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Full text of "Randolph County business directory, 1894 : in three parts: 1, Alphabetical ... 2, Classified ... 3, Farmers and land owners ... : also a supplement .."

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FRANKLINVILLE 



Mn n 11 fa c t tirini> 

(INCORPORATED.'* <— ' 



(FIRST BUILT IN 1838.) 



Company, 



FKANKLINVILLE, N. C. 

CAPITAL STOCK. $60,000. 



HUGH PARKS, President. 

BENJAMIN MOFFITT, Secretary and Treasurer. 

W. C. RUSSELL, Superintendent. 



RAW MATERIAL USED ANNUALLY, 1,500 BALES OF COTTON. 

PRODUCTS, 600,000 BAGS AND 150,000 POUNDS OF WARPS. 

NUMBER OP HANDS, O^E HUNDRED AND EIGHTY. 



RANDOLPH 



(Incorporated, 1862.i 



Man a fa e taring 
Company, 



FRANKLINVILLE, N. C. 

CAPITAL STOCK, $30,000. SURPLUS, $15,000. 



JOHN D. WILLIAMS, President. 

HUGH PARKS, Secretary and Treasurer. 

J. A. LUTHER, Superintendent. 



RAW MATERIAL USED ANNUALLY, 850 BALES OF COTTON. 

PRODUCTS, 3,000 YARDS OF 4-4 SHEETING, DAILY. 

NUMBER OF HANDS OPERATED, SEVENTY. 



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3 



Dr. JOHN MILTON WORTH, Asheboro N. C, 

SON OF DR. DAVID WORTH AND WIFE EUNICE, WHOSE MAIDEN 
NAME WAS GARDNER. 



vi 



"Was born June 28, ISll, in Guilford County, near Centre 
Church. Graduatetl at the Louisville (Ivy.) College of Med- 
icine. In is8-t he was married to ^liss Sarah Dicks, daugh- 
ter of Peter Dicks, and settled at Xew Salem, in Randolph 
County, where he practiced medicine. He was afterwards 
a citizen of Montgomery County, and was engaged in the 
practice of medicine, also mining and merchandising. 

From 1852 to 185G Dr. Worth was Senator from Mont- 
gomery County. About 'ii^iy'o he settled in Asheboro as a 
merchant and a man of genei'al enterprise. From 1870 to 
1875 he was Senator from Randolph County. From Novem- 
ber 22,1876, to January 21, 1885, he was State Treasurer. 
In 1877 and 1878 we rind him representing Randolph in 
the House. Dr. "Worth did more, perhajis, than any other 
one man to get the State debt consolidated, thus forever 
securing his fame as a financier. 

He is a man about eighty-three years old, and is still full of 
energy, enterprise and i)ublic spirit. 



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Randolph 
County 

1894 _ 

DU5ine55 
Directory. 



IN THREE PARTS: 

1. ALPHABETICAL. 

Names, Post-offices, and Line of Business. 

2. CLASSIFIED. 

Alphabetic by Classes. 

3. FARMERS AND LAND OWNER-. 

Names, Number of Acres, Valuation of the Entire County. 
ALSO, 

A SUPPLEMENT 

CONTAINING MUCH INFORMATION ABOUT THE ENTIRE STATE. 



PRICE, $3.00. 



raleigh , n. c: 
Compiled and Published by Levi Branson. 

1894. 
Copyrighted, 1894. by Levi Branson. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



It has been a real "labor of love" for me to compile this 
Business Directory of my native county — the home of my 
childhood and youth; hence many little historical shetches 
appear in the book. "Reminiscences of Randolph County," 
by my life-long friend, J. Adtlison Blair, aided me very 
greatly. Mr. Blair calls up — then beautifies and sweetens the 
old-time memories. 

The county has not only held her own, but has gone for- 
ward handsomely during the thirty-eight yearsof my absence. 
Randolph now feels the quickening pulse of 76.45 miles of 
railroads, as follows : 

North Carolina Railroail .70 mile. 

Cape Fear and Yakin Valley Railroad 30.10 miles. 

High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and South- 
ern Railroad 26.65 " 

Factory Branch (C. F. & Y. V.) Railroad 19.00 " 

Total 76.45 " 

The county has 720 square miles of territory. She now 
has fourteen cotton factories, and these not only beautify and 
enrich, but they render musical the very air of the county. 

This is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful sections of 
the State, and a grand future is in store for the laud of our 
birth if we still remain true to her destiny. 

Randolph has furnished the State two State Treasurers 
and one Governor. 

I here return my warmest thanks to many prominent citi- 
zens who have aided me in compiling this book. At some 
future time I hope to publish a revised edition that shall be 
larger and better in every way. 

LEVI BRANSON. 

Raleigh, N. C, June 23, 1894. 



CONTENTS. 



PART I. The Postoffices, page. 

In alphabetic order, giving the business at each 

place 24-64 

PART 11. Classified Directory, 

Giving Churches, Gold Mines, Hotels and Board- 
ing Houses, Lawyers, Magistrates, Manufacto- 
ries, Merchants^and Tradesmen, Mills and Pro- 
prietors, Ministers Resident, Newspapers, Phy- 
sicians, Postoffices, Schools, Sheriffs, Teachers- 65-92 
PART in. Farmers and Land-owners, 

Giving the names by townships — postoffice, num- 
ber of acres and value of such property 95-146 

ADVERTISEMENTS. 

( 1 to 15 

Advertisements are mostly found on pages < 92 to 94 

U-- 146 to 150 
Also in the Supplement 1 to 48 

MAPS. 

Map of Randolph County After 24 

Map of City of Raleigh After 64 

Map of Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railroad After 94 

ENGRAVINGS. 

Columbia Manufacturing Company 8 

Alberta Chair Works 3 

Franklinville Manufacturing Company 4 

Cedar Falls Manufacturing Company 6 

Randleman Manufacturing Company opposite title page 

Plaidville Manufacturing Company . 2 

Asheboro Wood and Iron Works 148 

Trinity College High School 93 

Mrs. Blair's Millinerv 94 

Jarrell's Hotel I 149 

Trinity College Inn Supplement, 38 

North Carolina Coat of Arms Supplement, 1 

0. R. Cox (portrait) 16 

Dr. John Milton Worth (portrait) 11 

Governor Jonathan Worth (portrait) 10 

Levi Branson (portrait) 23 

Julian S. Carr (portrait) 22 




O. R. COX, 



SECRETARY AND TREASURER AND SUPERINTENDENT OF MILL OF CEDAR FALLS 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 



Mr. Cox has made a name and fame for himself, while he 
has i)laced Cedar Falls among the very best of factories in 
tlie whole State. 



MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY FROM 
RANDOLPH COUNTY, FROM ITS FORMA- 
TION TO THE PRESENT DATE. 



Years. Senate. 

1780. John Collier. 

1781. John Collier. 

1782. John Collier. 

1783. Thomas Dougan. 

1784. Thomas Dougan. 

1785. Edward Sharpe. 

1786. Edward Sharpe. 

1787. Jesse Hendley. 

1788. Thomas Dougan. 

1789. John Arnold. 

1791. Zebedee Wood. 

1792. Zebedee Wood. 

1793. Edmund Wad dell. 

1794. Edmund Waddell. 

1795. E.lmund Waddell. 

1796. Edmund Waddell. 

1797. Edmund Waddell. 

1798. Edmund Waddell 

1799. Alexander Gray. 
1800 Henry Branson, 

1801. Henry Branson. 

1802. Henry Branson. 

1803. Henry Branson. 

1804. Alexander Gray. 

1805. Alexander Gray. 

1806. Alexander Gray. 

1807. Alexander Gray. 

1808. Colin Steed. 

1809. Michael Harvey. 

1810. Michael Harvey. 

1811. Lewns Spinks. 

1812. Alexander Gray. 

1813. Whitlock Arnold. 

1814. John Long, Jr. 

1815. John Long, Jr. 

1816. Seth Wade. 

1817. Seth Wade. 



House of Commons. 
Andrew Balfour, Jed u than Harper. 
J. Harper, Absalom Tatonj. 
Edward Williams, A. Tatom. 
Robert McLean, J. Harper. 
James Robins, Aaron Hill. 
Aaron Hill, Joseph Robbins. 
William Bell, Zebedee Wood.^ 
John Stanfield, Edmund Waddell. 
Zebedee Wood, William BelL 
Zebedee Wood, Aaron Hill. 
William Bell, Renben Wood. 
William Bailey, Henry Branson. 
William Bailey, Henry Branson. 
Henry Branson, William Bailey, 
William Bailey, Henry Branson. 
William Bailey, Henry Branson. 
William Bailey, Henry Bmnson. 
William Bailey, Michael Harvey. 
William Bailey, Simon Green. 
William Bailey, Michael Harvey. 
Michael Harvey, John Brower. 
William Bailey, Michael Harvey. 
John Brower, Michael Harvey. 
Whitlock Arnold, Colin Sneed. 
John Brower, Michael Harvey. 
Colin Steed, Whitlock Arnold. 
Whitlock Arnold, Seth Wade. 
Whitlock Arnold, Seth Wade. 
John Brower, Solo. K. Goodman. 
Solo. K. Goodman, Josiah L^mdon. 
John Long, Josiah Lyndon. 
John Long, Josiah Lyndon. 
William Hogan, Seth Wade. 
Josiah Lyndon, John Lane, Jr. 
Solo. K. Goodman, Joshua Craven. 
Joshua Craven, Shubal Ga rdner^ 
Joshua Craven, West Arrnistea^T" 



18 



RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Years. Senate. 

1818. Charles Steed. 

1819. Seth Wade. 

1820. William Hogaii. 

1821. Seth Wade. 

1822. Seth Wade. 

1823. Alexander Gray. 

1824. William Hogan. 

1825. William Hogan. 

1826. Alexander Gray. 

1827. Alexander Gray. 

1828. Alexander Gray. 

1829. Abraham Brower. 

1830. Abraham Brower, 

1831. Benjamin Elliott. 

1832. Hugh Moffitt. 
1883. Henry B. Elliott. 
1834 Alfred >taley. 
1835. Alfred Staley. 
1836 Jonaihan Redding. 
1838. Jonathan Redding. 
1840. Jonathan Worth. 
1812. Henrv B. Elliott. 
1844. Henry B. Elliott. 
1846. Alexander Hogan. 
1848. Dr. Wra. B. Lane. 
1850. Dr. Wm. B. Lane. 
1852. Dr. Wm. B. Lane. 
1854. Dr. Wm. B. Lane. 
1856. M. W. Holt. 
1858. Jonathan Worth. 
1860. Jonathan Worth. 
1862. Giles Mebane. 
1864. Giles Mebane. 
1866. M. S. Robbins. 

1868. J. H. Davis. 

1869. J. H. Davis. 

1870. Dr. J. M. Worth. 

1871. Dr. J. M. Worth. 

1872. Dr. J. M. Worth. 
1873 Dr. J. M. Worth. 

1874. Dr. J. M. Worth. 

1875. K. H. Worthy. 

(Moore County.) 



House of Commons. 
Shubal Gardner, West Armistead. 
Siiubal Gardner, J. Brower, 
Charles Steed, Joshaa Craven. 
Abraham Brower, Frederick Lane. 
A. Brower, Benjamin Marraou. 
A. Brower, George Hoover. 
A. Brower, George Hoover. 
George Hoover, Abraham Brower. 
Abraham Brower, Robert Walker. 
Hugh Walker, John B. Tro3^ 
Thomas Hancock, Hugh Walker. 
Alex. Cunningham, A. Brower. 
Jonathan Wortli, A. Brower. 
Jona. Worth, Alex. Cunningham. 
A. Cunninghiim, A Brower. 
A. Brower, Benjamin Hawkins. 
Zebedee Rush, Benj Hawkins. 
William B. Lane, Zebedee Rush. 
Michael Cox, William B Lane. 
Zi-bedee Rush, Wm. B. Lane. 
William B. Lane, Alfred Brower. 
Alfred Brower, Julian E. Leach. 
Alfred Brower, Zebedee Rush. 
A. Brower, Isaac White. 
Allen Skinner, Isaac White. 
Jesse Thornberg, J. M. A. Drake. 
Wm. A. Long, Jesse Thornburg. 
John A. Craven, Jesse Thornburg. 
H. B. Elliott, A. G. Foster. 
John A. Craven, Jesse Thornburg. 
A. H. Foust, Thos. L. Winslow. 
Jonathan Worth, M. S. Robbins. 
Joel Ashworth, Enos T. Blair. 
Joel Ashworth, Enos T. Blair. 
Joel Ashworth, Enos T. Blair. 
Joel Ashworth, En^s T. Blair. 
Jonathan Lassiter, S. F. Tomlinson. 
Jonathan Lassiter, S. F. Tomlinson. 
J. W. Bean, Geo. W. Reid. 
J. W. Bean, Geo. W. Reid. 
Geo. W. Reid. J. W. Bean. 
Hugh T. Moffitt, A. H. Kendall. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



19 



Years. Senate. 

1876. M. S. Robbins. 

1877. M. S. Robbins. 

1878. M. S. Robbins. 

1879. W. M. Black. 

(Moore County.) 

1880. W. M. Black. 

(Moore County.) 

1881. 0. W. Carr. 

1882. 0. W. Carr. 

1883. J. C. Black. 

(Moore County.) 

1884. J. C. Black. 

(Moore County.) 

1885. M. S. Robbins. 

1886. M. S. Robbins. 

1887. D. E Mclver. 

(Moore County.) 

1888. D. E. Mclver. 

(Moore County.) 

1889. Jas. J. White. 

1890. Jas. J. White. 

1891. J G. Skinn^^r. 

(Montgomery County.) 

1802. J G. Skinner. 

(Montgomery County.) 

1893. L. C. Phillips. 

1894. L. C. Phillips. 



House of Commons. 

M. L. Fox, Dr. T. L. Winslow. 
M. L. Fox, Dr. T. L. Winslow. 
M. L. Fox, Dr. T. L. Winslow. 
N. C. English, L. G. B. Bingham. 

Special session of S&nate. 

G. S. Bradshaw, A. S. Homey. 
G. S. Bradshaw, A. S. Horney. 
M. S. Robbins, B. W. Steed. 

M. S. Robbins, B. W. Steed. 

I. F. Caviness, B. W. Steed. 
I. F. Caviness, B. W. Steed. 
Dr. J. M. Worth, Thos. J. Redding. 

Dr. J. M. Worth, Thos. J. Redding. 

Benjamin Millikan, I. H. Pugh. 
Benjamin Millikan, I. H. Pugh. 
Dr. W. A. Woollen, E. B. Kearns. 

Dr. W A. Woollen, E. B. Kearns. 

H. K. Fuller, T. M. Robertson. 
H. K. Fuller, T. M. Robertson. 



CONVENTIONS. 

1835. Alexander Gray, Benjamin Elliott. 
1860-61. William A. Long, Alfred G. Foster. 
1865-'66. S. S. Jackson, Zebedee Rush. 
1868. T. L. L. Cox, R. F. Trogden. 
1875. J. W. Bean, A. M. Lowe. 



1779. 
1782. 
1784. 
1786. 
1788. 
1790 
1800. 
1826. 
1827. 
1840. 



SHERIFFS AND DATE 

William Bell. 
John Collier. 
William Pickett. 
John Arnold. 
Robert McLean. 
Simeon Geron. 
Isaac Lane. 
Thomas Hancock. 
George Hoover. 
Isaac White. 



OF THEIR ELECTION. 

1846. Hezekiah Andrews. 
1850. J. W. Steed. 
1864. Z. F. Rush. 
1868. R. F. Trogdon. 
1872. W. R. Ashworth. 
1876. 0. R. Cox. 
1N78. Benjamin Millikan. 
1880. E. A. Motfitt. 
1888. J. S. Swain. 
1892. Romulus R. Ross. 



20 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



SOME RANDOLPH COUNTY PEOPLE WELL KNOWN 
IN OTHER COUNTIES AND IN OTHER STATES. . 

( Rev. Allen S. Andrews, D. D., President of the Methodist 
University, Greensboro, Ala. 

Augustin Blair, Attorney, California. 

B. H. Palmer, Attorney, Lake City, Fla, 

Archibald C. Worth, New York. 
^-Rev. Henry Y. Rush, Editor, Dayton, Ohio. 

Rev. James H. Colton, Presbyterian Minister and Mis- 
sionary to the Indians. 

Henry Colton, Mining Expert in Tennessee. 

Representative Brookshire, of Indiana, United States Con- 
gress. 

Rev. Williamson Harris, now of Pennsylvania. 

Alfred Marsh (son of Jas. H. Mar^h), now on the editorial 
staff of McClure\3 Magazine, New York. 

Mrs. E. E. Moffitt, R.deigh, N. C. 

Mrs. C. S. Jackson, Raleigh, N. C. 

Herbert Worth Jackson, Esq., Banker, Raleigh, N. C. 

Joseph Brown, Legislator, Columbus County. 

B. G. Worth, ( ommission Merchant, Wilmington, N. C. 

Reuben Brown (late), Whiteville, N. C. 

Enoch Faw, Attorney at Law, Marietta, Ga. 

Rev. Dougan C. Johnson (late), North Carojina Conference. 

Rev. Rosso Brown, Presbyterian Minister, Greensboro, N. C. 

Mrs. Robert Bingham (late), Bingham Sch(jol, N. C. 

David Gaston Worth, Commission Merchant and Capi- 
talist, Wilmington, N. C. 

James G. Steed. Raleigh, N. C. 

Gen. James M. Leach (late), Lexington, N. C. 

John Milton Coffin (late), Salisbury, N. C. 

Alex. \V. McAlister, Real Estate Agent, Greensboro, N. C. 

Rev. Levi Branson, D. D., Editor and Publisher, Raleigh, 
North Carolina. 

Will. H. Branson, Manufacturer, Durham, N. C. 

Mrs. Marinda Branson Moore (late), Teacher and Author, 
Boyd, N. C. 

Mrs. Emily Branson Moore, Boyd, N. C. 

Williamm F. A>kew (late). Capitalist and Manufacturer, 
Raleigh. N. C. 

J. M. Odell, Cotton Manufacturer, Concord, N. C. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 21 



Will Odell, Cotton Manufacturer, Concord, N. C. 

J. R. Odell, Cotton Manufacturer and Wholesale Merchant, 
Greensboro, N. C. 

John C. Blair, Teacher, Winston. N. C. 

W. A. Blair, Banker, Winston, N. C. 

I. C. Blair, Professor in Blind Institute, Raleigh, N. C. 

Wm. C. White, Contractor and Builder, Jackson, Miss. 

Dr. B. F. Andrews (late). Euf=.la, Ala. 

Rev. Marquis L. Wood, D. I), (hite), ex- Missionary to China. 

Isaac Newton Branson (late), Army of Northern Virginia. 

J. B. Makepeace, Manufacturer, Sanford, N. C. 

Mrs. Mariah Louisa Drake Jones, Yanceyville, N. C. 

Rev. Gray Wood (late), Missouri. 

James M. A. Drake (late), Lajirairie, 111. 

Dr. Nathan B. Hill (late), Minneapolis, Minn. 

Clarkston Hill, Millionaire, Chicago, 111. 

Bethel Hill, Chicago, 111. 

Fowl Hill, Chicago, 111. 

Samuel Hill (late^, Capitalist, Richmond, Ind. 

Rev. James M. O'Bryant, Presiding Elder Lathrop District, 
Missouri. 

Capt. C. F. Siler, President Holly Springs Academy. 

Dr. J. W. Long, Professor in Virginia Medical College, 
Richmond, Va. 

Brantly York, D. D. (late), Professor Rutherford College. 

Maj. R. W. York (late), Williams's Mill. N. C. 

Capt. Thomas Allen Branson, killed near Petersburg, Va., 
August 21, 1864. 

Mrs. Mary Drake Cowan, Salisbury, N. C. 

Henry Branson (late), Fayetteville, N. C. 

Henry Branson Hill (late), Indiana. 

F. P. Julian, Publisher, Peoria, 111. 

E. J. Hale, the Elder (late), Publisher, New York. 

Henry C. Brown, Secretary North Carolina Railroad Com- 
mission, Raleigh, N. C. 

J. Milton Btown, Attorney, Albemarle, N. C. 

Mrs. Addie Worth Bagley, Washington City, D. C. 

Braxton Craven, D. D., LL. D. (late), President of Trinity 
College. 

Prof. Lemuel Johnson, Professor in Trinity College, and 
Civil Engineer. 

Nathan Hunt (late). Friends Preacher. 

Prof. I. L. Wright (laie), Profe.ssor in Trinity College. 

Robert Gray (late), Winston N. C. 




JULIAN S. CARR, DURHAM, N. C. 



THE FIRST MAN TO GIVE $10,000 TOA'ARD THE ENDOWMENT OF TRINITY COLLEGE, 
WHILE IT WAS YET IN RANDOLPH COUNTY. 




Rev. LEVI BRANSON, D. D., RALEIGH, N. C. 

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER OF SERMONS, DIRECTORIES, ALMANACS AND 
MISCELLANEOUS BOOKS. 

Born and brought up in Cedar Grove Township. Had 
preparatory training at the Branson School-house and in the 
public schools. Graduated at Trinity College, 1856. Settled 
in Kaleigh, 1862. 



COUNTY ORQANIZATION 



FOR RANDOLPH. 



COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

James E. Walker, Chairman, Ashehoro. 
B. AV. Steed, Farmer^s. O. K. Cox, Cedar Falls. 

J. W. BiRKHEAD, Clerk ex officio, Ashehoro. 
Marmiduke S. Rohhins, Attorney for Commis'rs, Ashehoro. 



COUNTY OFFIC 
George S. Bradshaw, Ashehoro, . . 



Romulus R. lioss, 

J. W. BiRKHEAD, 

S. A. Hayworth, 
Wm. C. Hammer, 
Dr. J. O. Walker 
J. S. Cox. .... 
Z. F. Rush, . . . 
M. T. King, . . . 
W. Penn Wood, 

M. S. ROBBINS, 
T. L. ClIISHOLM, 

J. A. Blair, . , 
Wiley D. Rush, 
J. A. Blair, . . 



Ashehoro, . . 
Ashehoro, . . 
Ashehoro, . . 
Ashehoro, . . 
Randlernan, 
Ashehoro, . . 
Ashehoro, . . 
Bulla, . . . . 
AsJiehoro, . . 
Ashehoro, 
Ramseur, 
Ashehoro, 
Ashehoro, 
Ashehoro, 



ERS. 

Clerk Superior Court. 

High Sheriff. 

Register of Deeds. 

Surveyor. 

Sup't Public Schools, 

Coroner. 

County Administrator. 

Jailor. 

Steward Count}^ Home. 

Treasurer of County. 

- Finance Committee. 
Board of Education. 



GRADED SCHOOL COMMISSIONERS. 
J. E. Walker, Chairman; R. R. Ross, 

A. O. Redding, E. A. Moffitt, 

Henry Rich. 



COUNTY BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES. 
George S. Bradshaw, Chairman ; Wm. Hammer. 



(one vacancy.) 



KEY TO NUMBERS. 

1. rrosin'Ct Mi'tlioclist Church. 

•1. I-ibtTty (Jrove (col.) Church. 

:j. Krecdman'.s Chapel. 

4. Oak Koicst Friends Church. 

.5. HoiK'well Methodist Church. 

f>. Ml. Vernon Mctliodist Cluircii. 

7. Fiirlow's Chnpei. Metii. I'rot. 

s. Marlboro Friends Cliurcli. 

9. Did Union (first eamivnits. i.S02). 

in. Ebenezcr, Mctliodist. 

II. Level Cross, Methodist Prot. 

IJ. Providence, Friends. 

IS. O. F. Cox & Co.'s Store. 

14. Gmy'a Chapel, Meth. 1,'rol. Ch. 

1.'). Randolph, Methodist. 

/re/Hprman Husband's I'lace uixl 
Vk Tub Mill. 

17. Troy's Old Store. 

18. Liberty Grove, Methodist Prot. 
lit. Richland Lutheran Church. 

20. Shady Grove Baptist Cluircli. 

21. Cool Spring, Methodist. 

22. Cedar Falls, Methodist. 

23. Cedar Falls, Mis.sionary Haptisl. 
21. Plea.sant Ridge, Christian. 

2i. Plainfleld Methodist Chinch. 
2((. Caraway Wesleyan Churcli. 

27. Zion, Methodist ['rotestant. 

28. New Shepherd Baptist Church. 

29. Shepherd, Methodi.st Episcopal. 

30. Bethel Wesleyan Church. 
•Tl. Old Tabernacle, Meth. Epis. 
;i2. New Tabernacle, Meth. Prot. 
3!}. Poplar Ridge Friends Church. 
M. Gllead, Methodist E:piscopal. 
:«. Ml. Zion, Methodist Protestant. 
■VS. Pleasant Hill, .Mdli. lOplscopal. 
.37. Pleasant Grove, Meth. Epis. 

.38. Hickory Grove, Baptist. 

:t9. Mt. Tabor, Methodist Episcopal. 



G U I L F 




MONTGOMERY COUNTY 



MAP OF RANC 




MOORE COUNTY 



KEY TO NUMBERS. 

► 40. Union, Methodist Episcopal. 
IL Hoover Grove, Wesleyan. 

► 12. Salem Church, Meth. Episcopal. 

► 4.i. Concord, Methodist Episcopal. 
■U. New Union, Methodist Epis. 

► 4.j. Union, Metliodist Protestant. 

ii^. IJack Creelt Friends Church. 

dTJ Where Col. Balfour was killed 
►^^ by the Tory, Fanning. 

/is) Branson Homestead. 

► 49. High Pine, Wesleyan. 

► ')0 Rocky Ridge Academy. 
I. Salem, Methodist Episcopal. 

► .52. Mt Pleasant, Methodist Epis. 

► rhi. Dorset's Store. 
.54. Union Grove Christian Church. 

f .5.5. Holly Springs Friends Church. 
^ .5(5. Cox's Mill. 

r 57. Parks's Cross Roads, Christian. 
^ .58. Shiloh, Christian. 

.59. Pleasant Grove, Christian. 

60. Mt. Olivet, Methodist Episcopal. 

01. Baptist Church. 
^ 62. New Centre, Chri.-tian. 

63. Fair Grove, Methodist Prot. 
^ 64. Rock Springs, Methodist Prot. 
i 65. Pisgah, Methodist Episcopal. 

66. Union. Methodist Episcopal. 
y 67. t.)ak (irove, Methodist Epis. 
i 68. New Hope, Melliodist Epis. 
' 69. Eleazer, Methodist Episcopal. 

\ Shepherd Mountain. 
y 15. Caraway Mountain. 
i ('. Back Creek Mountain. 

D. Dave Mountain. 
f K. Purgatory Mountains (3). 
i F. Fanning Rock. 
' G. Fanning's I{ock and Cave. 
y II. Faith Uock. 



COUNTY, N. C. 



branson's 
Randolph County Business Directory 

FOR 

1894 . 

ABBREVIATIONS USED IN THIS BOOK. 

Agt for ag-ent ; elk for clerk ; E for east ; (col) for colored ; Col for colonel ; xnfg 
for inaiuifafturing ; mftr for nianufaclurer ; mgr for manager ; N for north : pres 
for president; prop for proprietor; H for souLh; sup for superiutendent ; w for 
west. The others are so plain as to be easily understood. 



ASHEBORO (C. H.), \ 

Seventy-two miles west of Raleigh, is the county seat of \ 
Randolph County, and was built on land purchased from 
Jesse Henly in 1793. Mr. Henly gave two acres of land for 
public buildings, and the first court was held here June 12, 
1793, in a small wooden house. The present handsome brick 
structure was erected in 1835, under the supervision of Jona- 
than Worth, afterwards Governor of North Carolina. In 
July, 1889, the High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and South- 
ern Railroad wys completed to this place, since which time 
the population has increased rapidly, and is now estimated 
at 1,500. Asheboro was named in compliment to Samuel 
Ashe, a distinguished soldier and statesman of the American 
Revolution, and who became Governor of the State in 1795. 
The courts of the county were first held at Abram Recce's 
house (1779), about half way between Brown's Cross Roads 
(old Johnsonville Court House) and Randleman Factory. 
Courts were held afterwards (1786) at Johnsonville, until 
June 12, 1793, when the first court was held at Asheboro. 



ASHEBORO, 

Asheboro Township. Mrs. E. B. McCain, Postmistress. Popu- 
lation, 1,500. The town is incorporated and has officers elected 
in May, a? follows: E. B. Kearns, Mayor; Aldermen, Col. 
A. C. McAlister, Wiley D. Rush, Mr. Auman, Franklin Cox, 
Hugh J. Burns; Allen J. Woodell, Town Clerk; Will. Scar- 
boro, Treasurer; 0. R. Fox, Marshal; Braxton Orman, Court 
Crier. 



2G RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Asheworth W R, teacher 

Asheboro Clothing Company, B F Newbv, manuger 
Ashehoro NhHhoclist Protestant Church, C C Cecil, pastor 
ASHEBORO ROLLER MILL CO, Dr J M Worth, j)res 
Asheboro Courier, weekly Democratic paper, W C Hammer, 

editor and publisher 
Auman Jasper, general store 

Bell John, bricklayer 

Betts J M, policeman 

BIRKHEAD J W, Regit;ter of Deeds, Clerk Board County 
C'Omn^iissioners, etc 

BLAIR J ADDISON, lawyer and member Board of Edu- 
cation, etc 

Blair F S. teacher 

BLAIR Mrs E T, milliner and mantuaraaker 

l^olton J A B, brakeman, H P K A & S R R 

BRADSHAW GEORGE S, lawyer. Clerk of Superior Court, 
Ch'm'n B'd Public Charities for County, and President 
Asheboro Lumber and Manufacturing Co, etc 

Britton tt Sapp, attorneys at law 

BRITTON JOHN T (Britton & Sapp), lawyer 

Brower J W (col), teacher, in charge colored graded school 

Brower Mrs J W (col), teacher in colored graded school 

Brower J AV & Co, general store 

Brower's Methodist Protestant Church 

Brown Nathaniel, magistrate, terra expires 1S97 

Bulla Louis D, practical printer 

Burns A E, baggage master, H P R A & S R R 

BURNS B B, prop Burns' hotel and livery and feed stables 

BURNS J MOSS, brakeman, H P R A & S R R 

BURNS HUGH J, carriage and buggy works 

Boyette ct Richardson, drugs • 

Burns Willis (col), barber 

Burns Hugh J, town commissioner 

Caldwell D F (Greensboro), director roller mill 

Caudle Henry D, printer on Asheboro Courier 

Cecil C C, Meth prot minister, pastor Randleraan, Asheboro 

Chrisco J M, shoemaker 

Cox C J, director Asheboro wood and iron works 

Cox J S, Coujity Administrator 

Crawford H T, carp nter 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 27 



Davis, Henry's heirs of Jamestown, N C, own Gold Prospect 
near Asheboro (formerly worked) 

Farlow Daniel, teacher 

Ferree Rev T T, physician and pres N C M P Conference 

Fisher B J, owns the Fisher Gold Mine and Benbow Hotel 

at Greensboro 
Foundry Company, steam saw and planing mill 
Fox R, chief of police and town marshal 
Franks Zack, bricklayer 

Gilbert Miss Suckie E, teacher 

Grimes W A & Co, Shuttle Block Factory 

Grimes W A, town commissioner 

HAMMER Wm C, lawyer, also sup public schools and 

editor of Courier, etc, Asheboro 
Hammer J C & Co, general store 
Hall \V C, carpenter 

Hancock J W, depot agt. So Ex agt and telegraph operator 
Hancock Miss L J, teacher in primary dept of graded school 
Havworth S A, surveyor for the county 
Headen C \V, United States mail agent H P R A & S R R 
Henley S A, physician 
Henley F A, surgeon dentist 
Holmes Parker, pastor Methodist Church, South (Asheboro, 

Central Falls and Cedar Falls churches) 
Hoover T J, deputy sheriff 
Hoover T J, policeman 
Hunter R S, manager Guilford Lumber Manufacturing Co 

Kearns N F, teacher of vocal music 

KEARNS E B, undertaker and member of Board of Town 

Commissioners, etc, also Mayor of Asheboro 
King M T, steward of county home 

Ledbetter C A, carpenter 

Lewallen Henry, Methodist Protestant minister 

Loftin T G, carpenter 

Loudermilk E G, teacher 

Loudermilk S E, teacher 

Lyttle William (col), barber 

McALISTER & MORRIS, wholesale and retail general 

store 



28 RANDOLPH COUNTY 

McAlister C C, sec and trens Asheboro Lumber and Mfg Co 
McCain Mrs E B, postmistress 

McDuffie Miss Kate, assistant teacher in graded school 
McDowell Mrs Hannah, owns gold prospect (the Burrow Mine) 
McDowell \V F, Methodist Protestant minister 
MOFFITT E A, wholesale and retail general store, School 

(\)n]missioner 
Mofht Elijah, assistant teacher in graded school 
MOFFITT J T, sec and treas Asheboro Wood and Iron 

Works, magistrate, terra expires 1895 
Mooring W H, owns Gold Prospect, Jones Mine P 
Mooring W II & Co, wholesale and retail general store 

Newby B F, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Newby & Miller, general store 

New Hope Methodist Protestant Church 

Orman Braxton, court crier 

Parker D H (col), teacher 

Petty David, sup Asheboro Lumber and Manufacturing Co 

Porter S S, carpenter 

Pressnell Uriah, magistrate, term expires 1897 

PRESSNELL A M & D A, buggy and carriage repair shop 

Pressnell A M, blacksmith 

Pugh A S, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Pugh A S, general store 

Eankin A M, vice-pres Asheboro Roller Mill Co 

Rankin A M, conductor, HPRA&SRR 

Richardson , shoemaker 

Rich Henry, School Commissioner 

BOBBINS M S, lawyer and attorney for Board of County 
Commissioners, Chairman Finance Committee, etc 

Reed Charles T (col), bricklayer and plasterer 

BOSS BOMULUS B, Sheriff, also sec and treas Asheboro 
Roller Mill, com of graded school, etc 

Rush Z F, magistrate, term expires 1899 

BUSH WILEY D, lawyer and chairman Board of Educa- 
tion, Town Commissioner, etc 

Rush Z F Jr, jailer and deputy sheriff 

Rush & Ross, livery, sale and feed stables 

Saunders A W, blacksmith and woodworker 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 29 



SAPP P (Britton & Sapp), lawyer 
Scarboro Will, Town Treasurer 
Smith W R, minister Methodist Protestant Church 
Smith Travis, blacksmith 
Speagles A Frank, feed and trade stables 
Speagles Frank, boarding house 
Stedman W D, town commissioner 
Stedman J M, engineer HPRA&SRR 
Steed Nat's heirs, own gold prospect near Asheboro (for- 
merly worked) 
Stout J G, director in Asheboro Wood and Iron Works 

The Morris Drug Company, E G Morris, mgr, drugs and 

druggists' sundries 
The Randolph County Medical Society, headquarters at 

Asheboro; C C Hubbard, pres; C H Lewis, vice-pres; 

J O Walker, sec; S A Plenly, treas. Meets quarterly, 

third Thursday in May, Aug., Nov. and Feb. 
Tomlinson S F, teacher 
Tomlinson Charles F, principal of Asheboro Graded School, 

Male and Female Academy 

WALKER J E, treasurer Deep River Store Company 

WALKER JAMES E, sec and treas Powhatan Mfg Co at 
Randleman, chairman Board County Commissioners 

Wood ell Allen J, town clerk 

Woodell A J, shoemaker 

WOOD W P & CO, wholesale and retail general store 

Wood W P, county treas, also wholesale and retail merchant 

Woodell A J, clerk of Town Commissioners and shoemaker 

Winninghan R L, deputy sheriff 

Worth Dr J M, president Asheboro Roller Mill Company 

Winninghan Newton, officer of the grand jury 

AVinslow T J, teacher 

WORTH Dr J M, pres Cedar Falls Mfg Co and pres Worth 
Mfg Co, mills Nos. 1 and 2 

WORTH & McALISTER, Asheboro, own the Davis Moun- 
tain Mine, now in operation 



ACONITE, 

Richland Township, has a population of about 25. Wm. M. 
Coble is the postmaster. Ii is a pleasant country place, eight 
miles south of Asheboro. 

Cox Dennis, flour, corn and saw mill 



30 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



ARCHDALE, 

Trinity Township, is one mile from Trinity College station, 
on the H. P. R. A. & S. Railroad. This place (Bush Hill) 
was founded in 1820 by Allen U. Tomlinson, and has been 
called Archdale since 1887, after John Archdale, the Quaker 
Governor in 1694. A. J. Tomlinson is postmaster. The 
chief industries are the tanning of leather and the manufac- 
turing of shoes. This is a model village of about 350 people, 
having good churches, schools, etc. There is also a good 
roller flour mill. 

Archdale Church, Friends 

Church H F, brick manufacturer 

Frazier E AV, harness and saddle maker 

Frazier Jesse, president Archdale Roller Mill Company 

Hendricks T M, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Johnson Miss Notre, principal of the Archdale High School 

King Rufus P, Friends minister 

Miller Geo R, sec and treas Archdale Roller Mill Company 

Parker E P, vice-pres Tomlinson Mfg Co 

Parker E P, Archdale, patentee and mfr breeching strap at- 
tachment 

Tomlinson H A & Co, general store and drugs 

Tomlinson John Milton, physician 

Tomlinson Mfg Co, horse collars 

Tomlinson A J, sec and treas Tomlinson Mfg Co 

Tomlinson Dr J M, patentee of harrow tooth 

Tomlinson A J, postmaster Archdale p o 

Tomlinson & Andrews, brick and tile works 

Tomlinson S F, pres Tomlinson Mfg Co 

Tomlinson Dr J M, Archdale, owns gold mine (Prospect), 
Caraway p o ; also one near Archdale p o 



BOMBAY, 

New Hope Township. It is a new postoffice. Mrs. Martha 
Ingram is Postmistress. The place is estimated at about 25 
population. The people are mostly thrifty farmers. 

Ingram T W, magistrate, term expires 1897 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 31 



BROWN'S STORE, 

Grant Township, is estimated at 30 population. Isaac C. 
Brown is the Postmaster. It is situated a few miles south- 
east of Asheboro. 

Cox Arm el i a D, teacher 

Cox Cordelia, teacher 

Cox L L, teacher 

Cox Z H, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Hammond PI & Son, general store 

Hancock J F, teacher 

King Eli W, teacher 

Spoon W D & Mother, flour, corn and sawmill 



BROWER'S MILLS, 

Brower Township, is a small village in the southeastern part 
of the County. The Postmaster is R. S. Brower, and the popu- 
lation is estimated at about 60 people. Situated in a thrifty 
neighborhood. 

Brower E B, flour and corn mill 

Cox H P, teacher 

IMt. Zion Church, M E South, R. S. Abernethy 

Owen J W, teacher 

Owen Isaac C, teacher 

Owen I N, teacher 



BRUNSWICK 

Is in Providence Township, in the northern part of the 
County. Miss Mattie Chamness is the Postmistress, and the 
population is estimated at 25. 

Barker Orrenton, Methodist minister 

Barker G P, general store 

Bethel Methodist Protestant Church 

Brower W D, deputy sheriff 

Coble Robert, flcur and corn mill 

Cox Enoch, flour and corn mill 

Neece R W, teacher 

Neece W R, teacher 

Redding Mollie, teacher 

Wilson J C, teacher 

Wilson Orka, teacher 



32 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



BUFFALO FORD 

Is in Pleasant Grove Township, in a good neighborliood. 
M. J. Caviness is the postmaster, and the population is 
about 03. 

Bear Alson, flour and corn mill 

Bear A J, flour and corn mill 

Caviness Alfred, minister Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

Cox Calvin (Cox Mill), corn and flour 

Calah Presbyterian Church 

Cox Levi, owns the Baker Gold Mine, near Flower Hill P O 

Cox Calvin, tannery 

Cox Levi, Friends minister 

Holly Spring Friends Church 

Stout J E, teacher 



BULLA 



Is in Back Creek Township, five miles west of Asheboro. 
A. C. Bulla is the postmaster. It has a population of 28 peo- 
ple. This is a pleasant part of the county. 

Bulla A C, physician 

Bulla A M, physician 

Crowson Ida, teacher 

Charlotte, J H Stout, pastor, Methodist Protestant Church 

Haskin Ora D (col), teacher 

King N P, steward of county home 

McCain Hugh, magistrate, term expires 1895 

McRary W F & Co, flour and corn mill 

Robbins F C, Methodist Protestant Church minister 



BUNCPI 

Is in Pleasant Grove Township, and has a population of about 
26. Mrs. I. F. Caviness is the postmistress. 

Thompson John, general store 



CAPE 



Is in Franklinsville Township, east of Asheboro. J. R. Parks 
is the postmaster, and the place is reported at a population 
of 33. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 33 



Green J AT, mauistrate, term expires 1897 

Green T J, teacher 

Parks Fannie, teacher 

Parks J R, flour, corn and saw mill and cotton gin 

Parks J "Wellons, steam saw mill and gin 

Parks J R, merchant, general stock 



CARAWAY 

Is in Back Creek Township, about ten miles northwest of 
Asheboro. John F. Jerrell is the postmaster, and the popu- 
lation is 23. The lands are good surrounding it, and the 
people comfortable. 

Farlow E N & Co, general merchant 

Mountain View M E Church, North, J M Privett, pastor 

Miller Jones, magistrate, term expires 1895 

JARRELL JOHN F, deputy sheriff 

Redding T J, owns Caraway Gold Mine 

REDDING T J, owns the Sawyer Gold Mine 



CEDAR FALLS 

Is in Franklinsville Township, five and a half miles north- 
east of Asheboro. Samuel Bristowe is the postmaster. The 
population is about 378. The first cotton mill established 
in Randolph County was built here in 1836 by Benjamin 
Elliott, Phillip Horney, Alfred H. Marsh and Henry B. 
Elliott. This is a historic place, surrounded by man}' hal- 
lowed associations of the olden time. In 1775 the lands on 
both sides of Deep river, including the spot where this vil- 
lage now stands, and then called Cedar Fall^, were granted 
to Herman Husbands by the Earl of Granville. Benjamin 
Elliott subsequently acquired possession of the property and 
operated a grist and flouring mill there for a number of 
years before the factory was built. The factory is now owned 
and conducted by Dr. J. M.Worth, O.R. Cox, George H. Make- 
peace, Rev. W. M. Curtis and others, under whose skill Cedar 
Falls has become the queen of the river, and the cedar thicket 
is now a village of thrift and beauty. O. R. Cox, secretary 
and treasurer, is the manager. 

AUred J F, minister Methodist Episcopal Church, South 
Allred W E, smith and wagon shop- 



34 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Bristow Samuel, general merchant 

Bristow tSamuel, boarding-hou^e 

Cedar Falls Baptist Church, Rev Mr Merrill, of Franklins- 

ville, pastor 
Cedar Falls l*ostoIKce, Samuel Bristow, postmaster 
Cedar Falls Methodist Protestant Church 
COX R, county commissioner, sec and treas Cedar Falls 

Manutacturing Company, etc 
Cedar Falls Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Parker 

Holmes, pastor 
Jennings A G, chair and furnitiire factory 
Leonard Bros & Co, general merchants 
Lineberry G M, blacksmith 
Pepper C G, depot and express agent and telegraph operator 

C F & Y V Railroad 
Redding A H, physician 
Redding Brothers own the Julian Gold Mine 



CENTRAL FALLS, 

In Franklinsville Township, five miles northeast of Asheboro, 
has a population of about 318. J. S. McAlister is postmaster. 
The factory was built in 1881 bv J. PL Ferrer, J. E. Walker, 
A. M. Diffie, J. A. Blair, W. P. Wood, W. H. Reagan, J. H. 
Millis, J. O. Pickard, R. W. Frazier, G. S. Bradshaw, Mrs. 
E. E. Walker, Amos Gregson, R. M. Free and W. S. Ball. 
This is one of the very neatest villages on the river. This 
factory is now owned and operated by the J. M, Worth Manu- 
facturing Company (mill No. 2). 

Bankeraeyer T J, teacher 

Davis Lemuel, Methodist Protestant minister 

Davis W O, Methodist Protestant minister 

Diffie Mrs L J, general merchant 

Fowler J M supt the Worth Manufacturing Co, mill No. 2 

Hackney John, Central Falls, Miss Baptist minister 

Jordan James, Miss Baptist minister, pastor of church near 

Siler City 
Luck A J, magistrate, term expires 1899 
McAlister & Co, general merchants 
McAlister Jas S, magistrate, term expires 1899 
Morris C S, bookkeeper at mill No. 2 the Worth Mfg Co 
Scarboro H D, sec and treas Deep River Store Co 
Stevenson W M, teacher 
York E L, magistrate, term expires 1893 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 35 



CHEEKS, 

In Pleasant Grove Township, has a population of 37. II. T. 
Caviness is Postmaster. It is in the southeast portion of the 
county in a good section. 

Caveness H T, general merchant 

Caveness II T & Co, flour, corn and saw mill 

Caveness H T & Co (Cheeks Mill), flour and corn 

Craven J F, deputy sheriff 

Pleasant Grove Christian Church, W W Hayworth, pastor 

Sewell R H, teacher 



COLERIDGE, 

Pleasant Grove Township, is the seat of Enterprise Cotton 
Factory, and is situated far down on Deep River, at a place 
formerly known as Foust's Mill. The town has about 178 
inhabitants. The cotton mill was established herein 1883 
by E. A. Moffitt, James A. Cole Daniel Lambert and AV. S. 
Russell, and has been quite successful. James A. Cole is 
Postmaster. 

Cole Ed, teacher 

Cole & Co (roller mill), corn and flour 

Concord Methodist Episcopal Church South 

Enterprise Mfg Co (patent roller mill), flour and corn 

Enterprise Mfg Co. general store 

Inman Thomas W, Friends minister 

Siler Alice, teacher 

Siler Cora, teacher 

Siler R P, teacher 

Scotten A K & Co, steam saw mill 

Scotten A K, Methodist Protestant minister 

Scotten A K & Co, general store 

Yow W H, general store 



COLE'S STORE 

Is in Pleasant Grove Township, some four miles east of 
Foust's Mills. The population is estimated at 48. J. T. Lam- 
bert is Postmaster. 

Caviness J M, magistrate, term expires 1899 
Caviness John R, magistrate, term expires 1895 
Caviness J M, teacher 
Caviness Alfred, minister Meth Epis Church South 



RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Craven G N (col), teacher 

Craven L T, general merchant 

Lambert Daniel, Hour and corn mill 

Lambert D H (Lambert's Mill), flour and corn 

Lambert J T, general store 

Lane J R, flour and corn mill 

Wren & Lambert, flour and corn mill 



DEFIANCE 

Is a new postoffice, situated in Trinity Township, and is 
reported to have 18 people. B. F. Miller is the Postmaster. 

Gilead M E Church, South, J E Woosley, pastor 
Jerrell & Thad Crowson, steam saw^ mill 
Miller & Co (roller mill), flour, corn and saw mill, also cot- 
ton gin • 
Mt Zion Methodist Protestant Church 



EDEN 



Is situated in Tabernacle Township, some five miles north- 
west of Hoover Hill. Population 62. J. C. Andrews is 
Postmaster. This place is in a thriving section of the county. 

Dorsett Geo \V (col), teacher 

Hoover R L, steam saw mill 

Kennedy & Co (Thayer's Mill), flour and corn mill 

Phillips L C, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Phillips L C, general merchant 

Thayer Williams & Co, flour and corn mill 



EDGAR, 

p, is a sm: 

Wall & Beckerdite, general merchants 



In New Market Township, is a small village of 28 people. 
S. F. Wall is Postmaster. 



ELEAZER, 

In Union Township, is reported to have a population of 19 
people; and it is in the midst of a pleasant country. J. W. 
Luther is the Postmaster. 

Burney E L, flour and corn mill 

Eleazer M E Church, South, Wm M Robbins, pastor 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 37 



EMPIRE, 

In Pleasant Grove Township, is three miles southeast of 
Franklinsville. It is a small country place of 11 inhabitants. 
W. R. Brower is the postmaster. 

Brown W R, Christian minister 

Caddell S W, physician 

Cox Levi, flour and corn mill 

Holly Springs Friends Church 

Pleasant Ridge Christian Church, W H Right, pastor 

Porter Miss Elizabeth, owns gold mine which has been suc- 
cessfully worked 

Spoon Jo's heirs, own the Spoon Gold Mine, which has been 
worked successfully 



ERECT, 

In Pleasant Grove Township, is a pleasant country village of 
42 people, some eight or nine miles east of Asheboro. T. B. 
Tysor, postmaster. 

Bean Allison & Bro, steam saw mill 

Brown B F, teacher 

Hinshaw Amos, steam saw mill 

Mount Olive Church (M ECS), R S Abernethy, pastor 

Owen W F, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Sugg L 0, pottery works 

Sugg M T, pottery works 

Teague G W, pottery shop 

Thornburg N D (col), teacher 

Tysor T B, general store 

Wren M F, pottery works 

Yow J M, pottery works 

Yow J M, general merchant 



FARMERS, 

In Concord Township, has a population of 38, and is five and 
a half miles southwest of Science Hill, in a good neighbor- 
hood. Mrs. Emma Skeen is postmistress. 

Adderton & Nance, flour and corn mill 

Burkhead W T, flour and corn mill 

Concord M E Church, South, J W Strider, pastor 



38 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Jolinson Malla, teacher 

Johnson Annie, teacher 

Lewis C H, physician 

McMasters D G, magistrate, term expires 1893 

Miller Lillian, teacher 

Newby N W, general merchant 

Plummer John, steam saw mill 

Prevot W A, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Ridge C E, teacher 

Steed B W, county commissioner 

Yarborough W B, magistrate, term expires 1893 



FLORA, 

In Concord Township, is about" fifteen miles southwest of 
Asheboro, near Uwharrie river. The land in this section is 
good. The village has 38 people. B. B. Bingham is Post- 
master. 

Johnson Harris, (Roller mill), flour and corn 
Morgan J A, general stock 



FLOWER HILL, 

In Grant Township, is eight miles south of Asheboro, in a 
good section. Has a population of 25. Allen Scott, Post- 
master. 

Cox & Lewellen, steam saw mill 

Cox Y H & Co, own Gold Prospect 

Smith Wm R, Methodist Protestant minister 



FORK CREEK, 

In Richland Township, is some twelve miles southeast of 
Asheboro. It has a population of 22. Emsley Lowdermilk 
is Postmaster. 

Church, Missionary Baptist 

Dowd , physician 

Johnson O, teacher 

Johnson H M, magistrate, term expires 1895 
Lawrence John, Christian minister 
Lowdermilk E, magistrate, term expires 1899 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 39 



Lowdermilk Nora, te.acber 

Lawrence Wesley, Christian INIinister 

Pleasant Hill Church, Meth Trot, J H Stone, i)astor 

Way Samuel, Christian minister 

Yovv Andrew, Hour and corn mill 

Yow A J (fe Son, flour and corn mill 



FOUST'S MILLS, 

In Pleasant Grove Township, is four miles northeast of Mof- 
fitt's Mills. It is estimated to have a population of 128. 
Edgar T. Whitehead is Postmaster. 

Concord M E Church, South, R S Abernelhy, pastor 
Vestal R M, teacher 



FRANKLINVILLE 

Is in the Township of the same name. In 1801 Christian 
Morris bought the lands of Jacob Skeen and built a grist 
mill. In 1820 Morris conveyed the site to Elisha Coffin, who 
with Henry B. Elliott, Henry Kivett and John Miller, in 
1838 built here a cotton factory, which was the second one 
established in the County. They named the town after 
Jesse Franklin, who was then Governor of the Siate. This 
town, like others on the river, is noted for the high moral 
and christian character of its people. The mill was burned 
in 1850, but was soon rebuilt. It is now owned by Benja- 
min Moffitt, Hugh Parks, Mrs. E. E. Moffitt and W. S. Rus- 
sell. 

Allred J F, local preacher M E Ciiurch, South 

Allred Joseph F, brick factory 

Baldwin J C, teacher 

Brower Madison & Son, contractors and builders 

Burgess A H, general merchant 

Burgess A H, boot and shoemaker 

Church at Cedar Falls (Mi-ssionary Bap), H L Merrill, pastor 

Church (M E C S), R S Abernethy, pastor 

Ellison J A, teacher 

Ellison J M & Co, general merchants 

Fox Thomas, physician 

Franklinsville Manufacturing Company, flour and corn mill 

Franklinsville Manufacturing Company, general merchants 



40 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Free & James, repair and wagon shop 

Fraley T J, depot and express agent and telegraph operator 

Hackney Jo Dan, Missionary Baptist minister 

J lay worth M M, physician 

IloUaday T C, teacher l 

Ingold Ida, teacher * 

Jonts Wesley C, contractor and builder 

Johnson Mary, teacher , ^ 

Luther J A, sup Randolph Manufacturing Company's mill I 

Masonic Hall, Hanks Lodge, No 128 | 

Merrill G L, Missionary Baptist minister 1 

Methodist Episcopal Chilrch, South, R S Abernethy, pastor 

Moffitt E K & Co, sfone ware company 

MOFFITT BENJAMIN, sec and treas Franklinville Man- 
ufacturing Company 

Moore's Cha{»el (Missionary Baptist), G L Merrill, pastor 

McNair Adeline (col), teacher 

Morris Rena, teacher 

Parks Hugh, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Parks Thomas A, minister M E Church, South 

PARKS HUGH, pres Franklinville Mfg Co, sec and treas 
Randolph Mfg Co 

Pugh I H, teacher 

Randolph Manufacturing Company, general merchants 

Russell M S, boot and shoe maker 

Ritter Mrs J S, boarding-house 

Russell W C, sup Franklinville Manufacturing Company 

Slack T A, deputy sheriff 

Teague C H, teacher 

Tippett William H, contractor and builder 

Webster W B, teacher 

Webster James, Christian minister 

Williams John D (Fayeiteville), pres Randolph Mfg Co 



FULLERS, 

In Tabernacle Township, is situated in the neighborhood of 
fifteen gold mines, the township probably being the richest 
mining district in the county. Population, 76. A. W. Ful- 
ler, postmaster. 

Burt, Fuller & Hughes, flour, corn and saw mill 
Fuller & Hughes, roller mill for corn and flour 
Fuller Alson, physician 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 41 



Fuller A W, general merchant 

Lewis David ife Co, own and work Little Jones Mine 

Fuller I J, deputy sheriff 

Keystone Mining Co (gold), has been worked successfully 

Phillips C H, physician 

Pleasant Grove Church, M E C, South 

Thayer & Co, flour and corn mill 

Varuer J M, teacher 



GLADESBORO, 

In New^ Market Township, has about 50 inhabitants. Frank 
Frazier is the postmaster. It is about eight miles east of 
Trinity High School and near the Guilford County line. 

Coltrane Jesse, owns the Coltrane Gold Mine, near Caraway 

postoffice 
Coltrane Jesse F, flour and corn mill 
Coletrane Jesse, flour and corn mill 
Ebenezar M E Church, South, J A VVoosley, pastor 
Stanton I F, general merchant 



GLENOLA, 

In New Market Township, is on the H. P. R. A. & Southern 
Railroad, four miles south of Trinity College. This is a 
beautiful place for a new town, and is estimated to have 53 
inhabitants. Lyndon White is postmaster. 

Clark C A (col), teacher 

Marsh Victor, minister Methodist Episcopal Church 

Spencer James T, deputy sheriff 

Spencer & Coltrane, steam saw mill 

White Lyndon, depot agent 



GRAY'S CHAPEL, 

Six and a half miles northwest of Franklinville, is in Provi- 
dence Township and near Millboro, on the Factory Branch 
(C. F. & Y. V.) Railroad. It has a population estimated at 
51. Mrs. Zoal Nelson is postmistress. 

AUred D H, teacher 
Allred M L, teacher 
2 



42 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Cagle George, owns the Cagle Gold Mine 
Coltraine J C, teacher 

Gray's Chapel (Methodist Protestant Church) 
Pugh & Lineberry, general merchants 
Ruth Isaac, flour and corn mill 
Underwood S M, teacher 



HILL'S STORE 

Is in Concord Township, some fifteen miles west of Asheboro, 
near Uwharrie river. It has a population of 33. W. R. 
Lewis is postmaster. 

Colored Church (African Methodist Episcopal) 

Lewis Thomas G (col), teacher 

Lewis W R, general merchant 

Lewis W R, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Uwharrie Friends Church 



HOOVER HILL 

Is in Tabernacle Township, and has a population of 63. This 
village is in the midst of the gold mines, so well known. T. H. 
Redding is postmaster. 

Mount Pleasant Methodist Prot Church, C McRoper, pastor 

New Hoover Hill Gold Mining Company, Hoover Hill P 0, 
own the Hoover Hill Mine ; $350,000 capital ; supposed 
to be the richest mine in the county (a London company) 

Nichols Davy C (col), teacher 

Finch A B, magistrate, term expires 1897 

Hinshaw Steven, flour, corn and saw mill 

Hinshaw Jeff, flour, corn and saw mill 

Hoover Hill Gold Mining Co, general store, J Parkin, mgr 

Jarrett A W, general merchant 

Parkin Capt Joseph, mgr New Hoover Hill Gold Mine 

Pearce Julian, general merchant 

Redding T H, mine clerk (Hoover Hill Mine) 

Shepherd M E Church, South, J E Woosley, pastor 

Skeen Noah, flour, corn and saw mill 

Skeen N R, fiour, corn and saw mill 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 43 

HOYLE, 

Back Creek Township, is a new postoffice, with a population 
of 16 persons. John Laughlin is Postmaster. 

Caraway Wesleyan Methodist Church 

Farlow Daniel Jr, teacher 

Flint Hill M P Church, C McRoper, pastor 

Gold (was successfully operated), owned by Western men 

Loflin Shubal, flour and corn mill 

Rush Elwood & Co, flour and corn mill 



JACKSON'S CREEK 

Is situated in Concord Township, four miles northwest of 
Farmers. It has a population estimated at 61. Henry 
Nance is Postmaster. 

Delk W J, magistrate, term expires 1893 

Hill J C, general merchant 

Hill & Garner, flour, corn and saw mill 

Lanier B F, deputy sheriff 

Morgan J W, flour, corn and saw mill 

Mt Tabor M E Church, South, J W Strider, pastor 

Nance A & Sons, general merchants 



KEMP'S MILLS, 

Grant Township, is estimated to have a population of 72. It 
is about five miles southeast of Asheboro, in a good section. 
Milton Leonard is Postmaster. 

Albright Jesse P, pottery works 

Allen J J & Co, general merchants 

Allen J J & Co, flour, corn and saw mill 

Coffin Franklin, minister M E Church, South 

Cox S S, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Dowd T D, physician 

Graves Thos S, magistrate, term expires 1893 

Hammond Milo, teacher 

Hinshaw Thomas, general merchant 

Littles H J, teacher 

Smith Miss W A, teacher 

Spoon William (Spoon's Mill), flour, corn and saw 

Wright H F, teacher 

Yergau W E, miller for John Kemp 



44 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



KILDEE, 

Columbia Township, hris a population of 18, W. H. York 
is postmaster. 

York W H & V, general stock 



LASSITER'S MILLS, 

New Plope Township, is nine miles southeast of Salem 
Church, surrounded by a good farming section on the 
Uwharrie river. Alex. Murdock, postmaster. 

Leach Martin, Missionary Baptist minister 

Luck Minnie, teacher 

Murdock & Loftin, flour and corn mill 

Murdock Mrs D P, general merchant 

Robbins W M, pastor Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

Strider J W, pastor Methodist Episcopal Church, South 



LEASEE CROSS, 

New Market Township, is five miles north of New Salem, 
Population, 51. W. D. Fogleman, postmaster. 

Branson's heirs and others, flour, corn and saw mill (the 

Branson Mill) 
Bulla Jeff D, physician 
Gray Clayborn, physician 

Fogleman W D, minister Methodist Protestant Church 
Fogleman W D, general merchant. 
Level Cross Methodist Protestant Church 



LEVEL PLAINS, 

Tabernacle Township, is three and a half miles southwest of 
Glenola depot, on the Richmond and Danville Railroad. 
Population, 52. David Farlow, postmaster. 

Farlow Evangeline, teacher 
Farlow T E, teacher 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 45 



LIBERTY 

Is in Liberty Township, and is a depot on the Cape Fear and 
Yadkin Valley Raih-oad, twenty-three miles south of Greens- 
boro. This is a thrifty town of 520 people, built since the 
railroad was opened — a pleasant country and a live people. 
Dr. W. J. Staley, postmaster. 

Bowman W F, druggist 

Bowman F M, druggist 

Brower Mrs E N, millinery 

Burgess R R, public school teacher 

Causey H C, lumber dealer 

Cole John, shoemaker 

Cox Isham, Friends preacher 

Cox Mill, Staley & Arnick, two miles east of Liberty 

Curtis A W, teacher 

Curtis C R, teacher 

Farmers' Alliance Exchange, W L Kivett, manager, general 

merchants 
Faust John C, stock farm 
Fox W P, magistrate, term expires 1897 
Griffin cfe Trogden, general merchants 
HAMILTON E C, editor of Liberty Herald and North State 

Musical Voice 
HAMILTON E C, teacher of vocal and instrumental music 

and vice-president of N C C Association 
Headeu Annie T (col), teacher 
Hornada}' M N, liver}' stables 
Hornaday S M, livery stables 
Kirkman Julius, harness and saddles 
Letterloh Jeremiah (col), teacher 
Liberty Academy, Aliss Mamie Patterson, principal 
Liberty Grove Methodist Protestant Church 
Christian Church, W G Clements, pastor (PO, Morrisville) 
Liberty Methodist Protestant Church 
Methodist Protestant Church, James Hutton, pastor 
Michaux Richard, Methodist Protestant minister 
Missionary Baptist Church, T Edwards, pastor 
Moffitt Thomas, depot agent 
Overman J F, dealer in general merchandise 
Owen W B, deputy sheriff 
Patterson R D, teacher 
Patton John, Christian minister 
Patterson A J, physician 



46 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Pickett J F, general merchant 

Sandy Creek Primitive Baptist Church, four miles east of 

Liberty. This is said to be the oldest Baptist Church in 

the State 
Smith L H, magistrate, term expires 1895 
Staley & Dixon (Long's Mills), two miles north of Liberty 
Staley W J, dentist 
Staley S W R, teacher 
Staley D J, livery and sale stables 
Staley Dr W J, postmaster 
Way P T, editor of Liberty Herald 
West Low, teacher 
West Minnie, teacher 

West Bros, corn and saw mill and blacksmith shop 
York Aaron, York's Mill, five miles southwest of Liberty 



li 



LYTTON 

Is a new postofRce — Tabernacle Township. Population, 11. 
Lee Nance, postmaster. 

MARLEY'S MILLS, 

Columbia Township. Southeast of Asheboro. Has a popu- 
lation of about 61. G. C. Underwood, postmaster. 

Carter H B & Co (Marley's Mill), corn and flour mill 
Marley Thos, mgr flour, corn and saw mill 
Underwood W O, teacher 
Wright L A, teacher 



MARTHA 

Is in New Hope Township, about twelve miles west of Ashe- 
boro. It is a new postoffice, in the midst of a good farming 
country. Its population is estimated at 76. Ivey C. Nance 
is postmaster. 

Salem Colored Congregational Church, Zachariah Simmons, 
pastor 



MAUD 



Is in Trinity Township, some three miles south of Trinity 
College High School. The population is estimated at 21. It 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 47 

is situated in a good neighborhood. Glenola is the nearest 
depot. Dr. T. L. Winslow, postmaster. 

Crowson & Walker, steam saw mill 

Elder W N, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Elder AV N, general merchant 

Farlow Thomas, steam saw mill 

Hill John W, deputy sheriff 

Mount Vernon M E Church, South, J E Woosley, pastor 

Rush Brothers (Foundry Mill), flour and corn 

Steam saw mill, Thomas Farlow 

Wilson Charles F, teacher 

AVinslow Thomas L, physician 



MECHANIC, 

In Cedar Grove Township, about eight or ten miles west of 
Asheboro, is near one of the best farming sections of the 
county. Population estimated at 39. E. N. Howard, post- 
master. 

Howard & Co, general merchants 
Lowe N M, deputy sheriff 
Kemp John, fiour and corn mill 
Red Church (col), A M E Zion 
Science Hill Friends Church 



MILLBORO, 

Franklinville Township, is some four miles southeast of Ran- 
dleman and two miles east of Worthville. It is a thriving 
depot village on the Factory Branch of the Cape Fear and 
Yadkin Valley Railroad. Population estimated at 65. Wes- 
ley Pugh, postmaster. 

Pugh J W & Son, general merchants 
Routh P A, magistrate, term expires 1895 
Spoon & Coltrane, general merchants 



MOFFITT'S MILLS, 

In Pleasant Grove Township, is about eight miles southeast 
of Asheboro. The mills at this place have been long cele- 
brated. The population of the village is estimated at 93. 
L. E. Brady is postmaster. 



48 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Antioch Christian Church, H A Albright, pastor 

Albright J E, magistrate, terra ex|»ires 1895 

Albright Mary E, teacher 

Albright A A, teacher 

Brady R R, teacher 

Craven M F, teacher 

Cox Nathaniel & Son, flour and corn mill 

Cox Nathaniel & Son, sash and blind factory 

Cox Nathaniel, Friends minister 

Cox & Craven, flour, corn and saw mill 

Craven H R, teacher 

Hay worth D H, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Hayworth W W, Christian minister, also postmaster 

Hay worth Wm, Christian minister 

Hayworth W W, general merchant 

Hayworth F L, tannery and harness factory 

Howard Stephen, tannery 

Kearns B F, Christian minister 

McCoy I W, general merchant 

Moffitt Hugh T, Christian minister, magistrate, term expires 

1895 
Moffitt Elma, teacher 
Moffitt Otelia, teacher 
Ready R K, teacher 

Shiloh Christian Church, W W Hayworth, pastor 
Way Hartwell, Christian minister 
Pine Ridge Friends Ciiurch 



NEW HOPE ACADEMY, 

In New Hope Township, is a pleasant country' place of about 
37 people. Mrs. Martin Webb is postmistress. 

Burney E L, flour and corn mill 

Cagle B F, deputy sheriff 

Hill & Brothers, steam saw mill 

Lyndon J F, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Reeves C R, teacher 

Shears James, owns the Staff'ord Gold Mine 

Shaw W S, general merchant 

Steed Burwell, owns the Griffin Mine (gold) 

Strickland Henry, steam saw mill 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 49 



NEW MARKET, 

Two miles west of Randleman, in New Market Township, is 
one of the oldest places in the county. The population is 
estimated at 41. Duncan Newlin is postmaster. 

Barker Seth C, Friends minister 

Bostick J T & Son (Walker Mill), flour anil corn 

Farlow David Jr, Friends minister 

Johnson N C, teacher 

Marlhoro Friends Church 

Old Union M E Church, South, J A Woosley, pastor 

Spencer R B, general merchant 

Spencer & Co, steam saw mill (spoke billets, etc) 



NEW SALEM, 

In Randleman Township, is about two miles north of Ran- 
dleman depot. Dr. J. M. Worth, ex-State Treasurer, settled 
at this place and began his professional career as practicing 
physician. The population is now estimated at 153. E. P. 
Hayes, postmaster. William Clark also lived here and had 
a flourishing tannery and store, and was afterwards one of 
the organizers of Randleman Factory. Peter Dicks also had 
a store at this place. 

Adams Mary Lou, teacher 

Caudle L M, general store 

Caudle James N, magistrate, terra expires 1897 

Craven E S, teacher 

Hayes E P & Co, general store 

Roach T J, teacher 

Steele T J. magistrate, term expires 1895 

W^oollen J E, teacher 



PINSON 



Is a new postoflice in New Hope Township, some IweVe miles 
west of Asheboro. The population is estimated at 25. Wil- 
son Hill is postmaster. 

Hill & Bro, general store 

Rochel E G, teacher 

Rochel E G, magistrate, term expires 1895 



50 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



PISGAH, 

In Union Township, is about twelve miles south of Asheboro, 
in a well timbered section of the county. Population, 23. 
Milton Cox, postmaster. 

Cox Dennis, Hour, corn and saw mill 

Cox Robert M, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Cox S A, deputy sheriff 

Pisgah M E Church, South, William M Robbins, pastor 

Lucu9 J J, Hour, corn and saw mill 



PLANTERS, 

Columbia Township, three miles east of Ramseur, is in the 
midst of a farming section. Ramseur is the nearest depot. 
Population, 39. W. H. Foust, postmaster. 

Foust I H, teacher 
Foust J H, teacher 
Foust Maggie, teacher 



POST OAK, 

In Cedar Grove Township, is about eight miles west of Ashe- 
boro, in the midst of a good people. It is a new postoffice. 
Population, 23. Levi Lowe, postmaster. 

Back Creek Friends Church 
Bryant G W (col), teacher 
Skeen Alice, teacher 



PROGRESS, 

In Trinity Township, is only a few miles from Trinity Col- 
lege and in a- very beautiful part of the county. Population, 
17. G. G. Hendricks, postmaster. 

Blair Edward C, teacher 

Hendricks G G, general merchant 

Lowe Brothers, own gold mine now being operated 

Oak Forest Friends Church 

Trotter Jonathan, flour and corn mill 

Trotter J M, flour, corn and saw mill 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 51 

QUININE, 

In Richland Township, is a new place a few miles south of 
Asheboro. Population estimated at 17. John Trogden, post- 
master. 



RACHEL, 

In Union Township, is a new office. Population, 19. Mrs. 
Rachel Hill, postmistress. 

Parks Strider & Son, general merchants 

Thorn bursj W P, teacher 

Union M E Church, South, William M Robbins, pastor 



RALPH, 

In Grant Township, south of Asheboro, is a small village of 
16 inhabitants. J. M. Allen, postmaster. 

Allen J M, teacher 

Humble J A & Co, flour and corn mill 



RAMSEUR. 

In 1850 a factory was built at this place by Isaac H. Foust, 
Washington Brower, Henry Kivell, Dennis Curtis and Dan- 
iel Kime. They called it Columbia Factory. The town is 
situated on Deep river, a short distance below the mouth of 
Sandy creek ; and since June 26, 1890, has been the terminus 
of the Factory Branch of the C. F. & Y. V. Railroad. In 
1879 the property changed hands and is now owned and ope- 
rated by W. H. Watkins, A. W. E. Capel, T. L. Chisholm 
and J. S. Spencer. The population is estimated at 900. The 
Columbia Manufacturing Company, witli a capital stock of 
$90,000 and a surplus of $85,000, is the leading enterprise of 
the town. The Alberta Chair Works, S25,000 capital, is next 
in magnitude. The town has also two good churches, one 
good hotel, one high school, under management of Prof. 
F. S. Blair, several large stores, a handsome depot, also a 
splendid bridge across Deep river. Ramseur is withal a 
model town for industry, push, pluck, high morals and 
christian living. Hardly any place in the State would seem 
to have a brighter future. Not far below Ramseur, on Deep 



52 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



river, was the birthplace of Braxton Craven, D. D.,. LL. D. 
He was brought up largely by Nathan Cox, a Quaker of 
undoubted honesty. Dr. Craven lived to beau honor to the 
entire County, to the State and to the Nation. Many good 
and really great men have lived along U[) and down Deep 
river within tiie bounds of Randolph County. Of the towns 
that have sprung up along the river, perhaps none have a 
more hopeful future in prospect than Ramseur. Tlie owners 
of the factories are all faithful workers in the church and 
benefactors to humanity. 

RAiMSEUR, 

Columbia Townshij), is the terminus of Factory Branch C. F. 
& Y. Y. Railroad; is a beautiful town on the east bank of 
Deep river; has a population of 900. Edward Leonard is 
postmaster. The mill-dam here is probably the finest in the 
County — stone, cemented, and cost about $8,000, 

Allred Peter, shoemaker 

Allred John W, brickmaker and contractor 

Blair Prof F S, principal of Ramseur High School 

Branch M B, assistant teacher in Ramseur High School 
CBurgcss John H, agent for machinery 

jBurgess John H, magistrate, term expires 1897 

T^apel A W E, sup Columbia Mfg Co Mills, sec and treas 
Alberta Chair Works 

Caviness G R (col), teacher 

Chisholm T L, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Chisholm T L, sup Colunjbia Factory store and member of 
Countv Board of Finance, etc 

COLUMBIA MFG CO, capital stock, S90,000; surplus, 
§85,000 (incorporated); J S Spencer, pres; A W E Ca- 
pel, sup; W H Watkins, sec and treas; raw material 
used annually, 3,000 bales of cotton ; products, 3,000,000 
yards sheeting, 25,000 lbs sewing thread, 25,000 lbs 
bunch yarn; number of hands, 180; average pay per 
dav, 54 cents 

Cox R V, owner of Staley Cotton Mill, located at Staley P 

Cox L I, general store 

Church at Ramseur (M E, South), Robt S Abernethy, pastor 

Church at Ramseur (Miss^ionary Bap), J M Hilliard, {)astor 

Crutchfield Lou M, teacher 

Curtis D A, contractor and builder 

Farlow Miss Sue J, art teacher in Ramsc-ur High School 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 63 



Farmers' Alliance Exchange, general store, Wm Rightsell, 
manager 

Forrester Manly, Missionary Baptist 

Forrester J ife Co, general store 

Forrester J & Co, jewelry, furniture, coffins and groceries 

Foushee W T, deputy sheriff 

Fox M L, physician 

Friendship M E Church (col), J H Hunter (col), pastor 

Fruit E W, conductor Factory Branch Railroad (Ramseur 
to Madison via Greensboro) 

Hobson Silas, undertaker 

Harmon G W, Missionary Baptist 

Lane W F, wngon and buggy repair shop 

Lane J T, contractor and builder 

Lane W F, hoarding-house and livery and feed stable 

Leonard E B, postmaster 

Marsh J C, superintendent Alberta Chair Works 

Melton J B, depot and express agent and telegraph operator 

Parks James A, steam saw mill 

Parks' Cross Roads Christian Church, W H Right, pastor 

Ramseur Manufacturing Company, flour and corn mill 

Ramseur Store Co, wholesale and retail general store, T L 
Chisholm, mgr 

Ramseur Hot^l, A B Covington, prop 

Richardson W B, Christian minister 

Salem Methodist Protestant Church 

Scott J T, blacksmith . 

Stout W C, groceries 

Spencer J S (Charlotte), pres Columbia Mfg Co, at Ramseur, 
and vice-pres Alberta Chair Works 

Tate'C S, phvsician 

THE ALBERTA CHAIR WORKS (incorporated), capi- 
tal stock, §25,000; paid in, $10,000; WH Wai kins, pres; 
J S Spencer, vice-pres; AWE Capel, sec and treas; J C 
Marsh, sup; surplus, $5,000. This factory also manu- 
factures a general line of brooms 

Trogden John B, ast teacher in Ramseur High School 

Turner John T, blacksmith, contractor and builder 

Watkins W H, sec and treas Columbia Mfg Co, pres Alberta 
Chair Works 

Watkins Miss Etta F, ast teacher in Ramseur High School 

Watkins W H,chm Board Trustees of Ramseur High School 

York Jas D, bricklayer 



54 EANDOLPH COUNTY 



RANDLEMAN 

This is an incorporated town of 2,500, inhabitants, eight 
miles north of Asheboro. It is the largest manufacturing 
town in the county, and, in fact, has the largest population. 
Long ago Peter Dicks had a grist mill and an oil mill at this 
place, which was then called Dicks. In 1818 Jesse Walker, 
William Clark, Joseph Newlin, James Dicks and William 
Hinshaw erected a cotton mill here and called it Union Fac- 
tory. In 1866 John Randleman and John H. Ferree acquired 
control of the property and the name was changed to Ran- 
dleman. The Kandleman Mills, including the Quinn 
Mill, are now owned and operated by John H. Ferree. 
Naomi Falls Factory (owned by a stock company), Powha- 
tan Plaid Mills and the Randleman Hosiery Mill (making 
six cotton mills) are all within the corporation, and Worth- 
ville Factory is only two miles down the river. In 1885 
the Randleman Mill was burnt, but it was immediately 
rebuilt, and is now one of the leading manufactories 
of the State. The town has four churches, two hotels, a 
graded school and many other signs of prosperity. The 
High Point, Randleman, Asheboro and Southern Railroad 
has a fine depot here, and reaches the town by a loop, giving) 
a beautiful view as the train sweeps around the brow of the/ 
hill overlooking the place from the west. Within the town 
limits is Naomi Falls, named after Naomi Wise, who was 
drowned here by Jonathan Lewis about the year 1808. 
Naomi Falls Factory was also named for the ill-fated Naomi. 
It was built by J. E. Walker, John H. Ferree, J. 0. Pickard 
and Amos Gregson in 1879. Dr. Braxton Craven, after an 
able discourse, dedicated this factory building to "Almighty 
God, for the purpose and uses of Christian work." This was 
a new departure and a good example, and it is remarkable 
that the factories of Randolph County are conducted almost 
entirely by Christian gentlemen of very high type. 

RANDLEMAN. 

Town Officers — D. J. Gaster, Mayor; T. 0. Bowden, Wil- 
liam Ivey, William F. Spain, Robert Hanner, J. H. Wilson, 
Commissioners; Clarence Gregson, Secretary and Treasurer; 
W. H. Winningham, Chief Marshal. 

Allred G H, foundrv and machine shop 
BAIN J C & SONS, general merchants 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 55 



Baptist Cliurch, Carrick, of Lexington, pastor 

Bostick J T, postmaster 

Bowden T 0, town commissioner 

Brown William, magistrate, term expires ]897 

Bryant S, treasurer Naomi Falls Manufacturing Company 

Bryant S, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Bulla A N, superintendent Randleman Hosiery Mill 

GARR W, pres Randleman Mfg Co (lives at Trinity Col) 

Christian Church 

Clapp J A, general stock 

Copeland Mrs T J, principal Ilaudleman Graded School 

Coltrane R L, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Coltrane Miss Minnie, milliner and mantuamaker 

Davidson Jo, house painter 

Deep River Store Company, general merchants 

Ferree J H, sec and treas Plaidville Manufacturing Co 

Ferree J H, owner of the Randleman Mfg Company Mills 

Ferree D T, sup buildings of Randleman Mfg Company 

Fields J L, general merchant 

Fox VV A, physician 

Gaster D G, mayor of Randleman 

Gaster D J, deputy sheriff 

Glasgow J W, watchmaker and jeweler 

Gregson Clarence, town secretary and treasurer 

Gregson Amos, local preacher (M E Church, South) 

Gregson Rev Amos, sup Naomi Falls Manufacturing Co 

Manner Julius, Methodist Protestant minister 

Manner Robert, town commissioner 

HALL J L, undertaking and cabinet work 

Menshaw & Millikan, general merchants 

Mornaday C H, local preacher (M E Church, South) 

Ingold Fernando, magistrate, term expires 1899 

INGOLD F N, prop Ingold Motel 

Ivey Wm, town commissioner 

Johnson Miss Nora, ast teacher at graded school 

Johnson Alvin, blacksmith 

Kennett J F, boarding house 

Lamb Z N, photographer 

Lassiter & Co, general merchants 

Lineberry W A, general merchant 

Lineberry Robert, Methodist Protestant minister 

Lineberry Robert, blacksmithing 

Mt Lebanon Meth Prot Church, C C Cecil, pastor 

Mendeuhall L D, practical machinist 



5G RANDOLPH COUNTY 



MENDENHALL Mrs A L, boarding house, near depot 

MENDENHALL A L, local preacher M E Church, South 

MILLS G W, general merchant 

Millikan J M, groceries 

Miilikan J M, livery and feed stables 

Myricks Miss Nannie, mantuamaker 

Naomi Falls Mfg Co, capital stO(k, $108,550; S Bryant, treas; 
Amos Gregson, sup; raw material used annually, 2,200 
bales of cotton ; products, 3,000,000 yards plaids, checks 
and stripes and 600,000 seamless bags; number of hands 
employed, 225; shipping, express and telegraph offices, 
Randleman 

Naomi Store Company, general merchants 

Newlin S G, director in Plaidville Mfg Co and partner in 
Randleman Hosiery Mill 

Norwood J E, minister Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

Parsons J W, blacksmith 

Pickard J 0, director in Plaidville Mfg Co and sup Randle- 
man Mfg Co 

POWHATAN MFG CO, R Cox, pres; Jas E Walker, 
sec and treas; capital stock, $30,000; material consumed 
annually, 224,500 lbs yarn; products, 1,300,000 yards 
colored cotton goods; shipping point, express and tele- 
graph offices, Randleman 

Randleman Hosiery Mill, capital stock, $3,000; L A Spencer, 
sec and treas; A N Bulla, sup; S G Newlin, partner; 
raw material used annually, 50,000 lbs yarn ; products, 
30,000 dcz pairs hose and half-hose; number hands, 40; 
average wages per da}^ 60 cents ; shipping, express and 
telegraph officer, Randleman 

REDDING W W, general merchant 

Redding Miss Martha, assistant teacher at graded school 

Randleman Store Co, general merchants, N N Newlin, mgr 

Richardson N R, pastor St Paul's M E Church, South (Ran- 
dleman and Naomi Falls churches) 

Robbins R H, drayman 

Sapp L L, physician 

Spain William F, town commissioner 

Smith JjfizeW L, minister Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

Spencer & Lambe, general merchants 

Spencer L A, sec and treas Randleman Plosiery Mill 

STEED A A, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Stratford D W, house and sign painter 

Tally & Co, groceries and notions 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 57 



THE RANDLEMAN MFG CO, W Carr. pres; J H 
Ferree, sec and treas; capital stock, $100,000 ; surplus, 
892,000; J Pickard.sup; raw material used annually, 
30,000 bales of cotton; products, 4,000,000 yards plaids; 
number of hands worked, 250; average wages per day, 
43 cents; shipping point, express and telegraph offices, 
Randlemau. The entire capital stock of the Randleman 
Mfg Co is now owned by John H Ferree. THE ftUINN 
MILL is operated under same management 

THE PL/*IDVILLE MFG CO, J H Ferree, sec and treas; 
J O Pickard aud S G Ne^"lin, directors; capital stock, 
$50 000; material used annually, 600,000 lbs of yarn; 
products, 3,500,000 yards of plaids; number of hands, 
125 ; average wages per day, 60 cents ; shipping point, 
express and telegraph offices, Randleman 

WALKER Mrs J 0, proprietor Walker House 

WALKER J 0, physician 

Wall Mrs Emma, dressmaker 

Wilson J H, town commissioner 

Wiles E A, depot and Southern Express agent 

Winningham W H, chief marshal of Randleman 

Woollen W A, physician and druggist 



RANDOLPH, 

Tabernacle Township, is a new place, estimated at 15 inhab- 
itants. Farming community. Wm. M. Rush, postmaster. 

Parish W W, teacher 

Rush William H, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Parish W M & Co, general merchants 



RILEY'S STORE, 

New Hope Township, nine miles west of Bfill's Store, is a 
small village, estimated 24 people. H. C. Riley, postmaster. 

Johnson Jeremiah, flour and corn mill 
Sheets B I, general merchant 



SALEM CHURCH, 

Concord Township, fifteen miles southwest of Asheboro. 
This is the place of the Salem camp-meeting, so celebrated 
forty to fifty years ago. Dr. Doub, Dr. York, Dr. Craven and 
3 



58 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



many other earnest preachers of the olden days preached 
here and witnessed the conversion of thousands. Dr. Allen 
S. Andrews, Dr. M. L. Wood and many other distinguished 
preachers went out from Salem campground. There is now 
an estimated j)opulation of 47. Miss Rosaline Kearns is 
postmistress. 

Birkhead , fiour and corn mill 

Hill Geo F (col), teacher 

Nance & Nance, general merchants 

Salem M E Church, South, J W Strider, pastor 



SAWYERSVILLE, 

Back Creek Township, is seven miles northwest of Asheboro. 
Population estimated at 37. Z. F. Rush, postmaster, 

Spencer James, flour and corn mill 



SCIENCE HILL, 

Cedar Grove Township, is about ten miles southwest of Ashe- 
boro. This was the seat of a flourishing academy many 
years ago, and near this place was the well known Mt. Leb- 
anon Church. Population, 78. Miss Dollie McDaniel, post- 
mistress. 

Back Creek Friends Church 

Cedar Grove Wesleyan Meth Church, Thos Sechrest, pastor 

Kemp John, flour and corn mill 

Lowe S H & John T, own gold prospect 

Lowe John T, magistrate, term expires 1893 

Lowe N M & S H, own gold prospect Jj 

Lowe James, flour and corn mill Ij 

Mt Lebanon M E Church, South, Wm M Robbins, pastor 

McDaniels Allen, steam saw mill 

New Union Methodist Protestant Church, J H Stowe, pastor 

New Lebanon M E Church, South, W M Robbins, pastor 

Newby, Nathan's heirs, own the Newby Gold Mine 

Ridge J W, general merchant 

Parker W II, general merchant 

Pool Henry & Sons, steam saw mill 

Rock Hill Primitive Baptist Church 

Science Hill Friends Church ; 

Winslow Sarah E W, Friends minister 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 59 

SOAPSTONE MOUNT, 

In Columbia Township, is four miles north of Raraseur. 
Population, 39. H. L. Kimery, postmaster. 

Brown Presley, flour and corn mill (McMaster's) 

Brown A P, flour, corn and saw mill 

Holt M, corn mill 

Jones Alfred, general merchant 

Kimery H L, general merchant 

McMasters W R, general merchant 

Patterson Grove Christian Church, James Webster, pastor 

Rightsell George, flour, corn and saw mill 

Rightsell John, flour and corn mill 



SOPHIA, 

New Market Township, is a new depot on the H. P. R. A. & 
S. Railroad, some four miles west of Randleman. Popula- 
tion, 123. C. S. Dicks, postmaster 

Dicks C S, general merchant 

Plainfield Friends Church 

Johnson Mad, depot and express agt and telegraph operator 

Kivett Stephen, steam saw mill 

"Wall Nora R, teacher 



SPERO, 

Back Creek Township, is a new depot, four miles north of 
Asheboro, on the H. P. R, A. & S. Railroad. Population, 37. 
J. W. Bean, postmaster. 

Bean J W, general merchant 

Bean J W, magistrate, term expires 1897 

Davis Chapel Methodist Protestant Church 



STALEY, 

Liberty Township, is four miles south of Liberty, and is a 
small depot on the C. F. & Y. V. Railroad. The Staley Cot- 
ton Mill is located here, lately sold and purchased by Mr. 
Cox, of Ramseur. Population, 48. Wesley Cox, postmaster. 

Brower A C & Co, general merchants 
Christian Church 



60 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Church (col), Methodist Episcopal 

Foushee J M, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Church, Methodist Episcopal, South, R S Abernethy, pastor 

Shady Grove Missionary Baptist, J L Smith, pastor 

Staley Chas M, principal of Staley academy 

Siler Pleasant, flour and corn mill 

Teague J F, general merchant 



STRIEBY, 

Union Township, is a countr}'' village of 17 people, somei 
eight or ten miles south of Asheboro. Ruffin Walden, post- 
master. 

Old North State Mining Co, own the Uwharrie gold mine 
Plunkett J K, phj'siciau 
Walden II R, (col), teacher 



TRINITY COLLEGE, 

Trinity Township, is one of the three incorporated towns in 
the County. As far back as 1837 Dr. B. York established 
Union Institute at this place. In 1841 Dr. Braxton Craven 
took charge of the Institute, and in 1853 had it chartered 
into " Normal College." In 1858 it became the college of the 
North Carolina Methodist Conference. Since Trinity College 
was removed to Durham, some three years ago. Trinity High 
School has been conducted here, with Rev. J. F. Heitman as 
head master, accomplishing much good for the cause of edu- 
cation. The high moral influence of this school can be seen 
all over the county. County pride alone should secure 
ample endowment and keep it full of students on and on. 
The town has about 350 people, several stores and two fac- 
tories of small wares. It is a depot on the H. P. R. A. & S. 
Railroad, five miles south of High Point. Miss Cornelia Z. 
Leach, postmistress. 

Brame AV A, local preacher (M E Church, South) 
Carr Miss Maggie A, teacher in Trinity High School 
Craven Mrs Nannie, boarding-house 
Eshelman A F, boarding-house 
Eshelman A F, cigar factory 
Flour and corn, J A & Ben Miller 
Frazier Cicero, dental surgeon 
Frazier Dr F C, owns gold prospect 



.._j 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 61 



Frazier Miss Sallie, owns gold prospect 

Ganaway Prof W T, pres Wood Mfg and Milling Company 

Hopewell M E Church, South, J E Woosley, pastor 

HEITMAN J F (M E Church, South), head master of 
Trinity High School 

Hogau J H, boarding-house 

Hunley Mrs Charles, boarding-house 

Ingram L J, teacher 

Johnson A S, teacher 

JOHNSON Prof L, teacher in Trinity College High School; 
also civil engineer, author of Randolph County Map 
and others; also author of Johnson's celebrated Arith- 
metic 

Johnson Mrs Prof L, boarding-house 

Liberty Grove Missionary Baptist Church (col), Anthony 
Welborn, pastor 

Lineberr}' B L, general merchant 

Lineberry B L, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Lineberry & Co, steam saw and planing mill 

Lineberry B L, sec and treas and gen mgr Wood Mfg and 
Milling Co 

Matton Miss Nettie G, teacher in Trinity College High School 

Meams Emma, teacher 

McCanless A L, physician 

Parker Benson, boarding-house 

Parker Benson, merchant, sec and treas and bus mgr Trinity 
Broom Works 

Payne David M, merchant, flour and corn mill 

Parker B, general merchant 

Parker D Reid, physician 

Prospect Methodist Episcopal Church, South 

Pepper C M, retired minister M E Church, South 

TRINITY COLLEGE HIGH SCHOOL, Rev J F Heit- 
man, head master 

White J J, teacher 

White J C, teacher 

Woosley J E, pastor Randolph Circuit, M E Church, South 



UHLA, 

Cedar Grove Township, is a new postoffice, and is reported 

at 11 population, M. R. Moffilt, postmaster. 

Flag Spring Methodist Protestant Church 

Moffilt M R, general merchant, five miles south of Asheboro 

Presnell Uriah, general merchant 



62 RANDOLPH COUNTY 

VELNA, 

la Brower Township, is a new postoflSce. Population, 11. 
Rinsey Leonard, postmaster. 



WHEATMORE, 

Trinity Township, is a new postoffice. Thos. J. Finch, post- 
master. Population, 23. 

Church, Missionary Baptist 

Everhart Thomas, steam saw mill 

Gray John W (Thomasville), steam saw mill 

Gray McKendrie, stave factory 

Steam saw mill, Mr Elliott, of Thomasville 

Underwood M F, magistrate, term expires 1893 



WHITE HOUSE, 

Cedar Grove Township, is seven and one-half miles south- 
west of Asheboro, and has an estimated population of 27. 
Near this place lived Col. Andrew Balfour, who was killed by 
David Fanning and other Tories on Sabbath morning, March 
10, 1782, in the presence of his sister Tibbie and little daugh- 
ter. Col. Balfour lived in a large log house, old colonial style. 
He was a true Scotch patriot, and died a martyr to the cause 
of American liberty. The old rock spring-house is still stand- 
ing, and just across the public road, down the spring branch, 
was seen a broad and beautiful meadow. Levi T. Branson 
is postmaster at White House. 

Bettie McGee gold mine, (not operated at present) 

BUCKEYE GOLD MINING CO (Branson mine), John T 
Cramer, of Thomasville, gen mgr; telegraph and express 
offices, Asheboro. This property was lately bought of 
Eli Branson's heirs, and capitalized at $60,000 

Cox Elwood, Friends minister 

Cramer John T (Thomasville), gen mgr Buckeye Gold Min- 
ing Co 

Doub Mrs and others, of Greensboro, N C, own the Doub 
gold mine, near White House p o 

GLEWIS JOHN B, owns the Hannah's creek gold mine 
(500 acres), operated successfully before the war 

Hapwell Friends Church 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 63 



High Pine Wesleyan Meth Church, Thos Sechrest, pastor 

Johnson Harris & Sons, steam saw mill 

Miller & Co, steam saw mill 

Phillips J L, magistrate, term expires 1895 

Rush Z F Sr, owns the Rush gold mine, (not now regularly 

worked) 
Stuart John, magistrate, terra expires 1899 
Vuncannon Turner, shuttle block factory 



WHY NOT, 

Richland Township, ten miles south of Asheboro, on old 
plank road, was for many years the home of James Page, one 
of the best doorkeepers the world ever produced. This is a 
village of 37 people, in the midst of a pleasant timbered sec- 
tion of the county. Martin Cagle is postmaster. 

Auman Dempsey, general merchant 

Burroughs J P, teacher 

Chisholm J F, magistrate, term expires 1899 

Christian Union Church, John Lawrence, pastor 

Crisco John R, deputy sheriff 

Fair Grove Meth Prot Church, J H Stowe, pastor 

New Centre Christian Church, Wesley Lawrence, pastor 

New Hope (Aconite p o) Meth Prot Church, JAW Stowe, 

pastor 
Potter shop, Evan Cole, proprietor 
Parker G W, dry goods and groceries 
Stowe J H, pastor of Asheboro circuit Meth Prot Church 
Yow Henry, general merchant 
Yow E R, magistrate, term expires 1899 



WOODFORD, 

In Grant Township, south of Asheboro, is a new postofBce. 
Population, 13. Mrs. S. J. Brown, postmistress. 



WORTHVILLE, 

Franklinsville Township, on Deep river, two miles below 
Randleman, is a factory village of some 350 people. Mr. 
Allred, postmaster. This place is at the old crossing called 
Hopper's Ford, from Charles Hopper, who entered this land 



G4 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



and located near the ford over one hundred years ago. The 
cotton factor}'^ here was built in 1881 by Dr. J. M. Worth and 
H. Wortli. It is a magnificent building. The town is hand- 
somely laid out on the west side of Deep river, just below 
the mouth of Pole Cat creek. This site had never been 
improved before, but Worthville is already an honor to the 
county of Randolph and a living monument to the public 
spirit and enterprise of the men whose name and memory 
it will long perpetuate. 

Arnold J 0, general merchant 
Bethany Methodist Protestant Church 
Coble W C, grocer 

Cedar Falls M P Church, G F Melloway, pastor 
Harper C E, general merchant 
Hubbard C C, physician 
Jackson H L, sup Worth Mfg Co, mill No 1 
Jenkins A W, general store 
Julian W R, teacher 

Mc A lister J S, head bookkeeper for the Worth Mfg Co 
McMasters Cora, teacher 
Melloway G F, pastor Cedar Falls Circuit, Meth Prot Church 
Osborne A M & Jenkins A W, grocers 
Shaw R H, general merchant 

SCARBORO H D, sec and treas Deep River Store Co 
THE WORTH MFG CO, (cotton), Dr J M Worth, pres" 
Winslovv S S, public school teacher 

WORTH HAL M, sec and treas Worth Mfg Co, mills Nos 
1 and 2 



B RAN SON ^' '^^ ^^°^ °^ 

payetteville Street. . . . 
j^ ^j I I ^^ ^^ Next to Capitol Square. 

RALEIQh, N. C. 



l|^=^GOOD BOARD, by the Day, Week or Month, at mod- 
erate rates. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 65 

Randolph County Classified Directory 

FOR 

1 894. 

CHURCHES. 

(Names, Postoffices and Denominations.) 

Churcli, Asheboro ]\Ieth Epis, South 

Cedar Falls Church, Cedar Falls : Meth Epis, South 

Church, Staley Meth Epis, South 

Church, Ramseur Meth Epis, South 

Church, Franklinsville Meth Epis, South 

Concord, Foust's Mills Meth E[)is, South 

Concord, Farmers Meth Epis, South 

Concord, Coleridge ^Meth Epis, South 

Ebenezar, Gladesboro Meth Epis, South 

Eleazer, Eleazer Meth Epis, South 

Gilead, Defiance Meth Epis, South 

Hopewell. Trinity College Meth Epis, South 

XOTE.— This was the home church of Gen. Alexander Gray. In the beauti- 
ful cemetery lie his remains, and also those of the Leaches, Hogans, 
Finches, Bransons, etc. It is about three miles west of Trinity College. 

Mount Zion, Brown's Mills Meth Epis, South 

Mount Olive, Erect Meth Epis, South 

Mount Lebanon, Science Hill Meth Epis, South 

Mount Vernon, Maud Meth Epis, South 

Mount Tabor, Jackson's Creek Meth E[)ip, South 

Naomi Falls, Randleraan Meth Epis, South 

l^ew Lebanon, Science Hill Meth Epis, South 

Old Union, New Market Meth Epis, South 

Note. — At this church, it is said, the first camp-meeting in this State was 
held about 1801 ; church built 178(1 

Pisgah, Pisgah ]\Ieth Epis, South 

Pleasant Grove, Fullers Meth Epis, South 

Prospect, Trinity College Meth Ej)is, South 

Salem. Salem Church Meth E[)is, South 

Shepherd, Hoover HilL- Meth Epis, South 

Saint Paul's, Randleman Meth Epis, South 

Union, Rachel Meth Epis, South 

Salem(col) Meth Epis, South 

Asheboro Church Meth Prot 



66 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Bethany, Worthville Meth Prot 

Bethel, Brunswick Meth Prot 

Brower's, Asheboro Meth Prot 

Cedar Falls, Cedar Falls Meth Prot 

Church, Liberty Meth Prot 

Davis Chapel, Spero Meth Prot 

Fair (rrove. Why Not Meth Prot 

Flag ypring, Uhla Meth Prot 

Flint Hill, Hoyle Meth Prot 

Level Cross, Level Cross Meth Prot 

Liberty Grove, Liberty Meth Prot 

Mt Lebanon, Randleman Meth Prot 

Mt Pleasant, Hoover Hill Meth Prot 

Mt Zion, Defiance Meth Prot 

New Hope, Aconite Meth Prot 

New Union, Science Hill Meth Prot 

Pleasant Hill, Fork Creek Meth Prot 

Salem, Ramseur Meth Prot 

Archdale Church, Archdale Friends 

Back Creek, Post .Oak Friends 

Note.— Built in 1787, or earlier 

Bethel Friends 

Hopewell, White House Friends 

Holly Springs, Buffalo Ford Friends 

Marlboro, New Market Friends 

Oak Forest, Progress Friends 

Pine Ridge, Moffitt's Mills Friends 

Plainfield, Sophia Friends 

Science Hill, Mechanic Friends 

Uwharrie, Hill's Store Friends 

Caraway, Hoyle Wesleyan Meth 

Cedar Grove, Science Hill Wesleyan Meth 

High Pine, White House Wesleyan Meth 

Red Church, Mechanic Afr Meth Epis Zion 

Colored Church, Hill's Store Afr Meth Epis 

Mountain View, Caraway Meth Epis, North 

Church, Staley Col Meth Epis 

Friendship, Ramseur Col Meth Epis 

Antioch, Motiitt's Mills Christian 

Christian Union, Why Not Christian 

Church, Staley Christian 

Church, Randleman Christian 

Church, Libertv Christian 

New Centre, Why Not Christian 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 67 



Parks' Cross Roads, Ramseur Christian 

Patterson Grove, Soapstone Mount Christian 

Pleasant Ridge, Empire Christian 

Pleasant Grove Church, Cheeks Christian 

Shiloh, Moffitt's Mills Christian 

Cedar Falls Church, Cedar Falls Miss Bap 

Church, Fork Creek Miss Bap 

Church, Cedar Falls Miss Bap 

Church, Liberty Miss Bap 

Church, Ramseur Miss Bap 

Church, Randleman Miss Bap 

Church, Wheatmore Miss Bap 

Liberty Grove (col), Trinity College Miss Bap 

Moore's Chapel, Frauklinsville Miss Bap 

Shady Grove, Staley Miss Bap 

Sandy Creek (four miles west of Liberty) Prim Bap 

Note.— This is said to be the oldest Baptist Church in the State. 

Rock Hill, Science Hill Prim Bap 

Calah, Buffalo Ford . Presbyterian 

Church, Asheboro Presbyterian 

Salem Colored, Martha : Congregational 

Note.— The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, reports 3,500 members, and the 
Methodist Protestant Church reports 2,500 members in the county. 



GOLD MINES. 

Gold Prospect (The Burrow Mine), Asheboro, 

Mrs Hannah McDowell 

Gold (The Fisher), Asheboro B J B'isher 

Gold Prospect (Jones' Mine) W H Moring, mgr 

Hoover Hill Gold Mine, capitalized at $350,000 (supposed to 
be one of the richest mines in the County), Hoover Hill, 

Capt Joseph Parkin, mgr T H Reading, mine clerk 

Keystone (Gold) Mining Co, Jones Mine, has been worked 

successfully 
Herring Gold Mine, Jones Mine P O 

Mr Lewis, Brooklyn, N Y 

Laughlin Gold Mine, Jones Mine P W N Laughlin 

Pierce Gold Mine, Jones Mine P Alfred Pierce 

Elder Hill or Brower Gold Mine, Jones Mine 
P 0; Delk Mine, Jones Mine P 0; Miller 

Mine, Jones Mine P Dr Alson Fuller 

Jones Gold Mines, Nos. 1 and 2, Jones Mine P 0; Parish 
Gold Mine, Jones Mine P ; Kindley Gold Mine, Jones 
Mine P O (lately bought by a syndicate of North Caro- 
linians and Pennsylvanians) 



68 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



B W Hill Gold Mine, Jones Mine P O B W Hill 

Spencer Gold Mine, Fullers P Mr Spencer 

Copple Gold Mine, Fullers P O Mr Stoupe, of Pa 

Rush & Redding Gold Mine, Hoover Hill P 

Kind ley Gold Mine, Hoover Hill P 0, lately sold by Stanley 

Redding 
Northern company own a gold prospect near High Poipt 

Stafford Gold Mine, New Hope Academy James Shears 

Griffin Mine, New Ho{)e Academy Burwell Steed 

Uwharrie Gold Mine (not now operated), Striebv, 

Old North State Mining Co 
Newby Gold Mine (not now in operation), Science 

Hill Nathan Newby's heirs 

Gold (not in operation), Flower Hill B H Cox & Co 

Gold (Barker Mine), Flower Hill (not in opera- 
tion now), ow.ned by Levi Cox 

Gold (Spoon Mine) (has been operated success- 
fully), Empire, owned now by Jo Spoon's heirs 

Gold (has been operated successfully), Empire, 

Miss Elizabeth Porter 

Gold (now being opened), Progress Lowe Brothers 

Gold prospect. Science Hill S H & John T Lowe 

Gold prospect. Science Hill N M & S H Lowe 

Gold prospect, White House, Mrs Doub and others of Greens- 
boro, N C 
Gold (Coltrane Mine), Caraway (was worked suc- 
cessfully some thirty years ago — now dor- 
mant), owned by Jesse Coltrane, of Gladesboro, N C 

Gold (has been successfully operated, but now 

mant), ('araway T J Redding 

Cagle Gold Mine, Grav's Chapel George Cagle 

The Buckeye Gold Mining Co, White House, Hon L C 
Reeve, pres; Arthur L Reeve, sec and treas; John T 
Cramer, gen mgr; telegraph and express offices, Ashe- 
boro, N C 
Little Jones Gold Mine, Jones Mine (now being 

operated), owned by David Lines & Co 

Sawyer Gold Mine (formerly worked successfully; 
this mine has just been sold to Western Penn- 
sylvania parties, who will at once develop 
and operate on an extensive scale). Caraway, 

T J Redding and others 
Gold (The Julian), Cedar Falls Redding Brothers 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. G9 



Gold (The Rush Mine), White House (not regu- 
larly worked) . -Z F Rush, Sr 

Gold (The Manner's Creek), White House (was 
operated successfully before the war), 500 

acres, owned by John B Gluyas 

Gold prospect (formerly worked), near Asheboro, 

Nat Steed's heirs 
Gold prospect (formerly worked), near Asheboro, 

Henry Davis's heirs, Jamestown 
Gold (Davis Mountain Mine), Asheboro (now in 

operation) Worth & McAlister 

Gold prospect. High Point, owned by a Northern company 

Gold prospect, Trinity College Dr F C Frazier 

Gold prospect, Trinity College Miss Sallie Frazier 

Gold prospect (not in operation), Archdale, Dr J M Tomlinson 
Gold prospect (not yet worked). Caraway P O, 

owned by Dr J M Tomlinson 

Gold mine (prospect). Hill's Store Joseph Eddie 

Gold mine (prospect). Mechanic Henry Sanders 



HOTELS AND BOARDING HOUSES. 

BURNS HOTEL, near court-house (livery and 

feed stables in connection), Asheboro--B B Burns, prop 

Ramseur Hotel, Ramseur A B Covington, prop 

WALKER HOUSE HOTEL, Randleraan, near depot, 

Mrs J Walker, prop 
HOTEL INGOLD, Randleman (near the busi- 
ness centres of town) F N Ingold, prop 

Boarding-house, Randleraan Mrs A L Mendenhall 

Boarding-house, Cedar Falls Saml Brisfowe 

Boarding-house, Trinity College Mrs Nannie Craven 

Boarding-house, Trinity College Benson Parker 

Boarding-house, Trinity College J H Hogan 

Boarding-house, Trinity College Mrs Chas Hunley 

Boarding-house, Trinity College Mrs Prof L Johnson 

Boarding-house, Franklinsville Mrs J S Ritter 

Boarding-house, Trinity College A F Eshelman 

Boarding-house, Ramseur W F Lane 

Boarding-house, Randleman J F Kennett 

Boarding house, Asheboro Frank Speagles 



KANDOLPH COUNTY 



LAWYERS. 

BLAIR J ADISON Asheboro 

BRADSHAW GEORGE S Asheboro 

BRITTON & SAPP Asheboro 

BRITTON JOHN T (Britton & Sapp) Asheboro 

HAMMER W C Asheboro 

ROBBINS M S Asheboro 

RUSH WILEY D Asheboro 

SAPP P (BrittoQ & Sapp Asheboro 



MAGISTRATES. 

Albright J E, Moffitt's Mills Term expires 1895 

Bean J W, Spero Term expires 1897 

Brown Nathaniel, Asheboro Term expires 1897 

Brown William, Randleman Term expires 1897 

Bryant S, Randleman Term expires 1899 

Burgess John H, Ramseur Term expires 1897 

Caviness John R, Cole's Store Term expires 1895 

Caviness J M, Cole's Store Term expires 1899 

Caudle James N, New Salem Term expires 1897 

Chisholm T L, Ramseur Term expires 1899 

Chisholm J F, Why Not Term expires 1899 

Coltrane R L, Randleman Term expires 1895 

Cox Y H, Brown's Store Term expires 1899 

Cox S S, Kemp's Mill Term expires 1895 

Cox Robert M, Pisgah Term expires 1895 

Delk W J, Jackson's Creek--. Term expires 1893 

Elder W N, Maud Term expires 1895 

Finch A B, Hoover Hill Term expires 1897 

Foushee J M, Staley Term expires 1895 

Fox W P, Liberty Term expires 1897 

Graves Thomas S, Kemp's Mills Term expires 1893 

Green J M, Cape Term expires 1897 

Hayworth D H, Moffitt's Mills Term expires 1899 

Ingold Fernando, Randleman Term expires 1899 

Ingram T W, Bombay Term expires 1897 

Johnson II M, Fork Creek Term expires 1895 

Lewis W R, Hill's Store Term expires 1899 

Lineberry B L, Trinity College Term expires 1895 

Lowdermilk E, Fork Creek Term expires 1899 

Lowe John T, Science Hill Term expires 1893 

Luck A J, Central Falls Term expires 1899 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 71 



Lyndon J F, New Hope Academy Term expires 1899 

McAlister Jas S, Central Falls Term expires 1899 

McCain Hugh, Bulla Term expires 1895 

McMasters D G, Farmers Term expires 1893 

Miller James, Caraway Term expires 1895 

Moflitt Hugh T, Moffitt's Mills Term expires 1895 

MofRtt John T, Asheboro Term expires 1895 

Newby B F, Asheboro Term expires 1899 

Owen W F, Erect Term expires 1895 

Parks Hugh, Franklinsville Term expires 1895 

Phillips J P, Noise Term expires 1895 

Phillips J L, White House Term expires 1895 

Phillips L C,Eden Term expires 1899 

Presnell Uriah, Asheboro Term expires 1897 

Prevo W A, Farmers Term expires 1895 

Pugh A S, Asheboro Term expires 1895 

Pugh J W, Millboro Term expires 1897 

Rachel E G, Pinson Term expires 1895 

Routh D A, Millboro Term expires 1899 

Rush Z F, Asheboro Term expires 1899 

Rush Wm H, Randolph Term expirts 1895 

Smith L H, Liberty Term expires 1895 

Steed A A, Randleman Term expires 1899 

Steele T J, New Salem Term expires 1895 

Stuart John, White House Term expires 1899 

Underwood M F, Wheatmore Term expires 1893 

Yarborough W B, Farmers Term expires 1893 

York E L, Central Falls Term expires 1893 

Yow E R, Why Not Term expires 1899 



MANUFACTORIES. 

The Randleman Mfg Co, including the Quinn Mill, W 
Carr, pres; J H Ferree, sec and treas; J Pickard, 
sup; capital stock, $100,000 ; surplus, $92,000 ; raw ma- 
terial, 3,000 bales cotton a year; products, 4,000,000 yds 
plaids; 250 hands; wages per day, 43 cents; shipping 
point, express and telegraph offices Randleman 

The Plaidville Mfg Co, J H Ferree, sec and treas; J O Pick- 
ard and S G Newlin, directors ; capital stock, $50,000; 
material used annually, 600,000 pounds yarn ; products, 
3,500,000 yards plaids; 125 hands; average wages per 
day, GO cents; shipping point, express and telegraph 
offices Randleman 



72 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Powhattan Mfg Co, R Cox, pres; Jas E Walker, sec and 
treas; $30,000 capital stock; 224,500 pounds yarn an- 
nually; 1,300,000 yards colored cotton goods; shipping 
point, express and telegraph offices Randlemaa 

Naomi Falls Mfg Co, capital stock, $108,550 ; S Bryant, treas ; 
Amos Gregson, sup; raw material used annually, 2,200 
bales cotton ; 3,000,000 yards plaids, checks and stripes, 

and 000,000 seamless bags; 225 hands; wages, ; 

shipping point, express and telegraph offices, Randleman 

Randleman Hosiery Mill, capital stock, $3,000; A N Bulla, 
sup ; L A Spencer, sec and treas; S G Newlin, partner ; 
raw material used annually, 50,000 pounds yarn; 30,000 
dozen pairs hose and half hose; number hands, 40; av- 
erage wages, 60 cents per day; shipping point, express 
and telegraph offices Randleman 

The Worth Mfg Co (mill No 1), J M Worth, pres; Hal M 
Worth, sec and treas; H L Jackson, sup; capital stock, 
$100,000; raw material used annually, 2,500 bales of 
cotton ; gross products, 3,000,000 yards sheeting, 300,000 
salt and grain bags; shipping point, express and tele- 
graph offices, Millboro and Randleman; 135 hands; 
$22,000 pay-roll per year Worthville 

The Worih Mfg Co (mill No 2), J M Worth, pres; Hal M 
Worth, sec and treas; J M Fowler, sup; capital stock, 
$100,000; gross material used annually, 2,000 bales of 
cotton ; gross products, 1,800,000 yards of plaids, 300,000 
pounds of warps ; shipping point, express and telegraph 
offices, Millboro; 150 hands; $23,000 pay-roll ver year; 

Central Falls 

Cedar Falls Mfg Co (incorporated 1877), capital stock, $75,000; 
Dr J M Worth, pres ; R Cox, sec and treas and sup of 
mill; 75 hands; average pay per day, 40 cents; raw 
material used annually, 1,800 bales cotton; products, 
720,000 pounds of warps and fillings Cedar Falls 

Franklinville Mfg Co, capital stock, $60,000 (incorporated); 
Hugh Parks, pres; Benjamin Moffitt, sec and treas; 
W C Russell, sup; raw material used annually, 1,500 
bales of cotton ; products, 600,000 bags and 150,000 lbs 
of warps; number of hands, 180; average wages per 
day, 60 cents Franklinville 

Randolph Mfg Co, capital stock, $30,000; surplus, $15,000 
(incorporated 1862); John D Williams (of Fayetteville) 
is pres; Hugh Parks, sec and treas; J A Luther, sup; 
raw material used annually, 850 bales of cotton ; products, 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 73 



3,000 yards of 4-4 sheeting daily and also cotton yarns; 
number of hands, 70; average wages per day, (50 cents; 

Franklinville 
Columbia Mfg Co, capital stock, $90,000; surplus, $85,000 
(incorporated); J S S[»encer, pres; A W E Cupel, sup; 
W H Watkins, sec and treas; raw material used an- 
nually, 3,000 bales of cotton ; products, 3,000,000 yards 
sheeting, 25,000 lbs ball sewing thread, 25,000 lbs of 
bundle yarn; number of hands, 180; average pay, 54 

cents per day ^^.Ramseur 

Enterprise Cotton Factory, established in 1883 by E A Mof- 
fitt, James A Cole, Daniel Lambert and W S Russell, 
and has been quite successful; capital stock, $15,000; 

Coleridge 
Staley Cotton Mill, RV Cox, purchaser; original cost, $13,000; 

produces cotton yarns and warps Staley 

Boot and shoe making, A H Burgess Franklinville 

Trinity Broom Works, Benson Parker, sec and treas and 

business manager Trinity College 

Carriage and buggy works, Hugh J Burns Asheboro 

Brick and tile works, Tomlinson & Andrews Archdale 

Brick factory, J F Allred Franklinville 

The Alberta Chair Works (incorporated 1889), capital stock, 
$25,000; W H Watkins, pres; J S Spencer, vice-pres; 
AWE Capel, sec and treas; J C Marsh, sup ; surplus, 
$5,000. This factory also manufactures a general, line 

of brooms Ramseur 

Brickyard, H F Church Archdale 

Cigar factory, A F Eshelman Trinity College 

Chair and furniture factory, A G Jennings.*. — Cedar Falls 
Franklinsville Stone Ware Company, E R Moffitt & Co, 

Franklinville 

Pottery works, L Sugg ^ Erect 

Pottery works, E R Motiitt & Co Franklinville 

Pottery works, M T Sugg Erect 

Pottery works, M R Moffitt, prop Uhla 

Pottery shop, Evan Cole Why Not 

Pottery works, Jesse G Albright Kemp's Mills 

Pottery works, M F Wren Erect 

Pottery works, J M Yow Erect 

Pottery shop, G W Teague Erect 

Wood manufacturing. Wood Milling and Mfg Co, 

B L Lineberry, mgr Trinity College 

Sash and blind factory, Nathaniel Cox & Son, Moffitt's Mills 
4 



74 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Shuttle block factory, Turner VancaiiDon White House 

Shuttle block factory, Asheboro, \V A Grimes & Co, 180,000 

annually Asheboro 

Stove factory, McKendric Gray Wheatmore 

Tomlinson Mfg Co (incorporated), S F Tomlinson, pres; E P 
Parker, vice-pres; A J Tomlinson, sec and treas; tan- 
ners and shoe manufacturers; capital, $18,600, Archdale 

Horse collars, Tomlinson Mfg Co Archdale 

Harness and saddles, E W Frazier Archdale 

Tannery and harness factory, F L Hayvvorth.Moffitt's Mills 

Tannery, Stephen Howard Moffitt's Mills 

Tannery, Calvin Cox _ Buffalo Ford 

Wagons and smithery, T M Hendricks Archdale 

Foundry and machine shop, G H Allred Randleman 

Asheboro Wood and Iron Works, capital stock, $15,000; E A 
Moffitt, pres; J T MoflBtt, sec and treas; C J Cox, J G 
Stone and E A Moffitt, directors Asheboro 

Note.— This Company also has two saw mills and a store some miles in the 
country. 

Woodworking and blacksmithing, A W Sanders__Asheboro 

Wagon and smithing, W E Allred Cedar Falls 

Wood Mfg and Milling Co, Prof W T Ganaway, pres; B L 
. Lineberry, sec and treas and gen mgr; capital, $4,000; 

Trinity College 
Guilford Lumber and Mfg Co, branch factory at Asheboro; 
R S Hunter, mgr; main office, Greensboro, N C; C A 
Reynolds, pres; W D Mendenhall, sec and treas, 

Asheboro 

Asheboro Lumber and Mfg Co, capital stock, $25,000; S G 

Bradshaw, pres; C C McAlister, sec and treas; David 

Petty, sup; capacity for cutting 4,000,000 feet lumber 

annually Asheboro 



MERCHANTS AND TRADESMEN. 

Allen J J & Co, general merchants Kemp's Mills 

Allred Peter, shoemaker Ramseur 

Allred John W, brickmaker and contractor Ramseur 

Allred W E, smith and wagon shop Cedar Falls 

Arnold J O, general merchants Worthville 

Asheboro Clothing Co, clothing, B F Newby, mgr_ Asheboro 

Auman Dempsy, general merchant Why Not 

Auman Jasper, general store Asheboro 

Barker G P, general store Brunswick 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 75 



Boan J W, general merchant Spero 

Bell John, bricklayer Asheboro 

Blair Mrs E T, milliner and mantuamaker-_. Asheboro 

B )lton J A B, brakeman H P R A & S R R Asheboro 

Bowman W F, druggi^t Liberty 

Boyette & Richardson, drug store Asheboro 

Bfistowe Samuel, general merchant Cedar Falls 

BROWER MADISON & SON, contractors and builders, 

Franklinville 

Brower Mrs E N, millinery Liberty 

Brovver A C & Co, general merchants Staley 

Brower J W & Co, general store Asheboro 

Bulla A N, sup Randleman Hosiery Mill Randleman 

Bulla Louis D, practical printer Asheboro 

Burgess John H, agent for machinery Ramseur 

Burns E A, b^iggage master HPRA&SRR 

BURNS J MOSS, brakeman H P R A & S R R-_ Asheboro 

Bums Willis (col), barber Asheboro 

Buri.'ess A H. general merchant Franklinville 

CAPEL AWE, sup Columbia Mfg Co Mills and sec and 

treas Chair Works Ramseur 

Carr W, pres Randleman Mfg Co Trinity College 

Caudle Henry D, printer Asheboro 

Caudle L M, general merchant New Salem 

Causey H C, lumber dealer Liberty 

CuvHUPs^ H T, general merchant Cheeks 

CHISHOLM T L, sup Company Store, wholesale and re- 
tail general merchants 

Chrisco J M, shoemaker Asheboro 

Clapp J A, general merchant Randleman 

Coltrane Miss Nannie, milliner and mantuamaker, 

Randleman 

Cox L I, general merchant Ramseur 

Cole John, shoemaker Liberty 

Coble W C, grocer Worthville 

Cramer Jno T, mgr Buckeye Gold Mining Co, (Thomasville) 

Craven L T, general merchant Cole's Store 

Crawford H T, carpenter Asheboro 

Curtis D A, contractor and builder Ramseur 

I)avi<lsi>n Jo, house painter Randleman 

DEEP RIVER STORE CO, No 1, Walker & Scarboro, also 
at Ce<1ar Falls No. 2, capital stock, $12,000; J E Walker, 
pres; H D Scarboro, sec and treas; wholesale and retail 
general merchants Worthville 



76 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Dicks C S, general merchant Sophia 

Diffie Mrs L J, general merchant Central Falls 

Dunn Samuel, general merchant Climax 

Elder E N, general stock Maud 

Ellison J M & Co, general merchants Franklinville 

Enterprise Mfg Co, general store Coleridge 

Farmers' Alliance Exchange, \V L Kivett, mgr, general mer- 
chants Liberty 

Ferree D T, sup buildings Randleman Mfg Co__R.indlemau 

Fields J L, general mercliant Randleman 

Fields C, general merchant Climax 

Fogleman W D, general merchant Level Cross 

Forrester J & Co, general store, jewelry, furniture, coffins, 

etc Ramseur 

Foust John C, stock farm Liberty 

Fowler J M, sup Worth Mfg Co (mill No 2)--Central Falls 

Fowler E N & Co, general merchants Caraway 

Fralev T J, depot and ex agt and tel op Franklinville 

FRANKLINVILLE MFG CO, general merchants, 

Franklinville 

Franks Zach, bricklayer Asheboro 

Free & James, repair and wagon shop Franklinville 

Fruit E W, conductor on Factory Branch C F & Y V R R, 

Ramseur 

FULLER A W, general merchant Fullers 

Glasgow J W, watchmaker and jeweler Randleman 

Gregson Clarence, town sec and treas Randleman 

Gregson Rev Amos, sup Naomi Falls Mfg Co Randleman 

Griffin & Trogden, general merchants Liberty 

HALL J L, undertaker Randleman 

Hall C W, carpenter Asheboro 

Hall W C, carpenter Asheboro 

Hammer J C & Co, general store Asheboro 

Hammond H & Son, general store Brown's Store 

Hancock J W, depot agent Southern Express and telegraph 

operator Asheboro 

Harper C E. general store Worthville 

Hayworth W VV, general merchant Moffitt's Mills 

Hays E P & Co, general merchants New^ Salem 

Headen C W. U S mail agent H P, R A & S R R.Asheboro 

Henshaw & Millikan, general merchants Randleman 

Hendricks G G, general merchant Progress 

Hill J C, general merchant Jackson's Creek 

Hill & Bro, general merchants Pinson 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 77 



Hinshaw Thomas, general merchant Kemp's Mills 

Hobson Silas, undertaker Ramseur 

Hoover Hill Gold Mining Co, J R Perkin manager, general 

merchants Hoover Hill 

Hornaday M N, livery stables Liberty 

Hornaday S M, livery stables Liberty 

Howard & Co, general merchants Mechanic 

Hunter R S, manager Guilford Lumber Manufacturing Com- 
pany Asheboro 

Jackson H L, superintendent Worth Manufacturing Com- 
pany, Mill No 1 Worthville 

Jarrett A W, general merchant Hoover Hill 

Jenkins A W, general store Worthville 

Johnson Alvin, blacksmith Randleman 

Johnson Mrs H L, general merchant Thomasville 

Johnson Mac, depot and express agt and telegraph operator 

Sophia 

Jones Wesley, contractor and builder Franklinville 

Jones Alfred, general merchant Soapstone Mount 

Kearns E B, undertaker Asheboro 

Kimery H L, general merchant Soapstone Mount 

Kirkman Julius, harness and saddles Liberty 

Lamb Z N, photographer Randleman 

Lambert J T, general merchant Cole's Store 

Lane Col John R, general merchant Brush Creek 

Lane W F, wagon and bugg}'' repair shop Ramseur 

Lane J T, contractor and builder Ramseur 

Lane W F, livery and feed stables Ramseur 

Lassiter & Co, general merchants Randleman 

Ledbetter C A, carpenter Asheboro 

Leonard Bros & Co, general merchants Cedar Falls 

Leonard E B, postmaster Ramseur 

Lewis W R, general merchant Hill's Store 

Lineberry Robt, blacksmithing Randleman 

Lineberry B L, general merchant Trinity College 

Lofiin T G, carpenter Asheboro 

Luther J S, sup Randolph Mfg Co mill Franklinville 

Lyttle William (col), barber Asheboro 

MARSH J C, sup Alberta Chair Works Ramseur 

McAlister J S, head bookkeeper Worth Mfg Co-_Worthville 
McAlister C C, sec and treas Asheboro Lumber Co, Asheboro 
McALISTER & MORRIS, wholesale and retail general 

merchants Asheboro 

McALISTER & CO, wholesale and retail gen- 
eral merchants Central Falls 



78 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



McCoy I W, general merchant Moffitt's Mills 

McMasters W R, general merchant Soapstone Muunt 

Milton J B, depot and exp agt and tel op Ramseur 

Mendenhall L D, practical machinist Randleman 

Millikan J M, groceries, livery and feed stables -Randleman 

Mills G W, general merchant Randleman 

MofRlt M R, general merchant Uh'a 

Moffitt Thomas, depot agent Liberty 

MOFFITT E A, wholesale and retail gen mch't--Asheboro 
MOFFITT J T, secretary and treasurer Asheboro wood and 

iron works Asheboro 

Mooring W H & Co, wholesale and retail geu'l store_Asheboro 

Morgan J A, general stock Flora 

Morris C S, bookkeeper at Mill No 2, Worth Manufacturing 

Company Central Falls 

Murdock Mrs D, general stock Lassiter's Mills 

Myricks Miss Nannie, mantuamaker Randleman 

Nance & Nance, general merchants Salem Church 

Nance A & Sons, general merchants Jackson's Creek 

Naomi Store Company, general merchants Randleman 

Newby & Miller, general store Asheboro 

Newby N W, general merchant Farmers 

Orman Braxton, court crier Asheboro 

Osborn & Jenkins, grocers Worthville 

Overman J F, general merchant Liberty 

Parks J R, general stock Cape 

Parker Benson, general merchant Trinity College 

Parker E F, patentee breeching strap attachment.Archdale 

Parker W H, general stock Science Hill 

Parkin Capt Jos, mgr New Hoover Hill Mine.. Hoover Hill 

Parkin G W, general merchant Why Not 

Parks, Strider & Son, general merchants Rachel 

Parish WM & Co, general merchants Randolph 

Parsons J W, blacksmithing Randleman 

Pearce Julian, general merchant Hoover Hill 

Pepper C G, depot and exp agt and tel op Cedar Falls 

Petty David, sup Asheboro Lumber and Mfg Co--Asheboro 

Phillips L C, general merchant Eden 

Picket J F, general merchant Liberty 

Porter S S, carpenter Asheboro 

Porter Miss Mattie, clerk in Reg of Deeds' office, .. Asheboro 

Pressnell Uriah, general merchant Uhla 

Pressnell A M, blacksmith Asheboro 

Pugh J W & Son, general merchants Millboro 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 79 



Pugh A S, general store Asheboro 

Pugli & Lineberrv, general merchants Gary's Chapel 

RAMSEUR STORE COMPANY, T L Chisholm, manager, 

wholesale and retail general merchants. 
RANDLEMAN STORE COMPANY, N N Newlin, mgr, 

genf^ral merchandise Randleman 

RANDOLPH MFG CO, general merchants, Franklinville 

Rankin A M. conductor II P, R A & S R R Asheboro 

Redding T H. mine clerk Hoover Hill 

REDDING W W, general merchant Randleman 

Reed Cliarles T (col), bricklayer and plasterer Asheboro 

Richardson , shoemaker Asheboro 

Ridge J \V, general merchant Science Hill 

Robbins R H, drayman Randleman 

Russell W C, superintendent Franklinville Manufacturing 

Company Mill Franklinville 

Russell M S, boot and shoemaker Franklinville 

Rush & Ross, sale and feed stables Asheboro 

Saunders A W, blacksmith and woodworker Asheboro 

SCARBORO H D, sec and treas Deep River Store Co, whole- 
sale and retail general store Worthville 

SCOTTEN A K & CO, general store Coleridge 

Scott J T, blacksmith Ramseur 

Shaw R H, general store AVorthville 

Shaw W S, general merchant New Hope Academy 

Sheets B I, general merchant Riley's Store 

Smith Travis, blacksmith Asheboro 

Speagles A Frank, feed and trade stables Asheboro 

Spencer & Lambe, general merchants Randleman 

Spoon & Coltrane, general merchants Millboro 

Spencer R B, general merchant New Market 

Staley D J, livery stables Liberty 

Staley Dr AV J, postmaster Liberty 

Stanton I F, general merchant Gladesboro 

Stedman J M, engineer H P R A & S R R Asheboro 

Stout W C, groceries Ramseur 

Stout J R, general merchant Julian 

Stratfiird D W, house and sign painter Randleman 

Tally & Co, groceries and notions Randleman 

Teague J F, general merchant Staley 

The Morris Drug Co, drugs, E G Morris, mgr Asheboro 

Thompson John, general store Bunch 

Tippett Wm, contractor and builder Franklinville 

Tomlinson H A & Co, general store and drugs Archdale 



80 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Tomlinson A J, postmaster Archdale 

Tomlinson Dr J M, patentee harrow tooth Archdale 

TOMLINSON MFG CO, wholesale shoes and 

horse collars Archdale 

Turner John T, blacksmith, contractor and builder, Ramseur 

Tvson T B, general store Erect 

WALKER J E, pres Deep River Store Co, wholesale and 

retail general merchants Asheboro 

Wall Mrs Emma, dressmaker Randleman 

Wall & Beckerdite, general store Edgar 

White Lyndon, depot agent __, Glenola 

Wiles E A, depot and So Ex agent Randleman 

Winningham Newton, officer of grand jury Asheboro 

Woodell A J, town clerk and shoemaker Asheboro 

WOOD W P & CO, wholesale and retail gen store, Asheboro 
WORTH HAL M, sec and treas Worth Mfg Co, mills Nos 

1 and 2 Worthville 

WORTH Dr J M, pres Asheboro Roller Mill Co, Cedar 

Falls Mfg Co, etc Asheboro 

Yergan W E, miller for John Kemp ; Kemp's Mills 

York W H & V, general stock Kildee 

York Jas D, bricklayer Ramseur 

Yow W H, general store Coleridge 

Yow Henry, general merchant Why Not 

Yow J M, general merchant Erect 



MILLS AND PROPRIETORS. 

ASHEBORO ROLLER MILL, incorporated, capital stock, 
$10,000; Dr J M Woith, pres; R R Ross, sec and treas; 
A M Rankin, vice-pres; D F Caldwell, director; capac- 
ity, 50 barrels per day 
Archdale Roller Mill Co (incorporated), capital, $6,000 ; Jesse 
Frazier, pres ; Geo R Miller, sec and treas; capacity per 
day of 50 barrels of flour; corn mills, capacity, 300 bush- 
els per day Archdale 

Flour and corn (roller mill). Fuller & Hughes Fullers 

Flour and corn (patent roller). Enterprise Mfg Co ._ Coleridge 

Flour and corn (roller mill), Harris Johnson Flora 

Flour and corn (roller mill). Cole & Co Coleridge 

Flour, corn and saw (roller mill). Miller & Co Defiance 

Corn and feed mill, Asheboro Lumber and Mfg Co, Asheboro 
Corn and flour (Staley mill) Staley 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 81 



Corn and saw mill and blacksmith shop, West Bros, Liberty 
Corn and flour (Marley's mill), H B Carter & Co, 

Marley's Mills 

Corn,M Holt Soapstone Mount 

Flour and corn, Calvin Cox Buffalo Ford 

Flour, corn and saw, Steven Hinshaw Hoover Hill 

Flour and corn, Thayer, Williams & Co Eden 

Flour and corn, Enoch Cox Brunswick 

Flour, corn, saw and gin, J R Parks Cape 

Flour, corn and saw, J J Lucus « Pisgali 

Flour, corn and saw, Dennis Cox Pisgah 

Flour and corn, A J Yow & Son Fork Creek 

Flour, and corn, Franklinville Mfg Co Franklinville 

Flour, corn and saw, Cox & Craven Moffitt's Mills 

Flour, corn and saw, J J Allen & Co Kemp's Mills 

Flour and corn, A J Beau Buffalo Ford 

Flour and corn, Columbia Mfg Co Ramseur 

Flour, corn and saw, Jonathan Trotter Progress 

Flour and corn (the Branson mill), owned by 

Branson heirs and others Level Cross 

Flour and corn, Robert Coble Brunswick 

Flour and corn, Elwood Rush & Co Hoyle 

Flour and corn, Shubal Lofiin Hoyle 

Flour and corn, W F McRary & Co Bulla 

Flour and corn, James Spencer Sawyersville 

Flour, corn and saw, J M Trotter Progress 

Flour and corn, Jesse F Coltrane Gladesboro 

Flour, corn and saw, J J Allen & Co Kemp's Mill 

Flour, corn and saw, W D Spoon & Mother Brown's Store 

Flour and corn, J A Humble & Co Ralph 

Flour, corn and saw, J J Lucus Pisgah 

Flour and corn, Mr Birkhead Salem Church 

Flour and corn, Adderton & Nance Farmers 

Flour, corn and saw, Hill & Garner Jackson's Creek 

Flour, corn and saw, Jeff Hinshaw Hoover Plill 

Flour, corn and saw, Burt Fuller & Hughes Fullers 

Flour, corn and saw, Noah Sheen Hoover Hill 

Flour, corn and saw, Dennis Cox Aconite 

Flour and corn, James Lowe Science Hill 

Flour and corn, John Kemp Science Hill 

Flour and corn, Murdoch & Loftin Lassiter's Mills 

Flour and corn, E L Burney Eleazer 

Flour and corn, Alson Bean Buffalo Ford 

Flour, corn, saw and cotton gin, J R Parks Cape 



82 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Flour and corn, J R Lane Cole's Store 

Flour and corn, Wren & Lambert Cole's Store 

Flour and corn, Nathaniel Cox & Son Moffitt's Mills 

Flour, corn and saw. Cox & Craven Moffitt's Mills 

Flour, corn and saw, H T Caviness & Co Cheek's 

Flour and corn, Mrs E B Brower Brower's Mills 

Flour and corn (Merchant Mill), David M Payne, 

Trinity College 

Flour and corn, John Kemp_ Mtchanic 

Flour, corn aiid saw, Riley Hill Ril*-y Hiil 

Flour and corn, Jeremiah Johnson Riley's Store 

Flour and corn, E L Burney New Hope Academy 

Flour and corn, Jonathan Trotter Prog^ress 

Flour and corn (Tha3^er mill), Kennedy & Co Eden 

Flour, corn, saw and gin, Frank Parks -.Parks Cross Roads 

Flour, corn and saw, Thos Marley, mgr Marley's Mills 

Flour and corn, Pleasant Siler Staley 

Flour, corn and saw, A P Brown Soapstone Mount 

Flour and corn, Ramseur Mfg Co Ramseur 

Flour, corn and saw, Geo Rightsell Soapstone- M uiit 

Flour and corn, Isaac Ruth Gray's Chapel 

Flour and corn, John Kemp Mechanic 

Flour and corn, Andrew Yow Fork Creek 

Flour and corn, W T Birkhead Farmers 

Flour, corn and saw, J W Morgan Jackson's Creek 

Flour and corn, Daniel Lambert Cole's Store 

Flour and corn (Foundry mill), Rush Bros Maud 

Flour and corn (Walker mill), J T Bostick & Son, 

New M^irket 

Flour and corn, Jesse Coltrane Gladesboro 

Flour and corn mill and cotton gin, Franklin- 

ville Mfg Co i. Franklinville 

Flour and corn. Cedar Falls Mfg Co Cedar Falls 

Flour and corn, John Rightsell Soapstone Mount 

Flour and corn (McMaster's), Pressly Brown, 

Soapstone Mount 
Flour and corn (Lambert mill), D H Lambert.- Cole's Store 

Flour and corn (Cox's mill), Calvin Cox Buffalo Ford 

Flour and corn, Levi Cox Empire 

Flour, corn and saw (Spoon's), Wm Spoon Kemp's Mills 

Flour and corn (steam), J R Parks Cape 

Flour, corn and saw (Lane's Mills), John R Lane, 

Brush Creek 
Flour and corn (Cheek's mill), H T Caviness & Co__Cheeks 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 83 



Flour and corn, Nathaniel Cox & Son Moffitt's Mills 

Flour, corn and saw, Riley Hill Union 

Saw mill (water), J D Hockett Centre 

Long's mills, Staley & Dixon two miles north of Liberty 

C«irn, saw and cotton gin, Frank Parks- -Park's Cross Roads 

Saw (steam), Jas A Parks Ramseur 

Saw (steam), Jerrell & Thad Crowson Defiance 

Saw and planing mill, Asheboro Lumber and Mfg (^'o, 

Why Not 

Saw (steam), Spencer & Coltrane Glenola 

Saw (steam), A K Scatten & Co Coleridge 

Saw (steam), R L Hoover Eden 

Saw (steam), John W Gray, of Thomasville Wheatmore 

Saw (steam), Thomas Everhart Wheatmore 

Saw (steam), Crowson & Walker Maud 

Saw (steam), Hill & Bros New Hope Academy 

Saw (steam), Henry Strickland New Hope Academy 

Saw and gin (steam), J Wellons Parks Cape 

Saw (steam), Allison Bean & Bro Erect 

Saw (steam), AmosHinshaw Erect 

Saw (steam), Allen McDaniels Science Hill 

Saw (steam), John Plummer Farmers 

Saw (steam), Millis & Co • White House 

Saw (steam), Harris Johnson & Sons White House 

Saw (steam), Henry Pool & Sons Science Hill 

Saw and planing (steam). Lineberry & Co Trinity College 

Saw (steam). Cox & Lewellen Flower Hill 

Siw and planing (steam), Flower Hill Foundr}^ Co, Asheboro 

Saw (steam), Stephen Kivett Sophia 

Saw (steam), (spoke billets, etc), Spencer &, Co-_New Market 

Saw (water), J D Hackett Centre 

Saw (steam), Thayer & Co Fullers 

York's mill, Aaron York five miles southwest of Liberty 



MINISTERS RESIDENT. 

Abernethv R S, Ramseur M E C, South 

Allred J F, Cedar Falls M ECS 

Brame W A, Trinitv College M ECS 

Caviness Alfred, Buffalo Ford M ECS 

Caviness Alfred, (V)le's Store M ECS 

Cottin Franklin, Kemp's Mills M ECS 

Gregson Amos, Randleraan M ECS 



84 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Gretler Robt M, Red Cross M ECS 

IIorna«lay C II, Riindleman M ECS 

Heilinnn'j F, Trinity College M ECS 

Marj.li X'ictor, (ilenola M ECS 

Mcndenhall A L, Randleman M ECS 

Norwood J E, Randlenian M ECS 

Parks Thos A, Franklinville M ECS 

IVppor C iM, Trinity C(.llep:e M ECS 

Robbins W M, Lassiter's Mills M ECS 

Rirhjirdson N R, Randleman M ECS 

Strider J W, Lassiter's Mills M ECS 

Smith La/.ell L, Randleman M ECS 

Woosjpv J E, Trinity College M ECS 

Cecil CC, Asheboro Meth Prot 

Davis Lemuel, Central Falls Meth Prot 

Davis W O, Central Falls Meth Prot 

Fogleman W D, Level Cross Meth Prot 

Horner Julius, Randleman Meth Prot 

Lewellen Henry, Asheboro Meth Prot 

Lineberry Robt, Randleman Meth Prot 

Micheux Richard. Liberty Meth Prot 

Melloway G F, Worthville Meth Prot 

McCulloch T F (Greensboro), pastor Randolph Circuit 

Meth Prot 

Robbins F C, Bulla Meth Prot 

Roper C E M (Guilford College), pastor of High Point Cir- 
cuit Meth Prot 

Scottf'n A K, Coleridge Meth Prot 

Smith W R, Flower Hill Meth Prot 

Stowe J II, Why Not Meth Prot 

Simmons Zachariah (col), Worth Congregational 

Hiikrr ( )rrenton, Brunswick Meth 

Brown W R, Empire Christian 

Hayworth W W, Moffitt's Mills Chris 

Kearns B F, Moffitt's Mills ^ Chris 

Lawrence Wesley, Fork Creek Chris 

Lawrence John, Fork Creek Chris 

Mnditt Hugh T. Moffitt's Mills Chris 

I'attoii John, Liberty Chris 

Richardson W B, Ramseur Chris 

M'ay Snmuel, Fork Creek Chris 

Way Ilartwell, Moffitt's Mills Chris 

Webster James, Franklinville Chris 

Barker Selh, New Market Friend 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 85 



Cox Isham, Liberty Friend 

Cox Nathaniel, A[offitt's Mills Friend 

Cox Elwood, White House Friend 

Cox Levi, Buffalo Ford Friend 

Farlow David, New Market Friend 

Inman Thomas, Coleridge Friend 

King Rufus P, Archdale Friend 

Winslow Sarah, Science Llill Friend 

Forrester Manly, Ramseur Miss Bap 

Hackney John, Central Falls Miss Bap 

Harmon G W, Ramseur — .- Miss Bap 

Hackney Jo Dan, Franklinville Miss Bap 

Jordan James, Central Falls Miss Bap 

Leach Martin, Lassiter's Mills Miss Bap 

Merrell G L, Franklinville Miss Bap 



NEWSPAPERS. 

Asheboro Courier (Democratic weekly), Wra C Hammer, 
editor and proprietor; price per year, $1 Asheboro 

Liberty Herald (weekly news), P T Way and E C Hamilton, 
editors and proprietors; price per year, $1 Liberty 

North State Voice (a musical monthly), edited by E C Ham- 
ilton; 50 cents per year Liberty 

The Carolina Wesleyau (monthly), Rev J F Heitman, editor 
and proprietor; price per year, 50 cts — Trinity College 



PHYSICIANS. 

Asbury F E Asbury (Montgomery Countv) 

Bulla A M Bulla 

Bulla A C Bulla 

Bulla Jeff D Level Cross 

Coddell S W Empire 

Dowd T D Kemp's Mills 

Ferree Rev T T Asheboro 

Fox M L Ramseur 

Fox W A Randleman 

Fox Thomas Franklinville 

Frazier Cicero (dentist) Trinity College 

Fuller Alson Fullers 

Gray Clayborn Level Cross 

Hayworth M M Franklinville 



80 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Henley S A Asheboro 

Jlul)l)ard CC Worthville 

Jlenlev F A (dentist) -Raudlemaa 

Kirkman Starr (Montgomery County) 

Lewis C H Farmers 

Malone K J Brower's Mills 

McCanless A L Trinity College 

Parker D Reid Trinity College 

Patterson A J Liberty 

Phillips C H Fullers 

Plunkett J R Strieby 

Redding A H Cedar Falls 

Reeves Julian 

iSapp L L Randleman 

Staley W J, (dentist) Liberty 

Tate C 8 Ramseur 

Tonilinson John Milton Archdale 

Walker J -. Randleman 

W'inslow Thomas L Maud 

Woollen W A Randleman 



POST-OFFICES. 

(Nnme of Postofflcc, Township, Postmaster, and Estimated Population.) 

Aconite, Union Township, Wm M Coble, P M Pop, 25 

Archdale, Trinity, A J Tomlinson Pop, 350 

Asheboro (C H). Asheboro, Mrs E B McCain Pop, 1,500 

JJombay, New Hope, Mrs Martha Ingram Pop, 25 

P>rower's Mills, Brower, R A Brower Pop, 60 

Brown's Store, Grant, Ira C Brown Pop, 30 

Brunswick, Providence, Mrs Mattie Chamness Pop, 25 

I'.nd'alo Ford, Pleasant Grove, M J Caviness Pop, 63 

liuUa, Back Creek, A Bulla Pop, 28 

Bunch, Concord, Mrs I F Caviness Pop, 26 

Cape, Pleasant Grove, J R Parks Pop, 33 

Caraway, Back Creek, John F Jarrell Pop, 23 

Cedar Falls, Franklinville, Samuel Bristowe Pop, 378 

Central Falls, Franklinville, J S McAlister Pop, 318 




Eden, Tabernacle, J C Andrews Pop, 62 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 87 



Edgar, New Market, S F Wall Pop, 28 

Eleazer, New Hope, J \V Luther Pop, 19 

Empire. Pleasant Grove, W R Brown Pop, 11 

Erect, Brower, TB Tysor Pop, 42 

Farmer.*!, Concord, Mrs Emma Skeen Pop, 38 

Flora, Concord, B B BingliMm Pop, 38 

Flower Hill, Grant, Allen Scott Pop, 2G 

Fork Creek, Ricldand, Emsley Lowdermilk Pop, 22 

Foust's Mills, Pleasant Grove, Edgar T Whitehead — Pop, 128 

Franklinville, Franklinville, Alfred Burgess Pop, 0(55 

Fullers, Tabernacle, A W Fuller Pop, 7G 

Gladesboro, New Mmket, Frank Frazier Pop, 50 

Glenola, New Market, Lyndon White Pop, 53 

Gray's Chapel, Providence, Mrs Zual Nelson Pop, 51 

Hill's Store, Concord, VV R Lewis Pop, 33 

Hoover Hill, Tabernacle, T H Redding Pop, 63 

Hoyle, Back Creek, J(^hn Laughlin Pop, 10 

Jackson's Creek, Concord, Henry Nance Pop, 01 

Kemp's Mills, Grant, Milton Leonard Pop, 72 

Kildee, Columbia, W H York Pop, 18 

Lassiter's Mills, New Hope, Alex Murdock Pop, 78 

Level Cross, New Maiket, W D Fogleman Pop, 51 

Level Plains, Tabernacle, David Farlow Pop. 52 

Liberty, Liberty, Dr W J Staley P.^p, 520 

Lyiton, Tabernacle, Lee Nance Pop, 11 

Marley's Mills, Columbia, G C Underwood Pop, 01 

Martha, New Hope, Ivey C Nance Pop, 70 

M,md, Trinity, Dr T L Winslow Pop, 21 

Mechanic, Cedar Grove, E N Howard Pop, 39, 

Millboio, Franklinville, Wtsley Pugh Pop, 05 

Moffitt's Mills, Pleasant Grove, L E Brady Pop, 93 

New Hope Academv, New Hope, Mrs Martin Webb-- Pop, 37 

New Market, New Market. Duncan Newlin Pop, 41 

New Salem, Randleman, E P Hayes Pop, 153 

Pine-on, New Hope, Wilson Hill Pop, 25 

Pisgah, Union, Milton C<>x Pop, 23 

Planters, Columbia, W H Foust Pop, 39 

Post Oak, Cedar Grove, Levi Lowe Pop, 23 

Progress, Trinity, D G Hendricks Pop, 17 

Quinine, Richland, John Trogden Pop, 17 

Rachel, Union, Mrs Rachel Hill Pop, 19 

Ralph, Grant, J M Allen Pop, 10 

Ramseur, Columbia, Ed Leonard Pop, 900 

Randleman, Randleman, T J Bustick Pop, 2,500 



88 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Rand«)lph, Tabernacle, Wm Rush Pop, 15 j 

Rilev's Store, New Hope, H C Riley Pop, 24 ! 

Saleln Church, Concord, Miss Rosaline Kearns Pop, 47 

Sawversville, Rack Creek, Z F Rush Pop, 37 ' 

Scieiice Hill, Cedar Crove, Miss Mollie McDaniel-— Pop, 78 i 

Soapstone Mount, Columbia, H L Kimery Pop, 39 

Sophia, New Market, C S Dicks Pop, 123 

Spero, Back Creek, J W Bean Pop, 37 

Staley, Liberty, Wesley Cox Pop, 151 

Strieby, Union, Ruffin'Walden Pop, 17 

Trinity Colleo:e, Trinity, Miss C Z Leach Pop, 350 

riah, Cedar (irove, MR Moffitt Pop, 11 

\'ehia, Brower, Rinsey Leonard Pop, 11 

AVheatinore, Trinity, Thos J Finch Pop, 23 

White House, Cedar Grove, Levi T Branson Pop, 27 

Why Not, Richland, Martin Cagle Pop, 37 

Woodford, Grant, Mrs S J Brown Pop, 13 

Worthville, Franklinville, Mr AUred Pop, 350 



SCHOOLS. 

Asheboro Male and Female Academy and Graded School, 
Charles F Tomlinson, principal 

Graded Schools — Faculty, Charles F Tomlinson, principal ; 
Mrs L J Hancock, teacher in primary dept; Elijah Mof- 
fitt, Miss Kate McDuffie, assistants; J W Brower and 
wife in charge of colored schools 

Archdale High School (50 students), Archdale P 0, Miss 
Xntre Johnson, princijial 

TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL, Trinity College P 0, Rev J F 
Heitman, A B, A M, head master; Prof L Johnson, Miss 
Nettie G Metton, Miss Maggie A Carr, assistants. This 
school is under the management of the trustees of 
Trinity College. Local committee, Dr J F Crowell, Dr 
J R Brooks and John H Ferree 

Af.'i.lcinv. Staley Charles M Staley 

RAMSEUR HIGH SCHOOL, Ramseur, Prof F S Blair, 
princij.al; Miss Sue J Farlow, Miss Etta F Watkins, 
John B Trogden and M B Branch, assistants; W H 
Watkitis, chairman Board of Trustees; 146 students 
enrolled this year 

Randleman Graded School, Mrs T J Copeland, principal; 
Miss Martha Redding, Miss Notre Johnson, assistants 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 89 



Mount Olivet Academy and Masonic Ilall, Erect; no teacher 
Colored Graded School, Asheboro, J W Brower (col), principal 
Parks' Gross Roads Academy 

Rocky Ridgfe Academy, White House, S E Loudermilk 
Academy, New Hope Academy 

Academy, Farmers' C E Ridge 

There are 111 public schools for whites and 25 for colored 

SHERIFFS. 

Ross Romulus R, Asheboro High Sheriff of the County 

Brown W D, Brunswick Deputy SheriH' 

Cox S A, Pisgah Deputy Sheriff 

Cagle B F, New Hope Academy Deputy Sheriff 

Craven J F, Cheeks Deputy Sheriff 

Crisco John, Why Not Deputy Sheriff* 

Foushee W T, Ramseur Dej)Uty Sheriff 

Fuller I J, Fullers Deputy Sheriff 

Gaston D J, Randleman Deputy Sheriff 

Hill John W, Maud Deputy Sheriff 

Hoover T J, Asfieboro Deputy Sheriff 

Jarrell John F, Caraway Deputy Sheriff 

Lanier B F, Jackson's Creek Deputy Sheriff 

Lowe N M, Mechanic Deputy Sheriff 

Owen W B, Liberty Deputy Siieriff 

Rush Z F Jr, Asheboro Jailer and Deputy Sheriff 

Slack T A, Franklinville Deputy Sheriff 

Spencer Jas T, Gienola Deputy Sheriff 

AVinningham R L, Asheboro Deputy Sheriff 

TEACHERS. 

Adams Mary Lou New Salem 

Adderton R L Jackson Hill 

Allen J M Ralph 

Albright A A Moffitt's Mills 

Albright Mary E Moflilt's Mills 

Alfred M L.l Gray's Chapel 

Allied W E Ramseur 

Allred DH Gray's Chapel 

Ashworth W R Asheboro 

Baldwin J C Franklinville 

Bankemeyer T J Central Falls 

Bfthea R D (col) Greensboro 

Blair Edward C Progress 

5 

V 



90 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Blair F S - Ramseur 

Bradv R K Moffitt's Mills 

15ro\vn U F Erect 

Burgess R R Liberty 

Burroughs J V -"- Why Not 

Brvant G W (col) Post Oak 

Caveness G R (col) Ramseur 

Caveness J M Cole's iStore 

Causey J W S Crystal 

Clarke C A (col) Glenola 

Cole E'l Coleridge 

Coletraine Peter (col) Gladesboro 

Coltrnine J C Gray's Chapel 

Cox Eva J Climax 

Cox L L Brown's Store 

Cox 11 P Brown's Store 

Cox Arinelia D Brown's Store 

Cox Cordelia Brown's Store 

Crowson Ida Bulla 

Craven FS New Salem 

Craven II R Motfiit's Mills 

Craven (i N (col) Cole's Store 

Craven M F Moffitt's Mills 

Crutchfield, Lou M Ramseur 

Cude L F Colfax 

Curtis A W Liberty 

Curtis C R Liberty 

Dorset t Geo W (col) Eden 

Eccles P L (col) High Point 

Eccles Henry C (col) -PLgh Point 

Ellison J A Franklinville 

Farlow David Jr Hoyl 

Farlow T E level Plains 

Farlow Evangeline Level Plains 

Farlow David Asheboro 

Foiist J H Pbinters 

Foust Maggie Planters 

Foust I H Planters 

Ganaway N M (col) ..High Point 

Gilbert Miss Suckie E Asheboro 

Green T J Cape 

Halladay T C Franklinville 

Hammond Milo Kemp's Mills 

Hancock J F Brown's Store 

Hancock Miss L J Asheboro 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 91 



Haskins Ora D (col) Bulla 

Headen Annie T (col) Lil)erty 

Hill Geo F(col) Centre 

Ingold Ida Franklinville 

Ingram L J Trinity College 

Julian W R Woitliville 

Johnson Mary Franklinville 

Johnson A S Trinity College 

Johnson N C New Market 

Johnson Malla Farmers 

Johnson Annie Farmers 

Johnson O Fork Creek 

King Eli W Brown's Store 

Lowdermilk E G Asheboro 

Lowdermilk S E Asheboro 

Lowdermilk Nora Fork Creek 

Letterloh Jeremiah (col) Liberty 

Lewis Thomas G(col)--- Hill's Store 

Littler H J Kemp's Mills 

Lucas Nixon Wanamaker 

Luck Minnie Lassiter's Mills 

Mathews Dora Jamestown 

Means Emma Trinity College 

McDuffie Miss Kate Asheboro 

McMasters Cora Worthville 

McNair Adeline (col) Franklinville 

Miller Lillian Farmers 

Motfitt Elijah Asheboro 

MoffittOtelia Moffitt's Mills 

Moffitt Elma Moffitt's Mills 

Morris Sam P Wake County 

Morrison Effie Thomasville 

Morris Rena Franklinville 

Neece R W Brunswick 

Neece W R Brunswick 

Nichols Davy C (col) Hoover Hill 

Owen I N Brower's Mills 

Owen J W Brower's Mills 

Owen Isaac C Brower's Mills 

Parker D H (col) Asheboro 

Parks Fannie Cape 

Patterson R D Liberty 

PhilHps Ella Noise 

Phillips Joseph P Noise 

Parish AY W Randolph 



92 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Tuulj 1 JI Franklinville 

Rachel Eg"_' Pinsoii 

Redding Mollie Brunswick 

Reeves C R New Hope Acadenny 

Ready R K Moffitt's Mills 

Reynolds G L Queen 

Ki(V'e (' K Farmers 

Roach T J New Salem 

Russell L C ,- Blaine 

Seawell R H Cheeks 

Slier Cora Coleridge 

Siler R P Coleridge 

Siler Alice Coleridge 

Skeen Alice Post Oak 

Smith Mi.-s W A Kemp's Mills 

Sapp Tliomas F (col) Jamestown 

Staley 8 W R Liberty 

Stevenson William M Central Falls 

Stout J K Buffalo Ford 

Teague C' H Franklinville 

Thornburg \V D (col) Erect 

Thornburg W P Rdchel 

Tomlinson Charles F Asheboro 

Tomlinson S F Asheboro 

Underwood W O Marley's Mills 

Underwood S M Gray's Chapel 

Varner J M Fullers 

Vestal RM Foust's Mills 

Walker W H Jackson Hill 

Walden H R (col) Strieby 

Wall Nora R Sophia 

W'elbdrn (Jeorge C Thomasville 

West Lou . Liberty 

West Minnie Liberty 

Webster W B Franklinville 

Williamson E Carter's Mills 

Wilson Orka Brunswick 

Wilson J C Brunswick 

Winslow T J Asheboro 

Wilson Charles F Maud 

White J C Trinity College 

White J J Trinity College 

Woollen J E New Salem 

Wright L A Marley's Mills 

W^rightH F Kemp's Mills 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



93 



TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT OF TRINITY 
COLLEGE, DURHAM, N. C, 

Located at 

TRINITY 

Postoffice, F^ailway ar)d Telegraph Station, 
RflNDOLPli CO., N. C 




A Fir5t-Cla555choolforBoy5 



-IN THE 



BEfqUTipUL f\ND HEf^LTMFUL PIEDMONT 
SECTION OF NOI^TM CflROLINfl. 



Rev. J. F. HEITMAN. A. B., A. M., 

Head fVJastar. 



94 



RANDOLPH COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



IVlrs. E. T. BLAIR'S IVHIililKERY, 

Wholesale and Retail, 
ASHEBORO, N. C, 

KEEPS A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF THE LATEST AND MOST DESIRABLE 
MILLINERY, CONSISTING OF 

Hats, Bonnets, I^ibbons, plocuers, Laces, 

FANCY TIES, GLOVES, ETC. 




ALSO HAS IN S JOCK THE FAMOUS 

TULA WATER! 

for the Complexion, and Miss Beach's Curling Fluid 
for the Hair. Also a 

DRESSMAKING ESTABLISHMENT 

WITH ARTISTIC LADY ASSISTANTS. 
C^CUTTING AND FITTING A SPECIALTY. 



NlRS. E. T. BLAIR, 

ASHEBOKO, N. C. 



FARMERS AND OWNERS OF LAND 

IN RANDOLPH COUNTY. 



NAMES, POST-OFFICES, ACRES, AND VALUE. 



ASHEBORO TOWNSHIP. No. 1. 

(Postofflce— ASIIEBORO.) 

AsJichoro P — Asheworth Joel, 3 town lots, value $540 >' 
Aslieworth W R, 16 acres, 16 ; Allred Richard, 7 a, 40; Allred 
R J, 98 a, 400; Allred Branson, 1 lot, 300 ; Adderton Calvin, 
23 a, 25 ; Asheboro Courier, 1 lot, 100; Auman Jasper, 2 lots, 
425; Auman B A, 3 lots, 600 ; Allred J N, 1 lot, 125 ; Allred 
J C, 90 a, 200; Allred TN, J38a, 100; Allred Jane (heirs of), 
100 a, 25 (W W Redding, agt) ; Baldwin Phillis 19 a, 75 ; 
Birkhead J W, 35 a, 150, 1 lot, 750; Birkhead J F, 2 lots, 
900 ; Bell .John, 10 a, 250 ; Burrow John, 146 a, 300; Brittain 
John T, 5.^ a, 550, 2 lots, 75 ; Brittain John T, atty for Mrs 
WHinman,"28 a, 2,000, 3 lots 9C0 ; Burns B B, 31 a, 50, 2 lots, 
2,200; Burns W M, 130 a, 200; Burns & Moring, 8 a, 25 ; 
Bulla L D, 23 a, 200; Bulla T A, 1 lot, 800; Burgess W D, 
1 lot, 400; Brown Eli, 100 a, 200; Brown Nath, 706 a, 800; 
Brown Reuben, 2 a, 5 ; Brown Tlios, 200 a, 300 ; Balfour Geo, 
1 a, 120; Blair J A, 1 lot, 1,200; Brown & Hill, 1 lot, 75; 
Boyeite J M, 3 lots, 850; Bovette & Richardson, 1 lot, 200; 
Betls, J M, 1 lot, 435; Betts J .J, 1 lot, 175 ; Betts A L, 1 lot, 
150; Baldwin Atlas, 17 a, 50; Baldwin Robt, 9 a, 25; Burrow 
E H, 134 a, 250 ; Bailey W D, 100 a, 150; Bailey J W, 108 a, 
500 ; Brower J W, 2 a, 50 ; Brower J W & Co, 1 lot, 50 ; 
Bunting Louisa, 100 a, 250; Bunting W H, 100a, 150; 
Bunting W P, 27 a, 75 ; Bradshaw Geo S, 3 lots, 3,420 ; Bean 
C H, 67 a, 150 ; Burns H J, 36 a, 300, 1 lot, 1,400 ; Burns J 
M, 1 lot, 1,250 ; Cox Clarkson J, 1 lot, 150 ; Crawford Rowan, 
1 a, 20; Cox Sarah, 1 a, 10; Cox Ann, 1 lot, 25; Cox NO,! 
lot, 300 ; Clark .John M, 1 lot, 1,000 ; Clark John's heirs, 100 a, 
200 ; Calicutt Thos, 4 a, 4; Cross W D, 11 :V a, 150; Cross M 
H, 20 a, 50 ; Clapp W D, SO a, 100 ; Chavis Alfred, 1 n, 75 ; 
Craven J M, 26 a, 310 ; Crisco Jacob, 86 a, 125 ; Cox J M, 1 a, 
100 : Cross Bettie, 15 a, 50; Carr Cain, 15 a, 50. 1 lot, 15 ; 
Davidson J R, 215 a. 300 ; Davidson Everett, 7 a, 50; David- 
son John, 12 a, 75; Davidson Thos, 5 a, 20; Dunning John, 



9(5 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



14<) a, :U)0; Davis M L, 1 lot, 500; Dean Peter, 3 a, 25; 
Foster Tlios, 2 a, 50 ; Foster J \V, 1|- a, 85 ; Free J S, 19(5 a, 
:.()() ; Free A M, 42 a, 200 ; Free L M. 210 a, 400 ; Franks Jas, 
1 a, 50. /'i///m— Fuller J C, 2 lots. 75 ; Fuller D D, 3 a, 100. 
^.l.,/,,7,o/-o— Ferree Dr T T, 1 lot. 150; F..x O K, 1 lot, 500; 
Grimes W A, 2 lots, (550; Guilford Lumber Co, 1 lot. 6,000; 
(Jray t;am'l,2 a, 50 ; Gluis Wm,444a, 1,000 ; Henley DrS A, 
1 lot. 500; Hancock Mrs L J, 1 lot, 650; Hill Clarkson, 
1 a, 50; Hill Jas M, 4 -J a. 510; Hunsucker Gaston, 217 a, 
500 : Henlev Elizabeth, 440 a, 1,000 ; Hoover J F, 3f a, 140 ; 
Hearn Frank, 7 a, 50; Hamlin VVm A, 90 a. 300, 1 lot, 150; 
Hammer Fli A, 179 a, (500; Hammer G W, 150 a, 400; 
Hoflge Branson, 33 a, 100. Progress — Hendricks Pennel, 
200 a, 500; Hendricks Pennel agt, 32 a, 50. ^*//k— Hoover 
Harriet, 100 a, 100. Ashehoro—mUvdvd B F, 1 lot, 200; 
Hamlet A E, 46 a, 600; Hill Martha agt, 1 lot, 25 ; FLU 
Martha, 1 lot, 250; Hall W C. 1 lot, 100; HallJ W, 57 a, 
175, 1 lot, 250 ; Hearn Pliillis, 1 lot, 40 ; Henlev John B, 50 a, 
250 ; Hayes P, 4] a, 75. Central Falls— lleUev John, 100 
a, 200. Ashehoro—H\]\ J C, 1 lot, 50; Ingram Isaac, 2|- a, 
125; Ingold R L, 11 a, 150; Ingram A M, 3 a, 50; Iiioram 
W F, 1 lot, 100; Jarrell Wm, 30 a, 100; James T W, 140 a, 
600, 2 lots, 150; Johnson Marv Ann, 15 a, 100; King B, 1 
lot, 125; King Fletcher, 1 lot, 200; K^arns E B, 1 lot, 600; 
Kivett E W, 3 lo<s, 650; Luck Eli E, 40 a, 150; Louder- 




McCain Geo H, 3 lot.s, 325; Moore A M, 57 a, IrO; Miller & 
Newby, 1 lot, 500 ; Mathews A M, 1 lot, 20 ; McAlister A C, 
120^ a, 475, 4 lot.?, 6.815; Newbey N W, 2 lots, 50; Pou 
Jas H. guard, 190 a, 125; Plummer R F, 6 a, 125; Presnell 
D A, 3 a, 75 ; Petty D M. 1 lot, 600; Pritchard I F, 100 a, 
400; Porter Francis A, 1 lot, 750; Pritcliard Eli, 100 a. 400, 
1 Jot, 200 ; Ross R R, 7 a, 1,250 ; Ross R R (for Roller Mdl), 
1 a. 500; Rush Z F Sr, 3* a, 25, 1 lot, 40; Rush Z F Jr, 1 lot, 
200; Rush Wiley, 50 a, 100,2 lots, 560; Rush C H, 1 lot, 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 97 




lot, 200; Stith John, 30 a, 50; Trogden J M. 211) a, 400; 
Trogdeii W T, 17 a, 600; Tucker TIk^s, 4 a, loO. lln^iy— 
Tucker F A, lOO a, 800. J//7//^6ro— Underwood 8.)ui'l, 50 a, 
75; Underwood H A, 117 a, 200; Vuncannon J B, 1 lot, 
400. Wliij Net — Vuncannon Peler, 35.V a, o50; Vuncannon 
C A, 10 a, 125. ^.s/(e6o?'o— Vestal E F, 100 a, 350; Vestal 
J H, 121 a, 400; Vuncannon Henrv, 8 a. 25 ; Woodburn ct 
Buntinjr, 46 a, 50; Woodburn W W, 75 a, 250; Wuodeil 
A J, 1 lot, 500; Winnii]fi:hain Newton, 175 a, 435; Winnin<r- 
ham for Lantrlin, 10 a, 10; Winninghnnj a^t for Tlios Cali- 
cutt,4a. 4; Winnitig^hara agt for .J F Kinning, 60 a, 60 ; 
Wood W P, 1 lot, 3,500; Wood W P & Co, 100 h, 600, 6 lots, 
2,200; Winslow W C, 130 a, 500; William.s Delancey, 50 a, 
50; Winslow & Lewis, 1 lot, 300. Cartlmqe — Woolen L, 1 
let, 500. Ashehoro—\Yov{\\ Dr J M, 1,000 a, l,5(i0, 7 lots, 
4,000. /?f//;c//ema?i— Wilborn W L, 1 l-.t, 150. A^hehuro— 
Walker J E, 100 a, 256, 1 lot, 3,000. Why AV,/-Yow A K, 
1 lot, 35. Asheboro—Yovf Mary J, 1 lot, 150; Yates W C, 
140 a, 200. 

Wliy iVo/— Halin Matthew, 1 lot, ?200. AHj,choro—\\\\\ 
Alvinj 30 acres, 100, 2 lots 375; Gatlin Martitia, 2 a. 20; 
Hudson W A, 19^ a, 30; Hudson W A, 17 a, 30; Ke.lding 
Joseph Sr, 1 lot, 100; Redding Marv, 450 a, 450; Smither- 
inan David, 52 a, H)0, 1 lot, 75; Trogden W F, 1 lot, 35; 
Fislier B J, 380 a, 3,000, 1 lot, 75; Guilford Lumber iMfg Co, 
1 lot, 110; McAden Miss Nancv, 90 a. 200; Phillips Smui. 1 
lot, 10; Richardson W R, 1 lot,"'l50; Thrift Chess, I let, 100; 
Moffitt John T, Irens Asheboro Wood and Iron Works, 1 lot, 
780; Moffitt John T, 1 lot, 1,200; IVckett J M, 3.\ a, 25; 
Cox L B, 1 lot, 35; W^ood Win, 220 a, 400; Ledwell A E, 
177 a, 800; Cane H & Sons, 1 lot, 100. 



98 KANDOLI'Il COUNTY 



HACK CliEEK TOWNSHIP. No. 2. 

(Potitofflces-Bn.LA, Caraway, Hoyle, Sawyeksville, Spkro.) 

Spcrn P 0-Allred Atiron, 100 acr. s, value, $375; An- 
drews T W, 341 n, -J/iOO; AUred Warren, 50 a, 150; Amos 
J S, 428 a, 42S; Allred J D, 90 a, 150; Bell Mahala, 3 a, 
15 •' Bulla A M, 2<J3 a, 1,250 ; Butler Jerr^^, 10 a, 10. Bulla— 
Bulla I) W, 341 a, 700; Bulla A 0, 475 a, 1,223; Bulla J C, 
40 a, 300; Bulla Allrerl, 320 a, 1,100 ; Bulla B F, 220a, 900; 
Bulla J D, 05 a, 150; Bulla F I, 44 a, 150; Bell Calvin, 44 
a, 44; Bean J W, 5 a, 350; Burrough Delia, 5 a, 350; Bou- 
hermann G R, 5 a, 1 1 ; Breedlove Fannv, 16 a, 55; Barker 
S K, 90 a. 3G0; Beasley B B. 97 a, 300; Brookshire J T, 220 
a, 500; Beckenlite J T, 335 a, 1,300. Ashehoro — Bunting 
Arrinj^ton, 02 a, 110; Brown Wm, 50 a, 50; Cross J W, 3 a, 
15; Causey Isabel, 3 a, 10. i^u'/a— Crowson W S, 98 a, 250 ; 
Colfrane Jes=e, 300 a, GOO; C\)ltrane Jas H (E M Yates, agt), 
132 a, 775 ; Croker Martha (T B Prevat, agi), 36 a, 36 ; Co- 
nov J M & Sawver, 1 lot, 100 ; Conoy J M, 70 a, iOO ; Conov 
John H, 75 a, 75; C'app A 8, 76J a, 235; Clark R L (aj;t 
Caroline), 250 a, 1,600; Clark R L (John Clark's heir^), 225 
a, 6(iO; Conner Charitv, 35 a, 50; Davis Dougan, 232 a, 
1 ,600. 6>fro— Davis S G, 227 a, 440 ; Davis S B, 47| a, 150 ; 
Davis A P, 188 a, 400; Davis Orlando, 56 a, 125; Ditfee, Jas 
(F F Latnh, agt), 222 a, 300 ; Dorsett Ezra, 125 a, 250. Balla— 
Dougan J T, 101 a, 200; Dougan Margaret, 190 a, 700; 
Dix Cornelius, 83 a, 400; Evans G P, 18 a, 50; FaiTow 
David Sr, 142 a. S'iO. Level I'lains-F iir]ow G M, 119 a, 
325; Farlow D B, 33 a, 80; Farlow David Jr, 50 a, 137; 
Farlow Asenith, 120 a, 350; Farlow W A, 171 a, 625; Far- 
low A C, 120 a, 300; Farlow Adelia B (Millikan, agt), 15 a, 
30; Farlow Samuel, 230 a, 800; Farlow T E, 75 a, 250; 
Farlow Ahsalom, 96 a, 100; Farlow Thomas, 55 a, 200; 
Fuller John, 10 a, 40; Feriru.son T J, 90 a, 375; Ferguson 
Alfred, 90 a. 325 ; Furman Thomas, 19* a, 20 ; Fentress T C, 
3J0a, 800; Ford Christopher, 130 a, 250; Falkner David, 
80 a, 200: Farlow Susan J, 62 a, 200; Free D W, 65 a, 150; 
Free D W (^gt Samuel Free and Asenith Fenires-), 50 a, 
100; Gray Caroline, 29 a, 50; Gaddis Hilliard, 168 a, 175 ; 
Hill llos.a P, 25 a, 25; Ilavs O P, 60 a, 125; Henson J A, 
44 a, 100; Hales S J, 75 a, 375; HMrlin Nanev, 105 a, 200; 
Horton Enoch, 80 a, 80; Henley E B, 83 a, 272; Henlev Is- 
abel, 50 a, 125; Ilalen Anthony, 132 a. 300; Henley M 0, 
37 a, 80; Henley Ellen, 86 a, 400; Hiushaw Darius, 419 a. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 99 



800; Hinshaw W B Jr, 92 a, 500. Sawi/ersmll^—lUuxt 
Marsh, 25 a, 35; Plinsliavv I G, 29 a, 350; Hunt Z W, 20 a, 
30; HuntVP, 165 a, 1(35; Hunt J C, l;;? a, 310; Jhi^lis 
W D. 5 a, 11 ; Hughs J F, 5 a, 11. Spn-o—Uurrhs S A, 5 a, 
11 ; Hughs W G, 83 a, 165; Hoover Frank H, 30 a, 100; 
Hoover W A, 1 lot, 125 ; Hunt G W M, 9 a, 10. Carmvo)/— 
Hinshaw Je?se, 30 a, 75 ; Ilenle}' Saniuel A, 50 a, 150 ; Jar- 
rell John F, 10 a, 100; Jerrell Sidney, 54 a, 75; Jarrdl 
James, 157 a, 310 ; Jones M C, 25 a, 45 ; Johnson W (', 40 a, 
160; Johnson Ransom, 30 a, 60. SawyersvUle — Kearns 
Thomas E, 145 a, 812; Kearns Allen M, 120 a. 678 ; Kearns 
Sarah, 84 a, 775 ; Kearns Wm A, 100 a. 875 ; Kennedy A L, 
30 a, 52 ; Kennedy M M, 72 a, 345. i?(f/k— King John, 15 a, 
15; King Martha, 30i a, 31 ; King W M, 28 a, 28 ; Kivett 
G W Sr, 405 a, 850; King Bolinir .Jr, 3^4 a, 39. Saioyen^- 
ville — Kearns Aleon, 126 a, 900 ; Linthicum Mary, 50 a, 75; 
Liuthicum Samuel 0, 50 a, 100; Laughlin S G, 156 a, 650; 
Laughlin J F, 174 a, 307; Laughlin L E, 143 a, 300; Lamb 
E V, 100 a, 200; Lamb T F, 80 a, 175. Cnrowa}/— Lowe 
Wm, 292 a, 1 900; Mathews George, 2 a, 35; Miller B F, 
275 a, 491 ; Miller James Sr, 235 a, 400; Miller Julian, 80 a, 
160; Miller Dinah, 12 a, 25; Miller W M, 186 a, 470; Mil- 
ler John Sr, 37 a, 37. 5;(//a— Millikan E A, 425 a, 1.300; 
Millikan D \\^, 748 a, 3.200; Millikan A B, 5 a, 11 ; Milli- 
kan J K, 50 a, 150; Millikan W C, 72 a, 198; Millikan 
Ben], 212 a, 1,100; McCain Hugh, 112 a, 600; McCrarv, 
W F, 472 a, 2,300; McCrarv W F & Co, 11 a, 1,000; McCra- 
ry D B cfe J D, 208 a, 750 ; Moffitt E E, 85 a, 85 ; Millis J H 
(guardian), 85 a, 85; Meeken R A, 120 a, 2,000; Mo.'^s Eliza 
Hines, 5 a, 25 ; Newby Thos E, 102 a, 162 ; Newby Jesse O, 
75 a, 121 ; Neighhor.s J A, 139 a, 225; Pierce Ruffin, 150 a, 
250 ; Pierce I N, 131i a, 850: Pierce R R, 67 a, 450; Pliil- 
lips L D, 15 a, 250 ; Powell T C, 130 a, 242 ; Prevot T B (agt 
Elizabeth Prevoi), 21 a, 75. *S/>6ro— Pritchard B,750a, 1,800; 
Prilchard Wm, 6 a. 10 ; Pritchard A B, 10 a, 50 ; Pierce Lv- 
dia, 4-1 a, 750; Parker W H, 102 a, 230; Prevo F P, 44 a, 
80 ; Pritchard J C, 35 a, 250. Carawm/— "Ricks S M, 12 a, 
75; Rich Isaiah, 324 a, 1,000; Rich Alfred. 75 a, 150; Roach 
Eliza, 125 a, 150; Rogers Jesse, 41 a, 50; Rush J E ct Bro, 
9 a, 600; Bobbins Emeline, 45 a, lOO; Bobbins F C Jr, J F 
and E R, 182 a, 450; Robbins J A, 50 a, IdO ; Bobbins Han- 
nah, 35 a, 100; Robbins Emilv, 35 a. 50 /?////«— Rob- 
bins C L, 35 a, 80; Robbins J C, 15 a, 50; Robbins A A, 200 a, 
600 ; Robbins T F, 200 a, 200. Ca/-a?<;.ty— Robbins J S, 92 a, 



100 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



100; Kohhins George, 100 a, 500. A shebor o—Rohhins M S, 
222 H, 1,<;00. Curaivat/ — Rol.bins A 8, 1'38 a, 670; Robhins 
W K, lltO H, 400; Redding J II, 204 a. 932. Ashchoro—lUd- 
dine SopliiM, :« a, 200 ; Redding T J, 720 a, 2.897 ; Redding 
T J (agi Worth & Hammond), 204 a, 204; Redding Jolm, 
200 a, 325; Redding J T, 334 a, 1,030 ; R-tsdding Joseph. 50 
a, 150; Red.ling C S, 1G4 a, 205; Re Iding Alex. 114 a, 150. 
Bnlh—lU'fhVin^ Thomas, 278 a, GOO ; Re.lding B F, 112 a. 250; 
Redding W II, 107 a. 1.000; Rush Rev Z^bedee, 287 a, 1,500; 
liush Z F Jr, 58 a, 250 ; Rike Lonzena, 14 a, 20. Spfvo— 
Smith Wm R. 15G.\ a, 275; Smith Wm H, 10 a, 10; Staley 
W L, 104 a, 400; S'luder J M, 54 a, 54 ; Sechrest T M, 39 a, 
100; Stalker John, 9 a, 25; Snyder S C, 56 a, 200: Snvder 
B F. 2 a, 10. Sawijem-iUe—Siiv^yev W H,110 a, 250; Saw- 
yer Sarah, 315} a, 708; Sawyer Ruins, 42 a, 100; Sawyer 
Joseph, 84 a, 104; Spencer Nancv (R L CoUrane, adn)r), 36 
a, 100; Spencer N D, 60 a, 560; Spencer L R, 100 a, 1,540; 
Swaney A M, ^ a, 15; Spencer & Co, 360 a, 1,200; Sfieneer 
J W, 40 a, 750. Caraiuoy — Scott Levi, 100 a, 100; Spencer 
L A, U a, 100; Sawyer E N, 40 a, 50; Trotter Clarkson, 
75 a, 175; Tucker S P, 50 a, 50. Spero — Trogden S )lomon, 
35 a, 35; Underwood Samuel, 180 a, 350. Bulla — Vnncau- 
non II T, 190a, 1,000; Vickory William, 100 a, 100; Wins- 
low Kenben, 72j-. 100; Walker Henderson, 23 a, 38. L'vcl 
yVa//(.s— Walker Samuel H, 90 a, 470; Wall J R, 7U a, 198; 
Wall R'.ella, 2 a, 25; Wall Pinknev, 125 a, 530; Wall Nel- 
son, 127 a, 532; Williams H F, 500 a, 1,200. i?"//a— Wil- 
liams Harrv. 6 a, 15; Wa-d Hack, 40 a, 116; Ward J L, 
105 a, 285; Wall W F, 180 a, 3G0 ; Wall W F & J C, 2::,0 a, 
GOO. A.^hehoro — Walker J E (guardian), 250 a, 85. Sitvyers- 
v>lle—\VU\(e Ehzabeth, 132 a, 775; York James 8,302 a, 
7GG; York Sarah, 134 a, 350. Bulla — Yow George, 50 a, 
150. 

/^,//„_Allred A C, 8 a, 75; Bryant G W, 230 a, 600; Bry- 
ant W F, 180 a, 350; Connor A L, 35 a, 100; Coltrane R L 
(adn)r for Nancy Spencf^r), 29 a, 100; Davis R M, 50 a, 150; 
Hogan T B, l.\i. 25; Hinshaw I G, 18 a, 250; King B,40a, 
40; Millikan Allen, 120 a, 300; Pierce I N, 9 a, 10; Snider, 
B F, 60 a, 200. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 101 



BROWER TOWNSHIP. No. 3. 

(Postoffices— Brower's Mills, Velna.) 

Mofm's 3Iills P 0-Albright II A, 434 acres, value, 
$400; Albright J E, 100 a, 270; Albright H A, agt K R 
Albright, 170 a. 300. KUdee—Ash\\\ William, 240 a, 420 ; 
Asbill William E, 70^ a, 125; Beck Jdin F F, KiO a, (;00; 
Beck Wm E, cS3J a, 192; Beck Jas E, 00 a, 400; Beck Wm, 
executor Flora Phillif^s, 200 a, 400. MofUt's Mills— Bnxdy 
Wyatt,50a,115; Brady Thomas H, 51 a, 158; Brady Isaac F, 
1G8| a, 542; Brady Disey A, 70 a, 100; Brady IJenry W, 
Ih a, 25 ; Bradv John W, 2 a, 7 ; Bradv Isaac Sr, 04 a, 175 ; 
Bl-ady Alary, 77^ a, 1G6; Brady Eli A, 70 a, 210; Bradv J A, 
86 a, 284; Bradv Henry H, 02 a, 224. Brown's Slorr— 
Brady Joseph M,''56 a, 108; Brady L E, 70 a, 350; Bradv 
Wm iM, 521 a, 120; Bradv W A C, 131 a, 150; Bradv L B, 
200 a, 400; Brady J H. 23 a, 50 ; Bradv James, 212 a, 520; 
BradvOrlendo,60a,200; Brady Thomas"M,116a,250; Brady 
John^Sr, 166 a, 450. Brourr's Mills— Brewer E C, 48^ a, 93. 
Mnffitt's M//.S — Brower Rulus A, 422 a, 1,800; Brower 
Emilv B, 642 a, 2.975; Brower Wm N, 163J a, 500; Brower 
Emsley D, 100 a, 300; Brown Hardv, 729 a, 1,900; Brown, 
Frank R, 94Ja,270: Brown John T, i5 a, 50; Brown John I), 

101 a, 303; Brown Joshua, 67 a, 75. Brown's S'.ore — Brown 
Wm, 130 a, 390; Brown W D, 331 a, 1,250 ; Brown WW, 52 a, 
130; Brown Altrei I, 70 a, 250; Brown Mari^hall, 59 a, 148; 
Brown W 1, 15 a, 50. Kemp's Mills— Br-Av H W, 327^^ a, 760 ; 
Bray Alfre<] G, guardian of Minnie Brown, 70 a, 221 ; Bray 
John W, 125 a. 300; Bridges Horace N, 33i a, 67; Branson 
Jesse, 30 a, 90 ; Branson John, 7 a, 10. CheeLs—Bm] Z F, 170 
a, 425; Bean Allen, 52 a, 130; Cox Chas S, 125 a, 260; Cox 
R' becca of Abel, 386 a, 1,100: Cox Benj,55a, 140; Cox Simon, 
205 a, H15 ; Cox Nathaniel, 228 a, 375 ; Cox E Milton, 348 a, 
750. Brower's Mills-Cox Calvin, 200 a, 300; Cox Julius, 

102 a, 200; Cox Levi H, 213| a, 545; Cheek Green, 50 a, 150. 
Erect— Cheek John, 45 a, 415 ; Cheek Thomas F, 175 a, 500 ; 
Cheek Abner, 5 a, 21 ; Cheek Chesley, 23 a, 55 ; Cheek Hi-n- 
dersnn,52 a, 100; Cheek Josiah,448a, 1,278. Kemp's Milts — 
Chrisco Ann M, 64 a, 130; Chrisco Wm, 50 a, 125; Chrisco 
Hardy, 168 a, 575; Chrisco Daniel, 438 a, 650. Fuusf's 
Mills — Covington David, 22 a, 50; Caviness Louisa. 57 a, 70; 
Caviness Harrison, 54J a, 140 ; Caviness Chesley, 83,.^ a, 210 ; 
Caviness H«-nrv T, 11(3 a, 1,300; Chestnut J^enjamin, 410 a, 
172. Kemp's Mills— Bslyib Duncan, 100 a, 300 ; Davis J A, 



102 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



87 u, 150; Fox W T, 101 a, 150; Fox James M, 186ia,300. 
Median ic—Fi^snnre John M, 200 a, 500 ; Gibson E M, 100 a, 
187; Gibson Eliztibelh, 350 a, 325; Gardner Hiram, 145 a, 
SCO. Brouer'a AJiUs — Gardner James M, 20 a, 60; Gardner 
Win S, 287 a, 1,200; Gardner James, 227 a, 675; Goldston 
Benjamin, 20 a, 40. Eden — Goldston Gillis, 18 a, 45 ; Graves 
Thomas. 20.^. a, 41 ; Hayes John F, 127 a, 265 ; Hayes W N, 
60.\ a, 100; 'Hayes Jas W, 207 a, 414; Hayes Calvin, 210 a, 
4O0 ; Hay worth W W, 04 a, 100. 3Iechanic— Howard Eli N, 
50 a, 100; Howard Solomon, 40 a, 60; Hinshaw Thomas & 
Son, 210 a, 210; Harris Laura B, 146 a, 450; Hicks W H, 
22.\ a, 75 ; Ilussev Enjeline, 56 a, 150. HiWs Store — Harper 
Jiuncs E, 250 a, 1,500 ; Kidd Neill B, 163 a, 450. Broiver's 
JM.s— Kidd Mari(m J, 33^- a, 67; Lambert H B, 50 a, 110; 
Lambert H B, agt Nancy Lambert, 87 a, 2U0 ; Leonard A D, 
111 a, 375. Mechanic — Leonard Wm M, 173 a, 505; Low- 
Hermilk Alfred, 327 a, 1,167; Lowdermilk Eli A, 22 a, 50; 
Lowdermilk W VV, lOU a, 300; Lane John R, 28 a, 260. 
Balph— Leach D B, 74 a, 293; Leach Hannah, 223 a, 223 ; 
Macon Alfred, 526 a, 2,149. Kemp's Mills — Macon James S, 
269 a, 1,200. f/A/a— Moffitt W D, 130 a, 450; Moffitt Cal- 
vin C, 93 a, 450 ; Moffitt Alfred, 200 a, 900 ; Moffitt Nancy A, 
75 a, 350; Moffitt E G, 345 a, 1,598; Moffitt Wm M, 62 a, 
350 ; Moffitt S L Sr, 105]- a, 200 ; Moffitt Wm P, 150 a, 450; 
Moffitt John R, 90 a, 108; Moffitt Jesse H, 134 a, 475. 
Broivcrs Mills — Murray Jas W, 93 a, 172 ; Murray Robert L, 
92 a, 170. Kemp's Mills— Maness G T, 40 a, 142 ; Maness 
C 8, 100 a, 190 ; Maness James, 150 a, 250 ; Maness John Jr, 
200 a, 225; Maness Eli, 175 a, 350; Maness Alfred, 175 a, 
350 ; Maness Asa. guardian of B F and Mattie Howard, 60 a, 
103 ; Marley John M, 150 a, 700. Brower's Mills— MaAey A, 
100 a, 275. Marlei/s Mills— Marhy Jas M, 110 a, 400 ; Mar- 
ley Thos M, 147 a, 475 ; Marley Martha L, 74 a, 300 ; Moore 
John T, 75 a, 225. Foust's Mills— McCoy Elizabeth, 180 a, 
700; McCoy John W, 58 a, 454. Brower's Mills-'Need- 
ham Emma, 100 a, 188; Owen John C, 493 a, 1,400 ; Pass 
Banley, 25 a, 40; Purvis John M, 221 a, 425; Purvis F 
Haywood, 122 a, 225 ; Purvis James W, 234 a, 375. Kemp's 
Mills— Fearce Elizabeth, 200 a, 400; Pearce Lucv, 50 a, 
125; Pearce Reuben L=ind, 250 a, 450; Powers E S, 121 a, 
300 ; Perry H C, 102 a, 300. Quinine— FhilWps Jas S, 253 a, 
625; Phillips J P, 274 a, 960; Perberton Ellen L, 183 a, 550; 
Scott J(^hn F, 57 a, 170. Why Not— Scott James, 62i a, 
140 ; Shamburger Tyson, 52i a, 105 ; Sugg M T, 212 a, O^SO ; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 103 



Sugg L O, 370 a, 925; Sugg C E G, 50 a, 100. Jirower's 
i)////8— Sheffield Isaac, 7 a, 700; Spinks Allen il, 42 a, 75. 
Kemp's Mills — Sellers Mary, 11a, 22 ; Steed ivansoin, 3 a, lU ; 
Tomlinson James, 30.V a, 50. Brower's il////.s— Tyson II c\ 
181 a, 540 ; Teague G \V, 209 a, 525 ; Tvsor T B, i5t a, 450 ; 
Trogden Penelope, 325 a, 325. Eden— West F E, 107 a, 300 ; 
Wrenn W H, 116 a, 350; Wrenn M ¥, 202 a, 500; Wrenn 
Thos J, 179 a, 325. WInj J\"o<— Wilson Thus M, 108 a, 425 • 
Wilson Thos M (agt), 85 a, 184; Waddell \V F (exti), 27(5 h, 
700; Waddell Jas B (admr), 11 a, 20; WaUlen Elizal^eth, 
85 a, 125. Brower's iMills—\Ve\ch C H, 133 a, 400; Welch 
W G, 91 a, 175; Yow Nancy 0, 78 a, 150; Yovv John M, 
70 a, 250. 



CEDAR GROVE TOWNSHIR No. 4. 

(Postoffices— Mechanic, Post Oak, White Hou.se, Uhla, Science Hill.) 

Science Hill P — Asheworth Joel, 150 acres, value 
$500; Asheworth W R, 100 a, 700. t//i/a— Allred Elijah, 
155 a, 500; Allrtd H D, 150 a, 500 ; Allred B M, 38 a, 130. 
Mechanic — Bingham J F, 147 a, 150. Ai^Jieboro — Bunting 
A G, 50 a, 150. White i7ou.se— Branson Levi T, 418 a, 800. 
Science Hill — Barnes W T, 70 a, 200; Barnes Thomas, 30 a, 
200. Mechanic — Barnes Emsley, 25 a, 425. Wliitc House — 
Brewer Henry, 90 a, 200. Mechanic— ]^A\ G W, 177 a, 450 ; 
Bryant Thomas, 90 a, 160. C////a— Brower Noah, 372 a, 550 ; 
Brower Lilly, 80 a, 200. White iiowse— Brookshire W F, 
100 a, 100; Barbee W G, 94 a, 94. yl.s/ie/jo/o— Bulla L D, 
100 a, 30. Mechanic — Crawford Henry, 20 a, 40. Science 
Hill— Coliram James, 267 a, 600; Coltrain S A, 164 a, 300; 
Coltrain Nelson, 72 a, 140. \\li,ite House— Cox El wood, 280 a, 
325 ; Cox T L, 170 a, 250. Uhla— Cox W R, 38 a, 150. Science 
Hill— Coble Manly, 140 a, 350; Clark J iM, 800 a, 800. 
White House — Dawson Martha, 150 a, 150; Dawson I N, 
125 a, 180. Asheboro—YoBter Cordelia, 100 a, 100. Uhla — 
Fry C L, 75 a, 100. White House— Gxdiy J S, 330 a, 520. 
Science Hill — Garner Alexander, 12 a, 40. Uhla — Gatlin W S, 
147 a, 175 ; Gatlin Bethel, 100 a, 125. White House— Grevn 
Samuel, 182 a, 246 ; Gluyas John B, 100 a, 125. Mechanic— 
Hill Arthur, 28 a, 50; Hudson- W A. 91 a, 150. Ashe- 
boro — Hudson Ezekiel, 120 a. 300. White House— llusspy 
William, 155 a, 400. Science Hill — Hussey A L. 97 a, 575; 
Hussey Geo H, 50 a, 300; Hussey Eli, 65 a, 150. White 
House — Hussey E O, 100 a, 225. Mechanic— Howard E N, 



104 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



lt)0 a, 1,050. Snence Hill—Uooyer Alfred, 63 a. 700 ; Hoover 
Cuo W, :U) a, 175; Hoover B N, 140 a, 500; Hoover Briles, 
100n,oOO. White //ou.">r— HaiTiinoud Samuel, 355 a, 700; 
Hammonil J 0, 100 a, 450; Hammond W B, 80 a, 125. 
Scinice y////— Hammond John, 2<j9 a, 900. White House — 
Hammond A L, 107 a, 140; Hammond J A, 5 a, 125; Ham- 
mond J J, 40 a, 60. Archdale— Hammond Moses, I,4u0 a, 
1 ,400. A.shtboro — Haydock Hillery, 47 a, 75. White House — 
Johnson J A, 100 a, 295; Jones Mary J, 105 a, 155; Jack- 
.soii Miciijah, 78 a, 75 ; Jackson David, 100 a, 150. Science 
y//7/— Keerans I ^V, 371 a, 2.300; Keerans Susan, 86 a, 100. 
Axltilxiro — Keerans John, 156 a, 300. Meclianic — Keerans 
Jennie, 86 a, 215 ; Keerans Thomas, 370 a, 400. Hill's Store — 
Keerans A H, 401 a, 2,350. Science Hill — Kinny Martha, 
207 a, 300; Kemp John, 40 a, 1,400. Ashehoro—Ledwell 
Klwdod, 5() a, 125. White House — Luther E E, 55 a, 60; 
Luther Tilden, 100 a, 100; Luther J H, 160 a, 225; Lassiter 
Anna, 32 a, 75; Lassiter Elizabetli, 155 a, 600. Mechanic — 
Lassiter W W, 200 a, 450 ; Lewis Z C, 60 a, 110 ; Lewis D B, 
100 a, 75 ; Lewis T G, 100 a, 60. Wh)te House— Luck Noah, 
100 a, 1(50; Luck E<lmond, 23 a, 92; Luck A M, 135 a, 225; 
Luck C T, 130 n, 325 ; Luck Ransom, 262 a, 550 ; Luck Elias, 
100 a, 250. Mechanic— Lowe N M, 542 a, 2,400. Science 
y////- Lowe Levi B, 214 a, 550; Lowe James, 293 a, 2,000; Lowe 
J T, 240 a, 550; Lowe John, 216 a, 875. Mechanic— Lowe 
Sum'l IL 100 a. 100. Science Hill— Lowe Daniel, 390 a, 800. 
White House — Lewallen Nancy Jr, 84 a, 100; Lewallen 
Nancy Sr, 150 a, 300; Lewallen J M, 38 a, 50; Lewallen W 
M, 80 a, 100. yl.s/<ey^oro— Lewallen Z A, 300 a, 700 ; Lewal- 
len Henrv, 1,025 a, 1,175; Lewallen Frank, 100 a, 160. 
Science yy///— Lewallen G W, 201 a, 232. f7//k— Moffitt M R, 
300 a, 350; Moffitt M H, 125 a, 150; Moffitt J A, 200 a, 150; 
McPherson W F, 120 a, 200. Science Hill— McDaniel A H, 
5!)2 a, 1,500. Farmers— "Newhy N W, 38 a, 250. Science 
y////— Nance D (\ 73 a, 650 ; Nance N D, 73 a, 650. White 
Jfoiist — Owen Elizabeth, 196 a, 250. Mechanic — Potter 
Henry, 37 a, 75. White yyouse— Plummer J R, 400 a, 300. 
J/fT//f//»?r— Presnell Z A, 25 a, 45. Vhla — Presnell Uriah, 
350 a, 500 ; Presnell Virgil, 167 a, 170. White House— Fves- 
nell H C, 33 a, 94. Science Hill— Fool J E, 466 a, 1,400; 
Pool Henrv B, 100 a, 500 ; Pool Ezra T, 91 a, 275 ; Pool John, 
12 a, 35; Parker W H, 182 a, 570; Pickett W P, 50 a, 275; 
Pickett J M, 1 20 a, 700. Floivcr Hill— Fickeit I J, 60 a, 200. 
Science Hill—Fugh Cora, 25 a, 40. Mechanic— FhiWq^s Lewis, 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 105 



9 a, 50 ; Phillips, J L, im a, 300. Science /////— Parker Jona- 
thaij, 70 a, 400 ; Rush Henry, 277 a, 600 ; Ridge J W, 223 a 
1,000; Ridge J S, 23 a, 100; R..bl)ins I M, 130 a, 325 ; Rob- 
biiis .Jonaihaii,66 3,^5; Rcbbins T A, 150 a, 80. Ai^ltchoro — 
Smoke J S, 84 a, 200. il/cf7ia7»?c— Saunders Henry, 100 a, 
200. \Miitc House — Simmons Enoch, 97 a, 200. Mechanic — 
Spencer W W, 200 a, 500; Strickland Branson, 125 a, 150; 
Sikes H A, 50 a, 50. HiWs Store— Sited J T, 82 a, 150. 
WJtite Houi<e—StuATt John, 80 a, 150. iMechan ic—Ta,dlock. 
J W, 180 a, 300; Toney S D, 85 a, 150. Asl,eboro—[ uckcr 
Levi, 50 a, 80. Aconite — Vuncannon Elizabeth, 125 a, 100. 
Science Hill — Vuncannon J M, 2'.<0 a, 1,025. White Hovhc — 
Vuncannon T J. 127 a, 250; Vuncannon U S G, 1 15 a, 300 ; 
Vuncannon J S, 35 a, 200. Science Hill — Varner W A. 255 a, 
700. HilVs Store— Y^vY^QV J M, 130 a, 550. White Hovse— 
Workman M J, 100 a, 250. Ashehoro — Winslow' Azor, 247 a, 
600; Winslow J T, 60 a, 200. ' White //o»/.se— Williams .J M, 
104 a, 200. ^co?i?7e— Williams P A, 173 a, 236. J^Jula— 
Williams W S, 96 a, 175; White W W, 135 a, 200. Science 
HiU-\Ya]ker Felix. 201 a, 1,200; Walker R D, 94 a, 500; 
Walker J M, 42 a, 200; Walker Thomas, 140 a, 500. Eula— 
Williams H M, 34 a, 100. 



COLUMBIA TOWNSHIP. No. 5. 

(Postoffices— Marley's Mills, Ramseur, Planters, Soapstone Mount, 

KiLDEE.) 

Franmnville- Allen H B, 142 acres, value, S700; Allen 
H B (heirs), 510 a, 1.250; Allred William, 85 a, 550; Allied 
Milton, 95 a, 400; Allred Levi, 95 a, 350; Allred Elijah, 84 
a, 250; Allred S T, 1 lot, 300, 44 a, 150; Allred J W, 1 h.t, 
200; Allred Lucina, 115 a, 250; Allred Geo M, 1 lot, 200, 
79 a, 160 ; Allred J Wesley, 1 lot, 700. i2am.seur—Alld ridge 
Victoria, 83 a, 125; Beard J B, 1 lot, 325; Barker Dollv, 30 
a, 70 ; Barker Mary, 16i a, 50; Barker T B, 1 lot, 225, 8 a, 
100; Barker Jas A, 223 a, 650; Branson William, 100 a, 
400 ; Branson T M, 91 a, 175; Bray II T, 1 lot. 3U0; Hray 
A W, 78 a, 250; Bray Charity, 9 a, 75 ; Brown King, 20 a, 
50; Brown W A, 1 lot, 150; Burriss Murphv, 109 a, 500; 
Burgess John H, 95 a, 900 ; Burgess Mrs W H, 140 a, 900 ; 
Burgess M F, 5 a, 100; Burgess Thos J, 24 a, 100; Burge-s 
D B, 1 lot, 400, 50 a, 255 ; Burgess C W, 102 a. 500; Burges3 
E C, 114 a, 350 ; Burgess C F, 134 a, 325 ; Burgess D M, 
6 



lUG RANDOLPH COUNTY 



1 lot, 200. Fork Greek— Bwr^ess D A, 212 a, 350 ; Burgess 
(K'O II, 300 a, 5-'5; Burj^ess W H, 60 a, 150 ; Burgess N M, 
100 a, 400. /?a/H.sri<r— Burgess Elizabeth, 154 a, 225; Bur- 
gess Mrs A (I, 50 a, ::!00 ; Burgess (heirs of Eliza), 1 lot, 300; 
Brovver John F, 101 a, ^00; Brower J M, 1 lot, 15; Brower 
A C & Co, 1 lot, 400 ; Brower A P, 254, 2,400 ; Brower VV A, 
1 lot, 150; Brower Olympic, 1 lot, 25; B>.wdoin J W, 43 a, 
210; Bowdoin John 8, 137 a, 450; Brooks M V, 230 a, 750; 
Brocks Wm, 7^, 20 ; Builer James, 99 a, 250. Fork Greek— 
Biadv J E, 1 lot, 50; Baggott J F, 1 lot, 250 ; Breedlove 
Kohtl), 2U a, 75. Buffalo i^ord— Craven Jackson, 44« a, 
1,000; Craven (heirs of Delilah), 109 a, 4c0; Craven Nancy 
E, 6 a, 15 ; Craven E J V, 35 a, 250 ; Craven J R, 60 a, 250 ; 
Craven W 0,85 a, 'zOO. Franklinville — Craven Ruffin, 1 lot, 
100; Cheek Benjamin, 210 a, 800; Cheek Valmore, 52 a, 
450 ; Cooper A J, 1 lot, 100, 10 a, 100 ; Campbell W P, 144 

a, 400. Ramseur — Ca[)el '(treas of Chair Works), 1 lot, 

1,500; Cape! A \V E, 2 lots, 1,450, 33 a, 200; Curtis D A, 
1 lot, 25; Curtis James, 114 a, 450; Cheek America, 10 a, 
25; Chisholm J Y, 215 a, 550; Chisholm H C, 71 a, 200; 
Chishohn T L, 2 lots, 1,650; Carter H B, i a, 1,000; Cave- 
ness J M, 31 a, 50. Buffalo Ford — Cox Jas K, 167 a, 700; 
Cox J W, 3 lots, 345, 125 a, 400; Cox O P, 100 a, 300; Cox 
B P, 116 a, :^50; Cox Mrs Y W, 120 a, 300. Ramseur— Cox 
L I, 1 lot, 300; Cox B G, 136 a, 700. Liberty— Coh\e Mrs 
Sarah, 150 a, 375 ; Coble W H, 117 a, 550. Ramseur— C^y- 
ene'^s Jas, 135 a, 150; Coward W D, 1 lot, 400, 52 a, 300; 
Craven Cornelius, 1 a, 250; Edwards Mrs Wiley, 50 a, 200; 
Edwards J D, 2 lots, 105; Edwards W N, 80 a, 300; Elliott 
G W, 1 lot, 200 ; Elliott D K, 2 lots, 425 ; Elliott E Frances, 
165 a, 600. Franklinville— EUlson Zangy, HO a, 500; Elli- 
son J A, 235 a, 500. Ramseur— Toixshee W F, 206 a, 700 ; 
Foushee J M, 143 a, 425; Fox C P, 132 a, 450 ; Fox Eliza- 
beth, 39 a, 110; Fox Calvin S, 135 a, 900; Fox Jackson, 23 
a, 40; P>azier C G, 1 lot, 700; Fox S A & C M, 40 a, 800; 
Frazier D N, 155 a, 500 ; Frazier C G, 2 lots, 385, 400 a, 700; 
Frazier (.'alvin, 164 a, 350. Franklinville — Frazier M J, 159 
a, 370 ; Frazier W J, 1 lot, 10, 260 a, 750 ; Foust W H. 141 
a, 450; Foust Mary J, 350 a, 900; Foust Jacob, 15 a, 75; 
P'oust Christian, 35 a, 125 ; Foust Henry, 105 a, 120; Foust 
(heirs of Elizahelli), 25 a, 50. /?a?7?.seur— Forrester J 0, 1 lot, 
400 ; Forrester J O & Co, 1 lot, 300; Fetitral Marv Ann, 1 lot, 
200. Foust's .\J ills— Ferguson Mrs G W, 110 a, 200; Fergu- 
son Peggy, 20 a, 40; Ferguson G W, 7J a, 20; Fogleman 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 107 



D H, 180 a, 350; Fogleman W W, 2 lots, 35; Fields Elzira, 
31 a, 50. Enmstur — Fanners' Alliance Exchanfije, 1 a, 700; 
Free M C, 1 lot, 600; Gunter N B, 1 a. 250 ; Harris J S. 180 
a, 350. Liberty — Hollidav (heirs of Asenitli), 49 a, 75 ; Ilmn- 
ble Mrs A J, 45 a, 200; Humble C H, 41^ a, 100; Iluinhle 
Daniel, 1")5|^ a, 375. Frankiinville — Holl (lieirs ol Birbara), 
130 a, 225; "Holt Mary C, 57 a, 200; Hutson C J, 125 a, 450; 
Holder Lucinda, 40 a, 50; Hobson Silas, 14, 450; Hob-oii 
J A, 2 lots, 250; Hobson H V, 22 a, 125; Hicks G W, 1 lot, 
75; Hedreck J P, 98 a, 350. A^am.smr— Ha v worth M M, 
109 a, 500; Hayes W F, 110 a, 200; Hanner W D, 51 a,250 ; 
Henlev W F, 1 lot, 400; Ivey Jacob, 207 a, 350. Central 
/a//s— Jarrell Jane, 1 lot, 00; Johnsf.n VV C, 1 lot, 250; 
Johnson Mrs Y M C, 1 lot, 30, 200 a, 600. Liberty— KimYej 
H L, 160 a, 450; Kimrey Miss E E, 1 lot, 200; Kimrev Al- 
fred, 50 a, 113. Ramseur—Kwelt T M, 33| a, 90 ; Kivett 
W B. 353 a, 675; Kivett M E, 262 a, 1,000; Kivett J F, 357 
a. 875; Kivett Mila D, 134 a, 310; Kivett J M, 1 lot, 400; 
Kivett John W, 204 a, 450 ; Kivett W P, 112 a, 250 ; Kivett 
A F, 78 a, 250; Kivett D»vid, 249 a, 500; Kivett Mary M, 
146 a, 365; Kiveit Joel A, 377 a, 725 ; Kivett Peter, 150 a, 
250 ; Kivett Henrv J, 39 a, 1 15 ; Kivett Mrs E J, 130 a, 450 ; 
King W H, 1 lot, 400, 7 a, 75. Liberty— Kivkmau J M, 80a, 
350 ; Kirkman J H, 152 a, 500 Cedar Falls— Ldme W F, 
1 lot, 800; Lane J R, 120 a, 450; Lane W G, 147 a, 600. 
Frankiinville — Leonard Mrs So{)hia, 1 lot, 400; Langley Eliz- 
abeth, 9 a, 20 ; Langley E T, 206 a, 575 ; Langley J T, 40 a, 
175; Langley John, 188 a, 400; Langley Causey, J a, 5; 
Langley Orlendo T, 57J a, 325 ; Langley Jas, 1 lot, 200, 95 a, 
215. Millboro — Lineberry Orlendo, 1 lot, 15; Lineberry Al- 
fred, 152 a, 550; Lineherrv Jeff.^rson, 137 a, 385; Lineberry 
Eli, 207 a, 425. Buffalo Ford— Lowe C C, 50 a, 150; Lowe 
Madison, 5^i a, 300;" Lowe Wm, 1 lot, 100; Luther Willis, 2 
lot«, 650; Lednum F, 26 a, 100. S'n/ey—Lei\belieT Eliza- 
beth, 126 a, 350. Cedar i^a//s— Moffitt H A, 2 lots, 150; 
Muffiit W T, 150 a, 350. Stale ij—yiott\tt T J, 1 lot, 350; 
i^amsm?-— Melton J B, 2 lots, 1,000. ilM^oro— Mills Wni, 
8J a, 30. Marlfy's J/iV/.s— Marie v W M, 14 a, 100 ; Marley 
G T, 220 a, 1,400; Marley Eli, 85 a, 300; Marley Harris, 3 
lots, 200 ; Marlev Thos, 7^ a, 25. i^am.wur— McMastersT D, 
363 a, 725; McMasters, 205 a, 790; McMasters Hettv, 4 a, 
8; McMasters A B, 150 a, 350 ; McMasters Wm, 2S a, 60; 
McDaniel Nezri, 173 a, 515; McDaniel Sam'l, 52 a, 160; 
McNatt W H, 1 lot, 350; McPherson I P, 64 a, 130; Moore 



108 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



& Jones, , 400; Makepeace J B, 1 lot, 40; Mai 

Sallie, 1 lot, :-iOO ; Olive, Mrs A C, 140 a, 465 ; Osbori 
3i a, 20. Frnn/drnvU/(—F2LYka W M, 187 a, 610; 
H G, 125 a, 350 ; Parks Emily C, 135 a, 550 ; Parks 



<fe Jones, , 400; Makepeace J B, 1 lot, 40 ; Maun Mrs 

Osborne A P, 
Parks 
Ls Jas A, 
1 lot, 20, 115 a,' 050; Parks'Thos C, 390 a, 1,350; Parks 
Tlios W, 97 a, 400 ; Parks I W, 270 a, 1,000, Cedar Falls— 
Pu^'li Alfn.], 135 a, 275; Pugh T F, 444 a, 800 ; Pugh J M, 
25 a, 50 ; Pul'Ii Tlioinas, 120 a, 300. Buffalo Ford— Patter- 
son J A Sr, 130 a, 450; Patterson Nelson, 135 a, 150 ; Phelps 
Wiiliani, 10| a, 50. Franklwville— Foe W E, 32 a, 500; 
Phillips Martha, 1 lot. 200; Richardson W B, 50 a, 425 ; 
Richard.--on Franklin, 94 a, 250; Kichanison John T, 171 a, 
325; Kichard.son Malinda, 60 a, 60. Ramseur — Richardson 
John, 85 a, 200 ; Richaidson Jas, 199 a, 700. Gray's Chapel — 
Kouth EhzabHth, 224 a, 650; Routh A P, 254 a, 650. Lib- 
erty 37///— Right. -el & Pickett, , 2,500; Right^el G W, 

160 a, 900; Rightsel John, 140 a, 300. Kil dee— Rightsel 
John T, 127 a, 750; Rightsell Sam'l, 71| a, 350; Ri^htsell 
John Sr, 342 a, 1,100; Risht^ell William, 1 lot, 400; Stout 
Jas A, 134 a, 350; Stout W C, 3 lots, 700; Stout C N, 266 a, 
850. Frnnkllnville—iiiout K C, 130 a, 450 ; Stout J P, 45 a, 
300; Stout J C, 50 a, 150. Siler City— S\hr Oliver, 33 a, 
300; Slier J T, 105 a, 400; Siler S S (heirs), 134 a, 400. 
Frankhrmlle- SWer Pleasant, 13^ a, 1,125; Siler Mrs J W, 

1 lot, 150. Sinley—Sihr Mrs Lydia, 231 a, 600; Staley J W, 
980 a, 2,610; Stalev Cotton Mills, 1 lot, 5,000; Staley G W, 

2 lots, 525; Staley Mary, 1 lot, 250; Staley Elizabeth, 100 a, 
350; St.alev Joseph, 72 a, 225; Staley (heirs of Hannah), 10 
a, 30; Stalev Geo, 19 a. 75 ; Staley \V G, 140 a, 400. Ram- 
«atr— Smith Mrs CC, 486 a, 1,320; Smith W W, 121 a, 450; 
Smith C P, 127 a, 380; Smith John W, 160 a, 350; Simmons 
Jones, 1 lot, 25. Fork CneA^— Stinson Henry, 1 a, 10. Soap- 
i<i<>7ie Moinit—ScoVen Tavlor, 11| a, 50; Scotten Mrs R J, 
150 a. 400 ; Scott (heirs of H Craven), 44 a, 100. Barnsmr- 
Sn.tt B S. 1 lot, 150; Snyder W A, 1 lot, 100; Steele W H, 
1 lot 400 ; Steele J M, 1 lot. 200 ; Spoon Mary A, 263 a, 600 ; 
Turrer A J, 50 a, 200: Turner J T, 155 a, 425; Turner 
J VV, 3 lots, 125; Trogden S W, 1 lot, 35. Cedar Falls— 
Trogden Tyson, 49 a, 250. Ramseur— Thompson A P, 193 
a, r.oo. Franl-linville-Teague John F, 2 lots, 400, 145a, 675; 
Underwood G C. 160 a, 475; Vestal Manly, 40 a, 100. 
A'„„,.s^,,r— Watkins W H, 142 a, 2,300 ; Watkins W H (agt 
Mig Co), 90 a, 45,000 ; Williams Mrs Julia, 100 a, 250 ; Wil- 
liams Mrs Jane, 158 a, 550; Williams John W, 16 a, 100; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 100 



Williams C C, 1 l«)t, 25. Fork Oe^/fc— Williams F L, 100 a, 
200; Williams E P, 2oa, 75; Williams Jacob, 11(5 a, 400; 
Williams H P, 03. V a, 225. Fouxl'^ J////n- Williams W M, 
449 a, 1,770; Williams Rilev, 145 a, 300; Williams R S, 
150 a, 450. Fork Cm'/.-— Wright Louis, 147 a, 250; Wright 
John, 50 a. 75; Wright J, 77 a, 200; Wright Emsley, 1 
lot, 300; Wrightsmaii David, 153 a, 025; Warren Eli, 4.S a, 
150. Soapstorie Muuni—Warven W A, 200 a, GOO; Ward 
P, 30 a, 200; Wanl J A, 1 lot, 25; Wtiitehei-l M N. 1 lot, 
300; Whitehead J M. 1 lot, 350, 13'i a, 300; Wa.ldell Nel- 
son, 3 a, 50. Frank! i nvil I e—Y oris. Sally Ann, 04 a, 200; 
York John M, 154 a, 500 ; York J T, 15 fa. 500 ; York W T, 
127 a, 450; York Henrs S, 35 a, 175; York S C, 137 a. 500; 
York Jackson, 220 a, 675; Y-^rk W H Sr, 132 a. 50; York 
E W, 134 a, 592; York E L, 92 a, 300; York R W, 107 a, 
500; York L C, S8 a. 275; Y..rk John D, 36 a. 125 : York 
Melinda, 60 a, 150; York John G, 47 a, 200 ; York Nathan, 
511a, 1,150; York Sarah A, 12 a, 75. i^am.sm7---York J B, 
30 a, 100; York D T, 60 a, 200; York Mrs J B. 119 a, 500; 
York J W, 74i a, 150; York Geo C, 47 a, 200; York W H 
Jr, 85 a, 250; York Jas D, 1 lot, 200; York P, 40 a, 100. 



CONCORD TOWNSHIP. No. 6. 

(Postofflces— B0NCH, Farmers, Flora, Hn.i/s Store, .Iacksgn's Creek. 
Salem Church.) 

Florn P —Arnold John, 234 acres, value, $2,450 ; Arnold 
A C, 100 a, 350; Arnold Samuel, 227 a, 850 ; Arnold Martha, 
130 a, 500. Hiirs Store—A'.](\erUm G R. 447 a, 3,750 ; Adder- 
t-.n (fe Nance, 116 a, 1,000 ; Ailred D 1\ 75 a, 350. Mcrhmnc— 
Bingham Wm, 97 a, 325. i-'/ora— Bingham L G 15, 306 a, 
850; Bmgliam J W, 44 a, 150. Mechanic — Bingham J L, 
140a,l,09i. i^a/7*/cr.s— Bingham MC, lOSa.500. Mn-hanlc — 
Bingham W A, 75 a, 400. Jackson's Creek— BtiW K R, 38 a, 
75 ; Brookshirp H L, 80 a, ISO. PMnd>lph. — B^ ckerdi'e Jane, 
150 a, 1,000 ; Barnes Emsley (of C G), 1 A6 a. 1,725. Flora— 
Bischer J F, 475 a, l.OuO; Bischer W W, 100 a, 300. Salem 
Church— 209 a, 1,000; Birkhcad Ivev A, 209 a, 1.000; Birk- 
head W T, 69 a, 1,275; Brown E N, 100 a, 200. Riley's 
Store— Codsi Marv, 85 a, 175; Coda W F, 55 a, 100. Nno 
Hope Acan'cnuj—Cran ford Z A, 125 a, 600; Cranford M W, 
171 a, 525; Cranford S C, 144 a, 800 ; Chnndier C C, 92 a, 
250. i^/om— Camtron J F, 405 a, 975; Carter Amos 25 a, 
100; Cornelison A D, 51 a, 125. Riley's Store-DeWi W J, 



110 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



173 a 300. Trinity— 'DoT^eit H, 72 a, 1,200; Dorpett Ivey, 
M(t ii' r.OO. 7?ow/)a?/- Elliott T B, 103 a, 200. Formers— 
Fuller L K, 2<;3 a", 850; Fuller A J, 330 a, 1,250; Fuller 
H K 'M3 a 950 Rnn(^olph—¥\^\\er J C, 334 a, 2.500. 
yarmer!i—Yy\\\ov T H. 290 a. 2,600; Fuller C M, 223 «, 1.250. 
/^„//^.,_F„iipr I J, 109 a, 160 : Fuller & Welborn, 15 a, 100. 
/>;rwm— Fuller II L, 150 a, 1,400; Gallimore Wyatt, 103 a, 
150; Gallimore Wvatt (agi). 116 a, 175; Gallimore W E, 
135 a, 175; Garner Henry, 20 a, 75; Garner Henry (aot) 116 a, 
350 /////'.s 6Yore— Garner Sabrina. 47 a, 300; (Grib«on W C, 
66 a. 275; Garner P F, 210 a, 2,200; Gray A B. 50 a, 500. 
Scinyre /M— Hill C H, 100 a, 162; Hill M H, v'60 a. 1,060; 
Hill J C, 169 a, 724; Hill & Garner, 307 a, 1,300; Harrison 
J R 119 a, 200 ; Harrison G T, 66 a, 100. Rihy'^ Store— 
225 a, 300 ; Harris R D. 230 a, 670 ; Harris W R, 75 a, 150 ; 
Huiin Fannie, 55 a, ^0; Hughes W R. 75 a, 150. Scievce 
iM— Hoover Alson, 81 a, 200 ; Hoover Mnrv D, l^Sia, 750 ; 
Hover J W, 115 a, 200; Horney J F, 130 a, 400; Hall 
Ezekiel, 84 a, 100; Hallom H L. 100 a, 500. New Hope 
yl mr/fm?/— Ingram W E, 125 a, 350; Ingram W D, 96 a, 
1 ,200 ; iuffriim D H, 10 a, 25. Tdmty— Ingram W W, 55 a, 
217: Ingram T W, 2i8 a, 800; Ingram J T, 48 a, 300; 
Jackson C H, 146 a, 200; Jack-on John, 40 a, 100 ; John- 
son T \V. 216} a, 800. Salem Church — Johnson A H, 115 a, 
325; Johnson J I, 295 a, 1,110; Johnson T C, 102 a, 740; 
Job nson & Son . 1 5 a, 1 ,200. HilVi^ .S-^ore— Kearns S S, 228 a, 
760; K'arns J H, 238 a, 1.600; Ke^rns A H. 208 a, 2 300; 
Kr-nrns I F, 2^0 a, 1,600; Kea-ns C S. 471 a. 4,300; Kearns 
W T, 175 a, 450. Farm cr.s— Kearns B S. 24 a, 50 ; Kearns 
M (\ 38 a, 80; Kearns H L /admr), 208 a, 7"0; Kearns 
Alfred, 27 a, 50; Kearns W E & J O, 248 a. 1,675; Kearns 
W E & J (admrs), 170 a, 800; Kearns S W, 345 a, 1 600; 
Kearns Susan, 28 a, 50. Science Hdl — Kemp J(^hn, 242 a, 
2,'-()0 ; Kearns Ivev, 337 a, 1.575. Formers — Lewis Samuel, 
132 a. 1.300 ; Lowis D B, 154 a. 1,000 ; Lewis W R, 409 a, 
1.200; Lewis I)r C H. 8 a. 300; Loflin S A, 27 a, 50; Lr^flin 
W J, 188 a, 420; Loflin Kindred, 183 a, 250; Loflin J C, 
60 a, 100; Laughlin Robt. 101| a, 200; Laughlin Margaret, 
101 .^ a, 200. Lassiter's il////.s— Lassiter W W, 70 a. 300 ; Las- 
siterW H, 116 a, 400. T^orwms— Lass'ter Aaron, 240 a. 1,400; 
Laokev Milton, 83 a, 300; Lanier B F, 3U a, 53; Lanier 
Allen, 52 a. 80. Post Oak— Lowe Daniel, 13'5 a, 900; Low- 
derm ilk Alfred, 93 a, 900. i^;orr7— Lambeth Sam, 64 a, 100; 
Lambeth Morgan, 20 a, 1,750; Morgan J W, 600 a, 1,100; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. m 



Morgan Martha, 103 a, 200; Morgan N F, 50 a, 150; McDowell 
Levi, 25 a, 50 ; McDowell Jeremiah, 2«s5 a, OnO ; Mt.orc \V J, 
85 a, 2r)0. Farmers — Macon Gideon, 200 a, 2,000 ; Morris J li 
145 a, 600; Moms J C, 134 a, 400; Miller J G, 14 a, 135; 
Miller Eliza, 55 a. 218; Monroe M L J, 85 a, 400. Lamtn-'a 
i)////.s— Murdock Wm, 150 a, 200; McMasters D G, 140 a. 400. 
Bill's Store — Nance Allen, 168 a, 875;' Nance John, 85 a, 
220; Nance E B, 46 a, 100; Nance H C, 126 a, 400; Nance 
Martha, 112 a, 200 ; Nance Ivey C, i^ a, 50; Nance, Nance & 
Nance, 4 a, 50; Nance H H, 88 a," 275. Fanners— ^ewhy 
N W, 15 a, 350; Pierce T G, 55 a, 55; Pierce B M, 180 a, 
840 ; Pierce I I, 356 a, 1,050 ; Pierce Marv, 75 a, 200 ; Pierce 
J T, 80 a, 150; Prevo W A Sr, 112 a, 450; Parrish H C, 
239 a, 850; Ridge Penn, 137 a. 300; Hidge B B, 214 a, 1.250. 
Flora— Ridge N C, 40 a, 150; Ridge A W, 101 a, 325; Ridge 
R M, 65 a, 400; Ridge A A, 170 a, 650; Ridge Willis, 92 a, 
450; Ridge Noah, 130 a, 500; Ridge T H, 218 a, 370 ; Ragan 
J C, 55 a, 250; Ragm J R, 54 a, 175; Ragan Mar} E, 221 a, 
1.900; Rush A J, 94 a, 740; Ru.'^h D K, 40 a, 75; Rush 
Sarah, 80 a, 1.000; Reeves J C, 130 a, 325; Robins Dorca-s, 
30 a, 300: Rush T B, 212 a, 400; Kice Thomas, 200 a, 200; 
Snider H K. 144 a, 300; Snider R W, 120 a, 400; Snider 
J A, 213 a, 540. HiU's 6'iore— Snider M F, 150 a, 150 ; Sni- 
der Solomon, 93 a, 300; Snider H N, 120 a, 325. Dissitcrs 
Mills— Steed B W, 190 a, 1 ,600 ; Steed E A, 138 a, 800 ; SUed 
R F, 180 a, 500; Steed B K, 280 a, 650; Steed E B, 205 a, 
400. Farmers— Skeen E M, 230 a, 1,600 ; Skeen M M, 455 a, 
1,500; Skeen N R, 133 a, 150; Saunders Chesley, 18 a, 40. 
Riley's Store— Stone W V, 60 a, 120; Stone E F, 90 a, 500; 
Surratt B A, 218 a. 300; Sexton Jas, 137 a, 280; Sliuinl.ur- 
ger P L, 96 a, 1,200; Sheets Branson, 37 a, 125; Tysinger 
H S, 23 a, 2t ; Tysinger Margaret, 1 a, 50. i^/ora— Thomp- 
son John, 257 a, 1,000; Thompson Sallie W, 1«9 a, 900; 
Thompson K R, 120 a, 275; Thompson Resetta, 73 a, 600. 
Jackson's Creek — Tucker Jonathan, 125 a, 275; Tucker (lil- 
bert, 96 a, 175; Trogden Levi. 61 a, 75; Varner S L, 75 a, 
150. Farmers — Vuncanon B F, 10 a, 130; Vnncanon LA, 
10 a, 130; Vuncanon GT, 128 a, 360; Wood Hill. 90 a. 325. 
Salem Church— Wood Sarah, 166 a, 500; Wood Wm, PtO a, 
400; Ward D, 20 a, 25; Yates P R. 46 a, 125; Yaies N A, 
84 a, 135; Yates A C, 180 a. 175; Yates W B, loO a, 250; 
Yates Mary, 20 a, 15. Farmers— Yaies N L. 50 a, 125. 
Eihy's /S'<o-/r'— Yarbrough W B, 97 a, 150. 

Riley's 6Vo7-6'— Harrison George H, 25 acres, value S25. 
Farmers — Vuncanon B F, 30 a, 200. 



112 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



FRANKLINVILLE TOWNSHIP. No. 7. 

fPostofflces-CEDAK Falls, Central Falls, Fkanklinville, Millboro, 
Worth viLLE.) 

Millhnro P 0— AUred Jolm R, 100 acres, value, $500; 
Allre.l Peter, 15 a, 300 ; Allred ( : M, 13 a, 25. Central Falls— 
Ailre.1 W A. (50 a, 120; Allred J M, 125 a, 200; Allred J F, 
75 a, 200; Allred H B, 225 a, 450; Allred W D, 29 a, 100; 
Allred E S, 05 a, 150; Allred J C, 53 a, 300; Allred W E, 
81 a, 235. Franklinville—AWved I W, 313 a, 1,925; Allred 
M E, 10 a, 70; Allred Henry A, 14 a, 25; Allred Wm Y, 
28 a, 05 ; Allred Finitv, 125 a, 450 ; Allred Hogan, 40 a, 00 ; 
Allred D H (agt Allred heirs), 90 a, 400: Allen H B (admr 
of Minnie Allen). 210 a, 800. Central i^o //.<;— Allen C W,45 a, 
75 ; Aldridge J P, 18 a, 000 ; Aldridge W G, 11 a, 750 ; A&h- 
worth Julia, 30 a, 75. Millboro— Blunt J M, 1 J a, 25 ; Brown 
James R, 108 a, 285 ; Brown John K, 171 a, 075 ; Brown O P, 
78 a, 150. Frnnkliiiville—Bree(\\ove Simpson, 18 a, 00 ; Breed- 
love Nancy, 47 a, 200 ; Baldwin G W, 150 a, 300. Mdlboro— 
Bristow Samuel, 10 a, 30 ; Bristow S C, 113 a, 500; Burrow 
1) N, 180 a, 820 ; Burrow VV H H, 30 a, 125. Central Falls— 
Bonkermeyer G, 248 a, 810; Bonkermeyer T J, 41h a, 250; 
Bonkermever W H, 80./ a, 180 Cedar Falls — Burke Jennie, 
219 a, 300"; Burke R M", 90 a, 250 ; Bird Hartwell, 150 a, 450. 
Franki invi lie— Buie J A, 1 lot, 300, 15* a, 25; Buie M G, 3 
lo'.s, 7.'.0. 10 a, 25; Buie W S, 1 lot, 200; Black G H, 502 a, 
2,500 ; Bhick J W, 223 a, 1,250 ; Burgess Mary C, 55 a, 220 ; 
liiirgtss A H. 1 lot, 425, 9 a, 25 ; Brown M N, 100 a, 050 ; 
Burrow John H, 1 lot, 150. Cedar Falls — Cox R Nance, 100 a, 
1,100; Coe Arlendo, 2 a, 40; Cox O R, 98 a, 1,150; Cox 
Marv J, 80 a, 500 ; Cedar Falls Mfg Company, 290 a, 45,000. 
Frnnkliiiville— Craven J W, 47 a, 125; Craven J W C, 00 a, 
300; Craven Reuhen. 12 a, 30; Craven E J V, 125 a, 375; 
Craven Monroe, 1 lot, 400, 1 15 a, 300 ; Cross Rachel, 70 a, 100 ; 
(^•oss Mary, 20 a, 125. Central Falls— Cross S V, 04 a, 350; 
Coffin B F, 82 a, 510; Conner John H, 139 a, 500; Conner 
John M, fO a, 150; Conner M C, 33 a, 100; Conner John W, 
2 a. 20 Franklutville—CnrroW Sallie, 13 a, 100; Curtis Sarah, 
87 a, 200; Cwanl .John H, 154 a, 875; Coward W J, 188 a, 
300 ; Curtis W D. 1()0 a, 500. Central Falls— Cox Silas, 190 a, 
500; (^ox H C, 130 h, 500; Conner J W. 130 a, 475; Cox 
Mr- C A , 140 a, 475. Millboro— Coble D 0, 1 19 a. 500. Cedar 
Falls— Chi^ek B H, 120 a, 150. Franklinville—CrAveu J P R, 
75 a, 300; Capps heirs, 22 a, 25; Campbell Jas E, 1 lot, 300. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 113 



Cedar Falls— Ca^]e heirs, 51 a, 400; Cagle Geo C, 210 n,850. 
Central Falls— 'Dif[ee Mrs L J, 110 a, 650; DiHee J I, 84 a, 
300 ; Davis Lashuel, 54 a, 350 ; Davis J M, 2 a. 100. Trin- 
ity— Dnrseti Z B, 10 a, 25; Dorsett J F, 30 a, 50; Dove I), 

1 lot, 350, 10 a, 10. /'^■rt?iX7i./');i//e— Ellison J M, 2 lots, ^iOO ; 
Elli'^on J W, 145 a, 300; Ellison T M. 100 a, 200; Elliscn 
R H, 1 lot, 100. Asheboro—Tox O R, 275 a, 700. Frav/c- 
linville — Fentress Asenath, 127 a, 400; Fentre.'^s F F, 42 a, 75; 
Fentress Mrs J W, 1 lot, 50; Frazier J R, 164 a, 330; Fra- 
ser Henrv W. 1 lot, 500, 142 a, 320; Franklinville Mig Co, 
240 a, 36,000 ; Foust N J, 100 a. 200; Foust L P, 62 a, 150; 
Foust A S, 58 a. 250 ; Foust D H, 21 a, 65. Ashehoro— Free 
J M. 18 a, 60 ; Free Samuel, 60 a. 150 ; Free S E. 09 a, 400 ; 
Free John R. 57 a, 200 ; Free C M, 40 a, 7r,0 ; Free S H, 122 
a, 600. Ceotral Falls— GsiStev D T, 20 a, 200 ; Glasucw W M, 

16 a, 150. Wor(hville—G'\\^s M M, 125 a, 200; Giles J L, 
21 a, 25. Graifs Chapel— Grsiv J A, 131 a, 300 ; Gray J A Jr, 
98 a, 300. Worthville -Gr^\y L S, 5 a, 100; Gray Mrs R E, 
115 a, 125. Central Falls — Graves Aaron, 16 a, 60; Glass J E, 
160 a, 175; Glass Eliza, 1 lot, 50; Gihson Jesse, 1 lot. 100, 
15 a, 400 ; Hinshaw Allen, 76 a, 300; Hinshaw I G, 101 a, 
690; Hinshaw Zeiio, 86 a, 600. Millbom—Um^haw N.-ah, 
84 a, 600; Hinshaw Milton, 200 a, 800; Hinshaw Z M, 183 a, 
575. Fraiikl'mville — Hackney J D, 86 a, 1,250 ; Hackney J A, 
10 a, 65; Hurlev W E, 87 a, 100; Hu.lev C R. 109 a, 250; 
Hurlev J M, 10 a, 150. Central i^a//.s— Hamlin W R, 160 a, 
450; Harden W R, 10 a, 30; Harden Sarah .\i, 9 a, 25; Har- 
den L T, 75 a. 75; Harden Mary, 58 a. 75; Hollady F C, 
306 a, 744. New 6'a/^m— Havs Louis, 218 a, 700 ; H ays G P, 
103 a. 350 : Havs, Coltrane & Co, 442 a. 886. Central Falls— 
Hill EL, 155 a; 525; Hill D W, 9 a, 225 ; Hill Claudia, <;2 a, 
350. Fravklinville—\i2i\\ W E, 1 lot. 200; Hay worth M .\I, 

2 lots, 500, 209 a, 445 ; Hornev Ruth A, 3 lots. 900. W'orth- 
1)77/6— Holder Emmons, 58^ a, 160. Central 7'a//s— Hendricks 
Jacob. 150 a, 450 ; Houghs Anna, 105 a, 200. Cedar Fallx— 
Jones Isham, 8 a, 200; Jones G M. 112 a, 275; Jones C F, 
70 a, 100. Franklinville— Jonei^ Mrs M F, 80 a, 300; Julian 
W R, 72 a, 300; Julian L W, 137 a. 400; Julian T C, 60 a, 
300; Julian G S, 200 a, 390; Julian J G, 70 a, 370. J//7/- 
6oro— Julian D B, 167 a, 400 Central Fills— Johimm Ja.s E, 
48 a, 325; Johnson Isaac E, 76 a, 200; Jordan Jas, 1 lot, 50, 

1 7 a, 20. FrankHnville—JuM Ha t rison, 1 39 a, 1 00. Cent-al 
Falls— Jarrett Cicero, 32 a, 180; Jarrell Absalom, IS a. 50; 
Jarrell Calvin, 176 a, 250. MUWoro— J enmiv^s J D, 1 lot, 



114 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



500; Jemiintrs A G, 31 a, 400; Jennings Causey, 52 a, 200; 
Jt-nninjis J M, 24 a, 75; Jcnninjrs A G & Son, 1 lot. 175; 
Julian J F S, 35(5 a, hOO. Central FallH—Kiveit Mrs A J, 
1 lot, 150 ; Kin^ C C, 50 a, 200 ; Julian P M, 71 a, 800. Mill- 
Wo— Lane Wash, 30 a. 125 ; Lane R G, 25 a, 50 ; Lane R G, 
34 a, 100; Lane Charles I, 35 a, 250; Lane L'^abel, 15 a, 35 ; 
Lfine M.iigaret, 15 a, 30. Central Falls— Luther J L, 72 a, 
500; Luther J A. 104 a, 1,250. Worthville — Leonard Geo L, 
1 lot, 000, 13 a, 25; Leonard O L & J D, 150 a, 400. MHl- 
/>o/-o-Langly John W, 42 a, 100; Lingly J C, 225 a, 500; 
Langly J A, 4H^ a, 100. Franklinville — Lumselen Maggie, 

1 lot/30; Lindsay J D, 9f a, 75; Laughlin S T, 1 a, 50; 
Laughlin A G, : a, 75; Laughlin Priscilla Ann, 75 a, 300; 
Laughlin L C, 25 a, 75; Laughlin D J, 148 a, 250. Central 
/>///.%•— Morris C S, 18 a, 70; McAlister & Co, 2| a, 75; 
McDaniel Julia A, 50 a, 75 ; McDaniel Cornelia J, 54 a, 150. 

Franklinville— Uauer W D, , 250. Central Falls— MniwT 

J C, I lot, 125. Franklinville— Momtt E K, 2 lots, 150; Mof- 
fitt Harriet, 32 a, 75; Makepeace G H, 156 a, 2,100; Moon 
H H, 145 a, 500; Moon C F, 1 lot. 180; Mullanix Mrs Mary 
A, 2 lots, 310; McGee Richard, 12 a, 50, 1 lot, 75. Gmy's 
Chapel— Jiixon J C, 118 a, 125; Nixon Mary, 80 a, 125; Nel- 
son J M, 1 lot, 40, 30 a, 100; Nelson E P, 40 a, 200; Nelson 
A D, 70 a, 385. Central Falls— OshoYue B F & E, 41 a, 850. 
M Hlhoro— Tsitterson J M, 84 a, 150 ; Patterson Wm H, 13 a, 
100; Presnell Nixon, 195 a, 500. Franklh^ville— Founds J M, 
20 a, 125; Pounds J M. 26 a, 25; Parks Hugh, 2 lots, 1,650, 
170 a, 280; Pwrks Hugh (agt), 65 a, 350; Parks Hugh (agt), 
100 a, 110; Parks W H & Co, 1 lot, 100; Parks W H, 1 lot, 
750; Pugh Joe, 107 a, 300; Pugh Margaret, 100 a, 275. Mill- 
horn— Vu^rh I H, 109 a, 350; Pugh J A, 50 a, 90; Pugh 
Mali.'.sie, 72 a, 125 ; Pugh W A, 108 a, 235. Central Falls - 
I'ugh J.mies's heirs, 100 a, 500; Pugh Felix. 102 a, 150; 
Pugh M W, 119| a, 335; Pugh M F, 100 a, 350; Pugh Lovey 
A. 16 a, 20,1 lot, 250; Pugh IJ, 1 32 a, 295. Cedar Falls— Fu^h 
R W, 1 lot, 275. Millboro—Pu^h J W & Son, 1 lot, 400 ; Pugh 
J M. 240 a, 350 ; Pickett Laura A, 22 a, 100. Central Falls— 
Prichard W A. 97 a, 200; Prichard Thos, 60 a, 60. Frank- 
/;„v;,7/,-— Russell William C, 1 lot, 600, 80 a, 150. Millhoro— 
Re.iding John, 77 a, 350; Redding A H, 1 lot, 800. Cedar 
/■'//■s-R'ddiug S T, 245 a, 650. M//6oro— Redding J A, 
l:;5 a, 625. Central Fa//,s— Randolph Mfg Co, 50 a, 20,000, 

2 lots, 300; Robbins J R, 2^ a, 15 Grab's Chapel— RouWi 
Alfred, 124 a, 400 ; Routh J F, 9 a, 150 ; Routh Isaac, 125 a, 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 115 



1,250; Roiith A N, 110 a, 400; Ryder L F, 100 n, 125, 1 l,,t, 
150. Central Falls — Richardson James, 1 Idi, 125; Rteves 
John W, 1 lot, 150. /Va///7///v///c— Sumner J M, 20 a, 275; 
Sumner Daniel S, 100 a, 1.200; Sergant Mrs M E, 1 lot, 1,000. 
Axheboro—Speagle A F, 52i a, 250. Central i'aZ/.s— Siout C C, 
1 lot, 300; Stout Hiinnah,"lOO a, 250; Smith Nancy P. 28 a, 
75. Franklinville—^xmih. W A, 1 lot, 75, If a, 10; Smith 
Henry, 18 a, 50 ; Simmons Lydia, 15 a, 70 ; Slack T A, 22 a, 
22, 4 lots, 540; Trogdon Lucinda, 70 a, 80; Trogdon Geo U, 
1 lot, aOO. Central Falls-Tvog(\or\ Joel F, 162 a, 740; Trog- 
don Tvson (guardian), 555 a, 1,500, 1 lot, 750; Trogdon 
Liila A, 50 a, 50, 1 lot, 500; Trogdon D F, land, 350; Tn g- 
don F M, 10 a, 150 ; Trogdon C L, 193 a, 1,200. Frauklia- 
w7/e— Tippett W H, 1 lot, 150; Tipp«^tt Mollie, 132 a, 250; 
Tyson Jordan, 1 lot, 250. il//7//)oro— Underwood Martha, 
rif a, 50 ; Underwood Henry, 100 a, 200 ; Underwood John, 
104 a, 375; Underwood J A, 114 a, 275; Upton E C, 1(58 a, 
600. Central Falls— WiWmms W A, 130 a, 400. Fravklin- 
ville — Webster Jas A, 178 a, 300. Anheboro — Winningham 
M L, 160 a, 800. Ceniral Fa//s— Walker Lucetta, 157 a, 250 ; 
Walker A B, 92 a, 265; Wood J C, 24 a, 100; Wr ght C S, 
57 a, 130; Wright C S, 50 a, 50; Wright Jeremiah, 150 a, 
125. Fran klinville— West D H, 1 lot, 600 ; West Mary, 97 a, 
ir^O. Randlem an— Ward A, 94 a, 425; Ward W T, 137 a, 
500. Central Falls— Womh\e N Y, 50 a. 75. Ntw Snlem— 
Woollen J E, 3 a, 40. Jl//7/6oro— York E L, 79 a, 600, 1 lot, 
150 ; York Rosa, 5 a, 50 ; York Mary, 17 a, 17 ; York Geo W, 
30 a, 30; York A J, 146 a, 375. Central Fa//s— York S J, 
1 lot, 250 ; York Catherine, 102 a, 100 ; York W C,54 a, 320 ; 
York J C, 137 a, 650; York Bethany, 1 lot, 350, 8 a, 40; 
Yeargan Uretha, 75 a, 75. 

Central Falls— Worth Mfg Co (Mill No 2), 245 acres, value 
$56,675. Franklinville—Fimst Irena, 20 a, 30. Gmi/s 
Chnpel-Rouih J M Sr, 147 a, 300. Frank-nnvi/le—Foust 
W A, 20 a, 75. Central Falls— 100 a, 200; Allred Clement, 
56 a, 125 ; Trogdon E R, 36 a, 175. 



GRANT TOWNSHIR No. 8. 

(Postofflces-BROWN's Store, Ralph, Woodford, Kemp's Mills, Flower Hill) 

Bnlph P 0— Alford James, 62 acres, value. S^^S ; Alh-n 
M T, 7H a, 320 ; Allen J A, 125 a, 200 ; Allen S N, 65 a. 65; 
Allen J M, 250 a, 600; Allen J J, 4| a, 5.50; Allen Joh, 3| 
a, 5; Allen S E, 77 a, 150; Allen W E. 3 a, 10; Allen II M, 



IIG RANDOLPH COUNTY 



5() H. 150; Allen H B, 213 a, 300. Ashehoro—AWred J P, 9 
», 200, A 11 red VV E, 62 a, B5 ; Brown Ira O, 67 a, 150; 
Brown E \V, 38 a, 75; Brown J < ', 150 a, 500; Brown R F, 
75 a, 15«); Brown E L, 100 a, 200; Brown E C, 225 a, 450; 
Brown O P, 78 a, 150 ; Brown A D, 92 a, 200 ; Brown Enoch, 
100 a. 100 ; Brown D C, 228 a, 667 ; Barns & Crocker, 200 a, 
200; Bean Levi, 90 a, 125; Baldwin J M,41 a, HO; Baldwin 
J C, 41 a, ;0; Baldwin Matilda A, 82 a, 150. Erect— Bird 
E C, 45 a, 125; Bird E H, 45 a, 65; Bird H, 80 a, 250; 
Blair C W & J T, 101 a, 100; Blair Arris, lOO a, 200; Bar- 
ker E T (8 Humble, agt), 62 a, 85. Ralph— BrirkiiT Piiebe, 
125 a, 600; Barker Nathan, 448 a, 1,250; Brookshire Enoch, 
389 a, 1,300 ; Borough Wilev, 6 a, 12. Asheboro—Cox Enoch, 
164 a, 450; Cox Wm. 150 a, 850 ; Cox M P, 100 a. 350 ; Cox 
Ahirv H, 170 a, 500; Cox Y H, 257 a, 320; Cox Mary A, 100 
a. 1-.5; Cox Alfred, 50 a, 75; Cox D A, 126 a, 275; Cox 
S W, 164 a, 450; Cox J J, 190 a, 260 ; Cox M E. 100 a, 300 ; 
Cox Dr B F (0 C Cox, agt), 300 a, 800; Cox J L, 1,100 a, 
1.350; Cox Eunice (Y H Cox, agt), 76 a, 400; Cox Y H & 
Co, 50 a, 50; Cox B F, 680 a, 1,700; Cox \V M, 400 a, 600 
Cox Lt'vi, 100 a, 125; Cox Ezra, 72 a, 75 ; Cox Zeno, 50 a 
75; Cox Milton, 33 a, 250; Cox David, 117 a, 150; Cox Sira 
eon, 65 a, 1 10 ; Cox Mary, 206 a, 650 ; Cox A C, 250 a, 1 ,000 
Cox Benj G, 110 a, 150; Cagle J C, 175 a, 700; Coffin B F 
100 a, 1,000; Coffin Geo, 73 a, 110; Caveness Alfred, 40 a 
100; Caviiiess Geo, 25 a, 25; Caddell S W, 320 a, 320; Cra 
ven J II. 184 a, 350 ; Craven A J, 314 a, 530; Craven J C 

64 a, 150; Cox M A, 110 a, 175; Cox W M Sr, 40 a, 110 
Cox Niithan T, 120 a, 400; Cox Asenith, 317 a, 550; Cox 
Hannah. 317 a, 550; Cox Dennis. 87* a, IjO; Cox S S, 185 
a, 500; Cox R .J, 96 a, 375; Cox Marfha A, 110 a, 175; Cox 
Will W, 19 a, 75. Erect— Cox B F. Ill a, 225; Cox N C, 
100 a. 206; Cox Seth, 58 a, 50; Dupree J H, 232 a. 300. 
Knn},'s Mtlls-Diiy\s J M, 90 a, 100 ; Glasgow Thos, 317 a, 
325; Glasgow P C, 315 a, 4-15; Glasgow B F, 75 a, 100; 
Green Barnuni, 101 a, 125 Green B & G N, 103 a, 300; 
Green J L, 50 a, 50 ; Garner Peter, 100 a, 110 ; Garner H M, 

65 a, 100; Grav.s M E, 230 a. 1,100; Holmes Haywood, 68 
a, 250; Hinson J M, 144 a. 550 ; H.arus Frank, 17 a, 25; 
Harliii Ascnith, 32 a, 50; Harlin Sarah, 32 a, 50 ; Holland 
Jeremiah. 117 a, 25. Ashehoro— Henry Martha A, 75 a, 125; 
Humble David. 386 a. 500; Humble Matilda, 126 a, 300; 
Humble H M, 185 a, 500; Hob-on W J, 136 a, 200 : Hohson 
JT, 3Ja, 25; Humble W A, 31i a, 300 ; Humble J B, IJ a, 
200 ; Humble H M, 202^ a, 656 ; Humble Sarah, 169 a, 297 ; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 117 

Ingold J C, 120 a, 150 ; Ingold A M, 217 a, 225 ; Ivins Linsey, 
5-| 11,75 ; Jennings W li. 52 a, 175 ; Kenney Ci II, 114a, 'i:>{) ; 
Kenney VV H, 04 a, 200 ; Kemp Susiuinah, 180 a, 7U0 ; Leon- 
ard Milton 12oh a, 875 ; Lowdermiik Emsley, 50 a, 75 ; Luck 
W F, 223 a, 5o"o. nalph—UUler John, 110 a, 550; LittU-r 
Jeremiah, 95 a, 525 ; Littler Mary, 73 a, 150 ; Leaeh Henry, 
50 a, 100 ; Ledwell J M, 33(5 a, 400 ; Letlow Smart, 75 a, 75 ; 
McPherson G I, 64 a, 125 ; McPher^on H II, 100 a, 325; 
McNair Simon, 16 a, 20; McDaniel J W, 11 a, 25 ; Mcttitt 




100 ; Phillips E C, 427 a. 650 ; Pugh A S, 332 a, 600 ; Porter 
J C & Co, 157 a, 1,600; Rush D E, 22 a, 50; Rid^e J W, 
196 a, 300 ; Richardson W D, 200 a, 300 ; Richardson J W, 
500 a, 1,400; Rich J N, 60 a, 100; Rich H C, 71 a, 175; 
Rich A T, 551 a, 800; Styers H B, 67 a, 150; Shaw Lucy, 
46 a, 50; Scolt J M, 125 a, 150; Scott Allen, 230 a, 280; 
Scott B S, 121 a, 300; ShafJner Jerrv, 100 a, 125; Staler Al- 
fred, 125 a, 400; Slout J C, 50 a, 100; Stout C J, ls8 a, 400; 
Stout S C, 54 a, 150; Stout Adomjah, 22 a, 50; Stout Zimri, 
171 a, 250; Stout Jos, 70 a, 200; Strickland J W, 96 a, 150; 
Spoon S G, 100 a, 200; Spoon W D, 70 a, 450 ; Spoon W, 149 a, 
800 ; Spoon Sam, 378 a, 634 ; Spoon Sarah, 60 a, 2u0; Spoon 
M E, 67 a, 100 ; Spoon W E. 77 a, 300; Smi:h T S, 150 a, 200; 
Smith W R, 91 a, 125 ; Smith Elizabeth (W R, agt), 50 a. 50; 
Smith A C, 80 a, 200; Smith Willit^ M, 74 a, 210; Smith 
J H, 32 a, 50; Trogden S W, 120 a. 200; Trouden Peter, 30 
a, 30 ; Trogden Penelope, 6 a, 50. Ralpli—Yestal J M, 3 a, 




250; Wright W P, 164 a, 400; Wright M A, 62 a, 115; 
Wright Joseph, 105 a, 200 ; Wright J C, 150 a, 200 ; Wright 
Wm, 24 a, 60; Wright J P, 24 a, 60; Wright H D, 192 a, 
325; Wright Alston, 130 a, 225; Wright J A, 30 a, 30. 

Kemp's Mills— Kemp John, 40 a, 40; Kennedy A, 30 a, 
30; Bulla T A, 174 a, 800; Cox J S, 120 a, 120; Cox M II, 
178 a, 500; Cox Cornelia, 100 a, 100; Johnson D M. 75 a, 
75; Johnson H M, 326 a, 326. Ralph— Johnson D M & Co, 
30 a, 100. ^s/ie6oro— McDowell Jesse, 96 a, 100. llnlph— 
Rush W A, 23 a, 50. ^.s/ie/>oro— Richard.son Pet, 52 a, 75. 
Erect— ^poon E P, 200 a, 200; Trogdon Tyson. 35 a, 35; 
Vestal W, 137 a, 160 ; Henley John B, 7^ a, 200 ; Harman 
& Henley (executors Spoon heirs), 336 a, 935. 



118 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



LIBERTY TOWNSHIP. No. 9. 

(Postofflces— Liberty, Staley.) 

Liberty P 0— AUred Maloy, 30 acres, value $170 ; Albright 
D II, 3 lots, 450; AUred Elni^ley, 63 a, 200; AUred Isaac, 1 
lot, 200; AUridge H C, 103 a, 400; Amich Fredric, 38 a, 175; 
Amich W C, 50 a, 100; Brower A P, 155 a, 1,200; Brower 
A C, 137 a, 840, 1 lot, 30; Brower Adam, 192 a, 900; Brower 
W P. ItiOa, 400; Bowman W F, 2 lots, 600; Brown J A, 
50 a, 225; Brown Peter, 203 a, 1,200; Black Thomas, 404 a, 
2,000. Ja/ian— Black J C, 1 lot, 250 ; Black D T, 1 lot, 275; 
Black Eli, 2 a, 75; Black Eli (agt), i a, 50. Liberty— Bum- 
pass Samuel, 36 a, 290, 1 lot, 100 ; Burgess W D, 1 lot, 700 ; 
Burgess Bro, 1 lot, 150; Burgess M F, 1 lot, 300: Burgess 
W M, 1 lot, 250 ; Burgess I W, 1 lot, 275. aS'^a^— Breed love 
Catherine, 238 a, 875; Breedlove Josef >h, 38 a, 100; Breed- 
love J L, 42 a, 125 ; Brooks Martha A, 4 a, 50, 1 lot, 550. 
Liberty — Brothers Alfred, la, 25; Beard Julia, 1 lot, 450; 
Burrass Murphy, 105 a, 1,100; Bosley Henry, 1 lot, 10; 
Brickhouse Solomon, 1 lot, 75; Coble A T, 86 a, 125; Coble 
Eli C, 2 a, 60 ; Coble J F Sr, 1 lot, 40 ; Coble Emsley C, 71 a, 
350 ; Coble John F, 75 a, 450 ; Coble E G, 140 a, 600 ; Coble 
Alexan.ler, 1 19 a, 500 ; Coble Thos G, 1 lot, 10 ; Coble W C, 
7() a, 300; Coble J H, 1 lot, 400; Coble Susan E, 83 a, 375; 
Curtis A R, 161 a, 600 ; Curtis J H, 214 a, 1,400 ; Curtis M E, 
25 a, 75; Crutchfieid E J, 202 a, 675, 1 lot, 250; Cox Isham, 
14 a, 350; Cox J S, 1 lot, 200. ^^a/ev-Coltrane Flora E, 
190 a, 1,200, 2 lots, 750; Coltrane W W, 218 a, 1,500, 2 lots, 
175; Causey A C, ll3 a, 350; Causey H C, 2 lots, 1,050; 
Cameron D H, 416 a, 2,700; Cameron Sallie (guardian), 1 
lot, 350. Liberty— Qvonse A B, 126 a, 650; Campbell B G, 
274 a, 750; Cooper Williamson, 114 a, 400, 1 lot, 500; Cook 
Jacob C, 17^ a, 110; Chavvus Joseph, I a, 25. Staley— 
Dixon T C, 177 a, 1,100; Dixon & Staley, 7 a, 2,000; Devi- 
ney Samuel, 200 a, 500; Deviney Thomas, 80 a, 390; Devi- 
ney Nancy, 17 a, 65; Ellis J W, 51 a, 150; Euliss A M, 1 
lot, 300; Edwards M L, 192 a, 375; Fox S S, 130 a, 600; 
Fox C M (fe S A, 91 a, 360; Fox T I, 92 a, 400; Fox D L, 
154 a. 325; Fox W P, 72 a, 450; Fox Geo W, 114 a, 700; 




4..0; Fruit \V P, 133 a, 850; Fruit J T, 2 lots, 400; Free- 
man P P, 159 a, 2,500 ; Freeman W C, 100 a, 200 ; Griffin 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 119 



& Trogdon, 10 a, 50, G lots, 2,000; Garrett Eli, 69 a, 300; 
Goley Oscar, 98 a, SoO ; Gree^g G W, 55 a. 500; (imsoii 
J R, 105 a, 370; Holder Isabel, B7 a, 200; Holder J W Sr, 
100 a, 320 ; Hinshaw Clark, 200 a, 800 ; Hinsluiw Isaac, 24 a, 
125; Humble F C, 77 a, 300; Humble Rebecca, 2()S a, HOO; 
Hobson J A, 90 a, 350 ; Henderson E H, 175 a. 950 ; Hfirdeii 
C H, 210 a, 2.000. ^7a%— Highfell \) A. 100 a, 800; HmIcIi 
O T, 1 lot, 275; Hadley J A, 175 a, 1,100, 2 l..ts, 500; Ilor- 
nady S M, 27 a, 700, 3 lots. 1,100; Holladv D M, 13 a, 150 
J lot, 300; Hodgiu S F, 90 a, 250; Holt/jobn. 42 a, 300 
Harmon T F, 33 a, 125; Haithcox Thos, 90 a, 300; Heaven 
Jackson, 1 lot, 75; Headen Jose[)h, 23 a, 100; Jordan J M 
244 a, 1,600; Jones Alfred, 198 a, 1,100. Liherti/— Jones 
A F, 120 a, 600; Jones P P, 160 a, 800; Jones J F, 120 a 
600; Jones R W, 300 a, 1,000; Jones Delilab, 100 a, 300 
Ju/ia?i— Julian F P, 760 a, 4,100 ; Julian Lindsey, 76 a, 300 
Johnson L D, 2 lots, 300 ; Jarrell A L, 52 a, 350. Liberty— 
Jennings A G, 1 lot, 10; Kivett W L, 20 a, 150, 2 lots. 625 
Farmers' Alliance Exchange, lot, 1,000; Kivett J M, 120 a 
600; KivetD Trov, 133 a, 600; Kivett C L, 49 a, 175; Kivett 
W B, 2 lots, 275'; Kivett P C, 34 a, 100; Kivett Alfred W 
47 a, 150; Kivett J F, 100 a, 750; Kivett H J, 10 a, 35 
Kirkmau J M Sr. 170 a, 650; Kirkman J M Jr, 167 a, 800 
Kirkman J M, 132 a, 500; Kirkman W A, 96 a, 400; Kiniry 
A B, 81 a, 250; Kimrv J J, 109 a, 800; Kine Marv, 200 a 
1,500; Kine G B, 314 a, 1,050, 1 lot, 10; Kennett W C, 2 
lots, 575; Lane J D, 172 a, 500; Lane Isaac B, 113 a, 210 
Lane \V C, 39 a, 195. 6Yrj/cv— Ledbetter William. lU a, 750 
Ledbetter Wesley, 50 a, 275; Lowe Mrs Hart. 200 a, 1,000 
Lowe Jas, 111 a," 400 ; Lackey Sarah J. 70 a, 250. JAbertij— 
Lutterloh Anthony, If a, 25; Lutterloh J H, 15 a, 50 
McMasters J F, 97 a, 300; McMisters Mariah, 89 a, 550 
McMasters J D, 101 a, 450; M(?Masfers Anderson, 370 a 
1,000 ; Moser A A, 71 a, 350 ; Moser Wm M, 97 a, 400 ; Moser 
D W, 156 a, 525, 1 lot, 500 ; Moser Matilda, 195 a, 475 ; Mar 
ley John W, 225 a, 1,000. Julian— Moove & Jon^s, lt;5 a 
300, 1 lot, 400; Nixon Thomas, 90 a, 400 ; Newbprry Wm 
15 a, 150 ; Owen W B, 18 a, 200, 1 lot, 500 ; Owen W B (agt) 
80 a, 100 ; Overman M F, 1 lot, 365. Lvfterf?/— Overman J O 
3* a, 175 ; Pickett J P M, 2 lots, 550 ; Pickett J F, 1 lot. 350 
Pickett J A, 1 lot, 200, 10 a, 300 ; Pickett Alfred S, 1 lot, 225 
Pickett & Pickett, 5 a, 1.000; Pickett A M, 20 a, 50; Patter- 
son A J, 349 a, 2,600; Patterson R E, 1 lot, 700; Patterson 
S L, 2 lots, 100 ; Patterson Geo, 89 a, 350 ; Patterson R L, 



120 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



2 lots, 100; Patton J W, 1 lot, 300. 6Ya/ej/— Phi Hippie Mar- 
titia, 52 a, 300; Payue G P, 101 a, 550; Perry Ireue, 1 iot, 
200; Pliillips P A, 200 a, 800 ; Palmer R C, 430 a, 2,500; 
Reitzel ct Led better, 1| lots, 24. Liberty— Rehzal John W, 
HI a, TOO; Reitzel M J, 10^ a, 600; Reilzel P D, 1 lot, 250; 
Reese J M, 58 a, 300; Reese Moria, 150 a, 575; Routh Solo- 
mon, 31 a, 155. Gray's Chapel — Routh S L, 30 a, 150 ; Rouih 
Isaac, 7 a, COO ; Routh Pollie, 25 a, 15 ; Robertson T M, 96 a, 
480, 1 lot, 550 ; Roberson J P, 25 a, 800 ; Reeves J T, 1 lot, 
450. Lihcrly— Ray J M, 103 a, 530. 2 lots, 1,110; Russell 
Mary J, 1 lot, 50. ISta ley— Stsdej W J, 145 a, 400, 1 lot, 
550; ttuiley R H, 35 a, 250 ; Staley J W, 105 a, 250; Staley 
D J, 7 a, 100, 1 lot, 650; Staley (heirs of Wm), 200 a, 1,500; 
Staley Pollie, 110 a, 500; Staley J Wes, 263 a, 850; Staley 
J R, 308 a, 1,250; Staley L W, 185 a, 900; Staley Marliu L, 
92 a, 300; Staley M B, 110 a, 400 ; Staley T W & C H, 2 lots, 
370; Sialey Rose Ann, 85 a, 500; Stalev Caroline, 128 a, 
400; S out Z R, 1 lot, 150; Stout. Jacob W', 147 a, 900; Stout 
John W, 77 a, 225. Liberty— Smuh C P. 117 a, 400, 1 lot, 
1,000; Smith LH, 80 a, 700; Smith W W, 25 a, 100; Smith 
Ida C, 1 lot, 300; Siewart Henry, 173 a, 450; Sellers B A, 
564 a, 3,000. Gray's Chapel— Swaim Roddy, 263 a, 1,000. 
Ju/m/i— Swift Flower, 2l0 a, 700; Swing B" K, 6| a, 120; 
Sheperd J M, hO a, 350 ; Stephenson L C L, 112 a, 300. Sta- 
ley— Svaitou RT, 72 a, 400; Troy A L, 140 a, 450; Tn.y 
A L (agl), 35 a, 150; Trov L J, 100 a, 500, 1 lot, 500; Trog- 
dor) H K, 1 lot, 100 ; Upton H J, 79 a, 250. Liberty— Wi\- 
liams J M, 194 a, 1,850 ; Williams J B, 106 a, 650 ; VVilliams 
A L, 21 a, 150 ; Wren J H, 78 a, 350 ; Wren K B, 78 a, 400 ; 
Wnn R F, 1 lot, 50; Ward Eli, 165 a, 900 ; Ward A F, 132 
a, 600 ; Wright David, 120 a, 550 ; Wright Abraham 101 a, 
200; Wright Leonard, 118 a, 700; Wright J D, 7 a, 100; 
Wright Eiios, 15 a, 150; West J B Sr, 45 a, 175, 1 lot, 500; 
We.st Brothers, 60 a, 350. Staley— Wood S C, 105 a, 500; 
Wood Mrs W C, 1 lot, 500; Wnghtsell John, 300 a, 1,000, 
2h lots, 1.3.-0; Wicker D W, 29 a, 125; Walker Hugh, 159 
a, 500; Wrenn (heirsof J;is), 86a,340. Liberti/— York Aaron, 
128 a, 3,000 ; York A B, 137 a, 500 ; York W F, 114 a, 230. 



BRANSON'S STATE DIRECTORY, $5.00 

DURHAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 2.00 

RALEIGH AND WAKE COUNTY DIRECTORY, . . . 5.00 

RANDOLPH COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY, ... 3.00 

Order of- LEVI BRANSON, Raleigh. N. C. 



BUSINE-S DIRECTORY. 121 



NEW HOPE T0WN8H1P. No. 10. 

(Postoflaces— Bombay, Eleazer, Lassitek'.s Mill.s. Maktha, Pinson, 
KiLEY's Stoke, Ni:w Hope Academy.) 

New Hope Academy P 0— Brewer H, (ib at-res, value, $S0 ; 
Bean Madison, 12 a, 40. Las.siter's ilVi/Zs— Birkln^ad A C 
(adm'r), 290 a. 450; Birkhead J W, 256 a, 1,000; Birkhead 
Israel, 10 a. 30. i:)trieby -Bingham Mary, 207 a, 000; B d- 
ing W H, 157 a, 500. New Hope xlaf^/cj/iy — Brewer B A, 83 
a, 225; Brewer E C, 40 a, 100 ; Brewer C H, GO a, 80. Jiar- 
ney's Milis — Bnrnev E L, 75 a, 0(55; Buriiey E L (agt). 80 a, 
80. Bombay— W W Bisher, 132 a, 320. >l.s//eAoro— Birkliead 
& Bradshaw. 80 a, 40. Neiv Hope Academy — Cagle B F, 120 
a, 225; Cagle B F (agt), 100 a, 1,250; Cagle B F (agt), 40 a, 
250. Lassiter's iUi/Zs— drter S H, 1,130 a, 4,500. Rachel- 
Cooper Mathew, 130 a, 200. Bombay — Cornelison Q M, 112 
a, 300. Strieb y—Croi^a W M, 100 a, 250; Cross C R, 154 a, 
375. New Hope Academy— CrHwiord Wm, 10 a, 30; Craw- 
ford A H, 10 a. 30 ; Crawford E W, 75 a, 150; Crawford J W, 
94 a, 200; Crawtord John P, 18 a, 45; Crawford W r, 95 a, 
200 ; Crawford Micajah, 80 a, 100; Crawford L W, 95 a, 250 ; 
Crawford LA,. 80 a, 240; Crawford M B, 328 a, 1,300; Craw- 
ford Calvin, 109 a, 375; Crawtord Nathan \V, 32 a, 1,000; 
Crawford Thos, 140 a, 4(35; Crawford Peter M, 15 a, 40; 
Crawford John M, 23 a, 40; Crawford Eli, 2^ a, 350; Craw- 
ford Marley, 159 a, 465 ; Crawford Q A, 199 a, 475; Crawford 
P, 74 a, 135; Crawford W D, 70 a. 210 ; Crawford J T, 50 
a, 25 ; Crawford Julius A, 21 a, 50 ; Davis M A, 404 a, 800 ; 
Davis Jerry, 12 a, 40 ; Davis John, 1 a, 10 ; Davis W S, 200 
a, 350; Dalligny Chas, 2 a, 25 i^/om- Delk P..llv, 125 a, 
450. Lassiter's ^/i7/s— Elliott L C, 120 a, 350; Elliott E A, 
115 a, 500. New Hope Academy — Eury G W, 25 a, 40; 
Ferree F E, 100 a, 120; Griffin A C, 158 a, 350; Griffin 
Lewis, 295 a, 565. Hi/rs ^'^ore— Garner P F, 257 a, 1,550; 
Garner P F, 143 a, 1,050; Garner Honor, 248 a, 1,400; Gar- 
ner Garri.son, 5 a, 50. Lasi^itcr'H Milh — Graves Richard, 100 
a, 450 ; Hardister Julius A, 176 a, 350 ; Hardister D L, 6 a, 
30; Hardister Jonathan, 25 a, 100. New Hope Academy — 
Hardister Ezekiel, 100 a, 200; Harrison Julius, 212 a, 575; 
Hamilton Fannv, 140 a, 225 ; Hannah J C, 175 a, 355; Han- 
nah L C, 60 a, 90 ; Hannah J S, 55 a, 75. Lassifei-'s Milh— 
Hill Chas. 174 a, 150; Hill J M, 315 a, 915. Hiirx Store^ 
Hill N H, 217 a, 10,600; Hill Margaret, 83 a, 100. New 
-ffope^ca^^m?/— Hill WH,118a,100; Hill W A, 112 a, 225; 

7 



122 KANDOLPH COUNTY 



Hill John L, 120 a, 150; Hill Micajah, 140 a, 175; Hill T L, 
100 a, 125; Hill I -W, 145 a, 375; Hix W F, 144 a, 485; 
Hix L L, 50 a, 225. Lnssiler's iWls—Rix J A, 230 a, 700; 
New Hope Academy— Hopkins J P, 103 a, 200; Hopkins 
B H, 192 a, 640; Hopkins N F, 106 a, 375; Hopkins M M, 
250 a, 750; H(.pkins S A, 241 a, 750; Hurley C S, 200 a, 500; 
Henderson J M, 117 a, 460. Bombay— Ingram T W, 100 a, 
325; Ingram Randal 8r, 15 a, 60 ; Johnson J W, 123 a, 625. 
Lasaitcr's Milh — Johnson J R, 100 a, 200. ^/ora— Johnson 
ct Son, 6 a, 700 ; Johnson A B L, 65 a, 1^5. Bombay — 
Kearns R A, 425 a, 900; Kearns J W. 263 a, 600; Kearns 
N F, 1 07 a, 325; Kearns Solomon, 10 a, 30. Lassiter's 
M//s— Lassiter H G, 300 a, 1.000 ; Lassiter Martha. 150 
a, 600; Las^iier Katie, 363 a, 700; Lassiier John, 167 a, 
2,000; Lnssiter J \V, 100 a, 450; L.ssiter E V, 142 a, 750. 
Bombay — Linear Samuel, 240 a, 550. Lassiter's Mills — Lax 
Davis, 30 a, 60; Latham L D, 60 a, 180. i?ar//,f/~ Lam- 
beth Thomas, 173 a, 500; Led well Thomas Sr, 300 a. 300. 
Las.nter's Mills — Lewis S A, 18 a, 50; Leach M J, 800 a, 
800 ; Loflin Tlios, 10 a, 60 ; Loflin S T, 186 a, 650. Bombay— 
L Hin \V D. 60 a, 180; Loflin J W, 115 a, 340 ; Loflin T G, 
90 a, 175; Loflin J C, 166 a, 350; Loflin M- C, 83 a, 125; 
Lnflm W M, 7 a, 45 ; Lofl n E C, 280 a, 1,460; Loflin A A, 
100 a, 250. New Hope Academ,y—hyYn\Qn J F, 135 a, 300. 
Lassiter' s Mills —IjMihiiV Josiali, 300 a, 1,600; Luther Silas, 
53 a, 210 ; Luther W H, 315 a, 650 ; Luther G H, 420 a, 745 ; 
Luther J W, 425 a, 1,250; Luther Jacob (deceased), 315 a, 
475 ; Luther E L, 40 a, 125 ; Mason J W, 272 a, 950 ; Mason 
M J, 70 a, 70; Morris W N, 100 a, 300; Morris W N (agt), 
60 a, 150 ; Morris J M, 85 a, 235 ; Morris Je.-^se, 90 a, 90 ; 
Miller D H, 254 a, 690; Miiler T L, 120 a, 500 ; Miller Cic- 
ero, 5 a, 20 ; Miller Jesse, 150 a, 900 ; Murdock D P (execu- 
tor of J Lassiter, deceased), 450 a, 4,540 ; Murdock A G (agt), 
110 a, 200; Nance C H, 100 a, 300 ; Nance J I, 77 a, 160; 
Nance Sarah, 106 a, 300 ; Parks J G, 50 a, 150; Parks C L, 
82 a, 100 ; Riley H C, 135 a, 625. Bombay— RWey Rhodias, 
82 a, 246. New Hope Academy— Rachel E G, 112 a, 200; 
Rachel J C, 1 a, 10. Lassiter's J/i//s— Rothcock H T, 190 a, 
600. New Hope ^mdcmj/— Russell Alex, 190 a, 300 ; Russell 
J H, 100 a, 1 15 ; Russell Elizabeth, 25 a, 100 ; Russell Jas P, 
118 a, 275; Ru.ssell Thos L, 178 a, 458; Russell Thomas L 
(guardian), 134 a, 275 : Russell E A, 39 a, 100 ; Russell L M, 
100 a, 300; Russell L W, 77 a, 200; Ru.ssell Gabriel, 125 a, 
220; Ru.ssell Julius, 200 a, 434 ; Russell Ezekiel, 94 a, 125; 
Russell E C, 130 a, 200; Russell W A, 80 a, 300; Russell 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 123 

Leach, 44 a, 100 ; Saunders Margaret, 191 a, 275 ; Saunders 
Ira, 153 a, 325; Saunders Harris, 42 a, 400. Bornlmy — Sex- 
ton C C, 100 a, 200; Sexton CE, 96 a, 212 ; Sexton Cornelius, 
60 a, 125 Ntw Hope Academy— Shaw F K, 100 a, 3u0; Sluiw 
W T, 100 a, 125; Shaw W S, 162 a, 535; Shaw J. sse F, 551 
a, 1,500; Shaw W H H, 135 a, 300. ^r>m/>ai/— Slieets Ad- 
line, 110 a, 350; Sheets B I, 165 a, 525; Sheppard John B 
33 a, 85. Lassitcr's Mills— Sikes Nathan Jr, 110 a, 310 
Skeen Martha, 40 a, 80. .S^ne/;?/— Strider E J, 200 a, 500 
Strider B L, 49 a, 62; Stafford J E L, 93 a, 262. New Hope 
Academy— Sia^ord John M, 46 a, 150. Hill's Store — Steed 
B VV, 350 a, 1,000. New Hope Academy — Stokes Mark, 34 a, 
85; Stokes Wra, 16 a, 50 ; Seabolt C J, 62 a, 250 ; Strickland 
H W, 69 a, 150; Surratt Watson, 70 a, 200; Taylor W C, 
246 a, 550; Taylor John C, 10 a, 40; Taylor Wilborn, 18 a, 
54; Thomas F E, 80 a, 80. Salem Church— Thompson J L, 
42 a, 700. Lassiter's M//s— Thornburg J T, 728 a, 2.8(J0. 
New Hope Academy — Talbert C C, 34 a, 85; Talbert R L, 
100 a, 325. Salem Church — Tucker Noah, 77 a, 275; Tucker 
Gilbert, 17 a, 75. Bombay — Varner Laura, 65 a, 195. Las- 
siter's Mills — Vuncannon Alfred, 118 a, 500; Vuncaunon 
J B, 62 a, 150. Strieby — Vuncannon Enoch, 65 a, 100. 
Science Hill — Walker Robert, 10 a, 40. Saivi/ersville — Walker 
J T, 144 a, 325. Science Hill— Walker W M, 178 a, 500. 
New Hope Academy— Wehh W T, 15 a, 150 ; Webb M G. 40 
a, 125. Lasaiter's Mills — Workman C C, 267 a, 1,050; Wood 
P S, 111 a, 325. 

NEW MARKET TOWNSHIP. No. 11. 

(Postoflaces— New Market, Gladesboro, Glenola, Level Cro.ss, Sophia.) 

Eandleraan P — Anthony W 0, 71 acres, value, $200 
Anthony Jonathan, 110 a, 600. Glenola — Aid ridge Samuel 
185 a, 1,200; Adams Wm L, 331 a, 1,150; Adnms Mary J 
145 a, 500, 1 lot, 50 ; Adams Nathaniel T, 68 a, 260. Glades 
boro — Anderson Henry, 110 a, 200 ; Allen James A, 18 a, 70 
Allen James Calvin, 25 a, 160; AuLston Rose, 54 a, 200 
Ntw Market — Beeson Henry H, 160 a, 800 ; Beeson W S 
320 a, 1.300; Beeson Miltcm, 173 a, 400; Beeson John F 
120 a, 550. i?art(^/eman— Bostick J T & Son, 15 a, 1.500 
New il/ar^ei— Blair Branson J, 50 a, 150 ; Blair L J, 68 a, 260 
Blair Sidney J, 65 a, 150. G/«r/o^a— Brick house T N, 2 a, 40 
Brooks Chanty, 30 a, 150. New A/ar^d— Barker Seth, 40 a 
350; Breedlove Simpson, 141 a, 300; Bristow J M,24 a, 70 



124 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Brookshiie C E, 46 a, 280 ; Brown W F, 271 a, 800, 1 lot, 550. 
Level Plains— \^A\ Sarah, 9 a, 40 ; Belden Sarah, 3 a, 25. 
iVo<7rm-- Bowman William, 1 a, 10; Bean W H, 148 a, 900, 
Ce»/er— Cox J S, 174 a, 1,600; Coltrane Jas R, 589 a, 2,970. 
Gladeshoro — Coltrane Rufus E, 165 a, 500; Coltrane Mary, 
252 a, 1,()00 ; Coltrane Cornelia N, 52 a, 250 ; Coltrane Alice, 
92 a, 300 ; Coltrane Thos L, 10 a, 50 ; Coltrane Phillip, 22 a, 
125; Coltrane Sandy W, 9 a, 80; Coltrane Wm D, 15 a, 100; 
Coltrane Thcs J, 118 a, 525; Coltrane Rohert L, 112 a, 550; 
Ccltrane R.bt L (admr), 28 a, 75"; Coltrane Jas A, 100 a, 350 ; 
Coltrane Daniel L, 165 a, 800; Coltrane Mary E, 19 a, 76; 
Coltrane Jesse F, 514 a, 5,810; Coltrane Jesse F (guardian), 
1-5 a. 640; Coltrane Nannie C, 188 a, 1,025; Coltrane Kelly 
G. ISO a, 900; Coltrane Sol H, 62 a, 270; Coltrane J Lee, 
75 a, 400; Coltrane Branson, 314 a, 1,600; Coltrane John 
Filmore, 10 a, 75 ; Cox Fannie L, 339 a, 700 ; Cox T L, 133 a, 
850; Cox John M, 174 a, 9o0. Nnv Market— Coe W 0, 90 a, 
350. G/adeshoro— Causey Robt L, 95 a, 500; Calvin Wm, 
129 a, 250. Randhman — Cunningham Robt, 23 a, 45 ; Clark 
diaries A, 13 a, 75. Gladeshoro— C\?iYk Sarah M. 62 a, 225. 
Ashehoro—C\i\Tk John M, 378 a, 2,325. Edgar — Coble Den- 
nis, 60 a, 125; Crit^coe Sarah, 90 a, 270; Criscoe Alfred C, 
70 a, 250; Callicutt Clark, 2 a, 15. Lfvel Plains — Crowson 
T M, 37 a, 150 ; Crow J W, 33 a, 50. GZenoZa— Davis Jas M, 
256 a, 1,300 ; Davis David S, 360 a, 1,600; Davis Jonathan M, 
75 a, 200; Davis A W, 144 a, 500; Davis Daniel B, 200 a, 
550; Davis Cyrus S, 12 a, 50; Davis Jabez S, 50 a, 300; 
Davis Eleazar, 96 a, 450. Nno Market— Dd^wis R S, 120 a, 
662; Davis Cvrus, 133 a, 550; Davis David, 133 a, 700; 
Davis N E. 115 a, 312; Davis Sallie T, 30 a, 270; Davis 
David A, 98 a, 250; Davis Reuben L, 143 a, 500; Davis 
Willie E, 121 a, 500; Davis Nathan M, 209 a, 800; Davis 
Nathan M (guardian), 70 a, 270. Edgar— D'lQks James A, 
60 a, 150 ; Dicks C S, 4 lots, 260. New 3Iarket— Dicks Henry 
E, 39 a, 150 ; Dicks Cornelius T, 247 a, 1,500 ; Daniel Henry 
M, 140 a, 250. Nrw Salem— Dean J F, 14 a, 75 ; Dean Mary, 
3 a, 40. Maud— Elder Jesse. 80 a, 300; Evans Millie, 1 a, 
25 ; Evans Robt, 8.s a, 500. GVe/^o/a— Evans John J. 5 a, 25 ; 
Fentress Thos E, 5ti a, 200; Fentress T C, 290 a, 900, 1 lot, 
100; Fo^deman VV D, 2 lots, 85; Farlow Tamer, 21 a, 100; 
Farlow Wm C, 90 a, 350 ; Farlow Jas D. 22 a, 1 00. Edgar— 
Parlow Ephraim, 36 a, 200; Farlow Isaac N, 163 a, 760; 
Farh.w Isaac N (guardian), 90 a, 400; Farlow Martha, 10 a, 
60; Farlow Jesse E, 22 a, 100; Farlow Elihu B, 8 a, 50 ; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 125 



Farlow Abner, 79 a, 315 ; Farlow Franklin, 125 a, 350 ; Far- 
low Absalom, 65 a, 250; Farlow Michael C, 10 a, 50; Far- 
low Thos E, 60 a, 150; Farlow Newbv, 97 a, 500. Sophia— 
Farlow I T (agt), 35 a, 185; Farlnw Madison, 4 lots, 40. 
Progress — Frazier Dr T C, 1 lot, 10. Gladesboro—Fr:i7Aer 
Solomon, 180 a, 550; Frazier Isaac G, 200 a, 800; Frazier 
T G, 202 a, 800 ; Frazier Jesse, 175 a. 800 ; Frazier B F, 2 1 a, 
60; Frazier Robt F, 81 a, 250; Gray Pernetia, 8S a, 225, 
1 lot, 150; Gray John M, 45 a, 350, 1 lot, 150; Gray A 8, 
225 a, 615; Gray W H, 42 a, 100; Gray G G, 276 a, 1,400; 
Gray Abner, 337 a, 2,000 ; Gray Learn, 2 a, 15. Level Cross — 
Gray Clavborne, 12S a, 430. Glenola — Gray John S, 185 a, 
500; Gardner Ella, 100 a, 250. New Mar/tef— Gardner Frank- 
lin, 267 a, 500; Gardner T B. 40 a. 125. 6-7e//o/a— Goings 
Jas D. \ a, 50. Randhman — Glass W J, 100 a, 370; Gillmer 
H H, 3 a, 10. Gladesboro — G ossett Rebecca, 66 a, 250 ; Glenn 
Charlie, 15 a, 120. Rdudlemari — Henderson Hoskins, 1 a, 
10. 3Iaud—m\\ Wm, 64 a, 450; Hill Tamer. 138 a, 600. 
Why iV'^^-rHohn David M, 46 a, 240. New MnrLet—lVm- 
shaw G T, iHOa, 550; Hobbs Wm L, 300 a, 900; Hobbs 
Chas H, 183 a, 1,000. WorthvUle -Hodgin Martha, 11 a, 80; 
Hodgin Jas N, 225 a, 700 ; Hodgin J R, 175 a, 700. Maud — 
Hill J C. 143 a, 600; Harlan Eno.-h, 120 a, 350. Level 
P/ams— Harlan Wm L, 92 a, 340; Hoover W A, 63 a, 265. 
Level Cross — Heathcock B F, 13 a, 40; Heathcock Pinkney, 
80 a, 175. New Sa/cw— Holder D .M, 50 a, 150; Holder 
Amanda, 7 a, 25; Jobe William, 175 a. 600. Brniiswick — 
Johnson Nancy, 60 a, 200; Johnson Franklin, 138 a, 500; 
Johnson James L, 4 a, 50; Johnson James M. 2 lots, 125; 
Jones Martin, 1 a, 5; Jarrell Martha, 11 a, 50; Kearns Ilcnrv, 
112 a, 800. Gladesboro— Kennedy Wm C, 12 a, 150; Little 
Robert, 96 a, 400; Langston A W, 160 a, 1,195; Lanjrhliu 
Shubal W, 155 a, 900; Lowe Thos, 160 a, 712; Lowe Olivia, 
50 a, 150 ; Lowe Annie, H5 a, 280 ; Lowe James F, 75 a, 300 ; 
Lowe S L, 75 a, 300 New Market — Lytic Catheriiu', 1 a, 30; 
Lvndon J W, 106 a, 350. iS'op/im— Led well Franklin, 3 a, 
50; Ledwell Elzivan, 10 a, 50; McGee Jas R, 100 a, 400; 
Modlin Lanra, 25 a, 200. Glenoid — Marsh Henrv, 1 a, 5. 
Level Cross — Morgan Hogan, 10 a, 50; McDowell Niece, 14 a, 
50; McDowell J M, 106 a, 450. G/eno/a— Marsh J J. 5(5 a, 
350 ; Mendenhall Lorenzo, 10 a, 200. Sophia— fielson John 
W R, 49 a, 300 ; Nel-on E L, 50 a, 250. N^w MnrLet—Sew- 
Hn Duncan, 129 a, 500; Newhn J O, 175 a, 725; Ncwlin 
Wm, 108 a, 350; Newlin Wm (agt), 28 a, 250; Osborne 



126 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



David S, 188 a, 5o0 ; Osborne Nerius, 24 a, 100; Osborne 
Hannah W, 184 a, 1,500 Randleman — Parsons Aaron, 30 a, 
100. AS'v>//m— Pearce I N, 2 a, 30 ; Pool Albert G, 52 a, 100. 
Randlnnan — Parsons Eliza, 46 a, 100; Parsons J M, 66 a, 150. 
Glenola—?n^\\ E E, 126 a, 550; Robbins Jacob, 56 a, 250; 
Robbins Martin V, 202 a, 889; Robbins David Y, 40 a, 550; 
Robbins Alexnnder S, 156 a, 500 ; Robbins Nathan B, 140 a, 
550. CWj/tY— Reynolds Louis, 140 a, 300; Richardson J B, 
217 a, 850. iy/y/I Pom<— Rankin Emily, 39 a, 100. Level 
Ch-oHR—\{\c\\ Davis, 12 a, 25, 1 lot, 50. Sophia— ^\c\\ W R, 
1 lot. 250. Htgli fo??ji— Ragan Amos, 174 a, 550. Maud— 
Redding Stanley, 57 a, 350. New Market — Ridge Martha, 
119 a, 900; Ridge B F, 143 a, 568; Royals Abram, 8 a, 50. 
Asheboro—Rus?^ R R, 325 a, 2,000. Treman's MZ/.s— Scott 
F M, 105 a, 300. G ley tola— Spencer M L, 60 a, 250 ; Spencer 
Cyrus, 2J9 a, 600; Spencer Lemuel, 138 a, 650; Spencer 
Aden J, 52 a, 150; Spencer John F, 81 a, 250; Spencer 
Nathan F, 107 a, 600. New Market— Spencer C S, 21 a, 75; 
Spencer Asenath, 54 a, 150; Spencer Thomas 0, 174 a, 612; 
Spencer Thomas & Co, | a, 600 ; Spencer J F, 1;".9 a, 400 ; 
Spencer S G, 76 a, 115 ; Spencer Isaac M, 42 a, 200 ; Spencer 
Cyrus. 62 a, 150; Spencer Enoch, 45 a, 250; Spencer Isaac, 
186 a, 700; Spencer J T, 51 a, 150 ; Spencer E C, 110 a, 550; 
Spencer Asenath, 30 a, 100. Glenola — Steed W H, 51 a, 175 ; 
Steed Charles F. 57 a, 260; Steed C A, 23 a, 90. New Mar- 
ket— S^anion J P, 192 a, 1,000; Stanton Geo F, 500 a, 2,600; 
Stanton Samuel M, 92 a, 1,000; Stanton Isaac, 248 a, 800. 
G/a(/e.s-/;oro— Smith B N, 148 a, 250; Smith George W, 137 a, 
600 ; Steele T J, 55 a, 150. Level Ptoi//s— Stalker Noah, 21 a, 
50. G'/ary^oro-Shelbv W L, 10 a, 75; Swaim J S, 490 a, 
1,300; Swaim Hiram I), 40 a, 400; Swaim Sarah, 65 a, 300. 
Sophia — Swaim Joseph C, 15 a, 50; Swaim Lyndon, 200 a, 
500. 67e/<o/a— Sellers John, 63 a, 150. Progress— "T^jlor 
Julius D, 22 a, 200; Taylor Cyrus H, 48 a, 200, 54 a, 400; 
Trotter Jonathan, 99 a, 900. Gladeshoro — Tomlinson Cicero, 
17 a, 50 ; Tomlin-on David M, 66 a, 275 ; Toomes W F, 112 a, 
300. Glenola — Winslow Henry, 8 a, 50. New Market — 
Walden John W, 14 a, 60. il/a?/d— Walker A M, 2i a, 50. 
GWf.sioro— Walton Elizabeth, 65 a, 200; Wall S F, 35 a, 
125. 1 lot, 10. %)//ya— Wall J A, 3 a, 200 ; Wall A G, 226 a, 
1,000, 1 lot. 200. Edgar— \N^\\ Wm, 60 a, 162; Wall W H, 
6 a, 20 ; Wall Hannah, 156 a, 400 ; Wall Sol W, 213 a, 700 ; 
Wall Rub. rt W, 4 a, 20. Snphia—W 'A\ker Samuel, 8 a, 50; 
Walker E F, 24 a, 75. G/ade.s6oro— Walton Susan, 104 a, 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 127 



275 ; Wood J E, 6 a, 20. Neiv Market— Welhorn Robert M, 
60 a, 200, 6 lots, 25 ; Welborn J W, 22 a, 75. Lnrl Plains— 
Ward J L, 40 a, 1 25. Sophia— AVonhiugton S W, 150 a, 300 ; 
Worthiiigton Elizabeth, 247 a, 650. Glrnola — White Robi \j, 
270 a, 1.000; Wiiite Isaac, 17 a, 50; White A C, 68 a, 350; 
Wliite Lyndon, 118 a. 750. %)/<ia— Welborn Wm L, 71 a, 
175. Level Plains — Yow Christopher, 115 a, 280 ; Yow Geo, 
50 a, 150. 



PLEASANT GROVE TOWNSHIP. No. 12. 

(Postofflces— Cape, Cheeks, Coleridge, Cole's Store, Empire, Foust's 
Mills, Moffitt's Mills, Buffalo Ford.) 

Cheeks P 0— Allen Job, 412 acres, value, $2,300; Allen 
Job, 66| a, 350; Allen B N, 36 a, 130; Allred W B, 120 a, 
200 ; Brown Joshua, 211 a, 650. Kemp's M//.9— Brown E W, 
70 a, 300; Brown Nr.ncy, 60 a, 150; Brown S R, .^0 a, 600; 
Brown H F, 110 a, 300; Brown Dolphin, 1 lot, 150, 40 a, 
300; Brown Madison, 65 a. 200; Brown J M, land, 50; 
Brown W H H, 30 a, 450; Brown W R, 228 a, 580; Bray 
Wm F, 154 a. 900; Brav Wm, 150 a, 755; Bray Sophia, 60 
a, ,300 ; Bradv Milton H,"' 156 a, 800. Coleridge— Bnidv W C, 
128 a, 325; Brown Alfred M, 726 a, 1,000; Brown A D. 126 
350; Bean A I. 10 a, 1,500: Burroughs J H, 210 a, 550; 
Barker Thos A, 120 a. 525; Barker Wm J. 130 a, 375; Bar- 
rett Jas P, 25 a, 50; Brooks Henrv, 18 a, 50; Bio.^ks B B, 
178 a, 760. Broiuer's Mills— Cox Bethuel, 336 a, 1,8'.0 ; Cox 
Rachel, 215 a, 300; Cox E M, lU a. 666; Cox J F, 160 a, 
800; Cox Levi, 125i a, 1.000; Cox Seth, 170 a, 1,200; Cox 
Nathaniel, 100 a, 1,500; Cox John C, 152 a, 700; Cox Jasper 
N, 105 a, 300; Cox Henrv M, 100 a, 450; Cox Wm L. SO a, 
550 ; Cox Calvin, 312 a. 2,900; Cox Henry, 300 a, 1,500 ; Cox 
R H, 116 a, 475; Cox Jesse F, 193 a, 500 ; Cox Eli C, 200 a, 
1,250; Cox R R, 155 a, 1,500; Cox Joshua S, 200 a, 800; 
Cox Martha A, 200 a, 500 ; Cox Wm C, 75 a, 300 ; Cox H M, 
200 a, 700; Cox Eleazer F, 175 a, 550; Cox Timothy, lOO a, 
400; Cox W G, 65 a, 500; Cox Nathaniel & Son, 23 a, 2,700; 
Cox Eliza, 70 a, 150; Cox Malinda, 187 a, 450; Cox Sarah, 
75 a, 75. Coleridge— Craven Hiram P, 196 a, 650; Craven 
Daniel C, 150 a, 1,034; Craven Lvdia, 46 a, 180; Craven 
Mary C, 89 a, 212 ; Craven Wm M,'lO0 a, 300 ; Craven R S, 
90 a", 310 ; Craven Lewis P, 416 a, 1.000; Craven C H, 150 a, 
640; Craven Wm S. 230 a, 950: Craven B F, 73 a. 200; 
Craven J F, 1 19 a, 575 ; Craven C B, 125 a, 700; Craven .los. 



128 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



125 a, 400 ; Craven John R, 130 h, 750 ; Craven Wm R, 18 a, 
450. 1 lot, 450; Craven L R, 127 a, 400; Craven Jas F, 300 
a, 700; Craven Aaron S, 76 a, 250 ; Craven Jas M, 120 a, 
300; Craven Rebecca, 79 a, 150; Craven T A, 100 a, 450 ; 
Craven D C, 170 a, 700. Foust's Mills— C'A\-eness Mattie J, 
IGO a, 1,000; Caveness John R, 328 a, 800; Caveness A W, 
100 a, 400; Caveness Alfred, 203 a, 1,100; Caveness W W, 
120 a, 275; Caveness A H, 204 a, 625; Caveness B S, 275 a, 
850; Caveness Dr R L, 1 lot, 100; Caveness B M, 70 a, 200; 
Cheek J R, 140 a, 850; Cheek Mary J, 187 a, 500; Cheek 
p:ii/.aheth, 299 a, 600 ; Cheek Geo M, 125 a, 200. Coleridge— 
Cullerson Jas W, 100 a. 500; Cole Jas A, 336 a, 1,450; Cole 
Jas (agt), 47 a, 1,900; Dorsett Calvin G, 130 a, 500; Dnrsett 
C H, 100 a, 200; Dorsett Marv A, 354 a, 875 ; Dixon J B, 30 
a, 150; Davis Thomas, 67 a, 200, 1 lot, 400; Edwards Josh, 
135 a, 300; Edwards Win N, 100 a, 175. Faust's Mdls— 
Foust Geo A, 434 a, 2,000; Fousi Geo M, 187 a, 800 ; Foust 
John C, 218 a. 700; Fesmire Jas S, 200 a, 1,000; Gardner 
Wm S, 125 a, 250; Gardner Mary E, 120 a, 700; Gardner 
Elizabeth, 75 a, 500. C7///a— Gardner C F, 95 a, 400; Gee 
Henry, 149 a, 400; Gilliland J M, 117 a, 500. PosUmk— 
(Jreen Henrv L, 120 a, 470; Green J M, 120 a, 470; Green 
F A. l-.M) a, 470; Golev Eli H. 85 a, 275. Brower's Mills— 
Hayworth VV VV, 134 a, 850; Hayworth S L, 134 a, GOO; 
Hay worth D H, 210 a, 935; Hinshaw Thos, 346 a, 1,500; 
Hinshaw Amos, 16 a, 80. Erect— H\\\ Ann, 58 a, 160; Hor- 
nadv A M, 105 a, 300; Hodson Jasfer, 122 a, 800; Henson 
R M, 75 a, 225; Johnson Ishiim, 157 a, 300; Johnson Lo- 
ami, 200 a, 450. Cohri<lqe—io\\\\Bon J L. 215 a, 450; Jones 
Thos J, 120 a, 350; Kimry N A, l-'l a, 800; Kivett Alfred, 
229 a, 550; Kiveit Calvin G, 29 a, 125; Kearns B F, J50 a, 
350. iJ^j/p//— Lowdermilk J H, 280 a, 1,100; Lowdermilk 
L M, 48 a, 125 ; Langley J H, 40 a, 150; Littler Joel, 89 a, 
250; Lambert D H Jr, 500 a, 1,200; Lambert D H Sr, 210 a, 
625; Lambert J M, 135 a, 200; Lamberr G H, 125 a, 350; 
Lambert Jas I, 30 a, 150; Lambert D H & Co, 1 a, 2,500; 
Moffitt Jo.shua. 215 a, 950; Moffitt Sol, 409 a, 1,650. Mof- 
jitCx J//7/.S— Moffitt F T, 224 a, 1,000; Moffiit Aaron, 88 a, 
250; Moffitt Stephen T, 65 a, 550; Moffitt Minty, 128 a, 300; 
Moffitt Elizabeth, 58 a, 400; Moffiit Mila, 76 a, 225; Moffitt 
R E. 2.'0 a, 1,100; Moffitt D R, 2 a, 25; Moffitt, Eli W, 15 a, 
75; ^h,ffitt Lottie L. 38 a, 200; Moffitt Henrv L, 85 a, 255 ; 
Moffitt E G. 198 a, 800 ; Moffitt B S, 65 a, 550. Mechanic— 
Macon Nathaniel, 225 a, 1,250; Macon Alfred, 124 a, 600; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 129 



Macon Levi B, 47 a, 450; Macon W W, 154 a, 600; Macon 
Geo T, 113 a. 650; Macon Elias, 75 a, 50l) ; Macon Eli. 145 
a, 800. Chntham Count i/—lyAue John R. 581 a,4 0.".0. Ercd—. 
Morley W H, 159 a, 600; Morley L, 5 a, 85. Balph—Woon 
J W, 87 a, 150; Moon Hannali N, 55 a, 200; Miller J R, 1 a 
125; Mann W H, 81 a, 300; Moffitt M H 30 a, 50; Parks 
LT, 231 a, 900. t////a— Parks Wincv. 246 a, 750; Parks 
J R, 418 a, 2,850 ; Parks Huffh, 3()0 a, 2,750 ; Pickett Simon, 
230 a, 900; Phillips D M, 33 a, 50; Patterson Wm H, 111 a, 
300; Russell Thos C, 88 a, 350; Rains A E. 130 a, 400. 
Cofnidge—li'd'ms Rol.t M, 155 a, 350; Rains Wm H, 112 a, 
300; Stout Taylor, 21 a, 200; Stout Anron, 146 a, 650 ; Stout 
B J, 42 a, 275 ; Stout Wm A. 150 a, 500; Stout J E, 31 a, 
400; Stout Eli N, 58 a, 175; Stout, Franklin, 40 a, 70; Stout 
Wm G, 26 a, 100; Stout E L, 53 a, 175; Stout J P, 100 a, 
300; Stout Anna, 80 a, 125; Sellars D U, •272 a, 1.150. AWm 
—Smith J A, 150 a, 400; Sumner J C,184 a. 1,200; Stinson 
John M, 180 a, 600; Staley Simon, 13 a, 50; Spencer Annie 
E. 47 a. 225. Co/mt/.^'e— Scotten Jas M, 63 a, 275; Scotten 
Alfred. 30 a. 50 ; Scotten A K, 150 a, 550, 1 lot, 800 ; Trog- 
don Caroline, 80 a, 125; Williams A D, 150 a, 600; Wil- 
liams A H, 72 a 175; Wilburn John A, 108 a, 270; Wil- 
burn Joseph C, 135 a, 280 : VVrenn _-.,279 a, 1.050; White- 
head E T, 94 a, 300; Woodell C C, 1 a. 30; Vestal A R, 
107 a, 550. Fovs''s M^/s— Vestal J B. 130 h, 250 ; Vestal M 
A, 40 a, 100; York Solomon, 155 a, 500; York P:ii C, 25 a, 
150; York W J". 74 a, 185; York Leander, 55 a, 190; Yow 
W H, 277 a, 950 ; Yow Andrew. 198 a, 1,100. 



PROVIDENCE TOWNSHIP. No. 13. 

(Postofflces— Brunswick, Gray's Chapel.) 

Gh^ay's Chapel P 0— Allred G S, 617 acres, value, $1,500. 
Allred D H, 107 a, 400 ; Allred D H (a^t). 40 a. 150; Allred 
BP, 135 a, 350; Allred D A, 130 a. 525; Allred WH.150a, 
800; Allred Jesse Jr. 90 a, 400; Allred M H. 50 a. 150; All- 
red Jesse Sr, 105 a, 350; Allred N C, 51 a, 150; .Mired J M, 
14 a, 75; Adams Wm, 15 a, 25. Julian— Bowman Peter, 
90 a, 150; Bowman Rilev, 49 a. 155; Bowman W R, 82 a, 
125; Bowman C H, 29 a,^ 35 ; Branson W G. 7 a. 20; Bran- 
son William, 201 a, 1,400. Nnu Sainn — Burns Nathan. 20 a, 
40; Brown W F, 435 a, 2,000; Baldwin G W, 108 a, 850. 
Brunswick— Beeson Curtis, 50 a, 150; Beeson Isabel, 100 a, 



130 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



100; Brower W D. 447 a, 900; Bisher W F, 198 a, 400; 
Beroiigh B;uney, 82 a, 450; Borcugh W C, 84 a, 300; Berry 
C \V. 7o a, 150; Berry G W, 21 a, 75. Gray's Chapel — Bar- 
ker J \V, 81 a, (500 ; Barker G P, 60 a, 525 ; Barker A S, 81 a, 
300; Barker Siineou, 234 a, 1,000; Bishop W M. 50 a, 125; 
Bishop D B, 50 a, 150. Randleman — Ghamness Emma, 
155 a, 500; Chamness A, 120 a, 700; Ghamness L L, 73 a, 
300 ; Chamnei^s Elizaheth, 110 a, 400. New Salem — Cox M H, 
24.S a, 700 ; Cox Enoch L, 1 10 a, 500 ; Cox Elihu. 32 a, 125 ; 
Cox E U, 40 a, 120; Curtis N C, 161 a, 400; Curtis W M 
(agt), 200 a, 300; Curtis Lewi?, 4 a, 25. Brunswick — Coble 
J C, 129 a, 175; Coble S E, 166 a, 1,000; Coble P R, 250 a, 
1,850 ; Coble P R (agt), 80 a, 350 ; Coble Arington, 68 a, 250 ; 
Coble Henry, 6 a, 25; Craven Mary, 136 a, 600; Cranford 
C L, 152 a, 500; Cullins Irena, 100 a, 200; Clark Peter, 26J 
a, 100. ilA'cr/— Dunn Samuel, bl a, 115; Elliott Sarah J, 
125 a, 275; Frazier E D, 240 a, 1,400; Frazier Solomon, 110 
a, 600 Center — Foster Ala, 44 a, 100. Brvmswick — Fogle- 
man D L, 111 a, 250; Fields Christopher, 274 a, 750 ; Fields 
A L, 25 a, 125 ; Fields J P, 100 a, 250 ; Fields P F, 83 a, 250; 
P^ields D F, 41 a, 100 ; Fields Absalom, 20 a, 75 ; Foster Levi, 
72 a, 200; Fields Peter, 110 a, 400; Fields Roddv, 270 a, 800; 
Goley E G, 75 a, 150; Gretter R M, 165 a, 600; Greeson 
1) M, 124 a, 350 ; Gregson H C, 155 a, 475. Gray's Chapel— 
Gilmer Allen, 15 a, 75 ; Garner E L, 15 a. 25 ; Garner J M, 
53 a, 150; Gray R L, 25 a, 75; Hardin Je.-se C, 10 a, 50; 
Hackelt V R, 64 a, 200; Hackett Nancy, 341 a, 700; Hackett 
J F, 50 a, 125; Hemphill Sellars, 154 a, 610; Hanner Ran- 
som, 2 a, 50; Hart Thomas V, 100 a, 200; Frazier G M D, 
490 a, 1,450. New Market— YLmshAW Zebedee, 158 a, 350; 
Hinshaw J V, 29 a, 100; Hinshaw R A, 150 a, 450; Hinshaw 
Dernida, 150 a, 300; Hockett J D. 205 a, 900; Hinshaw J C, 
13 a, 800; Hockett H M, 306 a, 800; Hockett David F, 152 
a, 500; Hockett J B, 68 a, 160; Hinshaw J M, 280 a, 850. 
Gray's Chapel — Johnson J A, 22 a, 60; Jones J M, 75 a, 100; 
Jones A Q, 5 a, 15 ; Junes John, 24 a, 60 ; Jackson R D, 70 a, 
150. Julian— Juhun Marv, 56 a, 130; Julian W M, 110 a, 
300; Kine J C. 238 a, 475; Kine Henderson, 100 a, 200; 
Kuig Stanton, 16 a, 60. Staley—Khkman J W, 133 a, 250 ; 
Hix J F, 93 a, 195; Lineberry N S, 33 a, 200. MiUboro— 
Lineberry W S, 175 a, 400; Lineberry Shube, 86 a, 200. 
tStaley — Lineberry R A, 37 a. 125; Lineberry Rebecca, 25 a, 
50; Lineberry liavid, 5 a, 40 ; Lineberrv Scott, 120 a, 250; 
Lineberry R C, 100 a, 300; Lineberry Horace, 180 a, 500; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 131 



Lineberry G H, 77 a, 150; Ledbetter Wesley, 137 a, 450; 
Ledbetter Jas, 108 a, 500; Ledbetter J F, 25 a, 125. Gnn/H 
Chapd—Liiu^h\y B G, 10 a, 35; Lackey VV D, 40 a, 12o; 
Lamb W A, 25 a, 75; Lamb G M, 144 a, 550; Lamb Miles', 
105 a, 140; Lee W B, 50 a. 300; Lee Ej.b.aim. 90 a. 300; 
Lee Eunice, 65 a, 80; McMasters H W, 100 a, 200; Marley 
Eli, 50 a, 60. Ashehoro — McAlister A C (yuardiiui), 1(50 a, 
500. Neiu *Sa/fm— McAdden Emma, 114 a, 750; Moser An- 
thony, 126 a, 350; Nelson E P, 246 a, 500. Grai/s CItnpcl— 
Nelson Hiram, 130 a, 400; Neece Rilev. 175 a, 500; Neece 
W R, 255 a, 1,150; Nixon A W, 100 a, 350; Nixon Quinton, 
290 a, 600 ; Noch G M, 50 a, 50 ; Noch J M, 56 a, 75 ; Pugh 
Henry, 50 a, 50; Pugh J A, 450 a, 1,395; Pugli Louisa, 110 
a. 225. 31illboro—Fugh J W, 230 a, ()00 ; Pugh Scvtha, 39 a, 
60; Pugh T K, 30 a, 50; Pugh A S, 14 a, 40; Pugh Je.-se, 
65 a, 200; Patterson Simpson, 121 a, 250. Gray's Chapd — 
Routh W M, 111 a, 51 2; Routh J M, 320 a, 700; Routh PA, 
1,110 a, 300 ; Roulh E L, 97 a, 200 ; Routh Augustus N, 8 a, 
20; Routh W C, 105 a, 350; Reynolds Victoria, 53 a, 150; 
Reynolds Jesse, 75 a, 225; Reynolds Lemuel, 160 a, 225; 
Reynolds Louisa, 6 a, 25. i/^// Wo— Redding G M, 33 a, 125; 
Redding & Routh, 1 a, 300; Stout J A, 214 a, 875; Stout 
Mary E, 46 a, 125. Libeiiy—iS\\eY W D, 148 a, 475; Siler 
L C, 390 a, 850; Siler Thompson, 162 a, 560. Staley—^ta- 
ley Marv J, 56 a, 125 ; Staley Mary, 225 a, 800 ; Swaim M K, 
84 a, 325; Spencer S E, 163 a, 800; Smith J C, U a, 50; 
Smith Dock, 44 a, 100; Smith .J M, 103 a, 260; Smith S T, 
107 a, 300. New 5a/em— Trogdon— Marv, 74 a, 250; Trog- 
don E P, 122 a. 500; Teague Nellie, 225 a, 1,000. Millboro^ 
Underwood S M, 54 a, 200; Underwood S T, 4 a, l.'.O; 
Underwood A M, 170 a, 525; Underwood J C, 80 a, 250. 
Randleman—YieliOry W B, 570 a, 3,500; Vickorv A W, 
250 a, 1,500; Vickory J F, 164 a, 325. Edf/nr—Woll M M, 
90 a, 200; Wall W H, 118 a, 250; Wall Z A, 233 a, 800; 
Wall Josiah, 31 a, 80; Ward Michael, 140 a, 500. Nrw 
Salem— W&rd Michael, 140 a, 500; Wilson J C, 60 a. 200; 
Wilson Alfred, 16 a, 300; Wilson W L, 90 a, 350; Wilson 
Hiram, 175 a, 700; Wheeler John, 188 a, 700; Withro C I, 
90 a, 150 ; Walden B W, 45 a. 50 ; White John. 867 a, 2.900; 
Wilkerson Lewis, 58 a, 150; Wilkerson J C, 55 a, 125; Wil- 
kerson Ellen. 55 a, 150 ; Williams Zimri, 46 a. 100 ; Williams 
E M, 18 a, 50; Wood W C, 180 a, 550. Bruvswid—Wo' d 
W A, 25 a, 75; Wood Marv. 6 a, 20. New Salem— York 
Elizabeth, 150 a, 425 ; York F L, 50 a, 75. 

Neiv Salem— Fox Cora, 120 a, 300; Shaw G H, <:8 a, 80. 



132 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



RANDLEVIAN TOWNSHIP. No. 14. 

(Postofflces— New Salbm, Ranuleman.) 

RauHIeman P 0— Allred Elias, 107 acres, vAne SlOO; All- 
red L W, 4.\ a, 30U; Allred J C, 25 a, 200. Worthville— Ar- 
nold J W. 1 lot, 250; Aldridge Lee, 1 lot, 400; Allen J P, 
4 a, 100; Allen W F, 1 lot, 100; Allen A H, 1 lot, 150. 
Jiandl, man— Brown H W, 3| a, 75; Brown Wm, 583 a, 1,000; 
2 lots, 500; Brown J iM, 40 a, 200; Brown Kobbin, 4J a, 75; 
Bain J C. 3 lots, 1,^00; Bain J C, (ayt) 1 lot, 800; Bain W F, 
] lot, 350; B. .stick J T, 160 a, 1,600; Burgess E C, 1 lot, 10. 

Wordirille — Bolin Miss Emma, 1 lot, 20. Randleman — Brook- 
shire H L, 4 a,40; BrookshireCE, 1 lot, 15; Brooks Charity, 
10 a. 175; Bhmchel Florence, 1 lot, 75; Barker Miss L J, 1 
lot, 30; Bulla W H, 1 lot, 100; Bowman Matilda, 1 lot, 200. 

ll'o/7///v7/^— Bri.^tow y C, 23 a, 100. Randleman— C9,udle J N, 
50 a, 100, 1 lot, 800 ; Caudle L M. 16 a, 300, 1 lot, 100 ; Caudle 
JV,llot, 15; Curtis WD, 97 a, 600; Curtis J M, 156 a, 2,000; 
Cooper J T S, 1 lot, 175; Co-.per Miss B F, 2 lots, 62; Cooper 
Miss M F, 1 lot, 20; Connor Z F, 1 lot, 150; Carter Noah, 
7^ a, 100, 1 lot, 150; Carter Noah, (agt) 1 lot, 30; Coble W C, 
1 lot, 150; Cox J S, 1 lot, 700; Coltrane Mar\ and Minnie, 
1 lot, 750; Cross Mrs A M, 4 a, 45; Cross M C, 40 a, 80, 1 
lot, 175. Wortliville^CoWeit Jerrv, 30 a, 150; Collett Jerry, 
(guar) 181 a, 400. i^aW/f man— Coffin W C, 1 lot, 10; Coffiin 
A C, 1 lot, 150; Clap[) John, 100 a, 300, 1 lot, 675; Coward 
John, U a, 100; Dean W H, 2h a, 150; Dean T E, 76 a, 300, 
1 lot, 150; Davidson B F, 14"'4 a, 400; Dicks D T, 140 a, 
1,800; Dicks Mrs M C, 1 lot, 4.000; Elmore John W, 1 lot, 
300; Elmore J B, 15 a, 400; Ellis T J, 1 lot, 200; Ferree 
John H. 1 lot. 4,000; Fogleman David, 96 a, 700; Free 
Joseph, 28 a, 250; Ferguson W T, 1 lot, 800; Fox George, 1 
lot, 25; P^rguson A M, 1 lot, 1 000; Ferguson U C, 18 a, 40, 
1 lot, 2<i0; Fields J L. 125 a, 675, 2 lots, 750; Fox Dr. VV A, 
31 a, 900; Frazier H II, 1 lot, 25; Frazier Ed, 16 a, 50 ; Fra- 
zier J C, 89 a. 150; Frazier Jon, 70 a, ;-;00; Frazier Mrs. 
Emilv, 46 a, 250; Frazier B F, 15* a, 50; Frazier Martha V, 
88 a, 400; Ferres J H, 2 lots, 1,000. WorthviUe— Glover 
Wm, 2 a, 10; Gordon Mrs Martha, 85 a, 650; Giles R W, 2 
lots, 325; Giles J L, 1 lot, 275; Glass \V J, 1 lot, 650. Ran- 
dleman — Glass W J, (agt) 1 lot, 125; Gregson W J, 6ia,50; 
Gr.gson Amos, 1 lot, 1,500; Green Peter, 1 lot, 150; Hin- 
shaw Thomas. 105 a, 800; Henley Mrs Martha, 6 a, 35; 
Henley T C, 175 a, 650; Havworth J E, 1 lot, 900; Hill Mrs 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 133 



C A, 52 a, 700; Holder J W, 2 lots, 325; Holder limes, 1 
lot, 250 ; Hinshaw J H, 1 lot, 250 ; Hinshavv Jesse, lOO u, «i50 ; 
Hinshavv Mrs Frazena, 130 a, «iOO; Hinshaw T C, Sh a, 25; 
Hinshaw N T, 206 a, 900; Hinshaw Mebane, 75 "a, 300; 
Hinshaw^ Mebane, (agt) 175 a. 400; Henlev Mrs Martha J,' 
6 a, 35; Henlev T C, 175 a, 650; Havworth J E, I lot. 000; 
Hill Mrs L A, 52 a, 700; Holder J W, 2 lots, 325; Holder 
Wines, 1 lot, 250; Hinshaw J H, 1 lot, 250; Hinshaw Jesse, 
106 a, 650; Hinshaw T C, 3.V a, 25; Hinshaw, N T, 20(5 a, 
900; Hinshaw J W, 175 a, 400; Holland Samuel, 1 lot, 500; 
Henly H T, 113 a, 1,200; Hughs L R, 15 a, 250; Hughs 
M J, 1 lot. 250. Worthville—lUmmer W C Sr, 1 lot, 700; 
Hanner Eli, 1 lot, 200; Hanner Jesse, 2 lots, 140; Hanner 
John, 1 lot, 75; Hanner Miss Martha, 1 lot, '.^0; lliinner 
Julius, 1 lot, 250; Hanner D A, 1 lot, 150; Hanner R C, 1 
lot, 250; Harden W C, 1 lot, 10 Randlcman — Harden W ui, 
1 lot, 100; Harden David, 1 lot, 20; Hobbs C H, 100 a, 200; 
Haves E P, 2 iots, 250 ; Haves E P & Co, 25 a, 75, 1 lot, 400; 
Hayes Eli, 100 a, 500; Hayes Nannie, 15 a, 50; Haves A F, 
1 lot, 250; Hayes Mrs Pernelin, 1 lot, 350; Hnves N G, 152 
a, 600 ; Hayes M G, 7 a, 50 ; Haves J M, 135 a, 350 ; Hadl.y 
E P, 1 lot, 500; Ingold F N, 126 a, 350, 2 lots, 1,720; Ivey 
Wm, 88 a, 375 ; Ivey G H, 1 lot, 250; Ivey W F, 29 a, 150, 
1 lot, 650; Jarrell Branson. 30 a, 275; Jarrell Anderson, 1 
lot, 100 ; Julian W R, 3 lots, 160. Worthvnie—io\\i\^oi\ Sylvia, 
1 lot, 25; Johnson Jetf', 1 lot, 25; Johnson Jas E, 1 lot' 300; 
Johnson Mrs H J, 2 lots, 500; Johnson Periev, 1 lot, 25 ; 
Johnson W E, 1 lot, 300; Jackson H L, 1 lot, 700; Jorden 
Spencer, 1 lot, 20 ; Kirkman F M, 2 lots, 400; Kearns Jno, 
47 a, 150; Lovett Jas, 1 lot, 200; Loveit J C, 1 lot, 50; 
Lamb A B, 2 a, 50. Randleinan—-\ji\mh Charley, 1 lot, 100; 
Lassiter B H, 1 lot, 450; Laughlin Hugh, ^ a, 50; Ljiuoh- 
lin Lee, 2h a, 100 ; Laughlin J A, 1 lot, 85; Lawrence \V H, 
4 a, 40, 1 lot, 20; Leonard O L, 1 lot, 350; Long Dr J W, 
298 a, 895, H lots, 2,200; Lineberry Wm A, 48 a. 900, 1 lot, 
100; Lineberry Martha, 3 lots, 300; Lineberrv Mrs Rthecca, 
4 a, 50, 1 lot, 250; Lineberry R W, 1 lot, 200; Lineberry 
Mrs L J, 1 lot, 100; Lutterlow Nathan, 7 a, 100; Marshal 
Svlonia, 1 lot, 25; McCone Columbus, 1 lot, 50; Maihi- Geo, 
3i a, 10; McDaniel Geo E, 6 a, 50; Mitchell P li, 1 lot, 20; 
Millikan & Hinshaw, i a, 10 ; Millikan T F, 70 a, 300 ; M.-n- 
denhall A L, 25 a, 50; McCollum Rutf, 1 lot. 100; McC'ol- 
lum, J M, 35 a, 150; McCollum B C, 16 a, 450; xMcCol urn 
Thos A, 1| a, 125; McDaniel J D, 97 a, 225; Mills J II, 1 






134 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



lot. 75; Newlin S G, 1 lot, 1,800; Newlin N N, 1 a, 100; 
Nelson H H, 1 lot, 200 Nelson I H, 1 lot, 70; Naomi Falls 
Mfg Co, 05 a, 85,000 ; Osborne A M, 7 a, 300 ; Powhattan 
Mfg Co, 10 a, 10,000. Worthville—Frevo Miss E M, 1 lot, 
*500. Ramllemmi—Fln'uUiUe Mfg Co, 35 a, 25,000; Pickard 
J (), 5 a, 100, 1 lot, 2,000; Pugh T K, 205 a, 1,000; Parsons 
J W .Sr, 100 a, 200, 1 lot 10; Parsons C J, 1 lot, 400 ; Ran- 
dleman iMl'g Co, 200 a, 100,000; Rich wine Chas, 1 lot, 100; 
Keid Wm, 4 lots, 30; Robertson A K, 1 lot, 100; Redding J 
B, 6 a, 150; Redding W W, 1 lot, 1,000; Royal Miss E J, 
1 lot, 300; Robinson Irene, 1 lot, 50; Robbins Mrs Jane, 34 
a, 200; Robbins Jonathan, 2 a, 50; Robbins Jno Q, 16 a, 
550 ; Stratford I) W, 2 lots, 7D0; Spencer L A, 2 lots, 1,200; 
Stiigg Jno, 1 lot, 30; Stephens King, \8h a, 150, 1 lot, 100; 
Spain W F, 1 lot, 250 ; Sinclair Geo, 9 a, 600 ; Simmons T H, 
27 a, 280; Steel Rachel, 1 lot, 100; Steel A A, 49 a, 1,025. 
Jiandlemmi— Steed T J, 1 lot, 125; Steed J D, 1 lot, 350; 
Sikes N N, 4 a, 40; Stalker Geo L, 7, 100; Smith J W, 1 lot, 
10; Smith J M, 139 a, 139, 1 lot, 45; Slack Wm, 1 lot, 150; 
Slack C W, 1 lot, 300. Worthville— Tate Sidney. 7 a, 195; 
Turner Scott, 1 lot, 150; Tally R K, 65 a, 340. Randle- 
man— Tally W F, 1 lot, 1,000; Trogdon S H, 402 a, 1,200, 2 
lots, 400. 3///^Aoro— Underwood J P, 100 a, 200 ; Vestal 
C M, 1 lot, 500. Randi email— Y'lckovy A W, 236 a, 500, 4 
lots, 1,450. Asheboro — Ward J B, 1 lot, 400. Randleman — 
Walker Dr J 0, 1 lot, 2,000; Wishart John, 1 lot, 20; Win- 
ningham W H, 1 lot, 400; Wilson J H, 1 lot, 400 ; Wood 
Lee, 1 lot, 250; Wood John L, 1 lot, 225; Wise L W, 10 a, 
125; Walton Jno R, 1 lot, 15; Woollen Dr W A, 165 a, 700, 
n lots, 1,450 ; Wright J A, 1 lot, 50. Worthv i lie— \Vms\ow 
S S, 1 lot, 400 ; Worth Mfg Co, 50 a, 75,000 ; Welborn W L, 
53 a, 275, 1 lot, 50. New Salem— Woollen J E, 25 a, 350; 
Wall G B 8 a, 25, 1 lot, 175 ; Yeargan Jno W, 8 a, 25. Ran- 
dle^nnn — York Miss Martha, 85 a, «5. 

Randleman — Kearns Jno, 47 a, 150 ; Hinshaw I G, 3 a, 5. 



BRANSONS STATE DIRECTORY, $5.00 

DURHAM BUSINESS DIRECTORY 2.00 

RALEIGH AND WAKE COUNTY DIRECTORY, ... 5.00 

RANDOLPH COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY, . . . 3.00 

Order of^ LEVI BRANSON, Raleigh, N. C. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 135 



RICHLAND TOWNSHIP. No. 15. 

(Postofflces— Fork Creek, Quinn, Why Not.) 

Pisgah P 0— Auman Jefferson, 150 acres, value $J00. 
Mechanic — Auman Denipsey, HO a, 150; Auman J J, 27") a, 
300; Ashworth Wm, 100 a, 125; Asliworlh Michael, 130 a', 
140; Ashworth John, 74 a, 125. Mnffitt's ^l///7.s— Albright J 
N, 22 a, 50; Albright Naiu-y, 16 a, 60; Albright J G, Ho a, 
200; Allen Alvin, 100 a, 150. Erect— Boon Wm, 30 a, 00; 
Boon Martha, 60 a, 120 ; Boon Dan'l, 122 a, 244. Cfue/cs— 
Bean Henry, 44 a, 80; Bean Thos, 160 a, 350; Beau Alvis, 
171 a, 300; Bean Isham, 107 a, 210; Bean Mary, 408 a, 000. 
MoffiWs AJills—BoUug A, 100* a, 200; Boling Tvsou, lOO a, 
150; Boling Allie, 100 a, 200 Cole's Store— Brower J M, 
100 a, 125; Brower A J, 48 a, 100; Brown Temple, 79 a, 80; 
Brown Thos, 31 a, 40. 3Ioffitt's Mills— Borough A, 10 a, 20; 
Barker Nathan, 40 a, 85. Erect— Cole E, 300 a, 300 ; Cole 
Sam'l, 45 a, 100; Cole J M, 180 a, 300; Chrisco J R, 281 a, 
230; Chrisco John, 200 a, 400; Chrisco Cretia, 26 a, 50; 
Chrisco D D, 50 a, 50. Cole's iStore — Cox Westwood, 77 a, 
200; Cox Eleazer, 273 a, 400 ; Cox Joseph, 45 a, 85; Cox 
Eleazer Jr, 45 a, 85 ; Cox F F, 96 a, 100 ; Cagle J M, «)3 a, 
113; Cagle Dan'l, 63 a, 112; Cagle M A, 219 a, 450; Cagle 
Alfred, 100 a, 100; Cagle J N, 251 a, 500; Erecl—CUvV Wm, 
84 a, 100 ; Coble W M, 302 a, 375. Rachel— Criwen I F, 53 
a, 125; Craven Thos A, 100 a, 100 ; Craven Hiram, 20 a, 30; 
Craven Wm, 40 a, 40; Cassady Calvin, 158 a, 325; Cassady 
Jno, 36 a, 72 ; Cassadv Wm, 364 a, 750. Hill's .S/o7-e— Cheek 
Jas, 68 a, 170 ; Cheek Geo, 30 a, 40. i?a//;/i— Baud T C, 1 00 
a, 250 ; Dandy S, 200 a, 400 ; Davis W, 136 a, 285 ; Freeman 
G B, 63 a, 10*0 ; Foust G H, 50 a, 75. Moffitt's il////.s— Gard- 
ner Wm, 80 a, 275; Graves Wm, 125 a, 150; Graves Alfred, 
189 a, 250; Graves Randolph, 246 a, 300; Graves Elkanah, 
194J a, 225; Graves Adline, 118 a, 200; Guardner Lucv, 50 
a, 75; Guarder Eli, 52 a, 100; Guardner Wm, 109 a, 190; 
Guardner Enoch, 148 a, 222; Guardner I F, 23 a, 46 ; Garveu 
Elizabeth, 5 a, 10. i^ac/t^/— Hancock I F, 187 a, 207 ; Han- 
cock Jno, 76 a, 175; Hancock C, 20 a, 30; Hancock H H, 
330 a, 400; Hancock R, 33 a, iV); Hancock J S, 100 a, 195; 
Hayes Jas, 150 a, 400. Balph — Hammond Henrv, 100 a, 
400; Harper J C, 400 a, 700; Johnson II M, <i4d a, 2,100. 
Erect — Kennedy Dennis, 10 a, 50; Kennedy A E, 48 a, 75; 
King Robert, 226 a, 275; King Mary, 75 a, 200; King Mon- 
roe, 75 a, 125; King J, 71 a, 150; King Malialy, 215 a, 175; 



136 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



King A L, 59 a, 200 ; King Adeline, 270 a, 300 ; King Wra, 
lis ft, 200; KinK J A, 220 a. 340; Kennedy A, 48 a, 75. 
While i/o*'.se— Lowdermilk E, 4o0 a, 850; Lowdermilk 
Latliena, 183 a, 300; Lowdermilk J C, 124 a, 370; Lowder- 
milk Israel, 259 a, 700; Luck Jno, 35 a, 50; Latham Enoch, 
88 a, 150; Latham J R, 135 a, 250; Latham Kelly, 170 a, 
150. New Hope Academy — Lawrence W W, 274 a, 700; Law- 
rence J 8, 2»)2 a, 700; Lawrence T W, 100 a, 250; Lawrence 
Alfred, 70 a, 75. MoffiU's Mills— Lucas Wm, 230 a, 450; 
Miller II aman, 200 a, 450; iMiller J R, 102 a, 175; Moody 
Allrt d, 42^ a, 125. J??Td- McNeill Wm, 75 a, 100 ; McNeill 
E E, 57 a, 75. Uhla—Moma Joshua, 100 a, 200; Macon 
Hannah, 125 a, 200; Macon Wm,31a, 75; Marlev Jane, 35 a, 
75 ; Malone R J, 8 a, 50. White House— Moore Elias, 125 a, 
175. Ashehoro—McA\is{er A C (guard), 406 a, 1,500. Riley's 
iSVore-Northcott Wm, 118 a, 300; Owen Martiia, 12 a, 15; 
Owen J J, 152 a, 450; Owen Laskey, 52 a, 120; Owen Ace, 
20 a, 40 ; Phillips E C, 150 a, 400. t/Z/^a— Presnell Filman, 
381 a, 571 ; Presnell M J, 150 a, 250; Presnell Stanton, 80 a, 
175; Presnell Jno. 2,100 a, 1,000; Presnell Silas, 500 a, 525. 
A'yrd— Patterson Cl.irk, 19 a, 45; Parks Lewis, 225 a, 500; 
Parks G W, 75 a, 150; Paiks A, 212 a, 200. Ralph— "Rus- 
sell W G, 34| a, 75; Russell W H, 175 a, 550, White 
Hfjiise — Richardson J A, 308 a, 500; Richardson W R, 125 a, 
500 ; Richardson S R, 154 a, 400 ; Spencer W W, 231 a, 450. 
7vm7— Spencer Rose, 257 a, 1,000; Spencer J H, 324 a, 850 ; 
Spencer Geo, 370 a, 700; Spencer Mary, 168 a, 252; Spencer 
Lvdia, 150 a, 150; Spencer Elijah, 120 a, 300. Moffitt's 
ilM.s-Staley Wm, 90 a, 145; Staley Calvin, 40 a, 75; Smith 
Willard, SO a, 100; Stutts Wm, 27 a, 115; Stinson A, 325 a, 
325 ; Scott W N, 115 a, 175. Cheeks— Scoit W B, 314 a, 425; 
SponksLV, 153 a, 265; Sponks L V (admr), 136 a, 400; 
Snggs J M, 50 a, 50; Trogdon J R, 180 a, 315. 3foffitt's 
jy^//.s— Trogdon H, 39 a, 150; Tharer Mattie, 75 a, 325; 
Tucker E D, 147 a, 275. White House— TJ]pton Alvis, 181 a, 
255; I'pton Louvena, 70 a, 85 ; Upton Rayt'ord, 58 a, 85 ; 
Vuncanon J W, 73 a, 73; Vuncanon Latha, 110 a, 110. 
iv/vd-\'un canon J M, 108 a, 175; Vanderford W B, 100 a, 
100; Wright P A, 63 a, 64; Way L H, 100 a, 200; Way 
Orlcndo, 40 a, 85; Williamson Noah, 26 a, 56; Williamson 
John, 26 a, 50; Williams R, 58 a, 125; Williams W L, 6 a, 
15; Williams Solomon, 716 a, 850; Williams P A, 93^ a, 93. 
White House— W\hon Mary, 32 a, 133; Wilson H f, 52 a, 
95. Why Not— Yow Henry, 269 a, 500; Yow H H, 357 a, 



BUSINESS DIREUTORY. 137 



900 ; Yow A L, 189 a, 475 ; Yow Geo, 26 a, 26. Asfiehoro— 
Yuw Mary D, 95 a, 200. Why Not— Yow Jas M, 171 a, 4r)0 ; 
Yow Noah, 115 a, 250; Yow E S, 225 a, 500; Yow A J, 195 
a, J ,600. 

White House— Co\ eRuffin,80a,170. Moffitt's Mills— (J, u a rd - 
ner Enoch, 148 a, 222; Gardner I F, 23 a, 46; Garner Lucy, 
50 a, 75; Graves Adeline (agt), 118 a, 200. A'aZ/j/i— Garner 
Wm, 109 a, 190; Garner Elizabeth, 5 a, 10; Garner Eli, 52 a, 
100. 



TABERNACLE TOWNSHIP. No. 16. 

(Postofflces— Eden, Hoover Hill, Level Plains, Lytton, Randolph 

FULLER-S.) ' 

Fuller's P 0— Arnold J M, 130 acres, value, $275 ; Arnold 
Julia, 133 a, 300 ; Arnold P L, 140 a, 1,000; Andrews J G, 
198 a, 400 ; Alexander R W, 98 a, 100. Caraivay—Bnlea 
Micajah, 299 a, 450; Briles Mrs Grizelle, 135 a, 350; Biiles 
Jacob, 170 a, 200; Briles Henry, 245 a, 900 ; Briles J L, 53 
a, 1,500; Briles W A, 60 a, 275; Briles W C, 48 a, 300; 
Briles W 0, 103 a, 159 ; Briles Harris, 39 a, 50 ; Barnes J A, 
85 a, 250; Barnes S M, 105 a, 210; Barnes Mrs Elizabeth, 
Bell Latta, 20 a, 50 ; Bryant J F, 1^ a, 40 ; Copple Solomon, 
75 a, 225. Hoover Hill — Copple P P, 204 a, 550; Copple 
Matilda, 50 a, 150; Copple Barbara, 48 a, 125; CashattG F, 
30 a, 55 ; Cashatt Mary, 45 a, 50 ; Cashatt W G, 163 a, 326 ; 
Cody Stephen A, 6« a, 150 ; Crouis H L, 265 a, 900 ; Cam- 
eron Reuben, 260 a, 675; Craven Fred, 11 a, 55; Cummer 
C C, 54 a, 90 ; Causey & Jones, 250 a, 500 ; Davis Don^an, 
304 a, 2,550; Davis H H, 16 a, 50; D«vis John Sr, 147 a, 
205 ; Davis Wm N, 75 a, 350 ; Darr J M, 1 a, 15 ; Delk H H, 
104 a, 200. Eden—DoTseit W H, 121 a, 200 ; Dorsett David 
A, 16 a, 33 ; Dorsett Sarah M, 31 a, 62 ; Dorsett D F. 25 a, 
100; Dorsett H C, 24 a, 50; Dorsett L H, 1 a, 5; Elleton 
C F, IJ a, 5 ; Elder J W (agt). Ilia, 250. Fullfrs—TuUer 
Dr Alson, 850 a, 2,690 ; Fuller Dr Alson (agt), 181 a, 1,500; 
Fuller F R, 120 a, 500; Fuller I J, 256 a, 2,350; Fuller I J 
(agt), 70 a, 500; Fuller J C, 7* a, 15; Fuller A W, 370 a, 
2,520; Finch I J, 131 a, 650; Finch I J (guardian), 102 a, 
200 ; Finch A B, 126 a, 400. Eden— Finch L A, 144 a, 600 ; 
Finch L A (agent), 109 a, 200; Farlo J M, 42 a, 85; Free 
M M, 129 a, 300 ; Freeman John, 3 a, 12 ; Freeman Jesse, 6 
a, 18 ; Gray A J (agt), 400 a, 400 ; Grav IJ, 3 n, 6. Hoover 
Hill— Gaddis Franklin, 100 a, 200; Gaddis llilliard, 240 a 



138 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



900; GuddJs F R, 121 a, 400; Gorris G M, 9 a, 35; Gorris 
G M (guardian). 20 a, 75; Gorris Zilphia, 16 a, 16; Garren 
Win \V.40a,80; Gnrner Caroline, 1 a, 20 ; Garren Betty and 
Lou, 10 a, 20; G<*odin Noali, 3 a, 25. Fullf^rs— Kevin Gold 
Mining Co, 25 a, 3.000: Hunt P VV,121 a, 625 ; Hunt J M W, 
27 a, 65 ; Hunt W S, 50 a, 125 ; Hunt B F, 49 a, 200 ; Hunt 
Elizabeth, 2 a, 40; Hunt E W, 3 a, 20 ; Hunt Ciiarity, 75 a, 
175; Hunt Dock. 31^ a, 110; Hunt John T, 7 a, 15; Hunt 
Win, 20 ii, 75; Hunt Parthenia, 50 a, 100; Hill J C, 2| a, 
10; Hill Elizabeth, 137 a, 250; HillJoshua, 102 a, 300; Hill 
B W, H7 a. 125; Hill J A, 186 a, 430; Hill T A, 68 a, 200. 
Hoom- H>ll— Hoover Florence, 122 a, 908 ; Hoover J C, 120 
a, 300; Hoover F A, 49 a, 240; Hoover R S, 135 a, 800; 
Hinshaw J T, 119f a, 275; Hinshaw J T & Co, 3 a, 900; 
Hill A S (adm'r), 63 a, 150. Sawyersville-mx J M,7J a, 50; 
Hix Harrison, 8 a, 50; Harrelson Levi, 138 a, 350. Hoover 
/////— Ha rrelson Robt, 25 a, 40; Hoover Hill Gold Mining 
Co, 24(3 a, 7,000; Hoover & Garner, 63 a, 324; Harris R F, 
60 a, 120; Harris Fletcher, 5 a, 25; Harris Lindsay, 11 a, 
50; Harris Charity, 7 a, 20 ; Hughs Farley (heirs), 40 a, 49. 
S'nvyersvillr — Hughs J F, 40 a, 125; Hughs Martha, 75 a, 
125; Hughs W H, 169 a, 683; Helf)er A E, 77 a, 300; Har- 
ris E L, 148 a, 400. Hoover Hill — Jones Eunice, 80 a, 500; 
Jackson R L, 223 a, 850; Jarrett A W, 1 a, 42. Caraiuay — 
Jarrel John F, 10 a, 50; Johnson L L, 12 a, 35; Johnson 
Wil-son, 5| a, 8; Johnson Elizabeth, 77 a, 200; Kennedy 
W L, 184J a, 1,550; Keystone Gold Mine Co, 181 a, 1,500; 
Kennedv E G W. 75 a, 350; Kinley J G, 27 a, 75; Kinley 
J S,_139 a, 290; Kinley J W, 298 a, 1,306 ; Kinley Jane, 60 
a, 75. Hoover Hdl — Kinley Wm, 5S a, 300 ; Kinley Geo W, 
200 a, 890; Kinley Mining Co, 179 a. 2,000; Kearns R L, 
1(50 a, 500; Kearns Charlie, \^ a, 35; Kearns A R, 168 a, 
800; Kearns D F, 245 a, 1,100; Luther Mary A, 16 a, 35; 
Lewis Matilda, 1 a, 10 ; Lanier Benj, 60 a, 160; Lanier Eli- 
jah, 109 a, 190 ; Lanier Jas, 80 a, 188 ; Laughlin A C, 117 a, 
225; Laughlin Charity and Nancy, 224 a, 850; Laughlin 
W N, 188 a, 900; Laughlin John," 156 a, 1,000; Laughlin 
S W, 36 a, 200; Laughlin Robt, 100 a, 215; Laughlin Cenith 
F, 97 a, 300; Laughhn Wm, 32 a, 115. 8awyersville—lj3i\xg\\- 
lin Laura L, 57 a, 75; Lawrence M F, 58 a, 200; Morgan 
John M, 679 a, 3,300 ; Meyers Felix, 292 a, 600 ; Muftlv Min- 
ing Co, 200 a, 400 ; McKenzv Miller, 100 a, 275 ; Miller W J, 
134 a, 600; Miller Richard, 30 a, 60; Miller Marsh, 125 a, 
300; Miller Elizabeth, 60 a, 215; Miller Lonesa, la, 12; 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 139 



Nance Atsv, 75 a, 125 ; Nance W L. 230 a, 45l» ; Naiuv Wi- 
ley, 120 a, 350; Nance B J, OG a, 50; NMiice A P, 47 a, 75- 
Niclu.ls D W, 110 a, 812 ; Peterson Win M, 40 a, 50. JI,>om' 
Hill -Furkius Joseph, 205 a, 1,500; Parisii B F, 1G5 a, 350- 
Parish L C, 67 a, 800; Parish B M, 50 a, 110; Parish II II', 
53 a, 250 ; Parish Eliz.ibeth, 33 a, 100 ; Parker L iM,42 a. 175;' 
Pierce Sarah, 97 a, 250; Pierce Thomas, 85 a, 125; Pierce 
Fred, 153 ;i,-650 ; Pierce Elizabeth, 33 a, 100; Pierce S I) \V, 
218 a, 1,500; Pierce C F, 215 a, 550; Pierce H B, 12 a, 25; 
Pierce D C, 169 a, 525 ; Pierce A J, 140 a, 800 ; Pierce Alfred 
Sr, 370 a, 1,200; Pierce Alfred Jr, 40 a, 130 ; Pierce S B, 32 
a, 43 ; Pierce Julian, 239 a, 800 ; Pierce I J, 33 a, 134; Pierce 
Lorenzo, 58 a, 100. Fullers— l*hi\\\[)s L C, 35 a, 62, 103 a, 
750. Edtn — Royles J L & Robert, 30 a, 50. Ashehow — 
Robbins M S, 3(i8 a, 3,350. Eden — Robbiiis George, 4S8 a, 
1,750; Richardson J \V, 245 a, 550 ; Richardson A D, 100 a, 
225 ; Richardson Q M, 262 a, 750 ; Richardson G H, 35 a, 70; 
Royles J L, 173 a, 250. tSaioyersville—Rnih Gaston \V, 6 a, 
10; Rush Duncan, 167 a, 450; Rush A G, 80 a, 250; Rush 
G W, 38 a, 400; Rush James, 100 a, 200; Rusii J iM, 100 a, 
450; Rush D M, 147 a, 700; Rush Benj F, { a, 50; Rusli W, 
250 a, 2,500; Rush Wm H E-q, 272 a, 800. Hoover IJi/l— 
Rush Mrs S E, 130 a, 150; Sumney T F, 37 a, 80; Sumney 
G W, 22 a, 35; Sumney J F, 73 a, 290; Sumner Nelson, 107 
a, 225 ; Sumney Lvndoii, 206 a, 750 ; Sumney Lyndon (agt), 
227 a, 750 ; Scarlet Stephen, 30 a, 60. /^//m— Scai-let W F, 
2 a, 20. rmi%— Skeen M M, 231 a, 1,905 ; Skeen William, 
5 a, 30 ; Skeen C O, 220 a, 1,300. Hoover /////— Skeen Ehza- 
beih, 65 a, 350 ; Skeen William, 3 a, 30 ; Skeen Lindsay, 3 a, 
25 ; Skeen Mary E, 253 a, 900; Skeen N R (agi), 100 a, 375; 
Skeen N R, 524 a, 2,024; Snider W R, 80 a, 400; Snider 
P H, 250 a, 945. Fullers— SnUler R E, 120 a, 266. Cara- 
ivay — Stooks D C, 40 a, 750; Swaney Hiram, 134 a, 320; 
Small Rich, 94 a, 188. Scnvyersville— Spencer Malcom, 47 a, 
100; Spencer Michael, 137 a, 275; Spencer Louis. 165 a, 540; 
Spencer J M, 215 a, 632; Spencer J H, 18 a, 47; Spencer 
Hannah, 5 a, 75; Sawyer Mary A, 116 a, 350. Caraway — 
Smith Ed, 158 a, 500; Smith D H, 213 a, 2,000. SawycTS- 
viUe — Spencer Jordan, 15 a, 24 ; Spencer A A, 23 a, 75 ; 
Thomas David, 138 a, 800. Hoover Hill— Thuyer W S & 
A M, 792 a, 4,300 ; Thayer C W, 17 a, 750, 486 a, 9.s5 ; Thorn- 
burg Filmore, J a, 10; Vuncanon Mariiiia, 123 a, 250. 
i^u/Zers— A'arner A V,89a, 325 ; Varner J R.82 a, 225; Var- 
ner F A, 180 a, 415; Varner Mrs Sallie, 41 a, 125. Anhe- 



140 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



l,Qfo — "Worth & Hammond, 15 a, 100; VVorth & Redding, 
175 a 375. Farmers — Wood M L, 6H a, 300. Hoover Hill — 
Winsiow Abigail, 22 a, 250; Walls W K, 218 a, 603; Walls 
M V, 7 a, 30; Walls Joseph, 25 a, 100; Wilborn John, 128 
a, 600; Wilborn R C, 15 a, 35; Williams S C, ]92 a, 1,250. 
PulJers — Williams Lucinda, 16 a, 35. Caratvay — Walker 
R M, 234 a, 700; Walker R L, 100 a, 700; Walker E W, 
150 a, 1,500; Walker W F, 95 a, 550; Yonts Julius, 75 a, 600. 



TRINITY TOWNSHIP. No. 17. 

(Postofflces— Defiance, Progress, Trinity College, Wheatmore, 
Archdale, Maud.) 

Trinity P 0— Andrews W W, 45 acres, value, S800 ; Alex- 
ander J H, U a, 50; AUred H T, 1 lot, 350 ; Archdale Roller 
Mills Co, 2.V a, 2,500; Alberton J W, 72 a, 350; Arnold S R, 
250 a, 1,400, Arnold J T, 167 a, 1,400; ArnoM J W , 195 a, 
1,560; Alford Miss Maud, 217 a, 1,000; Albright G W, 3 a, 
50, 1 lot, 900. Progress— A\(} ride John, 235 a, 1,300, 2 lots, 
40; Burns Willis, 5 a, 75. Tnnity— Br ndshaw W S, 1 lot, 
800 ; Bramt! W A, 47 a, 700. Progress — Bvauson Samila, 71 a, 
300. Trinif y-Bwok^ Kelly, 1 a, 50 ; Bulla J D, 42i a, 200 ; 
Barker Chora, 1 a, 50; Bonldin W L, 202 a, 1,000. Arch- 
dale— Bowman Nannie, 125 a, 400; Butler Joseph, 75 a, 375; 
Brower L M, 20 a, 100. Trinity— Buudy C E, 50 a, 200 ; 
Bowers Jas, 150 a, 575; Brown Dempsey, 400 a, 1,000, 1 lot, 
150; Brown Albert, 1 a, 50; Brown Logan, 1 a, 15; Brown 
Al<on, 1 a, 100; Brown Jerry, 11 a, 50; Brown Eliza A, 400 
a, 1 ,200 ; Bird Joseph, 135 a, 500. Progress— BMv B F, 250 a, 
1.500; Blair B F (agt), 65 a, 340; Blair Cvntha J, 21 a, 150; 
Blair Wm N, 133 a, 650; Blair Mrs J 6, 50 a, 400; Blair 
J..hn A, 90 a, 450; Blair Jesse C, 40 a, 175; Blair J M, 153 a, 
550 ; Blair Wiley C, 50 a, 300 ; Blair Sallie J, 25 a, 150 ; Blair 
J Millikan, 147 a, 600 ; Belo Adam, 3 a, 40; Belo Joseph, 7 a, 
125. Archdale— B\ii\r Mrs Eunice, 220 a, 1,200; Blair S J, 
76 a, 500 ; Barbee L C, 187 a, 1,000 il7a?A(i— Crowson T M, 
4 a, 20. Glndeshoro — Coltrane Jesse T, la, 500; Coltrane 
Christina, 19 a, 100; Coltrane Betiie, 115 a, 400. Progress— 
Coltiane Cornelia, 35 a, 150 ; Coltrane Samira, 35 a, 150 ; 
Coltrane Martha, 35 a, 135; Clark Rodan, 1 a, 50. Trinity — 
Collett J B. 52 a, 312 ; Collett Benj, 200 a, 800 ; Collett John, 
283 a, 1,720 ; Crotts Fayette, 130 a, 400 ; Crotts S J, 30 a, 150; 
Champlin Jno, 50 a, 250 ; Carr Elizi V, 1 a, 400 ; Carr W, 
48 a, 500, 1 lot, 1,000; Corbett E T, 43 a, 150 ; Crawford E C, 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. Ml 



157 a, 700; Charles Newton, 8i a, 50; Craven Irena, 103 a, 
550,1 lot, 900; Craven Mrs Nannie, 94 a, 350, 1 lot, 450; 
Crowell J F, 1 a, 1,000. High Pom<— (^lapp Eliza, 90 a, 40o! 
IFAm<mo?r— Dorsett N L, 53;^ a, 225; Dorsett Ht-z.kiali, 
199 a, 1,000; Dnr.sett Hezokiah (agt), 471 a, 1,200; Dorsett J 
G, 136 a, 900; Dorsett Wm, 3| a, 150; Dorsett Mrs Amanda, 
la, 225; Dorsett John, 372 a, 3,750. Trinity — Daw John, 
2 a, 25; Dodson Margaret,! a, 25. Progress — Davis Jesse, 
216 a, 1,075; Davis J W, 20 a, 150. 3ia7<rf-Elder W N, 
180 a. 1.200; Elder David, 1 a, 15; Elder E C, 260 a, 1,250; 
Elder John H, 100 a, 500 ; English S L, 120 a, 700. Trinity— 
English J B, 8 a, 50; English E E. 67* a, 310; English N C, 
60 a, 300; English R L, 4 a, 15; EngFish N C (extr), isl a, 
750; English E A, 97 a, 450; Edwards Mollie, 1 lot, 700; 
Elroy Stephen, 15 a, 60; Emsley Leach, 20 a, 80; Ellington 
W F, 1 lot, 100. Arch dale— EWioU Mildred, 47 a. 300 ; Elliott 
L W, 200 a, 1,600. Trinity— TreemSin Mary, 4 a, 100 ; Free- 
man Jacob. 8 a, 50. Archdaif^ — Frazer E W, 40 a, 425 ; Fra- 
zer D W, 167 a, 500; Frazer John A, 140 a, 500. Trinity— 
Frazer J G (adrar), 160 a. 800; Frazer J G, 150 a, 1,050, 3 
lots, 75; Frazer H H, 133 a, 550; Frazer D M, 160 a, 600; 
Frazer Jemima (deed), 226 a, 850; Frazer A A 21 a, 135; 
Frazer Francis, 21 a, 100; F.azer F C, 305 a, 1,650 . Fraz.T 
E S, -.^00 a, 850. Wheatmore— Finch T J, 125 a, 4,000; Finch 
Branson, 12^ a, 100, 1 a, 25. Archdale—Fo\we\\ Thos S, 1 
lot, 400. Trinity— F\oy<] G C, 88 a, 625 Progress— Fl^xd 
B C, 60 a, 300. Trinity— Floyd G W, 242 a, 1,200 ; Freeman 
J L, 35 a, 260, 1 lot, 350. Wheatmore — Goss Ilarason, 33 a, 
200, 1 lot, 10. GZe//o^a— Goodman Noah, 1 lot, 25. Glades- 
boro — Guyar C A, 5 a, 50 ; Gamon Mary L, 1 lot, 500 ; Gibson 
Daniel, 10 s, 200. Defiance— Gray Benj^ 116 a, 500. Glennla — 
Gray JO, 67* a, 350; Gray Anderson, 1 lot, 50. Mavd— 
Gray Wm, 63 a, 537; Gray Lewis. 1 lot, 50; Gray Maria, 1 
lot, 25 ; Gray Dan'l, 50 a, 250. Trinity— Grav Henry, 15 a, 
90. Wheatmore— Gray Clark, 1 lot. 25 ; Gray T E. 43 a, 200, 
1 lot, 25. Trinity — Gammaway Edward, 1 lot, 150; Gain- 
maway W T, 208 a, 800, 1 lot, 1,500; Green Abram. 61 a, 
360; Gray Franklin, 8^ a, 50; Gray M K, 445 a. 3.2<)(); 
Heitman J F, :-!3 a, 1,000, 1 lot, 100. Prngress—U\]\ Jno A, 
135 a, 500 ; Hill S T, 130 a, 6'0 ; Hill Gaston. 5 a, 30. Maud- 
Hill John W, 100 a, 400. Progrex^—Uoh Thomas, 1 a, 25. 
7V?'?i?7?/— Hundley Chas, 2 lots, 750 ; Hem|)hill Dorcas, 1 a, 
25; Harvev Chas. 1 lot, 50 /I rr//f/o/^— Hammond .M. 1 lot, 
1,360; Hay worth N M, 53 a, 265; llavworth Mrs Mariha, 



142 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



25 a, 250. Trimtj/ -Haines Wm, 4 a, 20 ; HHrriss W O, 124 
a. 1,2')5 ; Hiirri-s Ernest, 9 ;), 50 Proc/ress — Hendricks T M, 
10^ a, 135; Heiulricks G G, 50 a, 1,000 ; Harrlen Bntie, 13 a, 
130. Wheatmore—Ho^Sin J M, 1 a, 50. jTrm^— Hnrri-s T 
F, 72 a, 420. Wheafmore— Ingram. I N, 52 a, 300 ; Injrram 
Lucy J. 31 a, 250 ; InnrrMm E H, 180 a, 1,230 ; Jordan G E, 
94 a', GOO; Jor<lan Tlios. 145 a, 700; Jackson Rachel, 1 a, 25. 
7V//</7)/- Johnson J A, 74 a, 300; Johnson Mrs Mary, 1 lot, 
200; Johnson C L, 59 a, 300; Johnson J E, 98 a, 450; John- 
son Ellis, 1 a, 50; Johnson L, 1 lot, 400; Johnson H L(decVl), 
192 a, 9G0. T/iomasv die— Johnson Mrs Eliza, 60 a, 175; 
Johnson R S, 50 a, 250 ; Johnson Eveline, 20 a, 90. Wheat- 
morc — Johnson Joshua D, 75 a, 250 Trinity — Johnson Miss 
Rose, 90 a. 350. DeH'ince — Jones Margaret, 2 a, 300 ; Jones 

I E, 168 a, l.OtiO. Trinity— Jox^es Wm, 187 a, 800; Jones T 
N, 143 a, 650. Archdale — Kersey Amos, 25 a, 150; King 
Rufus P, 12 a, 900; Kiser & Shipplett, 37 a, 150. Glenoln— 
Kennedv S J, 132 a, 830; Kennedy John L, 55 a, 250; Ken- 
nedy Wilson, 249 a, 1,150. Whe.atmore — Kennedv A W, 
233 a, 1,350. 7V;niXy— Leak D S, 1 a, 50; Led well W T, 60 
a. 225. 3Iaud — Lanier S W, 60 a, 300; Linthicura Z, 1 a, 
50; Lamar H mnah, 4 a, 50 Defiance — Laughlin Cliesley, 
5Ah a. 200; Laughlin M C, 30 a, 175; Laughlin Abigail, 8 a, 
50. ylrc/ida/e— Levvallen M C, 1 lot, 250; Love W D, 45^ a, 
425. T/'i/i/^v— Lineberrv A M, 110 a, 300 ; Lineberrv BL 
(•igt), 1 M, 200; Lineberry B L. 3 lots, 900; Lambeth Calvin, 

II 25 ; Lambeth W D, 133 a, 450 ; Lambeth D T, 72 a, 426 ; 
Lambeth F S. 72 a, 426; Lambeth B S, 188 a, 1,200; Lam- 
beth DT& FS. 600 a, 4,932; Lambeih R L, 107 a. 425; 
Leach A J, 38 a, 200 ; Leach J F, 153 a, 900 G/e/J ok— Leach 
John. 3 a, 50; L-ach Anderson, 21 a, 100; Leach CJ& 
Amanda. 1 lot, 400; Leach M B, 1 lot, 50; Leach M S, 43 a, 
300; Leach J A, 1 a, 100; Leach Mrs Marv, 7 a, 100. Trinity— 
Leach Miss Martha, 4(5 a. 250; Leach Mrs Marv. 78 a, 700; 
Leach Lorenzo, 31a, 300; Leach Mis Sallie M, 55 a, 500. 
P/-0(7rc.s.s— Millikan Marv, 117 a, 300; Millikan Mildred M, 
80 a, 250: Millikan E B, '140 a, 700; Millikan J H,10a,100, 
Millikan J Ed, 20 a. 150. Defi.a"ee—M\]]ev Jes-e A, 122 a, 
600; Miller J A & B F. 79 a, 2.500; Miller John, 1 a, 25 ; 
Miller Su«an, 10 m. 50; Morris Sarah, 280 a, 1,500; McCan- 
less A L, 1 lot, 500 Trinity— Myers Jacob, 1 lot, 150 ; Men- 
denhall Lorenzo, 1 lot, 400; Mendenhall R E, 191 a, 1,000; 
Mend'Mihdl Eli,93a. 115; VJendenhallJ F, sO a, 250 ; Marsh 
Jordan, 1 a. 50. II7iw<m.ore— Marsh W R Sr, lOO a, 350. 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 143 



P/w/?-e.s.s— Marsli A L, 203 a, 1,300. 7V//,//y— M^.jin.s .1 R. 
12 a, 50, 1 lot, 500; Keedham Vina, 1 lot, 200 : Owen H l| 
105 a, GOO; O'Biian A B. 47 ;i,300. Arch do le.-Tlummer \V 
A, 1 lot, 250; Pugh E W, 70 a, 050. Sophia— Vviux-v A C, 
142 a, 050. Triuifi/—l\\nsh M E, 53 a, 225. i'vo/;/Y.svs— Bar- 
kin Joseph, 160 a, 1,100. 7W7<?7(/— Peace Katie, 15 a, JM). 
A rch dale— i'eily John VV, 1 lot, 400. Triitltt/—l\'i^vnu\ W 
H, 1 lot, 550 ; P.-.yne D M, 53^ a, 1.200. Wluatmon-Vevry 
Jemima, 50 a, 450; Perry J M (adinr), 100 a. 400. Trinitif— 
Parker D Reed, 1 lot, 800 ; Parker Aiisou, 216 a, 900 ; Parker 
EP, llot, 700; Parker Benson, 2 lots, 1,200. Archdale— 
Ragan Amos, 110 a, 350 ; Ragan Chas, 50 a, 250. Maud — 
R^d.ling J S, 79 a, 800. Archdale— ReynoUs C A, 1 lot, 150. 
Aftliehoro — Richardson U 0, I lot, 50. 7Vi/(/7^- Kohbins 
Maria, 1 lot, 750; Bobbins Frank, 1 lot, 25; Robbins John, 
56 a, 300. il/at/d— Bobbins J M, 20 a, 100. Whcatmore— 
Rovals R D, 40 a, 200; Ron a Is Harrison, 45 a, 250; Royals 
Wiley, 30 a, 150; Rovals J L, 30 a, 100 ; Roval.s NanniH, 
102 a, 650. Trinity— He'\(\eck Samira, 4 a, 20': Reddcck R 
W, 62i a, 530 ; Reddeck H L, 22 a, 100 ; Reddeck W M, m a, 
400 ; Reddeck J L D, 47 a, 200 ; Reddeck A C, 15 a, 75 ; R. d- 
deck VV C, 32 a, 200; Reddeck J R, 93 a, 625; Reddeck J E, 
6| a, 50; Reddeck Beter, 50 a. 300; R-ddeck J S, 117 a, 500. 
Sophia — Rush Zebedee, 3 lots, 600. New Market — Spencer 
J H, 1 a, 50. Defiance— Snmner Nelson, 126 a, 650. Wlmit- 
?nore— Sppnce F H, 88 a, 300. J/r//fia/e — Spoon S J, 1 a, KiO; 
Swain J C, 92 a, 400; Snider W G. 176 a, 1,200. Tnnit>/— 
Spicer Marv, 1 a, 25; Strickland J T, 100 a, 400; Stanback 
J F, 49 a, 300; Shaw M, 1 a, 400. Archdale—SuUon Isaac, 
1 lot, 800 ; Shc41 Lucv, 1 lot, 400. Hiqh Point—Smith A B, 
259 a, 1,250; Smith Chas F, 1 lot, 75; Smith Jno Lee, 132 a, 
700; Smith M R (agt), 517 a, 2,400. Anhdale—Sieed W N, 
50 a, 200. iMaitd— Steve] L J, 1 lot, 400. P/-o^?v.s.s - Stc.-d B 
F, 185 a. 900; Steed B F (guaid). 44 a, 200. S'phin—Suwyi'r 
E N, 40 a. 160. (?mn.s6oro— Tomlinson Son V, 15 a. 3(>0, 
1 h.t, 1.000. Archdale— T(>m\\u>on A J, 4 a. 200 ; Tomlin.'^oii 
S F, 100 a, 1,000; Tomlin.son H A & Co, 1 lot, 300; Tomlin- 
son J M, 35 a, 700, 2 lots. 20; Thomps.m Sam'l, 1 lot, 550; 
Taylor Marv I. 438 a, 1,700; Towns Reuben, 1 I't, 160. 
Trinitij—Vnderwood M F, 100 a. 600. New Marbi- Walker 
John, 140 a, 800 ; Walker T E. 78 a, 640. T i,ill!/—\\'i ll-rn 
J A, 35 a, 240; Welborn Mi-s S S, 59 a, 400; We!bf>rn J 11, 
75 a, 600; Welborn Crissie. 33 a. 230: Welborn W K, 332 a, 
1,800; Welborn Edmond, 1 a, 25 ; Welborn J P, 93 a, 600; 



144 RANDOLPH COUNTY 



Welborn A G, 45 a, 250; Welborn W D (agt), 80 a, 640; 
Welborn W D, 300 a, 3,500; Welborn T S, __ a, 700; Wel- 
born Anthony, 114 a, 700; Welborn Joseph A, 205 a, 1,050; 
Welborn Mrs R B, 161 a, 800. Maud— Winslow T E, 5 a, 
200 ; Win slow T L, 52 a, 400. Archdale — Warner Annie, 5 a, 
25; 'Winningham J L, 1 lot, 250; Wilson W M, 46 a, 300, 
1 lot, 400; Wall Jane, 1 lot, 25. Trinity— White J G, 5 a, 
25. Glennla—Whhe Thomas, 213 a, 940; White Mrs Lucinda 
(dead), 11 a, 60 ; White R F, 15 a, 300. Tmniy— White J J, 
105 a, 1,535,1 lot, 25. ^^rAda/e— White P W, 1 lot, 150; 
White S P, 65 a, 300, 1 lot, 400; White W J, 1 lot, 125; 
White I T, 1 lot, 150; White Jno S, 1 lot, 350. Trinity— 
Young India, 1 lot, 300. Wlieatmore — Younts S L, 57 a, 
300; Yonnts A F, 56 a, 275. 



UNION TOWNSHIP. No. 18. 

(Postofflces— Aconite, Rachel, Stkieby, Pisgah.) 

Quinine P — Allen Arch, 42 acres, value, $75; Allen 
William, 185 a, 325; Auman Zebedee, 225 a, 250 ; Auman 
Reltbrd, 50 a, 50 ; Auman Andrew, 200 a, 225 ; Auman War- 
ren, 109 a, 275 ; Auman Elizabeth, 90 a, 90 ; Auman George, 
290 a, 355 ; Auman John, 379 a, 700 ; Auman Franklin, 375 
a, 500. Ashehoro — Auman Braxton, 80 a, 80. 'Quinine — 
Byerly Eli, 100 a, 180 ; Bingiiam Louvana, 288 a, 400; Bell 
Luov, 23 a, 40; Barnes & Piummer, 1,100 a, 1,250; Bean 
11 II, 200 a, 350; Bean Geo H, 157 a, 225; Bean Horatio, 
100 a, 100. Pis^a//— Bean C 0, 100 a, 105 ; Bean Margaret, 
103 a, 155 ; Boling Wm, 154 a, 400 ; Boling Wm & Co, 30 a, 
60; Brown Lyndon, 10 a, 10; Brown Thomas Y, 100a, 125. 
Elenzer — Cornelison J H, 77 a, 60 ; Calicutt Jacob, 55 a, 75. 
Striehy — Calicutt Amanda, 22 a. 25 ; Calicutt Pleasant, 122 a, 
122; "Calicutt Jiunes, 53 a, 150; Calicutt Adline, 10 a, 25; 
Calicutt Alfred R, 200 a. 250. Quinine— Cox Dennis, 919 a, 
2,500; Cox Alfred O, 150 a, 150; Cox Robt M, 330 a, 450; 
Cox Sidney A, 50 a, 50 ; Cole T F, 87 a, 200 ; Cole John, 226 
a, 275. S'riehy — Cross Chas, 69 a, 100; Davis Anthony, 51 
a, 109 ; Davis Henderson, 39 a, 75. Pisgah — Freeman Noah, 
310 a, 480 ; Fisher Wm, ^ a, 15. A shebor o—GluySiS John B, 
571 a, h59 ; Gluvas Wm, 187 a, 187. Pif^gah— Graves Willis, 
224 a, 500 ; Graves James 0, 200 a, 200 ; Graves Agnes, 98 a, 
250. Strirhy-mn Julius, 4 a, 25 ; Hill Calvin. 112 a, 150 ; 
Hill Priscilla, 4a, 25; Hill Amacia, 112a, 125; Hancock 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 145 



Daniel, 60 a, 75; Harvel Franklin, 104 a, 165; Harvel Mar- 
tha, 10 a, 20; Hall Thos W, 40 a, 75; Hall Thos, 80 a, 125. 
P/s<7a;i— Hall AVm, 100 a, 200; Herly Samuel, 200 a, 150; 
Herly Sally, 26 a, 26; Hodge Jesse, 325 a, 650. White 
House — Hammond Clark, 220 a, 220 ; Hammond Lee, 105 a, 
200 ; Hammond Moses's heirs, 250 a, 600 ; Hammc»nd Henrv, 
200 a, 200. Pisgah— King Jeneva, 30 a, 30 ; King C L, 336 
a, 350; Luther Visa, 50 a, 75; Lnther Henry, 100 a, lOO; 
Luther Asa, 130 a, 175; Luther William, 85 a, 150; Luther 
Sydney C, 200 a, 175; Luther Frankhn, 25 a, 25; Luther 
Deborah, 85 a, 85 ; Lawrence Wm, 400 a, 410 ; Latham Noah, 
70 a, 85; Lucas Lucy, 160 a, 250; Lucas Ransom, 223 a, 300; 
Lucas John R, 145 a, 185; Lucas George, 150 a, 175; Lucas 
Tabitha, 268 a, 400; Lucas Cicero, 35 a, 50; Lucas John J, 
746 a, 2.500; Lucas John Sr, 300 a, 600; Lowdermilk Elka- 
nah, 367 a, 400; Luck W H, 109 a, 218; Luck Newton, 78 a, 
156 ; Luck Levi, 132 a, 175. Seimce Hill — Lassiter H G, 66 
a, 66 ; Lassiter Benj H, 173 a, 200 ; Luther Polly, 146 a, 175 
Luther Elzivan, 92 a, 175; Lassiter Tom's heirs, 20 a, 40 
Luther Charles, 50 a, 50; Mendenhall Judith, 100 a, 100 
McLeod Jerry, 80 a, 138. Lassiter's Mills — Murdock Alex, 
97 a, 100. Pisgah—'NewBom. Nancy, 287 a, 300; Newsom 
E C, 12 a, 35; Parks John W, 150 a, 400; Parks Mary A, 
102 a, 160; Parks Geo, 150 a, 250; Parks John, 140 a, 160; 
Parks John B, 40 a, 40. ^sAe6oro— Plum mer J R & Co, 140 
a, 140. Pisgali — Presnell Levi, 98 a, 200 ; Presnell Harvey, 
254 a, 550; Presnell Dennis, 45 a, 60 ; Presnell Randale. 187 
a, 250; Presnell Geo H, 30 a, 45; Presnell Branson, 570 a, 
780; Presnell Alex, 77 a, 100; Plunkett John and others, 50 
a, 50; Ridge J R, 100 a, 225; Richnrdson Rufus, 42 a, 75; 
Russell Wiley, 200 a, 250; Ragsdale James, 77 a, 85; Spen- 
cer J A, 385 a, 830 Qvmine — Spencer Alexander, 170 a, 
340; Sikes D A, 250 a, 300. Pisgah—^\-Ack Laban, 295 a, 
450; Slack J B, 282 a, 450; Slack Aaron, 100 a, 100; Slack 
Clarisa, 85 a, 100; Sanders H, 160 a, 160; Strange Robert 
100 a, 125 ; Striders Charles, 37 a, 37 ; Strider Milton, 40 a 
30; Strider Ann, 30 a, 23. Striehy—^in^ev Margaret, 22 a 
22; Strider Willis R, 127 a, 77; istrider Nancy, 285 a, 285 
Strider Abraham, 410 a, 225; Strickland W A, 100 a, 200 
Strickland Henry, 100 a, 300; Shaw Ritly, 2oO a, 400 
Smitherman Charles, 29 a, 29; Strider I.sainh, 50 a, 100 
Strider J C, 50 a, 50. Pis^pa/*— Strider Enoch J, 284 a, 300 
Trogden William, 350 a, 350; Trogdon Wyatt, 128 a, 185 
Vuncanon Lewis, 112 a, 125; Vuncanon John, 50 a, 100 



14G 



RANDOLPH COUNTY DIRECTORY. 



Vuncanon Ransom. 52 a, 100 ; Vuncanon Enoch, 53 a, 100 ; 
Vuncaiion David's heirs, 100 a, 125; Vuncanon Joel H, 150 
a, 175 ; Welch J J, 135 a, 200 ; Welch John, 409 a, 550 ; Wil- 
liams Wm, 16| a, 25; Williams H C, 600 a, 700; Williams 
Nancy, 200 a, 325 ; Williams Jane, 15 a, 60; Williams Han- 
nah, 148 a, 175; Williams Noah, 309 a, 840; Walden H R, 
147 a, 300; Woodell J C, 40 a, 100; Welch D E, 50 a, 50; 
Wright William, 70 a, 100. 



Molly 5pring5 ^ ''• ^- ^^pVL'^p 
Academy —^ ^ 



ipal. 





^ 



y 



HOLLY SPRINGS, N. C. 

(WAKE COUNTY.) 

ij^^FALL TERM 

Will Open August 15, 1894. 

BOARD, S7.00 PER MONTH. r 

TUITION. SI TO $3 PER MONTH, 
MUSIC, J2.50 PER MONTH. 
PAINTING, $5.00 PER TERM. V 



IT IS BETTER TO SACRIFICE MONEY TO MAKE MEN AND WOMEN, THAN 
TO SACRIFICE CHILDREN TO MAKE MONEY. 



First National B ank of Durliam, 

DURHAM, N. C. 



CAPITAL STOCK, 
STOCKHOLDER'S LIABILITIES, 
DEPOSITOR'S SECURITY, - 



$1 .'>(>,<><><>. 



l:3ANKINO IN AT^r^ ITS BW/XNCHKS. 

Liberal Inducemeots for Deposits 



^ 



from B o nKs, Corporations. Busi- 
ness Houses and Individuals. . , 



Our Facilities for Malting Collec- 
tioQs Throughout tf^e Co u ntry are 
tbe Best 



^^ 



ALL RETURNS WILL BE MADE PROMPTLY. 



SPECIAL CORRESPONDENTS : 

NATIONAL BANK REPUBLIC. New York City. N. Y. 
NA TIONAL PARK BANK. New York City. N. Y. 

UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK. New York City. N. Y. 

MANUFACTURERS NATIONAL BANK. Philadelphia. Pa. 
MERCHANTS BANK. Danville. Va. 
STATE BANK OF VIRGINIA. Richmond. I/a. 

NORFOLK NATIONAL BANK. Norfolk. Va. 

NATIONAL BANK OF RALEIGH. Raleigh. N. C. 

COMMERCIAL NA TIONAL BANK. Charlotte. N. C. 

Our Discount Rale is 8 Per Cent, lo Everybody. 

OFFICERS: 

J. S. CARR, President. L. D. HEARTT, Cashier. 

J. M. WHITTED, Teller. 



J. S. CARR. 

J. W. WALKER. 



DIRECTORS : 

E. W. KENNEDY. 
W. R. COOPER. 
L. D. HEARTT. 



T. J. LAMBE. 
J. T. MALLORY. 



Aslieboro Wood and Iron Works, 



ASHPBORO. N. C. 




Lumber, Sash, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings. 
General pounders and Machinists. 



Machine Repair WorK- 



Manufacturers of Saw Mills, 
Horse Prowers, Plows, &c. 



JOHN T. BRITTAIN. 



OSCAR L. SAPP. 



BRITTAIN & SAPP, 

Attorneys ^^^ 

— and — 

Counsellors 




Law, 



OFFICE NEAR COUKT-HOUSE. 

PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO BUSINESS. 



A5hEBORO, N. C. 



PRACTICE IN THE ADJOINING COUNTIES. 
PROBATE BUSINESS A SPECIALTY. MONEY LENT ON EASY TERMS. 



Jarrell's 



CONVEYANCES 
AT ALL TIMES. 

TERM5: 

$2 per Day. 



HIGH POINT. N. C. 




J. W. DYER, Proprietor. 



SAMPLE 

ROOMS 

FOR 

COMMERCIAL 

MEN 

ON 

GROUND 

FLOOR. 



• • 



LARGE HALL connected with 
Hotel, suited to Traveling 
Troupes, Lecturers, Etc. 




SPECIAL RATES BY 
WEEK OR MONTH. 



S2. I Cape Fear and 



The 



Yadkin Valley 
Railway. ^ 

JOHN GILL, Receiver. 




NEW ROUTE SOUTH 

VIA 

FAYETTEVILLE 

Between MOUNT AIRY, ROANOKE, WINSTON-SALEM, 
GREENSBORO, 

AND 

Charleston, Columbia, Savannah, Jacksonville, St. 

Augustine, Rockledge, Lake, Worth, Palatka, 

Sanford, Tampa, all Florida Points, 

and HAVANA, CUBA. 

EXCURSION R AXES ^g^— 

During the Summer Months to all Mountain 
> A and Sea-shore Resorts, and during the Win- 
ter Months to all Florida Points, and 
Havana, Cuba 

Fast Freight Line. 

Unequaffed Facilities for Handling all Classes of Freight 

North, South, East and West. A liberal patronage 

is respectfully solicited for this Line. 

For further information, rates, maps, schedules, etc., apply to any 
Agent of the C. F. & Y. V. Ry. Co. 

J. W. FRY, W. E. KYLE, 

General Manager, General Freight and Passenger Agent, 

Greensboro, N. C. Payetteville, N. C. 



SUPPLEMENT. 



CONTAINING MUCH INFORMATION ABOUT THE ENTIRE STATE. 



ft Calendar.' 



A VALUABLE HAND BOOK OF INFORMATION. 




PRICE, 10 CENTS. 



j£lZJj±:Jj±2j(^/, 



vol. 3.] 27tll YEAR OF PLTBLICATION. 



No. 7. 



BRANSON S 

AGRICULTURAL 




FOR THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 
And, until the 4th of July, the 118th year of American Independence. 

Carefully Calculated for the Latitude and Longitude of Raleigh, by 

LEVI BRANSON, A. M., D. D. 
LEVI BRAIMSON, Publisher, UaleiKrh, N. C. 



COPYRIGFIT, 1S94. I!V LEVI BRANSON. 

POSTMASTERS ARE AUTHORIZED AGENTS FOR THIS ALMANAC. 




2 BRANSUN'fcl NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



TIME. 

The calculations of this Almanac are made in mean solar or clock time, which 
is indicated by a well rej^ulaled clock or watch, and does not correspond with 
the sun precisely, except on four days of the year. 

Apparent time is that which makes the Sun come to the meridian at I2 o'clock. 
No good clock will run with the Sun; if set with the Sun on the 2d of January, 
the clock will seem to be one minute too fast on the 3d of January. 

To adopt the calculations of this Almanac to apparent time, use the minutes 
in the column marked " Sun slow" or "Sun fast;" add them when fast, sub- 
iti tract them when slow. 

^ The calculations are made for the Latitude and Longitude of Raleigh, N. C, 
O but the times, phases, &c., will vary only a few minutes for any part of North 
2* Carolina, South Carolina, (jeorgia, Tennessee or Virginia. 

pL| RISING AND SETTING OF THE SUN. 

^ The Almanacs generally used have made the rising and setting of the Sun 
C together equal twelve hours. This is incorrect. During some portions of the 
5 year the .Sun changes so rapidly in Right Ascension and Declination that it 
^ makes a material change in the Diurnal Arc during the day. The times here 
g given have been rigorously calculated and compared with the authority, and are 
S true to the nearest whole minute. 

g TWELVE SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 

The Head snd Face sign. '^ Aries the Ram Ar. 



P JI Arms. 

W Gemini Gem 

A Twins. 

^ Leo Lion 

1^ Lion. 

pH S£k Reins. 

5A Libra Lib. 

pq Balance. 

K ^ Thighs. 

Q Sagittarius . . Sag. 
P^ Bowman. 



O 

CD 
'^ 

> 

•a 



^ Legs. 
'■arius .... 
Waterman. 



a Aquarius Aq, 
WatAr 




^ Neck. 

Taurus Ta«. 

Bull. 

\\ @ Breast. 

, Ctmcer Can. 

Crab. 

imp Bowels. 

Virgo VJr. 

Virgin. 

fP Loins. 

Scorpio Scorp. 

Scorpion. 

9|. Knees. 

Capricornus .Cap. 

Goat. 



The )-( Pisces the Fishes Pise 

To know where the sign is, find the day of the month, and against the day 
in the column marked Moon's Signs you have the sign or place of the Moon, and 
then find the sign: it will give you the part of the body it is supposed to govern. 

SIGNS. 

t^ Aries, or Ram. 



Spring 
Signs. 

Summer 
Signs. 






1 IKf 
( ^ 



Taurus, or Bull. 
Gemini, or Twins. 
Cancer, or Crab-fish, 
Leo, or Lion. 
Virgo, or Virgin, 



.Autumn 
Signs. 

Winter 
Signs. 



J 



j*i Li'ora, or Balance. 

^^ Scorpio, or Scorpion. 

Jf*' Sagittarius, or Bowman. 

4X Capricornus, or Goat. 

^ Aquarius, or Waterman. 

Jg; Pisces, or Fishes, 



^ Sun. 
% Jupiter. 
5 Mercury. 

9*New Moon 



SIGNS OF THE PLANETS 

(^ Moon. 9 Venus. 

fj, Saturn. (^ In conjunction 

3 Uranus. i^ Neptune. 

MOON'S PHASES. 

C3) First Quarter. ® Full Moon. (£ Last Quarter 

ELECTROPOISE-See page 43. 



^ Mars. 

r] Quadrature. 

f^ Ascending Node. 



H. 




lO A. 


M. 


6 A. 


U. 


8 p. 


U. 


3 P. 


U. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA AL MAiNAC. 3 
CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES AND ERAS. 

Dominical Letter G. | Julian Period 6607 

Epact 23 Jewish Era 5654 

Golden Number 14 [ Era of Xabonassa .2641 

Solar Cycle 27 ; Olympiads 2670 

Roman Indiction 7 '■ Mohammedan Era 1311 

MOVABLE FEASTS OF THE CHURCH. 

Epiphany Jan. 6 Palm Sunday March 18 

Septuagesima Sunday Jan. 21 Easier Sunday March 25 

Sexagesima Sunday Jan. 2S Whit Sunday May 13 

Quinquagesima Sunday Feb. 4 Trinity Sunday May 20 

Shrove Tuesday Feb. 6 i First Sunday in Advent Dec. 2 

Ash Wednesday, or Lent... Feb. 7 • Ascension Day May 3 

St. Patrick's Day March 17 I 

THE FOUR SEASONS. 

D. 

Spring commences March 20, 

Summer commences June2i, 

Autumn commences September 22, 

Winter commences December 21, 

MORNING STARS. 

Mercury will be Morning Star April 10, Augnst 8, and November 37. 

Venus will be Morning Star from February 15 to November 30. 

Jupiter will be Morning Star from January 4 to December 33. 

EVENING STARS. 

Mercury will be Evening Star about February 25, June 23 and October 19. 

Venus will be Evening Star till Feb. 15, then Nov. 30 to Dec. 31. 

Jupiter will be Evening Star till June 4 — Dec. 22 to Dec. 31. 

ECLIPSES. 

In the year 1894 there will be four Eclipses — two of the Sun and two of the 
Moon, and a transit of Mercury over the sun's disk. 

I. A partial Eclipse of the Moon March 21st, not visible in North Carolina. 

II. An Annular Eclipse of the Sun April 6th, not visible in North Carolina. 

III. A partial Eclipse of the Moon September 15th, visible more or less in 
North and South America. Moon enters shadow 3:35 A. M., leaves shadow 
5:27 A. M. 

IV. A total Eclipse of the Sun September 29lh, not visible in North Caro- 
lina. 

A Transit of Mercury over the Sun's disk November lOth, visible generally to 
North and South America. The Transit comes on at loh. 56m. a. m , and 
goes off at 4h. 12m. r. m. It commences on the Eastern limb of the Sun. 

TIDES. 

The time of tide can readily be found for the following places by adding the 
hours and minutes opposite the names to the time when the Moon is South on 
the day to which the tide is sought. The time when the Moon is South is given 
in the Calendar for every day. The next tide can be found very nearly by 
adding 12 hours and 29 minutes to the time of the one previous. 

The tides are given in local time — add 12 minutes for Eastern Standard. 

H. M. ; H. M. 

Boston II 12 ^ew York 8 13 

Sandy Hook 729 Old Point 817 

Baltimore 633 Washington City 7 44 

Richmond 432 Hatteras Inlet 704 

Beaufort 726 , Bald Head 726 

Southport 7 19 Wilmington 906 

Charleston.. 726 ■ Savannah 9 33 

B^~Heavy Woolen Underwear, cheap at WHITING BROS., Raleigh, N. C. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



HERSCHEL'S WEATHER PROGNOSTICATOR 



For Foretelling the Weather through all the Lunations of the Year. 



ttf) 
OS 

09 

o 

g 

QQ 



This table and the accompanying remarks are the result of many years actual 
observation, the whole being constructed on a due consideration of the attrac- 
tions of the Sun and Moon, in their several positions respecting the Earth, and, 
by simple inspection, it shows the observer what kind of weather will most 
probably follow the entrance of the Moon into any of its quarters, and that sa 
near the truth as to be seldom or never found to fail. 



If the new moon, first quar- 
ter, full moon, or last 
quarter, happen — 




OS 



Between midnight and 2 in 
the morning 



Fair. 



Cold, with frequent 
showers 



Between 2 and 4 morning j 

Between 4 and 6, morninglRain 

Between 6 and 8, morning Wind and rain 

Between Sand 10 morn'g ] Changeable 

Between 10 and 12 morninglFrequent showers... 
Between 12 o'clock at nooni 

and 2 in afternoon Very rainy 

Between 2 and 4, afternoonlChangeable 

Between 4 and 6. afternoon 1 Fair 



Between 6 and 8, aftern'n 

Between 8 and 10, aftern'n 
Between 10 and midnight. 



CO 

H 

o 

H 
O 

» 

>A 

O 

f3 Observations. — i. The nearer the time for the Moon's change, first quarter, 
© full and last quarter are to midnight, the fairer will be the weather during the 
p next seven days. 

2. The space for this calculation occupies from 10 at night until 2 next morn- 




In Winter. 



Hoar frost unless the wind 
be S. or S. W. 

•J Snow and stormy. 

Rain. 
Stormy. 

( Cold rain if wind be W. ; 

I snow if E. 
Cold and high wind. 

Rain and snow. 
Fair and mild. 
Fair. 

Fair and frosty if wind N. 

or N. E.; rain or snow 

if S. or S. W. 
Ditto. 
Fair and frosty. 



ing. 



3. The nearer to midday or noon the phase of the Moon happens, the more 
foul or wet weather may be expected during the next seven days. 

4. The space for this calculation occupies from 10 in the forenoon until 2 in 
the afternoon. These observations refer principally to the Summer, though 

^ they affect Spring and Autumn nearly in the same ratio. 
© 5. The Moon's change, first quarter, full and last quarter, happening during 
OQ six of the afternoon hours, i. e., from 4 to 10, may be followed by fair weather, 
but this is mostly dependent on the wind, as is noted in the table. 

6. Though the weather, from a variety of irregular causes, is more uncertain 
in the latter part of Autumn, the whole of Winter and the beginning of Spring, 
yet, in the main, the above observations will apply to those periods also. 

7. To prognosticate correctly, especially in those cases where the wind is con- 
cerned, the observer should be in sight of a good vane, where the four cardinal 
points of the heavens are correctly placed. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



FARM AND GARDEN. 

Farm and Garden Work for January. — Plant peas, beans, beets, onions. 
Irish potatoes, horse radish; sow turnips, spinach, lettuce, radish, parsley, carl 
rots, salsify. Plant early peas; artichokes must now be dressed, also asparagus 
beds; this is the proper time to sow early spring tomatoes, etc. 

Prepare land for the next crop, if not done. In the low country, if mud marsh 
or rushes are used, this is a good lime to haul out and spread in the alleys, and 
throw upon it a slight listing. Repair fences, plow, ditch, drain and manure. 
You can sow oats for a first crop. 

Farm and Garden Work for February. — Continue to sow peas, and such 
vegetables as were omitted in January. Plant pole beans, first crop (in the low 
country); full crop Irish potatoes, beets and carrots; dress artichokes and aspara- 
gus. Tomatoes, peppers a^d cucumbers sow in hot beds; put out mangoes. 

This is considered the opening month of the planter's year. Continue pre- 
paring as in January. Sow oats for a full crop in the low country; plant Irish 
potatoes; make up sprout beds for sweet potatoes. Plant root crop of sweet 
potatoes. 

Farm and Garden Work for March. — Plant bush squash, pumpkins, 
water and muskmelons. okra. Guinea squash or egg-plant, sugar beets, carrots, 
beans, peas, radishes, lettuce, corn, celery (first crop), tanyah and mangoes in 
the low country and elsewhere as soon as danger from frost is over. 

This is the first planting month for cotton, corn and rice. Plant your high 
lands first; leave the low lands for April. Plant rice about the 20th of the 
month. 

Farm and Garden Work for April. — Whatever has been omitted in 
March, do not neglect any longer. Sow green glazed cabbage, pickling cab- 
bage, full crop of cauliflower and brocoli. okra. tomatoes, peppers, beets, car- 
rots, leeks, melons, cucumbers, celery. 

Full crops of corn, cotton and rice should be put in during this month. Plant 
your lowland corn. Commence early to hoe your young cotton, and thin out 
to stand. Plant pumpkins for a field crop. 

Farm and Garden Work for May. — Plant snap beans and squashes. Sow 
cabbages for winter use, cauliflower, brocoli, celery, beets, carrots, salsify. 
Plant cucumbers, melons and pumpkins for late crop. Gather herbs for drying; 
always dry gently in the shade. 

Look well to your hoeings and plowings. Continue to plant corn in low 
lands. Sow first crop of early cow peas. Rice planting is generally postponed 
until June, as the birds are very bad in May, and the May bird is exceedingly 
destructive. 

Farm and Garden Work for June. — Sow full crops of cabbs>ges for fall 
and winter use. Cauliflower and brocoli may yet be sown, also a few carrots. 
Continue to sow tomatoes, okra, radishes, snap beans. Transplant leeks; pull 
and dry onions, garlic and eschalots. A few cucumbers and melons plant for a 
late crop, and a few ruta baga turnips. 

Keep constantly at the plow and hoe; this is the most important grass month! 
If the vines from your sweet potato sprout-bed are fit you can draw and plant 
out first good rain. Sow cow peas between your corn hills and rows. The end 
of this month is a good time to put in the first crop of standing field peas. 

Farm and Garden W'ork for July. — Sow cabbages, but protect from hot 
sun when young. Water at night. Plant snap beans and a few Irish potatoes. 
Continue to sow radishes, lettuce, endive, cresses, mustard and small salading. 
The early Dutch turnip is the best to sow for the first crop; follow with the 
yellow Swedish or ruta-baga. 

Now do not omit to sow full crops of standing cow peas. .Sow a few turnips, 
carrots and beets as field crops, though the hot suns are apt to destroy them; 
should they escape they will be fine; the next month is the best for these crops. 

E^°Rubber Coats, Boots and Shoes. WHITING BROS. 



6 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



Ist Month, 



JANUARY, 1894. 



31 Days. 



^ 



D. 
New Moon, 6 
iFirst Quarter, 14 



Moon's Plxaaea. 

H. M. 

9 59 p. m. ®Full.Moon, 



7 10 p. m. 



D. H. M. 

^ . 21 10 3 a. m. 

(j^Last Quarter. 28 1 1 42 a. m. 



P4 



^ 


^ 












V 


u 




s 



V 








c 


ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 


e« 


Ifl 


.£ 


s 


:^ 


U) 




% 


"■£ 


OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 


a 


.£ u5 





"0 


"0 


V) 


V 


_o 


•^ ^ 


MATTER. 


s 


c S 


c 


s? 


>» 


e 


c 


c 


s 








^ 






Q 





3 
CO 

7 10 


a 


s 
en 

4 


3 

22 58 




S 


s 


s 


I 


Mon 


4 S8 


New Year's Day. 


A 


rises. 


morn 


2 


Tue 


7 10 


S 


S 


22 53 


9 in Q. Gen. Wolf b. 1727. 


sh 


3 30 


8 29 


3 


We 


7 10 


5 I 


5 


22 47 


dcTQ)- Cicero b. B. C. 106. 


^ 


4 32 


9 17 


4 


Thu 


7 10 


S 1 


"^ 


22 41 


Arnold invaded Va. 1781. 


'^g 


5 32 


10 6 


5 


Fri 


7 10 


5 2 


6 


22 34 


^^d ^3)- Richm'd burnt 1781. 
llsPEpiphany. 


ifr 


6 29 


10 57 


6 


Sat 


7 10 


5 3 


6 


22 27 


J^ 


sets. 


II 49 



1. 

"7 

8 
9 

ID 
II 
12 

13 

2. 

14 
15 
16 

17 

18 

19 
20 



Epiphany. 



Day's length 9 hours 55 minutes. 



G. 




9 


5 


4 


7 


22 19 


Mon 




9 


5 


5 


7 


22 II 


Tue 




9 


S 


6 


8 


22 02 


We 




9 


5 


6 


8 


21 53 


Thu 




9 


5 


7 


8 


21 44 


hri 


7 


9 


5 


8 


9 


21 34 


Sat 




9 


5 


9 


9 


21 24 



Liberia colonized 1822. 
Battle New Orleans 1815. 
Napoleon III died 1873. 
d 9 0)' 2 greatest brilliancy. 
^ in aphe. Alex. Hamilton b. 1757 
Vicksburg fortified 1861. 
George Fox died 1690. 



Jt' 


5 17 


<z 


6 19 


4: 


7 21 


^ 


8 25 


f^ 


9 28 


••^ 


10 31 


IS. 


II 35 



eve 

I 

2 



28 
15 
5^ 
41 
23 
6 



First Sunday after Epiphany. 



Day's length 10 hour s i minute. 



0. 




9 


5 10 


10 


21 13 


Mon 




9 


5 II 


10 


21 2 


Cue 




9 


5 12 


10 


20 51 


We 




8 


5 13 


II 


20 39 


'Ihu 




8 


5 14 


II 


20 27 


Yx\ 




8 


5 15 


II 


20 14 


Sat 




8 


5 15 


II 


20 I 



PtiO. Com. Maury b. 1806 
'\ sta, Jackson b. 1767. 

6%3- Com. Gibbon d. 1794. 

Dr. Franklin born 1706. 

(5 t;i 3. Bulwer Lytton d. 1873. 

Gen. R. E. Lee born 1807. 

John Howard died 1790. 



'S. 


morn 


H' 


43 


H' 


I 55 


<P^ 


3 10 


ts^ 


4 27 


M 


5 39 


M 


6 44 



5 51 

6 39 

7 33 

8 32 

9 36 

10 44 

11 50 



3. Septuagesima Sunday. 



D^y's length ic hours 9 minutes. 



O. 

Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



19 48 

19 34 
19 20 

19 5 
18 50 
IS 35 
18 20 



/^^Mayor Holden died 1875. 
V^/Henry VIII born 1547. 
9 sta. Wm. Gaston died 1844. 
Pres. Johnson impeached 1868. 
cf in Q. Fayetteville settled 1 749 
Battle of Newbern 1864. 
d" 1i 3' Mozart born 1756. 



^tg 


rises 


=cs 


6 32 


•^ 


7 49 


^ 


9 


^ 


10 8 


^ 


II 13 


^ 


morn 



morn 
o 53 
I 
2 

3 
4 
4 



4. Sexagesima Sunday. 

28 "^^ 

29 

30 

31 



Day's length 10 hours 21 minutes. 



G. 


7 2 


5 23I13 i8 4 


Mon 


7 2 


5 23 13 17 48 


I'ue 


7 2 


5 24 14 17 31 


We 


7 2 


5 25 14I17 15 



C5 S 3- Tnpple Alii. 1668. 1 A 
rf ^O sup. Kansas ad. '6i.j j*j 
§ iiT. Hel. Lat. Harper d. 1883! SIS 
C^cT^ Corn laws abol. 1849. ! t^g I 



18 

1 22 

2 25 

3 26 



5 40 

6 25 

7 12 

8 I 



.—January— I, 2, 3. 4, 5, fair if wind N. orN. E.; 

6, 7, 8, 9. ID. II, 12, 13, fair if wind N. or N. E.; 
; 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, ig. f.Mr if wind N. or N. E.; 

20, 21, 22, 23. 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, cold high wind; 



Weather Conjectures 
rain or snow if S. or S. W. ; 
rain or snow if S. or S. W. 
rain or snow if S. or S. W. ; 

29, 30. 31, cold high wind. 

Farmers Should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE" brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d page cover.) S. w. TRAVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 7 

FARM AND GARDEN.-Continued. 

Farm and Garden Work for August.— Transplant all kinds of cabbage, 
cauliflower and celery. Sow carrots and beets, turnips of all kinds, spinach. 
lettuce, radishes and onions. 

Now sow full crops of field turnips, carrots and beets, and such other crops 
as were omitted last month; strip fodder. Early lice will be fit to cut the last 
of this month. Look to it. This is a good time to plant vines of the first slips, 
in order to procure seed potatoes for the next year's crops. 

Farm and Garden Work for Settemher. — Now sow full crops of all 
kinds — turnips, onions, carrots, beets, cabbages, lettuce, cresses. Look after 
your mushroom beds. Hoe and thin your turnips. 

Continue to sow field turnips, carrots and beets. Southern seed is always 
better than the imported; those from the latter are apt to run to seed early in 
the spring, unless it be English seed. Prepare land for sowing rye in October. 
Pick cotton; harvest corn. 

Farm and Garden Work for Octoder. — Vou may make two sowings of 
cabbage this month, and, if of English seed, they will not " run " in the spring. 
Sow Pktuce; hoe turnips and thin; put out leeks and onions; sow principal crop 
of spinach; earth up celery. 

Continue picking your cotton as it blows. Sow early rye, wheat and barley. 
Dig your sweet potatoes when the weather becomes cool and you e.xpect frost. 

Farm and Garden Work for November. — Sow your first crop of peas 
and a few turnips. Plant out onions raised from seed in August and Septem- 
ber. Plant Windsor and long-pod beans. Dress asparagus and artichokes. 

Sow full crops of rye, barley, wheat and other small grain. Harvest your 
sweet potatoes. 

Farm and Garden Work for December. — Plant peas of all kinds; set out 
onions, garlic, eschalots and cabbage. Sow a few lettuce, spinach, carrots and 
radishes. You may try a few Irish potatoes. 

Finish picking cotton; get out crops of rice, and prepare for market. Com- 
mence plowing, ditching, draining and manuring as early as possible for next 
year's crop. 

ANECDOTE OF DR. CLOSS. 

When quite a youug man he was sent by Conference to preach to the plain, 
illiterate fishermen on our coast south of Cape Hatteras. At one of his earliest 
appointments he was accosted by a rude, rough sailor, who requested that he 
would preach his father's funeral. 

" Is your father dead ?" asked Mr. Closs. 

"Oh, yes, he's been dead more'n a year, but nobody han't preached his 
funeral." 

" Well," said Mr. Closs," " I'll give notice to-day that at my next appoint- 
ment one month hence I'll preach Billy Wilkins' funeral." 

Notice was accordingly given, and at the next "meeting" a large crowd 
greeted the young preacher. He ascended the pulpit, a sort of story-and-a-half 
afTair, securely boxed in to prevent the escape of any preacher who might enter 
it ere the benediction was pronounced, and after giving out his hymn and pray- 
ing, and just as he was about to announce his text, he felt a nervous jerking at 
his coat tail. Somewhat surprised at the unusual occurrence, he looked around 
and down at the figure of a man who was thus attracting bis attention, and 
beheld Jim Wilkins, the son of the deceased, in a stooping position behind the 
pulpit, with one hand on the skirts of the preacher's coat and the other wound 
away around towards his hip-pocket, and as Mr. Closs stooped to catch the 
message, Jim, in a hoarse whisper, said: 

" Par;on, you know this is dad's funeral, and I want you to do your level 
best." And producing a "tickler" of what might have been whisky, said. 
" wont you take a drap to help you on in the good work?" 

It is said on the authority ot Mr. Closs that he declined and proceeded with 
the funeral discourse. J.-iinI'. Niatiifrv. 

E^^Drees Suits made to order— see our samples. WHITING BROS., 
Raleigh, N.C 



> BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC 

2d Month. FEBRUARY, 1894. 



28 Days. 




Moon's Phases. 

n. H. M. 1^- H M. 

New Moon, 5 4 36 p m. ©Full Moon, 19 9 8 p. m. 

iKirsi Ouarter. n 5 34 a. m. (CLast Quarter, 27 7 20 a. m. 



X 


^ 








u 




6 
u 










V 










ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 


rt 


U9 


"3 



s 


i? 


(A 




» 


tn in 


OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 




•= id 





"o 


.!2 




"in 


MATTER. 


C 





c 



>^ 


>. 


e 


c 


C 


C 













Q 


Q 


s 


9 

v. 




a 




S 


S 


% 


I 


Thu 


7 I 


S 27 


14 


16 37 


Peace Conference 1865, 


* 


4 23 


morn 


2 


Fri 


7 I 


S 28 


14 


16 40 


h sta. Prof. Dana born 1 8 14. 


^ 


5 It) 


9 43 


3 


Sat 


7 


5 29 


14 


16 22 


;_|§0, At. on Ft. Donaldson '63. 


^ 


6 3I10 34 



/>, Shrove Sunday, 



Day's length 10 hours 31 miiui 



tes. 



9 
10 



O. 

Nfon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



59 5 30 

58 5 31 

58 5 32 

57l5 33 

56|5 34 
55|5 
54I5 



14I16 49 in Peri. Guiteau sent'c'd 1882 

14I15 46'/l^d S 3- Carlyled. 1881. 

14! 15 28 ^& Shrove Tuesday. 

14J15 9 Ash Wednesday — Lent. 

14^14 50 (5 ^9. Fall of Roanoke Isl. '62 
35Ji4'l4 31 (jen. Hancock died 1886. 
361 14! 14 nQjj 0. Treaty of Paris 1763. 



^ 


4> 42 


fk 


sets. 


/& 


6 18 


(k 


7 21 


^ 


8 25 


-0 


9 29 


^ 


10 36 



II 24 
eve. 

57 

1 40 

2 23 

3 5 
3 49 



6. First Sunday in Lent. 



Day's length 10 hours 44 minutes. 



II 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 
17 

7'. 
18 

19 
20 
21 
22 

23 

?i 
8. 

25 
26 

27 
28 



G. 


6 53 


5 37 


14 


13 51 


Mon 


6 53 


5 38 


14 


13 31 


lue 


6 52 


5 39 


14 


13 II 


We 


6 51 


5 40 


14 


12 51 


Thu 


6 50 


5 41 


14 


12 30 


Fri 


6 49] 5 42 


14 


12 9 


Sat 


6 48 


5 43 


14 


12 9 



Charleston evacuated 1865. 

6 9i3. Seymour d. 1886, 
(5 413. Fer. Wood d. 1881 
Gibbon died 1794. 
6 9 O inf.' Durham fire 1881. 
Tudf^e Battle buried 1879. 
§ sta. Peace with England 1815 



mP 


II 44 


«¥' 


morn 


rtm» 


55 


<iPfl» 


2 9 


CTf 


3 21 


^ 


4 28 


«« 


5 26 



4 36 

5 26 

6 21 

7 22 

8 26 

9 31 
10 34 



Second Sunday in Lent. 



Day's length 10 hours 57 minutes. 



G. 


6 47 


5 44 


14 


II 48 


Mon 


6 \b 


5 45 


14 


II 27 


Tue 


6 45 


5 4(^ 


14 


10 41 


We 


6 43 


5 47 


14 


10 23 


Thu 


6 42 


5 48 


14 


10 I 


Fri 


6 41 


5 48 


14 


9 39 


Sat 


6 40 


5 48 


13 


9 17 



{f^^ i" iP- Luther d. 1546. 
\^i;j sta. A.W.Venabled. '76 
Battle of Olista, Fla., 1864. 

5 greatest brilliancy. 
Washington born 1832. 

6 tlG) S '" P^'"'- Rom. 3:10-23 
6 S 3- Guttenburg d. 1468. 



<s 


6 II 


f^ 


rises 


^ 


6 35 


^ 


7 45 


^ 


8 54 


^ 


10 I 


A 


II 7 



II 32 

morn 

26 

1 15 

2 2 

2 47 

3 32 



Third Sunday in Lent. 



Day's length 11 hours 10 minutes. 



G. 


6 39 


5 49 


13 


8 54 


Mon 


6 38 


5 50 


13 


8 32 


Tue 


6 37 


5 51 


13 


8 9 


We 


6 36 


5 52 


13 


7 47 



^ gr. Elon. E. 

<5 9 i9. 9 gr. Hel. L. N. 
Longfellow born 1807. 
□l^i©. Dr. Wingale d. 1879. 



A morn | 


»«€ 


12 


^ 


I 14 


^ 


2 14 



4 IS 

5 5 

5 54 

6 42 



Weather Conjectures. — Feuruary — i, 2, 3. 4, cold high wind; 5, 6, 7, 
8, 9, 10, II, 12, rain; 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, expect rain; 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 
24, 25. 26, fair if wind N. or N. E. ; rain or snow if S. or S. W. ; 27, 28, stormy. 

Farmers should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d page cover.) S. W. TRAVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 






BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



BRANSON MAXIMS. 

1. All men have faith in something, hence they work expecting results. — 
Branson. 

2. Some men have faith in the laws governing mind; obeying those laws they 
attain to mental power. — Branson. 

3. Some men have faith in the laws of health, and hence by obeying those 
laws they secure physical health and happiness. — Branson. 

4. The man who has faith in the laws governing the spirit life, can realijie 
that " the law of the Lord is perfect, converting the soul." — Branson, 

5. The Christian religion leads a man towards the highest cultivation of all 
his best capabilities. — Branson. 

6. The man who \\Zis fit/l faith in a// God's laws, and renders a perfect obe- 
dience, has peace flowing as a river, and a joy lhat is complete. — Branson. 

7. To give advice unsolicited is so delightful; it magnifies our self-esteem. 
To receive advice unsolicited is humiliating; it minifies our self-esteem. — 
Branson. 

8. A man in whose mind his own country is not fust, is a man who himself is 
not worthy to be first in another country. — Branson. 

9. Our State is a diamond; let us polish it well. — Branson. 

10. The mind crop is the greatest crop that can be raised on any tarm or in 
■any State. — Branson. 

11. The mind crop in North Carolina is better than ever before. — Branson. 

12. The mind crop should be planted early and cultivated better than cotton 
or tobacco. — Branson. 

13. The stronger the homes, the stronger the cottntiy in which the homes are 
found. — Branson. 

14. The greatest possibilities of a man are on his native heath; if he is great 
on another heath, he is still less than a native ought to have been. — Branson. 

15. It is strange how freely we give away onx own knowledge, and how freely 
vi& pay high prices for the knowledge we obtain from others. — Branson. 

16. Living in obedience to spiritual laws brings spiritual blessings. — Branson. 

17. Do your duty, then ivait. — Btanson. 

18. Work for your cotintry, and God will work i<i\ you — Branson. 

19. Much of our best work is unsuspected by ourselves, and even by the 
recipients. — Btanson. 

20. Individual comfort, State wealth, make a happy people. — Branson. 

21. Never keep people unnecessarily waiting. — Mrs Branson. 

22. Be happy; life is short. — Branson. 

23. To sleep sweetly, recline a few moments on your left side; then turn 
slowly onto your right side. Try it. — Branson. 

24. Live with happy people, and you are likely to be happy. — Branson. 

25. Do not keep a burr in your throat, nor a bit of malice in your heart. — 
Branson. 

26. If you 2iX& good this world is good enough for you; if you are mean, then it 
is too good for you. — Branson. 



TWENTY-FOUR CITIES AND TOWNS OF NORTH CAROLINA WITH 

POPULATIONS OF OVER 1,500. 

Wilmington, city 20,056 ; Washington, town 3.545 

Raleigh, city 12,678 | Greensboro, city 3.3I7 

Charlotte, city ii,557 Elizabeth City, town 3,251 

Asheviile, city 10,235 Reidsville, town 2.969 

Winston, city 8,018 Oxford, town 2.</)7 

New Berne, city 7,843 Salem, city 2. 711 

Durham, city 5485 Statesville, city a, 318 

Salisbury, city..- - 4,418 ' Edenton. town 2.205 

Concord, city 4.339 '■ Wilson, town 2.126 

Fayetteville, town 4.222 Hickory, town 2.223 

Henderson, town - 4.191 Beaufort, town 2.007 

Goldsboro, city 4.017 Morehead City 1,623 

m°t< full line of Dress Shirts, Collars and Cuffs. WHITING BROS. 



10 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



3d Month. 



MARCH, 1894. 



31 Days. 




Mhooii'a Phases. 

D. H. M. U. H. M. 

New Moon, 7 9 10 a. m. ®Full Moon, 21 9 2 a.m. 

))First Quarter, 14 i IQ p. m. ^ Last Quarter, 29 3 19 a. m. 



JS 


ji 










e 


V 










n 


V 










S 


^ 


u 


U) 


i 


0-5' 

4> 3 










11 

(A 


"3! 




>% 


>^ 


c 


c 


c 


C 


Q 


Q 


3 


s 


C/5 




I 


Thu 


6 34 


5 55 


12 


7 24 


2 


Fri 


6 32 


5 56 


12 


7 I 


3 


Sat 


6 30 


5 57 


12 


6 38 



ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 



. 6 (^3. Czar Nicholas d. 1858. 
I Bishop Andrews d. 1871. 
^ stationary. 















Ul 






a. 












c 


c Si 














S 


§ 


i 


3 9 

3 58 


^ 


4 41 



■.- ty) 



morn 

8 27 

9 18 



9, Fourth Sunday in Lent. 



Day's length 11 hours 30 minutes. 



G. 6 28 



cf 9 G)- Inauguration Day. 
5 gr. Hel. Lat. N. John 3: 18. 
Massacre Alamo 1836. 
/|1]I1&|,9 sta. Bible Soc.f'rmd 1804 
WFirst U. S. Cong. 1787. 
Merrimack sunk Cumberland '62 
Dr. Bennet Perry d. 1882. 



Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



6 26 
6 24 
6 23 
6 22 
6 20 
6 18 



5 58 

6 o 



^ 


5 16 


^ 


5 45 


4 


6 12 


A 


sets 




7 26 




8 26 


«< 


9 35 



10 6 

10 52 

11 37 
eve 

I 3 

1 47 

2 33 



10. Fifth Sunday in Lent. 



Day's length li hours 47 mnutes. 



O. 

Mon 
Tue 
VVc 
islThu 
16 Fri 
l7lSat 



6 17 
6 16 



Benj. West died 1820. 

6%Q. Mrs. Mordecai d. 1886. 

Mrs. C. W. I). Hatchings d. 1873 

<5 ^ O inferior. Acts 16:31. 

Caesar assass. B. C. 44. 
Battle of Aveiasboro 1865. 
St. Patrick's Day. 



if€ 


10 47 


m/> 


morn 


w^ 


1 


m^ 


I 13 


M 


2 20 


W 


3 19 


«« 


4 7 



11, Palm Sunday 
G. 



Day's length 12 hours 2 minutes. 



Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



8|6 10 



8' o 45|Suez Canal completed 1869. 
8; o 22 O'Kelly born 1741. 
7!norlh I /^^O ent. 'y Spring Com. 
l\ o 26 V^/Moon partly eel. invisible. 



49! 9 gr. bril. Stamp Act 1765. 

1 13 <i n,3- Good Friday. 

1 J7 dj^S- Queen Elizabeth d. 1603, 



i^ 


4 45 




5 17 


^< 


5 43 


^ 


res 


^ 


7 42 


1*1 


8 47 


j*j 


9 54 



II 4 
II 52 
morn 

37 

1 22 

2 8 



12. Annunciation — Easter Sunday. 



Day's length 12 hours 18 minutes. 



G. 5 
Monls 



58 6 16 



Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



536 



2 o 
2 24 

2 47 

3 II 
3 34 



Easter Sunday. 



^ sta. Easter Monday. 
Lord Bacon born 1627. 

CDr. J. T. Leach died 1S83. 
5 in ^5. Brit.Mus.fnd 1753 

3 57\d<^3- Bai. Somerville, Ky.. '63 

4 2ji^Mrs. Mary Bayard Clark d. 1886. 

Weather Conjectures. — March 



sk 


.1 


<C€ 


mcr-' 


»«€ 


3 


it 


I I 


^ 


I 52 


Jf 


2 37 


^ 


3 15 



2 55 

3 44 
1 35 

5 27 

6 19 

7 9 
7 58 



. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, stormy; 7, 8, 9, 10, 
II, 12 13. cold rain if wind be from West; snow if East; 14, 15, f(>, 17, 18, 19, 
20, look for rain and snow; 21, 22. 23, 24, 25. 26, 27. 28, cold rain if wind be 
West; snow if East; 29. 30, 31, snow and stormy. 



Farmers Should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE" brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See toi. 3d page cover.) S. W. TR AVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



"JESUS, LOVER OF MY SOUL." 

" Jesus, lover of my soul," 

Rose the words, sweet and clear. 
From the lips of a little child, 
Drifting fast to the other world. 

" Let me to thy bosom fly," 
She repeated, o'er and o'er. 
While her sweet brown eyes beheld 
Visions on the other shore. 

" While the nearer waters roll," 
And her voice was fainter still, 
But her echo rang more clear 
Far beyond the heavenly hills. 

" W^hile the tempest still is high," 
When the angels took her home, 
And Jesus bade her sing the rest 
As she stood before the throne. 

" Hide me, O my Saviour, hide," 
Thus we sang while bending low 
O'er the empty casket left 

For its precious gem had flown. 

" Till the storm of life is past," 

Came these words from trembling lips 
As the sweet, white lids were closed 
Over eyes with love once lit. 

" Safe into the haven guide," 

We sang the hymn soft and low. 
While we laid our darling's form 
Far beneath the drifting snow. 

" O receive my soul at last," 

Swelled this plea from aching hearts' 
As we turned in blinding tears 
From that low and sacred spot. 

But the Saviour heard our cry 

Ere we reached our darkened home. 

And he gave us strength to say, 

"Thy will, O Lord, not mine be done." 

And as we sat that night alone. 

And thought of her safe in the fold. 
We sang her hymn with happy hearts, 
"Jesus, lover of my soul." 
October 5, 1893. L. II. 



"I HAVE LIVED," says the indefatigable Dr. Clarke, "to know that the great 
secret of human happiness is this— never to suffer your energies to stagnate. 
The old adage of ' too many irons in the fire ' conveys an abominab'.efalschooil; 
you cannot have too many. Poker, tongs, and all— keep them ail going." 
■Shoes for Men, Boys, Ladies and Children, cheap at WHITING BROS. 



12 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



4th Month. 



AFRIL, 1S94. 



30 Days, 




Moon'8 Phases. 



D. H. M. 

_ New Moon, 5 10 sip. 
^^'irst Quarter. 12 7 24 p. 



D. H. M. 

@Full Moon, 19 9 54 p.™. 
(jj;Last Quarter. 27 10 12 p.m. 



M 








V 


V 








c 












^ 


tfi 


ui 


i 






M 







•a 





•c 


tn 


"tfi 


« c 


a 


e 


C 


c 


B 


3 


a 


s 


3 


tn 


tn 


•y; 


C« 



ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 








ca 








Ou 












c 


C Vn 














§ 


S 



.2>3. Low Sunday. 



Day's length 12 hours 35 minutes. 



O. |5 
Monk 
Tue 15 

41 We Is 

sThuls 

6 Fri 

7 1 Sat 



47|6 22 
46 6 23 
44 6 23 
42 6 24 

41 6 2s 
\S 396 26 
5 38I6 27 



4 44|d 9 3- All Fools Day. 

5 7|Richmond surrendered i86s. 

30 6 '4 3- Richmond evacuated '65 
53i^<!> 9 with ^. 
15 iialll'G eel. invis. at Washington. 
38 Battle of Shiloh 1862. 
I [Island No. 17 surrendered 1862. 



<x 


3 46 


tt 


4 14 


&. 


4 37 


«" 


5 




5 23 


H' 


sets 


H* 


8 33 



morn 

9 3» 
10 14 

10 57 

11 41 
eve 

I 17 



Day's length 12 hours 52 minutes. 



8 


G. 


5 36 


6 28 


2 


7 23 


9 


Mon 


5 35 


6 29 


I 


7 45 


10 


Tue 


5 34 


6 30 


I 


S 8 


iilWe 


5 33 


6 31 


I 


8 30 


12 


Thu 


5 3J 


6 31 


Vr. 


8 52 


13 


Fri 


5 30 


6 32 


■2. 


9 13 


14 


Sat 


5 28 


6 "33 





9 35 



^ in Aphe. 7th Crusade 747. 
(5 01-3. Gen.Leesur.Ap.C.H.'65 
5 gr. Elon. W. Benton d. 1858. 



Fort Sumter attacked 1861. 
Raleigh sur. to Gen. Sherman '65 
Pres. Lincoln assassinated 1865. 



IM, 


9 49 


It^ 


II 3 


Itf^ 


morn 


H 


13 


n 


I 14 


•« 


2 5 


««* 


2 46 



15. Third Sunday after Easter. 



Day's length 13 hours 7 minutes. 



6?. 


5 27 


6 34 





9 56 


Mon 


5 25 


6 34 





10 18 


Tue 


5 24 


b 35 




10 39 


We 


5 23 


6 36 




10 50 


Thu 


5 22 


6 37 




II 20 


Fri 


5 21 


6 38 




II 41 


Sat 


5 20 


6 39 




12 I 



Andrew Johnson inaugurated '65 
French evacuated Mexico 1867. 
Dr. Ben. Franklin died 1790. 
(9^ 6 tl3- Bat. Cerro Gordo '47 
\i/D'Isrreli died 1881. 
<J §3- 1st newspaper U.S. 1704 
Norfolk Navy Yard cap. 1861 





3 20 


9^ 


3 48 


^ 


4 II 


ly 


4 13 


?^ 


4 57 


jH 


rises 


^ 


8 43 



8 59 

9 46 
ID 31 

II 15 

morn 

o I 

o 47 



16. Fourth Sunday after Easter. 



Day's length 13 hours 22 minutes. 



G. 


5 18 


6 40 


2 


12 22 


Mon 


5 17 


6 41 


2 


12 42 


Tue 


5 15 


6 41 


2 


13 I 


We 


5 14 


6 42 


2 


13 21 


Thu 


5 13 


6 43 


2 


13 40 


bh 


5 12 


6 43 


3 


13 59 


Sat 


5 II 


6 44 


3 


14 18 



22 
23 
24 
25 
26 

27 
28 

17. Rogation Sunday. 

291 G. 1 5 10I6 45'' 3|i4 371 
3o |Mon l5 9!6 46I 3 I14 55I 

Weather Conjectures 
8, 9, ID, II, fair and frosty; 
E. ; rain or snow if S. or S. 
or N. E. ; rain or snow if S. 



R. C. Badger died 1882. 

9 in ^. S. A. Douglas b. 1831. 

Dr. McKee died 1875. 

Bank of England incor. 1694. 

/^|*^$ gr. Elon. W. Mark 6: 12 

V^I^C. C. Barbee died 1876. 

6(^3- Gen. Wolf killed 1759. 



^ 


9 49 


»« 


10 48 


Jf 


II 43 


4r 


morn 


Jf 


31 


a 


I 12 


^ 


I 45 



5 50 

6 38 



Day's length 13 hours 35 minutes. 

§ gr. HelTLat. S. John 14:1-3 i^ 2 14 7 23 
Louisiana ceded 1803. (^ 2 39 8 6 



• — April — i, 2, 3, 4, look for snow-storm; 5, 6, 7, 
12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, frost if wind N. or N. 
W^; 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, frost if wind N. 
or S. W. ; 27, 28, 29, 30, fair and frosty. 



Farmers Should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE" brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d page cover.) S. W. TR AVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 13 



ANECDOTE OF DR. GLOSS. 

At another time he was on the Granville Circuit, and near one of his churches 
resided a sister Jones. Her house was the home of all Methodist ministers, and 
though she was not wealthy they were ever welcome. She had a room adjoin- 
ing the sitting-room which was known as the "preacher's room," and as it was 
secluded from the rest of the house, and the good sister was lacking in pantry 
accommodation, she stowed under the bed therein her goodly store of pickles 
and preserves. She had a mischievous boy of thirteen years who had a sweet 
tooth and who sometimes made raids on his mother's sweetmeats. She accord- 
ingly kept an eye on John and on her hoarded treasures for company occasions. 

It so happened that Bro. Closs stopped at the clofe of a summer day at sister 
Jones' house. It was about dusk, and so he left his horse to be taken to the 
stable, and went in without knocking. Whoever heard of anyone knocking at 
a country house in those days? He entered the sitting-room and went at once 
to the preacher's room, and. North Carolina like, left the door open behind 
him. 

He removed his coat and bathed, and then bethought to spend a few moments 
in prayer. He knelt most reverently by the bedside and poured out his soul in 
thanksgiving and prayer, when just then sister Jones entered the sitting-room 
and seeing the door to the "preacher's room" ajar, she naturally suspected her 
son John guilty of his usual misdemeanor, and tipping in with cat-like tread, she 
saw in the dim and uncertain light of the room the form of Bro. Closs by the 
bedside, and so raising aloft her strong right hand she let fall the palm thereof 
on the bald head of her pastor, exclaiming in a high key: 

"Oh, you rascal, I've cau^it you again — stealing my preserves." 

Bro. Closs arose from his devotions — solemnly assured her that he was not 
"John," and that he was not even thinking of stealing her preserves, and was 
iorgiven. 

Bless the memory of that blessed man, and when we have done with earth, 
and earthly things may we meet him injthe home of the blessed. 

Yours, ' John B. Neathery. 



BEAUTIFUL LIVES. 



Beautiful lips are those whose words 
Leap from the heart like songs of birds, 
Yet whose utterances prudence girds. 

Beautiful hands are those that do 
Work that is earnest and brave and true, 
Moment by moment the long day through. 

Beautiful feet are those that go 
On kindly ministries to and fro, 
Down lowliest ways if God wills it so. 

Beautiful shoulders are those that bear 
Ceaseless burdens of homely care, 
With patient grace and daily prayer. 

Beautiful lives are those that bless. 

Silent rivers of happiness. 

Whose hidden fountains but few may guess. 

I AM NOW an old man. I have seen nearly a century. Do you want to know 
how to grow old slowly and happily ? Always eat slowly; masticate well. Go 
»o your food, to your rest, to your occupations, smiling. Keep a good nature, 
and a soft temper everywhere. Never give way to anger. A violent tempest 
of passion tears down the constitution more than a typhus fever.— ll^aUo, in 
•* Leaking Toward Sunset." 

^-Serge, Cheviot and Drap'de'te Suits for Men. WHITING BROS., 
Raleigh, N. C 



14 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



5tlt, Month. 



MAY, 1894. 



31 Days. 




Moon's Pliases. 



D. H. M. 

(^New Moon, 5 9 33 »• ""• 
^I'ifst Quarter, 12 r I2 a. m. 



D. H. M. 

(g)Full Moon, 19 II 34 a. m. 
(CLast Quarter, 27 2 56 p. m. 



-i 
*> 




tn 

4> 
'C 

B 
3 
7) 

5 8 
5 7 
5 6 
5 5 
5 4 


■5 

in 
B 
V5 


in 

C 

s 


Sun's decline 
north. 


Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 


6 47 
6 48 
6 49 
6 49 
6 50 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


15 13 
15 31 

15 49 

16 6 
16 24 



ASPECTS OF I'LANETS AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 



6 90)- ApianWayconst.3i2B.C 
Samuel H. Young died 1882. 
(^50. Ascension Day. 
' 6^3. Dr. Wm. G.Hill d. '77 
Bonaparte died 1821. 



"S. 



0f 
9* 



3 2 
3 25 

3 47 

4 12 
sets 



mom 

9 32 

10 iS 

11 6 
II 58 



18. Sixth Sunday after Easter. 



Day's length 13 hours 48 minutes. 



Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



16 40 (J 21- 3)- Dr. Somers d. 1882. 

16 57 d j;i 3- M. C. Doub d. 1876. 

17 13 Battle of Palo Alto 1846. 

17 29 Battle Spottsylvania_C. H. 1864. 

17 45 Confederate Memorial Day, 

18 o /^RiwQueen Mary died 1694. 
18 i6| >3ll' Battle of Raymond 1863. 



9^ 


8 44 


4W» 


10 


w 


II 7 


¥i 


morn 


-« 


3 


<£ 


47 


H5i» 


1I22 



eve 
I 



19. Whit Sunday— Pentecost. 



Day's length 14 hours o minutes. 



13 


G. 


4 56 


6 56 


4 


18 31 


14 


Mon 


4 55 


6 57 


4 


18 45 


15 


Tue 


4 54 


6 58 


4 


18 59 


16 


We 


4 53 


6 59 


4 


19 13 


17 


Thu 


4 53 


7 


4 


19 26 


18 


Fri 


4 52 


7 I 


4 


19 40 


19 


Sat 


4 52 


7 I 


4 


19 52 



Battle Brazos. Texas, 1865. 
Battle Resaca, Ga., 1864. 
i> Tl3- Dan'l O'Connell d. 1847 
Battle Champion's Hill 1863. 
c5 S 3. John Penn born 1741. 
/^^gin^. Matamoras tak. '46 
\^/6 ^ O sup. Prov. 11:2. 



^ 


I 51 


^ 


2 15 


■¥ 


2 38 


^ 


3 I 


i*i 


3 25 


A 


3 50 


MS 


rises 



7 44 

8 29 

9 13 
9 57 

10 42 

11 29 
morn 



HO. Trinity Sunday. 



Day's length 14 hours 11 minutes. 



201 6?. 

21! Mon 
22iTue 

23 We 

24 j Thu 

25 Fri 

26 Sat 



4 51 

4 50 
4 49 
4 48 
4 48 
4 48 
4 47 



4|20 5 

4|20 17 
4 20 2g 
4 20 40 
3 20 52 
3.21 2 

3 21 13 



Mecklenburg Independ. 1775. 

Columbus died 1506. 

^ in peri. Buchanan b. 1791. 

$ gr. bril. Livingston d. 1886. 

Corpus Christi. 

d 31- 5 . Col. Tucker died 1882. 

6 '^ ^. John Calvin died 1564. 



ms 


8 38 


t 


9 36 


^ 


10 26 


^ 


II 9 


<x 


II 45 


^ 


morn 


(^ 


14 



18 

10 
2 

54 
44 
32 
17 



21. First Sunday after Trinity. 



27 


0. |4 47 


7 7 


3I21 23 


28 


Mon 4 46 


7 8 


3'2i 33 


29 


Tue 4 46 


7 9 


3 21 42 


30 


We |4 45 


7 10 


3i2i 51 


31 Thui4 45I7 11 


3 21 59 



Day's length 14 hours 20 minutes. 
To 

6 43 

7 25 



dq d)- St. Petersb'g fn'di703 
9 in aph. N. Webster d. '43 

Gen. Winfield Scott d. 1S66. 

Federal Decoration Day. 

d QO)- Johnstown disaster 1889 



t^ 


40 





I 4 





I 25 


^ 


I 47 


t^ 


2 11' 



8 53 



Weather Conjectures. — May — i, 2, 3, 4, frosty; 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 
changeable; 12, 13, 14, 15. 16, 17, 18, very rainy; 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 
26, frequent i^howers; 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, changeable. 

Farmers Should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d cover page.) S. W. TRAVERS &, CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC.r 15 



THE LAW OF CHASTITY. 

We are not surprised to learn that Hon. W. C. P. Breckinridge will have 
opposition when he again offers for Congress. Mr. Breckinridtje h.is been sued 
for breach of promise, and we do not pretend to say that Miss I'olhird has a case 
against him. We do not know and we do not intimate that he made the young 
woman a promise of marriage. But the public believes that Mr. Breckinridge 
has sinned against the social law — the law of chastity — and he must clear his 
skirts of this charge before he can hope to regain the confidence of the people. 

There was a time when the public winked at immorality of this kind among 
men, and there are those who still do so. But the time has now come when tlie 
better class of the American people demand that public men shall be clean in 
their inner life, and they will not tolerate in office men who are impure and 
unchaste. 

There is but one code of morals and it applies with equal force to both sexes. 
Chastity in manor woman is the immediate jewel of the soul and it is as bind- 
ing upon one as upon the other. We long to see the day, and we believe that 
we shall see it, when society will as surely frown upon the unchaste man as it 
now frowns upon the unchaste woman, when no guilty man may obtrude his 
offensive presence into the society of pure woman. — Richmond State. 

SUICIDE NOT HEROIC. 

Suicide, as an escape from the earthly consequences of one's own misdeeds, is 
much affected nowadays, and it must be confessed that if escape is all that is 
desired no surer expedient could be adopted. But if one cares for character or 
name, it is the least worthy of all expedients. 

When a man loses his fortune which he has hardly earned, necessity compels 
him to go to work to earn another, or at least he tries to keep himself out of the 
poor-house. But when he loses his character, which is worth more than fortune, 
he has a more imperative motive for re-earning what he foolishly parted from. 
True it is easier to build up a shattered fortune than regain a good name, but 
the greater prize is worth the greater effort. 

Besides, to quit life at such a time is to repudiate every obligation imposed bj 
natural affection to parents, wife and children, who have the right to demand 
that no taint be put upon them. The individual himself may escape by suicid 
But the children he has brought into the world cannot. He simply handica 
them in the struggle for existence and slips away, leaving them a htiitagc 
shame. To live down wrong-doing and right one's self after having waiulcre 
so far out of the one true way is hard to do, but the manly man will not hesitate 
to live and undertake the task. — St. Louis Post-Dispatch. 



I 

ea 



A DRUNKARD'S WILL. 



I leave to society a ruined character, a wretched example, and a memory that 
will soon rot. 

I leave to my parents the rest of their lives, as much sorrow as humanity, in 
a feeble and decrepid state, can sustain. 

I leave my brothers and sisters as much mortification and injury as I well 
could bring upon them. 

I Ic-ave to my wife a broken heait, a life of wretchedness and shame, to weep 
over my premature death. 

I give and bequeath to each of my children poverty, ignorance, low character 
and a remembrance that their father was a monster. 

DRESSING PRETTY NECKS. 

It is frequently noticeable that the slender woman covers her neck with illu- 
sion when wearing a low-cut dress, but even a beautiful neck is ofitn more 
lovely if fitted over with a seamless yoke of transparent or fcmi-transparcnt 
material. A tiny edge of ruffle may finish the yoke at the neck, or it nuiy be 
drawn full with a dainty, narrow ribbon, or, again, it may simply disappear ur..l;r 
a necklace. — St. Louis Star Sayings. 

|[I^"Light Summer Underwear at WHITING BROS. 



16 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



6th Month. 



JUNE, 1894. 



30 Days. 



Moon's Pliasea. 



A 


Or^ 


B jw 








n. H. M. 


D 


H. M 


. 


i^ 


SJC 


|)New Moon, 3 5 48 p. m. ©Full Moon 


18 I 58 a.m. 


wSbM 


hSS 


5)First 


Quarter, lO 8 5 a. m. (CLast Quarter, 26 4 54 a.m. 


JS 


^ 












lU 






G 


«> 



















O 


V 










ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 










if 


8 


en 


n 


tf) B 


OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 
MATTER. 


a. 


B U3 


3 

M 

s 


Q 


Fri 


c 


B 


B 


B 




S 









3 


3 
C/5 


3 
2 


22 8 




S 


s 


s 


I 


4 44 


7 " 


6 9\.^. Prov. 10:17. 


If^ 


2 38 


morn 


2 


Sat 


4 44 


7 " 


2 


22 15 


g gr. Hel. Lat. N. Prov. 5:21. 


««B» 


3 II 


10 39 



22. Second Sunday after Trinity. 



Day's length 14 hours 28 minutes. 



G. 

Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



44 


7 


12 


2 


43 


7 


12 


2 


42 


7 


13 


2 


41 


7 


13 


2 


41 


7 


14 


I 


41 


7 


14 


I 


41 


7 


15 


I 



9 

23, Third Sunday after Trinity 

a. 



22 231^^6 !;io. 013. 2io. 

22 30^^^(5 5 0). A.L.Woodallk.'86. 

22 36 DeSoto died 1542. 

23 43 Patrick Henry died 1779. 
22 48! Robert Bruce died 1329. 
22 54 Battle Cross Keys 1862, 
22 59i Georgia chartered 1732. 



rtWf* 


3 51 


¥t 


sets 


¥i 


9 53 


■« 


10 42 


-«s 


II 21 


•^ 


II 53 


^ 


morn 



1I 40 
eve 

1 53 

2 58 

3 58 

4 52 

5 42 



Day's length 14 hours 34 minutes. 



4 41 
Mon'4 41 

Tue U 41 
We 14 41 
Thu 4 41 
Fri 14 41 
Sat U 41 




Dutch landed in N. Y. 1620. 

Salem witchcraft 1692. 
6 tl5 Tr. Ch. Durham dedic. '81 
(5 S3- Maryland chart. 1633. 
1st persecution by Nero 64. 
Magna charta 1215. 
QcT ©. Luther excom. 1520. 



6 28 

7 12 

7 56 

8 40 

9 26 

10 14 

11 4 
Day's length 14 hours 37 minutes. 



^ 


19 


^ 


43 


-^ 


I 5 


A 


I 28 


J*l 


1 54 


^ 


2 22 


're 


2 55 



^Bat. Boonville. Mo., 1861. 
^Battle Waterloo 1815. 
Alabama sunk 1864. 
9 gr. Hel. Lat. S. Rev. 22:17, 
© enters @. Summer Com. 
% sta. Bat. Weldon R. R. 1864 
5 gr, Elon. E. Prov. Ii;i2. 



^ 


3 34 


^ 


rises 


^ 


9 6 


^ 


9 44 


^ 


10 15 


^ 


10 43 


A 


II 7 



II 56 

morn 

48 

1 39 

2 28 

3 14 

3 57 



G. 


4 43 


7 19 


2 


23 25 


Mon 


4 43 


7 19 


2 


23 24 


Tue 


4 44 


7 20 


3 


23 22 


We 


4 44 


7 20 


3 


23 19 


Thu 


4 44 


7 20 


3 


23 16 


Fri 


4 45 


7 20 


4 


23 14 


Sat 


4 45 


7 20 


4 


23 10 



St. 



Day's length 14 hours 36 minutes 

JdfciN's Day! '■ 

^(in^. Gen. Morgan k. '63 
Tlios. Bashford d. 1881. 



Jeff. Lovejoy died 1877. 
Vicksburg bombarded 1861. 
d 9 '9- Henry died 1852. 
i ^ 3- Joe Smith killed 1844. 



A 


II 29 


•o 


II 49 


■0 


morn 




12 


tff 


37 


«< 


I 5 


«• 


I 41 



4 39 

5 20 

6 2 

6 45 

7 31 

8 25 

9 20 



Weather Conjectures— June — i, 2: changeable; 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. 9, 
expect fair weather, 16, ii, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, changeable; i8, 19, 20, 21, 
22, 23, 24. 25, fair weather; 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, cold with frequent showers. 

Farmers Should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco ; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliablCo 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

ee top 3d page cover.) S. W. TR AVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 17 



GOVERNMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA— 1893-'97. 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

Elias Carr, of Edgecombe County, Governor; salary $3,000 and furnished 
house, fuel and lights. 

R. A. Doughton, of Alleghany County, Lieut. Gov. and Speaker of the Senate. 

Octavius Coke, of Wake County, Secretary of State; salary $2,000 and fees; 
$1,000 additional for clerical assistance. 

Robert M. Furman, of Buncombe County, Auditor; salary $1,500; $1,000 
additional for clerical assistance. 

Samuel McD. Tate, of Burke County, Treasurer, salary $3,000. 

John C. Scarborough, of Johnston County, Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion; salary $1,500; $500 per annum additionnl traveling expenses. 

Frank I. Osborne, of Mt-cklenburi; County, Attorney General; salary $I, 000; 
Reporter to Supreme Court; salary $1,000. 

Francis H. Cameron, of Wake County, Adjutant (/eneral; salary $600. 

J. C. Ellington, of Johnston County. State Librarian; salary $1,000. 

T. P. Jerman, of VVarren County. Chief Clerk to .Vuditor; salary $t,000. 
, S. F. Telfair, of Beaufort Co., Private Secretary to Governor; salary $1,200. 

C. L. Hinton, of Wake County; Executive Clerk; salary $600. 

W. P. Batcheior, of Wake Co., Chief Clerk to Sec. of. State; salary $1,000. 

H. M. Cowan, of Chatham County, Chief Clerk to Treasurer; salary $1,500. 

Ernest B. Bain, of Wake County, Teller; salary $750. 

R. L. Burkhead, of Wayne County, Clerk for Charitable and Penal Institu- 
tions; salary $800. 

C. M. Roberts, of Vance County, Superintendent of Public Buildings and 
Grounds; salary $850. 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 

The Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Treasurer, Auditor, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction and Attorney General constitute the Board. 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA. 

(Chartered 1789, Founded 1793, Opened 1795.) 
Located in Chapel Hill, 28 miles N. W. from Raleigh. Is non-political and 
non-sectarian. Gives free tuition to sons of all ministers, to candidates for the 
ministry, to public school teachers and to young men under bodily infirmity. 
Loans and scholarships for needy young men of talent and character. Offers 
four general courses of study with wide range of electives, six brief cour.ses, a 
normal course for teachers, also special courses in law, medicine and enjjineer- 
ing, and an unlimited number of optional courses. There were 400 students in 
i893-'94. 

Faculty. — George Tayloe Winston, A. M., LL.D., President; Kemp Plum- 
met Battle, A. M., LL.D., Professor of History; Francis Preston Venable, 
Ph. D., F. C. S., Professor of Chemistry: Jos. Austin Holmes, B. S., F. G. S. A., 
State Geologist; Collier Cobb. A. M , Professor of G""logy and Mineralogy; 
Joshua Walker Gore, C. E., Profes-or of N.uural Phil -ophy; John .Manning, 
LL.D., Professor of Law; Thomas Hume. D.D.. LL.D.. Professor of the 
English Language and Literature; Walter D. Foy, M. A.. Professor of Modern 
Languages; Eben Alexander, A. M., Ph.. Professor of the Greek Language 
and Literature (on leave of absence as Minister to Greece); William '■•- 
C. E., Professor of Mathematics and Engineering; Richard H. Whi; 
M. D., Professor of Anatomy, Materia Medica and Physiology; Henry II 
Williams, A. M., B. D., Professor of Mental and Moral .Science; Henry V. 
Wilson, A. M.. Ph. D., Professor of Biology; Karl P. Harrington, A. M., 
Professor of the Latm Language and Literature; Howard Burton Shaw. A. B.. 
B. C. E., Instructor in Mathematics and Engineering; Edwin A. Aldciman. 
Ph. B., Professor of the History and Philosophy of Education; Hcrl)ert C. 
Tolman, Ph. D., Professor of Sanskrit and .Acting Professor of Greek; A. J. 
Edward's, Assistant in Chemical Laboratory; De Berniere Whitakcr. As.sislant 
in Physical Laboratory; Charles Baskerville, B. S., Instructor m Chcmi.stry 
and Assaying; James T. Pugh, A. B., Instructor in Latm; J. W. Gore. .Sec- 
retary and Registrar; W. T. Patterson, Bursar; Prof. Alexander, Librarian; 
F, C. Harding, A. B., Student Librarian. 
BF'Boy'8 and Children's School Suits at low prices. WHITING BROS. 



IS BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



7th Month. 



JUJW IS94. 



31 Days . 




?)New Moon, 
j! First Quarter. 



>l<>ou's Phases. 

;: D. H. M. 

37 I. m. @Full Moon, 17 4 54 p. m, 

'. •■-. m. C^Last Quarter, 25 3 58 p. m. 



M 


^ 










s 


V 
CI 








c 


s 


^ 


to 
u 


u5 


3:' 


""•5 


-Ti 





•c 


CO 


"co 


-a 


>% 


>. 


a 


C 


r 


s 


Q 


Q 


3 


3 
(73 


3 
en 


3 

•7) 



ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 



1) 
u 


s 


CO 


to 


a. 


u 






to 




C 


S to 














S 


S 



31 ^6- 



Sixth Sunday after Trinity 

I (&. |4 75 
pMon 4 46 

Tue |4 47 



Day's length 14 hours 35 minutes. 



We '4 47 
Thu I4 48 
Fri 4 48 

Sat 1 4 4g 



23 6 
23 1 
22 56 
22 51 
22 46 
22 40 
22 33 



o 

H4 '^7' Seventh Sunday after Trinity. 

Q 
Q 



c5 'Ji- "5 Bat. Gettysburg 1863. 
^cf gr- Hel Lat. N. 
1^5'® in Aphe. Luke 11:9. 
•:5 5 D. Independ. Day. 
in Aphe. Monroe died 1831. 
5 sta. Battle Carthage 1861. 
Mrs Surratt hung 1865. 



ilW^ 


2 27 


n 


3 25 


-4K 


sets 


<£ 


9 18 


«^ 


9 51 


«^ 


10 21 


IRVi 


10 46 



10 28 

11 30 
eve 

1 42 

2 41 

3 34 

4 23 



Day's length 14 hours 29 minutes. 



o 

o 

a 
B 

0} 
00 

o 

CO 



8j <V- 

9[Mon 

10 Tue 

11 We 

12 Thu 
islpri 
i4|Sat 



53 7 
5317 



22 26 
22 19 
22 12 
22 4 
21 55 
21 47 
21 38 



Dr. Wm. Closs died 1882 
(j \i 1. Siege of Malta 1565 

i_| h O. Blackstone b. 1723. 

6 rf 5. Bat. RichMount'n 1861 

(^ 9 i|i. Battle Boyne 1690. 

Draft riot in New York 1863. 

Great Chicago fire 1873. 



^ 


II 9 


^ 


II 33 


■^ 


II 58 


iH 


morn 


sh 


24 


MS 


56 


MS 


I 34 



2S. 



G. 

Mod 

T* 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

.Sat 



Eighth Sunday after Trinity 

16 
i6 
15 
15 
14 
13 
13 



21 28jNapoleon at Elbe 1814. 

21 i8|/^^Mrs. Lincoln died 1882. 

21 8 V^I. J. Young died 1885. 

20 58 Kirk cap. Yanceyville 1870. 

20 471 § sta. 6 9 %■ Math. 24:13. 
6120 36i(5 2 Q inferior. 2 Cor. 5:1. 
6120 24iBattle Bull Run 1861. 



Day's length 24 hours 22 minutes. 

10 44 

11 35 
morn 

24 

1 II 

1 56 

2 38 



Jf 


2 19 


Jf^ 


3 10 


^ 


rises 


4JL 


8 18 


<2 


8 47 


^ 


9 II 


^ 


9 34 



UK Ninth Sunday after Trinity. 



Day's length 14 hours 13 minutes. 



221 G. 



Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 



28 Sat 



6 20 12 
6120 o 
6; 19 47 
6,19 34 
6[i9 21 
6 19 8 
6!i8 54 



Atlantic Cable laid 1865. 

harlotte Cushrrian born 1816. 
<icTO- J- G. Holland b. 1819. 

©y gr. Hel. Lat. S. 
^ in Peri Prov. 12:2. 
6 9m Gemini. Prov. 13:2. 
6 % 'i) R eign of terror 1794. 



i& 


9 54 


«»• 


10 15 


•0 


10 38 


«^ 


II 3 


mf 


II 35 


iXT^ 


morn 


«• 


15 



30. Tenth Sunday after Trinity. 



Day's length 14 hours 3 minutes. 



G. 


5 


4 


7 


7 


6 


18 


40 


Mon 


5 


5 


7 


6 


6 


18 


2^ 


Tue 


5 


6 


7 


6 


6 


18 


10 



iW^ 



1 6 

2 9 

3 25 



9 8 

10 15 

11 21 



<5 9 5. Poland dissolved 1794 
5 sta. Wm. Penn died 1718. 
^ Cl 1>. P res. Johnson d. 1S75 

Weather Conjectures.— July— i, 2, cold rain; 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, fair; 9, 
xo, II, 12, 13, 14. 15, 16, fair; 17, 18, 19. 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, fair weather; 25, 
26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31. changeable. 

Farmers should use " NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for tbem. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d cover page.) S. W. TRAVERS &. CO., Richmond, Va. . 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 1» 



PUBLIC WORKS AND INSTITUTIONS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 



THE N. C. INSTITUTION FOR THE DEAK AND DUMB AND THE BLIND. 

The North Carolina Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind is 
located at Raleigh, and comprises two separate departments — one for the whites, 
in the northwestern part of the city, the other for the colored in the soullv- 
eastern part of the city. 

Officers. — W. J. Young, Principal; John G. B. (irimes. Steward; .Samuel 
McD. Tate, ex officio Treasurer. 

Board of Trustees.— R. S. Tucker, President; B. F. Park. C. D. Hcartt, 
John R. Williams, Dr. H. C. Herring, James A. Briggs, H K. Montague. 

The Institution has a full corps of teachers in the deaf-mute and blind depart- 
ments at both buildings. The buildings can accommodate about 250 pupils. 
The course of instruction includes eight years. .'Applications for admittance of 
pupils should be made to the Principal. 

NORTH CAROLINA INSANE ASYLUM. 

Situated in the vicinity of Raleigh, and will accommodate 300 patients. 

Resident Officers, — Dr. Wm. R. Wood, Superintendent; Dr. Francis T. 
Fuller, First Assistant Physician; Dr. William H. Cobb, Jr., Second Assistant 
Physician; William R. Crawford, Jr., Steward; Mrs. M. E. Whitaker, Matron. 

Board of Directors. — John B. Broadfoot, Cumberland County, Pre.>iident 
of Board; R. R. Cotton, Halifax County; Dr. Geo, A. Foote, Warren County; 
Capt. J. B. Burwell, Wake County; Capt. J. D. Biggs, Martin County; Dr. 
Geo. L. Kirby, Wayne County; Maj. J. B. Broadfoot, Cumberland Counlj^ 
Dr. R. H. Speight, Harnett County; B. F. Boykin, Esq., Sampson County. 

Executive Committee. — Capt. J. B. Burwell, Dr. Geo. A. Foote, Capt. 
B. F. Boykin. 

Officers. — Hon. Samuel McD. Tate, Treasurer ex officit; W. T. Smith, 
Esq., Keeper of Records. 

STATE HOSPITI^L, MORGANTON. 

» 

Officers.— P. L. Murphy, M. D., Superintendent; Isaac M. Taylor and C. 
E. Ross, Assistant Physicians; F. M. Scroggs, Steward; Mrs. C. A. Marsh. 
Matron. 

Directors. — James P. Sawyer, Buncombe County. President; I. I. Davis, 
Burke County; J. P. Caldwell, Iredell County; J. G. Hall, Catawba County; 
Dr. H. T. Bahnson, Forsyth County; Dr. G. H. P. Cole, Henderson County; 
E. R. Hampton, Jackson County; J. C. Mills, Burke County; G. W. F. Harper. 
Caldwell County. 

eastern N. C. insane ASYLUM. 

Officers.— Dr. J. F. Miller, Superintendent; Dr. W. W. Faison, Assistant 
Physician; Capt. Daniel Reid Steward; Mrs. B. V. Smith, Matron; John W. 
Wilson. Engineer; John Pate, Farmer; Mrs. Victoria Bryan. Seamstress. 

Executive Committee.— Dr. J. W. Vick, Johnston County, Chairman; 
L. H. Costex and John F. Southerland. Wayne County. ta xr « 

Board of Directors.— Dr. J. W. Vick, Johnston County; Dr. N. M. 
Culbreth. Columbus County; J. L. McLean. Robeson County; W. F. Kound- 
tree. Craven Countv; H. E. Dillon, Lenoir County; L-H. Costex Wayne 
County; Jno. F. Southerland, Wayne County; Dr. M. B. Pitt, Edgecombe 
County; Theophilus Edwards, Greene County. 

BUREAU of LABOR STATISTICS. 

B. R. Lacy of Wake County, Commissioner. salary|l.500; Logan D. Terrell. 
Wake County, Clerk, salary S900. Office in the Supreme Court Building. 
C^^Trunks, Bags, Valises and Umbrellas at WHITING BROS. 



20 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



8th Month. 



AUGUST, 1894. 



.31 Days. 




05 
CJ - 

© -e 

bo c 

a ° 
P4 -= 



s ■ 

s ^ 



D. 

New Moon, i 
3I*ir^t (Quarter, 8 



Moon's Ptiases, 

H, M. 
7 15 a. m 
4 57 a. m 



D, H. M, 
®Full Moon, i6 4 8 a. m. 
;^Last Quarter, 24 o 31 a. m. 
(DNew Moon, 30 2 56 p. m. 



V 

Q 


V 

S 


c 
a 


In 

c 

6 
6 
6 
6 


V 

_c 

•^ 
_« c 
"c 

3 
£/} 

17 55 
17 40 
17 24 
17 8 


ASPECTS OF PLANETS^ AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 


u 

"a, 

'a 




Moon rises or 
sets. 

Moon south. 


We 
Thu 
Fri 
Sat 


5 6 

5 7 
5 8 
5 9 


7 5 
7 4 
7 3 
7 2 


x^^South America disc. 1498. 
'©'Black Hawk war 1832. 
□ §©. Columbus left Spain 1492 
Tilden died 1886. 


1^ 


sets 1 eve 
8 18 I 20 

8 45j 2 12 

9 10 3 I 



CQ 31. Eleventh Sunday after Trinity. 
P 

03 



Day's length 13 hours 51 minutes. 



5 


G. 


5 10 


7 I 


6 


16 52 


6 


Mon 


5 II 


7 I 


6 


16 35 


7 


I'ue 


5 II 


7 


5 


16 19 


8 


We 


5 12 


6 58 


S 


16 2 


9 


Thu 


5 14 


6 56 


5 


15 44 


10 


bii 


5 13 


6 55 


5 


15 27 


II 


Sat 


5 14 


6 54 


5 


15 9 



<i ti 5. T. H. Briggs d. 18S6. 

d S 3- Cromwell d. 1658. 

Hampton, Va., burned 1861 
§ gr. Elon. W, Luke 5:23 

Battle Cedar Run 1862. 

Daguerre died 1851, 

W. H. Harrison d. 1880. 



^ 


9 34 


^ 


9 59 


A 


10 26 


A 


10 56 


MS 


II 32 


^ 


morn 


J^ 


15 



8 39 



g .32. Twelfth Sunday after Trinity, 
>* 

H 

o 
» 

Hi 

o 



Day's length 13 hours 38 minutes. 



G. 

Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



14 51 
14 33 
14 14 

13 55 

13 36 

13 17 

12 58 



George IV, born 1762. 
$ in Q. Nat. Turner ins. 1831. 
9 in ^. Gen. Grimes ass. 1880. 
^^Gen. Lafayette visits U.S. '24 
\l5^California discov. 1536. 
Mt. Cenis Tunnel opened 1871. 
5 in Peri. Atlantic Hotel dest. '79 



ifr 


I 4 


9 31 


J^ 


I 59 


10 21 


^ 


2 59 


II 9 


^ 


4 2 


II 54 


1^ 


rises 


morn 


A 


7 39 


37 


s. 


8 


I 18 



33. Thirteenth Sunday after Trinity, Day's length 13 hours 41 minutes. 



G. 

Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



d 

a 

o 

OD 

> 

< 
O 

a> 
09 



5 21 

5 21 
5 22 
5 23 
5 24 
5 25 
5 26 



6 45 
6 44 

6 43 
6 42 
6 40 
6 39 
6 38 



12 381 § gr. bril. Cresar died 14. 

12 i8|Benj. Harrison born 1833. 

II 59I c5 d 0)- J. C. Slocum d. 1881. 

II 38 Capt. Cook com. voyage 1768. j ffif 

II 18 /^5N Battle Pope's forces 1862. f^ 

I0 57VJ^6 1^D. Math. 5:5. Lp^ 

10 37 (5 Qi3. Gr. proce. in Raleigh '70I n^ 



8 


20 


8 


43 


9 


8 


9 


36 


10 


12 


10 


57 


II 


53 



1 59 

2 40 

3 23 

4 9 

4 59 

5 54 

6 54 



Thu 
Fri 



5 27 

5 27 
5 28 
5 28 
5 29 
5 30 



34. Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity. 

26^0: 
Mon 
Tue 
We 



Day's length 13 hours 9 minutes. 



6 36 
6 35 
6 33 
6 32 
6 31 
6 30 



10 i6| Battle of Crecy 1746. 
9 55 Sir Rowland Hill died 1879. 
9 34 c5 93- First Cable mess. 1858. 
9 12 § gr. Hei. Lat. N. Prov. 16:1. 
51 iljSlSlv (i s^ 5. 2d bat. Manassas '62 
8 29! \lyli' Great earthquake 1886. 



w 


morn 


n 


I I 


•« 


2 17 


<« 


3 38 


^ 


sets 


«5!* 


7 10 



7 

9 
10 
II 

II 5 
eve 



Weather Conjectures.— August— i, 2j 3. 4, 5,6, 7, wind and rain; 8, 
9, 10, II. 12, 13, 14, 15, rain; 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, expect rain; 24, 
25^26^27^^8,^29,_fa|r|_3o^i, changeable. 

Farmers should use " NATIONAL" Fertilizer forTobacso; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat, Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d page cover.) S. W. TRAVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLIN A ALMANAC. 21 

N. C. BOARD OF RAILROAU COMMISSIONERS. 

Commissioners.— J. W. Wilson, Burke County, Chairman, term expires 
April, 1899; E. C. Beddingfield, Wake County, term expires April, 1S97; T. 
W. Mason, Northampton County, term expires April, 1895; salary $2,000 each'; 
H. C. Brown, Surry County, Clerk, salary $1,200. 

Special sessions of the Court are held at Raleigh. Special sessions are also 
held at other places, under such regulations as made by the Commission. 

Offices of the Commissioners are located in the Agricultural Building. 

NORTH CAROLINA GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 

Jos. A. Holmes, State Geologist; H. B. C. Nitze, Assistant State Geologist. 
General offices of the Survey, Raleigh, N. C. 

OFFICERS N. C. STATE PENITENTIARY. 

A. Leazar, Superintendent State Prison, salary $2,500; W.J. Hicks, General 
Supervisor, salary $1,800; J. M. Fleming, Warden, salary fgofj; Wm. Ledbet- 
ter. Deputy Warden, salary $500; Dr. J. W. McGee, Physician, salary $500; 
Jos. J. Bernard, Bookkeeper, salary $900, 

Board of Directors. — A. B. Young, Vice-President, Concord. N. C. ; T. 
J. Armstrong, Rocky Point, N. C; Frank Stronach, R.ileigh, N. C, Dr. I. E. 
Green, Weldon, N. C. One vacancy. 

N, C. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT AND FERTILIZER CONTROL STATION 
AND STATE WEATHER SERVICE, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Officers. — H. B. Battle, Ph. D., Director and State Chemist; F. E. Emery, 
M. S., Agriculturist; Gerald McCarthy, B. S., Botanist and Entomologist; AJJ. 
F. Massey. C. E.. Horticulturist; C. F. von Herrmann, Meteorologist; B. W. 
Kilgore, M. S., F. B. Carpenter, B. S., W. M, Allen and C. B. Williams, 

B. S., Assistant Chemists; Alex. Rhodes, Assistant Horticulturist; Roscoe 
Nunn. Assistant Meteorologist; A. F. Bowen, Secretary. 

Offices and Laboratories in Agricultural Building, Raleigh; f.irm, stables and 
dairy at the Experiment Farm, adjoining State Fair Grounds. Visitois invited. 
Many interesting and valuable bulletins free on application. 

NORTH CAROLINA COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHAMU AKTS. 

Board of Trustees. — W. S. Primrose, President of the Board, Raleigh; 
W. F. Green, Franklinton; D. A. Tompkins, Charlotte; Henry E. Fries, 
Salem: N. B. Broughton, Raleigh; W. R. Williams. Falkland; J. B. Coffield. 
Everett's; W. R. Capehart, Avoca; W. E. Stevens, Clinton: J. H. Gilmer. 
Greensboro; J. F. Payne, Alma; J. R. McLelland, Mooresville; C. D. Smith. 
Franklin; R. W. Wharton, W.ishington. 

Executive Committee. — W. S. Primrose. Chairman; W. F. Green, N. B. 
Broughton, Henry E. Fries, W. E. Stevens, J. H. Gilmer. 

Finance Committee. — N. B. Broughton, Chairman; J. H. Gilmer, W. E. 
Stevens. 

Faculty and Officers. — Alexander Q. Holladay, President; W. F. Massey. 

C. E., Professor of Horticulture, Arboriculture and Botany; W. A. Withers. 
A. M., Professor of Pure and Agricultural Chemistry; D. II. IIiU, A. M.. Pro- 
fessor of English; B. Irby. M. S., Professor of Agriculture; W. C. Riddick, 
A. B., C. E., Professor of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics; R. E. L. Yates, 
A. M., Adjunct Professor of Mathematics; F. E. Emery, B. S., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Agriculture; Charles M. Pritchett, B. S., Instructor in Mechanics; 
Charles B. Park, Instructor in Practical Mechanics; C. B. Williams. B S.. 
S! E. Asbury, B. S., Instructors in Chemistry; B. S. Skinner, A.ssistant in Agri- 
cultural and Horticultural Practice; L. T. Yarborough, B. E., Assistant in 
Mechanics; F. T. Meacham, B. E., Dairyman; C. D. Francks. B. E.. Pre- 
paratory Department; Professor Withers, Secretary of the Faculty; Profesfor 
Hill, Bursar; Benj. S. Skinner, Superintendent of farm and Steward; Mrs. Sue 
C. Carroll, Matron; J. B. Dunn. M. D., Physician 

B^f=For Bargains in Clothing, go to WHITING BROS. 



22 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



9th Month. 



SEPTEMBERy 1894. 



30 Days. 



mBBk, 



9Ioou'8 Pbasea. 



n. 



H, M. 

T)First Quarter, 6 7 54 p. m. 
g)Full Moon, 14 II 13 p. m. 



D. H. M. 
(^Last Quarter, 22 7 23 a. m. 
(ffl)New Moon, 29 o 35 a. m. 



P4 



o 

a 

A 
P 

sz; 
o 
00 



d 
«> 

B 

o 

so 






ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 



^ 



7 35 eve 



I Sat 5 3i|6 28 I 8 7I Battle of S edan 1870. 

36. Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 12 hours 55 minutes. 



0. 


5 31 


6 27 


I 


7 45 


Mon 


S 33 


6 25 


I 


7 23 


Tue 


5 34 


6 24 


I 


7 I 


We 


5 35 


6 22 


2 


6 39 


Thu 


5 35 


6 21 


2 


6 17 


Fri 


5 36 


6 19 


2 


5 54 


Sat 


5 36 


6 18 


3 


5 31 



C5 tl-1- JBat. Fairfax Ch. 1862. 
(5 y O sup. Cromwell d. 1658. 
d S3. Gen. Morgan killed 1864 

3 Congress met 1774. 
May Flower sailed 1620. 
Independence of Brazil 1822. 
Montreal surrendered 1760. 



^ 


1 59 


^ 


8 24 


^ 


8 55 


ih 


9 30 


'«• 


10 II 


Jf 


10 58 


df 


II 52 



36. Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity. 



Day's length 12 hours 39 minutes. 



9 


G. 


5 37 


6 16 


3 


5 9 


ID 


Mon 


5 38 


6 15 


3 


4 46 


II 


■l"ue 


5 39 


6 14 


4 


4 23 


12 


We 


5 39 


6 12 


4 


4 


13 


Thu 


5 40 


6 II 


4 


3 37 


14 


Fri 


5 41 


6 10 


5 


3 14 


15 


Sat 


5 42 


6 8 


5 


2 51 



Battle of Eutaw 1781, 
Battle of Lake Erie 1813. 
Battle of Brandywine 1777. 
Battle of Chepultepec 1847. 

®n4lO. Battle Quebec 1759. 
3p'tly eci.vis. at Wash'gton. 
^ sta. Sheriff Nowell d. 1882. 



t 


morn 


^ 


50 


4S. 


I 51 


fk. 


2 54 


^ 


3 57 


(L 


4 56 





rises 



8 16 

9 4 
9 50 

10 34 

11 16 
II 58 
morn 



37. Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 12 hours 23 minutes. 



G. 


5 43 


6 6 


5 


2 28 


Mon 


5 44 


6 5 


6 


2 5 


Tue 


5 44 


6 4 


6 


I 41 


We 


5 45 


6 2 


6 


I 18 


Thu 


5 45 


6 I 


7 


55 


Fri 


5 46 


6 


7 


32 


Sat 


5 47 


5 58 


8 


8 



Senator Hill died 1882. 

9 in Peri. Ephe. 4:32. 

t^ sta. Surrender of Quebec 1759 

Battle of luka, Miss., 1862. 

(5 4* ^- New York panic 1873. 

§ in ^. Ephe. 6:2. 

O ent. j*i. Autumn Com. 



•^ 


6 48 


•s. 


7 10 


ffl^ 


7 37 


fl^ 


8 II 


(iWr 


8 52 


flWr 


9 44 


M 


10 47 



mw^ 

■^ 38. Eighteenth Sunday afte r Trinity. Day's length 12 hours 8 mi 

P 2T 6r. 5 48 5 56 8 south Neptune discovered 1846. M 11 5Q 



39 
22 

7 

56 
49 
47 
48 



Neptune discovered 1846. 
Monterey surrendered 1846, 
Battle of Montreal 1775. 
Philadelphia surrendered 1777. 
d 9 !»■ n^i O. Eph. 6:11. 
""^ total eel. invis, at Wash'tn 
Michaelmas Day. 



nutes. 



T! 26 

o 27 
OQ 28 



Mon 
Tue 
We 

Thu 5 

5 



5 56 
5 54 
5 53 
5 52 
5 50 
5 49 
5 47 



south 

39 

1 2 
I 26 

1 49 

2 12 
2 36 



w 


II 59 


MK 


morn 


=es 


I 17 


1E?P 


2 34 


^ 


3 50 


^ 


5 3 


^ 


sets 



6 51 

7 52 

8 51 

9 45 

10 36 

11 24 
eve 



Fri 
29, Sat 

39. Nineteenth Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 1 1 hours 53 minutes. 

30 O, 5 53|5 46 10 2 59 Battle Peebles' Farm 1864. "* ---',— r^rr 



^ 



6 241 o 59 



Weather Conjectures. — September — i, 2. 3, 4. 5, changeable; 6, 7, 8, 
9, 10, 11, 12. 13, fair if wind N. W.; rainy if S. or S. W.; 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 
19, 20, 21, fair; 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, wind and rain; 29, 30, fair. 



Farmers should use " NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco ; and BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d page cover.) 8. W. TR AVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC.:^23 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Officers —President, Julian S. Carri Durham, Durham Couniy -••■•■ 'r| 

Vice-Presidents (Permanent).— Hon. Kemp P. Baltic. Orange; Gov. T. 
M. Holt, Alamance; W. G. Upchurch and R. H. Hattle. W.cke. 

For State at Large —S. B. Ale.xinder. Mecklenburg; R. M. Collin*. 
Warren; A. T. Mial, Wake; H. E. Fries, Forsyth: R. P. Rheinhart. Catawba; 
Charles M. McDonald, Cabarrus; J. A. May, Haywood. The Presidents of 
all county fairs. 

Cor. Sec. and Manager. — H. W. Ayer. 

NORTH CAROLINA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE. 

W. F. Green, Chairman, Franklinton; W. R. Willi.ims, Falkland; J. IJ. 
Coffield, Everetts; W. R. Capehart, Avoca; W. E. Stephens. Clinton;' J. H. 
Gilmer, Greensboro; J- F. Payne, Alma: Dr. J. R. McLelland, Mooresville; 
H. E. Fries, Salem; C. D. Smith, Franklin John Robinson, Commissioner 
Agriculture and Immigration. T. K. Bruner, Secretary.J {Inspectors— George 
S. Terrell and P. C. Enniss. 

STATE NORMAL AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL AT GREENSBORO, N. C. 

This school was chartered by the General Assembly of 1891. The first ses- 
sion was opened in the fall of 1892. The following constitute the officers and 
Faculty for i893-'94: 

Board of Directors.— J. C. Scarborough, President, Wake County; E. 
McK. Goodwin, Secretary, Wake County; B. F. Aycock, Wayne County; Hugh 
Chatham, Surry County; R. D. Gilmer, Haywood County; A. C. McAlisier, 
Randolph County; M. C. S. Noble, New Hanover County; W. P. Shaw, Hert- 
ford County; J. M. Spainhouv, Caldwell County; R. H. Stancell, Northamp- 
ton County. 

Faculty. — Chas. D. Mclver, A. B., Litt. D., President, Pedaeogics and 
Civics; Mrs. S. M. Kirkland, Lady Principal; P. P. Claxton, A. B., Pedagogics 
and German; J. Y. Joyner, Ph. D., English Literature and Methods of Teach- 
ing Arithmetic; Gertrude W. Mendenhall, B. S., Mathematics; Dixie Lee 
Bryant, B. S , Geology, Biology and Physical Geography; Mary M. Petty. 
B. S., Chemistry and Physics; Viola Boddie, L. I., Latin and French; 
Annie M. Graves, M. D., Physiology and Hygiene; Maud F. Broadaway. 

Physical Culture; Lucy H. Robinson, History and Reading; Vocal 

Culture; Melville Vincent Fort, Industrial Art; Edith A. Mclntyre, Domestic 
Science; Sue May Kirkland, Habits and Manners; E. J. Forney. Bursar, Busi- 
ness Department; Fannie Cox Bell, Director of Observation and Practice 
School; Mrs. W. P. Conway, Matron. 

There was an attendance of 223 girls the first year, representing 70 counties, 
clerks u. s. circuit and district courts. 

W. C. Brooks, Elizabeth City; George Green, Newbern; '\\. H. Shaw, Wil- 
mington; James E. Reid, Asheville; H. C. Cowles. Siatesville and Charlotte; 
Samuel L. Trogdon, Greensboro; N. J. Riddick, Raleigh. 

ABOUT DR. WM. CLOSS. 

The mere mention of the name of Dr. William Closs will awaken a train of 
happy thoughts in the minds of thousands of people in North fJarolina. He 
was one of those grand old pioneers and patriarchs of Methodism in ihe State, 
whose memory should be cherished for aye. His zeal for his church, his love 
for his fellow-man, and his earnest and constant desire 'o see ail brought under 
the influence and saving power of the Christian religion knew no Iwunds. With 
a heart full of faith, with an industry that never tired, with a diligence that 
never swerved, and with a judgment that seldom erred, he was a man to be 
admired — yea, venerated. Possessed of commanding si 
ing eye, with a massive forehead, an earnt-stness that 

and with a magic voice that fascinated and charmed, ht- ! •..^. . ^ 

ciates and left thr; impress of his intellect and peerless preaching of pure gospel 
on thousands of grateful, regenerated hearts — CommunicaleJ. 

E^"Hats and Caps of all kinds and prices at WHITING BROS., Raleigh, N.C. 



24 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



lOth Month. 



OCTOBER, 1894. 



31 Days. 



be 



CO 

O 

o 

I 

oa 
P 

03 

M 
CO 

g 

Ph 

O 

O 

1^ 
1-3 

O 



d 
o 

o 

00 

> 

< 

CO 




DIoou'a Phases. 



D. H. M. 

First Quarter, 6 7 5 P- 
Full Moon. 14 i 32 P- 



D. H. M. 
^Last Quarter, 21 i 47 a. m. 
(^New Moon, 28 o 48 a. m. 



j£ 


^ 








V 









j= 





u 










ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 


RS 


<u 


3 






•c 


u 


cd 


(A (A 


OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 
MATTER. 


a. 




•Si 






c 



>s 


>s 


c 


c 


C 


C 













Q 


Q 


3 


3 

S 44 


3 
10 


3 

m 

3 22 




:s 


>3 


s 


1 


Mon 


^ in Aphe. Capt. White d. 1885 


i*i 


6 52 


eve 


2 


Tue 


S SS 


S 4"^ 


II 


3 43 


S. L. Riddle died 1886. 


A 


7 24 


2 38 


■^ 


We 


S "^6 


5 41 


II 


4 9 


Samuel Adams died 1803. 


<«L 


8 3 


3 30 


.) 


Thu 


5 57 


5 40 


II 


4 32 


Battle Germantovvn 1777. 


««i 


8 49 


4 23 


S 


Fri 


S S8 


S Sq 


12 


4 55 


'^A. J. Partin died 1880. 
vJH)!'' Battle Altoona Pass 1864. 


^ 


9 41 


5 lb 


6 


Sat 


5 59 


5 38 


12 


5 18 


ifr 


10 38I 6 8 



40. Twentieth Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 11 hours 37 minutes. 



7 


G. 


5 59 


5 36 


12 


5 41 


8 


Mon 


6 


5 35 


13 


6 4 


9 


Tue 


6 I 


5 34 


13 


6 27 


10 


We 


6 2 


5 32 


13 


6 50 


II 


Thu 


6 3 


5 30 


13 


7 12 


12 


Fri 


6 4 


5 2q 


14 


7 35 


13 


Sat 


6 5 


5 28 


14 


7 57 



Battle Saratoga 1777. 

Battle Fort Pickens 1861. 

9 gr. Hel. Lai. N. Chig.fire'71 

Gen. Stuart raid Pa. 1862. 

Samuel Wesley died 1837. 

Gen. Robert E. Lee died 1870. 

6^^. Prof. Wise lost 1879. 



if 


II 39 


^ 


morn 


4J, 


43 


/^ 


I 45 


fk 


2 47 


•§. 


3 49 


•0 


4 51 



6 58 

7 45 

8 29 

9 12 
9 54 

10 35 

11 18 



41. Twenty-first Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 11 hours 21 minutes- 
morn 
o 3 



14 


G. 


6 6 


5 27 


14 


8 20 


15 


Mon 


6 7 


5 25 


14 


8 42 


16 


Tue 


6 8 


5 24 


15 


9 4 


17 


We 


6 9 


5 23 


15 


9 26 


iS 


Thu 


6 9 


5 21 


15 


9 48 


iq 


bu 


6 10 


5 19 


15 


10 ID 


20 


Sat 


6 II 


5 18 


15 


10 31 



@dS3- Bat. Hastings 1066, 
Bank of Paris 1857. 
Napoleon at St. Helena 1815. 
Burgoyne surrendered 1777. 
^ gr. Elon. E. Prov. 24:17, 18 
Battle Hatcher's Run 1864. 
(^cJ'O- Grace Darling d. 1842 



^ 


5 56 


mP 


rises 


«" 


6 12 


/iW* 


6 52 


flP!r 


7 41 


n 


8 40 


H 


9 49 



42. Twenty-second Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 11 hours 5 minutes. 



G. 


6 12 


5 17 


15 


10 53 


Mon 


6 13 


5 16 


16 


n 14 


Tue 


6 14 


5 15 


16 


II 35 


We 


6 15 


5 14 


16 


II 56 


Thu 


6 16 


5 12 


16 


12 17 


Fri 


6 16 


5 II 


16 


12 37 


Sat 


6 17 


5 10 


16 


12 57 



? gr. Hel. Lat. S. 

Hon. Thos. Kenan d. 1843. 
QJ. sta. C.W.D.Hutchingsd. '83 
Daniel Webster died 1852. 
John F. Hanfl died 1883. 
Hogarth died 1765. 
C5 9'5- Bishop Doggett d. 1S80. 



<s 


II 3 


<« 


morn 


s^ 


19 


«^ 


I 34 


^ 


2 47 


^ 


3 56 


^ 


5 5 



5 46 

6 44 

7 38 

8 29 

9 17 
10 3 
10 50 



43, Twenty-third Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 10 hours 51 minutes. 



28 G. 


6 18 5 9|l6 


13 18 


if^l^Dr. Milburn in Raleigh '83. 
%lFBattle While Plains 1776. 


A 


6 16 


11 37 


29 Mon 


6 19 5 8 16 


13 .38 


A 


sets 


eve 


30 Tue 


6 20 5 6 16 


13 57 


5 sta. Gambetta b 1838. 


<«• 


5 59 


I 19 


3ilWe 6 21I5 5I16 


14 17 


Gen. Scott retired 1861. 


^ 


6 41 


2 12 



Weather Conjectures — October — i, 2, 3, 4, 5, expect fair weather; 6, 
7, 8. 9, 10, II. 12, 13, fair if wind N. W.; rainy if S or S. W. ; 14, 15. 16, 17, 
iS, 19, 20, look for much rain; 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, fair; 29, 30, 31, 
fair, Indian summer weather. 

Farmers Should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco ; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d page cover.) S. W. TRAVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 25 



THE STORY OF JIM JONES. 

Jim Jones, he was a candidate for office — so he was; 

He'd been workin' clean Jrom daylight in the Democrat'c cause; 

He'd heard about ih-i salary an office-holder draws — 

So he went in for an office in the mornin'! 

He brushed his old black beaver an' he polished up his boots; 
He got him twenty packages of Georgia-made cheroots, 
An' they missed him from the village an' political disputes — 
For he went in for an office in the mornin'! 

But the office wasn't comin', an' they told him for to wait; 
The road was kinder crooked when he thought it kinder straight; 
But Jones — he kept a'swingin' on the Democratic gate, 
" For," said he, " I'll ketch the office in the mornin,!" 

Soon the Congressmen had smoked up every one o' his cheroots. 
An' the mud had worn the polish from the leggins of his boots, 
An' the office jes' got mixed up in political disputes. 
An' Jones — he kinder we:ikened in the mornin'! 

So he boarded of a freight irain that was runnin' by the rule. 

For he didn't have a dollar, an' was feelin' like a fool; 

An' then he went to plowin', with a mortgage on his mule — 

An' he cussed out every office in the mornin'! F. L. S. 

SIAMESE TWINS AGAIN. 

They were natives of Siam, After traveling all over the world and accumu- 
lating a large fortune, they married two sisters (Gates) in Wilkes County, and 
after settled in Surry Counly on a large farm not very far from Mt. Airy, about 
1845 or '50. They were said to have been fine farmers, very industrious and 
quite well skilled in domg many kinds of manual labor, such as cutting down 
trees, loading and driving the wagon, plowing, &c. They had a kind of double 
house, and one family lived in each end. They each had eight or ten children, 
which they educated liberally. I think two or ibree were mutes and were edu- 
cated at the North Carolina Institution for the Deaf and Dumb and the Blind 
in Raleigh. My friend Z. W Hayncs, a mute te.icher. married one of the 
daughters, and now lives in Raleigh. He will be able to correct any mistakes 
I may have made in this short aiticle. After settling down to private lifp they 
were known by the name of Bunker — Chang Bunker and Eng Hunker. 

A neighbor of mine once visited them and told me that they slept on a large 
double bed — the twins in the middle and the wives on the outside. The fami- 
lies did not entirely agree after they grew to be numerous, so the husbands 
bought another farm adjoining and then alternated themselves between the 
farms — a v/eek at each one. Having lost their negroes and much other property 
by the war, they set about regaining and put themselves on exhibition at Bar- 
num's in New York, where I saw them in 1865 or '66. There are many other 
things of peculiar interest about them which I hope Prof. Z. W. Hayncs will 
be pleased to tell us. • -kvi Branson. 

" God be thanked for books. They ate the voices of the distant and the 
dead, and make us heirs of the spiritual life of past ages. Books are the true 
levelers. They give to all, who will faithfully use them, the .society, the spirit- 
ual presence of the best and greatest of our race. No matter how poor I am. 
No matter though the prosperous of my own time will not enter roy obscure 
dwelling. If the sacred writers will enter and take up their abode under my 
roof, if Milton will cross my threshold to sing to me of I'aradise, and Shake- 
speare to open to me the worlds of imagination and the workings of the human 
heart, and Franklin to enrich me with his practical wisdom, I shall not pine for 
want of intellectual companionship, and I may become a cultivated man though 
excluded from what is called the best society in the place where I live."— CAdw- 
ning. 
B^Overcoats for Men and Boys at bottom Prices at WHITING BROS. 



2G BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



llth Month. 



NOVEMBEB, 1894. 



30 Daps. 




Moon's Pliascs. 



D. H. M. 
First Quarter, 5 lo 7 a. m. 
Full Moon. 13 2 41 a. m. 



D. H M. 
(J||;Last Quarter, ig 9 op. m. 
(IffiNew Moon, 27 3 46 a. m. 



CO 

o 

o 
Pi 



m 
P 

< 



xn 

« 

Pm 

o 

o 
a 

o 

a 
«> 

OB 
••-I 
-4-» 

< 

« 
CO 



o-S 



ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 



jiThu 6 22 
2 Fri 6 23 

3lSat 6 24 

44-* Twenty-fourth Sunday after Trinity 



i6l 14 36 
16 14 55 
16 15 14 



Gen. McClellan in com'nd 1861. 
N. and S. Dakotas adm'ted 1889 
Battle Hohenlinden i8oo. 



I) 






« 








D. 


















C u 













S 


S 


if 


7 31 


Sf 


8 28 


if 


9 27 



eve 

3 59 

4 50 



Day's length 10 hours 37 min. 



4 


Q. 


6 25 


5 2 


16 


15 32 


5 


Mon 


6 26 


S I 


16 


15 51 


6 


Tue 


6 27 


S 


16 


16 Q 


7 


We 


6 28 


4 59 


16 


16 26 


8 


Thu 


6 29 


4 58 


16 


16 44 


9 


Fri 


6 30 


4 56 


16 


17 I 


10 


.Sat 


6 31 


4 56 


16 


17 18 



Geo. Peabody died 1869. 

Kepler died 1630. 
Lincoln elected i860. 
^ S O. Braxton Craven d. 1882. 
Milton died 1694. 
g in^. Dr. Lovic Pierce d. '79. 
Transit of ^ invis. at Wash'gt'n. 



4i, 


II 29 


^ 


II 30 


Hk 


morn 


it 


6 32 


■0 


I 33 


•s. 


2 34 


•s. 


3 3B 



38 
23 

6 

47 
28 

ID 

54 



45. Twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity. Day's It-i gth 10 hours 23 minutes. 



II 


0. 


6 32 


4 55 


16 


17 34 


12 


Mon 


6 33 


4 55 


15 


17 51 


13 


Tue 


6 34 


4 54 


15 


18 7 


14 


We 


6 35 


4 53 


15 


18 22 


15 


Thu 


6 36 


4 53 


15 


18 38 


iC 


Fri 


6 37 


4 52 


15 


18 53 


17 


Sst 


6 38 


4 51 


15 


19 7 



Wm. E. Pell died 1870. 

/^Dr. J. L. Craven d. 1885. 

>^/Fall of Meteors 1833. 

$ in Peii. llerschell born 1738. 

Battle Campbell's Station 1S63. 

Sherman's march 1S64. 

Suez Canal opened 1869. 



•^ 


4 45 


0^ 


5 56 


HPf 


nses. 


irf 


5 32 


M 


6 30 





7 39 


<s 


8 54 



10 41 

11 33 
morn 

30 

1 32 

2 36 

3 40 



46. Twenty-sixth Sunday after Trinity. 



Day's length 10 hours 11 minutes. 



18 

iglMon 

20 Tae 

2itWe 

22iThu 

23|Fri 

241 Sat 

47. 



15 19 21 
14119 35 



14 



49;M 
49ii4 
49 13 



19 49 

20 2 
20 15 
20 28 



CMt. .^tna eruption 1832. 
$ sta. Mason&Slidell cap. '61 
Eruption Mt. Vesuveus 1857. 
Telescope invents d 1790. 
cf sta. Fr.ince an Empire 1852. 
Gen. Bragg defeated 1863 



13I20 4oir5tl3- Aui't Abbey House d. '81 



-K 


10 10 


««• 


II 24 


1^ 


morn 


^ 


36 


^ 


I 45 


^ 


2 53 


sh. 


4 2 



4 40 

5 35 

6 26 

7 14 

8 o 

8 45 

9 31 



Twenty-seventh Sunday after Trinity. Day's length 10 hours I minute. 



25 


0. 


6 46 4 47 


13 


20 52 


26 


Mon 


6 47 4 47 


12 


21 3 


27 


Tue 


6 48:4 46 


12 


21 14 


23 


We 


6 49 4 46 


12 


21 25 


29 


Thu 


6 50I4 46 


II 


21 35 


30 


Fri 


6 51I4 46 


11 


21 44 



G^ 5? "J. Isaac Watts d. 1748. 
O in^?- Bishop Marvin d. 1875. 
~ Qc^t. B. F.Moore d. 1877 
(5 5$. Irving died 1S59. 
C^ Q O .sup. Seaton Gales d. '78. 
Saint Andrew. 



sh 


- 1 1 


^ 


6 i3 


'Ct 


.sets 


£< 


5 22 


^ 


6 16 


^ 


7 14 



10 19 

11 9 
eve 

55 

1 49 

2 41 



Weather Conjectures. — November — i. 2, 3, 4, frost unless wind be S. 
or S. W.; 5, b, 7, 8, 9. 10, 11, 12, cold high winds; 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, cold 
winds, perhaps snow; ig, 20, 21. 22, 23, 24, 25. 26, fair and frosty if wind N. 
or N. E.; rain or snow if S. or S. W.; 27, 28, 29. 30, snow and stcvmy. 

Farmers should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE" brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertilizer Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d page cover.) S. W. TRAVERS & CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 27 



48 PRIZE MEDALS OBTAINED. 



Why Suffer '^^^^'^^^ '' ' '""''^^ 

. . •« r^ which should be in 
unnecessarily • every household, by 
which the ill effects of a sudden chill may easily, without 
trouble and discomfort, be warded off, if applied in time. 
On the first symptom of pain, apply 

BENSON'S V^IW^ 

To the affected parts. In this way inflammation is relieved 
promptly by the absorption of suitable medication, quick 
cure accomplished, and serious consequences averted ; but 
"to be forewarned is to be forearmed," therefore, as delay is 
dangerous, always have BENSON'S Porous Plasters in the 
house for immediate use, and be sure to get the genuine 



Endorsed by over 5,000 Physicians and Chemists. 



Rheumatism, Sciatica, Lumbago, Bacliuche, 
Pneumonia and Kidney Affections 

YIELD PROMPTLY TO THE SOOTHING AND REMEDIAL EFFECTS OK THIS 
WONDERFUL PLASTER. IT IvS SAFE AND SI- RE. 

SEflBUHV & JOHflSON, 

59=61 Nlaiden Lane, 

NEW YORK. 



28 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



I'ith Month. 



DECEMBER, 1S94. 



31 Days. 




Moon's PIiaseH 

D. H. M. 
3First Quarter, 5 7 7 a. m. 
^Full Moon. 12 2 ,37 p. m. 



D. H. M. 

(^Last Quarter, 19 6 7 a. m. 
(jg!) New Moon, 26 9 11 p.m. 



ri 
















1^ 




c 





11 

tn 

•c 
c 


en 

C 


to 
M 

B 


1.- 


ASPECTS OF PLANETS AND 

OTHER MISCELLANEOUS 

MATTER. 


u 
rt 

'S. 

_<n 

"c 








OJ 
."' •■ 

c ^ 






3 


U) 

C 




Q 


c 




3 


S 
II 


3 

21 54 




s 


§ 


s 


I 


Sat 


6 51 


4 46 


Battle Austerlitz 1805. 


^ 


8 16 


eve 



48. First Sunday in Advent. 



Day's length 9 hours 54 minutes. 



a 

P4 






o 

-4-3 

o 

a 

o 

ID 

•■^ 

•4^ 

« 

« 

CO 



2 


6?. 


6 52 


4 46 


10 


22 3 


3 


Men 


6 53 


4 4^ 


10 


22 II 


4 


Tue 


6 54 


4 46 


9 


22 19 


5 


We 


6 55 


446 


9 


22 27 


6 


Thu 


6 56 


4 46 


9 


22 34 


7 


Fri 


6 56 


4 46 


8 


22 41 


8 


Sat 


6 57 


4 46 


8 


22 47 



John Brown executed 1857. 
Illinois admitted 1818. 

9 in ^9. Alabama adm'td '18 

Van Bliren b. 1782. 
Hastings born 1782. 
(5 § ^. Heb. 2:3. 
Dr. A. T. Bledsoe died 1877. 



<I 


9 18 


Ik 


10 19 


^ 


II 20 


^ 


morn 


t» 


21 


•0 


I 22 


•0 


2 25 



8 29 



4.9. 



9 
10 
II 
12 
13 
14 

_^ 5- _ 
50. 



G. 

Mon 

Tue 

We 

Thu 

Fri 

Sat 



Second Sunday in Advent. 
7 



Day's length 9 hours 48 minutes. 



4 46 
4 46 
4 46 
4 47 
4 47 
4 47 
4 47 



22 53JMilton born 1608. 

22 sSlDr Columbus Mills d. 1882. 

23 3 /^^Fredericksburg bomb. 1862 
23 8 >^/Cromwell Protector 1653. 
23 12 Drake sailed 1577. 

23 15 5 in Peri. Halcyon Days BEGiji 
23 19 d%3)- Bat. Nashville 1864 



«i^ 


3 31 


«< 


4 42 


/n^ 


9 57 


(IWf 


rises 


W 


5 20 


M 


6 35 


«« 


7 55 



9 18 

10 13 

11 13 
morn 

18 

1 24 

2 28 



Third Sunday in Advent. 



Day's length 9 hours 44 minutes. 



16 


G. 


7 4 


4 48 


4 


23 21 


17 


Mon 


7 4 


4 48 


3 


23 23 


18 


i'ue 


7 5 


4 49 


3 


23 25 


19 


We 


7 6 


4 49 


2 


23 26 


20 


I'hu 


7 7 


4 49 


2 


23 27 


21 


Fri 


7 7 


4 50 


I 


23 27 


22 


Sat 


7 8 


4 50 


1 


23 27 



Boston Tea Party 1773. 
Poet VVhittier born 1807. 

e§in^^. Sir Hum.Davyb. 1778 
Rome burnt 69 
South Carolina seceded i860. 
ent. ^. Winter Commences 



1^ 


9 13 


«^ 


10 26 


1^ 


II 37 


^ 


morn 


^ 


46 


A 


I 54 


sh 


3 I 



28 

22 
12 

59 
44 
29 



3 
4 

c 

5 
6 

7 
8 16 



51. Fourth Sunday in Advent. 



Day's length 9 hours 43 minutes. 



23 «. 7 84 51 

24 Mon 7 9 4 51 

25 Tue 7 9 4 52 

26 We 7 9 4 53 

27 Thu 7 10 4 53 

28 Fri 7 10 4 54 

29 Sat 7 10 4 5 4 

52. Sunday after Christnras. 



23 26\rjrP^. Henry W. Grady d. 1889 
23 25 5^tlD- Dr. Wm. Little d. 1879. 
23 24 /ifli^CHRiSTMAS Day. 
23 22 

23 19 
23 16 

23 13 



C5 91>- Battle Trenton 1776 
r^ ^ §. Kepler born 1571. 
$ in Aphelion. Rom. 10:10. 
CJ Q O sup. 1st John 3:1,2 



^ 


4 8 


^ 


5 15 


^ 


6 18 


^ 


7 15 


^ 


sets 


^ 


6 6 


<£ 


7 8 



9 5 
9 56 

10 48 

11 42 
eve 

1 25 

2 12 



Day's length 9 hours 44 minutes. 



56 
38 



301 G. ]7 ir|4 55| 3'23 91 Battle Savannah 1778. I ^ I 8 

3il Mon 7 ii'4 56 4 23 4lBattle Murfreesboro 1862. ' i^ ' 9 1 

Weather Conjectures. — December — i, 2, 3.4, snow and storm; 5, 6, 7, 
8, 9. lo, II, stormy; 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. 17, 18, fair and mild; 19. 20, 21. 22, 
23, 24. 25. stormy; 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, fair and frosty if wind N. or N. E.; 
rain or snow if S. or S. W. 

Farmers Should use "NATIONAL" Fertilizer for Tobacco; and "BEEF, 
BLOOD and BONE " brand for Cotton, Corn and Wheat. Strictly reliable. 
Ask your Fertili er Merchant for them. Carefully prepared by 

(See top 3d cover page.) S. W. TRAVERS At CO., Richmond, Va. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 29 



College of Physicians and Surgeons, 



RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 



HUNTER McGUIRE, M. D., LL. D., President 
JOSEPH A. WHITE, A. M., M. D., Secretary. 



A Three Years' Graded Course, 

Comprising the Following Departments: 

MEDICINE, THOMAS J. MOORE, M. D., 

^■^^"^^^"'■^■~ Chairman. 

DENTISTRY, lewis m. cowardin, m. d., d. d. s., 

~"'~'~"'^~~"^~""^~ Chairman. 

PHARMACY, T. A. MILLER, Ph. G., 
■^^^^■"■■■■^^"■" Chairman. 



The next regular session of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Richmond,Va., 
will begin October 2, 1894, and continue six months. The Course will 
consist of Recitations, Didactic and Clinical Lectures — special 
attention being devoted to Laboratory Work — Demon- 
strations on the Cadaver, etc., and Clinics, 
according to the grade of the student. 
IN DENTISTRY AND PHARMACY Every FacUity is Afforded for Thorough 
Practical and Laboratory Instruction. 



THIS COLLEGE has been established in Richmond, Virginia, the 
historic city of the South, in order to give Southern Medical, 
Dental and Pharmacy Students the same high grade facilities 
in a Southern climate as are offered by similar institutions beyond the 
Potomac. Everything being equal, high grade, able instructors, clinical 
advantages, there is every reason for Southern students to patroni/.e 
home institutions. The corps of professors and teachers lias been 
selected from among the prominent men in Virginia and North Carolina; 
the grade of the School has been placed high enough to make a graduate 
proud of his diploma; and the laboratory and clinical facilities all that 
could be desired. No expense has been spared to gain this end. The 
laboratories are large and well equipped for thorough instruction in 
Chemistrj% Histology, Pathology, Physiology, Bacteriology, Pharmacy, 
and Mechanical Dentistrv. 

THE VIRGINIA HOSPITAL, with a frontage of no feet, adjoins the 
College buildings, and, with a thoroughly organized DISPENS.'VRY, 
affords ample clinics and bedside in.struction. 

THE RICHMOND EYE, EAR, THRO.\T AND NOSE INFIRMARY, 
at 217 Governor Street, also adds to the clinical advantages. 

Attendance upon three full courses of lectures* is required of .in appli- 
cant for graduation in Medicine or Dentistry, and credit is j^jiven for 
courses taken at any accredited Medical School; moreover, this School 
accepts certificates of proficiency in any branch from any regular Col- 
lege requiring a graded course of three or more years. 

For catalogue and particulars as to fees, board, clinical advantages, 
hospital accommodations, etc., apply to the Secretary, 

Dr. JOSEF'HT A. WHIXE. 

200 E. Franklin Strkkt, Ricbmonu, Va. 

*A three years' course is required for several reasons: Firstly, in the inlercst of 
higher medical education; secondly, because it is demanded by the Association of 
American Medical Colleges, of which this .school is a member; and thirdly, Ixrcause 
some States have already passed laws making three years of study necessary Ijeforc a 
license can be g^ranted to practice. 



30 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



THE EDUCATION OF POOR BOYS. 

By Dr. John F. Crowell, President of Trinity College, N. C. 

The first thing that a poor boy needs in order to get an education is an inspi- 
. ration that he is worth sojnething to himself. Call it ambition, self-esteem or 
S anything else; it is after all the sense of present and future worth of his native 
powers that aflords the point of departure for him. Whence that sense of per- 
§j sonal worth we may not know, or how it comes may be a mystery, but it comes 
aj as certain as fate. The dull and hopeless Anthony Trollope, whom his father 
Pk occasionally knocked down with the family Bible, at last broke the crust of his 

apparent stupidity, and felt his strength like a young eagle. 
^ The second thing needed is confidence in others. A Baltimore young man, 
^ about half a century ago, went to a man of wealth and asked him for the use of 
§ a few thousand dollars with which to begin business. "What security have 
M you to give?" asked the merchant. " My own personal honor, sir." The loan 
rH was made and so was the fortune of the young man. This incident suggests a 
f^ third essential besides confidence of others, to the getting of an education by a 
S poor boy, that is, integrity and intelligence. No one will care to help to edu- 
^ cate a young man whose character is unsound. Nor will any man in his right 
senses do much for a lazy, loafing young man — I speak of poor young men. 
Q Character is better than collateral. The rneasure of credit which character caa 
^ command is simply enormous. I met a manufacturer the other day who told 
^ me of a merchant who had failed and settled with his creditors for 50 cents on 
the dollar, with receipts in full. Then some one turned around and offered the 
2 creditors 75 cents on the dollar for the other half of the unpaid debt from which 
^ the creditors had released their insolvent debtor. Such was the confidence which 
^ he had in the man who had failed but not impaired his power to restore himself 
tt in business nor lost his integrity in the time of trial. 

HH Integrity, to define more strictly, means wholeness of character. It must be 
^ above price; it must be kept entirely out of the market, for as soon as it or a 
2 part of it becomes for sale, then men will not be willing to trust it unless it is 
VR plastered over with bonds and mortgages, and the poor young man has none of 
Ph these. Integrity means truthfulness in act, word and thought alike. A liar is 
- a curse to the human family, because it becomes its destroyer. So, then, as a 
S woman guards her honor, must a man guard this part of his possessions called 

integrity of character, above suspicion of evil. 
p^ Diligence comes of a purposeful life. To what purpose can a young man be 
^ living who simply eats, drinks, sleeps and breathes the open air on the street 
fa corner, as if he had a perfect right to it ? Indolence is vice, or the next step to 
^ it. He who will not use opportunities is not the one upon whom to spend 
►^ money. A poor, indolent young man is a prospective pauper, a criminal poten- 
O tially. If he can be shaken out of his lethargy, his age will be the richer, for 
^ poverty may then be a spur to effort. Senator Simon Cameron, who began 
■*J very poor and became rich, said of his son Don, that he, the father, had one 
g advantage which Don wanted in starting life; that advantage was in being poor. 
g Poverty is nothing to be ashamed of; but on the other hand it is nothing to 
§ boast of. I have known young men who made fools of themselves coddling 
CD the notion that their poverty entitled them to future greatness. There is about 
^ as much virtue in that as there was in the pious dirtmess of the mediaeval monks. 
^ A poor young man usually works his way by earning enough to support him- 
> self for a time at school or college. If he is a clerk, let him be ambitious to be 
^ the best clerk in the store; if a mechanic, let him prove that he is not excelled; 
^ if a book agent, let him know that he is carrying the golden treasures of knowl- 
O edge to thousands to whom the wisdom of the ages would never have come but 
J® for him, I thank God for the book agents that have visited the distant rural 
home of my youth, where the fountains of history were opened to me and the 
treasures of philosophy were sought in quiet devotion. 

Be the best that you can be, young men, then men and women will risk money 

on you, if you want them to, in your effort to get an education. ■ For every 

dollar you earn with diligence, integrity and earnestness, you can borrow ten. 

Every coilege will trust you to pay your tuition. But be careful about a 

(Continued on page 34.) 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 31 



SUPERIOR COURTS OF NORTH CAROLINA FOR 1894. 

(Having all the changes made by the Legislature of 1H93.) 



JUDGES. 




SOLICITORS 


Name. District 


Residence. 


iXame. District 


A'. ; .'/-H.*-, 


George H. Brown, 


I 


Washington. 


John H. mount, 


1 


nrni..t.i. 


Henry R. Brown, 


2 


Newbeni. 


G. H. While (col.), 
John K. Woodara, 




Ncw'h rn. 


Jacob Battle, 


3 


Rocky .Mount. 


.1 


Wilson. 


Spier Whit.iker, 


4 


Raleigh. 


Edward W. Pou. jr.. 


.( 


Smithfield. 


Robert W. Winston, 


5 


Oxford. 


Edward S. Parker, 


1 


Grnhnm. 


Edward T. Boykin, 


6 


Clinton. 


0. H. Allen. 


(S 


Kiiiston. 


James D. Mclver, 


7 


Carthage. 


Frank McNeill, 


7 


KuckiiiKh.tin 


Robert F. Armfield, 


8 


Statesville. 


Benjamin F. Long, 


S 


Stalesvillc. 


Jesse K. Graves. 


9 


Mount .\iry. 


W. W. Barber, 


9 


WilkcslKjro 


John Gray Bynum, 


10 


Morganton. 


W. C. Newland, 


10 


Lenoir. 


W. Alexander Hoke, 


II 


Lin coin ton. 


J. L. Webb, 


11 


Shelby. 


George A. Shuford, 


12 


Asheville. 


George .\. Jones, 


13 


Franklin. 



Time of Holding Courts. 



»IRST JXTDICIAI. DISTRICT. 

Spring — Judge Armfield. 

Fall — Judge Mclver. 

Beaufort— JFeb. 19th, May 28th, Nov. 
26th. 

Currituck — March sth, Sept. 3d. 

Camden — March 12th, Sept. loth. 

Pasquotank— March 19th, Sept. 17th. 

Perquimans — March 28th, Sept. 24th. 

Chowan — April 2d, Oct. ist. 

Gates— April 9th, Oct. Sth. 

Hertford— April i6th, Oct. 15th. 

Washington — May 7th, Nov. 5th. 

Tjrrrell- April 23d, Oct. 22d. 

Dare — April 30th, Oct. 29th. 

Hyde — May 14th, Nov. 12th. 

Pamlico — May 21st, Nov. 19th. 

SECOND JUDICIAI, DISTRICT. 

Spring — Judge Graves. 

i^a//— Judge Armfield. 

Halifax— JMarch 5th, May 14th, Nov. 
12th. 

Northampton— April 2d, fAug. 6th, Oct. 
ist. 

Bertie— Feb. 5th, April 30th, Oct. 29th. 

Craven— |Feb. 12th, May 28th, Nov. 26th. 

Warren — March 19th, Sept. 17th. 

Edgecombe — April i6th, Oct. 15th. 

THIRD JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

Spring— Jni^Q Bynum. 

.Fa//— Judge Graves. 

Pitt— Jan. Sth, March 5th. t April 2d, 
Sept. 17th, +Dec. 3d. 
Franklin— Jan. 22d, April i6th, Oct. 22d. 
Wilson— tFeb. 5th, June 4th, Oct. 29th. 
Vance- Feb. 19th. May 21st, Oct. ist. 
Martin — March 19th, Sept. 3d. 
Nash— April 30th, Nov. 19th. 

FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

spring — Judge Hoke. 

/"a//— Judge Bynum. 

Wake— *Jan. Sth, fFeb. 26th, »March 
26th, +April 23d. *Sept. 24th, tOct. 22d. 

Wayne— Jan. 22d, April 16th, Sept. loth, 
Oct. 15th. 

Haruett— Feb. 5th, Aug. 6th, JNov. 26th. 

Johnston— March 12th, Aug. 27th, Nov. 
1 2th. 



: FIFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

t Spring — Judge Shuford. 
' Fall — Judge Hoke. 

Durham — Jan. 15th, March 2t)th, June 
I 4th, Oct. Sth. 

Granville— Jan. 29th, April 23d, July 
I 23d, Nov. 26th. 

I Chatham— Feb. 12th, May 7th, Sept. 
24th. 

Guilford— Feb. 19th, May 28th, Aug. 
27th, Dec. loth. 
' Alamance— March 12th, May 21st, Not. 
I2th. 

Orange— March 19th, Aug. 6lh, Oct. 
29th. 
Caswell— April 9th, Aug. 13th. Oct. 32d. 
Person— April 16th, Aug. icth. Not. 
19th. 

SIXTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

5/>rj'w^— Judge Brown. 

/a/Z-Judge Shuford. 

Pender— March 5th, Sept. lolh. 

Greene — Feb. 26th, Aug. 13th, Nov. yith. 

New Hanover— tjan. 22d, t-*pril I'ith, 
tSept. 24th. 

Lenoir— May 7th, Nov. 12th. 

Duplin— Feb. 19th, Aug. 6th, Dec. 3d. 

Sampson— Feb. 5th, Apr. 30th, Oct. 
Sth. 

Carteret— Mar«h 19th, Oct. zad. 

Jones— March ;''>th, f)ct. 2Qth. 

Onslow— April 2d, Nov. 5th. 

SEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

5/r«n^— Judge Bryan. 

/a//— Judge Brown. 

Columbus— Feb. 26th, July i6th, Nov. 
5th. 

Anson— tJan. sth, fApr. 30th. "Sept. jrd, 
tNov. 26th. 

Cumberland— Jan. 7v\, tMay 7th. July 
23d, tNov. I 2th. 

Robeson— Jan. 29th, 'May 2i»t, Oct. 
ist. 

Richmond— Feb. uth, June 4th, Sept. 
17th, Dec. 3d. 

Bladen— March 20th (Tue»d«yt. (>ct. 
23d (Tuesday). 

Brunswick— April 9th, Sept. loih. 

Moore-March sth, 'Aug. 13th, fAug. 
20th, 'Dec. loth, tU«"C. 17th. 



Insure against Loss by Fire in the N. C. Home Ins. Co. 
Ealeigh, N. C. 



32 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



EIGHTH JCDICIAL DISTRICT 

Spring— Judge Battle. 



SUPERIOR COURTS— Continued. 

Mitchell— April 30th, Oct. 15th. 
Yancey— May 14th, Oct. 29th. 



to 



/ci//— Judge Bryan. 

Cabarrus — Jan. 22d, July 23d. 

Iredell— Feb. 5th, May 21st, Aug. 6th, 
Nov. sth. 

Rowan— Feb. 19th, May 7th, Aug. 20th, 
Nov. 19th. 

Davidsou- March 5th, Sept. 3d, fDec. 3d. 

Randolph— March 19th, Sept. 17th. 

Montgomery— April 2d, Oct. ist. 



bP Yadkni— .\p'ril 16th, Oct. 15th. 
08 



Ph 

O 



Q 

P4 

o 



NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

5^ri'«^— Judge Whitaker. 

i=a//— Judge Battle. 

Alexander— Jan. 22d. July 23d. 

Rockingham— Jan. 29th, July 30th, Nov. 
5th. 

Forsyth— Feb. 26th, May 21st, Aug. 6th, 
Dec. 3a. 

Wiike-s- March 5th, Sept. 3d. 

Alleghany — April 2d, Sept. 17th. 

Da VIC— April yth, Sept. 24th. 

Stokes— April 23d, Oct. 22d. 

Surry— March 19th, Oct. Sth. 

TENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

.S/n'«^— Judge Winston, 

.Fa//— Judge Whitaker. 

Catawba— Feb. 19th, July 23d. 
McDowell — March 5th, Aug. 20th. 
Hurke — March 19th, Sept. 3d. 
Caldwell— April 2d, Sept. 17th. 
Ashe — April 9th, Sept. 24th. 
Watauga— April 23Q, Oct. Sth. 



ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

Spring— Judge Boykin. 

/a//— Judge Winston. 

Union — Jan. 29th, Aug. 20th. 

Stanly— Feb. 19th, Sept. 17th. 

Mecklenburg — fMarch 5th, fjune 4th, 
tSept. 3d, tDec. 17th. 

Gaston — March loth, Oct. 1st. 

Lincoln— April 2ci, Oct. 15th. 

Cleveland— April i6th, Aug. 6th, Oct. 

22d. 

Rutherford— April 30th, Nov. 5th. 
Polk— May 14th, Nov. 19th. 
Henderson — May 21st, Nov. 26th. 

TWELFTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT. 

Spring — Judge Mclver. 

J^all — Judge Boykin. 

Madison — Feb. 26th, July 30th, fNov. 
19th. 

Buncombe — -f-March 12th, fAug. 
fDec. 3d. 

Transylvania — April 2d, Sept. 3d. 

Haywood — April 9th, Sept. roth. 

Jackson — April 23d, Sept. 24th. 

Macon — May 7th, Oct. ist. 

Clay— May 14th, Oct. Sth. 

Cherokee— May 21st, Oct. 15th. 

Graham — June 4th, Oct. 29th. 

Swain— June nth, Nov. 19th. 



13th, 



*For criminal cases. 

fFor civil cases alone. 

JFor civil cases alone except jail cases. 



CRIMINAL COURTS. 

New Hanover County.— Oliver P. Meares, Wilmingrton, Judge; Benjamin R. Moore, 
Wilmington, Solicitor. Court begins January ist, March 19th, May 21st, July 16th, 
September 17th, November 19th. 
Mecklenhurg County.— Oliver P. Meares, Judge; George E. Wilson, Charlotte, 
Solicitor. Court begins February 12th, April 9th, August 13th, October Sth, December 3d. 
•^ Buncombe County. — H. B. Carter, Asheville, Judge; E. D. Carter, Asheville, Solici- 
tor. Court begins January 22d, April 23d, July 23d, October 22d. 

U. S. CIRCUIT AND DISTRICT COURTS. 

Western District.— R. p. Dick, Greensboro, Judge: Greensboro— Circuit and Dis- 
trict—April 2d, October ist. Sialesville-CiTcuit and District— April i6th, October 15th. 
.-IvAfj'/V/c- Circuit and District— April 30th, October 29th. C/iar/o//<;— Circuit and Dis- 
trict— June nth, December loth. 

aKASTKRN District.— A. S. Seymour, Judge: Elizabeth 07v— District Court— April 
16th, October 15th. JVe7i/bern— District Court— April 23d, October 22d. IVilmington— 
fl) Circuit and District Court— April 30th, October 29th. .^a/^j^A- Circuit Court— June 4th, 
November 26th. 

SUPREME COURT. 



CO 



O 

o 
•*» 

d 

0) 



OD 



Supreme Court meets first Monday in February. Examinations on Friday and 
Saturday before. First District, February 5th; Second District, February i2tb 
Third District, February' r9th; Fourth District, February 26th; Fifth District, March 5th 



^ Si.\th District, March 12th; Seventh District, March 19th; Eighth District, March 26th 
Ninth District, April 2d: Tenth District, April 9th; Eleventh District, April 16th 
O Twelfth District, April 23d. End of Docket, April 30th. 



, April 30th. 
-t Monday in September. F^xaminatioiis Friday and Saturday before, 
trict, SL-pteniber 24th; Second District. October ist; Third District, October Sth; Fourth 
District, October i,sth; Fifth District, October 22d; Sixth District, October 29th; Seventh 
District. November 5th; F^ighth District, November 12th; Ninth District, November 
19th; Tenth District, November 26th; Eleventh District, December 3d; Twelfth District, 
December loth, etc. 

Chief Justice: James E. Shepherd, Beaufort County; Associate Justices: Armistead 
Burwell, Mecklenburg County; .\Iphonso C. Avery, Burke County; Walter Clark, Wake 
County; James C, MacRae, Cumberland County. Salaries, |2,soo each, Frank I. 
Osborne, Attorney-General and Reporter; salary $2,000. Thomas S. Renan, Clerk; 
salary 8.100 and fees. R. H. Bradley, Marshal; salarj' $Soo. J. L. Seawell, Office Clerk. 

Insure against Loss by Fire in the N. C. Home Ins. Co. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC 



'Webster's International 
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first copy was printed. 

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Tlie "International" is invalnablo in the liousehold, 
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THIS COMPANY HAS BEEN IN SUCCESSFUL OPERATION FOR 
TWENTY-FOUR YEARS. 
W. 8. PRIMROSE, Pres't. CHAS. B. ROOT, Sec. and Tr« 

W. G. UPCHURCH, Vice-Pres't. P- COWPEE, AdjusUr. 



^1 

2.1 



34 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 

(Continued from Page 30.) f 

dishonest memory; one that forgets obligations or even settles down to the 
abominable heresy that after all the world owes you a living and that the insti- 
tution can ihank fortune for having had the chance to educate you. 

The financial means for a poor young man aspiring after an education are the 
least difficult to obtain, if the young man has character and can prove that there 
CO is something in him. Given character and grit, and he will wedge his way 
^ through without asking odds. But he must deny himself of some things in order 
to make sure of other things. If an education is really what he seeks, let him 
if possible lay other things aside except so far as they contribute to his mai» 
purpose. This is a hard lesson to learn — the long-continued concentration of 
energies in the line of a well-sellled purpose. The majority of men do other- 
5 wise; as Emerson says, The key to all ages is imbecility. Most poor young 
tfl men lack encouragement from their surroundings. Their friends seldom under- 
stand them, and were it not for their mothers the world would be far poorer in 
ZZ greatness than it is. It takes pluck to break through the shell of uninspiring 
— environments such as envelope the life of many a country hero. Custom oftea 
W turns up its nose at the one who attempts to rise above his fellows in his attain- 
59 ments. We fool ourselves in thinking that we Americans are entirely free t* 

2 emerge from one class to another. Our ignorant democracy, in frowning down 
aspirations after something above the common level, is no less contemptible 
^ than any aristocracy of Europe. We rave at Russia; we pity her in our ignor- 
pj ance of the fact that a peasant boy of talent and real worth has an open way t* 
P4 honor and glory even into the ranks of social and political life; the Universities 
O are open to him, the academies welcome him for his worth. But who has not 
W found the notion extant that a man's social standing may be estimated from the 
« price he pays for board! Yet I do not agree with Dickens, that we are a nation 
W of gluttons. 

The chances are, I think, in favor of poverty in the long run. What by eat- 
^I ing themselves to gout, and by softening themselves with luxury, or working 
rg themselves to pieces in business, the wealthy have not many generations of suc- 
m cess to their credit. And yet they have and may hold the field on the one inva- 
53 riable condition — self-denial. That virtue to the rich is what the sacrifices of 
y poverty are to the poor, both serving as the needed spur to higher aims. Knowl- 
9 edge was sweeter than sleep to him who rend by the light of 'he pine-knot on 
fg 'he hearth. But that was a necessity 10 him and of that he made a virtue. To 
t^ the rich young man, the invitation to the feast or the reception means much small 
S talk from people who have left their individualities at home. The social press- 
p^ ure to go is great enough to test his strength of self-denial. All credit then to 
^ wealthy young men who fight it off for higher things. The wise young man of 
fi) wealth finds better company in books in which individuals are let loos^e. But 
the poor young man nted not assert himself against such inducements; he .saves 
'-- that much energy of resistance at least. The solitude of poverty is congenial to 
S him. Chances and risks are counterparts, and poverty ever has its opportunities 
jSft nod its dangers. 

^ Eflucatioii never ends. After the trial of abstinence, to the poor student 

S\ comes the flush of success. It makes him unsteady, it is apt rather to do so. 

^ His solitude has been his armory; his contact with men to gtt a livelihood has 

/yi» been the battle- field of his life, and the touchstone of his creed. Where should 

C^ a poet live? asks Longfellow. In the city. Others say in the country. The 

O ages say — with humanity, past, present and future. But when we see a class of 

G\ present society capture a genius that was once poor, then there is a crisis at 

^ hand. It is only when his attainments shall have made him notorious that the 

PH social world, so-called, wishes to touch elbows with him. Until poverty is sugared 

over with greatness, society would feel quite uncomfortable to find him in its 

pew at church. That world laid hold on poor Burns and made him a guzzling 

gauger. Genius cradled in poverty can rarely stand the discipline of luxury; it 

is much less liable to survive it than the rich to survive poverty. The reason, 

it seems to me, is this: that genius, once led out of poverty into luxury, cuts 

off its. communion with the ages and lives with those who live in and for the 

present alone. But that is not education, that is abduction. Of it this age must 

beware, f. \.- 



BRANSON'S JS'OUTll CAROLINA ALMANAC. 86 



SffllTHDEAL BUSINESS COLLEGE, 

RICHMOND. VA. 

Shorthand, Typewriting,', Bookkeeping, Penmanship, Telegraphy, etc., 
taught to ladies and geiillenien in day and night classe-;. liigliest 
endorsements. Write for Catalogue. 



Vl^€g^ 




I-*rfc?fcilii»jnt. 



PRINTING of all kinds at «-^ IN DING i" »n styles 

RICES to meet all compe- B^C f I-lvI>GERS. 

tition. 1'^% KST -^ DAY BOOKS, 

amphlets, Books, Leaflets, B M (JOURNALS, Etc. 

Having the Largest Establishment of the kind in the State, we are pre- 
pared for large or small contracts. We make books of every size to 
order, and of best material. School, Commercial, Railroad and 
General Printing and Binding at Lowest Prices. 

The North Carolina Manual of Law and Forms. 

For Magistrates, County Officers, and Business Men. By Mail, |2.cml 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON, Raleigh, N. C. 



The north '' '''''""' ''""'' 
CAROLINIAN, 



SUBSCRIPTION REDUCED 
to $1.00 Per Year. 



Jt^^HE NORTH CAROLIXLIN is a large weekly journal, 
the State's best exponent of Literary, Historical ami Political 
activit}' 

Send for sample copy. A.ldr^s-. Tin: MHiTII (A ROI.J .\ f.t y, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



J. A. ARNOLD, 

Stall No. 8, Market House, Raleigh. 

Beef, Fresh Meats, Pork 



AND SAUSAGE. 




T 
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ji^^fi^o & d </5 













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.« ^ e~a K a (« . ■ o o^ 








33 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



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For 1P93-4 THE Following DErARTrncNTS are Otln 1 uk I^nsjkuction: 



2^ 



1. rhilosophical and Literary (for A. B. candidates). 2. History, Political and Social 
Science (for Ph. B. candidates)'. 3. Scientific (for R. S. candidates). 4. Technological (for 
B. E. candidates). 5. I.aw School (Summer Term opens July m). 6. Theological (for 
ministerial candidates). 7. Commercial icourses preparatory' for business pursuits). 

Besides these there are three special schools vritH courses of a more practical or pro- 
fessional character : ;!1: fr*^ ^• 

1. The Normal School for Teachers; 10 courses of professional instruction for one year 

2. School n{ Tniirnnlicitl T*rf\C Tr»1-ni T \ir^V.^r T\if^f^1^*- ■ fi.ll ^^..^^ ^r 1 a *.•!_ •- 



2. School of Journali.sm, Prof. John L. Weber. Director; full courses of instruction in 
s, Political Science, History, Sociology and daily practice in 



English, Economics, Civics 
■ewspaper work required. 

3. School of Finance, Economics and .administration 
higher studies related to public interests. 



Two j'ears' courses in the 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. Z9 



MONEY XO LOAN. 

THE ---^-^— —————— ——— 



A re prepared lo 



■^•^ A a ^ Are preparea to 

jViecnanics and make loans 



Investors' Union 



On Real Estate Security, 

On Eight Years Time 

/« any Town in whieh s 
Branch can be Organized. 



*. 



THE BORROWER WILL BE INSURED 

For the Full Amouut, and in case of his death ~^^\ 

the loan will be paid by the Insurance. 



Certificates of M, witli ComMit ImraEce Policy, 

Are issued to parties between the ages of 15 and 65, payable in about 

tight years, based upon small fixed monthly payments, and 

forming one of the safest and most profitable investments. 

For particulars write to the MECHANICS AND INVESTORS' UNION, 

George Allen, Secretary. Raleigh, North Carolina. 

AGENTS WANTED. 

Worts o[ CliaiiBs Dlcte j^i^:^.s For Only Oae Dollar. 

Charles Dickeus wa.s the greatest novelist who ever lived. No author before or since 
his time has won the fame that he achieved, and his works are even more popular to- 
day than during his lifetime. They abound in wit, humor, pathos, masterly delinea- 
tion of character, vivid decriptions of places and incidetits, thrilling and skillfully 
wrought plots. Each book is intensely interesting. No home should be without a set of 
the.se great and remarkable works. Not to have read them is to be far behind the times in 
which we live. The twelve volumes in this set contain the following world-famous 
works, each one of which is published complete, unchanged, and absolutely unabridged. 

DAVID COPPERFIELO, BARNABY BUDGE AND CHRISTMAS 

MARTIN CHUZZLEWIT, STORIES. 

NICHOLAS NICKELBY, OLIVER TWIST AND GREAT EX PEC- 
DOM BEY AND SON, TA TIONS. 
BLEAK HOUSE, THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP AND THE 
LITTLE DORRIT. UNCOMMERCIAL TRAVELER. 
OUR MUTUAL FRIEND, A TALE OF TWO CITIES, HARD TIMES 
PICKWICK PAPERS, AND THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN 
DROOD. 



J. A. HOLLOMAN, Publisher/^VSSN^* 



Heavy and Fancy Grocer, 

No. 11 HARGETT STREET. 



40 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



WHEN YOU WANT 

BOOKS OR STATIONERY 

For Day-School, Sunday-School, Office or Library, 
SEND TO 

ALKRKD WII.LIAIVIS &> CO., 

Wholesale and Retail Booksellers and Publishers, 

gS^Catalogues RALEIGH, N. C. 

on Application. 

Madame E. BESSON, 

MILLINERY, FANCY GOODS, NOTIONS, ''lI^Ml^^^' 



COAL, 



^ # ^ # 



For Domestic and Steam use, direct from mines 
to any depot, in carload lots, both Anthracite 
and Bituminous 

WOOD, 

LUMBER, LATHS, SHINGLES, CORN, OATS, 
BRAN, HAY 



ICE, 



► * * ♦ livL- Etc.. 

For sale at lowest cash prices by 

JONES &> POWKLL, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



THE SUCCESS RENOVATOR 



For Removing Gloss from Smooth Cloth, 

h Clothing. The use of it will r« 
lin. Cot>y>ip;htcd. Sent by mail o 
^ived. Address 

H. V, ALLEN, Raleigh, N. C. 



And for renewmi? the NAP on all Rough Clothing. The use of it will renew an old 
auit, and make the clothes look new again. CopyiighUd. Sent by mail on receipt of 
50 cents. One and two cent stamps received. Address 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC 



1 pp'^ For Cotton, Peanuts, Corn, 

Tobacco, U'hrat^ Clover and 



Prepared 
Agricultural 



Grass. 



Prevents Rust and Shedding in 
Cotton. Pops in Peanuts, lUid 
Worm in Corn, Rust and Smut in 
VVlieat. makes Heavy, Ricli, Sliiu- 
I 2*-v^iCk P"'^ Tobacco, and' Permanently 

LllllW Improves the soil. 

Manufactured and Sold by A S I P P 

28th and Gary Streets, RICHMOND, VA 

(Son and Successor of Albert L. West, 1-.A.I.A.,> , 

Architect and Superintendent, 

No. 1105 E. Main Street, RICHMOND, VIRGINIA. 

THOS. E. RADCUFFE. Assistant. 

Designs Buildings of Every De-scriptiou, and Superintends thtir Con- 
struction. Fire Losses Estimated. Strength and Capacity 
of Buildings Determined. 

The Raleigh Christian Advocate 

Rev. F. L. Reid, D.D., and Rev. D. Atkins. D.D., Editors. 
A RELIGIOUS NEWSPAPER OF A HIGH ORDER. 

As an Advertising Wedium, '^«« ralkk-h cmklstian Ar>- 

^ VOCATE was established in 1S55. 

One of the Best. ?^'^ especially .k-voled to the 

interests of Methodism in North 
Carolina, and circulates largely among the 120,000 Methodists in the 
State. It is pre-eminently a family paper. Every MethodHt in North 
Carolina should read it. Price, $2 per annum, in advance; six months, |i. 
For further information address 

RA LEIGH CHRISTIAN ADVOCATE, Raleigh, N. C. 

THE HOiME: COMRA.NV. 

CARALEIGH PHOSPHATE AND FERTILIZER WORKS. 

F. B. Dancy, President and Treasurer. KAI.KICiH, >i. C. 

ASHLEV HORNE, Vice-President. 

J. R. Chamberlai.v. Sec'y and Supt. ECLIPSE Ammoniated Guano. 

DIRECTORS- CROWN BRAND Ammoniated Fertilizer. 

S. R. HORNE, w. G. UPCHDRCH. CARALEIGH SPECIAL Fertilizer. 

J. W. Barber, E. C. Smith. . CLIMAX Dissolved Bone. 

ASHLEY HORNE, F. O. MoRiNG, STERLING Acid Phosohata. 

R. B. Ra.ney, J. R. Chamberlain, ctjo/ «■ ^^,w P' ■ ' 

T. H. Briggs. F. B. Da.vcy. * TAfLb ACia l 

Send for pamahletof testimonial.sas to \\ovi owx Eclipse \n .nl I.i«l ymr. 

its first season, we make our goods only of the very best an V •■..!-■. il«. 

hence we knowK\\fiy are good, and rvilt /^iiarantft thcin to b. -^ . 

■hence can name you more favorable prices than outsiders. 
Farmers, see that your dealers get for you our brands. Th-. , 
jinalysis, and the effect of the goods in the field, we are wiUing to iUud l>> 



42 BRANSON'S NOkTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



PEACE 



INSTITUTE, 



For Young Ladies, 

THREK Masters of Art in Literary Faculty; Music Director a full graduate of Leipsic. 
Assistant a graduate of Berlin. " Tweuty-two Officers and Teachers, 22 New Pianos. 
Why send your daughters out of the State when superior instruction can be obtained 
here at less' cost ? Send for catalogue to 

JAS. DINWIDDIE, M. A., (of University of Va. 



TO MERCHANTS! 



* * -x- * 



' It is an acknowledged fact that 

J. W. SCOTT &S CO., 

Sell for SPOT CASH staple GREENSBORO, N. C, 

Dry Goods and Notions 

At unusually low prices. It would no doubt PAY YOU, if a 
merchant, to buj' from them. They will cheerfully 

send 3'ou samples with prices. 

THE LEADING NEWSPAPERS. 

THE NEWS -OBSERVER -CHRONICLE. 

/>-.lJX/l^(expept Mondays), . $0.00 

Payable at office in advance. 
The Weekly Chronicle, $1.00 per anmim^ 

The Weekly News and Observer, $1,25 per annum, 

S. j^. u^S^3:E!, ISditor, 

SALEIGH, N. C 

EVENING YIsfTOR. 

Published Every Evening Except Sunday. 

$3.00 A Year in Advance. 

.^ W. M. BROWN, Proprietor, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CA ROLINA ALMANAC. 41 

THE ELECTROPOISE., 

H 
W 

The EivECTROPOiSE cannot now be ignored. It is 5^ 
an established fact. Oxygen is the great life feeder. ^J 
We cannot live withont Oxygen. Natnre snpplies f^ 
the oxygen needed throngh the Inngs. Wlien the ^ 
lungs are diseased the supply is largely cut off, or o' 
when the man is weak and breathes slowly and feebl}- ^' 
the needed oxygen is not supplied to the blood. ^ 

The Electropoise supplies the oxygen directly to ° 
the blood without any effort on the part of the patient. ^ 

It is the simplest of all treatments. ^ 

It is bound to come quickl}^ into universal use. IX; 
One answers for a whole family, and will last for ^ 
many years. You buy no more drugs, and hence the ^ 
Electropoise will quickly pay for itself. « 

I know of many families now using the Electropoise^ p 
and not one is willing to give it up, or let it go out of S 
the house. ^ 

Last summer I bought one for an invalid member % 
of my famil3^ The effect has been truly a benedic- ® 
tion. The Electropoise is now the favorite of the whole g 
family. We could not let it go out of the house. ^• 
Providence, in mercy, sent it along this way. g- 

I can sell you one for $25 cash down, regular price. "^ 
Or I can rent you one three months for $10 cash. You SL 
can then return it or keep it by paying $17.50 addi-,^' 
tional. 

I am authorized to receive orders by mail. ? 

REV. LEVI BRANSON, ^ 

• Exclusive Agent for Randolph and RockinKliam Cuiuilies. 

Raleigh, N. C. 



44 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 

ALLISON & ADDISON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

SMB £1 BRANJ JKD ASCIOR d> BRAHD 



FERTILIZEHS , 

For Xot)acco, Cotton arid Com. 



These fertilizers now need no commendation from us, as they have 
a standard reputation of over twenty-six years, and the most successful 
farmers and planters everywhere in Virginia and North Carolina testify 
to their superior merits. 

The constantly increasing demand is the best evidence of their value. 

Every bag is guaranteed to be of standard quality. 

For sale by agents everywhere in Virginia and North Carolina. " 

For further particulars, address 

ALLISON & ADDISON, Manufacturers, 

RICHMOND, YA. 

The Sick Healed, 

The Weak Made Strong, 

If you are sick or debilitated, do not be discouraged. 
Compound Oxygen has wrought many wonderful cures, and has given 
•trength to many. We know this to be true from our own experience 
of twenty-five years, and we are ready to furnish abundant proof. 

It is worth your while to examine the evidence, which you can do 
by writing to us, w^heu we will send you, free of charge, our book of 
two hundred pages, with numerous testimonials and records of surpris- 
ing cures of asthma, bronchitis, catarrh, consumption, nervous pro»- 
tration, neuralgia, rheumatism, and other forms of disease and debility. 

Home Treatment is sent out by express, to be used at home. 

Office Treatment is administered here. Consultation free. 

The effects of both treatments are the same. 

Our great success has given rise to numerous imitations. As there 
is but one Compound Oxygen which is genuine, avoid disappointment 
and loss of money by sending to 

Drs. STARKEY & PALEN, 

1529 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa., San Francisco, Cal., 

Toronto, Canada. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROT.TXA ALMANAC. 45 



Little's White Oil, 

FOR MAN OR BEAST. 

Read, try and you will be convinced that Little's White 
Oil will do all that it claims, and even more. For fifty years 
it has been on the market, and, notwithstanding it has not 
been advertised, yet, on account of its great merit, it is sold 
from Maine to Texas. For Swelled Joints. Cuts. Sprains, 
Bruises, Saddle and Collar Galls. Scratches, Poll Evil and 
Fistula, it has no equal. 

For sale by druggists and country stores, and if not ob- 
tainable, write to 

Price, POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG COMPANY, 

50 Cents. Wholesale Agents, Richmond, Va. 

POWERS' TONIC 

Hypophosphites 

Is a carefully prepared combination of Pure Chemicals in 
perfect solution, admirably adapted for Pulmonary Diseases, 
and for all persons suffering from general debility and broken- 
down constitution. It is neatly put up in full pint bottles, 
containing more than any similar preparation, and is sold at 
less price. It is endorsed by many of the leading medical 
men of the country, and we have rhany certificates from 
same. We only give one as a sample : 

"Waldo, Floru)A, Mny 31st. 18S9. 
" I have used Powers' Hypophosphites in many cases of lung diseases, and 
(wa recommend it as one of the best preparations before the pubhc. 

"C. R. CULLEN. M. D." 

Ask your druggist for it and take no other. 

POWERS-TAYLOR DRUG COMPANY, 

Price, $1, Richmond, Va. 



46 BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMANAC. 



BRANSON HOUSE. 



^ $ I .50 TO $2.00 PER DAY. 

JS Nos. ioi '/< and 103 J2 Fayetteville St., near Capitol Square. 

§ Conveniently Located 

^ Rooms Good, Table Good, 

S Servants Attentive. 

g GUESTS ADMITTED AT ANY TIME OF DAY OR NIGHT. 

S THIS IS ONE OF THE BEST HOUSES IN THE CITY. 
« « 

1 1 Tie University of Kortli Carolina 

ja ® Offers thorough education according to the best methods at 
^ o a minimum expense. The sessions begin annually the first 
- Thursdays in September and January. General instructioM 
S o is given in four full courses; special instruction in six brief 
^ Sb courses; professional instruction in law, medicine and engi- 
^ T neering. Address PRESIDENT WiNSTON, Chapel Hill, N. C 

j§ 2 W. D. SMITH, 

S f^^ Wholesale and Retail Dealer in Fish and Oysters, 

.bpN Nos. 9 AND II MARKET HOUSE, 

S W RALEIGH, N. C. ' 

OS 



g|SNELLmG & HICKS, nrii(ro-i^t^ 

Og loi Fayettevine Street, L-/ I L4^]^flOLO« 

.^ SPECIALTIES: Hick's Fragrant Almonds ; Hick's Nutritive Tonic. 

00 ■♦i^ 

-fJ CS I l.l.. « — !■ ..I.l 

§ T. W. BLAKE, Jeweler and Optician, 



« Special^^car^ in fit- ^PEOT^CIlEg. SS^^"^ ^^" 



ting by mail. 



g: RALEIGH STATIONERY CO., 309 Fayetteville Street. Manufacturing 



o 



Stationery, Office and School Supplies a specialty. Orders solicited. 

W. G. Separk, Manager. 



5 CEn^TI^-^Xj HOTEI-i 

Corner Wilmington and Hargett Streets, RAI,EIGH, N. C. 

MEALS AT ALL HOURS. ^ „ „^„„ ^ . - 

Rates, $1.50 to $2.00 Per Day. D. G. CONN, PrOprietOf. 



BRANSON'S NORTH CAROLINA ALMA NAT 



4T 



^} 




■B. B. b; 




Beef,Blood&Bone 

* FEHTUtlZEtl * 

WillGIVE SATISFACTION 

'•^^l^ ., COTTON and CORN 

By S.W.TRAVERS& CO., Richmond, Va. 

-SS?- Write for PricfGB and Test/ujonijiiw.^UA 



6 *" 



^BW ^^^^ *"^ 




?r^^^ ^ 




"NATIONAL" 

ToBflCCO pE^TIliIZEn. 

HIGH GRADE— QUICK— RELIABLE. 

181 FARMERS ENDORSE IL T HEY SAY IT TE LLS III THE EIELD AiO Oi THE WAREHOUSE FLOW. 

S. W. TRAYERS & CO, ''"''^"^;Vchm"^^^^^^^^ 

Write for Testimonial* ■nd Vric—- 



A«ENTS WANTED. 



"^^^^^p^^ 



Hr: — '/— ~' ' — ij — ij — ij — '/ — // — // — ii — II— ij — ij — ij — II — // — ir 


— ij ir — /I ll // 1) if—h HH 


[I 1 I .. . 1 < / . < ' 


IB 


5 BRANSON'S SHORT CALENDAR FOR 1894. Ii 


ll 


nl 


{ ' JANUARY. 


FEBRUARY. 


MARCH. jjj 


1- 


M 


T 


^v 


T 


F 


S 


s 


M 


T 


w 


T 


F 


S 


S 


SI 


T 


\v 


T 


F 


s yi 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


















._ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


- i 


l! 


1 


'> 


3 


4 


t) 


6 










1 


2 


3 










1 


2 


3 ll 


1^^ 

21 

\ 28 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


1^ r 

24 r 


15 


1(> 


17 


18 


19 


20 


n 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


11 


12 


13 


14 


\b 


16 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


27 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


29 


3(» 


31 








25 


26 


27 


28 








25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 B 


i 








































1 


1 APRIL. 


MAY 


JUNE. J 


i . 


















1 


2 


3 


4 


5 












1 


2 [1 


i! ^ 
1,? 

! 22 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 [1 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


10 


11 


12J13 


14 


15 


1« 

30 1 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20,21 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


17 


18 


1920 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


2G 


27 


28 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






24 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


5 29 

-1 


30 






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1 


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1 OCTOBER. 


NOVEMBER. 




DECEMBER. |{ 


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ELECTROPOISE. 



Vrite to (See page 43.> 

Levi Branson, Raleigh, N. C, 
Agent for Randolph and Rockingham Counties. 



BRANSON'S ALMANAC-SUPPLEMENT. 



lEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.— 1893. 



.^J. A. DouGHTON, Lieut. Governor and Pres't. W. V. Rush, (Aslibor. 

t W. G. BuRKHEAD, (Whiteville.) Prin'l Clerk. Geo. P. Pell, (Mt. A 

H. C. MOFFITT, (Whiteville,) Asst. " " W. V. Clii-ton, (Rali 

J F. Johnson, (Burgaw,) Asst. " " D. Mc. Matiieson,(1 i 
: ■^. Blair, (Lenoir,) EngfTossing " 



Ik. 
' cper. 



SENATORS: 



NAxME OF SENATORS. 



POST-OFFICE. 



I K. Abbott, d 

I. Armstrong, d 

W. At WATER, p.p... 

F. Aycock, d 

, v>B Battle, d 

."-^ \V. Blalock. d 

J. A. Brown, d 

J. A. BUKCH, d 

J M. Campbell, d 

T M. Cheek, d 

! R. Cooper, d 

, s. Cranor, d 

J. s. Davis, d .. 

W. H. Day, d .. 

W. G. Fields, d 

J. J. Gatling, d 

F. G. James, d 

E. B. Jones, d 

J. L. King, d 

Jno. p. Leach, d.. 

R. L. Leatherwood, d . 

R. E. LiTTLK. d 

W. H G. Lucas, d. 

J. S. Marsh, d 

F. B McDowell, d 

J. W. McLaughlin, d... 
R. B. McLaughlin, d... 

Peter McRak, d 

E F. McRae. d 

W. G. Means, d 

W. P. Mercer, d 

William Merritt, p. p. 
C. L. Mitchell, d. 

G. L. Morton, d 

G. W. Newell, d 

H. C. Olive, d 

W. S. Owen, d . 

G. F. Parrott, d 

S. L. Patterson, d 

C. L. Pettigrew, d 

L. C. Phillips, d 

Ben. Posey, d 

L. A. Potter, d 

J. H. Pou, d 

M. A. Royall. d 

R. W. SiLNDIFER, d 

W. H. Schoolfield, d.. 

M. O. Sherrill, d 

U. M. Stack, d... 

T B Twitty. d 



South Mills 

Rock> Point 

Rialto • 

Fremont .1 

Rocky Mount 

Ledger 

Chad bourn 

Burlington 

A.sheville 

Mebane 

Clinton 

Wilkesboro 

Iron Duff 

Halifax 

Sparta 

Gatlington . 

Greenville 

Winston 

Greensboro 

Littleton 

Bry son City 

Wadesboro 

White Hall 

Bath 

Charlotte - .. .. 

Raef ord 

Statesville 

Laurinburg 

Maxton 

Concord 

Elm City 

Bethel Hill 

Aulander 

Wilmington 

Louisburg 

Apex . 

Yadkin College 

Kinston 

Yadkin Valley 

Plymouth 

Ed'en 

Murphy 

Beaufort 

Smithfield 

Hamptonville 

Dallas ■- 

Reid.s ville 

Newton 

Danbury 

Rutherfordton 



coLwry. 



Camden. 

Pender. 

Chatlinm. 

Wayne. 

Na.Hh. 

Mitchell. 

C'olunibuH. 

Alamance. 

Buncombe. 

Orange. 

Sampson. 

Wilkes. 

Haywood. 

Halifax. 

Alleghany. 

G.itfs. 

Piit. 

ForByth. 

Guilford. 

Warren. 

Swain. 

Anson. 

Bladen. 

Bt-aufort. 

Mecklenburg. 

Cumberland. 

Iredell. 

Richmond. 

Robeson. 

Columbus. 

Edgecombe. 

Person. 

Bertie. 

New Hanover. 

Franklui. 

Wake. 

l)Hvidson. 

L«'tu>ir. 

CaMw.-ll. 

Wri-birifrton. 



I iri'Ki. 

JohnHton. 

Yadkin. 

(fHHton. 

RfK-kinghani. 

Catawba. 

StokeM. 

Rutherford. 



d. for Democrat ; p. p. for People's Party. 



OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 



HOUSE OF representatives! 



SESSIOISr 18Q3. 



OFFICERS. 

L, S. Overman. Speaker, Salisbury, Rowan County, N. C. 

J. M. Brown, Principal Clerk, Albemarle, Stanly County, N. C. 

H. A. Latham, Reading Clerk, Washington, Beaufort County, N. C. 

A, H. Hayes, Engrossing Clerk. Birdtown, Swain County, N. C. 

D. R JULLAN, Doorkeeper, Salisbury, Rowan County, N. C. 

G. L. KiLPATRiCK, Assistant Doorkeeper, Kinston, Lenoir County, N. C. 

A. K. Smith, Enrolling Clerk of the General Assembly, 

Smithfield, Johnston County,- N. C. 
A. E. Posey, Assistant Enrolling Clerk, Hendersonville, N. C. 



REPRESENTATIVES. 



NAME. 



POST-OFFICE. 



W. J Adams, d 

W. R. Allen, d 

J. S. Anderson. (Z 

Grayson Arledge, r... 

F. P. AxLEY, r... 

W. L Barlow, ri 
Geo H. Bellamy, d... 

J. R Blair, d 

L. M. Blue. d.. Rockineham 

Jesse Brake, d . Rocky Mount . 

E. J. Brooks, d Grif ton ... 

Jas. F Byrd, d Ramseytown 

W. M. Carraway. rf I Snow Hill 

D, H. Carter, «i | Fairfield 

C. H. Clarke, d Rp.leigh 



Carthage 

Goldsbcro .. 

Hayesville 

Mills Spring 
Murphy . . . . 
Tarboro .... 

El Paso 

Troy 



Henry L. Cook, d. 
W. R. Covington, d. 

W. H. Crews, r 

W. L, Crouse, d 

C. E. Daniel, d 



Fayelteville . 
Capel's Mills. 
Oxford . .. 
Lincolnton .. 
Turkey 



county. 



Moore. 

WaTue. 

Clav. 

Polk. 

Cherokee. 

Edgecombe. 

Brunswick. 

Montgomery. 

Richmond. 

Edgectimbe. 

Lenoir. 

Yancey. 

Greene. 

Hvde. 

Wake. 

Cumberland. 

Richmond. 

Granville. 

Lincoln. 

Sampson. 



MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSKMBLY. 
REPRESENTATIVES— Confintted. 



NAME. 



O. Dey. d 

. R. Ellis, r... 

■LVANUS Erwin, d... 
HN R. Erwin, d 

C. Eubanks. d 

DLLS R. Eure, d 

L. Fuller, d 

, K. Fuller, d . . 

H (jrlLMER, d 

D. Gilmer, d . 

MES T. Graves, d . . 
ALTER H Grimes, d. 

A. Hamilton, d 

SROY Harper, p.p.. 

R. Harrell. d 

JGH W. Harris, d . . 
Lius H. Hoffman, d 
S. Holbrook. r .. 

LRTiN H. Holt, d 

F. Howard, d 

A. Hoyle, d .. 
J. Hudson, Jr., p p 

L. Jetton. d 

C. Johnson, d 

>MUND Jones, d 

:lix Jones, r 

.M, King, jp. p 

E. King, d.... 

. H. KiTCHIN.d 

J. Lawhon. d ... 

T. Lawrence, d 

M. M. LEE.r 

O. A. LiLLINGTON, r. 

A Long, d 

. W. Long, d 

F. LoviLL, d. 

A. LOYD. p. p 

B. M.ASHBURN, r . . 

C. McCURRY.d 

;ed McGlohon. d 

H. McKenzie. d. . . 
R McLelland, d 

A. McNeill, d 

;ed. L. Merritt, d... 

B. MiDGETT.d 

alter E Moore, d . . . 

P. Nash, d 

S. Norton, p. p. - . 

s Norwood, d 

S. Oliver, d 

C. Parker, d.. 

H. Parker, p. p. . . 

G. Parmele, d 



POST-OFFICE. 



Currituck . 

Elbaville . .. 

Waco 

Shopton 

Hope 

Gatesville 

Durham 

Jackson's Creek . 

Greenaboro 

Waynesville . 

Wilson 

Raleigh 

Beaver Creek 

Maribel 

Potecasi 

Charlotte 

Morgan ton 

Trap Hill 

Oak Ridge 

Huntley 

Newton 

Reidsville 

Davidson 

Burgaw 

Lenoir 

I'ldiantown . . 

K.'lly's 

Sweet Home 

Scotland Neck . . . 

Rome . . 

Hamilton 

Summit 

Panther Creek . . . 

Graham 

Littleton 

Boone 

Spring Hop* 

Marshall 

Marion 

Wintersville 

Salisbury . . 

Mooresville 
Lumberton 
Morri.'^ville . . . . 

Rodantha 

Webster 

Palmerville 

Elk Shoal 

Hillsboro 

Affinity 

Oliver's 

Hertford . 

Wilmington 



C'.'f.NTY. 



('urrituc-k. 

Davie. 

Cleveland. 

Mecklenburg. 

Union. 

Gates. 

Durliaui. 

Randol) h. 

Guilf.in!. 

Haywof.'i. 

Wilson. 

Wake. 

Ashe. 

Pamlico. 

Northampton. 

Mecklenburg. 

Burke. 

Wilk.H. 

Guilford. 

Samp.-*on. 

Catawba. 

Rockingham. 

Mecklenburg. 

Pender. 

Caldwell. 

Camden. 

Blad-n. 

Iredell. 

Halifax. 

Johnston. 

Martin. 

Wilkes. 

Yadkin. 

Alamance. 

Warren. 

Watiiuga. 

Nash 

MH<lis«)n. 

MiDowell. 

Pitt 

Rowan. 

Iredell. 

RnU'Hon. 

Wake. 

Dare 

Jackson. 

Stanly. 

Alexander. 

Orange. 

RoiH'son. 

JoncH. 

PtrquinmnB. 

Nhw Hanover. 



MEMBERS OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY. 
REPRESENTATIVES— Confmiied. 



NAME. 



S. G. Petree, r 

H. M. Pritchard, p.p 

W. H. Queen, p. p 

J.F. RAY,d., 

T. M. Robertson, d 

A. S. Rascoe, d... 

Jno. R. Rowe, d - 

A. L. Rucker, d 

David W. Russell, d 

S. B. Satterfield, r .. 

Alfred Self, p. p 

J. B. Schulken, d 

W. B. Shepard, d - 

A. E. Shore, d 

Neill a. Smith, d 

F. S. Spruill. d 

H. J. Starr, d.-- 

John W Starnes. d 

Jno. a. Stevens, d 

John G. Tatham, d 

C. E. Tatem, p. p - . . 

C. T. Taylor, d 

T. L. Taylor, r 

F. H.Taylor, d 

W. P. Taylor, d 

Alex. Thagard, d. 

Jno. C. Thomas, d 

R. B. Vance, d 

T. D. Vance, r 

Stephen Venable, d 

5. W. Venters, d 

T. a. Walker, p. p 

A. D. WARD.d-- 

T. J. Watkins, d 

C. B.Watson, d 

Jas. M. Watson, r 

6. W. Westbrook, d 

D. Henry White, d 

J. B. White, d 

R. B. Whitley, d 

A. W. Wicker, p. p 

R. p. Williams, r 

J. Williams, r 

Robert W. Williamson, r. 

I. K. Witherington, d 

Thomas S. Wood, d 




county, 



German ton j Stokes. 

Elizabeth City | Pasquotank. 

Ocona Lufty Swain. 

Franklin .| Macon. 

Liberty .- | Randolph. 



Windsor 

Aurora 

Rutherford ton 

Beaufort 

Roxboro , 

Hadley Mills 

Whitesville 

Edenton 

Bethania 

Bradley's Store... 

Louisburg 

Mackey's Ferry. . . 

Asheville 

McClammy 

Graham , 

Gum Neck , 

Turner's 

Oxford ... 

Aurelian Springs 

Winton 

Cedar Creek 

Midway 

Alexander 

Spear 

Venable 

Onslow 

Monroeton 

Kenansville 

Poplar Hill 

Winston 

Henderson 

Wrightsville 

Concord 

Dallas 

Earpsboro 

Colon 

New Berne 

Hendersonville .. 

Milton 

Coxville 

Brevard 



Bertie. 

Beaufort. 

Rutherford. 

Carteret. 

Person. 

Chatham. 

Columbus. 

Chowan. 

Forsyth. 

Harnett. 

Franklin. 

Washington. 

Buncombe. 

Wayne. 

Graiiam. 

Tyrrell. 

Alleghany. 

Granville. 

Halifax. 

Hertford.'^ 

Cumberland. 

Davidson. 

Buncombe. 

Mitchell. 

Surry. 

Onslow. 

Rockingham. 

Duplin. 

Anson. 

Forsyth. 

Vance. 

New Hanover. 

Cabarrus. 

Gaston. 

Johnston. 

Chatham. 

Craven. 

Henderson. 

Caswell. 

Pitt. 

Transylvania. 



d. for Democrat ; r. for Republican ; p. p. for People's Party. 



BRANSON'S 

igricyltural Almanac! 

QOLDEN WORD5: 

^EWS-OBSERVER-CHRONICLE :—'' Great care has been taken to secure absolute accura. 

le Court, calendar and the oflficers of public institutions. This, with the two im^" 

ig the County ofRcei's all over the State, make, it an Almanac of very gn*at vahu- 

hatically, ' no other like it.' " 

DURHAM DAILY SUN: — "Branson's Almanac for 1894 conies to us again, vahiable as 

nany years past. 

THE NORTH CAROUN/AN .—''Branson's Almanac for 1894 is at hand, and is always 

jome." 

THOMASVILLE /VfJVJ.— Branson's Almanac for 1894 is before us, bright and accurate an 

a." 

THE L/y/NG-STONE:— "The calculator, owner and publisher, Levi Branson, A. M.. I). 1 ' 
accept our thanks for a copy of Branson's Almanac for 1894. Each year is an improv . 
it on tlie former one. Our State pride compels us to admire it." 
DAy/E TIMES:—" It is reliable, and saves every family nuuh valuable time.'" 
BRYSON CITY TIMES:— "The Almanac is always carefully calculated, ami is what 
ms to be, that is, ' a valuable hand-book of information 

ALAMANCE GLEANER:—" Worthy of a place in every household. One can hardly find a 
ent book of greater value." 

DAVIDSON DISPATCH:-" It is one of the best of its kind." 

SPIRIT OF THE SOUTH:— "It is well filled with useful information, and is richly woi ' 
price, ten cents." 

DAILY WORKMAN:—" Persons w-ho have used Branson's Almanac for past years, will i. 
lisappointed with the coming edition." 

PROHIBITION LEADER:- -The star edition is superior to any before issued-calculai. 
Ilr. Branson himself. He is a native of the State, and eminently quahtied to publwl. 
jrior Almanac." 

GOLD LEAF:— "It is thoroughly reliable and emi)hatically unsurpa.>««Ml. Th»' Stat^ 
«rs and salaries are given, also the time of holding the County. SuiH-n..r and h.nlenU 
xts. The Branson maxims are well worth reading." 
THE SOUTH:—" Has many wise sayings in brief form." 

NEWBERN WEEKLY JOURNAL:— ' As a Hand-Book for the people it is full of what 
ied by every citizen.'' . „ 

WESTERN CAROLINIAN:—" It is what is daily needed by each and i.'V<ry citiju-n. 
ORANGE COUNTY OBSERVER:—" Branson's Almanac is useful in every family.^" 
ROANOKE PA TRON:—" As a hand-book for the people, it is full." 
SPIRIT OF THE AGE: -"Few names are more familiar to the golden mediocrity lb 

HIGHLANDS STAR:— "This valuable household ntniessity is fdlo«i with inU?rp«tinK nuitt 
ut courts, officers of the State, public institutions," etc. 

LYCURGUS HOFLER, Register of Deeds Gates County:—" It is superior to any Uiat 1 haw «-. . 

WEEKLY NEWS:-" It i.s the best 10-cent han.l-book the farmer can buy-no other . 

DAILY JOURNAL :—" Full of valuable reading matter- worthy of a place in everv 
d and place of business. Is equal to the best." •. u .i 

THE TRUTH .-"The people hang it in the chimnev-corner f"'' ^^^^J [J foSnd in'MT 
g. It give^s them moVe useful knowledge al»out tfie State thon can be found in any 
er book for the same small price." 

LEXINGTON LEDGER:—" It is well worthy of the support it so nchly 6e»rre» 



BRANSON'S 

Agricultural Almanac 

QOLDEN OPINIONS: 

RALEIGH EVENING VISITOR .—'•'Dr. Branson takes great care to have all the Cov 
County officers, State officers, both full and accurate." 

CHRISTIAN SUN : — " Dr. Branson has for many years done the State valuable servic 
this line, as did Dr. Franklin for the State of Pennsylvania in his day." 

W. R. HARRIS, Troy, N. C. : — " More information in it than any I have received in yea 

THE CAROLINIAN: — " This little book is a favorite throughout the State — price, 10 cer 

TRUTH, Salisbury: — " Branson's Almanac is a household word." 

WILMING TON MESSENGER:—'' This number holds up the reputation of this old publicat 

and its varied contents make it a valuable household friend to every North CaroUnian.' 

WILMINGTON DAILY REVIEW:—" The Egyptians, Greeks and Romans had their Alman 

and so have all modern people, but perhaps none have better or more valuable than 

made right here in the Old North State. Dr. Branson has for many years done the 9 

valuable service in this line." ' 

ORANGE COUNT/ OBSERVER :—" Branson's North Carolina Almanac, as an old fri( 
comes every year with a familiar, smiling face. The title p^ge has a fac-simile of the S 
coat of arms and of the Great Seal of North Carolina. Every page looks bright and i 
and yet cheerful as a bosom friend. Much valuable information is given on almost e^ 
page about our native State, such as you cannot find in patent medicine calendars, 
sliort calendar on the last page is always handy. Few nouns are more familiar to 
golden mediocrity than that of Branson s Almanac. It has carried knowledge, science 
fun into thousands of happy North Carolina homes." 

HENDERSON GOLD LEAF:— Facts About It— No other like It.—" 1. The calendi 
calculated by Branson himself, and guaranteed to be correct to the nearest half minu 
no other like it. 2. It lias the weather carefully conjectured according to the best scien 
knowledge— no other like it. It stands the test of an intelligent public." 

WINDSOR LEDGER :—" It is full of useful things." 

SPIRIT OF THE AGE: — "'It has carried knowledge, science and fun into thousanc 
North Carolina homes." 

PINE KNOT: — "It certiinly merits its long continued prosperity." 



PRICES: 

1 Almanac, sent by mail, - - - - - $ .10 

1 Dozen Almanacs, sent per mail, - - - .75 

h Gross, sent per express, 3.75 

1 Gross Almanacs, sent per express (card on back), 7.00 

1000 Almanacs, sent per express or freight, - 35.00 

j|@^If you order one-half gross or more, you can have your bi 
ness card printed on the blank space on back, free of cost to you. 

Unsold copies (if reported by the first of June) will be replai 
by new ones next year, so that you run no risk whatever. 

Sold by Postmasters and merchants all over the State. 



Order at once of 



LEVI BRANSON, Raleigb, N. 









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RALEIGH. N. C 




Ornci WOHLD-S T K% 

Sept. 15, ibtjj 

BLACKWELL'S DlRHAM 
TOBACCO Co., 
Durham, N. C 
Gentlemen : 

We have Smoked up 
ail the Tobacco at the World's 
Fair, and have unanimously 
awarded tlie GoM Mcdai 
fur Smii|;inK Tobacco to 
BLACKWELL'5 

Bull Durham 

Cciik'ratulating you on your success, 
we remain Yours truly, 

COMMtTT! \ . 



Blackweirs Bull Durham 

Has been the recognized standard of Smoking Icb.K.o 
for over 2; "years. Uniformly good and unii-n: ■ 
first. Bright, sweet and fragant— wc invite tl.- 
most fastidious to test its peculiar excellence. 

Blackwell's Durham Tobacco Co., Durham, N. C. 



^Durham'! 



W. H. & R. S. TUCKER & CO., 

Importers, Jobbers and Retailers of 

Dry Good 5 



AND KINDRED WARES. 



Our stocks are the largest in North Caro- 
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Our store is one of the places of interest in 
the city, and strangers are always cordially 
w^elcomed, and every attention will be shown 
them, whether as purchasers or otherwise. 



W. H. & R. S. TUCKER & CO., 

123 and 125 Fayetteville Street, 

124 and 126 Wilmington Street, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS. 



The Thirty-fourth Annual Fair of the North Carolina State Agricultural Society 
will be held at Raleigh, October 16, 17, 18 and 19, 1894. 

The people of the State and of other States are cordially invited to participate in 
the occasion, both as actors and observers; and with this invitation j?oe« the announce- 
ment, without reservation, without exaggeration, that this coming event will hw the 
greatest, most comprehensive and most interesting one of the kind ever known in 
North Carolina. 

The aim and object of the Society is to make each Annual Fair more vuluabh* and 
more instructive to the people than its predecessor; and in connection therewith t<) 
engage and produce such features of amusement as have power to educate, and at 
the same time enrich and enliven the general programme, thus making the week a 
pleasant and enjoyable one to the many who take it as the occasion for an annual 
meeting and reunion of acquaintances and friends from all sections of the State. 

ATTRACTIONS. 

The Premium List is issued too early this year to permit positive announcement of 
attractions, but negotiations are being had for the newest and I>e8t that the geiiiuM of 
the times has been able to create, and the people may begin preparations for attend- 
ing the Fair with the assurance that it will present the most novel, beguiling and 
exhilarating features of amusement procurable. 

A special object this year will be to secure and exhibit the products of the State on 
a larger scale than ever before attempted, and to make the exhibit a great objeet- 
lesson for the people. No effort will be spared to make this feature more noteworthy 
and successful than it has ever heretofore been. The purpose is to have such prcxl- 
ucts displayed in competition for prizes as well as otherwise. Such comp«'liti*>n 
broadens the market for the producer, gives an impetus to trade through the Himple 
exhibition of trade's possibilities and tends to the growth in excellence of everything 
involved in the contest. 

In the following pages will be found the substantial inducement* offered to the 
Agriculturist, Breeder and Manufacturer to exhibit their productM. Their interest 
and co-operation are wanted and their correspondence is earnestly wjlicited. The pre- 
miums are so proportioned as to guarantee the expenses of the majority of worthy 
exhibitors, and splendidly reward those who excel. It is the privilege of a North 
Carolinian to exhibit for personal satisfaction; but it is a <luty to ejchihit fur the brnej- 
of the State at large. 

There will be during the week 

SOLDIERS' DAY, 

FARMERS' DAY, 

EDUCATION DAY. 

There will be a particularly special and appropriate programme for eMh of ihrm 
days, the details of which will be given later through the State prcM and rarioua 

circular publications. 



4 SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

RAILROAD RATES, ETC. 

The Railroads have announced a passenger rate of one fare for the round trip^from 
all points in the State to Raleigh for patrons of the Fair. 

Full freight rates will be charged on all exhibits from shipping point to Raleigh. 
Exhibits will be returned to shipping point free of charge when accompanied by a 
certificate from the Secretary to the effect that they were properly entered and 
exhibited at the Fair. This provision does not apply to racing stock. 

Arrangements have been made to have all bulky exhibits, except live stock, deliv- 
ered at the grounds by the railroads. 

EXPRESS, TELEGRAPH, ETC. 

The Southern Express Company will charge full rates to Raleigh on articles for 
exhibition, but will return same to point of shipment free. 
The Postal Telegraph Company will have an office on the grounds. 

IMPROVEMENTS. 

Various improvements will be made in buildings, stables, stalls, pens, etc., for the 
convenience of exhibitors and stock. 

RACES. 

The large and increasing interest in the development of thoroughbred harness and 
trotting horses in the State now insures the possibility of having a large field of fine 
and speedy horses on the race circuit this year, and the Society will seek to eclipse 
all former efforts in this department. Classes, programmes and purses will be an- 
nounced about August 15. The race track is the finest in the South. 
It^^Correspond freely with 

H. W. AYER, Secretary, 
Raleigh, N. C. 




NORTH CAROLINA 

AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



OFFICERS. 

President: 
Julian S. Carr Uurhant. 

Secretary and Treasurer: 
H. W. Ayer UaU-iK».. 

Vice-Presidents. 
Permanent : 

Hon. Kemp P. Battle Orange i Ex-Governor T. M. Holt Alamance 

R. H. Battle Wake I W. G. Upchurch Wake 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Allen, W. G. Wake lial.'i^li. 

Andrews, A. B Wake Raleigh. 

Armstrong:, T. J. Pender Rock? Point. 

Ashley, W. E... Wake RaleiRh. 

Atkinson, Natt. Buncombe. Asheville. 

Atwater, E. W Chatham KiKK«t>«'eV Store. 

Aydlett, E. F Pasquotank Elizalieth City. 

Bagwell, H. G Wake Garner. 

Barnes, F. W Wilson Wilson. 

Battle, H. B Wake RulHKh. 

Battle, R. H Wake Ral-iKli. 

Beddingfield, E. C Wake Kalf-iKh. 

Blacknall, G. W Wake RaK-i^'h. 

Blacknall, O. W Vance Kittrell. 

Blalock, S. W Mitchell LedK'»-r. 

Borden, F. K Wayne GoldHl)oro. 

Broughton. N. B Wake Raleigh. 

Burwell, J. B Wake Raleigh. 

Burgwyn. Geo. P Northampton Jackm»n. 

Byrd, J. F Yancey Ramwiviown. 

Caho, W. T Craven Newliern. 

Capehart, Dr. W. R Bertie Avot-a. 

Carter, D. H. Hvde Fairfield. 

Clark. Walter Wake Italeigh. 

Cooper, D. Y Vance Hend.Tion. 

Cooper. R. L Cherokee Murphy 

Cotton, R. R Pitt Falkland. 

Cowper, P Wake Raleigh. 

Crenshaw. J. M Wake Wake For»«t. 

Crocker, J. G. L Northampton .S^-alxiard. 

Crockett, W. F Craven N.-w>»-rn. 

Cross, W. T Gates.- '■ ■• "i" 

Crouse, W. L Lincoln ■ ' » 

Crudipp, W. W Surry .-^i........ ^ 

Cunnmgham, J. S. ..- Person Cunningham •. 

Denson, C. B Wake .R;il.ik;h. 



b NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

Droughon, W. B Cumberland Fayetteville. 

Elias, K Macon Franklin. 

Emry, T. L Halifax .Weldon. 

Flowers, G. W Alexander ..Taylorsville. 

Futrell, J. P Halifax Scotland Neck. 

Ginnings, S. J Wilkes Wilkesboro. 

Grainger, J. W Lenoir Kinston. 

Green, W. J Cumberland Fayetteville. 

Greene, J. A Harnett Lillington. 

Hackett. R. N Wilkes Wilkesboro. 

Hall, J. G - Catawba Hickory. 

Harper, G. W. F Caldwell Lenoir. 

Harrell, E. G Wake Raleigh. 

Harris, J. C. L Wake Raleigh. 

Hartley, H. H Davidson Tyro Shops. 

Hege, F. E Forsyth Salem. 

Hill, N. H Polk Columbus. 

Home, A Johnston Clayton. 

Horton, J. C Watauga Horton. 

Ives, Geo. N. Craven Newbern. 

Jenkins. J. J Chatham Pittsboro. 

Jones, R. H Wake Cary. 

Kennedy. W. L Lenoir Falling Creek. 

Kerr, J. P .-Alamance Haw River. 

Lane, Daniel Craven Bellair. 

Lash, Dr. W, A ...Guilford.. Greensboro. 

Latta, C. G Wake Raleigh. 

Lawrence, M. T Martin .Hamilton. 

Leak, Jas. A... Anson Wadesboro. 

Lewis, Dr. R. H Wake Raleigh. 

London, H. A Chatham Pittsboro. 

Long, B. F.. Warren Warrenton. 

Mason, T. W Northampton Jackson. 

Massey , W. F Wake Raleigh. 

May, J. A.- Buncombe Canton. 

McCauley, T. D Union Monroe. 

McCurry , J. C McDowell Marion. 

McGhee, W. L .Franklin Franklinton. 

Mclver, D. E Moore Sanford. 

McKee, Dr. Jas Wake Raleigh. 

McNamee. C Buncombe Biltmore. 

Meekins, J. C. , Jr Hyde. Norfolk, Va. 

Miller, Henry G Rowan Zeb. 

Moore, James Wake Raleigh. 

Moore, W. E Jackson Webster. 

Morgan, P. H Currituck Shawboro. 

Mott, Dr. J. J IredelL Statesville. 

Myers, J. S Mecklenburg Charlotte. 

Newby, H Swain Bryson City. 

Nichols, Jno Wake Raleigh. 

Norwood , Jas Orange Hillsboro. 

Odell, W. R Cabarrus Concord. 

Page, A. F-. Moore Aberdeen. 

Parker, D. R Randolph Trinity College. 

Patrick, John T Moore Southern Pines. 

Pogue, J. E Wake Raleigh. 

Primrose, W. S Wake Raleigh. 

Pritchard. J. C. Madison Marshall. 

Proctor, J. M .Wake .Raleigh. 

Reed, W. C Granville Oxford. 

Rockwell, R. A .(Jolumbus Whiteville. 

Russell, R. G Durham South Lowell. 

Robinson, T. C Anson Anson ville. 

Ricks, R. H ..Nash Rocky Mount. 



EXK'CUTIVE COMMITTKK. 



School field, W. H Rt)ckingham Koidsville. 

Shaw, W. P Hertford Winton. 

Skeen, R. H MontRdmery Mt. (iiiend. 

Skinner, T. G PeriiiiinuinH Hertford. 

Staton, L. L Edn^fomh*- TartHJro. 

Steele, R. L Richmond Rockingham. 

Stevens, W. E Sampson Clint^)n. 

Stronach, W. C Wake lialeigh. 

Stroud, R. L Orange Chapel Hill. 

Thompson, A. A Wake Raleigh. 

Thompson, Cyrus Onslow Richlands. 

Thompson, Jno. W Wake Raleigh. 

Tompkins, D. A Mecklenhurg Charlotte. 

Toms, M. C- Henderson Hendfrwjnville. 

T%vitty , T. B Rutherford Rutherfordlon. 

Wadsworth. J. W Mecklenburg Charlotte. 

Walker, R. L Caswell Milton. 

Webster, J. R Rockingham Reidsville. 

White, R. A Gaston Oiii 1-urnace. 

Williams, N. G Yadkin WiihaiuH. 

Wilson, J. W - Burke Morganton. 

Worth, Hal. M Randolph Worthville. 

Wood, Dempsey 

Wyatt, J. T 

Wvnne, J. S. 
Yancey, T. B. 



Lenoir Falling Creek. 

Rowan Salirthury. 

.Wake Raleigh. 

Wake . .. Raleigh. 



President Agricultural Society of N. C. CoiUge of Agriculture and Mechanic Art*. 




8 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

/?. EAMES, Jr., M.E., President, GEO. ALLEN, Sec. V. H. BOYDEN, Vice-President 

Salisbury, N. C. and Treasurer. and Attorney. 

THE flliliEH & BOYDEH CO]VIPfl|^Y 

Real Estate Agency. 

INCORPORATED. 

CITY REFERENCES Bv PERMISSION : ^ Realty Bought and Sold Strictly on Commission. 

His Excellency. Governor ELI AS CARR. -^ Especial attention given intending settlers and 
Hon. JOHN ROBINSON, investors. 

Com. of Agriculture and Immigration. # Reliable information in regard to Timber, Mining 

Prof. J. A. HOLMES. Stale Geologist. ^ ^^^ ^^^^ Lands, Water Powers and Manufac- 

Col. A . B. ANDREWS, ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^,,j„g sites in North Carolina. 

COMMERCIAL AND FARMERS No attention paid to "booms": only legitimate 

BANK, Raleigh. * business sought. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

The Allen and Boydcn Company was organized and chartered under the laws of North 
Carolina, for the purpose of promoting sales of Real Estate, Timber and Mining Property, 
Water Powers, Mineral Springs, Hotels, Residences, etc., and forgiving full and reliable infor- 
mation to persons desiring to settle in the State. 

A registry has been opened at the office of the Company, 107 Fayettville Street, Raleigh, for 
the purpose of recording property, with full description and price, that may be for sale in any 
part of the State. Owners of such property, or persons desiring to purchase, are invited to cor- 
respond with the Company. No charge is made for registering property, or for giving informa- 
tion. If sales are made, a reasonable commission will be charged. 

If you wish to settle, buy or .sell, write lo 

THE ALLEN AND BOYDEN COMPANY, Raleigh, N. C. 



John C. Drewry, President. J. S. Wynne, Vice-President. J. N. Holding, Attorney. 

B. S. JERMAN, Treasurer. C. G. Latta. W. S. Primrose. 

Mechanics and Investors' Union, 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

A Savings and Loan Company for North Carolina investors and borrowers, organ- 
ized in Raleigh and chartered under the Building and Loan Laws of North Carolina. 

A Company whose income, or deposits, are all loaned upon city and town real 
estate in North Carolina on eight years time, with easy monthly payments. 

A payment of 65 cents per month will mature ;fioo in al)ont eight years time. 
A payment of $6.50 per month will mature ten shares, and will return |;i,oooin cash. 

If a member, whether an investing or a borrowing member, should die during the 
time, and before the maturity of the stock, the payments will be made until matu- 
rity from the Guarantee Fund, without further cost to his estate. 

For information regarding investment stock, or loans, address 

GEORGE ALLEN, Secretary , 

107 Fayetteviile Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 



REGULATIONS. 



1. Until this year the management has confined competition to prodiictionH of our 
own State. The bars are thrown down, and competition with U8 now in ojK-n to the 
world, and friendly challenge extended, except in instances hp»cified. 

2. The gates will be open for the admission of visitors at 8 o'clock a. m. each dnv. 
and close at 6 p. m. 

3. All employees of the Fair must be promptly on hand at tht-ir p< sts at H o'clock 
A. M. each day of the Fair, and remam on duty till six o'clock i". M. (except niKht 
force). 

4. Every reasonable effort will be made by the officers of the Society and tho»<» in 
charge of the grounds to protect the property on exiiibition from loss or damage, but 
the Society will not hold itself responsil)le should loss or dainnge m-cur. 

5. Drunkenness, quarreling, or the use of profane or obscene languaKo. alHO^'finib- 
ling, pool-selling, or other games of chance, will not be allnwfd on the KTounil-; nor 
fireworks, petroleum, gunpowder, or any other objectionable or dangerous materiala 
whatever. 

6. Persons desiring space for the exhibition of articles or machinery not entere<i 
for competition must apply to the Secretary as early as possible, giving the name «»f 
the exhibitor and article, place of residence, and the amount of space re(|iiir»sl. 

7. Exhibitors of horses, cattle, siieep and swine will be nipiirtd to diHplav over 
each stall or pen, occupied by their stock, a placard containing the name, age and 
breed of animal occupying the stall or pen. and also the nanu* and address vf the 
owner. The placard will be furnished and filled up at the Secretary's oflice. 

8. All (iflHcers and employees are recjuested to wear badges during th** Fair 

9. No peddling, hawking or selling of any kind will be allowed in the buildinga, 
on the grounds, except by a special license obtained from the .Secretary of the .Si -ieiy. 

10. The distriliution of handbills or other advertisements that may cause a nui(Utnce 
is strictly prohibited about the grounds or buildings. 

11. No article or animal will be entitled to space until the proper entry has bwn 
made. After an article or animal has been entered for a premium, it cannot I* 
removed until the close of the Fair without permit-sion from the .Secretary or the 
Supervisor in charge of the department: ami if any person removes an article or an 
animal without such permission, he forfeits all claims to a premium, even if the 
same may have been awarded. 

12. Eich department will be under the special charge of one meml»er of the Kxitu- 
tive Committee, who shall be known as the Director of that department. He will 
oversee the arrangement of all articles otT»red for exhibition in bin depHrtment. and 
have control of the space assigned to ir. He will be assisted in luHdufien by a ii|MM-ial 
superintendent, who will receive all exhibits, take personal charge of them, counter- 
sign the exhibitors' coupons, and deliver the articles on the surrender of the coun- 
tersigned coupons at the close of the Fair. 

13. The exhibition of articles not mentioned in the premium li«t is mdicitMl Th*-^ 
will be assigned to proper departments, displayed to visitors and reported on by the 
judges. 

14. The Executive Committee reserves the right to withhold premhimn in any ca 
in which it shall appear to them that the regulations have not N-en complied wtih, 
or that fraud or deception has been practiced or attempted. 

15. There will be a free Bureau of Information at the main ortice. where all «|ue*- 
tions will be cheerfullv answered. 

16. Exhibitors must provide at their own cost all show-caaes, nhelvinjoi, counter 
fittings, etc.. which they may require. 

17. Exhibitors' business cards, pamphlets, circulars, samplen. etc., mmj b« plac- 
within and be distributed from within the space allotted them. 



10 ' NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

ADMISSION. 

18. The gates will be open at 8 o'clock a. m. each day. 

Single ticket, admitting one person once $ 50 

All horpes and vehicles, except vehicles for hire Free 

Each person in any vehicle, single ticket 50 

Children between 7 and 12 years of age - 25 

Children under 7, accompanied by parents Free 

Badge for Licensed Hack, admitting hack and driver at either gate at 

all times during the Fair 5 00 

Badge for Supply Wagon for parties renting stands, admitting wagon 

and driver to the grounds at all times each day of the Fair 1 00 

Coupon Tickets, for employees of exhibitors, and good for one admis- 
sion each day of the Fair 1 00 

19. Members of committees and Life Members when reporting to the Secretary 
will receive admission tickets. 

20. Laborers employed upon the grounds will apply to the Secretary each evening 
for admission tickets to the grounds next morning. 

21. No person will be permitted to remain on the grounds over night, except those 
holding permits, which must be secured from the Secretary. 

22. No reduced rates will be given to schools or organized bodies or combinations 
of persons. 

23. SPECIAL RULE (a).— The Society makes no charges for space and except in special 
instances exacts no entrance fees. This is a liberal policy toward exhibitors, and in no 
case, except where entrance fees are charged, will tickets be issued to exhibitors. Where 
entrance fees are not charged, tickets will not be issued to exhibitors; nor will tickets 
be issued to attendants without the payment of $1.00, which will secure a ticket good 
for one admission each day of the week. THERE WILL POSITIVELY BE NO INFRAC- 
TION OF THIS RULE. 

24. SPECIAL RULE (b).— Complimentary tickets, Life Members' tickets, Committee 
tickets and Employees' tickets will not be honored at any place of admission except the 
" PASS GATE " on the Hillsboro road, front of the Fair Grounds. 

ENTRIES. 

25. The entrjf-books will be open at the office of the Secretary of the Society, in the 
city of Raleigh, from September 15 to and including the Friday next before Fair 
Week, and at the Secretary's office at the Fair Grounds on Saturday and until 5 
o'clock p. M. on Monday, when all entries will close. Much trouble and annoyance 
may be avoided by observing this regulation. 

2i5. Entries are free except under conditions specially mentioned in the Premium 
List. 

27. Entries may be made in person or by letter. In making entries it will be neces- 
sary to give the name of the article, the name and post-office address of the exhibitor, 
and the premium number under which the article entered is to compete. This is 
especially necessary in order that the article may be properly entered. 

28. All articles which are the product of the soil must be entered in the name of 
the producer. Those showing handiwork or skill must be entered in the name of 
the one whose skill they exhibit. Such may be individuals, firms or factories. They 
must have been made within three years, and not exhibited at any former Fair of 
this Society. All other property must be entered in the name of the ACTUAL OWNER. 
Any violation of this rule will bar the violator from competing for any premium 
whatever, and render him and his exhibit liable to expulsion from the grounds. 

29. In case special facilities for meritorious exhibits are required, such entries shall 
be made before September 15. Any person may enter as many different articles as 
he or she may own. in any department. 

30. The same article or animal may compete for the premiums of two or more pre- 
mium numbers, except when otherwise stated; but, in order to do so, must be 
entered under each. 



REGULATIONS. 1 1 

31. All entries will be numbered and record»^d in the bookn of the proper Itt^pnrt- 
ment and Clas5, and correeixindinj^ ta«s will be isnued. whi»b mu«l be attarht**! to 
the exhibit before such can be placed on exhibition 

32. Contrary to the customa of most a^jricuhural societieB. the S<x:iety haM diH-idtU 
that the names of all exhibitors shall be i)lHced on the cards attached to the article* 
on exhibition, except in Department E and Department H, as to do oiherwiHc deprive* 
exhibitors of one of the main features of these exhibitions, viz., advertisinK. 

33. No person will be allowed to see the entries or have access to the eulry-boolu 
until after the awards are made. 

34. All entries shall be for the first premium of the premium numl>er umler which 
they are entered; but, failing to take the first, shall tompete for the Mi-r.nd. if a 
second is offered; and, failing to take the second, shall compete for the tbirtl, if any; 
but shall not be awarded more than one premium under the same preuimin iium>M*r. 

35. Exhibitors must see to the proper delivery of articles and live kUk-I. on the 
grounds, and to the proper care of the latter, as no charges for Iransporuiion or 
drayage will be paid by the Society. 

EXHIBITS. 

* 

86. The grounds will be in readiness for the reception of exhibits any time during 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday preceding the Fair, but no exhibits will l)e receive<l 
Sunday except live stock from a distance that may have been delayed in coming. 
Neither will exiiibitors be permitted to make any arrangements on that day except 
such as the Superintendent may deem necessary. 

37. Articles and animals provided with the required entry tags will be assigned 
places by Superintendents of Departments until Tuesday, October 10, at 12 o'cltK'k M., 
after which no more will be received in departments where pretuiums are offered, 
except in classes where perishable goods are entered. 

38. Exhibitors must see to the proper delivery of articles and live stock on the 
grounds, and to the proper care of the latter, as no charges for transportation will be 
paid by the Society. 

39. All animals must be exhibited in such places and at such times as the Superin- 
tendent in charge shall direct, in accordance with the official programme. 

40. Any and all articles obnoxious or repulsive in their character Hhall U' excluded 
from the grounds, or if entered without being fully known, nhall be removed at 
once. 

41. Ladies from a distance desiring to exhibit textile fabrics may ship their Koods 
to the Secretary, but in no case will he, or the Association, be res|M)nMible for any 
loss, damage or breakage. Goods so shipped must l>e directed to the S«^-retary. 
"Main Gate," Fair Grounds, and must arrive not later than Mon.lay, OctoUT \!i. 
after which date none will be received. No package will be accepted ttnleMM freight 
is prepaid. 

Specud notice is hereby given that none but textile goods and art tcork can be con- 
signed to the Secretary Jor exliibition or cotnj>etitioH. 

42 Exhibitors will be r» quired to keep their space and stalls in a cleanly cnndl- 
tion, by removing therefrom any filth or litter, ami place it in front of wud .•pai-e or 
stall, where the scavenger force of the As.socialion may get to it with ea»e. 

43. Should any person misrepresent his exhibit, and a premium be awanied upon 
it, such premium may be withheld by the Executive Cominittee. 

44. SPECIAL NOTICE.— Read carefully this rule as touching all exhibits. 

Exhibits not in place, and fully installed by 12 o'clock Tuesday. October 16. will 
receive no attention whatever from Awarding Committees, or Experts. 

This is but just to both exhibitors and management— more 
prime object of all exhibits is to show them to the public. Pr • 

and exhibitors should have, five full days in wnich to do thin .... M 

should fulfill its pledge to give four days' exhibition. k_. ^ 

Exhibitors can have the use of halls and grounds for any reasonable number of 
daNS preceding opening day proper, in which toplace the.r exhi Ml^. y»'''"\": ""«';"' 
reason for delay. Hence, it is repeated, this rule will be rigidly enforced for the 
good of all concerned."' 



12 NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

PREMIUMS. 

45. A preraiura ribbon is a badge of merit; and in no case should it be attached to 
article or animal where meritorious qualities are lacking. 

46. The premiums are designated by ribbons: blue meaning first, red second, and 
white third premium. These ribbons will be attached only by the Director of each 
department, or his superintendent, after Judges or Committees have made their 
awards and the same have been approved by the Director. 

47. The Society deems its diploma or medal to possess value equal to a cash pre- 
mium of twenty-five dollars. The exhibitor entitled to a prize, equal to that amount, 
will be at liberty to commute a money premium for a diploma or medal, but not the 
award of a diploma or medal into a money premium. 

48. Premiums are payable thirty days after the close of the Fair, and if not claimed 
by the first day of February, 1895, will be regarded as donated to the Society. 

49. Medals and diplomas will be delivered at any time between November 1 and 
December 31, 1894. 

INSTRUCTIONS TO SUPERINTENDENTS. 

50 No Superintendent of Department will be permitted to employ help without 
written authority of the President or Secretary, and the Fair Association will not 
become re.'^ponsible for the pay of help employed without such written authority. 
An order fur all supplies must be obtained from the Secretary. 

51. Superintendents of Departments will be in attendance from 8 A. M. to 6 P. M., 
at their respective posts on the grounds, Monday, October 15, to Saturday, October 
20, inclusive. They will have exhibits promptly placed, and Departments must be 
in complete order by 12 M. , Tuesday, October 16. 

52. They will receive all property entered for exhibition, see that the tags are 
securely attached, and place and arrange such property in a suitable and attractive 
manner. 

53. If erroneous entries are made they will make the necessary corrections, or 
cause such to be made in the official entry-books. 

54. Superintendents will point out to the Judges of Award the articles or animals 
to be inspected, and cause the same to be displayed in their proper places and at the 
proper time. 

55. They will see that order and decorum are observed in their Departments, and 
that property is protected against damage and loss by accident or otherwise. 

56. They will also see thai no property is removed before the appointed time, and 
that the checks are detached from the tags of property when removed, as a means 
to prevent fraud or mistakes by such removal. 

JUDGES. 

57. The Society reserves the right to use either the single or three judge system, or 
both, during the Fair of 1894. Special care will be taken to secure the best and most 
competent judge or judges for the various departments that can be had. 

58. The Judges of Awards, when ready for duty, shall be furnished by the Secre- 
tary with a list of all entries in their respective departments, and books in which 
their awards are to be recorded. 

59. Should any of the Judges previously selected fail to be present, the Director of 
each department is authorized to select others to fill the vacancies, always endeavor- 
ing to select [)ersons dulv qualified by tl eir pursuits or experience to make correct 
awards in each special de[)ariment. In all ea-<es, the Julges, l>efore awarding any 
premium, will be careful to see that the requirements ot the Premium List have been 
strictly complied with by the exhititor 

60. No person, directly or indirectly interested, will be allowed to serve as a Judge, 
and the Executive Cummiitee will quash the awards in every case, when a person 
interested has acted as Judge; nor shall a member of the Executive Committee act 
as Judge of Award or umpire, under any circumstances. 

61. Judges are expected and specially instructed not to award premiums to any 
animal or article because of its presence. Ir must be individually worthy. It is not 
the policy of the Society to encourage indifferent productions of any kind, or to dis- 



HKCILATIONS. 1 : 

tribute premiums equally among exhibitors, and ii.. prciuiurii should be awanlcii Ui 
any animal or article that does not possess high uitriusic ineritH. 

(52. Wheu two subjects of tiie same kind, presented fur |>reiniiiinH. are div-niiMl by 
the Judges of equal merit, and also of such high degree that ti. either, if alxiie. the 
premium would be awarded, in such case the award must be to divide the lirnt iin<l 
second premiums ecpially between the two competitors: or, in cat-e there nhHJl havo 
been no second premium olfered, then to divide the first oidy in hk.- proportinti. 

63. The Director in charge and the Special Superintendent shall attend the ,)tidgi-i« 
when making the examinations in their respective departmeniH, and ftirniMh them 
with all reijuired information. Premiums will not be paid to parties having exhibits whert 
it IS proven that they accompanied the Judges when awarding the premiums. The awHrdN, 
when completed, shall be signed by the Judges, and also by the Kirectur. who will 
take charge of the book and return it to the Secretary. As the awards are made, the 
Director or his Superintendent will attach the ribbon indicating the award. 

64. Decisions of Judges shall be final, and no appeal will be considered except in 
cases of protest in writing, with strong evidence of fraud or violation of the rulen of 
the Society, which may be filed with the Secretary before the premiums have U'cn 
presented. 

65. Reports must be signed by each Judge in his own hand. 

66. Judges cannot award premiums to articles not in the regular premium list, but 
may make recommendations and tile these with the Secretary, who will preMeiit them 
to the Executive Committee. 

GATE-KEEPERS AND POLICE. 

67. Gate-keepers will be clothed with police authority, and are reqiiireii to preserve 
order at the gates. They must not receive money for admission under any circum- 
stances. 

68. All tickets— Life Members" tickets or other tickets — presented by personH not 
entitled to hold them, must be taken up, and those olfering them required to pur- 
chase others before entering the grounds. 

69. The Superintendent of Police shall have charge of the police force on the 
grounds (under control of the Secretary), and it shall be his duty, with the atMinlanco 
of his aids, to preserve order. 

70. The policemen shall be sworn in as conservators of the peace and it Bhall lie 
their duty to arrest any person creating any disorder, or violating any of the rule* of 
the exhibition or laws of the State. 

71. The Superintendent of Police shall detail a suitable number of his force for 
night service, and any one employed, day or night, who shall neglect the particular 
duty assigned him or leave his heat without permission, shall forfeit all or part of In* 
pay. as the Superintendent of Police may determine, and no bill for |>olic.' wrvice 
shall be audited except presented and approved by the Superintendent of Police. **^ 

72. The policemen and gate-keepers will be promptly on the grounds at 8 A...JI., 
each day of the Fair. 

PRIVILEGES. 

73. Application for privileges should be made early to the SecreUrr. In |»em»n or 
by letter, and a deposit will be recjuired in every instance where a contract \» uia/le. 

74. One ticket, good for one admission each day of the Fair, will U* given for every 
ten dollars of privilege money paid. 

CARE OF STOCK. 

75. Straw for bedding will be furnished by the Society free of charKe. ArranR*- 
ments have been made with a responsible party to furnish hay corn. oaU and clu.p 
feed on the grounds at market prices, in quantities to suit pur.hHH4.rH. 

76. In order to acconmiodate exhibitors to ''.• i--- •.dxanlage. upplicaUon* for 
stalls should be made to the Secretary as early >■■ >o charije la m«l» lor 
use of stables by animals regularly entered for r n. 

77. Thursday will be the dav of the para.le, and all block munt 
parade or forfeit their premiums, except in cases where hKk-Ic ih i. 

out, or too vicious, and that to be decided by the Suiwrmtendent m ..,..,,:.• 



14 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



" IT SHOULD BE USED IN EVERY FAMILY OF CULTURE IN WHICH THE ENGLISH 

LANGUAGE IS SPOKEN." 



• R • 

Standard 
Dictionary 

of the 

English 
Language 



UPON 
ORIGINAL PLANS. 



Designed to give, in complete and accu- 
rate statement, in the light of the most 
recent advances in knowledge, and in the 
readiest form for popular use, the Mean- 
ing, Orthography, Pronunciation, and 
Etymology of ali^ the words and the 
Idiomatic Phrases in the speech and lit- 
erature of the English-speaking peoples. 
Prepared by more thar) 
Two Hundred Specialists and 
Other Scholars. 

The editors engaged upon the various depart- 
ments of the Dictionary have been selected from 
the front rank of English and American scholars; 
each is representative of all that is latest and most 
approved in his own field of exploration and re- 
search; and each is an accepted authority in his 
sphere. From beginning to end, the Standard 
Dictionary is the work of men thorovighly equip- 
ped in the schools of science, literature, and art, 
and of experts in all handicrafts and trades. 

It seems neither extravagant nor invidious to claim that no more capable 
and vigorous body of workers, in touch with the spirit and movement of the 
times, has ever been called to the making of a dictionary in any language. 
As has been well said, "This Dictionary will be, in fact, the joint product of 
many minds, reflecting the whole scholarship of the present age." 

IT EMBODIES MANY NEW PRINCIPLES IN LEXICOGRAPHY. IT CONTAINS OVER 
2,200 PAGES; NEARLY 5,000 ILLUSTRATIONS, MADE EXPRESSLY FOR THIS 
WORK ; NEARLY 300,000 WORDS, WHICH IS MORE THAN TWICE THE 
NUMBER OF WORDS IN ANY OTHER SINGLE-VOLUME DIC- 
TIONARY, AND ABOUT 75,000 MORE THAN IN ANY 
OTHER DICTIONARY OF THE LANGUAGE. 

SOLD ONLY BY SUBSCRIPTION. 






SINGLE-VOLUME EDITION 

Half Russia $12.00 

Full Russia ( Including Denison's) 14.00 

Patent V ^^ «« 

Full Morocco ( Reference index ) 18.00 



TWO-VOLUME EDITION rerVol. PerSet. 

Half Russia $ 7.50 $15.00 

Full Russia (including Denison's) 8.50 17.00 

- Patent > 

Full Morocco ( Reference index j 11.00 22.00 



THE INSTALMENT PLAN enables you to begin to enjoy the use of this Dic- 
tionary AT ONCE, paying only a small sum down. We want every reader of this 
page to at least investigate the subject of owning this splendid book. Write to us 
and learn how favorable are the terms upon which it is sold. 

Address, 
THE BEST AGENTS WANTED IN EVERY WAYNE ALLCOTT, 

COUNTY IN NORTH CAROLINA. General Agent for North Carolina, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



LI5T or PREMIUMS. 



DEPARTMENT A. 

FIELD AND GARDEN CROPS. 
A. F. PAGE, l)iRE( ToK. 
AH entries in this Department must be made in the name of the producer. 

COTTON. 

^^ An entry fee of $5 will be required of each bale competinj; for the premiuniH 
offered for the Best Bale of Cotton, which fee will entitle the exiiihitor to Mpnce himI 
a season ticket to the Fair. A bale entered for competition uiUHt wei^li not ieiwj than 
400 pounds. 

1. Best bale of cotton... $ lOt 00 

Second best -in 0<J 

Third best M) uo 

Fourth best 1 ."i (« 

Fifth best 10 UO 

Sixth best 5 00 

MISCELLANEOUS. FIRST. SECX>NO. 

2. Best two-bushel basket seed cotton $ :} 00 $ 2 00 

3. Stalk with largest number open bolls 3 00 2 00 

4. Best two bushels cotton geed 2 00 100 

TOBACCO. 

5. Best ten pounds bright lemon wrappers 10 (KJ .i i^i 

6. Best ten pounds bright mahogany wrappers 10 00 5 00 

7. Best ten pounds shipping tobacco 10 00 6 00 

8. Best ten pounds fillers 5 00 2 00 

9. Best ten pounds cutters 5 00 2 00 

10. Best ten pounds bright smokers 10 0<t 5 00 

11. Best ten pounds sun-cured fillers 5 00 2 00 

12. Best ten pounds sun cured wrappers 5 "0 2 00 

13. Best display manufactured smoking tobacco, North Carolina 

make t'o''' M«'dal. 

14. Best package cigars, North Carolina make Diplomii. 

15. Best box plug tobacco, North Carolina make Diploma. 

16. Best display cigarettes. North Carolina make Diploma. 

17. Best display manufactured chewing tobacco, North Carolina * 

make... M»'dal anil 20 00 

18. Best display cheroots, North Carolina make Diploma and lo iKi 

19. Best display cigars. North Carolina make Diploma and 10 (>0 

20. Best display fine-cut chewing tobacco Diploma. 

WHEAT. 

21. Best bushel white winter wheat 

22. Best bushel red winter wheat ^W 1 uo 

23. Best bushel white spring wheat «00 100 

24. Best bushel red spring wheat 3 00 100 



IG 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



HOflNOKE HOOFING fl]NlD IVJETAL CORNICE CO. 



/. R, COLLLXGWOOD, 
Maaascr. 



ROANOKE, VA. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Copper and Galvanized 
Iron Cornices and Building 
Trimmings. 

SKYLIGHTS ! 



METAL CEILINGS. 



A CAT 



ALOGUE 
FOR THE ASKING. 




Reduced 
Prices 



* 



ON THE 



BOSS 



Co rxoN Press. 

While we have sold over 4.000 BOSS COTTON PEESSES, 
ginners have complained of the price as high, because comparison was 
made with inferior presses. We have this year determined to cut our 
profit to the lowest figure, and the reduced price of raw material 
enables us to make a big reduction. Write for prices on it and other 
Presses, Engines, Boilers, Saw-mills, Gins, Pulleys, Shafting, etc. 

^<^LiddeII Company, 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 



HIC"OND. 


1 1 00 


•-• 00 


1 00 


1 01) 


1 00 


i (H) 


1 00 


5 00 


2 00 


2 00 


2 (Ml 


2 0«> 


2 Wt 


2 <NI 


1 (N) 


1 «K» 


1 IN) 


1 00 



rUKMHM LIST. 17 

FIRST. 

25. Best bushel buckwheat «; :i 00 

26. Bf St bushel new variety wheat ', mi 

27. Best sheaf wliite winter wheat j hi 

28. Best sheaf red winter wheat „• imi 

29. Best sheaf white spriiij; wlieat ■ J IM( 

30. Best sheaf re'1 sprinu; wheat 2 00 

31. Bei-t sheaf buckwheat ^J 00 

32. Best display of largest number of varieties of wheat, samples 

distinct from the foregoing 1 10 00 

CORN. 

33. Best two bushel'^ wliite cnrn in ear 4 00 

34. Best two huslieis yellow corn in ear 4 00 

35. Best two bushels Hint corn in ear 4 (Ml 

36. Best two b\Hhels sweet corn in ear 4 00 

87. Best two bushels Dent corn in ear 4 00 

38. Best six stalks of corn with ears attached 4 00 

39. Twelve ears of longest white corn 2 00 

40. Twelve ears of longest yellow corn 2 00 

41. Best twelve stalks of broomcorn :{ 00 

42. Greatest freak or curiosity in corn 2 00 

43. Best display of largest number of varieties of corn, one " C" 

Poindexter Corn-Splitting Machine, worth $35. 

OATS. 

44. Best bushel earliest oats 3 00 100 

45. Best bushel white oats 3 00 100 

46. Best bushel black oats 3 00 1 m 

47. Best bushel red oats..-. 3(H) 100 

48. Best bushel rustproof oats .. 3 0(» MM) 

49. Best sheaf white oats 2 00 1 OO 

50. Best sheaf black oats 2 00 100 

51. Best sheaf earliest oats ' 2 00 I 00 

52. Best sheaf red oats 2 00 1 00 

53. Best sheaf rust-proof oats 2 00 1 00 

54. Best displav of largest variety of oats, samples distinct from 

foregoing - •<> ♦» 5 00 

BARLEY. 

55. Best bushel fall barley '•} ^ ' JjO 

56. Best bushel spring barley •* 00 1 00 

57. Best sheaf fall barley J| '••' ' ^* 

58. Best sheaf spring barley '^*^*^ ' ^ 

59. Best and largest display of barley 5w 8 00 

RYE. 

60. Best bushel winter rye '* ^ 2 00 

61. Best bushel spring rye ' "*' 

62 Best sheaf winter rye ; 

63. Best sheaf spring rye. -- . ; ''' . 

64. Largest and most artistic display of rye '" w aw 

RICE. 

65. Best bushel upland rice, rough •} *^' * P|^ 

66. Best bushel upland rice, cleaned ' ' 

67. Best bushel lowland rice, rough 

68. Best bushel lowland rice, cleaned 

69. Best bushel upland rice Hour 

70. Best bushel lowland rice Hour 

71. Best sheaf upland rice 

72. Best sheaf lowland rice - 

73. Largest and most artistic display of ric 

9 



18 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE 



"Farmer5' Favorite" 
Qrain Drill. 



AS YE SOW. SO SHALL 
YE REAP. 



^ 



FORCE FEED IN GRAIN 
AND FERTILIZER 




WITH 



'--WIZARD FORGE-FEED FERTILIZER SOWER.-- 

Always Reliable. 

All Latest Improvements. 

Agents Wanted. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

BiCKKORD &^ HUKF^IVIAN Co., 

408 S. Eutaw Street. BALTIMORE, MD. 



PRKMdM I,rST. 



19 



U) 

(Ml 

(Ml 

(Ml 

1 (MJ 



HAV, ETC. 

KIR8T. 8KCOND. 

74. Best bale clover hay | *8 (K) $ 1 (X) 

75. Best bale orchard ^rass •;« oo 

76. Best bale tall meadow oat grass ; "i 

77. Best bale Oerman millet i 

78. Best bale Hungarian grass ,, .«i 

79. Best bale pea-vine hay H (M» 

80. Best bale peanut- vine hay :i iKi 

81. Best bale native grass •a (XI 

83. Best bale timothy hay '.\ (Id 

83. Best bale rice straw ;{ (Ml 

84. Best sheaf golden millet l» (Hi 

85. Best bheaf (Terman millet "J (Ml 

86. Best sheaf Hungarian grass 2 (Ml 

87. Best sheaf timothy... 2 (Ml 

88. Best sheaf red clover 2 (M) 

89. Best sheaf white clover 2 (Ml 

90. Best sheaf blue grass . . 2 (M) 

91. Best sheaf wild grass 2 (M) 

92. Best sheaf orchard grass 2 00 

*And one annual subscription to Cultivator and Country Oentleman. 



00 
00 

(Ml 
(Ml 
(Ml 

I i»: 

1 (Ml 
1 (Mi 
1 OU 

1 m 

1 IK) 
1 0(1 



93. Best bushel black-eyed peas. 

94. Best bushel Clay peas 

95. Best bushel white peas 

96. Best bushel speckled peas ... 



PEANUTS. 

Best two bushels large peanuts 

Best two bushels small peanuts 

Best six vines large peanuts with fruit attached 

Best six vines small peanuts with fruit attached . . . 

Best single variety of large peanuts, not less than one bushel. 

102. Best single variety of small peanuts, not less than one bushel. 

103. Best display of largest number of varieties 20 00 



98. 

99. 
100. 
101. 



SEEDS. 

na red clover seed 

na white clover seed., 
na orchard-grass seed, 
na timothy seed. 



104. Best bushel North Carol 
105 Best bu^hel North Carol 

106. Best bushel North fJarol 

107. Best bushel North Carol 

108. Best bushel North Carolina German millet seed - 

109. Best bushel North Carolina herd.^^-grass seed - 

110. Best bushel North Carolina tall meadow oat grass seed 

111. Best bushel blue-grass seed 

112. Best quart flaxseed 

113. Best quart tobacco seed 

114. Best quart collard seed 

115. Best quart cabbage seed 

116. Best quart turnip seed ; "«' i J' 'Hj' 

117. Largest and best displayed variety of garden and field seeds 

grown by any North Carolina firm or individual 

!^° Seeds for Premiuvi 111 must be grotni in North Carolina 
and exhibit must consist of not less than fifty varieties. 



3 00 


I ..,, 


3 (MJ 


I 00 


3 (Ml 


1 (M) 


3 (Ml 


1 00 


.-i 00 


2 ui 


ft 00 


2 00 


r, 00 


2 00 


."i (XI 


2 00 


.'i 0(1 


2 00 


.■i (Ml 


2 00 


20 00 


10 00 


4 IM) 


2 00 


4 00 


2 00 


3 00 


1 00 


3 00 


1 00 


3 (Kl 


I 00 


3 00 


1 00 


3 (H) 


1 W 


3 (MJ 


1 00 


3 00 


1 00 


2 00 


1 00 


1 00 




1 00 




1 00 




10 00 


5 00 


by the exhibitor. 



20 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



RALEIGH STATIONERY COMPANY, 

W. G. Separk, Manager. 

DEALERS IN 

£tatioi\^ry, Blai\k feook^^^^^,^ 

-^^^_]VoV^lti^5 ii\ fai\^y (^00^5, £^tQ. 

309 FAYETTEVILLE ST., - - RALEIGH, N. 0. 




THE ROSS ENSILAGE GUTTER. 



We Hereby Challenge the World to 
produce the equal of tliis Cutter. We 
claim that we can cut more food in less 

time, with shorter kuive-s, with le.ss power, and more satisfactorily, than with any other cutter made. 

WE r.UAKANTEE it to do better service in the way of hard usage than any other machine. 



For full particulars, address 



ODELL HARDWARE CO., Stale Agents, 

GREENSBORO. N. C. 



L.E 



ET©<Srf 



FRENCH BAKER, CONFECTIONER 



No. 103 Fnj'ettcville Street., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



AND CRACKER MANUFACTURER. 
WEDDING CAKES A SPECIALTY. 



PREMIUM LIST. 21 



ROOT CROPS, VEOBTABLKS, ETC. K1R8T. KEOi)!fD. 

118. Best bushel turnips $ 'J (H) $ 

111). Best bushel stuck beets 2 fM) 

120. Best bushel sugar beets 2 (X) 

131. Best six bunches celery 2 (H» 

122. Best egg plant, six specimens 2 IM) 

123. Best display of gourds 2 IKJ 

124. Best cabbage, six specimens 2 00 

125. Best coilards. six specimens 2 00 

12ti. Best salsify, six specimens 2 W 

127. Best squash, six specimens 2 <M) 

12S. Best parsnips, half-bushel 2 00 

129. Best carrots, half bushel 2 0(t 

130. Best and largest pumpkins, three specimens 2 00 

131. Best lima beans, peck 2 00 

132. Best North Carolina grown hops 2 00 

133. Best display of popcorn 2 00 

134. Best hemp (dressed), ten pounds 4 00 

135. Best jute (dressed), ten pounds 4 (KJ 

136. Best dozen cucumbers 2 00 

137. Best half-peck artichokes 2 (tO 

138. Best six bunches red- pepper 2 (X) 

139. Best bushel red sweet potatoes 2 00 

140 Best bushel white sweet potatoes 2 0<) 

141. Best bushel yellow sweet potatoes 2 00 

142. Best bushel early Irish potatoes 2 00 

143. Be?<t bushel late Irish potatoes 2 00 

144. Best bushel white field beans 2 00 

145. Best dozen vegetable oysters 2 (M> 

146. Best dozen radishes, round form 2 00 

147. Best dozen radishes, long form 2 00 

148. Best dozen red onions 2 00 

149. Best dozen white onions '^ '•^' 

150. B-'St dozen yellow onions 2 o'* 

151 Best peck castor beans ~ "" 

152. Best three citrons . . . - 2"*' 

153. Best three heads cauliflower j^ "*^ 

154. Best and largest single pumpkin '- *^\ 

155. Best bushel rutabaga - 

156. Best bushel mangel- wurz-^l beets ^ 

157. Best two dozen stalks sugar cane |J 

158. Best peck chufas ~ 

159. Best half bushel tomatoes .. , * 

160. Best sample of white soup bean, fourth-bushel - 

161. B^'st sample fall grown snap beans, fourth-bushel "- «' 

162. Best sample fall grown green peas, fourth-bushel '- OO 

COUNTY EXllIIJITS. 

A display offered as a Countv Exhibit must include artirlp« and contribution« in 

its make up from not less than seven citizens of the county from wh-n.-e it 

and the party or parties in charge of the same must presmt to "•"^-•'■••'^^^ ' 
tirtcate, signed by a majority of the Boanl of CommtssionerH of mirh .•ounly, . 
effect that the exhibit is fairly representative in its nature, of the counly. iu»a m 
sanctioned as such by the B )ard of Commissioners. 

The county of Wake will not compete for the premiuniH offered. 

Articles in County E.\liibits cannot compete for other premium». 

163. Best agricultural exhibit by any county in the State ", 

164. Best mineral exhibit by any county in thf State 

165 Best live stock exhibit by any county in the Statn . , 

166. Best exhibit of peanuts by any county in the htate 

167. Best exhibit of rice by any county in the State 

168. Best exhibit of cotton by any county in the State 

169. Best exhibit of tobacco by any county in the State. 



00 
00 
IN) 
(H» 
00 
00 



00 
00 
00 
00 
(M) 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
IK) 
IN) 
IN) 
01) 
00 
IN) 
00 
00 
00 
IX) 
INJ 
DO 
00 
00 
00 
00 
(NJ 
IN) 
(X) 
00 
IN) 
IN) 
1)0 
IN) 
IN) 
OU 
00 
00 

uo 

00 
(X) 
00 
00 
00 
00 



22 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



THE. 



1831 * * 1894 



CULTIVATOR 
And country 
QENTLEMAN 



J 



DEVOTED TO.... 



The Best 

of the 

Agrieultural 
Weeklies, 



Farm Crops and Processes, 

Horticulture and Fruit Growing, 

Live-Stock and Dairying, 

While it also includes all minor departments of Rnral interest, such 
as the Poultry Yard, Entomology, Bee-Keeping, Greenhouse and 
Grapery, Veterinary Replies, Farm (Questions and Answers, Fireside 
Reading, Domestic Economy, and a Summary of the News of the 
Week. Its Market Reports are unusually complete, and much 
attention is paid to the Prospects of the Crops, as throwing light 
upon one of the must important of all questions — JF/ien to Buy and 
When to Sell. It is liberally Illustrated, and by Recent Enlarge- 
ment, contains more reading-matter than ever before. The subscrip- 
tion price is $2.50 per year, but we offer a special reduction in our 

CLUB RATES: 

Two Subscriptions, m one remittance, $ 4. 

Six Subscriptions, •• ' 10. 

Ten Subscriptions, • - 15. 

jI^^SpECImen Copies Free. Address 



LUTHER TUCKER & SON, Publishers, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 



DEPARTMENT B-1. 

HORSES. 
P. COWPER, DiRix'TOR. 



Unless the Judges deem the animal individually irorthi/, they will wiibhoKl pre- 
mium. 

Pedigrees for this section must be fully verified and filed for examinatiun and 
approval with the Directors of this department. Reference will Jm* made to the Kn^- 
lish Stud Book, the American Turf Kenister, Wallace's or Hruco's Stud H.Mik. or 
others of equal standing. Stallions or jacks only admitted to couipetiiion that have 
served ten mares during the season. 

Exhibitors of horses will be recjuired to teat their animals umler the direction of 
the judaie or judges who may have charge of the class in which the entries are made. 
The judge or judges have full power to rule out of competition all who do not com- 
ply with their requirements. 

Horses to compete for premiums must be sound, except in cases of stallionB or 
mares injured by accidents which do not impair them f<ir breeding piiriHtseH. 

The age of hordes and foals will be reckoned from .January 1. All f»)alH will be 
considered one year old on the 1st of January succeeding birth. 

From 10 A. M. to 4 P. M. all stock must be uncovered, and an attendant there to 
answer all questions politelv. 

All stock must take part in the grand parade. 

THE STANDARD 
As Rtvisedand Adopted by the Americin Trotting Register Aitsuciittion. May 19. IfOl. 

In order to define what constitutes a standard bred horse, and ti> e.ttablish a br«MHl 
of trotters and pacers on a more intelligent basis, the following rules are adi>pt*-d !<■ 
control admission to the records of pedigrees. When an animal meets the rtj.ir- 
ments of admission and is duly registered, it shall be accepted aa a htandani ii«>l 
animal: 

1. Any trotting stallion that has a record of two minutes and thirty second* (2:80), 
or pacing stallion that has a record of two minutes and twenty five seconds i2;»'.'i), or 
better, provided any of his get has a record of 2::i") trotting, or 'i:-V^ pacing, or belltr; 
or provided his sire or dam is already a standard animal. 

2 Any mare or gelding that has a trotting record of 2:30. or pacing record of 2:23, 
or better. 

3. Any horse that is the sire of two trotters with records of '.'i^O, or two j 
with records of 2:25, or one trotter with a record of 2:30, and one jwcer with n t 
of 2:25, or better. 

4. Any horse that is the sire of one trotter with a record of 2:30, or one pacer with 
a record of 2:25. or better, provided he has either of the followinj; additicmnl .|ii«liii 
cations: (1) A trotting record of 2:35, or a pacing record of 2:30. or better. 

the sire of two other animals with trottii g records of 2:35. or pacing tf-ord of 

or one trotter with a record of 2:35, and one pacer with a rtcord of 2:30, or U'lU'r. 

(3) Has a sire or dam that is already a standard animal, 

5. Any mare that has produced a trotter with a record of 2:30. or a pacer with • 
record of 2:25. or better. 

6. The progenv of a standard horsf when out of a standard mare. 

7. The female progeny of a standard horse when out of a mar.- by n ntniidard horn*'. 

8. The female progeny of a standard hor.se when out of a mare whwoe dam m a 

standard mare. ■»«<«» i_.. 

9. Any mare that has a trotting record of 2:35. or a psc-ng record of 8U». or brtter. 

whose sire or dam is a standard animal. 



24 



ADVKRTISEMEXTS. 






^^'^^ICORPD^^AT£DJ ^ 

■^bnce-- -he -WD' 




WHEN 
PEOPLE 
LIVE 
LONG 



Others are curious to 
know the secret of their 
old age. We have lived 
a long and prosperous 
business career. Do you 
want to know the reason 
\s hy ? We have always 
dealt fair and square; have offered the first- 
class article at the lowest price, and have 
kept up to the times in new improvements. 
We have kept the confidence of our cus- 
QO YOU NEED tomers by doing exactly as we agree. 

Poultry Netting, Iron or Wire Fencing. Wire Mats, iron Beds, Fly Screens, Grate Guards, 
Window Guards, Artistic Bank and Office Railings, Stable Fixtures? 

DOW WIRE WORKS CO., Louisville, Ky. 



W. B. Mann, 

Heavy And Kancy 



No. 5 HARGETT ST. 



Fine Table Supplies 
A Specialty. 



GROCER! 






PICTURE FRAMES 



• • • 



AND 



. . . WINDOW SHADES 




CROSS &> LINEHAN, 

ClothieFs, 

ge:nxs' kurnishers and hatters, 

210 Favetteville Street. TERMS CASH. 



TRKMILM \\<V. 25 
TUOROL'dHliKKDS. 

(Pedigree required as above.) 

KIKHT. KKCOND. 

170. Best thoroughbred stallion, 4 years oli and over f 'iO (►0 $ 10 00 

171. Best thorougiibred stallion, 2 _\ ears oiil ami under 4 lU OO 

17'3. Best thoroughbred brood mare, 4 years old and over ijtl <HJ 10 00 

173. Best thoroughbred Hlly, 3 years old and under 4 10 00 

174. Best thoroughbred colt, 1 year old 7 50 

175. Best colt under 1 year old ."» (Hi 

176. Best mare with colt by her side 20 00 10 00 

STANDARD liKEl) HORSES. 

(Pedigrees required as above, and registered number of stallions entered on curd.) 

177. Best standard-bred stallion, 4 years old and over $ 20 00 $ 10 00 

178. Best standard-bred stallion, 2 years old and under 4 10 (XI 

179. Best standard-bred brood mare, 4 yeirs old and over 20 00 10 00 

180. Best standard bred tllly, 2 years old and under 4 10 00 

181. Best standard-bred colt or filly, under 2 years old and over 1, 7 50 

182. Best standard colt or filly, under 1 year old ri 00 

183. Best mare with colt by her side 20 00 l<i 00 

HEAVY DRAFT HORSES. 

Clydesdales, Percherons, Normans and all Heavy Draft lireeils. 
(Pedigree required as above.) 

184. Best stallion, 4 years old and over $ 20(H) $ 10 00 

185. Best stallion, 2 years old and under 4 10 00 

186. Best brood mare, 4 years old and over 20(10 10 00 

187. Best filly, 2 years old and under 4 10 (H) 

188. Best colt, 1 year old and under 2 7 50 

189. Best colt under 1 year old 5 00 

190. Best mare with colt by her side -" "*' 

LIGHT DRAFT AND SADDLE HORSES. 

(No pe iigree required. Must have been owned in the State at leant six munth« pre- 
vious to the Fair.) 

191. Best stallion, 4 years old and over ...8 20 00 $ 10 00 

192. Best stallion, 2 years old and under 4 Id (K) 

193. Best brood mare, 4 years old and over -"'•'<• '0 (Mi 

194. Best filly, 2 years old and under 4 ''j ^' 

195. Best colt, 1 year old and under 2 ^ •*|| 

196. Best colt under 1 year old •» '"| 

197. Best mare with colt by her side ••^' "" '" "" 

MATCH TEAMS. 
This class is intended especially for Driving Horses, and form, size. Myle. dticiliir. 
speed and good n)atch (color not consid.-red ) are requisites. T^-ain innM h^ "^?*" '" 
harness, to four-wheeled vehicles, and must have l.een owned and u.-». d for drninK 
purposes by the exhibitor at least sixty days previous to the Fair. 

198. Best team— carriage or coach horses, raised in North Caroli- 

na, not under 16 hands high .--•-. •--••;* ^^ 

199. Best team— light carriage or bugtry horses, raised in iNorlli 

Carolina, not under 14i ban. Is high. _^ j" ' 

200. Best pair matched horses, of any age ^ "" 

201. Best pair matched mares, of any age *" "* 

202. Best pair of fancy horses, mares, or horse and iMSir.-. r. gar.l 

less of size, age, sex, color or speed, but must b»- naturally _^ 

very stylish 



111 INI 



26 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

W. C. & A. B. STRONACH. 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

Staple and fancy Groceries, 

HORSE AND COW FEED. 

FAYETTEVILLE AND WILMINGTON STREETS, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



TH08. H. BRIGG8 1 80N8^ 

HARDWARE, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



STOVES, HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS, 
SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS, PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS, 

=^GUNS AND PISTOLS^ 



LIME, Best Ooods! 

PLASTER, % Low Prices! 

CEMENT, ^ Square Dealing! 

SHELLS, WADS, T 

^,,,vT ,n,r^, r^.,r^,v,^^ K W RITE FOR PRICES OF 

GUN IMPLEMENTS. ^ any goods wanted. 



Headquarters for ^/*N /) •? 

Men's, Boys' and Children's /^-^* 



CLOTHING! 




CLOTHIERS ^NATTERS 

Hats^ SJioes^ Underwear^ Etc. 
RellaMe doofls and Low Prices Our Motto. 




IM:i:miim LIST. 



I'AKM TEAMS. 

Teams must have been useil for Agricultural Purposnn nmi muMt U« ownml and 
driven by farmers. Matches and pairs will not !)»' allow*-.! tn In- mnile up for ih«« 
occasion, but must belong to the exhibitor. Size, action, strt-iigth and dotility are the 
requisites — not speed or color. 

KI«.ST. HECOND. 

203. Best pair of farm geldings or mares to wagon $ 20 (M) | 10 00 

MISCELLA.NEOfS. 

204. Best saddle horse raised in North Carolina 10 00 

205. Best single buggy horse raised in North Carolina 10 00 

206. Best jack owned in North Carolina 20 (X) 10 (M) 

207. Best jennet owned in North Carolina 10 00 

208. Best single mule dropped and raised in North Carolina 15 00 

209. Best mule colt, 2 years old, dropped and raided in North Car- 

olina 

210. Best mule colt, 1 year old, dropped and raised in North Caro- 

lina 

211. Best pair mules dropped and raised in North Carolina. 



50 



7 r,o 

20 00 



10 00 



SWEEPSTAKES. 

212. Best stallion, shown with five of his colts 



Medal. 




28 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

liUDDEfJ & BATES SOUTHERN MUSIC HOUSE. 

MAIN HOUSE, SAVANNAH, GEORGIA. 

STEINWAY. r^ I 9 n O 3 . . . . . MATHUSHEK. 

M.^SON & HAMLIN. O k- Q-ps p q^ STERLING. 

FROM THE WORLD'S BEST NIAKERS. 

Largest House in the South. 

Twenty-three Years in Business. No Overcharging. 

Large Capital ^^ Underselling. 

Seven Large Branch Stores, 

Write for free Catalogues and prices to Strictly One Price. 

MILLER & UZZLE, 

Managers Raleigh Braaeh, Raleigh, N, C, 



AITAMONT STOCK FARM, 

lYlillbrook, 
Duchess Co., 
New York. 




-s^>v. -y 




GUERNSEY CATTLE. 

SHROPSHIRE SHEEP. 

BERKSHIRE PICS. 

■^9)^ PR17F^ Won at the leading shows during the past three years. 
Show Stock and Breeding Stock of superior quality 
always for sale. For particulars, address 

G. HOWARD DAVISON. 



DEPARTMENT B-2. 

CATTLE. 
IVAN M. PROCTOR, Director. 



Unless the Judges deem the animals individually worthy, they will withhold pre- 
miums. 

All except Grades or Natives must he registered and certificateB of r<>KiHtrntion 
filed with the Secretary. In all entries for Grades, either the sire or the durn riiuMi 
be registered thoroughbred, and so proven. 

Cattle arriving at the limit of age during the month of Octoljer of huldini^ the 
Fair, shall be deemed to be under that age. 

Cattle entered for individual premiums can also compete in herds. A herd con- 
sists of one bull and not less than four cows or heifers over one year old. 

JERSEYS. FIKST. SECOND. 

213. Best bull, any age $ l'> <»0 $ 7 riO 

214. Best bull calf under 1 year old •') <X» 

215. Best cow. any age 15 m) 7 M 

216. Best heifer under 2 years old 10 0<l 

217. Best heifer under 1 year old •'» 0<j 

218. Best herd... -'5 <H) i:> m> 

GUERNSEYS. 

219. Best bull, any age l-'i 00 7 .'lO 

220. Best bull calf under 1 year old '1) <X' 

221. Best cow, any age -- l'* tM» 

222. Best heifer under 2 years old 10 (HI 

223. Best heifer under 1 year old 5 00 

224. Best herd 2.'> (JO 15 00 

DEVON'S. 

225. Best bull, anv age '-^00 7 5<J 

226. Best bull calf under 1 year old 5 00 ^ 

227. Best cow, any age '« 00 . v» 

228. Best heifer under 2 years old '0 00 

229. Best heifer under 1 year old // '^ 

230. Best herd ' '"' 

SHORT HORNS. 

231. Best bull, any age - "J JJJJ ' ''^ 

232. Best bull calf under 1 year old » "JJ 

233. Best cow, any age J!?^ 

234. Best heifer under 2 years old 'V ^J, 

235. Best heifer under 1 year old 

236. Bestherd 

HOLSTEINS. 

237. Best Vmll. any age.... *' JJ 

238. Best bull calf under 1 year old ^'^ ^ 

239. Best cow, any age 10 00 

240. Best heifer under 2 years old 

241. Best heifer under 1 year old .,'. ^^^ ,. qq 

242. Bestherd- 



30 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The very best way 

to know whether Dobbins' Electric Soap 
is as good as it is said to be, is to try it 
yourself. It can't deceive YOU. Only 
be careful not to get an imitation. There 
are a great many Electrics and Magnetics, 
all intended to deceive the public into 
supposing that they are Dobbins' Electric, 
or just as good. We have made this since 
1869. It is the original Electric, and is 
guaranteed to be w^orth four times as 
much as any other soap ever made. For 
washing anything, from the finest lace to 
the heaviest blanket, it is without a peer. 
Only follow directions. » 

Rccld ^^^ ^^^^ ^^'^ ^^y °^^ ^^^^ ^^^^*-' wrap- 
pers around the soap, and then 
v^areiully see for yourself whether or not 
you can afford to ever use any other soap than 
this, after having heard its own story, told you 
by your own test of it. 

Dobbins' Soap Manufacturing Co., 

Successors to I. L,. Cragin & Co., 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



PREMIUM LIST. 31 

DUTCH BELTKl) rATTI.K. 

KIIIST. sKi.iMi, 

243. Best bull, any age | 15 00 | 7 50 

244. Best bull calf under 1 year old SOO 

245. Best cow, any aj?e l.') oo 7 .Vi 

246. Best heifer under 2 years old in (M) 

247. Best heifer under 1 year old :, („i 

248. Bestheid.. * '"' 



AYRSHIRES. 



Best bull, any age 

Best bull calf under 1 year old. 

Best cow, any age 

Best heifer under 2 years old.. 
Best heifer under 1 year old... 
Best herd 



i 


7 


.V) 


."i UO 






15 04) 


7 


.V) 


10 00 






r> (K) 






•J.'l <IO 


!'' 


IMI 


15 <N) 


7 


.V) 


5 W» 






ir. o<i 


•• 
1 


:k) 



HEREFOKD. 

Best bull, any age 

Best bull calf under 1 year old 

Best COW any age ... 

Best heifer under 2 years old 10 (K) 

Best heifer under 1 year old 5 no 

Best herd 25 OO 15 00 

AMEKICAX HOLDERNESS. 

261. Best bull, anv age 15 Co . w 

262. Best bull calf under 1 year old 5 00 

263. Best cow, any age I'l IH) 7 50 

264. Best heifer under 2 years old. 10 00 

265. Best heifer under 1 year old ^ "O 

266. Best herd ■" ' 



NATIVES. 

267. B'^st bull, any age I", i"' : "." 

268. Best bull calf under 1 year old ■'»"*' 

269 Best cow, any age \!i W 7 50 

270. Best heifer under 2 years old 10 00 

271. Best heifer under 1 year old 5 0*) 

272. Bestherd. 25 00 15 00 

GRADES. 

273. Best cow l'» •"' 

274. Best heifer under 1 year old 5 00 

YOKES. 

275. Best yoke of working cattle m iki 

BEEF ANIMAI-S. 

276. Fattest and best beef animal of either sex or any bn'wl lo mj 

277. Fattest and best herd of beef animals, not less than 5 15 00 



32 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

J. R. FERRALL. JOSHUA B. HILU 

J. R. FERRALL & CO., 

Staple and Fancy Grocers, 

222 FAYETTEVILLE STREET, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Yarboro 



The \ / l_ L. T. BROWN, 

Proprietor^ 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



Mouse 



Offers Ample and Comfortable 
Accommodations 

To all who Visit the State Fair. 



ANTICIPATE PUTTING IN STEAM HEATING APPARATUS 
BY WINTER. 

Rates, $2,00, $2.50 and $3.00 per Day.-z/z/^/-- 

--^/jyvz^Especially Low Weekly and Monthly Rates. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

JEWELER, 

No. I 1 7 Fayetteville Street, RALEIGH, N. C. 

Badges and Plain Rings Made to Order. 

NKW YORK 

Millinery and Dry Goods Bazaar, 

221 FAYETTEVILLE STREET, RALEIGH, N. C, 

Fashionable Millinery and an Elegant Stock of Dry Goods Always on Hand. 




I'HKMIIM i.isr. 33 

DAIRY COWS. 

(WITH THE COOPERATION OF THE N. C. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION ) 

OPEN TO ALL BREEDS OWNED IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

$40 TO FIRST. $25 TO SECOND. $10 TO THIRD. 

It is well known that cows capable of the lHr;jest vieMs of milk, hiitt»'r hihI »lif> m** 
are so hijjhly orj^anized thitany undue or uiuisuhI nir)\vinenls excite iliein, <liiiiiiiiHh 



aiKT oij iii^iji^> v^jj^tiii i^^»-i mil ciiiY iiiiwii^ »#i iiiiii'tu^i iliw^ r-iilfin:^ r-.xv. Ill- illT-lll, illljllil|.«ll 

their yields of milk and reduce the (juality of what they do \i»^lil. Hence, th*' iniu-t 
of their usual home surroundinj^s is the hest place to makn tj)es>* tesin. which hIihII (►« 
de known and the prizes awarded when tlie cows are placed on exhihifion Ht the 
r. The tests shall be conducted at some liuje duriiij^ ihe month of S«'ptem>iT by 
lie member of the sraff of the North Carolina AKncultura! ExjKTitnenl Slutiun 
nmissioned to make them. 



CONDITIONS OF THE TESTS. 

The cows tested must be entered on the regular book< of the State AKricultural 
Society as members of herds competing;; fur henl prizes*, or for beHt cowh in their 
respective classes at the State Fair, and ti.ey must be tliere exhibited or no prize will 
be awarded even if otherwise deserved. 

The prizes %vill be awaided to the cows which sc )re the highest number of p<<int« 
and which appear on the Fair Grounds m the respective exhibits of their ownern, 
according to the order of the scores earm-d tiy the cows. 

The highest number of points earned secures the Hist prize of $I0 0<). 

The secomi hi^hes-t number of points earned secures the seci>n«l priz* of f'J'i (Hi. 

The third highest iium'er of points eained st cures the third prize of $1(».<MI. 

In order to have this test conducted, an owr.er of cows shouM enter hM herd or 
individual cows with the Secretary of the Fiiir for the regular henl or individual 
prizes, then request a test and name a date in September on which he would like to 
have the test made. If other dates do not interfere, that will be the elate for the test 
if the Station representative can reach the placM in season. otherwiM- Hiiother date 
will be arranged convenient to boih parties. When the date is agree.l ii|Kin a <lepo«U 
of $10.00 by each person so entering his c<'ws must be made with the iMn-ctor of thf» 
Experiment Station as a forfeit to partly defray the expenses of lh»' tent if the cow in 
not regularly exhibited. This money 'is to be returned by the I»irec-lor whenever 
satisfactory evidence is given that the tested cow has been placed on exhibition at 
the Fair. 

RULES FOR CONDUCTING THE TEST. 

The owner of a cow to be tested shall file a sworn statement with the Station repre- 
sentative before the test begins, statirg — 

1st. The breed; number, if regisiere-i, and age of cow in yearn. 

2d. The number of calves she has produced; date of Uht calvinK: date* of last bull 
service and when expected to come in milk again; or if not bred mi Htute. 

3d. The separate kinds and amounts of food eaten by the cow in the l««l ten dajra 
before the date of the test, and the value of each per ton in dollarH. If q'laliljr »nd 
quantity of food was changed in that time, state how much, and why. > 

4th. the Station representative will carefully wei^h and re<-or.l the food of e«rh 
cow tested for the 24 hours of the test, beginning with the evening prevjnud to tb- 
day of the test, and he will also inspect the jail and weigh the milk for the l«--t 
njilking before the test begins. # # ^ 

.5th. The Station representative shall not interfere with the U!*ual hour- of fewUng 
and milking cows except to see that 24 full hours, an-l no mor.* ,.,.. .ii,.« . ,i f,,r -. r.- 
tion of milk, and to assure himself of the weig'it of all the finnl 
test. He should weigh or measure the water drai.k. if conveni 
ing the cows undergoing the test. 



r 




I'KKMirM i.iM. •;• 

6th. He will weigh and inspect the tniik pH'l ht-f.-rt' i-at-h iiiilkin^con ihf.lHV of th»« 
test, and weigh and take so much of liie milk a.s will inBure an ttm|ilf anuiunt for 
specific gravity and fat determinations. 

7th. He will proceed with the tests without delav, and may prnw-nl thi» nwrnr of 
each tested cow a copy of what he finds, upon the owner's faithful pron 
divulge the result to anyone until after the coming State I'air; l>ul tU>> i 

tive shall impart such information to no other person e.\cept the l)irti. ; ;... 

Experiment Station, who will keep the tests secret until after the public Hnnounce* 
ment has been made at the State Fair. 

8th. The Quevenne Lactometer for specific gravity an«i Hahcock TeHter for the p*r 
cent, of fat shall be used to determine the valuable constiiuents of the milk. 

9th. Each cow will be credited with as many points as her product periudH of lacta- 
tion and gestation can reach on the following scale : 

For every 20 days lactation 1 point. 

For every 10 days gestation 1 |H)int. 

For every two ounces of solids, not fat. yielded in 24 hours 1 p«»int. 

For every ounce of butter- fat yielded in 24 hours Sf puintH. 

If Breeders' Associations, or individual owners of pure hr»d cattle witth to fifTtr 
similar prizes for their respective breeds, they will he accepted and the ihhih made 
under the above terms for all such entries of cows owned in North Carolina bm may 
be exhibited at the State Fair. 



ENGINES AND BOILERS 

FOR ALL PURPOSES. 

CORLISS, STATIONARY AND PORTABLE. 

Pumps, Grate Bars. Injectors, Ejcclur*. 
Steam Pipe and Fillings. Urass Goods. 

COTTON MILL AND ALL OTHER REPAIRS. 

Write for priLC- and j.Miti. u!..:- ■ 

MECKLEl^IBURa IROIM V^^ORKS, 

rilAKLOTTi:, N. < . 



The CentrsI C>3tCf7,7 1 .yctte. oic »• . < Ffp. om ^Mt^a). 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Cool and Shady Porches, Easy Chairs and Tables, and Kvcry I-'acility for EojoymenL 

High Grades of Wines. Liquors, Cigars. Tobacco and SrookerB* Good*. 

The best Imported Malts of all Descriptions, and the coolest glaw of beer .n .hr r.t v. 

POOL ROOM AND LUNCH COUNTER. 



36 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



OLD DOMINION 

HORSE AND MULE SHOES 



ARE THE BEST. WHY? 



Because . . . 

They are made from the very 
finest iron that can be produced; 
no scrap being used in their 
manufacture. 

The CreasinCx, punching and fin- 
ish is as perfect as it is possible 
to make shoes, and the shoes 
will not split in the crease. 

Try a Lot, and be Convinced of 
Their Superiority. 



ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE ON APPLICATION. 



Old Dominion Nails. 

Old Dominion Bar Iron. 

Old Dominion Round Edge Steel Tire. 




OLD DOMINION IRON AND NAIL WORKS COMPANY, 

Arxh. 33. Clarke, F'resiclentt, 
RICHMOND, VA. 



DEPARTMENT B-3. 

SHEEP. 
Maj. JOHN M. CRENSHAW, Dikki roit. 

Exhibitors are re(iuired to liave thfir stock rendy in tlie jx-ns f..r the JikJu.'h by 10 
o'clock A. M. the second day of the Fnir. This rule will tie strictly enforci-d. S.'^ 
that your entry tags are properly made out and securely placed in a con^picuoui* 
place on the pens. 

RULES GOVERNIX(} .ILDOES. 

Judges on sheep are expressly instructed that it is their duty, in every cane, to 
require from each exhibitor in lots of pure breeds, satisfactory evidence of purity of 
breeding, as claimed: and Judges, when awarding a preniiuin in any such li>tH. will 
be understood to say by such award that (in their opinion) the anitnals reieivin^ the 
premium are beyond a reasonable doubc, purely bred, as claimed. 

They are further instructed that if they shall have «ood reason to believe that any 
exhibitor, by false entry or otherwise, attempts to deceive the Judges or the public, 
and obtain a premium by misrepresentation, they shall report the fact at once to the 
Superintendent of the Stieep Department, who shall immediately instruct the Judges 
that such exhibitor is henceforth excluded from competition at this Fair. 

All ewes, three years old and over, shall have suckled this season. 

All sheep offered for competition must be aci'ompanied with an athdavit to the 
effect that they have been shorn since April 1, iy!)4, and the tlate of shearing niu»t 
be given. 

Flocks and pens of sheep must be owned by one individual or previoujly existing 
firm. 

LONG WOOLS. 
(To include Lincolns, Leicesters and Cotswolds.) 



278. Ram , 2 years old or over 

279. Ram, 1 year old and under 2 

280. Ram Lamb 

281. Pen of 2 Ewes, 2 years old or over... 

282. Pen of 2 Ewes. 1 year old and under 

283. Pen of 2 Ewe Lambs 



SHROPSHIREDOWNS. 

284. Ram, 2 years old or over 

285. Ram , 1 year old and under 2 

286. Ram Lamb 

287. Pen of 2 Ewes, 2 years old or over 

288. Pen of 2 Ewes. 1 vear old and under 2 

289. Pen of 2 Ewe Laiiibs 



1ST, 


HFJ-ONh. 


a (N) 


« 


2 00 


8 (M) 




I 00 


1 (K) 




50 


r, IK) 




2 00 


3 00 




I flO 


3 00 




1 00 

2 00 

1 .V) 
.VI 



HAMPSHIREDOW.NS. 

(To include all Middle Wools except Jjoulhduwnn.) 



290. Ram, 2 years old or over . 

291. Ram, 1 vear old and under 2 .... 

292. RamLa"mb.. . 

293. Pen of 2 Ewes, 2 years old or over 

294. Pen of 2 Ewes. 1 year old and untler 2. 

295. Pen of 2 Ewe Lambs 



38 



A DVEKTISEMKNTS. 




1838 

18JI4: 



YEARS. 



300 ACRES. 



NEW APPLE, PEAR AND NUT TREES, 



Siarr, the largest early apple; Paragoft, and other valuable sorts. 
Lincoln Corcless^Setieca andjapati Goldefi PnsseiPaars in collections 
at reduced rates. NUTS. — Parry's Giant, Pedigree JMammoth, Para- 
gon and other Chestnuts. Walnuts — P'rench, Persian, Japan, English 
Pecans, Almonds and Filberts. Eleagnus, Longipes, Hardy Oranges, 
Dwarf Rocky Mt. Cherries free from insects, black knots or other diseases. Small 
Fruits, Grape Vines, Currants, Etc. SHADE TREES — Immense stock of Poplars 
and Maples, Ornamental Shrubs and Vines. fi^^IUustrated Descriptive Catalogue Free. 

POMONA NURSERIES. WILLIAM PARRY, Parry, N. J. 



and American. 




GIVEN AWAY 
BARKER'S Comic Picture 
Tor Young and Old. SOUVENIR 

A book containing ahont 150 Coniio pictures, tlio ones that 

have appL'.arrd iu Barker's Alniiin.Tc from Ibu 

be^iuning of its publication. 

TO ANYONE who will send io the address below 

a top label of the great medicine for Animals 
BARKER'S Sorse, Cattle and Poultry 
and an outside wrapper of PO VV DER,, 
BARKER'S Nerve&Bone LINIMENT 

For Rheumatism, Sprains, Bruises, &c. 
or 2 labels of T'O'WIDEI^. or 2 wrappers of 

Ask your DrugBist or Storekeeper for 
BARKER'S "KOMIC" ALMANAC, Full of Fuc, 

The Barker, Moore & Mein 

Medicine Co. Philadelphia, Pa, 

Give your correct P. O. address, and mention 
this slip •when you write. 



I.EE S» GKEEN, 



Boarding, Sale and Exchange Stables.' 




LARGEST AND 

LEADING ESTABLISHMENT 

IN THE CITY. 

Customers have all the advantages that accrue from special 
care and experience iu all dealings. 



WILMINGTON STREET, 



EALEIGH, N. C. 



rUKMIl'M MST. 



:v.i 



DKLAINK MKHINDS. 

(To include National Delaine, Dii k ns.m. MiK( k-Tops, and i.tht-r l.rciHjB of l)c>Uin«> 

Wool S.'iee)' ) 

KIIIST. HKCOND. 

296. Ram, "^ years old or over $ 5 00 f 2 <to 

297. Ram, 1 year old and under 2 3 (K) 1 50 

298. Ram Lamh . 1 oo ,10 

299. Pen of 2 Ewes, 2 years old or over .'> (Ki 2 00 

300. Pen of 2 Ewes. 1 year old and under 2 8 UO 1 W 

301. Pen of 2 Ewe Lambs 2 00 I 00 

SOUTHDOWNS, 

302. Ram, 2 years old or over .1 00 2 00 

303. Ram. 1 year old and under 2 aoo 1 .10 

304. Ram Lamb 1 (Xt .10 

305. Pen of 2 E wes, 2 years old or over ."5 00 2 00 

306. Pen of 2 Ewes, 1 year old and under 2 a (K) 1 .10 

307. Pen of 2 Ewe Lambs 2 00 1 00 

OXFORDDOWNS. 

308. Ram, 2 vears old or over 5 OO 2 00 

309. Ram. 1 year old and under 2 8 00 180 

310. Ram Lamb 100 .W 

311. Pen of 2 Ewes, 2 vears old or over .. . r, «( 2 (K» 

312. Pen of 2 Ewes. 1 vear old and under 2 8(H) 150 

313. Pen of 2 Ewe Lambs 2 00 100 

SWEEPST.^KES— ANY BREED. 

314. Best ram of any age with five of his get - 10 00 

315. Best flock, to consist of 1 ram. 3 ewes over 2 years ol J; 3 ewes 

over 1 and under 2 years old, and 3 ewe lambs to l>e bred 

and owned exclusively by the exhibitor 10 00 5 00 

SOUTHDOWN SPECIAL. 

316. Best two recorded lambs— one r;un and one ewe bred and exhibited by a rwi- 

dent of North Carolina— the first four volumes of the American Southdown 
Record. 
Conditions: That but one premium will be paid the name exhibitor, even though 
these conditions permit an exhiliition at more than one Fair. ... 

1. That the animals competing f.r said premiums shall be recorded in the Amrn- 
can Southdown Record prior to date of entry for tlw extiibitinn. and that th.; ) -r- . 
making the entry furnish the Secretarv of (he American Southdown Hn-ederh 
cia.tion, at the time of entry, a, coi^y ttf HHme. . a , u 

2. That the premiums will be paid on the presentation of cert it1rat.« from th© 

proper officer of the Fair. JNO- ^j- «l'l'' '^' ■ ' '^ 

Secretary American Southdown Bree>terit .■ i 

Spriivi ■•'(*. 



SWINE. 

Swine claiming pure blond must |)roduce a satisfactory pedigree. 
Exhibitors %vill be required to keep the gmund froatinjc. within tm l< 
pens, clear and clean from all garbage. 

CHESTER WHITES. 

(To include all lar^'f v^ »'•" H-^.—l- 



•i uf ill. ir 



317. Boar, 2 years old or over 

318. Boar, 1 year old and under 2 

319. Sow, 2 years old or over 

320. Sow, 1 year old and under 2 -. - 

321. Sow. with litter n .t le-s 'ban -u<king pi.- 



J ou 
2 00 

• («o 



40 ADVEKTI.SEMKXTS. 



?30i'^^''i 



...FOR 

plow ^xanb 

• 9 • 

©VAND-^xG) 

Diamond Soluble Bone 

HAVE BEEN USED BY THE . .^ . . . 

FARMERS OF NORTH CAROLINA FOR 

Cotton, ^ohacco^ IDt^eat anb (£orn, 

AND HAVE ALWAYS GIVEN EXCELLENT 
RESULTS 

THE HIGH QUALITY OF THESE FERTILIZERS 
MAY ALWAYS BE RELIED UPON, AND NO BETTER 
INVESTMENT CAN BE MADE THAN TO PURCHASE' 
THEM. ......... 

NONE BUT THE HIGHEST GRADE MATERIALS ARE USED. 

Walton & Whann Co., 

Wilmington, Del, 



1.1 X»M). 



:i iM 


ii» 


2 OM 


8 00 




1 (N) 


r, (Ni 




•J 00 


:i (M) 




1 00 



i'i;i;MirM i isr, 

SUFFOLK AND VoftK^lUKK IlKKKI'-- 

323. Boar, 2 years old or over 

338. Boar, 1 year old and under 3 . . 

334 Sow, 3 years old or over 

335. Sow, 1 year old and under 2 

330. Sow, with litter not less than G sucking pig.s .. i "" •> •-' 

.JERSEY RED KKEEUS. 

327. Biar, 3 years old or over ."i 00 2 0J» 

338. B jar, 1 "year old and under 2 » 0<l 100 

329. Sow, 3 years old or over 5 00 2 00 

330. Sow, 1 year old and under 2 3 »M» 100 

331. Sow, with litter not less ihan C sucking pig-* 4 00 2 OO 

POLAND CHINA. 

332. Boar, 2 years old or over.. . 'i (H» 2 tM» 

333. Boar, I year old and under 3 3 00 100 

334. Sow, 3 years old and over 5 00 2 00 

335. Sow, 1 year old and under 2 H 00 100 

336. Sow, with litter not less than sucking pigs 4 W 2 (Ml 

BERKSHIRE. 

337. Boar, 2 vears old or over . '* 00 2 00 

338. Boar, 1 year old and under 2 3 (Ml 1 (M) 

339. Sow, 2 years old or over 4 <MI 2 00 

340. Sow, 1 year old and under 2 . 3 "O I 00 

341. Sow, with litter not less than 6 pigs 4 (Ml 2 00 

ESSEX. 

343. Boar, 3 years old or over •"» ("O - '*" 

343. Boar, 1 year old and under 3 - ^ ^ ' WO 

344. Sow, 2 years old or over !i 00 2 00 

345. Sow, 1 vear old and under 2 "^ ^*** ' '•0 

346. Sow, with litter not less than 6 pigs 5 (Ml 2 (JO 

viCT()RL\. 

347. Boar, 2 years old or over •'»•''• ';• J"! 

348. Boar, 1 year old and under 2 8 00 I 00 

349. Sow, 3 years old or over •'' <"* « 00 

350. Sow. 1 year old and under 3 ^"0 "I" 

351. Sow, with litter not less than 6 pigs '"00 • (W 

SWEEPSTAKES ON SWINK. 

353. Best Boar of any age or breed ♦ "* "JJ 

353. Best Sow of any age or breed l""j j'"jV11J 

354. Best herd of 1 Bnar and 3 S>»ws. all to be of one breed, owned and bred ^ ^ 



355. 



by the exhibitor • ■• • 

Best Sow of any breed with of her pigs under 1 year old. owned ann 
bred by the exhibitor 



42 



ADVERTISKMENTS. 









9 









OUR "OPTIMUS" BOOK PRESS. 



EBWARBS & BR0U6HT0N, 

POWDER 

PRINTERS " BINDERS, 



And Blank Book Manufacturers, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 

Having purchased the latest improved presses, and added 
the best machinery to our book bindery, we are prepared to 
publish books in the best style of the art. 




OUR "CRANSTON" BOOK PRESS. 



rU KM MM l.l.M. 



SPECIAL PREMIUMS OFFERED BY AMERICAN BERKSHIRE 

ASSOCIATION. 

The American F3erkshire Association (.llVr tin* following cp.' in pn ■: 
competfd for at the North Carolina Statf' I'.iir of \x\)i, vi/.: 'I'lic tlr- 
second five volumes of the American Ht-rk.-line Association m-CfSHarv loi .., .^ . .n- 
set of the successful competitor and valued at live dullara per volume. 

356. Best breeding pen of Berkshire registered in the American HerkMhire Kemril, to 

consist of a boar and three fows over one year of age, owneil hy a rt-Hidi-nt of 
the State or province in which the Fair is held, the Mrsi tivt- or K.cond live 
volumes of the Berkshire Record, valued at twenty-tive dollarn. 

357. Best breeding pen of Berkshire registered in ilie American Herkwhire Hecord, to 

consist of a boar and three sows under one year of ag«', owneil by a renuli-nt 
of the State or province in which the Fair is held, the first fivt- or Hecond five 
volumes of the Berkshire Record, valued at twenty-five dollara. 

Conditions: 1. That the boars and sows competing for the prizes 8|»«»cifie<l at'ove 
be recorded in the American Berkshire Record prior to the date of entry al the Fair 
and that a list of such entries be sent the Secretary of this Association. 
2. That there shall not be less than two competitors for each of the pri/en. 
8. That no animals competing for the above prizes be allowed to show for Haid pre- 
miums at more than one State or Provincial Fair in 1894. 

For further particulars address CHARLES F. MILI-S, 

Secretary American Berknhire Aumtciation. 
Spriny^lleld , lUinoin. 



FOR FIRST-CLASS 



TANKS, STACKS. TUBES. PIPEING. 

ERIE AND ATLAS ENGINES. '^^t^7^nU^?,'fjV^l%. ""^^^"^^ 

Complete Mill, Engine and Cin Outfits 
at Bottom Prices. 

Don't fail to write us before you buy. Address, 

LOMBARD IRON WORKS AND SUPPLY CO.. 
Al <;i sr\. <; A. 



Lijili III nl/nlUU (X VJUi^ Manufacturers of Shi.glw 

Adams Building, 310 and 312 Wilmington St . 

COTTON 5ELLER5. 

Storage and General 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN >-' v.w <- ^ 

Staple and Fancy Connmi5sion Merchants. 
Groceries. 



44 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

E. D. CA5TLETON, 

WASHINGTON C. H., OHIO, 

BREEDER OF 

Castleton's Celebrated Whaleback Games, 



Sbawlnecks, Heiinies, Aseels, Japs, Spangles, Kentucky 

Blues, Kentucky Dominiques, Irish Grays, Irish 

Black Reds, Claibornes; also 



BULL TERRIER DOGS 



M- 

w 




LARGER, STOUTER, 

. . . FASTER AND BETTER . . . 

THAN EVER. 

.CAM EN ESS GUARANTEED. 

Choice Specimens 

A 5 v^ w w To Select From, 

All Ages, Weights, Colors, Sex and Prices. Breeding Pens, Trios, 
Pairs or Single Specimens. 

. . EGGS, 33.00 For 1 5. . . 

Send Fifty Cents SILVER or POSTAL NOTE for Castleton's 
Enclyclopedia on Poultry and Dogs, their Management, Diseases and 
Cures. Handsomely Illustrated with New Engravings in beautiful 
colors. The Most Complete Book Published on the Subject. You 
need it. Order Now. Descriptive Catalogue and Guide of 36 pages, 
in two colors, ten cents. Price List Free. 

EVERYBODY WRITE. nflfl-R /IT RTIIH SATISFACTION GUARAiyiTEED. 



1 



DOGS AT STUD. 



DEPARTMENT C. 

POULTRY AND PET STOCK. 
W. S. BARNES, DiHKCTou. 



Rule 1. — The new American Standard of Perfection will he ihemiide of th)-.jiidK<><4 
on all varieties on which premiums are (itlered. ;"~"^. 

Rule 2. — All birds compelin^ for jiremiums must he strictly the property of the 
exhibitors. Any attempt to evade this rule in any particular will exclude all npeci- 
mens entered by the olTendins? party from mmpetinK. if discovered in iiaie; if nol, 
all premiums awarded such exhibitors shall be withheld. 

Rule 3. — Cards showing entry number must be attached to each coop, mm noon •(• 
birds are placed in position, and all entries must positively be in proper |)lHce by 10 
o'clock A. M. October 16, 1891, unless uiiav<)idal>ly delayed. In (halcHM« they may 
be admitted at the discretion of the Director of the Poultry Department. 

Entries positively close October 15, 1S<M. 

Rule 4. — All birds to be shown in pairs. 

No breeding-pen prizes. 

The term pair — a male and female. 

The term cock — a male bird hatched prior to October lo. Ibltii. 

The term cockerel — a male bird hatched after Octolx-r 15, isli;{. 

The term hen — a female bird hatched prior to October 15. 1893. 

The term pullet — a female bird hatched after Octol er 15. isjci. 

Rule 5. — Errors in making entries will bar the specimens from competinR unleiw 
corrected by the Secretary before the birds are placed in poeilion. ExhibitorM »tv 
particularly requested to be careful in making original entries correct, and thereby 
save time and trouble. 

Rule 6. — Exhibitors need not accompany their birds. They can be wnt direct to 
W. S. Barnes, Director of Poultry Department. State Fair. All npecimenM will bf 
promptly reshipped to their owners at the close of the exhibition, or diHpoMHl of •• 
they may direct. Express charges on all stock must be jtrcjxtid.i 

Rule 7. — Exhibitors who wish to enter fowls for competition and|/or «a/«? also, can 
do so by sending tags written very plainly as follvirs: 

For Sale. 



Variety , Age 

Price 

Apply to Director Poultry Department. 

Above tags to he given to Secretary at same time when entry i.ix- "■•• o- *»■ pU. .tl 
on coops, so that the corresponding number can be placed on the Fur SaU («k- 
thereby saving confusion. 

Rule S.— Adams and Southern Expre.ss Companies will return free of charg* all 
exhibits on which full rates have been paid to Kuleigh, N. C.. provided ili.-y an. 
accompanied by a card from the Secretary of Fair to the effect ihal owner«liip ha* 
not changed. .. • , . • 

Direct all coops in care of the Director of Poultry IVparlment, hair (irounda. 

Raleigh, N. C. 

Notes.— All Standard breeds, not enumerated in followinj; li«t «.ii »- .«.. i..| 
premiums same as others. Wheat, oats and corn chop for f.-. •! fun 
exhibitors. All exhibition coops will be removed from form.-r I. « ^ i 

inside the building thereby insuring the safety and health of the fo»»U a...l •"»♦•»• 
pleasant place for visitors to examine them in c«iw of bad weather. Kxhibltora 
wishing to furnish their own show coops can do so. 



40 ADVERTISEMKNTS. 

C. C. C. 

Catch on to the Centennial Cotton 

Presses, Ginning' Outfits, Water Wheels, Saw Mills, Shafting. Belting, 
Gearing, Engines and Boilers, and all FARM Jlachinerv Supplies. 

MECKLENBURG IRON WORKS, 

CHARLOTTE, N. C. 

THE POULTRY CHUM. 

THE POULTRY CHUM, now in its eleventh volume, is a wide-awake 
monthly, devoted exclusively to the interest of those raising poultry for 
profit and pleasure. It is published by a practical breeder of twe7ity-five 
years' experience in making poultry pay. 

IT GIVES THE BEST METHODS 

of mating for breeding, hatching and rearing, feeding and management of 
poultry for eggs and for Market, for profit and for the showroom. It is 
filled with the experience of those making the business a success. 

IT TELLS HOW TO BUILD POULTRY HOUSES, 
HOW TO CURE DISEASES, 
HOW TO PRESERVE EGGS, 

And has special articles on all breeds. 
As an AdvertishKj Metliuin The Poultry Chum has no superior. 
Even the Sample Copy which can be obtained by addressing The Poultry Chum, 
DeKalb, 111., will be worth a year's subscription to you. Subscription price 25 cents 
per year. HAXDSOMEL Y ILL USTRA TED. 

F. M. MUNGER, Editor and Publisher, DeKalb, III. 
. . . FOR . . . 

ICE AND COAL 

Of all kinds, both for Domestic Use and Steam, 
Grain, Hay, Mill-Feed, Laths, Shingles, etc., 
Write to 

JONES & POWELL, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



rUKMllM LIST. 



J 7 



358. Barred Plymoutli Rock cdck . 

859. Barred Plymouth Rock hen 

300. Barred Plymouth Rock cockerel 

361. Barred Plymouth Rock pullet 

362. White Plymouth Rock co.-k 

363. White Plymouth Rock hen 

364. White Plymouth Rock cockerel 

365. White Plymouth Rock pullet 

366. Silver or Golden Wyandotte cock 

367. Silver or Golden Wyandotte hen 

368. Silver or Golden Wyandotte cockerel 

369. Silver or Golden Wyandotte pullet 

370. White Wyandotte cock 

371. White Wyandotte hen 

372. White Wyandotte cockerel 

373. White Wyandotte pullet 

374. Black or White Cochin cock 

375. Black or White Cochin hen 

376. Black or White Cochin cockerel 

377. Black or White Cochin pullet 

378. Bulf or Partridge Cochin cock . 

379. Butf or Partridge Cochin hen 

380. Butf or Partridge Cochin cockerel 

381. BuiT or Partridge Cochin pullet 

382. Light or Dark Brahma cock 

383. Light or Dark Bralima hen 

384. Light or Dark Brahma cdckerel 

385. Light or Dark Brahma pullet ... 

386. Black Langshan cock 

387. Black Langshan hen 

388. Black Langshan cockerel 

389. Black Langshan pullet 

390. White- face Black Spanish cock 

391. White- face Black Spanish hen 

392. White-face Black Spanish cockerel . 

393. White-face Black Spanish pullet 

394. Rose or Single-comb Brown Leghorn cock 

395. Rose or Single-comb Brown L'-ghorn hen 

396. Rose or Single-comb Brown Leghorn cockerel .. 

397. Rose or Single-comb lirovvn Leghorn jiullet 

398. Rose or Single- comb Black Leghorn cock 

399. Rose or Single-comb Brown Leghorn hen 

400. Rose or Single-comb Black Leghorn cockerel . 

401. Rose or Single comb Black Leghorn pullet . 

402. Rose or Single-comb Butf or White Leghorn cock 

403. Rose or Single-comb Buff or White Leghorn hen 

404. Rose or Single-comb Buff or White Leghorn 

cockGrd .... .....-- -- ..... 

405. Rose or Single-comb Buff or White Leghorn pullet 

406. White or Black Minorca cock 

407. White or Black Minorca hen 

408. White or Black Minorca cockerel 

409. White or Black Mmnrca pullet 

410. W. C. B. or W\ C. W. Polish cock 

411. W. C. B. or W. C. W. Polish hen 

412. W. C. B. or W. C. W. Polish co.-kerel ... 

413. W. C. B. or W. C. W. Puli-^h pullet - 

414. Silver or Golden Spangled IlHmburg cock 

415. Silver or Golden Spangled Himhurg hen . ... . 

416. Silver or Gold'-n Spangled Hamburg cockerel . 

417. Silver or Golden Spangled Hamburg pullet 

418. Houdan cock 

419. Houdan hen 



KIKST. 



01) 
(N) 
00 
(ID 
III) 
III) 
01) 
IK) 
DO 
III) 
III) 
DO 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
00 
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00 
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00 
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00 
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00 
00 
00 

00 
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00 
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no 



00 
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Dl) 
(M) 
DO 



SKCOMD. 

.V).5 

500 

.'tDi- 

Mic 

r>Dc 
:)Di>. 

Mc 
.')D,; 
50c 
50c 
50c, 
50c 
.51 )c 
50c 
5Dc 
.50c 
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.50c 
50c 
.51)0 
.51)0 
50c 
50c 
.500 
5()j 
50c 
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.500 
50i- 
5Dc 
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.50c 
50c 
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5Dc 

.5Dc 
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500 
.500 



THIKU. 

Whitf Itil.lMNi 

While KitiU.ii 

While KihlNin 

Whit-< KibtMiu 

White HililH.ti 

White KititMin 

White KDiImiii 

Wlilte HiIiImiIi 

White Uilihoii 

White Kihttoii 

While HdilMtn 

While Kit>lH>M 

White |{|l))M.tl 

While KiI.Imiii 

White Kil))Min 

While |{ihtN)n 

White KihlMin 

While RiIiIh.m 

While Ki)>)Kin 

While IMiImim 

While Kil.lM)n 

White Ki)))m>ii 

White Rihtxm 

While HihlM.ii 

While Kd.lx.n 

While Hihlw.n 

Willie Klh»..n 

While Uii.lHin 

While Kih)H>ii 

While HihlM.n 

White UdilMin 

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While |{ih)M>ii 

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White l<i)>)Min 

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White Hi)>)->ii 

While KililMtii 

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While |{|»i»N.M 

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White 
White 



Kih(M>n 
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.VK- 
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While KihU'ti 

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Wh •• 

White • 

Whin- ! 

Wi. 

\S -1 

Wi....- ,. II 

Whit* Kii.N.n 



48 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



LPOULTRYILArS LIBRARY. 

THE FANCIERS' REVIEW AND SEVERAL 

POULTRY BOOKS CONSTITUTE IT 

THE FANCIERS' REVIEW 

Is too well known to need description. Its i6 large pages are replete with 
pract.calmformation for poultrymen. It has Pigeon nnd Kennel Departnients 
Its circulation (averaging 7,000 per month) ma\es it a deSle a^dveSt 
medium. Write for rates. The subscription price of the STlS^vtsOpZl 
for one year, 75 Cents for two years: 5/.00 for^three years, fn advance Three 
sample numbers are .sent for JO Cents. auvance. inrte 

500 QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. 

This is Me- popular poultry book of the day. It is written in the form of questions 
and answers, and contains the following chapters: Chapter I-Feed and Care 
Chapter II— Diseases. Chapter III— f>^s Chanter TV T,,o,,Kor r>u 

ter V-Buildings. Chapter\a-MisceTlaneoSs'(?u:H^^^^ 

keys Ducks and Geese. P. H. Jacobs, editor of the " Poultry Keeper " ha^ 
revised the last edition. Price, 25 Cents. uuiLr> I'^eeper, lias. 

LOW-COST POULTRY HOUSES. 

lostitTrliTral ''totnT\?"''"'' fi^""' ""^ specifications for poultry houses- 
costing rom 1:25 to ^loo. It is needless to say that this is iust the honk fr^r 
the poultryman who contemplates building a^oultrv housi Tr re^arran^i^.^ 
25 Cents ^^'' P^"" ""'' ^^^^'^">' "^^^^^ f°^ ^^"^ l^ook. Get a copyTpl^Tce^ 

PIGEON QUERIES. 

A book of great practical value to everyone interested in pi<.eons-the amiteur 
[r''clio?f fun ' ^^f i'f " ";^"^" in the form of questiSnf and answer and 
Price 25 Cen^s! ^'^fo'-^^^tion on breeding, care and diseases of pigeons. 

fi@^We also issue a little book for the man who keen"? 3 rnw Car,.i <- 1^ 

vfr?.n. ^ ^ T^ ''''' questions and answers compiled from the Question Box of 

various Farmers' Institutes. It has the following chapters- Chapter I-Catt1e 

III-mran'^L'Sr^C^ant ^V^^c^^ H-Feeding and' Fo" d ""iTol. ' c£ ^^l:^ 
^^LJ^f^^^ ji"d But eu Chapter I V-Cheese-makiug. Price, 25 Cents. ^ 

P^ We also publish a 16-page dairy journal, "The Practical Dairyman- " sub' 
cr ption price, 50 cents a year. Three sample numbers, 10 cen'ts "you m^Rht Hke 



o^^;;X'a^^e'^:^^SSt:^^^^^^^ year ana any 

FIRST-CLASS PRINTING FOR POULTRYMEN. 

SEND FOR SAMPLES. 



Address, cj-j^^ Fauciers Review, Chatham, N. K 



I'KKMIIM LIST. 



420. Houdan cockerel 



KIRST. 

1 (1(1 



421. Houdan pullet 1 (h) 

422. Dorking, any color, cock 1 (X) 

42;5. Dorkitig, any color, hen 1 

424. Dorking, any color, cockerel 1 

425. Dorking, any color, pullet 1 



426. 
427. 
42S. 
429. 
480. 
431. 
432. 
433. 
434. 
435. 
436. 
437. 
438. 
439. 
440. 
441. 
442. 
443. 
444. 
445. 
446. 
447. 
448. 
449. 
450. 
451. 
452. 
453. 
454. 
455. 
456. 
457. 
458. 
459. 
460. 
461. 
462. 
463. 
464. 
465. 
466. 
467. 
468. 
469. 
470. 
471. 
472. 
473. 
474. 
475. 
476. 
477. 
478. 
479. 
480. 



m 

00 
00 
0<) 

EXHIBITION GAMES .\NI) H.VNTAMS. 

Black or brown-breasted game cock 1 00 

Black or brown breasted game hen 1 00 

Black or brown-breasted game cockerel 1 00 

Black or brown-breasted game pullet 1 00 

Silver or golden duck- wing cock 1 00 

Silver or golden ducU-wing hen 1 00 

Silver or golden duck-wing cockerel 1 00 

Silver or golden duck wing pullet 1 00 

Red pile cock 1 00 

Red pile hen 1 00 

Red pile cockerel 1 OC 

Red pile pullet 1 00 

Indian game cock 1 00 

Indian game hen 1 00 

Indian game cockerel 1 00 

Indian game pullet 1 00 

Black or brown-breasted red bantam cock 1 00 

Black or brown-breasted red bantam hen 1 00 

Black or brown-breasted red bantam cockerel.. . 1 00 

Black or brown-breat'ted red bantam pullet 1 00 

Silver or golden duck-wing bantam cock 1 (M) 

Silver or golden duck-wing bantam hen 1 00 

Silver or golden duck-wing bantam cockerel 1 00 

Silver or golden duck- wing bantam pullet 1 Ofl 

Red pile bantam cock 1 00 

Red pile bantam hen 1 00 

Red pile bantam cockerel 1 00 

Red pile bantam pullet .. 1 00 

Golden and silver Seabright bantam cock . 1 0(» 

Golden and silver Seabright bantam hen 1 00 

Golden and silver Seabright bantam cockerel ... 1 00 

Golden and silver Seabright bantam pullet 1 0<) 

Butf or black Cochin bantam cock 1 0(» 

Buff or black Cochin bantam hen 1 00 

Buff or black Cochin bantam cockerel 1 00 

Buff or black Cochin bantam pullet 1 00 

Black-tail Japanese bantam cock 1 00 

Black-tail Japanese bantam hen 1 OO 

Black tail Japanese bantam cockerel 1 00 

Black-tail Jakanese bantam pullet 1 00 

Rose-comb black or white bantam cock 1 00 

Rose comb black or white bantam hen 1 00 

Rose-comb black or while bantam cockerel 1 00 

Rose-comb black or white bantam pullet 1 00 

Bronze turkeys, pair.. 1 *^ 

White turkeys, pair 1^*0 

Colored Muscovy ducks, pair 1 W 

White Muscovy ducks, pair 1 W> 

Pekin ducks, pair 1 "^ 

Toulouse geese, pair ^ ^ 

White guineas, pair ^ ^ 

White China geese, pair * ** 

African geese, pair * "" 

Best and largest display poultry 

Highest scoring fowl in show 

4 



SKCoNl). 

.'»()o 
50(: 
.Vic 

50c 



.Vtc 
."iOc 
.50c 
ftOc 
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.50c 
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.50c 
50c 
.50c 
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.50c 
50c 
.50c 
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.50c 
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.50c 
.50c 
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.50c 
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.54k- 
.50c 
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TIIIKli. 

Whitv Ribbon 

Whitf l{il>lMin 

While HiI.Ihiii 

Whiti- kil.l>.iii 

Wliit*- |{il,tM>ii 

While UibUiii 

Wliite HiMh.ii 
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White li'il.l,..!! 
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White kilifon 
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Wh"- "•■'■'-.M 
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kiM'on 
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kii.iH.ii 

inhU.ii 



50 ADVERTISEMENTS. 



F. E. HEGE & CO., 
I UO^S, Salem. N. C. 



I Poultry And 



Pets of all kinds. 

• • e 

ENCOURAGE... 

Home Enterprises, 

AND WHEN IN NEED OF STOCK IN OUR 
LINE, REMEMBER US, 



Nothing Preventing .... 

YOU WILL SEE OUR DISPLAY AT THE 
COMING STATE FAIR, 1894. 

BE SURE YOU SEE IT. You will be repaid 
for your trouble. 

e • o 

Catalogue for a Stamp. 

Frank E. Hege & Co., 

\ Salem, N. C. |J 



IMiKMllM I.IM. 

I'ET STOCK. 

FIRST. sKCOM>. TIIIHK 

481. Best Angora rabbit riOo "J.V- Whiu. I; 

482. Best Himalayan rabbit ftOc 'J'»c WliMe 1; 

483. Best English rabbit SOc "J.'jo Whin* I: 

484. Best German hare nOc tj.'ic \Viiit4< i. 

485. Best lop-ear rabbit SOc v'.'n- Whiit* l(ii.i...ii 

486. Best pair Guinea pigs r»(ic LTn- Wlnti* UihUtti 

487. Best Ferrit. ftOc a-'ic \Vhit«« Kib»H.n 

488. Best Maltese cat 5()j aSc While KibtHin 

489. Best display pet stock I>i|i|iiiiim 

DOGS. 

490. Best St. Bprnard * 3 00 

491. Best mastiff 8 00 

492. Best setter 8 00 

493. Best pointer «««) 

494. Best poodle I 00 

495. Best beagle I 00 

49(5. Best Scotch terrier 1 00 

497. Bestpug 1 00 

498. Best bull dog 2 00 

499. Best bull terrier 1 W 

[Exhibitors of Dogs muat feed and care for same themselves. Comfortable kIrIIh 
will be furnished for them outside the building. Dogs may be removed ui nnjht. 
hut must be returned each morning not later than 9 o'clock, until the clmie of th« 

Fair.] 



SPECIAL PREMIUWIS. 

FOR POULTRY AND PET STOCK DEPARTMENT. 



Through the liberal courtesy of friend.s. the Society has the plea.xur.- of annnunrinn 

and offering the following special premiums. 

By Oeorge M. Downs, Atlanta, Qu. 

500. Best Buff Cochin cock. One yearly subscription to Sonthi-rn Fancier. 

501. B^st Langshan cock. One yearly subscription to Southern tannrr. 

502. Best While Cochin cock. One yearly subscription lo Snutht-ru hanricr 

503. Best B. P. Rock cock. One yearly subscription to Sontlit-rn hi'. 

504. Best B. P. Rock hen. One yearly euo^ctiption to Snuthrru t.t 

505. Best display fowls. One yearly subscription lo Southern l-umi . 

By H. S. Babcock, Proridewe, R. I. 

506. Best Argonaut cock. One copy Argonaut. 

507. Best Argonaut cockerel. One copy Argonaut. 

508. Best Argonaut hen. One copy Argonaut. 

509. Best Argonaut pullet. One copy -lryo;tu«/. 

510. Best Pea-comb B. P. Rock cock. One ropy Argonaut. 

511. Best Pea-comb B. P. Rock cockerel. One copy Argnnaut 

512. Best Pea-comlj B P. Rock hen. One copy Argonaut 

513. Best Pea-comb B. P. Rock pullet. One copv Argonaut. 

514. Best Light Brahma cock. One copy Argonaut. 

515. Best Light Brahma cockerel. One copy Aryunaut. 



52 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



J. C. S. LUMSDEN, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

Tinware, Stoves, Sheet Iron, Copper-ware. 

TOBACCO FLUES A SPECIALTY. 

Hardware and House-furnishing Goods, 

STONEWARE, WOODENWARE. WILLOWWARE, 
IRON HOLLOWWARE. 

OLD NORTH STATE COOK STOVE, 

First Premium at FIVE Successive State Fairs, 



226 Fayetleyille Street, 



Ouposiie Market House, 




THE NORTH CAROLINA 

CAR COMPANY, 

MANUFACTURERS OF ;^^= RALEIGH, N. C^ 

SASH, DOORS AND BLINDS 

AND ALL KINDS OF BUILDERS' MATERIAL. 

I^^By carrying a large stock of Lumber, and having an equip- 
ment of the best improved machinery, we are prepared to Fill Orders 
Promptly. We are also prepared to ship houses, machine-framed, 
ready for erection. Correspondence solicited. 
Address 

THE NORTH CAROLINA CAR CO., 

JtAl^EIGH, N. C. 



ESTABLISHED 1858. 



H. MAHLER 



RALEIGH, N. C) 



Watches, Jewelry, Diamonds, 



sterling Silver and Silver-plated Wares, 



Clocks, Bronzes and Novelties. 



A SPECIAT^TY 



Wedding and Engagement Rings Made to Order in any Style or Design. 
For obtaining correct size for ring, send for Patent Ring Card. 

WATCHES AND JEWELRY PROMPTLY and CAREFULLY REPAIRED. 



PRKMIUM LIST. 53 

By B. A. Fox, Richmond, Vu. 

516. For highest sc.orin<!,- sintjh'-cntuh Brown LfRhorn co<-k ov.t 91 poinlN. One 

S. C. B. I.eKhoni cocktMvl, vahie jf^.O!). 

517. For highest scoring single coinh Brown Leghorn hen over »:» poinlM. Onr S. C. 

B. Legliorn pullet, value s.'j.OO 

518. For highest scoring single-i-oinh Brown Leghorn cock over IM pt)int»t. ()n«« pmr 

S. C. B. Letrhorns, value $!."). 00. 

519. For largest exhibitor of Brown Leghorns. 0:ie setting of eg>jM from l»eHt jM-n. 

By H. A. Bridge, Columbus, Ohio. 

520. For exhibitor showing four best B. P. Rock cockerels. One li. P. Rock cockerel. 

value !j;10 00. 

521. For exhibitor showing four best B. P. Rock pullets OneB P. K >rk cockerrl. 

value $5.00. 

By J. y. Bicktit'll, Buffalo, New York. 

522. For best pair Black Minorcas. One trio Black Minorcas, value f.'o (mi 

By Thomas J. Davis, Charlotte, N. C. 

523. Best trio Indian Games ^3 00 

524. Btst trio Dark Biahmas 2 00 

By H. A. Kiihu.s, Atlanta, Ou. 

525. For third prize White Plymouth Rock cockerel, one egg record. 

526. For third prize White Plymouth Rock pullet, one egg reconl. 

527. For third prize Barred Plymouth Rock cockerel, one egg record. 

528. For third prize Barred Plymouth Rock jjullet, one egu record. 

529. For third prize Golden Wyandotte coc^kerel, one egg record. 

530. For third prize Golden W^yandotte pullet, one egg record. 

By Ferris Publishing Co., Albany. N. Y. 

531. Best Indian Game cock. One subscription to Poultry Monthly. 

532. Best Bronze Turkev Tom. One subscription to Poultry Monthly 

533. Best exhibit of poultry. One subscription to Poultry Monthly 

534. Highest scoring bird in show. Oae subscription to Poultry Monthly. 

By Georfje E. Peer, Rochester. N. Y. 

535. For best BL C. cockerel hatched from eggs bought of him .luring 1"*9I. On* 

Buff Cochin cockerel, value §10.00. 

By J. B. Gadsden, Summer r Hie, S. C. 

536. Best Indian Gamecock * j |* 

537. Best Indian Gdme cockerel |^ 

538. Best Indian Game hen } ^ 

589. Best Indian G^me pullet - ••-- j *" 

540. Four highest scoring Indian Games owned by one exhibitor 

By J. E. Warner, 19 Par A- Place, New York. 

541. For best displav in Mediterranean class. One subscription U. hmltrp. Pi^frow 

and Lire Stock. ... n u r.- — .# 

542. For best display in American class. One subscription to Poultry. I tgtonM ana 

Lire Stock. 

By W. D. I Jar rill <V- Co., Ellenltoro, N. (' 
543 Best Black Minorca cockerel. One American I)omini.|UP luilj.i. 

544. Best trio H. C. B Leghorns. One S S. Hamburg c'|rk».r.-l. 

545. Best trio White Wyandottes. One B. Langshan pullet. 

By Sharp Butterjield. \Vindsor, Ontario. 

546. For six highest scoring birds owned by one exhibitor. One piir Llicht Hrahm*.. 



54 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

Reasons 

For Using 

Dobbins' Electric Soap. 

Best 

From a sanitar}^ point of view, because of its Absolute Purity. 

Unscented, 

Because nothing is used in its manufacture that must be 
Hidden or Disguised. 

Cheapest 

To use, because Harder than ordinary soap, does not WASTE 
away and because it is not filled with Rosin and Clay as 
make-weights. 

No Boiling of Clothes Needed, 

Because being Absolutely Pure, can do its own work. 

Leaves Clothes Washed 

With it Whiter and Sweeter than any other soap, because 
it contains no Adulteration to yellow them. 

Washes Flannels 

Without Shrinking, bringing them out Soft, White and 
Fleecy, because it is free from Rosin which hardens, yellows 
and mats together all woolen fibres, making them Harsh 
and Coarse. 

It will not Injure 

The Finest Lace or the most Delicate Fabric, because 
all the ingredients used in its manufacture are Harmless. 

Millions of Women 

Use it because they have found it to be the Best, most Economical 
aud absolutely unchanging in quality. 

Hgg^'To anyone mailing us 12 wrappers taken from the soap, we 
will send either of the following panel pictures: "Les Intimes," 
"Two Sisters," "May Day," "Heartsease." 



"We ^visfl to Caution the public against a lot of swindlers who go from door to door sell- 
ing what they claim is Dobbins' Electric Soap. It is a fraud. Dobbins' Soaps are never so\A in this 
way, nor have we any connection or consolidation with an3' other soap house, as they represent. 
$25 REWARD will be paid for the arrest and conviction of each man thus engaged in swindling 
the public. 

>eQr'Dobblii8' Electric Soap Is sold by all Grocers. Riever by Petldlers from door to 
door.'&tt 



rUKMIlM llsl. 

By E. B. Harrington d- Co., KanmH City, Mo. 

Best pair P.. P. Rocks. On<^ siihsoriptinn to .Vi''//nn</ /'ow/'r ' ,/ 

Bn-st pair B. L»ni?shans. One suhscripliMn t<i Mi<tliiiiil I'l ,ml 

Best pair Light Brahman. One sul>ncripti(in to .l/jf//(;//</ / , •■,,,,• 

Best pair Colored Dorkings. One subscription to Miilldml I'mtitry J 
Best pair Indian Games. One subscription to Midlumt I'oxdlry ,lu\n 

By C. E. Richards, Cedar Rapids, lotrit. 

552. B?st BufF Cochin Bantam pnllet. One subscription to Wentt-rn /'o/f/rv ./..nriKi/. 

558. Best Dark Brahma cock. One subscription to M'rstirti I'oidlry .liniriinl. 

55-t. Best Bronze Turkey Tom. One subscription to \\',st^rn Piiultr/i Jonrmil. 

555. Best display of poultry. One subscription to U'( .s7fr« Poultry .foiirnal. 

556. Highest scoring bird in show. One subscription to W'enti m I'oiiltry ./tturnu! 

By American Stockkeeper, Boston, Mass. 

557. Best display fowls by lady. One subscription to American Stnrkktr]n'r. 

558. Best display pigeons. One subscription to American Stockkeijicr. 

By Mrs. E. S. Avis, New Fort Bliss, Texas. 

559. Highest scoring Indian Game in show. One Mexican basket. 

By Joseph E. Pogue, Raleigh, N. C. 

560. For finest display fowls and pet stock. One caddy Pogue'a Premium Plug 

Tobacco. 

By Fanciers' Rerieni, Chatham. A'. V. 

561. For exhibitor winning most first premiums. One subscription to Fanciert 

Review. 

562. For heaviest Brahma cock, any variety. One copy of book. " 5tK) t^uestiona and 

Answers." 

563. For largest exhibit of Fans. One copy " Pigeon yuerie.s." 

56-1 For most second premiums taken by lady. One subscription to Faneiern lifvittc.^ 

565. For heaviest Cochin cock, any variety. One copy '• L jw Coot Poultry Iloutw-H."' 

By A. E. Share, Bay St. Louis, J/w.-*. 

566. Best display B. P. Rocks. One B. P. Rock cockerel. 

567. Best display Light Brahmas. Oae Light Brahma ccH-kerel. 

568. Best display S. C. B. Leghorns. One S. C. B. Leghorn cockeral. 

By Captain George IF. Means, Concord, A'. C. 

569. Best Pit Game cock in show $5.00. Also one of Means* Red Cuban tJame hena 

to match him. forwarded to winner free of cost. 

By F. M. Mnnger, DeKalb, Illinois. 

570. Best B. P. R. cock. One subscription to Poultry Chum. 

571. Best B. P. R. cockerel. O.ie subscription to Poultry Chum. 

572. Best B. P. R. hen. One subscription to Poiillri/ Chim,. 

573. Best B P. R. pullet. One subscription to Puultrp Chum. 

574 Best pair Laced Wyandottes. One subscription to Pmdtry Chum. 

575. Best pair 8 C. B. Leghorns. One sulwcription to Pnnltrt, chum. 

576. Best pair S. C. W. Leghorns. One subscription to / "»«. 

577. Best pair White Wvandottes. One subscription to / ■-• 

578. Best pair Bronze Turkeys. One subscription to !'<"*'•■ :> • 

579. Best pair White P. R )ck8. One sub.scription to Poultry thiim. 



im. 



By F. E. Hege tt Co., Salem, A'. C. 
580. Best Light B'-ahma hen. One Indian game cf>ck.Tel. 
581 " ' ' '^~~ '-•-'— ' 

582 



Best Licrht Wyandotte cockerel One Indinn «»«"•* '• •rWjTel. 
Best Indian gkme puHK. One .S. C. B. L-ghorn cmker. I. 



583". Buff Cochin pullet. One Buff Cochin cockerel. 



584. 



Highest scoring bird in show. One Buff Lochm ccK-kerel. 



5() ADVEHTISEMENTiS. 

Durham 
Fertilizer 
Company. 

Maautaetmes HIGH GRADE 

AMMONIATBD 
FERTILIZERS, 
ACID PHOSPHATES. 

Importers and Dealers in 

KAINITS, 
NITRATE SODA, 

And all kinds Fertilizing Materials. 

We Guarantee all goods bearing our name pure and free from 
shoddy materials. 

Being among the largest manufacturers of Ammoniated Guai^o 
in this country, we are always prepared to name close prices. 

Write for prices and testimonials. 

We ship goods from Durham and Wilmington, N. C. , Richmond 
and Portsmouth, Va. ; consequently can secure lowest freight rates. 

Please address 

DURHflIVS FEHTIlilZER CO|VIPANY, 



I'KKMllM I IM. 

By C. \V. Costellow, Waterl>ora, Maiue 

JSd. For best exhibit of fowls over Bintam weighr. One (lo/.,-i, , ;,^t.•,i..w ,. i..,t.-ni 
egg boxes. 

586. For be^t exhibit of Bantams. One dozen Cawtellow's patent f^/ \„,\,-' 

By E. D. Castli'tun. Washinyton C. If.. Uhin. 

587. For exhibitor showing largest niunher of pir (J.inies. One trio of CMileton'« 

VVhaleback ganiea. 

588. For exhibitor showing largest nunibir of stniiiis of pit (Janiei. One fi'mnli* 

bull-terrier pup. 

By Poultry Topics Pitbli.'ihing Co., Warsair, Mo. 

589. Best display pet stock. One subscription to Poultry Topirs. 

590. Best display fowls. One subscription to /*(>»//>// lOjiicn. 

591. Best Game Bantam cockerel. One subscription lo Pnu In/ Topics. 
593. Best Game Bantam puller. One sub^icripiion to Poultry 'htpn-s. 

593. Heaviest bird in show. One subscription to Poultry iojiicM. 

By Jos. L. Hahn, New Berne, A', i'. 
(Proprietor Oceola Poultry Yaid-i. ) 

594. Highest scoring cock (other than game) not taking otlier pri/,^ il 

595. Highest scoring hen (other than game) not takmg oih^r prt/.n . .'h» 

596. Highest scoring cockerel (otlier than gani") not laking other priz' ... .*»0 

597. Highest scoring pullet (other than g-tme) nut taking other prize 50 

598. Highest scoring trio Bantams in show 1 00 

By W. H. Bray, New Berue. N. ('. 
(Green Place Poultry Yard?.) 

599. Best S. C. B. Leghorn cockerel. One S. C. B. L'-ghorn cockerel. 

600. Best B P. Rock cockprel. One B. P. Rick cockerel. 

601. Best W. P. Rock cockerel. One W. P. Rock cnck-rel. 

602. Bests. L. Wyandotte cockerel. One S. L. Wyandotte cockerel. 

603. Best White Wyandotte cockerel. One White Wyandotte r<K-ken-l. 

604. Best Black Langshan cockerel. 0»e Black LaDg-^ban c.K-kerel 

605. Best Bnff Cochin cockerel. One Butf Cochin cockerel. 

606. Best White Cochin cockerel. One White t'ocliin cockerel. 

607. Best Partridge Cochin cockerel. One Partrilge C.icliin cockerel. 

[Birds competing for above prizes must be tired and oivneil by exhibttoni. The 
prizes are bred from pens scoring from \ii to 96 points.] 

By J. P. Kerr. Haw River. N. C. 
(Riverside Farm.^ 

608. Best Bronze Tom. One S. C White Leghorn cckerel. 

609. Best exhibit of f<twl8. One Light Brahma cockerel. 

610. Best B. P. Rock cockerel. One B. P. Rock cockerel. 

By E. E. Poag, Rock Hill, S. C. 

611. Best St. Bernard dog over 12 months old. Silver Medal. 

By " A Frietul." 



1 00 

1 no 



612. For best St. Bernard dog over 12 months of age 

613. Best Scotch Terrier dog in show 

614. Best Poodle dog in show * TZ 

615. Best Pointer dog in show j ,,, 

616. Best Pug dog in show 



58 



A DVEKTISKMENTS. 



BRIGGS BUILDING AND MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. 



MANIFACTURERS OK 



M], Doors, 



Hoygli ami Dressed Liioib 



, IMIiilgS, 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION No. 30. P. 0. BOX No. 96. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




EDWARD FASN^CH, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Sterling 
Silver-ware, 

15-KARAT PLAIN GOLD RINGS. 



File Jewelrj, 



Repairs carefully attended to. 

OPTICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Artificial Eyes Inserted. 



A. WILLIAIVIS & CO., 



RALEIGH, N. C, 



PUBLISHERS ™ 
BOOKSELLERS 



Keep the Largest 
Stock of Books 
and Stationery 
in the South, 



ALL STANDARD AUTHORS, POEMS, SCHOOL BOOI^S, 

SUNDAY-SCHOOL BOOKS, LAW BOOKS, 

BL.ANK BOOKS, 

And everything nsnal/y kept in a first-class hook-store, ahvays in stock. 



....CATALOGUE SENT ON APPLICATION. 

....ANY BOOK IN PRINT FURNISHED AT SHORT NOTICE. 



PKKMllM I i>r. ,,j 

SPECIAL GAME FOWL PREIVliUIVIS. 

A special Gime Fowl exhibit, with Hpccial jin-iniuins, will Iw Iii*|(| iiri.tcr th<* 
auspices of the Wake County tianie Fowl Association, ihn prtMnitiuiH Up 
teed by same, subject to the rules and reu;ulaiion8 of the N. C. A^;rll•ultlll 

Competition is opeu to the world. 

Exhibitors for " Largest and Best" exhibit in ild.s class will Ix' rf(|uired, iit tiiii»» 
of making entry, to Hie an affidavit — sworn to before Notary Public or Clerk of th« 
Court of county in which they reside, that all the fowls exhibited by iheiii are their 
own property. 

An entry fee of |5.00 will he charged for the " Largest and Fiest" exhibit. 

Fowls will be shown in pens — a pen being a ct)ck and iwo hens. 

White Pyle, or other breeil of W'liitcs. 

617. Best cock and two hens $ •> »"' 

618. Best stag and two pullets... 2 .V) 

Shawl Neck, or other breed of Light Redx. 

619. Best cock and two hens --- <H (K) 

620. Best stag and two pullets '-' -V* 

Peach Bloom, or other breed of Speckle. 

621. Best cock and two hens '' "*^ 

622. Best stag and two pullets ■-'.'»<) 

Red Quill, or other breed of Brotcn Red. 

623. Best cock and two hens -^ ^' 

624. Best stag and two pullets ■' '*" 

War Horse, or other breed of Black Red. 

625. Best cock and two hens ^ |*J 

626. Best stag and two pullets 2 M 

Murtishaic Blue, or other breed of Blue. 

627. Best cock and two hens ;J "JJ 

628. Best stag and two pullets '" ^ 

Chappell Dominique, or other breed of Dominiijue. 

629. Best cock and two hens ;,' 'J|' 

630. Best stag and two pullets 

Jenkins' Oray. or any other breed of Gray 

631. Best cock and two hens 

632. Best stag and two pullets 

''Shenandoah," or other Muff. 

633. Best cock and two hens 

634. Best stag and two pullets 

Hennies. 

a w 

635. Best cock and two hens n W 

636. Best stag and two pullets 

Miscellaneoii^ 

637. Best "Shakebag" cock, not le.-^s than seven pound- 

638. Best pure white cock and two hens 

639. Best puie wnite stag and two pullets 

640. Largest and best exhibit of game fuw ^ 



60 



ADVEKTISEMKNTfS. 



Richmond 
Nurseries. 



500 Acres in Nursery Stock. 
100 Acres in Orchards. 
100 Acres in Small Fruits. 



FRANKLIN DAVIS NURSERY CO. 

We offer to our customers an immense stock of 

Apples, Peaches, Cherries, Apricots, Grapes, etc., 

Also, the New Varieties of All the Slandard Sorts. 

Fruits, Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Roses, etc. 

Wholesale and Retail. To dealers we can offer stock on favorable terms, and the 
best facilities for packing and shipping. Catalogues mailed on application. 
AGENTS WANTED— Salat y or Commission. 



FRANKLIN DAVIS NURSERY CO., 

Office, 91S Main Street, Richmond, Va. 



Bicycles, 

Light, 
Strong, 



HARTFORD 




FOR 

Men and Ladies, 

FOR 

Boys and Misses. 



Prices: $100.00, $85.00, $75.00. 

You have your ehoiee of the COLUMBIA siiifrlc tube tire or 

the HARTFORD double tube tire, each 

the best In its class. 

Before You Decide on Yo^ir 1894, Eramine These Safeties. 

SEND YOUR ADDRESS FOR ONE OF OUR CATALCGUES. 



A 



The Hartford Cycle Co., 

Hartford, Conn. 



DEPARTMENT D. 

HORTICULTURAL, ETC. 
Capt. C. B. DENSON, Dirkctor. 



All entries in Fruit and Vej^etable classes mint be niaile by ili'« jirowen*. an<l al' 
fruits must be ot State growth. All entries in Manipulated Fruit and Wxelablt; 
classes must be by those who manipulated tlie sanie. 

Entries in Tool and Package classes may be by manufacturer or retailer, and ne^-d 
not be of State manufacture. Entries in Nursery cla.NS open to Stale >frown pluiin 
only. 

NURSERY, STOCK AND ORNAME.VTAI. IM.AM- 

641. Dozen apple trees, 1 to 3 years, 10 best grown trees. . . . . .$ 8 (lO 

643. Dozen peach trees, 1 year from bud, 10 best U 00 

643. Duzen pear trees, 1 to 3 years, 10 best 8 00 

644. Dozen grapevines, I year, 10 be.st 3 itO 

645. Best ami largest display of fruit trees ready for planting. . $ .') (M) an<l Diplotnti 

646. Best and largest display of grapevinesandsniall fruu plants, 5 00 and Diplonia 

647. For the best 12 palms'. • '» UO 

648. For the best 12 ferns 8 UO 

649. For the best 12 begonias 8 00 

6o0. For the best 12 bloommg plants 8 00 

6.51. For the best 12 coleii 8 00 

652. For the best 12 caladiums 8 00 

653. For the best 2 specimen plants 8 00 

654. For the best rustic hanging basket 8 00 

6.55. For the best wire hanging ba^^ket 2 00 

656. For the 1 2 best evergreens ^ 00 

657. For the 12 best cut roses, in 12 sorts 2 00 

6.58. For the best and largest assortment in cut lljwers 8 00 

659. 'For the best bouquet 2^0 

660. For the best basket of flowers J» ^ 

661. For the best floral design i ' ^k '* 

462. For the best collection of general greenhouse plante. not lets than 25 

varieties, must be well grown 



663. Best display of potted plants by an amateur 

664. Best single specimen of ornamental plant by amateur 

665. Best display of cut flowers by amateur 



8 00 1 


•2 00 


2 OO 


1 00 


8 00 


i 00 



FRESH FRl'IT.S. 
I^=Entries in this class shall be for plates containing not l.-.-«<« than fl nin^\mfn*. all 
of the same variety. 

666. Best plate of winter apples. .^ ^^^ ., ^^^ 

667. Best plate of fall apples --- •:;•■;;. 

668. Best coUec'ion of named varieties origmated t»outhol.tne 

37th parallel, north latitude ,--; 

669. Best general collection of apples— named varietiw . 

670. Best colleciion of crabs— named varieties 

671. Best unnamed seedling apple of merit 

672. Best plate of winter pears 

673. Best plate of fall pears 



10 00 


5 00 


10 00 


ft 00 


5 00 


SOO 


8 00 




8 00 


too 



62 ADVERTISEMENTS. 

CHICORA 

FERTILIZER 
^COMPANY, 

CHARLESTON, So. Ca. 
GEO. A. WAGENER, ... - General Manager. 

manniachmrs of < Actb Pt^OSpI^atC an^ 



( 



X)t55obcb ^om. 



ALSO IMPORTERS OF GENUINE GERMAN KAINIT, NITRATE 
OF SODA, MURIATE OF POTASH. 



We Offer for Sale the Following REGULAR BRANDS: 

CHICORA HIGH GRADE FERTIUZER. CHICORA ACID PHOSPHATE. 

Ammonia 2;^ per cent. Available Phos. Acid 12 percent. 

Potash (K3O) I '< " ! 

Available Phos. Acid 8 " " j chicora acid phos. with potash. 

CHICORA soi^UBLE GUANO. i Available Phos. Acid 10 percent. 

. - ,1 Potash (K„0) I 

Ammonia 2 percent. ' v „ y 

Potash (K.O) I " " 

Available Phos. Acid 8 " " 



CHICORA AMMONIATED DISSOLVED BONE. 

Ammonia 2 percent. 

Potash (K3O) 2 

Available Phos. Acid 9 " " 



CHICOR.\ TRUCK FERTILIZER. 

Ammonia 8 percent. 

Potash (KjO) 4 

Available Phos. Acid 8 " " 



CHICORA SPECIAL TOBACCO GROWER. 

1 Ammonia 3 percent. 

CHICORA DISSOLVED BONE. | Potash (K. O) 5 " " 

Available Phos. Acid 12 percent, i Available Phos. Acid 8 " " 



t^^Particular Attention Paid to Manijnilation of any Special 
Brand Fertilizer Desired. 



I'KKMILM LIST. 



03 



674. Best collection of named occidental varieties of pearr* $ 

675. Best collection of named oriental varieties of peurH.. 

676. Best unnamed seedlin^^ pear 

677. Best plate late peaches 

678. Best collection of named varieties of peach 

679. Best unnamed seedling peach 

680. Best plate of plums 

681. Best collection of named American and European varieties of 

plum 

682. Best plate of Japanese plums 

683. Best unnamed seedling plum 

684. Best pfate of quince 

685. Best collection of named varieties of quince 

686. Best unnamed seedling of quince 

687. Best plate of figs 

688. Best collection of named varieties of fig 

689. Best unnamed seedling fig. 

690. Best plate of Japanese persimmons 

691. Best collection of named varieties of Japanese persimmons.. 

692. Best plate of table grapes — American varieties . 

693. Best plate of table grapes — European varieties 

694. Best plate of wine grapes 

695. Best collection of named varieties of grapes 

696. Plate of largest apples, not less than 6 

697. Plate of largest peaches, not less than 6 

698. Plate of largest pears, not less than 6 

609. Plate of largest plums, not less than 24 

700. Plate of largest Japanese plums, not less than 24 

701. Plate of largest quince, not less than 6 

702. Plate of largest figs, not less than 12 

703. Plate of largest grapes, not less than 6 clusters 

704. Best and largest collection of fruits by any single exhibitor . 

705. Best and largest collection of fruits by any Congressi(jnal Dw- 

trict — this collection to be entered by the District Vice- 
President of the State Horticultural Society . .Diploma and 

MANIPULATED FRUITS AND FRUIT PRODUCTS. 

706. Best sample of apple cider, three quart bottles 

707. Best sample of apple brandy, three (|uart bottles 

708. Best sample of apple vinegar, tliree (|uart bottles 

709. Best sample of grape wine— still— three quart bottles. 

710. Best sample of grape wine— sparkling— three ([uarl botti.--* 

711. Best sample unfermented sterilized grape juice, three (juari 

bottles 

712. Best and largest collection of North Carolina grape wmes. not 

less than six varieties of three bottles each (told 

713. Best sample apple jelly by amateur, one quart in glass . . 

714. Best sample pear jelly by amateur, one quart in glass 

715. Best sample quince jelly by amateur, one (juart in gla-vs 

716. Best sample peach jelly by amateur, one quart m glass . 

717. Best sample fig jelly by amateur, one (juart in glass 

718. Best sample currant jelly by amateur, one quart ui );l:i-- 

719. Best sample blackberry by amateur, one (|uart in gl;i- 

720. Best sample canned apples by amateur, one quart in t;. ■- 

721. Best sample canned pears by amateur, one quurt in gl.i - 

722. Best sample canned quince by amateur, one rjuarl in cl > 

723. Best sample canned peaches by amateur, one .juarl m . 

724. Best sample canned cherries by amateur, one quart ii 

725. Best sample canned plums by amateur, one (]u.ir- ••■ 

726. Best sample canned stawberries by aniatt- ur, on. 

727. Bestsamplecanned blackberries by amateur, on.- .; 

728. Best sample canned gooseberries by amateur, one quarl m «Uia» 



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64 

JULIUS LEWIS. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



ESTABLISHED 1865. 



X. W. WEST. 



JULIUS LEWIS $( CO., 



Mardware 



22^\: Kayexxeville Sx., 




RALEIGH, N. C. 
Sash, Door.s, Blinds, 

Rubber and Leather Belting, 
"All Right" Cook Stoves, 
Ranges and Heating Stoves, 
^ Paints and Oils, 

Guns and Pistols, 

Iron, Nails, Steel, 

Lime, Plaster, Cement. 

HARDWARE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



TliQ CQM)ratQd 
Gullet Co tton= Ginning 



Outfits. 



THE SIMPLEST AND MOST PERFECT SYSTEM FOR 
HANDLING COTTON FROM WAGON TO BALE. 



The "Magnolia" Gin. 

The "Eclipse Huller" Gin. 

The " Main Belt Brush Driving " Gin. 

The " Long Staple " Gin. 



• The . .. . . 



feeders and Condensers. 

The Latest, Simpi.est and Most 
Perfect Elevator and Entire 
Svstem, WITH Single Condenser 
FOR Battery of Gins and Nec- 
essary Lint Flue 

A battery of three gins, showing entire system in operation, can be seen at factor)'. 
Prices on complete outfits furnished on application. Address 

THE GULLET GIN CO., Amite City, La. 



'"MAGNOLIA" 
SELF-PACKING 
COTTON PRESS. 



I'KKMll M I.isr. 



720. Best sample canned currants by Hmateur, one "iiiari m kI""-^ \ 
780. Best dried apples, one peck 

731. B'-sl dried pears, one peck 

732. Best dried peaches, one peck peeled . 

733. Best dried peaches, one peck unpeeled 

734. Best dried quinces, one peck 

73.1. Best dried plums, one peck 

736. Best dried cherries, one peck 

737. Best dried fifj;s, one peck 

738 Best dried blackberries, one peck 

739. Best and largest display of canned fruits by professionnl 

canner Diploma and 

740. Best and largest display of dried fruits by professional . . Diploma 

741. Best and largest display of jellies, jams and preserves by pro- 

fessional Diploma 

742. B^st muskmelon or canteloupe, half-dozen 2 (Hi 

743. Best watermelon, half-dozen ' "*' 



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CANNED VEGETABLES. 

744. Best sample canned sugar corn in glass, one quart, by amateur 

745. Best sample canned asparagus in glass, one quart, by aiiiateur 

746. Best sample canned rhubarb in glass, one (juart, by amateur. 

747. Best sample of canned green peas in glass, one quart, by 

amateur 

748. Best sample of canned squash 

749. Best sample preserved watermelon in glass, one quart, by 

amateur _ - 

750. Best sample preserved muskmelon or cantaloupe in glass, one 

quart, by amateur 

751. Best sample of chow-chow in glass, one quart, by amateur.. 

752. Best sample of pickled onions in glass, one quart, by amateur, 

753. Best sample of pickled tomatoes in glass, one quart, by ama- 

teur 

754. Best sample of pickled cucumbers in glass, one quart, by 
amateur. 



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1 "■ 

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755. Best display of canned and pickled vegetables by professional. Diploma 



.0 

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756. 
757. 
758. 
759. 
760. 
761. 
762. 
763. 
764. 
765. 
766. 
767. 
768. 
769. 
770. 
771. 
772. 
773. 
774. 
775 
776. 
777. 
778. 



Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
Best 
B.-st 
Best 



HORTICULTDRAL TOOLS. 

one-horse stubble plow Diploni* 

one-horse harrow Uiplom» 

horse hoe Kl^'r"** 

garden seed drill ?i'*|^^ 

potato planter UlplooM 

hand-wheelhoe J;!P. ' 

potato digger n T™* 

and largest display of garden handtools n K^Si 

c der press - --..- JxI't**''* 

apple parer f^f . 

apple slicer ,' '"* 

cherry stoner 

orchard ladder 

fruit sizer 

display of horticultural tools 

32 quart strawberry crate 

24 quart strawberry crate 

grape basket -..-- 

grape crate 

peach basket 

peach crate 

apple barrel 

display of fruit packages 



I'loniM 

:plolIUI 
Nf.d.I 



I 'qii'iiiiA 

. .Diploma 

. Dtploma 

< inid Hedmi 



66 



A dvp:rtisem ents. 



A REVOLUTION ! 

Triumph 
UISC 5^ 

• Harrows. 



TO THO.SE who desire to put their land in 
perfect condition for the successful growth 
of crops, we would state that we know of 
no implement at all that equals the 

TRIUMPH DISC HARROW. 

It is made of iron and steel throughout, 
and will last longer than any 
other harrow made. For full 
particulars, address 

ODELL HARDWARE COMPANY, 

State Agents, 

Greensboro, N. C. 







JORDAN'S^ 

Dining H^H i^ European Restaurant, 

No. 130 Fayetteville Street, 
K ALEHJH, N. 1". 

Meals at all Hoars. EIcf»ant Loclfiini>s, 



D. X. JOHNSON, Agt., 

RALEIGH, I»i. C, 

Wholesale Commission Merchant 

For the sale of all Kinds of Country Produce, Fruits, 

VEGETABLES, POULTRY, EGGS, S^LT FISH, SlC. 

Write for prices, and how to ship. 



DEPARTMENT E, 



PANTRY SUPPLIES. 



J. S. WVXXK, DiKi. r,,i: 



BREAD, CAKES, ETC. 

For the best of the following : 

779. Wheat bread, one loaf * I (M) 

780. Rye bread, one loaf. 1 iio 

781. Graham bread , one loaf . 1 00 

782. Plain biscuit, dozen.. 1 (jti 

783. Rolls of any shape, dozen 1 iiO 

784. Raised biscuit, dozen , 1 00 

785. Sweet potato bread 1 00 

786. Plain corn bread 1 00 

787. Risen corn bread 1 00 

788. Crackers 1 00 

789. Cheesecakes I 00 

790. Pound cake, iced 1 .V) 

791. Fruit cake, iced 2 .V) 

793. Jelly cake, sugared I 00 

798. Date cake . 1 OO 

794. Banana cake 1 00 

79.5. Molasses fruit cake I 00 

796. Cocoanut cake 1 00 

797. Sponge cake 1 00 

798. Gold cake. 1 00 

799. Icecream cake .. - 1 00 

800. Nutcake.. I 00 

801. Small cakes, dozen, any kind I 'W 

802. Bride's cake, decorated '^0" 

808. Best display of cake, six epecimens or more -- . '■ " 

PICKLES, PRESERVES, ETC. 

804. Sweet pickles, quart jars ' '"' 

80.5. Sour pickles, quart jars - 

806. Best preserves, any variety 

807. Best fruit butter, any variety 

808. Best jam, any variety 

809. Best tomato catsup 

810. Best catsup, other variety 

811. Best stuflFed peppers, six 

812. Best cordial, any variety 

818. Maple sugar, specimen, five pounds 

814. Candy, home-made, two pounds . .. 
81.5. Candy, walnut and groundpea 

816. Best variety of pickles, six specimens, qiuirt'^, (■ 

817. Best variety of preserves, six specimens, by hmi 

818. Largest display of preserves, jellies and pJcklf.-». :. 

varieties, by housekeeper 





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C8 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The Mape5 
Manures 




• • • 



FOR POTATOES, CABBAGES. 
I CAULIFLOWERS, CELERY, 
EARLY AND LATE TRUCK. 

THE MAPES FERTILIZERS HEAD BOTH LISTS OP FERTILIZERS REPORTED IN YEAR 
1893 BY THE CONNECTICUT EXPERIMENT STATION. 
[From Connecticut Farm {Hartford) March s, ^Sg^."] 

It will be difficult for the careful and unprejudiced reader of the Experiment Sta- 
tion reports not to be impressed with the remarkable high standard maintained by 
all the Mapes goods. In Part i, lately issued, of the Connecticut Station Report for 
1893, the analysis of 61 " Nitrogenous Superphosphates " and 76 "special manures,"' 
show that Mapes heads the list in both classes, in being found to have the highest 
valuation, as figured by the Station as compared with the cost to the farmer. 

[From the Nezv England Homestead, IMarch S, /cS'p/.] 

As to the quality of their goods, the Mapes Formula and Peruvian Guano Co. 
analysis shows them to be unexcelled for farm, fruit or garden purposes. The 
analyses of 61 nitrogenous superphosphates and 76 special manures by the Connec- 
ticut State Experiment Station, show that Mapes heads the list in both classes iu 
being found to have the HIGHEST VALUATION COMPARED TO THE COST TO THE 
FARMER. 

THE MAPES MANURES FOUND TO EQUAL OR EXCEED THEIR GUARANTEED 
STRENGTH IN EVERY CASE. 

Of the manufacturers whose goods were examined by the Rhode Island Experi- 
ment Station and reported on page 132 Bulletin No. 26, November, 1S93, the Mapes 
Company was the only one of all those whose tests amounted to 12 or over, who were 
Joimd to equal or exceed their gicarantee in every case. The Mapes Company had a 
record of 100 per cent.; the next best record was 93 per cent. 

Also No. I. Peruvian Guano, standardized. Ammonia, 10 PER cent. Specially 
adapted for Truckers. Nothing equal to it for producing quick growth, tenderness 
in quality, etc. Send for circulars. 

The Mapes Formula and Peruvian Guano Co., 

143 Liberty St., New York. 



TKIM H M LIST. V,\t 



SUNDRIES. 



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S19. Cheese, North Carolina, five pounds, new ^ 

820. Mutton suet, five pounds. North Carnhnii made . 

821. Beef tallow, ten pounds. North Carolina made 

822. Beeswax, ten pounds. North Carolina made 

823. Hard soap, ten pounds, home-made 

824. Soft soap, jars, one gallon, homemade 

825. Starch of wheat, five pound:^, home-made 

^26. Starch of Indian corn, Hve pounds, homemade 

827. Hams, two or more, North Carolina cured, not less than eight poundHtac-h. 

828. Wheat flour, one barrel or two bags. North Carolina wheat ami inadf in 

North Carolina, exhibited by manufacturer Diploma and 

829. Dried beef, North Carolina, ten pounds.- 

830. Bushel corn meal, bolted or sifted 

831. Pickled pork, half barrel. North Carolina made 

832. Roe herrings, half barrel. North Carolina catch, shown by original 

catcher - .'> 00 



«33. For the best ten pounds butter 5 00 

■834. For the best display of butter 5 00 

For girls under fifteen years of age. 

835. Loaf of wheat bread 1 00 

836. Rolls, one dozen 1 00 

837. Plain biscuit, one dozen. 1 OO 

838. Poundcake 1 "0 

S39. Preserves, quart jar. any variety 100 

840. Ji^lly, quart jar. any variety. 100 

841. Pickles, quart jar, any varietv 1 00 

542. Exhibit not otherwise entered, ten specimens 500 

BEES AND HO.NEY. 

843. Honey, greatest yield from one swarm of bees, five pounds to b<? ex- 

hibited J OJ 

844. Italian bees, hive on ground, glass "JJO 

845. Hybrid bees, hive on ground, glass * 00 

846. Common bee?, hive on ground, glass "00 

847. Bee-hive, sample "- JUJ 

S48. Honey in comb, five pounds J '"• 

849. Honey, strained, half gallon ' '"' 



Miss MaocxIK 1^i:ksh:, 

209 FAYETTEVILLE ST.. RALEIGH, N. C . 

pUinery and Fancy Goods! 

WOOLS, ZEPHYRS, 
Ei^"broiaer3^ lylaterials, Etc. 



70 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



GIBBS' • IMPERIAL • PLOWS. 



ITELLYOUSlFl 

The"impeR1AL" 

S THE BEST PLOW 
INTHE WORLD 

fio mistake! 

AND YOU KNOV/ |T- 







WOOD OR STEEL BEAM, RIGHT OR LEFT HAND, IM ALL SIZES, FROM SMALL POMY 
TO A LARGE TWO AND THREE-HORSE PLOW. 

Steel, chilled iron or cast, all parts duplicable, and steel, chilled 
or cast molds, shares or landsides interchange on same Plow. 

O-r Genera, Purpose and Hillside ^JJg gJJ(|JJg{} ^ fjjggg p|^g^ pn 



Plows received highest awards 

World s Fair, 1893. [L3? Write for our Columbian Catalogue. 



CANTON, OHIO. 



^ # 



a. a G. 



^ # 



And all Machinery for Mining and Gold "S GOOCJ and GPCat. 

Milling Gold Ore is Manufactured by the 

MECKLENBURG IRON WORKS. 



Treatment of Sulphurets by Chlori- 
JOHN WILKES, Manager, Charlotte, N. C. nation especially successful. 



DEPARTMENT F. 

MANUFACTURES. 



W. E. ASHLEY, Dikectok. 



VEHICLES. 

For the best of the following : 

Two-horse phaeton . .l>i|>l<)tna 

One-horse four-seated phaeton Diploina 

One-horse two-seated phaeton Diploma 

Two horse rockaway Diploma 

Top buggy Diploma 

Open buggy Diploma 

Jump-seat buggy Diploma 

Sulky Diploma 

Skeleton track wagon - Diploma 

Open pleasure wagon D|pl«)ma 

Two-horse family carriage Dipl<>m» 

One-horse family carriage Diploiim 

Uuctor's buggy Dit.lotiiH 

Surry " I ' "'.t 

Victoria. ' ' ' ** 

Ladies' phaeton ^'l' '"" 

Ladies' cart pipiomn 

Street-sprinkler Diploma 

Road wagon.. piploma 

Road cart pipl.-ma 

Harvest or hay cart j:*'! , ""* 

Dumping wagon Pi' . ""* 

Tumbril cart Diploma 

Ox cart ipoma 

Passenger or spring wagon |'l'"""* 

Furniture wagon Dip oroa 

Log wagon.. 'j*"""' 

Drlv— Dlpom. 

Four-wheel truck (freight) wagon I»ip oma 

ca^y'^s :':::::::::DlpiomI 

O^yf^- ...Diploma 

Hand cart * Dioloma 

Garden barrow Diiiloma 

Dirt and canal barrow p 5 i",,,^ 

Brick or bearing off barrow ' ^ 

885. Farm wagon, four-horse ^ 

886. Farm wagon, t%vo-horse ^ 

887. Farm wagon, one-horse V'A" "i C" » 

888. Best displav of carriages and buggies. North Carolma niaKe _ 

889. B-st displav of carriages and buggies, open to the world . , , 

890. Best displav of farm wagons. North Carolina niuke ^_ 

891. Best display of farm wagons, open to the world I""' 

CABINET WORK MADE IN NORTH CABOU.NA 

892. Parlor furniture, set for parlor ' ,"^* 

893. Bedroom set » 

894. Secretary and book-case -- 



72 ADVERTISEMENTS. 






>-^ I— / 1 I r\ r~\ L. H. J. DOWELL, 

HOTEL, " .>.:::: 

Corner Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

;g>K50 Per Day. 

PLEASANT and * ia/^e Airv Rooms. 

CONVENIENT * CUISINE THE BEST 

LOCATION. ^ Obtninnblc in the Country. 



Visitors to the State Fair 



Wilt. Find the CENTRAL to be 

ALL THAT IS DESIRED. 

Si^EciAL Rates by the Week. 






I'HKMir.M LIST. 

895. Desk !• 

896. Sideboard. P 

897. Bureau I 

898. Bedstead h 

899. Chairs, half-dozen i- 

91)0. Rustic chair, model 1» 

9UI. Rocking chair, parlor l^H 

902. Wardrobe l>i|i|i>iiift 

903. Cradle or crib Hiplnnia 

904. Finest display, six pieces, not otherwise 8hown 1 1 ; i -im 

905. Largest variety of cabinet work by one exhibitor ■ ; u^ 

9U6. Mattresses, three to be exhibited, not otherwise shown l»i|.iMrim 

907. Spring l«ds, three to be exhibited Diploin* 

LEATHER, ETC., NORTH C.\RULIN.\ MADE. 

908. Largest collection of tanned leather, not less than six sidea (ioM Minlal 

909. Sole leather, two sides Diploma 

910. Harness leather, two sides .Diploma 

911. Upper leather, two sides .- Diploma 

912. Calf skin, two sides Diploma 

913. Kip skin, two sides Diploma 

914. Morocco, dressed or undressed Dipl-nna 

915. Saddle, bridle and martingale Diploma 

916. Ladv's saddle, bridle and martingale Diploma 

917. Set carriage harness Diploma 

918. Buggy or sulky harness Diploma 

919. Four-horse wagon harness Diploma 

920. Two-horse wagon harness Diploma 

921. Shoes, brogans, one dozen pairs Dipl«»ma 

922. Boots, pair hand-made Diploma 

923 Shoes, gentleman's, six pairs Diploma 

924. Shoes, ladys, six pairs .Diploma 

TEXTILES, NORTH CAROLINA MAKE. 

925. For the best display of. fabrics, manufactured by any cotton or woolen 

factory in the State pip oma 

926. For the best brown sheeting. North Carohna make !».,., tua 

927. For the best plaids. North Carolina make ; '"» 

928. For the best cassimere or jeans. North Carolina make "• 

929. For the best woolen blankets - * 

930. For the best cotton blankets '• 

NORTH CAROLINA CARPENTRY. 

931. Best set of doors, blinds and mantel j!'*'i"'"» 

932. Best newel post and model baluster .- «■!",'* 

933. Best fret-sawing by boy not over fifteen years old 



WUFflCTURERS OF CflNDY ! ^^^^ "^ '"' ''"'' 

AND DEALERS IN FRUITS, CIGARS, TOBACCO. Etc. 
FINE CHOCOLATES AND FRUIT CANDIES A SPECIALTY. 



ADVKKTI.SKMENTS. 



G. M. ALLEN. 

wm. cram. 



AliliEN & GHfl]V[, 

Corner of Hargett and I OU 1^0 C PS and 

West Streets, 

RALEIGH. N.C., Machipiists. 




Manufacturers and 
Importers of 



Portable and 

Stationary 

Engines and Boilers, 

SAW, &RIST ANB CANE MILLS, 

If. Cotton Presses, 

^^=-^^ Brick Machinery, &c. 



ANTICEPHALALGINE ! 



The Q re a test 
Meadache and Neuralgia 
Remedy Known! 



SOLD EVERYWHERE. 

25c and 50c. a Bottle. 



CURES IN FIFTEEN MINUTES! 
PERFECTLY SAFE AND HARMLESS! 






MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 



JAS. I. JOHNSON, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 






DEPARTMENT G. 

GENERAL DISPLAYS. 
N. 15. BROUGHTOX, Diiti:. tok 



DISPLAY BY LADIES. 

KIUST. SKOiND. 

934. For best general display made by any lady resident in the 

State $ 50 00 I 20 OU 

[The composition of this display is left entirely with exhibitors, the rondilionw 
being that all articles must show woman's liandiwork in cooki'ry, tJnoranvw 
art. fancy work, sewing, etc.; every article exhibited miiHi l>e th»' work of ih«» 
exhibitor, and each exhibit must contain specimens of all work above deHi^. 
nated. Articles in this exhibit cannot compete for oilier preunuiuit. | 

MUSIC, ETC. 

For the best of the following : 
93.5. Grand piano ..Diploma 

936. LTpright piano Diploum 

937. Reed organ Diplom* 

935. Sewing machine, for style and (juality of work Diploinn 

939. Type- writer, for speed and (luality of work Diplom* 

GENERAL MERCANTILE DISPLAYS. 

Best and finest display of any kind in Main Exhibition Building ♦ •'»<> 00 

printing Uiplom* 

millinery Diplom. 

boots and shoes Diplimm 

jewelry - Diploiua 

silver-plated ware Hiplouia 

hardware, stoves and tinware .Diploma 

china and crockery •- I)H«'i'ii»* 

fancy groceries — J" •• 

saddlery and harness - }'• 

confectionery .,.,.......- jiiiiji'tin 

drugs, perfumes, etc Ihp i»m« 

hats and caps i»!'*i * 

carpets, rugs and oil cloihs Uiploma 

cabinet ware Dip ui,m 



940. 
941. 
943. 
943. 
944. 
94.5. 
946. 
947. 
948. 
949. 
950. 
951. 
9.52. 
953. 
954. 
955. 
956. 
957. 
958. 
959. 
960. 
961. 
962. 
963. 
964. 
965. 
966. 
967. 
968. 
969. 



Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
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Best d 
Best d 
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Beat d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Bestd 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 



splay o 
splay o 
play o 
play o 
splay o 
splay o 
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sp'ay o 
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plumbers and gasfitters' supplies Diploma 

furniture..... I|M')<'n|« 

bookbinding 

pianos 

organs r 

musical instruments 

scientific or other instruments 

fur goods ; . • 

merchant tailoring g<x)da made in the city 

housefurnishing goods 

books and stationery 

bronze work 

baby carriages 

bicycles and tricycles 

dairy utensils 



"M - 

rti( 1 Ilia 


1. , ■ "'• 








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76 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



RAMBLER B 




'i^m- 




Guaranteed for One Year. 

ONE PRICE 

For all Styles and Weights, 

125. 



Highest Award , 



AT THE 



World'5 Fair. ^ 



MORE MATEUR RAGES 
UNDER L. A. W. RULES 

THAN ANY OTHER MAKE. 





EADER! 
MEMBER 

RAMBLER RIDERS 

REAP RICH REWARDS 

AND 

RAKE IN RECORDS. 

SOLD BY 




CECIL G. STONE, Gen. Agent, Raleigh, N. C, 

Dealer in Bicycle Sundries and Accessories. 



REPAIRING A SPECIALTY. 



Catalogfues free at Agency, or direct 
for two 2-cent stamps. 



)'iu:.\iir.\i 1, 1ST. 



970. 

971. 

972. 

973. 

974. 

975. 

976. 

977. 

978. 

979. 

980. 

981. 

982. 

983. 

984. 

985. 

986 

987. 

988. 

989. 

990 

991. 

992. 

993. 

994. 

995. 

996. 

997. 

998. 

999. 

1000, 

1001, 



splay of houseliold decorations IHuhmia 

.splay of marl lie. wood and iron mantels ..IhuUmim 

splay of paints and oils !.lll. !!!!.".* !"l>li. loin* 

splay of rubber goods !!.! '!!. Dii»l'>m« 

splay of baking powders and spices !/. Dii»l«>m» 

splay of sporiiiig eqiiipments (guns, ti^hing tackle, etc.). .!','.'.!! Diploma 

splay of type- writers Diplunm 

splay of wire g. o Is Diploiu* 

splay of boys" clothing Diploma 

S(.lay of men's clothing Diploma 

splay of gents' furnishing goods Diploma 

splay of sewing machines.. Diploma 

splay of artists' ujaierials Diploma 

splay of carriage robes Diploma 

splay of ladies' furnishing goods Diploma 

splay of dry goods Diploma 

splay of trunks and traveling bags Diploma 

splay of wdlowware Diploma 

splay of office furniture Diploma 

spl^y of groceries I)iploma 

splay of wooden ware Diploma 

splay of ornamental ironwork Diploma 

splay of .^cales Diploma 

splay of iron safes Diploma 

splay of kiichen utensils Diploma 

splay of North Carolina mineral waters Diploma 

splay of cotton seed oil Diploma 

D splay model kitchen, by a hou.se furnishing firm Silver M«Mlal 

Display of model sitting-room, by a house-furnishing firm Silver .Medial 

Display of school books Meilal 

General display of school supplies Mfdal 

Display of school desks and tables Medal 



Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
B-st d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Bestd 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Bestd 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
Best d 
B^-st d 



NOW 



IS THE TIMK TO I'liKI'ARK Tt> 
EMB.-VRK IN Tin-: 



Poultry Business ! 



3IAKE NO 3I1STAKI: AI5<H T III IS. 

THi: BHJ MONKY' 

IS IN LATE AVINTEIJ AM> EAHIA' 
SPRING BI{OILi:i{S and KOASTIIKS. 

AVE FIKMSII 

ALL. NEC'ESSAKV. IN roKM.VTION. 

Highest Awards of Merit thl Great World's Fair 

The "Old Reliable" was there rt-ady t. 
with all other makes of Incubators and 
Merit wins ! That is why the "Old Ri-o.i > • 
the most popular artificial hatcher in exi.sti-ncf. 

AIED^L .'VXD DIPLOM.\ OF HIOHKST .\W.\Rn at the \V<»KI.I>S »'''*' "J"" ;»*" '' 
Brooder combined ! Tens of thousands saw our machines «n con»tant operaUott inef 

have bought, as a result of what they saw. 

The only Special Cash Premium aw.-irdcci by the - "• 

came ti) us. We send proof Do u'^t lail to wuUl' • 'c 

and instructive cataiojjut-s. .\<Mn.s,s. 

RELIABLE INCUBATOR AM) BROODrU COMIWSY, 
QUIINCY, ILLINOIS. 




78 A D V E K 'J- 1 S !•: M 1-: N 'I'S. 

We sell Dry Goods, 

Shoes, 
Notions, and 

Dress Goods,'''^'^'1'r •"'*"'• 

WHEN YOU ARE IN RALEIGH IT WILL PAY YOU 
TO SEE OUR STORE. 

Woollcott & Son, 

14 E. MARTIN STREET. 



WE ARE MANUFACTURERS OF 



PANTS 

■I And have the Nobb'est Line this Season 

ever shown in North Carolina. 

• • • • 

WOOliliCOTT & S0|^, 

14 E. MARTIN STREET. 



DEPARTMENT H. 

LADIES' WORK. 

J. E. I'OGL'E, DiRKdou. 

All articles in this department must be entered in tlu' nanif of the on»« wlum*' hIiIII 
they exhibit. They must have been made within thr»n* vcarH. and not fxhitnti-d nt 
any former Fair of this Society. Any violation of ilii.s rule will har the violator from 
competing for any premium whatever, and render the exhibitor and exhiliii liubU< lo 
expulsion from the grounds. 

1002. Silk quilt, any style | 2 00 

1003. Calico quilt, any style "j 00 

1004. White quilt, fancy quilting a 00 

1005. Knit counterpane 2 00 

1006. Crotcheted counterpane 2oo 

1007. Woven counterpane 2 00 

1008. Hearth rug, any style I .V) 

1009. Stockings or socks 1 <io 

1010. Infants' socks 1 uo 

1011. Knit purse - 1 00 

1012. Raw silk, one pound — I .V) 

1013. Plain sewing, hand, any style garment 2 00 

1014. Plain sewing, machine, any style garment 1 uO 

1015. Calico dress, cut and made by exhibitor I uo 

1016. Suit boy's clotbes 3 w) 

1017. Silk embroidery, specimen 'A (lO 

lOlH. Cotton embroidery, specimen :i 00 

1019. Kensington embroidery, specimen 8(10 

1020. Outline embroidery, specimen 2 UO 

1021. Tatting embroidery, specimen I SO 

1022. Specimen ecclesiastical embroidery 3 00 

1023. Specimen ink etching on fabric 2 00 

1024. Drawn work, specimen •* 00 

1025. Piano cover, any style -00 

1026. Table cover, any style I M 

1027. Fancy scarf, any style I '»0 

1028. Handsomest carriage robe.- * (W 

1029. Sofa pillow 3 llO 

1030. Headrest. I 00 

1031. Chair cover, fancy upholstered "J W) 

1032. Ottoman cover, fancy upholstered !* 00 

1033. Bureau scarf, linen drawn work '* 00 

1034. Bureau scarf, linen embroidered * <* 

1035. Bureau scarf , all silk 3 00 

1036. Buflfet cover * 00 

1087. Handsomest table mats, crotcheted, one-half do/.en S 00 

1038. Shawl or scarf > *0 

1039. Child's hood ' "• 

1040. Child's sack '" 

1041. Pin-cushion, any style • 

1042. Work-bag } JJJ 

1043. Lamp-shade, paper * ™ 

1044. Lamp-shade, silk *" 

1045. Decorated basket , '.^ 

1046. Lady's hand-bag, hand made • • j" 

1047. Handkerchief case, linen or silk » *» 

1048. Glove case, linen or silk 

1049. Slippers 



I 90 
! '<0 



80 NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

1050. Child'scloak $ 1 50 

105L Child's dress 1 50 

1052. Chilli's bonnet 1 50 

1053. Chilli's flannel skirt, embroidered. 1 50 

1054. Lady's flannel skirt, embroidered 2 50 

1055. Turkish or Roman embroidery 1 00 

105C. Fancy apron.. 1 00 

1057. Set lady's underwear 3 00 

1058. Lady's dressing sack 1 50 

1059. Gentleman's dressing gown, quilted 2 50 

1060. Gentleman's dressing gown, embroidered 2 50 

1061. "Wall protector or splasher, drawn work 1 00 

1062. Wall protector or splasher, embroidered.. 1 00 

1063. Pillow shams, machine made 1 00 

1064. Pillow shams, drawn work 1 50 

1065. Pillow shams, embroidered 1 50 

1('66. Towels, with embroidered initials in cotton, one-half dozen 2 00 

1067. Napkins, with embroidered initials in cotton, one-half dozen 2 00 

1068. Napkins, hemstitched, with embroidered initials in cotton, one-half 

dozen 2 00 

1069. Table cloth, with embroidered initials 2 00 

1070. Plate doilies, embroidered, one-half dozen 2 00 

1071. Plate doilies, drawn work, one-half dozen 2 00 

1072. Finger-bowl doilies, embroidered, one-half dozen 2 00 

1073. Finger-bowl doilies, drawn work, one half dozen 2 00 

1074. Center piece, all white, embroidered 1 50 

1075. Center piece, colors, embroidered 1 50 

1076. Center piece, drawn work 1 50 

1077. Carving cloth, all white, embroidered 1 50 

1078. Carving cloth, colors, embroidered 1 50 

1079. Carving cloth, drawn work 1 50 

1080. Set table linen, embroidered, including center piece, carving cloth, 

one half dozen plate doilies and one-half dozen finger-bowl doilies.. 4 00 

1081. Set table linen, drawn work, same as 1080 4 00 

1082. Tea table cloth, embroidered 2 00 

1083. Tea table cloth, drawn work 2 00 

1084. Picture frame, embroidered 2 00 

1085. Specimen lace work, Honiton, point or B 3 00 

1086. Lace handkerchief 2 00 

1087. Best specimen work not entered elsewhere 2 00 



For girls under sixteen years of age. 



1088. Plain sewing, hand , any style garment 2 00 

1089. Plain sewing, machine, any style garment 1 00 

1090. Fine shirt 1 50 

1091. Set underwear 3 00 

1092. Boy's suit 1 50 

1093. Calico dress . . 2 00 

1094. Patchwork quilt 1 50 

1095. Foot mat 1 00 

1096. Dressed doll 1 00 

1097. Dressed doll, by girl under twelve years 1 00 

1098. Silk embroidery 1 50 

1099. Outline embroidery 1 00 

1100. Knitting, any style 1 00 

1101. Tatting 1 00 

1102. Knit purse 1 00 

1103. Socks or stockings 1 00 

1104. Infant's sacque 1 00 

1105. Crocheting, specimen 1 00 

1106. Child's sacque 1 00 

1107. Fancy book -bag 1 00 

1108. Pin-cushion 1 00 

1109. Best specimen of work by child under ten years old 2 00 



DEPARTMENT I. 



FINE ARTS, PAINTING, ETC. 



W. S. PRIMROSE, Director. 



Exhibits must have been executed within past three years, and not exhibited before 
at State Fair. 

Each painting exhibited as having been painted directly from life or nature must 
be accompanied by a certificate from the exhibitor to the effect that the work is 
directly from life or nature. 

1110. Oil painting, North Carolina landscape $ 10 00 

1111. Oil painting, North Carolina marine -- 10 00 

11 12. Oil painting, portrait from life ^ 00 

1113 Oil painting, landscape from nature — -- 5 00 

1114. Oil painting, marine from nature - -- •") 00 

1115. Oil painting, flowers from nature 5 00 

1116. Oil painting, fruit from nature 5 00 

1117. Oil painting, landscape from copy 3 00 

1118. Oil painting, flowers from copy 3 00 

1119. Oil painting, fruit from copy 3 00 

1120. Oil painting, pair of panels .- - 3 00 

1121. Oil painting, birds or game from nature - 3 00 

1132. Oil painting, biids or game from copy 3 00 

1123. Water color, portrait from life 5 00 

1124. Water color, landscape from nature - 5 00 

1125. Water color, marine from nature 5 00 

1 126. Water color, flowers from nature — 5 00 

1127. Water color, fruit from nature 5 00 

1128. Water color, landscape from copy ---- 3 00 

1129. Water color, flowers from copy 3 00 

1 130. Water color, fruit from copy 3 00 

1131. Water color, birds or game from nature ._ 5 00 

1132. Water color, birds or game from copy 3 OOi 

1133. Pastel portrait, from sittings -- 5 00« 

1134. Pastel fancy head or figure 2 OO 

1135. Pastel landscape, from nature .- - 3 OO 

1136. Pastel landscape, copy 2 00 

1137. Pastel flowers, original 3 00 

1138. Pastel flowers, copy --- 2 00 

1139. Pastel fruit, original 3 00 

1140. Pastel fruit, copy 2 00 

1141. PdStel birds or game, original 3 00 

1142. Pastel birds or game, copy 2 00 

1143. Pastel still life, original 3 00 

1144. Pastel still life, copy 2 00 

1145. Pastel marine, from nature. - 3 00 

1146. Pnstel marine, copy 2 00 

1147. Pastel pair of panels - 3 00. 

1 148. Crayon portrait, free hand 3 00 

1149. Crayon group, free hand - 3 00 

1150. Crayon animal, from life - 3 00 

1151. Crayon animal, copy - - 2 00 

1152 Crayon landscape, from nature 3 00 

1 153. Crayon landscape, copy 2 00 

6 




VICTORIA REGIA- GROWN IN OPEN AIR AT WINSTON, N. C. 



PREMIUM LIST. 

1154. Crayon Howers, orif^inal > , , 

1155. Crayon flowers, copy '. . , , 

1156. Crayon fruit, original 

1157. Crayon fruit. coi)v 

1158. Crayon still life, original 

1159. Crayon still life, copy 

1160. Decorated fancy articles, in oil, six -j iMt 

1161. Plaques, two 3 00 

1163. Drawings from plaster casts, four 2 OU 

1163. Decorated screen, three leaves 800 

1164. Decorated screen, one leaf 100 

1165. Painting on silk, satin or velvet 1 00 

1166. Fan, painted on silk or satin 100 

1167. Fire etching 2 00 

1168. "Wood carving, by lady 2 00 

1169. Modeling in clay _ H 00 

1170. Sculpture in marble 5 00 

1171. Pencil drawing. 1 00 

1172. Charcoal sketch 1 00 

1173. Best oil picture of North Carolina History 10 00 

1174. Best Ideal Head in oil, original 5 00 

1175. Best Ideal Head in water colors, original H 00 

1176. Best Ideal Head in pastel, original 8 00 

1177. Best Ideal Head in crayon, original *J <J0 

PAINTIXU ON CH1N.\, ETC. 

1178. Best display of decorated china, painted by lady, not less than thin v 

pieces 10 00 

1179. Best decorated plates, not less than six 8 00 

1180. Best decorated cups and saucers, not less than six , . Jl 00 

1181. Best vase painted in oil 1 <Hi 

1182. Best vase in mineral colors 100 

1183. Best imitation Dresden china, three pieces 00 

1184. Best imitation Bonn or Royal Worcester, three pieces '• •*' 

1185. Best specimen china painting, not entered elsewhere 

PHOTOGRAPHS AND MISCELLANEOUS. 

1186. Specimen of photograph, colored, in water colors (not before exhibited) 

by professional ••. - Ihpl"!"* 

1187. Specimen of photograph, colored, in India ink (not before exhibited) 

by professional I)iploni» 

1188. Sixcartes de visite of children by professional liipI'Mii* 

1189. Six cartes de visite of adults by professional Diploma 

1190. Six cabinet photographs by professional U-pjoin* 

1191. Large plain photograph bv professional :••••■ pll"""* 

1192. Display of photographs (quality specially considered) by profewlona I Dip-in* 

1193. Specimen photograph by amateur - Dipioin* 

1194. Best collection of amateur photographs taken on groundK .luring f»ir 

week (not less than five specimens) quality specially conHidered; to »w 
submitted by November 10 '""| 'J'^"' 

1195. Colored photograph by amateur | !| '"* 

1196. Display of photographs by amateur '' ' "* 

1197. Fancy sign painting ' 

1198. Display and variety novelty jars 

1199. Most oddly decorated easel 

1200. Collection stereoscopic views; North Carolina K-enery _. - • 

1201. Largest collection and greatest variety <.f pictures in fmiuw* IMplooMi •n.i 



84 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



H. STEVENS SONS CO., 

MACON, GA. 

Sealer and 
Hailt^oad 
GulVePt Pipe 

IVIflflUFRCTUHEHS, 

In two and one-half feet 
lengths, 

\ 
Corrugated Spigots, and ^ 

Deep Corrugated Sockets. 

Fire Brick, 

Standard and Specials of the Best Quality. 

^ Locomotive Tiles, 

All Sizes and Shapes. 

Chimney Tops, 

-^^ Bottoms, Flue Pipe and Flue Linings. 

Lawn Urns, 

Vases, and all other kinds of clay goods. 

HIGHEST AWARD AUGUSTA EXPOSITION IN 1893. 




CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED. 

HENRY STEVENS* SONS CO. 



DEPARTMENT K. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS AND MACHINERY. 
JULIUS l-EWIS, DiKK.ToK. 



Exhibitors in this department are earn< stlv invited. Articles will \>t> cnu'tuWr in- 
spected by the Commitiee, who will make favorable mention of all «x>iibii« worthy 
of special notice. 

MACHINERY. 

1202. Portable engine on trucks Diploma 

1208. Small engine, any style ... Diploma 

1204. Cotton-gin, feeder and condenser Diploma 

1205. Cotton-gin, North Carolina make Diploma 

1206. Cotton baling press, any make Diploma 

1207. Seed-cotton cleaner to be tested on grounds Diploma 

1208. Gin-saw filing machine Diplomt 

1209. Cotton seed huller and separator, to be tested on grounds .. Diploma 

1210. Machine or process to remove hnt from cotton seed Diploma 

1211. Cotton-seed grinding machine ..Diploma 

1212. Best combined hand and power grist-mill for making meal Diploma 

1213. Portable corn mill at work Diploma 

1214. Best North Cai-olina grist-mill stones, 36 inches in diameter Diploma 

1215. Pair North Carolina mill-stones for corn, not less than 14 inches in 

diameter and 6 inches thick, without furrowt* ..Diploma 

1216. Pair North Carolina mill-stones for wheat, not less than 14 inches in 

diameter and 6 inches thick, without furrows Diploma 

1217. Cottjn planters Diploma 

1218. Cotton chopper DipUmia 

1219. Guano distributor Diploma 

1220. Pea harvester Diploma 

1221. Cotton picker DipUuna 

1222. Corn planter Diploma 

1223. Combined planter and guano distributor Diploma 

1224. Horse power, any style Diploma 

1225. Harvester and twine binder I'.;. .ma 

1226. Threshers, separators and cleaners combined ■'■ '"• 

1227. Threshers '"•■•■•«»• 

1228. Rice thresher and separator Dip »ma 

1229. Rice cleaner nt».l..iiia 

1230. Fanmill I^' '"• 

1231. Reaping and mowing machine ; ' '"* 

1232. Reaping machine • ,' "* 

1233. Mowing machine "* 

1234. Lawn mower 

1235. Corn shelter, hand power ! ' '"* 

1236 Cider mill and press, any size '■ '"* 

1237. Ensilage cutter, hand or power ■ 

1238. Clover seed huiler ., '"* 

1239. Straw and hay cutter, hand or power ^^ 

1240. Wood engine - j,' ,|,^ 

1241. Farm fence, model in wood — ,' ^^^^ 

1242. F^rm fence, model in wire I,; .^^^ 

1243. Pump, hand or power i . ! 1 » 

1244. Fruit evaporator 



86 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



WATER WHEELS 

BUILT BY 

JAMES LEFFEL & CO. 

OVER 32 Years business 

affords every convenience for making Wheels of highest 
excellence and 

SPECIALLY ADAPTED TO ALL SITUATIONS. 

Annong the Wheels in operation may 
be found the 

LARGEST AND SMALLEST WHEELS 

in great variety of form, style and finish, under the 

HIGHEST AND LOWEST HEADS 

in this country. Write, stating head, size of stream, kind of mill. We will send our 
fine pamphlet, and advise you. 




ENGINES AND BOILERS. 




UPRIGHT AND HORIZONTAL. 

From 3-horse Power Upward. 

SPECIALLY ADAPTED AND UNEXCELLED 
FOR DRIVING 

COTTON GINS 

AND 

MILLS. 



'J^^^ 



AFFORDING BEST POWER FOR 
LEAST MONEY. 



SEND FOR FREE PAMPHLET AND STATE 
YOUR WANTS TO 

JAMES LEFFEL & CO. 



SPRINGFIELD, 
OHIO, U.S. A. 



Or, 110 LIBERTY STREET, 

NEW YORK CITY. 



rUKMUM l.l-T. 

1245. i^nfjar caup gri'idt^r ! 

1246. C tm 'iiied sdA'^T ami cultivai"r .. I 

1247. Manure 8piead«r !■ 

1248. Fi( Id roller ! 

1249. Horse rake .. : ; ■ i 

1250. (yheck rower hi, mn 

1251. Dump cart .. h; '...i 

1252. PcHato or apple peeler ' 

1258. Potato digger 1 

1254. Groundpea cleaner Dijjlotu» 

1255. Feed steamer Uipluma 

1256. Stump puller Uiplom* 

1257. Portable farm fence Diploiun 

1258. Farm gate - l>iplonia 

1259. Washing machine Diploma 

1260. Clothes wringer Diploiuft 

1261. Tobacco press DipUnn* 

1262. Butter press Diploina 

1263. Cheese press-.- Diploma 

1264. Churn - - Diploma 

1265. Butter worker - Diploma 

1266. Wine press - - Diploma 

1267. Sad iron . or clothes ironer Diploma 

1268. Cotton plow -.- Diploma 

1269. One-horse plow Diploma 

1270. Two-horse plow Diploma 

1271. Four-horse plow.. Diploma 

1272. Sulkv plow. Diploma 

1278. Sulkv cultivator Dlpl-ma 

1274. Walking cultivator Dspl-ma 

1275. Harrow... " ' ' '"• 

1276. Road machine.. ' ' ^ '"» 

1277. Best and largest display of agricultural implement.^ ' ■«'! i M- <U1 

SPECIAL. 

For the best of the following articles made in North Carolini by exhibitorH. on the 
farm, for practical work: 

1278. Fieldroller ;JJ 

1279. One-horse dump-cart - |^ 

1280. Two-horse dump-cart ' 1^^ 

128 1. Stump puller - 

1282. Portable farm fence 

1288. Farm gate.. 

1284. Harrow ^ ^^ 

1285. One-horse plow " ^j^ 

1286. Two horse plow... g ^^ 

1287. Best plow stock j, ,^ 

1288 Best singletree ', ,^ 

1289. Best ox-yoke and bows ,,, 

1290. Best hames .-- ,^^ 

1291. Best three horse collars of any material. ... ^^ 

1292. Best nf st of cotton baskets, not less than six. ^^ 
1298. Bestaxe handle 

1294. Best hoe handle 

1295. Best backhand 

1296. Best plow bridle • 

1297. Best full set of plow gear (traces excepted i 

1298. Best shuck foot mat 

1299. Best bread tray 

1300. Best broom 



DEPARTMENT L 

EDUCATIONAL. 
Prof. J. B. BURWELL, Director. 



Competition for premiums in this department is confined to North Carolina. 

Exhibits by schools must be exclusively the work of pupils (except collections of 
natural specimens) actually attending the school, and the work must have beeii done 
since June, 1891. 

Exhibits by female schools may include art work, fancy work, penmanship, map 
drawing, culinary work, collections of geological, mineralogical, zoological and 
botanical specimens, plain and fancy sewing, by hand or machine, etc. Articles in 
such exhibit cannot compete for premiums offered in any other department, but may 
compete for one or more offered in this department. 

The Female Department of a mixed school may compete for premiums in the name 
of the school to which they belong. 

WORK OF SCHOOLS. 

1301. Largest and best exhibit by ( I'J ^'^'^- °"^ f^^inet Grand Piano, worth $S25. 

Female School " Prem. , handsome Gold Medal. 

' ( 3d Prem., one copy (3 vols.) Standard Dictionary. 

[4Eg="The premium piano is offered through Ludden & Bates' .Southern Music House, .Savan- 
nali, Ga., witli branch house at Kaieigh. It i.s style "J" of the Sterling Piano Co.'s malie; 1],'^ 
octaves, A to C. Double-veneered case, beautifully finished; combination and solid panels 
elaborately engraved or carved; swinging music desk; modern trusses; handsomely carved 
pilasters; ovei'strung scale; three strings; ivory keys; repeating action ; continuous liinges on 
fall and desk ; nicuel-plated rail and full iron frame ; three pedals. Length,. 5 feet 1 inch ; height, 
4 feet 5 inches ; width, 2 feet 2 inches. Walnut, nnahogany or oak case. Price, $^25. 

The premium medal is a large gold piece of high intrinsic and artistic value, given by Mr. H. 
Mahler, the well known Raleigh jeweller. The issuance of the medal from this house guaran- 
tees its rich workmanship and worth. 

The Premium Dictionary is given by Mr. Wayne Allcott, State Agent, Raleigh, It is the 
"Standard," issued by Funk & Wagnalls. It contains 2,200 quarto pages, nearly hfiOQ illustra- 
tions and nearly .'JOO.OOO words, which is 7.5,000 more words than is contained in any other dic- 
tionary of the language. It is acomplete dictionary and encyclopedia combined. The premium 
volume will be bound in full Russia and handsomely finished.] 

1302. For best general display by any male school. One thousand school catalogues, 

given by Messrs. Edwards & Broughton, the Printers, Publishers and Book 
Binders of Raleigh. 

1303. Display of maps and charts by school .- - ..Diploma 

1304. Display of art work by school - Diploma 

1305. Display of kindergarten work _ ... Diploma 

130(5. Display of agricultural and mechanical schools Dij)loma 

1307. Display of commercial school Diploma 

1308. Display of military school ...Diploma 

1309. Best general display work by school ... Medal 

1310. Best display of specimens of geology, mineralogy, zoology and botany 

by school...: ..Gold Medal 

1311. General display of graded school work by pupils under ten years of age. Diploma 

1312. Display of maps by pupils under ten years of age ... Diploma 

1313. Best specimen of penmanshij) by pupil Diploma 

1314. Best specimen of ornamental penmanship by pupil Diploma 

1315. Best specimen of penmanship by any boy or girl under fourteen years 

of age. Copy first two verses of First Psalm .Diploma 

1316. Best specimen of penmanship by professional Diploma 

1317. Best specimen of ornamental penmanship by professional Diploma 

1318. Display of penmanship by professional ... .... Medal 

1319. Best plan for country school hotise of one room Diploma 

1320. Best plan for village school-hou.se of two rooms ... ...Diploma 

1321. Best map of North Carolina drawn by a youth under sixteen, a pupil 

of any public school . $ 5 00 

1322. Best county map drawn by a youth under sixteen, a pupil of any public 

school in the county — 5 00 



DEPARTMENT M. 

HISTORICAL, SCIENTIFIC DISPLAYS, CURIOS, FREAKS, ETC. 
J. T. WYATT, DiRKCTOK. 



(Labels Required.) 

13:33. General collection of fossils $ 2 00 

1324. Genei-al collection of slieils 2 00 

132o. Collection fresh-water shells 2 00 

1326. Collection land shells 2 00 

1327. Collection ^lonnd Builders' (stone age) implements 4 00 

1328. Collection stuffed and mounted birds, animals and reptiles, illustrating; 

the natural history of the State Clold Mcilnl 

1329. Collection butterflies 1 00 

1330. Collection moths. 100 

1331. Collection botanical specimens Diploma and 2 00 

1332. Collection of curiosities, to consist of relics of the late war and of his- 

torical interest 5 00 

1333. Largest and best collection of Indian arrow heads 1 00 

1334. Largest and best collection of Indian a.\es 1 00 

1335. Indian pot.. -lO 

1336. Greatest curiosity in wood, natural '"M) 

1337. Greatest curiosity in vegetable life •'W 

1338. Greatest curiosity in minerals W 

1339. Greatest curiosity in granite 'W 

1340. Greatest living animal curiosity, any kind 8 00 

1341. Largest gourd ^ 

1342. Smallest gourd "^ 

1343. Longest gourd "^ 

1344. Fattest raccoon • ^ 

1345. Fattest opossum ' ^ 

1346. Pair canaries ' '"* 

1347. Mockingbird ' ^** 

1348. Talking parrot ' *♦ 

1349. An V other rare bird of merit ' JJJ* 

1350. Pair turtledoves ] *! 

1351. Largest and best collection of birds (five or more) 

1352. Largest and best collection of birds' eggs 

1353. Best collection of curios, not less than twenty specimens 

1354. Wax curiosities and relics 

1355 . Autographs of famous personages 

1356. Historical portraits and engravings ' 

1357. Ancient and modern coin collection * 

1358. Ancient documents, books, etc ^„ 

1359. Oldest antique piece • sir** 

1360. Largest and best collection Indian relics, to consist of not lf^ thanTiny 

different articles— all worthy— and properly lal>el--l '" J^ 

1361. Largest display of Confederate money - ' ^^ 

1362. Largest bill of paper money ".^ 

1363. Oldest bill of paper money , L. 

1364. Oldest gun J^ 

1365. Best Revolutionary war flag .^ 

1366. Best Revolutionary flag statf 



IN) 



•J IHI 

1 uo 



DEPARTMENT N. 

MINERALS, STONEWARE, ETC. 



l)n. H. B. BATTLE, Director. 



] 367. Best collection specimens of iron ores from State — labeled Diploma 

1868. Best collection specimens gold ores from State — labeled Diploma 

1369. Best collection specimens copper ores from State — labeled Diploma 

1370. Best specimen bitutninous coal, 1 00 pounds Diploma 

1371. Best specimen anthracite coal, 100 pounds Diploma 

1372. Best specimen building stone Diploma 

1378. Best specimen marble, dressed. North Carolina quarries Diploma 

1374. Best specimen millstone. North Carolina quarries Diploma 

1875. Best specimen of loam sand found in North Carolina for foundry pur- _-;n^: 

poses in the manufactui'e of stoves and other fine castings, with state- 
ment of location and extent of supply, accompanied by certificate of ~^'' 
actual test in a foundry .Diploma 

1876. Best specimen phosphate. 100 pounds Diploma 

1877. Best display of useful and ornamental potteiy ware, stone or earthen- 

ware Diploma 

1378. Best paving tiles Diploma 

1379. Best furnace, fire and stove tiles .Diploma 

1380. Best pressed brick, not less than 25 Diploma 

1381. Best common or moulded brick, not less than 25 Diploma 

1883. Best stock brick, not less than 25 _. Diploma 

1383. Best paving brick, not less than 25 Diploma 

1384. Best fire-clay from North Carolina Diploma 

1385. Best specimen of ])ipe for drainage, made in North Carolina, of clay, 

cement or other material ....... Diploma 

1386. Best specimen of tobacco pipes, of North Carolina clay Diploma 

1387. Best specimen rouble paving stones, not less than one dozen Diploma 

1 388. Best specimen of curbing Diploma 

1889. Best specimen gray gi*anite Diploma 

1 890. Best specimen white granite Diploma 

1891. Best specimen white and black-spotted granite . . .Diploma 

1892. Be.st specimen black granite ...Diploma 

1398. Best specimen blue granite Diploma 

1 394. Best specimen ])ink granite Diploma 

1895. Best specimen light gray granite Diploma 

1896. Best specimen any other kind granite .I'iploma 

1897. Best specimen sandstone Diploma 

1898. Best specimen fiexible sandstone .. Diploma 

1899. Best specimen white gravel pit grit Diploma 



THE PUBLIC ROAD QUESTION IN NORTH CAROLINA. 



It has been well said that " Every incinhcr of society is iiiteiesi.-.| m th. I. 

At birth, at death, and at all intermediate jioints diiriiij; life it is used. I4. .r 

less degree, by or for every individual nieiniK-r of society. It carii«'s tl.. .1... i..i tn 
the bedside of the sick, the minister to administer foii.solation to tiie dyin^. frii-nds u» 
the house of mourning, and the dead to their graves. It brings pun-liaM-r and con- 
sumer together. It is the avemie alike of |)leasiire and of traltic. Tlie farmer M-*'k- 
ing his market, the commercial traveller looking for customers, the millionair*- in 
search of enjoyment with his coach-and-foin-. the wheelmaivin the pursuit of 1. 
the few seeking pleasure and i)rotit on wheels, and the many in like |.ur- 
foot — all are interested in the public roads. Ami yet. direct and imniediat<> a- i n. — 
interests are. we are content to follow the methods of half a ct-ntury or more ago. to 
submit to inconvenience, to discomfort, and to the immen.->e waste of moiH-y and 
patience." 




, AN" ENGLISH COUNTKV ItO.AIi OF TO I).\Y, M AC AI>A M IXKI>. 

Nearly all the freight that is carried on the railroa<ls has to »»• (..■- 
over some kind of a road: all the freight that is hroiiulit int.. the statv 
roads has to be distributed to the citizens over some knid of a ro;id M 
farm lands, the value of mill privileges, the ^aine "'f fa«-tnry I.K-aliorm. «ii • 
largelv upon means of transportation, that is to sav. on lo al ro:td< 

The' greatest obstacle in the way of the move for U-tler r.».i ' -^ 

classes, who are ahvavs loth to increase the •' burdens <.r i.. 

cost: and this will continue to be the case until the |HH.pie .o,,,. ,.. '•""-'- ; -' * 
that 6ad rowls en^t more than good ro.id.s ; that the c wt ts immeiim- ami that It Ulto 
almost wholly on the farmer. 
^^»From '^Bulletin No. 4," Norlli Carolina Geologk-ul Sarvey. by J. A. Hottnw mnd Wn 



9'2 



ad\ehtise.mi<:n"is. 



BUCHER & GIBBS PLOW CO. 



GiBBS Plow 18 




^S^^^oi^ 



IMPERIAL IMPROVED SPRINC-TOOTH HARROW. 

DOES NOT GATHER TRAS I AS DO OTHER SPRING- 
TOOTH HARROWS. IT IS THE FARMER'S FAVORITE 
AND GIVES THE BEST OF SATISFACTION 

IMPERIAL ALL-STEEL SPIKE-TOOTH HARROW. 

STEEL U-BAR. TEETH AND LEVER ; TEETH CLA:\IPED 
TO BAR WITH MALLEAELE IRON CLIP, AND CAN BE 
REMOVED AND SHARPENED AS WORN 

THESE TOOLS ARE SUPERIOR IN 

MATERIAL, WORKMANSHIP AND FINISH. manufactured by 



THE BUCHER & GIBBS PLOW CO., 



Write for our Columbian Catalogue 



CANTON, OHIO. 



-K. Hj. Hj. Res* a In t Ion Rock Ronds 

As Made by 3IECKLENBURG COUNTY. 

All ihe machinery used by this County is made by the 

Mecklenburg Iron Works. 

JOHN WILKES, Manager, Charlotte, N. C, 
Who will be pleased to give information and to quote prices upon application. 



THK I'l'BLIC KOAD (irESTKiN. 



At just the time of the farmer's leisure, just tlie sejiso-i when ih.< farmer iihoiilii 
transport his product to the uiarket. lie is shut up to is»)lation. HoutetiineM for u.i<ki. 
and tlie work of transportation is delayed to the time of planlinjc. greatly Ui hu Km! 

COST OF WAOON TRANSI'OUTATION. 

" It is apparent that but few people comprehend tiie cost of traiis|M)rtation hv hnriM^ 
and wagons, or realize the amount of money anmiiiliy wasU**! hv the ill conditiun «if 
the roadways." 

The following table "shows from actual oi)servation the cost of moviiij,' a load of 
one ton a distance of one mile on level roadways with diircrfiit pavi-m.-ntH ui thi« 
usual condition in wh ch they are maintained. The excessive amount of lUt'm^ 
charges is seen, when it is remembered that the same goinls usinj; the roadwayn are 
now carried by the railroads at an average cost of ,"„ of a cent" {.vr ton \ht luilv. 

Cost of Transportation by Horses and Waoons, Haumncs Onk Ton a Immtakcr or 
One Mile on Different Hoau-coverino.«*. 

Onironrails 1 28 cents. On broken stone road, ordinary 

Onasphalt '2.70 " ooniUtlon 11.90 cvnta. 

On stone, paving, dry, and in good On broken stone roaid.covered wllli 

order _ 5.:^ " mud U..'*) •• 

On stone, paving, ordinary condi- on broken stone routl, with rut* 

tion 12.00 " and riuid MM " 

On stone, paving, covered with (^n eiirlli, dry and hard Ih.ou •• 

mud 21. .')0 " On earth. wiUi ruts and mud ;».00 " 

On broken stone road, dry, and in on gravt- 1, l<H>se Al.ao " 

good order 8.00 " on yravt-l, eonipacted y ViJ« " 

On broken stone road, moist and on plank, g<K>d cundlllon 8.H0 " 

in good order 10.30 " (»n .«and, wet SMB •• 

Ou sand, dry (M.OO " 

It will be seen from the above table that in hauling a load of one ton over one n)ile 
of level road, it costs more than twice as nnirh to haul this load over tin- U-st ilry ilirt 
road, about five times as much to haul it over a moderately muddy ilirt roail. and 
eight times as much on a dry, deep-sandy road, as it does to liatd 'the s;ime I<hi<I the 
same distance on the best dry. broken-stone or maca<lamized road. TIu'm- factM. and 
others given below will serve to show that better roads are needed in every MH-tion of 
the ytate, and that our bad roads in every section area heavy and t-xin-nhive burden. 

OTHER ITEMS IN THE COST OF BAD ROADs. 

In estimating further the cost of bad roads, we should take into ( ..n-i : 

loss of time by horses and men, the cost of maiiitaiiiiiig tin- hjii luriii t 

time, the injuries and the wear and tear to the horses, vehiclc-s and han.- : 

by the bad roads. We should al.so Uike into consideration the small load« th.r 
be hauled over these roads, frequently not one-fourth of a fidl load, atid \n ■ 
bear in mind the fact that during the "winter months, when ordinary farm woi 
not be carried on, is the time when wagons and tewins shoidd Im- mostly nmil 
roads in going back and forth to mark<'ts. etc., but this is just the s«'a.s4.n u li< n u .-.^ 
of the public highways become well-nigh impa.s.salile. even with b^-lit load-. It muft 
also be remembered that bad roads keep down the .selling and taxable \alue of Unda 
and all other real estate, while good roads raise these values, aa will bv bruu|{)it ool 
more clearlv below. 

We have now in the State, in round numbers, SCO.OOO hors4-s an<l niul.-H. ^\ . 
deduct from tliis number 50.000 which, in the cities ami town.s. c-an l»- un.-.! : 
the entire year, and there remain 210.000 horses and niide.s which, for our |i 
purpose, may be designated country horses and nmles. 

We may credit 134.000 of these to the llftv-si.x middle and wi-Mtern rouci,. i 

76,000 to the forty eastern counties. Th.-se ia4.000 country \u,rm-H and nm I 

to the middle and western counties cannot be u.s<'d during four w.t-k- -.f • ■■■ 

account of bad road?. The cost of feeding them i»er dav. ut tw.-?.' 
$26,800, which for the four weeks amounts to $:'.0.40(). Now let < 

item of the loss of time for the.se animals. Putting this .it 

(twentv-four days), we see another source of loss amotini i 

items give us a total of $1,054,400 per annum which «"•»>' 

passable public roads. Let us add to this the c.wt of_lh<- follo^^ 

amount in the aggregate to certainly not less than $^'t<>.(-<Mi: (, , ., , 

of ox-teams and the cost of feeding tliem during the four wttk*. ;-; und Uie k«^ 



94 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY, 



farmers sustain by not being able to carry farm produce, tobacco, cotton, etc., to 
markets at times when prices are highest: and the result presents at a reasonable 
estimate, a total loss of more than $l.(i(HI,(K)0 ])er annum to be charged against exces- 
sively bad public roads in North Carolina duiiiig tliese ft^ur weeks. 

We may suppose that one man was em))]oyed in the management of each pair of 
these 134,000 horses an i mules of the midland and western counties. Of these 67,0(tO 
teamsters we may fairly suppose that one-half of their time during the four weeks 
lost by the horses and mules was protltably emjjloyed in other ways about the farms; 
but we may also fairly consider the other half of their time as lost on account of bad 
roads. Valuing the services of these men at fifty cents per day and charging one- 
half of this as lost, owing to bad roads, we have (57,000 men at twenty-five cents, 
equal to $16,7.50 j er day; and for four weeks $iO'2.000. While this is believed to be a 
real loss due to bad roads it will not be included* in the final esiimates of the total 




THE FARMER IS 



■;iU T Ll' AND THE WORK OF TRANSl'ORTATION JS DELAYED, 
GREATLY TO HIS l.O.SS." 



loss, because there is a reasonable doubt as to the amount of actual loss from this 
soui'ce. 

~But then there is another lai-ge item that must be taken into consideration. We 
have estimated that this $l,6()0 000 per annum is lost during four weeks when the 
roads are so bad as to practicallv prevent all hauling. But it must be remembered 
that even when the dirt road is in good average condition, the loads hauled are not 
more than one-third those hauled on good Macadam highways. The average load 
for one horse on a macadamized country road in France is said to be two or three 
tons, and on the paved streets of a Fi-ench city one horse oft n pulls three to five 
tons; whereas, taken month in and month out. the load for one horse on the average 
American dirt road is less than half a ton. It can therefore be safely claimed that if 
we had good macadamized roads, the hauling we now do in two months could be 
done in less than half the time. 



Till-: ri Kl.ic lloAIt \»l KSTION. «»', 

It is probably safe to estimate tliat all the liaiilijij; ovvv the imhhe hmuIh <lnrinK' ihf 
year would reijuire the constant eniployment of the entire 'JlO.OdU horm'H ami iiiiiliit 
and 105. U(H) teamsters ami wa<^ons diirinj^; at least two months, with the nrndu in their 
present average condit on, and would reciuire their employment during one month 
on good Macadam roads. Here, then, is an imi>ortant ilem" of loss on aeeouni of >utti 
roads, z. e., the services and cost of maintenance of these horses and muleM, l«niin* 
sters, wagons and harness during one month. In this ca.se it is manifestly prI>|HT to 
include in the estimate the wages of teamsters, who spend all of their tune with the 
teams and are paid fvdl wages, while the teams are pulling half loads, and heucf 
losing half of the time. Valuing the services of these aiUUtW horses iinti nnilett nt 
twenty- five cents per day each (twenty-four days), we have an item of $l,"i<50.(MHJ; 
estimating their feed per day at twenty cents "each, twenty-eight davs. we liave 
another item of $1,176,000; and tlrt'se combined show a loss Of jf^.-lIItUMH) for the 
month. The pay of 105.000 teamsters, estimated at fifty cents p<'r day e.ich, gives an 
item of $53,500 per day and SI. -00. 000 for the four weeks. 'J'lie wear and tear on the 
105.000 wagons and harness, if placed at ten cents per day while in constant use. givi-n 
an item of slO.500 per day anil ^253.000 t\)r the four weeks. Add these s«-veral iti-niH 
and we have a sum of !^3.!)4y.OOO annually lost to the ])eople of the State l»y having 
poorly laid out and constructed dirt roads instead of good Macailam roa<ls. not includ- 
ing the loss during the four weeks when the roads are impassjible. That this is an 
actual loss will be seen more clearly when we understand that the amount of haul- 
ing which could be done at a profit will greatly increase as we make good roads, and 
thus reduce the cost of wagon transportation. 




KOAD 3IAKING IN RALEIOU TOWNSUII'. 

^- But there is vet another item which must be included in thi« general ••atimate iM-fore 
the grand total is reached. In the beginning of this di.scussion we left out of consid- 
eration fifty thousand of the hor.ses and nuiles in the .State as Ix-ing a|>proxiiiiately 
the number about the cities and towns which can be used throughout th. • ,r. 

The suburban roads and many of the streets of these towns, however, an it 

poor condition that we may safely estimate that if these streets and suh U 

were properly macadamized, these 50.000 horses and mules ami their .ii ' I 

do twice the "work thev now do, or one-half of them could e^sily d<i all li; 

now done, and the other half might thus be easily dis|H-ns«'i| with, ami tiii . .«tof 
horse feed, wagons, harness and teamsters saved. Let us s«'e wh.-it this sjivim.' would 
amount to if the latter plan were adopted. It costs tr) f«'ed these J" ' -I 

mules, at twenty five cents (citv prices) [jer day each for the year, u 
the sum of S2,28 1,000: and for these horses 12,500 t.-auKsters ar.- r...... .1 

fifty cents per day. cost for 800 days S1.h75.0imi: and 12.500 wagons aii-i .t 

ten" cents per day (for 300 davs). $:n5.000: making a total of about fl -r 

annum from these sources, which may fairly U- charged against <.ur inf«5r»ur r.JMU 
and streets. , , . , 

If we now estimate that there are in the State 220.000 to 

work on the public roads four davs of ea<-h year, and \ v 

cents per day, we have the sum of |440.0OO. which, wlu i , ^ ■ . .... ..r 

muscle, may be considered an anmial tax for public roads, but. in »p W ot Uiui larg.* 



96 



ADVEKTISKMENTS. 




The 0. S. KEIiIiY CO., 

-^-^Springfield, Ohio. 

5teann Road Rollers- 
Steam A5phalt Rollers. 
Portable Heating Tanks. 

Send for Handsome Illustrated Catalogue 
giving full description. 

REFERENCES:^-— a. 

Cities of Raleighi, JDtarhiam, Ashe= 
ville and Ctiarlotte, N. C. 



THK I'lM'.I.IC KOAIi lilKSTIoN. 




98 



NORTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



expenditure, year after year and decade after decade, we have not in the State to-day 
a long public liighway worthy of the name. 

Let us now bring together tlie result of these several estimates: 

Loss on account of the cost of feeding, and loss of time by the 1:^-1,000 country horses 
and mules in the middle and western counties, during four weeks of impassable 
roads, etc « 1,600,000 

Loss, on account of bad roads, of the time and expenses of maintenance of 210,000 coun- 
try horses and mules, 105,00i) wagons and harness, and wages of 105,000 teamsters, 
during one month - 3,948,000 

Loss, on account of bad roads, of the services and expense of feeding 26,000 town horses, 
and services of 12,500 teamsters, and wear and tear on 12,500 wagons and harness, all 
of whi(^h could be saved by having good roads and streets 4,531,000 

Wasted in working public roads in taxes and labor 440.000 



Total — $10,519,000 

The aggregate of these several items gives a grand total of over ten million dollars, 
which sum the people of the State lose annually on account of bad roads, and which 
sum might be saved annually to the State by a system of good macadamized roads. 

We are aware that many will question these astonishing figures, but they are care- 
ful estimates, not random gtiesses And while admitting that there are many sources 
of possible error, we are satisfied that whoever examines the estimates candidly 




BICYCLE RIDING ON RALEIGH TOWNSHIP ROADS. 

will be profoundly impressed with the fact that on account of these bad roads the 
people of North Carolina are suffering yearly enormous losses without any compen- 
sating return, and of the magnitude of which they seem to be hardly conscious; and 
it must be remembered that every year, as trade increases, and with it the number of 
horses and wagons and teamsters, we must use these bad roads more and more, and 
the losses they entail thus increase annually. These losses are, in an important sense, 
equivalent to an annual tax on the people of the State of ten million dollars, paid 
largely by the farmers who own the stock and wagons, but paid also in part by every 
man, woman and child in the State. 

And what do we get in return for this large drain upon the wealth of our people? 
A system of dirt roads, sandy in one region and clayey in another, which, as com- 
pared with macadamized highways, retard or prevent travel; diminish or prevent 
investment of capital; keep intelligent settlers away: retard and greatly increase the 
expense of all transportation and exchange of commodities between farms and 
markets; decrease the i)rofits of farming; interfere in the country with proper atten- 
dance at the schools and at churches: prevent proper social intercourse among people 
in the country, and between those living in the country and those in towns; make 
young people and old people dissatisfied with living in the country and anxious to 
move to towns and cities, where they can walk, ride or drive with some degree of 



TlIK rUlJMC KOAI) CiUKSTlON. 



<»0 



comfort; keep down the value of all lands and other real estate; prevent the inaUKurii- 
tion of many mining;;, manufacturin'; and other enter|>rises. hy making wuKon trann- 
portation too e.\|>t>nsive. 

And how Kmij; will this continue to be the case? What are we waiting for? How 
long will it be before the intelligent men of the State join earnestly in thiH move for 
better roads? How long will it be before our jieoplc. instead of asking for a •• re<lnc- 
tion of the burdens of taxation." already exceptionally ligh'. will come to undtTHtand 
that it will pay to expend a considerably larger portion of our labor and money in tho 
development of such internal improvements as tlu- construction of iM-ttcr public 
roads? How long will it be before we all come to realize the imperative nei-*! of \>et- 
ter roads sutiiciently to determine to have them, whatever sacrifice may U- nt-cehwiry 
in order to pay for them? If we wait until the country increases in wealth we may 
expect to " make haste slowly." for certain it is that batl roads tend to jierpetuate our 
poverty, and as equallv certain it is that good roads tend to increase the wealth and 
prosperity of the people. 




CONVICTS PKKCAKI.XG MACAUAM KN KALKKiH To W .N.-.W i i'. 



MILEAGE OF PUBLIC ROADS IN NORTH CAROLINA. 

It is of course impossible to give *iccurately the total mileage .f publi.- roads in the 
State owing to the fact that the majority of these roads have never U-en carefully 
surveyed and measured But an ap)>roximate estimate based u|K)n the U-st mn|w 
obtainable and extended observations in many counties shows a total for the State of 
(1) about 10 (00 miles of prominent public roads radiating from tlie coimty wat* to 
the borders of the counties, and (2) about lO.dOO miles of cross roails leading through 
various portions of the several counties. (lii In addition to these there in a f-onnider- 
able mileage of roads— probably 2(i.('0(i miles in all. some of tin in jiubin .r,,i «..ine 
private— of comjiarativelv little" inn)ortan(i-. which are not included in • iv. 

This would give an average of about 2i <> miles of prominent piiblu- i .<-h 

county in the State, i. e.. 100 miles of n.ads le;iding from the county wat «iui tltr^-ugh 
the country, and 100 miles of cross-roads: and an average of ','<»<• mil.-sof U-w-t public 
and private roads for each county In many of the larger counties the iiulenKP w 
greater, and in many of the smaller counties it is less than this average. 

THE COST OF GOOD R()AI>S. 

We have endeavored to sliow above approximat«'ly liow nnich our pi • m 

of bad roads costs the people of the State: an.i in statin- this at * •••r 

annum we believe that this estimate is Jielow rather than alw.ve the a- It 

must be apparent to every one that at any rea.sonable cost |ht mi e. the :. «n- 

diture of a small portion of this sum in road imi.rovement would give n- m of 

public highways, wliich in a short time would much more than jwy for lhfii.«-lv««. 



100 



NORTH CAROIJXA A(;KICU LTURAL SOCIKTY, 



Of course the cost will depend largely upon the kind of road to be made, but it may 
as well be clearlj' understood that the construction of any public highway which is 
to be worthy of the name, and which is to be of any real and lasting benefit to the 
communities through which it passe- is an expensive undertaking. The re-survey- 
ing, grading, proper drainage and other work in improving a good dirt road, may 
cost under different conditions from §100 to S^iOO per mile Macadamizing these dirt 
roads, already graded and drained, with different widtiis of road, different thick- 
nesses of broken stone and other varying conditions, may cost from $1,000 to $10,000 
per mile. 

Particulars of cost and method of construction are exhaustively given in " Bulletin 
No. 4," which may be had on application to J. v. Holmes. Chapel Hill, N. C. 

In Raleigh Township, in Wike (ounty. one of the larger and wealthier counties, 
Macadam roads are being constructed under the operations of a law which provides 
for the working of county convicts on the highways. 




A NKW WAKE COUNTY KOAI). 



This work is now done from the corporate limits of the city of Raleigh to the town- 
ship boundary line. About eight miles of road have been macadamized and the work 
is being gradually extended. It has given the greatest atisfaction, and is proving to 
be one of the most profitable and progressive steps ever taken. The advantages are 
seen bv' adjoining townships and the'^Ciood Road "" fever is spreading, slowly per- 
haps, but certainly and effectively; and some of those townships will ask the next 
Legislature for laws by which taxes may be levied u])on themselves for the purpose 
of good road construction Wherever these roads have been built, in Wake, Meck- 
lenburg, or other localities, there has been always an increase in value of property 
through which they run. Tliey have made stable values that would have otherwise 
fluctuated. That it woidd pay the people of any county to macadamize, or by some 
equally good method impro\ e the main roads lead ng from the county seats to the 
county boundaries, even though the cost should be large and that such a procedure 
would raise the selling value of farming lands and other real estate in the county ten 
to fiftj' per cent., no one who has studied the (juestion can doubt. 



COTTON AS A FACTOR IN PROGRESS. 



By D. a. TOMPKINS. 



The development of the production of cotton in the United Statt^s within a sin^Ut 
century from insifjnihcaiit pioportions t<> !• ()()(), <i()0 lialt-s a year. coMsidfrcd in all ilH 
relations to our industrial prof^ress, is \vitl\ont a jiarallfl in history. First of all, it is 
a sufficient answer to the charge so often riia<le aj^ainst tliesouthtrn part of tiie I'nited 
States that the people are without enterprise or mechanical in},'t'iiuity. It may not l>o 
going too far to assert that everything the northern part of the Union has accom- 
plished, put together has not affected the welfare of so many people in the world, or 

reached so far in its effeclM, 
-^ what has heen done in the 
ottt)n industry in the South. 
It may Im- answered: "The 
>outh alone is adapted to the 
iroduction of cotton; if it 
A(»uld only grow in the 
North, a dittereiit sliowing 
night have heen made hy 
hat section" But cotton 
:rows in India, in Kgypt. in 
hina.aiid in. South America, 
I lid a people cannot Ik* with- 
■ iit enterprise wlio. in cotn- 
letition with such a wide- 
pread cotton area. — m many 
>arts of which the plant Iihh 
leen cultivated for centuries 
ipon centuries — iti less than 
lue himdred years are ahle 
() show :i priNluction fur ex- 
< ediUi.' that of all the rest of 
he world 

In ISJO the cotton crop of 
he United Stat»-s amounttil 

ahout ^uii.tMHj hah^: in 
sltj the \ ield reached nearly 

1 (KiU.Onu ha'es Uurmg the 
reater part of the mterval 
he price has JM-en alnait ten 
o twelve cents jM-r pound. 
Mit it has i>een as Utw as tive 
■ents, and as high as twenty- 
■ieven centj*. leaving out of 
iccount the years of the war 
iseoto HtMi.wli ith 

radically '>- 

iiucing cotton ■ -> •■••IC 

."((H) |H»unds to the iKile and 
the price at ten cents per pound, the crop of 1«20 would have l.«-.-n w..rth. in round 
numbers. SiO.UOO.OoO. On the same hasis the .Top of IM!f.» would have a value of 
$450,('00.0OU. This great increase in i)roduction has l)een made in a .M4H-tion to whicn 
there has been no sucii constant tide of immigration sun has Ui-n e»|>.-riencf«i b> oincr 
parts of the United >tates and for this rea.son alone the result reHeetH great creUU 
upon the people who have accomplisheil it. 




IIIK CUTXU.N Ci-AM'. 



102 



NORTH CAROLINA AORICUI/rU H AT, ^O lETY. 



This great achievement is the result of three things combined, namely : ( 1) the enter- 
prise and energy of tlie people; (3) the invention of the cotton-gin; and (3) the design- 




ing of buildings and mechanical appliances by which the gin in ly be economically- 
operated. 

The cost of ginning 1.500 pounds of seed cotton and of baling the lint is to day only 
about one-fifth of the cost in 1870. The plantation gin-house and screw have been 



Cc TTON AS A FACTOR IN I'KOGRKHS. 



103 



supplanted almost entir ly by the modern ginneries wliieli an- centrally ItM-ated and 
are mamifacturinp:-l)lants ratlier than pljintation e(|nipments Many Of tlwni aro 
incorporated as parts of plants in wliicli the lint is >eparated liom the seed and liale<l, 
the oil is taken from the seed, and the cake is tiiound nito meal to he used ana fer- 
tilizer or cattle- feed, as the m.irkets may demand. 

In almost every community in the South there may now he found a luainifacturinK' 
plant known as a ji;it) oil-mill, and fertili/er-works. T ese ;; in cotton crush cotton- 
seed for cottonseed oil. and huvin;; some of the inj;redii'iits which are us«'d with 
cotton-seed meal, mix connnercial fertilizers -Out of thif de\eio|iment luis come the 
further business of fattening;- cattle on cotton seed hulls and cotton-M-ed meal. 
Recently a large business has been developed by these factories in preparing a Ht<x;k 
food made of cotton-seed hulls and meal, mi.xed. Hefore the war tlie seed were a 
waste product: ten ye^^rs ago the hulls were used for fuel oidy. LaHt year cotton- 
seed sold at $20 per ton and the hulls at from $:^ to s?! p.r ton 




HAULING COTTON TO THE GIN. 

The most expensive item now left in the production of cotton is the cost of picking 
the fiber from the stalks in the field. This opportunity for the e.xercise of ingenuity 
has not been neglected during the last few years Numerous patents have Un-n issued 
for cotton-harvesters, many of which are absolutely without merit, but some of which 
are marvelouslv ingenious. One tiiat seems, so far. to have come nean-st to «loinK 
commerciallv successful work is that of Mr. ('. T. Mason, .f South Carolina. The 
extent of the incentive for the solution of this problem may Ik.' judged from the fol- 
lowing estimate: 

The price now paid for picking cotton is from 50 to 75 cents f)er liundred ponnds. 
About 1.500 pounds of seed and cotton are required to make a ball of lint weigliinu 
501) pounds. The cost of picking 1 .5()<) pounds of cotton at. .say m c.-nt** jM-r hundr.-<l. 
would be S9. Therefore to pick ten million bales, which linut it is juvsum.il will be 
reached in the near future, would cost, at |)resent j)rices ^StO.ono.iMK) It i.m-laini.'<I 
by the cotton-harvester inventors that a machine can be made whicli with one inulo 
and one laborer can i)ick or gather 4.000 i.oimds of seed cotton ikt day. whereas the 
picking of loO to "200 pounds by haml is a gtuul day's work. 

The following table will gi\ e some idea of the increa-se in pro<hictio. • v 

tenth year, and of the value of each crop inchnled in the list sine*- n 

round numbers. Valu^^s nt' all hased on the rate of lU centn jht ixhuio .um .m ;i».i- 
age weight per bale of 500 pounds. 



104 



NOHTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Year 



1820 
1830 
1840 
1850 
18(50 
1870 
1880 
1890 



Production in bales, 



400.000 
1.000.000 
1.600,000 
2,-if)0,000 
3.(iOO,000 
4. -250, 000 
6.600.000 
8,0QO.O0O 



Value at 10 cts. per pound, 



$ 20.000,000 
50.000.000 
80.000,000 
112,500,000 
180.000.000 
212 500.000 
880.000.000 
400,000.000 



As has been stated alread3% the seed were before the war a waste product except 
where used in the iSoutheast to a limited extent as a fertilizer, since the war the 
cotton-seed oil business has been developed to such an extent that in the current sea- 




^^'^ 



A COTTON PI-ATFOKM AT EALEKill. 

son about 1.500.000 tons of seed wnll be crushed for oil and other products. Out of 
these seed come the following products, against which their values are shown; 

50,000.000 gallons cotton oil at $ 50 . . $ 25.000,000 

700,000 tons hulls at 4 00 2,800,000 

500.000 tons meal at 20.00... 10,000.000 

50,000,000 pounds short lint at .08 1 ,500,000 

Total -- $89,300,000 

This much comes out of what was in the days of slavery almost entirely w-asted. 

It is not alone in the utilization of cotton-seed that the revived mechanical genius 
of the South has been exhibited, but in the manufacture of cotton into \ arns and 
cloth as well. In a region of country reaching along the foothills of ihe mountains 
from Lynchburg, Virginia, to Atlanta, Georgia, almost every town has one or more 
cotton-factories, built since the war. Many factories have been built on the water- 
powers in the country, and towns have grown up around them. At first only coarse 
goods were attempted; then finer and finer products, by degrees. While as yet no 
very fine goods have been produced, enough has been done to prove that as capital 
accumulates and the owners acquire knowledge of the business and the operatives 
improve in skill, there is no more limit to the quality of the goods that may be made 
in North Carolina, than those that may be made about Lowell, Massachusetts, or 
Manchester, England. 



LIFE MEMBERS OF THE NORTH CAROLINA STATE 
AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 



Allcott, Wayne Raleigh, N. C. 

Allen. J. S Richmond. Va. 

Armstrong. John Columbia. S. C. 

Adams, L. H Raleigh. N. C. 

Adams. J. L., Raleigh, N. C. 

Andrews, A. B -. Raleigh, N. C. 

Arrington, B. F Goldsboro, N. C. 

Alexander. S. B Charlotte, N. C. 

Andrews, P. H. Mrs Raleigh, N. C. 

Brewster, J. C Raleigh, N. C. 

Bobbitt. J. B Raleigh, N. U. 

Busbee, J. T Raleigh, N. C. 

Busbee, CM... Raleigh, N. C. 

Busbee, J. L Raleigh, N. C. 

Busbee. F. H Raleigh. N. C. 

Blake. T. W Raleigh, N. C. 

Broughton. N. B ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Bachelor. J. B Raleigh, N. C. 

Boylan. W. M ...Raleigh. N. C. 

Bradlev, R. H Raleigh, N. C. 

Bur well. J. B Raleigh, N. C. 

Bryan, A. P Raleigh, N. C. 

Busbee, Johnston . Raleigh, N. C. 

Brown, N. L Raleigh, N. C. 

Blacknall. G. W Raleigh. N. C. 

Blacknall, J. T Raleigh, N. C. 

Betts, Anderson Raleigh, N. C. 

Battle, R.H Raleigh, N. C. 

Battle. L. J Raleigh, N. C. 

Bunting. J. N. . Raleigh, N. C. 

Badger. Thomas ... Raleigh, N. C. 

Battle, K. P .. Raleigh, N. C. 

Battle, Lucy Miss Raleigh, N. C. 

Bell, Douglass Raleigh, N. C. 

Blair, J. M . . . . Raleigh. N. C. 

Blacknall, G. W. Jr Raleigh, N. C. 

Briggs, T. H Raleigh, N. C. 

Crawford, W. R Raleigh, N. C. 

Crenshaw, J. M Wake Forest, N. C 

Crawford. J. H Raleigh, N. C. 

Cox, W. R Washington, D. C. 

Carmer, J. R. H Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Clawson, C. C Brooklyn, N Y. 

Clawson, H.T... Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Clark, Walter Raleigh, N. C. 

Cheathan;, B. F ...Raleigh, N. C. 

Cowles, M. T. Mrs Waterbury. Conn. 

Cowper, Grimes Mrs.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Dodd, James Raleigh, N. C. 

Dunn, R. G Raleigh, N. C. 

Divis, W. R .Raleigh, N C. 

Dodd, W. H Raleigh. N. C. 

Denson. C. B .Raleigh, N. C. 

Dancy, F. B. Mrs Norfolk, Va. 



Edwards. C. B Raleigh, N. C. 

Ellis, D. J Raleigh. N. C. 

Ellington, J. M Raleigh. N. C. 

Fraps. A. W Raleigh. N. C. 

Faison. P. F Raleigh. N. C. 

Fuller. T. C Raleigh, N. C. 

Fasnach. Edward ..Raleigh, N. C. 

Ferrall. J. R Raleigh, N. C. 

Ferrall. R. K Raleigh. N. C. 

Foote. J. H Warrenton, N. C. 

Fries, H. W Winston, N. C. 

Galley, J. P Raleigh, N. C. 

Graham, G. W Charlotte, N. C. 

Grissom, Eugene Denver. Col. 

Gulley. L J Raleigh, N. C. 

Guthrie. W. A Durham, N. C. 

Green, W. J Fayetteville. N. C. 

Grimes, Miss Nella Raleigh, N. C. 

Hayw-ood, F. J.. Raleigh, N. C. 

Havwood, F. J. Mrs Raleigh, N. C. 

Heck, G. C Knoxville, Tenn. 

Heck, F. E. Miss Raleigh, N. C. 

Heartt. CD Raleigh. N. C 

Hardie, P. C Raleigh. N. C 

Havwood. J. P Raleigh. N. C. 

Hoileman. W. H ..Raleigh. N. C. 

Harris, J. F Raleigh, N. C 

Heck. J. M. Mrs ...Raleigh, N. C 

Hunter. J. C Raleigh, N. C. 

IJarris, J. C. L.. ....Raleigh, N. C 

Harri-i, James ..Raleigli, N. C 

Haywood, J. A Raleigh, N. C. 

Hawkins, W.J Raleigh. N. C 

Hoke. R F- .Raleigh. N. C. 

Hicks. W.J .Raleigh, N. C 

Hogg, T. D... . Raleigh, N. C 

Hawkins, M.J. Ridgeway, N. C. 

Holt, T. M Haw River, N. C. 

Hines, P. E. Raleigh, N. C 

Heartt, L.D Durham, N. C 

Jones. J. A Rajeigh. N. C 

Jones. J. W Raleigh, N. C. 

Jones. N. P Raleigh, N. C. 

Jones. Armistead Raleigh, N. C. 

Jenkins. T. G Raleigh, N. C. 

Johnston. W. M ... Charlotte, N. C. 

Love, T. L Raleigh, N. C 

Lewis. Julius Raleigh, N. C 

I -ougee, L. O Raleigh. N. C. 

Lougee, G. E Durham, N. C. 

Lee, J. W Australia. 

Lee, T. F Mexico. 



T.IFK MKMIiRRS. 



1(17 



Leach, J. P Littloton, N. C. 

Lassiter. T. L Rak-itjli. N. C. 

Leach, M.T.. Kaleigh, N. C. 

Lawrence, G. W Fayetteville, N, C. 

Leacli, G. T High Point, N.*C. 

Lee, E. H. -Mrs Raleigh. N. C. 

Lee, A. S 

Martin, T. D Raleigh, N. C. 

McKee. W. H Raleigh. N. C. 

Myatt, W. A Raleigh, N. C. 

Mbseley, N. S . . - - . Raleigh. N. C. 

Marconi, J. W ...Raleigii. N. C. 

McPheeters, A. M Raleigh, N. C. 

McGee, T. Mrs Raleigh, N (J. 

McGee, W. T Raleigii. N. C. 

Morris, J. T Raleigh, N. C. 

Moring, F. O Raleigh, N. C. 

Mahler, H Raleigh. N. C. 

McKee, James .Raleigh, N. C, 

Mitchell. T. J Raleigh, N. C. 

Montague, B. F .Raleigh, N. C. 

IMcKee. J. S Raleigh, N C. 

Moore, James . . Raleigh, N. C. 

Norris. M. T. Raleigh, N. C. 

^e\vsom, J. D Raleigh, N. C, 

Norris, W. H.... Raleigh, N. C. 

Nichols, John Raleigh, N. C. 

QCttinger, Isaac New York, N. Y. 

O'Kelly, John Raleigh, N. C. 

Otey, VV. G Raleigh, N. C. 

Pullen. J. T Raleigh, N. C. 

PuUen, R. S Raleigh, N. C. 

Pool, S C Raleigh. N. C. 

Pescud, J. S Raleigh, N. C. 

Primrose. W. S Raleigh, N. C. 

Parker. M. A Raleigh. N. C. 

Perry, P. W Raleigh. N. C. 

Pace. W. H. Mrs Raleigh, N. C. 

Petty, R. E - Moore County. 

Page. W. H New York. 

Procter, I. M Raleigh, N. C. 

Root.C. B Raleigh, N. C. 

Rosenthal, L Raleigh, N. C. 



Stephenson, T. S Raleigh 

Stronach. A. B lialeigii 

Strong. G. V Ruleigh 

Simpson, William Itiileigli 

Scott, J. W Sanforil 

Shaffer, A. W Itoleigh 

Stronach. W. C Raleigii 

Smedes, B Hali-igh 

Short, N. B .Flemington 

Thomas, J.J Raleigh 

Tucker, R. S Raleigh 

Thiem, Phil Raleigh 

Turner, V. E. .R;ileigh 

Temple, A . H IJ la.sg( > 

Taylor, J. F .Rahigh 

Thomas, H. C Raleigh 

Upchurch, B. J Raleigh 

Upchurch, W. G Raleigh 

Upchurch. Alfred Durham 

Upchurch. W. C Raleigh 

Upchurch, A.N Raleigh 

Upchurch, H. C lijileigh 

Weikel. C . Raleigh 

Williams, G. H Raleigh 

Williams, R. I Raleigh 

Williams. Alfred It^ileigh 

Wyatt, L. R li^il.-igh 

Wilhams .n, B. P Raleigh 



Williamson. R. B BnK)klvn 

West, N. W Riileigh 

Whitaker, J. D li<ileigli 

Weir, W. J Italeigh 

Wait, S. D Raleigh 

Watson, J. W It;ileigli 

Watson, H. W Raleigh 

Williams. C. W Raleigh 

Wynne, G. W lijileigh 

Williams, J. R liiiL-igh 

Watson, H. W Kaleigh 

Wiley. P. A liJileigh 

Williams, S. T Riileigh 

Welsh, fhiiry Rjileigh 

Wilson, J. M Wil.s«)n"s 



Young, T J - 
Yancey, T. P. 



...Rjileigh, N. (• 
...lijileigh. N. «• 



FAIRS TO BE HELD IN 1694. 



FAIR. 


PLACE. 


DATE. 


SECRETARY. 


Iowa 


Des Moines, la. 


Aug. 31 to Sept. 7 .. 

Sept. 3 to 7 


P. L. Fowler 


Maine 


Augusta 


G M. Twitchell. 


West Virginia 


Wheeling 


Sept. 3 to 7 


George Cook. 
L. M. Bonham. 


Ohio _.. - 


Columbus ... ...... 


Sept. 3 to 8 


Champlain Valley. 


Burlington, Vt ..... 


Sept. 4 to 7 


E. W. J. Hawkinsv 


Monroe County... 


Stroudsburg, Pa 


Sept. 4 to 8 


T. C. Brown. 


Canada's Gt. Ind.. 


Toronto, Canada 


Sept. 8 to lo 


H. J. Hill. 


Nebraska.. 


Lincoln 


Sept. 7 to 14 


R. W Furnas. 


Michigan 


Detroit 


Sept. 10 to 20 


I. H Butterfield. 


Burlington Co .. 


Mt. Holly, N. J 


Sept. 17 to 21 


H. I. Budd. 


Rhode Island 


Pi'ovidence 


Sept. 17 to 21 


Walter W. Dexter. 


Indiana 


Indianapolis 


Sept. 17 to 22.. 


C. F. Kennedy. 


Inter- State 


Trenton, N. J 


Sept. 24 to 28 


.1. G. Muirheid. 


Illinois 


Springfield, 111. 


Sept. 24 to 29 


W. C. Gerrard. 


Hillsdale 


Hillsdale, Michigan.. 


Oct. 1 to 5 


J. F. Fitzsimmons. 


St. Louis 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Oct. 1 to6 


J. K. Gwynn. 


Burke County 


Morganton. N. C 


Oct. 2 to 4 


Theo. Gordon. 


Hagerstown 


Hagerstown, Md 


Oct. 9 to 12 


P. A. Whitmer. 


Virginia 


Richmond 


Oct. 9 to 19 


W. G. Owens. 


South Carolina . . . 


Columbia, S. C 


Nov. 12 to 16 


T. W. HoUoway. 



FARMERS ^ FERTILIZERS 



TO SUCCBBD 

IN GROWING 





If you want a good Fertilizer for 



Any Crop 



Write to us. 




^^^ 



^J:^rnu/^'^^ * 



MANUFACTURERS 



WORKS LARGE. 




t> 



(IflGANS RELIABLE HAMS, 

SMOKED MEATS. K (Q:^^^ 
DRY SALT MEATS. ^^^' ^'^^- 

PICKLED PORK-'K-PURE LAI 



U-/ 



fC^r-t 




fi 



^ 



-n^ 



yt 



^^j 



FRESH ^SMOKED SAUSAGE. 
BOLOGNA, 
^:r * * CANNED MEATS, rjf ^r ^i- 

FRESH MEATS...* DRESSED BEEF 

'Breakfast Bacon. ^ 



..•I'' 



'""'"»TmfH^p«wnigi^^