very new to Dick, 
and he often feels embarrassed 
when autograph hounds catch him 
in the middle of shopping for cold 
cuts or buying toothpaste at the 



corner drugstore in the usual way. 

Clara, too, is unpretentious. 
Her background is similar to 
Dick's. Although born in Memphis, 
Tennessee, she is practically a na- 
tive of California (Dick is). Her 
parents moved to Eagle Rock when 
she was but a child. At Eagle Rock 
High, it became obvious to her 
classmates that she was someone 
special. She was the most popular 
girl in her class. The boys did 
everything but walk a fence, Tom 
Sawyer-style, to carry her books. 
She wasn't the least bit impressed. 
She dated whom she pleased, 
whether he was a football hero or 
the shy intellectual in her English 
class. 

Clara was a good, conscientious 
student. She even found time be- 
tween studying and voice lessons 
to participate in the drill team 
pageantry at all athletic events. 
When she graduated, she went on 
to Glendale City College. In 1956, 
her beauty and charm won her the 
title of Homecoming Princess. 

Yet nothing she had ever known 
could prepare her for the night of 
the Academy Awards when she 
stepped into the near-hysterical 
limelight with Dick. 

"I thought my dress was slip- 
ping off," she confided to Dick 
later. "I kept tugging it up. Then 
I realized it wasn't the dress at all. 
It was my knees. They were shak- 
ing so badly my gown was like a 
hula skirt." 

Clara frankly confessed that, if 
it weren't for Dick's arm around 
her waist, she would have fallen 
flat on her face. When the night 
was over, she couldn't sleep, she 
was still so tense with excitement 
from the crowd's overwhelming 
reception. Dick, too, tossed and 
turned the entire night; it was his 
first glimpse (Continued on page 86) 



29 



# • 



% • 



When Vince Edwards and Sherry Nelson are 
together, they seem to light up as if they were 
hearing bells -wedding bells. But for Vince, 
this is not a new sound. There was that girl 
in Japan, for instance, with whom he came 
so close to marriage ... And now? "I'm think- 
ing of getting married," he admits. "I go 
steady with a girl who is for marriage. That's 
natural. She's a woman." Vince is for it, too. 
-After all," says his best friend, "why else 
does a single fellow keep dropping in on a 
married guy with kids?" We think this 
friend has the best answer so far to: "When's 
the wedding?" For his story, turn to page73- 



f 



■ *■"> 






\-# 



f 



A reporter, something of an eager beaver, once asked the Lennons, "Have you ever 
felt that God's thumb had been turned down against you?" The singing sisters 
stared at him helplessly. They were a little shocked. Their father, Bill, smiled 
and intervened. "Why should they feel that way?" he said. "They haven't been 
taught to think of God as a Nero deciding life and death with His thumb. We Len- 
nons don't believe God plays games with the souls of people. If good things come 



Why do we pray? What do we believe? 
The Lennon Sisters — Peggy, Kathy and Janet- 
get some frank answers from their father 




THE DAY GO 



32 



our way, we're thankful for the blessings . . . but if something bad should happen, 
I'm sure we'd all take the view that there was a reason for it. We don't blame God 
and we don't argue with Him. ..." As a family, the Lennons would rather live 
their religion than talk about it. Sure and strong in their Catholic faith, tljey 
try to mingle devotion to the Church and observance of its rituals with, humility, 
tolerance and joy. It is forgotten now which of the (Continued on page 87 



^Pti*^-**J 



M j 



r. , 

x 



+ . 






• 



\ 



ANSWERED NO 



At the swank Port St. Lucie Country Club, Florida folk stared in surprise 




This wasn't the Como they'd expected to see! He seemed so different ... off TV. 



35 



At the swank Port St. Lucie Country Club, Florida 



f olk stared 



in surprise 




JJMM 




This wasn't the Como they'd expected to see! He seemed so different ... off TV. 



Slamming the ball more than two hundred yards, he permits himself the luxury of a smile. 




STOPPED 




"Nice guys finish last," said Leo the Lip. Less pessimistic prophets 
like to point to Perry Como as proof that it doesn't have to be so. It 
might be true in dog-eat-dog professional sports — but it couldn't be 
true of the ace song pro known as "the nicest guy in show biz." 

Per hasn't finished last for years . . . and watching him play golf 
down Miami way, you begin to understand why. "Nice guy," eh? There's 
nothing wishy-washy about this star in action! No casual shrugs when 
the ball just lips the cup ... no meek apologies. Here is a man who 
lines up every shot in deadly earnest . . . who whacks every drive as 
though sailing into a mortal enemy . . . who shoots a sizzling 78. 

This is Perry Como? 

Yes, this is Per today ... the same guy who looks so relaxed on TV — 
after he's lined up every shot in hard-working rehearsal. He may have 
been "just a nice guy" once. That's when he had his failures. Now he 
knows: You have to play-to-win ... in your career, as well as any game! 







36 



Just a game? Perry Como is obviously going for broke! 




Slamming the ball more than two hundred yards, he permits himself the luxury of a smile. ^ 




STOPPED BEING A 



"Nice guys finish last," said Leo the Lip. Less pessimistic prophets 
like to point to Perry Como as proof that it doesn't have to be so. It 
might be true in dog-eat-dog professional sports — but it couldn't be 
true of the ace song pro known as "the nicest guy in show biz." 

Per hasn't finished last for years ... and watching him play golf 
down Miami way, you begin to understand why. "Nice guy," eh? There's 
nothing wishy-washy about this star in action! No casual shrugs when 
the ball just lips the cup ... no meek apologies. Here is a man who 
lines up every shot in deadly earnest . . . who whacks every drive as 
though sailing into a mortal enemy . . . who shoots a sizzling 78. 

This is Perry Como? 

Yes, this is Per today ... the same guy who looks so relaxed on TV 

after he's lined up every shot in hard-working rehearsal. He may have 
been "just a nice guy" once. That's when he had his failures. Now he 
knows: You have to play-to-win ... in your career, as well as any game! 



36 




Just a game? Perry Como is obviously going for broke! 







"NICE GUV" 




37 





Efrem Zimbalist saw her first . . . 



Efrem Z. makes 



The dilemma of Peggy McCay 

When the triangle first took shape, 'twas the night 
after Christmas. And all through the house, creatures 
were not only stirring — they were Twisting! . . . 
The "house": Romanoffs. The date: December 26, 1961. 
The Twisters: Just about all the stars at the gala 
post-premiere party for Warner Bros.' "A Majority 
of One." . . . That's when Peggy McCay saw her 
chance. Peggy had plenty going for her. She'd been 
cast as the mother on ABC-TV's "Room for One 
More," and tonight she was out on a date with Efrem 
Zimbalist Jr. Now, Efrem is the calm, gentle- 
manly, pipe-smoking catch of a lifetime, as any self- 
respecting spinster knows. And Peggy had him all 
to herself. . . . But was she content to count her blessings? 
No! You see, beneath the lady-like veneer she wears 
on the screen, Peggy McCay harbors a secret vice: 
Get her near a dance floor and the lady just has 
to Twist. . . . She looked at Efrem, who was sitting 
contentedly across the table from her, a mildly 
amused expression on his face as he watched his fellow 
actors make pretzels of themselves. Obviously he 
didn't have any intention of asking her onto the dance 
floor for this number. Peggy looked at the Twisters, 
who were gyrating happily to the wild music, and sud- 
denly her feet started itching and her hips started 
twitching. Almost before she knew it, she found herself 
asking Efrem: "Say — how about it?" ... He took 
his pipe out of his mouth, looked at her with just a 
hint of surprise and — {Continued on page 78) 



But he wont twist, audi 



38 



her heart stand still 




Then she saw Rohert Q. Lewis! 



obert Q. witll 



f 




GRACIE ALLEN: 



xjLHI a 

Too Sick 

To Know 
The Truth 

About 

My S on? * 






z/rf 



~f 






& 




I 




V 



40 




The news stunned George Hitrns and Grade 




Like the others on the tranquil block in Beverly Hills, 
it's an older home. Like the others, it has been superbly 
maintained throughout the years. One warmish day this 
past spring, a woman peered bright-eyed out the large 
picture window of its spacious living room. The rosebuds 
in the garden yawned to a cloudless sky. The violets bor- 
dering the driveway were in full bloom. The leaves on the 
trees fluttered in a slight breeze. 

Truly, it was a gorgeous day. The woman in the big 
house had enjoyed many splendid days. Ones filled with 
love, happiness and success. Ones devoted to her family. 
Ones devoted to her husband. Ones devoted to her career. 

Gracie Allen indeed has had a fruitful life. But that 
day, when she turned from the window — and the past — 
she found herself face to face with the problems of the 
present. 

Ironically, that same week, her daughter Sandra had 
announced that her second marriage had failed. She was 
getting a divorce. The day before, Gracie had picked up 
a newspaper only to read that her son Ronnie was planning 
to marry a girl she had met only casually. There was a 
time when Sandra and Ronnie Burns relied on their 
parents for advice. No longer. Somehow, they had drifted 
away. They no longer shared their confidences. 

On February 19th, 1958, Gracie Allen had announced, 
with much emotion, that she was retiring from show busi- 
ness. The team of Burns and Allen would be no more. 
The reason she gave: "I want to have more time to see 
our children . . . our grandchildren." 

This undoubtedly was a prime factor for her retirement. 
Another was her health. Associates at the time confided 
"off the record" that Grade's health was slipping. A 
year ago, she entered Mt. Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles 
for what George described as a "virus condition." How- 
ever, friends whispered that it was her heart. 

Of late, Gracie seldom ventures far from the confines 
of her home. She's still as witty and charming as ever, 
friends say, but she's not up (Please turn the page) 



41 



tanned George Hum* find Grade. 



i,/ r: -„..;.. 



GRACIE ALLEN: 



"Ami 
Too Sick 
To Know 
The Truth 
About 
My Son?" 



40 




L.ke the others on the tranquil block in Beverly Hills, 
"t'8 an older home. Like the others, it has been superbly 
maintained throughout the years. One warmish da> thil 
past spring, a woman peered bright-eyed out the large 
picture window of its spacious living room. The rosebuds 
in the garden yawned to a cloudless sky. The violets bor- 
dering the driveway were in full bloom. The leaves on the 
trees fluttered in a slight breeze. 

Truly, it was a gorgeous day. The woman in the big 
house had enjoyed many splendid days. Ones filled with 
love, happiness and success. Ones devoted to her family. 
Ones devoted to her husband. Ones devoted to her career. 
Gracie Allen indeed has had a fruitful life. But that 
day, when she turned from the window— and the past- 
she found herself face to face with the problems of the 
present. 

Ironically, that same week, her daughter Sandra had 
announced that her second marriage had failed. She was 
getting a divorce. The day before, Gracie had picked up 
a newspaper only to read that her son Ronnie was planning 
to marry a girl she had met only casually. There was a 
time when Sandra and Ronnie Burns relied on their 
parents for advice. No longer. Somehow, they had drifted 
away. They no longer shared their confidences. 

On February 19th, 1958, Gracie Allen had announced, 
with much emotion, that she was retiring from show busi- 
ness. The team of Burns and Allen would be no more. 
The reason she gave: "1 want to have more time to see 
our children . . . our grandchildren." 

This undoubtedly was a prime factor for her retirement. 
Another was her health. Associates at the time confided 
"i>ff the record" that Grade's health was slipping. A 
year ago, she entered Mt. Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles 
for what George described as a "virus condition." How- 
ever, friends whispered that it was her heart. 

Of late. Gracie seldom ventures far from the confines 
of her home. She's still as willy and charming as ever, 
friends say. but she's not up [Phase turn the pag,e\ 



"Am I Too Sick To Know The Truth About My Son? 



continued 



going to night clubs and parties. 

George Burns is still as active 
as ever. He puffs away at his 
cigars. He can exchange barbs 
with the best of them, whether 
it be Jack Benny or George Jessel. 
His Las Vegas appearances have 
been satisfying. The first time he 
appeared on Crap-table Row, he 
brought a young male singer with 
the egotism of Frank Sinatra and 
Jerry Lewis combined. His name 
was Bobby Darin, and it was 
George who introduced him to 
success. On the same stage, at a 
later engagement, he did the same 
for young Ann-Margret. 

Both Gracie and George had 
tried to launch Ronnie on an act- 
ing career. They cast him as their 
son on the TV show and the idea 
was an overnight hit. 

George once confessed that he 
had more than one reason for 
putting Ronnie in the show. "I 
wanted to give him something to 
do," George said. "I didn't want 
him to turn into one of those 
beach bums. He was spending too 
much time at Malibu with his 
friends." 

George and Gracie had reasons 
for their concern. In the winter 
of 1956, Ronnie was involved in 
an accident that resulted in a 
$60,000 suit being slapped against 
his parents. He was only twenty 
at the time, so they were still 
liable for his actions. The fol- 
lowing year, he was arrested for 
speeding at 85-miles-an-hour in a 
25-mile zone. When it came to 
driving, Ronnie seemed to think he 
was on the Indianapolis Speedway. 



a» 



X 



Gracie's retirement meant the 
demise of the TV show. Then, 
when Ronnie decided acting wasn't 
for him, they gave him another 
break — a job as an executive in 
their TV production company. 
They installed Sandra in a similar 
job. 

Ronnie, some say, began to drift 
back to his old habits. He liked 
to have fun. His handsome fea- 
tures and good build made him a 
sought-after bachelor. Two years 
ago, he came very close to marry- 
ing a Las Vegas showgirl whom 
he'd met while at the resort with 
his father. George even indicated 
that he and Gracie approved of 
the match. However, there was a 
quarrel and the two split up. She 
later married someone else. 

Ronnie came even closer to mar- 
riage this spring. At first, his dates 
with Helen DeMaree seemed strict- 
ly platonic. After all, she was mar- 
ried to Steve Crane, who owns 
the Luau restaurant and was once 
wed to Lana Turner. (He is the 
father of Lana's troubled young 
daughter, Cheryl.) 

Ronnie always has been one of 
the Luau's best customers and 
Steve was his good friend. So it 
appeared perfectly natural that 
Ronnie should dine with Helen 
at the Luau when Steve had to 
fly East on business. Sometimes, 
when Steve was home, the three 
dined together. 

This arrangement was short- 
lived. Soon, Ronnie and Helen 
began to be seen together at other 
places besides the Luau. They 
made a (Continued on page 96) 



42 



Ronnie, Helen DeMaree, 
Steve Crane were deep in 
a triangle. Sandra (at bot- 
tom) had bad news, too. 








eco, 



Want to bring romance back into your mar- 
riage? To "insure" happiness till-death-do-you- 
part? Don't ask the couple who've never had 
a quarrel, "never been separated for a single 
night" ! The lovebirds who really know are those 
who've felt the pain of long separation — even 
divorce — and somehow found the way to rebuild 
a broken marriage stronger than it was before. 
Hollywood has many who found out "the 
hard way" . . . and maybe, listening to them, 
you can prepare for a soul-satisfying second 
honeymoon while still cooing (or crying) over 
the first! Some of their answers may amuse you 
— surely, your disagreements aren't as silly as 



theirs? Some may stir you with a sudden sense 
of recognition. But all are the real stuff of life 
and love . . . and all quite different from the 
things they'd have told you in earlier days. 

Take a peek into the living room of a ram- 
bling California home. See those blood-red 
flowers entwining two white hearts? Though 
the stems droop slightly and some petals have 
fallen, the message they convey will linger in 
this room long after the flowers have faded. . . . 

A two-year-old toddler named Michele reaches 
out toward them. "No, no, darling," says her 
mother, Colleen. "Mustn't touch. Those are 
Mommy's present." The (Please turn the page) 



continued 



tiny hands drop obediently. "Dad- 
dy?" the light voice queries. "Yes, 
sweetie, Daddy gave those to Mom- 
my," says Colleen, her glance flying 
to the face of her husband across the 
room. For a long instant, their eyes 
meet in intimate awareness. . . . 

Jimmie Rodgers is first to break the 
silence: "Sometimes it's hard to be- 
lieve all this happiness is ours. Colleen 
and I are living a second honeymoon. 
Our first honeymoon was wonderful 

Jimmie and Colleen Rodgers 



ing that troubles and disagreements 
may exist but they can't basically 
change your love for each other — 
provided you have a strong founda- 
tion of love and mutual respect to be- 
gin with." Colleen nods in solemn, 
shining agreement. 

"We've been lucky that we found 
our way back," says Jimmie. "Col- 
leen's recent serious illness has taught 
us the important values and made 
us realize that life means nothing for 

June Allyson and Dick Powell 



singing 'Love Is Wonderful, The Sec- 
ond Time Around.' It has been won- 
derful for us." 

Jimmie and Colleen belong to a 
large army of Hollywood couples who 
decided they wanted "discharge pa- 
pers" — only to discover, after lonely 
months apart, they had a strong de- 
sire to sign up for another hitch! 
The cause of each couple's original 
strife may have been different . . . 
but all pairs have one thing in com- 

Carl Neubert and Ruth Warrick 




|joX0? $Pib Wjm 00 ^ 2 ^ ^ h&Vfe keeU c b ^ } yd 



— but it can't compare with this one. 
Between them were long, dark months 
of knowing what it is like to do with- 
out each other. We've known loneli- 
ness and we've known heartache — " a 
shadow of that pain crosses the faces 
of both husband and wife — "but it 
has all been worthwhile . . . for we've 
learned what marriage is really all 
about. 

"Marriage is not the physical at- 
traction, the passion, the glamour that 
first attracts you to each other. It's 
understanding your mate and realiz- 



either of us if we're not together. We 
know now that, regardless of the 
adjustments we might have to make, 
we belong together. 

"When Colleen and I decided to 
dissolve our marriage, the tensions 
and disagreements had built them- 
selves up all out of proportion. My 
traveling was an almost-constant 
source of irritation to us both — and 
when we were together, we were like 
two strangers having to become re- 
acquainted all over again." He grins 
shyly as he adds, "Now I feel like 



mon: They learned that, for them, 
separate life is no life. By returning 
to the mate they once thought they 
could discard, they found that, truly, 
the second honeymoon was richer 
and sweeter than the first. 

It took Jane Wyman and her hus- 
band Freddie Karger seven long years 
to learn this lesson. Why did they 
part? At the time of their separation 
— just two years after the wedding — 
Jane explained what had gone wrong: 
Little things had mounted up ... a 
major annoyance, for her, was the 



44 



late hours Freddie stayed at the 
studio to rehearse his band ... in 
two brief years, love's first violent 
storm of passion had been becalmed 
in a sea of dull monotony. . . . 

Today, the Kargers radiate seren- 
ity and peace — together. "We've 
found," says Freddie, "there was a 
way to keep our romance alive. Now 
we look for the positive things in 
each other, rather than try to find 
the flaws all humans possess." And 



stead of sliding along with the bad 
habits we cultivated, we've had a 
chance to back off and think about 
the things that really matter. Now 
we both really work at our marriage. 
I know Dick is trying much harder 
and hasn't allowed his career to be- 
come the all-consuming monster it 
once was. 

"I suppose many couples reach 
the point where they can no longer 
talk to each other ... sit down and 



a home outside Hollywood ... a 
woman's tendency to feel neglected 
as romance gives way to her hus- 
band's absorption in business when 
the first honeymoon is over. After the 
second one, a woman seems better 
able to accept the fact that her man's 
career will always be a tempting, 
time-consuming mistress . . . and a 
man realizes that success doesn't 
mean much without the personal hap- 
piness he can enjoy through a better 



Frank Lovejoy and Joan Banks 



Jane Wyman and Freddie Karger 



Carlyn and Mickey Callan 




aspeebscL-lh,© gee^a, mat| he jUsfc fcfe tpi rieeoL! 



Jane adds, "Our years apart taught 
me how wrong I was to think that 
marriage would always be a honey- 
moon — without tensions, without 
moods! I know now that much more 
goes into marriage besides romance. 
We're each trying harder to compro- 
mise and to understand the other 
one . . . and our effort has paid off 
in a deep and lasting relationship." 
Positive thinking also paid big divi- 
dends to June Ally son and Dick 
Powell. "Our separation was the best 
thing for us both," June says. "In- 



discuss the frictions driving them 
apart. Small troubles magnify until 
you're sure you've lost all the love 
between you. I know now — we both 
know — how much we've gained . . . 
we've thrown away the resentments 
and bitterness, and we've found the 
one thing that really counts: Being 
together. Life alone was bleak and 
worthless." 

The Rodgers, Karger and Powell 
break-ups had a common denomi- 
nator: Explosions stemmed from the 
spark which causes friction in many 



balance between business and pri- 
vate life. "Adjustment" is the key to 
solving the age-old problem of man 
and woman living together happily. 
It can be an elusive key in show 
business — or, indeed, in any mating 
of the young, the ardent, the strong- 
minded. 

The marriage, separation and rec- 
onciliation of Mickey and Carlyn Cal- 
lan is a case of two fiery, independent 
individuals who had to learn how 
to keep each other's love while 
not losing (Continued on page 92 1 



45 



If you've ever looked at your husband and thought, 

"HE'S NO BARRYMORE..." 

think 



look again! 



In 1952, Cara Williams became 
Mrs. John Barrymore Jr. It was a 
strange marriage from the very be- 
ginning — and very different from 
Cara's happy domesticity on TV's 
"Pete and Gladys." In a way, the 
Barrymore marriage was written in 
headlines and front-page newspaper 
photos. But, in a deeper sense, the 
real story has never been told pub- 
licly until now. . . . 

"Things were always bad for 
Johnnie," Cara said thoughtfully, as 
we talked over supper at a dimly- 
lighted table at Trader Vic's in Bev- 
erly Hills. "If things went right, some- 
thing would always go wrong, be- 
cause he made it go wrong. And the 
pity is that he didn't realize it. He's 
a wonderful boy, and it's pretty sad 
to think about what happened to 
him. 

"Johnnie was born under a trag- 
edy. He was the son of two famous 
parents — his mother was the movie 
star, Dolores Costello — but this 
brought him no happiness. He was 
always being sent off to schools, 
where he was beaten up, and he saw 
his father only once. He was told 
very little about his family, really. 




You 

don't know 

how lucky 

you are! 



He hardly knew any of them. I 
he saw his Uncle Lionel for exactly 
a week, and Lionel never really talked 
to him. Then, while Johnnie was 
still a child, his father died." 

She frowned. "When Johnnie tried 
to make an acting career for him- 
self, he found that he was always 
being compared to this great man 
who had died years before. It was 
an impossible situation. He was con- 
stantly being put in the position of 
having to prove himself — of having 
to prove that he wasn't trying to live 
off the Barrymore name." 

Naturally, John resented this, and 
occasionally he lashed out in a re- 
bellion which only made things even 
worse. "Every time he got so much 
as a speeding ticket, it was on the 
front page, because he was a Barry- 
more. His smallest mistake would be 
magnified. Even today, the same situ- 
ation exists, and it's responsible for 
many of his problems." 

When Cara married him, she tried 
to change things. "I wanted him to 
forget all the Barrymore publicity 
and the comparisons, and start a 
life of his own. Although I'd been 
a pessimist (Continued on page 93) 



46 




Cara Williams talks frankly about 
her two Barrymores (facing page) : 
husband John II and son John III. 






iiv's tost his iiM/'i'iaff*' ... unit . 3like La n don fia 






"I 3 m their 
father 
till the day 
they die... 

or I die! 3 * 







*avt> his sons 



As reluctant as he may be to do so, Mike Landon is 
forced to ask himself the question every parent dreads: 

"Am I an unfit father?" 

It is a question he cannot avoid. Only weeks after 
adopting his third son, Mike and his wife Dodie sepa- 
rated. Then, shortly after, in a Los Angeles court- 
room, Mike was named co-respondent in a cross- 
complaint to a divorce suit. Mannie Baier, a sales 
representative for a clothing firm, charged that he 
was not the father of the child expected by his actress- 
wife, Marjorie Lynn. He named Mike as the "other 
man." As we go to press, neither Marjorie nor Mike 
has had a chance to answer these charges. 

It is a curious side of fatherhood, however — and 
perhaps Mike will derive some comfort from it — that, 
usually, only fit fathers have the courage to question 
themselves and their rights to their children. The real 
cruelty of Mike's situation is the fact that his role as 
a father has so little to do with the actual circum- 
stances that push him into this anguished self- 
examination. 

In the beginning, marriage for Mike Landon and 
his lovely Dodie was an exciting and emotionally 
rewarding experience. But, as in so many marriages, 
as the years passed Mike and (Continued on page 82) 




Hf'H lost his marriage. . . now. Mike i.andon flgw P* 0w * *f# *o«* 



**/'m their 
father 
till the day 
they die... 

or I die!" 



As reluctant as he may be to do so, Mike Landon is 
forced to ask himself the question every parent dreads: 

"Am I an unfit father?" 

It is a question he cannot avoid. Only weeks after 
adopting his third son, Mike and his wife Dodie sepa- 
rated. Then, shortly after, in a Los Angeles court- 
room, Mike was named co-respondent in a cross- 
complaint to a divorce suit. Mannie Baier, a sales 
representative for a clothing firm, charged that he 
was not the father of the child expected by his actress- 
wife, Marjorie Lynn. He named Mike as the "other 
man." As we go to press, neither Marjorie nor Mike 
has had a chance to answer these charges. 

It is a curious side of fatherhood, however — and 
perhaps Mike will derive some comfort from it — that, 
usually, only jit fathers have the courage to question 
themselves and their rights to their children. The real 
cruelty of Mike's situation is the fact that his role as 
a father has so little to do with the actual circum- 
stances that push him into this anguished self- 
examination. 

In the beginning, marriage for Mike Landon and 
his lovely Dodie was an exciting and emotionally 
rewarding experience. But, as in so many marriages, 
as the years passed Mike and (Continued on page 82) 





ARE YOU 

LOSING OUT 

THE 

BEST THINGS 






50 






Ted Mack tells you ^y ways to b 



e a winner 



Jackie Kennedy . . . Mickey Mantle 
. . . Connie Francis . . . Cary Grant. 
Imagine a more unlikely quartet if 
you can! Yet they all — First Lady, 
baseball player, singer, and actor — 
have one thing in common: They're 
stars, all of them, in their own fields. 
Of course, not everyone really wants 
to live in the White House, or play 
centerfield for the Yankees. Not even 
everyone wants a career in show busi- 
ness, though Ted Mack — who's pre- 
sided over the auditions of more than 
a million would-be performers — some- 
times finds this hard to believe. But 
everyone wants to be a winner — a 
"star" in his own particular world. 
How do you get that way? What's 
the big secret? 

In the more than twenty-five years 
during which he's been connected with 
"The Original Amateur Hour," the 
eteran showman thinks he's learned 
lost of the answers. From among the 
teen hundred aspiring amateurs 
auditioned weekly throughout the 
>untry, he and his staff, he says, can 
almost unerringly spot those who 
lave it." And before the ballots have 
been counted after each Sunday after- 
soon show, he has "a good idea" of 
cho will poll the most votes. They 
goof now and then, he admits. Elvis 
Presley, for one, was passed up at his 
audition and didn't even get on the 



show. "We didn't know then what 
rock 'n' roll was," Mack grins. 

First of all, there's that all-impor- 
tant ingredient which has never been 
quite definable. Usually called "star 
quality," it's the thing that sets Mari- 
lyn Monroe apart from zillions of other 
curvy blondes, and makes millions of 
people stay up late to watch an old 
Garbo movie. The astute showman 
describes it as "an inner strength, a 
spark," and he cites Frank Sinatra, 
an "Amateur Hour" alumnus, as an 
example. "He has great talent and 
virility," says Mack, "and when he 
comes out on a night-club floor there's 
a magnetic thing there which has noth- 
ing to do with his singing. Even when 
he does things his audience may not 
like, that spark — that magnetism — is 
still there." 

But Sinatra didn't become one of 
the biggest stars in the entertainment 
world simply because of that "star 
quality," any more than hundreds of 
other folk, in their various fields, have 
succeeded without really trying. The 
ingredients for success in show busi- 
ness are many, and for the most part 
they coincide with those for success 
as a human being. 

The Mack recipe includes eight: 

1. Talent. All the props in the world, 
says the man who should know, won't 
make a successful singer — most of the 



"Amateur Hour" contestants these days 
are would-be vocalists — unless he has 
the talent to back them up. "Ability," 
as it's known in the non-show-business 
world, works the same way. But talent 
or ability, Mack emphasizes, doesn't 
mean just technical perfection. Maria 
Callas— she was Maria Kalogeropou- 
los when she appeared on the show, 
back in 1935 — didn't become one of 
the world's greatest opera stars just 
because she could hit high C. Just as 
truly, the girl who's most popular on 
the dance floor isn't necessarily the 
one with the snappiest new dress, or 
the one who can switch from the Twist 
to a polka without missing a step. But 
add a personality which shines out in 
a crowd and she's well on her way 
to becoming a winner. One of the 
first steps: Be yourself. If you're tiny 
and dark, don't try to be a carbon 
copy of the Grace Kelly of your crowd. 
If you're tall and, you think, skinny, 
don't go around with your shoulders 
hunched and all of you slumped over 
to try to look shorter. Stand up 
straight and don't worry if you have 
to look down at some of the men. 
Remember: From tall, slim girls, 
models are made. And a model repre- 
sents what everyone else wants to be. 
2. Persistence. "There's rarely a 
short-cut to success in show business," 
says Mack. (Continued on page 91) 



FOR HOW TO LOOK LIKE A WINNER, TURN THE PAGE 



51 



STEPS TO A 





EMTIFl L LIFE 



1 



Beauty is more than skin 
deep; it's a glow that 
starts from inside out. 
How do you get that 
glow? One way is to think 
beautiful. Sound easy? It is — once 
you get into the habit. To start, 
stand beautiful — i.e., straight. If 
your shoulders sag, if your back 
curves, if you always need to lean 
on things — tell yourself you're 
going to stop — and then do it! 
You'll feel — and look — much better. 



W& Walk in beauty. For this, you've 
^^ got to stay loose and limber. 
H> B Stretch lazily like a cat while 
^.J you're still abed; stretch again 
when you get out. Limbering 
exercises will relax your muscles, put your 
whole body at ease. For waist and hips: 
Reach 'way up over your head, pull up 
through the spine, then fall from the waist 
and let your hands touch the floor. Just 
hang there for a few moments, then 
start again. For neck, shoulders and back : 
Stand straight, chin up high. At eye level, 
clap both hands together in front of you, 
then swing arms around to back and clap 
hard. At the same time, reach backward 
with your head to firm the throat-line. 



2 



Dress like a beauty. Believe it or not, you can do 
it on a budget. The big expenditure: Time and 
taste. First, keep your clothes neat, well-pressed, 
organized. Spend an evening sorting out accessories 
and deciding what goes with what — and when. 
(Rhinestones are out for daytime; pearls are always in.) 
Make a chart, if necessary, to avoid last-minute mistakes. 
Look closely at the proportion of your clothes. Hem-lengths 
must look right on you — no matter how short everyone else 
is wearing them. Buttons should be sewn on, hooks mended, 
linings shouldn't hang and neither should threads. If you're 
petite, try solid colors, vertical lines, small prints. If you're 
tall, try this year's mad prints, any-which-way stripes, big, bold 
accessories — but try them in front of a mirror! Let your 
sense of line and proportion guide you. A good rule: Better 
to be "under"-dressed than "over." If in doubt, take the pin off. 



4 



Eat your way to 
beauty. To cut down 
fatigue and keep 
your spirits high 
during the day, keep 
a supply of low-calorie snacks 
handy — celery, carrots, fruits, 
whole-wheat wafers, skim milk. 
At mealtimes, keep things bal- 
anced. If you're dieting, you 
needn't be a martyr. Your gro- 
cer's shelves are full of low- 
cal, high-flavor temptations. 



5 



6 Put on a good face. But first, remember the old adage about 
cleanliness. You can see through make-up — no matter how plastered 
on^so you need as near-perfect a complexion under it as you can 
get. Cleanse often, treat blemishes as soon as they pop. For deep 
cleansing, remove make-up with cleansing cream, then steam your 
face with a hot cloth for ten minutes. To draw a winning smile, use a long-line 
lipstick and shape your mouth up at the corners. For sparkling eyes, erase 
shadows under them first with an opaque, lighter-than-skin-tone foundation 
stick. Then try a light flick of rouge below the eyebrow. A very light flick! 



7 



Meet the world with open hands — and beautiful ones. 
In other words, no more nail-biting or finger fidgeting. 
And graceful hands need frequent manicures, though 
they'll last longer if you brush on a coat of top sealer 
every night. Use hand lotion generously and often to 
smooth and soften. And don't forget that, in summertime, your 
feet are part of the public parade, too. Pedicure, anyone? 



8 



Start at the top — your 
hair. To get the most do's 
out of one haircut, visit 
a good stylist — the small 
extra expense is worth it. 
Have your hair cut fairly even 
all around, tapering gradually 
toward the ends. Remember, too, 
to choose the correct shampoo 
for your type of hair (dry. oily, 
normal, bleached, etc.). Add 
health with hair-conditioners, 
sheen with creme rinses. If your 
hair is drab, perk it up with one 
of the new semi-permanent rinses 
that last through several sham- 
poos, need no retouching, drama- 
tize your own natural coloring. 
If you need extra body to hold 
your hairdo, a permanent — home 
or salon — is the answer. If you 
haven't tried one in a while, 
you're in for a pleasant surprise. 
Modern science has taken the 
frizz out of them. And oh, yes — 
in all cases, brush, brush, brush. 

Be yourself. You're a very 
special individual, so let the 
world know it. One lovely way: 
A perfume as your signature. 



52 



does a 
SECOND WIFE 



Vaitessn ( Viulro Peters) faces 
a double problem as stepmother to 
Alan ( Jimmy Bayer) and second 
wife to Unite (Ronald Tomme). 




have to be 

SECOND BEST? 



by ARTHUR HENLEY with Dr. ROBERT L. WOLK 



(Please turn the page) 



53 



To millions of women, Vanessa 
Sterling is as real as their next- 
door neighbor. They see her each 
day on "Love of Life" and they know 
her as a rather remarkable woman 
in her mid-thirties, a woman strug- 
gling with the day-to-day problems 
of a second marriage. In this article, 
we, too, shall treat her as a real per- 
son and deal with her problems as 
real ones, especially those arising 
from a second marriage and the rear- 
ing of stepchildren. Certainly, a great 
many women on the other side of 
the TV screen are faced with the 
same problems as Vanessa and often 
need help in resolving them. In our 
discussion, my words will appear in 
regular type, like this, and Dr. Wolk's 
words will be in italics, like the fol- 
lowing: 

Psychologically speaking, the inti- 
macy of television and the regular 
habit of looking in on the same pro- 
gram every day combine to make 
Vanessa, her family, her friends, and 
all the local landmarks of the mythi- 
cal town of Rosehill loom even larger 
than life. 

Since Vanessa's problems are uni- 
versal, they become immediately rec- 
ognizable to the housewife, for they 
have something "in common." So by 
applying psychological principles to 
Vanessa's trials and tribulations, we 
might obtain some insight into our 
own lives. 

It's a second marriage for both 
Vanessa and her husband, Bruce 
Sterling. She lost her first husband 
in an airplane crash; he lost his first 
wife in a suicidal auto crash. 

Introduced by mutual friends over 
two years ago, they quickly fell in 
love and married. Along with Bruce, 
Vanessa inherited his two children: 



Barbara, now twenty, and Alan, now 
seventeen. Vanessa herself is childless. 
They all live in Rosehill, where 
Bruce is headmaster of a private prep 
school for boys, Winfield Academy. 
At one time a television actress. Van- 



A first marriage is 



made with the heart. 



thev sav ... a second. 



with the head. But 



is this reallv true? 



Doesn't a second 



wife want— and need 



love as much as 



am voumrer bride? 



The answer is yes, 



of course she does. 



But the path to this 
second love is far 
bumpier than a first 



wife ever dreamed... 



essa now works part-time selling real 
estate. 

A second marriage carries with it 
some special problems of its own. 
Invariably, the new mate is compared 
to the previous mate. The woman, 



especially, may wonder if her second 
husband truly loves her as much as 
her first did — and also if he loves 
her as much as he loved his first 
wife. Furthermore, both husband and 
wife have become more set in their 
ways, so adjustment often becomes 
more difficult. 

Stepchildren create further prob- 
lems. Although Barbara and Alan 
are not babies anymore, and are on 
their way to independence and ma- 
turity, Vanessa does have to make 
herself acceptable to them as their 
new mother. She's likely to be com- 
pared to their real mother and per- 
haps even resented as an interloper. 

Still, marriage to a widower may 
require less of an adjustment tlian 
marriage to a divorced man. In di- 
vorce, the first spouse is still on the 
scene, visits the children and may be- 
come an active, ever-present rival to 
the new spouse. 

Another problem every second wife 
faces is acceptance by old friends 
who knew her predecessor. But Van- 
essa and Bruce don't seem to have 
this problem ; they seem to be socially 
secure in Rosehill. 

Vanessa's marriage to Bruce is not 
"perfect." Most of their conflicts seem 
to come from sources outside them- 
selves. Nevertheless, they do have 
their differences, and don't always 
see eye to eye on everything. 

Vanessa, for example, believes in 
complete honesty at all costs. She is 
not as willing to make compromises 
for the sake of practicality as is Bruce 
— although he wouldn't do so at the 
sake of his honor or integrity. 

There was a time when they were 
separated briefly. During that period, 
Vanessa declined to feel sorry for 
herself and went to work, establishing 



54 



a real-estate business in Rosehill. Aft- 
er their reconciliation, their relation- 
ship became stronger than ever, but 
Vanessa still gives a few hours of her 
time each day to selling real estate. 

No marriage is perfect — even a 
first one. And any marriage is doomed 
from the start when the couple feels 
it falls short of perfection and doesn't 
live up to their dreams. Unwilling 
or unable to make compromises, such 
a marriage soon disintegrates. 

Vanessa and Bruce are no differ- 
ent from other couples in not seeing 
eye to eye on everything. This is nor- 
mal and healthy . . . provided that 
the couple can sit down together and 
talk things out reasonably when they 
have a major difference of opinion. 
If they have a great deal in common 
— similar tastes, interests and back- 
grounds, for example — they'll quick- 
ly overcome such differences and 
their marriage will become closer 
and more stimulating. 

Reconciliation may be easier in a 
second marriage, for both partners 
are usually more mature and more 
inclined to want to make the marriage 
work. It's the second time around 
for them and, unless they're highly 
unstable emotionally, they want it to 
be the last time around. 

Vanessa showed her mettle in go- 
ing to work during her separation. 
Such a woman would not want her 
marriage to sink into nothingness. 
Sometimes an episode like this serves 
to wake up both partners and bring 
them a new awareness, a new close- 
ness, a new respect for one another 
and their marriage relationship. 

The Sterlings' major problem is 
Bruce's daughter, Barbara. Try as 
they might, they cannot remain aloof 
from her marital difficulties. 



For Barbara had married a wealthy 
young man named Rick Latimer — a 
spoiled, egocentric, yet well-meaning 
fellow who simply was unable to find 
himself. Barbara failed to understand 
him and turned away from him — 







and the more she turned away, the 
more he drank and the wilder he 
behaved. Finally, she filed for a legal 
separation, despite the pleas of Van- 
essa and her dad to give Rick another 
chance. Even her brother Alan more 



or less condemned her antagonism 
toward Rick. 

Another man showed an interest 
in Barbara, but she became so con- 
fused that she refused to see either 
him or her estranged husband. Van- 
essa accused her of knowing nothing 
about love and warned her that she 
would destroy both young men by 
her attitude. In this matter, Bruce 
disagreed with Vanessa's severe point- 
of-view about his daughter. 

But no one was able to prevent 
Barbara from finally divorcing Rick. 
They only succeeded in getting her 
to agree to a Mexican divorce to 
avoid talk and to prevent Rick from 
further hurting himself by filing a 
vindictive suit for divorce in Rosehill. 

A stepmother has all she can do 
just to win the affection of children 
that are not her own. When such 
youngsters are beset by emotional 
problems, as Barbara is, her problem 
becomes doubly difficult. 

The father also has a difficult job 
on his hands, for he has to play 
fair with both his new wife and his 
children . . . and his deepest obliga- 
tion is to his children. When conflicts 
arise between wife and children, he 
has to decide who's right without 
offending any of them. 

Vanessa's disagreement with Bruce 
concerning daughter Barbara doesn't 
seem to have been too volatile. But 
Vanessa's involvement in Barbara's 
predicament may be looked upon by 
her stepdaughter as "interfering." 
After all, she is an adult, and if her 
marriage turned out unsatisfactorily, 
she must be left to find her own so- 
lution — unless she asks for advice. 

Her younger brother, Alan, also 
has no business interfering in his sis- 
ter's private (Continued on page 76) 



55 



AAY FIGHT TO SAVE MY 




When I arrived in Hollywood 
to play Kate in "The Real 
McCoys," I had the good repu- 
tation I treasure — both as a 
woman and as an actress. I still 
have it — but wait till you hear the de- 
tails of my fight to preserve it! 

According to the "authorities" I met, 
it was important to be talked about, to 
have a big career. So I said "yes" to 
some nice invitations to premieres and 
parties. I didn't foresee how things 
would snowball when I was merely try- 
ing to be obliging. The first time someone 
referred to me as "a red-headed riot," 
I was flattered. Who wants to be dull? 

To me, there's nothing wrong in loving 



by 

KATHY 
NOLAN 



life, in singing and dancing 
and laughing along with 
everyone else. I'm not prissy. 
At times, I'm overly affection- 
ate, a trait that's been mis- 
interpreted. I've had so much love in my 
own family, where we make every 
stranger welcome, that I feel like show- 
ing friendliness. But T learned that Tcan 
be standing next to somebody at a party 
in Hollywood, simply saying hello, and 
a picture may turn up in a magazine as 
proof of "a hot new romance." It's sup- 
posed to be a sign of how irresistible you 
are! Well, with one exception— I'll tell 
you about him later— I've never fallen 
instantly for (Continued on page 79) 



Don't miss this frank story of a girl who had to learn to say NO 



P6 





.■*¥*! 





j£ 





LU 



a> 


o 


Tj- 


> 

(0 


lb. 
(0 


or, 


» 


O 


& 


o 


E 

ttmm 


Q. 


"O 


+■» 


C 


03 


•*•* 


o 


^J 


& 




"o 


lb. 


XI 
0) 


c 


<D 


3 


03 




C 


o 


■*-« 






+■» 


c 


■a 
o 


O 

c 


o 

o 


o 


</> 


w 


W) 


03 


ik 




IE 


0) 


c 
o 


E 

■ MM 


lb. 


1- 


0) 


0) 


■ 


•*■» 


o 

Li. 


■ 
■ 


(A 




E 


(0 


"6 

wmm 




H 


03 


ummt 




</> 


£ 


d 


a> 


o 


W) 


o 
o 


XT 

o 


o 


2 
£ 


c 


3 


C5 


o 






o 


>* 




c 


CL 


</> 


(A 

Vb 


E 

■ MB 


c 

o 


a) 


</> 


x: 


4) 


E 


</> 


JC 


+■» 


(/) 




<L> 




c 


3b. 


fi 


a> 


0) 


o 


+^ 


lb. 


^■» 


W) 


Hh* 


*5 

X) 


'a> 


3 


B. 


*. 


A 


3 


o 


•- 


XI 

1 


+j* 




s 


3 


"35 
to 

0> 


o 


O 


</> 


x» 

03 


XI 


(0 


"O 


E 


a) 

> 


a> 


03 


J£ 




a> 




</) 


■■■■ 


03 


03 


o 


1 


a 


XI 


x: 


03 


<• 


CO 


-C 



58 







SivJ 



f_J^' •*. 



\>; 




• 



Three years after his cancer operation: Arthur Godfrey's own story of his life today 




Three years after medical sci- 
ence snatched him back from the 
shadows, Arthur Godfrey still lives 
every day with dying. He speaks 
of it calmly and matter-of-factly. 

"The pain is there but I'm in- 
ured to the aches and pains," he 
says. 

He's talking now about the 
arthritis in his arm and his leg; 
about the occasional hurt he ex- 
periences in the left hip which 
was operated on because of his 
now-famous auto accident. 

About the cancer? 

"The incision aches in the 
chest," he tells you. He's speaking 
about the giant scar, a visible re- 
minder of the three-hour opera- 
tion in which doctors removed a 
tumor and part of his lung. He 
will have to wait until five years 
have passed before he knows if 



the operation was successful- 
not. 

"This horrible, skulking thing," 
Arthur called the tumor after he 
first learned the harsh truth. 
"Man, this is rough," the peppery 
freckle-faced performer revealed 
with utter candor. "No pain any- 
where — look good, feel good. But 
some of the best brains in the 
medical profession have discov- 
ered a 'thing' in my left lung. 
Can't tell what it is-^this thing — 
but, whatever it is, it doesn't be- 
long there. It must be removed. If 
it's a benign tumor of some sort, 
hurray for our side — no more 
sweat. If the damn thing is mal- 
ignant — cancerous — then there's 
real trouble. Maybe have to take 
the whole lung out." 

The next night, he watched the 
farewell TV show he had taped 
on his Virginia farm. On the 
fourth hospital day, Godfrey was 
wheeled into surgery. The time 
was 7:25 A.M. At 8:29 A.M. — an 





hour and four minutes later — a 
team of three surgeons, three 
nurses and an anesthetist stood 
over Godfrey and the operation 
had begun. At 10 a.m. a doctor 
came out and whispered to Ar- 
thur's wife, Mary, that he had 
cancer. Mary Godfrey, who had 
spent the night at the hospital, 
took the news bravely. At 1:25 
p.m. the medical team completed 
its mission; Godfrey was wheeled 
into the recovery room. 

Less than two weeks later, he 
was discharged and went home to 
convalesce and undergo a long 
period of x-ray radiation therapy 
in an endeavor to kill the nucleus 
of the cancer cell and prevent any 
remaining living cancer cells 
from growing. Godfrey accepted 
the challenge with rock-ribbed 
courage, (continued on page 83) 



61 






WHY 
THEY 
WARN 

YOU 
ABOUT 

GEORGE 

MAHARIS 



"One thing you've got to admit about the guy: No matter what 
he's got, he shares it." This was the local gag going around 
in television circles, and the only person who wasn't laughing 
was George Maharis. He was in a Santa Monica hospital with 
infectious hepatitis, and everyone else in the cast and 
crew of "Route 66" was scurrying to the doctors for protective 
shots. There's truth behind the gag about George's 
willingness to share everything he has . . . but there was more 
than that behind the laughter. It was a big, booming sigh of 
relief — not only from his co-workers, but from the many com- 
munities being invaded by the wide-ranging TV series. George 
was under lock and key; he was well-guarded; for 
a while, at least as long as the quarantine lasted, 
they were safe. . . . Undoubtedly, adventure would 
still follow wherever "Route 66" went (isn't that 
the idea behind the whole show?) . . . during 
those weeks George had to be left behind to con- 
valesce. But surely there would be fewer misadventures 
which weren't in the script! Now, perhaps, there'd be no more "dead" 
bodies in the bed ... no clock-watching cities turned upside-down 
overnight ... no false runs on the local bank. It had been enough to 
drive a man to drink (and it did). But you can't really blame 
George for the poor guy who couldn't find his home again, or all those 

people who were late to work next morning, 
or the two college boys who tagged him 
and Marty Milner from town to town mimick- 
ing everything the stars did . . . particularly 
when you see that guileless expression in the 
Maharis eyes: "Look, Ma — I didn't do it. 
I was just there when it happened!" 
On the other hand, you can't blame 
those law-abiding citizens who 
think there should be a town crier 
running ahead, swinging a warning 
lantern and yelling: "Maharis is 
coming!" — just like 
in the Great Plague 
— when this enter- 
prising troupe swings 
into view down 
(Continued on page 89) 



62 









*;i 



I 





What your man really 
means when he says: 

" BUT, 
DARLING, 

WE(AN'T 

AFFORD 
IT ! " 



"I own a Bentley, my dear, for three reasons. Firstly, 
it is a beautiful automobile . . . secondly, it is not 
showy . . . and thirdly and most important, it is three 
hundred dollars cheaper than a Rolls-Royce. I believe 
in cutting corners whenever possible, and three hundred 
dollars is, after all, three hundred dollars. Frankly, 
I can't afford it." 

Being fully aware that the going price for a Bentley 
starts at around $20,000, I looked up quickly from my 
lunch to see if the gentleman was smiling. Sebastian 
Cabot was not. We were only on our first course, but 
I was already quite convinced that Carl Hyatt, the 
urbane and eccentric criminologist on "Checkmate," 
was only surpassed by the man who buys a Bentley 
to save money 1 

"I have my eye on another Bentley now," he con- 
tinued, "and also a little type-35A Bugatti. They're 
both a marvelous steal at the price on them." 

Sebastian's handsome wife Kay emitted a sound very 
much like a snort and gazed at her husband. You might 
even go so far as to say she stared at him. Sebastian 
lowered his eyes and concentrated on his snails. 

"We have four foreign cars in the garage but no 
place to sit in the house," sighed Kay. "Why don't 
you tell about the divan, darling?" 

"My dear, that is a gross exaggeration and you 
know it. W e have a number of places to sit. And as 
for the divan, I've told you we just can't afford to have 
it reupholstered this month. Perhaps in a few weeks." 

"That's what you said last month." 

"Darling, you have a one-track mind." 

"His stock answer to everything is we can't afford 
it. Whenever I want anything for the house, we have 
to sit down and discuss it. (Please turn the page) 



64 



A lesson for every woman-from Sebastian Cabot 




65 



Sebastian's war cry: 
Remember the budget ! 




Hobbies for the family— wife 
Kay; Yvonne, 4; Annette, 
19; Chris, 17 — are less costly 
than Sebastian's. Natch! 







Sometimes we disagree," Kay explained, dead-pan. 

"What she means is, neither one of us ever 
gets his own way without a hell of a battle," smiled 
Sebastian. Then he turned to discuss the merits 
of a clear consomme, as opposed to a turtle soup, 
with the hovering waiter. 

The discussion of money had come up when 
I asked the Englishman what he thought of the 
way many show-business personalities spent their 
earnings. So many appeared to live beyond their 
means, putting nothing aside for future security. 

"Most actors come from fairly middle-class 
backgrounds and a number from quite poor homes. 
Almost all have a rough time on the way up, so 
I suppose it is only natural to go out and splurge, 
once the money starts rolling in. I see nothing 
wrong in having one fling and getting it all out 
of your system. But, after that, one should relax 
and take stock. Not only take stock — but buy it." 

Kay Cabot ignored her husband's pun and pointed 
a finger in his general direction. "All right then. 



may I please have my first and last fling and 
get the divan re-upholstered? It's not that I mind 
the fact it's shabby and faded, but the darn springs 
have popped up right through the seat." 

"One must budget and conserve, my pet," Se- 
bastian nodded knowingly, as he admired the sole 
bonne femme and asparagus hollandaise set before 
him. Sipping the excellent white wine he'd ordered 
to go with the fish, he dwelled further on the 
wiseness of watching one's bank account. 

"My advice to any young actor is: Don't put 
up a front, but go carefully. Moderation is the 
motto. Glamorous homes and expensive furs are 
not practical, and gadding about from one night 
spot to another is far too fatiguing. It's better 
to acquire a nice little hobby." 

"What he means," Kay explained, "is that the 
couch won't be repaired next month, and this mink 
stole I borrowed from a friend is as near to a 
mink as I'm ever going to get. Night clubs are 
out because the food (Continued on page 85) 



66 



§P[1@D&[1 

MIDWEST 




At top — hosting a record hop at Moose Lodge. 
Right — at home with his pretty wife, Joann. 



Morning man Marc Alan (he's heard on KLEO 
from 5 to 9 a.m.) has an unusual and effective 
way of getting his Wichita listeners off to work 
in the morning. Here's how it works: When Marc 
took over the morning slot a year ago, he felt his 
listeners needed something to remind them that 
it was time to leave for work. He went to a pro- 
duction studio and recorded his audio version 
of a kiss. Each morning, he plays it and urges 
the housewives to kiss their husbands good- 
bye. And who gets Marc himself off to work? Why, 
he has a loving wife of his own, named Joann, 
who's only too happy to bestow a pre-dawn kiss. 
Says Marc with a grin, "I think she must be a little 
bit of a nut to have married a radio man!" 



KISSIN' 



KLEO Radio's Marc Alan has a 

smack-happy way of getting his listeners 

off to work. Read on to find out how 



67 




.It's not work, it's my whole life. I enjoy singing and 
I do it constantly." So speaks Chicago's pretty songbird 
Connie Mitchell, who is currently "not working" on 
three daily WBBM shows— "The Connie Mitchell 
Show," heard from 4:45 to 5 p.m.; "The Mai Bellairs 
Show," from 7:15 to 7:25 a.m.; and "The Joe Foss 
Show," from 7:30 to 8 a.m. . . . Cute Connie began 
singing at the age of six and, at eight, was a mem- 
ber of a local trio called "The Swingsters." At eight- 



Sweet as an angel in front of a harp, 
Connie Mitchell finds joy in everything. 
P.S. She also found out ^diamonds 



5? 



and gold cocktail gowns don't mix! 



68 



een, Connie won out, over 300 girls, for a booking at 
the Sherman Hotel. When WBBM announced it was 
looking for a new femme vocalist, she auditioned . . . 
and is happily still there. . . . "Getting up at five, 
every morning, means I have to go to bed very early 
and this keeps me from participating in an active 
social life, but I still enjoy it," says bachelor-girl 
Connie. The young singer lives with her family in 
Lincolnwood, in an eight-room, bi-level house, fur- 



nished in "modern French provincial." . . . Though 
Connie loves to play baseball, a recent incident almost 
turned her against the game entirely. At a radio-TV 
celebrity game, Connie enthusiastically joined in the 
play. Too enthusiastically, as it turned out! At one 
point, she unfortunately had to slide into third base. 
This wouldn't have been so bad, only Connie was 
wearing a gold cocktail dress which split . . . before 
an amazed and astounded audience of one thousand! 




Close harmony reigns in this musical Chicago 
family. Papa Albert is at the piano, above. 
Singing trio includes mama Ruth, Connie and 
sister Iris. Her nephew Mark shows he knows 
the score, too — though, at three years of age, 
he'd rather play "cowboy" with Aunt Connie. 



MEET 



\\ 



MOVIE 



#/ 





70 




Bill Kennedy knows all 
about the movies — 
with good reason: He 
used to make them 




I 





Bill enjoys helping son Bartley, 12, with his projects. 



Calls to Hillsdale College keep Bill near daughter. 



If Detroit's Bill Kennedy seems to know an awful lot 
about motion pictures, it isn't just because he's host 
of CKLW-TV's movie show, seen Sunday through Fri- 
day at 1 p.m. Bill actually made more than 100 films 
in the fifteen years he spent in Hollywood! Today, Bill 
says he honestly prefers showing films to making them. 
And his many colorful stories on his Hollywood expe- 
riences afford viewers a glimpse into the glamorous tinsel 
world of show business. In addition to hosting the movie 
show, he also answers listeners' questions and inter- 
views celebrities, many of whom are his personal friends. 
. . . Recalling his beginning in show business, Bill says, 
"I was working for a Los Angeles radio station after 
a couple of screen tests didn't pan out. Hal Wallis 
(then with Warner Bros.) heard my voice and won- 
dered what I looked like. When he saw me, he said, 
'I can just see you on a horse.' Well, I signed a seven- 
year contract. Funny thing is, I never did make a West- 
ern the whole time I was at that studio!" . . . These 
days, widower Bill tries to spend as much time as 
possible with his three children — Michael, 22; Patricia, 
19; and Bartley, 12 — when not busy with his reel life. 




Widower Bill leaves cooking to his housekeeper. 



71 



TV actors Larry Pennell and Ken Curtis play the sky divers in "Ripcord. 




with the greatest of ease — and speed . . . and a little 
help from their parachutes — these daring young sky divers of "Ripcord" 



72 



"Skydiving," the country's fastest-growing sport and a vital military 
tactic, became dramatic TV entertainment when Larry Pennell and Ken 
Curtis debuted in the action-adventure series "Ripcord." As Ted McKeever 
and Jim Buckley, they portray men in one of the world's most unusual 
and hazardous professions — parachutists for hire. They leap from a plane, 
doing what every child dreams of: Flying through the sky with the grace 
of a bird. In their remarkable jobs, they help on missions of rescue, 
mercy, and law enforcement. 

Larry, born in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, spent most of his early life 
in Hollywood, where he excelled in all sports. His baseball prowess won 
him a contract to play for the Boston Braves — he was with them for 
two seasons before he was drafted for military service. When he returned 
from service, Larry discovered that his contract had been sold to the 
Brooklyn Dodgers. He didn't like the terms and became a spring hold-out. 
During this period, a friend suggested he try for an acting career and 
arranged for a screen test with Paramount. Larry appeared in feature 
films for Paramount and other studios, then guest-starred in a number 
of TV shows. A role in "Malibu Run" caught the eye of producer Ivan 
Tors, who signed him for "Ripcord." 

Off screen, Larry lives a quiet life with his wife Patricia, a non- 
professional, and their baby daughter Melaine. 

Ken Curtis also switched careers. Born and brought up on a ranch 
near Lamar, Colorado, Ken came into show business as a musician. While 
a student at Colorado College, he wrote a musical show which was highly 
praised. After graduation, he headed for Hollywood, intending to write 
music for the movies. Instead, while waiting for his writing break to 
come, he got a job at NBC singing on variety shows. After military service, 
Ken returned to civilian life and appeared in a number of films and on TV. 

Ken is married to the daughter of director John Ford, and they live 
on a small ranch in the San Fernando Valley. 



Illtlllllllllllllltllll 






VINCE EDWARDS 



(Continued from page 30) 
(Long before either of them ever heard 
of Ben Casey, Vince Edwards and Nick 
Dennis were good friends. They've been 
through a lot together, including the 
current TV show on which Vince is the 
doctor, Nick the hospital orderly, Nick 
Kanavaras. Now, for the first time, Nick 
tells what his friend is really like. We 
think it's a revealing story that leaves 
very little unsaid. The Editors) 

Miracles like that you've got to see 
to believe. I saw it. 

It happened when I went along with 
Vince recently on a personal appear- 
ance tour to Phoenix. People take him 
seriously as Ben Casey — but I never 
knew how seriously until we hit Phoenix. 

I'm not talking about the crowds. 

I'm talking about one little girl. 

You don't have to take my word for it, 
either. It's documented. If you're skep- 
tical, all you have to do is check St. 
Joseph's Hospital in Phoenix. 

Vince was making the rounds, saying 
hello to the patients. It seemed to be 
kicks for everyone, including the doc- 
tors. I won't say my feelings were hurt, 
but I was kind of surprised that none 
of the orderlies looked me up and asked 
for pointers. 

There was one little girl in the chil- 
dren's ward whom Vince was going to 
pass up. She'd been smashed up in an 
auto accident and she was in a bad way. 
As they walked by her bed, the doctor 
shook his head. 

"What's the matter?" Vince asked. 

"Poor kid's been in a semi-coma ever 
since she's been here," the doctor said. 
"We don't seem able to bring her out 
of it." 

"That's too bad," Vince said. 

He meant it. What else could he say? 
This was life. It wasn't the show. 

The doctor gave Vince a strange look. 
"Why don't you talk to her?" he said. 

Vince didn't go for the idea. In a 
way, this medico was asking him to play 
a doctor and God at the same time. 

But the doctor pressed him. "What 
harm could it do?" he said. 

"I don't know," Vince backed off. "It 
just doesn't seem right, the kid that 
sick and all. What could I say to her?" 

The doctor smiled. "Just say, 'I'm Dr. 
Ben Casey,' " he urged. 

Vince walked over to the kid. She 
looked at him through a half stupor. 
He smiled down at her. 

"Hi," he said, "I'm Dr. Ben Casey." 

This is where the story turns to mush. 
It's not to be believed. Only it really 
happened. 

Seeing Vince did something uncanny 
to that little girl. Her legs began to 
twitch. Her arms began to twitch. The 
movement spread through her entire 
body. The kid came to! So help me — 
that's exactly the way it was. 

If Ben Casey ever did anything like 
that on television, they'd laugh the show 
off the air. The doctor at St. Joseph's 
had played a hunch. He had some psy- 
chological explanation— and I'm sure it 
made sense. 



I've got some theories of my own. I'm 
not saying I could have predicted that 
it would have happened. But I think I 
understand a little of why it happened. 
I feel I know Vince that well. I think 
the kid would have perked up if Vince 
had stood over her and said, "Hi, I'm 
Pete Picklepepper." 

No disrespect to Ben Casey, you un- 
derstand, but I think that kid was react- 
ing, not to a famous television person- 
ality, but to the look in Vince's eyes, 
the compassion in his voice, the friend- 



liness that was so clearly on the level. 

Vince was really cracked up about 
that kid. She got to him. He felt like 
some kind of an idiot walking up to her 
and telling her he was Ben Casey. But 
the doctor said do it, so he chanced it. 
I think all of that got mixed up in it — 
and the kid dug it. 

Don't think right away I'm going to 
quit the orderly business and hang up 
a shingle as a head-shrinker. I've got 
reason to believe this way. I sized Vince 
up long before either one of us ever 




Science Cracks The Smoking Barrier 

NEW "JET STREAM" 
PERMANENT CIGARETTE FILTER 
TRAPS LUNG IRRITATING TARS 

Works On Amazing New Principle ... No Filters ... No Cartridges . . . 
No Crystals. Actually Knocks The Tar Out Of Smoking. 



Thanks to the marvel of aerodynamic science, a 
new permanent cigarette filter has been developed 
that removes doubt, worry, and harmful tars . . . 
WHILE IT LETS YOU ENJOY A SAFER PLEASANTER 
SMOKE EVERY TIME. TAR GARD, invented by a chief 
design engineer for one of the nation's largest air 
lines, works on the principle of aerodynamics with 
surprising and sensational results. As you puff on 
the cigarette, TAR GARD forces the smoke through 
a tiny opening hitting against a special "trap 
holder" which literally knocks the tar out of the 
smoke. TAR GARD was specially designed to remove 
up to 80% of the "high temperature tars" that 
medical science has classified as causing the most 
damage and harm. The result is a safer, better 
smoke, while flavor, aroma and taste stay the same. 

TAR GARD uses the latest principles of science 
and has been thoroughly tested in leading universi- 
ties and independent laboratories. It gives you a 
permanent cigarette filter that begins where filter 
cigarettes leave off. TAR GARD is safe, simple, easy 
to clean, durable. 

Don't tamper with your health or your smoking 
pleasure another day. TRY TAR GARD. See it trap 
tars that would normally reach your system. See 
how cleaner, fresher your mouth feels. See how 
TAR GARD reduces ugly tar stains on your teeth. 
Notice how your "cigarette cough" may be relieved. 
Feel the pleasure and increased safety you get. Act 
now. ORDER TAR GARD TODAY. Results are so sen- 
sational that TAR GARD is sold on an unconditional 
30 day "Prove It To Yourself" Free Trial Offer. 
ACT NOW. Use The Handy "No Risk" Coupon. You 
must be pleased; you must be satisfied; you must 
be absolutely thrilled with the results. If not, simply 
return for full refund of your purchase price. 



HERE'S HOW TAR GARD WORKS: 

After only 2 cigarettes, see how much "high 
temperature tars" have been trapped. 



Here's the result after just 5 cigarettes.. 



This is the amazing result TAR GARD gives you 
after just 10 cigarettes. 



Imagine what TAR GARD will do if you just 
smoke 15 cigarettes a day. 

So why tamper with your health. Try TAR 
GARD now. It comes attractively packaged com- 
plete with simple instructions for easy cleaning. 
Remember TAR GARD is absolutely guaranteed. 
Try it for 30 days at our risk. You must see for 
yourself the amazing results; you must notice 
the trapped tars; you must be absolutely pleased 
... or return for immediate refund of your full 
purchase price. Act now. Use the handy "NO 
RISK" coupon below. 



MAIL THIS "NO RISK" COUPON NOW 



S UNCONDITIONAL GUARANTEE 

Use TAR GARD for 30 days. You must (j 

| be completely satisfied. You must n 

2 enjoy a safer, cleaner, fresher smoke o 

y or you may return for full refund of I 

I) your purchase price. 

TAR GARD LABORATORIES, INC. jj 



TAR GARD CORP. Dept. A ^ 

P.O. Box 882, San Diego 12, California ^ 

Rush TAR GARD Cigarette Holders @ 

$2.95 each. I enclose $ in Cash 

Check Money Order. You guarantee that 
TAR GARD must give me a safer, more enjoy- 
able smoke or I may return it within 30 days 
for full refund. FREE: 2 extra mouthpieces. 
I can keep these even if I return the TAR 
GARD. 
Check color preference: 

□ Amber □ Clear □ Blue D Pink 

□ White □ Black □ Green □ Turquoise 

Name _ 

Address 

City 



r | 



_Zone State. 



I 



73 



heard of Ben Casey. I saw the way 
Vince was with kids years before any- 
one thought he was enough of a big 
shot to tour a hospital to cheer up 
patients. 

I know the way Vince is with kids, 
because I've seen him with my own. My 
two daughters — Virginia, who's thirteen- 
and-a-half, and Paulette, who's eight- 
and-a-half — are crazy about Vince. They 
always have been ; even when he used to 
stop over at the house and wonder out 
loud if he'd ever really get anywhere in 
Hollywood. 

At heart, I think it's the honesty of 
kids that gets to him. And strangely 
enough, although Vince is a big boy 
now, it's his honesty that gets to them. 

I never saw Vince put on an act for 
my kids. He could either leave them 
alone or horseplay with them. If he 
didn't happen to be in the mood, he 
wasn't in the mood. He respects them 
too much — and likes them too much — 
to con them. 

All he has to do is just pick up Vir- 
ginia or Paulette, give a squeeze and 
yell. "Grreeeek! What are you?" — and 
suddenly it's Christmas and their birth- 
day all rolled into one. You've never 
seen anything like it. 

A family of his own 

He.'s rough and warm, and they're 
hopelessly in love with him. He's never 
brought them a present, either. Some- 
thing deep goes on with Vince when he's 
with kids. I think it has to do with how 
much he'd like to have a family of his 
own. 

For about five years after I first came 
to Hollywood from Broadway, I used to 
live in a house behind the Cock 'n Bull 
restaurant on Sunset Strip. Everybody 
knew us from New York, and when they 
came to Hollywood they were always 
dropping in — big successes like Marlon 
Brando and Jimmy Dean, and some who 
were just getting by on hope, like Vince 
Edwards. He was a kid I just got to 
know when he used to come backstage 
to say hello to Marlon when we were 
doing "Streetcar Named Desire" on 
Broadway. 

More than any of the others, Vince 
got to be like one of the family. I al- 
ways had the feeling, from the way he 
acted, the way he looked, that having 
our place to come to meant a lot. 

You know he's Italian, he's Mediter- 
ranean. I'm Greek. We've always been 
very close, and I think that's part of it 
— because we naturally understand each 
other. Even his appreciation of Greek 
food — you'd think Vince was a Greek 
himself. When you drink Greek coffee, 
sipping it, even slurping it, is allowed. 
It may be bad manners in America, but 
in Greece, if you don't make noise when 
you're having coffee, it means you're 
not enjoying it — and you're insulting 
the host. 

Vince never insults us. 

His favorite dish in all the world is 

stefado. I guess this is Greece's answer 

t to Irish stew. It's a national pastime in 

v Greece. Vince will come practically 

r from the other part of the universe to 

have some of Helen's stefado. It's made 

preferably with venison or rabbit, and 



sometimes with chicken or beef. Helen 
doesn't gravy it. She puts it in a pot 
and gives it the treatment with garlic, 
oil, wine vinegar, tomato paste and what 
not. The aroma is fantastic. Vince can 
just stand there by the hour — sniffing. 

The point I'm making is that Vince 
isn't just a friend. He's become one of 
us. He fits. We are always glad to see 
him. Others are warm friends, welcome 
any time. But Vince is family. 

Sometimes he'll just sit and barely 
say a word. Other times we'll stay up 
half the right talking about any subject 
you can name — politics, history, women, 
boxing, wrestling, Rome, Greece. Often, 
when we lived in Hollywood, we used 
to take long walks along the Strip — he's 
always liked to walk. We'd go to Ham- 
burger Hamlet for a cup of coffee and 
sit there for hours. Soon other actors 
would come by and join us. 

I always had the feeling that what 
Vince liked most about our place was 
that he could relax with us and be 
himself. He'd just sit down and have 
a smoke. Helen would give him a cup 
of coffee, a doughnut, make him a sand- 
wich, and he'd slump in his chair and 
he'd get that strange, heart-tugging half- 
sad smile on his face. When he came 
to my house, it was like home. It still is. 

Once, after Helen put the kids to 
bed and sat down with us in the living 
room, Vince put down his cup of Greek 
coffee, looked me straight in the eye, 
and said, "You know, Nick, I'm going 
to tell you something. You've got it 
made. I only wish I had your luck." 

I thought he was talking about acting. 
I was getting pretty steady work — noth- 
ing earthshaking, but acting was my 
trade and I was earning a respectable 
enough living at it. I knew Vince was 
sweating out his big break, and even 
though he wasn't working much at the 
time, at least he was drawing a salary. 

"What's the matter?" I said. "You're 
not doing too bad, Vince. You're under 
contract to Hal Wallis. That's not the 
worst thing in the world, you know." 

Vince shook his head. "I'm not talk- 
ing about that, Nick." 

He looked at Helen, who'd happened 
to let her hand fall over mine. I'm sure 
she didn't even realize it, and I didn't 
even notice it. But Vince did. 

Marriage for Vince? 

"You've got the world by the scruff, 
Nick," he said. "You've got a good wife. 
She thinks you're king of the sandpile. 
She takes care of you. You have two 
swell kids. You and Brando sit in the 
same room, and you better not ask your 
kids who's the greatest actor in the 
world. With them, it's not Brando. I envy 
you, Nick. Someday I'd like to make it 
like this." 

After all, there's only one reason a 
single fellow keeps dropping in on a 
guy who's married and has kids. He 
likes to be there. I think no matter how 
full Vince's life may seem to be, he'll 
always be a little lonely until he finally 
gets married and settles down. 

And I'm sure he knows it. 

But that doesn't mean you have to get 
out the crying towel. There's a reason 
Vince is still single. Vince is thirty-one 



or thirty-twof give or take a year. 
Doesn't mean a thing. I married late in 
life myself. 

You must realize his upbringing. Al- 
though Vince is American and all that, 
he still inherited what you call this 
Mediterranean flavor. In Italy, where 
Vince's people came from, and in 
Greece, where I came from, nobody 
thinks anything of waiting until he's 
35, 36 or 37 until he gets married. 
That's when a man knows what he's do- 
ing. He knows how to take care of a 
wife. 

In the old country, they start late, 
but they maintain the lateness. My 
brother was born when my father was 
61. Certainly! You read in the papers 
in Italy and Greece about men — they're 
82 years old and they've got twins. Be- 
cause you haven't burned your candle. 
You start drinking at fourteen and fif- 
teen, you get married in your teens, and 
at twenty-four you're burned out. 

Who needs it? Not Vince. Right now, 
in his looks, in his powers, Vince is like 
a nineteen-year-old kid. When he gets 
to be 45, he'll be like 32. I know his 
philosophy. This is something Vince 
and I have talked about many times. I 
know how he thinks — as an athlete, as a 
person, as an actor. He doesn't waste 
himself. He never has. He builds. He's 
a great swimmer, he wrestles, he's a 
weight lifter, he's an adagio dancer. 
He's an all-around athlete. He's a man. 
Life isn't passing Vince by, don't you 
worry. He's not about to let anything 
like that happen. I've honestly never 
seen girls go for anybody the way they 
go for Vince — and this was true long 
before he became Ben Casey. 

He always had a lot of girlfriends. 
Some of the girls I don't even remem- 
ber. Every time I saw Vince, he was with 
a different one. I'd say to myself, "How 
does he do it?" I'd see him in the morn- 
ing with one girl. Come afternoon he'd 
be with another. I'd take my daughters 
for a walk on Sunset Boulevard, and I'd 
see Vince with still another girl. 

Another thing I respect about Vince 
is his respect for women — and I think 
that's because he has respect for him- 
self. As I said, I've known Vince since 
he was a kid fresh out of Ohio State and 
used to come backstage when I was do- 
ing "Streetcar." That's a good chunk of 
years. Through those years we've spent 
countless hours together — no holds 
barred on anything we talked about. 
And I think the one thing that im- 
pressed me more about Vince than 
maybe anything else, is that, in all that 
time, he's never talked about his con- 
quests — never, not once. Not only ac- 
tors, but a lot of men in general, are 
always boasting about their conquests to 
prove their manhood. Half the time you 
don't know whether to believe them or 
not. 

But Vince is a man. For him, love is 
not for talking about. 

Obviously, I cherish Vince as a friend, 
and naturally I'm high on him. But I 
liked him for the same reasons ten years 
ago that I like him for now. I remember 
when he and I used to go to the Auto- 
mat on Broadway and fish nickels out of 
the slots so we could eat. I remember 
(Continued on page 76) 






$15,000 CONTEST! 



/^ 



^ 



True Story will offer monthly 

$ 2,500 in Cash Awards 

Plus 
25 Westinghouse Products 

First Prize $1,000 

Second Prize $500 

Third Prize $250 

Fourth Prize $50 

(•4- winners) 

Fifth Prize 

(25 winners) 

Westinghouse Hair Dryer 




A complete beauty salon in a travel 
case. Queen -size hood — nail dryer. 



Sixth Prize 

(14- winners) 



$25 
Seventh Prize $15 



(16 winners) 



62 Easy- to- Win Prizes! 



WIN BIG 
CASH PRIZES IN 

True Story Magazine's 








V 1 




m * ™^^™| I*""" 

■■■■* ■ ■•••■•• : - : " ' : '- *' ■ m 






ITS THE CHANCE YOU 
HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR! 



read the story... 
enjoy the story. . . then 

xzi nnn 





3 



Look for complete details and entry rules 
in August True Story 

A wonderful way to win extra pocket 
money — and you don't have to be 
a writer to win. . . enter the monthly 
Write a Title contest ... in August 
True Story Magazine now on sale. 



75 



(Continued from page 74) 
when I used to take him with me to the 
New York Times employees' cafeteria — 
where a few of us were allowed to eat 
because some guys in the drama section 
were very lenient on hungry actors. We'd 
get a whole vegetable dinner for fifteen 
cents, a big bowl of soup for five cents. 

How he's changed 

I remember Vince during those 
"Streetcar" days when, like everyone 
else, he was dressing a la Brando. One 
day he would be with the T-shirt, the 
next day he had on a polo shirt. That 
was the time when you were supposed 
to look not too well dressed. I did it 
and even Elia Kazan used to dress that 
way. But then around 1955, when 
Brando began to dress, everybody 
started dressing. 

The only way Vince has changed is 
that now he's setting the styles, not 
following them. But as a human being 
he's the same old Vince. Outside his 
work, he likes to clown, he likes to sing, 
he likes to play the piano, he likes to 
tell jokes. 

Only the other day, we were doing a 
"Ben Casey" scene together. He looked 
at me and forgot his lines. Instead of 
getting irritated, he burst out laughing 
and roared, "How do you like that. 
Greek? Stefado!" 

He loves to use Greek words — even 
though stefado is stew and had nothing 
to do with anything at the moment. To 
Vince, it just felt so good yelling it, 
getting out the sound of it. He likes to 
mimic me. He mimics me to death. 
When he rehearses, he says his lines the 
way I do. Out of a clear blue sky, he'll 
say, "That's right. We're going to Meli- 
nas Papadakis' place." 



He breaks up every time. He got that 
from "Too Late Blues," where I played 
Nick Bouboulinas, the Greek who ran 
the pool hall where Vince beat up 
Bobby Darin. "Where are the girls?" 
Vince will say. "They're playing cards 
over in Papadakis' house." 

To me, friendship is or isn't. With me 
and Vince, it is. And I'm sure it always 
will be. I know he likes my company, 
and I know I like his. We don't clash. 
He's tall. I'm short. We clown around 
with each other — but we take each other 
seriously. He doesn't put on an act for 
me. I don't put one on for him. 

Vince has done a lot for me. For 
what he has done, I'm grateful. But 
that's not why you like a man. You're 
more apt to like a man in spite of the 
favors he does for you than because of 
the favors he does for you. 

Once, when he was dating actress 
Roberta Haynes, I was over at her place 
with Vince and a bunch of other people 
for a swim. I was showing off with some 
crazy diving and my back went out and 
I was paralyzed as I hit the water. I 
went under twice. Everyone thought I 
was kidding. Once more and it would 
have been one Greek less in Hollywood 
— where they need all the Greeks they 
can get. A sixth sense told Vince some- 
thing was wrong. He dove in and fished 
me out. 

He saved my life, and I was grateful. 
But that has nothing to do with why I 
like Vince Edwards. 

If not for Vince, I wouldn't be in "Ben 
Casey." One day while we were shooting 
"Too Late Blues," Vince said, "You 
know, Nick. I'm doing a pilot for a TV 
series. Would you come over and see it? 
There's something I want to talk to you 
about." 

I saw the pilot and thought it was 



great, one of the best I'd ever seen. 

"Nick," Vince said, "how would you 
like to be in this series?" 

"How would I like to?" I said. "This 
is the salvation of an actor — to be in a 
series!" 

I'm grateful to Vince for that break, 
but one of the reasons I like him is the 
way he did it. People can degrade you 
with favors. Not Vince. He made it 
seem I was doing him the favor. 

"Nick," he said, "this isn't because 
you're my friend — but because I've 
known you as an actor for many years, 
and I think you'll be an asset to the 
series. That's why I want you in it. 
You'll be good in it." 

I think the key to Vince is his boyish- 
ness. He's a big, rugged guy. But he's 
gentle, very gentle. If Vince hits some- 
body, forget it. That's why he controls 
his temper. When his temper comes, it 
comes. It's that Latin blood. 

At the same time, he's just like a 
lamb. I've never seen Vince vicious. Not 
even with people who cross him. He 
just leaves them alone. 

The big thing about Vince is that he 
doesn't have any dishonest emotions. 
When he puts his arm around you, he 
means it. It's not a phony Hollywood 
gesture. It's not just for the sake of 
putting an arm around you. He squeezes 
you, if you know what I mean. He al- 
most kills you. The tighter he squeezes, 
the better he likes you. It's hard on your 
ribs, but it gives you a nice feeling. 

That's why I could understand what 
he did for that kid in that Phoenix hos- 
pital. It wasn't Ben Casey that little 
girl was hipped on. It was Vince Ed- 
wards. — as told to Bill Tusher 

See Nick with Vince on "Ben Casey," 
ABC-TV, Mon., from 10 to 11 p.m. edt. 



a 



LOVE OF LIFE 



if 



(Continued from page 55) 
life. Certainly he and all members of 
her family should give her emotional 
support in such a time of crisis, but 
that is all. 

As to prevailing upon Barbara and 
Rick to seek a Mexican divorce, we won- 
der if perhaps this wasn't motivated 
by the fear that some of the scandal 
would rub off on the rest of the family 
and a desire to protect their own 
■ reputations. 

Deeply affecting the lives of Vanessa 
and her family is her stepchildren's 
grandmother, Mrs. Vivian Carlson — the 
mother of Bruce's first wife. She is 
a meddlesome, opinionated snob who 
causes constant friction among the 
Sterlings. 

She exercises a good deal of influ- 
ence on Barbara. It was she who en- 
couraged her to seek a divorce and 
who accompanied her to Mexico. On 
their return, Barbara stayed with her 
and her husband, rather than with her 

T own family. 

v The modern grandparent plays an 

R important role in today's society. Mrs. 
Carlson, of course, is an extreme ex- 
ample of the worst kind of grandparent 

76 



who, to satisfy her own selfish needs, 
wreaks havoc with the rest of the 
family. 

That she is allowed to exercise such 
control is, to a great extent, Bruce's 
fault. It seems reasonable to assume 
that he is too weak to put a stop to 
her meddling. 

This is unfortunate for Vanessa, who 
now must battle the ghost of Bruce's 
first wife in the person of Mrs. Carlson. 
Obviously, she has been unable to per- 
suade Bruce to take a firmer stand 
against this woman. 

Barbara appears to be a weak, neu- 
rotic young woman who lacks confi- 
dence in her father. In order to win 
over such a person, Vanessa may be 
forced to offer more love, warmth and 
understanding than she can muster. For 
the odds are stacked against her, and 
she can expect little help from her 
husband. 

Conflict piles upon conflict, reaching 
a climax when Barbara discovers that 
she is pregnant — after the divorce. She 
wants to get rid of the baby, but 
Vanessa talks her out of it. Barbara 
agrees because she believes this to be 
her obligation as a mother and, despite 
the fact that she is no longer married, 
the baby was conceived legitimately. 

Suddenly, Barbara grows closer to 
her stepmother and even moves back 



into her father's home. During her preg- 
nancy, she works as a roving secretary 
at Winfield Academy and, although up- 
set and depressed about her condition, 
she grimly determines to have the child. 

The intense emotional experience 
Barbara is going through seems to have 
helped her to transfer her dependency 
from her grandmother to her step- 
mother. This incident may help to draw 
Vanessa and Barbara closer to each 
other. It all depends on the firmness 
of their relationship during Barbara's 
pregnancy. 

Once Barbara gives birth, however, 
many new problems may arise. If Bar- 
bara accepts Vanessa as her mother, 
rather than just as her stepmother, 
this will make Vanessa a true grand- 
mother to the baby. Also, it will help 
her to cope with Mrs. Carlson, who is 
sure to ingratiate herself into the 
situation. 

Barbara's child is doomed to become 
the pawn of all this emotional give- 
and-take — just as is the newborn child 
in any broken family. The emotional 
problems of the parents and grand- 
parents are sure to be visited upon 
the unfortunate child — unless they come 
to grips with their problems and clarify 
their relationships in a healthy, un- 
neurotic way. Now that Barbara has 
decided to have her baby, she must 



resolve to protect the child from the 
disturbing emotions in her environment. 
Vanessa — or any stepmother — must 
be guided by the behavior of her step- 
daughter. She must take care not to 
interfere in matters concerning Barbara 
and her baby — yet be there when she 
is wanted and needed. Bruce — as Bar- 
bara's father — can be decidedly helpful 
by rising to the occasion and standing 
by both his wife and daughter. In any 
second marriage, the true parent must 
be strong in times of emotional crisis 
in order to re-unite the family. 

Other people's problems 

In Rosehill, where everybody knows 
everybody else, togetherness is a way 
of life. Privacy isn't easy to come by. 
Vanessa, as a respected member of the 
community, is caught up in one emo- 
tional tangle after another. So in 
addition to seeking answers to her own 
difficulties as a second wife, she hovers 
over her neighbors like a mother-hen, 
concerning herself with their problems 
as well. 

Even in our largest cities, most peo- 
ple live in a "small town." A recent 
study on the subject emphasized the 
fact that most people really know only 
those neighbors who live on their street; 
so, in effect, their street becomes a 
small town itself. 

Rosehill is like that street. Vanessa 
is somewhat of a busybody. She messes 
around in what doesn't concern her. 
But in real life, the average woman 
has enough problems of her own to 
handle without going out of her way 
to become involved with her neigh- 
bors' difficulties. Vanessa can do this 
because she has "dramatic license" to 
do so; it makes her more interesting. 

A real-life woman in her position 
would be so taken up with the task 
of making her second marriage work 
that she'd have little time or patience 
to concern herself with anything else. 
Any second marriage most certainly 
poses some very special problems of 
its own, and it's a full-time job for 
every second wife to find acceptance 
in a home that is not really her own. 

Whatever happens in Rosehill is a 
matter of great concern to millions of 
faithful television fans. TV's Vanessa 
is their Vanessa. 

Even if yours isn't a second marriage, 
you can't fail to be affected by her 
various emotional conflicts. And if yours 
is a second marriage, chances are that 
you most certainly see yourself as Van- 
essa in your own life. 

But have a care. Remember to sep- 
arate the real from the fanciful. Van- 
essa is not truly of flesh and blood; 
you are! Make sure you don't wrongly 
confuse yourself and your problems 
with the image on your TV screen. 

This month we dealt with Vanessa 
Sterling and the problems arising out 
of a second marriage. Next month we'll 
tackle another popular daytime drama 
psychologically and try to make its 
stories and characters meaningful in 
your own life. — The End 

"Love of Life" is seen over CBS-TV, 
M-F, from 12 noon to 12:30 p.m. edt. 




Let's talk frankly about 

internal 
cleanliness 



Day before yesterday, many women hes- 
itated to talk about the douche even to 
their best friends, let alone to a doctor 
or druggist. 

Today, thank goodness, women are 
beginning to discuss these things freely 
and openly. But — even now — many 
women don't realize what is involved in 
treating "the delicate zone." 

They don't ask. Nobody tells them. 
So they use homemade solutions which 
may not be completely effective, or some 
antiseptics which may be harsh or in- 
flammatory. 

It's time to talk frankly about inter- 
nal cleanliness. 

Here are the facts: tissues in "the deli- 
cate zone" are very tender. Odors are 
very persistent. Your comfort and well- 
being demand a special preparation for 
the douche. Today there is such a prep- 
aration. 

This preparation is far more effective 



in antiseptic and germicidal action than 
old-fashioned homemade solutions. It is 
far safer to delicate tissues than other 
liquid antiseptics for the douche. It 
cleanses, freshens, eliminates odor, 
guards against chafing, relaxes and pro- 
motes confidence. 

This is modern woman's way to inter- 
nal cleanliness. It is the personal antisep- 
tic for women, made specifically for "the 
delicate zone." It is called Zonite®. Com- 
plete instructions for use come in every 
package. In cases of persistent discharge, 
women are advised to see 
their doctors. 

Millions of women al- 
ready consider Zonite as 
important a part of their 
grooming as 
their bath. 
You owe it 
to yourself 
to try Zonite. 



awsr: 



<? Guaranteed by " 
Good Housekeeping 




B«>m WALLET PHOTOS 




2'/ 2 "x3 l /2" genuine photos, 
for classmates, loved ones. 
Made from any photo on 
silk finish double weight 
paper. Send photo or neg. 
25 for $1.25 plus Free5"x7" 
enlargement (60 for $2.25) 



-Sir* 



Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

ROY PHOTO SERVICE 

Dept. A8, GPO Box 644, N.Y. 1, N.Y. 



BUNIONS 

Super-Soft Dr. Scholl's 
Zino-pads speedily relieve 
painful pressure on sen- 
sitive spot, soothe and 
cushion it. Enjoy real re- 
lief as millions do with 
Dr. Scholl's — world's 
largest-selling foot aids. 



Wflgtf D- r Scholls Zinopad. 




■CLIP THIS VALUABLE COUPON-FINAL OFFER' 



THIS MONTH DON'T PAY OVER 25c 

World /nnesf HAIR COLORING 

Regular $1.50 size new Creme Shampoo-Tint 
practically as a gift — Check Shade Below 

If your hair is gray, graying, streaked, dull, faded and lifeless 
looking, why mess around with half-way time-taking measures 
when you can re-color your hair to natural-like beauty, in only 
12 minutes ... for only 25£ tax included. Nothing to buy. 
Just mail your name and 25c\ shade wanted and we will send 
you the regular $1.50 size TINTZ CREME SHAMPOO- 
TINT, enough to re-color your entire head of hair or give 3 
touch-ups at temples, roots and parting. The new TINTZ 
CREME SHAMPOO-TINT HAIR COLORING is a per- 
manent type dye. Shampooing spreads color evenly. Won't 
wash off or rub off. Won't hurt permanents. Leaves hair soft, 
lustrous and colored to natural-like beauty. Thousands of 
packages sold monthly at $1.50 plus tax. Yours for only 25fS 
MA!L COUPON i tax included to cover handling and postage on this offer. 
Once you see how easy and simple it is to shampoo- Qjet Black nBiack nok. Brown □Med. Brown rjLt. Brown 
tint your hair at home this new quick way, you'll ™.„ ,w.. k,™ .int »dHi<>, ..* nrik uum Brn 
use nothing but TINTZ CREME SHAMPOO- :Warm shades ** ve sUsbt ieadisb casty QDk - Wm - Bm - 
TINT HAIR COLORING. That's why we make DMed. wm. Brn. QU. Wm. Brn. QAuburn (Henna) 
this amazing 25 si offer. Limit one to family. 
Name Address 




City Zone State 

..... FLEETWOOD CO., Dept. 22TH— 427 W. Randolph, Chicago 6, Illinois ..... 



77 



PEGGY McCAY 



(Continued from page 38) 
slowly but firmly — he shook his head. 
Then, seeing the disappointed expres- 
sion on her face, he added solemnly: 
"But— Merry Twistmas!" 

When Peggy told me about the in- 
cident over lunch in Warner Bros.' 
Green Room, she giggled — that's an- 
other vice of hers — and asked: "What 
can a girl do when she's turned down 
so charmingly?" 

I allowed that I didn't know. And 
I said, "I also don't know when you 
two met — but I'd like to." 

She smiled mischievously. "We met 
one day when I was chopping up furni- 
ture." Seeing my confused expression, 
she added hastily: "It was for a TV 
show — an episode of '77 Sunset Strip.' 
I played a rich widow who was tem- 
porarily short of money and chopping 
up the living room furniture to use as 
fuel. Somebody was threatening my life, 
and Efrem solved the case." Then she 
added wistfully, "It was a marvelous 
show — practically a duet between the 
two of us. . . ." 

"When did you start dueting in pri- 
vate life?" I asked. 

A dreamy expression had come over 
her face (she'll deny it when she reads 
this, but it's true!) and it took a few 
seconds for my question to bring her 
back to earth. "When did we start? 
I ... I really don't remember if it 
was while we were making the show, 
or just afterwards. But it was right 
around that time." 

"Do you see him often?" 

Suddenly she was on her guard. "We 
see each other . . . occasionally." 

"How occasionally?" 

"Occasionally." 

"All right. Where does he take you?" 

"He doesn't." 

"But I thought you said you see each 
other occa- . . . you know." 

She smiled. "He comes over to my 
house for dinner." 

"Doesn't he ever take you out?" 

She shook her head. "Never, except 
for the night after Christmas." 

"You must be a wonderful cook," 
I said. "What do you make for him?" 

"Casseroles," she said proudly. 

"Just . . . casseroles?" 

She bristled. "Not just casseroles! 
My casseroles. Things like Beef Bour- 
guinonne and Chicken Veronique. Why. 
I spend hours over them, chopping and 
grating and simmering. . . . Did you 
ever make a casserole? You can do 
lots of things with them!" 

Then she softened, and smiled. "My 
only trouble is that sometimes the 
things I prepare are too fancy. Once 
I cooked a very elaborate Christmas 
dinner for my mother. 

"After my mother had finished the 
dinner, she was so stuffed that she could 
hardly speak for two hours. Finally 
she turned to me and said, 'I think I'd 
T like a cup of tea, dear.' 
v "And as I headed for the kitchen to 

R make it, she added with a kind of 
desperation : 'Uh — don't — put — any- 
thing in it, dear. Just— tea. ...''' 

7n 



Peggy laughed. "Fortunately, Efrem 
hasn't complained yet." 

"But it can't be just your cooking 
that keeps him interested." I said. 
"What do you two talk about when 
you're alone together?" 

"We often discuss music. As you 
know, his father is a famous violinist 
and his mother was Alma Gluck, the 
opera singer. Efrem himself recently 
read 'A Lincoln Portrait' with the Phila- 
delphia Symphony. 

"Aside from music, we talk about 
our work. We're both 'New York ac- 
tors,' and movie work presents certain 
problems that our stage work didn't 
prepare us for! There was that time 
I had to work with sausage behind 
my ear . . ." 

"With what?" I asked. 

"There . . . I've startled you again!" 
she said apologetically. "You see, I 
recently made a picture called 'Lad. 
a Dog.' And the way you get the dogs 
to come to you is to rub sausage be- 
hind your ear so they can smell it. 
For a Method actress like myself, it 
was a little hard to accept this, but 
I finally resigned myself to it." 

"All right," I said. "I can certainly 
understand why Efrem's attracted to 
you. Your casseroles, your conversa- 
tion, and — did anyone ever tell you that 
you look like Janet Gaynor?" 

"Quite a few people," she said matter- 
of-factly. 

"Then you obviously know you're at- 
tractive. But tell me. Just what is it 
that attracted you to Efrem?" 

She gave me a look that said, "What 
are you? Some kind of a nut?" But 
then she put her reasons into words. 

"Well, he's certainly a very attractive 
person. And a completely charming 
gentleman — absolutely ! " She rapidly 
warmed to her subject. "It's a pleasure 
to see someone who's so ... so thought- 
ful. And considerate! So very consid- 
erate. . . .*' 

"I get the picture," I said. "I sup- 
pose, with a man like Efrem available, 
a girl would be foolish to date anyone 
else." 

"But I do date someone else," she in- 
sisted. "I see quite a lot of Robert Q. 
Lewis." 

Now, that was a switch. From a 
smooth, urbane leading man to a be- 
spectacled comedian — disc jockey. 
"Anybody else?" I asked. 

She shook her head. 

"Do you cook for Robert Q., too?" 

She smiled. "No, I'm ashamed to ad- 
mit that I never have. We always seem 
to go over to his house for dinner. He 
has a wonderful cook. But I do expect 
to have him over soon." 

"Is he one of those comedians who's 
actually very serious?" 

She giggled. "Not at all! He has a 
wild sense of humor. Recently he did 
a guest shot on 'Room for One More' 
just as a lark, and in one scene he broke 
us all up. 

"He was supposed to run up the stairs 
and say to me, 'Your husband!' I was 
to ask, 'Something happened?' and he 
was to reply, 'I don't know. We got the 
smelling salts.' 

"But he changed all that When the 
camera started rolling, he rushed up 



the stairs and said his first line. But 
when I asked, 'Something happened?' 
he shouted, 'I don't know — and I don't 
care! And if you think I'm going to do 
this show for scale, you're crazy.' Then 
he grabbed me in a passionate embrace 
like Rudolph Valentino. I nearly died 
laughing. 

"That's why I'm looking forward to 
acting with him at the Pasadena Play- 
house in a few weeks," she added. 
"We're going to do 'Send Me No Flow- 
ers,' and he's told me that after the 
first week he always starts ad libbing 
—'like Nichols and May.' Well, I'm no 
Elaine May, but I'm willing to try. 

"And there's one more thing," she 
said, with a gleam in her eye. "We're 
going to do a Twist in the play." 

"Now I know why you took the part," 
I said. "But tell me — how would you 
compare his sense of humor with 
Efrem's?" 

She thought for a minute. "Well . . . 
Efrem's wit is very subtle, even though 
he loves puns. But Bob's, as I said, is 
wild. He likes practical jokes and sight 
gags." Then she added diplomatically, 
"However, I think they're both very 
amusing men." 

"And very eligible men," I pointed 
out. "Which leads me to ask — just what 
qualities are you looking for in a 
husband?" 

She smiled. "As a matter of fact, I 
do want someone with a sense of humor, 
first of all. And he should care a great 
deal about his work. Since I've spent 
so much of my life in a career, I'd like 
to have a husband who's very interested 
in his, so that I could share some of 
that interest with him." 

"You wouldn't mind marrying an 
actor?" 

"Not at all. I'd love it! We'd under- 
stand each other so much better." 

"So far, your prescription fits both 
Efrem and Robert Q.," I said. 

"Wait a minute!" she cut in. "Who 
says I'm ready for marriage? As a 
matter of fact, I don't feel that I am. 
I think I need to be a little more mature 
first." 

And then she added, with a mis- 
chievous grin: "Of course, there's a 
point at which it becomes absurd to 
wait any longer." 

"When that day comes, will you want 
a big family?" I asked — remembering 
that Efrem has two teen-age children 
from his first marriage, which left him 
a widower. (His daughter by his sec- 
ond wife is living with her mother.) 

"Yes, I will — because I love chil- 
dren," she said. "And I've really en- 
joyed playing a mother on 'Room for 
One More.'" 

Suddenly I remembered something 
about the mother on that show: Not 
all her children were her own. Some 
were adopted. And I wondered if the 
same thing might happen to Peggy. 



Peggy stars in "Room for One More," 
ABC-TV, Sat., 8 p.m., edt. Efrem stars 
in "77 Sunset Strip," ABC-TV, Fri. 
9 p.m. edt. Robert Q. has his own 
program on KHJ Radio, Hollywood. 
After all, anything's possible — par- 
ticularly if Efrem learns to Twist. 

— James Gregory 



il 



Hiimtiitimijimmmitimm 



iiiitiit(itmirniJiiitiiii!iiiiiiiiiHiiiiJHiiiiuiiiiiinimiiini 



KATHY NOLAN 



(Continued from page 56) 
anyone I've gone with. My theory is 
that every date should become a friend 
before any further development is 
possible. 

Nick Adams and I got a lot of pub- 
licity when we were dating because 
we were newcomers to the Hollywood 
spotlight. We were eager to come up 
to expectations. But we recognized that 
our love was one of friendship, rather 
than one for marriage. There never was 
any blow-up, as some magazines de- 
lightedly reported. I've great respect 
for Nick s accomplishments. He and his 
wife, Carol, are good friends of mine 
and always will be. 

I was unwillingly pushed into a new 
phase as a playgirl after that. I went 
to a few parties with very decent dates 
and found I was considered a "starlet." 
That was supposed to be marvelous, 
but I didn't like that category. Either 
a girl is an actress, dedicated to im- 
proving her ability, or she is trying to 
use the starlet bit as a front! 

When I protested that I didn't go to 
a party every night, my denials were 
jazzed up into "colorful copy." I like 
to have fun, but I'm not a kook! I 
never did anything to win that classi- 
fication. 

It is a fact that I tried sky diving. 
I parachuted out of a plane four 
thousand feet high, along with Jim 
Franciscus and Jody McCrea. I took 
instructions carefully, wore the pre- 
scribed garb, and did it because I 
wanted to, not to be written about. 
Well, it was said that I kookily insisted 
upon wearing high heels instead of 
boots, and a straw hat tied with a 
ribbon under my chin rather than a 
helmet. I wouldn't be here to tell this 
if I had! 

Tall tales don't fade away fast 
enough. Vince Edwards just revived 
that one with a new twist. In an inter- 
view, he said that sky-diving isn't some- 
thing to kid around with (I absolutely 
agree) and then he used me as his 
example. "Kathy Nolan fainted before 
she could pull the ripcord, and if the 
emergency cord hadn't snapped open, 
she'd be dead." I did not faint, Dr. 
Casey I I pulled the proper cord with 
my own little hand. That's why I'm 
still alive. 

Certain magazines, attempting to be 
sensational to sell more copies, have 
caused me real heartache with their 
misrepresentations. While I was won- 
dering what I could do about this, I 
heard from Walter Brennan. Somebody 
had promptly handed him a magazine 
with a terrible story about me. I loved 
my character of Kate. She's like a real 
person, and I'd never do anything that 
would be offensive to any of the people 
who love her. Mr. Brennan was properly 
aghast. He lectured me for giving such 
an undignified story. Of course, he be- 
lieved me as soon as I told him I 
hadn't, and that what I had said had 
been rewritten without my consent. 

It's terrible not to be able to trust 
some people. At least it is for me. 






■ '."■ 






CASH IN this $ 2§S Value Coupon 

(k? A (mm WM SSI&M : 



INTRODUCTORY COUPON GOOD FOR 



Its o $2 - 75 y° r i h °1 *w 

Greeting Cards •■* 



25< s 



0N.w ChrWIma. A...r»m.nl. on approval with «.y 
detail, for ma king $50 tO *250*~ *» 

MIDWEST CARD CO., Depl. 405-X 

1113 Washington Ave., St. louis 1, Missouri 

Vnr 25c enclosed in full payment, please send me the $2.75 

SH^= mP ^^Hr^ 

of money-making ideas. (One Coupon to . Fam.ly) 



CLIP COUPON 

NOW!. 



ix."; 



fur 



Name- 



Address— 



_City_ 



_Statc. 



=» ForSpeclalFond-neuuuji-i.il, t=>)t > 



$2 



Save $2.50 by getting the giant 98-piece assortment 
of Christmas and AH OccasionGreetingCardsforonly 
25c with the coupon. You'll not only save money, but 
you'll also MAKE MONEY by letting friends see 
our exciting, new samples. No experience is needed. 

Your Friends Will Be Thrilled 
Everyone wants our beautiful, new designs and un- 
usual bargains at $1 and $1.25. You keep as much as 
60c cash profit on most assortments — more on higher- 
priced Gifts, Name-Imprinted Christmas Cards and 
Stationery. Everything to start you earning is in our 
sample kit: — Free Personalized Samples, Color 
Catalog and four leading Assortments sent on free 
trial. If friends don't snap them up, return them at 
our expense and owe nothing. 

Clip and Use Above Coupon NOW! 
The big $2.75 assortment, is yours to keep for the 
25c, whether or not you decide to make extra money. 
Decide after you see your samples and how easily the 
money comes in. Send the Introductory Coupon 
above TODAY! MIDWEST CARD COMPANY, 
1113 Washington Ave., Dept. 405-X, St. Louis, Mo. 



■ * 



w 



-Zfr 



---■'%ll 



I an »„"?°"me„i /' ?cca. 

f c "'l«niai o l 
/ £w>S«/ry ,.**. e «* 



ATTENTION: MAIL ORDER BUYERS 

New postal charges increase the cost of any item 
purchased COD by almost $1.00. Avoid this expense 
by enclosing payment with your order. Send check, 
cash or money order. Remember, it pays to prepay. 



SONG IDEAS 

WANTED 



Songwriters with publisher contacts want song 

ideas. Collaborate with professionals. 

SHARE ROYALTIES. NO FEES. 

Our Staff has written these Hits: 

LET THE LITTLE GIRL DANCE — OLD TOWN -BILLY BLAND 
PRETTY LITTLE ANGEL EYES — DUNES — CURTIS LEE 
WHAT A SURPRISE — COED — JOHNNY MAESTRO 
HOMBRE — SABINA — THE BELMONTS 
VUT, VUT — CARLTON — IMPERIALS 
HOP IN MY JALOP — MGM — CHUCK ALAIMO 
PLUS MANY OTHER HITS! 

Send Poems — Free Examination. 
SONGWRITERS' ASSOCIATES 

Studio 21, 1650 Broadway, New York 19, N.Y. 



Shrinks Hemorrhoids 
New Way Without Surgery 
Stops Itch -Relieves Pain 

For the first time science has found a 
new healing substance with the astonishing 
ability to shrink hemorrhoids and to relieve 
pain — without surgery. 

In case after case, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction (shrinkage) took place. 

Most amazing of all — results were so 
thorough that sufferers made astonishing 
statements like "Piles have ceased to be a 
problem!" 

The secret is a new healing substance 
(Bio-Dyne®)— discovery of a world-famous 
research institute. 

This substance is now available in sup- 
pository or ointment form under the name 
Preparation H®. Ask for it at all drug 
counters. 



DISCOVER NOW 

how to earn big money in your spare time. 
Write for FREE information: MACFADDEN- 
BARTELL CORP., 205 E. 42 St.. N. Y. 17. N. Y. 

NEW CHEMICAL CRYSTALS 
Safely CURLS. WAVES HAIR 
Without Permanent Waving 

No matter how straight and hard to 
curl your hair is, Just stir a spoon- 
ful of new discovery KASACTJRL 
HAIR WAVING CRYSTALS in a 
glass of water. Comb through hair, 
put up on reg. curlers or pins. 
Overnight hair takes on soft lustrous 
casual waves and curls as lovely as 
natural wavy hair. Safe for all 
types hair, even dyed hair. And 
nb matter how damp or rainy the 
weather, your KASACURt. stays in 
as neat and wavy the 7th day as the 
first. Rich In protein, conditions 
dry hair. It's amazing! Guarantee, satis- 
faction or money back. Send 91.10 tax 
included for a full year's supply. If C.O.D. 
postage extra. Write: 

FLEETWOOD CO.. Dept. 22KH 
427 W. Randolph. Chicago, Illinois 




r " HIGH - 1 
I SCHOOL I 

AT HOME IN SPARE TIME 



Low monthly payments include stand- 
ard text books and instruction. Credit 
for subjects already completed. 
Progress as rapidly as your time 
and abilities permit, diploma awarded 

SEND FOR BOOKLET— TELLS YOU HOW 



■OUR 65TH YEAR' 



I 
I 
i 



American school, Dept. HC53 

IDrexel at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois. 
Please send FREE High School booklet. 
NAME t 

I ADDRESS Ik 
CITY & STATE 

Accredited Member national home study council 



79 



80 



My father and mother and sister — my 
friends who were near — had no doubts 
about me. But it's cost my relatives 
in St. Louis a lot of phone calls when 
they've read what they assume is ab- 
surd. They still want to be reassured, 
and I don't blame them. 

I would like to emphasize that, as 
a whole, the press has been marvelous 
to me. Some of my best pals are re- 
porters, editors, and columnists. I can 
be perfectly frank with them. They 
have the good taste I like. But that 
made the disappointments even harder 
to bear. 

Imagine my surprise when I read 
false accounts of how I was feuding 
with Connie Stevens, and then with 
Dorothy Provine. I've never had a feud 
with anyone, because I refuse to be that 
petty. I'm not envious of the ability 
I see in others. I admire it! 

When an accident — a falling light on 
the set — gave me a brain concussion 
soon after I started as Kate, I was in 
a hospital to recover for several months. 
All my pals came to cheer me up, 
deluged me with flowers and messages. 
So what appeared in print? Sob stories 
about poor, sad little me, utterly for- 
saken and alone in heartless Holly- 
wood! They may have aroused sym- 
pathy, but that phony version made me 
furious. I've built loyal friendships 
wherever I've been, and this definitely 
includes Hollywood. 

Yet those uncalled-for cracks made 
me so miserable I finally reached the 
point where I flew back to New York 
and my family there almost every week- 
end. If I hadn't been under long-term 
contract for the series, I would have 
left Hollywood. 

For instance, there was the date who 
was so dented by the party-girl pub- 
licity I was getting that he believed 
it. He got too fresh when he was tak- 
ing me home. I made him stop his 
car on Sepulveda Boulevard, one of the 
main freeways in Los Angeles, and I 
walked home the rest of the way. It 
was the last mile home, and I trudged 
along in the dark. I'd do it again if 
I had to. 

A new way to say no 

I valued the stories that had appeared 
about me in TV Radio Mirror. This 
is one magazine I always have been 
glad to be in. But, after a while, I no 
longer was asked for interviews. One 
evening at an industrial gathering, I 
had a chance to talk directly to Eunice 
Field, the West Coast Editor. She's as 
wise as she is pretty. When I made 
UP my mind to ask her point-blank why 
this magazine wasn't interested in any- 
thing on me anymore, she answered 
kindly, "Perhaps we've read so much 
about the kookie things you do, you 
don't seem the type for our readers." 
She never knew that when I reached 
home that night I cried, thinking that 
over again. I hadn't suspected even 
people as discerning as she is could be- 
lieve I was at fault. 

That's when I resolved to say no in 
a new way. 

Until then, I felt nothing could be 
done. I'd firmly turned down the re- 
quests that confused me. When I was 



polite, but wouldn't go along with the 
gags, I was written about as a bit 
balmy, anyway. When I reached my 
decision that I wouldn't cater to sensa- 
tionalism, I was passed by for others 
who could be played up for their antics. 
But I realized, at last, that it was im- 
mature of me to be so discouraged by 
a few tricky operators and their fabri- 
cated stories. I'm a romanticist, but I'm 
realistic, ultimately. I saw I didn't have 
to run away, shrink in silence, either. 
From that time on, whenever I read 
something that isn't so about myself, 
I refused to despair. I try to get on the 
phone to the person who wrote it and 



DID KATHY SAY NO 
ONCE TOO OFTEN? 

Newspapers recently head- 
lined Kathy Nolan's biggest 
NO when she refused to sign 
a new contract for "The Real 
McCoys." Producer Irving 
Pincus was quoted as saying 
he'd offered to double her 
$l250-a-week salary and 
throw in a percentage of the 
profits — but couldn't agree 
to her other "demands." 

"It was never a question of 
'demands,' " Kathy tells TV 
Radio Mirror. "Signing a 
new five-year contract would 
mean ten years of my life 
given to one role — the most 
important, most productive 
years of a woman's life. I'm 
twenty-eight. I want a home 
and children. But no romance 
could really thrive under 
these circumstances. 

"There's a lot more to 
playing a regular part in a 
series than working in front 
of the cameras. Bob Fuller 
would say, 'Let's go fishing 
this weekend' — and I'd have 
to answer, 'Can't. Sot to go 
to Peoria for a personal ap- 
pearance.' A couple of weeks 
later, I'd say, 'Let's take the 
day off and go to Laguna' — 
and Bob couldn't make it. 

"Now I'm not only making 
records but have been asked 
to sing and dance on TV va- 
riety guest shots. I've been 
approached about three 
Broadway shows so far — two 
musicals — as well as movies." 

At the moment, Kathy is 
glad she said NO to the new 
TV contract. But is this one 
time she should have said 
YES? What do you think? 



ask, "Just where did you get your 
information?" To my astonishment, in- 
variably they're glad to hear the facts. 

I say no now, when I must, with a 
happy feeling. For I dare to be myself. 

Although Dick Crenna and I had been 
a "team" in the series, I didn't become 
as good friends as I am now with him 
and his wife until this past year. When 
we finally sat down to talk at length 
after four years in the show, I was 
amazed to discover even Dick had 
strange ideas about what I did — thanks 
to that old, kookie publicity! 

Sometimes you can't win. When the 
Spanish distributor of our show invited 
us to Puerto Rico for a week, I was 
able to fly there with Tony Martinez, 
who is Pepino in "The Real McCoys." 
Since he's from there, he was given a 
royal welcome. The newspapers also 
headlined that he was bringing me home 
to meet his family because we were 
getting married! 

The man I'll marry 

Marriage will be wonderful for me. 
when the time is right for this step. 
Bob Fuller and I have been going to- 
gether for over two-and-a-half years 
now. What you may possibly have read 
about Bob and me is guessing, because 
we haven't given any stories on love in 
the past two years. Our plans are not 
definite yet. Just because we have a 
disagreement over a cup of coffee at 
times, I'm not going to run to some writ- 
er and weep over what is bound to be 
a laugh for us in another day. 

Bob is the exception to my rule of 
always take time to become friends 
first. I didn't have time with him! Mu- 
tual friends arranged a blind date for 
us, and friendship had to follow the 
initial impact. 

The reason I have never married is 
that I want to be sure. I want to be 
married only once. I have my silver 
pattern and keep adding to it. I have 
a hope chest full of china, guest towels, 
and linen. I'd rather have yellowed linen 
than the wrong man! 

Bob and I still go out with others 
at times. Keely Smith and her brother 
are mutual friends of ours. Most of my 
friends are married couples: the Ed- 
mund O'Briens, the Danny Thomases, 
the Andy Williamses, Nick and Carol 
Adams, the Dick Crennas and the Charl- 
ton Hestons. 

I know interesting men in the busi- 
ness world. Nobody ever talks about 
my business sense, but Kathy Nolan 
Enterprises has a suite of offices in an 
ultra-modern building on Sunset Boule- 
vard in Hollywood. I handle my real- 
estate holdings, my interest in a print- 
ing firm, in a bowling alley, my stocks, 
personal appearances, and back a pub- 
lic relations firm there. My own office 
is efficient, but feminine. I've a silk 
scene of a romantic spot in Rome 
stretching across one wall. My desk is 
a table with a pink marble top. All the 
rest is cream and gold and pink. 

So is my life, now that I've learned 
how to say no! — as told to Tex Maddox 

This summer, Kathy Nolan can still be 
seen as Kate in "The Real McCoys." 
on ABC-TV, Thurs.. 8:30 p.m. edt. 



^ 






-U I 




u 



NOW ... 2 IS/FW 
PHOTO OFFERS 
FROM UNITED 




WALLET PHOTOS 
FROM YOUR PORTRAIT 

for giving to friends and 
relatives. Send Black & 
White portrait, snapshot or 
negative; returned intact. 
20 (2Vi" x 3V2") for $1.25; 
60 for $2.25. Made from 
one picture. 




Terrific Value 
3 for $2.49 



BEAUTIFUL 4 x5 
COLOR ENLARGEMENTS HIGHLIGHTED 
IN BEIGE & GOLD ANTIQUED FRAMES 

Now ... get beautiful 4x5 color enlargements 
from your color negatives or slides — in a rich 
beige & gold antiqued frame. 

Only 98( each or 3 for $2.49 

packed in individual boxes, ready for 
shipment — a wonderful gift. 

Black & White enlargements also available 
from B&W negatives. Same price. 



roll after roll -all you can use! 

For every roll of Kodacolor or black & white 
film you send us for custom developing at 
our low discount prices you receive a fresh 
roll of the same type Kodak film FREE with 
your developed prints. You will never have to 
buy another roll of film. 



Y Tear out this envelope now 

Fast "48-72 hour" in lab developing service 



• We pay return postage • 

FACTS ABOUT UNITED'S 
FREE KODAK FILM OFFER 



LOW DEVELOPING PRICES- United s developing 
prices are lower than those normally charged at stores . . . 
plus you get fresh Kodak Film . . . FREE. 

CUSTOM QUALITY DEVELOPING - United's labs 
use the latest Kodak electronic equipment . . . guarantee- 
ing you the best developing possible . . . anywhere ... at 
any price. 

HERE'S HOW IT'S POSSIBLE -you deal direct 
with us, eliminating the middleman's 40% profit. The sav- 
ings are passed along to give you FREE KODAK FILM and 
low cost custom developing. In addition, with each order 
you receive free safety envelopes for future use and the 
U.S. Mail is used for safe, fast delivery. 

OVER 1,000,000 SATISFIED CUSTOMERS have used 
United's service. It's the convenient, money saving way 
to take more pictures at less cost. 

NO FEES, NO DUES, NO OBLIGATION to participate 
regularly. Use United's service as seldom or as often as 
as you like. 

UNITED'S IRON CLAD MONEY BACK GUARANTEE. 
You cannot get better quality developing anywhere, at any 
price. The FREE film you receive is fresh, dated Kodak film 
. . . the same package that is sold in stores. You must be 
satisfied or your money will be promptly refunded. 



Add state sales tax . . . if any 



We pay return postage 



FOR FASTEST SERVICE MAIL FILM TO CITY NEAREST YOU. 

24 convenient locations — Coast to Coast 

SOUTH WEST MIDWEST EAST 

ATLANTA 1, GA LOS ANGELES 54, CAL. CHICAGO 80, ILL. NEW YORK 1, N.Y. 

DALLAS 21. TEX. PORTLAND 8, ORE. KANSAS CITY 41. MO. PHILADELPHIA 1, PA. 

CHARLOTTE 1. N.C. SAN FRANCISCO 26, CAL. CLEVELAND 1, OHIO BOSTON 4. MASS. 

MEMPHIS 1, TENN. PHOENIX 2, ARIZ. MINNEAPOLIS 40, MINN. ROCHESTER 3, N.Y. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KY. DENVER 1, COLO. DETROIT 32, MICHIGAN WASHINGTON 13, D.C. 

JACKSONVILLE 1, FLA. SEATTLE 11, WASH. ST. LOUIS 77, MO. 
NEW ORLEANS 50, LA. 



Stop buying film. .. 
start using UNITED'S service today! 



UNITED FILM CLUB inc. 



// safety envelope has been removed 

write for extra envelopes to: 

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS 

4130 No. Temple City Blvd., Rosemead, California 



©United IFiim Club Inc. 1962 



81 



MICHAEL LAN DON 



(Continued from page 49) 
Dodie learned that happiness is never 
an easy prize. "There were times in 
our marriage," Mike said later, "that, 
for Dodie and me, were the happiest 
we have ever known. 

"There were times, too, of fear and 
disillusionment. But until what hap- 
pened lately, we always had faith that 
our marriage would survive." 

Mike and Dodie strove desperately at 
times to walk the tight-rope of those 
fragile in-between days — and to repair 
the deepening misunderstandings of the 
days before. Their separation was the 
final admission of failure. Yet, at all 
times, they were both religious in their 
efforts to conceal the times of discon- 
tent from the children. 

We went to Mike to see if we could 
get at the truth of the matter. Naturally, 
he preferred not to comment on his 
alleged relationship with "another 
man's wife." It's a subject loaded 
with implications which, discussed out- 
side the courtroom, could - easily lead 
to wrong inferences. 

But on his three sons, on fatherhood 
and his love for Dodie, Mike was very 
articulate, willing and eloquent, though 
he was obviously greatly disturbed by 
the beating he is taking from all sides. 

He clasped his hands tensely before 
him. "They're my sons," he said quietly, 
"and I'm their father until the day 
they die — or I die. 

"I am a good father to them, and I 
think Dodie knows that. She knew it 
early in our marriage, while she lay 
in the hospital when I thought she was 
dying. 

"It was all of a sudden with Dodie. 
She is a graduate nurse. It's strange 
with people who are trained in medi- 
cine. They are always the last to admit 
how ill they are. Dodie was bright and 
cheerful that morning. I'll never forget. 
A few hours later, we were rushing her 
to the hospital. 

"I didn't learn until later that, from 
her training, Dodie understood all too 
well the seriousness of her illness. It 
was one of the reasons she held off so 
long, so as not to frighten me. But she 
knew her recovery was uncertain. 

"They watched Dodie for days before 
they decided to operate. She was con- 
scious and smiling every time I saw 
her, but inside she was terrified — and 
I didn't know." 

The doctors knew an operation was 
Dodie's only chance. The night before, 
Mike and Dodie talked for a while and 
then Dodie made the startling revela- 
tion to Mike. 

"Mike," she said, "I called my 
mother. I told her that if anything 
happens to me I want you to have cus- 
tody of Mark. You're a wonderful 
father to him, Mike, and he loves you." 

Mark is Dodie's son by a former 

marriage. 

T Mike tried not to show his concern. 

v "Until that moment," he explained, "I 

R didn't realize how terribly serious 

Dodie's condition was. I knew how 

much she. too. loved Mark and to hear 
82 



that she was now considering the pos- 
sibility of not surviving the operation 
turned my heart cold. 

"Yet in that moment of awful panic 
and shock over Dodie, I could not help 
feeling proud that she trusted me that 
much. She was right, of course. I love 
Mark as much as if he were my own 
and I've never kept it a secret. It's 
odd, but I think that Mark is more like 
me than a natural son could be. 

"But after the operation I had an- 
other shock coming." 

The doctor called Mike to his office. 

"Sit down, Mike," he said. "You're 
going to hear bad news." 

"I can barely remember the night- 
marish thoughts that raced through my 
brain," Landon recalls. "Oh, God, I 
thought, this is it! I know he's going 
to tell me that Dodie is dead or dying. 
At a moment like that, you pray with- 
out knowing you're praying." 

Mike listened in cold silence. 

"This will be a shock to you," the 
doctor said, gently, "but you will learn 
to accept it. Mrs. Landon will not be 
able to have any more children." 

"I wanted to jump for joy," he said, 
"but I knew that the doctor would 
misunderstand. He didn't know that I 



PHOTOGRAPHERS' CREDITS 
tennon Sisters, cover color by Frank 
Bez; Debbie Reynolds and Eddie Fisher 
by Globe; Dick Chamberlain and Clara 
Ray by G/obe; Vince Edwards and 
Sherry Nelson color by Bernard Abram- 
son of Vista; Lennon Sisters with Dad 
by Frank Bez; Perry Como golf pic- 
tures by Charles Trainor of Miami 
News— Gilloon; Burns & Allen by Wil- 
liam Woodfield; Cara Williams by 
CBS; Mike Landon by CBS; Kathy Nolan 
by Topix; Garry Moore— Carol Burnett 
color by Jack Stager; Arthur Godfrey 
by Wide World; George Maharis color 
by Del Hayden of Vista; Sebastian 
Cabot by John Hamilton. 



was prepared to hear that Dodie's ill- 
ness had been fatal. If I had shown 
the relief I felt, I was afraid the doc- 
tor might think I was happy because 
there'd be no more children. 

"The doctor mistook my silence for 
shock and kept apologizing, saying he 
was sorry and assuring me that every- 
thing medically possible had been done. 
So it startled him when, unable to con- 
tain my feeling an instant longer, 1 
grabbed his hand and cried, 'Thank 
God! Thank God!' 

"That doctor still thinks I'm a mon- 
ster who doesn't like children. But I do. 

"Nonetheless, to know I could never 
have children with Dodie was a hard 
blow to take. God knows, I wanted to 
be a father. Then the second shock 
came. What about Dodie? In pain from 
surgery, had she learned that she could 
not have another child? She had. We 
helped each other through that crisis." 

Mike stood up and paced the length 
of the room. Then he sat down again. 

"I know the feeling I have inside 
me for children," he said. "That's why 
I know I'm a fit father. 

"When the 'Bonanza' series caught 



the public's fancy and we knew the 
show was a hit — and enough of a hit 
to be established for a few years — 
Dodie and I didn't think of big cars, 
a house with a pool and the usual 
sudden-stardom accessories. 

'We put our arms around each other 
and thought exactly the same thing, 
together — 'At last! At last! We can 
find another son!' 

"We adopted Josh, now two. And a 
year later, we adopted Jason, now one 
happy year old. 

"They're wonderful boys. I love them. 
I think I am a good father. 1 know I 
try harder at that than anything else 
I do — even acting. 

"I hate it when someone calls them 
adopted. I think adopted is a word 
that should be used only for the actual 
legal ceremony and then dropped 
from then on. They're my sons — period. 
Not my adopted sons." 

But with the success of "Bonanza," 
trouble arose in a marriage that had 
lovingly weathered the tribulations of 
failure. 

"I don't like to say what caused 
Dodie and me to break up," says Mike, 
"but success, take it from me, is much 
tougher on marriage than failure. Fair- 
ure — with two people as much in love 
as Dodie and I — can keep you together. 

"All that I can say now is that suc- 
cess drove us apart. I'm sorry. I can 
say no more." 

He didn't have to explain — it's the 
oldest Hollywood story in the books. 
Once you get on top, that struggle to 
stay there takes over. Success is a 
ruthless master in Hollywood. 

But Mike says it will never take his 
boys away from him. 

"The custody and everything will 
have to be worked out in court, but 
my love for them is something that 
can't be dealt with legally. I know 
Dodie will give me visitation rights and 
partial custody." 

As to the question of governmental 
agencies taking away such young chil- 
dren from adoptive parents, Mike says 
there is no danger. 

"That was the first thing I had my 
lawyer check. They are still our chil- 
dren — always will be. I am still their 
father and I hope I will be a good one. 

"I think I'm a good father. I don't 
think Dodie, in any legal action she 
might take, will deny that. 

"If she hadn't thought I was a good 
father, would she have called her 
mother the night before major surgery 
and asked that Mark be given to me?" 

Unfortunately, Mike's deep-rooted 
affection for his three sons may not 
be enough to avoid the stern exami- 
nation his fitness as a father will face 
if his relationship with "another man's 
wife" is revealed as more than just 
friendly. 

In a sense, however, Mike's unhappy 
lot at the moment is of a kind that 
frequently plagues handsome, married, 
well-known TV stars. In some instances, 
simple business luncheons between a 
star and an attractive married woman 
start rumors skittering through the hop- 
pers of the gossip-mills. Quick denials 
by either party only rejuvenate the 
reports, while the most carefully- 



worded explanations can be deliber- 
ately misinterpreted and slanted out 
of all proportion to their significance. 
It is why stars, in the midst of a con- 
troversy, prefer to keep silent. 

Mike Landon, however, is a strong 
and intelligent man. Though his broken 
marriage with Dodie may never be re- 
paired, he is not without hope for him- 
self and his sons. 

Yet his fitness as a father, in the 
eyes of the public — who, he hastens 
to admit, have given him everything — 
may be criticized. That public should 
remember that this fitness is proven 
not by the father but by the sons. 

Mike's sons are everything children 
should be. They are well-cared-for, 
well-adjusted, polite and alert. Still, 
no parent, natural or adoptive, knows 
how good a job he's done with a child 
until that child reaches comparative 



ARTHUR GODFREY 



(Continued from page 61) 

He fought back and — so far, after 
three years — he appears to have the 
upper hand over the affliction which 
itself never actually gave him pain be- 
cause, as he said at the time, it was 
camouflaged by a "cold, clammy, clutch- 
ing fear that's gnawing at my vitals." 

True to his promise, he went back 
to radio and television and today he's 
a flesh-and-blood monument to the joy 
of living, thankful to be alive, solemnly 
hoping he will walk the earth for many 
more years beyond the fifty-eight that 
he has passed. 

"I love life so much," Godfrey says 
today. "I love it so much I figure it's 
just a shame to go. Every day I live 
with dying— but I must go on because 
I enjoy everything, even the pain. 

"Death is not something to be pan- 
icked about. It's just another expe- 
rience. Unfortunately, the last one. Just 
look at all the graveyards. People ly- 
ing in them have found their peace. 
But they are people who had the same 
problems, the same fears, the same 
ecstasies we possess. But look at those 
graveyards and realize this — nobody 
gets out of this world alive." 

Therefore, Arthur Godfrey is com- 
mitted to make the most out of his 
life for so long as he has the strength 
and stamina and good health to do it. 

"There's no such thing as a lousy, 
stinking day in my life," he tells you 
in his salty vernacular. "I enjoy every- 
thing — even the pain. I love to make 
something good out of nothing. What 
can you do if you're full of pain all 
the time? You regard it as a part of 
life. 

"If I give way to it, I'd be sitting 
in one of those damn wheel chairs, 
full of narcotics, doing nothing. 

"Am I going to let a little pain 
keep me from getting on a horse if 
I want to ride a horse? Am I going 
to stop ice skating when I get the urge 
to skate? The fun is in learning and 
doing and improving. 

"I do everything better than I ever 
have before. I fly better. I ride better. 



maturity, or a time when his actions 
give promise of intelligent adulthood. 

"It is easy to say I love my sons," 
Mike points out, "because I do. But 
there is no real way a man can prove 
that he loves his children. 

"It's what he gives them that is 
the greatest proof. It is what he teaches 
them to become and, at last, what they 
do become. You can't rush them 
through their young years just to find 
out how good a job you've done. All 
you can do is give them your heart, 
your honesty and your knowledge. I've 
heard that all a parent can do is hope 
for his children. I think that I, as a 
father, can go further than that. I am 
giving my sons hope. They need it as 
much as I do." — Alan Somers 

Mike Landon is Little Joe on "Bonan- 
za," NBC-TV, Sun., 9 to 10 p.m. edt. 



And I'm twenty times the performer 
I have ever been." 

It might appear Arthur Godfrey is 
giving the "I" undue supremacy, but 
this is not the case. This is a flat state- 
ment of fact by a man who has meas- 
ured life well and accurately. He knows 
its real worth and he knows, too, that 
he has been granted a new lease in 
this existence; he is determined to 
make the most of it. There is no brag- 
ging in his raspy voice when he brings 
the whole point home with a statement 
like this one: 

"I know I'm living on borrowed 
time — and I love it. It's fun. And I 
enjoy it every minute of the day. Young 
people think I'm an old man and my 
contemporaries think I'm nuts, flying 
my plane, jumping in and out of swim- 
ming pools, showing the horses. I've 
been warned about outgrowing my con- 
temporaries; a psychiatrist might say 
I'm trying to prove something. 

"Hell, I'm not out to prove a thing. 
I'm just trying to live. That's all I'm 
trying to do, the pains I suffer notwith- 
standing. I've been battered around 
quite a bit over the years and by now 
I'm thoroughly used to the aches and 
pains." 

Arthur Godfrey, who has been cred- 
ited as being an extraordinary sales- 
man during his long period of pre- 
eminence on radio and TV, is even 
more the salesman today than ever. But 
he is not plumping more energetically 
for the Madison Avenue boys and their 
accounts than in the past — Godfrey can 
get the fans to rush out and buy what 
he tells them without half trying. 

His big product which he brings 
under the hammer every day before his 
audiences is not a commercial package 
but, rather, a by-product of his own 
invincibility — courage. 

"I'll be here tomorrow, the Good 
Lord willing," Arthur has always told 
his viewers and listeners throughout 
the years as he signed off. He still does 
today. His faith in God is inexhaustible. 

He transmits his subtle words of 
bulldog courage in a variety of ways. 
He may say: 

"High adventure — that's what I've 
tried to make my life. Anybody who 
doesn't try to make life an adventure 



Amazing BOOK FREEH! 




Lose 
Inches 

QUICK! 




NO DIETS! NO PILLS! 
NO EXERCISES! 

If your figure is mostly good, but you are just 
worried about HIPS or WAIST, LEGS, ARMS, 
etc., send for your copy of this FREE BOOK. 

It tells about an amazing method FROM ENG~ 
LAND, used for almost 10 years by smart 
women in Paris, London, Scandinavia . . . and 
already being used by many thousands of 
women in this country. 

Get the free book today. Learn how STEPH- 
ANIE BOWMAN, England's leading authority 
on slimming, brought a new, slim figure and 
untold happiness to many women. No dieting 
... no pills ... no strenuous exercising. 
This method helps you SPOT REDUCE only 
WHERE YOU WANT TO LOSE . . . leaves 
the rest of your figure as is. It is truly amazing, 
safe, effective. It works for thousands ... IT 
CAN WORK FOR YOU. 

American Women Praise Results! 

"Lost 4 inches from hips in 2 weeks" 

-Mrs. H. S., Fla. 
"Lost 3 inches off thighs!"-Mrs. E. L., N. Y. 
"Now have 36" hips, 21" thighs!" 

—Mrs. M., Miss. 
"Lost 2" from waist!"-Miss C. B., Colo. 

FREE BOOK! Rush your request for 
Miss Bowman's free book: "A SLIM, LITHE 
FIGURE ... for YOU!" Fully illustrated; in- 
cludes details on the method and facts on how 
many women lost inches from hips, waist, bust, 
legs, arms, chin, etc. The book is yours for the 
asking . . . and Miss Bowman will send extra 
copies to your friends and relatives if you in- 
clude their names and addresses. 

WRITE TODAY . . . youll be started 
on the road to SELECTIVE SLIMMING be- 
fore Summer bathing-suit time. 

STEPHANIE BOWMAN, INC., 234 5th Ave., N.Y. 1 



Fill Out for FREE BOOK!!! 



■/ Check Where You Want to ! 

TAKE OFF INCHES QUICK! 1 

D Hips D Waist □ Tummy □ Legs 
D Thighs □ Buttocks O Chin, etc. 

jj Stephanie Bowman, Inc. (Dept. TSG-26) ■ 
" 234 Fifth Avenue, New York 1, N.Y. 

Dear Miss Bowman: Please rush your FREE BOOK I 
telling how I, too, can REDUCE measurement. 



NAME I 

I 
ADDRESS 1 T 

■ w 
CITY ZONE STATE I 

D Send extra copies for others. Nomes and § " 

addresses enclosed. 1 



83 




TRUST YODORA 

For those intimate moments . . • don't take a 
chance... trust Yodora and feel confident. New 
Yodora is a delicately scented modern beauty 
cream deodorant fortified 
with Hexachlorophene. 
Gives protection you 
can trust. 




Pure White. Non-Irritating. Contains no harsh Aluminum Salts 



Any 
PHOTO 



Send HO MO HEY 




K BILLFOLD 
^PHOIOS^" 



5 4 

handling | 



84 



Get acquainted offer! 
2>/ 2 x 3'/ 2 in. size on 
double weight, silk fin- 
ish, portrait paper . . . 
The rage for exchanging with friends, 
enclpsing in letters or greeting cards 
or' job applications. Original returned. 
Order in units of 25 (1 pose). No 
limit. Enclose payment ($1.25) and 
we prepay or SEND NO MONEY, (sent 
c.o.d. if you wish) 4 day service. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Send photo 
or snapshot today, with this ad. 
DEAN STUDIOS 
Dept. B3, 913 Walnut St., Des Moines 2, Iowa 



REMOVE 

WARTS! 



Amazing Compound 

Dissolves Common 

Warts Away 

Without 

Cutting or Burning 



Doctors warn picking or scratching 
at warts may cause bleeding, infec- 
tion, spreading. Now, science has 
developed an amazing compound 
that penetrates into warts, destroys 
their cells, actually melts warts away 
without cutting or burning. 

Its name is Compound W®. Pain- 
less, colorless Compound W used as 
directed removes common warts 
safely, effectively, leaves no ugly 
scars. 




is a damn fool. We had no control 
over our coming into this world and 
we have none over when we leave it, 
but the time in between is up to us. 
The Good Lord put a lot on this earth 
for us. but He doesn't force us to en- 
joy it, if we are determined not to. What 
a mess we can make!" 

No man alive is so well acquainted 
with fear as Arthur Godfrey. His can- 
cer operation of three years ago might 
have broken the spirit of many another 
man and cast a shadow over the rest 
of his days. Not with Godfrey. 

"It would have been easier if I'd 
known more about cancer— if I knew 
then what I know today," Godfrey says. 
"The fact is that there are now well 
over a million people in the United 
States who also once heard the diag- 
nosis — cancer. And, after treatment, 
lived on to hear the doctor say: 

" 'Well, you've passed the five-year 
checkup. Guess we can both relax.' " 

Godfrey is referring to the "cure 
rate" which the experts use as a yard- 
stick in determining complete recovery. 
A period of five years is regarded as 
a necessary time gap after a lung can- 
cer operation to conclude that the pa- 
tient is cured, if there is no recurrence 
of the disease in that time. 

However, statistics of the American 
Cancer Society show the "cure rate" 
is less than five percent. Moreover, 
some surgeons advise removal of the 
entire lung, rather than a part, as in 
Godfrey's case. But there's one happy 
statistic working for Arthur — his was 
a "left side" cancer, which, for reasons 
not yet fathomed by the medical pro- 
fession, has a lower mortality rate than 
cancer of the right lung. 

"I hope to hear those words that 
I've passed my checkup two years from 
now," Godfery says. "The doctor tells 
me that so far there's no trace of can- 
cer in me and that I'm in fine shape." 

Indeed, in better shape than he has 
been in years. By following his doctors' 
advice, Godfrey has gotten down to 
176 pounds and expects to shed another 
six pounds so he'll tip the scales at a 
healthy 170. 

"When my time comes . . ." 

Godfrey's experience with cancer and 
his close call with death taught him a 
great deal about fear. "Everybody is 
afraid," he says. "That's human, to be 
afraid. What's important is how yon 
counter fear, how you control it and, 
finally, overcome it. 

"We all live with the fear that some- 
day we're going to die and, when my 
time comes, I'm going to be so miser- 
able. But I'm not going to ruin all the 
days between now and then worrying 
about it." 

Godfrey claims he acquired an "edu- 
cation" in the months after his surgery. 

"What I found out is hopeful in the 
extreme. I want to share this knowledge 
with the public, because it may help 
other people face the ordeal of cancer 
if they must — and escape it, if they 
can. Many thousands of lives could be 
saved if more people knew the facts 
about cancer cure and prevention. 

"First, what did the hospital teach 



me? It exposed me to the miracle of 
modern medicine. Surgery, followed by 
radiation, saved me. As I later learned, 
they now save 170,000 cancer patients 
a year. 

"Second, what did my reading on the 
subject and interviews teach me? Up 
until now, more than 1,700,000 people 
in the United States have been cured 
of cancer — these are men, women, and 
children. 

"And that's another thing I learned 
— cancer can strike at any age. It 
often hits hard at the young and de- 
fenseless. More children die of cancer 
than of any other disease." 

Living on borrowed time 

Over the years, Arthur Godfrey has 
accumulated tremendous wealth. He 
doesn't have to work but does, because 
he gets sheer satisfaction and pure fun 
from it. Godfrey claims he is a "prac- 
tical realist," but he also maintains 
that he is an "outrageous dreamer." 
He might add that he also is an extrav- 
agant spender, but . . . 

"I don't go to Las Vegas and throw 
my money away," he says. "That's 
stupid. It's escape, like drinking is 
escape. I don't want to escape from life. 
I use my money to send kids to school, 
for medical research, for things peo- 
ple need to make life a little better. 

"You know, it's true, that corny bit 
about making somebody else happy and 
you'll make yourself happy, too." 

His money is poured at a fantastic 
rate into the Arthur Godfrey Founda- 
tion. The good this notable organization 
does is incalculable, but an example of 
its beneficence is the $70,000 airplane 
it presented to the late Dr. Tom Dooley 
for his medical missionary work in 
Laos . . . and the wing it built on the 
Loudoun County Hospital near God- 
frey's home in Virginia. 

Despite all that has happened to him, 
despite the pain he suffers constantly, 
despite the gnawing consternation he 
is compelled to endure until the next 
two years are up and he is "out of 
the woods" — Godfrey can stand with 
head high, proudly, for his significant 
triumph. 

"I love my work. I love what's go- 
ing on in this life. I want to be a better 
performer," he says. 

And you ask, "Hasn't Godfrey 
achieved the full and rich life with- 
out having to aim for any higher? Why 
doesn't he stop now?" 

Arthur Godfrey's insatiable appetite 
for this life will not let him rest on his 
laurels. 

"I've got to keep on going — or I'll 
die." 

That's Godfrey's credo. 

It's the tenet of a man who must live 
each hour, each day, each month in 
hope and prayer — and with forbearance 
for whatever the future might hold for 
him. 

That's the way it must be for Arthur 
Godfrey, living as he is on "borrowed 
time." — George Carpozi, Jr. 

"Arthur Godfrey Time" is heard on 
CBS Radio, Mon.-Fri., at 9:10 a.m. e.d.t. 
(WCBS Radio, New York, 10:10 a.m.) 



SEBASTIAN CABOT 



(Continued from page 66) 
isn't as good as in better restaurants. 
As for 'a nice little hobby,' my husband 
is the owner of one Bentley, a Lea 
Francis, a Lagonda and a Jaguar. And 
you heard him say he's thinking of buy- 
ing two more of those things. Some 
little hobby!!!" 

Sebastian nodded distractedly, as his 
eyes roved over the serving table beside 
us. The sole was removed and replaced 
with beautiful steaks and salad. It took 
some time for him to choose a fine 
burgundy wine to go with the course, 
and only after he had savored the first 
taste did he seem to fully realize what 
Kay had said. 

"Darling, you know the Bentley is 
a family car, and in any case my stom- 
ach would most certainly not fit behind 
the wheel of a Cadillac or Buick. The 
Bentley is for the difficult. It is a matter 
of comfort." 

I ventured the question that — if he 
had only one vice, his love of foreign 
cars — what did he consider his appreci- 
ation of food and drink to be? 

"That is a virtue — one of my great- 
est. And you are right, it is an appreci- 
ation and has been ever since I was 
fired from the salad department." 

The what department? 

"My first endeavor at making a live- 
lihood was as the salad chef in a little 
restaurant called Frascati on Oxford 
Street in London. My only memories 
of that particular time are that there 
seemed to be continual fighting — chefs 
are worse prima donnas than actors — 
and I was usually in the middle of the 
fight. You see, I was bucking for the 
position of pastry chef, I was getting 
damned tired of living on salad, and 
one day I got caught red-handed with 
a lovely chocolate eclair. I got canned 
the same day." 

"How does one go from being a salad 
chef to becoming an actor?" I asked, 
as Sebastian further ordered espresso 
coffee and a brandy. 

"Actually, without having been one, 
I don't think I would have become the 
other. Working in a restaurant and hav- 
ing learned the art of eating as well 
as preparing the food — I, uh, well, I 
naturally added some girth to my al- 
ready generous proportions. When I 
was fired, a friend told me he knew 
of a job as chauffeur to Frank Pet- 
tingell, the British actor. Before I 
knew it, I had the job and had also 
fallen in love with the theater. I set 
about learning all the repertory plays 
in which my substantial avoirdupois 
would be an asset. In other words — if 
they needed a fat man, I was ready 
for them and, well, I've been working 
ever since." 

Working~ever since, in Sebastian's 
case, includes dozens of British movies, 
plays and TV shows. When he came to 
the States for the first time, he kept 
up the pace both on Broadway and in 
Hollywood. Did he feel there were 
any drawbacks to what is obviously a 
busy and lucrative career? 

"There are some, but one must always 



take the bad with the good," Sebastian 
replied, as he ordered another brandy. 
Obviously, he was a man who also knew 
how to take the good with the bad. It 
was a very good brandy. Very old. 

"I had to have my beard dyed blond 
once for a 'Twilight Zone' episode and, 
by the time the final day of the shoot- 
ing was over, the roots were black 
again. The word got around that I was 
the only bleached blond in town who 
had a beard and, really, I had a lot of 
explaining to do to some of my male 
friends who are not in the business. 

"Another time, I was in Boston and 
I looked up some relatives. The Cabot 
family have done rather nicely in the 
States, you know, and I thought it 
would be appropriate if I presented my 
credentials as a Cabot of England. My 
grandfather, Charles Cabot, was a sea 
captain and quite well-known, both here 
and abroad. Unfortunately, the Boston 
Cabots didn't seem to be very recep- 
tive to an actor in the family. I was 
royally snubbed. Frankly, I don't think 
it had anything to do with my being 
an actor. I think it was my grandfather. 
In the old days, sea captains had some- 
what the same reputation as the travel- 
ing salesman in today's jokes. Far more 
interesting in those days, don't you 
think?" 

Sebastian asked for the check and, 
after signing his name and adding a 
handsome tip, he rose to help his wife 
on with her borrowed mink. "I must 
say, though, that — in spite of the fact 
television is by far the best way to 
make yourself known to the public 
and insure your financial stability — it 
can sometimes backfire. 

"We expose ourselves to millions of 
viewers and hire press agents to tell 
everyone how wonderful we are, and 
then it kicks us back in the teeth. In 
my case, it has to do with my cars. I've 
had a few slight accidents and they 
haven't been my fault. A fellow will 
recognize my beard or something about 
me and say to himself, 'Aha, there is 
an actor who must make a lot of money 
and probably carries a lot of insurance. 
One little bump can't hurt anything.' 

"I swear I've had some of them come 
at me at fifty miles an hour. Very dis- 
tracting." 

As we were leaving the restaurant, 
the maitre a" hurried up to Sebastian 
and excitedly whispered something in 
his ear. The portly man's face spread 
into a wide and wonderful smile and 
he beckoned us to return to the table. 

"My dears, I have just been informed 
that a bottle of old and extremely rare 
Spanish sherry has been uncovered in 
the wine cellar. We must certainly sam- 
ple it before making our departure." 

Kay dropped the mink back on a 
chair and, seating herself, gave me a 
look that only another woman would 
understand. "Sebastian, that sherry is 
worth a king's ransom. If that man 
opens that bottle, I insist that I have 
the couch — " 

"Tut, tut, my love, remember the 

budget! You know we can't afford it." 

— Tricia Hurst 

Cabot is Dr. Hyatt in "Checkmate," 
on CBS-TV, Wed., at 8:30 p.m. edt. 



OPPORTUNITIES 
FOR YOU 




Farad rates, write PCD 

549 W. Washington 

Chicago 6 



OF INTEREST TO WOMEN (P.W.—Aug '62) 

BEAUTY DEMONSTRATORS— TO $5.00 hour demonstrat- 
ing Famous Hollywood Cosmetics, your neighborhood. For 
free samples, details, write Studio Girl, Dept. 30C28, Glen- 
dale. California. "Canadians: 850 La Fleur. Montreal." 
SECOND INCOME FROM Oil Can End Your Toil I Free 
i«?k. and Oilfield Mapsl National Petroleum, Panamerican 
Building, Miami 32, Florida. 

$300 PAID FOR Your Child's Picture by advertisers. Send 
small photo. (All ages). Returned. Print child's, parent's name, 
address. Spotlite. 1611-P8 LaBrea. Hollywood. California . 
DRESSES 24c; SHOES 39c; Men's suits $4.95; trousers 
11.20. Better used clothing. Free catalog. Transworld, 164-A 

Christopher, Brooklyn 12, N.Y. _^ 

$100.00 WEEKLY PART Time. 3 New Selling Plans. Leads 
Furnished. Tre Beau Cosmetics, 491 7A Park Heights, 

Baltimore 15, Maryland. 

MAKE MONEY CLIPPING newspaper items! Detailed in- 
structions $1 (refundable). Reiss, Dept. B-2, Box 94, New 

York 52. [ ^_1__ 

EARN $50.00 FAST, Sewing Aprons. Details Free. Redykut's, 

Loganville, Wisconsin. __ 

EARN UP TO $2.00 hour sewing babywearl Free Details. 

Cuties, Warsaw 1. Indiana. 

EDUCATIONAL A INSTRUCTION 

FINISH HIGH SCHOOL at Home. Better jobs, more pay 
for high school graduates. Get your diploma thru simplified 
home study course. Personal attention. Write for Free Book, 
read about our "Guarantee of Success." Wayne School, 

Dept. 08-536, 417 S. Dearborn, Chicago 5, Illinois. 

COMPLETE YOUR HIGH School at home in spare time with 
63-year-old school. Texts furnished. No classes. Diploma. In- 
formation booklet free. American School, Dept. XC74, Drexel 

at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois. 

ATTEND BUSINESS SCHOOL at homel Save time and 
expense of attending classes, prepare for secretarial career 
in typing, shorthand, business procedures, bookkeeping. 
Write for catalog. Wayne School, 417 S. Dearborn, Dept. 

08-546, Chicago 5, III. 

BE A DENTAL assistant. A well paying, uncrowded field. 
Prepare at home for big pay career. Chairside duties, recep- 
tion, laboratory, personality development. Free book. Wayne 

School, Dept. 08-549, 421 S. Dearborn, Chicago 5, III. 

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA at home. Licensed teachers. 
Approved materials. Southern States Academy, Station E-1, 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

BUSINESS * MONEY MAKING OPPORTUNITIES 
MAKE BIG MONEY invisibly mending damaged garments 
at home. Details Free. Fabricon, 1589 Howard, Chicago 26 . 
EARN $3.00 HOUR — home sparetime. Easy Pump Lamps 
assembling, No canvassing. Write: Ougor. Cabot 33, Ark. 

AGENTS & HEIP WANTED 

60% PROFIT COSMETICS $25 day up. Hire others. Sam- 

B'es, details. Studio Girl — Hollywood, Glendale, California, 
ept. 30H28. Canadians: 850 LaFleur, Montreal. 

STAMP COLLECTING 

TERRIFIC STAMP BARGAINI Israel-lceland-San Marion- 
plus triangle set — plus Antiqua-Borneo-Virgin-Scouts-Congo- 
Russia — Plus large stamp book — all four offers free — Send 
10c for mailing cost. Empire Stamp Corporation, Dept. PC, 

Toronto, Canada. 

PHOTO FINISHING 

FREE EXCITING GIFT with 25 Wallet Prints $1 (60 for $2). 
Beautifully Finished. Send Negative or Print (Returned). 

Direct Mail Photo, Box 8352, Pittsburgh 18, Pa. 

MUSIC A MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

SONGPOEMS WANTED FOR Musical setting. Free exami- 
nation. Get "the Nashville Sound" in your songs and records. 
Send Poems: Music City Songcrafters, 6145-A, Acklen 

Station, Nashville, Tenn. 

SONGWRITERS, WITH PUBLISHER contacts, want song 
ideas. Share royalties. No fees. Send poems: Songwriters' 

Associates, 1650 Broadway, N.Y. 19-Y. 

POEMS NEEDED FOR songs and records. Rush poems. 
Crown Music, 49-PW West 32, New York 1. 




Touchy Subject? 

No, she relies on CHI-CHES-TERS to 
chase monthly blues and relieve cramps. 
Thousands of women are getting blessed 
relief every month from functional men- 
strual pain, cramps and nervous tension. 
Your money back if not satisfied. 

Buy CHI-CHES-TERS from your druggist. If ho 
does not stock them, ask him to get some for 
you -he will. 

Where a druggist is not available, we will 
fill your order direct, postage paid. Send 
500 for Purse-Pak size. Economy sizes 
$1.15 and $2.25. 

CHICHESTER CHEMICAL COMPANY 

Dept. 6-S, Philadelphia 46, Pa. 



85 




All Dressed Up... 
WITH 
UGLY 
VARICOSE 
VEINS 

How many times have 
you been ashamed of 
hideous purple veins and 
ugly splotches on your legs ? Whenever you wear a bath- 
ing suit, shorts, or even your best dress, those dis- 
figured legs make you look dowdy and unattractive. But 
now there's no reason you should suffer this embarrass- 
ment. 

FEEL BETTER BECAUSE 
YOU LOOK BETTER 

Now you can hide most horrid varicose veins that add 
years to your appearance. New TERM COVER CREAM 
covers up varicose veins, fades out the ugly look, 
matches your natural skin color. Just smooth a very 
light coat of TERRI COVER CREAM over veins. You 
apply it straight from the jar with your fingertips. No 
mess or trouble, and it won't stain or smear nylons. It 
removes easily with soap and water or cleansing cream. 

NO RISK— GUARANTEED OFFER 

Not in drug or department stores, you must order by 
mail. Select the shade that matches your natural skin; 
Light — Medium — Dark. Indicate shade, enclose $1.50 
for 10-week supply and we pay tax and postage. If 
C.O.D., postage extra. If not completely satisfied, re- 
turn the jar cap only for your purchase price refund. 
Don't let ugly looking varicose veins embarrass you ever 
again. Decide to try TERRI COVER CREAM today! 

FLEETWOOD CO., Dept. 22-RH 
427 W. Randolph St.. Chicago 6. III. 



HOW TO PUBLISH 

YOUR 

BOOK 



Join our successful authors in a 
complete and reliable publishing 
program: publicity, advertising, 
handsome books. Speedy, efficient 
service. Send for FREE manuscript 
report & copy of Publish Your Book. 

CARLTON PRESSDept.TRH 
8* Fifth Ave., New York 11, N. Y. 



rnrr framed 5x7 enlargement 
rlxCE colored in oils 

■" plus 25c 
handling 
& postage L 



2'/j" x 3'/i" photos made on profes- 
sional paper. Send photo, snapshot or I 
ne9. today with $1.25 (originals re- [ 
turned unharmed). State color of hair. I 
eyes, clothing. DISCOUNT PHOTO SERVICE 
Dept. 2, 835 B'way, N. Y. 3, N. Y. 



:<3z 



Poems Wanted 



% 



RICHARD CHAMBERLAIN 



i iimpinii 



II1NIIMIMIIIIN1 



Popular, Rock & Roll, 
Country & Western, and 
Gospel poems for musical 
setting and recording with 
"the Nashville Sound". 
Send poems today for 
Free examination and our 
best offer. 



MUSIC CITY SONGCRAFTERS 

Studio M, 6145 Acklen Station, Nashville, Tenn. 



GLAMOUR WIG 




86 



tBEFORE 

• Black • Brown AFTER-> 

• Dark Blond 

• Light Blond • Platinum 

• White • Pink • Ice Blue 

• Black with Grey Streak 

Ge bewitching, daring, 
winsome, demure — 
Split second change to 
new personality. A very pretty cover-up after swim- 
ming, washing or setting your own hair. Smooth, 
non-flammable Celanese acetate looks like real 
hair, feels luxuriously soft and lovely. SEND NO 
MONEY. Pay postman on delivery $5.95 plus C.O.D. 
postage or send $5.95 with order and save postage 
Money back if not delighted. Specify color. 

GUILD, 103 E. Broadway, Dept. W-680, N.Y.C. 2 




(Continued from page 29) 
of the mass drawing-power of television. 

Perhaps, too, there was something 
else that kept him awake. Certainly, any 
man might lose sleep over Clara's well- 
arranged five-feet-two. As for marital 
qualifications, she leaves few to be de- 
sired. Yet Dick does admit she should 
have taken home economics instead of 
algebra in high school. When it comes 
to boiling a three-minute egg, she's a 
whiz, but her culinary skill practically 
ends right there. 

Last March 31st, after months of 
consulting cookbooks, Clara thought 
she was ready to solo at the oven. It 
was Dick's twenty-sixth birthday, and 
she wanted to impress him. Clara ar- 
ranged a surprise birthday party at her 
Hollywood apartment. She invited 
Dick's close friends; she bought dec- 
orative party favors. 

Then, by dawn's early light, she got 
out the mixing bowls, the eggs, the 
milk, the flour. Carefully, she double- 
checked the recipe, measuring each in- 
gredient as carefully as a jet pilot 
checking his instruments before take- 
off. 

Finally the cake pans were filled 
with the sweet smelling batter and she 
was ready to slip them into the oven. 
She smiled with satisfaction. This, she 
thought, should be a birthday cake to 
delight any man's heart — and especially 
Dick's. 

At the appointed hour, she opened the 
oven door to take the cake out. Her 
face fell. So had the cake. Instead of 
the fluffy layers pictured in the cook- 
book, she saw before her a dark brown 
mass of flat dough. The mounds of 
frosting she spread over the layers only 
made things worse. 

It was too late to bake another. The 
guests were due any minute. Gamely, 
Clara stuck in the twenty-six candles, 
all the time wishing that she were that 
many miles away. The cake looked like 
a washed-out tortilla. 

By the time Dick arrived and the 
guests yelled, "Surprise, surprise," 
Clara decided to throw in the sponge. 
She led him by the hand into the 
kitchen. She pointed to the monstrosity. 
Each took one look and broke out 
laughing. The others came in to see 
what was going on. They, too, started 
to laugh. 

It was enough to make a girl cry. 
But not Clara. After a moment, she 
was laughing louder than anyone. 

Later, Clara and Dick drove all over 
Hollywood trying to find a bakery that 
was open. They managed to bring back 
a cake, but it couldn't help being an 
anti-climax. 

The two are definitely a fun-loving 
pair. When they did the showcase per- 
formance for the college last Septem- 
ber at the Pilgrimage Theater, it was 
a satire on the opera "La Traviata." 
Clara was dressed in a sheet-like gown 
and, in the death scene, she placed a 
rose between her teeth while Dick 
clowned around her. They were the hit 
of the show. 



Look for them to possibly record to- 
gether someday. In late April, Dick cut 
his first record, "Three Stars Will 
Shine Tonight" and "A Kiss to Build 
a Dream On." An album session fol- 
lowed. The next step is definitely a 
duet. 

Although neither has talked of mar- 
riage to others, there seems to be a 
secret understanding between them 
that it will eventually happen. Two of 
their close friends think it may be this 
year. 

There's a hitch, however, that could 
delay the wedding. Clara Ray meets all 
Dick's specifications to be Mrs. Cham- 
berlain — except one. 

"My wife must be understanding of 
the problems of show business," he con- 
fided. "She must like the arts. She must 
be attractive — I don't mean a striking 
beauty. She must want a flock of chil- 
dren. She must be content to just be a 
housewife and a mother to our chil- 
dren." 

Clara may not be ready to be "just a 
housewife" — you could hardly blame 
her. Like Dick, she has worked hard 
and long for a career. Only recently 
her ambitions have begun to bear fruit. 
Can Clara give it all up now — or can 
she take the chance that Dick will 
wait until she's ready to quit? This 
depends on how strong her love is. 
Some believe she will. Others don't. 
Perhaps Dick will relent on this one 
demand. 

One thing is certain. Dick won't be 
pressured into any decision. This hap- 
pened only a few years ago when the 
actor was attending Pomona College. 
Unofficially, he was engaged to a col- 
lege sweetheart. They had planned to 
marry when he finished college and felt 
financially ready. The girl agreed at 
first, but then changed her mind. She 
wanted to marry him immediately. 

Dick protested. Arguments followed 
and he decided it was best if they called 
the whole thing off. They did. He con- 
fided later that he felt he was beinp; 
forced into marriage. This feeling mr 
him want to run. It made him unsu. j 
of his love toward the girl. 

Even today, Dick can't stand the 
feeling of being pressured or forced in- 
to a situation. Against his better judg- 
ment, the studio arranged for him to 
escort one of the young brood of Italian 
sexpots to the premiere of "West Side 
Story" last December. It was one of 
those last-minute arrangements. The 
studio had the tickets but no escort for 
Rosanna Schiaffino, who was on the lot 
making "Two Weeks in Another Town" 
with Kirk Douglas. Dick volunteered 
like a private in the Army does for K.P. 
duty. He had nothing against the ac- 
tress. He just disliked being put on dis- 
play for publicity purposes. Sure 
enough, the appearance of the two 
together set every tongue wagging 
around Hollywood, linking them ro- 
mantically. 

That was when Dick vowed — even if 
it put him in the guard house — to refuse 
any more of these "dates." When 
Academy Award time rolled around, 
hordes of press agents in town hounded 
him to escort one of their clients to the 
affair, knowing full well that any actress 



spotted with Dick would immediately 
become hot copy. 

That was when Dick decided to bring 
his romance with Clara out in the open. 
He gave a week's advance notice that 
he wasn't taking any actress; he was 
taking his Clara. He realized that he 
could no longer hide his feelings to- 
ward her. He announced that he didn't 



J I Mil I M) Mil M 



inmiimiiNiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiii 



IIIMU'lllHi.lHIMll 



THE LENNON SISTERS 



(Continued from page 33) 
Lennons first said: "We are practicing 
Catholics — we go to mass, we pray, and 
we practice charity to all." But their 
many friends and admirers, not only 
of their own but other faiths, testify that 
this is not idle talk. Of the Lennons. 
they say: "Being a good Catholic and 
a good person go together . . . and 
they never act as if they had the ex- 
clusive rights to goodness." 

Kathy, Peggy and Janet, as well as 
Dianne and the other children, feel 
they are "very lucky" in their faith. 
"It was given to us like a present," 
Kathy summed up, "something we were 
given out of love, not because we did 
anything to deserve it." While the girls 
have treasured this gift of faith, and 
never taken it for granted ("we know 
how hard it comes to some people," 
Peggy has said) , they have never found 
it necessary to question the tenets of 
their religion or, for that matter, any 
religion. According to what they say, 
they have never felt a quake of doubt. 
And yet they have managed to avoid 
the slightest sense of smugness. 

For this, they are probably in debt 
to their mother, Isabelle ("Sis") Len- 
non. Faith and the security of her re- 
ligion did not come "like a present" 
to her. As a child, she knew "the empti- 
ness" of living apart from religious be- 
liefs. There was also the unhappiness 
of being too young to understand what 
she was missing and how to go about 
bridging the gap to God. 

"Bill and the children are luckier 
than they actually know," she points 
out. "They may have problems, but 
they've never had to grope in darkness 
because, for them, there has always 
been the light that comes from faith." 

Though baptized Catholic, her moth- 
er's religion, Sis never really took part 
in her faith until she took instructions 
and was confirmed just prior to her 
marriage to Bill. Her father was Prot- 
estant, and her parents separated when 
she was very young. In this period of 
disappointment and unhappiness, her 
mother fell away from the Church. "I 
have an idea my mother suffered more 
than she might have ordinarily, because 
of her loss of faith. She had no rock 
to cling to . . ." 

This lapse has since been put to 
rights. When Dianne, eldest of the chil- 
dren and now retired from the singing 
group, was married, Isabelle's mother 
attended the wedding communion along 
with the entire family. She had re- 
entered the Church a short while before. 
"I'd always hoped she would come 
back," says Sis, "but I also realized it 



care if the whole world knew Clara 
was his girl. Clara listened and smiled. 
He wasn't Dr. Kildare to her. He was 
Dick Chamberlain, the boy she met in 
a classroom and may someday marry. 
— Dean Gautschy 

"Dr. Kildare" time on NBC-TV, Thurs., 
is 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. — edt, that is! 

llllltllllttlltlltlllllilllllllllllllllllllllllltllllilllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIMillllllMIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINII llll IIM 

would have to be when she wanted it 
and felt the time had come. Bill and 
I never pushed her. We don't believe in 
that. Just as parents must teach their 
children the value of faith by setting 
a good example, so children must some- 
times set an example for the parents. 
When my mother saw that coming clos- 
er to God could fill the void in her life, 
she took the proper steps. If Bill and 
I had any influence in this, fine. But 
she did it on her own, and that is the 
best way." 

Young Janet, flipping through a mag- 
azine, came upon the sentence, "Prayer 
is a cry of hope." It nestled quietly in 
her impressionable mind until, some 
days later, she brought it to the atten- 
tion of her sisters. "Does it mean you 
always hope to get something when you 
pray?" she pondered. "Because I don't 
think that's right." 

"Oh, you don't," teased Peggy. "And 
what about all the things you've asked 
for?" 

"Maybe I ask for some things," al- 
lowed Janet, "but I always remember 
the story Daddy told us. You know, 
about the little girl who prayed for a 
doll and, when Christmas came, didn't 
get one. And her brothers poked fun 
at her and said, 'See, God wasn't lis- 
tening.' And she replied, 'Oh, yes. God 
was listening, and he answered. But 
this time, He said no.' That little girl 
didn't pray only when she wanted some- 
thing. She prayed mostly because it 
made her feel good. And I feel the 
same way." 

This led to a general discussion. Peg- 
gy said, "Praying is like having a heart- 
to-heart talk with God. It's true, God 
doesn't answer you with words. But 
He does answer in His own way. There's 
nothing wrong in asking for things. 
Our Lord said, 'Ask and ye shall re- 
ceive.' But a lot of times God says no 
because what you want isn't good or 
right for you. You may not know it, 
but God does." 

"Praying gives me strength and it 
makes me want to do something about 
my dreams and hopes," said Kathy. "I 
know I have to follow through, that 
just praying isn't enough. Some people 
think all they have to do in life is pray 
and lazy around. Then they complain 
when their prayers aren't answered. 
People ought to work hard for what 
they want, and show God they're really 
sincere and need what they're asking 
for. Then maybe they'd have better re- 
sults from their prayers." 

"Why all this talk about prayer?" 
Bill asked, exchanging a look with Sis. 
"Communication with God, the Virgin 
Mother, the saints, why, that's fine. It 
makes your life richer even if you don't 
get what you ask for. But you'll notice 
that your mother and I really enjoy 



Start your Collection NOW! 




The 100 Start linn it it- art availaalt It COLO* 0* tLACK i 
WHITE. Orftr as many n ytu with but it SURE ta taclatt 1Q£ 
far EACH phttt ta cavtr cast af poitift anf handling. 

Nick Adams Vincent Edwards Hay ley Mills 

Paul Ank» Anita Ekberg Martin Milner 

Annette Ron Ely Sal Mineo 

James Arness Everly Bros. David Nelson 

John Ashley Richard Eyer Ricky Nelson 

Frankie Avaton Shelley Fabareo Hugh O'Brian 

Brigitte Bardot Fabian Forte Lee Patterson 

Warren Beatty Eric Fleming Cynthia Pepper 

Dan Blocker Connie Francis Paul Petersen 

Ward Bond Robert Fuller Elvis Presley 

Pat Boone James Garner Dorothy Provine 

Richard Boon* John Gavin Juliet Prowse 

Stephen Boyd Anthony George Steve Reeves 

Peter Brown Mark Goddard Debbie Reynolds 

Raymond Burr Oon Grady Pernell Roberts 

Edd Byrnes Lome Greene Dale Robertson 

Rory Calhoun Clu Gulager Bobby Rydell 

Michael Caiian Brett Halsey Tommy Sands 

Freddie Cannon George Hamilton Jack Scott 

Allen Case Tv Hardin Margarita Sierr* 

Richard Chamberlain Charlton Heston Jeremy Slate 

Chubby Checker Dwayne Hickman John Smith 

Jimmy Clanton Eddie Hodges Roger Smith 

Barry Coe Robert Horton Robert Stack 

Chuck Connors Rock Hudson Connie Stevens 

Robert Conrad Tab Hunter Dean Stockwell 

Tim Considtne Will Hutchins Guy Stockwell 

Pat Conway Jack Kelly Elizabeth Taylor 

Johnny Crawford Michael Landon Robert Taylor 

Robert Crawford Jr. Peter Lawford Rod Taylor 

Tony Curtis Brenda Lee Vicki Trickett 

Bobby Oarin Gary Lockwoodj Bobby Vee 

James Darren Robert Logan Clint Walker 

Richard DavaloS Richard Long Deborah Walley 

Doris Day Carol Lynley John Wayne 

James Dean George Maharls Tuesday Weld 

Sandra Dee Jayne Mansfield) Adam West 

Bob Denver Lori Martin Guy Williams 

Angie Dickinson Donald May Van Williams 

Dion James McArthuT Natalie Wood 

Troy Donahue Diane McBain Loretta Young 

Tony Dow Doug McClure Tony Young 

Clint Eastwood Gardner McKay Efrem Zimbalist Jr. 

^ Steve McQueen 



— HOW TO START YOUR COLLECTION — 
I. Print the names of your favorite stars on a 

piece of paper. (Be sure to print plainly.) 
2* Enclose 10c for EACH picture you list. (To 

cover mailing and handling costs.) 

SPECIAL SERVICE — 

Air mail (50c extra) — First Class (25c extra) 

REAL COLOR, Oept. 1291 -A 

7868 WILLOUGHBY, HOLLYWOOD 46. CALIE 



THE BEST WAY TO 




KILL the HAIR ROOT 



is the Mahler Way! 

Thousands of women like yourself, after reading 
and following our instructions carefully, have 
learned to remove unwanted hair permanently the 
Mahler way. Re-discover the thrill of an excitingly 
beautiful complexion — don't delay another day! 

> Send 10c for 16-page Illustrated booklet "New 
V, Radiant Beauty" . . . learn the secret for yourself. 

602K, PROVIDENCE 15, ILL 



JflJBPeg 



You Sell Christmas Cards... 

You Want to MAKE THE MOST EXTRA CASH 



Get the lines of ALL the best -known 

Christmas Card Publishers 

FROM ONE COMPANY 

Easiest way to make most spare-time 
money! Introduce biggest line of Christ- 
mas, Everyday Cards, gifts, stationery, 
toys, gift wraps of all best-known, most- 
advertised greeting card companies. Get 
bignew color catalog displaying more than 
160 assortments, 600 Christmas money- 
makers! Make np to 100% profit... even 
more on Personal Imprints, oiher novel- 
ties. Generous Bonus Plan. We give 
CREDIT to individuals and groups. 
FREE CATALOG! Rush Coupon Today! 
BigChristmas"WishingBook"ColorCat- 
alogof all leading lines, yours FREE, plus 
amazing Bonus Plan, money making de- 
tails. Also sample boxes on approval. 
Style Line Greetings, Dept. r-47 
421 Fifth Ave. So., Minneapolis, Minn. 
- — - j 




FREE Catalog 

contains more 

■ten ,lMn 
ISO Christmas 
SEverydayCard 
Assortments; 
600 big money' 
makers. 



STYLE LINE GREETINGS, Dept. R-47 
421 Fifth Ave., South - Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Rush money-making Christmas "Wishing Book" Color 
Catalog of leading greeting card lines, details of Bonus 
Plan and big profits/rec. . .plus sample boxes on approval. 

NAME.___„__ 

ADDRESS 



, CITY _ ZONE.... STATE.. 



87 




CEEEj 



IN 6 WEEKS 



Write 120 words per minute- 
Age no obstacle— LOWEST COST 

Famous SPEEDWRITING 
shorthand. No strange sym- 
bols; no machines. Uses 
ABC's. Easiest to learn and 
use. Fast preparation for a 
better position and a sound, 
substantial future. 

Nationally used in leading w 'ns Fi "e Position 
a- j r~- •■ c i As a Result of 

offices and Civil Service; also SPEEDWRITING 

by executives, students, etc. Shorthand 

120 words per minute — 50% 
FASTER than Civil Service 
requirements. Over 500,000 




"After finishing my 
SPEEDWRITING short- 
hand course, I ac- 
cepted a job of my 
choice — secretary in a 
large advertising 

taught at home or through agency. The work is 
classroom instruction. The 



instruction, 
very low cost will surprise 
you. TYPING AVAILABLE. 

Schools in 443 cities 
throughout the world. 39th 
year. 
Write for FREE Booklet to: 



full of fun, friends 
and interest. It pro- 
vides a good salary 
and excellent working 
conditions" — Janet 
Lakin, New York, N.Y. 



(Good Housekeeping) 

Vftt GUARANTEE? 




Dept.308-2,55W.42ndSt.,N.Y.36 (g)^ 



POEMS 

WANTED 



Songs recorded. Send poems 
j today for FREE examination. 
I ASCOT MUSIC, INC. 
6021 Sunset Blvd. 

Studio A-30,Hollywood28,Calif. 



HELP WANTED 



*^p* 



SHOW YOUR FREE SAMPLE. I GIVE YOU 
amazing Leth'R-Test Footwear. Show on your 
feet to 10 people and 5 will buy on sight because 
of beauty, quality. You'll see! Only $1.99 to $4.99 
none higher. Guaranteed for one whole year. 
| Highest commissions. Rush your size, state if 
man's, woman's. Perfect-World Co., Dept. 170, 
Cincinnati 12, Ohio. 



<L 



ou 

I 



SEND A 
POSTCARD 
TODAY FOR 



3SS 



48 Page Shoe 

BOOKLET K 



It's Easy to be fitted Direct via Mail I 

| NO RISK TO YOU! MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Stars of stage, screen, TV and famous fashion models 

buy perfect fitting Shoecraft Fifth Avenue shoes by 

mail. Wonderful values priced as low 

as $5.95. We can fit all sizes 

8 to 13, in widths AAAAA to C. 

HI-FI only $6.95.. Black or bone nylon mesh. 

SHOECRAFT 603 FIFTH A V., NEW YORK 17 

PHOTO BARGAINS 





YOUR^P^CHOICE 

2—8x10 ENLARGEMENTS Lovely, reproductions of 

(1 Colored in Oil) or 

4-5x7 ENLARGEMENTS 

(1 Colored in Oil) or 

25 WALLET SIZE PHOTOS 

plus FREE 5x7 ENL. 

QUALITY VALUES, Dept. 606-B 
2 EAST AVENUE, LARCHMONT, N. V 



your favorite photo on 
finest quality double 
weiprht portrait paper. 
Send any size photo 
or neff. (returned un- 
harmed). Add 25c for 
postage and handling. 




100 Little Dolls 

all for I 




100 Dolls"made of genuine! 
Styrene Plastic and hard syn-» 
thetic ™Wr only $ J «or en- 
tire set. You get BABY DOLLS,; 
NURSE DOLLS. DANCING DOLLS. . 
FOREIGN 00LLS. CLOWN DOLLS, 
COWBOY DOLLS. BRIDE DOLLS,' 
and many more in Lill.put.iij| 
cuteness. And "ade not ofl 
paper or rags but of STYRENt. 
„iictir and hard synthetic rub- L 
be" you don't go wild ovef| 

Ave., New York "i •JiTi, 



M 



m 



?SS 



our religion because we never let it 
grow stale or routine. We go to study 
groups and try to learn a little more 
about the mysteries of the universe. We 
read the lives of the saints and try to 
benefit from their experiences." 

"Yes," Janet put in, "and you leave 
those books around so we'll see them 
and get interested and read them, too." 

"Well, at least we don't shove them 
at you," Sis laughed. "Sure, the books 
and pamphlets are here for you or any 
of our guests to read — if they want to. 
I keep hoping you'll want to." 

"Oh, we read them and lots of times, 
when we're on the road, we talk about 
what we read and exchange ideas," said 
Peggy. "But, after all, you don't have 
to be a professor of theology or a priest 
to obey the Ten Commandments and 
follow the Golden Rule." 

"You can do that without being a 
Catholic," reminded Bill. 

"That's true," Kathy mused. "God 
says we must love every human soul 
even if we don't happen to like the 
person in the flesh." 

"Daddy, you once told us that all 
people are children of Abraham," said 
Janet. 

"I was quoting the Holy Father," ex- 
plained Bill. 

"I think bigotry is hateful and dis- 
gusting," said Peggy heatedly. "We're 
Catholics and it's wonderful for us. But 
we mustn't forget there are other peo- 
ple who lead decent, worthwhile lives 
and they are Jews or Protestants or 
some other faith. After all, God gave 
the Ten Commandments to Moses, and 
he was a Jew. And Jesus, who was born 
of a Jewish mother, died on the cross 
to save us all — not for just one race or 
one religion." 

"It's my opinion," said Janet, "that 
there are good and bad in every re- 
ligion and race. People are born a cer- 
tain race and they can't help it or 
change it. And most people go to a 
certain church because they follow their 
parents' religion." 

"Like us, for instance?" Bill asked. 

"Well, yes," Janet hesitated a mo- 
ment. "I suppose if I'd been born in 
a Jewish family, I would be a Jew in- 
stead of a Catholic." 

"On the other hand," said Sis 
thoughtfully, "some religions are not 
quite as strict as ours." 

"The price we pay" 

Peggy and Kathy broke into a giggle. 
"You mean the movie list in the kitch- 
en? Well, you've got to admit we con- 
sult it before going to a show," laughed 
Peggy. And Janet added, "And if I'm 
going with you, you do change your 
plans and see a picture that's approved 
for the whole family." 

"Yes, Janet," Kathy teased her. 
"That's the price we pay for your com- 
pany — or should I say for putting up 
with your company." Janet tossed her 
head and said, "Well — I hope I'm worth 
it!" 

Each year, the Lennons, as a family, 
pledge to follow the Legion of Decency 
list of approved films and books. Since 
Peggy and Kathy are now past eighteen, 
they are eligible to see films listed in 
the "adults only" classification. Kathy, 



perhaps the most outspoken and gre- 
garious of the girls, may be heard on 
occasion in the kitchen, muttering, "Oh, 
heck! And I did so want to see that 
picture!" But she doesn't go — and be- 
ing the kind of girl she is, she manages 
to enjoy the substitute movie. 

"When you get right down to it," 
explains Sis, "some of these banned or 
'adult only' films turn up on television 
later on, and the whole family watches 
them without remembering the listing. 
Of course, it would be almost impos- 
sible for the censors to go over all 
the films being shown on local sta- 
tions. However, Bill and I feel that the 
important thing is not to deliberately 
and flippantly set out to see or read 
something that the Church considers 
objectionable. And in most cases, when 
films that are too mature for them 
do come on TV, the kids switch to some- 
thing else because they find them 
boring." 

"One thing about our religion," Janet 
boasted. "We have real big families 
and that's a lot of fun for kids." 

"You mean," Bill teased, "that Jews 
and Protestants have something in their 
religion that prevents them from hav- 
ing big families?" 

"No, but we do have the biggest, 
don't we?" demanded Janet. 

This set the Lennons off into a round- 
table laugh. Tossing her head, Janet 
said, "When I get married, I want a 
lot of children. Think of all the birth- 
day parties and confirmations!" 

"But what if you didn't have a lot 
of children?" asked Bill. 

"Then I'd adopt a few, of course!" 

Although there is this firm loyalty 
among the Lennons with regard to the 
religion of their fathers, their practice 
of it is never regimented. On Sunset 
Boulevard in Hollywood is a huge sign 
that reads: "The family that prays to- 
gether, stays together." The Lennons 
have managed to keep the essentials 
of "togetherness" without resorting to 
uniformity. Their attendance at mass, 
visits to church for special missions or 
confessions, are done in the main volun- 
tarily and often according to individual 
circumstance. Thus, when DeeDee was 
going to public school (the Catholic 
school in their vicinity had not yet been 
initiated), she would drop into church 
each morning before class. The younger 
children attend daily mass at their 
Catholic school. Peggy and Kathy still 
go to church each morning, and often 
visit it again during the day. The sing- 
ing trio must often adjust their religious 
obligations to the conditions in which 
they find themselves when on tour. 
There are occasions when some of the 
family attend early mass while others 
go later. It is no unusual event, how- 
ever, when the family are all united, to 
see the Lennons enter their church 
as a body. But there is no rigidity in 
this, merely another proof of their great 
affection for one another. 

Their roomy, comfortable, two-story 
home in Venice, California, is what one 
might expect of a devout family. Many 
religious objects are to be seen. Some 
of these are fine art pieces, sent them 
as gifts from fans all over the country. 
Again, not all of these works of art 
are solemn in tone ; some are humorour 



In particular, there is an amusing group- 
ing of chubby porcelain monks. Biblical 
scenes are set into the frame of their 
large picture window, and these are 
changed frequently "so that we don't 
take them for granted and stop look- 
ing." This from Bill, who is convinced 
that pictures and sculptures are "re- 
minders of our beliefs and our duty 
to God." Some time ago, one of the 
girls mischievously added several Afri- 
can masks to their backyard "arrange- 
ment," which has for its centerpiece 
the Virgin Mother surrounded by foli- 
age and a waterfall. "We showed it 
to Monsignor Wade when he visited 
here," Sis laughs, "and he turned our 









GEORGE MAHARIS 



(Continued from page 62) 
the turnpike. The story's right there, 
on the records . . . and perhaps some 
of it is inevitable, with a huge but 
close-knit family of cast and crew — 
a real family kind of family, when 
school's out and some thirty wives and 
sixty children, join the caravan — all 
traveling from one end of the country 
to the other. Together, they've covered 
tens of thousands of miles, put more 
than sixty shows — and cities — behind 
them. ... A lot can happen in that 
time and space. A lot more than an 
early press release predicted: "The 
show stems from a desire to present 
a more complete picture of contempo- 
rary America authentically and real- 
istically. Many of the cities and towns 
where the show will be shot have under- 
gone tremendous improvements and 
face-changing in the past decade and 
the episodes will help acquaint and up- 
date TV viewers with the improvements 
of our country. . . ." 

Brother, they've undergone more than 
the most daring City Fathers ever 
dreamed! Says George himself: "That 
writer should go on tour with us. May- 
be the viewers are learning a lot about 
our country, but I'm not at all sure 
the people in the towns we've shot in 
know where they are any more. 

"You know, we never use sets and 
we try to get the true feeling and at- 
mosphere of whatever we're shooting. 
One night, we were doing a scene in a 
hospital in Philadelphia, and we darn 
near caused a real-life heart attack. 
A relative of one of the patients walked 
into what had been his brother's room 
— and there was a body on the bed 
completely covered by a sheet. 

"The poor guy fainted dead away. 
He'd slipped past before anyone could 
tell him his brother had changed rooms 
with a bunch of actors and a dummy. 

"We've moved into small towns and 
changed the entire Main Street," George 
continues. "One time, during the night, 
the art boys converted the only bank 
in town to look like another building 
— man, let me tell you, the holy devil 
broke loose the next day! The bank 
directors had given us the go-ahead 
sign, but the local citizens didn't know 
what was going on. 

"At nine o'clock the next morning, 



kidding right back on us. He said, 'You 
Lennons have it made. What the Virgin 
Mother won't do for you, the witch 
doctors will take care of.' " 

Thus the Lennon Sisters and their 
family move through the sophisticated 
world of show business — with an intense 
dedication to the things of God . . . 
with pleasure in their devotions and 
prayers . . . with tolerance for the con- 
victions of others . . . and with a touch 
of humor toward their own observance. 
— Eunice Field 

The Lennon Sisters sing on "The Law- 
rence Welk Show," seen on ABC-TV, 
Saturdays, from 9 to 10 p.m. edt. 



iiilHiiirniiiinii, 



folks were walking up to their bank to 
make deposits or withdraw money, and 
what did they see? No bank. The local 
paper had to put out a special edition 
to explain what was happening — but 
not before a lot of depositors had de- 
cided their bank president had most 
likely skipped town with their life 
savings." 

That was one town with one bank. 
But let George tell you what he and 
his cohorts did to the city of Phila- 
delphia itself. "We had to change the 
hands on the big Ben Franklin clock 
that's a landmark there," he recalls. 
"Turned it back from midnight to ten 
o'clock, to fit our story. 

"I think I can truthfully say," says 
this truthful though high-spirited trav- 
eler, "Philadelphia will never forget 
us. The police department, broadcasting 
stations and newspapers were flooded 
with calls. And half the people in 
town were late to work, next day. 

"One guy lost his job and we had to 
write a letter to his boss explaining 
what had happened, before he was re- 
hired. How were we to know that every- 
one in town set their watches by that 
clock? Or that it hadn't been wrong 
in something like a hundred years?" 

Like to get your house redecorated 
free? Landlords, line up at the left — 
tenants, run for your lives — while 
George tells the sad tale: "One time, 
Red McCormack, our art director, com- 
pletely redid the outside of a little 
cottage. He got permission from the 
guy who owned the place and who 
rented it to a family which was away 
on vacation. 

"They put up fake windows over the 
original ones, painted the front door, 
placed shrubs around the front, even 
built window boxes with flowers and 
plants. When we finished shooting the 
scene, the owner asked Big Red to 
leave everything the way it was. He 
liked the new appearance. 

Home sweet hangover 

"Unfortunately, the guy who rented 
the place didn't feel the same way! 
When he returned from his vacation, he 
couldn't even find his own house. It 
unnerved him so, he went to the near- 
est bar and got clobbered." 

Hangover or no hangover, there's 
never been a real complaint from any 
city Maharis & Co. have visited. Cer- 
tainly not from any of the local citizens 



FINISH 
HIGH SCHOOL 

AT HOME 

• Better Jobs • Better Pay 
• More Security 

Without a high school diploma, it's really 
hard to land a choice job with good money 
and a real future. Look at the facts: 

• Government surveys show high school 
graduates make nearly $30 more a week 
than non-graduates. 

• Most companies require a high school 
education for their good jobs. 

• The need for educated people increases — 
but opportunities for the untrained shrink. 
NOW is the time to finish your high school 
education. No need to quit your job. Do it 
at home, in your spare time, like thou- 
sands of men and women of all ages have. 

Skilled instructors help you. Simplified 
teaching methods. Everything is mapped 
out to make it easy. Wayne training is fully 
accredited by Accrediting Commission of 
the N.H.S.C. You get credit for subjects 
you've already completed. With your 
Wayne Diploma, you're on your way to a 
better job, bigger income, a more secure 
future. Free Placement Service, plus 
Guarantee of Success. 

Time flies. So don't handicap 
your future any longer. Act 
now. If you're 17 or over and 
not in school, send coupon for 
Free Book, "Graduate to Suc- 
cess," plus full information. 

WAYNE SCHOOL of 
LA SALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY 
417 S. Dearborn St., Dept. 08-530, 
Chicago 5, Illinois 
A Correspondence Institution— Since 1908 
Please send Free Book, "Graduate to Suc- 
cess," plus information on high school 
training at home. No obligation. 




Name 

Address- 
City 



-Age- 



Zone & County- 



.State- 



. Accredited Member— National Home Study Council . 





PLAY RIGHT AWAY! 

Piano, Guitar, ANY Instrument 

pLAY real tunes on ANY instrument right from 
* the start — even if you don't know a single 
note now! Amazing course lets you teach yourself 
at home, in spare time. No boring exercises. You 
?'^y J e $ l n °tes. Make rapid progress. Easy as 
A-B-C. Low cost. Over 1,000,000 students. 

A FREE BOOK describes this famous 
i* course in full. See how easy learning 
•r music can be. No obligation. Write 
TODAY to: U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 
Studio 208. Port Washington, N. Y. 
(Largest in the world — 62nd success- 
ful year.) Tear this out as reminder. 



FRECKLES 



Do freckles prevent 
you from being beau- 
tiful? Start using Still- 
man's Freckle Cream 
today. It gently light- 
ens and leaves the 
skin smooth, soft and 
clearer. It is more than 
a freckle cream. Thou- 
sands of girls, women 
and men all over the 
world have used it for 
years. A good complexion always adds > 
charm to your personality. 

Write for FREE Beauty booklet with 
many beauty suggestions. 

THE STILLMAN CO. 

DEPT. 39, AURORA, ILLINOIS 




89 



YOU'D NEVER KNOW SHE HAD 



PSORIASIS 

Like hundreds of thousands of men and 

women, she uses SIROIL, which tends 

o remove theexternal crusts and scales 

of psoriasis on arms, legs, scalp and 

other parts of the body. Apply 

SIROIL before goingtobed; it 

won'tstainclothing or bedding. 

SIROIL is sold on 2-weeks-sat- 

isfaction or money back basis. 

Get a bottle of SIROIL today. 

Iat all 

, DRUG 
STORES 



3HCTT 



IS HER FRIEND 



Write today for 

FREE booklet 
about psoriasis. 



NEW! Far daylim* comfort u«« 

SIR-O-LENE Skin Softener 
b*lween nightly Siroil application*. 
Alio ideal for dry and flaky tkin. 



■SIROIL LABORATORIES INC.. Dept. Ml 1 5, Santa Monica, Cat 
I Ple>u send me your new rati booklet on PSORIASIS. 

I 



NAME- 



J ADDRESS 

I CITY—— STATE- 



Plute Print 



POEMS WANTED 



To Be Set To Music 

Send one or more of yeur best poems 

today for FREE EXAMINATION Any 

Subject. Immediate Consideration. 

Phonograph Records Made 

CROWN MUSIC CO., 49 W. 32 St., Studio 560, New York 1 



• ■CLIP AND MAIL> 



ITI" LANOLIN CREAM 

For Dry Skin, Dry Scalp, Dry Hair 

Super rich LANOLIN CREAM works 

wonders for most dry skin, scalp and 

hair problems. To prove it we offer the 

83? jar for only 10# tax and postage 

paid. Clip this notice, enclose 10i and your name 

and address. Limit one to family. Send to 

FLEETWOOD CO. Dept. 22-NH, 427 W. Randolph, Chicago 



10c 



Hotels and Motels Call for 
Trained Women 



Record-breaking tra- 
I vel means nation-wide 
opportunities and a sound, substantial future for trained 
women in the hotel, motel and hospitality field. Fascinat- 
ing work; quick advancement. You can qualify at home, 
in leisure time, or through resident classes in Washington. 
Previous experience proved unnecessary. Placement Service 
FREE. Write for FREE hook. Approved for AL.L Vet. Training. 

LEWIS HOTEL TRAINING SCHOOL 
Room HM-118-12 Washington 7, D. C. 46th Year 

ANY PHOTO ENLARGED 

Size 8 x lO Inches 



6? 




on DOUBLE-WEI6HT Paper 

Same price for fall length or bast 
form, groups, landscapes, pet ani- 
mals, etc., or enlargements of any 
part of a group picture. Original is 
returned with your enlargement. 

SendNoMoney 3 tor?] so 

Just mail photo, negative or snap- 
shot (any size) and receive your enlargement, 
guaranteed fadeless, on beautiful double- weight 
portrait quality paper. Pay postman 67c plus _ 
postage— or send 69c with order and we pay post- 
age. Take advantage of this amazing offer. Send your photos today. 

Professional Art Studios, 544 S. Main. Dept 32-H, Princeton, Illinois 

SHEETS, TOASTERS, 
TOWELS, MIXERS,etc. 
GIVEN TO YOU FREE! 

Thousands of famous prod- 
uces to choose from — furni- 
ture, fashions, silverware, 
china, draperies, etc. You 
get $50.00 and more in 
merchandise just by being 
Secretary of a Popular Club 
you help your friends form. 
It's easy! It's fun! Nothing 
to sell, nothing to buy. Write 
today: Pooular Club Plan, 
Dept F912, Lynbrook.N.Y. 

I Popiilor Club Plan, Dept.F912, lynbrook. N. Y. | 
J Send Big FREE 276-Page FULL-COLOR Catalog | 

• Name ~ -■.-.■■.■..„„,...-■■ I 




Address... 



I 



90 



• City Stat e.. 



who have been cast as extras in the 
series. In Mesqaite, Texas, a small ad 
was placed in the local paper asking 
for volunteers for bit parts and extras 
— and 4,000 townspeople turned out. 
It has been like this everywhere. 

"You have to hand it to them," Ma- 
haris says of all the communities in 
which he's staged his capers. "They've 
put up with a lot. They seem to get a 
kick out of having a series shot in 
their town. They've been just great 
and are always cooperative." 

George is pretty cooperative himself 
— well above and beyond the call of 
duty for a bachelor, as he proved dur- 
ing a completely unplanned maneuver. 
One day, as he was looking on at a 
shooting, a cameraman's wife asked 
if he'd mind watching her two-year-old 
for a few minutes while she shopped. 

Trustingly, he took one pale, flower- 
like little hand into his big brown 
paw and watched the mother disappear 
from sight. Then — as it must to all in- 
fants — diaper disaster befell his tem- 
porary cherub. Drippingly obviously. 

Without a moment's delay, George 
whisked the tot into a nearby automatic 
laundry, removed the offending gar- 
ment and tossed it into a machine. 
When it was thoroughly washed and 
dried, he replaced it on the child. Then 
they marched out of the establishment, 
chins high, eyes looking neither right 
nor left. Resourceful, that's George. 

But, since that time, it's said he al- 
ways looks twice before he agrees to 
baby-sit. He makes sure the kid is wear- 
ing rubber pants. 

Much as he may startle other people, 
it isn't easy to faze George himself. 
Neither he nor Marty Milner uses stunt 
men or doubles, no matter how danger- 
ous the plot. The result has been some 
pretty harrowing experiences no script- 
writer ever imagined. 

In the middle of winter, both stars 
were strapped to girders over the Cam- 
den Bridge in Delaware. Suddenly, 
George's strap started to unravel and 
give, and he clutched frantically at the 
steel girder — his only hope of not fall- 
ing into the ice-choked water two hun- 
dred feet below. 

As the entire company watched anx- 
iously, crewmen inched along trying to 
grab his arm and save him from cer- 
tain death. Finally, they managed to 
grasp one hand and pulled him to 
safety. 

Even ' as he jumped down to the 
solid flooring of the bridge, Maharis 
looked at the director and said firmly 
(reasonably firmly, that is) : "Before 
I go up there again, I want to take a 
look at my contract. Diving two hun- 
dred feet I don't mind — but there's 
gotta be a clause about the water. It's 
gotta read: 'Only tepid or warm water.' 

"A guy could kill himself on those 
overgrown ice cubes floating around 
down there. I'm delicate." 

He can dream, can't he? 

Nobody planned such a cliff-hanger 
for George, of course, but there have 
been times when the crew turned the 
tables on him . . . like the time he was 
wearing opaque contact lenses for an 



episode in which he was supposed to 
have lost his eyesight. Though he prac- 
ticed with them for three days, he 
found it impossible for him to focus. 

"That guy was in agonizing pain all 
the time and his eyes were a wreck," 
says one of the crew, "yet now, when 
we think back on it, we all howl. 

"Maharis had always admired but 
never met a well-known movie star, and 
one of the crew could mimic her to the 
life. Maharis was leaning against a 
wall, during a break in shooting, when 
this mimic came up behind him and 
murmured, 'Oh, George, you are just 
marvelous.' At the same time, a script 
girl kisses George on the cheek. 

"We thought Maharis was going to 
jump ten feet. By the time he'd re- 
moved his contact lenses and could see 
again, no one was in sight except the 
cast. He looked sheepish for a minute, 
then put his lenses back in without a 
word." 

To George himself, the weirdest mem- 
ory of all their travels was the time 
two college boys followed their caravan 
for two-and-a-half months. "They were 
living the whole part — and believe it 
or not — driving a Corvette identical to 
the one Marty and I are supposed to 
be driving! 

"It got so they were making us both 
nervous, because they aped everything 
we did — dress, speech, mannerisms — 
and when we took off for a new town, 
there they'd be, waiting for us. It got 
so they'd make suggestions and correct 
the dialogue." 

That was one time when George, in- 
stead of haunting others, got to feel- 
ing more than a bit haunted himself. 
Like all the other things that have 
happened along "Route 66," it's funny 
in retrospect — but not to be recom- 
mended or repeated. When the boys' 
vacation was over and it was time for 
them to go back to college, they were 
flat broke. Maharis & Co. had to take 
up a collection to get them back home. 

Which gets us back to the original 
gag: "No matter what George has got, 
he shares it." He's always had a repu- 
tation for being, not only a soft touch, 
but an easy mark for anyone who 
wanted or needed anything done. 

"Money," he says airily, "isn't going 
to get me what I want out of life, so 
I just keep enough to keep me going. 
Other people need it more. Other peo- 
ple need a lot of things more than I 
do. You help if you can." 

He'll share anything except his hepa- 
titis. That, he wouldn't wish on any- 
one. And, all kidding aside, "Route 
66" was mighty glad when he could 
join them again in their travels. But 
they still warn you: "Watch out for 
that guy Maharis! You'll die laughing!" 
— Pat Richards 

"Route 66" whizzes along over CBS-TV. 
Fridays, from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. edt. 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••a 
INVEST IN 

U. S. SAVINGS BONDS 

NOW EVEN BETTER 

•••••••*••••••••**••••••** 



TED MACK 



(Continued from page 51) 
"It usually takes a minimum of five 
years of hard work, persistence and 
polishing to get a foothold." And all 
along the way, there are rebuffs, de- 
feats, discouragements. Sinatra had his 
share of them. For three years, while 
he traveled with a quartet known as 
"The Hoboken Four," under the aus- 
pices of the show, he pleaded constantly 
for a chance to sing alone — and never 
got it. But he continued to try . . . 
to audition wherever he could. . . . 
Not everyone has to pick himself up 
off the floor so many times, but every- 
one meets with rebuffs and setbacks. 
The secret is not to let any of them 
defeat you permanently. If you're new 
in town, or in the office, or at school, 
and you're having trouble making 
friends, don't give up. Make a point 
of being pleasant, ready with a smile 
and a friendly greeting, no matter how 
hard it may be. Be helpful whenever 
you can. Many a lifelong friend has 
been made over a knotty algebra prob- 
lem or by a thoughtful gesture to a 
stand-offish neighbor. Go halfway, and 
a little more — but without being 
"pushy." The latter, says Mack, will 
get you nowhere, either in or out of 
show business. 

3. Management. The young person 
who has serious ambitions toward a 
career as an entertainer probably comes 
naturally endowed with both talent 
and persistence. Management he has 
to find later, and many a talented sing- 
er, Mack says, has never made it big 
because he hasn't been able to connect 
with a good manager. (Not every 
would-be Elvis has a Colonel Parker.) 
Obviously, most people in other walks 
of life are in no position to hire man- 
agers to guide their footsteps, but there 
are people eager to help — parents, 
teachers, wise and willing older folk. 
It was guidance of this sort that helped 
Jackie Kennedy bring to the White 
House a brand-new kind of charm — 
and enables her to hold her own with 
foreign dignitaries far older and more 
experienced than she. 

It was a wise mother who told her 
teen-aged daughter, about to take off 
for her first class party in a new school ; 
"Forget about yourself. Find someone 
who's sitting off in a corner alone and 
try to see that she (or he) has a good 
time. Pretty soon, you'll discover you're 
having a good time yourself." 

4. Beauty. No one, including show- 
man Mack, underestimates beauty, 
though in his recipe for success it 
ranks fourth or maybe, he says, even 
lower. The biggest winners, in or out 
of show business, are seldom the great- 
est beauties, and there's no point in 
becoming a hermit because you don't 
look like a movie star. Even Zsa- 
Zsa Gabor (and who should know 
better?) describes glamour as "being 
neat and clean." Keeping your hair 
brushed and shining . . . your nails 
in tiptop shape . . . and your clothes 
pressed — these are within the reach of 
every girl and can soon become a 



habit. And it's one that helps immeas- 
urably to give any girl poise and self- 
confidence. 

5. Charm is one of those elusive, 
indefinable qualities made up largely 
of unselfishness, an interest in the other 
fellow, and an eternal optimism toward 
life. Invaluable in the making of a 
winner in show business, it's just as 
potent in everyday life. A young per- 
former may feel like throwing a temper 
tantrum when his accompanist goofs 
— or his spot on the bill isn't what he 
expected — but he learns quickly that 
the old slogan about catching more flies 
with sugar than with vinegar is still 
true. Cameraman, sales clerk, teacher, 
network brass, neighbor, boss— all are 
pushovers for the smile-and-pleasant- 
word routine. Administered freely and 
often, it can get to be a habit, and a 
much more beguiling one than the 
grouch-and-gripe bit. No woman looks 
charming when, mouth turned down, 
she begins talking about her troubles. 

6. Luck is important, of course, and 
Ted Mack has dozens of examples to 
prove it. Pat Boone is one. It didn't 
take Pat five years, after his "Amateur 
Hour" appearances, to get a toehold 
in the professional world. He went 
straight home to Nashville and a job 
on the radio station there; has been 
going onward and upward ever since. 
And there is Fabian, who just happened 
to be sitting on his front porch when 
Bob Marcucci happened by, saw him — 
and a new star was born. 

In the same way, it's luck when a 
girl happens to go to a party, and hap- 
pens to meet that certain guy. Or 
happens to apply for a job on the very 
day there's a vacancy. Or holds a win- 
ning sweepstakes ticket. Luck, good 
luck, comes to everyone some time. The 
important thing is to be ready, as Pat 
Boone was, and take it from there. If 
you have already learned to be your 
own charming self, are well groomed, 
interested, thoughtful, you can't miss. 

7. Education doesn't matter much, in 
Mack's opinion, when a young per- 
former is getting started. Later on, 
after he's established, it becomes of 
inestimable importance. Translated into 
successful living, it comes out the same 
way. The "dumb blonde" is a classic 
gag, but it's not always a joke. Not to 
the pretty girl who marries before she's 
out of school and finds, later on, that 
she's unable to keep up with her in- 
creasingly successful husband. Nor to 
the cute teenager who wakes up one 
day to find she's no longer a teenager 
and that cuteness alone won't get her 
by in the grown-up world. Night courses 
will help ... or reading the daily 
paper ... or watching the educational 
TV programs. 

8. Self-confidence. Among the hun- 
dreds of teenagers who got their start 
on the "Amateur Hour" and have gone 
on to stardom is Paul Winchell, a lik- 
able kid whom everyone wanted to help. 
From time to time, they'd offer him 
quips or jokes for his ventriloquism 
act. Paul would listen, says Ted. Then, 
often, he would shake his head. "That's 
not for me," he would say — and that 
was that. Even as a teenager, Mack 
points out. Paul was willing to gamble 



How to make Big Money 
Wrjting Stories that Sell! 

We will reveal secrets and short cuts 
that can start you writing professionally 
in less than 4 weeks. We guide you 
every step — show you how to write 
and how to sell what you write. 
Our free hook tells you "How to Make 
Big Money Writing." It's yours free! 
We show you how to hook and hold 
the reader! See how to make opening 
paragraphs so intriguing, they can't 
stop reading. Your characters will come 
to life! Your dialogue will sparkle! 
We tell you how to write, what to 
write about! After mastering the easy 
techniques you join hundreds of 
students who now write for a profit! 
FAMOUS AUTHOR, STUART PALMER JHtk. 
Mr. Palmer has helped hundreds to 
successful writing careers. He has 
written over 20 books, TV scripts, 
Radio plays. ..has conducted univer- 
sity courses in writing. 

TELEVISION, FICTION, NON-FICTION, 
MAGAZINES... COMEDY ANO DRAMA 

You get individual coaching by pro- 
fessional writers! All assignments 
graded for you. You learn all fields 
at one low cost! Free book and 
sample lesson — no cost or obliga- 
tion, no salesman will call ! 
Free Book. "How to 3. 3 month magazine sub- 
scription... "The Writer's 
Mailbag," filled with tips 
on how to write and sell. 
4. Aptitude Quiz. Reserved 
in your name. 







make big money writing. 
Your key to success. 

2. Free lesson. Shows you 
how easy it is to become 
a professional writer. 



PALMER INSTITUTE OF AUTHORSHIP 

810 Dodsworth, Dept. H-1878, Covina, California 
Please send me your free book, free sample lesson, 
free 3 month subscription and free test. I under- 
stand there is no cost or obligation on my part now 
or ever and no salesman will call. Age 

NAME 

ADDRESS , 

CITY 



I 



.ZONE STATE . 



Member Association of Home Study Schools 




New version of the ageless curling iron, the 

QUINIO ELECTRIC CURLER COMB 

Only $9.95. Safe, easy to use. 
Also available are Medium, Large and Jumbo rollers 
which slip on and off easily for bouffant hairdos. $1.2.3 
each— set $3.25. 

10 DAY MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 
Immediate delivery. We pay postage. 

QUINIO CURLER COMB (Dept. M8) 
522 Beaver St., Sewickley, Pa. 



American Institute of Practical Nursing, Room 1 01 
120 S. State Street — Chicago 3, Illinois 

Please rush your FREE 10-page lesson on Nursing. 
No cost, no obligation. No calls by salesman. 

Name 



Street. 
City — 



—Zone 



_State_ 




Clip and mail this coupon 
for your 10-page. 



FREE. 1 , 



I st lesson 
NURSING 



Great need for Practical Nurses 
right now. Learn at home in 10 
weeks for Graduate Diploma. 
No age, no education limit. 
Enjoy new prestige, security. 
Wonderful opportunity. FREE 
to you: Nurse uniform and cap, 
Nurse's Medical dictionary, 
many needed accessories. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PRACTICAL NURSING, Room 101 
120 S. State Street— Chicago 3, Illinois 



91 



92 




YOUNG THROATS FOR OLD 

Jusi tie our amazing chemical pad on, and pro- 
ceed with normal activity. Guaranteed safe and 
effective. Use one (1) hour a day for 30 days. 
Better than most plastic surgery. Face reju- 
venating information included with order. No 
exports, no C.O.D.'s. Send exactly $2.00 check 
or money order for "Throat Pad" to: 

AGE-WISE COSMETICS 

Dept. 1 -6, # 1 Worth St., San Francisco 1 4, Calif. 



FREE 




5X7 ENLARGEMENT 
COLORED IN OILS 

Specify color eyes, hair, clothes 
WITH EVERY ORDER FOR 



25 WALLET PHOTOS 



made from any photo, 
snapshot or negative. ?■' 
Send payment with order, t,V>,u 9 ~e 
FRAMED PHOTO SERVICE, Dept. M, 1204 B'way, N. Y. 1 



1 




Mm into DOLLARS! 

I -i[s NEW Songwriters, Poets, Composers may gain 
=—= SUCCESS, FAME, WEALTH. Songs Composed, 
y§§= PUBLISHED. Appraisals, details FREE from . . . 

WNORDYKE SONGS & MUSIC 

T6000 Sunset, HOLLYWOOD 287. California, U. S. A. 



ANALYZE HANDWRITING 



MORE INCOME... MORE PRESTIGE 
and Greater PERSONAL Success 

YOU CAN learn how to identify character 
and personality traits from ordinary hand- /// Qn 
writing. Fascinating home-study training. Many //Aj», ^ 
career opportunities for both men and women, full III 4£yr. c / 



r It* - -. ' M 




a FREE sample lesBon and big illustrated catalog £// . . y^Oru c 
Free. No salesman will bother you. (State' age) . ^*^^*m*^M 
INTERNATIONAL GRAPHO ANALYSIS SOCIETY. INC. 
325 W. Jackson Blvd., Dept. HZ-94, Chicago 6, Illinois 



LIVE SEAHORSES 

Order a pair of MATED LIVE SEA- 
HORSES from Fla. Supply of food, our 
catalog and simple instructions on how 
to raise these fascinating little creatures 
of the deep. All you need is a jar. 
bowl or aquarium. Every one young or 
old enjoys watching their bizarre move- 
ments for hours. Educational, Interest- 
ing and Hardy. Guaranteed Live Delivery 
—Air Mail Postpaid — $3.50 a Pair — 
$7.00 SPECIAL: Order TWO PAIR 
and receive another PAIR FREE. 

F. F. MARINE LIFE, P. 0. Box 626-MW, Dania, Fla. 



NO COST! ' ^"""^ 

To get acquainted, I'll send you this 
superbly built Bulova super-powered 
7-transistor "slim line" portable radio. ^^^ [ / 
Guaranteed one full year. Features pre- 
cision tuning and jewelry styling. Simply hand 
out or mail only twenty get-acquainted coupons FREE to friends or 
relatives and help us get that many new customers as per our 
premium letter. I get so much enjoyment from my beautiful Bulova 
transistor radio that I'm sure you would love one for your home, too. 
Please send me your favorite snapshot, photo or Kodak picture when 
writing for your Bulova radio. We will make you a beautiful 5x7 
inch enlargement in a "Movietone" frame and you can tell friends 
about our hand colored enlargements when handing out the coupons. 
Send today and pay postman only forty-nine cents and a few cents 
for our c.o.d. service plus postage on arrival. Your original returned. 
Also include the color of hair and eyes with each picture so I can also 
give you our bargain offer on a second enlargement hand colored in 
oils for greater beauty, sparkle and life. Limit of 2 to any one person. 
Send today for your 20 FREE coupons to hand out and please enclose 
your name, address and favorite snapshot. Our supply of Bulova 
radios is limited. Mrs. Ruth Long, Gift Manager, 

DEAN STUDIOS 

Dept. X-541, 913 Walnut St., Des Moines 2, Iowa 



on his own opinions and self-reliance. 

Self-confidence and the poise which 
comes with it are just as important else- 
where. It's rough to walk into a room- 
ful of strangers without feeling some 
self-consciousness, but if you keep try- 
ing, head held high and your lips 
curved into a smile, it gets easier and 
easier. Try it. Keep on trying it. One 
day you'll wake up and wonder where 
those butterflies have gone. 

Of course, there are things Ted Mack 
doesn't mention — things like money and 
family background and all that they 



SECOND HONEYMOON 



(Continued from page 45) 
their own selves in each other's per- 
sonality. "At first," Mickey confesses, 
"it was a battle of who was going to 
win, who was going to make the other 
do things the way he wanted them." 
Mickey had led a life of coming and 
going as he pleased. When he attempted 
to retain the semblance of his old in- 
dependence, Carlyn was hurt that the 
life she offered didn't completely satisfy 
him. Minor spats became major argu- 
ments, until the flames of love were 
doused by a storm of mutal recrim- 
inations. 

Twice they separated. Twice they 
found they couldn't stay apart. Now 
they're back together in a relationship 
filled with more maturity and wisdom. 
Says Mickey: "We understand each 
other now. We've found that neither 
of us had to change. I can do the things 
I want. Carlyn can do what she wants, 
too. The secret is we each stopped try- 
ing to defy the other, to mold our 
partner into the image we wanted to 
see. We stopped trying to teach each 
other a lesson — and everything else fell 
into place." 

Actress Ruth Warrick and her in- 
terior-decorator husband Carl Neubert 
tried for nine lonely years to prove 
to themselves they didn't need each 
other to make their lives complete- 
but found it impossible. Here, the 
original friction had been caused by 
Ruth's need for independence and by 
her European-born husband's equal 
need for her to be a 100-percent wife 
to the exclusion of anything else. 

"He never could reconcile himself 
to the fact that I could be two per- 
sons," says Ruth. "He seemed disturbed 
with my other identity as an actress. 
I, on the other hand, was determined 
not to lose my freedom, my independ- 
ence, my individuality. I had been 
raised by a father who constantly re- 
minded me I was as good as any man. 
. . . I had been taught I could make 
my way alone without having to cling 
to a husband for support. I couldn't 
accept the fact that, once I was mar- 
ried, I must give up freedom and re- 
vert to the role of the subservient house- 
wife of my grandmother's era. 

"Do you know what those long, soli- 
tary years of our separation taught me? 
The difference between male and fe- 
male. This lesson is a very deep one 
that goes beyond marriage. Women 



represent. But run down a list of the 
currently popular singers. How many 
of them came from well-heeled families 
on the plushy side of the tracks? It is 
just as true that success as a human 
being depends not at all on these things. 
Hauling one's self up by your own boot- 
straps is an old American custom . . . 
and the Cinderella story is one which 
never grows out of date. — Betty Etter 

See both winners and losers on "Ted 
Mack and The Original Amateur 
Hour," CBS-TV, Sun., at 5:30 p.m. edt. 



piNiniiLiniiiniiiiiiJiiiiiMiiiii 



lliliiiliiliiliilin 



iiiiniiniiMiiiiiii 



have fought so hard for equal rights 
that, in many cases, they've lost their 
femininity and become 'counterfeit men.' 

"Now I know that being a woman 
can be beautiful," Ruth smiles. "There 
is nothing degrading or shameful about 
it. I used to think, 'Why should I rele- 
gate myself to becoming inferior?' Now 
I know that womanhood is a specific 
thing and something I should be proud 
of. We are the spiritual, the intuitive, 
the understanding, the sympathetic sex. 
If we're wise, we'll stop fighting it and 
will capitalize on what we can offer. 

"Oh, I've learned such a great deal! 
I've learned how shallow a victory 
freedom, is, how lonely it can be. I 
know now that it isn't necessary for a 
wife to feel subservient. I'm proud of 
being a woman. 

"I realize now there was never any 
doubt that Carl and I were always in 
love. Our nine years of separation 
erased any doubt there might have 
been. Now we can face life with a 
new maturity and a deeper sense of 
security. Carl told me recently, 'I've 
found I'll only love one woman in my 
lifetime. I'm convinced there will be 
difficulties and hard feelings sometimes 
between us — but if you want something 
badly enough, you can easily pay the 
price by compromising and changing 
yourself.' 

"Let me tell you what maturity has 
taught me," says Ruth. "I call it 'the 
climate of love.' There is more to mar- 
riage than just passion and physical 
appeal. A union will always consist of 
a varied climate — rain, storms, sun and 
calm. Realizing this, I can accept the 
cloudy days along with the brilliant 
ones, remaining aware of the one 
thing that really counts — Carl and me 
together." 

Is love more wonderful, the second 
time around? The list is long of Holly- 
wood couples who would answer a re- 
sounding "Yes!" Peggy Cass and her 
husband, Carl Fisher, are singing the 
same refrain as Jimmie and Colleen, 
since their recent reconciliation. . . . 
Actor Frank Lovejoy might have com- 
posed the words himself, as his testa- 
ment to love when he and actress Joan 
Banks, his wife of many years, ended 
their separation. . . . Linda Darnell 
and her airline-pilot husband, Robbie 
Robertson, are humming the tune now 
that they're giving marriage another try. 

As more and more couples learn the 
rewards to be found in a second honey- 
moon, the list will undoubtedly get 
longer. It can't get much happier! 

— Marilyn Beck 



CARA WILLIAMS 



(Continued from page 46) 
all my life in regard to myself, I tried 
to get him to see the positive side of 
life. But it's very hard for a man to 
think positively when everything's been 
so negative for as long as he can re- 
member." 

"Were you ever able to make him 
change his thinking?" I asked. 

She shook her head sadly. "No, not 
really. He was always negative, always 
unhappy, and he'd try to prove to you 
why he should be unhappy. He'd show 
you how much the breaks were against 
him, and nothing anybody could do 
would convince him otherwise. It was 
very sad, really. I tried, but I couldn't 
talk him out of thinking that way. 

"In spite of all this, I was very much 
in love with my husband, and he loved 
me. In a way, that finally became the 
one thing that broke us up, strange as 
it may sound. For we possessed each 
other too completely. He had never had 
real love in his childhood, and now he 
turned to me, expecting not only a 
wife's love, but the mother . love he'd 
been deprived of when he was a little 
boy. He became dependent on me — 
completely dependent — not only for 
love, but for guidance. We became in- 
separable, to such an extent that it 
was unhealthy for both of us. We could 
hardly breathe. 

"I gave up my career when I married 
Johnnie, and concentrated on his career. 
But he was so weak, so incapable of 
making a decision on his own, that it 
got to the point where he couldn't make 
a move unless I was there. He never 
went to work unless I went with him. 
He had to have me on the set all day 
or he couldn't perform. It became a 
real problem — and, for me, it was ex- 
hausting. For I'd have to get up early 
in the morning and go to work with him, 
stay with him all day, and then come 
home and try to take care of the chil- 
dren. By then, we had a son, John Barry- 
more III, and I also had my daughter 
Cathy, from my first marriage. I had 
to be a mother to my children and to 
my husband, as well. So, naturally, I 
couldn't get the cooking done in time 
when I came home at night. I had to 
neglect my housekeeping . . ." 

I said, "His family seems to have 
been responsible for his problems. Did 
any of them ever try to help straighten 
him out while you were married to 
him?" 

She smiled wryly. "Never. The Barry- 
mores are a strange family. I think 
they're one of the strangest families in 
the world. Until I married John, I'd 
never believed that a family could be 
as far apart as his was. Everybody was 
jealous of one another in the Barrymore 
family. I just couldn't understand no- 
body helping Johnnie, just as I couldn't 
see why nobody ever helped poor Diana 
Barrymore. But all the Barrymores 
were very cold to each other." 

Cara tried to give her husband the 
love he needed so terribly, but at last 
she saw that his dependence on her was 
crushing them both. In telling about it, 
her voice was regretful yet tender as 



she spoke of this boy-husband who had 
loved her too deeply and possessively 
for his own good. "He was so terribly 
insecure. He had never thought any- 
one really cared about him, and when 
he saw I loved him, he tried to hold on 
to that love so desperately that he lost 
it. Actually, I suppose that a great deal 
of my love was involved with pity, be- 
cause of the sad life he'd led. When I 
finally realized that we couldn't stay 
together anymore, I told him that we 
had to break up. And so, in 1958, we 
were divorced." 

John went to Europe, hoping to find 
success that had eluded him in Ameri- 
can pictures. Cara resumed her own 
career, and began to do surprisingly 
well. In fighting her husband's battles 
for him, she had gained a strength that 
she was now able to put to good use on 
her own account. 

"But, most importantly," she told me, 
"I started to take a positive attitude 
toward my life for a change. I hadn't 
been able to persuade John to give up 
his negativism, but I suddenly realized 
that, if I was to live a happy, success- 
ful life, I would have to apply a posi- 
tive philosophy to my own way of think- 
ing. I tried it, and it worked. Today I 
can truly say that I'm happy. I have 
a fine son and daughter, and a won- 
derful mother, and we all love each 
other very much. I'm happy in my work. 

"And it never would have happened 
if I hadn't tried to help Johnnie — and in 
doing so, discovered what was wrong 
with my own life." 

Yet her involvement with John did 
not end completely when they were 
divorced. A little over two years ago, 
he persuaded her to join him in Europe, 
telling her he wanted to try for a re- 
conciliation. But there was no recon- 
ciliation. Cara returned to this country 
and went into the CBS-TV comedy 
series, "Pete and Gladys," which 
brought her more fame than she'd ever 
known. 

A new wife, a new life 

On October 28, 1960, John married 
Gabriella Palazzoli in Europe. Once 
again, the marriage was a troubled one. 
After a quarrel with his new wife. John 
telephoned Cara and asked if she would 
oppose his returning to Hollywood. 

"You see, we have a divorce settle- 
ment," she told me, "and he owes me 
a great deal of money. That's why he 
asked me if he could come back. He 
wanted to know if I'd try to collect the 
money. I told him that he didn't have 
to pay it unless he could afford it — and 
he can't afford it." 

"It was generous of you to let him 
come," I said. 

"Well, he is my son's father, and I 
can't help but like him. He's a very 
nice boy." 

"You keep using that word 'boy' in 
relation to him," I pointed out. 

She shrugged. "He is a boy. He's 
never grown up, really." 

John did return to Hollywood and 
visited his son. He also dined with 
Cara. What they talked about is some- 
thing Cara hasn't discussed, but per- 
haps it was helpful to him. For, when 
he returned to Italy, he patched up his 



CLEAR UP ACNE-PIMPLES 




1 



with 
2 

tiny 

Capsules 

a day! 



IMPORTANT 

The Halsion Plan is 
fully guaranteed. 
Because individual 
experiences may 
vary, you must get 
satisfactory results or 
every penny will be 
refunded. 

(Not available in Canada 



A wonderful new 

vitamin formula 

No more sticky 

ointments 

No more greasy creams 

Full 30 day supply 

$3.95 



The Halsion Plan 
for complexion care 
is enclosed with 
each order. 



lalsion 

i rum Of nmwu 

KMCtflM UK CM 



ACNE PIMPLES 




ALLAN DRUG CO. o. P t 1291 

5880 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

D I enclose $3.95, check or money order, Halsion 

pays the postage. 
□ Please rush C.O.D. 30-day supply of Halsion. 

I agree to pay postage. 

It is my understanding that if I am not satisfied I 
may return the unused capsules or empty bottle for 
prompt refund. 

Name 



(pleatc print) 



Address. 



City. 



, Zone . 



State- 



OLD LEG TROUBLE 



i 



Easy to use Viscose Applications may 
heal many old leg sores due to venous 
congestion of varicose veins, leg swell- 
ing or injuries. Send today for FREE 
BOOK and full-refund Trial Plan. 

R. G. VISCOSE COMPANY 
100 w. Chicago Ave., Chicago 10, Illinois 



2 FREE ENLARGEMENTS 
OF YOUR FAVORITE PHOTOS, / 
NEGATIVES OR COLOR SLIDES *■ 

Just to introduce our new gold-tone process we 
will make PROFESSIONAL 5x7 enlargements of 
your favorite 2 snapshots, photos, negatives or 
color slides ABSOLUTELY FREE. Be sure to include 
color of hair, eyes and clothing for prompt infor- 
mation on having your enlargements beautifully 
hand-colored in oil and mounted in FREE FRAMES. 
Limit 2. Originals returned with enlargements. Act 
now. SEND NO MONEY. Just send 2 photos, nega- 
tives, snapshots or color slides today. 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS Dept. X-234 
7021 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood 38, Cant. 



HANDLED ENTIRELY BY MAIL 



*Mf. 




BORROW $100 TO $1000 ON 
YOUR SIGNATURE ONLY • 24 
MONTHS TO REPAY 

Enjoy life, end money worries! Confi- 
dential BORROW-BY-MAIL plan pro- 
vides cash for any purpose. Small pay- 
ments, fit your pockelbook. Private, 
entirely by mail. No endorsers, no per- 
sonal interviews. Fast service. State- 
supervised. Details sent in plain enve- 
lope. No obligation. Inquire now. 



Amount 
of Loan 


24 Monthly 
Payments 


$100 


$5.93 


$300 


$17.49 


$500 


$27.69 


$800 


$41.93 


$1000 


$51.24 



BUDGET FINANCE CO., Dept. LB-172 
114 S. 17, Omaha 2, Nebr. 

Name 



Address. 

City 

Age 



.Occupation. 



93 



Ugly broken, 
split nails... 



nEsaan 



94 



made lovely in minutes iff 

""" Marvel Nails W 



—a new liquid preparation that hardens into long, 
glamorous finger nails. Now you can change 
broken, split, bitten nails into strong beautiful 
nails — stronger than your own nails. STOPS NAIL 
BITING. 

Will not break or crack. Stays on until your own 
nails grow out. Can be filed, trimmed and beauti- 
fully polished. Each nail is made in one minute. 
You can do any type work while wearing these 
nails. No preparation like it. 

MARVEL KIT, 59* 
DELUXE JIFFY KIT. $1.50 

If not available at your favorite 
store, send 65c for $1.65) to: 

MARVEL NAILS, Dept. mw-8 

5249 W. Harrison St. Chicago 44. III. 

.WANTED for Musical 
1 Setting & Recording by 
. AMERICA'S LARGEST 
| SONG STUDIO. Send 
poems. Free examination. 
FIVE STAR MUSIC MASTERS, 265BEAC0N BLD6.. BOSTON. MASS. 

FALSE TEETH BREAK? 

GOOD Now repair them $198 
uEyyc at home in 8 min. Y | 

" Amazing PLATE-WELD repairs clear and 
pink plates and replaces teeth. Simply flow on— put 
together. Works every time— holds like new or money 
back. At Drug Stores or send $1.98 plus 22c handling to 
Home Dental Aids Co.. Box 1731, Dept. 27-A, Bakersfield, Calif. 

IMITATION 

DIAMOND RINGS 

$1.49 each or both for $2.49 
Gorgeous Solitaire and Wedding 
Ring set with beautiful imitation 
diamonds in 1/30 14 Kt. Yellow 
Gold Plated or Sterling Silver or 
White Gold Color Effect on a 
MONEY BACK GUARANTEE SEND 
NO MONEY. Pay Postman on de- 
livery plus postal charges. If you 
send cash or money order with 
order, we pay postage. 
HAREM CO., "The House of Rings," 
30 Church St., Dept. C364, New 
York 7, N. Y. 






1 » 



FEMALE HELP WANTED 

$23 WEEKLY for wearing lovely 
dresses supplied to you by us. 
Just show Fashion Frocks to 
friends in spare time. No in- 
vestment, canvassing or experi- 
ence necessary. Fashion Frocks, 
Dept. K-2093 1, Cincinnati 2, O. 



Un. 
5^ 
Fli 
tat 

CM 

shr 
sal 

f? 

del 



(ho 



ITCH in Women 
Relieved like Magic 

Here's blessed relief from tortures of vaginal itch, 
rectal itch, chafing, rash and eczema with a new 
amazing scientific formula called LANACANE. This 
fast-acting, stainless medicated creme kills harmful 
bacteria germs while it soothes raw, irritated and 
inflamed skin tissue. Stops scratching and so speeds 
healing. Don't suffer ! Get LANACANE at druggists ! 



BLO NDES! 



Wash Hair 
BRIGHTER, SHINIER,, 
SHADES LIGHTER 
Safely! 

Now, without tints, rinses or ugly 
bleached look, you can safely 
give your hair the radiant blonde 
color men love. BLONDEX the 
new 11 -minute "creamy" home 
shampoo contains ANDIUM for 
extra-lightness and shine. In- 
stantly removes dingy film that 
makes hair dark. Washes blonde 
hair shades lighter. Gives it lovely 
lustre. Safe for children. Get BLONDEX at drug or dept. stores. 



t* 




quarrel with Gabriella — a quarrel that 
had seemed headed for divorce. 

Today Cara prefers not to dwell on 
the past. The present is too perfect for 
that. Above all, she is concentrating on 
making a happy home for her children. 
John Barrymore III is seven years old, 
and already a charmer, with bright red 
hair and big blue eyes. Her daughter 
Cathy is a teenager, and near the top 
of her class at school. 

"Are you extra careful to see that 
your children have plenty of love and 
affection — because of what happened to 
your husband as a child?" I asked her. 

She smiled. "Oh, I don't worry about 
that, because we don't live the kind of 
a life Johnnie lived. My children are 
greatly loved and very secure. It comes 
naturally! We live a very plain kind 
of life. It's a bit chaotic at times, I'll 
admit. People are always dropping in 
on us, and my mother stays with us. 
There's always something doing. But 
we're very family-conscious and devoted 
to each other." 

"Would you like John Barrymore III 
to become an actor and carry on the 
family name?" 

She shook her head. "No. Definitely 
not. I'd rather see him doing almost 
anything else. I don't mind if he enters 
show business as a writer, or as a 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



CAROL AND GARRY 



(Continued from page 58) 
in 1959, Carol opened in "Once Upon 
a Mattress," at the off-Broadway Phoe- 
nix Theater. The play was an instant 
hit. But the Phoenix had other com- 
mitments. When the contract time on 
"Mattress" ran out, the Phoenix said 
the play would close to make way for 
"Lysistrata." 

The news hit Carol and the others in 
the cast like a hunk of falling scenery. 

"It's ridiculous," Carol fumed. "We 
were the first show in six years to keep 
that theater open all summer. So now 
we get evicted. It's a crime. Why don't 
they take 'Lysistrata' some place else? 
It'll probably be a bomb, anyway." 

That was the way Carol spoke, but 
her actions were even stronger than her 
words. She had the mattresses piled high 
during the final act, and right from the 
stage she climbed atop and appealed 
to the audience to write letters of pro- 
test to the Phoenix people. She also 
organized the cast's twenty-six members 
and picketed the theater. 

She aroused so much feeling that the 
never-give-up Carol soon had the show 
moved uptown to the Alvin Theater — on 
Broadway. Crowds poured in. When 
they had to leave the Alvin, to make 
room for another show, the play moved 
into the Winter Garden, then to the 
St. James. 

But Carol's leaving Garry's highly 
popular CBS variety show was quite an- 
other matter. It was a decision reached 
by Carol only after long talks with 
Garry about the best course for her to 
take — obviously, she should travel on 
a road paved by her own destiny. It 
was not wrought by any disagreement 



producer or director. But not as an 
actor." She smiled. "For one thing, I 
just can't stand the idea of a man pow- 
dering his nose! And, anyway, he 
doesn't want to act. Right now, he wants 
to be an astronomer. He's crazy about 
science, and he's even teaching me 
about it." 

She paused, and then said: "For in- 
stance — did you know that the moon 
isn't a planet? I had to find that out 
from my son!" 

"Do you think you'll ever marry 
again?" I asked. 

"I doubt it. At least not for a long, 
long time. I think the main reason for 
marriage is to have children, and I have 
two wonderful ones. Also, I think it's 
hard to combine marriage and a career 
in TV. If you're in the movies, it's not 
so difficult. But with TV it's impossible, 
because of the long hours you work. By 
the end of the day you're exhausted, and 
you can't be a proper wife." 

Then she grinned. "Besides, I'm mar- 
ried to Pete for twelve hours a day. All 
day long I do the dishes and fight with 
my TV husband. When I get home at 
night, I can use a little rest!" 

— Chris Alexander 

Cara Williams co-stars in "Pete and 
Gladys," CBS-TV., Mon., 8 p.m. edt. 



■I. Ml, ■HUN II-. 



or dispute between them. "There never 
was any pressure on Carol's part," 
Garry related. "She always was sweet 
and pleasant in her way when she dis- 
cussed the idea of leaving. And she 
would tell me, 'Garry, even after I'm 
gone as a regular, I'll come back to be 
on the show whenever you want me.' 
Carol is a very considerate girl." 

When Carol announced her decision 
to "go out on my own," she didn't mean 
on her own TV show, where so many 
are convinced that she belongs. Carol 
cannot agree. 

"I want to do Broadway shows," says 
Carol, "but I don't ever want to have 
a TV show of my own. It's too tough, 
especially for comedy. No half-hour 
film series for me." 

Garry knows why Carol turns thumbs 
down on her own video production. 
"Carol has worked as hard as anyone 
on my show," he related. "It was al- 
ways a source of wonderment to Carol 
how much work had to be put in for 
one TV show. She never complained 
about it, but she's an outspoken young 
lady — and she would tell me that she 
thought it was a rugged pace." 

"She'll go far" is how Garry put it 
to this writer as he talked about Carol's 
departure. There was a trace of melan- 
choly in Garry's voice as he retraced 
his comedy star's career with his show. 

"The day I saw her, I knew she was 
something. In this business you see them 
come and go, and I must have seen 
thousands. I've seen them with and with- 
out talent, with and without looks. 

"But when I saw Carol and she be- 
gan speaking to me — and later when I 
auditioned her — I knew that show busi- 
ness had a natural in her. It's some- 
thing you can't quite define, this busi- 
ness of looking at a lineup of beautiful, 
glamorous girls, all dying to be selected. 



And somehow you point your finger at 
just one, often without knowing just 
why. 

"Yet I know why I hired Carol — be- 
cause she was great." 

Garry gave Carol her big break when 
he took her on after she had auditioned 
for him for his daytime show back in 
'59. As a result of those frequent guest 
spots with Moore, she was invited on 
the Ed Sullivan show, then opened in 
New York City's Blue Angel with a 
brisk act that wowed the night spot's 
sophisticated clientele. 

The secret of Carol's instantaneous 
success was that she never allowed a 
leer, a wiggle, or an off -color insinua- 
tion to creep into her routine. Night- 
club stages from New York to San Fran- 
cisco are littered, like the desert sands, 
with the bleached bones of comedians 
and comediennes who tried to keep it 
clean and comic. Only Carol succeeded 
where all the others had failed. 

"I'm not here to purify the American 
theater," Carol offers to explain, "but 
I won't work even a teeny bit dirty. Off- 
color stuff isn't my type of comedy." 

Garry reminisced about her type of 
comedy, "I used to watch her come on 
stage. There was something about her 
— an infectiousness, a magnetic, dy- 
namic, audience-appeal quality that is 
the true measure of star quality. 

"She would smile and the entire set 
would light up. Once, in making a show, 
it became difficult to continue. She had 
everybody in a state of near collapse 
from laughing — and that included cam- 
eramen, sound technicians, engineers, 
and the whole production staff. 

She'll try anything 

"Her main asset is that she can be 
enormously funny, yet retain her fem- 
ininity and wholesomeness. She cap- 
tures her audiences by doing what 
comes naturally for her. And she is 
always willing to try anything — never 
quits learning." 

Carol came up the hard way. She was 
eight years old when the family moved 
from San Antonio, Texas, to California. 
Her father died a short time later. Her 
mother wrote publicity for a movie stu- 
dio. 

She entered Hollywood High School 
and concentrated on journalism, which 
she hoped to make her career. She be- 
came editor of the school paper. When 
she went on to U.CX.A. and took a 
course in playwriting and theater arts, 
something happened to change the 
course of her entire life. 

"It was a happy accident," Carol said. 
"We were required as part of the course 
to participate in the college shows. The 
first time I stepped on the stage and got 
my first laugh — I knew that was for me. 
It was heavenly." 

From that day on, Carol had a single 
goal in sight — the Broadway stage. In 
her junior year, Carol was invited to a 
posh party in San Diego with a fellow 
student, Don Saroyan. Together they 
entertained the guests with a scene from 
"Annie Get Your Gun." Afterward, 
Carol and Don were having coffee when 
one of the guests told them: "I liked 
you kids very much. What's your am- 



bition?" His interest seemed genuine. 

"To go to New York," said Carol. 

"Why don't you go?" the guest asked. 

"Money," Carol and Don chorused. 

"What's money?" the man shot back. 
"I came to this country broke. Now I'm 
a millionaire. Come to my office Mon- 
day. I'll give you the money to go." 

"We thought," Carol said, "that may- 
be he'd had too much to drink. But on 
Monday we went to see him. He called 
in his accountant and ordered two 
$1,000 checks drawn up." 

There were four provisions to the of- 
fer: They couldn't tell the benefactor's 
name ; the loan was for five years, to be 
paid back without interest; it had to 
be used to go to New York; afterward, 
Carol and Don would have to help oth- 
ers as the man helped them. 

"We'll send you a regular report," 
Carol enthused. 

"Oh, hell," the benefactor answered, 
"send me a postcard once a year — a 
Christmas card. And you'll pay back. 
Others have." 

"I made a fool of myself . . .". 

Carol and Don came to New York in 
1954 and, at first, jobs were scarce and 
money scarcer. Then, slowly, Carol be- 
gan to prove that her benefactor had 
been right about her. 

It was on Jack Paar's program that 
she sang "I Made a Fool of Myself 
Over John Foster Dulles." It so amused 
the late Secretary of State that he asked 
for a recording of it for himself. 

"That got me a lot of attention," 
Carol said, "but I had to watch my 
step. I could have quickly gotten the 
reputation as 'that girl who sings the 
song about. . . .' " 

But she didn't. As Garry says, "She 
was originally a stand-up comic and her 
stuff was infectious, hilarious, and tre- 
mendously popular. But in time Carol 
realized this was not her forte. She 
wanted to do more than the stand-up 
stuff; her comedy sense had become 
sharper. Basically, it's important to 
realize she's a sketch comedienne, and 
my biggest satisfaction was in being 
able to persuade her that she is not a 
grotesque girl but someone with a great 
deal of charm and sex appeal. Above all 
that, she was in every way a girl." 

Carol Burnett is deeply grateful to 
Garry for all, he's done in her interests. 

"I adore Garry and I'll always be in- 
debted to him for the fatherly attitude 
he took toward me," Carol says. "His 
little words of wisdom, his guidance, 
the way he instilled confidence in me 
when things went wrong — they've 
helped make me the kind of performer 
I am today. There are few people as 
fine as Garry in this business. He's one 
in a million." 

Of course there are times, working as 
close as Garry and Carol have, that mis- 
understandings might come about. Was 
Carol ever given to a display of tem- 
perament? 

"Temperamental?" Garry exclaimed. 
"Why, Carol doesn't know the meaning 
of the word. She's a warm, gentle girl, 
although very outgoing and frank. But 
lose her head? Never. Sure, she's un- 
inhibited and she's got a free-swinging 




FOUND 
MONEY 

If you want to find 
an easy way to make 
extra money regular- 
ly, mail to the ad- 
dress below today. 
We will send you FREE informa- 
tion, showing you how to make 
$50, $60, $70 regularly, in your 
spare time, by helping us take 
orders for magazine subscrip- 
tions. It's easy to do. No experi- 
ence needed. We supply every- 
thing you need FREE. Send 
today for information. There is 
no obligation. Address: 

TV RADIO MIRROR 

SUBSCRIPTION SALES 

205 East 42 St., 

New York 17, N. Y. 



UNKNOWNS ARE WRITING "HITS"-GAIN FAME! 
RECORDED • PUBLISHED 
Nationally Promoted 

• 2-Woy Royalty percentage 

• Words Set to Music FREE 

11,419 Boylston St.. Boston, Mass. 



^fe UNKNOWNS ARE WRIT 

Songs 

HOUSE OF MUSIC %^ M, 41 



tSSwiftS Roll Film 
Developed & Printed 

FIRST ORDER ONLY— To acquaint you 
with our 1 5 years of rapid, quality 
service. Send FILM direct or write for 
FREE MAILERS & color film price list. 

BRIDGEPORT FILM STUDIOS, Box 9061A, Bridgeport 1, Conn. 



FREE 

Send 25c to 
cover handling 
and First Class 
Postage. 



WANT TO BE A 
_ PRACTICAL 



NURSE? 



Easy to Learn at Home • Famous Wayne Method 

, Big pay, big demand no w in home duty 
' nursing. Many earn while learning. 
,' Ages 18 to 55 accepted. High School not re- 
' quired. FREE lesson samples and Free Book 
giving work rules and facts about non-licensed 
1 nursing employment opportunities. Write now. 
BFI nCM Criiniil 2S2S North Sheffield Ave. 
DtLUtri OtliUUL Desk £-99. Chicago 14 





Suffer Varicose 
LEG SORES? 



IF you suffer pain and misery of Varicose Ulcers 
or Open Leg Sores, send away at once for FREE 
Booklet "THE LIEPE METHODS FOR HOME USE." 
Tells all about this 60-year-old method, praised and en- 
dorsed by thousands. Liepe Methods, Dept. 30-H, 
3250 N. Green Bay Ave., Milwaukee 12 , Wisconsin. 



SKINNY? 

AMAZING NEW EASY WAY PUTS ON POUNDS AND INCHES 
OF FIRM, SOLID FLESH WITHOUT OVEREATING : 

If skinny, thin and underweight because of ^. 
poor appetite or pooreating habits take Wate- v 
On Emulsion or Tablets or New Super For- 
tified Wate-On. Pats on pounds and inches 
of firm solid flesb or money back. WATE-ON 
is super-rich in weight building calories plus 
vitamins, minerals and body building nutri- 
ents. Hospital tested. Fast-weight gains of 
10 to 40 pounds reported. No overeating. 
Helps make bustline, cheeks, arms, legs fill 
out, helps put on flesh all over body. Fights 
fatigue, low resistance, due to underweight 
condition. If underweight is due to disease, 
ask your doctor about the value of Wate-On 
for you. Satisfaction or your money back. 
Wate-On Emulsion, pint . $3.00 
Wate-On Tablets, (96) . . 3.00 
NewSuper Wate-On, 16 oz. 3.98 



At Drugstores 
Everywhere 

ASK FOR WATE-ON TODAY 




95 



nature. But that's refreshing and de- 
lightful to have around. Carol's a real 
pro." 

But wouldn't Carol have been better 
off if she'd stayed in TV, from a finan- 
cial standpoint ? 

"Money? It means nothing to her. If 
she had stayed with us, she would be 
about the seventh highest paid per- 
former on TV today, and that includes 
the stars. But that's not her objective. 
She wants more out of life than what 
she's accomplished so far." 

Today, Carol's main ambition is to 
team up with someone like Julie An- 
drews on Broadway. 

"We work well together," Carol says, 
recalling the time last year when she 
and Julie appeared together on Garry's 
show, and again more recently when 
they co-starred in a "special." 

We tried to find out if Carol might 
have had any other reason for leaving 
Garry's show and she assured us: 

"No, none at all." 

How about a romance? 

Carol, who had married Don Saroyan 
after they came to New York, and later 
divorced him, has been linked ro- 
mantically with press agent Johnny 



Friedkin. However, she doesn't seem 
ready to make a second grab at the 
ring on the matrimonial merry-go-round. 

The absence of Carol Burnett as a 
regular will certainly take something 
away from the Garry Moore show, but 
it isn't likely to lessen its popularity 
over the long run. So long as Garry 
maintains the low-pressure approach 
and remains the star, as he has been all 
along, he should continue to keep his 
grip right at the top of the ratings. 

For, despite all the talent that Garry 
succeeds in rounding up for his show, 
one incontrovertible fact still remains — 
Garry Moore is the star of "The Garry 
Moore Show." It's Garry, with his cas- 
ual, easy style, his quick wit, pleasant 
humor, and refreshing personality, who 
makes the show the smash it is. Garry 
is a veteran of more than 25 years in 
the business of broadcasting. Garry at 
one time, back before 1949 when he 
started "The Garry Moore Show" on 
CBS Radio, considered himself a stand- 
up comic. But when he got going with 
his own program, he found the response 
was always bigger when he played 
himself. 

One of his finest qualities, which is 



admired by the critics, is the conscious- 
ness he shows for his public, the respect 
he displays for his vast millions of view- 
ers. He observes the standards of good 
taste, as do Carol Burnett and all the 
other performers who appear before the 
cameras on his show. 

Her association with Garry Moore 
will always serve as a reminder that 
quality and class and good taste are 
still in vogue. 

Garry sums up his feelings this way: 

"It's true that I've been almost like 
a father to her in her career. But it's 
like when your son becomes of age at 
twenty-one and says he's leaving for 
another home. 

"It'll be marvelous to lean back and 
watch her fly. 

"She's one of the great talents — and 
I wish her all the best. . . ." 

(P.S. Carol paid the $1,000 loan back 
to her benefactor in 1959, with heart- 
felt thanks. ) — Chrys Haranis 

"The Garry Moore Show" returns next 
fall to CBS-TV. "The Garry Moore 
Radio Show" continues throug'h summer 
on CBS Radio, M-F, 10:30 a.m. edt. 
(WCBS Radio, New York, 11:30 a.m.) 



GRACIE ALLEN 



(Continued from page 42) 
charming couple. Helen is much young- 
er than Steve Crane; she's much closer 
to Ronnie's age. Tongues wagged every 
time they appeared at a different bistro. 
"Imagine!" one gossip hissed. "Going 
out in public like that ! She's a married 
woman. They both must be crazy in 
love — or just plain crazy!" The talk 
grew louder when Steve and Helen 
separated after a year of marriage. 
However, a few weeks later, they were 
reconciled. Ronnie was still in the pic- 
ture, though, and he and Helen soon 
resumed dating. 

Then, in April, it happened. Ronnie 
happily informed his friends — if not 
his parents — that Helen would divorce 
Steve and marry him. The news was 
kept from Crane. He and Helen were 
still living under the same roof. Steve 
thought happily so, too. 

Finally, Helen could stand it no 
longer. She broke down. She confessed 
her love for Ronnie and asked Steve 
for a divorce — a quick one. To say the 
least, he was flabbergasted. Yet he gave 
his permission and Helen hopped the 
first plane to Atlanta, Georgia, where 
she could obtain a divorce in six weeks. 
Steve wasn't the only one who was 
surprised. George and Gracie were 
dumbfounded. Ronnie hadn't told them. 
When a reporter called for a comment 
the next day, Gracie said: "I didn't 
know anything about it until I saw it 
in the newspaper. We don't know the 
girl too well. However, we wish them 
a lot of luck. 

"Maybe a mother is the last to 

T know," she said. "I met Helen when 

v Ronnie brought her to see me when 

R I was sick. But then, he brought a 

lot of other girls, too. All I know is 

that she is always leaving her husband 
96 



and then going back to him. But ask 
George — maybe I'm too sick to be told 
the truth." 

When George was asked about it, 
he said, "If you find out anything about 
it, let us know! Ronnie has dinner with 
us twice a week, but he's never told us 
anything about getting married." 

It wasn't the first time George and 
Gracie found themselves in such an 
embarrassing position. 

The phone rang in the Burns house- 
hold on August 7th, 1953. Then, too, 
it was a reporter. He was asking about 
their daughter eloping to Nevada City 
with Young (Bill) Wilhoite III. 

It was news to them. However, al- 
ways the good showman, George man- 
aged to sound pleased as he said: 
"Gracie and I know the marriage will 
work out just fine." 

A sudden elopement 

Sandra was only eighteen then, and 
the couple had previously announced 
their engagement. George and Gracie 
were planning a giant wedding that 
would be the talk of Beverly Hills for 
years to come. But they didn't get that 
chance to see their daughter walk down 
the aisle in full splendor. Sandra and 
Wilhoite were married instead in a 
dusty office of a nearby justice of the 
peace. 

The Wilhoites presented the Burnses 
with two grandchildren — Laura, now 
seven, and Melissa, now five. Yet George 
was wrong about the marriage working 
out. They separated after three years 
and they were divorced in 1958 — the 
year Gracie retired to devote more time 
to her family. 

Sandra surprised her parents a sec- 
ond time. Three years ago, she eloped 
to Mexico with TV director Rod Ama- 
teau. Again, George had missed the 
chance to give his daughter away. "Gee, 
we didn't know," Gracie told friends. 



"Otherwise, we would have gone witli 
them." 

This second marriage ended in April, 
just as Ronnie was busily planning his 
wedding to Helen DeMaree. He'd even 
fixed a date: July 9th. 

"It's just one of those things," Sandra 
said with remorse, as she revealed her 
second marriage had floundered. "I feel 
badly about it. But we both feel it's 
for the best." 

A few days later, Ronnie felt badly, 
too. His Helen had changed her mind. 

"I'm not getting the divorce," she 
wept from her hotel room in Atlanta. 
"I want to go back to Steve — if he'll 
have me. 

"Ronnie and I had a long talk. We 
decided it really wasn't love. It's best 
this way." 

Again, George and Gracie had to 
learn the news at second-hand. 

Why? What had happened to create 
such a distance between them and their 
children? Weren't they good parents? 

Too often, success unties family 
bonds. "George and Gracie were won- 
derful parents to both Ronnie and 
Sandra," a close friend told TV Radio 
Mirror. "Perhaps, they were too good. 
George gave Ronnie everything he 
wanted. He thinks the world of that 
boy. I think Ronnie resents this in a 
way. He feels guilty. Guilty because he 
hasn't lived up to his parents' success. 
Until he can make it on his own, the 
situation probably won't change." 

Both George and Gracie are in their 
sixties; their children still in their 
twenties. Perhaps, the future will be 
good to them. Perhaps, one day soon, 
the team of Burns and Allen will enjoy 
its greatest triumph. Far more reward- 
ing than a standing ovation at Madison 
Square Garden would be the chance 
to be a closer part of Sandra's and 
Ronnie's lives again. Their friends hope 
they get that chance. They deserve it. 
— Rocky Rockwell 




oaess . . 

MODESS NAPKINS • MODESS TAMPONS MODESS BELTS 










Kotex is confidence 

Today's the day. . .you're on your way! So perfectly poised 
and free from care. For Kotex napkins have a moisture-proof 
shield under that soft covering. It's the napkin women trust 
for complete, long-lasting protection. 





REGULAR 



JUNIOR 





SLENDERLINE 



KOTEX and SLENDERLINE are trademarks of Kimberly-Clark Corp. 



j POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

1 Room9R92 - 121 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

| Send me, without obligation, your FREE sample lesson 
1 pages, and your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

j NAMF | 
. ADDRESS , 




POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Room 9R92 - 121 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. | 

Send me, without obligation, your FREE sample lesson j 
pages, and your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

NAME 

AUDRFSS 

CITY ZONE STATE 1 


i CITY ZONE STATE ! 



FILL OUT THE COUPON ABOVE 
AND I WILL RUSH TO YOU 



• • • 




FREE NURSES BOOKLET 
t AND SAMPLE 

LESSON PAGES 





v " LEARN PRACTICAL NURSING AT 
HOME IN ONLY 10 SHORT WEEKS 

THIS IS THE HOME STUDY COURSE that can change your whole life. You can 
enjoy security, independence and freedom from money worries . . . there is 
no recession in nursing. In good times or bad, people become ill, babies are 
born and your services are always needed. You can earn up to $65.00 a week 
as a Practical Nurse and some of our students earn much more! In just a 
few short weeks from now, you should be able to accept your first cases. 

YOUR AGE AND EDUCATION ARE NOT IMPORTANT . . . Good common sense 
and a desire to help others are far more important than additional years in 
school. Practical nursing offers young women and men an exciting chal- 
lenging future . . . yet the services of mature and older women are also 
desperately needed now! 

HUNDREDS OF ADDITIONAL PRACTICAL NURSES WILL SOON BE NEEDED to care 
for thousands upon thousands of our older citizens as Medical, Surgical, Re- 
tirement and Pension benefits are made available. A tremendous opportunity 
to begin a new life of happiness, contentment and prestige is before you. See 
how easily you can qualify for choice of a career as a Practical Nurse, Nurses 
Aide, Nurse Companion, Infant Nurse, Psychiatric Aide, Hospital Attendant 
or as a Ward Orderly. 

BUT THE IMPORTANT THING is to get the FREE complete information right 
now. There is no cost or obligation and no salesman to call upon you. You 
can make your own decision to be a Nurse in the privacy of your own home. 
We will send you without obligation your FREE sample lesson pages, and 
your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ROOM 9R92 - 121 SOUTH WABASH • CHICAGO 3, ILL. 




•awa 
tiering 

liimrning 
onyout , 

v^atfonf 



QtoH*kfi&(>o £~" 





{ 



PERMANENT DARKENER 

FOR LASHES AND BROWS 

• the ideal vacation-time 
eye make-up! 

• ifitisn'tSWIMPROOF 
it isn't "Dark- 




Swim all day, dance the night away, shower 
at will, "Dark-Eyes" gives your eyes a natural, 
BORN BEAUTIFUL loveliness all day, all night, 
'round the clock ! Avoids looking "featureless" 
and washed-out at the beach ! 

Carefree "Dark-Eyes" really isSWIMPROOF! 
Soap-and-waterproof! Water makes mascara 
run, but "Dark-Eyes" never runs, smudges, 
or washes off. Ends all the bother of daily eye 
make-up . . . goes on once, STAYS-ON four 
to five WEEKS until lashes and brows are 
normally replaced by new hairs. 

"Dark-Eyes" permanently colors. . . doesn't 
coat. It is never sticky, heavy, obviously 
"made-up" . . . always soft, dark, luxuriant 
and refined-looking! It is simple to apply, 
pleasant to use and goes on in the wink of 
an eyelash! Stays on all thru your vacation. 

"Dark-Eyes" is completely SAFE, use with 
confidence. Contains no aniline dye. 

Three shades: 
jet black, rich 
brown and 
light brown. 

(for the hairs to 
which applied) 



ABOUT 12 
APPLICATIONS 

(normal year's supply) 
. at leading 
,i drug.dept 
\ and variety 

chain stores 




SEPTEMBER, 1962 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 58, NO. 4 



Eddie Fisher 

Connie Stevens 

Robert Horton 

E. G. Marshall 

Vincent Edwards 

The Lennon Sisters 

Hugh Downs 

Leslie Uggams 

Fred MacMurray 

Shelley Fabares 

Jacqueline Kennedy 

As the World Turns 

Robert Conrad 

Frank Sinatra 

Barbara Hale 



IT HAPPENED THIS MONTH 



25 Eddie Has the Last Word Cindy Adams 

26 "Come Live With Me and Be My Love" Kathleen Post 

30 Bob Fights for His Life Jane Ardmore 

32 No Law Against Being Different! Doug Brewer 

34 His Mother's Heartache George Carpozi Jr. 

38 The Lennons Discuss Mixed Marriage Eunice Field 

40 "I've Stopped Beating My Wife" Bob Lardine 

43 When a Dream Comes True! Paul Denis 

46 The Road Back from Hell Fred MacMurray 

48 He Dated My Sister . . . He'll Marry Me! . .Shelley Fabares 

50 Is the Honeymoon Over for Jackie? Ed DeBlasio 

54 Can a Family Be Too Close? . . .Art Henley and Dr. Wolk 

56 I Just Don't Belong Mrs. Bob Conrad 

58 What's Right With Sinatra Flora Rand 

62 "Raymond Burr Saved My Marriage". .. .Dean Gautschy 



BONUS: A MAGAZINE WITHIN A MAGAZINE 



17 Close-up on Gene Krupa 21 Pieces of Eight 

18 Album Reviews 22 Eddie Fisher's Real Friends 

24 The Wonderful World of Ed Sullivan 



WHAT'S NEW? WHAT'S UP? 



4 Information Booth 

6 Earl Wilson's Inside Story 



10 What's New from Coast to Coast 
74 Photographers' Credits 



SPECIAL: YOUR MIDWEST FAVORITES 



Kent Slocum 

Rex Davis 

Rita Bell 

Pat Conway 

Richard Eastham 



65 On the Sunnyside (KOTA-TV) 

66 They Believe in Him (KMOX) 

68 Rita's a Real Bell-Ringer (WXYZ-TV) 

70 Too Tough to Die! ("Tombstone Territory") 



CLAIRE SAFRAN. Editor 

EUNICE FIELD, West Coast Editor 
TERESA BUXTON, Managing Editor 
LORRAINE BIEAR, Associate Editor 
ANITA ZATT, Assistant to Editor 



JACK J. PODELL. Editorial Director 

JACK ZASORIN, Art Director 
FRANCES MALY, Associate Art Director 
PAT BYRNE, Art Assistant 
BARBARA MARCO, Beauty Editor 




TV Radio Mirror is published monthly by Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, New York, N. Y. Executive, Adver- 
tising and Editorial Offices at 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. Editorial branch office. 434 North Rodeo 
Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif. Gerald A. Bartell, Chairman of the Board and President; Lee B. Bartell, Executive Vice 
President; Frederick A. Klein, Executive Vice President for Publishing-General Manager; Robert L. Young, Vice 
President; Sol N. Hlmmelman, Vice President; Melvin M. Bartell, Secretary. Advertising offices also in Chicago 
and San Francisco. 

Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its possessions and Canada, one year, $3.00; two years, $5.00; three years, 
$7.00. All other countries, $5.00 per year. Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. Send your old as well 
as your new address to TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 
Manuscripts and Photographs: Publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 

Foreign editions handled through International Division of Macfadden-Bartell Corporation, 205 East 42nd Street, 
New York 17, N. Y. Gerald A. Bartell, President; Douglas Lockhart, Sales Director. 

Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., and other additional post offices. Authorized as second-class 
mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. Copyright 1962 by Macfadden- 
Bartell Corporation. All rights reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Convention and International 
Copyright Convention. Copyright reserved under Pan American Copyright Convention. Title trademark registered 
in U.S. Patent Office. Printed in U.S.A. Member of Macfadden Women's Group. 



. 




NATIONAL BELLAS HESS 

3oA s-l/vAwtet 



• All the newest styles at lowest prices. 

• Amazing bargains in housewares, radio, TV, sport- 
ing goods, furniture and other household appliances. 

See hundreds of the newest styles designed in New 
York, Miami, Hollywood, Paris and Rome — the 
fashion capitals of the world, offered to you at prices 
guaranteed to be the lowest anywhere. 
Look through page after page of exciting new items 
for yout home . . vacuums, washers, TV, radio, 
tools, auto accessories, typewriters, furniture and 
hundreds of others . . . you'll be amazed at the ex- 
citing low prices, too! 

Shop by mail and join the millions who save by 
buying from this colorful 476 page catalog. Select 
from thousands of famous NBH bargains without 
leaving your easy chair. 

You can buy four ways at NBH: Cash,— C.O.D., 
Charge-It or Credit. No Down Payment is required 
with any NBH Credit Account. 
All merchandise is absolutely guaranteed. Your 
money back if you are not pleased. 




SAVE MONEY, SAVE TIME — ACT NOW 



NATIONAL BELLAS HESS, INC. 

247-99 Bellas Hess Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

Please send me, free, the new Nationgl Bellas 
Hess Money-Saving Catalog. 



NATIONAL BELLAS HESS 

247-99 Bellas Hess Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 



Name 

Address_ 
P.O. Box. 
State 



.City. 




PERIODIC PAIN 

Every month functional menstrual dis- 
tress had Donna feeling miserable. Now 
she just takes MiDOLand goes her way in 
comfort because M idol tablets contain: 

• An exclusive anti-spasmodic that 
Stops Cramping... 

• Medically-approved ingredients that 
Relieve Headache and Backache... 
Calm Jumpy Nerves... 

• A special, mood-brightening medi- 
cation that Chases ''Blues." 

^^ "WHAT WOMEN WANT TO KNOW" ^/ 
^ FREE! Frank, revealing 32-page book, explains 



womanhood's most common physical problems. 



«»•"•»-»» 



I 



#«***" 



***««*3 



/e$*^ fe\ *'-~" "'-4 




\,bq&> 



ft/ 




Which Twin Has the Doctor? 

JPTio w £/ie one m>i£^ f^e ZioiVi broth- 
er? Vincent Edwards (Ben Casey) or 
Richard Chamberlain (Dr. Kildare) ? 
What is his occupation? 

N.W., Berlin, Pa. 

There's only one Dick Chamberlain. 
Vince has the twin. His name is Bob 
and he's a bus driver. For a full-length 
story on Vince Edwards, turn to page 
34.— Ed. 




Mystery Man 



There is a very handsome man on 
"Sing Along with Mitch." He's one of 
the singalongers, in his early fifties, I 
guess, very distinguished-looking with a 
white mustache. Who is he? Is he Brit- 
ish? M.U., New York, N.Y. 

Adrian Revere was born in Minne- 
apolis 55 years ago. He lives in Deep 
River, Connecticut, now, with his wife 
Margaret and son Karl, 32. You may 
have seen Adrian also in magazine ads, 
because he occasionally models for 
them. His favorite job, however, is sing- 
ing-along. — Ed. 



Here's Rowdy 

/ would like very much if you would 
tell me something about Clint East- 
wood, who plays Rowdy Yates on "Raw- 
hide." I enjoy your magazine very much. 
J.P., Holmes, N.Y. 

Clint is 6' 4", weights 194, was born 
in San Francisco, May 31, 1930. He at- 
tended Oakland Technical High School 
and after graduation didn't know what 
career to follow. He tried lumber jack- 
ing while he made up his mind — until 
he was drafted in 1951. His job in the 
Army was teaching swimming and sur- 
vival courses. A movie was filmed while 








he was at Fort Ord, California, and 
director suggested he start thinking 
seriously about acting. Back in civvies, 
he enrolled in the drama course at Los 
Angeles City College and met a co-ed 
from the University of California, Mag- 
gie Johnson. They were married in 1954. 
Clint likes everything about his co-star- 
ring role in "Rawhide" — except the long 
hair and the sideburns. — Ed. 



Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write to 
address given — not to TV Radio Mir- 
ror. 

Richard Hayes Fan Club, Patti 
Burch, 5537 Ardleigh Street, Philadel- 
phia 38, Pa. 

Elvis Presley Fan Club, Lynn Hug- 
gins, Route 2, Staton, Tenn. 

Carol Burnett Fan Club, Diane De- 
vino, 11 Martin Street, Waterbury 6, 
Conn. 

Brian Keith Fan Club, June Denning, 
1305 Nolan, Corpus Christi, Texas. 

Johnny Mathis Fan Club, Michael 
Barone, 1116 Mifflin Street, Philadel- 
phia 48, Pa. 




Some Quickies 



/ would like to ask you where could 
I write to the Bonanza cast. 

B.G., Dearborn, Mich. 

Write them in care of NBC, 3000 

West Alameda Blvd., Burbank, Calif. 

—Ed. 

How old is Carol Burnett? 

V.L.G., Paris, III. 
Carol may not like our telling, but 
she was 28 in April. — Ed. 



Write to Information Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 
205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. We regret 
we cannot answer or return unpublished letters. 



$15,000 CONTEST! 



/** 



^ 



True Story will offer monthly 

$ 2,500 in Cash Awards 

Plus 
25 Westinghouse Products 



First Prize 
Second Prize 
Third Prize 



$1,000 
$500 
$250 



Fourth Prize $50 

(4* winners) 

Fifth Prize 

(25 winners) 

Westinghouse Hair Dryer 




A complete beauty salon in a travel 
case. Queen -size hood — nail dryer. 



Sixth Prize $25 

(14- winners) 

Seventh Prize $15 



(16 winners) 



62 Easy-to-Win Prizes! 



WIN BIG 
CASH PRIZES IN 

True Story Magazine's 




D 




-'■■■' ". ■ .^— ^— m . ■■ 

mmmmtS \ t- . . » " 





ITS THE CHANCE YOU 
HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR! 

read the story... 
enjoy the story. ..then 




Z 




Look for complete details and entry rules 
in September True Story 

A wonderful way to win extra pocket 
money — and you don't have to be 
a writer to win. . . enter the monthly 
Write a Title contest... in September 
True Story Magazine now on sale. 



Why doesn't TV bring on some 
dames? 

I'm pretty sure I'd just as soon 
see Jayne Mansfield or Zsa Zsa 
Gabor, as, let's say, Vince Ed- 
wards — and I love Vince, who in 
real life is a personable Joe. Of 
course, Jayne would have to do 
something, and the question is, can 
Jayne do anything besides play that 
violin? Or come out of her shoulder 
straps? And can Zsa Zsa do any- 
thing (that wouldn't get the pro- 
gram thrown off the air) ? 

The sad truth is that some of our 
most beautiful women aren't seen 
on TV — and I think it's a great 
shame. 

And apparently the reason is that 






EARL 



they can't do anything. Well, the 
solution for that is to give them a 
program on which they don't have 
to do anything. You think that's 
silly, do you? Well, a few seasons 
ago there was a show all set to go, 
with Hal March as emcee, called 
simply, "The Most Beautiful Girl 
in the World." It was set to go — and 
it went— it went away. 

Well, let's bring it back. 

Just think of the mail it would 
get . . . the angry mail from not-so- 
good-looking women who would 
scream their heads off about those 
pretty women being on TV and not 
able to do a blasted thing! 

Maybe if we have to have shows 
about doctors, lawyers and cowboys. 



we could have Marilyn Monroe, 

let's say, playing a doctor ; Brigitte 
Bardot as a lawyer, and Natalie 
Wood or Lee Remick as a cowboy. 

Sure, as Mr. Minow says, we 
ought to have serious viewing: 
Things like the Peace Corps in Af- 
ghanistan. But couldn't we have 
Liz Taylor or Arlene Dahl or 
Marie McDonald introducing the 
emcee, or moving the furniture 
around, or something . . . ? 

I suppose my idea will never catch 
on. But think back to the days when 
the most exciting thing on TV was 
Faye Emerson or Dagmar. 

And then there was Jackie Ken- 
nedy's tour of the White House — 
and, personally, I don't think that 







WILSON'S 




















Special four-page gossip section: Who's in? Who's out? What's up? Each and 
every month, TV Radio Mirror brings you the scoopiest column in any magazine ! 



many people were only interested in 
the White House. 

In case there's nobody around 
willing to find the beautiful girls 
for the shows I'm suggesting, I will 
even donate my time and talent to 
lead the search. That is to say, the 
great woman-hunt. 

What do you say, fellahs? (Wom- 
en — I wasn't asking you!) 

That Paul Anka! His father, 
Andy Anka, was telling me the 
other day: "You know Paul wrote 
the theme music for Darryl Zan- 
uck's 'The Longest Day'?" This I 
knew and said so. . . . "And Sammy 
Davis's new hit, 'Everybody Calls 
Me Joe'? . . . And of course he 
wrote his own new song, 'A Glass of 
Wine and a Steel Guitar.' . . . And 
you did know, didn't you, that he 
wrote all the music for the Copa- 
cabana show?" 

I was about to say, "Make it easier 
for yourself. What didn't he write?" 

Strange thing about Paul's "Glass 
of Wine" song . . . Dean Martin 
needed a song and asked Paul to 
suggest something. 

"I've got something," Paul said, 
long-distance, New Jersey to Cali- 
fornia. "I'll cut a demo and send 
it right out to you." 




Liz Taylor: Is she what TV needs? 



Paul recorded "Glass of Wine" — 
and when his manager, Irv Feld, 
heard it, he said, "I won't let you 
send that to Dean Martin. You're 



keeping this song for yourself!" 

"But I promised . . ." protested 
Paul. 

"No matter. . . ." 

So Paul kept it and it became a 
fast hit. 

Incidentally, Paul moves into the 
very sophisticated adult class with 
this song — doing the wine-drinking. 
I mean. In real life, Paul likes to 
sip a "Fogcutter," a rum drink 
served at Trader Vic's and else- 
where, with his girl friend, model 
Ann Dezogheb. 

"That, and a little wine, is all I 
ever drink," says Paul — who will 
have turned twenty-one when you 
read this. 

I asked Paul what turning twenty- 
one would mean to him. 

"I'll become twenty-one while 
working in Las Vegas," he said. 
"When I really get there, I'm going 
to put fifty dollars on something — I 
don't know what. That'll be the sign 
that I've come of age." 

Madison Avenue had a laugh at 
a report that NBC might again un- 
dertake to get Marilyn Monroe 
to do "Rain" on TV. The insiders 
knew it was laughable, because N3C 
spent $75,000 to $100,000, a year 
ago, on the (Please turn the page) 



Now that he's turning twenty-one, singer Paul Anka's got everything he needs — including a pretty girl of his own. 





continued 



project — and got nothing for its 
money but headaches. 

DON'T PRINT THAT! The rea 
son that Mort Sahl has used Inger 
Stevens on TV every chance he 
gets is becoming obvious as I write 
this. He is just simply nuts about 
her. . . . Peter Lawford — good as 
he is, and good as his connections 
are — has to look around for parts 
these days, just like everybody else. 
. . . My Gorgeous Mother-in-law, 
who's seventy-seven, thinks that the 
team of Marty Allen and Steve 
Rossi, which has appeared so often 
with Garry Moore, is a more hilar- 
ious duo than any other comedy 
team working. . . . Perry Como 



Carol has her husband to thank! 




wishes people wouldn't circulate 
those rumors that he didn't want to 
quit telecasting from the Ziegfeld 
Theater and move out to Brooklyn's 
big NBC studio. Perry claims he 
actually prefers Brooklyn to Man- 
hattan — you see, it's nearer his golf 
course. 

FEARLESS FORECASTS: One 

of the fat young comedians who is 
so personable on TV keeps getting 
into trouble playing night clubs 
(where he started). He hassles with 
the customers and privately pre- 
dicts, "I'll have to get out of night 
clubs." And he will have to! . . . 
Strange that an Eastern TV show 
noted for its nice "family appeal" 
is heading for difficulty over its own 
"family trouble." . . . Frank Si- 
natra took his pride in hand and 
went personally to Irving Berlin 
and Howard Dietz to seek rights 
for Reprise Records to the songs of 
"Mr. President." So, naturally, with 
that kind of treatment, he's probably 
going to get them. . . . Marie Wil- 
son ("My Friend Irma" of a slight- 
ly earlier era) is on her way back 
to TV after doing very well again 
on stage and in the movies. . . . 
Garry Moore is getting to be known 
as "Mr. Nice Guy" of CBS. Artists 
tell us he comes up to them before 
the show's even over and tells them 
how well they've done — even if they 
haven't. "You will go to any lengths 
to please a guy like this," one star 
said. 

Gracie Allen needs a lot of rest 
these days to keep her health good — 
but she's pleased at the way George 
Burns is working out with his new 
comedy partner, Carol Channing, 
as they push on toward a regular 
TV series. 

"Now, you know, Carol," Gracie 
told Miss Channing, "there are hun- 
dreds of dames I wouldn't have let 
work with Georgie Porgie — but you 
I like!" 

One reason she likes Carol is that 
she feels Carol is much like her. 
"Both of us actually believe all those 
lies George tells us," Gracie ex- 
plains. By "lies" she means some of 
the comedy material and show busi- 
ness yarns that George remembers. 

George and Carol got acquainted 
through Carol's husband, Charles 
Loew, who produced the George & 
Gracie TV show. Burns gave Carol 
and Charles a party when they wed. 




Getting obvious: Mort and Inger. 



Carol, victim of a bad memory 
for faces, decided to learn the names 
of everybody by memorizing the 
place cards on the main table. She 
wouldn't have to know the faces — 
she'd just remember that Jack 
Benny sat at the right of a Mrs. 
Smith and Mrs. Benny at the right 
of a Mr. Brown. Carol had every- 
thing worked out pretty well until 
George discovered her trick — so he 
mixed up the place cards deliberate- 
ly, to mix Carol up. 

They've been dear friends since 
the mix-up. 

Red Skelton, one of TV's Great 
Men, kept a wary eye on the stock 
market during the crisis a couple 
of months back, and he tells this 
story of one of his speculative sorties 
then: 

"I called up my broker, bought a 
certain stock — and it went up. I 
called up the next day, bought some 
more of the stock — and it went up 
again. This continued for a couple 
of days, but one day I called to ask 
how the stock was doing and my 
broker said it was down. 

" 'Down?' I said. 'Sell.' 

"The broker replied, 'To whom?' " 

It may not have looked that way 
to viewers, but just about the most 
ad-lib show on TV in the last couple 



of months was Perry Como's fare- 
well show of the season. That's tra- 
ditionally the time when Perry and 
his cast of regulars play the game of 
"no-holds-barred," and everyone 
joined in on the fun. 

After Perry had inched up behind 
music director Mitch Ayres and 
conducted the orchestra with a ba- 
ton he filched from Mitch's hand, 
Mitch got his revenge when he 
walked up to Per's cue card for the 
rendering of "When I Fall in Love." 

Perry, no kill-joy he, leisurely 
stepped aside and gave Mitch the 
front stage, whereupon Mitch sang 
the song straight through. 



Jose with a TV series of his own. 

Bill, by the way, is a very shrewd, 
articulate fellow when he's not Jose, 
and he was a little miffed at NBC 
when they publicized that he, Louis 
Nye and Pat Harrington were go- 
ing to co-host the "Tonight" show 
for one of the weeks prior to John- 
ny Carson's taking over for good 
in October. 

"They released that story without 
my consent," said Bill. "Actually, 
Louis, Pat and I are trying to get 
away from being the same old three 
stooges. We're going our separate 
ways. You might say that I'm in- 
volved in very egocentric activities 



simply because you're not supposed 
to have. 

They'll be making their television 
debuts on Ed's all-new talent show, 
and if the viewing response is good, 
Ed plans to have other new-talent 
shows every four or five weeks. 

Did you know George Maharis, 

star of "Route 66," is an artist of 
some note? Well, if you didn't — or 
don't believe it — drop by the Lunt- 
Fontanne Theater on West 46th 
Street, N.Y., and inspect his work. 
But don't forget to look up! He 
was one of three artists who land- 
scaped the ceiling. 




Gary Morton knows two beautiful girls who can "do something" : His wife Lucille Ball and impish Sheila MacRae. 



This show has such a high pro- 
fessional polish, though, even the 
ad-libs came out like they were writ- 
ten that way. 

Bill Dana, the space astronaut 
in the guise of Jose Jimenez, says 
he'll come down to earth for the 
1963-64 season long enough to have 
his own show, which is being hand- 
died through Danny Thomas. 

Bill will be Jose Jimenez, the Ele- 
vator Operator, in the proposed 
comedy series, the idea originating 
from Bill's three appearances on 
Danny's own show. Response then 
was so great it was decided to launch 



right now," he grins disarmingly. 
These activities, according to Bill, 
include another album, tentatively 
titled, "Jose Jimenez Talks to Teen- 
agers of All Ages." 

After fourteen years of f ollowi.- g 
virtually the same program format, 
Ed Sullivan has something "r-r-r- 
really big and new" up his sleeve. 

Sometime in September, you'll 
be seeing on his Sunday-night show 
such entertainers as The Cathalas — 
a circus act, Arlene Fontana, Yo- 
landa White, Bobbi Baker, and Ko- 
rengo The Magician. If you've never 
seen or heard of these people, it's 



Unearthed from a hilarious book 
entitled, "Son of Sing Along With 
Bullwinkle": A song called, "I'm 
in Love With Dr. Kildare" (to the 
tune: "Object of My Affection") 
"The object of my affection 
Can lance my infection 
Or amputate my spine, 
Anytime he takes my pulse 
And tells me that he's mine. 
There are other docs who bill me 
And some who can thrill me 
With offers of romance, 
But I'd catch St. Vitus Dance 
If it would make him mine!" 

—That's Earl! 



Mary Tyler Moore's elopement took 
CBS by surprise. They had no idea 
whom she'd wed. The name, gents, is 
Grant Tinker— an NBC-TV exec. . . . 
After selling his interest in Evans- 
Picone sportswear, Bob Evans is after 
sewing up the seams of his film career. 
His ex, shapely Sharon Hugueny, 
is now trying it on for size with Ann- 
Margret's ex, Burt Sugarman. . . . 
That cruise Dick Powell and June Al- 
lyson took added up to a three-month 
"second honeymoon." . . . Advert for a 
Los Angeles lunch plate: "Mother- 
in-law Special — Cold shoulder and 
tongue." . . . Caught at the women's 
press club: "There's a new doll on 
the market called 'The Liz.' You 
don't wind it — just push the Burton!" 



SfcpiCodd 

Sta)dt KeadJM&-iA,ovJl 

by EUNICE FIELD 



That's What They're 
Saying: As Danny 
Kaye's sidekick 
in "Man from the 
Diner's Club," Cara 
Williams confides: 
"Instead of pay, I wish 
they'd give me a lifelong 
unlimited credit card — so 
I could eat forever and 
never get a bill!" 
... In spite of the 
loyal gang-up by 
the press and his 
friends to boost his 
morale, Eddie Fisher 
laid a bomb at his Co- 
coanut Grove comeback 






What Every American Home 
Should Have — according vo Kirk 
Douglas — is a steam room "to sweat 
out the problems and let off steam 
when the goin's rough." . . . Fess 
Parker doffed his Davy Crockett cap 
for modern-day clothes (the first time 
he'll wear 'em on TV) for ABC's "Mr. 
Smith Goes to Washington," bowing 
Sept. 29th. . . . After Lucille Ball's 
wedding to Gary Morton, they were 
calling the studio "Desi-blues" — but 
now her ex, Arnaz, seems happy again. 
... TV will really become a "vast 
wasteland" if allowed to go on split- 
ting old movies into installments. This 
could get down to making Johnny Q. 
Public watch one film four nights in a 
T row — just to find out how it ends! 




Judi Meredith's wedding present 
from Richard Boone was a promo- 
tion for husband Gary Nelson — up to 
director of the "Have Gun" episode 
in which she's starring. . . . Another 
newlywed is sunny Ginny Simms, top 
singer oh-so-long with Kay Kyser. 
Groom: Don Eastvold, former At- 
torney General of the state of Wash- 
ington. Best man: Ish Kabibble, an- 
other Kyser alumnus. . . . Happiness 
re-visited: Best wedding news of the 
year for pals of James Craig was his 
remarriage to his ex-wife, Mary. His 
passel of kids are happy, too. . . . Billy 
("Father Knows Best") Gray — con- 
victed on dope charges — to appeal. 
. . . Don Taylor a-courtin 1 Hazel — 
pretty actress Hazel Court, that is! 






Rumors on the Rocks: 

That Matt, Kitty 
and Doc conspired 
so as to get Dennis 
Weaver's big variety 
series nixed — so Ches- 
ter would have to keep 
imping around Dodge City 
with them on "Gunsmoke." 
. . . That when Marie 
Wilson, buxom blonde 
star of yesteryear's 
"My Friend Irma," 
was asked why she 
hadn't been on TV 
lately, her so-simple 
answer was: "Nobody 
asked me — that's why!" 



<-m <■ 



Kathy Nolan swore — once she left 
"The Real McCoys" — she'd gussy up 
as a glamour gal and go high-fashion. 
So how come she was back in the old 
gingham for a "Gunsmoke" — her first 
TV stint since returning from New 
York? . . . With the announcement that 
Dwayne Hickman and Tuesday 
Weld are "talking again" and she's 
cast in the new "Dobie Gil lis" mish- 
mash, a teenie wit predicted: "There 
will be days when we won't get dia- 
logue between them . . . but just two 
monologues on one soundtrack. . . ." 



v ///// J ///// J 



Dear Drs. Kildare and Casey: Since 
Dick ("Medic") Boone traded his 
scalpel for a gun, I seem to be the 
elder statesman among TV docs. You 
young M.D.s might gain by a small 
consultation. . . . On my first "Donna 
Reed Show" (I'm her hubby, Dr. Pe- 
tersen) the A.M.A. caught me with my 
stethoscope on backwards. Were they 
mad! They forgave me only after I lost 
ten pounds, joined a gym and took 
elocution lessons. TV doctors, they 
said, must not mar the "image." . . . 
So, lads, here is my advice to keep in 
good with the A.M. A., the P.T.A. and 
your fans: Shave twice a day, stay 
trim, always carry Materia Medica 
and never say "fee." Your practice may 
then equal mine. . . . Luck, Carl Betz. 



10 



He-jinks and She-nanigans: Robert 
Stock and Diane McBain in torrid 
clinch on "The Caretakers" set. Sez 
Bob, "This is my first hug V kiss since 
I went into 'The Untouchables' four 
years ago." Quoth Diane, "What girl'd 
hug a man wearing one of those gun 
holsters?" Leered Bob, "That'.; why 
the Ness men were called 'untouch- 
ables'!" Actress-wife Rosemarie 
Bowe, she jes' smiled and smiled. . . . 
When Pamela Mason read the Lon- 
don rumors about James seeking a 
divorce, she got off a wire to her 
press pals, asking them not to jump 
to conclusions. "James and I have not 
had a private talk yet. But I've asked 
my lawyer to do what is needed to 
protect the interests of our children." 




"Kissless" Ness with Rosemarie. 



Playing the Field: Are the Lennon 
Sisters movie-bound — in a re-do of 
"Three Smart Girls"? . . . Mario 
Lanza's 1 3-year-old Colleen not only 
inherited her late daddy's voice but 
has Joe Pasternak to guide her steps 
to fame. She already has an MGM 
record pact. . . . Bert Lahr's B'way- 
bound musical, "Foxy," opened the 
first Gold Rush Festival in Dawson 
City, Yukon. . . . Disc jockey Johnny 
Grant says, "Marriage is just another 
union defying management." . . . TV's 
going Mark Twain with Johnny 
("Rifleman") Crawford co-starring 
with George Chandler as the late 
great humorist in "American Narra- 
tive," a fall spec — and Bob Newhart 
slated to do "Puddinhead Wilson." 



»-> 



Ask Me No Questions: Why does a TV 
hotshot medic's agent whisper his cli- 4 
ent is secretly wed to the cute blonde 
he travels about with — while said star 
firmly denies it? . . . Would you call 
Marilyn Monroe and Wally Cox, eye- 
yi-yi-ing it at La Scala Restaurant, a 
"suet duet"? . . . Could that possibly 
be Sam Jaffe getting a haircut in the 
studio barber shop? Preening his feath- 
ers to step out with co-star and wife 
Bettye Ackerman? . . . Will Liz "dis- 
cover" Paul Anka? Or hasn't she 
noticed the singer's growing into a 
cross between Eddie and Mike Todd? 
... Do books "written" by actors really 
sell? Or are they bought by the au- 
thors and handed out as autographs? 




Bettye Jaffe and a shorn lamb. 



Mary Livingstone and Gracie Allen 

couldn't be happier about the gals 
their spi'3 (plural of "spouse") picked 
as partners in their acts. Jane Morgan 
proved a great comedy foil for Jack 
Benny at Las Vegas Desert Inn, and 
Carol Channing helped George Burns 
win rave reviews at The Dunes. . . . 
The name William O. Douglas, long 
associated with the Supreme Court, 
has found a show-business niche. The 
younger Douglas is in Hollywood to 
try for stardom. A day after he told 
his famous father he'd decided to be 
an actor, he found him studying a news 
story about crime and violence in TV 
and films. "So now we're to be on op- 
posite sides of the law?" sighed Dad. 



<- 



James Best, star of Warners' "Black 
Gold," does his buying with silver dol- 
lars. . . . Through the keyhole at 
>ardi's: Sez actor No. I, "Say, I 
know that cute chick." Pleads No. 2, 
"Could you get me a date?" Protests 
Jo. I, "But what about my wife?" 
Agrees No. 2, "Okay— she'll do in- 
stead!" . . . Bob Conrad, the sun- 
burnt "Hawaiian Eye," credits Col. 
R. W. Coe, principal of Chicago's 
Woodstock Military Academy, and 
Warren Watwood, his homeroom 
teacher, with inspiring his love of act- 
ing and his drive to success. Bob's a 
grateful, understanding-type guy — as 
his wife Joan's story proves in this 
issue. And he does so take her out 
occasionally — as photo at right shows! 







Joan's favorite subject is Bob. 



Pierre Paul Jalbert, the Cajun G.I. 
in ABC-TV's upcoming "Combat," was 
once a film cutter. His job was to edit 
and trim film footage down to proper 
running time. "For years," he says, 
"I was haunted by a pair of huge 
scissors. I'd wake up screaming— all 
those poor sad faces of actors who'd 
waited years for the right part, now 
tossed like trash on the floor! All those 
fine scenes lost! I felt so guilty, I 
couldn't bear it. Thank heaven, I'm 
an actor now!" So those nightmares 
have eased up? "Alas, no," he mourns. 
"They're worse. I'm still haunted by 
those scissors. Only now it's my poor 
face and my best scenes that lie 
on the cutting-room floor! I still wake 
up yelling." (Please turn the page) 



11 




h 



I didn't have 
to look 
very far for 
Tampax 
advantages 



• Invisible and unfelt in place 

• No chafing, no irritation 

• Easy, gentle insertion 

• Satin-smooth container-applicator 

• No odor 

• No belts, pins, pads 

• No need to remove during bathing 

• Easy disposal 

• Extras can be tucked in purse 

• More poise, more self-assurance 

• Complete freedom of activity 

Tampax® internal sanitary protection 
is available in your choice of 3 absor- 
bency sizes (Regular, Super, Junior) 
wherever such products are sold. 
Tampax Incorporated, Palmer, Mass. 



•ft Dress by Mr. Gee 



12 




Invented by a doctor — 
now used by millions of women 




continued 






You Mean Girls? Little Jay North 
is not so little anymore, so CBS-TV is 
changing the image of "Dennis the 
You-know-what." He'll go from over- 
alls to blue jeans, also his hair will be 
shorter. "And," says the studio, "he'll 
get into mischief more befitting an 
older boy of nine." . . . They used to 
joke about Sears-Roebuck catalogues 
— but not any longer. Now Vincent 
Price has been hired to collect art 
works for exhibition and sale at the 
many Sears stores. . . . Tittle-titles for 
your titillation: The bird man of Alca- 
traz let the sweet bird of youth out 
for a taste of honey but it flew over 
oceans eleven to see a certain Rome 
adventure with a five-day lover, then 
winged over the road to Hong Kong. 



»») r 




Don't you believe him, Miltie? 

■<r-m -<-m: -<-« <- 



Judy and Buster — TV "naturals." 

<-m -<r-m -<-« <- 



Hi-Finance: At a Reprise recording 
session, a couple of deep thinkers were 
wondering what actually caused the 
stock market to go into a dive. "The 
real reason for the crash," said Sam- 
my Davis Jr., "is this" — and pointed 
to the headline, "Mickey Rooney 
Files Bankruptcy!" Maybe that's finan- 
cial advice yet, that Mickey's trying to 
give Milton Berle in the candid shot 
above??? . . . The only man left in 
show biz with sex appeal— sez Mae 
West — is Elvis Presley. . . . They say 
politics makes strange bedfellows. But, 
in Paramount's "Hatari," John Wayne 
gazes in disbelief at "bride" Elsa 
Martinelli as she beds down with 
three baby elephants. "Could you call 
that a 'bridle' suite?" asked a viewer. 



Comeback Trail: Oldie comics Joe 
E. Brown and Edgar Buchanan join 
Buster Keaton in an October seg- 
ment of "Route 66." Now, how about a 
TV spot for Judy Canova? That gal 
can really yodel — and make us howl! 
. . . "Fair Exchange," an hour-long fam- 
ily comedy, to debut Friday, Sept. 
21st. . . . An RCA album featuring 
Peter Nero is called "Music for the 
Nero-Minded." . . . Thought for the 
day from KMPC's Ira Cook: "Talkin' 
without thinkin' is shootin' without aim- 
. . And while we're on the sub- 



in 



ject of gunfire and horseplay: Did you 
know that show-biz nags not only wear 
lipstick — but that something bitter- 
tasting is added to it, so's the oat- 
eaters won't lick it off before filming? 



How High the Stars: 20th-Fox is 
howling that they've lost mill-yuns try- 
ing to keep Liz and Marilyn in orbit. 
But it has cost You and Me bill-yuns 
to put a coupla guys in orbit — and 
who's complaining? . . . Add statis- 
tics: Beverly Hills, which has the high- 
est concentration of stars, now also has 
the highest percentage of lawyers for 
any city, 893 — or one for every 33 
residents. . . . Three tough, tough, TV 
cops _"Naked City's" Horace Mc- 
Mahon, "87th Precinct's" Norman 
Fell, and "Untouchables' " Paul Pi- 
cerni — signed for film "Mad, Mad, 
Mad, Mad World." . . . What TV 
Romeo got in Dutch because the Gov't 
mistook his book of private phone num- 
bers for a list of undeclared dividends? 







Nufs fo Sieve? No, says Jayne! 

<-m <-m <-m <- 



What There Ain't No Shortage Of: 

Looking for new zany types for his late- 
night show — now seen on various top 
stations around the nation — Steve 
Allen put an ad in the shopping sheets, 
"We need kooks and nuts. See Steve 
Allen, 760 LaCienaga Blvd." Next day, 
all traffic was tied up by a line of 
trucks carrying cucumbers and peanuts. 
Steve and his wife Jayne Meadows 
are still chuckling. . . . "The U. S. Steel 
Hour," now in its ninth dramatic year, 
is setting TVIand a fine example. As 
usual, the show continues through the 
summer with new plays — and no repeats. 
. . . Ann Blyth bowed blithely out of 
"Saints and Sinners," the Nick Adams 
series — but not to have another baby, 
as rumored. (Please turn the page) 





"Just between us curls . 
are you still using water?" 



Silly curl. 
Where will you be in 8 hours? Straight 
as a string, I'll bet. And it won't help 
to use a setting lotion, because these 
days a curl needs lasting body. A pin 
curl made with Bobbi (like me) holds 
a wave for 8 weeks. What's more, a 
Bobbi gives you the same soft, shy 
look you get with water. Bobbi holds 
like a permanent, but refuses to look 
like one. Easy to do. Just pin up as 
usual, but use Bobbi instead of water 
or setting lotion. Bobbi is perfect for 
adding body between permanents. 
It's a wave come true for girls who 
love the softness of curls made with 
water, but want that look to last. 
Have a Bobbi. 



i 



timhfeWMWflWBMdMaL 



I 



New! t*> wo" 



nigUhl P^'V 






I 



If you can make a simple pin curl— you can give yourself a BOBBI— the 8-week wave! 



13 




FEMININE, 
EXCITING, 
ALLURING . . . 



Your moonlight 
magic in figure flat- 
tering, rich textured 
SILKY BEMBERG 
CAPRI. 



• BLUE 

• GREEN 

• GOLD 

• BLACK 



So Easy to Order By Mail ! 



FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY-RUSH COUPON! 



PARADE FASHIONS, INC. Dept. 468 
1313 W. Randolph St., Chicago 7, Illinois 
Send the following (Quan.)... "Draped Enchantment" 



HOW MANY? 


SIZES 


1st COLOR 


2nd CHOICE 



















14 



□ PREPAID: I enclose payment plus 39c for 
one dress; (add 20c for each additional dress.) 

D C.O.D. I'll pay postman plus post. & handl. 

NAME (Print). 

ADDRESS , APT. 

CITY ZONE STATE 

• SATISFACTION GUARANTEED or MONEY REFUNDED' 



Meet Frankenstein: Jim Backus, summer 
host for "Talent Scouts," wails, "That 
runt Magoo has taken over my life!" 
Kids cry if he won't "do Magoo." TV 
sirens ooh and ah over .him — not for 
his masculine charms, but to get him to 
"do Magoo." When he can't reserve a 
table at plush spots, he puts on that 
squeaky voice — and promptly gets a 
"Yes, indeed, Mr. Magool" Recently, 
he was invited to a party by a B'way 
producer and Jim had visions of him- 
seJf in a hit legit. But all the producer 
wanted was for him to do the near- 
sighted cartoon character. Groans Jim, 
"All I live for is sweet revenge. I 
dream of the day that doggone 
Magoo will be called to the studio to 
star in a big TV spec titled 'Doing Jim 
Backus.' "... Memory Land: Bob 
Hope recalls that he talked his parents 
into letting him go into show business 
by arguing, "It will keep me out of 
poolrooms." And Joan Crawford, film- 
dom's most poised star, can never for- 
get her "shakes" on reaching Holly- 
wood as a $75-a-week bit player. . . . 
Shades of Stalin! The first title for 
a show about construction men was 
"The Workers." Sounds too much like 
the red sheet, The Daily Worker, said 
the big-domes. What was needed, they 



argued, was something cleancut Amer- 
ican. So now the series is called "I'm 
Dickens, He's Fenster." . . . Numbers 
Game: MGM-TV feels number eleven 
is as lucky in production as on the crap 
tables. They just signed eleven direc- 
tors for their "Eleventh Hour" series 
starring Wendell Corey. . . . The Tragic 
Clown: Red Skelton often has a fit of 
wheezing before he can walk out on a 
stage — and if he winds up with the 
"old man at the parade" bit, he usu- 
ally walks off in tears. . . . Oddities and 
Endities: With 20th-Fox suing Dean 
Martin for over three million and Dino 
hitting back with a six-million counter- 
suit, the number-one song on Holly- 
wood's hit parade is "I'll Be Suing 
You." . . . Jerry Lewis added a boxing 
arena to his other dealings and wheel- 
ings. . . . Talk about "fringe benefits"! 
Allentown (Pa.) dept.-store tycoon Max 
Hess spends thousands importing TV 
and movie stars — just to shake the 
hands of his star-struck employees. . . . 
Brenda Scott, rising young actress, is 
sure fame will come her way if she 
keeps studying old pictures of her late 
aunt, Mae Busch, so lovely in the silent 
films. . . . Annie ("Angel") Farge joins 
Julie Harris in the movie version of 
B'way's "Shot in the Dark."— THE END 



Vote Today-A Gift Is Waiting For You ! 

Just fill in. your favorites and your choices, in the box below, 
and one of our 400 prizes may well be yours! This month's 
prize: "Letters from Camp" by Bill Adler, with illustrations 
by Syd Hoff. The art is hilarious, but nothing's funnier than 
the genuine messages America's Pup Tent Set actually write 
home! It's all yours to own and' enjoy— if you send in one 
of the first 400 complete ballots we receive. Mail it today! 

Paste this ballot on a postcard and send it to TV Radio 
Mirror, Box 2150, Grand Central Station, New York 17, N. Y. 




MY FAVORITES ARE: 



MALE STAR: 1. 



2. 3. 


FEMALE STAR: 1. 


2. 3. 


FAVORITE STORY IN THIS ISSUE: 1. 


2. 3. 


THE NEWCOMER I'D LIKE MOST TO READ ABOUT: 


THE FAMOUS PERSON, NOT IN SHOW 
BUSINESS, I'D LIKE TO READ ABOUT: 









9-62 




Would you 

like to meet 

a flier? 

or a sailor? 

or a singer? 

or a salesman? 

or a horseman? 

or a farmer? 

or a writer? 

or an actor? 

or a banjo picker? 

or a producer? 

or a director? 

or a hunter? 

or a comedian? 

or a ukulele player? 

or a cab driver? 

or a war correspondent? 

or a radio operator? 

**■« «* **lm*±m*± ^mjI^m ^%^^I^O 




Here they are! 



They're all Arthur Godfrey— every description on the preceding 
page fits ! Besides being all those men, Arthur Godfrey is now a 
horse trainer (he trains, rides and exhibits thoroughbred Palo- 
minos); an ice skater (he's done whole shows on ice); a crack trap 
shooter; and a retired Colonel in the U.S. Air Force Reserve. 
Because he's done all these things, he knows all kinds of people, 
and many of them drop in on CBS Radio, weekday mornings at 
Arthur Godfrey Time. With Arthur drawing them out, they tell 
inside stories, trade facts, swap gags and personal anecdotes. 
You never hear an interview— just shop talk between fascinating 
friends. 

Among other visitors, Arthur's talked shop with Andy Wil- 
liams, a fellow singer; Red Buttons, a fellow comedian; John 
Crosby, a fellow critic; Major Bob White, a fellow flier (Bob flies 
the X15!); Harry Golden, a fellow kibitzer; Robert Ruark, a 
fellow African hunter; Trevor Bale, a fellow animal trainer (he 
trains tigers and lions); Lionel Hampton, a fellow musician; Mr. 
Nita, a fellow fireworks-maker (Godfrey's are verbal, Mr. Nita 
makes the Japanese paper kind); and Phil Silvers, Buddy Hack- 
ett and Jackie Gleason, fellow experts at the game of gab. 

That's just a small sampling. And besides all the good talk 
there's the best of popular music : blues, ballads, and old and 
new hit show tunes. All this, plus the regulars you hear every 
weekday morning on CBS Radio's Arthur Godfrey Time. 

A lot of entertainment— a lot of interesting people. But then, 
so is Arthur Godfrey. All by himself, he's a crowd. 

CBS RADIO STATIONS: 

Alabama Birmingham WATV, Gadsden WAAX, Mobile WKRG, Montgomery WCOV, Selma WQWC, Tuscumbia WVNA Arizona 
Phoenix KOOL, Tucson KOLD Arkansas El Dorado KELD, Fort Smith KFPW, Little Rock KTHS California Bakersfield KERN, Chico 
KHSL, Eureka KINS, Fresno KFRE, Los Angeles KNX, Modesto KBEE, Palm Springs KCMJ, Redding KVCV, Sacramento KFBK, 
San Diego KFMB, San Francisco KCBS Colorado Colorado Springs KVOR, Denver KLZ, Grand Junction KREX Connecticut Hartford- 
Manchester WINF, Waterbury WBRY District of Columbia Washington WTOP Florida Fort Myers WINK, Jacksonville WMBR, Miami 
WKAT, Orlando WDBO, Pensacola WDEB, St. Augustine WFOY, Sarasota WSPB, Tallahassee WTNT, Tampa WDAE, West Palm 
Beach WJNO Georgia Albany WGPC, Athens WGAU, Atlanta WYZE, Augusta WRDW, Columbus WRBL, Gainesville WGGA, Macon 
WMAZ, Rome WRGA, Savannah WTOC, Thomasville WPAX Idaho Boise KBOI, Idaho Falls KID Illinois Champaign WDWS, Chicago 
WBBM, Danville WDAN, Decatur WSOY, Peoria WMBD, Quincy WTAD, Rock Island WHBF, Springfield WTAX Indiana Anderson 
WHBU, Fort Wayne WANE, Indianapolis WISH, Kokomo WIOU, Marion WMRI, Muncie WLBC, South Bend WSBT, Torre Haute 
WTHI Iowa Cedar Rapids WMT, Des Moines KRNT, Mason City KGLO, Ottumwa KBIZ Kansas Topeka WIBW, Wichita KFH Kentucky 
Ashland WCMI, Hopkinsville WHOP, Lexington WVLK, Louisville WKYW, Owensboro WOMI, Paducah WPAD Louisiana New Orleans 
WWL, Shreveport KCIJ Mains Portland WGAN Maryland Baltimore WCBM, Cumberland WCUM, Frederick WFMD, Hagerstown 
WARK Massachusetts Boston WEEI, Pittsfield WBRK, Springfield WMAS, Worcester WNEB Michigan Adrian WABJ, Bad Axe 
WLEW, Grand Rapids WJEF, Kalamazoo WKZO, Lansing WJIM, Port Huron WHLS, Saginaw WSGW Minnesota Duluth KDAL, Min- 
neapolis WCCO Mississippi Meridian WCOC Missouri Joplin KODE, Kansas City KCMO, St. Louis KMOX, Springfield KTTS 
Montana Billings KOOK, Butte KBOW, Missoula KGVO Nebraska Omaha WOW, Scottsbluff KOLT Nevada Las Vegas KLUC 
New Hampshire Keene WKNE, Laconia WEMJ New Jersey Atlantic City WFPG New Mexico Albuquerque KGGM, Santa Fe KVSF 
New York Albany WROW, Binghamton WNBF, Buffalo WBEN, Elmira WELM, Gloversville WENT, Ithaca WHCU, Kingston WKNY, 
New York WCBS, Pittsburgh WEAV, Rochester WHEC, Syracuse WHEN, Utica WIBX, Watertown WWNY North Carolina 
AshevillO WWNC, Charlotte WBT, Durham WDNC, Fayetteville WFAI, Greensboro WBIG, Greenville WGTC North Dakota Grand 
Forks KILO Ohio Akron WADC, Cincinnati WKRC, Columbus WBNS, Dayton WHIO, Portsmouth WPAY, Youngstown WKBN Okla- 
homa Oklahoma City-Norman WNAD, Tulsa KRMG Oregon Eugene KERG, Klamath Falls KFLW, Medford KYJC, Portland KOIN, 
Roseburg KRNR Pennsylvania Altoona WVAM, DuBois WCED, Erie WLEU, Harrisburg WHP, Indiana WDAD, Johnstown WARD, Phila- 
delphia WCAU, Piltsburgh-McKeesport WEDO, Reading WHUM, Scranton WGBI, State College WRSC, Sunbury WKOK, Uniontown 
WMBS, Williamsport WWPA Rhode Island Providence WEAN South Carolina Anderson WAIM, Charleston WCSC, Columbia-Cayce 
WCAY, Greenville WMRB, Spartanburg WSPA South Dakota Rapid City KOTA, Yankton WNAX Tennessee Chattanooga WDOD, Cooke- 
ville WHUB, Johnson City WJCW, Knoxville WNOX, Memphis WREC, Nashville WLAC Texas Austin KTBC, Corpus Christi KSIX, 
Dallas KRLD, El Paso KIZZ, Harlingen KGBT, Houston KTRH, Lubbock KFYO, San Antonio KMAC, Texarkana KOSY, Wichita Falls 
KWFT Utah Cedar City KSUB, Salt Lake City KSL Vermont Barre WSNO, Brattleboro WKVT Virginia Norfolk WTAR, Richmond WRNL, 
Roanoke WDBJ, Staunton WAFC Washington Seattle KIRO, Spokane KGA West Virginia Beckley WJLS, Charleston WCHS, Fairmont 
WMMN.Parkersburg WPAR, Wheeling WWVA Wisconsin Green Bay WBAY, Madison WKOW, Milwaukee WMIL Wyoming Casper KTWO. 

THE CBS RADIO NETWORK 



■■ 



Bobby Scott 
Music Editor 



S£ 








ir 



"THE OLD MAN" 
GENE KRUPA 



• "The Old Man"— as I have come to 
call him ever since I served an appren- 
ticeship with him — is one of the nicest 
and warmest human beings I've ever 
had the pleasure of meeting. He is many 
things. He's the legendary Drummer 
Man, jazz giant, bandleader and teacher. 
He's also just Gene Krupa, manager of 
a Yonkers softball team. A lender of his 
musical talents for civic benefits, he's a 
well-rounded, well-informed gent whose 
neighbors call him by his first name 
and like him as much as they admire 
him. 

He's a dyed-in-the-wool N.Y. Giant 
fan ... a record listener from Bach to 
Stravinsky, from King Oliver to Dave 
Brubeck ... a reader of books which 
can range from (Continued on page 21) 



msm 



111 



K& 



IK 



m 







Your Monthly ON RECORD Gti/ofo 




18 



POPULAR 

••••Dinah, 62, Dinah Washington, 
orch. cond. by Fred Norman (Rou- 
lette) — Well, here is the Queen! And is 
she murder! Dinah just naturally turns 
any tune her way and comes up with all 
the marbles. She is first and foremost a 
blues singer, and everything she sings 
is instilled with that shouting quality, 
even the ballads. This album is not a 
journey into subtlety. It's straight ahead 
all the way. Big band, organ and a 
fighting rhythm section. (The only mi- 
nus is the way Dinah's voice was re- 
corded. It's not bad, mind you, but it 
could use a little edge.) 

Nobody can catch Dinah in her 
groove. She's the alpha and omega. No 
matter how diverse the tunes, she brings 
them all into her orbit. "Destination 
Moon" will bring back the memory of 
Nat Cole's record, but Dinah's version is 
in another groove. She uses the lyrics 
only as symbols. It's interesting to see 
how she belts "Red Sails in the Sun- 
set." For this tune, the rendition is 
rather boisterous, considering the mes- 
sage, but Dinah brings it home. 

Some of the other gems include "Co- 
quette," "Is You Is Or Is You Ain't My 
Baby," "Drinking Again" and "You're 
Nobody Till Somebody Loves You." 

It all jumps off the record. All con- 
cerned — Fred Norman's arranging and 
conducting, Teddy Reig and Roulette 
Records and, mostly, the Queen of 
Blues, herself — deserve a healthy round 
of applause. Recommended — and very 
highly so, we might add ! 



•••Mr. Broadway — Tony Bennett 
(Columbia) — This album delighted me. 
Tony embraces all the tunes with his 
biggest selling point: Heart! Through- 
out all the proceedings he's in fine fettle. 

Tony's range of expression is profes- 
sionally large. He has got it down to a 
science. When the huge sounds and feel- 
ings are required, as in "Climb Every 
Mountain," he is strong with sentiment 
and sound; strikingly warm when sing- 
ing "Love Look Away" ; and full of the 
old Nick when he does "Put on a Hap- 
py Face." He also puts in a fine wispy 
performance on the beautiful and be- 
witching "La2y Afternoon." Needless to 
say, "Just in Time," "Stranger in Para- 
dise" and "The Party's Over" need no 
introduction to you by this reviewer. 

So if you care to see Broadway, there 
couldn't be a nicer chap or larger talent 
to promenade with. The tunes are 
Broadway's best, the singing, some of 
Tony's best. The arrangements, all neat- 
ly written. (And performed very well, 
too.) I'd buy it, if I were you. 




•••Bobby Vee Meets The Crick- 
ets (Liberty) — Bobby Vee never sur- 
prises me ! His albums are always dead- 
center shots. This venture with the 
Crickets is a rewarding one. Both Bobby 
and the Crickets hear things similarly. 
It also offers Bobby a chance to stretch 
out, since the music is not highly ar- 
ranged nor the orchestra encumbered 
with a great number of players. In fact, 
there may be only five or six musicians, 
including the Crickets. (I did detect a 




piano on several of the album's tracks. ) 
The material in the album ranges 
from "Peggy Sue" and "Bo Diddley" to 
"Sweet Little Sixteen" and "Lucille." 
Bobby is absolutely at home with all the 
tunes. He also appears to push harder 
and sing stronger on these than on some 
of his strings-voices type single records. 
The recorded sound is very good and 
the cover is a tasteful picture, in color, 
of Bobby and the Crickets, casual-style. 
The kids, I'm sure, will hoist this al- 
bum up all the hit album charts and 
justly so. In his groove, Bobby is one of 
the aces. He also has the talent to pull 
in a few older ears like mine. I dig him. 

MOVIE MUSIC 

••••"Advise and Consent," Orig- 
inal Sound Track, comp. and cond. by 
Jerry Fielding (RCA Victor) — Nothing 
delights me more than first-rate movie 
music. This is a wonderfully entertain- 
ing album even if you forget about the 
movie! I have no doubt that this score 
makes the movie a much greater experi- 
ence. It would have to! It's an entity 
in itself. 

Jerry Fielding is a talent that many 
people have by-passed when in the 
market for a film score. Why? Don't 
ask me. All I know is, he has for years 
been a top-notch arranger-bandleader- 
composer. I'm glad Otto Preminger 
gave him this opportunity to show his 
wares. Jerry is able to cover every mood. 

The titles really mean very little. The 
quality of the music is something else. 
It has the American pulse. (The modern 



-K-MC-K GREAT I 
-K-MC GOOD LISTENING 



-MC FAIR SOUNDS 
+ IT'S YOUR MONEY 



tVi*f& #****© 




mifnn 



one.) Jazz is here, lyric right beside it. 
Strength and depth. Vital rhythmical 
excursions. For you people who always 
pick up on the scores from Hollywood, 
this is a must. To all concerned, con- 
gratulations! 

LATIN 

***Vaya Puente, Tito Puente and 
His Orch. (Tico) — Tito Puente has long 
been a favorite of mine. A skillful ar- 
ranger, fantastic drummer and an ex- 
cellent vibist, Tito also excels in yet a 
greater department. He, above all the 
mambo-Latin-type orchestras, has al- 
ways led the way so far as integrating 
American jazz-type music into his Latin 
format. (And without altering the Latin 
message.) Tito, to my knowledge, has 
never fronted anything but a first-rate 
band of players. All his recorded per- 
formances are peak professionalism in 
action. The tunes herein are charming 
dance vehicles. (I can assure you, you 
will begin to move some part of your 
torso to this music. The dance-beat is 
that persuasive.) 

Tito's timbale (Spanish drums) play- 
ing is always an exciting thing to ex- 
perience. In his own way, he's like 
Count Basie. He sets the most musically 
desirable tempos and instills them with 
the feeling of steadiness. The arrange- 
ments are bright, brassy and concise. 
The ballads are in the bolero fashion 
and musically interesting. The whole 
album is full of excitement. Take a lis- 
ten at your record shop and see if you 
don't end up saying, Vaya Puente! 



CLASSICAL 

*-AiHrThe Magnificent Sound of 
The Philadelphia Orch., Eugene Or- 
mandy cond. (Columbia, 2 L.P.'s) — 
First, let me say two 12-inch L.P.'s for 
$3.98 is a steal — and throw in just 
about the finest musical organization in 
the world and it becomes highway rob- 
bery! 

The collection, largely smaller works 
of the favorite variety, is impressive. 
The "Afternoon of a Faun" prelude by 
Debussy, the deeply motivated Sibelius 
opus, "Swan of Tuonela," and the "Toc- 
cata and Fugue in D Minor" by the 
giant of composition, Bach, to name a 
few. (Several of the others are weary- 
ing to this reviewer, but they hardly de- 
tract from the value of the package.) 

The Philadelphia Orchestra is, in 
your reviewer's humble opinion, our 
greatest orchestra. Even in the rest of 
the world, few orchestras have equaled 
their performance level. It is not 
strange that they upset the Russians on 



their tour of that music-loving country. 

The string section of the orchestra is 
remarkable. It is unmatched in every 
area. (Recently, they lost their master 
flutist, William Kincaid, to the call of 
retirement. He was a great mainstay. 
Kincaid is heard, though, here.) 

I would recommend the package as a 
buy for any number of purposes, from 
the classical collectors to those who 
would investigate for the first time 
the appeal of classical music. 




ilriiSummer Festival (RCA Victor. 
2 L.P.'s) — As you might note, I haven't 
listed any artists here. The reason 
being it would require as much space 
for the list of the performers as it would 
for this review. This is a classical sam- 
pler. A pot of stew, so to speak. Cli- 
burn to Lanza, Renata Tebaldi to Mor- 
ton Gould. The pieces here are mostly 
excerpts, single movements out of larger 
works and short pieces, two long-play- 
ing records' worth. (I believe a special 
$3.98 price goes along as well.) 

The high points, musically — the fact 
that it is a sampler aside — are the mar- 
velous finale of Beethoven's Concerto 
No. 1, played by the Russian entry in 
the great pianists department, Sviato- 
slav Richter, with Charles Munch and 
the Boston Symphony; the finale of the 
Giuliani Guitar Concerto performed by 
Julian Bream; and the Scherzo from 
Edward MacDowell's Concerto No. 2 
played by Van Cliburn, with Walter 
Hendl and the Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra. 

There are two Puccini arias sung by 
Leontyne Price and Anna Moffo. Both 
are, to your reviewer's taste, sadly lack- 
ing. Both are deliberate, stilted. An ex- 
citing moment herein is an exerpt from 
Bernstein's "West Side Story" music 
with Robert Russell Bennett conduct- 
ing. Also included is a "par-for-the- 
course" track by the late, great Mario 
Lanza. 

On the whole, it's an interesting pack- 
age, well paced and geared to stimulate 
interest. For the price — or even a much 
higher one — it's well worth it. 



19 




Vow#- Monthly ON RECORD Guide 



20 



MUSICAL TRAVELOGUE 

VHUkrSound Tour, Orch. cond. and ar- 
rangements by Kenyon Hopkins (Verve 
Records, 4 separate L.P.'s) — Verve is to 
be congratulated on this rather fresh 
idea in music and packaging. In con- 
junction with Esquire's travel editor, 
Richard Joseph (who has supplied the 
rather inviting booklet of notes that 
comes with each of these albums), Ken- 
yon Hopkins has brought us an interest- 
ing look at the countries of Spain, Italy, 
France and our new state, Hawaii. The 
view is not so much representative of the 
cultures as it is of our view of them. 
Kenyon Hopkins — whose latest movie 
score triumph was "The Hustler" — in- 
corporates the music of America, jazz, 
into every setting. Strangely, it never be- 
comes obtrusive. (The jazz talent on 
these albums is of the highest calibre.) 
Also present on all four albums are 
sound effects ranging from a sheep's 
bleating to waves lapping the shore, 
winds, etc. In some spots, it is not a sore 
thumb; in others, it's a little overdone. 

The Sound Tour: Italy album is 
chock full of good, though subtle, often 
under-written, arrangements. "Bella 
Roma," a Hopkins version of "Ciribiri- 
bin," is done in a contemporary waltz 
fashion with jazz overtones. It occa- 
sionally lapses into the Italian street 
band type of sound, which makes for in- 
teresting pacing in the color-of-sound 
department. "Gondola," a boat song, 
starts with the waves (real ones!) and 
sails an enchanting route. Other strong 
vehicles are "Early Morning Song" or 
"Mattinata" or better known as the pop 
song, "You're Breaking My Heart"; 
"Shepherd's Serenade" and the socking 
"Street Dance." Throughout these pro- 
ceedings, mandolins are heard. They, 
almost by themselves, are able to create 
the warmth of Italy. It's a delectable 
little sojourn. 

Sound Tour: Spain finds us in the 
hands of strings, enchanting musical 
moments and a good deal of the relaxed 
jazz piano of the underrated Hank 
Jones. Admittedly, I'm more open to 
Spanish, and particularly the modal- 
type, music. But that aside for a mo- 
ment, I think the melodic material in 
this Spain album has not been beaten to 



■ , :■■:. '...'■.. .■."..' .,. . ■■ 




death like some of the Italian and 
French tunes that we are so familiar 
with. (Of course, Mr. Hopkins is a bas- 
tion of taste so nothing falls too low.) 
Spain, in your reviewer's humble opin- 
ion, comes to life much more so than 
Italy did. (In fact, of the whole four al- 
bums, Spain is the most intriguing. ) 

The moments of Latino splendor are 
many in this album. "Parador" and 
"The Doves of Majorca" are entranc- 
ing! They're so plentiful here, these 
gems, it's hard to pick 'em. "Basque" 
has a swinging groove with the strings, 
like a blanket of warm wind, supporting 
a crystal-like piano solo. The rhythm 
section rocks along very strongly. 

The wind effect on "Costa Brava" is 
definitely an asset in the sound depart- 
ment. It chills, unquestionably. Of 
course, nothing about Spain could possi- 
bly be complete without something from 
Bizet's opera "Carmen." The habanera, 
herein called "Carmen Speaks English," 
is done up in fine fashion. And last but 
not least, a glimpse into the bull ring. 
This time it's the "Timid Toro," a hybrid 
jazz and Latin satire. "Adios Granada" 
takes us sadly to the end of our journey. 

Sound Tour: France — although its 
jazz quality is high, as well as its pic- 
torial side — is not able to invoke what 
"Spain" did in your reviewer. It has 
enough wonderful moments so as not to 
affect the rating for all the other albums. 
"Train Bleu," a version of "Sur le Pont 
d'Avignon," is the opening gem. "Voy- 
age a Bicyclette" is a wonder! It creates 
the ride through the countryside down 
to the dog's bark and the chirping birds. 
The candid shot of St. Tropez, more 
commonly known as Bikini-Land, "Pays 
de Bikini," is a marvel. The jazz play- 
ing takes the wheel here and do these 
chaps shout a bit! As a matter of fact, 
this is more in a total jazz groove than 
the other albums. 

Sound Tour : Hawaii is the weakest 
of the set but that's hardly condescend- 
ing, as the others are impossibly good as 
these-type albums go. There is so much 
more to say about these albums, but I'm 
afraid this review could easily turn into 
a novel at any moment. I'll leave you 
with this advice: They are unquestion- 
ably the best of this variety I've heard in 
many moons. Highly recommended. 



- 









"THE OLD MAN" 
GENE KRUPA 

(Continued from page 17) 



current fiction to the contemplative 
works of Thomas Merton ... a graying 
gentleman, who has spent more than 
half his fifty-odd years in the music 
business and, to my knowledge, has 
rarely made an enemy. 

Gene was raised in a tough part of 
Chicago. At one time, he entertained 
the thought of the priesthood as a vo- 
cation. But music kept calling. He 
played in keyhole clubs during prohibi- 
tion, graduated into the Austin High 
Chicago-style Dixie clique and eventu- 
ally the Benny Goodman heydays. 

Gene's bands were equally as famous 
as Benny's, and the talents that Gene 
helped nurture along are uncountable. 
Roy Eldridge, "Little Jazz," Vido Musso 
(later to make a name with Stan Ken- 
ton), Anita O'Day, Johnny Desmond, 
Gerry Mulligan, Charlie Ventura and 
Teddy Napoleon and many others. 

My own sojourn with Gene was a 
marvelous education. He is, above all, 
patient. He stimulated my interest in 
all areas of music, was the first person 
interested enough in my voice to record 
me as a singer with the group, and was 
a great guiding force in his own subtle 
way. I matured quite a bit while work- 
ing for him, both musically as well as 
mentally. If, when I did leave the group 
after two years, I was able, at nineteen, 
to lead my own groups, much of the 
credit goes to Gene. 

Gene Krupa, the musician, is always 
very much aware of what's going on in 
jazz. He always gives encouragement 
and credit to those players he feels are 
comers. More important, he never talks 
about himself. If asked about drums, 
he'll talk about Buddy Rich, Max 
Roach, Joe Morrello, Art Blakey and 
some of the older players. He is also 
the most receptive of the older musicians 
I've come across. (I believe "Burnin' 
Beat," his recent Verve album, proves 
that.) 

Maybe that's the key to his personal- 
ity. He can enjoy many diverse things 
and absorb and eventually apply them. 
That's why Gene is the vital person he 
is; he's still growing. 

One night, while I was working with 
Gene, he preceded us out on the stage. 
The audience gave him an ovation that 
is accorded only a small group of peo- 
ple in the music business. I looked out 
and what I saw was not just respect but 
love for the gentleman and legend that 
Gene Krupa is and always will be! 



PIECES OF EIGHT 

• Bobby Darin is having some throat difficulties. It may 
mean canceling some upcoming engagements around the 
country. Meanwhile, Bobby's latest album tribute to Ray 
Charles is doing well. . . . "Old Rivers" has put actor 
Walter Brennan on the recording scene. Wonder what he'll 
do next? . . . George Maharis of "Route 66" fame seems 
to be getting turntable action on his new recorded efforts. 
"Teach Me Tonight" is the strong one. . . . Singer-actor Dick 
Haymes is in the middle of a deal to produce motion pic- 
tures. He'll be leaving N.Y. to reside in Hollywood. 

Tony Bennett's "San Francisco" and "Candy Kisses" are 
getting air-play. . . . Capitol Records has released three al- 
bums — all in the Hawaiian groove. Possible this is the new 
resource for tunes. . . . Folk singer Joan Baez is playing 
concerts to full houses. (Don't say I didn't tell you about 
her ! ) . . . Josh White recorded some single record material 
in Nashville. His family joined him and everybody sang. . . . 
Jackie Wilson still taking it easy after his accident. . . . 
Dion looks like he has another big album. . . . Joe Williams 
set to do a big-band album for Roulette. Torrie Zito will do 
the arranging. Joe has been doing a single since he left Basie. 

Benny Carter, saxophonist-composer-arranger-conductor, 
was in N.Y. recently, wielding the baton for Peggy Lee at 
Basin Street East. . . . Johnnie Hallyday, Europe's hottest 
artist, was in N.Y., too, for a short while. 

Quincy Jones, bandleader and A&R man for Mercury 
Records, back from Europe, where he recorded Robert 
Farnon and Yves Montand. ... It looks like we called it! 
"Uptown" — our No. 1 single a couple of months ago — really 
climbed the charts. . . . Clint Eastwood, of "Rawhide" 
fame, tells us he'll be recording soon. . . . Chuck Sagle, 
independent arranger-conductor, has been hired by Frank 
Sinatra's Reprise Records as A&R man. 

Singer Bob Crewe now heading a new record operation, 
Perri Records. Bob, one of the most diversified of talents, 
shouldn't have much trouble putting them on the map. . . . 
Buddy Rich is back drumming again with the Harry 
James band. He had been ailing with a heart condition, but 
we hope Buddy's well on his way to recovery. 

Jazz notes: ABC-Paramount's jazz line, Impulse Records, 
has just released a big band album by Quincy Jones. Phil 
Woods is featured. Also albums by Benny Carter and John 
Coltrane. . . . Verve cut Oscar Peterson's Trio doing the 
score from "West Side Story." . . . The jazz scene was sad- 
dened by the passing of Leo Parker. He was an outstanding 
baritone saxophonist. He had recorded extensively. . . . Gil 
Evans and Bill Evans slated to do an album on Verve. . . . 
Julius Watkins has a new album release on Mercury which 
uses a choir of French horns. Eight in all. Gerry Mulligan's 
new album on Verve features Zoot Sims on tenor with 
Gerry's swinging concert band. It's a winner. . . . David 
Amram recently had a program of his compositions pre- 
sented at Town Hall. It featured the Beaux-Arts String Quar- 
tet. . . . Slide Hampton, late of the Maynard Ferguson 
band, has recorded an album for the new company, Charlie 
Parker Records. . . . Columbia is soon to release an album 
of the piano playing of James P. Johnson. 



21 




22 



In a recent issue of TV Radio Mirror, we asked 
you, the readers, if you felt that Eddie Fisher 
should have another chance. You answered with an 
overwhelming YES. In fact, you voted your confidence 
in him at odds of 8 to 1. . . . Apparently, Hollywood 
shares your faith and your concern for his future. The 
pictures on these pages reveal — not only the proverbial 
great heart of show biz — but the infinite variety of all 
those who stood up to be counted alongside Eddie: From the 
matriarch of Grossinger's — the resort hotel where he married 
Debbie Reynolds ... to the son of the late, great Mike Todd 
— Elizabeth Taylor's previous husband . . . and, perhaps the 
most amazing of all, Juliet Prowse — whose frequent dates with 
Fisher had Hollywood wondering if it was about to see a triangle 
no one could have expected, when Frankie-boy got back to town 




1 Kay Gable — widow of "The 
King." 2 Mrs. Jennie Grossinger — 
owner of the big Eastern resort. 
> 3 Eddie Cantor — who gave Fisher 
early boost to fame. 4 Andy Wil- 
liams. 5 The Keenan Wynns— and Kay 
again. 6 Janet Leigh. 7 Mr. and Mrs. 
Mike Todd Jr. 8 And Juliet Prowse — 
Hollywood's (and Eddie's) biggest surprise! 




Romano Mussolinis (Maria 
Loren) expecting a Dec. stork. 
. . . Count Basie murdered 'em 
in London — raves. . . . Jane 
Fonda to marry Andrew Vout- 
sinas. . . . Jack (CBS) Ster- 
ling named her Linda. (It's 
their sixth girl-child.) . . . 
Mort Sahl and Inger Stevens 
cooing at Basin St. . . . Chris- 
topher Lynn Calloway was in 
debbie debut group, Waldorf- 
Astoria. She is Cab's daughter. 
. . . Glenn Ford and Hope 
Lange resumed. ... Dag- 
mar and Danny Driscoll split. 
. . . Cole Porter deeply pleased 
at world tributes on his 70th 
birthday. Porter, the Peru, 
Ind., kid who in 1911 penned 
Yale's "Bulldog, Bulldog," and 
"Bingo," told me that he was 
so humiliated at the flop of his 
very first B'way musical in 
I 1916, he locked himself in his 
room at the Yale Club in N.Y., 
ate all his meals there, then 
t grabbed a liner to Europe and 
v enlisted in the French Foreign 



24 



Legion ! For nine years, Porter 
never came up with a B'way 
stage hit. . . . Ann-Margret 
dating "Bye Bye Birdie's" 
Bobby Rydell. . . . Peter 
Duchin and Gary's Maria 
Cooper pianissimo. . . . Eddie 
Fisher dating Leslie Parrish. 
. . . England's Gaitskell noted : 
"Best bit of news is that Khru- 
shchev enjoyed Benny Good- 
man. Jazz is a very good 
international cement." Good- 
man learned, as we found out, 
that Russians love U.S. per- 
formers. . . . Louis Armstrong 

was 62, July 24 Churchill's 

sec'y, Jo Sturdos, to wed Earl 
of Onslow. . . . Joan Bennett 
and Peter Pagan at El Mo- 
rocco. . . . Jimmy Durantes 
got final adoption O.K. . . . 
Explains Harlem's Nipsy Rus- 
sell: "I'm loaded. I smuggle 
Herald Tribs into the White 
House." . . . Carol Burnett 
would be sensational as Fanny 
Brice. She's just as good as 
Fanny and much more attrac- 



tive. . . . Peggy Ann Garner 
and Tony Farrar a twosome. 
. . . Crowds made TV coverage 
of U.S. Open so difficult that 
TV must come up with new 
precautions to prevent fans 
from blocking putting greens. 
. . . Carol Lawrence and 
Larry Kert resumed. . . . 
Charles Laughton was hos- 
pitalized at the very moment 
all of us were cheering his 
Academy Award performance 
in "Advise and Consent." . . . 
Did you ever know that Laugh- 
ton tried to get out of his 
Captain Bligh role, which 
made him famous? "I get 
deadly seasick," Laughton ex- 
plained to director Frank 
Lloyd. Then he, studied Lloyd's 
face: "Wait a moment. If I 
had your bushy eyebrows, 
Frank, I could be Bligh." They 
made up the false, bristling 
eyebrows, he became the fear- 
some Bligh and his menacing 
"Mr. Christian — come here!" 
became a national phrase. . . . 



To conceal his sentimentality, 
Laughton always assumes a 
pretended fierce gruffness. Ac- 
tually, no one has a deeper 
affection for people. As long 
ago as 1949, he introduced 
Bible reading to TV on our 
show. As a result, Laughton 
and Paul Gregory then brought 
to the Broadway stage such 
classic readings as "Don Juan 
in Hell," "John Brown's Body," 
etc. . . . Sudden thought: 
How does "Ben Casey" 
feel about Medicare? . . . 
Eartha Kitt to give four con- 
certs in Kenya, for needy chil- 
dren. . . . Marlene Dietrich 
postponed concert tour in Rus- 
sia. . . . Michael Wilding woo- 
ing Karen von Unge. . . . After 
all the cooing while she was 
headlining at the Latin Quar- 
ter, Pat Wymore and Texan 
MacCaudle iced. 



Published by permission of 
the Chicago Tribune — New 
York News Syndicate Inc. 



J 










! 



1 



1 



about: 

His divorce from Liz! 



His next marriage! 



His meeting with his kids! 



His "engagement" ring! 



The woman who healed his heart! 



His "nervous breakdown"! 



»■_. 

After being hounded by reporters and hurt by"imade-up 
stories, Eddie Fisher was driven into silence. Now, in this exclu- 
sive interview — his first with any magazine since his split with 
Liz —Eddie leveled with me. "The press can (Continued on page 74) 



s^rinriHi mum 



j^55rm> 1^1^ mrsz 



jL^cmwim 



TO 



All good little Brooklyn girls go to Coney Island and 
little Concetta Ingolia was no exception. The amuse- 
ment park there is a magnet for youngsters, with its 
exciting rides and games, its hall of distorted mirrors 
which can reflect back to an imaginative child all the 
fantastic and different things she might be. . . . It's a 
long, twisting road that leads from Coney Island to Hol- 
lywood, but little Concetta traveled it — to become cute, 
glamorous and successful Connie Stevens . . . and the 
changes that took place en route are more fascinating 
than anything the hall of magic mirrors could have 
hinted at! Today, as Warner (Please turn the page) 



26 






i 



«« 



k* 





f 



HI ' 



I*ike any girl, 

Connie Stevens 

reaches out for 

a man to love . . . 

like no other 

girl, her choice 

will surprise you! 









wrmnicsiHi <Q>* 



■ 

■ 



% 




t V >VVV*M| 



A'V* 




k Gary Clarke: Is the 
man in her past also r _ - 
the man in her future? 



Si: 




"«■« 



#C ^* . . A. 



Bros.' hottest young star and the talk of the town, 
Connie is a growing legend. The list of men to whom 
she has been reported engaged, on the verge of 
marrying, or just dating, is as long as a space-flight 
countdown, and it includes the most attractive "eligi- 
bles" in show business. Not only that, but her 
"fussin' and feudin' " with the studio has made 
headlines wherever there are phonographs, movie 
houses or TV sets. 

A recent conversation, overheard from a table in 
PJ.'s, went something like this: "That Stevens gal 
has the look of a teenager." "But," said another, 



"she has the body of a sex kitten." "Yes," added a 
third, somewhat maliciously, "a sex kitten with the 
heart of a tiger!" There must be moments when 23- 
year-old Connie herself- — musing on the rash of 
stories that claim to "reveal the true Miss Stevens" — 
looks into her mirror and remembers . . . her mind 
backtracking to the time when little Concetta stood, 
big-eyed amid the weird and baffling reflections in 
the hall of mirrors, and wondered, Can any of them 
really be me? 

The fact is, nobody knows the "true" Connie 
Stevens — and even if she herself has the secret key 



28 



<OCO>E5r55riI. 



'~2T J5JJSMI! 



W^^ 





3 Glenn Ford: 
He'.« out of sight, but 
is he out of heart? 



) Troy Donahue: What 
else but love could make 
a girl fight so hard? 






to her complex, winsome, talented, frank, clevei and 
explosive self, she isn't talking. Those who purport 
to know her, know only what they see of her. To 
her father : "She is all a daughter could be . . . she's 
still part little-girl and yet definitely all-woman." 
... To her manager, John Vestal: "There's a V-8 
brain behind that doll's-face — she has a knack for 
sizing up a good investment, and her drive for suc- 
cess is fantastic." . . . To a filmtown wag: "Connie's 
a gal who's never said no to a date and never said yes 
to a pass. That's her reputation. Beginning with Gary 
Clarke (her first love), she's dated practically all of 



Hollywood's eligibles. According to one and all, the 
date is wonderful — but it stops short at her door- 
step." Connie has reversed the usual pattern. The 
longer her escort brigade, the better her reputation. 
To her brother, nicknamed "Charlie Boy," she is 
"the type who'll make a great wife and mother. She 
doesn't have a lot of free time but, when she can, 
she's over helping Ellen, my wife, and playing with 
our three little girls, who adore her." To Gary 
Clarke, actor-singer who has been in and out of her 
life and is still considered "the front runner" as of 
this writing: "Connie's {Continued on page 84) 



29 




by Jane Ardmore 



HORTON 
FIGHTS 

FOR 

HIS 

LIFE 



What kind of a guy would 
turn his back on a million 
dollars? What kind of a 
wife would let him do it? 
Well, as for the man, he was 
described in his first acting job as "six 
feet of red-headed dynamite." The 
name is Robert Horton. He's a tal- 
ented guy, a thoughtful guy and 
a growing guy. He's fought his family, 
his studios, his script writers. He's 
fought for love and rebelled at mar- 
riage . . . and made some big, whopping mistakes, both personally 
and professionally. The difference, this time, is that fiery Bob 
finally knows what he wants and whom he wants . . . and he's 
fighting for his very life. For three years, he's been living and working 
in a strait- jacket . . . pressured from the outside to go on, 
on, on— pressured from the inside by an increasing lack of ease, a 
loss of self — he'd been swallowed whole by the show which had given him 
his first chance at the big-time. . . . When he began pulling away from 
"Wagon Train," Hollywood just thought he wanted something extra. 
"Bob," a studio executive told him, "just give us another three years of 
your life and you won't have to worry about money as long as you 
live. You can retire . . . you can see all of the world you want 
. . . you can give that bride of yours everything you've dreamed. . . ." 
The man was hitting close to home. Bob had just married. After 
romantic chaos, he'd finally found a girl who was right for him. 
Could he jeopardize their emotional security (Continued on page 16) 




He'd been in fights before, but this time the 

stakes were too high...this time, Bob couldn't afford to lose 



30 



▼I ' 











m v 




7M I I 

m "' T 1 

Infe 








\ 







Five mornings a week, E.G. Marshall— the suave 
Lawrence Preston of 'The Defenders"— wakes in 
his town house on New York's East 92nd Street, 
breakfasts with his family and then changes from 
robe to sweat-suit Then (Continued on page II ) 




i 



\m 




Five mornings a week, E.G. Marshall— the suave 
Lawrence Preston of "The Defenders"— wakes in 
his town house on New York's East 92nd Street, 
breakfasts with his family and then changes from 
robe to sweat-suit Then (Continued on page II ) 



HOW VINCE EDWARDS 




HIS MOTHER'S 

ACHE 




Vince Edwards was coming 
home to his old Brooklyn apart- 
ment for the first time in three 
years . . . for the first time since 
he hit it big on television. It was 
a happy time — especially for his 
mother. At least, it should have 
been. 

Yet when I called Vince's 
mother, I was astonished by the 
sadness in her voice. 

"How are you, Mrs. Zoino?" 
were my first words. 

"Oh, just fine . . . fine . . ." 

The sentence drifted away. It 
seemed as if Mrs. Julia Zoino 
were speaking from distant Aus- 
tralia rather than the few short 
miles that separated her from my 
phone in midtown Manhattan. 

"I called to ask about Vince," 




For three years, Mrs. Zoino 
had waited for this moment. 



I told her. "1 heard he's coming 
home. You must be thrilled." 

There was a long pause. 

"Well," she started, slowly. 
"Vince was coming home . . . 
but . . ." 

Again Mrs. Zoino's voice 
sounded distant and faint. 

"You mean it's not true that 
your son had made plans to pay 
you a visit?" 

"Oh, no! It's right, Vince was 
coming home. But something 
came up . . . He had to go to 
Indianapolis ... a publicity tour. 
He was forced to give up his 
plans. So he called . . ." 

I interrupted Mrs. Zoino to in- 
quire whether that meant that — 
even after all this time, after all 
of her (Please turn the page) 



34 



plans — she would not see the hulk- 
ing, handsome twin son she had 
missed so much. 

"No, no," she returned, with 
alarm in her tone. She didn't want 
me to misunderstand. There had 
been so many rumors that Vince 
didn't want to come home again; 
that since he hit the big-time he had 
forgotten his family and friends 
back in the East New York section 
of that famous borough; that per- 
haps, like the Dodgers, he had for- 
saken Brooklyn for good. Mrs. Zoino 
was apprehensive. 

"Please," she continued, "Vince 
was forced to change his plans. He 
called me up last night and begged 
me to understand. But he didn't have 



must have tickled Mrs. Zoino to hear 
me fumbling for words to frame the 
next query. She began to laugh. 

"I'm as surprised as you are," she 
said finally. "I had no such plans 
until Vinnie talked with me last 
night and told me he couldn't make 
it. But he asked me to come out to 
the Coast, to stay with him for a 
long visit. And I told him I would 
go sometime this summer." 

Mrs. Zoino was evidently pleased 
with the happy thoughts the planned 
visit brought to her mind. Her voice 
had completely lost its earlier sad- 
ness and now she bubbled over with 
enthusiasm. I couldn't get a word in 
edgewise. 

"Do you know what he told me?" 



THE GIRL VINCE BROUGHT 



to do that — I always understand 
when Vinnie talks to me. I know 
how difficult his life is and how com- 
plicated it's made with his hectic 
work schedule. He told me to 
wait . . ." 

There was no resentment in her 
voice. There was the hint of disap- 
pointment but, after all, she was his 
mother; whatever her Vinnie was 
doing was all right with her. 

"Does this mean you won't see 
Vince until some vague time in the 
future?" I asked. 

"Not if Vinnie has his way," Mrs. 
Zoino said. For the first time, her 
voice brightened. "I'm going out to 
Hollywood to see him!" 

This came as a total surprise. It 



she went on. "He said he wants me 
to go out there and live with him! 
He told me, 'Mom, if you come out 
to Hollywood, I'll fix you up so that 
you'll live like a queen!' He made 
me so happy talking that way." 

When I was able to interrupt, I 
wanted to know if she'd take Vince's 
offer and go out to live in the lavish 
surroundings that a grateful son had 
offered his mother. 

"Oh, I couldn't do that," Mrs. 
Zoino replied. "I have my family 
and friends here in Brooklyn. My 
roots are too deep in this soil to 
just pick up and leave. And, besides, 
there's my job . . ." 

That was another surprise. 

"Your job?" 



■ 






.¥ 



36 







"I work in the school cafeteria," 
Mrs. Zoino said matter-of-factly. 

"In the school cafeteria?" 

"Yes, I work behind the self- 
service counter at Eli Whitney Vo- 
cational High School . . . I've 
worked there for a long time. And 
I love it. I serve food to the chil- 
dren." 

It was the most interesting dis- 
covery I'd made in the several talks 
I'd had with Mrs. Zoino. It was more 
of a surprise because, when I had 
spoken with her on previous oc- 
casions for TV Radio Mirror — she 
had mentioned nothing about her 
job in the school cafeteria. So I 
wanted now to hear more about it. 

"Are you a celebrity in the eyes 



firmed what she already said about 
being Vince's mother. 

"The children are all well-be- 
haved. Once they get to know me, 
all they want to do is talk about Vin- 
nie. They keep asking me the same 
question you asked — when will he 
come home? And they also want to 
know if they might have a chance to 
see him. I tell them to be patient." 

Mrs. Zoino told me then that she'd 
have to wait until school closed for 
the summer before making the trip 
out to the coast to visit Vince. 

"I just couldn't leave all my fans 
in the lurch, could I?" she laughed. 

I shifted the conversation back to 
Vince and asked his mother what he 
talks about when he phones her. 



HOME TO HIS MOTHER . . . 



of the kids?" I asked the mother of 
TV's most famous physician. 

There was a brief burst of laugh- 
ter. "Oh, the new girls there come to 
me all the time and ask, 'Are you 
really Ben Casey's mother?' They 
seem to think that the mother of a 
big star like Vince Edwards should 
not work — especially at such a rou- 
tine thing like a countergirl's job. 
But I tell them before they have a 
chance to say it. I tell them, T know 
you'll ask me what I'm doing here. 
My answer is that I love you 
all 

The kids who hear who she is for 
the first time are very surprised and 
don't seem able to believe it, even 
after the veteran students have con- 



"He always asks how everyone is 
feeling, and tells me how much he 
misses me. Then he'll talk about his 
work — how much he loves it. But 
he's always so very tired. He tells 
me that he works thirteen and four- 
teen hours a day. I can understand 
how difficult it is. I can see the re- 
sults in the way he acts. As a doctor 
on TV, I think he's getting better all 
the time. The shows are really great. 
Even real doctors call me and com- 
pliment me on my son's perform- 
ances. You can imagine how I feel 
then!" 

I asked Mrs. Zoino kiddingly 
about Ben Casey's video rival, Dr. 
Kildare. Does she ever watch that 
program, (Continued on page 86) 






37 



plana — she would not see the hulk- 
ing, handsome twin son she had 
missed so much. 

"No, no," she returned, with 
alarm in her tone. She didn't want 
me to misunderstand. There had 
been so many rumors that Vince 
didn't want to come home again; 
that since he hit the big-time he had 
forgotten his family and friends 
back in the East New York section 
of that famous borough; that per- 
haps, like the Dodgers, he had for- 
saken Brooklyn for good. Mrs. Zoino 
was apprehensive. 

"Please," she continued, "Vince 
was forced to change his plans. He 
called me up last night and begged 
me to understand. But he didn't have 



must have tickled Mrs. Zoino to hear 
me fumbling for words to frame the 
next query. She began to laugh. 

"I'm as surprised as you are," she 
said finally. "I had no such plans 
until Vinnie talked with me last 
night and told me he couldn't make 
it But he asked me to come out to 
the Coast, to stay with him for a 
long visit. And I told him I would 
go sometime this summer." 

Mrs. Zoino was evidently pleased 
with the happy thoughts the planned 
visit brought to her mind. Her voice 
had completely lost its earlier sad- 
ness and now she bubbled over with 
enthusiasm. I couldn't get a word in 
edgewise. 
"Do you know what he told me?" 



THE GIRL VINCE BROUGHT 



to do that — I always understand 
when Vinnie talks to me. I know 
how difficult his life is and how com- 
plicated it's made with his hectic 
work schedule. He told me to 
wait . . ." 

There was no resentment in her 
voice. There was the hint of disap- 
pointment but, after all, she was his 
mother; whatever her Vinnie was 
doing was all right with her. 

"Does this mean you won't see 
Vince until some vague time in the 
future?" I asked. 

"Not if Vinnie has his way," Mrs. 
Zoino said. For the first time, her 
voice brightened. "I'm going out to 
Hollywood to see him!" 

This came as a total surprise. It 



she went on. "He said he wants me 
to go out there and live with him! 
He told me, 'Mom, if you come out 
to Hollywood, I'll fix you up so that 
you'll live like a queen!' He made 
me so happy talking that way." 

When I was able to interrupt, I 
wanted to know if she'd take Vince's 
offer and go out to live in the lavish 
surroundings that a grateful son had 
offered his mother. 

"Oh, I couldn't do that," Mrs. 
Zoino replied. "I have my family 
and friends here in Brooklyn. My 
roots are too deep in this soil to 
just pick up and leave. And, besides, 
there's my job . . ." 

That was another surprise. 

"Your job?" 




"I work in the school cafeteria," 
Mrs. Zoino said matter-of-factly. 

"In the school cafeteria?" 

"Yes, I work behind the self- 
service counter at Eli Whitney Vo- 
cational High School . . . I've 
worked there for a long time. And 
I love it. I serve food to the chil- 
dren." 

It was the most interesting dis- 
covery I'd made in the several talks 
I'd had with Mrs. Zoino. It was more 
of a surprise because, when I had 
spoken with her on previous oc- 
casions for TV Radio Mirror — she 
had mentioned nothing about her 
job in the school cafeteria. So I 
wanted now to hear more about it. 

"Are you a celebrity in the eyes 



firmed what she already said about 
being Vince's mother. 

"The children are all well-be- 
haved. Once they get to know me, 
all they want to do is talk about Vin- 
nie. They keep asking me the same 
question you asked— when will he 
come home? And they also want to 
know if they might have a chance to 
see him. I tell them to be patient." 

Mrs. Zoino told me then that she'd 
have to wait until school closed for 
the summer before making the trip 
out to the coast to visit Vince. 

"I just couldn't leave all my fans 
in the lurch, could I?" she laughed. 

I shifted the conversation back to 
Vince and asked his mother what he 
talks about when he phones her. 



HOME TO HIS MOTHER . . . 



of the kids?" I asked the mother of 
TV's most famous physician. 

There was a brief burst of laugh- 
ter. "Oh, the new girls there come to 
me all the time and ask, 'Are you 
really Ben Casey's mother?' They 
seem to think that the mother of a 
■ big star like Vince Edwards should 
not work — especially at such a rou- 
tine thing like a countergirl's job. 
But I tell them before they have a 
chance to say it. I tell them, 'I know 
you'll ask me what I'm doing here. 
My answer is that I love you 
all . . .'" 

The kids who hear who she is for 
the first time are very surprised and 
don't seem able to believe it, even 
after the veteran students have con- 



"He always asks how everyone is 
feeling, and tells me how much he 
misses me. Then he'll talk about his 
work — how much he loves it. But 
he's always so very tired. He tells 
me that he works thirteen and four- 
teen hours a day. I can understand 
how difficult it is. I can see the re- 
sults in the way he acts. As a doctor 
on TV, I think he's getting better all 
the time. The shows are really great. 
Even real doctors call me and com- 
pliment me on my son's perform- 
ances. You can imagine how I feel 
then!" 

I asked Mrs. Zoino kiddingly 
about Ben Casey's video rival, Dr. 
Kildare. Does she ever watch that 
program, {Continued on page 86) 



37 



CO 
CO 




o 

CO 
Q 
CO 

LU 

I- 

co 

CO 




o 





LU 



LU 

X 




38 








- 







J. 

c 

■MM 


J» 


■s 


tO 




+j 


CO 


■ 


i_ 


CD 


CD 


~ 


to 


CD 


/-—\ 


e 


■ 

to 

e 


5 




"ie 
o 

TJ 


to 

CO 


£ 


a> 

x: 

"5 




to 

3 

CO 

o 

CD 
X) 

o 

c 

y> 


_ca 

3 


^» 


X 


00 
00 

CD 


in 

s 
e 

"53 


o 

<B 
</> 

<b 

E 

1 


> 

■ MB 

a> 

"o 

a» 


a> 

"> 

i_ 

<D 
-f-» 
C 

a> 
> 

'to 


to 
o 

4-» 


6B 

DO 

a) 

a. 


t>0 

x: 

(0 

o 
to 


o 
a. 

Q. 
(0 

00 

c 


tj 

c 

CD 

TJ 
CO 

a 


0) 

SZ 

-*: 

o 

b 


E 

i_ 

o 

*♦— 

i_ 
o 

O 

E 


1 

CO 

M— 

TJ 
O 
O 
DO 

CO 


4-' 

3 
O 

TJ 
CD 

+-> 

C 

o 
a. 


GO 
CO 
CL 

c 
o 

TJ 
CD 

3 


»m 


£ 


o 

e 


_3 


(0 

sz 


TJ 


to 


CD 


cd 
W) 

CO 
'v. 

V- 

CO 

E 

M— 
O 

o 

CUD 
CO 


TJ 


4-» 

3 


E 


TJ 


>, 


'■3 


<B 

e 

<B 

e 


"<5 

hi 

a> 


<b 

a- 

e 
1" 


O 
X 

a> 

c 
co 

c 


to 

c 
o 

c 
c 
a> 

_j 

cd 


co 
to 

4-> 

to 

CD 


CO 

to 
o 


XI 

o 

M— 

to 

Q. 


c 
co 

cd 

CD 

a 

CD 
CD 

a 


XJ 

x: 
op 

'v. 

"co 


00 

_C0 

3 
O 

tr 

CO 


"co 
to 

to 

>* 
CO 

js 

CO 


sz 

■*-> 
CO 

c 

CO 


c 
O 
O 

+-' 

x: 
00 

E 


a> 

E 

e 


re 

E 


a> 


aT 

CD 


■+-' 


c 
o 
X 


(0 


v. 

a> 
+^ 
to 


TJ 

C 
CO 


Q. 


CL 

C 


TJ 
CO 

Q 


sz 

CO 


to 

CD 


e 

e 


o> 

a- 


X 


CO 

x: 
5 


** 


c 
x: 


co 

E 


00 
C 


• 


Cl 
CO 

X 


CO 

o 


= 


CD 


DO 
C 







<B 

E 



>» k 



CA 



<Q 
O 

a> 



«u0 



w l 

E » «= 
E > 



a> 

> 
IB 



O 



E em 



.A >, <D 
TJ 

3 
CO 



•£ <: .2 



o 

to 

CD 



to 

CO 

> 

CD 



CD 

E 
o 
o 

CD 
X> 



X) 

Jo ^ 

C 1= 

R^ 

to •- 

£ I 

CO 

^ .5 

o 

— to 

H- tO 

o o> 

_ c 

O 3 

■g *s 

>» 2 

tO CL 

ro I 

CD 

O TJ 

c c 

CD CO 



O CD 

■3 SZ 

<D TT 



TJ 

c 

CO 

CD 

i_ 

3 
O 
'CL 

CD 



TJ 
CD 

O 

x: 
to 



CD O +± 

CO x> <u 



cr ro 
to w 

— CD 
+-> 
tO 

CO 



E 5= 



CD 



c 
o 

c 
c 

CD 

_J 

DO 

C 

DO 

C 

to 

CD 



CD CO 



to a> 

CD >» 
to I 

CO I 

o 



o 



DO E 



o 

c 



o 
o 



W> to 
.E ^ 

sz o 

<D 1o 

II 

to -ffi 

c £ 

o 

c 
±i co 

3 £ 
X) 



to 

CO 

in 

c 
o 

c 
c 

<D 
-J >s .5 



3 
O 

>s 



to •= 

■I-' 

c 

CD 



DO *•- 

C o 



o 

co a> 
a. xj 



o ■* 



to -r- 



E c 
CO 4-> 

*- to 
x> 

CO to 
o 



CD 



CD 

< E 



to 
to 

CD - 

.E f^- 

Q. <D 

co .2 

<B E 

J.S 

tt to 

o 
o 

3 

to 



to 

CO 

E 



^ DO 

o .E 

^ TJ 

> c 

> CO 




= o> a> 

I S * 



a> 

la 
(B 



<B 

E 

(B 



tw» 



&J» 



E 

<B 
CO 



OJ» 



TJ C 

CD — 

CO ^£ 

(O CD 

CD J5 

DO +j 

O CO 

"■ CD 

4-> x: 
c 

P x: 



Q> 



o 5 

5 x: 

fc ■*-* 



TJ C 

CD CD 

"C ® 

QJ -Q 

tO T-, 



O 

CD 



CO 



3 

o 



CD 



TJ 
C 
CO 

X2 

to 

3 

x: 



CO 



CO o 

sz to 



s_ 

CD 

TJ 

C 

CD 
DO 



.2 fe 
to £ 

O" CD 



CO 

x: 
o 



DO 

C 
3 
O 

>v 

i_ 
CD 

x o 

. c 

CD ^ 
CD <0 



DO +- 

E to 

</> iJ x 

,2 x: - 

4-» Qfl ■ • 

O ~ CD 

o .h (U 

s«- ^ to 
CO 



•^ E 2 

CO " xj 

-E. x: co 

o u - 

o - > 



; to 

CL -Q 

3 ■£ 

J- TJ 
C CD 

co x: 



to 

CD 

E 
o 

x: 



to 

CO 



sz 
o 

x: 

5 



to 
to 

CD 

c 



CD 



CD 



CO 



CD CD 

x: x: 



co 

c 
o 

CL 3 O 

3 T> H " 

73 'o "O 

CD "■ CD 

^c: n 

.2 aj iS 

Cl x: X) 



o g E 



CD 

§ 2 

^» DO 

•J- 3 

c H 

co 

o 



TJ ^ 

ci- 

CO "> +- 



c5 ° 

TJ ° 

2 TJ 

«> £ 

+-< CO 



£ 

CO 

M— 

CO 

o 



c 

CD 

5 



39 



THE LENNON SISTERS DISCUSS: 






"Even a boy and girl who've grown up 
in the same neighborhood are strangers 
when they go to live as man and wife." 



"The children (of a mixed marriage) 
must have a bad time — because they 
grow up without believing in anything." 



"Something about a religious wedding — 
no matter what faith — makes a couple 
realize the importance of their vows." 



The woman on the front page stared 
out at the world with heartbreak in 
her eyes. Her husband had deserted 
her, and now her young son had been 
picked up on a narcotics charge. Under 
her picture, the frightening question 
blazed for all to see: "Has the Ameri- 
can Family Gone Bankrupt?" 

Turning from the debris of shat- 
tered marriages and homes, both in 
and out of show business, TV Radio 
Mirror went to a family which has 



become for the vast television audi- 
ence a symbol of love, responsibility 
and purposefulness in family life. We 
showed the picture and its question 
to the singing Lennon Sisters and their 
parents, noting: "Cases like this are 
becoming common — yet the public 
thinks of you Lennons as a decent 
American family built on something 
more substantial than matchsticks. 
What's your master plan for happiness 
and lasting success in marriage?" 



Here, in an exclusive interview, is 
what the Lennons had to say: 

"Honestly," said Peggy, "I don't 
think any of us has such a thing as a 
'master plan' for being happy or mak- 
ing a go of marriage. Dad and Mother 
. . . and DeeDee and Dick . . . they are 
happy, all right, but it's not because 
of any particular gimmick or formula." 

"Dad always said a good family is 
like a hand," Kathy pointed out. "The 
fingers might (Continued on page 88) 






to my tune, 




IN CASE you didn't know, Hugh 
Downs doesn't hit his wife any- 
more. He hasn't hit her since that 
day some fifteen years ago. And it's 
only when some elephant-minded 
viewer needles him about it that he 
even recalls the occasion. Hugh him- 
self publicized the love tap before 
millions of startled viewers on Jack 
Paar's show a few years ago. He 
matter-of-factly mentioned that, 
early in his marriage, he found it 
necessary to belt his wife. Hugh has 



never once regretted the wife-slap- 
ping, but it was the kind of slip of 
the tongue that makes a man wish 
he'd bitten it instead. 

"Maybe I didn't make myself 
quite clear that night," smiles the 
easygoing, forty-year-old television 
veteran. "People wrote, called and 
wired accusing me of being a wife- 
beater and un-American. Actually, 
I was very young when the 'belting' 
took place. I wouldn't resort to it 
now, of course. Some men thrive on 







the perpetual cruelty to women. 
They do it to give themselves a sense 
of security. I deplore that kind of 
behavior." 

Normally, viewers are in complete 
rapport with Hugh. They avidly buy 
the products he commends, and 
they quietly support his stand on al- 
most everything from motherhood 
to brotherhood. But he aroused 
some fans' ire on another occasion 
when he discussed Nazi butcher 
Adolph Eichmann's case with actor 



Ben Gazzara over the airwaves. 
"I enjoyed the session with Ben," 
says Hugh. "He has enlightened 
ideas of the penal code. I was quite 
surprised at the reaction of viewers 
who blasted both our thoughts on the 
subject. I felt that Israel had missed 
a great opportunity when she con- 
demned Eichmann to death. To kill 
this wretch was to give him final 
victory. He would have to be slain 
six million times for equal retribu- 
tion. It goes without saying that I 



haven't a shred of sympathy for this 
inhuman being. I simply thought he 
should have been incarcerated as 
a living monument." 

Hugh now wishes he might have 
clarified his position a little better. 
"I could have stressed that if killing 
Eichmann brought back one man, 
woman or child, I'd be in favor of 
it. But vengeance only begets venge- 
ance. I still think it would have 
been a great step forward for civil- 
ization had (Please turn the page) 






41 



- 



No regretting for Hugh Downs . . . but he wouldn't mind forgetting one or two things ! 

continued 



Israel not sentenced him to die." 

Hugh believes in being outspoken 
on all matters, in intelligent airing 
of controversy. But the Akron, 
Ohio-born walking encyclopedia 
rarely attempts to be the funny man 
on the show. "I passed up glorious 
opportunities to have said smart- 
alecky things," he says. "But I never 
mourned for not having said them. 
At the moment, they might have ap- 
peared clever, but they wouldn't 
have served me well in the long run. 

"I remember one evening," he 
says with a chuckle, "when we were 
kicking around the word 'derriere' 
on the show. Somebody wisecracked 
'Destiny shaped my end!' and the 
audience roared. I was concentrat- 
ing on the next commercial, ob- 
livious to all the horseplay. Finally, 
it was time to go on. I stood in front 
of dozens of tins of sardines, soups, 
dog food, and so on, and said: 
'Friends, no matter what size can 
you have — ' and then I stopped as 
the audience suddenly went wild. I 
just stood there sheepishly with a 
can opener in my hand." 

Many viewers have written in ask- 
ing: "Do you really feel so en- 
thusiastic about all those products?" 
The announcer's answer is: "Yes." 
Hugh claims he has often turned 
down advertising copy which he 
felt was "fraud-flavored or silly." 

Even his own studio copy has 
been treacherous. One time he 
started interviewing a girl who had 
been a sniper in the Russian Army. 
"She was a Russian-type Zsa Zsa 
Gabor," says Hugh. "She had mar- 
ried four times and had marvelous 
anecdotes connected with each man. 
My copy sheet, prepared by the 
show's researcher prior to the start 
of each program, read: 'I under- 



stand her first husband was some 
kind of a nut.' 

"Without thinking, I blurted out: 
'Exactly what kind of a nut was 
your first husband?' " 

It's not often that the glib, highly 
articulate announcer finds himself 
groping for words, but Jack Paar 
possessed the knack of tongue-tying 
him. "We'd talk about something 
prior to going on the air, which 
frankly wasn't meant to be said on 




They're always in tune now: Hugh, 
his son H.R. and daughter Deirdre. 



television," reveals Hugh. "As soon 
as the program would commence, 
Jack would casually say: 'Hugh, tell 
them about the joke you heard to- 
day.' I'd look at him flabbergasted, 
and say: 'But Jack, I can't . . .' He'd 
just lean back and laugh." 

As for Paar himself, he never 
seemed fazed by anything that oc- 
curred on his show. "I can't recall 
ever having heard him duck a ques- 
tion from the audience," says Hugh. 
"One night we all held our breath 
when a youngster asked him point 
blank: 'Is it true that you wear a 



toupee?' Jack grinned and admitted 
he did." 

Hugh likes to reminisce about 
Paar, and the days when viewers 
would write in insisting that either 
the announcer should tell Jack off, 
or Jack should stop picking on him. 
"I never understood where they got 
either impression," says Hugh. 

Now Hugh is leaving the "To- 
night" show to take over "Today," 
beginning September 10th, and he's 
currently figuring out how he'll find 
time to sleep with his new schedule. 
He just hopes nothing occurs on the 
morning show which might embar- 
rass either him or the sponsor as it 
did when actress Rosanna Pagann 
was a Paar guest. 

"She was relating the plot of her 
off-Broadway play," says Hugh. 
"She kept talking about how the 
viceroy in the play did this, how 
the viceroy in the play did that. 
Viceroy, viceroy, viceroy — that's all 
I kept hearing. Finally, I couldn't 
stand it any longer. 'Please,' I said. 
'Don't mention viceroy on this Kent 
cigarette-sponsored show again, or 
we won't have a sponsor!' ' 

Sponsor trouble, though, is some- 
thing Hugh need never worry about, 
and that goes for his highly-rated 
"Concentration" game show (seen 
daily at 11:30 a.m. edt over NBC- 
TV). "They've been wonderful," 
agrees Hugh. "Why, they're even 
partially sold on my favorite idea to 
give away one million dollars as a 
prize on the show. They haven't 
batted an eye about the money. It's 
just a question of working out the 
tax and insurance problems." 

That's what we've been saying 
right along: Money isn't everything 
— especially when you've got a good 
left hook! — Bob Lardine 



42 



LESLIE UGGAMS 




/ 



/ 



i 



\ modern Cinderella story for all those who like old-fashioned, happy endings 




Like a good deed in a naughty world, this is a story TV can be proud of 



The girl had spent ten years struggling toward this 
moment. Two years before, she had been a gan- 
gling, awkward fourteen, with the wrong hairdo 
and the wrong clothes. Only her answers — as a 
contestant on "Name That Tune" — had been right. 
And the way she sang — that had been right, too. 

The years before that, she had been just another 
Negro kid scampering around the stoop of her 
house on New York's upper west side, playing 
hop-skotch and potsy with the other children, 
colored and white, from the neighborhood. 

But tonight she was someone different. Tonight 
could be the beginning — or the end — of everything. 

She took, a deep breath and stepped forward 
onto the stage. Only someone who had known her 
through all the other years could have spotted the 
inner trembling. Her heart beat a little faster, her 
eyes blinked once or twice in the harsh light of the 



TV studio. Then her cue sounded and the camera 
found her. She started her song. When she started, 
she was a sixteen-year-old nobody. When she 
finished, she was a star. 

The show was "Sing Along With Mitch" ... the 
girl was Leslie Uggams ... the moment was one 
she would never forget. Whatever successes came 
after it, this would always be her greatest triumph; 
this would always be the night she found out what 
it was like to have a dream come true. 

Her mother had often prayed for a miracle — 
just a small one — so that life would be easier for 
Leslie and her older sister Frances. 

"I wouldn't say that any 'miracles' occurred for 
Frances or for me," says Leslie now, "but I cer- 
tainly had a lot of very good fortune in my friends!" 

Leslie's mother, Juanita, a former chorus girl 
with New York's famous (Continued on page 95) 



44 





^iV 



When the clock strikes, Cinderella 
is on the run. Busy Leslie uses a 
taxi as study-hall (1 ) en route to 
rehearsals. She gets pointers from 
Mitch Miller (2), then, during a 
break, the crew invites her to join 
a friendly card game (3) and share 
an ice cream (4). A quick retouch 
on her makeup (5) and she's ready 
for "Sing, Sing, Sing." (6) A long 
day, but she's home in time to help 
her mother (7 and 8) with dinner. 



W?> 






\. 




8 



45 




Like a good deed in a naughty world, this is a story TV can be proud of 



The girl had spent ten years struggling toward this 
moment. Two years before, she had been a gan- 
gling, awkward fourteen, with the wrong hairdo 
and the wrong clothes. Only her answers — as a 
contestant on "Name That Tune" — had been right. 
And the way she sang — that had been right, too. 

The years before that, she had been just another 
Negro kid scampering around the stoop of her 
house on New York's upper west side, playing 
hopskotch and potsy with the other children, 
colored and white, from the neighborhood. 

But tonight she was someone different. Tonight 
could be the beginning — or the end — of everything. 

She took, a deep breath and stepped forward 
onto the stage. Only someone who had known her 
through all the other years could have spotted the 
inner trembling. Her heart beat a little faster, her 
eyes blinked once or twice in the harsh light of the 



TV studio. Then her cue sounded and the camera 
found her. She started her song. When she started, 
she was a sixteen-year-old nobody. When she 
finished, she was a star. 

The show was "Sing Along With Mitch" ... the 
girl was Leslie Uggams ... the moment was one 
she would never forget. Whatever successes came 
after it, this would always be her greatest triumph; 
this would always be the night she found out what 
it was like to have a dream come true. 

Her mother had often prayed for a miracle — 
just a small one — so that life would be easier for 
Leslie and her older sister Frances. 

"I wouldn't say that any 'miracles' occurred for 
Frances or for me," says Leslie now, "but I cer- 
tainly had a lot of very good fortune in my friends!" 

Leslie's mother, Juanita, a former chorus girl 



with New York's famous (Continued 



on page 



95) 



When, the clock strikes, Cinderella 
is on the run. Busy Leslie uses a 
taxi as study-hall (1 ) en route to 
rehearsals. She gets pointers from 
Mitch Miller (2), then, during a 
break, the crew invites her to join 
a friendly card game (3) and share 
an ice cream (4). A quick retouch 
on her makeup (5) and she's ready 
lor "Sing, Sing, Sing." (6 1 A long 
day, but she's home in time to help 
her mother (7 and 8) with dinner. 





45 



^1 


pi 





m 





Early in 1954, two lonely people met at a party 
neither of them really wanted to go to. . . . Fred 
MacMurray hadn't been going out at all. His wife 
Lillian had died in 1953, after a long and heart- 
breaking illness. Fred, still not over his loss, was 
devoting himself to his children, Susan, 14, and 
Robert, 10. But that night — when friends simply 
wouldn't let him say no once more — he came to the 
party. He sat down next to beautiful, blonde June 
Haver. They'd worked in a picture together once, 
but that was years before and a great deal had 
happened to both of them since then. . . . In October 
of 1949, the man June planned to marry, Dr. John 

We live pretty simply. We're the 
kind of people who kind of 
like doing things ourselves and 
it isn't too complicated a 
household. We both putter 
around the kitchen. I en- 
joy snooping around with 
cookbooks; they read just 
like literature to me. June 
does the secretarial work 
— whatever there is of 
it that gets done — I'm 
no letter-writer. I do 
most of the repair work and 
the putting things together 
— including a doll house 
and all the furniture, which came with such 
elaborate instructions that it took me the whole 
night before Christmas last year. We don't have 
a nurse, we just have one girl who comes in every 
day from eight to four, and if that sounds chintzy 
for an actor's family, there's nothing chintzy 
about it. We like the privacy of our house at 
night, we enjoy taking care of the kids. Once in 
a while when we go out — and, believe me, it's 




Duzik, died of uremic poisoning. June, who till then 
had seemed to have everything — love, beauty, talent 
— faced life with an empty heart. She sought com- 
fort in religion: She entered a convent. For 7 
months, she served a novitiate — then, painfully, 
realized that this was not for her. She couldn't turn 
her back on the world. . . . At that party, when they 
met again, Fred realized that neither could he. That 
night, these two began — together — to climb back 
from the depths of their despair. Five months later, 
they were married. This is Fred's story of the road 
back and of the life, he and June managed to build 
together in the years since then. — The Editors 

once in a long while — we get 
June's aunt and uncle or her 
mother to come over and 
stay. They adore Laurie 
and Katie, our five- 
year-old twins, and the 
kids adore them. Ev- 
ery family has to 
work out a way of life 
for themselves, and this 
is ours. . . . June is a born 
wife and mother. She's also 
a talented actress — we met 
first, years ago, making a 
picture together, "Where 
Do We Go From Here?" 
But when we met again, in 1954, she'd already 
given it up. She'd worked since she was very 
young. She was exactly seven when she sat down 
with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and 
played the andante from Haydn's "Surprise 
Symphony" at the weekly children's concert. 
That was just after she'd won the gold medal in 
the Post Inquirer competition and, from then 
on, she was in business. ( Continued on page 93) 



kf W* MacMoRRAr 




He dated my sister... 



I'm happier than I've ever been in my 
life. The world is a grand, glorious, 
wonderful place — and it's all because 
of a man named Lou Adler. . . . We argue 
about just one thing 
— Lou and I — and 
that's the first time 



by Shelley Fabares 



we met! Lou insists it was back in 1958, 
but as far as I'm concerned it wasn't 
until a night in December of 1960. I 
can't imagine meeting Lou and not re- 
membering it, but he 
says that one day in 
1958 he came along 



48 




but he 11 marry me: 



f 



on a layout Jan and Dean, Roberta Shore 
and I were doing. The whole afternoon, 

as I do remember it, was very hectic, 
so it is possible I did meet him then. 
But still I find it hard to believe. Lou 
is not an easy man to forget. ... He 
is a young, talented man of twenty-six 



who is head of the West Coast office of 
Nevin-Kirschner Music Publishing Com- 
pany. In addition, he is the personal 
manager for the popular singing team of 
Jan and Dean. Also, in addition, he is the 
ideal man for me! . . . Lou also insists that 
we met for the second (Continued on page 82) 






49 



• 



1 



K 



I -£ 






'w 




fl 




£ 



* 



^»i 













M 






IS THE HONEYMOON 



Is America's romance with 
her ending? Here is the in- 
side story of the incredible 
plot against the Kennedys! 



Eleanor Roosevelt could have warned 
her about it: so could Bess Truman 
and Mamie Eisenhower. They had been 
First Ladies, too, and they knew it 
was inevitable that the plot against 
Jacqueline Kennedy would get under 
way. Perhaps the only thing they 
couldn't have known was how bad it 
would be — how vicious. 

But it was inevitable that the petty 
people, the jealous ones, would begin 
after a while to whisper about Jackie 
and to try to destroy her. They had 
waited while she had her honeymoon; 
they had waited while their intended 
victim charmed an entire nation, in- 
deed an entire world. Patiently, they 
waited as her beauty and charm were 
extolled; her way of dressing copied; 
her every move — with her husband, 
with her children, on her own — re- 
corded and delighted over. "She is 
the woman (Please turn the page) 




OVER FOR JACKIE ? 



51 



What they're saying about Jackie as a wife ... as a mother ... as First Lady 



I W BB BP W WWWP * ^ 



v 



'- 




\ 



who has everything — including the Presi- 
dent of the United States," someone close 
to Jackie once affectionately said. And 
while the rest of the nation affectionately 
agreed with this, the plotters — their jeal- 
ousy growing in them like a fungus — 
continued to wait. 

There was no doubt that they would 
eventually strike. The only questions 
were: When? and How? and Is there any 
danger she'll strike back? 

All three questions, it turned out, were 
pretty easy to answer. 

When? "You strike," the thought 
seemed to be, "when the victim's hus- 
band becomes most vulnerable. When 
there's something like a war threat 
(wouldn't that be nice!) ... a recession 
(dandy!) . . . any kind of catastrophe (the 
more catastrophic, the better!). When 
anything's going on that gets the citizens 
upset and the first man they're bound to 
blame for it is their President. So — 
through him — you get her!" 

How? "You strike swiftly, and hard. 
One-two-three — let her have it! You pum- 
mel her with tiny whispered criticisms 
. . . and let the wind take them from 
there. For the wind will swell the whispers 
and carry them to all corners of the 
nation — swiftly! (Continued on page 78) 



• 



1 "Not properly dressed," they criticize, when the 
First Lady doesn't wear a hat to church. 2 "Not 
dignified," they whisper, when they see her holding 
hands with her husband. 3 Yet her French hair style 
and elegant gowns are labeled "too chic." 4 "Too 
many eggheads invited to the White House," they 
cry — and 5 "Her parties are too lavish!" 6 India 
loved the way she followed local customs — but, 
back home, there was grumbling about "unneces- 
sary extravagance" and that "her place is with her 
husband and children." 7 When cameras record 
her life with her children, they snipe that she's 
"using John Jr. and Caroline for publicity." 8 They 
even attack her through her daughter— charging 
Secret Service men "take care of Caroline's pony! 



:£^ 



52 



I 




k 




M 



V 



iy% 



\ 



I 






4?- ft* 



*Si 




> 4 



i 



What they're saying about Jackie as a 



wife 



as a mother ... as First Lady 



1 1I 






^U 



* 



V 



who has everything— including the Presi- 
dent of the United States," someone close 
to Jackie once affectionately said. And 
while the rest of the nation affectionately 
agreed with this, the plotters— their jeal- 
ousy growing in them like a fungus — 
continued to wait. 

There was no doubt that they would 
eventually strike. The only questions 
were: When? and How? and Is there any 
danger she'll strike back? 

All three questions, it turned out, were 
pretty easy to answer. 

When? "You strike," the thought 
seemed to be, "when the victim's hus- 
band becomes most vulnerable. When 
there's something like a war threat 
(wouldn't that be nice!) ... a recession 
(dandy!) . . . any kind of catastrophe (the 
more catastrophic, the better!). When 
anything's going on that gets the citizens 
upset and the first man they're bound to 
blame for it is their President. So — 
through him — you get her!" 

How? "You strike swiftly, and hard. 
One-two-three — let her have it! You pum- 
mel her with tiny whispered criticisms 
. . . and let the wind take them from 
there. For the wind will swell the whispers 
and carry them to all corners of the 
nation — swiftly! (Continued on page 78) 






Lf 



<fcT 



rjtf .« >*> t 



vMi 



•^rj 



1 "Not properly dratted," they criticize, when the 
First Lady doesn't wear a hat to church. 2 "Not 
dignified," they whisper, when they tee her holding 
hands with her husband. 3 Yet her French hair style 
and elegant gowns are labeled "too chic." 4 "Too 
many eggheadt invited to the White Home," they 
cry — and 5 "Her parties are too lavith!" 6 India 
loved the way the followed local customs — but, 
back home, there wat grumbling about "unneces- 
tary eitravagance" and that "her place it with her 
hutbond and children." 7 When camera! record 
her life with her children, they snipe that she's 
"using John Jr. and Caroline for publicity." 8 They 
even attack her through her daughter — charging 
Secret Service men "take care of Caroline's pony! 



.1 



k 



#> 



,m 



52 



fc 



V 



h* 



>*1^ 



I 



I 



What is it that really holds 
people together? Is. it love? Or 
is it loneliness? Are they united 
by their similarities? Or by their 
differences? And can people — 
family or friends — actually be 
held too close together? These 
are the questions we'll try to an- 
swer as we look at the two fami- 
lies who come to life on TV each 
day in "As The World Turns." 

Viewers first met the Hughes 
and Cassen families six years 
ago and, watching them in the 
daily drama, have come to know 
them as real people. That's how 
we'll treat them, too, as we look 
at their problems and try to see 
what these might mean in your 
own life. 

In our discussion, my descrip- 
tions will be in regular type (like 
this) and Dr. Wolk's comments 
will be in italics (like the follow- 
ing) : 

From the psychologist's view- 
point, a TV slice of life can some- 
times give a thoughtful viewer 
insight into her own behavior. 
She certainly won't want to pat- 
tern herself after some guilt- 
ridden heroine — but seeing such 
a person up close might help her 
avoid similar weaknesses in her 
own personality. And looking in 
on family relationships that are 
honest and healthy can be both 
entertaining and enlightening! 

Close families like the Hughes 
and Cassens stimulate and enrich 
each other. In a way, they lead 
each other's lives. Such strong 
emotional ties can be upsetting 




Facing page: Hidden heartaches menace 
the Cassens (Nancy Wickwire and Nat 
Polen). Panel above: Can Jeff (Mark Ry- 
dell) and Penny (Rosemary Prinz) stay 
reconciled? The Hugheses (Helen Wag- 
ner and Don MacLaughlin) haven't al- 
ways told daughter Penny the truth! 
And even fine old Judge Lowell (Bill 
Johnstone) has lied "for the family." 



when the members are neurotic 
or unstable, but can be a blessing 
if they're normal, happy people. 
Two such families can support 
each other in times of crisis. 

These two TV families are not 
identical. The Cassens are wealth- 
ier, members in good standing 
at the local country club, and 
ever conscious of their standing 
in the community. The Hugheses 
are comfortable, outgoing and 
close-knit. 

The Cassen family unit con- 
sists of Doug, a doctor; his 
wife Claire; her daughter Ellen; 
and Judge Lowell, the father of 
Claire's first husband. 

The Hughes family unit con- 
sists of Chris, an attorney; his 
wife Nancy; his dad, Grandpa 
Hughes; the three children — 
Penny; Don, a lawyer; Bob, an 
intern — Bob's wife Lisa and son 
Tommy; Don's wife Jan; and 
Penny's husband, Jeff Baker. 

It was the friendship of Ellen 
and Penny, who were school- 
mates, that brought the two fam- 
ilies together, but they also have 
professional ties. Dr. Doug Cas- 
sen is the Hugheses' family physi- 
cian, and Chris Hughes is the 
Cassen attorney — at one time de- 
fending Doug as both his friend 
and client. 

Here are two families held to- 
gether by far more than friend- 
ship. They are neighbors, they 
inter-twine professionally, and 
seem to complement one another 
socially and economically. How- 
ever, in (Continued on page 92) 



by ARTHUR HENLEY 

with Dr. ROBERT L.WOLK 



55 






/ 





X 




~ « « -! ^ -S x - 



» K — 



^=G 



O'O 




w .. T R — ' *"" 

_ i, -*' ■** ** ^ 



an 4; 



* tfi ^ ,: 



%* - I \ 



2 I 



ICO 








E** - ■■■■■». - 
w ^; *« 

a — * o 

3 -* 

C C S5 4) 

es U 4> "S 




5 u "■" . 






£ ^ *■ sj 
« * « 3 

S « o — 

S "0 






- © .2. 
s- J Z 5 


* 

s 


1 ^ 




S I 5 — 
,. •! «- 5 

* & " "2 








$ IS j; l^ 
45 j: CQ S 












.2 -a c 


1 


> 


x 4) 45 

s_ 4( T 3 

S "- * F 


V 








I try to share my husband's new life 



)%M 



?PH 




by Mrs. Bob Conrad 

Looking through Robert's seraphooks. it 
always amuses me to read about the "rare 
appearances" of Mrs. Conrad. "It's so nice 
to see them out together," the captions say. 
Yet, somehow, half the pictures in the hook 
are of me! . . . Still, it's true, I don't go with 
Robert to all of the parties and premieres 

and functions lie attends as part of liis job. 

Many of llicsc nr<> (€U>ntitlu*d on pnfir 00 ) 









/ 



tiimt' a ntar on "Ha 
en hintn of "domestic trouhl 
cen tl»*» Boh Conrucle. No 
iilcnro to tell TV Radio Mirror her side of it. 



y 



■^H! 



1 



. r 



ii 









In., ^^ 


ImL ^^Hfl 1 




k * ' 






Is Sinatra a right guy— or a wrong one? For the answer to that 
one, don't ask the hipsters. And don't ask the press. But around 
the world, you can put the question to any one of thousands 
of needy children and get your answer. Kids have that instinct 
for knowing a friend when they spot one. They don't want to 
hear about the kind of headlines Frank Sinatra is famous for— 
scrapes and fist fights and dames and Clanantics. For them, the 
news is Frank's global tour putting on benefits for underprivi- 
leged youngsters. . . . The trip cost about a quarter-million, and 
no one but Frank paid the tab. Why? To find out, turn the page. 



59 



A memory sent Frank 
around the world. One of 
his first stops: Israel 

continued 

Some said it was the White House urging 
a better image for their friend; others 
said it was Frank's way of forgetting a 
broken engagement. But perhaps closest 
to the truth were those who guessed it 
was a memory that sent Frank around 
the world. . . . Once he had been a family 
man ; once home and children had really 
mattered. Whatever happened along the 
way, Frank has never stopped caring 
about children. Perhaps now, as he 
found a way to help them, he was also 
finding his own way back to the man he 
was before high life replaced home life. 





A changed Frank meets Prime Minister Ben Gurion; 
speaks to Arab and Jewish children to launch the 
Sinatra Centre in Nazareth; dines with 
Archbishop George Hakim, Nazareth Mayor Zaoubi. 



60 






^f^im. 



(!) 



■■•••• 






At top right, he plants "Nancy's Tree" in 
Jerusalem's Histadruth forest. At left 
and above, he finds language is no barrier 
as he meets with kindergarteners. 



61 



A memory sent Frank 
around the world. One of 
his first stops: Israel 

continued 

Some said it was the White House urging 
a belter image for their friend; others 
said it was Frank's way of forgetting a 
broken engagement. But perhaps closest 
to the truth were those who guessed it 
was a memory that sent Frank around 
the world. . . . Once he had been a family 
man; once home and children had realty 
mattered. Whatever happened along the 
way, Frank has never stopped caring 
about children. Perhaps now, as he 
found a way to help them, he was also 
finding his own way back to the man he 
was before high life replaced home life. 





f 



f 



A changed Frank meets Prime Minister Ben Gurion; 
speaks to Arab and Jewish children to launch the 
Sinatra Centre in Nazareth ; dines with 
Archbishop George Hakim, Nazareth Mayor Zaoubi. 






< 



St 



h^ 



f 




a 



m 




At top right, he plants "Nancy's Tree" in 
Jerusalem's Histadruth forest. At left 
and above, he finds language is no barrier 
as he meets with kindergarteners. 



44€liiA^i4A^M>Wlv^^0i^ bn&ir&AyyA 



// 



• • • 







RAYMOND BURR 




MY MARRIAGE 



It was obvious to the "Perry Mason" cast: Barbara Hale was 
seriously troubled. But why? There was only one man in her life, 
Bill Williams, her husband now for (Continued on next page) 








■*aW '^t, tse^rZv?- iO'^w. Wi ■ ' -wEfejr -V 






•J 



M 



J < 



nt iiiiiiiiiiiHiiHiiiiiiliiiiiiii n iimiilriiiitiiiiiiiiiii nun 

BARBARA HALE 



IKIIillilllllllllllllllflllllllillili 



64 



(Continued) 
sixteen years; they had three beauti- 
ful children, a fashionable ranch house 
in San Fernando Valley, an enviable 
bank account. Didn't this add up to- 
every thing a woman could desire? 

Yet the close-knit cast could tell that 
their Delia Street was in some kind of 
trouble. Barbara Hale appeared gaunt 
and tired that day as she reported for 
the seven a.m. call. Purposely but po- 
litely, she avoided conversation. 

"Wonder what's bugging her," an ac- 
tor said as she left the set. 

This was not idle curiosity, but deep 
concern. The members of the "Perry 
Mason" show are a real family, almost 
as much as if they were tied together 
by an umbilical cord. Years of film- 
ing the television series together, years 
of sharing each other's good fortunes 
and even disappointments all have 
blended to make them a family unit. 

So it was not unusual that last spring 
the company was worried. Usually, Babs 
(as most call her) would stand around 
and chit-chat with the predominantly 
male cast. They would sip steaming 
cups of coffee, crack jokes and discuss 
the headlines of the morning until it 
was time to face the camera. 

This morning, Barbara would have 
no part of the coffee gang. She didn't 
even take a cup to her room. When it 
was time for her first scene, she emerged 
calmly but coolly. Her face wore a 
rigidly fixed expression. 

Soon the routine of playing Delia 
Street, Perry Mason's Girl Friday, 
seemed to snap her back to normal. 
Yet, throughout the day, Barbara peri- 
odically lapsed into stony silence. 

"She looks like she didn't get a 
wink of sleep all night," one of the 
crew members whispered. 

The following days found Barbara 
in the same mood. One of worry. One 
of apprehension. 

Burr and the others tried their best 
to thaw out the actress. They invited 
her to lunch. She politely refused. 

Soon whispers circulated around the 
set as to the cause of the trouble. 

"Have you heard?" one of the play- 
ers said. "Barbara and Bill are think- 
ing about a divorce." 

This dumbfounded the other. 

"Why, I can't believe it," he replied. 

Yet, it was true. Barbara and hus- 
band Bill Williams were having marital 
problems. It was a closely guarded 
secret, though. Only a handful of their 
close friends knew. 

Most Hollywoodians have become 
conditioned to accept the unexpected 
with only a blink of an eye. Too many 
so-called perfect marriages have been 
torn apart in recent months. 

Still the intimates of Barbara and 
Bill were shocked that these two were 
having trouble. 

They had married in storybook fash- 
ion on June 22nd, 1946. The wedding 
took place in a stone church outside 
of Barbara's hometown, Rockford, Il- 
linois. Their courtship was equally as 
romantic. They met while making a 
screen test together two years previ- 



ously at the old RKO Studios. Both 
wound up with contracts. Both fell in 
love almost at first sight. 

Bill's career, at the time of their 
marriage, was at its peak. Barbara's was 
just getting into orbit. 

"This will be a marriage for keeps," 
Bill told newsmen at the wedding. 

Following a honeymoon at Niagara 
Falls, the two settled down in a two- 
bedroom San Fernando Valley home. 
The breaks were really going Bill's 
way. He became one of television's first 
big cowboy stars, starring in the "Kit 
Carson" series. Barbara, too, was riding 
high and very much in demand. 

One bright fall day, Barbara was 
ecstatic as she emerged from her doc- 
tor's office. And when she told Bill, his 
chest swelled bigger than Mickey Har- 
gitay's. In July of 1947, Jody was born. 
Again, in 1951, the stork stopped off at 
the Williamses. This time with Bill Jr. 
And another little girl came along in 
1953, thus rounding out the family. 

Barbara appeared happier having 
babies than making movies. In fact, one 
day in 1952 when she was pregnant 
with her third child, the actress came 
close to making a decision that would 
affect her future. She wanted to retire. 

Bill left the decision up to her. Then 
came an opportunity the actress 
couldn't afford to turn down. 

Enter "Perry Mason" 

She couldn't refuse to play Delia 
Street in the "Perry Mason" TV series. 
The series appeared to be a sure win- 
ner. And the pay was tops. 

Bill took Barbara's good fortune as 
enthusiastically as she did, even though 
his own career was on the downhill. 

Nonetheless, the next few years were 
happy ones. The Williamses moved into 
a larger home, complete with swimming 
pool. The three children were tanned 
and healthy in the California sun. 

Season after season, the series was 
renewed. Each year, Barbara received 
a fat raise. Other rewards, too, like the 
coveted Emmy. 

Then, according to their circle of 
friends, trouble signs began to appear. 

"Bill's career practically was at a 
standstill," one of them confided to TV 
Radio Mirror. "He remained home 
most of the time. Therefore the rearing 
of the children more or less fell in his 
hands. Barbara was on call for the 
series nearly every day, leaving at the 
crack of dawn and not returning until 
late at night. Naturally, Bill felt neg- 
lected. Felt hurt. Felt that Barbara 
wasn't spending enough time being a 
mother." > 

How could she? When not working 
on the soundstage. there were other 
demands. Interviews, public appear- 
ances and other musts limited the time 
she had to spend with the family. 

"She spent more time with her tele- 
vision family," another friend said. 

The once happy home in the Valley 
became a potential tinderbox. Accord- 
ing to a friend, Bill and Barbara had 
sharp words, followed by days of icy 
silence. 

How long could this situation last? 
Divorce seemed to be the only alterna- 
tive. Bill didn't want to be married to 



Delia Street. He wanted Barbara Hale 
as his wife. Barbara felt he should he 
more understanding. 

The relationship of Barbara and 
Ray Burr since the show's inception has 
been one of brother and sister. When 
Ray was hospitalized several times with 
a chronic throat condition, Barbara was 
usually the first to see if she could do 
anything for him. 

So when the chips were down and 
Barbara obviously was grieving about 
conditions at home, it was Burr who 
was equally concerned. 

Burr and Williams always have been 
the best of friends. The two have en- 
joyed many evenings together along 
with Barbara. 

So perhaps Ray sensed the main prob- 
lem the two were facing. Bill felt neg- 
lected; Barbara, persecuted. 

"If Bill could only become busy 
again," the speculation went. "He's 
brooding too much. Spending too much 
time at home." 

Unknown to either Bill or Barbara, a 
campaign was waged to help them. Bill 
soon found himself on the set of the 
"Perry Mason" show. Not as a guest 
to see his wife, but as an actor. He 
had been cast in a guest-starring role. 
On the set, Ray went out of his way 
to make Bill feel at home. He took every 
opportunity, too, to remind Bill how 
lucky he was to be married to a girl 
like Barbara. He used the same tactics 
on Barbara. 

Suddenly, Bill also found himself up 
for two motion picture roles. 

And as for Barbara, the smile re- 
turned to her face. Why? Her close 
friends attributed it to Ray Burr's help. 
He began to kid her about her home 
life — but, each time, the joke had a 
point to make. "He made us laugh at 
our problems ... he made us laugh and 
love again . . ." is how she described it. 

"Ray speaking as a big brother to 
his sister," one of her closest friends 
confided, "bluntly told her that she 
wasn't spending enough time with her 
family. 

"Even if it meant sacrificing a por- 
tion of her career, she should do it. 
Being a good wife and a mother should 
always come before being a good ac- 
tress." 

Will Barbara now decide to retire 
and devote full time to Bill and the 
children? Her friends think not, main- 
ly because the marriage is on an even 
keel again. 

So even, in fact, that Barbara and 
Bill stole away for a second honeymoon. 
Just the two of them. They spent ten 
days in their power cruiser off the 
Southern California coast, and the trip 
did much to reassure them that their 
love is too precious to allow anything 
to destroy it. 

Naturally there will be other prob- 
lems that will come between them in 
the future. They know, however, that 
their love for each other is stronger 
than ever. They know that Raymond 
Burr and their other friends are de- 
pending on them. Are on their side. 
They've vowed not to disappoint them. 

— Gal York 

See Ray and Barbara in "Perry Mason," 
CBS-TV, Sat.. 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. edt. 



ON THE 




SUNNYSIDE 




MIDWEST 



Kent Slocum's listeners leave their 

worries on the doorstep when he beams 

KOTA's good sound to Rapid City, S.D. 



■ Kent Slocum tries to walk a balanced road in pro- 
graming his "Music on the Sunnyside." He says, 
"I've tried to keep in mind that the radio audience 
consists of many types of people and situations — the 
man in his car, the homemaker in her kitchen, the 
secretary in her office. To build friendship with the 
listener is to beam the broadcast to each individual, 
treating each individual as the most important person 
in the audience." Heard weekdays 2:35 to 5 p.m., the 
program provides a good cross-section of popular 
music, "with the emphasis on good." Kent has a 
classical music program, "Masterworks of Sound," 
Saturdays 1 :05 to 1 :55 p.m. In addition he does the 
"Weathervane" on both television and radio, week- 
nights 9:45 to 9:50. . . . Kent's family consists of his 
wife Elaine — whom he met "sneaking peeks at her 
Spanish papers at Huron College" — their four-and-a- 
half-year-old daughter Jan — who is "a little ham" and 
likes to visit Daddy at work — and a smoky-gray barn 
cat, "Shadow" — who came from Elaine's father's 720- 
acre farm. . . . Kent has an aversion to "any medi- 
ocrity that rock 'n' roll affords" and to "immature 
singers passing themselves off as professionals." He 
is an optimist about future trends in popular music. 
"The turn to better music seems evident with stations 
turning from the Top 40 format to a better calibre of 
music." It's always been "better" on the Sunnyside. 



Jan, Kent's and Elaine's daughter, tries to be a "good girl," 
because Daddy may let her say a few words on the radio. 







65 




THEY 

BELIEVE 




In disaster or calm, St. 



Louis counts on Rex Davis 



for his way ivith the news 



He's been coming into people's homes for such a long time 
— 17 years on Station KMOX, St. Louis — Rex Davis, News 
and Public Affairs Director, thinks that must be why 
"they believe in me and accept me as one of the family." 
Mayor Raymond Tucker echoed the sentiments of Rex's 
large audience (42% of the total listeners for KMOX 
news broadcasts) with his congratulations on Davis' "serv- 
ice to the people of St. Louis and his excellent job of 
maintaining the interest of the citizens in community 
affairs." His listeners become interested because Rex him- 
self is "terrifically interested in what is happening in the 
world today and, like many, terribly worried about how it's 
all going to come out. One likes to be optimistic, of course ; 
nevertheless, the chance of eventual confrontation with 
the forces of Communism seems to me to be virtually un- 
avoidable. I don't know if people have changed or I have 
become more aware of their thinking. I always realized 
there was prejudice and bigotry in the world, but never 



did I realize on how wide a scale it existed or how bitterly 
narrow they could be until I started taking their telephone 
comments. Under the anonymity provided by the telephone 
they speak in such a manner that is not only sickening, 
but almost frightening. Not all of our callers react in 
this way, of course — many are good, sincere people who 
have very valid comments or are genuinely seeking infor- 
mation and they are a joy to contact. To me the most 
dangerous thing in this country today is the very vocal 
spokesmen of both Right and Left. I wish fervently that 
we could organize the great middle-of-the-road group into 
a militant army of moderates to keep things on an even 
keel." . . . The opinions Rex Davis gives on the air are 
always his very own. Unlike many newscasters, he writes 
all his own material. In addition to the top-rated "Noon 
News," Monday through Friday, Rex is heard, Monday 
through Thursday, with two programs, "Strictly Editorial" 
and "News Open Line." both part of KMOX Radio's "At 



66 




Your Service." On Fridays, he opens his "Mail Bag" and 
reads letters from listeners. He continues his "At Your 
Service" participation on Saturday mornings with "Ask 
the Mayor," "Ask Your Congressman" and "Strictly 
Editorial and News Open Line." And then, throughout 
the week, he broadcasts hourly morning newscasts plus 
news and business features heard later in the day. During 
the summer months, Rex acts as the host for the band con- 
certs in the park, broadcast on KMOX. He is moderator 
for the medical forums sponsored by the St. Louis Med- 
ical Society, St. Louis Globe-Democrat and KMOX. . . . 
He somehow manages some leisure time for reading and 
once-a-week bowling, averaging 170. His wife Suzanne 
shares his love of listening to good music. . . . They live 
in Kirkwood, in a six-room ranch house. They met when 
both were singing in a church choir and have two grown 
children, both married. . . . Rex Davis believes strongly in 
his job and says, "I would do nothing else in the world." 



67 



RITA'S 
A REAL 
BELL-RINGER 




68 




Rita rings in juvenile talent for her Sunday show, "Starlit Stairway: 



When Rita rings your bell, it's prob- 
ably to give away money. Or so most 
people think who watch Rita Bell's 
"Prize Playhouse," Monday to Fri- 
day from 9 to 10:20 A.M. on Greater 
Detroit's WXYZ-TV. She introduces 
feature films and comments on them. 
She conducts interviews with cele- 
brated guests, civic leaders and volun- 
teer workers for charitable causes. 
And she telephones viewers. She asks 
a simple question first. If the second, 
or jackpot, question is answered, the 
prize can range from $25 to some- 
thing around $1,000. Each time the 1 

_L 




Rita's son Michael (left) may have doubts about his mother 
as bike mechanic, but she's a ringading whiz in the kitchen. 



When the phone rings in Detroit, 
people jump to answer it. After all, 



it might be Rita Bell calling! 




jackpot question is missed, the pot 
rises $7. A toy jackpot grows along 
with it and also goes to the winner. 
Sample questions are: "What is the 
married name of the actress who won 
the latest Academy Award for best 
icting in a starring role?" "Who is 
the director of the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency?" "Name the members 
of 'I've flown through space club.' ' 
... Rita's other program is "Star- 
lit Stairway,", a talent show for 
youngsters and adults, Sunday at 
12:30. Her unflagging cheerfulness 
and warmth help overcome mike and 



camera fright and keep the pace fast 
and exciting. . . . Rita, a speech 
graduate from Marygrove College in 
Detroit, worked as a public relations 
secretary until she sang informally at 
a corn roast one day and was dis- 
covered by John F. Pival, now presi- 
dent of WXYZ, but then executive 
vice-president. She was soon working 
for the station as a weather girl, and 
still fills in occasionally. One of the 
busiest girls in town, Rita, who is 
separated from her husband, keeps a 
neat house for a handsome youngster, 
Michael, 13, and her mother. She 



bought her attractive home three years 
ago. . . . She enjoys her work most of 
all, then such pursuits as reading, 
swimming, ice skating and teaching 
speech. She listens to records, par- 
ticularly those of Keely Smith, Andy 
Williams and Bobby Darin. She is 
also a rabid fan of Richard Burton 
and would like most to meet George 
Burns. Rita has interviewed hundreds 
of famous people on her show. She 
finds the best way to be bright and 
perky in the morning is to go to bed 
early the night before. In that way, 
she's always sure to ring the bell! 



69 



T^he town "too tough to die" — Tomb- 
stone, Arizona — is the locale for 
the exciting adventures of Sheriff Clay 
Hollister (Pat Conway) and news- 
paper editor Harris Claibourne (Rich- 
ard Eastham). Although the charac- 
ters of Hollister and Claibourne are 
fictional, the stories told on "Tomb- 
stone Territory" are based on actual 
incidents recorded in the files of The 
Tombstone Epitaph, which is still 
printed. Tombstone's fame grew from 
a span of three years, beginning in 
1877, when the town's founder, Ed 
Schieffelin, discovered a rich silver- 
ore mine. He named the lucky spot 
"Tombstone." because he had been 



TOO 
TOUGH 
TO 



TV lawmen. His sheriff is not a grim 
law enforcer, but a man who likes peo- 
ple and attempts to dissuade them 
from trouble before it happens. But, 
when necessary, he meets danger head- 
on, guns blazing. It was only natural 
for Pat to become an actor. His father, 
the late Jack Conway, was one of 
Hollywood's top directors at MGM. 
From the time he could talk, Pat was 
convinced he wanted to be an actor. 
His parents had no objection — but 
they insisted he get an education first. 
His early youth was spent on the fam- 
ily's 125-acre ranch; he learned to ride 
when he was five, and roped his first 
steer when he was nine. While in 



a home in the Hollywood Hills. . . . 
Richard Eastham's first theatrical 
break came when he replaced Ezio 
Pinza on Broadway in "South Pacific." 
He had landed a small part in the 
Rodgers and Hammerstein show, then 
was selected to understudy the star. 
He did 56 performances opposite 
Mary Martin before he joined the na- 
tional company, with Janet Blair. 

Richard's first straight role was with 
the road company of the comedy "An- 
niversary Waltz." When the play 
reached the West Coast, Eastham de- 
cided to remain there rather than re- 
turn to New York. He played an im- 
portant role in the lead-off film of 




Pat Conway, Richard Eastham 
re-create the thrills of frontier 
days in "Tombstone Territory' 

warned that he was headed straight to 
the heart of the Apache country, and 
all he would ever find out there would 
be his tombstone. Within months after 
his claim was staked, the area was 
swarming with prospectors, miners 
and tradesmen. Some of the wildest 
gun battles of the West were fought on 
Allen Street, "main stem" of the town. 
Money and blood flowed like water. 
During this period, Tombstone was the 
mecca of famous gunmen, the hope of 
prospectors, and a prey for tinhorn 
gamblers and rustlers. Conway and 
Eastham as the sheriff and editor com- 
bine the pen and the sword to bring 
law and order to the town. . . . Pat 
Conway plays Hollister unlike most 



Menlo Junior College, Pat realized 
continuing a regular academic educa- 
tion was pointless for him. His parents 
insisted he finish — or support himself. 
He took them up on their challenge 
and struck out on his own. He got a 
job and enrolled at the Pasadena Play- 
house, where he studied for a year. He 
then set out for London, auditioned for 
the Old Vic company, and was signed 
as a regular member. World War II 
took three years out of his acting life 
when he served as a U. S. Marine. Aft- 
er the war, he returned to Hollywood 
and got roles in many top TV dramatic 
series and several movies before Ziv 
signed him for "Tombstone Territory." 
Six-foot-two Pat is a bachelor and has 



"Men of Annapolis," a Ziv production. 
The studio was so pleased with his 
work, they cast him in "Tombstone 
Territory." Eastham is a native of 
Opelousas, Louisiana, and is one of 
seven children. When he was five, the 
family moved to Missouri, and Dick 
began voice lessons. At 16, he sang 
bass in the famed St. Louis Grand 
Opera Company. In 1941, he went to 
New York to study voice — but the les- 
sons lasted only a few months before 
he joined the Signal Corps, where he 
served for four years as a photography 
officer. After his discharge, he headed 
straight back to New York and singing 
lessons. Six-foot-two Dick is wed to 
childhood sweetheart Betty Van Allen. 



70 






E.G. MARSHALL 

(Continued from page 33) 
hauls out his bike and blithely cycles 
off to work. 

Unrecognized by most New Yorkers 
— to whom a bicycle is a toy for fifteen- 
year-olds and under, and fifteen may be 
stretching it, at that — E.G. hears their 
cracks as he makes his way up busy, 
traffic-choked Third Avenue. 

"Crazy bicycle, lookit ! " 

"Where you pedalin' to, pardner?" 

"Mama, see the character on the two- 
wheeler . . . Ooooooh, nutty!" 

"Unfair to us cabbies, that's what you 
are." 

"Hey, Mac, mind if I trot along 
wich'a?" 

So on and on E.G. pedals, till he 
reaches Filmways Studio at 127th 
Street. 

There he gets off his bike, waves 
back to a few neighborhood Puerto 
Rican children on their way to school 
(they're used to him by now), enters 
the studio and — after a quick trip to 
makeup and wardrobe — makes his way 
to the brightly-lit and camera-eyed of- 
fice of Preston & Preston. 

One morning, just after he'd won the 
Emmy as best TV actor, E.G. was ap- 
proached by one of the neighborhood 
kids, who asked him: "Mr. Defender — 
can you tell me jus' one thing." 

"Sure," said E.G. 

"Why," asked the boy, "you ride bike 
to work — big man like you?" 

E.G. smiled. "For exercise, first of 
all," he explained. "I'm not as young 
as I used to be, you see, and a man has 
to find a way of keeping fit. So for this 
reason I ride my bicycle. . . . And — see 
this big studio? Well, inside it's stuffy. 
It's damp. It's pretty dark. Most of the 
year I work inside this studio for nine 
or ten hours a day. But this bike — for 
a few minutes a day, at least — it keeps 
me outdoors. . . . When I was a boy- 
like you, I used to love the outdoors. 
You do, don't you, son?" 

The boy nodded. "Sure thing, Mr. 
Defender," he said. 

"Well," said E.G., "so did I. And I 
guess you could say that this bike — in 
a way, for a few minutes a day — takes 
me back to my boyhood. . . ." 

The place of E.G. Marshall's boyhood 
was a tiny town in Minnesota — called 
Owatonna; there, for a boy nearly half- 
a-century ago, life was strictly Huck 
Finn. 

There was a river, of course — "We 
fished there," E.G. says. "We swam. We'd 
dig for freshwater clams. Mmmmm, I 
can still taste them. Delicious, they 
were." 

There were woods — "We'd hike. We'd 
build our tree houses. We'd find twigs 
and whittle, making things to play with 
or for our rooms, or for pretty little 
girls to whom we felt we might like 
to give a present." 

There were caves — "Or more under- 
ground huts, you might say, actually 
built by us, and very well concealed. 
Every boy had to have his own private 
cave and the laws of concealment were 
very strict." 

There was a gentle family life — slow. 



SHOULD I REFUSE 

MY HUSBANDS DEMANDS? 

Her husband made life unbearable . . . un- 
til he learned his lesson the hard way . . . 
No wife should miss this exciting story! 




SPECIAL REPORT: 

LOVE BEFORE MARRIAGE Society decrees that 
a girl must remain "pure" until she's married. Yet modern living 
has created more and more temptations for the single girl. Read 
this up-to-date report on the manners and morals of single girls. 

I DELIVERED MY OWN BABY I enjoyed free- 
dom from terror and experienced the thrill of sharing every step 
of my daughter's journey into the world." These are the words 
of a modern-day mother who delivered her own child. Don't 
miss this informative story ... a story that will help every future 
mother. 

Seven exciting true-to-life stories, 
PLUS pages on food, fashion 
and beauty for homemakers 
everywhere . . . information de- 
signed for the busy modern-day 
woman. 

SEPTEMBER 



Tkue 



ON SALE NOW 




T 
V 
R 

71 



T 
V 
R 

72 



loving, rich in the stuff of which mem- 
ories are made: "Mother would bake 
bread in the big kitchen. Or she would 
prepare some of those Norwegian spe- 
cialties. She would sit near the window 
and darn our clothes. She would read 
to us. These things I remember. . . . 
My father worked for the telephone 
company — it was quite an adventurous 
job; the telephone was very new then. 
And at night he'd come home from work 
and regale us with stories of this new 
modern wonder." 

There was school, too, of course; one 
of those red-brick one-room affairs — "I 
liked school. I got my start in theater 
there. In kindergarten, one day, I did 
an imitation of Charlie Chaplin and all 
the children laughed and applauded. In 
a way, that was the beginning for me. 
In first grade, I think it was, there was 
a Christmas play and I played Santa 
Claus, the leading role. In fifth or sixth 
grade, we presented a spring pageant 
and staged an oxentanze — ox dance — 
and I was very proud to be chosen as 
caller: 'Slap your thigh,' I called!" 

It was, in fact, right after this oxen- 
tanze when E.G. Marshall met his very 
first fan. She was an immense woman 
— the wife of one of the county's lead- 
ing farmers — with a piercing pair of 
eyes and an imperious voice that might 
once have been used, succesfully, to call 
the cattle home. She came up to young 
E.G. now and said, boomingly: 

"Boy!" 

"Yes'm?" 

"I've just come from a trip to Chicago 
— don't you know." 

"Yes'm?" 

"And I saw some theatricals there. 
One — a play — with a lad no older than 
you. An actor he called himself. Imag- 
ine, at that age. But no matter, the 
point is, he was a professional actor, 
and no better than you." 

"Thank you, ma'am." 

"Are you interested in a theatrical 
career r 

"Well, ma'am—" 

"I think you should be. I know. I 
know. Most lads from our country end 
up like the corn that grows out there 
beyond the road — all sturdy and hand- 
some enough, but all of them yellow- 
eared and all of them ending up one 
same as the other. But once in a while, 
nobody can explain why, a red ear 
pops up in the crop. And I think that's 
what you're going to be, boy; a red 
ear o' corn." 

"Maybe, ma'am." 

"Well, good luck — if you act, that is. 
And if you should ever act any of that 
Shakespeare, think of me. I like his 
writin's." 

"Yes'm." 

"You know who Shakespeare is, 
boy?" 

"No, ma'am." 

"Well, you probably will some day. 
You probably will. . . ." 

The farmer's wife was right. Young 
E.G. would know, and play, the writin's 
of Shakespeare — and before not too 
long. 

But first came a baptism by music — 
or "premature rock 'n' roll," as E.G. 
likes to call it. 

It all started with a guitar. 

Someone gave it to E.G. as a present. 



There were no music teachers in Owa- 
tonna at the time, so E.G. plunked away 
at the instrument till the chords were in 
place and things didn't sound too bad 
in general. After that — immediately — 
he became the town's leading musician. 
He continued plunking away — and after 
a while he sang, too, at farmers' conven- 
tions, ladies' club meetings, at the 
Y.M.C.A., at church suppers. Most of 
this was done for free — "though once in 
a while I did get a quarter tip." 

Then one afternoon when he was six- 
teen or so, an elderly gentleman — an cx- 
vaudevillian of sorts — got an idea and 
contacted E.G. about it. 

"You got an orchestra? 'Cause I 
have some big ideas if you do," said 
the man. 

E.G. crossed his fingers, fib-style: 
"Sure, I have an orchestra." 

"How many fellows in the group?" 

"How many you need?" 

"Four." 

"Just what I got!" 

The elderly gentleman, delighted, 
then explained: "My idea is to get a 
band circulating 'round here for Sat- 
urday night festivities. Now, if you and 
your three friends are good enough — " 

"Shades of Hades" 

The first thing E.G. had to do, of 
course, was to find three other musi- 
cians. But he did, soon enough, in 
neighboring towns — kids about his age; 
a violinist, a piano player and a drum- 
mer. They rehearsed together for a 
few hours. One night they played for 
the old man, who seemed pleased with 
what he heard. They gave themselves 
a name — "The Shades of Hades," ob- 
viously so there should be no question 
that the jazz they played was hellishly 
hot. And that Saturday night, they 
played their first dance. 

"As I remember," E.G. says, "we each 
got two dollars that night. And a few 
scattered tips. And we had a grand 
time ... I must have been quite some- 
thing then — singing, squirming, smiling 
away. I listen to rock 'n' roll now once 
in a while, and I think. 'My gosh, that's 
the same kind of stuff I used to do!' 
. . . The Shades played together for a 
few years after that. We stayed together 
till 1933, when a Shakespearean reper- 
tory company on its way South passed 
through town, put out a call for an 
actor . . . and I found myself joining 
them. 

"It was an adventure I wouldn't have 
missed for anything," E.G. says. "Yes, 
there were rough times in those early 
days. Most of it financial, I guess you 
could say. But perhaps the roughest 
time of them all, looking back, was the 
night I spent in jail. ... I was working 
in Chicago then, with the Federal Rep- 
ertory Theatre. I was to have an inter- 
view with someone, to meet him in 
Milwaukee. Well, I got to Milwaukee 
early one evening. But this fellow wasn't 
there. I'd just missed him. So I began 
walking back to the railroad station 
when these two cops came up from be- 
hind me, tapped me on the shoulder 
and told me to come along with them. 
'Where?' I asked. 'To jail,' they said. 
'Why?' I asked. They told me I was 
under suspicion of robbery and as- 



sault. Just like that. They'd say nothing 
more. . . . The next morning I was to be 
confronted with one of the victims, the 
one who would or would not put the 
finger on me — as they say. They brought 
me into this room. This woman was sit- 
ting there. Very nervous. Very agitated. 
All I could think was, 'She's so excited 
— who knows what she's going to say?' 
I even thought, 'Suppose she says it 
was me — then what?' But slowly the 
woman looked up, and over toward 
where I stood. She stared at me for a 
few long moments, very hard. And then, 
thank the Lord, she shook her head. 
And she said, 'No — that's not the man.' 
And I was set free." 

But a night in jail here, a few 
hungry days there, didn't stop the young 
actor from following the career he had 
decided by now was it-or-nothing. 

After a few years in Chicago, E.G. 
decided to try his luck in New York. 

And after a few years there — in the 
early '40s — at age thirty-one, he got his 
big break by playing a seventy-year-old 
adventurer in exactly seven minutes' 
worth of a play called "Jason." 

"Jason" wasn't too well received; but 
Marshall was. 

"Brilliant" — cheered the critics. (One 
of them even wondered where the "old 
man" had been all his life!) And from 
that opening night on. E.G. Marshall — 
who has since played youngish, old, me- 
dium rare; what you want from a great 
actor ; and how you want it — was on his 
way. 

Don't let's bother here with the cred- 
its he has since racked up; we don't 
have that much room. Enough to say 
that, from that day to this, E.G. Mar- 
shall has appeared in nearly 500 tele- 
vision plays, two dozen movies, a dozen 
or so Broadway plays. 

Besides, this is a story about E.G. 
Marshall the man. 

And we want to get on to the heart of 
the man. 

For a good, nice, wise and softly- 
humorous heart it is. . . . 

He is a dedicated artist, yet at the 
same time he's relaxed. If he is called 
in front of the camera for a short take, 
he will go, do what he has to do, return 
and say, "Now, as I was telling you — " 

And talking about a variety of sub- 
jects, you get to know something about 
the man. 

He talked a little that day about 
Robert Reed, the young actor who plays 
his son, Kenneth Preston, on "The De- 
fenders": "Bob is a very gentle person. 
A real human being. He's very — I don't 
want to say dedicated — but he has a 
great deal of respect for the work he 
must do and that we all must do . . . 
Our relationship is the same off screen 
as on. Except I never get angry with 
him. He's a bright boy. Not self-serv- 
ing. He doesn't complain. Very often 
the writer doesn't give him enough to 
do on the show — and so I suggest how 
more lines can go his way. I guess it's 
the kind of thing Lawrence Preston 
might do for his son. I do it because 
I like Bob Reed." 

He talked about the subject of work : 
"I will never say that I am overworked 
because one, I love my work— and two, 
there are too many memories, which I 
guess all actors share, about the times 



we couldn't get work. But there have 
been times when I became tired, very 
tired. I guess after the operation is 
over and the wound is healed, you don't 
think about it so much. Yet, there were 
times. And it usually hit me around 
the eyes— a little twitch right here — in 
this eye. And I would find myself tak- 
ing a little time off and going some- 
where to relax for a couple of weeks. 
Usually in the country." 

He talked about his country house: 
"It's up in Stratton, a tiny town in Ver- 
mont. I call it the Nothing House — 
because there's nothing square there, 
nothing level. I was hiking with a friend 
who lived nearby, one day, through the 
woods, when we came across this old 
shed. It caught my eye — the way it was 
situated especially, in a pleasant vale, 
surrounded by big maple trees. The 
quiet pleased me, too; I didn't realize 
it till that day, how much I missed the 
natural setting. I'd been in so many 
cities these past twenty years. You don't 
know that your ears are constantly 
bombarded with noise till you get away. 
I guess I felt at that moment that I had 
to have some wilderness again. Anyway, 
I bought the old shed. And proceeded 
to transform it into a house — added 
rooms, a foundation. It was like putting 
a shining gold crown on a rotten tooth. 
We go there summers now. And for a 
few weeks in the winter, when we can. 
It's the happiest place in the world to 
me and my family." 

He talked about a tree that used 
to stand not far from Nothing House: 
"I don't know why I did it. But this 
huge tree was in the way of something 
I was planning. A marvelous tree — 
about ninety years old. So I got some 
guys to come and take it away. And 
when they started with their saws, I 
had to turn away. At one point I 
thought, 'But this is a living thing, a 
beautiful thing — it shouldn't be de- 
stroyed.' I called out to the men to see 
if they could stop. But it was too late." 

He talked about friends: "A good 
friendship to me is one in which some- 
one knows your faults and forgets them. 
I am moved by the purity of friendship 
in people." 

About family: "I prefer to say noth- 
ing about my family life. It has always 
been a policy of mine. Yes, I was mar- 
ried when I was rather young and have 
two fine daughters by that marriage. I 
have since married again, very happily, 
and have a fine son and daughter. My 
definition of a good marriage? Not 
something where each party gives fifty- 
fifty, but where each gives one hundred 
percent." 

He talked a little about his social 
life: "My favorite kind of evening is 
for us to sit at home — or in the homes of 
friends: Kevin McCarthy, his sister 
Mary McCarthy, Zero Mostel — and 
group-read from plays. Instead of cock- 
tail parties, we have reading parties. 
Instead of musicales, we have theatri- 
cales. They're a big hit. And we have 
an awful lot of fun together." 

He talked a little about public re- 
action to himself since the walloping 
success of "The Defenders": "I walk 
into a restaurant now and usually a 
few people will look up and nod. Not 
much more than that. Except, of course, 



that we get a lot of mail. Quite a few 
people write in asking advice on spe- 
cific legal subjects: Bankruptcy, com- 
pensation, negligence. I tell them to go 
to a legal adviser — or to go see Perry 
Mason." 

Finally, he talked a little about his 
initials: "Many people have asked me 
what E.G. stands for. I never tell them. 
Or else I say that E. is a name in it- 
self and G. stands for gregarious. Or 
I might say that I borrowed E. from 
Lizabeth Scott, who didn't need it — 



that's a gag I picked up from Joe E. 
Lewis — and that E. stands for enigma. 
But I never tell. And I don't intend that 
I ever will. Why? Maybe because it 
makes me a little bit different. Once, a 
woman said to me that I was destined 
to be different — like a red ear of corn. 
And I guess that, at heart, I am just 
that. A grown-up and contented red 
ear of corn . . ." — Doug Brewer 

"The Defenders" is seen on CBS-TV, 
Sat., from 8:30 to 9:30 p.m. edt. 




Science Cracks The Smoking Barrier 

NEW "JET STREAM" 
PERMANENT CIGARETTE FILTER 
TRAPS LUNG IRRITATING TARS 

Works On Amazing New Principle ... No Filters ... No Cartridges . . . 
No Crystals. Actually Knocks The Tar Out Of Smoking. 



Thanks to the marvel of aerodynamic science, a 
new permanent cigarette filter has been developed 
that removes doubt, worry, and harmful tars . . . 
WHILE IT LETS YOU ENJOY A SAFER PLEASANTER 
SMOKE EVERY TIME. TAR GARD, invented by a chief 
design engineer for one of the nation's largest air 
lines, works on the principle of aerodynamics with 
surprising and sensational results. As you puff on 
the cigarette, TAR GARD forces the smoke through 
a tiny opening hitting against a special "trap 
holder" which literally knocks the tar out of the 
smoke. TAR GARD was specially designed to remove' 
up to 80% of the "high temperature tars" that 
medical science has classified as causing the most 
damage and harm. The result is a safer, better 
smoke, while flavor, aroma and taste stay the same. 

TAR GARD uses the latest principles of science 
and has been thoroughly tested in leading universi- 
ties and independent laboratories. It gives you a 
permanent cigarette filter that begins where filter 
cigarettes leave off. TAR GARD is safe, simple, easy 
to clean, durable. 

Don't tamper with your health or your smoking 
pleasure another day. TRY TAR GARD. See it trap 
tars that would normally reach your system. See 
how cleaner, fresher your mouth feels. See how 
TAR GARD reduces ugly tar stains on your teeth. 
Notice how your "cigarette cough" may be relieved. 
Feel the pleasure and increased safety you get. Act 
now. ORDER TAR GARD TODAY. Results are so sen- 
sational that TAR GARD is sold on an unconditional 
30 day "Prove It To Yourself" Free Trial Offer. 
ACT NOW. Use The Handy "No Risk" Coupon. You 
must be pleased; you must be satisfied; you must 
'be absolutely thrilled with the results. If not, simply 
return for full refund of your purchase price. 



HERE'S HOW TAR GARD WORKS: 

After only 2 cigarettes, see how much "high 
temperature tars" have been trapped. 



Here's the result after just 5 cigarettes.. 



This is the amazing result TAR GARD gives you 
after just 10 cigarettes. 



Imagine what TAR GARD will do if you just 
smoke 15 cigarettes a day. 

So why tamper with your health. Try TAR 
GARD now. It comes attractively packaged com- 
plete with simple instructions for easy cleaning. 
Remember TAR GARD is absolutely guaranteed. 
Try it for 30 days at our risk. You must see for 
yourself the amazing results; you must notice 
the trapped tars; you must be absolutely pleased 
... or return for immediate refund of your full 
purchase price. Act now. Use the handy "NO 
RISK" coupon below. 



MAIL THIS "NO RISK" COUPON NOW 



| TAR GARD CORP. Dept. A ^1 

P.O. Box 882, San Diego 12, California ^| 
I Rush. _TAR GARDjCigarette Holders @ j 



.in Cash 



$2.95 each. I enclose $. 

Check Money Order. You guarantee that 



I 



UNCONDITIONAL GUARANTEE 

Use TAR GARD for 30 days. You must 
be completely satisfied. You must 
enjoy a safer, cleaner, fresher smoke 
or you may return for full refund of 
your purchase price. 

TAR GARD LABORATORIES, INC. 



I | TAR GARD must give me a safer, more enjoy- I 
I able smoke or I may return it within 30 days I 



for full refund. FREE: 2 extra mouthpieces. 
• I can keep these even if I return the TAR 
I GARD. 

j Check color preference: 
| □ Amber □ Clear □ Blue □ Pink 



i 



j □ White □ Black □ Green □ Turquoise | 



Name. 
Address- 



City. 



.Zone State. 



T 
V 
R 

73 






EDDIE FISHER 



iiififiiMiifiimiitiHiii' 



(Continued from page 25) 
manufacture any kind of story it wants 
these days," he explained. "Who has 
time to go around denying or trying to 
answer every comment? If I really 
started to straighten out the record, I 
wouldn't have time to get my career go- 
ing again. Oddly enough, in all these 
years I've never kept a scrapbook. I 
didn't even save the good write-ups. I 
can understand it's the job of a reporter 
or columnist to get a slant on a story 
and write it, but they don't have to be 
so heavy-handed about it. I'm not talk- 
ing about my relationship with Eliza- 
beth, but many of these people develop 
an attitude toward something, and they 
can create troubles where there aren't 
any." 

I took the bull by the horns and 
asked him about the impending divorce. 
It had been reported that he would be 
the one to get it. 

"It wasn't my idea to begin with. It 
was Elizabeth's. Besides, I'm so busy 
working that I haven't time. Since she's 
the one who wants it, she'll have to be 
the one to get it," he decreed with the 
finality of a man who has had the last 
word. 

"After marriage to Elizabeth Taylor, 
who's considered one of the most beau- 
tiful girls in the world, wouldn't it be 
difficult for anybody to follow in her 
footsteps?" I asked. 

"There are many different kinds of 
beauty. I'd try it again, I guess, some- 
where along the line," he answered 
softly. 

Eddie is handsomer today than he 
was B.C. — Before "Cleopatra." His 
few weeks in Palm Springs had tanned 
him to a luggage brown. He's regained 
the twenty pounds he lost. And he's 
wearing exactly the same size suits he 
sported back when Eddie Cantor heard 
him singing for the Labor Day holi- 
dayers at Grossinger's Hotel in the Cat- 
skills and pushed him into the big-time. 
That was 1949. Two movies, two chil- 
dren, two glamorous wives and two life- 
times ago. 

Today, after what he smilingly ad- 
mits was a "kind of temporary semi- 
retirement," Eddie's back at work full 
time. 

I asked him if he hadn't known that 
all this time he was sort of tossing away 
his own redhot career? "I didn't have 
a moment to think. There just seemed 
to be many other things that were much 
more important to me during these 
years. It never entered my mind. Even 
my agents knew how I felt and didn't 
get in touch with me. I don't know . . . 
I guess I just didn't care." 

Whenever he's not actually perform- 
ing these days, he's rehearsing. With the 
same Svengali he had in the early days, 
Milton Blackstone, he starts early in 
the morning and, barring a little break 
to sop up some sun, he goes straight 
through until the night. 
T Immediately after nudging J.F.K. off 

v the front pages, he recorded six tunes. 
R Two from Broadway's "Milk and 
Honey" were made in Europe. As soon 
74 



as he landed back in his own backyard, 
he recorded "Back in Your Own Back- 
yard," which he likes "the best of any- 
thing I ever made. But later on I know 
I won't feel the same way." "The Sweet- 
est Sound" from "No Strings" was next 
followed by "Bravo Giovanni." The 
sixth sold 400,000 copies already. "Just 
so happens it happened to have been 
'Arrivederci Roma,' " Eddie grinned. 

"It wouldn't matter what I sang, 
though. People would read something 
into it. They're just waiting for some- 
thing. You can't avoid a certain amount 
of torch songs. Most really great num- 
bers written down through the ages fit 
that category. I'm planning on doing a 
variety of tunes. Some will be torchy." 

Although Eddie and Co. tried to 
avoid tunes that have the double mean- 
ings, this brought to mind a recent 
benefit performance which prompted a 
reviewer next day to foam at his type- 
writer: "It was apparent Eddie was 



PHOTOGRAPHERS' CREDITS 

Gene Krupo by "Popsie"; Eddie Fisher 
party pictures by Globe; Eddie Fisher 
portrait on p. 25 by U.P.I. ; Connie 
Stevens color by Gene Trindel of Topix; 
Bob Horton color by Win Mu/drow; 
E. G. Marshall by CBS; Vince Edwards 
portrait by Marv Newton of Graphic 
House; Sherry Nelson and Vince Ed- 
wards by Gi'i/oon; Lennon Sisters by 
Frank Bez; Hugh Downs, wife and 
family by Jack Stager; Leslie Uggams 
by Jack Stager; Fred MacMurray by 
Phil Stern; Shelley Fabares and Lou 
Adler by John Hamilton; "As the World 
Turns" by CBS; Frank Sinatra color and 
black-and-white by Pictorial Parade; 
color pix of Raymond Burr and Barbara 
Hale by Biff Kobrin. 



singing not to the thousand who were 
there, but to the one who wasn't. He 
sang his heart out last night and every 
song was seemingly directed as a mes- 
sage of love. 'Any Time' brought a gasp 
from the audience. T Need You Now' 
caused an exchange of knowing glances. 
Most obvious of all was his tenderly 
touching 'Wish You Were Here,' which 
never before carried the sweet, haunt- 
ing tones that he instilled into this 
rendition which was a lament of yes- 
terday and a hope of tomorrow. In his 
last threnody of love to his estranged 
wife, Eddie sang 'You Gotta Have 
Heart,' and it was plain he was wearing 
it on his sleeve." 

Eddie's wry comment: "These days, 
anything I sing would be read into. 
Even 'How Are Things in Glocca- 
morra' ! " 

Sitting on the edge of his chair, his 
chin cupped in his hands, Eddie dis- 
cussed his career. "Of course, it's too 
early to tell how this will affect my 
popularity. Tragedies always seem to 
make people more important. I'm al- 
ready booked into my hometown and 
Vegas and Dean Martin pushed his en- 
gagement back so I can play Tahoe. 

"I've been offered several exciting 
TV deals. I'm considering them all. I'm 
very anxious to prove myself as a per- 
former. But I'm a singer primarily. I 
made two movies. Both of them bombed. 



So, I'd have to consider acting offers 
very carefully." 

Speaking of acting, what was his 
opinion of "Cleopatra"? "I've seen two 
hours and forty-five minutes of it. It's 
a true artistic achievement which will 
be one of the greatest pictures of all 
time. Elizabeth gives the greatest per- 
formance of her life." 

Rumored to have gone through cash 
almost as fast as 20th Century-Fox, he 
was asked about reports that he's broke. 
He stared at his alligator shoes (rough 
guess is $40 per foot) and answered, 
"Well, I've leased a Beverly Hills home 
and an apartment in New York. And. 
as to whether or not I'm busted finan- 
cially, all I can say is nobody is ever 
going to have to run a benefit for me." 

In the other room of his hotel suite 
there were some ten or more aides-de- 
camp, songwriters, TV producers, man- 
agers and other humans of assorted 
shapes, sizes and salaries. Two phones 
were ringing constantly, and being an- 
swered by the sergeants-at-arms. 

Eddie Fisher is a young man who, at 
an age when many other men are still 
in hock to their in-laws, has already 
been married to Debbie Reynolds and 
Elizabeth Taylor, two of this planet's 
most sought-after box office attractions. 
He's entertained kings and queens and 
presidents. His "Anytime," "I'm Walk- 
ing Behind You," "Oh, My Papa" and 
"I Need You Now" have sold over a 
million records each. But he is no cocky, 
arrogant kid whose off-hours are spent 
munching caviar. 

He is a pleasant, boyish gentleman 
who amiably and honestly answers 
questions from friends he doesn't figure 
will gut him just for the sake of a 
headline. Eddie is a soft-spoken, well- 
mannered individual who shows re- 
markable restraint and good grace in 
this new international poker game 
where a fellow called Richard Burton 
is the pot. 

Eddie absently twirled the green jade 
circlet he wears on his pinky. It 
matched the green paisley tie, belt and 
handkerchief he wore. It's his "engage- 
ment ring" given him by you-know- 
who back you-know-when. He's worn it 
"three years and eight months ... I 
wear it all the time whether I'm in 
green or not," he said. He had taken 
off his wedding ring, however. 

"I admit I've made a lot of mistakes 
in my life. Sure, I'm human — like any- 
body else. I have a temper. I blow. I 
have an all-round disposition. But no 
matter what was ever happening to me, 
I always tried to be a gentleman 
throughout it all. 

"This whole thing has been like a 
free-for-all," he continued. "I read all 
the papers every day, so I've heard all 
the reports and the rumors going 
around. In the beginning every item, 
every photograph or headline hurt. 
Now I look at it like they're strangers. 
Like it's no part of me." 

Eddie puffed a borrowed cigarette 
and sat down on the frilly tuxedo shirt 
that was laid out for the evening. "And 
about that press conference I held and 
those padded-cell stories! When I ar- 
rived in the United States, I decided to 
go into the hospital for some rest. There 



weir two people with me. One is a good, 
long-time friend — a colonel in the Air 
Force. The other was my personal 
physician. Some stewed reporter barged 
in, asked nobody for any quotes and 
made up a highly exaggerated story, to 
say the least, about two 'psychiatrists' 
working me over behind locked doors. 
I realized I had to show myself. So I 
held that press conference just to show 
I was sane. Very sane. The only shock 
treatments I ever received were those 
thrown at me by the press. 

"And 99.9 percent of the reports of 
my dating are all made up. I don't mean 
I want to be left alone, but I don't do 
a tenth of a percent. Those Natalie 
Wood stories are right out of the blue. 
And the Kim Novak thing is completely 
manufactured. I don't understand 
where they get their information." 

Then, of course, there was another 
attractive young lady in Hollywood 
Eddie might have seen — Debbie Reyn- 
olds. Had he seen his ex-wife, talked 
with her? 

"No. Just the nurse was there when I 
visited the children in Palm Springs." 

The children. What might their reac- 
tion be to this complicated situation? 
What had he told Carrie and Todd? 

"Nothing. I will someday when they 
reach a certain age. But they're too 
young to know anything about it now. 
It was wonderful to see them again 
after eight months." 

What did his mother have to say 
when her "Sonny Boy" (his nickname) 
came home dragging those newspaper 
tales behind him? 

"My dear mother's not well. She's 
had heart trouble for years. But she 
forgot all about her problems when I 
needed her. All she was interested in 
was her baby. My mother had no educa- 
tion. And she had a very tough life. Yet 
my mother's a very wise, wise woman. 
I never really used to listen to her. She 
was in New York when I came back. 
She said many loving, kindly things. 
Mothers are full of that. It sure was 
nice to have a mom around when I 
needed her. It's nice to have a mom 
around all the time ... I think we 
should learn to listen to our mothers." 

And what's with his future? 

"All I want to do is sing. I'm in great 
voice. I'm dying to perform. Dying to 
get in front of an audience again. I'll 
sing anywhere." The lovable boyish 
grin spread over his face. "In fact, if 
you ask me, I'll do a half dozen numbers 
for you right now. 

"That's why I'm doing benefits all 
over. Just one stray performance won't 
put you back in shape. When I used to 
be off a week I'd get stale. All this 
while I never did exercises or scales . . . 
boy, I really made it rough on myself! 
Somehow, though, unhappiness didn't 
affect my voice. 

"I want to be in action. I want to 
sing and work like I never have before. 
I'll do some old songs, something new, 
something borrowed and . . ." he 
smiled . . . "something blue. 

"All I want is a chance to sing my 
little old heart out." 

As he walked to the phone, which 
was ringing again, he added, "And it is 
old, too. . . . " — Cindy Adams 




Let's talk frankly about 

internal 
cleanliness 



Day before yesterday, many women hes- 
itated to talk about the douche even to 
their best friends, let alone to a doctor 
or druggist. 

Today, thank goodness, women are 
beginning to discuss these things freely 
and openly. But — even now — many 
women don't realize what is involved in 
treating "the delicate zone." 

They don't ask. Nobody tells them. 
So they use homemade solutions which 
may not be completely effective, or some 
antiseptics which may be harsh or in- 
flammatory. 

It's time to talk frankly about inter- 
nal cleanliness. 

Here are the facts: tissues in "the deli- 
cate zone" are very tender. Odors are 
very persistent. Your comfort and well- 
being demand a special preparation for 
the douche. Today there is such a prep- 
aration. 

This preparation is far more effective 



in antiseptic and germicidal action than 
old-fashioned homemade solutions. It is 
far safer to delicate tissues than other 
liquid antiseptics for the douche. It 
cleanses, freshens, eliminates odor, 
guards against chafing, relaxes and pro- 
motes confidence. 

This is modern woman's way to inter- 
nal cleanliness. It is the personal antisep- 
tic for women, made specifically for "the 
delicate zone." It is called Zonite®. Com- 
plete instructions for use come in every 
package. In cases of persistent discharge, 
women are advised to see 
their doctors. 

Millions of women al- 
ready consider Zonite as 
important a part of their 
grooming as 



their bath. 
You owe it 
to yourself 
to try Zonite. 



fv Guaranteed L , 
I Housekeeping 

*4eynmso*2£ 





PLAY RIGHT AWAY! 

Piano, Guitar, ANY Instrument 

pLAY real tunes on ANY instrument right from 
■*• the start — even if you don't know a single 
note now! Amazing course lets you teach yourself 
at home, in spare time. No boring exercises. You 
play real notes. Make rapid progress. Easy as 
A-B-C. Low cost. Over 1,000,000 students. 

FREE BOOK describes this famous 
course in full. See how easy learning 
music can be. No obligation. Write 
TODAY to: U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 
STUDIO 209, Port Washington. N. Y. 
(Largest in the world — 6tfh success- 
ful year.) Tear this out as reminder. 





THE ONE 

GUARANTEED WAY 

TO LOSE WEIGHT 

is by eating less.. 
No pills before every meal 



J 



JUST ONE B-SLiM CAP IN THE 
MORNING BEFORE BREAKFAST 

...acts gently with controlled 
release. Helps cut down your desire 
for food and caloric intake — 
naturally, harmlessly, effectively. 
What's more, only 1 capsule per day 
means you pay less too. 



FREE 



OUR EASY CALORIE 
CONTROL SECRETS 

Full 3 weeks supply 

(21 capsules) only $1.98 

Economy 6 weeks supply 

(42 capsules) $2.98 

Now! Special Savings— 12 Weeks Supply 

(84 capsules) $4.98 

Order now. B-SLiM CAPS must do all we say, 
, or money refunded. Save 470 on postage. 
■>■ Send cash, check or money order with order. 

$1.00 deposit MUST accompany C.O.D. orders. 

Balance collect plus P.O. charges. 

MARSHALL DRUG REMEDIES, INC. © 
Dept. 60-E, Box 188, Forest Hills 75, N.Y. 



MAKE $ 460 

BETWEEN NOW 
AND CHRISTMAS! 



lAIIIFSI* 23 WEEKLY for 
■.nuit-i). wearing lovely dresses 
supplied to you by 
us; up to $460 in 20 weeks before 
Christmas. What a happy holi- 
day you can have — with 
money worries off your mind! 
Just show Fashion Frocks to 
friends in spare time. No in- 
vestment, canvassing or ex- &%l 
perience necessary. 
Fashion Frocks, Inc., Dept. K-30931 
Cincinnati 2, Ohio. 






Your 



]]m< 



are 



American Institute of Practical Nursing, Room 113 
120 S. State Street— Chicago 3, Illinois 

Please rush your FREE 10-page lesson on Nursing. 
No cost, no obligation. No calls by salesman. 

Name 



Street- 
City 



.Zone State- 




Clip and mail this coupon 

for your 10-page... 



FREE. 1 , 



L ST LESSON 
NURSING 



Great need for Practical Nurses 
right now. Learn at home in 10 
weeks for Graduate Diploma. 
No age, no education limit. 
Enjoy new prestige, security. 
Wonderful opportunity. FREE 
to you: Nurse uniform and cap, 
Nurse's Medical dictionary, 
many needed accessories. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PRACTICAL NURSING, Room 113 
120 S. State Street— Chicago 3, Illinois 



T 
V 
R 

75 



milHtllrllllllllll 



ROBERT HORTON 



IIIIIIIIMIil.llilllN 



iniitiiiiiiMiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiritiii' 



illiiiiiiiiihiiiniiiirii 



(Continued from page 31) 
with financial insecurity? . . . His wife 
Marilynn's reaction, was, if anything, 
a shade quicker than Bob's. She'd met 
him in summer stock, two years ago, 
when they co-starred and fell in love in 
"Guys and Dolls." But it was one Bob 
Horton who strode through "Guys and 
Dolls" . . . savoring the excitement of 
the musical theater, singing his heart 
out every night on stage. It was quite 
another Bob Marilynn had come to 
know in Hollywood ... a man who 
came dragging home each night . . . 

Three years of his life, the executive 
had said! That night, Bob came home 
steeped in gloom. "The studio's breath- 
ing down my neck," he told Marilynn. 
"They want me for another three years, 
after my regular contract expires ... it 
means a million dollars . . ." 

"I don't want you to do it," she said, 
before he could finish. "You don't want 
to and / don't want you to." 

His face changed as though he were 
hearing music. Bob's been a fighter all 
his life — but now, for the first time, 
someone believed in him ! "You have to 
fight to live," she said, very simply — 
because that was one of the reasons she 
loved him. 

The next day, Bob lowered the boom. 
He was through with "Wagon Train" as 
soon as the series stopped filming. NBC 
offered him "The Virginian." He turned 
his back. "I was in for some surprises," 
Bob tells me. "An actor is a commodity 
to be bought and sold. I hadn't quite 
realized . . ." 

During the last weeks of shooting, he 
was down with a virus infection. Mem- 
bers of the crew called to see how he 
was, sent cheer-up cards. Not one word 
from the front office. A year before, 
he'd injured an eye while filming with 
plastic snow and everyone at the stu- 
dio had been on the wire. . . . 

At the very last, one executive said 
bluntly, "Bob, come to your senses. 
How can you turn your back on a mil- 
lion bucks?" 

"I had no difficulty turning my back 
on that money," Bob says now, "as soon 
as I stopped and realized it was all I'd 
be getting for three years of my life. 
I've been broke, sure, but it's not im- 
possible to make money, and I've cer- 
tainly found that money itself is no 
panacea for your troubles. When you're 
involved in something that no longer 
stimulates you, you begin to slow down. 
You're no longer using yourself, you 
lose your identity. 

"That's what was happening to me 
with Flint McCullough. Flint's okay, 
but I'd done as much with him as I 
could — you might say I was paralyzed 
to his stature. The fact is, TV builds 
great star characters but it doesn't 
build stars, and I've got to build. 

"Actors aren't the only ones who 

find themselves in a spot like the one 

I'm in now. I tried a number of jobs 

T before acting and, sooner or later, 

v found myself bored with all of them. 

r A man can start in any business, fight 

his way up, enjoy himself thoroughly, 

then find — a half dozen years later — 
76 



no challenge left. He has a choice. He 
can conform, stay where he is, make a 
good living and accept the loss of his 
own self-respect. Or he can make a 
break, start over again, find new chal- 
lenges and fight for his life." 

It's a battle for which Bob has been 
building muscles since he was a kid 
... a problem child, if you'd asked his 
family ... a nonconformist . . . noth- 
ing like his older brother, Creighton. 
Young Howard (Bob was Meade How- 
ard Horton Jr., but his dad was called 
"Meade," so he was called "Howard") 
did not do what he was told. "Not cross 
the street? I ran away from home, the 
first time, when I was four. Didn't get 
very far — I was on a tricycle — but the 
point remains that I was very interested 
in what was going on around the cor- 
ner. 

"I kept on being interested. I ran 
away at sixteen because I was fed up 
with things in general — and again, at 
seventeen. That time it was a car ac- 
cident. I had my first car and I was 
driving along and, suddenly, it was a 
total mess and I wasn't about to go 
home and hear the lectures. I just 
couldn't face all that conversation. I 
phoned home, told them where I was, 
and by the time I came home, a week 
later, they were glad to see me. 

"My family thought me hard to 
manage and maybe I was. There was 
certainly a problem with a kidney 
ailment that ended in an operation, 
and an appendectomy . . . there was 
certainly a problem with all sorts of 
accidents. Here I was," Bob grins rue- 
fully, "a strong all-American-looking 
boy with red hair and freckles, and I 
was always breaking something or get- 
ting run over! But mainly the problem 
was that my parents were strict . . . 
were then and are now. They were very 
rigidly brought up in the Mormon re- 
ligion and they brought us up this way, 
including no smoking and all that sort 
of thing — which was not for me. 

"My family are wonderful people, 
but I didn't happen to want to be just 
like them and I got pretty tired of 
hearing what good grades my older 
brother got in school and how he never 
talked back. 

The opening battle 

"The first time I ever really partici- 
pated in school was at Harvard Military 
Academy, when I was a senior. Be- 
cause of my kidney condition — and all 
the accidents — I'd always been kept 
away from sports. So now I decided I 
was going to play football. My mother 
and dad said I couldn't. But I played, 
anyhow. The first day of practice, I 
turned my wrist and, when I came home 
that night, the family said, 'You see, 
Howard, you see?' But I played that 
whole season, played every quarter!" 

That was his first victory. 

Bob's second victory followed short- 
ly after, when he suddenly decided he 
was too hefty. Pictures had just been 
taken for the school annual, Howard 
took one look at his 205-pound image 
and didn't like it. That was the seven- 
teenth of January. There was a party 
that night and he had a date — but that, 
he decided, would be his last fling. He 



cut out dates and parties, went on a 
diet, increased his physical activity. 
When school broke for Easter vacation 
on March 27th, he'd lost twenty-seven 
pounds! To Bob, this proved the power 
of self-discipline. But he hadn't proved 
anything to the rest of the world — yet. 

He still wasn't interested in his stud- 
ies. He didn't have the foggiest notion 
what he wanted to do, though his broth- 
er was already in medical school. Rebel 
Horton, aged nineteen, joined the 
Coast Guard. Unknown to his family, 
he had got married, just a few months 
before graduation, to a pretty teenager 
from a nearby private school. They 
were secretly married, the wedding was 
secretly annulled — it all seemed pretty 
romantic. 

Fourteen months in the Coast Guard 
were less romantic. They reactivated the 
kidney problem and, after his discharge, 
Howard drifted along as a member of 
the 52-20 club. "Veterans were given 
$20 a week for fifty-two weeks. I lived 
on that, went to the beach, loafed 
around. My family had a fit. And when 
I suddenly decided to go to college, they 
were afraid to believe it." 

He had chosen the University of Mi- 
ami. It was a good, long way from 
home and the climate was advertised as 
balmy. Also, on the side, a guy with 
a torso like his could model bathing 
suits and sportswear. The torso and 
the red hair attracted the attention of 
people who were producing a play. 
The girl in the lead was red-haired and 
they wanted a redhead to play her 
brother. The minute he started re- 
hearsals, Bob decided to fight for a 
place in the theater. 

In and out of Yale 

Now that, for the first time, he had 
a goal and was in a whirlwind hurry to 
reach it, he really went to college with 
a vengeance. He transferred from Mi- 
ami to U.C.L.A., completed four years' 
undergraduate work in three, graduated 
with honors, jumped in his car — and 
headed for Yale. There were exactly 
five days between his graduation and 
the close of registration at Yale. Though 
he'd been told he couldn't possibly get 
in Yale because he hadn't applied early 
enough, fighter Horton made it — then 
found that the classes he most wanted 
were all filled. For five days, he at- 
tended those classes available, decided 
he was working for Yale, rather than 
Yale for him, turned around — and sped 
back to U.C.L.A. 

That summer, he went East. He did 
summer stock in Atlantic City, returned 
to Broadway, played his first small part 
on television, in "Suspense." The fol- 
lowing week, he played a feature part 
in the same show. The third week, he 
was the star. Everything had worked 
precisely as he'd planned it. 

Now he was ready to come to Holly- 
wood and make pictures. Every studio 
was interested — and so was a "marvel- 
ous girl, Mary," he recalls, "who, at 
nineteen, was a bright young reader at 
Columbia. The memories I have of her 
are warm and dear. I was twenty-one 
when we were married and, for a brief 
while, we were happy. But things were 
moving fast. I made two pictures and 



was signed to a contract at MGM. With 
my career going into full gear, I lost 
her. . . . She couldn't be happy mov- 
ing at this pace, and reluctantly I 
agreed to a divorce." 

Young Horton had planned to cause 
a furor in Hollywood. He did. David 
Selznick changed his first name to 
Robert, and MGM's plans for him were 
star plans. Bob drew rave notices as 
the hero of "Apache War Smoke." To 
make the triumph even lovelier, he and 
Barbara Ruick had fallen in love while 
making the picture, and married. It 
was all strictly Cloud Nine. 

Then, a couple of months later, it 
was all over. MGM had run into hard 
times, efficiency experts were called in 
to supervise a re-tooling of effort, op- 
tions were dropped right and left. 

"I went from hot to cold so quickly, 
it was as if I'd committed some wrong," 
Bob says. "When I'd married Barbara, 
I was the hottest young fellow on the 
lot. By the time we separated, I couldn't 
get arrested. And I wasn't equipped for 
it. I'd worked hard, the critics had 
praised me, the public reaction had 
been all I could ask. Then nothing. I 
didn't know where my next dollar was 
coming from, but I'd learned a few 
things. You can't put your career in 
other people's hands. 

"You have to fight" 

"I began going through the trial-and- 
error bit . . . trying out for parts, not 
getting them . . . getting parts, having 
the pictures shelved. Sometime about 
mid-1955, I began getting hold of my 
career reins again and, since then, I've 
made 98 and 44/100 of the decisions. 
I ask advice, but I make the decisions 
and I fight every inch of the way. You 
have to. This is a competitive business. 

"I think what touched me the most 
when I left 'Wagon Train' was the 
farewell from the crew. They've been 
around for a long, long time and they 
are pretty rugged. But we've had a 
great time working together and it's 
nice to know that we're friends. With 
producers, you have no relationship, 
you're a commodity." 

This particular commodity will "sell 
himself" — but only for a challenge. 
Bob has the combination of singing and 
acting talents that screams for musical 
theater and he's been trying them out 
in summer stock for several years. He 
likes drama, he likes comedy — "an ac- 
tor has to play all the strings of his 
instrument." At this writing, he's off for 
Chicago with Marilynn to do "The 
Man" for six weeks at the Drury Lane, 
then they'll play four weeks of "The 
Pajama Game" together in Detroit — 
where they fell in love — then Bob goes 
into four weeks of "Oklahoma!" 

"The most marvelous thing," Bob 
says, "is to really enjoy your work and 
to be really, deeply satisfied with your 
wife." He sits on the arm of her couch 
and they touch. "In this business, you're 
thrown constantly with beautiful girls. 
You're not blind, but, gradually, you 
reach the point where you're no longer 
impressed by what you see. You realize 
the toll this business takes of women 
... I'd never want Marilynn to be in it, 



CAN YOU READ THIS? 

Then You Are Only 6 Weeks Away 
From a Better Job and More Pay. 



(flood Hous e keeping) 

• VV OUAMNIllS ..»,' 





FOR SPEED WITH ACCURACY ®- 

SHORTHAND 

No Strange Symbols, No Machines— Uses ABC's— Typing Available 



I'm Earning $ 1400 More a Year" 



"Although I was a | 

college graduate, I 

couldn't get the job I I 

wanted. Two friends, 

in good positions as a I 

result of studying I 

SPEEDWRITING 

shorthand, convinced ' 

me to take your course. 

Now, all thanks to SPEEDWRITING, I am 

secretary to an account executive at a leading 

advertising agency. I earn a fine salary and 

have unlimited job opportunities."— Joan 

Marie Robins, Kew Gardens, N. Y. 




Get out of that dull, routine job and move up into a 
higher paying, more interesting position— in only 6 weeks 
-with SPEEDWRITING. How can you do it so quickly? 
Because you use the ABC's you already know ! No strange 
symbols to hold you back. SPEEDWRITING Shorthand 
gives you a 75% headstart. In spare time, at home, or 
through classroom instruction you can qualify as a fast, 
accurate stenographer in ONLY 6 WEEKS! You'll take 
120 words per minute— 50% faster than business or Civil 
Service requirements. Over 500,000 graduates have proved 
it-you can, too. TYPING AVAILABLE. 

SEND FOR FREE BOOK. FREE SAMPLE LESSON. 
See how quickly SPEEDWRITING Shorthand can pre- 
pare you for a top-paying job in a leading business firm 
or Civil Service office. Send .for Fascinating FREE Book 
and Sample Lesson TODAY! 39th Year 

School of Speedwriling, 
Dept. 309-2, 55 W. 42nd St.. N.Y.36.N. Y. 



FREE NATIONWIDE LIFETIME PRIVILEGES 

Free Brush-up, Free Transfer 

Free Employment Service 

Available In SPEEDWRITING Schools 

in 443 Cities 

When you enroll for cla$sroom instruction at 
one SPEEDWRITING School you ore entitled 
to these privileges ot All SPEEDWRITING 
Schools in 443 cities. For name of SPEEDWRIT- 
ING School nearest you CONSULT LOCAL 
DIRECTORY. © T961, School of Speedwriting. 




SCHOOL OF SPEEDWRITING 

Dept. 309-2. 55 W. 42nd St.. N. Y. 36, N. Y. 

Please send me without obligation or expense your new 
booklet with full Information about SPEEDWRITING 
Shorthand and typing. Also send FREE SAMPLE 
LESSON. 

D Home Study O Classroom Instruction 

D If under 17, check here for Special Booklet A 



Name... 
Address . 



I 

I City Zone State. 




THE BEST WAY TO 



KILL THE 
HAIR ROOT 



IS THE MAHLER WAY! 



Thousands of women tike yourself, after reading 
and following our instructions carefully, have 
learned to remove unwanted hair permanently the 
Mahler way. Re-discover the thrill of an excitingly 
beautiful complexion — don't delay another day! 

Send 10c for 16-page illustrate* booklet "New 
Radiant Beauty" . . . learn the secret for yourself! 

MAHLER'S INC. Dept. 602M, Providence 15, R.I. 



You Sell Christmas Cards... 

You Want to MAKE THE MOST EXTRA CASH 



Get the lines of ALL the best-known 

Christmas Card Publishers 

FROM ONE COMPANY 

Easiest way to make most spare-time 
money! Introduce biggest line of Christ- 
mas, Everyday Cards, gifts, stationery, 
toys, gift wraps of all best-known, most- 
advertised greeting card companies. Get 
big new color catalog displayingmorethan 
150 assortments, 600 Christmas money- 
makers ! Make up to 100% profit . . . even 
more on Personal Imprints, otber novel- 
ties. Generous Bonus Plan. We give 
CREDIT to individuals and groups. 
FREE CATALOG! RushCouponToday! 
Big Christmas" Wishing Book" Color Cat- 
alog of all leading lines, yours FREE, plus 
amazing Bonus Plan, money making de- 
tails. Also sample boxes on approval. 
Style Line Greetings, Dept. $-47 
421 Fifth Ave. So., Minneapolis, Minn. 



Send NO MONEY 



PHOTO 
Copied 




25 



>LD 4 

rose! 

n pSc^BM 
I handling | 



FREE! 

2 Enlargements 



BILLFOLD . 

__ _ra»PHOIOS« 

Get acquainted offer! 
2Vi x 3% in. size on 
double weight, silk fin 

ish, portrait paper ... — 

The rage for exchanging with friends, 
enclosing in letters or greeting cards 
oVjob applications. Original returned. 
Order in units of 25 (1 pose). No 
limit. Enclose payment .($1.25) and 
we prepay or SEND NO MONEY, (sent 
c.o.d. if you wish) 4 day service. 
Satisfaction guaranteed. Send photo 
or snapshot today, with this ad. 
DEAN STUDIOS 



Dept. B3, 913 Walnut St., Des Moines 2, Iowa 



I Wishing Boole 

FREE Catalog 

contains more 
... than 

150 Christmas 

SEverydayCard 
Assortments; 
600 big money- 
makers. 



STYLE LINE GREETINGS, Dept.s-47 

421 Fifth Ave., South - Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Rush money-making Christmas "Wishing Book" Color 
Catalog of leading greeting card lines, details of Bonus 
Plan and big pro6ts/ree. . .plus sample boxes on approval. 



NAME. 



ADDRESS.. 



CITY ZONE. STATE.. 




YOUNG THROATS FOR OLD 



Just tie our amazing chemical pad on, and pro- 
ceed with normal activity. Guaranteed safe and 
effective. Use one (1) hour a day for 30 days. 
Better than most plastic surgery. Face reju- 
venating information included with order. No 
exports, no C.O.D.'s. Send exactly $2.00 check 
or money order for "Throat Pad" to: 

AGE-WISE COSMETICS 

Dept. 1-6, #1 Worth St., San Francisco 14, Calif. 



T 
V 
R 

77 



even though this girl has a giant talent. 
If she wanted to go on, she could make 
the Metropolitan Opera." 

Marilynn, a tiny girl with an excel- 
lent figure and flashing, animated face, 
speaks up quickly. "I gave up any 
thought of a career when I married Bob. 
I would divorce Bob tomorrow if I even 
considered a career. I mean it. It 
doesn't work. There are too many prob- 
lems just concerned with one career . . . 
singing together this summer — that's no 
career, that's just fun." 

When the contracts were being drawn 
up, Bob told Marilynn to have them 
drawn up with her name as Marilynn 
Horton. She reminded him she'd have 
to have everything changed — her Equity 
card . . . why not just stick with the 
old Marilynn Bradley? No, he said, he 
wanted her to be Marilynn Horton. 

Basically, this man has been fighting 
all his life for more than just self- 
expression, more than just a place in 
the sun. He's been fighting essentially 
for emotional security. Three quick 
adolescent sort of marriages only indi- 
cate one thing: A tremendous need to 
love and be loved, a need to have some- 
one of one's own. 

"I'm very much a one-woman man,'' 
says the gentleman four-times-married. 
"I never wanted to date a lot of girls. 
I dated a girl and married her. But they 
weren't really marriages. Marriage 
means living with a woman, taking care 
of her, taking responsibility for a 
shared life. I wasn't ready for that. I 
wasn't ready to take charge of my own 
life, far less anyone else's." 

Actually, Bob emerged from those 
early marriages without any intention 



of ever marrying again. He realized 
perfectly well the reasons for marriage, 
but he felt sure that the problems of 
marriage were rooted in the contract 
itself. "Any relationship from which 
there's no escape," he said, "isn't as 
good as one from which you can go at 
any time." 

So Bob was fighting marriage, too, 
when he met Marilynn — "who is a 
really wonderful girl, the loveliest thing 
that has ever happened to me. A girl 
who is with me all the time, who has 
been with me all the time since the day 
we met. She's my best friend, along 
with everything else we are. We come 
from such different backgrounds and 
yet our values are the same. She's much 
younger than I, yet she is marvelously 
mature." 

What of his other wives? 

"No," Marilynn tells you, "I never 
worried about Bob's having been mar- 
ried before! You always think, 'I'm 
the one who's going to change all this.' 
Sometimes you do, sometimes you don't. 
We're fortunate. We're amazingly alike. 
We didn't have nearly as many adjust- 
ments to make as some people. His ap- 
proach to marriage appealed to me be- 
cause, instead of being wildly romantic, 
he was terribly analytical. I liked that. 
I've been married once before and you 
get to the point where you don't want 
to get into something wildly romantic. 
I believe in marrying and living to- 
gether quietly." 

They were married in Las Vegas on 
New Year's Eve — which wasn't exactly 
quiet — rode in the Rose Bowl parade, 



next day, and almost immediately found 
that marriage was changing them . . . 
one of their worst dreads. Bob was the 
one who noticed it acutely. "You've 
changed," he'd say, "you're not the 
same Marilynn." And he was right. 
Two weeks after they were married, 
Bob was the subject of "This Is Your 
Life" — which meant that, for those first 
two weeks, his poor bride was con- 
stantly putting on an act, to keep him 
from guessing the surprise! 

Since then, of course, they've settled 
down. Their best time of day has been 
from 5:30 to 7:15 in the morning. 
Marilynn makes breakfast, brings it 
upstairs on a tray and they spend about 
an hour and a half talking. They are 
close, they are candid, they can start 
the day totally reinforced. What in- 
trigues Bob about Marilynn is that most 
women he has known in this business 
have become hard . . . they have to — or 
be hurt. Realizing this, Marilynn says. 
"To be able to be soft and not be hurt 
is wonderful. Bob has made me feel so 
secure." 

What kind of a woman will stand by 
her husband when he turns down a 
million dollars? A woman who is very 
young, very much in love, and who has 
no fear — because she has faith. Mari- 
lynn has been willing to give up a 
career for emotional security. Now she 
wants Bob to have security . . . and, 
loving him, she knows there is no se- 
curity for him unless his life is in his 
own hands, fought for by his own 
hands. — The End 

"Wagon Train" is seen over NBC-TV. 
Wed., from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. edt. 



JACKIE KENNEDY 



(Continued from page 53) 
You watch her every move. You pick 
on anything you want. In short, you 
twist little facts about her 'round and 
'round until her own mother wouldn't 
know whom you were talking about!" 

Will she strike back? "No. Don't be 
silly. As wife of the President, she can't 
exactly stand on a soap box every time 
someone says something about her, and 
cry back, 'It's not true. Believe me, 
it's not true.' Too undignified. And 
besides, the First Lady of the land is 
supposed to be above this. . . . Does 
that put Jackie in a pretty helpless 
position? That's her worry!" 

And so the plotters plotted. 

And waited. 

They let Jacqueline Kennedy have 
her little honeymoon. And then, when 
the dark headlines began to hit — Indo- 
China, the Stock Market slump, a few 
others — they rubbed their hands. They 
gloated. And they prepared to strike. 

It pleased them mightily to know 
that some people — millions, they hoped 
— would listen to them, believe them. 

It pleased them most to think that 

Jacqueline Kennedy herself would be 

J hurt by what they said. After all, this 

was their mission — to hurt this young 

and sensitive woman; to make her a 

little nervous at first; then uncertain; 
78 



to bring a few tears to her eyes; then 
to unnerve her completely; and, eventu- 
ally, to destroy her. 

Their reason for this? In the destruc- 
tion of someone beloved by others, there 
are those who find sick solace. It's that 
simple. 

And so, suddenly, when the time 
came — sick and strong and determined 
— they struck. . . . 

They whispered, insidiously, glee- 
fully: "She's bathed in conceit, you 
know. A snob. Oh, yes, pure snob, 
through and through. The warmth? 
That's all surface, my dear. She doesn't 
really like anybody like us slobs who 
weren't born rich! Look at her back- 
ground. And just look at her elegant 
hairdos and clothes. And those parties 
she's been throwing at the White House 
— aren't they elegant, my dear? I mean, 
fiddlers lining the hallway — and those 
strange entertainers, those eggheads, 
she's been inviting to perform." 

They whispered: "She's some wife, 
isn't she? Real cold, if you ask us. Oh, 
sure — she holds her husband's hand 
once in a while, in public, with photog- 
raphers around. But why isn't she with 
him more? His birthday party in New 
York — remember? At Madison Square 
Garden. With 18,000 people there. With 
music and confetti. And entertainers 
who flew in from all over the world. 
But where was she, his wife, that night? 
With him? Singing 'Happy Birthday' 
along with the others? No. Oh, no. Not 



her. She couldn't take the time!" 

They whispered: "And a mother? 
Hmmmph. Allowing those children to 
be photographed all the time — just for 
her own publicity. . . . And Caroline's 
ponies, living at the White House. You 
know who has to take care of those 
ponies, don't you? The F.B.I. And you 
know who pays the F.B.I., don't you? 
We do." 

They whispered: "What right did 
she have to go running off to India 
last spring? She's not the President. 
Who wanted her over there — or her 
sister, for that matter? What good did 
they do there? And — do you know what 
that little trip of theirs cost the tax- 
payers of America? The Lord knows 
what for transportation. And for movies 
of the trip — forty-five thousand dollars, 
at least." 

They whispered: "Why doesn't she 
leave the White House alone? All that 
re-decorating and everything. It's not 
her house. It's the nation's!" 

They whispered : "She won an Emmy 
on TV — though we can't tell why. Still, 
winning something like that is an honor. 
But did she have the common decency 
to show up and accept her award?" 

They whispered : "And she's supposed 
to be a Catholic? I mean, did you see 
those pictures of her going into church 
without even a hat on, just wearing 
some kind of tiny veil? And with no 
stockings?" 

They whispered : "See how she's mak- 






ing us lose face throughout the world! 
Why, in England the other day, a news- 
paper came out bluntly and said that 
they're glad their Queen isn't like our 
Mrs. Kennedy. The Queen, the article 
said, is shy, quiet, well-bred, unostenta- 
tious. Our Mrs. Kennedy, they said — 
'wearing those new short skirts cer- 
tainly makes her knees no state secret ! ' 
Now, isn't that something nice for our 
national prestige?" 

They whispered on and on, all of it 
concerning Jacqueline Kennedy, all of 
it attacking her. 

A shout to end the whispers 

Jacqueline Kennedy could not talk 
back to the plotters. But we think it's 
high time somebody did. 

It's not a hard job, either — to shame 
these plotters. In fact, it's quite easy. 
You just take the whispers — one by 
one. You counter them with facts, real 
facts — statements from the press, from 
people who know Jacqueline, state- 
ments by Jacqueline herself. 

And you let the truth speak for itself. 

She's a snob . . . conceited. Now 
here's a lie, for sure. As a child, Jackie 
— according to that best authority of 
all, her mother — was a "shy, sweet, 
rather self-effacing girl." As a teenager, 
she lost some of her shyness but still 
considered herself a rung or two below 
her friends and her sister Lee in matters 
intellectual, social, physical. 

Shortly after turning twenty, she be- 
gan to go to her mother's dressmaker. 
Mrs. Mini Rhea — who has said this 
about Jackie: "While working with her 
one day, I commented on how lucky 
she was to have a figure like a model 
right out of a Parisian salon of haute 
couture. But I was amazed to learn that 
Jackie didn't think she was perfect or 
ideal, and in fact was quite critical of 
herself. She wished her feet were 
smaller, her waist slimmer, her bust 
larger, her legs straight and her face 
more oval. I felt like spanking her. 
Here she stood — the most beautiful girl 
who had walked through my door — and 
she was beset by small dissatisfactions. 
'If I had your face and form, I think 
I'd head for Hollywood,' I said. 'Or 
home,' she said, laughing. 'I'm late.' " 

It's a pretty well-established fact 
that a conceited woman doesn't cotton 
much to other beauties or want them 
around her husband. But one day in 
1955 — two years after her marriage to 
Jack Kennedy and while he was re- 
cuperating in a New York hospital fol- 
lowing serious spinal surgery — Jackie 
walked into his room and announced, 
"Darling, I've just brought you the 
most lovely-looking surprise in the 
world." She turned toward the door 
smiling . . . and, a moment later, Grace 
Kelly sailed in! 

She doesn't like us slobs who weren't 
born rich. There's a former reporter on 
the Washington Times-Herald who well 
remembers the day, back in '52, when 
Jackie began her job as Inquiring 
Photographer. He'd heard about her 
earlier that morning — about her back- 
ground: The posh schools she'd at- 
tended; the millions her family was 
worth; the mansion called Merrywood, 



draw me 



You may win a $ 535.00 Scholarship in Commercial Art 



Draw the girl in pencil — but make your 
drawing a different size from the 
picture at the right. 

If you win the scholarship prize, 
you get the complete course in 
commercial art taught by Ameri- 
ca's leading home study art 
school, Art Instruction Schools. 
You will receive personal atten- 
tion from professional com- 
mercial artists in the fields of 
advertising art, illustrating, 
cartooning and painting. 

Even if you do not win, you 
will get a professional estimate 
of your talent without cost. 

Entries for September contest 
must be in before September 30, 
1962. None can be returned. Our 
students and professional artists 
are not eligible. Mail your entry 
in right away! 



A«/a 



/ART INSTRUCTION SCHOOLS 

Studio 8962 
500 South 4th Street, Minneapolis 15, Minn. 
Please enter my drawing in your draw-a- 
head contest. (please print) 

Name 



Occupation. 

Address 

City 

County 




- Age_ 
-Apt_ 
.Zone. 



_State_ 



Accredited by Accrediting Commission of National 
Home Study Council, a nationally recognized 
accrediting agency as defined by U.S. Office of 
Education under the Public Laws 82-550, 85-564. 



EXTRA CASH 



can be yours for help- 
ing us take orders for 
magazine subscrip- 
tions. FREE information: Write to Maria dden- 
BarteU Corp., 205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N.Y. 




65 For $2.00 

(Include 25c for Mailing) 
Genuine Photographs 2 '/iM 14 Glamorous 
Double-weight silk finish— Made from your 
Favorite Snapshot, Portrait or Negative- 
returned unharmed. Mail it today between 
cardboards. 



GROSS COPY CO I Dep ' ,5 04 oos ' 
WKU33 \.\jri \.\j. | Konsas Cit 10 Mo 



Shrinks Hemorrhoids 
New Way Without Surgery 
Stops Itch - Relieves Pain 

For the first time science has found a 
new healing substance with the astonishing 
ability to shrink hemorrhoids and to relieve 
pain — without surgery. 

In case after case, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction (shrinkage) took place. 

Most amazing of all — results were so 
thorough that sufferers made astonishing 
statements like "Piles have ceased to be a 
problem!" 

The secret is a new healing substance 
(Bio-Dyne®)— discovery of a world-famous 
research institute. 

This substance is now available in sup- 
pository or ointment form, under the name 
Preparation H®. Ask for it at all drug 
counters. 



ATTENTION: MAIL ORDER BUYERS 

New postal charges increase the cost of any item 
purchased COD by almost $1.00. Avoid this expense 
by enclosing payment with your order. Send check, 
cash or money order. Remember, it pays to prepay. 

T~l- »ut. EASIER Way 



EXTRA MONEY 



75* PROFIT ON '1.25 BOX 

Show lovely 21-card $1.26 Christmas boxes to 
friends— make $75.00 on 100 boxes. Newest 
Christmas and Birthday Assortments, 63 
Name-Imprints in free Album, dddsda) Stationery , 
Gifts to please everyone. Big profits. Gift Bonuses. 

JUST SEND NAME FOR SAMPLES 

No experience needed. Eicloaive. new-ideaPar- 
aonal Seal Stationery and best SI .26 Christmas Assort- 
ment FREE with first order. Mail coupon for samples 
on approval and fall money-making details. Act NOW 

r CR^TI VECARD CO .TrTeptTlir-C " 
J 4401 W. Cennak Road, Chicago 23, II. 

■ Send samples on approval— mine to keep free with first order. ~~ 

| NAME 

• ADDRESS 




cin. 



. STATE. 



HANDLED ENTIRELY BY MAIL 



ImTfl 



REPAY $51.24 MONTHLY 



BORROW $100 TO $1000 ON 
YOUR SIGNATURE ONLY • 24 
MONTHS TO REPAY 

Enjoy life, end money worries! Confi- 
dential BORROW-BY-MAIL plan pro- 
vides cash for any purpose. Small pay- 
ments, fit your pocketbook. Private, 
entirely by mail. No endorsers, no per- 
sonal interviews. Fast service. State- 
supervised. Details sent in plain enve- 
lope. No obligation. Inquire now. 



r ~f£*a 



Amount 
of loan 

lioo 


24 Monthly 
Payments 

$5.93 


$300 


$17.49 


$500 


$27.69 


$800 


$41.93 


$1000 


$51.24 



I BUDGET FINANCE CO., Dept. MB-192 

I 114 S. 17, Omaha 2, Nebr. 

I Name 

I Address 

j City 

| Age 

I 



""so.^ 



.Occupation. 



T 
V 
I 

79 



in nearby McLean, Virginia, where they 
all lived. "I thought, 'Man, isn't this 
going to be something, a gal like this 
toting a camera and going out into the 
street asking people questions?' I made 
a bet she'd last no more than two weeks 
on the job. 

"I lost that bet, I'm glad to say. 
Because Jackie worked with the paper 
for eighteen long, hard months. And, 
believe me, this was a girl who was as 
democratic and natural and good- 
hearted as they come. And as far as 
her work went — she worked for her 
$42.50 a week, went out into the street 
every day with her camera and note- 
book, interviewed truck drivers, counter- 
men, executives, tourists, poor people, 
big shots — and she was as nice with 
one as with the other. Jackie a snob? 
That'll be the day." 

Clothes-horse— or monument? 

Those clothes . . . those hairdos. . . . 
The fact is that Jacqueline Kennedy 
has always had a way with clothes, has 
always believed in good grooming. The 
fact is, too, that many of the same 
women who are criticizing the Jackie 
Look are the same women who are 
somehow copying that look. 

Actually, the hubbub about her ward- 
robe and tastes began even before she 
became First Lady. Wrote Martha 
Weinman in The New York Times: 
"When Jacqueline Kennedy, then five 
days the wife of the Presidential candi- 
date, stepped aboard the family yacht 
in Hyannis Port, wearing an orange 
pullover sweater, shocking-pink Capri 
pants, and a bouffant hairdo that 
gamboled merrily in the breeze, even 
those newsmen present who could not 
tell shocking pink from Windsor Rose 
knew they were witnessing something 
of possible political consequence." 

Jackie herself is honestly confused 
by the hubbub: "All this talk about 
hairdos and clothes, about what I wear 
and how I fix my hair, has me amused 
and yet puzzles me. What does it all 
have to do with my husband and the 
Presidency?" 

It's very probable that Jackie has 
found her greatest comfort in this mat- 
ter from two remarks that have been 
made to her: One, by Mrs. Franklin D. 
Roosevelt, who told her, "I often felt, 
when / was First Lady, as if I were 
dressing not myself but a national 
monument." 

The other, made by her husband, on 
Inauguration night, when he stared at 
her as she came down the White House 
stairs, that first time, and said, "My 
dear — you look so lovely." 

Those parties . . . violinists lining the 
hallway . . . eggheads performing! Let's 
start with the so-called eggheads who 
have been asked to perform at the 
White House. The list happens to in- 
clude the most brilliant examples of 
our culture — men and women of whom 
we should all be proud. To name 
just a few: Pianist-composer-conductor 
T Leonard Bernstein; cellist Pablo Ca- 
sals ; dancer-choreographer Jerome Rob- 
bins. Don't most of us, like Jackie, 

figure it's about time we took these men 
80 



from the private halls or commercial 
theaters — and spotlighted them before 
the entire nation? The entire world? 
Aren't most of us a little tired of having 
America's artistic tastes and talents 
downgraded in relation to other coun- 
tries? 

As for the White House parties them- 
selves, a social arbiter wrote years ago: 
"The sign of the truly good hostess is 
the woman who does everything pos- 
sible — and even adds that little touch 
of the impossible — so that she may 
please and delight her guests." 

Had this woman been writing today, 
she might well have gone on to say: 
"Mrs. Kennedy's position as First Lady 
is extremely difficult and challenging. 
She must constantly entertain foreign 
dignitaries who have entertained her 
husband and herself — and show her 
guests as good a time as she and her 
husband were shown. Therefore, the 
old-fashioned concept of serving hot 
dogs to the King and Queen of England 
is out — and the concept of social recip- 
rocation is in. Thus, the violinists lin- 
ing the hallways . . . the exquisitely- 
prepared dinners ... all the extra little 
elegant touches which show that the 
host and hostess of the White House — 
and through them, the people of Amer- 
ica — care." 

What makes a husband happy? 

She's a cold wife. Those who know 
Jackie — who really know her — vow that 
she loves her husband intensely. "She 
fell for him, hard, the moment she first 
laid eyes on him," says one friend. 
"She's somehow never quite gotten over 
that first beautiful feeling of being 
madly in love with him." 

And listen to Jackie herself on the 
subject of herself and her husband, 
what she has said : "I think that a wife's 
happiness comes in what will make 
her husband happy. ... I don't see 
myself as being a political partner to 
Jack. I like to think of myself as having 
an old-fashioned idea of what a wife 
should do — make her home as pleasant 
as possible, relax her husband and raise 
her children. . . . 

"I love it when, once in a while, I 
have a chance to cook for him. When 
a man is tired after a busy day, I think 
he should at least be able to have a 
substantial meal. And so I start with 
a good homemade soup. Then a roast — 
never overdone — and fresh vegetables 
in season. Perhaps a potato or noodle 
casserole — Jack loves these. . . . 

"I love my husband with all my 
heart. But I love him especially for 
his quiet kindnesses." 

About the matter of the President's 
"birthday party" in New York, by the 
way, the very basic facts are these: 
It was not actually his birthday on 
that date. The weekend in New York 
was mostly political and the so-called 
birthday gala represented only a small 
part of that weekend. 

She spoils those children. Aw, come 
on, fellas. Let's face facts! It's hard 
enough for any mother to keep a child 
from being somewhat spoiled. And just 



think how fantastically hard it must be 
for Jackie Kennedy . . . with photog- 
raphers constantly begging her for pic- 
tures of the children (when she says 
no, which is quite often, they use tele- 
scopic lenses and get the pictures, any- 
way) . . . with newshawks querying 
her and the entire White House staff 
about Caroline's latest doll and baby 
John's newest words. And yet Jackie 
has done a wonderful job of seeing 
that her children are not spoiled, and 
— she hopes — never will be. 

To prove it, here's an interesting 
quote from actress Lauren Bacall: "We 
were having dinner with Mrs. Kennedy 
one night, in New York, before she 
went on to see my husband's play. 
[Editor's Note: Jason Robards Jr. in 
"A Thousand Clowns."] While we were 
eating, Mrs. Kennedy disclosed this fact 
— that Caroline had never seen a photo- 
graph of herself in a newspaper or 
magazine." 

And a heart-felt quote by Jacqueline 
Kennedy herself: "I feel that if you 
bungle in raising your children, what- 
ever else you do — no matter how well — 
simply doesn't matter." 

Those ponies . . . and the F.B.I. A 
quickie answer should take care of this 
of t- whispered complaint ! 

"Macaroni" and "Tex"— Caroline 
Kennedy's pet ponies — do not live at 
the White House but are only occa- 
sionally brought there from the Ken- 
nedy farm, Glen Ora, in Virginia. The 
Secret Service men at the White House 
have nothing to do with their care, 
which is entrusted to head gardener 
Robert Edmond and his staff — men wise 
in the needs of ponies as well as pe- 
tunias. 

Innocence abroad 

That trip to India. Regarding the 
transportation costs for Jackie and her 
sister Lee — both women bore those costs 
themselves. Regarding the trip itself, 
and its effect, Walter Winchell — one 
of the President's severest critics — 
summed this one up nicely. He quoted 
a headline which read: "Congressman 
Criticizes the High Cost of Filming Mrs. 
Kennedy's India-Pakistani Tour." Then 
he wrote: "The tour was an ordeal. 
She did it to win friends for our coun- 
try — which she did. She's a greater 
friend- winner than all of Congress!" 

Wrote another columnist, female this 
time: "She went only because she was 
invited by Prime Minister Nehru at a 
White House dinner last November. I 
was with her all that trip. She didn't 
talk much about the President, the four 
or five times we chatted. At first I 
thought this rather strange, but then I 
realized it was because she was so 
lonely for him. Did you see those 
photographs of her smiling face at the 
airport when she returned and the Pres- 
ident greeted her? Well, I was there 
and let me tell you — photographs 
couldn't begin to capture the happy and 
relieved and I'11-never-do-it-without-you- 
again feeling of that smile." 

Why doesn't she leave the White 
House alone? All that fancy fixing up 



of hers! Technically-speaking, the First 
Lady of the land is allowed — indeed, 
encouraged — to make any change she 
sees fit, provided she's given an okay 
by the White House Fine Arts Commis- 
sion. As for Jackie's "fancy fixing," all 
she's trying to do is to make the Execu- 
tive Mansion more gracious. 

Washington correspondent Ruth 
Montgomery wrote not long ago : "Jack- 
ie's restoration project will assure her 
a well-deserved niche in history. Future 
First Ladies will be indebted to her for 
a dramatic face-lifting not only of the 
public rooms of the White House but 
also of the family quarters. 

"Jackie devotes much less time than 
most of her predecessors to ladies' 
luncheons, charity benefits and political 
rallies. She made an early decision to 
devote her time and energies to a few 
main projects and not just lend her 
name — and do nothing really — to many 
different organizations. In addition to 
her Fine Arts work, Jackie has under- 
taken a number of projects for children. 
She has already had two concerts and at 
least two more are scheduled for this 
year. She visited the Children's Hos- 
pital in Washington and planned a 
Christmas party for orphans, and an- 
other party for staff children." 

Why didn't she go to the Emmys and 
accept her award? No doubt, she would 
have been happy and proud to — be- 
cause the show, "A Tour of the White 
House," meant an awful lot to Jackie 
and we're sure that the award did, too. 

But — a White House social bulletin 
for that same date reads: "Tonight the 
President and Mrs. Kennedy have the 
honor to entertain at dinner M. Felix 
Houphouet-Boigny, President of the 
Ivory Coast, and Mme. Houphouet- 
Boigny. . . ." Enough said? 

Her, a Catholic . . . going to church 
with no hat . . . no stockings! The 
latter complaint stems from Sunday- 
morning masses Jackie has attended 
while in Palm Beach, where the Presi- 
dent and his family spend their winter 
holidays. Now, it's perfectly true — the 
Catholic Church does prefer that pa- 
rishioners dress "properly" when going 
to mass. But what is proper in Maine 
is not necessarily the thing-to-be-done 
in southern Florida. And isn't it a fact 
that what is in one's heart is more im- 
portant than what happens to be — or 
not to be — on one's legs? 

As for the no-hat issue : In most parts 
of the world, Catholic women do wear 
veils or shawls when in church. Most 
of the female saints of the Catholic 
Church wore such headgear — not hats! 

Finally: She's making us lose face 
all over. . . . In England, a fashion 
commentator wrote: "We're glad our 
Queen is not like Jackie, who shows 
her knees!" 

Here, we think the New York Daily 
Mirror summed up the situation best — 
against English critics, American plot- 
ters, reputation-snipers around the 
world — on this issue in particular, 
though in fact on all other issues con- 
cerning Mrs. John F. Kennedy. With 
this punny and pungent little headline: 
A HEM! WE LIKE OUR FIRST 
LADY! —Ed DeBlasio 



REWARD $9,985.50 FOR THIS COIN! 

$500,000.00 SEARCH FOR RARE COINS! 



Stop spending valuable coins worth hundreds 
of dollars. New 1963 catalogue lists hundreds 




of coins we want to buy and gives the price 
range we will pay for these United States 
Coins. Certain half cent coins are worth up to 
$3,500.00 for Canadian Coins. Our valuable 
Coin Boole may reward you many thousands of 
dollars. Coins do not have to be old to be 
valuable. Thousands of dollars have been paid 
for coins dated as recently as 1940 to 1956. 
Now you too can learn the rare dates and how 
to identify rare coins in your possession with 
our new 1963 catalogue. A fortune may be 
waiting for you. Millions of Dollars have been 
paid for rare coins. Send your order for this 
valuable coin catalogue now. Hold on to 
your coins until you obtain our catalogue. 
Send $1.00 for 1963 Coin Catalogue Book to 
Best Values Co., Dept. 933, 285A Market St., 
Newark, N. J. 



ILLUSTRATED: 1804 Silver 
Dollar. 19.000 Minted, only 12 
accounted for — where are the rest? 



YOUR MONEY WILL BE REFUNDED IN FULL IF 
YOU ARE NOT SATISFIED WITH THIS CATALOG. 



FOR CERTAIN COINS WE 


PAY UP TO 


CERTAIN 




Gold Coins Before 1929 


$10,000.00 


Pennies Before 1919 


9,000.00 


Silver Dollars Before 1936 


8,000.00 


Nickels Before 1945 


6,000.00 


Dimes Before 1946 


5,000.00 


Half Dollars Before 1947 


4,500.00 


Quarters Before 1941 


3,500.00 


Half Cents Before 1910 


3,500.00 


Lincoln Pennies Before 1940 


200.00 



Best Values Co.. Dept. 933 

285A Market St., Newark. New Jersey 

Rush your latest 1963 coin catalogue list- 
ing the actual price range you will pay for 
United States Coins listed in the cata- 
logue. I enclose $1. Send Postage Prepaid. 



NAME. 



ADDRESS 

CITY STATE 



HOW TO PUBLISH 

YOUR 

BOOK 



Join our successful authors in a 
complete and reliable publishing 
program: publicity, advertising, 
handsome books. Speedy, efficient 
service. Send for FREE manuscript 
report & copy of Publish Your Book. 

CARLTON PRESSDept. TRI 
S4~ Fifth Ave., Mew York 11, N. Y. 



m 



YOUR OLD FUR COAT 



INTO NEW CAPE, STOLE! 



^wom fur coat, into a glamorous new cape / *%£/?* 

m plete, includes new lining, interlining, l^Pfr 
^ monogram, cleaning, glazing. 

- (*Mink, beaver, extras, add'l. ) 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 
We Are Bonded Fur Specialists. 

send NO monev! Wrap up your old fur coat, mail it to us 
T^now. Send your dress size and heighton postcard. Pay post- 
man $24,95 plus postage when new cape arrives. Or send 
for FREE Style Book now! Many styles to choose from. 
Write: I. R. FOX • 146 W. 29th Street, Dtp.. B-83, N. T. I 



SONG IDEAS 



WANTED 



- — ^-~ Songwriters, with publisher contacts, 

(S/fm) want song ideas. SHARE ROYALTIES. 
^— NO FEES. Send poems: 

SONGWRITERS' ASSOCIATES 
Studio 21, 1650 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. 



ANY PHOTO ENLARGED 



67 



Size 8 x lO Inches 

on DOUBLE-WEIGHT Paper 

Same price for full length or bast 
form, groups, landscapes, pet ani- 
mals, etc., or enlargements of any 
part of a group picture. Original is 
returned with your enlargement. 

Send No Money 3 for $] 

Just mail photo, negative or snap- 
shot (any size* and receive your enlargement, 
guaranteed fadeless. on beautiful double-weight 
portrait quality paper. Pay postman 67c plus 
postage— or send 69c with order and we pay post- 
age. Take advantage of this amazing offer. Send your photos today. 

Professional Art Studios, 544 S. Main, Dept 32-L, Princeton, Illinois 





Christmas Assortment 

Show friends MORE FOR THE MONEY in the newest 
Cardinal Christmas Cards. Instead of 21 cards, 5 EXTRA 
BIG Assortments offer 25 to 36 cards at $1 to $1.50. Instead 
of 25 cards, Name-Imprinted Christmas Cards are 50 for 
$1.95 and $2.50. Everyone saves on our 450 exciting new 
Christmas and year-round card, stationery and gift needs. 

How Your Earnings Mount Up 

You don't need experience to make good money. Exclusive 
"Supreme 25" Christmas Assortment at $1.25 pays you 60c 
cash profit per box in any quantity. Up to $1.95 profit on 
others. Liberal cash bonus besides. "Cheaper by the 
Dozens" pricing and Money-back Guarantee assure 
up to 20c extra profit per item. 

SEND FOR INTRODUCTORY SAMPLES 

Send no money. Just mail the coupon. We'll rush 
samples on approval including novel Sewing Set and 
FREE Album of 47 Personalized Card Samples. "Su- 
preme 25" is yours FREE with starting order. Many 
surprise offers. Actnow. CARDINALCRAETSMEN. 
HOP State Ave., Cincinnati H. Ohio. X 



•450 New 
Christinas Sellers 

•MORE CARDS 

PER BOX 
•Big Imprint 

Album FREE 




City. 



MAIL NOW 



> CARDINAL ■ 

/CRAFTSMEN, Dept. 270 | 

• 1400 State, Cincinnati 14. Ohio I 

.w Please send money-making I 

jf sample kit on approval with I 

**FREE Album of Imprints, Free J 

fOfferon $1.25 "Supreme 25" Assort- I 

ment. other surprise offers. 

I 

■ I 

I 

J 



.State.. 



T 
V 
R 

81 



T 
V 
R 

82 



SHELLEY FABARES 



(Continued from page 49) 
time at 1959's Deb Star Ball. "Surely 
you remember that night," he says. 
"I was Smokey's date." Smokey is my 
sister. Well, all I remember about that 
evening was being nervous — since I was 
to be presented as a Deb Star. 

I do remember that Roberta Shore, 
who was responsible for setting up 
dates for some of the girls, called me 
to say she hadn't yet lined up a date 
for Lou Adler and another fellow. I 
already had a date, but since I knew 
Smokey wanted to go, I suggested her. 

At any rate, Lou said I was intro- 
duced to him — again — at the Ball, but 
I hardly knew my own name that night. 

I have never forgotten, though, a 
night in December of 1960 when I went 
to a surprise party for Brenda Lee at 
the Crescendo, a night spot in town. 
Jimmy O'Neill, a local disc jockey 
whom I'd been dating, called me to 
ask me to go to the party — and he also 
invited Smokey. 

"She can go with Lou Adler if she'd 
like," he said. 

That night is one I'll always remem- 
ber. Smokey and I came downstairs 
at our house and there were Lou and 
Jimmy waiting for us. Lou said to me, 
"It's nice to meet you again." I looked 
at him, wondering what he meant. But 
I liked what I saw — a tall, handsome 
young man with a warm smile. 

At the party, Lou and I began to 
talk, and the more I was with him 
the more impressed I was. However, at 
the time I was seeing Jimmy a good 
deal, so there was no thought of any 
dates for Lou and me. We were thrown 
together, though, at other times after 
this, mainly when Jan and Dean ap- 
peared at local high schools where 
Jimmy was acting as emcee. Lou was 
always there, and gradually we became 
good friends. Our friendship, born at 
this time, was later to mean so much to 
both of us. 

After a while, Jimmy and I stopped 
dating. He had met someone else. And 
then, one evening, Lou called me. 

"I didn't want to call while you were 
going with Jimmy," he said, "but I 
understand you're not seeing each other 
now." 

"That's right," I answered. I was 
surprised to discover I felt so excited 
— just because Lou was on the phone. 
"We haven't gone together since my 
birthday party a few weeks ago," I 
told him. 

"Well, I — I wondered if you and 
Margie would like to go out to dinner 
with me," he said. 

Margie was my close girl friend, 
and I had mentioned her to him. Still, 
I wondered why he'd think of asking 
her, too. But all I told him was that 
I'd talk to her. 

He called back the next day. 

"Margie already has a date," I told 
him, "but she said to say she was 
sorry." 

"How about your sister then?" 

Now I was even more confused. Why 
did we need a third party? Anyway. 



as it turned out, Smokey had to cancel, 
too, because of a previous date. 

"I'm sorry, Lou, but Smokey can't 
make it, either," I told him when he 
called again. "If you'd rather, we can 
make it for another night." 

"No, let's not do that." There was 
a pause. "Would you — would you like 
to go with me then?" he asked finally. 

"I'd love to!" I exclaimed — and I 
meant it. I had begun to think he'd 
never get around to asking me. 

Later Lou explained why he had gone 
around and around about asking for 
the first date. He simply felt my parents 
and I would like it better if he asked 
someone to go with us. He had really 
wanted to date only me in the first 
place. 

That first date! We went to the 
Islander, my favorite restaurant, and 
I felt like a queen the whole night. 
Lou was such a gentleman! He helped 
me out of the car, he helped me across 
the street, he paid me every kind of 
attention. I was so excited and nervous 
I hardly knew what to say or do — at 
least for the first few minutes. But once 
we were in the restaurant, I felt as 
though Lou and I had been dating for 
months. 

Lou was different from any other 
boy I'd gone with. As I look back on 
that date, I can only remember how 
happy I was, how warm I felt inside. 
Everything was perfect, from the soft 
candlelight in the room, the tropical 
setting, the divine food — I do love to 
eat— and, of course, Lou. 

Lou had more maturity than other 
fellows I'd known. There was none of 
the playboy about him. Sophisticated — 
yes — but he didn't even drink. As the 
evening went on, I began to feel much 
more mature than my young years — and 
a little worldly. Yet — also comfortably 
young. 

When our dates became more fre- 
quent, Lou began to treat me with even 
more consideration and kindness — and 
he also began to call me by a few nick- 
names, like "Little Girl," "Shell Shell" 
and "Finko." That last may sound like 
an odd one, but he knew I liked, for 
some reason I don't even understand 
myself, the word "fink." 

It was on our second date that I did 
an incredible thing. We were talking 
about what mattered to us and I sud-, 
denly began saying seriously how I felt 
about marriage, having children, and 
what I thought a wife should be. It 
was only after I'd expressed myself so 
fully that I came to with a start. I 
thought to myself, "Shelley, what are 
you doing talking like this to him! 
He'll think you're trying to rush him 
into marriage — and he'll make a fast 
exit out the side door." 

Very embarrassed, I said, "Oh, Lou, 
I'm sorry." 

"For what?" he asked. 

"For talking like that. What must 
you think of me?" 

"Don't be silly, Shelley. I asked you 
how you felt about things and you told 
me. There's nothing wrong in that." 

As I thought back about this later, 
I realized I never could have spoken 
as I did if I hadn't really felt close to 
Lou. 



We had a couple of dates after that 
and then, on Valentine's Day, Lou 
called me. He'd been calling every day 
for the past couple of weeks. 

"I know you're working and that 
you can't go out for long, but could 
you go on a treasure hunt with me to- 
night?" he asked. 

"Treasure hunt? What do you mean?" 

"You'll see," was all he'd say. 

Lou picked me up about seven- 
thirty and took me to Schwab's Phar- 
macy on the Strip, first. 

"I have to pick up something," he 
said. "I'll be right back." 

In only a few minutes he returned 
with a package all neatly wrapped. It 
was obvious he'd ordered it ahead of 
time. The first thing I saw was a beauti- 
ful three-dimensional Valentine's Day 
greeting. Then on the package was a 
thin card which read, "To Shelley — 
sweet as candy." It was attached to a 
big box filled with candies from Hol- 
land. 

I thought this was the treasure hunt, 
but he said he had another call to 
make, so we drove up the Strip to a 
florist shop. In a few minutes he came 
back with a card reading: "Pretty as 
a rose." It was tied onto a single long- 
stemmed red rose. 

Lou had somehow remembered my 
telling him once about seeing Connie 
Stevens with a date one night. She 
had no corsage — she was simply carry- 
ing a red rose. It was a beautiful thing 
to see. 

"We have one more place to go be- 
fore I take you home," Lou said. "Jan 
and Dean are being interviewed at Don 
and Phil Everly's place and I have to 
drop in. Okay?" 

We drove up to the house and, as 
he was getting out, Lou said, "Guess 
I'd better lock the car." Then he 
reached under the seat and pulled out 
a huge picture. When I looked at it. 
in complete surprise, I recognized it 
as one by Walter Keane, an artist both 
Lou and I had admired. He had remem- 
bered how much I had liked a smaller 
picture of Keane's that he had, so he 
had sent to San Francisco to get this 
one for me. 

This was a Valentine's Day I'll cher- 
ish forever. Everything Lou did seemed 
to say, "I think of you all the time." 

What my parents think 

Lou has been very generous to me, 
anyway — too much so, I think. Last 
Christmas, he gave me a beautiful beige 
cashmere sweater with a detachable 
mink collar, and then on my birthday 
this year he presented me with a match- 
ing black sweater. He also gave me a 
gold necklace with one pearl, and a 
pearl ring. I haven't taken either of 
them off since the day I got them. 

My parents think Lou is as great as 
I do. We see each other every night 
now, and if I don't have dinner out 
with him, he has dinner at our place. 
We often spend an evening just sitting 
around playing cards. 

He has been as thoughtful of my 
parents as of me. On their thirty-first 
wedding anniversary, he sent to Italy 
for a beautiful, carved-wood statue of 



St. Anthony, my mother's favorite saint. 
And each Mother's Day he gives her 
a tremendous bouquet. Yet, there is 
always one flower in the center with 
a card reading: "For Shelley — Happy 
Sunday." The flower is a red rose. 

That's another thing about Lou — he 
likes a family and he likes to do the 
simple things. The "chi chi" night life 
isn't for him. I can honestly say Lou 
and I have never had any arguments or 
differences. We discuss all kinds of 
things together, we share opinions and 
beliefs. In some ways, Lou has changed 
me. I used to be very nervous and I'd 
worry a lot. I also had quite a temper, 
but now, because he's so calm, I'm 
much calmer, too. 

Lou is particularly understanding 
about my work. He likes the fact that 
I have a career, and he encourages me 
to continue with it. Of course, I don't 
know what I'll do about that in the 
future. 

Lou is constantly attentive to me. 
In fact, he spoils me. Not long ago I 
had mononucleosis and was in bed for 
a month. He called me several times 
a day and came by each night to see 
me. Once he even had the Islander send 
over a specially catered dinner for me. 
The relationship between Lou and 
me has grown steadily and beautifully 
from a real friendship to something 
more meaningful. I never said, "Lou, 
we're going steady now." And he never 
said, "You're going steady with me." 
We simply have not dated anyone else. 
Yet, we both knew we could if we 
wanted to. We just haven't wanted to 
be with anyone but each other. 

So where do we go from here? All 
I can say is that it is very serious with 
us. We have talked about marriage, 
but in more general terms. We some- 
how don't think we have to put what 
we feel inside into words. You see, 
I've always felt a man and a woman 
are put on earth to love each other, 
to bring children into the world, to 
love God. And to fulfill those obliga- 
tions, you have to look at every side 
of a situation. I think Lou and I have 
been realistic about the future. 

As for marriage — well, all I can say 
is I never wanted to be a June bride. 
I don't like hot weather. I like the 
autumn better, the beautiful colors of 
the season, the cold, nippy weather. 
That is the ideal time, to me, to get 
married. 

Such is Lou's and my story. Some 
may think I'm too young to get so 
serious — eighteen certainly isn't old. 
But I've been raised to know what 
values are, what is important in life, 
what a good relationship with another 
person means. I don't feel my youth is 
a disadvantage. I think I know what 
matters — at least to me. 

I know I'm happy now — beautifully 
happy. I know I can't imagine a day 
going by without seeing Lou. I am 
content, I feel a glow all around me. 
I belong to someone. What more does 
any girl need? 

— as told to Jack Holland 

Shelley is Mary Stone on "The Donna 
Reed Show," ABC-TV, Thurs., 8 p.m. 
edt. She also records for Colpix. 




S-e&eHrfmMt&L nation's 
leading figure authority, says . . . 

i CAN GUARANTEE YOU A PERFECT FIGURE 
IN THE PRIVACY OF YOUR OWN HOME!" 

THOUSANDS OF WOMEN have obtained beautiful, perfectly proportioned 
figures at Eileen Feather's famous and fabulous California Figure Salons. 
Now, for the first time, the amazing Eileen Feather system of Contouring 
Co-ordinates is available to you in your own home. No matter what your age, 
no matter how long you have had your figure problem, Eileen Feather prom- 
ises You a beautiful new figure. 

OVERWEIGHT OR UNDERWEIGHT, only Eileen Feather has the scientific 
method of Contouring Co-ordinates that can guarantee you the figure of your 
dreams . . . the kind of breathtaking figure that women envy and men admire. 
In her amazing new course, Eileen Feather reveals all of the secrets, the exact 
methods she used to develop and shape her own lovely figure. 

THESE AMAZING BEAUTY SECRETS AVAILABLE 
ONLY FROM EILEEN FEATHER: 

• How to lose ONE FULL INCH from your waist in just 40 minutes! 

• How to lose ONE FULL INCH f rom your hips, thighs in just 40 minutes! 

• How to gain 3 OR MORE INCHES on your bust in just a few weeks! 

(By the exclusive, fabulously successful Eileen Feather method.) 

• How to develop beautiful calves, thighs, and hips in an amazingly 
short time! 

• How to rid yourself of double chin, wrinkles, and loose skin on the 
face and neckline! 

ONLY EILEEN FEATHER CAN GUARANTEE RESULTS LIKE THESE! 

SEND TODAY for Eileen Feather's FREE "A Perfect Figure for You", 
and receive your FREE personalized figure analysis chart. Don't 
put it off another minute. Eileen Feather has the answer to your 
figure problem. 



Eileen Feather, 
Nation's leading 
Figure authority. 



Eileen Feather promises 

you can: 
Lose 3 to 8 inches from waist 
Lose 3 to 8 inches from hips 
Gain 2 to 4 inches on bust 
Reshape and beautify calves, 
thighs, ankles 
Shape a lovely neckline 

ALL IN JUST 90 DAYS! 



MISS EILEEN FEATHER Box 679, Dept. rt-3 
Berkeley, California. 

Please send me my FREE personalized 
figure analysis chart and, at no cost or obli- 
gation your "Perfect Figure for You" 
with exciting details of your GUARAN- 
TEED method of figure perfection. I am 
enclosing 2bi for postage and handling. 

NAME AGE 



ADDRESS- 
CITY 



.STATE- 



YOU DISCOVER 

how to earn extra money in spare time by 
writing for FREE information: TV RADIO 
MIRROR. 205 East 42 St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. 



2 FREE ENLARGEMENTS 
OF YOUR FAVORITE PHOTOS,/ 
NEGATIVES OR COLOR SLIDES §m 

Just to introduce our new gold-tone process we 
will make PROFESSIONAL 5x7 enlargements of 
your favorite 2 snapshots, photos, negatives or 
color slides ABSOLUTELY FREE. Be sure to include 
color of hair, eyes and clothing for prompt infor- 
mation on having your enlargements beautifully 
hand-colored in oil and mounted in FREE FRAMES. 
Limit 2. Originals returned with enlargements. Act 
now. SENO NO MONEY. Just send 2 photos, nega- 
tives, snapshots or color slides today. 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS Dept.X-253 
7021 Santa Monica Blvd. Hollywood 38, Cant. 



Whiten Your Skin) 

in7Ni #s-WhileYoj)j leep) 

The Gentle Mercolized Cream Way! 

Here's the quickest, easiest way to the 
beautiful white skin you long for! Just 
apply time-tested Mercolized Cream 
to face or hands for 7 nights before 
retiring. Let it gently bleach your skin 
while you sleep. Each morning you'll 
see your skin actually become whiter, 
smoother and radiantly younger looking. 
Not a cover-up cosmetic. Mercolized 
Cream works UNDER skin surface 
to bring results right from the start. Long lasting. 
Beautiful women all over the world 
have used this plan for over 40 years. 
Just try Mercolized Cream yourself 
for 7 nights. If not delighted, your 
money will be cheerfully refunded. 

MERCOLIZED CREAM 

AT ALL DRUG AMD COSMETIC COUNTERS 




gf^ UNKNOWNS ARE WRI1 

Songs 

HOUSE OF MUSIC ^^ M.4I 



UNKNOWNS ARE WRITING "HITS"-GAIN FAME! 
RECORDED 
Nationally Promoted 

• 2-Way Royalty percentage 

• Words Set to Music FREE 
, 4l9BoylstonSt., Boston, Mass. 



Don't Cut Corns 
Calluses, Warts 

Use New Magic Rub Off 

Thousands of sufferers from laming corns, calluses, 
and common warts now report astonishing results 
with an amazing new formulation that rubs them off 
painlessly and safely without danger of infection from 
cutting, acids or abrasives. Secret is a wonder-working 
medicated creme called DERMA-SOFT that softens 
and dissolves those tormenting, hard to remove 
growths so that they rub right off, leaving skin 
silky smooth and soft! So don't suffer anothet 
minute. Get DERMA-SOFT at all druggists. 

$50 REWARD 

RUN A POPULAR CLUB 

FREE AND EASY 

Free — Choose anything you want from the amaz- 
ing new Popular Club Plan catalog. $50 or more 
in famous merchandise— sheets, 
toasters, clothing, curtains . . . 
anything! 

Easy — You simply help a few 
friends form a Popular shop- 
ping club. Send for big free 
catalog and full information. 
Write today. 



Pb,«l«rl/«). Mmm ' 



is skirl 

urn 



i Popular Club Plan, Dept. F913, Lynbrook, N.Y. 
Send big FREE 276-Page FULL-COLOR Catalog 



Name 

Address.. 
City 



..Zone State . 



T 
Y 
R 

83 



T 

V 
R 

84 



CONNIE STEVENS 

(Continued from page 29) 
not just a girl I've loved for four years 
and would have married long ago, if my 
career had orbited the way hers has. 
She is a tower of strength as a friend. 
She's fiercely loyal and dependable. 
Not that she's all sugar candy, by any 
means! She has a temper and isn't shy 
about showing it. But in every case, 
when it happens, you can bet she had 
plenty of provocation." 

To Kenny Miller, an old and trusted 
friend: "She makes you feel warm, 
amused, wanted. Before you realize 
what you're doing, you are pouring out 
your troubles and crying on her pretty 
shoulder. As a result, she has many 
men devoted to her. But there has never 
been a scandal that could stick to Con- 
nie. She's so forthright and decent, no 
one would believe she could do any- 
thing scandalous." 

To an executive at her studio, she is 
"both the most talented and most exas- 
perating package we have. What other 
girl, with everything to lose by a scan- 
dal, would take off for Paris with Glenn 
Ford for the premiere of 'The Four 
Horsemen of the Apocalypse' and spend 
fourteen days abroad, mostly in his 
company? 

"When we had her on the carpet, her 
answer was so simple, so innocent, it 
knocked all the suspicions and fears 
out of our minds. T wanted to help 
Glenn publicize his picture,' she said, 
and then gave an irrepressible giggle. 
'Anyway, Glenn's a perfect gentleman 
and you can hardly find that kind any- 
more.' If anyone else — say, Marilyn 
Monroe or Liz Taylor — had done a 
thing like that, the public would have 
raised cain. All she has to do is open 
those baby-blue eyes a little wider, and 
her fans are ready to march out in bat- 
talions to do battle for her." 

That there are many whose feathers 
she ruffled in her rise to fame — and 
many whose feathers are being ruffled 
right now in her struggle to stay on top 
— cannot be denied. Their views, while 
perhaps not openly expressed, may 
easily be deduced. There is the pert 
young starlet who appeared on the stu- 
dio lot looking and acting like a new 
edition of Connie Stevens. She had a 
ponytail swinging behind her, and 
spoke in the kittenish manner Connie 
often adopts in her role of Cricket 
Blake on "Hawaiian Eye." 

The real Connie took one look at the 
imitation, slapped down her script, and 
marched off the set. Obviously, she was 
under the impression that the studio 
had trotted in the little "double image" 
to scare her with the idea that she could 
be replaced! 

To Jack Warner and his son-in-law 
Bill Orr, executive producer of all TV 
shows on the lot, Connie has to be a 
blister on the nose of contentment. For 
more than a year, she campaigned vig- 
orously — "battering their doors down 
with her darling pink and white fists" is 
the way one observer sardonically put 
it — to land the coveted role of Liza 
Doolittle in the upcoming multimillion- 
dollar "My Fair Lady." In her usual 



fashion, Connie was anything but coy 
in making this desire known. "I want 
that part like I've wanted nothing else 
in my whole career," she told a friend. 
But the studio awarded the part to 
Audrey Hepburn. 

The shock of this disappointment had 
scarcely been absorbed by Connie when 
she was informed that Anthony Eisley, 
one of her co-stars in "Hawaiian Eye," 
had been dropped, and Troy Donahue 
brought in to fill bis shoes. The studio 
was a chaos of rumors, and there can 
be no doubt that some of them found 
their way to Connie's shell-pink ears. 
Troy was there "to attract more teen- 
agers to the show." It was also rumored 
that Bob Conrad's part would be sub- 
merged to give a larger splash to Troy. 

Connie has been closely associated 
with Eisley and Conrad and their wives 
since the inception of the show. They 
are fast friends, and Joan Conrad and 
Judy Eisley are two of Connie's confi- 
dants. Both families had just purchased 
new homes and Connie became con- 
cerned for her friends' futures. 

About Connie's own relationship with 
Troy there seems to be some sort of 
ambivalence. Attraction and repulsion, 
love and hate, are often entwined. At 
one period, Connie dated Troy with 
some regularity. But by the time they 
completed making the feature "Susan 
Slade" together, they were far from 
friendly. Nowadays, both tend to play 
down their "romantic" period by claim- 
ing it was a studio-inspired publicity 
gimmick. It's reported that when they 
went to Hawaii recently, to shoot back- 
grounds for the series, they spoke to 
each other only when necessary. 

"You learn a lot from love" 

But the feud is now patched up. A 
crew member insists it was Bob Conrad, 
a man used to fighting his own battles, 
who soothed the troubled waters by as- 
suring Connie that he could handle any 
rivalry with Troy. On her side, Connie 
makes it clear that the response of 
Eisley's fans protesting his departure 
from the show is proof that her own ob- 
jections were well founded. "If they 
needed someone to pull the teen-age 
viewers, would someone tell me what's 
wrong with Bob Conrad and yours 
truly?" she points out. 

As for Troy, he's become very career- 
conscious. He'd like fans to stop think- 
ing of him as a fun-loving bachelor 
about town. In particular, he'd like to 
wipe out all memory of the headlines 
created when his ex-fiancee, Lili Kar- 
dell, accused him of slapping her 
around. "I think I've changed in the 
past year," he says soberly. "You learn 
a lot from love— though the lessons are 
often not easy to take. I'm trying hard, 
these days, to get along with everyone — 
especially the people I have to work 
with." 

That "have to" is telling. The truth— 
those who have known Troy for years 
insist — is that he really would rather 
not do a TV series at all. He balked 
about "SurfSide 6" but, in order to get 
certain other conditions in his Warner 
contract, he went along with the studio. 
His assignment to "Hawaiian Eye," 
after the other series folded, didn't 



elate him at all. But he's shrewd enough 
to realize he isn't old enough yet to 
carry a leading-man role in Hollywood's 
current crop of films. So — he looks on 
this as a transition period. 

But Connie was not feeling in as 
philosophical a mood as Troy. The news 
of the changes in the TV series, coming 
on the heels of her rebuff with regard to 
"My Fair Lady," sprung the revolt that 
was already, due to a number of smaller 
irritants, on a hair-trigger. Connie went 
on strike. Not only wouldn't she appear 
for work at the studio, but she cut off 
her telephone and — on the advice of her 
lawyer — refused to talk to the press, 
studio intermediaries or anyone who 
had the slightest link to "the industry." 
When she was upbraided by the front 
office at Warners (some say the quote 
came from Jack Warner himself) with 
the admonition, "You can't eat your 
cake and have it, too, Connie," she is 
said to have snapped, "Yes, I can, if I 
bake two cakes." 

For the true significance of this re- 
mark, one must go back to when Connie 
and Gary Clarke were courting steadily 
and quite seriously. She was upset by 
Gary's stern refusal to marry her until 
he had gained some success and could 
support her properly without relying on 
her income. "I don't believe in long en- 
gagements," she said at the time. "They 
lead to temptations, human nature be- 
ing what it is." She was also being 
badgered by the studio on several 
scores. One day, she burst out angrily, 
"Maybe the solution is for Gary and me 
to get married and forget about Holly- 
wood. He could go back to being a me- 
chanic and I could get a job clerking. 
I've done it before, you know." 

Much as she loves show business and 
the fun that goes with being desirable, 
famous and a star, there is a stubborn 
and inflexible streak in Connie that 
might, if she doesn't find happiness in 
her career, prompt her to throw up her 
hands and give it all up. Being a movie, 
TV and singing star is not the only cake 
in her private kitchen. She is quite 
capable, if pressed too hard, of whip- 
ping up an entirely new batter and bak- 
ing herself a new way of life. Just be- 
fore this latest battle with Warners was 
resolved, she said: "I've had offers to 
write a column and be a disc jockey. 
Happiness is more important to me 
than stardom." 

Which is the real Connie? 

In the feminine complexity that is 
Connie Stevens, there are many para- 
doxes, many contradictions, many mys- 
teries. She is stubborn, open-minded, 
strong-willed, sentimental, jealous, in- 
telligent, idealistic, practical, unconven- 
tional, deeply religious (Catholic), 
ruthless, generous, fun-loving, clean- 
living, and so on and on and on. Who 
can tell which of the Connie Stevenses 
is the real, the true, the definitive one? 
Probably the answer to the enigma will 
someday be provided by the man she 
marries and lives with on the intimate 
terms of man and wife. 

At the time of their break, two years 
ago, Gary Clarke said: "Connie is mine 
. . . whatever happens we'll get together 
again." Current items in the gossip col- 






umns would seem to be making that 
prediction come to pass. 

But Gary himself now denies the new 
batch of rumors that has him taking 
Connie out of Glenn Ford's arms and 
straight to the altar. "We are seeing 
each other again," he insists, "but not 
at all as it was on the old basis. Now we 
are just good friends." 

What brought him back into Connie's 
life, Gary says, was "The Virginian," 
the new TV series in which he has his 
best acting job to date. The first person 
he called, after signing the contract, 
was Connie, "because I knew how 
happy she'd be, how much of an inter- 
est she has in my career, as she has in 
the careers of all her friends," he 
points out. Naturally, Connie wanted to 
hear all the details — and in person. She 
and Gary saw each other that night, 
and have continued to do so. 

"Gary and I discovered that we un- 
derstand each other far better now than 
we did when we were dating seriously," 
says Connie. "For one thing, we don't 
take everything personally. We can dis- 
cuss matters, criticize and help each 
other in an objective way. We were 
never able to do that before." 

But, despite all denials, there are still 
those who believe that Glenn Ford — 
quite inadvertently — brought Gary back 
into Connie's range. There had been 
many stories about her assorted escorts 
and alleged romances. Those who knew 
Connie never really took them seriously, 
until the question, "Is there definitely a 
Ford in Connie's future?" got mass cir- 
culation. Did Gary decide then it was 
time he took positive action or lost the 
girl he professed to love forever? 

"Forever" is a big word, but there 
has never been any doubt that Connie, 
a Catholic and the child of a broken 
home, looks on marriage and family life 
as a permanent and unbreakable tie. 
With Gary's career at last on firm 
ground, there is now no excuse for them 
to put off marriage and every induce- 
ment to fulfill the demands of their 
heart. But both say there is no wedding 
in their future. 

It would seem, at least at this writ- 
ing, that absence has not made the 
heart grow fonder for either Glenn or 
Connie. Reports from France, where he 
was working in "The Grand Duke and 
Mr. Pimm," had Glenn once again ro- 
mancing Hope Lange, his co-star in the 
film. Another person close to him con- 
fided that Glenn recently said he'd like 
to give up his bachelor life and go back 
to wife Eleanor Powell and son Peter. 

Just as these rumors were circulat- 
ing, news of Connie's new feud with 
Warner Bros, reached France. Glenn, 
who had previously given Connie both 
professional and business advice, put in 
a trans-Atlantic call to her. Perhaps he 
called as a friend who wanted once 
again to lend a strong shoulder of sup- 
port. Connie's phone already discon- 
nected, he didn't reach her. He left 
word with her manager and at her 
agent's office that he wanted to talk to 
her. He called back, the following day, 
to see if she'd received his messages 
(she had). This would indicate that 
Connie had decided against returning 
his call. Was it because, with Glenn, it 
was a case of "out of sight, out of 



, 6 I»$ATI0IMI 



a^VS&sSSi 



■ G BAND — 



r ZIF...IT'S ON 
ZIP... IT'S Off 

Never-never before such 
a sensational all-around I 
foundation controller as %> 
new FIGURE TRIMMER g?> 
with the amazing remov- m 
able-adjustable waist || 
and tummy-nipping band 
which INSTANTLY tucks 
away tummy and waist 
and makes you look and 
hteel younger, many 
inches slimmer. 




COPRE C7S FAULTS OF OTHER GARMENTS 

Where other foundations fail -New Figure 
trimmer succeeds. Most girdles either hold 
in the abdomen but push up the waist- 
others nip the waist but do nothing for the 
abdomen. Only New Figure Trimmer both 
nips the waist and flattens the stomach 
and firmly supports the back too. It's 
the amazing Zip-On-Zip-Off Band with 
extra adjustment that does this. 

_ WARD GREEN CO., Dept FT-589 

■ 43 West 61 Street, New York 23, N. Y. ■ 
I Send the Figure Trimmer for 10 Days Trial. Full | 

■ refund of my purchase price guaranteed. 

I n I enclose $ ...... Ward Green pays postage. 

■ D Send COD. I'll pay purchase price plus postage. ■ 

. . ■ 

■ My waist size is . ■ 

. D Regular (waist 22-32) $3.95 (33 & up) $4.95 > 

■ □ Panty (waist 22-32) $4.95 (33 & up) $5.95 | 

■ □ Detachable crotch piece 50c extra; 5 for $2 

* NAME f 



ADDRESS.. 



ZONE 



STATE 



START YOUR OWN BUSINESS 

Write for free information on how to make BIG 

MONEY taking orders for magazine subscriptions 

-Macfadden-Bartell Corp., 205 E. 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. 



PHOTO BARGAINS 




CHOICE 




2-8x10 ENLARGEMENTS 

or 

4-5x7 ENLARGEMENTS 

or 

25 WALLET SIZE PHOTOS 

plus FREE 5x7 ENL. 



Lovely reproductions ot 
your favorite photo on 
finest quality double 
weight portrait paper. 
Send any size photo or 
negative (returned un- 
harmed). Add 25c post* 
age and handling. 



Any enlargement hand-colored in oils, 50$ extra. 

State color of eyes, hair, and clothes. 

QUALITY VALUES, Dept. 70G-A 

2 EAST AVENUE, LARCHMONT, N. Y. 



|:M:1:M7I:VI,'.M 



ONLY *42 9 -2 = *1000 




Borrow $100 to $ 1000 1 

tirely by mail! Pay all yonr 
bills with a confidential loan 
from Postal; only one small 
monthly payment instead of 
many. Over 67 years of dependable 
service to people throughout the U.S. A. 
State-licensed— your assurance of fair 
rates and supervised reliability. FAST, 
AIRMAIL SERVICE. TRY US! 

POSTAL FINANCE CO., Dept. 50-R 
200 Keeline Bldg.. Omaha 2, Nebr. 



D. J. Levitt, President 

Postal Finance Co., Dept. 50- 

200 Keeline Bide-, Omaha 2, Nebr. 

Rush FREE complete Loan Papers. 



SELECT LOAN HERE 



Cash You 
Receive! 


30 Monthly 
Payments 


$100 


$5.12 


$300 


15.06 


$500 


23.57 


$800 


35.28 


$1000 


42.92 



Nairn. 



Mrfnss. 




jJSty™-. 20M....SUU „j 



POEMS 

HVE STAR MUSIC MASTERS. 2( 



WANTED for Musical 
Setting & Recording by 
AMERICA'S LARGEST 
SONG STUDIO. Send 
poems. Free examination. 
5 BEAGON BLDG.. BOSTON. MASS. 



«AS$I» 



Trained Dental Assistants are in greater 
demand than ever! Prepare at home for 
experience in this fascinating field. 
Course includes lab, X-ray and chair-side assist- 
ance, office and reception duties. Everything fur- 
nished ; easy terms. Write for complete facts, FREE! 

Wayne School of LaSalle Extension University 

A Correspondence Institution 
42 1 So. Dearborn St., Dept. 09-583, Chicago 5, III. 



r ~ HIGH 



AT HOME 
I 



IN SPARE TIME 

I 



Low monthly payments include stand- 
ard text books and instruction. Credit 
I for subjects already completed. 
Progress as rapidly as your time 
and abilities permit, diploma awarded 
I SEND FOR BOOKLET— TELLS YOU HOW 
OUR 65TH YEAR 
American school, Dept. H653 
IDrexel at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois. 
Please send FREE High School booklet. J 
NAME " 

I ADDRESS || 
CUT Mb STATE |i 

Accredited Member national home study council 



I 



T 
V 
R 

85 




TRUST YODORA 8 

For those intimate moments . . . don't take a 
chance.. .trust Yodora and feel confident. New 
Yodora is a delicately scented modern beauty 
cream deodorant fortified 
with Hexachlorophene. 
Gives protection you 
can trust. 




^Pl| 



ooMnwni *t*«ma 



o 



d o r a 



Pure White. Non-Irritating. Contains no harsh Aluminum Salts 



ANY BLACK 
AND WHITE 



Roll Film 
Developed & Printed 

FIRST ORDER ONLY— To acquaint you 
with our 15 years of rapid, quality 
service. Send FILM direct or write for 
FREE MAILERS & color film price list. 

BRIDGEPORT FILM STUDIOS, Box 9061 A, Bridgeport 1, Conn. 



FREE 

Send 25c to 
cover handling 
and First Class 
Postage. 



Poems Wanted 



NOW 



Popular, Rock & Roll, 
Country & Western, and 
Gospel poems for musical 
setting and recording with 
"the Nashville Sound". 
Send poems today for 
Free examination and our 
best offer. 



MUSIC CITY SONGCRAFTERS 

Studio M, 6145 Acklen Station, Nashville. Tenn. 



GLAMOUR WIG 




T 
V 
R 

86 



• Black • Brown AFTER-f 

• Dark Blond 

• Light Blond • Platinum 

• White • Pink • Ice Blue 

• Black with Srey Streak 

Be bewitching, daring, 
winsome, demure — 
Split second change to 
new personality. A very pretty cover-up after swim- 
ming, washing or setting your own hair. Smooth, 
non-flammable Celanese acetate looks like real 
tiair. feels luxuriously soft and lovely. SEND NO 
MONEY. Pay postman on delivery $5.95 plus CO.D. 
postage or send $5.95 with order and save postage 
Money back if not delighted. Specify color. 
GUILD, 103 E. Broadway, Dept. W-709, N.Y.C. 2 



mind" — or was it because Gary, her 
"first real love," was back? 

Mirror, mirror, on the wall . . . 

Since there is no way of knowing, at 
least today, the true nature of Connie 
Stevens, there is no way of guessing 
how this situation will be resolved. Will 
she marry young Clarke or some older, 
more sophisticated beau? Will she and 
Troy Donahue discover that fighting 
goes with love, too, and they could be 
much more than a publicity-inspired 
romance? Or is real and lasting love 
yet to come — from someone else? 

When asked why she hasn't married 
yet, Connie gave a flip laugh and said, 
"Because nobody has asked me." It is 
one of the few fibs ever attributed to 
this utterly frank girl. With her current 
feud with the studio resolved, will the 
"truce" last? Or will she rebel once 
again and carry it to the ultimate limit, 
refuse to act in films or TV again, and 
either retire to the calm of homemak- 
ing, or go forward to a new chal- 



VINCENT EDWARDS 

(Continued from page 37) 
since she has such a vested interest in 
the opposition? 

"Oh, all the time," she answered. 
"And I like Dr. Kildare, too . . . But 
I love Dr. Casey." 

As the interview drew to a close. I 
came to a familiar conclusion about 
Mrs. Zoino — when that lady talks about 
her boy, her love for him just drips 
from her voice. It's a kind of over- 
whelming pride, too. And she makes 
no effort to disguise it. 

A few days passed, after I had spok- 
en with Mrs. Zoino, when word reached 
me that Vince Edwards had come to 
New York after all, quite unexpectedly. 
Checking further, I learned that Vince 
was accompanied by Sherry Nelson. 
Sherry, as all Vince Edwards aficionad- 
os must know, is the secretary being 
billed as the future Mrs. Edwards. 

Not too surprised, I learned that 
Vince and Sherry had taken proxi- 
mitous suites in the Sherry-Nether- 
lands Hotel. I proceeded to seek them 
out, but Vince and Sherry could have 
put Khrushchev to shame in the game 
of erecting iron curtains. 

They were literally and irrevocably 
incommunicado. 

Still, I did learn that Vince had 
come to New York to attend the Emmy 
Awards party here, even though ev- 
eryone had expected he would be at 
the Hollywood festivities. So, it was 
quite a surprise to find Vince in New 
York — and with Sherry along. 

This must mean, I concluded, that 
Vince's sudden change in plans would 
undoubtedly bring him home to Brook- 
lyn to visit his mother, whom he hadn't 
seen in three years. That prompted 
another quick call to Mrs. Zoino. 

"Isn't it wonderful," she cried. "He's 
here ! And he's coming over to see me." 

"When?" I asked. 

"He didn't say," Mrs. Zoino re- 



lenge offered by beckoning Broadway? 

Is there some secret yearning that 
has long troubled the heart of this im- 
pressionable and alluring woman-child, 
some ambition never disclosed, some 
will-o'-the-wisp she has mutely desired 
to chase? Who can tell? It remains the 
dark side of the moon, and nobody in 
her little universe has been afforded a 
glimpse of it. Perhaps Connie herself 
isn't aware of the secret, buried long- 
ings of her heart. 

It may well be that plump little Con- 
cetta Ingolia once did catch a glimpse 
of the truth in that Coney Island hall of 
mirrors. If so. the intuition has prob- 
ably been all but forgotten. Perhaps 
Connie, one of these fine days, may de- 
cide to revisit Brooklyn's amusement 
park. It is almost a certainty that, if she 
does, she will seek out those mirrors 
and repeat the question she put to her- 
self so long ago: "Which of these reflec- 
tions is really me?" — Kathleen Post 

Connie is Cricket in "Hawaiian Eye," 
on ABC-TV. Wed.. 9 to 10 p.m. edt. 



plied. "Maybe tomorrow, maybe the day 
after." 

I told Mrs. Zoino I'd call back in a 
couple of days for the details. 

The Emmy Awards came off and, as 
luck — and the judges- — would have it. 
Vince didn't walk off with any honors. 
If you were watching the ceremony on 
TV that night, you might have noticed 
the disappointment on Vince's face. 
He wasn't alone in his feelings. Mil- 
lions of his fans felt disappointed, too. 

Whatever disappointment Vince felt 
after he was frozen out must have been 
quickly thawed in the warm, cheery 
glow of the family gathering that fol- 
lowed the next night in Brooklyn. 

"Wonderful, wonderful, wonderful." 
Mrs. Zoino's voice bubbled when I 
asked about the get-together that had 
been so long and uncertain in coming. 

"We were so happy to see each other 
we couldn't find words," she went on. 
"My goodness, I was so surprised how 
young he looked. He didn't seem any 
older than twenty-two or twenty-three. 
Everyone who hadn't seen him for the 
three years he was away said the same 
thing." 

I wanted to know how Mrs. Zoino re- 
acted when she first laid eyes on her 
son after all that time. 

"The bell rang." she said. "I was ex- 
pecting Vinnie. I went to the door with 
my heart beating a mile a minute. I 
opened it and — there he was. 'Hi, mom.' 
he said with a big smile. He put out his 
arms and I just rushed right into them. 
He tightened them around me in a won- 
derful bear hug. It was one of the hap- 
piest moments in my life. My son had 
come home again." 

I asked Mrs. Zoino if Vince had come 
alone. 

"Goodness, no." she answered. "He 
had a whole group of people with him." 

"Was Sherry Nelson along?" I prod- 
ded. 

Mrs. Zoino hesitated, at first. With 

the tact of a diplomat, she repeated. 

"He had a lot of people with him . . ." 

If Mrs. Zoino was reluctant to clis- 



cuss Sherry, it might have been only the 
good judgment of a mother who didn't 
want to embarrass her son. She no 
doubt had her suspicions, but she still 
wasn't sure — at least not one-hundred- 
percent — that he was prepared to march 
down the aisle with this particular girl. 
In one of our previous talks, I had 
asked Mrs. Zoino if Vince ever dis- 
cusses marriage, and her answer was, 
"No, he never does — but I talk to him 
about it. I tell him that he should get 
married and have children, so I can 
have more grandchildren. He's the only 
one of my children who hasn't married. 
But his answer is that he isn't ready for 
it. He tells me that he wants to hit solid 
rock bottom first before he takes the 
big step, and that he wants his wife to 
be lady of leisure." 

At any rate, it was obvious that Mrs. 
Zoino had rolled out the red carpet for 
the homecoming, and that Sherry could 
not have felt any less thrilled by the 
welcome than if she were really and 
truly a member of the family already. 

For a full day, Mrs. Zoino raced 
about frantically preparing for the oc- 
casion. Everyone in the family pitched 
in — Vince's sister, Mrs. Nancy Alba- 
nese, and her husband; Vince's twin 
brother, Bobby, and his wife, Pearl; 
and their other brother, Joe, and his 
wife. Not a detail was overlooked. Espe- 
cially not in the line of food. 

"What was on the menu?" I asked 
Mrs. Zoino. 

"You name it," she laughed. "We had 
it." 

There was proper indignation in Mrs. 
Zoino's voice when I asked her if she 
had cooked the meal herself. 

"Well, of course I did," she replied. 
"You don't think I'd let anyone else 
step in when it comes to the food. After 
all, one of the big reasons Vinnie came 
was to get a taste of my home cooking ! " 
Of course, Vinnie has been billed as 
a food faddist who eats nothing but 
organically grown foods — foods that 
come from the earth without chemical 
fertilizers. Even his mother couldn't 
persuade Vince away from his special 
diet when he lived at home. Mrs. Zoino 
always had to yield during those years 
by supplying her son with wheat germ, 
black strap molasses, and the other spe- 
cial dietary provisions called for on his 
epicurean health kick. 

This time was no exception, despite 
Vince's three-year absence from the 
family table. Mrs. Zoino hadn't forgot- 
ten, and those specially-packaged or- 
ganically grown foods were right there 
and waiting when Vince sat down with 
his family and friends at the overladen, 
banquet-style dining-room table. 

Far and away, it was a spread of 
magnificent proportions. The antipasto 
was fit for the most discriminating gour- 
met. The spaghetti was cooked to per- 
fection, and its sauce was simply 
m-m-m-m. Chicken cacciatore is always 
a delicious and delightful dish in the 
better Italian restaurants, but the way 
Mrs. Zoino prepared it was the epitome 
of perfection, suited to a king's taste. 
All this, in a large sense, added up 
to a rather startling caloric intake for 
the guests, particularly for one sculpted 
with such precise symmetry and archi- 
tectural balance as shapely Sherry. 



Wasn't Mrs. Zoino afraid that her in- 
ordinately generous portions would cre- 
ate havoc with Sherry's waistline? 

Truthfully, it didn't faze Mrs. Zoino 
one iota. Like most mothers who have 
been steeped in the traditions of an 
Italian heritage, Mrs. Zoino believes 
when a person sits down at the table, 
it's for one purpose — to eat, and eat 
well. In her eyes, a girl like Sherry is 
probably so "skinny" that her present 
mold is just a hint of something that is 
yet to be. In other words, you might 
say, this girl hasn't even begun to fill 
out. So why should Mrs. Zoino have any 
qualms about crowding Sherry's plate 
with the inescapably fattening fare that 
had been prepared for the feast? 

From what we heard, Sherry threw 
caution to the winds and, like the good 
trouper that she is, elbowed her way 
through yards and yards of spaghetti 
steeped with that rich sauce, a gener- 
ously large portion of chicken, and the 
other delectable entrees — and enjoyed 
it tremendously. 

She later confided in Vince, we were 
told, that she had never relished a home 
cooked meal as much as she did his 
mother's. Mrs. Zoino later heard this 
from Vince and was elated by the com- 
pliment. 

Moreover, Mrs. Zoino was overjoyed 
after the initial meeting with Sherry. 
She found Sherry friendly, endearing, 
sweet, and extremely likable. She had 
all the fine and desirable qualities that 
Mrs. Zoino has hoped for in a girl her 
famous son might someday pick as his 
bride. 

The next night, another gathering was 
staged in a similar gala setting. 

Then the moment that Mrs. Zoino 
dreaded finally arrived — the moment for 
goodbye. It had been three years since 
she had seen Vince, virtually a lifetime 
to a mother as devoted to her son as 
Mrs. Zoino is. 

Despite all his assurances by phone 
that he is well, it is difficult for a mother 
to escape the anxiety, the restlessness, 
and the uncertainty that somehow he is 
hiding something from her; that, away 
from her, her son is not as well as he 
should be. And, above all else, Mrs. 
Zoino is unalterably a mother who loves 
her son deeply and intensely. Her con- 
cern and worry for him are inescapable 
so long as she is separated from Vince 
by the painful stretch of miles between 
New York and Hollywood. 

There's no doubt, now that Vince has 
returned to the movie capital, that Mrs. 
Zoino has gone back to worrying about 
him again. Yet in her heart, Mrs. Zoino 
knows now, too, that she still has a son 
who has not forgotten his mother. For 
whatever the future holds, the immedi- 
ate present shows that Vince, coming 
home as he did, has cured his mother's 
heartache. — George Carpozi Jr. 

Vince is '"Ben Casey," as seen over 
ABC-TV, Mon., 10 to 11 p.m. edt. 



••••*••••**•••••*••••••••• 
BUY U. S. SAVINGS BONDS 

AND INVEST IN YOUR FUTURE 

*••**•*••*••**•••**••*•*•* 



Sure, I color 
my hair. . . 
with Nestle!" 





Why look dull? It's easy to 

glamorize your hair color with 

Nestle Colorinse or Colortint 






World-famous Nestle 
Colorinse is a must after every 
shampoo. Use it to add new "life" 
and natural-looking color-highlights 
to your own hair shade. . .to restore 



shampoos remove. Color rinses in 
quickly... shampoos out easily! 12 
beautiful shades. 6 rinses 35c 



Wonderful Nestle Colortint 
gives more intense, longer- lasting 
color. Use it to enrich your own hair 
shade OR to add a glamorous new 
color that lasts 3 weeks. Covers 
gray hair quickly. Stronger than a 
rinse but not a permanent dye! 10 
lovely shades. 6 capsules 35e 




COLORINSE or COLORTINT 

More women use Nestle than any 
other temporary hair coloring. 



T 
¥ 
R 

87 



MAKE BIG MONEY 

□ Full or Part Time! 

□ High Commissions! 

□ No Experience! 

□ No Age Requirements! 

□ Free Sales Kit! 

□ No Investment! 

□ No Obligation.' 

Rush your name and address today for 
amazing new sales kit. It's absolutely 
FREE. Gives you startling information. 
Tells you how to make big money fast 
and often by helping us take orders for 
magazine subscriptions. It's easy! No ex- 
perience needed! Become our personal 
magazine representative in your com- 
munity. Free kit works like magic to put 
dollars into your pocket! You don't in- 
vest a penny of your money now or any 
time. We supply everything you need 
free. Act now. 

Paste coupon below on post 
card and mail today! Extra 
cash is yours for the asking! 



Subscription Agents Division, 

Macfadden-Bartell Corp. 

205 E. 42 St., New York 17, N. Y. 

YES! Rush FREE Money-Making Infor- 
mation at once. I'm ready to start. 



T 
V 
R 

88 



IKMIINIIIIIIIIHtHIIHH 



iriiifiiniiirnnmirniintliitli«iiiin 



HimmmimiHiimiitiitM 



THE LENNON SISTERS 



iiiiiMiimiiinitiitiiiii 



iitiiiniiiilinitiittlll 



nmmiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimniM 



Name . . . 
Address 
City 



State. 



l«aU WALLET PHOTOS 




SSLr 3 



Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

ROY PHOTO SERVICE 

Dept. A9, GPO Box 644.W.Y.1.N.Y. 



LOOK, YOURS! 



BEAUTIFUL 
\ IMPORTED 

7"JE wwtla movement 

WRISTWATCH 

with every Bridal Set 

Think of it! Your choke of a fine lady's or Man's 
7 -jewelled lever movement, onti-mognetic watch. Each 
watch h in gleaming, modem I OK yellow rolled gold 
plate case (stainless bade). GUARANTEED FOR I TEA! 
against mechanical defects. Complete with smart strap 
or band. 





ON COMBINATION OFFEI. When ordered and paid for 
within one year. Gorgeous matching Bridal Set, in 
1/30 UK yellow gold plate, features a total of 14 
perfectly matched, brilliant, simulated diamonds. Both 
these Hashing rings NOW YOURS, plus a beautiful 
7-iewel wristwolch, for a total cost of 513 61 
NEW YORK MART, Box 1382, New York 8 



GET ACQUAINTED PAYMENT 
PUN I FUU. YEAR TO PAYI... 
SEND NO MOHEYI Just name 004 
address. We ship Immediately upon 
receipt of order. You pay postman 
only M.il ,don 'r pay o penny more. 
We pay the posTage. fay balance of 
S9.00 later onyrime within one 
year. .Stare whether you wont 
lady's or man's watch. Wear ID 
doyt on oppeovol. HONEY RACK 
GUARANTEE. To set correct ring the 
tend mine or drip of paper, MaR 
order NDWI 
.N.T., Dept, VIM S74 



(Continued from page 39) 
be different, but they all have to co- 
operate and act like a unit to get things 
done!" 

"That poor woman in the papers — 
that's a sad case, and I know there are 
many around," Bill Lennon commented, 
one arm around his wife and his ex- 
pression troubled. "But it's not the 
rule, not in the United States." 

Bill and Isabelle ("Sis") Lennon 
have taught their children that their 
own success in love and marriage was 
built around their family. They do not 
believe in separating their personal feel- 
ings toward each other from their par- 
ental attitude toward their children. 

"We try to make our youngsters a 
part of our love, and they get into the 
habit of showing affection and consid- 
eration to each other. Individualism is 
great, when you go out to compete in 
the world. But, inside the family circle, 
there ought to be some kind of unity 
and common purpose," Bill said. "This 
doesn't mean that we expect or want 
them to think and behave alike. It's 
just that, in a family, you must learn to 
think as one for the good of all when it 
comes to family matters." 

It was the eldest and only married 
child, DeeDee, who recently explained: 
"From the time we were old enough to 
sing, and that's quite some time, we 
were taught that raising a family and 
having a happy marriage was like har- 
monizing. When you sing in a group as 
we did" — DeeDee is now a homemaker, 
though her sisters Peggy, Kathy and 
Janet still perform with the Welk show 
— "it's necessary to adjust your own 
voice to the others for the best effects. 
In marriage, it's the same. The wife, 
the husband and their children must 
learn to fit their individual characters 
and wishes to what's best for the group 
as a whole. Just as some singing groups 
break up because each one wants the 
most to do or has a personal axe to 
grind, a lot of marriages go to pieces 
for the same reasons." 

Sis believes, and often stresses the 
point, that many people rush into mar- 
riage nowadays because they think it's 
got to be a ball from start to finish. 
"The word love is tossed around as if 
it added up to just romance," she 
claims. It's her theory that too many 
youngsters today "grew up in the fat 
years, not knowing what it is to strug- 
gle for bread and butter, let alone the 
icing on the cake. As soon as marriage 
begins to develop a problem or two and 
stops being a ball, they call for the 
divorce lawyers. 

"Just for the record," she adds, "the 
old days had plenty of problems, too, 
but they were mostly concerned with 
making a Kving, not whether or not 
there was money enough for several TV 
sets in the home." 

When Bill and Sis got married, their 
biggest headache (as with many people 
during those years just prior to World 
War II) was learning to get along, and 
have a family, on their very small in- 
come. Those "lean" days usually evoke 
a chuckle from Bill. He recalls, with a 



solemnity belied by the twinkle in his 
eyes, that when he and Sis got engaged, 
he found a job at Douglas Aircraft, 
making all of $38 a week. "My brothers 
and I had been trying to make a go of 
it in show business as a quartet, but 
we'd reached the point where we were 
anxious to get married. 

"Singing just couldn't earn enough 
for that, not in those days. Also, it 
meant traveling . . . being away from 
our wives. At the time we got married. 
Sis had the idea of working for a while 
until we got our apartment furnished. 
But then, when DeeDee was on the way. 
we decided she should give up working. 
We knew we'd have to make do with 
the $38 a week, and we did." 

"We felt then, and still do," Sis 
smiled, "that a woman's job is that of 
the homemaker and a man's the provid- 
er and protector of the home. It may be 
an old-fashioned idea but I'm convinced 
that, in most marriages, this makes for 
the most happiness." 

"Actually," Bill pointed out, "when 
things got real rough, Sis did work — 
though not away from home. She made 
tortillas and, after work, I'd take them 
out and sell them. We're not against 
married women working when there is 
an honest-to-goodness need for the extra 
money, or when she's a professional 
woman — say, a doctor or nurse — who is 
really needed by others. But we can't 
see a married woman with children 
holding a job just to buy a fancy car, 
or keep up with the Joneses." 

The Lennon girls seem to take the 
same view, with DeeDee already prov- 
ing how she feels. When she married 
Dick Gass, she quit show business to 
give her full time to her home. The girls 
had been earning good money for sev- 
eral years and DeeDee had a nice little 
nest egg. She also received a lot of gifts 
from fans and friends. But she didn't 
have any impractical notions, even if 
she did have it made, compared to many 
other brides. She was proud and con- 
tent to move into Dick's old home, the 
house he'd purchased from his parents 
when they had moved to a larger place. 
Both DeeDee and Dick are happy on 
what he earns working for the tele- 
phone company. 

"They budget accordingly." Kathy ex- 
plained, "and, as a result, everything 
they buy has a special meaning for 
them. They enjoy each new item more 
for having worked and saved for it. It's 
been a real lesson for me. I'm certainly 
going to try and be as wise when I get 
married." 

"Me, too," Peggy agreed. "But, you 
know, money certainly isn't everything 
in life. Do you remember 'the old days' 
before we went on the Welk show? I 
know that some of my happiest memo- 
ries come from the little house we lived 
in then." 

In those days, the Lennons lived in an 
old house which had only two bedrooms. 
The boys shared one room, the girls 
crowded into the other, and Bill and 
Sis slept on a pull-out couch in the liv- 
ing room. "Talk about togetherness," 
laughed Kathy. "We really had it!" 

"Yes, but we were a real family," 
Janet put in, "ae much as we are now, 
even though there were less of us. And 




I'm sure that neither Mother nor Daddy 
ever would have thought of leaving each 
other. They had real togetherness." 

"That's true," Sis said softly, "but 
togetherness for its own sake is no an- 
swer. You can chain two prisoners and 
get togetherness, but who wants it?" 

Not a jack-in-the-box! 

"Of course," Peggy pointed out, 
"there are people who think that, since 
Catholics like us don't sanction divorce, 
this is practically the same as chaining 
two prisoners together and telling them 
they must live out their lives that way. 
The Church does allow separations 
when it is best for the couple or their 
children. And when it comes right down 
to fact, I don't think there's any re- 
ligion that doesn't frown on divorce. 
After all, marriage is a sacrament, and 
you shouldn't pop in and out of it like a 
jack-in-the-box." 

"I don't know the statistics on broken 
marriages in the United States." said 
Kathy, "but, judging from the newspa- 
pers and magazines you read, it is 
mighty high. And I've heard it said 
often that divorce is the cause of much 
of the juvenile delinquency and crime." 

"And I've read, too, that the biggest 
percentage of divorce is in mixed mar- 
riages," Peggy added, "and in mar- 
riages where there is no religion at all. 
It must be very lonely and depressing 
for any child who has no faith to turn 
to. That's why I feel it's so important 
to marry someone of your own religion. 
That way, children don't become con- 
fused by seeing their parents going to 
different churches — or, worse yet, none 
at all." 

"Sis" Lennon herself went through 
her early years without the serenity and 
happiness that faith can bring. Her 
mother was Catholic, her father a Pro- 
testant. Sis was christened a Catholic, 
but never practiced the religion as a 
child. Her parents divorced when she 
was very young. While the difference in 
their religions was not the only cause of 
their separation, it surely contributed. 
One of the things that attracted Sis most 
to Bill was his faith and the importance 
of religion to his family. Even before 
they decided to marry, Sis had made up 
her mind to take instructions and be- 
come a practicing Catholic. She was 
determined her own children would 
have a faith to give them peace of mind. 

"You know," Kathy explained, "we've 
been taught to live up to the teachings 
of God the Father and the brotherhood 
of man. But we — and I'm sure Peggy 
and Janet agree on this, too — don't hold 
with mixed marriages as a general prac- 
tice. The average boy and girl, even if 
they've grown up in the same neighbor- 
hood, are still virtual strangers when 
they go to live as man and wiie. The 
first months of getting to know and ad- 
just to each other — plus facing all the 
problems of running a home and paying 
the bills — must be a hard enough hur- 
dle to pass. The difference in family 
customs, upbringing, outlook, even a 
little thing like the difference in style 
of family joking — all this makes it hard 
for two people when they are newly- 
weds. Now, add a difference in religion 
— not just in how they worship or the 



kind of Bible and hymns they use, but 
how they think about having children, 
the meaning of marriage, and so on — 
well, then the problem of adjustment 
must be even bigger. Why ask for trou- 
ble?" 

"Yes. that's true,'* agreed Peggy. "If 
boys and girls of the same religion date, 
it's only natural that they'll fall in love 
and get married. If they choose to do 
this, as a kind of insurance for their 
future families, it doesn't mean they 
consider themselves superior or intoler- 
ant to other faiths. Catholicism isn't 
the only religion that discourages mixed 
marriages. Judaism and many Protest- 
ant sects also take the stand that, when 
you marry in your own faith, you have 
a better chance for a happy family life." 

Bill nodded. "Too often, when the 
house is divided on religion, the couple 
retreat behind a wall of indifference. 
Then there is no religion at all prac- 
ticed in the home." 

"Yes," said Janet, "then the children 
must have a bad time because they grow 
up without believing in anything. I 
think religion is something the whole 
family should take part in together." 

Another strong "anti-mixed-marriage" 
factor, the Lennons pointed out. is that 
it can cause unhappiness and often 
estrangement, if the families of the 
young couple object. 

Mixed marriage for the girls? 

What if one of the Lennon children 
fell in love with someone of another 
faith? 

"We would point out all the pitfalls, 
all the difficulties of a mixed marriage," 
said both Bill and Sis. "But if they did 
marry, we would do everything in our 
power to get them off to a fine start." 

"Well. I don't think it's likely to hap- 
pen," said Peggy seriously. "I know 
that Kathy, Janet and I always feel 
especially good when Daddy and Moth- 
er and the kids set out for mass togeth- 
er. Getting so many children ready on 
time is a struggle — but it's worth it. I 
don't say that going to the same church 
can hold a marriage together — but it 
helps. And there's something about fac- 
ing a religious wedding ceremony, no 
matter what faith it is in, that makes 
a couple realize the importance of the 
vows they are taking. That means they 
think about marriage a long time before 
taking the step." 

Since religion stresses family life, the 
Lennon girls pointed out that a young 
couple planning marriage are forced to 
look ahead more realistically. DeeDee 
and Dick discussed every facet of their 
future before the wedding. They knew, 
from their months of dating, that they 
liked the same sports, household fur- 
nishings, and friends. That they had 
much in common was obvious. But they 
also realized many things change after 
marriage. That's why they talked over 
honestly any fears or doubts. Too many 
couples, DeeDee feels, are inclined to 
take the attitude of "we'll solve that 
problem when it comes," rather than 
being prepared for it. 

While the Lennon Sisters are aware 
that building a happy marriage takes 
effort, they've learned, from observing 
their own parents, that the rewards are 



SEPTEMBER 



PHOTOPLAY 

MAGAZINE 



EXCLUSIVES! 



MARILYN MONROE 

. . . tells why she posed in the 
nude. Was it daring ... or des- 
perate ? 

LIZ TAYLOR a report 

on why and what makes Liz run 
from man to man. 

HEARTBREAK Debbie 

and Eddie fight over their son's 
religion. 

BOBBY ■ . ■ Kennedy, of 
course ! His enemies call him the 
little brother that Jack built ; his 
friends call him the little brother 
who built Jack. Read this inform- 
ative story before forming your 
own opinion. 

KIM IN THE KREM- 

LIN • • • read about Kim Novak's 
trip to Russia and the friends she 
made there. 

Also — stories about Tuesday 
Weld, Bill Holden, Connie Ste- 
vens, Paula Prentiss. 

ALL IN SEPTEMBER 

PHOTOPLAY 

ON SALE NOW! 



89 



FINISH 
HIGH SCHOOL 

AT HOME 

• Better Jobs • Better Pay 
• More Security 

Without a high school diploma, it's really 
hard to land a choice job with good money 
and a real future. Look at the facts : 

• Government surveys show high school 
graduates make nearly $30 more a week 
than non-graduates. 

• Most companies require a high school 
education for their good jobs. 

• The need for educated people increases — 
but opportunities for the untrained shrink. 
NOW is the time to finish your high school 
education. No need to quit your job. Do it 
at home, in your spare time, like thou- 
sands of men and women of all ages have. 

Skilled instructors help you. Simplified 
teaching methods. Everything is mapped 
out to make it easy. Wayne training is fully 
accredited by Accrediting Commission of 
the N.H.S.C. You get credit for subjects 
you've already completed. With your 
Wayne Diploma, you're on your way to a 
better job, bigger income, a more secure 
future. Free Placement Service, plus 
Guarantee of Success. 

Time flies. So don't handicap 
your future any longer. Act 
now. If you're 17 or over and 
not in school, send coupon for 
Free Book, "Graduate to Suc- 
cess," plus full information. 

WAYNE SCHOOL of 
LA SALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY 
417 S. Dearborn St., Dept. 09-515 
Chicago 5, Illinois 
A Correspondence Institution- Since 1908 
Please send Free Book, "Graduate to Suc- 
cess," plus information on high school 
training at home. No obligation. 




Name 

Address. 
City 



-Age- 



Zone & County- 



^State- 



Accredited Member— National Home Study Council 



1\ SONGS-POEMS 



We need New Ideas 

FOR RECORDING . . . 

Your Songs or Poems could 

EARN MONEY FOR YOU! 

FREE EXAMINATION 

Mail to: STAR-CREST RECORDING CO. 

Dept. K-9, 6602 Lexington Ave., Hollywood 38, Calif. 



WRINKLES GONE 



Look years younger: This is the new sensa- 
tional liquid that Beauty 
editors rave about — A 
drop of this delicate liq- 
uid temporary wrinkle 
remover will smooth out 
your wrinkles like magic 
— Helps smooth away 
frown and smile lines 
too. Firms. Wonderful for 
puffiness under the eyes. 
Thrilling instant results! 

CprplAI OFFPR I Return thts ad with $1 and receive 
OrtblHL UrrLrl . a reBuIar $ 2 .50 bottle prepaid. 

LECHLER, 560 B'way. TS-9, New York 12 

NEW, Tinu, Powerful _, — Vfcfif), 




NO COST! 



/ 



IV 



T 
V 

R 

90 



To get acquainted, I'll send you this 
superbly built Bulova super-powered 
7-transistor "slim line" portable radio. 
Guaranteed one full year. Features pre- 
cision tuning and jewelry styling. Simply hand 
out or mail only twenty get-acquainted coupons FREE to friends or 
relatives and help us get that many new customers as per our 
premium letter. I get so much enjoyment from my beautiful Bulova 
transistor radio that I'm sure you would love one for your home, too. 
Please send me your favorite snapshot, photo or Kodak picture when 
writing for your Bulova radio. We will make you a beautiful 5x7 
inch enlargement in a "Movietone" frame and you can tell friends 
about our hand colored enlargements when handing out the coupons. 
Send today and pay postman only forty-nine cents and a few cents 
for our co.d. service plus postage on arrival. Your original returned. 
Also include the color of hair and eyes with each picture so I can also 
give you our bargain offer on a second enlargement hand colored in 
©B$ for greater beauty, sparkle and life. Limit of 2 to any one person. 
Send today for your 20 FREE coupons to hand out and please enclose 
your name, address and favorite snapshot. Our supply of Bulova 
radios is limited. Mrs. Ruth Long, Gift Manager. 

DEAN STUDIOS 

Dept. X-552, 913 Walnut St., Des Moines 2, Iowa 



worth making every effort you can. 

"Marriage should give a meaning and 
purpose to your life," their mother has 
often told them. "Love is the key that 
opens the door. You begin by loving 
each other. Then, if you are blessed 
with children, you make them part of 
that love." 

Sis and Bill show no partiality among 
their youngsters. Each of their eleven 
children, from 22-year-old DeeDee down 
to 2V2-year-old Christopher, feels that 
he or she has a personal stake in the 
family. They are not just a group of 
brothers and sisters forced through cir- 



ROBERT CONRAD 



(Continued from page 57) 
strictly business and I don't go for the 
same reason I wouldn't go to his office 
parties or I didn't go down to the 
Chicago docks when he was working 
there. I just don't feel it's where I 
belong. 

This year, since I've started studying 
pre-law, I'm in school two out of three 
times when one of these affairs is 
scheduled. Law is something I've al- 
ways wanted to study — my father and 
a brother are attorneys — and now that 
our daughters Joan and Nancy are 
both in school all day I have the time. 
But I needed encouragement to begin, 
and Robert gave me lots of it! He still 
does. 

The only time I ever really partici- 
pated in his "career" was in Chicago. 
He was working at three jobs — a candy 
factory in the afternoon, singing week- 
ends at the Club Hollywood until two 
in the morning, then getting up to 
deliver milk by six. He had already 
missed two mornings that winter, if 
you missed three you were automati- 
cally fired. So Robert insisted he had 
to run the route. I was afraid if he 
went by himself he'd fall asleep stand- 
ing up, so I put on a pair of levis, a 
warm jacket and pulled one of his caps 
over my hair. There was no one I could 
leave the children with so I bundled 
them up and they sat up in the 
front of the truck. Robert would drive 
to a stop, catch a couple of winks, and 
I'd run up to the door with the delivery. 

I was scared to death. The company 
had a very strict rule about not letting 
anyone in the truck except the driver. 
We had to hide from the other milk- 
men — and the housewives. 

You've probably noticed I call him 
Robert. I can't call him Bob yet, it 
just doesn't sound right to me. His 
legal name is Conrad Robert Falk, but 
we started using Conrad as a surname 
when we were married so my parents 
wouldn't find us. (More on that later.) 
When he was growing up, he auto- 
matically used his stepfather's names. 
This has created such a mess that some 
day we're going to gather up all our 
papers and descend on some unsus- 
pecting lawyer to straighten them out — 
or maybe that's one of the things he's 
saving for me. 

We lived just about two miles from 
each other in Chicago, practically on 



cumstance to make the best of living 
together. They have understanding, re- 
spect and good will for one another. 
More important, they know how to com- 
municate what they feel. 

As for the original questions TV 
Radio Mirror brought up: Have mar- 
riage and family life in America gone 
bankrupt? ... If the Lennons are an 
example of American family life, the 
answer is a resounding no\ 

— Eunice Field 

The girls sing on "The Lawrence Welk 
Show," ABC-TV, Sat., 9 to 10 p.m. edt. 



the same street, right on the lake. I 
had seen him around. In the summer 
you see a lot of people who have boats 
at the lake. Finally I met him at a 
party. My first impression was that he 
laughed a lot, everything was a big 
joke, yet he was quiet and well-man- 
nered. I think I was more impressed by 
his good manners than anything else. I 
was wearing a red and white organdy 
dress, and he had on a blue shirt and 
dark blue slacks. It's funny, you do 
remember things like that. 

The party was in June, but it was 
about six weeks before he asked me 
for a date. By mid-August, we were 
dating regularly and making plans to 
be married when we were through col- 
lege. I was a junior in high school then, 
and we were going to come out here 
and go to U.C.L.A. together after grad- 
uation. That was our big dream. 

But my parents had other ideas. They 
had gone to Florida while I finished 
the semester in a convent boarding 
school. Then they decided, rather sud- 
denly it seemed to me, to move me to 
Florida, too. You weren't allowed to 
call boys from the school, so when I 
dialed Robert's number and, luckily, 
he answered, I said, "Hello, Phyllis." 

He said, "What?" and I told him I 
was calling to say goodbye. I was all 
packed and my grandfather was coming 
at noon to pick me up. 

He said, "You don't have to go to 
Florida. You can always marry me," 
and I said "Okay!" real fast. So he 
can't really say I proposed to him. I 
just didn't waste any time when he 
asked me. 

We had a big send-off. When I saw 
him drive up at the school, I just kind 
of dashed away from some nuns I was 
talking with, down four flights of stairs 
and grabbed up my luggage I had al- 
ready cached by the gate. Everybody 
was running in two different directions 
looking for me, and we drove off with 
people in the yard calling after us. 

We were the shock of the whole 
North Shore. My parents, of course, 
were horrified — we didn't tell them 
where we were until the end of May 
and I found I was pregnant. We figured 
it was too late then for them to have it 
annulled. They thought we were so 
young to be getting married. We were, 
too, except for one thing. At seventeen, 
Robert was more ambitious and hard 
working and ready for responsibility 
than a lot of men are at thirty, or fifty 
or a hundred ! 

At the time, he didn't have any 



definite career in mind. He had been 
interested in journalism, but in show 
business, too. He didn't wait around 
trying to find something he "liked." He 
had me to look after now and he in- 
tended to do it. He took a job as a 
dock worker. It paid more than any 
white-collar job he could have gotten 
and they weren't too curious about his 
age. When he told them he was twenty- 
one, the minimum, they took his word 
for it. As little experience as he had 
had with life, he ended up being the 
one in the gang all the other men talked 
to about their problems. If they had 
known they were talking to a seventeen- 
year-old kid! 

The first year, our money didn't go 
very far. He'd cash his check after work 
every Friday and bring home a dozen 
or two dozen roses. We always planned 
the things we were going to do together. 
We still do. After a movie or going out 
for dinner on Saturday and Sunday, 
we'd count up what we had left on Mon- 
day morning. He'd say, "I need this 
much," and I'd say, "I need this much," 
and that would about do it. 

He was delighted when we knew I 
was pregnant. This was something he'd 
always wanted, a family. His mother 
and father were divorced before he was 
two years old. We celebrated our first 
family New Year in the hospital. Joanie 
was born at 7:30 on New Year's Eve 
itself. 

Career investments 

Meanwhile Robert took singing les- 
sons and even dramatics from a pro- 
fessor at Northwestern. He had a friend 
with a band and started singing with 
them at different clubs. 

This was career, and the money he 
made from it went right back into it. 
One of his first major investments was 
a tux. He was pretty proud of it. He 
came home and modeled it for me. 
Even then, he'd rather have not so 
many clothes but things he really liked. 
He's still that way. He likes to be com- 
pletely informal or very dressed up. 
Nothing in between. He has a tennis 
jacket right now which he just adores 
and wears everywhere. It's either all 
or nothing. This is pretty much a com- 
mentary on his whole outlook. 

On Christmas Day of 1954, he was 
laid off at the dock — just three months 
before our second daughter, Nancy, was 
born. Out of necessity, he became a 
milkman. 

All the time, of course, he was look- 
ing for some way to get a start in his 
career. He was very excited and happy 
about meeting Nick Adams when Nick 
came to Chicago for a personal appear- 
ance. Actually, I think they spent only 
one evening together, but Nick is the 
sort of guy who knows whom he likes. 
When Robert decided to make the big 
jump to Hollywood, he felt at least he 
had a toehold in knowing Nick. 

It was a lot more than a toehold. 
Nick's always remained a best friend. 
He took Robert around to agents and 
producers and finally practically 
pushed him into "Hawaiian Eye." That 
took a little time, though — a year and 
a half, to be exact. Much of that time, 
Robert wasn't working. Not even on a 



milk truck. He applied for a route but 
there weren't any openings. 

Now that we look back, that year 
Robert wasn't working was a marvelous 
time. How many men have the oppor- 
tunity to spend a year with their chil- 
dren while they're growing up? I mean, 
to get up with them and have lunch 
with them and dinner every evening. 
He taught them how to swim, how to 
ride their bicycles and took them horse- 
back riding. Even when he'd go on job 
interviews, we'd all go just for the ride 
and wait for him in the car. 

We've always had as much fun with 
the dreams as with the reality. Right 
now our big dream is our house. We 
hope to start building in a few weeks. 
Once we're living in it, there will be 
things that break down or need repairs. 
But now, while it's still a dream, it's all 
enjoyment. 

Robert is happy and enthusiastic 
all the time because he's doing work he 
likes to do. I don't think being in the 
spotlight has changed him at all. He 
still does and says exactly what he 
wishes; he's always been kind of an 
individualist. He has enough confidence 
in himself that he can do any job he 
sets out to do. 

He's interested in all the facets of 
his business — writing, directing, every- 
thing. One day he will be a director, 
too. 

I would like to buy him one of those 
view finders a director uses to see the 
scene as the camera will show it — as 
a surprise. Except that I am terrible at 
surprises. All last year he wanted a set 
of gold cuff links with a star sapphire 
he'd seen. I managed to get them in 
September and hid them away for 
Christmas. I kept my great secret 
exactly two days. Then he was going 
some place, and I couldn't stand it. I 
handed them to him and said, "You 
might as well have these now. when 
you need them." 

There's only one thing that worries 
me about Robert. Being from a family 
of lawyers, I like to see things in writ- 
ing. His idea of a contract is a hand- 
shake. He says this is his way and he's 
built his whole life on handshakes. I've 
had to settle for that, temporarily. 

It's a little difficult to insist on this 
point with Robert. He has as great a 
belief in his friends and associates as 
he has in himself. He is as enthusiastic 
about their successes and their dreams 
as he is about his own. Perhaps this 
is why everybody confides in him. 

I may not share the industry func- 
tions with him, but he's fun to be with 
— and I am with him as much as pos- 
sible. There, I belong. 

— as told to Marie Tinsley 

Robert Conrad co-stars in "Hawaiian 
Eye," on ABC-TV, Wed., 9 p.m. edt. 



Mental Health 
Campaign /-S\ 



Give! 






OPPORTUNITIES 
I0R YOU 




For ad rates, write PCD 

549 W. Washington 

Chicago 6 



EDUCATIONAL & INSTRUCTION (P.W.—Sept '62) 

OUR DIPLOMA CAN Mean $1,500 A Year To You I Yes, high 
school graduates make More. Get Diploma now, at home, in 
spare time. Personalized help from fully accredited school, 
write for Free Book, read about our Guarantee of Success. 
Wayne School, Dept. 09-523, 417 S. Dearborn, Chicago 5, 

Mlinoia. 

COMPLETE YOUR HIGH School at home in spare time with 
63-year-old school. Texts furnished. No classes. Diploma. In- 
formation booklet free. American School, Dept. X674, Drexel 

at 58t h, Chicago 37, Illinois. 

ATTEND BUSINESS SCHOOL at homel Save time and 
expense of attending classes, prepare for secretarial career 
in typing, shorthand, business procedures, bookkeeping. 
Write for catalog. Wayne School, 417 S. Dearborn, Dept. 

09-541, Chicago 5, III. 7 __ 

BE A DENTAL assistant A well paying, uncrowded field. 
Prepare at home for big pay career. Chairside duties, recep- 
tion, laboratory, personality development. Free book. Wayne 
School, Dept. 09-544, 421 S. Dearborn, Chicago 5, III. 
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA at home. Licensed teachers. 
Approved materials. Southern States Academy, Station E-1, 

Atlanta, Georgia. 

MEDICAL SECRETARY HOME Study Boston Institute 

725X Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

OF INTEREST TO WOMEN 

BEAUTY DEMONSTRATORS— TO $5.00 hour demonstrat- 
ing Famous Hollywood Cosmetics, your neighborhood. For 
free samples, details, write Studio Girl, Dept. 30C29, Glen- 

dale. California. 

$300 PAID FOR Your Child's Picture by advertisers. Send 
small photo. (All ages.) Returned. Print child's, parent's name, 
address. Spotlite, 1611-P9 LaBrea, Hollywood, California. 
DRESSES 24c; SHOES 39c; Men's suits $4.95; trousers 
$1.20. Better used clothing. Free catalog. Transworld, 164- A 

Christopher, Brooklyn 12. N.Y. 

MAKE $25-50 week, clipping newspaper items for publishers. 
Some clippings worth $5 each. Particulars Free. National, 

81, Knickerbocker Station, New York City. 

EARN MONEY AT home, sewing aprons for merchants. We 
supply materialsl Write: Jiffy Aprons, Fort Walton Beach 16, 

Florida. 

EARN $50.00 FAST, Sewing Aprons. Details Free. Redykuf s, 

LoQanville, Wisconsin. 

EARN UP TO $2.00 hour sewing babywearl Free Details. 

Cuties, Warsaw 1, Indiana. ^_ 

HOME TYPING FOR Advertisers. Instructions $1. Merit, 42 

Warren, Brentwood, New York. , 

AGENTS * HELP WANTED __ 

MAKE $50.00 SELLING 25 boxes of our personalized Christ- 
mas cards. 49 exclusive designs. Free album. No obligation. 
Write Elmcraft, Dept. EC-7, 5930 So. Western, Chicago 36. III. 
60% PROFIT COSMETICS $25 day up. Hire others. Sam- 
ples, details. Studio Girl— Hollywood, Glendale, California, 

Dept. 30H29. 

$35 TO $75 regularly, sparetime, demonstrating cosmetics to 
neighbors, waiting customers. $10 Demonstration Kit Free on 
Trial. Lucky Heart Cosmetics, Dept. 4JX, Memphis, Tenn. 
EARN EXTRA MONEY selling Advertising Book Matches. 
Free sample kit furnished. Matchcorp, Dept. WP-92, Chicago 

32, Illinois. 

BUSINESS & MONEY MAKING OPPORTUNITIES 
MAKE TELEPHONE SURVEYS Spare Timel Free home- 
business details. No selling, choose your own hours. Tele- 
phone Institute, Dept. HC2369, 1038 South La Brea, Los 

Angeles 19, Calif. 

MAKE BIG MONEY invisibly mending damaged garments 
at home. Details Free. Fabricon, 1589 HowardT Chicago 26 . 

STAMP COLLECTING 

SMASHING COLLECTION FREE— Includes Triangles, 
Early United States, Rockets, Sports, British Colonies, High 
Value Pictorials, etc. Complete Collection plus big, illustrated 
Magazine, all free. Send 10c for postage. Gray Stamp Co., 

Dept. PC, Toronto, Canada. 

LOANS BY MAIL 

NEWI BORROW $800. Anywhere. Increased Loan Limit. Air 
Mail Service. Postal Finance, 308 Francis Building, Depart- 

ment 63-P, Louisville, Kentucky. , 

MUSIC * MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

SONGPOEMS WANTED FOR Musical setting. Free exami- 
nation. Get "the Nashville Sound" in your songs and records. 
Send Poems: Music City Songcrafters, 6145-A, Acklen 

Station, Nashville, Tenn. 

SONGWRITERS, WITH PUBLISHER contacts, want song 
ideas. Share royalties. No fees. Send poems: Songwriters' 

Associates, 1650 Broadway, N.Y. 19-Y. 

POEMS NEEDED FOR songs and records. Rush poems. 
Crown Music, 49-PW West 32, New York 1. 




PHOTO SPECIALS 

Greatest Values 
Ever Offered.'.' 

ENLARGED FROM ANY SNAP- 
SHOT, PHOTO OR NEGATIVE 



EACH GROUP 



4 5x7 ENLARGEMENTS 

1 COLORED IN OIL 

or 

2 8x10 ENLARGEMENTS 
I COLORED IN OIL 



11x14 Colored in Oil (only 1 to a customer) 
Send payment with order. 

Color Eyes Color Hair Color Clothes 

PERSONALITY PORTRAIT, Dept. M, 1204 B'way, N.Y.I 



plus 25c 

for handling 

& pottage 



$1.98 



T 
V 
R 

91 



T 
V 
R 

92 



CLEAR UP ACNE-PIMPLES 



with 
2 

tiny 

Capsules 

a day! 




IMPORTANT 

The Halsion Plan is 
fully guaranteed. 
Because individual 
experiences may 
vary, you must get 
satisfactory results or 
every penny will be 
refunded. 

(Not available in Canada' 



A wonderful new 

vitamin formula 

No more sticky 

ointments 

No more greasy creams 

Full 30 day supply 

$3.95 



The Halsion Plan 
for complexion care 
is ' enclosed with 
each order. 



lalsiori 

a njw or INTEMUL 
■cwcuriM urn cut 

ACNE ■ PIMPLES 



Halsion 

By ALLAN _ 



ALLAN DRUG CO. d.* 1321 

5880 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Calif. 

D I enclose $3.95, check or money order, Halsion 

pays the postage. 
D Please rush C.O.D. 30-day supply of Halsion. 

I agree to pay postage. 
It is my understanding that if I am not satisfied I 
may return the unused capsules or empty bottle for 
prompt refund. 

Name 



{please print) 



Address. 



City. 



, Zone . 



-Stale- 



POEMS WANTED 



To Be Set To Music 

Send one or more of your best poems 

today for FREE EXAMINATION Any 

Subject. Immediate Consideration. 

Phonograph Records Made 

CROWN MUSIC CO., 49 W. 32 St., Studio 560, New York 1 



Woman Nearly 
Itches To Death 

"/ nearly itched to death for 

7'Ayears. Thenl found anew 

wonder-working creme. 

Now I'm happy," writes 

Mrs. P. Ramsay ofL. A. Calif. 

Here's blessed relief from the 

tortures of vaginal itch, rectal 

itch, chafing, rash and 

eczema with an amazing 

new scientific formula called LANACANE. This 

fast-acting, stainless medicated creme kills harmful 

bacteria germs while it soothes raw, irritated and 

inflamed skin tissue. Stops scratching and so speeds 

healing. Don't suffer ! Get LANACANE at druggists 

Super-Soft Dr. Scholl's 
Zino-pad s speedily relieve 
painful pressure on sen- 
sitive spot, soothe and 
cushion it. Enjoy real re- 
lief as millions do with 
Dr. Scholl's — world's 
largest-selling foot aids. 



\'oifi D-Scholls lino pads 





'AS THE WORLD TURNS 



IT 



IIIIIIIIIIIIM1IMIIIIIII 



(Continued from page 55) 
real life, families may become drawn 
together for no other reason than that 
they happen to live across the street 
from each other. Or they may have just 
one special interest in common — such 
as bowling! Or perhaps the two bread- 
winners work at similar jobs or for the 
same company. 

There are also times when families 
form close ties for purely emotional 
reasons. Not being the kind that makes 
friends easily, they might cling to each 
other out of sheer loneliness. And then 
there are those who make friends in 
order to fill their special neurotic needs. 
A family in a lower economic bracket 
might seek out a more well-to-do fam- 
ily which enjoys higher social status. 
This flatters their ego, gives them a 
feeling of importance — and the other 
family feeds their own ego on the re- 
spect of their admiring friends! 

To have really close ties, families 
needn't dovetail together as completely 
as the Hugheses and Cassens, but they 
should have as much in common as 
possible. Their backgrounds and chief 
interests should be similar, and all 
members of both families should get 
along well together. If the wives are 
close — but the husbands are not — 
friendship can't truly blossom. The men, 
in fact, may resent being forced to so- 
cialize and may demand that the girls 
break off their relationship. 

The Hughes family is especially in- 
teresting because there are four genera- 
tions living together under one roof: 
Grandpa Hughes, Chris and Nancy, 
Bob and Lisa and their little boy. 

Lisa often complains that her mother- 
in-law interferes too much in her fam- 
ily. She's been attending night school 
and busily socializing in sorority ac- 
tivities, and especially dislikes being 
criticized for not spending enough time 
with her child. Still, when Bob sug- 
gests that they can afford to move into 
an apartment of their own, now that 
he's finished his internship, Lisa re- 
fuses to move, knowing that here she 
has a "built-in" baby-sitter. 

Reconciled with her own husband, 
Jeff, Penny no longer lives at home. 
Neither does Don, who's a recent bride- 
groom. But, even without them, it's a 
very busy household and all members 
are close and see each other regularly. 

The Hughes family seems to be biting 
off more than they can chew, in having 
their son's family live with them. This 
is pushing togetherness to the breaking 
point — for it's a rare group of people 
who can keep four generations happy 
under one roof! 

Lisa undoubtedly shrinks from taking 
the giant step to womanhood because 
she is too insecure to summon up the 
necessary courage. The Hughes home 
offers her more than a roof over her 
head — or even a baby-sitter. The pres- 
ence of a successful father-in-law, a 
strong mother-in-law and a respected 
oldster like Grandpa surrounds her 
with the emotional support she craves 
so she can remain the child that she 
obviously is. 



This puts Nancy in a difficult posi- 
tion and forces her to play two roles. 
She is, in fact, grandmother to Lisa's 
small son but she is, in deed, also his 
mother, since she tends to him so much. 
Like so many real-life women in her 
position, her unconscious may play 
tricks with her mind, in this respect. 
She may find it necessary to criticize 
Lisa, the real mother, because she un- 
consciously is competing with her! 

In situations like this, the suspicion 
arises that women like Nancy are ex- 
tremely possessive and, in their heart 
of hearts, do not really want to let any 
part of their family go. 

The lost child 

The Cassen family structure is quite 
different. Dr. Doug Cassen and his wife 
Claire, who was married previously, 
have had many stormy moments. Claire 
has wanted to leave Doug, and at one 
time became so emotionally and physi- 
cally ill that she attempted suicide. In 
spite of this, Doug stood by her. 

Also living in the Cassen home is her 
first husband's father, Judge Lowell, 
who is greatly respected by Doug. And 
there is her daughter Ellen — who, some 
years ago, gave birth out of wedlock 
and put the child out for adoption. 
Ellen has learned the identity of the 
adoptive parents and is now intent on 
regaining her child — especially because 
the adoptive mother has since died, and 
she herself is engaged to marry. 

The breadwinner of the Cassen fam- 
ily has had plenty to contend with! A 
busy doctor, Doug was denounced by 
Judge Lowell for being so absorbed in 
his work that he neglected his wife — 
helping to drive her into another man's 
arms and to bring on her severe mental 
state. Doug took the tongue-lashing, 
offered to make amends by giving Claire 
a divorce, if she insisted. But she in- 
terpreted this to mean that he is in 
love with another woman. Meanwhile, 
she has rejected psychiatric help. 

The Cassens are a good example of 
the kind of family that clings together 
— not in spite of — but because of their 
emotional problems. They seem to 
thrive on hurting and being hurt. It 
may seem strange, but this sort of 
high-pitched behavior is what keeps 
them all together. Such families are 
far from unique; you see them every- 
where. In this case, Judge Lowell 
seems to be a powerful father-figure 
to all the Cassens — perhaps symboliz- 
ing the strong, stable parent they 
wished for but never really had. 

Claire would certainly benefit more 
from psychiatric treatment than from a 
divorce! At this point, it's impossible 
to state why she attempted suicide. Was 
she so oppressed by her immediate 
problem that she saw no other way out? 
Was she trying to "punish" her hus- 
band? Or was it something that had 
been building up for many years, wait- 
ing only for the right opportunity? 
Only intense psychiatric examination 
can tell. 

The over-busy husband who neglects 
his family may be forced to work so 
long and hard in order to support them 
adequately. Or he may bury himself in 
his work, just to get away from them! 



In the latter case, if his wife should 
decide to walk out on him, he may not 
care — except for the hurt to his ego. 

As for Ellen — or any of today's le- 
gion of unwed mothers — one can only 
speculate why she wants back the child 
she once gave up. The usual reason is 
guilt. Ellen may feel, now that her 
child is motherless, he needs her. But 
that could be merely a rationalization 
of her "guilt" feelings. It may be she 
who needs the child. 

In both families, there are times 
when trickery and subterfuge are re- 
sorted to. In the Hughes home, when 
Penny's estranged husband sent her a 
letter, her mother withheld it from her 
— and when Jeff tried to see Penny to 
effect a reconciliation, Nancy went out 
of her way to prevent their meeting. 
And young Dr. Bob almost ruined a 
patient's marriage by concealing the 
performance of a hysterectomy from her 
fiance — until after the operation. 

In the Cassen family, Ellen avoided 
telling the man she hopes to marry 
about having had a baby out of wedlock 
— despite the fact that the child had 
been adopted by someone in the same 
community. She only divulged her story 
after learning that the adoptive mother 
had died and she felt she had a better 
claim to regaining her child. 

Even Judge Lowell — when Doug was 
being sued for malpractice — cooked up 
a fictitious story, to prevent word get- 
ting around about Claire's suicide at- 
tempt. That was the real reason why 
Doug hadn't been able to attend the 
unfortunate patient who died. And, of 
course, the truth eventually came out. 

But they meant well 

Sooner or later, the truth always 
comes out, no matter how cleverly we 
try to hide it. Most of us know this 
and, when we disregard it, live in miser- 
able anxiety under the ever-present 
threat of being found out someday. 
Aside from any moral issues, duplicity 
must be condemned because of the tre- 
mendous burden of guilt it places on 



FRED MacMURRAY 



(Continued from page 47) 
In short order, she was playing and 
singing on the Juvenile Theater over 
Station WHBF. This is a girl who 
never had a teen-age life and that's 
probably one reason why she values a 
woman's life so much. . . .Two years 
ago, I got her to work one deal. I was 
on a "Lucy" show and the gag was 
that I'd lost my allowance and had to 
call home a couple of times to explain 
my plight. Desi suggested it would be 
great to get June to come in and ap- 
pear in the final scene, and she finally 
did come in — one day. But it meant 
getting up terribly early, leaving the 
house before the children were awake, 
getting home after they'd gone to bed. 
"I just wouldn't ever do it again," she 
said. "Never!" And I think she means 
never. She's found the way of life that's 
for her, she enjoys the children, she is 



the one who practices it. And parents 
who play lightly with the truth will 
find that their children follow in their 
footsteps and make deceit a part of 
their character, too. 

Of course, we always mean well when 
we tell a little white lie. But sometimes 
we take liberties we aren't entitled to. 
When Penny's mother tried to prevent 
her daughter's reconcilation, she was 
making a decision which was not hers 
to make. Bob did likewise, when he de- 
cided for his patient. But they meant 
well. 

Ellen wasn't honest with her fiance 
for fear she'd lose him. But that's 
no way to start a marriage. And Judge 
Lowell allowed his personal feelings 
to interfere with justice — actually 
jeopardizing Doug's defense by falsi- 
fying the facts. 

The Hugheses and the Cassens are 
protective of their own and of each 
other. Whatever one family might lack, 
the other seems ready to supply— 
whether it be emotional stability or 
professional guidance. They truly sup- 
port each other and it shouldn't be 
at all surprising if they get on well to- 
gether. 

Families often become too insepa- 
rable and begin to get on each other's 
nerves. You've seen this happen when 
two close groups take a lengthy vaca- 
tion together. In constant company with 
one another, they start interpreting 
every friendly gesture as an intrusion on 
their privacy. But the Hugheses and 
Cassens manage to retain their privacy 
without loss of their friendship. They're 
held together by common interests, mu- 
tual concern — and just enough differ- 
ences in temperament to make them 
need each other! 

Next month, we'll apply our psycho- 
logical yardstick to another of your 
favorite daytime dramas and deal with 
another important aspect of human re- 
lations, hoping to make their problems 
meaningful in your own life. — The End 

"As the World Turns" is seen over 
CBS-TV, M-F, 1:30 to 2 p.m. edt. 



happy, so am I. Actually, this way, 
when I come home from the studio with 
my problems, she understands them, 
but we're lucky enough not to have two 
sets of those problems. And, inciden- 
tally, she's very much the same June 
I fell in love with, a girl bubbling with 
vitality, very real, very curious and 
eager about life. She never was focused 
on herself, as many actors are. She was 
always concerned about other people, 
the world, everything. The only change : 
Her hair is brown and it's very attrac- 
tive — I like it even better than the 
blonde and I guess she senses that. 
Sometimes she says she feels like being 
a blonde again, but she hasn't changed 
it. 

A lot of our way of life is thanks to 
her. It isn't easy to walk into a family 
with a ten-year-old son and a fourteen- 
year-old daughter — and that, of course, 
is what she did. That first year was 
pretty rough. Kids the age of Rob and 
Sue aren't about to listen. Not to any- 
one. They're absolutely positive no one 



lipue Experience 

• FOR • 

TODAYS 

YOUNG 

WOMAN 

Every issue of True Experience 
brings readers a brand new ex- 
perience ... an opportunity to 
share the joys and heartaches 
of young women in all walks 
of life. Read these searching 
dramas and find the answers to 
your own problems from lessons 
others have learned. 







SEPTEMBER ISSUE: 

• Surprise Family 

• I Took Another 

Woman's Name 

• Meddling Teen 

• Memorable Alaskan 
Adventure 

SPECIAL: 

• Your secret weapon 
against divorce 



ALL IN SEPTEMBER 

Tiiie Experience 

ON SALE NOW 



93 




Jlk 



FASHION CATALOG 

SENT ^-7^ 



To you who are OVER 57" — new 
Fall fashions priced no higher than 
regular misses' sizes. Style shown is 
100% acetate jersey, crease-resistant 
and hand washable. Striped in multi- 
colors. Sizes: 12 to 22. Other styles 
and fabrics, $3.69 through $22.98. 
Sizes 10 to 24. Also coats, shoes, 
lingerie, suits, sportswear. MAIL 
COUPON FOR FREE "TALL GIRLS" 
CATALOG. 



Over Five-Seven Shops, Dept. T-8 

465 Fifth Ave., New York 17, N.Y. 

Please send FREE Tall Fashion Catalog to: 

name 



address 



post office 



state 



F-62 



rnrr framed 5x7 enlargement 

rl\CE COLORED IN OILS 



plus 25c 

handling 
& postage 



plwr'" - iiiiMii^ 



2'/i" x 316" photos made on profes- 1 
lional paper. Send photo, snapshot or I 
neg. today with $1.25 (originals re- I 
turned unharmed). State color of hair, 
eyes, clothing. DISCOUNT PHOTO SERVICE 
Dept; 2, 135 B'woy, N. Y. 3, N. Y. 



A S 




|p into DOLLARS! 

'€="= NEW Songwriters, Poets, Composers may gain 
Ns&S SUCCESS, FAME, WEALTH. Songs Composed, 
|||= PUBLISHED. Appraisals, details FREE from . . . 

VNORDYKE SONGS & MUSIC 

f 6000 Sunset, HOLLYWOOD 287. California, U. S. A. 



*How ; j 
tc 



MAKE MONEY with 
Simple CARTOONS' 



book everyone who like s to draw 
should have. It is free; no 
obligation. Simply address 



FREE 
BOOK 



T 

Y 

R 

94 



rARTOONISTS' EXCHANGE 
Dept. 599 Pleasant Hill, Ohio 



YOU CAN ' 

SEE & TASTE 

.WHAT IT DOES *. 
for GRAVIES and 
BRUSHING MEATS 



GR4VV 
MUSTER 

MEMBER BRAND NAMES FOUNDATION 



Be A Hotel- f 
Motel Hostess k 



ENJOY YOUR WORK! Fascinat- 
ing positions and a sound future 
await trained men and women 
in the hotel, motel and hospitality field. Lewis 
graduates "making good" as Hostess, Executive 
Housekeeper, Manager, Social or Food Director, 
and 55 other types of well-paid positions. Previous 
experience proved unnecessary. Lewis training 
qualifies you at home or through resident classes 
in Washington. Lewis Nationwide Placement Serv- 
ice FREE of extra cost. June Young writes: "After 
graduating, I became Club Manager-Hostess of a 
dining and social club and find my work very inter- 
esting." Write for fascinating Free Book. "Your 
Golden Opportunity." Accredited by N. H. S. C. 

Course Approved for ALL Veteran Training 

LEWIS HOTEL TRAINING SCHOOL Jfi » uccw . PUL , 

SU. HO-118-Ol, Washington 7, D.C. *W\j YEAR I 



understands them, especially parents. A 
radical change like this is hard for chil- 
dren, suddenly having a new mother 
and a new home. 

But June was a mother . . . from the 
beginning. Sue and Rob eventually 
couldn't resist that. They found they 
could rely on her in a pinch. I don't 
think I have to explain about teen-age 
kids and what you go through. But an 
amazing thing happens: Suddenly they 
come out of it. Our Sue never picked up 
her room in her life, you never saw such 
a mess. She couldn't cook, she wasn't 
interested in cooking, she was the least 
domestic teenager in America. Now she 
runs a spic and span household of her 
own, cooks up a storm, is an excellent 
wife and is great with her two kids, 
Freddie, two, and Stevie, five months. 
And Rob is a freshman at the Univer- 
sity of San Francisco and is interested 
in psychiatry. 

I'd always looked forward to the time 
when they would be over the hurdles 
and then I'd have a chance to travel 
with June and do all the things I'd 
never done. I was sure June understood 
all that. Then one night after we'd been 
married about three years, I found my- 
self at a party totally surrounded by 
doctors. The party was at a doctor's 
house. Dr. Prucher, the O.B. man I play 
golf with, was there . . . now that I 
think of it, almost every man in the 
room was an O.B. man. Of course, June 
has always done a lot of work at St. 
John's Hospital, working with the sis- 
ters, helping with the paraplegics, so 
we know some doctors. . . . This night 
Dr. Prucher cornered me. 

"We have a wonderful baby coming 
up soon for adoption," he said. 

I shrugged that off. "June under- 
stands how I feel about this. Thanks, 
anyway." 

"I understand," he said. 

Fadeout. A few weeks later, I was 
playing golf and, when I came in to the 
clubhouse, there was a message to 
phone Dr. Prucher. 

"Sit down," he said. 

"What's happened?" 

"The baby's here." 

"Boy or girl?" I asked automatically. 

"Girl . . . two of them, as a matter of 
fact." 

June, of course, was in a state of rap- 
ture. Six weeks later, we got them out 
of the incubator and brought them 
home, and they are dolls, real dolls. 
How could I possibly imagine life with- 
out them? 

As for the traveling. . . . When they 
were two years old, we took our long- 
awaited trip to Europe — and stayed ten 
days. I couldn't wait to get home. The 
next trip to Europe was this year, for 
"Bon Voyage," and the four of us had a 
ball. In Paris, we hired a nurse because 
I was working and we didn't want to 
disrupt their schedule with late dinners, 
etc. But the nurse deal didn't work out. 
So, from there on, we were on our own, 
as we've always been. 

Really a saxophone player 

When I'm working, I work hard, but 
when I go home, I'm not an actor. I've 
never considered myself an actor, never 
thought of myself that way. Maybe be- 



cause I started as a saxophone player, 
maybe because I never had any acting 
ambitions and it was just something 
that happened. ... I happened to be in 
the right place at the right time and, 
without doing a thing about it, was 
hauled out to Hollywood and, in six 
months, I was a star. I didn't even know 
that a star was supposed to make some- 
thing more than $250 a week until I be- 
gan looking around at the way the stars 
lived. 

Carole Lombard was the one who put 
me wise. We were making a picture and 
she suggested I go to Palm Springs for 
a few days. 

"But we have to work tomorrow," I 
said. 

"Listen, Buster," Carole said, "go to 
Palm Springs." 

I went. I got a raise. It's lucky I 
wasn't canned. 

But, as I say, I just never felt like an 
actor. An actor, to me, is someone like 
Brando or Guinness who can step into 
different roles and be different. I'm a 
guy doing a job. At home I'm some- 
thing else again, a sort of a Mr. Fix-It, 
always have been, always had a work- 
shop in the house and carpenter's tools, 
and I'm always tinkering around with 
light sockets or plumbing. As a matter 
of fact, when Sue and Rob were small, 
they thought I was a carpenter — that's 
what they always saw me doing. It was 
kind of a shock when they found out I 
was an actor. Times have changed and 
kids' sophistication has changed. The 
twins see "My Three Sons," watch TV 
and are pretty hep. 

Sometimes my tinkering turns out 
fine, but I've been known to have duds. 
There was the day I took the toaster 
apart and finally had to pile it all in a 
bag and take it in to the shop. And 
there was the day the tub was leaking 
in June's bath and I couldn't at first 
figure out how to get in the needed 
washer — faucets and spout come out of 
a marble slab. I waited until the 
plumber was there, fixing our water 
heater and asked him how to go about 
it. He said the marble would have to 
come off but he wasn't about to do it — 
he was afraid of cracking the slab. 

I got the marble off with a hacksaw 
blade, unscrewed spout and handle, put 
in the washer and got it all back to- 
gether. I was feeling pretty pleased 
with myself, too. 

We were having lunch when our girl 
rushed in, her face absolutely white. 
"Come look at the living room," she 
said. We dashed to the living room and 
there was hot water pouring through 
the ceiling and all over the paneled 
walls. 

"What did you do?" the plumber 
yelled at me. 

"What did you do?" I yelled at the 
plumber. 

Well, what we'd done was this: The 
water had been turned off while I was 
tinkering, he'd turned it off because of 
the work he was doing on the water 
heater. I'd left a faucet open, not know- 
ing. Then he'd turned the water back 
on. This is what can happen. 

Of course what looked like a- catas- 
trophe that day is child's play now. 
Ours was one of the houses in the re- 
cent fire, and we were only too happy 



I 



to flood it with water to save what we 
could of it. We were lucky. Many peo- 
ple lost everything. We didn't lose too 
many things that couldn't be replaced. 

You know, everyone should make a 
list of things they should do. things they 
would want to save. Then, if disaster 
should strike, grab the list ! I did pretty 
well — to a point. I ran in the house and 
packed a suitcase with pictures, movies 
and photographs of the children which 
were irreplaceable. Then I went out 
and got on the roof and left the suitcase 
in the house! If it had burned to the 
ground, they would be gone. So, make a 
list. Have we made ours yet? Well, no. 
not yet, but everyone should! 

We're living in a rented house while 
our home is being rebuilt. June is hav- 
ing a ball picking wallpapers and fab- 
rics, because the whole place has to be 
redone. It will be finished soon and it 
will be nice to get back home again. 

Recipe for happiness 

When I finished work on "My Three 
Sons" for the season, I had some time 
off. I went steelhead-fishing for a few 
days in Northern California, and then 
June's aunt and uncle stayed with the 
twins and June flew up and met me at 
Monterey, where I played in the Crosby 
Golf Tournament. It was pretty wild ! It 
snowed. My golf isn't too great in good 
weather, but it was fun. I played with 
Jimmy E. Thompson, and his wife and 
June walked around with us. At night. 



LESLIE UGGAMS 



(Continued from page 45) 
Cotton Club, resolved ten years ago that 
her youngest daughter was to be a 
dancer, and taught little Leslie many of 
the tap routines she had known at the 
club. With these routines "down pat," 
Mrs. Uggams watched for notices of 
auditions for kiddie talent shows, and 
took Leslie to as many of them as she 
could manage. Leslie landed featured 
spots on the shows here and there, 
and very often won prizes. 

"Those were pretty tough days," says 
Leslie's father now, "but we pulled 
through all right. I had sung with the 
Hall-Johnson Choir, but my voice gave 
out as I grew older, and I got a job 
as elevator operator in a Park Avenue 
apartment house — a job I still have, 
by the way. It was always a thrill to me 
when Leslie appeared in some show or 
another, at school, at our local movie on 
Saturday, or wherever." 

In fact, Leslie's whole family was, 
at one time or another, involved with 
with show business. Her aunt Eloise has 
appeared in several of the Broadway 
revivals of "Porgy and Bess," even now 
sings in her church choir. Leslie had 
sung ever since she was a little girl in 
the junior chorus at St. James Presby- 
terian Church. But under her mother's 
urging, dancing had long been her 
greatest interest. 

Once, Mrs. Uggams took little Leslie 
to an audition for the "Milton Berle 
Show." To her delight and amazement, 



there'd always be get-togethers. One 
night, it was at the Hatlos. I had my 
sax in the car and Phil Harris and a 
couple of others joined in and we had 
a jam session. June knows all the songs. 
She sang and it was quite an evening, 
all told. 

We like this sort of thing. When we 
go up to Black Lake, fishing in Colo- 
rado, I always take my sax along, too. 
Last year, Freddie Karger and Jane 
Wyman were with us and every night 
Freddie and I would go to work. Every- 
body sang, it was great. We like the 
outdoors, we love going up to the ranch. 
When we were up there, last Thanks- 
giving, it rained most of the time. But 
we loved it ! We built fires, walked, took 
jeep rides, had a look at our herd of 
Black Angus cattle, had friends in to 
dinner. That's how we live. 

And if the children wake in the night. 
. . . Last night, it was Laurie. They 
must have seen something on television 
that was too exciting — we try to control 
this, but once in a while — and the poor 
little kid was crying in her sleep, while 
Katie slept straight through. June and 
I were both up and in their room, pat- 
ting Laurie's back, watching the two 
of them, growing in their sleep. It's a 
wonderful feeling . . . beautiful . . . 
something you have to make for your- 
selves, something no book can tell you 
the recipe for. — The End 

Fred MacMurray stars in "My Three 
Sons," ABC-TV, Thurs., 9 p.m. edt. 



Leslie was signed for the show. After 
Leslie had made several appearances, 
Milton's mother, Sandra Berle, went 
backstage to meet the little girl. She 
was speechless at the sound of Leslie's 
lovely voice as she sang softly to her- 
self in her dressing room. Turning to 
Leslie's mother, Mrs. Berle whispered 
urgently, "That child of yours is going 
to be a star some day, I'm sure of it! 
But her greatest talent is singing !" 

Leslie went on dancing, though, on 
Milton Berle's show, and each week 
Mrs. Berle would come backstage and 
say to Leslie's mother, "What are we 
doing for that child? She should be 
singing!" 

After Milton Berle's show, Leslie's 
next big break was with Peter Lind 
Hayes, who booked her once on his 
show and then was so pleased that he 
kept bringing her back, again and 
again. More than that, he praised her 
to people in power in television, and 
her name and face became familiar 
around the studios. 

Leslie was booked on the "Arthur 
Godfrey Show" and the great man him- 
self shook his head in wonderment: 
"Such a big voice from such a very 
little girl! This child will be a big 
star soon. I am sure of it." 

It was two years later, when she was 
fourteen, that the first "small miracle" 
occurred. She was only watching TV, 
but that was the beginning of a chain 
of events that would lead to the greatest 
miracle of all. The show was "Name 
That Tune." Contestants identified 
songs and viewers were urged to send 



bliss! painless sleep! no pins! no rollers ever again! 




SALON-STYLE HAIR-SET IN MINUTES! 

FOR BOUFFANT— CLEOPATRA— FLIP-UP 

PAGE BOY-FLUFF-BEEHIVE-CHEMISE 

Newest advance in electric hair curling! Set 
your hair safely, easily with MAR-ROL ELECTRIC 
ROLLER CURLER by Gene Pauldine, U. L. Ap- 
proved. Quick-twirl curls into enchanting waves, 
'firm' or casual set, keep hairdo fresh from 
one salon visit to the next! Ideal for travel, 
plugs in anywhere! Skip nightly pin-ups 
forever, order NOW! ' 

Complete with Roller Attachments in 3 sizes, 
small, medium and large with <"TQQ 
"Put-Away" Box and full in- $/70 
structions! / Complete 

Add 50< for postage and handling 
10 day Money Back Guarantee 

Enclose Check, or M. 0. 
REMINGTON RESEARCH, Dep't. M-18 

220 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. 



Write to.- 



Learn Profitable Profession 

in few months at Home 



M 




WOMEN AND MEN, 18 TO 60 

$4.00 to $10.00 for 1-hour treatment is the established 
charge for a skilled operator. Easy to learn and do. 
Diploma awarded. Open your own office or earn good 
income from Doctors, Hospitals. Clubs and other 
health or recreational centers. Wonder- 
ful part-time profession. Low monthly 
payments. Write today for free Anatomy 
Charts and catalog. No obligation. 

ANDERSON SCHOOL OF SCIENTIFIC MASSAGE 

Dept. Lie, Princeton, Illinois 



BUDDY BREGMAN 

MUSIC PRODUCTIONS 



d WANTS POEMS 1 



GOIDV/YN 
STUDIOS 



. . to be developed into 
| NEW SONGS for Recording and Promotion. Buddy Bregman 
has been musical director for— -^ BING CROSBY 
it ELLA FITZGERALD . . and many other top artists. 

Send POEMS today tor FREE ejcommofion to: 

, 6UD0Y BREGMAN MUSIC PRODUCTIONS kl| 
Opt. 1321,7868 Willoughby, Los Angeles 48, Calif. I 




LIVE SEAHORSES 

Receive LIVE MATED DWARF SEA- 
HORSES, by Air Mail from FLA. Sup- 
ply of food, our catalog with simple 
instructions for raising these fascinat- 
ing little creatures from the deep. All 
you need is a Jar, Bowl or Aquarium. 
Every one young or old enjoys watch- 
ing their bizarre movements. Educa- 
tional, Interesting, and Hardy. GUAR- 
ANTEED LIVE DELIVERY— Air Mail 
PPD. $3.50 a Pair— $7.00 SPECIAL: 
Order TWO PAIR and receive another 
PAIR FREE. 

F. F. MARINE LIFE 
P. O. BOX 626-MW Dania, Fla. 




$50.00 FREE MERCHANDISE 

every few weeks. Furniture, famous- 
brand dresses, blankets, sheets, 
i v silverware, china, etc. Fabulous 
rewards for minutes a week. You 
DON'T buy or sell. Just show giant 

iujjt^ v catalog to a few friends. $l-weekly 
Club Plan backed by multi-million- 
dollar assortments. Members save 
20%. YOUR selections are FREE. 
\ Easy and it's fun. No risk. Mail 

I It Cli I cou P° n for fu " details and free 

f |f -"^-j 300-page catalog. 

GRACE HOLMES CLUB PLAN 
Dept. A713, Ashton, Rhode Island 

, GRACE HOLMES CLUB PLAN 

I Dept. A713, Ashton, Rhode Island 

I Name 

I Address 

| City State 




FREE 

WRITE FOR 
COMPLETE 

CATALOG 



T 
V 
R 

95 



in lists of songs to be used in the quiz. 
Impulsively, Leslie mailed in her list of 
songs, and a few days later she saw her 
name flashed on the screen. Her list had 
been picked! 

Then came the $25,000, a miracu- 
lous sum that could hardly be called 
"small." She appeared on "Name That 
Tune," and, teamed for several weeks 
with a truck driver, split that amount 
with him in May, 1958, just a few days 
after her fifteenth birthday. Harry Sal- 
ter, producer of the show, was so im- 
pressed with Leslie's knowledge and 
ability that he scheduled her for a 
song appearance. The ratings the show 
received were as high as her hopes. 

She was on her way. Now she en- 
gaged two managers, Mort Curtis and 
Al Wilde, and went on tour. She drew 
full houses wherever she went. In the 
fall of 1958, Leslie enrolled at the 
world-famous Juilliard School of Music 
in New York. 

"The instruction at Juilliard, plus the 
actual performances on television and 
on tour — even to small audiences — gave 
me a confidence and sense of poise I 
never had before," says Leslie. "I made 
up my mind, once and for all, to be a 
professional singer. And I know in my 
heart that, like Cinderella, I had good 
fairies watching over me." 

But there had been one cloud dim- 
ming the joy of Cinderella during her 
transformation to Princess — her hesi- 
tation about the worthiness of her ca- 
reer. An idealist, Leslie had thought 
about being a teacher, or maybe a nurse 
— even of joining the W.A.C.s. Now she 
says sincerely, "Teaching and nursing 
are proud and noble professions, but I 
think that a serious entertainer can 
render a great service to people, too." 
She is finally sure that she is doing what 
is best. She is happy that she is helping 
her parents live a prouder, more com- 
fortable life, and that she is able to 
build for herself a financial nest egg. 

A disappointment 

Even an ex-Cinderella can rebel. The 
life of a princess cheats her sometimes. 
Once, when she was sixteen, she had 
arranged to go with some of her girl 
friends to Coney Island, for a Sunday 
of swimming, hot dogs, and rides. She 
mentioned this a couple of days before 
the big outing to Mort Curtis, and he 
exclaimed, "But, Leslie, I've already 
booked you at Grossinger's Sunday. 
I'm sorry, dear, but we can't go back on 
the booking. You've been advertised, 
and the show must go on! Why, Leslie, 
it's a privilege to be as talented as you 
are. and your talent is granted to you 
by God." 

Bursting into tears at her frustra- 
tion, Leslie cried, "But even God took a 
day off!" (The show did go on, Leslie 
was smash hit, and she has never re- 
gretted Curtis's good advice.) 

There is a sequel to the story, though. 

Three years later, when she booked into 

Atlantic City, she reminded Curtis, 

"You beat me out of a day at Coney 

v Island, remember? This time you've 

R simply got to let me go on all the rides 

at Atlantic City ! " So, it was written into 

her contract that the day after Leslie 

96 



Uggams opened at Atlantic City would 
be an open date for her. And she went 
on every ride, and played every game! 

Now Leslie is a star on "Sing Along 
With Mitch," appearing regularly on 
the show, and well on her way to a 
quarter of a million dollars this year. 
Hers is a "West Side story" come true 
with a happy ending, and a luminous 
chapter in the otherwise dismal his- 
tory of television's rejection of fine 
Negro artists. 

For all her acclaim and stardom, 
however, at home Leslie is still an 
obedient and respectful daughter. When 
the family moved last September into 
a new, elegant midtown apartment, she 
decorated her bedroom herself. She still 
puts away her own clothing and tidies 
up her own room. She runs errands for 
her mother, cooks her own breakfast 
and lunch, and does household chores. 

Recently, when her mother called to 
her, "Leslie, carry out the garbage, 
please," Leslie protested. "Mother, I'm 
being interviewed by a gentleman from 
Life magazine. Can't that wait?" 

"That's all right," her mother re- 
sponded. "He can wait a minute, I'm 
sure, while you take out the garbage!" 

Leslie enjoys cooking and, when she's 
in the kitchen, everybody has to leave, 
just as Grandma Uggams used to chase 
her out with a broom, when she was 
very little. "I cook because I like to, 
and my own favorite is spaghetti with 
Italian tomato sauce. Mom, who's from 
Florida, and Dad, from South Carolina, 
like Dixie pork chops, baked with rai- 
sins and pineapple sauce. But I prefer 
my own spaghetti. I make the sauce 
myself, starting with the tomatoes and 
going through all the ingredients — 
chopped sirloin, oregano, chili, every- 
thing — and gosh, is it good!" 

Mr. and Mrs. Uggams are loving but 
strict parents. "When Leslie goes out," 
explains her mother, "she must call if 
there's any change in her plans. Her 
father, especially, gets nervous if she 
doesn't come home at the time she 
promised to. Now that she drives, she 
must phone us when she reaches her 
destination." 

Leslie believes her parents are rea- 
sonable. "Too much strictness is bad, 
I think. When parents forbid too much, 
kids want to do the forbidden things. 
And too much leniency can be bad, too." 

As an artist, Leslie has been com- 
pared with such greats as Judy Gar- 
land, Lena Home, Mahalia Jackson, 
Doris Day and even the legendary 
Marian Anderson. "It's a bit frighten- 
ing to be compared with such stars. 
Certainly quite premature, I think!" 
says Leslie. 

Her friends find her an impish de- 
light, without any trace of swell-headed- 
ness. Her best friends include producer 
Herman Shumlin's daughter Lola, pro- 
ducer Mike Myerberg's son Paul, mu- 
sician Ronald Scott, actors Brandon de 
Wilde and Rex Thompson. 

Cinderella as a Negro 

She moves easily among both white 
and Negro friends, says she has never 
felt the humiliation of segregation. "I've 
been fortunate in practically everything. 



I attended integrated schools and lived 
in an integrated neighborhood. I know, 
though, what segregation means, and 
that it exists in both North and South." 

Leslie admires the Freedom Riders 
through the South, calls them "1961's 
most significant event, here at home." 
She admires the courage of the Negro 
and white Freedom Riders immensely. 

She was excited when Negro college 
students led sit-in movements for Negro 
rights. "They showed the country there 
is a new Negro . . . not afraid of fighting 
in the open for his rights!" 

People from all walks of life, Negro 
and white, admire her remarkable tal- 
ent, her dignity, her lustrous innocence 
and her spine-tingling singing style. 
The magazine, Ebony, calls her "Tele- 
vision's Top Negro Performer." 

A song of faith 

She has a cupid face, with sparkling, 
mischievous eyes and a strong spiritu- 
ality that can be traced to her minister 
grandfathers, her church-singing aunt, 
her devout parents and relatives. It is 
significant that she was singing "The 
Lord's Prayer" when Mitch Miller 
heard her for the first time on "Name 
That Tune" and it was almost inevi- 
table that her first Columbia album was 
a collection of songs of faith, "The 
Eyes of God." There is an inner strength 
in her serenity, and she is calm, confi- 
dent and mature beyond her nineteen 
years. 

"I try to read good books, pay atten- 
tion to what others are doing and say- 
ing. The more you do this, the more 
you do yourself by way of self-improve- 
ment, the more opportunities you'll be 
given," she says. 

"What my mother prayed for when 
we were little girls has come true for 
my sister Frances and for me. The 'mir- 
acle' has happened. Frances is happily 
married, and I have been able, through 
some talent, I guess, and through luck 
and help from some of the grandest 
people in the world, to accomplish 
something." 

Leslie Uggams has been compared 
with Cinderella of the childhood legend. 
And who does she consider her "fairy 
Godmother"? Milton Berle, Milton's 
mother, Arthur Godfrey, Peter Lind 
Hayes, Mitch Miller? There are others, 
people who gave her a boost here, a 
helping hand there: Paul Whiteman, 
Garry Moore, Johnny Olsen, Jack Paar 
and Genevieve. Each encouraged her, 
gave her work, inspired her. 

"Cinderella I'm called?" laughed 
Leslie. "Yes, in a way, maybe. But not 
much. And the biggest difference is 
this: where Cinderella had a mean, evil 
stepmother, and a good fairy God- 
mother, I've had a good mother and — 
and, well, a good fairy, too. But they 
are both the same person ! My mother is 
my fairy Godmother. Without her love 
and care, training and encouragement, 
all the other wonderful people in Les- 
lie Uggams' life would never even have 
heard of little Leslie, you know!" 

— Paul Denis 

Leslie "Sings Along With Mitch" on 
NBC-TV, Thursdays, at 10 p.m. edt. 
She sings, too, on Columbia Records. 



the 
most 




eyes 

in the 
world 
are by 

Maybelline 




%%*,'. 






glorify your eyes 




the most prized/eye cosmetics in the world 



jfith precious jewel-tone colors and subtle, lovely accents Maybelline makes it so easy to transform your 
eyes unforgettably! All you need for an exciting beauty-miracle: Iridescent Eye Shadow Stick and Fluid Eye Liner, 
waterproof Magic Mascara with Spiral Brush, Self-Sharpener Eyebrow Pencil, $1 each. New Pressed Powder Eye Shadow 790 



(^Beautiful 0Ca'tr 

B RECK 



FREE 30* CREME RINSE <«■»■> 

with purchase of 

60* BRECK SHAMPOO »<*i 




rmat vtatr 




iffla 



% 











SPECIAL OFFER- BRECK CREME RINSE WITH BRECK SHAMPOO 

Enjoy a free Breck Creme Rinse when you Breck Creme Rinse eliminates snarls, tangles 

buy a 60^ size of Breck Shampoo for Dry, and fly-away hair, leaving it smooth and 

Oily or Normal Hair. Breck Shampoo cleans manageable. It is also recommended for care 

thoroughly and leaves hair soft and lustrous. of damaged, tinted or permanent waved hair. 




3. Rinse with clear 
se of a 60£ Brec 





4. Hair combs out easily S. New softness and lustre 

mp