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Full text of "Ravelings"

^Mi- ^^ 





Rave lings 





STUDENT LIFE 



4 • Homecomini 
6 • Greek Week 
8 • Scot Sing 

10 • Springfest 

12 • Commencement 



DRAMA 

17 • Saxophone Alley 

18 • Tartuffe 

20 • Agnes of God 
22 • American Buffalo 
24 • The Skin of Our 
Teeth 



WORTS 







FEATURES 

14 • Have time on' 

you hands? 

Find out what others 

do with theirs. 

28* ... It's 

unidentifiable 

and it happens three times 

aday ... CAFETERIA 

FOOD?? 

30 • MINI 
A summary 
year's evi 



rOD '89 



BASEBALL 
48 • BASKETBALL 

MEN'S 
52 • BASKETBALL 
I WOMEN'S 

54 • CROSS COUNTRY 
56 • FOOTBALL 
60 • SOCCER 
62 • SOFTBALL 
64 • TENNIS MEN'S 

AND WOMEN'S 
66 • TRACK AND FIELD 

MEN'S 
68 • TRACK AND FIELD 

WOMEN'S 
70 • VOLLEYBALL 
72 • WRESTLING 



R 378.05 M752ra 1989 c.3 
The Ravel ings 






Vivienne 

Dipeolu 

editor 

Edward 

Scott 

advisor 



FACES, 
UCES, ETC. 



FACES 

bmen, Sophomores, 
et. d 

Greeks ^ 
Organizatmns^ti. 




The Community Activities Board plays a vital role in student life. Fresli in their 
programming was Springiest, a third term event. Yvonne Howard and LaShawn 
McNulty enjoyed clowning around that day. 



Sonya Myers, Tom Rusk, Gregg Guenther, Kurt Pemberton, John Mueller 
and Brian Swaw try to save Scots Day through incessant prayer. 





Fresh in the fall is sorority rush. Greeks are involved in many 
aspects of student life, as are independents. Participating in rush 
is Tammy Shell and Ann Mader. 

Stude nt Lifel 



Often complaints can be heard that, 
"There is nothing to do around here!" Once 
in awhile someone will retort, "You came 
here to get an education, not to lead a social 
life. " It is true that social things to do are 
limited at a school with less than 650 stu- 
dents, than opposed to say the University of 
Illinois with more than 30,000 students. 
There are, however, recreational and cocur- 
ricular activities that, while they never seem 
to have enough participants, add greatly to 
the student life here at Monmouth College. 
Such opportunities include: the Community 
Activities Board (CAB) — which programs 
campus-wide activities, Intramurals and col- 
legiate sports, departmental clubs such as 
the Monmouth College Geological Society and 
the Computer Club, Special Interest groups 
like Amnesty International, Association of 
Women Students, and the Black Action Af- 
fairs Council, fraternities and sororities, and 
the Student Association — just to name a 
few. Special Events such as Homecoming and 
Scot Sing add spice to the life here on 
campus. So, next time you become bored or 
have nothing to do, get off your butt and get 
involved. After all, there is much to choose 
from, and some combine education with 
"fun. " For those of you who graduated, we 
hope that you did participate in someway 
and in doing so, left a positive, lasting im- 
pression here. 

— Vivienne Dipeolu 



Signifying the completion of four years of hard work is commencement. 
Mary Westemeier and Kelly Hinker, congratulations on your achievements. 




Horn ecotning 



Alumni and students alike celebrated Homecoming 1988 
with the theme, "All the World's a Stage" — an adage taken 
horn Shakespeare's play As You Like It. 

The weekend began with the coronation Friday night. Antici- 
pation rose as the Homecoming Court was announced. The 
Court consisted of: Freshman Attendants — Amy Shryack and 
David Weeks, Sophomore — Sharmon Oberle and Scott Wol- 
lam. Junior — Devon Monroe and Bryan Young, Senior — 
Crystal Straube and Ross Richardson, Paul Fus and Tracy 
Clevenger — King and Queen. 

School spirit was the requisite for the annual bonfire at Woll 
Field. Many were present to cheer the football team on and keep 
spirits high. The "MC Spirit Shout, " traditionally held during 
the bonfire, was enjoyed by all present, with the Black Action 
Affairs Council winning the contest with their rendition of the 
Monmouth College Anthem. 

Of course, it wouldn 't be a Homecoming without a parade — 
which began at 10 a.m. Saturday — down Broadway. Floats 
from various organizations participated. The entries were judged 
during the parade and cash prizes given to the top three during 
the half-time aaivities of the football game. The 1988 winners 
were, in order: The Black Action Affairs Council — with their 
version of "The Wiz" complete with a 'Crimson' city, the Office 
of Minority Affairs with — All the World's a Stage, "Coach", 
and the International Club — with a colorfully decorated car, 
and members dressed in traditional garb representing many 
cultures from around the world. 

It wasn't a surprise when the Fighting Scots trounced the 
Cornell Rams 31-10. 

The festivities came to a conclusion with the dance that tooi 
place that evening in the MDR. A DJ. provided the entertain- 
ment. — VLD 





S^«.a-^^^^^^^^;^ 



'rSSg.iKa':^-^''; 



1968 Homecoming Court: Front Row — Amy Shiytck, Shannon Oberie, Devon 1 
Monroe, and Crystal Straube. Back Row — David Weeks, Scott WoUam, Bryan 
Young and Rosa Richardson. 




Latinos Unidos entered for the first time this year. 



With a strong defense, QB Craig Anderson was able to complete 
VJ9 vttds during the season. 



Theta Oii make it more than obvious that they have again won the,, 
L fraternity side of Gieek Week. 




Greek Week 




Kelly Patch enjoys having strange goo placed in her hair by Rick 



jreek Week, spofSHHHJ^BFPanhellenic and Interfrate 
nity Council, was held during the week of April 24-29. Its main 
objective is to promote awareness of the greek system and 
foster cohesiveness between the greeks on campus. In this spirit, 
the three sororities — Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, and 
Pi Beta Phi — divided themselves and regrouped into five teams 
identified as Panhel 1-5. The fraternities — Alpha Tau Omega, 
Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, and Zeta 
Beta Tau — competed as themselves. The various aaivities 
included: the "orange run", the "mummy wrap", — part of the 
Greek Olympics, and of course the Chariot Race and the Tug O' 
War. In addition, a contest was held to determine the "god" and 
"goddess" of Greek Week. Each organization entered a nomi- 
nee. Nominees on the "goddess" side were: Shannon Oberle — 
KKG, Michelle Doering — KD, and Stacy McQuellon — Pi 
Phi. On the "god" side the nominees were: Mike Jakubec — 
ATO, Alex Lawson — Sig Ep, Tom Rusk — TKE, Sean Stewart 
— Chi's and Mark Bradley — ZBT. Buckets designated for each 
participant were placed in the Student Center lobby during 
lunch and dinner and monetary donations could be made. The 
catch, though, was that change added points while dollar bills 
deduaed 150 points from the total. All proceeds went to the 
Dream Faaory, which grants wishes to terminally ill children. 
Tom Rusk was named "god" and Stacy McQuellon "goddess". 
The week's activities wrapped -up with an all -greek party in the 
fratertuty complex. — VLD 





Scot Sing 





Blue Key and Monar Board presented Scot Sing, an annual 
showcase of talent by organizations on April 27. Juan Mitchell 
and Amy Manning were the hosts for the evening. Performers 
competed in two categories — large group (16 or more) and 
small group (15 or less) — and were judged on appearance, 
creativity, and overall performance quality. Points could also be 
given for a creative poster. The judges for the competition were: 
C.P. Patterson — Monmouth alumnus, Clarence Huntly — a 
well-loved Green Army man, Robert Gillogly — Dean of 
Students, Larry Wiedman — professor, and Mark Peters — food 
service assistant. 

Seven groups participated beginning with Crimson Masque's 
"The Search for Elvis." Geraldo Rivera and Robin Leach led the 
mission and eventually found the "Shroud of Elvis", but not the 
man. Then, much to the surprise of Rivera, Leach, and Elvis 
fans, the "King" himself appeared and explained through song 
and that throughout his life, "I did it my way!" Soon after, the 
"King" dies. Sigma Phi Epsilon entertained with a live band, 
headed by Doug Gormley and Corey Kelly, covering such 
songs as Guns N' Roses Sweet Child O' Mine. Theta Chi gave 
us an eyewitness account of the last minutes in the life of John 
Belushi. As a chorale, Kappa Delta performed children's songs 
under the direction of "Dick Griffiths." The Black Action 
Affairs Council presented "Amateur Night At the Apollo." 
Guests at the Apollo included: Salt 'n' Pepa, Phylis Hyman, and 
the show -stopping performance of Ike and Tina Turner. During 
the amateur portion of the show, singers and dancers competed, 
with the lucky winner being chosen by the response of the 
audience. Pi Beta Phi displayed talent in a play based on the first 
year at college. The performance featured History 666, the class 
from hell, headed by Ms. Frogenagel the professor who enjoys 
failure. The Monmouth Christian Fellowship gave us the Church 
Lady's show with special guest Tammy Faye Bakker — make- 
up artist extraordinaire — who wanted to know why the Church 
Lady Had a moustache. Several singers were featured including 
a Christian rap group telling its listeners to "Get A Bible!" 

To shorten the lull during set-up time between acts, members 
of the audience were asked to come up on stage and entertain a 
few minutes. After much coaxing, there were several takers of 
the offer. Deron Simmons was the first up, and taught everyone 
how to "Walk the Dinosaur." Jeff McCraven and Willard Rob- 
inson gave a sample of rap and dance. Next, Frank Prokup made 
sure people knew that he could "Stroke It. " H 

The evening concluded with the announcement of the win- *" 
nets: In the large group category the winner's were: First Place 
— the Black Aaion Affairs Council, with Kappa Delta and Pi 
Beta Phi coming in second and third respectively. In small 
group, Crimson Masque received the honor of being first with 
Monmouth Christian Fellowship being second. Jeff and Will, by 
the response of the audience, were selected as winners of the 
"impromptu " category. Another creative if not entertaining Scot 
Sing has passed. — VLD 



tt^ 




^pringfest 



Despite the threat of rain, Springfest '89 sponsored by the , 
Community Activities Board (CAB) went off without a hitch. 
The entertainment for the day included Monmouth D.J. Keith 
Patterson who provided music throughout the day, The Flying 
Fool Ken Schultz — a roving artist who fashioned hats from 
balloons and during dinner, juggling, balancing chairs on his 
chin — just being a complete fool. From noon until 4:30, 
organizations provided games and services such as the Associa- 
tion of Women Students Cake Walk, CAB had a trivia game 
contest and the Black Aaion Affairs Council had face painting. 
The day concluded with a dance in the MDR featuring (for a 
change of pace) Jak Makral, a band chosen by the student body. 
— VLD 



COMMENCEMENT 

A PHOTO ESSAY 




Sharing in the joy of graduan'oa: Mika Nisbiki, Minako Tokamaru, Mika's 
Moamoulh host family the Limaooa's and her mother aad father. 




Tie Brass Quiaiet herald the beginning of Commeoceateat, 
as the HigblaijJgt^ggju^^^tiiggfsioBtl. 




Skateboarding has its perks for Etop Udo. 




Plenty To Do In Spare Time 





Classes are 
you're do: 
now what 

A great deal ofxudent life is, indeed, being 
a student. But ye^tven Monmouth students 
get stressed out (andjxen bored!) and need 
an escape. A town oi^fughly 10,000, Mon- 
mouth is definitely no raMMOf metropolis. 
Over the course of four years^could becoi 
a real test of imagination to ftr WfflisS S^o'do 
in that blessed sparetia^^^^^fre Etop 
Udo n'-r-fi'^rffffr Prnr TTtT*' -^'r j — "-'"n 
■viM'r seen Etop riding the hills 
ofTH^I^^fjty, ttke t stroll over to Wal- 
lace Hill some-t^tfOOgg^^'ll be bowled 
over. Literally, Etop hit^^^^tment with his 
surfboard-on-wheels on mosi 
when he has extra time. In fact, he hits 
pavement often. To him, that's part of the 
appeal of ska teboarding. ' 'I like it a lot and it 's 
a lot of fun, really exciting," says Etop, "And 
you can get hurt. " 

When the weather gets hot, free time seems 
to become increasingly crucial. In sunny 
weather, bare bodies abound, attempting to 
become bronzed by the blistering sunrays. 
With no beach nearby, Monmouth students 
Michele Mangel and Teresa Christiansen let 
their imaginations go, making due with the 
front and side lawns ofMcMichael HalL Both 
being of the tres committed bikini set, they 
have admitted to traversing uptown to the 
local tanning spa in order to get an early start 
on "The Perfect Tan. " 



I /unior 
elaxing 
' states Dan the Man, 
.irently, it's catching 
on. A ».• ^ on any spring day 

will lend i.r;ci ot loic!" through the air, 
followed by shirtless wonders wandering 
about with six-irons slung casually over their 
shoulders. 

Junior Cheryl Conaway finds that, in her 
spare time, getting off campus is her best bet. 
She finds sol ace in escape and communing 

■hey take 

mymiin^^^i^^ .elalso 

bike, pla^^^^^^^^^^KjMuiktng. ' 

Music pi 
freshman roo. 
Charles Burton 
include MC Lyte a. 
listening to music is o. 
time activities. "I like to 
on some music, and chill, 
pecially to music with lots o. 

Charles also finds music a 
classes, homework and practice, 
artist is Prince, but he enjoys a wide 
musical entertainment. 

Is the night-time the right time in Afo! 



Tnts, arouna ivp.m., somehow 
\y over to a fraternity house that is 
Ihrowing a party that night. Other organira 
tions like the International Club and the Black 
Action Affairs Council throw occasional 
blasts foe members and invited guests. 

Lucky students with cars travel to Peoria 
Macomb, or tht • ' 
dance clubs Ff 

natives ten .ire not teint 

of heart, f 

One group ol students ( who wish to re 
main anonymous) find respite from 'Scur 
stress ' at the local town bar "We go to Dan 
ny's to hang out and get loose, " stated oni 
student "Having a few brews with your 
friends is what fun is all about " 

Said ani>rher 7 think Danny's ii a realh 



ose fa voA 
tronix, states thai 
his preferred free 
to my room, put 
Willard Es 
•s." 



^U ti.tnj^' >ii[ II 



carrying it a bit lar. but 



Freshmen Erl^^^^newr^^^^^^son, 
Mc^^^^fdl their time^^ 
mu^^n their band. Scarecrow^ 

Student Billy Harwood also 

'ar and sings for his rock band, 

which plays small clubs through- 



KjJio. 1 cl 
twan gs A f 
StorM 



Kbout playing in a band, Billy says, 'I love 



14 





Dan Kelleher in his spare time likes to do sports -related death defying acts. 



Sean Stewart and Steve Tropea relieve school -related stress by 
yelling? 




9U feel really alive when 
you're up there. It's a real high." 

For the homebodiee of the campus, spare 
time is merely a chaace to sleep, talk with 
friends and watch telS^ion. Luis Ramirez, a 
sophomore, fmds the ^me Shopping Chan- 
nel particularly interestirig "They have great 
sales and it's better tl^^oing to K-Mart. " 
Among Luis' chtiuiel^Kmoice are CNN and 

MTV. 

So no matter whttyotu^e, class, or town 
of origin, there's somethin^er everyone here 
irt the Maple City. It only taAsome imagina - 
tion and a little sleuthing tohnd your niche. 
— LaShawn McNuky 




Tracy Clevenger and Diane SneUenberger illustrate a familiar scene of summer. 





Musical success is in the works for members of Scarecrow Radio Eric Ostermeier, Joe 
McDaniel and Rick Wilson. 



15 




I'm happy!" Also Pictured: Kelly Johnson and Bcyan Young. 




. Dust, Dan Kelleher. Back: Mike Henman, Frank 
make up the Sig Ep Dynasty housed in Gibson. (Happy Dan?) 



le iiiture of Monmouth College. Tfiis 
ispective's best asset (u she demonsttai 
seems to be her ability to place both hands int 





Julie Ziegler, and Jodi Karwath. 



Carlos Smith? From the looks of that sign 
behind you, you HAVE all of youi claaset 



In Saxophone Alley 

In Saxophone Alley is the story of three people trapped in lines that are futile. Le 
Roi, a young Black man is the central character of the play. During the action, he 
lives in the busy urban streets, in an area that most people would not care to wander 
in. Le Roi works the streets as a drug peddler for a ring of petty dope dealers who 
are chasing him when the curtain opens. Although, in earlier years he gained a good 
education, his eventual return condems him to a life from which he can't escape. 
With his return to the streets, Le Roi has come full circle with his life. 

Entering his circle for the first time is Kelly Gilson, a teenager, who has 
concealed her pregnancy from all of the people in her life. She comes to the alley 
with the intent of depositing her still born baby amongst the debris. Kelly is caught 
by Le Roi and is forced to revel herself and what she has done, to him. Although a 
stranger, Le Roi must, and does assume the role of Kelly's redeemer or persecutor. 
The third character is Shoes. Shoes is a longtime friend of LeRoi's, working the 
drug ring with him. His name describes him well, for he is willing to step on 
anybody to get what he wants. Shoes is forced to escape the violence of street life 
that is encircling him or to soullessly abandon him. Le Roi Johnson was played by 
Raymond Doswell, Tony "Shoes" Sims — Willard Robinson, and Kelly Gilson — 
Mary Hauser. 
— R. Calvin Jones 




Raymond Doswell 




Willard Robinson 

Not pictured: Mary Hauser 



17 



Tartuffe 



By 

MoUere 



Cast of Characters 




Orgon/Moliere 


Stephen A. Klien 


Stagehand 


Dawn E. Kamadulski 


Elmire/Madame Moliere 


Danette E. Forbes 


Valere/lst Actor 


John H. Thomas 


Cleante/2nd Actor 


R. Calvin Jones 


Mariane/lst Actress 


M.E. Westemeier 


Dorine/2nd Actress 


Laguerra Champagne 


Mad. Pernelle/4th Actres. 


' Pamela Malone 


Damis/3cd Actor 


Radha Aiwa 


Mon. Loyal/Stage mgr. 


Kevin Sefton 


Flipote/ird Actress 


Sylvia Zethmayr 


Aristocrat 


Darin C. Forbes 


Officer/Official 


Joseph McDaniel 


King Louis XIV 


Andrewe Johnson 


Tartuffe 


William Cone 


Directed 


by 


James De 


Young 


Designed by 


Douglas Rankin 



The Speech Communication and Theatre Arts Depart- 
ment presented Moliere's comedy, Tartuffe. 

Tartuffe is a French play that satirizes religious hypocrisy 
in Paris during the l600's. The comedy is the French play 
most frequently produced known. It was performed at the 
Monmouth College Little Theatre during the weekend of 
October 20-23. 

*The theatre in which Moliere and his company per- 
formed, the Palais Royal, was built in 1641 for the personal 
theatricals of Cardinal Richelieu. Richelieu died shortly after 
its completion and the property was turned over to the King 
who used it occasionally for court entertainments. In 1660 
the space was assigned to Moliere, where he remained until 
his death in 1673- 

Tartuffe was given its inaugural performance in the Palais 
Royal in 1664 and was banned immediately. A revision done 
in 1667 was also banned. A third revision finally passed the 
censors in 1669 and ran for a record of thirty-three straight 
performances. 

After Moliere died in 1673 (quite literally on stage during 
a performance of The Imaginary Invalid), the Palais Royal 
was used primarily for music and ballet under the direction 
of the court composer LuUy. The building finally burned 
down in 1763. Today the national theatre of France, the 
Commedie Francaise, occupies the site and it is fitting that its 
alternate name is "The House of Moliere." 
— taken "From the Clipboard of the Director"* 





Mon. Loyal serves a writ or eviction to Orgon as others look on. 



Madame Pernelle tells Orgon in so many words 
that he is a dunce. 



18 




Tartuffe is in the process of seducing Elmire. 



Damis has caught Tanuffe trying to seduce Elmire and warns him to keep his hands off. 





Valere and Mariane are in the mist of arguing as Dorine. the maid, tries to make peace. 



19 



Agnes Of God 

According to John Pielmeier, Agnes of God "is a play of the mind and 
miracles." For me, the play is not concerned with the "miracle" of Agnes' child 
as much as it is with the "mircle" of Martha Livingstone's return to her faith. 

If Agnes is an instrument of God (the title is presumably a pun of the Latin 
Agnus Dei, "Lamb of God"), her ultimate fate reward is to be with "the Lady" 
and with Christ. No one would argue that Agnes deserved the things that 
happened to her, but Roman Catholics would find solace in the belief that 
Agnes' "life after death" would be a happy one. 

Martha Liningstone's faith was tested at an early age, and the play offers a 
sympathetic view of her agnosticism. Yet Livingstone must eventually re- 
examine her faith, if only to help her justify Agnes' pain and torment. 

It is difficult to argue that Agnes of God presents our world in positive light. 
As Livingstone says: "What kind of God can permit such a one as her (Agnes) 
to come trampling through this well-ordered existance?" It may be naive to 
simply suggest that our world contains "evil" in order to recognize "good." Yet 
I suspect that most of us would like to think the world is a "purposeful" place 
and that there is ultimately some rationale to explain our activities. 

Catholicism (in particular, and religion in general) offers one explanation for 
our being, although it doesn't offer "all of the answers" for everyone. For some 
of use, the "wonder" is finding all the answers. For others of us, the "wonder" is 
the search. 
— "From the Clipboard of the Director" 



Cast of Characters 

Doctor Martha Livingstone 
Latitia L. Earls 

Mother Miriam Ruth 
Danette E. Forbes 

Agnes 

Amy B. Manning 




Seated: C.J. Phillips and Danette Forbes. Standing; Darin Forbes, Sue Kozyra, Kendra Turner, 
Norma Ward, Latitia Earls, and Amy Manning. 



20 



Agnes tells Mother Miriam that she is being 
punished, as stigmatas appear on her hands. 



Dr. Livingstone asks Mother Miriam Ruth to stop interferring in her investigation 




When confronted with the question of how this situation has come about, Agnes exclaims, "God did Mother Miriam introduces herself with the quip. 

it, and I hate him and now I will burn in hell because I hate him!!' "Dr. Livingstone, I presume.' 



21 




Cast Of Characters 


Donny — Stephen A Klein 
Teach — Richard Wilson 
Bobby — Ken Schaefer 
Directed By 
Kevin D Sefton 



In American Buffalo, which arrived on Broadway in 1977, conversation is 
again front and centre, although the characters are petty hoodlums. Mament 
achieves freshness even in tough talk: 'Only, and I'm not, I don't think, casting 
anything on anyone; from the mouth of Southern buUdyke asshole ingrate of a 
vicious nowhere cunt can this trash come.' The American Buffalo is the buffalo - 
headed nickel found in Don's junkshop, which inspires a fantasy crime against 
the purchaser — a crime masterminded by Don for performance by Bob. When 
Teach appears in Don's shop, he convinces that latter to let him replace Bob in 
the action. Near midnight, when the robbery is scheduled. Bob appears with 
another buffalo nickel. His presence embarrasses Don and irritates Teach, who 
hits the young man. Bob confesses that he bought the valuable nickel, invented 
the rich coin -collector, and suggested the burglary. In frustration. Teach trashes 
Don's shop and the, subdued, he prepares to take Bob to the hospital for his 
injured ear — the ear that Teach injured. Don then apologizes to Bob, and Bob 
to Don who assures him that 'he did real good'. American Buffalo is human as 
well as nickel in the tough talk that 'buffaloes' the meek, who inherit nothing. 
— Taken From the New American Dramatists: 1960-1980 by Ruby Cohn 



PICTURES BY JOHN KATOR 



22 




23 



Cast of Characters 

(in order of appearance) 



The Skin 
Of 



Our Teeth By 

Thornton Wilder 



Thornton Wilder needs no real introduction. His 
play. Our Town, remains on the reading lists of most 
American high schools and the musical fashioned 
from his charming comedy, The Matchmaker, and 
retitled Hello Dolly has delighted millions of patrons 
on both stage and screen. Like Our Town, The Skin of 
Our Teeth earned Wilder a Pulitzer Prize. Even though 
some of his "daring" theatricality and homespun phi- 
losophy is a bit precious these days, it remains con- 
vincing because it is so obviously felt and sincerely 
intentioned. The laughs are broad; the costumes 
bright; the sets inventive; and you do leave the theatre 
with the kind of feeling that Sabina talks about in the 
first act when see says, "Why can't we have plays like 
we used to have, good entertainment with a message 
you can take home with you.'" 

I must admit that the play selection might have 
some little bit to do with the culmination of our own 
theatrial dream. Theatre at Monmouth has indeed 
hung by the skin of its teeth and there have been 
several times in the past 25 years when I have been 
tempted to give it up and "put out the fire" or perhaps 
I should say, "start a little fire." 

The Skin of Our Teeth, presented by Crimson 
Masque and the Speech Communication and Theatre 
Arts Department, was performed the weekend of April 
20-22 
— taken "From the Clipboard of the Director" 



Sabina 

Mr. Fitzpatrick 

Mrs. Antrobus 

Dinosaur 

Mammoth 

Telegraph Boy 

Gladys Antrobus 

Henry Antrobus 

Mr. Antrobus 

Doctor 

Professor 

Judge 

Homer 

Miss E. Muse 

Miss T. Muse 

Miss. M. Muse 

Fred Bailey 

Fortune Teller 

Conveeners 

Good Time Girls 

Chair Pusher 
Defeated Candidate 
TV Reporter 
Camera Operator 
Mr. Tremayne 
Hester 
Flo 

Directed by 
James L. De Young 
Designed by 
Douglas Rankin 



CJ. Phillips 

Stephen A. Klien 

Danette E. Forbes 

Radha Aiwa 

Jennifer L. Rotche 

Darin C. Forbes 

M.E. Westemeier 

Andrewe W. Johnson 

Kevin Sefton 

Laguerra Champagne 

Daniel L. Kelleher 

Michael J. Mihallik 

John H. Thomas 

Mary L. Hauser 

Lisa M. Stevens 

LuArm M. Dunn 

Darin C Forbes 

Jennifer Rotche 

John T. Thomas, Michael J. Mihallik 

Daniel L. Kelleher 

Lisa M. Stevens, LuAnn Dunn, 

Tammy S. Shell, Rita C. Rush 

Darin C. Forbes 

Stephen A. Klien 

Mary L. Hauser 

Tammy S. Shell 

Radha Aiwa 

Laguerra Champagne 

Mary L. Hauser 




Cain, uh I mean Henry is the first to admire Sabina sitting on 
the beach in Atlantic city. 



24 



After the war, Mr. Antrobus finally confronts Henry and 
his evil ways. 





Mr. Antrobus is visited by "friends" warming up from traveling during the Ice Age. 




On the Atlantic City Boardwalk, the Conveeners have a "good time" with the Good Time 
Girls. 




Mr. Antrobus, after having won the election, addresses 
the crowd. 



Mr. Antrobus has just arrived home, and has brought with him his new invention The Wheel 
much to the curiosity of Henry. Gladys, Sabina. and their pet a woolly Mammoth. 



2S 



COMMENCEMENT II 



Commencement consist of more activity than the actual 
exercises. It is a time for alumni to return and talk about the 
past at Monmouth College and also its future. 



In a salute to the giaduates, faculty and Senate 
members, and honored guest form a double line 
along the walk leading from Wallace Hall. 
Cheryl Broskow passes thtough, symbolizing the 
completion of her undergtaduate education. Left, 
Bfuce Haywood. 





S.A. president Cheryl Conaway and patliamentarian Katie Hale congtatulate Jan Jones on het 

accomplishments. 



Alumni ptesented a talent show, "Give My 
Regaids to Broadway. Floyd Hershberger 
pictuted singing, "There But For You I Go" 
'49 accompanied by Gtacie Peterson '22. 



26 



Well-loved professor of Englisli Gary Willliardf (Class of '59) and alumn Jan Miller (Class of '60 did a hilarious redilion 
of "I'm Herbert." 





IHonmouth College President Bruce Haywood, left, conferred four honorary doctor of laws degrees on alumni of 
the College on Commencement Day They are from the left: Grace Gawthrop Peterson '22. I. Keith Mann '46, 
Marilynn K. Hofstetter'49, and Edwin A. Trapp, Ir. '53. 



2/ 



the horror, the horror ... 

THE CAFETERIA 

Never In Your Wildest Dreams (Or Nightmares) Did You 
Think Food Could Be So Bad!!! 



Setting Scene: It's Thursday night in the Mon- 
mouth College Main dining 
Room (a.k.a. The Cafeteria). 
Somber students stand out- 
side, brandishing beautiful, 
color-coded meal-cards ready 
for the punching They enter, 
picking up trays, silverware, 
napkins. And then ... The 
Encounter!! 

Student A: "Ugh, what's this?" 

Student B: "Mystery Meat " 

Student A: "And iMl 

Student B: "Potatoes, I think. " 

Student A: "Ah, looks like a cereal night " 

Does this scenario sound familiar? It 
should. It's the stuff of which nightmares are 
made. Our beautifully remodeled cafeteria is a 
sight to behold Unfortunately it was the food 
that needed the overhaul 

Remember when we were prospectives? At 
the Open House, we got food that we could 
visibly identify and that didn't taste like ceil- 
ing tile. 

Boy were we tricked It only took a few 
days before reality set in. This wasn't mom's 
home cooking This wasn't even our little 
brother's homecooking 

"/ don't know why the food tastes the way 
it does, " states sophomore Rita Rush. "I'm 
sure Doug (Van Laere) and Mark (Peters) 
try, but something just ain't right" 



Perhaps it's that tasteless spaghetti. Or 
maybe it's the reheated chicken pot pies. No 
. . . it's got to be "Recycle Sunday" when 
graveyard remnants from the past week 
(weeks?) come back to haunt our stomachs. 
That has got to be the worse. 

To get the full gist of the horror of the 
cafeteria, one only needs to ask the students 
themselves to describe the food in one word 
Tara Triplett: "Interesting" 
Tammy Stockwell: "Yuck!" 
Yvonne Howard: "Nasty. " 
Joseph Courtney: "Mysterious." 
Pam Marshall: "Gravey-train. " 

There are alternatives for those who opt to 
forgo the cafeteria scene There is always 
Scotland Yard. But, soup, salad, and sand- 
wiches can become real tired real quick. 

The town has a choice pick of fast food 
restaurants to choose from when one wishes 
to escape from the culinary ecstacy of the 
cafeteria. For the lovers of Italian, there are 
four (Count them — one, two, three, FOUR!) 
pizza restaurants uptown. Students feeling a 
bit tight in their checkbooks may find Domi- 
noes or Alfano's pizza to their monetary lik- 
ing There is also the lesser-eaten Italian Vil- 
lage. (Does anyone eat there?) 

For the slightly well-to-do pizza scarier, 
there's Pizza Hut, which is also frequented by 
groups of 3 or more Monmouth students 
trying to economize by "Going-IN" on a large 
Super Supreme. 



For burger lovers, we must confess (if you 
haven't noticed by now) there is no McDon- 
ald's. Or Burger King Or Wendy's. But mpe 
off that frown and cheer up! We do have a 
Hardee's! Though most of the urban students 
had never heard of Hardee's, they've quickly 
adjusted and now eat breakfast biscuits with 
the best of 'em. 

Also in town are Kentucky Fried Chicken, 
(when burgers become mundane) Dairy 
Queen, (when a D-minus on your ceramic coil 
pot leaves you depressed) Park-N-Eat (for 
hashbrowns with that good 'ole rural Illinois 
flavor) and finally the Golden Palace (nothing 
like Monmouth-style Chinese take-out). 

So the town is bursting with a veritable 
cornocopia of restaurants with owners wait- 
ing impatiently for desperate Monmouth stu- 
dents to mow down their doors. And fifteen 
minutes away in neighboring Galesburg, are 
more restaurants with flashing lights, napkin- 
wrapped silverware, and — yes! — even free 
peppermints! 

Student A: "Well, what about those of us 
who didn't save our hard-earned 
summer money so that we could 
dine out so well?" 

Well, you're up a creek without a spoon. 
Those without finance have to resolve them- 
selves to breakfast lunch and dinner in the 
cafeteria. Rest assured it's not a fate worse 
than death. But, it comes awfully close! 







— 








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The Nightmare 
Begins Like This . 



The Sign Points In The 
CAFETERIA . . 



For those of us with only a httle money to spare for a decent meal, there is always Dairy Queen where 
the Full Meal Deal seems like a feast compared to Cafe' food!!! 




YOU DECIDE TO GO IN. 
YOUR FRIENDS DECIDE 

DIFFERENTLY 
AND GO TO ALFANOS. 

You Are On Your Way 
To The Hospital . . . 




while most of us shop at Giant, there is also or should I say there was Bill's (where the expiration date 
on the food always seemed to be the exact day that you shopped) now there is an Aldi's type store 
called Save-A-Lot in Its place. 




Pizza Hut is the choice of many. Unfortunately our stomach and our money never seems to get together. 
Often groups of people try to find others to go in on a pizza with them. 



They Are Enjoying Real 
Food . . . 

You Are On Your Way To 
Community Memorial 
A New Nightmare!!!! 

Question!! Why do we 
HAVE to take our 
meals on campus?? 
Is it because they know 
that if we didn't they 
would have no need for 
Food Service?? 
Ah! I wonder!! 




^v^%^ * 



t« 



«»^ 



THINOS 



During the year an informal suruey was 
tahen by your editor, and here are some 
of the ^^printable^^ results: 



FAUOfilTE 
MOUIE 

1. The Robe 

2. A Fish Called Wanda 

3. Beaches 

FAUOftin 

CAMPUS 

£U£NT 

/. What Campus Event?? 

2. Tahiti '89 

3. Hump Day Parties 



FAUORITE 
MUSIC 

1. Progressive 

2. House 

3. Anything But Top 
Forty!! 



FAUOftlTE 
BEUEftAOE 

/. Cerveza Frea 

2. Diet Coke 

3. Anything But RUST 
Water. 



BEST FLOOR 
IN UBRAftV 

/. No Floor 

2. 4th Floor 

3. 1st Floor 

(Because 

The 

InterLibrary 

Loan Is 

There) 

FAUOftlTE 
MAOAZINE 

1. U.S. Farm And 
Agricultural 
Report 

2. Teen Beat 

3. MAD 



FAUORITE 
POLITICIAN 



/. Dan Quayle 

2. Dan Quail 

3. Jim Wright 



FAUOfilTE 
SPORT 



1. Quayle Hunting 

2. Wright Lynching 

3. Tower Demolition 



30 



FAUOftin 
CELE6RITV 

/. David Letterman 

2. Richard Simmons 

3. Arsenio Hall 

FAUORin 
BAR 



1. Salad 

2. Danny's 

3. Tliunderstep 



FAUORITE 
SPORT 
(SCOT) 

1. Posting 

2. Beer Bonging 

3. Nude Bowling 

FAUORITE 

(DORD TO 

SAV 



1. Weekend! 

2. Chicago 

3. OuttahereU 



FAUORITE 
FOOD 
PLACE 

/. Cafeteria 

2. Landmark 

3. Anything With A 
Mc In It. 

BEST 
CAMPUS 
SPEAKER 

1. John Malloy 

(Yes Folks, Wasn't He 
Worth Our Time And 
Money?) 



FAUORITE 

CREEK 

LEHER 

ORGANIZATION 



1. Alpha Lambda Delta 

2. Beta Beta Beta 

3. Lambda Pi Eta 

FAUOftlTE 
STREET 

1. Main 

(Where The Real Food 

Is.) 

2. nth St.-Giant 

3. 700 E. Broadway 
(The 10th Of Each 
Month) 




Danny 's the second best 
bar next to salad!.' 



Marks Of Distinction 



U.S. News Ranks Monmouth Among The Best 



Last fall, in addition to an announcement 
from The Kresge Foundation of a major grant 
to help complete the Wells Theater campaign, 
Monmouth College received yet another na- 
tional confirmation, one of many in the last 
few years, of the kind of curriculum and 
programs that have been put in place in the 
last decade 

On Oct 10, the weekly news magazine, 
U.S. News & World Report, published its 
fourth special report on "America's Best Col- 
leges, " a category-by-category ranking of the 
nation's 125 leading colleges and universities, 
and Monmouth College, for the second time, 
was highly ranked among the very best 

According to the U.S. News piece, Mon- 
mouth College is ranked seventh among the 
top 25 colleges in a special category called 
"regional liberal arts colleges." These are 
more than 400 colleges that "typically are 
less selective than their natioinal counter- 
parts . . . and award more than half of their 
baccalaurate degrees in the arts and sci- 
ences. " The other four categories include na- 
tional universities, national liberal arts col- 
leges, comprehensive colleges and univerities, 
and small comprehensive colleges. 

Even though last year's Best Colleges piece 
was the fourth time U.S. News has undertak- 
en such a nationwide comparison, the authors 



of the article confessed that after extensive 
consulations with college presidents and other 
academic experts, they have made major 
changes in their study "First, because aca- 
demic deans and admissions officers often 
see education from rather different perspec- 
tives than do college presidents, they also 
have been included in the survey of the more 
than 1,000 college officials. Second because 
the experts' opinions are just that opinions, 
U.S. News has based its academic rankings on 
"on objective data as well as on the subjec- 
tive judgements the survey " 

In the category of regional liberal arts 
colleges, the authors of the article said they 
ranked the top 25 colleges on the following 
criteria only: qualilty of the student body as 
determined by the school's selectivity, 
strength of the faculty and teaching, extent of 
resources, and the ability to retain students 
through graduation. In the case of national 
universities and national liberal arts colleges, 
a fifth attribute was added to the formula: 
academic reputation, as determined by stand- 
ing in an exclusive U.S. News survey of col- 
lege presidents, deans, and admission offi- 
cers. 

In its brief discussion of each of the 25 
schools in the regional liberal arts category 
U.S. News cited Monmouth for providing its 



"biology students with the opportunity to 
study either at an ecological field station on 
the backwaters of the Mississippi River or at 
one of the finest 'prairie plots' in the state, 
where the flora and the fauna have been 
preserved for more than a century " 

Monmouth was also highlighted among the 
other regional liberal arts colleges in the coun- 
try for being among the top five in the area of 
student retention. Rankings were based on 
the percentage of freshmen returning for 
sophomore year and the percentage of enter- 
ing freshmen who graduate with bachelor's 
degrees in four years. 

The other 24 colleges listed in the U.S. 
News story that were ranked in the regional 
liberal arts category include, in order of rank: 
Southwestern University Simon's Rock of 
Bard College, Transylvania University, Alaska 
Pacific University, Berry College, Wittenberg 
University Spelman College, Arkansas Col- 
lege, Hillsdale College, Hiram College, Ohio 
Wesleyan University Marietta College, Con- 
verse College, Westminster College, Mount 
Union College, Illinois College, Presbyterian 
College, Wofford College, Taylor University 
Dordt College, Wesleyan College, Holy Names 
College, Westminster College of Salt Lake 
City, and Rosemont College. 



32 



mLCOME 



TO THE 



STOCKDAL E C E N T E R 



Vice Admiral James Bond Stockdale, Con- 
gressional Medal of Honor recipient and 
Senior Research Fellow at the Hoover Insti- 
tution in Stanford, California, attended IHIon- 
mouth College as a freshman in 1942 before 
receiving an appointment to the U.S. Navel 
Academy at Annapolis. He later attended 
graduate school at Stanford University 
where he earned his master of arts degree. 

Stockdale was shot down on his second 
combat tour over Viet Nam in 1965. For 
eight years he was the senior naval POW, 
where he endured severe physical and men- 
tal torture. Stockdale spent four years in 
solitary confinement, two of which were in 
leg irons. 

He was instrumental in organizing a 
camp-wide "tap code" that enabled prison- 
ers to covertly communicate. 

Stockdale was discovered using the "tap 
code" by his captors in 1969. He underwent 
severe torture but resolved to make himself 
a symbol of resistance regardless of person- 
al sacrifice. 

For his gallantry he was awarded the 
Congressional Medal of Honor by Gerald R. 
Ford in 1975. 

He left the naval service as its most 



decorated member, wearmg 26 personal 
combat decorations, including two Distin- 
guished Flying Crosses, three Distinguished 
Service Medals, four Silver Stars and two 
Purple Hearts. 

In 1981 the U.S. Navy established the 
"Vice Admiral James Stockdale Award for 
Inspirational Leadership," the hrst award 
ever issued in the name of a living person. 

Stockdale has authored dozens of arti- 
cles on leadership, moral philosophy, the 
prison/hostage circumstance and the anato- 
my of extortion. 

He has served as the director of the Chief 
of Naval Operation's strategy plans and 
policy division, and as president of the Na- 
val War College. 

He has also held the position of college 
president and college professor. He is cur- 
rently chairman of the President's Commis- 
sion on White House Fellowships, a member 
of the Board of Visitors and Governors of St. 
John's College of Annapolis and Santa Fe, a 
member of the Academic Policy Board of the 
United States Naval Academy, and Special 
Advisor to the American Leadership Forum. 
— taken from the Stockdale Center Dedication pro- 
gram 



TOP mYS TO mSTE 
TIME BEFORE AN . 
EXAM 

REARRANGE THE PENS 
ON YOUR DESK AND 
IN THE DRAWERS 
DO LAUNDRY 
CALL PARENTS COL- 
LECT AND WHINE 
BOTHER DORMMATES 
WHO ARE TRYING TO 
STUDY 

TRY TO NAME THE 
MEMBERS OF SIGUE SI- 
GUE SPUTNIK 
VEG-OUT WITH MTV 
MATHEMATICALLY 
FIGURE OUT THE LOW- 
EST GRADE POSSIBLE 
FOR A FINAL GRADE 
OF C 
EAT 

WRITE ANSWERS ON 
ARM 

PLAN NEXT PARTY 
INVENT NEW + EXCIT- 
ING DRINK COMBINA- 
TIONS 
DROP THE CLASS 




19S9 Tau Pi Mortar Board scholarship recipients. From left standing: Lisa Jackson, Brad Nahrstadt, Jackie Bell. From left seated: Karen Owrey, Isabel Bickett 
Marshall '36, president of Tau Pi Mortar Board Alummnae Association, and Cheri Nelson. 



t 




Samuel Ramy, world-renown opera singer, was on campus, adding a much 
needed taste of culture. 




Freshmen Tammy Shell and Sharon Miller performing a duet during the annual Martin 
Luther King, Jr. Vesper services in January in the College Auditorium. 



34 



AIDS, College Students, And 
The Law 



A lively and Informative panel discussion 
featuring, among others, three Monmouth 
College alumni and titled "AIDS, College 
Students, and the Law" was held In the 
Auditorium In January and was sponsored 
by the Monmouth Lawyers Association and 
a group called the Forum. 

The panelists included Doug Carlson '66, 
a partner in the Chicago law firm of of 
Wildman, Harrold, Allen and Dixon; Michael 
P. Hayes 73, chair of the department of 
pathology at the Saint Francis Medical Cen- 
ter in Peoria; Jacquelyn Condon, associate 
dean of students; and James Monroe Smith, 
an attorney and executive director of the 
AIDS Legal Council of Chicago. Dan Keating 
'83, an assistant professor of law at Wash- 
ington University in St. Louis, Mo., served 
as moderator for the panel discussion. 

Fach panelist spoke for about 20 min- 
utes on a specific topic, and the remaining 
portion of the program was open for ques- 
tions from the audience. Smith discussed 
discrimination faced by AIDS victims in the 



employment and insurance areas. Hayes 
talked about the medical aspects of AIDS, 
including how the disease is and is not 
transmitted. The impact of AIDS on student 
activities and campus housing was dis- 
cussed by Condon, and Carlson spoke on 
AIDS and public education, as well as AIDS 
testing and confidentiality. 

The Monmouth Lawyers Association, 
which was formed this past fall, consists of 
lawyers and law students who are gradu- 
ates of the College. Its purposes include 
fostering communication among the mem- 
bership about matters of common profes- 
sional and educational Interest, publishing a 
directory of member lawyers and law stu- 
dents, and encoraging the pursuit of post- 
college legal studies by Monmouth College 
students. The association is a not-profit 
organization and is seoarate and Indepen- 
dent from the College. 

The Forum is a group of professors and 
students who meet periodically to discuss 
matters of topical Interests. 




TOP REASONS TO 
ATTEND MON' 
MOUTH 

— BECAUSE THEY HAVE THIS 
THING CALLED SCOTS DAY 

— YOUR DEGREE IS RE- 
SPECTED? 

— YOUR A FACE NOT A NUM- 
BER 

— FREE VISITS FROM "THE 
SHOWER MAN" 

— EVERYONE SAYS, "HI, 
HOW ARE YOU AND 
MEANS IT 

— PRESIDENT HAYWOOD 
WANTS YOU TO 

— IT'S MONMOUTH, HOME 
OF WYATT EARP 

— DANNY'S 

— WE'RE THE FIGHTING 
SCOTS 

— THE YEARBOOK IS AWE- 
SOME! 

— HEY, YOU HAVE NO OTHER 
PLACE TO GO NOW DO YA 



Pictured: Carlson — '66, Smith, Condon, and Hayes 
— '73. 




Top: Azus3 Ikezaki and Gina Winnett all smiles before their Kappa meeting. Middle Left: "Best 
of Show" deservedly went to junior Jack Elliot for his bronze sculpture at the second annual 
student art etibition and competition. Bottom Left: The Cleiand staff consisting of Head 
Resident — Carlos Smith and Resident Assistants — Earl Allen, Terry Cook, Derrick Allen, 
Chris Henneman, Duane Baldwin and Rick Hacker — was chosen as the best staff. 



In honor of Martin Luther King, Jr. Frankie Freeman presented a convocation 
discussing her role in the civS rights movement and the Civil Rights 
Commission during the King years and beyond. 1989 marked the first year 
for the Center for Cultural Diversity better know as Hubbard House. 




liura Smajo and Lori Worthy are coKectini money outside of the Monmouth Eagle for Kappa Delta's 
annual national philanthropy, "Shamrock Project." 




Kappa Kappa Gamma raised $500 for Warren Achievement in their first and hopefully annual golf tourney. 
Presenting the check, Teresa Downs and Toni Meier. 



snmm!)\i 

WROTE ON MONPAY. 




KATH'SENItNCEP 
ON TUKPii;C 



SPORl^P 
0NVIEDNE5DAY, 




smmwmfx 
TERjDRisr raws. 



Loose Lips Stupid Quips I 



"It's so rare to show blacks in that situation. 
We've almost been neutered on film." 

— Gregory Mines 'Tap' star on black love scenes 

"I didn't think It was funny until they passed 
the title on to Mark Harmon. Then I laughed my 
head off. " — Mel Gibson, on being labeled the 
sexiest man alive 

If you want to be really hip you get married or 
check Into a drug rehab center, or both. " 

— Eric Stoltz who has yet to do either 

"I want my record to go platinum several 
times over. That's all we have In our family — 
platinum." — La Toya Jackson whose 'You're 
Gonna Get Rocked!" got socked by the critics 
and failed to even go gold 

"The only thing It does is keep people off my 
back because they figure I'm on medication. " 

— W. Axl Rose, Guns n' Roses singer on the 
effects of his manic-depression medication 

"Actually, I blew It for the first time today. " 

— Geraldo Rivera, when asked about his broken 
nose. 

"Women feel dirty; men don't." 

— Jerry Hall theorizing about sex without love 



What was the name of that book? The Satanic Purse? Curse? My First? 



Smeal Makes Feminist Appeal 



Former National Organization of Women 
(NOW) president Eleanor Smeal says that wom- 
en can best handle the problems that will face 
women and society in 21st century America. 

Smeal, who spoke at the March 21 Convoca- 
tion lecture, said that most of the people in the 
United States by the year 2000 will be women 
and the dependent children, yet today women 
earn only 64 cents on the dollar compared to 
men. 

In addition to the issue of equal pay for equal 
work, Smeal listed child care, parental leave, 
minimum wage, and contraception as political 
topics that women must address by running for 
political office. 

Once these women are elected to office, 
Smeal said the nation's spending priorities must 
change from military to social spending-on pro- 
grams such as health care, elderly care, and the 
environment. 

But, she says, the process of nominating and 
electing women to political office on all levels 
must accelerate from present trends. For exam- 
ple, she points out that males currently compose 
95 percent of the U.S. Congress, including only 
two senators. Women currently make up only 17 



percent of the state legislators, she added. 

Smeal claimed that the men who presently 
stock the halls of Congress come from "a narrow 
segment of society, " and that they are typically 
wealthy, white male attorneys who lead what 
she termed a rich lifestyle. "I believe they're 
living in a different day," she said, "out of 
touch. 

"I'm sick to death of the decisions they're 
making, " she continued. 

Through the organization over which she pre- 
sides, the Fund for the Feminist Majority, Smeal 
intends to change the decisions that are being 
made by replacing male with female representa- 
tives. 

Smeal says that the workforce in America 
today is 49 percent female and that 66 percent 
of the new jobs go to women. Yet women remain 
severely underpaid and must scramble to make 
ends meet. 

To illustrate her claim about male-dominated 
political intransigence, Smeal notes that there 
has been no new comprehensive child care bill 
passed in Congress since 1971. 

"I'm convinced we need new leadership 

that represents everybody," Smeal stated. 



"Women are encouraged not to run, yet the 
electorate desperately wants changes and is 
more likely to vote for women than men if all 
things are equal " 

Speaking directly to the audience of about 
200 people, Smeal said that the political 
system in the U.S. wants to underregister 
young people to vote because "you don't 
think like older people." She added that 
current incumbent endorsement rules from 
what she labels "incumbent protection clubs 
in both parties. " 

Smeal painted a picture of the U.S. as a 
nation in crisis-of pollution, debt, and poor 
quality food. Chastising an older generation 
that is spending the younger generation's 
"dollars, resources, and future, " she urged 
the audience to get involved in public deci- 
sion making in their early twenties. "There's 
a tremendous vacuum at the top, " she said. 

Smeal ended her appeal by observing that 
"democracy is at its best when it makes 
power work for the people and makes people 
take control again. " Obviously, she believes 
the best way to reach that goal is to elect 
more women to political office. 




Eleanor Smeal (center), former president of the National Organization of Women (NOW), meets witli members of 
the press before Convocation last spring. Smeal is now president of the Fund for the Feminist Majority, a group 
that promotes the increase of female politicians. 



38 



Gee! Who is this AwWlr with the earners. I can't stand this!! Picture lakiniH Mary Houser and Dr. Griffiths 
chatting over a cup of coffee, or is that something stronger in that cup, Mary? 




Mrs. Devi, Sudha's aunt, participates in Freefait — a gathering of friends all with the love of poetry — 
reading a selection from the church of St Paul. The picture is not that bad Sudha, slop complaining 




Loose Lips 
Stupid Quips // 

"/ love my wife. I'm never gonna leave my wife. My 

wife's never gonna leave me. " 

Mike Tyson talking about Robin Givens last September 

"There are a lot of good women out there. My mistake 
was I just didn't find one." 
Mike Tyson in October 

"What a dog. What a stupid dog. A stupid dog. " 
Ed Koch, New York City mayor, on newsman Sam 
Donaldson 

"I'm a pussycat. " 
Sam Donaldson 

"I was quite studious when I was in school. " 
Rod Stewart 

"I've never known Rod to read a book. " 
Alana Stewart Rod's ex 

"I want to become, in my own eyes, a real actor. 
Someone other actors look-up to — like De Niro. " 
Steve Guttenberg 

"I don't get it. Why does Steve Guttenberg keep 
getting work?" Rob Lowe 

"Yeah, the guy could sing, but let's face it, he was a 

major tasteless hick. " 

Michael Hutchense INXS lead singer, on Elvis 

"I saw more of a sense of humor than bad taste. " 
The Edge, U2 guitarist, on Elvis 



"So, Pebble, what can I do for you today?" "IVell, 
Tim I have a class, and I wanted to purchase the 
book. But I did not have $125 and I have three 
more that I need, at even a higher price. So I had 
to take out an additional loan and . . . 




That "phenomenal" woman, Yolanda Studway performs a dramatic i 
during Freelall. 



Bryan Young and Cheryl Conaway ran lor vice president and president respectively of the 
Student Association. 




Challenging Cheryl and Bryan was Carlos Smith for president and Dan Flanagan for vice president. 
The team lost to their opponents by a narrow margin. 





Performing as a choir during ihe King Vesper Service, is: Yolanda Barnes, Tammy Shell, Sharon 
Miller, Michelle Divers, Pamela Marshall and Jonica Oliver. 



The three muskeeters — Ed Matters, Dave Grein and Rob Herzog - 
giving us an illustration of what true brotherly love is all about? 



40 




"So what's the special down here today?" Oh, sandwiches, sandwiches and more sandwiches. "Oh, we 
also hare spaghetti Tuesday and Friday and also next week. 




It is hard to believe that Kendra Turner, Liz Friedrich and Donna Godar are smiling after eating in the 
Cafeteria. Maybe the smile is because they chose to go with only the ice cream cones. 




LOOSE UPS 
STUPID QUIPS III 



"They have to deal with me; that's the way I 
look at it. I'm the vice president. They know it. 
and they know I know it. " — Vice President Dan 
Quayle, on the Bush campaign insiders who were 
critical of his selection as a running mate. 

"Hi, I'm Dan Quayle. Who are you?" — Dan 
Quayle to a woman at Hardee's who turned out 
to be his Secret Service agent 

"Ninety-nine percent of the time, you see 
blacks shooting blacks. I always say to people, 
'Who is holding the camera? Why isn't anybody 
shooting them?' " — Denzel Washington on 
South African news coverage 

"My mother is a congressperson; she makes 
the laws. My father is an attorney; he enforces 
laws. I'm an actor; I break the law. " 
— Judd Nelson relatively speaking. 

"I hope they die in a plane crash. " — Michael 
Gross when asked what happens to the Keatons 
during the last season of Family Ties 

"I've got a birthday present for her. I got her 
a new brand of mascara. You put it on with a 
forklift. " — Jessica Hahn, whose sexual encoun- 
ter with Jim Bakker brought down his ministry, 
in a birthday message to Bakker's wife Tammy 
Faye. 



Faddy and Michelle Merritt deligently trying to figure out how to use the Communications department 
state-of-the art equipment. 



ff-^- 



The Phonebill From Hell 

Little Did We Know A Plione Could Cause Financial Ruin 



\Jl 



w 



R-ring! R-R-ringH 

It's a sound that's near and dear to the 
hearts of many Monmouth collegiates. The 
demanding call of the mud-brown communica- 
tion device hanging complacently on the 
dorm-room wall 

Yes, the telephone. 

But with the sunshine joy and fun of gab- 
bing away the hours to friends in far away 
places, comes the inevitable rain. This down- 
pour happens early every month and is deliv- 
ered expressly to each and every individual 
campus mailbox. 

The dreaded phonebill. Alexander Graham 
Bell never had it so rough. 

Communication is an essential component 
of human existence. And at Monmouth, com- 
munication with the outside world is tanta- 
mount to maintaining your sanity. So you pick 
up the phone — and run-up your bill 

Who could forget freshman year, about 
early October, when the very first bill arrived? 
You'd been calling every number you knew, 
even your Aunt Thelma. Then you received 
"The Phonebill From Hell " 

"T-t-two hundred and seventy-six dol- 
lars?!" 

"I don't even know half of these numbers! 

This can't be mine." 



"I never called Scotland!" 

Betty Babcock and Bev Brewer hand out 
those death sentences known as access codes 
with misleading ease. They smile patiently at 
you as they slide that insidious green form 
across the counter at you and say sweetly, 
"Just fill out this form and sign it at the 
bottom. " 

Sure. And kiss all of your money goodbye. 
Ah, to be young again. Those days of old when 
you just pick up the phone and dialed willy- 
nilly. It didn't matter that you stayed on the 
phone for three hours explaining to Mara 
Stanton why you liked Kenneth Jacobs. What 
did you care, you weren't paying for it Heck, 
most of us didn't even know that the phone 
was something that people paid for, until we 
were dutifully reminded by our parents: "Hey, 
that thing costs, don'tcha know!" 

Junior Michelle Divers is one such student 
that is hooked on the access code. Though 
she wouldn't reveal exactly how high her 
phone bill is, she did say that it was "up 
there. " 

"I just need to stop calling people, because 
my bill is mostly ridiculous, " she says. 

Freshman Michelle Martin also has similar 
concerns about her bill. She is currently de- 
vising a system to keep her communication 



skills up and her phone bill down. I'm going 
to start writing more letters, " she states. "I 
write a lot now, but I'm going to write more. " 

And has it worked? 

"Well not yet," she admits, "But I'm work- 
ing on it " 

It is rather a rude awakening to receive at 
the tender age of eighteen — to realize that 
(in this big bad ugly world) someone would 
charge you for picking up the phone to reach 
out and touch someone) to spread a little 
sunshine. Someone would charge you for call- 
ing up your lonely old grandmother just to 
say, "/ love you, grandma. " Someone would 
ask you for money just because you called to 
ask your parents for money! 

It is a ghost that haunts us all — those 
little access codes numbers and the outra- 
geous bills that leer at us every month from 
our mailboxes. And it's only the beginning 
Phone bills will continue to plague us for the 
rest of our natural lives. What is this phone 
bill deal, anyway? Some sort of cruel Mon- 
mouth-devised rite of passage? 

Welcome to the real world of Monmouth 
College living; where nobody loves you, no- 
body cares if you can 't get a car because your 
phone bill is $1200, and ordering a pizza is 
still 15C. 



42 




Harlow Blum, professor of art, left, received the Sears-Roebuck Foundation Award for Teaching Excellence and 
Campus Leadership, and Craig Watson, associate professor of English, received the Burlington Northern Foundation 
Faculty Achievement Award last spring. Each received a monetary stipend for their achievements. 



John Malioy, author of the book "Dress for Success", was brought 
to the campus with the help of many organizations. Wouldn't it be 
nice if we could travel across the country telling everyone to 
basically shop at Brooks Brothers!! 




On Commencement Day the ground was broken for the new Wells Theatre. Members of the National Wells Theatre 
Campaign were present along with Jan Cone, president of Crimson Masque and James De Young, professor of SCTA and 
director of the theatre program, and president of the College, Bruce Haywood. 



43 




SPORTS 




46 

48 
52 
54 
56 
60 
62 
64 
66 
68 
70 
72 



BASEBALL 
BASKETBALL m 
BASKETBALL mm 
CROSS COUNTRY 
FOOTBALL 
SOCCER 
SOFTBALL 

TENNIS MEN WOMEN 

TRACK AND FIELD men 
TRACK AND FIELD women 
VOLLEYBALL 
WRESTLING 



BASEBALL 



lik^mmm 






Almost Perfect Season 



The baseball team won its first 20 
games and entered the four-team confer- 
ence playoffs with a 22-1 record, but 
dropped two straight contests to Ripon 
College on the second day of the double 
elimination tourney to relinquish its hard- 
ball crown. 

The double loss left head coach Terry 
Glasgow's squad with a 24-3 record for 
the year. The team was led by pitcher 
Arnold Gonzalez, and shortstop Chris 
Wheat. Gonzalez went undefeated in 
eight decisions, and junior Wheat, an 
All -Mideast Region choice last year, bat- 
ted .547 during the regular season. 



Monmouth averaged 10 runs a game 
during the regular season while batting a 
collective .386. The lowest batting aver- 
age among the starters was .290. Five 
pitchers won at least three games prior to 
post -season action. 

Besides Wheat, other outstanding hit- 
ting performances included Chris Kittell, 
a junior third baseman ( .436, 31 runs, 25 
RBI); Jim Nelson, a senior outfielder 
(.420, 20 runs, 15 RBI); senior Travis 
Wyatt (.414, 22 runs, 22 RBI); and junior 
outfielder Doug Mote (.387, 25 runs, 19 
RBI). 



^ 



A^. 



^ 





46 




Arnold Gonzalez winds up for the pitch against Illinois College 




Junior Chris Wheat rounding the bases after st hit way out in centerfield. 



47 



BASKETBALL 



Third at Midwest Regionals 

Season full of broken records and firsts 



Monmouth won 10 consecutive Mid- 
west Conference games to post an 11-2 
league mark and claim its fifth consecu- 
tive South Division title, but lost its con- 
ference championship to Beloit, 76-74, in 
Beloit, Wis., on Feb. 25. 

Three nights later on its home floor, 
the Scots whipped the same opponent 
82-70 in the first round of the NCAA 
Division III Midwest Regional to ad- 
vance to the second round of the tourna- 
ment at Whitewater, Wis., on March 3- 

Monmouth met the University of Wis- 
consin Whitewater in the second round. 
Despite, a last minute rally, the team lost 
112-76. 

Monmouth achieved its first 20-vic- 
tory season by downing Millikin Univer- 
sity in the third place game at 
Whitewater. 

Besides winning its ninth division title 
in the past 10 years, Monmouth also won 



the Stormy Petrel Classic held in Atlanta, 
Ga., in November. 

Other season highlights included vic- 
tories over North Division powers Beloit 
and Ripon on consecutive nights in late 
January, and an 88-82 win over Knox as 
the Fighting Scots surged to the division 
title by mid-February, clinching the 
crown with a 100-87 overtime decision 
over Coe on Valentbe's Day. 

The win over Beloit was also the 
school's 900th since it began playing bas- 
ketball during the 1899-1900 season. 

Four senior co- captains were complet- 
ing their playing careers: Brant Carius, 
John Herman, John Wright, and Brian 
Horton. 

Carius became the 12th player in Mon- 
mouth basketball history to score more 
than 1,000 career points. Herman was 
nearing the 1,000 -point career mark, 
Horton had already set a new single sea- 



son assist record (171, eclipsing Bob 
Schlicksup's 125 total in 1973-74), and 
Wright played brilliantly in every crucial 
game down to the stretch for the Scots. 

Two juniors were leading the team in 
scoring, guard Juan Mitchell (15.7 points 
per game) and forward Bill Lavery (14.8 
points per game). Other significant un- 
derclass contributors included forwards 
Shawn Strachan and David HiUis and 
guard Craig Anderson. 

With the above players returning next 
season, plus some junior varsity stand- 
outs, head coach Terry Glasgow and his 
team can expect to contbue Monmouth's 
winning hoop tradition. 

With the third place victory in 
Whitewater over Millikin University, 
Glasgow had won 261 games during his 
17 years as head coach here. 



Front row: Craig Anderson, Juan Mitchell, 
Brian Horton, Mike DeGeorge and Derrick 
Allen. Middle row: Mike McNeive, Tim 
Atterberg, John Herman, Brad Fekete, Matt 
Schimmelpfennig, and Joseph Dietz. Back 
row: Jon Wright, Jason Segebrecht, Dave 
HiUis, Steve Watt, Shawn Strachan, Brant 
Carius, Brian Glisan, and Bill Lavery. 






Left: Dave HiUis rises above three Coe defenders. 

Below: Brant Carius still connected despite being surrounded 
by a swarm of Ripon players. Carius became only the 12th 
player in MC basketball history to achieve a career total above 
1,000 points. 




Coming into a full lane, Shawn Strachan puts up a short jumper over his 
opponents. 



BASKETBALL 



John Herman, in the game against MacMurray ^ 
attempts a field goal the hard way. 



Horron shows why he 
is nationally ranked in 
assisrs. 






Jon Wright scores over a Coe Kohawk late in the game. 
The game went into overtme, but Monmouth prevailed, 
100-87. 



Monmouth 


92 


Univ. of South 


90 


Monmouth 


'5 


Oglethorpe Un 


iv. -"1 


Monmouth 


51 


Central Mo. St 


^1 


Monmouth 


''4 


Manrcrest 


'0 


Monmouth 


90 


Olivet 


83 


Monmouth 


-0 


Adrian 


75 


Monmouth 


93 


Aurora 


80 


Monmouth 


87 


MacMarray 


76 


Monmouth 


74 


Coe 


■77 


Monmouth 


98 


Illinois Coll. 


■'6 


Monmouth 


73 


Knox 


86 


Monmouth 


75 


MacMurray 


65 


Monmouth 
Monmouth 


112 


Lake Forest 


88 
68 






Monmouth 


80 


Ripon 


68 


Monmouth 


96 


Grinnell 


6~ 


Monmouth 


94 


Cornell Coll. 


^4 


Monmouth 


82 


Grinell 


66 


Monmouth 


91 


Illinois Coll. 


68 


Monmouth 


88 


Knox 


82 


Monmouth 


100 


Coe 


87 


Monmouth 
Monmouth 


116 


Cornell Coll. 


89 

76 


74 


Beloit 


Monmouth 
Monmouth 


82 


Beloit 


70 








Monmouth 

S 


87 
eason 


Millikin 
record 20-6 


84 


Mid 


west C 


onference 11-2 














k >.v. 



22 



Juan Mitchell connected 46.5 
percent of his attempts at the 
three -point line. Making him 
sixth in the conference. 








John Herman 



Bryan Horton 





Bill Lavery 



Four make it to all-MWC squad 





Juan Mitchell 



Four men's basketball players received 
honors from the Midwest Conference, 
including a trio of Fighting Scots that 
were named to first team All -Conference 
in the South Division. 

Juan Mitchell, Bryan Horton, and John 
Herman all made the first team and Bill 
Lavery made the second as the Scots put 
more players on the squads than any oth- 
er MWC school. 



In the final conference statistics, Hor- 
ton ranked second in assists with 7.7 per 
game. Mitchell was seventh in assists 
(4.5) and sixth in three-point shooting 
(46.5 percent). Herman shot 55.5 percent 
from the field to rank eight, five slots 
behind Lavery, who sank 62.3 percent of 
his attempts. Lavery was 11th in MWC 
scoring with an average of 16.5. Brant 
Carius, who was not named to either 



squad, ranked sixth in free throw shoot- 
ing with an 85.2 percent accuracy rate. 

As a team, Monmouth led the league 
in field goal shooting (51.1). The Scots 
were sixth in three-point shooting (37.7) 
and fourth in free throw shooting (71.8). 

On the women's side Heather Robert- 
son was one of five South Division wom- 
en honored. 



BASKETBALL 



Michelle Periy's three-point attempt average for the season was 64,3%. 




Perry connected on the average of five baskets pet game. Also pictured: Shellee Laubersheimer 
who led the team in assists with 105, and Penny Rowan. 






Front Row: Chris Hickey, Sheri Tim- 
merman, Shellee Laubersheimer, Chris 
Bciermann, Traci Young. Middle Row: 
Toni Presley, Tracy Benge, Karen 
Sheets, Shannon McCurry. Holly Keith, 
coach Jud Kruidenier. Back Row: 
Deena Simester. Penny Rowan, Mi- 
chelle Perry and Heather Robertson. 



Best year and record yet 



The women's basketball 
team hoped to achieve their 
first Midwest Conference South 
Division title when they began 
the season with a 5-0 record. 
However, an 84-82 loss to 
Knox College on Feb. 7 started 
a five game losing streak that 
took the glow off an otherwise 
bright season for Monmouth. 

The team finished the season 
with a 14-8 record with their 
defeat to Cornell College on the 
road. Still, the record gave the 
team the most wins by any 
Monmouth women's team in 
the 15 -year history of the sport 
at the College. By losing its last 
five loop meetings, however, 
Monmouth finished 4-6 in 
South Division play and missed 
the four-team conference 
championship playoff. 

Senior co- captains Michelle 
Perry and Heather Robertson 



completed outstanding careers. 
Perry, at 5'10", averaged 9-2 
points and 5.5 rebounds per 
game. Robertson, in the first 
minute of the Cornell game, 
scored a field goal thereby 
breaking the school's all-time 
scoring record for men's or 
women's basketball. 

Robertson's bucket gave her 
1302 points, surpassing Bill 
Seller's men's career record of 
1301 tallies, which was set from 
1982-86. 

Robertson, at 6 -feet aver- 
aged 18.7 points and 9-1 re- 
bounds per game. 

Robertson entered the sea- 
son as the second woman in the 
14 -year basketball history to 
score more than 1000 points in a 
career. The other was Ann Ja- 
mieson, who scored 1105 points 
from 1981-85. 

It's a unique achievement for 



her to set the record in the time 
that she has done it," said coach 
Jud Kruidenier. "Heather has 
been a good leader for the 
team, and her play has been the 
key to our record this year." 

Heather's official career total 
was 1,477 points with 411 of 
them being tallied this season. 

Penny Rowan, a freshman, 
had an outstanding rookie sea- 
son, averaging 10 points and 8.3 
rebounds per game. Sophomore 
guard Shellee Laubersheimer, 
made 39 of 97 three -point at- 
tempts (40.2 percent) and aver- 
aged 9-1 points per game. 

Holly Keith, also a co- cap- 
tain, completed her playing ca- 
reer for the Scots. 

Head coach Jud Kruidenier 
now has a seven-year record of 
78-72. 



All 
time 

Record 

1,477 
— Heather 
Robertson 



CROSS COUNTR Y 



<fife 



Uphill battle 



V 



Freshman Julia Zobrist won All -Mid- 
west Conference honors by placing 14th 
in the women's division at the league 
harrier meet held in Beloit, Wis., on Nov. 
5, but the men's and women's teams fell 
short of their goals. 

Head coach Chris Pio had predicted 
prior to the loop meet that the men's 
team would place third and the women's 
squad among the top five teams. 

But the men's team finished fifth 
among 10 teams while running without 
senior captain John Clingan, who missed 



the meet due to illness, and the women's 
squad placed seventh of the eight teams. 
The men's team did win three invita- 
tional meets during the season, and at the 
Divisional III State Meet, host Mon- 
mouth had five state runners in their re- 
spective divisions (finishing among the 
top 20 runners); Zobrist (lOth), Jody 
Smith (14th), Clingan (7th), Keith Hol- 
lendonner (lOth), and Steve Hartman 
(18th). The Scots finished third in the 
men's division and fourth in the women's 
division in the State Meet. 




Front Row: Julia Zobrist, Terri Lacey, Dawn Fordyce, Jody Smitli, Kelly Simpson, Sudha Vallabhaneni. 
Middle row: Chris Banning, Randy Wakeland, John Stark, John Clingan, Steve Hartman, 
Back row: Mark Meckel, Jeff McCraven, Head coach Chris Pio, Kenny Bland, Keith HoUendonner. 
(Not pictured: Mark Bradley, John Blassingame) 



1*^ 






Steve Hartman — part of the reason they 
placed first at Knox. 




Jeff McCraven struggles to finish. 



54 






The team has reason to smile, the men placed first and the 
women third at the Knox Invitational on Oct. 8. 






Jody Smith strides out of the pack to lead the Fighting Scots to success 
many times during the season. 




A scene familiar to cross country. 



Monmoufb 
Men 



am place 
U"omf/7 



Madison Tech In^itaiionat 

Millikin Invtlational 

Principia In^irarioaal 

Beloil Inviiaiional 

Knox Inyttanonal 

WJ.U. Open Meet 

Illinois Division III Meet* 

Univ. of Chicago Jnviianonal 

MC AC/MC AW Meet (Beloil. Wis.)" 



fib fth 

Isl 2nd 



4tb 
)td 
2nd 
!ib 



ird 
8th 
4th 
frd 
rth 



* John Clingan. Keith HoIlendonner.Siete 
Hanman. Julia Zobrisi and Jody Smith 
earned All-State honors 

** Julia Zobrist earned All-Conference honors. 



FOOTBALL 




Senior Jim Nelson made 21 receptions for a total of 451 yards, 



The Scots embarrassed the Cornell Rams by walking over them 31-10 
at Homecoming. 



Brilliant regular season 

Only blemish, a post-season defeat in conference championship 



Monmouth won its second consecu- 
tive South Division title with an unde- 
feated record, but, as it did last year, lost 
to St. Norbert in the conference champi - 
onship, 12-0, in DePere, Wis., on Nov. 
12. 

The Fighting Scots swept through 
conference play with a 7-0 record, and 
also whipped non- conference opponents 
Eureka and MacMurray. 

The team came from behind to defeat 
Beloit 31-28 and Coe 13-12, and capped a 
brilliant regular season by smashing arch- 
rival Knox 45-6. Monmouth's Bronze 
Turkey win, its fifth in the past seven 
years (with one tie) gives the Scots 44 
wins, 45 losses, and 10 ties as the series 



moves to Galesburg next November for 
the 100th meeting in a rivalry that dates 
back to 1891. 

Senior fullback Sean Maher led Mon- 
mouth's offense with 726 yards rushing 
and six touchdowns. Senior wide receiver 
Jim Nelson caught 20 passes for 438 yards 
for the Scots, who averaged nearly 27 
points per game while holding opponents 
to an average of less than 10 points per 
game. Senior kicker and punter John 
Warfield led the squad in scoring with 57 
points, including 30 of 31 extra points 
and nine of 10 field goal attempts. He 
also averaged 37.6 yards per punt. 

Twelve members of the team were se- 
leaed to the all -conference squad. First 



team selections included Maher, offen- 
sive lineman Ross Richardson, Mike 
Herman, and Bart Smith; defensive end 
Greg Bennett; nose guard Joe Courtney; 
linebacker Steve Ford; defensive back 
Mark Newlin; and punter Warfield. Hon- 
orable mention picks included Nelson, 
tight end Dan Mahr, and defensive tackle 
Tim Beiermann. 

The team is coached by Kelly Kane, 
who now has a five-year record of 31-16. 
Under Kane's direction, Monmouth has 
won 26 of 29 games during the past three 
seasons and has also won 20 consecutive 
regular season games. 




From row, L-R: Mark Reed, Doug LaveU, H.T. Kinney. Scott Woods. KeUy Kane, Orv Often, Van Steckelberg, Hal Devore, Andy Everett. Second row, L-R: Peter Robertson. Kit Packard, 
Pat Hobin, Todd Stevens, Sean Johnson, Matt Ghrer, Trent Thomas, Brad Crisco, Bill Steckelberg, James Fancher, Jarrod Hippen, Darren Sweeney. Jessie Gutierrez, Scott Brokaw, Craig 
Anderson, Sean McKee,Jim GiUespie, Mark Newlin, and Greg Bennett. Third row, L-R; Terry Geimaeirt.Jim Nelson, Scott Wollam,John Robbins,John Orroll. Sean Maher. Lane Eldred, 
Shawn Kelly, Paul Fus, Jon Nelson, Kurt Johnson, Tom Hasson, Tom Rusk, Tim Hinson, Mike Salaway, Eric Worsely, Brian Lund, and Steve Morrill. Fourth row, L-R: Mike Herman, 
Mike Jones, Jon Helm, Sean Stewart.Jim Machowiak, Dave Nauert, Jim Eagleston, Kxaig Sweeney, Roger Rohrer, Trent Ash, Steve Tropea, Bruce Hagie, John Warfield, Todd Tesdal, Steve 
Ford, Bob Innis, Derek Clayton, and Colby Oleson. Back row, L-R: Dave KeUy, Joe Courtney, Joe Ryner, Ty Weisendanger, Kyle MiUer. Ross Richardson, Todd Wetterhng, Bart Smirh, 
Jim Malinowski, David Hernandez, Andy Johnson, David Sonnon, Tim Beiermann, Nick Wyant, Btyan Buckert, Dan Mahr, Jim Graham, Charles Burton, Corey Bihps, and Robert Hamann. 



FOOTBALL 






^0^ . 






0^" 







f 





Even snow could not stop Monmouth's de- 
fense. The team held its opponents to a 
season score total of 95, The Scots total was 
268. 



Monmouth 19 


i 

Eureka 





Monmouth i2 
Monmouth 35 


MacMurray 


10 

7 


Ripon 


Monmouth 31 


Beloit 


28 


Monmouth 31 


Illinois Coll. 





Monmouth 31 


Cornell Coll. 


10 


Monmouth 13 


C< 


le 


12 


Monmouth 3 1 


G 


rinnell 


10 


Monmouth -s 


5 


K 


aox 


6 


Monmouth C 

Sei 
Co 


) 

ISO 

nfe 


St 

a 9 
ren 


Norbert 

-1-0 
ce 7-0 


12 
















Nice scalp. The clean look was in during the season. 




Sophomore Craig Anderson rushes 
pass the Rams. 



Jon Nelson ranked third in rushing. 





QB Craig Anderson hands-off to senior Sean Mahr during the Ripon game. Sean 
'rushed for a season total of 723 yards and 7 touchdowns. 




Facing off on the scrimage line against Knox. 





The appearance of the Scots in the end zone was a familiar sight during the 99th playing ot the 
Monmouth -Knox rivalry. 



Despite excellent defense by freshman Jess Willson, Monmouth lost 2-1 to 
Cornell College. 




Bud Sherman concentrates on defense against 
Siwash. 



Front Row: Jess Willson, Jeff Coverdell, Steve Patrick, Rick Ramirez, Tom Prapuolenis, Gregg Guenther. 

Middle Row: Etop Udo, Mick Rettke, Bud Sherman, Rick Wilson, Travis Coverdell. 
Back row: Assistant Coach Jim Brown, Larry Cecilio, Neil Currie, Mike Guenther, Ed Lapsa, Rick Wherry, 

Head Coach Mike Williamson. 




Experience, not skill, needed 



Monmouth defeated Cornell College 
2-1 in its final game of the season to 
finish in fifth place in the six-team South 
Division of the Midwest Conference. 

The Scots completed the season with a 
1-4 conference record and an overall 
mark of 3-8-1. The team opened its sea- 
son with a 14-2 trouncing of Lincoln 



Christian College, and also defeated 
Wartburg College 1 -0 and played to a 1 - 1 
tie against Illinois Wesleyan University. 
Composed primarily of freshmen and 
sophomores, Monmouth lost three 
games by one goal, including two con- 
ference defeats. The team played under 
the guidance of coach Mike Williamson. 



Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 


14 
1 




! 

Lincoln Christian 
Blackburn 
Grinnell 
Knox 


2 
2 
4 
i 
i 
1 

5 
4 
1 
5 
1 


2 



JlUnois College 
Coe 


Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 

Fifth 

Seas 
ConI 


i 


Wartburg 


2 


Principia 


1 
1 

2 

in 
on 
'ere 


MacMurray 
Illinois Wesleyan 
Culver-Stockton 
Cornell College 

South Division 

3-8-1 


nee 1-4 










Mike Guenther tires to find an opportunity to pass to teammate Tom Prapuolenis. 




With the help of goalie Etop Udo, the opposition was held to one scire in three of the seasons 
games. 



SOFTBALL 



Could have been better 



Monmouth won seven of its first eight 
games, but lost 15 of its last 18 contests 
to finish the season with a record of 10- 
16 under the direction of head coach 
Amy Potts. 

The Scots posted a 5-5 Midwest Con- 
ference mark and placed a pair of seniors 
on the all-loop team: outfielder Julie 
Smith and catcher Michelle Perry. Perry 
was also selected Most Valuable Player 
by a vote of her teammates. 

Freshman Shannon McCurry, an in- 
fielder, led the team in batting average 
with a .338 mark. Other .300-plus hitters 
included freshman Chris Hickey at .306, 
and Smith at .302. Ferry batted .296. 

Freshman shortstop Penny Rowan led 



the team in runs scored with 16. McCurry 
and Perry each had 12 runs batted in to 
lead in that category. 

Junior pitcher Sonya Myers led the 
team in earned run average at 2.23, and 
freshman hurler Polly Youngquist regis- 
tered six wins and a no -hitter against 
Illinois Wesleyan in a 1-0 Scots victory 
on March 27. 

Other season highlights included a 
doubleheader sweep of Augustana and 
winning two of three games from Knox 
College. 

Coe College won the four -team con- 
ference championship playoffs held at St. 
Norbert College. 





Front Row; Donna Klenke, 
Polly Youngquist, Amie jack- 
son, Susan Waschevski, Second 
Row: Julie Smith, Shannon 
McCurry, Traci Young, Laura 
Prentice. Third row: Sonya My- 
ers, Michelle Perry. Penny 
Rowan, Jennifer Lentz, Chris- 
tine Hickey. 



62 



Sophomore Sue Waschevski connects as teamnnates Amie 
Jackson and Tracy Young look on. 



Don't let the photo fool you. Seniors Julie Smith and Michelle Perry take only a 
brief time-out. When called upon by teammates, their efforts were always above par. 
For this reason, they were the only members ot the Monmouth team to make all- 
loop team and Michelle was named Most Valuable Player for the '89 season. 






Penny Rowan tries to beat the ball to second base. 



Season stats were not available Honestly! 




In the wind-up, junior pitcher, Sonya Myers prepares to 

pitch. 



TENNIS 



Young teams on the 



move 



MEN 

Monmouth placed ninth at the U- 
team Midwest Conference meet held in 
Beloit, Wis., on May 5-6. The Scots 
scored points at No. 6 singles (Peter Sor- 
ensen) and No. 2 doubles (Mick Rettke 
and Brent Dahl). Rettke is a sophomore 
and Dahl is a junior. 

Under the direction of head coach 
Mike Lewis, Monmouth posted a dual 
meet record of 3-6. 

Sorensen, a freshman, was the team's 
Most Valuable Player and posted a regu- 
lar season mark of 11-1 at No. 6 singles. 

Ripon won the conference meet, fol- 
lowed by Lawrence and Lake Forest. 



With all six starts returning next spring, 
Lewis says he expects Monmouth to 
build on the successes of this year. 

WOMEN 

Monmouth scored 10 points to tie 
with Illinois College for 9th place in the 
11 -team Midwest Conference meet host- 
ed by iCnox College and played in Mo- 
line, IlL, from Oct. 21 to 23. 

Scoring points for Monmouth were 
Pam Bowman at No. 2 singles. Shannon 
Oberle at No. 3 singles. Penny Rowan at 
No. 6 singles, and Rowan and Beth Bau - 
mann at No. 3 doubles. 

Mike Lewis coaches the team. 



MIDWEST CONFERENCE 


TENNIS 


RESULTS 




WOMEN 




Ripon 


78 


Lawrence 


57 


Cornell 


54 


Belolit 


51 


Lake Forest 


41 


Knox 


40 


Grinnell 


33 


St. Norbert 


29 


Monmouth 


10 


Illinois College 


10 


Coe 


5 


Due to a lack of coopera 


ion from 


coach Mike Lewis, season stars were | 


nor available 











Front Row — Susan Waschevski, Hiroko Inami, Polly Youngquist, Pam Bowman and Beth Baumann 
Back Row — Michelle Moy, Shannon Oberle, Stacy McQuellon, coach Mike Lewis. 



P 



«*C«rt\* swsi^ 



-5 



SPORTS "CANDIDS' 



The dance squad started off the season with new moves and uniforms. 

Avid fans of baseball (and tanning) turned out to watch a near perfect season. 





9..%^ 



>^-.>„wt«t: 




Coach Otten starts 'em wrestling before they can even 
walk or talk. 



Mick Rettke taking a break from tennis is clowning around before the 
baseball game starts. 





Left: Hiroko Inami returns the ball during singles play. Top: Mick Rettke returns service. 



TRACK AND FIELD 



Fteshman Charles Burton finishing the last 
leg of the 4 X 100 relay. The team came in 
first. 



Championship 
missed 

Only 5.3 points between first and second 






o 






Monmouth lost to Cornell College 165 
to 161.5 in the Midwest Conference track 
and field championship held in Grinnell, 
Iowa, on May 12 and 13. Ten teams com- 
peted. 

The Scots crowned four individual 
champions and one relay team winner. 

Ross Richardson, a senior and two- 
time national qualifier, won the shot put 
with a distance of 15.96 meters. John 
Warfield won the discus with a throw of 
43.51 meters. David Hillis, a sophomore, 
won the javelin with a throw of 189 feet, 
4 inches. Charles Burton, a freshman, and 
the college's first national qualifier in two 
events, won both his specialities — the 
110-meter high hurdles (14.65 seconds) 
and the 400 -meter intermediate hurdles 
(54.77 seconds). 

The 4 X 400 -meter relay team of Bur- 



ton, Jeff McCraven, Tim Wolf, and John 
Clingan, won the event with a time of 
3:20.24. 

Warfield also placed second in the 
shot put with the distance of 15.13 me- 
ters. Todd Stevens, a sophomore, placed 
second in the triple jump with a distance 
of 13.80 meters and third in the long 
jump with a distance of 6.04 meters. 

Burton also placed second in the 100- 
meter dash (11.04 seconds). 

Other third place finishers included 
Steve Hartman, a freshman, in the 10,000- 
meter run (34.45.0); Clingan in the 800- 
meter run (1.57.63); and Wayne Hasty, in 
the javelin (1721"). 

Monmouth has placed first or second 
at the men's conference meet in each of 
the past five seasons under the direaion 
of KeUy Kane. 




William Steckelburg hands off the Charles Burton in the 4 X 100 at the only Home Quad meet. 




John Warfield placed second in the shot put 
at conference. Here he participates in the 
discus. 





. ( 



H 










John Mueller, Randy Wakeland, 
and Kenny Bland practicing on 
the high hurdles. 

Competing in the javelin throw, 
Wayne Hasty. 





t 



I^^BE.^ i- 


• A . 


6 @ 






1 


— 'J^^IBF ^ 




7 ^ "■ 


mm-W 


.-* 


EG 


' ™ 


\\~" 



Front Row — John Clingan, Jeff McCtaven, Todd Stevens, William Steckelberg, Charles Burton, Brian Lantman, and 
John Blassingame. Second Row — Keith HoUendonner, Kenny Bland, Steve Hartraan, John Stark, John Mueller. Steve 
Morrill, Tom Hasson, and Ed Kopp. Third Row — Frank Ptokup, Wayne Hasty, Jim Malinowski, John Warfield, Ross 
Richardson, Dave Hillis, Sean Johnson, and Shawn Strachan, Back Row — Randy Wakeland, Mark Heckel, Don Purley, 
Nick Wyant, Joe Ryner, Trent Goforth, and Shane Weyland. 



TRACK AND FIELD 



Winding up for the discus throw, is Shelley 
Brown who placed third at Midwest Conference. 




Front Row — Michelle Moy, Terri Lacey, Jody Smith and Dawn Fordyce. Back Row — Julia 
Zobrist, Kelly Simpson, Shelley Brown, and Heather Robertson. 




Placed Sixth At MWC 



The eight-member women's team 
placed sixth among 10 teams at the Mid- 
west Conference track and field champi- 
onships held in Grinnell, Iowa, on May 
12 and 13. 

Shelley Brown, a senior, won the jave- 
lin event with the throw of 107 feet. She 
also placed third in the discus with a 
throw of 33.89 meters, and finished fifth 
in the shot put with a distance of 9.75 
meters. 

Kelly Simpson, a senior, placed third 
in the long jump with a leap of 5.09 



meters. 

Heather Robertson, a senior, placed 
third in the 100- meter hurdles with a time 
of 15.56 seconds. 

St. Norbert College retained its team 
title. 

Another season highlight occurred on 
May 6 when the team won the Forrest 
Rittgers Invitational in Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa. 

Head coach Jud Kruidenier must re- 
place five seniors on this year's small but 
talented squad. 




Senior Heather Robertson anticipates the 
hand off of the baton from teammate Jody 



68 



Julia Zobrist pulls away from her challengers. 




«MM««tffel 



i « « 4 * ^ 






Smith during the 4X4 relay at the home 
quad meet. 



Julia kicks in during the last leg of the relay. 



VOLLEYBALL 




Front row: Donna Godar, Lori O'Brien, Cindy Siepel, Laura Prentiss, Cathi Phillips. 

Middle Row; Azusa Ikeaki, Traci Young, Holly Keith, Sonya Myers, Lisa Stevens, Toni Presley. 

Back row: Deena Simester, Mary Kay Francis, Heather Robertson, Shelley Brown, Elise Cummings, Brooke 

WeUs. 

(not pictured; Katie Francis, Sarah Skov) 




Monmouth 





Judson 


2 


Monmouth 





Eureka 


2 


Monmouth 





Eureka 


2 


Monmouth 


2 


Rockford 


1 


Monmouth 
Monmouth 



2 


MacMurray 
Lakeland 


2 



Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 




1 
2 



Augustana 
Augustana 
Evangel (Mo 
Turkio 


2 

4 

) 

2 


Monmouth 





Park 


2 


Monmouth 





Peru State 


2 


Monmouth 


2 


Graceland 





Monmouth 





Ta 


bor 


2 


Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 


3 
1 


in 

lo 


Wesleyan 1 
wa Wesleyan 1 
iaaell | 


3 


Gi 


Monmouth 





Cc 


rnell Coll. 


3 


Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 




1 
1 


III 
Ca 

Mi 


Valley 
rl Sandbur^ 
illkia 


2 
4 


Monmouth 


3 


Cc 


e 


2 


Monmouth 


2 


Gi 


andview 





Monmouth 
Monmouth 
Monmouth 


1 

2 
2 


M. 
M. 


irycrest 

irycrest 


2 
3 
i 


Ki 


wx 


Monmouth 


1 


III 


'nois Coll. 

wrence Un 



iy. 


Monmouth 


2 


La 


Monmouth 


1 


Lake Forest 


2 


Monmouth 


2 


St. Norbert 


1 


Monmouth 





Cornell 


2 


Monmouth 


1 


Knox 


2 




5ea5 


on 12-20 





Communication was also a key to 
success. 



Volleyball on the rise 



WRESTLING 



Troy McDaniel tries xo maintain the advantage 
over his opponent. 



Wrestlers wrap-up 



All nine wrestlers who went to the 
Midwest Conference meet placed second, 
third, or fourth in their respective weight 
classes and the Scots placed third as a 
team among the seven entrants. 

Brian Swaw (118 pounds), Kurt Kelly 
(134 pounds), and Dave Sonnon (heavy- 
weight) all placed second. 

Rob Herzog (126 pounds), Trent 
Thomas (l42 pounds), and Scott Ham- 
mer (177 pounds) placed third. Gene 
Figge (150 pounds) and Joe Courtney 
(190 pounds) finished fourth. 

Coe College edge defending champion 
Cornell College 101.5 to 90.5 Monmouth 
was third with 60.5 points, followed by 



Illinois College, Lawrence, Knox, and 
Ripon. 

Monmouth also posted its first-ever 
dual meet victory over Cornell College, 
beating the Rams 21-17 in December. 

The Scots posted an 11-6 dual meet 
record for the season under the direction 
of head coach Orv Otten. 

Three wrestlers won more than 20 
matches. Swaw posted a record of 25-9-1 
at 118 pounds. Figge, the lone senior on 
the squad, was 24-11-1 at 150 pounds. 
Jim Mackowiak was 22-8-0 at 158 
pounds, but missed the conference meet 
due to a shoulder injury. 





John Robbins tries to turn his opponent. 



72 





73 



%^' 



ir; 






>^ 



KiM:/ fofo and Eriko Tsuchiya feel at ease in Hubbard House, which houses 
the Office of htewational Affaffs and the Office of Minority Affars Also 
pictured: Ms. Barbara OiSe. 



nms^ 



^ « 



A 



/ think this particular picture wU teach you Bud Sherman not to take certain pics 
with photo-lab fUm. (smile!) Oh, by the may, nke towel dude. 



Jason Ray and Katie Francis are reaty into dancing at Homecoamg. 



Alpha Tau Omega 



FACES, PLACES, ETC. 




Tammy Shell and Kta Rush 



FACES 

FACULTY AND STAFF 

FRESHMEN 

SOPHOMORES 

JUNIORS 

SENIORS 

THE BLACKLIST 

ETC. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

GREEKS 

CLOSE 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

PLACES 

You'll just have to remember them for there 
isn't any room left in the book. 




David Allison 
Professor, Biology 

Rajkumar Ambrose 

Assistaat Professor 

Physics 

William Amy 
Professor, Religion 

Betty Babcokc 
Business Office 

Colleen Barker-Williamson 
Student Center Director 

Catherine Bennett 

Secretary 

President's Office 

Beverly Brewer 
Business Office 

Steven Buban 

Associate Professor 

Sociology 

Robert Buchholz 
Professor, Biology 

Skip Burhans 
Reference Librarian 

Daryl Carr 
Computer Center 

Richard Cogswell 

Assistant Professor 

Mathematics 

Jacquelyn Condon 
Associate Dean of Students 

Andrea Cornett-Scott 

Director of 

Minority Affairs 

Roberta Da villa 

Faculty Associate 

SCTA 

James DeYoung 
Professor, SCTA 

Sandra Eskins 

Director 

Student Financial Services 

Douglas Fargo 

Assistant Professor 

Military Science 

Peter Gebauer 
Professor, Chemistry 

Robert Gillogly 
Dean of Students 




76 




Terry Glasgow 
Associate Professor 
Physical Education 

Tim Gray 
Manager, Bookstore 

Richard Griffiths 
Professor, Music 

Eleanor Gustafsoa 
Interlibrary Loan 

Kathy Haas 
Secretary, Physical Ed. 

Farhac Haq 
Assistant Professor 
Government 

William Hastings 
Professor, Psychology 

Harris Hauge, Librarian 



James Haynes, Registrar 

Jill Munson 
Secretary, Registrar 

Roger Haynes 

Assist. Track/Football 

Bruce Hayfever, President 



Jerry Hazen, Chaplain 

Susan Holm 
Assistant Professor 
Modern Foreign Languages 

Janet Hull 
Secretary 
Career Planning 

Dennis Johnson 
Director, Audiovisual 

Wanda Johnson, Secretary 

William Julian 
Dean of the College 

Kelly Kane 

Instructor 

Head Football Coach 

Brigit Keefe 

Faculty Associate English 

Alfred Keller 
Visiting Instructor 
Modern Foreign Languages 



77 



Jobo Ketterer 
Professor, Biology 

Richard Kieft 
Chemistry 

Carolyn Tyirin-Kirk 

Associate Professor 

Sociology 

Barbara Koch 
Secretary, Student Center 

Judson Kruideaier 
Lecturer, Physical Ed. 

Rodney Lemon 
Professor, Economics 

Lee McGaan 
Assistant Professor, SCTA 

Jeremy McNamara 
Professor, English 

James Mills 
Instructor, Geology 

Roger Noel 

Assistant Professor 

Modern Foreign Languages 

Barbara Odle 

Director of 

International Affairs 

Orvin Otten 
Head Wrestling Coach 

Kenneth Peterson 

Assistant Professor 

Biology 

Eugene Pibal 

Lecturer, Economics 

Business Administration 

Chris Pio 
Cross Country Coach 

Amy Potts, Head 

Volley/Softball Coach 

Richard Reno 

Associate Professor 

Computer Science 

Roger Sander 
Assistant Coach 
Basket/Baseball 

Edward Scott 

Assistant Professor 

Philosophy 

Leroy Sells 
Master Sergeant 
Military Science 




78 




Thomas Sienkewicz 
Professor, Classics 

Charles Skov 
Professor, Physics 

Ira Smolensky 
Assistant Professor 
Government 

Douglas Spitz 
Professor, History 

Frances Stauffer 
Academic Secretary 

Sue Stevenson 
Circulation, Secretary 

David Suda 
Associate Professor 
History 

Marta Tucker 
Assistant Professor 
Mathematics 

William Urban 
Professor, History 

Douglas VanLaere 
Director, Food Service 

Deborah Vetter 
Director, Career Planning 

William Wallace 

Assistant Professor . 

SCTA 

George "W" Waltershausen 

Professor, Art 

Craig Watson 
Assistant Professor 
English 

Andrew Weiss 
Associate Professor 
Econ. and Business 
Administration 

Lyle Welch 
Associate Professor 
Mathematics 

Carol Whiteside 
Secretary, Dean of the 
College 

Gary Willhardt 
Professor, English 

Dean Wright 
Professor, Psychology 



79 



AJlyce Adams-Smitb 

David Allisoa 

David Badal 

Sarah Benson 



John Blassingame 

Susan Boland 

Darci Boles 

Melissa Brewer 



Charles Burton 

John Carroll 

Andrew Catlin 

Laguerra Champagne 



Dolores Childress 

Travis Coverdell 

Bradley Crisco 

Deletra Cross 



Tammy DeMay 

Laura Dean 

Mary Jane Erickson 

Charlene Faughn 




80 




Adam Gould 
Todd Halihaa 
Kristin Hallaat 
Kimberly Hallam 



Julie Hartzler 
Mark Meckel 
Jill Henson 
Karen Hestroffer 



Christine Hickey 
Jennifer Hoekstra 
Andrewe Johnson 
Coreena Johnston 



Jon Kruse 
Edward Lapsa 
Nicole Leachman 
Jennifer Lentz 



Brian Markut 
Pamela Marshall 
Michelle Martin 
Shannon McCurry 



81 



Joseph McDaaiel 

Sean McKee 

Sharon Miller 

Kenneth Newton 



Sbannan Norris 

Jonica Oliver 

Eric Ostermeier 

Laura Prentice 



Gary Price 
Don Purley 



Valerie Reppelin 
Karen Robinson 



Willard Robinson 
Robin Rose 



82 





Tammy Shell 
William Steckelberg 
Genyne Steed 
Lisa Stevens 



Tammi Stockwell 
Lorrie Stoll 
Bobbi Swarts 
John Thomas 



Tara Triplet! 
Kris Wang 
Merideth Willett 



Jess Willson 
Richard Wilson Jr. 



Teresa Wolf 
Julia Zobrist 



83 




npbel. 

Karon Cotton 

Joseph Courtney 

Michael Daaner 



Tina Decker 

Raymond Doswell 

Donna Dudzinski 

LuAnn Dunn 



Emilio Fuentesjr. 

Edith Godby 

Dave Grein 

Randy Gunia 



KJmberley Haley 

Robert Hatnann 

Kirstin Hartman 

Katbryn Hileman 



64 





Keith Hollendonner 
Cheryl Horn 
Yvonne Howard 
Pebbles J a ckson 





Dawn Kamadulski 
Jodi Karwath 
Stephen Klien 
Courtnay Kondas 




Karen Lafferty 
Natalie Mallie 
Micbele Mangel 
LaSbawn McNulty 




Tonya Meier 
Colby Oleson 
Nobuyuki Ota Jr. 
DuFresne Penrod 




Angela Pensinger 
Catherine Phillips 
Luis Ramirez 
Sbirlynne Roan 



85 




Heather Robinson 
Susan Rogers 
Thomas Rusk 

Elizabeth Schmidt 



Rhonda Seelye 

Teresa Sheils 

Barry Sherman 

Mary Senica 



Marian Simkins 



Jody Smith 



Renee Soderstrom 



86 



During the Christmas season Theta Chi collected toys for children in need. 
Pictured: Chuck Yingst. 



Bill Lavery and Yvonne Howard relaxed and having fun at the Homecoming 
dance. 




David Sonnon Jr. 



Trade Stahl 



Trudi Steichmann 



Stacy Stoyanoff 
Nila Stuckey 
YoJanda Studway 
Sudba Vallabbaneai 



Michelle Van Landuit 
Norene Vass 
Steven Wadhams 
Patricia Washington 



B7 



JUNIORS • JUNIORS 



Rabid to A wee 

Duane Baldwin 

Cheryl Coaaway 

Jeffery Coverdell 



Kathyrne Dahl 

George Davis 

Gregory DeKoster 

William Dust 



Charles Farr 

Danette Forbes 

Donna Godar 

Miyuki Gotoh 



Rodney Greer 
Katie Hale 



Amy Hequembourg 
Tracy Howard 



88 





JUNIORS • JUNIORS 




Rochelle Hurt 
Azusa Ikezaki 
Carin Jobason 
Rika Kato 



Daniel Kelleber 
Masae Kobayashi 
Sue Kozyra 
Jeaaaiae LeVasseur 



Charles Lewis 
Jill Linder 
Joan Linder 
Laura Loy 



Brian Lund 
Michael Miballik 



S. Juan Mitchell 
Devon Monroe 



John Mueller 

Robert Nelsoa III 

Lori O'Brien 

A. Christy Ogilvie 



Kelly Patch 

Kurt Pemberton 

Victoria Perez 

John Popolis 



Robert Ravel 



Stacy Reese 



Heather Robertson 




Junior Vicki Perez performs dance on part of the entertainment at Las Posadas 
sponsored by the Office of Minority Affairs. 



90 



Secretary of State (Illinois) spoke to Monmouth students before the November 
6 elections on "Republican Day. " 




Kevin Seftoa 



Tomoko Shida 



Carlos Smith 



James Stolz Jr. 
Tammy Sudholt 
Randall Wakeland 
Randy Welch 



Chris Wheat 
Todd Wozniak 
Yuki Yamagishi 
Sylvia Zethmayr 



91 




'^enay /v.. tsauer 

Cum Laude 
Accounting* 

Kimbedy D. Bratkovic 

Accounting 

Cheryl M. Bcoskow 

Business Administration 
Government 




Elizabeth N. Breasner 
Education 

Tracy J. Cleveager 

Mathematics 



John T. Cliagaa 

Cum Laude 
Computer Science* 




Terry L. Geirnaeirt 

Education 



Kelly B. Goudschaal 

Cum Laude 
Mathematics 



Jeanette E. Grate 

Magna Cum Laude 
Business Administration* 



k 





Michelle M. Hall 

Psychology 

Corey G. Kelly 

Cum Laude 
Psychology* 

Jamal Bin W.Z. Kipli 

Business Administration 



Mary R. Larson 
Cum Laude 
Distinction Graduate 
Biology* 

Andrew B. Kurz 

Cum Laude 
Biology* 

Anthony S. Kurz 

Cum Laude 
Biology* 



I 



Anne C. Mader 

Summa Cum Laude 
French* 

Daniel R. Mabr 

Business Administration 

Amy B. Manning 

Summa Cum Laude 
Biology* 



Clifford S. Mason 
Business Administration 

Tiffany D. Meksbes 

Business Administration 



93 



Bradley C. Nabrstadt 

Summa Cum Laude 

Distinction Graduate 

English* 

Government* 

Mika Nisbiki 
An* 

Karin R. Owrey 

Magna Cum Laude 

Dinstinction Graduate 

Accounting* 



Terri M. Reed 

Cum Laude 
Religion 

Kelly L. Rinker 

Psychology 

Keith W. Schmidt 

Psychology 



Diane C. Saelleaberger 

Synoptic 



Soon Cbye Yap 

Business Administration 




President Haywood and Dean Julian in the processional. 
Commencement, the beginning of a bright future. 



94 



It is hard to believe that four yers have passed. It began for many 
at Matriculation. Cheryl Conaway addresses the Class of 1992 
as Dean Gillogly, Dean Julian and President Haywood look on. 




Jennifer E. Stevenson 

Cum Laude 
History 



Minako Tokumaru 

SCTA 



Mary Ellen Westemeier 

Psychology 

Jacqueline K. White 

Accounting 



Saeko Yanaka 

Psychology 

Robert C. Yingst 

Business Administration 

Masako Yodonawa 

Alt* 



95 



Blacklist nC black list): a list of persons that are 
disapproved of or are to be punished or discriminated 
against as e: persons engaged in activities subersive of 
the national interest ie. not taking one's yearbook 
picture. 



FRESHMEN • 


FRESHMEN 


• FRESHMEN 


• FRESHMEN • 


FRESHMEN 


Jonathan Acheson 


Lance Eldred 


Robert Innis 


Kindra Oleson 


Shannon Stewart 


Clinton Alcorn 


Adriene Estler 


Kurtiss Johnson 


Race Owens 


David Sweeney 


Timothy Atterberg 


Ellen Ewen 


Heather Klopp 


Christopher Packard 


Aki Tazaki 


Yolanda Barnes 


James Fancher 


Tracey Knutson 


Katherine Palmer 


John Terry 


Christy Beck 


Brad Fekete 


Erin Krieg 


Dawn Pfeiffer 


Trent Thomas 


Renee Bergquist 


miiam Finch 


Terri Lacey 


Toni Presley 


Sheri Timmerman 


Ricci Bickling 


Darin Forbes 


Brian Lantman 


Jason Ray 


Kevin VanOrder 


John Bielawa 


Katie Francis 


David Kelly 


Wendy Raymond 


Laura Voetberg 


Corey Billips 


Toni Fry 


Lisa Legris 


Andrew Rogers 


Erica Walker 


Kenny Bland 


Kurt Geer 


Scott Lewis 


Barbara Rogers 


Norma Ward 


David Bradshaw 


Matthew Ghrer 


Keith Longtin 


Penny Rowan 


Stephen Watt 


Jonna Brewer 


Trent Goforth 


James Mackowiak 


James Ryan Jr. 


Blair Weeks 


Juaneryle Brooks 


Yvonne Gosney 


Jeffery McCraven 


Joseph Ryner 


Ty Weisendanger 


Lori Carrell 


Bruce Hagie 


Shawn McDaniel 


Matthew 


Brooke Wells 


Teresa Christiansen 


Marcus Hall 


Michael McNeive 


Schimmelpfennig 


Michael Wetteling 


Derek Clayton 


Scott Hammer 


David Mickley 


Jason Segebrecht 


Craig Willeford 


William Cone 


Stephen Hartman 


Kyle Miller 


Michelle Sherlock 


Kirsten Wolever 


Jennifer Cornett 


Brian Helmig 


Jennifer Milnes 


Amy Shryack 


Nicholas Wyant 


Dawn Crafford 


David Hernandez 


Kimberly Mortimer 


Cynthia Siepel 


Kay Wykert 


Anthony Culotta 


John Hickling 


Susan Murphy 


Deena Simester 


Traci Young 


Nicolas D' Alfonso 


Timothy Hinson 


Susan Naab 


Jennifer Sims 


Polly Youngquist 


Nicole Davis 


John Hippen 


Barbara Nashold 


David Smith 




Michael DeGeorge 


Kristen Hunter 


Tom Nehrkorn 


Lisa Smith 




Christopher Earl 


LaShionda Hurt 


Jon Nelson 
Michael Nelson 


Daniel Spurgeon 
John Stark 




• 


SOPHOMORES • SOPHOMORES • SOPHOMORES • SOPHOMORES • 


Radha Aiwa 


Loren Cook 


Hiroyuki Fujita 


Shalise Johnson 


Michael Rettke 


Craig Anderson 


Elise Cummings 


James Gillespie Jr. R. Calvin Jones 


Kelly Rice 


Toni Anderson 


Neil Currie 


Michael Glassburn John Kator 


Peter Robertson 


Rosalind Banks 


Brett D'Antonio 


James Graham 


Kurt Kelly 


Roger Rohrer 


Gregory Bennett 


Daniel DePew 


Michael Guenther Stephen Kennedy 


Rita Rush 


Mark Beuttel 


Michelle Doering 


Richard Hacker 


Diantha Koenig 


Carta Sanders 


Susan Boland 


Regina Doswell 


Trina Hager 


Edward Kopp 


Barry Sherman 


Michael Bradford 


Salena Dreger 


Thomas Hassan 


James Malinowski 


Bill Slay don 


Wray Broskow 


James Eagelston 


William Hennemann Jennifer Mason 


Laura Smajo 


Bryan Buckert 


William Finch 


Robert Herzog 


Sharon McHone 


Christina Smallwood 


Darb Calvert 


Elizabeth Ford 


David Hillis 


Melinda Miller 


Bart Smith 


Jennifer Campbell 


Dawn Fordyce 


Patrick Hobin 


Stephen Mizell 


Elizabeth Smith 


Stuart Carr 


Jesse Foe 


Steven Howard 


Jeffery Moulton 


Richard Smith 


Charles Case 


Mary Francis 


Amie Jackson 


Mindy Thi Nguyen 


Peter Sorensen 


Cimberlie Chambers 


Angela Frederick 


Wesley Jacobs 


Shannon Oberle 




Julaine Chewning 


Ginger Frick 


Kelly Johnson 


Thomas Prapuolenis 




Emily Collins 




Sean Johnson 


Adam Reading 





Todd Stevens 
Sean Stewart 
Stacy Stoyanoff 
miliam Strachan 
Martlia Strode 



Nila Stuckey 
Valerie Taylor 
Suzanne Tebo 
Tom Theleritis 
George Thomas 



Steven Tropea 
Etop Off long Udo 
Michelle Van Landult 
Norene Vass 
Steven Wadhams 



Raegan JoAnn Wang Eric Worsely 
Susan Waschevski Lori Worthy 
Naoki Watanabe David Wyatt 

Shane Weyiand 
Scott Wollam 



iJUNIORS • JUNIORS • JUNIORS • JUNIORS • JUNIORS • JUNIORS • JUNIORS] 



Todd Ackermann 
Mikiko Adachi 
Doug Alexander 
Derick Alien 
Earl Allen 
Vinod Ambrose 
Ann Ardell 
Fadiilah Asha Ari 
Christine Beiermann 
Tracy Benge 
Percy Bennett 
Bruce Beuttei 
Michael Bloomer 
Scot Bollin 
Angela Bowling 
John Bruner 
Steven Bruner 



Cathy Ciburk 
Jeffery Crum 
Ritch Dembinsky 
Vivienne Dipeolu 
Michelle Divers 
Peter Donahue 
Theresa Downs 
Melissa Dutton 
Jack Elliott 
Dan Flanagan 
Kurt Fowler 
Megan Gist 
Brian Glisan 
Arnold Gonzalez Jr. 
Yuki Goto 
Gregg Guenther 
Bill Harwood 



Jon Helm 
Michael Herman 
Lori Hippie 
Ayako Hirata 
Francis Honsey 
Cheryl Hunter 
Michael Jakubec 
Michael Jones 
Shawn Kelly 
Christopher Kittell 
Lisa Lox 
Pamela Malone 
Edward Matters 
Vic Matigan 
Troy McDaniel 
John McGinnes 



Stacy McQuellon 
Lynne Moormann 
Stephen Morrill 
Stephen Mote 
Chad Myers 
Sony a Myers 
Daniel Nauert 
Vickie Nelson 
Robin Ottenad 
Sheri Owen 
Jayne Poland 
Todd Porter 
Jennifer Rotche' 
Kenneth Schaefer 
Jeanne Seitz 
Karen Sheets 



Cindy Sholl 
Jeffery Shuchman 
Deron Simmons 
Sarah Skov 
Mark Smith 
Emily Suess 
Darren Sweeney 
Lynne Talbott 
Kimiko Tanaka 
David Terry 
Kristin Themanson 
Misako Wantanabe 
Tureka Watson 
Paula Weikert 
April Young 
Julianna Ziegler 



SENIORS • SENIORS • SENIORS • SENIORS • SENIORS • SENIORS 



Cris Altgilbers 


Robert Estes 


Aaron Jensen 


Jack McDonald 


Tracy Roth 


JeffBakker 


Don Farr 


Janette Jones 


Jayna Meglan 


Michael Salaway 


Daniel Beattie 


Robert Figge 


Michael Jones 


Michelle Merritt 


Richard Schierling 


Timothy Beiermann 


Steven Ford 


Stacy Junge 


Brian Miller 


Colleen Sells 


Jackie Bell 


Elizabeth Friedrich 


Debra Kachle 


Michelle Moy 


Kelly Simpson 


Karen Bjorkman 


Paul Fus 


Holly Keith 


Jackie Myers 


Julie Smith 


Pamela Bloomer 


Matthew Giigunn 


David Kelton 


David Nauert 


Monica Stone 


Scott Boone 


Christine Glasgow 


Patricia Kerback 


Cheri Nelson 


Crystal Straube 


Pamela Bowman 


Kimberly Glasgow 


David Kirby 


Christa Nelson 


Shintaro Tasaki 


Brenda Boyer 


Peter Grable 


Sharon Klein 


James Nelson 


Todd Tesdal 


Christal Brown 


Sandra Hartman 


Mary Korte 


Mark Newlin 


Kendra Turner 


Timothy Burress 


Sarah Hatlestad 


Christopher Kramer 


Julie Olin 


Deborah Underwood 


Christopher Byers 


Jon Hauser 


Douglas Lavell 


Marc Orr 


John Warfield 


Brant Carius 


Charlotte Henze 


Alexander Lawson 


Nobuyuki Ota 


Gina Winnett 


Mary Ann Clague 


John Herman 


Lisa Leverton 


Mark Parent 


Timothy Wolf 


Janice Cone 


Norizan Hj Halus 


Amy Lillard 


Steve Patrick 


Brett Wolfe 


Shari Consentino 


Daniel Horner 


Sean Maher 


Michelle Perry 


Scott Woods 


Lisa Dick 


Bryan Horton 


Tamara Martain 


Tina Prindle 


Charles Worcester 


Kamden Dollinger 


Dayang Seiha Ibrahim 


Susan Matthews 


Frank Prokup 


Janet Workman 


Llewelyn Druce- 


Adam Ismail 


Eric McClaughry 


Sarah Retherford 


Jonathan Wright 


Hoffman 


Pizza Jackson 




Michael Revolinski 


Travis Wyatt 


Deanna Dumolien 






Ross Richardson 


YiYu 


Latitia Earls 










mmmmmmmmmmmimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmB^^ 


Britt Eubanks 


Daniel Dick 


Thomas Fisher 


Tina Decker 


Mitchell Morris 


Dana Wilke 


Leonard Carlson 


James Cole 


Douglas Gormley 


Rhonda Crossen 


Terry Dove 


Jeff Houston 


Mary Bosler 


Sara Hunborg 


Brian Swaw 


Brenda Fort 


Roger Bowman 


Kelly Emmert Bollman 




Christopher Buban 


Mary Hauser 


John Winebright 


Heather Robinson 


Eric Larson 


James Smith 


Gus Lowery 


Carol Moore 


Stephen Mizell 


Elizabeth Simmons 


Donna Klenke 


William Lavery 


Allison Miller 


Michelle Campbell 


Eriko Tsucbiya 


Roger Bowman 


Mark Freitag 


Hiroko Inami 


Lorenzo Cecilio 


Bryan Young 


Scott Brokaw 









^- ^^^- 








The council is composed of two 
representatives and the president of 
each fraternity, a secretary, presi- 
dent, and adviser. IFC governs the 
social fraternities in such matters as 
rushing and pledging. IFC promotes 
the College and community endeav- 
ors of the fraternities. Fraternities 
represented: Alpha Tau Omega, Sig- 
ma Phi Epsilon, Tau Kappa Epsiion, 
Theta Chi and Zeta Beta Tau. 

Michael Mihallik — secretary, 
Eric Worsley — president and Bruce 
Beuttel. 




The council sponsors all-campus 
activities, offers assistance to all 
women interested in sorority life, 
and organizes rush programs. Com- 
posed of a president, vice president/ 
secretary, treasurer, and two repre- 
sentatives from each chapter, the 
council meets once a week. Soror- 
ities represented: Kappa Delta, Kap- 
pa Kappa Gamma, and Pi Beta Phi, 

Front Row — Jeannine LeVasseur, 
Kelly Patch, Amie Jackson, Toni 
Meier. Back Row — Melinda Miller, 
Jodi Karwatb, Cheryl Hunter, and 
Trudi Steichmann. Not pictured — 
Emily Suess. 



PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 



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Front Row — Susan Boland, Cynthia Sie- 
pel, Kris Wang, Charlene Faughn. Second 
Row — Wendy Raymond, Erin Krieg, Jo- 
seph McDaniel. Third Row — Jill Henson, 
Brooke Wells, Susan Murphy, Adam 
Gould. Fourth Row — Jennifer Hoekstra, 
Dr. Willhardt, Ellen Ewen, Edward Lapsa. 
Last Row — Andrewe Johnson, Gary 
Price, Brian Lantman, Darb Calvert, and 
Eric Ostermeier. 

Alpha Lambda Delta is the national honor- 
ary scholastic fraternity for freshmen. To 
gain membership, a freshman must earn a 
3.5 a verage during the first term or a cumu- 
lative 3.5 average over the first two terms 
of the entire year. 



The Black Action Affairs Council 
is an organization which promotes 
black awareness on the Monmouth 
College campus. The organization 
fosters a strong commitment to di- 
recting black destiny through poli- 
tics and academics, attaining unity 
within the confines of the organiza- 
tion, instituting cohesive communica- 
tion with the black community, and 
promoting issues relevant to the pro- 
gression of blacks and other minor- 
ities. Memberhsip is open to all MC 
students. 

Front Row — Dr. Edward Scott, 
Raymond Doswell — treasurer, La- 
guerra Champagne — secretary, Cal- 
vin Jones — president, Deletra Cross 

— vice-president, Genyae Steed — 
public relations, Allyce Adams-Smith 

— parlimentarian and Mrs. Andrea 
Cornett-Scott — advisor. Second 
Row — Willard Robinson, Yolanda 
Barnes, Jennifer Cornett, Rosalind 
Banks, Rita Rush, Yvonne Howard, 
Michelle Divers, Pamela Marshall, 
Tara Triplett, Nicole Leachman,Jon- 
ica Oliver, Shirlynn Roan, Minh Cam 
Nugyen, Tureka Watson, and Karon 
Cotton. Third Row — Jesse Fox, 
Charles Burton, Sharon Miller, De- 
lores Childress, Nicole Davis, Jeff 
McCraven, LaShawn McNulty, Erica 
Walker, Tammy Shell, Don Purley, 
David Badal and Carlos Smith. Not 
pictured: Steve Buban — Advisor. 



ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 





mmmm^mm' 



BLACK ACTION AFFAIRS 
COUNCIL 



CRIMSON MASQUE 




mri '' 



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Crimson Masque is the College 
drama society. Three full-Length 
plays and experimental one-act plays 
are produced under its auspices each 
year. Membership is open to all in- 
terested students, and no previous ex- 
perience is necessary. 

Front Row — Amy Manning, Dan- 
ette Forbes, Darin Forbes, Kevin Sef- 
ton, and Toni Fry. Middle Row — 
Jan Cone, Laquerra Champagne, 
Mary Westemeier, Lisa Stevens, Rick 
Wilson, and Steve Klien. Back Row 
— James De Young — advisor, Jim 
Stoltz and Doug Rankin. Also pic- 
tured — Kurt Fowler. 



The Community Activities Board 
creates for the Monmouth College 
community social, cultural, and rec- 
reational activities such as dances, 
concerts and off-campus trips. Board 
voting members are selected through 
an interview, but meetings are open 
to the student body. 

Front Row — Robin Ottenad, Julie 
Ziegler. Second Row — Karen Rob- 
inson, Nila Stuckey,John Kator, and 
Steve MizeU. Third Row — Pebbles 
Jackson, Rosalind Banks, Katby 
Dahl, Toni Fry, Kristin Hunter, and 
Courtnay Kondas. Back Row — Jill 
Henson, Tracy Howard, John Thom- 
as, and Susan Boland. Not pictured: 
-JOolleen Barker-Williamson — advi- 
sor. 



COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES BOARD 



BETA BETA BETA 



Beta Beta Beta is the national hon- 
orary biology fraternity. Member- 
ship is open to those students who 
meet the necessary grade and course 
requirements. 

Front Row — Cim Chambers, Amy 
Manning, Stacy Junge and Jeannine 
LeVasseur. Second Back Row — An- 
drew Kurz, Michael Mihallik, Mary 
Larson, Sarah Skov, Rob Ravel and 
Anthony Kurz. 



MCF is a non-denominational Chris- 
tian organization that presents vari- 
ous activities designed to fulfill the 
spiritual needs of students. Programs 
include Bible studies, prayer, discus- 
sions on the Christian life, and uplift- 
ing fellowship as well as occasional 
retreats. MCF is open to all students. 

Sitting — Jennifer Cornett and Shar- 
on Miller. First Row — Karin Ow- 
rey, Tracy Howard, Pamela Marshall 
and Darin Forbes. Back Row — 
Cathy Ciburk, Karen Lafferty, Jesse 
Fox, Charles Burton and Danette 
Forbes. 




MONMOUTH CHRISTIAN 
FELLOWSHIP 



WMCR 





WMCR is the student-operated ra- 
dio station and serves the campus 
with broadcasts of news and weather 
and music to suit many tastes. Facili- 
ties for the campus radio station are 
located in Wallace Hall. WMCR is 
carried by cable to all residence 
halls. 

Sitting — Dr. Lee McGaaa, Coreena 
Johnston, Todd Stevens, Wendy Ray- 
mond, Jeffery Coverdell, Jess Will- 
son. Back Row — Richard Wilson, 
Jeffery Shuchman, Eric Ostermeier, 
Jon Kruse, Tammy Shell, Eriko Tsu- 
chiya, Charles Burton, Steven Wad- 
hams, Darin Forbes, and Lisa Jack- 




Sitting — George "Spike" Davis, Mi- 
chael "Caliban" Mihallik, Jeannie 
"Lady" Grote. First Row — Brian 
"Bimbo" Markut, Betsy "Ubu" Ford, 
Robert "Argus" Nelson, Ira 
"Tramp" Smolensky and W.Z. Kipli 
"Barkiller" Jamal. Not pictured: 
Cathy "Bijou" Ciburk, Andrew "Mr. 
Peabody" Weiss, Larry "Rock- 
hound" Weidman, Sylvia "Spuds" 
Zethmayr, "Checkers", "Dodger", 
and "Shamus". 



DELTA OMEGA GAMMA 



P.E.P.S.I., Phi Epsiloa Phi 
Sisters, Inc., also known as ZBT 
Lil' sisters was founded on October 
20, 1968. 

First Row — Eriko Tsuchiya, Ellen 
Ewen, Cathy Phillips, Donna 
Dudzinski, Trudi Steichmann, Toni 
Fry, Yuki Yamagishi, Tomoko 
Shida, and Kris Wang. Second 
Row — Tracy Howard, Danette 
Forbes, Tammy Sudholt, Courtney 
Kondas, Karen Robinson, and Jill 
Henson. Third Row — Cim 
Chambers, Tammy Stockwell, 
Tomoko Shida, Susan Boland, 
Laguerra Champagne, Kendra 
Turner, Karen Owrey, and Donna 
Godar. Back Row — Misako 
Wantanabe, Yuki Gotoh, Julie 
Ziegler, Karen Sheets, Jeannine 
LeVasseur, Michelle Van Landuit, 
Beth Schmidt, Dawn Kamadulski, 
Julia Zobrist, and Ann Mader. 




P.E.P.S.L 




The Band is a traditional big- 
band ensemble which performs the 
best of that genre's literature. The 
band is in great demand for 
performances on campus and at 
high schools, colleges, and supper 
clubs. Members are chosen by 
audition from the Wind Ensemble. 

Front Row — Raymond Doswell, 
Troy Thomas, Brenda Boyer, Janet 
Workman, Chris Smallwood, Barb 
Nashold, Christina Smallwood, 
Charles Farr, Jeannine LaVasseur, 
John Pratt-Knox, Terri Lacey, Alex 
Lawson and Mary Hauser. Back 
Row — Brad Simpson-Knox, Greg 
DeKoster, Bill Finch, Brett Wolf, 
and Duane Baldwin. 



Nv.?j;s;?s»KV5«r^>:vVi<w**iJ***^»»«-T 




JAZZ ENSEMBLE 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB 



The putpose of the Interaadonal 
Club is to further the cause of better 
international relations. Membership 
is open to all those interested in such 
endeavors. 




Dr. Douglas Spitz — advisor, To- 
moko Shida, Yuki Yamagishi, Ayako 
Hirata, Valerie Reppelia, Eric Oster- 
meier, Etop Udo, Soon Chye Yap, 
Richard Wilson, Laura Dean, Aki 
Tazaki, Barbara Odle — advisor and 
Rika Kato. 



First Row — S. Juan Mitchell and 
Dan DePew. Second Row — Captain 
Douglas Fargo, Rocbelle Hurt, Cathy 
Ciburk, Tammy Stockwell and Third 
Row — Kenneth Schaefer, Andrewe 
Johnson, Charles Barton and Julia 
Zobrist. Back Row — Llewelyn 
Druce-Hoffman, George Tyler, Mi- 
chael Bloomer and Robert Yingst. 



RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING CORPS 



KAPPA KAPPA 
GAMMA 



Kappa Kappa Gamma was found- 
ed on October 13, 1870 by Hannah 
Jeanette Boyd, Mary Louise Bennett, 
Martha Louise Stevenson, Mary 
Moore Stewart, Minnie Stewart, Su- 
san Walker, and Ann Willets. KKG 
has a special place within the history 
of Monmouth College becaus^'it was 
founded herie. 

In 1874, the College instituted a 
ban on all fraternities. At this time, 
KKG went underground, resulting in 
the chapter being declared inactive 
in 1884. The Alpha, chapter jwas re- 
established 50 ye£^ later in 1954. 

KKG is involved in many philan- 
thropy projects. This year they held 
their first Kappa golf tournament to 
help Warren Achievement Center in 
their endeavors. The organization 
hopes to make this project an annual 
event. In addition, KKG sponsors a 
foster child in memory of Shannon 
Cook who lost her life in an auto 
accident in the spring of 1988. An- 
other project that KKG has been 
working on is the acquisition of the 
Minnie Stewart House at 1015 East 
Euclid Avenue. It is there that Kappa 
Kappa Gamma was founded. The 
home has be placed on the National 
Register of Historic Places. It is the 
only founders home left in existence. 
Kappas are involved in many aspects 
of campus life and plans to continue 
and increase this involvement for 
many years to come. 



Zeta Beta Tau was founded in 1898 
in New York City. Originally found- 
ed as a Zionist Youth Society, ZBT 
eventually eliminated its Zionist ob- 
jectives and began to serve as a fra- 
ternal organization for Jewish col- 
lege students who were by and large 
prevented from joining most other 
fraternities. In 1954 ZBT adopted a 
policy of nonsectarianism, opening 
its membership to all men regardless 
of race, creed, faith or color. 

Today ZBT continues to be a lead- 
er atQiing fraternities with a member- 
ship over ninety thousand undergrad- 
uate and alumni members. 

The Delta Lambda chapter of Zeta 
Beta Tau was chartered in 1971, 
however it began as Phi Epsilon Phi 
in 1968. 

ZBT has participated greatly in all 
aspects of .campus life — academic, 
cocurricular, and recreational. 

ZBT has been recognized on both 
the local and national fronts for their 
achievements. ZBT has won the Ki- 
wanis Award for the best grade point 
average of all campus fraternities for 
nine of the last ten years. 

The Chapter has received national 
recognition for their outstanding ac- 
ademic achievement, alumni rela- 
tions, campus and intramural partici- 
pation. 

Campus involvement has always 
been above par. Members are in- 
volved in Student Association, Com- 
munity Activities Board, Communi- 
cations Board, Oracle editor. Blue 
Key, Mortar Board, wrestling, track 
and many other campus activities. 

Zeta Beta Tau hopes to continue 
and expand in its endeavors — both 
academic and social — in the future. 
In doing so it will remain a "power- 
house of excellence. " 



ZETA 

BETA 

TAU 



PI 

BETA 

PHI 



I.e. Sorosis — today known as Pi 
Beta Phi — was founded at Mon- 
mouth College on April 28, 1867 be- 
coming the first sorority. 

The conception of I.C. Sorosis 
took place upstairs in the home of 
Major Jacob Holt where two of the 
twelve founders, Ada Bruen and Lib- 
bie Brook, lived. Today, Holt House 
— a national historic landmark — is 
used for special chapter functions, 
teas, and receptions. 

Pi Phi's are extensively involved 
on campus and in the surrounding 
community. They have members cur- 
rently involved in basketball, track 
and intramurals. Members are also 
involved in Student Association, 
dorm councils, WMCR, Wind Ensem- 
ble, Blue Key, Psi Chi, Alpha Lamb- 
da Delta and tpany more organiza- 
tions. 

Pi Beta Phi plans to continue and 
increase its aready extensive role in 
campus and community activities. 

editors note — Organizational pic- 
tures for Student Association, Wind 
Ensemble, Sound of Five and Vocal 
Jazz were not in this publication be- 
cause the pictures provided by the 
Photolab were in worse condition 
than the Jazz Band photo. Therefore, 
instead of wasting space, they are ex- 
cluded. The three greek organiza- 
tions above are featured because 
their members took time-out to pro- 
vide the information that I requested. 
I asked members of each organiza- 
tion to do so, and this is what I re- 
ceived. Deep thanks goes out to 
Cheryl Conaway — Kappa Kappa 
Gamma; Michele Mangel — Pi Beta 
Phi and Stephen Klien — Zeta Beta 
Tau. Without them, this page could 
have been blank. Other organiza- 
tions such as Blue Key, Mortar Board 
and Psi Chi had schedule conflicts 
either on their part or on ours. Still 
others did not even bother to re- 
spond to letters sent to the president/ 
chair of the organization. 



109 



MONMOUTH COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS 

Presidential Scholars 

Susan Boland Jon Kruse Ed Lapsa 

Melissa Brewer Eric Ostenneier 

Katie Francis Gary Price 



Todd Halihan 



Trustee Scholars 
Race Owens 



Lisa Stevens 



Allyce Adams-Smith 

Charies Burton 

Laguerra Champagne 

Dolores Childress 

Jennifer Comett 

Deletra Cross 



Ethnic Minority Scholars 

Nicole Davis 

LaShionda Hurt 

Nicole Leachman 

Pamela Marshall 

Jeffrey McCraven 

Sharon Miller 

Jonica Oliver 



Don Puriey 

Jason^ay 

Willard Robinson 

Tammy Shell 

Genyne Steed 

Tara Triplett 



Sarah Benson 
Darci Boles 
Adam Gould 
Marcus Hall 



Senate Scholars 

Jill Henson 
Jennifer Hockstra 



Andrcwe Johnson 

Barbara Nashold 

Cynthia Siepel 

John Thomas 



Timothy Atterberg 

Christy Beck 

Corey Billips 

Neil Currie 

Ellen Ewen 



Dawn Crafford 
Susan Murphy 



Jon Acheson 

Renee Bergquist 

Jonna Brewer 

Andrew Catlin 

Dolores Childress 

Nick D'Alfonso 

Chris Earl 

Mary Jane Erickson 

Adriene Estler 

Michelle Hall 

Kurt Johnson 



Wallace Scholars 

Chariene Faughn 

Kristen Hunter 

David Mickley 



McMichael Scholars 
Wendy Raymond 



Honor Scholars 

Jennifer Lentz 

Brian Markut 

Pamela Marshall 

Michelle Martin 

Sean McKee 

Dawn Pfciffer 

Laura Prentice 

James Ryan 

Joe Ryner 



Christopher Packard 

Penny Rowan 

Bobbi Swarts 

Trent Thomas 

Traci Young 



Karen Robinson 
Bill Steckelberg 



Michelle Sherlock 

Deena Simester 

Lisa Smith 

John Stark 

David Sweeney 

Kevin Van Order 

Kris Wang 

Brooke Wells 

Merideth Willett 

Polly Youngquist 

Julia -Zobrist 



Calvin Jones 



Derick Allen 

Jeff Bakker 

Rosalind Banks 

Christy Beck 

Susan Boland 

Melissa Brewer 

Donna Ehidzinski 

Jesse Fox 

Katie Francis 

Todd Halihan 



Derick Allen 
Kim Buckert 



ACM Minority Scholars 



Distinction Program Participants 

Jon Hauser 

Rogert Herzog 

Jennifer Hoekstra 

Andrewe Johnson 

Stephen Klien 

Jon Kruse 

Ed Lapsa 

Mary Larson 

Melinda Miller 

Lynne Moormann 

M-Club Varsity Athlete Awards 

Term III, 1987-88, and Terms I & II, 1988-89 

Robert Herzog 



Carios Smith 



Brad Nahrstadt 

Eric Ostermeier 

Karin Owrey 

Gary Price 

Valerie Reppelin 

Kelly Rice 

Rhonda Seelye 

Lisa Stevens 

Nila Stuckey 

Emily Suess 



Andrcwe Johnson 
Julie Smith 



no 



SPECIAL PRIZES AND AWARDS 

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF 

UNIVERSITY WOMEN AWARD 

Pamela Malone 



LYLE W. FINLEY PRIZE 
Valerie Reppelin 



AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 

CHEMISTS AWARD 

Shintaro TasaJd 

HUGH R. BEVERIDGE PRIZE 
Craig Anderson 

BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT AWARD 
Sarah Skoy 

BLUE KEY BOOK AWARD 

Robin Ottenad 

Robert Nelson, III 

BLUE KEY FRESHMAN MAN OF THE YEAR 
Charles Burton 

BLUE KEY SENIOR MAN OF THE YEAR 
Brad Nahrsladt 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT AWARDS 

Jackie Bell, Accounting 

Jeanette Grote, Business 

Gerald Oh, Economics 

CHEMICAL RUBBER COMPANY AWARD 
Randall Wakeland 

CLASSICS DEPARTMENT AWARD 
KimbeHey Haley 

EVA CLELAND BOOK AWARD 
Emily Suess 

COMPUTER SCIENCE AWARD 
John Clingan 

KENNETH E. CRTTSER MEMORIAL PRIZE 
JeffBakker 

F. GARVIN DAVENPORT PRIZE 
Jennifer Stevenson 

SELIG & SELMA EDELMAN PRIZE 
Tern Reed 

DEAN G. EPLEY AWARD 
Pam Bowman 

INEZ FINLEY KAPPA DELTA PRIZE 
Jeannine LeVasseur 



GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT AWARD 
Brad Nahntadt 

ROSANNA WEBSTER GRAHAM PRIZE 

Calvin Jones 

Dawn Kamadulski 

ADELE KENNEDY BOOK AWARD 
Dawn Kamadulski 

LULU JOHNSON McCOY PRIZES IN MUSIC 

Jeannine LeVasseur 

Brett Wolfe 

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT AWARDS 

Anne Mader, French 

Kelly Rice, Spanish 

MORTAR BOARD OUTSTANDING FRESHMAN WOMAN 
Kris Wang 

MORTAR BOARD OUTSTANDING SENIOR WOMAN 
Lisa Jackson 

NATIONAL ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 

SENIOR BOOK AWARD 

Lisa Jackson 

Brad Nahrstadt 

LENA LEE POWELL PI BETA PHI AWARD 
Lynne Talbott 

CY RAGAN AWARD 
Brad Nahrsladt 

HAROLD RALSTON CLASSICS ESSAY AWARD 
Sylvia Zethmayr 

GLEN RANKIN MEMORIAL PRIZE SCHOLARSHIP 
Derick Allen 

RESEARCH AWARD IN CHEMISTRY 
Shintaro Tasaki 

JESSIE C. & FIELDING A. SMITH MEMORIAL PRIZE 
Don Farr 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION & 

THEATRE ARTS DEPARTMENT AWARD 

Lisa Jackson 

THOMPSON PRIZE IN HUMANITIES 
Lisa Jackson 

WALL STREET JOURNAL AWARD 
Aaron Jensen 



AWARDS TO GROUPS 

INTERFRATERNFTY COUNCIL 

PLEDGE CLASS AWARD 

Zeta Beta Tau 



PANHELLENIC COUNCIL 

PLEDGE CLASS AWARD 

Kappa Delta 



KIWANIS FRATERNTTY AWARD 
Zeta Beta Tau 



KIWANIS SORORITY AWARD 
Kappa Delta 



111 



EDITOR 

LAYOUT EDITOR 

COPY EDITOR 

TYPIST 

ETC. 

miENNE DIPEOLU 

FEATURE EDITOR 

LASHAWN MCNULTY 

PHOTOLAB MANAGER 

JOHN KATOR 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

VIVIENNE DIPEOLU 

ED LAPSA 

BUD SHERMAN 

ADVISOR 

EDWARD SCOTT 

JOSTENS 
REPRESENTATIVE 

JON KAUFFMAN 




The 1989 Ravelings started as The Big Plan, but like many it went awry. It was my 
intention to explain here on the last page what happened, but there really isn't a need to 
do so. The situation was like the Oracle. There is genuine excitement and help in the 
beginning from others, but ultimately everything rests upon the editor because it 
becomes extremely difficult, if not impossible to find legitimate, competent help. I hope 
that the administration would consider taking the yearbook and giving it to a corporation 
to do. That is their intention in the first place, but they do not want the students to feel 
that they are taking away "student" publications. Now, I have given them a reason to do 
so and I hope they act accordingly. 

What happened this year in terms of help has happened every year since the mid '70's. 
If proof is needed, just go to the Monmouthiana Room in the Hewes Library and take a 
look at past publications. Think about the Oracle and the situation it has been in for the 
past four years. Think about how the Carillon has to beg for creative work. I wish that 
attention was paid to a publication, not when there is a problem, but before. Unfortu- 
nately, that is not the case. 

However, there are many positive aspects. In working on this book I have had 
invaluable experience in layout, typing, begging, etcetera. This book has taught me how 
to do things on my own. On the negative side, however, it has introduced feelings I had 
hop)ed never to experience. 

Oh well, here is the book I hope you liked it. I did the best I could with what I had in 
terms of photos and information. Looking back on the year, I think the most important 
event was the announcement on May 12th that the faculty had voted in favor of the 
semester calendar to commence the 1990-1991 calendar year. Students were supposedly 
angry, but when the time came to stand up and be heard the same few, concerned people 
spoke. I wonder how the semester system will work. By the time this book appears I will 
have found out first hand. 

I would also like to take this time to thank several people who did make this 
publication less difficult by helping when I begged. First, I would like to thank Dr. 
Waltershausen for the use of his art work for the cover. I had seen it my freshman year 
and just loved this particular print. Thanks to Amy Hequemborg for designing a cover 
before I selected this one. For the greek composites and/or information I wish to thank 
the following: composites — Barry Sherman — ATO; Courtney Kondas — KD; Lisa 
Stevens — KKG; Edie Godby — Pi Phi; Jeffery Coverdell — Sig Ep; Jerry Hippen and 
William Steckelberg — TKE and Luis Ramirez — ZBT information — Cheryl Conaway 

— KKG; Michele Mangel — Pi Phi; Andrewe Johnson — Theta Chi and Stephen Klein 

— ZBT. I am grateful to all of you and will personally see to it that your composite is 
given back in the same condition as they were received. To Etop Udo, Mrs. Andrea 
Comett-Scott, Lisa Jackson, Cheryl Conaway, Colleen Barker-Williamson, Luis Ramirez, 
Andrewe Johnson, Dan Kelleher, and anyone else who provided photos to fill the many 
gaps I had. In the Drama department I extend thanks to R. Calvin Jones, Danette Forbes, 
Darin Forbes and Dr. James De Young. The Mini Mag would not have been without 
Tom Withenbury, Director of Public Relations and LaShawn McNulty with her feature 
stories. To everyone that helped in the identification of people in the photos, without you 
the book would not have been. Extreme gratitude to Rick Delgado-Partin, Director of 
Sports Information. Without his help the sports section would not exist. He provided 
much needed quality photos, information, stories and graduation photos. Thanks to 
Photo -god Edward Lapsa for doing spur of the moment photo assignments and coming 
through when needed. 

Lastly I would like to thank and aploligize tojostens representative Jon Kauffman and 
my advisor Dr. Edward Scott for putting them both in this predicament. (I give the gas 
face to the administration and to all of those who offered to help but backed out when 
approached.) 

It would be quite impossible for the entire campus to work on the production of a 112 
page yearbook. Typing, layout, and research is not the only way to assist in the making of 
a book. 400 more people could have help)ed by taking their FREE picture. This aaion 
can be considered the most important, and the sad part is, it is the easiest to do. When 
pictures are taken for the 1991 edition, please expend a few calories and participate. 

I hope I have not forgotten anyone. Please do not take it personally, but it has almost 
been two years since I started this endeavor. Oh, one last thing, I have also learned that 
procrastination can go a long way and thanks to that necessary being for actually letting 
me see the end! 

Vivienne Dipeolu 
editor 




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