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Full text of "TV Radio Mirror (Jan-Jun 1961)"

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AUDIO-VISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The LIBRARY of CONGRESS 




Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 




RADIO 



MIRROR 



iDIO MIRROR jan. . 25* 

ickie Gleason Talks 
)out His Faith 



Orbit with the 

Stars in 

LUCKY DOZEN 

CONTEST: 

FABULOUS 

PRIZES 




tOL BURNETT 

Joke!" 




Vr 



tENDA LEE 

Girl, Big Voice 



'W. 




fM 






Sweet surprise . .. your skin can easily look this fresh and lovely 




You'll marvel, too, that your own grown-up skin can have this youthful freshness 
so easily, so soon . . . with a simple change to regular Ivory care. You see, the milder 
your beauty soap, the prettier your complexion . . . and Ivory Soap is even gentle 
enough for a baby's delicate skin. Pure white, clean scented. 99 44 /ioo % pure® ... it 
floats. And did you know that today more doctors recommend Ivory for babies' 
skin, and yours, than any other soap? Your skin never outgrows mild Ivory ... it 
just grows smoother, clearer, lovelier. Then suddenly you have That Ivory Look! 



H E 

JANUARY, 1961 



TV 



RADIO 
MIRROR 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 55, NO. 2 



Ann Mosher, Editor 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 

Lorraine Girsch, Associate Editor 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Eunice Field, West Coast Representative 



STORIES OF THE STARS 

Tragedy on U.S. Route 79 by Ann Mosher 2 

Man in the Sports Corner (Tony Flynn of WISN-TV and Radio ) 10 

Lady Luck (Mary Ann Luckett of WHAS) 12 

A Fascinating Field (Claude Dorsey of KMBC-KFRM Radio, KMBC-TV) 13 

Meet The Glovables (Jim and Bud Stewart of WBKB-TV) 14 

The "Lucky Dozen" Contest (your opportunity to win a prize from Rick Nelson, 
Connie Francis, Annette Funicello, Fabian. Dodie Stevens, Paul Anka, Joanie 
Sommers, Rod Lauren, Jo-Ann Campbell, Bobby Rydell, Neil Sedaka, Connie 

Stevens ) 16 

Jackie Gleason Talks About His Religion by Robert Lardine 30 

"The Three of Us" (Dick Clark) by Martin Cohen 32 

Hong Kong (Rod Taylor) by Bill Kelsay 34 

Pauline Frederick, Reporter by Lilla Anderson 36 

Little Miss Dynamite (Brenda Lee) by Helen Bolstad 38 

The Many Faces of Shari Lewis by Jeremy Tarcher 40 

Showman, U.S.A. (Ed Sullivan ) by Lee Gregory 42 

Fun Day in the Sun (Janet Lennon and friends) 44 

To Build A Family (Don McNeill) by Charles Carner 48 

"It's No Joke Raising a Teenager" (Carol Burnett) by David Dachs 50 

No Time For Romance (Sarah Hardy of From These Roots) ... .by Frances Kish 52 

The Man with the Button-Down Mind (Bob Newhart) by Kathleen Post 54 

Home Is Where the Family Is (Martin Milner) 58 



FUN AND SERVICE FEATURES 

What's New on the West Coast by Eunice Field 4 

Information Booth 7 

What's New on the East Coast by Peter Abbott 8 

Beauty: Magnetic Air (Rosemary Prinz) by June Clark 56 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 64 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 80 



Cover Portrait of Dick Clark by Michael Levin 



BUY YOUR FEBRUARY ISSUE EARLY • ON SALE JANUARY 5 



Published Monthly by Macfadden Publi- 
y i I • . cations, inc., Executive, Advertising, and 

Editorial Offices at 205 E. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. Editorial Branch Office, 321 
S. Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif. Irving 
S. Manheimer, President; Lee Andrews, 
'm^' Vice-Pres.; S. N. Himmelman, Vice-Pres.; 

Meyer Dworkin, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. Advertising offices also in Chicago, 
and San Francisco. 

Manuscripts'. All manuscripts will be carefully considered 
but publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 
It is advisable to keep duplicate copy for your records. 
Only those manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self- 
addressed return envelopes with sufficient postage will be 
returned. 

Foreign editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, N. Y. 17, N. Y. 
Irving S. Manheimer, Pres.; Douglas Lockhart, Vice- 
Pres. 

Re-entered as Second Class matter. June 28, 1954, at the 



Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 
3, 1879. Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., 
and other post offices. Authorized as Second Class matter 
by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
© I960 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. All rights 
reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Con- 
vention and International Copyright Convention. Copy- 
right reserved under the Pan American Copyright Con- 
vention. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion 
Panamericano de Propiedad Literaria y Artistica. Title 
trademark registered in U.S. Patent Office. Printed in 
U.S.A. by Art Color Printing Co. 
Member of the TRUE STORY Women's Group. 

Subscription Rates: in the U.S., its Possessions, & Canada, 
one year, $3.00; two years, $5.00; three years, $7.00. 
All other countries, $5 50 per year. 

Chanae of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. When 
possible, please furnish stencil-impression address from. 
a recent issue. Address changes can be made only if you 
send us your old as well as vour new address. Write to 
TV RADIO MIRROR, Macfadden Publications. Inc., 205 
East 42nd Street. New Yck 17 New York 



HAVE YOU 



EVER 




THOUGHT 

YOU WERE 

GOING CRAZY? 



At one time or another 
a great many "normal" 
people have thought 
that they were going 
crazy. It has been es- 
timated that 25% of all 
adult Americans think 
that they have had 
emotional problems se- 
rious enough to war- 
rant medical assistance. 
On page 191 of his new 
book entitled, You Are 
Slipping, Daniel C. 

Munro, M.D., has these encouraging 

words to say: 

"I have pointed out the cause of 
most of our mental or nervous 
breakdowns as the depositing of 
cholesterol in artery walls of our 
mental-nervous equipment, inter- 
fering with the normal conduction 
of brain waves to and from the 
brain. Then since that is the condi- 
tion, it is obvious that the problem 
is to stop depositing cholesterol 
and to withdraw some that has 
been already deposited. THIS CAN 
BE DONE." 

The methods — the diets — and the help 
you need to stop depositing cholesterol 
are all explained in Dr. Munro's fascinat- 
ing new book. 

In this book, You Are Slipping, you 
will learn what modern research in bio- 
chemistry has found will benefit you. 
The price of this remarkable book is only 
$3.00 at all bookstores — or if more con- 
venient, mail coupon now. 

P-------------------------T 

I Bartholomew House, Inc. Dept WG-161 

J 205 E. 42 St., New York 17. N. Y. 

1 Send me Dr. Munro's latest book, You 

■ Are Slipping. I enclose £3.00. If not de- 

■ lighted, I will return book within 7 days 
I and you will refund my £3.00— at once. 
I 
I 



I Name 

■ 

| Street 

l 

• City . 










State 



TRAGEDY on 




The accidental death of 
Johnny H or ton in head-on collision 
marked the fifth teen idol to meet 
sudden death while on tour. 
First — Valens, Holly, Richardson. 
Then Cochran. Now Horton. Could 
these deaths have been averted? 



Johnny Horton 



En route from an engagement in 
Austin, Texas, to his Shreveport, 
Louisiana home, Johnny Horton met 
death. In a grinding collision with a car 
driven by young Texas A. & M. student 
James E. Davis, Horton was instantly 
killed. His personal manager Tillman 
Franks and musician and friend Gerald 
D. Tomlinson were severely injured. 
Thus snuffed out the life of the singer 
whose record, "The Battle of New 
Orleans," charged to nationwide fame 
and 800,000 sales in less than a month. 
In deepest tragedy, Horton's widow 
Billie Jo mourns the second husband 
she has lost to sudden death. She was 
first married to Hank Williams, an- 
other immortal of country-and- West- 
ern music, who also died on the high- 



Ritchie Valens 



Buddy Holly 



way. Williams died of a heart attack 
in 1953, en route from Knoxville to 
Nashville. Horton married the young 
widow and made a home for her and 
her child in Shreveport. Two children 
were born to them. 

To have time with his family, Horton 
held his bookings to an intensive, fast- 
paced twenty days of the month. His 
own childhood had been a wandering 
one. His parents followed the crops 
from Texas to California. Johnny 
worked his way through high school 
and college, majoring in geology. Re- 
turning from a job in Alaska, he en- 
tered a contest on a dare and began 
writing and singing the "story" songs 
he loved. 

Horton's death dramatically illus- 



trates a life-hazard which rides with 
all of the young singers, running hard 
to capture elusive Fame and tantalizing 
Fortune. The track must be fast. So fast 
that these young men and women live 
every day at literally a "killing" pace. 

Since February, 1959, screaming 
headlines have announced the death — 
by plane or car — of at least five major 
young talents. 

First: Scattered in a corn patch near 
Mason City, Iowa, the torn bodies of 
Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and J. P. 
("Big Bopper") Richardson. Each had, 
in less than twenty-five years of life, 
achieved a success in the popular music 
field which was the wonder and envy of 
millions of teen fans in the United 
States and overseas. Why were they 



ROUTE 79 




Bystanders look with horror at the crumpled wreck of a 
car in which singer Johnny Horton met death, at dawn, 
thirteen miles southwest of the town of Cameron, Texas. 



J. P. Richardson 



Eddie Cochran 



together on a charter-plane flight be- 
tween Mason City and Fargo, North 
Dakota? They had been on tour by 
bus for so long, they needed clean 
laundry and elected to charter a plane 
to give time to tidy up. Such haste and 
confusion is not at all extraordinary 
on such a tour. 

Just over a year later, on April 17, 
1960: Singer Eddie Cochran sped in a 
rented limousine toward London air- 
port. With him in the car were fellow 
singer Gene Vincent, who had been 
with him on his five-month tour of 
England, and Patrick Tomkins, man- 
ager of their English tour. The fourth 
passenger: Sharon Sheeley, Cochran's 
fiancee and a successful song writer, 
who had flown over to visit him during 



the last few days of the long, grueling 
series of performances. Suddenly a tire 
blew, the car wobbled drunkenly from 
side to side, mounted the curb and 
crashed into a lamp pole. Nine hours 
of emergency operation failed to save 
the life of the brilliant young performer. 

Such a community of sorrow exists 
among the parents of the young singers 
that, when services were held for the 
dead singer in Eddie Cochran's native 
California, the mother of Ritchie Valens 
made a special trip in order to offer 
comfort to Cochran's bereaved parents. 

Horton's star-crossed life seemed to 
be riding high in early November, 
when last he visited the New York 
office of Columbia Records, his record- 
ing label. His record, "North to Alaska," 



the theme song he had composed and 
recorded for 20th Century-Fox's movie, 
was jumping fast up the "Top 100" list 
of pop records. He had been signed to 
do three movie roles during the next 
year. Columbia Records had every rea- 
son to believe that — not only the single 
record — but Horton's most recent al- 
bum would put him again at top of the 
hit list. 

For the young girls and boys to whom 
Horton was an idol, the death was re- 
ceived with genuine sorrow. To young- 
sters who recently made hits of "Teen 
Angel" and "Artificial Flowers" — 
themes dealing with youthful death 
— the title of Horton's last album 
appeared eerily prophetic: "Johnny 
Horton Makes History." 




"King" of newspaper boys, Mike Watkins, chats with Jack [Queen For A 
Day) Bailey and Richard Boone — who remembers his own newsboy days. 



Irishman J. Carrol Naish has played almost 
every nationality — now he's TV Indian chief. 




With a song in her heart, lovely Dianne Lennon became Mrs. Dick Gass. 



by Eunice Field 

Good Indian: Since his debut as Hawk- 
eye on the Guestward Ho! series, J. 
Carrol Naish, an Irish New Yorker, has 
been made an honorary blood-brother 
of the Sioux, Navajo and Apache tribes. 
During these ceremonies, he was pre- 
sented with handsome sets of head 
feathers and treated as though he were 
indeed an Indian. This brought to mind 
his experiences with his first two TV 
shows — in which he played an Italian 
immigrant in Life With Luigi and an 
Oriental detective in Charlie Chan. His 
performance as Luigi was so authentic 
that he received a letter from an Italian 
lady, along with a bottle of vino, which 
said she would be interested in marry- 
ing so nice an Italian gentleman. He 
replied by saying he already had a 
wife and that he was really Irish. Came 
the retort, "That you have a wife, I can 
understand, but to deny your ancestry 
is a shame." Years later, the same wom- 
an wrote again, "I just saw you in 
Chan . . . please forgive me for calling 
you down about denying your Italian 
blood. Now I can see you are really 
Chinese." 

The Woman's Angle Is a Curve: 
Van Williams' wife Vicki is a gal who 
excels at any sport. Recently, she and 
Van have been giving Troy Donahue 
lessons in skin-diving for his Surf Side 6 
role and these have been so successful, 
a dozen actors have pleaded for instruc- 
tion in this difficult sport. "It's won- 
derful to have a wife who shares your 
athletic hobbies," says Van, "although 
sometimes it can get real rough. Vicki 
has the competitive spirit and doesn't 




With his recent marriage to Barbara, Gary Crosby (photo at right) joined his three brothers, all of whom are now 
wed. Seen here, left to right: Dennis and Pat; Philip (Dennis's twin) and Sandra; Lindsay and his Barbara. 






believe in the shrinking -violet act. 
When she plays a man, she plays to win 
and she has beat me in many a test. 
I'll admit having a wife like that puts 
you in shape. I have to be, to keep pace 
with her." Vicki, listening to her hus- 
band's praise, generally says nothing. 
But once a reporter asked her what her 
favorite sport was. "Well," fluttered the 
demure Vicki, "I'd say it was whipping 
up real luscious desserts." 

No Pussyfooting Here: Gardner 
McKay's best pal is his shaggy dog 
"Pussycat," who follows the popular 
actor all over the Fox lot, except on the 
soundstage, from which he has been 
barred. With dog-snatching on the rise, 
Gard has issued a ban of his own — no 
more press pictures of his dog. One day, 
Jill St. John, visiting her home lot with 
husband Lance Reventlow, saw a car 
almost hit Pussycat as he padded up the 
street. "You'd better stop worrying 
about your pet being swiped," she 
cautioned Gardner, "and see that he 
doesn't get sideswiped." Lance asked 
whether the dog could do any tricks. 
Gard drew himself up to his full six- 
foot-five and replied, "Pussycat does no 
tricks and I have no intention of teach- 
ing him any. Would you ask your best 
friend to roll over and play dead for a 
cookie?" . . . Sin, Suffer and Repent: 
Elvis Presley arrived on the set of 
"Flaming Star," his new 20th-Fox pic- 
ture exactly seventeen minutes late one 
morning. He was all apologies. "Don't 
let it bother you," assured director Don 
Siegel. "It could happen to anyone." 
Elvis, however, is not "anyone." The 



next day, Siegel was astounded to see 
Elvis walk in early, gleefully holding up 
his watch. "See?" said Elvis. "I'm ex- 
actly seventeen minutes early, so you 
and I are even." 

Three Bangles Off Der Bingle: The 
three "middle Crosbys," as they call 
themselves — they're sandwiched be- 
tween older brother Gary and baby 
brother "Tex" — have polished their act 
to a professional luster. But they still 
insist on a month's break between en- 
gagements so they can relax, study the 
act for improvement, and show off 
their beautiful brides. They are slated 
to do another stint at The Desert Inn 
in Las Vegas and, before that, a movie 
produced by Marty Melcher, husband 
of Doris Day. At present count, the 
boys have five youngsters among 
them — Dennis, two; Philip, two, and 
Lindsay, one. All married Vegas show- 
girls, as did brother Gary in a recent 
trip to the altar. Why showgirls? 
"Well," said Philip, unofficial spokes- 
man for the group, "they make good 
wives. Being on their own so much, 
they have to learn to wash and repair 
clothes, cook and manage their own 
affairs ... all good training for run- 
ning a household. And, as for show 
business, it's not an easy road for 
beautiful women. The attentions they 
get, the adulation, are mostly insincere 
. . . and so, after a while, they get 
tired of it and long for the complete 



devotion of one man who is reliable 
and sympathetic." 

However You Slice It: It is one of 
the peculiarities of Tom Ewell that he 
cannot abide black bread in any shape 
or form. This distaste seems to date 
back to his very first TV show, "Brother 
Rat," which was done live in New York 
back in 1938. "We wore brown makeup 
and black lipstick in those days," con- 
fides Ewell, "to help with the photogra- 
phy. Things were pretty rudimentary 
then— not like the shootings we're do- 
ing on my new show. On camera, we 
had to eat pumpernickel or dark whole 
wheat bread that wouldn't show the lip- 
stick coming off. In those days, we also 
had continual run-throughs before the 
actual show went on. By the time that 
first experience was over, I'd lost my 
taste for black bread and I've never 
been able to digest it since. . . ." 

The Whole Town's Talkin': When 
he began work in "Back Street," 
singer-actor Dick Kallman received 
what is perhaps the most unusual open- 
ing-day fanfare. Universal-Internation- 
al got a wire saying, "Every man, 
woman and child in Dick's home town 
of Dixville Notch, New Hampshire, 
wish him luck and have signed their 
names to show it is unanimous." For 
those who imagine this swelled the 
profits of Western Union, it must be 
explained that Dixville Notch boasts 
but eleven (Continued on next page) 



For What's New On The East Coast, See Page 8 



What's New on the West Coast 



citizens — which has since been reduced 
by four when the actor's family moved 
to Hollywood! 

Playing the Field: When Roger 
Smith gets up a full head of steam, 
everybody had better clear the way. 
He plows through all obstacles until 
he's done the job. Deciding to try his 
hand at writing, he sat down, cut off 
the phone, bolted doors and knocked 
out four scripts, all of which he sold 
to his own 77 Sunset Strip series. He 
is now a full-fledged member of the 
Writer's Guild. Dissatisfied with the 
swimming pools he saw, Roger designed 
a pool according to his own taste and, 
during the six-week summer lay-off, 
built it. Next, he finished a twelve- 
foot-high fire-pit, around which he 
planted five majestic palm trees im- 
ported from Hawaii. It seems that, 
while on Naval duty in the Pacific, he 
fell in love with the designs and deco- 
rations of the islanders and vowed to 
reproduce same on his own patio some- 
day. Recently, his interest was cap- 
tured by a handsome sailboat and he 
rushed home to wife, Vicki Shaw, and 
announced he'd bought it. "I'm going 
to teach you to water ski," he prom- 
ised, "and we'll spend all our free time 
on the ocean." "Oh, yes?" replied 
Vicki. "And when are we going to use 
that lovely Hawaiian patio you built?" 
Roger paused a moment to consider, 
then his face lit up. "Don't worry, it 
won't go to waste. I'll write a new script 
for 77 Sunset and work the patio into 
it. Then we will bill Warner Bros, for 
the use of it and, with the money, 
throw the biggest luau this town ever 
saw." 

Where the Girls Are: Young Sharon 
Hugueny was thrilled with her first 
Hollywood premiere, "Sunrise at 
Campobello." A large turnout of stars, 
ablaze with jewels, helped make the 
evening spectacular. Sharon came on 
the arm of her "Parrish" co-star, Troy 
Donahue, who gave his other arm to 
lovely Myrna Fahey. Teased Sharon, 
"Lucky it wasn't the premiere of 
Parrish,' because then I'd have to 
share him with Myrna — plus Connie 
Stevens and Diane McBain, the other 
girls in the picture." . . . Newly-wed 
Gigi Perreau has been much in demand 
lately for TV Western roles. So much so 
that, when a friend asked her what 
she was wearing for the ceremony, she 
absentmindedly replied, "Why, the 
usual — split-skirt, boots and hat." She 
and groom Frank Gallo have taken a 
temporary apartment and are keeping 
a weather- eye open for a house — 
"probably," laughs Gigi, "ranch style." 
. . Jane Powell can't figure out why 
TV, which has borrowed every kind of 
movie format, should have neglected 
the sophisticated comedy. It is no co- 
incidence that this happens to be the 
kind of series she's set her heart on 
doing. She and Four Star Productions 
are in the hot spot of having a sponsor 
eager and ready to go, but no definite 
format and no scripts. "Until we find 
writers who can give us what we're 
looking for and will sign contracts to 



(Continued from page 5) 
stay with the show, I'll concentrate on 
invading the concert and opera fields, 
plus occasional TV guestings," says 
Jane. 

Chills and Thrills: That sound heard 
around the TV sets these nights is not 
the power tube going but teeth chat- 
tering, and Boris Karloff's NBC Thrill- 
er show is to blame. Karloff, who never 
had faith in the possibilities of "Frank- 
enstein" when he made it, generously 
gives the credit for that success to Jack 
Pierce, a Universal makeup man. "I've 
since grown to like the old monster," 
Karloff smiles, "and it's really a joy to 
hear from so many children who ex- 
press pity for the creature and pleasure 
at my 'Hans Christian Andersen' and 
'Pied Piper' records. Just the other day, 
I got a letter from a little boy living 
in the Midwest. He wrote, "After see- 
ing the movie, I had nightmares . . . 
but I want you to know I don't have 
any grudge against you. It was worth 
the nightmare to see it." . . . Ernest 
Borgnine told all about the new Bever- 
ly Hills home he bought for wife Katy 
Jurado, when he appeared on Ben 
Alexander's About Faces, but didn't 
tell about a gesture that adds up to his 
being one of the "nicest" guys in town. 
Ernie, who picks his roles with care, 
and has turned down several big screen 
offers — recently, because he didn't like 
the script — took on the job of narrating 
an upcoming Blue Angels show for 
nothing. Reason: Ernie was a cook in 
the Navy and wanted to take part in 
the segment, which is a documentary in 
tribute to the fiftieth annversary of 
Naval aviation. . . . Howard Duff prom- 
ises his Dante will continue to have 
"guts and bite." "We'll keep hitting 
hard," says Duff, "and will dress up 
the show with some glamour dolls." 
Howard, you'll recall, was the popular 
Sam Spade of radio fame. "One thing 
I guarantee," he adds: "We'll have no 
kids or dogs on the show. They'd look 
ridiculous in the night-club surround- 
ings — and, besides, Dante is not a 
family show." 

Busy Is the Word: Room For One 
More, the Warner series starring Andy 
Duggan, is definitely slated for a Janu- 
ary bow, Fridays on ABC-TV. Twenty- 
six episodes are being shot despite the 
fact there's no sponsor as yet. . . . 
Bill Dana and Pat Harrington Jr. will 
cut an album this month. . . . Jimmy 
Shigeta's next lp will be "Two Loves 
Have I," with one side to be sung in 
Japanese, the other in English. . . . 
During his Cocoanut Grove stand here, 
Svend Asmussen, the violin player of 
the "Swe-Danes," revealed that he 
spent two years in a Berlin prisoner-of- 
war camp. His offense? Playing Ameri- 
can jazz during the World War II Nazi 
occupation of Denmark. 

Heard Around: If the cute blonde 
currently seen as eldest of the daugh- 
ters on The Tom Ewell Show looks fa- 
miliar, it's because she's Cindy Robbins, 
formerly a model on The Big Pay- 
off. . . . Richard Boone was one of 
the guests on Jack Bailey's recent 
Queen For A Day show honoring news- 




Cute Gigi Perreau has a brand-new 
husband — he's businessman Frank Gallo. 

paperboys. Dick says he remembers 
well the days when he got up at five 
a.m. to deliver Los Angeles morning 
papers, even though family finances 
didn't force him to. "My dad used to 
say it was good training," Dick re- 
called, in talking to young newsboy 
Mike Watkins, who was named "King" 
on the basis of audience applause. "I 
used to say 'training for what?' But 
you know — it turned out he was right. 
When Have Gun goes on location, I 
have to be up even earlier than five — 
and it's no strain, because I did it so 
many times as a teenager." . . . Jane 
Withers, who's been devoting herself 
to occasional TV roles, and to bring- 
ing up her five children, goes into 
20th-Fox's "The Right Approach," to 
be directed by David Butler, who 
helmed her very first film, "Bright 
Eyes." The ex-child star has finally 
gained her dream of having a "family 
recreational center." She and husband 
Ken Errair (who retired from The 
Four Freshmen shortly after their mar- 
riage five years ago) have purchased 
forty acres in nearby Saugus Valley 
and will convert the old country club 
there into a museum to hold her more 
than 3800 dolls. They'll also build a 
large swimming pool, restaurant and 
shops, hold auctions, have jazz and 
classical music festivals, and present 
rodeos. The project should be ready 
for opening by spring. "The family that 
plays together, stays together," is Jane's 
philosophy, "and I'm sure there are 
many who agree with me and will en- 
joy the recreation our place will offer." 
. . . Elaine Stritch, star of My Sister 
Eileen, is finding it difficult to get used 
to the West. "Life is so relaxing," says 
she, "I'm sure I'll become lazy. The TV 
pace? Why, it's nothing. When you've 
played on Broadway and in summer 
stock for years, shooting one show a 
week is a cinch." So she won't get too 
homesick for "my New York," Elaine 
is keeping her apartment there and 
will spend all holidays in the East. 



Information Booth 



The Tall Texan 

Could you do a write-up on the actor 
Mark Miller? 

O.G.I., East Riverdale, Maryland 

Playing the part of the owner of a 
dude ranch in New Mexico in ABC- 
TV's Guestward Ho! series is a cinch 
for handsome Mark Miller for two 
reasons. First, he's a Southwesterner by 
birth — was born in Houston, Texas, 
thirty-six years ago. Second, he's a 
talented actor with lots of experience 
to his credit. . . . Mark studied archi- 
tecture at Texas A & M, Pueblo Univer- 
sity in Mexico, and Texas University. 
In his senior year at the latter, he 
wrote, directed and acted in a one-act 
play for an English-course project. Fol- 
lowing other amateur productions, 
Mark then headed for New York where 
he studied two years at the American 
Academy of Dramatic Art. . . . Later, 
the actor appeared at the Newport sum- 
mer theater and toured in "The Moon 
Is Blue," "Bus Stop," "Picnic" and 
"The Dark at the Top of the Stairs." 
He appeared on TV in Omnibus, Studio 
One, Suspense, and Gunsmoke, among 
others, and in such movies as "The 
Eagle and the Rose" and "The Trouble 
with Blondes." . . . Mark is married 
to the former Beatrice Ammidown, a 
former fashion editor for Harper's 
Bazaar. The couple resides at Malibu, 
in California, where Mark pursues his 
hobbies of swimming, sailing, horse- 
back riding, water skiing and tennis. 
In Texas, the black-haired, gray-eyed 
actor was once a champion water-polo 
player. 




Mark Miller 



Ardent Supporters 

The editors of TV Radio Mirror 
received the following letter from a 
group of 46 young people who live in 
Lansdale, Pennsylvania — they have a 
very decided opinion about who should 
be the Welk program's new Champagne 
Lady: "We all signed this petition for 
Peggy Lennon to be given a chance at 
Champagne Lady. She is number one 
with us, and one thing you can count 
on — we are all Irish!" 

Some Quickies 

Are Harry Morgan and Henry Mor- 
gan related? 

M.L.L., Cedar Vale, Kansas 
No, they are not. 

Arthur Tate and Joanne Barron play 
husband and wife on Search For To- 
morrow. Are they married in real life? 
J. A.M., Lyndhurst, New Jersey 

They are not married to each other. 

/ would like to know the real name 
and birthplace of the singer Dinah 
Washington. 

N.W., Greenwood, Nebraska 

Her real name is Ruth Jones and 
she was born in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 

Are Bobby Rydell and Mark Rydell 
brothers? 

A.R.P., Woodville, N.C. 
No, they are not related. 

/ would like to know how old the 
Crosby brothers are. 

J.R.T., Dayton, Ohio 

Gary is 27; the twins, Philip and 
Dennis, are 26; and Lindsay is almost 
23. 

Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write 
to address given — not to TV Radio 
Mirror. 

John Smith Fan Club, Annamarie 
Van Hausen, 417 Straight St., Pater- 
son, NJ. 

Anita Bryant Fan Club, Carol Paul- 
son, 27 Eastview Ave., Yonkers, N.Y. 

Joey Bishop Fan Club, Johnny Bar- 
ron, 2025 E. Moyamensing Ave., Phila- 
delphia 48, Pennsylvania. 

Mitzi Gaynor Fan Club, Jeanne 
Marie Schulz, 164 Long Meadow Drive, 
Rochester 21, New York. 

Jim Roberts Friends Club, Kay Bur- 
bey, 1210 Redwood Dr, Green Bay, Wis. 

Noreen Corcoran Fan Club, Ginger 
Wilson, 1305 Tyson Ave., Phila., Pa. 




Nancy Malone 

An Actress by Accident 

Please tell me something about the 
actress Nancy Malone. 

B.B.S., Bordentown, New Jersey 

Pretty Nancy Malone's show-busi- 
ness career has been the result of two 
lucky accidents. The first one occurred 
when she was only seven years old. An 
attractive auburn-haired pixie even 
then, she was playing on the streets 
of her native Queens Village, New 
York, when a model-agency photog- 
rapher noticed her. He photographed 
her and, the next day, she began her 
career as a model. . . . Two years later, 
another accident launched Nancy into 
an acting career. She happened to ac- 
company an actress friend who had an 
appointment at a talent agency. An ex- 
ecutive saw Nancy waiting in an outer 
office and promptly offered her an act- 
ing job. Nancy accepted and that 
started the ball rolling. She appeared 
regularly on children's radio and TV 
shows, in several Broadway plays and, 
more recently, on the daytime series 
The Brighter Day. She is currently ap- 
pearing in ABC-TV's Naked City. . . . 
The blue-eyed, unmarried actress lives 
in a Manhattan apartment where she 
pursues her hobbies of painting and 
writing poetry. 



We'll answer questions about radio and 
TV in this column, provided they are of 
general interest. Write to Information 
Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd 
St., New York 17, N. Y. Attach this 
box, specifying whether it concerns ra- 
dio or TV. Sorry, no personal answers. 







Even the camel is surprised to find Jack Paar on his back. Can you blame him? 




Last outing: The late Johnny Horton with good pal, fellow singer Johnny Cash. 



by Peter Abbott 

Come Dig: Sponsors already needling 
networks and agencies to come up with 
some new ideas for next season. Feel- 
ing is that Westerns have over- 
saturated the public. . . . More gold for 
Silvers. Phil and wife Evelyn Patrick 
expecting their third. . . . Bobby Rydell 
readying a club act. He has an open 
invitation from the Copacabana. . . . 
The American Medical Association co- 
operated with the writers of the day- 
time TV series Young Doctor Malone 
while the script was developing the 
theme of his trial for malpractice. 
Thought this was a good example of 
how an unscrupulous attorney could 
harass an innocent doctor. . . . Casting 
capers: Esther Williams making her 
first appearance as a cowgirl on Zane 
Grey Theater — and, in the same series 
on December 15, Tuesday Weld appears 
as a Mormon teenager. 

Remember Lola: Peter Gunn's lovely 
Edie materialized in N.Y.C. in the 
person of Lola Albright. Prettier than 
her TV picture — like five-four, blonde, 
lovely and not skinny — she said, "I've 
put on weight and I'm happier now 
than ever in my life. No more insomnia. 
Not lonely. Lots of things to do and 
lots of friends. And happier about 
Peter Gunn than ever, now that the 
action of the series takes place in my 
own club." There's no chance that, in 
the series, Edie will marry Pete. "Then 
it would turn into a situation comedy," 
says Lola. She likes the character of 
Edie: "That girl knows how to treat 
a man. After all, man gives woman 
security and romance. Some women 
aren't grateful for this and put down 
their men. Edie never would. The 
women who hate Edie just aren't treat- 
ing their men right." Edie noted she is 
thirty-four and doesn't care who knows 
it. And she's very pleased with her new 
movie, "Cold Wind in August," which 
opens this month in art theaters. "It's 
serious. I play a stripper who finds a 
teen-age boy in love with her until he 
discovers her profession and then is 
disillusioned. Herschel Bernardi, who 
plays Lt. Jacoby on the Gunn show, is 
in the movie in the role of my rejected 
lover." Lola who has had two unsuc- 
cessful marriages, has set a May date 
for her third. This time, to Bill Chad- 
ney, real-life pianist who is a musician 
on the Peter Gunn series, too. He also 
owns a night club — a real one — out- 
side Los Angeles. 

Pieces of Eight: NBC news reporter 
Bill Ryan fathered an eighth child. And, 
over at CBS, Joe Hamilton, Gary 
Moore's producer, did the same. Now 
what about equal storktime for ABC? 
. . . Arthur Godfrey signed for the role 



For What's New on the 





that Will Rogers originated in the movie 
"State Fair." During the remake of 
this movie classic, this should be a con- 
genial movie set. Pat Boone has the 
juvenile lead. And Arthur was the guy 
who gave Pat his first break on net- 
work broadcasting . . . Singer Jack 
Scott came up with a $75,000 song-writ- 
ing contract, one of the biggest ever 
negotiated. Add to this his many hit 
recordings, his popularity as a per- 
former and his Mr. America physique, 
and he would appear to be a lucky kid. 
But he has one big frustration. He wants 
a date with Sandra Dee. Last time in 
Hollywood, he was set up with a break- 
fast date with Sandra but was swung 
out of town, the night before. Since 
then he carries around a heart that 
feels like a busted egg. . . . Count your 
pennies. Colonel Tom Parker says you 
can have Elvis sing at your church so- 
cial for a mere $75,000. . . . Bob Hope 
turned up in New York and fired off a 
few local-interest blasts. "Actually, I'm 
taking it easier than ever this year and 
thinking of turning golf pro, but I'll 
have to start my own club. No one else 
will hire me. . . . About my December 
12 show, I'll be working with Polly 
Bergen and Durante and Andy Wil- 
liams. All favorites of mine. . . . New 
York always excites me. I just walk 
around and breathe the air and try to 
keep out of the way of the buildings 
they're tearing down." Andy Williams 
will tour G.I. bases with Bob Hope 
during the Christmas season. Then 
Andy settles in France long enough to 
make a movie with Sacha Distel, one of 
Bardot's ex-romances. . . . Funny bit 
from Sammy Kaye, who tells about the 
woman who bought fifteen hundred 
pounds of steel wool because she wants 
to knit a sports car. 




One of New York's finest finds Lola Albright as pretty as Manhattan scenery. 



The Big Paarty: At press time, NBC 
considering either a December or Jan- 
uary date for Paar's first special of the 
season, tentatively titled, 'The Square 
World of Jack Paar." The hour consists 
of film made in Europe with Paar, wife 
Miriam, daughter Randy, and Cliff Ar- 
quette. There is about eight minutes 
on East Berlin. Jack and party smug- 
gled into the Red Zone a three-foot- 
long lens to picture their wanderings 
among Communist soldiers and, the 
next day, the border was closed. Paar 
comments, "A typical Paar goodwill 
tour." And there is film of Paar in Tan- 
giers, Gibraltar, Italy and Spain. Jack 
watched a bullfight and, after the third 
bull was killed, he walked out sick. 
"Now I'm even scared of hamburgers." 
One of the funniest scenes was not re- 
corded. Wife Miriam had been shopping 
all over Europe for a gown, but, while 
she was im- (Continued on page 57) 

Went Coast. See Page 4 




All seriousness, when it comes to cutting a hit song — Jack Scott has many of them. 



Man in the Sports Corner 




Prior to broadcasting each play-by-play account, Tony receives helping hand 
from wife Marian in preparing "spotting boards" used in broadcast booth. 




. . . that's Tony Flynn, who is 
a real pro when it comes to 
sports broadcasting for Mil- 
waukee's WISN-TV and Radio 



When he's asked how he hap- 
pened to get into broadcasting 
as a profession, Tony Flynn has a sure- 
fire answer. "I have a natural tendency 
to talk fast," he says. This basic talent 
stands by him to good effect on his 
sportscasts over WISN Radio and 
WISN-TV. On radio, he has a busy 
schedule with broadcasts daily at 4: 10, 
4:50, 5:30 and 10:15 p.m. and, on TV, 
with a show at 10:05 p.m. And during 
the football season, Tony does the pre- 
game interviews and dope before the 
professional games. Also on TV, fol- 
lowing the ABC -TV prize fights, he 
conducts a weekly sports interview 
show. . . . Actually, Tony was drawn 
toward broadcasting because an older 
brother of his did radio work as a 
means of earning his way through 
college. Tony, who had always had an 
avid interest in sports — along with the 
fast- gab talent previously mentioned 
— got a similar chance to start "sweep- 
ing out" for free, then working into a 
paying job. When a chance came to 
put together a sports program, it all 
pulled together very easily. In his jobs, 
Tony has had the opportunity to 
meet many top figures in baseball, 
football, boxing, race-driving, basket- 
ball. Speaking with love of his work, 
Tony says, "I've had some wonderful 
experiences. Games played in wind 
storms . . . fog so heavy the field was 
invisible. Once, at the end of a pro- 
fessional football exhibition game dur- 
which one score had been made, I 
discovered at the end of the game 
there had been a two-foot lateral and 
I had the wrong person scoring!" 
Tony, his schoolgirl-sweetheart wife 
Marian and the three Flynn sons live 
in a duplex apartment furnished in 
"early confused" style. Their family 
hobbies are golf, skating, water-ski- 
ing, hunting. Anything active and con- 
nected with sports, that's for Flynn! 



10 







Little Danny, 2 l /2, is a man of many moods. Above, with mom and dad, he's a pensive cowboy. Below, 
with brothers Pat, 9, and Michael, 12, he's a bit miffed about dad's putting away the family boat. 




11 




Canary is strictly the non-singing type. "Just 
professional jealousy," smiles Mary Anne. 




Titles: Above, as Welk's guest "Champagne 
Lady." And below, as "Miss Naval Reserve." 



12 




LADY LUCK 



When A girl deserts a plush secretarial job for a receptionist's 
desk, she's got to have a reason. Kentucky's Mary Anne 
Luckett was angling for a foothold in WHAS Radio and TV, and it 
worked! She's now heard on Fun Fair and Coffee Call, and seen on 
Hayloft Hoedown. . . . While singing with the Loretto High School 
glee club and, later, the Holy Name Choral Club in Louisville, 
Mary Anne hit the high notes, drew long whistles and longed 
for a chance to solo. Finally, the break came. A local band leader 
wanted' a singer for a dance date. Somebody remembered the 
cute kid with the dark hair who had sung in a church variety show. 
And things have been moving fast for Mary Anne ever since. 
Mary Anne was hired as WHAS vacation vocalist on several radio 
shows featuring pop tunes and standards. But the real breakthrough 
occurred when she made an appearance on the 1958 WHAS 
Crusade For Children telethon. Here she was singing with 
Gretchen Wyler and the Billy Williams Quartet, backed up by 
both the big band and the Bobby Hackett Quartet. She was big- 
league and everybody knew it. However, the only opening at 
WHAS was on Old Kentucky Barn Dance, a Saturday-night hour 
of country music. She'd never sung country tunes before . . . 
but "you've got to begin sometime." Finally, a full-time opportunity 
came from WHAS. The station needed a receptionist. In July, 
1959, with her good looks, really fine voice and new job, Mary 
Anne was sitting pretty when a full-time staff vocalist was needed. 
She became a regular on WHAS-TV's big Friday -night Hayloft 
Hoedown. On radio, she became a Fun Fair regular from 6:30 to 
9 a.m., Monday through Saturday, and took over the featured 
vocalist spot on the weekly half-hour Coffee Call — an audience - 
participation program. . . . Her stardom has come so quickly that 
Mary Anne admits, without a blink, she's still a star-gazer. She 
still gets a thrill to be invited to sing with well known artists. 
And she still thinks of herself as a homebody, despite the few hours 
each week she's able to spend with her family. Mary Anne 
tries to squeeze golf and bowling into her schedule — and she 
emphasizes the word "squeeze." At home, she likes to cook and 
sew and take care of the rose bed. After singing her way through 
the week, Mary Anne looks forward to weekend family get- 
togethers. Brother Al plays the guitar and sings for fun, with sister 
Carolyn joining in. Their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Luckett, 
lend encouragement. "Dad used to play the drums in amateur 
bands," says Mary Anne, "but I'm the only real noisy one in the 
family now." She talks about having her own home one day and a 
house full of kids. But right now, with nobody special in mind 
to share that dream, she's a full-time songbird. It's unlikely that 
she'll ever again be a secretary or a receptionist. She's sitting 
pretty at a microphone. 

Music is a family thing in the Luckett household. Mom and Dad Luckett, 
brother Al and sister Carolyn join Mary Anne (at right) in recording. 




A FASCINATING FIELD 



. . . says newscaster Claude Dorsey of his work for KMBC- 
KFRM Radio and KMBC-TV in Kansas City, Missouri 




Crack newsman Claude has two ways of getting the news fast — 
in the KMBC news cruiser and the station's whirlybird (below) 




There's nothing like preparing for a career at an 
' early age. Long before he finished elementary 
school, KMBC's Claude Dorsey was learning the in- 
tricacies of the news-imparting business. His 
father was a country newspaperman — editor and pub- 
lisher of the Cameron (Missouri) Sun — and Claude was 
introduced to the inside workings of the news busi- 
ness by him. Since then, Claude has "touched on 
virtually all the journalistic bases" and today is 
known as one of Kansas City's favorite TV news- 
casters. He is especially noted for his complete 
and authoritative coverage of the news on his shows — 
10 O'clock News, seen on KMBC-TV, Monday through 
Friday evenings, and his several news programs, 
heard on KMBC-KFRM Radio, Monday through 
Friday at 3:55, 4:55 and 5:55 p.m., and Saturday at 
5:55, 7:15 and 7:55 a.m. . . . Once he had learned the 
field — from the printing press up — Claude didn't 
rely on his experience alone. He attended Kansas 
University before joining Transradio Press Service. 
He quickly became bureau manager for it in Hartford, 
Connecticut, and, later, in Kansas City, before joining 
KMBC. Says Claude of his work, "It's a fortunate, 
fascinating and highly effective medium for reporting 
and interpreting the news." . . . Claude's wife Nell, 
to whom he has been married for twenty years, 
was his accompanist when he sang in high school — 
but, says Claude, "We didn't actually get around 
to dating until after college." Today, the Dorseys 
have two sons. Mike, 17, is a senior in high 
school and considering an engineering major in 
college. Jimmy is in the seventh grade and already 
a swimming champ at the age of 12. . . . 
The nearest approach to a hobby that Claude has 
is music. Says he with a grin, "I'm a sometimes singer." 



Claude and his wife Nell, who recently celebrated their twentieth 
wedding anniversary, have two sons — Mike, 17, and Jimmy, 12. 





Meet the (/lobbies 



14 



There's a zany, off-beat children's show which re- 
cently premiered on Chicago television. It's called, 
simply, Jim Stewart And The Glovables. Jim and Bud 
Stewart — the talented husband-and-wife team who star 
on the WBKB kiddies' show five days a week — fabricate, 
design, manipulate and speak for the hand-decorated 
gloves which assume delightful personalities. The show 
itself is largely cartoon-fare aimed at the younger set, 
but the satirical take-offs and comedy bits of the Glov- 
ables qualify for the adult entertainment category. The 
clever show-biz folk who animate these little characters 
were actually well-entrenched in Chicago TV three 
years ago, when their Here's Geraldine debuted. More- 
over, the highly-rated children's show about a whimsical 
giraffe won Jim Chicago's TV Emmy for Best Children's 
Performer in 1960. . . . The male half of the versatile 
team, James Elson Stewart, who was born in Paducah, 
Kentucky, says the show-business bug took hold of him 
while he was still in school. (Jim attended the Tilghman 
High School in Paducah.) But, as luck would have it, 
his big chance — the lead in the high-school operetta — 
never materialized. He was rushed to the hospital during 



dress rehearsal, with appendicitis. Jim recalls that his 
hospital experience wasn't a total loss. He learned to 
knit while he was there. There was only one thing 
wrong, though. No one ever bothered to show him how 
to cast off, and, as a result, he ended up with a neck 
scarf some twenty feet long. . . . Bud, christened Rose- 
mary Annastacia Lightfoot-Lee Taylor, was born in 
Owensboro, Kentucky, and attended the Agnes Scott 
School in Decatur, Georgia. She claims her early start 
in radio came about because the hometown radio sta- 
tion's program director had a crush on her older sister; 
and, in order to make a good impression, he gave little 
Bud a show of her own. . . . After high school, both Jim 
and Bud enlisted in the Armed Forces during World 
War II. With the end of the war, Jim headed for Chi- 
cago, where he took on odd jobs until he settled down to 
write copy for radio Station WCFL. After the service, 
Bud also went to Chicago, where — in addition to meeting 
Jim — she studied and later taught at Chicago's Columbia 
Radio College, performed in semi-professional theatri- 
cals, and eventually married Jim in the fall of 1947. . . . 
During their early years of married life, the couple shut- 



... as lovable a family of puppets as 
you'll find, with Jim and Bud Stewart of 
Chicago's WBKB doing the "handiwork" 





The Glovables — puppets used by husband-and-wife 

team Jim and Bud Stewart — are actually designed and 

made from gloves by the Stewarts themselves. 



tied back and forth between Chicago, Owensboro, Madi- 
sonville, Kentucky — and Evansville, Indiana, where, 
incidentally, Here's Geraldine was born. . . . Deciding 
to return to Chicago in 1956, the Stewarts — now with 
two young boys, Chris and J.E.B. — packed their young- 
sters, their star-struck giraffe and her assorted animal 
friends, and headed again for the Windy City. Within a 

year's time, they found a permanent berth at WBKB 

Although hardy veterans in children's programing, both 
people say, "You're always taking your life in your 
hands when you have kids on a live show." Their young 
guests have been known to drive sponsors to the moon 
and back with bland statements acknowledging the fact 
that their mommies "never buy the stuff because we 
hate it." And, of course, there are the giggler, the con- 
stant talker, and the little girl who is continuously lift- 
ing her skirts to show her pretty pink panties to the TV 
audience. In telling about his most memorable experi- 
ence in connection with kiddie shows, Jim tells the 
story of a letter he received from a mother thanking him 
for saving her boy's life. The woman wrote that her 
little boy refused to get into a car with a strange man 



because the Stewarts, on one show, had cautioned 
youngsters about doing such things. . . . Currently, the 
Stewarts live in suburban Evanston, Illinois, with their 
boys (now nine and eight), a golden retriever named 
"Princeton Joe" and a turtle named "Edward." When 
they have the time, the couple like to relax by working 
in their spacious front and back yards, which bound the 
hundred-year-old house they recently bought. Bud lists 
collecting giraffes of all kinds (stuffed, metal, and glass) 
as her major hobby. Jim likes to collect swords. Both of 
them are avid fans of Bob Newhart and Ken and Mitzi 
Welch and, on a word's notice, will hop into the plane 
of a close friend, Chicago deejay Dan Sorkin, and head 
for the theater or night club headlining their favorites. 
. . . Apart from his regular TV chores, Jim has found 
time to appear in a fifteen-minute syndicated series, 
Light Time, produced by the National Lutheran Council 
and directed to youngsters with no church affiliations. 
He also writes and produces educational TV features 
for the Encyclopaedia Britannica. As for The Glovables, 
the Stewarts simply say, "We love it and wouldn't want 
to do anything else." 



15 





CUTEST 



m 




ENTRY BLANK 

Though tunes were tops in Fifty-Nine 
And Sixty's songs were superfine, 

Stars must pit their wits 

To make Sixty-One's hits 



And 



(last line should rhyme with "nine") 

I WANT THE GIFT FROM BECAUSE 

(fill in name of star) 



16 



(in 25 words or less) 



MY NAME IS 

MY ADDRESS 

(Paste entry blank on a postcard and mail to THE LUCKY DOZEN CONTEST, TV 
RADIO MIRROR, Post Office Box 2985, Grand Central Station, New York 17, N. Y. All 
entries must be postmarked no later than December 31, 1960.) 








<8nmdte&iitiiedfo 


n 


la.^ r 


ft* 





Say a happy, rewarding hello to the dear 

old Christmas season . . . give a little time, 

a simple rhyme— get fun and a fabulous prize! 

It's easy to enter, and if you do enter and WIN: 

THE GRAND PRIZE 

is a trip to New York . . . PLUS an appearance on Dick Clark's American Bandstand in its 
Philadelphia studio! Why? To receive your "Lucky Dozen" prize — and acknowledgement that YOU 
submitted "the most original of all entries in The Lucky Dozen Contest." A personal interview with 
Dick Clark will make the day THE MOST. And, if the contestant winning this grand prize is under 
twenty-one years of age, the trip will be granted to both the winner and an adult chaperone. 

ALL TWELVE "LUCKY DOZEN" WINNERS 

will receive a personal gift (as described) from one of the fabulously favorite young stars whose 
stories are told on the following pages . . . PLUS a personal note from the star! 

HOW THE CONTEST WORKS 

FIRST, get the thinking cap in order, then fill in the last line of the jingle on your entry blank. 
THEN, in twenty-five words or less, give your reason for wanting the gift from the star of your choice. 

Contest is open to all persons in the United States and Canada, except employees of Macfadden 
Publications and its agencies. 

Decisions will be made on the basis of originality, and the decision of the judges is final. In case 
of ties, duplicate prizes will be awarded. 

Contest closes at midnight, December 31, 1960. No entries with a later postmark will be considered. 




(JO-©/w^0M]pM{ 





\\ . 



(pam't&M 




17 




A Honolulu newspaper called it "the 
second attack on Pearl Harbor" and 
military police had their problems, when 
thousands of young fans tried to invade the 
naval base. Their target: Rick Nelson, who 
was there to film "The Wackiest Ship in 
the Army" for Columbia Pictures. The mob 
scene was later repeated in Melbourne and 
Sydney, Australia, when Rick appeared 
there to sing for what was reported to be 
the highest fee ever paid an American en- 
tertainer there. 

Add to that his unbroken list of hits for 
Imperial (seven gold records), plus his 
long-running role on the family TV pro- 
gram, and it would appear that Rick has 
no more worlds left to conquer. 

Rick, however, continues to find new 
challenges. A current enjoyable one is the 
flying trapeze. Such a spectacular combina- 
tion of athletic, musical and acting talent is 
two-generations deep in the Nelson family. 
Ozzie Nelson played quarterback for Rut- 
gers University, was graduated from law 
school, had one of the top big bands in the 
nation, and married his vocalist, Harriet 
Hilliard. Their radio show, The Adventures 
Of Ozzie And Harriet, went on the air in 
1944. Rick, a tow-headed, impish wise- 
cracker, began playing himself on the show 
when he was eight. 

Now twenty, he stands six-one. His hair 
has turned dark, but his eyes are bluer than 
ever. And the wide smile makes feminine 
hearts flutter. An English girl sent him a 
328-page fan letter. And there are those 
who refer to a certain substation as "the 
Rick Nelson branch of the Hollywood post 
office." 

What's ahead for Rick in 1961? Profes- 
sionally, just about anything he chooses to 
do. Romantically, who can tell? Rick and 
brother Dave have purchased adjoining 
hilltops in the Santa Monica mountains as 
the site of their future homes. 



RICK'S GIFT: A Kodak Automatic 35 Cam- 
era, designed for easy picture-taking, with 
an automatic lens-setting done by a mirac- 
ulous electric eye. Altogether, totally super! 




THE LUCKY DOZEN CONTEST 



18 



Connie Francis took her own sweet time in accepting 
a motion-picture contract. Roles of various sorts had 
been offered her ever since she turned her MGM record 
"Who's Sorry Now!" into a million-seller and swiftly fol- 
lowed it with "Stupid Cupid" and other hits. Six gold rec- 
ords and many TV shows later, she signed for Joseph 
Pasternak's light-hearted movie "Where the Boys Are," 
and, on arriving in Hollywood, promptly won Mr. Paster- 
nak himself as a devoted admirer. Says Connie, "My own 
father couldn't have been more concerned about me. He 
invited me to his home, and he also invited nice young 
men he thought I should meet." 

In the studio, Connie amazed everyone by being so at 
ease in front of the cameras. What Hollywood did not 
realize was that Connie and cameras were old friends. 
Born December 12, 1938, she was still in grade school 
at Belleville, New Jersey, when she first crossed the Hud- 
son to appear in George Scheck's juvenile TV revue, Star 
Time. At seventeen, she was assistant director. She had 
also played roles in many TV dramas. Connie, literally, 
had grown up under the eyes of the camera. 

Connie's New Year's wish for her fans is, "May you 
find love all your lives. The love and guidance of parents, 
first; then love and romance with your mate. Together, 
may you love and care for children. And may we all share 
an embracing love of God and our fellow men." 



CONNIE'S GIFT: An avid collector of stuffed toy animals 
of all kinds, Connie selected as her gift for the lucky 
winner an enchanting, bow-bedecked grey poodle (not 
in picture below — but "life-size" as sketched at right). 





19 



THE LUCKY DOZEN CONTEST 




. 




Annette Funicello was only thirteen 
when she began winning the hearts of small 
boys — and girls, too — as one of the original 
Mouseketeers of Walt Disney's Mickey Mouse 
Club. Born October 22, 1942, in Utica, New York, 
the daughter of Joseph and Virginia Funicello, 
she grew up in Hollywood and made her motion- 
picture debut in Disney's comedy, "The Shaggy 
Dog." She now stars in Disney's upcoming 
feature-length production "The Horsemasters," 
with Tommy Kirk and Janet Munro. Filming on 
the movie was done in London last fall. 

Now a sophisticated young lady in high heels, 
sheath dresses and the curves to go with them, 
Annette receives about a hundred proposals a 
week. She announced her future plans, the mo- 
ment she was graduated from high school last 
spring. She said, "I can't wait to pack away my 
books and concentrate on my career." The fast 
upsurge of her Vista record, "Pineapple Prin- 
cess," and her albums "Hawaiian Annette" and 
"Italian Annette" prefaced new accomplishments 
in all areas of show business during 1961. 

During her eventful years in show business, 
Annette Funicello has received many a tribute, 
but it was rare, even for her, to receive one from 
a boyfriend's pestiferously teasing kid brother. 
This was when Paul Anka's young brother Andy 
Jr. put together a record dedicated to Annette. 
And, of course, Annette herself had paid Paul 
Anka a pleasant compliment with her album 
of Anka-written material, "Annette Sings Anka." 

Heading into a major adult career as actress 
and singer, Annette can genuinely say, "For 
everybody, 1961 should be the greatest." 




ANNETTE'S SIFT: To take with you no matter 
where you roam, RCA's transistor portable "The 
Ensign" in non-breakable case. High-efficiency 
speaker, earphone jack. Size: 7" high; 4l/ 8 wide. 



20 





Fabian's accomplishment during 1960 has 
not alone been his hit records, motion- 
picture roles, stage shows and television per- 
formances. It has been his achievement as an 
individual in winning the respect of persons 
of stature. Louella Parsons proclaimed, "I'm 
on my soap box. For heaven's sake, give Fabian 
a chance . . . He's only seventeen and it's to 
his everlasting credit that his big success hasn't 
gone to his head." Bing Crosby, after working 
with him in 20th's musical, "High Time," an- 
nounced, "Fabian has a natural singing voice 
and great acting ability. And, in addition, he's a 
fine young man, well-mannered, alert, under- 
standing and very cooperative." 

To celebrate Christmas — and give thanks for 
his own good fortune — Fabian will again join 
with his fellow Chancellor artist, Frankie Avalon, 
in giving children's parties at Philadelphia 
settlement houses. His special Christmas request 
to his fan clubs is: "Instead of sending a present 
to me, give it to your favorite charity." Many 
admirers already do this. One fan club in Holland 
has as its particular project the entertainment of 
400 refugee children. 

Fabian has learned many things this year, 
and his New Year's wish is a serious reflection. 
"May you have the wisdom to distinguish the 
true from the false; may you grow in spirit as 
well as stature; and may this year be wonderful." 




FABIAN'S GIFT: Straight from the 20th Century- 
Fox movie lot, Fabe will send the canvas "cap- 
tain's chair" which he used during breaks in the 
filming of "North to Alaska" with John Wayne. 




21 



- 





There are handicaps to being thirteen years 
old, even if you have just sold a million rec- 
ords. Dodie Stevens discovered them when she 
and Fabian appeared in "Hound Dog Man," his 
first movie. 

Fabian, then sixteen, had been welcomed to 
Hollywood by a mob of girls so delirious they 
crushed in the window of his car. Dodie was a 
top-ranking recording star. Her crazy little song, 
"Pink Shoelaces," was higher in the charts than 
his "Turn Me Loose." They were two of the 
youngest performers in the cast and liked each 
other at first sight. While taking publicity pic- 
tures, they swam, ate hot dogs, were constantly 
together. But no real dates, at Dodie's age! 

Fabian is not the first performer to think that 
Dodie Stevens is just about the sweetest, cutest 
little singer to turn up in show business. Stars 
have been awarding her contest trophies and in- 
viting her to appear on their shows ever since 
her parents moved to Temple City, California. 
(She was born in Chicago, February 17, 1946.) 
She has studied professionally since she was six 
and has a list of motion picture and TV support- 
ing credits almost as tall as she is. This year, 20th 
Century-Fox signed her to the "important" con- 
tract. 

Her record on the Crystalette label is a remake 
of the old Ella Fitzgerald favorite, "A-Tisket, A- 
Tasket." Dodie had another hit in "The Five Pen- 
nies." She likes best to sing standards, with a 
beat. 

Yet, for all Dodie's talent, education must still 
come ahead of bookings. She's a junior high- 
school student. She also studies piano, writes 
songs and paints. She loves to swim, go bowling 
and play table tennis. 

Once she has done her homework, her fifteenth 
year promises to be bright for Dodie. "May 1961 
be the greatest for everybody," she says. 




DODIE'S GIFT: A rain-or-shine umbrella-parasol, 
Paris inspired, with its high-fashion exterior in 
this year's purple, lined delicately with flowered 
silk. A feminine triumph for any day's weather! 



THE LUCKY DOZEN CONTEST 




FEW young performers wore as many hats as 
did Paul Anka in 1966. In a maturing of his 
many talents, he was composer, lyricist, pub- 
lisher, motion-picture and TV actor, concert art- 
ist, night-club entertainer, international ambas- 
sador of good will and always, throughout his 
many activities, the singer who loves to sing. 

Basically, Paul is a reporter in music. With a 
perspective rare in one his age, he observes the 
emotions of himself and his fellow teenagers and 
turns them into songs. This began when he was 
fifteen, with "Diana," the story of a boy's hope- 
less love for an older girl. "Diana" became one 
of the world's all-time best-selling records. 

What starts Paul off on a song? Recently, he 
told how "Summer Is Gone" came to be written. 
"At resorts, I saw how kids had made new 
friends or fallen in love and had formed new little 
worlds of their own. But soon they had to go 
home. It was sweet and sad and wonderful, all at 
the same time." 

Paul was born July 30, 1941, in Ottawa, where 
his father, Andrew Anka, owned one of Canada's 
poshiest restaurants. Hoping Paul would get show 
business out of his system, Andrew permitted 
him to spend an Easter vacation in NeW York. 
Paul contrived an audition at ABC-Paramount, 
wrote "Diana" while waiting for it, and came 
home with a contract. 

Pleading that travel, too, was educational, he 
got time off from school to tour the United States 
and foreign countries. He has since appeared in 
nearly every nation this side of the Iron Curtain. 

Paul has acted and/or written music for a 
number of films. His current picture is "Look in 
Any Window." This year, he also did an acting 
stint for the TV series, Dan Raven, and was the 
youngest performer ever to star at New York's 
Copacabana. 

Paul's current album reflects his friendship 
with people of many lands. The album is titled 
"Christmas Everywhere," and Paul says: "There's 
no better thing I could wish for all of us than the 
traditional 'Peace on earth, good will toward 
Christmas everywhere — all year long! 



men. 



PAUL'S GIFT: With a fabulous batch of sweaters 
in his own closet, Paul chose to gift a winner 
with a scrumptious gold-colored bulky Italian 
topper — warm as it is wonderful. For girls only! 





23 




THAT twenty-first birthday is impor- 
tant in everyone's life, but for Joanie 
Sommers it will truly mean emancipation. 
Joanie started out with a unique handicap. 
She had a voice to be compared with Ella 
Fitzgerald, June Christy, Chris Conners — 
a smoky, passionate, exciting voice which 
could convey all the emotion of sophisti- 
cated jazz. The trouble was, she was just 
eighteen. A Warner Bros, recording execu- 
tive confessed, "We're utterly frustrated. 
She's too young. We don't know what to 
do with her." 

She was born Joan Drost, in Buffalo, New 
York. Her family moved to Venice, Cali- 
fornia, and Joanie later attended Santa 
Monica City College. 

A high-school dance gave her an on- 
stage audition. Tommy Oliver, as a cour- 
tesy, let Joanie sing a song. Two hours 
later, when she finished, she had a job with 
his band. Oliver took her to Warner Bros, 
and arranged the music for her first album. 

Songs in that album — "Positively the 
Most!" — include the sultry classics "Heart 
and Soul," "My Heart Belongs to Daddy," 
"So In Love." One man, writing about that , 
session, remarked : "In years to come, many 
a knowing jazz buff will play this album 
for friends, saying with awe, 'This was the 
first she ever made.' " 

Set back into her own age to grow up, 
Joanie then played some TV roles on 77 
Sunset Strip, and was Edd Byrnes' voice- 
mate on "Kookie's Love Song." About to 
be 21 in '61, she's set to go anywhere her 
talent takes her. A five-year contract at the 
Sahara in Las Vegas is a starter. 

Joanie counts her blessings. She says, "I 
feel God has been terribly good to me to 
give me a career so early." She counts her 
friends. "I hope to make many more, both 
boys and girls." Hobbies? "I like to go 
bowling and I love to swim. But, most of 
all, I love to sing." That's Joanie. 



JOANIE'S GIFT: A charming pastel-pink 
box for your favorite jewels, which strikes up 
"The Merry Widow Waltz" when the lid is 
lifted. A singing start for any lovely day. 




THE LUCKY 



24 





DOZEN CONTEST 



PUBLICLY, recording companies usually 
have nothing but superlative praise for 
their rising artists. RCA Victor, however, 
lodged a mild complaint against Rod Lau- 
ren when they sent out his second record, 
"A Wild Imagination." They stated, "For 
months, we have been trying to get Rod 
Lauren into a studio, but the busy young 
singer-actor has been on the run with ap- 
pearances in Australia, the Midwest and 
with The Ken Murray Revue. Finally, he 
found a free weekend to record." 

Rod acknowledges, "They just couldn't 
catch me. As for the record, the title fits. 
If anyone had predicted all these things a 
year ago, I'd have said he did have a wild 
imagination." 

A year ago, for instance, he was still 
called by his given name, Roger Laurence 
Stunk. He was born in Fresno, California, 
March 26, 1940. His father Larry, a rail- 
road man, sings in the church choir; his 
mother, a teacher, plays the organ. Rod 
plays piano and trombone. The parents' 
customary treat was to take Rod and his 
teen-age sisters to nearby San Francisco to 
see a play or opera. His parents thought 
he should become a dentist, but Rod wanted 
to be an actor. Movies were his textbook. 
"I'd stay in a theater through so many 
shows they had to kick me out." 

He gained experience in college plays, a 
jazz band and local TV shows. A song- 
writing friend asked him to sing on his 
demonstration records. RCA Victor took 
the singer, but not the songs. They 
launched Rod with a $50,000 promotional 
campaign. A screen test followed. He'll do 
"The Sons of Kate Elder" at Paramount. 

His aims are clear. "I want to study and 
work. I want to hone my talent to a sharp 
edge and be a good actor and singer." His 
New Year's wish for his friends : "May each 
one find the thing he most wants to do — 
and also get a chance to do it." 



ROD'S GIFT: An RCA Victor clock-radio, 
for a lucky winner in the one-eye-shut, one- 
eye-open set. The Formflair has sleep 
switch-off, wake-to-music alarm. It's great! 



25 




* 






She'll be home for Christmas, says Jo-Arm 
Campbell. Blonde, blue-eyed and just five 
feet tall, she has the affectionate nature to go 
with such kitten-soft packaging. An only child, 
she has — for each of her twenty-one years — been 
the focus of her family's holiday plans. "My 
grandparents, who live in Jacksonville, Florida, 
will come to New York. We'll have a tree and 
all the trimmings." 

Sentimental though she is, Jo-Ann also has a 
strong side to her character. Since childhood, 
she has sought to be a successful entertainer. 
To further her ambition, her parents, James and 
Doris Campbell, moved from Jacksonville to 
New York. Jo-Ann studied acting, singing and 
dancing. Already a successful recording star, she 
wants to go into motion pictures when her chance 
comes. 

The best thing which has happened to her this 
year, she says, was signing with ABC-Paramount, 
who released "Kookie Little Paradise." 

Jo-Ann's New Year's wish for her friends : 
"May you always stay as sweet and wonderful to 
everyone as you have been to me." 



JO-ANN'S GIFT: 

A sterling silver 
charm bracelet, 
loaded with silver 
charms to jingle a 
good wish to the 
winner for the 
whole year ahead. 





THE LUCKY DOZEN CONTEST 



With A gold record for "Volare" plus other 
Cameo label hits to his credit, yellow-haired, 
bright-eyed Bobby Rydell glances back over the 
year when he turned eighteen and says, "How 
could fifty-two weeks hold so much? Dreams I've 
had all my life actually came true." With a grin, 
he adds, "A couple came so true they were almost 
nightmares." 

In the too-true classification was his appearance 
at Atlantic City's Steel Pier. This had been 
Bobby's scene of dreams since his parents, Adrio 
and Jennie Ridarelli, first took him there on sum- 
mer outings. Bobby would sing all the way home 
to South Philadelphia, then do the show over for 
his delighted grandparents. 

The family was present when Bobby actually did 
run out on that great stage to sing, dance, play 
drums, do imitations. He bowed, and a fan tossed 
a toy dog at his feet. Bobby kissed it and exited 
laughing. The next show, the laugh was on him. 
He says, "The kids must have bought every stuffed 
animal on the Boardwalk. It rained a zoo!" 

Bobby also had a small bout with Broadway. 
Preparing for the time he would bid to bring his 
own name up in lights, he auditioned for a musical, 
"just for practice." To his astonishment, the pro- 
ducer dismissed other applicants, announcing, 
"You've got the part." 

Bobby says, "I stood speechless. What can you 
say when you're handed your heart's desire — and 
you can't accept? I was booked solid, all around 
the country. No Broadway for me this year." 

The producer was just plain mad. He cut the 
role out of the show, stating, "Anyone else would 
be anti-climactic." 

A movie may be in Bobby Rydell's near future, 
but his dearest personal wish for 1961 is a new 
house. "We've had fun in the old one, but when 
you add a few visiting fans, it gets crowded. I've 
asked Dad to let me share the cost to buy or build." 

Bobby's New Year's wish for his friends reflects 
his own happy state of being. "It's great to be 
young, and there's much joy in the world. May 
each of us find it, every single day." 



BOBBY'S GIFT: For some lucky girl, a stunning 
wristwatch by Hamilton, the 22-jeweled "Juno." 
10-karat white gold-filled case and matching 
gold bracelet. Anti-maqnetic, shock-resistant. 




THE LUCKY DOZEN CONTEST 





For Neil Sedaka, this was the year 
he had hoped for since he was knee- 
high to a piano bench. His records were 
hits, he traveled to meet foreign fans, he 
played clubs and appeared on television 
programs. Most important of all, he wrote 
the musical score for the movie "Where 
the Boys Are," which stars his long-time 
friend, Connie Francis. 

Born in Brooklyn, March 13, 1939, 
Neil is the son of Mac and Eleanor 
Sedaka. His grandmother was a concert 
pianist and Neil earned his first Juilliard 
scholarship when he was nine years old. 
He was strictly longhair until he and his 
neighbor, Howard Greenfield, discovered 
rock 'n' roll. They first matched Howie's 
tricky rhymes to Neil's bright tunes in a 
high-school musical. They got their first 
pop hit when Connie Francis sang their 
"Stupid Cupid." Neil turned vocalist and 
cut his first RCA Victor record with a 
tune which Connie inspired, "The Diary." 

Neil found his tours of Brazil, the 
Philippines and Japan stimulating. He 
says, "The kids were great, just like the 
ones at home. Young people of the world 
have no trouble getting along. It's a pity 
politicians can't do the same." 

His biggest gripe of the year is against 
the newspaperman who wrote: "Neil 
Sedaka's mail brings no proposals. What's 
wrong with his girl fans?" 

Neil savs, "I assure you there's nothing 
wrong with them. But if a girl writes me 
an affectionate letter, I'll not violate her 
confidence by showing it to some re- 
porter." He has a running love affair with 
all his fans, he maintains. "I put it on 
record with 'You Mean Everything to 
Me.'" 

His own 1961 ambition is to get a 
musical show on Broadwav. His wish for 
his fans is: "Mav you all have just as 
much fun as I'm having. This is a won- 
derful year." That's for surel 

NEIL'S GIFT: Portable RCA Victor stereo 
"Victrola" with 4-speed "Floating Action" 
record changer. Lift-away lid contains 
the second speaker. Dual volume control. 



28 







Connie Stevens believes in realistic 
preparation for an acting role, up to 
a point. She took a three-day job as a 
field hand in the Connecticut tobacco 
country to learn how to play her part in 
the Warner Bros, picture, "Parrish." 
However, she has not yet contemplated 
doing any private sleuthing to give depth 
to her character of "Cricket," part-time 
assistant to the detectives in ABC-TV's 
Hawaiian Eye. 

She needs no extra-curricular prepara- 
tion for Cricket's other job as a night-club 
singer. That's as real as a lifetime knowl- 
edge of the music business can make it. 
Connie was born in Brooklyn, August 8, 
1938, and named Concetta Ann Ingolia. 
Her father, a musician, works under the 
professional name of Teddy Stevens. Her 
mother, Eleanor McGinley, was a vocalist. 
Her brother Charles, too, is a musician. 
When Connie and her father went to visit 
relatives in Hollywood, the visit turned 
into permanent residence as they both 
found career opportunities. 

Gifted, blonde Connie went swiftly from 
amateur singing and bit parts to profes- 
sional recording, television and motion- 
picture contracts. 

In recordings, her voice backed Edd 
Byrnes on "Kookie, Kookie, Lend Me 
Your Comb." She had a million-seller in 
"Sixteen Reasons." And it would appear 
she really believes the philosophy of 
another hit, "Too Young to Go Steady." 

Just when everyone expected a formal 
announcement, Connie cooled toward 
singer Gary Clark and she made the 
forthright statement: "We never an- 
nounced an engagement because we 
weren't ready to set a wedding date." 

Whether 1961 will bring a ring, Connie 
does not yet choose to say. But, career- 
wise, her course is certain. For Connie, 
there will be more records, more movies, 
more television, more opportunities. 



CONNIE'S GIFT: Whether it's an English 
theme or a letter to your love, some happy 
winner will rejoice in this beige Skyriter 
Portable with zipper case (9 pounds). 




Life hasnt been all laughs for 

Jackie. But out of the early struggles, 

the later doubts and fears, has 

come the one strong answer he was seeking 



by ROBERT LARDINE 



When Jackie Gleason was nine, he had a habit of 
furtively slipping money, slated for the collec- 
tion plate, back into his pocket. He never missed a 
Sunday attendance at Our Lady of Lourdes Church 
in Brooklyn — and he never missed dodging a col- 
lection plate, either. "All the kids used to do it," 
says the rotund comic, "and I was no exception. I 
bought cigarettes with the money." Today, the hard- 
working, hard-living comedian contributes huge 
sums to the Catholic Church, as well as to other 
religious groups and charities. "I have enough ciga- 
rettes now," he says with a grin. 

Jackie's turnabout behavior toward the church is 
evidenced in many other ways, too. For instance, 
he's aiding Father Hayden of Brookline, Massachu- 
setts, in gathering funds to build a hospital for the 
mentally defective. He occupies himself with many 
projects of this kind, but shuns publicity concerning 
them. As a result, the TV audience thinks of him 
strictly as a fun-loving, gregarious buffoon. They'd 
be surprised to hear the eloquent funnyman speak 
seriously about man's obligation to God and church. 
The many-faceted clown hasn't always felt so 
dedicated. As a youngster, his church-going was 
forced on him. When bereft of parental supervision 
at an early age, his visits to the local DeSales Place 
parish became few and far between. It was about 
this time that he began to search deep within him- 
self. He was confused about everything that had 
been told him. Why was he a Catholic? he won- 
dered. Why not a Protestant, a Jew, a Moslem? 

"To this day," says Jackie, "I don't believe a per- 
son should inherit his religion. I know I didn't want 
to be born something or other. I wanted to find out 
for myself." He started out with the Catholic En- 
cyclopedia, and then devoured countless other 
books on all forms of theology. He studied for years, 
until finally he was satisfied. 

"Fortunately," says the comedian, "I discovered 
that Catholicism was best for me. Its lack of vacil- 
lation in dogma impressed me. If you're a sinner, 
you're a sinner. There are no two ways about it. The 
religion will not stretch the rules to justify wrong- 
doing." 

He has found peace of mind in discovering that 
religion fills his particular need. But Jackie insists 
he shouldn't be depicted as (Continued on page 70) 



30 



V* * 






«-^» 



**'■ 



Life hasn't been all laughs for 

Jackie. But out of the early struggles, 

the later doubts and fears, has 

come the one strong answer he was seeking 



by ROBERT LARDINE 

When Jackie Gleason was nine, he had a habit of 
furtively slipping money, slated for the collec- 
tion plate, back into his pocket. ^ never missed a 
Sunday attendance at Our Lady of Lourdes Church 
in Brooklyn-and he never missed dodging a col- 
lection plate, either. "All the kids used to do it 
says the rotund comic, "and I was no exception. 1 
bought cigarettes with the money." Today, the hard- 
working, hard-living comedian contributes huge 
sums to the Catholic Church, as well as to other 
religious groups and charities. "I have enough ciga- 
rettes now," he says with a grin. 

Jackie's turnabout behavior toward the church is 
evidenced in many other ways, too. For instance, 
he's aiding Father Hayden of Brookline, Massachu- 
setts, in gathering funds to build a hospital for the 
mentally defective. He occupies himself with many 
projects of this kind, but shuns publicity concerning 
them. As a result, the TV audience thinks of him 
strictly as a fun-loving, gregarious buffoon. They'd 
be surprised to hear the eloquent funnyman speak 
seriously about man's obligation to God and church. 
The many-faceted clown hasn't always felt so 
dedicated. As a youngster, his church-going was 
forced on him. When bereft of parental supervision 
at an early age, his visits to the local DeSales Place 
parish became few and far between. It was about 
this time that he began to search deep within him- 
self. He was confused about everything that had 
been told him. Why was he a Catholic? he won- 
dered. Why not a Protestant, a Jew, a Mosleml 

"To this day," says Jackie, "I don't believe a per- 
son should inherit his religion. I know I didn't want 
to be born something or other. I wanted to find out 
for myself." He started out with the Catholic En- 
cyclopedia, and then devoured countless other 
books on all forms of theology. He studied for years, 
until finally he was satisfied. 

"Fortunately," says the comedian, "I discovered 
that Catholicism was best for me. Its lack of vacil- 
lation in dogma impressed me. If you're a sinner, 
you're a sinner. There are no two ways about it. The 
religion will not stretch the rules to justify wrong- 
doing." 

He has found peace of mind in discovering that 
religion fills his particular need. But Jackie insists 
he shouldn't be depicted as (Continued on page 70) 



30 



\>V^ ^ 




■ 





Always close to their son, Dick and Bobby Clark make sure that Dickie gets even more time and attention, these days. 



"the 3 of us" 




Dickie wants to "sail boats" — so Daddy puts aside 
his work to go down to the brook. Show biz can wait. 



Key words — and a candid admission — 
inviting you into the very private life 
of a Dick Clark at home, away from 
the daily razzle-dazzle of show business 

by MARTIN COHEN 

In the Dick Clark household in suburban Phila- 
delphia, it gets a little rough in the early- 
morning. Sometimes Dick wakes with a toe in his 
ear or his mouth — and it's not his and not wife 
Bobby's. Or, at six a.m., the doorbell rings and Dick 
groggily descends the stairs to the front door to 
find a neighbor towing in a small-type character. 
The character in question is a combination Dennis 
the Menace and automatic alarm clock. It is 
Dickie Clark, three-and-a-half, and he is really 
beginning to swing his weight around. 

"Dickie's not a good eater and he's not a good 
sleeper," papa Clark tells you. "He's very active, 
mischievous — and, in a few words, very normal." 
But, about eighteen months ago, the Clarks were 
filled with anxiety about Dickie. He began 
stumbling quite a bit, and then they noticed that 
his right eye turned in occasionally. It got more 
and more serious, so they took Dickie to an eye 
doctor, who explained (Continued on page 71) 

Dick Clark's American Bandstand is on ABC-TV, Monday through 
Friday, from 4 to 5:30 P.M. EST, under multiple sponsorship. 



32 



■ 




* 



Routine Frederick, Reporter 




All is serene, in her apartment near the United Nations. 
Her poodle drowses on the terrace. Awards above the desk 
attest the esteem Pauline has won. But it took a heap of 
hustle — both brain and nerve — to achieve the status she 
has today, the authority with which she speaks over NBC. 




by LILLA ANDERSON 

Pauline Frederick, NBC News, New York, is 
the only woman to have a regularly 
scheduled network news broadcast. An expert 
on the United Nations, she is also on call 
to appear on other newscasts, radio and TV, 
and is the regular reporter-narrator for 
NBC-TV's Purex Specials For Women. Her 
admiring audience ranges from schoolchildren 
to diplomats. Poet Carl Sandburg, once a 
newsman himself, writes her fan letters. Four 
colleges have awarded her honorary doctorates 
and she has received many broadcasting 
awards. She has been president of the U.N. 
Correspondents Association and was on the 
Board of Governors of the Overseas Press Club. 
Yet the title which she (Continued on page 68) 

Pauline covers United Nations sessions for NBC News. She is 
reporter-narrator for the once-a-month daytime Purex Special 
For Women on NBC-TV. See local newspapers for day and time. 





A proud title, truly won in the no-woman's-land of TV and 

radio news. An inspiring story of a gracious, resourceful woman 

whose own colleagues— all male— call her "the greatest" 



37 



/£* 






Hi* 




Brazil: Enthusiastic welcome upon Brenda's 
arrival merely foreshadowed fabulous events to come. 
Armed soldiers barred her from a club date — 
others escorted her to governor's palace for a party! 



Just turned 16, not yet five feet tall, 
Brenda Lee has been blasting 
records — and waxing 'em, too — since 
she was just a baby firecracker 

by HELEN BOLSTAD 

Depending on which way you look at it, she's a 
press agent's dream — or a press agent's 
nightmare. No one needs to build a "legend" around 
Brenda Lee. Her young life has been too fabulous 
already. As a tot, she cut her teeth on-camera. Now, 
as an adolescent, she's crowding Connie Francis 
for the title of number-one girl singer. 

And thereby hangs a problem. How can anyone 
tell Brenda's story, just as it happened, and still hope 
to be believed? If a dramatic series literally re- 
enacted her life up to now, critics all over the country 
would froth at the typewriter, demanding, "How 
incredible can you get?" (Continued on page 62) 




Paris: She won hearts of both the masses 

and the muses. Above, with Gilbert Becaud, who 

composed "The Day the Rains Came Down." 



39 






With or without her puppets, she still uses her hands to talk. 
I find Shari's conversation exciting — even when we don't agree. 



Multiply TV's Miss Lewis by the 
variety of characters she's created — 
and you'll just be beginning to 
know the little enchantress I married 



by JEREMY TARCHER 



"Lamb Chop" (due left) won't be grilled — though Shari 
(feeding tidbits to a canine guest, below) loves to cook! 




This past summer, Shari got her first ticket 
for speeding — and she was delighted. Star- 
tling? Sure. Even though I (her husband) 
found her reaction unexpected, I can explain 
it. Like most of us, Shari has never had trou- 
ble with the law. She doesn't drive a car, so 
she's never had even a summons for overtime 
parking or passing a light. 

But, on this particular occasion, we were in 
our outboard-motor boat and Shari was at the 
helm in one of the inland waterways off Long 
Island. A policeman flagged her down. She 
was going all of seven miles an hour in a five- 
mile zone. When the officer (a Shari Lewis 
fan) recognized her, he was very apologetic. 
Yet she grabbed for the ticket as a child 
reaches for a new toy, and gave the lawman a 
big, happy smile! He's probably still scratch- 
ing his head — but this is a perfect example of 
the naive side of Shari Lewis, one of her 
many faces. 

There are so many sides to Shari, and they 
are bewitching rather than bewildering. Ac- 
tually, you can see the various expressions of 
her personality in (Continued on page 75) 

The Shari Lewis Show is seen over NBC-TV, Saturdays, at 
10 A.M. EST, sponsored by the National Biscuit Company. 



41 




Showman, U.S. J 



© 



See America with Sullivan— and learn why Ed falls more in lov< 



42 



m^ 




San Francisco welcome — "one of the nicest things that ever happened 
to me!". Above, Ed gets glamour-greeting at airport. Below, with wife 
Sylvia and Louis Simon of Station KPIX. At left — Golden Sate Bridge. 




by LEE GREGORY 

Don't stand still! That's been Ed Sullivan's formula for 
success ever since his show premiered more than twelve 
years ago. Today, more than ever, the hustling Hibernian is 
scurrying around for new ideas, intriguing formats and unusual 
concepts. He'll go anywhere in the world seeking them. 

His current drive to keep his top-rated show alive and vital 
hinges on a "See America With Ed Sullivan" theme, starting 
with San Francisco, Chicago — then New York at Christmas, 
Dallas in January, New Orleans in February, Los Angeles in 
March, Washington, D. C, in April, and Boston in May. Not 
content with that itinerary, he's already eyeing St. Louis in the 
summer, and busy jawing with many (Continued on page 66) 



with its great cities every time he visits them 



Dr. T. C. Geiger, head of the Mayor's 
Welcoming Committee, makes it official: 
San Francisco loves Ed — as Ed has always 
loved the cosmopolitan but friendly city. 




Chinatown — with tiny, talented Ginny Tiu 
— was one of manyjocal settings used on 
Ed's first special "See America" show. 




"See America With Ed Sullivan" is a once-a- 
month feature of The Ed Sullivan Show, which 
is seen regularly each week over CBS-TV, on 
Sundays, from 8 to 9 P.M. EST, sponsored by 
Eastman Kodak and the Colgate-Palmolive Co. 



43 







Fun Day in the Sun 



44 



It's a date! And, for Janet Lennon 
and her best friend Joan Esser, this 
afternoon with the brothers Crawford 
was right down the road to Endsville 




Double date, single phone call — from the Crawford 
home to the Lennons': Above, Johnny (at left), 14, 
and Robert, 16. Facing page, Janet Lennon (left) 
and Joan Esser, closest pal and neighbor, both 14. 



When Johnny Crawford called Janet 
Lennon for a date, brother Robert 
hinted, "Maybe she has a friend?" In- 
deed she has — Johnny had seen her at the 
ABC studios where both he and Janet perform 
for TV! Joan Esser lives just around the 
corner from the Lennons, has been Janet's 
inseparable pal since kindergarten. So a 
foursome it was. . . . The boys planned to take 
their dates to an amusement park but — 
soon as they arrived — found more than 
enough fun and games around the Lennon 
home itself. Indoors, the four played records 
(Como, Belafonte, Ray) and had punch and 
cookies ("Umm, homemade," said Johnny 
— "Yes, but not by me," signed honest Janet, 
"though I'm going to learn to bake soon!") . 
But, mostly, the fun was outdoors in the sun. 




Zero hour, big moment for Johnny — who's such a fan of the 
small singer, Robert says they call The Lawrence Welk Show 
'The Janet Lennon Show"! Below: In no time at all, the four 
are in the Lennon backyard, plotting the day's outdoor play. 



Continued 



► 




Fun Day in the Sun 



(Continued) 







Croquet is a new game for Johnny and Robert, but 
they manfully take a whack at setting up the wickets. 




Mallets for all. (Johnny hit first ball so hard and far that 
Robert had to warn him, "This game is like golf — not polo!") 




Robert saves the day for the males by winni 



in 



Janet is on the beam — and male honor is at stake. The boys find the 
game fascinating but quickly discover it isn't as simple as It looks. 

Janet sings on The Lawrence Welk Show, seen on ABC-TV, Sat., from 9 to 10 P.M. 
EST, as sponsored by Dodge Div. of Chrysler Corp. and J. B. Williams Co., Inc. 
Other Welk programs are heard over ABC Radio ; see local papers for day and time. 



46 





v. 



*s«# 




Mi 



.,.-.- 



'-*■/,■■ : -, 






'::-.. 



m*-~ 



VHi 



Baseball's a surprise. "Both girls are great batters and runners," the Crawfords report. "We'd pick them over most boys 
in forming a team." All four are Dodger rooters and already setting up a date for the Los Angeles Coliseum next spring. 



but Johnny 'fesses up, "A terrible thing happened to me: I lost." 





End of day, near shrine which is the pride of the 
Lennon home. It's been a fun day to remember, for 
Joanie and three busy young TV performers — singer 
Janet of The Lawrence Welk Show, Robert Craw- 
ford Jr. (who is John Smith's kid brother in Laramie), 
and Johnny (Chuck Connors' son in The Rifletnan). 



47 



Fun Day in the Sun 



(Continued) 





BBBbBH^H 



Croquet is a new game for Johnny and Robert, but 
they manfully take a whack at setting up the wickets. 




Mallets for all. (Johnny hit first ball so hard "and far that 
Robert had to warn him, "This game is like golf— not polo! ) 



Robert saves the day for the males by winning 




Baseball's a surprise. "Both girls are great batters and runners," the Crawfords report. "We'd pick them over most boys 
in forming a team." All four are Dodger rooters and already setting up a date for the Los Angeles Coliseum next spring. 



...but Johnny 'fesses up, "A terrible thing happened to me: I lost." 



Janet is on the beam— and male honor is at stake. The boys find the 
game fascinating but quickly discover it isn't as simple as it looks. 

Janet sings on The Lawrence Welk Show, seen on ABC-TV, Sat., from 9 to 10 P.M. 
EST, as sponsored by Dodge Div. of Chrysler Corp. and J. B. Williams Co., Inc. 
Other Welk programs are heard over ABC Radio; see local papers for day and time. 



46 





End of day, near shrine which is the pride of the 
Lennon home. It's been a fun day to remember, for 
Joanie and three busy young TV performers — singer 
Janet of The Lawrence Welk Show, Robert Craw- 
ford Jr. (who is John Smith's kid brother in Laramie), 
and Johnny (Chuck Connors' son in The Rifleman). 



47 




June, 1953: Wife Kay seated with sons Tom (left), Bob and 
Don Jr. (right); Don standing with his sister Agnes (left) 
and parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harry McNeill. December, 1957: 
Don, Bob, Kay, Don Jr. and Tom, at Sun Valley. His tall 
sons' athletic prowess is a source of pride to the host of 
Breakfast Club — who couldn't indulge in sports as a youth. 





TO BUILD 
A FAMILY 



From Don McNeill's own heritage 
comes the magic formula with which 
he and Kay created the kind of 
"success" that really counts in life 

by CHARLES CARNER 



Don McNeill isn't one to glance backwan 
very often, but, like most men in then- 
middle years, he sometimes considers 
what might have been. For Don, who reaches 
his fifty-third birthday December 23, the 
"what might have been" forks in the road 
pointed to New York and Hollywood. 

"Careerwise," Don admits, "I guess I've 
turned down more opportunities for so-called 
success than most people in this business. 
But, each time these chances came along, we 
weighed them against the boys' futures and, 
though these were good offers, we didn't want 
to uproot the family." 

Don McNeill of the Breakfast Club realizes 
that, by this time, a network television 
program would be his, (Continued on page 60 ) 

Don McNeill's Breakfast Club, on ABC Radio, Monday through 
Friday, 9 to 9:55 A.M. EST, under multiple sponsorship. 





It adds up to everything a man could wish, says Don: 
Outdoor excursions, home evenings with Kay — and the 
young McNeills' progress in either school or career. 




_ 






All too true, says Carol Burnett . . . 
when you yourself are only in your 
twenties but face the challenge of being 
a mother to your own kid sister! 

by DAVID DACHS 

This past summer, Carol Burnett anxiously 
went around to parents of teenagers, at a 
New York State resort, asking— as seriously as 
a U.N. delegate— "What time does your daugh- 
ter have to be home? . . . What time does Johnny 
have to be home from the Saturday dance? . . . 
What time does Celia have to be in on Sunday 
night?" 

Since Carol is probably the most talked-about 
TV comedienne since Imogene Coca and Lucille 
Ball, the vacationers listened to her with a half- 
smile, waiting for the punch-line. But the 
"snapper" never came. Reason? Carol was in 
dead-earnest. 

For the fact is that reddish-brown-haired 
Carol Burnett, chief female comedy backstop 
on The Garry Moore Show, is the "mother" of 
a teen-age girl, Christine. And lovely, long 
haired Christine (pictured here with "mama" 
Carol) is old enough to be dating! 

Now, don't jump to the conclusion that twen- 
ty-six-year-old Carol was a child bride, similar 
to one of the unshod lassies in the never-never- 
land of Li'l Abner's "Dogpatch." The far-from- 
comic truth is that the parents of both Carol and 
Christine are dead. So Carol now has the sole 
responsibility, of raising and guiding her kid 
sister. 

Of Christine, Carol says: "She's full of life, 
and I have my problems cut out for me in being 
a parent. But I love her very much and she 
loves me." 

Christine is a stunning brunette, a dark-eyed 
beauty who causes swiveling of eyes wherever 
she goes. She's just sixteen this December, but 
she could easily pass for nineteen or twenty. The 
teenager is also quite tall. In fact, at five-feet- 
eight, she's taller than Carol, who tilts the yard- 
stick at five-seven. 

"I try to- be with Chris as much as I can," says 
Carol. "Last year was pretty rough. I was on the 
Garry Moore program and appearing in 'Once 
Upon A Mattress' on Broadway. But I managed 
as best I could." 

During the winter, Christine has a tight 
schedule. She goes to St. John's Baptist School, 
an Episcopalian all-girls' (Continued on page 76) 

Carol Burnett is featured on The Garry Moore Show, as seen on 
CBS-TV, Tues., from 10 to 11 P.M. EST, sponsored by Plymouth 
Div. of Chrysler Corp., Johnson's Waxes, and Polaroid, Inc. 

Photo by Horst Ebersberg 




^f 









i jhh 




^ it 



All too true, says Carol Burnett . . • 
when you yourself are only in your 
twenties but face the challenge of being 
a mother to your own kid sister! 

by DAVID DACHS 

rpras past summer, Carol Burnett anxiously 
I went around to parents of teenagers at a 
New York State resort, askmg-as seriously as 
UN delegate— "What time does your daugh- 
ter have to be home? . . . What time does Johnny 
have to be home from the Saturday dance? . . . 
What time does Celia have to be in on Sunday 

"'since Carol is probably the most talked-about 
TV comedienne since Imogene Coca and Lucille 
Ball, the vacationers listened to her with a halt- 
smile, waiting for the punch-line. But the 
"snapper" never came. Reason? Carol was in 
dead-earnest. u~*~>a 

For the fact is that reddish-brown-haired 
Carol Burnett, chief female comedy backstop 
on The Garry Moore Show, is the "mother of 
a teen-age girl, Christine. And lovely, long 
haired Christine (pictured here with 'mama 
Carol) is old enough to be dating! 

Now, don't jump to the conclusion that twen- 
ty-six-year-old Carol was a child bride, similar 
to one of the unshod lassies in the never-never- 
land of Li'l Abner's "Dogpatch." The far-from- 
comic truth is that the parents of both Carol and 
Christine are dead. So Carol now has the sole 
responsibility. of raising and guiding her kid 
sister. 

Of Christine, Carol says: "She's full of life, 
and I have my problems cut out for me in being 
a parent. But I love her very much and she 
loves me." 

Christine is a stunning brunette, a dark-eyed 
beauty who causes swiveling of eyes wherever 
she goes. She's just sixteen this December, but 
she could easily pass for nineteen or twenty. The 
teenager is also quite tall. In fact, at five-feet- 
eight, she's taller than Carol, who tilts the yard- 
stick at five-seven. 

"I try to- be with Chris as much as I can," says 
Carol. "Last year was pretty rough. I was on the 
Garry Moore program and appearing in 'Once 
Upon A Mattress' on Broadway. But I managed 
as best I could." 

During the winter, Christine has a tight 
schedule. She goes to St. John's Baptist School, 
an Episcopalian all-girls' {Continued on page 76) 

Carol Burnett is featured on The Garry Moore Show, as seen on 
CBS-TV, Tues., from 10 to 11 P.M. EST, sponsored by Plymouth 
Div. of Chrysler Corp., Johnson's Waxes, and Polaroid, Inc. 

Photo by Horn Ebersberg 





From These Roots: Around young Lyddy (Sarah Hardy) 
swirl the highly adult problems of her mother Emily 
(Helen Shields, at top right), her aunt Rose Fraser 
(Tresa Hughes) and Jim Benson (played by Henderson 
Forsythe), the father she adored — and recently lost. 



Being Lydia, on From These Roots, 
is exciting. But, personally, it keeps 
Sarah Hardy so busy that she sighs: "I 
can only dream about getting married" 

by FRANCES KISH 

Sarah Hardy, who plays Lydia Benson in the 
NBC daily television drama, From These 
Roots, is petite — five-feet-two, 110 pounds, 
tiny-waisted. Her thick, short dark hair 
is the kind a man wants to run his hands 
through. Her dark eyes are alight with fun — 
and warmth. Her manner is vivacious, her 
smile engaging, her voice soft and tinged 
with the music of the South. (She's from 
Columbia, South Carolina.) 

A romantic girl, in both appearance and 
actual fact. Yet Sarah herself has no time these 
days for romance. "I have to live vicariously 
in Lydia's romances," she sighs. "I can think 
about getting married, but that's all. A 
working actress in a daytime drama doesn't 
have much time for dates. Or much oppor- 
tunity for meeting men who aren't in show 
business — and I would rather not marry an 
actor. There seems (Continued on page 73) 

From These Roots is seen on NBC-TV, M-F, from 3:30 to 4 P.M. 
EST, as produced by Paul Lammers, under multiple sponsorship. 



J\o Time 



52 




forRomance 



f 



hi 





Just that one problem: So little time for 
dates! The lucky man seen here is William 
Hale, who lives nearby — and has just aban- 
doned acting for a career in advertising. 




There's little drama in Sarah's 
own "inner sanctum" but lots of 
literature and fine art. She's 
an expert at sculpture, drawing 
— and practical painting, when 
necessary, in the apartment she 
shares with another career girl. 





From Theie Roots: Around young Lyddy (Sarah Hardy) 
swirl the highly adult problems of her mother Emily 
(Helen Shields, at top right), her aunt Rose Fraser 
(Tresa Hughes) and Jim Benson (played by Henderson 
Forsythe), the father she adored— and recently lost. 



Being Lydia, on From These Roots, 
is exciting. But, personally, it keeps 
Sarah Hardy so busy that she sighs : "I 
can only dream about getting married" 

by FRANCES KISH 

Sarah Hardy, who plays Lydia Benson in the 
NBC daily television drama, From These 
Roots, is petite— five-feet-two, 110 pounds, 
tiny-waisted. Her thick, short dark hair 
is the kind a man wants to run his hands 
through. Her dark eyes are alight with fun— 
and warmth. Her manner is vivacious, her 
smile engaging, her voice soft and tinged 
with the music of the South. (She's from 
Columbia, South Carolina.) 

A romantic girl, in both appearance and 
actual fact. Yet Sarah herself has no time these 
days for romance. "I have to live vicariously 
in Lydia's romances," she sighs. "I can think 
about getting married, but that's all. A 
working actress in a daytime drama doesn't 
have much time for dates. Or much oppor- 
tunity for meeting men who aren't in show 
business— and I would rather not marry an 
actor. There seems (Continued on page 73) 

From These Roots is seen on NBC-TV, M-F, from 3 :30 to 4 P M 
EST.as produced by Paul Lammers, under multiple sponsorship.' 



J\lo Time 



forRomance 





^■^^ 


\ y 




M 0m 




L- vJ/ 


^^L JTa 


ft 




^^9*^^_ 




■«r "- j 



Just that one problem: So little time for 
dates! The lucky man seen here is William 
Hale, who lives nearby — and has just aban- 
doned acting for a career in advertising. 



There's little drama in Sarahs 
own "inner sanctum" but lots ot 
literature and fine art. bne s 
an expert at sculpture, drawing 
-ancf practical painting, wen 
necessary, in the apartment she 
shares with another career girl. 




■ 















<m 
















mx& 



What does it all mean? Humor thai 's new— and true — and indescribable. The 



KATHLEEN 
POST 



Bob Newhart tells this on himself. 
While in San Francisco, he played 
golf with a friend who brought two 
businessmen along. After the game, 
one of the men confided to Bob, "Your 
pal told us you are the best of the new 
comics. He must be kidding. You didn't 



say a funny thing all day!" The fact is, 
as Bob explains, he is not a big belly- 
laugh comic. "Nor am I a sick or an 
angry young comic," he adds ruefully. 
"But that won't stop anyone from say- 
ing I am— or expecting me to live up 
to it." Bob, whose first lp album, "The 



■Trr 







. .. 









» 



fhugMK*. ',y' 



ni ! 



t 






*tx + 



<year's quietest comedy click himself confesses: "I'd be afraid to analyze it" 



Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart," 
perched atop the best-seller lists for 
months, smiles wistfully as he talks — 
and, at once, he seems transformed. He 
is no longer the newest laugh-maker of 
the "witnik" set, rival to Shelley Ber- 
man and Mort Sahl. He seems the 



personification of the man next door, 
caught in the grip of a world he never 
made and does not know how to con- 
trol. He is a modern Abe Lincoln, 
holding a neatly typed copy of the 
Gettysburg Address, being scolded b.y 
his publicity (Continued on page 74) 




■ 
■ 



- ^ f ;--- •• , 



V"- 



"^. 






1 

a 



*. * 



■I 



What does it all mean? Humor that's new-and true-and indescribable. 

say a funny thing all day!" The fact is, 
as Bob explains, he is not a big belly- 
laugh comic. "Nor am I a sick or an 
^/ young comic," he adds ruefully, 
out that won't stop anyone from say- 
^V.,*™— or expecting me to live up 
w it. Bob, whose first lp album, "The 



Dob Newhart tells this on himself. 
■"While in San Francisco, he played 
golf with a friend who brought two 
businessmen along. After the game 
one of the men confided to Bob "Your 
pal told us you are the best of the new 
comics. He must be kidding. You didn't 



Tht 



3Tv 



year's quietest comedy click himself confesses: "I'd be afraid to analyze it" 



Button-Down Mind of Bob Newhart," 
perched atop the best-seller lists for 
months, smiles wistfully as he talks— 
and, at once, he seems transformed. He 
is no longer the newest laugh-maker of 
the "witnik" set, rival to Shelley Ber- 
man and Mort Sahl. He seems the 



personification of the man next door, 
caught in the grip of a world he never 
made and does not know how to con- 
trol. He is a modern Abe Lincoln, 
holding a neatly typed copy of the 
Gettysburg Address, being scolded by 
his publicity (Continued on page 74) 




Dainty Roserhary Prinz, the pert 
Penny on As The World Turns, 
is a great advocate of perfume 




She wears it around the clock, 
totes a travel-size bottle in 
her purse. Rosemary sprays her 
hankie, dabs her brow with scent. 




by JUNE CLARK 



Lovely Rosemary Prinz has very definite ideas on 
fragrance. To her, it is a completely personal 
accent. Fashions can be copied, but never the 
reaction of perfume on your particular skin, says 
Rosemary, who first discovered the real magic of 
fragrance on her eighteenth birthday — when a very 
handsome pilot presented her with a big bottle 
of perfume which he had flown in from Paris. 
Picture the excitement of the pretty teenager when 
she opened the precious bottle which had traveled 
all the way across the Atlantic Ocean especially for 
her! It was a wonderful moment that Rosemary 
will never forget. Since then, she uses perfume 
every day, no matter where she may be. Rosemary 



has two demands of perfume: It must be pleasing 
to her, and it must influence others to compliment 
her. She applies fragrance on her skin, on her 
wrists, in the crook of her arms, and on her throat. 
She admits to generous use because she wants 
always to be aware of the scent herself. Her tricks 
—she sprays fragrance on her hair after a fresh 
shampoo, saves empty perfume bottles to tuck into 
her closets and among her lingerie, sprays her 
gracious East Side apartment before guests arrive. 
Rosemary advises that no woman should overlook 
the power of perfume in completing her personality. 
The right fragrance is a conversation-piece which 
attracts others to yoU, adds to feminine allure. 



56 




Seen everywhere together — lovely Joan 
Collins and handsome Warren Beatty. 



pressed by the fabrics, she couldn't find 
a style that would be comfortable on 
the N. Y. scene. Finally, in Venice, she 
saw exactly what she wanted in a shop 
window. She went in and found the 
Italian clerks spoke no English. She 
pointed at the dress and asked, "Do you 
have that in size twelve?" They didn't 
understand. She counted to twelve on 
her fingers. Still nothing. She took the 
dress out of the window and wrote "12" 
on a piece of paper. Then, gently but 
forcibly, they took the dress away from 
her and ejected her from the store. She 
had been in a dry cleaning shop! 

Ear Happy: "Zacherley," noted the 
jacket cover, "was, of course, born in 
Transylvania, the eldest of three only 
sons, parented by a migratory mortician 
and a reformed lady spiritualist." And 
now, fully ingrown, the TV idol (grrr) 
of many Easterners has made an album 
for Elektra — "Spook Along with Zach- 
erley" — that boasts such little monsters 
as "The Ghoul View" and "Spider Man 
Lullaby." . . . TV's Louis Nye presents 
"Heigh-Ho, Madison Avenue: Songs of 
The Advertising Game" for Riverside. 
And it's a bloody, hilarious mess that 
Louis makes of the advertising boys 
with such gems as "Ode to an Ulcer," 
"Thimk, Scheme and Plan Ahead," and 
"Flush the Dirt Right Down the Drain." 
. . . The southern-fried hipster, Dave 
Gardner, comes up with the same gawk" 
eyed humor that has made him a fre- 
quent visitor on Paar's show. This disc 
is Victor's and it was recorded in Texas. 
. . . Just to change the subject, for the 
most refreshing Yuletide songs you've 
ever put on the phonograph, Victor's 
twins (Hugo and Luigi) have gathered 
a chorus of twenty-two youngsters 
between the ages of eight and twelve — 
the number varying, according to the 
prevalence of mumps and head colds — 
to record "The Sound of Children at 
Christmas." This one you will love. 

Canapes: The new year finds Julia 
Meade with a choice Hollywood plum. 
She'll play the naive wife in the movie 
version of Broadway's hit, "The Chalk 



What's New On The East Coast 

{Continued from page 9) 

Garden." . . . Johnny Mathis now works 
for a minimum of twenty -five grand a 
week plus percentage. . . . Arlene 
Francis making the winter scene with 
white mink from chin to ankles. . . . 
CBS pulls Ingrid Bergman out of the 
hat in March with dramatic special, 
"Four and Twenty Hours in a Woman's 
Life." . . . Yul Brynner makes the CBS- 
TV network December 10 with a special 
report on "Yul Brynner's Odyssey," a 
documentary on fifteen million men 
without a country .... In deference to 
NBC's colorcasting, Merv Griffin has 
accumulated a closet full of brilliantly - 
hued vests. . . . Talk about job security: 
Galen Drake has begun reading a por- 
tion of the Bible daily, via radio, and 
will go on to the end. Figures it will 
take him two years. . . . Riverboat tor- 
pedoed and being replaced next month 
with The Canfield Brothers, a Civil War 
series. 

Hail— and Farewell: Easterners are 
still stunned by the loss of their be- 
loved Western hero, Ward Bond. Of all 
pioneer-type characters, Major Adams 
of Wagon Train came closest to being 
a "father image." Ward's death was most 
untimely — he was born April 9, 1903, 
in Benkelman, Nebraska — but the cir- 
cumstances were peculiarly in keeping 
with the sports-loving life he led. He 
was in Texas with his wife Mary Lou, 
on the eve of making a personal appear- 
ance in the Cotton Bowl during the 
game between the Dallas Cowboys and 
Los Angeles Rams. Football was close 
to the heart of this rugged star, who 
stood six-feet-four and weighed 215 
pounds. Ward was playing tackle for 
the University of Southern California 
Trojans when he was discovered for 
movies. From then on, it was an acting 
career for the brawny chap who'd stud- 
ied to be an engineer. Ward Bond was 
a familiar figure on-screen for thirty 
years, playing both good guys and vil- 
lains — but nothing to equal the fame 
which was his on TV, from the moment 
Wagon Train premiered three years ago. 
Now millions mourn his passing. 

The Really Big Ones: NBC sweeps 
the holiday season with special pro- 
graming. On December 8, Mary Martin 
is in with her new color-taped version 
of "Peter Pan." Her big problem, at 
press time, was finding a girl to play 
Wendy. In the '58 version, the role was 
filled by Mary's daughter, Heller Halli- 
day, who is now much too grown up. 
. . . On December 16, Hallmark pre- 
sents 'The Golden Child," a new opera 
about a family arriving in California on 
Christmas Eve during the Gold Rush. 
. . . On December 21, the producers of 
the award-winning "Mark Twain" and 
"Abe Lincoln," on Project 20, present a 
program that has been labored over for 
a year, "The Coming of Christ," in 
which great religious masterpieces are 
spun into a narrative with Alexander 
Scourby as narrator. . . . On Dec. 25, the 
eleventh annual showing of "Amahl and 
The Night Visitors" comes your way. 




Louis Nye's new album spoofs Madison 
Avenue and the advertising game. 



This will be the tape version made in '58, 
starring Kirk Jordan as Amahl. Kirk, 
who was then eleven, is going to school 
in Texas. Rosemary Kuhlmann, who 
plays Amahl's mother, turns up on New 
Year's Day in "Deseret," the world 
premiere of a melodic opera about Brig- 
ham Young, played by Kenneth Smith. 
The opera is at once about the spirit 
of the Mormon leader, and also a love 
story . . . Rosemary plays the role of 
Young's first wife. Judith Rackin takes 
the part of the girl who is about to 
become his twenty-fifth. 

The Wind-Up: Ron Jackson, the 
twenty-year-old actor who plays Tony 
Vento on Love Of Life, is considered 
by Atlantic Records to be one of their 
hottest new singing artists. . . . Joanie 
Sommers, the wunderkind jazz singer, 
slid into Manhattan saying, "I should 
be feeling tired. I mean I've been work- 
ing so much that I shouldn't have so 
much social life. But I do. If you give 
up all dating for the business, what's 
the sense in working?" Joanie, who has 
worked with Shelley Berman and 
Lenny Bruce, opens at the Crescendo 
in L.A. in January, with Mort Sahl. . . . 
Dion's making a record separately from 
The Belmonts isn't a one-time thing. 
The split is the new fit. . . . Craig Stev- 
ens will be the big gun on four Chevy 
musicals this season. . . . ABC-TV pre- 
paring a new police series called The 
New Breed. The cops, all college grads, 
fight switchblades with brains instead 
of brawn. . . . Elizabeth Seal, star of 
Broadway's musical smash "Irma la 
Douce," makes the Como scene on 
January 4. . . . Robert Merrill doesn't 
require elevator shoes to build his ego. 
"I grow dwarf trees around my house 
to make me feel tall." . . . Garry Moore 
has resolved to have no more sick 
comics and no progressive jazz on his 
Tuesday-night show. Finds the mass 
audience cares not for them. . . . And 
Scott Brady has resolved that he will t 
do no drinking on New Year's Eve be- v 
cause he doesn't want New Year's Day R 
to be remembered as the "moaning" 

after. That's all, brother. 

57 



4to*n& iA wli&tA tfce O^MiixulA 




58 



For Martin Milner, traveling CBS-TV's Route 66 is a happy 

journey ... so long as his wife and tiny daughter can be with him 




Wherever they stay in their travels — be it motel, hotel or 
boarding house — little Amy and mommy Judy make sure 
it's "just like home" tor husband-and-daddy Martin. 



Martin Milner, handsome young co-star of 
CBS-TV's Route 66, surprised even his 
closest friends when he decided to take his family 
with him to the remote location sites where 
the series is being shot. . . . The original plan, 
when Martin signed the contract, was for him 
to travel by himself — and return, whenever 
he could, to see his beautiful wife Judy, and 
their two-year-old daughter Amy. There were 
several reasons for this decision. The 
first was that Judy is expecting another child, 
and, though the doctor said she could travel, 
Milner knew that he'd be going into some 
rough country, and he didn't want his wife to 
run the slightest risk. The second reason 
was that he is very devoted to his little girl 
Amy, and he felt that a child of her age 
should have a stable, secure home environment. 
Lastly, he felt that his home life should not 
be disrupted merely because he had landed 
a co-starring role. He didn't feel it was fair 
to his wife and baby. Why, then, did the young 
actor change his mind? Martin is an intelligent, 
mature person; he is not given to hasty or 
rash action. . . . The change came following 
a month on location in Louisiana, filming stories 
in the steaming bayous, on an off-shore oil rig, 
in the Gulf of Mexico, and in the mysterious 
old French Quarter of New Orleans. During 
his stay in Louisiana, Martin telephoned home 
every night. When he had time, he wrote letters. 
But this was not enough. Martin's devotion 
to Judy and Amy could not fully span the 
distance that had been placed between them. 
When he stepped off the plane in Los Angeles, 
Martin was burdened not only with the presents 
he had bought for his wife and child, but also 
with the knowledge that he would only be 
home for three days. Soon he was to be flown 
into Kanab, Utah, to film another episode 
of Route 66. The big decision was made after 
his wife tearfully told him she had heard Amy 
tell a neighbor's child that she had no father! 
The next day, Martin phoned the studio and 
told them to make the necessary provision for 
two more travelers. . . . As Martin explained, 
"Nothing is going to separate my family. It 
is the most precious possession that I can call 
mine, and nobody will ever take it away from 
me. Judy and I will keep moving with the 
company until the doctor calls a halt. Then 
I'll take her to our new home." So far, 
Martin, Judy and Amy have lived in nearby 
motels and hotels while filming episodes in 
Kanab, Utah; Port Hueneme, California; 
Grants Pass, and Merlin, Oregon; Page, 
Arizona; and Carlsbad, New Mexico. At each 
new stop, Judy and Martin work together to 
make a new home for Amy. "We'll admit that 
it has its disadvantages," said Judy, "but nothing 
has ever brought us closer together. We're 
growing together more and more each day." 

Route 66 is seen on CBS-TV. Fri., 8:30 to 9:30 P.M. EST, 
for Chevrolet Motors, Marlboro Cigarettes, Bayer Aspirin. 



59 



(Continued from page 48) 
had he moved. Yet knowing this — and 
knowing, too, that many families made 
the change and survived — did not alter 
Don's opinion then. Nor does it now. 
"You just never know how it might 
have affected them," he replies. 

Don McNeill's feeling of responsibil- 
ity toward raising his family may have 
dimmed his chances for network tele- 
vision, but the investment in his family 
is paying dividends beyond the fondest 
dreams of Don and his wife Kay. Tom, 
25, a lawyer and first lieutenant in the 
Judge Advocate's Department of the 
Air Force, and Don Jr., 24, who is con- 
tinuing his studies, were both graduat- 
ed summa cum laude from Notre Dame 
and Bob, 19, is among the top scholars 
in his sophomore class at the same 
great university. 

Like their parents, the boys feel 
a deep sense of responsibility toward 
fellow countrymen. This past summer, 
Tom and Bob led a tour of fourteen 
college students through Europe, in- 
cluding East Germany and on to Rus- 
sia. This experience impressed Tom so 
greatly that he plans a lecture tour, 
upon terminating his service career in 
early 1962, to help alert the nation to 
the dangers of communism. 

This fall, the two boys appeared on 
the Breakfast Club and, in their inter- 
views with Don, explained to the lis- 
teners how the indoctrinated Russians 
refuse to consider other systems or to 
believe they have no real choice under 
communism. 

These three young men are serious, 
intelligent, responsible, stable, and 
handsome. It is natural to conclude that 
these assets accrued to them because 
of the time and effort and parental con- 
cern that Don and Kay contributed to 
raising this family. Though he's very 
proud of his sons, Don, with character- 
istic modesty, expresses surprise that 
they turned out so well. It's still ob- 
vious that the excellent example set 
for them by their parents was greatly 
responsible. 

Don's sister, Dr. Agnes McNeill Don- 
ahue, head of the English Department 
at Barat College in Lake Forest, Illi- 
nois, explains it this way: "Don and 
Kay drove all over the northern and 
western suburbs of Chicago to watch 
the boys participate in athletics. There 
wasn't a Saturday that went bv. re- 
gardless of the weather, that the two of 
them weren't out there cheering the 
boys on, and often Don's dad and I 
joined them." 

"That's true," says Don. "We've al- 
ways maintained that youngsters al- 
ready had two strikes against them if 
their parents weren't interested in the 
children's activities." 

"Don and Kay put the boys before 
everything else," Mrs. Donahue adds. 

No social engagement was ever im- 
portant enough to cancel out a family 
activity. When a birthday was in the 
offing, it never was necessary for either 
T parent to order the boys to be home 
that evening. Each knew it was a "fam- 
ily night," and each one wanted to be 
there. Table tennis, living-room bowl- 
60 



To Build A Family 

ing, or the introduction of a new game 
were among the ways Don and Kay 
kept the boys interested in family ac- 
tivities. And this parental attitude is 
appreciated. 

In a letter home, during another trip 
around the world given Tom and Don 
Jr., the latter told his parents how 
much more he thought of his home and 
family after seeing the hardship and 
suffering in the world — and what this 
had made of other youths they'd met, 
particularly among those whose par- 
ents had no concern for their children. 

"The boys hold Don and Kay in very 
high esteem," Mrs. Donahue observes. 

To understand why Don McNeill 
might seemingly have sacrificed what 



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many people term the ultimate of suc- 
cess, in favor of a more modest show- 
business career, one must know Don's 
background and know the obstacles he 
overcame. One must know, too, the 
closeness of his entire family, from 
Grandfather McNeill to the children. 

As a result of a childhood illness, 
Don was not a robust youth. After the 
family had moved from Galena, Illinois, 
where Don was born — to Sheboygan, 
Wisconsin, where his grandfather had 
a furniture factory — the future radio 
star built up his health in all manner 
of ways. 

During summer vacations at the fam- 
ily cottage near Princeton, Wisconsin, 
Don slept outside in the woods. His fa- 
ther and grandfather always took Don 
with them when they went on fishing 
and hunting trips, to help build him 
up, and he continually worked out, al- 
though he didn't participate in athletics. 

But he was into everything else, in 
those years, to make up for it. Illustrat- 



ing and cartooning for the high-school 
papers led to editing the annuals. He 
was in the drama group. After taking 
music lessons and learning to play the 
flute, clarinet, and saxophone, he or- 
ganized a band which played all over 
the area and at school dances. Topping 
it all off, Don continually made the 
honor roll. 

The story of Don's being fired from 
the Milwaukee station, when he asked 
for a raise, and being told he "had 
no future in radio," is familiar to all 
Breakfast Clubbers. This occurred dur- 
ing his Marquette University days, 
when the Depression hit his father's 
business and he'd found work as a 
newspaper columnist and radio an- 
nouncer. 

After graduation — as valedictorian of 
his class — Don went to Louisville, Ken- 
tucky, and developed an act, "The Two 
Professors," with Van Fleming. With- 
in a short time, the program went on 
the network, and the two performers 
moved to San Francisco. Fame and for- 
tune beckoned, and Don married Kay 
(the former Katherine Bennett of Mil- 
waukee) on the West Coast. 

Eighteen months later, it was all 
over. The sponsor dropped the pro- 
gram. The act split up, and Don and 
Kay returned to Milwaukee. Those 
were dark days. To survive, Don or- 
ganized and emceed highly successful 
Saturday-night jamborees at a local 
Milwaukee auditorium. But what Don 
calls "the starvation period" ended 
almost at the moment he auditioned 
for the Breakfast Club in 1933. In twen- 
ty-seven years, his consecutive-broad- 
cast record rivals Lou Gehrig's for 
baseball — and it has assuredly earned 
Don the title of "Iron Man," too. 

"It takes an unusual individual to set 
a record like that in an occupation as 
unstable and competitive as show busi- 
ness. Don is a very unusual person," 
says Mrs. Donahue. "He is not pushy 
for himself, nor is he greedy. He's led 
an exemplary life. This, in itself, is un- 
usual in the world of entertainment." 

Many of the reasons why Don Mc- 
Neill has maintained this strength of 
character are evident in his back- 
ground. Grandfather McNeill was or- 
phaned, between his second and third 
year in elementary school, in Boston. 
He received no further formal educa- 
tion, yet he became a voracious reader. 
Today, on the bookshelves in the Evan- 
ston home of Don's father, Harry Mc- 
Neill, there are many volumes which 
belonged to Grandfather McNeill — 
Dickens, "The Rise and Fall of the 
Roman Empire," Balzac, Zola, and oth- 
ers. Until the day he passed away, he 
could recite entire chapters from much 
of what he'd read. 

A huge, handsome, self-made man 
was Grandfather McNeill. He felt every 
gentleman should write "a fine hand," 
so he taught himself to write a beauti- 
ful Spencerian script, samples of which 
are still kept in the Evanston home. 
And he served as president of the local 
school board in Sheboygan. 

But when his son Harry was about 
to enter high school, Grandfather Mc- 



Neill decided it wasn't necessary for a 
boy to attend high school — he should 
learn a trade, then directly enter col- 
lege. So, at fourteen, Harry McNeill 
became an apprentice machinist. On 
concluding the apprenticeship, he took 
entrance examinations for the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin — and was accepted. 

This is Don McNeill's heritage. It isn't 
surprising that this sort of ruggedness, 
the ability to withstand show-business 
pressures, is reflected in Don's life — as 
well as in the daily broadcasts of his 
Breakfast Club, which has been the 
springboard to fame for many young 
persons. It's small wonder that the pro- 
gram has brought so much happiness 
and comfort to listeners, throughout the 
years, with a McNeill at the throttle! 
Many of the program features — the 
four "calls to breakfast," March Time, 
Memory Time (when Don reads his 
favorite homely poems), and the Mo- 
ment of Silent Prayer — spring from 
Don's early life and from his own 
philosophy. 

For millions of Breakfast Club listen- 
ers, it is good news that the program 
will continue — and with McNeill at the 
controls. But eventually, Don knows, 
he'll step aside. When this does hap- 
pen, he is inclined toward teaching. 

"Typically, he is not interested in 
material success and power," says Mrs. 
Donahue, "nor is he interested in en- 
tering industry to make more money. 
He would rather be of some service to 
young people. I've often told him the 
money is not tremendous but the re- 
wards are." 

Of this, Don says: "I would teach 
them the realities of the communica- 
tions industry, and I'd tell these rosy- 
cheeked young students that — unless 
they're willing to work at least five 
times as hard as the next person, and 
do it for less money — they should 
choose another field." 

This is the voice of experience. Don 
was a musician, writer, comedian, and 
announcer. He worked day and night 
when he started. For seven years, he 
eager-beavered it to the advertising 
agencies in New York and anywhere 
else a potential sponsor reared his head. 
That was how long Breakfast Club re- 
mained unsponsored. Suddenly, all the 
past efforts paid off, and sponsors 
flocked to the program. 

There may have been an easier way 
— those forks in the road, for instance — 
and it might have led to greater fame 
in television, as well as radio. But Don 
knew what he was doing when he 
traded this away for the benefit of his 
family and listeners. 

To Don McNeill, the big things in 
life are simple: The satisfaction of 
raising a family, watching your chil- 
dren grow, being part of their lives and 
having them want you to be a part of 
theirs. The greatest thing, according to 
Don, is to see what you've done grow- 
ing up in your children. 

"What many people term success, 
bright lights, money, assume less im- 
portance every year. They diminish in 
square-root proportion to your num- 
ber of years," says the wise coffee- 
and-toastmaster of America's beloved 
Breakfast Club. 



TV & MOVIE 
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5. Alan Ladd 
11. Elizabeth Taylor 
15. Frank Sinatra 

18. Rory Calhoun 

19. Peter Lawford 
25. Dale Evans 
34. Roy Rogers 

5 1 . Doris Day 
56. Perry Como 
74. John Wayne 
84. Janet Leigh 

109. Dean Martin 

110. Jerry Lewis 
121. Tony Curtis 
128. Debbie Reynolds 
136. Rock Hudson 

140. Dale Robertson 

141. Marilyn Monroe 
145. Marlon Brando 

147. Tab Hunter 

148. Robert Wagner 
175. Charlton Heston 
198. Gale Storm 
202. George Nader 
207. Eddie Fisher 
215. Kim Novak 
219. Natalie Wood 
221. Joan Collins 
223. Sal Mineo 

225. Elvis Presley 

227. Tony Perkins 

228. Clint Walker 

229. Pat Boone 

230. Paul Newman 
233. Pat Wayne 
241. Lawrence Welk 

245. Hugh O'Brian 

246. Jim Arness 
249. John Saxon 
254. Nick Adams 
256. Harry Belafonte 

261. Tommy Sands 

262. Will Hutchins 

263. James Darren 

264. Ricky Nelson 



268. Dolores Hart 

269. James Garner 

270. Everly Brothers 
272. Sandra Dee 

275. Michael Ansara 

276. Jack Kelly 

278. Annette Funicello 
280. Tim Considine 

282. Johnny Mathis 

283. David Nelson 

284. Shirley Temple 

285. Pat Conway 

286. Bob Horton 

287. John Payne 

288. David Janssen 

289. Dick Clark 

291. Carol Lynley 

292. Jimmie Rodgers 

293. Guy Williams 

294. Frankie Avalon 

295. John Gavin 

298. Joanne Woodward 

299. Teddy Randazzo 

300. Paul Anka 

301. Peter Brown 

302. Edd Byrnes 

303. Joni James 

306. EfremZimbalist, Jr. 

307. John Smith 

308. Lloyd Bridges 

309. John Russell 

310. Gene Barry 

311. Chuck Connors 

312. Geo. Montgomery 

313. Craig Stevens 

314. Steve McQueen 

315. Conway Twitty 

316. Ty Hardin 

318. Fabian 

319. Roger Smith 

320. Tuesday Weld 

321. Dion 

322. Bobby Darin 
325. Connie Francis 



327. Eric Fleming 

328. Clint Eastwood 

329. Gardner McKay 

330. Connie Stevens 

333. Richard Long 

334. Roger Moore 

335. Van Williams 

336. Peter Breck 

338. Michael London 

339. Pernell Roberts 

341. Bob Conrad 

342. Dwayne Hickman 

343. Dorothy Provine 

345. Robert Fuller 

346. Peggy Castle 

347. Patty McCormack 

348. Bobby Rydell 

349. Anthony Eisley 

350. Johnny Restivo 

351. Doug McClure 

352. George Hamilton 

354. Dodie Stevens 

355. Rod Lauren 

356. Troy Donahue 

357. Stephen Boyd 



358. Paul Evans 

359. Bob Crewe 

360. Shelley Fabares 

361. Jane Fonda 

362. Robert Stack 

363. Clu Gulager 

364. Ralph Taeger 

365. Jeremy Slate 

366. Keith Larsen 

367. Shirley Bonne 

368. Annie Farge 

369. George Maharis 

370. Marty Milner 

371. Anthony George 

372. Charles Quinlivan 

373. Skip Homeier 

374. Lori Martin 

375. Howard Duff 

376. Bill Reynolds 

377. James Philbrook 

378. Diane Brewster 

379. Lee Patterson 

380. Diane McBain 

381. Rod Taylor 

382. Cary Grant 



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T 
V 
R 

61 



(Continued from page 39) 
Here's a sample of what would have 
to be included. In Rio de Janeiro, a 
contingent of soldiers, armed with ma- 
chine guns, barred her from opening at 
a night club . . . but, a few days later, 
the governor sent his mounted palace 
guard to rescue her from over-enthusi- 
astic fans. In Paris, she sat beside the 
premier to sign autographs. The much- 
discussed "child poetess of France" 
became her best girlfriend, and a teen- 
age duke, descendant of a Royalist 
family, became the nearest to a steady 
boyfriend that Brenda has ever had. In 
America, she has been a paid TV per- 
former since she was ten, has put 
several discs into the hit lists and 
topped the charts, the past summer, 
with her gold record, "I'm Sorry." 

And here's the payoff: Brenda Lee 
is just sixteen years old! 

She stands less than five feet tall, 
weighs less than a hundred pounds, has 
tawny hair, is just outgrowing her 
freckles and looks like everyone's fa- 
vorite girl-next-door. She lives near 
Nashville, Tennessee, with her mother, 
Mrs. Grace Tarpley Rainwater, her 
brother Randall, 10, and a half-sister, 
Robyn, 4. Her older sister, Linda, 18, 
recently married. 

Last summer, they moved into a new 
house in the suburban Creve Hall sec- 
tion. Brenda describes it: "It's a Swiss 



Little Miss Dynamite 

chalet split-level, with four bedrooms 
and lots of living space. And don't 
forget three baths. At last, I can spread 
out all my girl-type stuff without hav- 
ing my kid brother yell I'm hogging 
the bathroom!" 

An A student, Brenda is a sophomore 
at Maplewood High School and, for 
her, school is "just like it is for every- 
one else." She says, "I'm up at six, 
catch the bus a little after seven, get 
home about four. If I have homework, 
I do it then. I like to get it finished. 
Then my girlfriend Nancy Jessup and I 
listen to records, try out hair-dos. The 
usual stuff." 

Brenda thinks she is too young to go 
steady, and dates are group projects. 
Despite her stardom, she fits into 
the crowd. "That's the beauty of liv- 
ing in Nashville, where there are a hun- 
dred entertainers per square inch. Lots 
of kids in my school come from show- 
business families, so who's going to be 
impressed? I get along. I was presi- 
dent of my freshman class, I'm one of 
the cheer leaders, I'm on my debate 
team." 

Understatement, with a twist of 
irony, is characteristic of Brenda. She 
makes terse comments and totally lacks 
that ain't-I-great attitude which besets 
some performers. During one of the 
many, many interviews she had while 
in New York to receive her gold 



T 

v 

R 

62 



Statement required by the Act of August 24, 1912, as amended by the Acts of 
March 3, 1933, July 2, 1946, and June 11, 1960, (74 Stat. 208) showing the 
ownership, management and circulation of TV RADIO MIRROR, published 
monthly at New York, N. Y., for October 1, 1960. 

1. The names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing editor, and 
business managers are : Publisher, Macf adden Publications, Inc., 205 East 42nd 
St., New York 17, N. Y.; Editor, Ann Mosher, 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, 
N. Y.; Managing Editor, Teresa Buxton, 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y.; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Meyer Dworkin, 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

2. The owner is: (If owned by a corporation, its name and address must be 
stated and also immediately thereunder the names and addresses of stockholders 
owning or holding 1 percent or more of total amount of stock. If not owned by a 
corporation, the names and addresses of the individual owners must be given. 
If owned by a partnership or other unincorporated firm, its name and address, 
as well as that of each individual member, must be given.) Macf adden Publica- 
tions, Inc., 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y.; Meyer Dworkin, c/o Macf ad- 
den Publications, Inc., 205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y.; (Mrs.) Anna 
Feldman, 835 Main St., Peekskill, N. Y. ; Henry Lieferant, Hotel Franconia, 20 
W. 72nd St., New York 23, N. Y.; Irving S. Manheimer, 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y.; Samuel Scheff, 1841 Broadway, New York 23, N. Y.; Joseph 
Schultz, 110 East End Ave., New York 28, N. Y.; Arnold A. Schwartz, c/o A. A. 
Whitford, Inc., 705 Park Ave., Plainfield, N. J.; Charles H. Shattuck, Box 422, 
Pharr, Texas; (Mrs.) Elizabeth B. Wise, R.F.D. 1-Box 326, Onancock, Va. 

3. The known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or 
holding 1 percent or more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities 
are: (If there are none, so state.) None. 

4. Paragraphs 2 and 3 include, in cases where the stockholder or security holder 
appears upon the books of the company as trustee or in any other fiduciary rela- 
tion, the name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting; also 
the statements in the two paragraphs show the affiant's full knowledge and belief- 
as to the circumstances and conditions under which stockholders and security 
holders who do not appear upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock 
and securities in a capacity other than that of a bona fide owner. 

5. The average number of copies of each issue of this publication sold or dis- 
tributed, through the mails or otherwise, to paid subscribers during the 12 
months preceding the date shown above was: (This information is required by 
the Act of June 11, 1960, to be included in all statements regardless of fre- 
quency of issue.) 667,011. 

(Signed) MEYER DWORKIN, Secretary-Treasurer 
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th day of September 1960 

[seal] TULLIO MUCELLI, 'Notary Public 

State of New York No. 03-8045500 

Qualified in Bronx Co. 

Cert. Filed in New York Co. 

Commission Expires March 30, 1962 



record, a reporter asked her, "Do you 
know Elvis Presley?" 

Brenda didn't crack a smile. One 
had to look close to see the twinkle in 
her eye. "Elvis and I are the greatest 
friends," she replied, "but you know 
how it is. He's so busy, and he's gone so 
much of the time . . . and it's so far 
from Memphis to Nashville. . . ." Her 
voice trailed off in a perfect duplica- 
tion of an embarrassed freshman ex- 
plaining why the senior she has a 
crush on hasn't called her. 

In point of fact, her answer could 
have been quite different. Elvis has 
been collecting Brenda Lee records 
since the days when he himself was 
little known, and now has every one 
she has ever cut. Further, she tops 
him on at least one score. In his strug- 
gling days, it broke his heart because 
Nashville's Grand Ole Opry turned 
him down on the grounds that he 
wasn't a "country" singer. Brenda isn't, 
either — but she has been on the Opry. 

Her big voice and highly personal 
style have won her many fans among 
the pros. The veteran orchestra lead- 
er, Owen Bradley, who is now Decca's 
artists-and-repertoire man in Nash- 
ville and is in charge of Brenda's re- 
cording sessions, offers this opinion: 
"Brenda doesn't sing like anybody, 
but she does seem to have 'absorbed' 
from the pop music of this century. 
There's a touch of ragtime in her style, 
and a lot of blues and jazz. She's got 
swing, and the beat. You never can 
tell what to expect. She'll blast like 
Sophie Tucker, rock like Elvis, sob as 
hauntingly as Judy Garland, or tell a 
story like Jimmie Rodgers. It's more 
voice, more style, than you expect a 
person her age to have." 

In her early years, love and sorrow 
both left their mark on Brenda's sing- 
ing. She was born December 11, 1944, 
at Atlanta, Georgia, the second daugh- 
ter of Ruben and Grace Tarpley. 
Ruben played professional baseball, 
was a carpenter off-season. Grace 
would have liked to sing, and Brenda 
Lee started singing when she was two. 
"Mother tells me that I'd sing along 
with her and with the radio. I'd sing 
anything — hits, hymns, ballads — for 
anyone who would listen." 

She could draw a crowd of apprecia- 
tive neighbors when she was three, 
and her uncle paid off in ice-cream 
cones. She won a talent contest when 
she was four and, at six, another talent 
contest brought her into television. 
"After I won, the sponsor, a resort 
hotel, asked me to join their regular 
cast. This was my first job. I got paid 
— maybe five dollars a night. I was 
on it three years." 

Being as familiar with microphones 
and cameras as she was with dolls and 
doll buggies, and being as accustomed 
to crowds as she was to playmates next 
door, has given Brenda an unshakable 
poise. She has never had stage fright. 

Tragedy added its depth to her style 
when she was seven. Her beloved 
father was critically hurt in an indus- 
trial accident. The day before he 
died, he gave her his blessing and fare- 



well. "I'm not going to be here to 
see it, but my little girl is going to be 
a big star." 

Perhaps it was a sorrowing child's 
wish to sing as high as heaven that 
gave Brenda Lee her intensity. If she 
ever had any "cute kid" tricks, she lost 
them fast. People called her "Miss 
Poker Face." 

This brought her that first, big break. 
Dub Allbritten — her manager, and 
the most important man in Brenda's 
life since her father died — tells about it: 
"I was managing Red Foley's show 
when we came into Augusta, Georgia, 
where Grace Tarpley and her chil- 
dren were then living. When we got 
the usual request from a disc jockey 
to put a local kid on the show, we 
didn't expect too much. We just asked 
that she hold her song down to three 
minutes." 

Brenda's intentions were good, but 
the crowd wouldn't let her go. Red 
Foley later described the scene: 
"One foot started patting out the rhythm 
as though she were stomping out a 
prairie fire, but not another muscle 
in that little body twitched. And 
when she did that trick of breaking 
her voice, it just plain jarred me. I 
stood there with my mouth open two 
miles wide." 

Dub Allbritten recalls that he said, 
"We've got to have her," and, with that, 
their friendship began. Eventually, 
Dub became Brenda Lee's personal 
manager. 

The first national television audience 
saw Brenda in 1956, via Foley's big 
show on ABC -TV, when she did the 
bayou blues number, "Jambalaya." The 
next day, Jack O'Brian, acid-penned 
critic of the New York Journal-Ameri- 
can, wrote, "I didn't catch the name 
of the nine-year-old singer on Ozark 
Jubilee but she belts out a song like 
a star." 

Show bookers took notice. She was 
a regular performer on Jubilee and she 
guest-starred with Perry Como and 
Steve Allen, played Las Vegas, and 
signed a record contract with Decca. 

Her first near-million hit, "Dyna- 
mite," late in 1958, sold as well abroad 
as it did here. Foreign booking offers 
followed and, at fourteen, Brenda be- 
came one of the youngest American 
girls ever to earn that resounding old 
Victorian title, "The Toast of London 
and Paris." Those toasts were drunk 
in champagne, ale, tea, milk and just 
plain water, for people of all ages fell in 
love with "Little Miss Dynamite." 

After appearing on major tele- 
vision shows, she went to the Olympia 
theater in Paris. Originally booked 
for four weeks, she stayed nine. One 
paper headlined, "Brenda Lee rocks 
and Paris rolls." Another said, 
"There's a new star in the sky over 
Paris." Another paper created a sen- 
sation by claiming she was not a child, 
but a midget. A rival paper replied 
by running a blow-up of her passport 
to establish her real age. 

The shopkeepers of Paris — who, some 

tourists claim, can pull an American 

dollar out of the air and bank it — paid 

their tribute in a remarkable fashion. 

(Continued on next page) 




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Seldom was Brenda permitted to pay 
for anything, says Dub. 

"When she admired some crystal gob- 
lets at a restaurant, the gift of a 
dozen was at our hotel when we re- 
turned. She saw a toy bulldog that 
cost thirty-five dollars. I argued it 
was too expensive. I didn't even know 
the shopkeeper understood English — 
but in came the dog, with his compli- 
ments." 

Many people invited her to visit their 
homes, and Brenda often accepted. Two 
of the most enjoyable friendships were 
with a girl poet and a young duke. 
"We'd go over to his house all the 
time," says Brenda. Minou Drouett 
is the child poet whose first published 
works caused some critics to claim 
they could never possibly have been 
written by one so young. When a 
reporter tagged Brenda "the Minou 
Drouett of rock 'n' roll," the pretty 
little poet asked to meet her. "We 
were introduced at a style show, and 
discovered we were nearly the same 
age. We often visited each other, after 
that. And now she writes me the 
most wonderful letters." 

In contrast to her Parisian triumphs, 
Brenda's venture into South America 
began with turmoil. Dub says, "We 
hadn't been fully instructed about their 
tax regulations. We were told to prove 
she was 'emancipated' before she 
could open at a Rio de Janeiro night 
club. We just didn't have the proper 
records with us and it would have 
taken a week to secure them from 
home. The night-club owner and the 
officials got into quite a contention 
and a judge ordered in a contingent of 
eighteen soldiers, with machine guns, 
to keep Brenda from setting foot in- 
side the club." 

All was well — better, perhaps — when 
Brenda was transferred to a theater, 
for then fans her own age could see 
her. Again, Brenda charmed them. 
But their ardor provoked another in- 
cident. The governor invited Brenda 
to a midnight supper at his palace. 
When she was two hours late, an aide 
phoned to find out what had happened. 
Dub answered, "There's such a crowd 
of kids, we can't get out of the 
theater." 

The governor acted promptly. With- 
in a few minutes, his mounted palace 
guard came charging down the street, 
dispersed the crowd and escorted 
Brenda to the party. 

Brazil's president, Juscelino Kubits- 
chek, also asked that she be presented 
to him and, at a reception, called her 
"the best goodwill ambassador the 
States have sent us. She promotes 
understanding between our young 
people." 

With such experiences, it is no won- 
der that Brenda, when she received 
her gold record last summer, calmly 
accepted it by saying, "At last. After 
all these years." 

But, back in the hotel, a young girl's 
natural show of sentiment broke 
through her performer's poise. To her 
friend and manager, Dub Allbritten, 
she said, "I wish my dad could have 
been here . . ." And then, wistfully, 
"Do you think he knows?" 



Hong Kong 



(Continued from page 34) 
measure — and proceed to show you 
how wrong you can be. 

"We set up the camera as if we were 
going to shoot the Hong Kong side," 
says Rod, "and then I walked across a 
little narrow railroad bridge, gave a 
signal behind my back, and the camera 
swung around to shoot the border. Ev- 
erybody was very tense. Here were 
the Red police and the machine guns 
and the pillboxes. It was a weird at- 
mosphere, and when you're there — 
when you are actually there — the 
whole thing seems unbelievable. 

"The guards on both sides of the 
border stand about four feet apart 
and never speak to each other or smile 
or nod or anything like that. They just 
stand there with their machine guns, 
twenty-four hours a day, watching the 
border con ntly." Rod shakes his 
head and seems to recall the scene with 
a slight chill. "It's weird," he says 
again. 

"When I walked up to the border," 
Rod resumes, "this guy had his ma- 
chine gun trained on me because I was 
wearing an American suit. Then, when 
they saw the camera and caught on to 
what we were doing, he started jab- 
bering away and another guard ran into 
the pillbox and came out with his own 
camera and started taking pictures of 
me. 

"About two minutes after I walked 
back, a loudspeaker came on, with a 
woman's voice shrieking in Cantonese 
that Eisenhower had lost face in the 
Orient and that, if the American movie 
company thought it could come up and 
poke fun at them, we were very much 
mistaken. 

"It wasn't till then the Hong Kong 
police told me there had been some 
trouble the week before, when a Jap- 
anese company had been up there to 
shoot some scenes. The story came out 
that the Japanese script girl had shaken 
her fist in a guard's face and he had 
run away — which was untrue, of course 
— but the Japanese had been spreading 
it around and the Commies were just 
waiting for another movie company to 
show up. 

"If I had known about that, we 
wouldn't have gone up there in the 
first place. I'm not that brave! I could 
have been shot!" 

If Rod and the location crew were 
startled, it was mild compared with the 
surprises they brought to the residents 
of Hong Kong. "We had to hide the 
camera," Rod explains. "You couldn't 
leave it in the open, because thousands 
of people would come around and take 
the screws out of the tripod and any- 
thing else they could get. 

"So, we'd hide the camera in a basket 
on a coolie's shoulder or in a rickshaw 
or anywhere we could think of. Lloyd 
Bochner, who plays the chief inspector 
in the series, had his uniform made at 
the police quartermaster's store, so it's 
identical to the Hong Kong police uni- 
forms. 

"Then I'd run down one of those 
crowded little streets, with Bochner in 
full pursuit, and the people wouldn't 



know what was going on. We got genu- 
ine reactions. Beautiful reactions. 
Bochner would go into a little Hong 
Kong bar, sort of push his way in and 
stand there, looking stern. The patrons 
didn't know he wasn't a real policeman 
and they'd quiet down and watch him. 
After a minute, he'd say, 'Carry on!' 
very authoritatively. Then he'd turn 
around and walk out. Another time we 
boarded a junk and scared them pretty 
badly. They thought it was a raid and 
started throwing their opium pipes 
overboard." 

If it hadn't been for Rod's penchant 
for turning a flat "no" into a positive 
"yes," the chances are he would not 
be in America today. His arrival here 
was not exactly auspicious, despite the 
fact he had won the Rola Award for 
radio acting in his native Australia plus 
the "down under" version of the Critics' 
Circle Award for his work in the 
theater. 

"I had reached the point in my Aus- 
tralian career where I was a fly in a 
bottle," he explains. "I could go up 
and I could go down. It was fantastic. 
I was doing about forty starring roles 
in radio — there was no television. I'd 
work all day in radio, then, at night, 
I'd be at the theater. I was about as big 
as I could get in Australia. 

"The Rola Award included a sum of 
money, and I was going to England to 
get out of the bottle. But then I de- 
layed long enough to do the American 
movie which was shooting there with 
Robert Newton — 'Long John Silver' — 
and everybody said, 'Go to America.' 

"So I came to America. All sorts of 
flattering letters went back and forth 
before my arrival and, when I got here, 
M.C.A. was at the airport to meet me. 
I guess they were expecting a cross be- 
tween Marlon Brando and Rock Hud- 
son. Then I stepped off the plane in my 
tiffht Australian suit and their faces 
fell, visibly. I thought, Okay, you don't 
like Tne. I'll stay!" 

Rod quickly decided that M.C.A. was 
too big and too disinterested in a new- 
comer, and he went to a smaller agency. 
Little by little, starting with bit parts, 
he began to climb again and, this time, 
there was no cork in the bottle to stop 
him. 

He progressed from minor roles to 
starring parts on television's Studio 
One, G-E Theater, Playhouse 90 and 
all the major shows. In motion pictures, 
he followed the same path, beginning 
with a small part in "A Catered Affair," 
working his way to important roles in 
"The Darkest Hour," "Giant," "Sep- 
arate Tables" and a number of major 
productions. 

His latest picture, "The Time Ma- 
chine," in which he stars with Yvette 
Mimieux, brought him face to face 
with another man who wouldn't take 
no for an answer. "I turned the part j 
down, to begin with," Rod recalls. I 
"Then George Pal, the producer-direc- j 
tor, called me and said he wasn't mak- 
ing 'a science -fiction picture.' He was 
making 'an H. G. Wells picture.' He 
said, 'I've never directed before. There 
are areas where you can help me and 




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areas where I can be of help to you.' 
"He's something of a con artist, too, 
you know," Rod adds with a grin. 
"Fortunately so, because it did give me 
an opportunity to work closely with 
the director, rather than just coming 
to work and going home." 

Rod was at the point in his career 
where he had a great deal of prestige 
within the business, but was only a 
familiar face to the average movie au- 
dience and television viewer. "Studios 
don't build stars anymore," he explains, 
"but I think television series do. Before 
Hong Kong came along, I had to turn 
down most of the new series because I 
felt they weren't right for me. I love to 
work, but I wouldn't do anything that 
I didn't believe in. 

"When I first heard of this series, it 
intrigued me. I talked with the creator 
of the show, Bob Buckner, and found 
our ideas coincided. This was no 'Fu- 
Manchu in Hong Kong' thing. I felt 
the character Glenn Evans could very 
well be Rod Taylor. I'm not creating a 
separate screen personality for this. If 
I got up there on the screen and 'pre- 



tended' for thirty-nine weeks, some- 
body would see through it, or else get 
awfully sick of it. Either the public 
buys me, or we're out of luck. 

"Now, don't confuse 'screen per- 
sonality' with 'character.' This charac- 
ter of Glenn Evans, for instance, the 
roving American correspondent, is a 
guy who can be charming in a Cary 
Grant situation, and be just as suave 
— then take off his coat and slug it out, 
as Cary Grant wouldn't. He can be a 
gentleman, and still be tough. He can 
be well dressed, and sometimes he can 
be a slob. 

"This, I think, is what is going to 
catch the audience and keep them in- 
terested, the injection of contrast. We 
are not holding to one static situation. 
There are gentle situations, loving 
situations, action situations — even sexy 
situations. Some shows are played 
within four walls. Others are com- 
pletely out-of-doors. I think we have 
a good series, a good, solid, exciting 
show." 

Rod has recently moved into a new 
home above Coldwater Canyon, in the 



area also favored by Frank Sinatra and 
Peggy Lee. He's still a bachelor, and 
has no plans to change that status any- 
time soon. "I'm enjoying life too much," 
he admits, "and I'm such a beast about 
work that I couldn't burden any gentle 
little girl with it. 

"I've been too busy to entertain much 
yet. I usually keep the group down to 
one or two — preferably some dear girl 
I can persuade to cook dinner for me." 
Rod possesses such a gracious, persua- 
sive manner that this shouldn't present 
any serious problem, although he de- 
clares, "I'm not terribly fond of myself. 

"I feel that, to get things done, often 
I have to be a not very nice guy. I'm 
very serious about things, especially 
my work, and sometimes I am probably 
a bit abrupt and rude. It takes people a 
while to see that I'm not a rat. Honesty 
is probably my trouble — some people 
don't like honesty in others, some do." 

Apparently there are more who do 
than he realizes, for it's the audience 
which makes a star — and audiences at 
home and in the theater have defi- 
nitely made a star of Rod Taylor. 



(Continued from page 43) 
Junior Chambers of Commerce in other 
cities about where to buzz through next 
on his "See America" tour in 1962. 

As emcee of the oldest hour-long net- 
work TV show, Ed's been careful not to 
rest on his laurels or his format too 
long. Many another television luminary, 
once assured of popularity, has made 
the mistake of continuing in the same 
old groove until it turned into a rut and 
finally a grave. The non-smiling Irish- 
man, on the other hand, has never let 
high ratings lull him into complacency 
or dullness. Each year, he has varied his 
variety show. 

In 1958, Ed devoted a whole program 
to a filmed visit to the Brussels World 
Fair. He got itchy feet soon after his 
return. Trips to Spoleto, Italy, and to 
Russia followed. But, this year, Sulli- 
van suddenly realized that, in ranging 
all over the world, he was ignoring the 
tremendous dramatic possibilities of his 
own country. "I decided something 
should be done about the United 
States," he says. "After all, Americans 
are nice people. They live in nice com- 
munities. It amuses me to think that, 
after traveling all over the globe look- 
ing for novel vistas, I should find the 
most unique ones right on my very own 
doorstep." 

The fifty-nine-year-old television 

pioneer decided — after urging from his 

son-in-law, Robert Precht, producer of 

the show — that San Francisco would 

be the perfect spot to kick off the 

American tour. "Actually, I've always 

loved San Francisco," says Ed. "When 

I was the Hollywood columnist for the 

New York Daily News, I used to drive 

over there every couple of weeks — or 

sooner, if I became homesick. San Fran- 

1 cisco reminds me so much of the East 

Coast city. The theaters and restaurants 

are so similar. It was a great place to 

„ get over one's loneliness. I remember 
66 



Showman, U. S. A. 

it being such a joy getting away from 
Hollywood, where everyone dressed in 
slacks and casual clothes." 

Ed also rates the people living in the 
Bay area as being of the first water. 
"They're actually friendlier than New 
Yorkers," says Ed. "They think nothing 
of walking up to you, a total stranger, 
and inviting you home for a dinner. 
You'd never see anything like that hap- 
pen in New York." 

The gregarious Gael hadn't been in 
San Francisco for five years, up to the 
time he dropped in on the city in Sep- 
tember. And what a greeting the Cali- 
fornians gave him! It was almost as 
though they knew how he felt about 
them and their city. As he stepped from 
the plane, the St. Mary's Catholic Chi- 
nese girls' drum-and-glockenspiel corps 
broke out with a lively version of 
"When Irish Eyes Are Smiling." And, 
begorrah, before you knew it, Ed broke 
out into one of his famous shamrock- 
sprouting grins. 

Ed claims he didn't believe the tre- 
mendous reception was for him. "With 
all the bands blaring, and the big crowd, 
I thought sure they were expecting 
Nixon or Kennedy. It was only after I 
saw a group of girls spelling out 'Wel- 
come to Ed Sullivan' that I realized this 
was all for me. I can truthfully say that 
the airport reception was one of the 
nicest things that has ever happened 
to me." 

Throughout his week-long sojourn 
in San Francisco, the warmth extended 
toward Ed never abated. When he 
hosted the special Pacific Festival va- 
riety show, he was constantly hailed 
with cries of "Hi, Ed," and "Let's have 
another big shew this Sunday!" 

During the taping of the Johnny 
Mathis sequence, in which Ed and 
Johnny drove down one of the town's 
incredibly winding streets, the crowds 
besieged both men for autographs. It 



was the same in the ten other locales 
where Ed wound up taping the rest of 
the October 16 program. 

The celebs for the show were selected 
on the basis that they had either been 
born in San Francisco or had become 
famous in the colorful town. Since 
Mathis had crooned his first notes in the 
West Coast city, he was a natural to be 
in demand. Sultry-voiced Peggy Lee, 
a native Californian, was requested to 
appear because she'd scored some of 
her greatest triumphs in San Francisco. 
Hit wit Mort Sahl was picked because 
he had first blistered the hides of the 
high-and-mighty in "the hungry i" 
night club. 

Jazz-great Dave Brubeck, who lives 
in nearby Oakland and is considered 
the dean of the West Coast swing set, 
also got an early invite from Sullivan. 
Dorothy Kirsten was chosen immedi- 
ately, as the currently-rated top so- 
prano with the San Francisco Opera 
Company. Completing the lineup were 
the Limeliters, a new vocal group, who 
had recently created a sensation in the 
city. 

With this kind of talent, the only in- 
gredient necessary to make the initial 
"See America" program another smash- 
ing Sullivan success was the "European 
technique." This was something de- 
veloped by Bob Precht on Ed's Euro- 
pean excursions. It consisted of captur- 
ing the cities as they actually existed. 

"In the past," says Ed, "when I did 
shows out of Detroit, Philadelphia or 
Chicago, I used theaters, skating rinks 
and memorial halls for backdrops. The 
programs could have been done in any 
city and it wouldn't have made any dif- 
ference. Bob suggested giving the TV 
audience a chance to get the feel and 
the atmosphere of the city visited. I 
think you'll agree that, in our San 
Francisco and Chicago shows, Bob suc- 
ceeded in capturing the full flavor of 



the cities. It was accomplished by taping 
the show in the various sections of the 
town." 

By this process, viewers got a capsule 
travelogue of San Francisco. They saw 
a portion of the city's craggy land- 
scape when the camera focused on Bru- 
beck's picturesque house on the side of 
a cliff. They obtained a revealing look 
at the Chinatown sector when little 
Ginny Tiu introduced her talented sis- 
ters and brothers in an impromptu act. 
They were given a perceptive insight 
into Oakland Naval Hospital when 
Peggy Lee entertained. They thrilled to 
the beauty of the Japanese Gardens in 
Golden Gate Park when Dorothy Kir- 
sten sang an aria from "Madame But- 
terfly." And they caught a glimpse of 
West Coast night life when Mort Sahl 
performed in "the hungry i." 

While the San Francisco show 
stressed performers who were associ- 
ated with the locale in one way or an- 
other, the Chicago program emphasized 
the college-oriented community idea. 
As a result, Charlton Heston was taped 
doing his act against a background at 
Northwestern University, where he 
studied drama. Benny Goodman, who 
started at Jane Addams' Hull House, 
was presented there. Bob Newhart was 
pictured in the student building of his 
alma mater, Loyola University. As in 
the case of San Francisco, liberal use 
was made of film clips to enhance the 
mood of the show. 

The trip to the Windy City whipped 
up some memories for Ed — not all of 
them pleasant. "During the first World 
War, I ran away to Chicago to join the 
Marines. I used the name of Frank 
Keegan, a friend of mine in school. But 
the Navy doctor was suspicious of my 
age," says Ed. "He asked me if I lived 
in Chicago, and I said yes. But I couldn't 
tell him my address and so I was re- 
jected. 

"Pretty soon, my money ran out. I 
never was so cold or hungry in my life. 
I slept most of the time in a Y.M.C.A. 
for a quarter a night. It was a great re- 
lief to me when my folks finally caught 
up to me. I'll always carry a picture of 
icy streets and chilling winds when I 
think of Chicago." 

With two cities of the tour behind 
him, Ed eagerly looked forward to the 
rest of his traveling schedule — espe- 
cially the jaunt to Dallas. "I've been in 
Texas five times, and I love Dallas, so 
I think the Texans will like us," he says. 

01' Smiley's almost joyful, when he 
talks about the scheduled trek to New 
Orleans during Mardi Gras time. "We 
plan to have Louis Armstrong serving 
as my official guide. It's such a colorful 
place, I'm sure we'll be able to impart 
a great deal of the enthusiasm and ex- 
citement of the festival to the TV audi- 
ence. The last time I visited the Louisi- 
ana town was four years ago, and I can't 
wait for the return trip. The people are 
utterly charming, but I think they're 
more reserved than in many other parts 
of the country." 

When he lights into Los Angeles in 
March, Ed expects to bump into many 
old friends. "It's such a cosmopolitan 
town and there are so many ex-New 



Yorkers living there. It's like 'old home 
week' every time I arrive." 

In envisioning his forthcoming jour- 
ney to Washington, D.C., Ed expresses 
the regret that the show won't be in 
color. "We'll be down there in cherry- 
blossom time," he mourns, "and color 
TV would have caught the beautiful 
scene to perfection." 

When May rolls around, TV's broth 
of a boy will be in Boston, where he 
never fails to be swamped by admirers. 
"After all," says Ed, "anybody named 
Sullivan would be in like a thief, in 
Boston. I remember in 1922, when I 
was covering the boat races for the 
New York Evening Mail up there. No- 
body could get a Western Union wire 
to telegraph their stories back to the 
papers. I walked up to the dispatcher 
and asked, for a wire. The dispatcher 
gruffly said: 'Out of the question!' But 
then he asked, 'What's your name, Son- 
ny?' When I told him 'Sullivan,' he 
broke into a big grin. 'Sullivan, eh. Well, 
that's different!'" 

Strangely enough, the last time Ed 
visited Boston he got the scare of his 
life. "Some friends took me up in a 
helicopter," he says. "I didn't feel at all 
secure in the thing, I kept rocking from 
one side to the other. And it flew so 
low! I could actually see the maids 
making up the beds in the downtown 
hotels." 

Ed's now flying high, though, and is 
mighty exuberant about his "See Amer- 
ica" scheme. Despite a major ulcer op- 
eration early in the year, and the ex- 
tensive traveling, he shows little strain. 
He's just as enthusiastic about TV as 
he was the day he started his network 
show on June 20, 1948. 

"t 
I can't understand today s criticism 

of television," he says. "The detractors 

expect it to have one hit show after 

another. That's impossible. Look at the 

book publishing industry. How many 

best-sellers do they come up with a 

year? And every show on Broadway 

isn't a hit, either. But when it comes 

to TV, the critics place the darndest 

obligation on it. They expect TV to be 

one hundred percent successful. All in 

all, I think the criticism is unfair in that 

it isn't founded on good sense. TV has 

many weaknesses, as any medium 

would — but it does a wonderful job, 

considering the problems facing it." 

Ed's quick to admit, however, that 
one of TV's glaring faults lies in the 
excess of violence on some shows. His 
son-in-law, Bob, is quick to agree. "I 
can readily see," says Bob, "some cor- 
relation between crime on TV and in 
the community. I think a child should 
get something out of television. An 
adult, of course, is seeking entertain- 
ment primarily." 

All critics concur that The Ed Sulli- 
van Show has been among the foremost 
on TV in providing decent and great 
entertainment for the entire family. All 
critics, that is, including the hapless one 
who so mistakenly wrote — on the day 
that Ed made his debut on TV: "The 
amiable Mr. Sullivan lacked both the 
stage presence and personality which 
are essential tools of the trade of the 
professional master of ceremonies." 




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67 



Pauline Frederick, Reporter 



(Continued from page 36) 
most deeply cherishes is the one she 
first set out to earn for herself: Pauline 
Frederick, Reporter. She says, "It was 
tougher to persuade editors to let me 
cover serious news than it has ever 
been to report it." 

The information that editors, both 
of ink and air, still fight to keep females 
off their reporting staffs may come as 
a distinct shock to high-school girls 
who plan to study journalism. 

But it is a familiar, maddening fact 
of life to almost every woman who 
seeks to earn her living by reporting 
news outside the readily-conceded 
areas of fashion, food and froth. The 
manpower shortages of World War II 
did open some opportunities for women 
to cover what is termed "hard-core 
news," but few of these women, even 
those of proven ability, are welcomed 
in news rooms during their now ma- 
ture years. Even fewer have been able 
to advance beyond a "girl feature 
writer" position. 

Their me-too comments point up 
Pauline Frederick's unique status. Says 
one, succinctly, "It's still 1890 in the 
news room." Says another, "The same 
editor, who will campaign for civil 
rights, claims a personal exemption 
from women's rights." 

A third, whose exploits somewhat 
parallel Pauline's, says, "I've covered 
crime, fire and flood; war, Washington 
and Wall Street. I've dodged bullets in 
Cuba and commissars in Russia. No 
editor has ever had to fish me out of 
trouble. Yet what happens when I ask 
to report international economics? I 
get that old wheeze that there are cer- 
tain assignments where they just can't 
send a woman. Then comes that equally 
worn-out sop, 'But we might be inter- 
ested if you can dream up a new fea- 
ture for women.' " 

Pauline can match such experiences, 
add a few, and laugh about them now. 
She says, "The news director who wins 
my personal booby prize gave orders 
to his editors to look at anything I 
brought in — free-lance. He also told 
them he would slit the throat of the 
man who either gave me an assign- 
ment or told me about the order." 

How did she overcome such obsta- 
cles? Newsmen who have worked with 
her answer: "Sheer ability." Pauline is 
more modest. "I was more stubborn 
than anyone else. And luckier. I hap- 
pened to be in the right places at the 
right time." 

For all her self-confessed stubborn- 
ness, Pauline is no modern counter- 
part of the suffragette who chained 
herself to lamp posts. Her manners 
are as quiet as her voice. She has ex- 
pressive, steady gray eyes, a flawless 
delicate skin, a trim figure and a nice 
taste in clothes, is utterly feminine. 

But she has always known exactly 
what she wanted to do. "It had to be 
some combination of politics and jour- 
nalism. From the time I was able to 
T reach up to a typewriter, I had to be on 
a school paper. If my school didn't have 
a paper, I started one." 

Her father was her first teacher in 
68 



politics. Matthew P. Frederick was 
postmaster at Gallitzin, Pennsylvania, 
when Pauline was born. Three years 
later, he moved his family to Harris- 
burg, the state capital, where he held 
a number of appointments, usually in 
the labor department. 

In a middle-sized city, what happens 
on the capitol hill is always the day's 
topic of conversation. Pauline became 
her father's confidant and soon had 
items of her own to contribute. During 
her college days in Washington, when 
other students went to the soda foun- 
tain after classes, she took off for the 
gallery of the Senate to listen to the 
debate. What she learned there made 
her a formidable debater at American 
University, Washington, D.C. She was a 
scholarship student and a major in 
political science. 

Her course changed when Arthur 
Flemming, now Secretary of Health, 
Education and Welfare, became her 
debate coach. She says, "Like most 
students who fell under his influence, 
I chose to follow his example and study 
law." She earned a fellowship, and had 
completed requirements to take her 
master's degree in international law, 
when a history professor again brought 

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a change in direction. She says, "He 
pointed out there were so many law- 
yers, particularly in Washington, that 
I might have a better chance for suc- 
cess if I went back to my journalism." 

Obviously, neither realized that this, 
too, was an overcrowded field which 
held little welcome for women. Paul- 
ine's only professional experience had 
been in a Harrisburg newspaper's 
society department. She certainly did 
not intend to waste a brand-new law 
degree by going back to this. With 
the advice of the professor and a 
friendly newspaper man, she hunted for 
a new idea for a series of articles. They 
settled on a plan for Pauline to inter- 
view the wives of newly arrived dip- 
lomats. 

Ministers from China, Czecho-Slo- 
vakia and Panama had recently pre- 
sented their credentials. To reach their 
ladies, Pauline had to resort to a bit 
of double-talk. "When I called for ap- 
pointments, the secretary's first ques- 
tion was 'Where will this interview be 
published?' I hated to say this was my 
first attempt as a free-lance reporter. I 
said that would depend on what kind of 
material I got and how wide an appeal 
the story would have." 

When Pauline had her interviews, 
the newspaper friend gave her a letter 
to Oliver Owen Kuhn, managing editor 
of The Washington Star. Pauline 
shivered throughout their conference. 
"He was a gruff man who had no time 
for women reporters, but he did agree 
to read my stories. I could only hope 
he would take them." 



That hope dropped below zero when 
a messenger from The Star delivered 
her packet of copy to her door that 
evening. She says, "I was scared to open 
it, but there was a note from Mr. Kuhn 
— saying that, if the rest of my inter- 
views were as good as these, he would 
take one-a-week." 

North American Newspaper Alliance 
syndicated the series, and Miss Mar- 
garet Cuthbert, then in the public 
affairs department at NBC, saw Pau- 
line's stories in The New York Times 
and wired to invite her to audition at 
NBC, Washington. Pauline says, "I had 
worked on the 'U. S. News' with Bauk- 
hage, who'd become NBC's anchor man 
in Washington. I asked if I might inter- 
view him for the purposes of my NBC 
audition, and, he agreed." 

Baukhage liked the series of articles 
Pauline had done for newspaper syndi- 
cation and he liked Pauline. Their as- 
sociation continued throughout the 
eventful years of World War II, and he 
later became one of her staunchest 
supporters as a broadcaster. But Pau- 
line never forgot his first command, 
"Stay away from the news room. They 
just don't want women around." She 
smacked up against the same prejudice 
when she asked to go overseas as a 
correspondent. Abruptly she was told, 
"That's no place for a woman." 

Then, just after Nazi Germany sur- 
rendered, she learned that the Military 
Air Transport planned to fly a group 
of reporters overseas. Pauline — who 
had moved fom NBC with Mr. Bauk- 
hage and was working with him at ABC 
network — begged for an assignment, 
but ABC absolutely refused to ac- 
credit her. The big publications had 
their own people. 

"In desperation," Pauline recalls, "I 
went to Western Newspaper Union, a 
syndicate which primarily sells to 
weekly newspapers. I was told they 
had absolutely no need for my serv- 
ices, but that they would accredit me 
and that they might possibly buy, at 
regular space rates, some of the stories 
I might send back." 

Pauline applied for an allocation, but 
had not received it at the time that she 
went to San Francisco, with Baukhage, 
to cover the charter meeting of the 
United Nations in the spring of 1945. 
While there, the Military Air Trans- 
port notified her that she was on the 
passenger list for a junket to the Far 
East, and directed her to confirm the 
booking immediately and to start get- 
ting her shots. 

Pauline was torn between two stories. 
World history was being made in San 
Francisco, Baukhage needed her and 
urged her to give up her "foolish no- 
tion." For two weeks, she argued with 
herself. Her final decision was made in 
a beauty shop while she was having a 
manicure. "I suddenly asked myself, 
'Why not go? Maybe I'll never have an- 
other chance.' I was afraid it was too 
late. Fortunately, they still had a place 
for me." 

She made the rounds of the networks, 
asking for assignments. Only ABC 
would yield even a "Keep us informed" 



answer. Pauline herself says of the 
tour, "This was a real international 
education. In two months, we visited 
nineteen countries. There were nine 
men and four women, I was the only 
unknown' aboard, but I, too, met every- 
one — kings, generals, G.I.s." At Chung- 
king, ABC's correspondent turned over 
two of his broadcast periods to her. It 
was Pauline's first international news- 
cast. 

When the war ended, she moved from 
Washington to New York and into a 
period of gambling for the highest pos- 
sible stakes — her daily existence and 
her future career. It was a horrible time 
to try to free-lance world news. Men 
were returning from service, and those 
news editors who objected to women 
reporters were getting them off their 
staffs as fast as they could. This was 
when that most cynical of news direc- 
tors issued his instructions that Pau- 
line's offered copy should be read, but 
that she was never to be given an 
assignment. 

The odd arrangement worked to her 
advantage when the Cunard Lines or- 
ganized a huge press junket. Reporters 
were to cross on the Queen Mary, then 
making her last voyage as a troopship, 
and return when the Queen Elizabeth 
made her maiden voyage. ABC ac- 
credited Pauline. "They made it clear," 
she recalls, "that I was going only be- 
cause they could not spare a man. They 
also specified that I could not expect to 
be paid, except for copy actually used." 

The trip furthered her acquaintance 
with international personalities. Gen- 
eral and Mrs. Eisenhower were on the 
outbound voyage; Molotov was on 
board during Pauline's return trip. 
And, unwittingly, this same Russian 
later helped clear out Pauline's per- 
sonal roadblocks. "I was back in New 
York," she remembers, "still saying to 
editors, 'Now may I cover straight 
news?' and getting fashion shows in- 
stead. 

"A night came, at ABC, when there 
was only one man available to cover 
two stories. The editor refused to send 
me to the truck strike because there 
might be violence. He said that, if I 
wanted to take a chance, I could try the 
meeting of the foreign ministers at the 
Waldorf. At least I knew Molotov by 
sight, so I took off." 

Pauline got her story, and eventually 
it led to staff status, first at ABC, later 
at NBC. From the Nuremberg trials on 
to the Congo crisis, she has had a day- 
to-day hand in reporting world history. 
"There have been many hectic times, 
but the Congo crisis has been the 
worst," she says now. "On July 13, 
when we broke into the Democratic 
convention coverage with cut-ins from 
the U.N., I did my last spot at 3:30 
a.m. I washed my hair, slept an hour, 
and was on the Garroway Today Show 
at 7 a.m." 

Home, for Pauline, is a small Park 
Avenue penthouse within sight of the 
U.N. buildings. As she describes it, "I 
have a tiny kitchen and dining room, a 
bedroom, living room and den. In dec- 
oration, it's faintly French provincial, 
but I like best those things I have 
picked up on my travels." Of enter- 



taining, she says, "I'll cook if I have 
to, but I would rather leave it to the 
woman who helps me. I like to have 
a roast going on the electric spit on the 
terrace, and I like to have a chance to 
enjoy my guests." A brown poodle 
named "Sputnik" shares her domain. 
"He's my fellow traveler, who orbits." 

Pauline meets queries about romance 
with the career girl's standard reply, 
"I'm still hoping." Seriously, she adds, 
"The man I deeply loved died." Al- 
though currently lacking a personal 
emotional attachment, Pauline is sur- 
rounded by admiring males. Diplomats 
call her by her first name and save up 
stories for her. She has totally charmed 
her fellow reporters. Chet Huntley 
speaks for them all, when he says, 
"Pauline is the greatest. We like work- 
ing with her, and we all pick her 
brains." 

Irving Gitlin, producer of the new 
once-a-month series, Special For 
Women, adds a revealing tribute: "The 
first day I came over from CBS, I was 
in the control room with Bill Mc An- 
drew, head of NBC News, when they 
cut to Pauline at the U.N. I had admired 
her for years, but that day I was more 
than ever impressed with the quiet, un- 
flustered way she analyzed complex 
happenings. I said to Bill, 'By gosh, 
she's good.' Bill answered with feeling, 
'She sure is.' " 

Right then, Gitlin determined to have 
Pauline on the programs he had pro- 
jected to give serious, critical examina- 
tion to problems which women actually 
face in today's society. 

In discussing Pauline's potential role, 
the question arose whether she, a 
specialist in international politics, could 
also do a personal, home-interest re- 
port. Gitlin and his director, George 
Lefferts, decided to hold an on-camera 
audition. Their avowed purpose was to 
"test how flexible she was." (This out- 
side observer gains the impression that 
the audition was also a grown-up ver- 
sion of a boy's tendency to tease a girl 
he admires.) 

Gitlin confesses, "George and I wrote 
down every penetrating question we 
could think of. He went on camera and 
quizzed her. She answered everything 
sensibly and without a qualm." Gitlin 
then decided Pauline, too, should have 
her innings. From the control room, 
he called out, "Miss Frederick, is there 
anything you would like to ask Mr. 
Lefferts?" 

The ensuing colloquy has become one 
of the NBC staff's favorite stories. Gitlin 
says, "Pauline smiled sweetly and took 
aim. Her first question was: 'Mr. Lef- 
ferts, why is the male sex so ineffectual 
these days?' Another: 'Is it true that 
men really fear the competition of 
women?' In a couple of minutes, she 
had George so tied up he couldn't an- 
swer, and the crew laughing so hard 
they couldn't operate. I finally threw 
in the sponge by saying, 'Okay, we're 
sorry we ever started this. You get the 
job because it calls for a good woman 
reporter.' " 

Pauline got the last word. She said, 
"It calls for a good reporter, period. 
I am taking it, not because I am a 
woman, but because I am a reporter." 



Are Females 
As Romantic 
As Cold Salmon? 

According to one young man: 
"Ask the average girl if she'd like 
to sail around the world with a 
handsome, daring boy and she'll 
answer, 'But, gee, what if we got 
hit by a hurricane.' " Find out 
what senior boys think of the op- 
posite sex in the colorful, new 
issue of Teens Today Magazine. 




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69 



Jackie Gleason Talks About His Religion 



(Continued from page 30) 
a "profoundly religious person." He 
maintains that he's "religiously aware" 
and is a "deeply religious-conscious 
person," but he doesn't want to be 
placed in the position of influencing 
anyone. 

"I'm not a preacher," he says. "It's a 
mistake for a layman to inflict his 
views on anyone. Piety is a delicate 
attitude. Religion should be a continu- 
ous search of man seeking to better 
himself before God. Some part of the 
battle is won if you realize you have a 
duty to God." 

Gleason's prodigious knowledge of 
religious doctrine impresses every 
theologian he meets. Evangelist Billy 
Graham was so taken with the come- 
dian's grasp of the subject that he tried 
to persuade Jackie to give talks on 
religion. "I turned him down," says 
Gleason. "I told him that I wasn't good 
enough. Though I lead a life that's not 
so irreligious or so sinful, it would be 
hypocritical to do such a thing." 

And that's one thing Mr. Gleason 
isn't. He says: "During a man's life, he 
looks for solace. Sometimes he tries 
escape through liquor or women. Or 
refuge in other distractions. But neither 
works for me. Only honesty works." 

The forty-four-year-old comedian's 
church-going days are now split be- 
tween St. Patrick's and the Actors' 
Chapel. The little church that he first 
attended as a boy certainly doesn't 
compare with these august places of 
worship, but it's doubtful that he'll 
ever forget it. The mere mention of Our 
Lady of Lourdes brings back a torrent 
of memories to him. 

He remembers firstly his mother, a 
devout woman who attended church 
every day of her life. She worked as a 
subway cashier to bring up Jackie after 
his father, Herbert Gleason, disap- 
peared mysteriously one day on his 
way to his job as an insurance auditor. 
Jackie was eight at the time. 



When he was sixteen, his mother 
passed away, Jackie, with just an ele- 
mentary education, was thrown out in- 
to the world. He remembers that day 
vividly. It was the day he opened at 
the Folly Theater, his first acting break. 
"I had to go on," says Jackie, "I only 
had thirty-six cents to my name." 

After that, he spent lots of time in 
pool halls waiting for more chances to 
go on stage. He worked as a Coney 
Island barker, an exhibition diver, a 
daredevil driver and a disk jockey. He 
began earning as much as seventy-five 
dollars a week. 

He started moving into the big-time 
when booked at a Budd Lake, New 
Jersey resort. Then he fell in love and 
married Genevieve Halford, a New 
York dancer. Their marriage of 
eighteen years ended officially in 1954. 
The pair agreed to a legal separation, 
and Jackie says of the marriage: "All 
of the problems and tensions always 
originated with me. I guess I was too 
immature to appreciate the qualities of 
such a fine woman." 

Two daughters were born of the 
union. Geraldine, 20, is about to be 
graduated from Marymount College in 
California; Linda, 18, attends Catholic 
University in Maryland. The latter 
youngster is very interested in becom- 
ing an actress. 

Jackie moved into real money when 
he was booked into the Club 18 in New 
York. His specialty was insulting the 
patrons. He got a Hollywood offer and 
took it, but then was unhappy about 
the parts he was given. He returned to 
New York to be cast in Olsen and 
Johnson's "Hellzapoppin' " and "Artists 
and Models." In 1945, he wowed them 
in "Follow the Girls." 

His climb to the stars continued on 
TV when he initiated the Life Of Riley 
role later played by William Bendix. 
His appearance in Cavalcade Of Stars 
catapulted him into the $10,000-a-week 
bracket. Nothing could stop him now. 



T 
V 
R 

70 



PLAY EDITOR 

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He developed the famous characters of 
Rudy the Repairman, Ralph Kramden, 
Reggie Van Gleason III, the Ham Actor 
and the Poor Soul. Total result: A 
whopping fifteen-million-dollar con- 
tract and recognition as the greatest 
comedian in the world. 

When Jackie could draw a deep 
breath after his amazing rise to the 
zenith, it's little wonder that he re- 
membered with nostalgia the poor 
boy who held back his pennies from 
the collection plate in an out-of-the- 
way church in Brooklyn. 

But the Gleason story seems only to 
be getting its second wind now. In Oc- 
tober, the Great Man starred in the 
first of two dazzling spectaculars for 
this season — the musical variety show 
called "The Big Sell"— following up, a 
couple of months later, with "The Mil- 
lion Dollar Incident," a ninety-minute 
CBS-TV drama which focuses on 
Jackie being kidnaped and held for 
a king-size ransom. Projecting his 
thoughts to next year, he's already 
booked to do a "conversation" show on 
February 12, in which he will inform- 
ally interview a show business celeb- 
rity. The CBS brass are so enthusiastic 
about this idea that they're mulling 
plans to use it as a series. So Gleason 
may be seen weekly on TV again, in 
the not-too-distant future. 

As if not to be accused of being lazy, 
the tireless round man will be com- 
posing and conducting new albums be- 
tween CBS specials. (He has already 
sold more albums than any conductor 
in history.) But, while this whirring 
genius spins his gyroscopic path 
through the entertainment world, one 
thought, one fear, lies in the back of 
his mind. 

Jackie's afraid of losing his soul. It's 
the only fear he has in life. "It's 
natural," says Jackie. "Everyone's 
primarily occupied with taking care 
of their own soul. They should, before 
taking care of anyone else's." 

The comedian's preoccupation with 
religion has led him into a study of 
psychic phenomena. It all started with 
his interest being aroused in the 
supernormal powers exhibited by some 
saints. Today, the study of extrasensory 
perception has become his favorite 
hobby. He's built up an enormous 500- 
book library on it and similar subjects. 

People meeting Jackie for the > first 
time are often startled to hear him in- 
telligently discussing the extrasensory 
experiments of Prof. J. B. Rhine of 
Duke, or the powers of the late Ken- 
tucky clairvoyant Edgar Cayce, or 
Hindu firewalking. 

Some Gleason critics single out his 
liking for psychic phenomena as an in- 
dication that he's obsessed with the fear 
of dying. "That's absurd," Jackie 
counters. "It's like saying that a physi- 
cian studies medicine because he fears 
disease. I can only say that I wish I 
had even more knowledge about this 
fascinating subject." 

Other detractors of the rolypoly 
jokester mutter something about "luck" 
when someone refers to his success. 
They don't get much of an argument 



from Jackie. He's frank about that 
elusive intangible in life. "I'm a great 
believer in luck," he says. "I define it as 
being in the right place at the right 
time. For me, the right place was a 
carnival where a ventriloquist was do- 
ing his stuff. It was also the right time. 
My dad brought me to the place just at 
the time when my interest was being 
aroused in show business. I had only 
one ambition in mind after that." 

When the discussion turns to talent, 
Jackie believes in giving credit where 
credit belongs. "All talent," he main- 
tains, "is a gift from God. Actors have 
neuroses about it because they realize 
the fact." He firmly believes that the 
Almighty was liberal in the instilling of 
talent. '"Everyone has some innate tal- 
ent," he says. "I'm sure there are some 
plumbers around who could have been 
atomic scientists. That's why it's so 
important to find the right vocation for 
kids." 

One of the best ways to steam him up 
is to insinuate that comedians aren't 
in the same class as actors. "A comic 
with a toothache is the finest actor 
around," he claims. "You don't see 
many actors who can draw laughs. It's 
a comedian's ability to act that gets 
him the yak." 

He's quick to needle pompous thes- 
pians. "There's a great mistake made 
about acting, anyhow," he tells them. 



"Everyone's an actor. A plumber with 
lipstick on his shirt has to act. And 
don't forget that the audience, which 
is his wife, has seen him hundreds 
of times!" 

As for the comedian's own acting 
prowess, one has only to turn to the re- 
views of "Take Me Along," the Broad- 
way smash hit. He's proud of his ac- 
complishments in the play, but he takes 
more pleasure in solo comedy stints. 
And he defines a comic as "someone 
who's able to extend the material that 
he's given. He should be able to execute 
more than just a line. He should be 
able to make you cry." 

With this in mind, he lists Charlie 
Chaplin, Red Skelton and Jack Oakie 
as his personal favorites of all time. He 
laments the fact that there aren't 
enough places for young comedians to 
gain experience today. He advises 
novices to seek out whatever stage 
training they can — "church socials, 
summer stock ... it makes no dif- 
ference. Just get on the stage!" 

That's been the Gleason credo 
throughout his life: Get on the stage. 
He loves it there, and is most happy 
when performing. "I don't envy a single 
person in show business," he notes. 
"Why should I? I'm financially set for 
the rest of my life." 

He's also well set for friends. Two 
of his dearest are Bishop Fulton Sheen 
and Cardinal Cushing. 



"The Three of Us" 



(Continued from page 32) 
that it was caused by a weak eye 
muscle. Dickie now wears glasses and, 
if that doesn't correct his eyes, there 
will be an operation. 

"It's serious, but not terribly serious," 
Dick says. "It's a fairly common opera- 
tion — but, of course, you have to think 
of the psychological problem." He 
pauses, then goes on, "One thing I'm 
trying hard to do these days is to give 
Dickie more time. I mean if I'm headed 
out to work and he asks me to play 
with him, I used to say, 'Wait until Sun- 
day.' Now I stop and think and, if I 
can get the work done by staying later 
at the office, I put aside the briefcase 
and go back to the brook and help him 
sail boats." 

There is that about Dick Clark which 
is deceptive — his youthful appearance, 
his unruffled and unharried manner on 
the air, which makes him look as if 
success had been handed to him on a 
silver platter. It wasn't, and isn't, so. 
Watching him off the air, you see the 
painstaking attention he gives produc- 
tion details, fan mail, trends in music 
and the hundreds of records that come 
in for audition. But even more im- 
portant is the loyalty and understand- 
ing he gives to his friends and business 
associates, his son and his wife. 

Since there are few performers so 
sensitive to the problems and feelings 
of those around him, it isn't much of a 
surprise to learn that Dick has, in pri- 
vacy, been working on a novel. Dick 
doesn't suggest that he's about to buck 
Hemingway. But his sincerity and ear- 



nestness are evidenced by the fact that 
he carries the manuscript in a brief- 
case wherever he goes, although no one 
but Dick himself has seen it and it is 
still untitled. 

"It's the story about a young man in 
the music business," Dick says. "Of his 
overnight success and the complications 
that come with it, in both business and 
private life." He notes that, while the 
main character will be fictitious, most 
of the drama will be factual — based on 
the experience of himself and others. 
"If you're lucky enough to be success- 
ful in show business," he continues, 
"you know you must go back. There are 
always reversals. There are very few 
who stay successful. All performers 
know it, and this is their great fear. The 
thing is not to be afraid, and you must 
have something to hold on to. 

"What it is, you learn rather quickly 
when you do have a reversal. I mean 
like, just yesterday, I was talking to 
a performer who had been divorced. 
During the past year, he had been on 
the road forty-five weeks. His wife 
just couldn't adjust to it and she didn't 
like show business. Now, that divorce 
hurts more than any business reversal, 
because it's what's at home that holds 
you up when things get rough. Maybe 
this performer's wife didn't know what 
was ahead of them. Maybe they didn't 
sit down and talk about it ahead of 
time." 

Dick and wife Bobby have often dis- 
cussed the problems and demands and 
uncertainties of show business. "Bobby 
is always ready for the unexpected," he 



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says. "We have never lived ostenta- 
tiously, and never intend to. Matter of 
fact, I phoned Bobby last night and 
said, 'Boy, did I have a cruel day. 
Everything is crackling around my ears. 
Start looking for that chicken farm.' 
And she said, 'Fine by me.' 

"She takes everything placidly. I can 
think of only one exception." To appre- 
ciate that exception, you have to see 
Barbara Clark, a tall, creamy-skinned 
blonde with a Phi Beta Kappa key in 
her bureau drawer — and an unusually 
even and calm disposition. So calm and 
understanding, she had Dick in a real 
panic one evening. 

It was five-thirty and Dick was still 
in the studio when the message was de- 
livered. "Your wife says it's an emer- 
gency and you're to call her immediate- 
ly." It was the first time Bobby had 
ever used the word emergency. Dick 
ran to a telephone and got Bobby. She 
said, "Dick, they're building an express- 
way through our home. You've got to 
get right up here." 

Dick gasped, caught his second wind, 
and asked, "You mean they've got 
wreckers and bulldozers up there?" 

There was a long pause on the other 
end, then he heard Bobby laugh and 
begin to relax. She explained that 
neighbors had shown her a newspaper 
which detailed plans for a new express- 
way out of Philadelphia, with the road 
running directly through their house. 
And she agreed that Dick could take 
another twenty minutes to clean up 
some details before he rushed home. 

"I could appreciate her feelings," Dick 
recalls. "This is our first house and 
we've put a lot of work into it. Just six 
months after we moved in, she hears 
we're going to lose it. Anyway, it turned 
out, a few days later, they were going 
to run the expressway somewhere else." 

The Clarks have been married eight- 
and-a-half years, but they've known 
each other for sixteen. None of their 
respective families was in show busi- 
ness, so they had no preparation for its 
unusual problems. "It's the domestic 
problems that are the most common 
hazards in our business," Dick observes. 
"I've experienced a few myself, and 
I've seen a lot more, and I try to fight 
what I see around me. Some of them 
you almost have to second-guess. 

"Now, I wouldn't expect Bobby to 
envy me — but she did. I didn't realize it. 
I'd call her from New York and tell 
her that I had to stay over for a meeting 
with a sponsor or something like that. 
I'd forget that she was still back on the 
cooking range, hog-tied with a child 
and rassling with the same domestic 
routine. To her, my life seemed thrill- 
ing and exciting." 

Dick began inviting Bobby to various 
meetings with his agency and sponsors 
and to rehearsals, and took her along 
on personal appearances. "She saw 
that, backstage, it's dull and routine. 
She saw how tedious it is to beat out 
a contract. She knows that, when you 
go to a meeting, you spend a lot of time 
waiting and arranging, and it's pretty 
unexciting. 

"Now I've got to fly to California this 
weekend and she couldn't care less 
about coming along, for she knows 



what's involved," he explains. "Friday 
evening, I pack, to the airport, then 
the flight. Then to a hotel and checking 
in and unpacking and getting ready for 
a half-dozen different meetings. Before 
you know it, you're packing again and 
reversing the whole process . . . you 
might as well have been in Podunk." 

When Dick went to Hollywood to 
make a movie, he was there for almost 
a month and Bobby and Dickie were 
with him. "We did have fun on that 
trip," he smiles. "I worked hard, but 
there was time in the evening to see a 
lot of friends who five out there and to 
meet a lot of different people. And 
Dickie even got lost once — which means 
he had a good time, too." 

Dickie hasn't been lost in every state 
of the union, but he's trying. Out in 
Detroit, he opened his window in a 
motel and was found, a half-hour later, 
wandering around in his pajamas in- 
specting the facilities. The very first 
night in California, Dickie had peace- 
fully seated himself in the living room 
of a rented house to watch television 




FOR CEREBRAL PALSY 

JOB 
TRAINING 



JOIN THE 



'© 



MINUTE 
MARCH 



while Dick and Bobby had dinner in the 
dining room. 

Dick recalls, "Bobby had a fork half- 
way to her mouth when she said, 'I've 
got a funny feeling. I don't think 
Dickie's in there watching television.' 
I said, 'Don't be silly. It's his favorite 
program.' But Bobby went in to look 
and, sure enough, Dickie had disap- 
peared. We were scared, because it was 
an unfamiliar neighborhood — but I 
found him down the street. A man was 
holding his hand and waiting for some- 
one to claim him. 

"Down in Maryland," he chuckles, 
"Dickie disappeared in a supermarket 
that sells everything from eggs to 
clothes. Bobby posted her mother at 
the main door, so he couldn't escape, 
and began to search up and down the 
aisles. Just as she was about to alert 
the store manager, Dickie peeked out 
from a rack of dresses. He had been 
playing hide-and-seek." 

Dick's own mother finds nothing un- 
usual in Dickie's actions. Dick himself 
had been the same kind of a child, ac- 
tive and curious and adventuresome. 
And, like his father, young Dickie is 
very interested in music. "He has his 
own record player and, God bless him, 
he drives us wild playing the same rec- 
ords over and over. Like all parents, I 
look for signs of talent. Dickie can pick 
up a melody and remember words. He 
even recognizes some artists. If he's 
listening to the radio, he will comment 
that that's Pat Boone or Bobby Darin 
or Connie Francis. He plays popular 
records but, of course, the kiddie rec- 
ords are his big favorites." 



Dick pauses and then says, "You 
know, the father-son relationship is 
limited at his age, and there are still 
periods when I may not see him for a 
few days. This is one of the worst as- 
pects of show business. I mean — that it 
keeps you away from home so much." 

Wives, he notes, never quite get used 
to all the sudden departures and 
changes in plans. "No woman likes to 
have you stand her up," he observes. 
"About six months ago, I resolved I'd 
get Bobby to a movie once a week. Well, 
we get there maybe twice a month. 
Often I have to cancel a dinner date 
for business. On our anniversary, this 
past year, we had to go to a baseball 
game the station was having as a cele- 
bration for its staff. Luckily, Bobby 
happens to like baseball!" 

Dick always discusses with Bobby 
any business arrangements which will 
have any unusual effect on the family. 
For example, during Christmas week, 
Dick will be at work in New York 
studios on a new Columbia film, "The 
Young Doctors," in which he will play 
a medic. He says, "It will interfere dras- 
tically with our holiday plans, and 
neither of us likes that part, but we 
agree it's a challenge and that I should 
do it." 

He expects this Christmas will be the 
most hectic in his life. Under ordinary 
circumstances, he seldom has time to do 
his own shopping but he never allows 
anyone else to do it, so, the few days 
preceding Christmas, he shops franti- 
cally. He says, "I've never felt right in 
asking anyone, my secretary or even 
my wife or mother, to shop for me. I've 
got to do it myself, no matter how 
crammed my schedule. What makes it 
especially rough is that it's not a matter 
of buying one nice gift for everyone 
in the family, but buying many. It's al- 
ways been that way in my family. We 
put the stress on quantity, rather than 
quality. For us, it's the fun of opening 
a lot of different packages." 

Dick explains further about the 
movie: "You remember what I said 
earlier about every performer living in 
fear that his career will collapse? Well, 
one of my ways of fighting this is by 
maintaining other interests. Now I'm 
going to make another movie. I don't 
honestly know that I can develop a 
motion-picture career, but I'm going to 
try — so that someday, if I'm so inclined 
to try motion pictures full time, I will 
have had some basic experience. 

"Maybe, when the time comes, I'll 
turn away and go to the chicken farm. 
I don't know. But, all through my life, 
I've tried to have enough interests so 
that I'll always have something to keep 
me active and interested." 

Dick concludes candidly: "You can't 
kid about the importance of a career to 
a man's ego. But above that — always — 
is being with people you love. Business 
must be secondary to people. Show 
business being what it is, husband and 
wife have to work a little harder to 
secure their happiness. You know the 
old cliche — 'It's bigger than the two of 
us.' Well, nothing in show business or 
any business is bigger than the two of 
us . . . except — including Dickie — the 
three of us." 



No Time for Romance 






(Continued from page 52) 
bound to be some kind of competition, 
some clash in ego." 

Giving up dates started when Sarah 
Hardy was in high school, and already 
a member of the Columbia Junior 
Theater. She missed a big school dance 
because there were rehearsals at the 
theater. Her mother warned, "You will 
have to make a great many sacrifices to 
your theatrical ambitions. Are you sure 
it's going to be worth it?" 

She still thinks it is. In her early 
twenties now, Sarah feels she can afford 
to wait a while, if necessary, for mar- 
riage, and the four children she would 
like — "two boys and two girls, so each 
will always have a pal." 

Sarah comes from just such a family. 
She has a twin brother, Archie, now 
completing work for his master's degree 
at Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Archie 
is in youth work. "It's far removed from 
acting, in a way — and, in a way, not. He 
must meet people well. He sings, plays 
the guitar for the kids — the guitar was 
our present for one of our birthdays, 
but he learned to play it. He leads 
young people in recreational activities, 
entertains them, gives talks, went to 
Europe last summer for the World- 
Wide Christian Youth Conference." 

Edmund, the younger brother, will be 
going into their mother's insurance 
business. "But he's got some ham in 
him — we all have." Elizabeth Cecil, at 
fifteen, plays bass sax with the high- 
school band and has also acted in school 
plays. 

The Hardys had a home life in which 
something was always happening — 
"marvelous, exciting, chaotic, closely 
knit in the tradition of the South, where 
family is so important," as Sarah de- 
scribes it. "But we all have strong per- 
sonalities of our own. My mother used 
to say that the only unfortunate thing 
about us was we had all leaders and no 
followers." 

At the Junior Theater, Sarah's first 
performance was in the fairytale, "The 
Princess and the Swineherd." She 
played the villain of the piece. Her best 
friend played the princess. Afterward, 
the kids swarmed backstage to tell the 
princess how wonderful she was, how 
beautiful, how much they loved her in 
the show. 

Sarah waited for her turn to be con- 
gratulated. "It was awful. They came 
over to me, yanked at my costume, and 
said they hated me. I was upset. It took 
me quite a while to understand that it 
was a tribute to the reality of the per- 
formance. But it didn't exactly help my 
popularity, either." 

After high school and the five years 
with the children's theater, she felt 
ready for New York. Her parents, con- 
ditioned to the fact that they had an 
actress on their hands, agreed she could 
go. She had seen the city briefly, when 
she was thirteen, and was more scared 
of it than she admitted. "My parents 
stuck me in a residence club for girls, 
so I would be sure of eating three times 
a day and have a little supervision. It 
took a year and a half to persuade 
them to let me get a small apartment of 



my own," she says with a rueful smile. 
She studied nine hours a day at the 
American Theater Wing — acting, danc- 
ing, play analysis, theater history. Her 
first professional job was with the Val- 
ley Players, at Holyoke, Massachusetts, 
doing the young-girl comedy role in 
"A Roomful of Roses." Later, she played 
the important ingenue part in the same 
play with the Port Players, in Ocono- 
mowoc, Wisconsin, and repeated that 
part in a 1957 production at Rome, Italy. 

Sarah's first New York acting job was 
in Moss Hart's "The Climate of Eden," 
for the Equity Library Theater. Extra 
parts on television followed — for Kraft, 
Studio One, other nighttime dramatic 
shows. Her first big TV chance came in 
a sequence of The Verdict Is Yours. 

A one-shot she did on The Edge Of 
Night impressed Don Wallace, who was 
then directing that television serial. 
Later, when Wallace was casting for 
From These Roots, on NBC -TV, Sarah 
was just the actress he had in mind for 
the part of Lydia Benson. That was 
more than two years ago, and she has 
been Lyddy ever since. 

"Lyddy isn't the usual ingenue," 
Sarah emphasizes. "I've grown up, and 
grown mature, with Lyddy. That's one 
reason I love to play her. At first, I 
thought of a part in a daytime serial as 
something that would give me a chance 
to be choosey about other parts that 
were offered me. A kind of security. 
Now I like it completely for its own 
sake. From These Roots is one of the 
best, as far as quality is concerned — 
the production, under Paul Lammers, 
the writing, the acting. One of the nic- 
est things is working with the same 
people, day after day, but doing differ- 
ent episodes." 

When there's time for dates, Sarah 
tries to avoid places and parties with 
an all-theater atmosphere. "I find it re- 
freshing to talk to people in other pro- 
fessions and other businesses, with 
entirely different interests. One of my 
best friends teaches in a grammar 
school. His creative ability comes out 
in his teaching. We have wonderful 
talks together." 

With another girl — the producer with 
whom she worked in Rome — she shares 
a four-room duplex apartment near 
Central Park, on a street of old New 
York town houses. With one wonderful 
room upstairs, which is Sarah's. It has 
windows on three sides and the sun 
circles around them from dawn to dark- 
ness. Sarah has turned the room into a 
kind of den, where she keeps her hi-fi 
and her drawing board. She has a talent 
for line drawings, done with pen or 
brush and ink, mostly character studies 
of people. She also has the beginnings 
of a nice collection — some original Mary 
Cassatt lithographs and two drypoints. 

She likes to cook — but is still "too 
nervous about cooking, too afraid it 
won't turn out right, to enjoy it thor- 
oughly." She "invents" dishes, once 
made a perfect orange spice cake that 
she can't, for the life of her, repeat — 
because she can't remember how she 
did it. She thinks nothing is more won- 
derful than a good, hearty stew — or a 



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73 



good, thick vegetable soup, served with 
home-made corn bread. "At home, we 
used to make a meal of that." And she 
likes to eat to music — liturgical record- 
ings, or folk music, with a dash of other 
kinds. 

On the show, she calls her mother 
"Mama." And it comes naturally. That's 
an old Southern custom — and apparent- 
ly prevails elsewhere, judging from her 
mail. She gets letters from women and 
from men, who tell her they love to 
hear her say it. "I called my father 
'Daddy' and, when I occasionally said 
'Father,' he would immediately ask, 
'How much?' He knew it preceded a 
request for funds!" 

One of Sarah's great disappointments 
is that her father died just before she 
began to play in From These Roots. 
But her mother now watches the show 
— from her office. If people happen in 
when the broadcast is beginning or is 
on, she hands them cups of coffee and 
they watch with her. "A lot of busi- 
nessmen in our town know the show. 
They have to, if they arrive when it's 
broadcast time!" 

Last summer, one day's show was 
made up entirely of two dream se- 
quences — one with Ann Flood as Liz 
Fraser, one with Sarah as Lydia Ben- 
son. These were done surrealistically, 
with "limbo" sets — just frames of door- 
ways, mere suggestions of backgrounds 
and furnishings — in and out of which 
the girls had to run with split-second 
timing. 

"By the time we are ordinarily get- 
ting ready to go into 'dress' rehearsal," 



Sarah recalls, "we were only half 
through the camera blocking — and still 
had the run-through to do. We were all 
off-schedule. An air of resignation fell 
over the studio. This had turned into a 
spectacular. How could we possibly go 
on the air that day? 

"Then the time came to go on, and 
the show went beautifully. I had worn 
flats with leather soles, held on by 
thongs — and, when I ran around the 
studio, they kept slipping. I was terri- 
bly scared that I would ruin the timing 
on the air. So the dream sequence al- 
most turned into a nightmare for me — 
but no one else guessed that." 

Not all the days are as strenuous as 
that one, of course. But acting in 
a daytime serial is demanding of time 
and energy. There never can be time 
enough for rehearsals. Performances 
have to be spontaneous. And they can 
be given only once, with no chance for 
improvement. An actress learns to re- 
spect the demands, and to demand the 
same respect from others. 

"I had one little experience," she 
reminisces, "with a boy I had been 
going with, off and on, since my early 
teens. He was working at writing, and 
had little use for the actor's contribution 
to a play. We went to see John Giel- 
gud's 'Ages Of Man' — which was abso- 
lutely magnificent in every way. As we 
came out, this friend said, 'Well, it just 
goes to prove that the actor never can 
be as great as the man who writes for 
him.' He meant it, every word, and I 
was angry. And, all the time, he had 



been asking me — an actress — to marry 
him!" 

Sarah won what she terms "a small 
victory" while she was playing in Rome 
— and this, too, concerned a boy she 
had dated in high school when he was 
a university student. He had the te- 
merity to predict that she would never 
continue a career but would throw all 
her training away, marry, and have 
three children before she was twenty- 
five. 

He subsequently went into the Navy, 
was stationed in Italy, and Sarah never 
really expected to see him again. But, 
one day, standing in front of the thea- 
ter in Rome, she noticed a sailor study- 
ing the poster announcing that "A 
Roomful of Roses" was playing there. 
He looked at her, looked back at the 
poster — and finally walked over. "He 
was a little awed," Sarah smiles, "and 
a lot surprised! It made me feel good." 

But victories, in themselves, can be 
hollow. What makes up for everything 
— at least, for the present — are the 
wonderful relationships on a show like 
From These Roots. The friendships. 
The working together. "You work with 
younger and older people, and age 
makes absolutely no difference. There 
are no caste systems. Everyone's work 
is respected. Each does his part in put- 
ting the whole together." 

In short, it's rather like the teamwork 
of a closely knit family. The kind of 
family Sarah Hardy herself comes from. 
The kind she likes, and hopes to have 
herself some day — when there's more 
time in her life for romance. 



The Man With the Button-Down Mind 



(Continued from page 55) 
agent for not writing it on the back of 
an envelope and being warned "to do 
the humble bit like Charley wrote 
it." He is the skipper of a nuclear sub- 
marine, thanking his men at the end 
of a long cruise and pleading that "a 
joke's a joke but please return the 
executive officer . . ." While denying 
he is sick or angry, Bob cheerfully 
admits he is confused. The course of 
history, the age we live in, people and 
their quirks, show business, and even 
his own amazingly swift rise to fame, 
all leave him bewildered, amused and 
faintly alarmed. 

A good example was his recent bout 
with an ad agency. Slated to do four 
shows for Ed Sullivan this year, plus 
other TV variety programs, he awoke 
one morning to read that he was to be 
starred in his own television show, a 
full-season series to open in the fall. 
He had barely recovered from this 
shock when another story appeared 
saying The Bob Newhart Show had 
been cancelled. How a show that had 
never existed could be cancelled was a 
question that left Bob gasping but — 
in his usual style — resigned. 

Interviewed at San Francisco's "the 

hungry i," Bob delved into this puzzle- 

T ment. "My manager and I had a couple 

' of talks with a chap from an ad agency," 

he mused in his flat Midwestern tone. 

"The chap said he was interested. I said 

74 



we were interested, too. Which was the 
truth, because there's nothing I like less 
than people who aren't interested — after 
all, what could be worse to a comedian 
than uninterested people? 

"Well, some talk passed about for- 
mats and styling and the fellow said 
something like 'You shouldn't come on 
like Gang Busters' and I said something 
equally profound like 'You've got some- 
thing there' and we shook hands and 
said, 'This is worth chewing on' — and, 
the next thing you know, I'm the star 
of a show that's been cancelled." 

The button-down mind made its first 
appearance on a night-club stage on 
February 1, 1960. It was at the swank 
Tidelands Club of Houston. The spot- 
light shone down on Bob's balding head 
and — when he began his meek, ram- 
bling and somewhat dry first monologue 
— the audience showed signs of getting 
restless. Then came one of his offbeat 
cracks and someone tittered. The crowd 
pricked up its ears to learn what was 
so funny. 

A few moments later, they were 
laughing quietly, heartily, and with the 
delight that is a combination of sur- 
prise at something new and recognition 
of something true. In Bob's funny, 
poignant and baffled characterizations, 
they saw themselves trying to keep 
step and make sense of a world moving 
at jet speed. 

Just who is this young man who so 



quickly conquered the hard-to-attain 
status of a top comedian, considered in 
the same league as Mort Sahl and 
Shelley Berman? The Oak Park, Illinois 
lad himself points out that his mid- 
dle-class, serious-minded background 
would hardly have seemed likely to 
produce a comic. With a Bachelor of 
Science degree from Loyola University, 
Bob had decided the law was his field, 
and studied that subject for two years, 
meanwhile working at many other jobs 
— shoe clerk, copywriter, accountant, 
and cigar clerk, among others. 

The question has been raised: What 
can be funny about a man who looks 
like a cigar clerk, talks like one, and 
actually was one? Says Bob, rather 
slyly, "What's funny is not the man or 
his occupation, but human problems 
that enter, the moment a man and his 
occupation come together — as in the 
case of the driving instructor and his 
wild and woolly pupil." 

As for style, Bob insists that, if he has 
one, he can't say what it is or how it 
got there. "I'd be afraid to analyze it," 
he smiles, "because, once you get self- 
conscious about it, your style can limit 
you badly." In any case, it is generally 
conceded that he offers the most under- 
played comedy on the American scene. 

"People who see me for the first time 
are let down," Bob explains. "That 
'button-down mind' intro leads them to 
expect a suave, handsome Ivy League 



type. Instead, they get me. And until 
I get more exposure, I'm afraid I'll seem 
somewhat strange to most people out 
front. Many of my fans bought my first 
album before they saw me on TV or in 
night clubs. They had a special notion 
of what I looked like. This posed a 
problem as to what kind of picture 
should be put on my album. A confer- 
ence with the record people was held. 
Asked my opinion, I said, 'Let's have a 
picture that reveals the inner me.' To 
which someone snapped, 'We can't sell 
a creep from outer space' . . ." 

The vast amount of fan mail pouring 
in has pleased and surprised Bob. His 
apartment in San Francisco — rented for 
his parents (George D. and Pauline) 
and his sister (Virginia) when they 
visited him during his stay at "the 
hungry i" — was literally stacked with 
mail. "Having an apartment, and your 
family with you, is a large step up from 
the usual routine of living in hotels. At 
least, there's a feeling of permanency — 
which is something I really crave, even 
though I'm a bachelor. 

"On account of the mail," he con- 
tinues, "I had to buy a typewriter, and 
now I've had to hire a part-time secre- 
tary to help with the correspondence. 
I had no idea letters addressed simply 
to 'Bob Newhart, U.S.A.' would seek 
me out wherever I happen to be. What 
a post-office system we have!" 

Returning to the subject of how he 
made his success, Bob lays the credit 
to luck and good friends — which, he 
adds, "is also part of being lucky be- 
cause good friends don't happen every 
hour on the hour." Born thirty years 
ago in Chicago, he was a quiet kid, 
studious, with a definite interest in 
bugs. His family was sure he would 
become a naturalist — particularly his 
mother, who fought a losing battle 
against the frogs, beetles and spiders 
he smuggled in for purposes of study. 

While in his teens, however, Bob 
suddenly developed an interest in a 
young people's theater group. The di- 
rector, Jean Lynch, commissioned him 
to help in writing some " 'tween-scene" 
skits. One day an actor failed to show 
up, and she gave Bob his first crack at 
treading the boards. 

"I guess all of us kids had a sub- 
conscious hope that lightning would 
strike and we'd be discovered by a 
talent scout. But I didn't really think 
it would happen to me. It was a hobby 
and, being a practical guy, I turned my 
serious thought to college and the law," 
Bob recalls with a grin. "I must admit 
that the law had other ideas. I flunked 
the course. Maybe I didn't want it 
badly enough to give it a real try. 

"Anyway, by then, I had the acting 
bug and I was itching to get something 
in that field." Having joined the Oak 
Park Stock Company, Bob resolutely 
went to work to support himself work- 
ing at various jobs. "The Illinois Un- 
employment Department finally got 
tired of helping me get other jobs and 
took me on," he chuckles. 

It was then that a close friend, Ed 
Gallagher — now a copywriter for Bat- 
ten, Barton, Durstine & Osborn, in New 
York — and Bob put their heads together 
and came up with a radio show on 



unusual occupations. The show was 
funny, says Bob, but it didn't turn out 
funny for its creators. "We sold it to a 
Chicago station and we thought we had 
two other cities fined up to buy tapes. 
But, at the last minute, they pulled out. 

"It ended up with Ed and me scraping 
together $200 apiece to make up the 
difference between our costs and what 
we got paid. But one good thing came 
out of it: I got my idea of the driving- 
instructor routine from this radio show. 
In looking through want-ads to get 
ideas on 'odd-ball' jobs, I was impressed 
with the number of driving instructors 
being sought. There seemed to be a 
constant turnover. It didn't take much 
reasoning to figure out why." 

Meanwhile, Dan Sorkin — Chicago 
deejay and author of the hilarious book, 
"The Blabbermouths" — had heard some 
of Bob's radio tapes, plus others which 
Bob had recorded impromptu (usually, 
while talking on the telephone with 
friends). He introduced Bob on his 
Chicago Nightline TV show, and the 
response was so strong that Bob got a 
staff job with WBKB. Sorkin also sent 
tapes of Bob's routines to the Chicago 
manager of Warner Bros, records. The 
disc company evinced a clear-cut in- 
terest, but they felt Bob's routines 
would come off better before a live 
audience. 

The irons began to get hot. It was 
arranged for Bob to make his night- 
club debut at The Tidelands in Houston, 
Texas. "I was scared to death that first 
night," Bob recalls. "But I was happy 
the debut was there instead of Chicago. 
I would have been twice as frightened 
if I had to stand up there and deliver 
in front of my friends." 

A huge success in his debut, Bob next 
traveled to Windsor, Ontario, where he 
again scored heavily at the Elmwood 
Casino. Then, with only one network 
TV appearance behind him (The Jack 
Paar Show), Bob was unexpectedly 
paged to appear on the Emmy Awards 
show, to do his "Khrushchev Visit" 
number. When, only hours before show 
time, the comedy team of Nichols and 
May bowed out of their spot, Bob was 
asked if he could fill the gap. 

"I just happened," he grins, whenever 
he tells of that all-important day, "to 
have my music with me." The "music" 
was "The Submarine Commander" 
speech, and both audience and review- 
ers agreed that Bob Newhart was the 
hit of the show. The "button-down 
mind" had found an open-hearted tele- 
vision public. 

At the start, Bob was equipped with 
six short routines, all of which were 
recorded on his first album. His reper- 
toire now has at least eighteen pieces — 
enough, when shuffled about, to give 
each performance an air of novelty. 
However, it is a rare night when he 
can get off stage without having to 
answer his audience's shouts for "The 
Driving Instructor'" (apparently the 
number-one favorite) or "The Sub- 
marine Speech." 

This never ceases to amaze him. 
"Most of these folks have my album, 
they tell me," he ponders. "They must 
have played these skits over and over 
for friends. In fact, I can see by their 




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75 



attitude that they know every line by 
heart, and still they keep calling for 
me to do them on stage." 

"Stage" is just what Bob means, these 
days. Discouraged by the noisy crowds 
in night clubs — particularly, the almost- 
inevitable drunken heckler — and real- 
izing that his quiet "mood" comedy 
suffers from any interruption, Bob re- 
cently decided to concentrate on con- 
cert-type tours and TV in future. That's 
the kind of itinerary his agent is now 
setting up for 1961 — with scarcely a 
backward glance at the night-club 
dates which brought in most of the esti- 
mated $200,000 Bob has earned in 1960. 

Newhart's enterprises are not all con- 
fined to records and personal appear- 
ances. There is the Bob Newhart Pub- 



lishing Company, and the Bob Newhart 
Production Company — "and my calling 
them by my name is not conceit, I'll 
have you know," he chuckles. "I'm just 
trying to avoid some of those jaw- 
breaker names given nowadays in 
honor of wives, children, friends and 
investors." 

Of all latter-day comics, Bob freely 
admits that his preference is for 
Jonathan Winters — who, he believes, 
"under cover of sick zany wit is actually 
brilliant." Bob himself is both uncom- 
plicated and un-neurotic, according to 
those who know him best. He plays a 
good game of golf ("shot 82 my last 
outing," he preens), likes music, both 
classical and jazz, and, above all, is fond 



of good company. He would like to find 
the right girl and get married. 

Brought up in a household of women 
— he has three sisters, one of whom is a 
Catholic nun — Bob allows, with a wink: 
"When you grow up fighting for your 
chance at the bathroom or the tele- 
phone, when you go day after day wait- 
ing, waiting, waiting for the ladies of 
your family to get through dressing, you 
shudder at the thought of bringing one 
into the home who will probably em- 
body all the feminine traits in her little 
self. Yet, let's face it, you can live with- 
out a wife — but that's like saying you 
can live without sunlight. Who'd want 
to?" 

That's the wide-open question facing 
the man with the button-down mind 



"It's No Joke Raising a Teenager" 



(Continued from page 50) 
school in Morristown, New Jersey. She 
gets only one full weekend "free" a 
month. That is, she can go off-school- 
grounds once a month — plus, of course, 
Thanksgiving, Christmas, and summers. 
On most of these occasions, she stays 
with Carol in Manhattan. And, since 
Christine has such a pretty rugged 
schedule, Carol arranges to go over to 
St. John's on Sundays, as frequently 
as she can. Morristown is about thirty- 
three miles from New York City. 

"What do we do together?" Carol 
echoes smilingly. "We go out to lunch, 
talk, play table tennis, walk around the 
school grounds. It's a very nice school, 
and the grounds are quite beautiful." 

Chris rarely sees her sister cavort on 
TV, since the school is very strict, and 
she has to be in bed before ten. But 
when Christine does catch Carol on 
TV, she does a neat job as critic. "I'm 
going to brag a bit about Chris's critical 
faculty," the vivacious comedienne re- 
ports proudly. "She doesn't drool over 
things. When I've done a poor job, and 
my clowning hasn't paid off, she will 
say: You weren't so hot, Carol.' But, 
if I've done a successful bit of business 
in a sketch with Garry or Durward 
Kirby, she'll say, You were very good 
in that' — -and I know she means it. 

"Sometimes," Carol adds, "Chris has 
even told me to pause before delivering 
certain lines, to get a bigger laugh. And 
I try it, and it works." 

Of course, Carol and Christine clash 
occasionally. They fought bitterly about 
smoking. When Carol first saw her 
teen-age sister with a cigarette, not 
long ago, her reaction was not exactly 
calm and collected: "If I ever catch 
you smoking again, I'll shove the ciga- 
rette through your braces!" 

But Carol found out, as any parent 
could have told her, that hurling threats 
didn't work. So she gave her "permis- 
sion." What happened? Chris volun- 
tarily gave it up. "I'm not saying every 
parent should use that approach," 
warns Carol, "but it worked for me." 

The sisters also do not see eye-to-eye 
1 regarding money matters. Carol feels 
youthful Christine doesn't realize the 
8 value of money. "Christine gets an al- 
lowance of thirty dollars a month, and 
76 



it goes very fast," Carol groans. "Some- 
times she spends three months' allow- 
ance in one fell swoop. But I will say 
this: She has pretty good taste, and 
she shops around. She'll go and look 
and try on, and is terribly choosey. Me, 
if I see what I want — and it fits — I buy 
it. I hate to take the time out to do 
shopping." 

Christine also gets a dollar a week 
"spending money," independent of her 
monthly allowance. 

"My raising of Chris is superficial- 
ly analagous to my upbringing," Carol 
thoughtfully observes. "I was raised by 
my grandmother, Mae White, out in 
Los Angeles. She's a wonderful old 
lady, now 75. My parents — and Chris's 
— died young. So I was raised by my 
grandma. 

"But I must say there's a lot of differ- 
ence between my growing up and 
Chris's. First, I went to Hollywood High, 
a giant, public high school. She's in a 
private school with a much smaller 
student body — eighty students. Also, 
she gets an allowance for what she 
needs. I had to work." 

Carol worked like a beaver during 
high school, on weekends and holidays. 
She was an usherette (sixty -five cents 
an hour), worked in a movie box- 
office (seventy-five cents an hour). She 
also sold handbags in a shoe store dur- 
ing Christmas (seventy cents an hour, 
plus commissions). 

"Despite the difference in ages," says 
the now-college-educated clown, "Chris 
and I are both in what you might call 
the same generation. Yet the kids are 
different today. Perhaps it shouldn't be. 
But it's true. I guess human history re- 
peats in some ways. When I was Chris- 
tine's age, I remember my mother 
complaining about the 'younger gen- 
eration.' " 

Carol feels today's boys and girls are 
sharper, and harder to handle. That 
they're more "hip," but not necessarily 
more mature. "They catch on a lot 
faster," says the not-so-slow Miss Bur- 
nett. "Adults talk more freely in front 
of them. The movies are franker, and 
earthier. 

"But they're still teenagers," Carol 
avers. "What's 'mature'? If you're ma- 
ture, you can look at another person's 



point of view. Of course, Chris says she 
does, but often she doesn't. However, I 
don't expect teenagers — my sister in- 
cluded — to be mature." 

After closely watching the reactions 
of Chris and her friends, Carol is in- 
clined to think that she herself was 
more patient at that age. "But I never 
was mature at her age," she confesses. 
"Teenagers generally live in a world of 
their own." 

Carol keeps a watchful eye on the 
younger girl's social activities and 
plans. For example, what Chris will be 
doing on her free weekend is a matter 
of intense discussion. And, like all par- 
ents, Carol fights the ceaseless battle of 
the curfew. There are lots of disagree- 
ments as to when Christine has to be 
home from dates or from excursions 
with girl friends. 

Sometimes Christine is permitted to 
stay out until 1:30 a.m., but that's rare. 
Chris thinks her older sister is lenient 
and flexible in this area, and has gen- 
erously admitted: "Carol doesn't try to 
make up a bunch of rules and have me 
stick to them rigidly." 

When Christine is on a "free week- 
end," she stays with the busy Carol at 
her New York place, a three-and-a- 
half -room apartment, with a terrace, on 
East Fifty-Sixth Street. As Carol de- 
scribes it: "The walls are sparkling 
white, and there's lots of green — my 
favorite color — in the curtains and 
drapes. Chris and I both have lots of 
fun with my two dogs, 'Bruce' and 
'Fang.' " 

On vacation, the Burnett sisters try 
to spend a great deal of time together. 
This summer, they enjoyed three won- 
derful weeks at Merriwold, a private 
resort colony in the Catskills. Teen- 
aged Chris loved it there. The place 
abounded with dances, bonfires, swim- 
ming, boating, and male-chasing. 

Staying with the Burnett girls was a 
cousin of theirs from California, a 
freckled blonde sprite, Andrea. There 
was so much hectic social life at Mer- 
riwold, "mama" Carol had to set up a 
curfew schedule for Chris and Andrea 
which went something like this: During 
the week — 11 p.m.; Saturday-night 
dance — 1 a.m.; Sunday night — 11 p.m. 

Of course, there were some upsets. 



Carol recalls one night: "I was waiting 
for Chris to return from a Saturday 
dance. Came one a.m., no Chris. One- 
thirty a.m., still no sign of her. She 
didn't get home till well after two, and 
I was furious. So I punished her. The 
next four nights, she had to be home at 
ten o'clock. 

"Chris cried and ranted and insisted 
I was 'a villain.' But how else could I 
make her understand that I really 
meant those curfews?" As for Chris, 
her explanation of her extreme lateness 
that night was innocence itself, and 
teenager-ish as a triple-scoop ice-cream 
cone: "The dance was extremely dull, 
until about one a.m. — when a charming 
young fellow walked in. I just couldn't 
go home then." 

The summer had its laughs, as well as 
its quarrels. Chris and Andrea discov- 
ered that two young boys whom they 
liked were part of the colony's garbage 
detail. The "dreamboats" would come 
by every morning about 7 a.m. So Chris 
and Andrea would rouse themselves, 
wash, and put on make-up — just to be 
on hand when the boys came rattling 
by to collect the garbage. 

"After the boys stopped, and loaded 
the stuff on a truck, Chris and Andrea 
would go back to sleep," Carol recalls, 
with a slight chuckle over the way ro- 
mantic feelings could triumph over 
empty tin cans, decayed apple cores and 
chicken bones. 

The rest of the summer Chris spent 
with her grandma in Los Angeles, while 
Carol went to Europe — where she com- 
bined a vacation and some TV appear- 
ances on Chelsea At 9, a top variety 
program in England. She returned, a 
little after Labor Day, to prepare for 
The Garry Moore Show and hunt for a 
possible Broadway musical. She also 
worked on the album of Broadway 
show tunes, "Show Stoppers," for 
Decca. 

This coming summer, Chris will be of 
working age, and her big sister would 
like her to get a summer job. Carol puts 
it this way: "It'll be good for her. It'll 
give her a sense of accomplishment, and 
teach her to be on her own. Maybe she 
can be a junior counselor at camp. 
She'll also get to know the value of 



money." Chris agrees with Carol. 

As a big girl, Chris has been accused 
of packing in food like a truck driver 
after an all-night haul. She has a broad 
frame and sometimes tips the scale at 
143 pounds, though she is so tall that it 
hardly shows. Yet Chris insists, "I don't 
eat like a truck driver." 

Carol says calmly, "All teenagers do. 
She could afford to lose fifteen pounds 
easily. Chris says she tries. She goes on 
starvation diets. Stops eating complete- 
ly. But I'm against that, of course." 

Chris also has another glaring teen- 
age syndrome, "boythink." But she 
doesn't want to go "steady," doesn't be- 
lieve in it for teenagers. "I'm very 
fickle," she confesses. "That's the way 
a teenager should be. It's a time for fun 
and dating. This is important, in order 
to have a background to getting mar- 
ried. All the dating has to be in the 
past." 

Chris leads an active social life. At 
St. John's, there are school and class 
dances with music provided by records. 
But the authorities are quite strict 
about student behavior at these func- 
tions. The boys are invited to St. John's 
from nearby schools, but the visiting 
males constantly complain that the 
lights are so bright at these hops, they 
get "sunburnt." 

What about a career for Chris? Carol 
says: "I don't want to push off any par- 
ticular profession on her. I'm for her 
doing anything, short of being a thief. 
If she wants to be a housewife or an 
actress — whatever she wants is okay 
with me. But she has to be in earnest. 

"For a time, Chris wanted to be a 
social worker. But, lately, she's been 
worrying that she might take every case 
home with her, because she is the type 
that wants to put her whole heart and 
soul into something she does." 

Carol reveals that her kid sister is 
also fond of sociology and may pursue 
that in some form, professionally. Of 
course, Chris is going to college, after 
graduation from St. John's. Carol her- 
self studied drama and journalism at 
U.C.L.A. 

"My basic goal for Chris is simple," 
Carol sums up. "I want her to be happy. 
Isn't that what every parent's goal is?" 



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(Continued from page 41) 
her puppets, "Lamb Chop," "Charley 
Horse," "Wing Ding" and the others. 
Lamb Chop is a sweet, innocent char- 
acter and this is a part of Shari. Al- 
though she's been exposed to the heart- 
break and hardness of show business 
for ten years, she still enjoys and ap- 
preciates her audience and has no "show 
folk" pretensions. 

Wing Ding is a crow — a very crazy 
kind of crow who does a disappearing 
act in which he puts a cloth over his 
head, asks you to pull it away, then 
looks you in the face and asks, "Am I 
gone?" This is a kind of unrestrained 
humor very different from what Shari 
usually does. Because of the incredible 
amount of time that goes into a tele- 
vision program, her performance is very 
carefully planned and rehearsed. So 
Wing Ding is a reaction, a bid for free- 
dom of expression, against the restric- 
tions of the big clock on TV. 

Charley Horse is probably the "ex- 
perienced" Shari. He's a very knowing 
youngster and has been around. He 
knows all the old jokes. Shari can sit 
in front of television, watch a comic 
at work — and throw the punch lines be- 
fore the comic does. Charley is the 
Shari Lewis who has had to fight, and 
fight hard, to get ahead in show busi- 
ness. Show business is particularly dif- 
ficult for a woman, especially a cute, 
five-foot-no-inches type like Shari. 

Some evenings, she comes home de- 
pressed. Frequently, I find it's because 
she has been in conference with a 
heavy male type who thinks he must 
dominate a woman, particularly a petite 
one. On the other hand, she may come 
home, full of smiles, in a florist's de- 
livery truck. "I couldn't get a cab," she 
explains, "and I just asked this man if 
he were going my way." And this again 
is an expression of Lamb Chop's sim- 
ple faith in the friendliness of people. 

Our home is a reflection of our mu- 
tual tastes. The furnishings are modern, 
and golden-yellow carpeting and walls 
contrast with warm, dark earth colors. 
We live in a six-and-a-half-room 
apartment on Riverside Drive. This may 
sound spacious for two people, but we 
still manage to have a constantly full 
house. There is almost always a large 
assortment of puppets and props, pro- 
ducers and writers, around. 

Shari seldom has a chance to be the 
typical housewife, except in the eve- 
nings, when the maid and writers have 
gone home and she goes into the kitch- 
en to make dinner. And on weekends, 
when we pull out the phone plug and 
enjoy our wonderful privacy. A Satur- 
day or Sunday is like a whole vacation. 
In good weather, during the summer, 
we may go out on our boat. We came 
to get the boat rather curiously. We had 
been in California for some time and, 
when we got back, the building super- 
intendent asked us, "Why don't you 
come out on my boat some weekend?" 
We thought it sounded like a marvel- 
ous idea and. two weeks later, we 
bought one. It's been a source of great 
pleasure for us, and perfect relaxation. 

We talk a lot. We both wake up eas- 



ily. Neither of us requires one or two 
cups of coffee to make us livable. On 
any "work day," Shari dresses meticu- 
lously and loves to match her shoes and 
gloves and handbags. On a weekend, 
she wears slacks, a blouse and no 
make-up. This is the way I prefer it. 

Shari is bright — so bright that I 
sometimes think it's a pity she's not in- 
volved in something less ephemeral than 
show business. Living with her is a 
constant stimulation. And the fact that 
I've had a college education, and she 
hasn't, is often something of a handi- 
cap for me. 

"Now what," she will ask, "is lateral 
tolerance?" Or it may be a question on 
philosophy or literature. Shari assumes 
that I should know the answer. I fre- 
quently don't, and it's a little embar- 
rassing. But there is nothing embar- 
rassing for Shari in any discussion. Her 
quick intelligence is immediately evi- 
dent. 

Luckily, I have that background 
which makes it natural for me to both 
love and appreciate her. Although my 
father was a very successful advertising 
man, our women were no slouches, 
either. My mother is an excellent law- 
yer. One of my sisters is a successful 
magazine writer and the other, a house- 
wife, does social work with consider- 
able ability. I was brought up in a home 
where women were respected for their 
ability and intelligence. 

"Where do you want to go this eve- 
ing?" I ask. 

Shari answers — but then her intuitive 
mind tells her that I have something 
else in mind. The next few minutes 
may be a little difficult, for each is 
then trying to plan what he (or she) 
thinks will make the other happy. Yet, 
generally, Shari has so many perform- 
ance decisions to make during the 
course of an average day that I think 
she's happy to have me make the 
decisions around the house. 

It doesn't always please her. Shari 
now wants a dog and I have said no. 
This may make me sound cruel, but 
hear me out. In our three years of mar- 
riage, we have had many pets. We 
have had birds that have caught a draft 
by an open window and turned sick. 
We have had a collie — and it was then 
I learned that you must lead a dog's 
life as the master, if you live in the 
city. We also have had a charming 
little monkey, but he turned out to be 
strictly a "one -person" animal. 

That was during the time when Shari 
was doing the Hi, Mom show. The 
monkey and I would sit together and 
watch the show on television. He liked 
Shari's performance — but he didn't like 
her. One day, Shari was being inter- 
viewed by Life Magazine and she said, 
"Look at my lovely monkey," and the 
monkey took a real bite out of her! 
Nevertheless, we will soon have an- 
other animal in the house — for Shari, 
like Lamb Chop, still likes pets. 

It would be a lopsided picture of 
Shari if I showed only the Lamb Chop 
side. On the domestic front, she is very 
much of a woman and reminds me of 
our friend Kathryn Murray. Like Kath- 



ryn, Shari loves to cook. And the fancier 
the dish, the better. She enjoys sewing 
and is very proud of the appearance of 
our home. Her personal attitudes are 
basically mature. 

Goodness knows, Shari works hard 
enough and has gone far enough, 
career-wise, to deserve minks and dia- 
monds. But she has no craving for 
fancy trappings. If I buy Shari a nice, 
inexpensive little pin, she gets more 
pleasure from the trinket than many 
people get from rubies and diamonds. 
Neither of us requires the outward 
signs of success. 

For Shari, the basic values are built 
in. Her mother is a schoolteacher and 
her father a professor at Yeshiva Uni- 
versity — so, from childhood, she learned 
that worthwhile things don't necessar- 
ily come in fancy packages. Again, it is 
her own family which has contributed 
so much to her stability as a performer. 

People seldom talk about how terribly 
depressing show business can be, yet — 
as a television producer myself — I 
know there are many reasons which 
make this so. For example, a perform- 
ance can be just great, but the whole is 




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rejected for business reasons. It can be: 
"You were great, but we sold only sixty 
bars of soap." This is very depressing 
for the performer, because, if a show is 
rejected, she is rejected. 

Shari combats this by never being 
defeated. Shari's father is a kind of 
homey philosopher. One of his favorite 
expressions is: "Have faith and be of 
good courage." Actually, if you assume 
in your life that you can do something, 
it is a long step toward being able to 
do it. So a setback for Shari is not a 
total defeat — only a single step back- 
ward in the march forward. She is con- 
sistently wise, a friend I can turn to 
with a problem, and be sure of an in- 
telligent opinon. 

We have few conflicts. We don't agree 
on background music at home. I like to 
have the phonograph going and prefer 
classical music. Shari prefers silence. 
But this is about our major disagree- 
ment. She is as thoughtful as a wife can 
be — there are little gifts, an umbrella 
which arrives with rainy weather, a 
new pair of gloves when I need them 
but don't realize it. And, with each sur- 
prise, there is a note — usually signed by 
Lamb Chop or Hush Puppy or another 
of the puppets. 

Shari's thoughtfulness extends to 



friends, but she has a great handicap in 
that she is very near-sighted. Without 
glasses, she is almost blind and will 
walk by people she knows well. I've 
seen her lean into people trying to 
identify their features. Often she says 
hello to people she can't be sure she 
knows, because of her fuzzy vision. 
There is none of this business of "be- 
cause I'm in show business and you're 
not, you have to speak to me first." 

I worry about her "hitchhiking." Too 
often, in Manhattan, you read about a 
woman being beaten up for a few dol- 
lars in her purse. Yet, because it's 
sometimes hard to get a cab in front of 
our apartment building, Shari walks 
right up to a car stopping for a fight 
and asks, "If you're going downtown, 
may I ride with you?" 

This past September, she came home 
to tell me about some people who gave 
her a lift. "They seemed to have Rus- 
sian accents and they said they were 
going to the dock." I picked up the 
newspaper and showed her the front- 
page story about Khrushchev arriving 
in New York. She had apparently got 
into a limousine with some Russians 
who were on their way to meet Mr. K. 

I constantly ask Shari to stop thumb- 
ing rides, and she agrees. But then she 
will get caught in the rain, find it im- 
possible to get a cab — and she asks for 
a ride. To me, it is a sign of this extra- 
ordinary trust and faith she has in 
people. And, I have to admit, she proves 
that people are amazingly friendly. 

I don't think you have to explain 
why children love Shari. There is noth- 
ing phony about her interest in the 
younger set. I see it when we visit 
friends with children. They come to her 
as they would to a friend their own age. 
Shari keeps a bin of toys for children 
who visit us, and none ever leaves 
without a little gift. But adults are no 
small part of her audience, as proved 
by the fact that, this season, she has 
been appearing monthly on different 
nighttime variety shows. 

Shari's own reaction to working with 
other performers is almost that of a 
fan. She has come home to tell me, in 
excited terms, how sweet Max Liebman 
is, or about her interesting conversation 
with Hans Conried. For a long time, 
Shari and Burr Tillstrom corresponded, 
although they never met. Then, one 
day, Burr called from a hotel in New 
York and she invited him to dinner. 

Now, in a sense, she and Burr are 
competitors and both are important in 
the business. But Shari couldn't have 
been more excited if she were having a 
man from Mars to dinner. It was as if 
she were the president of a Burr Till- 
strom fan club. We all had a ball that 
evening. Burr brought along "Ollie" and 
"Kukla" and gave us a little show, and 
Shari gave Burr a performance with 
her puppets. And her whole feeling 
was, "Isn't this fun?" 

I suppose when you get down to the 
basic question — "What is Shari Lewis 
really like?" — you're up against some- 
thing more complex than even a hus- 
band can answer. To me, Shari is just 
so talented, so bright and so wonderful, 
she almost seems to be a product of the 
enchanting world of puppets she has 
created. 




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TV 



RADIO 
MIRROR 



FEBRUARY, 1961 



MIDWEST EDITION 



Vol. 55, No 



, 



Ann Mosher, Editor 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 

Lorraine Girsch, Associate Editor 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Eunice Field, West Coast Representative 



STORIES OF THE STARS 

TV's Favorite Bachelors Choose the Most Glamorous Women in the World 9 

Built-in Happiness (Keith Larsen) by Steve Kahn 14 

Mr. and Mrs. John Smith of the Hollywood Hills 16 

20 
22 
24 
26 

Nilesland, U.S.A. (Wendell Niles of It Could E You) 28 

30 
32 



Accent on Truth (Michael Ingram of Young Doctor Malone) ... .by Frances Kish 

He Fell in Love With His Press Agent (Mark Goddard) by Dora Albert 

All the Way to Hawaii (Bob Conrad) by Bill Kelsay 

A Castle for Alan King by Martin Cohen 



Gardner McKay Makes the Grade by Joseph H. Conley Jr. 

My Wife, Shirley Bonne by Ronald Freemoml 

First for TV! Royalty Sponsors an International Festival 

(Prince Rainier and Princess Grace) by Herbert Kamm 34 

A Tough Team to Beat (Paul Picerni, Nicholas Georgiade, Abel Fernandez of 

The Untouchables) by Kathleen Post 36 

All This — and Ellen too! (Patricia Bruder of As The World Turns) 

by Alice Francis 40 

Eddy Arnold Has a Farm by Helen Bolstad 42 

A Family With Flair ( Dick Van Dyke I by Charlotte Barclay 46 



SPECIAL MIDWEST STORIES 

Expedition! St. Louis (Bruce Hay ward of KTVI-TV) ,. 49 

Experience Is the Best Teacher (Doris Junod of CKLW-TV) 50 

Round Man of Sound (Mike Russell of KIRL) 52 

Here's Uncle Wally (Wally Nehrling of WIRE) 54 



FUN AND SERVICE FEATURES 

What's New on the East Coast by Peter Abbott 4 

What's New on the West Coast by Eunice Field 6 

Beauty: Starring Hands (Bess Myerson) by June Clark 48 

Movie Immortals on TV: Jackie Cooper — Perennial Success by Leon Rice 56 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 64 

Information Booth 78 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 84 

Cover portrait oj Robert Stack, courtesy of ABC 



BUY YOUR MARCH ISSUE EARLY • ON SALE FEBRUARY 2 



Published Monthly by Mctcfadden Publi- 
iio cations, Inc., Executive, Advertising, and 

Editorial Offices at 205 E. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. Editorial Branch Office, 321 
S. Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif. Irving 
S. Manheimer, President; Lee Andrews, 
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Meyer Dworkin, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. Advertising offices also in Chicago, 
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Foreign editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
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Re-entered as Second Class matter, June 28, 1954, at the 



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3, 1879. Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., 
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© 1961 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. All rights 
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Music to charm TV viewers — courtesy of Gloria Lynne, Harry Belafonte. 




At night club: Audrey Meadows, Anthony Quinn, Elizabeth Seal, Ina Balin. 




Tommy Sands' right-hand "man" — when it comes to interviews — wife Nancy. 



WHAT'S 
NEW 

ON THE 
EAST 

COAST 



by PETER ABBOTT 



Up, Boy: Networks plunging into new 
year frantically looking for new story 
ideas. Take this exclusive item: CBS 
passed $200,000 to an independent pro- 
ducer who brought in merely a title 
and idea — the series to be set in the 
B.C. period of Rome and to be called 
The Gladiators. Authentic in detail it 
will be, but the plots will be "cowboy 
and Indian." Bob Mathias up for con- 
sideration as one of the young heroes. 
. . . Thomas Cronin, Princess Margaret's 
ex-butler, crowns a glorious career 
with a bit role in Hong Kong. . . . Mark 
Rydell, who played drunk Jeff Baker 
in As The World Turns, was written out 
of the script. But viewers flooded the 
mail with pleas for his return and he is 
being woven back into the series — still 
drunk. . . . Bess Myerson dating base- 
ball's Hank Greenberg. . . . Pat Suzuki 
and husband-photographer Mark Shaw 
had them a male blessing. . . . The big 
Bobby Darin special on Jan. 31 will in- 
clude Bob Hope and young singer 
Joanie Sommers. Joanie gets big ex- 
posure, working with Bobby through- 
out the show, but let's clear the air 
on one thing: She is not, as reported, 
a Darin protege — even if Darin were 
old enough to have a protege. Although 
she digs Bobby's singing, they have met 
only casually and she was, in fact, 
auditioned and cast for the show while 
Darin was in Italy. And how about that 
whirlwind marriage of Darin and 
Sandra Dee, right on top of their en- 
gagement announcement? That's a lot 
of talent for one couple! 

Suddenly Gloria: Belafonte's pro- 
ducer went down to the jazz mecca, 
Birdland, to hear Gloria Lynne. That 
night, Bill Russo's group ran overtime 
and left Gloria with only enough time 
for two numbers — not long enough to 




Polly Bergen makes like February between Jan (Murray) and (Hal) March. 



really warm up. But Gloria's manager, 
Monte Kay, talked the Belafonte people 
into another audition at 11 a.m. in Bird- 
land, when the club was empty. Harry, 
in person, showed up half asleep. He 
listened, began snapping his fingers 
and, in the end, stood up and cheered. 
Gloria was scheduled for five numbers 
and got guest star billing. And so a star 
was born. "That Harry," she says, "he 
looks beautiful. He is beautiful. He 
makes you feel so relaxed and he's such 
a good director." On his November 
spec, the public saw Harry in a tie and 
jacket for the first time. "And I did it 
all for you," he told Gloria. . . . You 
can't put a finger on her style. There's 
a bit of Ella — she toured with the great 
Fitzgerald; a bit of gospel, for she sang 
many years with the A.M.E. Zion 
Church. And there's the sound musi- 
cianship of a gal who has had five years 
of concert training. Divorced, Gloria 
lives alone in New York with a TV set. 
She says, "Just watching TV, you never 
know how hard it can be. My manager 
said, 'Only Belafonte could get you to 
the studio so early.' But when it was 
over, I felt suddenly sad." 

In and Out: Making the Manhattan 
rounds: Connie Francis and Jack Scott. 
Connie makes the Jack Benny special, 
next month on CBS. . . . Merv Griffin 
spouted angrily when pushed — clothes 
and all — into a swimming pool. "I 
wouldn't have minded if it had been the 
shallow end," he blubbered. "I can't 
swim." . . . Gertrude Berg and Sir 
Cedric Hardwicke, having hit it off so 
well in their 'hit play, "A Majority of 
One," will co-star in the TV series, 
Mama's A Freshman. Filming begins in 
June. . . . Tillman Franks, who survived 



the car crash that killed Johnny Hor- 
ton, is trying to talk Johnny's wife into 
working under his managerial direc- 
tion. Odd thing about Johnny: Although 
he was a wonderful father and husband, 
he always asked reporters not to men- 
tion that he was married. Right up to 
his untimely death, he believed that 
public knowledge of his domestic life 
would hurt his popularity with record 
buyers. . . . Robert Young, who thought 
he knew best, is already feeling restless 
in his retirement and is getting ready 
a new series for CBS — another warm, 
human comedy. . . . Dwayne Hickman 
privately working on a club act which 
he plans to get on the road in April, 
when the shooting of Dobie Gillis lets 
up. His effectiveness with comedy 
monologues has one hipster predicting 
Dwayne as "the Bob Hope of the fu- 
ture." 

The Breakthrough: At press time, 
Goodson-Todman didn't have a title 
for their new audience-participation 
show which replaces Dough Re Mi. But 
they had the format and star, Art 
James, who has been associated with 
Hugh Downs on Concentration. "I'm a 
different type from Hugh," Art says. 
"I'm a non-intellectual. Don't read 
much. Mostly engaged in outward pur- 
suits, and kind of a golf nut." Born of 
immigrants, he spoke Russian before 
English. He was graduated from Wayne 
University, worked in Detroit radio, 
married actress Jane Hamilton, and 
came to N.Y.C. in '58. "Jane has our 
two children to care for. One is three, 
and the girl is a baby, so Jane hasn't 
had much time to flex her dramatic 
muscles — although she made some 
Oldsmobile (Continued on page 70) 



Far What's New an the West Coast, See Page 6 




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It relieves cramps, eases head- 
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Two beautiful blondes — singer Shirley Jones, little Linda Breese, 1961 poster 
girl — are featured in "What About Linda?", TV spec for March of Dimes. 



WHAT'S 

NEW 

ON THE 

WEST 

COAST 



by EUNICE FIELD 




TV's Chuck Connors finally has girl 
in Rifleman — pretty Joan Taylor. 




Popular singer Frankie Vaughan likes 
U.S. — but misses English wife (above). 



Beware, Young Lovers: Dangers of a 
movie romance were highlighted by 
Dana Andrews on the "Madison Ave- 
nue" set. The script called for a kiss on 
the cheek and a nibble of the pretty ear 
of co-star Jeanne Crain. Dana was faith- 
fully following directions when sud- 
denly he began to cough and wheeze. 
There was a small panic until someone 
gave him a pound on the back, pro- 
ducing the cause of the spasm — one 
of Jeanne's earrings! Whereupon he 
regaled the cast with the sad story of 
his first movie kiss during the filming 
of "Berlin Correspondent," in 1941. Re- 
cipient of this buss was Virginia Gil- 
more. The pair clinched. The director 
yelled "Cut!" The cameramen began 
moving to the next set. But Dana and 
Virginia remained fixed in their em- 
brace. This mystery was solved when 
it was learned that both stars were 
wearing retaining braces on their teeth 
and, somehow, these had locked and 
couldn't be pried apart. A dentist had 
to be summoned to separate the pair. 
"See this on my lip," Dana wryly point- 
ed to a tiny scar. "That's, where I got 
nicked, had to be bandaged and was 
out of the picture for two weeks." 

The Measure of Success: When 
Jimmy Shigeta refused to sign a seven- 
year contract with Warners, he was re- 
placed as one of the leads in Hawaiian 
Eye by Bob Conrad . . . and, for the 
benefit of those who have been won- 
dering how Bob got the Oriental- 
sounding tag of Lopaka, that's how. It 
was originally meant for Jimmy. Now 
in Japan starring in "Bridge to the 
Sun," Jimmy is slated to do the lead 
in "Flower Drum Song." On meeting 
the great Japanese star of stage and 
screen, Sessue Hayakawa, Jimmy mar- 
veled, "I can't get over how young and 
vital you look. What's the formula?" 



Hayakawa's face became a mask of 
Oriental meditation as he replied, "In 
the West, a man's success is counted by 
his material goods. Here in the East, 
there are people who count themselves 
lucky if they have one bowl of rice each 
day. But, at the height of my success, 
I found that eating two bowls of rice a 
day would keep me young and vigor- 
ous. In a sense, that's the measure of 
material success — that extra bowl of 
rice." 

Call Me Kayo: The cast and crew of 
Checkmate have been spoofed for some 
time by bearded Sebastian Cabot. It 
seems he has latched on to a gold medal 
engraved "Winner 1940 Olympics, Box- 
ing," and he wears it on his watch chain 
as a fob. This has started a legend that 
Mr. C. is a tough hombre with his dukes 
and Cabot has mischievously given life 
to the legend by acknowledging intro- 
ductions with a gruff "Call me Champ." 
The truth is that there never was a 
1940 Olympics. It was cancelled out 
because of the war. But, until he gets 
his comeuppance, jolly Mr. C. is having 
his laughs bullying and strutting like 
John L. Sullivan. . . . Room with a 
View: The itchiest feet in television be- 
long to Mari Blanchard of Klondike. 
Mari only turned to acting as an easy 
way to see the world, going from loca- 
tion to location. The trick worked. She 
had actually seen sixteen countries be- 
fore going into the series and marrying 
Reese Taylor Jr. When her marriage 
faltered, Mari grew restless again and, 
as a stopgap cure, bought a new home. 
"I bought it for the view," she sighs, 
"but I soon saw that, to certain tourists, 
I was the view." This led to an invest- 
ment of $2000 for drapes to cover the 
wall-wide picture window. And now 
Mari is itching to move again. With the 
drapes shut against peepers, she hasn't 




Setting his sights on a future musical 
is John Raitt, who also loves TV work. 



had much chance to enjoy her view. 
So, whether the series is renewed or 
not, Mari's desire is to be only a part- 
timer and to sandwich appearances on 
the show with jaunts to hither and yon. 

Dimpled Dynamite: Cute and gifted 
Susan Oliver has no regrets about turn- 
ing down the choice role of Claudia in 
the proposed TV series of the same 
name. "I just didn't feel it was right 
for me. But I'll admit I'd love doing a 
series and hope the right one comes 
along soon." As a result of being ac- 
costed on the street by a wolf on the 
prowl, blonde Susan has decided to 
take up the art of karate, an ancient 
Oriental form of self-defense akin to 
judo. Inspiration for this came from 
none other than Elvis Presley. "The day 
after I was bothered by that masher," 
smiles Susan, "I met Elvis at the Wil- 
liam Morris Agency and told him what 
happened. He showed me how he could 
break a board with one stroke of his 
hand. I immediately signed up with his 
karate instructor. Elvis was so funny. 
When he saw me taking my lesson, he 
said, 'If it ever gets out that I've been 
advising pretty girls to go in for karate, 
their boy friends are going to make me 
target for the day.' " 

Tea-Time in Old Blighty: Though 
he has a term contract at 20th-Fox and 
another with the Dunes Hotel in Las Ve- 
gas, England's top pop singer, Frankie 
Vaughan, has no intention of moving 
to this country. Starring in "The Right 
Approach," Frankie has several reasons 
for continuing to make his home in a 
London suburb. Firstly, his wife and 
two children are happy where they are; 
secondly, Frankie feels the British fans 
who gave him stardom might be hurt 
if he moved to another country. "Most 



Busy, busy, busy — that's pert 'n' 
pretty Connie Stevens these days. 



of all, I'm too used to our English ways," 
says Frankie. Asked how these differ 
from American ways* he crinkles his 
brows in thought. "Here's an example. 
In order to get some privacy, certain 
American entertainers, I hear, have 
built high fences around their homes. 
But back home, when fans invade our 
property, we invite them in for a cup 
of tea. It usually calms them down and, 
I must say, they come up with some 
wonderful ideas on the songs I ought 
to sing. . . ." 

Before and After: This is the plight 
of Joan Taylor, a fast-rising luminary 
of TV. Happily married in real life and 
the efficient mother of two, Joan has 
been cast both as the deceased wife of 
Robert Taylor in a segment of The De- 
tectives and also as the general-store 
owner in The Rifleman, who looms as 
the romantic interest of Chuck Connors 
and, by implication, his wife-to-be. 

The Boys in the Back Room: The 
male contingent of TV stars far out- 
number the female on the Warners' lot 
and, for relaxation during lunch breaks, 
they've been having a few friendly 
rounds of poker. It was strictly stag 
until wide-eyed Dorothy Provine asked 
to be taught the game. "Sure," said 
Jack Kelly with a tolerant wink at the 
others. "We'll let you in." By agree- 
ment, stakes were low for the first ses- 
sion and Dot was given every oppor- 
tunity. As a result, she won. But when 
she continued to win with ease and 
cunning, the boys began to suspect they 
were being suckered. So, at this writ- 
ing, Warners' big problem with its he- 
man stars is not higher salaries but 
how to keep one pip of a blonde from 
getting in the card game and diverting 
her toward (Continued on page 62) 




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\^ DIE-HARDS 

DON'T DARE! 



Who'd ever think you'd see a divided 
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Who'd ever think that girls could dye 
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used to color their lips? Who'd ever 
think that eye make-up would be the 
daytime craze of the '60s? 

Who'd have ever thought — twenty-five 
years ago — that millions of girls would be 
using billions of Tampax. 

Only die-hards don't dare! Tampax® 
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And a package of 10 costs only 45^ in 
your choice of any absorbency: Regular, 
Super or Junior. 

Don't be a die-hard ! Join the millions 
who do use Tampax. You'll be more 
than glad you did. 



For What's New On The East Coast. See Page 4 



TAMPAX 



Incorporated, 
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ME VIOSI 







GLAMOROUS WOME 






IN THE WORLD 



He™* 



We 



e gave them no rules, no definitions, no hints. They were completely on their own. 
All we asked them to do was to name "The Most Glamorous Women in the World" . . 
and then tell us — in no uncertain words — why. 
Here are the results, direct to TV Radio Mirror, from the pens of Hollywood's 
most exciting new leading men . . . all of them good judges of womanhood, as any 

man should be. 

The results . . ? Well, some may surprise you, some may please you, and some 

may puzzle you. But when you put them all together, one thing becomes 

pretty obvious: When you try to get men to agree on a subject like 

women . . . well, it just can't be done! 



( nnlinin'il 





Grace Kelly — now Princess of 
Monaco (see page 34), formerly 
one of Hollywood's loveliest 
stars and winner of an "Oscar" 
for her acting talents— is the 
selection of Tom Tryon, hand- 
some, jaunty "John Slaughter" 
of TV's Walt Disney Presents. 






Tom Tryon asks wistfully: "I 
wonder how many young males 
like myself sat there, eating 
their hearts out, when the an- 
nouncement came through that 
Grace Kelly was to leave the 
realm of possibility? She was 
going to become a princess, and 
poof. — there went that dream. 

"But I don't give up easily. I 
can still daydream, can't I? She's 
still the most glamorous of all of 
them, for my money (which isn't 
a lot; about $3.75 right now). 

"There was a girl with class. 
Those white gloves, you know? 
Man, they told the whole story, 
those white gloves. I have to 
agree: A girl who wears those 
and can do it like she did, with- 
out being or looking self-con- 
scious . . . well, she deserves to 
find a husband! 

"I'm just mad she married 
somebody else, while I sit here 
eating my heart out! Ah, well, 
we all have to do our bit for 
international diplomacy. 

"I'll tell you another reason 
why I think she's the most 
glamorous girl of them all. Can 
you imagine anyone calling her 
'Grade'? Kind of does something 
to you, doesn't it? Like, akkkkkl 
In fact, it's hard to think of any- 
one not calling her Princess 
Grace, from the time she was a 
little girl. 

"Maybe now you can see why 
it's going to be hard for me to 
settle down in a little house in 
West Covina. I don't know if 
I'll ever be coming down out of 
the clouds ... or if I want to, 
either. I'm too young to trade 
glamour in for dishpans and 
diapers, don't you think? 

"You don'tV 



THE MOST GLAMOROUS 



10 




Gardner McKay observes: "I 
don't believe, in the first place, 
that The Most Glamorous Wom- 
an in the World could ever be 
someone, 'new' — an overnight 
sensation, as it were. No, she 
must be someone whom the 
whole world has accepted. 

"At first. I was tempted to list 
Greta Gar bo; she fits that defini- 
tion. But I was swayed by the 
magic longevity of tne glamour 
of Miss Ingrid Bergman. No mat- 
ter what happens to her, person- 
ally, publicly, or any other -ly, 
she still seems to have that last- 
ing glamour which grows and 
matures and becomes even more 
rare with the passing seasons. 

"This is Miss Bergman. 

"Perhaps I'm a bit partial to 
the Scandinavian stock; I'm not 
sure. Miss Garbo has, of course, 
many of these same qualities, 
too. 

"But it's that serene face, with 
its melting eyes, which becomes 
so devastating. And the air of 
mystery about her, too. Some- 
thing we often associate with the 
Oriental, but Miss Bergman has 
it: A dignity and maybe even* a 
little pride in being a member of 
the human race. 

"My, but I bet this all sounds 
esoteric! 

"I don't mean to be. But it 
seems that it would be very 
obvious for me to say things like 
'Ingrid Bergman would win the 
Miss Universe pageant tomor- 
row' (which she could — or 
should) . 

"It's those eyes. Whenever 
they turn in your direction, you 
know that they're aiming only 
at you — and, at that moment, 
nothing else matters." 




Ingrid Bergman, another film 
beauty, who has won two Acad- 
emy Awards, is the dream princess 
of Gardner McKay — who flutters 
many a feminine heart himself, 
and is steadily improving as an 
actor on ABC-TV's Adventures 
In Paradise (see story, page 30). 



WOMEN IN THE WORLD 



Continued 



11 





Eva Gabor — most serious actress 
of the three Hungarian sisters 
whose name has become an inter- 
national synonym for glamour — 
is the charming choice of Roger 
Perry, whose own charm illumi- 
nates the role of Pat O'Brien's 
legal-beagle son, over ABC-TV. 



Roger Perry answered: "Mmm, 
yes! All right, my idea of the 
most, most glamorous gal I ever 
met is Miss Eva Gabor. And 
'gal' is just about the most inac- 
curate word I could have chosen, 
isn't it? Let's re-word that so it 
comes out 'woman — all woman.' 

"I think I probably had just 
about as wrong an opinion of 
Miss Gabor as anyone might, 
anyone who's read all the car- 
razy things they say she's said 
and done. Which is fine . . . I'm 
not knocking that; she is a little 
bit crazy. 

"But there's a lot more to Miss 
Gabor, too. First of all, the first 
time I met her (it was in the line 
of duty, 1 promise you; we were 
both filming a segment of Har- 
rigan & Son— plug!), I was just 
overwhelmed by her beauty. If 
you think she's beautiful in pic- 
tures, you should see her in per- 
son. Garrumph! It just likes to 
knock a sane man down on his 
knees! 

"Time for a quick recovery, a 
glass of cool water, then plunge 
ahead: She's charming. Maybe 
I'm an A-number-one, typical, 
young, naive American sap, but 
there's a kind of radiance about 
Miss Gabor and you just find 
yourself standing there, grinning 
your fool head off while she's 
talking to you. It's her charm 
that does it. 

"And furthermore: She has a 
great sense of humor, once you 
break through the dialect jazz. 
She really does. For instance 
and as a matter of fact, she told 
me she 'loved working on the 
Pat O'Brien serious.' I know that 
may be hard to figure out, but it 
kind of grows on you. Inscruta- 
ble, that's what she is. 

"And mad . . . completely mad 
and lovable and . . . what's the 
word? Glamorous? You bet!" 



THE MOST GLAMOROUS 




Rod Taylor sums up succinctly, 
"Answer: Sophia Loren. Rea- 
sons: Five of them. 

"One. Dignity. For all the pub- 
licity ordeals — and all the photo- 
graphing — she's had to go 
through, Miss Loren still has 
managed to preserve a great deal 
of dignity. That's quite unusual, 
especially for foreign-born stars, 
who lately seem to have to be 
recognized almost exclusively 
for the amount of clothing 
they're not wearing. Regardless 
of what she is or isn't wearing, 
Sophia Loren has dignity. 

"Tiuo. Femininity. This isn't as 
obvious a comment as you might 
think. Surely, she's feminine, but 
it isn't easy to combine her fem- 
ininity with the tremendous 
force of her personality. And, in 
spite of the hard-driving quality 
she has about her, she still re- 
mains soft and feminine. 

"Three. Beauty. Of course, this 
is one of the primary requisites 
to being glamorous. And Miss 
Loren is a beauty of the first 
rank. She had to be, to be picked 
out of the hundreds upon hun- 
dreds of starlets surrounding any 
movie colony, and to have maga- 
zine editors clamoring for her 
latest stills. 

"Four. Sex. No mystery about 
this. Miss Loren is one of that 
very elite group of ladies whom 
we used to call 'pin-ups.' She is, 
without doubt, near the top of 
any red-blooded male's list of 
dream women. 

"Five. Mystery. And, with it 
all, the feeling that there's some- 
thing immutable about her. The 
eternal feminine; the woman 
that man can never wholly know. 
That's the intriguing part of it 
. . . the extra excitement . . . 
which makes Sophia Loren the 
most glamorous woman in the 
world!" 




Sophia Loren, Italy's gift to 
the American screen (but, thus 
far, a "holdout" from TV), is 
the well-documented selection of 
Rod Taylor — Australia's gift to 
American television, seen each 
week as the star of the hour- 
long series called Hong Kong. 



WOMEN IN THE WORLD 



Continued on page 74 



page 74 ^ 





14 



Prettiest wife that any man could wish, Vera Miles is 
not only a talented .actress but a confirmed "homebody." 

Keith is Drake Andrews in The Aquanauts, seen on CBS-TV, Wed., 
7:30 to 8:30 P.M. EST, sponsored by Kellogg Company, Carter 
Products, Kent Cigarettes, Vick Chemical Co., General Foods. 



Exclusive! Four heartwarming reasons 
why Keith Larsen of The Aquanauts 
took his most daring, most rewarding 
dive — into the seas of matrimony 

by STEVE KAHN 







Keith could be caroling, "Are there any more at 
home like you?" And Vera could reply: "Yes — three!" 



Two little blondes — one ten, the other seven — 
rushed up to the tall, strapping visitor. He 
towered over them, but leaned down for their 
affectionate embraces. You could see the spark 
between the man and the girls. They didn't sim- 
ply like this man; they loved him. 

Suddenly, in chorus, the two girls sang out: 
"When are you marrying Mommy?" The question 
— which was asked, just as subtly, every time the 
visitor came over to their house — was one to 
which they never expected an immediate answer. 
They realized that one day, probably one day 
soon, they would have their answer. 

The answer came last July 16, a sun-splashed 
Saturday to which Keith Larsen was looking for- 
ward with all the eager anticipation of a man in 
love. That evening he was taking her — Vera 
Miles — to the theater. For a change, they were 
leaving the kids— her kids — at home. There were 







a 



Wm 



@®i 9Z. 



sS 





All the barefoot comforts of home — snug harbor, indeed, for the seagoing, skindiving hero of this season's Aquanauts. 



Raiding the cookie jar before the kids empty it! Vera 
is an excellent cook — Keith, an appreciative consumer. 



three of them. Debbie, ten, and Kelly, seven — the 
little marriage brokers — and Mike, three, and a 
confirmed bachelor. Usually, the children chap- 
eroned Keith and Vera, but, on this occasion, they 
were getting the night off. 

. Keith woke up early and called Vera; her voice 
was the most effective wake-me-up tonic he could 
think of. His bachelor diggings were in their 
usual state of suspended animation. Vera, sus- 
pecting same, invited him over for breakfast. 
"Okay," he agreed, "but I'll bring my clothes 
over, so I can spend the day at the pool and then 
change without having to go home." 

They ate a hearty breakfast prepared by Vera, 
one of Hollywood's most accomplished and ardent 
chefs, then adjourned to the pool. The kids were 
inside the house, dressing to join some of their 
playmates for the Saturday matinee. Keith was 
lounging at the poolside, (Continued on page 71) 




Mr. and Mrs. Smith oft 




No handsomer couple exists in GlamouTville than ac- 
tor John Smith and actress Luana Patten, who — 
since their marriage a few months ago — have been 
sampling the joys of "living happily ever after." Their 
house, high in the hills, gives them a sun-drenched view 
of the fabulous vista of Los Angeles by day and a stun- 
ning light-spattered panorama by night. They typify a 
new brand of Hollywood star and, for many reasons, 
consider 1961 their year. 

Tall, blond and handsome John Smith is a perfect 
symbol of Hollywood today. The community has changed 
over the years, has given up the reckless abandon of 
earlier days. The glamour of show business, the lure of 
dvernight fame are as strong as ever, but the new stars 
are saner, more serious, more mature. 

The road to the top is tougher these days. Gone are 
the astronomical tax-free weekly salaries. Today's star 
doesn't stop when he hires a press agent. He arms him- 
self with a ousiness agent, as well. The reason? He's seen 
too many of yesteryear's carefree, high-living stars 





the Hollywood Hills 




The higher the better is John's specification 
for his dream house. So Laramie's star and 
his beautiful Luana live very close to heaven 










■► 



Mr. and Mrs. Smith 



(Continued) 

plummet quickly from success to hard times. 

Smith's career is a good example of modern 
ways to stardom. Seven short years ago, he was 
trying to break in as an actor, selling used cars, 
deep-freeze units and dinnerware on the side, to 
survive. He lived in a small apartment with three 
other struggling young actors. In 1953, he got his 
first major break when he played the young 
honeymooner in the movie "The High and the 
Mighty." John left the apartment and leased a 
house, again sharing it With a group of young 
actors. When jobs were scarce, he worked install- 
ing TV antennas. 

"I finally had to move to a small apartment by 
myself," John says. "I was getting into debt all 
the time from 'subsidizing' my pals." About this 
time, he began getting regular acting roles, and 
got caught up in the Hollywood social whirl. "By 
1956, I was nine thousand dollars in debt." 



John and Luana rig fishnet to decorate poolside patio. 





The two love to spend quiet evenings at home, ofte 



John's big break came in 1957, when NBC-TV 
cast him in one of the three regular starring roles 
in Cimarron City. He at once acquired a business 
manager. "Within a year's time, my business 
manager, Fred Barman, had me out of debt," 
Smith says gratefully. John then moved into a 
house in the Hollywood Hills with a lease and an 
option to buy. 

In 1959, John went from a starring role in 
Cimarron City to a starring role in the same net- 
work's Laramie series. And this one was tailored 
specifically for him. 

With his career fully on its way, John did what 
he had always wanted to do — bought a home high 
in the Hollywood Hills. The house is a ranch-type 
with three bedrooms and three baths. It sits on 
one acre of land. There is a large kidney-shaped 
swimming pool, and the view over Hollywood in- 
cludes the NBC Studios in Burbank and the 
Revue Studios where Laramie is filmed. 

While his home, his car, his eighteen-foot cabin 
cruiser are all unmistakable symbols of success, 
John doesn't throw money around. "One of the 
first things my business manager did was to put 
me on a budget," John says. "Till I was married, 
for instance, I lived on fifty dollars a week to 
cover food, laundry and entertainment. Now- 
adays, you have to think of the future. I'm in- 
vesting so that I'll always have something to fall 
back on. I've already bought several acres of 
desert property." 

John and Luana are having a wonderful time 
making their home a warm and charming reflec- 
tion of their own personalities, but by no means 
are they splurging. As John sums it up: "I man- 
aged to live when I was making thirty-two dol- 
lars a week in 1952. We certainly can live within 
our means now." A sound, sensible philosophy! 

John Smith stars as Slim Sherman in Laramie, seen on NBC-TV, 
Tuesday, 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. EST, under multiple sponsorship. 

18 





pit their wits against each other at chess. Luana collects miniature teacups. Here's one John bought for her. 



Cabin cruiser can be towed easily by car to lake or sea. With them go Juan and Sahib — their devoted canine "family." 




Mr. and Mrs. Smith 



(Continued) 

plummet quickly from success to hard times. 

Smith's career is a good example of modern 
ways to stardom. Seven short years ago, he was 
trying to break in as an actor, selling used cars, 
deep-freeze units and dinnerware on the side, to 
survive. He lived in a small apartment with three 
other struggling young actors. In 1953, he got his 
first major break when he played the young 
honeymooner in the movie "The High and the 
Mighty." John left the apartment and leased a 
house, again sharing it with a group of young 
actors. When jobs were scarce, he worked install- 
ing TV antennas. 

"I finally had to move to a small apartment by 
myself," John says. "I was getting into debt all 
the time from 'subsidizing' my pals." About this 
time, he began getting regular acting roles, and 
got caught up in the Hollywood social whirl. "By 
1956, I was nine thousand dollars in debt." 



John and Luana rig fishnet to decorate poolside patio. 





The two love to spend quiet evenings at home, often I ft ^ e ' r w '* s a 9 a ' nST eacn °™er at chess. 




ana collects miniature teacups 



e John bought for her. 



John's big break came in 1957, when NBC-TV 
cast him in one of the three regular starring roles 
in Cimarron City. He at once acquired a business 
manager. "Within a year's time, my business 
manager, Fred Barman, had me out of debt," 
Smith says gratefully. John then moved into a 
house in the Hollywood Hills with a lease and an 
option to buy. 

In 1959, John went from a starring role in 
Cimarron City to a starring role in the same net- 
work's Laramie series. And this one was tailored 
specifically for him. 

With his career fully on its way, John did what 
he had always wanted to do — bought a home high 
in the Hollywood Hills. The house is a ranch-type 
with three bedrooms and three baths. It sits on 
one acre of land. There is a large kidney-shaped 
swimming pool, and the view over Hollywood in- 
cludes the NBC Studios in Burbank and the 
Revue Studios where Laramie is filmed. 

While his home, his car, his eighteen-foot cabin 
cruiser are all unmistakable symbols of success, 
John doesn't throw money around. "One of the 
first things my business manager did was to put 
me on a budget," John says. "Till I was married, 
tor instance, I lived on fifty dollars a week to 
cover food, laundry and entertainment. Now- 
adays, you have to think of the future. I'm in- 
l?2 ne ^^ m alwavs ha ve something to fall 
mck on. Ive already bought several acres of 
desert property." 

mf^ n a ? d . L , uan a are having a wonderful time 
h™ Al "" home a warm an <* charming reflec- 
ai.J\u , own Personalities, but by no means 
apL t?i- plur i ing - M John sums it up: "I man- 
far, a «,T e - w ^ en J was making thirty-two dol- 
our ll ek m 1952 - We certainty can live within 
our means now." A sound, sensible philosophy ! 

y - 7 - 30 t0 8:3 ° P-M. EST, under multiple sponsorsh.p. 
18 



Cabin cruiser can be towed easily by car to lake or sea. With them go Juan and Sahib— their devoted 





Voice of America proved he'd learned enough of 
his adopted language — and land — to help broad- 
cast the truth overseas. Now he carries a tape 
recorder and queries people everywhere, In order 
to capture the typically American point of view. 








Fans write that they find his way of speech "fascinating." 

Stefan Koda of Young Doctor Malone 
is Michael Ingram in person. The 
European-born actor means what he says 
on TV — and the accent is his own 



by FRANCES KISH 

Letters from pans of Dr. Stefan Koda (of NBC-TV's 
Young Doctor Malone) invariably remark on the 
doctor's charming Old World accent. "I never heard 
such a well-done accent," one woman wrote recently. 
"You must have worked a long time to sound so foreign 
—and fascinating," another commented. "Somehow, 
people assume I am taking on an accent," says Michael 
Ingram, who plays Dr. Koda. "In reality, it is my 
own. A mixture of my German background, fused 
with other cultures to which I have been exposed, 
particularly that of this country. It would be difficult 
now to trace it exactly." 

When Michael first went into acting, on radio, 
as a young boy not too long out of Berlin, a heavy 
accent was the rule for German roles. "A certain 
stereotype was insisted upon," he says. "Probably to 
get across immediately to the listener that a German 
was speaking. Actors who played German roles all 
spoke in this stereotyped way. (Continued on page 60 ) 

Young Doctor Malone is produced by Carol Irwin over NBC-TV, Monday 
through Friday, from 3 to 3:30 P.M. EST, under multiple sponsorship. 



1 









Young Doctor Molone boasts a TV "medical association" both dedicated and companionable. Backing up Dr. Stefan Koda 
(Michael Ingram) in hospital scene: Dr. Jerry Malone himself (William Prince) and Dr. Eileen Seaton (Emily McLaughlin). 



21 






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tiH 



...^ 




. ■?>-■ 
mm 



an 



m 



'Um"!> 



mm 



m 




. . . and she fell in love with him. Who could be in a better 
position to know that Mark Goddard is everything he seems to 

be in The Detectives: Impulsive, charming — and most sincere! 



22 



he fell 




ove 



with his 
press 
agent 




Wedding date: Jan. 1 5. Bride: Marcia Rogers. Bridegroom: 
Mark Goddard — alias Sgt. Chris Ballard of The Detectives. 



by DORA ALBERT 

But that can't be the girl who's going to 
interview me, thought Mark Goddard. An 
interviewer from a publicity office wouldn't be 
that young and pretty! "Hi, there," she said. "I'm 
Marcia Rogers from the Rogers-Cowan office." 
Later, Mark — who's currently seen as Sergeant 
Chris Ballard in The Detectives — was to find out 
that this blonde, petite girl with the hazel eyes 
and the winning smile was the daughter of 
Henry Rogers, the (Continued on page 80) 

Robert Taylor In The Detectives, with Mark as Sgt. Ballard, is 
on ABC-TV, Fit, 10 P.M. EST, sponsored by Procter & Gamble. 



Marcia doesn't plan to wear such a formal bridal gown. But she does plan to cook more elegant meals for her husband! 




23 




ALL THE WAY TO 




Hawaiian Eye stars: Bob as Tom Lopaka, Connie Stevens 
as Cricket, and Anthony Eisley as Tracy Steele. The big 
break seemed suddenly easy — when it finally came. Bob 
got his terrific suntan the hard way — while unemployed! 



Bob Conrad traveled a rough and 
roundabout road — through night clubs, 
milk routes, factories — to reach 
a haven of TV stardom on Hawaiian Eye 






Besieged by youthful neighbors in Sherman Oaks. Bob's 
great with the kids, has two little girls of his own. 



Wife Joan seldom appears in public, is always at 
Bob's side where life means most to him — at home. 



by BILL KELSAY 



Two years ago, Bob Conrad was just another 
good-looking young actor trying to get his break 
in Hollywood, a town loaded with good-looking 
young actors trying to get a break. Bob's break 
was a co-starring role as Tom Lopaka in the War- 
ner Bros. TV series, Hawaiian Eye. . . . All too 
often, young actors who do find themselves thrust 
suddenly into stardom get grandiose ideas about 



their own importance. Bob is one of the pleasant 
exceptions. "I don't have to consciously work at 
deflating my ego," he explains, "because I have 
worked very hard for the small success I'm en- 
joying, much harder than people realize. I'm grate- 
ful for this opportunity. I won't say I'm humble. 
It's just that I'm appreciative." . . . That hard work 
began when he was (Continued on page 63) 



Hawaiian Eye is seen on ABC-TV, Wed., 9 to 10 P.M. EST, as sponsored by Whitehall Laboratories, Carter Products, 
American Chicle, Oldsmobile Division of General Motors, and Beecham Products. 



24 



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a Castle for King 



















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Above: Rolls Royce is a real "status symbol" Alan 
picked out in London — or was it vice versa? Below: 
The boys are right there with Dad's light — when not 
innocently "spiking" the lemonade for sidewalk sale! 



26 




This is the fair estate on Long Island which is now home for 
Alan and Jeanette and their sons Bobby, 9, and Andy, 6. 



It's a long trail from city streets 
to the green mansions of suburbia. But 
Alan King's poorest memories are 
rich — and even the crabgrass is fun 

by MARTIN COHEN 

Five-feet-ten, thirty-three years old and especially 
handsome for a comic, Alan King is a paradox: 
Built for football, he is an indoor, on-stage 
performer. Aggressive and extroverted, he is both 
warm and sentimental. A thorough male animal 
with pipe or cigar in mouth, he's also apt to have in 
his pocket a couple of recipes he's ripped from 
the woman's page of the daily paper. His voice 
strikes hard — but what he has to say is human. 
And the paradox continues. This season, King enters 
your living room some dozen times via the Garry 
Moore, Perry Como and Ed Sullivan shows. His 
monologues are concerned, (Continued on page 68) 




Ik 



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Nilesland, U.S.A 

Wendell Niles, of It Could Be You, has a sports-amusement "park" 
right in his own backyard— complete from water rides to barbecue 







Wendell's pool is 55 feet long, 12 feet deep, suitable for speedboating (see opposite page), 
water skiing (with aid of shock cord) — and oh, yes, swimming! Man in background, above, is stunt- 
diver John Benson. Not shown in pictures is modernistic diving tower designed by Wendell himself. 






Archery — safari style: Bold hunter Niles's 
target is tiger head on other side of pool. 



ON television, Wendell Niles is part and parcel of It Could 
Be You, the engrossing audience-participation show 
in which he helps Bill Leyden stage reunions, stunts and 
sundry surprises. Off camera, his life might well be 
subtitled: "It Should Happen to Us!" Biggest hobby of both 
Wendell and Ann Niles is their lovely home in the Toluca 
Lake district of California's San Fernando Valley. As 
befits a lad from Livingston, Montana, the grounds seemingly 
encompass all the delights of the wide open spaces. The 
big backyard is one great fun area (known locally as 
"Wendell's Crazy Pad") . Pictures on these pages emphasize 
the more watery side of the Niles sports enthusiasms, but 
the full equipment ranges from a punching bag to an open-air 
barbecue. Surrounding buildings include dressing rooms, 
projection room, and an al fresco dining area. Everything 
but a box-office for general admission. Tickets, anyone? 



Wendell Niles is seen on Ralph Edwards' It Could Be You, as colorcast over 
NBC-TV, Monday through Friday, 12:30 P.M. EST, under multiple sponsorship. 



28 





Shuffleboard: A "team" game for Wendell and wife 
Ann. There's also table tennis- — and a putting green. 



Fishing: Wendell can even catch a trout without leaving home! 
And it can be tastily cooked outdoors, right on the premises. 





Nilesland, U.S.A. 

Wendell Niles, of It Could Be You, has a sports-amusement "park" 
right in his own backyard— complete from water rides to barbecue 






Qn television, Wendell Niles is part and parcel of It Could 

«e you the engrossing audience-participation show 
m which he helps Bill Leyden stage reunions, stunts and 
sundry surprises. Off camera, his life might well be 

w i n : '?A Sh01 ^ Happen t0 Us! " Bi Sg est hobby of both 
Wendell and Ann Niles is their lovely home in the Toluca 
Lake district of California's San Fernando Valley As 
befits a lad from Livingston, Montana, the grounds seemingly 
encompass all the delights of the wide opin spaces The 
«& f Z aT £ 1S ° ne great fun area (known locally as 
Wendell's Crazy Pad") . Pictures on these pages emphasize 
the more watery side of the Niles sports enthusiasms^ bu 
the full equipment ranges from a punching bag to an open-air 
barbecue. Surrounding buildings include dressing rooms 
projection room and an al fresco dining area. Everything 
but a box-office for general admission. Tickets, anyone" 



by 



Archery— safari style: Bold hunter Niles's 
target is tiger head on other side of pool. 




Shuffleboard: A "team" game for Wendell and wife 
Ann. There's also table tennis- — and a putting green. 



Fishing: Wendell can even catch a trout without leaving home! 
And it can be tastily cooked outdoors, right on the premises. 



28 



Wendell Niles is seen on Ralph Edwards" // (m.l.l » v \ 

mbctv, M.,d., ,h„u«h ri,, ssrti SfirasfSss! 




> £f i 




VvUKftM n/tAJeeS m&ftWe 



They said the star was a failure, when 
Adventures In Paradise began. Yet 
Gardner has now proved himself a winner ! 
How? Here's the off-camera story . . . 

by JOSEPH H. CONLEY JR. 




Gardner's grin, these days, is for real. He always loved 
boating but had to learn how to act — and enjoy it! Author- 
actor Conley (above, left, in an episode of Adventures In 
Paradise) tells the reasons why — as observed on the set and 
as revealed personally by both McKay and his co-workers. 



An actor whose first-season television show has 
just been renewed by the sponsor for a second 
year suddenly becomes impossible to get along with! 
This is a television "rule" I've come to know well, 
since I'm a character actor who moves from studio 
to studio, doing some thirty different TV shows dur- 
ing any given year. 

But now I've also found the "exception" to this 
rule. The show: Adventures In Paradise. The actor: 
Gardner McKay. I'm not a close friend of Gardner's, 
just a casual acquaintance. But actors must be good 
observers and I've worked (Continued on page 72) 

Gardner McKay is Adam Troy in Adventures In Paradise, ABC-TV, 
Mon., from 9:30 to 10:30 P.M. EST, under multiple sponsorship. 




The name's "Pussy Cat" — and he almost purrs. 
Gardner has described his constant canine pal 
as "part poodle, part spaniel, all whiskers." 




One of Hollywood's most handsome escorts, 
Gardner is shown here with Maria, the at- 
tractive daughter of actor Gary Cooper 



31 



Y WIFE 






So beautiful, so sweet — 
and things just keep happening 
around her! Is it any wonder 
I find Shirley Bonne and TV's 
My Sister Eileen very much alike? 

by RONALD FREEMOND 
as told to Marcia Borie 



Shirley not only looks like a youngster, but is just 
as frank and guileless as one — even though she was the 
mother of three almost before she was out of her 
teens. Johnny, 71/2, Sherri, 6, and Marty, 3, are the "extra 
dividends" in our life. We have grand times together. 

There are two beautiful blondes in My 
Sister Eileen. Two girls from Ohio, seeking 
fame and fortune in a hard-hearted but 
hilarious New York. Ruth, the practical, witty 
one, is played by that talented star of stage 
and TV, Elaine Stritch. The girl who plays 
her naive, starry-eyed sister Eileen is my wife, 
Shirley Bonne — and you can take it from me, 
that enchanting doll who comes into your living 
room each week isn't all makebelieve! Except 
for some real-life changes in plot, my wife 
Shirley is Eileen. ... I suppose the odds against 
an unknown walking (Continued on page 76) 

My Sister Eileen is seen over CBS-TV, Wednesday, at 9 P.M. 
EST, as sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive and Pillsbury Mills. 





Royalty 

Sponsors 

an 

International 

Festiuat 



I iissi I 01; TV! 



T 



Prince Rainier and Princess Grace 
of Monaco inaugurate an event 
which challenges the award supremacy 
of both "Oscar" and "Emmy" 

by HERBERT KAMM 



he tiny principality of Monaco, that cozy, 
romantic land unknown to most of us until 
its ruling monarch wooed and won screen 
beauty Grace Kelly, has wrapped its princely 
robes around — sound the trumpets loud and 
clear ! — television. 

In its short but eventful life, television has 
rarely, if ever, won more than the con- 
descending recognition of kings and princes. 
They have let it go its sometimes tortuous 
way, as a medium of the masses, with neither 
endorsement nor disapproval. 

But what has happened, and is about to 
happen, in distant Monaco could have far- 
reaching impact. It could have a lot to do 
with improving the quality of the shows you 
watch, and it could very well, if you'll pardon 
the flowery language, hasten TV's develop- 
ment as an international instrument of good 
will. 

Quietly but efficiently, since last June, His 
Serene Highness, Prince Rainier III, with the 
enthusiastic encouragement of the lovely 
Princess Grace, has been plotting seizure of 
the television limelight on a scale never 
before attempted. 

His efforts are about to bear fruit. Between 
January 14 and 28, Monaco will sponsor and 
play host to the first International Television 
Festival, an award- (Continued on page 55) 



35 



a Tough Team to Beat 




The Untouchables: Eliot Ness (Robert Stack) points the way for a determined 

trio — left to right, William Youngfellow (Abel Fernandez), Lee Hobson (Paul Picerni), 

and Enrico Rossi (Nicholas Georgiade). On or off TV, says Bob, "I couldn't 

ask for better, more loyal and more talented support ... or three finer human beings." 



36 




Real fighters, true heroes, good 
guys to have on your side! 
Meet Robert Stack's mighty trio of 
"Untouchables"-Paul Picerni, 
Nicholas Georgiade, Abel Fernandez 

by KATHLEEN POST 



It's a stroke of TV magic, as ABC's The Un- 
touchables seemingly brings D'Artagnan and 
the Three Musketeers back to life and shows 
them fighting for justice in America's Prohibi- 
tion days. When brave and honest Treasury 
Agent Robert Stack leads his hoodlum-hating 
team of Paul Picerni, Nicholas Georgiade and 
Abel Fernandez into battle, using tear gas and 
automatic guns, millions thrill as they once did 
to the adventures of the valiant swordsmen 
created by Alexandre Dumas. The idea of a 
latter-day "all for one, one for all" group of 
crime fighters has paid off handsomely on tele- 
vision, winning an Emmy for Desilu Studios 
and enriching not only Stack — already a top- 
rated star — but his trio of able character actors, 



37 



a Tough Team to Beat 

(Continued) 




Paul Plcerni credits his good fortune to his family: "With each 
new baby, I've had a new bit of luck!" Above, rear, he's flanked by 
his wife Marie and daughter Nicci, 12, with little Gina, 4, down in 
front. The other children are — left to right — Maria, 9; Gemma, 10; 
Michael, 7; "P.V.," II; Philip, 5; Charles, 8. A successful movie 
and TV actor since World War II, Paul had previously earned the Air 
Force Medal and Distinguished Flying Cross in the China-Burma area. 



who probably appreciate even n* 
the regular paycheck which a success- 
ful series brings. 

Picerni — with his happy, hearty 
family of eight youngsters "who could 
eat you out of hearth and home even 
if they weren't happy and hearty" — 
is particularly pleased by the pros- 
pect. Although he's greatly in de- 
mand and has appeared in more than 
sixty movies, as well as on most of 
the major TV shows, Paul feels that 
a regular series is the only way to 
solve the inevitable problems created 
by an actor's uneven income. 

"My wife, Marie, has breathed a 
sigh of relief," he says. "Now she can 
stop worrying about the fat-month, 
lean-month type of budget which is 
really tough to balance. For the first 
time since I left Warners' in 1953, she 
is sure of what's coming in and can 
arrange her expenditures and plan 
her payments properly." 

Among other actors, Paul is re- 
spected as "a real pro," one who can 
be relied on for an inspired and thor- 
oughly thought-out portrayal. Direc- 
tors love him. He always knows his 
lines, is helpful to fellow players, and 
is a fertile source of ideas to improve 
his performance and the show. 

His fellow lawman, "Nick the 
Greek" Georgiade, calls him "the bal- 
ance-wheel" of The Untouchables. 
Says Nick, "Paul was the last to join 
our permanent group, yet he's the 
number-one force next to Stack. This 
might have made for a situation, since 
Fernandez and myself are members 
of the original team. But petty jeal- 
ousies fade away when Paul appears. 
He loves people and enjoys their suc- 
cess as much as his own, and you've 




The Untouchables, starring Robert Stack and narrated by Walter Winchell on 
ABC-TV, Thursday, from 9:30 to 10:30 P.M. EST, is sponsored by Whitehall 
Laboratories, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., Armour & Co., Beecham Products. 



Nicholas Georgiade took up his present 
career to please actress-wife Anita Raffi 
(above), was discovered for TV by Lucille 
Ball. Previous credits? Nick won European 
heavyweight title of U. S. Army in 1950. 



38 



'm 



^ •* 





>v 



/ 



Robert Stack, star quarterback of The Untouchables' unbeatable team, relaxes modern-style, away from the TV cameras. 
He's married to actress Rosemarie Bowe, their daughter Elizabeth just turned four, son Chuck will be three in June. 




just got to respect and like him. He's 
been a veritable tower of strength to 
us all. ..." 

In describing how he got the part 
of Lee Hobson, Paul says modestly, 
"It came out of the blue, when Jerry 
Thorpe, who was casting the series, 
called my agent." But there was 
much more to it than that. The Un- 
touchables had originally been pre- 
sented to the public as a two-part TV 
program, in which Paul appeared as 
a cafe owner who slapped Barbara 
Nichols around and got his come- 
uppance from Eliot Ness (Stack) and 
his men. When Anthony George, 
playing the right-hand man to Ness, 
elected to leave the show to star in 
Checkmate, Paul's name at once came 
to the fore. 

Born in New York City, educated 
there and at Elmhurst High on Long 
Island, Paul (Continued on page 66) 



Abel Fernandez is a born Westerner, but not an Indian — though he 
often portrays one. A former paratrooper, he was the middleweight 
champion of the Far Eastern forces, later turned "pro" in the ring. 




39 




Husband Charles Debrovner, now an intern at Bellevue, 
was her high-school sweetheart. Patricia learned to cook 
after marriage — and both gained weight that first year! 




Happy as an actress, happy as a wife, 
Patricia Bruder is now finding 
extra added attractions in her exciting 
"new" role on As The World Turns 






r 



X' 



^ ~^H 














¥',. 


i 








^3 



Portrait bears the signature "Patsy," which was young 
Miss Bruder's childhood nickname. She debuted on radio 
when only ten, got her first Broadway role at thirteen. 



by ALICE FRANCIS 



To take over a TV part which another actress has 
been portraying is a little like starting in the 
third act of a play: Someone else has been doing 
the first two acts — and you suddenly have to come 
on and continue the performance. That's the way 
Patricia Ann Bruder felt, one day last September, 
when she became Ellen Lowell Cole in the CBS- 
TV daytime drama, As The World Turns. Wendy 
Drew, relinquishing the role to be married, gave 
Patricia some parting words of advice: "Just re- 



\~ 



-^ 






i 













As Ellen, Patricia's also surrounded by medicos on As The World Turns — Nat 
Polen (at left) as Ellen's stepfather, Dr. Doug Cassen, and George Petrie as Dr. George Frey. 



member that Ellen is a many-sided girl who has 
already been through a great deal, and you will 
find her as exciting as I have." 

"She was right," Patricia says. "I got to know 
Ellen well, even before I began to play her. Every- 
one helped. Especially Ted Corday, our executive 
director, who has been with the show since its be- 
ginning. Now Ellen seems part of me, in spite of 



the different paths our lives have taken. Ellen has 
been unhappy in love, while I am happily mar- 
ried. But when you're in sympathy with a person, 
and you really like her, she becomes almost an ex- 
tension of yourself." 

Patricia is a five-foot-two blonde with hair the 
color of pale honey, sparkling gray-blue eyes, 
and a complexion which (Continued on page 58) 



As The World Turns, created by Irna Phillips, is seen on CBS-TV, M-F, 1:30 to 2 P.M. EST, for Procter & Gamble and other sponsors. 



41 



Eddy Arnold Has a Farm... 




Coffee for top trio of Today On The Farm — first major net- 
work show to originate from Chicago in many a harvest 
moon. Carmelita Pope does women's features, Alex Dreier 
(center) is news commentator, singin' Eddy Arnold is host. 




Sure, he commutes to Chicago 
for each week's nationwide telecast 
of Today On The Farm. But 
that's a real spread "The Tennessee 
Plowboy" has near Nashville — 
and Eddy knows how to work it, too ! 

by HELEN BOLSTAD 



Eddy not only uses the sponsor's products on his acres 
down in Tennessee but is mighty proud of all modern farm 
machinery. Tractors were rare, where he grew up. It was 
all "mule power" then — plus boy power, from dawn to dusk. 



42 



Eddy Arnold is the singing host of Today On The Farm, over NBC-TV, Saturday, at 7 A.M. (all time zones), sponsored by Massey-Ferguson, Inc. 







/-* * 



- 



■ate 



Raising Hereford cattle is his specialty — but he also has three of the famous Tennessee walking horses, just for riding. 



Supple and straight as a hickory limb, singer 
Eddy Arnold settled his six-foot-two of brawn 
and muscle into a Danish modern chair in his man- 
ager's New York office and allowed as how he was 
the number-one fan, as well as host, for NBC-TV's 
Saturday-morning program, Today On The Farm. 
In the measured accents of western Tennessee, he 
said, "I'm paying right close attention to what all 
those experts report, and it sure is useful. I can't 
help learning things to do on my home place." 

Those experts are headed by farm editor Mai 
Hansen. Their reports are filmed at working farms, 
Department of Agriculture experiment stations 
and agricultural colleges all over the country. Irv- 
ing P. Krick's long-range predictions tell farmers 
how to make an ally instead of a foe out of their 
old adversary, the weather. Alex Dreier presents 
the news and Carmelita Pope brings features of 
interest to farmers' wives. Seen at 7:00 a.m., on 
some two hundred stations, it is the first major net- 
work program to be televised from Chicago studios 
in a number of years. 

Eddy contributes his songs, but he is more than 
an entertainer. Because of their vast background 
in country music and talent, he and his manager, 
Ed Burton, work closely each week with the show's 
producer and creator, Ed Pierce, and the director, 
Max Miller, and Eddy continues to view the pro- 
gram's content from the standpoint of a working 



farmer. His own "home place" is a farm in the 
rolling, wooded hills outside Nashville, Tennessee, 
where he lives with his wife Sally, their daughter 
Jo Ann, fourteen, and their son Dicky (Richard 
Edward Arnold Jr.), eleven. Eddy also owns a 
second farm, three miles distant, bringing his total 
holdings to 257 acres. Tenant farmers work them, 
but Eddy manages them — "I'm the living example 
of that saying, 'A boy works like the dickens to 
get off the farm, then works even harder to get 
money enough to get back.' " 

It is the contrast between the farm where he 
grew up and farm life today which makes Eddy a 
fan of the NBC program. He says, "The day of the 
hick, the hillbilly, is past, thank goodness. Radio, 
television, good roads and education keep the 
farmer even and sometimes ahead of the city man. 
But I remember too well how it used to be. . . . Say, 
do you know, I'll bet I'm one of the few fathers 
who gets a big kick out of seeing his daughter 
sprawl out on the floor and talk on the telephone 
for hours. . . . 

"When I was that age, there was one puny little 
telephone line along that backroad of ours. Then 
the Depression came and the batteries in all those 
wall phones wore out. The farmers couldn't afford 
to replace them and soon the whole line was dead. 
We didn't have electricity and the same thing 
could happen to the battery radios. We got a news- 



43 




Says Eddy, "The first real money I made, I bought a house for my wife Sally and me. When the children came along, I got 
us a farm where they could grow up." Now daughter Jo Ann is fourteen, son Dicky (Richard Edward Arnold Jr.) is eleven. 




Teen telephoning doesn't bother Eddy — he recalls days 
when many farms had no sure line to the outside world. 



paper once a week. You sure could feel cut off 
from the world! Of course, kids got together then, 
same as they always do, but when I wanted to talk 
to a girl, I walked. Or maybe rode a mule." 

From personal experience, Eddy knows all the 
heartbreaking hazards which farming can have. 
"We had a good bit of flat land near Henderson, 
Tennessee, where we put in cotton, corn, peas, 
beans and peanuts. All by mule power. I knew one 
man who had a tractor. Before I was knee-high to 
a cotton boll, I was driving a two-horse turning 
plow— the kind where one mule walks the furrow 
and the other walks along the unbroken land. I 
sure earned that old name, 'The Tennessee Plow- 
boy.'" 

On Eddy's eleventh birthday, his father died. His 
family lost the farm and turned sharecroppers. 
Eddy quit high school in his first year. "I got me a 
job cutting timber. I sure was a strong little oT 
country boy. I could swing that axe and pull my 
weight on a crosscut saw. I haven't forgot, either. 
Nowadays, when there's timber to be cleared on 
my place, I go out and show the men how to chip 
a tree so it falls into an open space, not on top of 
somebody." 

Good woodsman and good plowboy though he 
was, Eddy yearned for larger life, and music was 
his passport. "My mother (Continued on page 79) 



44 



Eddy Arnold Has a Farm... 



(Continued) 



i 




Show-biz careers for his children? Eddy replies: 
"Dicky says he wants to be a doctor. The only show 
he can put on is socking out a homer in the Knot- 
hole League. And that's sure all right with me." 





Hubby's hobby: Golf at the Hillwood Country Club — with 
Chet Atkins, guitarist and local head of Victor Records. 



Wife's hobby: "Antiquing! Sally took a decorating 
course — then really started hunting for old things." 



45 





Meet the Van Dykes: Dick and Marjorie; sons Chris, 10, and Barry, 9; daughter Stacey, 6. Other members 
of the family include Roberta, queen of the kitchen, and two frisky pooches named "Sammy" and "Alice." 






Audiences of all types agree that Dick 
Van Dyke's a very funny fellow, 
whether hosting ABC Radio's variety- 
packed daily program Flair, guesting on 
TV, or starring in the Broadway hit musi- 
cal, "Bye Bye Birdie." The only dissenting 
votes seem to come from a certain white 
house at Brookville, on New York's Long 
Island, which happens to be the home of 
Dick Van Dyke. Ask the occupants there, 
"Is Daddy funny around the house?" and 
Daddy himself snorts "No!" He's staunchly 
supported by nine-year-old Barry and six- 
year-old Stacey — while Mommy observes 
thoughtfully, "He's happy, but never the 
clown." Only ten-year-old Chris, a rugged 
individualist to the core, stoutly maintains, 
"Yes. I think Daddy's funny around the 
house. Very funny!" This wide divergence 
of opinion probably stems from one very 
simple, incontro- (Continued on page 81) 



Dick juggles the daily program 
on ABC Radio, TV specs— 
and stage stardom in "Bye Bye 
Birdie" But Marjorie and 
three little Van Dykes swear 
Daddy never misses a trick! 

by CHARLOTTE BARCLAY 



Dick is host of Flair, broadcast over ABC Radio, M-F, from 1 to 1:55 P.M. EST. See local papers for time in your area. 



46 








u 



dhsdli 





Humor in the Van Dyke family is always good, but 
Dick saves his clowning for radio's Flair, TV and 
stage — or the tape recorder at home. He's "very 
romantic," his wife confides, "and never forgets 
special days." Neither do the children, who love to 
serve him breakfast in bed on Father's Day. There 
isn't that much leisure for most meals. Dinner has 
to be early, so he can make that Broadway curtain 
— but the menu isn't a problem. "Promise him any- 
thing," sighs Marjorie, "but give him bean soup!" 






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Meet 
of the 



the Van Dykes: Dick and Marjorie; sons Chris, 10, and Barry, 9; daughter Stacey, 6. Other members 
family include Roberta, queen of the kitchen, and two frisky pooches named "Sammy" and "Alice." 



Audiences of all types agree that Dick 
Van Dyke's a very funny fellow, 
whether hosting ABC Radio's variety- 
packed daily program Flair, guesting on 
TV, or starring in the Broadway hit musi- 
cal, "Bye Bye Birdie." The only dissenting 
votes seem to come from a certain white 
house at Brookville, on New York's Long 
Island, which happens to be the home of 
Dick Van Dyke. Ask the occupants there, 
"Is Daddy funny around the house?" and 
Daddy himself snorts "No!" He's staunchly 
supported by nine-year-old Barry and six- 
year-old Stacey — while Mommy observes 
thoughtfully, "He's happy, but never the 
clown." Only ten-year-old Chris, a rugged 
individualist to the core, stoutly maintains, 
"Yes. I think Daddy's funny around the 
house. Very funny!" This wide divergence 
of opinion probably stems from one very 
simple, incontro- (Continued on page 81) 



Dick juggles the daily program 
on ABC Radio, TV specs — 
and stage stardom in "Bye Bye 
Birdie." But Marjorie and 
three little Van Dykes swear 
Daddy never misses a trick! 

by CHARLOTTE BARCLAY 



Dick is host of Flair, broadcast over ABC Radio, M-F, from 1 to 1-55 PM per c i , 

iu i.jj r.m. tsi. see local papers for time 



46 



in your area. 





Humor in the Van Dyke family is always good, but 
Dick saves his clowning for radio's Flair, TV and 
stage — or the tape recorder at home. He's "very 
romantic," his wife confides, "and never forgets 
special days." Neither do the children, who love to 
serve him breakfast in bed on Father's Day. There 
isn't that much leisure for most meals. Dinner has 
to be early, so he can make that Broadway curtain 
— but the menu isn't a problem. "Promise him any- 
thing," sighs Marjorie, "but give him bean soup!" 




ING 






forget to pamper elbows 



soothing lotion, cautions 



For a lasting manicure, Bess applies a 
sealer over her polish and adds a dash 
of cologne on palms to absorb moisture. 



I 




' 



Regal Bess Myerson, panelist on CBS-TV's Vve Got A 
Secret, has many secrets of her own on hand beauty 

by JUNE CLARK 

Bess Myerson feels that well-groomed, graceful hands are not 
a happy accident; they must be cultivated. The little 
effort, however, is well worth the reward: Poise and self-con- 
fidence. Bess guards her skin with lotion which she smooths 
on as she would a glove — from the tips of her fingers to her 
wrists. She keeps a bottle in her bedroom, bathroom and studio 
dressing room as visual reminders for frequent use. With long 
sweeping motions, she applies the lotion on her arms, right 
up to her shouders, then rubs extra lotion on her elbows. Grace- 
ful hands are limber, according to Bess. She's an accomplished 
pianist, so her fingers get plenty of exercise. Her suggestion: 
Ease tension and step up circulation by playing a makebelieve 
scale several times a day. Because she leads such a busy life, 
Bess has little time for a. professional manicure, often grooms 
her nails herself. She wears them short for piano playing; her 
one hope is to have long nails someday. With an emery board, 
she files them in one direction only — side to center. For an 
illusion of length, Bess covers her whole nail with polish. She 
never cuts her cuticles, gently pushes them back with an orange 
stick. Bess prefers a delicate neutral shade of polish which 
is not distracting when she plays the piano. Then she uses an 
orange stick dipped in remover to go over the contour of 
her nails to remove excess polish. To help prevent chipping, Bess 
applies a sealer over her polish. Her advice to busy women: 
Develop a quick, easy hand-care routine, then follow 
it faithfully until it becomes a beautifying habit. 



EXPEDITION: ST. LOUIS 




KTVI-TV has a new concept 
in public-affairs programing 
and the man behind it all 
is St. Louis's Bruce Hayward 




Another episode was "Biography of a River," life story of the Mississippi 



On location for episode "The City Fights Back," slum-rehabilitation story. 



WHAT SORT OF IMAGE does St. Louis, 
as a city, present to the world? 
How can the average St. Louis dweller 
be made more aware of its importance 
in international commerce and human 
relations? With a new concept in pro- 
graming, KTVI-TV set out to answer 
these provocative questions with its ex- 
citing public-affairs series of programs 
entitled Expedition'. St. Louis. The thir- 
teen-episode series includes such in- 
teresting topics as slum rehabilitation 
and a study of the Mississippi River, 
each filmed and produced in its entirety 
by staff members. . . . Acting as nar- 
rator for the series is veteran broad- 
caster Bruce Hayward, who is Director 
of News and Public Affairs for KTVI. 
Minneapolis-born Bruce started his pro- 
fessional career in 1940, while attending 
the University of Minnesota. While 
working in a Chicago advertising agency, 
he was sent to St. Louis to deliver com- 
mercials for a daily newscast. Upon 
completion of this contract, he joined 
radio Station KWK as chief newscaster 
and, in May 1953, accepted the position 
of Director of News and Public Service 
with KTVI. At that time, he spent most 
of his spare moments observing the news 
operations of other TV stations in a five- 
state area and then, using the knowledge 
he had gained, established KTVTs news 
department. Hayward then originated a 
series of public-service programs, one 
of which was the popular What's Going 
On In Greater St. Louis. 



49 




On-show, Jim McKnight — the "famous chef" — demonstrates culi- 
iary arts for Doris (right) and her co-hostess, mother Myrtle Labbitt. 



T 
V 
R 

50 




Experience 



Almost anything can and does 
happen on a TV homemaking show 
but CKLWTV's Doris Junod— 
wife, homemaker and mother of 
four — is well prepared to 
handle any and all problems 



Seven years ago, when Detroit's CKLW-TV 
asked radio -veteran Myrtle Labbitt to 
do a homemaking show, she agreed and im- 
mediately asked that her daughter Doris be 
given the assignment as her assistant. Thus 
was born the highly popular and successful 
team of Myrtle And Doris, now seen on the 
show of the same name on Wednesday and 
Friday at 12:30 p.m. "We originally decided 
not to reveal our mother-daughter relation- 
ship," smiles Doris, "but that lasted through 
only one show. On the second program, I 
moved off-camera and said, 'Hold the fort, 
Mom.' Well, that did it. From then on, we made 
no bones about it and now our viewers 
enjoy it as much as we do." Doris is also 
hostess of another program. It's Tower Kitchen 
Time, seen Thursdays at 12:30 p.m. . . . It's 
no surprise to anyone that Doris is so capable 
of handling both her homemaking shows 
so well. She not only studied the subject — 
she received her B.S. in home economics from 
Wayne State University — but she is a wife, 
homemaker and mother of four, as well. 
Doris met husband Jack when they were both 
attending high school. "He used to walk me 
home from school every day," reminisces 
Doris. And that was no small accomplishment 
... at the time, she lived two miles from 
the town in which the school was located . . . 
The Junods now live in a house situated on 
a big wooded lot. Their home is complete 
with Early American furnishings and four 
lively American children — Jo, Jackie, Bobbie 
and Jamie. "My only problem, as far as the 
children are concerned," says Doris, "was 
rinding someone to stay with them while I'm 
working. I finally happened on to a lovely 
little old English lady. 'Polly,' as we all call 
her, comes every day that I'm away and the 
children just love her." When she is at home, 
Doris and her family enjoy swimming, 
ball-playing, group singing and bridge. 






Is the Best Teacher 




Fireside family fun: Doris and Jack Junod with their children — Jo Ellen ("Jo"), 
16; James ("Jamie"), 6; Barbara ("Bobbie"), 10; and Jacqueline ("Jackie"), 13. 



T 
V 
ft 

51 




Round Man 
of Sound 

. . . that's the nickname of good- 
natured Mike Russell, who "circulates" 
pop music for Wichita's KIRL 



Mike's bachelor apartment is complete with private sun- 
deck. Here, he can pursue his favorite hobby — photography. 




52 



People in central Kansas have pinned many nick- 
names on one of the most popular disc jockeys in 
the area, but the one that seems to best fit Mike Rus- 
sell of KIRL in Wichita is the "Round Man of Sound." 
The Round Man has built up a terrific audience in the 
central Kansas area with his daily 7 to 10 p.m. program, 
and everyone, both listeners and co-workers at the 
station, says Mike has that wonderful quality of making 
everyone feel "it's a terrific day to be alive." . . . Mike 
was born some twenty-three years ago in Springfield, 
Missouri. His father is an executive with one of the 
Midwest's largest meat-packing companies and, because 
of this, Mike grew up in quite a few cities and towns in 
the Midwest. About the first time he settled down to 
any one spot was when he enrolled at Wichita Univer- 
sity and spent four years working on his degree. While 
there, he discovered that radio held a great attraction 
for him. It was in school that he really got his first 
radio experience as general manager, announcer, pro- 
gram director and general all-around man at the uni- 
versity's station. . . . After graduation, Mike started 



his first stint in commercial radio at KANS in Wichita 
(later changed to KLEO). It didn't take the people of 
Wichita and the industry long to find out that the 
"Round Man of Sound" had that rare gift of projecting 
a feeling of happiness and good feeling. About this time, 
Mike also discovered that other people were interested 
in him, and he started receiving offers from outside the 
radio industry. But he found, after much thought, that 
radio was the only thing that really made him happy 
and held his interest. This is probably the one big 
reason that Mike is so successful in his work — he loves 
radio, he truly enjoys the job of making other people 
happy and, as a result, you have a happy, jovial guy. 
. . . Mike's co-workers at KIRL are very quick to heap 
a lot of praise on him. The one big point they all make 
is that he has the ability to work under all conditions 
or with any age-group of people. On personal appear- 
ances, for Record Hops in and around Wichita, the 
kids stand around the stage all evening, visiting with 
Mike and asking his advice about a million different 
things. At a recent remote broadcast from a new super- 




market, Mike was right at home with shoppers of all 
ages. . . . The deejay is a bachelor and has recently 
moved into an apartment near his favorite spot in 
Wichita — the Wichita University. An ideal bachelor 
place, Mike's has a sun-deck which is a fine vantage 
point for him to practice his favorite hobby — photog- 
raphy. . . . Like all top disc jockeys, Mike watches the 
music trends very closely. He's an avid collector of 
records himself and has some very definite ideas on the 
public's likes and dislikes in music. For example, you 
might think a popular disc jockey like Mike would 
favor rock 'n' roll, but his attitude is merely "if that's 
what the public wants, I'll play it for them." When asked 
if he thinks the disc jockeys are responsible for the 
current popularity of rock 'n' roll, Mike says, "No, sir! 
I strongly believe that the public buys what they want — 
they think for themselves and those of us in radio 
business play what they want to hear!" As for Mike's 
personal record collection, he's pretty much down-the- 
middle-of-the-road with a fairly even collection of 
pop, rock 'n' roll and classical music in his library. 




53 




HERE'S 
UNCLE 
WALLY 




. . . who is really Wally Nehrling 

of Indianapolis' WIRE Radio — 

v a man who simply loves people 



54 



For almost 15 years, Uncle Wally conducted WIRE "Funny Paper Party." 



IF you had to settle on one reason for Wally Nehrling's success, it 
probably would be that he loves people. He knows no stranger. He 
talks to anyone and everyone, and he listens to everyone and anyone. 
Almost everyone knows Wally, early-morning announcer for Station 
WIRE in Indianapolis. So dear is he to the hearts of his listeners, 
in fact, that they affectionately refer to him as "Uncle Wally." What's 
the secret of the broadcaster's success? No one could define it in 
a few words; it is a combination of many things. . . . First of all, 
Wally has been an announcer at WIRE Radio for twenty -three years, 
and that's long enough for the average married couple to move 
from newlyweds to grandparents. A great many of Wally's present 
listeners have actually gone through this transition with him. . . . 
Secondly, Wally has made thousands of personal appearances before 
all kinds of audiences. As a master of ceremonies, he's excellent. 
His joke bag is never empty and his sense of humor never lacking. He 
has an unusually good memory, and — extremely important — he 
seldom forgets a name. ... A third point: Wally is a devoted 
family man. He and his wife June have four children — Wally, 19; 
Henry, 17; Daniel, 13; and Martina, 9. The Nehrlings live in a two-story 
house in the northern suburbs of Indianapolis. They've always been 
a great family for collecting such pets as ducks, rabbits, chickens, 
horses, etc. At one time, they had as many as twenty different 
animals. . . . While attending Notre Dame University, the broadcaster 
had no plans for becoming a radio announcer. Instead, he wanted 
to be a professional singer. He applied for a singing job at WSBT 
and was told no singing jobs were available. However, the WSBT 
management liked his voice so well, they asked him if he wanted an 
announcing position. Wally accepted the offer and has been a radio 
announcer ever since. . . . Practically everything good that has 
happened to Wally has been connected either directly or indirectly 
with radio. He even met his wife as a result of radio. June came 
to the WIRE studios to do a program while Wally was on duty. He 
lost no time introducing himself and, after a whirlwind courtship 
of eight weeks, they were married. . . . For a hobby, Wally loves golf. 
He's constantly experimenting with new clubs, new grips, new 
stances, and all other details ardent golfers usually fuss over. Although 
Wally doesn't get a chance to play a full round more than a couple 
of times a week, he hits a good ball off the tee and shoots a fair score. 



First International TV Festival 



(Continued from page 35) 
giving extravaganza which promises to 
exceed the glitter and pageantry of the 
"Oscar" and "Emmy" ceremonies put 
together. 

After all, neither Hollywood nor 
Madison Avenue has been able to at- 
tract to its productions the kind of in- 
ternational audience which is about to 
descend on Monaco. Never before have 
the best TV shows of some thirty coun- 
tries been subjected to the judgment 
of an international jury. Never before 
has a hall like Monaco's historic Monte 
Carlo Opera House, breathtakingly 
beautiful in its ornateness, been the 
scene of a television production. 

Fully aware that it has stolen a 
march on the rest of the TV world with 
this event, Monaco has pulled out all 
the stops. Through arrangement with 
Freddie Fields Associates, Ltd., of New 
York, the awards ceremony will be re- 
corded on tape for showing, not only in 
the United States, but in Latin Ameri- 
can and Asian countries, as well. An 
edited one-hour version is scheduled 
to be shown on NBC February 7. 

Further, Tele-Monte Carlo, Monaco's 
own TV channel, will distribute the 
program throughout the countries of 
Western Europe. Commercial profits 
will be distributed among charities dear 
to the heart of Prince Rainier and 
Princess Grace. The value to Monaco 
in terms of goodwill and attracting 
tourists defies calculation. 

TV Radio Mirror elicited this com- 
ment from Prince Rainier, on the eve 
of the festival: "I believe that, above 
all, what we now demand of television 
is good entertainment and also the pos- 
sibility to enlarge our general knowl- 
edge of things and people. 

"But beyond these, our first expecta- 
tions, one greater mission is offered to 
the television medium: A new, peace- 
ful link between the peoples of the 
world. Where diplomacy may have 
failed, art can be successful, if televis- 
ion becomes a real creative art and an 
instrument of proper information. It 
will then be recognized as such and 
appeal to all people throughout the 
world, ignoring the frontiers of language 
and faith. Each country must look be- 
yond its frontiers and, through the 
presentation and exchanges of artistic 
television productions, appeal to the 
heart and mind of man." 

The festival, due to become an an- 
nual event in Monaco, will present at 
least six awards, possibly nine. The six 
certain categories are for the best single 
program in dramatic form, the best 
single program in the comedy, musical 
or variety form, the best performance 
by an actor, the best by an actress, 
the best direction of a dramatic work, 
the best writing of an original drama. 

Special awards, at the option of the 
jury, may be given for outstanding news 
coverage, for the program which did 
most to further international under- 
standing, and for the best scientific con- 
tribution in the development of TV. 

Emmy and Oscar are likely to blush 
at the award to be given each winner. 
It will be a foot-high gold statue, 



created by Cartier, of "La Nymphe," 
the original of which is a world-famous 
sculpture on exhibit in the Louvre. 

The first two days of the festival will 
be given over to welcoming the jurors, 
who will spend the following week 
viewing the entries. The awards will be 
announced January 23, and the climax 
will come the evening of January 28, 
when Their Serene Highnesses will 
preside at a gala dinner- dance preced- 
ing the actual awards presentation. 

As has been her custom since she 
married the Prince on April 18, 1956, 
Princess Grace will not take an active 
part in the festivities. "Grace prefers to 
stay in the background at most public 
functions," a close friend of the royal 
couple explained. "It isn't a case of be- 
ing shy and reluctant. Protocol requires 
that the Prince, as Monaco's chief of 
state, preside over public functions." 

The invited audience of some five 
hundred guests will see a Princess 
Grace more lovely than ever. "She has 
never been more radiant or happier," 
a recent visitor to the Royal Palace told 
TV Radio Mirror. "This is really like 
a fairytale romance come true. Yet 
Grace hasn't insulated herself from the 
realities of life. She takes an extreme- 
ly active part in charity work in Mon- 
aco and also keeps busy supervising the 
household. Her happiest hours, how- 
ever, are spent with her two children 
(Princess Caroline, four years old on 
January 23, and Prince Albert, who 
will be three on March 14)." 

PREVENT CRIPPLING DISEASES 




PLEASE SAY YES TO THE 

^ MARCH OF DIMES 




BIRTH DEFECTS • ARTHRITIS • POLIO 



The Philadelphia girl who abandoned 
her regal station in Hollywood to take 
up a royal station in the 368-acre prin- 
cipality of Monaco has often been ru- 
mored as planning a movie comeback. 
"Not a chance," a confidant of the 
Prince and Princess declares. "There is 
nothing for her to go back to. Every- 
thing she could want is in Monaco. 
There isn't even much of a chance for 
her to get lonely for her friends, be- 
cause so many of them visit her from 
time to time." 

The International Film Festival will 
provide further opportunity for Grace 
to see many of her old friends, for a 
number of the American stars with 
whom she has worked are expected to 
be featured in the entertainment pro- 
gram integrated into the ceremony. 

That portion of the event which will 
be taped for television will be much 
like a variety show. Seats in the Monte 
Carlo Opera House will have been re- 
moved, so that the main floor can be 
used for dining and dancing. Even the 
Prince's box will be usurped — for the 
installation of TV cameras. 

One might be led to assume that tele- 
vision in Monaco is somewhat primi- 
tive. Nothing could be further from 
the truth. In some respects, in fact, it 
is more advanced than television in the 
United States. As part of the Eurovis- 
ion system, covering most of the coun- 
tries of Western Europe, Tele-Monte 
Carlo is able to pick up important news 
events live from the major capitals. 

Nor could it be said that the Prince 
and Princess are not aware of American 
television fare. Viewers in Monaco see 
many filmed American shows — includ- 
ing Westerns (Wagon Train is a big 
favorite), old movies and situation 
comedies. This being the case, it is rea- 
sonable to assume that there are some 
evenings when Their Serene Highnesses 
watch the good guys and bad guys as 
eagerly as we do in the States. 

As a rule, however, the cultural taste 
of Princess Grace and her husband is 
much more elevated. And it is toward 
that end — of better material on TV— 
they have lent their sponsorship, pres- 
tige and support to the International 
Festival. Actually, the idea for the fes- 
tival was not the Prince's own. It was 
suggested to him by his American ad- 
visers, who pointed out that, while 
there are numerous international movie 
festivals, TV awards had yet to cross 
international boundaries. 

"The Prince was happy to under- 
take the TV festival," an American 
spokesman for him said. "Monaco for 
years has given awards in literature, 
music and art, and with television now 
being actively produced in thirty-seven 
countries, according to latest United 
Nations statistics, the Prince sincerely 
believes that TV can become our most 
effective means of international com- 
munication." 

The expectation is that the awards to 

be given at Monte Carlo will become t 

the most important in all television. V 

They won't put the Emmies out of busi- « 

ness. But the Emmies may soon find 

they have real competition. 

55 









MOVIE IMMORTALS on TV 







The juvenile Jackie. Scene is from "The Champ," one of many hits in which Cooper and Wallace Beery were co-starred. 



by LEON RICE 



56 



Last fall, Jackie Cooper's Hennesey began its second 
year's new episodes over CBS-TV. Jackie is charm- 
ing and amusing as the young Navy medic who's in and 
out of comedy situations — and more or less in constant 
pursuit of heroine Abby Dalton. The writer of this effec- 
tive TV series, Don McGuire, is co-owner — with Cooper 
— of the Hennesey Company which controls the show. 
Thus its success on the TV screen also means a substan- 
tial financial success for its star. A comparable partner- 
ship existed in Jack's prior TV series, The People's 
Choice, which involved a three-way participation by 
Jackie, George Burns and creator-producer Irving 
Brecher. 

The recent release to TV of so much old film puts 
Cooper in the somewhat unique position of being be- 
fore the public in footage reflecting his acting ability 
from the age of three to thirty-five. While no one view- 
ing Hennesey would ever dream of thinking of the suave, 
finished actor as an "oldster," Cooper has been per- 
forming on screen, stage and TV for thirty-two years! 
Yet, no matter what part he plays, you can see Skippy, 
the Ail-American Boy, the true spirit of American man- 
hood, revealing a boyish appeal, charm and wistfulness. 
Unlike other child actors, who depended on one care- 
fully maintained acting style for effectiveness, Jackie 
Cooper was and is a versatile and intelligent performer. 
He is a "natural" in the theatrical sense, making his 
own contribution to the role he plays, in addition to 
performing in the routine sense. 

Jackie is one of the few child stars who ever success- 
fully grew up in the public eye. He survived childhood 
success in movies, achieved maturity, fought his way 
to the top in two new media: The stage and television. 
Except for the war years — 1942 to 1945 — at no time since 



he was eight years old has he ever made less than 
$50,000 a year. (By the time he was ten, he was earning 
more than the President of the United States!) 

Born on September 15, 1922, Jackie first broke into 
the movies at the age of three. His mother was a re- 
hearsal pianist at Fox. During the casting of a number 
called "That's You, Baby," for "The Fox Movietone 
Follies," she watched them take hundreds of tests of 
children. She felt her son Jackie could sing better. So 
she asked her mother, who took care of the child while 
she was at work, to bring him in for a test but not to 
tell anyone who he was. He got the part. After that, 
Jackie appeared in bit parts in several musicals, in- 
cluding "Sunny Side Up." He got some parts in Lloyd 
Hamilton comedies and then was put under contract to 
Hal Roach at $50 a week for the "Our Gang" comedies, 
now also familiar to television viewers as "Little Ras- 
cals." 

At this point, Hal Roach tried to get movie rights to 
"Skippy," the famous comic strip by Percy Crosby, but 
Paramount beat him to it. They had a script prepared, 
and wanted to test Jackie Cooper for the role, but 
Roach was so annoyed he refused to release the boy. 
Eddie Montaigne, Jackie's godfather and a producer at 
Paramount, suggested a secret screen test. If it was no 
good, they'd forget the whole thing. If the test went well, 
they would try again to convince Hal Roach. The test 
was successful and Paramount persuaded Roach to lend 
Jackie to the studio for the picture. Roach agreed only 
on condition that Jackie sign a new contract with him. 
This contract paid Jackie $100 a week when he worked 
and $50 when he didn't. Jackie was a huge hit in 
"Skippy" and skyrocketed to stardom at the age of eight. 

For "Skippy," Jackie got only $900 — six weeks' work 



PERENNIAL SUCCESS 








Adult and still successful! Cooper in his current role in the 
TV series Hennesey, with Abby Dalton and Henry Kulky. 



Young love. Romance at high-school age 
— with Betty Field in movie, "What a Life." 



at $100 a week, plus a $300 bonus Paramount added in 
appreciation of the boy's work. Not too long thereafter, 
MGM purchased Jackie's contract from Roach at a figure 
rumored to be more than $100,000! And, in their new 
contract, they gave Jackie his new income — $1300 a 
week, with options for two more years at increased 
salaries. 

"Skippy" had made Cooper the nation's most popular 
child actor. MGM quickly pressed the advantage, and 
Jackie was starred in a sequel called "Sooky." Following 
this, he scored with Wallace Beery in "The Champ." 
Then came "Peck's Bad Boy," "The Bowery," and 
"Treasure Island." He remained under contract to MGM 
until 1937. By this time, Jackie had started to grow up 
and adolescence dimmed him as a box-office draw, al- 
though he continued to get star billing and top money in 
pictures like "Seventeen," "The Spirit of Culver," 
"Syncopation," "Where Are Your Children?" and "What 
a Life." 

In 1941, when Jackie was nineteen, his mother died. 
They had been very close, and she had carefully pro- 
tected his finances in the years before rigid laws con- 
trolled the earnings of child stars. Trust funds and an- 
nuities had been set up so that Jackie had no money 
worries. 

When World War II broke out, Jackie — then twenty — 
enlisted in the Navy, serving three years. With his serv- 
ice discharge, in 1945, began the lowest period in Coop- 
er's career. He was bitterly resentful of people who 
reminded him of his former greatness. He was confused 
and insecure, doubting his own talent. He made some 
quickie movies in Hollywood, including one with Jackie 
Coogan called "Kilroy Was Here," but starring roles 
were no longer readily coming his way. He was tired of 



fast-buck pictures which were only justified on the basis 
that they made money. Believing that an actor's only 
resources are experience, training and study, Cooper 
came to New York in 1947, to try to break into the 
Broadway stage. 

For the next few years, Cooper devoted himself to 
becoming a finished actor. He gained experience by 
appearing in summer stock. And, in 1948, he made his 
Broadway debut in "Magnolia Alley." The production 
was a flop on which Jackie lost $15,000 of his own money. 
Following this disaster, he toured in the national com- 
pany of "Mister Roberts" in the top comedy role of En- 
sign Pulver. 

He returned to Broadway in 1951 in "Remains to Be 
Seen," in which he scored a great hit. By this time, 
Jackie was in great demand for TV appearances. And, 
since then, he has appeared on every major TV show, 
some of them several times. He has also directed several 
programs, including the highly successful The People's 
Choice. The amusing Hennesey series followed. 

Cooper is married to the former Barbara Kraus and 
they now have three children — Russell born in 1956, 
Julie in 1957 and Cristina in 1959. He also has a four- 
teen-year-old son, John Anthony, the child of a former 
marriage. 

Since the release of old films to television, the public 
has the complete 32-year career of Jackie Cooper 
available for viewing. The earliest "Our Gang" Come- 
dies, "The Champ," "Peck's Bad Boy" and others. It is 
possible to contrast the growing, charmingly wistful 
boy with the adult and polished actor of Hennesey. And 
. . . though Jackie may be grown-up and a more mature 
actor . . . the little boy still looks out through his eyes 
and shows up in his irrepressible grin. 



57 



All This— And Ellen, Too! 



(Continued from page 41) 
looks soap-and-water scrubbed. She 
was twenty-three last April, and has 
been a performer thirteen of those 
years. At ten, she was on radio in 
Juvenile Jury and Bob Emery's Rain- 
bow House. At thirteen, she was on 
Broadway, first understudying and then 
playing Flora in "The Innocents," later 
touring with the national company for 
eight months in the United States and 
Canada. 

Again on Broadway, she was fea- 
tured in "Lace on Her Petticoat" and, 
off-Broadway, in "Livin' the Life" — 
playing Tom Sawyer's Becky Thatcher 
—and "The King and the Duke," in 
which she sang and danced as well as 
acted. Stock experience has included 
ingenue leads in "A Roomful of Roses," 
"Anniversary Waltz," and "Time Out 
for Ginger." She has done a lot of radio 
and television, had featured roles in 
radio daytime dramas such as Road Of 
Life and Ma Perkins. 

Patricia was still appearing in Ma 
Perkins, and was also in "Gypsy," the 
Broadway hit starring Ethel Merman — 
Patricia was playing Marjorie May, one 
of the girls in Gypsy's vaudeville act — 
when she decided to give up the latter 
job to concentrate mainly on As The 
World Turns. She gave up her nick- 
name of "Patsy" at about the same 
time. "My family had always called me 
that and it became my professional 
name, too. But, as I grew out of child 
parts, I kept wishing for my given name 
of Patricia. It was such a pleasure to be 
leaving childish roles behind, and to 
play more mature ones, that it was time 
to make the change." 

Part of the reason for this new ma- 
turity was Patricia's marriage, in June, 
1959, to Charles Debrovner, who is now 
interning at New York's Bellevue Hos- 
pital and preparing to specialize in 
obstetrics and gynecology. She and 
Chuck met at a party when she was a 



junior in high school and he was a 
senior. 

Actually, at the time of that first 
meeting, young Patsy had come home 
from a rehearsal, deciding she was too 
tired to go to a party. But her mother 
suggested that, since she had been 
working so hard, she ought to have a 
little fun now. So Patsy went, and 
Chuck was there, and they began to 
date. When he entered Yale, she was his 
date whenever he got home, although 
neither had any idea then that it meant 
more than going out together. "For- 
tunately, I never had to play love 
scenes in plays or TV before I fell in 
love with Chuck," she says. "Because 
they were easy after that!" 

Their wedding was planned for Sat- 
urday, June 6. Patricia was already in 
rehearsal for "Gypsy" in March, pre- 
paratory to an out-of-town tour and 
the Broadway opening in late May. 
But she felt secure in the belief that 
arrangements had been made for her 
to be off the show that Saturday night 
in June, and also for a brief honey- 
moon. 

However, an actress friend had 
warned her not to count on it, so — just 
to be safe — the wedding was put off 
until Sunday, June 7. Happily, as it 
turned out, because Patricia did have 
to work that Saturday, and also had to 
return for the Monday night perform- 
ance! Only when the show took a 
week's holiday, at Christmastime, did 
she, and Chuck have their honeymoon 
trip. 

The wedding went off beautifully. 
Patricia was a dazzling bride in full- 
length white peau de soie gown with a 
little train. Her only sister, Joan, was 
her matron of honor. Chuck's only sis- 
ter, Brenda, was maid of honor. Joan's 
husband, pediatrician Dr. Stuart Danoff , 
was best man. A hundred and seventy- 
five guests sat down to the wedding 
dinner. 



T 

v 
n 

58 



PLAY EDITOR 

WHO ARE YOUR FAVORITES? 

I want to read stories about (list TV, radio or recording stars): 



ACTOR 



ACTRESS 



ID 
(2). 
(3). 
(4). 



(!)■ 

(2). 

(3) 

(4). 



2-61 



T/ie features I like best in this issue of TV RADIO MIRROR are: 

(') (3) 

(2) (4) 

Name Age. . . 

Address 

Paste this ballot on a postcard and send it to TV Radio 
Mirror, Box 2150, Grand Central Station, New York 17, N.Y. 



Meanwhile, Patricia had somehow 
found time to find an apartment and 
have it ready. Three-and-a-half rooms, 
on a sunshiny corner, not far from the 
Washington Square Arch at the foot 
of Fifth Avenue. With white walls, 
contemporary furnishings, and "sort of 
autumn colors — beiges and browns and 
the greens, touched up with black and 
bright orange. And with a counterpoint 
of the Wedgwood blue that Chuck and 
I both like. 

"Some couples can't agree on the style 
or the color scheme," Patricia observes, 
"but we were fortunate. Chuck and I 
have about the same tastes. We took 
the same delight in doing some of the 
work together — like staining and var- 
nishing our cabinets and library 
shelves. We reserved one section, which 
goes right up to the ceiling, for his 
medical library. 

"We're glad that we married when 
we did, instead of waiting. It's good to 
be married and settled, when both are 
so busy. Now we would have less and 
less time for dates. Chuck works very 
hard, and I have a schedule which 
leaves time for a good home life, but 
little for night life. And it's the home 
life that is important." 

Patricia enjoys being a working wife, 
with all its demands, but home -making 
doesn't require all her time right now. 
"The first year was an enormous chal- 
lenge. I had so much to learn. How to 
keep everything running smoothly, how 
to cook and get a dinner on the table in 
time, with the hot things hot enough 
and the cold things cold enough. My 
marriage and home had to be the focus 
of my life for the first twelve months, 
and I didn't want to undertake too 
much else." 

The first time she planned a big fam- 
ily dinner, she also planned to have 
some friends in to dinner a few nights 
before. Preparing that meal was going 
to be a sort of "dry run" for the family 
event. Chuck loved the way she fixed 
sauteed chicken livers, with rice and 
mushrooms, just for themselves. But 
guests meant having a greater quantity. 
"I asked some of the girls in 'Gypsy' 
how much rice I should use, and they 
told me. But I wasn't experienced 
enough to know that I needed a great 
deal more of the sauce, too. I poured it 
all over the rice at once, and of course 
it absorbed, and there was none left 
over for last-minute serving. It was 
the driest rice anybody ever ate!" 

Appalled by this fiasco, she lost her 
nerve and called her mother. Mrs. 
Bruder suggested roast beef as the main 
course, and came over early, on the 
day of the family dinner, to lend a 
hand. Of course, everything turned out 
fine. And the next time, there was no 
problem. 

Except the one that developed toward 
the end of that first year, when she and 
Chuck discovered they had each gained 
about five unwanted pounds. "It was 
those cheese and cream sauces I was 
serving on vegetables, and the fancy 
meat dishes, and the enormous desserts. 
I was so pleased about cooking that 1 
kept trying to excel my previous efforts. 



My mother had taught me her dessert 
specialties — cheese cake, fruit cake, 
brownies, pies — and I put those on the 
table in addition to ice cream topped 
with berries, which is a favorite of 
Chuck's. Now most of our vegetables 
are plain, our meat is broiled, and we 
go more easy on the desserts." 

With housekeeping well under con- 
trol last summer, she was in just the 
right mood for the attractive part of 
Ellen, when it came along. As a doc- 
tor's wife and a doctor's sister-in-law, 
Patricia finds it fascinating to be in a 
drama concerned with the problems of 
doctors and their families. On the 
show, Ellen is the young widow of Dr. 
Tim Cole, the stepdaughter of Dr. 
Casson, and is surrounded by romantic 
young medicos. 

Patricia loves being an actress. Look- 
ing back, she realizes it was pure play 
to a ten-year-old and to a teenager. 
"If it hadn't been, my parents wouldn't 
have permitted me to do it. I never 
remember being nervous — I just went 
on and did the job and enjoyed it. My 
life wouldn't have been half so inter- 
esting doing anything else. It's still 
wonderful makebelieve for me." 

The work, however, is strictly for 
real. Her schedule begins with the 
ringing of the alarm clock at 6 a.m. and 
arrival at the studio for 7:30 rehearsal. 
Rehearsals continue, with brief coffee 
breaks, until air time. If she is going 
to be on the next day's show, she re- 
mains for several hours for the script 
readings and camera blocking. If she 
has a day off, she goes supermarket 
shopping, puts a couple of loads of 
laundry through the washing machine, 
shampoos her hair, does housekeeping. 

When both the laundry and her hair 
are dry, she starts dinner so that Chuck 
can come home to a pleasant, relaxing 
dining table. If he is on duty at the 
hospital that night, she has dinner there 
with him. But, three or four nights out 
of every week, she has lines to learn, 
with that early-morning alarm in mind. 
On Saturday nights, Patricia and Chuck 
celebrate with a dinner brought home 
from the delicatessen, with none of the 
fuss of cooking or washing pots and 
pans. 

She has a spare-time interest, started 
backstage at "Gypsy" during waits. She 
began to paint in oils, only portraits, 
but was quick at getting the likeness. 
Now she has completed about half a 
dozen — "there were a few I gave up 
because they weren't turning out right." 
She wants to do the whole family, a 
gallery which will eventually include 
her sister's three children, as well as all 
the grown-ups. Also Rose, who comes 
in to clean for her — and times the iron- 
ing so she can put the board up near 
the TV set and watch As The World 
Turns. 

This is just the kind of dramatic serial 
Patricia wanted: "The story of two 
families, played by nice people. It's 
wonderful to be the same girl, but to 
be placed in different situations." And 
Ellen Lowell Cole is just the kind of 
girl she finds interesting: "A sympa- 
thetic part — a girl who has lived, and 
suffered, and grown." 




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Accent on Truth 



(Continued from page 20) 
Although mine was a genuine accent, 
I had to adapt it to theirs." The trace 
that now remains in his speech seems 
part and parcel of Michael Ingram's 
personality. It goes with the strong, 
well-cut features and deep brown eyes, 
set in a somewhat ascetic face. With 
the dark hair romantically touched with 
gray, and lean figure just an inch short 
of six feet. The quiet manner, with its 
suggestion of underlying force and 
purpose. And it goes with a certain in- 
nate reticence, which makes it difficult 
for him to talk about himself too freely 
or to expose his innermost feelings. 

As a high-school boy in Berlin, in 
the middle '30s, Michael met stage and 
opera performers. He liked to visit 
backstage. But his conservative family 
would have thought a professional act- 
ing career unthinkable for him. The 
nearest he came to it was carrying a 
spear, with other students who had 
been recruited as extras. "I carried 
more spears than anyone else. It was 
a chance to watch rehearsals, to be on 
the great stage of the opera house 
among the singers and actors, with the 
lights pouring down on us. Quite a 
wonderful feeling for a young boy." 

Because of the German dictatorship, 
his mother urged him to leave and go 
to the United States. "Too many men 
in our family had been lost in wars. 
She saw another approaching and en- 
couraged me to go. So I was suddenly 
on my own, in a strange country and 
in a strange city — Chicago." 

He got a small job in a meat-packing 
plant, which kept him housed and eat- 
ing. But mind and soul had to feed 
on something more than that. Some- 
one told him about Chicago's Good- 
man Theater and its fine school for 
actors. He applied, won a scholarship. 
"I suppose my accent helped. Most of 
the students were Midwesterners, and 
I had something different to offer." 

Daytimes he worked at the theater 
school, continuing at night in the meat- 
packing plant, with only a few hours 
of sleep in between. After a year of 



that, he had lost forty pounds, didn't 
know how he could continue his double 
life. It seemed plain he would have to 
give up theater and resign himself to 
business. Then he stumbled into radio 
acting, through one of those lucky 
flukes every actor dreams of. 

An upper classman at the school 
lived in his neighborhood, and they 
often went home together. The boy had 
to stop at the NBC studio for an audi- 
tion one day. Michael decided to wait 
in an outer office. The boy finally came 
out, accompanied by the man who had 
conducted the audition. "Come back 
in six months or a year, when you have 
had more experience," the man was 
saying. Then he turned to Michael, 
and automatically said, "Next!" 

"I started to tell him I was just 
waiting for my friend. But he was al- 
ready going back into the other room, 
and automatically I got up and fol- 
lowed him. When we were inside, he 
saw that my hands were empty. It was 
the custom to bring something to read, 
but I hadn't expected to read. He 
handed me a couple of pages of script 
that were lying around — and disap- 
peared into the control room. I stood 
there — and read the script, cold. He 
came out, said, 'All right. Are you free 
tonight?' " 

It was a part in a show that evening. 
Michael was so frightened he went 
through it as if in a trance. Afterward, 
he had no idea of what he had done. 
But it must have been all right — be- 
cause he got a part for the next day. 
From then on, he had trouble finding 
time for his school work, though it was 
too important to him to slight it. Now, 
there were so many radio jobs that 
he could give up his night job in the 
packing plant. 

The radio studios teemed with ex- 
perienced and competent actors who 
disdained doing more than merely read 
over a script before going on. But 
Michael was still struggling with his 
heavily accented English, still getting 
used to new words and phrases, still 
feeling the need to work over his lines 



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and study the characterization. Since 
this sort of thing seemed to be frowned 
upon by more facile actors, he had to 
sneak off in corners. It took quite a 
while before he had the courage to 
work out in the open and not care 
who was watching. 

The language problem was trouble- 
some in many ways. Buying sus- 
penders, he translated literally from the 
German, asked for "pants holders." His 
accent turned the words into "pen- 
holders" — and that's what he got. "I 
was too timid to protest, so I ended up 
with a pen which I didn't need, and 
with my pants still slipping." 

When he was graduated from the 
three-year course at Goodman, he was 
fairly well known as an actor in their 
stage productions and as a radio actor. 
It seemed the time to break away from 
radio and storm Broadway, his real ob- 
jective. He had been saving his money 
to tide him over the first few months 
in New York. 

Theater people in New York en- 
couraged him. They said nice things — 
even hopeful things. But nothing really 
happened. He met many old friends 
from Chicago radio. "Oh, I didn't know 
you were here," they would say. And 
would tell him about broadcasting op- 
portunities that were just right for 
him. Without wanting it, he was right 
back in radio again, this time in New 
York studios, but as busy as ever. 

War threatened. He wanted to do 
what he could to help the cause of his 
new country. His greatest contribution 
seemed to lie in the field of broad- 
casting — through the Voice of America. 
Throughout World War II, he broadcast 
overseas, became a specialist attached 
to the staff until the offices were moved 
to Washington. At one period, he super- 
vised European production. Later, he 
worked in New York as a free-lance, 
going wherever events and people could 
be covered with his portable tape re- 
corder, writing his own feature ma- 
terial, broadcasting the American point 
of view wherever it could penetrate to 
peoples hungry to hear it. It's work 
he continues to do. 

As a radio actor, he was playing in 
so many daytime dramatic serials that 
it would be easier to name the ones he 
wasn't in than the ones he was. His 
accent cast him frequently as the heavy 
or villain, but almost as frequently as 
the romantic hero. On stage, he has 
been in a couple of Broadway plays. 
"Men in Shadow," a war play which 
was popular in England but enjoyed 
only a brief run in the United States. 
And "House in Paris," in which he had 
the male lead. 

He never had to "make rounds" or 
contrive "contacts." Someone always 
seemed to hear of a producer or di- 
rector who was looking for a certain 
type — and remembered him. 

"I got into television," says Michael 
Ingram, "the same way I got into radio 
— by chance. Someone asked me to 
read for a part. I got it. It was in the 
early days of TV, when you couldn't 
move more than a few inches one way 



or another without being off-camera. 
The lights were unbearably hot. But 
one part led to another, and I was in 
practically all the important nighttime 
shows. 

"I remember one, in particular. I was 
a Frenchman, involved with a girl and 
up to no good. We were about to 
indulge in champagne, in an intimate 
little scene. The waiter, a nervous 
extra, was having trouble getting the 
cork out of the bottle. The camera left 
him struggling and came back to us. 

"The girl and I had to ad lib. But 
we couldn't ad lib around the plot, 
because we weren't supposed to be 
talking freely in front of the waiter. 
I was still not too proficient in English 
and had little small talk. But somehow 
I managed — although, to this day, I 
can't tell you what I said!" 

It wasn't the only nightmare experi- 
ence on camera. A well-known de- 
signer of women's fashions had been 
scheduled to narrate his own fashion 
show, but suddenly went cold about 
appearing. Michael received a hurried 
call to substitute for him, •maybe be- 
cause they are somewhat the same 
type, maybe because both have slight 
accents. He was never sure why. There 
was no prepared script. The designer 
wouldn't have needed one, but Michael 
did. And he still wonders how he got 
through that evening. 

Directors have always called him 
when they needed special kinds of ac- 
cents. His phone rang late one night 
and he was asked if he could do a 
Malayan. He said yes, of course — -with- 



out having the faintest idea what it 
should be like. But he figured no one 
else knew, either. No one complained 
about that broadcast, so he probably 
was right. When there is time, he takes 
no chances, does his research and study 
meticulously. 

At the beginning, Stefan Koda was 
merely an incidental character in TV's 
Young Doctor Malone. But the part 
grew and grew, under Michael Ingram's 
sympathetic portrayal, until it has be- 
come one of the pivotal roles. "Stefan 
Koda's life may have been different 
in many ways from the lives of other 
men," Michael observes, "but the dif- 
ference is more in the scale and scope. 
He has gone through violent upheaval 
— but, in more minor ways, others have 
these upheavals, too. Others have had 
his feelings of being rejected, of want- 
ing to belong. And of knowing that it 
isn't any outside evil force that makes 
people hurt each other, but something 
they are fighting in their own selves. 

"Stefan Koda is a man without bit- 
terness. He realizes that all of us are 
apt to transmit our own hurts to others. 
Something happens that wounds us. 
We pass that along, increasing the 
hurts of the world. An endless stream. 
As a doctor, Stefan has the advantage 
of helping to influence the mind, as 
well as heal the body. He tries to use 
that influence well. I enjoy the experi- 
ence of playing him." 

Michael also enjoys the cast and the 
rest of the people connected with the 
show. "An intelligent group. Not the 
kind that can only talk shop, or gossip." 



The actors don't always know how 
the story will develop. And this, he 
believes, is an asset. "Life also is de- 
veloping from day to day. We don't 
know what will happen tomorrow, or 
next month, or next year. It's the same 
with the story. I immerse myself in 
the character, and what happens to him 
becomes as fresh and interesting to 
me as it does to the audience." 

He does narration for films shown 
in Europe. He loves the theater, goes 
"in a completely uncritical attitude, 
like anyone else in the audience, and 
I find myself right back where I was 
as a boy, watching the play for the 
sheer magic of it." He brings this 
same uncritical enjoyment to concerts. 
His mother once tried to make him 
learn the piano, but he had such a 
good teacher, who played his pieces 
so beautifully, that he couldn't bear to 
follow with his own clumsy efforts. 

When he walks along the streets 
today, Michael Ingram is recognized. 
Letters from schoolgirls beg for a lock 
of his hair — a few strands, to add to 
their "collections." Letters from a 
slightly higher age level frequently 
offer advice. About what he should do 
in the story — whether he should marry 
or remain a romantic bachelor. 

Many women urge the latter course 
upon him. They picture him as the 
perennial bachelor type. They don't 
want the image blurred. It's that Old 
World charm. The intriguing reticence. 
The air of mystery, and that interesting 
trace of accent. All part and parcel of 
Stefan Koda — and of Michael Ingram. 




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61 



What's New on the West Coast 



(Continued from page 7) 



something feminine like knitting. 
Groans Jack, "That gal's hands are 
faster than our eyes and I don't like 
the smooth way she rakes in the pots — 
no beginner was ever that smooth." 
As for Dot, she is as wide-eyed as ever. 
But, if one looks hard enough, there is 
a knowing gleam in her innocent gaze. 

Playing the Field : John Raitt is one 
singer with a strong sense of responsi- 
bility toward his public. "A lot of 
entertainers resent having to repeat the 
same old numbers they made popular. 
But I feel that, as long as the public 
wants to hear a song, it's my duty to 
sing it." John has set his sights on a 
musical for this year — "Brave New 
World," based on the book by famed 
author Aldous Huxley. The musical will 
present the words and music of Larry 
Rosenthal and Franklin Lacey. John 
denies he plans to "go Western" as so 
many other stars have. "I love working 
on TV," he explains, "but I feel the 
transition from singing to acting is a 
great step and I'm not sure I care to do 
it. What I'd really go for is the kind of 
series where the emphasis is on singing, 
with occasional bits of acting in- 
between. It has always seemed to me 
that, when singers talk about acting, 
they're either running away from the 
problems of what they are or trying 
to prove they can be something 
else." . . . Big Clint Walker's book, 
"Prospect for Living," which gives de- 
tails about his diet and exercise regi- 
men, plus hints on how to prospect in 
isolated areas as he once did, is due 
out in the spring, Bobbs-Merrill pub- 
lishing. 

Jet-Propelled Doll: Instead of "busy 
as a bee," Hollywood now says, "busy 
as Connie," meaning Connie Stevens. 
What with movies, TV and cutting rec- 
ords, she has bought a musical comedy, 
"April Land," and plans to produce it 
off-Broadway. "Wish I could star in it, 
too," she muses wistfully, "but I 




couldn't get off from Hawaiian Eye for 
that long." Connie is also hoping for a 
twelve -week vacation this year, but 
not to loll in the sun — she plans to do 
the night-club circuit and is working 
with writers on special material for 
this tour. In her "spare time," she is 
busy designing hats and dresses for the 
swank Beverly Hills shop she opens 
this month. ... A Pleasure All Around: 
The invitation from Paramount read 
"The pleasure of your company" is re- 
quested at a welcome-back party for 
the cast and crew of "The Pleasure of 
His Company." And the affair turned 
out to be pleasurable for guests, stars 
and studio officials. Debbie Reynolds, 
whose first TV spec had aired a few 
nights before, was in great good humor 
despite some poor reviews dealt her 
show. "I'm not let down in the slight- 




Thanksgiving weekend wedding merged 
62 star Debbie Reynolds and Harry Karl. 



Actor-turned-author is Clint Walker 
— his book comes out this spring. 



est," she insisted. "My contract with 
ABC calls for two more specs, and I'm 
determined to get to work on the next 
one as soon as I can. Our rating was 
good and the fan reaction was terrific. 
And, frankly, I'm more concerned about 
pleasing the public than a few critics." 
With this attitude, co-star Fred Astaire 
was in complete accord. Although his 
first two specials got rave notices, the 
third fared less well. "In my own mind, 
it was the best of the three and the 
public felt the same — that's all that 
counts," said Fred. "Those of us who 
took part in all three shows had no 
doubt that the third was more original 
and polished than the others." Debbie 
was unescorted, but Fred had brought 
his lovely nineteen-year-old daughter, 
Ava. She looked exquisitely sophisti- 
cated in black dress and red coat, se- 
lected especially for a trip to San Fran- 
cisco where "The Pleasure" company 




Dorothy Provine has a new pastime . . . 
and it's keeping the boys guessing. 



locationed for a few days. Though Ava 
bears a striking resemblance to Fred's 
long-time dance partner, Ginger Rog- 
ers, she has no yearning for the stage. 
"I'm going to business college in Santa 
Monica," she laughed. Tab Hunter, the 
other star of the company, was also in 
high spirits. His court case, involving 
a dog-beating complaint, had been set- 
tled in his favor the day before. "I'd like 
to point out one thing that wasn't prop- 
erly explained at the trial," he said. "It 
was not neighbors who signed the 
charge, but apartment-house transients 
in the area. My neighbors stood up for 
me in court. Still, it's soured me on 
living there. Anyone want a home in 
Glendale — cheap?" 

My Card, Sir: At the opening of the 
second Paladin Room in Apache Junc- 
tion, Arizona, Dick Boone presented the 
manager of Hotel Superstition Ho with 
a ceramic tile replica of the Have Gun, 
Will Travel card that is a feature of 
the show. Done by Sasha Brastoff, the 
tile card is 11 x 21 and is now on display 
in the Paladin Room adjacent to the 
cocktail lounge called Jake's Saloon. 
With a decor of red brocade walls, mar- 
ble tables and tufted black satin love- 
seats of the 1870 era, it compares fa- 
vorably with the first Paladin Room in 
San Francisco, where Dick left the red- 
knight holster as a memento of his visit. 
The star is thinking seriously of a con- 
test for the best Paladin cocktail — only 
bartenders being eligible to compete. . . . 
A Clan What Are a Clan: In the opin- 
ion of Rosemary Clooney, the famous 
"clan" of Sinatra, Dean Martin, etc., has 
nothing on her "Roxbury Clan." "We 
have a number of film and TV per- 
formers on Roxbury Drive in Beverly 
Hills, several with substantial families. 
I have five, Jeanne Crain has six, and 
there are others. And if we are not as 
famous as Mr. Sinatra's clan, we sure 
do outnumber them." 



All the Way to Hawaii 

(Continued from page 24) 
seventeen, and just married. "I had 
always been on the fringe of show 
business," he says. "My mother is a 
publicist and my stepfather was one of 
Chicago's better-known disc jockeys. 
But when Joan and I eloped, I had 
no vocation, no real ambition. But I 
couldn't wait. I was married. Finally, I 
took a job as a dock worker." 

It wasn't particularly inspiring or 
challenging work, picking things up and 
putting them down somewhere else. 
"Junior," as Bob was called by the old- 
er men, was soon expressing the exu- 
berance of youth in song. He didn't 
give it much thought until one of the 
other dock workers told him he was 
wasting his time juggling freight: 
"You're a nice-looking boy, you have 
a natural singing voice. Now's the time 
to get into something that you really 
want to do and that will pay big divi- 
dends." 

Bob discussed it with Joan. "But we 
didn't know anything about how you 
make it in this business, so I talked to 
my mother. She threw up her hands. 
She knew how long it had taken 
Frankie Laine to get someplace, be- 
cause she had done publicity for him. 
Her attitude was, 'Why play the long 
shots?' 

"But I started studying privately at 
the Metropolitan School of Music and 
later at Chicago Musical College. I 
wasn't very good, but I had an oppor- 
tunity to see young kids who were be- 
ginning as I was, and some of them 
were starting to move. Nothing big, but 
as dance-band singers and night-club 
entertainers, and I began to get enthu- 
siastic about it." 

His first appearance earned him an 
even five dollars. He met a band leader 
who needed a vocalist, and Bob turned 
professional on the spot. "We played 
college gigs. It was tremendous expe- 
rience because, many times, there 
wouldn't even be a mike. The first time, 
I really didn't know anything about 
working professionally. The pianist 
asked me what I knew, and I told him 
'September in the Rain.' 

"He said, 'What key?' and I was lost. 
I finally told him, T sing it like this — ' 
and hummed a few bars. He looked at 
me like 'Get up and show the teeth, kid, 
but forget the singing.' " 

However, it was a beginning, and 
Bob began to learn. Meanwhile, he had 
left the docks and taken a job deliver- 
ing milk. Also meanwhile, he began to 
acquire a family: Two daughters, Joan 
and Nancy. By the time he went into 
a suburban night club called the Bali 
Hai, he was earning two hundred dol- 
lars a week — and still driving a milk 
truck. 

"I wanted to accumulate enough 
money to invest in myself, but my 
family had to eat, too. I worked the 
milk route from six till two. Then, from 
four to nine, I worked as a laborer in 
a candy factory. On weekends, I sang 
at the Bali Hai, sometimes until three 
or four in the morning. 

"In the first five years of our mar- 
riage, we managed to save six thou- 



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sand dollars, but I wasn't getting any- 
where with the career. I decided to 
make a break to a club downtown and 
sort of sold them a bill of goods at a 
place that was just opening. I had my 
own group and I worked out a deal 
with the owner to take a percentage of 
the net profit. 

"At the age of twenty-two, I learned 
the difference between 'gross' and 'net.' 
We were there two weeks and it cost 
me a hundred-and-forty dollars be- 
cause I had guaranteed the band's sal- 
aries!" 

By now, Bob had begun to wonder 
if music might not be a blind alley for 
him. He had yet to sing in the big-time, 
and it was the heyday of the teen-age 
vocalist — Presley, Pat Boone, the 
youngsters who were selling the rec- 
ords and drawing the crowds. 

Bob Schneideman, associate profes- 
sor of the School of Speech at North- 
western University, had become one of 
his close friends and advised him to 
study acting. "If you should hit as a 
big-time singer," Schneideman pointed 
out, "and went into movies, you'd be 
equipped as an actor." 

Thereafter, Bob studied informally 
with him and, by the time he decided 
he was on a vocal treadmill, Schneide- 
man had given him real encourage- 
ment. Bob concluded his future was in 
acting. 

"I went to New York," he recalls, 
"and spent three weeks drinking coffee 
with some of the sick actors in Dow- 
ney's — the guys who look down their 
noses at everything and say, 'Yeah . . . 
yeah.' This was in 1957, and everything 
was going West. 

"So I went West, too. I didn't know 
anything about Hollywood. All I had 
was an association through Nick Adams, 
whom I had met when he was in Chi- 
cago on tour. Nick started taking me 
along on his interviews and introduced 
me to people. Finally, I got a non- 
speaking part in 'Juvenile Jungle' and 
spent two days on the beach at Santa 
Monica kissing a girl who was a strip - 
teaser by profession. 

"When I told Joan about it, she said, 
'I don't know about this. I've put up 
with the night clubs and the singing, 
but this acting business doesn't sound 
like it's going to be so great.' " 

Which was more prophetic than she 
knew. His next job was in a picture 
called "Thundering Jets," and Bob 
turned in a performance which he calls 
"unforgettably terrible— if I ever get 
enough money, I'm going to buy every 
print and destroy it." 

After that, he didn't work for nine 
and a half months. The money he had 
saved was gone. He tried to get a job 
as a milk driver, but even there he 
couldn't find anything. Finally, he ap- 
plied for unemployment compensation 
"and, for the first time in my life, I 
started borrowing five dollars here and 
ten dollars there — not from people who 
would think I was a dead-beat, but 
from people who knew I would pay it 
back." 

He adds, with obvious satisfaction, 
that he has paid it back, every cent. 

Eventually, things started coming his 
way again. He did eleven shows for 
Ziv, and the producer of The Aqua- 



nauts, which debuted this year, wanted 
Bob for one of the leads. But, by then, 
Bob was under contract to Warner 
Bros. 

He got the job as Tom Lopaka in a 
borrowed tuxedo. "Nick had tickets for 
the Academy Awards, and wasn't going 
to take a girl because he wanted to talk 
business — he was then trying to sell 
The Rebel. He called me, but I didn't 
have a tuxedo, so he loaned me his. 
Then he called the rental place and told 
the girl there, 'I'm not going to give 
you a nickel for the tuxedo, baby, but 
I'm going to tell everybody there where 
I got it.' 

"So we went to the Academy Awards 
— both of us in borrowed tuxedoes! Bob 
Wagner was at the table with the peo- 
ple from Warner Bros. Bob knew me 
and liked me, and when they told him 
they were looking for another fellow 
for Hawaiian Eye, he said he knew just 
the guy and insisted on bringing me 
over. I was unemployed and had been 
lying in the sun most of the time, so I 
was really tanned. All you could see 
were two holes where the eyes were. 
And that was about it. I was in Hawai- 
ian Eye." 

Bob and Joan and their two little 
girls now live in a comfortable apart- 
ment like several thousand others in 
the San Fernando Valley. They love it. 
Especially when Bob reads the weather 
reports from Chicago and remembers 
the bitterly cold mornings he delivered 
frozen milk from door to door. 

There has been one disquieting factor 
to their California living. Because Joan 
prefers to stay in the background, cer- 
tain gossipmongers have hinted Holly- 
wood is breaking up another marriage. 
"I resent these innuendoes," Bob de- 
clares, with feeling. "They don't upset 
me because I don't allow them to, but 
they do irritate me. They're so ridicu- 
lous! I love this girl. We've been mar- 
ried eight years, and we have some- 
thing more important to me than 
career or suntan or biceps or anything! 
We have a good wholesome marriage, 
and I only hope I can continue to pro- 
vide for her and our children. 

"What she can't understand, and 
what I can't understand, is why people 
should feel she should be present at all 
these various functions, when they are 
primarily business. She never accom- 
panied me to the docks. She never rode 
the milk truck. She watched me sing 
in the night clubs only two or three 
times, because she felt this was busi- 
ness and it wasn't a wife's place to be 
there. She comments on my perform- 
ances, on my publicity, my overweight, 
everything. We're in partnership, but 
she is a silent partner in my career." 
Perhaps the most tangible indication 

■ of how Bob feels about Joan is the 
recently purchased Cadillac — "a blue 
Cadillac with blue leather upholstery. 
Blue, because my wife is a blonde. The 
way I feel about it, my wife is the kind 
of a girl who should drive a Cadillac." 
The way he says it, you sense that 
Bob Conrad is proud that he can now 
afford a Cadillac — but you know he is 
a hundred times more proud of the 

, beautiful girl at the wheel. 



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(Continued from page 39) 
enlisted in the Air Force during World 
War II and flew twenty-five missions 
in the China-Burma Theater. He was 
awarded the Air Force Medal and Dis- 
tinguished Flying Cross. When the war 
ended, he went West and enrolled at 
Loyola University under the G.I. Bill, 
determined to become an actor. Love 
promptly entered his life. While work- 
ing as a doorman at Hollywood's Coro- 
net Theater, he met lovely Marie Ma- 
son, a ballet dancer who was working 
as an usher in her spare time. They 
married in 1947. It was while Paul was 
appearing in a play at Mount St. Mary's 
School in Westwood— where he was 
head of the drama department — that 
Paul was spotted by Solly Baiano, a 
Warners' talent scout. On June 11, 1950, 
a day he will never forget, Paul re- 
ported for his first movie role in 
"Breakthrough." 

It was also his graduation day at 
Loyola, but Paul couldn't attend the 
ceremonies and pick up his diploma. 
(Marie did it for him.) Since then, he 
has enjoyed the quiet, steady kind of 
success that most actors wish for. 

The Picernis — Niccoletta, 12; Paul 
Vincent (called "P.V." to avoid "Jun- 
ior"), 11; Gemma, 10; Maria, 9; Charles, 
8; Michael, 7; Philip, 5; and Gina, 4— 
live in a thirteen-room house on a full 
acre at Tarzana, in the San Fernando 
Valley. The six oldest children help 
with the chores, the boys assigned to 
feed the chickens (a dozen laying hens 
which provide eggs for the family) and 
two beagle hounds. It is a religious 
family and when Paul, during a brief 
rough period, failed to find work, the 
youngsters said Rosaries every day 
until he got a job. 

Paul attributes his good fortune to 
his children. "Several years ago," he 
recalls, "when I told Argentina Brun- 
netti, one of the nicest actresses in the 
business, that Marie was expecting our 
eighth child, another actor remarked, 
'I'm surprised you're not worried!' Ar- 
gentina laughed and said, 'You know, 
there's an old Italian saying that each 
new child comes into the world with a 
loaf of bread under each arm. Paul 
must believe this.' I must say she was 
right. With each new baby, I've had a 
new bit of luck — a better part, an op- 
tion picked up, an increase in salary." 

Husky, six-foot Nick Georgiade is 
the powerhouse of the gang -fighting 
trio behind Agent Ness. It has been 
said that he is a "living proof" that 
talent is still in demand and that Holly- 
wood never stops its search for the best 
of the new crop. If Nick had to be 
"discovered," he couldn't have picked 
a better discoverer than Lucille Ball. 
Part owner of Desilu and a woman of 
conviction willing to talk up for same, 
the great comedienne spotted Nick 
while he was playing a lead role in a 
local production of "A View from the 
Bridge." She invited him to join her 
Desilu Workshop Theater, then in full 
J swing. At the time, he was doing seven 
shows a week for thirty dollars. 

"You never know where these things 
will lead," he says of his stint with the 
66 



A Tough Team to Beat 

Players Ring Company. "In 'View,' I 
didn't mind the small pay because it 
was a wonderful showcase. Lots of peo- 
ple in the industry came to see us. I 
went at my part with deadly serious- 
ness — and when I say 'deadly,' I mean 
it. One actor said I was 'too physi- 
cal' in my part. The ending had me 
killing him in a highly emotional scene. 
At first, he wanted me to use a real 
knife, but I knew how charged up I 
got in the role and I insisted on a rub- 
ber knife instead. A good thing, too! 
I'm afraid that, when I act, I give it 
my all." 

Among the good things that came 
from this role, Nick recalls, was that it 
interested Paul Newman, who arranged 
for a Warners' test. "He was most en- 
couraging, and wanted me in 'The 
Young Philadelphians.' " Ironically, it 
was Paul Picerni who got the part — be- 
cause the studio wanted a "name." 

When Lucille Ball saw Nick act, she 
felt he was "too advanced" for her 
Workshop. But his performance haunted 
her. "I went to see Tallulah Bankhead 
at the Hartford Theater the next night," 
she remembers, "but, all during the 
show, I couldn't concentrate. ... I kept 
thinking of Nick's vitality and skill in 
'View.' I went home and dreamed he 
had become a great star. I called Hal 
Gershon (co-director of her Work- 
shop) and said, 'You know the saying 
about Greeks bearing gifts? Well, I'm 
sending you a Greek who is a gift, and 
don't look the 'gift horse' in the mouth 
— just sign him!' " 

Although the Workshop folded soon 
after, Nick lost nothing. Through it, 



GIVE— 

Strike bach at Cancer 



he won his role in The Untouchables 
and he was kept busy with "Project 
58," a group of serious actors, looking 
to extend the horizons of their art. 
Here, again, his part in "View" paid 
off. The membership committee of 
"Project 58," who are all top talents, 
were impressed with his reading but 
felt he lacked acting credits. Fortu- 
nately, on the committee were Jeff 
Morrow and his actress wife, Anna 
Karen, who had seen Nick and went 
all out in convincing the others to ac- 
cept him. He is still active with this 
group, since he has a firm belief that 
actors must keep working at learning 
more of their craft. 

"I love acting," Nick says earnestly. 
"I got into it by way of my better half, 
Anita Raffi. There's nothing I want to 
do — or wanted to do — as much as this. 
But, in the beginning, when Anita kept 
at me to keep trying, I thought I was 
being hooked into something strange 
to my nature. Now I know she was 
right. Through acting, I found myself." 

Nick went the long route in finding 
his way to the stage. Born March 25, 
1933, in New York City, he had two 






F. 



burning desires at fifteen. He wanted 
to travel and to excel in boxing. Ly- 
ing about his age, he joined the Army 
and set out to see the world. He also 
got a chance to sharpen his ring craft 
and soon was participating in bouts be- 
fore the troops. In 1950, he won the 
European heavyweight title of the U.S. 
Army and, while stationed in Berlin, 
became a sparring partner of champion 
Jersey Joe Walcott, when the fighter 
asked the State Department if he could 
"borrow" a couple of boys. 

"That's when I discovered the all- 
important fact about myself as a fighter. 
I'd never make it as a pro, because I 
had a glass jaw. I would have to find 
something else to bring me fame and 
fortune. Those were good years, though. 
I got one of my wishes, because I did 
travel, saw most of Europe, and even 
got to Africa." 

In 1952, back in mufti, Nick was 
about to apply for seaman's papers, as 
a means of livelihood, when Sam San- 
tangelo, a buddy, sugggested he come 
up to Syracuse for a weekend and try 
out for an athletic scholarship. Without 
a high-school diploma, Nick didn't 
think he had a chance, but he took the 
general exams, anyway. 

He did pass, and entered college, 
majoring in sociology and psychology 
with the general aim of becoming a 
teacher. Then a pretty senior named 
Anita hove into sight, and Nick was a 
gone goose. In order to be with her, 
he joined the campus drama club and 
appeared in "The Rose Tattoo." After 
marriage and Nick's graduation, they 
made New York their home while 
Nick studied with Herbert Berghoff, 
and made the casting rounds. But with 
stage roles scarce and most TV and 
film activities on the West Coast, the 
Georgiades headed for Hollywood. 

Nick and Anita live in an unpreten- 
tious apartment in West Hollywood. 
While his standard Screen Actors Guild 
contract offers security, it doesn't pro- 
vide for Beverly Hills rentals. How- 
ever, with Nick on the rise and Anita 
getting her chance, too — she has been 
seen lately in "courtroom" shows, This 
Man Dawson, Lookout, and an Un- 
touchables segment — the young, tal- 
ented and likable Georgiades seem 
destined for a good life. 

Another fighter turned actor is the 
third member of the gang-busting Fed- 
eral musketeers. This is tough but sen- 
sitive Abel Fernandez, an ex-para- 
trooper, who plays William Young - 
fellow, the Indian sidekick of Picerni 
and Georgiade. Fernandez grew up 
within walking distance of movieland 
in downtown Los Angeles. As a child, 
he was fascinated by film companies 
shooting street scenes and he often 
tried to sneak onto studio lots. 

Abel's mother died when he was 
born, the youngest of a large family. 
He was bounced from relative to rela- 
tive, until a kindly grandmother took 
over his rearing. He grew up in a 
neighborhood that required some skill 
with fists and, at Belmont High (now 
Cathedral High), he made his mark as 
an athlete. Money was scarce in the 



Fernandez family, and Abel felt it 
would be better all around if he went 
into the service, where he could possi- 
bly learn a trade and earn his own way 
at the same time. Like Georgiade, at 
sixteen, Abel — already a strapping six- 
footer — talked his way into the service, 
shrewdly picking the paratroopers be- 
cause that branch paid more money. He 
was sent to Asia with the Eleventh 
Airborne Division shortly after the end 
of World War II. 

Abel did learn a trade — boxing. He 
won the middleweight championship 
of the Far Eastern forces and, after his 
discharge, decided to go pro. He worked 
as a printer's devil while in training. 
But, after some 120 bouts as amateur 
and pro, Abel quit the ring. 

"It was all too cold-blooded for me," 
he explains. "And there really wasn't 
much money in it, after I paid for spar- 
ring partners, equipment, training fa- 
cilities and all the rest. Then, one night, 
I got really mad when my opponent 
insulted me as we climbed into the 
ling. I belted him so hard he ended up 
in the hospital for three days. I didn't 
even feel any joy at winning. Inside, I 
was just sick." 

So, Abel quit the prize ring in 1953, 
just as he was being touted as a real 
comer. He turned to bartending, de- 
voting all his free time to studying 
acting. "It just suddenly hit me that 
that was what I'd wanted all along. 

Abel, a strange mixture of national- 
ities — he's part Mexican, Irish, Italian, 
Portuguese and Spanish — attracted a 
number of friends in the movie indus- 
try who set out to help him. A part 
opened for an easy-going, tall, dark 
and handsome actor, and six-foot-four 
Abel applied and landed his first movie 
role in "Second Chance," with Robert 
Mitchum and Linda Darnell. He has 
since appeared in sixteen movies and 
about fifty TV shows, including 77 
Sunset Strip, Playhouse 90 and Wagon 
Train. In The Untouchables, he plays 
a role that has become ail-too familiar, 
an Indian. 

"I don't mind, as long as I'm not 
frozen into this type," he says. "I've 
got a lot to learn and being in this 
series is a fine break. But I'm not con- 
sidering it the end-all of acting. I'd 
like to go on from here to other things. 
I was a pretty good fighter before I 
went into acting, and I don't think my 
hat-size will change if I make good. 

"What I'd really like is to hear some- 
one who knows say one day, 'That Abel 
Fernandez is a heck of a good actor' . . . 
I'd also like," he adds with a grin, "to 
find the right girl and get married. I 
don't particularly enjoy being the only 
bachelor on the show. I get a lot of 
ribbing from the other boys." 

As for the leader of this intrepid 
band of fighters for law and good gov- 
ernment, what says Robert Stack? "As 
Eliot Ness, I couldn't ask for better, 
more loyal and more talented support 
than these three have been giving me. 
As Robert Stack, I couldn't ask for 
three finer human beings to be associ- 
ated with. It was a great day in actors' 
heaven when Picerni, Georgiade and 
Fernandez were recruited for our 
show." 




750-PAGE 
ALDENS GENERAL CATAL 
FOR SPRING & SUMME 



1961 




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67 



(Continued from page 26) 
as always, with life in the suburbs . . . 
the kids in the grass, the weeds in the 
grass, his wife in his hair about the 
kids and weeds in the grass . . . and 
the paradox is that Alan King, crab- 
grass comic, grew up on the cracked 
concrete surrounding New York's tene- 
ments. 

"I didn't plan to be a spokesman for 
the surburbanites. It still startles me 
when I think of it," Alan says. "But 
I've been living in the country for about 
eleven years and, one night, when I 
was working in a Miami club, I started 
kidding about the grass. Jack E. 
Leonard was in the audience and after- 
ward said to me, 'If you don't do a 
routine on moving into a house, you're 
crazy.' That's how it started." 

We talked in his office. His home, he 
explained, was in a mess because they 
were about to move to the fabulous 
former Hammerstein estate on Long 
Island's North Shore. But the office it- 
self illustrated other paradoxical char- 
acteristics of the man. Alan never fin- 
ished high school, but on the shelves 
are rare books and a large bust of 
Shakespeare. Although he couldn't af- 
ford to belong to any youth organiza- 
tions, on his desk is a silver statuette 
presented to him by the Boy Scouts of 
America for the tremendous assistance 
he has given them. On the wall are 
many pictures of celebrities. 

But most prominent of all is the pic- 
ture of his family. "I get most of my 
ideas at home," he says. "My boys, 
Bobby and Andy, are nine and six and 
typical. They're wild and spoiled." 

Since his wife spoils the children all 
day, Alan thinks it a little unfair that 
he should be expected to discipline 
them when he gets home. He seldom 
does. This spoils them even further. 
"Like the evening I came home to find 
the whole neighborhood upset. Bobby 
and Andy had gone out to sell lemon- 
ade at a nickel a glass. There are only 
eight families on our block, so they 
can't sell any lemonade and they begin 
trading. Now there is an uproar. 

"What happened was that Andy, the 
little one, was left in charge — and he 
took a bottle of sherry and spiked the 
lemonade. Andy didn't know any bet- 
ter and the big one swore he knew 
nothing about it. But the kids in the 
neighborhood are walking around load- 
ed, and the mothers are carrying on 
like it was the end of the world. I 
don't know what to do. Do I beat up 
the kids? I can't. It's too funny to me." 

Alan has a special feeling for children 
which derives from his own childhood. 
He was born in the Depression and 
things were bad for his father, who 
was a laborer, often on relief. He lived 
in the switchblade section of Brooklyn. 
"It's become a cliche," Alan says, "but 
true. It was tough and there was just 
a hairline between my staying good or 
going bad. What made the difference 
T was that, because my father couldn't 
find employment, he spent a lot of time 
with me. 

"He used to tell me stories about 
68 



A Castle for King 

traveling and the good things in life. 
I was well versed in the Bible because 
he could take the stories and make 
them sound like cowboys-and-Indians. 
And, no matter how poor, he never lost 
his dignity — and I'm talking about 
poverty that goes with relief checks. 
I never saw him sit down to dinner 
without a white shirt, tie and jacket." 

He speaks of his father's understand- 
ing. "My parents were Russian-Polish 
immigrants and had a hard time with 
American customs. But, whatever I 
wanted to do, my father took an in- 
terest in. What he couldn't do for me 
with money, he made up for in thought- 
fulness." 

Alan cites a time when his father 
worked as a night watchman for the 
W.P.A. He came home one day and 
mentioned that an athlete was doing 
road training every morning at five, in 
Van Cortlandt Park, and passed his 
post. Alan, very sports conscious, had 
never seen a professional athlete be- 
cause his father didn't have the price of 
tickets to a sports event. 

"I was nine," Alan recalls, "and, one 
Friday evening, he took me on the job 
with him. There was a cot in the 
watchman's shed where I went to sleep. 
At five-thirty, he woke me to see this 
man training. It was Jesse Owens get- 
ting in shape for the Olympics. My 
father couldn't afford to buy me a bike 

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— but going back and telling the kids 
I'd met Jesse* Owens made me a big 
man in the neighborhood." 

When Alan wanted to take drum 
lessons, his father walked over the 
bridge to Manhattan, saving the fare 
of two cents each way — which came 
to twenty cents a week, the exact cost 
of the lessons. This is what led Alan 
into show business. At the age of four- 
teen, he had his own band. At fifteen, 
he was playing in a resort hotel on the 
borscht circuit. 

By the time fall blew in, Alan had 
learned that he was good at comedy 
and, when he had a chance to be a 
second comic at the Gayety Burlesque 
Theater in Montreal, Canada, he 
dropped his school books and ran away 
from home. "It was the money. Sev- 
enty-five dollars a week for a fifteen- 
year-old. I couldn't resist it." 

He was a professional for eight 
weeks. Then immigration authorities 
discovered he was working without an 
alien permit and chased him home. He 
returned to high school for a time, but 
was back up in Canada the following 
year — this time, with a work permit. 
When he got back to New York, he 
began to pound the doors of agents. 

At nineteen, he married a pretty 
brunette who lived down the block. 
"Jeanette is part of my luck," Alan 



says. "She was eighteen when we mar- 
ried. Her parents had been against it 
and they threatened to send her away 
to school to separate us. But it was a 
right marriage. I had responsibility 
from the very beginning. She's tre- 
mendous and she's grown with the 
marriage. 

"You know, I've seen a lot of mar- 
riages — and not only in show business 
— where two kids get married, he be- 
comes successful and has to travel in 
different circles, and his wife is at a 
loss. But Jeanette holds her own with 
the best. And she's great for me, be- 
cause I'm very emotional." 

When Alan married, he was making 
$150 a week — when he worked. Some- 
times it was tough sledding. In 1949, 
he got his first break. He filled in for 
an ailing comedian at the Paramount 
Theater and that led to a tour with 
Patti Page, then a brand-new singing 
sensation. The following year, he 
toured with Billy Eckstine, then spent 
a year on the road with Lena Home. 
After that, he was on a bill with Tony 
Martin. By 1955, he had worked in 
three movies, but was referring to him- 
self as "America's most successful un- 
known." 

In 1956 came the turning point. He 
opened at the Palace Theater with Judy 
Garland, a date which has gone into 
show-business history as one of the 
great shows of all time. Every im- 
portant showman in New York was in 
the audience. Alan was a tremendous 
hit and Ed Sullivan signed him for 
three Sunday-night TV shows. That 
was the "really big" beginning. 

When Alan opened in London with 
Judy Garland, he was greeted by 
British reserve. He came out on the 
stage and did his usual routine, the 
same one that had buckled his New 
York audience, but there was no ap- 
plause and no laughter. Just silence. 
Alan looked hard at the audience and 
said, "I don't like you, either." Then 
came the applause and laughter. Since 
that time, Alan has been commuting 
between New York and London, where 
he is frequently seen on television 
with his own program. In England, he 
is considered the most significant 
American contribution to British enter- 
tainment since Danny Kaye. 

"And yet my story," he says, "is of 
the city boy who moved into the coun- 
try. Once, in the past eleven years, 
Jeanette and I talked about moving 
back into the city. We said we couldn't 
do that because of the children, but we 
were kidding ourselves. We really 
didn't want to." 

Alan makes no bones about the fact 
that community living entails keeping 
up with the Joneses, whether it be in 
landscaping or in cars. "Take the car 
situation," he says. "My wife tells me 
we're the only ones who don't have a 
foreign car. This doesn't look very 
nice and, besides, it's hard on the kids. 
They go to school and their friends say, 
'Yah, yah, you're father has a rear- 
engine drive.' So I have to take the 
rap. Then I'm on my way to London 



and my wife says, 'Bring me back a 
foreign car.' " 

As Alan notes, if you go to London 
and ask to see a "foreign" car, they 
show you Buicks and Chryslers. What 
Alan had in mind was a Rolls Royce. 
"I've always loved cars," he explains. 
"And what every man wants, who loves 
cars, is a Rolls Royce. 

"So I went to a Rolls Royce* show- 
room. Now, this is unbelievable but 
true. They are not concerned with your 
interest in getting a Rolls. They want 
to know whether the car is interested 
in you. They interrogate you and take 
down your answers. One of the ques- 
tions was whether anyone in my family 
ever owned one. I said, "Sure, my 
father, when we were kids on the East 
Side, used to drive the Rolls to get his 
relief check.' And they wrote it down. 

"So I ordered their inexpensive 
model and, when I get home and off the 
plane, my wife asks, 'What did you 
buy?' I told her, and she starts to go, 
'A Rolls Royce! Are you crazy? Who 
needs one?' I said, 'Nobody needs one, 
but it's something I've always wanted. 
You wanted a foreign car and that's as 
good as you can get.' " 

Alan talks with great pride about 
the new home, twenty-two rooms on 
two acres. "That was my idea, too," 
Alan says. "We were looking for a little 
larger house when I saw this and it 
was just the most exciting thing. It's 
so beautiful to look at. It's a manor 
house with beamed ceilings and beau- 
tiful wood. We're moving in with nine 
rooms of furniture. 

"Our friends ask Jeanette why we 
bought a twenty-two-room house. She 
says right back, 'Why did Alan buy the 
Rolls Royce?' The house is a feeling 
of accomplishment, but I didn't buy it 
to be ostentatious or to show off. I 
get great pleasure out of beautiful 
things. I buy beautiful paintings and 
rare books. I like them." 

Yet he is not faking his suburban 
routines. Do-it-yourself projects? In 
the house Alan is about to desert, he 
designed a wing off the living room 
and then — instead of giving the plans 
out to a contractor — he built it himself 
with the help of three men who came in 
during evenings. Decorating? This 
again is something he enjoys, an in- 
terest he shares with his wife. Wher- 
ever he travels, when he has a free 
hour, he looks at paintings and antique 
furniture and old books. Cooking? He 
does more cooking around the house 
than his wife does. 

Friends come for dinner and Jeanette 
explains Alan's absence: "He's still 
busy back in the kitchen." He takes 
cooking seriously, but quips that it all 
came about in self-defense. "The first 
two years, I ate lamb chops six nights 
a week. Jeanette just isn't a good cook. 
Ask the kids. They'll tell you I'm the 
best cook. 

"I'll get a call at the office in the late 
afternoon," he grins. "The kids want 
to know if I'm coming home to make 
dinner or will they have to eat what 
mother makes." He gets a dreamy look 
in his eyes. "In the new house, I'll 
have a real kitchen. Two stoves, two 
(Continued on page 70) 



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69 



sinks and two refrigerators." 

Although Alan has a finger in much 
of what goes on around the house, he 
says in perfect frankness, "Jeanette 
runs it, and it's not that I'm afraid of 
my wife. It's because she's completely 
sensible and keeps the balance and 
thereby keeps me in check. I'm not 
easy to live with, by any means. I'm 
very emotional, high-strung and keyed 
up. But she gives me all the rope and 
freedom I need." 

He mentions his sleeping habits. Not 
since childhood has he been able to 
get in bed and sleep for eight hours, or 
even six. "I walk around all night. It 
takes me eight hours to sleep four, 
because I'm up and down. I go into 
the study. Do a little work. Smoke a 
pipe or maybe read." 

When he gets completely exhausted, 
he and Jeanette will fly to Mexico to 
see the bullfights. At home, he relaxes 
by watching old movies on television. 
But, a great part of the time, he's 
traveling. "There's no comedian in the 
business who travels more than I do," 
says Alan. 

He notes that fifty percent of his in- 
come derives from one-nighters which 
may take him to Milwaukee or Chicago 
or Boston or Atlanta. His wife seldom 
goes along on these trips. "But it's not 
so bad. I'm seldom away for more than 
twenty-four hours. It's an improvement 
over the early days, when I had to go 
out of town for a two- or three-week 
engagement." 

He's the perfect answer to the wife 
who complains that she seldom gets out 
of the house. Alan enjoys driving into 
Manhattan for dinner and the theater 
or a table at a night club. They both 
enjoy dressing up to see and be seen. 
Jeanette plays golf, but Alan — once a 
tournament golfer — finds he hasn't time 
for it today. And, by the time the week- 
end comes along, he is in a state of near 
exhaustion. He may take the kids for a 
ride. They like to look at the boats 
along the shore, although they haven't 
given much thought yet to owning one. 
"I suppose if there's any one thing 
that bothers me, it's the kids," Alan 
says. "I probably get more time at home 
than the average businessman, but I'm 
always comparing myself to my own 
father and, in that comparison, I fall 
short. Take vacations and holidays, for 
example. We have a Christmas tree, al- 
though I come from an Orthodox Jew- 
ish family and my boys go to Hebrew 
School. But, at Chanukah or Christmas, 
I'm working. 

"Alan King has become a big busi- 
ness and it keeps me busy. I wouldn't 
kid you with the expression 'poor little 
rich boy.' I know I've been fortunate, 
and I'm grateful. But it's a funny thing. 
In spite of all my poverty as a kid, the 
thing that comes through is the rela- 
tionship of parents to children, people 
to people. Maybe that's the real answer 
to my concentration on the problems of 
a suburban family. The fact that it's 
suburban is incidental. I'm not telling 
¥ jokes anymore. I'm painting pictures of 
R the family, reflecting for them what 
goes on in their own lives. And it gives 
me a good feeling," says Alan King. 



What's New on the East Coast 

(Continued from page 5) 



commercials and did a part on True 
Story." Pleased about his new assign- 
ment, Art kept his restraint up. "It's a 
screwy business. You're up one day 
and down the next. When you're in 
show business, you live for today." 
The new show calls on contestants to 
pick out a variety of merchandise with- 
out going over a thousand dollars. 
Shades of Price Is Right? True, but 
Goodson and Todman own that, too, 
and can't sue themselves for plagiarism. 
Salute: Don McNeill's ten-year con- 
tract expired New Year's Eve, the end 
of his twenty-eighth year of breakfast- 
ing on radio — but he had a new five- 
year contract effective New Year's 
Day. . . . Ralph Taeger, of Klondike, 
just moved into new bachelor diggings, 
then took a three-week hunting trip— 
and that should kill off the rumors 
about his marrying Molly Bee. . . . 
Curious note: Eddie Sauter, co-leader 
of the far out sounding Sauter-Finne- 
gan Band, is among those working on 
the musical background for the Winston 
Churchill series. . . . Fine casting for 
Our American Heritage's "The Invinci- 
ble Teddy" on NBC January 13. George 
Peppard plays T.R. and it's Ina Balin as 
his wife. 

January's Child: "It's like no news 
is good news," Jan Murray says. "The 
TV show is doing well. Ratings going 
up and everyone so pleased, there's 
nothing to talk about. But there is 
something new for me — my acting de- 
but on television." In early December, 
Jan flew to Hollywood to star in an 
episode of the Zane Grey Theater. "It's 
not a prosaic Western. I play a gambler, 
a character study of a good guy who 
has to choose between gambling and 
the love of his wife." Later, in the 
spring, he goes back to the coast again 
to make a pilot with Danny Thomas's 
company for a new comedy series. . . . 
Jan says, "I've been studying acting for 
three years. Sounds funny for me. I 
never had any lessons. No drama. No 
musical instruments. Everything I've 
done in show business has been by in- 
stinct. Anyway, I decided to try an act- 
ing class and loved it. Some people 
sneer at acting schools but it's good for 
performers. Like a violinist practicing 
or an athlete training." . . . On the 
home front he noted that his wife was 
still locked behind the steering wheel, 
chauffeuring his kids from dance classes 
to Boy Scout meetings and so forth. 
"I'm very proud of my eldest, Warren. 
He was just made president of his col- 
lege fraternity, Kappa Nu, and he's 
only a sophomore. Serious kid with 
plans to teach history." About his 
youngest children, he says, "They're 
lazy. Doesn't look like I'll get them 
working before they're eleven." 

Eyes & Ears: Shari Lewis has writ- 
ten a new book, "Fun with Kids" 
(Doubleday), but it's really for parents 
who get that "what are we going to do 
now, Mommy?" treatment. There are 
ideas for everything from rainy days to 
sunny ones, before and after holidays, 
party suggestions and even fun for the 
little sick -abed. The book is chock 



full of wonderful games and fun proj- 
ects. . . . Somewhere back in his early 
youth, Henry Morgan, must have had a 
traumatic experience. Frightened by a 
commercial, he's never let up on spon- 
sors. And so a book, "And Now a Word 
from Our Sponsors" (Citadel), in which 
he berates the man with a message. 
Every other page has a funny gag pic- 
ture taken by Gary Wagner. It's only 
fair to say there are a lot of laughs in 
the book but Henry is so bitter about 
commercials, he might be taken the 
wrong way. . . . And the half-million 
or so people who bought Bob Newhart's 
first album better walk to the store 
once more. He's done it again with "The 
Button-Down Mind Strikes Back." More 
of the same clever, deceptively simple 
humor on the Warner Bros, label. 

By Invitation: Not tea, not liquor, 
but coffee was served at five p.m. for a 
group of reporters invited to meet 
Tommy Sands and wife Nancy, nee 
Sinatra. Tommy, in a television re- 
hearsal, never did get there but Nancy 
showed. A soft-spoken brunette with a 
twenty-one-inch waistline, she re- 
mained gracious, at ease, and responded 
quickly to all queries. "I wasn't upset 
about all the stories on our romance. I 
mean, when they said the marriage was 
off and on, it just made it more excit- 
ing. . . . Tommy's the boss, not Daddy. 
. . . We haven't yet had our honeymoon 
because Tommy has been so busy ... I 
go with him to rehearsals and press 
meetings and everywhere else. I don't 
even think of working with him in a 
show. He's sufficient by himself, but I'll 
always be sitting on the sidelines. . . . 
I honestly want to be a performer and 
I've studied and Daddy picked all of 
my teachers. It won't make me angry 
if people think of me as Frank Sinatra's 
daughter, so long as my performance 
entertains them. . . . I've no plans for 
myself now. Tommy goes back to make 
a picture and then we go on the club 
circuit. In May, he opens in New York 
with the Stan Kenton Band." On the 
way out, manager Ted Weeks men- 
tioned, "Nancy has been booked to 
dance and sing on the Perry Como 
show in May. I suppose she doesn't 
mention it because she doesn't want to 
take the play away from Tommy." 

Homestretch: Ward Bond will still 
be seen in new Wagon Train episodes 
until the end of January. . . . Julia 
Meade departs N.Y.C. in February to 
film "Tammy, Tell Me True." Sandra 
Dee is Tammy and Julia plays a rich 
society girl. . . . Teal Ames, of The Edge 
Of Night, is not the gal to plan your 
diet. She excluded everything from the 
table but nuts and tea. . . . The magnifi- 
cent Christopher Plummer lights up the 
screen January 18 on CBS with "Pris- 
oner of Zenda." ... On January 5 and 
12, The Untouchables does a two-part 
story on Al Capone titled, "The Big 
Train," concerning the excitement in 
transporting Capone to Alcatraz. Inci- 
dentally, if you ever wonder about it, 
the real Elliot Ness was involved only 
in the capture of Capone. His involve- 
ment in other episodes is fiction. 



Built-in Happiness 



(Continued from page 15) 
thinking of the people around him: 
Vera and the kids. Suddenly, with a 
surge of emotions which he will never 
be able to define, "I decided that we 
should get married," reveals Keith. "I 
just knew that we had to get married." 

As soon as Vera had safely seen 
Debbie and Kelly off to the movies, 
and made sure that Mike was resting 
comfortably in his crib, she joined 
Keith at the pool. In the sunlight, 
framed by the sloping Santa Monica 
mountain range, they made a photo- 
genic, handsome couple. 

Keith couldn't contain himself. In 
one long breath, he exhaled all his 
thoughts: "If we fly to Vegas now, we 
can get our license, be married and 
be home again by ten-thirty tonight." 
Vera, who was stunned and over- 
whelmed, managed only to stutter: 
"You're kidding. You're not serious." 

"And, for a minute," Keith admits 
today, "I myself wasn't sure whether 
or not I was kidding. But then I knew 
I wasn't, that I meant every word, 
that we just had to get married, that 
the love we knew we had for each 
other had to be fulfilled." 

Vera, with two unsuccessful mar- 
riages behind her, also took a long 
count to think things over. But then, 
just as surely as Keith, she knew that 
the only response could be an inti- 
mate, immediate "Yes." 

Keith ran — didn't walk — back into 
the house to call the airport and make 
reservations for the next flight to Las 
Vegas, reserve a chapel there, and 
confirm a return flight home the same 
day. Then, with the agility of the ath- 
lete he is, he tumbled into his suit 
("I had never thought it was going to 
become my wedding suit!") and 
whisked Vera off to the airport. 

"I guess you've deduced that I don't 
believe in long engagements," quipped 
Keith as he detailed his wedding day 
exclusively for TV Radio Mirror. 
"But I also don't believe in inactivity. 
You must go ahead and do what you 
feel you must do. There is no other 
way to go through life. You never plan 
those things which mean the most to 
you. They just happen. That's what the 
story was with us. What had to hap- 
pen, did." 

Everything went so smoothly in Las 
Vegas that the newlyweds found they 
had an hour to roam around the lively, 
neon-bedecked town before their 
plane for home took off. "I knew that 
Vera would never again come to 
Vegas," says Keith. "She's a dignified 
woman, a homebody. And you just 
know that she's out of place in a setting 
like Vegas. It just doesn't jibe with 
her personality. 

"I knew that I could probably never 
drag her to Vegas again. So I insisted 
that she walk through one of the gam- 
bling casinos, just to see what they 
are like. I swear we walked into one 
of them and never broke stride as we 
practically jogged through the place. 
Vera just wanted to get home and 



back to the kids, where she's happy." 

Keith, of course, spent the night — 
his wedding night — at Vera's house. 
In the morning, the kids were a bit 
surprised to find Keith in the kitchen 
at such an early hour. But they just 
figured that he had come over early 
for a Sunday brunch. 

Keith broke the news to the two 
older girls and they broke into 
broad do-you-mean-it? smiles. "They 
couldn't have been more pleased," 
says Keith, "but somehow they couldn't 
believe it. They'd been nagging us to 
get married, and now we'd done it. 
It was what they wanted. But, when it 
happened, they just couldn't believe 
it. They kept saying, 'You two aren't 
married' — just, I guess, to make sure 
that we were. It took about a week 
for them to really believe it. Mike, of 
course, didn't have too much to say 
about the whole thing." 

Debbie, Kelly and Mike had ac- 
cepted Keith from the second he had 
set foot into the house. They made 
their house his and never, ever made 
him feel like a stranger. Vera, of 
course, was delighted and relieved to 
see the bond between the kids and 
Keith — though, with the intuition of a 
woman in love, she had known that 
they would accept him at once. 

The children were never in the way 
when Keith and Vera dated. "They 
were usually with us," recalls Keith. 
"When we went to the movies, we 
never went to a theater but always to 
a drive-in, so that they could be with 
us. The only times we didn't take them 
along was when we went to see a play. 
I hated to go anywhere without them. 
They became a part of us." 

The prospect of a built-in family 
greeting Keith as he crossed the 
threshold never bothered him. "I never 
really had a chance to question their 
acceptance," says Keith, matter-of- 
factly but modestly. "They completely 
accepted me from the start and there 
was never any sort of a problem. Until 
you just brought up the question of 
acceptance by them, I really had never 
thought of it. I guess that's because I 
was lucky enough never to have to." 

Theirs was really a trouble-free, 
untemperamental courtship. On the 
surface, it would seem to be a Janu- 
ary -to -July romance which ended in 
marriage. But, under the surface, it 
was a nine-year-long engagement. It. 
was in 1951, on a picture called "The 
Rose Bowl Story," that Keith and 
Vera met. "I knew then," says Keith, 
with the prophecy of a man in love, 
"that she was the woman for me. But 
though I was always fond of her, 
whenever I wanted to date her, she 
was married." 

Last fall, Vera was separating from 
her second husband and Keith man- 
aged to secure her phone number — a 
feat which automatically qualifies him 
for a counterspy position. They had a 
couple of dates and then Vera had to 
leave for Rome to film a picture, "Five 
Branded Women." Upon her return in 
the winter, Keith and Vera kept com- 




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71 



pany - steadily — but not steady com- 
pany. "We both dated others," says 
Keith, "and, up to the day we got 
married, we never 'went steady' al- 
though we had vowed our love to each 
other." 

Three children they both loved were 
certainly not going to become an ob- 
stacle to their love. Instead, they be- 
came a focal point, if not the focal 
point, of their love. 

Keith, without terribly much prompt- 
ing, will wax poetic about the three 
children in his life. "Debbie," he en- 
thuses, "is a bony blonde who is a 



beautiful girl. She has an angelic, 
ethereal, dramatic quality about her 
and is an idealist. Kelly is like her 
mother. A practical, beautiful, brilliant 
blonde who is wonderfully affection- 
ate. Mike is a really little guy. All- 
man and a roughneck. As a matter of 
fact, we sometimes play so rough that 
Vera holds her breath as we wrestle. 
But he can take it." 

As the children have posed no prob- 
lem to this well-founded marriage, 
neither have Vera's and Keith's sepa- 
rate, and successful, careers. They are 
not in competition with one another. 



Instead, they remarkably complement 
each other, both on and off the screen. 
Keith, star of CBS-TV's The Aqua- 
nauts, is not out to top his wife in the 
headlines or spotlights. And Vera, in 
turn, makes certain that nothing will 
tarnish their glistening relationship. 

Debbie, Kelly and Mike — the Lar- 
sens' three miniature musketeers — add 
that certain glow to their marriage. For 
Keith, this built-in family has pro- 
vided built-in happiness. 

Says Keith, a proud father and 
husband, "I wouldn't part with those 
kids for anything in the world." 



(Continued from page 31) 
with Gardner McKay both this year 
and last, and was a fellow student with 
him at one time. 

In May of 1959, a relatively unknown 
and distinctly untried Gardner McKay 
was suddenly thrust into 20th Century- 
Fox's big, high-budgeted TV offering, 
James A. Michener's Adventures In 
Paradise. This was more than a gigantic 
opportunity for a young actor. It was 
a challenging, grueling test. 

Gardner's job was to star in the equiv- 
alent of one feature motion picture a 
week for a full season. As "guests," he 
would have co-stars of the first magni- 
tude. He himself was expected to be an 
ail-American athlete, a sailor of obvi- 
ous ability, an actor of consummate 
skill, the major love-interest in each 
story — and a personality who would 
make a lasting good impression. 

The studio was betting millions that 
he could make it. Production values 
made this the most expensive of TV 
series. In September of 1959, Gardner 
received the biggest publicity build-up 
ever given an "unknown." His picture 
appeared on the cover of Life and a 
dozen other national magazines. Every- 
one in the entire United States knew 
who Gardner McKay was. 

In October, 1959, the show hit the 
air — and the balloon burst. He and the 
show were severely panned in virtually 
every publication across the country. It 
became close to a laughing stock. But 
the series continued through the season, 
completing thirty one-hour episodes— 
with Gardner starred in every one. 
When summer repeats started in mid- 
May, critics predicted: "This show 
won't be back for another season!" 
In July, 1960, Adventures In Paradise 
started filming for its second season. 
The first of these episodes ran on ABC- 
TV in October — and was greeted by ex- 
cellent reviews. What had happened? 
Who changed the script? Why did the 
show return? To get these answers, I 
talked with Gardner and with every 
technician on the show. 

Gardner says it was the immensity of 
it all that got to him last year. He 
worked long, long hours — sometimes 
T seventy a week at the studio. This does 
v not include the study of scripts at 
g home and the mandatory personal ap- 
pearances. He was in virtually every 
scene and a great deal of physical effort 



McKay Makes the Grade 

was required. He was dog-tired all the 
time, and undoubtedly some of this 
showed through on the film. 

It was a hellish year, he says, and 
sometimes he was irritable and felt op- 
pressed. It was as if he had a perpetual 
headache. He found that he could not 
unwind from the tensions at night. He 
knew his acting background was mea- 
ger, and he also knew this was no secret 
from the production crew. He felt that 
they had no respect for him and this 
undermined his confidence in himself. 

I talked to several members of the 
company about this. Here are some of 
their remarks: "Gardner was unsure of 
himself and this manifested itself in a 
recalcitrant attitude toward the crew." 
... "I never thought he was unsure of 
himself; he was just overworked and 
the strain was showing." . . . "He's an 
independent guy, sure, but he was al- 
ways conscientious and very thought- 
ful." 

"As a guy, he was great — but, when it 
came to acting, it was like pitting a 
good high-school tennis player against 
Pancho Gonzales." . . . "The job was 
too big for him at the beginning. He was 
cracking and we knew it!" . . . "We 
helped him all we could, because we 
put attitude above performance, any 
day of the week. He's the salt of the 
earth." 

As you can see, the majority of his 
fellow workers harbored no resentment. 
They realized the strain he was under 
and tried to help. But these things are 
never spoken about openly, so Gardner 
thought he was waging his battle alone. 

The fact is that, although the show 
was being panned unmercifully by the 
critics, the viewing audience was eating 
it up. Personally, Gardner was receiv- 
ing two or three thousand fan letters a 
week. True, he's very handsome and 
some of the letters were concerned only 
with this. But the majority of writers 
said they liked him as a friendly, outgo- 
ing person — the kind of fellow they 
would like their brothers or boyfriends 
to be. 

One of the problems Gardner faced 
was one of the very assets of the series 
— the fact that he had the privilege of 
working with some of filmdom's great- 
est, such as Herbert Marshall, Elsa Lan- 
chester, Dan Duryea, Lizabeth Scott, 
Yvonne DeCarlo. These are renowned 
names, not only to viewers, but to 



Gardner himself. He was so much in 
awe of them that it occasionally caused 
him to forget his character, even his 
lines. 

He found it difficult to imagine him- 
self playing scenes with such lumi- 
naries. This sometimes resulted in Adam 
Troy — the strong, virile captain of the 
schooner "Tiki" — appearing as an im- 
mature boy among grown-up men and 
women. He confesses that this was 
harmful to him. Yet it might be the very 
thing which caused his fans to identify 
with him: He was acting like them- 
selves in a similar situation. 

Another problem which confronted 
the young Mr. McKay was the formula 
of movie -making. A universal hex, to 
all neophyte movie actors, is the fre- 
quent necessity of repeating one scene 
many times. With each "take," tensions 
mount, fears increase and apprehensions 
intensify. This is a difficult aspect to 
overcome and, in Gardner's case, maybe 
a bit more so. 

Before Gardner began acting, he had 
dabbled in art. Quite successfully, too. 
His paintings sold for decent prices and 
he was honored for his work in sculp- 
ture. Gardner believes (and I quote) : 
"True greatness in art is brought about 
by hard work and accident." He applied 
this philosophy to acting. When he had 
worked hard on a scene and it came off 
well, from his standpoint, he saw no 
need of repetition. Doing a scene over 
and over made it less real to him and, 
therefore, less convincing in perform- 
ance. 

Because of the very nature of the 
show and the time involved, Adventures 
In Paradise has no regular director. 
Each week, Gardner met a new man 
with new ideas and different techniques. 
He would just about settle down to 
the habits and demands of one director 
when he would suddenly face another, 
often one with opposite methods of ap- 
proach. He found it difficult to conform 
and sometimes arguments ensued which 
helped no one, especially the actor. 

As to the scripts themselves, the 
word "adventure" can have many 
meanings. There is the one which fits 
such adjectives as exciting, dangerous, 
thrilling, hair-raising. This was the 
producers' plan. The scripts threw 
Gardner into heavy situations loaded 
with intrigue and plot. With the em- 
phasis always on serious drama, there 



isn't much room for diversified inter- 
pretation. Gardner is a lighthearted, 
easygoing guy who can play heavy 
drama when it's called for. But playing 
it every day of every week makes for 
heavy going and tends to subdue the 
lively character of the very man on 
whom the series is based. 

These were the main stumbling 
blocks which stood in Gardner's way 
during the first few months of film- 
ing. And this is how he has been able 
to overcome them: 

As to being in awe of some of the 
stars with whom he worked, Gardner 
tells me he finally woke up to the 
fact that these were people, not really 
different from everyone else. They 
were perfectionists who should be re- 
spected for their talents — but, once the 
camera started rolling, they played a 
character. And the feelings of Adam 
Troy must be directed toward that 
character in that particular situation. 

It took him a while, but now he plays 
with the same honesty toward all ac- 
tors, whether they be stars or bit 
players. On a few occasions, he has 
received applause on the set — a reac- 
tion from super-critical technicians 
which is seldom given anyone — and it 
has helped build up the confidence 
every actor needs. 

Adjusting to the repetitive nature of 
movie work, Gardner soon realized he 
must approach the problem as an actor, 
not a painter. The latter is the sole con- 
tributor to his own work, responsible 
for all that's good or bad in his paint- 
ing. But movie-making is a team effort. 
He gradually learned that what an actor 
believes to be a perfect "take" may, for 
elementary reasons, be very bad. This 
might or might not be the fault of the 
actor. It might also be caused by a de- 
fect in lights, camera, sound, props, 
wardrobe — individually or collectively. 

On one occasion, Gardner watched 
Herbert Marshall, an actor he avidly 
admires, do a very difficult scene to 
perfection — then stood dumfounded 
when he heard the director call for 
another take. Mr. Marshall repeated 
the scene three times, and Gardner was 
amazed to find that each successive 
take was better than the previous one. 
Similar occurrences have now con- 
vinced him that the job is not done well 
until the director says so. He accepts 
the problem of repetition as an occupa- 
tional hazard which must be lived with, 
rather than fought. 

Arguing with the director isn't con- 
ducive to good movie-making. Expe- 
rience taught Gardner that this was an 
area over which he had no control. He 
didn't hire the directors, but the direc- 
tors hired were capable, experienced, 
creative men. When he fought with 
them, it was time-consuming, nerve- 
racking, and used up his own energies. 

He has learned to give full power to 
the director, thinking of himself, not 
as the sculptor, but as the clay in the 
sculptor's hands. He finds that this re- 
spect works both ways. Now, when he 
has a suggestion, it is listened to by the 
director and, if it contributes to the 
scene's success, it is accepted. But the 
director's word is final. 

This acceptance has made Gardner 
a more satisfied person, free to enjoy 



his v/ork within the actor's confines. 
His philosophy has now become: "I 
forget that I am the star of the show 
and just play the part. This has made 
me less conscious of the demands 
placed upon me, and a greater contrib- 
utor to the whole — which is the story, 
not the individual personality." He sin- 
cerely feels that the title star is obso- 
lete. "In television, there is no longer 
any room, time or opportunity to in- 
dulge in such an illusion." 

However, the producers are very 
much aware of their star and have dis- 
covered ways of capitalizing on Gard- 
ner's engaging personality. They ex- 
perimented by inserting a light comedy 
script into the schedule. The word "ad- 
venture" now fitted such adjectives as 
amusing, hilarious, offbeat, fun-filled. 
Gardner responded as they had hoped 
and the light script proved to be the 
best they had made. 

Don't get me wrong. Gardner is not 
a comedian, and certainly not a comic 
actor. He simply finds it enjoyable to 
have a kidding or humorous sidelight 
to each story. The producers were 
pleased to have found this out. Now 
each script has humorous overtones 
and Gardner's wry smile is seen more 
often. 

Now that he has overcome his prob- 
lems, there is a new Gardner McKay 
not only on the TV screen but on the 
set. He is friendly and cooperative. He 
still works long hours and the burden 
of responsibility is heavy upon his 
shoulders, but his entire demeanor has 
changed. Where he once stood aloof, at 
times last year, he now jumps in to 
assist the crew when they're tackling 
some difficult chore. Just the other day, 
I saw Gardner and several laborers on 
the set huffing and puffing as they 
moved a huge camera platform. 

I've never helped this way, and I 
never saw any other actor do it. We've 
always figured that they have their jobs 
and we have ours. With Gardner, it's 
different. He needs to feel that the per- 
manent crew regard him as just an- 
other guy. I also think he needs the 
release from tension a hard physical 
task affords. 

The sound engineer has told me that 
Gardner created history, as far as he 
was concerned. This man is tucked 
away in a truck far from the shooting 
end of the set. He was new on the show 
this year, and therefore astonished 
when Gardner introduced himself on 
the very first day of shooting — and then 
called him by name the next day. This 
technician says this was the first time, 
in his thirty-one years in the business, 
that an actor had ever done this. But 
it's only one example of Gardner's 
kindness and consideration toward all. 

"I am happier than I have ever been 
in my entire life," says Gardner. He is 
able to say this because he feels that 
he is now using himself to the best of 
his ability. As for the future, he would 
like to do feature motion pictures. The 
studio has talked to him about it and 
has even offered him a script about 
which he is very enthusiastic. 

There's only one hitch: Lack of time. 
The successful new Gardner McKay is 
too busy on the successful second TV 
season of Adventures In Paradisel 



Why Don't Boys 
Date Outside 
Their Crowd? 

What reasons do the boys give for 
staying within their crowd? One 
boy says he stopped dating "out- 
side" because "it meant I had to 
give up my friends or travel with 
her friends or date all alone." A 
revealing survey in the colorful, 
new issue of TEENS TODAY 
Magazine provides some surpris- 
ing answers for all teenagers. 
Don't miss it. 



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73 




THE MOST GLAMOROUS WOMEN IN THE WORL 



LD 




Simone Signoret of 

France is tops in "inter- 
national womanhood" 
for George Maharis, 
the bachelor rover of 
Route 66, on CBS-TV. 



(Continued from page 13) 

More fascinating selections 
from more of TV's fascinating 
bachelors — whose keen eyes 
for feminine beauty range from 
modern to ancient times! 






Susan Hayward, Amer- 
ica's own, spells both 
"class" and "classic 
beauty" to Robert Ful- 
ler, who's co-starred 
in NBC-TV's Laramie. 



74 



George Maharis opines: "This is hardly 
original thinking, but I'll choose Simone 
Signoret. I've just seen her in a couple 
of films, 'Room at the Top' and 'The 
Witches of Salem.' But that's enough. 
She's it, mister, and that's all there is 
to it. I don't blame Yves Montand or 
France or Hollywood or anybody else 
for falling over themselves in front of 
her. She's worth it. She beats these 
other young-starlet types two ways to 
Sunday, and I'm not kidding. You just 
look at her and, all over, it's written: 
Woman. You bet. 

"She's got a kind of basic, earthly 
glamour that means more than all the 
other kinds. The way I look at it, glam- 
our is really the quality of being wom- 
anly as well as you can. (I've never 
heard of a man being called 'glamorous,' 
I don't think.) And nobody's going to 
deny that Mrs. Montand isn't just about 
the most all-woman ever put on the 
screen. Oh, sure, there've been lots of 
fancy substitutes — the vamps and sirens 
and sex-pots and all — but it took the 
French (in one way, with Brigitte Bar- 
dot, and in another, with Miss Signoret) 
to do it. They turned out the quintes- 
sence of the International Woman. 
(How's that for big language?) 

"One more thing: She's not being 
skimpy on being a woman, either. I 
don't know where American women got 
their obsession for being all skin and 
bones, but it sure does look awkward to 



me. A little padding — just a reasonable 
amount — never did anybody any harm. 
And, on Simone Signoret, it's glamor- 
ous. At least, that's this guy's opinion." 

Robert Fuller avows: "I'll wrestle any 
man in eight feet of mud who doesn't 
agree with me that Susan Hayward is 
the most glamorous woman in the 
world! I remember that, a few years 
back, some group voted her that title 
and, as far as I'm concerned, it still 
stands. There isn't any one thing that 
makes me think of her as the most 
glamorous star I know. It's everything: 
Hair, eyes, face, shape. She has classic 
beauty. 

"I've been watching her for years. Up 
on the screen, I mean. It may seem like 
a strange way to get kicks, but I think 
almost everybody does it ... go to the 
movies and sort of fall in love with the 
people you see. That's when I fell for 
Susan Hayward. You know, a lot of kids 
were falling for Donald Duck? I fell for 
Susan Hayward. So who's to say who's 
sick? 

"Anyway, I like to think that my fall- 
ing for her was partly under the head- 
ing of Art Appreciation. Look at it this 
way: There are some girls who are just 
perfect. So perfect that a guy'd have to 
be a fool to want to change it by meet- 
ing them. That's why I call Susan Hay- 
ward 'art appreciation.' I like to look at 
her from afar . . . look at all that glam- 



our . . . and then shut my eyes and 
dream. 

"One more thing: She has class. Class. 
To me, that word means that Susan 
Hayward is the kind of woman you're 
proud to live in the same world with, 
you know? She's the kind of woman 
who sits and walks, straight up — not 
because she learned it in any posture 
class, but because she is straight up, 
naturally. She looks a little taller than 
she really is. That's class. And that's 
Susan Hayward." 

Anthony George asks: "Can I name 
half a dozen, just so I won't have to 
settle for one? 

"1. Lee Remick. It's her kind of cool 
but magnetic sex appeal ... it really 




No less than six "clues" for Anthony 
George, sleuth of CBS-TV's Checkmate. 






comes across to you. You watch her in 
something like 'Anatomy of a Murder,' 
and you begin to understand all over 
again what makes women so darned at- 
tractive. 

"2. Elizabeth Taylor. Here's the most 
beautiful woman in the world, maybe, 
and one that the whole world has 
watched grow up from the early 'Na- 
tional Velvet' days to her current 'Cleo- 
patra' ones. She's the modern Cleopatra, 
no doubt about that. 

"3. Madame Nehru. It takes a lot of 
stature and dignity to earn the title of 
'most glamorous.' Perhaps Madame 
Nehru isn't the kind of person who'd 
make you twist your neck off to get a 
second glimpse of her. But, once you be- 
gan to talk to her, I bet you wouldn't 
start looking around at other women! 

"4. The Marquise de Portago. I only 
saw her once, on a TV program, but she 
was the epitome of cool refinement. The 
whole roof could have caved in and it 
wouldn't have rattled her teacup. Great 
self-possession, and that's a mark of 
glamour, I'm sure. 

"5. Marlene Dietrich. For her siren 
quality, and those world-famous, bil- 
lion-dollar legs. How can you help but 
bow low before this Lorelei? 

"6. The woman I marry. Don't say 
this cat hasn't got foresight! I'm cover- 
ing all the bets, just in case. . . ." 




Lee Patterson echoes the question, 
"Who is the most glamorous woman in 
the world?" — and answers: "That's not 
an easy question ... I guess you realize 
that. Hmm, the most glamorous in the 
world. . . . Maybe someone like Kim 
Novak — certainly no arguing about her 
beauty ... or someone like Rita Hay- 
worth or Dorothy Dandridge or — gee, 
any number of movie stars. . . . 

"But does it have to be a movie star? 
There are plenty of other glamorous 
women, too . . . like Maria Callas or 
Madame Nehru or Princess Margaret. 
They've got something extra-special, 
something more than glamour . . . what 
would you call it? 'Presence,' maybe 
. . . or 'stature.' Makes their glamour 
seem deeper than skin-deep. 

"What does 'glamour' mean, anyway? 
If you're looking for someone glamor- 
ous, you can find plenty of them in the 
ads in magazines. Those fashion maga- 




Venus de Milo of the Louvre museum 
is the "disarming" choice of Lee Pat- 
terson — who pursues more modern 
lovelies in ABC-TV's SurfSide 6. 



zines, they're supposed to be loaded 
with glamour. All their models have it 
— like Suzy Parker . . . and Carol Lyn- 
ley and Sandra Dee used to be models, 
too. They're still part of the over-all 
glamour picture. But you can't settle on 
one woman, that way. 

"Maybe . . . no, she couldn't be intel- 
lectually glamorous. She has to be fun, 
though ... or at least seem like she'd 
have some kind of personality . . . you 
can't fall in love with a statue, now, can 
you? Although the Venus de Milo cer- 
tainly does have a lot of glamour to her 
credit. . . . 

"That'd be fascinating, wouldn't it? 
A statue as the most glamorous woman 
in the world! Nobody'd believe me, 
though. They'd all say, 'Lee Patterson, 
what a crazy guy!' Well, we've all got 
to go sometime. . . . 

"Venus de Milo. And if you expected 
maybe Jayne Mansfield, I'm sorry." 




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{Continued from page 33) 
into TV stardom as a result of her very 
first interview are about a million-to- 
one. Yet, up until the time Shirley was 
cast as Eileen, she'd never studied act- 
ing or acted professionally before. But 
Shirley's life has been full of unusual 
coincidences and chance meetings. 

Take the way we met — it was sheer 
kismet. You see, I'm an attorney. I 
practice law in Beverly Hills and, up 
until a certain June night in 1958, I had 
no idea that such a person as Shirley 
Bonne ever existed. Fate brought us 
together . . . but, wait a minute, even 
though this is the first magazine story 
I've ever had a hand in writing, I should 
know better than to start at the middle! 
To go back to the very beginning, she 
was born Shirley Tanner in Inglewood, 
just southwest of Los Angeles. When 
she was three, her parents were di- 
vorced and she and her mother moved 
to the city. Because her mother had to 
go out to work to support her, Shirley 
was sent to a private co- educational 
school, the Carl Thorpe School in Santa 
Monica. She saw her mother only twice 
a month and, in a situation which de- 
prived her of a normal family upbring- 
ing, it's no wonder that her favorite 
game was "playing house." She would 
draw in the dirt an outline of a cozy 
cottage, pretend there were four walls 
surrounding her, and fill it with dolls 
which she cared for and babied. 

When it was time to enter high 
school, Shirley moved back home with 
her mother and enrolled at Washington 
High in Los Angeles. Though she'd al- 
ready developed into an exceptionally 
pretty girl — the type that usually gravi- 
tates toward drama classes — Shirley 
never had the slightest inclination to try 
her hand at acting. Her main ambition 
in life was to finish school so she could 
settle down, marry, and raise a house- 
ful of children to whom she'd devote 
her life. 

While she was still at school, family 
friends introduced her to Leonard Bon- 
anno, a boy seven years her senior. 
Before the ink on her diploma was dry, 
Shirley had become a teen-age bride. 
She and her husband moved to San 
Clemente, south of Los Angeles. A year 
passed and they had a son, Johnny — a 
blessed event which, unknown to Shir- 
ley, was eventually to lead her to star- 
dom. 

To make her husband's first Father's 
Day a special occasion, she had some 
color pictures made. Without her 
knowledge, the photographer entered 
one of them in the Laguna Beach Fes- 
tival of Arts. There, it was spotted by 
another photographer who tracked 
Shirley down, and asked if she'd be in- 
terested in doing professional modeling 
for five dollars an hour. This seemed 
like a gigantic sum to an amateur like 
Shirley and it wasn't long before she 
got her first cover on True Story. 
That accidental discovery snowballed 
T into one job after another. She began 
v commuting 170 miles, every other day, 
n to Los Angeles assignments. She signed 
with a top agency and was soon filming 

„ television commercials, as well as ap- 
76 



My Wife Shirley 

pearing on many, many more magazine 
covers. 

Then she retired temporarily, to 
await the birth of her second child, 
Sherri — and again, when little Marty 
came along. Just barely out of her 
teens, Shirley was the mother of three, 
and a most successful model. In her 
private life, things weren't going as 
well. She and her husband had grown 
apart. Shirley obtained a divorce from 
Lenny, but everything was — and still 
is — very friendly between them. (To- 
day, the three of us are good friends.) 

All of which brings me back to a 
June night in 1958 and our own per- 
sonal kismet. A director friend of mine, 
Bob Gordon, had invited me to join 
him at a place called Ye Little Club, in 
Beverly Hills, for a social evening with 
a group of young single people who 
called themselves the Rogues and 
Wenches. As soon as I got there, I was 
sorry I'd come. The place was filled 
with people, all of whom seemed to 
know each other intimately. 

My eyes finally focused on a coiner 
booth and, to my surprise, I knew one 
of the men at the table. Next to him was 
a girl I recognized as a former Miss 
Universe contestant, and next to her 
was a girl in a light red suit, who was 
talking to the owner of the club, Mar- 
shall Edson. I kept staring at the table, 
then walked over and was invited to sit 

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down. I sat between the former beauty 
contestant and the blonde in red — who 
said, the minute I sat down, "Gee, you 
sure have been knocking yourself out 
flirting with me." 

I was startled, partly because that's 
not the kind of remark a girl usually 
makes, mostly because I hadn't been 
staring at her in the first place. I was 
too gentlemanly to inform her that I 
had been carrying on a mildly teasing 
flirtation with the girl sitting next to 
her! But one word led to another and, 
a few minutes later, the blonde — who'd 
been introduced as Shirley Bonne — 
smiled and said, "It's very stuffy in 
here. Would you like to go next door 
and get a cup of coffee?" 

Naturally, I accepted. How could I 
resist? The place next door was closed, 
so we wound up around the block in a 
booth for two at Frascatti's. Over cof- 
fee, we found ourselves chatting away 
like long-lost friends. She told me she 
was a model and that she'd come to the 
club that night to see her good friends, 
Mr. and Mrs. Edson. 

"Then you aren't a Wench?" I said. 

"Are you kidding?" she answered, 
smiling that toothpaste -ad smile of 
hers. She had no idea that I was refer- 
ring to the group gathered at the club, 
the Rogues and Wenches. I just smiled 
to myself. You see, since I wasn't a 
regular Rogue and she wasn't a regular 
Wench, it's obvious that fate brought 
us together that night! 



Over a second cup of coffee I asked 
for her phone number. 

"I never give my number out," she 
said. "But you can give me your num- 
ber and maybe sometime I'll call you!" 

Boy, was that a refreshing experi- 
ence! As a matter of fact, the thing that 
struck me, as I sat across from her, was 
how uniquely wholesome and sweet 
and neat and unpretentious she was. It 
may sound corny, but it's the truth. Her 
beauty, which haunted me later on, 
didn't even faze me that night. I was 
captivated by her personality, so frank 
and wide-eyed and original. 

After the fifth cup of coffee, she sud- 
denly smiled and said, "I've changed 
my mind. You're very nice. Not at all 
like the others. I will give you my 
number." By this time, I was a little 
confused. 

I thought to myself, This girl is too 
good to be true, or else she's a kook or 
something, and I'll be darned if I'll call 
her, anyway, since she lives 70 or 80 
miles away and that means long-dis- 
tance! We finished cup of coffee num- 
ber six and said goodnight. 

The next morning, my office phone 
rang. It was Shirley calling me. "I'm 
coming into Los Angeles on an assign- 
ment. Would you like to have lunch?" 
I didn't realize how much she'd affected 
me until I found myself saying yes be- 
fore she'd finished asking the question. 
As I sat across from her in the cafe, 
something happened — like you read 
about in books. Vibration . . . She really 
got through to me! From that moment 
on, I never had any desire to date an- 
other girl. 

During lunch, Shirley went on gaily 
chatting, then she suddenly said, 
"There's something I have to tell you. 
I've been married and I have three 
little children. My divorce will be final 
in three months." If someone hadn't 
casually mentioned this fact to me the 
previous evening, I really would have 
been stunned. She looked about eight- 
een at the most, and there was some- 
thing so childlike about her, it hardly 
seemed possible that she was the moth- 
er of three. 

Shirley went on to tell me a little 
about her background. The more she 
talked, the more I knew I was deeply 
attracted to her. But one part of me 
managed to remain aloof. I certainly 
had no intentions of getting married, 
not for years. I'd only been out of law 
school a little more than two years. 
Half that time, I'd worked for the City 
Attorney. I had just started in private 
practice and, like a typical bachelor, 
had furnished a nice apartment and 
bought myself a sharp -looking T-bird. 
No, sir, the last thing in the world I 
was thinking about was settling down. 

We started seeing each other every 
time Shirley came to Los Angeles, 
which was several times a week. I 
knew I'd fallen in love and I thought 
she felt the same way, too. Yet neither 
of us said anything. Aside from 
thoughts of taking on the responsi- 
bility of a wife and three children, 
there were other problems. When we'd 
started dating, my parents had been 



out of town. Now they were due back 
and I knew I had to tell them about 
Shirley. I didn't know how or what 
I'd say, but my sister arranged a fam- 
ily dinner for the folks and me, and I 
just came right out and told them I 
was seeing a girl who'd been married 
before, etc. 

To be honest, they weren't over- 
joyed. They had nothing against Shir- 
ley, but you know how parents are, 
particularly with an only son who's 
just starting out to make his own way 
in the world. Finally, I took Shirley to 
meet my folks. It was a strained meet- 
ing, with Shirley on the defensive, my 
mother on the offensive, and my dad 
noncommittal. The evening ended up 
a draw. 

But we kept on dating and, finally, I 
resolved the conflict in my own mind. 
I knew I had my own life to lead — and 
I could not envision that life without 
Shirley. By this time, it was January 
of 1959 and we'd been dating for seven 
months. One night, I picked her up to 
take her to the movies. We wanted to 
make an early show and didn't have 
time to stop for a full dinner, so we 
wound up having a snack at Schwab's 
drugstore. 

Now, Schwab's may be famous from 
Coast to Coast because a lot of celeb- 
rities do hang out there, but, believe 
me, the decor isn't exactly what you'd 
call romantic. We ordered, then I took 
a deep breath and listened while Shir- 
ley went rattling on about life in gen- 
eral and our situation in particular. 
Finally, I just looked at her and said, 
"I want to marry you." 

I guess maybe I didn't read my line 
well, because Shirley just looked at me 
and said tartly, "That's all you ever 
say!" I was too stunned to say any- 
thing for a few moments, until finally 
it dawned on me that she hadn't got 
my message at all. I took her hand and 
said, in mock anger, "I thought you said 
you loved me!" 

"Well, I do," she said, and I could 
see the tears about to fall. 

"All right, then why are you so up- 
set? I just proposed to you." Her huge 
blue eyes opened as wide as saucers. 
"You did?" she said. Then, reaching 
for her coin purse, she jumped up from 
the table. "I'm going to call everybody 
I know and tell them the good news!" 
Then she disappeared into the phone 
booth for half an hour. 

Shirley and I were married at my 
sister's home on April 12, 1959. It was 
a small wedding. Just my sister and 
brother-in-law, my folks, Shirley's 
mother, and her two oldest children, 
Johnny and Sherri. Throughout our 
courtship, I'd grown to love the chil- 
dren — so you can imagine how I felt 
when the ceremony was over and both 
of them ran up and hugged me and 
looked at Shirley and said, "Now can 
we call him Daddy?" 

Neither of us could take any ex- 
tended time off, so we spent a three- 
day honeymoon in Palm Springs, where 
my folks were staying. They, in turn, 
fell in love with Shirley. From the 
night of our wedding dinner, Shirl's 
been able to twist my dad around her 
little finger and, if any little thing goes 



wrong, both my parents always take 
Shirley's side. So you can see every- 
thing worked out wonderfully well. 

A few weeks before we were mar- 
ried, Shirley had flown to New York 
for the first time in her life. She did 
some important commercials and, after 
several return trips to New York dur- 
ing the first year of our marriage, she 
decided to try acting. She called agent 
Dick Clayton, who'd been trying to talk 
her into testing for five years, and told 
him she was ready. Maybe he could 
get her a few bit parts or walk-ons. He 
set up an interview for her with Max 
Arnow, casting director at Columbia 
Studios. 

When Shirley walked into Mr. Ar- 
now's office, his secretary took one look 
at her and blurted out, "My gosh, you're 
Eileen!" Shirley didn't have the vaguest 
idea what the woman was referring to, 
until the secretary told her that the 
studio was frantically looking for a girl 
to play a character called Eileen, had 
already tested 150 girls, and hadn't been 
able to find one. She added that this 
information was hush-hush and told 
Shirley not to say a word about it, un- 
less Mr. Arnow mentioned it first. 

When Mr. Arnow interviewed Shir- 
ley, he didn't say a word about Eileen. 
Instead, he gave her some scripts and 
asked her to read for him. She was ab- 
solutely petrified and managed to con- 
vince him that she wasn't at her best, 
reading "cold," so he gave her the 
scripts and told her to go home and 
memorize them. Shirley left his office, 
still unaware of what the "Eileen" bit 
was all about. 

A few days later, when she received 
a call from Columbia asking her to 
report to Mr. Harry Ackerman's office 
at Screen Gems, she was still so new 
to the business that she had no idea 
what Screen Gems was. She didn't 
know that it was Columbia's TV sub- 
sidiary and that Mr. Ackerman was one 
of the big executives. 

On her first interview, she'd tried to 
impress Mr. Arnow, all done up as if 
she'd been going to pose for a Vogue 
cover. Chic suit, hair piled high, fur 
stole, the works. This time, although 
she had no idea why, she decided to be 
casual. She wore no makeup except a 
trace of lipstick and a bit of eyeshadow. 
She wore a simple skirt and blouse, 
and that was that. 

She entered Mr. Ackerman's office 
and sat waiting to be called. The door 
opened, a man walked in, looked at her 
and said, "Are you the one who's test- 
ing for Eileen?" 

Shirley looked bewildered but didn't 
get a chance to say anything, because 
the secretary put her finger to her 
mouth and said to the man, "Sh, it's a 
secret." Shirley just sat still, looking 
wide-eyed and waiting for somebody 
else to make the first move. The man 
must have been mistaken. From what 
little she'd been able to gather, Eileen 
was a big part in a new TV series — so 
obviously it wasn't for her. 

Mr. Ackerman asked her to come in, 
took one look at her, and handed her a 
script. On the cover were the words: 
"My Sister Eileen." It was forty-seven 
pages long and, as she sat nervously 




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77 



thumbing through it, she could see that 
Eileen had just tons of lines on each 
page. "Go home and learn this," he told 
her. "Be ready to take a test next 
week." 

Shirley came home that night in a 
complete panic. She was so scared, she 
looked like she'd been set in a deep- 
freeze for a week. She just stared at 
me, then started to cry. "Oh, Ronnie, 
how will I ever learn all of these lines? 
I've never had to memorize anything 
in my life before that was longer than 
a ten-line poem in school. I can't do it. 
I'll just die!" 

I calmed her down and she started 
to work on it. Seven days later, she 
made the test. Four days after she made 
the test, the phone rang. Shirley Bonne 
had won out over nearly one hundred 
and sixty professional actresses. She 
was to be Eileen! It was unbelievable. 
Especially, two weeks later, when she 
was in front of a television camera 
acting with seasoned professionals like 
Elaine Stritch. 

To this day, Shirley goes around in 
a state of disbelief. Every day, she gets 
up and goes to the studio and works 
like a beaver, then comes home just in 
time to spend an hour with the kids 
and learn her lines and fall into bed 
exhausted. On Saturdays, she does 
publicity. On Sundays, she and I and 
the children spend the whole day to- 
gether at the beach or the mountains 
or the amusement park. Twice a month, 
Shirley attends P.T.A. meetings. John- 
ny, now seven-and-a-half, is in the 
second grade, Sherri, six, is in first 
grade, and the baby, Marty, three, goes 
to nursery school. 

Since the beginning of the year, so 
much has happened to us it's amazing. 
Shirley got her contract, I moved into 
a new suite of offices to accommodate 
my rapidly growing law practice, and 
we bought and furnished our first 
home. Talk about kismetl That about 
brings me up-to-date on my wife Shir- 
ley, except that perhaps I should ex- 
plain more precisely why Shirley and 
Eileen are so much alike. 

Shirley has not changed one iota 
since success started to come her way. 
Frankly, I'm convinced she's complete- 
ly unaware of her physical beauty. 
She's just a regular, down-to-earth, 
starry-eyed girl who looks sixteen 
when she's around the house in slacks 
and a blouse and no makeup. 

She's considerate and kind and loves 
everybody and never has a bad word to 
say about anything. She simply loves 
life and manages to live each day as 
fully as possible. She never fails to say 
thank-you, and whenever she sees her 
name in print — whether it's a two-line 
item or a five-page story — she imme- 
diately sits down and writes a letter 
of appreciation, even if she's so ex- 
hausted she can hardly move. 

I guess you've gathered by now that 

I'm rather fond of my wife, Shirley 

Bonne. Every day since I've met her 

has been a hundred times more beau- 

t tiful because of her. That's why I re- 

v iterate that Shirley and Eileen are so 

R alike. Both of them bring joy to others 

because of their inner goodness and 

sweetness and refreshing charm. 



Information Jiooth 



The Name's the Same 

Please tell me if the actresses Kath- 
leen Crowley and Pat Crowley are 
related? 

B.A.L., Tacoma, Washington 

The two attractive young actresses 
are not related. 

Blonde, blue-eyed Kathleen Crowley 
dreamed of becoming an actress all the 
time she was growing up in her native 
New Jersey. Lacking funds for a col- 
lege education, she let herself be spon- 
sored by the townspeople as Miss Egg 
Harbor in a preliminary contest for 
Miss America, in hopes of winning a 
scholarship. She reached the finals 
as Miss New Jersey and won not one 
but two scholarships, which she 
promptly used to study at the Ameri- 
can Academy of Dramatic Art. . . . 
Kathleen later worked a season at Ken- 
nebunkport Playhouse in Maine before 
returning to New York to star in many 
TV shows. . . . The pretty actress ar- 
rived in Hollywood in 1952, where she 
has been ever since, appearing in 
movies and such TV shows as 77 Sun- 
set Strip and Maverick. Kathleen likes 
to read and is fond of music. 

Dark-haired, hazel-eyed Pat Crowley 
does have a sister in show business, but 
the latter's name is Ann. It was 
through her that Pat made her pro- 
fessional debut as an actress. Ann had 
the lead in the Broadway musical 
"Carousel" and managed to wangle a 
walk-on part for sister Pat, then only 
fourteen. From this small beginning, 
Pat eventually went on to starring roles 
in Broadway plays, movies and many 
TV shows, including Walt Disney Pre- 
sents and The Untouchables. . . . 
Pretty Pat is married to attorney Greg- 
ory Hookstratten and has a son Jon, 
2!/2. She likes cooking and dancing. 

Some Quickies 

Are the actresses Barbara Lawrence 
and Ruta Lee sisters? 

R.D., Rockford, III. 
They are not related. 

/ would like to know when and 
where Loretta Young was born. 

N.R., Fairmont, N.C. 

She was born in Salt Lake City, 
Utah, on January 6, 1913. 

/ would like to know the following 

about Donald May, Tom Tryon, Will 

Hutchins and Peter Brown: How old 

are they and are any of them married? 

P.G., Babylon, L.I., N.Y. 



PAT 
CROWLEY 




KATHLEEN 
CROWLEY 



Donald is 32; Tom, 35; Will, 28; 
and Peter, 25. Donald is the only one 
who is currently married. 

Are Marjorie Lord and Jack Lord 
related? L.M., Homer, Nebraska 

No, they are not. 

Regretfully 

The editors of TV Radio Mirror 
note with regret the tragic death, in a 
motorboat accident, of twenty-three- 
year-old actor Ted "Zeke" Budny, 
close friend of Rick Nelson, and author 
of a story about Rick which appeared 
in our December 1960 issue. 

Calling All Fans 



The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write 
to address given — not to TV Radio 
Mirror. 

Allen Case Fan Club, Joyce Mocher. 
710 Whipple Rd., N.W., Canton. Ohio. 

Adam Wade Fan Club, Linda Mc- 
Curdy, 458 Morehouse Dr.. Wilming- 
ton, Del. 

Conway Twitty Fan Club, Lorraine 
Bartucca. 19 Jones St.. New Rochelle. 
N.Y. 

Diane McBain Fan Club, Pamela 
Lea, 6743 Banning Dr., Oakland, Calif. 

Dorothy Provine Fan Club, Polly 
Businger, 164 E. 226th St., Euclid, 0. 



We'll answer questions about radio and 
TV in this column, provided they are of 
general interest. Write to Information 
booth, TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd 
St., New York 17, N. Y. Attach this 
box, specifying whether it concerns ra- 
dio or TV. Sorry, no personal answers. 



Eddy Arnold Has a Farm 



(Continued from page 44) 
had taught me to chord a guitar and I 
kept trying to learn enough songs so as 
I could get me a job. Singing was the 
only thing I could turn to, and I wasn't 
really equipped for that, either — as I 
soon found out by cooling my heels 
around radio stations." 

Eddy says that he honestly did not 
know the difference between a country 
tune and pop number. "To me, they 
were all songs. Some I wanted to sing, 
and some 1 didn't. But program man- 
agers had them all fenced off. Music 
was hillbilly, jazz, pop or classic. All I 
wanted was to be accepted as an enter- 
tainer, but it was almost impossible to 
break through the barriers." 

Chronologically, that barrier-break- 
ing Arnold career first surged forward 
when Eddy went on tour with Pee 
Wee King's band. It advanced^ when he 
landed a radio show on WSM, Nash- 
ville. At radio's pre-TV peak, Eddy was 
heard daily on more than a thousand 
stations. He was the first of the Nash- 
ville singers to play smart hotels and 
that money -mecca, Las Vegas. 

His RCA Victor records, "Anytime," 
"I'll Hold You In My Heart," and 
"Bouquet Of Roses," were among the 
first of the country-flavored tunes to 
sell a million discs. His style, copied by 
many artists, was one of the components 
of that fusion which became rock 'n' 
roll and was later modified into today's 
more melodious pop music with a beat. 
Today, some music men say that Eddy 
"sings all- American." Others classify 
him with Burl Ives. 

However, Eddy is also a strong con- 
tender in the pop field. In a year when 
anyone over twenty had a hard time 
getting heard, he ran "The Tennessee 
Stud," a story-telling ballad about a 
horse and its rider, to the top of the 
charts. His recent "Before This Day 
Ends" didn't do so badly, either. 

These are the accomplishments which 
Eddy refers to as "working like the 
dickens to get back on the farm." He 
says, "The first real money I made, I 
bought a house for my wife Sally and 
me. When the children came along, I 
started looking for a farm where they 
could grow up. On a farm, a child learns 
a lot about life in a wholesome way. 
Sex isn't any big mystery; it's a nat- 
ural part of growth. Also, on a farm, a 
child has room to run and he has work 
to do. He feels useful and he doesn't 
get all cooped-up and rebellious." 

Eddy chose land in the Brentwood 
section, near Nashville. Describing it, 
he says, "It's the prettiest place. Not 
that the house is so much. It's just an 
ordinary, comfortable, roomy, ranch- 
style white clapboard. But it sits at 
the top of a hill and the way the land 
rolls and the trees grow makes a pic- 
ture." 

The character of the land led to 
Eddy's specializing in raising cattle. 
"Eventually, I want to get most of it 
into permanent pasture. I got me a herd 
of eighty-five grade Herefords, plus 
some registered bulls. I fatten an ani- 
mal eighteen months before selling it 
for beef." 



There are horses, too. "I confess that 
I've played golf more often than I've 
been riding, lately, but I just can't 
imagine a farm without horses. We 
have three Tennessee walking horses 
and a pony. Every time I go down to 
the pasture, they come running to me." 

Furnishings of their home reflect 
Eddy's and Sally's old-American herit- 
age. Many of the pieces are antiques. 
What Eddy calls "Sally's antiquing" 
also led to the purchase of the second 
farm. "She had been collecting for quite 
a while," he says. "Then she took a 
course in interior decorating and really 
started hunting for old things. She 
heard about this auction, and I went 
along. I'd had my eye on that land, and 
I had walked it over, but I didn't think 
I could buy it. The auction was on a 
nasty, dismal day and the crowd was 
small. When I realized what price it 
was going for, I bid it in." 

In a high-pressure business, Eddy 
manages to pack a lot of family enjoy- 
ment into a low-pressure life. The 
secret, he says, is living near Nashville. 
A few hours on a plane take him to 
Chicago or New York, but, in between, 
he's at home. 

"A recording session here isn't like 
a recording session anywhere else," he 
explains. "Jo Ann and Dicky can come 
along if they want to. There's no fran- 
tic arranger or conductor getting rat- 
tled by having people sitting around on 
the sidelines. My friend, Chet Atkins, 
who heads up the Victor branch here, 
gets the musicians together and hands 
out a leadsheet. We go into the studio 
and just keep on playing and singing 
until we get what we want on a record." 

Both Eddy's children have a gift for 
music. By Eddy's statement, "They do 
right well when we're sitting around 
the living room and I ask them to go to 
the piano and play me a tune." He is 
cautious, however, in encouraging pro- 
fessional ambitions. "I remind them 
they might not be as lucky as their old 
pappy has been. They can go into show 
business, if they want to. That's up to 
them." 

Any attempt to draw them into it 
prematurely arouses Eddy's wrath. "A 
fellow from Detroit sent me a song and 
had the nerve to say, "This can be your 
son's first hit.' Well, I fired it right back 
at him. I wrote that man, 'My son sings 
only in his bedroom and says he wants 
to be a doctor. The only show he can 
put on is socking a homer in the Knot- 
hole League. And that's sure all right 
with me.' " 

There's one threat of encroachment 
on Eddy Arnold's particular brand of 
country life. "The city is growing this 
direction so fast that I figure we'll be 
surrounded about the time the children 
are old enough to go away to school. 
When that happens, I'll sell off the land 
for a development and keep just a few 
acres for the home place. What will I 
do then? Well, I told you I was the 
kind of country boy who had to work 
hard to get back on the land. I'm not 
leaving it. I'll just take the money and 
go out a ways farther and buy me an- 
other farm!" 



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T 

V 
It 

79 



He Fell in Love With His Press Agent 



T 

V 
R 

30 



(Continued from page 23) 
well-known press agent. Marcia — long 
accustomed to an atmosphere of pub- 
licity ballyhoo — isn't apt to be easily 
impressed by handsome young actors. 
She duly noted that the new client was 
six feet tall, had dark brown hair, olive 
skin — and eyes the same color as her 
own (hazel) — and dutifully jotted down 
these details in her notebook. 

Now it was time to find out what 
subjects this new addition to the cast 
of The Detectives would talk about to 
future interviewers. "Would you be 
willing to talk about why you will or 
won't go steady?" she asked Mark. 

"I'll talk about why I won't go 
steady," he said. "I don't want to get 
involved. It's important, right now, to 
concentrate on a career. Acting is a 
business, like any other business, and 
requires concentration. I don't expect 
to fall in love for a long time so I go 
out with a girl a few times, then switch 
to someone else. If a man doesn't take 
any girl out too often, no one gets hurt." 

"That will be a good angle for a fan 
magazine story," said Marcia. "We can 
call it, 'I Won't Go Steady'." 

Within three weeks, Mark Goddard 
and Marcia Rogers were going steady. 

When Mark had said that he didn't 
expect to fall in love for a long time, 
he was telling the truth. "I'd never been 
in love before," he told me. "Infatua- 
tions, yes. But love — I thought that was 
something which would hit me in the 
remote future." 

He did ask Marcia for a date the very 
first time they met. It was to be a 
casual sort of date — they'd play table 
tennis at the home of producer-writer 
Aaron Spelling and his actress wife, 
Carolyn Jones. "I have a tentative ap- 
pointment but I'll try to change it," said 
Marcia. It wouldn't do to antagonize a 
client — but she also didn't want to get 
involved. 

For about nine months, Marcia had 
been going steady with Burt Reynolds. 
Neither she nor Burt was contemplating 
marriage, but it was a nice friendship; 
they got along well. Mark was attrac- 
tive, modest and pleasant — but it would 
be silly to drop a good friend for a man 
who'd never be anything more than a 
casual date. 

So, when Mark called to ask about 
the table-tennis date, she said she 
didn't have time that Sunday. "Then 
what about lunch next week?" Lunch 
would be nice, she agreed. Lunch, she 
thought, would also be safe — much 
more noncommittal than an evening 
date. A girl might become sentimental 
in a restaurant with soft lights and mu- 
sic at night, but nothing of the sort 
could happen at lunch. However, what 
did happen was that she liked Mark so 
well that, when he suggested a date a 
few nights later at the Albatross at 
Malibu, she weakened and said yes. 

That evening at the Albatross, Mark 
Goddard became aware that he had 
fallen in love at third sight. "It took me 
longer to fall in love," says Marcia. 
"About two or three weeks." » 

That evening, Mark talked as he nev- 
er had before to any girl. He found 



himself telling her intimate things that 
he'd never told anyone. As they looked 
through the large picture windows at 
the ocean, Mark said, "I've always loved 
water. I was brought up near water. 
Though I was born in Lowell, Massa- 
chusetts, I was brought up in Scituate — 
which is right near the harbor. 

"Somehow, I always get a sense of 
peace from being near the ocean. 
Whenever I used to get through doing 
a show, I would take a walk on the 
beach to relax. No matter how upset I 
was, there was something about the 
waves that always calmed me. I still 
feel that way. Do you?" 

Marcia admitted that she, too, loved 
the ocean. 

As they talked, the picture of what 
Mark was really like became more and 
more appealing. From the time he was 
a small boy, he had been impulsive. His 
closest friend had been Pete Stewart, 
and the two of them — both imaginative, 
both restless — had got into all sorts of 
scrapes and adventures as youngsters. 
Pete and Mark (whose real name was 
Charles Goddard) were curious about 
everything and anything. They used to 
go down to the boatyard, and jump 
from one boat to another. 

When the northeast storms came up, 
they'd venture out in their dories. Once 
they'd been caught in a particularly 
bad storm, and the Coast Guard had to 
come to save them. In the winter, they 
were always exploring nearby ponds, 



FIGHT CANCER 

With A Checkup 
And A Check 



* 



skating metaphorically and literally on 
thin ice. Sometimes, they would fall 
into ponds, and once Pete was caught 
in quicksand. Terrified as he was, young 
Mark had managed to rescue him. 

Their worst escapade came when 
Mark was about eighteen. They were 
in Boston at the time, and had noted 
the famous wooden Indian in front of 
the Algonquin Hotel. As a prank, they 
decided to remove the figure and place 
it with some of its brother Indians in 
the Museum of Fine Arts. They man- 
aged to drag it from the hotel entrance 
into their car, but that was as far as 
they got — at that point, the Boston po- 
lice arrested them. 

They were kept in jail overnight. 
Next morning, along with a lot of dere- 
licts, they had to face the judge. For- 
tunately, she was a woman with a great 
deal of understanding of teenagers. She 
quickly realized that these boys were 
simply planning the kind of practical 
joke boys have played from time im- 
memorial, and dismissed them with a 
warning. 

Pete and Mark attended Scituate 



High School together, then Mark went 
on to Holy Cross College, with the idea 
of preparing for a legal career. Actual- 
ly, he was more interested in athletics 
than in law. He tried out for varsity 
basketball, but didn't make the team. 
Up to that point, he'd done well in his 
studies. Now he was so disappointed 
that he stopped paying attention to his 
studies, and his marks went 'way down. 

Finally, Father Gallagher, the rhet- 
oric teacher, sent for him. "What's the 
matter with you?" he asked. "You're a 
bright boy, but you've been paying 
very little attention to your studies. 
What's wrong?" 

"I'm just not interested in anything," 
said Mark. "I've lost interest. First, I 
couldn't get on the basketball squad, 
and now I'm not sure that I want to 
become a lawyer." 

Father Gallagher suggested that 
Mark try out for a school play. "Not 
interested," said Mark. But later he 
wandered into the auditorium to watch 
a rehearsal and became so interested 
that he accepted a bit part in the play. 
In fact, he was so excited by this 
whole new world of acting that he made 
up his mind to quit college and study 
for an acting career. 

When he told his mother that he was 
going to take his junior mid-year exams 
and then quit college, she said, "At 
least, come home and talk things over." 
To please her, he did. "But my mind 
was made up," he now explained to 
Marcia. "If I hadn't left college, I 
wouldn't be here in Hollywood today. 
I wouldn't be acting in television — and 
I wouldn't have met you." 

The eloquent way in which he said 
"you," was enough to give Marcia the 
tip-off. This boy who didn't want to go 
steady was falling for her. She'd gone 
out with other actors, and she knew the 
signs. To all of them, acting had been 
the center of fife. But, to this young 
man, life itself was the center of life. 
To him, acting was an exciting busi- 
ness, but the sun didn't rise or set ac- 
cording to how well an actor did in a 
part. 

In his view of things, actors were far 
less important than doctors and many 
others. They had a job to do. If they did 
it well, they could derive much more 
satisfaction than if they did it sloppily. 
He would always do his best. But he 
would never become self-important or 
egocentric. 

When they said goodnight, Marcia 
was startled by Mark's directness. 
"You're the kind of girl I've been look- 
ing for all my life," he said. "Sooner or 
later, Marcia — and I hope it's sooner — 
we're going to get married." 

Startled, Marcia changed the subject. 
But Mark meant what he had said. 
That night, he told a neighbor: "I've 
met the girl I'm going to marry." 

They began to see each other almost 
every evening. Marcia discovered that 
Mark has a wonderful sense of humor. 
She chortled over his story — which she 
dragged out of him with her best press- 
agent finesse — of how he got into tele- 
vision. 

After playing stock in Florida and 



New England for two-and-a-half years, 
he decided that he wanted to go to 
California to try to get into pictures. 
He got the names of friends' friends in 
various towns along the route, then 
started West with about seventy -eight 
dollars and a beat-up little car. 

Once in California, he learned that 
Joseph Anthony was directing a pic- 
ture called "Career," and wrote to him, 
explaining his background and his am- 
bitions. Something about the letter in- 
terested Mr. Anthony, and he sent 
Mark to the William Morris office with 
his recommendation. As a result, he got 
his first part in a TV show. 

Knowing that a pilot film was going 
to be made for a promising new West- 
ern, the William Morris office asked 
Mark if he could ride. As you may have 
gathered, Mark is a man who is willing 
to take chances. Though he'd never 
been on a horse in his life, he pre- 
tended to be an experienced rider. 

The wranglers gave him a lively 
horse. He grabbed the saddle and 
swung onto the horse. His hat flew off, 
the reins fell, and the horse took off. 
When the riders were ordered to halt, 
Mark couldn't get his steed to stop. On 
and on it flew — till one of the extras, 
taking pity on him, stopped the horse. 

That particular scene will never be 
shown on TV. 

"After that," Mark told Marcia, "I 
made up my mind that I'd learn to ride. 
I practiced continually. I went to 
Sandy's Stables at Riverside and hung 
around the wranglers. They taught me. 
In about a month, I learned to ride 
horses presentably in front of the 
camera." 

It was a good thing he did. Other- 
wise he never would have got his first 
big chance, playing Cully in Johnny 
Ringo. His success in that role con- 
vinced Dick Powell, Aaron Spelling and 
others that he would be right for the 
role of young Sergeant Chris Ballard 
in The Detectives. 

Because things have happened to him 
so quickly in Hollywood — he's been 
here a year and a half — Mark Goddard 
is not only modest but occasionally feels 
almost insecure. "There are times," he 
confesses, "when I get very depressed. 
When I do, just looking at Marcia 
makes me feel happier." 

One thing Mark is very sure about: 
His love for Marcia. One night, after a 
date, he found her gold charm bracelet 
in his car. Their next date was only a 



night away. In that single day, he lov- 
ingly polished the bracelet till it shone, 
and added one more charm: A gold 
heart bearing the words "Hi, there" — 
the first words she'd ever said to him. 

And how does Marcia feel about 
Mark? For no special occasion — just 
because she loves him — she gave him a 
cigarette lighter with the words, "You 
are the light of my life." 

They became engaged the first of 
October and set their wedding date 
for January 15 at the home of Marcia's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rogers. 
"The wedding will be confined to mem- 
bers of our family and to close friends," 
is the way Marcia has planned it. 
"Aaron Spelling will be best man, and 
a close friend of mine — Elaine, the wife 
of Mark's manager — will be matron of 
honor." 

As to plans and ideas to help them 
turn their marriage into a successful 
one, Mark says, "I think the most im- 
portant thing to remember is that you 
have to work at marriage. Everything 
isn't coming up roses just because 
you're in love. Marcia and I haven't 
had our first argument yet — unless you 
call the fact that we disagree on politics 
an argument! 

"My mother wrote a letter in which 
she said that there is no need ever to 
have that first argument. I don't think 
that's entirely true. It would be most 
unusual for two married people never 
to disagree. We don't have to believe 
alike. I want Marcia to believe as she 
does, and I'll believe what I believe. 
Where there is understanding, there 
can be no misunderstanding." 

Marcia says, "It is important not to 
be influenced by other people." Mark 
adds, "Every decision Marcia and I 
make we'll make. . ." 

"Together," they say in unison. 

Marcia intends to keep working after 
marriage. "But I'll try to leave the 
office early, so I can have Mark's din- 
ner waiting for him when he comes 
home. I want us to have perfect din- 
ners, with wine and candlelight, and me 
bringing him his slippers." 

Mark smiles. "Marcia makes me feel 
good," he says. "She's considerate. I 
hate to be away from her." 

Once, when Mark had a cold, Marcia 
sent him some antihistamine pills and 
aspirins with this telegraphed message: 
"Take these and be healthy because I 
love you." And Mark didn't have to be 
a detective in Robert Taylor's TV series 
to know she meant it! 



A Family With "Flair" 



(Continued from page 46) 
vertible fact: The Van Dyke family 
isn't seeing nearly as much of Dick, 
these days, as they (or Dick) would 
prefer. Daddy's so busy, they hardly 
get to see him, except on Sundays! 

This has been especially true since 
last October, when Dick debuted as 
emcee of Flair, five days a week on 
ABC Radio. It's an unusual assignment, 

i since Flair is a daily hour gem-packed 
with what Dick calls "a little bit of 



everything. We have humor, news, mu- 
sic, beauty hints — features like Boris 
Karloff speaking on baby care, Herm- 
ione Gingold discussing men, Martha 
Rountree covering the Washington 
scene. There may be a hundred stars 
in all, each appealing about twice a 
week. And all monologues are limited 
to a minute-and-a-half, including 
mine." 

Dick's own stint is a daily one, add- 
ing up to a pretty heavy schedule for 



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a star who's also appearing on Broad- 
way. But he enjoys every moment, 
whether he's working or just relaxing 
at home. His charming blonde wife, 
Marjorie, and their three children are 
equally well adjusted. It's a happy and 
devoted family living in that nine-room 
colonial farmhouse, complete with large 
patio, barbecue pit and swimming pool. 

"We have five bathrooms," Chris 
adds proudly. "We're clean, anyway," 
Dick comments. "And the boys eat like 
boys, not like horses — so we can't get 
away with feeding them oats!" 

Family meals are served at a large 
circular table set before a wood-burn- 
ing fireplace in the pine-paneled kitch- 
en. Dinner is early, so that Dick may 
leave at seven for the 54th Street Thea- 
ter where "Bye Bye Birdie" is playing. 
On winter nights, it must take the 
courage of a pioneer to hop into a cold 
car for that twenty-seven mile drive 
into town, leaving behind so warm and 
charming an atmosphere! 

The Van Dyke living room is large 
and uncluttered. Carpeting is beige, 
draperies white. Built-in bookcases 
with white cupboards line the walls on 
both sides of the fireplace. A large cir- 
cular coffee table is flanked by easy 
chairs — one blue, one green — and there 
are two gold couches. Above the fire- 
place is an abstract painting done by 
Dick; on another wall, an interesting 
study of Dick as a white -faced clown, 
painted in his dressing room. "It doesn't 
resemble me much but the artist said 
he wasn't attempting a portrait," the 
star explains. 

There is a hi-fi set and a baby grand 
piano which is for use, not show. "We 
all play a little," says Marjorie. "Stacey 
has just begun to study. She's been 
playing by ear for a year. The children 
all love music." 

"I used to play trombone," Chris con- 
fides, "but I gave it up. The blowing 
hurt my ears." Dick smiles: "It was a 
question of being talented or deaf." 

"I can play the clarinet," Barry an- 
nounces hopefully. But it is Stacey, a 
doll-like child with large blue eyes and 
long blonde hair, who is called upon to 
perform. "Play 'I Love You, Conrad,' 
and Daddy will sing it," her mother 
suggests. 

Stacey seats herself at the piano, tiny 
hands poised over the keys, little-girl 
legs swinging a good foot above the 
pedals, and begins. Dick beams with 
pride. "That's from 'Birdie.' " he leans 
informally against the piano and joins 
her in song. 

Do any of the children plan a career 
in show business? "I doubt it," Mar- 
jorie says, "although Stacey claims she 
wants to be a ballerina. I'll let her study 
when she's eight. I studied ballet but 
never did anything with it profession- 
ally. Chris leans toward science and 
Barry wants to be an archaeologist. 
Right now, they're interested in base- 
ball, football and track. Barry's quite a 
runner. 

"In the summer, we all live in the 
pool. But, whenever the weather is 
right, Dick gets out in the backyard 
and joins the boys in athletics. They 
even have a high jump. How about 
Stacey? Oh, she has swings and a slide 
and she's happy with her dolls. She's 



a real little girl. The only major argu- 
ment the kids ever have is when the 
boys want to watch a Western on TV 
and Stacey insists on cartoons. We set- 
tle it by having them take turns. 

"Dick is very patient with the chil- 
dren, but firm," Marjorie adds. "We're 
not 'progressive' parents at all. We de- 
finitely believe in discipline. Dick says 
there are those who feel he's overly 
strict because he makes the kids be- 
have around the house, but I'd say he 
has more understanding than I." 

The concert over, Stacey slides off 
the piano bench and announces excit- 
edly, "We're going to a party tonight — 
in costumes! I'm going to be a gypsy. I 
can hardly wait." 

"I'm going to be Dracula," says Chris, 
"and Barry's going to be a ghoul. Dad- 
dy's going to make us up. Let's go get 
our costumes, huh?" The children troop 
upstairs and Dick settles in an easy 
chair. "One good thing about being a 
father in show business, I can always 
get them costumes for a masquerade. 
First date I ever had with Marge was 
kind of a masquerade — well, not really. 
It was the Sadie Hawkins Day dance 
and she asked me to go. I always did 
wonder who married whom." 

"We were in high school and the girls 
were supposed to ask the boys," Mar- 
jorie explains. 

"Yes, dear." He smiles at her affec- 
tionately. "I remember you were wear- 
ing a full skirt and kind of large 
squares — " 

"That was gingham. That's what we 
wore to Sadie Hawkins dances." 

"Good idea having the girls ask the 
boys. Took you three years to catch 
me, though." He laughs and throws his 
arm up as though to ward off an imagi- 
nary blow. "Never mind! I wanted to 
be caught. I liked Marge right off the 
bat. She was good company and I felt 
— well, comfortable with her. You know 
how it is at that age. You're usually 
kinda shy." 

"The truth is I laughed at his jokes. 
Was he funny then? Oh, yes! His sense 
of humor was one of the things I liked 
best about him. And, of course, he was 
very attractive. He's always had ex- 
cellent taste in clothes — we were very 
proud when he won the Best Dressed 
Actor Award. Dick is a soft-spoken, 
gentle sort of person and very roman- 
tic. Not a bit practical. Well, you might 
say he's practical in being romantic. He 
never forgets special days, but he's 
absent-minded about everything else." 

"I showed up for the wedding, didn't 
I?" Dick smiles.' "We were married in 
1948 in Los Angeles, on Bride And 
Groom. I remember we got all kinds of 
stuff. Furniture, appliances, a honey- 
moon at Mt. Hood — " At that moment, 
he's interrupted by a cry of, "Daddy, 
would you come up here, please?" 

Did Marjorie ever feel in the early 
years that Dick would be famous one 
day? "Well, I knew he had the talent 
but I didn't know if he'd ever have con- 
fidence enough. What Dick has achieved 
career-wise has gone far beyond our 
greatest hopes." Marjorie excuses her- 
self to settle a problem in the kitchen, 
where Roberta — whom the Van Dykes 
consider "another member of the fam- 
ily" — reigns. Dick re-enters the living 



room almost on cue, settles down com- 
fortably on a couch and returns to his 
favorite subject: His family. 

"Kids are funny," he muses. "Ours 
love to take over on special days like 
Father's Day and Mother's Day. Chris 
gets up early and serves us breakfast 
in bed. They bring us presents they've 
made in school — ashtray for me, jew- 
elry box for Mom. Their favorite trick 
is to wrap a tiny gift in sixteen boxes, 
each one bigger than the last. One year, 
they dragged in a box so big I said, 
'You built me a hot-rod!' " 

What is a typical day in the Van 
Dyke household like? "Like anybody 
else's, I guess," says Dick. "Except 
Daddy can sleep till ten or eleven, if 
he's lucky. It's not so bad when there's 
school. But, during the summer, they 
get me up pretty early. Of course, I 
have two matinees of 'Birdie' each week 
and, on other days, we tape Flair. Also, 
I always seem to be rehearsing for 
some TV show— like the NBC -TV spe- 
cial on Thanksgiving Day called 'No 
Place Like Home.' Ironical? 

"Actually, the only day I can count 
on having to myself is Sunday. We all 
?et wo and go to church. We attend the 
Dutch Reformed Church here in 
Brookville, and I teach Sunday School. 
But, the rest of the day, we just stay 
home — no guests. We don't even go for 
a drive. The traffic is too heavy on the 
Island. When we go on family excur- 
sions to some place like Freedomland, 
we go on a weekday. 

"Any hobbies?" he echoes. "None 
that I have time to pursue. I like golf, 
and I was quite an amateur magician 
when I was a kid. Used to put on lots 
of penny shows in our back yard in 
Danville, Illinois. I was born in 1925 
and missed being a Christmas present 
by twelve days." 

Dick's dad, L. W. Van Dyke, is an 
agent for a freight line. Young Richard's 
childhood was rather uneventful. He 
confesses that he was a quiet young- 
ster. "Pretty bookish, I'm afraid. I have 
a younger brother Jerry, but I remem- 
ber I played alone most of the time. 
Amused myself inventing magic tricks." 

Dick made his first public appear- 
ance at the age of six, when he recited 
a Christmas poem in Sunday School. 
He acted in high-school plays and with 
the Danville Civic Little Theater, but 
insists he had no real desire to enter 
show business until he came out of the 
Air Force. "I was in pilot training until 
the war was over. I went in, in 1944, 
as a cadet — and came out a cadet. But, 
meanwhile, I was active in the enter- 
tainment division of the service. 

"I had had an assortment of jobs, up 
to that point. I started with a paper 
route as a kid. Later, I got a job as a 
shoe salesman, then graduated to radio 
announcer after school. The summer I 
was seventeen, I became a carnival 
barker for Sally Rand at the Illinois 
State Fair. I informed the family that 
I was going to quit school and travel 
with the carnival. That idea didn't go 
over so well, but they needn't have 
worried. I lasted three days. The grind 
was tougher than I thought." 

Eventually, Dick ended up in adver- 



tising. He and a friend opened their 
own agency. He enjoyed it while it 
lasted but it was "an awful lot of hard 
work. My wife was my secretary." 

Marjorie comes in and says, with a 
chuckle, "I wasn't his wife then, and I 
wasn't paid. I was strictly a volunteer. 
I did everything, even finished all the 
furniture they bought for the office. 
They got unfinished stuff and I had to 
sand it and paint it." 

Dick gives her a hug. "And she loved 
every minute of it. It was the only way 
she could get to spend so much time 
with me." His grin fades, as he adds, 
"Actually, the advertising agency was 
a bad idea. A town that size had no 
need of one. So, when a friend of mine, 
Phil Erickson, came through town look- 
ing for a partner to do a record pan- 
tomime act called The Merry Mutes, I 
joined him and headed for the West 
Coast. 

"Three months later, I sent for Mar- 
jorie and we got married. The name of 
the act was subsequently changed to 
Eric and Van. We played everything 
from Martha Raye's 5 O'Clock Club in 
Miami to the Old Last Frontier in 
Vegas, but traveling was tough. When 
Barry was a baby, he actually did sleep 
in a theatrical trunk." 

After six years, Dick called it quits 
and settled in Atlanta, where he em- 
ceed a daily TV show. In 1955, he 
moved to New Orleans for another 
daytime TV offering. Then he got a 
network contract in New York, and he 
was on his way. 

Two years ago, Dick faced what he 
considers one of the greatest challenges 
of his career — he took over for Jack 
Paar on NBC-TV's big late-night show, 
while the star was on vacation. Was it a 
tough assignment? "Yes. Not so bad 
when I got into it, but I was a nervous 
wreck for a week before. Was I over- 
prepared that first night! I had enough 
material for a telethon. And then, to 
my surprise, the show seemed to be 
over before it got started." 

A miniature poodle and a Cairn ter- 
rier race into the room. Dick gives 
them a stern look. "All right, Sammy, 
Alice — out!" he says firmly. Obediently, 
the dogs leave the room. It's obvious 
who is boss in this house. Dick meekly 
agrees, "I am. But it's not a self-ap- 
pointed job. I was elected to the post." 

"Excuse me, Daddy," calls Chris from 
the doorway, "but the photographer is 
here. He wants to take a picture of me 
serving you breakfast in bed like I do 
on Father's Day." 

There is a sudden hush as the entire 
family waits for Dick's reply. "I don't 
think we'd better. My good dressing 
robe is at the theater." 

"I have a bathrobe," Stacey says 
hopefully. Nobody seems to hear. She 
reaches for the costume she's going to 
wear to the party and avows, "I'd 
rather be a gypsy, anyway. Who wants 
a lot of old crumbs from breakfast-in- 
bed?" 

Dick swings her up in his arms. "I'd 
like an old crumb like you anytime." 
The children roar with laughter. 

"See?" says Chris proudly. "I told 
you Daddy was funny around the 
house." 




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If youVe ever 

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Here is the very information 
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A nervous breakdown! The very 
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have had emotional problems serious 
enough to warrant medical assistance. 
So, if you worry about a nervous break- 
down, this is a normal fear. 

CHOLESTEROL— HUMAN RUST 

The increasingly high rate of mental 
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ing In his new book, Dr. Daniel C. 
Munro tells us that we are slipping both 
physically and mentally — and then he 
points a way to better health through 
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Cholesterol — the arch villain of good 
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«.--........ — ... — .... ., 

Bartholomew House, Inc. Dept. WG-361 

205 E. 42 St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Send me Dr. Munro's latest book, You 
Are Slipping. I enclose $3.00. If not de- 
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and you will refund my $3.00— at once. 



Name 

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Street 

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"1 have pointed out the cause of most 
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as the depositing of cholesterol in artery 
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Then since that is the condition, it is 
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THIS CAN BE DONE." 

The methods — the diets — and the help 
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Some may wonder: Why should Dr. 
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It seems to be the least well explained 
of all diseases. My work on diet brought 
hundreds of people suffering from men- 
tal conditions to my attention, and I 
have seen many favorable results from 
diet in this type of case after all other 
methods failed." 



Daniel C. Munro, M.D. 

While it is not Dr. Munro's desire to 
frighten people — he does drive home 
the point that our present day physical 
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Dr. Munro's books are not written for 
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YOU ARE SLICING 

by Daniel C. Munro, M.D. 

This revealing new book by a famous physician diagnoses the ills of 
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POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Room 9R3I - 131 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

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NAME. 



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CITY 



ZONE. 



.STATE. 



POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Room 9R3I - 131 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 3, III. 

Send me, without obligation, your FREE sample lesson 
pages, and your FREE folder "Nursing Facts." 

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FILL OUT THE COUPON ABOVE 
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v " LEARN PRACTICAL NURSING AT 
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POST GRADUATE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

ROOM 9R3I - 131 SOUTH WABASH • CHICAGO 3, ILL 




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Township H. S., McMurray, Pa., 
says: "When I first had pimples, 
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medications down inside pimples, where anti- 
septic and drying actions are needed. 

HOW CLEARASIL WORKS FAST 

1. Gets Inside Pimp/es— 'Keratolytic' ac- 
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and active medications can get inside. 

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LARGEST-SELLING BECAUSE IT REALLY WORKS 




MARCH, 1961 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 55, NO. 4 



Ann Moslier, Editor 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 

Lorraine Girsch, Associate Editor 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Eunice Field, West Coast Representative 



STORIES OF THE STARS 

Housewife Gone Nuts! ( Phyllis Diller ) by Pat Fulford Mullen 13 

Australia's Shooting Star (Diana Trask) by Herbert Kamm 16 

TV's Only Real Matinee Idol (John Larkin of The Edge Of Night) by Mary Temple 18 

Love Walked In ( Abby Dalton of Hennesey) by Kathleen Post 20 

Arthur Godfrey and Candid Camera by Frances Kish 22 

Perry Mason's Secret Ingredient (Gail Patrick Jackson ) by Fredda Balling 24 

They Loved Him on TV (President John F. Kennedy) by Robert Lardine 26 

Beaus, Beaus, Beaus ! ( Connie Francis I by Helen Bolstad 28 

The Unbeatable Beatnik ( Bob Denver of Dohie Gillis) by Dora Albert 30 

Everybody's Ragtime Girl (Jo Ann Castle) by Bill Kelsay 3-1 

The Star Who Grew ( Fabian ) by Lilla Anderson 36 

Lucy Lives It Up ( Lucille Ball's fabulous penthouse apartment) 38 

New Daytime Host (Art James of Say When) by Charlotte Barclay 42 

"What Teenagers Have Taught Me" (Bud Collyer) by Alice Francis 44 

The Fun's For Real on the Nanette Fabray Show by Kel Williams 46 

The More the Merrier ( Edgar Allan Jones Jr. ) by Martin Cohen 48 

SPECIAL MIDWEST STORIES 

The -Fuller" Life ( Bob Fuller of KMTV ) 53 

( lontinental Bob ( Bob Lewandowski of WBKB-TV ) 54 

Let"s Exercise! (Ed Allen ) - 56 

Man on a Party Line ( Milton Metz of WHAS-TV, Radio) 58 

FUN AND SERVICE FEATURES 

Information Booth 3 

What's New on the East Coast by Peter Abbott 6 

What's New on the West Coast by Eunice Field 9 

Beauty: Knee-Length Hair (Mary Stuart ) by June Clark 52 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions ) 60 

Movie Immortals on TV: Robert Taylor— All-Time Hero by Leon Rice 66 

New Designs for Living ( needlecraft and transfer patterns) 84 

Coier Portrait of Jo Ann Castle by Robert Perkins 
Portrait of Fabian on page 36 by Bob Williams 



BUY YOUR APRIL ISSUE EARLY • ON SALE MARCH 7 



Published Monthly by Macfadden Publi- 
, 1 1> cations, Inc., Executive, Advertising, and 

Editorial Offices at 205 E. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. Editorial Branch Office, 321 
S. Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif. Irving 
S. Manheimer, President; Lee Andrews, 
Vice-Pres.; S. N. Himmelman, Vice-Pres.; 
Meyer Dworkin, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. Advertising offices also in Chicago, 
and San Francisco. 

Manuscripts: All manuscripts will be carefully considered 
but publisher cannot be responsible for loss or damage. 
It is advisable to keep duplicate copy for your records. 
Only those manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self- 
addressed return envelopes with sufficient postage will be 
returned. 

Foreign editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, N. Y. 17, N. Y. 
Irving S. Manheimer, Pres.; Douglas Lockhart, Vice- 
Pres. 

Re-entered as Second Class matter, June 28, 1954, ot the 



Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 
3, 1879. Second-class postage paid at New York, N. Y., 
and other post offices. Authorized as Second Class matter 
by the Post Office Department, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 
© 1961 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. All rights 
reserved. Copyright under the Universal Copyright Con- 
vention and International Copyright Convention. Copy- 
right reserved under the Pan American Copyright Con- 
vention. Todos derechos reservados segun La Convention 
Panamericano de Propiedad Literaria y Artistica. Title 
trademark registered in U.S. Patent Office. Printed in 
U.S.A. by Art Color Printing Co. 

Member of the TRUE STORY Women's Group. 
Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its Possessions, & Canada, 
one year, $3.00: two years, $5.00; three years, $7.00. 
All other countries, $5.50 per year. 

Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. When 
possible, please furnish stencil-impression address from 
a recent issue. Address changes can be made only if you 
send us your old as well as your new address. Write to 
TV RADIO MIRROR Macfadden Publications, Inc., 205 
East 42nd Street, New York 17, New York. 



INFORMATION 
BOOTH 



Tips on Talbott 

/ would like to know something about 
the actress Gloria Talbott. 

T. B. B., Salt Lake City, Utah 

"I was brought up within a few miles of 
the studios," says pretty dark-haired 
Gloria Talbott, who was born in Glendale, 
California, a city founded by her maternal 
grandfather. "And that in itself is an ob- 
stacle to fame," she continues. "For some 
reason, people who come from 'outside' 
seem to progress more rapidly." But 
Gloria certainly never needed to worry 
about that. She is now one of Hollywood's 
most versatile performers (she's played 
everything from an Indian maiden to a 
girl who turns into a monster and has ap- 
peared in well over two hundred TV shows 
and movies) .... After graduation from 
high school, Gloria acted at the Eagle 
Rock Theater and at the Pasadena Play- 
house. Her first big professional break was 
in the play "One Fine Day." Then came 
many roles in movies and TV, including 
Wanted — Dead Or Alive, Zorro, and Al- 
fred Hitchcock Presents. . . . Gloria was 
married in 1949 and divorced in 1954. She 
has a ten-year-old son named Mark. The 
brown-haired, brown-eyed actress has a 
favorite hobby — horseback riding. 

(Continued on next 23age) 




Gloria Talbott 




Magicool, by Permadift, is the coolest, softest, most controlling rubber girdle 
you have ever worn. Made of a new miracle molding material called Elastomer 
D rubber, Magicool is air-cooled -with 50,000 tiny pores and lined with soft 
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Easy to slip on and off. Magicool will never 
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Perma • lift and Maoieool are Reoietered Trade Marks of A. Stctn & Company. Another fine (£& Kayter Roth product. 




Information Booth 

(Continued from previous page) 




Fay Spain 



Wink Guthrie and "friend" 



Facts About Fay 

What can you tell us about the actress 
Fay Spain? 

D. F. C, Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Fair-haired, blue-eyed Fay Spain got 
her start in the theater at the early 
age of fifteen . . . but as the cashier in a 
movie house in White Salmon, Washing- 
ton! The Phoenix-born actress then 
moved to Frederick, Maryland, to work in 
the Braddock Heights Theater. On Tues- 
days, Thursdays and Saturdays, she was 
an actress. On Mondays, Wednesdays and 
Fridays, she was a babysitter for the lady 
manager of the theater, also an actress. 
. . '. After working on the Borscht circuit 
in New York's Catskill Mountains, Fay 
headed for Hollywood, where she eventu- 
ally broke into TV and, since then, has 
appeared in practically every successful 
TV series, including Gunsmoke, Maverick, 
77 Sunset Strip, Bat Masterson. Her 
movies include "God's Little Acre," "The 
Beat Generation," and "Al Capone." . . . 
Fay is married to an artist and is the 
mother of a son, seven-year-old Jock. 

Some Quickies 

What is the name of the newest Lennon 



baby? 



M. G., New Hartford, N. Y. Casey Comes Calling 



Born last March, his name is Christo- 
pher. 

Please inform me if Durward Kirby and 
William Hopper are both the sons of De- 
Wolf Hopper. 

Reader, Worcester, Mass. 

Just William is his son. 

Please tell me if Skip Homeier and Lee 
Marvin are related. 

A. R. J., Randolph, Va. 
No, they are not. 

/ would like some information about 
Don Grady of My Three Sons. What sports 
does he like, what shows has he been on, 
and what school does he go to? 

P. S., Houston, Texas 

Don attends Burbank High School, likes 
baseball, horseback riding, and water ski- 
ing. He has appeared on Wagon Train, 
The Rifleman, Rescue 8 and Have Gun — 
Will Travel, among others. 

What is the birthdate of Tab Hunter? . 
J. H., Riviera, Texas 
July 11, 1931. 



Coos Bay's KCBY-TV, newest member 
of Oregon Triangle Television group, has 
a new "member" of the staff. He's Casey 
B. Wye, a squirrel ! Casey, who lives in the 
woods near the transmitter station located 
on Noah's Butte, drops in every day to 
keep the engineers company. 

Reader Accolade 

Dear Editors: 

I read your November issue article on 
George Maharis entitled "A Fighter All 
the Way" and thoroughly enjoyed it. Fri- 
day evening is a most enjoyable one for 
me, for that is Route 66 time. There are 
many reasons for its being so enjoyable 
to me. First, the authenticity of location 
makes it good. I haven't been able to travel 
very much, and these actual locations let 
me see quite a lot of the country. Secondly, 
George Maharis and Martin Milner play 
their parts with such realism and natural- 
ness. One other thing, the simplicity of 
love and affection is presented in a most 
wonderfully clean manner. Marvelous. It's 
nice to see that these precious feelings are 
still treated with respect on TV. 

Sincerely, Elizabeth Cardinale 




Myrna Fahey 



The Girl from Maine 

Please give me some background on the 
actress Myrna Fahey. 

J. F. B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

When beautiful Myrna Fahey an- 
nounced — at the age of 17 — that she 
wanted to become an actress, the most 
surprised person was her father, who had 
never heard her talk of show business as 
a career. "He couldn't have been more 
amazed if I had announced that I was em- 
barking on a career as a tail-gunner on a 
spaceship," she says. A native of Carmel, 
Maine, the young actress never had any 
theatrical ambitions until she was gradu- 
ated from high school and decided to do 
"something more exciting than just exist- 
ing." She immediately went to California 
and studied at the Pasadena Playhouse 
for a year. After becoming one of the six 
finalists in the Miss Rheingold Contest of 
1956, Myrna did modeling and TV com- 
mercials before getting her big break as 
an actress. . . . Her TV credits include 
Gunsmoke, Zorro, 77 Sunset Strip, Ha- 
waiian Eye and Perry Mason. And she re- 
cently had a starring role in the movie, 
"The House of Usher." ... In April, 1960, 
the dark-haired actress became engaged 
to MoKenzie Moss II, a bank executive. 



Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write to 
address given — not to TV Radio Mirror. 

Brian Keith Fan Club, June Denning, 
1305 Nolan, Corpus Christi, Texas. 

Neil Sedaka Fan Club, 3112 Belfort 
Avenue, New Orleans 19, Louisiana. 

Rod Taylor Fan Club, Cheryle Godwin, 
3616 Bolivar Dr., Dallas 20, Texas. 

Jayne Mansfield Fan Club, Peter Bank- 
ers, 37 Fairview St., Rt. 4, Smithtown, 
L. I., New York. 

Anthony Hall Fan Club, Sally Hada, 
MGM Studios, Culver City, Calif. 

John Connell Fan Club, Carlene R. 
Gibbs, 28 "L" St., Brockton 8, Mass. 

Clu Gulager Fan Club, Karen Mark- 
ham and Irene Doiwchi, 5110 Orange PI., 
Los Angeles 8, California. 



We'll answer questions about radio and 
TV in this column, provided they are of 
general interest. Write to Information 
Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd 
St., New York 17, N. Y. Attach this 
box, specifying ivhether it concerns ra- 
dio or TV. Sorry no personal answers. 




Ul\ -Even on "those days?" 

CERTAINLY! 

It's a superstition to believe that washing 
your hair during your period will stop 
the flow. 

The same thing holds for showering 
or bathing. In fact a warm tub will make 
you feel neater, sweeter, better. 

A second question: need you remove 
Tampax during bathing? 

Of course not. Tampax® internal san- 
itary protection acts protectively, does 
not absorb any water from the outside, 
prevents odor from forming. 

And when you do change Tampax, 
it flushes away neatly. 

Many a girl has thought to herself 
that it's simply more consid- 
erate to use Tampax. This is on 
top of all the advantages it holds 
iotyou: no chafing or irritation, 
freedom, poise, invisibility when in place. 

Chances are that you will turn to 
Tampax some day. Why not do it now — 
this very month— and start enjoying the 
better way} 

Your choice of 3 absorbencies (Reg- 
ular, Super, Junior) wherever such prod- 
ucts are sold. In packages of 10 and 40. 
Tampax Incorporated, Palmer, Mass. 





• -"" Invented by a doctor 

'... now used by millions of women 



WHAT'S NEW ON 




Having a ball — that fabulous redhead Lucy appearing in Broadway's "Wildcat 




New job in sight for Dick [Real McCoys) Crenna — seen here with wife Penni 



by Peter Abbott 



Inside Out: NBC's Project 20 prep- 
ping new series "The World of - — " 
to premiere this spring with Bob 
Hope's world under scrutiny. A crew 
with hand cameras will spend a month 
following Robert from place to place 
for candid photography. . . . Dick 
Powell definitely set to host full-hour 
weekly dramatic series over NBC this 
fall. CBS has not commented on what 
will happen to Powell's Zane Grey 
Theater but there is every expecta- 
tion that it will fade. . . . Handsome 
star of Disney's "The Swamp Fox," 
Leslie Nielsen gets the lead in ABC- 
TV's new cops-and-robbers series, 
The New Breed. . . . State Dept. ask- 
ing Hanna-Barbera for copies of The 
Flintstones to send the Russians. . . . 
NBC no longer gloomy about daytime 
TV. Over $33 million in new and re- 
newal business signed for daylight 
hours, a 30% increase over a year 
ago. . . . Oddly enough, our great TV 
media will be almost silent in Civil 
War programing, although the nation 
has begun a five-year commemoration 
of the historic struggle. Sponsors re- 
jected many program ideas, fearing 
bad reaction when tempers are so 
heated over segregation and civil 
rights. 

Roundabout: Polly Bergen getting 
streaks of gray in her hair but defi- 
nitely refusing to touch up. "I want 
everyone to know I'm thirty." . . . Dick 
Clark, currently filming "The Young 
Doctors," has top-notch assistance in 
Fredric March and Eddie Albert. . . . 
Lucille Ball drew great reviews — the 
Broadway show itself ("Wildcat"), 
lukewarm notices. But it has a mil- 
lion-dollar advance sale and thus 
should be around for many months. 
Rumors come and go about Lucy and 
Desi reuniting. Meanwhile, she sees 
the town with Keith Andes, her lead- 
ing man. . . . Wouldn't you know? 
When Jimmy Durante married Mar- 
jorie Little, it was Jimmy who broke 
down and cried. . . . Bobby Darin, 
with his TV special out of the way, 
joins Fess Parker in the film produc- 
tion of "Separation Hill." . . . Johnny 
Mathis is turning down guest-appear- 
ance offers. He has his own show for 
TV sale and manager Helen Noga is 
ready to greet all customers. 

Hamster Actor: Ebullient Dick 
Crenna, Luke on The Real McCoys, 
phoned in the big news. "I'm going to 
try directing the show. You might say 
they are auditioning me for the job. 
If it goes well, it'll be a permanent 
thing." The show itself he finds as ex- 



THE EAST COAST 



citing as ever. "But the kids are grow- 
ing like weeds. Lydia Reed plays my 
kid sister, but she's beginning to look 
more like my wife. She's sixteen and 
mature beyond her years." Around 
the set, they figure they may get a 
wedding invitation any day. Whose? 
"Bob Fuller's and Kathy Nolan's. This 
has been a steady thing for over a 
year." One other thing is new for 
Dick. "You know I'm playing a ham- 
ster, too. On the Mr. Magoo TV series, 
I play Hamlet the Hamster!" 

Crystal Ball: You may expect to 
hear NBC announce they have bought 
six famous David Selznick proper- 
ties: "Rebecca," "Spellbound," "No- 
torious," "The Paradine Case," "Por- 
trait of Jenny," and "The Spiral 
Staircase." These will be adapted for 
TV specials. . . . Desilu will put up for 
sale two new programs. CIC, a series 
on counter-intelligence, and Holidays 
Abroad, a comedy series which will 
mean the return of Barry Nelson and 
Richard Carlson. . . . ABC nursing to 
birth a comedy show titled The Hath- 
aways, starring Jack Weston, Peggy 
Cass and Enoch the Chimp. 

Televitis: Godfrey on tape this 
month while the live Godfrey hunts 
big game in Africa. . . . Robert Stack 
producing a movie on the life of 
Trotsky. . . . Bill Frawley says Lucy 
kept him feeling young, but My Three 
Sons makes him feel old. . . . Did you 
know that beautiful Maggie O'Neil, 
who plays Althea Dennis on The 
Brighter Day, is the wife of Shepperd 
Strudwick? . . . The Islanders gets 
washed away in April and will be re- 
placed with new series, The Asphalt 
Jungle, starring Jack Warden and 
Arch Johnson. Duke Ellington is writ- 
ing background music. . . . For Easter 
presentation, ABC is preparing a 
specially commissioned opera titled 
"Mary Magdalene." . . . Yvonne Lime, 
of the Happy series, with actress 
roommate Sarah Bruckner, founded 
an organization to find homes for for- 
eign orphans. A Marine officer in 
Japan came to their aid — and wound 
up marrying Sarah. . . . While Pro- 
fessor Ruccel C. Erb taught science 
over WFIL-TV, Philadelphia, he 
wooed. One of his viewers, Mrs. Julia 
Wiedoft, of Norristown, began a cor- 
respondence with the professor and 
the result was matrimony. . . . On the 
planning board at NBC is Dead Letter, 
a series about what happens to people 
who don't get an important letter be- 
cause of a plane crash. 

(Continued on next page) 




Right at home with shears is former 
barber P. Como — with Philip Crosby. 



Scheduled for second TV appearance 
on March 6 — lovely Ingrid Bergman. 




Double exposure — Earl Twins dance with Gene Nelson on Bell Telephone Hour. R 
For What's New on the West Coast, See Page 9 





""*/. 



^x 







Doing the night clubs — Jo-Ann Campbell, Neil Sedaka. 



Andy Williams is on Jack Benny's "Remember How Great. 



WHAT'S NEW ON THE EAST COAST 



(Continued from previous page) 



The Big Ones: On February 8, 
Jack Benny presents and appears in 
"Remember How Great," an hour 
music-variety with Andy Williams, 
Connie Francis, The McGuire Sisters 
and Juliet Prowse. The unusual aspect 
is that it will be on NBC— the first 
time Benny has been on that network 
with his own program since 1948. The 
inside story is that he did the show 
as a favor to Paul M. Hahn, president 
of American Tobacco Company. . . . 
Dramatically speaking, "Cry Venge- 
ance!" looks like the big one for 
February and the day is Tuesday, 
21, NBC-TV. A three-star cast of Ben 
Gazzara, Sal Mineo and Peter Falk 
tell the story of a self-styled Robin 
Hood in the Sicilian mountains. . . . 
The majestic Ingrid Bergman makes 
her second TV appearance ever, on 
March 6, via CBS-TV in "Twenty- 
four Hours in a Woman's Life." The 
problems behind the scene have not 
been those of the lady. Maximilian 
Schell was dropped in favor of Rip 
Torn when the script changed Berg- 
man's love interest from a European 
to an American. And when the men 
who run the bank at Monte Carlo re- 
fused to grant permission for the tele- 
tape to be made on their premises — 



because it did not reflect their best 
interests (a young man tries to com- 
mit suicide because of gambling 
losses) — the whole production was 
shifted to New York. 

Look, Ma, No Pix: Radio — defined 
as TV without a picture — is not quite 
the tattered old man you might think. 
NBC is considering expanding net- 
work service from eighteen hours a 
day to twenty-four. . . . Radio day- 
time serials evaporated, but now 
there's a chance they may reappear 
as syndicated series on local stations. 
. . . While music and kookie-talking 
deejays seem to hold the fort, unusual 
items turn up such as this one: 
At radio Station WTRY — servicing 
Albany, Troy and Schenectady — four 
times a day, six times a week, there 
is a program reporting and describing 
lost dogs. Sponsored, natch, by a dog- 
biscuit maker. . . . And one deejay 
actually created a market for a new 
product. KDKA's Rege Cordic, who 
has been "inventing" new products 
since his undergraduate days at 
WWSW, talked of a beer so light that 
the liquid floats on top of the suds and 
called it Old Frothingsham. Now a 
Pittsburgh brewmaker is marketing 
beer under that name in Ohio, Penn- 



sylvania, New Jersey and New York. 

Extra Special: The Bell Telephone 
Hour schedules for February 17, 
NBC-TV, "The Sound of America," 
with words and music by Gordon 
Jenkins. It has been taped in Disney- 
land. Among the cast are Gene Nel- 
son, Jacques d'Amboise and The 
(lovely) Earl Twins. This means dou- 
ble-exposure (pun intended) for 
Jane and Ruth Earl, who dance again 
on the Fred Astaire repeat February 
20. The twins kept things lively and 
lovely at Disneyland, playing the 
usual identical-twin tricks — until 
Gene Nelson branded Jane with lip- 
stick so he could tell them apart. 

Over & Out: Jo-Ann Campbell — 
looking not the least put-out over 
Darin's marriage — collaborating with 
Neil Sedaka at the Harwyn. And it's 
all "deductible" for Neil, because he's 
penning songs for Jo-Ann. . . . Nancy 
Kovack to make two pictures for Co- 
lumbia. . . . Joey Bishop will star in 
his own series under the production 
aegis of Danny Thomas. . . . Jimmy 
Boyd signed for six more Bachelor 
Father episodes. . . . General Mark 
Clark filmed at Ft. Myer for Valiant 
Years, the Winston Churchill series 
seen Sunday nights on ABC -TV. 



WHAT'S NEW ON THE 




by Eunice Field 



So They Were Married: On the set 

of "Come September," shot in roman- 
tic Italy, Bobby Darin met his bride- 
to-be, glamour-glowing Sandra Dee. 
Perhaps to cover his shyness, Bobby 
wisecracked, "I enjoy your pictures, 
Miss Tuesday Weld." No slouch her- 
self at boy-girl repartee, Sandy 
snapped, "And I love your records, 
Mr. Fabian." So began the love story 
behind the movie love story in which 
they were co-starred. As the film pro- 
gressed, first in north Italy, then in 
Rome and Portofino, Bobby deluged 
Sandy with yellow roses. . . . They 
were young, far from home. The place 
was lovely, the time auspicious, and 
they had to make screen love every 
day according to direction of Robert 
Mulligan and the script. Dates began 
to blossom. They drove in horse and 
carriage through Rome, took long boat 
rides at Portofino, fed the cats at mid- 
night at the Colosseum and strolled 
hand-in-hand through the famed art 
galleries of the Vatican. And so, for 
once, life imitated fiction, and the 
lovers of "Come September" returned 
to America. Bobby put a huge square- 
cut emerald ring on Sandra's finger, 
and their elopement — no surprise to 
anyone who had seen their love scenes 
— soon followed. Says Mulligan rue- 
fully, "Had I known this would hap- 
pen, I'd have adapted our movie to 
meet the more romantic goings-on be- 
tween these real-life lovers." 

TV Series for Sports-Minded View- 
ers: Terry Moore cut the pilot this 
month for her TV show, with Tony 
Owen producing. It has a sports back- 
ground, and important figures in the 
athletic world will be guest stars each 
week. Terry's quite an athlete herself 
in real life — is great at skiing and sail- 
ing. In fact, she and her husband — 
Stuart Kramer III — are entering their 
boat, "Karawan" (meaning "peace of 
mind" in Arabic) in the Honolulu 
Races July 4. 

New Home for Oscar: Controversy 
still rages over the moving of the 
Academy Awards ceremony from 
Hollywood's Pantages Theater to the 
Civic Auditorium in the nearby beach 
suburb of Santa Monica. And there's 
more grumbling than usual over the 
fact the Oscar show will be spon- 
sored. More commercials than ever are 
rumored for this year of the "hard 



Screen romance blossomed into real thing for Bobby Darin, Sandra Dee, in Italy. 



sell." The new site of the Oscar fes- 
tivities can accommodate 2,368 guests 
— almost double the Pantages capacity 
— and, according to TV engineers, 
acoustics and fighting conditions are 
excellent. But, whether the move was 
for good or bad, it's still going to sound 
strange to hear the announcer say, 



Monday night, April 17, "And now 
from Santa Monica, California, we 
bring you the Hollywood Academy 
Awards." 

Horrors, Mr. Hitchcock! The mas- 
ter of mystery and suspense admits T 
that he (Continued on next page) v 



For What's \etr on the East Coast, See Page 6 



J 



WHAT'S NEW ON THE WEST COAST 



(Continued from previous page) 












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Fred Astaire's lovely companion is his daughter Ava. 



Milton Berle, Jeff Chandler get tips from a champion. 



10 




Pint-sized young admirer (?), all of 3 years old, draws a bead on TV's Gene 
Barry — attired in one of his more outdoor-type Bat Masterson outfits. 



never watches his own shows. "I can't 
stand suspense in any shape or form, 
which may account for my knack for 
bringing it in vivid style to the public," 
says Alfred H. Hitch does not, how- 
ever, see horror stories as being a bad 
influence. He feels this side of enter- 
tainment has been grossly maligned. 
Even children, he feels, do not take 
the grisly events too seriously. They 
seem mostly interested in technical 
points. At a premiere, he was ap- 
proached by a boy who asked, "In the 
scene where your victim got knifed 
last week — did you smear her with 
chicken blood or plain ketchup?" Look- 
ing soberly down at the lad, Hitch re- 
plied, "We used chocolate syrup." To 
which the kid exclaimed, "Gee, imagine 
wasting all that good syrup!" Hitch 
recalls only one letter of protest — this 
from an outraged husband. It said, 
"Since seeing the French film 'Dia- 
bolique' — where a woman is murdered 
in a bathtub — and then 'Psycho' — 
where Janet Leigh gets killed in a 
shower — my wife hasn't taken a bath 
or a shower. What am I to do?" Re- 
plied the impish Hitch, "Send her to 
the dry cleaners." 



ma 



Startled blonde is Jayne Mansfield as Ralph Edwards says, "This Is Your Life." Onlookers include -famous Hollywood stars. 



The Little Pink Lie: Most amazing 
thing about This Is Your Life is the 
way family and friends faithfully keep 
the secret from the subject. Since there 
is always a "dress rehearsal," every- 
one but the subject knows a week in 
advance. This resulted in ten-year-old 
Jayne Marie Mansfield telling her first 
lie to Mommy Jayne. Step-daddy 
Mickey Hargitay helped out the 
youngster by letting his glamorous wife 
know, the week before, that little 
Jayne would need a new dress for a 
birthday party. The day of the fictitious 
affair, Jayne busied herself prettying 
up her daughter. When Mickey was 
about to drive the giggling Jayne Marie 
to her party, Jayne Sr. ran out, wav- 
ing the gift Mickey had prepared as 
a decoy. "You forgot your present," 
chided Jayne. When Mickey and Jayne 
Marie turned up on the stage of Ralph 
Edwards' show, nobody was more sur- 
prised than Jayne. "I'm sorry I told 
you that white lie," apologized the 
child later. "Darling," laughed her 
mother, whose home is done in pink, 
one of her favorite colors, "In your 
case, we will call it a little pink lie." 
In Jayne 's (Continued on next page) 




"Fast Draw Contest" (Sahara Hotel in Vegas) drew many TV "Westerners" 
— Ernest Borgnine, Wayde Preston, Hugh Downs, Gene Barry, Clint Eastwood. 



11 



WHAT'S NEW ON THE WEST COAST 



case, actually her favorite color is 
lavender. But, since it has been so 
closely associated with Kim Novak, 
she settled for her second-best color, 
pink. After the honors paid her at 
This Is Your Life, she was presented 
by her husband with a lavender Cadil- 
lac. As she was about to enter the car, 
Mickey handed her a large box. "It isn't 
pink and it isn't lavender," said Mickey 
gallantly. When Jayne opened it, a 
leopard coat was revealed. "Daddy and 
I picked it out," chirped Jayne Marie 
gleefully, " 'cause how we feel about 
you is like the coat ... it will never 
change its spots." 

Sez Gob to Gobbler: Roly-poly Bud- 
dy Hackett lost twenty pounds during 
the filming of "All Hands on Deck," at 
20th-Fox. Buddy plays a sailor who has 
to act as guardian of a thirty-pound 
turkey named Oswasso. After carting 
the bird around the lot for several days, 
the perspiring comic addressed Oswasso 
\ as follows: "You fowl t'ing you, and 
they calls me fat and give me Metracal 
. . . dey oughta give youse the stuff. But 
just wait ... a day's comin' when you're 
gonna get eat up — but not by me. I 
wouldn't swallow one itsy-bitsy bite of 
you 'cause even my stomach is sick 'n' 
tired of carrying you around!" 

And That's No Joke: While Tennes- 
see Ernie Ford, just past forty, is again 
talking retirement, fiftyish Milton Berle 
— with two-thirds of his thirty-year 
NBC contract to go — says he's just 
starting a new trend in comedy. There 
were some in show business who 
laughed at the notion of Uncle Miltie 
emceeing Jackpot Bowling. What a 
comedown, they said. But the laughter 
came to a sudden stop when it was re- 
vealed that Berle was getting $15,000 
per segment, and that the show was 
zooming into top ratings. Not only that, 
but Uncle Miltie is talking of sinking 
two-and-a-half-million into four big 
bowling centers. "It's become the num- 
ber-one national pastime," chortles 
Miltie. Said pal Jack Benny, "With all 
this bowling on your mind, I'm sur- 
prised you haven't picked it up." 
Snapped Miltie, "I would if I could pick 
up the ball." 

Playing the Field at Las Vegas: 
The second annual "Fast-Gun Con- 
test" held at Las Vegas attracted more 
than 200 gunslingers from across the 
country, many from television's star- 
studded horse operas. Among the latter 
were Bill Williams, Jock Mahoney, 
Sheb Wooley, Clint Eastwood, Peter 
Brown, Eric Fleming, Paul Brinegar, 
Gerald Mohr and Gene Barry. Clint 
modestly laid claim to being a slow 
¥ shooter, saying, "In Rawhide, we don't 
r have to shoot fast. Our job is to move 
the cattle along." Modest Clint failed to 

„ mention that he is one of the fastest 
12 



(Continued from previous page) 

draws in show business, having been 
officially clocked at 48/100 of a second. 
In an impromptu shoot-out with Peter 
Breck (of the recent Black Saddle), 
Clint won easily. Commenting on the 
Sahara Hotel's contest, Paul Brinegar 
— who plays Wishbone, the cook, on 
Rawhide — declared, "One thing's more 
deadly than lead poisoning from a fast 
gun, and that's ptomaine poisoning 
from a chuck wagon." And Sheb Wool- 
ey, of the same show, has just com- 
pleted a ballad about a fast-draw artist 
named Billy Bardel which he hopes will 
match the sales of his famous "Purple 
People Eater" tune. Winner of the con- 




At Thalions' Ball — blonde songstress 
Margaret Whiting, actor John Vivyan. 



test was a millwright from Mt. View, 
California — Jack Sims, who gunned 
down San Jose's pride, Al Brian, to win 
the national title in 42/100 of a second. 

Skin-Deep and Sky-High: For Jody 
McCrea, there is no thrill like sky-div- 
ing — parachuting, to you. Says the 
young star, "Its got skin-diving beat 
every which way. Going down into the 
sea is fun, sure. But, for pure sensation, 
you have to get high in the sky and 
jump." When Jody made his first dive, 
parents Joel and Frances Dee McCrea 
had no idea what their son was up to. 
He told them after he came down! Now 
Jody is teaching young Fabian the art 
of dancing on the clouds. Said one film 
executive, "I can shut my eyes and see 
those fan clubs sailing through the sky 
after Fabe with their autograph books 
in their hot little hands." 

Horse Sense: Eric Fleming, one of 
TV's most eligible (and elusive) bache- 
lors, pays his compliments to all the 
lovely gals but reserves his prime time 



for his horse. "When I say horseback 
riding is the best way to live to a 
healthy, ripe old age, I'm not talking 
about the exercise," he points out. "Dis- 
sipation has killed off many actors. But, 
as long as you're on a horse, you're safe. 
You can't take a horse into a night club, 
pool hall or saloon." 

The Wonderful World of TV: Ac- 
cording to Eddie Albert — interviewed 
while taping his part in the upcoming 
Linkletter special, "Kids Are Funny" 
—viewers will soon be shopping 
through their TV sets. As veep for 
Henry Kaiser's multi-million-dollar 
city, Hawaii Kai, now in construction 
outside Honolulu, Eddie is in charge of 
all TV in the project. It will have a 
closed circuit channel designed strictly 
for home services and arm-chair shop- 
ping. Machines are now being fashioned 
— and they work, he assures — so that a 
housewife can push a button and order 
delivery of any item scanned by the 
camera as it moves slowly by the 
shelves. Fascinating as all this is, Eddie 
doesn't plan to limit his TV activities to 
the Hawaiian job. He is preparing a 
special, "The Songs That Lincoln 
Loved," which he will emcee, with top 
folk singers featured. 

Just Call Me "Bub": Bill "Bub" 
Frawley, says that the I Love Lucy se- 
ries was "gentleman's work"- compared 
to My Three Sons, on which he plays 
Fred MacMurray's father-in-law and 
housekeeper to three growing boys. 
"We used to work from ten to five on 
Lucy," Bill points out. "But, on this 
one, it's usually five to ten. Sometimes 
we have such a short lunch period, I 
forget to take off my apron on my way 
out of the studio." But one thing is defi- 
nitely on Bill's agenda — in April, he 
and long-time pal, actor John Gallau- 
det, head for Europe, to mark Bill's first 
trip abroad. "I've often pictured myself 
in Vienna sitting in one of those side- 
walk cafes, sipping beer. At last, I'm 
going to make it. We'll hit my ancestral 
sod, Ireland, too, even if it's just for one 
hour." 

"On the Riviera": Mike Connors' 
new TV show, The Riviera, began loca- 
tioning in Paris with the New Year, and 
from there moved on to Rome and 
Geneva. Format will have Mike as a 
writer covering news events, and it will 
all be on a glamorous, upbeat basis, 
trying to capture the excitement of 
such films as Cary Grant's "To Catch A 
Thief." . . . Jimmy Darren returned 
from the Hawaiian location of "Gidget 
Goes Hawaiian" to discover that wife 
Evy Norlund had decorated their new 
Hollywood Hills home in Danish mod- 
ern, with vivid Italian paintings com- 
plementing. "That figures," says Jim- 
my, "since Evy's Danish, and I'm 
Italian." 








HOUSEWIFE 
60NE NUTS ! 



Text by 

PAT 

FULFORD MULLEN 



Pictures by 
PEARSON A. MULLEN 



Until five years ago, Phyllis Diller lived in San Francisco with 
her five children, her insurance-salesman husband, and, like 
everyone else, had bills from here to around the block — and not 
quite enough money to pay them. How could a simple homebody, 
a gal from nowhere, not even young, leap to fame as 1961 's top 
comedienne in such a short space of time? Phyllis tells it like this. 

"I always loved to make people laugh. I was as thrilled as the 
conductor of a symphony orchestra — laughter was music to my 
ears and I couldn't get enough of it. I came from a singing family 
and I always wanted to write. I'd write one-liners, gags and funny 
songs every chance I got. I didn't know what to do with them so I 
tried them out on my family, and they loved them. I'd read my 
routines off to myself in a mirror with a clock in my hand for 
timing, then serve them up with the dinner. Then I found myself 
either giving parties or going to them just so I could entertain. 
And that was the beginning." 

Finally her family rebelled. They kicked her out of the kitchen, 




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14 



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which was fast becoming a disaster area, took over 
themselves, and made Phyllis sit down and write 
about the peccadillos which she thought were the 
bane of the average housewife's existence. When she 
had a real act put together, they arranged for audi- 
tion at the "Purple Onion," a well known night club. 
The owner agreed to put her on for practically no 
pay, then gave her $60 a week. She stayed for 89 
record-breaking weeks! 

She careened across the country, sharpening her 
act, a mixture of parodies, gags and songs. Combined 
with weird costumes and the deepest, most contagious 
laugh ever heard on stage, Phyllis landed two years 
ago in New York at the age of forty. She was booked 
at No. 1 Fifth Avenue. Her pianist, Harold Fonville, 
watched her as she sat on top of the piano in black 
tights doing an imitation of Eartha Kitt, and decided 
she was such a riot she ought to be good on the Jack 
Paar show. He called the Paar office every day for 
two months until they finally agreed to give her an 
audition. 

"Jack Paar and I took one look at each other and 
got this thing going," Phyllis says. "What's he like? 
Besides being a gentleman and a scholar, he's a sweet, 
sensitive, sincere guy and I love him. I owe every- 
thing to Jack Paar. People know me now. I can't walk 
down the streets of any city without being mobbed! 
And as for the money? I'm up to $4,000 a week, I'm 
practically priced out of the market. Only the best 
places can afford me. And am I glad! 

"It wasn't always that way. People think one ap- 




by Chords ao 



pearance on the Paar show is enough to make you 
rich. I've been on The Jack Paar Show twenty-seven 
times. The first time nothing happened. The second 
time the same. Along about the tenth time people 
knew either my first or my last name — not both. 
About the fifteenth time, a year and a half ago, every- 
one knew me. Then my salary began to skyrocket, 
and the night clubs where I once performed for noth- 
ing began to make lovely offers. I've been in a movie, 
'Splendor in the Grass,' soon to be released, where 1 
play Texas Guinan which was a wonderful experi- 
ence. And I've done summer stock, too. I have a 
record, 'Wet Toe in a Hot Socket.' " 

Phyllis's husband Shelly travels with her as per- 
sonal manager. She has an agent and a press agent 
Between engagements, every seven or eight weeks, 
she manages to fly home to St. Louis, where the fam- 
ily home now is, to see her five children, who are 
cared for by her sister-in-law. She phones them 
every day, and sometimes sends for the whole family. 
The kids, ranging from ten to twenty, have been to 
Hollywood, Florida, New York and Texas, and are 
her best audience. The two boys and three girls, help 
her rehearse and watch her whenever she's on TV. 
All five of the children have reddish brown hair like 
their mother, who dyes hers white for the act. 

Phyllis Diller plans to write books, plays and nov- 
els, as well as the comedy routines which have 
made her famous. Then, when she's 86, like Grandma 
Moses, she will start in to paint — and she's good at 
that, too! 




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15 




With a real sense of discovery, 

TV Radio Mirror presents a tall, cool, 

beautiful singer who's scheduled 

to burst right out of the screen to fame ! 





Showcased by such knowing stars as Jack Benny 
(above) and Mitch Miller (left), Diana now has an 
exclusive NBC-TV contract, may get her own show. 

by HERBERT KAMM 

Take heart, you youthful guys and dolls who 
dream of being touched by the magic wand of 
show business. It could happen to you — just as 
it happened to sultry-voiced Diana Trask. Less 
than two years ago, newly arrived from her 
native Australia, she stood on the sidewalks of 
New York, a frightened and bewildered teenager 
gazing up at the columns of concrete. She wasn't 
penniless or friendless, but no jobs were in 
sight and her staunchest ally was her own con- 
viction that, given the (Continued on page 59) 



1 



TV RADIO MIRROR'S NEW FACE OF THE MONTH 



17 



The ladies love The Edge Of Night, the long-running daytime drama. And 




Top test of a true matinee idol is that he can steal feminine hearts by daylight. John Larkin 
does, as Mike Karr in The Edge Of Night. Extra-special fans here: Daughters Sharon (left) and 
Kathleen (center), wife Audrey and tiny Victoria. The latter not only vigorously applauds her 
dad's dramatic scenes, but sometimes steals them from him — in her TV role as Laurie Ann Karr! 



18 



John Larkin — the series* crime-detecting star — truly merits the accolade . . . 

TV's Only Real Matinee 




by MARY TEMPLE 

When a wide-eyed little blonde, playing a mere 
supporting part, upstages the handsome 
hero of a TV drama, she seldom gets away with 
it more than once. But this sort of thing keeps 
happening on The Edge Of Night, CBS 
serialization of the career of crime-detector 
Mike Karr. 

John Larkin, who has been Karr since the show 
began on April 2, 1956, is an actor known for 
his kindness to young beginners. He has been 
seen to turn from the camera deliberately, to 
let some newcomer register more forcibly with the 
audience. But such selflessness must have its 
limitations when you're the star of a show. And 
this blonde is a born scene-stealer! 

John's pretty wife, (Continued on page 68) 

The Edge Of Night is seen on CBS-TV, M-F, from 4:30 to 
5 P.M. EST, as sponsored by Procter & Gamble and others. 




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Framed: A caricature of John. Below, left: The Larlcins with 
Vicki and Sharon — and maybe a fan call on their fancy phone? 



Kate, John's eldest, now studies 



political science in junior college. 




ir 





More laughs than love-talk, in Hennesey's 
Navy! But Dr. Chick Hennesey (star Jackie 
Cooper) obviously — and understandably — 
admires nurse Martha Hale (Abby Dalton). 




Sometimes it really does happen just like 
the stories say. Two people's eyes meet, 
and it's instant love. So turn on some soft 
music and read about Abby Dalton and romance 





Hennesey is seen on CBS-TV, Mon., 10 P.M. EST, 
sponsored by General Foods and Kent Cigarettes. 



Skiing on land — not water — led Abby to real-life romance with Ja.ck 
Smith (facing page). Above, happy pair check plans in kitchen of 
their new home. Left, choosing fabrics at Los Angeles Furniture Mart. 



by KATHLEEN POST 



Oh, we're a very unusual couple," laughs beauteous Abby 
Dalton, leading lady of television's Hennesey. "In most cases, 
the groom courts the parents to get at the girl . . . but my big 
romance likes my parents so much that sometimes I think he 
married me so he could spend more time with them!" 

This notion — far-fetched to anyone who has ever caught a glimpse 
of blonde, Las Vegas-born Abby — is most pleasing to the girl 
who plays Martha Hale, Navy nurse, on TV. She comes of a close- 
knit family who are great on doing things together and having 
fun. When she started to date Jack Smith, a wholesale electrical 
supplier, seriously, her father said: "Marlene" — Abby's real 
name is Marlene Wasden — "we're happy you're dating Jack . . . 
but I wonder if you've got the brains to (Continued on page 71) 



20 



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Surprise! Unlikely combination of three very likely people: Arthur Godfrey — one of broadcasting's all- 
time greats . . . Dorothy Collins — one of its. sweetest singers and a delightful comedienne . . . Allen 
Funt — the man whose unique idea proved that broadcasting has both all-seeing eyes and all-hearing ears! 



22 



cwax C3ftux(ia C^€t*vte/tct 



A revealing report on the roving-eye 
show which reveals humanity in all its 
lovable gullibility— with America's 
fabulous redhead along to spark up the fun 

by FRANCES KISH 




Candid Camera catches people unaware, in situations so odd its 
well-known stars aren't even recognized. Arthur says, "I wouldn't 
know how to play anyone but myself." Yet he successfully 
passed himself off as a Good Humor Man (above). Dorothy 
found several stalwart volunteers to push her "stalled" car. 
Unknown to them: No engine! Also unknown: Dorothy herself. 





Differences of opinion, yes. But Godfrey and Funt 
have honest respect for each other's achievements. 



It's good to have him back. That was the universal 
reaction, when Arthur Godfrey returned to the 
evening scene via Candid Camera last falL For 
those who couldn't catch him mornings, on CBS 
Radio's Arthur Godfrey Time — for all who wanted 
to see the ebullient redhead, as well as hear him, 
it was the best of news. It was good news, too, 
that Allen Funt's intriguing Candid Camera was to 
have a solo slot of its own on CBS-TV, after a 
season as a highly successful segment of The Garry 
Moore Show. Viewers sat back, prepared to enjoy 
a hilarious half-hour with two long-time 
favorites on Sunday evenings. 

And they got it Ratings soared, unaffected by 
rumors and even headlines of dissension behind the 
scenes. Was Godfrey, the host and star, feuding 
with Funt, the man who created Candid Camera? 
Was cute Dorothy Collins — previously best-known 
as a singer, now a regular (Continued on page 62) 



Candid Camera is seen over CBS-TV, Sunday, 10 P.M. EST, as 
sponsored by Lever Brothers and the Bristol-Myers Company. 



23 



i 




Perry Mason: Gail chats with her title star, Raymond 
Burr (above), okays coiffure for Barbara Hale (right). 



by FREDDA BALLING 

Self-appointed juries of psychologists (male) 
have indicted the modern American female. Their 
accusation: In compromising her "traditional role" 
by competing with men in business and the 
professions, she can only make herself unhappy. 
Their verdict: A woman who undertakes two jobs 
excels at neither, is punished by both! 

Enter for a resounding defense: Gail Patrick Jackson, 
wife and mother in good (Continued on page 75) 

Perry Mason is seen on CBS-TV, Sat., 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. EST. 



"X" marks the spot: Set design is one of many vital 
details supervised by Executive Producer Gail Jackson. 



PERRY MASON'S 






Behind the scenes of this slick, 

successful series is Gail Patrick Jackson. 

Executive producer's the title. She says, 

"Mother confessor, listening post, 

correlating agent." Quite a job for a lady! 




Homemaker: Gail Patrick (yes, 
she's the former movie star' 
with her husband — Cornwe 
Jackson — their children Tom, 
7, and Jennifer, going on 9. 
"Every day with them," says 
Gail, "is a fresh adventure!" 






"Glamour" of the Massachusetts Senator 
and his lovely wife, Jacqueline, was evident 
to all who knew the Kennedys, but unrecog- 
nized by rest of nation — until TV campaign. 



President Kennedy has indicated 
that, in future months, 
there is a possibility that he 
will use the all-seeing 
TV eye to bring the White 
House closer to the public. 
Here is an analysis of the 
role TV played in his election 





Television not only gave Kennedy a vigorous "new image" but was a 
deciding factor in his election. Now the whole country takes a family 
interest in the President, his First Lady, their lively, church-going 
daughter Caroline (at left) and newly-christened son John Jr. (above). 



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by ROBERT LARDINE 



One day last YEAR — August 27, to be exact — a worried- 
looking John Kennedy studied the day's supply of 
newspapers. Picking up one at random, the Democratic 
candidate winced as he read: "New York bookies rate 
Nixon the favorite to win the state." Flipping rapidly to 
another, he frowned at the headline: "Las Vegas Odds- 
Makers Establish Nixon Choice For White House." The 
Senator from Massachusetts groaned aloud when he next 
came across the lead article in an influential paper: "Poll- 
sters across the nation see Nixon as the next President." 
Kennedy wearily put the papers down, feeling as though 
he had already been stomped on by the G.O.P. elephant. 



But, exactly one month, later, Kennedy was positively 
jubilant. He even went so far as to whisper confidently 
to intimates that he now felt he couldn't lose. As for the 
New York and Las Vegas gambling houses, they were 
frantically adjusting their odds to make the handsome 
Senator the favorite. Meanwhile, the poll takers were 
scratching their heads as they checked and re -checked 
their figures, which revealed a sudden avalanche of senti- 
ment for the lanky ex-Naval hero from New England. 

What caused this phenomenal reversal of the nation's 
thinking? How did Nixon lose his decided advantage in 
thirty short days? Why were the (Continued on page 77) 



27 




-3E/ 



V 



New York: Connie steps out at famed Harwyn Club with How- 
ard Greenfield, who (with another close pal, Neil Sedalca) wrote 
title song for her first film— MGM's "Where the Boys Are." 




by HELEN BOLSTAD 

Connie Francis, who has just turned twenty-two, 
is living Everygirl's dream. Fans around the world 
acclaim her talent and beauty. She has just appeared in 
her first movie. Her records crowd the Top 100 lists. She 
has a charming home and many beautiful clothes. 
Glamorous, admiring friends shower her with invitations. 
And everywhere she goes there are beaus, beaus, beaus. 
. . . Naturally, Connie loves every moment of it, but 
she confesses that enjoying the frivolity is a new phase 
in her life. She says, "I've changed. (Continued on page 82) 



Connie's personal "stagline" spans half the globe: Below, with 
singer Adam Faith in London. Right, with actor Anthony 
Hall in Hollywood. (Plus other beaus in Germany and Canada! 



28 





Where the Boys Are: Yes, that's the 
movie title. But where are the boys? 
Thatfs the question. And what's 
the answer? The boys are wherever 
singer Connie Francis happens to be! 





X 




the Unbeatable Beatnik 




The latest "fuzz": Above, star Dwayne Hickman and Bob 
Denver (as Maynard) debate the tacts of life on Dobie 
Gillis. At right, little Kim, Maggie, Bob and newshound 
"Annie" beam the good tidings: There's a blessed event 
in the Denver family — as pictured on the following pages! 



by DORA ALBERT 

America's favorite beatnik is a bearded teenager 
named Maynard, bosom buddy of TV's Dobie Gillis. 
Reality may be even harder on him than on most folks — 
watching his antics, you know why! — but that never 
dampens his wild and woolly imagination. And who can 
resist such a blissfully resilient dreamer? 

Take it from redheaded Maggie Denver, wife of the 
man who plays Maynard, her husband Bob is equally 
irresistible in private life. Maybe as much of a dreamer, 
too. But definitely not a beatnik — though the best-laid 
Denver plans sometimes come smack up against the 
facts of fife, with unpredictable results. 

With what care, for instance, they tried to prepare 
three-and-a-half-year-old Kim (Maggie's son by a 
previous marriage) for a new addition to the family. 
Hoping to teach him something about both birds and 
babies, Bob and Maggie took Kim to an exhibit showing 
dozens of chicks hatching out of their shells. Somehow, 
the conection with human blessed events only confused 




The frisky little "beard" of the 
Dobie Gillis series grants an inside look 
at his life as a loving, responsible 
and thoroughly non-beatnik father 





Kim. Now Maggie asks helplessly, "How will we ever 
convince him that Patrick didn't peck his way out of 
an egg?" 

Another highly recommended plan also backfired. 
When Maggie took Kim shopping to "help" pick out the 
expected baby's clothes, Kim refused to select anything 
but pink. He knew what he wanted: A baby sister. And 
when Patrick was born, Kim was indignant. He still 
can't get over the treachery of the stork (Kim probably 
thinks it was a hen) who brought Patrick. 

"He's having an attack of j-e-a-1-o-u-s-y," Maggie 
spells out, as she gives Patrick his bottle. 

If anyone can help Kim get over jealousy, it's Bob. 
From the time the two laid eyes on each other, it's been 
a case of mutual love. Bob not only plays parchesi with 
Kim but also reads aloud to him. When he reads animal 
stories, he imitates each animal. When he reads about 
planes or cars, he can sound more like a jet or hot-rod 
than the actual engines themselves. 



Dobie Gillis is seen over CBS-TV, Tuesday, 8:30 P.M EST, as sponsored by Marlboro Cigarettes and Pillsbury Mills. 

Continued 



30 



31^* 





/ 





the Unbeatable Beatnik 



Maggie strings along with a beatific guitar as Annie — 
beatest dog in Beverly Hills — flails Bob's bongo drums. 




Quiet games are more Bob's style, off TV — though he 
makes some terrific sound effects reading aloud to Kim, 




(Continued) 




The beard has it, playing darts. (But it was Maggie 
who aimed for that first date with Bob — and scored.) 



Bob and Maggie start the flowers from the ground up. 
It's much easier than teaching Kim about "the birds"! 



Bob's also an expert at handling Patrick, and holds the 
baby in his arms like a veteran father. No wonder 
Maggie says happily, "We'll have a large family — at least 
four children, and certainly a girl!" 

Bob smiles and admits that the future is hard to 
predict. He's all for living in the present. "You're here 
for so long," he explains his philosophy. "You have to 
plan for the future, but you mustn't live in it. Living 
is a day-to-day process." Ever since he met Maggie, 
life has taught Bob the importance of living in the 
present. They had very little money when they married 
and, if they'd been over-concerned about the future, 
they'd still be single and lonely. 

Love and the role of Maynard, the bearded beatnik, 
came into Bob's life almost simultaneously. Redheaded 
Maggie Ryan was secretary to Norman Henry, associate 
producer of Dobie Gillis. The first time she saw Bob 
on the lot, she felt a flutter around the heart. He thought 
she was attractive but, since he was going steady with 
another girl, he didn't ask for a date. So Maggie took 
matters into her own hands. 

One day, she came to the studio by bus, just so she 
could ask Bob for a ride home. He recognized her 
strategy, but willingly swallowed the bait. "Instead of 
my taking you directly home, why don't we go to the 
Max Shulman party at the Ready Room tonight?" he 
suggested. (Max Shulman, of course, is the author who 
created Dobie Gillis.) 

Bob knew his way to the Ready Room restaurant, but 
he got so engrossed in their conversation that he took 



32 




It's a boy named Patrick — though Kim wanted a baby sister. Maggie's son by a previous 
marriage, Kim is devoted to Bob, would like to be the Denvers' "only boy" a while longer. 



the wrong turn. "Are we going north?" he asked 
Maggie. "I don't know," she confessed. They wandered 
around for more than two hours, and arrived at the party 
late. It was the inauspicious beginning of a fine romance. 
For about three months, Maggie and Bob dated almost 
every night "Bob was different from anyone else I'd 
ever dated," says Maggie. "He never put on a front. 
He drove a battered car, with torn upholstery." On their 
dates — most of them informal — they learned a lot about 
each other. Bob learned that Maggie was working to 



support herself and help support her young son, Kim. 
She learned that Bob had been born in New Rochelle, 
New York, and was the son of an accountant. He'd started 
high school in New Rochelle, where he'd tried out for 
football, and landed on the team. 

"They kept me on the bench, but used me for a 
scrimmage dummy," he said cheerfully. "I was only 
five feet tall then"— he's almost five-eleven now — "and 
very light. But I always tackled everything I saw. I 
aimed for their shoestrings (Continued on page 74) 



33 






• * ■ 

» * • 

■ 







*.%:■* » 



-%*%,* 







WF.^tQ&f* 



The wonderful eighty-eight-note riot 

of the Welk music aggregation — 

Jo Ann Castle — talks about the big break 

by BILL KELSAY 

It's a wonderful world when you're twenty-one — old 
enough to vote — and firmly established as a 
television favorite with several million viewers 
from coast to coast. This is the wonderful, sometimes 
breathless world of Jo Ann Castle, the ragtime piano 
gal on the big Lawrence Welk shows. It's been more 
than a year now since Lawrence hired her as a regular 
member of the band, on her twentieth birthday. "That 
was my biggest moment," Jo Ann says emphatically. 
"It was supposed to be just a (Continued on page 81) 



The Lawrence Welk Show is seen on ABC-TV, Sat., from 9 to 10 
P.M. EST, sponsored by the Dodge Division of the Chrysler Corp. 
and by J. B. Williams Co., Inc. Other Welk programs are heard 
on ABC Radio. Check local papers for day and time in your area. 




Accordionists all: Jo Ann, Myron Floren (above left, cen- 
ter below) — and maestro Lawrence Welk (above right). 
But Jo Ann really pounds the ivories on ragtime piano! 




s C 










. 



35 



■m. * 





the 

STAR 

who 

GREW 



Fabian, the boy, was 

an untrained, untried singer. 

The critics panned. 

The teenagers adored. 

Here we show you the seasoned 

star that boy has become 




"And one to grow on": Fabian and friends watch Brenda Lee cut 
her birthday cake. Seasoned trouper that she is, Little Miss 
Dynamite still is many months short of Fabian's eighteen years! 



by LILLA ANDERSON 



Fabian stood on the ornate grand staircase of New York's 
Paramount Theater, signing autographs. He had a pat on 
the head for the littlest kids, a smile for the girls, a 
handshake for the boys. His manner was easy, but it was 
obvious that his days as "the handsomest boy in show business" 
were nearing their end. . . . Not that he has lost his looks! He 
is, in fact, handsomer than ever, now that he tops six feet 
and has shoulders broad enough to do credit to the University 
of Pennsylvania backfield where he once hoped to play. . . . 
He simply has outgrown being a "boy." 

Eighteen years old on February 6, he will be graduated 
in June from Philadelphia's South High School. Already, he 
has graduated from being merely "the singer Bob Marcucci 
invented." The young artist who was once scoffed at by 
columnists, as being talentless, now stands squarely on his 
merits as an adult singer and motion-picture actor. 

Such success is more remarkable because Fabian was 
literally catapulted into a career and way of life for which he 
was not prepared. Unlike his friends and neighbors, Bobby 
Rydell and Frankie Avalon, Fabian never learned his per- 
forming ABCs on Paul Whiteman's TV Teen Club. 

His break came out of a deep sorrow. Three years ago, 
Bob Marcucci — who, with Peter DeAngelis, had recently started 
Chancellor Records — was about to visit Mr. and Mrs. John J. 
Palieri, when he noticed a boy sitting on the next doorstep, 
weeping. From his friends, Bob learned that the boy's 
father, a police officer, had just been taken to the hospital, vic- 
tim of a heart attack. Bob spoke to the (Continued on page 73) 



37 



LUCY LIVES IT UP 




Apartment's entire decor is white, yellow and green — lovely, airy complementary colors for Lucy's red hair and green eyes. 



After years of being America's favorite redheaded lady 
i in the TV series 1 Love Lucy, Lucille Ball has moved 
back to New York as the lead in "Wildcat," a fast and 
funny musical comedy about wildcat oil-drilling in the 
West. . . . Broadway is the richer for her arrival. But 
for Lucy, the move meant transplanting young Desi IV 
and her daughter Lucie to an apartment — after years of 
California house living. The home she chose, in Imperial 
House — New York's newest luxury apartment house — is 
light, spacious, charming. It comprises a center entrance 
hall, surrounded by two bedrooms, a guest-study, living 
room, dining room, kitchen and baths. A penthouse, it 



has the advantage of a thirty-foot terrace. . . . Lucy was 
typically vigorous in handling the problem of interior 
finishing and decoration. She employed the decorating 
firm of Claire Jenneth Interiors and chose all furnishings 
and fabrics herself, after settling on a color scheme of 
white, yellow and green. The entire apartment makes 
generous use of Italian silk from the house of Bergamo, 
in a wide range from taffeta and satin to Venetian 
damask and brocades. Still as fascinated as ever with 
what's going on in TV, Lucy has a set in every room in 
the house, except the dining room. The apartment makes 
a handsome, elegant background for Lucy and her family. 



I Love Lucy is currently seen in re-run over the CBS-TV network, Monday through Friday, at 11 A.M. EST. 



38 



. . . and 'way up, in a penthouse paradise 
in Manhattan's social East 60' s. The lovable 
comedy star of TV and the sure-fire 
Broadway hit "Wildcat" welcomes you for a visit 



n 





Dining room is furnished in Directoire style, 
with practical formica table-top, vinyl floor. 



Yellow Bergamo silks in draperies and upholstery give -a sunny, 
rich look to Lucy's bedroom. Note grouping of family pictures. 



Continued 



The guest-study combines function of informal sitting room and guest room. Here Lucy reads to Desi IV, 8, Lucie, 91/2. 








t 



39 



LUCY LIVES IT UP 




Apartment's entire decor is white, yellow and green — lovely, airy complementary colors for Lucy's red hair and green ey 



After years of being America's favorite redheaded lady 
i in the TV series 1 Love Lucy, Lucille Ball has moved 
back to New York as the lead in "Wildcat," a fast and 
funny musical comedy about wildcat oil-drilling in the 
West. . . . Broadway is the richer for her arrival. But 
for Lucy, the move meant transplanting young Desi IV 
and her daughter Lucie to an apartment — after years of 
California house living. The home she chose, in Imperial 
House — New York's newest luxury apartment house — is 
light, spacious, charming. It comprises a center entrance 
hall, surrounded by two bedrooms, a guest-study, living 
room, dining room, kitchen and baths. A penthouse, it 



has the advantage of a thirty-foot terrace. . . • L uc v w 
typically vigorous in handling the problem of inte " 
finishing and decoration. She employed the dec01 ^ ta2S 
firm of Claire Jenneth Interiors and chose all furnishing 
and fabrics herself, after settling on a color schen "L s 
white, yellow and green. The entire apartment m 
generous use of Italian silk from the house of Berg ^ 
in a wide range from taffeta and satin to Vene i 
damask and brocades. Still as fascinated as ever ^ 
what's going on in TV, Lucy has a set in every room 
the house, except the dining room. The apartment m_^ 
a handsome, elegant background for Lucy and her 



/ Love Lucy is currently seen in re-run over the CBS-TV network, Monday through Friday, at 11 A.M. EST. 



38 



. . . and 'way up, in a penthouse paradise 
in Manhattan's social East 60's. The lovable 
comedy star of TV and the sure-fire 
Broadway hit "Wildcat" welcomes you for a visit 




^H^HMMH| 



<M 



J,! 



1 



v. 




■* 





a 

n 




Dining room is furnished in Directoire style, 
with practical formica table-top, vinyl floor. 



Yellow Bergamo silks in draperies and upholstery give -a sunny, 
rich look to Lucy's bedroom. Note grouping of family pictures. 



Continued 



The guest-study combines function of informal sitting room and guest room. Here Lucy reads to Desi IV, 8, Lucie, °l/ 2 . 




LUCY LIVES IT UP... 



<* 






(Continued) 





Lucy's spacious living room in New York is a comfortable combination of Provincial and 
contemporary furniture. Draw drapes of Bergamo silk match those in hallway below. 





Comfortable guest-study has two studio beds, lounge chair 
and ottoman in green-and-white floral tapestry, TV at left. 



Long entrance hall leads to terrace, and is center of 
the apartment. White vinyl floor has yellow-green trim. 



40 




4 




\ 



( 



*- 




Children's bedroom is done in white, with chandelier 
of metal flowers. Yarn dolls and animals make it gay. 



Lucy has morning tea by window in her large, cheery bed- 
room. Below, other side of the room, with Venetian love seat. 










LUCY LIVES IT UP... 



(Continued) 




Lucy's spacious living room in New York is a comfortable combination of Provincial and 
contemporary furniture. Draw drapes of Bergamo silk match those in hallway below. 







Comfortable guest-study has two studio beds, lounge chair 
and ottoman in green-and-white floral tapestry, TV at left. 




40 




HS^9kt:. I ■■■ 



s£*f 



I 




Children's bedroom is done in white, with chandelier 
ot metal flowers. Yarn dolls and animals make it gay. 



Lucy has morning tea by window in her large, cheery bed- 
room. Below, other side of the room, with Venetian love seat. 




Long entrance hall leads to terrace, and is center of 
the apartment. White vinyl floor has yellow-green trim. 



im ■hi. 



S+ 







With the debut of Say When, 
TV's newest fun-game, 
Art James really hit the 
Big Time. Introducing 
the personable young man 
who's sharing your morning 
coffee break these days 




amgd: 




Say When? The whole James family's 
ready for fun and games, anytime — 
host Art himself and his attractive 
wife (actress Jane Hamilton), three- 
year-old Jeffrey and baby Jennifer. 



NEW DAYTIME HOST 



by CHARLOTTE BARCLAY 

In the large, half-empty living room of his 
newly rented ten-room apartment on 
West End Avenue, Art James watches with 
amusement as his blonde, brown-eyed 
wife, actress Jane Hamilton, gaily describes 
her decorating plans. "The walls will 
remain white, the rug will be a mossy green, 
and the furniture will be Italian 
provincial." 

"Right now, it's 'early poverty,' " says 
Art, with a slow smile. Jane laughs and 
nine-month-old Jennifer, seated in 
her stroller, looks up with a toothless grin. 
Jeffrey, age three, is too busy playing 
cowboy to appreciate Daddy's humor. 

Pleased about his new show, Say When, 
Art confesses: "When it first happened, when 
I first knew I was going to have a show 
of my own — graduating at long last from 
announcer to emcee — I felt no emotion. It 
followed such a period of hard work that it 
just seemed as though everything was 
finally beginning to fall into place. These 
overnight success stories you hear always 
amuse me. I've been in this business 
ten years." 

He is not jesting about the hard work. 
Between high school and college, Art went 
through a (Continued on page 64) 





Everybody gets into the act, as the Jameses move into their 
new apartment in New York. Asked if "cowboy" Jeff has shown 
any talent for show business, Art grins: "He's certainly loud 
— if that's any indication — and he likes to sing and dance." 



Art James emcees Say When, audience-participation show produced by 
Goodson-Todman with NBC-TV, seen on the network, M-F, 10 A.M. EST. 



43 




Every week, Bud Collyer meets 
with more than eighty young 
people. In an era where "teenager" 
has become a negative tag, 
he has a vigorous defense for 
this magic period of growing up 

by ALICE FRANCIS 

Any talk with Bud Collyer is apt to 
. touch on the subject of teenagers. 
Because he likes them. Because he enjoys 
spending time with them. Because he 
doesn't think they are difficult to under- 
stand, or intolerant of adults. 

Bud wishes someone would coin a new 
word to describe the teens. "Teenager 
has been used so adversely that the kids 
themselves are beginning to resent it," he 
says. "But, in its real sense, it describes 
that magic period between childhood and 
adulthood. Years that should be wonder- 
ful for both parents and children." 

It bothers him when people speak of 
"the teen-age problem." As Bud says, 
"Every period in (Continued on page 70) 



Bud Collyer emcees To Tell The Truth, on CBS- 
TV, Mon., 7:30 P.M. EST, sponsored by American 
Home Products and Helene Curtis Industries. He 
hosts the new daytime audience-participation show, 
Number, Please, ABC-TV, M-F, 12:30 P.M. EST. 




At home with Bud Collyer and his wife, former actress Marian Shockley . . 



44 




atricia and Cynthia (right), now "ex"-teenagers . . . and Michael, nineteen. 

f 



l*» 




/ 




Bud and Marian consider the three young- 
er people of the household their "three 
best friends." Here, accompanied by Pat. 




Parents should be "good listeners" — and 
always have time for their children, says 
Bud (with Mike above, Cynthia below). 









Every week, Bud Collyer meets 
with more than eighty young 
people. In an era where "teenager" 
has become a negative tag, 
he has a vigorous defense for 
this magic period of growing up 

by ALICE FRANCIS 

Any talk with Bud Collyer is apt to 
. touch on the subject of teenagers. 
Because he likes them. Because he enjoys 
spending time with them. Because he 
doesn't think they are difficult to under- 
stand, or intolerant of adults. 

Bud wishes someone would coin a new 
word to describe the teens. "Teenager 
has been used so adversely that the kids 
themselves are beginning to resent it," he 
says. "But, in its real sense, it describes 
that magic period between childhood and 
adulthood. Years that should be wonder- 
ful for both parents and children." 

It bothers him when people speak of 
"the teen-age problem." As Bud says, 
"Every period in (Continued on page 70) 

Bud Collyer emcees To Tell The Truth, on CBS- 
TV, Mon., 7:30 P.M. EST, sponsored by American 
Home Products and Helene Curtis Industries. He 
hosts the new daytime audience-participation show, 
Number, Please, ABC-TV, M-F, 12:30 P.M. EST. 




At home with Bud Collyer and his wife, former actress Marian Shockley 




otricia and Cynthia (right), now "ex"-teenagers ... and Michael, nineteen 





Bud and Marian consider the three y ..n. , 
er people of the household their "three 
best friends." Here, accompanied by Pat 




Parents should be "good listeners" — and 
always have time for their children, says 
Bud (with Mike above, Cynthia below). 





Tack 




£¥£ 



THE NANETTE FABRAY SHOW 




Westinghouse Playhouse Starring Nanette Fabray And Wendell Corey: Nanette plays stage star who weds 
widower (Wendell) with two children. Kip Hamilton is actress caught in middle of typical episode seen above. 



The thing that delights me," says Nanette, 
"is that the show is really the story of our 
marriage. It really happened just the way we 
filmed it in the first episode of the new 
Westinghouse Playhouse. Randy and I met on 
Monday, fell in love on Tuesday, married on 
Friday, and then came home to face up to 
his children. They were wonderful. I came 
unglued, but they were wonderful." 

Nanette Fabray, of course, is a familiar and 
well-loved face on the nation's TV screens. 
Before Sid Caesar introduced her to delight 
the millions on (Continued on page 78) 

Westinghouse Playhouse Starring Nanette Fabray And Wendell 
Corey — as Mr. and Mrs. Dan McGovern — on NBC-TV, Fri., 
8:30 P.M. EST, is sponsored by Westinghouse Electric Corp. 



A new bride. A built-in young 
family to cope with. A sense of 
humor. Result: An entrancing 
new comedy series based 
on honest-to-good ness reality 
by KEL WILLIAMS 



46 








s 





Show stems from Nanette's own whirlwind 
romance with Ranald MacDougall — suc- 
cessful screen writer with three children 
she didn't meet until after the wedding! 




Ranald created story for the new series 
— "funniest material I ever worked with," 
she beams. Meanwhile, their baby Jamie 
has increased MacDougall brood to four. 






Day In Court: Presiding — Edgar 
Allan Jones Jr., expert on law. 



by MARTIN COHEN 

He has three jobs, each of which 
would be a full career for the 
average man — as star of ABC-TV's 
Day In Court, professor of law at 
the U.C.L.A. Law School, and labor 
arbitrator. He also has eight chil- 
dren, with a ninth due this Feb- 
ruary — and finds fatherhood the 
most satisfying occupation any man 
could have. 

Yet in person — an intelligent, 
alert man about five-ten, with 
brown hair and blue eyes — the 
incredible Edgar Allan Jones Jr. 
proves to be an incredibly relaxed 
individual who accomplishes the 
impossible with little effort. 

He notes, "I just bought a small 
two-door sedan. Hasn't been de- 
livered yet, but there's no rush. I 



48 




ore 




Eighth child Therese (at left, with 
parents) loses "baby of family" sta- 
tus with birth of a ninth this year. 




errier 



Edgar Allan Jones Jr., actor, lawyer and 
teacher, confesses that his favorite 
role is "father" and explains how 
rewarding it is to be a nine-time winner! 




Older children participate in team-type sports with their dad — basketball, baseball, volleyball, touch football. Left to 
right, above: Anna Marie, I I; Linda Marie, 13; Carol Marie, 10; Terry, 9; David, 3; Dennis, 7; Bob, 6. Individually, each has 
his or her own "day out" and "night up" alone with father and mother — who have their own "night out," usually on Saturdays. 



Continued 



49 




Day In Court: Presiding — Edgar 
Allan Jones Jr., expert on law. 



Mo 



thelWMore 



by MARTIN COHEN 

He has three jobs, each of which 
would be a full career for the 
average man — as star of ABC-TV's 
Day In Court, professor of law at 
the U.C.LA. Law School, and labor 
arbitrator. He also has eight chil- 
dren, with a ninth due this Feb- 
ruary — and finds fatherhood the 
most satisfying occupation any man 
could have. 

Yet in person — an intelligent, 
alert man about five-ten, with 
brown hair and blue eyes — the 
incredible Edgar Allan Jones Jr. 
proves to be an incredibly relaxed 
individual who accomplishes the 
impossible with little effort. 

He notes, "I just bought a small 
two-door sedan. Hasn't been de- 
livered yet, but there's no rush. I 



M 



thelwlerrier 



Edgar Allan Jones Jr., actor, lawyer and 
teacher, confesses that his favorite 
role is "father" and explains how 
rewarding it is to be a nine-time winner! 



3 



i'o 





Eighth child Therese (at left, 
parents) loses "baby of family sta- 
tus with birth of a ninth this ye° r ' 



pate in team-type sports with their dad-basketball, baseball, volleyball touch football. Left to 
arie, I I ; Linda Marie, 13; Carol Marie, 10; Terry, 9; David ,3; Dennis, 7; Bob, 6. Individually each has 
'•• and "night up" alone with father and mother-who have their own night out, usually on Saturdays. 



Continued 




theJMore the Merrier 



Hobbles? Jones even finds time to make a mosaic — with 
expert "sidewalk supervision" from sons Bob and David. 



Wife Helen "is a genius at creating an atmosphere in 
which we're all happy." He often says it — with flowers! 



(Continued) 



can fit all the family into my present convertible with- 
out any trouble." Even the pre-breakfast hour, when 
ten people are rushing in and out of bathrooms, 
dressing for work and school and converging en masse 
at the breakfast table, is less than a minor problem. 
"I admit the traffic is pretty heavy but there are no 
traffic jams, and we all get dressed and arrive at 
breakfast together." 

At eight-thirty, Edgar Allan Jones Jr. is on the 
campus as a professor of law. About five-thirty (Pa- 
cific time), he appears at the ABC studio to perform 
in Day In Court. Occasionally, he is called on to act 
as an arbitrator in management-labor disputes. But 
on Monday and Wednesday evenings, and on week- 
ends, he is again a father — one who believes in a sense 
of humor. "My wife and I believe in kidding each 
other and laughing at ourselves," he says, "especially 
in front of the children." 

But, with the humor, there is a serious attitude and 
a heavy sense of responsibility toward the family. 
"People tend to test me. They say to themselves, 
'Here's a man, well-educated, very busy in the con- 
temporary scene, and he has brought a large family 
into a world that is fraught (Continued on page 80) 

Edgar Allan Jones Jr. is the presiding judge for Day In Court, as 
seen over ABC-TV, Monday through Friday, 2 P.M. (local time). 





Jones believes "first steps" are all-important — and 




No cracks about "Davy Jones," now. Bob and David are safe as can be, in their little boat, with older brother 
Dennis lending a steady hand, Dad watching from the pool edge — and Terry understandably quite unconcerned. 




ing supervision 




Fun is part of a rich family life, too. And this family can make quite a splash! 



51 




the More theJwwerrier 



Hobbies? Jones even finds time to make a mosaic — with 
expert "sidewalk supervision" from sons Bob and David. 



Wife Helen "is a genius at creating an atmosphere in 
which we're all happy." He often says it — with flowers! 



(Continued) 



can fit all the family into my present convertible with- 
out any trouble." Even the pre-breakfast hour, when 
ten people are rushing in and out of bathrooms, 
dressing for work and school and converging en masse 
at the breakfast table, is less than a minor problem. 
"I admit the traffic is pretty heavy but there are no 
traffic jams, and we all get dressed and arrive at 
breakfast together." 

At eight-thirty, Edgar Allan Jones Jr. is on the 
campus as a professor of law. About five-thirty (Pa- 
cific time), he appears at the ABC studio to perform 
in Day In Court. Occasionally, he is called on to act 
as an arbitrator in management-labor disputes. But 
on Monday and Wednesday evenings, and on week- 
ends, he is again a father — one who believes in a sense 
of humor. "My wife and I believe in kidding each 
other and laughing at ourselves," he says, "especially 
in front of the children." 

But, with the humor, there is a serious attitude and 
a heavy sense of responsibility toward the family. 
"People tend to test me. They say to themselves, 
'Here's a man, well-educated, very busy in the con- 
temporary scene, and he has brought a large family 
into a world that is fraught (Continued on page 80) 

Edgar Allan Jones Jr. is the presiding judge for Day In Court, as 
seen over ABC-TV, Monday through Friday, 2 P.M. (local time). 






^x^s^x a ?i°«^^^ 



dably quite unconcerned. 



Jones believes "first steps" are all-important— ond s0 j ls lo *ing supervision. 




■ram 

Fun is part of a rich family life, too. And this family can make quite a splash! 



51 



KNEE-LENGTH 
HAIR 

Lovely Mary Stuart, of CBS-TV's 
Search For Tomorrow, prefers long 
hair though it means more care 





Brush, brush, brush is Mary's advice to those 
who want shining hair. She faithfully brushes 
her locks and daughter Cynthia's every day. 




For a lasting setting, and to tame stray strands, Mary uses hair spray 



by JUNE CLARK 



Having yards and yards of hair presents no problem for 
Mary Stuart, for this clever lass has devised a unique 
beauty program which leaves her hair perfectly groomed. 
She begins with a sensible premise: Proper attention to her 
tresses makes for greater manageability. Clean locks are 
the basis of loveliness, according to Mary, who has an unusual 
way of shampooing. She washes all her hair once a week, 
which is normal enough — but, in addition, she shampoos 
only her bangs twice a week. (This way, they are always 
bright and obedient, with lots of bounce.) After her weekly 
sudsing, Mary smooths a cream conditioner through her 
hair to prevent snarls and to pave the way for easy combing 
and brushing. Mary feels brushing is vital in distributing 
the natural oils to combat dry and brittle ends, and to add a 
healthy glow. With an upward and outward motion, 
she wields the brush until her arm is tired. Everyone can 
master the care of hair with consistent brushing, claims Mary. 
Don't worry about upsetting your wave, she says. Brushing 
gives hair resiliency, helps to train it to the curve of the 
wave. Carry a tiny hair brush in your handbag, too — and, 
in no time at all, your curls and waves will learn to behave 
properly. Mary has her hair cut only when she can no longer 
conveniently reach it to brush it, and even then she is 
sparing with the shears. In a matter of minutes, Mary adeptly 
arranges her long hair into an artistic figure eight. Then she 
vigorously brushes back her pin-curled bangs and, with 
her fingers, arranges each strand individually on her 
forehead. Mary finds this hairdo is easy to keep when she 
protects it with a spray. At night, for comfort, she lets 
her hair dangle between the headboard and mattress! 



^SS 




SPECIAL MIDWEST EDITION 

THE "FULLER" LIFE 

Whether it's acting, or newscasting on KMTV, 
to Bob Fuller, it's all a part of "story telling'' 




The happy Fuller family at home — I. to r. — Mom Elizabeth; son 
Robert, I I ; Dad Bob; and five-year-old daughter Diantha. 



From footlights to klieg lights . . . and from acting to 
real life ... so goes the career of Bob Fuller, self- 
styled "story teller" and broadcasting-billed "featured 
newscaster" for Station KMTV in Omaha, Nebraska. 
"It all really amounts to the same thing," says Fuller, 
"whether you act, direct, write or broadcast news. The 
techniques and tools are different, but it's still story tell- 
ing." Bob is well qualified to express an opinion on the 
relation of all the various media. For more than a decade, 
he has been busy exploring all forms of "story telling" 
and, at the same time, making friends, influencing people, 
and earning a living doing it. Robert H. Fuller of Cleve- 
land and then Akron, Ohio, didn't get the "story telling" 
bug until he enrolled at Syracuse University. There, for 
two years until the Army beckoned, he majored in jour- 
nalism. He enlisted in the Army in 1939 and then spent 
the next six years in khaki. . . . Eventually, he turned to 
acting. In 1949 and 1950, he did 52 weeks of the ABC-TV 
network show, I Cover Times Square, which starred 
Harold Huber. He also worked with Ralph Bellamy in 
the Man Against Crime series. . . . During this time, 
Fuller was directing as well as acting in television and 
off Broadway. At this point, New York Post drama critic, 
Vernon Rice, seemed to sum up Fuller's career in com- 
menting on the off -Broadway production of "A Case of a 
Neglected Calling Card," directed by Fuller. "Judging his 
work here and the jobs he has done with other off- 
Broadway groups, Fuller seems to be preparing himself 
as a superior all-around man of the theater," Rice 
wrote. ... In the 1953-54 season, Fuller joined a road 
company of "Mister Roberts" which covered the entire 
United States. When it was over, Fuller decided to settle 
down in television in Syracuse, New York. He joined 
WHEN-TV as a staff announcer and director and quickly 



worked into the News Department. ... In 1957, Fuller 
went to Little Rock, Arkansas' KTHV and, within a year, 
was the News Director. There, Fuller had a big story to 
tell. "Integration ... its violent introduction to the city, 
and the parts played by individuals in the struggle was 
heavy drama," says he. "I became aware that life is 
dramatic. That news is drama. And, if you look for it, 
you'll find it everywhere. The television newsman who 
says 'nothing happened today' is only admitting that he 
has failed, for news stories are really everywhere. The 
drama that is news concerns people who are in conflict — 
with other people, with nature, with themselves. Whether 
you make it up — as a playwright or novelist does — or 
whether you report it as it happens — as a newsman does — 
you are still simply telling a story," philosophizes 
Fuller. . . . Since joining KMTV, in September, 1960, 
Fuller has been the featured newsman on eleven news- 
casts a week. He is part of a sixteen-man team which 
produces the top-rated 10 p.m. news show in Omaha tele- 
vision. In addition to his on-the-air duties, he personally 
covers numerous stories, conducts sound-on-film inter- 
views and develops feature stories for the regular news 
broadcasts. With Fuller narrating, KMTV won nationwide 
recognition in November on the station's study-in-depth 
of teen-age driving problems, following a tragic accident 
in which six young people were killed. Fuller's tongue 
and pen are already making themselves well known in 
the Omaha area. In addition to his television work, he 
spends his off hours writing a novel. . . . Mrs. Fuller, the 
former Elizabeth Goettel, is a home economist. . . . 
The Fullers have two children — an eleven-year-old boy 
Robert and a five-year-old girl Diantha. And what do 
they think of their dad? Well, to quote little Diantha: 
"He's quite a story teller." 



53 





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He's been many places, done 

many things, but WBKB-TV's 

Bob Lewandowski came "home"— when 

America took him to its heart 



54 



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Arms linked, Bob happily joins the 
Lithuanian Dancers of Chicago. 



Bob leads a guest dance group and 
audience in a German singing game. 



Each week, the Chaine Dancers do a 
dance of some nationality group. 



Every Saturday, from 6 to 6:30 p.m., the danc-< 
ingest show on TV beams out to a fanatically 
enthusiastic audience over WBKB-TV. Polka- 
Go-Round is described by its host Bob Lewan- 
dowski as "music, singing, dancing of many na- 
tionalities — a lively family party." Bob is an 
ideal selection to helm a show on which people 
of many national backgrounds appear. Born in 
Poland, trained for the stage, his life took an 
abrupt and dramatic turn when Nazi troops oc- 
cupied Warsaw. He served as an announcer on 
Polish Underground radio and as a member of 
the underground army for five years — and was 
a prisoner of war in Germany when World War 
II ended. The experience gained for Bob a phi- 
losophy of life which sums up as: "Leave to- 
morrow for tomorrow, and you will be happier 
today." This optimistic slant on life has helped 
Bob in all his days since 1945, through all the 
many countries in which he performed to bring 
joy to people of many lands. When, in 1951, he 
reached the United States, he said: "I wasn't 
a wanderer anymore. I was home!" 





'^sW. 



EXERCISE! 



56 




He doesn't sing, dance, or even 
tell jokes, but likeable Ed Allen 
is wowing the ladies with 
his daily physical-fitness show 



The shy, skinny boy named Ed Allen happily 
tugged his father's hand as they left the movie 
house. Again, he had seen his favorite performer, 
Donald O'Connor. He looked up at his father. "That's 
what I'm going to be — an entertainer," he announced. 
"What are you going to be — a dancer, singer or 
actor?" asked his father. "I don't know that yet," the 
boy answered, "but I do know that it'll have to be 
some kind of show business." Father suggested: 
"You have a pretty good voice, Ed. What say you 
try to do something with it? Radio would be a good 
start. . . ." So, the boy began studying voice and, 
before long, he landed a job — doing commercials on 
the Jack Armstrong radio show. And he was getting 
parts in musicals at school. He was happy in this 
accomplishment, but soon there was something else 
that began gnawing inside of him with more and 
more insistence. It was his slight build. Here he 
was, a freshman in high school, very eager to play 
football, but only weighing a paltry 120 pounds. . . . 
One day, he stopped at a drugstore for something 
to read to take his mind off his discouragement. An 
advertisement from a magazine caught his eye. It 
was a picture of a heavily-muscled man who attrib- 
uted his handsome physique to weight-lifting. This 
might be the answer, he thought. Quickly, the boy 
hurried home, gathered some savings, and set out 
to buy a set of weights. Day after day, he set time 
aside for the barbell treatment and his interest in 
physical culture intensified. In between resting peri- 
ods from the weight-lifting, he read every available 
book on physical culture. . . . The two strong inter- 
ests of that boy — entertainment and physical culture 
— eventually blended and have culminated in the 
popular daily TV show, Ed Allen Time, which, shortly 
after its initiation on WWJ-TV in Detroit, attracted 
the attention of Fred A. Niles Productions, Inc. for 
video-tape syndication on stations throughout the 
nation. ... Ed Allen — who was born in Milwaukee 
and moved to Chicago with his family during his 
school years — experienced a varied career in the en- 
tertainment field before his current TV show. He 
has performed in Broadway musicals, theatrical road 
companies, summer theaters, supper clubs, radio, 
and has written, produced, packaged and emceed 
twenty-seven TV shows in all. . . . His start in tele- 
vision came quite by chance, after a hitch in the Air 
Corps, when he joined a successful comedy panto- 
mime act. "We were playing in a hotel in Windsor, 
Canada," he recalls, "when a program executive of 
WXYZ-TV, in Detroit, saw our act and signed us 
up to perform it in one of his TV shows. That led 
me into other TV programs and, before I knew it, I 
was including exercise segments in my format. Ac- 
tually, Ed Allen Time is an evolution of many TV 
shows I've done, both in Detroit and Chicago." In 
addition to being the host and performer, Ed pro- 
duces and writes the show. He selects all the ex- 
ercise routines, many of which are his originals, 
and is very careful in seeing to it that they are 
suitable and not too strenuous. . . . Ed's home life 
is filled with a variety of interesting activities. He 




Ed's wife, daughter and son share his love of food but can't quite match his "6 eggs, bacon, 4 slices of bread" breakfast. 



and his wife Kay have two children — Edward, 10, 
and Kandace, 8. (And the Aliens are now expecting 
their third child.) They live in a three -bedroom 
ranch home — complete with art room and gym — in 
St. Clare Shores, a suburb of Detroit. Both Ed and 
his wife paint in oils, water colors, and pastels. 
"With two artists in the house, 'friction' sometimes 
generates when there's wall space to be filled," Ed 
says. "We all use the gym, of course, and my son 
is getting to be quite a weight-lifter in his own 
right." He adds, with a grin, "There's only one thing 
I'll never understand about my wife. She's a 
marvelous cook, yet she becomes annoyed when 
I tell anyone. About the only thing Kay doesn't 
do well is sew — in fact, she can't sew a stitch. 
When one of the kids loses a button, Daddy's 
elected." . . . Ed's interest in sports has also stayed 
with him during the years and he swims, plays golf 
and fences whenever he can. "There just isn't the 
time to do all the things I want to do." Kay reveals 
that Ed likes to polish things — silver, the family's 
shoes, cars, bathroom faucets and what-have-you. 
Of course, this is the family joke. She goes on to 
say, "Our family and friends never quite get used 
to the idea that Ed's breakfast includes a half-dozen 
eggs, a half-dozen slices of bacon and four- slices 
of bread. Or that he likes a good-sized head of lettuce 
for a snack." . . . He's the kind of man who can't 
help projecting fun on Ed Allen Time. That this has 
both the understanding and hearty approval of TV 
viewers is evidenced by the fact that the formerly 
local show is well on its way to nationwide fame. 




Ed enjoys all physical work — even polishing family shoes. 

Ed Allen Time is seen in the Midwest on WWJ-TV, Detroit: 
WSPD-TV, Toledo: WITI-TV. Milwaukee: WJW-TV. Cleveland. 



57 



MAN ON A PARTY LINE 

. . . is WHAS* Milton Metz, who literally has the 
whole Kentucky — southern Indiana area talking . . . 
on the telephone . .. . on all manner of subjects 




Fun around the fireplace for the Metz family — including 
Milton, his pretty wife Miriam, and six-year-old son Perry. 





Eight-thirty is talking time on WHAS and, in Juniper 
5-2385, the radio station has a program which seems 
to have the whole Kentucky — southern Indiana area 
talking. In fact, the ninety-minute, Monday-through- 
Friday night show draws mail from forty-two states and 
has received as many as thirty-nine long-distance tele- 
phone calls on a single night. . . . Versatile Milton Metz 
conducts the party-line program, which allows the lis- 
teners to hear both ends of conversations on the most 
varied group of topics an active imagination can muster. 
It's the kind of program which has prompted scores of 
people to write their first fan letters. One listener 
describes it as "interesting, informative, educational, and 
the essence of free speech and discussion." ... In the middle 
of all this talk is dapper Milton Metz, always courteous, 
never taking sides, but continually drawing out his 
listeners. He begins every program with a background 
period to set the stage for the open discussion, frequently 
calling on guest experts but often developing the subject 
himself. This presents a real challenge, since the pro- 
gram topics range from "Do Women Dress for Comfort, 
or Are They Just Plain Sloppy?" to "How Much Mercy Is 
There in Mercy Killing?" . . . Metz introduced himself 
to broadcasting by doing sound effects for a local radio 
station while still attending high school in Cleveland. 
He then worked his way through Ohio State University 
doing various radio jobs. After three years in the Army, he 
joined Louisville's WHAS. He soon built a strong repu- 
tation as a special-events and current-affairs announcer. 
In 1952, he became the weather specialist for both 
WHAS-TV and Radio. He later inaugurated a nightly 
business-news program on radio. And, in 1957, his 
public -affairs efforts won him a Ford Foundation Fellow- 
ship. In 1958, a weekly series of traffic-safety TV 
documentaries produced and conducted by Metz won a 
National Safety Council award. Milt reads voraciously for 
enjoyment and to keep up with anything which could 
conceivably be discussed on the show. . . . Despite 
his heavy air schedule, the broadcaster is called upon 
with great frequency as an after-dinner speaker. And, 
early in 1960, he was a lecturer on public relations at 
the first annual Institute for Adult Probation and 
Parole Officers, University of Louisville. . . . Married 
since 1949, Milt says his lovely wife, Miriam, is a great 
help with original ideas and unusually objective criticism. 
Their six-year-old son, Perry Stewart, follows his 
dad's programs closely but is "singularly unimpressed," 
says Milt. ... As a "professional middle man," Milt 
withholds his own opinions on Juniper 5. One belief 
which he makes no effort to keep to himself is that 
broadcast audiences are a good deal more intelligent 
than they've been pictured in some quarters. No 
wonder listeners like him too! 



Diana Trask 

(Continued from page 17) 
chance, she could make it. And make it 
she has. Today, Diana Trask is under 
exclusive contract to the NBC Tele- 
vision Network and reaping the fruits 
of a buildup that has made her the 
freshest — and most eye-filling — singing 
star in many a TV moon. 

The lissome, long-stemmed beauty 
has sung on the shows of Perry Como, 
Dinah Shore, Jack Benny and Mitch 
Miller. She has captivated night-club 
audiences in New York and points west. 
She has gone to parties with celebrities 
who, short months ago, were a world 
away. 

In a brief span, too, she has learned 
that a beautiful young "discovery" pays 
a price for her fame. Because she sang 
on a show with Frank Sinatra in Aus- 
tralia and received encouragement from 
him, she has been referred to by some 
columnists as a "Sinatra protege," 
which she denies, and as a "Sinatra 
broad," which she resents. 

"I'm not a Sinatra broad," she in- 
sists, in an interview for TV Radio 
Mirror — her first since she hit the big- 
time. "He was very nice to me, the 
one time I met him, but it's unfair to 
call me his protege, and I'm certainly 
not a 'broad.' " 

It would indeed require considerable 
license with Mr. Webster's lexicon to 
apply the term to this nineteen-year- 
old strawberry blonde with the flaxen 
and pink complexion, the wide green 
eyes, and the polished manners of a 
society deb. And yet, with all of these 
attributes, plus a gifted voice, Diana's 
success story is a strange one. Not the 
least of its poignant points is the fact 
that she was a flop back home before 
her faith and talent shone through. 

It should be understood, first, that — 
although Australia is nearly half a 
globe away from us in distance — it is 
almost as modern in its entertainment 
tastes as Broadway. Teenagers in the 
land "down under" dote on American 
music and are enamored of American 
stars. They buy records, collect photo- 
graphs and write fan letters, just as 
our home-grown youngsters do. 

It was perfectly natural, then, for 
Diana to rebel at the idea of following 
in the footsteps of her mother and be- 
coming an opera singer. Mother Trask 
taught her daughter piano, voice and 
theory. At the age of nine, Diana won 
a voice contest and music scholarship. 
But, as Diana grew up, the beat of jazz 
and swing overwhelmed the arias. 

"I still have an ambition to do opera," 
Diana says, "and perhaps one day I 
will. My voice has a wide range, and I 
could be a lyric soprano. But I adore 
popular music. When I first started to 
sing popular songs, Mother looked du- 
biously at everything I did. She used 
to tell me I screamed, that I was forcing 



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STAR CANDIDS YOU'LL TREASURE 



5. Alan Ladd 
11. Elizabeth Taylor 
15. Frank Sinatra 

18. Rory Calhoun 

19. Peter Lawford 
25. Dale Evans 
34. Roy Rogers 

5 1 . Doris Day 
56. Perry Como 
74. John Wayne 
84. Janet Leigh 

109. Dean Martin 

110. Jerry Lewis 
121. Tony Curtis 
128. Debbie Reynolds 
136. Rock Hudson 

140. Dale Robertson 

141. Marilyn Monroe 
145. Marlon Brando 

147. Tab Hunter 

148. Robert Wagner 
175. Charlton Heston 
198. Gale Storm 
202. George Nader 
207. Eddie Fisher 
215. Kim Novak 
219. Natalie Wood 
221. Joan Collins 
223. Sal Mineo 

225. Elvis Presley 

227. Tony Perkins 

228. Clint Walker 

229. Pat Boone 

230. Paul Newman 
233. Pat Wayne 
241. Lawrence Welk 

245. Hugh O'Brian 

246. Jim Arness 
249. John Saxon 
254. Nick Adams 
256. Harry Belafonte 

261. Tommy Sands 

262. Will Hutchins 

263. James Darren 

264. Ricky Nelson 



268. Dolores Hart 

269. James Garner 

270. Everly Brothers 
272. Sandra Dee 

275. Michael Ansara 

276. Jack Kelly 

278. Annette Funicello 
280. Tim Considine 

282. Johnny Mathis 

283. David Nelson 

284. Shirley Temple 

285. Pat Conway 

286. Bob Horton 

287. John Payne 

288. David Janssen 

289. Dick Clark 

291. Carol Lynley 

292. Jimmie Rodgers 

293. Guy Williams 

294. Frankie Avalon 

295. John Gavin 

298. Joanne Woodward 

299. Teddy Randazzo 

300. Paul Anka 

301. Peter Brown 

302. Edd Byrnes 

303. Joni James 

306. EfremZimbalist, Jr. 

307. John Smith 

308. Lloyd Bridges 

309. John Russell 

310. Gene Barry 

311. Chuck Connors 

312. Geo. Montgomery 

313. Craig Stevens 

314. Steve McQueen 

315. Conway Twitty 

316. Ty Hardin 

318. Fabian 

319. Roger Smith 

320. Tuesday Weld 

321. Dion 

322. Bobby Darin 
325. Connie Francis 



327. Eric Fleming 

328. Clint Eastwood 

329. Gardner McKay 

330. Connie Stevens 

333. Richard Long 

334. Roger Moore 

335. Van Williams 

336. Peter Breck 

338. Michael London 

339. Pernell Roberts 

34 1 . Bob Conrad 

342. Dwayne Hickman 

343. Dorothy Provine 

345. Robert Fuller 

346. Peggy Castle 

347. Patty McCormack 

348. Bobby Rydell 

349. Anthony Eisley 

350. Johnny Restivo 

351. Doug McClure 

352. George Hamilton 

354. Dodie Stevens 

355. Rod Lauren 

356. Troy Donahue 

357. Stephen Boyd 



358. Paul Evans 

359. Bob Crewe 

360. Shelley Fabares 

361. Jane Fonda 

362. Robert Stack 

363. Clu Gulager 

364. Ralph Taeger 

365. Jeremy Slate 

366. Keith Larsen 

367. Shirley Bonne 

368. Annie Farge 

369. George Maharis 

370. Marty Milner 

371. Anthony George 

372. Charles Quinlivan 

373. Skip Homeier 

374. Lori Martin 

375. Howard Duff 

376. Bill Reynolds 

377. James Philbrook 

378. Diane Brewster 

379. Lee Patterson 

380. Diane McBain 

381. Rod Taylor 

382. Cary Grant 



WORLD WIDE, DEPT. WG-361 
112 Main St., Ossining, N. Y. 

I enclose $ for candid 

pictures of my favorite stars and have circled 
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FILL IN AND MAIL 
COUPON TODAY! 



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59 



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my voice and would be very sorry. I'm 
happy to say she has lived to renege it." 

Diana's professional debut came at 
the age of seventeen, when she entered 
a television contest in the hope of at- 
tracting attention. Singing such stand- 
ards as "Embraceable You," "These 
Foolish Things" and "You Go to My 
Head," she won four eliminations and 
captured top money of $2,100. A rival 
television station promptly hired her — 
but for the next five months the golden 
singing voice wasn't heard on the air. 

Ironically, that first job called for 
her to stand before the cameras and 
merely mouth the words to top-selling 
records. Further frustration came when 
she was booked as the singer on a 
nightly program similar to The Jack 
Paar Show — and succeeded in offending 
most of the viewers with her style. 
Enough wrote in to get her fired. 

"For some reason," Diana says, "I 
just didn't get across, even though I 
sang the most wonderful of American 
ballads. They told me I was 'cold.' May- 
be the listeners weren't in the mood. 
Anyway, I was sacked." But she took 
great comfort from the words of the 
boys in the band and the station man- 
ager, who told her: "Don't give up. You 
have it in you to be a star." 

More determined than ever now, to 
make it to New York, Diana headed in 
roughly the right direction — north and 
east. The journey was short, to the city 
of Sydney, but it was an important stop, 
for it was there that the Australian 
phase of her career turned upward. 

In several months of singing in night 
clubs, doing her own radio show and 
appearing as a guest on TV programs, 
she became the- country's best-known 
vocalist, and she was a natural choice 
for the local talent when an American 
troupe headed by Frank Sinatra was 
booked for a four-night stand in the 
Melbourne Stadium. 

Diana's return to Melbourne was tri- 
umphant. Sinatra wowed the audiences; 
Diana wowed both the audiences and 
Sinatra. After the opening night's per- 
formance, he sent a message to her in- 
viting her to a party. "When I was in- 
troduced to him," Diana remembers, 
"all he said was, 'I'm happy to meet 
you.' I almost fainted." (She hadn't 
reached her eighteenth birthday yet.) 

Sinatra also told the slim beauty (she 
recollected, when she regained her 
senses) that she had "real class" — a su- 
preme accolade from the great man — 
and that he would try to help her if she 
came to the States. Similar encourage- 
ment was bestowed on her not long 
afterward by Sammy Davis Jr., when 
that versatile entertainer toured Aus- 
tralia and Diana sang on the same bill. 

"It was as a result of this that the im- 
pression was created I was a protege of 
Mr. Sinatra," Diana says, in her clipped 
manner of speaking. "Certainly, he 
helped give me courage, and I'll always 



be grateful to him for it. But I came to 
the United States on my own, as I had 
always wanted to do." 

The date of her arrival was June 4, 
1959. Diana had saved most of her con- 
test prize money and her earnings — but 
"I was frightened to tears . . . just didn't 
know what would happen to me." 
Actually, developments were not too 
slow in coming. After an audition, she 
signed a contract with General Artists 
Corp. Two months later, she was 
booked into The Blue Angel, a New 
York night club which long has served 
as an excellent showcase for new tal- 
ent. The favorable notices she received 
from the critics led to other night-club 
engagements and finally to an appear- 
ance at Lake Tahoe with Jack Benny. 
In hope of breaking into the movies, 
as well, Diana took a screen test and 
signed a contract with 20th Century- 
Fox which threatened for a time to sty- 
mie her television appearances. But she 
soon realized that movies were too 
large a challenge at the moment, and 
arrived at a compromise arrangement 
under which she'll probably make one 
film during 1961 and devote most of her 
time to TV. 

Her American network debut on tele- 
vision came on May 24, 1960, as a spe- 
cial guest star on the NBC Ford Star- 
time colorcast of "Sing Along With 
Mitch." Her rendition of "A Guy Is a 
Guy" drew critical raves and convinced 
NBC it had captured a new star. Rec- 
ords, guest appearances on other top 
shows and attention from network brass 
followed, and it's likely that the once- 
frightened girl from Australia will wind 
up with a show of her own next season. 
"I can see my way clear now," Diana 
says. "The only thing I have to work on 
now is myself. I want to become a bet- 
ter singer and be able to act. There is 
so much talent in this country that it 
makes you want to do the very best 
you can. I've been so lucky, and I don't 
want it said I was not worthy of it." 
Meanwhile, Diana travels in the best 
of company. Though she can afford the 
luxury of disavowing the sponsorship 
of Sinatra, the singing king did attend 
her opening at The Blue Angel and 
continues to evince a keen interest in 
her progress. Jack Benny and Mitch 
Miller also have demonstrated a rooting 
interest in her. When Jerry Lewis threw 
a surprise party in New York recently 
for his wife, Diana arrived on the 
scene with Benny and rubbed elbows 
with such other stars of song as Ethel 
Merman and Sophie Tucker. 

She hasn't reached the point yet 
where she is recognized on the street, 
but her trim five-foot-seven figure and 
her cameo -like face have succeeded in 
stopping traffic. Australia seems farther 
away than ever, Diana admits, some- 
what wistfully. "It's still my home. But 
it is here, in America, that dreams 
come true." 



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T 
V 
R 

61 



Arthur Godfrey and Candid Camera 



(Continued from page 23) 
comedienne on the show — getting less 
chance to display her unexpected but 
undeniable "new" talent? Were there 
too many guest celebrities cluttering 
up the format? 

Whatever the charges and counter- 
charges, the basic appeal of Candid 
Camera remained. "Everyone I have 
talked to expresses a different reason," 
Godfrey told me. "But it's true that 
natural human reactions are always 
more interesting to watch than any 
trumped-up ideas. The sequences have 
to be played by ear all the way. The 
fact that they never work out quite the 
way Allen has planned them is what 
makes the whole thing fun." 

This skill for improvisation is one 
which Funt began developing, back in 
his Army days, when the novel idea 
first occurred to him. Assigned to help 
G.I.s make recordings to send their 
home folks, he found the men were 
stilted and formal — until he learned to 
catch the byplay of their conversation 
before they knew they were on record. 
Later, he turned the hidden-mike trick 
into a network program, under the 
name of Candid Microphone. 

When television came upon the scene, 
Funt re-christened his brainchild Can- 
did Camera and, throughout the years, 
the formula of catching people offguard 
has retained its popular appeal. Techni- 
cal advances merely increased its ef- 
fectiveness. With the aid of such cam- 
ouflages as a one-way mirror, the 
camera can look directly into the faces 
of people who have no idea they're 
being photographed. Close-ups can be 
made from even some distance away, 
with the use of telescopic lens. A tape 
recorder takes care of the rest. 

The main problems are purely psy- 
chological. The people themselves, of 
course— though, after they learn what 
has happened, most of them go along 
with the fun. And the stars them- 
selves, whether guests or regulars on 
the program. Accustomed to being 
recognized, they're not so sure they 
can "get away with it," in the hidden- 
camera sequences. 

When Godfrey was scheduled to mas- 
querade as an ice-cream vendor, for 
the opening program this season, there 
were doubts that he could play the part 
unrecognized. He may have had some 
doubts, too. As he says, "I wouldn't 
know how to play anyone but myself. 
Several times, when people said to me, 
'You look like Arthur Godfrey,' I just 
replied, 'Yes, everyone says that' This 
would put them off for quite some 
time. My big trouble was to keep from 

T breaking up when something funny — or 

v too unexpected — happened." 

R Dorothy Collins faced the same prob- 
lems, when she was tapped for the 

62 



show. One day, when the format was 
first discussed in her presence, someone 
said there should be a girl on the pro- 
posed program — one with a flair for 
comedy, but not a recognized comedi- 
enne. "A girl who is sweet and apple- 
pie-ish. Like Dorothy here." Everyone 
looked at her and agreed, "She's the 
one." Dorothy shook her head. "Sounds 
like fun," she told them, "but people 
would know me." 

Funt shook his head. "I don't want 
to deflate your ego, Dorothy, but you're 
going to be surprised. You won't be 
recognized. People will be so busy re- 
acting to what's going on, they won't 
notice you that much." And she was 
surprised. Even those who later told 
her that her voice sounded familiar, 
had no idea it was she at the time. 

Funt has an explanation of why he 
is still not recognized after years of 





candid reporting of this kind. "I have 
learned the art of distraction, of moving 
in so quickly that the person becomes 
completely involved and offguard. The 
'vocal' offensive has something to do 
with it. I don't give anyone enough time 
to pause and put the pieces together. 
And I hate to admit it, but I seem to 
have the kind of face that doesn't stand 
out. Several times, after I have told 
people they have been photographed 
for our show, they have said, T saw 
that program only last night — or the 
night before. How could I fail to recog- 
nize you today? But I did!' I believe the 
main reason the celebrities on the show 
haven't been recognized is that no one 
expects to see them in these situations." 
"The people have to be the stars on 
this show," Godfrey commented. "We 
can't be the stars." This was amply 
proved by the sequence in which Garry 
Moore — dressed in little -boy shorts — 
pretended to be a six-year-old who was 
new to a school classroom. The kids 



themselves were definitely the stars. 
Garry simply became their straight 
man. As Godfrey observed, "When 
Garry said he was scared of school, 
that's all those kids needed to hear. 
They accepted him, and they wanted to 
take care of him. It impressed me that 
everyone — men, women, children — 
wants to help, even in what seem like 
ridiculous situations." 

Funt is persuaded that the idea of 
showing people becoming too angry or 
frustrated, as he sometimes did in the 
very early days of his show, is no long- 
er good. He once thought it was fun to 
watch a man fight his way out of some 
predicament. Now he looks for happy, 
more contented types. The only time he 
ever really broke up was when, in those 
long ago days, he sent for a locksmith 
to free a girl he had chained to a desk! 

He explained to the bewildered man 
that the girl always stayed too long 
when she went out to lunch, and this 
was his way of keeping her in until he 
was ready to let her go. "The back of 
the man's neck flushed bright red with 
anger, as he bent down to start sawing 
the chain. I never saw anyone work so 
hard and fast, or get so furious. The 
film later showed me practically hold- 
ing my sides with laughter, but he was 
too angered with me, too eager to break 
those chains, even to notice. I wouldn't 
do a stunt like that now, although it 
made a very funny piece of film." 

When anyone suggests that Candid 
Camera might hold some persons up to 
ridicule, Funt says, "We keep thinking 
about how not to do that. We worry 
about it. We do everything possible to 
avoid it, and I think we succeed. We 
think most people enjoy laughing at 
themselves a little." 

The early Candid Camera employed 
only a small group. There are now 
twenty-two. Executive producer, work- 
ing closely with Funt, is Bob Banner, 
who last year produced The Garry 
Moore Show and whose reputation goes 
back to the fabulous Garroway At 
Large which made TV history as one of 
the most original and imaginative pro- 
grams of the early 1950's. 

Everybody has ideas for this show, 
including the viewers. "The mail is full 
of ideas every day," Godfrey noted. One 
of the most frequent lines is: "I would 
love to see how I look on Candid Cam- 
era." Husbands want to get wives on 
the show, and vice versa. But no one 
gets on who wants to. No one gets on 
who is even thinking about it. That 
would spoil the whole thing. 

Sometimes the cameraman goes out 
on little wordless expeditions and 
comes back with priceless bits. A street 
sign will be put up — Silence, No Talking 
Area. Two little girls tiptoe down the 
street after reading the sign. When they 



come to the one marked Resume Talk- 
ing, they act quite normal again. A wall 
will have two signs affixed to it: Wet 
Paint — and (on the same wall!) Dry 
Paint. People can't resist testing. "I 
think Allen can tell beforehand what 
type of person would touch a finger to 
the Wet or the Dry," Dorothy observed. 

Dorothy doesn't drive. In a gas station 
where she was supposed to have oil and 
water checked — she had been pushed 
down a hilly road by unseen hands, 
with just enough momentum to land 
her safely at the destination — the at- 
tendant asked her to "pull up over 
here." She had to go through the 
motions of starting the car — which, by 
the wa*y, had no engine at all — and 
complain that suddenly the car wouldn't 
start. Three gallant men sprang to the 
aid of the helpless little woman at the 
wheel, pushing the car into the pit 
where it could be given a going-over. 
"But I still had to steer into the narrow 
thing and I don't know much about 
steering. Fortunately, they mistook my 
scared look for concern about the car. 
'Don't worry,' they kept telling me. 
'We'll take care of it.' " 

From past experience, Allen has 
learned that some of the best scenes 
occur after they think they are through. 
"Back in the very early days of the 
show, we used to wind up a sequence 
when we decided it was finished. Now 
we keep going as long as four or five 



minutes — because some of the things 
that come afterward are even funnier 
than those we have wrapped up. 

"There was a kid once who came into 
a pet store to buy some guinea pigs for 
science class at school. It was a real 
cute piece of film, but we cut when we 
told him he was on a show. The best 
part came later, when he walked back 
into the shop and earnestly began all 
over again to look for these guinea pigs, 
just as if nothing had happened. Who 
could have guessed he would come 
right back?" 

A great deal of planning goes into the 
show. The talk is necessarily ad-lib, 
but a plan has to be carefully laid out. 
It can be thrown away if things take 
a different turn. When celebrities come 
on "cold," as it were, a greater amount 
of planning is required. More details 
have to be worked Out ahead of time. 
But, for the regulars, it's done pretty 
much on the wing. 

Much of the conversation calls for 
fast thinking. Dorothy found herself de- 
fending a filling station attendant who 
had put forty -two gallons of gas into 
what was supposed to be the eleven- 
gallon tank of a small car. (An over- 
size tank had been put into the car, 
to. confound the attendant.) "I called 
across the street to Allen, as if he were 
my husband, and told him I was paying 
for forty-two gallons. He pretended it 
was the most ridiculous thing he ever 



heard. I began to insist that the man 
had really put that much gas in — sud- 
denly I thought, Whose side am I sup- 
posed to be on?" 

Funny things sometimes happen even 
after shows have been on the air. But 
touching things happen, too. One of 
the sweetest has grown out of the 
saddest. "Over the ten years we have 
photographed and recorded for this 
program," says Allen Funt, "many 
caught by our candid shots have since 
passed on. Letters have come from 
some pf the families, asking for that 
particular piece of film. There have 
been somewhere between thirty and 
forty such requests, and we try to 
honor them. It's a strict rule of mine 
never to give out film to anybody, un- 
der any other circumstances — but this 
is different. It becomes a precious re- 
membrance for those left behind." 

Funt himself feels that the show's 
basic appeal is self-identification. That 
the viewer relates in basic ways to the 
person involved on the screen. That, 
therefore, the outlandish stunts are .not 
necessarily the most successful. "The 
more genuine the situation, the more 
amusing it is to most viewers." 

And for Godfrey, for everyone con- 
nected with the show, for people even - 
where — whether watching or facing the 
camera — the greatest fun of all has been 
that nothing ever works out quite the 
way it was planned! 



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63 



Art James: New Daytime Host 



(Continued from page 43) 
period of indecision where he "bummed 
around" and had hundreds of jobs. 
He worked as a grocery clerk, soda 
jerk, and on a construction crew. He 
was a cab driver, factory worker, ship- 
ping clerk, credit investigator and 
telephone salesman. 

Does he feel that any of these various 
endeavors helped him to gain the charm 
and poise he has today? "I guess the 
one that really helped me most was the 
telephone-salesman thing. This TV 
station in Detroit had a half-hour show 
called I Believe In America, and they 
wanted the small businessmen for 
sponsors. You were given a stack of 
cards with names and telephone num- 
bers, and everything you were to say 
was written out for you like a script. 
We even had rebuttal sheets. 

"No matter what the guy said, you 
nipped through the pages and it told 
you exactly how to answer him. But 
when I got more expert, developed 
more confidence in myself, I began to 
ad-lib — you know, wing it. It was com- 
parable, in a way, to facing a TV studio 
audience for a warm-up. The objective 
is the same: Win them over!" 

How did Art happen to get Say 
When"! "Through a competitive audi- 
tion at Goodson and Todman," says 
Art. "The show is fun, it takes only 
about two and a half hours of my time 
each day, and that leaves me plenty 
of time to worry and drink." 

"Art!" exclaims Jane. "You forget 
people who don't know you might be- 
lieve that. What have you got to worry 
about?" 

"What have I got to worry about? 
With an accountant in charge of my 
money and me on a measly allowance? 
Nowadays, when I get an extra little 
check in the mail — like maybe twenty- 
five dollars for a slide film or some- 
thing — I just stick it in my pocket and 
don't tell him." Actually, Art believes 
that hiring an accountant was the 



smartest move he ever made. "I al- 
ways have a very great desire to be 
practical but I never quite make it." 

"That's because he's the romantic 
type," says Jane. "He gave me my en- 
gagement ring in our favorite French 
restaurant, a cellar kind of place. We 
were both sobbing — " 

"Oh, come now," says Art. "Speak 
for yourself. If I did cry, it was from 
an impending sense of doom!" 

Blue-eyed, tow-headed Jeffrey 
climbs onto his father's lap and looks 
up at him adoringly. "We have fun, 
don't we, old man?" Art beams at him 
with fatherly pride. "I go out with 
Jeff a lot. We go to the zoo, ride the 
carousel, take a rowboat out on the 
lake in Central Park. He loves pony 
rides, and the theater fascinates him. 
I take him to the kid shows. He loves 
to have the story re-told before he goes 
to bed. 

"Don't get me wrong," Art grins. "I 
love my family, but I'd leave them for 
golf any day. I think nothing of get- 
ting up at five or six a.m. to play over 
in Jersey. I enjoy physical exercise. I 
belong to a health club where I play 
handball and swim. I've always loved 
baseball. I tried out for the Yankees, 
after I finished high school, but I 
failed miserably." 

Along with his love for outdoor ac- 
tivity and the casual life, Art has an- 
other foible: He hates to get dressed. 
He confesses that on Sundays — "unless 
we have friends coming over" — he often 
doesn't dress until dinnertime. He likes 
to relax in khaki pants, T-shirt and 
slippers "three times too large." 

The James family day usually starts 
at seven, when Jeffrey wakes and 
"climbs in with us." Art is up shortly 
after. "I have the show to do, and there 
are always other things like checking 
with my agent, following a lead, an- 
swering fan mail. I like to read when I 
can. At the moment, I've gone off into 
a new area — devising and creating TV 



shows. I would like to be anonymously 
rich, and I'd love one day to do a 
Broadway play. I don't mean as a pro- 
ducer. I'd like to act. 

"I had a taste of it when I did stock 
in Detroit. We ran the gamut from 
'Hay Fever' to 'Macbeth.' That's where 
I met Jane. I innocently took her out 
for a beer and we were married eight 
months later — September, 1956. Today, 
we both study with a director from 
Actor's Studio." To date, Jane has done 
TV almost exclusively, here in New 
York. She finds combining a career 
with marriage difficult, but she wouldn't 
want "one without the other." 

As a child, Art James dreamed of 
show business. He studied piano and 
violin — but only because it was "forced 
on me" by his Russian-born parents, 
Olga and Samuel Efimchik. Art's father, 
a die-maker for the Ford Motor Com- 
pany in Dearborn (where Art was 
born October 15, 1929), loved music 
and wanted advantages for his two 
sons, Artur and Leo. Papa quite ap- 
proves of Leo, a Detroit attorney who 
also uses the name of James — a loose 
translation of Efim, in Russian — but 
he was strongly opposed to the enter- 
tainment medium for Art, although he 
had no objection to the boy's perform- 
ing at social gatherings. 

"When I was a kid," Art recalls, "the 
Russian community in Dearborn was 
very closely knit. We children had a 
Russian tutor once a week. And, every 
week, a big ball was held in one of the 
large halls. There was always a musical 
and dramatic program. I can remem- 
ber — I must have been five or six — 
standing on the stage reciting a poem 
by Pushkin, in Russian, wearing the 
traditional high-collared silk shirt and 
boots. I don't know how I managed it, 
because I was painfully shy and never 
took part in any school activities. 

"On rainy days, I loved to hide in 
the attic and- read adventure stories. 
But I also had a bolder side to my 



64 




Tape for Art's sake: A relaxed session with the James family — Jane, baby Jennifer, son Jeffrey. 



nature, in good weatner, i was always 
outside. We lived in a neighborhood 
that was heaven for active boys. There 
was a creek, railroad tracks, and a 
lumber yard. We built rafts, hopped 
trains, and played all kinds of danger- 
ous games in and around the piles of 
lumber. I remember I used to collect 
stray cats and dogs, and sometimes I 
was allowed to keep one." 

Art attended Fordson High School 
in Dearborn, where he was a straight- 
A student until the tenth grade, when 
he began "skipping school a lot." He 
never again regained his status as an 
honor student. He entered Wayne 
State University in Detroit to study 
aeronautical engineering but devel- 
oped a mental block about mathematics 
and quit. He "started college four 
times" before he was finally graduated, 
in 1952, with a B.A. in business admin- 
istration, minoring in Russian and 
theater. 

"In between," he adds, "there was 
that period with the numerous jobs. 
Come to think of it, I guess the dreari- 
est one of all was the job I had as a 
counter for an oil company. I was as- 
signed to count traffic on a corner 
where they were considering opening 
a new gas station. The first three hours, 
I was very conscientious — but then I 
began to count dogs, bicycles and baby 
carriages." 

It was about the second day that 
a friend passed by the magic corner 
and changed the whole course of Art's 
life. "I knew this guy from the college 
theater. He had just auditioned for an 
announcer's job on WKNX in Saginaw. 
I got a sudden inspiration — why 
shouldn't I try? I did, blustered my 
way through, and got the job. I ended 
up as a deejay playing hillbilly music." 

About a year later, in September, 
1952, Art was called into the armed 
forces. "I was a radio broadcast spe- 
cialist. Did a fifteen-minute recruiting 
show in Missouri. Then I went to 
Frankfort, Germany, as an announcer 
with the armed forces there." Upon 
discharge from the Army, in 1954, Art 
headed back to Saginaw and soon got 
a summer-replacement job as staff 
announcer on WWJ-TV in Detroit. 
From there, he went to WJR Radio as 
staff announcer for three years. 

When Art heard that a TV show 
called Concentration was due to go on 
the air over NBC in New York, he 
made an audition disc and sent it to 
the producers. "They told me to come 
in, so I flew to New York and they had 
me do a warm-up on Tic Tac Dough. 
Luck was with me that day. There was 
a sort of chemistry in the air. My 
stories all went over and I got the 
job as announcer on Concentration. 
Things have been looking up ever 
since." 

With his warmth, charm and ambi- 
tion, it is easy to predict that this is 
only the beginning for Art James. No 
more counting cars on corners — he'll 
be counting them in his own garage. No 
more rowboats on Central Park lake — 
there is a Chris Craft just around the 
corner. After all, what's a few thou- 
sand dollars to a man who will some- 
day be "anonymously rich"? 




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MOVIE : JMMORtALS on TV 







ALL-TIME HERO 





T 
V 

r In new career build-up, just following his service in the U.S. Navy, 
Robert Taylor played role of Lancelot in "Knights of the Round Table." 
66 



As tough detective in his ABC series, 
Robert Taylor last year began on TV. 



by LEON RICE 



Robert Taylor became a movie star 
because he "just happened" to join 
a college acting group. He has now be- 
come a TV star because he "just hap- 
pened" to live across the street from 
Dick Powell. As he explains it, "I 
bought a farm across the road from Dick 
Powell. Has Dick Powell ever given 
you a sales talk? This is a stubborn 
man who knows what he is selling, 
why he's selling it and — what's more — 
why the person he's selling it to should 
buy it. He was sold on TV. I should be 
on TV. I wanted no part of TV. He sold 
me on it. So I'm on TV and loving it." 

Taylor, who is without question one 
of filmdom's greatest stars, now has his 
own TV series on ABC -TV each week. 
Appearing with him, from time to time, 
is his beautiful wife Ursula. She was 
persuaded to come out of retirement to 
play the continuing role of a reporter. 

Taylor is considered to be one of the 
most photogenic males who ever faced 
a camera. Like Elizabeth Taylor on the 
distaff side, it is believed to be impos- 
sible to take a bad picture of him, re- 
gardless of the camera angle. For most 
of his career, he has struggled to prove 
that he was more than a pretty boy and 
that he really could act. 

Robert Taylor was born Spangler 
Arlington Brugh on August 5, 1911, in 
Filley, Nebraska. His father was a doc- 
tor. Spangler Arlington Brugh went to 
Doane College in Crete, Nebraska. 
There he took the pre-medical course 
and also studied the cello. He was un- 
decided as to whether he should be- 
come a musician or follow in the foot- 





Taylor's beautiful wife is actress Ursula Thiess, who married 
him in 1954. This season, she acts sometimes in The Detectives. 



World War II found Taylor in service with the U. S. 
Navy as flying instructor, with rank of First Lieut. 



steps of his father. When his music in- 
structor at Doane "College transferred 
to Pomona College in California, 
Spangler Arlington Brugh followed him 
there. For no reason that actor Robert 
Taylor can now remember, he joined 
the dramatic club and played a variety 
of small roles. In his senior year, he 
played in "Journey's End." Incidentally, 
this is Taylor's only acting experience 
before a live audience. 

After studying acting privately for a 
few months following his graduation in 
1933, Brugh — convinced that he had no 
real talent as an actor — returned to his 
hometown of Filley when his father be- 
came ill. After his father's death, Spang- 
ler Arlington Brugh and his mother re- 
turned to Hollywood in November, 1933. 
He started to study acting again and 
made the studio rounds. Samuel Gold- 
wyn took a free fourteen-day option on 
his services and immediately dropped 
him. A talent scout at MGM believed in 
him, however, and persuaded MGM to 
sign the young actor at a big thirty-five 
dollars a week. His first assignment was 
an almost invisible part in a Will Rogers 
picture called "Handy Andy." After 
several other microscopic parts, he was 
given the second lead in "Society Doc- 
tor," starring Chester Morris. This 
movie released to theaters across the 
country late in 1934. A tidal wave of fan 
mail for the young co-star overwhelmed 
the studio executives. At this point, 
Spangler Arlington Brugh died and 
Robert Taylor was born. 

A few pictures later, in 1935, while on 
loan-out to Universal, Robert Taylor 



proved he was not a one-part freak. He 
played opposite Irene Dunne in "The 
Magnificent Obsession." Mail arrived in 
truckloads. Exhibitors begged for more. 
But it was not until 1936, opposite Greta 
Garbo in "Camille," that he really hit 
his peak as a matinee idol of the screen. 
He was twenty-five years old, and he 
was considered one of Hollywood's great 
permanent stars. 

In 1937, Taylor was Barbara Stan- 
wyck's co-star in two pictures. Their 
friendship grew into romance and they 
were married on May 14, 1939, soon 
after Miss Stanwyck's divorce from 
Frank Fay. They were divorced Feb- 
ruary 21, 1951. 

During the late '30s, Taylor was 
selected as one of the ten top box-office 
attractions — runner-up to Clark Gable 
as King of Hollywood. 

Taylor voluntarily left his movie-star 
career to serve in World War II and, at 
war's end, was discharged as a full 
lieutenant in the U. S. Navy. After the 
war, his career took a whole new turn. 
He began to play parts with more char- 
acter, which made greater demands on 
his abilities as a creative actor. Taylor 
appeared in "Quo Vadis" and then he 
made "Ivanhoe." These were followed 
by the role of Lancelot in "Knights of 
the Round Table" and the lead in 
"Quentin Durward." Later came pic- 
tures such as "Tip on a Dead Jockey" 
and "The Killers of Kilimanjaro." These 
parts are a far cry from the roles that 
got Taylor nicknamed "The Heartthrob 
of a Nation." 

During the actor's twenty-five years 



with MGM, he was the workhorse of 
the studio. He made over fifty movies. 
and co-starred with Irene Dunne, Janet 
Gaynor, Garbo, Vivien Leigh, Barbara 
Stanwyck, Joan Crawford and Kath- 
arine Hepburn. 

In 1954, Robert Taylor married 
Ursula Thiess, a German-born actress 
who had two small children by a pre- 
vious marriage. They now have two 
children of their own — Terence and 
Tessa. 

In the twenty-seven years that Rob- 
ert Taylor has worked before the 
cameras, he has grown up and devel- 
oped. He has matured. He has developed 
his techniques as an actor. Now no 
longer just a "pretty boy," even his ap- 
pearance has changed. He is handsome 
and playing two-fisted, rugged roles. He 
strives constantly to increase and im- 
prove his ability. 

Television audiences can judge how 
well he has succeeded by watching the 
MGM movies now being shown. These 
include his magnificent portrayal of 
Armand Duval opposite Garbo in "Ca- 
mille." His latest roles have been widely 
diversified — romantic costume parts, 
dashing adventuresome roles, and real- 
istic character studies. Robert Taylor 
proves the depths of his matured ability 
by playing each one with the skill and 
ease of a master craftsman. He hates 
being half-good at anything. From this 
facet of his personality and realistic ap- 
proach to life comes promise of in- 
creasingly finer performances on tele- 
vision in his current series, The Detec- 
tives, as well as on the screen. 



67 



The cynics said it 
wouldn't last, but . . . 

"Our Marriage 
Is Different" 

So say Janet Leigh and Tony 
Curtis, one of Hollywood's most 
happily married couples. Be sure 
to read how they manage both 
stardom and marriage success- 
fully in the exciting new issue of 
TRUE STORY Magazine. 




etJturr ron ncw 

MOTHU Ml) MBV 



T 
V 

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68 



More Than 30 Prize Stories, 
Helpful Articles, and Family- 
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Is the two-job husband a threat 
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WHY I LEFT 

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(Continued from page 19) 
Audrey — herself a petite brunette — 
was the first to notice what the blonde 
was up to. "She upstaged you in the 
crib scene," Audrey taunted him. "Oh, 
I don't know about that," John began, 
defending his actor's ego. Then he 
laughed. "I just thought people might 
prefer looking into that lovely little 
face for a minute, instead of mine. I 
let her get away with it." 

The lovely little face belongs to Vic- 
toria Larkin, two years old this Janu- 
ary 14. Daughter of Audrey and John, 
she has been playing Mike Karr's 
daughter, Laurie Ann. And who could 
have a better right to get into the act 
— and sometimes even steal it? 

There's an axiom in show business 
that you've got it made if you happen 
to be in the right place at the right 
time. Vicki was. It happened one day 
last summer, when Audrey brought her 
to the studio to pick up John. One of 
the cameramen took some shots of the 
little girl as she stared into cameras 
and poked her fingers into props. The 
soft, pale hair, darkly lashed large blue 
eyes, peaches-and-cream complexion, 
registered sensationally. She looks like 
her daddy, she responds to him always 
with adoration. What more could a 
casting director want? From that time 
on, Laurie Ann Karr began to appear 
on the show in the enchanting image of 
Victoria Larkin. 

It hasn't gone to Vicki's pretty head 
that her name appears prominently on 
the list of credits headed by her fa- 
ther's. Fame is an ephemeral thing. 
It's those lights and the big cameras 
and those fascinating microphones 
which are tangible and concrete. A girl 
can grab at them and maybe hold on 
to them for a while. Besides, her home 
audience of one — namely, a black 
French poodle called "Scarlet" — is 
every bit as satisfying to her as all the 
people "out there" she hears everyone 
talk about on the set. 

Home is an attractive Swiss -chalet 
type of house, on a quiet street in a 
quiet Long Island village, where Vicki 
has her own turquoise and pale yellow 
room. "Just a nice, little girl's room," 
Audrey says. "I happen to think it's a 
magnificent room," John adds, "prob- 
ably because I decorated it." 

"It really is," Audrey concedes. 
"John has impeccable taste. But I mean 
that a room for such a small girl 
shouldn't rate too much attention. It's 
the way we feel about Vicki's fling at 
acting. The minute we see her re- 
acting too much, out of TV she goes. 
Now she doesn't realize that anything 
is being done especially for her. She 
goes to the other actors without making 
any fuss. She's happy and well ad- 
justed. But if she gets too aware of 



what's going on and of being the center 
of attention, she's out — at least until 
she's older." 

John's and Audrey's bedroom is 
coral and brown. John's daughter by 
an earlier marriage, Kathleen, lives 
with them and has a "pink and ruffly 
room, the kind every young girl should 
have." Kate, a tall, blue-eyed, blonde 
beauty, is away now at junior college, 
has switched from acting ambitions to 
political science and government. 
Sharon, John's middle daughter, by his 
marriage to actress Teri Keane, lives 
with her mother but comes to visit. 
She is almost ten, has chestnut-tinged 
hair, lovely hazel eyes, is tall for her 
age, talented, and has a strong drive 
toward the theater. 

The living and dining rooms are in 
warm autumnal shades, orange and 
beige, gold and brown. The blue-and- 
beige kitchen is big and bright, the 
combination den and guest room cozy 
and inviting. Much of the furnishing 
is Danish contemporary. An old-fash- 
ioned rocker is one that Audrey scoured 
antique shops to find before their mar- 
riage, the minute she learned that John 
had wanted such a chair for years. 

Their house is built on a high rise 
of ground, with triple terraces flaunting 
multi-colored azaleas in the spring. 
This year, they hope to do more land- 
scaping, but it's a busy household in 
which a dozen things are always wait- 
ing to be done. 

Audrey was an actress and singer 
before her marriage, did off-Broadway 
leads, some radio and TV, but is now 
devoted to Vicki's care. She has a big, 
Merman-like voice and continues with 
a voice coach, hoping some day to use 
it in a musical. Right now, she's chief 
cook and bottle washer. John used to 
fancy himself as quite a chef, but has 
retired in favor of his wife. "I've 
learned everything but Chinese cook- 
ing," she says. "We both love it, and 
if I knew how, my husband would 
never have a reason for taking me out 
to dinner." 

For a man who knows good food and 
likes to eat well, John keeps his six- 
foot frame remarkably lean and fit. He 
works out regularly in his basement 
gym, but he's not the type to put on 
weight easily. For one thing, he's too 
active, and too restless. When he talks, 
when he feels strongly on any subject, 
he's on his feet and striding around the 
room. "We own fifty-two acres in New 
Hampshire now, with nothing but trees 
on it — but it gives a man space to move 
about in. We're going to put a house 
on it one day." 

"I started this whole New Hampshire 
idea," Audrey laments, "and some- 
times I'm sorry I ever thought of it. 
I prefer city living, but John just has 




to get away from the city, from time 
to time. So it's really a good thing." 

In the role of Mike Karr, Larkin 
plays the strong, lean-on-me kind of 
guy his wife says he really is. A man 
with softness and sentiment under the 
strength and determination. Audrey 
says, "I cling to the belief that the man 
should be the dominant one in a mar- 
riage. The other way may be progress, 
but I never liked a man I could push 
around. I remain an individual. The 
children are very definite individuals. 
But John is the head of his house, and 
we all know it. We like it that way." 

He's a generous man — with his time, 
with his interest. His answer to prob- 
lems is What can we do to help? "I 
sometimes think my husband would 
like to pick up the whole world and 
soothe its hurts," Audrey observes. "To 
get up and shout for all the things in 
which he believes. In spite of the soft- 
heartedness he tries to hide, his ap- 
proach to life is much more realistic 
than mine, sometimes even a little pes- 
simistic. His humor is more subtle and 

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quiet than mine. But I think I am one 
of the few people who can make John 
Larkin laugh heartily, no matter what 
he has on his mind." 

There was a night last fall, however, 
when even Audrey's clowning failed 
to elicit any big laughs. John's fan club 
— huge, adoring, enthusiastic — had been 
asking him to tell them his most em- 
barrassing moment, to put in their club 
paper. He told them he didn't have 
any really embarrassing moments to 
make a good story. 

"I have now," he could say later. 
"I had lunch on a Friday with my 
agent, Arthur Hanna, and Don Wallace, 
executive producer of The Edge Of 
Night. Something came up in the con- 
versation which made them pay me the 
compliment that, in twenty years on 
radio and TV, I had never gone up 
in my lines, never goofed. So that very 
afternoon, I goofed — and how!" 

It happened this way: The cast often 
ad-lib during rehearsals, with silly 
"asides" that are not in the script. 
It relieves the tension of long rehears- 
ing but, when air time comes, every- 
thing changes to strictly business. For 
some reason, on this day, John got 
confused about the clock. He thought 
the air show was still dress rehearsal. 
So, feeling exuberant, he made a crazy 
kind of entrance, struck a pose, ran 
through his first lines. 

John was saying, "Well, Bill, that's 



obvious." It seemed a fine time to add 
a little something of his own. He looked 
straight into the camera — which he 
thought was strictly for rehearsal — and 
added, "And so am I obvious, fans out 
there in television land." Instead of 
laughs from the cast and crew, he was 
greeted with stony silence. Everyone 
was petrified. "So was I, when I 
realized we were on," he groans. But 
to show that "King John" can do no 
wrong, the only mail about it came 
from viewers more amused than upset 
by this departure from the expected. 

In the Larkins' home neighborhood, 
there may be some flurry of excite- 
ment at his comings and goings, but 
mostly he's just another householder 
and family man like all the others. At 
a Broadway Sunday-night Actors' 
Benefit performance which he attended 
with Audrey, that super-sophisticated 
audience fairly mobbed him after the 
show. On the street, workers yell to 
him from construction jobs. "We see 
you when we get off the job. Great 
show." Taxi drivers wave, truck drivers 
slow down to talk. 

On Park Avenue, one recent day, a 
long gray car drew up next to the curb. 
In it sat a little gray-haired matriarch, 
all dressed in gray. John saw her 
signal the chauffeur to stop, press the 
button to lower the window. "I've been 
trailing you for blocks," she said to the 
astonished Larkin. "I just want to tell 
my family tonight I saw John Larkin 
and talked to him." She waved a dis- 
creet goodby, the car sped off, leaving 
John standing with his mouth still 
open. "She was so pretty and cute," 
he told Audrey. "I just loved her." 

When John and Walter Greaza (who 
is Winston Grimsley on the show) 
were at the Yankee Stadium in New 
York during the recent World Series 
games — John being the most rabid of 
all the rabid Yankee fans — they were 
surrounded by a crowd at least ninety 
percent masculine. In department 
stores, he has been known to need 
twenty minutes to get from one floor to 
another. Folks just want to tell him 
they see the show and like it. Some- 
times they tell him what Mike should 
do — or shouldn't. "Rather pertinent 
advice, at times," he says. "But, mostly, 
they just want to say they like us. 

"Karr is the kind of man an audience 
doesn't tire of. He was never a cipher 
to begin with, and he has grown in 
dynamism and strength. He is all-male, 
virile and vigorous. You feel, when he 
walks in, that this is a man in charge 
of his own affairs, able to make his 
own decisions. Master in his house." 

That's Mike Karr. That's also John 
Larkin. But there's a certain little 
blonde named Victoria who can reduce 
him to a slave. Even upstage him, any 
time she tries. 

Boss in his own domain, is he? Well, 
most of the time! 




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T 
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69 



"What Teenagers Have Taught Me" 



(Continued from page 44) 
life has problems to be worked out. 
Teenagers are solving theirs every day, 
sometimes much better than the 
grownups do. Teen-age problems are 
apt to reflect adult problems." 

As the father of three children, Bud 
Collyer has always maintained a close 
companionship with them. Patricia and 
Cynthia are now out of their teens and 
Michael has just turned nineteen. As 
a Sunday School teacher of fourteen 
years' standing, with a class which runs 
to some eighty-five students ranging 
from middle to late teens, he has had a 
long indoctrination into what makes 
teenagers tick. He is grateful for it. "I 
never close a Sunday School year with- 
out thanking my students for what they 
have taught me." 

Because his ideas are based on ex- 
perience, are understanding and go 
straight to the point, we asked Bud 
some pointed questions and got his an- 
swers: 

Are teenagers justified in believing 
that parents tend to be old-fashioned in 
their ideas? 

"I believe that most parents do a good 
job of keeping up with the times. They 
make allowances for the fact that things 
have changed since they grew up. By 
and large, the rules they lay down are 
fair. Kids should remember there is a 
natural inclination for parents to be 
concerned about a child, and this some- 
times makes them seem out of date." 

At what age should boys and girls be- 
gin to date? 

"This is entirely an individual ques- 
tion, for their parents to decide. Cer- 
tainly not before the age of fourteen, or 
perhaps fifteen. But this, too, depends 
on the maturity of the girl or boy in- 
volved. Even then, certain definite lim- 
its should be set for an evening date — 
going to the movies, a school or club or 



church dance or entertainment, a party. 
Parents should work out the rules in 
advance, and teens should adhere to 
them. One of the greatest honors you 
can pay teenagers is to let them know 
they are trusted." 

What about going steady? 

"Try to avoid going steady too early; 
get to meet as many as possible of the 
opposite sex first. When dating finally 
involves one boy, or one girl, parents 
should be careful about such statements 
as 'What can you see in him — or her?' 
Or upon insisting that 'You're not right 
for each other.' This is difficult to know, 
and even the most loving parent should 
beware of playing God." 

Then why should teenagers believe it 
when parents say they don't know what 
love really is? 

"Probably because it's true! Most 
young people haven't lived long enough 
to realize that love — and this means 
love of any kind, not just between a boy 
and girl — is an enduring relationship. 
It's much more than romantic attrac- 
tion, much more than dating or going 
steady. The teen years, and those just 
beyond, are the time to meet many 
people, to get to know them, to evalu- 
ate qualities and personalities, and to 
choose among them the one with whom 
you want to spend your life. There is 
no fast step to becoming an adult. You 
will be grown up a long time. Why be 
in such a hurry?" 

Should teenagers have cars? 

"If there is a way to avoid giving 
high-school and first-year college stu- 
dents their own cars, I'm all for avoid- 
ing it. Responsible kids can drive the 
family car — but with the understand- 
ing that it belongs to the parents, and 
the child is responsible to them for its 
use. Traffic laws should be absolutely 
obeyed. I have a friend who gave each 
of his sons a car upon graduation. In 



Watch TRUE STORY 

on your NBC-affiliated television station on Saturdays 

See your local paper for time and station. Exciting 
stories of actual events and people, straight from the 
files of TRUE STORY Magazine— narrated by Kathi 
Norris. 

And don't miss "OUR MARRIAGE IS DEFER- 
ENT," the story of Janet Leigh and Tony 
Curtis and a love that should have failed ... 




Kathi Norris 



T 
V 
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70 



"^ TRUE STORY M ^« 

The Woman's Guide to Retter Living 
Bay Your Copy Today Wherever Magazines Are Sold 



theory, I wasn't sure I entirely ap- 
proved, but I admired the wisdom with 
which he handled his gifts. Each boy 
was warned that the first traffic ticket, 
even for illegal parking, meant sacri- 
ficing the use of the car for two months. 
Two tickets meant the loss of the car 
altogether. The boys never broke the 
rules, justifying his trust in them." 

Do young people respect a certain 
amount of discipline and guidance? 

"Not only do they respect it, they 
want it — and respond, when it is rightly 
given. The channels of communication 
between parents and children should 
always be kept open. There is nothing 
our kids can't come to us about. Even 
more important, they have always 
known this. Parents should be good 
listeners. Teens want a place where 
they can find understanding. Brush 
children aside once too often, and they 
turn elsewhere. Teens also should be 
tolerant. Parents have feelings, too — 
their experience merely makes it easier 
for them to hide their hurts." 

Should teenagers have to earn their 
own spending money? 

"This is an individual problem for 
parents and children to work out to- 
gether. Generally speaking, it's an ex- 
cellent thing to earn at least part of 
what you get. No young person, who 
starts out doing that, will later look 
upon work as a burden. It drives home 
the lesson that earning money is a 
means to an end, not an end in itself." 

Is competition good for teenagers? 

"A certain amount, in scholarship and 
in sports. But too competitive a spirit 
may be a strain on a growing boy or 
girl. Sometimes the parents push too 
hard. Sometimes the kids themselves 
push too hard. Almost everyone has far 
more potential than is used, but each 
should try to learn his own capabilities 
and go at his own speed. If young peo- 
ple do particularly well in anything, 
especially their school work, an attempt 
should be made to reward them. Take 
them to the theater, or let them go to 
something special, even on a school 
night — on the theory that good students 
can afford a night out occasionally. We 
found that this worked beautifully. It's 
good to be tops in something, but not 
really necessary. And certainly not in 
everything. The great thrill is in the 
achievement itself, and no one can 
learn that too early." 

Does a belief in religion — no matter 
what denomination — help teenagers 
meet their problems? 

"This is the question I have been 
waiting to answer. Because, to me, true 
religion is the greatest help anyone can 
have. Not mere religious ritual which 
has become a habit, but a living faith in 
the power of a Supreme Being and in 
what that power can do. At our house, 



_ 



we have always talked to God — our way 
of praying. The children have seen and 
heard us, and have done this them- 
selves, from earliest childhood. It comes 
so naturally to us all that there is no 
embarrassment about it, and "no prob- 
lem has been too big or too small to be 
approached in this way. I have tried to 
impress this on my students. I tell them 
that when they are confused or trou- 
bled, God should not be the court of 
last resort, but the first." 

Could you sum up some of the im- 
portant things for teens — and their par- 
ents — to remember? 

"It would be presumptuous for me to 
speak as an authority — except as a 
father who thinks of his three children 
as his three best friends, and as a Sun- 
day School teacher who enjoys every 



minute of his class. I have simply told 
you the things that worked out well 
for us. Even when parents have been 
justifiably angered, I believe they 
should maintain the resiliency of for- 
giveness. They should remember how 
angry they got sometimes, when they 
were young, and how quickly they 
could forgive and forget. I believe 
young people should try just as hard to 
be understanding, and forgiving. 

"The greatest help the parents can 
give — and the greatest help the teen- 
agers can give themselves — is to accept 
each new phase of development. The 
teen years are wonderful," Bud Collyer 
sums up, "when both remember that 
every period in life has its own particu- 
lar problems, but that all problems can 
be overcome — with God's help." 



Love Walked In 



(Continued from page 20) 
marry him. . . ." Now Abby twinkles, 
"When I was walking down the aisle 
at my wedding, I winked at Daddy and 
said, 'Aren't you glad I've got brains?' " 

Jack's courtship of Abby got off to 
a halting start. He had become friendly 
with the Wasdens when his best friend, 
Ronald Heck, was in process of marry- 
ing Abby's sister, Shirley. Between the 
usher and the sister of the bride had 
flared a rather vague attraction, but 
neither had done anything to en- 
courage its growth. Soon after Shirley's 
and Ronald's wedding, Abby left for 
New York, where she became a model. 
It wasn't long before both she and 
Jack were married — none too happily 
— to two different people. 

"My first was a musician. I was a 
romantic teenager," Abby explains, 
"and I had high hopes of finding some 
bridge between our opposing tempera- 
ments. Maybe he thought the same. 
It just didn't work." 

Daughter of a one-time boxer, and 
member of an athletic family, Abby 
excels in many sports. These include 
riding, baseball, water-skiing, the 
Trampoline and skiing. It was the lat- 
ter interest which, after her divorce, 
finally brought Jack once more into 
her orbit. By then, he, too, was in 
process of ending his marriage. 

From time to time, Abby had run 
into Jack on skiing trips to Mammoth 
Mountain in the Sierras, some 280 miles 
from Los Angeles. About a year ago, 
she and a girl friend, actress Connie 
Hines, went up to the ski lodge for a 
weekend. Disillusioned and lonely after 
the failure of her young dream of love 
and marriage, Abby said little. Finally, 
Connie patted her hand and said, "Ab- 
by, it's time you let go of the past and 
began to pick up the threads of your 
life. Maybe this will be a lucky week- 
end and you'll meet someone nice." 



To Connie's surprise, Abby merely 
shrugged. "There's only one man I'd 
like to know better. He's on the ski 
patrol at Mammoth and does come 
up here often. But, with my luck, this 
won't be the time. . . ." 

That evening, she was proven wrong. 
"Whenever I tell people how romantic 
this reunion with Jack was, they laugh 
and say, 'You have to be kidding.' Con- 
nie and I walked into the social room 
and the jukebox happened to be play- 
ing 'Some Enchanted Evening.' I looked 
across the room — and there stood the 
man I was hoping to see again. He 
rushed across the floor to me. It was 
a wish come true." 

If Abby's name has seldom appeared 
in the gossip columns, it's because she 
rarely makes the round of night clubs. 
Deeply attached to her parents, sister 
Shirley and brother Raymond, she 
most enjoys a holiday at Lake Arrow- 
head, where the family can loaf and 
run the gamut of sporting skills to- 
gether. 

Jack is now one of them. "Any 
Thanksgiving, Christmas or birthday, 
you'll find us all there," he smiles. "Es- 
pecially birthdays — more especially, 
Marlene's. There's a good reason: She 
doesn't let anyone forget her birthday 
is coming up, and spends weeks re- 
minding you!" 

To this, Abby tosses her head. "It's 
not the presents — it's just that I like 
seeing the family together, and a birth- 
day is a good excuse for a get- 
together." 

Abby's mother enjoys the outdoors 
and watching her athletic brood in ac- 
tion, but is the least sports-skilled 
among them. "Mother knows what she 
can and cannot do well," says Abby 
thoughtfully. "Lately, I've come around 
to the idea that the important thing 
for a wife is to encourage her family in 
what they love to do and to share an 





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71 



interest in these things. But it is not 
important, at all, for her to imitate 
them. She must develop her own in- 
terests, and her family ought to return 
interest for interest by encouraging 
her." 

This sage piece of thought probably 
relates to a near-tragic attempt of Mrs. 
Wasden to go in for water-skiing. Be- 
cause it is a favorite sport of her family, 
she decided to test her own ability — but 
fell into the water, narrowly avoiding 
injury and possible drowning. Mrs. 
Wasden still accompanies her family 
to the outings, but limits participation 
to whipping up delicious picnic meals 
for her bustling, wave-and-wind- 
weary bunch. 

Abby's prowess at all sorts of ath- 
letics has often backfired. "I'm afraid 
I've lost a lot of beaus that way," she 
sighs. "You know, when I was modeling 
in New York, I spent weekends on 
Long Island with friends. One day, a 
group of us were playing ball. Sudden- 
ly, I hit the plastic ball about a hun- 
dred feet over their heads into the 
ocean. A few minutes later, I was 
alone on the beach, doing pushups — 
while the other girls, lolling prettily 
in their sun suits, had all the lads 
bumbling around them! 

"The wonderful thing about Jack is 
that I don't have to pretend to be a 
helpless lily around him," she beams. 
"He can lick me at most things — and, 
when he can't, he takes it in good sorts. 
Neither of us tries to be what we 



aren't, and we're always comfortable 
with each other. I guess that's a sign 
of maturity." 

This lack of pretense was evident in 
the way he proposed and she accepted. 
They were at Mammoth and had been 
asked to a party. Neither wanted to go, 
that evening, but they had promised 
the hostess. Finally, Abby said she 
really thought they should go. Jack 
grinned at her and offered a deal. 
"Marry me and I'll take you." With a 
simplicity and quiet tenderness that 
matched his own, Abby said, "I will . . . 
so let's go." But they had to wait until 
Abby could wangle a holiday from her 
Nurse Martha Hale role before setting 
the wedding date. 

At Christmas, when the Hennesey 
series took a rest, seemed the logical 
time. Jack's father, the Rev. George 
"Burt" Smith (now retired), performed 
the ceremony. Then the family, in-laws 
and all, made the trek to Lake Arrow- 
head for a celebration . . . after which, 
the happy pair left for — where else? — 
Mammoth, for their honeymoon. 

The wedding reception, it should be 
noted, took place in the San Fernando 
Valley home the Smiths now occupy. 
It is a modern place, with two bed- 
rooms upstairs and an enormous room 
downstairs which is not in use as yet 
but will eventually be divided into a 
family room and nursery. The house 
is done entirely in fight beige on the 
inside, while the outside is a combina- 
tion of white and charcoal gray. 



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Newlyweds: Abby Dalton married Jack Smith at Christmastime, I960. 



"Being a new bride," says Abby, 
"I was worried about mishaps at the 
reception, but no damage was done. 
Coffee was served in the den and 
champagne on the terrace. Since the 
furniture -wasn't delivered until after 
our honeymoon, we had plenty of 
room for our friends." 

Because she couldn't have all her 
close chums serve as bridesmaids, 
Abby initiated a new custom of twelve 
"almost-bridesmaids," whose job was 
to serve at the reception. Her sister 
Shirley was matron of honor, and 
Ronald Heck returned Jack's favor by 
serving as usher. 

The house itself was "another case 
of romantic luck," says Abby. "Jack 
and I spent weeks looking for a place 
and, finally, we found almost what we 
wanted. The real-estate woman told us 
about a house with a spiral staircase 
nearby. It sounded good, and we de- 
cided to look at it with the thought 
of 'borrowing some ideas' for the place 
we'd almost settled on. We knew we 
couldn't buy it, because the price was 
out of our budget. But, when we got 
there, we found it closed and were 
terribly disappointed. 

"Suddenly, the real-estate woman 
said, 'Wait, there's the builder on his 
way up to another house. This is a 
dead-end street, so we'll stop him when 
he comes down.' We did. And it turned 
out that the contractor-builder was ro- 
mantic by nature and he took an inter- 
est in us right away. When he found 
out we were going to be married and 
had fallen in love with his house, he 
sold it to us at less than the asking 
price! I guess he saw how much we 
wanted it and, being a man who loved 
his creations, he wanted someone liv- 
ing in the place who felt about it as 
he did." 

Abby plans on working until chil- 
dren come along. "I love show business, 
and it's a wonderful, rewarding way 
of making a living. But it's not my 
life. That is deeply involved in my 
family — or I should say, 'families' . . . 
because, actually, I have three now 
. . . my own, Jack's, and the one we 
hope to raise together as man and 
wife." 

But fans who have seen Abby's ex- 
ploits in such shows as Rawhide, The 
Rifleman, Have Gun — Will Travel, and 
now weekly on Hennesey, will find it 
hard to believe that the agile, gamin- 
like Abby will ever quit acting. They 
say so in thousands of letters every 
month. As for hubby Jack, his com- 
ment is: "Being in the electrical busi- 
ness, I have a particular interest in 
lighting — lighting of all types. And the 
lighting that appeals to me most is the 
kind my wife gives off when she's 
emoting on that little magic screen. 
Here's one of her fans who wants noth- 
ing so much as her happiness . . . but 
I'm not pushing for her retirement." 



The Star Who Grew 



(Continued from page 37) 
lad, and, simply because the boy was 
so handsome, asked if he would like 
to cut a record. Fabian's oft-quoted 
reply was: "Me? I just flunked 
Chorus." 

Bob's answer was: "We'll teach you 
to sing." 

What is now acknowledged to be one 
of the most brilliant promotion cam- 
paigns, in recording history, drew 
some shafts of ridicule at the time. 
Bob introduced him as "The Fabulous 
Fabian, protege of Chancellor's teen- 
age idol, Frankie Avalon." 

A financial measure of that venture 
was revealed last November, when an 
accounting in Orphans Court showed 
Fabian's 1959 income to be $136,926. 
(Don't let that "Orphans Court" puzzle 
you. Fabian has a full set of compe- 
tent, solvent, intelligent and loving 
parents, Domenic and Josephine Forte. 
However, as an under-age performer, 
he is under the jurisdiction of this 
court and protected by it.) 

Salary from films, singing dates and 
personal appearances amounted to 
$62,236. Record royalties were $74,690. 
His expenditures: Taxes, $33,594; ex- 
penses, $28,702; managerial commis- 
sions and fees, $38,702. (His neighbor, 
John J. Palmieri, a physical education 
instructor, accepted a guardian's fee of 
1% percent — $1,828 — although five per- 
cent is the normal fee.) 

Marcucci predicts that Fabian's 1960 
accounting will show his income dou- 
bled. And the year 1961 will show 
higher motion-picture earnings — 20th 
Century-Fox has given him a new 
five-year contract. 

How has this untrained boy accom- 
plished this? The answer lies in the 
character of Fabian himself. One rea- 
son that Marcucci and DeAngelis have 
been able to coach Fabian into star- 
dom is that he is highly intelligent and 
anxious to learn. Further, he retains 
the spirit of the athlete he once wanted 
to be. In contrast to the "born" enter- 
tainer — who says, in effect, "Look at 
me. I have to shine" — Fabian's atti- 
tude is more that of "If you let me 
carry the ball, I'll try to score for all 
of us." 

Sensing this, people identify with 
him and feel they share his role. It is 
an appeal not unlike that of the late 
Clark Gable. Gable never claimed to 
be the world's best actor, but certainly 
became one of its most beloved ones. 
Fabian, too, says, "I want to be a good 
actor." 

In Chancellor's New York office, 
prior to his Paramount autograph 
party, Fabian told this reporter of his 
ambitions. "I'm studying. Not just sing- 
ing and acting. As soon as I finish 



trigonometry and English, I'll be ready 
to graduate with my class. I hope to be 
able to be in Philadelphia for the prom 
and other graduation-week events. 
Then I'll work on college credits. I 
want to major in business manage- 
ment." 

He's modestly pleased that his earn- 
ings eased two family crises. Soon after 
his father's heart attack, his brother, 
Bobby, developed curvature of the 
spine. Fabian says, "I'm glad it gave 
them a better chance to get well. 
They're both fine, now." 

Proud as he is of a new house near 
Haddonfield, New Jersey, he's still fond 
of the Philadelphia one. "That was a 
nice house, too, but it did get a little 
crowded. And it's great to have a swim- 
ming pool." The pool is also great for 
his friends. Last summer, Fabian in- 
vited so many of the old gang that, on 
some days, the family couldn't get 
into it. 

Reared in a loving family, Fabian's 
flow of affection makes him unusually 
considerate of his fans. During his At- 
lantic City engagement, he saw a frail 
young girl peering in his dressing- 
room window. Rain drenched her hair; 
tears drenched her eyes. Fabian yelled, 
"Bob, do something," and Marcucci 
brought the girl in. Fabian towelled her 
hair; Bob brought her coffee. She 
stayed for three shows. 

On tour, Fabian carries along a list 
of fan-club presidents and calls them. 
It's not always a successful gesture. 
He says, "Sometimes they think they're 
being kidded. I talked to one girl 
twenty minutes. I even sang for her. 
But she still wouldn't believe it was 
me. 

He likes high-school press confer- 
ences. "The reporters are kids my own 
age. Sometimes I ask more questions 
than they do. In Little Rock, I told 
them, 'I'll bet I've read more about 
you than you have about me,' and we 
sure had a session." 

He's always eager to learn. Recently, 
a friend found him reading Homer's 
"Iliad." Said Fabian. "I sure dig this. 
Those old boys got around. There's 
more action than a Western!" On tour, 
he tries to explore the cities he visits. 
"I want to see more than backstage 
and a hotel room. They all look alike. 
I have to find out about the rest of 
the country." 

At eighteen, Fabian already is a 
star with a fabulous past. He promises 
to have an even more fabulous future. 



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73 



The Unbeatable Beatnik 



(Continued from page 33) 
and held on. Since most of the players 
weighed about twenty-five pounds 
more than I, if I'd hit them high up, 
they'd have gone through. I never 
played in a real game. But, because I 
tackled everything, they kept me on 
the team." Though Bob made light of 
his athletic abilities, Maggie learned 
that he'd won several medals for swim- 
ming. He is modest and unassuming, 
and enjoys laughing at himself. 

He told how the Denvers had lived 
in Texas for a year and then moved to 
California. "I went to Loyola Uni- 
versity, planning to study law," he said. 
"The speech classes were my Water- 
loo. Whenever I got up to deliver a 
speech, my mouth seemed full of 
marshmallows. " 

It was rather surprising that Father 
Joseph S. Brusher, moderator of the 
dramatic club, kept urging him to take 
part in the university plays. Maybe he 
realized that Bob was just suffering 
from stage fright. First, Bob agreed 
to stage-manage a play; then Father 
Brusher talked him into playing some 
roles. 

It was while Bob was playing the 
lead in "Harvey" that Ben Bard, then 
head of talent at 20th Century -Fox, 
saw him in the play and liked his per- 
formance. "My sister Helen, his secre- 
tary, conned him into going to see 
it," Bob explained to Maggie. 

After graduation from Loyola, he 
wanted to get into television, or on the 
stage or into pictures. He'd lost interest 
in law. But all he could land was a 
ten-line bit in a TV drama. So, when 
his father died, he decided he'd better 
give up his dream of acting. "The 



mortgage on our house in the Pacific 
Palisades had to be paid. Since I was 
living there, it was only fair that I 
pitch in." 

Bob became an athletic director and 
part-time schoolteacher at the Corpus 
Christi School in the Pacific Palisades, 
and took courses that would lead to a 
master of arts degree. Meanwhile, to 
earn extra money, he worked at the 
post office. 

One evening, about five, his phone 
rang. It was his sister — calling for her 
boss, Ben Bard. Would he come to the 
studio right away and see Herbert 
Swope, Jr., the producer, about a 
comedy role in Dobie Gillis? 

Bob looked at the clock in surprise. 
He'd fallen asleep, because of exhaus- 
tion, and had failed to get up in time 
for his job at the post office — his diffi- 
cult schedule had finally worn him 
out. He hesitated. If he rushed, he could 
still get to the post office and earn a 
few dollars. 

"This may be your big chance," said 
his sister. So he reported. But, when 
Mr. Swope saw him, he looked disap- 
pointed. "This role is for a boy of 
eighteen," he said. "How old are you?" 

"Twenty-three," admitted Bob. 

"You look every day of it," said Mr. 
Swope. But he agreed to give him a 
chance, after Bob told him that he 
usually looked younger, when he was 
less exhausted. After a good night's 
rest, Bob came to the studio the next 
day. Someone pasted a beard on him, 
gave him some lines to learn, and 
then tested him. 

About a month later, Max Shulman 
phoned to tell him he'd won the role, 
and might as well begin to grow a real 



74 




Today, Bob and Maggie know where they're going. Happiness ahead! 



beard. And so Bob became Maynard, 
the beatnik, on TV. 

Off TV, Maggie told herself, he was 
Bob, the unbeatable. They found that 
they had a lot of mutual tastes. They 
both liked jazz and picnics and serious 
non-fiction books. In spite of the fact 
that Bob had to drive to the Pacific 
Palisades each night to get ready for 
his dates, then drive to her house in 
Hollywood, take her out, drive her 
home again, and go back to his home, 
they were dizzy with love. Bob was 
also dizzy with fatigue. 

Suddenly, one day, it hit him that he 
couldn't keep seeing Maggie every eve- 
ning without committing himself to 
marriage. But was he ready for matri- 
mony? Love had happened so sudden- 
ly, he hadn't had time to think. He'd 
have to quit seeing her, in order to 
think logically. 

Manlike, he picked the worst pos- 
sible time — two days before Christmas 
— to announce that they ought to stop 
seeing each other so as to give them- 
selves time to think things over. He 
mentioned this over the salad at dinner 
in the Naples Restaurant. 

Maggie burst into tears. "We'll never 
see each other again," she sobbed, and 
stormed out. He threw some money on 
the table, and followed her. 

"We'll have to be apart for a while 
to weigh things," he said. But Maggie 
couldn't see it. She knew instinctively 
that Bob was right for her, and she 
for Bob. 

The next day, she had a headache. 
She told her sympathetic boss what 
had happened. Hating to see anyone so 
unhappy just before Christmas, he 
sent her home in a cab. 

At home, Maggie looked at the gifts 
for Bob she'd stacked all over the 
apartment, and thought, What am I 
going to do with them? 

Early that evening, the phone rang. 
It was Bob. "May I come to see you?" 
he asked. "All right," she said in a 
dead-pan voice. 

He was there a few minutes later. 
He'd parked close to her apartment, 
and had called from the neighborhood. 
In his arms he carried a beautiful 
bouquet of chrysanthemums. He fol- 
lowed her into the kitchen. 

"Will you marry me?" he asked. 

"Do you really mean that?" she said. 

"Yes," he said — and took an engage- 
ment ring out of his pocket. Then she 
said, "Yes." 

They decided that August would be 
a nice month for marriage. Not long 
afterward, they decided July was 
better. Then it seemed obvious June 
was still better. They got married on 
January 22, 1960, in Big Bear. They 
packed hurriedly. Maggie had bought a 
gorgeous beige suit and Italian shoes 
for the wedding. She left them home 



by mistake, and was married in a plaid 
skirt and sweater. But it didn't really 
matter. 

Nothing has been able to down their 
spirits since their marriage. A month 
after the wedding, the writers' strike 
came along and Maggie was out of 
work. Then the actors' strike came 
along, and Bob was out of work. "But 
people who'd seen me on TV let us buy 
things on credit," he said. During the 
strike, they grew their own vegetables 



and bought second-hand furniture, 
which they cheerfully refinished. The 
strike eventually ended, and they are 
now enjoying life in a log-cabin bunga- 
low in Beverly Hills. It is probably the 
only log cabin in that exclusive sec- 
tion. 

There they live with their two chil- 
dren, a cat named "Moke," a dog named 
"Annie," and a parrot. It's an unbeat- 
able combination, headed for thorough- 
ly non-beatnik success. 



Perry Mason's Secret Ingredient 



(Continued from page 24) 
standing, and executive producer of 
one of the all-time smash hits of tele- 
vision, Erie Stanley Gardner's Perry 
Mason, starring Raymond Burr in the 
title role, with Barbara Hale as "girl 
Friday" Delia Street. 

How did Gail Patrick Jackson reach 
her present eminence, and how has she 
retained her position in TV — a field 
noted for its mercurial changes of per- 
sonnel? 

According to Gail, "I married into my 
job. My husband, Cornwell Jackson, 
and Erie Stanley Gardner have been 
partners for years. When the show was 
planned, someone was needed to draw 
the threads together. I knew the acting 
side of the business, and Corny felt that 
he could teach me the executive job, so 
away I went. I was a 'premature baby,' 
and I've been rushing ever since." 

More explicitly, she explains, "My 
job — pared to its essentials — is 'loving 
care.' My talent is a love for people and 
a sort of sixth sense about their true 
natures, their needs, and their prob- 
lems. I serve as mother confessor, lis- 
tening post, and correlating agent. In 
any complex operation, there has to be 
a loose-end gatherer-upper; I'm it in 
our organization." 

Born Margaret Fitzpatrick in Bir- 
mingham, Alabama, Gail earned her 
A.B. degree from Howard University 
and made plans to study law, thanks to 
a scholarship. A Paramount talent 
scout, waving a long-term contract 
beginning at seventy -five dollars per 
week ("in Birmingham, there just 
wasn't that kind of money" per week") 
enticed the tall, brown-eyed brunette 
to Hollywood. 

"I'll never forget the morning I re- 
ported to the Marathon Street gate," 
she says. "There I stood, all knuckles 
and teeth, and watched a chauffeur- 
driven Rolls Royce wheel up and dis- 
charge two Russian wolfhounds, a uni- 
formed maid, and a real, live movie star 
in a full-length mink coat. I thought I 
had never seen a more beautiful sight 
in my life. It was Jeanette MacDonald." 

The girl from Birmingham starred in 
some fifty films before turning to wife- 
hood, motherhood, and TV production. 



To confound the cry-havoc psycholo- 
gists, Gail's present weekday schedule 
(during the school year) is submitted 
in evidence to prove glowing health — 
both mental and physical — and the fact 
of notable accomplishment: 

She rolls out at 6:30 each morning 
and prepares breakfast for her husband 
and two children, Jennifer (almost 
nine years old) and Tom (just past 
seven). Breakfast ends at 7:30, when 
Tom goes to his piano for thirty min- 
utes of practice. Until recently, his 
mother has sat with him, explaining 
musical passages and encouraging 
concentration. 

Then, one morning, Gail — not a piano 
player — realized that there was some- 
thing different about one selection he 
played. "I'm transposing it," her son 
explained calmly. 

"I knew then," she says, "that I was 
going to have an extra thirty minutes 
each morning. It was pretty clear that 
Tom didn't need me anymore!" 

At eight, the children leave for school 
via motor pool. (The Jacksons have the 
duty every sixth week.) For the next 
half-hour, Gail places telephone calls 
having to do with Perry Mason and 
running her household. 

She reaches the studio before 9:30, 
to attend to details that have accumu- 
lated on her desk since the previous 
afternoon. At eleven, she sees the 
"dailies" (footage shot the previous 
day). At 11:30, she watches wardrobe 
testing — a matter of importance. Time- 
hungry programs have found that the 
proper use of clothing can save valu- 
able footage for plot development. The 
distraught wife who enters Perry Ma- 
son's office wearing the conservative 
but suavely cut "little black dress"' and 
a string of pearls, is quite different in 
impact from the distraught wife who 
wears a tight, flowered sheath and car- 
ries a mangy fox scarf. 

"Impact," in this context, is one of 
Gail's happy responsibilities. 

At noon, she usually has luncheon 
with a newspaper or magazine writer, 
or with some -member of the Perry 
Mason cast or crew. In the afternoons, 
she sits in on casting interviews and 
script conferences, and presides at 



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meetings called to review the ramifica- 
tions of TV production. 

She is quick to say, "We have no real 
problems on our show, because our 
regulars are essentially secure and suc- 
cessful adults. Everyone works well 
together. When our stock company is 
away from the studio for a week or so, 
it's fun to be on the set when shooting 
is resumed. It's like a family reunion: 
Everyone is simply delighted to see 
everyone else. They have trouble set- 
tling down that first morning, because 
they have so much to talk about." 

Gail feels that the Perry Mason show 
makes a valid human point each week, 
but her ambition for the series is mod- 
est: "They tell us that millions of view- 
ers watch our show each week. If only 
one person — at the end of one of our 
programs — has a clearer understanding 
of his rights and his responsibilities 
under law, we shall have served a use- 
ful purpose." 

Like any craftsman, she has her fa- 
vorite segments. One was "The Case 
of the Violent Village." Its story dealt 
with the dilemma of an ex-convict who, 
in trying to go straight and rebuild his 
life in a small community, encountered 
ironclad prejudice. Charged with a 
crime he did not commit, he was de- 
fended by Perry Mason, who proved 
the man to be innocent. 

Gail says, "It was a powerful script, 
dramatizing the truth that a man must 
be held innocent until proved guilty, 
instead of the opposite. It also stressed 
the importance of giving a pardoned 
man a chance to mend his life so as to 
take his place as a constructive mem- 
ber of a community." 

Another favorite was titled "The 
Case of the Nine Dolls." It dealt with 
the search for parents of a small girl 
living with foster parents and being 
supported by mysterious payments from 
a Swiss bank. The child in the story 
was played by a small friend of Jenni- 
fer Jackson. "It's always a thrill to dis- 
cover authentic talent," says Gail. "I 
think the girl may have taken her first 
step toward a highly rewarding career." 

In the past, members of the cast have 
urged Mrs. Jackson to appear in an 
acting capacity on Perry Mason. She 
laughs at the suggestion, dismissing it 
with: "I'm too lazy to do the work nec- 
essary to perfect a characterization. I 
have no desire to go back to acting." 

Her studio day ends at four, when she 
drives home to be on hand to welcome 
her children when they step off the 
school bus. From that moment on, her 
life belongs to her family. She says, 
"My home is my relaxation." The Jack- 
sons live on a seven -acre plot in the 
Hollywood Hills. The estate is so situ- 
ated that it seems isolated from the 
city (deer saunter down to eat the 
R roses in winter) , yet it is a five-minute 
drive from Hollywood Boulevard. 

Both of the Jackson children are 

7o 



adopted. Jennifer "chose" her parents 
when she was five days old, and she 
selected her younger brother, Tom, 
when he was only three days old. The 
children never tire of the story of their 
acquisition. Repeatedly they demand an 
account of the Jacksons' search, of 
their hurrying from hospital to hospital 
seeking the daughter God had placed 
on earth for them. 

An expectant hush falls as Gail says, 
"Then, one day, your daddy looked at 
you in your crib and said, 'That baby 
looks like me. I wonder if she's ours.' 
Then you opened your eyes wide and 
smiled at us, and we knew that you had 
picked us out of the whole world to 
belong to you." 

After one such recital, Jennifer was 
unusually quiet for several moments. 
Suddenly, with a flash of insight, she 
threw her arms around her mother's 
waist, held her in a bear hug, and mur- 
mured intensely, "I'm so glad I picked 
you." 

The relationship between Jennifer 
and her younger brother has been ideal, 
until a rift developed early this year. 
Because of her eighteen months' sen- 
iority, Jennifer has always been ac- 
corded a privilege or two beyond Tom's 
scope — things like being able to stay 
up fifteen minutes longer in the eve- 
ning, and designing a centerpiece for 
holiday dinners. She has cherished those 
advantages, and at times she has been 
mildly patronizing with her little 
brother. 

Suddenly, Tom was a "little" brother 
no longer. Following a growth pattern 
for which his parents were prepared 
by knowledge of his background, he 
began to lengthen out. At first, Gail 
was puzzled by Jennifer's inexplicable 
antagonism toward her brother. Pa- 
tiently, Gail began to ask questions, 
soon unearthed the reason: Jennifer 
thought that the advantage of her age 
was to be nullified by her brother's 
height, and that, as he grew taller, he 
would be permitted her privileges. 

That misunderstanding straightened 
out, a new emergency arose. Tom de- 
cided that he wanted one thing, and one 
only, for his birthday: A piano bench 
exactly like the one Van Cliburn had 
used when Tom heard him play at the 
Hollywood Bowl. Satisfaction of the 
ambition seemed sensible — until the 
Jacksons priced the electrically -adjust- 
able bench. They relayed the news to 
Tom, who has a lively sense of cash 
money. "Two hundred dollars!" he re- 
peated. "How many Saturday chores is 
thatV 

He is paid ten cents for letting his 
mother sleep undisturbed on Saturday 
mornings; ten cents for making his bed 
and straightening his room on Satur- 
days; ten cents for emptying the waste- 
paper baskets; ten cents for raking 
leaves off the lawn. He is docked for 
less than perfect performance: One cent 



off for a lumpy bed job; one cent off for 
a sweater left on the back of a chair; 
two cents off for leaving the rake on the 
lawn instead of hanging it properly in 
the tool shed, etc. 

Jennifer has her own money-making 
ventures, and suffers her own penalties. 

Both children are encouraged to save 
for the future. Every penny deposited 
in the piggy bank by one of the young- 
sters is matched by a contribution from 
the parents — with one exception. Fam- 
ily friends sometimes provide an un- 
expected dime for an ice-cream bar. 
Jennifer, spotting an investment op- 
portunity, tried to talk her dad into 
duplicating windfalls. No dice. 

"The wonderful thing about chil- 
dren," Gail says, "is that every day with 
them is a fresh adventure. Nothing is 
static. We started our family somewhat 
later than most couples do; possibly 
that's one reason our enjoyment is so 
intense. We aren't casual about them. 
They are a constant challenge and a 
constant source of amazement. Now and 
then they provide stunning insight into 
one's self. 

"The children's daddy is semi-retired, 
at the moment, because of a mild ill- 
ness from which he is recovering, so 
he has been able to spend a great deal 
of time with them. He does most of the 
chauffeuring — which is lucky for me. 
Last year, I was driving around sev- 
enty-two miles daily, and keeping my 
present office hours." 

One afternoon, Gail overheard Tom 
asking Jennifer, "Why does Mother al- 
ways hurry so fast, and why does Dad- 
dy always move so slow?" 

Jennifer's prompt answer: "Because 
Mother always has a lot to do, and 
Daddy isn't going anywhere." 

Gail says, "I think both Jennifer and 
Tom are growing up without precon- 
ceived notions of woman's 'traditional 
role.' I think they will share my opinion 
that choice of profession, extent of abil- 
ity and degree of dynamism are indi- 
vidual things, have nothing to do with 
one's having been born male or female. 

"Both children accept the fact that 
I'm energetic and know how to use a 
hammer, whereas Jennifer is artistic 
to the point of having been offered two 
hundred dollars for a painting she did 
when she was four. Both accept with- 
out question Tom's being musical, and 
Corny's love of reading. 

"I hope they will always avoid the 
error of pigeon-holing human beings — 
which is, of course, the error of psy- 
chologists when they start to generalize 
about the status of women who com- 
bine a private with a public career." 

Gail Patrick Jackson, chinchilla- 
haired these days, flashing- eyed, dy- 
namic and humorous, is obviously a 
contented woman. Jazz musicians have 
a term meaning "authentic, in harmony 
and on beat." It is: "Solid, Jackson." 

"Solid, Jackson," is the word for Gail. 



Kennedy: They Loved Him on TV 



(Continued from page 27) 
American people cottoning to the lad 
born with a solid gold spoon in his 
mouth? 

The constant answer you get from 
professional politicians, veteran news- 
men, TV commentators, political anal- 
ysts, etc., is that the television "Great 
Debates" — especially, the first one, on 
September 26 — did more in gaining the 
big prize for Kennedy than any other 
single factor. Quick to agree with this 
theory is the new President himself. 

When asked at a press conference if 
he thought he would have won without 
participating in the debates, Kennedy 
replied: "I don't think so." His brother 
and general campaign manager, Rob- 
ert Kennedy, was even more specific. 
'"Without the debates," he candidly ad- 
mitted, "it wouldn't have even been 
close." 

Long-time reporter James Desmond 
of the New York Daily News concurs 
with Robert's statement. "Unquestion- 
ably," says the sage political writer, 
"the TV debates did it for Jack. In the 
opening one alone, he dispelled the no- 
tion that he was immature and inex- 
perienced to be President." 

New York State's Democratic chair- 
man, Michael Prendergast, adds: "Pub- 
lic opinion sampling in the course 
of the campaign showed that the TV 
debates were a decisive factor in Ken- 
nedy's favor in New York State. They 
helped him win the undecided vote. 
They also helped to expose the myth of 
the so-called Nixon 'experience' issue. 
The people had the opportunity to see 
and hear the candidates face to face, 
right in their own living rooms, to the 
great advantage of the Democratic can- 
didate." 

J. Leonard Reinsch, executive di- 
rector of James M. Cox's TV and radio 
stations, thinks there's little doubt that 
the debates paved the way for a Ken- 
nedy triumph. "The first debate was the 
big one," says the man who served as 
Kennedy's TV consultant throughout 
the campaign and who is given credit 
for the President's polished television 
technique. "We broke down the Re- 
publican charge that Kennedy was 
immature. We solidified Democrats 
who had wondered if Sen. Kennedy was 
the right choice to defeat the Vice- 
President. That first debate convinced 
campaign workers, governors and 
others that we had a strong, fighting 
candidate. It scared and shocked Re- 
publicans. Our people were inspired. I, 
too, was convinced after the opening 
debate that we had a great candidate." 

The initial TV encounter between 
Kennedy and Nixon also convinced 
William (Bill) Shadel, ABC-TV politi- 
cal commentator, that the Senator had 
scored a tremendous victory. "Up to 



that time," says Bill, "I frankly thought 
Nixon would clobber him. After all, 
the Vice-President had the decided 
edge in TV experience and exposure. 
But, once Jack got before the cameras, 
he took the offensive immediately. He 
seemed to reflect sincerity, a knowl- 
edge of many subjects and a real pas- 
sion for the highest office in the land. 
On the other hand, Nixon had a diffi- 
cult time projecting sincerity. He also 
had the heck of a position of trying to 
defend the Ike Administration while, 
at the same time, trying to curry favor 
with the Democrats. In addition, he had 
to reconcile the forces of Sen. Barry 
Goldwater and Gov. Nelson Rocke- 
feller. On top of everything else, his 
makeup job was poorly done. He 
seemed sickly. Even his tailor seemed 
to have committed a boo -boo during 
the first debate. He never adjusted 
Nixon's shirt collar, which appeared 
much too loose. It made him look 
scrawny." 

Many political savants think it's im- 
material whether Kennedy won or lost 
the opening debate with Nixon. The 
important point was that the Senator 
gained the necessary exposure before 
the American people. Prior to the de- 
bates, Nixon was much better known 
across the land than the Senator. TV 
gave Kennedy a chance, in a few ap- 
pearances, to close the gap that Nixon 
had built up for four years. Then, too, 
television provided the means for Ken- 
nedy to get across some of his more 
potent ideas. He couldn't rely too well 
on the press for this function, since 
seventy -five percent of the Fourth Es- 
tate were on record as supporting 
Nixon. 

That Kennedy was one hundred per- 
cent correct, in his estimation that TV 
would put him across with the people, 
was borne out by Shadel's interviews 
with hundreds of people throughout the 
country. "My job made it necessary for 
me to do a great deal of traveling," 
says Bill. "Following the first debate, I 
was amazed to hear people from all 
walks of life tell me: 'I didn't think 
much of Kennedy, but I saw him last 
night and he sure knows his stuff.' You 
know, that TV eye sees right through 
you, and Kennedy was coming over 
very strong to a great many people." 

With thirty-two years of radio and 
TV experience under his belt, Shadel 
doesn't shock too easily, but he con- 
fesses that "glamour boy" Kennedy 
electrified him with his TV debate per- 
formances. "I knew Jack and Dick 
Nixon ever since they came into the 
Senate, fourteen years ago," he says. 
"Kennedy was so young looking, at the 
time, that you couldn't distinguish him 
from the pages. Little attention was 
focused on him, other than that he was 




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T 
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77 



exceptionally handsome and exception- 
ally rich. His Senate record wasn't ex- 
actly a brilliant one. I'm sure that Nix- 
on didn't fear him at all, prior to the 
first debate. After all, he had seen him 
in action many times on the Senate 
floor, and even Kennedy's die-hard ad- 
mirers would admit that he wasn't any 
ball of fire." 

But then came the momentous de- 
bates, and a change came over the 
tanned, tight-lipped Senator. "I no- 
ticed it immediately," says Bill, who 
had the honor of moderating the third 
of the historic television debates. "He 
seemed to have a tremendous amount 
of confidence. He radiated the stuff. He 
gave the impression that he actually 
felt it was extremely important that he 
be elected President — not so much for 
himself, but for the country! This fierce 
dedication and desire undoubtedly 
communicated itself to the people." 

Little fanfare was actually needed to 
fire the public's imagination for the un- 
precedented head-on clash between the 
Presidential candidates. NBC boss Rob- 
ert Sarnoff, commenting on this phase, 
said: "The attention the debates com- 
manded from the American people is 
reflected in the fact that any one of the 
four broadcasts would qualify as the 
most-watched program in television 
history." 

The Gallup Poll estimated that 
eighty -five million adults watched at 
least one of the four debates. In the 
initial clash, the American Research 
Bureau claimed that seventy-three mil- 



lion viewers were glued to their sets. 
In the New York area alone, the Niel- 
sen rating service asserted that fifty- 
four percent of all homes with TV sets 
were tuned to the debate — which, 
translated, meant that 2,241,000 screens 
were reflecting images of Dick and 
Jack. 

Strangely enough, the original mo- 
tive which prompted both the Repub- 
lican and Democratic parties to seek 
the debates was a financial one. Neither 
side actually foresaw that one of the 
candidates would crush the other in a 
verbal battle. They were much more 
interested in gaining free time for their 
standard-bearers. 

In cold, hard cash, it is estimated 
that the networks lost between twenty 
and thirty million dollars in footing the 
bill for the unsponsored Nixon-Ken- 
nedy tiffs. Both political parties, on 
the other hand, saved an estimated four 
to five million dollars that they would 
otherwise have expended in network 
time. Even with the debates given to 
them gratis, the G.O.P. spent $1,644,381 
dui'ing the national campaign and the 
Democrats forked over $1,053,310. 

It's interesting to note that, when 
time was bought from the networks for 
either Kennedy or Nixon, it was prac- 
tically money thrown out. Entertain- 
ment shows opposite the "paid political 
announcements" invariably swamped 
them, rating-wise. For example, two 
days before the election, Nixon's politi- 
cal talk was practically disregarded by 
TV viewers. The Rebel, on ABC-TV, 



had a 22.6 rating; Dinah Shore had a 
19.6 on NBC; Nixon came in last, with 
an 11.4 mark. The same disastrous re- 
sults were experienced by Kennedy. On 
October 31, the Senator came in last in 
the ratings race when thrown opposite 
such moderately popular shows as 
Bringing Up Buddy and SurfSide 6. 

However, there's no arguing against 
Kennedy's obvious TV appeal. Already 
his smile has become as famous as 
Franklin D. Roosevelt's. Shadel says: 
"I believe Kennedy has discovered he's 
a new TV idol. I have no doubts that 
he'll go on TV whenever he really 
wants something, such as a piece of 
legislation passed. He'll use television 
as F.D.R. used radio, to get the people 
to go along with his policies." 

As for Kennedy engaging in "Great 
TV Debates" in 1964, there isn't much 
chance of that happening. The hero of 
Hyannisport learned only too well 
what TV could do for the virtually un- 
known. 

When the query of whether Ken- 
nedy would take part in TV debates in 
1964 was asked of the President's 
brother, Robert, he chuckled. Then, with 
eyes sparkling and the famous Kennedy 
boyish grin showing to great advantage, 
he replied: "Of course not! A President 
would not want to debate with someone 
who wanted to be President." 

So we'll probably have to forget about 
TV debates for some time to come. Of 
course, they can always show the 
Nixon -Kennedy debates over and over. 
They re-run everything else on TV! 



The Fun's For Real on the Nanette Fabray Show 



(Continued from page 46) 
television, she had endeared herself to 
the thousands of Broadway theater pa- 
trons in such musical comedies as 
"Bloomer Girl," "High Button Shoes," 
"Make a Wish," and many, many others. 
Her husband, Ranald MacDougall, is 
also famous, in a less spectacular way. 
His fame lies within the motion-picture 
industry, where his screenplays for 
"The Hasty Heart," "Mr. Belvedere" 
and "Mildred Pierce" established him 
as one of the important writers in 
Hollywood. More recently, he has writ- 
ten and directed "The Subterraneans" 
and "Go Naked in the World," in which 
Nanette appeared in bit roles. 

"Randy's career is the important one 
in this family," Nanette declares em- 
phatically. "I'm not ambitious. I was 
semi-retired when we married, and all 
I wanted was a home and a family. Be- 
fore and after that great day, I was 
offered a number of series. But, before 
we were married, I wasn't anxious to 
T get involved — and, afterward, I knew 
v that a series would probably involve 
R situations which would mean being 

away from the family. As far as I'm 
78 



concerned now, if I can't get home to 
them, the studio can burn down. 

"I did a spectacular and some guest 
appearances. About the closest I came 
to being a regular was on the Dinah 
Shore show. There, for a while, it 
seemed they kept hitting some snag 
with their guest stars and, every time 
somebody had to cancel out, Dinah 
would call me. Once I came on with 
only one day's notice. I did six shows 
with Dinah, the last one when I was 
very pregnant!" 

Jamie is two years old now, and, 
Nanette laughs, "Sometimes it's spooky. 
He'll come in and tell me there's a great 
big locomotive out in the backyard, 
then he goes through the whole bit with 
the face working — the whole routine. 
It's like watching myself do an act." 

Besides Jamie, the MacDougall house- 
hold includes Laurie, who is nineteen; 
Heather, seventeen; and Brian, seven — 
all of whom have "contributed" some- 
thing to the plot of the new series. The 
situations are normal family situations, 
blown up to comedy proportions on the 
show. The episode about "organizing" 
the family, for instance, stemmed from 



the habit Nanette developed of carry- 
ing a stack of notes and papers to the 
studio each morning and bringing them 
home each night unopened and unread. 

"Wendell Corey co-stars as my hus- 
band on the show," Nanette says, "and 
who could ask for more? We're not 
playing him as a goof, either. I think 
the day for 'poor old nice but stupid 
Dad' is about over on television. He's 
a writer, like Randy, and, in one epi- 
sode, I find out that when he is just 
staring into space, he isn't loafing. Ac- 
tually, he's working very hard. I found 
this out myself at home one time," she 
adds with a wry grin. 

"Nine-tenths of the quality of the 
show is Randy's writing. He knows 
how to write for me and his material 
is the funniest I've ever worked with. 
He wrote the first several scripts, but 
now he acts as script supervisor. We 
can't afford him full-time. He's too ex- 
pensive," Nanette tells you with very 
little effort to hide her pride. 

The usual procedure, with a television 
show which has just been sold, is to 
hurry it on the air as quickly as possi- 
ble. Consequently, everybody from the 



writer to the script girl is continually 
fighting a deadline, which creates in- 
tense pressure — and painful ulcers. The 
Nanette Fabray show was sold four 
days after the pilot was completed, but 
the MacDougalls firmly refused to rush 
into production. 

For one thing, Nanette wasn't about 
to become involved in a situation which 
would rob her family of a normal life. 
She insists on one day a week com- 
pletely away from any part of the show, 
so she can spend that day on family af- 
fairs. Also, during the shooting sched- 
ule, she leaves the studio in time to 
feed the baby and put him to bed. 

Additionally, Randy felt it would be 
a distinct "plus" for the show itself to 
have everything properly organized. 
There are no last-minute script con- 
ferences on the set, no panic because 
the next episode has to be in the can 
by Thursday at the latest. Everything 
is planned and scheduled to the min- 
ute, before the director ever calls, 
"Roll 'em!" 

All of which is quite a switch from 
Nanette's days with Sid Caesar. "Sid 
likes to work under pressure," she re- 
calls. "It was go-go-go! Seven days a 
week. The only time off was the morn- 
ing after the show. In the afternoon, we 
were at it again. Material was written, 
tried out, put in, taken out, and rewrit- 
ten right up to air time. It was pretty 
hectic, and it's marvelous now to work 
on a set where everything is worked 
out beforehand. I have such a good time 
that I never get tensed up." 

Nanette's almost fierce preoccupation 
with her family doubtless stems from 
the long years of the uncertain life in 
show business. She was four years old 
when she made her first professional 
appearance in Los Angeles. She had 
been taking dancing lessons for only 
two or three weeks when she entered 
and won a children's talent contest. 
First prize was a week's engagement at 
one of the leading local theaters. From 
then on, her childhood was spent back- 
stage and on movie sets. 

"It's very hard for a youngster to 
grow up in that atmosphere," she says 
quietly. "You are forced to cope on 
adult terms, and you don't even know 
what you're competing for. 'Success' is 
just a word. When you're a child, you 
don't even know what it means. Mostly, 
it's the mothers who are pursuing the 
careers. 

"Of course, if a child has talent, it isn't 
fair not to develop it, but it shouldn't 
become the only goal in life. Like my 
niece, Shelley Fabares, on The Donna 
Reed Show. She's always had talent 
coming out her ears, but her mother 
has been very wise. The growing-up 
comes first. Show business, second. 
Shelley gets good grades in school. She 
has dates. She has friends who are not 
actors and actresses and show people." 

Nanette followed her own profes- 
sional debut with a vaudeville tour 



headlining comedian Ben Turpin. She 
played in several of the "Our Gang" 
comedies, in between vaudeville troup- 
ing, until she started outgrowing the 
Baby Nan stage. At Los Angeles Junior 
College, she won two scholarships for 
Max Reinhardt's Dramatic Workshop 
and played leading roles in two of his 
productions. It was the musical revue, 
"Meet the People," which took her to 
New York — "and I just sort of stayed." 

"I don't know where it began," she 
says of her talent for making people 
laugh, "but the turning point was 'High 
Button Shoes.' I had played the love 
interest in four previous shows. I hadn't 
especially enjoyed being an actress. It 
was just my work, the only work I 
knew. 

"When 'High Button Shoes' came 
along, with Phil Silvers in the lead, I 
was offered my choice of playing the 
twenty-five-year-old ingenue, like al- 
ways, or the part of the mother. There 
were only about four lines of dialogue 
in the latter role, when it started out, 
but it was comedy — and, in the previ- 
ous shows, I had been getting laughs on 
lines that weren't supposed to be funny. 

"So, I thought, Why not? I took the 
mother role and we worked on it. We 
worked hard on it, building the charac- 
ter up till it was important. And, on 
opening night in Philadelphia, it paid 
off in spades. It was a big hit and, for 
the first time, I really enjoyed my work. 
It was fun making people laugh. This 
isn't something you can learn from 
scratch. You must have an instinct for 
comedy, a feeling for it, just as a writer 
must have a feeling for words. Me, I 
can't write a decent letter. 

"Of course, just having the instinct 
isn't enough. Like anything else, you 
have to work to develop it. You have to 
learn it inside out. In comedy, about the 
only way to leam is by observation. I've 
taken something from everyone I've 
ever worked with." 

It took Nanette a long while to find 
her proper niche in the theater, and it 
wasn't all violins and ice cream while 
she was searching. There were hard 
times as well as good times, there were 
overnight flops as well as long-lived 
hits. One time, after playing the lead in 
two Broadway shows in quick succes- 
sion, she spent two years just trying to 
find another job. 

It took her even longer to find her 
proper family. Now that she has found 
it, she's taking no chances on losing it. 
The new show doesn't come home with 
her — or with Randy, either. "I don't 
mean we never discuss it around the 
house," she amends quickly. "But we 
keep it in its proper perspective. It 
doesn't overwhelm the whole family." 

Nanette has reached the turning 
point now in her personal living. She is 
a happy woman, with a family — and a 
job which gives her a lot of personal 
satisfaction and several million viewers 
a lot of laughs. So everybody wins! 




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79 



The More the Merrier 



(Continued from page 50) 
with pessimism and danger. He should 
know better.' So I tell them I majored 
in history in college and I know that 
in any given period of time the same 
point could be made. 

"Threats of war, of vandalism, of 
economic recession and utter annihila- 
tion have always been with us. They 
say I'm bringing children into a 
world where they will be demolished 
by a nuclear bomb. Well, everyone is 
going to die sometime; the prospect 
of death is no reason to prevent the 
birth of one child or ten. I'm afraid 
death is regarded as a very grim 
specter in our society. Here in America 
we have such a high standard of liv- 
ing and, with all these creature com- 
forts, people think, 'It can't be as good 
as this in heaven.' And they tend to 
focus on the shadows of existence 
rather than on reality." 

Reality, to Edgar Allan Jones Jr., 
means appreciation of human values. 
Although his family grows and grows, 
he maintains individual contact with 
every member of his family. He has 
worked out a system so that no one is 
devoured by the whole. There is the 
"day out" when one child alone joins 
him and his wife Helen for dinner. 
For the older children, there is the 
"night up," when one alone comes to 
the living room to spend the evening 
with his parents. "And no matter what 
the child has done during the day, the 
'night up' is never taken away from 
him as a means of punishment." 

Their home is in Santa Monica. It's 
an old Spanish house with two floors — 
and four bathrooms. "A matter," he 
comments, "not to be taken lightly with 
a large family." There are two pianos, 



which serve four young musicians. A 
huge dining table supports the entire 
group. He says, "You can do much to 
prepare your children for adulthood 
in routine matters. When an entire 
family eats together, as ours does, they 
learn basic respect for others." 

He tries to convey to the children 
the spirit of the law just as he does to 
the TV audience. He says, "To quote 
Judge Learned Hand, 'No court can 
preserve liberty unless people want it.' 
But liberty is dependent on law. With- 
out it, only a few, the very strong, 
would be free. Well, even my children 
grasp this." 

In the eyes of the law, especially 
that of Edgar Allan Jones Jr., woman 
is an equal citizen. "I want to see all 
women treated on a par with men, on 
terms of their own personalities and 
talents and skills. And I mean this 
for the career woman and housewife 
alike. When I get home a little grumpy 
and tired, I don't expect special treat- 
ment. I'm not surprised to find that 
my wife is tired, too, and may not be 
smiling with ecstasy as I come through 
the door. She has been working, too!" 

He notes that domestic bliss is not 
easily come by, for a lawyer and his 
wife. Law is a jealous mistress de- 
manding a great deal of time and 
energy. "But Helen and I were mar- 
ried when I was a law student, and 
then it was law twenty-four hours a 
day — so, by comparison, things are 
now better. Besides* we have an ideal 
relationship. We've never had an ar- 
gument. I defer to her and she defers 
to me, but we don't keep count to see 
who's 'ahead.' " 

The Joneses start off each day with 
a family prayer. Before breakfast, all 



r 

V 
R 

80 



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In this issue of TV Radio Mirror, there are more stories than ever before. 
Many of them are, as before, about favorite stars of TV seen regularly on 
weekly shows. Others, as you've noticed, are about new stars, new shows, 
or — in the case of President Kennedy — a national figure you see on TV. 
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kneel down in the living room and 
ask God "to take care of us, as well as 
our friends and enemies." At meal- 
times, even the four-year-old takes 
his turn in asking God's blessings on 
the family. And while the family eats 
together, plays together and is taught 
"all for one and one for all," they are 
told that "all" includes people who live 
outside the family. 

He has had young couples ask his 
advice on whether or not to have large 
families. He tells them, "It seems nega- 
tive, almost depressing, for a young 
couple to assume that, perhaps in ten 
years, there won't be enough money 
coming in to pay the way of a large 
family. And it's ignorance to fear the 
shape of the world to come. The whole 
history of humanity is the broadening 
of insights, a greater grasp of the truths 
of the universe, and there isn't any 
reason why we should not continue 
broadening. 

"I don't niean this only in terms of 
scientific achievements, but in the de- 
velopment of tolerance and respect for 
the individual. We have come a long, 
long way and, although we must go a 
longer way now in a shorter time, the 
history of the race on this planet has 
been one of progressing from a com- 
plete, callous disregard of the human 
person to a rather sophisticated con- 
cern. The earth could explode any- 
time, and astronomers will tell us that 
it doesn't have to be attributable to a 
nuclear holocaust. It's within the 
realm of possibility that a star might 
crash into us. But — even if this should 
happen in ten days — the human race 
will be nonetheless ahead. This is the 
nature, the wonder of it, and the fact 
is that the next day always holds 
something a little better for the race 
as a whole — but only so long as we 
work at it!" 

All of the Jones philosophy goes into 
daily practice. No matter whose birth- 
day, all the children get a gift. ("It isn't 
right to give one child presents when 
the others don't get anything.") Find- 
ing yet another name for a new baby. 
("No problem. We even give them 
middle names as a bonus.") Wrapping 
a hundred gifts for the children at 
Christmas. ("There's so much paper 
around afterward that you can't see 
the light of day for an hour.") His wife 
sewing, washing and cooking for a 
family of eleven. ("She's the happiest 
woman I know.") His putting in a fif- 
teen-hour day in the home, on campus 
and at the studio. ("I believe that man 
and woman must use their talents to 
the utmost, consonant with health.") 

Yes, Edgar Allan Jones Jr. believes 
wholeheartedly in large families. "For 
me," he states simply, "there could be 
no more pleasant way of life." 



Everybody's Ragtime Girl 






(Continued from page 35) 
guest appearance, but then Mr. Welk 
told everybody it was my birthday and 
they brought out a big cake. I felt so 
good I cried, and then he hired me 
right there on the air." 

Since then, Jo Ann Castle's life has 
been what musicians call "up-tempo." 
Lawrence allows his specialty artists 
to take outside engagements, as long 
as they don't interfere with the show, 
and the blonde pianist has been getting 
almost more than she can handle since 
her name has been associated with the 
maestro. Also, this year for the first 
time, Welk has taken the entire band 
on a series of one-night stands through 
the Midwest and the South. And that 
was exciting, too. 

In New Orleans, Jo Ann had to see 
Bourbon Street. After the show, she 
and several of the other musicians from 
the troupe found a Dixieland spot 
where they jammed the night away. 

In St. Louis, it was election night, and 
raining. One of the bandsmen had a 
transistor radio with the plug in his 
ear as he relayed the balloting results 
to Lawrence, who announced them to 
the audience. "We also had a television 
set backstage," Jo Ann says, "and I 
stayed up until five o'clock watching 
the returns. This was my first time to 
vote and I was real excited. 

"When I knew we were going to be 
on tour Election Day, I sent for an 
absentee ballot. But it didn't come and 
it didn't come, and I began to get wor- 
ried. Finally, I was afraid I'd lose my 
very first vote, so I went downtown and 
marked my ballot. It was a thrill, going 
into the booth alone and really being 
a citizen. ... Of course, the very next 
day the absentee ballot came in the 
mail!" 

Jo Ann had decided early in the 
campaign who was her choice for Presi- 
dent, but her mother, who has been the 
guiding force in her career, was un- 
decided. "We had some real election- 
eering around the house," Jo Ann 
laughs. "I was so worried she'd vote for 
the other candidate — and 'cancel out' 
my vote — that I was almost a one- 
woman bandwagon." 

She had another opportunity to see 
the democratic process in action when 
she was playing an engagement with 
Buddy Morrow's orchestra at the Corn 
Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota. "I 
was there when Senator Kennedy came 
through on his campaign. The Lennon 
Sisters were there, too, and they had 
met him before, so I told them they just 
had to introduce me. And Buddy prom- 
ised to take a picture of me with Mr. 
Kennedy. 

"When he came in, he saw the girls 
and went right over to talk with them. 
I just stood there for a long time. I was 



actually shy. Finally, I said to myself, 
What's the matter with you? You're in 
this business of getting up in front of 
strangers, and now, all of a sudden, you 
get scared! 

"So, I took a deep breath and walked 
over and sort of stood in the way until 
Kathy introduced us. Then, when I got 
hold of his hand, I wouldn't let go, I was 
so afraid Buddy wouldn't get a pic- 
ture. I was shaking hands and turning 
around to look at the camera, and when 
Senator Kennedy started to leave, I 
trailed along behind him, signaling over 
his shoulder to Buddy: Did yon get a 
picture? 

"He had got eight before I ever 
let go of Senator Kennedy's hand," she 
admits with a grin. "I can just imagine 
what he was thinking — but I was so 
excited, I called Mother long-distance 
to tell her about it." 

It's something special and wonder- 
fully warm to Jo Ann now when she 
goes on these personal appearances. 
Less than two years ago, she was just 
a performer to the people in the audi- 
ence. Now she is greeted like an old 
friend. 

"One time, a hammer fell off the 
piano during the show — I play the piano 
very hard, you know, like a man," she 
says. "I was playing along and all of a 
sudden — whoops! — right over the key- 
board. After the number, I picked it up 
and waved it in front of the camera. An 
awful lot of people must have seen it, 
because now on tours someone is al- 
ways coming up and saying, 'I saw that 
hammer you knocked off the piano.' 
They're so nice and friendly about it, 
like it was a family joke. 

"And everybody says my personality 
is so different on TV. For one thing, 
they're surprised at how tall I am — 
five-feet, seven-and-a-quarter. I'm a 
tall girl, and big-boned, too. But, for 
some reason, I look smaller on tele- 
vision. I do have small hands, though, 
which is something else that surprises 
them. It seems that, when you're mak- 
ing a personal appearance, people want 
to look at your hands, and they're al- 
ways amazed that I can reach so far 
with such short fingers. I can reach be- 
cause I exercised my fingers for years." 

Jo Ann is as accomplished an accor- 
dionist as she is a pianist. She plays the 
accordion occasionally on the television 
show. On other jobs, it is a featured 
part of her act. She has an electronic 
instrument with which she gets a 
stereophonic effect by placing an am- 
plifier on one end of the stage while 
she plays at the other. 

It produces a good sound, but her 
introduction to electronic music was 
quite literally shocking. It happened 
in Bakersfield, California, which is her 
hometown. When a strap broke on her 




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accordion, she borrowed another one 
which had been adapted to an amplifier. 

"The owner suggested I try it with 
the amplifier," Jo Ann says, "and 
everything was fine until I had to dis- 
connect it to get off stage at the break. 
When I came back, I was groping 
around trying to reconnect it, and talk- 
ing to the audience to cover the time. 
Then I took hold of the microphone, 
and that was it\ 

"I remember thinking I should try 
not to fall on my face — because that 
would smash the accordion. So there 
I was, flat on my back on the stage, 
with the back of my head up on the 
dais, and I couldn't let go of the mike 
until somebody threw all the switches. 
It seemed like an eternity. I wasn't hurt. 
I wasn't even scared — except that I was 
afraid I might have broken the man's 
accordion." 

More and more, Jo Ann is finding 
less and less time for relaxation. The 
day the pictures were scheduled to be 
taken for TV Radio Mirror, she had 
just flown in from Fort Worth after a 
week of one-night stands, and was to 



fly out to Spokane on Sunday. With 
about two hours' sleep, she had to run 
to rehearsal for the Welk show, hurry 
to the studio for the pictures, then 
dash off to the Aragon Ballroom to play 
for the evening. She wasn't worried 
about the lost sleep. Her only concern 
was whether or not "the photographer 
could tell if I was tired." 

When she does have an evening of 
her own, she likes to go to shows or 
bowling. "I try to make time for dates." 
When asked if the dates are with any- 
one in particular, she grins self-con- 
sciously and admits, "In a way." 

"I'm more or less in an ABC clique," 
she adds. "There's a bunch of us — the 
engineers and announcers and their 
wives, and we do things together." 

It's a busy life Jo Ann is leading, and 
a happy one. She is still thrilled by her 
substantial stacks of fan mail, and a 
little awed that so many of her fans 
take such a personal interest in her 
career. "There's one man in Joliet who 
writes every week. He's never pre- 
sumptuous or out-of-order. He just 
comments on the show each time and 



what I did. And there's another one. 
It's as if he were watching the show 
while he writes. His letters are a regu- 
lar running commentary on the way I 
smiled or a gesture I made. The main 
thing is, they all say they don't see 
enough of me on the show — and that's 
good!" 

Someday, of course, even the Law- 
rence Welk engagement must come to 
an end. "I haven't thought much about 
what happens after that," she admits. 
"I'll want to expand in every field — 
except dancing. I started out as a danc- 
er, but it doesn't appeal to me anymore. 
I may try to get into acting. Actresses 
have told me I have expressions which 
should work out well in dramatics. 

"I just don't know, not yet. I was so 
excited about being twenty-one, but 
I'm even over that now. I'm as old as I 
ever want to be. I feel like old age is 
already creeping up on me!" She says 
it with a laugh, but there is a bit of a 
sober look in her eye. After all, right 
now, at twenty-one, it's a wonderful, 
wonderful world in which Jo Ann 
Castle finds herself. 



Beaus, Beaus. Beaus! 



(Continued from page 28) 
You know how hard I've worked. . . ." 
The previous few minutes had offered 
a capsule illustration of Connie's ter- 
rific pace. She had arrived at her 
Broadway office after a rugged four 
hours of language lessons. To com- 
municate with her international audi- 
ence, she is studying French, Italian, 
German, Japanese and Spanish. Turn- 
ing the efficient young executive, she 
then discussed contracts with her 
manager, George Scheck, dictated let- 
ters and set the date for a recording 
session. At last, she was ready to sit 
down and talk, and she knew what 
she wanted to say. 

"Even in high school, I had no time 
for dates. Five minutes spent holding 
someone's hand was five minutes taken 
away from work." Her dark eyes 
sparkled with laughter. "I've got news 
for you: I now dig boys. I don't want 
to sound like the female version of the 
sailor who has a romance in every 
port, but I've got a boyfriend in Holly- 
wood and another in London and one 
in Germany. And I've got a real groovy 
i little thing going in Canada, too. Since 
my bookings keep me racing around 
the world, it's fun to know there's a 
particular someone waiting." 

Serious again, she added, "For the 

first time, I am planning my work so 

that I also have time to play." Her 

change in attitude came while in Hol- 

t lywood. Connie says, "I didn't realize 

v that stars pamper themselves while 

R making a picture. The smart ones get 

enough sleep and recreation to look 

82 



their best. I raced, as usual. Besides 
working in 'Where the Boys Are,' I 
recorded songs for two albums, made 
personal appearances and did a dozen 
other things." 

It was MGM's famed producer, Jo- 
seph Pasternak, who pulled her up 
short. He invited her to spend a Sun- 
day at his house and Connie consulted 
her date book. "I just can't," she had 
replied. "I have language lessons and 
song rehearsal and . . ." Pasternak — 
who, in his long, brilliant career, has 
seen many stars rise and fall — inquired 
gently, "And what hours in your 
schedule have you reserved just for 
Connie?" 

Startled, she admitted there were 
none. She says, "That's when he talked 
to me, not like a father, but as one 
who knows everything about show 
business. He said that I had a long 
career ahead of me and that I would 
be a better singer, a better actress, and 
a better person, if I allowed myself 
time to enjoy being young." 

Connie took his advice, cleared out 
her appointments and began spending 
her Sundays at the Pasternak home. 
She says, "His hobby is cooking his 
native Hungarian dishes. Mmmm, such 
food! He also invites some of Holly- 
wood's most interesting young men to 
his pool and tennis court. Mmmm, such 
boys!" 

Connie's subsequent appearances 
with them did not go unnoticed. She 
says, "Every time some one took me 
to dinner, the columnists tried to marry 
us off." One such report brought con- 



sternation back home in New Jersey. 

"My mother is an absolute darling," 
Connie observes, "but she can be pretty 
square about some of these Hollywood 
things. She was crying so hard that 
she called my secretary, Sandy Con- 
stantinople, instead of me. Between 
sobs, she said she was glad I had found 
someone I loved, but she did feel badly 
because I was going to marry a man 
she had never met." 

Irked, Connie investigated. She then 
phoned her mother. "I told her that I 
had never met that man, either. In 
fact, no one had, because he did not 
exist. This was just a name some 
one made up and put in a column." 

One boyfriend who definitely does 
exist is MGM's promising young actor, 
Anthony Hall, who stars in "Atlantis." 
Speaking of him, Connie flashes a 
smile and flirts her long eyelashes. 
"He's gorgeous. Girls turn around for 
a second look. He's also a warm, in- 
telligent, understanding person." 

Happily, Tony turned Mr. Paster- 
nak's advice into a for-real experience. 
"When I opened at the Las Vegas 
Hotel," Connie recalls, "he flew down. 
For the first time, I was practically 
forced to have fun. There was nothing 
else to do. No recording sessions, no 
interviews, no promotion appearances. 
I worked just two shows a night and, 
beyond that, Tony and I danced, swam, 
went water-skiing or just sat around 
being lazy. In the words of the song, I 
had a chance to enjoy being a girl." 

Dates in Europe with the German 
film and recording star, Peter Kraus, 



were memorable for the same reason. 
"We were on a record-promotion tour," 
says Connie, "but these Europeans 
have a way of holding onto a private 
life, however busy they are. I'll never 
forget the night we went to a wine 
garden in the Vienna Woods. We dined 
before an open fire with violinists sere- 
nading us. It was as magic as a Strauss 
waltz." 

Connie's meeting with Adam Faith, 
England's young hitmaker, was far 
more explosive. She says, "I raced in 
from the London airport to a luncheon 
being given for me at the Dorchester. 
It was most formal. Ladies were dressed 
in high fashion and the gentlemen wore 
those black 'sack' coats you see at 
weddings — except for one young man. 
He had a silk suit and a bulky Italian 
sweater. His blonde hair could have 
been cut with a meat grinder. I heard 
some one say, 'That Adam Faith. He 
always calls attention to himself.' " 

Connie fluffed their introduction, 
saying, "I've heard your records, Adam 
Wade. You sing just like Johnny 
Mathis." 

The young man glared at her. "And 
I've heard yours, Miss Stevens." Stiff- 
ly, he marched away. 

Connie says, "I blushed all over, then 
I got cross. I knew I'd made a mistake, 
but he didn't have to be so sarcastic." 

A bit later, Adam chose to make 
peace. As photographers clamored 
around Connie, a hand dropped on her 
shoulder. In her ear, a voice said, "Are 
these men bothering you, lady?" 

Connie says, "It was Adam. Of 
course, I had to laugh. Before we left 
the luncheon, he had asked if he might 
call me." 

They would do "something different," 
Adam promised when they arranged a 
date. "He wouldn't say where we were 
going, but somehow I got the impres- 
sion it would be a coffee house in 
Soho. Wanting to dress like the other 
girls there, I put on toreadors and a 
sweater. You can imagine the jolt I 
got when he turned up in a dinner 
jacket!" 

Before changing into a dress to 
match his attire, Connie insisted on 
knowing their destination. "We're go- 
ing to the cinema," Adam announced. 

Said Connie, "That's different?" 

But Adam replied, "For me, it is. I 
don't get much chance to see a movie 
anymore. If a fan spots me and asks 
for an autograph, it can turn into a 
riot. Maybe the dinner jacket will be 
sort of a disguise. Besides, I felt like 



dressing up for you." 

Connie says, "After the picture, we 
went to a supper club and had a most 
interesting evening. Adam liked me, 
and I liked him. Later, he took me 
sightseeing, not just the usual tourist 
places, but to parts of London he knew 
and enjoyed. We went out to his 
homes, too. He has built two houses 
in a suburb, one for himself and one 
for his family. They had been des- 
perately poor before his records be- 
came hits, but he makes no pretense 
about it. I know no one who has ac- 
cepted success with such good grace 
as Adam. He's stayed himself. Some- 
times he can be moody as Jimmy Dean, 
but he knows how to laugh, too. He's a 
wonderfully tender, thoughtful per- 
son." 

Dates with other entertainers are 
enjoyable, but Connie can also yearn 
to get out of the spotlight. With a 
dreamy look, she says, "That's how I 
met Ralph . . ." 

Because he is not in show business, 
she chooses not to mention his sur- 
name. "He's the friend of a friend of 
Sandy's. The only blind date I've ever 
had in my life." 

It happened last summer, when Con- 
nie, wanting a bit of vacation, had 
asked her secretary to make hotel 
reservations at Asbury Park under any 
name other than "Francis." Connie 
says, "When Sandy mentioned she 
knew a boy who lived there, I sug- 
gested she call him." 

Connie had been on the beach when 
the boys arrived. "I came back to the 
hotel looking a mess. I was plastered 
with sun oil and my hair was wild. I 
caught sight of them in the lobby. They 
were so cute. I whirled around and 
ran into the restroom and tidied up." 

Connie sighed. "Any hope I had of 
going unrecognized vanished when 
Sandy introduced us, for Ralph grinned 
and said, 'Hi, Star.' But it didn't matter. 
We went right ahead trying every 
game and ride on the boardwalk, just 
as others our age were doing. It was 
a wonderful, carefree evening. We've 
continued the same way. When I go 
out with Ralph, I forget all about show 
business. I'm just one of the old gang 
from Jersey." 

For marriage-making columnists, 
Connie has a bit of bad news. "Right 
now, I'm not getting serious about any- 
one. Why should I? That would stop all 
this fun. I've taken Mr. Pasternak's 
advice. I'm being my age, for a change, 
and enjoying being young." 



0ctr /ttuucat rfwancU Itecte 

On the cover: Loret+a Young • Inside: The Gold Medal announcements 

Plus: 14 exclusive features on people and programs in the news! 

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83 



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84 



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ISSUE 





Loretta Young 

STAR 
OF THE YEAR 







**t 



1961 EDIT 




TV-RADIO ANNUAL 



all new • all exclusive 
packed with pictures and 
news of TV's greatest- 
front Adams to Zimbalist 



It's packed with news . . . gossip . . . chit-chat . . . and 
pictures of your favorite entertainers. It's the brand 
new edition of TV-Radio Annual. This is the yearbook 
that show people all over the world await with keen 
anticipation. It's the yearbook that covers all the 
history-making moments of the industry ... all the 
great shows and programs of the year. Here, too, is the 
news of the year — the marriages . . . divorces . . . 
babies . . . and those choice bits about he and she. You 
will go for the intimate stories about the stars and the 
life they lead off stage. You will go for the yummy 
pictures of your favorites — and those full-color photos 
are truly glamorous. Get double the pleasure out of 
your radio and TV set — get your copy of the new 
issue of TV-Radio Annual — today. 



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INFORMATION 
BOOTH 



Teen-Aged Dollmaker 

Dear Editors: 

My hobby is creating miniature dolls 
of various popular TV stars. This is an 
exciting, fun-filled pastime for me, and 
has brought me many hours of pleasure. 
At present, my collection includes Kath- 
ryn and Arthur Murray, Paul Winchell, 
Jerry Mahoney, Knucklehead Smiff, and 
The Three Stooges. 

The dolls take a good deal of work, 
including analysis of the person which the 
doll represents, but it all seems worth it 




compared to the pleasure I have received 
from my hobby. 

Sincerely, Linda Dill 
Baird, Texas 

Editor's Note: A photograph of some of 
the dolls appears above. 

Calling All Fans 

The following fan clubs invite new 
members. If you are interested, write to 
address given — not to TV Radio Mirror. 

Joanne Woodward Fan Club, Bobbe Es- 
poset, 477 W. 140th St., New York 31, 
New York. 

Clint Walker Fan Club, Karen Baider- 
man, 310 N. Irving Ave., Scranton 10, 
Pennsylvania. 

Johnny Tillotson Fan Club, Nancy Lee 
Gardner, 26 Lincoln St., Hartford, Conn. 

Brothers Four Fan Club, Sally Johnson. 
2060 Heath Rd., Chesterland, O. 

Pat Harrington Jr. Fan Club, Lynda 
Norman, 1447 Harvard St., Santa Monica, 
California. 

Lennon Sisters Fan Club, Eugene Gor- 
ney, 7415 Pleasant View Dr., Minneapolis 
21, Minnesota. 

(Continued on page 3) 




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RAJDIO 




APRIL, 1961 



MIDWEST EDITION 



VOL. 55, NO. 5 



Ann Mosher, Editor 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 

Lorraine Girsch, Associate Editor 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Eunice Field, West Coast Representative 



STORIES OF THE STARS 

Loretta Young : Star of the Year by Helen Ferguson 18 

Donald Hyatt's Candied Culture (Project 20) by James Taylor 20 

Twenty-Four Hours in a Woman's Life (Ingrid Bergman) by Robert Lardine 22 

Art Linkletter Talks About Adoption by Kathleen Post 24 

The Rocky Road to Success (Hanna-Barbera and The Flintstones) by Martin Cohen 26 

The Kingston Trio: A Primer on Proms by David Dachs 30 

Dennis The Menace (Jay North ) by Bill Kelsay 32 

The Four Big Men of Bonanza by Herbert Kamm 34 

Mary Stuart vs. The Simple Life by Frances Kish 36 

TV's Perennial "Mad" Man (David Susskind) by Jim Morse 38 

Como's Lady Laugh Artist (Selma Diamond) by Pat and Pearson Mullen 40 

To Danny with Love (Danny Thomas) by Mario Thomas 42 

Presenting Mike Clifford by Gregory Merwin 44 

Liederkranz Hall (backstage with Love Of Life, Search For Tomorrow, and 

The Secret Storm ) by Alice Francis 46 

SPECIAL AWARD FEATURES 

TV Radio Mirror Award Winners, 1960-61 9 

Best Over- All Programing on Radio: WHAS, Louisville, Kentucky 50 

Most Original Program on TV: KM OX-TV, St. Louis, Missouri 52 

Best News Program on TV: KMTV, Omaha, Nebraska 54 

Best Music Programing on Radio: KADY, St. Louis, Missouri 56 

Best News Program on Radio: WCKY, Cincinnati, Ohio 57 

Best Children's Program on TV: WBKB-TV, Chicago, Illinois 58 

Best Women's Interest Program on TV: WANE-TV, Fort Wayne, Indiana 59 

Best Music Program on TV: WCCO-TV, Minneapolis, Minnesota 60 

Best Public Service Program on TV: WCCO-TV, Minneapolis, Minnesota 62 

FUN AND SERVICE FEATURES 

Information Booth 1 

What's New on the East Coast by Peter Abbott 4 

What's New on the West Coast by Eunice Field 6 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 68 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 92 

Cover Portrait of Loretta Young by John Engstead 



BUY YOUR MAY ISSUE EARLY e ON SALE APRIL 6 



Published Monthly by Macfadden Publi- 
cations, Inc. Executive, Advertising, and 
Editorial Offices at 205 E. 42nd St., New 
York, N. Y. Editorial Branch Office, 321 
S. Beverly Dr., Beverly Hills, Calif. Irving 
S. Manheimer, President; Lee Andrews, 
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Meyer Dworkin, Secretary and Treas- 
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Manuscripts: All manuscripts will be carefully considered 
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Re-ontered as Second Class matter, June 28, 1954, at the 



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© 1961 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. All rights 
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Subscription Rates: In the U.S., its Possessions, & Canada, 
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All other countries, $5.50 per year. 

Change of Address: 6 weeks' notice essential. When 
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TV RADIO MIRROR, Macfadden Publications, Inc., 205 
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Information Booth 

(Continued from page 1) 

Lucky Dozen Contest Winners 

TV Radio Mirror is pleased to an- 
nounce the winners in our January 
"Luckv Dozen" contest. 



Winner of Grand Prize and camera 
from Rick Nelson: Bill Fox, Athens, 
Ohio. 

Sweater from Paul Anka: Michael 
Thomas. Norfolk 5, Virginia. 
Umbrella from Dodie Stevens: Ellen 
Mason. Seville. Ohio. 
RCA Victor "Victrola" from Neil 
Sedaka: Jim Wilson, Canton, Ohio. 
Chair from Fabian: Pam Bowen, Park 
Ridge. Illinois. 

Jewelry box from Joanie Sommers: 
Susanna Sommers, Vancouver 10, B.C. 
Charm bracelet from Jo Ann Camp- 
bell : Carol Haugen, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
Typewriter from Connie Stevens: 
Don Altman, Miami 56, Florida. 
Wristwatch from Bobby Rydell: Pa- 
tricia W. Fruet, Buffalo, New York. 
Clock radio from Rod Lauren: Rose 
Leion, Miami Beach 41, Florida. 
Stuffed animal from Connie Francis: 
Sharon Lee Porter, Winchester Bay, 
Oregon. 

Transistor radio from Annette Fu- 
nicello : Dave Conner, Phoenix, Arizona. 



Some Quickies 

Please tell me if Teresa Brewer and 
Gale Storm are sisters. 

P.M., Cookstown, N.J. 
They are not related. 

/ would like to know where and when 
Allen Case was born. 

B.D., West Covina, Calif. 

He was born in Dallas, Texas, on Oc- 
tober 8, 1934. 

How old is Paul Burke? To whom is he 

married and does he have any children? 

M.E., Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 

Paul is 34, has a wife, Peggy, and three 
children. 

Do Roger Smith and his wife have any 
children ? If so, what are their names end 
ages? 

LM., Columbia, S.C. 

They have a daughter Tracy, almost 4, 
and a son Jordan, 2%. 



We'll answer questions about radio and 
TV in this column, provided they are of 
general interest. Write to Information 
booth, TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 42nd 
St., New York 17, N. Y. Attach this 
box, specifying whether it concerns ra- 
dio or TV. Sorry, no perscnal answers. 




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WHAT'S NEW ON THE 



by PETER ABBOTT 




A TV first for Marilyn Monroe — fu- ^ On the rise- 
ture plans include a dramatic spec. new young 



-musically speaking — 
singer Buzz Clifford. 



Hot Stuff: The Art Carney revue got 
the walloping treatment from critics but 
Lee Remick came out of it covered 
with whipped cream and cited as a 
"sparkling new comedienne." And now 
she is being besieged with TV offers. . . . 
Bob Stack's wife, Rosemarie Bowe, 
wants to come out of domestic retire- 
ment and act again. . . . Pat Boone in 
the production business. His company 
will make a series on the great Barnum 
for ABC-TV. . . . Hugh O'Brian 
skimmed through N.Y.C. after a skiing 
vacation in the Alps. He's now busy 
readying three TV shows for presenta- 
tion to the networks. . . . Du Pont has 
an ambitious plan for spring — a ninety- 
minute spec on the lives of Laurel and 
Hardy. It hopes to get Gleason and 
Carney for the title roles. . . . Take a 
good look, for it may be your last, at 
Ernie Kovacs's Take A Good Look. Any 
day now pow! Most likely replacement 
will be Silents, Please. ... At R.C.A. 
figures on TV color receiver sales are 
rosy, not red. Profit in sales for 1960 
was over $1 million. . . . On March 19, 
Sammy Davis Jr. guest-stars on Law- 
man as a cowboy. This is not show- 
biz hokum. Negro cowboys were among 
those who broke the trails to the West. 
. . . An airline hostess, who stops over 
in Manhattan occasionally, claims to be 











First of "Brothers Four" to wed, John Paine, wife Libby now have son Scott. 



Rick Nelson's most steady date. . . . 
Jan Murray has a new idea for a science 
fiction movie he would title "Flapjack." 
The story of a monster pancake that 
eats waiters! 

Spring Fever: Polly Bergen's TV 
absence is temporary. She is presently 
working on a film, "Cape Fear," with 
Gregory Peck. And, come summer, she 
is due to make a TV comedy series 
titled, Occupation: Female. . . . Last 
year, NBC paid Ingrid Bergman $100,- 
000 for her first TV dramatic perform- 
ance. But Marilyn Monroe will get a 
larger gratuity — $125,000 — to play the 
temptress in "Rain." Rod Serling will 
adapt the Somerset Maugham story for 
TV. Oscar Homolka has the part of the 
innkeeper and Fredric March is being 
sought for the missionary. NBC plans 
to schedule the blockbuster for No- 
vember. . . . The biggest musical success 
story of '60, The Brothers Four have 
another four-star album in Columbia's 
"B.M.O.C."— Best Music On (or off) 
Campus. One of the "brothers," Dick 
Foley, started off the new year by 
marrying his Seattle sweetheart, Janice 
Eisinga. The score is now two down and 
two bachelors to go, because John 
Paine has been married more than two 
years and has a son six months old. . . . 
Dragnet's Jack Webb huddling with 
Danny Thomas over a new series. . . . 
Fabian, three credits short for mid- 
term graduation, will make it for sure 
with the June graduating class. His next 
movie will be made with society actress 



Busy thrush Gogi Grant makes sure 
she has time for a personal life. 



Dina Merrill — and how's that for "from 
rags to riches"? 

Grant Takes New York: The tal- 
ented decibels of singing star Gogi 
Grant came over the phone, "I only 
have twenty minutes before the fitter 
gets here, and then back to rehearsal." 
In town for The Ed Sullivan Show, 
Gogi explained that, the moment work 
was over, she would fly back to "the 
most wonderful man in the world — 
my husband Robert Rifkind. I just 
won't take a job that will keep me out 
of commuting distance for over a 
week." Married two years, they recent- 
ly moved into (Continued on page 74) 



For What's New on the West Coast. See Page 6 



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Kiss from fabulous Fabian should be enough for any teenster! But Brendo Lee has other dreams — one here, one overseas. 




WHAT'S NEW ON THE 





Capital Hepcats : The cat who went to 
London to visit the queen had nothing 
on Louis Prima. With the okay of the 
Las Vegas Desert Inn, Louis and love- 
ly wife Keely Smith cut short their 
date at the hotel by a week in order to 
attend the star-studded Inauguration 
Ball for John F. Kennedy, and perform 
at the money-making wingding master- 
minded by Frank Sinatra. Though this 
was Keely's first brush with Wash- 
ington society, Louis had "made the 
scene" before. In 1942, Eleanor Roose- 
velt bade him come to dinner with the 
President and family. For days, Louis 
worried over protocol and what to 
wear. But what gave him most concern 
was how to addres F.D.R. Should he 
call him "Sir"? "Your Honor"? Or just 
"Mr. President"? Came the great occa- 



by EUNICE FIELD 

sion and Louis was ushered into the 
smiling presence of F.D.R. His mind went 
blank. The little speech he had pre- 
pared, protocol, the proprieties, were 
all gone. He looked at the President's 
outstretched hand and blurted "Hiya, 
Daddy-o." Then he stood and prayed 
for the floor to open and swallow him. 
Now came the greatest of all shocks. 
The President took his hand, squeezed 
it, chuckled and shot back, "And how 
are you, my friend Daddy-o?" 

Queens High: For the past two 
years, actresses K. T. Stevens (Mrs. 
Hugh Marlowe), Midge Ware (Mrs. 
Arthur Bitanides), Peg LaCentra 
(Mrs. Paul Stewart) , Chris Nelson (Mrs. 
Louis Quinn) and Joy Terry (Mrs. 
Paul Frees) — plus their non-pro pals, 



Charle Wynn (Mrs. Keenan), Julie 
Forsythe (Mrs. John) , Marianne Stew- 
art and Dorothy Atlas — get together on 
Tuesday nights for a fast, tough session 
of poker. Men are strictly banned. But 
the deal-to-the-death brand of poker 
played by the gal pals requires a mini- 
mum of seven hands. Thus, on at least 
three nights, the absence of a player 
made them compromise and let a hus- 
band fill in. So "honored" were Keenan 
Wynn, John Forsythe and Louis Quinn. 
They had to swear, however, that they 
would never blab a word of what they 
heard to anyone, because the chitchat 
is almost completely distaff stuff. Also, 
in order not to break the illusion of 
an all-gal game, the boys were forced 
to answer all evening to the names of 
Kay, Joan and Louise. 




Ken Murray collected — then donated 
his memorable collection to enrich 
Hollywood Motion Picture Museum. 



Keely Smith remains unimpressed, as 
husband Louis Prima recalls how he 
handled matters in the White House. 





Escorting wife and son Johnny to opening of International Pancake House, Clu 
Gulager wore Billy-the-Kid duds — to show his gratitude to his Tall Man series. 



Little Man, Big Torch: Jess Oppen- 
heimer, producer of Angel, was reading 
a script when a knock came at his door. 
To his surprise, it was an eager-eyed 
boy no more than ten. "Mr. Oppen- 
heimer," the boy said, "I live up the 
street and my dad says you're in charge 
of the Angel show on TV." Jess allowed 
that he was. "Could you get me a pic- 
ture of Angel with her name on it?" 
Oppenheimer smiled. It seemed strange 
to hear a boy that age ask for a picture 
of his French star, rather than one of 
Jim Arness or Dick Boone. "You really 
go for our Annie," he marveled. "Why?" 
The boy lifted a pair of shiny, enamored 
eyes. "It's her cute Southern accent, 



that's why. . . ." The Convert: Famed 
actor Joseph Schildkraut, who used to 
call television "the moronscope" and 
swear he'd never lend his talents to it, 
has seen the light. "I must admit," he 
confesses, "that TV has improved to an 
impressive degree, especially the an- 
thology series. I have decided to do 
such a series myself and scripts are in 
the making. We haven't selected a title, 
but I can promise it won't be 
'Manischevitz Rides Again' or 'Space 
Rabbi.' " 

The Seat of the Trouble: TV is 

having an impact on the garment in- 
dustry and in {Continued on next page) 



THE V4ST 




II 





A girl of 12 received a Christmas 
present of $25 from a relative. Her 
mother refused to let her spend it, 
however, saying she would merely 
waste it on trivialities. "When can 
I spend it?" the girl asked. "When 
you are 16," the mother replied. 
Mollified, the girl sat down to 
make a list of what she would buy 
when she had her money. Sud- 
denly she burst into tears. "The 
whole list's wasted," she sobbed. 
"I won't want at 16 what I want 
now. Now I'll have to find a 16- 
year-old and ask her what she'd 
buy with $25." 

It is true that the teens create their 
own gulfs every single year. Sixteen 
is nothing like fifteen. Seventeen 
changes again. And eighteen looks 
back with amazement on seventeen's 
carefree outlook. 

Some time during these formative 
years, many girls make up their minds 
to try a most popular product: 
Tampax. What motivates them? Gen- 
erally speaking, a newly acquired ma- 
turity of viewpoint. 

When you consider how many of 
your own friends use Tampax s , it is 
obvious that there is nothing strange 
or unnatural about internal sanitary 
protection. In fact, by absorbing in- 
ternally, Tampax prevents odor, chaf- 
ing, irritation, embarrassment. Far 
smaller than an external pad, Tampax 
is easy to dispose of, convenient to 
carry. And it gives complete freedom 
of action. 

Some day you, too, will almost 
surely graduate to Tampax . . . just 
as you graduated to lipstick and high 
heels. For every Tampax user main- 
tains firmly that Tampax is a better 
way; not just different — better! 



For What's New on the East Coast. See Page 4 



TAMPAX 



Incorporated, 
Palmer, Mass. 



WHAT'S NEW ON THE WEST COAST 



(Continued from previous page) 



Stars in her eyes — if they mean 
what they say, SurfSide <5's Diane 
McBain is in for an eventful life! 





New daytimer, Shoppers Keepers, 
may lure football's Frank Sifford 
to TV-emceeing for CBS next fall. 




Surprise duet: Jo Ann Castle up and wed Dean Hall — right while the presses 
were rolling on recent TV Radio Mirror story of her success on Welk show. 



the strangest way. Not only are we 
getting fatter due to TV "snacking," 
but the middle of the figure is suffer- 
ing from our prolonged sitting, and the 
sizing of clothing is being changed as a 
result. But young character actor Kel- 
ton Garwood may save the day. He's 
working on the invention of a station- 
ary "TV" bicycle. It will have a tray on 
the handlebars and, says Kelton, view- 
ers can eat and work off the fat while 
they enjoy their shows. . . . Lost in the 
Stars: Vivacious, blonde Diane Mc- 
Bain is a star with stars on her mind. 
Diane has become an astrology addict 
and recently put out $40 for a complete 
horoscope. On the set of SurfSide 6, 
she sat poring over the chart that pre- 
dicted she would marry a rich man in 
1964, remarry twice again, go into a 
profitable business venture and attain 
great movie fame. Her co-stars, Van 
Williams and Troy Donahue, observed 
her with skeptical eyes, as she read 
them the various predictions. "The only 
thing I can't understand is why this 
says I'll definitely retire at 35," Diane 
sighed. Snapped "unbeliever" Troy, "If 
you keep on studying that silly chart 
instead of your script, you may be re- 
tiring a lot sooner than that. . . ." 

The Price Was Right: The cast of 
Goodson-Todman's new TV series, One 
Happy Family, is fast becoming just 
that in real life, too. When Jody Warn- 
er — who plays the bride in the situ- 
ation comedy which features three 
generations living under one roof — 
bought her first home, she was in such 
haste to move in that she didn't wait to 
buy furniture. Within three days, her 
TV parents and grandparents, Chick 
Chandler, Elizabeth Fraser, Jack Kirk- 
wood and Cheerio Meredith had prac- 
tically furnished the house for her. 
Cheerio sent a bedroom set; Kirkwood, 
living and dining room suites; and 
Chandler and TV wife Liz Fraser made 
kitchen and den contributions. Jody 
was delighted to have the use of these 
"second-hand" gifts until she can find 
time to do some shopping on her own. 
But one article from "Gramps" Kirk- 
wood amazed her. It was a tin bathtub. 
"Now what do I need that for?" she 
asked. Quoth Jack, "It was on sale for 
thirty -five cents in a curiosity shop and, 
at that price, I figured no home can 
afford to be without one." . . . The Who- 
Done-It of Art: Roger Moore has in- 
structed a London art agent to make 
inquiry about buying a painting by Sir 
Winston Churchill. The former British 
prime minister had earlier declined to 
sell any of his paintings, but, since he 
must get his estate in order to meet 
heavy inheritance taxes, will shortly 
offer them (Continued on page 70) 



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THE STAR OF THE YEAR 

LORETTA YOUNG 



TV'S "GOLDEN 

MOST POPULAR NEW ACTOR 
Rod Taylor 

BEST NEW COMEDIENNE 
Annie Farge 

BEST NEW MUSICAL PROGRAM 
NBC Saturday Prom 

BEST NEW SITUATION COMEDY 
My Three Sons 

BEST CHILDREN'S PROGRAM 

The Shari Lewis Show 



BEST PANEL PROGRAM 
To Tell The Truth 



DOZEN" 

BEST DAYTIME ACTRESS 
Mary Stuart 

BEST NEW DRAMATIC SERIES 
Checkmate 

BEST NEW SPECIAL SERIES 
Purex Specials for Women 

BEST FAMDLY PROGRAM 
Leave It To Beaver 

BEST DOCUMENTARY SERIES 
Project 20 

MOST ORIGINAL NEW SERffiS 
The Flintstones 



SPECIAL AWARDS 



FOR OUTSTANDING INTERPRETATION 

OF NEWS ON RADIO 

Edward R. Murrow's "Background" 

FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT 

AS EMCEE AND IMPRESARIO 

Garry Moore 



FOR DISTINGUISHED NEWSCASTING 

ON BOTH RADIO AND TV 

Chet Huntley and David Brinkley 

BEST CONTINUING VARffiTY 

PROGRAM ON THE Affi 

Kraft Music Hall 




TV Radio Mirrors 
National Awards 1960 - 61 

The editors of TV Radio Mirror salute the people and shows of TV and radio which 
have brightened the present season of home entertainment for millions of Americans 




Best Continuing Variety Show on the Air: Now sixty minutes long and telecast in color, each Wednesday evening, 
Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall (NBC-TV) carries on a tradition of entertainment excellence which began on radio, 
for this sponsor, back in 1933 . . . long before Como — or the industry itself! — dreamed of success on the magic screen. 



10 



Television has come a long way since the days when 
you used to peer through the snow on your seven- 
inch screen to see Milton Berle or Jerry Lester and 
Dagmar. The snow has melted away. And Dagmar 
has been replaced by a passel of rootin' tootin' cowboys, 
some of the slickest private-eyes ever to track down a 
criminal, a full contingent of erudite news com- 
mentators—and even, last fall, by the candidates for 
the Presidency of the United States. 

You can settle down in an easy chair any evening, 
this season, and see and hear some of the best that the 
entertainment world has to offer. People, to whom 
Mike Nichols and Elaine May or Maurice Evans or 
Harry Belafonte would otherwise be only names, are 
now able to watch these top-flight performers in 
their own living rooms. As television has grown 



larger and larger, the world has grown smaller and 
smaller. 

Vying with each other to present the most popular 
programs on the air, the three major networks have 
come up this season with new shows which, they hope, 
will one day become as popular as those perennials 
which return year after year "by popular demand." 

From the new and the old, TV Radio Mirror has 
selected, for its annual Awards, those programs which 
best fill the roles for which they are intended, and those 
stars who have contributed most to television's and 
radio's popularity. 

• As she whirls blithely onto the screen, Sunday 
evenings, Loretta Young is every elegant and talented 
inch the star — and TV Radio Mirror's "star of the 




Best New Comedienne: France's Annie Farge 
brings both authentic talent and authentic 
personality to her role in Angel (CBS-TV) 
— as the bewildered but resourceful French- 
born bride of America's Marshall Thompson. 





Best New Situation Comedy: Movies' Fred MacMurray 
(center) stars as widower on ABC-TV's My Three Sons 
— with Lucy's lovable William Frawley (rear) as the 
"housekeeper" for an all-male household which includes 
young Tim Considine (right), middle-sized Don Grady, 
littlest-son Stanley Livingston and a very shaggy dog. 



Most Popular New Actor: Australian-born Rod Taylor 
has found his most rewarding American role to date, as 
the foreign-correspondent hero of exciting Hong Kong 
(ABC-TV) who is ably abetted — and sometimes thwarted 
— by series-regular Lloyd Bochner (in uniform at left). 






year." In an industry where few women have made it 
big, and where the life expectancy of any program is 
figured at four or five years, Loretta is now in her 
eighth season as hostess and star of The Loretta Young 
Show, with a faithful following of twenty millions. 
(This season, re-runs of her earlier plays are also being 
shown five afternoons a week as The Loretta Young 
Theater.) The full story of the fragile -looking star's 
fabulous career appears elsewhere in this issue of 
TV Radio Mirror. 

• When long-lived programs — and stars — are men- 
tioned, Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall just has to head 
the list. The perennially popular Perry has had his 
own television show for twelve years, starting with a 
fifteen-minute program three times a week in 1948, 



and shifting six years ago to his current hour format. 
For the past two seasons, he's presided over the even 
longer-lived Kraft Music Hall, which was launched on 
radio back in 1933, when Como was still cutting hair 
back in Canonsburg, Pa. TV Radio Mirror gives a 
double bow to Perry and the Hall for the best con- 
tinuing variety show on the air. 

Produced under the banner of Roncom, Perry's own 
company, the program makes use of the talents of 
Mitchell Ayres and his orchestra and the Ray Charles 
singers, long familiar on Como shows. The easy-going 
atmosphere is helped along by producer Nick Vanoff, 
director Dwight Hemion, writer Goodman Ace and 
his staff of four. One of these writers is Selma 
Diamond, about whom a story appears elsewhere in 
this issue. 



11 



TV Radio Mirrors National Awards I960 - 61 



• From the movies to TV has come the star of TV 
Radio Mirror's choice for the best new situation 
comedy of the year, My Three Sons. Fred MacMurray 
had been a big name in movies for twenty years, and 
finished his latest feature picture, "The Absent-Minded 
Professor," for Walt Disney, just before beginning work 
on the new series. 

Though he had previously made only guest appear- 
ances on TV, and turned down any number of series, 
Fred accepted the role of widower Steve Douglas 
without hesitation. The idea — the complications of life 
in an all-male household — appealed to him. And with 
Peter Tewskbury — who had won an Emmy for his 
work on Father Knows Best — at the helm as producer- 
director, Fred figured he was in good hands. He was 
right: The show was a hit from the start, with both 
critics and audiences. And that's no mean feat. 

Once his signature was on the dotted line, Fred's role 
was, of course, tailored to his man-next-door person- 
ality, long popular with movie-goers and now proving 
just as appealing to home viewers. But much of the 
success of My Three Sons is also due to William Fraw- 
ley, who plays Bub, housekeeper for Fred and his sons. 
Known for years, to everyone who's ever looked at a 
TV screen, as the next-door neighbor in I Love Lucy, 
Bill Frawley presides over the kitchen sink as if he'd 



been doing it all his life. He looks right at home. 
In their smaller parts, the three boys — played by Tim 
Considine, Don Grady and Stanley Livingston — are just 
as believable. Of these, twenty-year-old Tim is best 
known. An alumnus of The Mickey Mouse Club and 
other Disney features, he also worked with Fred in> 
"The Shaggy Dog" a couple of years ago. 

• Though he has been in Hollywood since 1955, work- 
ing in both movies and television, Australian-born Rod 
Taylor got TV Radio Mirror's vote as the most popular 
new TV actor of the year. For it is as Glenn Evans, the 
two-fisted foreign correspondent of Hong Kong, that 
Rod has made his first big impact on American 
audiences. A rugged guy — five-feet-eleven and 175 
pounds — who insists on doing his own fight scenes, 
Rod is also a competent actor, with more than ten 
years' experience on radio and the stage, as well as in 
movies and TV. He had turned down exactly nineteen 
series offers, he says, before he read the Hongf Kong 
script and found it irresistible. On the TV screen 
Wednesday evenings, women are finding him irresisti- 
ble, too. 

Born in Sydney, Australia, the son of a contractor 
(his father) and a writer (his mother), Rod was 
wavering between art and acting when Sir Laurence 



Outstanding Achievement as Emcee and Impresario in Radio and TV: What crewcut showman stars on both Tuesday 
night's Garry Moore Show (left to right — Durward Kirby, Marion Lome, Patti Page, emcee-impresario Moore, Carol 
Burnett, Ed Wynn) and Wednesday night's I've Got A Secret, over CBS-TV . . . and also weekdays over CBS Radio? 



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Distinguished Newscasting on Both Radio and TV: 

No one tops David Brinkley and Chet Huntley — solo or 
as a team — whether on radio's Emphasis, TV's Texaco 
newscasts, or special NBC reports around the world. 



Best New Special Series: Skillfully tackling such topics 
as "The Working Mother" (v/ith Leora Dana and Seth 
Edwards, below), the hour-long Purex Specials For 
Women (NBC-TV) proved that no subject is too delicate 
or too difficult for daytime — when handled with taste. 




Olivier and the Old Vic company appeared "down 
under." That settled the question of a career for the 
seventeen-year-old. After some amateur theatrical ex- 
perience and a year's study, he began pounding on the 
doors of radio stations. Got in eventually, and, by the 
time he was twenty-four, he was named best actor 
of the year by Australian newspaper critics. His prize 
was a trip to England, but he never got there. Deciding 
to have a look at Hollywood first, he was signed to a 
movie contract and has made ten pictures since — the 
latest, "The Time Machine," in 1959. 

With a big budget and no corner-cutting necessary, 
Rod gets top-notch support from Lloyd Bochner, who 
plays the police inspector, and some of the most sought- 
after Oriental cuties in Hollywood. The lavish pro- 
duction included making background shots in Hong 
Kong itself, where Rod got too close for comfort to 
the border of Red China. Since then, he has settled 
down to a safe but grueling schedule of thirty -six 
hour-long episodes, one right after the other. They 
are made at 20th Century-Fox, where Rod is also un- 
der contract for movies. 

• Even less familiar to American audiences, until last 
fall, was Annie Farge, the twenty-four-year-old who 
walked off with TV Radio Mirror's Award for the best 
new comedienne of the year. Though she has a fine 
theatrical background in her native France, she had 
been seen here in only a few TV commercials before 
she turned up in Angel. But the pint-sized bit of 
femininity who struggles with the language — and all 
things American — on TV, began winning hearts on her 
first appearance, last October, and has been enlarging 
her holdings each week since. 

There was nothing in Annie's early life to indicate 
that a bright new star was in the making, unless it was 
the fact that her world was so terrifying she was 
forced into makebelieve to escape from it. Annie's 



family is Jewish — her real name is Goldfarb — and when 
the Nazis invaded France in 1940, the little four-year- 
old and her brother, six, were hustled off to a friend's 
farm near the Belgian border. Registered under as- 
sumed names, they lived for five years with neither 
pother nor father, and always in the shadow of death. 
Annie was nine when she rejoined her mother in 
Paris, and fourteen when — having auditioned success- 
fully for the Conservatoire National — she received 
parental permission to study acting. Graduated at 
sixteen, she has been appearing on the French stage 
since. She was married in 1958 to Dutch dancer- 
director-choreographer Dirk Sanders, and their first 
child, daughter Leslie, was born in Paris on April 6, 
1960. Two months later, Annie was in Hollywood, 
beginning work on Angel and coping with all things 
American, just as she does on-screen. 

• Garry Moore has proved that life on TV isn't neces- 
sarily an ephemeral affair. After eight seasons as the 
emcee of a daytime program during which he en- 
deared himself to millions of housewives, Garry bowed 
out in 1958, in favor of a weekly nighttime show, and 
quickly proved that he could hold his own against 
formidable competition. 

Garry doesn't sing, dance, or act — and, though he's 
sometimes labeled a comedian, he doesn't tell many 
jokes, either. But the warmth of his personality, and 
his shrewd showmanship, have made him one of the 
most popular emcees and impresarios in the business. 
In the opinion of TV Radio Mirror, he is this year's 
best. 

In his years on radio and television, Garry has intro- 
duced new ideas and personalities galore. Dig back 
into the beginnings of dozens of present-day stars — 
George Gobel — for one — and you'll find they got their 
start with Garry. Last season, Carol Burnett was 
zoomed into the upper stratum of show-business on the 



13 





Best New Dramatic Series: Anthony George, Sebastian Cabot and Doug McClure 
have reason to beam in Checkmate (CBS-TV). New twist on an ever-popular theme — 
not "who-dun-it" but "don't-let-'em-do-it" — guarantees fresh plots. High budget 
guarantees top guest stars and such exciting real-life locations as San Francisco. 



Moore show. Candid Camera, which had been an on- 
and-off item for years, was incorporated into Garry's 
program as a weekly feature and was so popular that, 
this season, it's been made into a highly successful 
half-hour of its own. "The Wonderful Year of . . . .," 
another Moore innovation, has become a series of 
successful record albums. 

• For years, critics of television, both professional and 
amateur, have complained about the quality of day- 
time programs. In their opinion, housewives, who 
make up the major part of the daytime audiences, were 
being fed pap. But since the arrival of the Purex 
Specials For Women last October, they are — some hap- 
pily, some reluctantly — eating their words. Hour-long 
and presented at intervals of approximately once a 
month, the programs were chosen by TV Radio Mirror 
for its "best new special series" Award. 

Each of the shows deals with a major problem area 
for women in today's society, and a special bow goes 
to Irving Gitlin, executive producer of the series, and 
his staff for their courage in presenting subjects which 
were considered taboo only a few seasons ago. But The 
Cold Woman, The Single Woman, The Working Mother 
— though treated forthrightly — have been done with 
such taste that no one could take offense. 

• Newscasters extraordinary are Chet Huntley, forty- 
nine, and David Brinkley, forty. The team has this 
year risen to a new place of prominence. On NBC, 
their nightly TV Texaco Huntley -Brinkley Report . . . 
Emphasis, a radio program on which they and other 
newsmen comment on events, trends and personalities 
that make the news . . . Chet Huntley Reporting . . . 
and various special programs . . . have made the two 
newsmen true celebrities. TV Radio Mirror's Award 
for distinguished newscasting on both television and 
radio is thus awarded to them for 1960. 



• Turning from the established talent in the news 
field to new faces in TV drama, we survey next 
Checkmate, the new hour-long show which is TV 
Radio Mirror's choice as the best new dramatic series 
of the year. 

The creator of the series is Eric Ambler, whose name 
on a book jacket is a guarantee of cold chills up and 
down the spine to mystery aficionados. Older of the 
two co-stars is Anthony George, thirty-five. Tall, dark 
and handsome, he has been working in Hollywood 
since 1948, appeared last season as an aide to Eliot 
Ness in The Untouchables, The younger is twenty- 
five-year-old Doug McClure, a native Californian re- 
cruited from last season's Overland Trail. Sebastian 
Cabot, long-time stage, screen and television actor, 
plays the former Oxford criminology professor to the 
last turn of a whisker. 

A liberal production budget has allowed for filming 
on location in San Francisco, where the private-eye 
firm is theoretically headquartered, as well as in Los 
Angeles, has made possible guest stars of high caliber, 
and has made Tony George one of the i>est-dressed 
dicks in the business. The experienced hands doing 
the mixing of all these ingredients are Herb Coleman, 
who learned about chiller-dillers from that old master, 
Alfred Hitchcock, and Maxwell Shane, most recently 
producer of M Squad. 

• Among the hardy perennials in the fast-changing 
world of television is To Tell The Truth, winner of a 
TV Radio Mirror Award as the year's best panel 
show. A product of Goodson-Todman, which also 
produces Whafs My Line?, To Tell The Truth made its 
debut without any great fanfare four years ago. But it 
caught the public fancy, and has continued to hold it. 
Like many successful ideas, it is simple. By asking a 
series of questions, four panelists attempt to decide 
which of three people, all claiming to be the same 



14 



TV Radio Mirrors National Awards 1960 - 61 




Outstanding Interpretation of News on Radio: All 

the skill of one of broadcasting's most experienced, 
most respected minds went into the analysis on CBS 
Radio's background With Edward R. Murrow (right). 



person, is telling the truth. Though they have no 
stake in it, home viewers like to guess, too. 

It's a relaxed, easy-going half-hour, presided over 
by personable Bud Collyer. Like its time slot, which 
has changed several times over the years, the panelists 
have changed, too. Polly Bergen alone remains of the 
original four. Kitty Carlisle and Tom Poston are other 
recent regulars, joined each week by a guest panelist. 

• Since World War II, when his words, "This is Lon- 
don," were the prelude to newscasts from that be- 
leaguered city, Edward R. Murrow has been a com- 
mentator of stature on both radio and television. Back 
last summer, from an eight-month trip around the 
world, during which he observed various international 
trouble spots, he started a new radio series: Back- 
ground With Edward R. Murrow. To this Sunday show 
goes TV Radio Mirror's Award for outstanding in- 
terpretation of news on radio. After the Awards had 
been determined came the news of Mr. Murrow's 
appointment by President Kennedy as director of 
the United States Information Agency. In this new 
post, his avowed intention: "Whatever is done will 
have to stand on a rugged basis of truth." 

• The Shari Lewis Show — another program new this 
year — receives TV Radio Mirror's Award as the best 
children's show of 1960. 

Shari is just five feet tall and weighs ninety-seven 
pounds. She is a ventriloquist, puppeteer, story-teller, 
dancer, musician and magician — and uses all these 
talents to entertain her small-fry audiences. With her 
are her puppets: The flirtatious-lashed Lamb Chop, 
pun-loving Charlie Horse, Hush Puppy and Wing 
Ding. Playing her next-door neighbor, Mr. Good- 
fellow, is English actor Ronald Radd, out of Broad- 
way's "My Fair Lady." His "dog," Jump Pup, is 
played by Jack Warner. 



Best Panel Show: An ever-increasing 
audience tunes in on Soodson-Tod- 
man's To Tell The Truth (CBS-TV), 
eager to match wits with panelists (here 
Polly Bergen, Don Amecne, Kitty Car- 
lisle, Tom Poston). Bud Collyer emcees. 




Putting all these elements together is a group of 
young and talented folk: Producer Bob Scheerer; di- 
rector Bob Hultgren (formerly of Howdy Doody) ; 
writers Saul Turteltaub and Lan O'Kun, who worked 
with Shari on her local shows; and the star herself. 
A weekend brain-storming session is followed by three 
days of rehearsals, during which O'Kun composes the 
music and songs to be used, and the bits and pieces 
are brought together on Thursday, when they are 
taped for showing two days later. 

Shari and her puppets aren't new to moppets in the 
New York area, where she had two local programs, 
Hi Mom, and Shariland, a few years ago. But, for chil- 
dren in other parts of the country, The Shari Lewis 
Show is a brand-new half-hour of magic peopled with 
puppets as real to them as the twenty-seven-year-old 
who manipulates them, and especially entrancing in 
all the magic of color television. 



15 




Best New Dramatic Series: Anthony George, Sebastian Cabot and Doug McClure 
havereason to beam in Checkmate (CBS-TV). New twist on an ever-popular theme — 
not "who-dun-it" but "don't-let-'em-do-it" — guarantees fresh plots. High budget 
guarantees top guest stars and such exciting real-life locations as San Francisco. 



Moore show. Candid Camera, which had been an on- 
and-off item for years, was incorporated into Garry's 
program as a weekly feature and was so popular that, 
this season, it's been made into a highly successful 
half-hour of its own. "The Wonderful Year of . . . .," 
another Moore innovation, has become a series of 
successful record albums. 

• For years, critics of television, both professional and 
amateur, have complained about the quality of day- 
time programs. In their opinion, housewives, who 
make up the major part of the daytime audiences, were 
being fed pap. But since the arrival of the Purex 
Specials For Women last October, they are— some hap- 
pily, some reluctantly— eating their words. Hour-long 
and presented at intervals of approximately once a 
month, the programs were chosen by TV Radio Mirror 
tor its best new special series" Award. 

Each of the shows deals with a major problem area 
for women in today's society, and a special bow goes 
to Irving Gitlin, executive producer of the series, and 
his staff for their courage in presenting subjects which 
were considered taboo only a few seasons ago. But The 
Cold Woman, The Single Woman, The Working Mothw 
-though treated forthrightly-have been done Zl 
such taste that no one could take offense. 

• Newscasters extraordinary are Chet Huntley fortv 
nine, and David Brinkley, forty. The team has tWs 
year risen to a new place of prominence. On NBC 
their nightly TV Texaco Huntley-Brinkley Report ' 
Emphasis, a radio program on which they and other 
newsmen comment on events, trends and n B ,..l w- 
*at make the news . . . Chet Hu^He^r^ 
and various special programs . . . have mad* hf i " 
newsmen true celebrities. TV Ramo mZ d 1 A 2 
for distinguished newscasting on both TteLli 1 

radio is thus awarded to them L i960 °" "* 



TV Radio Mirror National Awards I960 - 61 




• Turning from the established talent in the news 
field to new faces in TV drama, we survey next 
Checkmate, the new hour-long show which is TV 
Radio Mirror's choice as the best new dramatic series 
of the year. 

The creator of the series is Eric Ambler, whose name 
on a book jacket is a guarantee of cold chills up and 
down the spine to mystery aficionados. Older of the 
two co-stars is Anthony George, thirty-five. Tall, dark 
and handsome, he has been working in Hollywood 
since 1948, appeared last season as an aide to Eliot 
Ness in The Untouchables. The younger is twenty- 
five-year-old Doug McClure, a native Californian re- 
cruited from last season's Overland Trail. Sebastian 
Cabot, long-time stage, screen and television actor, 
plays the former Oxford criminology professor to the 
last turn of a whisker. 

A liberal production budget has allowed for filming 
on location in San Francisco, where the private-eye 
firm is theoretically headquartered, as well as in Los 
Angeles, has made possible guest stars of high caliber, 
and has made Tony George one of the best-dressed 
dicks in the business. The experienced hands doing 
the mixing of all these ingredients are Herb Coleman, 
who learned about chiller-dillers from that old master, 
Alfred Hitchcock, and Maxwell Shane, most recently 
producer of M Squad. 

• Among the hardy perennials in the fast-changing 
world of television is To Tell The Truth, winner of a 
IV Radio Mirror Award as the year's best panel 
snow. A product of Goodson-Todman, which also 
produces Whafs My Line?, To Tell The Truth made its 
debut without any great fanfare four years ago. But it 
caught the public fancy, and has continued to hold it- 
^ike many successful ideas, it is simple. By asking a 
series of questions, four panelists attempt to decide 



, . — i-""uiu>, iour panelists attempt w - — 
which of three people, all claiming to be the same 



V 



Outstanding Interpretation of News on Radio: All 

the skill of one of broadcasting's most experienced, 
most respected minds went into the analysis on CBS 
Radio's Background With Edward R. Murrow (right). 



person, is telling the truth. Though they have no 
stake in it, home viewers like to guess, too. 

It's a relaxed, easy-going half-hour, presided over 
by personable Bud Collyer. Like its time slot, which 
has changed several times over the years, the panelists 
have changed, too. Polly Bergen alone remains of the 
original four. Kitty Carlisle and Tom Poston are other 
recent regulars, joined each week by a guest panelist. 

• Since World War II, when his words, "This is Lon- 
don," were the prelude to newscasts from that be- 
leaguered city, Edward R. Murrow has been a com- 
mentator of stature on both radio and television. Back 
last summer, from an eight-month trip around the 
world, during which he observed various international 
trouble spots, he started a new radio series: Back- 
ground With Edward R. Murrow. To this Sunday show 
goes TV Radio Mirror's Award for outstanding in- 
terpretation of news on radio. After the Awards had 
been determined came the news of Mr. Murrow's 
appointment by President Kennedy as director of 
the United States Information Agency. In this new 
Post, his avowed intention: "Whatever is done will 
nave to stand on a rugged basis of truth." 

• The Shari Lewis Show— another program new this 
year— receives TV Radio Mirror's Award as the best 
children's show of 1960. 

Shari is just five feet tall and weighs ninety-seven 
Pounds. She is a ventriloquist, puppeteer, story-teller, 
dancer, musician and magician— and uses all these 
talents to entertain her small-fry audiences. With her 
are her puppets: The flirtatious-lashed Lamb Chop, 
Pun-loving Charlie Horse, Hush Puppy and Wing 
Oing. Playing her next-door neighbor, Mr. Good- 
te Uow, is English actor Ronald Radd, out of Broad- 
way s "My Fair Lady." His "dog," Jump Pup, * 
Played by Jack Warner. 



Best Panel Show: An ever-increasing 
audience tunes in on Goodson-Tod- 
man's To Tell Tlw Truth (CBS-TV), 
eager to match wits with panelists (here 
Polly Bergen, Don Ameche, Kitty Car- 
lisle, Tom Poston). Bud Collyer emcees. 




Putting all these elements together is a group of 
young and talented folk: Producer Bob Scheerer; di- 
rector Bob Hultgren (formerly of Howdy Doody); 
writers Saul Turteltaub and Lan O'Kun, who worked 
with Shari on her local shows; and the star herself. 
A weekend brain-storming session is followed by three 
days of rehearsals, during which O'Kun composes the 
music and songs to be used, and the bits and pieces 
are brought together on Thursday, when they are 
taped for showing two days later. 

Shari and her puppets aren't new to moppets in the 
New York area, where she had two local programs, 
Hi Mom and Shariland, a few years ago. But, for chil- 
dren in other parts of the country, The Shari Lewis 
Show is a brand-new half-hour of magic peopled with 
puppets as real to them as the twenty-seven-year-old 
who manipulates them, and especially entrancing in 
all the magic of color television. 



16 



TV Radio Mirrors National Awards 1960 - 61 




Best Children's Show: Childhood's most delightful 
companion sparkles The Shari Lewis Show (NBC-TV) on 
Saturday mornings, accompanied not only by her cast of 
puppets, but by two full-size performers — Jack Warner 
as "Jump Pup," Ronald Radd as "Mr. Goodfellow." 



Best Family Show: The ever-loving but everlasting 
differences of viewpoint between children. and parents 
have never been captured more charmingly than in 
Leave It To Beaver (ABC-TV). Left to right — Tony Dow, 
Barbara Billingsley, Jerry Mathers, Hugh Beaumont. 




• Just as a lot of grown-ups watch The Shari Lewis 
SJiow, so do a surprising number of men make a point 
of catching Search For Tomorrow, a daytime dramatic 
series aimed at women, and the oldest such on TV. 
(Its star, Mary Stuart, even has a fan club made up of 
truck drivers who stop for lunch every day at a Buffalo, 
New York diner to watch her show.) Equally popular 
with women all across the country, Mary was an 
obvious choice for TV Radio Mirror's Award as best 
daytime actress. 

It was in September, 1951, that Mary took on the role 
of Joanne Barron (later to become Mrs. Arthur Tate). 
In the same month, she became, in real life, Mrs. Rich- 
ard Krolik, wife of a New York press agent. For more 
than nine years, she has happily combined her two 
careers. Where else, she asks, could she find a spot 
which would allow her to continue acting and yet be a 
devoted wife and mother? 

A graduate of Tulsa University and its little theater, 
an alumna of Hollywood — where she had "small parts 
in big pictures and big parts in little pictures" — Mary 
is today successfully playing her double role and reign- 
ing as "queen of daytime drama." A story on Mary 
and her family appears elsewhere in this issue. 

• When the NBC Saturday Prom debuted last October, 
it was intended for teenagers, but when its creator and 
producer, Ed Pierce, saw a member of his crew out on 
the dance floor with his wife during rehearsal, it began 
to dawn on him that he had something for grown-ups, 
too. Even parents who couldn't care less about dancing 
are enthusiastic about the weekly program. 



The show has kept its promise re the bands andjhe 
singers. Studio 8H is weekly turned into a festive prom 
setting, with a dance floor bordered by tables and 
chairs, and a soft-drink bar. Each week, some 400 or 
500 students from a different high school in the New 
York area are brought in as guests. And Merv Griffin, 
who began his show-business career as a pop singer, 
and is now also emcee of the daytime Play Your 
Hunch, presides. 

To the NBC Saturday Prom goes TV Radio Mirror's 
Award for the best new musical show of the year. 

• There's no question about for whom Leave It To 
Beaver is intended, or who watches it. It's a family 
show, for men and women, grown-ups, teenagers and 
kids — and, in the opinion of TV Radio Mirror, the best 
such, show in many a moon. 

It's more than three years now since Beaver and 
Wally and their sometimes harassed, more often per- 
plexed, parents first appeared on home screens. Beaver 
was eight then, and Wally, twelve. But as Jerry 
Mathers, who plays Beaver, and Tony Dow, the Wally 
of the series, have grown, so have the two on-screen 
brothers. The complications of life in the Cleaver 
household have changed, too, to fit the older boys. 

The brain child of Joe Connelly and Bob Mosher, 
who have continued to write and produce it, there's no 
doubt whence it gets its authenticity: There are six 
little Connellys and two little Moshers at home. 

• Up on the fourth floor of the RCA Building, in the 
very center of busy New York, is a group of offices 



16 



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^* — . * 


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't!- ^ 
i 




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t ^ Wf 


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h 



Best New Musical Show: Telecasting today's best in both dance bands and singing stars, NBC Saturday Prom has 
attracted an even wider audience than anticipated — parents at home join the toe-tapping fun, along with teenagers 
in Studio 8H, where proceedings are emceed by Merv Griffin (center), who also hosts the weekday Play Your Hunch. 



Best Daytime Actress: The warmth and talent of Mary 
Stuart has much to do with the long-running success of 
Search For Tomorrow. Other fine members of this CBS- 
TV "family" include Lynn Loring and Terry O'Sullivan. 



which provides a small oasis of calm, complete with 
rocking chairs and afternoon tea. Here work five 
dedicated men who are responsible for Project 20. In 
its seven years of existence, this little group has pro- 
duced twelve films dealing with the major events and 
forces which have acted upon twentieth-century man. 
All of them have received salvos of applause from 
critics. More important, audiences have become in- 
creasingly aware of them, too. This year, Project 20 
has topped the series ratings list whenever one of its 
films has been shown. It's the winner of this year's 
TV Radio Mirror Award for the best documentary 
series. A full story on Donald Hyatt, producer-director, 
and Project 20 appears elsewhere in this issue. 

• Something new under the sun, and on the TV 
screen, made its appearance this season— and wins an 
Award from TV Radio Mirror as the most original new 
series on the air. It is The Flintstones, a situation 
comedy for adults in cartoon technique, picturing the 
Stone Age adventures of Fred and Wilma Flintstone 
and their neighbors, Betty and Barney Rubble. 

Out of the imagination of Joe Barbera and Bill 
Hanna, who are responsible for such kiddie cartoon 
fare as Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound, this new 
format seems certain to start a new trend in TV 
comedy. What makes these two men tick is the basis 
for a story elsewhere in this magazine. 

And there they are — the sixteen stars and shows 
judged best by TV Radio Mirror's editors for the 
current season. They furnish solid proof that there's 
much that's good, a lot that's superb, on radio-TV. 







fl <^"* -*•** ■ ^k 



Ji 



TV Radio Mirror presents here, in brief, 
the story of Loretta Young which concisely 
defines the special quality of her success 



y 




Her personal messages on The Loretta Young Show spell out 
a credo by which she herself has lived — and which she herself 
expresses so well in the accompanying story. Result today: 
A stellar career-record which is literally 'incomparable." 



The Loretta Young Show, NBC-TV, Sun., 10 P.M. EST, is sponsored by 
The Toni Company and Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co. The Loretta 
Young Theater (repeats) is seen on NBC-TV, M-F, at 2:30 P.M. EST. 







. 



A 



& 



18 



STAR OF THE YEAR 




Gretchen young's first big break 
resulted from a simple fact. 
She was in the right place at the 
. right time; a bell rang and she an- 
swered it 

Mervyn LeRoy, of First National, 
was telephoning her sister Polly 
Ann. Twelve-year-old Gretchen 
explained that Polly Ann was 
working for a week and on location. 
Alerted to hear whatever might be 
opportunity's knock on her door, 
"Won't I do?" she asked. 

LeRoy told her to come to the 
studio. She went to the studio and 
she got a job — but not Polly Ann's. 
She was hired, with several other 
children, for a sequence in a Col- 
leen Moore picture. 

Miss Moore (First National's top 
box-office star) noticed her on the 
set. Miss Moore called the front 
office. Miss Moore insisted the stu- 
dio put the tall, lanky youngster 
under a long-term contract. Miss 
Moore changed her name Gretchen 
to "Loretta." Miss Moore predicted 
the child would become a great 
beauty! 

Loretta has a basic philosophy of 
life, which she herself summed up 
concisely in an article she wrote for 
TV Radio Mirror a number of 
years ago, "Have Faith in Your- 
self." As she explains, "You have 
to believe in yourself if you want 
to be a success in life. It doesn't 
make any difference if you want 
to be a successful actress, engineer, 
or housewife. Believing in yourself 
is the keynote in any field of en- 
deavor. 

"By (Continued on page 75) 




Waif, society matron, dancing girl, peasant 
wife — Loretta plays all these and more. From 
the beginning, she's given TV her very best, 
just as she aid in the movies. Below, with 
John London, producer of The Loretta Young 
Show, and assistant director Nate Levinson. 





TV Radio Mirror presents here, in brief, 
the story of Loretta Young which concisely 
defines the special quality of her success 




Her personal messages on The Loretta Young Show spell out 
a credo by which she herself has lived — and which she herself 
expresses so well in the accompanying story. Result today: 
A stellar career-record which is literally "incomparable." 



The Loretta Young Show, NBC-TV, Sun., 10 P.M. EST, is sponsored by 
The Toni Company and Warner-Lambert Pharmaceutical Co. The Loretta 
Young Theater (repeats) ia seen on NBC-TV, M-F, at 2:30 P.M EST 



STAR OF THE YEAR 



/^ retchen young's first big break 
V resulted from a simple fact 
She was in the right place at the 
right time; a hell rang and she an- 
swered it 

Mervyn LeRoy, of First National, 
was telephoning her sister Polly 
Ann. Twelve-year-old Gretchen 
explained that Polly Ann was 
working for a week and on location. 
Alerted to hear whatever might be 
opportunity's knock on her door, 
"Won't I do?" she asked. 

LeRoy told her to come to the 
studio. She went to the studio and 
she got a job — but not Polly Ann's. 
She was hired, with several other 
children, for a sequence in a Col- 
leen Moore picture. 

Miss Moore (First National's top 
box-office star) noticed her on the 
set. Miss Moore called the front 
office. Miss Moore insisted the stu- 
dio put the tall, lanky youngster 
under a long-term contract. Miss 
Moore changed her name Gretchen 
to "Loretta." Miss Moore predicted 
the child would become a great 
beauty! 

Loretta has a basic philosophy of 
life, which she herself summed up 
concisely in an article she wrote for 
TV Radio Mirror a number of 
years ago, "Have Faith in Your- 
self." As she explains, "You have 
to believe in yourself if you want 
to be a success in life. It doesn't 
make any difference if you want 
to be a successful actress, engineer, 
or housewife. Believing in yourself 
is the keynote in any field of en- 
deavor. 

"By (Continued on page 75) 




Waif, society matron, dancing girl, peasant 
wife — Loretta plays all these and more. From 
the beginning, she's given TV her very best, 
just as she did in the movies. Below, with 
John London, producer of The Loretta Young 
Show, and assistant director Nate Levinson. 





M 



Project 20 covers every field of human interest: A unique showing of 
art treasures on "The Coming of Christ" (above, Massys' "Adoration 
of the Magi," from the Metropolitan Museum) ... a special version of 
the wartime documentary, "Victory at Sea" (below). "A fine program 
can be and should be repeated," says producer-director Donald'Hyatt. 
Meanwhile, he enjoys the challenge of new projects such as the two 
planned for late March: "The Story of Will Rogers," narrated by Bob 
Hope. .."The Real West" (I 840-1900), with Gary Cooper as narrator. 




II i/a Us 

Candied 
Culture 



Recipe: First, take a big, 
tough subject. Put it on the 
fire to soften up its cultural 
elements. Add the marvelou9 
"sugar" of entertainment. 
What do you have ? Another world- 
beating Project 20 production 

by JAMES TAYLOR 

IN the backrooms of the television indus- 
try, "culture" is a word that is seldom 
used with enthusiasm. You're more apt to 
hear that culture won't sell soap, or that it 
is box-office poison. Not so, however, in the 
NBC offices of a thirty-six-year-old dedi- 
cated dynamo named Donald Hyatt! 

Hyatt is Director of Special Projects for 
the NBC-TV Network, and producer-direc- 
tor of the award-winning Project 20 series, 
which is one of his "special projects." 

"It all sounds pretty involved," grins Hy- 
att, a strapping six-foot, 190 pounds of en- 
ergy, whose easygoing manner belies his 
determined drive. "Actually, as producer- 
director of Project 20, I report to myself 
as Director of Special Projects — an arrange- 
ment that is most satisfactory to me." 

Defining Hyatt's job is rather difficult. 
"Boiling it down," he says, "I guess what 
I'm doing is attempting to present culture 
on a commercial basis. There are those in 
this business who say I have an impossible 
task. They're wrong. We're proving them 
wrong all the time. The television audience 
isn't made up of (Continued on page 81) 

On NBC-TV's Project 20, Tues., March 28, from 9 
to 10 P.M. EST, "The Story of Will Rogers"— Wed., 
March 29, 7:30 to 8:30 P.M. EST, "The Real West." 





Mr< 



*f? 



-H 






Hyatt counts his understanding wife, Jeanne, as a major asset in his demanding job. 
"She was my secretary at NBC," he says. "She worked with me then and she still does." 



21 




24 HOURS 

A WOMAN'S 




22 



I 



STARRING 




Unnoticed by the other passengers, Ingrid Bergman gazed 
out the window beside her. She idly watched the ocean 
flashing in the sunlight as the plane winged its way toward 
New York. Her mind wandered from the monotonous scenery 
below to the demanding role she would soon be undertaking 
before the cameras. A couple of weeks' rehears?!, then the 
taping — and finally, on March 20, the drama would be shown 
over CBS-TV. By then, of course, she would be back home 
in Paris. 

Ingrid leaned back, slowly closed her eyes and once again 
thought of the upcoming TV show. "Twenty-Four Hours in a 
Woman's Life," she mused An unusual title for a television play. 
The actress began to doze — and if she dreamed of the "key" 
twenty-four hours in the life of a woman whose name happens 
to be Ingrid Bergman, who could really be surprised? 

Many of those hours had been brilliant, shining ones which 
brought her acclaim from the entire world. Other hours had 
been filled with pain, abuse and rejection by the very same 
people who once had shouted her praises. 

Let's "flash back" and tick off those (Continued on page 80) 

Ingrid stars in "Twenty-Four Hours in a Woman's Life"— the Stefan Zweig 
story of a widow's efforts to reform a compulsive gambler (played by Rip 
Torn)— as seen over CBS-TV, Mon., March 20, from 9 to 10:30 P.M. EST, 
sponsored by Revlon, Inc. Her husband, Lars Schmidt, is executive producer. 





at 



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it* 



by KATHLEEN POST 

Suddenly i felt a shadow over me. And, according 
to Art Linkletter, this shadow has stayed with 
him all his life, a cloud on an otherwise sunny vista. 
. . . The disclosure of its existence has come as a 
shock to the many ardent Linkletter fans. Considering 
Art's great success, fine family and radiant person- 
ality, they felt that here at last was a man who had 
been spared the dark uncertainties that afflict most 
people today. . . . Now it is known that Art Linkletter, 
genial emcee of two popular programs, was an 
adopted boy, an Unhappy boy who did not learn the 
secret of his birth until he was ten, and who has 
borne the painful sense of rejection and doubt into 
the years of his maturity. 

Since he told the story of his unhappy childhood, 
Art has been the target of letters chiding him for 
being ungrateful to his foster parents and the system 
of adoption which has given so many orphans the 
blessing of a home and family. "Had I been an or- 
phan," Art points out, "or had my foster parents — the 
only mother and father I ever really knew — told me 
at once that I was adopted, I'm sure I would have 
felt better about the whole thing. 

"I found out that I was not really Art Linkletter, 
but Gordon Arthur Kelly, when I was ten. My 
curiosity had been aroused several times, when I 
came into my father's room and saw him hide a pack- 
age of papers in a drawer. One day when he was 
away, I slipped into the room, took out the papers and 
read them. To my amazement, they were letters from 
my real parents discussing my adoption and other 
matters pertaining to me. I sat there a long while 
staring at the letters and my adoption papers. My 
first feeling was not regret, but relief. This may sound 
like a terrible thing to confess, but it is the truth and 
there were good reasons for my relief. Later, I felt 
the shadow of rejection that has haunted me all of 
my life." 

As any child psychologist will point out, Art was 
at a crucial stage in a boy's life. . . . the time when 
he begins to seek for the identity which can form a 
bridge between past and future. He had never been 
really happy with the life of his adoptive parents, 
although he accepted them as his own and loved 
them. The trouble was that, by nature, Art was 
completely unsuited to John (Continued on page 84) 

Art Linkletter's House Party is on CBS-TV, M-F, 2:30 P.M.— 
CBS Radio, M-F, 10:10 A.M. (WCBS Radio, 11:10 A.M.)— un- 
der multiple sponsorship. His People Are Funny, on NBC-TV, 
Sun., 6:30 P.M., is sponsored by Squibb Laboratories. All EST. 




Art 

Linkletter 
talks 
about 

ADOPTION 



Today, adopted children are told 
the truth about themselves, 
lovingly. Yesterday, this wasn't so. 
A retrospective look at a childhood 
crisis by one of TV's most beloved men 



24 



.&:; 




Youngest grandparents in show biz: Art and Lois not only have five children of their own. 
They have four grandchildren: Dawn Linkletter Zweyer's twin sons Kevin and James (in Art's 
arms) . . . Jack Linlcletter's baby Dennis (in Art's lap) and firstborn Michael (held by Lois). 




25 




the Rocky Road 



Behind the new Screen Gems success: 
Joe Barbera (left) and Bill Hanna — who 
have teamed up for more than 20 
years making prize animated cartoons. 



The impossible happened this tele- 
vision season, when a cartoon series 
jumped into second place in national 
ratings. Into a TV world dominated 
by cowboys, private eyes and neurotic 
villains came The Flintstones, an "ani- 
mated" family show as wholesome as 
a fresh apple. Betty, Fred, Wilma and 
Barney live in Bedrock, a suburb of 
Anywhere, U.S.A., but their "props" 
are a little different. They drive cars 
with rock wheels, bet on dinosaur 
races, play Stoneway pianos. When 
Fred shaves, he picks up a clam shell, 
glances out the window and eyes the 
largest bumblebee in the bush. Snap! 
and the bee is buzzing inside the 
shell, and Fred has the best "electric" 
shave known to the Stone Age. 

The creators of this happy comedy 
are two genial geniuses, Bill Hanna 
and Joe Barbera. "If there is an un- 
derlying philosophy about our car- 
toons," says Joe, "it is to project 
warmth and good feeling. Wilma and 



The Flintstones' way of life has 
struck a spark with TV audiences, 
whose sharp eyes were seeking 
something NEW! And that's the 
series. This story is about 
the people who made the miracle 

by MARTIN COHEN 




m 




Behind the lovable cartoon characters seen on The Flintstones: Voic 
of (left to right) Alan Reed as Fred Flintstone, Jean Vander Pyl as 
Wilma Flintstone, Bea Benadaret as Betty Rubble, Mel Blanc as Barney 
Rubble. These talented performers are only heard in such scenes as the 
one on the facing page, but the visual goings-on are human as can be! 

Cartoons © 1961 by Hanna-Barbera Productions 



to Success 





the Rocky Road to fiuecQSS 



(Continued) 




Bill Hcmna (center) with Fernando Montialegre (left) and 
Art Lozzi, who do "backgrounds" — the settings seen 
through the transparencies which carry the "animation." 



Joe Barbera (right) with the story director, Alex 
Long. They welcome every idea, no matter how off- 
beat — so long as it isn't "frightening or wicked." 




Hanna-Barbera uses 140 artists, including 
several two-generation families. Many work at 
home, as does Bill's married daughter Bonnie. 
Every movement and expression in an ani- 
mated cartoon requires a separate drawing 
(like one she holds) called a "cell" (celluloid). 



The Flintstones is seen on ABC-TV, Fri., 8:30 P.M. 
EST, for Winston Cigarettes and Miles Laboratories. 



Betty say 'Honey' when they speak to their hus- 
bands, and their husbands are good guys. We 
spoof lots of things — Hollywood, cars, television, 
and even our own animated commercials — but we 
don't see anything funny in violence and sin. Even 
our villains are nice guys." 

Besides The Flintstones, Hanna's and Barbera's 
brainchildren include Quick Draw McGraw, Yogi 
Bear, Huckleberry Hound, Jinks and Pixie and 
Dixie, Doggie Daddy and Snaggle Puss. Last 
season, Huckleberry Hound won an Emmy as the 
best children's series — but this is misleading. The 
show's audience involves a wide range of adults. 
Sponsor Kellogg received a letter signed by six 
scientists at White Sands Proving Ground, asking 
that the daytime show be moved to a later hour 
because "it is one of our chief relaxations." 

In Seneca, New York, a group of businessmen 
formed a charitable organization and titled it The 
Yogi Bear Club. In Seattle, a bar hangs out a sign 
once a week: "No drinking. No talking. No noise. 
Yogi Bear is on." Asked what they would miss 
most on a two-month charting course in the Ant- 
arctic, the 1,750-man crew of the U.S.S. Glacier 
named — not Marilyn Monroe, not Brigitte Bardot — 
but Huckleberry Hound. The Yale Alumni Review 
announced that their alma mater had chosen 
Huckleberry Hound as its favorite TV show. At 
Ohio State University's big homecoming game, 
Huck and Yogi were the featured stars. 

"How do you explain it?" Says Joe, "Well, we 
don't write stories for children or adults or any 
particular age group. This is TV humor. Something 



28 




"Moving" pictures: Head cameraman Frank Parker's 
task is to bring "cells" and "backgrounds" together 
in one smooth-running, hilariously believable film. 







Cordiality reigns at the studio, despite busy schedules. 
Here, Hanna joins the girls from the Inking and Painting 
Department to celebrate Roberta Greutert's birthday. 



altogether new. Children and adults together have 
loved Gleason, Carney, Lucy, and Sid Caesar. This, 
too, is our kind of humor. You would never hear 
of college students voting Mickey Mouse their 
favorite, never hear of a father making a point to 
watch Donald Duck with his kids. That's because 
Mickey and Donald are designed for children. Our 
shows are made for the family." 

Barbera continues, "The other part of it is the 
personal side. Cartoonists are unusual people. 
They are adults who never grow old. Everyone in 
our business stays young. You watch a white- 
haired artist describing a funny idea, and he acts 
it out with the agility and excitement and humor 
of a person one-third his {Continued on page 85) 




Huckleberry Hound, a Hanna-Barbera daytime series, proved 
there's no age limit for cartoon enjoyment. Collegians love the 
characters, used them as the theme for Ohio State's homecoming. 



Businessmen named a charitable organization 
for Yogi Bear (above), scientists begged a 
later TV-time for his friend Huck (below). 

















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4- ■ 






Hearty appetites! Richard and Mary Stuart Krolik, little Cynthia and Jeffrey— all ready for an outdoor feast. 



by FRANCES KISH 



IT would be a return to romantic Early American living, 
Mary Stuart thought last June, when she and Richard 
and the children took possession of a small, gfeen-shut- 
tered white house in the gentle hills of Connecticut. They 
would learn how peaceful, how beautiful, how easy it 
is' to live among spreading trees and rolling meadows. 
Happily, they would forget crowded New York on all 
the weekends. And Mary herself would have three restful 
weeks of vacation from being Joanne Tate in the CBS 
television serial, Search For Tomorrow. Surely, life 



would be more simple in such surroundings. . . . She 
was partly right. They all loved it. They still do. It has 
been peaceful — some days. And beautiful — always. Hap- 
py, too. But easy? Simple? Not on your life. Certainly, 
not on Mary's life. 

"Even during those brief vacation weeks in the country, 
I got some idea of the miracles women perform daily 
who live in outlying and suburban areas. They are the 
unsung heroines of our time. They are not only wives, 
mothers, housekeepers, full-time (Continued on page 76) 



36 



Mary Stuart stars as Joanne Tate in Search For Tomorrow, seen on CBS-TV, M-F, 12:30 P.M. EST, sponsored by Procter & Gamble Company. 




& vs. 

THE SIM 




PLE LIFE 



The trials and tribulations 
of Joanne Tate in 
Search For Tomorrow had 
nothing on the real-life 
doings ivhich occurred when 
actress Mary Stuart 
came to grips with Nature 




Mary can always count on the kids' "help" going to market 



Richard, a public relations exec, takes to the wood . . . also finds mowing three acres is no simple task. 




w 




Hearty appetites! Richard and Mary Stuart Krolik, little Cynthia and Jeffrey-all ready for an outdoor feast. 



by FRANCES KISH 



It would be a return to romantic Early American living, 
Mary Stuart thought last June, when she and Richard 
and the children took possession of a small, green-shut- 
tered white house in the gentle hills of Connecticut Thev 
would learn how peaceful, how beautiful, how easy it 
is' to live among spreading trees and rolling meadows. 
Happily, they would forget crowded New York on all 
the weekends. And Mary herself would have three restful 
weeks of vacation from being Joanne Tate in the CBS 
television serial, Search For Tomorrow. Surely life 



would be more simple in such surroundings. . • • *~ 
was partly right. They all loved it. They still do. It has 
been peaceful— some days. And beautiful— always. Hap- 
Py, too. But easy? Simple? Not on your life. Certainly, 
not on Mary's life. 

"Even during those brief vacation weeks in the country. 
I got some idea of the miracles women perform a ■ 
who live in outlying and suburban areas. They are 
unsung heroines of our time. They are not only vw 
mothers, housekeepers, full-time (Continued on P fl 9 e 



36 



Mary S.uar, stars as Joanne T.te in Search For Tomorrow, seen on CBS-TV, M-F, 12:30 P.M. EST, sponsored by Procter & &3^ 




THE SIM 




LIFE 




The trials and tribulations 
of Joanne Tate in 
Search For Tomorrow had 
nothing on the real-life 
doings ivhich occurred when 
actress Mary Stuart 
came to grips ivith Nature 



Mary can always count on the kids' "help" going to market. 
Richard, a public relations exec, takes to the wood . . . also finds mowing three acres is no simple task. 









>N 



I 



Round table: Sidney Poitier, Anthony Franciosa, David Susskind, Harry Belafonte, Shelley 



David Susskind wages an 
unceasing one-man war against 
mediocrity on TV. Win or lose, 
nobody can say he isn't lively! 

by JIM MORSE 



Although he lives in a glass house, David Susskind 
delights in throwing stones — "verbal boulders" 
might be a better description! Without doubt, Susskind 
is the angriest young man of show business. He is also 
one of its most successful. It's an unusual combination 
indeed, in this day and age of mass conformism. 

His enemies are legion — simply because Susskind is 
a self-described "dedicated critic." He speaks up, he 
speaks loud, he speaks often. And he names names. 

Tony Curtis, for one, has publicly threatened to punch 
Susskind in the nose, the first time he sees him. Other 
targets may have something of a similar nature in mind, 
even if they haven't announced such violent physical 



38 



CWL 







■I I 



Winters. Atmosphere is relaxed — conversation is electritying. No time limit on Open End\ 



intentions. Yet all this pleases David Susskind. He's 
fighting a one-man war against complacency and medi- 
ocrity, and he believes that reactions such as this are 
proof that he's getting results. 

Who and what is David Susskind? 

Millions of people are acquainted with his activities as 
a prolific television producer and as moderator of NTA's 
(National Telefilm Associates') syndicated discussion 
program, Open End. But these are just two of his many 
activities. In addition, he's a producer of motion pictures 
and Broadway plays, a lecturer, an author, and a critic- 
at-large. 

Surprisingly, perhaps, his pet hates are the very busi- 



nesses of which he is so very much a part — the present 
state of television, Hollywood and the theater. "Televi- 
sion," he barks, "is mostly junk. It lulls you to sleep. It's 
escapism. Its greatest capacity now is the capacity for 
harm. It's a sleeping robot. 

"This is shameful, during this time in world history 
when we must be awake, alert and thinking. The public 
affairs programs are TV at its best On the whole, they're 
doing a brilliant job. But the entertainment section of 
television is miserable. There's (Continued on page 66) 

David Susskind' s provocative program, Open End, is presented in 
the New York area over WNTA-TV, Sun., beginning at 10 P.M. 
EST. For time and day in other areas, see local newspaper listings. 



39 




I 



CWL 



tf^ 



Round fable: Sidney Poitier, Anthony Franciosa, David Susskind, Harry Belafonte, Shelley 



David Susskind wages an 
unceasing one-man war against 
mediocrity on TV. Win or lose, 
nobody can say he isn't lively! 

by JIM MORSE 



38 



A lthough he lives in a glass house, David Susskind 
** delights in throwing stones— "verbal boulders 
might be a better description! Without doubt, Susskind 
is the angriest young man of show business. He is also 
one of its most successful. It's an unusual combination 
indeed, in this day and age of mass conformism. . 

?r enemies are legion— simply because Susskind * 
a self-described "dedicated critic." He speaks up, ° e 
speaks loud, he speaks often. And he names names. 

Tony Curtis, for one, has publicly threatened to pun<* 
Susskind in the nose, the first time he sees him. Other 
targets may have something of a similar nature in ran* 
even rf they haven't announced such violent phy*"* 1 



Winters. Atmosphere is relaxed— conversation is electrifying. No time limit on Open End\ 



intentions. Yet all this pleases David Susskind. He's 
nghting a one-man war against complacency and medi- 
ocrity, and he believes that reactions such as this are 
Proof that he's getting results. 

Who and what is David Susskind? 

Millions of people are acquainted with his activities as 
a prolific television producer and as moderator of NTA's 
(National Telefilm Associates') syndicated discussion 
Program, Open End. But these are just two of his many 
activities. In addition, he's a producer of motion pictures 
and Broadway plays, a lecturer, an author, and a critic- 
at-large. 

Surprisingly, perhaps, his pet hates are the very busi- 



nesses of which he is so very much a part — the present 
state of television, Hollywood and the theater. "Televi- 
sion," he barks, "is mostly junk. It lulls you to sleep. It's 
escapism. Its greatest capacity now is the capacity for 
harm. It's a sleeping robot. 

'This is shameful, during this time in world history 
when we must be awake, alert and thinking. The public 
affairs programs are TV at its best. On the whole, they're 
doing a brilliant job. But the entertainment section of 
television is miserable. There's (Continued on page 66) 

David SuMkincfs provocative program. Open End, is presented in 
the New York area over WNTA-TV, Sun., beginning at 10 P.M. 
EST. For time and dajf in other areas, see localnewspaper listings. 



39 




by PAT and PEARSON MULLEN 



1 rnen — 

how* 6 ?* 10 



If you call her on the phone and ask, "Is this Selma 
Diamond, the gag-writer?" — there's a small silence, 
then a polite, slow "Well . . . this is Selma Diamond, 
the writer." Once that's clear, TV's top woman comedy 
writer — now sparkling up the Perry Como show — cor- 
dially invites you to visit. Selma Diamond's elegantly 
furnished apartment in smart Sutton Place has a dream 
terrace looking down on New York City. Selma herself 
is small and blonde, with a cuddly figure and an ever 
present, pixie-ish grin. She has a tendency to bounce. 
She's never still for a moment. She wears toreador pants 
and bright sweaters almost as a uniform, and her con- 
versation is hilarious. 

"Do I have trouble with the comedians I work for? 
Why, I have trouble with the butcher! I can make a 
four-act drama out of a trip to the supermarket! . . . 
Am I rich? Let's say that I don't have to go to the 
Laundromat anymore — I just drag the stuff there to get 
gags. . . . But, honestly, the comedian I like the best 
is always the one I'm working with at the time. I've 
worked for Groucho, Berle, Caesar, Garry Moore, Jimmy 
Durante. I got along fine with every one of them. Right 
now, my true love is Perry Como and I hope to work 
for him straight through until 2061!" 

Though her credit-line is a foot high on the TV 
screen, Miss Diamond makes it clear that she works 



with Goodman Ace, the most important comedy writer 
of our time. The writing "team" which puts the Como 
show together also includes Jay Burton, a jokemaster 
from 'way back, Frank Peppiatt and John Aylesworth. 

"I'll try to describe an average day," she says. "First, 
you don't write as the novelist or columnist writes, alone 
in an ivory tower with endless sheets of blank paper 
to fill and the clock racing madly toward an impossible 
deadline. You never work alone. The bigger the comedian, 
the more writers he can afford. Sometimes you find 
yourself in a mob scene of ten to fifteen people, all top 
comedy writers with definite ideas of their own — and 
one lone female . . . me. 

"Comedy writing is an exhausting business. It's a 
combination of group therapy and public breast-beating. 
You don't write — you throw lines at each other. Then 
you fight for every comma, every intonation, and for 
every smallest bit of business the comedian you are 
working for must put over on the TV screen. Then comes 
the payoff — you watch the program. And when the lines 
that are particularly your own flash on the screen, if 
the comedian happens to forget to raise an eyebrow 
to accent a punchline, you are as plunged in gloom as 
if he skipped your lines altogether. 

"But I'm doing what I always wanted to do, since I 
was a kid in high school: Write comedy. I used to cut 



40 Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall, NBC-TV, Wed., from 9 to 10 P.M. EST, is sponsored by Kraft Foods Division of National Dairy Products Corp. 



No flaws in this diamond. Selma Diamond, that is. America's top lady 
gag-writer tells how it feels to be the only woman in a man's profession 



classes to catch the vaudeville acts, then waylay the 
comedians at the theater and hand them written jokes. 
After a while, they got to know me and they'd buy me 
sodas and candy. I never got any money. But the glory 
of hearing them tell my jokes on the stage was enough 
to keep me starry-eyed. Then I began to branch out 
a bit. I sent some gags to New Yorker cartoonist Perry 
Barlow and, to my stunned amazement, he bought one 
for five dollars. I was really hooked then — that sale 
was the biggest thrill of my life. 

"For the next couple of years, I supplied nearly every 
cartoonist in print with gags — I wrote thousands. Then 
I decided to work on a comic-strip idea which I called 
'Jeannie.' Sort of a girl-reporter type thing. I hired 
a cartoonist and sold it to the Herald Tribune Syndicate. 
It sold quite a few papers and, for a while, it looked 
like the comic strip would take up my whole time. 
Finally, I gave it up because salaries and commissions 
amounted to more than the strip brought in. 

"Along the way somewhere, an agent had looked 
over my work ... he was big-time and I was a nobody, 
but I held onto his card. He had said that, if I ever 
got out to Hollywood, I should look him up. That was 




n Lon- 



■Bo. •■„ Canada,^ >« — ; ^dI^S 



do „ t o U» B-^SftSmff Ctafa We- 




a cross 



between The Chipmur 



rawi 

r.' 



Afnco 0n SQf ,f 



ten years ago and I was a bit on the broke side. I 
thought I might just as well spend my last cent in 
Hollywood as anywhere else. When I arrived in the 
land of sunshine, I had less than twenty dollars in my 
purse and a dog-eared card with the name 'George 
Griskin, Agent' on it. The card was three years old. By 
some lucky quirk of fate, the agent remembered me and 
assigned me to the Groucho Marx show. Next came a 
stint with Tallulah Bankhead and Duffy's Tavern, both 
radio shows, then television with Milton Berle." 

From then on, Selma Diamond had people waiting 
until she was available. In the beginning, there weren't 
any set thirteen-week contracts. She'd be hired for two 
weeks or four weeks. There were so few women in 
comedy writing, she was always taken on "temporarily, 
until we see how you do." Now the contract's by the 
year. 

"It just takes a couple of days for the men I work 
with to get used to having a woman in the group. After 
the first shock, there's complete harmony and we pull 
together as a team. Though I wouldn't recommend the. 
hectic life of a comedy writer to the beginner — it's too 
strenuous — and I sometimes think I'll give it up and 
retire to the country and grow things ... I know I never 
will. Comedy writing is my whole life and I love it!" 



41 






I 







A daughter's affectionate appraisal of that beloved funnyman, Danny Thomas 




Above: Let me present a remarkable man and father, Danny Thomas. 
Also, my remarkable mother — someday I'll write a story about her. 




While in college, I enjoyed entertaining friends informally at home. 
Never dreamed about show business — and Daddy liked it that way. 



The Danny Thomas Show, CBS-TV, Mon., 9 P.M. EST, is sponsored by General 
Foods. (Re-runs— Make Room For Daddy— are seen on NBC-TV, M-F, 4 P.M.) 



by MARLO THOMAS 

About a year ago, I was invited to ap- 
xlL pear as a mystery guest on The Jack 
Paar Show. Naturally, I was thrilled. I 
had a chance to be interviewed, I told a 
joke, 'n' everything. I was in my ele- 
ment. (All this was long before I made 
my "formal" TV acting debut on Dick 
Powell's Zane Grey Theater — that earth- 
shaking event took place just this 
February.) 

During the quizzing, a series of ques- 
tions established that I was the daughter 
of a show-business personality. Instantly, 
someone came up with: "After one look 
at those eyes, I know you just have to 
be one of Eddie Cantor's daughters!" 

It's true that my eyes were patterned 
after those of my father, but my dad is 
Danny Thomas. Being the daughter of 
a world-famous personality is often de- 
scribed by outsiders as an adventure as 
mixed-up as a Chinese dinner with plenty 
of sweet-and-sour sauce — emphasis on 
the sour. 

I can't go along with the "poor me" 
descriptions. Cases (Continued on page 71) 



Now that I've decided to be an actress — 
well, believe it or not, that's Danny T. 
with me (below) in the Dick Powell's Zane 
Grey Theater episode which was my debut! 





Irresistible! With a voice as big as his grin. 

This fellow's out to capture you . . . and you . . . and you . . . 



by GREGORY MERWIN 






Bareheaded and wearing a topcoat which be- 
longs to Johnny Mathis, Mike Clifford stands 
at the corner of Broadway and Fifty-Second 
Street. Keyed up with excitement, he grins at 
newsboys, policemen and strangers. It's Mike's 
first morning in New York, his first day in a 
coast-to-coast promotion trip to introduce dee- 
jays to his first recording for Columbia. Tall 
and slim, hazel-eyed and brown-haired, he looks 
like a youthful edition of Jimmy Stewart. Still 
grinning, he says, "It's just that I feel so good. 
I have a lot to be happy about." 

Mike is on a jet express to stardom. Propelling 
the jet is female dynamo Helen Noga, whose 
talented ears have led her to discover the tal- 
ented sounds of such as Dave Brubeck, Gerry 



Mulligan and Andre Previn. Four years ago, 
Johnny Mathis walked into the San Francisco 
club she runs with her husband, and she became 
Johnny's personal manager. Now she has taken 
on one other singer — seventeen-year-old Mike 
Clifford — and that is news. 

Helen says, "I've been in the business more 
years than I care to remember, and I've heard 
a lot of singers that I don't want to remember. 
I don't have time to waste and couldn't get 
interested in a personality unless I was con- 
fident that he was unmistakably great." Getting 
down to particulars, she goes on, "I haven't 
heard a voice like Mike's since Buddy Clark. 
The pure tone of his voice is rare. His person- 
ality and looks — the (Continued on page 90) 



TV RADIO MIRROR'S NEW FACE OF THE MONTH 



44 



4 



i 






*• ■ 






J 







Irresistible! With a voice as big as his grin. 

This fellow's out to capture you . . . and you 

by GREGORY MERWIN 



and you . . . 



Bareheaded and wearing a topcoat which be- 
longs to Johnny Mathis, Mike Clifford stands 
at the corner of Broadway and Fifty-Second 
Street. Keyed up with excitement, he grins at 
newsboys, policemen and strangers. It's Mike's 
first morning in New York, his first day in a 
coast-to-coast promotion trip to introduce dee- 
jays to his first recording for Columbia. Tall 
and slim, hazel-eyed and brown-haired, he looks 
like a youthful edition of Jimmy Stewart. Still 
grinning, he says, "It's just that I feel so good. 
I have a lot to be happy about." 

Mike is on a jet express to stardom. Propelling 
the jet is female dynamo Helen Noga, whose 
talented ears have led her to discover the tal- 
ented sounds of such as Dave Brubeck, Gerry 

TV RADIO MIRROR'S NEW 



Mulligan and Andre Previn. Four years ago, 
Johnny Mathis walked into the San Francisco 
club she runs with her husband, and she became 
Johnny's personal manager. Now she has taken 
on one other singer— seventeen-year-old Mike 
Lhrtord— and that is news. 

Helen says, "I've been in the business more 
years than I care to remember, and I've heard 
a lot of singers that I don't want to remember, 
i aont have time to waste and couldn't get 
interested in a personality unless I was con- 
haent that he was unmistakably great." Getting 
down to particulars, she goes on, "I haven't 
heard a voice like Mike's since Buddy Clark. 
The pure tone of his voice is rare. His person- 
ality and looks-the (Continued on page 90) 







1 





ps— 




I 



II 



1 



A venerable New York 
landmark, once the home of 
a German singing society. 
Come inside for a 
behind-the-scenes look at how 
some of your favorite daytime 
dramas are put together 



by ALICE FRANCIS 

Daily, thousands pass a weathered brick 
building on New York's East Fifty- 
Eighth Street. It claims little attention, set 
as it is in a tight row of equally ancient 
edifices. But, if the eye follows the sharp 
ascent of old-fashioned high stone steps, 
it finds a sign which proclaims this to be 
Liederkranz Hall. Other signs attest to its 
use now as a CBS television studio. Actu- 
ally, four separate studios. 

Sometimes, a girl whose lovely face 
seems oddly familiar — or a man who re- 
minds passersby of someone they seem to 
know — hurries up the steps and goes in, 
too quickly for total recognition. Or a 
truck pulls up, spilling out scenery and 
props, and people pause for a moment to 
watch with some curiosity. 

But, to most New Yorkers, this is just 
another old building which has stood since 
before the turn of the century. Some may 




Through Liederkranz portals pass such 
gifted daytime-TV performers as Joan 
Copeland (left), Helen Dumas and Tom 
Shirley, star Audrey Peters (right) — 
Love Of Life's Margie Porter, Vivian 
and Henry Carlson, Vanessa Sterling! 



Monday-through-Friday programs telecast on CBS-TV from Liederkranz Hall include: Love Of Life, from 
12 noon to 12:30; Search For Tomorrow, 12:30 to 12:45 P.M.; The Secret Storm; 4:15 to 4:30 P.M.; 
and Captain Kangaroo, 8:15 to 9 A.M. (also seen Sat., from 10 to 11 A.M.). AD times given are EST. 



ranz 



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2' ! I 



A venerable New York 
landmark, once the home of 
a German singing society. 
Come inside for a 
behind-the-scenes look at how 
some of your favorite daytime 
dramas are put together 

by ALICE FRANCIS 

Daily, thousands pass a weathered brick 
building on New York's East Fifty- 
Eighth Street. It claims little attention, set 
as it is in a tight row of equally ancient 
edifices. But, if the eye follows the sharp 
ascent of old-fashioned high stone steps, 
it finds a sign which proclaims this to be 
Liederkranz Hall. Other signs attest to its 
use now as a CBS television studio. Actu- 
ally, four separate studios. 

Sometimes, a girl whose lovely face 
seems oddly familiar — or a man who re- 
minds passersby of someone they seem to 
know — hurries up the steps and goes in, 
too quickly for total recognition. Or a 
truck pulls up, spilling out scenery and 
props, and people pause for a moment to 
watch with some curiosity. 

But, to most New Yorkers, this is just 
another old building which has stood since 
before the turn of the century. Some may 



# t 






Through Liederkranz portals pass such 
gifted daytime-TV performers as Joan 
Copeland (left), Helen Dumas and Tom 
Shirley, star Audrey Peters (right) — 
Love Of Life's Margie Porter, Vivian 
and Henry Carlson, Vanessa Sterling! 



Mondav-throueh-Fridav programs telecast on CBS-TV from Liederkranz Hall include: Love Of Life, from 
12 noon to ifsO; Smirch for Tomorrow 12:30 to 12:45 P.M; The Secret Storm; 4:15 to 4:30 R M ; 
and Captain Kangaroo, 8:15 to 9 A.M. (also seen Sat., from 10 to 11 A.M.). All t.mes given are EST. 



NO PARKIN! 



Liederkranz Hall 




remember it as the former home of a 
German singing society, the Lieder- 
kranz. Its once-great dining and con- 
cert halls hosted stars of the Metro- 
politan, musicians from Carnegie Hall, 
great names of Broadway. Presidents, 
and dignitaries of many lands, have 
been honored guests here. 

Few realize that here and now, in the 
heart of the city, is a modern Temple of 
Dreams filled with romance and an- 
guish, excitement and sweetness, which 
it beams electronically into every city 
and town and village across the nation, 
providing entertainment for millions. 
For out of this sober-looking structure 
come three of the CBS top-rated daily 
dramatic serials: Love Of Life, Search 
For Tomorrow, and The Secret Storm. 
Thus, Liederkranz Hall is a veritable 
"home away from home" for many who 
live on these sets in their long-running 
roles. 

Studio 55, from which Search For 
Tomorrow is telecast, is largest of the 
three used for serials. (The fourth, 53, 
is home of the topflight children's show, 
Captain Kangaroo, and of many public 
affairs programs and special shows.) It 
measures some forty by fifty-five feet, 
but the "playing area" is necessarily 
more confined, among all the back- 
grounds and equipment. Studios 56, 
housing Love (Continued on page 78) 



The Secret Storm, on set in Studio 54: Haila Stoddard as Pauline Fuller 
(left), Marjorie Gateson as Grace Tyrell, Mary Foskett as Susan Dunbar. 



Search For Tomorrow: A coffee break in Studio 55 for Mary 
Stuart (Joanne), Melba Rae (Marge) and Larry Haines (Stu). 



Typical TV clutter doesn't faze Search director Dan 
Levin. He knows where — and how — it all goes. 




TV RADIO MIRROR'S 



Regional Awards 




In this fast-whirling age of electronics, the 
American public is rapidly growing accustomed 
to the idea of a far-out satellite capable of in- 
stantly transmitting radio and TV to any global 
point. It's a challenging concept. The immensity 
of the world is shrinking year by year with each 
step forward in speed of communication. Interna- 
tional networks are already in the planning. What 
does this mean for local radio and TV stations? 
TV RADIO MIRROR believes that the develop- 
ments of the next few years will increase, rather 



than diminish, the national and world importance 
of the functions performed by those dedicated peo- 
ple who produce perceptive programing for local 
regions. So, once again, the magazine is happy to 
honor a group of local radio and TV stations 
judged outstanding in the opinion of the editors. 
Material was invoked on a competitive basis from 
these regions: Atlantic States, Midwest States, 
Southern States, Western States, and Canada. Our 
stories tell about these best programs — and the 
people who made them outstanding. 



On the following pages, THE WMXNERS from the MIDWEST STATES y 

R 



49 




Host Van Vance of Fun Fair PM and 

his guest jazz musician, Jonah Jones. 



News director Bill Small confers with 
editors Hugh Smith, Richard Thomsen. 



Milton Metz gathers weather informa- 
tion. He broadcasts twice each day. 




Moral Side Of The News: Rt. Rev. Msgr. F. N. Pitt, 
Dr. D. K. McCall, Dr. P. Stauffer, Rabbi J. J. Gittleman. 



50 




WHAS has 
Everything! 



Singing-emcee Jim Walton (front) of morning Fun Fair 
with music director Srubb, program director Walsh. 



Day-by-day programing excellence, 365 days a year, 
is the proud record of radio Station WHAS, of 
Louisville, Kentucky. In addition, its special programs 
reached a high peak with its reportage of the important 
national events of 1960. But, if all this gives an impres- 
sion of egghead, strictly educational, deep stuff, it just 
isn't so. Variety being the spice of life, WHAS's day is 
liberally sprinkled with seasoning. Running through it 
are fun and frolic and laughter, with music and song 
(minus the red-hot type and the shouting platter - 
pluggers). News — local, national, foreign, business, fi- 
nancial. Farm news, with market information. Home 
news and woman-to-woman talk. Panel discussions, 
drama, dancing parties. Religious discussions. Sports, 
with accent on horse racing — that sport of kings and 
Kentuckians. Sports are staffed by director Cawood 
Ledford and editor Dave Martin. During the year, more 
than twenty separate sports, major and minor, are 
covered on WHAS programs, regularly or as special 
events. . . . News is high on the daily schedule, headed 



BEST OVER-ALL PROGRAMING ON RADIO: WHAS, LOUISVILLE. KENTUCKY 




Randy Atcher and the Red River Ramblers rehearse The Old Kentucky Barn Dance, Saturday-night sparkler tor al 



by news director Bill Small and assistant news director 
Jay Crouse. Besides the full-time staff of ten, forty part- 
time correspondents throughout Kentucky and Indiana 
send in exclusive reports. Thirty-five countries and 
news centers feed additional material. Farm director 
Barney Arnold travels more than 15,000 miles annually 
to interview experts and discuss farm problems with the 
people themselves. He broadcasts twice daily. The Moral 
Side Of The News consists of a panel of Baptist, Catholic, 
Christian (Disciples of Christ) and Jewish leaders. Such 
topics as the Population Explosion, Should We Have 
Compulsory Voting? and Discrimination are freely dis- 
cussed. . . . Five nights a week, the listeners speak by 
calling Juniper 5-2385, sometimes seriously, sometimes 
hilariously. Moderator Milton Metz starts off a discus- 
sion and, from there on, it's a lively free-for-all. . . . 
The Old Kentucky Barn Dance is a favorite country- 
music show. Headed by singing star Randy Atcher (who 
also conducts the Saturday-night Country Record Shop), 
it includes clowning "Cactus" Tom Brooks, the Sharpe 



Twins, Red River Ramblers, accordionist Kenny Riehl 
and teen favorite Bobby Lewis. . . . On Saturday morn- 
ing, it's Hi Teens — Ray Shelton's teen-age participation 
program of music, talk and interviews, staged in co- 
operation with high-school editors. The Monday - 
through-Saturday Early Morning Frolic (and we do 
mean early — from 5 to 6 a.m.) is Shorty Chesser's, a 
service-entertainment affair that's a real waker-upper. 
. . . Later in the morning comes Jim Walton's Fun Fair — 
relaxed, spontaneous melange of music and banter and 
service features. Fun Fair PM has Van Vance emceeing. 
Here's Tiny presents mid-morning keyboard entertain- 
ment and anecdotes by Carl "Tiny" Thomale. Joe Ham- 
ilton spins popular recordings on Hamilton, K-Y. The 
big break for housewives, of course, is Phyllis Knight's 
Your Home. Every weekday morning, Phyllis "expands 
the four walls of a kitchen to include the world." There's 
more, day and night — much more than we can cover 
here — and it all adds up to a wondrous variety of prime 
listening pleasure for every tuner-in. 



51 



MOST ORIGINAL PROGRAM ON RADIO: KM OX, ST. LOUIS. MISSOURI 



AT 

YOUR 

SERVICE 




Eleanor Roosevelt discusses the U.N. with Jock Buck, Station Mgr. Hyland listens in. 




Baseball's Jackie Robinson answers listener questions 
on the air, with Jack Buck acting as the anchor man. 




52 



Rev. Kellogg of Maplewood Baptist Church, Father 
Bayne, S.J., participate in a church-state debate. 



ANEW CONCEPT IN RADIO BROADCASTING is the 
four-hour, 3 to 7 p.m. At Your Service programing 
on KMOX, St. Louis. Capturing the full potential of 
creative, mobile radio, the microphones are open 
to news and views, culture and comedy, audience parti- 
cipation and celebrity appearances, sports, 
woman appeal, constructive controversy, big-name inter- 
views — all presented a little differently from 
the usual run of radio. . . . The first hour is a press 
conference of the air, hosted by Jack Buck, who con- 
tinues as host throughout the entire four hours. 
Jack interviews the V.I.P. of the day, listeners call 
in questions to the guest, who answers them on the air. 
Prof. Roy McCarthy screens and paraphrases questions, 
is skilled at give-and-take tactics with the callers. 
During the first week of broadcasts, trunk lines 
were tied up, as well as the whole telephone exchange. 
. . . The second hour makes events and names in 
the news come alive, through Bob Goddard, John 
McCormick, Steve Rowan, Rex Davis, Miss Nanette 
(fashions), Laurent Torno (music), Dr. Alfred Weber 
(space age). Bob Holt, man of a thousand voices, 
turns up anywhere in the area with comic commentary. . . . 
Rowan and Davis tee off the news from 5 to 7 p.m., 
with Bob Anthony taking over local and regional 
reports. . . . Jack Buck contributes "vignettes" from the 
news and the people who make the news. Harry Caray and 
Bob Burnes contribute individual sports features. . . . All 
of this woven together into a complete whole by 
coordinator Buck. . . . The daily morning story conference, 
at 8, is designed to keep the programing fresh, 
exciting, topical. Wherever and whenever news breaks 
occur during the day, KMOX and At Your Service 
are on the spot — with a never static, constantly 
expanding service for all its listeners. 









W. "\Wf- 




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^4 



IK*.»* 






PROFILE OF HUMAN RIGHTS 



>J5 



"■Jaith in fundamental human rights is re- 
■ affirmed by the United Nations Charter. It is 
reaffirmed also by the St. Louis community serving 
as a part of the larger body of the United Nations. 
... It is reaffirmed by the effort of many individuals 
and organizations working within the community 
toward the most urgent area of concern — the area 
of interracial human rights. Within the Negro 
community rests the greatest problem . . . within 
the entire community rests the only solution. In 
an effort to appraise the problem, KMOX-TV offers 
this special report: Profile Of Human Rights." 
With these inspired words, on Saturday, December 
10, 1960, KMOX-TV set the stage for an hour-long 
tribute — commemorating the twelfth anniversary of 
Human Rights Day. The commemoration became 
an area-wide observance — a public forum — directed 
to more than 850,000 families living in the fifty-two 



counties served by the station. . . . Cooperating with 
the station on this special "Profile" program were 
fifteen local organizations, representing a member- 
ship of more than 100,000 workers dedicated to the 
advancement of equality and dignity of all persons 
and all groups. With outspoken direct commentary 
from intelligent, forceful representatives of the 
St. Louis community, and vivid dramatization of 
the present living and working conditions of St. 
Louis' Negro population, the special show was a 
standout for originality of concept. The show was 
written and produced by Helen Hagen, directed by 
Robert Schnorf. Although it was a one-time broad- 
cast concerned with a topic of vital interest to the 
community, it acted as a year's-end summary of 
many programs of public interest and as an ex- 
tension of a station policy which focuses attention 
on the highest principles of human rights. 



filJjj 



53 



BEST NEWS PROGRAM ON TV: KMTV, OMAHA, NEBRASKA 



::.':,' 



54 




A local news show which triggered a national front-page scandal! 



One day last June, a faint rumor drifted into the news 
room of Station KMTV in Omaha, Nebraska. A 
cautious phone call or two, to check the rumor, per- 
suaded the station that they had stumbled upon what 
might be a news story of international importance. Forth- 
with, three men — Floyd Kalber, the newscaster, and 
Mark Gautier and Jerry Mason, two KMTV reporters — 
set to work. Before they were through, they had de- 
veloped a story that shook the entire United States mili- 
tary establishment and brought about a radical change 
in defense policy which strengthens American security. 

The core of the story was this: That, notwithstanding 
the real progress — along with the excitement and pub- 
licity — of American guided missiles in recent years, the 
construction of launching sites for these missiles was so 
far behind at many vital defense points as to render the 
missiles currently useless. For the most powerful missile 
extant is as harmless as a toy pistol, unless there is a 
properly built and equipped site from which to launch it. 

What made the discovery even more hair-raising, to 
the men at KMTV, was the fact that the Offutt Air Base 
at Omaha was the headquarters of the Strategic Air Com- 
mand, one of the most acutely important defense arms of 
this country. The S.A.C. lives "on the alert." Day and 
night, around the clock, through every day, hour and 
minute of the year, the S.A.C. must be ready to take 
the air at a second's notice in the country's defense. And 
here was the Offutt Air Base — other air bases, as well — 
with its protective missile-launching sites incomplete, 
unready and in a state of "chaotic confusion." Just how 
vulnerable can you get? 

The situation is different now, and the reason why it 
is different is because of what KMTV did. 

The award of TV Radio Mirror's annual Gold Medal to 
KMTV is simply recognition of the fact that one of the 
most admired traditions of American journalism is still 
alive and going strong: That truly vital news stories do 
not always originate with the press corps of the great 
metropolitan stations and newspapers. Given an alert 
and efficient personnel — which KMTV has — a small sta- 
tion can scoop the great ones. 

Consider some of the facts which underlay this tre- 
mendous story. The first atomic bomb was dropped on 
Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. This bomb, developed in 
the United States, utterly changed the character of war- 
fare. It jolted the world as it had never been jolted be- 
fore. So great, indeed, was the jolt that it overshadowed 
in the public mind the development of the radio-aimed 
"buzz bombs" which Hitler had used, toward the end of 
World War II, in a final effort to subdue the British. True, 
there had been rocket enthusiasts and experimenters 
in America for years. True also that, after 1945, the 
United States military had persuaded German missile 
technicians to come to America and pursue their experi- 
ments at White Sands, New Mexico, and elsewhere. But, 
on the whole, this work seemed like just another of those 
scientific military miracles so numerous you couldn't keep 
up with them. 

But on October 4, 1957, the Russians launched the Sput- 
nik. The whole world realized that another weapon revo- 
lution of profound importance had occurred. In America, 
there was a wave of apprehension as it dawned on people 
that we had been outdistanced in this development. At 
once, there began a feverish expansion of the missile 
program. Money was poured out. Millions of persons, 
for the first time in their lives, began to hear about Cape 
Canaveral and launching pads. 

Conceive then, the state of mind of the KMTV men 
when, last June, they turned up in their researches one 



Rex Breese, an engineer employed by the George A. 
Fuller Co., a big contracting firm. Breese had been sent 
to Omaha to find out why missile-site construction at 
Offutt and other bases was so far behind. After three 
months of total frustration, he was about to resign. 

KMTV persuaded Mr. Breese to make a sound-on-film 
statement. When broadcast, it proved as big a bombshell 
as a missile would have been. Work at the base was "in 
complete chaos." Wasted money, interminable delays, 
faulty materials, endless work stoppages and wildcat 
strikes — even "a bribe offer of $50,000 to take my men 
and get out of town." 

Next development: Mr. Breese told KMTV that the 
prime contractor at Omaha, the Malan Construction Co. 
of New York, had been turned down in their original 
bid for the job — and then, in some mysterious way, were 
awarded the contract, five days after the turndown. 

Day by day, KMTV broadcast these developments. The 
earth began to heave. There was growing agitation in 
Washington. Where KMTV pointed the finger, investiga- 
tions multiplied. The Army Engineers investigated. So 
did the F.B.I. , the Air Force, and the House Armed 
Services Committee. Official investigators were getting in 
each other's way, there were so many of them. The KMTV 
men couldn't understand why, if the missile sites were 
so critically important, there hadn't been some of this 
investigation long before. 

KMTV kept right on and, presently, the mystery began 
to crack. Congressman Taber of New York frankly stated 
that, when the Malan bid had been rejected, his aid had 
been sought. He had asked that the question be reopened. 
It was — with the result that the Malan people had brought 
in a firm of collaborating contractors and the resultant 
bid was accepted. There was, and is, nothing unusual or 
necessarily sinister about Congressional intervention. If 
anyone doing business with the Government feels that 
he has been slighted or unjustly treated, he has the right 
to seek reconsideration, at least. The trouble with the 
Malan people — or, maybe, just one of the troubles — was 
that they were participants in a contract system which 
had become so complicated and overgrown as to be an 
almost impenetrable jungle. 

What a picture KMTV gradually brought to light! It 
appeared that the General Dynamics Corporation made 
the original specifications for the missile sites. Then the 
Air Force Ballistics Missile Division drew the initial plans. 
Then the Army Engineers became responsible for con- 
struction and the awarding of contracts. Then the suc- 
cessful prime contractor turned around, cut his contract 
in little bits, and subcontracted out each fragment. In the 
end, you might find "John Doe" — a small-time, small- 
town builder — attempting vainly to build something far 
beyond his comprehension or competence. What do you 
expect from a carpenter or metal worker — accustomed to 
building garages, putting tin roofs on houses — when he is 
confronted with demands for measurement tolerances so 
exact that they represent the difference between life and 
death? What you might expect was what you got at 
Omaha and elsewhere. 

The climax came when Secretary of Defense Gates 
summoned to Washington the fifty-six leading missile and 
construction contractors from the entire country. It was the 
first time that most of these men had ever got together 
with defense officials to go over this critical problem! 

What was the upshot of the KMTV effort? The appoint- 
ment of a "missile czar," the cutting of red tape and a v 
clearing of the tracks. Things are moving now at the R 
missile bases, but KMTV is still watching closely. KMTV 

deserves the gratitude and admiration of us all. 

55 



BEST MUSIC PROGRAMING ON RADIO: KADY, ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI 




Program Director Don Leviton checks show script with Will R. Cady Jr., who wrote the spectacular. 




Staff engineer Jacoby monitors sound (above). 
Don Levitan works on "Happy Holiday" (below) 
with Springman and Kemper, station announcers. 




56 



HOLIDAYS IN MUSIC 



The people of the St. Louis, Missouri area were — this 
past year — treated to a wholly original and new idea 
in radio programing. For each of eight holidays of 
the year, Station KADY's facilities were devoted com- 
pletely to music related to the day. Save for brief 
news breaks, and the excellent spoken commentary which 
brought the music's significance to life for listeners, 
the whole day was music, music, music. First notion 
of such an original program idea came from William R. 
Cady Jr., President and General Manager of KADY (AM) 
and KADI (FM), St. Charles and St. Louis, Missouri. 
Working with him on the shows were fourteen people: 
The total sales, adminstrative, announcing and 
engineering personnel. Cooperating generously (by their 
relinquishment of prior time-commitments) were the 
regular sponsors who use the stations. Sponsoring the 
special music series was the Laclede Gas Company, who 
underwrote all costs, and held commercial interruption 
to a minimum. For example, during the Christmas Day 
show, they did not include a single commercial, used 
only an institutional message from their Chairman of 
the Board wishing seasonal greetings to listeners. . . . 
Music for the shows came from the KADY-KADI library, 
which contains over 50,000 selections. And a portion 
of each show was done in stereo, utilizing the AM and 
FM stations for channel separation. The range of selec- 
tions was wide — folk music, marching songs, popular 
selections, jazz — any composition which could evoke in 
the listener a dramatic feeling of the reasons why the 
holiday was celebrated in the first place. To St. Louis 
residents, a special treat. For KADY-KADI, a triumph! 



BEST NEWS PROGRAM ON RADIO: WCKY, CINCINNATI, OHIO 



COMPASS 





Compass planning session: Paul Miller, Jeanette Heinze, Paul Sommerkamp, 
Lloyd Baldwin, above. Below, "agent" Jones as himself, WCKY newsman. 



"Undercover" agent Tom Jones got great 
tapes posing as ex-con looking for a job. 




A Monday through Friday WCKY Radio news show, 
from 6 to 7 p.m., is appropriately titled Compass. 
Covering North, South, East, West, in all its facets, spe- 
cifically geared to follow day-to-day local happenings 
in the Cincinnati area. Pivot-man is Lloyd Baldwin. . . . 
The format is flexible, as wide-open to change as the 
news it reports. The first twenty-five to thirty-five min- 
utes are devoted to all the day's news for those who 
may have missed it — not just the "hot" items. Where 
possible, actual voices of people who have made the 
news are heard. "Business Beat" and "Sports Beat" are 
included. "Background," five-minute commentary on 
what's behind the headlines, and "As Others See It," 
editorial comment from the national and local press on a 
current topic. Specials deal with many community prob- 
lems. "Talkback" is man-in-the-street informal stuff. 
"Overseas Monitor" records highlights of foreign broad- 
casts, with explanatory comment, especially on Russian 



propaganda. "Documentary" may cover the last thirty 
minutes of Compass, is an in-depth report on a major 
community problem. "Sounds" presents sound-pictures — 
amazingly vivid in the images they call up — teenagers 
screaming greetings to visiting Johnny Mathis, or the 
"Sounds of Christmas" recorded in stores and streets. . . . 
Perhaps in "Undercover," Compass achieves some of its 
most unique reporting. WCKY reporters, armed with 
hidden mikes and tape recorders, pose as something 
they're not, to get both honest and dramatic stories. They 
have worn the guises of ex-convict, panhandler, sidewalk 
fund-solicitor, to name a few. One reporter, posing as an 
ex-con, went out to get a job, being careful to establish 
his "record" early in interviews. Aside from gathering 
interesting, enlightening program material, the man got 
the job — proving it could be done. . . . Big people, little 
people, newsworthy people and events, all have their 
day on this highly stimulating program. 



57 




During a segment called "Sure You Can Cook," regular Tom Fouts concocts a tasty treat for the "Clock-Watchers. 



CLOCK-A-DOODLE-DAY 



58 



To make it easier for the kids to get off to a hard day in 
the classroom, give them something to think about, to 
wonder at, and to giggle at a little. That seems to be the 
thought behind this excellent early-morning children's 
television program, Clock- A-Doodle -Day, telecast over 
WBKB, Chicago, five days a week. It's hosted by Dale 
Young, produced by Tom Shutter, directed by Dick Du- 
mont. The time is 7 to 8:30, the age group runs roughly 
eight to twelve, but the four-year-olds are fast catching 
on to the fact that there's fun for them in it, too — and 
many a mom and dad is bewitched into watching. The 
pace is fast, the show is plotted to a highly mobile audi- 
ence getting dressed, breakfasting, grabbing up books and 
homework papers, sweaters and lunchboxes. Segments are 
short, compact, attention-holding. Quality, suitability of 
program content is guided by educational consultants. . . . 
Two grade-school youngsters are designated each week as 
"Clock-Watchers" — chosen by their grade school and 
junior high-school principals on the basis of scholarship 
and character. They assist Dale Young for the five- 



day period, have a rare chance to get acquainted with 
activities involved in behind-the-scenes production of a 
live TV show. . . . It's a sought-after honor, of course, and 
they love it. Some favored features of the program are: 
Minute Mysteries — quick identification of famous people. 
Sure You Can Cook — easy dishes for young chefs. Some- 
thing To Grow On — ninety-second parables by Chicago 
churchman Dr. Preston Bradley. What Is It? and Snap 
Judgment — identification of objects, or parts of objects, 
flashed on the screen for a fraction of a second, to stimu- 
late visual alertness. It Figures — fun and fascination with 
numbers. Twisted Tales — "spoonerisms," or unusual pro- 
nunciations of children's stories as told by host Dale 
Young. A Visit With Uncle Fudd — anecdotes from that 
comical character, portrayed by Tom Fouts. . . . Even 
weather reports are slanted to youthful watchers, with 
some simple science lessons worked into them. News, too, 
is made easy to understand. Mom and Dad wait for that 
. . . after all, kids don't mind letting their parents in on a 
good thing like their own Clock- A-Doodle-Day! 



BEST WOMEN'S INTEREST PROGRAM ON TV: WANE'TV, FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 




WOMEN ARE 

WONDERFUL 



All women are wonderful, according to the Ann Colone 
\ Show, seen at 1 p.m., Monday through Friday, 
on WANE-TV, Fort Wayne. This includes the viewers, who 
put aside the lunch dishes and the dustcloth and 
polishers to keep their daily date with Ann. It certainly 
includes Ann Colone herself, a pixie-type gal 
with a lively sense of humor, a pervading curiosity 
about people and a genius for attracting some of 
the most interesting ones to her show. . . . The program has 
a little of everything for the ladies, and it all 
adds up to something rather special. Exercise Day, on 
Tuesday, is host to a physical-education instructor 
from the local Y.W.C.A. Ann goes along with the bend- 
ing and jumping, sometimes persuades a dignified 
guest to join in, has had the whole Johnny "Scat" 
Davis orchestra — seven members strong — doing bends 
like crazy. There's a weekly home-economist feature, 
to which Purdue University Extension Service 
sends an expert. Another, on flower care and arrange- 
ment, with the help of a local florist. A two-man and two- 
woman provocative panel discussion, and a Who's Who 
list of guest celebrities. And always there is time to 
talk about the work and the needs of various 
community and other organizations which may require the 
help of Ann's thousands of devoted followers. 




Ann Colone doesn't just stand there. She dared to put 
on skates when show was telecast from a portable rink. 




The program has its serious side, which also appeals to 
women. Her guest here is Mwant Yav, of the Lunda tribe. 




With the Dukes of Dixieland, Ann plays it cool at the mike while the boys blow it hot, sweet, super-melodic. 



59 



BEST MUSIC PROGRAM ON TV: WCCO'TV, MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 



'- 



Light Christmas entertainment, but with loveliness and reverence in it. 




Music 

in 
the Air 







An original musical, locally written, orchestrated and produced, using local talent. 
"Christmas In The Air," they called it. The audience colled it "terrific' 



Music, songs, Santa. Elves, children, dancing and 
magic makebelieve. What more could one ask of 
any Christmas show? For the third consecutive year, 
a Christmas In The Air program has been produced 
as an hour-long special by WCCO Television, using local 
talent in prime evening time on the Sunday preceding 
the Big Day. . . . Sets were designed by Robert Edwards, 
constructed by the scene-shop crew, painted by Bill 
Dietrickson. Director Harry Jones also collaborated 
on the script, with Donna Sorenson. Cast included the 



Lamplighters Sextette, nine-year-old Ginny Sears, Mary 
Davies. Music was arranged and conducted by Foster 
"Pops" Wakefield. Three special songs were written by 
Dick Wilson. . . . Some familiar Christmas characters 
were present — Mr. Claus with his sleigh and reindeer, 
Old Scrooge. And new ones — little Ginny and the elf, 
Twinkles. Light, tuneful entertainment . . . but the end 
carried the true meaning of the day with the adoration 
of the Child. Preserved on video-tape, it will be repeated, 
if its many delighted viewers have their say! 



61 



BEST PUBLIC SERVICE PROGRAM ON TV: WCCO "TV, MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 




Winning team of Reports is writer Jim Dooley, pho- 
tographer P.J. O'Connell, and producer Carl Ruble. 




Such subjects as Civil Rights in Colleges receive 
unbiased reportage in straightforward, open forum. 
Dave Moore (also seen at left) is able narrator. 



The WCCO Television Reports program, narrated by 
Dave Moore, is an example of how a daytime show, 
starting in a small way, grew in importance to fill a prime 
nighttime spot. At the beginning of 1960, it was part of 
the Sunday afternoon news-in-depth reporting of problems 
and incidents significant to the people of the Northwest. 
By April, a public-affairs production unit was set up to 
produce the Reports headed by Carl Ruble, assisted by 
news writer Jim Dooley and film photographer P. J. O'Con- 
nell. By the end of November, WCCO Television Reports 
went nighttime as an every-third-week alternate to a 
network show. . . . The impact of subjects covered has, 
at times, swamped the mailroom and switchboard of the 
station. A study of Unwed Mothers, first shown in the 
daytime, was repeated on an evening broadcast because 
of tremendous reaction from viewers themselves and from 
schools and church organizations. Handled with taste and 
tact, it was an intelligent and sympathetic report on an 
age-old problem which has touched many homes. . . . The 
plight of the Chippewa Indian was covered in a visit on 
the Minnesota Red Lake reservation. Operation Fire-Stop 
showed methods used to fight ravaging fires which destroy 
much of Minnesota's third largest industry. The wheat 
farmer's problems have been studied in depth. One Report 
few viewers will forget was the poignant "One Christmas 
Day," a touching documentary about Yuletide and the way 
it was celebrated on Skid Row in Minneapolis. 






The Kingston Trio 

(Continued from page 31) 
Dobie Gillises isn't relevant. "I haven't 
seen more mature behavior in adults, 
so far as handling a car is concerned. 
Driving doesn't necessarily improve 
with age." 

Though he is not oblivious to the 
serious problems involved, crew-cut 
Nick Reynolds is for the family lending 
Junior the car on sheerly practical 
grounds. "Where else are the teenagers 
going to get a car, unless they borrow 
Dad's? How else are they going to get 
home? There are few, if any, buses 
tunning at late hours." 

Dave Guard argues: "My opinion is 
that, if you don't give the kids respon- 
sibility, they won't be ready to take it. 
I had to go out and buy a car and 
learn to drive it myself. I never drove 
the family car. Kids should be allowed 
to drive when they reach the legal 
age." 

Besides observing the rules of the 
road, boys and girls should observe cer- 
tain prom decencies, otherwise a beau- 
tiful evening can turn into a sad one. 
As the entertainment world knows — 
and everybody else who isn't tone-deaf 
— the Kingston Trio rode to fame in 
1958 with "Tom Dooley," a ballad about 
a fickle lover who killed his sweetheart 
because he found another more to his 
liking. For this, he got the hangman's 
noose. The button-down balladeers 
don't intend to imply that fickle teen- 
agers will follow Dooley's footsteps to 
the gallows. But, for proms, they do 
recommend certain amenities. 

"For example," says Nick Reynolds, 
"don't take another fellow's girl home 
from a dance. This is bad form for 
either sex, switching partners. If you're 
attracted to somebody at a prom — other 
than the boy or girl you're with — what 
then? Well, trading dances should be a 
regular custom at proms (prom com- 
mittees, please note). It gives a fellow 
an opportunity to get a line on a girl 
who attracts him. 'Bird-dogging' — 
that is, sticking to one partner like a 
corsage — isn't a good prom habit." 

In the next two months, few high 
schools or colleges will have the good 
fortune to have the Kingston Trio 
entertain at their proms. More than 
seven requests for them to appear are 
turned down daily, according to their 
booking agency, I.T.A. At proms they 
stick pretty close to the same repertoire 
they use on TV (for Dinah Shore, 
Perry Como, Bell Telephone Hour) — 
the best of the world's folk music. The 
trio has also discovered that the set- 
ting (college auditorium or night-club 
floor or TV mike) has no bearing on 
musical tastes. Neither does geography. 
Their folk tunes, sea chanteys, work 
songs ("Fast Freight," "The Jolly 
Coachmen," "John Henry") are as well 
received at California's Cocoanut Grove 




Daniel C. Munro, M.D. 



A nervous breakdown! The very thought 
of it sends a chill down your spine. Yet 
25% of us think that we have had emo- 
tional problems serious enough to war- 
rant medical assistance. So, if you worry 
about a nervous breakdown, this is a 
normal fear. 

CHOLESTEROL— HUMAN RUST 

The increasingly high rate of mental 
disease today as compared with 50 years 
ago suggests that something is happening. 
In his new book, Dr. Daniel C. Munro 
tells us that we are slipping both phys- 
ically and mentally — and then he points 
a way to better health through a simple 
change in our eating habits. 

Cholesterol — the arch villain of good 
health — is discussed almost daily in 
newspapers throughout the country. Dr. 
Munro describes cholesterol as "Human 
Rust." You owe it to yourself to learn 
as much as possible about what cho- 
lesterol is and what you can do about it. 
On page 191 of his new book entitled, 
You Are Slipping, Dr. Munro has these 
encouraging words to say: 

"I have pointed out the cause of most 
of our mental or nervous breakdowns 
as the depositing of cholesterol in artery 
walls of our mental-nervous equipment, 
interfering with the normal conduction 
of brain waves to and from the brain. 
Then since that is the condition, it is 
obvious that the problem is to stop de- 
positing cholesterol and to withdraw 
some that has already been deposited. 
THIS CAN BE DONE." 

The methods — the diets — and the help 
you need to stop depositing cholesterol 
are all explained in Dr. Munro's fasci- 
nating new book. 

Some may wonder: Why should Dr. 
Munro write on mental conditions when 
he is known principally because of his 
work on diet. Dr. Munro says, "Through- 



Is a 

nervous breakdown 

your worry? 



out my medical life I have always been 
a student of the 'why' of mental disease. 
It seems to be the least well explained 
of all diseases. My work on diet brought 
hundreds of people suffering from men- 
tal conditions to my attention, and I 
have seen many favorable results from 
diet in this type of case after all other 
methods failed." 

While it is not Dr. Munro's desire to 
frighten people — he does drive home the 
point that our present day physical and 
mental ills are associated with the typ- 
ical American diet. Dr. Munro's books 
appeal to the serious, intelligent person 
who is receptive to new ideas. Dr. Mun- 
ro's books are not written for the "health 
faddist." 

MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

We are so sure that you will find You 
Are Slipping a helpful and stimulating 
book that we make you this offer: Mail 
the coupon below with $3.00 to Barthol- 
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East 42nd Street, New York 17, N.Y. 
Read the book for 7 days. Try the diets. 
Sample the menus. Use the recipe for a 
Spanish Cream dessert that melts in 
your mouth. Then, if you do not agree 
that this is exactly the information you 
have always wanted — simply return the 
book and your $3.00 will be refunded im- 
mediately — and without question. That's 
a fair offer — isn't it? Make use of the 
handy coupon — today. 



Bartholomew House, Inc. 
205 E. 42 St., New York 17, 



Dept. 
Y. 



RM-461 



Send me Dr. Munro's latest book, You 
Are Slipping. I enclose $3.00. If not de- 
lighted. I will return book within 7 days 
and you will refund my $3.00 — at once. 



Name 
Street 
City State. 



63 



as on a Virginia university campus. 

At proms, the West Coast folksingers 
do not play requests. This is not out of 
rudeness, but for professional esthetic 
reasons. However, they point out that, 
in most cases, a dance band is happy to 
comply with requests for certain tunes. 
"But don't go to the bandstand," Bob 
Shane warns, "and shout, 'Hey, you. 
Play "I Could Have Danced All 
Night"!' There is a simple and digni- 
fied way of making a request. Just go 
over quietly to the bandleader and say, 
'Mr. Elgart' — or whatever the band- 
leader's name is — 'could you please 
play "I Could Have Danced All Night"?' 
Chances are he'll be happy to play it." 

Whether a top U.S. band, local jazz 
combo or the Kingston Trio entertain, 
the function's meaning is the same. 
Proms mark a high point in school 
social life and a coming-of-age for 
young people. They are an old Amer- 
ican custom. "Prom," of course, comes 
from the word "promenade" — in the 
sense of a fancy ball or dance. From the 
start, these have been considered ex- 
citing, romantic, memory-filled events, 
graced by soft lights and music. They 
still are. "Many college students get 
married right after the prom," says 
happily -wed Bob Shane. 

Today, going to a prom is relatively 
inexpensive. For a high-school student, 
it may be five dollars a person, while 
a college prom may be five to ten dol- 
lars a person. Years ago, they were 
only for the well-born and rich. How- 
ever, though tickets are now relatively 
inexpensive, the prom itself is getting 
more complex. Right after the dance, 
for instance, the big question is: 
"What'll we do now?" 

The Kingston Trio's Dave Guard ad- 
vises that, when the band strikes up the 
traditional farewell strains of "Auld 
Lang Syne," this shouldn't be a signal 
for wild carousing, high-speed drives 
to suburban roadhouses. A good idea 
is to have a late snack or early break- 



fast at someone's home. Some may pre- 
fer a quiet hamburger at a drive-in. 
Some may prefer more substantial re- 
freshments at an all-night restaurant. 
Whatever the post-prom dance activity 
may be, self-discipline should be ac- 
cented. "Moderation," he says, "should 
be the keynote." 

Should teenagers go to a night club? 
This is rapidly becoming a point of con- 
tention, since many night clubs are now 
featuring top teen record and TV stars. 

To Dave Guard, there's "nothing par- 
ticularly wrong in post-dance night- 
clubbing, even for high-school grads, 
providing they're prepared to behave 
as adults. Teenagers at the Cocoanut 
Grove in Los Angeles, and other places 
where they have come to see us, have 
been well behaved — and great to us! 

"It's a responsibility which teenagers 
should assume only if they're prepared 
for it. And, of course, if the law allows 
it. Reputable night clubs know how to 
handle teenagers, and waiters can usu- 
ally spot youngsters if they are under- 
age, and won't serve them liquor. 

"Those who are really too young 
should try to have a quiet home party, 
or a snack with friends. If youngsters 
are really under-age and they walk 
into clubs with dates, and sit all eve- 
ning nursing a Coke apiece, the waiters 
are justified in sounding an air-raid 
alert to get them out into the open." 

About drinking, the Kingston Trio — 
to a man — insist that it's "silly" to get 
drunk in the mistaken notion that this 
is adult behavior. So far as imbibing 
goes, Bob Shane suggests: "Drink only 
what you would at home. Drink mod- 
erately, if at all. If you get drunk, you 
merely spoil what could be a beautiful, 
sentimental occasion." 

Lately, there's been the rise of the 
"all-night prom." These take many 
forms. Usually, a dinner begins the 
festivities, followed by a clothes change, 
the dance itself, a movie, perhaps a 
moonlight swim, a night-club visit, 



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64 



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breakfast at a Rotary Club — or any- 
thing else the prom committee can 
dream up. Sometimes school busses 
provide the transportation. 

Sometimes, the students themselves 
concoct all-night prom activities in 
which the prom dance is followed by a 
party at home. Such parties have to be 
run impeccably, according to Dave 
Guard. "Such parties have to be well- 
organized. No resorting to such tactics 
as breaking up furniture for laughs or 
making so much noise that the neigh- 
bors call the police! 

"When a party goes on all night, no- 
body can object — if the host's or hos- 
tess's parents are around to serve the 
sandwiches and Cokes or lobster ther- 
midor. Smart parents know how to be 
present at their kids' parties without 
making themselves too obvious and 
putting a damper on the fun. Staying 
up all night on special occasions is 
just a natural part of the process of 
growing up." 

As a bright footnote, it might be 
worth noting that today's young peo- 
ple are not addicted to "mad sprees" 
on prom night. The Eugene Gilbert 
Youth Research group recently re- 
ported, in a spot check, that only thir- 
teen percent of the teenagers queried 
wanted to "have a wild time." Most 
said that they wanted to have a good 
time, but also "to mind their manners 
and watch their conduct." 

Good conduct implies a sense of re- 
sponsibility. Which brings up the elec- 
tronic device that binds together young 
America, the telephone — a good instru- 
ment to remember on prom night. The 
Kingston Trio's Bob Shane suggests 
that wherever "the crowd" goes, after 
the dance, responsible teenagers should 
not forget to call home, particularly if 
they agreed to be home at a certain 
time and aren't there yet. "If you're 
late for any reason, phone. Parents are 
naturally worried if it's late and they 
don't get a call from the kids. That 
doesn't mean that the parents are play- 
ing Gestapo. It's only normal for par- 
ents to get worried if the kids don't 
check in at a certain time. They might 
have been in an accident." 

Informal as sportswear, and wary of 
regimentation, the former collegians do 
not want to be killjoys in regard to 
proms, binding them in with lots of 
rules and regulations. They believe 
proms are more fun, if self-discipline is 
practiced. They contend that parents 
can help youngsters to acquire greater 
self-confidence by a degree of trust in 
their children. And teens can repay this 
trust by taking care of themselves and 
their dates. 

Now some final tips from the trio. 
Bob: "Just take the prom in your 
stride, and you'll have a good time." 
Nick: "Act natural, as if the prom 
were just another school -gym dance." 
And from Dave: "Have fun!" 




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All the strength Red Cross has comes from you. You, your family, 
your neighbor next door. Red Cross is people. People needing, 
people heeding— giving comfort and care person-fo-person. 
In time of personal tragedy or national disaster, people turn to 
Red Cross for swift, unfailing help. This is why— ^Smfy- 
now — Red Cross turns to you. HyST 



GOOD THINGS HAPPEN WHEN YOU HELP. 



65 



. 



TV's Perennial "Mad" Man 



(Continued from page 39) 
no challenge. Drama is sterile. The 
comedy shows are inane. As for the 
Westerns . . . well, if you dial out Mav- 
erick halfway through the program and 
then dial in Lawman, you won't miss 
a beat. The same thing with Gunsmoke 
and Wyatt Earp. 

"Yes, unfortunately, most of televi- 
sion is designed to knit by, to doze by, 
and to avoid-talking-to-your-wife by. 

"Leland Hayward recently told a 
group of Detroit advertising men that 
TV shows are thirty percent worse this 
season than last. I disagree with his 
figures. Leland was being kind. It's 
eighty percent worse. And from what 
I hear of what's coming up, it's going 
to get still worse. 

"In addition to not entertaining and 
not causing people to think," says an- 
gry young David Susskind, "I have a 
feeling that television isn't selling. My 
five-year-old son had a favorite show, 
last year, sponsored by a spark-plug 
company. He never missed it. My wife 
and I never watched the program. I 
know of no other adults who did. But 
my son thought it was great. I doubt 
that he's ever bought a spark plug. So 
maybe there were thirty million five- 
year-olds who watched the show. Most 
of them get ten cents a week allowance. 

"While I'm at it, I'd like to salute the 
handful of sponsors who have stood up 
against the tide of claptrap. They seem 
to care about culture more than ratings. 
I'm referring to sponsors like Hallmark, 
du Pont, Bell & Howell, and the Arm- 
strong Cork Company. 

"It's my belief that good program- 



ing and good business go hand in 
hand. But that's a difficult thing to sell 
to a sponsor when you're trying to 
produce drama, especially original 
drama. Sponsors say, 'Why should we 
spend $200,000 on an unknown play? 
Get us something that's proven itself, 
something that's been done before.' An- 
other reason why original drama is al- 
most hopeless is because the people who 
write such plays have something to say. 
Their material is controversial. It may 
antagonize somebody. Sponsors don't 
want to offend a single person. So what 
have we got? Sterility. . . 

"Some people are getting out of tele- 
vision, it's so bad. But they're wrong. 
Where else can one present exciting 
ideas to so many people at once? Fifty 
or sixty million people saw 'The Moon 
and Sixpence'"— the NBC-TV "spe- 
cial" produced by Susskind's Talent 
Associates. "I can't walk away from 
TV. But it's getting tougher all the 
time. The networks, the agencies, the 
sponsors tell me, 'We want action, not 
that artistic bunk. Give us a private- 
eye or a Western.' " 

Although Susskind sneers at present- 
day TV comedy, he is hopeful about the 
future. "There's a new crop of come- 
dians," he believes, "who are going to 
break through the barrier. People like 
Shelley Berman, Bob Newhart, Nichols 
and May, Buddy Hackett and, of 
course, Mort Sahl. They are social sa- 
tirists and they're quite marvelous. 

"They provide pin-pricking humor, 
something that's needed desperately. 
They stab at phony values. Among the 
veterans, let me pay tribute to Bob 



66 




Show business being Susskind's favorite topic, director Peter Glenville and 
actress Margaret Leighton are ideal guests for an Open End discussion. 



Hope. His opening six-minute mono- 
logues are brilliant. They're topical and 
urgent. He has something to say. 

"Idea comedy is almost extinct, ex- 
cept for the newcomers. The idea that 
what's funny in New York and Chi- 
cago won't be funny in Ames, Iowa, is 
ridiculous. There are no 'sticks' any- 
more. There's just America. Appetites 
are the same. Nichols and May have a 
funny routine about necking in a car. 
It's great. Well, people are necking 
everywhere . . . not just in New York 
and Chicago." 

Let's get back to Hollywood and 
Tony Curtis. 

On his Open End program — originat- 
ing, at the time, from Hollywood, where 
he was producing the film, "A Raisin 
in the Sun" — Susskind cut loose on a 
group of actors who have taken to 
writing, directing and producing. 
Among those he mentioned were Mr. 
Curtis, Dick Powell, Rock Hudson and 
Jerry Lewis. "They barely qualify as 
actors," he charged. "The idea that they 
are creators is nonsensical and mani- 
acal." 

Curtis was quoted as replying thusly: 
"I've never met Mr. Susskind. But 
when I do, I'm going to punch him 
right in the nose. Nobody has to tell me 
how bad an actor I am. Better men than 
Susskind have told me I'm lousy. His 
criticism isn't even original. As for 
that punch in the nose, I'm not kidding 
about that. He'd better stay away from 
me." 

Susskind has yet to meet Curtis. "I 
have a very full life without him," he 
says. "We don't need each other. I've 
always believed that violence was the 
last recourse of an exhausted mind. If 
I'm not the biggest admirer of Tony 
Curtis' talent, I've never questioned 
his virility or strength. No, it's prob- 
ably just as well that we've never met. 

"However, I would like to meet Mrs. 
Curtis" — actress Janet Leigh. "She's 
never threatened to hit anybody. She 
did rip my picture from the wall of 
Sardi's Restaurant, here in New York, 
with the explanation that she was going 
to put it in her bathroom. That's the 
kind of imagination I admire." 

Other Susskind quotes relative to 
Hollywood, and made on that scene: 

"Show business here is founded on 
quicksand. The people are quick to take 
offense at criticism because they have 
a guilt complex. They know they're 
turning out crass, commercialized junk. 
Basically, they are ashamed of it, and 
they're defensive. 

"Actually, there is more creative tal- 
ent per square inch in Hollywood than 
any place else in the world, but it is 
abused and misused." 

Tony Curtis wasn't the only one to 
make public reply: "Susskind," jibed 
Oscar Levant, "is salami dipped in 



chicken fat." And Groucho Marx called 
David Susskind "this phony New York 
intellectual." 

Unlike Curtis, Marx was someone 
Susskind did want to meet. "After 
Groucho blasted me," he recalls, "1 
phoned him and invited him for lunch. 
We became very good friends. He's a 
wit, a cultivated man, a seeker of 
knowledge." 

During a recent interview in his 
Madison Avenue office, Susskind ex- 
pressed a more sympathetic attitude 
toward the film capital. "Hollywood is 
going through an agonizing period. To 
be successful today, movies must be 
truly tailor-made and urgent. The mov- 
ie habit is over. When someone leaves 
the comfort of his home today to go to 
a movie theater, the film must be com- 
pelling, inspired, something different 
from what can be seen on television. 

"It doesn't surprise me that 'Alamo' 
— a twelve-million-dollar Western — 
was a box-office flop. We've been West- 
erned to death on television. For the 
same reason, I wouldn't want to pro- 
duce a private-eye movie. When you 
come right down to it, the movie -going 
public is no longer attracted by pfiffle. 
There's already too much pfiffle on tele- 
vision. And that they can get for free. 

"Movie producers used to say, 'Get 
me Gary Cooper or Marlon Brando on 
the phone,' and then they'd sit back 
with no worries. That day is over. The 



story is the big thing today. Once you 
get a good story, add marquee names if 
you can — but the story itself is the most 
important. People won't go to see 
Cooper or Brando in a bad movie." 

Never one to undersell his own abil- 
ity, Susskind believes that, in "A Raisin 
in the Sun," he made the kind of movie 
that will enhance the quality of mo- 
tion picture fare. 

"I'm doing work that gives me pride 
and satisfaction," he says. "I'm a rebel 
against the status quo." 

He himself expects to follow up "A 
Raisin in the Sun" with a double - 
exposure of Rod Serling's award-win- 
ning television drama, "Requiem for a 
Heavyweight." He says, "Ralph Nelson 
and I are going to produce 'Requiem' on 
Broadway and make a movie of it at 
the same time, with the same cast. It 
will be the first time anything like 
this has been attempted. 

"We plan to start rehearsals for the 
play in August, open it on Broadway 
in October, and start shooting the mov- 
ie in November." At forty, Susskind is 
still a young man in a hurry. 

After graduation — cum laude — from 
Harvard in 1942, he served a few months 
as an economist for the War Labor 
Board, and then entered the Navy. 
Upon his discharge, he took a job for 
$50 a week as a studio press agent in 
Hollywood. After learning the ropes of 
show business, Susskind and Al Levy, 



a talent agent, joined forces and be- 
came producers in their own right 
under the name of Talent Associates, 
Ltd., which has since become one of 
the best known and most active of all 
television production firms. It antici- 
pates a gross of forty-two million dol- 
lars for the 1960-61 TV season alone. 

Susskind was a behind-the-scenes 
figure until the fall of 1958, when he 
became moderator of Open End on an 
independent station, WNTA-TV, in the 
New York area. Within a few weeks, 
Susskind became a "name" as a per- 
former, and requests for syndication 
of Open End began arriving at WNTA 
from other stations throughout the 
country. It is now seen in a number 
of cities from Maine to California. 

Open End — so-called because there is 
no set time at which the program must 
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too much vitriolic argument among his 
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"Such a show, with a lot of fellows sit- 
ting around bleating about nothing but 
sweetness and light, would become the 
most stupid affair imaginable. Sure, I 
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or get off the air. Nothing is duller than 
a discussion program where no one 
takes sides." 

Susskind came under heavy fire from 
the critics following his solo Open End 
interview with Nikita Khrushchev. It 
was said that he was not equipped to 
wage a battle of words with the Rus- 
sian leader, that he was too much on 
the defensive. 

"I'm glad I did that program," says 
Susskind, "but I'll admit that I could 
have done a better job. I presented 
Khrushchev as a new personality. I 
never expected for a second that he'd 
say anything new, but I thought it im- 
portant that America should see him as 
a human being. After all, he's one of 
two men who could set the world 
aflame. But I wish I'd done a better job. 
I shouldn't have tried to debate with 
him. Dulles couldn't, Eisenhower 
couldn't, Herter couldn't, and I 
shouldn't have tried. 

"The trouble was, I think, that the 
hysteria preceding the show got to me 
subconsciously. People called me a 
Communist, told me to go to Russia, 
and that sort of thing. There were pick- 
ets and newspaper editorials criticizing 
me. The animosity got to me. I found 
myself trying to prove my American- 
ism on the air. I felt compelled to chal- 
lenge Khrushchev and argue with him, 
instead of just getting information." 

While on the subject of discussion, 
Susskind defends television from those 
who say that TV is to blame for the 
"lost art of conversation." 

"The American school system is at 
fault," he charges. "I don't know what 
they've been doing to English courses, 
but whatever it is, it isn't good. The 
average person's vocabulary is pitiful. 
Television didn't do it, the school sys- 
tems did. 

"Of course, television hasn't helped. 
People sit there, in front of the TV set, 
and don't 'relate' to each other. But 
good television programs throw out 
ideas. They make people think and 
have feelings. That's what all my shout- 
ing is about. That's why I'm opposed to 
all the junk that doesn't even make 
people think enough to turn off the 
set. 

"As for conversationalists, actors are 
the worst. The very worst. They're 
boring. Their favorite subjects are 
themselves. On that subject, they're 
brilliant. But it's all they can talk 
about. Actors, with few exceptions, are 
glorious kooks. Of course, to be an 
actor in the first place requires cer- 
tain conditions. An actor can't be him- 
self . . . he's always playing someone 
else. They play a game. They're charm- 
ing, though ... as children can be 
charming." 

A man with unlimited energy and 
ideas, Susskind puts in a seven-day 
work week, and his working day usu- 
ally begins at 9:30 a.m. and ends at 



2: 30 a.m. He hasn't had a vacation since 
1957. "How do I do it?" he repeated. 
"Easy. I love every minute of it. There's 
never enough time. Why do I do it? I 
have a desire to express myself. There 
just aren't enough ways. Television, 
movies, theater — no one outlet is 
enough. I make about fifty lectures a 
year, and not just because I get paid for 
them. Many I make gratis, when I have 
something to say that I believe should 
be said. I'm also writing a book. It will 
be titled 'Happy Shows for Happy Peo- 
ple with Happy Problems.' That's be- 
cause of all the sponsors who tell me, 
'We don't want that intelligent bunk.' 

"I'm a doer. I believe in action. Time 
spent in dreaming and talking . . . that 
time, invested in doing, will get it done. 
That's why I like Mrs. Curtis . . . Janet 
Leigh. She ripped my picture off the 
wall. She did something. 

"I enjoy the challenge of show busi- 
ness. It's unpredictable and exciting. 
When you step up to bat, you can hit 
a home run or strike out. When I strike 
out, I come right back to bat. That's 
the secret. After all, success means be- 
ing more right than wrong. Rodgers and 
Hammerstein were masters when they 
were right, but they also wrote a few 
bombs. No one can fail as badly as 
talented people. That's because they 
dare to do more. A modest talent aims 
lower — so, if he fails, his failure is 
smaller." 



Even his critics will agree that Suss- 
kind, whatever they believe his other 
faults may be, is not lacking in courage. 
In December of 1960, he rebelled against 
the long-time practice of submitting 
names of performers to networks for 
clearance in casting television programs. 

"I will no longer submit names for 
clearance by anybody," said Susskind. 
"The witch-hunt hysteria in America is 
over. The 'blacklist' is one of the sorri- 
est chapters in TV's history. Of all the 
things television should be ashamed of, 
the 'blacklist' is the worst. We actually 
gave in to pressure groups, with no 
evidence, and without offering the vic- 
tims an opportunity to defend them- 
selves." 

The custom of "clearing" performers 
came into being in the early 1950s, 
when many actors were barred from 
employment on the basis of information 
published in privately-operated pam- 
phlets such as "Red Channels." 

The first major victim of the "black- 
list" in 1950 was actress Jean Muir. 
Last December, Susskind cast her in 
Talent Associates' taped series, The 
Witness, on the CBS television net- 
work. His casting of Miss Muir was 
widely interpreted in the industry as 
indicating the end of the blacklist era. 

"I simply told CBS that Jean Muir 
was cast, that she was ideal for the 
role, that she was a splendid American 
and a fine actress," said Susskind. 



"1 intend to fight against blacklist- 
ing," he said, "as an unjust, unmerciful 
and ugly thing." 

Following the appearance of Miss 
Muir, Susskind received only one let- 
ter in opposition. "Someone wrote to 
tell me the old line that I should go to 
Russia," he said. "On the other hand, 
I received many letters applauding my 
stand." 

Susskind and his wife, Phyllis, live 
in Manhattan with their three children : 
Pamela, 17, Diana, 14, and Andrew, 6. 
"I don't suppose I lead what most peo- 
ple consider a normal home life," said 
Susskind, "but then, who wants to be 
normal? What is normalcy? I don't 
know, and I don't want to find out. 

"Phyllis is interested in what I'm 
doing. She'd have to be, to have stayed 
with me all these years. My business is 
exciting, and it excites her too. Why. 
she's a part of it. She's production as- 
sistant of our program, Family Classics. 

"I have no hobbies, other than read- 
ing. Oh, I'm interested in politics. Not 
as a politician, but as an American. 
But that's not a hobby. 

"I'm a leader. At least, that's what I 
want to be. I want to lead with what I 
believe to be the truth. It makes me feel 
good inside. If I seem to be fighting all 
the time, it's only because there's so 
much to fight against — mediocrity and 
complacency. Besides, that's what 
makes life worth living." 




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69 



WHAT'S NEW ON THE WEST COAST 



(Continued from page 8) 



for public sale. Roger, whose biggest 
ambition at the moment is to have a 
Churchill seascape hanging in his home, 
says, "I don't care whether it's great 
art or not. When I think of the great 
man whose hand did it, I couldn't care 
less about how how good or bad art 
critics might consider the picture to 
be." 

Playing the Field: Opening of the 
newest International Pancake House on 
Sunset Strip brought out almost every 
top TV star in town, most bringing 
along the entire family to eat it up and 
join in the fun. Among them were the 
Bob Stacks, Chuck Connorses, Bob 
Denvers, John and Luana Smith, Bob 
Conrads, and Clu Gulager. Clu, wear- 
ing his regalia from The Tall Man, took 
a royal ribbing for it. He laughed it 
off by saying, "Some actors resent be- 
ing associated off-screen with their 
roles. I don't. I'm grateful to the series 
and figure every time I plug it I'm 
plugging myself." Clu swears the fol- 
lowing story of his pre-"Billy the Kid" 
video days is true. As he was driving 
along Sunset Boulevard one day, a po- 
lice car hailed him over to the side. 
Clu couldn't figure why and was cer- 
tainly surprised when the officer told 
him to raise his arms, put them on the 



roof of the car and proceeded to frisk 
him. Clu showed his driver's license 
and explained he was an actor. "May- 
be," said the cop, "but I've seen a 
mug shot of you somewhere." Sudden- 
ly it dawned on Clu. "Did you see The 
Untouchables last week?" The officer 
admitted he had. "Well," grinned Clu, 
who'd played a heavy on the show, 
"that's where you saw me." . . . With 
her return to professional life this 
month — via a splashy, beautifully- 
staged revue at the Sahara Hotel in Las 
Vegas — Eleanor Powell says she'll let 
no more grass grow under her feet. 
Eleanor has had offers from every net- 
work to do a TV spectacular, and the 
star — who gave up her fame as Top 
Dancing Lady of the World when she 
wed Glenn Ford fifteen years ago — 
says, now that her marriage is ended, 
her career begins anew. "It will be 
many years before I hang up my danc- 
ing shoes again," she promises the many 
fans who've missed her. 

Heard Around: Will Sugar foot 
Hutchins has his first on-screen kiss 
in Warners' feature, "Claudelle Ing- 
lish." The closest he ever got to it on 
TV was a peck on the ear from his 
horse. "I've nothing against kissing, 
either on or off screen," explains Will, 




70 



Kingston Trio prove themselves globe-trotters as well as prom-trotters (see 
page 31). Camera snaps 'em at Waikiki Beach with stewardesses of Japan Air 
Lines, after seven-week concert tour of Far East and South Pacific. Left to 
right — Emi Ikawa, Bob Shane, Michiko Ishii, Dave Guard and Nick Reynolds. 



"but TV kisses, at least for Western 
stars, seem to be taboo. I've done my 
own census of television shows and, in 
watching twenty -four Westerns in one 
week, not one star kissed the girl. Guess 
it's proof that the home viewer prefers 
shooting to smooching." . . . Petite 
Brenda Lee, now enrolled in Holly- 
wood Professional School as well as 
high school in her hometown in 
Tennessee, still has one great frustra- 
tion. Every time she gets to California, 
she's so busy between school and pro- 
fessional appearances, she hasn't been 
able to get to Disneyland. She got up 
at six one morning, during her last 
Western stay, dressed, and was all set 
for a trip to Walt's fairyland — when 
the rains came and the junket had to 
be cancelled. "I'll make it yet, though," 
she sighed. "That and a trip to Russia 
are my big desires." Brenda's next re- 
cording will be a hymn, with a choir 
as the only background. . . . Mike 
Connors was already in Europe shoot- 
ing backgrounds for Riviera, a new 
series, when called back for Tightrope, 
which will now go to a full hour and 
be back on the networks come the fall. 
. . . Jane Wyatt thought she'd enjoy 
the rest from weekly shooting of the 
cancelled Father Knows Best, but grew 
restless instead. So, she returned to the 
stage — for the first time in eight years 
— playing "Candida" at the Phoenix 
(Arizona) Sombrero Playhouse. Now 
she's reading scripts with the hope of 
going to Broadway next season. . . . 
Ken Murray has donated his fabulous 
collection of show-biz artifacts to the 
Hollywood Motion Picture Museum. 
The collection includes every auto- 
biography ever written by film and TV 
stars. . . . Alan Mowbray, who plays 
the maitre d' on Dante, admits that his 
TV role is "getting to him." Sighs Alan, 
"I went to a restaurant one night, 
noticed the silverware had been wrong- 
ly placed, and corrected it at every 
nearby table." . . . Robert Ryan's burro 
has become a celebrity. The animal, 
only one of its kind in fashionable 
Holmby Hills, roams the Ryans' front 
lawn all day long, and is now included 
in the new movie-star tourist maps. . . . 
Gary Cooper — who, on his thirty-fifth 
anniversary as a major star, was hon- 
ored by the Hollywood Friars with a 
testimonial dinner — was the first film 
personage to be elected to their Hall 
of Fame. A sculptured bust of Gary 
will be the first to be lodged in their 
new $750,000 building in Beverly Hills. 
The new three-story headquarters is 
expected to be completed in August, 
and the opening will be a gala fund- 
raising affair — all monies to go to the 
many non-sectarian charities sup- 
ported by The Friars Club. 



To Danny With Love 

(Continued from page 43) 
vary as individuals vary, but — in my 
opinion, and in that of my sister 
Theresa and my brother Anthony — 
being the children of Danny Thomas is 
the best present that an army of Fairy 
Godmothers could bestow upon three 
kids. 

The above emotional announcement 
results from no snap judgment. When I 
was a little girl, I could look in my 
heart and find reasons why I thought 
my daddy was tops; now that I'm 
grown, I can look into my mind and 
spirit and verify my heart's report. 

Many people ask me, "What is your 
dad really like?" He is like this: His 
work, like that of most men, is fore- 
most in his life. Once that is said, it 
must be followed by explanation of the 
characteristic that makes him different 
from ninety-nine men out of a hun- 
dred. With the other ninety-nine, work 
is not only No. 1 in their lives, but 
numbers 2 to 20, as well. With Daddy, 
his family is No. 1A. 

That is proved by the kooky goings- 
on during our first Christmas in Cali- 
fornia. I was ten at the time, Theresa 
was five, and Tony was not yet born. 
During the first two weeks in Decem- 
ber, Theresa and I spent most of our 
time at the front window of our Bev- 
erly Hills home, scowling into the 
dazzling sunshine and asking Mother 
when snow would start to fall. 

We couldn't imagine Christmas with- 
out snow and she hadn't the heart to 
break the news that the most we could 
hope for was rain. Daddy was in Chi- 
cago, appearing at the Chez Paree, so 
we assumed that when he came home — 
his booking ended on December 17 — he 
would bring the snow. 

Meanwhile, back in Chicago, the 
owner of the Chez Paree asked Daddy 
to remain for three more weeks. "I 
can't," Daddy said regretfully. "My 
family is in California; they expect me 
home for the holidays." The owner said 
that was okay, he would treat the fam- 
ily to round-trip air tickets and a 
holiday stay at the Blackstone. Daddy 
telephoned Mother the news. 

I won't quote Mother exactly. But 
she said, in essence, that she had just 
finished decorating an eight-foot Christ- 
mas tree, wrapping all our gifts and 
signing for packages from all over the 
country. She had no intention of flying 
East for three weeks and leaving every- 
thing. 

Apologetically, Daddy reported the 
situation to the owner of the Chez 
Paree. The owner was a sport. "Okay, 
we'll fly the family and their tree and 
their presents to Chicago. When you 
finish your run here, we'll fly them 
home again." 

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71 




Danny Thomas was thrilled with gift actress-daughter Mario brought him 
from Europe — an old German beer stein which plays "O Mein Papa!" 



72 



was a spectacular Christmas. There we 
were, in our hotel suite, overlooking a 
city we loved; snow began to drift down 
lazily on December 23, so we walked to 
Mass on Christmas morning through a 
Christmas-card landscape. . . . And all 
because my daddy said, "I promised to 
be with my family for the holidays, and 
I have to keep my word." 

Daddy is also like this: He has great 
presence. Many people in show business 
say that his professional poise is 
unique; with easy grace, he can man- 
age night-club situations that would 
floor a less competent performer. Al- 
most nothing jars him. Except leading 
his family through a personal appear- 
ance. 

A few years ago, Person To Person 
called on the Thomases. It was all 
sketched in, in advance. We were to be 
here, and — in general — we were to say 
thus and so. Among other antics, 
Theresa was to play "White Christmas" 
while the rest of us clustered around 
the piano, singing. Twenty minutes be- 
fore we were to go on the air, Theresa 
(then thirteen) announced abruptly, 
"I'm not going to play." 

"You're not what?" gasped Daddy. 

Theresa repeated her statement, ex- 
plaining that she had broken two fin- 
gernails that afternoon, so her hands 
looked "awful." She said "Let Mario 
play." It was my turn to fall to pieces — 
I hadn't practiced in months. Finally, 
Theresa was assured that the camera 
would keep its eye off her hands. That 
settled, the show went on the air. 



The rest of us arose to the occasion 
and carried on as if nothing had hap- 
pened. We were as cool as an electric 
fan in the Klondike, but Daddy flubbed 
several times. He was so concentrated 
on extracting attractive performances 
from his family that he had no energy 
left with which to put himself across. 
When the show was over, he collapsed 
into a chair, totally beat and dripping 
perspiration. ... A few hours later, he 
received a ribbing telegram from the 
William Morris agency, to wit: "We're 
dropping you and signing the rest of the 
family." 

As I grew up, I was convinced that I 
was the only teenager in the world 
who regularly received lectures from 
her father on coast-to- coast CBS-TV. 
By that time, I had started to watch the 
program every week, whereas — earlier 
— I had boycotted it. I had my reasons. 
During my pre-teen days, Bunnie Lu- 
bell was Daddy's daughter on The 
Four-Star Revue. No junior actress 
was ever scrutinized more closely than 
Bunnie by Daddy's two daughters at 
home. We were bitterly jealous of her. 

One night, Daddy — following the 
script — attempted to comfort Bunnie 
because of some childhood mishap. 
Sourly, I watched him pick her up and 
hold her on his lap. But when he called 
her "Daddy's little girl"— I burst into 
tears and announced wrathfully that I 
was through forever with watching the 
show, and I was never, never going to 
speak to Daddy again. 

The next day, Daddy had a talk with 



me. "In addition to my show, your 
mother tells me you watched a cowboy 
show last night. A man was killed in 
that script. Did you believe he was 
really killed, or was it just makebe- 
lieve?" Grudgingly, I admitted that I 
knew it was makebelieve. "The other 
day, your doll was sick. Was she really 
sick, or were you play-acting?" I finally 
got it. 

That has always been one of the won- 
derful things about Daddy. When we 
children had to be set right, it has been 
done in terms we could understand. He 
always let us know that we were still 
in, still members of the family in good 
standing, but we were never to do that 
particular thing again. Sometimes, it 
hasn't been necessary for Daddy to 
speak up in mere words. 

When I started to have dates, there 
was one boy who came to our house 
often and stayed late. . . . Well, he and 
I didn't think it was late, but Daddy 
held a different opinion. One night, 
when the boy and I were in the midst 
of a serious discussion of the school 
elections, we were abruptly interrupted 
by the blasting strains of "Pomp and 
Circumstance" from Daddy's upstairs 
hi-fi. I got it instantly. It was Daddy's 
way of saying, "Time to march!" 

It's been a signal ever since; nowa- 
days, all of my friends and most of 
Theresa's have caught on. They get a 
kick out of it. 

Sometimes, unintentionally, I've sup- 
plied Daddy with material for the show. 
One night, when a boy brought me 
home from a party a little later than 
Daddy thought was satisfactory, we had 
a conference in front of the clock. 
"Look, Daddy, I'm in college now," I 
said. "There comes a time in every 
father's life when he must assume that 
his teachings have taken root. He has 
to trust his children. If I should fail 
to do right, it would mean that you 
had failed in bringing me up. Daddy, 
I'm not going to let you fail." 

We both shed a few tears, then kissed 
each other goodnight. A few months 
later, the incident appeared in a seg- 
ment of The Danny Thomas Show, 
"Make Room For Daddy." I knew that 
Daddy was setting me free — but, in 
giving me freedom, he was also accept- 
ing my pledge of responsibility. Daddy 
likes to say, "My children have always 
been wise enough to use psychology on 
me." I think that may be true, but only 
because he has always used psychology 
on us. We've learned our technique 
from a master. 

After I was graduated from Mary- 
mount High School and entered U.S.C. 
(where I was a member of Kappa 
Alpha Theta), I decided that I wanted 
to be a teacher. Although I had done 
a good deal of modeling of teen-age 
clothes for Saks Fifth Avenue and for 
Lanz, I hadn't been bitten by the show- 
business bug. I earned my A.B. degree, 



and applied to the Beverly Hills School 
Board for a position. There were to be 
six vacancies, the following fall, and 
there were five hundred applicants. I 
wound up with an appointment to teach 
second grade — one of the biggest thrills 
and most flattering triumphs of my life 
to date. 

However, during the summer, my 
thinking changed. For the first time in 
four years, I had a chance to see a 
great deal of television, and many 
movies. I had a chance to talk with 
Daddy about his profession, and to 
share the excitement (and occasional 
discouragement) of many of my friends 
who were getting a show-business start. 

I knew then that I wanted to be an 
actress. 

Before I resigned my teaching posi- 
tion, I had my "most serious" talk with 
Daddy. He started out by saying that 
the only truly happy career for a girl 
was marriage, a home, and children. He 
added that show business could provide 
a thrilling, engrossing, instructive ex- 
perience for a girl, if it could be re- 
garded only as an experience, not a 
career. 

He said, "Never forget that any pub- 
lic career is a tremendous burden. No 
girl should be expected to take on the 
enormous responsibility of bringing up 
a family while trying to maintain a 
public career. If you want to be an 
actress while you're very young, be 
one. Be the best possible, within your 
talent and training. But remember al- 
ways that acting should be a part of 
living; it should not be your life. I don't 
want to have a shattered little girl, de- 
stroyed by a senseless chase after a 
stuffed rabbit. Some things are not 
worth capturing." 

He went on, "If you want to have 
the experience of acting, there is one 
more thing you should know. You can't 
divide a personality. You can't come 
across the footlights, or over the movie 
or TV screen, as a warm, genuine, re- 
sponsive human being, unless you are 
warm, genuine and responsive. A phony 
can get by on surface charm, for a 
while. But, sooner or later, audiences 
develop X-ray eyes. Grow and develop 
as a real woman, Rainbow" — Daddy 
has always called me "Rainbow" during 
sentimental moments — "then you will 
also grow and develop as a real actress." 

That's what I hope to do. If I can give 
a few people a fraction of the joy my 
daddy has given many, I'll feel that I 
have been a success and a credit to a 
remarkable man and father, Danny 
Thomas. 

P.S. I have a remarkable mother, too, 
who is a combination of Gracie Allen, 
Judy Holliday, and the Queen of Ru- 
mania. Sometime I'll write a story 
about her ... if I can catch her in- 
credible quality of zaniness and regal- 
ity and tireless devotion to those she 
loves! 



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WHAT'S NEW ON THE EAST COAST 




On rare night-club visit — Naked City 
star Paul Burke with his lovely wife. 

an old Spanish home in Holmby Hills. 
"I'm in the midst of redecorating, and 
working on a new album for Liberty. 
I've got exciting ideas but would rather 
not divulge them." But she did note 
that, although she was a Philly-born 
filly, she had little taste for the rock 'n' 
roll coming out of the city. "I like music 
that sounds like music." She concluded. 
"I'll be back East to do Garry Moore 
and Bell Telephone shows." 

Bullets & Boogie: TV's Gunsmoke 
will be with you ninety minutes a week, 
in two versions. The Saturday -night 
episode expands to a full hour, while 
films from the current series will be re- 
run, with a new title, on another night 
of the week. . . . Steve McQueen bites 
the dust soon. Wanted — Dead or Alive 
will be replaced by Danger Man, a 
British-made adventure series. . . . 
Fast-rising singing star Buzz Clifford, 
of "Baby Sittin' Boogie" fame, is an 
eighteen-year-old football type and 
may become the most exciting new 
bachelor in '61. . . . Peggy McCay will 
be among the greenery on ABC -TV 
next season as star of the new series 
Room For One More. . . . There will be 
no telecast of the Patterson-Johansson 
rematch on March 13, but ABC Radio 
has paid close to $400,000 for broad- 
casting rights. The price is right, be- 
cause an estimated sixty-one million 
listened in on the last championship 
fight. ... It will be a dramatic evening