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Full text of "Ravelings"

H"! 




uuiLLinm R. Din€$, jr., Editor 

H€nRy R. SmiTH, Business fTlanager 






iB»7^ 



csffn^m^w^^^im^m^ | 



THe 1940 Rnv€LinGS 

Published by the 

JUniOR CLfiSS 

Of (Tlonmouth College 




1 1 
II 



j; 



^ ^ 






Copyright 1039 
Volume XLVI 

June 1939 



D€DICflTIOn 



To tlic men and women of the Greek letter social oro'anizations, past 
and present, in their unshirkinj;" participation in the acti\ities and life of the 
C(illei;e. adding to the atti'acti\eiiess of each passiiii;" da\' witli their overflow 
of I'ov and happiness, facini;' the nian\- dirficiillies which ha\'e confronted 
them ihron^h llie \ears and i)rep;irinj;' the road for their successors, tlrawinj;' 
each \'ear the flower ot the Freshman class, producing' most capal)le and 
e\'er-lo\'al alumni who ]i;i\e carried the re\ered name of "Alonniouth" on 
their lijis to the four corners ( d" the earth, making" the name of their "alma 
m;iler" renowned as a pioneer (ireek letter collet^e. participating;" in the 
development of Monmouth C'olle,iL;e to its [jresent point of honor ant! prestige 
■ami.nj4" American colleges and universities, the ic)4C) R.WEUixcs is respect- 
full\ dedicated. 



W*||iliP?' 




FRnTERNITV 



SDRDRITV 



;;^n_Ba» ptii -J 






CLASSES 



STUDENTL FE 



sr^nsr 



SIGNALS fR OP-KiC Kf^ \^^\ /V/IElDCWL PiG-Sf 



conieriTs 
















HTHLETICS 







mUS C ^^ji<;^^ 



FORENS C ^'^ 



DRRfTIHT (Si 







IBSEN-WILLIAMi -VIOLA-CRIMSON MASQUE -TWUFTh 



W 




4^ 



FOR€UJORD 



It lias lifcn iiur tnii>t ainhitidii and niitii'inj; flfdrl In acex-ii- 
tuatc and !;i\(.' lUi'in in tlii' iik'HH irio ol (Hii' cnllfj^x' ila\> whicli 
ill alUT \c'ars will ]k iimst clKri>lK'il. In llii> allciii]il. tlic 
K(ui\-Sixtli \'c>luiiK' nf ihf .Mdiiniiiutli Ci'lk',i;i.' 1\ w i;i,i.\(',s i> 
lu'iH' iiflcrcd til iinr licliixrd ci ilk't^c and il^ Icarneil slnik'nt^. Max- 
its ci intents lir prcscrx I'd and in da\> tn cnnK- il> pa;;!'^ tiinud 
hack til hrin^- nianv lia|i|i\- nu-nii iric^. \\k hupf nnr readers. 
wlKtlKT stndcnls, alnnini, kv I'lirnds, will find niucli en ii i\nient 
in tlic fi illiiwiiii;' pa.t^cs. May it scr\ c tn hriiii;" tn.^ctlRT in iiniMin 
the niaiu aeti\itie'- which Mirrnund n-- in the niiu' iii(inth> nt 



)iir ci i|leL;"e \ear. 



Tfin Ku*' R.iriiijxcs st.ifp. 



in fTiEmoRiflm 



Tlie memory of some great men is like a tall, straight tree — hut the 
memory of Dr. T. H. McIMichael is like a hill, a sno\y-cro\vned, heayen- 
seeking hill. Pot thirty-three years of ser\ice. he was a greater Monmouth 
tradition than the college seal or the campus maples. 

Dr. McMichael assumed the presidency of the college in 1903, just six 
years after his own father, Dr. J. B. McMichael had resinged from the 
same position. With a foundation of two huildings and a struggling repu- 
tation, he deyeloped a college of high standing throughout the midwest, a 
college with three millions of capital assets. 

Born in Monmouth, Dr. McMichael received his higher education at 
Monmouth College. A pcjpular student, pleasant and winsome, he gained 
fame both as an orator and athlete. He once pitched to \ictor}- both hall 
games of a double header with the Uni\-ersity of Illinois. 

A graduate fr<:im !\lonmouth College in 1886, Dr. McMichael became 
a student of the United Presbyterian Theological Seminar}- at Xenia, Ohio. 
After graduation from the seminary, he seryed in pastorates in both Spring 
Hill, Indiana, and Cleveland, Ohio; th.en accepting the presidency <if his 
alma mater. 

Five colleges presented Dr. McMichael with honorary degrees during 
his lifetime and several offered lucrative positions which were always rcfusctl. 
He would not desert Monmouth College. 

The students who remember Dr. McMichael as a wise councillor, guide 
anil friend are man\'. He himself remembered with personal interest and 
attention e\ery student with whom he had associated. 

A man of distinguished appearance. Dr. McMichael's snow}- hair and 
kindly face were familiar emblems of the college for the thiirty-three \-ears 
of his active presidency and the one _\'ear after he had resigned to Ije suc- 
ceeded by Dr. James H. Grier. Not only the college, but the United Pres- 
byterian Church suft'eres the loss of this man whose ready friendliness and 
keen intellect were accessible for eyer\' worthwhile work. 

Dr. Grier, in speaking of Dr. McMichael, said, "A great man has passed 
away, one whose name and work will live in the memory of this community 
and of the United Presbyterian Church for years to come." Someone else 
has said that Dr. McMichael's ability, character and personality were so wide 
in scope that he would have attained a conspicuous success in various other 
fields of activity. 

\\'ith tenderness we think of Dr. MclNIichael antl regret his passing only 
because we can no longer benefit from his searching character and deeply 
inlaid Christian principles. 

Some great men live in our memories like tall, straight trees — but Dr. 
McMichael was like a strengtli-gi\ing hill, a snow-topped, hea\'en-reaching 
hill. 




''7:^J- 



TTK 



1 t.-rC<a_a_^ 



CRfTlPUS V16LUS 




'r-iviliijlit sdflly fuliiiii/ hriiKjs iiic llidutihls of iit/icr days: 
I dvcatii about a caiii/^iix d rifled dcc/^ in sunlit li'j:::i\ 

J (/Icain of stately jvllars i^'liere the /^urfde s/iado:es fall. 

The smiles and </reetiii(/s of llie friemls I lore the hesi of all. 

Ijje's loll;/ road may lead me far from M onn}onth's ha/''/'>v laay: 
'/die dreams I dreamed in e<dle(/e fade in duties of toilax- 

lUit oh! to our dear eam /vis. our t/ioinj/ifs turn baek to you. 

'Idle slroiKj and loyal hrotherliood of friends ami eomrades too 

— Elizabeth H. Parrel!. 




LIBRflRY 




UURLLflC€ HRLL 




SCI€nC6 HniL 



\ 




Gymnflsium 




Fine ARTS BUILDinC 




nricmicHna DORmiTORy 



cflmpus 



snflps 




THE TERRACE CRIMSON MASQUE LITTLE THEATRE GYMNASIUM 

CHAPEL-AUDITORIUM WALLACE HALL McMICHAEL DORMITORY 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY AND BUSINESS OFFICE LOOKING EAST SCIENCE HALL 

PANORAMA VIEW OF CAMPUS FROM THE EAST BROADWAY FLAGPOLE 

PHI KAPPA PI PRESIDENT'S HOME, "WOODBINE'' SUNNYSIDE DORM. 

TAU KAPPA EPSILON HOME OF FINE ARTS COLLEGE CLUB HOME 

MARSHALL HALL FOR GIRLS THE BOYS' VAN GUNDY HALL BETA KAPPA 



PR€siDenT 




Jam€S Harper Grier 



A. Vk. Wcslniiiij^UT C'iille,L;r. njoj; .\^ M.. 
iliid.. i()(>3; riUsliur;;li 'I'lici iloj^iral ScniiiKU \ . 
11)1") ; 1 >• n.. \\ Otiniiivlcr C'iille,i;c, !()_'_'; 1,1,. 
I)., W'otniiii.stcr Ciillc^c, Uj^j; I'rdfussnr of 
Greek'. \\'c^linin>tci' l'iilk',i;L-. kjos-h')- IV-acii- 
in.i;' ,-111(1 Suulw Assiul C< 11c.l;c. l^i^ypl, ii^oj-os: 
Fnifcssiir Old 'lV>t;inicm 1 ,an.iL;u,'i,i;(-' and Lit- 
erature, Pittsl)ui-,t;h TlKMild^ie.al Seminary. 
19JJ-1926. Ml iiinii null, 11)3(3. 



Pace Twenty 



Dean 




J. S. CIdand 



A. B., Muskin.yuni College, igo8; A. M., 
Princeton L"ni\'ersity, 1909; Pli. D., Uni\er- 
sity of Pittsburg;h, 1914; Graduate Student, 
Columbia University, Summer 1916; Oliin 
State Uni\-ersity, Summer 1936. Monnioulh, 
1927. 



of the Collige 



Dean 



:mma 



Gib 



son 



Ph. B., Colorado State Teachers College, 
1908; A. B., University of Neljraska, 1012; 
A. M., Columbia University, 191b; Graduate 
Student, University of Chicago, Summers of 
1924, 1925, 1933; European Study and Trav- 
el, 1929-1930; Summer 1935. Monmouth, 
1920. 




Bu 



$in€S$ 



)f iJU 



omen 




D. m. mclTlichael 

A. B., Monmouth College, igib; Har- 
\"artl L'niAersit\', School of Business Admin- 
istratit)n, 191 7. Monmouth, 1929. 



m 



anager 



Pat-c Twenty-two 



WILLIAM S. HALDEMAK 
Pressly Professor of Chemists 
Graduate Keystone State Teachers College, 1904; L'ni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 1914 ; A. M., Harvard University, 
1920: Graduate work, Universit\' of Illinois, summer ses- 
sion 1920, 1921, 1922, 1925. Research Chemist, U. S. In- 
dustrial Chemical Company, summer 1927. 1928, 1929; Uni- 
versitv of California, summer session, 1932, Monmouth. 
1918. ■ 

MILTO.X .\U)-\K(.)I-; .MA^XARD 
Professor of Educ.vtiox 
A. 1'... University of Oklalioma. 1908: Graduate 
(lent in Entflish. Universitv of Chicago, summer se 
1909. 1913. 1916; A. M.. in Education. Universitv 
nois, 1920. Monmouth. 1909. 

JOHN DALES BUCHAI^^X 
Professor liF Eihlk .\.\ii I'^^B^^.'^' 
A. I!.. Monmouth College. 191,^; A. M., I'lincl.. 
Mi-Mtv. 1921; Th. B.. Princeton Theological SiniinnN 
(Graduate Student Universitv of (liicaso. 191'', I'L'.s 
Graduate School of Theologv. Edmliiirgh. \<)2l-l')ZZ 
1923; Universitv of Edinburgh. I'LM : l.hhversilv of N 
hurg German. '1922; D. D.. Tarkm Cnllegc. 1931. Jl 
ninnlli. l')23. 




FK.XXCIS MITCHl-LL McCl.l'.X.\lMN'=^*' 
Professor of Piivsus .a.vh Gicoi.ocv 
A. B.. Tarkio College. 1896; A. B.. \:i]v UniverMtv 
19(10; A. M.. ihid.. 1901; Universitv of Chicago. siVmn 
1897. 190.S. 1911; Graduate Student. 'I'alc Universlt\, 1' 
1903. 190.=i-1906; Fellow Mellon Institute, 1916-1918. M 
m..nth. 1924. 



I\-AX W. C.M-IOOX 
DiKKi riiK .\.\ii MA.\.\(;i':k of .Atih.I'.tk 
I'h. r... Gonzaga University. 192.S; ( hM.hi; 
Uni\ersil\ nf Wisennsin. sun-nier sessions. 1933 
l"',i.S. .Mniinmuth. 19,i8. 



.e Stud. '01. 
1935. 1937, 



S \\iL'l-;i M. TIKAl i'Si )X 

I 'UCIKISSIK nl- I'll ll.lisnIM V 

.\. i;.. Momni.uth College. 1>L'4 : A. M.. Princeton Uni- 
it\. 1''25: l-\-llinv in I'liilnMipln . I'rineeton Universi;\'. 
-i'L'{.; Ph. \).. ihid,. I"31. M-nninulh. 19_'(i. 



HERBERT McGEOCH TELFORD 
Professor of Classical Languages 
A. B.. Muskingum College. 1896: Pittsburgh Theologi- 
cal Seminary. 1899; A. B.. Princeton University. 1904; 
Graduate work. University of Tennessee. 1901-1903; Buhl 
Classical Fellowship. Universitv of }ilichigan. 1922-1924: 
A. M.. ibid., 1923; Ph. D.. ibid.. 1926; Study and Travel 
in Greece, summer 1934. Monmouth. 1928. 



W. MALCOLM REID 
.Assistant Professor of Biologv 
S.. Monmouth College. 1932; M. S., Kansas State 
-ge. 1937; Teaching and Study, Assuit CoUe.ge, Egypt. 
-1935; Heidelberg Lhiiversity, summer session. 1933; 
ias State College, 1935-1937; Brown Universit}-, 1937- 
; Cold Siirin.g Harbor Biological Station^ summer ses- 
.18. Monmouth. 19.^8. 




ROBERT WiXSLOW McCULLOCH 
.As^Jj^^'T Pi<i'FESS(!R OF Political Scte.ni e 
\. H.^^n Sl-ge. 1931 ; A. M.. University of Mich- 
I'l.iJ; Tra\el and Study in England. France. Germany 
Swuzerland 1933 ,!4 : Ph. D.. Universitv of Michigan, 
4. Mnnmoufli, l'M5. 



iiiOM.VS HOFF.\l.\X H.\.\lILTOX 
PifoFEssoR OF Fi.N'E Arts 
\.Wl. Monmouth College. 1907; University of Xorth 
1922; Graduate student Universitv of Chicago, 
lol_', Munmers 1934-37: Columbia Universitv. 1917-18: Al- 
lianu l-'rancaise. Paris. 1919; Lhiiversitv of North Caro- 
liy:i 1920-22; Marv.inl 1923-25; Research. Librarv of Brit- 
ish .Museum. 192S. .\lnnm..nth. 1932. 

n.W'iD .\. .\lrl^;k.\^■ 

.\SS0I l,\TI. Pk 'KKSSi'R of r.llll.K AMI ReMOIOX 

.\. P.. MunnunUh C..lleL;e. 1885: A. \\ .. Princeton Uni- 
versity. 1887: 1), 1)., O.e Cnllegc. l')(L'. Mnnmouth. 1925. 

G.MxK'Kl r W. ITIIESSKX 

.\SSin IWK I'UOFKSSOK OF (,.' 11 K :il I STK\' 

.\. r... Cornell Udleee. 1924: M. S.. Universilx of Iowa. 
1925: Ph. D.. ibid.. 1"27. .Monmouth. 19,i0. 



HALUEMAN 



MAYNAUU 



BUCHANAN 



McCLENAHAN 



THOMl'SON 




McCULLOCH HAMILTON 

Pasre T\vent.v-three 



HANNA REYNOLDS WILLIAMS 




GARWOOD 



EVA MARGARET HANNA 
Associate Professor ok English 
A, B., Washington State College, 1919; A. M., ibid., 
1925 ; Graduate student. University of California, summer 
session, 1928; University of Michigan, summer session, 
1932; University of Chicago, summer session, 1933; Euro- 
pean Travel, and Cambridge University, England, summer 
session, 1936. Monmouth, 1923. 

LEON REYNOLDS 
Instructor in Physics 

A. B., Earlham College, 1936; M. S., State University 
of Iowa, 1936. Monmouth, 1938. 

RUTH WILLIAMS 
Assistant Professor of Speech 

B. L., Northwestern University School of Speech, 192j 
A. M., Western Reserve University, 1933; American Ac; 
emy of Dramatic Arts, summer session, UyO ; Grad 
student, Wisconsin University, summer seaiBi,1931 ; 
versify of Iowa, summer 1936. Monnic^uth, 19L'.i. 

< 
LOUIS S. GIBB 
Assistant Professor of Business .-Xhminis'ikatiox' 
B. S., University of Nebraska, 1931 ; .\. M,, ibjd 
University of Nebraska, 1937-38. Monn "^ 

DOROTHY DONALD 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 
A. B., Indiana University, 1921 ; M, A., ib 
Middlebury College, summer 1923 ; University of W 
sin, summer session 1926: 1936-1938; Residence in Mad 
Spain, 1929-1931, Centro dc Estudios Historicos, 1929- 
Universidad Nacional de Mexico, summer 1935. Mon 
mouth, 1932. 

CHARLES LELAND NEIL 
Assistant Professor of French 
A. B., Monmouth College, 1924; A. M., Columbia Uni- 
versity, 1933; Repetiteur d'Anglais, Ecole Normale d'ln- 
stituteurs, Amiens, France, 1935-36; Travel and Study 
abroad, summers 1925, 1926, 1929, 1934, 1935, 1937. M<in- 
mouth, 1936, 



LYNN W. TURNER 
Professor of History 
A. B., Indiana Central College, 1927 ; A. M., Indiana 
University, 1932 ; Graduate Study, Indiana University, 1932- 
1934 ; Graduate Assistant, Indiana University, 1932-34 ; 
Graduate Study, Harvard University, second semester, 
1935, 1935-36; Graduate Assistant, Harvard Lhiiversity, 
1935-36. Monmouth, 1936. 

RUTH E. GARWOOD 
Assistant Professor of German 
ernment Schools, Puerto Rico, 1907-1917; A. B., 
ersitv of Wisconsin, 1919; Fellow, ibid.. 1920; A. M.. 
L, 1920; Graduate Study and Instructorship, ibid., 1920- 
Professor of Romance Languages. Texas Woman's 
liege. 1928-30; Travel in Europe, sunnners 1922. 1924, 
16, "l928; Graduate Studv and Instructorship, University 
isconsin, 1933-35; Ph. D., ibid., 1935. Monmouth, 

CHARLES A. OWEN 
DING Professor of English LAN':r.\Gi-; Axn 
Literature 

ollege, 1907; A. Ah, A'alc Univer 

1921; Sterling Fellow, iliid., 1928- 

f ■glish, Assiut College, Egypt, 1913- 

T 

MARY E, j\lcCOY 
Librarian 
outh College, 1913; Iowa University Li- 
l,rsummer 1919; B. L. S., Western Reserve 
ihrary School, 1936. Monmouth, 1936. 

I\1AR\' ELIZABETH NEWCOMI'. 
Instructor in E.\gllsi[ 
B., Monmouth College, 1916; A. M., University of 
as, 1928 ; University of Colorado, summer 1932 ; Uni- 
versity of Cln'cago, sununcr 1934; Travel and Study in 
Europe, sununcr 1938. Mnnmontb, 1933. 

ROBERT GEORtiE WOLL 
asslst.wt dufectok of physical education anil 

Athletics 
li. S.. Monmnutli College, 1935; University of Illinois, 
suL.nicr 1937. :\lonnioulh, 1935. 







rase Twenty- fo 



EUGENE B. VEST 
Assistant Fkofkssok of English LANM-jAcii Ayn 

LiTKRATURK 

A. B., Northwciterii University. 1928; A. M.. iliid. 
1929; A. M.. Harvard University, 19,M ; Pli. D.. ihid., 1932, 
Mdninouth, 1938. 



MAUDE EDGERTON BAIRD 

Assistant Librarian 

A. B., Monmouth College. 1911 ; Monmouth College, 

summer session 1929; University of Iowa, School of Li- 

Ijrary Science, 1930; University of Illinois, School of Li- 

hrarv Science. 1935. Monmouth. 1930, 



MAR\' WEIR 

DiRKiToR II' Phvsh.m. I{|iU( \TIi;\ 1-(iR \\'(i.\IK\ 
" v.. S.. Monmontli Cnjle.yv. 1932; B. Ed., llliimi^ Stat 
N(jrni;i! L'ni\'er>il\ . l'»,i.i. .Monniiiiith, 193.\ 



JEAN ESTHER LIED.MAX 
Instructor in Spkf.ch 
A. R.. MonmoiUh College, 1927; A 
\\■i^c.lnsin. 1935; Graduate Student. Ui, 
liur-h, summer .session. 1929, 193(1 
rado, summer session, 19,to ; Universi 
nier session, 1937, 19,i8. M'jnmouth 



MARY J AXE DE\L]N 
].\structor in Exr.i.isH 
A. B., Wellesky Collese, 19,?3. Monmont 



M AirniA Ml-.TZGER HAMILTON 
Instructor in .'\rt 
Heidelhers- University, 1918-20; B. A., University ^ 
North Carolina, 1923; M. Ed., Harvard University, 193. 
Harvard Graduate School of Education, 1923-25 ; Simmon 
Cidle^e, 1924-25; University of Cliicasjo, summers 1934 
1935 ' 1936, 1937. Monnumth, 1937. 




MAE Mc(-RAXAHA\ BEVMER 

.SonAL Director 

A. B., Simpson College. 1890. Monmi.utli. 1933. 



NEZ HOGUE 
|L.. Monmnuth College, 1898; B. A., ihid., 1925 
bid., 1929. Munmoutli, 1923. 



IBTS BLACKSTONE 

' JfJlCE" Su'li-RI.NTE.VI»F..NT AND TrK.\SL'RF.R 

O^je .Secrei.ii\ , 192-3-37; Superintendent and Treas 
\7. IVtHnniniUh. 1923. 



DGROTH\- WHALING 
Office Skc ketarv 
.M.mm.iuth. 1937. 



HARRIET KN'LER PEASE 
Art Lihr.\rian 
B. S., Monmouth College, 1929; Graduate in Voice, 
Monmouth College, 1914; Diploma, New York School of 
Eine Arts, 1917; summer sessions. Harvard University, 
1934. University of Chicago. 1935, t'.dumliiu Uni\ersit>- 
1937; luiropean" Travel, -uninur 193(i. M.mmouth. 1931. 



RICHARD P. PETRIE 
■Assistant Professor of Economics 
B. S. Monmouth College. 1929; University of Chicago, 
summer quarter 1931, 1932, 1933, 1936; A. M.. University 
of Chicago, 1933. Monmouth. 1929. Director of .Admis- 
sions and Personnel. 19.iS. 



HAMILTON 




HOGUE BLACKSTONE WHALING 

Page Twenty-five 



PETERSON 




HERMANN 



MIXTA KT.n\T. 

\[ATRn\ McM llTIAI'l, [)|1RM1T(1RY 

itli. 1928. 



HAROI.n TIF.R^rWX 
Ai.uwxi Skikktarv 
Ar..nninulli C.lk'Kc. 1927. Moniii. 



Monmouth H 
liita!, Chicago, l^, 



MILDRED ANDERSON PROSSER 

Residext Nurse 

l.ital, V>M: R. X 



k Couiitv H( 



M. 



.uth, 1935. 



EDXA B. RIGGS 
Pi.\N0.. Harmony, Counterpoint and Org.vn 
Graduate in Cla.ssical and Musical Course, Denison 
University. 189S ; Piano with Carl Faelton, Boston, 1896 ; 
Theoretical Subjects under Dr. Percy Goetschius and Louis 
C. Elson, Boston : Piano and Advanced Theory, Beloit Col 
lege, 1897-1899; Piano with Edward MacDowell, New Yor;' 
1899-1900; B. Mus., and Graduate in Organ, Wooster U 
versity, 1913; Study in Europe, 1906-1907; summer 1 
in Europe. Monmouth, 1917. « 

GRACE GAWTHROP PETERSON 
Te.vcher of Pi.\>jo 
Graduate of ^[onmouth College Coi 
Monmouth, 1922, 

GLENN C. SHAVER 
Acting Directory of Conservatory 
B. M., Monmouth College. 1926; A 
College, 1928; A. M., Monmouth Colle.ge 
Musical College, summer 1922, 1929 ; Christian 
Schnol, summer 1936. Monmouth, 1925. 



F \Iusic 

B., Monmouth 

1935; Chicago 



HEIMO LOYA 
Teac:her of Violin, Violincello and Orches-; 
Director of College Orchestra wii Ba: 
B. M., Chicago Musical College, 1936 ; V 
Max Fischel, Composition and Orchestration with Louis 
Gruenberg, Composition with Wesley La Violettc, Cmuiter- 
point with Gustav Duukclberg, Conducting witli Rnddlpli 
Gauz and Christian Lyngby. Monmouth, 193o, 



JOHN ACHESOX 
Field Represent.vtive 
B. L., Monmouth College, 1896; Xenia The 
Seminary 1901 ; D. D., Monmouth College, 1935. 
mouth, 1937. 




EVA LOUISE BARR 
Professor of German .\nd Spanish 
Monmouth College, 1892; A. B., Gouclur dl- 
j,l?96; Student Universities of Gottingen and Munich, 
Fellow in German, University of Washington, 
A.. M., ibid., 1908 : Student in France and Spairi, 
National University, A'lexico City, summers 
European Travel and Study, summers 1924, 
The German Summer School, Mt. Holvoke 
19'i*Moiiiiiputh, 1915. 




"A-i R. BEVERIDGE 
PROFESSOR OF Mathematics 
S., Monninuth College, 1923; A. M 



I'h. D., Universitv of 



L'niversitv of 
Illinois, 1929. Mon- 



ESTHER M. BROWER 

Dietician 

Kansas State Teachers College, 1925 ; Special 

Training in Dietetics, Michael Reese Hospital. Chicago, 

1926-27; Member of American Dietetic Association. Alon- 

mouth, 1939. 




CLnSSES'^ 



5ENHCR • JUNICR - SOPHOMORE » FRESHMAN "ag^i"^? 



SeniOR OFFIC6RS 




PRi:sini-:xT 

\'k'i; Pri:siim:\t 

S I'.c K i:t A i<\-'V k i;as I k i:i^ 

(.'UASS l\Ki'Ki:SKX'l'ATI\l'. 



Staxi,i-:v \'ickkrs 

klCilAKD MooDV 

AxxA AIakii-: Wjixc; 
How ARii Mammkx 



In a few \\A-e'k'> llic Class nf '3c) will rchirlatuK hid tarcwcll In 
llirir Alma Mak-i'; lurniiii;' ihcir faces, siniic for llu- la^-l time, awa\- 
f n im their lieliAed C;ille.i;e; will chart their cmu'^es with the fmir 
wands and start another lap (da full life. 

After nearl\- f 1 an' \ear- nf ha|i|i\ Ci imrade>hi]> the\- will pause 
and with Innd reminiscences recall the happ\- ninnients ^])ent Iteneath 
the mii;ht\ trees that, like L;iant >entinel>, L;nard the !;riiunds upnu 
which llie\ |ilanne(l and di-eamed (if their separ.ate i'(ia(N to success. 

The hi^ti (r\ dt '^C) i> tilled with pi' md ace im|ili>hment>. I'rom 
the tir->t tew weeks, toiu' >hiirt \e,ars a^o. to the present da\- when 
,i;i'.adu,iti(in i> ■-( > ne.ar at hand, the cl,as> has demonstrated ,a >i)irit 
thai ha> per\ ;ided e\er\' niemher of the class and ha:^ done nnich to 
help the collei^e to m.ainlain it> proud name ,ind reputation. 

Idle seed> that were planted here in the rich > lil of culturi' haxe 
taken deep firm root and the fruits of the har\e>t ^hall he reaped in 
de.i^rees ol doctors, l,aw\-er>, chemi>t>, Inisinos men, and ministers 
that shall not only he repre>entali\ e of Monm lUh I'olle.^e, hut shall 
he the harxest lor ;i hetter .\nierica. 

■\s '3c) i;"oes forw.ard, ha\ in;; taken another Inualle of life in its 
stride, we, the couu-ades and hrothers, extend our hesl wishes. 



■^ ^^ ^y^ |i:^ ix^ ^i^ )fN:^|c^ jfsT^ 1^*^ 



Page Twenty- 



KXFiEi.n. Ohio 



.MON MC UTH , II LINOIS 



RT, Iowa 

Tic asureSijirid RuWi Chair- 

Trt-asiuri — 4; firench )Cliib 1: 



:;rA. Illinois 

cle 1-2; 

lav 1-4; 

ss\ii1i 2-4, S,,loist 

1 Choir 1-3; 





N 



40: 



SlK'lAI. SlIE.NCI- 

Plii KaiMia 
ident 1, ,3; StmiiMi 
ity Council 4 ; 
1-4; Intraimiral 
iiuAnu-rican Cf 



E.N'Gl.ISK 

Ka]i|)a Ka| 
mail 3, Corrc-sp 
Rembrandt Clul 
President 3 ; \V 
coming Float C 
Committee 4 




RERXARD BOLOX 

A LIU A, Iii\V\ 

'resident 4. Pledge Master 3; Class Prcs- 

reasurer 1, 3, 4; Inter-Fraterii- 

4; Basketball 1-4: Baseball 

ng Cbairnian 3; Wbn's W bo 

rsities, 

KAIXARD 

MlJXMOITII. h.I.IX' IIS 

Registrar 2. Rnsb Cbair- 



^■. W. C. 



Cabinet 



Geology 

Phi Kap])a 1' 
resentative 3 
ball 1-4; Basketl 



g 1-4; Pep Clnb 1-4. \icr 
Pageant Director 3; llonu- 
de Committee 4. Decoration 



s\'X 

MoLixi:, Illinois 

^-Tanager; V. W. C. A. 

_,.,sqne 2. 3, 4; Masque I'las 

fessiab 1-4; CirK' liasket- 



DF.R 

Ali'Lxa. Mii'Hicax 
. -^jial Chairman; \'. W. C. A, 
r^. _, „, Wiinien's Upi<cr Class Council, 
F^te Committee. 2. 3; Pe|i Club 1-4. 



BYRX 

Xew Albany. Ixdian. 
lent 3; Athletic Board Rep 



1 3; "M" Club 4; Foot- 
1-3; Intramurals 1-4. 



ilyi-l^ CAMPBELL. JR. 



I oi/iTiy:vL S( IFXCI-; | 

(riy/vH^ipa Kp:,l),.n. Presitk^iit 
icityvi'^iirrrfm. ^ockiL-t btrii-niiin 4 



lojius Club 4; bocial Science Clnb 2; Inter- 
IS CluK 3; Xnflon,il ColleSiate Players 3-4: 
' ■"' 'est, lent 4: Clioir 2-4^(;iec flub 2-4: 
;4; Ila.knball 1 : fhTFauiur;iK 1-4. 




Xlwtox. low. 
C. A. l-J, I'nb 
aternitv Com 



sr.\Tixi;. bi\v.\ 
Council 3. 4; 



.Soci-Clr-St^sAji^^^'-.^^ '.KPiijsiA'RGH. Pkxxs\lv.\xl\ 

Tail Ka|)pa EpsiloiTTTTesTrlmt — USpanKni. Inter-Fraternit\ 
Opuncil. Secretary 4; Choir 1-4; ('ilee Club 3-4; Minstrel 2-.C 
Messiah 2-4; Rembrandt Clnb. President 4; Basketball 1-2: 
Swimming 2 ; Intramurals 1-4. 




11 




NTTIC 




ARTHUR L. DEAN 
SoriAi. SciF.xcE I'.Ki.i.K \'kk\ox. Pennsylvania 

College Cluli, Atlieltic Man:it;er, Sucial_Chairman ; Penn 
State 1-,^: Oracle. Repiirter 4; Intramural 0?lincil, Secretary 
4: liitramiirals, I'.M.tliall, Snflliall 

RALI'H C. I^AIRMAN 

MaTHKMATKS i' PipSBURCH, FJENNSVLVANIA 

Tail Kappa E|)silon, Pvlorteti 4 ! "V. W. C. /i.. Cabinet 3; 
Band 1, Manager 2; "M" "Clnl)|i3-4 ; Pi.-.thall .?; Track 3-4; 
liitramurals, Manager 3, " ' ' 




I'.xra isii I \\ f^«>MiTivA. Vi-Lixois 

Kappa Kappa (ianniia, President 4; Ivaveltiiigs 3y'Societv 
Editor; V. W. C. A. 1-4: I ';in-Hellenic ( nuncil, Pr^ident 4'; 
Sigma Omicron Mn 3. 4, \ ice I'resideiit 4; Si^ma Tail Delta 
2-4. Vice President 4; Chapel Cliiiir -'-4; Tau I'i. President 4: 
Crimson Masque 2; Choir 2-4; Cler ("lull 2-4; \linstrel 2, 3; 
Messiah 2-4. 



JOY 



( il•:R^tAN-SPANIS^ 



^Iff 



HELEN ROSEAfARN' FIELD 



\LD >s 

.. MoNNnHpiI, tl-MNOIS 



Spi'Kei-r 
Kapi 



111 



Kappa (i;Lmma, Soci 
lain 4; Class Secretary-Treasure 
hership Chairman 3, Treasurer 4 
Treasurer 4; Pan-Hellenic Cou|!if;il, 
Club 1-4. Treasurer 4^V.ht)t5^| 
Cuiversities. '^ ,;Cs s 



M ATltEMATIl S 



MoNMoifTH, Illinois 
dliairman 3, I Pledge Cap- 
; Y. W. C. |\. 1-4. Mem- 
tjudent Council. Secretary- 
Vice President 3 ; Pep 
American Collc.ges and 



Choir 1-4; (ilee Cfiil>.iU;i Minstrel ■l-#:'^^^^ie:s'iiajrn-j4 ; 
Orchestr;i 1-4; Rand/C 3. 4 ;'^:iinir - ■ 




Social Science 

Tau Ka])pa Epsilc^ 
Cluh 4; "M" Cluh 2 

FRED 
Chemistry V. \"i^\^ ■ MoxMq'm-p.l'Ii^NOis 

Beta Kappa. Chancellor 3, 4; Student Body" Pr*i/ent 4; 
Student Council 3-4. President 4 ; Sigma Omicron Mu 3-4 ; 
Phi Eta Mu. Secretary 3, President 4 ; Who's Who in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities. 




N 



4o: 



Pasre Tliivty-two 



MARY ERASER 
Mathematics Mowkhtii. Iii.inois 

V. W. C. A. l^-^-Studoit Q.uiKil -\: Mln^ird .i-4 : Uvm- 
l.ramlt C\uh 4; i^f^^W^'Mif'^'' I'aKcaiU 1^4; W. A. A. 1-4. 
I'lvsidmt 4. 



l-.xf:i.isii 

Pi Beta P' 
ilfiit 4, Pledge 
Crimson Masqnle' 




EiVELVN FF}EDERI( K 

Avox. Iii.ix.ii; 
Udrrespoiuliiig Sccvetar\- 2-.i ; \'ice Prcii 
^iuiicrvisor 4; ^'J W. C. A. 1-4; I'reiuli CliiK 
If 1 ; Rcmbrandl^ Club 2-4. 



TFvFL'l.TON 



T.\Ar.\, |:)\v.\ 



XR'S' (ill.L 

(,'lM-.M ISTKV Kl'MKI-K, l.)\V' 

P.eUi Ka|i|i. I'lcaMirLi- 4; ( )r:i,k-. I^|i. .rlr'' 1 -,i : iik-r 
Fraternity yniinal, TnaMuur 4: R,flr 4\-ani 4: llasfl.al! 2 
Chenlistrv/As^l^lant 2-4; \'.uA.<.J^ Chil. 2-.i ; ( licniisirv l lul 

UfAR^' rsi>IJIAM 

Er.axkkiidt, Ki:x-n 
flditor 4; V 
Hellenic Com 



I 



VV. C. A., (.ahiiul ,). \'ice 
il. Secretar\' ,5 ; Si.nina I :ui 



1^-W-utional (■iille.uiate Pl;i\ers 4; Crini-- 



'A 

Sii:i.(-Ii 

kappa Dcltt) 
l'i-e>i(kii( 4; P:< 
Delia 2-4; Tan 
Mas{|ne 1-4. 



AROLD G-RlFFlTll 

i .Sk,\tox, li.i.ixias 

Tail Ka|)pa kpsiU.n ; N'. M. ('. A. 1-4; C. C. A. Cnnncil 2; 

Slndent Council 1; Xatioiial C.nlleniale Plaxers 4; Crimson 

Ma^cpTe 1-4 ;-M<iif':S Debate 4; ([Mioir 1-4; (ike ( liili 1; Miii 

strfl^4.; Mes^iii IM; Oration 

V,lv{/5rjv/I^RAM.CES--CLAIRE H^^^i 

Exc;i.igj|r:'||Vl '■- ^ ---f-r-''-^/ Davkxi'ort. Iow.v 

Pf'Beta-Flu. Historiaifi^Treasurer 3. Fresident 4; Kavel- 
ins^f Women's Editor 3; Oracle 1-4. .\-,r.ci.ito Editor 3-4. 
y?-VY. C. A. 1-4. Secretary 4; C, C. A. Conncil 3; Pan-Hel- 
i6ni(/ Comvcil 3-4, TreSRuFer- 'Tf Sjfeiiia'S'A'an Delta 2-4. Prcsi- 
;lent SY T»4^PL4 ; Rembrandt/Club P-2 ; Mana.i'er of May 



V-*^^ NEIJL i^RRp^^GTOMJ 

CHEML^-RV ""^-^^ R.' if ,' // // ClIK \(;:l. ll.I.lX 

Men's Debate 1 MTrtranuirals 1-4; Rifle tinli. Presid 
3-4 •/tRg'iTn|tiT' -Assistant 3-4 



4'^- 

i Debate ' 
3-4 /XR^irnstry -Assistant 3-4. 

V_ i 1=^1 (-JljA^AX .MARIE h/kE 
ChemistuS- " ~ _ / Lkh.wox, Miss.iuri 

Iberia Junior College 1-2; T. W: C\ A. 2-4; Iclulms Cliil. 
4; BioloRv Chib 4; Rifle Club 4; Inleniatiunal Relations Chin 
2-4: Iberia .\cademv of Science 1-2. 




tl 




^ 



°^f 



Pase Thiity-thi-ee 




LOLA JUNE JACOBS 
English Si'arlanu, Illinois 

Oracle, Reporter; Y. W. Q:f:\. 1-4; Ichtl^tiys 1-4; Women's 
Debate 2; Choir 3-4; Glee Cfl 
,1 4; W. A. A. 4. 



G:?A. 1-4; Ichtlitxs 1- 

" WK 4-:- M™str6ll-i!-4 ; Messiah 1, 

1 

i: 



FREDER|C [AMES 

PlllLIISOI'lIV ANMI PsVt'HOLIGY [l J'WeStERN S 

Beta Kappa ; ^'. M. C. A 
Council. President 4; Crimson M isqne 1 
Choir 1-4; Glee Club 1-4; Mijistr 
tra 2; Football 1 ; Intrariuirals 



RIXGS, IJ.LINOIS 



Prqgram Chairman 4 ; C. C. A. 

-2; Nlen's Debate 3; 

ih l-j- Orches- 

ub,. Secretary 3. 



XKCTICl'T 

l,,^enion Team 
ref 3 ; Max- 



NCTJON, Il)\V.-. 




HlSTI}RV 

Alpha Xi Delta; V. ^ 
Manager 4; Pep Club 1 
Fete Committee 3. 



ExGLisn 

P.eta Kai.p.- 



DOX R. L| 

Mathematics 

P.eta Kappa; ^■. ^L C. A 

1-4: Rasketliall 1 ; Baseball 1 

mAI^V ELIXi 
ICx'i.Lisn ( |U 

KaiMia DeltiiSJY 
\-ice President 4 
Messiah 1-4; Chai)e 



I I ISTliRN' 

■M" Chd, 2-4_ _^ 

JLVFORD 

'.xGLisii ■ ;i;jL__~ — 'v-zz^aVest A'lfi^i'S.ivwsroNsiN' 

V. W. C. A. 2-4; lchthns~2^TrTrtiT!?nOT^^a4iiaar4; Choir 
3-4; Minstrel 4; Messiah 2-4; Cniversity of Minnesota 1 
Mav I^ete Connnittee 2. 




LRTriATTlY 



4o: 



Page Thiity-l'o 



LEONARD A. McCflJ.OC'l I 

Illlll.CdV ^___^__ l.AKKW'dlin, Olll 

^■. i\r. C. fy^f^fztM^^ 2-4; Fo..ll.all 1-4; l!:iskctb;il 
l-,>; Track 1-4T 



Chkmistrv 

Kappa Delj|i; fT^'W C. A, 



Music THfortH:,^ 

Kapp 
l-,3; Glee 
Band 1-4 



McCULLOCII 

MdNMIHTFI. III. I NdlS 

1-4; Bidlcigy Club 4. 



TYUii 

M;1NM0UTH. ll.l.lN'dlS 

W. C. A. 1-2; Chdii 
isiah 1-3; Orchestra 1-4: 



;<ri)0\ALD 

PiuNci:rd;\, li.i.ixdi: 

Iiitcr-Frateriiit-, ( dun- 

•M" Clnh 2-4; !"ddl!uil1 

raniural I'mard 4; liUi'aiiiin'aU 




TlLllKX. ll.l.lXdlS 

\. 1-4; W. A. A. 2-4; Kill' 



MAMMl'lX 

M A^■\vddll. li.i.ixdis 

csidcnt 3 ; SUiiUii; 

-3; Fodtball 1 ; 



I.ES. CAI.IFdRM \ 

d- 2, i-:ditdr ,?: 
itjiiia Tail Delta 
rs 3-4; C'rinisdii 

Kappa Delta 4 ; 
ih 2; Oraldry 3. 
atidiial Kelatiuiis 



Ps\ I lldl.d(;^■ AN'i> Pnvi.os;iPHV Cd\i.Md\T, tdi.dKAiid 

\'an (hiiidv. Treasurer 3; Chdir 2-4 Glee CIuli 2-4; Min- 
strel 2-4; Messiah 2-4; Orchestra 1. 





N 



4o: 



FaKo Thirty-five 




RICHARD MOODY 

SciClAL SCIEXCK Mr. StKRI.IXG, ll.l.INdlS 

Tail Kappa Ejjsilon : Class \'ice President 1. 4. President 
2; Oracle, Editor 3; Reporter 1-2 ;Sti«Jciit_ Council 2-3; Oc- 



topus 4 ; Crimson Masque 1 /Glee Club 1 ;i 
Basketball 1-4; Baseball 1; I it'ramurals J-4 ' 
American Colleges and Univti 



MARY PUFPHY 
SiieiAL SnicxcK 

Kappa Delta, President 4 



Hellenic Cnnncil, \'ice Presi 
I'i : Rembrandt Clnl 



M" Club 2-4; 
Who's Who in 



Y. 
dent 



lUTH, Illinois 
W, C. A., (cabinet 4; Pan- 
4 ; Social Council 4 ; Tan 




LOUA 
English .\Nti L.\tin I ' ' I-TikisWnii!!^ Illinhis 

Oracle, Reporter 3:/\. \V. I. A. 1-4; Women's Debate 
3; Rembrandt Club 1-2 SliiternatiMnnl Kelaiimis Club 3-4. 



m^ 



BETT\' XORRl"?? 

.SiiKill I h;tc).\. low .\ 

\'. W. (.'. A. ,5-4; Crimson Mas(|ue 4: Clmir 4:t;iee Clui. 

4; Minstrel 4; Messiah 4; \^•. A. I A. 4; M attM" Pageant 3. 



essiah 4; W. A.I.A. 4; \\ iM\- h'age 



CHIYOKf]); 

Sci L\L Si iK.veic 

Y. W. C. A, Cabinet 4; 
Inl-.M-nalioual Relaliniis Club. 



CJHATA 

(_ . P.M.S 



Sri L\L SeiKXlL / 

Ravehngs. .(s 



Sjivfmminy, Water Pageant 3; 
^^^c^^lj lilAkK 



M.\LU- ll.M'..s:i 




rcHiN ~~r l/i 

_OloNG Bli',OVl,l!Cy(ltlFURNM.' 

Kappa Kappa Gamma ; YTlVr"'&-AT-XIal5jnet\S>( Ichthus, 
Social Chairman 3-4; Crimson Masque 4; CliorrT; Glee Club 
4; .Minstrel 4; Messiah 3-4; Orchestra 3-4; Band 3-4; Rem- 
brandt Chill 3: Swimming. Water Pageant 3-4. 



^ff ^A^ ^y^ ^ \y.f* \xfi ^^b^ \^^ 



Pase Thirty-s 



KENXiriH IWTTKRSOX 
Matiikmatk-s St. Loi'is, Miss.irni 

Tail Kappa Epsilon ; Footljall 1: P.ascliall 2; Intranuiral-- 
1-4. 



J.-lv.MI'.S I.. 1' CKl-.X 



^■. M. c. 



Cli.iir 1-4; Gleu Chili 1-4; Miiistr 

tra 1 ; "M" Clul. 4; Rnntliall 1; 

Cro.'i.s t'duiitry 4 ;1 ( 'I'^jp^'l Ti-'ani 



lJi;s .MnlNKS, IllWA 



A. \U: lUtluis, Prcs (lent 3; C. C. .\. Council 



1-4; Messiah 1-4; OrclKS- 
rack 2-4 ; [iitramuraK 1-4 ; 



i^'- wTfcw A ^|_ chXrle ^\ 1 ' I \ 1': 

.STORN -SiK lAI. ^HKNy^^^^NV I C.\.\Tnx. If.i.lXdl 

()r;ulc Busiiic>,s ^huiaiax^^^Stiidcilt Cniincil 4. 



)YS QWSOE 

l",.\i;i.isil ' ■■^•■\\ GT'' }'<i ) /^■•''' -"^i- I"!!.-;. .Missiirm 

.\lplia Xi Drlla, R.Tn,-,i;,i- Srci-rlai-> 4; >\ W. C. A. 
1-4. Caliiiu-l 4; l)..rMiilor\ Si-iii'H RfprcscntatiM 4; Baskct- 
l.all 1-4; Captain 4: \h,ckr^ 1-4; P^-p Cliil, 1-4, President 4; 
W. A. A. 1-4, \'icr I'rrM.lriil 4: Wc. men's L'nper Class Cuuii- 
cil 2; French CliiK 1-2: I Idnucomiii.L; (■cniniittee 4. 



Si iKNii; 
I'lii Kai.pa Pit 



JEAN R. HOSS. 

;:?- — " MnxMiniH. li.ii.Mir; 

'\iipointniciit jo U. S, .\rniy Air Ciirps 



I'M" 



K■^•^^■ ru(?ixo 

.\! \lin- .MATK S [' I 1 'r;lKI(l\:,ln\, (^'(IX X I I 11 1 TT 

l\,i]ip;i Ddt^,- Assii,tant Treasilrer ,! ; Ireasiner 4; l\a\- 
ellll•^^. .\s-.Hiatf Eilitni-;^: Oracle, Assistant Eilitor 1-2; Xews 
Kiliinv 4: ^ W. C. i\. 1-4; Stu leTlKA'oiincil .i ; Dorniilorv 
lVe-.iileiit Siiiiinsi.le i; Siynia (>iiiicrnn- A] n .i-4. Secrctarv- 
I're.isTjrvr 4; X.itimul ( nll.-i.ur I'linrvs ,i-4, Secretarv- Treas- 
urer 4; Criiiisou .\tas,|i)r 1-4, r.uMiie.v> Manager 4; Masqne 
I'lavs 1-4; Clunr ,;-4 ; Cl.^c Chili 1. .5. 4; Mmstrel 1, .1 4; 
MessKiJi ,'i-4;^V^ .\.,v,\^l-4, Pre33cin'3; Ciuipel Oryanist 
,i-4; Eruich Clnl>ivt'."'\U'C Presidcm't l^__,,:iii^ 




English a .n- mriTvmvTHw; _J~-' \4fI(ix.\icnTn, lij.ixdis 

Theta Chi Mu. Treasurer 3; bignia Oniicrnii Mu 4: 
Crinisun Masque 1-4; Masque Play 1-4; Hcickey 1, 3. 




fM4 hf'^^^'f'i^M^' *' 




LEE P. SHARP 
Biui.uGV MoxMouTH, Illinois 

Plii Kaiipa Pi ; IiUraimiials 

CHARLES ALLLK S-[^i^.-<^'R 

EllLRATIciX Xoh'H 

Beta Kapi)a : Atliletic Board Repie 
1-4; Student Council 4: Clioii 
2-3 ; Messiah 2-3 ; "M" Clul) 2-4 
Track 1-2; Baseball 1-4; Swir 
Handball Champion 2-4. 



EVELV 



HlSTDK^' 

Kai)pa Delta. \'ice President 
4; ^•. W. C. A. 1-4, Cabinej 4.. 
urer 4; Crimson Masque. Tech 
brandt 3. 4; International /Re' 



HARRIETT 

E.NC.I.ISII 

Ali>lia Xi Delta. Si 
1-3, Society Editor 2; \. 
President 4, Representative .2, 
son Masque, Technician 2-3 ; 
Secretary-Treasurer 3 ; Social 
Water Pageant Co-Director 3 




I lll.MISTKV 

Al|iha Xi Delt 
Cla><s Secretary 

A. 1-2, Cabinet 3, President 4: fTJ f. A. Couniji 
Hellenic Council 3-4; Tan I'i 4;'Cbfr 2-4; Me 
ketball 2; Hockey 4;_\i_-\. A. 4: kofle.Ckib 3; 
in .\merican Colic 



Tau Kappa I'psil 
Inlranunak 1-4; Ch^ 



b'Nr.Lisii 

Bet:i Kappa, ( iuard 
2. President 4; Oracl 
4; lnler-l-"raternit\ 
Club 3-4; Eootbafl 
2-3; Inlranuiral 

RA\" 

So( i.\L SciKMic Monmouth," 

Class \ice Presi.lent 1 ; Raveliiit;s Business M;i 

Student Council 2; Pbi l'".ta Mu; Inlramurals 2-3. 



^t^b^ii^kt^ij^bi^^b^l^ 



I'.iKO Tlihty-fichl 



MAKCELI.A I.. WALLACE 

MrSlC MciXM HTM. Il.l.ixi:l> 

Y. W. C. A. 1-4: Choir 1-4; (ike Clnl. 1-4; Minsti-L-l 2-4; 
Messiah 1-4; (>ctiE!:TnF=!+p^ Ban.l 2; Keiiihran.lt Chih 2: 
Chapel Chnir At^.c-'^^^'^iiil..' 



ALWORIH 

Mux Mull II . Il.I.IXlllS 

:•,: \. W. C. A. 1-4; Criln^..•l 
1 ; Track 2-4 ; Iiitraimiral- 



rox 

ClIKACd. ll.l.lXliIS 

•\y Piihlicit.\ Cliairmau 4; 
SiVma Omicnin Mu, i're-- 

r 4; Binlniiv Cluh 2; 

\iiiericaii I'olle.ues :in'', 



I.irTI.K \'iil<K. Il.l.lXnl^ 



M. WILSOX 

ALixMiirTii, li. I, IX IIS 
1-4; Chnir 1-4; (ike Cluh 2-4; 
iraiidl Cluh 2. 




'vTiTij;Rixh: 

M \'i II r MATics j 

Kapi.a Del Ij \;.A\'- ('■ A, 



Mui^lrel 3: .Mi|yi;i/li 1-4; Keni 
iJ AXXA \L\I 



11-: ^()CX(; 




KKI.IXi;. ll.l.lXlllS 

.>ei:ite hWivv .i ; 

3: Ichthus Cluh 
asdue 2-4 ; Rem- 

2-4, President !, 



Ad P. ll.LIXUlS 

rnn Mu 4; "M" 
■ais 2-4; Chenii.- 
ttee. Chairuiau 4; 



iGE W. ZlEl 
Crit,.\ii:4K>i,__^JL5J 'R' r'//3iMsTKii Fam-s. Oiik 

Beta KappaT~^T^f7-GT-A_J^J_Ji^nia Omieron Mu 4; Phi 
Eta Mu 1-4; Mintrel 2; Track 1, 4'; Swimmiiif' 3-4; Intra- 
niurals 1-4; Special Chcniistrv Assistant 2; Physics Assistant 
3-4. 




f'^i'^H^i^H'^f'i^'i^^^^'^ 




Betty hits a mean chord— -Waiting for the bridge to burn — Gordie loolis i>retty- Sam hits the boolcs. 
Here's where I live— See tlie bird, boys— "Feekinpc Tom" at work- Dormitory "pettin' " room. 
Telegram for you— Minister and all— Stretching it too far— What 
Where art thou boys— On the walk— Mac's dating bureau 
Tippy and slacks. 
Harold Griffith, a senior (sorry about this. Grif)— Yes. she's in the c 
Smilin' thru for the cameraman- Just what it says, and thanks D 



a difference from above. 




h winds do blow girls- 




Jim- A gathering- Hi. Sweede ! 




rray She must be mad, Manor. 




J/ 4 J^ i ^ 


i -^' 


a^l^l^ 


^l»%^ 




JUniOR OfFIC€RS 







I'ki-;sii>i;xi' 
N'icK I'ri-;sii)i;.\t 
Si:cKi-:T.\Rv-'rKi-;AsrRi:K 
Class Rki'KKsivX'i'a'i'ui 



1 low AKIi I A.Mii;su\ 





h'roiu Uk' fir^l imuldli.'d week nl Scptciiihcr. I(),V'. wln-'ii llic 
Class (if '40 were t'nisli. thi> .!;riiii|) l)in(lin.t; itsclt with ihc Ijtuuls 
of mutual interest, showed their mettle on all occasions. 

The Junior class ha> reached the hall\\a\- mark in its col- 
le.i;e lile at Monmouth. In a )onrne\' that is not all loo certain, it 
is best to hesitate hi' a moment and check upon the instruments 
of naxd^'ation. Ilalf \our iourne\- is ])ehin(l \ou. ^'ou ha\e 
])rofited a thousand fold in the lime spent ^oKiui; the problems 
that ha\'e confronted \iiu. Xow as the path seems clearer to 
\"ou, do not hesitate or waste time, hut head for \-our port. 

Monnioiuh is proud of \-ou and \-our efforts antl extends to 
}'ou once as^ain il^ helpin.i; hand and wi>hes \i lU success. 



^^i^^^^^^^h^ 




JOSE ALMAGUER 
Chicago. Illinois Son 

CHARLES W. ANUERSO! 

MuXMOUTH. 1lLI.\;:IS I^H CULiMISTin 



CLEONE BARXES 

Monmouth, Illinois 



eARE BASSLER 



Ai.NswoRTH, Iowa 




ELIZABETH LEE BIRBARI 
Monmouth, Illinois 



JOHN DONALD BRANN 
Monmouth, Illinois 



^Knglish ^H 



JEAXXETTE BRITTAIX 
Trenton, Ohio ' English 

FRAXK IRVING BR()\\XI-:lL 



MoNMOL'TH, Illinois 



M.\T HEMATIC' 



HELEN LOUISE BUCHANAN 
MoNMOLiTH, Illinois chemistry 



ALVRION BURGESS 



AIoNMoUTH. Illinois 




Paire Forty-two 




N 



L4o: 




I^;()HERT LLOYD CALDWELL 
kC'Ri;ii. Pexxsvi.vama Exci.ish 

iJHI CHARLES W. CAMPBELL 

^[|'. I'l.KASAXT, PkXXSVI.VAXIA SOIIAI. SciKXfE 



\L\RTIIA JAXR CAMPBI'.LL 

M ( I \ MJBftftfe , llllMlls M MIIF.MATICS 



:lesson chikasc\'e 

(ii.ui.u. i^HI. Sociai. Sciknttl 




KITH CMAMP.l'.RS 



EXCLISII 



CILXRLF.S C. COl'LTER 



Geoi.o(:\' 



CIII'.STER DEMUS 
(, lyUAOr, li.uxiiis Biology 

\\ILLL\M RALPH DIXES 



Jf 




ELIZABETH DODGE 



ROBERT EVLER 



AIoXMlj^H, IlLIN'OI!^ 




Page Forty-three 



is^i^t^^fc^t^^^l^^"^ 




LOUIS FAUSSET 

LeBAXON. IxiHAXA MAfHEM \T1 



MELVIX FEXXER 
Pittsburgh, Penxsyi.vaxia 



DELEERT RAV CARDXER 
Monmouth, Ili.ixois ■■iulcgy 




CHRISTEL GLEICH 



('iii(A(;(i. Illinois 




RUTH C.LEXN 



Monmouth, Illinois 



MARGARET GUMMER.SO 
M,.XM(]UTii. Illinois 



WIIJJAM IIAMll.TOX 
McijKisox. Illinois Sooi.\^^cience 




DORIS HATCH 



( .KIT X\ IIW, IlLIXOI? 




CLIFFORD HEATOX 



Si'ARTA. Illinois 



HANNAH HIXSHAW 



OsKAi.oosA, Iowa 




Patte Forty- I'o 



«^t^fc^i^t^lj^fe^^b^t# 



MAK(;AKET J. HL'TCHISOX 
hSKuH^Ji^^sviA'AXiA Spekch 




GORDOX JACK SOX 
SeaHIHIW'ashixctox. 



HOWARD TAMIESOX 

EvKIiKT'^^BASHlXGTnX 



RITA M. JOHXSTOX 
\^^l Ai.Lis. W'iscoxsix Social Sciexc 



ELIZABETH JOXES 



ADELIXE KXEPP 
Illixiiis Exr.LISH 



LUCILLE LEOXARD 
M('X^^H^Hi'i'iX''i^ Mrsi'' 





WILLIAM LICSLll'. 

'HIi-AOO. ll.llNdlS Sue lAI. SclKXc 



ITH ELIZABETH LUCAS 
;a. Iij.I^^ Exr.iisii 



FRED \V. McCLELLAX 
Xkxia. ^B' GiiKLi; 





Papo Forty-five 




ITT IN 



i^ 




JANE McMillan 



MoNMdUTH, Il.I.IXllIS 



Chicago, Illinois 



RA^' \rAILLER 





JAMES GILMORE AFANOR 

Prn-spuRnii, Pennsylvania SikHHScience 

WILLIAM MARTIN 
Monmouth. Illinois 



KARL EVERETT MUNSON 
AToNMnuTiT, Illinois S 



WILLIAM H. T. MURR-'l 
Santa Monua, Califuknlv 




FREDERICK NEIL 



Sl'ARTA. ll.LINOLS 



CLEMENS NEILL »^' 
C(ii:lterville. Illinois jt,, 



Mat-11l;.\iatic> 



RUTH M. NORRIS 
M(!NMoiiTH, Illinois Soc 



EUGENE OAKBERG 
New Windsor. Illinois 




^ b^ t^ i*^ t"-^ V '^ fc*^ t-^i^ i*^ 




lAMI'S OWI'.X 



i)()i-;( yi\\\ ri'/ri:RSOX 

MgnBHi. Ii-i-ixiiis Matihmati. 



MARII'". PIl'.RSOX 



nnROTin" RF.nsr 




HI I I) \ lU'TII 1^I'F\'E 

llXTdX. InWA SorlAI. S( IKXl 



1 n.wii) iii'Riiicirr rf.xxi'.k 

Ji.-vv Vimji_liTV, Xiw ^"(l;K (■JIl:^rlSTl!V 



DWKillT RUSSELL 

IIIXHTCX 



JOSKPH SAXDERS 

ToKMOtTTlifSlll.l IXdlS .\[ AT II IMA I'll 



JOllX SCHAXTZ 
MdUTH. li.i^Bs S.)riAi. SiiKXc 




NLARSHALL SIMPSOX 



\l Mill M ATli 




Pajre Forty-Si 





N 



L4ti: 





HENRY R. SAIITH 
Monmouth. Illinois Politil^^HScience 



HELENA LETITIA SPE 
Hanover, Illinois 



ANDREA JEAN SURRATT 

Sl'RINGFIELD, ILLINOIS 



WILLIAM O. THO:\[ASj 
Pittsburgh, Penns-iiaanta ^■jcial Science 



PAUL LINCOLN THOMPSON 
Seattle, Washington Soc 




JAMES TIPPETT 



Little York, Illini 



WILIJAM TORRANCE 
Kearnkv, New Jersia 




L-\l. S( ILXCE 



EAN E, TURNBUI-L 



Speer, Illi> 



JOHN EDWARD \'EST 
MOnmouth, Illinois > 

JANUiS \'IPONI) 
Scules MciUNii, Illinois 



" HisTcnn 



ruse Koity-eit'ht. 



ii^iA^t^tH^t6^ij^is^i#is^^# 



l•l^\\^l:s w.M.i.i'X 



rmKK WATSOX. .JR. 

TtT^BlIRGII. PeNXSVIAAXIA ClIKMlSTRV 



LI'.WIS WILLIAMS 

Al(;.\ Mdl^^H ll.l.lX.llS SiKlAI. Si IICNCI' 




I'KAXKI.IX WILSOX 
K^^Bvi:i:. Ii.i.ixdis Siu [AI. Siiexck 



\\■A^■XI•: WILSOX 



MAXixh: w'lxi'.K.i.i'.i; 

McXM.'ll'TII. IllLIXlllS 




PICTURl'.S XOT IXCIA'DI'.I) 

VIKCIXIA \)()\\.V. DL•DLE^' I'LIXKI-TT 

jVl^^HLLI]I^^tlii.'.ii^ Chi;mistuv Ai.mia, Ii.i.iXdis Matiifm vtics 

HAKin- l-:iAII'.i>: LinSTkOM C'IIAKLI'S KLSSI'.LL 

Chic.^H Ir.MXdis Phvsus McjXMnrrii, lii.ixdis ("iii:misti;v 



Exni.isii 




^ARD McCLia.LAXl) JAXl' VI-ST 

>.}:BRCKB ; '+^K-V»JS YMfK X I A HlSTdl),' DiXdX, Il.MXdIS 



i)W1(;ht maxxex harold waodell 

li.iiXdis .\Iatiii:matii s Di:x\i:ii. Cdi,dK\iid Soi i \i. St ii:xii- 



MPJA'IX PATTERSOX PHVLLLs WILLSOX 

\'.^R?f Fm.i.s, K\xsas \[atiif.maticS Muxmouth. li.i.ixois 



Fiu:x( II 



rai;e Forty-nine- 




Hp's ticklish, Dc.iie-Undfv a blanket o( balloons— Manaser Beckett— The K.iUntain nl Y.iulli and Faivnian. 

Collcue Club )irci.ales I'or battle— Peek-a-boo Teeter— Lookin.c for Kold bul lin.l only loal - 

Whafs Jean think ot this. Walt. 

The Oiien-house shaK He iliil l'in<l time for a little studyinK, fond teachers -A dormitory serenade. 

The whistle has just blown "M" clubbers watch over the flock— Candidates for Hou.se of David. 

Christmas decorations at I12II AwaitinK their dates at MciMichael Why nnt a !ie leaf. Dick— 

Pickens concentrates. 



l^ 



soPHomoRe officcrs 




I'ki;sii)i;.\ r - 
\'ici-; l'Ki-:sini;.\T 
vSi-;cKi';'r.\m"-'rKi:.\sii<i;R 
Class 1\i:i'1<I':si;.\tati\ i-: 



I \M i;s Kt IT 

I'lKici-: l)(ini,i:i; 

]'\< wcLs Si m rstiN 

I .i:-^i,ii'. .McC'i.iNTiix 



The M iplu iiiK.i-c cla>> ( irL;ani/.c(l >i nw allcr m_'1i(miI siarU-il in llic tall, and 
willi the aid (if the stuilciU rouncil a>-iinicil the mil of "jjii; limtlKT" ii\cr 
till- Ire^limen. 

The traditii Mial plaid (i\er-sea> ca|)s made tlK-ir a]i|iearance, and the 
siiph's. nil ire mi than ainnrie else, saw tn it thai the eraninni i I each and 
e\ ei'f,, \ earlin,!^ sta\ed C(i\ered. 

Mh tlie' Itnn.uaT "l'; ile .S^'tap."— lii«--*<t'T5<Jnd \ear men were L;reall\- dut- 
mniiihered I)\- the Ireshiiieii and in. the cl^isin.i; minnte> nf the hattle the\' 
C'luM nil 1i'11l;x'i- lift their arms alii n'e "their Iteads tn lianl d iwii the I reslniien, 
w hi ■- ciAered the pi.Je like lreckle>. t )ii this'-j.^eea'-i: n, a new traditimi was 
^larted: the si i|Wl^oni( ire gy?ls"jjatliered in a ^n'li]) and elieered tlieir hemes nil. 

The tlass \'f '4[ h'S auKms^ it- rank-, - ane nf tlie lie-t talent that ha-. 
ever * ri i-sed Moniii. nth'- campus. Its iiiUi'ld iX'-'Hirces ni alhleli.'- sin add 
carr\- the i''i,L;iUin,L; Sc'^t- a I'iii.l; wav" in finitlrill, ]ia-keth:ill and swimming;. 
Its -Indents are selling;' a p,ue that i- ei|n,al l" anv hereti'lnre ^een. amAiits 
niemhers nmre ai'tisticalh' inclined lia\ e i,n\en fine perfi irmaiice- in nuisic 
and other extra activiH(js. 

They have adjusted tlK^tiSelye;>,^tlie life nt a cnlle.t^e student well. The}' 
ha\e hastih' [lut .aside the nianTTerisnis that ;ire pmminent characteri.-tics <if 
the \i untier i^iaaip, and have tak'cn the rule nf xhuiil; men ,and women nf 
America. The jnh is wi rtli dnint;-, and dnin;; riLjiit. 

-\s Ai lu stri\e mi, we wish tn extend nur hest wishes tnward the success 
\(iu will e\entuall\" find. 




ra.u'O Fifty-oil 




Ridiar.l Aliln- 
Frank Adams 
Max Anii^tn 
Irene liaili 
Warfiiril Bak 
Mar\- Bai/tl%«.'ia'iA'/ 
LawrencefMr 'fe 

Joseph Bfid^it a 

R.,l,ert IJlaoli; 
losei.h IHa.suc 
hilia B(/p(fhe'r(Iii 
Nekkn "" " 
Ester 

Helen ffli^ 
MiUlred'aiini 
Mar ' 
Frai 

Earl favw 
D-r-thy niali.uTs 
.\l:ir\etta Cha|mian 
Onentin Cliristensen 
Theodore Clark 
Dannv Cla\l)ers 
Rohert Clelan.l 
Martha CowiU-n 



William Craij 
Ernest Crow 
Alden Currie 
Laura Davis 

liarlesQa 
Rnicn5dDlef- 
Jean Duncan' 
Liiuise Efaw 
Albert Elirinti 
Margaret Eis 
William E:i(ler 'r^' 
Emstrciniv 
. E'rskine 
E\e 
nk 
Frizzell 
Dbr.ithv Inillery 

(laurice ( iarlajiij^,,,,.; 
^>latil(la CiaiinOW/w.* 
«Dornthv <iibl. 

Anna (iru^f <^r«R. 
- Richagi'urosvenor 
-tamilton 
Harney 
Robert Harris 
Ruth Henderson 




William Holm 
Scott Hoyman 
Fern Huey 
Jane Irey 
Dalton Jacobs 
Mary James 
Janette Jamieson 
Harrv Jean 
Melville Jewell 
Betty Anne Jolinson 
Betty M, Johnson 
RoUand Johnson 
Ann Jones 
Alarion Kaiser 
Fred Kalivoda 
((.George Kauzlaricli 

Robert KuiKsburv 
I)a\ia Kryzaiiowsky 
Hazel Kuntz 
Grace Kyle 
Vivian Lawrence 
Frank Lindell 
Lois Lindsay 
Wilbur Lindsay 
Robert Litzenberger 



PaKc Firt.v-t« 



?^iA^b^Vs^ij-^i:#is^^i#i-^# 




Curtis McAtec 
Leslie McClintun 
Waymaii McDaiiie 
John McD.^3i(l. 
Erma Mt< iaan 
Ethel .\U(;aan 
Muriel MelhVr.i 
Marian .\fcMlv 
lean MallW'f 
HuKh M-^B 
Joan MaJ-:f]f 
Walter ill 
Ruth MP 
Josepli I 
Tame: 
Leith 

r,Nie \p^. 

^^•alte^ Nl 
Edith 'Oiiwtfl'ntl 
Harrv ParUer " 
l,,MTl,i,„- ranis] 
Riehard Tajeheu 
Rosemary Patter 
Leland Payne 
Ila Porter" 




l\a\niiind Powell 
Wiley Prngh 
Marvin Rathfelder 
Eugene Reinstein 
lard Klu^ffes 
•^fDoi-is R.,l,iiiMni 
Mai- 
Mary Ellen RViwlex- 
anu'S Riii]ip -V 
Richard Sapp ^N^ 
Raymond Scapc'ccbi 
Donna Ann Sclianlz 
Ernest Schlaretzki 
V\'ilHain Schmidt 
Keitli Shafcnl.cr;^ 
Kenneth Shank 
l-'arl Sherman 
K-a-vnii'nd Sln-odc 

^irhrr ,,^ 

Simpson 
SkiniiGr=<R, 
kinuer 
mith 
Smntz 
) Sorrentino 




(ienevie\e Sprout 
Fred Sternherg 
Marylouise Slice 
Rolland Swansoii 
Betty Teeter 
Elwood Throssell 
Jane Tipton 
William Tresham 
Theodore Tnrnliull 
Jane Tuttle 
Edward \'ancil 
Pauline Van Eaton 
Donald X'osjel 
Dorothea Walker 
Brvant Walworth 
Irene \\'alzer 
Alfred Weeijar 
Donald Welflin 
Clark Whitelnill 
Edith Williams 
Rohert Winhigler 
Lois Winter 
Patricia Woolley 
Eugene "^'oung 
Wilford Zimmersche 



I'aKC l'"irty-tlu- 




I ' '■ -"^cots Go Hollywood -Athletic field, bu: it must begettins' dark- Huddle ! Did you L-et a look at hei V 

Hiiii:-' on tisht, StoB.irie— She's on page 58, Fred- Don't fall now- Happy to be out— SprinKtinie — 

Stopped on way up town — A couple of peaches — Chapel round-up — Self Portrait of Merriam — 

Stop it now, Dick, I'll call Charley— Dr. Jeckel or Curiy— Cut it out, Pachen— -Oracle is oiit-- 

No thanks, I'm wniting for Bill— Power plant— M. C. and Knox Tekes get together— Off on 

a sl-igh ride one day— Fifteen cents \yorth. (what a puny jokel ~3; Editor Marrin— "J 

Talking over old times — See the eat in the tree ? ^ 

|r^ ^a^ ^y^ ^E^ ^1.^ I (^ ^f*^^i^^ I s^ i*^i 



FR€SHnn€n 0FF1C€RS 




PkEsidext 
\'icE Presiui;.\i' 

SECRETARV-TKEASrKi:R 

Class RErKESEXTATixi-; 



TlKlM AS S \\ \('.l'. 

R(jh:-;ki' I\a\\S(i.\ 

Ji; \x l^r.xDorisT 

W'lUMA.M Kevxoi.us 



Youth ;iccustiinis itself ijiiickly and well, and sn it wa^ with the class 
(if '42. Respundini^- U> the call fur hi,t;her educatii^n. the freshmen pninted 
their Cduipasses toward Ah innn mtli l'i>lle,i;e, and ^larteil frnni four CMrner- 
iif iiur countiA' as well as fmni f(irei,L;n si d to experience the tour tulle^t 
and most carefree \ears ol their li\es. 

Septeniher, 193N, marked a new era lor tlie^e students. As September 

i> the month for the >tart of a new season, so the Ljreen "tro>h" started a 

new >easun ill their li\'es, that would terminate in the mellowness of learn- 
1 -v. ( h-^.l__. 

inij that iV'tilil' ffuide them in the r senSfate walks of life. (t-^~__^ 

. They enterecr^is tHe lai'gesl^roup ev(^ask->dt^- ftcMrictaijct u> tlK.' portals 
^- this schooJ_,Xj.VkT the ahle leadership tH turn Savage thy clas?; fshcyived 
fits cisi'ir In w innin,!,^ the annual [ju'le M;rap frou) iheir iraditi^ ual aie/iies, 
\\'n- .-(jplioinores. .\fter a -hort time of walking" ar'^und \vnli theii' ('hests 
out. at w hicKJittre~".i f anv; attention vv:t-f>fjuitl, the^: jenltjvtulc Wir^ Uecfime 
/an inlei.;ral iiart of tin.- coifec:ejtL_all ofJts activities!"^ J ^ O T b "^ ? "X 



T- U 



ntfniioow ioi)\va^-(.l't<T'pien- reiyiaiKjuTg Means at s^onmnuti^ 
M3c;Wrs tMt hKA"e passe/f bb^fofe' th^m. ■uviil/ljjausc/ run 
irate -retit^^ to. sue^s^;^BeJcLC^i.theHl the\^\i;ill j>et^ thei 



shining' goal and to it^^hase the\- will chart and steer a stra;i.<,dit course that 
will do them honor and ser\e as an inspiration to those that are to follow in 
their footsteps. 

'4-' we salute \ou and extenil our lie>t wishes for success. 





IN 



•40: 



Page Fifty-fiv 



Leonard Abels 

Miriam Adair 

Janet Alexander 

Warren Alexander 

Leonard Altobelli 

Betty Appenheimer 

Leslie Armstrong 

\Mlliam Arthur 

Kenneth Austin 

William Bader 

William Barbou 

Beryl Barkman 

Maude Barnes 

Charles Basjlaji -^ 

Lucille Beigli 

Ruthella Bedis ■ ■ .f"! Jk f £ 

George BersMj ij^ j^^^^^ 




Frances BirdKt 
Richard Blair^J^SJ'raT;, 
Francis Bloqjiter ^>?^' 
Helen Boniy 
Frank BornemarR 
Edward Eorthwick 
Francis Bouxj 
Robert Bowman^ 
Bernice Bringman 
Arch Brown 
Robert Brown 
Jane Brownell 




Annette Buhler 
William Butler 
Warren Calhoun 
Peter Caliendo 
Elloise Calmer 
E. Frances Camp! 
Helen Campbell 
Coral Cannell 
Mildred Carrier 
.oberta Carrier 
Thqinas Chajulier 
Coiylance/Cl 
Lorem Clay 
raul'Cofenian 
ain I'oiikli 
\a>ninnil Codk 
I.nUNe, ("uinniin 

FMill 

K.ilvn Drl.ilii 
I) 
l)r \'nre 
Dilfeitliau 

K'llIlK- I) 
}<Ui>c\\ I) 
Donald IJuclon 
Robert Dunlap 
Tames Dunnan 
Charles Eastman 



Frank Edwards 
Marjorie Elliott 
Dean Emons 
Kenneth Farrar 
Eleine C. Fein 
Charles Ferguson 
Mary Fernald 
John Fidler 
Maudie Field 
Ruth Finlay 

obert Finlayson 
I'h^ph Fmfir?% 
Ba#|iara /^^lenWi 




upnick y 




fF.lwii Fulton' 
' Ji' Dl\i Cial 
:'iiracc |Ros/(_^arr,et" 
/|Geori;o C,/utheil 
Raliil/GrAham 
Drjikl.l (irVn y 
•'arren ( iriffey*"^'- 
Robert Griffith 
Barbara Hanford^ 
Velnia Jean Harris 



Donald Henr\' 
Warren Hewitt 
James C. Hill 
Tames J. Hill 
Mary Jane Hill 
Ray Holtschlog 
Carroll Houfburg 
Evelyn Howison 
Howard Hoyt 
Robert Huston 
Robert Irwin 

largaret Jared 
Jean Louise Johnson 
son 
'arsten 
^auzlarich 
Kelly 
cring 
rkpatrick 
nauer 
J^Wi^Kritzer 
Jojin laison 
_'''f?obert| Lanning 



■I /jjamesyLauyer 



"^^ 



larc/s Leighty 
'-5>»t;^iaj^areet Leonard 
^"W'illiam LeSuer 
Robert Lindahl 





Frederick Lipton 
Alice LoiiK 
Richard Lovegrcn 
John Lucas 
Jcane Lundquist 
Nancy Lvtle 
Lyle McClelland 
Samuel \rcClelland 
Robert McConnel 
Harriet McHar/ 
William AUJiiil 
Mary MeLaushlin 
Clarence MacMant'is 
Willar.l McMastcr 
Iamei"Mc>'lalinn 
Patricia Mc;.Millan ,, 
HarveVMjdl 
MirianA'Ma 
Fdward Ms 
Willi; 

loanno'' A(ax,\ve"h 
Roherf Miwt 
Stuarf^ Mch 
Richard. Mil]j 
Bruce MnTtgaTr 
Joseph Missavage '" 
C. A. Moody 
lean Morrison 
Mary Jane Xelsun 



HuRh Nesbitt 
William Netzbandt 
Robert Nichols 
William Xormoyle 
Russell Xowotny 
Beverly Olson 
William Olson 
Bruce Pitman 
Ivobert PoRUc 
Porter 
Ruth EjDwe 

)Bair/t''K^ 

'H;i 




William Samlber 
'Hiomas Sa\aKe 
Harriet Schleicli 
Charles Schleper 



Harold bcnneider 

Elizabeth Schrei 

Marjorie Schumaher 

Howard Seaton 

Ethel Jean Selig 

Robert Sharpe 

Vivian Sheldon 

Robert Sheridan 

Robert Shinn 
urton Shul 

John Sbnllow 

Beriwrd Slu)lts7 

Glei'i Skiiubcrg 
triiia Simniojl,^ 

U.,ris Sn 

Saimiel Smilli -1^ 
/Arlelic SihiN\- ■ cE 
I Phyllis Slrplirns-i y'Kj 

Tuanita Ste 



lean/ie Stoops) \ -,| 

larviric'' Stor)<iont\ /) 
Hersdkel Str>fie \, 
Marv' Lot!r?tultz . -l 
Helen Jo\- SuitL^r-V:^-, 
Maril\n Tiffanv 
Donald Torlev" 



Winifred Torley 
Charles Treptow 
Calvin Triick 
Ruth Trotter 
Wesley Turek 
Louise Ugland 
Robert L'ran 
Anne L'rlian 
William \'an 'l"uyl 
Bruce WaRuer 
William Walker 
Mar-an-t Walw.irll 

■ Warner 
Paul Watson 
I'/>yd Wesliinsk^y 
l/ine Wharton 
. White 
Widnev 
'Mary A. Wilcnx 
sCatherine Wils. n 
fveraldine Wibnii 
Jlianita Winb 

Woods 
/lary Work 

■es W\att 
lack WM.ler 
Har.dd Zielkc 



■ler 




X 



s^is^b^i^t^i .,4i,^^i^k.^ 




What did Rosie think ot that, Bolon— Shnme on you. ywede— Pi Phi duo— Jamieson. take a squint al 
the (ground — Plunk and Leslie have a tussle — Hello Franny — The campus — Beckett again — "Stumpint;^"^ — 

Miller hanes a sign— "Esquire Kid"— On the B. K. Steps— It's spring at the Ttke House— 

Dont you know. Bill, she's already gob a date — "Hick-hiking" up town — Do you wear stripes all of 

the time, Kritzei' — How's this, cameraman — Caught unawares — Gym — Murray grabs a bit 

of shut-eye — Don't strain your necks — A si)ace filler— Viewing the Broad(wayl — Get back in class— 

A bit of a gabfest among the B. K.'s— A neatj room for a fraternity —She's waiting for someone 



raKC Fifty-eight 







STUDENT-LIFE 



tOLtcce a^Nce -vespers - &r**9uation - iNTeR-FHj^T simo - 



ti 



flCTiviTies founo at monmouTH 



SENIOR HOXORAR^■ 

Tail Pi and Octopus are the senior women's and men's 
lionorary societies on the campus. The standards that are 
to be met by new memliers are primarily tlie same in eacli 
KTOU]), being leadersliii), character and personality. 

In Tau Pi, five to twelve new members may he taken 
into the organization, while the Octopus is limited to eisbt 
senior men who are himored by an eleetinn held by lluir 
predecessors. 

Members of the Octopus, during llieir last .\ear in 
school, represent the .Mnmni club on the Miinmomb Col- 
lege camiuis, this not bein.g true of the women's club. 

Each or.nanizalinii presents its members with nold em- 
blems inscribed u lib llic' secret insignia of eacli. 



KI'LICION 



The fimr n'fuinnv .i^Vdups on the canipns, ^ . M. ('. A.. 
Y. W. C. A., Ichthns and C. C. A. are .yrowini; im.re vital 
in Monmouth College every year. The influence and guid- 
ance that radiates from these groups in their work and 
activities is felt more and more in all College functions. 

They have greatly increased their contacts with the 
freshmen and have given untold service in molding the 
philosophies of many new students in their first year 
away fmni hnnie. 

FOR EX SIC 

Debating has laken un new life al Mi.iinio\nb and ;.;reat 
success is seen fur the future. However, a successful team 
or season is not necessarily the idtimate goal of achieve- 
ment. More important is the fact that through debates, 
opportunities are opened for public discussion of vital is- 
sues, and gives wide training in ease of meeting people as 
well as public situations. 

Phi Kappa Delta is an honorary forensic frate.iiity of 
one hundred fifty-two chapters. In order to gain admis- 
sion to this organization one must have been prominent in 
debate, oratory or extemporaneous speaking for two years 
previous to admittance. Its purpose is to stiniplat'; inter- 
est and superiority in intercollegiate forensics. 

Miss Liedman, deb.'ite coach, has finished her third 
year as directnr and adxisi.ir in debate and i.>ralory at 
Monmouth. 

SICMA OMICROX MC 

Since the foundation of Sigma Omicmn Mu in \^>2ti. 
it has fostered a program tn raise the vcholarship ni the 
college to a higher level. 

In a small Liberal Arts college it is the equivalent of 
the national honor society. Phi Beta Kappa, although its 
requirements in character, scholarship and abilit\' e.xceed 
those of the larger organization. 

Juniors and seniors who have obtained the standards 
set forth by the organization are honored at a trailitional 
chapel service lield un scholarship da\ twice yearly. 

Sl(;.\l.\ TAU DELTA 



Xatii'ual Professional English fra- 
RUo .\lpha chapter at Monmouth 



Sigma Tau Delt:i, 
ternitv established tb( 
College in .April, 1920, 

Its purpose is to foster a creati\e spirit in wruing. t 
further the purpose of good literature in reading and I 
stimulate a congenial feelinu between facult\ and student 



wild ha\e specialized in the English language and literature. 
In the Spring of each year Sigma Tau Delta sponsors 
a contest open to freshmen willing to submit their work in 
order to further enCDUr.ige the creative s|nrit am.mg the 
underclassmen. 

DRAMATICS 

Crimson Masque dramatic society of Monmouth Col- 
lege, was established fourteen years ago by Ruth Williams. 
Since that time the .Masque has prospered to a scjciety of 
amateur actors and actresses that has surjiassed in per- 
formance many professional productions. It is entirely 
self-supporting, including its home, the Little Theatre, and 
all necessary e(|uipment to iiroduce its ])erformances. 

The National Collegiate Players are chosen from the 
Masque for various lines of dramatic work. The <irgani- 
zation represents the liest in undergraduate work in col- 
leges. Memliers of N. C. P. are given leading parts in 
Crimson Masque jiroductions. 

PI CAMMA Pr 

In 19,% Miss Eva Barr organized Pi Gamma Pi for 
the purpose of encouraging high scholastic standing among 
freshman .girls. Its foundation is the same as that of the 
freshman boys' honor fraternity and it was organized as 
a sister organization but with no direct connection. Initi- 
ates retain acti\e membership as long as they are students 
in Moiminuth Ci. liege. 

.MUSIC 

One iif the nuslanding fe;itnres nf .Monmouth, m addi- 
tion to the activities connected with it, is the music depart- 
ment. Monmouth has had an exceptionally fine choir for 
many years. Other than its regular work, it has fostered 
the glee club, minstrel show and the "Messiah." 

The orchestra and band have been a real aid in arous- 
ing the college spirit that is so essential to the college. 
Through the efforts of Heinio Loya. the orchestra has 
been placed on a par with orchestras of other colleges of 
the countrx-. 

PHI ETA MU 

Phi Eta Mu is a freshman boys' honorary scholastic 
fraternity, organized by Dr. H. R. Beveridge in 1926. The 
purpose of Phi Eta Mu is to better scholastic work among 
the men of the freshman class. It has been the aim of the 
organization to stimulate a congenial feeling between the 
faculty and students, for it is their belief that a student 
who is friendly and knows bis professors will do better 
wiirk and be a credit to his school. 

IXTRAMURALS 

Litranuiral sports on Monmouth's campus have grown 
by leaps and bounds from year to year. This program 
started in 1926 with a few contests listed, and as years 
have passed the number of activities has reached eleven, 
including every major and minor sportr in school plus a 
number of non-collegiate sports. 

The program originated to build an opening for com- 
petition between those who are not of the calibre for major 
sports and who do not have time for intercollegiate com- 
jjetition. With the ever-growing list of activities there has 
been made a place in siiorts for all students. 




UUniK OUT 




The parade slaits fr. 
Into the i'vatornity 



Wallace Hall 

Enjoyment of da 



ver thru Womlbine they ti-amp 
honliro on the Athletic lield 



"Hail liail, the gang's all litM't-" is a very apijropriate 
li.\-IiiiL- tor the feeling that was spread during the walkimt. 
P.ut nevertheless, everybody whd is anybody joined intu 
the hilarions trek, in and nut nf ever\ available linilding in 
town lliat is or is not worth seeing. 

The walkout is held every year, to make the fresh- 
men feel more at home, and get them acquainted with the 
students and town. Time was, when Sandy Mitchell had 
his pool room on the corner now occupied by Woolworth's, 
(no free advertising intended), and on more than one oc- 
cassion, it has been the first and last time sevefd of the 
students of a more devout nature ever entered through 
such portals. 



I.ed his year by "Pres" Foster, closely heeled by Miss 
"Smutzie." the caravan moved off through the darkness 
in front of Wallace Hall. Soon all the traffic proceeding 
either way on East Broadway was tied up in a nois\ tooting 
of horns, which only added a little spice to the procession. 

Flashlights mingled with the souvenirs that were 
dislribnted to each person, amplified the care-free attitude 
that prevailed with each person. .After the "four hundred" 
marched into the valley of death, or rather "business activi- 
ties." and succeeded in stopping the picture show and dis- 
rupting liusiness in general, the mob returned to the glowing 
bonfire that was blazing on the athletic field, wii'ch was 
followed with an "Open House" at Wallace Hall 



\int'i^^il^^^^^^^ 



Page Sixty-two 



u 



ii\.ili 



T R€C€PTIOn 




l-a.-iilty an. I -Hulent-; i-atlU'i- t. talk .ivcr the suir.mcv va; : 
The "Grand March" sets underway with the Prexy and Mrs. 



One (if the first social gatlicrinss tn \w ln-ld oicli year 
on the Miininuiith Caniinis is tlic ^^ W. and ^■. M, C. A. 
Reception, held in the ,u\mnasinni each fall. 

The social event enaliles the new and old sttnienls to 
meet the new faciilt\ nieHil;ers. It aKo enaliles the new 
stndents to meet all their fellow "men of letter,." .■\^ 
each freshman enters the gymnasinm. he or she i.s given 
a piece of paper and is sent on their way to gather the 
names of sttident-s from their se]iarate states, the iioy and 
girl gathering the greatest ntimher of names representing 
different states receives a prize. 



The "Grand March" is led each year hy Dr. and Mrs. 
James H. Grier, and lends its thrill to the snccess of the 
evenin.g. Directly following the (irand March, the group 
is favored with se\errd selections from son.gs by members 
of the student liody. 

-As the [irogram draws to a close, refreshments of 
ice cream is served and the formal receiition is ended as 
usual iri a very informal party. 



|S^i^t^ii^t^i^fc*^^b^^# 



Page Sixty-three 



p 
o 

L 
€ 

S 
C 
R 
fl 
P 




Septcnilier 30tli, 8 :00 o'clock, the whistle blew, 
classes were dismissed, and the time was at hand 
tor the annual Pole Scrap, the tussle for colors 
with the freshmen matched against the second 
year men. 

Each year, sometime during the first three 
weeks of schoijl. the student hody is excused from 
classes to attend the battle at the base of the 
pole between the two underclasses. The sopho- 
mores defend the pole with their colors at the 
top, with the freshmen attempting" to dim the 
upright and place their banner on high. 

This yi-.ir the freshmen timk ailvantage of 
their superior mnubers and throu.gh the use of 
well-planned strategy, succeeded in boosting Don 
(ireen up the ])ole to climax the fight .uid give 
the cl.iss of '42 the victory. 

The members of the "M'' Club and the Stu- 
dent Coimcil act as judges and oflicials over the 
event which always arouses the enthusiasm of 
the tnwnst(dk as well as students. Som.e 2.500 
|iersons attend the annual scrap. 



The whistle has blown. 

Andeisun puts uji the colors, 
freshmen prepare for battle. 

The sophomores (defenders). 
The freshmen sather for the rush. 

The Kun fires, there's a rip of pants 

Soph ,1,'irls Kive help. 
An unsuccessful attempt. 

Green ffoes uv for Mi. 
The victors after an hour of battle. 



t^isft^t^t^t^ks^te^li^is^ 



Page Sixty-four 



Hom€cominG 




Olil crads meet The afternoon's entertainment -Tail Pi's Hoal Refurehanil l'e|i Motin-: 

lieaiilcd contestants The stands aiv paekcd— Sunnysiile Kii'ls LnokinK down on the danee 

Van C.undy decoiates— Tekes follow thcnic -Winners of lonir beards—Marshairs lawn 

Kappr.'s haskct of victoi'y — Phi Kap entertainment— Who's Who in beards — Pep Club jrirls and hears 

Toke traubadours— Snake dance through town-Junior class RavelinKs--Ovev 'round Sunnyside wa 

Ten years at Monmouth— Beta Kappa stupor Y. M. offers a clever stunt at Pep Meetine; 

Alpha Xi charm on parade — Welcome from Phi Kapc — B. K. b:auty tor Alums — Pi Phi carriage 




N 



L4o: 



flLL-COLL€G€ PROm 




Music tor the ccvei-al huml-ctl 
"The Highland Fline" 
Undei- a blanket of streamers, the dance 



attending: 
[1 into tlie nitrht 



On Saturday, April 30. 19,i8. a new social event darcfl 
to stick its eager head :int into the open. After a short 
month of preparation, hnt a long time of hard work to 
gain permission, a committee headed hv Dan Whitmarsh 
and Howard Orr announced the first ."Ml-Collego prom 
More than four hundred students, faculty members and 
alumni danced and made merry to the melodies of .\udv 
Hill and his orchestra. 

.■\fter such a successful event, plans were laid to 
have the prom as a semi-annual e\ent, one held in the 
Fall at Homecoming: time, and the other to be lield in 
the Spring shortly after Easter. 



Decorations for the dance were planned and car- 
ried out by Howard Orr. The stage setting was very 
spectacular and was one of the first things to catch the 
eye as you entered the door. A large standard with 
Monmouth cnscribed on it hung over the middle of the 
stage and around the front platform there were stand- 
ards made in the same way representing the Greek or- 
ganizations on the campus. The lighting affects were 
new and furnished by several colored spotliglits and 
tour lighted pillars set in eacli of the corners of the 
gym. This year the prom v>'as continued as planned. 
Jim Rupp was chairman of the committee and Bill 
Davey had charge of the decorations. 



^i^^U^i^^^^^i^ 



UUflT€R CflRniVfiL 




sn't hard il" you know h 
"Ticky" is as funny as 
nail Fry .crocs a fishinp:. 



nl by two jiirls in white 

Up anil over, then a siilasl 

always downinjr or somethin' 
, . Under the spreading umbrella 



Popular with the Mnninomh ^tiulriit^ and lnwiisfolk 
is tlie \\'ater Pageant ]iresentc(l t-acli year liy the Women's 
Athletic Association. This year the theme of the |)rogTam 
was the "Campus Hit Parade," which was under the dir- 
ection of Misses Anne drier and Ann Jones. Miss Mary 
Weir, director of women's athletic^, assisted in making; 
the pageant the success it was. 

Given hefore a large audience, the feature activity of 
the evening was the diving exhibition presented by Charles 
Skinner, Monmouth's championship diver, assisted liy Misses 
Martha Jane Campbell and Maudie Field. 

Comedy numbers and various formations in t'lo water 



fealured the seven acts offered. Po|iular soii.e hits of the 
(la.\' were snn.t; by a chorus ui mixed voices. 

In the final numlier, the .yrnup worked in complete 
darkness u^in.n^ onl\' flashliglits under the water while tlic 
numbers were presented. Honorm.n the seven fraternities 
and sororities on the campus, the swimmers formed the 
pins or Greek letters of each organization with a hlcnd of 
voices in the background singing the group's son;r. The 
color of the lights were changed for each num1)er. 

.As the concluding number, a large red "M" was 
formed with the entire audience joinin.tj in the ^in^lIlg of, 
"A Flame of White and Crimsom." 



^ 




N 



•4o: 



mRy F€T€ 



QUEEN 
Mary Alice Hill 

ClIANCl'.EEOR 
Kenneth lohnson 




COl'RT 

Mildred Leinbach 

Celia Lou Senne 

Helen Wagner 

Elva Tlowlev 
Forrest llodthby 

Henrv Kuhie 
Glennard Eucas 
Xan \\ hitniar>!i 



A spirik-il dapple ii.iny pranrt-.l duwii tlic (")l(l I-ji^lish 
lane lined on either side ]iy tlie sIllIIs that t'ornied the set- 
ting for the "English Country Fair," theme of the 1938 
May Fete. At the far end of the lane stood the thrones 
that were to hold the Queen, Chancellor and their courts 

The Imnnred ]iair were drriven to their seal of ex- 
cellenc\- in a royal chariot followed on font liy the court. 
Upon taking their places on the platform, he Queen and 



Chancellor received the crowns of recngnition and pre- 
pared for the en.tertainment of the peasant dances. 

Till' lane emptied into a large clearing before the 
scat of honcir, and here the peasant girls danced and the 
clowns aniniused tlie spectators. 

The gala eyent was held on the evening of M;'.y 20th. 
with se\eral hundred townsfolk and students filling the 
natural auditorium. 




N 



4o: 



Pos,'e Sixty-eight 



flLL-COLL€G€ SIHG 




Jdlm l;nu\sc-in, Cllali^.•^ SkiiiiKr, Hnward Orr. WalKr Xicol. KuiiiK-lh Johiisnii 
\ollaiul Swaiihuii, Tim CanipliL-ll, Ralph Fainiian. Carl ForlirigLr, Brucu Du!ik-r 



"HERE'S T(J OL'R COI.LKCE, OUR OLD Al C; - : - : " 
"A FLAME (IF WHFrE AND CRIMSOM, \\EA\FS MEMORIES 
•■I WAXT TO (;o BACK T(J OLD M C. THE BEST SCHOOL - 



The second annual inter-fratcrnity and SDi'D'-Jiy sin.n 
was held on the eleventh day uf -May. 1938. in the natural 
stage nestle in the fresh greenness of "Valley Beautiful." 

Each sorority and fraternity took place along the 
walls of the \alley and as their tinn eanic to render then- 
songs, they formed separate groups in tlie center of the 
stage. 

As the sun was setting in the west, the white dresses 
of the women, and two-toned suits worn hy the men, pre- 
dominately stood out like hlotches of moonlight against 
the floor and sides of the valley. Soon all that was distin- 
guishable were the white forms of the singers, and in the 
still darkness of the night, the melodies floated uii to those 
who had closed their e.\es to dreams and thoughts. 



The event was so successful, that two >inger> from 
each of the men's organizations were chosen to sing in a 
grou]j on several occassions. 

Following the sing, a serenade was held hy the many 
voices at the home of the late Dr. Thomas H. .McMichaei, 
beloved president of the college for thirty-three years. 

The sing is held under the direction of the Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council who make all preparations. In \ears past 
there have been no awards made for the outstanding group 
of singers, but it is the hopes of many that a trophy will be 
awarded in coming years to the group judged as the out- 
standing singers. 



s^t^b^is>t-^t'^^^^b^h> 



Pase Sixt.v-nii 



connm€nc€nn€nT 



1856 : : : : 1938 
82ik1 AXXL'AL COMMEXCKMEXT 




The sixth day of June. 1938 was one of the most 
memoralile days ever siJent in tlie lives of seventy-one stu- 
dents of Monmouth College. Of the large number of am- 
bitious and hopeful students that entered Alonmouth four 
years before, it was these seventy-one that survived the 
buffets and storms that have to be met in comiiletint; a 
four year course at any college or university. 



Sc mew here near the hour of ten o'clock, the 82nd 
ConimencL'ment service became a realization, the comtnence- 
mcnt address being; delivered by Dr Harold H. McConnell 
Th.M. :D.D., of Wilkinsberg, Pennsylvania. 

Honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters was 
liestowed upon Dr. L. E. Robinson for whom the Commence- 
ment exercises were in honor. 



^i^^ii^i^i'f'^^^f^^ 



Payu Sevent.v 




FRnTERNITV 



BETA KAPPA • TAU KAPPA EPSILON • PHI KAPPA PI 



SDRDRITV 



ALPHA Xt DELTA • KAPPA DELTA • KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA- PI BETA PHI 



Inter-Fraternity 




R. Gill, Htta Kapim : H. Lidstrom. Tan Kappa Ep- 

silon: S. Vkkers. Btta Kapi.a : H. rarr, Phi Kappa 

Pi: B. B..li.n, Phi Kappa Pi; W. Davcy. Tau Kappa 

Eps 1. 



Pan Hellenic 




R. Jc.hnston. Kapl.a Delta 
J. Suviatt, Alpha Xi Delta; M. TaEKart, Alpha > 
Delta : M. Murphy. Kappa Delta ; M. J. Hutchi; 
Kappa Kapiia Camma : R. Moffet. Pi Beta Phi; J. 
Farwell. Kap]>a Kappa Gamma. 



Page Seventy-lhr 







The (Ic^ire^ nf u-n l.iinil)ar(l Culleijc \\(inK'n 
were fulfilled when i.n April 17, icSi)^, Alpha 
Xi Delta \\a> 1 iri;aiiize(l at l.nnihard Ciillei;e 
Gale>hurL;', llliniii>. In Ahn', H)3<>. l.nmhard 
and Kniix Culle.^e, lioth li seated at Cialeshur.i;-, 
merited heeause it wa'^ the eonxietinn d huth 
colleges that une cmild sei-\ e the ediieaticnal 
needs (if the \ieinit\ hetter than two. Alpha 
chapter was then nio\ ed to Knox with the pass- 
in,t;" of 1 ,1 ini])ard. 

Alpha \i Delta was installed at .Monmouth 
Colle,L;'e on Ala\- 17, if-)^^-:. when thirt\--se\en ac- 
ti\ e and alunin;e nienihers of I'hi Delta Siunia 



were initiated int(j Heta I'.psilon chapter of Alpha 
Xi Delta. Since that time there ha\e heen o\er 
ti\e score .yirls wearing- ipiills, the national badge, 
at Monmouth College and there has been estab- 
lished a chartered .\lumn:e chapter in Monmouth. 

The local chapter i> unu^ualh' hirtunate in 
ha\ ing Mrs. .Mice liruner, one ol the founders of 
.Vlpha Xi Delta, as an alumn;e ad\isor. 

The national pledge pin is an elipse of black 
enamel on which are the (ireek letters in bur- 
nished gold. The badge is the golden quill with 
the letter .Mpha .Xi Delta in raisetl and burnished 
gold on the feathers. 



/A 



g^^' 



4> P- 






3*. 



Vane Scvciit.v-fmu- 



V « "i 






Alpha Xi Delta 



Sl'.XlORS 

MARY HEAL 
EVELYN HEATTIE 
BETTY HUKKHOLDKK 
UETH McKlNLEY 
GLADYS QUADE 
HETTY SMITH 
MARY ta(;i;art 
HELEN WHARTUN 



JIWIOKS 

elizabeth birhari 
,i\;argaret cummekson 
ruth norris 
dorothy peterson 

JEAN SURRATT 



SOIMIOAIOKI'.S 

MARTHA rOWDEN 
MARCARET ElSlMINCiEK 
FRANCES EMSTROM 
LOUISE FRI/.ELL 
HAZEL KUNTZ 
JOSEPHINE PAlJIilSIl 
ROSEMARY PATTERSON 
DOROTHEA WALKER 
IRENE WALZER 



FKI'.SIl.Ml'.X 

•HELEN HROWN 
*ELOISE CALMER 

BARBARA HANI'ORD 

MILA JANE KELLY 

BEVERLY OLSON 
'MAKJORIE SCHUMACHER 

I'TiANCES WYATT 



c)]'fici:KS 

I'rcsidcnl Alar\- Ta,L;!;arl 

(jean Sunatt) 

\ ice rn.>i(lcnl l'>ctl\ Smith 

( I'Vanco I'.nisi k mi ) 

(.'niTCSiiiinilin.L; Secy. . .jean SiinaU 
( n.in.thea W alker l 

UeCdnlin,^- Sec\- (ila(l\> ( Hiade 

( l'".lizalietli llirliari ) 

Treasurer Mar\- Ileal 

( Ivulh Xiirris) 




Page Sfvent.v-ri\ 







On October 22. 1926, Xi Gamma Delta, a 
local fraternity, became Pi chapter uf the na- 
tional Beta Kappa. 

Beta Kappa was founded October 15, 1901 
at Hamline University, St. Paul, Minnesota by 
Dr. Paul Rader, Edward T. JNlarlatte, Allx-rt T. 
Spencer, and Charles H. \\'allace. The f.irtern- 
itv was the se(|uel i>f a Denxer blt^h school nr- 
ganization named "l'>i'j-k" tn which Kad'.-r had 
formerly belonged. Its purpn^e, perpetuated tn 
a degree by Beta Kapi)a. had been to furthi r con- 
Sfenialitv, clean livinp-, and Christian ideals. 



Thus it had nut been, in anv sense, a high 
school fraternit\". 

In the formation of Beta Kappa, the let- 
ters B-O-S-K were replaced by their Greek- 
equivalents Beta Omicron Sigma Kappa which 
was latter shortened to Beta Kappa. 

Since the installation ui Pi chapter on the 
Monmouth campus in 1926 by Grand Arkon 
.Arthur S. W'illiamsDn, the number of chapters of 
the iirganization has increased steadily, and 
at i)resent arc represented in i)\cr halt nt the 
states (if the union. 



imi^ 







■/A 



. J I i^ 






Beta Kappa 



SENIORS 

FRED FOSTER 
UICHARD (iri.L 
FRED JAMES 
BURDET JOHNSON 
DON LAWRENCE 
HOWARD MAMMEN 
CURTIS RUSSELI, 
CHARLES SKINNKR 
STANLEY VICKERS 



Tl^NIORS 
CHARLES ANDERSON 
FRANK CAPUTO 
ROUERT EYLER 
DELBERT GARDNER 
CORDON JACKSON 
WILLIAM MARTIN 
FREDERICK NEIL 
•CLEMf:NS NEILL 
WILLIAM TORRANCE 
JOHN VEST 
FRANK WILSON 



S( )lMI()i\l( )KI<:S 

RICHARD AHHEY 
MAX ARMS'I'RONC 
ORVAL HEAR 
EARL CARWILE 
QUENTIN CHRISTENSEN 
ROBERT CLELAND 
DICK CROSVENOR 
•WILLIAM HOLM 
WALT NICOL 
JAMES RUPI' 
KEITH SHAFENBERG 
EARL SHERMAN 
ELWOOD THROSSELL 
WILLIAM TRESHAM 
ALFRED WEEGAR 
ROBERT WINBIGLER 



FRI<:snMKN 

•KENNETH AUSTIN 
WILLIAM BARBOUR 

•THOMAS CHAMBERS 

•RUSSELL DOUTHET 
CHARLES FERGUSON 
HARRY FRANTZ 
RALPH GRAHAM 
JOHN LUCAS 

*LYLE McCLELLAND 
ROBERT McCONNELL 
CLARENCE MacMANUS 
WILLIAM OLSON 
HOWARD ROGERS 
JACK RYAN 

•BERNARD SHULTZ 

•BERNARD SCHULTZ 
SAM SMITH 
CLINTON STEWART 

•WILLIAM VAN TUVL 



okkici':rs 

Arknn Stanley \ ickcr^ 

(jdhn \'cst ,1 

Deputy Arkon Idhn \est [ 

i 
(Franklin Wilson) | 

Chancellor I'red Foster 

(Delhert (laidiier) 

Scribe Howard Alaninien 

( William Tli(.nias ) 

Treasurer Richard (jill 

( Robert h'.vler ) 

Guard h'ranklin Wilson 

(William Torrance ) 




Paj^c Scvcnty-^u 







Kappa Delta sorority was founded nn Octo- 
ber 23, 1897, wlien at Frinnin.^tnn, \'ir,^iiiia, a 
group of young women met to foster what has 
become toda\- an outstanding organization of o\"er 
15,000 members, with 69 active chapters. 'J'here 
are also 150 alumni groups throughout the 
country. 

The diamond badged sorority came to Mon- 
mouth shortly after the opening of school in 
1936, when in October of that year, Theta Chi 
Mu, a local on the campus fur six ^-ears, was 
granted a charter as Beta Gamma chapter (if 
Kappa Delta, Twenty-three members were pres- 
ent for the installation ser\ices. 



Since the time t>i installation, and while still 
;l local group. K.ippa Delta has been \ery active 
on the campus butii >chi iLastically ,ind sdciall}-. 
A high schdlarship a\ erage has been upheld 
an.icng these wnmen. and fur eight "Ut of ten 
pre\ ious semesters. ha\e been in i)i)ssession of 
the Kiwanis Scholarship C'up awarded twice each 
year. 

The national pin of the sorority is in the 
form of a diamond, jeweled on the four sides. 
The Greek characters of Kappa Delta are in- 
scribed within tile jewels and several secret Greek 
letters adorn the be.aulx' of the badge. The dag- 
ger is tile emblem nf the grouji. 



■,!m 






i J^"n Hit m''-'-^ ■^:S "%l .-Jh-^^ < k#.--S: 






.^(rM«w»«!*v^*.«r,*»**^ft'»'-'." 



■■ 'i Vi-iiiMWeWT;'-' 



Kappa Delta 



SENIORS Jl'XlORS 

MARY OILLHAM CHRISTEL GLEICH 

MARY ELIZAZBETH LEDLIE RITA JOHNSTON 

MARjORiE Mcculloch Elizabeth jones 



JEANNE McINTYRE 
MARY MURPHY 
HETTY RUBINO 
EVELYN SMITH 
CATHERINE WILSON 
ANNA YOUNG 



ADELINE KNEPP 
RUTH E. LUCAS 



SOPHOMORES 

MARY E. ERSKINE 
RUTH HAMILTON 
FERN HUEY 
LOIS LINDSAY 
ILA PORTER 
DORIS ROBINSON 
MARY ROGERS 
MARY ELLEN ROWLEY 
URSULA SIEBER 
MARILOUISE STICE 



FRESHMEN 

♦MAUDIE BARNES 

RUTHELLA BECK 

HELEN CAMPBELL 

RUTH KATHRYN FINLAY 

MARY JANE HILL 

MIRIAM MARTENS 

RUTH POWELL 

PATRICIA REID 
•ETHEL JEAN SELIG 

PATRICIA SIMMONS 

ARLENE SNOW 
•PHYLLIS STEPHENS 
•JANE TUTTLE 
•GERALDINE WILSON 



Pledge 



OFFICERS 

President Mary AFurphv ^ 

( Diiris l\( iliinsi m ) 

\'ice I'resiclent l'".\-elyn Siiiilh 

(Rita Jobiistiin) 



Secretar\- 



Uita jiiiinstiin 
( 11a l'..rter) 



Treasurer Betty Kuhinn 

( Ivuth 1-".. I.ucas) 

Asst. Treasurer .... Ruth 1'.. I.ucas 
( 1,1 >is I.indsav^ 



Editi 



. . . Mar\' Gdlliam 
{ Christel Gleich ) 




Page Seventy- 




•■iaTCTC*. ti.'i.T.ny. l^'i.\3.\x'% 



Some 6g \'(.';irs as^o, dn the Aronininuh cam- 
pus, six fair cn-rds liuddk-d ti it^cllK-r (Hilsidc the 
chapel dii(i|-, wailing- Idr the olhci' ^Indents tn 
take their seals. W'idi the i>p|)i)rlune moment, 
they l)(]ldly w.alked tn the front nf the asscml)lv 
and faced liie student hody xi they nii,i;hl (lispl;i\- 
their new .i^olden l<e\s, whieli hore ('ireel< letters 
— the first uri^anizalidu for women on Monmouth 
campus to adopt a ("Ireek name "hke the men's." 
October, 1870, Monmontli C'oik\i;e, >ix .i^iris, .and 
the founding of Kappa Kappa tiamma. 



From lliat nucleus, one of the top ranking 
sororities of the Countr\- came into being ;ind has 
ste.adih' grown into ;in intern.ational organization 
of some _'().()<)() mem]>ers with 71 actixe chapters 
.and I i() alumni ch.apters. Chapters are fountl in 
Canada, llaw.aii, l''.ngland and other countries. 

Owv the heart of e\er\- pledge rests a blue 
.and blue ])in combining the Greek letter Sigma 
within the Hell;! tri.angle: the flower, the fleur- 
de-lis; llu' jewel, the sapphire; and the goklen 
key be.ars the (d'eek letters. Kappa Kappa Gamma 
on the stem and Ali.)ha Upsilon on the ward. 






.U. 









*r^.- 



yf!>^- in^ f^v-^ '-^ 



1 K,5 



! ■ iiiai0!.-oafi9'^s^- <s 







1/ Lr:.I;4»o.t.l^^3i*^- JJ Xx^K %c^\S}Jo^J 






SENIORS 

ISABELLE BRAINARD 
ROSEMARY FIELD 
JEANNETTE FARWELl. 
JEANNETTE T'ATCHIN 



Kappa Kappa Gamma 



JUMOKS 

MARION KURCESS 
RUTH GLENN 



SOFHOiMOKKS 

MARY BARTLING 
MARY CAMPBELL 



MARGARET JKAN lUITfinSON MARYETTA CHAPMAN 



JANE Mi-MILLAN 
'HI LA BETH REEVE 
LETITIA SPEER 

.lEAN TURNBULL 



LAURA DAVIS 

JEAN DUNCAN 

BETHANY EVERS 

ANNA GRIER 

MARY JAMES 

BETTY ANNE JOHNSON 

ANN JONES 

JOAN MARTIN 

EDITH OMER 

DONNA ANN SCHANTZ 

LOIS WINTER 



FRESHMEN 

SINA LOU BEACH 

JANE BROWNELL 

LOUISE CUMMINS 

MARY FRANCES DIFFENBAUGH 

MARJORIE ELLIOTT 

MAUDIE FIELD 

JEAN LOUISE JOHNSON 

JEANE LUNDQUIST 

•PATRICIA McMillan 

JEAN MORRISON 

HARRIET RATHBUN 

MARY LOU STEWART 

MARJORIE STORMONT 

JANICE WARNER 
♦MARY WILCOX 

MARY WORK 
• Pledges. 



(OFFICERS 

President jcanetlc i'arwcll 

( .\Iar,t;-arcl j. 1 lulclii^iii ) 

\'icc Prcsidc-iU .... Udscinarx I'iclil 
( jean TuiMiluiIl ) 

Cnr. Sec\- Nal)i.-llc r.rainard 

( Ixiitli f'.lcnn ) 

Rec. Sec\' Kntli rdcnn 

( Marii in llnryess 1 

Treasurer Marvella C'liapnian 

(Edith Onicr) 








It was the cxeninL; of April jH. 1867, Twelve 
skirls met in tlie ultl Holt homestead on I'irst 
A\'enue. TweKe .L;"irl> came forth Irom the portal 
f)f that old home later that e\eninj;' wearino; 
golden arrows. It was the Imuulini;" of Pi lleta 
Phi sorority, the first of two of the greatest 
women's Greek organizations in the conntr^^ 
founded at Monmouth College, 

After se\enteeu \ears of gr.and huilding, 
facult}- regulations hanned such organiz.itions on 
the .Monmouth campus in 1SS4, .and it wasn't 
until K)2() th.it Illinois .\lpli;i of I'i IV-ta Phi, 
hetter known hefore that time as Pi Phi'.- "lost 



Alpha" chapter, caiue hack home. During this 
]>erio(l of time, a local, Zeta h'psilon Cdii, took 
her stand on the campus. 

Pi Phi was the first women's fraternity to 
undertake a tlefinite philanthropic project. The 
Settlement School at Gatlinherg, Tenr.essee, was 
founded as a memorial to the founders. 

The colors of the fraternit\- are wine and 
siKcr hlue ; her flower, the wine-coloreil carna- 
tion. The pin is a gold arrow with the Greek 
letters Pi P)eta Phi written trans\ersel\- in the 
shaft, and a small chain i)endant ol twelve links. 









Patjf Eitchlv two 



36-*'^ 



?°^„, 






k-.--.;^^. 

'>~? '^!* 



Sl\NIORS 

EVELYN FREDERICK 
FRANCES HAND 
RUTH WILEY 



1 h 



:r>"> 






Pi Beta Ph 



JUNIORS 

MARTHA JANE CAMl'HEI.I. 
HKT'I"!' DODCK 
DORIS HATCH 
HANNAH HISHAW 
MAXINE WINBIGLER 
•CLEONE BARNES 



SOIMK ).\|( )KI''.S 
DORO'IHY CHALMKKS 
MAHLKN K A IS 1:1 • 
ANN KEKNAN 
VIVIAN LAWRENCE 
JEAN MAI.LEV 
RU'ITI MOli I'-.T 
IRANCES SIMI'SON 
HETTE SMITH 
1!ETTY TEETER 
JANE TIPTON 



I'kl'.SIIMluX 

HELEN HON 1 1 
ELEANOR CAMI'llELL 
CONSTANCI': CHATTEN 
MARY JANi: I'RAZIER 
♦MARC A RET J AREl) 
MARY JANE NELSON 
LEE RLIESS 
HARRIET SCHLEICH 
HELEN LOUISE STEWART 
MARY LOIS S'lULTS 
HELEN SUITOR 
MARILYN TIFFANY 
JUANITA WINBIGLER 



Pledge: 



Ol'l-*lCl{RS 

President ^^';uK■e^ 1 land 

( Afartha jane C'anipbell ) 

\'ice President . . . I'"\elyn iM-ederick WtfSS^f^ 

(Frances Sini]iMin) j}j^>-^^ 

Rec. Secv. . .Martha jane C"ani|il)ell 

(Alaxine \\inl)i,i;ler ^ ^■^l 

A ■ 

Cur. Secy I'dte Smith 

( i'etle Smith ) '^,5^ 

Treasurer Pettx Und^e 

( Dnris Hatch ) 




Page Eighty-threi 







The local tralcTiiity must clnscly allicil willi 
the earlier (]a\> n\ Aldnnmuth Collet^e i-; I'hi 
Kapjia I'i. lt> ]irecurser, Tlieta v^i.L;iiia I'l, \va< 
ci>nleili|ilale(l as v:iv\\ u> Sepleilllier, lS<S5 and 
was fi)riiiall\- ci'i^aiii/eil under thai name in iSgo. 
Senator C'larence \'. lUick of Alonmonili \\a.> one 
(if the ,i;ui<lini;" --piritN of the mo\emenl. 

llo\\e\er, ihe liislor\- of fraternities had 
Come to an ahrupl slop in \^J4 when llie college 
senate ordei-cd all (Ireel^ letter orijanizalions to 
(lishand. ll wasn't until icioj that I rateruities 
as^ain made their hid ti > open existence. At this 
time the old h^cal came into heiuL;" aj^ain, hut 
uniler a new name. Phi Kappa Pi. 



Tlie\- hecame known more informally as 
the "r)i.i;' 8," ( jrii^inalh- the nietiihership being' 
limited to eight memhers, the numher of its 
founders. In honor of this, the pledge lnitti:ii is 
traditionalh' a large white '"8". 

The fraternit\' is umisualK- fortunate in ha\-- 
ing attached to it two \cr\" strong organizations, 
the .\lumni .\ssoeiation of o\er _'oii memliers 
headed hv \'iclor Moffrt of Monmouln, and a 
Padies' .Vuxiliarw 

The acti\a' hadge of ihc group is coniposed 
is a monogram composed of the two letters. Phi 
and Kajipa, and is jeweled with pearls. 



jg^ ^/.t.\»» ^*,t«-ri*-'>!»wfe-»- lass 5~**v>.^<5!,.-»,»T«.'- ^J> ' ^ t-^V*»**< '''—^'^ ».«'*- V>s*>.*»n- V.-. i|,- %- 4- ^«r i« V -^^^^J^ 



Pat'o Eighty-four 









^ 



Phi Kappa Pi 



SI-'-XlORS 

LINDLE BELLIS 
BERNARD BOI.ON 
ROBERT BYRN 
STANLEY MaoDONALD 
HAROLD PARR 
DEAN ROSS 



Jl'NIOKS 
CLII'F IlEATON 
DWinHT MANNEN 
JOHN SCHANT/, 
MARSHALL SIMPSON 
HENRY SMI'IH 
FRANCIS WALLKN 



S()PTTr)Al()|<l':S 
WARKORD HAKER 
HARLES DAWSON 
CEORGE KAUZLARICH 
LEITH NELSON 
lA'LIO NELSON 
RiHARD PASCHKN 
RAY POWELL 
EUGENE REINSTEIN 
RICHARD SAPl' 
RAYYMOND SCAPECCHI 
ROLLAND SWANSON 
EDWARD VANCII, 



i<"ri-:siiaii':n 

WILLIAM ARTHURS 
BERYL BARKMAN 
FRANCIS BOU.XSEIN 
ROBERT BOWMAN 
DEAN EMONS 

•JOHN FIDLER 
WARREN HEWITT 
JOHN KAUZLARICH 

•TRACY KNAUER 
JOHN KRITZER 
RICHARD LOVEGREN 
AUSTIN MARTIN 

•WILLIAM MARTIN 
HARVEY McROBERTS 
JOSEPH MISSAVAGE 

•WILLIAM NORMOYLE 
ROBERT RAWSON 

•GALE REYNOLDS 
CHARLES SCHLEPER 
ROBERT SHERIDAN 

•GLEN SKONBERG 

•DONALD TORLEY 

•CHARLES TRKI'TOW 

•WESLEY TUREK 

•WILLIAM WALKER 
PAUL WATSON 
FLOYD WESHINSKEY 
JAMES WHITE 



Plodijc' 



OFFICKRS 

Prcsidfiit llcrnanl I'.dlon 

( 1 Icnrv Sinitli ) 

\'icc I'rcsidciU llarold I'arr 

( Francis W'allcn ) 

Secretary l\av Powell 

Treasurer Pyle Xelsnii 

Pledge Master Henry v'^niilli 

I James White ) 




Page Eighty-fii 







This fall the Alpha lq)sil(in chapkT el Tan 
Kappa Kpsilon celehrateil its tenth aniii\ersar\- 
as a national nrqanizatinn i.n the Moninduth cam- 
pus, and also (ihscr\c'(l the thirtieth liirtlula\- nf 
the f()Uii(lin,<^- nf Plii Si.i^nia Alpha, the lueai .qronp 
which \\;is reC'i^nized as Teke in IC)_'S. 

Phi Sigma Alpha was fi>undetl late in the 
spring (if igo8 as the result of its fi\e fnunders, 
Bruce Galldway, C'aniphell George. Crier (Juaw 
George Khodes and j.-iines Thonie. The org.ani- 
zatinn then grew until in March, iQjS the ])eti- 
tion of the local for .admission to the national 
w.as granted. 

T.au K.appa, l'".psilon w.hn founded J.anuarv 
lo, 180CJ hy five students at Illinois \\\>lev;in 
I'niversity. riloomiiigton. Illinois. In U)oq the 



second charter was granted at James Afillikin 
College at Decatur. Illinois, with the C.unnia 
chapter coming into existence at this time at the 
l'ni\ersit\- of Illinois. 

Since th.at lime. 41 chapters lia\'e been 
charteretl throughout the countrx*. Illinois, how- 
e\'er, remaining the true center of T. K. 1{. which 
also has se\en undergraduate and ti\e graduate 
chapters. 

The cherr\- and grey triangle pledge hutton 
adorns the chest of m;m\' Teke's each \'ear which 
i.^ later replaced In' the gold triangle pin mounted 
with ;i skull and ci-oss-bones. .\ scroll appe;irs at 
the bottom of the pin with the letters T. K. Iv 
imbedded therein. 



JA 



i'iifeOt.:4^ 












':ii.^ta».-aA:A-»'rt'^ 



. .-I ' ' 



f^.rX. 



•^ - --^ ^ ^i ^ \ M-^. i'^1 ^krf 'V^ ^ 



Tau Kappa Epsilon 



SI •'.MORS 

ROBERT BLAIR 
TIM CAMTBELL 
WILLIAM DAVEY 
RALPH I'AIRMAN 
DAN FINN 
HAROLD GRII-IITH 
RICHARD MOODY 
KENNETH PATTERSON 
ROBERT TORLEY 



JUNIORS 
FRANK HROWNEI.L 
HARLES CAMPBELL 
CLESSON CHIKASUYE 
WILLIAM DINES 
HARRY LIDSTHOM 
FRED McCLELLAN 
RAY MAILLER 
JAMES MANOR 
WILLIAM MURRAY 
DUDLEY PLUNK ETT 



SORIK ).\1()R1':S 

JOSEPH BECKETT 
DAN CLAYBERG 
BRUCE UOBLER 
WILLIAM ELDER 
CARL FORBRIGER 
JOHN McDONALD 
JOSEPH MONTGOMERY 
JAMES MUNN 
WILEY PRUGH 



FRI'.Sll.MI'X 
CHARLES HASTIAN 
ARCH BROWN 

•ROBKRT BROWN 
JAMES DUNNAN 

•DONALD GFFFN 
HOWARD HOYT 
ROBERT HUSTON 
ROBERT PANNING 
ROBERT MAYO 
GERALD A. MOODY 
ROBERT RUFF 
WILLIAM SANDBERG 
JACK WYLDER 

* Pk-dfc'c-s. 



oRP'ICKRS 

Pr\-tanis W illiaiii 1 )a\ c\" 

( jamo Manor ) 

Epi Prytanis I)a'i I'imi 

( \\ illiani .Mui"ra\- ) 

Chr\"sriph(ilis llarr\' Rid-irMin 

I lislor W illiani Mnri-a\ 

( William 1 )inc> ) 

Hcganiiin Dudley Rlankclt 

( Jd^cpli M(>nt,i;'iinKT\- ) 

I ly[)iiplictc.s (."liarlc^ C'aniplicll 

Graniiiiatcus Knherl Ti)rk'\- 

( Wiley Ri-u.i;h ) 

P\l()rtes Ralph F'airnian 

(Krcd )>[cClcllan) 




HISTORY OF fRflT€RniTI€S fiT monmOUTH 



The history of fraternities and sororities at Monmouth 
is as interesting as it is unusual. Since the founding of the 
college nineteen dit'ferent fraternal organizations have ex- 
isted on (he caniims. Fnurleen of these have al some 
lime or other l)ecn al'liliatecl with national fraternal organi- 
zations. 

First to appear on the Monmouth campus were Lambda 
chapter of Deha 'Ian Delta am! .\lpha Aljiha of Beta 
Theta Pi, Ijoth chartered in 18(i.t. 'Hie following year saw 
the ajipearanee of L'hi eliaptcr of I'lii ( lannna Delta. 

The _\ear 18(>7 marked .Monmoutli foremost in the de- 
velo|)ment and history of sororities witli the estalilishment 
of the Alpha chapter of Pi Beta I'lii. recognizeil hy tlie 
National Pan-Hellenic Congress as l)eing the first national 
sorority. Then in 1870, another great national .sorority 
was founded at Monmouth wdien Kapjia Kappa Gannua was 
est.-dilished. The founding of these two nationals lure, lioth 
of which have now expanded from coast to coast, marks 
Monmouth as the country's foremost pioneering college 
amon.g national W(imen's fraternities. 

(..annua chapters of Phi Delta Tliela and Phi Kappa Psi 
were established in 1871 to continue the building of national 
men's fraternities that today are e.xtinet on the Monmouth 
cam])ns. Three years later Epsilon Epsilon of Sigma Chi 
was founded. 

Because of conflict between the fraternities and the 
college and also because of the jeabmsies and qua'-rels of 
the fraternities themselves, the fraternity regime was ter- 
minated by a resolution of the College Senate in 1874. 
Some of the fraternities lived stdi-rosa for a few years, but 
were eventually eliminateil by strict enforcement of the 
anti-fraternity rule. At the time of this action, it was 
necessary on the part of the college, but in \iew of what 
those great nationals have evobed into toda.\'. they would 
have been a decided aid to the college. Also present with, 
these larger nationals were Kappa Phi Lambda and the 
Phi Sigma League, wdiich became inactive in 1875. 

Fraternities again appeared in 1899. 1900, and l9(),'i, w hen 
the Beta Chi chapter representing it at Monmouth, origin- 
and Phi Delta Sigma, respectively. Although the men's 
fraternity. Phi Kappa Pi, has existed since 1885, it's pres- 
ence was not felt till 1900, and today it has the honor of 
being the oldest continuous fraternity organization at 
Monmouth. Men organized Tan Lambda Phi in 1904. 
which united with Pi Rho Phi. The latter had six chap- 
ters over the country, the last one bearing that n.iine be- 
coining extinct here in 1935. 

Phi Sigma Aliiha was the next group to be organized, 
being established in the spring of 19()tS, while Xi Ciannna 
Delta was founded in 1914. but lapsed till 19_'(). it's en- 
tire membership being drawn into tlie service durmg the 
war. 



The seven fraternal organizations established since 
1899 were not officially recognized by the faculty until 1922, 
when "local" fraternities were recognized by a resolution 
of the College Senate, Until 1925, however, national fra- 
ternities were liarred, but in that year local fraternities were 
granted the right to petition national organizations, wdien 
the College Senate repealed all original anti-fraternity legis- 
lation. 

Thus Xi Cianima Delta in the sunnner of 1925 sent 
delegates to the conclave of Beta Kappa Naitona! F'ratern- 
ity in St. Paul, Minnesota, and were installed as Pi 
chapter of Beta Kappa in the fall of 1926, marking the 
return of national fraternities to Monmouth. 

In the year 1927, the Zea Epsilon Chi sorority ap|iearcd 
before the national convention of Pi Beta Phi and peti- 
tioned the rcestablishment of its Aljiba Chajiter which was 
not granted until the Spring of 1928. as Illinois .X'.pha of 
Pi Beta Phi. 

Phi Sigma Alpha was the next men's local fraternity 
to go "national'' when in the fall of 1928 they were in- 
stalled as Alpha Epsilon chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon. 
Following the Tekes to the national throne was Pi Rho 
Phi, who became the Zeta Beta cha])ter of Theta Upsilon 
Omega in 1930 and then reverted to the former chapter of 
Pi Rho Phi in 1934, becoming extinct in 1935. 

The National Women's organization of Alpha Xi Delta 
was the next to appear at Monmouth, evolving from the 
local chapter of Phi Delta Sigma. 

The return of the .Mpha cha])ter of l\ai>pa Kappa 
tiannna, finally came about in 1934 after eight years of 
petitioning by a local sorority. Kappa Alpha Sigma. Last 
to appear was the national organization of Kappa Delta, 
the Beta Chi chapter representing" it at Monmouth, origin- 
ally known as Theta Chi Mu. founded in 1903. The in- 
stallation took place in the fall of 1936. 

Present on the Monmouth College campus today are: 
.'Mldia Xi Delta, Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, and 
Pi Beta Phi, for women: and Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Pi, 
and Tau Kappa Epsilon for men. 

One cannot help but be impressed, after reviewing the 
history of local and national fraternities and sororities at 
Monmouth, with the possibility of there being further de- 
velopments. Also with the constantly expanding size of 
the student bodies, the possibilities seem even less remote 
of added local chapters being organized here, and the 
eventual return, through these local fraternities, of sever- 
al of the six great national fraternities for men that were 
banned in 1874. The lack of dormitory space for men and 
women makes the possibility even greater, especially for 
women who have dreamed of sorority houses for years. 
But what the future has in store for the fraternities and 
sororities of .Monmouth College, it will be for :mothcr 
conuiientator of a later "Kavelings" to imravel. 









Face EiKhty-eiKht 




Illllllll lllllillll 

lllllillll J 



nTHLETICS 



[CAPTAIN 'FORWARD • M»P WESTERN CONFEREMCE -HOCKEY 
BAND • QUARTERBACK • HOLO THAT LINH • 220 • POLE VAULT 



CORCH€$ 




ivfln uu. cflHoon 

DiRixTiiu AM) Maxa(,i:k III A I ni,i;TKS 
Cducli "'PiuN'' CaliiMin lanu- I" Moiimmilli in the fall c.f 
l'),i.X for his first tr\- at diri'diiiK uf athlctiL-s in tlie ciilliyr ami 
uni\LTsity ranks. Xnt Liitirrlx ni-w in this yanic h"ui\i^-r, thu 
L-x-Grecii Bay I'ackcr star tackle i.f a few \eurs a,L;ii luit liis 
recruits through a fine first .\ear seasun. Me recei\e(l hi^ I'h. 11. 
ile.yree in the spring of 1925 from ( lonzai^a L'ni\ersil\ on the 
West coast. For several years he saw action with the famous 
lirofessional foothall team, Cireen r,a\ Packers of \\i.,consin. 
and u|i to tile time of coniin.n to .Monmouth, he was coach of the 
tjreen Bay High School eleven, having had many iiowerful squads. 
Track teams are also his specialty. 



ROB6RT C. UUOLL 

-\ssisr.\XT Dn<i,i roK ok .\tii i.i;ti( s 

())ie ..I the finest, and perhaps the siuallest athlete Mon- 
mouth has e\er had, comes in the figure of foiich "Rahhit" W'oll. 
r.olihy has received his college degree from Momuoulh in l'',i,\ 
and for the past two years has taken extra summer training at 
the University of Illinois. The midget coach has charge of the 
hackfield memhers of the footljall team in the fail, and wdien 
snow flutters in early Decemher he takes complete charge of 
the baskethall routines. During his second season as leader of 
the hardwood men he iilaced at Moiunouth's doorstep a Alidwest 
championship team. This year he missed the re|ieat of champion 
victory by one game, taking a second in the conference. 




JOHPI LUSK 



In these twn me)], the .\l'in)nouth >earli))ys had a 
pair of fine athletes who k)iew the l-'ighting .^cot sys- 
tem, a)Kl were able to convev the new ternis t.i thou. 
Through their able leadership, the \onng Scots vh,,\ved 
fine fo)-)u thron.i^bout the vear and will make fine lua- 
terial for varsitv wo)d< ))ext season. 

L. ITIcCULLOCH 





illiani A\line, Ruliaitl Petrie. Charles Skinner, Dii.lley Plunkett 
Coach Woll. Huu'h Bpn eiidt'e, Dr. Kalph Graham. Garrett Thiessen 
Not ineluilud: Coach Gaboon, Dr. Sherrkk, Dr. Griur. 



fiTH 




ROL 



^^^^^ }ear, ;it 
which times thtJiwardiiisJ: i if llic Athletic "M" luul h'reshiaBi Hmeral sweaters 
IS made. J Iil|I,)> 'ani voU- upon iiic caiuiuialis ti iiii tlicTecl^iimeiulatinn (if 
the Athletic I ■ej:tur, L\,Mch. aiicl (^"apLaiii dI Ihe team in, cadi spmi. 



Ti) recci\ 
complete seme 
semester and 

I'he recpi 
mnst pla\- in ; 
a man nuist [ 
a man tiiat pi; 
I >ne I ■V mi ire [ 
in tw(i dual 
Sjii irts ; Tenni 
presented im 



in th 




assc'i^^J houi" Rolre^' 
in a maimer (lescrVlUK of 

I 




hH.'iille,i;e fur the 
rk diirii;^^' that 
j.)A award. 



awards ma ji n' b^i^^^h Hh iiDall— -.i 
he quarters fur th^'ilnrSea^'SB liaskcthall — 
lit iif the liahes fitr ihc entire scj.sdii. I'rack- 
1 e\ciit at ;i ma Jim* relay meet, a 
.■rence meet, a mail that wins lo 
leets approxed h\ the Athleti 



man thai wins 
ir mure pi tints 
anl, .Minor 



r\' and Swimmi 
ts Won in the 



wards, lieiiii. 



ithlet 




Time Ninct.v-two 




Baker. Nelson, Kauzlarich. Mannen. Currie. Nelson. Saiip. Wilson. Vest, Cleland. .lamieson 

Plunkett. Wallen, Leslie, Murray. Rupip. Almaituer. Forbriser. McClellan. Vipond, Hamilton. Gariln 

Williams, Vickers, Zajaczkowski. Moody. Skinner. Lawrence. Bolon. Fairman, Finn, McCulloch 

Parr, Moody, Lidstroni. Wahvortli 




;n, tliis ,L;rciup 
)i lie- scr.-ip ami 
is lidpcd that 



Pase Ninety-lhr 



VflRSITY 1938 




Nelson. Baker, Plunkett, Vancil, L, Nelson, Harris, Pachen, Vickers, Williams 
Msr. Beckett, Coach Woll, Byrn, Wallen. Sapp, Kaurlarich. Nicol, Caputo, Gardn 
p.ch Cahoon. Scapecchi, Renner, Vipond, Lidstvom, Skinner, Lawrence, Christensen, Lesl 
Mascot B. Cahoon 



The 1938 season brought a "New Deal" to the Fighting 
Scot football machine. Coach Cahoon, coming to Mon- 
mouth from Green Bay, Wisconsin, began his first year 
as football mentor and Athletic Director, and gave the 
team a new system and colorful new uniforms. Dependent 
to a great extent on Sophomore material, and \vith an 
ambitious schedule the Scots had on the whole a better than 
average season and at times performed brilliantly. 

Backfield coach Bobby Woll turned out a fast and ver- 
satile group of backs, composed mainly of sophomores, that 
always contained two or three potentially dangerous ball 
carriers and passers. ]Monmouth lines are traditionally 
tough, and this year's was no exception. Combining an 
effective balance of speed and weight the forward wall 
outcharged virtually every line it faced. 

In potential ability the team was probably the class oi' 
the league, and in most of its home appearances looked un- 
beatable, but injuries and lack of coordination kept it from 
winning enough games to stay in the running" fur the 
championship. 

Brightest spot in the season was the appearance in thf 
lineup of so many sophomores, these together with a num- 
ber of junior veterans make the future appear rosy fur 
Messrs. Cahoon and Woll and all other Scot partisans. 

In the second game of the season, following an easy 
19-0 victory over Burlington, the gridmen traveled to Dos 
Moines, Iowa to engage the powerful Drake Bulldogs. Fur 
the first half the Scots stubborn defensive work kept the 
Bulldogs in check, but too much speed and too much reser\ r 
strength turned the second half into a scorin.g spree, in 
which Drake amassed a score uf 47-11. 

Capitalizing on a fumbled I'unl lip- Red and White 
squeezed out a 6-0 victory u\er Cartliai;e in the I'st ipm- 
conference game. 

The old Coe jinks liobbed u|i again next week and 
after out-playing their Cedar Rapids rivals throughout the 
game, the Scots finally succumbed in the final minutes of 
play, 19-13. 



All aspirations for a Midwest title were rudely jarred 
when Lawrence defeated the Fighting Scots in :\ game 
that proved costly, both in men lost through injury and in 
league rating. 

The Scots finally lived up to their iKitentialitie^ in the 
Homecoming game, thrilling undergrads and alumni with 
a wide open style of play that produced the first Midwest 
win 21-13 at the expense of Ripon. 

Continuing an undefeated series of games ■•n their 
own field lasting since 1937. the Scots overwhelmed North 
Central to achieve their first 1. C. C. victory. 14-0. 

Returning to the Midwest conference the Scots crushed 
a highly rated Cornell eleven, 19-0. Scapecchi produced 
the most brilliant scoring pla\ uf the seasun. a 92 yard dash 
up the sidelines fur a tuuchduwn that pointed the wa\- to 
victory. 

The next encounter at Ruck Lland saw .\ugustana 
I;uunce the Scots out uf the runnin.g for the Illinois Con- 
ference title with a 14-7 defeat, replete with bad breaks 
and injuries. 

The 54th meeting of Monmouth and the Siwash of 
Knox was a thrill from start to final gun. The Siwash 
scored first on a seventy yard run. and the Scots quickly 
retaliated with a touchdown produced by a brilliant power 
offense ; but Knox scored again in the second period and 
held throughout the rest of the game to win 1-1-7 and 
retain the Bronze Turkev fur another season. 



.Mujunuutli 

Munmuutli 

Munmr.ulli 

Munmuuth 


2(1 

n 

6 

. . . . 1 ^ 


Burlinytun 

Drake 

Carthage 

Coe 

Lawrence 

Ripon 

North Central . . . . 

Cornell 

Augustana 




47 



19 

19 

13 





14 

14 








97 


Monmouth 


14 

19 


Monmouth 

Munniouth 


7 

7 








STA.\■1,^■,^' \'1CKI".RS— TAC'KIJ'.— SI'.XIOU 

Stan |ila\i_(l lii> I'lHirtli M,a>'in fur tin.' KlhI ami While llii- \\-dv. Ili- 
t;(iiiiL; will Ica\r a lai'm. Imlc In lill at tackle ik'xI war. I'laxin;; in (.'Xfrv .L;anK- 
and al\\a\s for alnii^l a fnll >i\t\- niinuto, "\ ic" \\a> a hard cliari^cr < m 
iiflun^'.' and lii^ >tcad'. ik'ten^cw i Tk in inlni;, n|i ruininiL; jilax'^ \va-. :< cun-lanl 
Miurcc iif eniliara>>nK-iU In i ippi ments' hall carrirr^. lli> ciinsi>tcnt and dc- 
|n'ndahk' ])la\- lin'un,i;li the ^ca^in L^ainnl him a first >irin,y hcrth on tlie All- 
MidwesL team. 



i^Woi 



^iJ_ULLliS SKI X X 1 '. R 
ud di luiui. I'^^k.x'k' anil. 




:A"1()R 



K\"a> dMi;i:;cd h\ in- 

Ibr the iiiajortil;> ^'vP-l*!! - ladt^asesh '1>Mt when tie ffliiBied Ui CMni]ietitii>n 
|in the season he coiii|iilccl a .; -lod average in vardaAeBained >]ieLi, li/.ini; 
If-Mver drives over the center. "Chuck" can ki'r^^^, |id hi^ cnmhination 



1 alnii 1st cxcrA' ])'isiti(in 

1 at end and in tlie i.p- 

pi ipular ei meeptii m i n 

rnnnin;;" pla\ > c nsi-t- 




\"ear. "Tweet^" did nut 
)eed and pnwa-r he was 
md a.> a likieker. 



received earl\- m 
Id the t\ lie < if line 

play that ha.s helped keep the Sent line al\v;i\-s aniMn.L;' the strnn.^est in either 
lea,i;ue. The .t^nard pi>siti(in is little noticed hut all important and I )i >n 
played it capalil\' and ci insistenth', hlnckiiiL; accuraleh" and keepiiii; ninniiiL' 
phn-s awav from the center of the line on ilefense. 






Pajru Ninuty-li 













ROBKRT BYRN— END— SENIOR 

Bob was also a senior this vear and saw action at end. The wing po- 
sition ahvavs draws a large number nf candidates cm the Red and \\'hite scjiiad 
and Byrn had to work hard to keep his j(.)b. He made up for lack nf >i>eed 
hv his experience and his blocking ability on offense. 



This wa 
no experience pre 
exceptional. His 
sition. A scholar 
of plays, and spec 
interference. D 
if he continues to impr 

FRANCIS 

Playing the fullbac 
"Fritz" receixed a shov 
action for part of the se 
the hardest l>locker and 
hand\- to ha\ e around 
slashing in from the seci 



DUDLEY PLUNKETT 
^ "D 

and 200 



-TACKLF:— JUNIOR 




Jim is a junior, pla 
minute of the season. S 
and his defensixc pla\ 
wall \irtualh' imprcgna 
around his opponents' 1 
bothering the ball 
good as his defens] 
All-.\merican ele\ 

1)1'. 

(niard, tackle? 

who plays them all dependably. This is his second \ear on the varsity and 
though he saw lots o| action this seaMHi, next \l\u- if he continues improving 
he should lia\c a steady job at guard. \\'eight is a desirable asset at the cen- 
ter of the line and Del furnishes this (juite adeipiatelv. 



PaKe Ninety-s 




^*tiJfa»t>r.;. 




JA.M1-:S RUFP— CI'.XTKR— SOPHO.MOkl-: 

Jim was miL- uf the sophoim iri.^ wlm came in for much nf the heavy diit} 
111" the sea.S'in, also makin<r the future luok riis\- for the next t\vi> \-ears. On 
otteii^e he liamiled the center assignmnt without mi>liaii and mi defeii; i;, 
patrciUed the hack nt the hue, knucked di'wn numerous ]ia>>es and liu'iiw- 
int^' his anijile hidk trei|uenth' and success luHx' intu an\" Iireaches in the 
forward wall. I\ui>p slioidtl ih'aw first call as the startint^" center next season. 

RICHARD SAP?— HACK Kli'.I.I)— SOPHOMORE 

Tri[)le threat men w ere numerous on the snuad tiiis fall a n^l Sapp was in 

<;i Mj;l [junler, 
accurate passei '^■timnmu^»rsj|B, tie played tM ■U'"' V'^^^^ -d the 

one o3iiB outstandint^' of- 

ve threats. If such a thing a^ a "quadruple thrgM iMn" exists, Dick 

T|i that class because added to his other abilltieslieHas an imi:.ortant 

jie dep^riinent of blocking. 

lAIUCH— P AClxFIELa-BOPHOMORE 

jobs oiltlHteam ami recei\e the 

Idled t^s^siunnient exceptional- 

>ing a large share id' the blocking 

s such that he attracted little attention 

\- liadh" needed \ards 

1 spectators and op- 

h it. 




ctem. F< 

t, up I ht 1 m L 
he liacls-, I 
?d a lar^Buunher oT]ioints ; 
jicH'^iieak in which h 
under the line in 




.WPECCHI— HA 

ftensive threat on' 

rier seen h\' .Mon 

s," will 1 in his SI ip 

lined li\ the lea 

au,t;iil numeri ai 

d l\pic: 

eld me 

started 



.AND 




OPllOMORE 

. fall and one i f the 

man\- seasons. This 

ed up the major part 

n>; a spfcdw nii^'^ed 

|much I if the piuUint;' 

ise interference 

ir a ti luchdi iwn 

\ictijrv in that 



MU{ 



:enter assn/nment with Ivui 



and saw ]ilemv of action. AlllioUi^h li,i;hter than most of the Scot forwrinls. 
with another season's experience he shmdd dexelop into a first class line- 
man, llis centerin.i^- was accurate and he used his height to ad\antage in 
Liackiny up the line on pass defense. 



>. 



Pao-e Ninety-se 









LEITH NELSON— END— SOPHOMORK 

The sli.i^htly bi.ygcr half of the NeNcni dun stepjicd right mit of the fresh- 
man ratiks intii a steady jnli at end in his first varsity A-ear. The big wing- 
man made Ufe miserable tor nunn- a wunld-be Ijlncker nn end run'; and 
iiff-tackle slants, and unl iiifrei|uentl\- bowled mcr interference and ball- 
carrier at one antl the saiue time. This was onl\- his Jirst \ear with the var- 
sity and next year should l)e one ot the mainsta\-s of what promises to be a 
great line. 



EUGEI 

Cxood backf 
didn't break inl( 
and has plent\- i 
son should see 1 



:FiELn- 



Jineup very much (jf the time, but he is only a soph 
ind drive and is an acriuate passer, so anoth^ 
_jiiiyj^^j^action at quiiierback or^^iJ^|^^ ^ 



W'ARFO 

Baker is anotl 
to surpass before he i 
Coming to MonuK lul 
useful in the next t\\ 
(|uentl\' will have no 
lined up this spring ; 




WALT 

The 1938 editiot 
was no exception t 
line and an effective 1 
the line are his field 
he will [)robabl\' be s 
of the ends. 



The smallej 
handicapped by 

Powerful and liaTd to luove, iTxie f)rof<e up numertius enenn- tfirusts a.t tlie 
end of the line and was an important factor in the lirilliant defen>i\e record 
of the forwards througlKJUt the cantpaign. Pyle and Plunkett should make 
one of the toughest ])airs of tackles in any league next fall. 



Page Ninety-eight 



With the hirgest freshman chiss in Mon- 
nuaith's history to choose from, it was to be ex- 
pected that coaches johnn\' husk and heonard 
McCulloch wiiuld have |)lent\- of material thi> 
seasi n. The expected was realized when fitt\'- 
fi\ e \'earhnL;s answered the call to practice. 

An Illinois C'onference rulin.i; allows ilu' 
Freshmen S(|uads onl\- twn scheduled panics, 
therefoi'c the first \'ear men, as is customarw 
were re,i;ularl\- emplo\ed as cannon fodder tor 
the \arsit\' scri mma pes Hiiwf\e r the \arsit\- 
squad had 
Little Scot? 
furnishin 




the trick. The first stru.!4,i.;le, on the local battle 
i^rounds, was a (j-o defeat of .\u,i;ustana. The 
uame was played mostly alont;' defensive line: 
because neither team could t^el its offense runnim; 
smoothly. The lone score of the .t;ame came at 
the end of ihi' fir>l ]ieriod. Ixarsten, Scot half- 
hack, got off a se\ent\" yard punt to the .Vugie 



lO-yarcl line where the \'ikings fumbled on 
first tlown. The Little Scots reco\'cred and after 
three punches at the line tallied on a pass, Dela- 
haut to Missa\-age. 

The following (la\- the iM'osh journeyed into 
eium\' territor\ to engage in a miniature Turke\' 
1 )a\ struggle with Knox first \ear men. .Vgain 
the Little Scots placed the rok- of opportunists. 
.\tler liattling on e\en terms for the better part 
of two [jeriods, the Scots scoreil oti a stolen ball 
pla\'. Shin n, diminuti ve Alo nmonth back, notic- 
Kn< 

id, tu^S%it under hisjj'wn arm, and 

vn the field si-\ enty yeaffls for a touch- 

.^__ jj_^,_^,,ash ret alia tu^Rvith^pfc'ty in a blocked 

punt ana tlie lot al trosfi matf^i I this with another 

ty. For the^^^P^]K_gaiii^^i' Scot defense 

tvSctioned w it^Kyi^^^^^^^^Vand the 




te]ipea up, 4eiie\ed hnn ot 




Iter their successful two dav campaign the 
Krcish confined their activities to intra-squad 
scrimmages and o[jj)onnents' plays for the bene- 
fit of the \'arsity. Coaches Lusk and McCulloch 
should be commended for their cajKible handling 
of the large squad, and the dele\'lopment of a 
large number ol pla\ ers who will W- \'aluable 
\'arsit\' material in the 1939 season. 



fR€SHm€n 



Pw 



36 -iA 43^1 37 19 JO 18 29 Jj | 



^ 



Wykler, .1. Lusk. Pittman. L. .^,.1.111,..^,, .M, .-.,.., .,-..-. .. ,,lvr.., 

Milligan, Bloomer, Fan-. Mayo, Chikasuye, McClellan, SanabeiB, Walker, Tu-ek. ML-Manii* 

McClelland. Trick. Stripe, Watson, Chambers, Douthett. Barkman. Wagner. Kaurzlarich. Edwards, Huston 

Delahout. Austin, Hoyt. Armstrong. Martin, Coleman. Irwin. Hewitt. Borremans, Dunlap 
Schneider, Sherridan. Lindahl, Arthur, Van Tuyl. Cook, Sava'je. Shinn. Green. Gribbin, Bouxsein. Nicholls 



Page Ninety-nii 



VARSITY 1938-39 




Cahoon, coach; Plunkt-tt, Hnlm M 
MikkIv. Schnii.lt Cikci 

\Iasc.it-l 

The Scotch h(](i])sters, under the directinn of 
Coach Bobhx' Wdll, nccupied the precarious and 
vuhierable position of de lending;' L'hanipions in 
the Midwest Conference, ha\-in£;' come throut^ii 
a brilliant seasc m last \ear luulefeated. With fi lur 
men returning;" from last \-ear's startin.!;' lineup 
and three other letternien the chance> lujked \er\- 
bright for another top ranking' combination at 
the bei^innin^' of the season. The Scots ,L;ot olT 
to a bad start ]>y losing their >econd conference 
game to the Siwasli, but b\- mid-season the\- had 
reached lop form and seemed well on the w av to 
another Championship, onl\ to lose the last two 
games id' the season and drop into a tie for sec- 
ond ])lace in the league standings. 

In the opening game id' the iQ^S-iqj^q sea- 
si in tile Scots easih' outcl.assrd I'urlinglon liinior 
College 41-iq. Tlien followed a two game sortie 
into l')ig Ten compelilioii in which .Monmoulli 
gave a good account ol herselt, losing to Iowa and 
Purdue by scores id 37-34. and ^A-jf) respectixe- 
Iv. rmth wi're close contests and the Scotch near- 
ly upsel iheii' bigger rixrils in each game. 

In the fii'st .Midwest encounter, .Monmouth 
nosed out Cornell in a ,iU-,V) thriller, but three 
nights later saw her chani[)oiiship hopes fade as a 



linen 
ClcK 



aiiiKsnn W iKi.n Co.ah R W nil 
n.l Thi.ni-,..ii \ est B,il..n 
Cahoon 

result of a defeat by Kimx, in a game character- 
istic of Scot-Si wash clashes in its speed and rough, 
ness. The Blue-Boys of Illinois College next fell 
\ictim to llie Scot att.ack in an Illinois C'oiiler- 
eiice game. The following week the sipiad jour- 
neyed to X'orth field and upset a slmng Carleton 
i|uintet, thereby eliminating them from the pen- 
n;ml r.ace. .\fter losing .an I. C". C. game to Aug- 
ustana, the Scots again were in the fight for the 
Midwest title by \irtue id' xictories over Coe and 
Beloit. 

The cagemen lost all hopes of a place in the 
front rank of the I. C. C'. by .again succumbing to 
the powerful ,\uguslana \ ickings. In a non-lea- 
gue encounter, the Scots next drojiped a close 30 
to jy decision to St. .Vmbrose in the Chicago Col- 
iseum. 

.\g.ain entering the Midwest wars, Mon- 
mouth com])letely oui]ilayed Kipon, 50 to 31 and 
went on to av'enge a former defeat b\- ]iiling up a 
49 to T,j margin o\er Knox. Willi the .Midwest 
crown almost within its gras]i, the squad had a 
streak of misfortune and lost two costly en- 
counters with Cornell and Coe, to lose sight of 
the title. 



Paee One Hundred 



F(,K\V.\Kli 

Dud lias been one (if 

Conference during botli ^Hl^l "^^^^^B<'>^^^ST> squad, 

and altliougli this makes liiiH i>|^|^^|itik Monmouth 

]iartisans it makes liini very uiEipklar with "ppu 

ers and lie was usually cluscfiy aiuarded tliroug 

season, liut managed to toss iifcjiiite a few ^-f his 

oue-lianders nonetheless. He flti mate 

ward and besides being a slia|p-booter and ac<ji 

ser on otTense. uses his rugji 

on defense. In the league scor 

place with 95 points. 




FoRWARII 

Short bnl sinoi 
lie operates ;il fnrv 
makes up for it li\ 
and one of the best te 
a Monmouth ])roduct a 
tition will help make u| 
quintet in the coming ' 



Pase One Hundred On 



Guard 
Howie lia 
his three year 
time he is on 
either at giiari 
in under the 
Jamieson \v 
hoopmen next 



Sophomorf: 

e least valualjle sopiioniorc 

ious baskethall experience. 

nient. He completes the team's 

]iecializes in defensive work. 

e>e for the hoop but his ball 

v. if it continues to improve, 

next two seasons. 




Gu.^RD 
Playing Kuard in this 
Frank showed nuich impi 
competition and saw plenlv 
fensive player and shoots 
arch with uncanny accu 
Moody next winter will t 
on his shoulders, which 1 
handle quite capably. 



SopiioMoRr: 
r's Frosh squad. Bill 

strong" reserv.' squad 
rugged defense man, 
had few opportunities 
peedy and has plenty 

fill the vacant guard 



Page One Hundrea Two 



Tlie iQ^S-^q (.'(litiiiii n|" llic iM-cshman c;i,L;r 
team ci'nt;iiiR(1 plciil}- nf niakTial for C'drir'n JmIhi 
,usk III WDfk with. The v(|iia(l had tew nut- 
tanih'n.!4' plaxers and depended Iarj;el\- nii icani 
ila\-. TlK'ii- >ehi.-(hiled .^aines eoiisisU-d n\ Iw^ 
;aines eaeli with .\u,!4"tistaiia and Knox. In their 
pare time tin, 




their 
hits l)"^IBiWP^7T-actice time 
hut ciim]iic'tfd tile reason willi a fifly-fift) |)er- 
cenla^e. Twiec the Seols pla\ed \\\v An.'jiislana 
\ ikin^s, and fonnd liltK- dilTuaiH) in lakint^' lliem 
inlti camp hntli time'-. I'lil willi Kmix it was a 
dil'ferent stnry. i'mth yanies were lightly played 



and eliise lln'i in^hi mi widi hnth leani^ ih--pki\ ini;' 
llashesdi hrilHant lia>kelhall. In each enc- nnler 
tin- Hah)- Siwa-li pulk'd the .i;ame out uf liie fire 
in the last lew minnles id jilaw wiimini;' !i\' twn 
pi lint-- in the fir--t i^ame and h\- nne in the l::--l. 

\ fle r tile eiinipl^M^M^ieir seasmi's '^ames, 

d i \ i ( l^^Wr>^|HI|Rllil - , plaxiiiL;^ in llu- 

|d lea^^^^iid e^i^^^u^i practice aftei' 

• wj\\ l.i('kni^^fflni^^^^ar~> nr an\' nnl- 
standing shariidiuoters, th^ -i|uad \\a> well drilled 
in fundaiTienials bv ru^tt-l^-Luak Wfl" ]ila\ed ,L;nard 
irt^jh^j ai--ill^^|ajS|^^ra^^^^jri-- fundamental 
tl^^QVind ( Mpenda^N^^HI^ wi >rk will >tani1 
ihein in i^ond stead next \ear i ill the \ ai'sitx'. and 
a nnmhvr of them will nndoiihledh see plenl\- nl 
actimi. 

Thirteen nu-n recei\"ed numeral sweaters 
fi ir their seasmi's wi>rk. 



fResHfnen 




Page One Hundreitl Thr 




ady for the take-off 
Over he hurdles 



the 100 yard dash — The stait of the cross en 
Forbriger, Walworth, Russell. Picken 
Simpson, McClinton, Currie, Hamilton 
have only about 12 feet to fall to the pit — It sure looks like Olympic material 



■Mm the .-.11 yar.l lint 
And that's histh 

hat jump 



Sprint; linmsht AFinininutli's ciiider luirm-rs to life Aronmnulh's sea^^nn opened with tlio entry of .t mile 

again tollDwing a fine cross-ccmntry irainint; held in ihe rela\- team in the .lOtli annual Drake Relays held at 

fall, A fair nnnilier (if tneii responded to the call of Coach Des Moines, lo\v,i. The hoys were outclassed in the large 

Ivan W, Cahoon, who is guiding the men for his first field and failed to ipialify in the preliminary heat by a 

time this year, a larger number of freshmen answering the few tenths of a second, and therefore did not see service 

call than varsity material. on the final runs. 

Monmouth track fans were at a loss this year for en- The Scots will be active the remainder of the season 

tertainment in that all meets in wliich the Fighting Scots in both freshman and varsity competition. The following 

participated were held awa.\' from home. This is the first is the track schedule for the 1939 season : 

time in many years that the Red and White tracks»ers have 
not been host to a conference meet of some nature. 

Rrake Relays .\prii 2S-2') 

P.eloit Relays May .^ 

MKnox Dual Meet May l.i » j 

.Augustana Dual Meet May 17 K ^ 

Illinois Conference Meet May 20 \\ /I 

Illinois College ^tect May 27 I V | 

M ilwaukee Intercollegiate Meet May 30 II 

Pasre One Hundred Four 



IDTRfi-mURRLS 



'kUa 




tflr ^ 


p iyvgi 




^iinr^ 






1^ . ■ . 



Rupp. Lindsay. Dean. MacDonald. Schmidt. Zimnicrsheid 
Not Included: Becliett 



Monmoutli's iiitra-miiral program hranclieil lut into 
many fields this \car. .yivin.L;" c\'crv interested man un the 
campus a chance tu show himself in one of the sports. 
Also in connection with the new fields was the inaugura- 
tion of an Intra-Mural Board which handled all the pro- 
gram for all sports. 

This is the first }ear that such a Ijoard lias heen 
in existence. Stanley MacDonald hcing elected president, 
and Art Dean, secretary, in the first meeting iicld in 
the fall. Throughout the year the council met and planned 
the sports program. 

At this date the complete returns of the program are 
not availalile with several of the sports still in progress. 
However, in a close fast race in the fall, the Phi Kaps 
caputercd the touch-footljall crown, the victory coming 
after many tie games had heen played off. 

The rifle competition which is a new event in llu- extra- 
curricular acti\ites this >ear. was won li\- the Ijeta Ka|ipa 



organizatii>n. Indoor track w,is taken hy the \'an Gundy 
cindermeu. with vollexhall going to the I'hi K<-i]is. 

The Tekes were success I ul in the swiuuning meet 
when three entries look to the pool and all iilaced high to 
win this e\ent. 

Baskethall pla>-oiT showed a three wa\- tie wiien final 
points were talliecl. the Tekes. Phi Kaps. and \'an (iund.N- 
holding equal honors. In the play-'iff the Phi Kaps emerged 
victorious after drawing a h\ e. \ an (iundy defeated the 
Tekes in the first match. 

The six teams entered in active competition iluri)ig 
the year were: Beta Kappa. College Cluh. .Macs. Phi 
Kaiipa Pi, Tan Kappa Epsilon. and \'an (iuud.\ Hall. 
Individual e\ents which were added to this \ear's |irogram 
were: shul'f le-h<.ard. haskethal! golf, seven-up. three 
throws, tahle tennis, handliall. and footliall throw for 
accuraev. 



Pace One Hundred Fi' 




s 

w 
I 

M 

M 

I 

N 
G 




T 
E 
N 
N 



Trcshum, Kryzanowsky, ZajiK-zkowski, Mur 




Uub .MtCuniitll - SwaiiSMii. Thiossell. Samlbe 
l'as;u Onu Huiulrud Six 



o 



H 



S 
W 

I 

M 
M 




Leaders ur cI.clis and aiuuscrs uf |.c|. amunK the students 




Kritzer. Rutf. Fidler, McRobevts. Coach Howard 
Stewart. Armstrong. Forbriger, Collman 



Pa.ue One Hundred Seven 



GIRLS* flTHL€TIC$ 




UnOEFEATED JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM 



In past \cars little luis liutn said in ihu liiK- (if (iirls' 
Athletics, altliimgh it lias lieeii une nf the nmst acl:\e or- 
ganizations on the canipiis in the fall ami winter months 

During the first three months of the school year, 
the various classes tangle on the hockey field. The junior 
girls hold the honor of Iieing the only undefeated, untied 
squad in three years of active competition. 

Basketljall also hnlds an important part of the extra- 
curricular activities heinj; pla\ed in the girls' gym on the 



third floor of Mc.Michael dormitor\ and also in the col- 
lege gymnasium, when not in use hy the varsity. 

A Girls' Rifle Squail was inaugurated for »he first 
time in open competition this year with mucli interest lieing 
shown. The organization is restricted to 2.t uieniliersr. 
Four styles of test are given which an individual must 
pass to become eligible for membershi]!. Besides being 
required to know the gun-man's code, they must be able 
to shoot from four positioris. namely, iiroue, sitting", 
kneeling anil standing. 



Standi! 



f..r tl 



le vear ari 



Juniors 0; Sophomore-Senin 
Sophomores (j ; Freshmen 1. 
Juniors 2; Freshmen 1. 
Juniors 4: AW Stars 1. 
Monmouth \'arsit\' 0; Kno.N 
Monmouth iM-esluuen 4; Kr 



\'arsity 1. 
i.\ F'reshnien 



BASKETBALL 



Sophomores 23 ; Seniors 12. 
Juniors 26 ; Freshmen 8. 
Sophomores 28; Juniors 11, 
Seniors 23; Freshmen 17. 
Sophomores 26 ; Frcslimen 9, 
Juniors 25 ; Seniors 14. 
Juniors 33; Freshmen 11. 
Juniors 21 ; Sophomores 21. 
Sophomores 2 ; Seniors 0. 



RTFLE 
Beth MeKinley— 99 ,.ut of possible KKl. 
Betty Burkholdtr— 95 out nf p.issilde 100. 
Irene \\'alzer— 91 out of possible 100, 



One Ihuulruil EJK'lit 



STUD€nT council 




W. Reynolds, J. Rupp 

H. Smith. S. Vickcrs, M. Fraser. K. Chevcrt<in, II. .I;iniiLM;n 

V. Foster. H. P<ut. R. Field, B. Holi.ii 

Not Included r T. Savaw. L. McClinton 

DORmiTORy OFFICeRS 




p. Reid. F. Wyatt. M. Stormont. M. Work. H. Hinshaw 

R. Hamilton. E. Calmer. E. I. Seliir. G. Wilson. .]. Turnhull. G. tjuade 

Jean Ltidman. Mae Beymer, Emma Gibson. Bettv Smith 



Pacrc One Hundred Eleven 



ORflCL€ 




The Oracle, weekly newspaper, is pulilished solely li\ 
student nieniliers of the ciille,i;e, ehusen each spring liy 
the student hody. Tlie editor is electeil with the hnsiness 
manager chosen by the board of publicatinns. The editor 
names his staff for the year's work. 

Each Wednesday afternoon the paper is issued to the 



students with much enthusiasm packing the Oracle office 
when word spreads, "The Oracle is out." Editor Dick 
Cheverton and his able staff did a fine job this year in 
keeping the student public up in the news, both local and 
away-from-liomc incidents. Bill Pine handled the adver- 
tising like a \eteran. 



EDlTORI.-\L ST.\FF 

Editor Richard Ciieverton 

Managing Editor Scott Hoyman 

News Editor James Af anor 

Make-Up Editor Betty Rubino 

Society Editor Rosemary Patterson 

Sports Editor Stan ^'ickers 

Exchange Editor Edward Borthwick 

Feature Editor Hamiali Hinshaw 

Advisor Eugene N'est 

BUSINESS STAFF 

Business Manager William Pine 

Assistant Af anager Richard .VbbcN 



REPORTERS 

James Manor, Robert Bowman, .\my >'oung, Ruth Moffet, 
Frances JJand, Frances Simpson. Xancy Lytic, Robert 
Black, Richard Lovegren, Mary Jane Frazier, Helen Suiter, 
Mary Stults, I^ee Reuss, .Art Dean, Robert Eyler, Sina 
l.ou Beach, Arlene Snow. Mariam .\dair, Scott Hoyman, 
leanette Brittain. Laura Davis. Jean TurnbuU. William 
Ti.rrance, Dwight Russell, Elinor Russell, Jean Morrison, 
Marjorie .Stormont, Mildred Brown, Eleanor Campbell, 
l'"li7.abetb Jones, John Lucas. Cleone Barnes, Jane P.rown- 
ell, Ruth Powell, Ernest Schlaretsky, Vivian Sheldon. 
Jane Tuttle. Patricia Simmons. William Schmidt. Tom 
Savage. Gordon Tackson, lames Hill. Don Torlev. lames 
Rupp. David Park. 




Tai-'C Oin- irumlroil Twclv 



RflV€LinGS 




Sliindiiis; : Munay. CHm|ibfll, Schantz, Canii.bL'll. Jiihnst.in. Manor, Simpsun, V-unu 
Seated: Jackson. Elder, ymith. Dines. Vest. Svvanson, BuiT 
Not Included: Orr, Hinsliaw, .Janiiesun 



i. Sandheii'. Tv 



"Ttu' Raxrlinw^." ycirl.pok nl" llu- .Mnnmouil' ( nlK-c 
sliiilciil IhkIv, first made its apiK-araiRT in \W2, an filiUuii 
ri l.iO pa.Ljcs. ,'^iiK-i' llial tiiiK' fort\ -l'i\a' imlilicatiuns liavc 
licfii M't ill IxjH-, this licin.L; iuiinln.-r l'ort>-si.\. Siin;e have 
Wvu lar.yer than the V2 ho.ik. smiic smaller, this Imnk well 
ah(i\c the axeraue. 

In the past, the iM.nk h:is usiiall\ fnlk.we.l the cojoi- 
schenie of reii ami while, uhieh .uixes iliie respee' tn ihe 

EDrroKI.M, S'iWh'l' 

Editi.r William Dines 

Business Manager Henry Smith 

Assistant Editor Willard Elder 

Assistant .\laiia,L;er Rolland .^ wans. .11 

Art Editor Huward Orr 

Women's Edittn- Martha Jane Caniiiliell 

.\dvisor Eueene \'est 



eollcge eolors. hut to carry out a complete color theme 
from co\er to co\er. eop]ier tint was chosen this year with 
one section of red showin.t; in the spi>rls .uroiiji. 

It is the hiM".' "f the junior fl.iss. piiMishers for \'>.V>. 
th.it this hook has met with each reader's satisfaction, and 
that in \ears to come \ou will cherish all of these mem- 



STAFF 

Men's Athletics William ^rnn•,ay 

Women's .\lhlctics Marian BurRcss 

Calendar Rita Johnston 

Cartoon and Art William Sandher.i; 

Classes William Torrance 

Dramatics Howard Janiieson 

Features James Manor 

Forensic Charles Caniphell 

Eiterary Hannah Hinsliaw 

Music Marshall S'mpson 

Organizations Gordon Jackson 

Society Cleone Barnes 



si^i^fe^w^t^b>fei^k#W^i# 



PaKC One Hundred Thirteen 



COLLGGG CLUB 




R. Cook. W. Miller. J. Shullow. J. Picken, R. Nowotny 
R. Forsyth. R. Chevcrton. M. Patterson. W. Schmidt 
Mrs. Lambcrtson. L. MfCulloch. L. Abels, R. Dunlap 
H. Sliipe. A. Dean. M. Garland. T. Savage. W. Bloomer 



vfln Gunoy hall 




^^^^'^Wf&f&^H 



PaKe One Hundred Fourtee 



siGfTiFi omicRon mu 




H. S.n.lli, <,. lliievMli. VV. ll;il.Uiii;iii. U. Lliii.iii.l. J. l-lLilniun. M. Keid, H. J:iiiiH'sc..., 

ii. Torley. F. l-'oster, G. Zeiu-lei-, R. Eyl.jr. P. Zajaczkowski 

J. Fai\v...|l, D. Reave. B. Rubino 

Not Included: H. Wharton. L. Neil. R. Pctii=. H M. Telfoid. E. H?.nna. H. Beveridtre. 

J. H. Grid-. L. E. Robinson, E. Bail'. X. Winbiyler 



SlCmfl TflU D€LTfl 




E. Jones. H. Hinshaw. C. Owtn. E. Ni-w.-umb, E Sfhkuutzki. D. Vowl. H .Ja 
A. Jones, J. Fai-well. M. J. Hutchison. R. Blair. R. Chtverton, J. Martir 
F, Hand, M. Winbigler, R. Lucas, D. Reese, U. Sieber 
Not Included: M. Gillham, W. Murray. I. BoUman. R. Caldwell 




N 



140: 



Page One Hundred Fifteen 



PI Gflmmn pi 




Roblsoii, Omur. Lionard. M J HutLhi j. 

Erskine, Lindsay. Skinner. DaM^ Wal/ci 

Walker. President: Suirantt. Vice President Cha,.man Secietai v-Tlcasuie 



y. m. c a 




James. Schlaretski. PruRli 
Russell. T. Campbell. Schantz. C. Campbell 
President: Manor. Treasurer: Murray. Secretary: Dr. Buchanan. Sponsor 



^^^^^iif^^^^^ 



Paire One Hundred Sixteen 




Smith. Tuinbull, Mi-Clinton 
A. Rhnades, Zieiiler, SclilaiLtski. Tresham. Limlcll 
Foster. President; Beverirfge, Sponsor; Jamieson. Viee President; Eyier. Tr 



y. uu. c. fl. 




WlKUlcn. Murpliv, Smith 
Ledlie. Patihin. Hutt-hison. Quade 
Smith, Turnbull. Hinshaw, Dod?e 
Tageart. Pres. : Gillham. Vice Pres. ; Ohata. Field, Treas. ; Beal. Asst. Tr 



Pf'^^^^^^^^^^ 



Page One Hundred Sevente. 



TfiUPI 




MARY TAGGART 

HELEN WHARTON 

JEANETTE FARWEI.L 



BETTY SMITH 
MARY OILLHAM 



MARY MURPHY 

ISABELLE BOLLMAN 

FRANCES HANn 



An ni-oanizalidii fnniicd in 1931 In u|iliiil(l ihc standards of wman- 
lii 1(1(1 on tlu' cani])us and U> lie a piihlic n_-cii,^nition for those wonK-n who 
liav(.- attained these standards (hnant;- their first three rears in eolle.i;e. Tliese 
.-.enior women are chosen on the basis of scholarshi]), serxicc ;uid leadership. 
This sociel\' lunctioiis o]ienl\- dnrin.t;- the school year, and the new nieniher- 
ship is known to the stndent body each spring. 




N 



Page One Hundred Eis-htoen 



L4o: 



OCTflPUS 




BERNARD BOLON 

RICHARD MOODY 

FREDERICK FOSTER 



PAUL ZAJACZKOWSKI 
HAROLD PARR 



LINDELL BELLIS 

DAN FINN 

STANLEY VICKERS 



nuriny- the fall nf 1927, eleven men who fell the need of a 
Senior Society for men on the campus met and formed this orqrini- 
zation. Now the niemhershi]) is limited to ei.Ljht men, cho>cn an- 
nually, wlio are pled.s^ed at the close of their junior \ear and are 
memhers throui;ii their v'-lenior \ear. Their names are withheld until 
the Raveling's appears. 




Page One Hundrerd Nineteen 



40: 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 



The International Relations Club is affiliated with similar cluhs all 
over the United States which were established and are aided by tlie Car- 
negie Endowment. 

The imrpose of the ehili is to foster an interest in Internatimial Re- 
lations and tii pnimote kniiwled^e and midei-standini;- <if tile |iri.l>leni. wliicb 
eonfrnnt ynnny iieople as citizens df the w.irld. 

Tile menlber^lli|> is made nii iif ]iersi.ns wlio are definitely ink-rested 
in the serial and pnlitieal sciences and the role lhe\- iila\' in w-irld affairs. 

The niemliers iif the clnb ciHi|ierate in kcepini; ni)-to-dale, tlir w.irld 
affairs map located in the main hall nf the ailministration Imilding. 

Professor R. W. McCuUoch is in charge of the meetings. 



REMBRANDT 



The W(irk of the Rendirandt Cluli in the riast has been of a ]iurely 
appreciative nature — lectures and classes were useil to create a deeper 
understanding of painting, and art work. However, this year, those in 
charge decided to follow an entirely' new course. 

Aware of the fact that there must he in college, nmnerous st\ulents 
who in some respect ilo creatie work, the Club has s|ionsored a creative 
department. Drawing, water colors, clay modeling and wood blocks, with 
a small class in costume designing being included in the program. 

The works of this cIuli arc usually e.xhiliited each spring at the Fine 
.\rts Building. 

Professor T. H. Hanu'llnu directs the did). 



ICTHUS 



The Ichthns Club is a grou|} of students forir.ed each year to stimu- 
late interest along the Christian lines, to benefit those interested in s.icial 
service or misvionary work and for those who ]ilan to enli-r the ministry 
upon graduation from college. 

.\lonthl.\' nu-etings arc held c\er_\- third Simday of the moulli in the 
College Cbrislia)! .-\ssociation rooms located in the .\udito|-ium biulding. 
The pin-piise of the meetings is for general discussion along the b.ncs of 
interest of the slndeiU members. 

Dr. II. M. Telfonl is sponsor of the organizalion. President James 
H. (Jrier and Dr. Dales Lluchanan lieing on the board of directors. 



t>^fc#i«>U^t^N^ks^W^i^ 



Page One Hundred Twenty 



CHEMISTRY CLUB 



Miiiiiii.nith College's Chemistr\- (lull was organizcil slmrtly after 
Chrislnias, \')37. At the oryanizaticni meeting, tile fulluwiuK ninnliers eii- 
nilleil: ( .eor.^e ZicKler, fliarU-, l)aws..n, lui.ueiie L. Keinsleiii, Irene Wal- 
zer. l.e^li^• MeCliiit.in, IIumIi Marsli, Ivirl Carwile, Marvin Kal li fel.U'r. 
Knlierl l.itzeiilierf^er, Rieliar.l Al.liey. kolierl ICyler, Frank Caput, ,. knl.erl 
I'ink. Max ArnislrciiK, Jaeksnu l':riek-,uu. and William Crai'^. 

This \ear several ini|Mirtant nuetin.^s lune heen luld. Ratlier earl>- 
la^l fall Hull l.itzeiiliertjer earric'd .ail a series .if ex|ieriments uilh ilr\ iee. 
In |aiinar>. a re|iresentati\ e ..f the \\ ilken-, AmlerMin ('iiiii|ian\ s|i.ike l.i 
a yniuii .if elnh nieniher, i.n the fnline f. .r eheinists. just recinlK there 
was sliiiun un.ler the aiispiees ,.f ihc (_ henhstr\ (_luli. a film ilepiel ini; tin- 
mining ami uses ui sulphur. 



SOCIAL COUNCIL 



The Social Cnuiieil reliews the tension an. I humdrnin .if acailemie 
work with an "( )pen House" once a week. This conimiiiee, c. imposed of 
Mrs. Mae I'.eymer. Dr. Crier, Dean Cilisou. Dean Cleland. h're.l Foster, 
Rosemary ITehl. Tun Campliell, Mary Ta.yuart, jean Turulitdl, Betty 
.Smith and .\lar\ \lurph\-, met .mce a month t.i plan for all College Open 
H.iuses. This \ear's committee |iut these affairs on a new plane of ex- 
trava.ganzas liy huyiu.g a new electric phouo.graph. with amplifiers and 
tip-to-date records. Thi'n, to make things e\en finer, the\- turned ;u'. extra 
roiim into a dance floor ami refinished the flo.ir t.i make ()|ien Houses 
the center of attraction .hiring the week-end, Xext year's parties should 
he even hetter for a microph.iUe is to he installed for the henefit of the 
partiers. 



RIFLE CLUB 



Aronnioutli College has her own rifle experts, F. ir pr.iof, this year, 
under the sponsorship of Dr. C. W. Thiesseu, a rifle cluh was .iruanize.l 
f.ii- h.ith hoys and girls. The cluh spoils, ired in.li\idual matches as well 
.as intercillegiate c. anpetiti. m. Dick (.ill won the in,li\i,lnal awar.l f.ir 
the men. sh.ioting a iierfect sc.ire .if KK). I'.elh .\lcl\iule\ captnreil the- 
same title f. .r the w.mien with a sc.Me .if ''''. With a \ear's exii.rience 
from which to ihaiw. the rifle cluh l.ioks f.irwar.l t.i liigger ami hetter 
ihings next year. 

It's memhership includes: ( ,ill, Renner, Weeger, llarringl..u, Torley. 
P.urkhol.ler, Walzer. Skinner, Cliamhers. Ihuhanan an. I .l.ilins..n. 
Burkh.dder, Waltzer, Skinner, Chamhers. Buchanan and Jolmson, 




4o: 



Page One Hunde Tidwenty-un 




Di. H. R. Beleiidge, Plofcsbo. ot MathematiCb. ( a little far removed from the formal sect'.on. but bjtt^-r 
here than not at all). Even the instructors dress for dinner — En route to chapel — Always seen, seldom 
heard of, trrounds keeper. Sam Hamilton. Don't take such hiss steps. Bob— Two learned profs.— Watch 
out now. Doctor Garwood — Nope. Mac, not j^rold ; just a piece of coal — Haldy caup:ht in the act of think- 
ing — The biE and little of the athletic depai'tment That famous character. Dr. Murray — Shaver heads 
for Coldhrook. not Los An.celes— Dr. Grier meditates— McCulloch looks over the frosh— Johnny shows the 
kick. It's a Kood likeness of the cipcar— Hurry alomr. Miss Donald, Buck's in a hurry— Dave on first- 
Doc Vest T>eeks thru. SmilinK Mort takes a pose— Quite a load. Miss HoEue— Doc and Dave survey the 
landscape— Penny for your thoudhts AND HERE IS THE PRIZE PICTURE OF THE YEAR. MISS 
EVA BARR CAUGHT IN ACTION ONE FINE DAY 




PaKe One Hundred Twenty-tw 




musK j»-^/^o^ 



BACH-HAMILTON»WAGNER°PETERSON-CH0PIN»RIGGS°DEBUSSY° SHAVER 



FORENSIC 



PI KAPPA DELTA ° LIEDMAN » DEBATE ° MAYNARD " SPEECH 



DRnmnTKS 



IBSEN-WILLIAMS'VIOLA^RIMSON MASQUE "TWELFTH NIGHT- 




RUTH UUILLIflmS 

I JlKiX'TOK 

Mis^ WiUianis li;i^ just ci iiiiiilcled 1k-i- sixleenlh wuv at Mi ni'iii iiilli 
Ciilk',t;x\ ^-ixtccn \L-ar> in which nian\- chaiis^cs ha\c cdiiic ah' lUl in ihc 
(h'anialii,' stancHn;^' on the canipns. lUiilt frnin a mere nuthini; bi nne 
1 1 1' tile lar!;'e>t or.s^anizatii .n> un tlie eanipiis, Crinix m .MaM|ue lia^ .--lii i\\ n 
a rapid rise under tlie leadership nl its al}le director. 




MontKomery. Campbell. Tresham. Crow, Carwile, .lackson. Coulter. Simpson. Elder 

Johnson. Sneer. Walworth. Griffith. Russell. Stice. Dobler 

Doilse. Teeter, Brown. Davis. Ledlie, Walzer, Lyford, Kuntz, Schlaretski, .James, Hovnia 

Barbari. Ncnris, Walker. Leonard, .lones. Pati bin, Martin, Ynum; 

WilliaTus, Hutchison, Reese, Rubino. Cami'bell, Bollman, Gillbam, Murray, Jamies.>n 



Paee One Hundred Twcnty-fi' 



(TIRS. mooriLiGHT 





Bv Biix Li;\v 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Turn Moonlight Tim Campbell 

Mimiie Mary Cillham 

Edith JoiKS Lucille I.L'onarci 

Sarah Moonlight Mary .Jame, 

Percy Middling Curtiss Russell 

Jane Moonlight Isabel Bollman 

Willie Ragg John Martin 

Peter Middling Charles Canipbel! 



M. liking the opening ol" the Crimson Masque 1938-39 season's program, "Mrs. Moon- 
light" was presented in the Little Theatre, October 28, under the capaljle direction of 
Miss Ruth M. Williams. This etherial drama concerns the possibility of an individual, 
never growing old, but remaining the same in ])hysieal appearance despite the years. Such 
a situation is the one confronting Mrs, Sarah Moonlight, .\ pink velvet evening dress 
for Mrs. Moonlight helped [irovidc the necessary atmosphere. With this fantastic iilnt. 
the entire cast developed a clima.x of marked emotional intensity. However, tb'' barbed 
criticisms of the crusty Scotch maid, Minnie, adequately furnished the humor ii.'oessarv 
lor keeping the tensions from becoming oppressive. 



ra.co Ono Humlic.l Twcnt.v-six 



i^^^^^i'^i^^i^i'^ 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 

Stanhope 1 Inward JamioDii 

Osborne Ernust Schlaretski 

Trotter Earl Carwik' 

Jlilil.crt Harold Griffitli 

Raleigh Scntt Hoynian 

The Cnloiiel Willard Ekler 

The Company Sergeant-Major 

Bryant \\ alworth 

Mason Bnrdet Jolinson 

Hardy Cord.m Jackson 

A Yunng- German Soldier . AN'illiam Treshani 

Broughton Hngli Marsh 




Re-enacting fonr days of life in a British frontline ilngont, an entire cast of male 
actors iiresented the war pla>-, "Jonrney's End," on Decemlier 9. According to dramatic 
critics this is one of the most iiowerfnl pla}S exer jiresented. For the first time in six- 
teen years the Masque deviated from its prescribed course of omitting social problem 
dramas, and i)resented this pla\ as its contribution for' peace. Humans with tense nerves, 
strained almost to the breaking point, portrayed the stark reality of war with the aid of 
scenery, costumes and sound effects. The packed house and favorable criticism indicated 
that the change from the usual program was well recei\ed. 



jouRneys eno 



Pace One Ilund-cJ Twenty 



STRGe DOOR 




Bv EDXA FERBKR ami GEORGE S, KAUFMAX 



"Stage Door," witli its detailed action and dramatic 
climax, was produced three times, twice under the spon- 
sorship of Monmoutli Chapter of the American Associa- 
tion of University Women on March 9 and 10, and again 
on ^larch 18 for the High School Open House. This is 
the play that furnished good entertainment in three fields. 
Broadway, Hollywood, and Radio. The clever lines cre- 



ated the sparkling small talk common to boarding clubs. 
.'Ml the action of this satire on Hollyw-ood is centered 
in the Footlights Club, a boarding liouse for girls of the 
stage. A great deal of perseverance w'as necessary in pre- 
paring this production because nf the flu epidemic which 
made serious inroads in the cast uf thirtv-thrce. 



CIST of CII.IK.ICTF.RS 



Olga Brandt Betty Ruhino 

Bernice Xiemeyer Margaret Jean Hutchison 

Susan Paige Hazel Kuntz 

Mattie Dorothea Walker 

Alary Harper ( Big M;ir\ ) Betty Norris 

Mary McCune (Little >iary) Jeanette Patchin 

iladcleine Vauclain Irene W'ab.er 

Bobby Melrose Mary Gillham 

Tuditii Canfield Evclvn Beattie 

Ann Braddock M ildred Brown 

Mrs. Orcutt Mary Elizabeth Ledlie 

Kaye Hamilton Marilouisc Sticc 

Pat Devine .^nn Jones 

Linda Shaw ■ L'rsula Sieber 

Jean Maitland Betty Teeter 

Louise M itchcU Bcthanv Evers 



Kendall .\dams Isabell Bollman 

Frank William Murray 

Terry Randall Laura Davis 

Sam Hastings Earl Carwile 

Timmv Devereaux William Tresham 

Fred "Powell Bryant Walworth 

Lou Millhauser Harold Griffith 

David Kingsley Ernest Schlaretzki 

Keith Burgess John Martin 

Mrs. Shaw Ruth Cliambers 

Dr. Randall Hugh Marsh 

Ellen Fen wick Lucille Leonard 

Tony Gillette Doris Hatch 

Larry Westcott Gordon Jackson 

Billv Burdet Johnson 

Adolph Gretzel Curtiss Russell 




IluncUc.l Twcnt.v-Gisht 




THE OLD 

•CRACKER BOX" THEATRE 

^lonnioiit/i iLo(/e(je ~^}Lonrnoiith, U //inois 

...PROGRAMME... 

EZNGAGEZMEZNT EXTRAORDINARY 

'■-1 THE POD-BEE CRIHSON MASDOE THCATRICU COMPANY 

— IN— 

The Great Romantic, Spectacular 

Borneo ij ^)rania 

"FASHION" 




DRAMATIS PERSONNAK 

Adam Trueman: (A heart of gold from Catteraugus) - JMr. Nowotiiy 

Count Jolimaitre: (A Bogus count, a crumb from the upper crust) .Mr. Tippett 

Colonel Howard: (A true gentleman as well as a soldier) Mr. Blair 

Mr. Tiffany: (A worshipper of Mammon) Mr. Mayo 

T. Tennyson Twinkle: (A sweet poet).... Mr. Armstrong 

Augustus Fogg: (A drawing room appendage) Mr. Milligan 

Snobson: (A bad egg, the evil genius, a d-xx-1) Mr. Nicholl 

Zeke: (A colored citizen ready for the suffrage when it is 

ready for him) Mr. Turek 

Mrs. Tiffany: (The upper crust of the New York "Eelight") Miss Campbell 

Prudence: (A lady in waiting — for a husband) Miss Reid 

Millinette: (Femme de chambre — tres jolie) Miss Chatten 

Gertrude: (An orphan and governess) Miss Robinson 

Seraphina Tiffany: (A coquette) Miss Martens 

Ladies of the ensemble Miss Speer and Miss Garrett 



The (lrani;i writt'-'ii 1)\ Mrs. .\niKi C"r;i Mowatt and 
placed (.11 the stage liy Miss Williams and lier ..nleiidid 
assistant, Miss Norris. 

Ter|)sichorcan interludes by Miss Junes. 

Touching balladry and songs selected liy Miss KrJiiiin, 
Miss Bcattie and Miss Jones. 

Musical accompaniments by Miss Ruliino. 

Appropriate sceneries and machineries nf this elabo- 
rately constructed stage are executed liy that eminent artis;. 
Mr. Russell, and a phalanx of talented assistants. 

New and characteristic dresses at vast expense and 
with gorgeous display by Miss Birbari and assistants. 



.ViiiiK.xmM 

Because nf the serii.ns tune of this phi\, the .ludieiice 
is respectfully requested to exercise as luuch restraint as 
possible in (h'spla\ in.s; their appreciation of the sentiments 
and theii- (hsapproval of the \illaiii\-, eitlier li>- applause, 
or liissiii.ij. rie.-ise refrain from ealin.y peanuts as it mars 
the performance ami annoys the audience. 



BllKllSISlgBllSIESSESlSKiaiglSISIglglsXEIgEISEEIglEEKli^^ 



"JOAN OF ARC" 



Oil April 15, the Steven's Marionettes presented a puppet show in all the realism and 
liackground of the real sta.ye. .\ drama of coura.ne, "Joini of .\rc," was produced on a 
miriature stage witli diniinutixe actors. This was the professional number on the season's 
liro.yram. 



^b^ W^^t>k-^i ■>^>^i*^i# 



Tatru One Iluniln-,1 Twunt.v 



^fe^t^^b^ti^fe^^fcs^fe 




Under the direction of Mis:i 
Jean Liedman, the season of 1938- 
1939 was a succcssfnl one fur the 
Monniniilh (olleyu fur.^nsic de- 
parlnicnt. Sexcii wunieu and six 
men debated in five tournaments, 
plus numerous individual contests. 
The question for debate this year 
was; "Resolved, that llie I'liiud 
States should cease to use iiulili' 
fluids nr credit for the purjiose uf 
stimulating business." Thj tourn- 
aments were held at Illinois Slate 
Norma! Universiity in I'sormal ; 
Principia College near Aliun. Illi- 
nois ; the State tornament a! ],ake 
Forest; Pi Kappa Delta tourna- 
ment at Augustana College in Rock Island; and the Mid- 
west Conference tournament at Coe College in Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa. 

The Midwest Conference was especially significan' 
this year in that it represented the openin.g of a new 
forensic activity for our college and the others in this 
vicinity, iieing the first year for the conference com- 
petition. At the first liusiuess meeting, a jiermauent 
constitution was drawn up estalilisliing an animal legis- 
lative assemlily to replace the regular Inui'iiaiuciU de- 
bating. 

It was decided that next year's meeting will lie held 
in the Wisconsin State Senate Chamber, Misers lean 



JEAN LIEDMAN. 
Coach 



Surratt and Lrris Lindsay, and .Scott Hoyman and Charles 
Cinupliell being cbnseu U> represent Monmouth af this 
first Clin foence. I lie scbmils who have already given 
a|iplii;ilii:n fur aihnittance are Knnx, Ijebiit, Riiio]i, Cor- 
nell and Cue. Other scbimls will be added at a later date. 
The stnilriil le,mslati\e ;ls^emlll^■ \\\\] i-epresent the latest 
deNrliipnient in fnrensic acti\ities. 

A gre.il ileid nf ,-icti\it\- was alsn noticed in the 
iir,ilnr\ and extempniinieons speaking departmeiits. In 
:i pi.ielire tnnni.inienl held at llliiiuis Wesle\-an. r.liiiim- 
ingtiin, e;u-|y in the se;iMin, WilliiLm liutler was awarded 
fiist place ,nid tbailes Cainpbell secnud |ilace in the 
men's extempnranenus wurk. Misses Riub Lucas and 
IC\el>n ILniisiiii, ,-nid Juhn .Martin were entries in 
Or.Uiiry, .nid Misses Lmuse Cgbnid and Lois Lindsay 
were inlered in wumen's extempure. 

jiibn Martin \vas entered in the Stale contest in 
iiraliiiw kiler in the seasnn, winning first |dace in the 
men's dixisinn, being aiLanced to the national cnntest. 
Louise Cglaud placed secnnd in women's extempore 
spe.dving ;uid Charles Campbell wiiu third in the men's 
extempore s|ieecli. This was the second year for such a 



stale 



inle 



Scott llii\man and Lrnest Schlaretski met two men 
fiiiin Chica.no I'niversitN- in a i-ound-table discussion on 
the ipiestion: "W'b.it t\pe of education best fits mail 
foi- iiiod'.Tn iHenlietb eenlmx- life?" The season was 
eompleled with a debate with l);irtmoutb College held 
late in April. 



PI HflPPfl D€LTfl 




Pasix' Oho Hunilivil Thirty 



. 



isf fc^W^t^t-^N^h^h5i# ' 



UJOmeiTS D€BflT€ 



}m^!r" 


"''^tB| 




tp^ 




[E^^^^^^l 



L. Walworth, A. Snow. H. Hond. P. Slfvons. M. I-inli'.v. K. Wyatt, L. Un 
1'. Van Ealoii, J. Sin latt, I.. Liiulsay. R. Lucas 



m€n*S D€BflT€ 




Daviil Park, Hany Krant/., K..l.eit Bowman 
Gorilon Jackson. John Martin. Charles Camphcll. Scott Ho 



Payro One Hundred Thirty-on 



MUSIC DIRECTORS 




GLENN SHAVER 



GRACE PETERSON THOMAS HAMILTON 



The Music Department ha> pnixeil U< he mie 
of the outstanchii.t;' (lepanniciUs "ii llie c;impu> 
this year. A .g^real cleal i>\ ini]ii-i i\ cnicnt ha^ l>ecii 
shown amoni,'' the \ari(iu> i m ;;ani/.alii 'Hs, aii'l each 
has developeil an interest anmni;^ its nienil)ers, 
wherehv jNhmniDUtli Cnliei^e can expect a. 1 letter 
and a fjjrdwinj;" music department in the luture. 

The clidir is ^row in,i;', and lias had >ucce>> 
in all its perfcirmances. A selected f^roup. knnwn 
as the MonnidUtli C'dlei^e Concert (."hnir, I'epre- 
sented their alma matci' in ()liiii and niuihein 
lUinciis this year, ha\in,L; a \ei'\- succcsslul trip. 
This is, perhaps, the must nulst.indiiig concert 
choir that .MonnioiUh has >ent out. 

The Men's Glee Clul) and the W omen'^ Cdee 
Clul) under the direction of (denn Sha\er and 
Grace Peterson respecti\ely, were new organi- 
zations this year, so far as the concert tour wa^ 
concernetl. A well liaLanced choir was to he 
found in each group. These chilis should develop 
into two of Monmouth's out>tanding represen- 
tatives before many _\ears. 

A musical ,i,n'ou|), made up of members of 
the Crillege Choir and si.\t\- other members of 
the student bod\- who wishe<l to partici])ate, g;i\ e 
the annual .Messiah (.'onceil on llecemlur i ^ 
193S. The concert was enjo\,able, llie soln p.irls 
being taken b\- .\li>> l''.\el\n He.iltie, ^opi-ano; 
Miss Josephine Swinne\, ,dto, of L'hicago; Thos. 



W. Williams, tenor, of Knox College; and Glenn 
Sluner, bass, of the Monmouth faculty. 

Tile I'l.ind was well represented this year, 
conipii>ed of _V' college students. The\- pla_\ed 
at the local football ami basketball games, giving 
an atmosphere of real college spirit, and a desire 
fi ir ri\alr\'. 

Meniljers of the band who recei^-etl letter 
sweaters this year for completion of four sem- 
esters in the grouii were: I.ucille Leonard, Wil- 
liam h'ink, Joseph Sanders and Thomas P>e\-er- 
idge. 

The orchestra has dexeloped and grown ami 
is now an outstanding grou]i, not onl\- in ]\Ion- 
UKiuth, Init among other colleges. Much credit 
is gi\eii Mr. f.oya, the director, for bringing for- 
ward such an important organization ^\■llich n-', iV 
has 50 [lieces. 

The music department also brought the C<:)1- 
lege Choral Societ\" to Monmouth again this vear. 
This is one of the feature attractions to the 
students as the\- had the opp irtunitx' of seeing and 
listening to fixe concerts, nameh' : 

The I'.va Jesse Colored Choir. 
The 1 'unbar I'el! Ringers. 
The .\nnual Messiah L'oncert. 
.\braham (,'hassins, concert pi.niisl. 
(icorgia Graxes, contralto, 
\\alter Mills, liaritoiie. 



^^^^i>-t'i^f'^\^\*f'^ 



V:iyA- Our Ihnuliud ■riiiily-lv 



COLL€Ge CHOIR 



t t t fit f f t I I I 

u,.^ f i: t * » « t t t t f ^ 




^r u 1/ f/ 



■|lir \lonin..uili Cillryi' ( linir is 
iiii-luilc s|ir(;i;il iiunilii'|-s ;il llic re,u;i 

This year tlu- i-cilli',m- was rciiri-s 
years. Each grdiip, ihc- nun's and 
presented in tlie CohL'se CcuR-irl I'cni 
Tliese clu)is meet once ever\ nlhrr \ 
( llenii Shaver is the ihrcctnr. 



nade lip Ml' si\l\-t\\n 111(11 and winiieii. 'Idiei'- iklties 
lar \espers, and the preparali. .n fur concert tuurs. 
■iiled li.\ lu.. nUe (hil.s I'm- the lirsl tiTiie in several 
'.omen's, was made np nf 17 nieinliers. Tliry were 
■, ihe Iwn i^nnips Ini^elhi-r f.irmin,!; the concert clioir. 
eek dniing the reynlar chmr rehearsal lor practice. 



CHRP6L CHOIR 



The ('li;i|n'l Clidir is a ,L;rini|) nf sixln-n wlm are spi'cialh' sc- 
Ic'Clrd f|-niil llii' (,'iiIK-,l;i' C'ln -ir. ll is llicir ilul \" li > sillt;" idr tin- i i|n.-niti,i;' 
st'r\ii\'S al clia])!'! liclil i\uli ila\. and Id rcprc'sml llir ci illc!_;r mi sprr- 
ial I iccasii Ills, siicli as clmrrli rouniiiiis and liit^li scIiumI pia .oraiiis 
'i'liis \v:\.v \\\c t^rmip lias wi-ll liillilU-d ils dnt\, as tlu-\ lia\i' rcprc- 
sriilrd llic rnlk'oc wiiliiii a radius i,\ -3 |i> k 10 iiiilos. 

Till' 1 H-oaiii/.alii 111 iiu'cls \,.r w^uIav piarlicr Iwicf a \voel<, llu' 
llK'lliln'rs rei\'i\iiio ci iIlrL;r creilil. Musi i,\ [\]c niiisic is 1 itllstindinu 
sacred and scnilar nunilicrs, li\ the 1 mi si.nidino inusic ci niipos-rs. 



I- IKS't SOPRANO - 

.It-anettr Kaiwell 

Hila Bi-tli Reeve 
SKCOND SOPRANO 

Louise l-rizell 

Constance Chatten 
FIRST TENOR 

Marshall Simiison 

Richard ^iiller 
SECOND TENOR- 

William Fink 

James Munn 
FIRST ALTO 

Marv Elizaheth Ledli< 

Jeanette Patchin 
SKCOND ALTO- 

Mai-y Rogers 

Maijoi-ie Stoi-mont 
HARITONE 

Call Bassle:- 

RLlielt Clelaiu! 
PASS ■ 

Ernest SehlaietskI 

Uwinht Russell 
DIRECTOR 

Tl„,ma^, H. Haniillon 




^^▼fATTtV 



I JT 1 N TTIC TT 1 S TT 140: 



Tape On,. Itun.lie.l Thi, ty-thv 




N 



messiflH 




Tlic aumuil Mo^iah coucltI was prescnU'i! 
Dcccnihcr 13, KJ38. The ci:llL',L;"e clmir of sixl\- 
luo nieinlicrs, and sixty uIIkt students ci )iii|)( )S(.'il 
lliL- coiK'cil ,i;ri'U]). The m)1ii arrani^cmciits were 
lilled hy two Monnmutli nicilihcrs, and twn out- 
(it-ti>wn j^ucst sin.i;LTs, AIi>s i-'\cl\n llcattie. '30, 
sdpranii, rcpresctcd thu lucal C()nscr\at(ir\- ■•{ mu- 
sic cHicicntly. Miss Josephine Swinnev, alti>, df 
Chica.i^n. was nne nf the ^iiest si T lists. I'rnfes- 
siir Thi.nias W. Williams, (Ureetnr of music at 
Kni'x (ift'ei-ed the tenor smIo^,. ("denn (,'. Sliaxer, 
local director, took the h.ass solos, also represenl- 
in,i,;- the staff of the conserxatorv. 



The proj^ram consisted of two solo t^roups 
hy the ,iL;uest sol<iists, Mr. Williams and Miss 
Swinne\-. The .Messiah C'oncert was composed of 
se\ en recitati\es, the best known lieinj;' the tenor 
solo. 'T'onifort \'e .M\- Teople," and nine .arias 
which included the well known soprano number, 
"I Know that .M\- Redeemer l,i\eth." The cho- 
rus ,L;roup sani.;' fi\e numhers. 

I'nder the direction of Professor Hamilton, 
with .Miss h'.dn.a Ui.i;-,!;s at the pi.ano. W'ilev Pru^ii 
at the or,i;an. and lleinio l.oya directin,^;- the Col- 
K't^e ()rchestr:i, the concert was :i success. 



Vwv One Hundred Thiity-foui- 



W^t^fc^ W^^L^i .^i^M^^is^^O^ 



R€CITRL$ 




Rivv;., rrtu-]!-..ii Rfcital 

Stiuk-nts -tiuhiiii; |ii'i\ atrl\ , l;i\(.- rci'itaK ;il the rMnser\ ati iry each week. 
Music niajdi's L;i\e ri'citak up m llie ci iiiiiiK-lii )U "i llieir cmu'ses. The lacultv 
uieiuliers i;f Hu' music (le|iarlnient al^M aia re|ire^enle(l iu the l*acuU\ Recital. 



GL€€ CLUB 




Sli.ivcr. .liic'itor; Mi-Ck'llanil. Miinii, Ciinilii, Millrr, Simi..^..,,. .Inni.'s, l.;uin 

I'liik, Hill. Gardni-r, Hollniaii. Kealti.-. Kaiw.ll. .Si-hlaivtski, 

Chattel!. Fiizz.-ll. Wilson. Gil.lj. .Jar-..bs. Wallace. Ri.i'ers. I nai.i. Lytur.!. Tat,' 



HIT. Rus.^ell. Rear, r.ia'li. ri.kc 

Clelan.l. Basslei- 
in. Warner. .Slewai-.l. Ruchana 



Pane One Ilunilre.l Tliirty-fi 



ORCH6STRP 




Having grown trmn a .small, nnkmuxn nryanizatKin, the Urchcstra is irnv oni' 
iif the most popular groups on tlie campus. It gives various recitals during the year 
and arc always an active part in the Messiah given liy the College Choir in the 
winter. .Some fifty pieces made up tliis \ear's orchestra. 



BRHD 




Thrniigh the aid .>f lieinio l.oya. the .Scots' Hand is sL.wlv hut surelv material- 
iznig inio what should someday liecome one of the feature attractions of M.nuiiouth 
College. Tlie organization is growing little by little each year, and it is the hope of 
all that fine new uniforms will soon adorn the members of the band. 



1 * 




N 



L40: 



Pace One Humlrcd Thiity-.s 




SNAPSHOTS' AND A WHOLE BUNCH OF LOVELY STUFF !!!?•! 



i 




Pat'e One Hundred Thiity-nii 



sepT€nnB6R 12*^10 19 .k 



FRESHMAN WEEK 




Dcnn Cleiand Kives a word of advice to the incomitlE freshman el; 




New sliideiits are ■.■aests of the Second U. P. Church in the opening week. 




PaB-e One Hundred Forty 




10. 



Jtj. 



Sclioiil \c;ir lO.V'^-.iO uniifririalK' upcn^ willi \ . .\l.-\ . W . KLtical. 
Xew ->\\ai'ni arri\(.-> and the nKl llmk returns. 
W'ondL-r what |)lans ai'c ihsctissed at laciill\' nK'ctin.t;? 
I'rohnian l)a\' — cunipletL* with |)i"e-i'(_\L;istratii in cunfcrence^; llihlc, 
l'',n,L;Hsh and l's\-(.-hi :li i,l;\- tests; tea dani'L- idr new .^irls; talk's h\ reprc- 
scnlati\cs ol" student l)^^■ani/.ali<lns ; and the ^'. I'. (.". L'. sucial at h'irst 
and Sermid I'. 1'. i'IhutIk's. 

l''i|-sl chaiiel, and it Idnks hke a hit; \a-ar with J_'5 I'lTshincn W alkniil 
and hiinlirc < in alhklir luld. 

(.'(iiiliniK'd iT,i;islrati(in. ^'. W. niiTlin.i^- at Wniidhinc. \. W . al .^\ni. 
Kccitalicns in all (k-partnunts. I'.(i\> conic hi.nu- I'luni I 'an liii,L;l"n J iv 
C'lilk-t^c with \ icti ir\- nl jo-ii. 

,^atinala\- a (la\- of I'cst ? \. .\l.-^. W. reception. l''icsliii's unahlc lo 
tell old students troni new. "\(an' name, please."" 
Mr. (ii'iei' pi'caches fn'sin \ espei' sei'\ ice ot new \i'ar. 
Classes ln\L;in with a \ enijeanci-. l'',\er\one atteinK //r.v/ pr.i\ci- nieet- 
nii.; — ("iraiMc leadini; the ■'niL;ni;;. 

I'.k'CtioUs III]' senior class oHicers, conned and alhletic lepresentatives 
a Iter chapel. 

Student council and junor class elections. 

Sophomore election, l-'reshman .i;irls carr\ wlnte I'ose-- home lioiii 
^ . W. initiation ser\ ice. 

h'reshman election. I'hi kap open house. Icluhus C'luh part\. I )i"aki.' 
"ISull Hoj^s" take a ])'\<^ kite and swallow .Monmouth 47-0. 
(lirls spend all da\- cleaning; roonis iny dorm open house, and most ol 
the nielli at either 11. K. or Wallace llall open house. 
\'. P. I'. I', meetiui.;- arotuid honlire. 

.Messiah practice starts, (urls don house-Coats lor dorm "commingle." 
Soroi'ities meet to ilisciiss t'|-eshman ,L;irls. I'hi Kaps open frat nishint^' 
with their han(|uet. 

I'anM lellenic tea for all new ,i;irls. Teke pi,L; roast. 

r>. 1\. rush partw ^ . W . fireside meeting; in livint; room o| hit; dorm, 
h'reshies sweep oxer the tew soph^ struf^^lini; around the pok', makini;' 
the si'Cond deleat in the pole scrap for the class of \\_\. 



Pasre One Hundred Foity-nne 



inTER-FRATERNITV COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

President Stan \'ick(.r< 

Secretary WiHiani Davcy 

Treasurer Bcnanl Bnlim 

When Tekcs, B. K's ami Plii Kai}s get to.y:etlir--it's an 
Interfraternity Conncil meeting. Composed of two repre- 
sentatives from each of the campus fraternities, the Council 
serves as a clearing hmise fnr (irrek kller ilil'ficulties. The 
group meets monthly to (li^cnss their ccnnmoii iirolik-nis ami 
to fijster a spirit nf amial)ilit\- anions ihe fraternities. 

In ciillal)i.rati..n with Dean Clelaml, facultx' advisor, 
the Council directs rushing activities in the fall and enforces 
rules of conduct decided upon. Without this stabilizing in- 
llnence, rushing cnuld not he as well regulated and free 
from the w.ir^t as]iect^ of rivah-\' as it is. 

.\n(l since a feudist attitude is more suiteil to the liilK 
of Kentucky than the maple clad campus of Monmouth, 
the hrothcrly influence of the Interfraternity Council ]>vv- 
vails to the satisfaction of .all. 

.\t one li}iie a plan similar In Dr. D. .'\. Murray's |iop- 
nlar exchange night had leen ]iraeliced hy the f ralrrnities. 
hut in recent \ears tliis ])lan has not lieen in-acticed. How- 
ever, under the sponsorship of the Coimcil, .several time-; 
each semester an inter-fraternity "smoker" is held in ime 
of the fraternitx- homes. This is always followed hy a sere- 
nade .if the girls' donnilnries. 



PAN HELLENIC COUNCIL 

OFFICERS 

President Jeannette Farwell 

Vice President Rita Johnston 

Secretary Ruth Moffet 

Treasurer Jean Surratt_ 

The Monmouth F'an-Hcllenic Council is a liranch of 
the National Pan-Hellenic Congress, composed of twenty- 
three women's fraternities. The fraternity system with its 
tendency toward what might be called "intense nationalism" 
if referring to cnuntries, is nicely lialanced ])y this council 
ci usisting of two members frnni each campus surority 
and an alunin;e advisor from each. By this method of 
Contact, the women's fraternities are linked more closely in 
a common strivin.g for the higli ideals set forth for every 
woman's fraternity. 

Pan-Hellenic Council at .Monnioulli sponsors several 
events each year. In the fall just liefore rushing, a tea is 
held at Hawcock's for all the new wdmen on the campus. 
(Jnce a year the Pan-Hellenic and Interfraternity (_'ouneils 
entertain at a dinner in \lcMichael Home. 

Besides the Pan-Hellenic C^ouncil holds regular meet- 
ings during which mutual problems such as scholarship, 
quota systems, and rushing rules are discussed. The his- 
tory and emblems of other women's fraternities are pre- 
sented occasionally. 

Without Pan-Hellenic Conncil, feline fur would scatter 
duiiiig diflicult rushing seasons. This representative group 
is constantly strivin.g for better understanding and sym- 
pathy among the woiuen of Monmoulh College. 



THOSE ST.ICKS or HOOKS .IXP COOP LOOKIXC OII'TS. 

To Ihosc -li'liii lo-rr hooks, a hookslorc is iilwiixs ii :,■ ondrrfiil I'lacc. When Collci/r days arc <i7'cr. Iccrp 
your iiiiinl (•:'('r drrclo/'iii;/ :Olli ci'nslanl i;-adiin/ of books. Tooks arc (/alcicays to adi'cutnrc— traz'cl 
— liislory an, I all l/nid\ of kiio7clc<li/c. 



W'r like IIk' siu.lcnl' 



W'f 1p |ic \i 111 like lis, ti 



l!l■:T■|'^■ M \KSII At. I. 

s.\i;a w II iTi;.\i w 

Ui;uT.\ IlKnW ,\ 



MlMn 


S 






<^:r^' 


ijTM 




ti 






w. 



J AM i;s iii'i'i-n'T 

II.W.X.MI I'()STI:r 
J -\ .MI'S I'OSTEK 



WIRTZ' BOOK STORE 



Monmouth, Illinois 



Pub-.- (liH- lIuM,ii-,.,l l'-,,it.v-lw,. 



SIGMA OMICRON MU 

OI'l'KiCKS 

President I kluii W liarton 

Vice Prcsiflont Jeaiiiielle l''arwfll 

Sccrel:ir\ - Tixasiinr P>ell\' I^u1)iiiii 

Conimitlur on J'(iliL\ I'rcdcrick Fosk-r 

Willi its i-.ilurs ,,\ iir in'^r and hiack mcst ai>|ir(.prialr al 
HallnwiV'H lime. Si.nnia OnniTiai Mu il^^■lf is nmsl a|i|>i-.i- 
priate al all limes of tlie xear. As a "soeielx- l"i>i' the reen^;- 
nitiiiii iif seli(darslii|i and enltnre" this i.i-.t:anizaliiMi is ill'; 
essence nf scliiilarl\' Irailili.m mi llie campus. Sliade-- <il" 
past menilicrs liii\er weiijlilily n\er llie cli.apel un Scli(d.ir- 
ship r)a\- when eli,L;ilile inniiii's and seninis ale taken indi 
llie aiiKii^l ,i;i'"np. 

I\r(|iiireiiienls f.ir .Si,.;ina Omiermi .\lii are hi.i^lur ill. in 
lhi;se i>\ the Xalicn.il linii.irar\ M.eiel\. Phi I'.eta K.ippa. 
Ill wlicise ranks llie local . i|-,^.im>,ilinn aspires. l'aenlt> I'lii 
Ik-la Ka]ipa and .'~iiu;iiia \i memhers are inclndeil in Sie- 
ma ( )microii M n. 

The Iwii fre--lim:ni sehdlarslnp I r.ileriiille-. I'i I iaiiniM 
Pi and Phi lua Mil were Inslereil l>\ llie pareiil -(.ciely. 
Sigma Omieroii Mn. and cnntinne In llmirisli iimler her 
direction. 

Considcriiv-; .Miuiinnnth C'i'lli_-L;e as an edneaiiiaial in- 
stitution, Sisma ()mieriiii .\ln is prohahl) the nio^l signifi- 
cant orsanizalion nn the cainiuis. IMie emphasis which il 
places un sehdlarshiii is aloii.L; with the ^■. W. and ^'. M. 
C. A., one of the higher intlnences in the scho.il. Ii i- 
an organization free from politics and very iiiiich wdrlli 
the aspiration of any student. 



SIGMA TAU DELTA 

OFFKI'IRS 

President Frances 1 land 

\ice I 'resideni leannette l-"arucll 

."-Secretary Kaliel Ih.llnian 

I'reaMirer Kol.er' I!lair 

.si;..;m,i Tan Delia. c.ini|„,srd nl the I iiddiiif.; Pnes, 
l.nimlelh.ws. ami ( ). Ilein>s nl ,\l oninniilh, w.is estah- 
lished on .Moiimoiilh eampiis in I'lid. ihe Kli,, .\1plia chap- 
ler of the n.alional pro l'essi(.nal FiiLjIish fraleniilN. The 
society meets nioiithly scanewhere on or ahoiil the campus — 
the -.indenl loniiije. Dr. Owen's class room, .me of the 
I'ral houses- for the e.\cli.ni.i.ie of orii^inal papers h\ the 

In the s|irin,y, Si,:;iiia Tan Dell.i's f.nieies turn to the 
pl.innin.u- of the annn.at freshman contest. Crealiw fresh- 
man |i,ipers are turned in. indeed hy a special Committee. 
and prizes are awarded at Comnienceinenl lime lo three 
p.ipers. The anlhors of the ten papers ind.i^ed hest are 
eiitert.iined al a lianc|Uet at I law cocks hy the chaiiier. 

Contrihutions from the local chapler are sent in to 
Ihe national Si.yiiia Tan Delia imlilication, "The Recl.ui.ule." 
— and oceassionally piihlished. 

Menihership in Si.yira Tan Delta is limited to Iwenly- 
fi\e majors and minors in l'ni;lish with an a\era,L;j above 
C. and an aptitude for creali\e writing shown li\- puhlic- 
lion of an article of 1.000 words. 



Slljtnk nf UB fnr rampuB partira 
©iir fhnitrra arc rut t'rrBh ^ail^I 




iFlcral Bl}ap 

Wc iuuitr jiait tu utait mti- yrmiluiuar 
12D1 *. daiit ^trrrt }Jl|onr 39 




Art Pottery 

Is al-\vay« appropriafe and appreciated 
as a &iit. Students, relatives and 
friends <)f students are invited to visit 
onr factories, display rooms and 
beautiful sunken sardens. 

Western Stoneware Co. 

MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



I'ne-c- OiK- Ilun.lrc.i l'...t.v-tlii 



Ol'K cliiti cniHurii Is llic Iminanitifs, lliu ,-M-ts. tlu- 
scii-iicc-s. Wc funiisli \(iuni4 in_'ii|ilc wi'ii ideas, 
tlio ideas (if the .t;rcat smils cif the past, ami 
lilai-e in tln-ir liaiids the t'xils h\ which they 
iiia\ niani|iulale and ap|il> them. We ,ni\e them Ian- 
,ynayes, anil phiee liefnie them literatine, |ihiliisn|ili\ , pn- 

Hetry. soiiy:. and textlmnk-., which they are eqmpped tn 
read and understand. We ,;;ive tliem mathematics from 
the primary principles tn the very advanced sequences 
anil place hefnre them written In.ijic and fnrensies. We 
,L;i\e them social sciences and somiil liusincss |irinci|>les, 
and present tlicm with the prnlilems of the markets nt" 
nnr ila\. We teach them what men haxe learned almut 

BXature and the world in which we live, and turn them 
loose in our lahor.Uories to try for themseUes these hasic 
principles and to know that the\ are true. And while 
" this complex mental and spiritual hniise is hein.i; liuildcd, 
we ]iriivide our xouth with i'resh air and sunli'^ht, .t;\m- 
(■ nasia and swimming' ])ools, courses in physical training 
t; ! and health. I do not know of any lieltcr plan than this. 
' ' nor of any other <|uite so good. It is the conlrilmtion of 
the liheral arts college. 

It is my ide.il for .Monmouth (.'ollege that she do 
this work well. 1 do not want to aiheilise .Mnniuouth 
hee.-inse it is econoiuical ; I do not want to advertise Mon- 
mouth hecausr it is small: I do not want to Mlvertise 
.Monmouth heeause it has a good (.'hristian atmiis|)here 
— 1 want to advertise Monmuuth first of all heeause it 
is a jrood college scholastically ; because we provide our 
students with exactly what is presented in our cata- 
logue: liec:uise the work we do is not slioild\- and the 
sanu- degree of merit is denumded of one stirient as 
i of the other. 1 want to he able to say to prospective 

p j students. "We offer courses in liberal arts. Tbey are ver\ 
complete. Xo matter wdiore you go you will not find 
these com-ses more ellicienth- presented." 

P.iU a,g:iin I do not w:nit .Monmouth College lo he a 
purel\' intellectual center, dealing onb' with the mind 



and withoiU regard to moral and spiritual \alues. Some 
one has said, "It is a poor town in the Middle West 
which does not ba\e a poor college." .Moiuuoutb must 
not be just another college. This is distinctlv a Chris- 
tian college: our antecedeiUs are Christian: oiu" faculty 
members ai'e C bristiiui : oin- cullme is C hrisl'an : our 
oiUlook upon life and its opportunities are Clfisliau ; 
ue not only maintain the Christian forms and associa- 
tions upon our campus. biU we proiuote them in every 
way wc know: no oni' dwells in our midst lon.g btlt 
knows that the smritual life is the chief concern. The 
homes whence our young people come are Christian 
homes, and it is our purpose that the teachings and 
ideals of those homes be fostered and magnified while 
these \(iim,g people are here. 

In this ei'fort we would avoid extremes and would 
aim that oiu- religious campus life be wholesome, sane, 
safe: and that our young people, wdien they emerge 
from colle.ge go out into a world where they fit :uk1 feel 
at home. We feel that whatever may be otp- short- 
comings and faihues. we are doing this task well ,uid 
doing ii without offense to class or creed. 

The constituency of Monmouth College for eighty 
wars has been made up of plain peo|)le. They have 
Come here from the farm, the small business centers. 
:uid the professions. Xot iului}- wealthy, not many in- 
lUuiitial, ha\e come; and vet 1 would challenge any 
one to count our alumni of the past fifty years, follow 
them through their careers of usefulness and helpfulness. 
their struggles for fame and fortune, without a feeling 
of just pride. Not many have sat in the seats of the 
mighty, and yet they have become judges, .governors. 
physicians, clergymen, engineers, attorneys, architects. 
and \er\ man\ have been men and women of note. They 
h:i\e been workmen o| whom their cities and communities 
have not been ashamed. To this same constituency we 
appeal today, and to them ;uid their means must we 
iiil<-i|it our plans and financial needs. 



* .III cxiract frnni an luidnss iiiiidr In Ihc collrac fac- 
nlly. riiday. [■rhniiiry 17, \<^).\9. hy I'rcsidciii (..'rici: 



One Hundred Fciity-four 







tfirough 
a 

library 
window 



(17/ //■ IS .1 niMitiif roK.' 

I'll admit liijlu and iiir : 

To indicate' Ihiit icliiih is i^ilhiii: 

Til i/ivc an idea of the lislas that lie ahead: 

'Fa llii-aw tliini/s out of. 

Collene eonrses are like :Jnda:es. They let in 'iqht and air. They hriini freshness In stale ideas. T'ley ///:■■■ 
insii/iit into the fossihilities of the i'::r.d. I'hey offer a eoirirnieiit nwdinni for dninl^iiui fiejudiees and laiseioi ■ 
ee/ilions. Tliey'of'en ne:o fields. ne:o vistas of lui/^fiuess. 

.'^.lonnionrh Cidleoe sindenis are nraed to avail themselves of their I'pforlunities to take eonrses lehieh are l^n- 
nnirily of eultnral valne. eonrses :ehieli ol^eii iie:e fields of enjoyment, understandina. emilenlment . ns fulness. 
Many sneli eonrses are availalde—M nsie. .i-t. I .'•'le'-olnre. Lanouaije. Seienee. 

Monmouth offers sfeeial eonrses in the flislio-y and .Iffreeiation of .Irt and .\hisie. The eollei/e fnhlishes book- 
lets on the leorl: offered in these fields. To nniiiy titey may open the windows and leveal neie beauties. 

/■or further infornmtion write to I'uhsiiikxt Jamks Haupkk (Irihk. 
rill-: MONMOUTH COLLEGE. 

MnX MOUTH, ILI.IXOIS 



m 



^^™ 



Pasc One Hundred Fuity-live 



SORORITY RUSHING 



Octolier -Itli ami the first wick of s( 
iiiulcr way. Pi Byla I'lii i.|Kiic<l this 
rack riik'. invitations luin;; ckvfrl\ 
lumclus of straw. Tlic .L;irls nu-t at 
W". 1!. W'lir, wlurc two lart;i- liay-ra 
Drcssc'l in spni'ts to.ns ,in<l with sqnc: 
vnnnn uonun clinilicil in and were off. 



irity rushiny yi-ls 
■cck witli a liay- 
,c(l to niiniatnri. 
c liome of Mrs, 
cs awaited lliein 
s of deliL;IU, the 





Thrni 


yh 


int 


tlie 


rid 


tlu 


llie ru 
home 
eider 


he 
.if 
an 


'm 

1 a 


.nne 

s. 1 

,|,le 


1. 




l'ollo\ 


vin 


^ ll 


e 1' 


I'h 


lilt 

am 
( la 


ertanie 
tra(h't 

\- «Mis 


1 \ 
on 
■ 1 


■itl 
Ih 
ape 


■ in\ 
r d. 


ital 

lis 



■, sonys were sini.y in which sonic 
Followin.y, the party continued ai 
where rcfrcshnients of doiiohnnts 
■re enjo\ed. 

i party, the Kapiia Kappa (iannna's 
>\ I'ateran, carrying out in col<ir 
oils, entertainment and decorations, 
were sent to the rushces and the 



imUalioii was revealed when the doll 
.Miss Marian Stanton, dressed in .y\ ps> 
yirls into her garden wdiere the party \ 
outdoor fireplace buns a huge black 



, dress was lifted, 
attire received the 
-as held. Over the 
kettle from which 



..■eped delicious odors of onions, potatoes and ; 
ood things that go to make gypsy goulash. Cidcr 
i\ed along with the foreign dish. 



entcrtainmciil 
treasure hunt 



nd as is true to thi 
clima.xed the evening 



(James were the 
form of the part.\', ; 

.■\lpha Xi Delta was ne.xt in line and used as their theme 
a Mexican ])arty. Mexican men, made of pa|)er concealed 
the invitation and a sombrero was given each girl on which 
the program w-as printed. 

The rushees were taken to the home of Miss Hazel 
Kuntz which was decorated in Merican fashion. Chili was 
served and with it cocoa and whipped cream, and while 
the girls ate, Miss Evelyn Beattie. dressed as a Mexican 
senorita. sang songs in a true fiesta style. 

Each rushee was .given a little Mexican man of gum 
drops and songs were sung and several stunts presented. 

The last of the parties held during tlie first week of 
informal rushing was by the Kappa Deltas, the theme of 
which was an "Olive Ring." The party was held in the 
home of Mrs. .\. W. Barnes, and around the li\ing room 
were placed pictures of the girls in the sorority, :ind the 
guests were asked to name as many as possible. 

.\ delicious lunch was served and the actives san.g songs 
and presented \arious skits and readings. 

The following week the formal parties started, these 
being the only two rush |)arties given hy the sororities dur- 
the first semester. 

Kappa Delta gave the firsrt iiarty on October 11. .\ 
delectable dinner at Hawcocks on tables decorated with 
white roses and candles, followed by dancing at the Colonial 
hotel, was enjoyed. The ballroom gave the appearance of 
a garden with a fence in one corner surrounding green law'n. 

From the hotel the girls W'ent to the home of Mrs. Will 
Woods where Miss Mary Murphy, president, gave a short 
talk, and songs were sung. Each rushee was presented with 
a rose. 

The following evening .\lpha Xi Delta again enter- 
tained, their jiarty also being at Hawcocks. The room was 
arranged as a night club with the center open for dancing. 
Dancing was enjoyed and lietween numbers a floor show 
was given. Each rushee was presented with a rose in a 
very unitpie manner, an active stepping from a picture frame 
to present the flower. 

The annual progressive party of Pi Phi opened the 
third c\ening's entertainment with a cocktail party at the 
home of Mrs. Belle Legg. From here the group moved to 
the home of Mrs. .\. Henning where the main course was 
sir\eil. T.alilc were decorated in wine and silver blue, the 
sororit.\ colors. .\t each rushee's plate was a corsage and 
dance priu'gram, the inside a memorandum for the year. 
From the Henning home the party went to Mrs. W. B. 
Weir's where the evening was spent in dancin.g. 



Completing I be round of formal parties was the pro- 
gressive parly of Kappa Kappa Gamma. Coclails were 
served at Mrs. Jo Graham's, from whence the girls went 
to the home of Mrs. A. R. Tubhs wdierc thev were served 
the salad. A stunt was offered by the actives before con- 
tinuing to Mrs. J. L. Sherrick's where the main course was 
ser\'e(i. The girls traveled on to the home of Mrs. Armsby 
iiir dessert. Here several skits were given and songs sung. 

M .S o'clock the olTicial rushing for the year was 
brou.ght to a close. One day silent period was held and on 
Saturday, the day of official pledging, fifty-three women 
were presented with |)ledg"e buttons. The following took 
the oath of the four nationals on the campus: 

i'i I'.ela Phi: Helen 1.. Stewart, Juauila Winhigler. 
Helen Bond, Mary J. Xels.m, Mary L. Stults, l-:ieanor 
Campbell, Harriet Schleicb, Margaret Jared, Jean Woods, 
Cleone Barnes. Constance Chatten. Mary J. Frazier, Kosa- 
niond Kuess, Helen Suiter. Marilyn Tiffany. 

Kappa Kappa Gamma: Marv Work, Harriet Rathbnn, 
-Mary F. Diffenbaugh, Jean L.' Johns. .n. Maudie Field. 
Hila Beth Reeve, Janice Warner. Jane Brownell, Patricia 
.McMillan, Marjorie Stormont, Marjorie Elliott. Jean Mor- 
rison, Mary Wilcox. Mary L. Stewart. Sina Lou Beach, 
Jeane Lundqnist. 

Kappa Delta: Mary J. Hill. I'ern Huey. Patricia Sim- 
mons, Miriam Martens. Helen Camiibell, Jane Tutt!';, Ruth 
Powell, Ethel J. .Seli.g. Maudie Barnes, Geraldine Wilson. 
Ruthella Beck. I^hyilis Ste|diens, Patricia Reid, Eliza- 
beth Jones. 

.Mpha Xi Delta : Beverly Olson. Jane ^'est, Margaret 
bTisimingcr. Mariorie Schumacher. Elloise Palmer, Frances 
Wyatt, Barbara ■Hanf..nl, Mihi Jane Kelly. 



L I. HUTCHINS 

Fine Printing 

and 

Engraving 

200 W. First Avenue 

Telephone 777 



IhiTKlri',! Fi.rtry-: 



FRATERNITV RUSHING 



TiK'silay afUTiiiidii — Octulifr 'i — tmir n'clm-k — six upper 
classnuii wait paticiitlv outside Dcau Clelaud's iiffice, Tliis 
all has but one meaning; announcements are to lie made 
as 1(1 the nunilier of men wdio will he joining the ranks 
of the Monmouth fraternities. 

Howi-\er. nian\ aeti\ilies ha\e taken jilaee liefore this 
eventful hour. The older nienihers of the three organiza- 
tions were called back to school three to four days early in 
September in order that they might get their homes in 
spick and span condition before the new hordes of freshmen 
men made their debut on the campus. Rushing chairmen 
were l)usily engaged in planning for their parties and guest 
speakers, for only a short period of rushing was to lie had. 

The forni.-il rush parlies were opened li> the I'hi Isapp.i 
I'i's with a liancput at 1 l.iw cock's. .\ large number of 
rushees t^.atbered among the active members of the organi- 
zation and the in,in\ ainmni who were in attendance. .\lr. 
\'icloi- .Molfel. presiilent of the .Munini Boaril. ga\e a short 
talk on the values of the local "nig X" group. 

hollowing the dinner, the mass adjourned to ihe fra- 
leinil\ home where they were entertained by sophoiuore 
nieiubiis of the organization, and several magician ai.'ts were 
pieseiUed. Henr\- Smith was in charge of the rushing plans 
ibis \ear. and was very s\iccessful in bis ellorls. id nien 
pledging in the firsrl ceremony. 



I'oUnwing in line of the rotating method oi parl\ 
gi\in.g. Tan Kappa Kpsilon was the second to ofler a formal 
party. L'nder the able guidance of James Manor, the part> 
was held in Hawcock's Blue Room with many rushee.^ 
lireseut. For many years the Tcke's party has been known 
as the "Pig Roast" getting its name from an old custom 



CURT DAY'S 
GROCERY 




SOME OF THIS— SOME OF THAT 

A BIT OF EVERYTHING 
IN THE GROCERY LINE 

1 18 S. 8th ST. PHONE 540 



started li\ the I'hi Sigma .\lpha local group before going 
national. 

Dean 1,. R<ilili, a grailu.ile from .Momnoulh in the 
Class of '30. acted as principle speaker for the evening, 
telling of his many ex]ieriences while in school, and telling 
of wdiat a fraternity means to a man wdicn getting out into 
the business world. Professor S. M. Thompson. Txichard 
Petrie and Dr. J.ihn .Xcbeson als.i gave short talks in 
behalf of the frateruit.v. 

The last of the formal frateruit.v parties was hehl in 
the home of the Beta Kappa's. Their large dining room 
was beautifully decorated with fraternity colors. The ban- 
(|uet was served by the house mother, assisted li\ -everal 
girls from .Mc.Michael dormitory. 

I'resident of the house. Stan X'ickers. pusidicl over 
the evening's festivities, introducin.g John \ est \\h.> was in 
charge of the rushing activities. Dr. LaX'ern .\l\ers acted 
as guest speaker for the evening. Dr. ,\l\ers graduated from 
Monmouth in ly.M. Dean J. S. Clel'aml an<l Profes.sor 
W. S. ll.ildeman also made lirief conuuents to the gr<iup. 

.Mrs. Harold Peters,, n ,,ffereil entertainment .at these 
three p.arties. pla_\ iiig anil singling fa\,irite song-,, "C iracie" 
is alua\s in demand at both fraternil\ ami s,,r,irilv fmic- 
li,,ns. but is kept busiest <luring the f,irmal rush peiiod ,,f 
the men's ( ireek letter organizations. 

Ibe activities <if llie last il.iv ,,f pia-ferriil iiislnng. as 
is carrieil on at .Monmouth, is always ,,ne ,if mucli excite- 
ment. I'reparatious f,,r the final part\ are in pr,,i.;ress. and 
each gr,,up is w,,nilering wh,, will cme t,, tlu-ir List part\-. 

Saturday e\ening. netober Isi, ^aw the last ,,f the im- 
portant parties before the siUnl perio,l went in!,, elTeel. 
The three fraternities g.i\e their la^t sI.-il: g.ilberiiigs ,,n 
this night. 

The h,,me at 727 K.ist r,r,i.i,lwa\ was lnilh.nitK ligbtnl 
f,,|- the I'.et.a K.ipp.i "Sm,,ker" which was attended li\ mam 
men. Kusbees ,,f the Phi K.aps were taken to fialesburg I,, 
altenil the theatre, with ,i get-together at the li,,m,- iip,,n 
returning. .Monmouth Park was the scene of the ,icli\ities 
,,f the Tekes with a lar.ge group of luen g.ilbering about 
an open fire for a weiuer roast .and sing. 

.\nd with the clock striking li mi, blight, .i siK'iU per- 
iod came into being foi' three ila\s at which time ihi'ie w .as 
no rushing from an\ of the gr,,u|is. .\s the ileadlinv mile, I 
ar,iun,l on Tues,l.a\- aftern,ion. luany d.ark haireil gentlemen 
weri' showing the strain ,if three weeks hard l.ili,,r, 

.\t the meeting held with Detui Clidand. (i2 nun uere 
named as having signed bids for entrance into the Iwn 
national and one local fraternities. On this same .veiling, 
formal [iledging was hebl in the vari,nis h,,nses, the lollow- 
ing men taking o.alb t, , their respecti\e ,gr,inps : 

Beta Kappa: Sam Snuth. Russ Douthet. James Tippet, 
jack Kyan. Tom Richev. Clinton Stewart. Tom Chambersr. 
William Barhoiu-. l,oren Clay, Charles Ferguson. K'.'U .Aus- 
tin. Howarrl Seaton. Bernard Schnltz. Htirrv Frautz. Ralph 
Graham. William \"an Tuyl. William Mclndoo. William Ol- 
son. Boh McConncll. John Lucas. Howard Rogers. Clarence 
McManns. 

Phi Kappa Pi: Floyd Weshinsky. Bill Reynolds. Bob 
Bowman. Warren Hewitt. Harvey McRoberts, Joe Missav- 
age. Charles Schleper. John Kritzer. Bob Sheridan. Gail 
Reyu.ilds. Dick Lovegren. Jim White. William Martin. Rob- 
ert Edwards, E. Austin Martin. Robert Rawson. Paul Wat- 
son. Don Torlev'. Francis Bouxsein. William .Arthu'-s. John 
Kauzlarich. Beryl Barkman. William Walker. Robert Dcuth, 
Dean Enions. Tracy Krauer. 

Tau Kappa E|isilon : Boh Rult. Jim Dunnan. Cleasson 
Chikasuyc. Jack Wylder. Frank Wagner. Don Green. Bob 
Lannin.g, Arch Brown. Beib Brown, Charles Bastion. Rob- 
ert Hutsou. G. A. bloody. Bob Mavo. Howard Hoyt. 



PaKC Onu Humlr 




>4- 

15- 

1 6. 

17- 
i8. 
19. 



23- 

■24- 

-'5- 
26. 



MDnniiiutli trims L';Lrtlia,i,a' d-o. Suulcnl (.'(Hiiu-il npcn linusc. 
Sabliath — peace and i|uict. 

I'eginnin,;,^ of C. C. A. "Christianity in I'mfessidn^ ;" talk l>y lawver. 
Fraternity hiddini,^ dlTicialiy ends the three day silent period. Japanese 
prints on disphiy at the Fine Art^ Imildin^. 
Concert Choir siiiijs in Galc'-hur:;, 

Sigma Tan Delta announces new nienihers dl" their gronp. 
Best seller today— The K^d I5o,,k. F,,se to Coe. 

Sororit\' presidents meet all ni'>hee->. Alpha Xi Delta open hoii^e. 
"E\"ervhi)dv pra\'s." Ini^iness manager of L'. P. Pnlilications lioard. 
vesper speaker. 

Usnal Monday program — C. L'. A. and Choral. 

First student chapel. Songs, hog calls, dancer from all hatless frosh. 
Openin.g of intramural ti 'uch-fi " ithall game^ in ^ ale Howl: 
Secretar\- of Oaleshui'g ^ . M. s])eaks at ^ . .M. lian(|uel. Internal ii inal 
Relations (.'luh ha-- wienie ri last at the |)ark. 

Silent period for sororities and tlieir rushees. llard wiuk. girl>? 
Squeals ot delight, si.ghs df disa])pointment — sni-, rit\- hiddin.g anil ]iledg- 
ing — hack to the dorm for lunch. 1! K open hnuse. ^ . I'. C". I', picnic. 
"Remember the Sabbath Day — " 
Prayer meeting — "Christianit}- and Medicine." 

It's all right gals, this beard gruwing contest can't last much longer. 
Art sho\y of bronze sculpture. First da\- of winter mi the campus. 
Faculty opens musical program for the year with recital in the Chapel. 
\ . ^^'. interest groups. 

"Gay Nineties Reyiew" at Auditorium — stunt by each (irganization — 
comparison of length and tou.ghness of beards — pep meeting — bonfire — 
Say! What? Beat Ripon ! 

Homecoming parade — touch-fcotball and hockey — we win Monniouth- 
Ripon game — alumni teas — fraternity and sorority .ahniini dinners — All- 
College Homecoming dance in the gvm. 
Homecoming services. 

Prof. Turner holds his home open for History majors. 
La.st chance to drop out of a course without taking an F. 
Student recital. 

W. A. .\. meeting. Group pictures on steps of Wallace Hall for Ravelings. 
Crmison Mas(|ue's dramatic sea.son if I'Ff to ,1 fine start with the loyeh- 
unreality of "Mrs, Moonlight." 

White chad nm-.se--, bdltle^ of bismuth, trays nf M.np. (.'nipty cl.assrooms — 
Fpideniic id" '38. 
Collegi.ile committee reyiyes the honesty movement. 



I'HKL' One Hii 



■il Korty-eiitht 



T€H€*$ T€nTH 



■ of llirir |iri.-- 



"1 an aliiniiii 
a ilccisi\c Si ot vie- 
ck's fnllowiM liy an 

spiiit w ; 



Man\ |irontiiu-nl aluiniii tioni far am 
to Monmouth HomuL-omin.L; l)a\ to crlulr 
'I'ciith Aiiiiiversary, and the ihirtirth hiilhil: 
ilcccssor. Phi Sigma Alpha. 

The anniversary celeliralion consi'ilril 
luncheon at the chapter liouse at noon 
tory over Ripon, a ban(|uet at Hawci 
All-College Prom in the gymnasium. 

An overabundance of anniversar\ 
(lent at the football game when cheer leailcr l)a\e 
ston showed the present .generation liou tliey screamed their 
lungs out back in the twenties. 

Monmouth graduates of the Cliica.go Teke L'l'ih were 
in charge of the program and liant|uet with such naines as 
McClanahan. the Acheson brothers. Meloy and Livingston 
figuring as the most iirominent. The anniversary banquet 
at Hawcock's was clima.xed by the ke\' speech of Michi- 
.gan's Teke, Charles A. \\'algreen (if Chicago, whj repre- 
sented the National Grand Council in e-xtending congratu- 
lation to the chapter. 

From aluinni bull sessions which lasted late into the 
wee hours of the morning, Tekes of the present generation 
learned about the formation of their fraternity on the .Mon- 
mouth campus from the most authentic sources available. 
.Mso precious tales were unwoven how they did it in the 
"old days'' in which the truth diil not iiUerfere with a gooil 
story. 

Tekes and Phi Si.gs alike ionied in lamiching the fralers 
at the Teke House on their ele\enth \ear. 




LUMBER 

BUILDING 



COAL 
MATERIALS 




DIFFENBAUGH LUMBER & COAL 

COMPANY 



509 South First Street 



Monmouth, Illinois 



ra,irc One Hunilrcil Forty-nine 




48 y€RRS OF RIVflLRY 



Forty-eight years with fifty-four games having been 
played on the gridiron is one nf the oldest rivalries found 
in the history book of sports with the Monmouth Fight- 
ing Scots and Knox Siwash holding this honor jointly. 

The "night-before" was somewhat the same this year 
as it has been in the past, each school being heavily guarded 
against prowlers with their buckets of whitewash ready to 
apply the "Beat So-and-Sn" on the pavement. 



Three colorful bands, representing Monmouth College. 
Kno.x College and Monmouth High School opened the 
afternoon ceremonies with the playing of "The Star Span- 
gled Banner." while the flag was being raised. 

Following the 14-7 victory of Siwash, the Purple and 
Gold retained the "Bronze Turkey," and were also suc- 
cessful in unearthing the south goal post for a souvenir. 



WE HONOR 



^ 



GRflDUdTeS 



CflRT€R'$ 

PHfiRmflcy 

201 E. BROADWAY 
PHONE 182 



Oik- Hundred Fifty 



^^^H*^^Hf'^^^^'^ 



Homecominc 



'PIk- |ii-()Krain I'f i1k' I'WX HoiiucniiiiK was .1 ,L;rcal 
siicOL-ss in all lasia'Cls. 'Hk- ;1u-iiu- nt iIk- lisliviliy was 
nanic'il "Sc.>ts of llir W-,." Willi this as a lii'KiiiiiiiiK, tlu' 
I loniccoiniiiK C'cinimitlei.', lu-ailiil li\ lliiir\ Sinitli, dcvel- 
o|it-(l a \ery i-lalxiralt- program to follo\\ out tlir title. 

In ki't'iiinK with the spirit of the earl> ila\s, all the 
men on the campus agreeil to grow hcards. The he-man 
with the higgest crop was to he awarded a prize at the pep 
meeting held tlie day hefore the game, at which -everal 
])rofessors acted as judges. 

The annual ]iarade was held Salurda\ morning, ^'artillg 
at the Chapel and following the regular course through 
town. Each fraternity, sorority, dcjrni, class, and many iu- 
(le|ieudent organizations presented floats for participation 
in the jiarade, all of which added in making it one of the 
most successful in years. Following this, the houses and 
dorms were judged for their good qualities carrying 



liiU the theme of Homecoming ami also for heaulw 

Saturda\' afternoon .Monmoiuh's Fighting Scots were 
successful in downing Kipon to further complete a suc- 
cessful holiday. 

As eyening drew nigh, the clan that had gathered at 
their old Alma Mater joined the young Scots in the pre- 
paration for the Second Annual Prom held in the gym. 
The dance committee, headed hy Jim Rupp as chairman 
and with Bill Davey heading the decorations committee, 
(lis]ilaye(l a very heautifully decorated .gyniuasiuni. The 
large crowd that attended the dance had a noisy and 
joyous time, swinging and swa\ing to the tunes and show 
of Doc Lawson's orchestra. 

.After two days exceedingly fidl of activities, the young 
and olil were willing to de[iart un their separate paths as 
the last notes faded into the heyond for another year. 



OIL BURNERS STOKERS 

HAYS & EASTMAN 

224 SOUTH FIRST STREET 

HEATING PLUMBING 

GLENN E. WILSON 
JEWELER 

Cigars Cigarettes 

The Home Cigar Store 

NORTH SIDE SQUARE 

Billiards M. P. Murphy Candy 

BOWMAN BROS. 

FOR 

QUALITY SHOES 



McCullough 

Lumber and Coal 

Headquarters For 

BUILDING MATERIAL 

and 

COAL 

101 East 4th Ave. Phone 56 

Invite Your Friends to Stay 
at the 

(Enloutal ij^ntpl 

208 East Broadway Phone 265 



Pat'e One Huiulred Fifty-. 



$€niOR GRfiDUflT€$ 



DOROTHY L. ANDERSON 
MARl E. BEAL 
EVELYN L. BEATTIE 
I.INDLE H. BELLIS 
THOMAS K, BEVEKIDGE 
ItOKEKT L. BLAIR 
ISABEL A. BOLLMAN 
liERNAKD D. BOLON 
ISABELLE BRAINAKI) 
MILUKEU L. BROWN 
BETTl E. BURKHOLDER 
ROBERT S. BVRN 
■IIMOTHV J. CAMPBELL 
WILLIAM J. DAVEV 
ARTHUR L. DEAN 
RALP C. FAIRMAN 
M. JEANNETTE EAR WELL 
N. JOYYCE FERNALD 
H. ROSEMARY FIELD 
WILLIAM A. FINK 
DANIEL D. FINN 
FREDERICK C. FOSTER 
MARY M. FRASER 
EVELYN R. FREDERICK 
EDNA J. FULTON 
RICHARD H. GILL 
MARY A. GILLHAM 
HAROLD P. GRIFFI-JH 
FRANCES C. HAND 
CORNELIUS J. HARRINGTON 
LILLIAN M. HOKE 
LOLA J. JACOBS 
FREDERIC B. JAMES 
BURDET F. JOHNSTON 
DONALD R. LAWRENCE 
MARY E. LEDLIE 
MILDRED C. LOOSER 
JOHN H. LUSK 
MARY E. LYFORD 
LEONARD A. Mt-CULLOCH 
MARJORIE E. McCULLOCH 
STANLEY G. MacDONALD 
JEANNE B. McINTYRE 
BETH N. McKINLEY 
HOWARD E. MAMMEN 
JOHN H. MARTIN 
WILLIAM H. MERRIAM. JR. 
RICHARD S. MOODYY 
MARY L. MURPHY 
LOLA M. NEWMAN 
BETTY A. NORRIS 
CHIYOKO OHATA 
DAVID W. PARK 
HAROLD E. PARR 
JEANNETTE PATCHIN 
JAMES K. PATTERSON 
JAMES L. PICKEN 
WILLIAM C. PINE 
GLADYS A. QUADE 
DEAN R. ROSS 
BETTY A. RUBINO 
JAMES C. RUSSELL 
DOROTHY M. RYAN 
LEE P. SHARP 
CHARLES A. SKINNER 
EVELYN C. SMITH 
HARRIET E. SMITH 
MARY F. TAGGART 
ROBERT E. TORLEY 
STANLEY C. VICKERS 
RAY A. WALKER 
MARCELLA L. WALLACE 
WILLARD H. WALWORTH 
HELEN L. WHARTON 
RUTH WILEY 
CATHERINE M. WILSON 
ANNA M. YOUNG 
PAUL A. ZAJACZKOWSKI 
GEORGE W. ZIEGLER 



commencemenT day 




fl. R. ROBinson, D. D. 



ll 



Paee OiH- Hundred Fifty-Uv.l 



ART 6DITOR 




HOLUDY ORR 

S|ii-in!;iii,n- from the c-nvirmis i,f S|)i-ini;ilalc, [\'iinsyl 
\aiiia, u Milmrli nf "liroati-r" l'itt>liui-,L;h. In MnniiMutli (',,1 
lc"i- ill l''.?.i and a.yaiii in l'),i7, i-anu- a t;nillcnKiii, an artis 



and a Phi Kap in the cliaracter nf Howard Orr. to whom 
goes <luf credit for llie licautifnl and clever art work of 
this ho.ik. 

Howdy lias lieen ahsent from the Monmouth campus 
this past year, taking special art work at the Carnegie In- 
stitute of Technology in Pittshurgli, hut has nevertheless 
held the capacity of art editor of this year's Ravelings which 
he has handled so capahly and hy remote control. That 
"lla|)p\ ()rr" spirit is characterized li\ his work wherever 
found in this v.ilunie and has done much to influence other 
menil;ers of the staff. 

Within a week after Howd\'s return tcj scIkjoI at the 
lie.ginning of llie second semester a year ago last Fcljruary. 
the name of "(.Jrr" was known to every student in college. 
His work as decoration chairman of .Monmouth's first .All- 
College Dance marked him lie\ond all douht a skilled! artist. 
During two short xisits tliis year, his two impromptu 
sriceches last fall to the Freshmen at the first "^"' -Meeting 
in the Student Lounge and then a.gain this s]irin,g to the 
student hody in chapel had Imth audiences lioldin.g their 
sides with laughter, thcmgh llnwdy drove home a point on 
hoth occasions in his artistic and inimitable manner. A tok- 
en of his personal devotion for Monmouth was made evi- 
dent hy liis art iireseutation of "Christ in the Garden of 
( iethsemane" whicli struck us witli reverent awe. 

Too much credit caimoi he liestnwed oil .Mr. Orr in 
making llie I'Md Ravelings as he coined it— "Best Ever." 



WHITES' FOR 
FURNITURE 




WHITE FURNITURE CO. 

209 S. Main St. Monmouth, Illinois 



Western Auto 
Associate Store 

HOME OWNED by F. R. GUNN 

"Everything for the Automobile" 




A Fan in a Bi ix at the Little Tlieatrc 



Page One Hundred Fifty-thr 





B 




SI 




1^1 



pre: 
Sm 
Rul: 



n6uu $. o. m/s 

Two days out of each college year are set aside from 

regular college routine at which time recognition is 
■n the outstanding scholars on Monmouth's campus. At 

time those students who have attained the high av- 
ie required for entrance are "tapped" intu Sigm.i Omi- 
1 Mn. 

Fi)Ilowiiis" the presentation nf an hnniirar\ dcgreo. 
■tor (.f Divinity to Rev. K. L. lunlie of Fort .\lar- 
. Colorado who was princijial speaker, Helen Wharton, 
iident. named the following new memhers : Henr\ 
th. Dorothy Reese. Howard Jamieson. George Ziegler. 
lert Torley. Paul Zajaczkowski and Roliert Eyler. 



UUflLLflCe HALL OP€n HOUS6 



Tlie social prugram (if M.innnintli t. .liege came to 
life with a scries of teas, get-togethers, "hig and little sister" 
affairs, to say the least of the gala"i>prn liuuses." 

Tile ".get-acipiainted" idea which persisted thr.iughoul 
til.- first week of schnol was high1\ successful as n!ie ci.uld 
readil\ see at tlie first iipen hiiuse of the \i'ar. hehl after 
llie pep meeting and the magnanim.ius hnnfire mi the 
athletic field. This occasion was not one of tlinse imnrly 
attended affairs that the upper classmen ]i.i\e wilii ssed in 
_\ears hef.ire hut coidd lie mure lnilhfii]l\ compared with 
our later all-school dances. 

Willi such a wonderful heginiiing it w.is doiilited if 
.■iiiother such interesting o]ien house coulil folL.vi' it up. 
r.ut this was later to he found ver\ untrue. .\ii o]ieii 
housf ■•lo see liow the other hall li\e-." was held when 
Marshall Hall. .Sunnvside and .McMicliael Dorinitorie- 
opened their doors to all the siudeiils ,nid facult\ on our 
campus. .\fter careful iiispeclion of the spick and span 
rooms the visitors proceeded to Wallace Hall, where 
dancing and games were enjoyed. Throughout ihe vear 
each of these three Dormitories were responsihle for clever 
and entertaining open houses. 



Kvery or.ganizalion on the cain]ins sponsored an open 
house. Hach fraternity anil sorority contrihuled their hit 
to make this \ear ;is successful as it has heeii, with an 
o]ien house sjionsored li\ each group. 

Special occasion were celehrated uilli dec. .rations, pro- 
grams, and games. The iiriginalit\ of each was received 
with much enthusiasm hy the sludeiil hodv. 

.\s successful as the ..pen houses pro\ed to lie. llic\- 
could not have heen carried out without the cooperation of 
the colle.ge itself. The new recordin.g machine furnished 
lj.\' the college was a .great im]iro\ement anil wa:; greatK 
apprecialed hy the students. This w.is onl\ the lirst of 
the Contrihntions : the next improvement was ihe n.'W ad- 
dition to the dance floor. This was also aii]irecialed .as 
it has heen used throughout ihe enlire \ear and proved to 
he a great advantage over the ]ire\ioUs room use.l for the 
open house programs. 

With the cooperation of each organization on tlie cam- 
]ins this \ear the series of open hou.ses have heei, more 
than successful and will long he rememhered hv the 
students. 



Anderson Drug Store 



c^P^ 



102 South Main St. 



Phone 62 



Hotel Monmouth 

A MODERN HOTEL 

with 
QUALITY SERVICE 



Pasre One Hundred I.'ifty-four 




3- 
4- 
5- 
(>. 

7- 
S. 

t). 
Id. 
I I . 

\2. 1 

13- 
14- 
15- 
[6. 

i/- 
i.S. 

IC). 



-'4- 

-5- 

26, 

29. 



P1k-\v! Who threw that slnich homh in Wallace llaH'' 
Miss l,ii-(lman ami l'"(irensir nuelinj;. Ui-siili - ihc \iarV |il;(ii- |'m|- 
speech ei >ti tereiices ami ti nirnanR'iit-.. 

h'.\eii a talk uii post-war Austria is wurlli ,i;ettin^ nul ul class earl\ lor. 
The ^ . W . st\le show, cuniplete Ii-miii hathint; suit In hi " ip skii"!. 
Scots plow thru lund to deleat (."oiaiell ly-o, to a\ eu;;e last \ear. 
Rain — so the\' schedule \ espers. 

lUiml cheuiisl (lefeu<ls the chars^e that scieulists lack |-eli,!;ion. 
Al i(l-seuiesler exauis. ^soiue lime lor the hoiR-st\ caui])aiL;ii! 
"( )h Theui I )i\ rxiue--" and "St. l.ouis I'.lues," 1)\ l''.\a |esse\'s choir. 
C'lose o| inlrauiui"al lodihall willi I'hi Kaps keepiiu; the tropin-, 
1'.. I\., C'olle.i^e C'luh, and Wallace Hall open houses. Take \our pick. 
'iiolo,t;\- and Kenihraudt clnhs hold lirst uieelin;.; ol the \ear. 
A perfect Siuidaw C'hristuias concert rehearsals seem a little out oi place. 
C". C". .\.. a student-lacultN loriun. 
vSludent ch.apel. C"le\er stunt. 

Moderator ot" l'. P. Ceueral .\ssemlil\- .L;uesl at cha]iel. 
I'.xtra-curricular, pre-l\no.\ ,t^anie exhiliition. l.i^hts tniaied oil and 
allenipted walk-out o| dorm. 

Ktiox keeps the tnrke\' until next \ear. Thrillei' ends 14-7. Teke- ^larl 
social hall rolling; with dinner al llawcock's and dance at the k.lks. 
"lii.^-and-liltle sister" dance, (.'limax of ^'. W'. C\impus Sister prot;ram. 
Ichllnis Cluh holds t^i'oup discussion on C'hrislian \ ocational (uiidance." 
Mid-semester grades come out. (irand rush to the lihrarw 
Ann\' Kutz, "Marx'" of the Passion l'la\- ,ui\es illustrated lecture on 
".\ PilL;rima.L;e to ()l)eratiimer,L;"au." 

There's a Beta Kappa formal underneath all those balloons. 
Plii Kaji's annual Tlianksj^ix ini; dance. 

A "white" Kappa formal — decorations, and the first ri'al snow. 
Silver stars in a Plue ceiling — and \ou have \ an (iuml\- winter parlw 
^■. P. C. V. "The Master of Triumphant Life." 
French C'luh elects officers. 
Gracie and the Clee Cluli. 
Facult\' enters two \()lle\- hall teams in the intramm-al contests. 



raw Oni- Humhoil Fifty-fi. 



\\ai,k-(h;t pi bkta phi plf:dginCx 

A l)rilli:int fall season in .Monmouth CollesT Illinois Alpha of Pi P.eta Phi announced llic 

was opened hy the traditional "Walk-C^ut." The p]fdf^in,y- of \i\ian Lawrence, Ml. Pleasant, Iowa. 

cuvtoniai-)- excitement and tension in the air, and , ,,^ Tuesdax' vSeptemher _M , in the chapter room 

tlie |.erio<lic sho(,tin.i.; of the .yun for tlie ever- lAillowin.y- the ceremony a traditional t'ookv 

clian-in.t;- line of couples, were enh.anced ])V the c^ij,,^, ^^.^^ i,^.],] ,^j ^l^^. home of Ruth Moffet, The 

luuisual concession of lair weather. .\ -top m eommittee in charge was Marian Kaiser and 

front of the Woodbine for cheering and college |^,,|,j j\[;ill^v. 

scugs, a circuit of the down-lown theatres and 

restaurants, and .1 hmfire on the atliietic field APIMIA XI Dl'.PT.V TNITI.\TION 

with more cheering and songs, to climax a ver\- ,. ■, ,- m 1 x-- tx u 1 

r. , •■ 1 1 1 i. ■ r>eta l-.i)Silon o| .Mijha \i Delta announced 

excUnig evenmg opervhouse was held after ' -r , 0.1 ,, ( 

, .. , , 1 , , 1 1 the lormal miti.ation 1 uesdav Se|)teml>er _'[. of 

the ])inlire, which concluded the usual sr.ccess- ^ , , " i \\' i 

Frances hmstrom, Galesburg; Irene W alzer. 



Zearing; Hazel Kuntz, Margaret Gunmierson. 
and Dorothy Peterson of Monmouth. 



ful exening. 

C.\.Ml'S CPIMI 
The Campus Cduh entertained the new girls 
of the college at a tea I'ridav afternoon, S( ptem- Following the ceremonv a banquet was en- 

lier 23, at the Imuc Arts building. .Mrs. llamil- joyed at ll.awcock's Cafe. -Mary Taggart pre- 

ton. .\lr>. Crier, and .Miss Gibson were in the sided at the table. Dorothea Walker and l-A-elyn 

recei\in"' line. Beattie were in charge of arrangements. 



When There's Doubt In Your Mind 
Phone Us or Drop In at the Store 

FOWLER & SHAW 

We Specialize in 

MEATS and GROCERIES 

Wholesale and Retail Meats 
Free Delivery Phone 142, 145 

Tat'e One Hundred Fifty-six 




N 



L4o: 



KAIM'A KAPPA GAMi\rA IMCXIf 

'I'Ik- nicnilici^ I if Kai)]);i Ka|i])a (laninia were 
LiUcrlaincd li\' the Alumna' Asm icialii m al a ^cliiil- 
arsliip picnic on Tucsdax' evening Scptcnibci' _' I . 
Srlidlaslic rcC(i,i;nilii 111 was i^ixcn Id I'.dilli ( )in(.'i\ 
who was nut present {<< receive l:er award hir the 
highest average in tht' chapter. A scholarship 
award was also ]jn'senled to Ann Junes I'T die 
Lji'ealest iinjin )\cnienl in j^iades <huin:; the pre 
\ious semester. 

SI'.XIOK C,\\<\.'> \'.\'rVM'\\\\\ 

Senior .i;irls of AlcMicliael 1 )ormilor\- en- 
tertained stndeiils and facult\- meml)ers at .an in- 
liirinal tea Satin'dax' afternoon ( )ctoher I, loliow- 
iniL;' the foothall i^anie. I )ean (lihson presi(iei1 at 
the lieautifnll)- decorated tea tal)Ie. C.lad\s ^Juade 
senior representatixe ot the or,!;ani/.ation, was in 
cliarsje n\ arraniji'ments. 



.\l.lMi,\ \I Dh'.i/rA IMCXIC 
Tue^dax' exeniii;;. Septemlier J I , the active 
chapter of ,\lpha Xi 1 )eha liel<l it- fii'-t fall ,i;et- 
to,^"et]iei- in .Monmouth Park from 5 until 7 p. m. 
.\fter a welcome I'epast of wiener-, marshmal- 
lows, etc.. the ,^i"oup enjoNcd a ]ieriod o| v,.rorit\ 
son,L;s and recreation around the cani]ilire. 

( )u Se|itemhi'r JJ. I'.eta h'p-ilon of .Mpha. 
.Xi 1 )elta eiUerlained hei" palr.ine--es and .dnmiKe 
,at a form.il dinner in .\lc.\l iciiael 1 )orinitor\-. 
The lahle decoration- were in the traditional col- 
orr-, douhle lilue and i^old. ( )ther .L;lle-t- iniluded 
Miss Gihson, .Mrs. Crier, and n..ro|hy C'line. 

Pill K.\pp.\ PI ixiTi.vnox 

Phi l\app;i Pi announce- the initial ion on 
Septemher 10 of Clifford lleat'in, Sparta; (leo. 
K.au/.larich, l*armin,L;ton ; (."harles 1 )aw-on, Clin- 
ton, Iowa; .Mar-h,all Simp-on, .\lexi-; l'.n,i;"ene 
l\ei-lein, .Mpena, .Mich.; l\;i\ Sc;i]iecclii, l';irm- 
inuton; kolhnid Swau-ou, .Monmouth. 



mflD€FORyOU $25 and Up 

€ast Side Sc|uar€ rTlonmouthJIIinois 

GRRHfim 
TRILOR 




(Eltaa. A. 



§>min ^prmrr at a iln^pratp (Enst 

lUnnmauth. 3llinnta iTplrphanp 730 



Page Oni' Hundred Fifty-se 




r. HandiVral'l, music, campus service iiUcrcsl .L;rnu]is feature "\'. \\'. meetin,s^'. 
J. Mnnmoulli realK' rale> iu liralcrical aud e\tem]ii iranei Mis speakers' con- 
tests ;ii llliuiiis \\esle\an. I 'i I'lii wiuler I'm-mal. 

3. raii-llell. seuds two (lele,!;ales In cniii^ress in l'".\ansti m. K D carnival 
part\-, Sunn\'si(le "sweater swinj^." 

4. Ciinirs rehearse lUr Christmas services. 

5. Reilecnratinn (if C". C\ A. ic h mi lie,L;ins. 

(). t'ui'taiii rises 1 ni Kj^S-^g liaskelhall seasmi. Scnts deleat T^iurlinyldn 

junii'r (.'1 lUei^'e. Tan Pi tea Inr new ,t;irls. 
y. Dunhar I'leh Kinm'is L;i\e umisiial ]irML;i'aiii, lealurcdt local cnncerl assii. 
S. Kappa I )ella spdUsor^ C'lirislmas npeii Ikhisc — Cdftee and dnn^hnuls. 
q. "|iiurne\'s hjid" — an all male cast and ihi' real liillerness nf war. 

Candles in the <liniiij; n k iiii n| llie dnrni. 
10, keiulirandl Chili nieels. .\l]ilia .\i I )elta firiuial. Ini|uire nf a)i\ e\- 
v^unn\side jnnidr cnncerniiiL; the spread — dnniliells — tin pins -and an- 
nnved seniors. 
M. Senior j^irls sini;" for their hreakfasls. Second Church Choir Candle- 

li,i;hl Service — ,L;"a\- carolers — while \ esled choir slaleK candle '. 
I J. .\la\ h'ele mana.L;ers and coiumiitees election. 1 .use to I'nrdne 
IT,. Annual presenlalion of I landel's .Messiah li\ College Choral Society. 

14. Candlelight service re]ieated. 

15. Chrislinas parties — decorated fral houses — Christmas haskets — ,:;ifl.s — 
carols and collection for Spanish war children. 

i(). \acatii.u exodus from AI. C. hegins with the twelve o'clock wlii-tle. 




Pnir.. One' Humlroil Fifty-eiulit 



CHRISTfTlflS CFinDL6LIGHT S€RVIC€ 




Each \ear at the Christmas liuliday season, the Second United Presli\ terian Churcli Llmir, cinsislini; nf 
Munmcnitli Cullcse students and under the direction of Mrs. (irace Gawtliroji Peterson. utTers a cai'.d!eli,Liht 
service. The event is one ul the most looked for of college students and townsfolk alike. 



'the- place -to - EAT "/ 




MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 



Page One Hundred Fifty-nine 




LIBRflRy 

1939 



I'MKU Onu Ilumlml Sixty 



OUR FRIENDS, BOOKS 

Friends, did yuu say? Who arc tlicy ? 'i'licir lUimlicT is k'.nicm and increases willi 
the years. 

Books, in tlieir liest meaning are "offers of frienilslii|i from liini wlio \vritc'- !o him 
wlio reads." Having' siicli fricndsliips to offer, our lilirary doors are seldom closed. The 
welcome sign is never taken do\\n. 

So, to our students who make daily use of the treasures withiu our walls ami tc futtu'e 
students who may scan these lines, wc extend our cordial greetings through the pages of 
the Ravelings. Our wish is that Minr awareness to these treasures within \onr reach ma\ 
he deepened, that yotu' lives may he hroader ami richer heeause the lilirary has pro\ed 
\-our friend. 

To our alumni and others who are constantly doing fine things for us, who are gi\'- 
ing that our treasures may he enriched, we sa_\-, "Thank you. Friends." 

Our needs are constant and numerous, ami if at times we seem to heg, we trust that 
instead you will feel we are asking you to share \vith us a ]iri\ilege that r,nl>- friends are 
asked to share. After all 

■■fiooL's arc more lluiii luinhs 

I'liry arc tlic essence and (iitintesscnee of men's li'ccs." 

.\1.\KV K. McCoy, Libra, tan. 



BEWARE! 



Someone has facetiously remarked of the historical Bodleian i.ilii-,ii\- 
at Oxford University, that tlie ca\eruous underground recesses in which 
many of its hooks are stacked are so numerous and so rannficil that 
scholars have heen known (o \enture into its gloom.w lah_\ rinthine depths 
and ne\er find their w,ay hack. .\'ot so .Momnoulh College l,ihrar>. .\o 
one could get lost in its light, ro(]my stacks, ."^till. m.any a hrowser leafing 
through the pages of some newly found lihi-arious aci|uaintancc has su 
far forgotten time and place as to neglect to emerge in time f(n- dinner. 
So — heware of thumhing through oui- hooks, unless you ha\e time to spai'c. 

Ek.\|;ST SCIII.AKKTZKI. 



ONWARD 



Dancing candle-flame in swinging glass doors, the show cases, the stuilious couples, the ( iothic -.vindows. 

feehle light and heavy shadow— that \vas the e\enlful .Miss Mel o\'s helpfulness— these things are as f.imiliar 

night before the Knox game when lights were oiu all lo us .is the ( )racle. or t.)r. Grier, or announcemeiUs in 

over the campus — hut the library carried I'U with laudles. chapel. h'amiliarit> s,.metimcs breeds conlem|it, hm not 

The library ak^vys carries on. It is the safetx pin, ^" ""I' lli'-' l''"'-""-^ : increased knowledge increases re- 
tire Scotch tape of the college, very usefid. verv much ^l'^'^'- *-'•'" mm^Wx->. files, reserves, daters (not college 
in demand. A student may not go to chapel; may not students), indices, magazine closets !— all in the realm 
frequent the gymnasium; the Student Lounge and half "'' ''"■' ''"''>" blu'arian. 

the classrooms in Wallace Hall nia\ he secrets to him— Bhie sk\ and tree-filtered sunshine through (iothic 

but the library is the forum, the public square, the vil- windows — silence with an undertone of rustling papers — 

lage green — even a sort of cemeter\ for those students a whisper or three — shelves of intriguing ]irint — the 

who "bury" themselves in the stacks for an afternoon. library. 

The studv tables, the e\er-changing bulletir. lioard. u u,,- 

tl .\ > \ .M 1 I I I N S 11 .\ \\ . 






Page One Hundred Sixty-one 



The Sooner You Plan Your Furture 
The Better Your Future Will Be 



Below is the educational background of 25,357 
men and women who have won distinction in busi- 
ness, the arts and sciences. 

77 7' Had College Training 

13'--'/^ Had High School Training 

9'2'7i: Had Elementary School Training 

34 7c Had No School Training 

Today's preparation will provide your fu- 
ture income. Put part of your earnings into 
adequate life insurance. 



The field of life insurance affords many 
outstanding opportunities as a vocation. In- 
vestigate these possibilities. 



ILLINOIS BANKERS LIFE ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Home Office 

MONMOUTH, ILLINOIS 

I'asrc One Hundred Sixty-two 






4 "nn"s n y€flR 




DUD PLUnK€TT 



"Monmouth's outstanding athlete," is the term that aptly descrihes Dud Plun- 
ki'tt, for although only in his third year of conipctition on Fighting Scit teams, 
he has already earned a secure place in the list of Monmouth all-time great ath- 
letes hy his feat last year of winning four major varsity letters in one season. 
This achievement has heen hut rarely attained in Monmouth's history ar.d may 
never be again, due to the dropping of hase1)all from the sports program. 

Dud not only jdayed four different s|]orls. I;ut his |ierformanee in all i.f them 
was brilliant. He came to Monmouth fmni .Alpha. I]lini>is, wliere he h;'d little 
training in any sport e.xeept basketb.ull, lint he learned easil\ ami rapidlv and in 
his first varsity year was one of the ke\- men mi the football, basketball, track, 
and baseball squads. 

In his first season of varsity f(]Otball, the second year he had ever c:impeted 
in the sport, he immediately won a starting post at tackle, and has ])la\ed in 
every game since, lilockin.g cnnsistently and specializing on defense. 

Ilaskelliall seaM.ii found bini i.perating at forward, a)id doing a big share of 
the work of winning a -Midwest ebainpicinship in the 19,^7-.W season. -An accurate 
ball handler ami reboumler, lie used \u>. familiar one band shot lo lead the league 
in scoring. 

]n the siiring Dud alternated between the diamond and the o\al. li track 
be confined himself to the field e\-ents, tbrijwing the shot, jaxelin, and <liscus 
around with equal abandon. He was one of the Scol^■ few consistent iioint 
winners during the season. 

( )n the baseball nine Dud occtijiied several i]ositions, but worked mostly 
around first base, hatted in the cleanup s]iot and occassionally tossed a few balls 
somewhat in the direction of the plate from the (litcher's mound. 

In his leisure hours Dud found time to do enough studying to attain a "B" 
average and thereby help to refute the popular myth that sportsmen cannot also 
be scholars. 



Ololm^lla 



Cahica' Srahn to fflrar 

jaraprrira 

Srji (Snofta 

iHdhbc JFurniBl!iiu(3 




fflrn'o JfurnifllitngB 

Jfuriiiturr 

(Cljiita anil (SlaBBUtarr 



iH0nm0utl]'0 ICarg^st i^partm^nt ^tnr^ 



Pane One Hundred Sixty-thn 



t 




PI GAMMA PI 

ui'i-ici-:i<s 

President Doruthea Walkcli 

Vice President Jean Siirratl 

Secretary-Treasurer Maryetta Cliaiiman 

Pi Gamma I'i. Inunded in 19.56, is in a way an off- 
spring of Sigma Omicron Mu — springing, like Alinerava, 
full-armed from the brain of Jove. The group eonsists 
of freshman girls ulio have made a scholastic average of 
3.6 honor points for the first semester or makes this 
average for the two semesters. 

Pi Gamma Pi is in llie nature of a pat on the back to 
freshman women and a kind of suggestion that if the\ 
work hard, they miglit fulfill Sigma Omicron Mu require- 
ments some day. 

Recognition of Pi (ianima Pi girls is made twice a 
year, on Scholarship Ua\-, wlicn Sigma (Jmicron .\lu mem- 
bers are "tapped" and Kiwanis cups given for the fraternitv 
and sorority scholastically highest that semester. 

iliss Barr, instigator of the organization, and facult\ 
advisor, entertaines the group at tier home some time dur- 
ing the semester. Pi Gamma Pi girls remain active in tir 
group as long as they are in Moninouth College. The pur- 
pose of the group, however, is to bestow recognition upon 
freshman women who have achieved high grades during 
the difficult first \-car of college. 



1 



NORRIS 



fe 


s^ 


Jjv^ii^V. - 


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1 1 


ffi^ 



OFFICE EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 

107 K. Broadway 

EVERYTHING for the OFFICE 

Monmouth, Illinois 



y. M. C. A. 

OFFlClikS 

President Howard Jamieson 

\'ice President Curtis Russell 

Secretary William Murray 

Treasurer James Manor 

The Y. M. C. A. is as old as the Y. W. C. K. and is 
its twin organization on the campus. Each fall, the week 
end before school begins, the two cabinets meet at Lake 
Bracken, Galesburg, among the tree-clad lake shores, the 
moonlight and lake ripples to plan the best possible pro- 
gram of "\" activity for the coming year. 

.^part from til Y. W., the Y. M. C. .K. holds monthly 
lueetings for the men of the college and or.ganizes and 
sends out gospel teams to surronding churches. 

Representatives of the Y. M. C. K. and Y. W. C. .\. 
combine to form the C. C. .'\. Council wdiich arran,ges the 
beneficial Monday night religious meetings which bave be- 
come a tradition with the passing years. This is x tradi- 
tion — inore than a tradition — wdiich would be vitally missed 
if it were not continued. This year, Fred James as chair- 
man of the council prepared a threefold program for the 
year of Christianity in various Phases of Life. 

This group of college men, united in the fellowship of 
the Y. M, C. A. is one of the most wortlnvhile organizations 
on the campus, and its influence silently pervades many cor- 
ners of student life. 

In a school such as ours, we are proud to say, the 
"Christian" of the ^■. M. C. .\. letters, establishes this or- 
ganization as a proiuinent and desirable influence in th.' 




Business oFfic€ 



One of the busiest rooms within the portals of the 
college buildings is found twice each year in the Business 
Office, and perhaps three of the busiest persons, outside 
of the bustling freshmen, are Dave McMichael, Lois Black- 
stnne and Dorothy Whaling, receivers of that "last dollar." 

.Mr. .McMicliael, besides being kept busy as business 
manager of the college, is also visited frequently by the male 
students of the eurolliiient with pleas of a job on their 
lips. It is through this branch that many help to pay their 
way througii college with NY.\ jobs. 

Misses Blackstone and Whaling, college treasurer and 
.secretary respectively, are noted day in and day out either 
behind their typewriters, filing cabinets, or complting ma- 
chines, busily engaged in keeping the financal records of 
the college u proper order. 



Pbkc Oho Hiimhod Sixty-fuur 



^^^^^b^^^^^ 



y. w. c. A. 



UFFlCliRS 

President Mary Taggart 

Vice President Marv Gillliani 

Secretary Frances Hand 

Treasurer Rosemary Field 

Assistant Trerasurer Mary Bcal 

V. W. C. A. has been functioning on Moninou:!i cam- 
pus for a long, long time — from tlie days of our mothers 
till now there liave been "Y" Cabinets and V. ^^'. C. A. as- 
sociations. As the women's Christian group on the campus, 
Y. \V. C. A. fitly interprets the deeper and finer spirit of 
Monmouth which has come down to us through years >.'f 
tradition, 

^". W. spiinsi.rs the Hi.!,; Sister Miivement on tile cam- 
pus eacli fall, beginning with the \\'oodl)ine meeting and 
ending with the Christmas formal. The spring .-nid fall 
style shows and the Easter sunrise service are also contri- 
butions of the Y, W, C, A. Twice a month, meetings an- 
held for all the women of the school. One of thes'" meet- 
ings is a program meeting, designed fur the group as a 
unit, 

V. W, C. A. in cooperation with Y. M, C, A. sponsors 
the Monday night C, C, A„ a hook sale each semester, a 
formal reception each fall, Alothers' Day Vespers, the all- 
school picnic in the spring, the publishing of the Red Book — 
the list of services seems inexhaustible; and truly the 
Y, W, C, A, is an organization of service. It is a bond of 
friendship wliich encircles every girl on the campus and 
brings them together in a wide group of fellowship and 
interests. 



o 



m 

-..^k 



aHM 



muRRflys Lounce 

The Student Lounge — or the Murray Lounge as it is 
formally called — entered upon its first full year of college 
life last September, Beautifully and expensively decorated 
and furnished, the Lounge promised to be the "joy-s]iot" of 
the Campus, 

But a grim menace stalked the Lounge, Furniture was 
broken and the ])eace of the rooms shattered. College au- 
thorities took steps to iireserve these fine rooms, and the 
open hours were limited. 

Next September brings forth a new school year. It 
behooves us all t(i cherish and preserve this "dream come 
true" on our campus, so with this coming year, let us all 
aid in the upkeep of the between class rest room. 



PHI ETA MU 



UI-FICERS 

President l-Vederick F.ister 

\'ice President Howard Jamieson 

Secretar\- William Thoma- 

Treasurer K,.,bert Eyler 

Phi Eta .\lu is the freshman scholastic fratermty for 
men and requires an axerage only a lenth of a iioint les.- 
for memhersrhip, than that of the freshman xvomen's (.r- 
.ganization. To be eligible, a freshman man nuist make ai' 
honor point average of 3,5 for the firsrt semester or lor 
the year as a whole. 

Phi Eta Mn was (.>rganized at the same time as Pi 
Cimma Pi and under the auspices of .Sigma Oniicron .\lu. 
Dr. Bexeridgc, who activel\' promoted the organization 
is the faculty advisor. 

Recognition of Phi Eta Mu nKuibers is mide on 
Scholarship Day, and membership is retained in ihc or- 
.ganization as long as the initiate contiiuies at Monmouth 
College, 

By recognition of attainment. Phi Eta Mu hopes to 
encourage scholarship and set a higher goal for future as- 
piration. Since the origin of the group several of its 
members have already entered the higher portals of Sig- 
ma Omicn.m Mu. 




Stop in and see 
" Miirdy " for a 
fine fit in shoes 



MURDOCK 

SHOE STORE 



We carry all th 
latest style 
campus & dres 
footwear. 




Page One Hundred Sixty-five 




M. r, \,„yf tri.ii,); no place in particular— Seeins dc 
liis kite- -JitterbuK special leprosy — Gridiron men 
Murray and Campbell — Not a bad looking kid — M 
in there, Rupp— Students behind the pillars — Twc 
pose for a jihoto — On way to daily chapel — Weshi 

CxRAC'Il'/S GANG 
ATembers of the Secdiid Gliurcli choir, 'com- 
monly known as "Gracic's Gan.y;" ) met lieneath 
the weiner tree in INIonmouth i'ark for a cele- 
bration Friday, September 30, a .yala evening- 
being spent in playing; g-ames and singing songs. 

ALPHA XI DELTA PICKLE AIIX 
The patronesses of Beta Epsilon of Alpha 
Xi Delta entertained the active members '^ith a 
"pickle mix" at the home of Mrs. Hugh T. 
Beveridge, Thursday evening from 5 -.^o to 7 :30 
o'clock October 6. Moving pictures taken at the 
National Convention at Yellowstone Park were 
shown. 



able with Dave- Just after football p 


■actice — Mac flies 


ijiven letter sweaters — Eskimo Manor 


takes a stroll — 


ammen does a bit ot homework — Ho 


w did you sneak 


heads are better than one — Such a 


lovely .^roup to 


sky looks up. 





BETA K.\1M'.\ OPh'.N HOUSE 
Pi Chapter of Beta Kapi>a entertained about 
se\ ent\-fi\ e couples at their annual rush open 
house Saturda\- September -'4. Chaperones were 
Air. anil Ah>. Lo\-a and Air. Xeil and Aliss 
Liedman. Those in charge of arrangements were 
John A'est. Ted Winbigler, and Charles Anderson. 

SIGAIA OAIICROX AIU INITIATION 
Sigma Omicron AIu held an initiation cere- 
mony Wednesday evening, No\emlier 9, at Haw- 
cock's. It was followed bv a ban(:[uet at which 
Helen Wharton was toast-mistress. Bett\- Ru- 
bino gave a speech of welcome. Henrv Smith 
responded in behalf of the initiated. 



harrYEShapiro 

♦by quality and low price shall he be known* 
87 North Side Square 

MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

87 North Side Square Monmouth, Illinois 



I'atre One Hundred Si.xty-si; 




2. \'acatiiin ends when the twn seventeen |inl!s intu Munnmuth. 

3. Pnifessurs begin wurk- in earnest. 

4. The $3.00 fine surel\- l)rin,t;s students l)acl<. Ahimst c\-er\iine i.-^ liere. 

5. Internatii iiial Relations Cduh, "The (k-rnian.s and the CV.ecks." Schdl- 
arhip Day. I'an-Iielienic meeting ;it ddrni — Fre,-hnian-\arsit\' game. 

6. Teke'> hi lid traternil\- npen Imuse, Phi Kap's spnnMir vShipwreck dance. 

7. Cham]iii>n ni Midwest npen 193Q-41) campaign 1)\' defeating C'irnell. 
(lirls' liaskethall team elects captain and manager. 

8. What, nil \'espers? 

9. I'mfosnr Th(ini[>SMn s])eaks at C C. A. It's ynnr turn ti 1 he late, anv- 
\\a\'. teacher, 

10. Passing iif Mrs. I'dla Pynn, Teke Imu^e nrnther. v^tudent chapel. Ivnox 
game — Siwash 35, Mnnmnuth 31. 

11. Ma-\' Fete committees meet. 

12. Girls meet fur ^'. W. 

13. Fritlay the 13th parlies at 1'.. K. and K. K. O. npen Imuses. 

14. Twelve Sent cagers return fmm mugli hattle with jackMinville IMue 
Bijys with Illinnis C'nllege scalps nn their helt^. 

15. Debate tournament, "Resnlved: That the L'nited States >hnuld cease to 
use jjublic fnnd> fnr the bnsine-s nf stimulating business." 

16. C. C. .\. ilebale on "I'riend^ \ >. .\ci|uaintance>." 

17. Cnllege orchestra — fift\" i)ieces — presents a cnncert at the Chapel. 

18. Student recital — Chapel >tunt — \'nlle\ball game — Came at Carlton. 

19. Regular meeting nf ^'. W. C. .\. 

20. Senior acti\it\" >lips due. < )pen hnu>L' at Wallace Hall. 

21. 'Mnnninuth-Knnx Freshman game. 

22. Hnnest\' cnnference. 

2T,. "Pespnnsibility nf a Parent," C. C. .\. Semester music recital. 

24. Snrnrities gi\e up regular meetings in view ijf cijming finals. 

25. EXAMS START! 

26. Organ music offers relief between tests. 
2y. Open Ilnuse at the .Vrnmry. 

28. We win Lawrence game. 

29. More cramming. 

30. \'acati<.in for a few fnrtunates. 

31. LAST EXAM! 



Page One Hundred Si.vty- 



I 




COLLEGE CLUB 



Tlie College Clul) appeared on the Monmouth campus 
this year for tlie first time as an organized group. Th-.* 
house has been run on a cooperative basis and was to be 
more or less of an experiment this year. In view of this 
fact the Club has liad a successful year. There are twenty- 
three members of the house including boarders, Init there 
are also several men affiliated with the house by participating 
in intramural sports for the organization. 

Officers were elected shortly after the beginning of the 
school year. They were : President. Bill Schmidt ; Vice 
President. Walter Miller; Secretary, Russell Xowotny; 
Treasurer. Dick Cheverton ; and House Manager. Melvin 
Patterson. 

The Clul) has participated whole-heartedly in campus 
activities such as Homecoming week-end. College Club 
decorations won a second prize in the Homecoming con- 
test. It has also sponsored Open House at Wallace Hall, 
held its own house parties, and has taken an active part 
in Intramural sports. 

As an experiment, the Colle.ce Club has lieen very suc- 
cessful and is looking forward to liigger and better years 
in the future. 

The mendaers are : Leonard McCnllocli. Maurice Gar- 
land. Fred Lipton, Robert Forsyth, James Hill, Marcus 
Leighty, Fred Ginther, Dick Cheverton, Melvin Patterson, 
Hershel Stripe, Leonard Abels, Art Dean, Tom Eavage, 
Ray Cook, Russell Nowotny, Walter Miller. Robert Dun- 
lap, Kennetli Farrar, Wayne Bloomer, Bill Schmidt, Laiii 
Conkling. Al Ehringer, Bob ShuUaw. 



VAN GUNDY HALL 

When school opened last September Van Gundy had 
already found its ])lace in the "sun." The foundation of 
the hou.se was laid last year — Van Gundy's first on tb.e 
campus. In that year the cooperative method was intro- 
duced, a plan which enables the men to live at minimum 
cost. Also in that beginning year the name Van Gu-idy was 
made known and then during the second year the men 
worked to g.iin a reputation for the house. 

The returning upperclassmen : W. Merriam, H. Jam- 
ieson, P. Thomson, A. Currie, R. Harris, W. Lindsay. L. 
McClinton. L. Rhoades, E. Skinner and E. Young, were 
aided by the Freshmen who "ruled" the house by major- 
ity number. The freshies : W. Alexander, R. Blair, W. 
Butler, P. Coleman R. Forbriger, R. Johnson, S. McClel- 
land. R. Miller, S. Milligan, H. Xesbitt. R. Xicholls. B. 
Pittniau. R. Sharpe, and R. Shinu. 

\'an (juudy was recognized for its rating scholastically 
and kept that rating above any other group. One of the 
several novelty displays of the House was the Homecoming 
decoration which gained a first prize. Van Gundy gave 
much needed support to the V. M.-Y. W. Carnival and 
has supplied several leaders in the campus organizations. 
The house has been looked on as the "leader" of the inde- 
pendents and has taken a prominent part in the ccdiege poli- 
tics. With Mrs. Speer as house mother \'an Gundy has 
enjoyed a good j'ear. 



Economy 



Efficiency 



Coal from Mine to You 
Use 



Knoxville Mining Company's 
NO. 1 SEAM COAL 

Lump - Egg - Mine Run - Screened Nut - Stoker 

Stoker Coal Free From All Iron 

COMPARATIVE TEST 
PROVES "KNOXVILLE" BEST 

A Local Product — Delivered By Local Men 
Galesburg Phone K-3806 Knoxville Phone K-3806 



Page One Hunilicd Sixty-ciKht 



f#is^i^^fc^W^bfW^ii^fc# 



STUDENT COUNCIL 

President Frederick Foster 

Vice President Harold Parr 

Secretary Rosemary Field 

Treasurer Bernard Bolon 

The Student Ciiuncil is one nl the organizations on the 
campus whicli recognizes the "adult" faculties of the stu- 
dents and seeks to employ them. 

The student body officers are officers uf the Council. 
.Additional membership includes the four class presidents. 
Forensic Board president, house president of McMichael 
Home, Oracle Editor, a representative from W. A. A., a 
senior representative from tlie .Athletic Board, and one 
elected representati\ e from each nf the fnur classss beside^ 
the presidents. 

The Student Council is res])onsible for the student 
lounge, "preservation" hours this year, the all-school dances, 
and the iKjnesty campaign. Besides, the Student Council 
is a definite influence in many other campus functions. 

With the responsibility of "campus tone" dependins; 
largely on our Student Council, the selection and election 
of student body officers should lie fully based on merit and 
nut on political graft. 

As the House Council wurks with the heads uf the 
dormitories, the Student Council works with the facultv 
of the college in an effort to secure cooperation, understand- 
ing and friendship lietwecn the faculty and the sluden'^. 



DORMITORY OFFICERS 

Alc.MlCHAKL HO.MK OFFICERS 

President Bettv Smith 

Vice President Mary Elizabeth Le.llie 

Sccretar\-'i"reasurer lean Turnbull 

SUX.VNSIDE (JFFICICRS 

President .Marjorie Storniont 

Vice President Harriet McHard 

Secretary Helen Bond 

Treasurer .\larv Work 

.M.\RSHALL HALL OFFICERS 

President Frances Wvatt 

Vice President Ethel jean Selig 

Secretarv-Treasurer Bell\ .Appeiiheimer 

HOUSE COU.VCIL 
House Officers. Miss (iibsi.n, .Miss Liedman, Mrs. Beymer 

Senior Representative Gladys Quade 

Junior Representative Hannah Hinshaw 

Sophomore Representatix e Ruth Hamilton 

Freshman Representative Katherine Wilson 

McMichael. Marshall and .Sium\side dormitorcs pool 
their problems occassionally in the House Council meetings. 
The Council consists of one representative from each class, 
the dorm oflicers and heads of each house. 

The dormitories sponsor several Wallace Hall open 
houses each year, a "Commingle" or two in pajamas and 
liiiusecoats up in McMichael (j\m and the annual Christ- 
mas dinner, besides the dormitory teas after football game-. 



TO inDlfl 




LeonflRD fTlcCULLOCH 



.Moiunoulli College is alwaxs prouil of her sons and lianglUers who leave 
the cam|ius to lilaze :i n.ame for llieni-cKes in the worhl loi|a\. Leonar'l 
.McCullcjcli is sucli a son. .\n athlete par e.xcellenct — comjieting in football, 
hasketliall, and track with marked success — and a student of merit, Leonard 
heeded a call to teach scIk.oI inWoodstock. India. His new duties incliulc not 
only teaching, but advising :uid coaching the \iiung bo\ s ,is well. 

Though Mas — as he is kiiown to u> — is on llie ot'.ier side of the world, 
our thoughts and well-wishes are willi In'm in hi-; new l.isk. 



Monmouth Dairy Co. 

825 North B Street 
Try Our Golden Seal Products 



oxn xiiriiR Kxows where 

MlSFORTUXi: M.\^' STRIKE XEXT 

sjiiicr.iKn ynri< rrrrki: 

by IXSl'RIXC witli 

The McCOY Insurance 
Agency 



41,! Labi Bnibling 



Telephone 803 



Page One Hundred Sixty-n 



iS^tf^t^^ 




H/«iLL OF FAHE 




Women's Athletic Association 

OFFICERS 

President Mary Fraser 

Vice President Gladys Quade 

Treasurer >[arion Burgess 

Advisor Miss Mary Weir 

Tlic purpose of the W. A. A. is to sponsor sport ac- 
tivities on the campus for colle^^e women witli a program 
of events throughout the entire year encouraging the for- 
mation of health hahits and participation in all forms of 
athletics. This year's memhership reaches a total of 32 
memhers. Any girl is eligible for membership who has 
earned a total of 125 points. 5 points being given for each 
hour of activity. After a total of 1,200 points has been 
attained, she is awarded an "M" letter, and when 1,500 
points is reached a sweater and a letter is awarded. Thes.> 
points may lie earned in group play or in individual aciivities. 

W. .\. A. sponsors activities in hockey, basketball and 
tennis. Games are played between classes wliich are re- 
sponsible for much friendly rivalry. The juniors are win- 
ners for three successive years in hockey and the sopho- 
rnores have won the basketball tournament both years 
Captains of the hcjckey teams were: Freshmen, Patricia 
McMillan; Sophomore-Senior, Betty Rubino; Junior, Mar- 
tlia Jane Compliell. Captains of the basketl)all teams were: 
Freshmen, Maudie Fielil ; SoplK.more, Jean Malley: Junior, 
Ruth Chambers; Senior, Gladys (Juade. Joan Martin was 
in charge of the basketball tournament. Inter college in- 
terest is maintained in .yames witli Knox in liockev and 
basketball. 

Swimming is another sport with a large mmiber of 
devotees. Kach year a Red Cross Examiner visits the 
campus for e.xaminatioii for those wishing examiners' cer- 
tificates. This year the examination required five nights 
for completion. 



Collese Whistle 



"Whistle, Whistle, Who swiped the whistle?" This 
question has been asked off and on for many years, Init 
never so many times in the same year as during the past 
term. 

In the middle of April, the old whistle, with its fa- 
miliar shrill toot failed to blast sleepy scholars from their 
beds, classes were cut and a most irregular routine of daily 
work was carried on for several days. Until the college se- 
cured a new wdiistle, which sounded like the scream of a 
freight train on a lonely night, the schedule was not resumed. 
After days of hearing this squeal, some kindly unknown 
workman approached the heating plant, where the "tooter" 
is located, and in the early morning substituted the "college 
rooster" with a third whistle with sound effects of a river 
steamboat. 

The above took place on Ajiril 25th, and the following 
Saturday mornin.g the inevitable took place. Seven years 
has passed and Pres. J. H. Grier found on his porch a fine 
1)rass steam whistle. \\'rapped with the package a note: 
"I am the wandering Monmouth College whistle. The 
last time ihat warm steam pulsed through my veins and 
belched forth from m.v nostrils was to announce the 20-0 
victory of the Fighting Scots over the Siwash. Nov. 24, 
1932, which fact is attested by the inscription on my side. 
After almost seven years of rest, I am now ready to toot 
more Monmouth victories and to awaken the slumbering 
students at 7:4.^ with my melodious blasts. I hope that my 
return will underwrite several "minutes" for the college. 
I have one request to make. Please, take good care of me 
so that childish students will not again be tempted to em- 
bark on a life of crime which has its own reward by chisel- 
ing me from my moorings and hiding me away in dark ar- 
chives where I cannot do my duty." 
.-\n(l so lies the fate of the wandering whistle. 



New Homes May Be Built or 
Purchased with Small Down Pay- 
ments As Small As Rentals 
Would Be. 

This Association Is An Approved 
Mortgagee of the Federal 
Housing Administration. 

The 
Monmouth Homestead 
And Loan Association 

5 1 South Side Square 
C. S. Peacock, Secretary 



Pbko One Hundred Seventy 



^^^^^i^^^^^h^ 



Heimo Loya 



Monmouth College has heen cxcecdiiigl_\- fortunate the 
past three years in having as a leader of their hand and 
orchestra the talented musician, Heimo Loya. Mr. Loya 
came to Monmouth in the fall of 1936 after having re- 
ceived his Bachelor of Music degree from the Chicago 
Musical College. He studied violin with Max Fischel, one 
of the foremost teachers of violin in the United States. 

Arriving at Monmouth, the new director found the or- 
chestra and band in a depressed condition. At the first 
rehearsal of the orchestra, sixteen undergraduates were 
present to form the nucleus of what is rapidly approaching 
the milestone where we shall have reached the peak in in- 
strumental music at Monmouth. For today, we alread_\ 
have an organization that has grown to fifty players with 
full symphonic instrumentation, which is the largest ever 
assembled at the college and is unmistakably the best trained. 

The musical programs now presented at the college 
consist of cross sections of music in their present day 
forms, and can well be considered as a liberal education to 
students, the programs including selections from composers 
such as Bach, Mozart and Sibelius, to Duke Ellington and 
George Gershwin. 

In 1937 Mr. Loya took the leadership of the band which 
at that time had practically ceased to exist. Reconstruc- 
tion soon took place, and today the band comprises approx- 
imately thirty-five players. 

Mr. Loya has inspired those with musical talent in as 
much as the players can now receive credit for their elYorts 
as well as sweater awards. 



Avoid that meal time rush 

PRATT'S 
CAFE 

THE PLACE WHERE COLLEGE STUDEXTS 

GO FOR QUICK SERA'ICE AT 

/,0(C I'RICES: 

PAY US A \' I S I T SOON. 

Wayne & John Blakney 

Co-Managers 

/».y/ .Icross from The "Rk'oli." 




Pep Club 

OFFICERS 

The Pep Club, whose membership is limited to 25, sup- 
ports inter-collegiate athletics by rousing school spirit 
among the student body, giving stunts in chapel before im- 
]iortant athletic contests. The women of the organization 
wear sweaters emjilematic of their |)ositii:'n. 

This year nine new meniliers were taken in and the 
active membership of the eluli entertained at a weiner roast 
at Monmouth Park. 

The Pep Clul) was in charge of the Homecoming stunt 
night, "The Gay Nineties Review," in which all organiza- 
tions on the caiTipus participated. Some of the skits pre- 
sented were the Floradora girls, bathing beauties of the 
'90's, the bearded lady, Popeye — all of the skits implying 
that Monmouth would be victor on the morrow. The final 
part of the program was the judging by a faculty commit- 
tee of the beard growing contest with first prize going to 
John Laison and Bernard Bolon a close second. Appropri- 
ate prizes were awarded to the winners. After this, the 
group treked down to the athletic field amid wdioops and 
howls for victory to beours. On the field a huge bonfire 
w-as burning — thanks to the freshmen — and songs and yells 
were shouted. After that a snake dance was staged thru 
town. 

Other stunts during the year were presented before 
games. Some of these being a clothes line which spelled 
victory, Santa Claus who presented victory to Bobbv W'oll 
and a "Catch Oscar" skit. During the year the Pep Club 
gives out printed sheets with new yells and songs for the 
student body to learn. 

The Pep Club has pot luck suppers frequently and 
sponsors open house at least once a year. 



Page One Hundred Seventy 



14- 

15- 
16. 

'7- 
[S. 

19. 



-3- 
24. 



Win Monmouth-Carleton game. 

New semester — another registratinn — Chapel seating posted, aU good 
people are proctors. 

Different classes — strange snhjccts — and \\'irtz does hig business. 
Men's rifle team loses to Ripon l)\' one [xiint. 

Wine drai)es, soft light, and smooth i)aint — the renovated C. C. A. room. 
Religious emphasis week. Reverend Wm. Orr, speaker each e\ ening 
and every Chapel service. 

Monmouth and Carthage hold ])r;iclice debate. 

Dr. Grier ann(5unces plans for changing the art and music department 
next semester. 

Pra\-er meeting, "Skeleton in the Closet." College Octet dri\'ing to Mis- 
souri ; car skids and upsets, no one hurt. 

Cagers climax three dav trip b\' defeating Pieloit and losing to St. 
Anil>rosc ;it Chicago Colliseum. 

X'alentine theme for \'an Gundw Teke, and Wallace Hall open houses. 
A breeze slipped aroiuid insinuating that spring is here. 
vSwimming team arrixes home from lleloit. 

Girls ask for the dale — hearts, 1 lowers — and tlie Tan Pi Tea Dance. 
Debate with l\ ol Chicago team. Defeat Augie in tank, but lose on 
])asket])all floor. 

Plans for the vSpring ^^lrm,•d begin. 
X . \\\ meets to discuss, 'A on and ^'olU' Futm'e." 

Library closes ,at se\en, and we smothers a supposedlv strong Ripon. 
Kifle match with Coe. Scotch "fish" swim to \ictorv against Knox. 
Phi Kap open house. 
llonest\' campaign is declared useless. 
Freshman lootb.all stars blossom out in new s\\x'aters. 
Scots one step nearer Midwest championship b\- con(|iiering Knox. 
College limits enrollment beginning next \ear. Students to remain 550. 
Phi is in again. 
We lose to Cornell. 

Coe \ictorious, eliminating Monmontli from anv of getting Midwest 
cup tor the second year — in a row. For the V>. K. "Hard Time" partv, 
the social council .-mnounces a withdrawal of dime admission to open 
house. 

"Take trom among \-ou — " 

lntr;imural council meeting. C. C. .\. a 1"acultv discussion. 
Defe.-U of Illinois t'ollege rings down the curtain on the '^S-.^q bas- 
ketball sea.son. 



P.1K0 One Humli'cd Scvcnty-two 



HOnOR $TUD€nTS 



Fred Foster. gTaihialiii.L: In Chemistry at Munmoiith i^ 
(let'initely heading fur Ciiliiniliia L'ni\ersity. He lias al- 
ready received his appointment at that institution to con- 
tinue his studies in cliemistry in the Cokimljia graduate 
school. Good luck. Freddie: we expect .great things from 
you. 

Paul Zajaczkowski, also graduating in Chemistry a! 
Mimniouth. will accompany Mr. Foster to Cnlumliia In 
ccinlinue his work in chemistry. Paul, too, has alr-id\ re- 
ceived his appointment at the eastern school. Cvml link 
In ynu, Paul; we e.xpect great things from you tno. 

Miss Marjorie McCuUoch will enter Northwestern L'ni- 
\er-,it\'s Medical School and Clinic to study to he i medi- 
cal technician. Her course will he complete t\vel\e-mi iiuh-- 
ciinrse. The liest oi luck In \nu. .Marj.irie; we know \nn'li 
cnme throu.gh. 

Miss Helen Wh.irtnn is .ilso entering Xurtli western 
Universit\'s Medical Schi.nl and Clinic to study to he a 
medical technician. She is enrolled in the same coursi- as 
.Miss McCulloch. We know that you. t.io. will he ,i shining 
light for .Monmouth. 

Lee Shar|ie. Jr. will enter Northwestern University 
this fall, his stnd\ to \\^- the dentistry profession at the 
dental clinic of Northwestern. Best of luck, Lee. Who 
knows — you might be drilling on us some day. 

Curtiss Russell will ,go to Pittshur.gh where he will 
enter the Pittsburgh-Xenia Theological Seminary 1o studv 
for the ininistry. Curt, \iiu've chosen a grand work. Keep 
it up and the hest of luck to you. We'll he watchin.g you. 

John .M.'irtin will coiuiime his ^tnllies in preparation 
lor the law. .\t this writing |ohn was not certain as to 



which school lie would attend, hut he expected to go to 
Harvard. Hapjiy days, John. 

Miss Mary Taggart will ]iursnc- her studies in the 
sunny state of California. She will alleiid the Children's 
Hospital in Los Angeles where she will stmly to h(.-C(jme 
a medical technician. Loads of hick. .Mary, and congratu- 
lations on this appointment. 

William Merriani will continue his studies along the 
line of social service administration. .-Vt this writing it is 
higlih- iirohahle that he will attend Western F^eserve. Good 
luck, Mill : it's a great field. 

Miss .Mary Heal will keep up her g,,od work as a li- 
brarian: for she will continue her stmlies for li]ir:iry work 
in a special library school. That should be delightful work, 
Mary. Good luck to \ou. 

Fred James will go on to graduate school, probably at 
North western University, wdiere he will study law. Per- 
haps you can get us out of a jam soineda\', Fred. But ser- 
iously-, good luck, fellow. 

-Miss Jcaunette '"arwell will t.ake graduate work at the 
Cniversit\' of Illinois. She recei\ed a fellowship at ibis 
institution. We'll miss Ndii around here. Jeaiiette. but lots 
of luck to you. 

Robert Torley, Howard Mamnien, Richard Gill. Neil 
Harrington. George Ziegler. and Tom Beveridge are all 
plannin.g on goin.g to .graduate school. Fach will attend 
Some school, bill none of these men know at this writing 
winch sclh.ol it will be. Tliey will iimloubledlv be placed 
ill the very near future: indeed quite ])ossibly before school 
adjourns. Anyway, wherever you go, we'll be hearing good 
reports from you, we are sure. Lots of luck to all of you. 



CONGRATULATIONS 

from the 




MONMOUTH THEATRE COMPANY 



Paste One Hundred Seventy-thr 



STflT€ CHflfflPIOnSHIP 





John Martin 



John Alartin rose to the liciglits of success in oratory 
this year. Speaking on "The (jentile Proljlem" johnn\ 
waded through the State Oratorical Contest, througli the 
Juter-State Contest, and knocked on the door of National 
fame, only to be denied entrance at the last moment. 



This year is the second year of oratorical competition 
for Monmouth's talented speaker. Last year he was runner- 
up in the State finals, but this year he took first place with 
his oration on the Jewish question. The interstate con- 
test was held at Lake Forest, Illinois, on April 28. Mr. 
Martin placed second in this contest, which permitted him 
to go into tlie National Oratorical contest the following 
day. He reached the finals of this National contest, before 
meeting defeat. 

Martin's oration was in defense of the Jewish race. He 
pictured the Gentiles as doing the very same things that 
the Jews have been accused of doing. He pleaded a strong 
case for more toleration of the Jews by the Christian Gen- 
tile. His oration gave adequate proof that the problem 
which separates the races is more the fault of the gentile 
than the Jew. 

It is quite possible that Monmouth might ha\;.- had a 
national champion in the person of John Martin had he 
entered the field of oratory before his junior year. His 
fine voice and pleasant manner plus his own inimitable 
style leaves little to ask for in the way of a finished 
product. It is more than possible that John will some day 
cast happy reflections upon Monmouth with some really 
notable and vital speaking. 



LARSON 
FURNITURE 




WHEN RRFL'RXISHING 

yoi!k I'h'.irjihwrriiis oi< dormitories 

Stop in and let us show you tlie 

LATEST IN FURNITURE; 

Something that will stand the wear and tear 

FOR YEARS TO COME! 

209% South Main St. Monmouth, Illinois 



PEP CLUB OPEN HOUSE 

The Pep Ckih .'iponsdrecl Open House at 
Wallace Hall, Friday evening, November 19. Red 
and while Monmouth decorations were used. A 
novel fe;iture was the "MONMOUTH" spelled 
out I in the eight windnws. Elwood Throssel, 
one (if the cheer-leaders, acted as master of cere- 
monies. Joan Martin was chairman of the com- 
mittee. She was assisted h\- the other members 
of the Pep Club. 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA TEA 
Alpha Chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma en- 
tertained the Campus Club at a formal tea on 
Wednesday afternoon, November 17, at the home 
of Mrs. David McMichael. The table was deco- 
rated with \ello\v chr\santhemums and candles. 
Jeannette Farwell poured. 

BETA KAPPA OPEN HOl^SE 
A Beta Kappa Ojien House was held Satur- 
day evening, November 12. Ted Winljigler. Cur- 
tis Russell had charge of the arrangements. Mr. 
and Mrs. E. Gibb, and Mr. \\. \'est chaperoned. 
An e\'ening of dancing was enjoved. 



Page One Hundred Se 



Paw One Hundred Se 



^^^^^^^i^^^^ 



and ynur tavonte c 
slij) fur m\' scrap bn 



Y. M.-V. W. RKCKPTIOX 

"^'|)ur name, please?" "Wallace I lall !" " — 
r?" "I'd like tn save this 
The first ,y;rand assem- 
bly of the year was in session at the Mininiouth 
College Gymnasium. The ^'. \\'.-^ .M. Kecep- 
tiiin was a real mixer with nne frosh as bidd as 
the next in accpiirint;" the desired in furmation 
frnm the near-by members nf the (i])])nsite ^ex. 
All the upiK'rclass girls were determinedly tag- 
ging their "little sifters" in Impcs of meeting a 
few new tall, tan and terrific males, themselves. 
I'pperclass men stuck to their ne\\l\- acijuired 
.pals, thoughtfully looking over the freshman 
'girls. 

The chief recreation of the evening was 
hanil-shaking and that was ilonc with hearty good 
will on the parts of upperclassmen, freshmen and 
faculty alike. 

The usual grand march led by Dr. .and .Mrs. 
Grier, was (|uite solemn and impre^^i\e except 
for the moment when two of our tallest fellows 
found themseh'cs walking with two of our smal- 
lest girls. Before the newcomer> to Monmouth 
had quite recovered from their disai>pointment 
at no dancing after the march, Jeanette Patchin 
and her magic flute held the autlience spell-In )und 
for the iluration of two short pieces. "Baby 
Snooks" interpreted by ]Mary James and Hila 
Beth Reeve was a boost for old 'SI. C. !\Iar\- Gill- 
ham gave a A-ery delightful reading in darker- 
dialogue. ]\Iarv Fraser's dancing feet called for 
big applause. Roland Swanson's "On the P.umpy 
Road to Love" and "Pve Got a Pocketful of 
Dreams" made a big hit with young and old 
alike. The program came to a climactic end with 
Evel}"n Beattie singing "Xow It Can Be Told" 
and "You Are Love." 

The gala affair ended very satisfactorih- with 
generous distribution of Xertz bars to each and 
e\'erv one present. .\s the g^ni door closed cm 
the last straggling guests, another ]>age in the 
JMonmouth book of traditir)n was filled. Manx- 
thanks to the committee — Bettx- Smith, Jean 
Turnbull, John Schantz and Howard Orr, one 
one of the best receptions Monmouth ha^^ ever 
seen. 







IF YOU WANT THE BEST 
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336 




Page One HumUt-d Se 



w~--€ ir^ 



KAPPA PRETZEL BENDER 
Alpha Chapter (if Kappa Kappa Gamma hclcl 
it regular mniithlv "pretzel hender" at the homi; 
lit Maridii Hurgess mi Saturday evening, N(i\- 
eniher 5. 

KAPPA ]:)1<:LTA OlAW'. BING 
Beta Gamma of Kappa Delta held its No- 
\ emher "( )li\e Binge" nn h"ri(la\- night, X(i\enilier 
[ I, at the home of L'atherine Wilkin. Ueforc din- 
ner, a stunt, "The Gathering of the Xuts," was 
presented h\- the jiledge group. Sororit}' song.-- 
were sung and a soci.al hour enjoyed. Arr.ange- 
ments were in charge ot lielt\" Kuhino. 



I'.XPRIuSS VorUSI'J.F ON THE 

D.We'l'. El.OdR 

USBOL'I^ TECIIXKJI'E 

WVATT-N(.)R]M()VLI':. Inc. 

SCHOOL OK THK DANCE 



K.\PP.\ K.\PP.\ (;.\.\1.\L\ h'oR.M.M, 
Alpha chapter I'l K.appa Kappa ('.amni.i 
opened the sorority formal season with a form:ii 
dance, Frid.iy e\ ening, Xo\ emher _'3 at the I'dk^ 
Cluh. A while color scheme was carried out 
This was completed hy the first real snow lall of 
the season. Phil Morris and his orchestr.i fur- 
nished splendid music throughout the e\enin!.'-. 
Mr. and Mr,>. (uhh, Mr. and .Mrs. Richard Petrie 
were the chaperones. lane .McMillan was chair- 
man of the eomniitlce in ch.arge of arrangements, 
and was assisted hy .\nna Girier, je.an Turnhull 
and |e;inette P.alchin. 

\AX GL'Xm- PARTY 
\'an Gund\' entertained ten girls Tlianks- 
gixiug Da) ;il a. splendid dinner. The group at- 
tended the Ri\oli as guests of Dr. Murray after 
tlinner. 




4CC 




V 



DO \()V W ISll TO P.h: ENGAGED? 
u* so 

S!':e Ml-: FOR .\ wiDi-: .vssortment of 
I'R.rriih'.xiT]' rixs 

PL I MOM) NIXCS 

XO FUSS.' NO BOTHER.' 

DOlMS M.XTCM, I'ldimited 

COLLEGE CLl'P. OPluX lloL'Sl', 
The College Cluh held ,an Open House iM-id.ay 
e\ening, No\emher 11. The decorations con- 
sisted of red, white and blue streamers, rifles, 
pistols, ,and sabres in remenilirance of Arinistice 
Day. Representalix es of the three fraternities 
and \'an Gund\- were guests. Mr. and .Mrs. Rob- 
ert W'oll and Mr. I'.ugene \'est ch.aperonedi. Tlu' 
committee was composed id' Art Dean and Pill 
Schmitlt. 

\-.\N GUXD^' WINTER PART^' 
The \ an Gun(h- Winter Partv was held at 
\'an Gundy, Saliu'day, Xo\ ember _'6. The Imuse 
was decorated in blue ,ind siher. The sih cr stars 
suspended from the false ceiling were a s])ecia 
feature. The chaperones were: Mr. ,uul Mrs 
Robert W'oll and Mr. and .Mrs. Richard Petrie 
.Mrs. v^peer was hostess. William Merriani lul 
gai- v^kinner, Wilbur Lindsax, Rex lohnson 
Richard Brail and Les .Mcldinton were in charge 
I ;l the arrangements. 

P. h:T.\ K \ P P.\ PHI 

MEETS E\'ERV Tl-ES1).\Y EVEXING 

in the 

LOC.IL R.irilSKlilJMR 

Community Sing at i 1 :30 



b^ b^^i^b^ 



I'nuu Onv Hun, hurt Scvcnty-si: 




N 



L4o: 



IwNjOV DANCING 

AT THF, 

"iMcMlCllAl'.l. l>l()Anil()l'SI'. 

ri<:ni)I':z\()L'S" 

I'KKE IXSTKLC'l'IUN I'AlvKV MCin" 

ij :o() til n:i\\ii. 
Adiiiissiiin Free loc. in Aihaiicc 

I'.I'.TA KAPI'A I'^OUMAl. 

I'i rlKi|ikT (if I'cla Kappa lu'ld its fall lunnal 
(laiK'c at [\\v I'.lks CIuli, W L'clncMla\' l'\ (.'iiiuL;, NH- 
xcniliLT J3, l"'all (k'Coratii Ills consisted i.l curn 
stalks and pnnipkins. A noxcl feature na.s the 
use iif kernels nf c<irn In tdrni "\\. 1\" ( .n the 
walls. R(ij;"er Graham's orchestra tui'nished th.' 
music, 

C'hapernnes tor the evening \\i.'re: Mr. and 
Mrs. S. M. Thomp.son, .Mr. and Mrs. M-dcuIm 
Keid; Mr. O. L. Neil, Miss Jean Kiedman, Hr. 

and Mrs. Grier, .Mr. and xMrs. C. G. W Iward. 

The cnnimittee in char.i^e was Ted \\ inhi^ler. 
Walt Nicnl and h'arl Sherman. 

PHI KAPPA PI FORMAL 
Phi Kappa Pi held its annual Th:uiksf,d\im; 
formal dance, nn Thursda\', Nmemher _'4, at the 
Elks Cluh. The room was attractively tleciirate<l 
in red and blue. Ivan Nagel and his oi'chestra 
furnished the music. Dr. and Mrs. 1 In.yli 15e\- 
eridge, and Mr. and Mrs. Lnuis Gihh, cliapenincd. 
The committee in cliarge was composed of Rnl)- 
ert Byrn, Lindell Bellis, Cliffnrd lleatun. War- 
ford Baker, and John Kritzer. 

A R T M D E L I N G ~ 

BY 

PROFESSIONAL MO D t'. I , S 

M.\RV E. MvDLIE DORIS SMITH 

HANNAH HINSHAW KITH CI I .\ .M HHUS 

CHRISTEL GLEIC1[ DORIS W II. 1. 1. VMS 

Local No. 14; B. T. V. 



.\ R I'. \() L" .\ .M .\ \ 

(IK 

A R 1-: VOL .V M L' S l'. 

? ? ? ? 
My ScIkmiI of Instruction I'.uilds 

BOLHUs ui' Micwn 

I'.ll.l.V' ".X'n.AS" Tki:s|| AM 



X . W. C. .\. I'OR.M.M, 
The ^. \\ . G. .\. Ganipus Sifter pro^iMui 
was liruu,L;ht to ,a clim.ictic end S.alurd.iv exeniii.i;, 
Noxemher 30, with the annual Ganipiis Sister 
h'orin.al. It took pkice in W'all.ice Ilall fnnn 
y .yi until i<i:(Hi o'clocl<. The fall decor.itions 
were \ ei'v .attractive. Pumpkins, cornst.alks, or- 
an.i^e ,and lilack d.ance proj^ranis, oraii,L;e room 
decorations, and a hui^e harvest moon were tlie 
outstanding" features. The first hom- w.as ,a hur- 
ried rush for exchange dances. Relreshments 
were serve<], and upperclass .twirls toi ik their little 
sisters home for the last lime this vear. Tlie 
formal was a ijrand success, due to the ahk. in.ui- 
a,<;ement of Mary Murphv. memliersrhip chair- 
man. 

W. .\. .V. OPI-.N HOUSE 
The W. .\. .\. sponsored Open House at 
Wallace Hall Saturdav, Novemlier J3. John \'est 
was master of ceremonies. The new records and 
also the new recordin.y" machine met with great 
enthusiasm. The program consisted of a tap 
tiance by Mary Eraser and a stunt by two nf the 
new initiates, l.ola Jacobs and .Marv Work. The 
memliers of the committee were: liettv Ruliino, 
Irene W'al/.er, Lois Winter and .Martha Jane 
Campbell. 




N 



L4o: 



Pa.TC Onu Hundred Seventy-se 




Girls on the hockey field — Asleep or dead, that is the tiuestion — Cheni. students i^ive a sample — Skinnei 
and "M"— Senorita Donald explains the lesson — Talkin.c it over— Tennis from the rear — You fornot to 
drape yourself for this c■n(^-A jiortion of the Phi Kap trophy case — Two youni^ la(^ies pose vith Mr. 
Topper— Bellis looks vver the situation Freshmen Ket a few calisthenics— Trucking on down— Baker 
looks like an up and comins gentleman- Bioloiry specimens. 



OPI'.X TIOUSI". 

Swayiii,^ coupler daiict'il the "Ii,i;lil fantastic" 
Friday Xdvenihcr I I. at Wallace llali. \ vcrv 
special attractiiin was the new rec< irdins^^ -xstem 
furnished by the college. Its enchanting melodies 
drew college students frdiii the Student l.oungc, 
the dorniitnries and the streets. ^l;irjnrie Shoe- 
maker's flying feel — Hila lieth Reexe's sweet so- 



prani > rendering "Suniniertiine" and ".\ Chinese 
Xiir>ery Khyiiie" — "The Waltz," a reading by 
M,-ii"\' I'.lizaheth l.edlie — jnhn Sch.int/. as ,a \erv 
dignified master of ceremonies — the winners of 
the prize w:dtz, l'>ett\- Ruhiiio and Glen Skon • 
berg — this was ( )pen Mouse sponsored hv the 
Social Council, under the direction of IMrs. Bey- 
mer. 



DAIRY 



J 



SAFE-PASTEURIZED 

108 South A Street 



PASTEURIZED 

DAIRY 
PRODUCTS 



PaKc One Hundred Sevenly-eisht 




flmpus 

OUPL€$ 



PIXS 

VICKKKS K. I'ARKBK 
I'ARR F. SIMPSON 

FOSTER H. sMrrz 

. DAVEY M. WILEY 
BELLIS M. TAGGART 
JACKSON -r. FOUST 
JOHNSON- E. NESBITT 
ROSS J NELSON 

. THOMAS - G. QUAUE 

. NICOL J. WOODS 
CAMPBELL- J. FARWELL 
CALDWELL- A. YOUNG 
I\;acDONALD- E. FKYMIRE 
JAMES M. STAN'ION 
MONTGOMERY B. JOHNSON 
HARRIS E. SMITH 
CAMPBELL J. TURNBULL 
SWANSON— B. EVERS 
RUSSELL--F. LA RUE 
SKINNER -A. GRIER 
FINN R. GLENN 
MOODY B. TEETER 
WOODWARD -R. WILEY 
BOLON R. FIELD 
DOBLER M. JAMES 
HARRINGTON W. TORLEY 
WYLDER S. COLLINS 
(;AKI)NER I. BOLLMAN 



ST HAD IKS 

. BAKER H. STEWART 
RUPP— M. CHAPMAN 
RUFF -F. HUEY 
SMITH— J. TIFFANY 
JAMIESON M. HUTCHINSON 
FAIRMAN V. SIEBER 
WINBIGLER B. SMITH 
HUSTON R. GARRETT 
WHITE- H. SUITER 
FORBRIGER -E. STICE 
CHRiSTENSEN- J. LUNDtHJIST 
EYLER- B. DODGE 



W. REYNOLDS M. NELSON 

R. MAILLER J. DUNCAN 

D, GROSVENOR B. McKINI.EY 

J. MANOR - A. JONES 

J. KRFIV.ER R. MOFFET 

D. CLAYBERG -M. MURPIIV 

W. MARTIN— M. EISIMINGEU 

W. SCHMIDT— J. JOHNSON 

D. MOODY- H. RATHBUN 

W. ARTHURS M. STULT7, 

F. McCLELLAN R. HENDERSON 

R. CLELAND— B. BURKHOLDER 

T. SAVAGE M. DIFFENUAUGH 

D. GREEN— B. 13USC1I 



K. SHAFENBERG M. JENNY 
W. PRUGH J. JAMIESON 

F. WALLEN- M. ERASER 

J. McDonald s. beach 

L. McCLINTON L WALZER 

C. MASTIAN M. JARED 

D. MANNEN- M. FRAZIER 
C. ANDERSON M. BURGESS 
H. SMITH -D. HATCH 

R. LANNING- H. CAMPBELL 

H. MAMMEN D. SCHANTZ 

C. HEATON B. RUBINO 




STRAND'S 
BAKING CO. 

WHOLESALE & RETAIL BAKERS 

120 West First Avenue 
Phone 46 



One Hundied Seventy 



HIRD flnnUflL COLL€G€ OP€n-HOUS€ 




McClenahan Kets a microscopic view — T\v( 
Physics experiment set-up — A detachable 
heai-t— Calculations to the nth decree~C 
assistants — In the advanced chemistry w( 



nes from the gcolcgy specii 
for body study — A job \vi 
lab. and all the trimming 

vith pipettes. 



{ "Old Mother Ea.th' — 
roscopes — Explaining the 
mce Hall profs and the 



With X-rays flashing, explosions roaring, and hustling 
demonstrators on all sides, the Science Departments con- 
ducted their part of the third annual College Open House. 
Each department prepared exhibits showing not only the 
routine work of the courses, but also illustrating many in- 
teresting phenomena not encountered in regular college and 
laboratory work. 

The ground floor of McMichael Science Hall featured 
Geology motion pictures, exhibits of fossils and minerals ; 
and various Physics exhibits and demonstrations, among 
them being X-rays, magnetic action, and water freezing 
and boiling simultaneously. 

Chief among the Biology demonstrations was the "Dis- 
sectable Man." At intervals a life-sized model of a human 
body was taken apart and the parts explained. (.)lher plant 
and animal exhibits and collections were shown, in addi- 
tion to routine laboratory work. 

The peace of the top floor, devoted to chemistry, was 
frequently shattered by ear-splitting explosions. .\ variety 
of other demonstrations were carried on(, amon.g the most 
interesting was a demonstratiun nf the freezing prnperties 
of liquid air. an expcriTuent net carried out on the campus 
in several years prior lo ihis one. 

Nearly -400 senior high school students and instructors 
visited this annual affair presented by the college. Not only 
were they eiilertainerl in the science building, but w; re also 
guided abonl the vari.ms sp,,ts of inleresl on the campus. 
The Fine .\rls Hnilcliug olTered some fine collections of 
art and sculpture work, and an interesting tour was made 
through the library. The Crimson Masque ofifcreil the play. 
"Mrs. Moonlight," to several hundred persons that evening. 



©urufauU 



One Hundred Eighty 




14- 

15- 
1 6. 



iS. 
19. 



The Ci)llc,i;\' 11,111(1 is til ha\e new unilUniis. 

The flu is hiildiiii;- up rehearsals n I" "Sta.^e l)ii(ii-." 

French film at the little theatre. I'.eta Kappa dpen Imuse. 

College Cluh iiperi iiduse. 

/\iigustanii College presents their choir in a concert. 

The College chemists attend meeting of lllinois-lnwa section of the 

American Chemical Societ\- at Augustana. 

Weekly concert ot music students. 

"D" slips are out again. International Uelations Topic, Faci-ni in 

America. 

.V group of students and faculty go to IV-oria to hear h'.dw.ird ISenes. 

e.x-president of the CV.eck repuhlic. 

"Stage l)ooi-" successfulh- pi-esented despite llu. storms, ,ind liglits nut. 

Wallace ll.all "Spring" part\ is under the direction ol \ an (nmdw 

l\epresentati\ e of the Institute of h'amiK Kelatinns is 1 in the campus to 

intcr\-iew students interested in Soci.al work. 

C. C. A. — ,an illustrated t.alk < >u diseases. 

T;iu Kappa Kpsilun and Ka|ip;i Kapp.i Gamma axerage the highest 

grades in lraternit\ and siiriirU\ gruups. 

Internation.al Relations .group discusses "South .\merican Cimtries." 

Sterling I'ollegc male i|Uertet presents progr.im in ciiapcl. "Iji i'> 

Date" ■^■. W. meeting. 

Annual deh.ate tourn.ament of Illinois Debate 1 .e.ague ,it Lake Forest. 

A'isiting high school seniors are entertained h\- dormitor\- and science 

hal open luaises, T.au I'i tea, ,ind Fi Fhi Si. F.atrick Shindig. 

\'. F. C. L'. h'ellow ship hour — light supper — In k ik re\ie\\ of Leonardo 

da A'inci. 

Flection of candidate for Drake Relay (Juenn. 

Flection of UaA'clings editor fur next \-e;ir. 

It's finally here— VACATION ! 

(.'ollege (.'oncert Cdioir leaxes for Spring Concert Tour. 

It was such a tin\- \acation. 

lUu'sl of actixitA" in the intr.amur.d haskethal! progr,am. 

The annual water pageant a "College Hit I'arade." 



Pace One Hundred Eiiihty-o 



flUTOGRflPHS 



fr ^|S^ 




Tf tiTf rN5V ter5T ir5» t4S 



l'!i>;c One Hundrucl Eishty-two 



flUTOGRflPHS 



^i^^^\^^^^^^^ 



Page One Hundred Eighty-thr 



;lCfln 




Jim vipono 



To Jim \'ipnnfl. after the cnnclusion nf this fall's football season, was 
awarded a signal honor. He was given a position at guard on the mythical 
"Little All-American" football eleven. A selection made from small colleges 
and nniversities throughout the country, and one wdiich means, for small 
schools, what the numerous ".Ml-.'Xmerican" teams mean to the large univer- 
sities. 

Monmouth students and |iartisans may be proud of Jim and of the team 
on which he ]ila\ed lor this is tlie first time that a Fighting Scot has ever re- 
ceived this award, ami it is clear ]irunf tliat Mimniouth teams rank with the 
best in schools of its size. 

Vipond played running guard cin the Scut ek'\'en. a pusition in wb.icli it is 
no small task to 1e outstamling emaigh to attract atlentinn. He lias plenty of 
s|)eed to |iull I ut of the line and bl..ck elTcctivelx' on offense. His brilliant 
work, hiiwever, was on defense. He enmliined tile ability to elude opposing 
blockers and to diagnose running plays, and made numerous tackles behind 
the line to break up running" plays before they .got under way. It is significant 
that he was only a junior this year and consequently will be an important mem- 
l)er of another |iiitentially strong forward wall next season. \'ipond is also 
a member of the varsity track squad and should win some points this year 
in the pole vault. 

The Fighting Scot teams uere well represented on the various All-Star 
teams throughout the season. X'ipond also scored a first string berth on the 
All-Midwest conference team along with Stan \'ickers, co-captain of the 
1938 squad. "\'ic" played some fine ball his last year and was well deserving 
of the credit given him. Honorable mention was given to the Xelson brothers, 
Lyle and Leitli, Dud Phuikett, Jim Rupp and Fritz Wallen. 

Monmouth's flashy little Scaiiecchi was named on the Associated Press 
All-State team, but was given a seconil team rating in the Midwest league. 

The Fighting Scots shunld I'laee nian\' men in the honorary columns next 
fall witli tlie piiwerful force llial was sliown un tlie gridinm in the spring 
training. 



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Page One Hunilied Eighty-four 



./A"/.\;v77rr77o.v 
or nisrixcTiox 

Life ill MiiiiiiKinlli Ciillcgc, ax t/iis luiliniic sc :ecll 
iiiilic'iitrs, is a ricli cxf^cvicucc in liaf^f^v and useful 
liiiiu/. Munniniil/i aims to make her eaurse of study 
a sonnd fonndotinn fay nindern life in this inereas- 
ini/ly eoinf^le.v -lenrld. To aehieve this f^iir/^'iu' the 
i'(dle</e f^ro:d<les f/ond equilvnent. endo:enient . and 
a stroll;/ faenltv. Hut nj^on the stiiilents theiusel'ees 
falls the heary resf^onsihility for the siieeess of the 
/vof/ram. 

.]/ onnioiith seeks as stuilents voniuj men and :eomen 
■:eho ill sehools aiul home eonimiinities lurre (//rv;; 
f^romise of hu/h (lehierement. and :eho hare demini- 
strated both in mi ml ami eliaraeter the ahility to pro- 
fit by the proi/ram to :Kdiieh the e<dlei/e is eommitted. 

For further infi^rmatiini :erile to 
Prksidkxt Jamks IIari'Ek Gkier 

T IT I". MOXAroi'TIT COLLEGE 

MliX.Mliri'M. ll.l.lN(]I> 



Page One Hundred Eighty-fi' 



^ - If^-^-^ ' ^'~-^' 



^i^^^^^ 



FOR€nSIC 



Monmoutli College is the home of the Illinois Zeta 
chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, one of the largest honorary 
fraternities in the country, its membership includin!? hotli 
faculty and students. The Monmouth chapter faculty 
members are, Misses Ruth William and Jean Lieddman. 
and M. M. Mavnard, R. W. McCulloch, D. Buchanan, Dr. 
J. H. Grier and Dean J. S.Cleland. The student member- 
ship consists of the following: Charles Campbell, David 
Park and Miss Jean Surratt. Four students were taken 
into the fraternity at the close of this year, liein,^. Miss 
Lois Lindsay, Jolm Martin. Robert Fink, and (iord.in 
Jackson. 

Pi Kappa Delta holds its national convention every 
two years. Lexington, Kentucky, being the honor C!t3f for 
1940. During the odd years between the national conven- 
tions, province meetings are held. During the past year 
the Illinois-Wisconsin province tournament was lield at 
.\ugustana College in Rock Island. The local group was 
entered in all events, there being two debate squads of four 
each in the men's and women's divisions, and entries in 
both divisions of extemporaneous and oratory. The men's 
debate team placed fourth. 

William Butler, promising freslunan. placed fifth in 
the men's extempore speaking, his suljject lieing "Pan-.'\mer- 
ican Alliances." Miss Phyllis Stephens spoke for tliv 
women on the subject, "Pacific and Oriental Crises." 

Miss Frances Wyatt placed first in the women's divi- 
sion of oratory, her subject being, "Trash," referring to 



Industrial Chemical 
Laboratories 



the cheap magazines of today. Gordon Jackson spoke in 
the men's oratory. 

Officers of the organization are: Miss Jean Surraft, 
president; David Park, vice president; Charles Campbell, 
secretary-treasurer; and Miss Jean Liedman is the facidty 
sponsor and coach of all forensic work. 

WOMEN'S DEBATE 

The women of Monmouth entered three debate tour- 
naments during the past year, the first being a practice 
tuurney at Illinois State Normal University at Bloom- 
ington. Their next entry was in the state tournament at 
Lake Forest, Illinois, closing the season at the Pi Kappa 
Delta Province tourney at Augustana College. Both sides 
of the question were argued by the girls. 

Members of the squad included Misses Phyllis Ste- 
jdiens, Margaret Wawlorth, Lois Lindsay. Jean Surratt, 
and Arlene Snow. Misses Surratt and Lindsay \>'ere the 
onl\ members of last year's team. 

MEN'S DEBATE 

The 19,!8-39 season proved to be one of great success 
tor the men's debating division of the forensic program. 
Many tournaments were entered and high honors received. 
The season opened with a practice debate at Normal. Rob- 
ert Fink, Robert Bowman, David Park and Harry Frantz 
were entered in the non-decision division. The team of 
Charles Campbell and Scott Hoyman, however, won third 
place in the championship division of fifteen schools. 

Following defeats at both Principia and State tourna- 
ment, the teams entered the Midwest Conference tourney 
at Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Campbell and Hoy- 
man tied for second with the Ripon squad. The season 
closed with the invitational tournament of the Province of 
Pi Kappa Delta held at Augustana College in which the 
team of Campliell, Hovman, Bowman and Fratz tied for 
fourth. 

.March 4th saw the team of Camiibel! and (;riffith par- 
ticipating in a radio discussion with Wheaton College over 
station WCFL. Cbica.go. The discussion concerned various 
idans for improvement of railroad systems of our country. 
( )n the same trip the men debated DePaul University. 

Monmouth met several school on the local campus in 
imlividual meets, the season being closed with an audience 
deliale with Dartmouth College. 



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DRflfTlflTICS 



Crimson Masque is madu n|i of so]ilioniorcs. Juni 



.t Illinois, ln-inK i-staLlislu-.l on tlu' local campus in 1929 



and seniors who ha\e succcssfnll\' navigated llic ]ierils of .Menihership is liniiteil to n])|iercla->s students who have 

Dramatics 136. This war it offered fi\e major prodnc- met certain scholastic re(|nireinents and who have slKJwn 

lions, one of which was the professional yroup of ]iup- cajialiility in actin,!^", directing; and crew work in Crimson 

lieteers. In addition to the actors, there are three special- Mas(|ne. 



ized HTonps, properties, li.yhts. and carpmterin.y, which wi. 



In the winter of ]9.V) the local (hapter will send a 



capahly handled this year hy Maxine W'inhiLjler, Charles delegate to the first national convention of X. C. 1'. to he 

Coulter, anil Dwi.nlit Russell ,ind ['.ill iJarhour. respectively. held in Chica.yo in ci.njnncti.in with the Xational .\ss,icia- 



(:)1'i-ic1':rs 

President Tim Canipliell 

\'ice President Howard jamiesou 

Secretary Kahel r.ollman. 

Business Mana.£;er l'.ell\ Ivuhino 

Treasurer William \lurrav 

Ptd)licity Dorothy Reese 

Program ....M,ar\- (iillh.am, John Martin. Piunlet Johnston 
Director Ruth William^ 

DR.AM.XTKS l.ii. 

Providins" an o]iporttuiity for theatre work of all 
kinds. Dramatics \M> is .a lahoratory course for Freshmen 
and others interested in dramatics. In .addition to the 
Freshman Play. "Fashion" which was ]iresented April 2S. 
nine one act pla\s were prodnceil as work-shop plays. 

X.ATIOX.AL CO].LE(;iATE PLAVFR.S 
The .\lonmoiUh Chapter of X. C. P., national honoray 
dramatic fraternity, is one of the two chapters in the State 



tion of Teachers in .Siieech. 



President Mary Gillham 

Secretary-Treasurer Betty Ruhino 



Tsahel Bolhn.an P.nrdet John^ton Tim Camphell 

John M.arlin Uiuh Williams 



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Pase One Hundred Eiprhty-si 



19 




The ^'. W. Carnival — ha\i- m-\xT -^rcn sn many pennies. The telegraph 
sei"\ice and the races are kept busy. 

Ml mini null chapter Zeta Kappa Epsilnn, history I'raternity recognized. 
Cdnlinuation nf Crimson Mascfue dramatics course, one act plays. 
Y. W. Installs new ol'Picers. Pan-Hellenic invites new members, officers, 
to tea and installation. 

Good Friday church ser\ices ;dl afternoon. 

Sunnyside "llunny Hop." Tekes and 1!. K.'s IkjUI open houses. 
\'espers — usual Easter style parade. 

Midsemester grades. Dean of Simpson College is C. C. A. speaker. 
Fdection of Oracle editor. A])rani Chassins. pianist, presents concert. 
Historv film, "Tsar to Lenin." 
Guest night at the tlorni for Mr. Chassins. 
Teke senior dinner. 

Crimson Maspue presents "[(tan of .\rc." Steven's marionettes. 
Ichthus Club elects officers. 

Student hotly election. Georgia Gr;ives, contralto; Walter Alills, Ijari- 
tone. ]{xchange ilinner at the dorm. 
The new Pan-Hellenic Council meets. 
Choir and orchestra concert. 

All school prom huge success — Charlie Cartrwright's orchestra. 
Conference of International Relations Club at Xortwestern. Dart- 
mouth debate team here. Inter-S(|uad football game. 
College blankets, sweaters and letters presented. 
Whistle disappears so 7:45 classes begin anvtinie. 
Election of student body secretary. Potanv field trip. 
Tennis match with Turlington. Dorm girls choose roommates. 
Opening senior musical recital. ^'. W. interest group meeting'^. 
Crimson Masque presents "E.asbion," a melodrama. 
Pi Grmima Pi open house. 




-■Xiidtbci- cif ^ronnioutli's sliinins lialit,'; is going over-seas soon. In tin's case 
she is Miss l.yn Smilli and lier destination is Alexandria. I'.oypt. Miss Sniitli 
received an aii|i(iintment to teach school in (lie .Scliuol fur .Xniercan Missionary 
Children at .\kxandria. l.yn will sail in .\u.mist and she will he .i^onc for three 
years. Thnngh she will he far fnnn home, still she will have Monnionth com- 
liany, as Miss .lane Finney, a fnrmer .Monnionth student, is teachin,t; at the same 
school. Monmnnlh inflnence is felt in many far aw.ay conntries across the seas. 
A large innnher of gradnates have taken positions in the foreign lands. 



I,\\ SMITH 



Page One Hundred Eighty-eight 



miD-UU€ST CHflmPS 




A familiar siglit uu tlu- MnnniMiuli cani|iu>, Ii iih mi and c.jT 'Jr- tiiiiiis 
C(m^l^, i^ tliu (hut <<i l!ill> Miirrax and I'ani /aKuvkmi -^ki. 1 t-tti-r knnun 
til nuiiiliLTS iii tlic .\l'>niniinlli student liiid\' as "jMck" and "Zac." '\k'^k 
nanu'S are iistially assuciatcd willi llu-ir ace. .ni]ili-.linuiiis en tliL- linnis cmrt. 
which hist year carried Munmiiiitirs ccihirs tii tennis fame l)y ciipl in ii:'^ tile 
donlile. cups in holh the Illinois Cnihi^e Cnnference. .>n the Knox College 
Courts in daleshur.y. and the Midwest Conference un the Lawrence College 
courts in Apiilelou. Wisconsin. 

The "long" and "short" of the Scot's net duct are this -pring again 
smashing awa\ in search of grealer tennis fame, furthering the name of 
.Monniouth on many dist.nit courts and also at home. 

With the graduation of Zac in Jnne, this .amicahle tennis pair will lie 
liroken up btit their accomplishments will not he forgotten for many years 
to come. 



rHurray and Zac 



The Rev. Will ()rr liecame the idol of the Campus 
last Fehruary during the annual Religious Etnphasis Week. 
As a matter of explanation, this week is devoted mainly to 
the religious and spiritual needs of thestudent body. Rev. 
Orr, at that time pastor of the Beaver Falls Church, just 
out of Pittsburgh conducted these meetings. 

His schedule for each day of the week was replete to 
the finest detail. He spoke in Chapel and each evening 
at the Campus Christian Association meetings. His after- 
noons were filled with student conferences as were several 
of his mornings. .And to climax his stay at Monmouth, he 
spoke at \'espers and a banc|uet the following iiigbf. 

Rev. Orr's topics were quite diversified, but ihey in- 
cluded talks and discussions cm the home, family, and 
personal relationship with God. Mr. Orr proved to be a 
very engaging speaker. He had a delicious sense of humor. 
He dramatized several of the Biblical illustrations which 
he used with marked success. But his talks witc more 
than just entertaining — they affected the spiritual iivcs of 
the student body, raising the students to new levels of 
Christian experiences. 

This special week is under the auspices of the N'. M. 
C. A. and the ^■. W. C. .\. Such an occasion marks the 
highlight in the varied program of these two organizations. 
Needless to say, this year's Religious Emjihasis Week was 
most successful in accomplishin.g its pur]iose. The stu- 
dents accepted Mr. Orr w hcde-heartedly ami he g.i\e to 
Monmouth a new set of Christian experiences which will 
help to tide one over as we look forward to another Re- 
ligious Emphasis Week. 



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Page One Hundred Eiehty-nii 



A I 





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Miss Betty Riiliino was clinscn this year as tlic caii- 
ilidate for Queen of the Drake Relays, held each year in 
Des Aloines. Iowa, she heing chosen by the popular vote 
of the student body. Six candidates were chosen by the 
committee in char.ee and from these the Monmouth Queen 
was picked. 

Some 2S0 wnmcn were entered in the contest from the 
many schools represented with a team at the events. From 
this list, the three judges cut the total number of con- 
testants to 25 young women, one of whom would reign 
over the two days' activities at the 30th Annual Drake 
Relays. Miss Rubino survived the first elimination pro- 
cess and went into the final race. However, when the 
last vote was taken, it was found that a young lady from 
the University of Missouri placeil high among the con- 
testants. 

The Quenn was chosen upon four merits: Intelli- 
gence, Activities, Beauty and Poise, one who was really a 
stately woman worthy of being called a Queen. Of these 
four points, the Scots' representative possesed all. having 
a long list of activities to show for Iter four years of col- 
lege life and having completed her higher educatio!! course 
with nearly a perfect record. Final statistics from the 
offices of the registrar showed that Betty had attained a 
3.879 average out of a [lossible 4. average for her four 
years of school. She is affiliated with the Kappa Delta 
sorority. 

This was the first year that Monmouth has lieen rep- 
resented with a candidate for Queen of tlie Relays, hi^wever, 
having been eligible for a contestant in past years when a 
Monmouth track team was entered in the events. It is the 
hope of all that Monmouth will berepresented at every 
relav in the future. 




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Cleone Barnes 



Paru One Hundred Ninety 



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Mention is certainly ilcscrvins 1)_\- tlie five AFon- 
mouth co-eds who were chosen as candi(hiles in tlie 
Drake Relay Queen Contest held on the camims earU 
in April. As there can he only one winner in a con- 
test the five remaininij' from the six starters receive 
only the honors of Ikh 111:4 hem niiiiierN-ii|i. 

Three Senior ami two Junior women are listed 
among these entries: Misses Isahel BoUman, Rose- 
mary Field. Doris Hatch. .lean Surratt and Mr.ry Tag- 
gart. They all were qnalified as possible candidates for 
Monmouth's representative for Queen of the Relays. 

Miss BoIInian. a senior, has been very active on the 
campus throughout her four years, her greatest inter- 
est being in the music department. She has had many 
leading roles in musical festivities, besides taking active 
parts in many other extra-cnrricular events ofl'ercd at 

To Miss Rosemary Field goes the praise of high 
scholarship and much extra-curricular work in her col- 
lege life. During her senior year she acted as secre- 
tary of the student body, besides having an active pari 
in her sorority. Kappa Kajipa (iamma. 

The two junior contestants, Misses Doris Hatch and 
Jean Surratt. rated very high in the count of votes from 
the student body. Each has been very active in school 
work and they have been entered in many outside 
activities. Miss Hatch is a member of I'i lUta i'lii. and 
Alpha Xi Delta claims Miss Surratt. 

And last, but not least, comes the third senior. Miss 
A'lary Taggart. Mary took an active part in campus 
activities throughout her four years at A'lonmouth. and 
was certaiidv well deserving of credit as one of the 
candidates. Miss Taggart also calls llie Alpha Xi Del- 
ta her sororit\-. 



READ 

the 

ORACLE 



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Scots Weekly Newspaper 




ISABELLE BOLLMAX ROSEMARY FIELD 

DORIS HATCH 
JEAX SURRATT MARY TAGGART 



Dick Cheverton 



William Pine 



HOTEL PARKSIDE Kewanee, Illinois 



HOTEL BROADVIEW 

"Visit the Steeplechase Grill" 
Galesburg, Illinois 



Quincy, Illinois HOTEL NEWCOMB 



TaKc One Humlrcd Nincty-o 




A new whistle — i t "'I'Ik- v'^pirit nf '39." 

B(jnfire at tlie lii,::;- donn — two 1'. M. T.iiys' l\iflc medals presented. 
3. Senioi" speech recitals heyin. W in tennis match with Knnx. 
3. l-^■()^^h .iL^iilt xiiiail defeats varsit}'. lleta Kappa formal. 

.Miither\ 1 )av \'esper>. I'liDflicial picnic da\-. ()cti>pns roasts .-teak'S. 

8. lleginning" of ciimprehensi\e e.xams — poor seniors. Kno.wille (piartet. 

9. Scholarship Dav. Sigma ( )micron .Mu taps three. 
Sigma Tau Delta guest hamiiiei. "Mail to the cherrx'" — Teke serenatle. 
W. .\. .\. Tea dance, l.a-t \'. W. meeting of the year. 
I'dection of Ala}- (Jneen and L'hancellor. l^hi Kap. formal Senior tea. 
Teke part\' at countr\- chih. 

lb. Music Dept. present spring concert featuring, orchestra, hand, choir. 

19. May Fete — featuring liolidays. \'an Gundy part}-. 

20. Kappa Delta Garden Part\-. 

24. Tennis match — Knox. .Vll-^chool picnic. Song festi\-al. 
29. Riggs-Peterson Recital. Tomorrow exams hegin ! 



1. Dr. Grier's receptii n for the seniors. 

2. Oh, to he a scni(.r, and ha\ e 1'., and get out of finals! 

3. Crimson Masque repeat> "Mr^, Ahionlight" as commencement plav. 

4. Baccalaureate Sermon. 

5. Alumni Day. Gla^-s reunions. Alumni han(|uet. 

6. Connnencement Day — I'rocession forms. — Diplomas are given. — Tear' 
are shed — and the day is o\ er. Goodbye e\ erybody. — We hope tr 
see yciU next }-ear. Bon vo}-age, Senior.s. 




Uuiuli-,.,l NiTR'ty-lv 




N 



L4< 



T. K. E. FORMAL 
Al])h;i I'.psiliin cha|)ter nf Tau Ka|)pa F.p- 
silon iipcncd the fonnal part\- scasmi \\illi a din- 
ner fiirnial l''ri(la\" (.■\cnini4', Xi i\enil)cr iS. ai 
I law Click's anil the I'.Iks C'lnl). The deci irati<in>- 
wcrc in the ti-alernil\- culurs, cherr\' and ,L;ra\-. 
Ldiarles l'>rinkle\' and his nrchastra turnislied 
spleniHd nuisic, Imth fast and slow. I lis redi- 
lion of ciille,t;x- snn.ys fdlowed hy "Hail. Hail, 
the Gang's All Here." was popular during the 
evening. The conimiUee in charge was cmnpnsed 
iif \\'illiani nines, Ralph h'airnian. James Manor. 
Richard Mm id\-, and Jii>eph .Mi inlg(inier\-. C'hap- 
erones \\ere Mr. and Mrs. Heinm Ro\;i, Mr. and 
Mrs. Richard I'etrie and Mr. and Mrs. 11. A. 
Peterson. 

PI Pl'.T.V IMII DL\Nh;R IXWCl-: 
The annual "Twelfth Night" dinner d.ance 
of Illinois .Mplia chapter (if Pi P>eta Phi was held 
December 2. The dinner was held in the Illne 
and Gold room of Ilawcock's Cafe. The tra<li- 
tional "idnm pudding" was ser\ed. Dancing wa'- 
enjoyed at the h'lks GInh. Decorations weri. \er\- 
effecti\e with the lights coxered with white drunT; 
with "Pi Pieta Phi" printed on them. Tln' white 
orchestra background liore the lighted arrow. 
Roger Graham's orchestra furnished the music. 
Guests were: Mr. and Mrs. Robert WoH, and 
Mr. and Mrs. L. W'. Turner. Members of the 
committee were Jean Malle}' and Marian Kaiser. 

TAU PI TEA 
Freshman and new upper class girls were 
entertained by Tau Pi at a tea held in the Fine 
Arts Building, Tuesday, No\ember 30. from 
4:30 until 5:30 o'clock. Mrs. Grier, and. Miss 
E. Gibson, Miss Donald and Mrs. Soule were 
present. Jeannette Farwell ga\e a short talk ex- 
plaining Tau Pi and the Tau Pi cup to the new- 
girls. 

K.\PP.\ GHRISTM.VS P.\inA' 
Alpha chapter of Kappa Kappa Gamma en- 
tertained four young guests at the annual Christ- 
mas party held at Ilawcock's, December '3. A 
short program lollowed the dinner, and gifts were 
presenteil to the guests. Jane MclNIillan, Rose- 
mary P'ield, Donna :\nn Schantz, and Petbanv 
Evers were in charge. 



APPH.\ XI DIH.T.V l'( )R.M.\1. 
Delta I'.psilon u\ .\lpha Xi Delt.a hel.l its 
Chri>tmas formal v^;iturda\- evening. December 

10, at the Parichial School. The Christmas theme 
was carried out in the |-ed ;md white f.aPe ceiling, 
the four li.ghted Christmas trees in the corners, 
the red wreaths in the windows, and the I'endi- 
tion of "Jingle liells" ])\' the orche-ti-a. Ralph 
Hall and his orchestra furnished the mu-ic. The 
chaperiiues were: Dr. ;ind .Miv-.. S. .M . Thomp- 
son, Mr. .and .Mr-. W. .M . Rei.l. Dr. and .Mrs. 

11. R. Ileveridge, and .Mr. ;md .Mr>. C. C. Wood- 
ward. .Members ot the committee in charge of 
.arrangements were W\\\ llnrkholder, chairm.ai!: 
Margaret Eismin.ger, Ro.-,emar\- l';itterson and 
r)e\erl\- Olson. 

KAPP.V DlH/iW D.XXCl". 

Peta Gamma chapter of Kapp.a Delta held 
its fall lormal dance on Satmala\- night, Decem- 
ber 3, at the Colonial Hotel. I'.right colors ]ire- 
^ ailed in the "carni\al" theme of decoration- — 
in the false ceiling id' crepe p:iper and baboons, 
and in the wall decoration- id' clown faci'- and 
huge cellophane bows. Roger Gr.ah.am a.nd his 
orchestra turnislied the music. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thoni.a- ILamilton and Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert .Vrmstrong were the ch.aperones 
I'hristel Gleich w,as the chairm.an of the commit- 
tee in charge and was assisted by Pettx' Rubino, 
Adeline Knepp, and Marilouise Stice. 

PI PHI COOKIE SHINE 
Illinois Alpha chapter of l^i Peta Phi held 
their Christmas Cookie Shine IX'Cember 15. At 
the home i.d' i\Irs. l\or\- ljuinb\-, an interesting 
Christmas program was presented after which a 
,grab bag was held. The committee in charge of 
arrangements consisteil of l{\elvn I'rederick, 
Doris ITatch and Marilyn Tiffanw 

SUXX^"S1D1■. OPl-.X IIOL'SE 
Sunn\-ide sponsored ( )pen House on Sat- 
urday, December 3, at Wallace Hall. It was a 
"Sweater Swing." Constance Chatten .and Mar- 
jorie Stormont san.g "Re\erie," and "This Mav 
Pe The Night." The decorations consisted of 
silhouettes on the xvalls. .\ special feature was 
the iiennant ilance. Plarriet McCord was mistress 
ni ceremonies. 



Page One Hundred Ninety-thr 



t ♦If^is* 




41 




CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

1940 RAVELINGS 



;:asiM;a£jS5i5ss)Saiai[aaa[aaissj:^^was!i:M,iEaaagiLKisasiaiiiisiiaii!siigiia 



An Eastman Kodak and Supplies 

were used 

Throughout this Book 



L. T. HALL & SONS 



FORD »^» LINCOLN 

MERCURY Authorized Dealer ZEPHYR 

Monmouth, Illinois 



To the CLASS of '40 
we extend our 

COnORflTULflTIOnS 

for this fine yearbook 

TH€ RflV€LinGS 

i"i"^i«ji-'j><jKi>tiajK:i«L><;LK:ia,i«:ia.iK:feiK:L«i: 

MONMOUTH 
Daily Review-Atlas 



COVERS 

For this Book 
were manufactured by 

S. K. SMITH CO. 

Chicago, Illinois 

"MOLLAY MADE" 



NEWHOUSE 

PAPER 

COMPANY 



Paso Oiu- HuikU-uJ Ninety-four 




lias iiflary 31amrs 



iloumoitth. SUinotB 



Page One Hundred Ninety-five 




JAHN & OLLIER ENGRAVING CO 

817 West Washlnston Blvd.. Chicago, III. - Telephone MONroe 7080 

Comm«rci>l Artists, Photographers and Makors of Fins Priniing Platss for Blacit and Coloi 






PaKe One Hundred Ninety-: 



THE 

COMMERCIAL ART 
PRESS 

has PRINTED the 

RAVELINGS 

Twenty- Seven Times 

In T>veiity-Eiglit Years 




Page One Hundred Ninety-: 



DOCTOR'S DIRECTORY 



PHYSICIANS 



DR. CHARLES P. BLAIR 

Office 

Broadway and First 

Telephone 

Office 102 845 Residence 



DR. W. A. FRYMIRE 

Office 
312 E. Archer Avenue 

Telephone 
Office 551 Residence 



: ,k; )t |« .« K j; ,j: k ,;£ j: iji 



nany, n nMi 



DR. H. GLENN EBERSOLE 

Office 

Illinois Bankers Life Building 

Telephone 

Office 23 940 Residence 



DR. RALPH GRAHAM 

Office 

National Bank Building 

Telephone 

Office 1280 184 Residence 

HBlKlllglgliaigK'aK, 



DR. J. L. SHERRICK 

Office 

317 E. Broadway 

Telephone 

Office 51 Residence 



SPECIALISTS 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 



DR. E. A. FETHERSTON 

Office 

Lahl Building 

Telephone 

Office 26 4850 Residence 



DR. F. C. WINTERS 

Office 

Lahl Building 

Telephone 

Office 871 2871 Residence 



OSTEOPATH 

DR. J. D. DEVLIN 

Office 

Lahl Building 

Telephone 

Office 29 Residence 



raire One Hnnclied Ninuty-eiu'ht 



PiiKe One Hwnclreil Niiiely-six 



RDV€RTI$€R*S DIR€CTORy 



\n(kTS(>n's nru^' Sti)rc 1 5__| 

'>anu'> UriithL-rs iHj 

Icrii & Dines 194 

Uair, Charles I'., A[. D 198 

lowman llrDtlicrs Sh< le Store 151 

Sroach-iew lintel 191 

in iudwax' Sliiie Repair Shi)|) icS6 

Irown l.Mich Scntt C"iini|)an\- 184 

Carter's PharmacA- T 50 

'olonial Motel T51 

'oiiimercial Art Press. Printers 197 

"ol wells Department Store 163 

"u(l(l Di-\ Cleaners 189 

'm't 1 )a\'s (irocer\' 14- 

^aih' l\e\ ie\\-.\tlas 194 

)evlin, j. D., 1). 198 

^illenl)au,i;"li Luniher (S; Coal Co 149 

{hersole, II. Glenn. M. 1) 19S 

'Vtherston, IC. .\.. Al. I) 198 

Friwler & Shaw, Grocers 156 

Frvniire. William A.. Al. D 198 

Gr.ah.'im T.ailor 157 

Graham. Rjili-h. Al. D 198 

1,. T. Hall \- Sons i9_l 

1 lawcock's (."life 159 

Mays & h'astman, Plnmhers 151 

Mewitts Flowei- Shop ic^j 

Home Ci,<.;ar Conip:in\- 151 

Motel Monmouth 154 

Mutchins Printers 146 

Tlliniiis Hankers l.ife -\ssnr;ince Co. . . . i6j 

Indnstrial L'liemical Conip:in\- 186 

Jahn & Oilier, luigraAcrs 196 



Kno.wille Alining' C'iim|i;ni\' 

Larson Furniture Al;irt 

l.on.g's Studio 

Fu.g-.i;-& MoUiday 

AlcCo}- Insin-ance -\.t;ency 

ArcCullou.i;h Lumber Com])an\- .... 

Mc'iple City r):iii-\- 

Alaple City Floral Shop 

Alonniouth Colle.ye 

Alonniouth Collei^e 

Alonniouth Dair\- Products 

Momiiouth Homestead iK: Loan .\ssn. 

Alurdock Shoe Store 

Xanc\- (iraham 

\ewhou>e Paper Coni]i;Ln\- 

.\orris ()rrice l"'.(|uipment 

O. K. C'leaners ,and Faimdr\- 

Oracle 

Pill.sburv Cloihin-- Co 

Pratt's Cafe 

l\i\oli ;ind Piijou Theatres 

ll.irrx- Sh.ipiro, Cloihier 

Sherrick, J. P.. Al. D 

S. 1\. Smith Comp;in\- 

Slr.and ll.akin,!^' Coni])an\- 

'rorle\' Mardware Conipan\- 

Turnhull I'uneral 1 hmie 

\\ extern .\ulo Su|ipl\- vStore 

W estern Stonew.are C'onipanA" 

\\ hile I'urnilnre C'onip;in\' 

Glenn Wilson, F'weler 

Winters, F. C, Al. D 

Wirtz Book Store 



Page One Hundred Ninety-ni: 



S T U D € n T 




Abbey. R.— 52, 76 
Abies. L.— 56 
Adair. M. — 56 
Adams, F.— 52 
Alexander, J. — 5G 
Alexander, W.— 56 
AlmaKuer, J, — 42 
Altobelli, L. 56 
Anderson, C— 12, 76 
Anderson, D.— 30 
Appenheimer. B. — 56 
Armstrong, L. — 56 
Armstrong, M. — 52, 76 
Arthur, W.— 56, 84 
Austin, K.— 56, 76 

Bach, I.— 52 
Bader. W.— 56 
Baker, F.— 30 
Baker. W.— 52, 84, 98, 102 
Barbour, W.— 56, 76 
Bartlinpc, M.— 52, 80 
Barkman. B.— 56, 84 
Barnes. C— 42, 82. 108 
Barnes. M.— 52, 78 
Bassler, C— 42 
Bastain, C.—R6, 86 
Beach, S.— 56, 80 
Beal, M.— 30, 74 
Bear. L.— 52. 76 
Beattie. E.— 30. 74 
Beck. R.— 56. 78 
Beckett, V.— 52, 86 
Bellis, L.— 30. 84. 110 
Bersted. G.— 56 
BeveridEe. T.— 30 
Birbari. E.— 42. 74. 108 
Birditt, F.— 56 
Black, R.— 52 
Blair, R.— 30, 86 
Blair, D.— 56 



ri, J. 



F.— 56 

Bollman, I.— 30. 118. ISl 
Bolon. B.— 31. 73, 84. 101. 119 
Bond. H.— 56, 82 
Borcherding, J. — 52 
Borremans, A. — 56 
Borthwick. A.— 56 
Bouxsein. P.— 56. 84 
Bowman. R. — 56. 84 
Boyle, N.— 52 
Brainard, I. — 31, 80 
Brannan. D.— 42 
Brinpman. B. — 56 
Brittain. J.— 42 
Brown, A.— 56. 86 
Brown. H.— 52. 74 
Brown, M. — 31 
Brown, V. — 56 
Brown, R.— 56, 86 
Brownell. F. — 42. 86 
Brownell. J.— 56, 80 
Buchanan. H. L.— 42. 108 
Buhler. A.^56 
Burgess. M.— 42, 80. 108 
Burkholtler. B.— 31. 74 
Butler. W.— 56 
Hyrn. R.— 31. 84. 96 

Caldwell. R.— 43 
Calhoun, W.— 56 
Caliendo. P.— 5« 
Calmer, E. -5S, 74 
Camp. M.— 52 
Campbell, C— 43, 86 
Campbell. E.— 56. 82 
Campbell. H.- 56, 78 
Campbell. M. J.— 43, 108 
Campbell, M.— 52, 80 
Campbell, T.— 31, 69, 86 
Cannell. C— 66 
Caputo. F.— 52. 76 
Carrier, M.— 56 
Carrier, R.— 56 



Carwile, E.— 52, 76 
Chalmers. D.— 52, 82 
Chambers. R.— 43, 108 
Chambers, T.— 56, 76 
Chapman, M.— 52, 80 
Chatten, C— 56, 82 
Cheverton, R. — 31 
Lhikaseuye, C— 43, 86 
Christensen, Cj. — 52, 76 
Clark, T,— 52 
Clay, L.— 56 
Clayberg, L>.— 52, 86 
Cleland, R.— 52. 76. 97 
Coleman. F. — 56 
Conkling, L. — 56 
Cook, R.— 56 
Coulter. C— 43 
Cowden. M. — 52. 74 
Craig. W.— 52 
Crow, E.— 52 
Cummins. L.— 56, 80 
Cunningham, P.— 66 
Cuno, E.— 56 

Davey, W.— 31, 73, 86 
Davis. L.— 52. 80 
Dawson. C— 52, 84 
Dean, A.— 32 
Delahout, R.— 56 
Demus, C— 43 
Deuth, R.— 66 
DeVore, D.— 56 
Difenbaugh, M. F.— 56, 80 
Dines, W.— 2. 43. 50. 86 
Dobler, B.— 61, 51, 69, 86 
Dodge, E." 43, 82 
Doupuik, J. — 56 
Douthett. R.— 56. 76 
Doyle, v.— 49 
Duclon. D.— 56 
Duncan. J. —52. 80 



Eastman. C. — 56 
Edwards. F.— 56 
Etaw. L.— 52 
Ehringer. A.— 52 
Eisminger, M, J. — 52, 74 
Elder. W.— 52, 86 
Elliott, M.— 66, 80 
Emons, D.— 56, 84 
Emstrom, F.— 52, 74 
Erskine, M.— 52, 78 
Evers, B.--52. 80 
Eyler. R.— 43, 76 

Fairman, R.— 32, 69, 86 



-56 



Farwell. J. -32. 73. 80, 118 

Faussett. L— .44 

Fein. E. C.--56 

Fenner. M. — 44 

Ferguson. C— 56. 76 

Fernald. J.— 32 

Fernald, M.— 56 

Fidler. J.— 56, 84 

Field. M.— 56, 80 

Field. R.— 32. 80. 191 

Fink. R.— 52 

Fink, W.— 32 

Finlay, R.— 56, 78 

Finlayson, R.— 56 

Finn, D.— 32, 86, 119 

Finney. J.— 56 

Fleming. B.— 56 

Flesher, R.— 56 

Forbriger, C— 52. 69. 86— 

Forbriger. R.— 66 

Forsyth, R.- 56 

Foster, F.— 32. 76. 119 

Frantz. H. -56. 76 

Fraser. J.— 56 

Fraser. M.— 33 

Frazier. M.— 56, 82 

Frederick, E.— 33. 82 

Frizzell. L.— 52. 74 

Fuller. D.— 62 

Fulton. E.~33 

Fulton. F.— 56 

Calloway. J.— 56 
Gardner. D.— 44. 76. 96 
Garland, M.— 52 
Garrett. G.— 56 
Giannone. M. — 52 
Gibb. D.— 52 
Gill. R.— 33. 73, 76 
Gillham, M.— 33, 78, 118 
Ginther. F.— 56 
Gleich. C— 44, 78 
Glenn. R.— 44. 80 



Graham. R.— 56. 76 
Green. D.— 56. 86 
Gribben. R.— 56 
Grier, A.— 52, 80 
Griffith, R.— 56 
Griffith, H.— 40, 80 
r. R.— 52. 7( 
M.— 44. 



Hamilton. R.— 62. 78 
Hamilton, W.— 44 
Hand. F.— 33. 73. 82. 118 
Hanford. B.— 56. 74 
Harney. J. — 52 
Harrington. N.— 33 
Harris. R.— 52 
Harris. V.— 56 
Hatch, D.— 44, 82 
Heaton, C— 44, 84 
Henderson, R.— 52 
Henry, D.— 56 
Hewitt, W.— 56. 84 
Hill. J. C— 56 
Hill. J. J.— 56 
Hill, M.— 66, 78 
Hinshaw, H.— 44. 82. 108 
Hoke. L.— 33 
Holm. W.— 52. 76. 102 
Holtsehlag, R.— 56 
Houfburg. C— 56 
Howison. E.— 66 
Hoyt, H.— 56, 86 
Hoyman, S.— 52 
Huey, F.— 52, 78 
Huston, R.— 56. 86 
Hutchinson. M.— 45. 73. 8 

Irey, J.— 52 
Irwin, R.— 56 

Jackson, G.— 45, 76 
Jacobs, D. — 52 
Jacobs. L. — 34 
James, P.- 34. 76 
James. M. — 52, 80 

H.— 41, 45, 102 

J.— 52 
Jared, M.— 56. 82 
Jean. H.— 52 
Jenny. M,— 34. 74 
Jewell. M. — 52 
Johnson. B. A.— 52. SO 
Johnson. B. M.— 52 
Johnson. J.— 56. 80 
.Johnson, Rex — 56 
Johnson. R.— 52 
Johnston, B.— 34. 76 
Johnston. R.— 46. 73. 78 
Jones. A.— 52. 80 
Jones. E.— 45. 78 

Kaiser. M.— 52, 82 
Kalivoda. F.— 62 
Karsten. L.— 56 
Kauzlarich. O.— 52. 84, 97 
Kauzlarish. J.— 56. 84 
Kelly. M.— 56. 74 
Kenan. A.— 52, 82 
Kettering, L.— 56 
Kingsbury. R.— 52 
Kirkpatrick. R.— 66 
Knauer. T.— 66. 84 
Kramer. K.— 56 
Knepp. A. — 45. 78 
Kritzer. J.— 56. 84 
Kryzanowsky. D. — 62 
Kuntz. H.— 52. 74 
Kyle. G.— 52 



Lauvev. J.— 66 

Lawrence. D.— 34. 76. 95 

Lawrence. V.— 52. 82 

Ledlie. M.— 34. 78 

Leighty. M.— 56 

Leonard, L.— 45 

Leonard. M.— 50 

Leslie, W.— 46 

I.eSuer. W.— 56 

Lidstrom, H.— 49. 73. 86. 95 

Lindahl. R.— 56 

Lindel. F.— 52 

Lindsay. I..— 52. 78 

Lindsay. W. — 52 

Lipton. P. — 57 

Litzenberger, R. — 52 

Long. A, — 57 

Looser. M.— 34 

Lovegren, R.— 67. 84 

Lucas. J.- -57. 76 

Lucas. R.— 41. 45. 78. 108 

Lundquist. J. — 55. 57, SO 



Page Two Hundred 



DIReCTORY 



Lusk, J.— 34, 91 
Lyford, M.— 34 
Lytle. N.— 57 

MacDonaltl. S.— 36. 84 
MacManus, C— 57, 78 
McAtce, C— 53 
McClellan, F.— 45 
McClelland, L.— 57. 76 
McClelland, R.— 49 
McClelland, S.— 67 
McClintcn, L.— 51, 63 
McConnell, R.— 57, 76 
McCulloch, I..~35. ill, Ifi!! 
McCulloch, M.— 36, 78 
McDaniel, R.— 53 
McDonald, J. --53, 81! 
McGaan, E.— 63 
KcGann, E.— 53 
McHard, H.— 67 
Mcllwraith, M. 63 
Mclndoo, W.— 57 
Mclntyre, J.— 35. 78 
McKelvie, M.— 53 
McKinley, B.— 35. 74 
Mel.auKhlin. M.— 57 
McMahon. J.— 57 
McMaster, W.— 57 
McMillan. J.— 46. 80. 108 
McMillan, P.— 57. 80 
McRoberts. H.— 57. 84 

Mailler, R.— 46. 86 
Malley. J.— 63. 82 
Mannen. D.~4!1. 848. Hl\ 
Mammen. H. — 27. 35. 76 
Manor. J.— 46. 86 
Marsh, H.— 63 
Martens, M.— 57. 78 
Martin. A.— 57. 84 
Martin. Joan— .';3. 80 
Martin. John- 36. 174 
Martin. W.— 46. 76 
Martin. W. O.— 57. 84 
Maxwell, J.— 57 
Mayo, R.— 57, 86 
Mekemsen, S.— 57 



W. 



Miller. R.— 67 

Miller. W.— 53 

Millican. B.— 57 

Missavace. J. — 57. 84 

Moffet. R.— 63. 73. 82 

MontKomery. J.— 53. f6 

Moody. G. A.— 57. f6 

Moody. R.— 27. 36 86. If)'. 3 

Morrison. J.— 57. 80 

Munn. J.— 53. 86 

Munson, E. — 46 

Murphy. M. — 36. I".. 78, 118 

Murray, W.— 46, 86 

Neil. F.— 46, 76 
Neill, C— 46. 76 
Nelson, Lh.— 6.3, 84. fiS 
Nelson, T.e. — ^i. P4. 08 
Nelson. M.— 67. 82 
Ncsbitt. H.— 57 
Netzbandt. W.— 57 
Newman. L.— 36 
Nicholls. R.— 57 
Nicol. W.— 53. 60. 76. OS 
Normoylp. W.— 67. 84 
Norris. B.— 36 
Norris, R.— 46. 74 
Nowotny, R. — 57 

Oakbers. E.— 46 
Ohata, C. — '6 
Olson, B.— 57. 74 



Park. D. — 36 
Parker. H.— 63 
Parr. H. — 36. 73. 84. 
Parrish, J.— 53. 74 
Paschen, R.— 53. 84 
Patchin. J.— 36. 80 
Patterson, K. — 37. Pf 
Patterson. M.— 4fl. 7; 
Patterson. P.— 53 
Payne, L.— 53 
Peterson. D.— 47. 74 
Picken, J.— 37 
Pierson. M.— 47 4 
Pine. W.— 37 
Pitman. B. — 57 
Plunkett. D.— 40. 86. 
PoKue, R.— 57 
Porter. I.— 53. 78 



02, flfi, 101 



Porter, J.— 57 

Powell. Ray. 53. 84 

Powell. Ruth 57. 7 

PrUKh. W. 53. 86 



84 



tjuade, G.- 37, 74 

Raiiuzzi, J.- 57 
Rathbun, H. 67. 80 
Rathfelder. M.- 53 
Rawson. R.- 65. 57. 84 
Reese, D. — 47 
Reeve. H.— 47, 80 
Reid, P.— 57. 78 
Reinstein. E. 53. 84. 08 
Renner, D.— 47 
Reynolds. G.- 57. 84 
Reynolds, W. 55, 57, 
Rhaodes, A. — 53 
Richey. T.- 57 
Ricketts. N.— 57 
Robinson. D.--53. 78 
RoKers. H.— 57. 76 
Rocrers. M.--53. 78 
Ross. D.— 37. 84 
Rowley, M. 63. 78 
Royer, H.— 67 
Rubino. B.- 37. 78. 1 
Ruess. L.— 57. 82 
Ruff. R.— 57. 86 
Rupp, 51. 53. 76. 07 
Russell. C- 37. 40. 7f 
Russell. D.— 47 
Russell, E.--57 
Ryan, D.— 37 
Ryan. J.~-57. 76 



Sandberc. W.— 
Sanders. J. — 47 
Sapp. R.— 53. 85. 0' 
SavaEe. T.— 56, 57 
Scapecchi, R. — 63. f 
Schantz. D.— 63. SO 
Schlaretzki. E.— 53 
Schleich. H. -57. 82 
Schleper. C. 57. 84 
Schmidt. W.-53 If 
Schneider. H. — 57 
Schrei. E.— 57 
Schumacher. M. 57 
Seaton. H. — 57 
Selip. E.— 57. 78 
Shatenberc. K.-53. 
.Shank. K.- 53 
Sharp. I,.— 38 
Sharpe. R.--57 
Sheldon. V.- 57 
Sheridan. R.— 57. f 
Sherman. E. -53. 7f 
Shinn. R.— 57 
Shrode. P.— 53 
Shullow. B.— 57 
Shullow. J.— 57 
Shults. B.— 67. 76 
Sieber. U.— 53. 78 



86 



Simpson, F. — 51. 



84 



Sii 

Skinner. Ce 
Skinner. Cs.— 38. 60. 7 
Skinner. E.— 53 
Skonberc. G.--57. 84 
Smith. B.--53. 82 
Smith, D.— 57 
Smith, E.— 38. 78 
Smith, H.— 38 
.Smith. Hv.— 2. 41. 48. ' 
Smith, S.— 57. 76 
Smutz. H.— 53 
Snow. A.— 57. 78 
Sorrentino. O. — 53 
Speer. L.— 48. 80, 108 
Sprout, G.— 53 
Stephens. P.— 57. 78 
Sternberp. F.— 53 
Stevenson. J. — 57 
Stewart. C— 57. 76 
Stewart. H.— 57. 82 
Stewart. M.- 



Stii 



M.— 53. 78 



Stoops. 

Stormont. M.— 67. 80 

Stripe. H.— 57 

Stults. M.— 57. 82 

Suiter. H.— 57. 82 

Surratt. J.— 48. 73. 74. 108 

Swanson. R.— 53. 69. 84 




Titfanj 


, M.— 5 


7, 8 


Tiiipett 


J. -48 




Tiipton. 


J. 53, 


82 


Torley, 


D.-57, 


84 


Torley, 


R.— 38. 


86 


Torley, 


W.~57 




Torran 


ce, W.- 


48. 


TreptoN 


V, C— 5 


7. 


Tresha 


n. W.— 


53. 


Triik, 


C.-67 




Trottei 


R.— 5- 




Turek. 


W.— 57 


84 


Turnbu 


11. J.— J 


8. 


Turnbull, T. 


3 


Tuttle, 


J.~53, 


78 


UKland 


, L.— 5 




Urban, 


R.— 57 




Urban, 


A. —57 





Vancil. E.— 53. 84 
Van Eaton. P.— 53 
Van Tuyl, W.— 57, 76 
Vest, J.— 40. 101 
Vest, Jn.— 41. 48, 76 
Vickers, S.— 27, 38, 73, 7 
Vipond, J.— 48, 06, 184 
VoKcI, D.— 53 

Waddell, H.— 49 
Wacner, B.— 57 
Walker, 0.-53, 74 
Walker. P.— 38 
Walker. W.— 57. 84 
Wallace. M.— 39 
Wallcn. F. 49. 84. 06 
Walworth. B.— 53 
Walworth, M.-57 
Walworth. W.— 30 
Walzer. I. -53. 74 
Warner. J.— 57. 80 
Watson, M.— 57, 84 
Watson, P.— 40 
Weeprar. A. — 53. 76 
Welfin, D.--53 
Weshinskev. F.— 57. 84 
Wharton. H.— .10. 74. 118 
Whartcn. J.— 57 
White. E.— 40 
White. J.— 57. 84 
Whitehill. C— 53 
Widney. B.— 57 
Wilcox. M.— 67, 80 
Wiley, R. -39, 82 
Williams, E.— 53 
Williams, L.— 40. 05 
Willson. P.— 40 
Wilson, C— 30. 78 
Wilson. C. R.— 57 
Wilson. G.— 57, 78 
Wilson, F.— 40. 76. 102 
Wilson. W.— 49 
Winbicler. J.— 57. 82 
WinbiKler, M.— 40. 82 
Winbicler. R.— 53. 76 
Woods, J.— 57 
Woolley. P.— 53 
Work. M.— 57. 80 
Wyatt, F.— 67. 74. 131 
Wylder. J.— 57, 86 



Zajaczkowski, P.— 39, 119 
Zeicler, G.— 39 
Zieike, H.— 57 
Zimmerscheid. W.— 53 



Pase Two Hundrerd On 



€DITOR'S LfiST UUORD 



A.sjain the numth of ^Fin- has mlled anamd nn the calendar, and althi)U,i;h this means the ]\Iay 
Fete, fraternitv and S(ir(iit\- sprin.i;- fiTnials. "spiK.ners" on the loose, final examinations staring 
us in the f;iee, anil the many oilier e\ents which lia\e kept us hoi)ping to and fro, it also means an- 
oiher time has come for the annual to he placed in your hands. And to hring this hook to you, it 
h.is meant nearh- a full ^•ear of hard lahor on the part of some lift\- persons, including the staff, 
engi-a\ers, printers and co\er concern. It has taken a large numher of persons a long time to plan 
and .assemhle this hook which mu ha\e perhaps scanned thru l)\- this time. And so, for this, it 
means that 1 ma\- offer a last word of thanks to all. 

First of all. m,i\ 1 offer m\- thanks to the score of students who so gracioush" ga\e me their 
help in making this a ])oi k of memories ; to Fhiw ilv ( )rr, for the heautiful art work whicli took 
man\- hour> to prepare; to Hank Smith who has handled the husiness entl to [jerfection. going well 
o\'er the planned (|Uota for adx'ertising ; and the UKnn- others, hoth from the lunior class and 
memliers of the other three classes who ollered snapshot pictures which ^-ou see on man\- ')f the 
pages.^ 

From J.ihn iv ( )llier came the finest halftones which ha\e filled \-our pages with pictures, also 
ollering the one-and-only "Sully." a super-salesman hailing fr(iii the state of Xehraska. i\lan_\- of 
the page ku-outs were hatched froiu the cerehellum of this inimitahle gentleman. And than.ks also 
to .\1 Gage and F. W. Hill of j. & O. 

To Ken Cooley goes the honor of the cover design, representing the S. K. Smith Co.. makers 
o| Malloy-Made Covers. iM'ed Davis of the Xewhouse Paper Company went through many sam- 
ples to lind the exact type of paper desired for this annual. 

And kist, hut hy no means least, it comes hard to find words to thank the emplo\ees of the 
Commercial Art Press, "llapiiy," "Art," "Charlie" and "\\"eh," not to forget the three women 
who assemhle and gather the pages together, to give you this volume. We had lots of s(|ual)l)Ies 
oyer this and th.at, hut we also have the finished pnxluct to show for our hard lahors. 

This is all — it's keen a lot of work, hut it has heen well worth the time given. 

Here's hoi)ing that you have liked it. And so, Yours for "Best Fver," 

P)!],!, Dl.XKS. 





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