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Table of Contents 

Book I. The Campus 

Book II. Seniors 

Book III. Organizations 

Book IV. Fraternities 

Book V. Athletics 

Book VI. Dramatics 

Book VII. Faculty 

Book VIII. L' Allegro et II Penseroso 



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Skining tlirougk Hue kills nortnward 
^A^lncls m silver riDDon 
ICansas mighty stream. 
TkreaJing tke eastern valley- 
Creeps a tiny train-trail 
Like some arcwsy aream. 

Over tke southern meaao^vs 
Checker lignt and snaaow 
As tke clouds dart ky. 
^A^hile, on tke pme-crest westward 
Nature s dark pagodas 
Silkouette tke sky. 

—Gale Gosset, '12. 






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Frank Strong, A. B., A. M., Ph. D., LL. D. 
Chancellor of the University 



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'HE time spent in college is the most unique period of one's 
life. It is a period of romance. While it is real life in a com- 
plete and definite sense, it yet has the glamour of unreality 
about it. The sordid things of life do not obtrude themselves; 
the fierceness of the competition of after years has not yet 
come ; life has not taken on the aspect of a battle ; and while 
college men are critical they are at the same time generous. 

The thing that stands as the personification of all this is the institution 
itself, the alma mater to which we are responsible, the mother toward which 
our loyalty ought to be forever undimmed. It has happened to many a man 
that the relation he bears to his alma mater is one of the most beautiful, in- 
spiring and ennobling things that life brings to him. He has quite missed one 
of the most spiritual things about his life if he has not had this experience and 
if he has not learned what it really ought to mean to be a college man. 

All of this begets a great obligation. In the first place it is a material obli- 
gation. No one, whether he goes to an institution on a private foundation 
or to a state university, ever pays for his own education. Someone else pays 
for it. He is therefore beholden to others. He is in fact beholden to society 
itself, to the age that preceded him and handed on these great instruments of 
civilization to the coming generation. In the second place it is a spiritual 
obligation that arises through the demands of honor and integrity. One can- 
not use such instruments and receive such benefits without being subject to 
the demands of the highest honor that these obligations be lived up to by 
loyal service. 

From every aspect, therefore, those that graduate from the University of 
Kansas in June, 1912, owe the finest and most untiring loyalty to the insti- 
tution that has mothered them, and it is nothing short of base ingratitude to 
forget this great obligation. Most of you will receive no other scholarship 
brand than that placed upon you by the University of Kansas, and your degree 
can be worth no more than the institution that gives it. 

I therefore call upon you in the name of the University of Kansas for the 
highest kind of loyalty and generosity toward your alma mater in the years to 
come. 

FRANK STRONG 

Chancellor. 



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The Board of Regents of the 
University of Kansas 



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Hon. William Allen White 
Emporia 



Hon. Scott Hopkins 
Topeka 



Hon. Leon S. Cambern 
Erie 



Hon. Rodney Elward 
Hutchinson 



Hon. Chas. F. Foley 
Lyons 



Hon. James Kimball 
Salina 



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"The old order changeth" as surely as the sun arises and sets and Universities are not 
excepted. Seniors leaving this year have noted even in their short stay here, new things 
springing up here and there over the campus, new buildings rise and more faces appear each 
year on the campus. In some of these changes perhaps we have been disappointed, but it is 
only because our sentiment was attached to the old things. Our associations with different 
phases of college activities in our first years were so vivid and delightful that we thought that 
other students should follow in the same path or they would lose something precious. All 
know that there has been progress, materially and more apparent still, in the thousand and one 
things that a university accumulates with age. Some wail our lack of a single great tradition, 
but infinitely more valuable is a score of traditions that bind us together into more loyal alumni, 
more loyal Kansans. Student discipline, self imposed, cooperation in athletics, a growth of 
fellow feeling as instanced by the demand for football and school smokers, the securing of profits 
from student managed activities for student buildings; do not these things meet with approval 
in your eyes? 

We are "regulated." We do not pursue the same old hit and miss methods that we found 
when we arrived. But we like it best this way. We would not return to the old ways if we 
could. We are more socialistic. What a manager does with what he makes is the business 
of all the students, and not a matter for him to dispose of as he thinks best. Whatever happens 
we can never slip back. When we discover that a method is good let us not discard it when 
we have the power, because we opposed it in the beginning. Elections come and go but progress 
is not dependent upon politics. Advance standards, and keep them high. So may we have a 
great and greater University of Kansas. 



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The Men's Student Union 



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THE MEN'S STUDENT UNION building has at last changed from a dim dream 
of the future to a realistic idea of the present, and within the scope of this year's 
freshmen's university hfe will take material shape. 

The need for such a building at the University of Kansas has long been felt by 
both faculty and students. The lack of a common meeting ground where the 
men of the University from the various schools, frat and barb can get together, 
and become acquainted, and uphold the democratic spirit of K. U., has been 
talked about for years. This year a start in the form of money payments was made, and 
it is the intention of the Student Council who has the work in charge not to allow the matter 
to drop until the building is completed. 

The present Senior class can look back over their university career and see the need of 
the union. In their Freshman year how well the men remember those long lonely evenings 
when the only enjoyment was the nickle or a pool hall. How often they wished that there 
might be some place where they could meet with their fellows and take their place in the Uni- 
versity life. 

A book could be written on the reason for building a Union, but we must limit this article 
to a description of the Union that is to be built. Imagine you Seniors that leave this year, 
imagine if you can, the pleasure and convenience that you might have derived from a building 
of the following description if it had been completed in your time. 

The site of the Union is to be on the extreme northeast end and side of the hill which 
leads from the west wing of the Administration Building due north to the Golf Links. 

This location is ideal. It will be the center of the semicircle comprising the campus. 
It will be within two hundred feet of the proposed drive up the valley from Mississippi Street, 
and will in addition be close to the student section. Being the most central and most prominent 
building on the campus it must needs be an edifice of great architectural beauty, and at the 
same time must present a hospitable appearance to the fifteen hundred students which it will 
gather within its doors. 

The inside of the building will surely appeal to the men. In the basement will be a very 
large dining room and kitchen capable of serving two thousand men at a time. Here the 
athletic teams will eat. It is planned to serve meals to the students at three and a half dollars 
a week, with breakfast and lunch on the plan at present in use at the university cafeteria. 
Dinner will be served in the usual manner with complete service. The basement will also 
contain a large check room and bowling alleys to be operated at cost. Barber shops will also 
be located here. 

The first floor will be given over for the most part to a large lobby where two thousand 
men can gather with ease. The lobby will be fitted with the best soft leather furniture that 
can be obtained, and off the lobby will be reading rooms, private rooms and a large billiard 
and pool room. Rooms for the officers of the building, for the officers of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, and rooms in which old grads may talk over old times will also be situated on this floor. 
A cigar stand will be placed in the main lobby. 

The second floor will contain Student Council offices and meeting rooms. 

"Dens" where caucuses, so dear to the heart of the average male student, clubs, and organ- 
izations may meet, will also be provided. The trophy hall of the Athletic Association will 
be removed from the gymnasium to this floor. Bed rooms will be in readiness for prominent 
speakers or visitors who are guests of the University. 

The third floor will contain a large dance hall, large enough to accomodate the Junior 
Prom, and yet will be so arranged that small parties may be held here also. 

In the main lobby will hang a bronz tablet dedicated to Tommy Johnson, K. U.'s greatest 
athlete. 



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I'M SORRY BUT THAT DATE IS TAKEN 



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The Women's Dormitory 














N' OWHERE has the reUgious crusade spirit of Kansas been seen better than in 
the present movement for a Women's Building. The alumnae have undertaken 
the work with an earnestness and determination which comes only from the 
feeling of a sincere and burning purpose. For the last ten years the need of a 
dormitory has been felt with increasing conviction. The legislature for various 
reasons could not furnish the money. Then the alumnae began the movement, 
and with the assistance, interest and sympathy of every Kansan it hopes to reahze its dream 
in the form of a building for girls. 

Our alumnae saw that if Kansas was to stand at the head of the state universities of the 
Middle West, it must provide a university home for the girls. Kansas, they said, is a pros- 
perous state. They saw no reason why they should not undertake the raising of funds. Last 
commencement then, they thought dormitory, talked dormitory and planned dormitory. All 
alumnae, non-graduates and friends of the University were to help toward realizing the fund 
of $75,000. 

It was indeed an undertaking and yet it was not too much — nothing was too much for these 
Men and Women who saw the good that would result from having a home where the daughters 
of Kansas might know one another better. The machinery for raising the funds was put into 
operation several months later. The alumnae of the state were organized by counties, a com- 
mittee working in every county. Besides that, at present a committee for each of the forty 
classes has been formed and for many large towns outside the state — Kansas City, Chicago, 
Boston, New York and San Francisco. 

But it is not the alumnae entirely that are contributing to this building. The girls them- 
selves want it to be theirs and have been helping to make it so. At the mass meeting on 
Woman's Day, October the sixth, the girls pledged various amounts. The four classes and 
many organizations made pledges which have already been paid. A stranger coming into 
Fraser Hall on Friday might wonder at the numerous candy sales. The answer is, "Dormitory 
is our story." At a recent meeting of the alumnae committee, of which Miss Alberta Corbin 
is chairman, committees were appointed which should ask the help and interest of the faculty 
and the merchants of the town. 

$5,000 has been raised within six months. Is it wise to prophesy what will be raised in 
the next year? The girls need your help, the University needs your interest, therefore, "Let 
every man do according as he is disposed in his heart." 






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The University of ICansas 

Willard A. Wattles, '09 



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They have throned her upon a hill-top, mother 

and queen in one, 
Bride of the skies at midnight, sister of the sun. 
Crowned with the glory of wisdom, garlanded 

with light, 
With the stars in her shadowy tresses, when 

she sleeps in the arms of night. 
With the stars in her shadowy tresses, and a million 

lamps that gem 
The undulant lines of her body to the fringe 

of her garment-hem. 

To her feet from the far-flung prairie her loving 
subjects press. 

Sprung from the sun-browned heroes who peopled 
a wilderness. 

Lads on whose hearts are graven epics of toil un- 
sung. 

Bolder than olden story boasted in golden tongue, — 

Bolder than Knights of Arthur, braver than 
Charlemagne, 

The patient, unchronicled warriors, whose plough- 
share conquered the plain. 



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Beside them kneel their sisters, womanly, strong 

and true, 
Their hearts aflame with a courage such as 

their mothers knew 
When they watched the hot winds shrivel the corn 

in the swelling ear 
And smiled at the men who faltered, though 

every smile was a tear; 
Still smiled when the tiny invader set teeth to the 

ripening wheat. 
And the face of the sun was darkened, and ruin 

seemed complete. 

They have throned her upon a hill-top and her 

sceptre sways afar; 
The ends of the earth acknowledge her wherever 

her children are. 
Never in pride of her glory may those she has 

nourished forget 
That not on the purple dais is her throne of 

dominion set; 
Not on the purple dais, — May the sons of those 

pioneers 
Stand strong by their fathers' struggle and clean 

by their mothers' tears. 









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The Fort Riley Encampment 




CAPT. HORACE E. STEELE 



TO the old "grad" who chances to 
pass Fort Riley on the Union 
Pacific, the sight of a large K. 
U. done in white limestone on the 
bluffs opposite Pawnee flats, brings 
memories of, "Hats off to the 
Crimson and the Blue." 

These same letters also stir up the fighting 
blood of the K. U. guards who put them there 
during the summer encampment in August, 1911. 
Even the Metcalf loving cup and the medals 
won by private Utterbach for the best individ- 
ual score, fade into insignificance when placed 
along side the fight with the Aggies. 

It was a beautiful night according to 
Corporal Waddell who, with a few others, had 
been detailed to guard the letters. About ten 
o'clock, two lurking figures came upon the 
scene from the heights above and two more 
from below. After smoking a while in silence, 
they began tearing away the K, Then Macy 
got busy with his bugle, but before company 
reinforcements came, Bony Colin had a prisoner 







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SAMUEL G. FAIRCHILD 
First Lieutenant 



at the point of his bayonet. After a consul- 
tation the trembling farmer was released, and 
the guards rested in peace until two o'clock. 
Then the hill began to swarm with Aggies and 
everybody was pressed into service. Even 
Cook Osborne who needed the sleep, came out 
with a frying pan as a weapon. Benson appeared 
upon the scene with nothing but a belt and a 
bayonet to protect him from the night air. 

Out of the confusion there rose the next 
morning, a new white washed K which was 
guarded up until the moment of breaking camp. 
Then came the climax. Just as the train was 
ready to start, four horsemen moved off toward 
the hill to get the Jayhawker's goat. Majors 
Hudson and Kitchens saw what was coming 
and said that they would hold the train and 
give the boys a last chance. Every collegian 
jumped the fence and charged toward the hill 
with an impetuosity that would put the Light 
Brigade to shame. The letters were saved and 
every K. U. man's hat came off as the First 
Regiment Band played the "Crimson and the 
Blue." 




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The K. !!• Spirit 



Rock Chalk! Jay Hawk!! K. U.!!! Clackety— Bang! Bang! Whoeeee— Boom! Kansas!! 
Will there ever be a time, dear reader, when you shall return to Lawrence as a staid and care- 
worn alumnus, with thoughts of youth far behind you, and animated solely by the desire to 
look once more upon the gray walls of old Fraser, and the green slope leading from the crown 
of the horse shoe across Potter Lake, down through brown roofs and flourishing trees, down to 
the glistening river; when you return at such a time, old college mate, will you ever thrill again 
if you meet a long line of whiteclad figures dancing fantastically down the street emitting 
joyously sounds like the above? Will the old wild intoxication of victory over the Corn- 
husker, or that dearest foe of all, the Tigers, come over you as you behold other youths the 
exact replica of yourself in your sophomore or junior year, to whom the college world is glorious 
and a football victory a golden thing, singing a paen of conquest, to the accompaniment of 
rattling pans and boxes? Or will you sneer wisely at their thoughtless abandon, and wag 
your head wisely with such remarks as "0 well, they're young now but they will soon get over 
it," or, "Did I ever care for that sort of thing?" We believe if you have been a real Kansas 
rooter that you will thrill; that you will do more. We believe that you will plunge out into 
the old alley back of Allie Carrol's, seize a box and a tin bucket and running back to the street 
with a yell, will bang them together and start the "snake dance" down Massachusetts; that you 
will throw your hat away when, afterwards, you listen to the rousing econium delivered by some 
sweater-clad racuous voiced cheer leader in honor of the wearers of the Crimson and the Blue, 
and that you will return to the Eldridge at a late hour to your bed, vowing that it makes you 
feel twenty again, that the boys are just as fine fellows as they used to be, and that the old 
school is holding her own with the best of them. It is worth while isn't it? If business and 
work, toil and responsibility are the same now and forever, why should not rallies and en- 
thusiasm meetings and football games play as large a part in our early career? 



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We will take with us as precious souvenirs the banners that we wrested from the stubborn 
hands of the Missourians in Kansas City, the Beat Kansas buttons that we brought back with 
us from Drake and Oklahoma. We will cherish as an important part of our education the 
memory of Tommy Johnson gamely meeting every attack, trying every point on the end or 
in the line and at last with a superhuman effort dodging and whirling down the field past 
the chalk marks to the distant goal. 

Was it for nothing that Uncle Jimmy taught us in chapel lessons of courage in the face of 
difficulty, of the kind of rooting that never quits, of the sacrifice and nerve of the football boys, 
of hard fought battles, and hard won fields ? 

The real wonder is that we ever were content to stop at all, that we ceased to come back 
every year to the big games and add our shout to the general volume that swelled out across 
McCook. In this year of 1912 we promised at our senior smoker to be better alumni than 
any other class from K. U. had ever been. We promised to keep in touch with University 
affairs and to aid her with our purse and influence, providing we possessed either, whenever 
the opportunity presented itself. Why then can we not keep ourselves young, and give the 
boys a lift by coming back to the athletic games every year. Most of us are going to live in 
Kansas. Let's be Kansans! When Nebraska and Missouri threaten our state's laurels, let 
us rush to their defense. We'U never regret it you know, and then, too, we will in this way 
not allow ourselves to forget that we are college men, that we got something here besides 
knowledge that is lasting; and that no other than a loyal and lasting love for Alma Mater. 





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The Engineers' Banquet 



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THE twelfth annual Engineers Banquet which took place in Robinson Gymnas- 
ium on February 24th was easily the "best ever." Nearly three hundred of 
Dean Marvin's "boys" rambled in for the feast and when they rambled out again 
they would fain have returned on the morrow. 

When the engineers arrived they found engineers there to welcome them and 
there was a continual round of welcome and song till the doors separating them 
from the table were thrown open and lo! — an engineers fairyland was revealed 
to their eyes. 

A dazzling sky rocket shot up along one wall and, curving slowly, "broke" in a shower 
of myriad colors showing the letters "K. U. E. E." in red and blue. It was the Electricals' 
stunt. With noiseless hum and whir, with smokeless furnace and silent whistle, a full fledged 
power plant in miniature, thus properly toned down, gave evidence of the calling of the Mechan- 
ical Engineers. Hanging from electrical connections at different points on the ceiling, were 
the reminders of the mining engineers which turned out to be dynamite caps buried in confetti. 
A fountain, held down by a glass cover, played with itself at the head of one of the tables as 
happy as the municipal engineers that made it. Rising from the table where the civils were 
to be grouped, was the boom of a construction crane holding at its tip a pretty emblem of the 
civil engineers. Multi-colored fires flickered and burned in a weird way down the center of a 
table which was plainly that of the chemicals. 

Bang! bang! the noisy mining engineers with their six-shooters, and their "nigger chasers" 
which sped in smoking trails around the feet of rival engineers, and their infernal machines, 
furnished ample entertainment between courses. W-o-o-o-e-e-e-i-i-i, with the uncanny, 
swelling, wail of a siren, the Electricals sought to drown out the yells of all the other schools 
combined. But they didn't quite succeed for the engineers heard again that, — "Chemistry, 
chemistry, is no joke," and many new ones. 

All too soon were the "eats" over with but gladly enough did the engineers, well satisfied, 
turn towards Professor Rice, the toastmaster, who, styling himself "official, turner-on of the 
gas," began at once to introduce the speakers. 

Plumer Wheeler, chemical engineer from Kansas City, the first speaker, had for his subject 
"The Selecting of Standards." He advocated the duodecimal system of standards as opposed 
to the metric system. 

"The man that invented the sandwich was a conservationist," said Dean L. E. Young, 
of the Missouri school of mines at RoUa, speaking on "Conservation of Time." 

C. F. W. Felt, Chief Engineer of the Santa Fe Railroad, gave probably the best talk of 
the evening. "An engineers success," said Mr. Felt, "depends on three things; getting a job, 
knowing how to do it, and getting the money for it." 

Carl C. Witt of the State Public Utilities Commission called attention to the obligations 
which the engineer owes his state and his community. 

At this juncture Professor Rice made himself famous by springing a poem (?) on the 
engineers. "I expect," he said, "thatjl've stretched the poetic license to the elastic limit and 
I know that my feet arn't mates but here goes." And when he had finished the engineers 
felt that the muse did not rest with the college alone. 

Dean F. 0. Marvin gave the engineers some good advice. "You must dare to do your 
duty when you see the opportunity," said the Dean. 

Chancellor Strong was the next speaker. It was the chancellors first appearance at an 
engineers banquet within the memory of the oldest P. S. B. 

"As you all know," said the Chancellor, "the engineering school is the most important 
school in the University." And the engineers felt that the laws could just, "put that in their 
smoke and pipe it." 

L. 0. Ripley of Wichita speaking on "The Business Side of Engineering" told his listeners 
that they must be business men too. 

Professor W. A. Witaker waxed eloquent on the engineering field in general and the metal- 
lurgical field in particular. 

Martin K. Thomen, vice-president of the engineers closed the speaking with a short 
speech on Engineers' Day. 

When the spell was broken and the banquet was over, it was with many backward glances 
that the engineers left the hall. 

Page 38 



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Engineers' Day 

Engineer's Day was held at the University for the first time last year and was considered 
such a success that plans were made to make it an annual event. 

This year the date has been set for the thirtieth of April and at the time of writmg of this 
article all of the plans are practically complete. From all indications the day will be even more 
of a success, if this is possible, than it was last year. 

On the morning of April thirtieth all of the Engineers, attired in their working costumes, 
will attend chapel together where they will receive an address from Robinson upon a subject 
appropriate to the occasion. 

Immediately after chapel the parade will start from the Engineering Building and will go 
across the campus, through the main sections of town and will terminate finally at McCook 
Field. The parade will be one of the main features of the day. It will be led by the Univer- 
sity Band which will be followed immediately by the automobiles bearing the Chancellor, Dean 
Marvin, the Regents of the University and the members of the Engineering faculty. Next in 
line will come the floats representing the different schools and also many small features repre- 
senting various classes or individuals. 

According to the present plans the Civils will be represented by two floats, one from the 
Seniors and another from the Juniors. The Seniors will demonstrate the workings of a huge 
lift bridge, while the Juniors will present a manufacturing office and field plant. The Electri- 
cal Engineers will present an electric locomotive made according to the latest model, while a 
miniature power plant with all the equipment will represent the Mechanicals. The Chemical 
Engineers would hardly dare to dissapoint the pubhc so, according to their time honored custom 
they will endeavor to present all the foul odors which have been discovered up to the present 
time. The Miners will demonstrate the workings of a mine with the derrick, drills and other 
machinery necessary to carry out the operations. The Municipals will also be represented 
and will display a real portable fountain in action. Besides these large floats there will be 
many small features representing classes or individuals in the engineering school. 

Immediately upon the arrival of the parade at McCook Field coffee will be served and every 
one will have lunch. Then at half past one the events of the afternoon will commence. By 
the curtesy of some of the merchants of the town, many prizes and medals will be awarded 
to the winners of the events. The following are the events as they are to occur and the prizes 
for each: 

1. 50 yard dash f 

2. 100 yard dash Gold Medals for 1st place. 

3. 120 yard high hurdle j Silver Medals for 2nd place. 

4. Running broad jump 

5. Standing broad jump [ 

6. 220 yard dash ( Gold medals for first place. 

7. ^2 mile run I Silver medals for second place. 

8. 1 mile run [ Bronze medals for third place. 

TO WINNER OF FIRST PLACE ONLY 

9. Boxing Bronze medals. 

10. J4 mile run Gillete Safety razor 

11. Running high jump Box of Cigars 

TO SCHOOL OR CLASS 

12. Baseball Game Banner 

13. Tug of War Banner 

14. Inter-school relay Loving cup 

15. Inter-class relay Loving cup 

16. Spectacular relay Loving cup 

17. Fat man's race Box of Cigars 

18. Faculty race Box of Cigars 

At half past eight o'clock all of the Engineers will go to Robinson Gymnasium where the 
dance and reception to the Regents and Engineering faculty will be held. 

The hall is to be divided into sections with one section for each of the departments of 
Engineering. Each of these sections will be decorated by its department and here the members 
of the faculty of that department will entertain its members. The Regents of the University 
have been invited to attend the dance, and a special effort will be made to have them meet 
the students and faculty of the Engineering School. 

Page 40 













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•;|| The University of Kansas has, during its 

:|| history, granted 4,764 degrees to 4330 per- 

'•■if, sons, of which 3,398 were men and 1,366, 

'0. women. These graduates are now in all parts 

■y^ll of the United States and the world winning 

;;/§ fame for themselves and their Alma Mater. 

-'A As might have been expected, the women 

;;^;;. started things at the University. The first 

iv: student enrolled was Miss Lillian R. Leis, of 

:'yfi Lawrence, who registered in September, 1866, 

':i$ not with George O. Foster, as one might 

^.\^ have thought, but with Elial J. Rice, one of 

the then three members of the faculty, R. W. 
Oliver being Chancellor. 

Among the first graduates of the University 
who are well known in state and even national 
history is Frank P. MacLennan, '75, present 
editor of the Topeka State Journal, and Ger- 




GERTRUDE B. BLACKWELDER, '75 



MISS LILLIAN LEIS 
First Student to enroll at University 



trude B, Blackwelder, '75, now of Morgan 
Park, 111., and a leading Chicago club woman 
and social worker. Later came J. Willis 
Gleed, A. B., '79, A. M., '82, professor of Law 
in the University 1887-1900, and now President 
of the Missouri and Kansas Telephone Co., 
his brother Charles S. Gleed, L. L. B., '80, for 
12 years Regent of the University and at 
present Director and Legal Adviser for the 
Santa Fe railroad at Topeka, Kans., and 
George T. Nicholson, '76, now Vice-president 
of the Santa Fe railroad system, and living at 
Chicago. At this time, also, (1876-77), Richard 
A. Ballinger, former Secretary of the Interior, 
was a student at the University, but, strange 
to say, withdrew to attend Washburn. 

In the early '80s, Franklin Riffle, '80, man- 
ager of a large power plant in San Francisco, 



Page 42 



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Scott Hopkins, '81, one of the present Regents 
of the University and well known in Kansas 
political circles, and Charles F. Scott, '81, 
former member of Congress from the second 
Kansas District and now editor of the lola 
Register, when students made themselves 
conspicuous in a Lawrence election by annexing 
the colored vote by means of some ardent 
"ward-heeling." 

Glenn L. Miller, graduated in '84, is now 
President of the Home Trust and Savings Co., 
of San Francisco, and Albert S. Riflfle, '84, 
(now deceased), was chief bridge engineer in 
the construction of a railway in South America. 
W. Y. Morgan, '85, editor of the "Hutchinson 
News," and author of "Journeys of a Jay- 
hawker" and other books, was, in those days 
of form-fitting coats and lurid red ties, con- 
sidered quite a "fusser." 




FREDERICK FUNSTON 



Page 43 




W. Y. MORGAN, '85 



At this time, also, the University was 
honored by the attendance of two great men, 
William Allen White, present editor of the 
"Emporia Gazette," author of "In our Town," 
"A Certain Rich Man," etc., and Frederick 
Funston, Lieutenant General in the U. S. 
Army and of Phillipine War fame, who were 
enrolled in the College in 1886-87. Their 
career here, however, was short-lived, they 
having trouble with the faculty, and both reluc- 
tantly took their departure from our noble 
halls of learning at the urgent request of the 
before-mentioned gentlemen. 

Frank D. Hutchings, '86, is now Judge of 
the 29th, and W. A. Jackson, '87, of the 
2nd judicial districts of Kansas. Harry E. 



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Riggs, '86, is now a leading valuation man of 
public utilities and located at Ann Arbor, 
Mich. Another engineer of whom the Univer- 
sity should be proud is Arthur L. Adams, '86, 
who is perhaps the leading hydraulic engineer 
of the Pacific Coast. He resides at San 
Francisco. 

William E. Borah, United States Senator 
from Idaho, attended the University during 
the years of 1885-86, but his record while here 
would hardly have foretold such a brilliant 
future for him, and had there been a Student 
Council in those days, he might have been the 
unfortunate victim of its wrath. 

Walter W. Davis, a student in the University 
from 1885-88, is now financial manager of a 
large mining company in Leadville, Colo. 
Edwin E. Slosson, A. B., '90, A. M., '92, al- 




ARTHUR L. ADAMS, '86 




WILLIAM E. BORAH 



though considered the homeliest man in the 
University while here, has outlived it and is 
now Literary Editor of the "Independent," 
and author of the well known book entitled 
"Great American Universities." 

The Law School seems to have been partic- 
ularly attractive in the early '90s and many 
students were graduated who have later be- 
come conspicuous in state affairs. A great 
many of these must have been of a judicial 
temperament for a majority of the judges of 
the judicial districts of Kansas are proteges of 
"Uncle Jimmy." Thomas J. 'Flannelly, '92, 
is judge of the 14th judicial district of Kansas, 
Edward L. Fisher, '92, is judge of the 29th, 
Jabez O. Rankin, '93, of the 10th, Gordon L. 
Finley, '93, of the 31st, Oscar Rains, '94, of 
the 36th, and Jacob C. Ruppenthal, '95 of the 
























29th. John A. Rush, '93, is a leading poli- 
tician and lawyer of Denver. 

The Kansas legal talent has also invaded 
other states and in Oklahoma, Jesse J. Dunh, 
'93, has proven the efficiency of the K. U. Law 
School as Judge of the Supreme Court of 
Oklahoma, as has Ralph E. Campbell, '94, 
who is United States District Judge of the 
Eastern District of Oklahoma. 

Not to be outdone by their ancient enemies, 
the Laws, the Engineers also "did things" in 
this period. 

Eugene W. Caldwell, '92, one of the best 
X-ray experts of New York City, is connected 
with the Belleview Hospital of that city, 
Arthur S. Osborne, '92, is chief engineer of the 
Denver and Rio Grande Railway, with offices 




EDWIN E. SLOSSON, '90 




JOHN A. RUSH, '93 



at Denver, W. L. Brayton, '93, is bridge engin- 
eer for the Union Pacific railroad at Omaha, 
and Frank Ringer, '93, is chief engineer of the 
M. K. and T. railroad with headquarters at 
Parsons, Kansas. 

Graduates of K. U. have succeeded in busi- 
ness and financial as well as in professional 
circles. Thornton Cooke, '93, Treasurer of 
the Fidelity Trust Co. of Kansas City, Mo., is 
considered one of the most prominent bankers 
of the West, and a leading authority on finan- 
cial questions. 

Kansas men will succeed anywhere, even in 
Missouri. When Herbert S. Hadley, '92, was 
Attorney General of Missouri, he taught the 
Missourians the "Kansas Language," and as 
a result of the able manner in which he prose- 










Page 45 







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cuted the corporations and boodlers of St. 
Louis, he was elected Governor, the first 
Republican for thirty years to be elected to 
that office. 

Although the School of Journalism was not 
estabUshed at that time, Miss AUce Rohe, '96, 
has been a success as a journalist and is now 
on the staff of a large Denver newspaper. 
Russel R. Whitman, '93, has made perhaps 
the most notable success as a journalist, being 
now publisher of the Boston American. 

Of the more recent graduates, M. K. Shaler, 




GLENN L. MILLER, '84 

'02, who is connected with an American-Belgian 
mining company in the Congo district, A. A. 
Hoffman, '05, a prominent engineer now in 
South America, W. S. Kinnear, former assistant 
general manager of Michigan Central Ry., 
lately chief engineer of Kansas City Terminal 
Ry. Co., and now in New York City, and 
Herbert W. Rankin, '08, have shown that it is 
still possible for K. U. graduates to succeed. 




HERBERT S. HADLEY, '92 












m< 



ALICE ROHE, '96 



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Page 46 



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Masters of the Vineyard 



A university election is a large gathering by a number of small people usually to elect 
some engineer to a position of High Trust and Honor. In rare cases the person elected may be 
a law, or even a struggling candidate for an A. B. degree, but not often. As a rule the engineers 
frown upon the political asperations of mere laws and college men. Next to formal spring 
parties and the Junior Prom, university elections are among the most lavish social functions 
of the entire year. This is necessitated by the difficulty of luring and entrapping the timid 
and elusive feminine "vote," and so the female contingent is wined, dined, fed on Hersheys 
Milk Chocolate, decorated with American Beauty roses, and finally driven to the polls in red 
six cylinder bubble wagons from which they are lifted down, presented with five pound boxes 
of Allegretis, and sent in to cast their white and uncorrupted ballots for the candidate nomi- 
nated by the engineering school and the Whoopty Phi boys. However just because someone 
is generally elected president of something or other, do not get the idea that this is the prime 
motive of politics and of elections; far from it- Elections in their broadest and most widely 
known capacities serve to increase and enlarge our social activities, and to permit many little 
bachelor maids who are not terribly bothered with gentlemen company to have occasion to 
boast of at least one or two dates. Again, the candidate may be taken in hand and introduced 
among the elite, but not often. Generally he has forgotten to have his hair cut, and the "cau- 
cus" suggests that he ought to spend a few hours in shop, or in the chemical "lab." It is 
expected that elections will go on indefinitely unless the state suffers from another shortage of 
crops, in which contingent all such activities will be delayed until returning prosperity brings 
with it renewed social endeavor, and its accompanying store of chocolate smooths, spearmint, 
nut bars, and pop corn crisps. 



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Page 47 













Aprons and Overalls 






N addition to foot ball, the University offers other facilities for developing both 
mind and body; namely, a well developed system of laboratory courses. 

There is scarcely a school or a department but has its laboratories. The 
chemical laboratories are especially in evidence with their abundance of flasks, 
fumes, and freshmen, and the widely-known liquid air machine. It was here 
that the stamp-licking dog became famous along-side of K. O. H. and other 
chemical affinities which assert themselves from time to time. 

The Physics Department is equipped with expensive apparatus, with especial regard for 
the laws of accuracy. Budding physicists here learn that electricity consists of more than a 
tinghng sensation from a medical battery. 

The laboratories connected with the School of Engineering consist of shops, forge room, 
strength of materials laboratory, and other laboratories for the appHcation and testing of laws 
dealing with practical engineering problems. The mineralogical laboratories are located at 
Haworth Hall and are connected with the courses in mining engineering. 




Page 48 



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The School of Medicine has its anatomy and physiology laboratories, that of anatomy 
having been moved recently to the basement of the museum in order to make room for the 
School of Journalism. This latter has a new laboratory equipped with all of the facilities 
for making expert newspaper men out of cubs. 

Snow Hall, the biological building, is devoted almost entirely to laboratory purposes. 
Its biological collections offer the opportunity of studying anything from an Aspidiotus per- 
niciocious to the thoracic appendages of a crawdad. 

Psychology claims a large place among the laboratories, occupying the basement of the 
new Administration building. It has recently come into the lime-light by the "Doings of 
Dockery and his Dogs." 

The most recent additions to the family are the laboratory of the School of Education 
and that of the Domestic Science Department with the University Cafeteria run in connection 
with it. This cooking laboratory gives the girls scientific training along the line of work that 
appeals to the "mere men" of the University. 



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Serenading Seven States 



T was nine bells and fifty-five minutes, on the morning of February 19, 1912, 
when the Santa Fe train which was to bear the University of Kansas Gleemen 
to the land of English violets and roses, had waited five minutes over schedule 
and the conductor had given the signal to start, when in the distance a carriage 
was seen from the rear of their observation car. The train started but was 
stopped as Clyde Dodge and Ed Rhodes fairly fell from the carriage and ran to 
the rear of the train and were pulled over the railing of the special car amid 
the cheer of spectators and friends. 

Thus auspiciously was begun the most triumphal tour which has ever been experienced, 
by a K. U. Glee Club; a tour carrying them through seven states, thirteen cities, and through 
varying experiences, long to be remembered and cherished. 

Just as soon as the train stopped at Chanute, Bob Campbell, Clarence Sowers and Clyde 
Dodge began a tour of inspection with the intention of getting a line on the good looking girls 
of the town. Their effort was not in vain, for within thirty minutes, each of the afore mentioned 
had crushed a beauty. Needless to say this queening continued until the train left at twelve 
forty-five. Their visit will long be remembered in Chanute. 

At noon the next day the club arrived in Wellington where the second concert of the trip 
was to be given. The weather was abominable and it was simply impossible for the fellows 
to leave the harbor of the Harvey House. It was here that the two bald headed men of the 
club; to-wit, Hal Harlan and Hal Black, ably assisted by Freshman Smitty centered their 
attention upon the fair waiting maids in the dining room. Before leaving each of the girls 
had extracted from those singers, a promise to exchange at least one post card. 

Few adventures befell our tourist at Wyanoka, Oklahoma, and Canadie, Texas. It was 
at Amarillo, Texas, where Manager Kates smoked his first cigarette. This fall from grace was 
doubtless largely due to the fact that recent blue laws have been passed in Texas, prohibiting 
card playing, and rotation pool. The boys were compelled to pitch quoits and play checkers 
to quench their thirst for excitement. After the concert several members of the club were 
royally entertained at the home of Raymond Bedford, a former K. U. student. 



Page 51 














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The next stop was at Clovis, New Mexico, where the club was welcomed by a prodigious 
rainfall making the streets resemble the Wakarusa River. On the way to the car after the 
concert, while the club was enjoying the generosity of Manager Kates, who had provided them 
with a carry-all, they were greatly peeved when the rear wheels of the hack began to sink into 
a quicksand. It was here that Finny Graham, who possessed the most complete, comprehen- 
sive and capacious vocabulary of the bunch relieved the feelings of the crowd by forcibly ex- 
pressing his opinion of New Mexico, Clovis, rainfall and especially hacks, as each member was 
forced to leave the conveyance, and walk two hundred yards to the car, clad in white "trou" 
and pumps. 

Owing to a blizzard that was encountered at Vaughn, New Mexico the club moved on with- 
out a concert to Albuquerque, where an impromptu concert was given at the request of the 
University of New Mexico. No less than fifteen hundred citizens and students turned out to 
hear what proved to be one of the best concerts given by the club on the trip. The club sang 
in chapel at the University in the morning and immediately afterwards were taken for an 
automobile trip to the foothills, some fifteen miles away. Never before had Johnny Musselman 
summoned enough courage to leave the car for any length of time until he met "Her." The 
competition between him and Smitty for the front seat in "Her" automobile resulted in the 
overthrow of the heretofore invincible Smith, and Johnny occupied the much envied position 
the remainder of the day. 

At Gallup there seemed to be a scarcity of the fair sex, and the club was taken in a body 
by the business men to visit the well known Navajo Mine. The trip over the mountains was 
uneventful, except that several members of the club took a great interest in watching the Indians 
in their native garb, gambling and making Navajo blankets. From Gallup the club journeyed 
to Williams, Arizona, and it was from this point to Needles, California, that the special train 
was given the club. The last one hundred and fifty-three miles was made in three hours and 
twelve minutes, a record which had Death Valley Scotty's time beaten to a whisper. The 
road officials at Needles marveled at the time made by Engineer Crockett. 







Page 53 



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The one stop made between Needles and Los Angeles was Barstow, which was in the heart 
of the American desert. 

On March the second the club arrived in Los Angeles, and were met at the train by a body 
of K. U. alumni. The entire visit in this city was one round of entertainment, hospitaUty 
and good fellowship. A concert was given to the old K. U. students at the Metropolitan Club. 
It was here that the sea water failed to agree with the Kansas youths, and a diversity of enter- 
tainment was welcomed by several members of the club. After a stop of five days the club 
started on their return trip. Owing to the fact that former clubs had incurred the displeasure 
of the management of the Eltovar Hotel at Grand Canon, the members of the club were com- 
pelled to pay their fare from Williams to Grand Canon and return. Since the sum was seven 
dollars and fifty cents and entirely unexpected on the part of the fellows, who had been rather 
extravagant in Los Angeles, there was not enough money to hire a single mule to go down the 
trail at Grand Canon. 

The trip down the trail which was fourteen miles proved to be more of an endurance test 
than anything else. It was at the base of the trail that the boys decided to wade in the Col- 
orado River. Every member of the club including Jenkins took a foot bath. After eating a 
light lunch, the trail was again taken and even Weston would have fallen among the stragglers 
on the return trip. Ed Rhodes arrived at the top first because he posed as a strong man, 
Vic Larsen was a close second because he didn't know any better, Smitty was third because 
he was a freshman, and Phillips was fourth because he was the goat. Rhodes held the record of 
seven miles up the trail in two hours and thirty eight minutes. A concert was given in the 
hotel at Grand Canon to an audience that represented some twenty-five states in the Union. 
On the return trip Clyde Dodge surprised his fellow travelers by making a hit with a Roman 
Nosed Jewess. 

With the exception of an enforced stop at Dodge City, the return trip was completed with- 
out further adventure and the tired singers arrived in Lawrence Monday afternoon, March 
eleventh after having completed a circuit of nearly 5000 miles. 



Page 54 



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EVERETT WALDO VAUGHN, A. B. 
Caldwell 

President Adelphic Literary Society 
(2), German Play (3). 

Be still Fellowsl We all want to hear 
this man speak. 




FRANK FONCANNON, A B 
Emporia 

«>A0, *Bn. 

We'd tell that Fony came from the 
College of Emvoria only we hate to haul 
him out. 


















ROBERT E. LEE, A. B. 
Lawrence 
B9n, Good Government Club, 
Friars, Sophomore Farce, Sophomore 
Social Committee, Chairman Decora- 
tion Committee Junior Prom, Senior 
Play Committee, Student Council (4). 
Suave diplomat in the college. 




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PAUL PETER EWALD, A B 
Lawrence 

The medics dubbed him the Apostle 
Paul" because he didn't swear when 
Professor Scott took the whole class for 
crooks. He is English, which account'^ 
for everything. 



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LUCILE YATES, A. B. 
Junction City 
Lucile does things up Brown. 




LUCILE H. WILKINSON, A. B. 
Muskogee, Okla. 

IIB*, Y. W. C. A. Princess Ida (1), 
Class Farce Committee (2), Class Farce 
(2), Class Prom Committee (3), Class 
Farce (3), Idle Idol (3), Red Domino 
Club, Quill Club, Senior Play Com- 
mittee. Queen of the Kirmess (4 . 

Object, Matrimony. 




ALFRED A. GRIFFIN, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Entomological Club, Company H, 
First Regiment, K. N. G. 

// war should break out I would be the 
first one to offer my life to my country. 




MAYME WHEELER, A. B. 

Guthrie Okla. 

When the moon plays peek-a-boo. 







Mi 



(■..>3'-'.-" ' 

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Page 65 









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SIDNEY M. WOODMAN, A. B. 
Netawaka 

Risen from the ranks. 



:■,.(,;•;.;.;.', i.;-'.,:^'-!v.;y:'/'Vv'i'?.'!'V'-''X-'^'-"'- 




FLORENCE ADA WALLACE, A. B. 
Phillipsburg 
We wonder why Florence rooted for 
Nebraska last fall. 




REGINA WOODRUFF, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Quill Club, Prom Committee (3). 
Most girls are supposed to be afraid 
of bugs but not Regina. 



'* j: 




JOSEPHINE WALKER, A. B. 

Holton 
KKF. 

/ am glad the Kappas moved up so 
that I don't have to climb the hill. 




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CATHERINE TUPPER, A. B. 

Lawrence 
I'll sign no petition for senior exemp- 
tion from examinations. 







ELIZABETH K. WILSON, A. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
*BK. 

/ know more German than Herr 
Kiesewetter. 




TILLIE SHKLAR, A. B. 
Kiowa 
Alice in Wonderland (1), Cheer 
Leader Women's Athletic Association. 
The optomist of the senior class. 




HARRY WILKINS, A. B. 
Chapman 
QuiU Club, Associate Editor Oread (4) 
The only trouble with me is that I'm 
never on time. 



Page 67 



:.:''M 











.-•■.'"-■.■•J/i'*^-'.!.-.-' 













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JEANNETTE SPALDING, A. B. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
I'm not sleepy, just tired. 



HELEN STEVENS, A. B. 
Parsons 
Xit, President Social Center Club, 
Y. W. C. A. 

The only girl who ever wore one at 
K. U. 




GEORGE H. STUCKE^, A. B. 
Formoso 

<i>K^, Basket-ball (2, 3), Captain (4), 
Class Track (1), Sachems, Friars, Good 
Government Club, Student Council (4) , 
K Club, Pan-Hellenic Council (4), 
Sophomore Invitation Com., Junior 
Music and Programs Com., Class Farce 
(2, 3), Assistant Editor 1912 Jayhawker_ 

The Formoso " New Era" will give you 
the remainder of his pedigree. 




A. T. SWANSON, A. B. 
Randolph 
Careful! You'll hurt Auntie's feelings. 



Pane Gi 













-.'^^\ 







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#^i 



^ 





GEORGE SAMUEL SNODDY, 
A. B. B. S. 



Empona 



<I>AK, Acacia. 

Never Again. 







EDWIN C. SCHMITT, A. B. 
Moundridge 
*Bn, Prom Committee (2). 
Although I am from Moundridge, my 
grand-papa came from Rotterdam. 



xi». 







ELSIE LOUISE SMITH, A. B. 
Leavenworth 

W. S. G. A. (3), Prom Committee (3) 
1912 Jayhawker Board. 

By the way Elsie, which one do you 
like best anyway? 




MARY EUPHEMIA SMART, A. B. 
Ottawa 

KAG. 

Have you got another girl at home like 
Mary Euphemia? 








tfS;W%S-&&S-?;:$( 



Page 69 



vv iv: 









i;-;ifl.-3»'.v;. 



.••as 







BERNICE RUHLANDT, A. B. 

Osawatomie 
She's only a child. 







MYRA ROGERS, A. B. 
Abilene 
KA0, Sophomore Farce, Class Day 
Committee, 1912 Jawhayker Board. 

You shouldn't forget football players 
just because they're gone. 



I' 







d^k'^ 



Vtyl' 




MAE FLORENCE ROSSMAN, A. B. 
Olathe 
Secretary of Freshman Class, Class 
Farce (2), Prom Committee (3), Vice- 
President W. S. G. A. (4). 

Although not a suffragette. Political 
Graft is not altogether unknown to her. 




JAMES GORDON ROBINSON, A. B. 
Viola 

Assistant |Instructor at Cooper, 
Fellow in Chemistry. 

How can a gun in Chemistry come 
from a town named Viola? 



^^alM-! 



Page 70 















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1 





SARAH RHODA NAYLOR, A. B. 
Holton 
She came here this year to Naylor 



LEOTA McFARLIN, A. B. 
Lawrence 
IIB* Y. W. C. A. Thespians, Red 
Domino Club, As You Like It (1), 
Alice in Wonderland (2), Idle Idol (3), 
Junior Farce, Object Matrimony, Jun- 
ior Prom Committee, Editor of Dra- 
matics 1912 Jayhawker. 

See the chic little lady with the hull-dog. 










DONALD McKAY, A. B. 
Girard 
B9n, Manager Prom (3), President 
College (4), Manager Red Domino 
(3, 4), Good Government Club, Chair- 
man Class Farce (2), Class Football (2), 
Student Council (3). 
{Applause). 








REBECCA PASSON, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Thespians, German Dramatic Club, 
President German Verein (3, 4), The 
Climbers (2), Der Bibliothekar (4), 
District Chairman W. S. G. A. (2). 
/ don't care for violin music anymore. 



Page 71 



:i i; 










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?t$^#Sig^??S;3S5^<5^| 




li 





LELAND W. MOORE, A. B. 
Ottawa. 

Hasn't scratched yet. 



W-^f'^^^^^^^^^^ll^^^'0W0' 




^^mmm^^ 





KARL E MOORE, A. B 
Inman 
2N, Friars, Junior Farce 
// you should bend htm he'd break. 




LLOYD HENRY MOSSER, A. B. 
Hamlin 

Whistle if you want me, dear. 




BERTHA E. MIX, A. B. 

Tecumseh 

/ don't care. Polities is exciting. 



^■:* 



*;<:' 



i-^a^'lJJ^r 






Page 72 




















ORELL GRACE MYERS, A. B. 
Olathe 

The girl with the rosy cheeks. 




FAY CECILIA MOYS, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Y. W. C. A. (3). 
Great Expectations. 



Page 73 




WARREN M. MILLER, A. B. 
Sabetha 

AT, *Bn, Soccer (3, 4), Class Foot- 
ball (4). 

He's just the cutest little fellow you 
ever saw. He admits that he prepared 
at th". University of Nebraska. 







CARRIE A. MORRIS, A. B. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Really Oklahoma City is a civilized 





m^mn^ 









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lists 



MARGARET KILLARNEY, A. B. 
Atchinson 
Fess up now. Did you ever kiss the 
Blarney stone? 










NELL M. MARTINDALE, A. B. 
Lawrence 

Secretary of the Senior Class, W. S. 
G. A. (3, 4), Manager W. A. A. (4), 
Y. W. C. A., Junior Prom Finance 
Committee. 

Amply proved that women know enough 
about politics to vote. 







MILDRED MAURINE MANLEY, 
A. B. 
lola 
Junior Farce, Senior Farce Com- 
mittee, German Play (4). 

/ had the nerve to sass the Student 
Counn I. 



. , J 




BENJAMIN HEIM LEVENTHAL, 

A. B. 

Rosedale 

Orchestra (2), French Play (2, 3). 

/ am of Jewish decent and so was 

Dtxraeli. 






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Page 74 









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MARY ISE, A. B. 
Lawrence 
*BK. 

She bought her Jayhawker ticket early. 




JOHN C. JOHNSON, A. B. 
Formoso 
IIT, NZN, Faculty Editor 1912 
Jayhawker, Class Farce (2,3), Class 
Baseball (1), Class Football (2, 4), 
Mikado (2), Chairman Junior Social 
Committee (3), Sophomore Farce Com- 
mittee, Friars, Freshman Cap Com- 
mittee. 

So you were on the Freshman Cap 
Committee were you John? 



j^ji4,VCi^fC 








LUCILE KELLERMAN, A. B. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
*BK, Secretary German Verein 
(1, 2), President German Verein (2,3). 
// this is a sample I'll take a dozen. 




|^» ' Page 76 



CHARLES KUBIK, A. B. 
Caldwell 

*Bn. 

Has smoked the same pipe ever since 
he has been in school. 





fe^»»'-. 








,;;•■ .;:=:-''iw,'. ;■•>(.: .^^^ 




MYRTLE ETHEL HYRE, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Hyre! Hyre! Where have we heard 
that name before? O Hire's. 



'^■i^M:M0M^^^§§^$^^^j^^0;^ 




ELIZABETH KATHERINE HEAVEY 

A. B. 

Leavenworth 

Senior Farce Committee, Quill Club, 

Senior Girls Dormitory Committee (4), 

Y. W. C. A. 

/ think the Quill Club should give a 
dance 




JEAN G. HALL, A. B. 
Waterville 
Acacia. 

Author of "In the lime'Jight for three 
I years." 




MYRTLE HUMPHREY, A. B. 

Russel 
She's from Russell Give her room. 
















Km . 



Page 76 




^^:^!Yi^ 



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TEKLA CECILIA GUSTAFSON, 
A. B. 
Lawrence 
She took the University course with 
three skips, and two jumps. 



■;j|^yt'^^^Pt'PISIPSI^Pi?!S^I^ 




CLARENCE. EARNEST 

Washington 

N2N, Varsity Band (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Class Football (2). 

Come on and hear! Come on and hear! 
Alexander's Ragtime Band. 





ROBERT LEE HOFFMAN, A. B. 
Ellsworth 

IIT, <i>Bn, Medical Society. 

Ach! Such a Deutcher! He is even 
proud of his ability to eat green cheese. 
Yes, she lives in Ellsworth. 




[^^^■a Page 77 



WALTER L. HOFFMAN, A. B. 

Enterprise 
Entomology Club. 
// you want to know a good way to 
kill potato bugs, Walter will teU you. 



"^; 




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BERTHA LOUISE DACK, A. B. 

Lyons 
KKr, 1912 Jayhawker Board. 
Y. W. C. A. 

Between "Bill" and Pan- Hellenic, 
the Kappa Mgr. has led a strenuous life. 







GLADYS E. ELLIOTT, A. B. 
Lawrence 

Red Domino, Vesper Chorus, In- 
structor in Physical Culture, Deutsche 
Verein, Chairman of Senior Farce 
Committee. 

This girl '^aw the K U -M U game 








ELMER H. DITTMAR, A. B. 
Clay Center 

ATfl, Sachems, Friars, School for 
Scandal (2). Ysbrand (2), Pan-Hellenic 
Council (3), Assistant Business Man- 
ager 1912 Jayhawker 

A gum shoed diplomat with a weak- 
ness for moving pictures. 




MARGARET DARRAH, A B 

McPherson 
Junior Farce, Quill Club 
/ don't think the hoys ought to hue 
to feed the gtrlb on week nights 











Page 78 







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5Ci--^"<V4x>r- . • - -xjcfciC. *xr 




ELEANOR DRAPER 
Oswego 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4), Qiill 
Club. 

As dear Brother Henry used to say — ■ 




FRANK E. DAVIS, A. B. 
Lawrence 
2AE, Friars, Good Government 
Club. 

Kitty! Kitty! Kitty! 




NELLIE MARVIN DALTON, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Y. W. C. A. 

She specialized in what we all osten- 
sibly came for. 




LILY GAZZELLK HAKER, A. B. 
Cherry vale 
A most irrepresatble conversationalitl. 



1 i 



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Page 79 





•s. 



fej-SefeSv*- ' 








LEDRUE G. CARTER, A. B. 
Lawrence 
$K^, Decoration Committee Prom 



(3). 



O vjhat we know about you! 







LEONA C. CALENE, A. B. 
Sylvan Grove 
Y. W. C. A. 

Sylvan Grove! Sounds like Keats 
doesn't it? 




s^^-i 




"" M^^' 




ELLIS WEBB DAVIDSON, A. B. 
Lawrence 

SAX, Varsity Football (2, 3, 4), 
Class Football (1), Sachems, Editor 
Oread Magazine (4), Quill Club, Scoop 
Club, Varsity Band (1), Organizations 
Editor 1912 Jayhawker, K Club, 
Athletic Board (3, 4). 

"Ain't that an- awful bunch of stuff 
to tie onto a man? I'll leave it to you 
kid." 

(Quotes are Davy's own) 




VILLA CRAWFORD, A B. 
Lawrence 

My heart's in Schnectady My heart 



IS not here 



k\^>'fA'\^ *'' 









Page 80 



,^*-' 






<i*i~Mi^' 






1 

I 





EDWARD CECIL COLIN, A. B. 

Argonia 
Cooley Club, K. N. G. 
Most remarkable in that he's alteay 
on the job. 






Si' 




WALTER ALBERT BUTLER, A. B. 
Atwood 

Class Football (2, 3, 4), Class Basket- 
ball (3), K. N. G. 

Honest now Walt, were you ever mad 
enough to fight? 



'^ '. ■\ ■<■ 




WESTON W. CARPENTER, A. B. 
Lawrence 

Y. M. C. A. Class Track (1). College 
Basketball (3, 4), Varsity Soccer (4). 

After you have stuck around the chem- 
istry building four years you don't notice 
the smell. 




FAY CARMICHAEL, A B. 
Colony 
<t>BK. 

Do you know Latin's not bad after 
you get used to it. 






' - "T^fiT 



Page 81 



V'i"--'^^^* ' 









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MARION M JOHNSTON, 

Lawrence 
Mathematics Club 
HoH old J6 Anne^ 




BROWNIt: ANGLE, A B 

Kansas City, Mo 

KKT, Y W C A , Class secretary 

(2), Class Farce (2, 3), Thespians ('J), 

Quill Club, Senior Play Committee 

Steady there' 




EARL F AMMONS, A B. 
Arkansas City 

President Senior Class, Athletic Board (4) 
Sachems, Captain Varsity Football (4), 
Class Football, Baseball, Track (1), Varsity 
Football (2, i, 4), Varsity Track (2, 3), 
Varsity Baseball (4), K Club, Coach Senior 
Class Football (4), Holder University Dis- 
cus Record 

ATOmj/'s honors have rolled up hke a snow- 
ball in wet •fuou. 




MAELYNETTE ALDRICH, A. B. 
Salina 
*BK. 

Maelynette' And the is as learned 
as her name bounds 



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Page 82 










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LEOTOS LENTZ, A. B. 
Sumner County 
She knows more than all the men in 
the medic class. 






- > 1 




EDWARD F. KOHMAN, A. B. 
Dillon 

AXS, 2S, *BK, Vice-President 
Class (2), Yeoman of the Guard (4), 
American Chemical Society. 

/ always manage to maintain a very 
high standing with the faculty my dear. 









GALE GALBAUGH GOSSETT, A. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 

KAB, *BK, French Play (1), Y. W. 
C. A. Cabinet (2, 3, 4), Quill Club, 
Oread Board (4), Spanish Play (4), 
1912 Jayhawker Board. 

Its against our policy to say anything 
nice about anyone, but we can't he sar- 
castic about Gale. 




JAMES EDGAR HENSHALL, A. B. 
Osborne 

NSN. 

{Chorus of Old Ladies) My! My! How 
you hate grown! 



1 ^"> 



Page 83 







mm. 




HARVEY C. LEHMAN, A. B. 

Humboldt 
*AK. 

"/ came to college to satisfy my curi- 
osity, but am still curious. 




ETHEL L. STONE, A. B. 
Emporia 
HB*. 

To instruct the youth of our land is a 
great and noble ambition for every col- 
lege graduate. 



CARL LESLIE CANNON, A. B. 
Smith Center 
IIT, Editor-in-chief 1912 Jayhawker, 
Managing Editor Kansan (3, 4), Good 
Government Club, Scoop Club, Quill Club, 
Friars, Oread Board (4), Thespians, Class 
Farce (2), Class Football (1, 2, 3), Captain 
(2), Class Track (1). 

" Nix, Nix, You can't get me in this book." 




ELMER RAY HOSKINS, A. B. 

Lawrence 
4>Bn, Prom Committee (3). 
His question always is, " How's 
politics?," and yet he is not a politician. 



S:;- 






S&H\'^ 



11! 










Pa-je 84 
















•X-: 







HELEN HILL, A. B. 
Oswego 
Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4), Y. W. C. A. 
/ wonder if the Hill was named after 






■■,'i^ 




GRACE WILKIE. A. B. 
Witchita 
Xfi, *BK, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 
(1, 2, 3,'4), W. S. G. A. (4), Class Farce 
Committee (4), Prom Committee (3). 
It is hard to believe, but Grace was at 
that Thanksgiving party at Ecke's last 
fall. 



-. - * 



! 
-.1 \' 



Page 85 



pi,t -.^r.vnfA-^)! 




RUBEY MAY MAYNARD, A. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
This University would be a good place 
if the suffragette movement met with a 
warmer response from the girls. 




ANNA HANSON, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Not especially romantic, but might be 
moved on a moonlight spring night. 




•'5i 



»«•" ■;-'<-'X' - -iv •'Ukr'sXi. 





















FRANK B. WARD, A. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Third year in school. Fie! Fie! 







GEORGIA WITHINGTON, A. B. 
Allen 
Papa thays I lithp, mamma thays I 
don't. What do you thay? 



8rv .■ 








T. SCOTT WILSON, A. B. 
Wichita 
He can't help it. He was photogra- 
pher and "joke" man on the Fairmount 
annual last year. 




HARRY E. WEAVER, A. B. 
Belleville 
// a man can not he a master, let him 
he a faithful servant. 









Page 8() 














LEROY J. WHEELER, A. B. 

Wakeeney 
That child-hke expression is a blind 



lead. 




ISABEL THOMES, A. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Masque Club, Royal Knave (1), 
Madam Butterfly (2), Allemania, 
Quill Club. Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4), 
Alice in Wonderland (2), Vice-Presi- 
dent Y. W. C. A. (3, 4), 1912 Jayhaw- 
ker Board. 

Do you remember the time that I was 
almost secretary of the Junior Class. 




GRACE PAULINE ULRICH, A. B. 

Lawrence 
Listens more than she talks, which is 
one reason why she is so entertaining. 



,1!^^ 






&^,' 




1-A 





^ . > ^ >-^1' 



MABEL GRACE ULRICH. A. B. 
Lawrence 
The best combtnalion is chemistry and 
Masonry. 



PaKP S7 



;ri??S's:c**s.;-*vii>;j;-'. 



W«-«»,Il«-»^ ., ».si^<i.-" 



«>..^.-*--%^^.-]^•»-wv^v»nl-< 










AMY TUCKER, A. B. 
Wichita 
/ won't vote for a candidate I haven't 
met. 




<liiiliil^i^a?!^aiS 1,., 



GORDON A. SMITH, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Varsity Track (2, 3, 4), Class Track 
(1, 2, 3, 4). 
A fast man. 




JOHN ELDEN SAWHILL, A. B. 
Concordia 
NSN, Y. M. C. A. 
We suspect that a lot of these fellows 
put Y. M.C. A. after their names for the 
benefit of the folks at home. 




JOHN W SHIVE, A B 
Burrton 
O we pray thee John come down off 
the fence. 



II' 

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Wm0^ 






Page 88 



'""hi: 




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EDNA MAUDE SMITH, A. B. 

Smith Center 
Miss Smith of Smith Center, Smith 
County, and proud of it. 







HERMIONE A. STERLING, A. B. 

Lawrence 

District Chairman, W. S. G. A., 

Alice in Wonderland (3), Y. W. C. A. 

I didn't inherit the school teaching 
germ. 







PATTIE SANKI, A. B. 
Lawrence 
*BK. 

No she is not descended' from a 
noble Japanese family, and a name 
like that does not prevent her getting 
straight I's. 




Page 



^.■v.I^;.i^;j::^^^ 



ROY E. SMITH, A. B. 

Winchester 

And Sheridan twenty miles a»ay. 



m 

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WORTH HUFF RODEBUSH, A. B. 
Selden 
SS, *BK, AXS, Colorado Debate 

(4). 

All it takes is concentration, system- 
ization and application. 




NELSON TIMOTHY STEVENS, A. B. 
Lawrence 
*Ae, Scoop Club, "Yeomen of the 
Guard' C4). 

Fancy a man being a Latin gun, and a 
live nev>spaper man at the same time, 
and yet that's what Nelse is. 




ROSCOE ROYAL REDMOND, A. B. 
Ottawa 
Keltz, Friars, Manager Junior Prom, 
Chairman Senior Invitation Com- 
mittee. 

My vote and my influence go to the 
side that offers me the most. 




EVALYN RAGSDALE, A. B. 
Smith Center 
<i>BK. 

Evalyn makes all those good things 
they serve at the Cafeteria. No, I 
haven't heard it, if she is. 

Page 90 






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SUSIE PHELAN, A. B. 
Holyrood 
[ It sounds phunny to spell it Phelan. 



iT>^ KvJjil'V-'^'^y^oJvl'S^?!^^ 




JENNIE MAY RICHARDSON 

Lawrence 
*BK. 

Miss Richardson knows enough Ger- 
man to talk the Kaiser himself out of 
countenance. He'd enjoy it too. 



;^?i. 



£f<- 



■./£%■?' 




EARL CLEVELAND O'ROKE, A. B. 
Sabetha 
'J>AK, Entomological Society, 1912 
Jayhawker Board. 
A clever Irishman with no habits. 




CLARA LOUISE OSGOOD, A. 
Parsons 
AAA, Class Farce (3). 
10:30 Rule. Ha! Ha! Ha! 



Page 91 



fife 



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m" 




RUTH C. MILLER, A. B. 
Pratt 
Home Economics. 
Can she make a cherry pie? 











WILL A, MOORE, A. B. 

Chapman 

Keltz, Friars, Treasurer Junior Class, 

Finance Committee Junior Prom, 

Manager Freshman Base Ball Team, 

Sophomore Social Committee. 

Say! Did you all notice what a social 
gun I have become my last year? 




ANNA R. MANLEY, A. B. 

Junction City 

Quill Club, Thespians, Deutsche 

Verein, Allemania, Y. W. C. A., 

Student Council (1), 1912 Jayhawker 

Board. 

"Dormitory is our story." 




BESS JANE McKITTRICK, A. B. 
Wilson 
Her position as general manager of 
the Cafeteria, qualifies her for . 






i^i^^' 










Page 92 


































;\^^B^Sl^^^^*^!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^*«i»^ 





INEZ MORRIS, A. B. 
Tecumseh 
Heine has proved by mathematics that 
women ought to vote. 




ARTHUR E. MALLORY, A. B. 

Scott City 
Entomology Club. 
The proper study of mankind is bugs. 









wm 







ARTHUR C. MOSES, A. B. 
Manhattan Beach, Calif. 

*Ae. 

We'll get you otherwhere Art. Haven't 
time here. 



''■■:^SS^^^Si^MM^!MMrM 




FLORENCE EMERA MORSE, A. B. B. S. 
Plain ville 
Not all are from PlainnUe. 



\U Page 93 










fpife^Sf *■ !lv§?| l^t'i 







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1 i^tft;!? 





OSCAR ROY MURRAY, A. B. 
Varsity Track (3, 4), Senior Athletic 
Committee. 
Boynton used to pick on me. 




LUCIE MILES MARCH, A. B. 
Lawrence 

*BK, IIB*, W. S. G. A. (1, 2), 
Treasurer W. S. G. A. (1, 2), Treasurer 
Y. W. C. A. (3), President Y. W. C. A. 
(4). 

Safe and sound as her offices prove. 




BEULAH V. MURPHY, A. B. 

Lawrence 
Xfi, President W. S. G. A. (4), 
Secretary W. S. G. A. (3), Y. W. C. A. 
(3, 4), Quill Club, Oread Board, (4), 
Manager May Fete (3), Associate 
Editor 1912 Jayhawker, Speaker Stu- 
dent's Day (3). 

Time hangs so heavy on my hands. 




WILLIAM VERNON MILLER, A. B. 
EmpOria 

€>BK, AXS, Glee Club (3). 

"It was too bad I wasn't on the Glee 
Club this year instead of last, don't you 
think?" 



Page 94 



^4 
1 
































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\mf£. 




LENA MORROW, A. B. 
Lawrence 
KAG. 

It won't do you any good to come 
"buzzing" around now. 



its::. 




HERBERT S. MAXWELL, A. B. 

Bradyville, Iowa 
24>S, Vice-President Freshmen 
Medics (3), President Sophomore 
Medics (4). 

You never can tell what these Brady- 
ville boys will do. 



^I^Si^iSSSZI 







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m 




ALBERT N. LEMOINE, A. B. 
Concordia 

Captain Freshman Track, Cross 
Country Record (1), Class Football (4), 
President Sophomore Class, Sophomore 
Farce, Secretary Student Council (4), 
Class Day Committee. 

I'm a remarkable man in more ways 
than one. 



Pape 95 




OTTO MALLEIS, A. 
Halstead 



B. 



Class Basketball (1), College Basket- 
ball (3). 

Did you ever see a man from Halstead 
who did not plajf baakelballf 



S?sSS?R»?8S® 
















'■'ii?:ri^*"*?!31 








ALFRED P. KRUEGER, A. B. B. S. 
Atchinson 
He fought in South Africa with the 
Boers under his uncle "Oom Paul." 




MINA RAE JOHNSON, A. B. 
Norton 

/ wish that the men in the faculty had 
charge of student discipline becavse the 
girls can appeal to them. 



h ' -I 






Jf>' H^ ^;^/^;f^|JttVi0?^S5^fefe•^^ 










HERMAN SCHMIDT KLIEWER, A. B. 

Newton 

"Am a German. I read, write and 

speak the German as well as the English." 

(His remarks.) 




Xiii^it 



EDITH IRENE HAIGHT, A. B. 
McPherson 
*BK. 

We didn't know they trained Phi 
Beta Kappas at Emporia. 



(Km' ii' 



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I 






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1 

,.1 

,1 
■■I 

'V 




NANCY FISHER, A. B. 
Lyons 
Xi2, Sophomore Farce, Y. W. C. A. 

Has travelled in Europe and Illinois. 



/'"'•'''^V'^ !.'"'( 5 




WILL FRENCH, A. B. 
Pittsburg 

<1>AK, Varsity Track (2, 3), Captain 
(4), Class Track (1), Vice-President 
Freshman Class, Athletic Board (4), 
Quill Club, Sachems, K. Club, Student 
Council (3), Editor of Athletics 1912 
Jayhawker. 

My mother calls me William, but the 
fellers call me Bill. 




GLENDALE GRIFFITHS, A. B. 
Lawrence 

Sophomore Prom Committee, Secre- 
tary Junior Class, W. S. G. A. (3, 4), 
1912 Jayhawker Board. 

The greatest engineering feat ever 
planned at this University was the 
attempted kilnapping of Glendale at 
last year s Athletic election 




Page 97 






ARTHUR S. HUMPHREY, A. B. 
Junction City 
*K^, German Play (2), Adelphic 
(2, 3), "Dictator" (3). 

You notice that I bring all the Junction 
City boys into my frat don't youf 






m- 



i: 




5^ 

m 


















GERTRUDE FIGLEY, A. B. 
Lawrence 
*BK. 

She and her sister are students right. 




CHESTER G. FARNSWORTH, A. B. 
Wichita 

4>BK, Friends University (2, 3), 
Quill Club. 

While in college at Wichita, Chester 
just about ran the institution. Since 
coming to Kansas, however, he has been 
content with the Quill club. 




CHARLES CLEMENT FAIRCHILD. 
A. B. 
Lawrence 
Varisty Track (2, 3, 4), Class Foot- 
ball (1, 3, 4), Cooley Club, K. U. De- 
bating Society. 

Charles has darted like Halley's comet 
across Oread's sky. 







ANGELINE FIGLEY, A. B. 
Lawrence 
4>BK. 

She and her sister are students right. 






;^^' 






'fffiifif^S^' 






Page 98 









&-'iSVS&§€:ST>-^-c^? ;1 .-"^^3 


















t;5rg.5;;.v:.j>a 









KATHERINE ELLIS, A. B. 
Pratt 
A youthful senior who escaped Cupid's 




darts. 



HERBERT E. FORD, A. B. 
Lawrence 
CooleylClub, Class Day Committee 

(4). 

Don't think for a moment that he's giving 

out anyiinformation. 






i^^M' 'r^ 




DENA HOPE ELLIS, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Y. W. C. A., Quill Club, Member 
Class Day Committee. 

It will happen in the good old summer 
time. 





Page 99 



1 'I'cM ."■ ii^: 'J- 



EDMOND E. EWERS, A B. 
Topeka 
A philosopher who slipped through 
college without creating a disturbance 







xy^^-yy-v/'"^"/^ ""f , - ^ 



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*'««i?«l!#^<«IBi9W?^ 






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\ 



ESTHER DEGEN, A. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
XS2. 
Doesn't mind Freshmen. 




DON L. DAVIS, A. B. 

Kansas City 

*BK, Student Council (3, 4), 

Varsity Track (2, 3, 4), Y. M. C. A. 

Cabinet (4), Chairman Class Day 

Committee. 

Don is a representative student except 
that he had to go and make Phi Beta 
Kappa. 



KATHERINE DOLMAN, A. B. 

Lawrence 
KA0, Junior Prom Program Com- 
mittee, Junior Farce. 

/ think annuals are just horrid. 




FLOYD B. DANSKIN, A. B. 
Aulne 
Sasnak, Quill Club. 
Poker at K. U.? I'm going home. 









Page 100 


















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i 

a 



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ELDRIDGE STEVENS ADAMS, A. B. 
Atchinson 
Gentlemen! The King! 



Vs-; •>:•: <:iW'i^'&'^<-BI^'^^ii!M^^^^'' 




MADGE CARMICHAEL, A. B. 

Colony 

Walt Mason isn't in tht same class 
vnth Juvenal. 





BESS CUKTISS, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Little old Lawrence is good enough for 



M. CHRISTINA DAVID, A. B. 

Bonner Springs 
Princess Ida (1). 
Just a mintUe. Where's my hammer? 



Page 101 



&. 
























.'i'^>;J^.-«S^ 












:?5;i5;ii5'i^ii^S3^^#*?iiS#S^^ ''^'"■^'. '^^i^^iiS 







^?7^^3j^ 



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CAROLYN ISABEL BABB, A. B. 
Wichita 
You'll do little girl, you'll do. 





EVERETT W. BRUMMAGE. A. B. 
Beloit 

K2, Sachems, Friars, Thespians, 
Good Government Club, Men's Stu- 
dent Council (4), Chairman Senior 
Play Committee, Class Farce (3), 
Class Prom Committee (2), 1912 Jay- 
hawker Board. 

Since Spec's chapter isn't here he has 
become a Chi Omega. 







HAROLD J. BROWNLEE, A. B. 
Sylvia 

Varsity Football (2, 3), Captain (4), 
Class Football (1), Treasurer Senior 
Class, Chairman Finance Committee 
(4). 

Show U8 the half that can run his end. 



V. . f: 




ELVA MARION BLACK, A. B. 

Ottawa 
*BK. 

Miss Black h<is taken work in every 
college in Kansas, and is looking for 
more worlds to conquer. 



Page 102 ^11^ 









■ '■'■■'' iV'K&iM" :^'-'}ryf 




^M^M 









:m 











NAN R. ARMSTRONG, A. B. 

Lawrence 
Class Day Committee (4). 
Yes I am a good politician for a girl. 




HELEN S. BURDICK, A. B. 

Lawrence 
IIB*, *BK, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet 

(2, 3, 4). 

Helen didn't know whether she was a 
junior or a senior until this year. 



^ . - rfliw'TBjrtmilwMI&iiifeii^ 




RACHEL BAUMGARTNER, A. B. 
Halstead 

Prom Committee (3), Senior Finance 
Committee. 

This world is a lonesome place without 
Brother Ed. , 



Page 103 








HAZEL T. BUTTS, A. B. B. L. 
Wichita 

DB*. Y. W. C. A., Alice in Wonder- 
land (2), Cap and Gown Committee. 

There is still another one of us girls at 
home. 

—- . - ;■ - •-- ^v-r.-^C-V 




^^'■i'^'f 











m 






HARRY C. BERGER, A. B. 
Halstead 

*Bn. 

Of course a smoker can pass the Slate 
Board. 








■;/^ii^ 








LUCILE MARGARET ARNOLD, A. B. 

Ashland 
Merry Man and his Maid (4), Y. W. 
C. A. (3, 4). 

We're sore! She imports her men 
for the Junior Prom. 



,' i 



k 







CARLETON H. ARMSBY, A. B. 

Council Grove 

Junior Invitation Committee, Senior 
Finance Committee. 







j.gc^^;T^ 



t 






I'll stay put boys, 
want me? 



Where do you 






HOMER AUGUSTUS ALEXANDER 
A. B. 

Nickerson 
*BK, NSN. 

He is after the Mayo Brothers' Angora. 
Now watch him! 









Page 104 



M-: 



Si 




CYRIL EVAN SHEPPARD, A. B. 
Wellsville 

NSN. 

Yes Genevieve, doctors always make 
lots of money. 




HELEN HOUGHTON THOMSON, 

A. B. 

Emporia 

IlB*, Thespians, Idle Idol (1). 

There is a certain Sig — 



W&M^^^i?M^M^iy;<^-iM>^U 



^|5*>^r ■ ' • 










WALTER V. CULLISON, A. B. 

Mulberry 
AX 2. 

There's a good time coming boys, a 
good time coming. 




Page 105 






GERTRUDE WILEY, A. B. 
Arkansas City 
Quill Club 
A flirt they say 







i^m^'^r;^^^f^f^ 






I' f. 



'i 






NAN EDGARINE WALTON, A. B. 
Leavenworth 
Sure but slow. 



ZEPHYR CEDONIA LAYNE, A. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Should you think that she would ever 
want to change a name h.ke that? 




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Page 106 



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MELVIN KATES, L. L. B. 
Newton 
SX, *A€>. 
The oft fooled fooler of the fair. 






w ( 



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I 




HOWARD H. WIKOFF, L. L. B. 
Oneida 
Ben, Class Farce (2, 3), Class 
Farce Committee (4), Masque Club. 

Lofty Representative in the School of 
Law. 




CLYDE B. HARROLD, L. L. B. 
Ponca City, Okla. 
*AA. 

Specialized in attending to his own 
business. 




ALEX JOHNSON, L. L. B. 
Okmulgee, Okla. 
SN, Masque Club, Pan-Hellenic (3). 
Twenty-five minutes from Broadway. 













is" 



PiRp 108 









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11 '^^^f. !'.■'*;•■' 






1^ 







VANCE H. DAY, L. L. B. 
Racine, Wisconsin 
2X, KB*, Class Football (1), 
Senior Play Committee. 

Van's lime was chiefly spent between 
making friends and having Shorty keep 
his pompadour in perfect trim. 



^;M'^WJ;^S;?;^i^|^?|^lilif|ilfii?i^ 




CLARK A. WALLACE, L. L. B. 

Kingman 
SAX, f>AA, Keltz, Friars, Good 
Government Club, Manager Sopho- 
more Prom, President Freshman Class, 
Kansas Lawyer Staff (4), Business 
Manager Kansan (3, 4), Scoop Club, 
Manager 1912 Jay hawker. 
Oh! Look who's here. 




• FRANCE Q. WILSON, L. L. B. 
Abilene 

Masque Club, Jurisprudence Con- 
ference, Fine Arts Opera (2), Ysbrand 
(2), Class Farce (3), Senior Play, 
Senior Farce, Class Football (5). 

Sometimes I'll tell you fellows why I 
wear my hat on one side and always go 
with sorority girls. 




Page 109 



ORVILLE H. WARNER. L. L. B. 
Garden City 

*Ae, Black Helmet, 

Sometimes I set and think, and some- 
times I }ust set. 







"^ 



^•^.■t^»i.;u:j 









WILLIAM WELLHOUSE, L. L. B. 
Topeka 

SAE. 

A braw shoeky haired lad with a 
big pipe. 







HAROLD HICKS WOODBURY, L. L. B. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

2X, Varsity Football (2, 3), Varsity 

Track (2), Class Track Captain (1), 

Class Football (1), Sachems, K Club, 

Vice-President Senior Laws. 

Buzz may usually be seen in Tod's 
wake, and occasionally Hilda's. 




mm 



■'i;^ 








CHARLES PUTNAM WOODBURY, 

L. L. B. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

SX, Varsity Football (2, 3), Athletic 
Board (2, 3), Sachems, Black Helmets, 
Class Basketball (1), Class Football (1) 
Class Track (1), Varsity Track (2), 
K Club, Vice-President Y. M. C. A. 
(2), Vice-President Freshman Laws, 
Thespians. 

// Kansas City hadn't been but forty 
miles away I might have taken up with 
one of these K. U. Girls. 




FRANK ALBERT THEIS, L. L. B. 
Kansas City, Mo 

SAE. 

Since late last fall I have stood very 
high in the lady's favor. 






'j^^^i^^ 



mm" 











Page 110 



























mm$ 










FRANK SWANCARA, L. L. B. 
Irving 

Who said " Have a smoke?" 



MM$i§^^S^S^^^^M 




CLEVE LIDSTOM SWENSON, L. L. B. 
Junction City 
2N, <i>A<l>. Vice-President Junior 
Class, Secretary Middle Laws, Kan- 
sas Lawyer Board. 

Came here this winter for the social 
season. 



;SMS&^^ 





BYRON L. SHINN, L. L. B. 
Chanute 
<I>AA, Good Government Club, Kan- 
sas Lawyer Board (1, 2), Vice-President 
Middle Laws. 

Yes I inherited considerable of my 
namesake's poetical genius. 






KARL VICTOR SHAWVER, L. L. B. 
Osawatomie 
*AA. 
The human question mark. 



''^■, >r-;.;''^y3 Page 111 








5\*-'!¥!") 







WALTER SCOTT RICE, L. L. B. 
Smith Center 

2N. 

A gentleman of polish sir, and sociable 
too 




IRA CLARENCE SNYDER, L. L. B. 
Omaha, Neb. 
SX, <I>A<I>, KB4>, President Senior 
Laws, Sachems, Good Government 
Club, Jurisprudence Club, Inter-frater- 
nity debate (3), Chairman Committee 
Law Journal (3). 

Now fellows, here's the way I look at 
that — 




'■f/^-W:0^k^^^^Ml^Mi 



BURTON PEABODY SEARS, 

L. L. B. M. A. 

Lawrence 

SN, 4>BK, €>A*, Con Club, Presi- 
dent Sachems, Founder Good Govern- 
ment Club, Jurisprudence Conference, 
Pan-Hellenic Secretary and member 
of Men's Student Council, 1908 Jay- 
hawker Board, Bryan Prize, Fellow in 
American History. 

We didn't number Button's honors 
fot obvious reasons. 




GLENN W. PORTER, L. L. B. 

Wichita 
*A,e 4>AA, Varsity Baseball (2). 
Cut it out fellows. I'm known around 



here. 



Page 112 















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p 

is"! 

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BENJAMIN V. PARDEE, L. L. B. 
Baldwin 
He and Uncle Jimmy run the Law 
School. 







ROBERT ROHRING OWENS, L. L. B. 
Horton 

We want to know what Robert is 
Rohring about. 




RAYMOND CUFTON OGDEN, 
A. B. L. L. B. 
Lawrence 
Secretary of Senior Laws. 
Shorty has an automobile, and Shorty 
is a good fellow, and we hate to see him 
leave. 



•^^lai^^^iiiiiiSiis iR^^^^ 




LELAND M. RESLER, L. L B. 
Chanute 
<i>AA. 
He got $25 of mine, and you? 




Page 113 















msmMmM&x^M^^!ii^m^m^& 



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iiW 




RICHARD EDGAR McINTOSH 
L. L. B. 

Burns 
*AA. 

A species of grafter which may well 
be designated as "gentle" 






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J. EARL MILLER, A. B. L. L. B. 
Lawrence 

<t>A*. SAX, Sachems, Scoop Club, 
Thespians, Good Government Club, Circu- 
lation Manager Kansan (5), Sport Editor 
(6), Senior Play Committee (4, 6), Senior 
Play (4), Class Farce (4), Senior Farce Com- 
mittee (4), 1910, 1911, Jayhawker Boards, 
Chairman Executive Committee Law Ban- 
quet (6), Kansas Lawyer Board (5), Presi- 
dent Middle Law Class, Vice-President 
Men's Student Council (6). 

A man whose refinement is equalled only 
by his modesty 



'■^J>s-<^^''> 



urns .4 



'"^'M. 







ALSTON MADDEN McCARTY 

L. L. B. 

Emporia 

Ben. Thespians, Scoop Club, 

Class Baseball (1), Varsity Baseball 

(2, 3), President Woodrow Wilson 

Club (3), The Bachelor (3). 

Advertised his baseball fame in Em- 
poria via the clothes line. 







GEOFFREY W. MILLER, A. B. L. L. B. 

St. Mary's 

AT 12, *AA, SAX, Scoop Club, 

Jurisprudence Club, President Junior 

Laws, Senior Class Speaker, Uncle 

Jimmy Day Banquet (2). 

We can excuse Geoff on the ground 
that he came from St. Mary's. 













Page 114 




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W. J. MASEMORE, L. L. B. 
Sterling 
*AA. 

Come on now, a little of the happy 
thought. 




'tv:/ 



"! iSm^ll^^^^i 



VAN M. MARTIN, L. L. B. 
Hutchinson 
SN, <I>A<I>, Sachems, Good Govern- 
ment Club, Kansas Lawyer Board 
(2, 3), Editor Law Journal (3). 

To observe him you might well believe 
that his ancestors were kings and that he 
himself must be at least a dukelet. 




DONALD CAMERON MATINDELL 
L. L. B. 
Lawrence 
ATQ, Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (3), Y. M. C. 
A. Treasurer (4), Y. M. C. A. President 
(5, 6), Class Basketball (1), Varsity Basket- 
ball (2, 3, 4), Varsity Track (2, 3, 4) 
Captain Senior Class Track (4), Class Track 
(5, 6), Class Football (6), Class Farce (4), 
Idol Idle (5). 

Steppin' out some eh? 







Page 115 






ELMER H. MATTINGLY, L. L. B. 
Ponca City, Okla. 
*AA. 

Af a<'8 sad expression is caused by the 
fact that tn his three years here, he fears 
some point of law may hare escaped hirn. 



II3%*J^ 








^:^?S^^?; ■■■■£'■ I 






DONALD MUIR, L. L. B. 
Harper 
*AA. 

I'm looking for the man that wrote the 
Merry Widow waltz. 







IKE LAMBERT, JR., L. L. B. 
Emporia 
4>A0. Good Govern -nent Club, Friars, 
Chairman Sophomore Social Com- 
mittee, Business Manager Kansan (4), 
Thespians, Pan-Hellenic (3), 

The Jeff of the original Mutt and Jeff 
combination. 









ROSCOE KING, L. L. B. 
Marion 
4>A4>. Lawyer Board, Jurisprudence 
Conference. 

Marion is a good little town, but Kan- 
sas City, say — 




DAYTON R. MOUNTS, L. L. B. 
Lawrence 

Jurisprudence Club. 

Judging from his recitation he would 
make a fine poker player. 







'; >>vA Siw 







■iAy-vVi ■■■■ '■■■: 

mm 






;t;;a«rie *■■-•■! 






'•■jS 







R. CARL ISRAEL, L. L. B. 
Wichita 
*AA. 

'Tis all because of him, our dear old 
Uncle Jim. 







LEVI LILBURN KABLER, L. L. B. 
Kingman 

Acacia, Varsity Football (2, 3), K 
Club, Treasurer Senior Laws, Varsity 
Track (3). 

"O, about two years after I get out of 
eehool." 








w^m 




REGINALD PRITCHARD JACKMAN, 
L. L. B. 
Wichite 
Acacia, Law "Scrim" Committee (3). 

Reggie is always happy if you put 
him 'mongst the girls. 




BEN SAM JONES, L. L. B. 
Lyons 
One of those sturdy fellows who believe 
that old-fashioned names are best. 



'^'^4^i}li Pa«ell7 














STANLEY M. 


HOISINGTON, 
Newton 


L. L 


1 
B. f 


Stan would have grown 
didn't need to at Newton. 


taller 


but 


he y 







HAL E. HARLAN, A, B. L. L. B. 
Lawrence 
SX, ^A*. KB$, Varsity Baseball 
(2, 3, 4), Chairman Baseball Com- 
mittee, Glee Ciub (3, 4, 6), Junior 
Farce, Good Government Club, Cnair- 
man Class Day Committee, Senior 
Play, Athletic Board (4, 5), Speaker 
Law Banquet (5), Sachems, Jurispru- 
dence Club, Toastmaster Law Ban- 
quet (0). 

Must I be carried to the skies on flowery 
beds of ease? 




GEORGE THURMAN HILL, L. L. B. 
Independence 

$AA, Vice-President Junior Laws, 
Cooley Club, University Debating 
Council, Class Baseball (1), Varsity 
Baseball (2, 3). 

A fellow should aevote some of his 
time to other things than study. 















JAY RANSOM HANNAH, L. L. B. 
Lawrence 

4>A^, Jurisprudence Club. 

The most distinguished looking man in 
the Law School. 



3' *v?„ v 



Page 118 















FRANK M. HYAMES, L. L. B. 
Lawrence 
4>AA, University Debating Council 
(3). 

It took the whole Law School to make 
him wear a Freshman cap. 










WILLIAM EDWARD HAMNER, 

L. L. B. 

Rosedale 

SAE. *A A, Ysbrand (1), Law Scrim 

Committee, Class Football (3), Kansan 

Board (1). 

This way otit please. 




GILBERT H. FRITH, L. L. B. 
Emporia 

•IiAO, Chairman Finance Com- 
mittee, Law Scrimage (3), Pan-Hel- 
lenic, (4)- 

Not to make any bones about it, I'm 
a m.arried man. 



"''■■'• : ^ ^^^;^M00^^i^:^^^ M 





ARTHUR HERMAN FAST, A. B. L. L. B. 
Baldwin 
S*S, ^A*, ASP. Masque Club, 
Kansas Colorado Debate (2). 

A versatile and discreet young man. 



Page 119 







— rt««^^ 




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EDGAR W. CAMPBELL, L. L. B. 
Seneca 
Secretary Junior Laws. 
Cheer up Ed, the worst is yet to come. 







C. C. CURTIS, L. L. B. 

Lawrence 

Acacia, President Junior Laws, 

Chairman Executive Committee Law 

Scrim (3), President Jurisprudence 

Club (2). 

Curt has quit insurging and lives on 
past glory. 









RIALDO ALLEN DARROUGH, L. L. B. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
SAE, Class Football (4), Pan-Hel- 
lenic Council (3, 4), Law Editor 1912 
Jayhawker. 

"Who is that tall distinguished looking 
fellow in the English walking suit?" 




E, W. COLUMBIA, L. L. B. 
Chetopa 

Who said a red headed man couldn't 
make a good lawyer? 












ll 






Page 120 






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BENJAMIN ARTHUR BABB, L. L. B. 
Lawrence 

What means this stir in Rome? 



ISiiilii^l^asSl- 



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GEORGE BEEZLEY, L. L. B. 
Girard 
nX. f>AA, Student council (3) Re- 
freshment Committe Senior Smoker, Chair- 
man Invitation Committee Junior Prom, 
Varsity Football Squad, Class Football (1). 

He becomes justly indignant when the 
recall of judges is discussed. 




.0^0^ 




TED RELIHAN, L. L. B. 
Smith Center 
SX, KB<I>. 

He didn't want to come in but we 
needed him. 



Auf 



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GEORGE BISCHOFF, L. L. B, 

Washington 
We needed him too. 



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Page 121 



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RANDOLPH JOSIAH TUCKER, B. S. 

Lyons 

This world is a devlish lough place 




'■M 




RAY M. SMITH, B. S. 
Hiawatha 
Civil Engineering Society, Engineers 
Banquet Committee (4), Cap and 
Gown Committee. 

One of Lee's Smith twins combination. 




MARTIN K. THOMEN, B. S. 

Junction City 
Vice-President Engineers (5), Vice- 
President A. I. E. E. (5), Program 
Committee, Senior Smoker (4), Execu- 
^ tive Committee A. I. E. E. 

^,My time and brains belong to the 
Engineers, God bless 'em. 




HAROLD KING SHAW, B. S. 

Hiawatha 
/ aeeounled for two tcindow lights in 
Green Hall myself. 



Page 123 






M^- 



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GUY S. SMITH, B. S. 
Hiawatha 
Civil Engineering Society, Class 
Football (4). 

When Guy appears you think you're 
seeing double. 




A. R. MacKINNON, B. S. 
Lawrence 
Keltz, President Men's Student 
Council (4), President Junior Class (3), 
Friars (3). 

Some men have presidencies thrust 
upon them. 





CHARLES J. ROBINSON, B. S. 
Topeka 

Chemical Engineer, 4>A9, SH, 
AXS, Band (1, 2, 3, 4), Manager 
(3, 4), University Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4), 
Manager (2, 3), Secretary Associated 
Student Enterprise, Photographer 1912 
Jayhawker. 

I'm the mxin who wrote the article 
about the band boys suits. Pretty clever? 
Eh? What? 




CHARLES CLAY SPILMAN, B. S. 
McPherson 
Chemical Engineering Society. 
/ just got out of a class under Cody. 






Page 124 



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MORTON GLEN MONROE, B. S. 

Fairview 
/ don't amount to much when spring 



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FRED E. JOHNSTON, B. S. 
Madison 
Tunnel and Shaft, Class Football 
(4), Social Committee (4), Civil En- 
gineering Society. 

When Fred dropped out of school a 
year to get his second udnd, he lost most 
of his hair. 



:littl^^^ii^B^^i y i, 




ROY MOCK, B. S. 
Kingman 
Mandolin Club (4), Fine Arts Opera 
(4), A. I. E. E. 

My only regret is that the Laws didn't 
have the nerve to give the Engineers a 
good snowball fight last winter. 




m 



T. P. HUMPHREY. B. S. 
Mound Valley 
Class Football (3), Member Civil 
Engineering Society. 

The only man on the hill who can tell 

u hi n a (-(ISC is not n rafr. 




Page 126 



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^^^''^ 




CHARLES E. CUBBISON, B. S. 

Gardner 
Chuck is such a sly fox. 



;^^;iVi^:':i^'KMM^^i^0^^^^1^W&0!^ ' ■ 




HOWARD N. CALDERWOOD, JR., B. S. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
AXS. 

Went through school in a pair of high 
topped boots. 




JAMES GANSON DANIELS, B. S. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Ben, Class Football (2), Varsity 
f Football (4), Friars, K. Club. 

Herder of Voters in the School of En- 
gineering. He wears a K too. 




BERT E. DODGE, B. S. 
Wichita 
Member Civil Engineering Society. 
My hobby is Michigan. 



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EMERSON LESTER BRAY, B. S. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
SH, Electrical Engineer, Finance 
Committee (4). 
For further particulars see daily papers 







LESLIE A. BALDWIN, B S 

Kansas City, Mo 
2H, President Student Branch 
A. I. E. E. 

Chief cook and bottle ua^her at sum- 
mer camp. 




HARRY V. BECKER, B. S. 
Ellsworth 
C. E. Society (3, 4), Student Coun- 
cil (4). 

A good class football substitute for 
three years. 




GEORGE MacMILLAN BROWN, B. S. 
Pleasanton 
ITT, Student Branch A. I. M. E. 
/ bought a gold brick, onee Thtnk 
I'll he a miner' 



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m 
^' 

ft 



o.~viv.i.-S?»;i'-p;.i-:o?i\<»i^--i.Ki .■■..>. 





Page 127 



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'i^ 




ADOLPH H. BEYER, B. S 
Inman 
Pa, I want to learn to smoke. 



fB^i}:::^^^:W^^f$0$^^!^^^^^^^$^ 



JOHN P. BOESCHE, B. S. 
Gaylord 
Class Football (3), University Band 
(1, 2, 3, 4), Secretary-Treasurer Civil 
Engineering Society (4). 

Anyway I keep people guessing most 
of the time. 



\\ 












OLIVER LEWELLYN ANDREWS, B. S. 
Powhattan 
SA*, Tunnel and Shaft, Student 
Branch A. I. M. E., Fine Arts Operas 
(1, 2, 4), French Play (1). 

A living breathing denial of the fact 
that the engineer has no music in his 
soul. 




CHARLES VERNE WADDINGTON 
B. S. 
Wichita 
Student Member A. I. E. E. 
C. V. would do a twenty mile marathon 
to avoid cutting class. 



rage 1-J8 






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FOREST C. WALDEN, B. S. 
Newton 
Two ambitions. First, get even with 
the rdreet car company; second, get back 
to Newton. 







HAROLD F. WILSON, B. S. 
Lawrence 
Member K. U. Branch A. I. E. E., 
K Club, Varsity Track (2, 3, 4). 

/ would rather love what I can never 
have, than have what J couUt never love. 




HERBERT L. WILSON, B. S. 

Lyndon 
Tunnel and Shaft, President C. E. 
Society, Senior Invitation Committee. 
"Skeet" never saw the girl yet that was 
as entertaining as any engineer. 




EARL L. WRIGHT, B. S. 
Pleasanton 
Cap and Gown Committee. 
That safety-razor grin of hts is con- 
tagious. 



i 



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I Page 129 



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THOMAS PANE STEEPER, B. S. 

Lawrence 

/ didn't write Home Sweet Home. 




'■l^Sf ?SiPi:M| ,. ., 




WALTER SHRINER, B. S. 
Frankfort 
Acacia, SS, Class Football (4), 
Class Track (4), Student Council (4). 
Red is already in the promised land. 







m 





EDWARD E. STEPHENS, B. S. 

Bethel 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet (4;, A. I. E. E., 
Chairman Refreshment Committee 
Engineering Banquet, Board of Direc- 
tors of the Y. M. C. A. 

We think Ed is a pretty nice fellow, 
Don't you? 








HERBERT M. STOCKWELL, B. S. 
Paola 
C. E. Society, Class Football (4). 
Here, there, and everywhere. 



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Pa?e 130 



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GEORGE C. MAGATAGAN, B. S. 


'!^X^U 


Chanute 


'ti00^ 


Acacia. 


M$I^M 


Tell us about your Wichita trip Mat. 






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EDMUND OLIVER RHODES, B. S. 
Dodge City 

4>AB, AX2, Chemical Engineering 
Society, President Engineers (4), Sachems, 
Glee Club (2, 3, 4), Princess Ida (1), Chair- 
man Decoration Committee Prom (2), 
Class Farce (3), Pan-Hellenic Council (3), 
Chairman Engineers Day Parade Com- 
mittee (3), Fraternity Editor 1912 Jayhaw- 
ker, Chairman Constitutional Committee 
Engineering Society (4). 

A rather handy man to hare around, 
shouldn't you think so? 



m 






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ROSS I. PARKER, B. S. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
BOIL Tunnel and Shaft, Chair- 
man Can and Gown Committee, Ex- 
ecutive Committe A. I. E. E. 

We're sure much obliged to Ross for 
gettirtg us our caps and gowns. 



ii 




Page 131 



A. H. MANGELSDORF, B. S. 

Atchinson 
ATS2, Tunnel and Shaft, Fine Arts 
Opera (1), President of Mining En- 
gineers, Pan-Hellenic Council (3, 4). 
A most useful addition to Engineers 
summer camp. 

















i 









^^ 






' <f&^J>c 











ROSS H. FORNEY B. S. 
Lawrence 
S S, Treasurer Student Branch A. S. 
M. E., Engineers Day Committee. 

Ross thinks a Sigma Xi badge is a 
paddle. 



:■■■ C:^y-^::Wf^MmflMWWi^^^M 










HOWARD H. HOUK, B. S. 
Pittsburg 
Class Football (3, 4), Football 
Squad (4), Civil Engineering Society. 
Warranted to make more noise than 
any other three engineers. 



;:^#;;y.'j 




VOLNEY HEWITT HILFORD, B. S. 
Caney 

Freshman Social Committee, Class, 
Football (2, 3, 4), Class Farce (3), Red 
Domino Secretary, Student S«ction 
A. S. M. E., Cheer Leader (4, 5), Y. M. 
C. A., P. S. B. 

Just see what our little Volney has 
become. 





i)pik^yM 



THOMAS P. KING, B. S. 
Minneapolis 
Civil Engineering Society. 
Chorus of Laws ( He not like the other 
engineers then). 



Paiie 132 












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Sm'i'ia tiii'. 



PERRY C COLE, B S 
Clay Center 
C. E. Society. 
The wonderful boy pitcher 






,m 







MURRAY COPES CONLEY, B S. 
Oklahoma City, Okla 

Corresponding Secretary S S. of A. 
S. M. E. (1), Engineering Editor Jay- 
hawker (4), Prom Committee (3), 
Mikado (3), Senior Play (4), Class 
Farce (4), Red Domino (5). 

Just listen to that nou, ' 









Page 133 







SjB« 






sp 






JOHN ADRIAN DAVENPORT, JR., B. S. 
Lawrence 

Keltz, Class Football (2, 3), Captain (3), 
Golf Club, Class Farce (3), President Sani- 
tary Engineers (4), Civil Engineering 
Society, Chairman Engineers Day Speaker 
Committee, Engineers Social Committee, 
Engineering Editor 1912 Jayhawker. 

Isn't it a terrible thing to be a lion among 
the ladies? 










ELMER DERSHEM, B. S. 
Baldwin 
A constant attendant at the joint Y. M.- 
Y. W. receptions. 






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GILBERT A. BRAGG, B. S. 
St. Joseph, Mo. 
AX 2, President Chemical Engineers 
(3), Prom Committee (3), Vice-Presi- 
dent Senior Class (4), Chairman 
Engineers Social Committee (4). 

Hopes to be professor of funny stories 
sometime. 




LAWRENCE LELAND BROWNE, B. S. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Class Committee (2), Prom Com- 
mittee (3), Chairman Invitation Com- 
mittee (4), Class Football (4), Secre- 
tary Student Section A. S. M. E. 
Good Heavens! Can this be Leland? 




HAROLD BRODERICK, B. S. 

Lawrence 
Too late to classify. 




GLENN PYLE, B. S. 
Coldwatei- 
Read me some simple poem 











Page 134 






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RAMON A bWAYNE, A B 

Wamego 

Favorite occupation soccer football 




BERTHA MARIE SHUEY, B M 

Lawrence 

M<i>E, Y W C A Cabinet (4) 

Music and Missions' What a com- 
bination 




HANNAH MITCHELL, B. M 
Lawrence 

Xfl Masque Club, Royal Knave (1), 
Bishops Carnage (2), District Chair- 
man W S. G. A . Y. W. C. A , Class 
Farce (2), 1912 Jayhawker Board 

In Julia Marlowe's footsteps 




LENNA RIDENOUR B M. 
Emporia 
Why doesn't everybody atten.d the 
Fine Art Recitals^ 



Page 136 






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ARTA PRICILLA BRIGGS, B. P. 
Lawrence 

Palette Club, Quill Club. 

Why don't you speak for yourself 
John^ 



LAURA PENDLETON, B. M. 

Lawrence 
ITB*. Y. W. C. A., Vice-President 
W. S. G. A. (4). 
/ choose you. 





vf 



JOSEPHINE YOLANDE McCAMMON, 
A. B. B. M. 
Lawrence 
M*E, TAn, Yeoman of the Guard 
(4). 

Well now Miss Mossier says — - 




Page 137 



GENEVA OGDEN, B. P. 
Lawrence 
Palette Club, Woman's Athletic 
Association, Y. W. C. A., Senior Invi- 
tation Committee. 

My brother's ruime is Shorty. 



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MRS. OLIVE BUCHANAN, M. B. 
Chanute 
The soul of music spread. 





MONA NEWTON EBERLE, B. M. 
Lawrence 
Y. W. C. A. 

Bring back my bonny to me. 




mS0 








NEVA JUNE FOSTER, B. P. 

Lawrence 
Senior Invitation Committee, Presi- 
dent Palette Club, Y. W. C. A. 
She has a good running mate. 



a.' 




RUTH ETHEL CORLE, B. M. 
Lawrence 
/ would never admit that I like rag- 
time. 



Pige 138 



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CAROLINE ISHMAEL, B. M. 
Kiowa 

Spends her time collecting recipes and 
hemming tea towels. 




JESSIE HOLCOMB, B. M. 
Parsons 
AAA, M4>E. 

Ever notice that view of the Kaw from 
yjorlh College steps? 





ETHEL MARY HESS, B. M. 

Alma 
M*E. 

North College won't seem the same 
place without her. 







AUDREY HARSHBERGER, B. M. 
Lawrence 
M*E, Y. W. C. A. 
Fie! Fie! Fickle woman. 









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Page 139 






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BLANCHE BARKDULL, B. M. 

Lawrence 
Blanche is also a bachelor of the pipe 
organ. 




SYLVIA DAPHNE ALFORD, B. M. 
Lawrence 

Xn, Y. W. C. A. Cabinet (3, 4). 

Wait a minute girls. Let's get some- 
thing to eat. 



e 




vrH:- 



JOSEPHINE BARKDULL, B. P. 

Lawrence 
Palette Club, Senior Invitation Com- 
mittee, Women's Athletic Association, 
A genius is born not made. 











BERTHA C. BURGESS, B. E. 
Douglass 
Y. W. C. A., Thespians. 
What are some of your expressions 



Bertha? 















Page 140 



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CORA IRENE REYNOLDS. B, M. 
Lawrence 

Princess Ida (1). 

Come on girls and visit Sis and I at 
our bachelor quarters. 



rsir 




MYRTLE FERGUSON, A. B 
Kansas City 
Just as we go to press. 




ESTHER SHAW, B. M. 
Kansas City 
M*E. 

She nearly missed getting into this 
book. 



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PAULINE INGELS, A. B. 
Lawrence 
Innocencrs abroad. 



Page 141 



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C- I- ZUGGE, B. S. M- D- 
ECansK City. Mo. 




5-^V^%^'^5^->?^^^^^^^?^^^^^^ , 



PATRICK H. OWKX. A. B. If. D. 
Chuote 
IIB#. bicne St. Maisucfc Hovital 
TkeawMlIvifafac 



■ '^ ■^"-'■^^^^F?^^^^^^^^^^^^SS^*i'- ~ ~.":'-^53$&^^^^TijI _;£5 




VIRGIL W. MsCARTY. A M. M- D. 
Kansas City. Mo. 
IIT, XZN. ZH. Varsay FoodnD 
a). Iirtnae at BdH Hovital. Medieal 
Bfibar 1912 Jaykawkcr. 

Tht mmmtimm fmt wf TtimWx dmwt 
{■ PvA Mminma. 




*rX NSM. Van^ Fbodid (». 
The a riji mm l p t i i am of ifcg iril— • cauL 



^s^^^s^.-"-^ 








KKKO MORIKY. M. f. 

H* »♦;*■-' .v*-^ i'^"^ uA-%.'-,;;f Cji 




WILLIAM T. FITtSlMMONS. 

▲. B. M. IX 

KuMMCity. Mo. 

LrtanM ait Q«naA H«a|iital (4). 

WB WVM MMmft MWC9MI Mfltn tw 



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EDWARD T. QIBSOM. A. M. M> IX 
KUMM City. M*. 

n::^. :£S. at^ fmow ta i««ai> 

«Cy wftd EmbryolQty. 
Tkum lto«» j gM w < tent ^ dhMvlilM 



-:'^^*§! 




FRSD aSCKER. A. M. 
KuNMCtky. Mo. 

Ht hut m wwn^ in ^t tibt ^ii$i9tt^ 




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MILTON H. DEMAND, A. B. M. D. 
Wichita 
Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4). 
/ belong to the Amsterdam Dutch. 



:^^lS^il^^»^«i^^. 




GUY A. FINNEY, A. B. M. D. 

Wamego 
N2N, SS, Vice-President (4). 
Stub will never succeed with the women. 





CHARLES C. DENNIE, A. B. M. D. 
Hillsdale 

NSN, Sf>E, Fellow in Chemistry 
(2), Assistant in Chemical Pathology (4) 

Away there. Clear the rabble! 




FRANK FLACK, A. B. M. D. 

Longton 
<l>Bn. 

Cut out the rough stuff. 



! <^J ^} 












Page 14fi 







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MARTIN L. BRAKEBILL, A. B. M. D. 
Rosedale 
/ dare do all that may become a man. 



i »iii^lS^^»': 





BEDA KJELLONDER 
Grefle, Sweden 
Class Treasurer. 
A little more light please. 



ige 147 














JOHN WESLEY DeMAND, A. B. M. D. 
Wichita 
Orchestra (1, 2, 3, 4). 
Hand me that scalpel. I want to 
remove this man's stomach. 








NELLE R. ROBERTS 
Muscata 
Bobberts to the rescue. 




:(^-?,ii;^^ii5s^'S ?.^Mg^?;S? WMM&fr 












KATE ALFREY, C. S. 
McAllaster, Okla. 
Secretary. 
Petite! Petite! 



MABLE ALICE TAYLOR 
Sedgwick 
President. 

A specialist in mopping the brows of 
hard working surgeons. 






ii ^ 



I; 
I 



1^ 





NORMA G. BLUNT 
Greeley 
Chairman of the Pin Committee. 
Korea is a long way oft. 



Page 148 



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MILFORD NORMAN WEDEL, PH. C. 
Moundridge 
Now what a fearful thing a Pharmic 
fusser is. 






■.■..4;.iaSi4;V;<^ 










EARNEST ROLLAND SMITH, PH. C. 
Hartford 
Acacia, Vice-President Junior Phar- 
macy Class (1), Treasurer Banquet 
Committee. 

The only real penman in the senior 
class. 




LeROY METZ, PH. C. 
Sabetha 
Pharmacy Editor 1912 Jayhawker. 
Pharmic Struggle Committee. 

LeRoy was a big help to us on the 
annual board. 








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MYRON WOODSON CARPENTER, 
PH. C. 
Clearwater 
I should have been a Judge instead of 
a Pharmic 









Page 152 




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OLIVE E. SHERRARD, PH. C. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
All the Pharmics are fond of olives. 




NICK J. MAY, PH. C. 
Andale 
He has a get-rich-quick scheme that 
he intends to work on the folks back home. 



Paf^o 1 .' 




LILLIE MERLE MATTSON, PH. C. 
Elsmore 
Secretary of Pharmaceutical Society. 
Member of Women's Athletic Associ- 
ation. 

Education without genius is like gold 
in the mine. 

(Her remarks) 







A. L. PURCELL, PH. C. 
Leavenworth 
President Senior Pharmics. 
I'll do a thing if I have to. 







I 




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LEON A. KUEBLER, PH. C. 

Gridley 
He still loves the old folks at home. 



GEORGE M. HUMES, PH. C. 

Bunker HUl 
Member of the Wrestling Team. 
Yes Sir, under George Washington 
himself. 







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JAMES B. EARLY, PH. C. 
Medford, Okla. 
Wrestling Team (2), Member K. N. 
G. Pharmaceutical Society. 

His father used to say to him, "Jamei 
B. Early" Altogether now! 



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F. ARTHUR JONES, PH. C. 
Moline 
Who wouldn't rather dispense pil 
than teach. 



Page 154 










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HAROLD BRADLEY, PH. C. 

Caney 
Student Council (3). 
He has much faith in his own opinions, 
but little in others. 








MARY ETHEL ATTWOOD, PH. C. 
Clay Center 
Women's Athletic Association. 
Treasurer Senior Pharmacy Class. 
She who hesitates is lost, 
(Her remarks) 



Page 155 



CHARLES C. CRAMER, PH. C. 
Gardner 
President Pharmaceutical Society 
(2), Student Day Speaker (1), Junior 
Speaker at Banquet (1), Varsity Track 
(2), Chairman Pharmic Banquet Com- 
mittee (2). 

"Candy" works while others sleep. 




SAMUEL L BERGER, PH. C. 

Medford 

Varsity Band (2), Pharmaceutical 
Society. 

A firm believer in the broadening in- 
fluence of the moving picture shxyw. 



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Page 157 



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ORVILLE TURNER WILSON, M. A. 

Emporia 

Good thick text books with lots in them. 







DAVID HENRY WENRICH, M. A. 
HaskeU Institute 

SS, French Play (3), Fellow in Zo- 
ology (4). 

// Professor McClung should leave, 
I would be able to carry on the work 
just as well. 



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WILBUR E. TILBERG, M. A. 

Dwight 
Fellow in History from Bethany. 
There's a Swedish girl in Lindsborg, 
an' I know she thinks of me. 




















FRANCIS X. WILLIAMS, M. A. 
Lawrence 

S2, Member of Entomology Club. 

My home is in heaven. I'm here on 
a visit. 



Page 158 




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EFFIE LOUISE STEVEN, M. A 
Lawrence 
O bring back my bonny to me. 




EDWARD H. TAYLOR, M. A. 
Ottawa 

SA<I>, SE, Yeoman of the Guard 
(4), Spanish Play (2), Paleontological 
Expedition, Biological Expedition (3). 

When I'm dressed as an archer or 
something of the XV century I'm 
thrilling. 



W9IM 











FRANCIS DEAN SCHNACKE, M. A. 
Topeka 
<1>A A, Fellow in Economics (5), 
Member American Economic Assoc- 
iation, Keltz. 

Professor Boynton used to say, 
"Schnacke why is it you always have 
your lesson?" 




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Page i59 



FLOYD BENJAMIN STREETER, M. A. 
Lawrence 
German Verein, Graduate Club, 
Fellow in American History (4, 5). 

That cool weather we had last winter 
was bracing, don't you think? 











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CORNELIUS C. REGIER, M. A. 
Moundridge 
All I don't know about Spooner 
Library, the University is welcome to. 







LOUIS A. RUFENER, M. A. 

Elmo 
^BK, Circulation Manager Oread 
(4). 

You can't tell how these quiet fellows 
will act when they are not under obser- 
vation. 















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ARCHIE DAYTON POWER, M. S. 
Baldwin 

Baker Fellow. 

We had no hill at Baker, yet I think 
this is an improvement. 




DONNA CLARE ROSE, M. A. 

Holton 
Fellow in Latin. 
After « person g^ts an M. A. in Latin 

nothing else matters. 



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RAYMOND F. MILLER, M. A. 
Emporia 
Sure! We're all for T. R. in Bill 
White's town. 




ROBERT TYLER McCLUGGAGE, 
A. M. 
Rose Hill 
Fe'low in History from Fairmount. 
History presents such a sad spectacle. 



Page 161 




CHARLES RUDOLPH NEbBITT, M A 
Colony 
University Ff^llow in Sociology, 
Cooley Club, Graduate Editor 1912 
Jayhawker, Member American Econ- 
omic Association. 

Get onto my style of dancing 







WILLIAM G. NELSON, B. S. M. S. 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Fellow in Physics and Mathetiatics. 
Lost, strayed or stolen? 



0, 












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SOPHIA HARMS, M. A. 
Wichita 
Sophia Harms no one. 



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PETER CORNELIUS HIEBERT 
A. B. B. S. 
Hillsboro 
President Graduate Club. 
Before he came to this University, Mr. 
Hiebert was acting president of Tabor \ 
College in his native town of Hillsboro. 



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TENNYSON MYERS, M. A. 
Eskridge 
Washburn Fellow. 
I'm a good fellow in spite of that. 




EDWARD FISCHER, M. A. 
Wheaton 
Varsity Band (1). 

/ don't think I am conceited, but I 
know a pretty girl when I see one. 











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Page 162 







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E- KLEA X vr ^ - 
The BrndtOm Gitl »f Smtm U^L 




BOT FRAMES. B. &. A. 
GaitttaL, Ontario, CwiJi 



Catf JMw ITnf Ctm<fe. 







HESTHA ELIZABETH COLUXS. 

A» R* Jm* JMi« 




Fdbva 

Gnr aw fifer^r m tme me dtaAl 



ETHEL CLiJ 



his wmm^a Kke mime. 



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A. F. BEAL, M. A. 
Lawrence 
The girls like to ride in my little 
benzine buggy. 







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CARL RICHARDS BROWN, M A. 
I^awren-e 

Fellow in Psychology, University 
Orchestra, Mathematics Club, Mando- 
lin Club 

The fellow who ■itarted all those nature 
faker fortes last vnrUer. 




MARTIN KAHAO BROOKS, A. B. A. M" 
Lawrence 
French Play (1, 2, 3), French Fellow- 
ship (5), Knights of Columbus, Quill 
Club. 

Men may come and men may go but 
J go on for ever. 





THORNTON LYNN BOUSE, M. A. 
Holton 
*AK. • 

A touch of high life will do you no 
harm. 



cjJiMJi^'^^:4:^\£ji 



Page 164 



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HAZEL ELISABETH BRANCH, M. A. 
Wichita 
<t>BK. 

The boys at this University are fully 
up to the average. 



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THEODORE H. ASCHMANN, 

M. A. M. S. 

Inman 

*Bn, Fellow in Anatomy (2), 

Senior Football, (1, 3), Varsity Band 

(1, 2, 3), Yeoman of the Guard (3), 

Object: Matrimony (3). 

The girls at Inman think ' am nitf. 
So do the K. U. girls for that mattir 






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A. R. KINSLEY, A. B. 
Formoso 
All the world's a stage. 



Page 165 







GEO. R. HIATT, M. A. 
Lawrence 
Frequently I am amused. 







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Senior Class Officers 









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■wm 







Ammons 



Bragg 



Martindale 



Brownlee 



OFFICERS 

President Earl Ammons 

Vice-President Gilbert Bragg 

Secretary Nell Martindale 

Treasurer Harold Brownlee 

Editor Jayhawker Carl Cannon 

Manager Jayhawker Clark A. Wallace 

Manager Senior Play Everett Brummage 

SENIOR COMMITTEES 

Invitation Committee — Roscoe Redmond, Chairman, Josephine Barkdull, Herbert Wilson, 
Ralph Johnston, Geneva Ogden, Neva Foster. Senior Farce Committee — Gladys Elliott, 
Chairman, Lucile Wilkinson, Ben Jones, Arthur Johnston, Mildred Manley, Howard Wykoff. 
Class Day Committee — Don Davis, Chairman, Albert LeMoine, Nan Armstrong, Myra Rogers, 
Ross Carpenter, Gertrude Wiley, Dena Ellis, Herbert Ford. Athletic Committee — Will French, 
Chairman, Harry Becker, Roy Murray. Social Committee — Francis Long, Chairman, Fred 
Johnston, Harold Broderick. Finance Committee — Harold Brownlee, Chairman, Carlton 
Armsby, Rachel Baumgartner, E. L. Bray, Harry Weaver, Emily Zwick, Ethel Stone. Cap 
and Gown Committee — Ross Parker, Chairman, Hazel Butts, Bernice Ruhlandt, Bertha Burgess, 
Grace Ulrich, Earl Wright, Ray Smith. 



Page 168 















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Junior Class Officers 






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Price 



Bozell 



Hobson 



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OFFICERS 

President ...William Price 

Vice-Presidant Asher Hobson 

Secretary Bess Bozell 

*Treasurer Donald Donsman 

*Left school and Asher Hobson appointed to fill vacancy. 



JUNIOR CLASS COMMITTEES 

SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

Charles Coates 

FOOTBALL COMMITTEE 

H. Burnham 

TRACK COMMITTEE 

O. Patterson 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Frances McCreath 
Vera Wolf 
Amos Johnson 



E. A. VanHouten, Chairman 



R. Coolidge, Chairman 



U. Gribble, Chairm.an 



John Sterling, Chairman 
Vera Atkinson 
John Bordman 

Page 169 



Elwood Sharpe 



H. Tudor 



F. Black 



Elizabeth Kennedy 
Everett Johnson 
James Malcolmson 



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Junior Prom Committees 





ELMER WHITNEY 



BRUCE KURD 



John Hoffman, Chairman 
PhylHs Burrough 
Ward Magill 



INVITATION COMMITTEE 

Nell Carraher 
Helen Pendleton 
Walter Davenport 
Chester Dunn 



Anna Malott 
Lydia Le Seur 
Milton Minor 



REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE 



Charles Hawes, Chairman 



Laura Bates 
Beatrice Neumiller 



Florence Payne 
Roy Heil 



PROGRAMS AND MUSIC COMMITTEE 



Herbert Sommers, Chairman Lolita McCune 
Frank Banker Edmond Lodge 



R. G. Allison, Chairman 
Frederika Hodder 
Claude Coggins 



DECORATION COMMITTEE 

Florence Black 
Ruby Flynn 
Floyd B. Devlin 



JUNIOR FARCE COMMITTEE 



Henry Campion, Chairman 
Fay Chisham 



Lucile Brown 
Charles Younggreen 
Gene Davis 



Ina Pratt 
Paul Flagg 



Ethel Houston 
Claribell Lupton 
Don Crawford 



Lois Harger 
Charles Hainbach 



Page 170 






















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Sophomore Class Officers 



Yeoman 



Hazen 



Bigelow 



Marchbanks 



OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Ralph Yeoman 
Dan Hazen 
Edna Bigelow 
Howard Marchbanks 



SOPHOMORES CLASS COMMITTEES 



SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

Ward Maris, Chairman John Musselman 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Robin McGeorge 



Howard Marchbanks, Chairman Fred Soper G. W. Marks 

R. Thompson Theodore Grove 

ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 



L. L. Smith, Chairman W. E. Brown 

H. K. Allen 



F. C. Campbell 
James Parker 



Page 172 







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Sophomore Hopp 



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Manager of Hopp Arvid Frank 



PROGRAM AND MUSIC COMMITTEE 



Abe Goldman, Chairman A. W. Hosier 

Margaret Robert 



J. T. Leidigh 
Edna Lyon 



DECORATION COMMITTEE 

Edith Van Emmon, Chairman May H. Jordon Ittai Luke 

John Hartman DeWitt Filmore 



REFRESHMENT COMMITTEE 

Frances Powell, Chairman 

FARCE COMMITTEE 

Hale Cook, Chairman Claude Sowers 

INVITATION COMMITTEE 



Marjorie Templin 
Lloyd Charlesworth 



Charles Strickland, Chairman Ray Stockton 

Ross Beamer O. C. Graeber 

Lelo Nevin 



Edward Boddington 
Emily Berger 
Ruth Fox 



Page 173 



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Freshman Class Officers 



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Waugh Hatcher Hornaday Francis 

OFFICERS 

President William Waugh 

Vice-President Ward Hatcher 

Secretary Helen Hornaday 

Tresaurer Chester Francis 

FRESHMAN CLASS COMMITTEES 

SOCIAL COMMITTEE 

Frank Russel, Chairman Ethel Ulrich Baldwin Mitchell 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 
Ralph Lewis, Chairman Albert Teed Paul Richardson 

ATHLETIC COMMITTEE 
Herbert Coleman, Chairman Oliver Woodward Albert Ross 



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Page 174 




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Senior Law Officers 




Snyder 



President 

Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Kabler 
Woodbury 

OFFICERS 



Ogden 



I. C. Snyder 
H. H. Woodbury 
Raymond C. Ogden 
Levi L. Kabler 








Page 175 









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Middle L.a\^ Officers 







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Weede Hicks 

Snyder Hoffman 

OFFICERS 

President John C. Hoffman 

Vice-President Orlin A. Weede 

Secretary Harry E. Snyder 

Treasurer Carl S. Hicks 



Page 177 



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Junior Law^ Officers 










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III 




Kent 



President 

Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Goldsworthy 
McCoskrie 



Von Schriltz 



Guy W. Von Schriltz 
Martin Goldsworthy 
Winona McCoskrie 
J. S. E. Kent 









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Officers of Engineering School 




Thomen 



VanHouten 



Rhodes 



OFFICERS 

President Edmond Rhodes 

Vice-President Martin Thomen 

Treasurer Ed Van Houten 



Page 179 



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Graduate School Officers 



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; Hiebert 

Blair Hungerford 

\ Andrews 

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( 

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OFFICERS 

President P. C. Hiebert, A. B. 

Vice-President .' G. B. Blair, A. M. 

Treasurer H. B. Hungerford, A. B. 

Secretary Orrel M Andrews, A. B 



Page 180 



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Senior Pharmic Officers 




Purcell 



Wedel 



Sherrard 



Attwood 



OFFICERS 

President A. L. Purcell 

Vice-President M. 'Wedel 

Secretary Olive Sherrard 

Treasurer Mary Attwood 

Kansas Pharmaceutical Society 

The Kansas Pharmaceutical Association was organized in 1867 for the purpose of upbuilding 
the profession of pharmacy in the State of Kansas. 

They at once decided that it was necessary for the profession of pharmacy that there 
should be a school of pharmacy at the State University. 

This they finally succeeded in obtaining after a number of years of persistent endeavor. 
Thus the legislature of 1885 provided that the regents should at once establish a department 
of pharmacy. 

Dean L. E. Sayer at that time was chosen as professor of pharmacy and materia medica, 
also Dean of the school of pharmacy, the office he holds at the present time. The excellent 
reputation which the department has at home and abroad has been largely due to the faithful 
and efficient performance by him of the work thus given him to do. 

The school of pharmacy has gradually grown and has been transported from one building 
to another and is again very much crowded for room. 

The school of pharmacy is very well equipped with apparatus and specimens of all kinds 
so necessary in illustrating pharmaceutical manipulations. 

Soon after the formation of the school of pharmacy the students and faculty of the school 
formed the University Pharmaceutical Society which has continued in a very flourishing 
condition. 

Since the enactment of the Pure Food and Drug Law of 1906, the department of pharmacy 
has analized the drugs for the State Board of Health. 

The school is one of the best equipped in the United States, having a faculty of twenty- 
five members and possessing advantages of culture which only university life can give. 

Page 181 



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OFFICERS 

President Winslow J. Cipra 

Vice-President Raymond Ebnother 

Secretary Nolan Fitch 

Treasurer Byrd O. Powell 



Page 182 




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Jay hawker Board 

Editor-in-chief Carl Cannon 

Business Manager Clark Wallace 

Associate Editor Beulah Murphy- 
Assistant Editor George Stuckey 

Assistant Business Manager Elmer Dittmar 

Art Editor Daniel Maloy 

Editor of the College Alonzo Buzick 

Editor of the Law School Rialdo Darrough 

Editor of the School of Engineering Adrian Davenport 

Editor of the School of Fine Arts Hannah Mitchell 

Editor of the School of Medicine Virgil McCarty 

Editor of the School of Pharmacy LeRoy Metz 

Editor of the Graduate School Rudolph Nesbitt 

Editor of Athletics Will French 

Editor of Organizations Ellis Davidson 

Editor of Fraternities Edmond Rhodes 

Editor of Sororities Myra Rogers 

Editor of Faculty John Johnson 

Editor of Dramatics Leota McFarlin 

LITERARY STAFF 

Gale Gossett Pat O'Roke Anna Manley 

Isabel Thomes Bertha Dack Glendale Griffiths 

Elsie Smith Everett Brummage 



FORMER EDITORS AND MANAGERS 



Date 
1874 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1889 
1893 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 

Page 185 



Name 
The Heirophantes 
The Kansas Kikkahe 
The Kansas Cyclone 
The Cicada 
The Helianthus 
The Quivera 
Annus MirabiHs 
The Kwir Book 
Senior Annual of Class of '97 
The University that Kansas Built. 
The Oread 
The Galaxy 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 
The Jayhawker 






Editor 

E. E. Meservey 
E. F. Caldwell 
Alfred S. RifHe 
WiUiam Allen White 
R. R. Whitman 

Grace Brewster 

Ethel A. C. Hickey 
Stella M. Case 
Gertrude Hill 
Estella Riddle 
Louise Haynes 
Earl W. Murray 
George Nutting 
Dana Gatlin 
Hedwig F. Berger 
Chester Ramsey 
Cap Young 
August Krehbiel 
Ralph Spotts 
Elbert Overman 



Business Manager 



W. W. Douglas 
H. G. McKeever 

Blaine F. Moore 
Guy Ward 
Kit Wilson 
Myron Humphrey 
George Hansen 
Chester A. Lainbach 
Roy K. Moore 
Harold Bozell 
Bert Evans 
Cy Leland 
George Russel 



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Distinctive for at least two things, is the Oread Magazine. It has done battle with the 
University administration oftener than any other student institution, and is the only regular 
student publication which is absolutely free from faculty domination, control or advice. 

Oread Magazine, a literary quarterly, is in the second year of its existence, and is the 
official organ of the Quill Club. Manuscripts are received from any student in the University; 
and this year, it has aroused much interest in short story writing. 

Ellis Davidson. 



Page 188 



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GRADUATE MAGAZINE 

The Graduate Magazine is published monthly, by the Alumni Association of the University 
of Kansas. It is the purpose of the magazine to keep the Alumni in touch with University 
affairs and activities, in cooperation for the advancement of mutual interests. Professor F. N. 
Flint, general secretary of the Alumni Association, is editor of the Graduate Magazine. 

THE NEWS BULLETIN 

The News Bulletin is published weekly, by the University of Kansas, for the purpose of 
furnishing items of interest regarding University affairs — especially to the press of the state. 

SCIENCE BULLETIN 

The Science Bulletin is an irregular publication, containing four hundred pages a year of 
scientific articles on original investigation carried on by faculty and students in the University 
of Kansas. The committee in charge is: Professor E. H. S. Bailey; U. G. Mitchell, Exchange 
Editor; Professor W. C. Stevens; Professor C. E. McClung, Managing Editor, and Professor 
F. E. Kester. 



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Men's Student Council 

The Men's Student Council in this its third year of existence, is as firmly planted as the 
governing body of the students in the University, and has proven itself to be all that faculty 
and students could have hoped for. 

The Council's first act after coming into office was the compiling and publication of the 
"Red Book." This book for the first time, placed in the hands of the students a complete 
copy of the Constitutions, Rules and By-Laws of the student organizations in the University. 

The Faculty showed its confidence by giving the Council complete charge of student 
discipline, and suspending the faculty discipline committee from office. The Council has had 
several cases and handled them in a way that gained for it the confidence and respect of both 
faculty and students. 

Probably the greatest act of the Council was the institution of the Football Smoker in 
the place of the formal banquet. 

The Council has made a step toward the realization of the Student Union by starting 
a campaign for funds. 

The complete revision of the Constitution of the Athletic Association was a needed reform 
which the Council accomplished. 

The last Act of the Council was to accept the control of the Student Enterprise Association 
and to regulate prices of tickets and their sale. 

All acts of previous Councils were carried out to the letter. 

OFFICERS 

President A. R. MacKinnon 

Vice-President J. E. Miller 

Secretary Albert LeMoine 

MEMBERS 
COLLEGE 



"Jesse T. Gephart Everett Brumage 

George Stuckey Asher Hobson 

Don Davis 



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Clay Roberts 



ENGINEERS 

Harry Becker 



E. A. Van Houten 



*Sandy Hamilton 
tRobert E. Lee 
tCharles Hill 



*W. Red Schreiner 
tPhilo Halleck 



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Burton Sears 



*Resigned Feb. 5, 1912. 

Pagp 193 



LAWS 

MEDICS 

Watson Campbell 

PHARMICS 

Harold Bradley 
tElected to fill vacancies. 



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The Woman's Student Government Association 

The Women's Student Government Association, the regulating body for all enterprises 
of women students of the University, has as its purpose the fostering of a feeling of mutual 
responsibility and helpfulness among the women, and the maintenance of high standards of 
living, scholarship and loyalty to the University. All women students become members of 
the Association upon registration in the University. 

During this, the fourth year of its existence, the Association has received new inspiration 
and interest from its members, and has taken on new powers of distinct benefit to the women 
of the University. For an experimental period of one year the Association has taken over the 
absolute discipline of the women students. The Association has also adopted elegibihty rules 
to govern all enterprises in which women participate. The management of Associated Student 
Enterprises has also been vested in a joint board from the men's and women's councils. The 
Association has during the year done all in its power to further the plans for a girl's dormitory. 

To create a closer social life among the girls until the dormitory is established, the town 
has been plotted into districts, having approximately fifty girls in each, supervised by a district 
chairman. The various interests pertaining to wom3n students are thus kept before the girls. 
This year the girls are introducing a Spring Kirmess as a means of perpetuating their scholar- 
ship fund. 

The present district Chairmen are: Flaude Johnson, Florence Payne, Irene McCullock, 
Mary Thomas, Claribell Lupton, Mary Ise, Francis Powell, Hermione Sterling, Vivian Straum, 
Patti Sankee, Bess Bozell, Florence Wallace, Estellene Greer. 



EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 



President 

Vice-President, College 

Vice-President, Fine Arts. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Beulah V. Murphy 
Mae Rossman 
Laura Pendleton 
Ruth Van Doren 
Frederika Hodder 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Senior Class 

Junior Class 

Sophomore Class 
Freshman Class... 



Glendale Griffiths 
Lina Coxedge 
.Edith Van Eman 
Sophie Smithmeyer 



Nell Martindale 
Francis Banker 
Dorothy Ward 
Margaret Kanaga 



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The Sachems 

The Sachems is the senior society for men at the University of Kansas, founded in the 
fall of 1910 by twelve upperclassmen and graduates. It was the first distinctive class society 
to be formed here. 

The object of the Sachems is to promote and foster a spirit of fellowship and a close acquain- 
tanceship among all the men of the University. Within the past year it has been the promoter 
of several class smokers and other University functions. 

Members are chosen in the spring of every year from men in the Junior class. Identifi- 
cation with University interests, and activities is a requisite for membership. 

The members are: 

HONORARY MEMBERS IN THE FACULTY 



Professor H. A. Rice 
Professor W. O. Hamilton 
Ralph Spotts 



Burton Sears 
George Stuckey 
Louis LaCoss 
Earl Ammons 
Roy Heil 



Professor H. C. Hill 
Professor Merle Thorpe 
J. W. Murray 

STUDENT MEMBERS 

Robert Fisher 
Van M. Martin 
Edmond Rhodes 
Hal Harlan 
Ellis Davidson 



Coach Ralph Sherwin 
Professor E. W. Murray 
E. R. Weidlein 



J. Earl Miller 
C. P. Woodbury 
E. Brummage 
Watson Campbell 
Harold Woodbury 



Ira Snyder 



Harold Brownlee 









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Page 197 






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The Friars 

The Friars is a junior honorary society organized for the purpose of so banding together 
a number of the representative men of the junior class that they may work better for the 
interests of the class and of the University. 

It is the endeavor of the society to encourage in every possible way athletics and all other 
student activities not only in the junior class but in all fields of University life. 

The society publishes once each year its official paper, "The Jester," containing the 
"Dope" on the hill written up in picturesque style. 

At the close of the school year men of the sophomore class are elected to membership for 
their junior year. 



■&:■'. 



Sandy Hamilton 
Herbert Sommers 
John Sterling 
Elmer Whitney 
John Hoffman 



MEMBERSHIP 

Curtis Hostetler 
Bruce Hurd 
George Marsh 
Edwin Van Houten 
James Schwab 



Guy Walker 
Chester Cassingham 
Oliver Patterson 
William Price 
William Busick 



Ulysses Gribble 



Milton Minor 



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Black Helmet 





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The Order of the Black Helmet was organized October 13, 1910, by thirteen sophomores 
of the class of 1913. It is the aim of the organization to create a better spirit of fellowship in 
the University. 

To approach this end it has given smokers during the year for the different class organi- 
zations, hoping in this way to come into closer touch with the representative men of the school. 
At these smokers the guests were addressed by members of the faculty on subjects pertaining 
to class organization in other colleges. 

It is the custom to pledge, on class day, thirteen men from the freshman class to compose 
the Black Helmet for the following year. 



Ross Beamer 
Robert Campbell 
Arthur Perry 
Arvid Frank 



MEMBERS 

Walter Boehm 
Ray Stockton 
A. W. Hosier 
John Musselman 
Loren Brown 



Willis K. Bramwell 
Wilham Cain 
Ralph Yeoman 
Russel Clark 



Page 201 



















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Spillings 


Morris 


Lindley 


Schwinn 


Calhoun 


Butler 


McDonald 


Busch 


Fuller 



Hamilton 
Teed 

Martin 



Carson 


Goldsworthy 


Waugh 


Bolin 


Miller 


Smith 



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The Torch 

The Torch is an honorary society of young women, organized in 1912, v/hose members 
are chosen annually from the incoming Senior Class, and whose object is the furthering of 
student responsibility toward the best interests of the University. 



Helen Burdick 
Lucie March 
Mae Rossman 



MDCCCXII. 

Nelle Dalton 
Nell Martindale 
Isabel Thomes 



Gale Gossett 
Beulah Murphy 
Grace Wilkie 




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Deutscher Verein, 1911-12 






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The Deutsche Verein, which meets once a week, consists of such students as have made 
sufficient progress in German to be able, with comparative ease, to speak and understand the 
language, and of the German faculty. This year almost fifty students belonged to the club. 
The object of the club is to furnish the student special opportunity to familiarize himself with 
the spoken language, and to promote an interest in all that is German. 

Programs, rendered by the students, alternate with lectures by members of the faculty or 
other eminent Germans, and the meetings are conducted exclusively in German. The Club 
had the pleasure of hearing a number of interesting talks about Germany, from one who came 
directly from the Fatherland, the exchange professor, Bruno Kiesewetter of Maryburg. A 
special feature of the Verein is the Christmas celebration which is observed in true German 
style and spirit. Another distinctively German custom of the Verein is the "Kaffeeklatsch," 
or the social afternoon when games are played or conversation is carried on in German and 
when coffee and cakes are served. 



OFFICERS 

FIRST TERM 

President Rebecca Passon 

Vice-President Irene Garrett 

Secretary and Treasurer Anna D. Bechtold. 

Re-elected for the Second Term. 



I 

WM: 





Page 204 



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Personnel of Glee Club 



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Director.. 

Pianist 

Manager. 



FIRST TENOR 

John Musselman 
Lawrence P. Smith 
Harold Jenkins 

SECOND TENOR 

Findley Graham 
Clarence Sowers 
Clyde Dodge 



Professor E. Edward Hubach 

Melvin J. Kates 

Melvin J. Kates 

FIRST BASE 

Harvey Phillips 
Robert Campbell 
Victor Larsen 

SECOND BASE 

Hal Harlan 
Edmund Rhodes 
Hal M. Black 



QUARTETTE 



Lawrence P. Smith 
Harvey Phillips 



John Musselman 
Hal M. Black 



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Clarence Sowers 



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Mandolin Club 

PERSONNEL 



FIRST MANDOLINS 



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John E. Castles 
Harold M. Jenkins 



Harvey A. Phillips 
Ray M. McConnell 






SECOND MANDOLINS 



Daniel F. Hazen 
John R. Miller 



Harold B. Hurd 
Clint G. Armstrong 



TENOR MANDOLA 

Lawrence B. Morris 



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GUITARS 



Daniel D. Mickey 
B. Roy Mock 



Charles J. Robinson 
Arthur C. Johnston 



CELLO 

Edward G. Wickwire 

FLUTE 

Clare A. Poland 

CLARINET 

Carl R. Brown 
Daniel D. Mickey, Manager James F. Lawrence, Director 



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The University Orchestra 

Since the early days of the University there have been occasional attempts to form an 
orchestra beginning with a group of players who organized under Mr. Newhall, a local band- 
master, and played consecutively for seven years between 1868 and 1874. During the next 
twenty-five years orchestras were occasionally organized for special purposes, such as furnish- 
ing Commencement Music; but the first organized effort began under Professor Farrell, director 
of the viloin department 1889-1900. In the Fall of 1903 Dean Skilton became leader and the 
Orchestra was still further enlarged. The practice of giving two concerts a year was begun 
and has ever since been continued, as well as that of furnishing music for Commencement and 
occasionally for the Music Festival. In 1906 it accompanied the opera "Der Freischutz" at 
the Festival. In 1907 the student performances of opera began. The Orchestra has furnished 
the accompaniment each year and been an important factor in the success of the productions. 
It has always devoted itself to the best music and has made many classical selections familiar 
to the student body. The College faculty grant one hours' credit under certain conditions for 
orchestra work and members may wear the pin after one year's service. 






OFFICERS 







President Professor W. H. Carruth 

Manager William Hoyt 

Librarian Carl Brown 

Director Dean C. S. Skilton 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



FIRST VIOLINS 

Professor Wort Morse, Concertmaster 
Helen Hill Frances Smith 

William Hoyt John Miller 

Paul Royer 

SECOND VIOLINS 
Anna Murray Blanche Simons 

James Lawrence Lee Samuel 
Elmer Burnham Francis Saile 

Ray Eldridge 

VIOLAS 
Dorothy Keeler Gordon Welch 

VIOLONCELLOS 
William Dalton Ralph Stevens 

VIOLONCELLOS 
William Dalton Ralph Stevens 

DOUBLE BASS 

Charles Robinson 



FLUTES 

Clare Poland Horace Dunn 

OBOE 
William Burkholder 

CLARINETS 
Harry Elliott Carl Brown 

Villepique 

BASSOON 

Professor Havenhill 

FRENCH HORNS 
Professor Jones Professor Bushong 

CORNETS 
. Marguerite Villepique Leo Davis 

TROMBONE 

Marguerite Villepique 

Leo Davis 

TROMBONE 

Ulysses Gribble 
TYMPANI 
Professor Harry Gardner 



Page 211 



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The University Band 






There is a vast difference between a disjointed boiler factory and a band. This was 
demonstrated to the University in 1907, when J. C. McCanles ascended Mount Oread, paid 
his matriculation fee, and took unto himself the directorship of the University band — a position 
which he has held ever since. Before that time, alleged bands, under youthful student leaders, 
had made spasmodic appearances and many blue notes; but the days of discord have passed 
into oblivion, and this year, the Jayhawker organization was acknowledged to be the best 
college band in the Missouri valley, in concert and parade. 

Forth men wear the University uniform. They play three regular concerts every year, 
and loyally respond to the call for music, on all occasions of importance at the University. The 
band appears at all athletic events, both at home and on foreign fields; and never, in the last 
five years, could any newspaper correspondent truthfully write of Mac and his boys, "The 
Kansas rooters subsided when they saw their team going down to inevitable defeat; and even 
the strains of the inspiring 'Crimson and the Blue' died away, for the bandmen had laid down 
their instruments." 

The instrumentation follows: 

MEMBERS OF K. U. BAND, 1911-12 

Director J. C. McCanles 



J. C. McCanles 
Errol Welch 
Victor La Mer 

Charles J. Robinson, 

Edward G. Fischer 

Ellis Davidson 

W. Harkrader 



E. J. Leasure 
Carl H. Siever 
J. W. Dale 
Fritz Hartman 



Ralph Johnson 
I. H. Clark 

J. C. McDonald 



Page 213 



CORNETS 

R. L. Branden 
C. C. Covey 

PICCOLO AND FLUTE 

Manager 

BARITONE 

BASSES 

Theo. Aschman 

ALTOS 

I. S. Berger 
Professor Bushong 

CLARINETS 

Raymond Davis 
Clarence Earnest 
E. Belt 

SAXAPHONE 

Albert S. Teed 

TROMBONES 

J. S. Amick 
H. R. Adair 

DRUMS 

OBOE 

Glen Allen 



John Probst 

F. A. Trump 

G. B. Sammons 

W. G. Gillett 
Charles Baird 
S. C. Neibling 
E. L. Treece 



William Burkholder 
Samuel J. Charpie 
H. D. King 
Villipique 



John Hartman 
H. P. Evans 



O. Bryan 






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Music Festival 

The Music Festival was established at the University of Kansas in 1904 with the aim of 
providing music of the highest quality and broadest scope for the students of the University 
and the citizens of Lawrence. This aim has been abundantly fulfilled. Each year an orchestra 
of national reputation has been engaged with a quartet of noted singers, a chorus of over one 
hundred voices had been organized and trained to perform several of the great choral master- 
pieces, while local artists and musical organizations of the University have lent their assistance. 
These festivals have become the leading feature of the musical life of the community, and have 
attracted many visitors from the outside. Financially they are guaranteed by the Lawrence 
Merchant's association, members of the University faculty and students of Lawrence. 

This year's concert was given by the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra on April 18 and 19. 

Among the artists who assisted at the festival are: 






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Carl A. Preyer 

C. Edward Hubach 

Horatio Connell 



Harriet Greisinger 
Richard Czerwonky 
Lucille Stevenson 
Willy Lamping 



Maude Cook 
Genevieve Wheat 
Namara-Toye 



Page 214 






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The Good Government Club 








OFFICERS 

President William S. Norris 

Vice-President Everett Brummage 

Secretary-Treasurer Robert E. Lee 

The members of the Good Government Club of the University are chosen by election 
of the club from the junior and senior classes. The aim of the club is to acquaint the members 
more fully with the significant political movements of the day, and specially with the methods 
and experiments being employed to secure better and cleaner government in national, state 
and municipal administrations. 

The club is enabled to inquire into and study the problems of government and politics 
from the inside by talks before the club from such prominent men as U. S. Senator Chas. S. 
Curtis, Governor W. R. Stubbs, Judge Clark A. Smith of the Supreme Court, Mayor D. A. 
Brown and Judge Burney, of Kansas City, Professor Higgins, Assistant Attorney General 
S. N. Hawkes and H. G. Larimer and Arthur Capper of Topeka, who have addressed the club 
this year. 

The club is a member of the Inter-Collegiate Civic League, which consists of similar 
organizations in forty-four of the large Universities. The local Membership is as follows: 



Hal E. Harlan 

Willis K. Bramwell 

Carl Cannon 

J. A. Williams 

J. Earl Miller 

Bruce Hurd 

Jesse Gephart 

K, K. Simmons 

Ira C. Snyder 

Professor A. J. Boynton 



Van M. Martin 
Joseph W. Murray 
W. E. McLain 
Louis LaCoss 
Don McKay 
Watson Campbell 
Professor M. E. Thorpe 
Hal M. Black 
Ike E. Lambert 
Everett Brummage 
Milton Minor 



Clark A. Wallace 
Milton D. Baer 
Burton P. Sears 
H. C. Dolde 
Byron L. Shinn 
Robert E. Lee 
WiUiam S. Norris 
Professor C. A. Dykstra 
Winn E. Holmes 
George Stuckey 



Page 217 





















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The Scoop Club 

The Scoop Club was organized five years ago by newspaper correspondents for metro- 
politan papers, and since that time has flourished as a live society of University journalists. 
An essential for membership is that the applicant must have received some remuneration for 
his journalistic efforts. 

Meetings are held every two weeks and various editors of the state have addressed the 
club on topics pertinent to newspaper work. 

A pleasant feature of the club's activities this year have been the regular "bi-monthly 
hikes," weather permitting, which the members have taken to Buermann's where the hungry 
scribes feasted on chicken suppers, and talked over affairs of state. 

The Club this year won the prize for the best football song submitted. This was composed 
and rehearsed on one of the "hikes". 

OFFICERS 

President M. D. Baer 

Secretary and Treasurer Louis LaCoss 



Professor Merle Thorpe 



M. D. Baer 
Ellis Davidson 
Clark A. Wallace 
George Marsh 
William Ferguson 
W. A. Allen 
John Madden 



MEMBERS IN FACULTY 

Professor F. N. Flint 
Ralph Spotts 

MEMBERS 

Carl Cannon 
Louis LaCoss 
Nelson Stevens 
Wayne Wingart 
Oliver Atherton 
John A. Williams 
Robert Sellers 



J. W. Murray 



J. Earl Miller 
Geoffrey Miller 
Alston McCarty 
George Edwards 
Earl Potter 
C. Ray 
W. S. Norris 




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Page 219 






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The Quill Club 






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The Quill Club is an honorary Uterary organization, made up of aspiring young poets, 
novehsts and hterary critics. The club was first organized in 1900, and the fact that several 
of the charter members, and even some of more recent date, are to-day publishing their work 
in periodicals of dignified standing, presages, we hope a glorious future for the present members. 

At the weekly meetings, the ambitious writers are given an opportunity to display their 
genius before their fellow-members, and to hear their criticisms. These criticisms are fre- 
quently of a nature to prevent the young author from becoming too much impressed with his 
own greatness. Since the members aspire to an enlarged appreciation of literature, as well as in- 
creased skill in writing, the club is always glad to be addressed by distinguished men of letters. 

The Oread Magazine, published quarterly is the official organ of the club. Contributions 
may, however, be received from any student in the University. 

OFFICERS— SPRING TERM 1912 

President Robert Fisher 

Vice-President Eleanor Draper 

Secretary-Treasurer Margaret Darrah 

Critic Ottie McNeal 






Brownie Angle 
WilUam Burkholder 
Margaret Darrah 
Dena Ellis 
Chester Farnsworth 
Irene Garret 
Homer Hoyt 
Ottie McNeal 
Earl Potter 
Maud Swisher 
Allan Wilber 
Lucile Wilkinson 
Louis Rufener 



MEMBERS 

Arta Briggs 
Carl Cannon 
Ellis Davidson 
Nancy Fisher 
Will French 
Gale Gosset 
Louis LaCoss 
Oreta Moore 
Robert Sellers 
Isabel Thomes 
Gertrude Wiley 
Regina Woodruff 
Lois Stevens 



Martin Brooks 
Floyd Danskin 
Eleanor Draper 
Robert Fisher 
Florence Fuqua 
Elizabeth Heavy 
Anna Manley 
Beulah Murphy 
Inez Smith 
Ruth Van Doren 
Harvey Wilkins 
Maynard Young 
Myrtle Greenfield 







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Page 221 



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The Cooley Club 

The Cooley Club has enjoyed a prosperous year. The United Senate parliamentary 
procedure is used as that of the club. All members have state names and are recognized by 
such in preference to their personal names. Legislation regarding the questions of the day 
is constantly dealt with during the sessions of the club. Meetings are held at 1:30 every 
Friday afternoon in the lecture room of the law school. Officers of the Cooley Club are as 
follows : 



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FIRST TERM 

President... Orlin A. Weede 

Vice-President Charles Dolde 

Secretary ...A. D. Zook 

Treasurer C. H. Ewald 

Sargeant at Arm3 E. J. Erwin 



SECOND TERM 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Sargeant at Arms 



Hugh Adair 
C. SuUivan 
F. D. Schnacke 
Glen A. Wisdom 
Harry W. Fisher 



R. C. Davis 



F. M. Hyames 
T. E. Thorn 
C. H. Ewald 
A. D. Zook 
M. D. Baer 
H. W. Fisher 
R. O. Lindsay 
J. C. Hoffman 
C. O. Buckles 

G. S. Lynch 
George Brown 
P. Pfauts 

J. F. Crow 
Wilham McClure 
R. E. Mcintosh 
C. A. Carlton 
M. Hatcher 



DEBATING COUNCIL MEMBERS 

F. M. Hyames Wm. Hughes 



Walter Griffin 



MEMBERS 

Walter Griffin 
G. A. Wisdom 
O. A. Weede 
H. C. Dolde 

F. D. Schnacke 

G. N. Lewis 
C. C. Colins 
B. Steeper 
B. Kirchner 

B. M. Dunham 
A. F. Lindsay 

C. E. Sullivan 
George F. Burton 
H. C. Crandall 
Guy Von Schritz 
M. Guilfoyle 
Roy Davis 



L. W. Burford 
Hugh Adair 
C. C. Fairchilds 
A. B. Campbell 
F. M. McClellan 
Claud Conkey 
R. G. Hepworth 

A. R. Buzick 

C. F. Merris 

D. C. Moflfett 
William Cain 

B. L. Hart 
J. S. Kent 
A. Moon 
Ed. L Irwin 
F. Swancara 

O. M. Edmonson 



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Jurisprudence Club 

The Jurisprudence Club was organized in 1906 by a number of law students who wished 
to study and discuss questions of general importance to the legal profession. 



President 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



H. W. Humble 

C. C. Curtis 
I. C. Snyder 
A. H. Fast 
H. E. Harlan 

D. R. Mountz 
J. R. Hannah 



OFFICERS 1912 



MEMBERS 



W. T. Griffin 
W. E. McLain 



C. F. Maris 
G. A. Wisdom 
K. K. Simmons 
W. E. McLain 
W. L. Griffin 
CO. Buckles 
F. M. McClelland 
B. R. Sears 



H. Fisher 

A. J. McAllister 

R. L. King 

A. B. Campbell 

H. A. Heller 

U. A. Gribble 

F. A. Wilson 



Page 225 



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Debating Council 







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The Debating Council is the organization that controls and manages the debates between 
the University and other schools. The body is composed of four faculty members appointed 
by the Chancellor and four student representatives from each of the active literary societies of 
the University. 

The Council this year has arranged for debates with the universities of Oklahoma and 
Colorado, which are in a debating league with the University of Kansas, and with Missouri. 
The question of the Recall for the State Judiciary has been chosen and will be used in all of 
the debates. 

The Council has decided not to enter the new Missouri Valley Oratorical League at the 
present time and is considering the formation of a Pentagonal Debating League to consist 
of the Universities of Kansas, Missouri, Texas, Oklahoma and Colorado. 



OFFICERS 



President 

Secretary 

Business Manager 

Corresponding Secretary. 



W. M. Hughes 
M. D. Baer 
W. T. Griffin 
Professor G. A. Gesell 



MEMBERS 



M. C. Minor 
W. T. Griffin 
W. M. Hughes 
R. C. Davis 



Professor C. A. Dykstra 

Professor H. C. Hill 

Professor G. A. Gesell 

Professor R. R. Price 



O. A. Weede 
L. LaCoss 
M. D. Baer 
F. M. Hyames 



Page 227 










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The K. IT. Debating Society 

The Kansas University Debating Society was organized January 25, 1912, with the pur- 
pose of giving to those students interested an opportunity to engage in active debate and 
parHamentary practice. Meetings are held weekly in the rooms of the society in Fraser Hall 
It is the purpose of the society as soon as it is fully established to divide into two distinct organ- 
izations which will oppose each other in debate. 










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OFFICERS 



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President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



H. R. Adair 
E. L. Bennett 
A. C. Castle 
J. M. Clauser 
C. C. Fairchild 
W. L. Griffin 
H. F. Gorsuch 
J. H. Houghton 
J. F. Jacobs 
L. F. Meissner 
G. Marks 
W. H. McClure 
A. F. Olney 
P. Ross 
R. J. Soper 
C. Z. Steinsmeyer 
R. D. Woolary 
H. S. Wilson 



Page 229 






Milton Minor 
Allen Wilbur 
C. C, Fairchild 
Frank Carson 



MEMBERS 

G. F. Beezley 
A. L. Boman 
F. L. Carson 
CO. Konkey 
H. Flint 

A. A. Griffin 
C. C. Gorsuch 
H. Hoyt 

W. M. Kimball 
W. M. Morton 
J. C. Madden 
R. F. McCluggage 

F. W. Poos 

E. A. Robinson 

B. Steeper 

G. W. Staton 

C. Williamson 

C. C. Younggreen 






E. W. Boddington 
A. B. Campbell 
C. W. Carson 

W. Edwards 
R. Fisher 
M. Guilfoyle 
C. 0, Hornbaker 

A. Hobson 

B. Kirch ner 
M. C. Minor 
H. F. Mattoon 

C. McCormick 
J. H. Probst 

F. L. Soper 

C. E. Strickland 

G. H. Vansell 
A. S. Wilber 
A. D. Zook 



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Minor Wilber 

Held at Lawrence, Kansas, April, 1912. 

The question debated was, "Resolved, that the recall should be applied to the state 
judiciary." 

Kansas presented the affirmative and was represented by Allen Wilber and Milton Minor 
— both Juniors in the College. 

Page 230 



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Oklahoma Team 




F. M. McClelland 



R. C. Davis 



M. C. Minor 



Held at Norman, Oklahoma, April 10, 1912. 

The question debated was, "Resolved, that the recall should be applied to the state 
judiciary." 

Kansas pie:ented the negative and was represented by F. M. McClelland, a Junior, R. C. 
Davis, a Middle — both of the law school — and M. C. Minor, a Junior in the College. 



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Page 231 



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Colorado Team 






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Carson 



Rodebush 



Heller 



The Colorado team met the University of Kansas team at Lawrence, April 10, 1912. 
Kansas presented the affirmative side of the question, "Resolved that the recall should be ap- 
plied to the state judiciary." 

The men composing the Kansas team were: Cale Carson, Harvey Heller, Worth Rodebush, 






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Page 232 



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CLUBS 




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Palette Club 



Flower: Wild Crab Apple. 



Colors: Gold and Old Rose. 



Emblem: Palette and Brushes 




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The Palette Club, an honorary organization in the Drawing and Painting Department 
of the University was organized in January, 1910 for the purpose of promoting greater activity 
in artistic and social life thus giving to its members a helpful and an appreciative influence 
toward the good, the true and the beautiful. 

OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 

Critic 



ilte^;k<j'^'HS 



Geneva Ogden 



Lucile Brown 



Addie Underwood 



Lo Alma Brown 



Lucile Kreider 
Wilma Arnett 



Professor W. A. Griffith 
Page 235 



FIRST TERM 



SECOND TERM 



MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

Josephine Barkdull 
Neva J. Foster 

JUNIORS 

Lida Le Suer 

SOPHOMORES 

Myrtle Ellsworth 

SPECIALS 

Lena Tripp 

Nettie Smith 

FRESHMEN 

Ruth Walker 
Letha Churchill 

FACULTY 



Josephine Barkdull 
Geneva Ogden 
Addie Underwood 
May Jordan 
Lo Alma Brown 



Neva J. Foster 
Myrtle Ellsworth 
Lo Alma Brown 
Lida Le Suer 
Arta Briggs 



Arta Briggs 

Erma Keith 
May Jordan 
Mayme McFarlin 



Edith Cooper 
Constance Fennell 



Miss Maria L. Benson 












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Allemania 

Aliemania is a student organization with the primary purpose of affording its members 
an opportunity to become proficient in the use of the German language as it is spoken. Al- 
though the intellectual aim is foremost, the club affords the members a social life as well. 




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MATRON 

Mrs. Clara Price Newport 

MEMBERS 

FACULTY 

Glenn E. Palmer 

SENIORS 

Anna R. Manley Isabel Thomes Ruth VanDoren 

Harvey C. Lehman Theodore C. Schwartz 



William H. Tangeman 



Marie P. Sealy 
Florence F. Fuqua 
Harold R. Branine 



Mary A. Brownlee 






JUNIORS 

Thomas R. Jones 
J. Charles Brownlee 

SOPHOMORES 

CorneHa M. Downs 
Bessie B. Bechtell 
William A. Stacey 

FRESHMEN 

Marion I. Manley 
Clare A. Poland 



Walter H. Wellhouse 



Marjorie Templin 
Ruth Deibert 
Leslie H. Dodd 



Donald B. Joseph 



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Knights of Columbus 






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The Knights of Columbus of the University is an organization of Catholic men, who are 
affiliated with the fraternal organization of that name. The purpose of the ogranization is 
primarily social. A private boarding club is maintained. 

There are fourteen members in the organization. Among the faculty it has Professor 
E. .J. Curran, professor of anatomy, and F. X. Williams, assistant curator of the entomological 
collection. 

The membership follows: 



Professor E. J. Curran 



R. N. Hoffman 
George C. Dunn 



FACULTY 



1913 

Charles Hainbach 
J. A. Riordan 
Frank J. Lynch 



F. X. Williams 



Floyd B. Devlin 
James T. Share 



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Matt Guilfoyle 



Louis LaCoss 



1914 

Hugh F. Markey 

GRADUATES 



Lewis W. Betourney 



Martin K. Brooks 





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Roster First Provisional Company, First Infantry 



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NATIONAL GUARD OF KANSAS 

Captain H. E. Steele 

First Lieutenant Samuel Fairchilds 

Second Lieutenant Harry AUphin 

First Sergeant Glenn Broyles 

Quartermaster Sergeant Ittai Luke 

First Duty Sergeant Theodore Utterbach 

Second Duty Sergeant David Wenrich 

Third Duty Sergeant John McArthur 

Corporals, Floyd Moody, Wayne Edwards, Harold Crawford, Allan Sterling, William Hughes 

Musicians Ernest Macy, Edward Todd 

Artificer Melvin Croan 

Company Clerk Carl Hunter 



Theodore Aschmann 
Charles Benkleman 
John Bosse 
Cyril Colin 
Otto Dixon 
Richard Gardner 
William Hamner 
Warren Jordan 
James LaRue 
Joseph Marcy 
Leland Resler 
Donald Lackey 
Steele Sproull 
Ray Wheeler 



PRIVATES 

Wilbur Barnes 
Walter Butler 
Emmett Bennet 
Harold Cheney 
Floyd Devlin 
Roy Grayson 
Ross Hall 
Arthur Klamm 
Herbert Maxwell 
Dayton Mounts 
John Shive 
Frank Sands 
Charles Stiensmeyer 
Alfred Waddell 
William Whittakar 



Ernest Bradbridge 
George Bischoflf 
Edward Colin 
Clyde Hornbreaker 
James Early 
Howard Houk 
Lucius Hayes 
Albert Lemoine 
Stewart McMillan 
Robert McCluggage 
Harboro Hill 
Lester Sprinkle 
Cyrus Viers 
Louis Wilhelm 



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Theta Tau Fraternity * 

The Kansas University Chapter of the Theta Tau Fraternity was installed April 19, 1912 
with the ten members of the Tunnel and Shaft Society as charter members, Theta Tau is a 
national professional fraternity whose membership is limited to engineers. 

Membership in the Kansas chapter is limited to men of the Junior and Senior Classes. 
Toward the close of the school year, men of the Sophomore Class are elected to membership 
for their Junior and Senior years. Membership is based not entirely upon scholarship but 
also upon other worthy attainments in general. 

It is the serious aim of the Fraternity to promote in every way the best interests of the 
School of Engineering and of the University. 



CHARTER MEMBERS 



Honorary President . 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer... 

Oliver Andrews H 

Richard Ward E. 

George A. Murphy 



L. Wilson 

A. VanHouten 
William F. Price 
John P. Boesche 



H. A. Rice 

Ross I. Parker 

A. H. Mangelsdorf 

C. M. Coats 

Fred E. Johnston 
Henry H. Campion 
Curtis B. Hostetler 









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Society of Mechanical Engineers 

The University of Kansas Student Section of the American Society of Mechanical Engin- 
eers, was affiliated with the American Society, March 9, 1909. This section was among the 
first of the student sections to be admitted to general society and ranks among the first six 
sections. 

OFFICERS 

President V. H. Hilford 

Vice-President E. A. VanHouten 

Recording Secretary L. E. Knerr 

Corresponding Secretary L. L. Browne 

Treasurer R. H. Forney 

Senior Mechanicals 

The annual inspection trip made this year by the Senior Mechanicals included the plants 
of The Indiana Steel Company, at Gary, the Standard Oil Refinery, at Whiting, Indiana, the 
Commonwealth Edison Company, and Western Electric Company, in Chicago; AUis-Chalmers 
Company, A. O. Smith, Schlitz, Vilter, and light and power plants in Milwaukee; and the 
Rambler automobile works, in Kenosha, Wisconsin. 

On November 8-9 the seniors ran a test on the entire pumping system of the Kansas 
Natural Gas Company. The Senior Mechanicals appear on opposite page. 



Page 245 







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The University of Kansas Branch of the American 
Institute of Electrical Engineers 









The University of Kansas Branch of the American Institute of Electrical engineers was 
organized in March, 1908. This branch has one member, two associate and fifteen student 
members of the A. I. E. E. The A. I. E. E. is the National organization of the electrical 
engineering profession and has over seven thousand members in the United States. Student 
branches have been estabUshed in thirty-nine of the leading engineering schools. 

The Branch holds bi-weekly meetings at which one outside member and two student 
speakers give papers on technical subjects. At the close of every year a banquet is given and 
prominent members of the profession address the society. The Branch has taken an important 
part in all things pertaining to electrical engineering in the school at large. The membershp 
is now thirty-nine, a steady growth having been maintained since the organization started. 

OFFICERS 

Chairman L. A. Baldwin 

Vice-Chairman M. K. Thomen 

Secretary and Treasurer M. H. Hobbs 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Professor C. A. Johnson R. I. Parker 



Professor George C. Shaad 
Professor C. A. Johnson 
Professor M. E. Rice 

E. L. Bray 
G. 0. Brown 
H. E. Hoadley 
B. R. Mock 

D. K. Crawford 
W. D. Thompson 
P. A. Meyer 
T. A. E. Belt 
0. H. Horner 

F. L. Armstrong 



MEMBERS 

M. K. Thomen 
R. I. Parker 
L. A. Baldwin 
O. E. Marvel 
H. F. Wilson 
E. L. Wright 
R. L. Simpson 
H. H. Campion 
Carl Cross 
G. C. Dunn 
E. E. Hartman 
T. P. Hennessy 
A. R. Fuchs 



S. S. Schooley 



C. V. Waddington 
G. C. Magatagan 
F. C. Walden 
Elmer Dershem 
C. F. Hanson 
E. E. Stephens 
T. P. Steeper 
M. H. Hobbs 
J. E. Turkington 
S. S. Schooley 
W. I. Morton 
W. F. Price 
R. S. Johnson 






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The Senior Civils 

The Senior Civils in years of long ago held forth in their lair on the fifth floor of Fraser 
Hall. They were a husky bunch and passed out the rough stuff to all comers. They still do. 

Today they rule the roost in Marvin Hall and are noted for the impartial administration 
of their special brand of justice. Their reception committee and boards of welcome are very 
cosmopolitan, extending a warm welcome to each visitor, whether Freshman or Faculty member. 

When not engaged in athletics, politics or sitting up with sick friends, they have so quietly, 
earnestly and conscientiously delved into the mysteries of their profession that the bogey man 
of Sigma Xi has not disturbed their peaceful existence. 



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Civil Engineering Society 




OFFICERS 1911-12 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary and Tresaurer. 

Faculty Advisor 

Corresponding Secretary. 



Herbert L. Wilson 
Harry E. Burnham 
John P. Boesche 
Professor H. A. Rice 
Professor H. A. Parker 



H. V. Becker 
J. A. Davenport 
F. E. Johnston 
P. M. Smith 
H. M. Stockwell 



R. J. Bodman 
H. E. Burnham 
W. A. Davenport 
J. R. Ghormley 
R. M. Martin 
G. R. Murphy 
J. Vawter 
G. H. Hill 



J. L. Bliss 
H. L, Bunn 
A. E. Home 
L. W. Kinnear 



A. J. Groft 

E. C. Richardson 



Page 251 



MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

J. P. Boesche 

B. E. Dodge 
T. P. King 
G. S. Smith 

W. R. Schreiner 
H. L. Wilson 

JUNIORS 

E. W. Brown 

C. S. Cassingham 
R. S. Frush 

F. Hunter 

F. D. Messenger 
F. H. Nelson 
R. B. Ward 
V. Wood 

SOPHOMORES 

L. E. Bolinger 
L. H. Dodd 
W. C. Hornaday 

D. M. Rankin ■-• 
W. D. Weidline 

FRESHMAN 

E. L. Heidenrich 
C. A. Shockley 



P. C. Cole 
H. H. Houk 
H. L. Richardson 
T. C. Schwartz 
R. J. Tucker 



P. K. Bunn 
C. L. Cone 
O. D. Fuller 
W. A. Kingman 
W. N. Moore 
B. A. Ruth 
G. C. Glenn 
J. A. Young 



J. A. Brouk 
A. F. Duncan 
L. L. Jackson 
N. F. Strachan 



C. A. Poland 
R. L. Templin 






















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American Institute of Mining Engineers 




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The American Institute of Mining Engineers is one of the best known engineering societies 
of the world. Student branches have been formed. In most of the large technical schools 
and universities in the United States offering courses in mining engineering. Such a branch 
was organized at the University of Kansas in the fall of 1908. 

Meetings are held each week at which students read reviews of articles appearing in the 
current mining engineering journals or listen to practical talks on different phases of the pro- 
fession they are to follow, by visiting engineers or alumni. 

It is through this organization that the miners make themselves known as a power in the 
engineering school of the University of Kansas. 

OFFICERS 

President A. H. Mangelsdorf 

Vice-President C. A. Roberts 

Secretary and Treasurer C. J. Hainbach 






G. R. Allen 
H. P. Halleck 
O. A. Dingman 
J. Parker 
D. H. Cadmus 
C. B. Hostetler 



MEMBERS 

O. L. Andrews 
R. N. Hoffman 
H. W. Ralstin 
G. M. Brown 
A. D. Johnson 
A. H. Mangelsdorf 



C. M. Coats 
L. B. Smith 
C. A. Roberts 
W. E. Rohrer 
C. E. Tetter 
C. J. Hainbach 



W. Monroe 



C. Greenless 





Page 253 






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The Chemical Engineering Society 

The Society was founded at the University of Kansas in 1909. The main objects being 
to promote interest in the science of chemistry and to bring about closer association between 
the chemical engineers of the university. 

Meetings are held in the evenings of the first and third Wednesdays of each month. Prom- 
inent Chemical Engineers and members of the Faculty address the society at these meetings. 
Among the important events of the year was the entertaining of The American Chemical 
Society at a banquet in December, the second annual dinner of the society in March, and the 
industrial trip of the upper classmen lasting one week during which the important manufac- 
turing concerns of Kansas City and St. Louis were visited. 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



G. A. Bragg 
H. N. Calderwood 
C. E. Cubbison 
J. G. Daniels 



C. G. Armstrong 
R. L. Carpenter 
H. V. Chase 
E. P. Jaques 
C. C. Kreider 



J. L. Bennett 
R. S. Bracewell 
E. J. Baldwin 
W. B. Byers 
H. V. Cadwell 



OFFICERS 



1912 

T. M. Godfrey 
E. E. Grignard 
E. L. Griffin 
A. R. MacKinnon 
G. L. Pyle 

1913 

E. E. Lyder 
L. E. Leatherock 
L. S. Madlem 
J. D. Malcolmson 



1914 

C. S. Clarke 
B. D. Fillmore 
R. Hess 
A. R. Jones 



Emile E. Grignard 
James D. Malcolmson 
Ewart P. Jaques 
Truman M. Godfrey 



E. O. Rhodes 
C. J. Robinson 
C. E. Spillman 
H. K. Shaw 



A. R. Powell 
G. O. Peterson 
J. A. Riordan 
C. W. Seibel 
J. W. Schwab 



W. J. Lauterbach 
L. G. Moore 
J. C. Musselman 
I. R. Parkhurst 
J. R. Stephenson 







Bijiililip 






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Students' Mathematical Club 



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The Students' Mathematical Club was organized in December, 1911. It aims to make 
a study of unusual problems and interesting phases of mathematics not taught in the regular 
courses, and to promote a spirit of fellowship among its members. 

Anyone taking advanced work in mathematics or allied branches, is eligible to membership. 

OFFICERS 

President Alfred L. Nelson 

Vice-President Edward Fischer 

Secretary-Treasurer Inez Morris 

Faculty Adviser Professor U. G. Mitchell 



Vera Atkinson 
Florence Black 
Thornton Bouse 
Carl Brown 
Helen Brown 
Kate Daum 
Elmer Dershem 
Edward Fischer 



MEMBERS 

Louise Fleming 
Ruby V. Flinn 
S. M. Haag 
Marion Johnston 
Chester Kimel 
Herman Kliewer 
Alfred Krueger 
Catherine McCreath 
Frances McCreath 



Clarence McCormick 
Bess McKittrick 
Harrison McMillin 
Inez Morris 
Florence Morse 
Alfred Nelson 
Bernice Ruhlandt 
Earl Thompson 








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The Elntomolo^ical Club 



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Claassen Spangler Fraser Griffin Emery 

Mallory Andrews Hunter Hungerford Hosford 

Isely O'Roke Branch Williams Hoffman 

The aims and purpose of the Entomological Club are the review and discussion of current 
entomological problems. Meetings are held every Tuesday afternoon at 3:30. Membership 
is confined to the instructors and students showing active interest and proficiency in ento- 
mological work. 

OFFICERS 

President H. B. Hungerford 

Vice-President S. J. Hunter 

Secretary Ruby Hosford 



Page 260 



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BOARD OF DIRECTORS 1911-12 











Chancellor Frank Strong, Ch. 
Professor George C. Shaad 
George 0. Foster 
Ralph Yeoman, '14 
H. E. Marchbanks, '14 
C. O. Dunbar 



Professor W. C. Hoad, Vice-Ch. 
Professor John E. Boodin 
Rev. Noble S. Elderkin 
O. A. Weede, '13 
E. E. Stephens, '12 



Professor E. F. Engel 
Professor F. H. Billings 
D. C. Martindell, '12 
C. F. Hanson, '12 
H. A. Alexander, '12 
William F. March 



General Secretary, Roy Stockwell, '11 



Heretofore it has been customary to say a lot of nice things about the Y. M. C. A. in the 
Jayhawker. This year we don't intend to do so. An organization of more than 525 K. U. 
men, that has the loyal support of almost every member of the Faculty, that employs the entire 
time of a competent secretary at a good salary, that spends in its various activities in the 
University almost $3,000.00 annually, that has sent out its former secretary, "Dad" Herman, 
to work among the college men of India, that has given K. U. men an opportunity to come in 
touch with some of the biggest business and professional men of the West; that has fostered 
many of the great spiritual ideals which really make life worth while — such an organization 
is too busy to be very much affected, we fancy, by any passing remarks we might make. 

CABINET 1911-12 

President D. C. Martindell, '12 

Vice-President C. P. Woodbury, '12 

Recorder R. O. Dart, '14 

Treasurer Ralph Yeoman, '14 

Chairman Religious Meetings Com M. C. Minor, '13 

Chairman Bible Study Com E. E. Stephens, '12 

Finance Chairman Foreign Work Com. ..Don. L. Davis, '12 

Study Chairman Foreign Work Com Allen S. Wilber, '13 

Chairman Membership-Finance Com R. J. Soper, '13 

Chairman Social Com C. C. Younggreen, '13 

Chairman Employment Com F. D. Messenger, '12 



Page 263 











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OFFICERS 



President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



Lucy March 
Isabel Thomes 
Eleanor Draper 
Gale Gosset 






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CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 



Beulah Murphy, Meetings 
Mary Reding, Practical Service 
Helen Burdick, CaUing 
Marie Shuey, Missionary 



Florence Payne, Bible Study 

Helen Pendleton, Finance 

Anne Malott, Rest Room 

Ruth VanDoren, Sustaining Membership 



Ruth VanDoren, Sustaining Membership Marie Shuey, Missionary 
Sylvia Alford, Social 
General Secretary, Nadia Thomas 




ADVISORY BOARD 



Mrs. Louis E. Sisson, Chairman 
Mrs. H. E. Tanner 
Mrs. P. F. Walker 



Mrs. W. H. Johnson 
Mrs. C. G. Dunlap 
Mrs. H. O. Kruse 
Mrs. F. B. Dains 
Mrs. Frank Strong, Ex-Officio 



Miss Margaret Lynn 
Mrs. W. J. Baumgartner 
Mrs. Harry Gardner 








Page 265 



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Draper Olinger Dalton Ford Malott 

The Westminster Guild was organized on January 28, 1911, with a membership of 50. 
The present membership is 200. The purpose of the Guild is to promote helpful forms of 
social life among the students. Monthly socials are held with an average attendance of 150. 

Westminster Hall was founded by the Synod of Kansas for the religious care and education 
of Presbyterian and other students at the University of Kansas. Bible classes are conducted 
at the Hall, and the Presbyterian Church, in clubs and fraternities by the University pastor 
and his wife with a total attendance of 325. Westminster Hall is a social center for class 
groups, clubs, and many forms of social life. 

OFFICERS 

President Herbert E. Ford 

Vice-President Nellie Dalton 

Secretary- Treasurer Annabella Crawford 

Principal of Westminster Hall Stanton Olinger, B. D. 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

Social Theodora Grove 

Program .....Eleanor Draper 

Membership Howard Marchbanks 

Finance Annabella Crawford 

Church Cooperation Anne Malott 

Hospitality Gordon Smith 



Page 266 



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Plymouth Guild 




Woolsey Rutherford Alford Meissner 

Ward Olney E. Strahm Angevine B, Strahm 

The purpose in organizing Plymouth Guild in Kansas University was to provide a means 
by which the students who belong to the Congregational church, or have Congregational 
preference, might become better acquainted with each other. 

The Guild holds regular monthly meetings of a social character, usually at the home of 
some member of the church. 

The guild was organized March 12, 1911. 

OFFICERS 1912 

President Leland Angevine 

First Vice-President ...Estelle Strahm 

Second Vice-President Lawrence Rutherford 

Secretary ...Carrie Woolsey 

Treasurer Lawrence Meissner 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES 

Entertainment Sylvia Alford 

Social Vivian Strahm 

Membership Avery Olney 



Page 267 



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My K. U. Girl 

Crimson ribbon. 

Eyes of blue. 
Are my memories of you, 
Tinge my vision of the days 
We sauntered through, up Oread- ways. 

My girl of old K. U! 

How your glances. 

How a curl 
Red-banded, set my heart a whirl! 
And still that crimson and that blue 
Bring Alma Mater back — and you. 

My Kansas girl! 



-Gale Gossett '12. 



Page 268 



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The Pan-Hellenic Council 

The Pan-Hellenic Association of the University of Kansas was organized in 1907. The object 
of the association is to promote good feeling and a closer relationship between the general national 
fraternities, regulate and control inter-fraternity affairs and to advance the interests of the fraternities 
together with those of the University. 

The association is governed by a council of two representatives from each of the eight general 
fraternities having chapters in the university. The organization has met with great success, in- 
stilling a broad and fair-minded spirit of fraternalism such as prevails in few other institutions. The 
council has charge of inter-fraternity base-ball and debate, puts on a Pan-Hellenic smoker each year 
and provides entertainment for visitors at inter-collegiate athletic meets. 

This year the council with overwhelming success has enforced regulations which have materially 
improved the scholarship of the fraternities, and has also initiated a movement for the curtailment 
of unnecessary social expense. 

OFFICERS 

President Sigma Nu 

Vice-President Alpha Tau Omega 

Secretary Beta Theta Pi 

Treasurer Phi Gamma Delta 

MEMBERS 









Beta Theta Pi 

Donald McKay 
Bruce Hurd 

Phi Kappa Psi 

George Stuckey 
Robert Campbell 

Phi Gamma Delta 
Watson Campbell 
A. S. VanEman 

Phi Delta Theta 
Gilbert Frith 
Russell Clark 



Sigma Nu 

Burton Sears 
Alex Johnson 

Sigma Chi 

Melvin J. Kates 
Willis Bramwell 

Alpha Tau Omega 

A. H. Mangelsdorf 
Floyd Fisher 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Rialto Darrough 
Raymond Stocton 



Page 271 






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Beta Theta Pi 

Founded at Miami University, 1839. Alpha Nu Chapter installed January 9, 1873. 
Publication: "The Beta Theta Pi." Colors: Light Pink and Blue. Flower: La France Rose. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
SENIORS 



Robert Lee, A. B., Lawrence 

James Daniels, B. S., Kansas City, Mo. 

Howard Wikoff, L. L. B., Oneida 



R. Donald McKay, A. B., Girard 
Ross Parker, B. S., Kansas City, Mo. 
Alston McCarty, L. L. B., Emporia 



JUNIORS 

Lewis Buxton, Kansas City, Mo. Henry Campion, Leavenworth 

Bruce Hurd, Abilene R. G. Allison, Clay Center 

James Schwab, Enid, Oklahoma Charles Ebnother, Downs 

George Murphy, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Lewis Keplinger, Kansas City, Kans. 

Allen Wilber, Kansas City, Mo. William Allen, Lawrence 

Young Mitchell, Tulsa, Oklahoma 

SOPHOMORES 

Lawrence Peairs, Lawrence Glenn Allen, Lawrence 

Lawrence W. Kinnear, Kansas City, Mo. Arthur Perry, Kansas City, Mo. 

Huntsman Haworth, Lawrence Sidney Walker, Holton 

FRESHMEN 

WilHam Schwinn, Wellington Raymond Ebnother, Downs 

Victor Housholder, Columbus Arthur Weaver, Lawrence 

Delmer M. Buckley, Kansas City, Mo. Oliver Atherton, Emporia 

Ben Sweeny, Kansas City, Mo. Martin Goldsworthy, Hancock, Michigan 

PLEDGE 

Henry Anderson, Kansas City, Mo. 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Arthur H. Boynton 
E. F. Stimpson 
David L. Patterson 
William H. Johnson 



William H. Carruth 
Olin Templin 
Erasmus Haworth 



Wallace C. Payne 
Earl W. Murray 
William F. Kuhn 



W. Irving Hill 
E. E. Melvin 
Chas. S. Finch 
Ogden S. Jones 

Page 273 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Fred L. Morris 
William H. Pendleton 
Max F. Wilhelmi 
Robert C. Rankin 



Ervin C. Ross 
Julius G. Uhrlaub 
Samuel Weatherby 
Lawrence Smith 




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Founded at Jefferson College, Canonsburg, Pa., 1852. 
Kansas Alpha Chapter installed February 19, 1876. 
Publication: "The Shield." Colors: Lavender and Pink. 



Flower: Sweet Pea. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



SENIORS 



George H. Stuckey, A. B., Formosa 
George H. Hill, B. S., Paola 



Ledrue G. Carter, A. B., Lawrence 
Arthur S. Humphrey, A. B., Junction City 



JUNIORS 

H. Charles Dolde, Leavenworth Charles C. Younggreen, Topeka 

Sam Bierer, Jr., Hiawatha Harold D. Evans, Kansas City, Mo. 

Edwin A. Van Houten, Topeka Lewis M. Sawyer, Jr., Norton 

Findley P. Graham, Hiawatha Carl A. Delaney, Waterville 

Robert J. Campbell, Kansas City, Mo. 

SOPHOMORES 

Claud H. Nigh, lola John C. Musselman, Lawrence 

Charles W. Tholen, Leavenworth George H. Edwards, Jr., Kansas City, Mo. 

Charles E. Strickland, Junction City Ralph Yoeman, Kingman 



FRESHMEN 



Lawrence B. Morris, Junction City 
Caleb F. Bowron, Hiawatha 
James Ray Blacker, Kansas City, Mo. 
Ray J. Folks, Linwood 



William Ainsworth, Lyons 
Frank E. Bolin, Junction City 
Charles L. Milton, Lawrence 
Karl B. Spangler, Lawrence 



PLEDGES 

Clarence E, Falls, Kansas City, Mo. Edwin C. Meservey, Jr., Kansas City, Mo. 

Scott Griesa, Lawrence 



Frank O. Marvin 
Frank W. Blackmar 
Frank H. Hodder 



George E. Esterley 
William Griesa 
Nathaniel E. Berry 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Charles G. Dunlap 
Miles W. Sterling 
E. B. Cowgill 

FRATRES IN URBE 

Herbert B. BuUene 
Brinton Woodward 
Arthur M. Spalding 



C. A. Haskins 
Ralph H. Spotts 
Adolph J. Spangler 



Joseph Ramsey 
John Robertson, Jr. 



Page 275 



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Phi Gamma Delta 

Founded at Williams and Jefferson College 1848. 

Pi Deuteron Chapter installed October 29, 1881. 

Publication: "The Phi Gamma Delta." 

Color: Royal Purple. 

Flower: Heliotrope. 

Chapter Publication: "The Jayhawker Fiji." 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

Watson Campbell, M. D., Attica John A. Williams, A. B., Buffalo, N. Y. 

A. S. Van Eman, A. B., Leavenworth 

JUNIORS 

Herbert C. Sommers, Abilene Walter J. Trousdale, Newton 

Paul D. Surber, Independence Samuel B. StoU, Des Moines, la. 

William A. Buzick, Sylvan Grove William Q. Cain, Atchison 

Wray E, McLain, Newton. 

SOPHOMORES 

William E. Hinesley, Lawrence Joseph B. Bishop, Lawrence 

Charles R. Greenlees, Lawrence James Parker, Independence 

Ward H. Maris, Kansas City, Mo. Ray Stemen, Kansas City, Kans. 

Claud E. Sowers, Wichita Reginald V. Williams, Buffalo, N. Y. " 

Clarence R. Sowers, Wichita 



FRESHMEN 



A. Baldwin Mitchell, Lawrence 
Robert W. Linley, Atchison 
Herbert A. Schnierle, Kansas City, Kans. 
Kenneth D. Bower, Kansas City, Kans. 



Chester L. Wurster, Wichita 
J. Randolph Kennedy, Ft. Scott 
W. Westle Fuller, Kansas City, Mo. 
Edward B. Hackney, Atchison 



PLEDGE 

Halleck I. Craig, Independence 

AFFILIATE 

Robert E. Thomas, Highland Phillip Miller, Kansas City, Kans. 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

William C. Stevens M. T. Sudler W. 0. Hamilton 

P. F. Walker George E. Putnam 



Albert D. Carrol 
Luther N. Lewis 
Russell E. Fitzpatrick 
James W. Means 
Ed. O. Perkins 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Paul A. Dinsmore 
Robert C. Manley 
F. P. Smith 
Wilder S. Metcalf 
T. Henry Fitzpatrick 



Charles Elwell 
Melville W. Wood 
Hugh Means 
Clement D. Perkins 
Samuel E. Riggs 






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Phi Delta Theta 

Founded at Miami University, Oxford Ohio, Dec. 26, 1848 
Kansas Alpha Chapter installed November 5, 1882. 
Fraternity Publications: "Scroll" and "Palladium." Chapter Publication: "Kansas Alpha News." 
Colors: Azure and Argent. Flower: White Carnation. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



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SENIORS 



Orville Warner, L. h. B., Garden City 
Charles J. Robinson, B. S., Topeka 
Frank Foncannon, A. B., Emporia 
Gilbert H. Frith L. L. B., Emporia 



Edmund O. Rhodes, B. S., Dodge City 
Ike E. Lambert, L. L. B., Emporia 
Glen Porter, L. L. B., Viola 
Arthur C. Moses, A. B., Kansas City, Mo. 



Guy R. Walker, Hutchinson 
Russel Clark, Kansas City, Mo. 



James Leidigh, Hutchinson 
Ray Zimmerman, Hiawatha 



JUNIORS 

Loren V. Brown, Kansas City, Mo. 
Ralph Seger, Topeka 

SOPHOMORES 

Clyde Adams, Topeka 
.John Detwiler, Smith Center 



FRESHMEN 



Albert DeBernardi, Kansas City, Mo. 
Paul Ketchersid, Hope 
Frank Miller, Topeka 
Leonard Hurst, Emporia 



Lewis Northrup, lola 
Ralph Lewis, Topeka 
Van Holmes, Emporia 
Philip Buck, Wichita 



PLEDGES 

Carl G. Logan, Kansas City, Mo. Charles Martin, Emporia 

William Waugh, Eskridge 



Wm. E. Higgins 



E. F. Caldwell 
B. B. Berry 
J. W. O'Bryon 



Page 279 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Dean C. H. Johnston 
W. A. White, (Regent) 

FRATRES IN URBE 

S. T. Gillespie 
Otto Barteldes 
Robert Rowlands 
Harry Allphin 



Harry Gardner 



Frank Banks 
F. H. Olney 
Clinton Kanaga 










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Si^ma Chi 



Founded at Miami University, June 28, 1855. Alpha Xi Chapter installed May 23, 1884. 

Publications: "Sigma Xi Quarterly" and "Sigma Chi Bulletin." 
Colors: Azure and Old Gold. Flower: White Rose. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



SENIORS 



Harold E. Harlan, Lawrence 

Melvin J. Kates, Newton 

Roy H. Heil, Topeka 

Harold H. Woodbury, Kansas City, Mo. 

Ira C. Snyder, Stockton 



Vance H. Day, Racine, Wisconsin 

Ted D. Relihan, Smith Center 

Wm. S. Norris, Topeka 

Charles P. Woodbury, Kansas City, Mo. 

Richard B. Ward, Belleville 



JUNIORS 



Glen Miller, Newton 

Ward Magill, Wichita 

Walter C. Eisenmayer, Springfield 



Amos Smith, Seneca 
SOPHOMORES 



Orlin A. Weede, Atchinson 
Roger Coolidge, Smith Center 
Roscoe C. Ward, Belleville 



Harold W. Wilson Horton 
George L. Allison, McPherson 



Bernard Caswell, Belleville 
FRESHMEN 



Willis K. Bramwell, Belleville 
A. W. Hosier, Kansas City, Mo. 



Wm. L. Butler, Kansas City, Mo. 
Frank L. Russell, Lawrence 
Walter B. Martin, Lawrence 
Arthur D. Fulton, Kansas City, Mo. 



Frank E. Hissem, Ellsworth 
Lawrence P. Smith, Kansas City, Kans. 
Ivan W. Dibble, Topeka 
Ott L. Connell, Topeka 



CUflford C. Young 



Rev. Evan A. Edwards 
Edward B. Schall 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

DeWitt C. Croissant 
FRATRES IN URBE 



Dr. W. S. Sutton 



Page 281 



F. Henry Perkins 



Roy A. Henley 
Dr. Carl Phillips 



Robert B. Wagstaff 
Perry B. Barber 
Jos. W. Schultz 



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Founded at the Virginia Military Institute, 1869. Nu Chapter installed 1884. 
Publication: "The Delta." Colors: Black, White and Gold. Flower: White Rose. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

POST GRADUATE 

Burton P. Sears, L. L. B., Lawrence 

SENIORS 

Van M. Martin, L. L. B., Hutchinson Karl E. Moore, A. B., Inman 

Fred W. Ott, Hamilton Alexander Johnson, L. L. B., Okmulgee, Okla. 

Walter S. Rice, L. L. B., Smith Center Cleve Swenson, L. L. B., Junction City 

Ben W. Davis, Eskridge 



Wilbur L. Beauchamp, Holton 
Walter Boehm, Hutchinson 



JUNIORS 

Leland M. Ewers, Topeka 

Thomas W. Twyman, Independence, Mo. 

SOPHOMORES 



Webster W. HoUoway, Hutchinson 



Wilbur Betournay, Concordia 
Owen C. Cline, Concordia 
Harold J. Higley, Sterling 
Charles Spellings, Martin, Tenn. 



John S. Codding, Westmoreland 

FRESHMEN 

Beecher Breyfogle, Chanute 
Wayne Fowler, Chanute 
Lloyd Jackson, Chanute 
Arnold C. Todd, Halstead 



PLEDGES 

Waldo Banker, Russell Charles Smith, Stockton 

Amos Wilson, Leavenworth Paul Richardson, Medicine Lodge 

Frank Cook, Medicine Lodge Clifford Lindley, Medicine Lodge 

Richard Williams, Concordia 



Walter Boehm 



Page 283 



AFFILIATES 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Elmer F. Engle 



Thomas W. Twyman 









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Alpha Tau Ome^a 



Founded at the Virginia Military Institute, September 11, 1865. 

Gamma Mu Chapter installed November 8, 1901. 

Publication: "The Palm." Colors. Sky Blue and Old Gold Flower: White Tea Rose. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

SENIORS 



Elmer H. Dittmar, A B , Clay Center 
Donald C. Martindell, L. L. B., Lawrence 



Albert H Mangelsdorf, B S., Atchinson 
Geoffrey W. Miller, L. L. B., St. Marys 



JUNIORS 



Floyd E. Fischer, Wamego 

John M. Clauser, Kansas City, Mo. 

Curtis E. Hostetler, Belleville 



Milton C. Minor, Douglas 
Lynn Konantz, Ft. Scott 
George A. Holliday, Topeka 



Vinton Jones, Kansas City, Mo. 



Fletcher Haskin, Frankfort 
Claire O'Donnell, Ellsworth 
John R. Emery, Seneca 
Harold P. Calhoun, Ft. Scott 



I. J. Brook, Lawrence 

SOPHOMORES 

Earl W. Wingart, Topeka 

FRESHMEN 

Theodore J. Rhodes, Frankfort 
Joseph C. McDonald, Beloit 
Ray E. Wright, Lyons 
Frank G. Benedict, Lawrence 



PLEDGES 



Glen P. Stotts, Yates Cneter 



Hazzard Forbes, Wathena 



J. N. Van der Vries 



Elmer C. Clark, Oswego 
FRATRES IN FACULTATE 
Herbert Emerson 
FRATRES IN URBE 



George J. Hood 



Clitus B. Hosford 



Charles F. Brook 



Page 285 



Clayton Hackman 



Leonard Hazen 
Robert Hackman 














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Si^ma Alpha Elpsilon 

Founded at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, March 9, 1856. 
Kansas Alpha Chapter installed February 14, 1904. 
Publications: "The Record" and "The Phi Alpha." Colors: Purple and Gold. Flower: Violet. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

Frank E. Davis, A. B., Lawrence William E. Hamner, L. L. B., Rosedale 

Rialdo A. Darrough.L.L.B., Kansas City, Mo. John B. Parker, A. B., Kansas City, Mo. 
Frank A. Theis, L. L. B., Kansas City, Mo. William E. Wellhouse. L. L. B., Topeka 



Hal F. Rambo, Ottawa 



JUNIORS 

Andrew A. Hamilton, Columbus 
Thomas M. Puckett, Galena 



SOPHOMORES 



A. Ray Stockton, Kansas City, Mo. 
Samuel G. Fairchild, Hutchinson 
Walter A. Lambert, Leavenworth 



M. Lee Riley, Kansas City, Kans. 
Benjamin D. Fillmore, Blue Rapids 
C. Bliss Darnell, Argentine 



FRESHMEN 



Thomas T. Taylor, Lewiston, Montana 
Edgar C. Welsh, Kansas City, Mo. 
William M. Howden, Skidmore, Mo. 



Albert S. Teed, Hutchinson 

G. Kenneth Hamilton, Kansas City, Mo. 

William H. Pool, Galena 



PLEDGES 



William H. Biddle, Leavenworth 
Robert Galer, Guthrie, Oklahoma 



Chester A. Dunham, Galena 
Edwin Coombs, Kansas City, Mo. 



Merle Thorpe 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Frederick Kester 



W. A Whitaker 



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Pi Upsilon 

Founded at the University of Kansas April 26, 1909. Publication: "The Quarterly." 
Colors: Old Gold and Dark Green. Flower: White Carnation. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

POST GRADUATES 

Clanrolde A. Burnett, A. B., '09, Girard 
Benjamin E. White, A. B., '11, Topeka 



E. R. Weidlein, A. B., '09, A. M., '10, Ph, D., '13 

Augusta. 
Fred W. Bruckmiller, A. B., '11, A. M., '13, 

Kansas City, Mo. 



SENIORS 

George F. Beezley, L. L. B., Girard George M. Brown, B. S., Pleasanton 

Carl L. Cannon, A. B., Lawrence R. Lee Hoffman, A. B., '12, M. D., '14, Ellsworth 

John C. Johnson, A. B., '12, M. D., '14, Formoso 



JUNIORS 



Frank L. Carson, Ashland 
Hale S. Cook, Kansas City, Mo. 
Russell S. Bracewell, Kincaid 



Cale W. Carson, Ashland 
Willard D. Murphy, Lawrence 



Chester C. Cassingham, Warrensburg, Mo. 

Earl Potter, Salina 

Ray L. Eldridge, Ellsworth 



FRESHMEN 



Frank B. Henderson, Kansas City, Mo. 
Wayne A. Ridgeway, Kansas City, Kans. 



PLEDGE 

Orin T. Potter, Kansas City, Mo. 

PRATER IN FACULTATE 

William L. Burdick 



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Founded at the University of Kansas, January, 1911. 
Colors: Purple and White. 




ACTIVE MEMBERS 

POST GRADUATE 

F. Dean Schnacke, A. B., A. M., Topeka 



SENIORS 



Spencer L. Baird, L. L. B., Dodge City 
Arch. R. MacKinnon, B. S., Lawrence 
Roscoe R. Redmond, A. B., Ottawa 



Clark A. Wallace, L. L. B., Kingman 
Adrian Davenport, B. S., Nashville, 111. 
Will A. Moore, A. B., Chapman 



Walter A. Davenport, Nashville, 111. 
Elmer L, Whitney, Talmage 
J. Calvin Morrow, Washington 

Charles L. 



JUNIORS 

DeWitt Mickey, Junction City 
William F. Price, Topeka 
Thomas P. Hennessy, Fulton 
Edwards, Hazelton 



SOPHOMORES 



Robert S. Dinsmore, Jr., Troy 

Donald M. Rankin, Paola 

Harvey A. Phillips, Greeley Colorado 



Chris. G. Curray, Larned 
Chester A. Badger, Overbrook 
John S. Butler, Kansas City, Mo. 



FRESHMEN 






Page 291 



Floyd F. Minger, Sabetha 
Ralph S. Busch, Junction City 
Wilbur G. Gillett, Kingman 

George B. 



Karl R. Ziegelasch, Junction City 
Adna E. Palmer, Kingman 
Clyde S. Constant, Lawrence 
Harrell, Washington 



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Sasnak 



Founded at the University of Kansas, May 1, 1911. 
Colors: Olive Green and White. Flower: Narcissus. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

SENIOR 

Walter H. Hoffman, A. B., Enterprise Louis A. LaCoss, Lawrence 

Alonzo R. Buzick, Lawrence 



JUNIORS 



John C. Hoffman, Enterprise 
Glen C. Calene, Sylvan Grove 
William H. Hughes, Lawrence 



Charles A. Hill, Moline 
E. Wilson Davis, Chapman 
C. Earl Hawes, Augusta 



SOPHOMORES 



Fred H. Campbell, Poplar Bluffs, Montana 
Ross M. Beamer, Parsons 
Roy S. Springer, ElDorado 



L. Lloyd Smith, Chanute 
Leo S. Madlem, Lawrence 
Dan H. Campbell, Tulsa, Okla. 



FRESHMEN 



Chester H. Francis, Cherryvale 
Ward V. Hatcher, Cherryvale 



Guy Van Schriltz, Coldwater 
John W. Hamilton, Columbus 



Ralph E. Wiley, ElDorado 

Clay S. Simpson, Kansas City, Mo. 



PLEDGES 



Floyd Danskin, Aulne, Kans. 
Earl Killarney, Atchison 



Page 293 



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Si^ma Delta Phi 

Founded at the University of Kansas, October 24, 1909. 
Colors: Garnet and Old Gold. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

POST GRADUATE 

Edward H. Taylor, Ottawa 



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SENIORS 

Forest C. Walden, Newton 



Rex E. Welsh, Clifton 
Clayton V. Woods, Burlingame 



JUNIORS 



Furman T. Thorne, Wellsville 
Ernest W. Macy, Glen Elder 



SOPHOMORES 









Ittai A. Luke, Topeka 
Howard S. Welch, Gas City 
Richard H. Gardner, Altoona 



Lester A. Sprinkle, Topeka 
Delbert D. Finley, Wellington 
Harry B. Jenkins, Herington 



Page 295 



Robert W. Hemphill, Norton 
George B. Sammons, Sabetha 
E. Cyril Colin, Argonia 



FRESHMEN 



Lee R. Samuels, Topeka 
Carlton G. Libby, Glen Elder 
Jacob R. Mireau, Newton 









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Pi Beta Phi 

Founded at Monmouth College, 1867. Kansas Alpha Chapter installed, 1872. 

Colors: Wine and Silver Blue. Flower: Red Carnation. 

Publication: "The Arrow." 



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Helen Burdick, Lawrence 
Lucie March, Lawrence 
Helen Thomson, Emporia 
Ethel Stone, Emporia 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

Leota McFarlin, Lawrence 
Lucile Wilkinson, Muskogee, Okla. 
Hazel Butts, Wichita 
Laura Pendleton, Lawrence 
Geneva Wiley, Emporia 

JUNIORS 



Helen Pyle, Muskogee, Okla. Ethel Houston, Wichita 

Marie Willet, Hiawatha Edith Laming, Tonganoxie 

Marion Ellis, Kansas City, Kans. ^ Sylvia Abraham, Kansas City, Mo. 

Helen Pendleton, Lawrence 



SOPHOMORES 



Berenice Butts, Wichita 
Adrienne Atkinson, Lawrence 



Irma Spangler, Lawrence 
FRESHMEN 



Charline Smith, Lawrence 
Lucile Smith, Kansas City, Mo. 



Genevieve Herrick, Kansas City, Mo. Nora Cubbon, Wichita 

Margueritte Graybill, Hutchinson Elizabeth DeBord, Kansas City, Mo. 

Maurine Fairweather, Kansas City, Mo. Constance Fennell, Kansas City, Kans. 

Mamie McFarlin, Lawrence Sophie Smithmeyer, Lawrence 

Mildred Hickman, Hutchinson 

PLEDGE 

Dorothy Porter, Topeka 
MEMBERS ON FACULTY 

May Gardner 



Hannah Oliver 



Nadine Nowlin 



Agnes Evans 
Ethel Morrow 



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Kappa Alpha Theta 



Founded at DePauw University, 1870. Kappa Chapter installed, 1881. 

Publication: "The Kappa Alpha Theta Journal." 

Colors: Black and Gold. Flower: Black and Gold Pansy. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Gale Gossett, Kansas City, Mo. 
Euphemia Smart, Ottawa 
Lena Morrow, Washington 



SENIORS 



Oreta Moore, Lawrence 
Katherine Dolman, Lawrence 
Myra Rogers, Abilene 





JUNIORS 



Frederika Hodder, Lawrence 

Lois Harger, Abilene 

Nell Carraher, Kansas City, Mo. 



Ruth Harger, Abilene 

Marie Hedrick, Kansas City, Mo. 

Bessie Anderson, Lawrence 



Vera Atkinson, Lawrence 

Beatrice NeumuUer, Kansas City, Mo. 

Pauline Murray, Wellington 



SOPHOMORES 



Adine Hall, Ottumwa, Iowa 

Marion Bedford, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Nellie Taylor, Earlville, 111. 






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FRESHMEN 

Rachel Coston, Topeka Lucille Topping, Ottawa 

Mildred James, Kansas City, Mo. Myra Stevens, Lawrence 

Elsa Barteldes, Lawrence Amarynthia Smith, Louisville, Ky. 

Ruth Lawson, Kansas City, Mo. 



AFILLIATE 

Eleanor Keith, Missouri University 



Page 301 



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Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Founded at Monmouth College, October 13, 1870. Omega Chapter installed December 17, 1883. 

PubUcation: "The Key." 
Colors: Light and Dark Blue. Flower: Fleur-de-lis. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
SENIORS 



Bertha Dack, Lyons 



Josephine Walker, Holton 
Brownie Angle, Kansas City, Kans. 



JUNIORS 



Fay Chisham, Atchison 
Mildred Pettit, Peabody 
Virginia Elward, Hutchinson 



Mira Luce, Kansas City, Mo. 
SOPHOMORES 



Florence Payne, Lawrence 
Flaud Johnson, Lawrence 
Ruth Davis, Kansas City, Mo. 



Virginia Siegel, Kansas City, Mo. 
Rue Thomson, Junction City 



Frances Meservey, Kansas City, Mo. 
Emily Berger, Halstead 



FRESHMEN 






Ruth Walker, Kansas City, Mo. 
Madeline Nachtmann, Junction City 
Helen Taber, Holton 
Helen Hornaday, Lawrence 



Crete Stewart, Kansas City, Mo. 
Ruth Smith, Seneca 
Marie Fogarty, Junction City 
Margaret Kanaga, Lawrence 



MEMBERS OF FACULTY 

Esther Wilson Mida Stanton 



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Chi Omega 



Founded at Fayetville, Arkansas, April 5, 1895. Lambda Chapter installed December 18, 1902, 

Publication: "The Eleusis." 
Colors: Cardinal and Straw. Flower: White Carnation. 






ACTIVE MEMBERS 



SENIORS 



Grace Wilkie, Wichita 
Beulah Murphy, Lawrence 
Esther Degen, Kansas City, Mo. 



Sylvia Alford, Lawrence 
JUNIORS 



Nancy Fisher, Lyons 
Helen Stevens, Parsons 
Hannah Mitchell, Lawrence 



Lina Coxedge, Parsons 
Elizabeth Dunaway, Oswego 
Helen Degen, Kansas City, Mo. 



Gladys Clark, Fredonia 
Lillian Matkins, Lawrence 
Franc Banker, Russell 
Ina Pratt, Lawrence 



SOPHOMORES 



Edith K. VanEman, Leavenworth 
Helen Hodgson, Lawrence 



Helen Rigby, Concordia 
Louise Fairchild, Topeka 
Ethel Bartberger, Merriam 
Virginia GofF, Lawrence 



Margaret Roberts, Kansas City, Mo. 
Clare Morton, Green, Kans. 



FRESHMEN 



Erna Fischer, Lawrence 
Agnes Engel, Lawrence 
Mildred Roberts, Stafford 
Gertrude Kirchoff, Lawrence 



AFILLIATE 



Page 305 



Esther Degen, Colorado University 
MEMBERS OF FACULTY 

Rose Abbot Nadia Thomas 



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Dy the death of David L. Row^Iauds, o^v^ner of 
the College Book Store, on the t>veiity-eighth 
of last March, the University lost one of its 
best friends, and the students one of its most 
loyal and enthusiastic supporters of student 
enterprises. 






Page 306 











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Phi Delta Phi 



Founded at the University of Michigan, 1869. Green Chapter installed 1897. 

Publication: "The Brief." 
Colors: Wine and Pearl Blue. Flower: Jacqueminot Rose. 






ACTIVE MEMBERS 



SENIORS 








Ira C. Snyder, Stockton 
Winn E. Holmes, Wichita 
Elmer W. Colombia, Chetopa 
Burton P. Sears, Lawrence 
J. Earl Miller, Lawrence 
Cleve L. Swenson, Junction City 



Melvin J. Kates, Newton 
Arthur H. Fast, Baldwin 
Merle V. Martin, Hutchinson 
Roscoe L. King, Marion 
Jay R. Hannah, Lawrence 
Robert R. Owens, Horton 



MIDDLES 



Kenneth K. Simmons, Baldwin 
Orlin A. Weede, Atchison 
Walter T. GrifRn, Lawrence 
Glen A. Wisdom, Kansas City, 
Henry C. Dolde, Leavenworth 
Wray E. McLain, Newton 
Louis W. Burford, Lawrence 



Kans. 



George A. HoUiday, Topeka 
I. John Brook, Blue Mound 
Harry E. Snyder, Dodge City 
William A. Allen, Lawrence 
Otis M. Edmonson, Wichita 
EUwood W. Beeson, Wichita 
Roy C. Davis, Osage City 



J. W. Green 



R. C. Manley 
J. H. Mitchell 
S. D. Bishop 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

W. E. Higgins 
H. C. Hill 



W. L. Burdick 



FRATRES IN URBE 



R. F. Rice 



A. C. Mitchell 
Wilder S. Metcalf 
Henry H. Asher 



Thomas Harley 
J. W. Means 
M. A. Gorrill 
Walter Thiele 



Page 309 




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Founded at the University of Michigan, 1904. Gimel Chapter installed November, 1904. 

Publication: "The Journal." 
Colors: Black and Gold. Flower: Acacia. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



SENIORS 



Jay E. Bond, A. B., L. L. B., Lawrence 
Charles C. Curtis, L. L. B., Lawrence 
Jean G. Hall, A. B., Waterville 
Reginald P. Jackman, L. L. B., Wichita 
Levi L. Kabler, LL. B., Kingman 
George C. Magatagan, B. S. 
Ernest R. Smith, Ph. C, Hartford 

Harry E. Weaver, A. 



Roy A. Porterfield, B. S., Baldwin 
Jesse T. Gephart, A. B., Oskaloosa 
Ross E. Hall, B. S., Hutchinson 
Jake O. Jones, B. S. 
Francis H. Long, A. B., Madison 
Walter R. Schreiner, B. S., Frankfort 
George S. Snoddy, A. B., Emporia 
B., Lawrence 



JUNIORS 



Don J. Douseman, Kansas City, Mo. 
Philo H. Halleck, Abilene 
Clyde O. Hornbaker, Castleton 
Robert L. Sellers, Paola 



Otis M. Edmonson, Wichita 
Richard G. Hepworth, Burlingame 
Ralph S. Johnson, Lawrence 
Grin M. Rhine, Washington 



SOPHOMORE 

Wallace C. Magathan, Marion 

FRESHMAN 

Roy D. Grayson, Oskaloosa 



AFFILIATES 



E. Ward Tillotson, Yale University 



W. A. Whitaker, Jr., Colombia 



Wm. L. Burdick 
F. W. Bushong 
H. W. Emerson 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

George O. Foster 
Wm. E. Higgins 
H. W. Humble 
F. O. Marvin 



J. S. Amick 
Frank P. Brock 



W. G. Thiele 



FRATRES IN URBE 

Dave M. Horkman 
T. E. Linton 



F. N. Raymond 
N. P. Sherwood 
A. H. Sluss 



W. F. March 
B. O. Parcels 



Archie J. Weith 



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Founded at Ann Arbor Michigan, 1882. Beta Theta Chapter installed February 6, 1909. 

Publication: "The Bulletin." Colors: Wine and White. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



SENIORS 



C. C. Denny, B. S., '07, M. D., '12, Baldwin 
Virgil W. McCarty, A. B., '09, A. M., '10, 

M. D., '12, Kansas City, Mo. 
Clyde Magill, M. D., Wichita 



Joseph W. Myers, Galva 



Guy Finney, A. B., 10', M. D., '12, Wamego. 
E. F. Gibson, A. B., '08, A. M., '10, M. D., 

'12, Kansas City, Mo. 
W. T. Fitsimmons, A. B., '10, M. D., '12, 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Delbert 0. Smith, Minneapolis 



SOPHOMORES 



John C. Johnson, Formosa James E. Henshall, Osborne 

Homer A. Alexander, Nickerson Watson Campbell, Attica 

Clarence E. Earnest, Washington Frank A. Trump, Formosa 

Cyril E. Sheppard, Wellsville 



FRESHMEN 



Roland M. Athay, Kiowa 
Guy R. Duer, Nickerson 



J. Elden Sawhill, Concordia 
Victor E. Chesky, Nickerson 



ALPHA SIGMA (PLEDGE SOCIETY) 

Ray Stemen, Kansas City, Kans. Robert Davis, Kansas City, Kans. 

Phil D. Miller, Kansas City, Kans. 



Mervin T. Sudler, Ph.D.,M.D. 
F. E. Murphy, M. D. 
R. D. Irland, M. D. 
George M. Gray, M. D. 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

W. L. McBride, M. D. 
P. F. Bohan, M. D. 
H. E. Emerson,Ph.C.,B.S. 
D. C. Guffey, M. D. 



J. E. Sawtell, M. D. 
J. G. Hayden, M. D. 
H. P. Kuhn, A. M., M. D. 
C. H. Heuser, A. B., A. M. 



Page 313 



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Phi Alpha Delta 

Founded at the Chicago Kent College of Law, 1897. 
James Woods Green Chapter installed April 29, 1909. 
Publication: "The Phi Alpha Delta." Colors: Old Gold and Purple. Flower: 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 



Carnation. 



SENIORS 



George F. Beezley, Girard 
Clyde B. Harrold, Ponca City, Okla. 
Frank M. Hyames, Lawrence 
Willis J. Masemore, Sterling 
Geoffrey W. Miller, St. Marys 
Richard E. Mcintosh, Burns 
Leland M. Resler, Shaw, Kans. 
Byron L. Shinn, Chanute 



Hugh H. Adair, Lawrence 
Clanrolde A. Burnett, Girard 
Carl S. Hicks, Lawrence 
Roy O. Lindsay, Gilman City, Mo. 
Paul B. Nees, Independence 
Francis D. Schnacke, Topeka 



Alonzo R. Buzick, Lawrence 
Edward C. Colin, Argonia 
Paul P. McCaskill, Parsons 
William H. Poole, Galena 
Paul H. Royer, Abilene 



William E. Hamner, Rosedale 

G. Thurman Hill, Independence 

R. Carl Israel, Wichita 

Elmer H. Mattingly, Ponca City, Okla. 

Donald Muir, Harper 

Glen W. Porter, Wichita 

Karl V. Shawver, Oswatomie 

Clark A. Wallace, Kingman 



MIDDLES 



George L. Brown, Atchinson 
Ulysses A. Gribble, Arkansas City 
William M, Hughes, Lawrence 
Charles F. Maris, Cleveland, Okla. 
Frank W. Nesbit, Garnett 
Clifford Sullivan, Burrton 



PLEDGES 



John Riling 
Thurman Fitzpatrick 

Page 315 



James F. Crow, Kansas City, Mo. 

PRATER IN FACULTATE 

Professor H. W. Humble 

FRATRES IN URBE 

Jasper B. Wilson 
Nathaniel C. Berry 



Arthur Baker, Chanute 

J, S. Kent, Hutchinson 

Louis LaCoss, Lawrence 

Alva F. Lindsay, Gilman City, Mo. 

Guy W. VonSchriltz, Coldwater 



Harry Allphin 
John W. Robertson 






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Alpha Chi Si^ma 

Founded at the University of Wisconsin, 1898. Kappa Chapter installed May 29, 1909. 
Publication: "The Hexagon." Colors: Prussian Blue and Chrome Yellow. Flower: Red Carnation. 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 
GRADUATES 



Edwin R. Weidlein, A. B., A. M., Agusta 
Ivan W. Humphrey, A. B., Russell 
C. A. Nash, A. B., A. M., Lawrence 



John P. Trickey, Lawrence, A. B, 
W. E. Vawter, B. S., Oswatomie 
F. W. Bruckmiller, A. B., Lawrence 



SENIORS 



Gilbert A. Bragg, B. S., St. Joseph, Mo 
Edmund 0. Rhodes, B. S., Dodge City 



Truman M. Godfrey, B. S., Kansas City, Mo. 
Howard N. Calderwood, Jr., B. S., Kansas 
City, Kans. 

Edward F. Kohman, A. B., Dillon Charles J. Robinson, B. S., Topeka 

Walter V. Culhson, A. B., Mulberry WiUiam V. Miller, A. B., Lawrence 

Worth H. Rodebush, A. B. Riley 

JUNIORS 

James D. Malcomson, Kansas City, Mo. George O. Peterson, Lawrence 

James W. Schwab, Enid, Okla. 

SOPHOMORE 

James L. Bennett, Carthage, Mo. 
PLEDGES 



Oscar A. Harder, Lawrence 



Harold J. Brownlee, Stafford 



E. H. S. Bailey 

F. B. Dains 
H. C. Allen 



L. V. Redman 



Page 317 



FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

R. K. Duncan 
F. W. Bushong 
C. C. Young 

FRATRES IN URBE 

E. W. Tillotson 

F. P. Brock 



H. P. Cady 

W. A. Whitaker, Jr. 

Harry Gardner 



A. J. Weith 



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Phi Beta Pi 

Founded at the University of Pittsburg, 1891. Alpha Iota Chapter installed March 18, 1910. 

Publication: "Phi Beta Pi Quarterly." 
Colors: Green and White. Flower: Crysanthemum. 

ACTIVE_MEMBERS 

POST GRADUATE 

Clarence L. Zugg, M. D., Kansas City, Kans. 



SENIORS 



Fred H. Morelly, Kansas City, Kans. 
Frank L. Flack, Longton 



Martin L. Brakebill, Savonburg 
Patrick H. Owens, Carlton 



JUNIORS 



Theodore H. Aschmann, Inman 
Arthur E. Hale, Kansas City, Kans. 



Charles M. Gruber, Hope 
Walter O. Quiring, Newton 



Harry C. Berger, Halstead 
Robert L. Hoffmann, Ellsworth 
Charles S. Kubik, Caldwell 



SOPHOMORES 

Frank Foncannon, Emporia 
Ray E. Hoskins, Lawrence 
Warren M. Miller, Sabetha 



FRESHMEN 

Glen H. Broyles, Bethany, Mo. James R. Elliott, Linn 

Ersel M. Fessenden, Emporia Edwin C. Schmidt, Moundridge 

Paul M. Drake, Plymouth, Idaho John R. Campbell, Meade 

John A. Sterling, Carlton John E. Castles, Fort Morgan, Colo. 

George T. Twyman, Independence, Mo. Don R. Black, Columbus 

Wm. S. Nichols, Arkansas City Elwood A. Sharp, Council Grove 

PLEDGES 

Herbert Coleman, Lawrence Howard S. Welsch, Gas, Kans. 

Howard Marchbanks, Pittsburg Watie M. Alberty, Westville, Okla. 

Wilbur A. Baker, Woodston 

FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Samuel S. Glasscock Henry H. Look John W. Perkins 

Clarence B. Francisco Andrew W. McAllister Andrew L. Skoog 

Arthur E. Hertzler Clifford C. Nesselrode Walter S. Sutton 

William K. Trimble Isadore J. Wolf 

Page 319 



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Si^ma Delta Chi 



Founded at DePauw University, 1909. 
Beta Chapter installed, 1910. 
Colors: White and Black. 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



I 



SENIORS 

Clark A. Wallace, LL. B., Kingman Geoffrey W. Miller, LL. B., St. Marys 

Ellis^W. Davidson, A. B., Lawrence John A. Williams, A. B., Lawrence 

Louis LaCoss, A. B., Lawrence 



JUNIORS 

Russell H. Clark, Kansas City, Mo. Robert Sellers, Paola 

George W. Marsh, Kincaid 






SOPHOMORES 

George H. Edwards, Kansas City, Mo. Stanley R. Pinkerton, Olathe 

James Leidigh, Hutchinson 



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FRATRES IN FACULTATE 

Merle Thorpe Joseph W. Murray 








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Mu Phi Epsilon 



Founded at the Metropolitan College of Music, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, 1903. 
Xi Chapter installed April 12, 1911. 
Publication: "The Mu Phi Epsilon." 
Colors: Purple and White. 
Flower: Violet. 



Clara Hase, Lawrence 
Gertrude^Cooper, Peabody 



ACTIVE MEMBERS 



POST GRADUATES 



Creola Forde, Lawrence 
Kate Caldwell, Lawrence 



SENIORS 



Josephine McCamman, Lawrence 
Olive Buchanan, Chanute 
Ethel Corle, Lawrence 
Cora Reynolds, Lawrence 
Jessie Holcomb, Parsons 



Audrey Harshberger, Lawrence 
Marie Shuey, Lawrence 
Ethel Hess, Alma 
Mary Morin, Williamstown 
Esther Shaw 



JUNIORS 



Margarete Frederick, Bonner Springs Edith Bideau, Chanute 

Gladys Henry, Lawrence 



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Edna Lyon, Lawrence 
Helen Woolsey, Lawrence 



SOPHOMORES 



Fay Blair, Spring Hill 
Rhea Wilson, Lawrence 



SPECIAL 

Ruth Wells 




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Harriette Greissinger 
Maude Cook 



MEMBERS ON FACULTY 

Louise Wiedemann 
Maude Miller 



Anna Sweeney 
Blanche Lyons 




Hazel Styles 



ALUMNAE 

Elva Sanders 



Lyla Edgerton 



Page 323 



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Hutt McFarland Amick Gilbert 

Schuchart Calene HoUoway Dawson 

Achoth 

Founded at Lincoln, Nebraska, March 5, 1910. 
Daleth Chapter, organized March 13, 1912. 
Colors: Sapphire Blue and White. 
Flower: Lily of the Valley. 

8 

ACTIVE MEMBERS 

SENIORS 

Leona Calene, Sylvan Grove 

SOPHOMORES 

Mary^Schuchart, Waterville Hazel Dawson, St. John 

FRESHMEN 

Genevieve Gilbert, Waterville Florence Totten 

PLEDGE 

Grace Terrell, Gardner, Kans. 

HONORARY MEMBERS 

Mrs. J. S. Amick, Lawrence Miss Nelle McFarland, Lawrence 

Miss Anna Hutt, Lawrence 

ALUMNI 

M. Fay HoUoway, Lawrence 



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Phi Beta Kappa 



Founded at the College of "William and Mary, Dec. 5, 1776. 




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The United Chapters 

President. Professor Edwin Augustus Grosvenor, L. L. D., Amherst, Mass. 
Vice-President. Col. John James McCook, L. L. D., New York, N. Y. (Deceased) 
Secretary and Treasurer... Re v. Oscar McMurtrie Voorhees, A. M., New York, N. Y. 



The Alpha of Kansas 

OFFICERS FOR 1911—1912 



President 

Vice-President. 

Secretary 

Treasurer 



.W. L. Burdick, Ph. D. 
Alberta A. Corbin, Ph. D. 
.James A. Campbell, A. M. 
Richard R. Price, A. M. 



Members Elected From the Class of 1912 



Maelynette Aldrich 
Gertrude Blackmar 
Don Louis Davis 
Gertrude Figley 
Myrtle Greenfield 
Lucile Kellerman 
William Vernon Miller 
Worth Huff Rodebush 
Grace Wilkie 



Homer Agustus Alexander 
Helen Salisbury Burdick 
Chester George Farnsworth 
Irene May Garrett 
Edith Irene Haight 
Edward Frederick Kohman 
Evalyne Ragsdale 
Julia Anne Simms 
Elizabeth Kreps Wilson 



Elva Black 

Fay Carmichael 

Argeline Figley 

Gale Galbaugh Gossett 

Mary Ise 

Lucie Miles March 

Jennie May Richardson 

Patti Sankee 



Page 326 






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The Football Season 



In the Spring of 1911 there were not a few dubious and disgusted football "fans" at the 
University of Kansas, A new system of coaching was to be introduced, the new ruling com- 
pelling all coaches to be members of the faculty. Consequently Kansas was to have a new 
football coach, and when the fans looked back on the records of the teams developed under 
the leadership of Kennedy and Mosse, they doubted the wisdom of the change and did not 
hesitate to say so. The new coach was to come from the East. He would not know the 
western style of football, nor would he get acquainted with the men until the first game was 
almost upon them. No wonder they did not like the change. 

Accordingly when the season of 1911 was ended with two defeats and two "ties" chalked 
up against the Jayhawkers, those who followed the game most closely were not surprised. 
They had not expected a great season with the handicap under which the team and the coaches 
had begun work. They had been frankly skeptical, at beginning the of the season, but when 
it was passed they were equally warm in their praise of the coach. They had seen what it was 
to build up a team not just join one together. They had seen the new coach work the largest 
squad of men ever out for a football team. As the fans saw the new men instructed in the 
rudiments of the game, and slowly developed from raw material into skilled players, they 
realized that the new coach knew football, and moreover was able to teach it to new men — a 
valuable asset for any coach. 

The fact that Kansas had a new coach lent to the interest of the game and spirit ran high 
throughout the season. The action of the students in buying the red K. blankets for the team 
shows that the Kansas spirit is backed by something more substantial than mere rooting. 

Taking it all in all last season was a hard season, one of change not only in coaches but 
of men, also in the attitude of the regents and the University authorities toward football. 
We have now passed into a new epoch of cooperation between the authorities and athletics, 
and athletics stands to gain by it. It means more to the men, more money to work with, 
better equipment and better spirit. Athletics are essentially student affairs, and ought to be 
largely controlled by the men but nevertheless, the cooperation and favor of the University 
authorities is an asset too valuable to be disregarded, and once secured will do much to make 
Kansas as far as athletics are concerned "The Yale of the West." 



THE SCORES 



Kansas 





Kansas 


46 


Kansas 


6 


Kansas 


11 


Kansas 


14 


Kansas 





Kansas . 





Kansas 


3 



Baker 

St. Mary's 

K. S. A. C. 

Drake 3 

Washburn 6 

Oklahoma 3 

Nebraska 29 

Missouri 3 






Page 332 




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Football "K" Men 1911 






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Earl Ammons, Arkansas City 

Ellis Davidson, Lawr nee 

Spencer Baird, Dodge City 

Roy Heil, Topeka 

Charles Woodbury, Kansas City, Mo. 

William Price, Topeka 

Harold Brownlee, Sylvia 

Carl Delaney, Waterville 

James Coolidge, Smith Center 

Willis Bramwell, Bellville 

William Weidlein, Lawrence 

James Schwab, Kansas City, Mo. 

James Daniels, Kansas City, Mo. 

Ben Davis, Eskridge 






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TRACK K MEN-1911 



Harry Hamilton 
Harry Osborne 
Harold Woodbury 
Harold F. Wilson 
L. B. Robert 
Oliver Patterson 

TENNIS K 
Paul Nees 
Glenn Hawes 



Clem Parker 
Charles Woodbury 
William French 
Earl Ammons 
James Schwab 
Ray Watson 
MEN-1911 
H. L. Richardson 
William Rohrer 



BASE BALL K MEN-1911 



James Smith 
Carl Hicks 
Charles Haller 
John Farrel 
William Buzick 

BASKETBALL 
George Stuckey 
Ora Hite 
Walter Boehm 



Glenn Porter 
Richard Ward 
Glenn Wilhelm 
WiUiam Locke 
Aston McCarty 
K MEN-1912 
Loren Brown 
Charles Greenlees 
L. L. Smith 






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Basket Ball 



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The 1912 basketball season was started with only two K men in suits and when Captain 
Dousman left school early in the season the team was left with only one man, who had played 
on the varsity before. This was an unusual circumstance for Kansas, because heretofore 
they have had three or four old men back. 

However there was no scarcity of material, and some of the men had seen long service in 
high-schools. Seventy-five men reported for the team the first of the year, and the coach 
had his hands full cutting this number down to one that could work out on the court. After 
a long period of elimination a team was obtained which proved to be one of the fastest that 
Kansas has ever put on a court. 

The early practice of the team was much interfered with by the enforced holidays, and as 
a result, the team was not working well, early in the season. Baker was the first opponent 
and they were easily disposed of. Nebraska however was a harder proposition. They were 
a "beefy" bunch and it seemed that they came down with the idea of taking the games rather 
than winning them. They succeeded in their intention. 

After these two games the team was enabled to get some much needed steady practice, 
and the men began to work together better with the result that they won every game played 
on the home court for the remainder of the season. On the first trip, they won two games 
from Missouri, and one from Washington, losing the first to the latter school which was as 
much as was expected from the team on that trip. But on the trip north the Jayhawker had 
different luck. It is needless to say more of the results of the game or Nebraska's or Stiehm's 
refusal to play off the tie for the championship. In justice to the coach and the team, it is 
well to remember that Kansas's chances at a championship must not be determined by the 
results of the last two games played. The class of 1912 never knew the Kansas Basket Ball team 
except as Missouri Valley Champions, and they will stand by the Coach and the team in their 
refusal to "concede" any body a championship for 1912. 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE, 1912 

Baker 18 Kansas .45 Lawrence Washington ..16 Kansas ..43 

Nebraska 30 Kansas .26 Lawrence Washington .22 Kansas .30 

Nebraska 30 Kansas .26 Lawrence Missouri 24 Kansas .39 

Baker 13 Kansas .34 Baldwin Missouri 25 Kansas ..32 

Aggies 25 Kansas .37 Lawrence Washington .32 Kansas .28 

K. C. A. C. 15 Kansas .43 Lawrence Washington .26 Kansas .18 

K. C. A. C. 25 Kansas. 31 Kansas City Aggies 32 Kansas .28 

Missouri 16 Kansas .27 Lawrence Nebraska 49 Kansas .21 

Missouri 21 Kansas .31 Lawrence Nebraska 29 Kansas 28 



Lawrence 

Lawrence 

Columbia 

Columbia 

St. Louis 

St. Louis 

Manhattan 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 



Page 340 










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Baseball 

Owing to the late spring the baseball men were forced to content themselves with working 
out their porcelain arms in the gymnasium until the first of April. Both Coach Sherwin and 
Captain Hicks made attempts to secure some batting practice on the Soccer field before McCook 
was in shape but with little success. 

Nevertheless the indoor work gave the men some excellent training as it has been more 
vigorous than ever before. Coach Sherwin has set about the development of the team in his 
usual systematic manner, with good results. 

An unusually large number of men tried out last spring and with the competition and good 
coaching developed a strong nine. The number of games scheduled gave them a good oppor- 
tunity to show their ability, but the fact that there were only three Missouri Valley Conference 
Schools playing baseball made the determination of a Valley champion rather uncertain. It is 
to be hoped that sometime in the future the question of summer baseball will be settled so 
that baseball will be put on the same solid foundation as other major sports. 

Baseball Schedule 

April 9-10 — Missouri, Lawrence. 

April 13 — Emporia College, Lawrence. 

April 19-20— K. S. A. C, Manhattan. 

April 26-27— K. S. A. C, Lawrence. 

May 1 — Baker, Baldwin. 

May 4 — Emparia, Emporia. 

May 11 — St. Mary's, Lawrence. 

May 14 — William Jewell, Liberty. 

May 15 — Missouri Valley College, Marshall. 

May 16 — Westminister College, Fulton. 

May 17-18 — Missouri, Columbia. 

May 20 — Baker, Lawrence. 

May 25 —St. Mary's, St. Mary. 



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1912 Track 




At the end of the 1911 track season the prospects for the succeeding spring were unusually 
bright. Only one man, Captain Hamilton was to be lost by graduation and it was expected 
that all the other men would be back in school this year. But when school began this fall the 
track team was short many of its old stars and more were lost by the first term examinations 
so that when the season opened the material from which to make the 1912 track team while 
plentiful was rather inexperienced. 

The squad was composed of men who were wilUng to work and because of this and the skill 
of the coach in developing new men to fill in the holes left by the withdrawal of the older men 
the team started the season in fair shape. In the Baker meet the distance men gave some 
promise of unusual strength in these events and Kansas seems at last to have developed distance 
men who are leaders in the Valley. Although the Missouri meet was won by "the same old 
Tiger in the same old way" the competition was keen and as a result the meet was very inter- 
esting. 

A late start in out door work makes a guess at the strength of the team in out door meets 
rather hazardous, but it seems that with no more bad luck the team this year should close the 
season very successfully. 

TRACK SCHEDULE FOR 1912 

March 26 — Missouri at Kansas City. 

April 5 — K. C. A. C. in Kansas City. 

April 20 — Drake Relay Carnival. 

April 27 — Interclass Meet. 

May 3 — Nebraska at Lawrence. 

May 11 — Missouri at Columbia. 

May 25 — Missouri Valley Conference at Des Moines. 

June 1 — Western Conference Meet at Purdue University. 










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MISSOURI-KANSAS INDOOR MEET 
Convention Hall — March 26, 1912 



Event 


Time 


First 


Second K 


. U. 


M. U. 


50 yd. dash 


:05 2/5 


...Kirksey (M) 


Davis (K) 


3 


5 


1 mile 


4:33 3/5 


...Shockley (M) 


Patterson (K) 


3 


5 


55 yd high hurdles. 


:07 1/5 


...Heegen (K) 


Nicholson (M) 


5 


3 


440 yds 


:53 4/5 


...Bermond (M) 


Hutsell (M) 





8 


880 yds, 


2:05 4/5 


...Bermond (M) 


Fairchilds (K) 


3 


5 


High jump 


*6ft. 15^ in... 


...Nicholson (M) 


French (K) 


3 


5 


55 yd. low hurdles. .. 


:06 3/5 


...Kirksey (M) 


Nicholson (M) 





8 


Shot put 


40 ft. 1 in 


...Anderson (M) 


Thatcher (M) 





8 


2 miles 


*9:51 2/5 


...Murray (K) 


Wickham (M) 


5 


3 


Pole vault 


11 ft. 3 in 


...Cramer (K) 


Woodbury (K) 


8 





Relay 


3:34 


...Missouri 


Kansas 





5 


Total 


30 


55 


*Record. 












Missouri relay men 


Hutzell, Estes, 


Knoble, Bermond. 








Kansas relay men: 


D. Davis, Smith 


, Block, Fairchilds 













Page 352 



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Women's Athletic Association 



The Women's Athletic Association was organized February the eighth of the current year- 

'. f^ The organization was formed as the result of the demand on the part of the athletically inclined 

'4*f girls to engage in some kind of systematized sport. The Association is divided into two sides 

the Crimsons and the Blues, which contest each other in each of the Basketball is the only 

sport as yet where a championship series has been undertaken, but in tennis, a tournament 

will be held late in the spring. Baseball, volleyball and track enthusiasts take possession of 

the floor at various times and the mermaids trouble the water twice a week. Great rivalry 

exists between the Crimson and the Blues and a victory on either side is prized as is a Kansas 

Victory over Missouri. Each side has a captain for each sport and each sport has a manager 

under the supervision of Nell Martindale, who is general manager of sports. Bernice Huff 

^ , is baseball manager, Nell Martindale is basketball manager and Amarynthia Smith is manager 

X^^j of track. 

This years work is chiefly preliminary. Everything is directed towards a complete 
schedule for next year. Throughout the year there will be two sports running so as to enable 
everyone to take part in the association all the time. Tennis and swimming will open the season, 
basket ball, base ball, track and volley ball will be played during the winter months. In the 
spring, tennis and swimming will again be taken up and with these the season will close. 



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Tennis 



In spite of the incapacity of the University courts and the fact that no former "K" men 
had returned last year, interest in tennis at the University received more attention than ever 
before. 

TEAM 

C, E. Hawes, Captain H. L. Richardson, Manager P. B. Nees Wm. Rohrer 
The team was selected by means of a "Round Robin" tournament in which each aspirant 
played every other contestant, the four players winning the largest percent of games, being 
chosen to represent the University. They well cared for the responsibility extended them by 
winning from Baker, carrying off the championship of Kansas in both singles and doubles in 
the Kansas Inter-Collegiate Tournament at Topeka, and taking second place at Kansas City 
in the Missouri Valley Tournament. Only one series was lost, that against Oklahoma, owing 
to the inability of the entire team to make the trip and the development of a severely sore 
hand by Nees immediately before the game. 
Prospects for future tennis seem bright. 

TENNIS SCHEDULE 1912 

May 10, 11 — Kansas Inter-Collegiate Tournament at Baker University. 
May 17, 18 — Missouri Valley Tournament at Columbia, Missouri. 
The other games have not been arranged. 









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Early 



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May Fete 



The May Fete was introduced into University life in the spring of 1908, by the University 
Young Women's Christian Association. It came into being in answer to a long felt need for 
an out-of-door play-festival, which should be a traditional part of University life. 

The third Fete was given May 15th, 1911. The festivities began with the Grand Pageant 
led by the May Queen and her attendants, winding in and out across the campus from the 
Gymnasium to the lilac hedge in front of Fraser Hall. Here the four May-poles were erected 
and sixty girls representing the four classes gave the May-pole dance before the throne of the 
Queen. After the May-pole dance the crowd scattered to the four natural theaters where the 
rest of the performances were presented. The throng of carefree revellers was made up of 
about 3,000 spectators and over 100 performers. 

"Every condition was the best that could be conceived — a blue sky, a windless May after- 
noon, the campus fresh and lovely in the clean new greenness of early summer, and all the 
University out in holiday temper. It was a May Queen's own day. The long procession, the 
entrance of which opened the revels of the afternoon, was a gay and unique line. 

A ubiquitous master of the revels, with gaudy costume and stentorian voice; a jester in 
red and yellow; heralds with long gold trumpets and professional costume; the attendants of 
the queen in white dresses garlanded with roses; tall canopy bearers with filleted heads and 
rosy pink gowns; J;iny pages soberly holding up the queen's extensive train; the queen herself, 
gracious and smiling serenely moving to the coronation; sooty little sweeps with racuous song 
and great satisfaction in their own appearance; becrooked and bebodiced sheperdessess, with 
flowered panniers, and red and tinseled gypsies properly coquettish; dozens of Maypole 
dancers in white and green petaled overdresses; and all the jolly array of king and queens and 
courtiers and Robin Hoods and outlaws and knights and giants and an amazing dragon, all 
the actors in the plays — ^this made up the procession that wound across the campus. It was 
a gay medley. 

The May Fete brings all the elements of the University together in a wholesome sort of 
activity and jollity. It shows us the kind of beauty and charm that have not much place in 
our everyday lives. Along with the lightness and merriment, there is a regard for tradition 
that is a wholesome thing for us. We have none too much reverence for tradition. There is 
a pleasure in reviving the old, when that old had for its motive a real instinct of simple enjoy- 
ment and an impulse that was a response to natural conditions. Why should it be any more 
a natural impulse for young Greeks or young English to go out and dance on the green in the 
springtime, than for young Kansans?" 











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Opera 



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During the past twenty years operas have occasionally been given in Lawrence in which 
students and town people have cooperated. Since 1908 the School of Fine Arts and the Uni- 
versity Orchestra have united in presenting an opera each year under the direction of the Fine 
Arts faculty, only students appearing on the stage. While the work is undertaken primarily 
for the benefit of voice students, those of other departments are eligible. Five Gilbert and 
Sullivan operas have been presented as follows: 

The Pirates of Penzance 1907 

Patience 1908 

The Princess Ida 1909 

The Mikado 1910 

The Yeomen of the Guard 1912 

CAST OF THE YEOMEN OF THE GUARD 

Lieutenant Oliver Andrews 

Colonel Fairfax Walter Eastman 

Sergeant Merryl Earl Potter 

Leonard Merryl Edward Kohman 

Jack Point Victor Larsen 

Wilfred Shadbolt Nelson Stephens 

The Headsman Ellis Davidson 

Elsie Maynard Mary Hutchinson 

Phoebe Merryl Josephine McCammon 

Dame Carruthers Gertrude Cooper 

Kate MadeHne Nachtmann 

CHORUS OF TOWER WARDERS 

Arthur Babb George Mensch 

Raymond Beamer Roy Mock 

Edward Kohman John Sterling 

Ittai Luke Edward Taylor 

CHORUS OF CITIZENS 

Lucille Arnold Theodore Aschmann 

Fay Blair Eugene Davis 

Nell Buchanan Carl Dunbar 

Ruth Fox Charles Gibson 

Leora Kuchera Frank Henderson 

Jean Lightener Frederick McNeil 

Edna Lyon Leon Poundstone 

Ruth Morton John Sproule 

PauUne Murray George Staton 

Madeline Nachtmann Sidney Walker 

Etta Smith Howard Welch 

Josephine Smith Peter Zuercher 



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Masque Club 






The Masque Club of the University of Kansas had its origination in the University Drama- 
tic Club which was organized to satisfy a desire among many students for organized work in 
dramatic art. As a part of its plan, this club staged several successful productions each year. 
In 1905, the organization bequeathed its good will and fame to the present Masque Club. 

The membership in the Masque Club is limited to twenty-five, and only those who have 
had speaking parts in public performances of the club are eligible to election. The emblem of 
the club is a Grecian actor's masque of gold, with a golden dagger thrust through the left eye 
and protruding from the mouth. On the hilt of this dagger are found the letters M. C. symbol- 
izing the name of the organization. Membership in the club is open to all students attending 
the University, and its purpose is the advancement of dramatic art and the furthering of literary 
criticism. During the year it is the aim of the club to hold literary meetings, at which the mem- 
bers discuss dramatic art and literature. The colors of the club are light and dark green. 
The Masque Club plays are always taken from the most popular productions of the American 
stage. 







OFFICERS 

President Charles Younggreen 

Secretary Faye Chisham 

Manager Harold Wilson 

Director Gertrude Mossier 



Isabel Thomes 
E. W. Wingart 
A. H. Fast 



MEMBERS 

A. W. Hosier 
F. J. Wilson 
Ina Pratt 
Hal Rambo 



Hannah Mitchell 
H. H. Wikoff 
Alex Johnson 



PLAYS PRODUCED BY THE MASQUE CLUB 



Shore Acres 1901 

A Night Off 1902 

Alabama 1903 

Rosemary 1904 

All the Comforts of Home 1905 

An American Citizen 1905 

David Garrick 1906 



The Crisis 1907 

Green Eyes 1907 

My Friend From India 1908 

A Royal Knave 1908 

Bishop's Carriage 1909 

The School for Scandal 1909 

The Dictator 1910 



The Lottery Man 1911-12 



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Cain Walker 


Smith 




Wilkinson 


Potter Woolsey 




Walker 




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Wood Sproul! Butts Aschman Murray Hurd 

Campion Degen Hatcher Harger Henderson James Smith 

Boddington Fisher Guillette Abraham Roberts Walker McCune 




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Red Domino Dramatic Club 



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The Red Domino Dramatic Club was organized for the purpose of producing original 
plays, sketches and musical comedies, dramas and the Hke, in the spring of 1910. The first 
performance given was "The Idle Idol" which met with a cordial reception. This year a musical 
comedy, "Object: Matrimony" was given April 9 and 10. The music was by Arvid Frank 
and the libretto by Earl Moore. Miss Gertrude Mossier directed the play. 

It is the intention of the club to present one original play each year. The members of 
the club are elected from those who appear in the production, and those who contirbute original 
music, sketches and plays. 

The charter members were: 



Moe L. Friedman 
George Bowles 
Marguerite Stone 



Donald McKay 
CorneHa Hardcastle 
Nina Pilkenton 
L. B. Roberts 



Mat Graham 
Tess Critchfield 
Ruth Van Doren 







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The present membership and those taking part in this year's show are: 



*1 






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Lucile Wilkinson 
Ruth Van Doren 
Finley Graham 
Volney Hilford 
Lawrence Smith 
Earl Moore 
Pauline Murray 
Helen Woolsey 
Theodore Aschmann 
Ward Hatcher 
Frank Henderson 
Rachel Wood 
Ruth Harger 



Leota McFarlin 
Edna Bigelow 
Louis Buxton 
Donald McKay 
Murray Conley 
Joe Bishop 
Lola Eaton 
E. M. Bodington 
Lewis Keplinger 
Wilbur Gillett 
Mildred Roberts 
Sernice Butts 
Mildred James 
Helen Degen 



Gladys Elliott 
John Mussleman 
Henry Campion 
William Cain 
Earl Potter 
Sidney Walker 
Ruth Walker 
Bruce Hurd 
Harold Woodbury 
Steele Sproule 
Sylvia Abraham 
Etta Smith 
Loleta McCune 




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Goldman 



Fairchild 



Blincoe 



Nowlin 



Bechtold 



Passon 



Manley 
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Spreier 
Wilber 



Dal ton 



Page 372 










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Der Deutsche Dramatisclie V^erein 

Short German plays have heretofore been presented by the German Department, but 
in organizing this Club it was the purpose of the founders to put German plays on an equality 
with those produced by English Dramatic Clubs. The result was the forming of The German 
Dramatic Club in the fall of 1911. 

The Club presented its first play Gustav von Moser's "Der Bibliothekar" at the Bower- 
sock Theater, March 28. The play was under the direction of Miss Patti Hiatt and Dr. A. M. 
Sturtevant, and management of Edmund C. Bechtold. The success of its first venture and 
the hearty reception given it, makes the performance of the Club certain. 

It is the intention of the Club to produce one German play annually. The Club is thor- 
oughly a student organization and membership is open to all who prove successful in a tryout 
held in the fall before a committee composed of members of the German faculty and a pro- 
fessional director, who has charge of the productions. The only requirements are a good 
reading and fluent speaking knowledge of German. Membership is limited to thirty. 
CHARTER MEMBERS AND OFFICERS 

President and Manager Edmund C. Bechtold 

Vice-President and Ass't Manager Rebecca Passon 

Secretary Gladys Elliott 

Anna Bechtold Marie Russ 

MEMBERS 
Homer Blincoe Eileen Burkhardt Arthur Clasen 

Beatrice Dalton Cora Downs Charles Fairchild 

Irene Garrett Abe Goldman Cecil Gorsuch 

Anna Manley Mildred Manley Lawrence Meissner 

Minnie Moser Leila Nevin Mabel Nowlin 

Fred Poos Paul Schaeffer Sophie Smithmeyer 

Irma Spangler Fred Spreier Vera Wessels 

Allen Wilber 

Page 373 



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The Senior Play 



It has been one of the time-honored customs of the University for each senior class to 
present an original play. 

"Dope" is the title of the senior play given this year, which is a farce comedy requiring 
three acts to complicate, develop and unfold the plot. The play has decidedly a college setting, 
and deals in the main with University life. The plot concerns the career of a star athlete, 
who on account of circumstantial evidence is forced to leave school in disgrace, but returns 
and is vindicated in the eyes of his fellow students. 

OFFICERS 

Director Gertrude Mossier 

Manager Everett W. Brummage 



Lucile Wilkinson 
Vance Day 



PLAY COMMITTEE 

Ruth Van Doren 
Brownie Angle 
Louis LaCoss 



Robert Lee 
J. Earl Miller 



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THE^SOWERS TWINS 



MAURINE FAIRWEATHER 



The Thespians 



The Thespians Dramatic Club was organized in the University of Kansas in 1907. Since 

that time they have successfully produced six plays as follows: 

The Little Minister 1908 Father and the Frat 1910 

The Climbers 1909 The Bachelor 1911 

As You Like It 1909 Billy 1912 

The Thespians is a thoroughly student organization and is governed as are all other student 

organizations. Tryouts are held each fall for the election of new members under the direction 

of a professional director. To these tryouts every student in the University is cordially invited. 

Regular meetings are held in which questions are debated in relation to raising the standard 

of dramatics in the University. 

The comedy farce "Billy" was presented by the club the afternoon and night of February 

12th, 1912. It was the first student dramatic organization to make its appearance in the new 

Bowersock Opera house and was the first student production at the University to be directed 

and staged entirely by a member of the club. 



Page 377 



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OFFICERS 

President Charles Dolde 

Vice-President Everett Brummage 

Secretary Lucy Gulp 

Manager Ike Lambert 













MEMBERS 



Pw^ 



Charles Woodbury 
George Edwards 
Paul Carson 
Beatrice Nenmiller 
Carl Gannon 
J. Earle Miller 
Clarence Sowers 
Ward Maris 
Virginia Elward 



Nell Garraher 
Ike Lambert 
Fern Edie 
Claude Sowers 
Charles Dolde 
Clyde Dodge 
Margret Roberts 
Bertha Burgess 
Trine Latta 
Hazel Clark 



Alston McCarty 
Leota McFarUn 
Lucy Gulp 
Brownie Angle 
George Staton 
Anna Manly 
Maurine Fairweather 
Russell Clark 
Robert Thomas 



Page 378 









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The Student Circus 

This year for the first time students in the University originated and carried out success- 
fully a circus. It was a real circus with three rings, a band or two, a steam calliope, elephants, 
acrobats, dare-devil trapeze performers, tight rope walkers and a whole nest of clowns. The 
performance was given to a full house, and when the last act had been staged there was not a 
one to say that it had not been the equal of a Ringling show. 

The purpose of the circus was to make money for the women's dormitories, and the inten- 
tion was fully realized. Not the least of the entertainment as far as money goes was the sale of 
lemonade and popcorn. 

C. B. Root gymnasium instructor and his troupe of trained gymnasts contributed largely to 
the success of the enterprise, as did the clowns under the direction of Charles Younggreen. 
Captain Horace Steele and his Zouaves performed in warlike fashion on an elevated battle 
ground. Following the regular performance a concert was given for those who cared to stay. 





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Page 380 




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FACULTY fcliili 



THE FACULTY 



DEAN WALKER 

Ancient Language 

Arthur Tappan Walker, ^t, 4>bk. 

A. B., 1887, University of New York City. 
A. M. 1982, Vanderbilt. 
Ph. D., 1898, University of Chicago. 
Professor of Latin Language and Literature 
and Director of Summer Session. 

Alexander Martin Wilcox, ake, 

$BK. 

a. B., 1877, Ph. D., 1880, Yale. 
Professor of Greek Language and Literature. 

Hannah Oliver, nB$, $bk. 

a. B. 1874, A. M. 1888, University of Kansas. 
Associate Professor of Latin. 

Miles Wilson Sterling, $k^, <i>BK. 

a. B., 1883, A. M., 1893, University of 
Kansas. 

Associate Professor of Greek. 

Page 381 



Earl Walter Murray, Ben, <i>bk. 

a. B., 1904, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Latin. 

Botany 

William Chase Stevens, $rA, ss. 

S. 1893, University of 



B 



M. 



S., 1885, 
Kansas. 
Professor of Botany, 1899, (1889.) 

Frederick Horatio Billings, 2H. 

a. B., 1896, Leland Stanford. 

A. M., 1897, Harvard. 
Ph. D. 1901, Munich. 

Associate Professor of Botany and Bacteri- 
ology, 1907. 

Charles Morgan Sterling, $bk. 

a. B., 1897, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Botany and Pharma- 
cognosy, 1901. 

Grace Meriam Charles. 

Ph. D., 1910, University of Chicago. 
Instructor in Botany, 1911. 

Noble Prentice Sherwood, Acacia. 

B. S., 1905, A. M., 1911, University of 

Kansas, 
Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology, 1911. 

Kate Sears, 

B. A., University of Nebraska. 
Instructor in Botany. 

Larry M. Peace, 

a. B., 1901, a. M., 1906, University of 

Kansas. 
Preparator and Demonstrator in Botanical 

Laboratory. 

Chemistry 

Edgar Henry Summerfield Bailey, 

SH. 
Ph. B., 1873, Yale. 
Ph. D., 1883, Illinois Wesleyan. 
Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy and 

Director of Chemical Laboratories, 1883. 









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Robert Kennedy Duncan, ss, axs. 

A. B., 1892, Toronto. 
S. C. D., 1912, University of Pittsburg. 
Professor of Industrial Chemistry, 1901, {1905). 

Hamilton Perkins Cady, 2S, axs, 

A. B., 1897, Ph. D., 1903, University of 

Kansas. 
Professor of Chemistry, 1910, {1899). 

Frank Burnett Dains, ^T, axs, SS, 

$BK. 

Ph. B., 1890, M. S., 1891, Wesleyan 

University. 
Ph. D., 1898, University of Chicago. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry, 1911. 

Francis William Bushong, ss, axs. 

A. B., 1885, A. M., 1888, Franklin and 

Marshall. 
Sc. D., 1900, College ol Emporia. 
Associate Professor of Industrial Chemistry, 

1910, {1905). , 

William A. Whitaker, Jr., Acacia, 

SAE, AXS. 

Ph. B., 1904, University of North Carolina. 

A. M., 1905, Columbia. 

Associate Professor of Metallurgy, 1911. 

Herman Camp Allen, axs, 

A. B., 1904, McPherson College. 
A. M., 1905, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 1910. 

Henry Louis Jackson, 

A. B., 1905, Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry in Charge 
of Foods, 1907. 

John Paul Trickey, ks, axs, sh, 

B. S., 1909, New Hampshire. 

Vegitable Ivory Fellowship, Assistant Prof- 
fessor. 

E. Ward TiLLOTSON, Acacia, AXS, SH, 

A. B., 1906, Ph. D., 1909, Yale. 
Holoplane Fellow, Assistant Professor. 



Edward Ray Weidlein, nr, axs, ss, 

A. B., 1909, A. M., 1910, University of 

Kansas. 
Stubbs Grenfell Fellow, Assistant Professor. 

L. V. Redmond, axs, sh, 

a. B., Toronto. 

Julius Carpen Fellow, Assistant Professor. 

Archie J. Wieth, axs, SH, Acacia, 

B. S., 1908, University of Kansas. 
Carpen Fellow, Junior, {Instructor.) 

Frank P. Brock, Acacia, axs, sh, 

B. S., 1907, University of Kansas. 
Carpen Fellow, Junior, Instructor. 

I. W. Humphrey, axs, $bk, 

A. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Fells Fellowship, Junior, {Instructor.) 

W. E. Vawter, axs, sh, 

B. S., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Armstong Fellow, Instructor. 

Edward L. Griffin, ce>bk, sh, 

A. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Instructor of Chemistry, 1911. 

Jean MacKinnon, 

A. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Chemistry, 1911. 

Frank Finch Rupert, sh, 

A. B., 1905, A. M., 1907, University of 

Kansas. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Clifford Young, sx, axs, 

A. B., 1910, A. M., 1911, University of 

Kansas. 
Assistant Professor in Water Analysis, 1910. 

Anna Agnes Anderson, 

A. B., Baker. 

A. M., University of Kansas. 

Assistant in Food Laboratory. 

Reginald King Bailey, 

A. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Instructor in Chemistry. 

Page 382 
















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DEAN SKILTON 

Fine Arts 

Charles Sanford Skilton, 

A. B., 1889, Yale. 

Dean of School of Fine Arts and Professor 
of Musical Theory and Organ, 1905. 

Carl Adolph Preyer, 

Vienna. Mus D., 1909, Baker. 
Professor of Piano, Counterpoint, Canon, 
and Fugue, 1892. 

Charles Edward Hubach, 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 

of Music. 
Professor of Voice, 1903, 

William Alexander Griffith, 

Academy J alien, Paris. 

Professor of Drawing and Painting, 1899. 

Blanche Lyons, 

Graduate of New England Conservatory 

of Music. 
Assistant Professor of Voice. 

Page 383 






Harriet Greissinger, 

Mus. B., 1895, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Piano. 

Frank Everett Jones, 

Armour Institute. 

Assistant Professor of Carpentering and 
Pattern Making. 

Maude Beatrice Cooke, 

University of Kansas, New England Con- 
servatory of Music, Berlin. 
Assistant Professor of Piano, 1907, (190^). 

Marie Livering Benson, 

a. B., 1900, Newcomb. 
Instructor in Design and Ceramics. 

Wort S. Morse, 

Brussels Conservatory. 
Instructor in Violin, 1909. 

Gertrude Mossler, 

University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Elocution. 

Maud Miller, 

Music B., 1898, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Piano, 1905. 

Louise Wiedemann, 

Music B., 1897, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Piano, 1908, {190Ji.). 

Anna Louise Sweeney, 

Music B., 1906, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Piano. 

Wm. Dalton, 

University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Violincello. 

Joseph Colbert McCanles, 

B. S., 1907, Kansas Christian College. 
L. L. B., 1909, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Band Instruments. 

Constance L. McCammon, 

Certificate in Expression, 1911, University 

of Kansas. 
Assistant Instructor in Expression, 1911. 






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DEAN JOHNSTON 

Education 

Charles Hughes Johnston, 

A. B., 1898, University of North Carolina. 
A. M., 1903, Ph. D., 1905, Harvard. 
Dean of School of Education and Professor 
of Education, 1910. 

Arvin Solomon Olin, 

A. B., 1892, Ottawa University. 
A. M., 1894, University of Kansas. 
Professor of Education, 1899, {1893). 

William Hamilton Johnson, 
Ben, <i>BK, 

A. B., 1885, A. M., 1892, University of 

Kansas. 
High School Visitor and Professor of Edu- 
cation, 1905, {1903). 

Augustus William Trettien, 

B. L., 1899, University of Wisconsin. 
Ph. D., 1904, Clark University. 
Associate Professor of Education, 1911. 



Homer Walker Josselyn, 

A. B., 1905, A. M., 1910, University of 

Michigan. 
Assistant Professor of Education, 1910. 

George William Kleihege, 

A. B., 1902, K. w. u. 

A. M., 1894, University of Kansas. 

Assistant Instructor of Education, 1911. 

English Language and 
Literature 

Charles Graham Dunlap, $k^, 4>bk, 

A. B., 1883, A. M., 1889, Ohio Wesleyan. 

Litt, D., Princeton. 

Professor of English Literature, 1890, {1887). 

Edwin Mortimer Hopkins, $bk, 

A. B., 1888, Ph. D., 1894, Princeton. 
Professor of Rhetoric and English Language, 
1893, {1889.) 

Raphael Dorman O'Leary, 4>bk, 

A, B., 1893, University of Kansas. 
1895, Harvard. 

Associate Professor of Rhetoric, 1 901 , {1 896). 
(Absent on leave.) 

Seldon Lincoln Whitcomb, 

A. B., 1887, Grinnell. 

A. M., 1893, Columbia. 

Associate Professor of Rhetoric, 1 905, {1 90 It) 

Louise Eugene Sisson, 

A. B., 1904, Leland Stanford. 

A. M., 1909, Harvard. 

Associate Professor of Rhetoric, 1905, {190 Jt) 

Frederick Newton Raymond, 

A. B., 1896, University of Kansas. 

A. M., 1897, Columbia. 
Assistant Professor of Rhetoric, 1901. 

Margaret Lynn, 

B. S., 1889, Tarkio. 

A. M., 1900, University of Nebraska. 
Assistant Professor of English Literature, 
1901. 

Page 384 




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Charles Henry Gray, gax. 

B. L., 1885, M. L., 1896, University of 

Michigan. 
Ph. D., 1904, University of Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of English Literature. 

William Savage Johnson, 

A. M., 1900, Ph. D., 1905, Yale. 
Assistant Professor of English Literature. 

Lulu Gardner, 

A. B., 1905, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of English Literature, 

1910. 

Dewitt Clinton Croissant, zx, 

a. B., 1899, Ph. D., 1911, Princeton. 
Assistant Professor of English Literature, 
1911. 

Mary Leland Hunt, 

B. L., 1897, M. L., 1898, University of 

Wisconsin. 
Ph. D., 1911, Columbia. 
Instructor in Rhetoric, 1911. 

Alice Winston, 

a. B., 1898, A. M., 1903, University cf 

Chicago. 
Instructor in Rhetoric. 

Clara Francis McIntyre, 

A. B., 1900, Radcliffe. 
A. M., 1911, Columbia. 
Instrucotr in Rhetoric, 1911. 

Glen Ernest Palmer, *bk, 

a. B., 1910, University of Michigan. 
Instructor in Rhetoric, 1911. 

Rose Ruth Morgan, 

A. B., 1894, A. M., 1895, University of 

Kansas. 
Instructor in English, 1910. 

Warren E. Reed, 

A. B., 1907, Harvard. 
Instructor in English, 1911. 

Page 385 



Entomology 

Samuel John Hunter, $bk, se, 

A. B,, A. M., 1893, University of Kansas. 
Professor of Entomology, 1906, {1896). 

Herbert B. Hungerford, $bk, 

a. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Entomology, 1911. 

Francis Xavier Williams, 

A. B., Leland Stanford. 

Assistant Curator in Entomology, 1910. 




DEAN MARVIN 

Engineering 

Frank Olin Marvin, <j>k^, 2H, 

A. B., 1871, A. M., 1874, Allegheny. 
Dean of School of Engineering and Professor 

of Engineering, 1882, {1875). 

William Chester Hoad, 2S, 

B. S., 1898, University of Kansas. 
Professor of Civil Engineering, 1911, {1906). 



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Perley F. Walker, $rA, SH, 

B. M. E., 1896, University of Maine. 
M. M. E., 1901, Cornell. 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 1 906, 
{1905). 

George Rees Shaad, 

B. S., 1900, M. S., 1905, Pennsylvania 

State College. 
Professor of Electrical Engineering, 1 909. 

Montrose Fallen McArdle, 

Professor of Architecture, 1910. 

Clinton Mason Young, 2H, 

B. S., 1904, E. M., 1909, Case. 
Associate Professor of Mining Engineering, 

1906. 

Herbert Allan Rice, 

C. E., 1897, Ohio State University. 
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, 
1905. 

B. J. D ALTON, 

B. C. E. L., 1890, University of Kansas. 
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering, 
1906. 

Charles Ives Corp, 

B. S., 1903, University of Kansas. 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, 190U. 

George Jussen Hood, 

B. S., 1902, University of Kansas. 
Associate Professor of Mechanical Drawing, 
1911, {1902). 

Alfred Higgins Sluss, 

B. S., 1901, University of Illinois. 
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, 1908. 

Clarence Antony Johnson, 

B. S., 1906, University of Nebraska. 
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
1911, {1908). 

Harry Gardner, 

B. S., 1905, University of Wisconsin. 
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, 1909. 



Charles Cochran, 

University of Colorado. 
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Drawing, 
1906. 

C. A. Haskins, <i>k^, 

B. S., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Civil Engineering, 1911. 

0. W. Melin, 

B. E., 1910, University of Wisconsin. 
Instructor in Civil Engineering, 1911. 

Robert R. Fisher, 

B. S., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Laboratory Assistant in Mechanical En- 
gineering, 1911. 

George R. Brown, nT, 

B. S., 1912, University of Kansas. 
Laboratory Assistant in Mining Engineering, 
1911. 

Frank Emerson Ward, 

Northern Indiana Normal School. 
Superintendent of Fowler Shops and Shop 
Instructor, 1899, {1889). 

Hubert H. Wiltfong, 

Forge Instructor, 1911. 

Ephriam Edgar Landrum, 

Assistant Instructor in Woodworking, 1909. 

Carl Falster Hanson, 

Assistant Laboratory Instructor in Electrical 
Engineering, 1911. 



Geology 



Erasmus HawoRth, Ben, *bk, zh, 

B. S., 1881, M. S., 1884, University of 

Kansas. 
Ph. D., 1888, Johns Hopkins. 
Professor of Geology, Minerology and Mining 
and Superintendent of Geological Survey, 

189 It, {1892). 

James Edward Todd, 

A. B., 1867, A. M., 1870, Oberlin. 
Assistant Professor of Geology and Miner- 
ology, 1907. 

William Henry Twenhofel, 

A. B., 1904, Lebanon. 

A. B., 1905, A. M., 1910, Yale. 

Assistant Professor of Geology, 1910. 

Page 386 






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Germanic Lan^ua^es 
and Literature 

William Herbert Carruth, sen, 

$BK, 
A. B., 1880, University of Kansas. 
A. M., 1889, Ph. D., 1893, Harvard. 
Vice President of Faculties and Professor of 

Germanic Languages and Literature, 

1882, {1879). 

Elmer Franklin Engel, sn, <S)BK, 

A. B., 1893, University of Kansas. 

A. M., 1898, Harvard. 

Associate Professor of German, 1905, {1892). 

Alberta Linton Corbin, $bk, 

A. B., 1893, University of Kansas. 

Ph. D., 1902, Yale. 

Associate Professor of German, 1911, {1901). 

Henry Otto Kruse, 

A. B., 1894, A. M., 1903, University of 

Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of German, 1905, {190i). 

James Andrew Campbell, 

A. B., 1901, A. M., 1906, University of 

Michigan. 
Assistant Professor of German, 1907, {1906). 

Helen Gaile Jones, ka e, <i>bk. 

Ph. B., 1900, De Pauw. 
Instructor in German, 1911. 

Edward Maurice Briggs, 

A. B., 1904, University of Nebraska. 
Assistant Professor of German, 1911, {1 906). 

Albert Morey Sturtevant, 

A. B., 1899, A. M., 1901, Ph. D., 1905, 

Harvard. 
Assistant Professor of German, 1910, {1908). 

Esther Wilson, 

A. B., 1901, A. M., 1902, University of 

Kansas. 
Instructor in German, 1 908. 
Page 387 



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George W. Spindler, 

A. B., 1900, A. M., 1908, University of 

Indiana. 
Instructor in German, 1909. 

Allen Anders Seipt, 

A. B., 1900, A. M., 1903, Ph. D., 1906, 

University of Pennsylvania. 
Instructor in German, 1910. 

Clara Price Newport, 

A. B., 1903, Swarthmore. 

Ph. D., 1908, University of Wisconsin. 

Instructor in German, 1910. 

August Ferdinand Albert Bruno 

KlESEWETTER, 
Berlin, Grenable, Marburg, University of 

Kansas. 
Lektor. 

History and Political 
Science 

Frank Heywood Hodder, $k^, $bk, 

A. B., 1883, Ph. M., 1891, University of 

Michigan, 
Professor of American History and Political 
Science, 1893, {1891). 

Carl Lotus Becker, 

B. L., 1896, Ph. D., 1907, University of 

Wisconsin. 
Professor of European History, 1908, {1902) 

Daniel Leslie Patterson, 

B. S,, 1895, Pennsylvania State College. 
Associate Professor of European History. 

Clarence Addison Dykstra, at, 

A. B., 1903, University of Iowa. 
Associate Professor of History, 1909. 

Clarence Corey Crawford, $bk, 

A. B., 1903, A. M., 1904, University of 

Kansas. 
Ph. D., 1906, University of Wisconsin. 
Assistant Professor of European History. 

William Watson Davis, 

B. S., 1903, M. S., 1904 Alabama Poly- 

technic. 
A. M., 1905, Columbia. 
Assistant Professor of American History 

and Political Science. 












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Home Elconomics 

Edna D. Day, 

B. S., 1896, M. S., 1897, University of 

Michigan. 
Ph. D., 1908, University of Chicago. 
Professor of Home Economics, 1 91 0. 

Journalism 

Merle Thorpe, 2ae, 4>A4>, sax, 

A. B., 1905, Stanford. 

1907, University of Washington. 

Professor of Journalism, 1911. 

Leon Nelson Flint, $bk, 

a. B., 1896, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Journalism, 1 906. 

J. W. Murray, sax, 

a. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Journalism, 1911. 

Librarian and 
Assistants 

Carrie M. Watson, 

a. B., 1877, University of Kansas. 
Librarian, 1887. 

Edith M. Clarke, 

a. B., 1895, University of Kansas. 
Cataloguer. 

Clara Scioto Gillham, 

a. B., 1884, University of Kansas. 
Loan Desk Assistant, 190U. 

Mary Maud Smelser, 

Accession Assistant, 1904. 

Mary Agnes Collins, 

A. B., 1904, University of Kansas. 
Reference Assistant, 1907. 

Susie Shafer, 

A. B., 1910, University of Kansas. 
Reference Assistant, 1910. 



Nellie Burnham, 

A. B., 1910, University of Kansas. 
Reference Assistant, 1910. 

Ethel Morrow, ne^, 

A. B., 1909, University of Kansas. 
School of Law Assistant, 1911. 

Dora Renn Bryant, 

University of Kansas. 

School of Engineering Assistant, 1911. 

Orrie Andrews, 

University of Kansas. 
Biology Library, 1911. 




DEAN GREEN 



Law 

James Wood Green, are, 

A. B., 1866, A. M., 1886, Williams. 

Dean of School of Law and Professor of 

Law, 1878. 

Page 388 






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William Livesey Burdick, ^T, $bk, 

A. B., 1882, A. M., 1884, Wesleyan. 
Ph. D., 1885, Grant. 

L. L. B. 1894, Yale. 

Professor of Law, 1902, (1898). 

Williams Edward Higgins, 4>a e, $bk 

B. S., 1888, L. L. B., 1894, University of 

Kansas. 
Professor of Law, 1906, (1899). 

Henry C. Hill, eAx, 4'A<f>, 

A. B., 1888, Bowdoin. 

L. L. B. 1899, University of Michigan. 

Professor of Law, 1910. 

Henry Wilbur Humble, 

L. L. B., 1904, University of Cincinnati, 

A. M., 1908, Cornell. 

Associate Professor of Law, 1908. 

Mathematics 

Ephriam Miller, 

A. B., 1885, A. M., 1858, Ph. D., 1895, 

Allegheny. 
Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and 

Astronomy, 1910, (187U). 

John Nicholas Van Der Vries, ATfi, 

2H, 
A. B., 1896, A. M., 1899, Hope. 
Ph. D., 1901, Clarke. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1906, 

(1901). 

Charles Hamilton Ashton, sh, 

A. B., 1887, Union. 
A. M., 1893, Harvard. 
Ph. D., 1909, Munich. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1910, 
(1903). 

Ulysses Grant Mitchell, 

A. B., 1906, A. M., 1907, University of 

Kansas. 
Ph. D., 1910, Princeton. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Herbert Edwin Jordan, ss, 

A. B., A. M., McMaster University. 

Ph. D., University of Chicago. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 1911. 

Marion Ballantine White, 

Ph. B., 1893, University of Michigan. 
A. B., 1906, University of Wisconsin. 
Ph. D., University of Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, 1910. 

Page 389 



Arthur Bowes Frizell, 

A. B., 1893, A. M., 1900, Harvard. 
Instructor in Mathematics, 1909. 

John Jefferson Wheeler, 

A. B., 1904, University of Indiana. 
Instructor in Mathematics, 1911. 

Jasper Ole Hassler, 

A. B., 1907, William Jewell. 
Instructor in Mathematics, 1911. 

Hazel Hope MacGregor, 2H, 

B. S., 1906, Yankton College. 

M. A., 1908, University of Illinois. 
Instructor in Mathematics, 1911. 




DEAN CRUMBINE 



Medicine 

S. J. Crumbine, 

M. D., 1889, Cincinnati College of Medicine 

and Surgery. 
Dean of School of Medicine and Secretary 

of State Board of Health, 1911. 



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Anatomy 

Edward James Curran, 

M. D., 1908, Harvard. 

D. Ophth., 1910, Oxford University. 

Professor of Anatomy, 1911. 

Eugene Smith, 

M. D., 1876, Rush. 
Demonstrator in Anatomy, 1903. 

Bacteriology and Pathology 

T. Harris Boughton, ss, 

S. B., 1903, S. M., 1904, University of 

Chicago. 
M. D., 1906, Rush. 
Professor of Bacteriology and Pathology. 

Henry Leslie Chambers, 

M. S., 1886, Lane University. 
M. D., 1895, Kansas City Med. College. 
Adjunct Professor of Hygiene and Patho- 
logical Physiology. 

Dermatology 

William L. McBride, nsn, 

M. D., 1901, Rush. 

Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Richard L. Sutton, 

M. D., 1901, u. M. c. 

Associate Professor of Dermatology. 

Gynecology and Obstetrics 

Don Carlos Guffey, n2n, 

A. B., 1899, University of Missouri. 

M. D., 1905, University of Pennsylvania. 

Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 

Zachariah Hanson, 

M. D., 1888, College of Physicians and 

Surgeons, Baltimore. 
Clinical Professor of Obstetrics. 

Robert Douglas Irland nsn, 

M. D., 1909, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Obstetrics. 



Internal Medicine 

Franklin E. Murphy, nsn, 

M. D., 1893, University of Pennsylvania. 
Professor of Internal Medicine. 

IsADOR Julius Wolf, $Bn, 

M. D., 1887, Munich. 
Professor of Inetrnal Medicine. 

John N. Scott, 

Ph. G., 1887, University of Kansas. 

M. D., 1896, U. M. C. 

Associate Professor of Therapeutics. 

Jesse E. Hunt, 

M. D., 1902, Western Reserve University. 
Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine. 

Peter Thomas Bohan, n2n, 

M. D., 1900, Rush. 

Instructor in Internal Medicine. 

Nathan Boggs, 
M. D., u. M. c. 

Instructor in Medicine. 

Logan Clendening, 

M. D., 1907, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Medicine. 

Medical Jurisprudence 
and Economics 

William Livesay Burdick, ^t, <j>bk, 

A. B., 1882, A. M., 1884, Wesleyan. 

Ph. D., 1885, Grant. 

L. L. B., 1898, Yale. 

Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence. 

David Ritterhouse Porter, 

M. D., 1872, Bellevue Hospital Medical 

College. 
Lecturer on Life Insurance. 

Neurology 

C. C. Goddard, 

M. D., 1883, Bellevue Hospital Medical 

School. 
Professor of Neurology. . 

Page 390 






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Henry 0. Hanawalt, 

M. D., 1873, Medical College of Ohio. 
Professor of Neurology. 

Andrew L. Skoog, *Bn, 

M. D., 1902, Northwestern. 
Associate Professor of Neurology. 

W. F. KUHN, 
A. M., M. D. 

Lecturer on Neurology. 

Ophthalmology 

Andrew Walter McAlister, ^bii, 

A. B., 1902, M. D., 1905, University of 

Missouri. 

Professor of Ophthalmology. 

Charles J. Lidikay, 

M. D., 1894, University of Lousiville. 
Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology. 

James W. May, 

M. D., 1900, College of Phys. and Sur. 

K. C. Mo. 
Clinical Professor of Surgery. 

Pathology — (clinical) 

Marshall Albert Barber, 

A. B., 1891, University of Kansas. 
A. M., 1894, Harvard. 
Professor of Clinical Pathology. 
(Absent on leave.) 

Ward Kirk Trimble, *Bn, 

M. D., 1906, Kansas City Medical College. 
Associate Professor of Clinical Pathology. 

Arthur E. Hertzler, $Bn, 

M. D. 1894, Northwestern. 
Ph. D. 1902, Illinois Wesleyan. 
Associate Professor of Pathology. 

Psychiatry 

S. S. Glasscock, ^bii, 

M. D., 1887, Rush. 
Professor of Psychiatry. 

Lyman L. Uhls, 

M. D., 1884, Rush. 
Professor of Psychiatry. 
Page 391 



Rhynolaryn^olo^y 
and Otology 

Joseph E. Sawtell, nsn, 

M. D., 1886, College of Phys. and Sur. 

Baltimore. 
Professor of Rhynolaryngology. 

Hal Foster, 

a. B., 1880, University of Alabama. 
M. D., 1882, University of New York. 
Associate Professor of Rhinolaryngology. 

Samuel Charles Emley, 

a. B., 1899, University of Kansas. 

M. D., 1902, Rush. 

Associate Professor of Rhinolaryngology. 

Edward Park Hall, 

M. D., 1897, Ensworth. 

Assistant Professor of Rhinolaryngology. 




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Surgery 

Mervin Tubman Sudler, n2n, 

Ph. D., 1899, Johns Hopkin. 

M. D., 1901, College of Phys. and Surgeons, 

Baltimore. 
Associate Dean of School of Medicine and 

Professor of Surgery. 

E. Jacob Block, 

M. D., 1879, Medical College of Ohio. 
Professor of Genito-urinary Surgery. 

John Walter Perkins, <J>Bn, 

A. B., 1882, M. D., 1886, Harvard. 
Professor of Surgery. 

Walter S. Sutton, $Bn, 

a. B., 1900, a. M., 1901, University of 

Kansas. 
M. D.. 1907, College of Phys. and Surgeons. 
Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Edward H. Thrailkill, 

M. D., 1890, Kansas City Med. College. 
Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

John G. Hayden, nsn, 

B. S., 1902, University of Chicago. 
M. D., 1904, Rush. 

Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Russel a. Roberts, 

a. B., 1881, A. M., 1886, Marysville Col- 
lege, Tennessee. 
M. D., 1887, Medical College of Indiana. 
Assistant Professor of Surgery. 

Clifford C. Nesselrode, $Bn, 

M. D., 1906, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Surgical Anatomy. 

Nurse 

Lestella E. Bechtel, 

R. N., Guelph Hospital, Ontario. 

R. X., General Memorial, N. Y. City. 

Superintendent Nurses Training School. 




DEAN SAYRE 



Pharmacy 

Lucius Elmer Sayre, 

B. S., 1897, University of Michigan. 
Ph. G., 1866, Ph. M., 1896, Philadelphia. 
Dean of School of Pharmacy and Professor 
of Pharmacy, 1885. 

L. D. Havenhill, 

Ph. C, 1893, Ph. M., 1894, University of 

Michigan. 
B. S., 1903, University of Kansas. 
Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 

1908, (1899.) 

Herbert William Emerson, at 12, 

nsn, ss. 

Ph. C, 1901, B. S., 1902, University of 

Michigan. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, 1906, 

{1903). 

Page 392 






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George Nathaniel Watson, 

A. B., 1904, B. S., Ph. C, 1908, University 

of Michigan. 
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, 1910, 

{1909). 

Arthur Earl Stevenson, se, 

Ph. C, 1909, University of Kansas. 
Assistant in Drug Analysis, 1911. 




DEAN TEMPLIN 

Philosophy 

Olin Templin, Ben, 

A. B., 1886, A. M., M. S., 1890, University 

of Kansas. 
Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and 

Sciences and Professor of Philosophy, 

1893, {188U). 

James Elof Boodin, 

a. B., 1895, a. M., 1896, Brown. 
Ph. D., 1899, Harvard. 
Professor of Philosophy, 190U. 

Page 393 



David Camp Rogers, 

A. B., 1899, Princeton. 
A. M., 1902, Ph. D., 1903, Harvard. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy and 
Psychology, 1909. 

Arthur Mitchell, 

A. B., Ph. D., Yale, Auburn Theol. Sem., 
Oxford, University of Pennsylvania, 
Harvard. 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy, 1911. 

Floyd Carlton, Dockeray, 

A. B., 1907, A. M., 1909, University of 

Michigan. 
Instructor in Psychology, 1910. 

Physical Education 

James Naismith, 

A. B., 1887, McGill University. 
M. D., 1898, Gross Medical College. 
Professor of Physical Education and Chapel 
Director. 

Margaret Lee Johnston, 

M. D., Colorado University. 
Associate Professor of Physical Education, 
1911. 

William 0. Hamilton, $rA, 

A. B., 1898, William Jewell College. 
Assistant Professor Physical Education and 

Manager of Athletics, 1911, {1909). 

Ralph Waldo Sherwin, ake, 

B. S., 1911, Dartmouth. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Charles Burton Root, 

Instructor of Physical Education, 1909, 

Rose Abbot, xo, 

A. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Instructor of Physical Education, 1910. 






















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Physics 







Frederick Edward Kester, sae, 2H 

M. E., 1895, Ohio University. 

A. M., 1899, Cornell. 
Ph. D., 1905. 
Professor of Physics, 1909. 

Martin Everett Rice, sh, 

B. S., 1892, M. S., 1893, University of 

Kansas. 
Associate Professor of Physics and Electrical 
Engineering, 1906, {1892). 

Edwin Fiske Stimson, bgii, 

B. S., 1890, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Physics, 1905, {1901). 

T. TowNSEND Smith, 

a. B., 1907, A. M., 1908, Harvard. 
Instructor in Physics, 1910. 

Physiology 

Ida Henrietta Hyde, sh, 

B. S., 1891, Cornell. 

Ph. D., 1896, Heidleberg, Germany. 

Professor of Physiology, 1905, {1899). 

Ernest Lyman Scott, sh, 

B. S., 1902, Ohio Wesleyan University. 
M. S., 1911, University of Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Physiology, 1911. 

Lalia Viola Walling, 

a. B., 1905, A. M., 1907, University of 

Kansas. 
Instructor in Physiology, 1908, {1903). 

Romance Languages 
and Literature 

Eugenie Galloo, $bk, 

B. L., 1892, University of Michigan. 
Academie of Paris, Brevet 1881. 
Sorbonne, 1884, University of France. 
A, M., 1895, University of Kansas. 
Professor of Romance Languages and 
Literature, 1900, {1892). 



Elise Nuen Schwander, 

A. B., 1898, University of Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, 
1905. 

Arthur Leslie Owen, 

A. B., 1906, University of Vermont. 
A. M., 1908, University of lUinois, 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, 
1910. 

William Philip Ward, 

A. B., 1906, Western Reserve University. 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, 
1908. 

Frederick Augustus Grant Cow- 
per, ake, $bk, 

A. B., 1906, A. M., 1911, Trinity. 
Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, 
1911. 

Calvert Johnson Winter, 

Ph. B., 1905, Hiram College. 
Instructor in Romance Language, 1 909. 

May Gardner, 

a. B., 1897, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in French, 1909. 

Ana Jule Enke, $bk. 

Ph. B., 1905, University of Chicago. 
Instructor in Spanish, 1909. 

Amida Stanton, 

a. B., 1904, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Romance Languages, 1910. 

Public Speaking 

Gerhard Adam Gesell, 

A. B., 1908, University of Wisconsin. 
Assistant Professor of Public Speaking, 1910 

Page 394 



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DEAN BLACKMAR 

Sociology 
and Elconomics 

Frank Wilson Blackmar, $k>^, *bk, 

Ph. D., 1889, Johns Hopkins. 
Dean of Graduate School and Professor of 
Sociology and Economics. 

Arthur Jerome Boynton, b en, 

A. B., 1901, Harvard. 
A. M., 1902, Columbia. 
Associate Professor of Sociology and Econ- 
omics. 

Victor Emanuel Helleberg, 

A. B., 1883, Yale. 

L. L. B., 1885, Cincinnati. 
Assistant Professor of Sociology. 

George Ellsworth Putnam, <i>rA, 

B. A:, 1907, University of Kansas. 
M. A., 1908, Yale. 

B. Litt., 1911, Oxford. 

Assistant Professor of Economics, 1911. 

Page 395 



University Extension 

Richard R. Price, 

B. S., 1900, M. A., 1905, University of 

Pennsylvania. 
Professor of University Extension, 1909. 

Helen Maud Clarke, 

A. B., 1903, A. M., 1907, University of 

Kansas. 
Ph. D., 1910, Cornell. 
Instructor in Correspondence Study. 

Nelly May Stevenson, 

Instructor in Correspondence Study. 

Ralph Spotts, $k^, <j>bk, 

a. B., 1910, University of Kansas. 
Organizer of University Extension, 1911. 

Agnes L. Evans, nB$, 4>bk, 

A. B., 1911, University of Kansas. 
Reference Assistant in University Extension . 



Zoology 



Clarence Erwin McClung, 2H, 

Ph. G., 1892, A. B., 1896, A. M., 1898, 
Ph. D., 1902, University of Kansas. 
Professor of Zoology, 1906, {1899). 

Lewis Lindsey, Dyche, sh, 

a. b., b. s., 1884, a. m., 1886, m. s., 1888, 

University of Kansas. 
Professor of Systematic Zoology. 
(On leave of absence as state fish and 

game warden.) 

William Jacob Baumgardner, <^bk, 

a. B., 1900, A. M., 1901, University of 

Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Zoology and Histology. 

Roy Lee Moodie, sh, 

A. B., 1905, University dt Kansas. 
Ph. D., 1908, University of Chicago. 
Assistant Professor of Zoology, 1909, (1908). 



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Chester H. Heuser, n2n, ss, 

A. B., 1908, A. M., 1910, University of 

Kansas. 
Assistant Professor of Embryology, 1911. 

Nadine Nowlin, nB<i>, $bk, 

A. B., A. M., 1903, University of Kansas. 
Instructor in Zoology. 

Horace Gunthorpe, Acacia, 

Ph. B., 1905, Hamline University. 

A. B., 1909, Leiand Stanford University. 

Instructor in Zoology. 

Ray Duncan Lindsey, 

A. B., 1909, A. M., 1910, University of 

Kansas. 
Instructor in Zoology, 1911. 

Handel T. Martin, 

Assistant Curator of Paleontology, 1907, 
(1899). 

Charles D. Bunker, 

Assistant Curator of Mammals, Birds and 
Fishes. 





EDWARD E. BROWN 

Business and 
Executive Officers 

Edward E. Brown, 

Secretary and Purchasing Agent, 1907. 

George 0. Foster, 

A. B., 1901, University of Kansas. 
Registrar of University, 1899. 

Eben F. Crocker, 

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, 
1902. 

Earl B. Cronemeyer, 

Accountant, 1906. 

Minnie Stella Moodie, 

Secretary to the Chancellor, 1902. 

Eleanor Maude Kibbey, 

A. B., 1895, William Woods College. 
Assistant Registrar, School of Medicine, 



1905. 



Page 396 






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Fellowships 1911-1912 



Charles Merle Gruber, A. B., University of Kansas — Physiology. 

Martin K. Brooks, A. B., University of Kansas — Romance Languages. 

Grace Orpha Light, A, B., Iowa State Teachers College — Latin. 

Charles Rudolph Nesbitt, A. B., University of Kansas — Sociology. 

Myrtle Greenfield, A. B., University of Kansas — Botany. 

George William Kleigege, A. B., Kansas Wesleyan University — Education. 

Jesse R. Derby, A. B., Southwestern College — English. 

James Gordon Robinson, A. B., Cooper College — Chemistry. 

Floyd B. Streeter, A. B., University of Kansas — History. 

David H. Wenrich, A. B., University of Kansas — Zoology. 

Estella E. Carothers, A. B., University of Kansas — Zoology. 

Carl R. Brown, A. B., University of Kansas — Philosophy. 

Ansell Stubbs, a. B., University of Kansas — German. 

Howard Curl, Scholar in Pathology. 

S. M. Haag of Admire — Fellow from the College of Emporia. 

Bertha Elizabeth Colline of McPherson — Fellow from McPherson College. 

John B. Wesley of Stafford — Fellow from Southwestern College. 

Robert Tyler McCluggage of Derby — Fellow from Fairmont College. 

Wilbur Emanuel Tilberg of Dwight — Fellow from Bethany College. 

Sophia Gerhardine Harms of Wichita — Fellow from Friends College. 

John Tennyson Myers of Eskridge — Fellow from Washburn College. 

Alfred L. Nelson of Troy — Fellow from Midland College. 

William Gustaf Nelson of Ottawa — Fellow from Ottawa University. 

Archie Dayton Power of Baldwin — Fellow from Baker University. 

Donna Clare Rose of Holton — Fellow from Campbell College. 

J. T. Falkner — Physicians Fellowship. 

Edward Fisher — Fellow in Mathematics. 

Francis Dean Schnake — Fellow in Economics. 

T. H. Aschman — Fellow in Anatomy. 

Florence Margaret Beatty — Fellow in Greek. 

Roy Eraser — Entomology Research. 



Page 397 






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Forew^ord 

The more serious phases of our college life will, presumably, be long remembered. It is 
our business to remember them; but the humorous events are more likely to be forgotten, 
and to pass away, and it is to your interest that they be preserved. That little episode of 
which you had hoped the annual board would overlook, and altogether fail to record, is, in all 
probability, to be found among the following few pages. Others enjoy it and laugh, and you 
should prove yourself a good fellow, by laughing with them. However, if your feelings are of 
the more delicate variety, and you are determined to feel an imaginary sting, lay this volume 
carefully away, for, let us say, the space of twenty-five years. At the end of that interval of 
time, take it out, brush the dust from off its ancient covers and read the comic section. We 
are willing to wager a new silk hat, against a plugged lead nickel that you will then slap yourself 
on the back, metaphorically speaking, and comment admiringly on what a devilish young 
blade you must have been. 

The next noon, when you lunch down town with "Fatty Lewis," who also graduated in 
1912, you will feel justly indignant when he asserts that his name appeared more frequently 
in this section than did your own. 

That night wifey will have an unexpected guest at dinner, and afterward, hubby and the 
guest will go over the Jayhawker together, until the last page has been turned, the last cigar 
has been smoked, and the clock has struck twelve. 



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Forew^ord 

The more serious phases of our college life will, presumably, be long remembered It is 
our business to remember them; but the humorous events are more likely to be forgotten, 
and to pass away, and it is to your interest that they be preserved. That little episode of 
which you had hoped the annual board would overlook, and altogether fail to record, is, in all 
probability, to be found among the following few pages. Others enjoy it and laugh, and >ou 
should prove yourself a good fellow, by laughing with them. However, if your feelings are of 
the more delicate variety, and you are determined to feel an imaginary sting, lay this volume 
carefully away, for, let us say, the space of twenty-five years. At the end of that interval of 
time, take it out, brush the dust from off its ancient covers and read the comic section. We 
are willing to wager a new silk hat, against a plugged lead nickel that you will then slap yourself 
on the back, metaphorically speaking, and comment admiringly on what a devilish young 
blade you must have been. 

The next noon, when you lunch down town with "Fatty Lewis," who also graduated in 
1912, you will feel justly indignant when he asserts that his name appeared more frequently 
in this section than did your own. 

That night wifey will have an unexpected guest at dinner, and afterward, hubby and the 
guest will go over the Jayhawker together, until the last page has been turned, the last cigar 
has been smoked, and the clock has struck twelve. 



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Reminiscences 

The time of this reminiscence was the fall of 1882 when the class of 1885 was just getting 
dry behind the ears and the class of 1884 was putting in the large glass front that characterized 
it in later years. 

A young professor had come out of the East, a graduate the June before of some great 
college, to remain as a member of the faculty of the University of Kansas, if proper arrange- 
ments could be made. He brought with him a silk hat, the first ever seen alive in Lawrence, 
and his manners and thoughts harmonized with the hat. 

At a select meeting of a few hard students, it was decided that the Easterner should be 
received in due form. The first Sunday evening after his arrival, a committee of the Hard- 
Students called to escort him to church. On the way they told him of the dangerous characters 
in the town and the necessity of always going armed. On leaving church one of them pressed 
a revolver into the reluctant hand of the Stranger, each of the committee drew a "gun" and 
the squad marched to Massachusetts street and then out by the city park, then surrounded by 
a high hedge and filled with tall grass and small brush. A large and appreciative audience 
moved in columns and companies in the same direction. Opposite his street was a turnstile, 
and the party entered with proper precaution. As the Eastener passed through there was a 
shot, and the silk hat went to the grass. "Straight across the park for your life," was the 
shouted injunction, and it was obeyed. At the faculty investigation, which followed the next 
week, the statement was made that there were two shots in rapid succession and that when 
the first one was heard the Professor was on Massachusetts street and when the second came 
he was on Tennessee. 

That's all of the story, except that the Easterner left the next day and was not heard of 
again. He did not go back for his hat and for a long time it was a valued relic. Will Brown, 
who is now in Africa, may have it yet. 



W. Y. MORGAN, 



Hutchinson, Kansas April 20, 1912. 



Page 400 






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Confidential Tips 



President of the W. S. G. A. (at the telephone), "But don't quote me." 
President of the Men's Student Council (to the S. R.), "We're giving nothing out." 
The Masque Club. "We'll have to hurry up this meeting because Art Moses wants his 
breakfast." (Faye blushes) 

The Annual Board — "Be Clever." 

Professor Palmer (to his class) — "You'll find it on page 287 of my book." 

Mae Rossman (in council meeting) — "Well, the fallows say." 
Will Moore (at the telephone) — "Which shall it be." 
Anna Malott (gigghng) — "It will BE all right with me." 



Bertha Dack (turning from the telephone)- 
Get busy!" 

Professor Reed (inaudibly) — " 



-"I'm going to have a guest. Freshman, 

!!&$" "&') ('&— %*t" "). 

Lena Tripp (confidentially) — "Well, you know, all's fair in politics." 
Bill Thomas (freshman at the Griffith Club) — "It has been my experience that every 
girl takes the first chance she gets." 

Swede Swenson (nonchalantly) — "Ye;?, I'm on the hill." 
Bess Bozell (laughing) — "Yes, I think so, too." 



Pass Words 

Glendale Griffiths (in council) — "Well I was talking to one of the fellows yesterday." 

Anna Manley (confidentially) — "My pupils just poured out their little souls to me today. 

Mabel Nowlin — "Ha-ha, I heard something about you yesterday. Now "fess up." 

Eleanor Draper (proudly) — "I don't know, but Henry told me so." 

Beatrice Dalton (before class) — "I'm just slung together." 

Art Moses — "Faye." 

Chas. Youngreen — "When I was with Paul Gilmore." 

Burton Sears — "The Chancellor told me." 

Murray Conley — "I must go on up to the Pi Phi House." 

Hal Black — "We did it this way at Cornell." 

Lucy Marsh — "Oh Goodness!" 

Rachael Baumgartner — "Every body lies and steals." 

Clark Wallace — "Oh! You make me tired." 

Lucile Smith (simpering) — "I adore the classics." 

Lolita McCune (to the backward girl) — "If you can't take him, I guess you can't come. 

Professor Trettien (hand on head) — "This is a problem for defectives." 



Page 401 






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Quiz Questions 

1. When is a date not a date? 

2. What is a class party? 

3. What is the best method of carrying on an extended conversation in the library? 

4. What is strolling? 

5. Why is a joke? 

6. Draw a comparison between quiz week and a period of history. 

7. When is a Junior Farce? 

8. Is there any difference between our Ferguson and WilHam J. Burns? 

9. Why is Melvin Kates stuck on himself? 

10. Is Lena Tripp the best friend the W. S. G. A. has? 

11. Would you say that Ralph Waldo Sherwin is fickle or merely frivolous? 

12. Which of the Universily of Kansas professors live on bear's meat? 

13. When is a Sophomore Prom not a Prom? 

14. What in your opinion is the best way for students not to get what they want? 

15. Do you want to hear any more jokes about the Physics clock? 

ANSWERS TO QUIZ QUESTIONS 

1. When a girl asks you to take her to the postofRce. 

2. An occasion when six couples enjoy the benefit of home talent. 

3. Keep moving. 

4. A spring fever which if not carefully cared for will cause loss of sleep. 

5. Professor Twenhofel knows the answer. 

6. A reign of terror when many subjects lose their heads. 

7. Ask Hink Campion. 

8. The sheriff at Olathe knows. 

9. I was not in class the day we discussed that question, Professor. 

10. Well, no. 

11. Rather that he likes to have a good time. 

12. Boynton and Templin. 

13. When it is a Hop. 

14. Petition the University Council. 

15. NO. 



Page 402 












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Dramatics at K. IT. 

PROFESSOR DYKSTRA'S CLASS 

Scene — Administration Building 
Time: 10:19 A. M., Tuesday 

All but one member of the class have been in their places since 10:05. At a sound of swift 
rushing through the hall everyone takes a last frantic look at his notebook. 

Professor Dykstra blows in through the rear door with a pile of quiz books under his arm. 
At the third stride he reaches the desk. Flashing an angelic smile at his victims, he begins 
distributing the quiz books. 

Professor Dykstra. I just want you each to write me a Httle billet doux for about six 
minutes, so I can know what's in your hearts. Now you may write down the last ten sub- 
divisions in day after to-morrow's lesson. I grade on a scale of ten that will give you three- 
fifths of a minute on each. While you're writing I'll call the roll. Abel! Beamer! Colin! — 
Where's CoUn? Anybody here seen CoUn? Oh, here he is. Been to chapel, eh? The 
administration of this University and I do not agree. They don't stick to their platform. 
The Bulletin says classes begin at 10:20 and that's when my class starts, Colin, (again the 
angelic smile — (after the books are taken up). Now, we'll begin where we left off yesterday. 
Ammons, why is a political party? 

Ammons. Why, a bunch of grafters get together — 

Professor Dykstra. Wrong! You're trying to define a University class. Smith! 

Smith gets tangled up. Ditto Moore and Edwards. 

Professor Dykstra. I see this is blue Tuesday. Look here, folks, we'll have to all pull 
together or we'll all pull apart — or maybe a bunch of flunks. 

(A watch is heard to snap. The professor stands with his in his hand.) No hurry, it's 
only fourteen and two thirds minutes after eleven. I let you go too early yesterday and had 
to wait four minutes for the next class — well, you may go now. 

A TYPICAL CLASS UNDER PROFESSOR WALKER 
Scene — Greek seminar room. (Teachers latin class.) 

Nine girls and one man are already gathered around the table. They are huddled together 
and talking in subdued tones, as Professor Walker bustles in, — Everyone becomes quiet, — 
Professor Walker draws up his chair and sits down with a thump. This monologue follows: 

"G-r-r-r— B-r-r-r-r Wow! How many got hold of the text books this week? Eh? Every- 
body? Oh, nobody except the Misses Figley and the Misses Carmichael. Miss Figley, Miss 
Angeline I mean, tell me why men are better Latin teachers than women. Oh, Miss Figley 
refuses to answer and Mr. Brooks is too modest to answer. Well I'll tell you. Women, as 
long as they are young enough to be good teachers, are too busy looking for husbands to put 
on a professional attitude and when they're old enough they've given up all hope of husbands. 
And when a woman gives up hope of that, she can't be interested in anything, not even Latin. 
And if there is any poor woman who doesn't want a husband, she is too abnormal to be a good 
teacher. Well! I can't talk any longer — Chapel lasted too long, G-r-r-r, B-r-r-." 

(Everyone leaves in a hurry). 

TEMPLIN'S CLASS IN ETHICS 
Time: 8:00. 

Professor. What do you mean by the term "good" Mr. Moody? 

Mr. Moody. Why I mean that it's not bad, that is that you're all right er — er — that 
is good. 

(The girls snicker and the Professor frowns disapprovingly.) 

Professor. You are not exactly clear on that point Mr. Moody. What does your author 
say? 

Mr. Moody. Well you see Professor they burn gas where I stay and we froze out so I 
had to run to keep warm, therefore I did not read the lesson. 

Professor. Miss Moore do you burn gas or coal at your home? 

Miss Moore. Coal. 

Page 405 



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Professor. Then tell the class what is meant by "good." 

Miss Moore. I think so and yet I can't be sure. It must have been and yet perhaps not. 

Professor. Quite right. Mr. Hoyt, what is the ethical concept of the consciousness of the 
moral volitions. 

Hoyt. We burn gas. 

Professor, (disgustedly) Next. 

Hoyt. Sir. 

Professor. I meant the student in the next seat. 

Miss Walker. The ethical concept is founded on the virtue of womankind. Men are all 
wicked and women lead them on — to better conditions. 

Professor. I doubt it. Now there's a man who lives right here in Lawrence; I'll not 
mention his name, and yet some of you know him, who, etc., etc. 

(Miss Johnson goes over to the window, raises it, and sHps back to her seat.) 

Miss Johnson. Professor, it's too chilly here. My feet are cold. 

Professor, (looks at thermometer) That's right, we'll leave. (All exit hurriedly.) 

BOYNTON'S CLASS IN PUBLIC FINANCE 

Time: 10:15 

Professor. How are you getting along with your readings, Leventhal? 

Leventhal. I have as yet 20 pages to read in Bullock. 

Professor. How about you Danskin? 

Danskin. Only 40, my kind Sir. 

Professor. And you Carson? I suppose you must have 60. 

(Carson blushes confusedly while the Professor shuffles his papers.) 

Professor. Where is your mind Carson? Out in the snowbanks of Western Kansas? 

Carson. O yes sir, — I mean nosir — , Here sir. 

(Mr. Long fidgets and scrapes his chair.) 

Professor (glaring fiercely in the direction of the disturbance). We'll all turn over together. 
Now I'll tell you a story. When I was out camping, etc., etc., etc. 

(The members of the calss glance at each other with patient resignation, with the exception 
of Chas. Younggreen, who stretches out happily in his chair and closes his eyes). 

Professor (at the end of five minutes). Now the class is all shot to pieces, what with 
football rallies and cold snaps and long chapel and this that and the other thing. We'll have to 
push up — Take a thousand more pages in Plehn, a thousand in Bastable, and five hundred in 
Adams. Have this done by our next meeting please. (Class dismissed.) 

ENGLISH NOVEL UNDER PROFESSOR DUNLAP 

Place: Second Floor Fraser. Time: Afternoon 

One of these twenty girls and one man classes. Professor Dunlap is discovered twined 
around his chair. He is shuffling his timeworn notes and he frowns as he orders all the late 
comers to take chairs in the fartherest part of the room. He clears his throat strenuously, 
places his finger on the side of his nose, peers down at the class and begins his lecture. 

I'd like to have everyone pretend to be interested to-day. Are these lectures too soporific 
for you? Eh? What — what? Somebody answer me. Is it warm enough? Is it cool enough? 
Now we'll go on. 

(He reads a page or two of his notes, then stops and fixes a stern gaze toward the back of 
the room.) 

Please don't try to entertain each other, young ladies. Give me a chance for this hour. 
I know it's hard on you — but just be patient. What? Did anybody speak? Did anyone say 
anything? Speak up. Now we'll go on. Has anyone read Pendennis? What? No one? Well, 
it's a novel — by a man. By a certain W. M. Thackeray. I'm going to ask you all to read it. 
Yes, girls, and all — (With that he beams at the one man and continues thus forever.) 

Page 406 





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Memories 

Time by the Physics clock. 

Week-night dates. 

Trysting on the Museum steps. 

T. N. E. 

A Sig Alph Une party. 

Chapel tickets. 

The girl back home. 

High-school pin. 

The Honor System. 

Fresh air at the Gym. 

Board at 2.25 per. 

Graft. 

Snaps in Law School. 

Moonlight Dances. 

John Musselman in Y. W. C. A. meeting. 

A week-night date. 

Professor Olin's Walk. 

The Engineers in Chapel. 

Interview with Mrs. Ecke. (Beulah) 

Billy's. 

Fay, Before she met Art. 

Ptolomy, The SN bull dog. 

K. U. Cook Book 

(Approved by the Domestic Science Department.) 
FUSSER PUDDING 

1 Pi Phi, (dark hair preferred). 
1 Pinch of studying. 
yi Teaspoonful of sense. 
3 Cups of graft. 

3 Cups of sweetening (any kind). 
Spice to taste. 

Beat ingredients until light, add a "case" or two for variety. 
Put into a mold with the lid on tight. Warm, but with hot air. 
SWEETBREAD COQUETTE 
1 Pair of Thetas. 
]4: Teaspoonful of "airs." 
1 Tablespoonful of experience. 
5 Drops of wit. 

1 Heaping cup of warmed over sweetening (any kind). 
Stir and cook until very thick. Set out on the fire escape of F. A. A. and then serve with 
creamy sauce on the way home. 

FOOTBALL CUSTARD 
1 Quart of Sherwin. 
J^ of a Nebraskan (powdered). 

4 Backs (quarter). 
H Cup of "Boola." 

Beat all together than add a punt, beat again, and add a drop kick. 
Put in a Nebraskan and stir with "Boola" until the goal is made, then serve to the winning 
team. 

Page 407 



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Engineers Rebel at Wichita 



Lured far from home on a plant test twenty engineers found themselves expected to live 
on ham-sandwiches with thin air for desert. The Company had promised to feed them well 
as pay for the work they were doing. Finally on the receipt of two lunch baskets of ham sand- 
wiches for dinner they presented this petition: 

"We, the undersigned, hungry as hell and fed on ham till our stomachs turn over, do hereby, 
believing that 31c is not too large a sum per man for the Wichita Gas and Electric Company 
to spend for one meal out of four on us, — humbly beg that the grub which we will outline to 
you, be laid before us for our evening repast. 

Whereas there may be as many British Thermal Units in a ham sandwich as in a chicken 
leg, — nevertheless our efficiency falls off greatly under these heavy overloads of ham. 
Respectfully submitted to Mr. Heaton thru the kindness of Professor Johnson. 
Signed: 

Robert R. Fisher George C. Magatagon L. A. Baldwin 

R. J. Parker H. E. Hoadley S. S. Schooley 

E. L. Wright C. F. Hanson Steeker 

Dershem Thomen Hartman 

Mock Martinson Wilson 

Plank E. L. Bray Waddington 

Bartlett Marvel Stephens 



Page 410 




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NeM^s Items That Cscaped The Kansan 

The following is a new serial feature story that will be run in the Jayhawker from year to 
to year. We may as well admit that it is merely a device to force alumni to keep right on 
buying Jayhawkers after they leave school. The author is writing anonomously, with the 
intention of revealing (his, her), indentity later if (he, she) finds that (his, her) production 
meets with the general approval. The story is entitled, "What might happen if the Right 
People got together," and we think it is really good. 

March had passed, and May also, when, on a Fair Sommers Day, being a Fast Walker, I 
started for a distant Grove. After Cross (ing) four Hills I came to a Glenn, the lovliest of 
Younggreen Spotts. Beside a Brook grew two Roses, with one Smart Weede. There, in the 
Shade of the Hazel Branch I fell asleep by Hazzard. Quick, I was Ware of a flash of Light and 
a smell of Tinder. There stood a Keyser and two Kings attended by only one Lackey and one 
Porter. All were weeping. 

"Why are you Moodie?" I asked, "Peairs like you are Loveless." 

"Ah!" Spake the venerable Mann," we have lost the way to our Tudor Castle which stands 
on a Hite flying a Flagg of White and Vermillion. We left in pursuit of our twenty-one Millers, 
two Painters, eight Taylors, three Carpenters, Barber, Butcher and three Cooks, who left in 
a Huff." 

"I hope you will succeed in your Hall-Quest and Ketchem," I replied, "Pardee, they de- 
serve to be sent to the Penn to Werk on the Stone Pyle." 

Just then the Tooter blew for Chappie, and I awoke, thinking myself Doty. 



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CHEMIST VICTIM OF GHASTLY ACCIDENT 
FAMOUS INDUSTRIAL FELLOW SMITTEN AT HIS TABLE 

While E. Ward Tillotson, familiarly known as "Doc" was working on his new discovery 
yesterday he inadvertently spilled some 100% nitric acid on his nose. All persons acquainted 
with the deadly work of this drug can guess the result. A horrible looking smear appeared 
on the side of his nose. To add to his discomfiture, he remembered that he had a date 
with a young lady that evening. Despair lent courage to the young chemist, and seizing a 
piece of sand-paper he applied it with such vigor that in a few minutes he was in a presentable 
condition. 

FOND PARENTS 

Following a careful inquiry on the part of the Jayhawker Board, instigated at the request 
of some of our representative students, we have discovered that the parents of the following 
men are excessively fond of children. Otherwise they would never have been with us: 
Skeet Wilson Red Columbia Earl Hawes 

William Thomas Robert N. Linley Child Herold 

Hyames Will French Charles Hill 



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ABSENT MINDED STUDENT CAUSES ANNOYANCE— BOARDERS THREATEN 
VIOLENCE UNLESS RELIEF IS PROMISED 

Roomers at 1333 Tennessee street have called repeatedly at the police station of late, and 
have informed the captain of the police as a last measure, that unless some agreement can be 
reached agreeable to them, that a life is liable to be lost. The story as told to a reporter last 
night by the sergeant is as follows,"Roy Davis during the last moments of his date with a girl 
at that number invariably rubs up against the door bell and awakens the whole household." 

Page 411 






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Rosedale Jolts 

Dr. Hoxie. Well — what is the matter with this man? 
Brakebill. He was born dead. 



Milton Demond. This patient has the "Egg." 

Dr. Bohan . What? 

Demond. "Egg." 



Dr. Hoxie. McCarty was struggUng with the birth of an Idea. 
McCarty. You are wrong, — I didn't have to struggle. 
Sequel — Ill's under Hoxie. 



Doctor. Magill — what are the symptoms of Diphtheria. 

Magill. I don' know — but— (Here Magill makes a perfect recitation). 



Notes on Hector — 

"His ideas are tangled up in the exuberance of his own verbosity." — (Gibson). 
"I don't know what is the matter with Hecter. He is not a poroniac — because he has no 
fixed idea." — (Skoog). 

HAVE ANY OF US FORGOTTEN— 

Dennie, seeing the methylene blue? 

Dr. Hyde, calling on Magill? 

Dr. Binnie's few remarks to McCarty? 

Brakebill dropping the sponge and Dennie scratching his head while assisting Hertzler? 

Kinmons quizz book in Hygiene? 

The osteopath's paper on "EndotheUoma"? 

Mill's expression when asked to make his physiology paper "Neater"? 

How lazy were last year's Seniors? 

Cupp's Recitations? 

McCarty pitching at a crack? 

The valuable assistance of "Noncrede"? 

Sevin's imitation of the paralytic gaits? 

EXCERPTS FROM THE MASTERPIECE— KINMON'S QUIZ BOOK IN 

HYGIENE— "HYGEON." 

(On yellow fever) — "Yellow fever has about the same preventitives as malaria, the mos- 
quito bemg the msultmg factor. The specia differs some from the malaria fever. The one in 
yellow fever is smaller and can be detected by its method of biting — it stands on its head. It 
IS a small animal shghtly yellow in color. Quarinteen is a great factor in the spread of yellow 
fever." 

(Factor in resistance.) 

1. Ocupation. 2 Inviroment. 3. Rase. 4. Color. 
6. Ancistory. 

(A few more examples.) 

"Stagnent" (Atagnant) 

"Petition" (Partition) 

"Naturley" (Naturally) 

"Soar" (Sore) 



5. Previous condition of servetude. 



"Achers" (Acres) 
"Corocein" (Kerosene) 
"Vaxination" (Vaccination) 
"Ventolator" (Ventilator) 



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MEN STUDENTS 

Name Usually Found How Known 

Ammons, Earl F On McCook By his dancing 

Amnions, Earnest H Eating As "Little Brother" 

Armstrong, Clinton D. In His room By his smile 

Babb, George R At the Pole By the hair 

Baer, Milton David At Tripps By his laugh 

Banker, Louis W Nowhere As Frank's Brother 

Bechtold, Edmond C. SeUing Tickets By his optimism 

Becker, Harry V With a lady By his blushes 

Beezley, George F. Singing By his walk 

Bergen, John H On the porch bench By his voice 



Boddington, Edward M At Lee's 

Bragg, Gilbert A Chemistry Bldg. 



Brooks, Martin K.. 

Brown, Loren D 

Bruckmiller, F. W. 
Brumage, Everett 
Buzick, Alonzo R... 

Cain, Wm. Q 

Clark, Russel H 

Cunnick, Paul C 

Davidson, Ellis 

Davis, Don L 



By his ideas 
By his racquet 
As Professor 
By his Freckles 
By his wit 
By his face 
As Queener 
As an Actor 
As a Bostonian 
By his modesty 
By his "small talk" 
As "Dashing Don" 



In the Stacks 

With Hamilton 

At the Bee-hive 

With the State Statistician 

Wednesday Night Dances. 

At early church 

At Ecke's 

Hangin' around 

At Con's 

Studying 

Derby, Jesse R In English office By his walk 

Dittmar, Elmer H Laughing As "Nickle Pete" 

Farley, James N Asleep By his Case 

Eraser, Roy Boning By his power of Speech 

French, Will Reclining As a sprinter 

Goldman, Abe M At the Piano As Germany 

Gribble, Ulysses A Not alone As Benedict 

Hansen, Herbert Out Walking By his ties 

Heil, Pete Kicking As "Little One" 

Hoffman, J. C. Among the girls By his giggle 

Humphrey, Arthur With the "fellows" No one like him 

Kates, Melvin StrolUng on the campus 

by himself Admiring himself 

LaCoss, Louis Wilson's drug store As "Lute" 



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Name Usually Found How Known 

Lambert, Ike Buying Royalty's Managing Proms and Things 

Lehman, Harvey Discussing live questions By his eyes 

Luke Ittai Butting In Misses his train 

McKinnon, Archibald With the faculty By his influence 

Metz, LeRoy Trotting By his coquetry 

Moore, Will With one of them By his indecision 

Moses, Art Keeping engagements By his henpecked 

expression 



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Name 

Addison, Beulah 

Atkinson, Adrienne. 

Atkinson, Vera 

Banker, Frances 

Berger, Emily 



WOMEN STUDENTS 

Usually Found 

At church 

With a man 

Chatting 

With "brother" 

Amusing people 






By 

By 

.As 
.As 
By 



Bijelow, Edna Jollying As 

Bozell, Bess In politics As 

Burdick, Helen Having a party By 

Burroughs, Phyllis With Bernice By 

Butts, Bernice Reading By 

Carraher, Nelle At the studio As 

Chisam, Fay Hunting news As 

Coston, Rachael Before the Council As 

Coxedge, Lina At Verein As 

Crawford, Villa Chinning As 

Culp, Lucy With mankind As 

Dack, Bertha On the job As 

Dalton, Beatrice Gossiping As 

March, Lucie Interviewing Miss Thomas As 

Mitchell, Hannah At Cons As 

Mix, Bertha At the Nickle By 

McKittrick, Bessie In the Cafeteria As 

Tripp, Lena Working the Men By 

Walker, Josephine Bluffing As 

Wiley, Gertrude In Lab As 



How Known 
her "case" 
her languishing smile 
a politician 
Frank 
her wonderful 

conversation 
Little Actress 
"Easy Mark" 
her dad 
her boneheads 
her laugh 
"Model" 
"Cub" 

"The budding bride" 
"Phi Beta Kappa rushee" 
"Heart's Desire" 
"Cutey" 

"The Freshman Terror" 
"Miss Nobody from 

Starland" 

Y. W. C. A. supporter 
Leading Lady 
her diversity 
"Some Cook" 
the Council 
"Jo" 
a Cash-girl 








Page 415 






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Election Returns 

After much time and trouble and careful rechecking, of the ballots the Jay hawker "bored" 
has at last tabulated the results of the senior election to determine the superlatives of the class. 
Practically every senior voted so that the returns may be taken as a fairly accurate estimate 
of public opinion. Following are the list of the successful contestants in the race for first place. 

1. The Man who has done the most for Kansas University — 



FIRST PLACE 

Earl Ammons 

2. The laziest Man- 

FIRST PLACE 

Hal Harlan 



SECOND PLACE 

Ellis Davidson 



SECOND PLACE 

Hal Harlan 



3. The most pupolar Man^ 

FIRST PLACE SECOND PLACE 

Louis LaCoss Harold Brownlee 

4. Beau Brummel of the Class — 



FIRST PLACE 

Conley 

5. The worst Fusser — 

FIRST PLACE 

Art Moses 

6. The best Athlete— 
FIRST PLACE 

Earl Ammons 

7. The worst politician- 
FIRST PLACE 

Hal Harlan 



SECOND PLACE 

Hal Black 



SECOND PLACE 



SECOND PLACE 

Tod Woodbury 

SECOND PLACE 

Spec Brummage 



8. The biggest grafter— 
FIRST PLACE 

Arch MacKinnon 

9. The worst Grind — 
FIRST PLACE 

The Figley Girls 

10. The most popular girl in Senior Class — 
FIRST PLACE SECOND PLACE 

Myrtle Wykoff Myra Rogers 



SECOND PLACE 

Anna Manley 

SECOND PLACE 

Jack Williams 



ALSO RAN 

Beulah Murphy 
LeMoine Manglesdorf 

ALSO RAN 

Hal Harlan 



ALSO RAN 

Ed Rhodes Pete Heil 



ALSO RAN 

Bill Hamner 



ALSO RAN 



ALSO RAN 

Ira Snyder Gladys Elliott 

ALSO RAN 

Ike Lambert 



ALSO RAN 

Leota McFarlin 

ALSO RAN 

Peter Hiebert 



Billy Norris 



Bill Hamner 



ALSO RAN 

Emily Grignard, 
Frances Wilson, 
Lucille Wilkinson, 
Brownie Angle, Bertha Mix, 
Nelle Martindale 

Page 416 



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Minutes of the Last Meeting 



SIGMA NU 

Meeting called to order by Uncle Button. Sears moved that a motion be passed in Pan- 
Hellenic abolishing spring parties, as the Sigma Nu's need the money for a house fund. Presi- 
dent suggested that the taking of senior laws by the Sigma Chis was encroaching upon their 
property. Spellings appointed to notify the Sigs. Committee on membership reports that 
Hatcher had decided to stay with the Kappa Sigs. Sears promises he will get a motion through 
Pan-Hellenic keeping Kappa Sig out for the next 25 years. Swenson congratulated on his 
large list of conquests made during the last week. Kline and Betourney announce the rental 
of a tally-ho and that they will start their social whirl Sunday. Meeting adjourned to permit 
Sears to confer with the Chancellor. 










PHI GAMMA DELTA 

Meeting called to order with Brother Stoll and Surber absent. Committee sent up stairs 
to pull Surber away from the mirror. Joe Bishop reports that having successfully completed 
five hours work, his father has given his consent to Joe to go the farewell party. Stoll arrives. 
His excuse for being late is that the Greenlees clock was slow. Brother Campbell hands out 
individual schedules of instructions for the next week on printed slips. Brother Linley is 
restricted to five dates after supper per week, until he gets his work up. Brothers Stoll and 
Sommers urged to study for base ball. Entertainment committee reports plans for high school 
dance, next Friday. Brother Williams reads his Fiji copy in which he praises the Phi Gams 
in the most glowing terms for making "Billy" a success. Meeting adjourned so Jack could go 
to Y. M. C. A. 

PHI KAPPA PSI 

Meeting called to order by President Stuckey. Committee appointed to bring the play 
boys, Dolde, Tholen, Evans and Sawyer in from the street. Committee appointed to get 
Delaney to class. Sammy Bierer reports that all Kappas look aUke to him. Brother Young- 
green orates at length on his great work in the Y. M. C. A. and thinks that by next year all the 
committeeships should be held down by Phi Kappa Psis. Brother Edwards excused to pack 
for California as press agent for the Glee Club. Brother Campbell who has been looking out 
of the east window reports that Theta meeting is over and asks to be excused. Brother Tholen 
and Edwards state that they intend to go to the Pi Phi party. Brother Graham also expects 
an original. Meeting adjourned as the Junction City Kappas are sighted on the corner. 

SIGMA CHI 

Meeting called to order by President Snyder. Proposition advanced that we consolidate 
with Phi Delta Phi rejected as all members but two in the Law School were already members. 
Brother Norris congratulated on getting a Pi Phi original with such a small effort on his part. 
Brother Snyder informs Brothers that he is about the best ladies man he knows of. Brother 
Hosier expresses his great joy that he may still be with us. Brother Butler suggests a straight 
Boston program for the next dance, offering to show any of the brothers the step. Brother 
Harlan urges the members to get out for athletics as the football team is slipping from our 
grasp. Brother Martin suggests that Coach Sherwin be made a regular boarder. Meeting 
adjourned as the pool tournament was to start in half an hour. 

Page 419 
















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ALPHA TAU OMEGA 

Meeting called to order. Brother HoUiday comes in with his hair pasted down, clothes 
neatly brushed and a rose in his buttonhole, as he has an engagement at 11 o'clock with his 
soul mate. Brother Miller severely censured for his many trips to Kansas City. Brother 
Clauser announces that he has hopes of landing an original to the Pi Phi spring party. Brother 
Dittmar relates the thrilling nickle programs for the past week, and urges all the brothers to 
see "Bunny" in "Country Club." A letter from President Van read in which he urges brothers 
to work hard in his absence. Brother Martindale congratulated on his social chmb. Brother 
Minor excused to hold conference with Gesell, but suggests before he leaves, that Professor 
Dykestra he asked over to Sunday dinner. Meeting adjourned. 

SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON 

Meeting called to order with Theis and Darrough absent. Darnell arrived late. Darnel^ 
reports that he has successfully eliminated Sammy Bierer in the race for the Kappa in question. 
Theis discovered out on the roof looking at the moon, and brought into the meeting. Hamner 
excused to call up Hutchinson on long distance. Brother Darrough moved that Paul Cubbison 
be permitted to have his picture taken with the bunch. Brothers Hamner, Darrough, and 
Theis excused to meet Cubbison, and fix up story to tell the Student Council about their cab 
riding serenade. Brothers Dunham and Howden have phone call from Chi Omega house and 
excusing themselves hastily, beat it. Meeting adjourned as friends from Kansas City have 
arrived. 

PHI DELTA THETA 

Meeting called to order but a quorum was not present. Pete is sent over to Lee's to bring 
absent brothers home. Reports that Skinny was making tea at the Pi Phi House, and would 
not come. Investigation started to see if there were any brothers that were not yet engaged. 
Proc confessed but apologized, stating that he was progressing nicely. Brother Rhodes warned 
all the freshmen to study so that when they grew up they might be president of the engineers. 
Brother Lambert and Clark promise not to recognize their friends that passed by in a cab on 
the previous night. Meeting adjourned to have joint meeting at Lee's with our bosom friends 
the S. A. E.'s, and treats on Brother Ike who had just successfully managed "Billy." 

BETA THETA PI 

Meeting called to order with overflow meeting being held in the dinning room. Committee 
on pledging reports that system of putting colors on Freshmen while they were asleep was a 
failure. Arch MacKinnon calls up and assures the brothers that all members of the cab party 
will be sufficiently punished for taking the names of the Betas in vain. Brother Daniels com- 
plains that the exorbitant price being paid to keep up the Hutt automobiles will ruin the 
chapter. Brother Schwinn is excused to spit. The brothers are all urged to try out for the 
Red Domino show as Brother Manager McKay has assured them all a lead. Meeting adjourned 
to enable Brothers Wykoff, Walker and Lee to attend a suffragette meeting. 

KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 

Freshmen Fogarty and Nachtmann finally rid themselves of "Chuck" and "Del" — Moses 
sent down cellar, and meeting called to order. Sister Flossie Payne announces that the con- 
census of opinion of the crowd she travels with is that sister Angle should leave the feeding 
bottles alone and try someone her own size. Sister Brownie gets peeved and says that even 
tho she is engaged to Jim, Leonard is real dear and she could not very well refuse those Phi 
Delt parties. Engagement committee announces present membership of Fay, Rue, Brownie 
and Flossie; and pledges Madeline, Crete, Mildred and Ruth. The following were reprimanded 
because Kappa must keep ahead in the matrimonial fine; that Bertha bug up as it is her last 
chance to get Billie's pin. That Virginia E. would have more luck if she would devote herself 

Page 420 



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to one of the two. A vote of thanks was offered Moses for tending furnace during the cold 
spell, and that Foster give him part credit for the Kappa scholarship. The question of why no 
Kappa made the Senior Society came up but it was soon dropped for the more interesting sub- 
ject of the Spring Party. A brief discussion ensued as to what was the latest date obtainable. 
Due to loud knocking on the cellar door the meeting was adjourned. 

KAPPA ALPHA THETA 

Meeting called to order with everybody present with the exception of sister Coston who 
was busy moving to 1400 Tenn. Minutes of last meeting read and approved. Committee 
on True Theta Policy reported that most of the upperclassmen had, during the past month, 
complied with all the rules, no dates, no rats, no slang, no extremes in avoidupois, no anything 
unusual or startling. Chairman sister Gosset complained that she could get no hold on Elsa, 
Myra, nor Rachel as they were too slippery for her. Moved and passed that sister Coston 
be requested to give at least twenty-four hours notice of any change of residence, whether it 
be in or out of the house. Stewardess Neumuller, in answering the charge of poor board, 
brought by sister Lena, refers to the sixteen pounds which sister Smart and Rogers have gained 
during the past week in spite of their daily vinegar rubs and strenuous rolling exercises. Finance 
committee reports a coal bill of $75.00. (A result of doing away with gas during cold weather). 
Moved and seconded that it be sent to Judge Smart as per request. 

CHI OMEGA 

Buelah arrives from across the street. Meeting called to order. Moved and passed that 
the rumor of a Chi Omega spring party not to be denied until later in the year. Sister Dunaway 
requested that they should not shovel the snow from the walks hereafter as she enjoyed being 
carried from the cab to the porch, and that the rest should try it. Moved that Spec, be dis- 
missed long enough to go in for dramatics. The matter was strongly opposed by sister Fair- 
child, and in consideration of her feelings withdrawn. Sister Murphy speaking from the chair 
requests all sisters hereafter not to hesitate to take it upon themselves to regulate the lighting 
wherever they might be entertained, for instance as she had done at the Pi U house. Sister 
Wilke says that a certain chaperon remarked slightingly on the dim lights and the manner of 
dancing at the Engineer's Dance and asks Buelah how it happened when she was present. 
Sister Murphy answers the charge by saying that she was unaware of any improprieties, in 
fact enjoyed herself immensely. Spec arrives and meeting adjourned for a little dancing. 

PI BETA PHI 

After one final grand rally around Skinny Frith the meeting was called together. Minutes 
read and approved. Sister Graybel was excused as she had forgotten to bring her crochetting, 
and had promised to make three collars for the girls that night. Sisters Thompson and Wiley 
pointed out the advisability of entertaining the frats in the order Beta, Sigma Chi, Phi Psi, etc. 
as their respective annual parties, the Turkey Pull, Masque, and Christmas Dinner came in 
that order. It was carried by unaminous vote and sisters Wiley and Thompson given a vote 
of thanks for their forsight. Moved and carried that Pi Phi must have a distinctive type, and 
in order that this may be accomplished all sisters are advised to dance in blue serge coats at 
class dances. This rule applies to both winter and summer. Week night dates were then 
discussed and it was decided that Dorothy Porter should be allowed to have them as she came 
up to school late and lost out on the advantages of having them in the fall. The Publicity 
committee was warned to use more than the usual tact in letting slip their intensions of giving 
a spring party, and that it would be unnecessary to inform the Sigma Nus and Phi Psis as 
Jerry and Fin had already found it out. It was announced that their most representative 
girls were elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Meeting was then adjourned as their week night dates 
were whistling from all angles of the house. 



Page 421 



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L-etter From Self-made Son in College to Folks at Home 

Lawrence, Kansas, April 20, 1912. 
Dear Mother and Father: 

I can well imagine that you think I have forgotten you, but if you only realized how heavy 
my work is getting you would surely sympathize with me. I spend Friday and Saturday 
evening in my room of late, sometimes working until two o'clock on my musical appreciation 
problems. It takes a lot of paper to do this on by the way, and the dean insists on the best 
quality of paper, so that it really is a quite heavy expense. On Sunday evening I go to church, 
and according to instructions you gave me before coming I have attempted to help the church 
as much as I could by giving them financial assistance. 

Did I tell you in my last letter that the Junior Prom was coming soon. It is the really big 
party of the year now that they have abolished the fraternity spring parties. All the faculty 
attend, and they look the crowd over pretty carefully to see if their students are there. They 
like to see them all present as it proves to them that they are not too hard in their course. But 
believe me, folks, there is nothing like it at home, at least so far as expense is concerned. A 
fellow is supposed to wear a dress suit, patent leather shoes, stiff hat, white gloves. In addition 
he is required to give his girl flowers, and take her to the performance in a cab. By the time 
you meet all these expenses you feel flat for some time. It costs at least fifteen beans. 

I wish to tell you, if you will forgive my speaking of it myself that I am making pretty good 
in a social way up here this year. My most recent conquest was an election to the Camels and 
the Con Club. They are however secret organizations so that I cannot really tell you much 
about them. The Con Club for instance is so much of a secret that they had their photographs 
put in last year's Jayhawker backward, so as not to betray the membership. 

The members of the Camel Club must like a camel be able to strive onward toward a goal 
in life, exhibit endurance, and go without food for a time if circumstances demand it. But in 
view of the fact that membership in these organizations means recognition, in a rather distinc- 
tive way, please do not show alarm at the price that is to be paid. The initiation fee is $25.00 
for each club. I paid $15.00 for my Con Club pin, and then lost it so that it has to be replaced. 

Your suggestion about not attending too many social functions at the week-end appealed 
to me as an exceedingly wise idea so that I have been cutting out to a large degree lately them, 
and taking almost my entire social diversion Wednesday nights by attending small and select 
dances at Ecke's Hall. 

This letter has run on more than I expected it to when I commenced but it seems that 
there is always so much to tell you home folks. I need hardly remind father, I presume, that 
I need a new spring suit and that he has not forwarded me a check sufficient in size to enable me 
to meet such an expenditure. 

Your dutiful son, 

JAMES HENRY. 












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Daffydils 

It was in the middle of the night. The assistant business manager of the Jayhawker was 
sound asleep in bed after having just returned from his nightly visit to the nickles. Visions 
of films and reels and women with large picture hats, and pictures inviting him to come and 
bring the family ran through his dreams. Wild cowboys with guns exploding by the assistance 
of the snare drummer, chased savage Indians over some perfectly gorgeous mountain scenery 
Suddenly our hero sat up in bed with a scream. His mouth opened and from his trembling 
lips came the interrogation, "If the Aurora should move across the street wouldn't it be Grand''" 

Duck Blackstone! There comes a snowball! 



The rambling Wreck from K. U. Tech. dragged slowly along in the hot sun carrying a 
Transit over one shoulder and a note book in the other hand. As he started to mount a Bare- 
faced rock a 20 foot Rattler glided from a crevice and thrust his head within two inches of our 
hero's Map. The latter was startled momentarily, but recovering his Composure asked in an 
agreeable conversational Tone, "If I wore Engineers Boots wouldn't you call me Well Shaad''" 

("You're Dismissed," Beat It) 



The pretty freshman Co-ed was climbing laboriously up the hill slipping back two steps 
for every one she gained. At length she became exasperated beyond all endurance and raising 
one of her pink-rose-pettled Hands on high lost her Balance and fell to the icy Bricks and scraped 
down a Block. A gallant Law came rushing to the Inert Form and Leaning over whispered 
anxiously in her Hair, "If a class under Blackmar were Doubly Bad would you call it 

Twenhofel?" (It's 8:15, boys. Lets Cut). 



The football Hero lay dreaming the night before that Missouri might yet Beat Kansas* 
Over the field ran huge black and yellow striped Tigers carrying the ball down, Down, close to 
the Red and Blue Goal. As his nightmare began running faster and faster he saw Puny Bluck 
bearing down on him with all sails set and the water Boiling. As he received the 230 pound 
Pat in the Epigastric region, he murmured pleasantly, "If Lawrence was like Moberly wouldn't 
you call it Helleberg?" 

(Quick fellers! The Paddles. He has no cap.) 



The Thespian Star came from the wings bowing to his Audience before the applause came 
As soon as he had taken one good look at the vast sea of Faces in the Bowersock Theater, he 
lost his equanimity and began to grab for his breath. His mind became a painful blank and 
his mouth swung open like a restaurant door in fly time. The stage manager enraged by his 
helpless plight seized a club and running upon the stage muttered truculently, "When Professor 
Sturtevant gets lonesome must he seek a Newport?" 

(Ye Gods! Still no check from Home.) 



A Tennessee Street girl was drifting down the walk busily engaged in picking up hair pins 
and hanging them on trees. Just at Lee's a bachelor professor appeared and she accomplished 
a roguish glance to attract his attention. He was, however, engaged in finding a thought, and 
she was forced to drop her handkerchief directly in front of him. The absent minded one trod 
upon it and departed and as the disappointed maiden picked up her damaged bait, she hissed, 
"If Miss Day plays the piano can Maude Cooke?" 

(Dockeray, Keep those dogs Still.) 



Percival, the pink cheeked manicured fusser was gliding dreamily over the floor, carrying 
a beautiful doll in his arms. Once he deflected his ceiling stare and strove to look into the eyes 
which were Gazing through the buttonhole in his coat lapel. His foot caught in a pa.sing 
train and as he realized his fate he yawned nonchalantly, "If Professor Gesell came into the 
Medic building to make a date where would Ida Henrietta Hyde?" 

(Bang! Bang!, 'tis the musketry of the K. N. G.) 

Page 426 







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Arms and the Woman Johnnie Johnson, Beulah Addison 

Beloved Vagabond Harry Kemp 

Best Man Spec Brummage 

Call of the Wild Bill Hamner 

Climbers Ira Snyder, Swede Swenson, Buzz Woodbury 

Comrades Fame and Myra 

Countess Diana Nelle Carraher 

Cupid's Understudy Ruth Lamb 

Fighting Chance Delaney 

Fool Errant Cub Baer 

Man on the Box Jack Williams 

Slim Princess Ira Snyder 

That Printer of Udell's Ellis Davidson 

Together Hermione Sterling, Charles Gruber 

To Have and to Hold Lawrence Peairs, Edith Laming 

Wanted, A Chaperone 1301 Tenn. Street 

Younger Set Margaret Kanaga, Elsa Barteldes, Earl Moore, Biliken Edwards 

Iron Woman Beulah Murphy 

Dri and I Rye and Paul 

Bud Paddle Palmer 

Masquerader A. W. Hosier 

Looking Backward Napoleon LeMoine 

The Conqueror Captain Steele 

Kidnapped Glendale Griffiths 

Don Quixote Red Brown 

Old Curiosity Shop Kappa House 

Last of the Mohicans Haskell Football team 

Hungry Heart Proc Porter 

Infatuation Levinson, Bertha Mix 

Intrusion of Jimmy Hazel Butts 

Lion and the Mouse Lamb, HoUiday 

Fortune Hunter Glen Bramwell 

Goose Girl Merle Clark 

Grafters Anna Manley, Joe Bishop, Hal Black 



Half A Rogue 

Half A Chance 

He Fell in Love with his Wife 

Heart Throbs 

Heart's Desire 

House of Mirth 

Rebellion Mildred Manley, Leota McFarlin, Bernice 

Paste Board Crown 

Egoist 



Ike Lambert 

Edna Bigelow 

Frank Ward 

Rue Thompson 

Sherwin, Gladys Elliott 

Pi Phi House 

Ruhlandt, Lolita McCune 

SkuUy Waugh 

Arch McKinnon 



The One Woman Margaret Siegel 



Page 427 



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Test Questions for a Well Educated Man 

1. Can you look a W. S. G. A. member in the face and then make a date for Wednesday 
night? 

2. Can you digest Doctor Day's thirteen varieties? 

3. Can you understand Professor Boodin's latest book? 

4. Can you tell Clarence R. from Claude E.? 

5. Do you know what's in the little white box? 

6. Do you love your neighbor as the Laws love the Engineers? 

7. Can you converse with Dockeray's educated dogs? 

8. When does the whistle blow? 

9. What was the personnel of the moon dance? 

10. When are cabs and flowers necessary? Explain fully. 

11. How many flunks are necessary for voluntary resignation from the council. 

12. Who is Vice-President of the W. S. G. A.? 

13. Who was Ittai Luke? 

14. Who carries the tune in chapel? 

15. Where have all the good old snap courses gone? 

16. Does the council have it in personally for Jack? 

17. Do you care whether Dorothy Porter goes to Topeka every Friday night and returns 
every Sunday evening? 

18. Can you talk about the comparative merits of Ecke's and Fraternal Aid? 

19. Can you suggest a reform for the elimination of graft? 

20. Will you buy a tag for some public benefit enterprise every time you appear on the 
hill? 



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Ever Hear These 

Dean Templin— "I was arrested once myself." 

Professor Boynton — "The idea of asking a Professor to bring his shovel and work out his 
poll tax — The idea!" 

Dean Green — "How many of this class are there whose grandmothers died just before the 
last quizz?" 

Professor M. E. Rice— "Marty is getting old. He has forgotten his cubic acres joke." 

Professor Cady — "Haaaaa! Please bring five pounds of chocolates." 

Professor Young, (Cliff) — "Do it anyway." 

Gardner — "Er-r-r-r, Well you know what I mean." 

Dean Marvin — "I am Very busy." 

Professor Hoad — "Hand all this work in Monday." 

Professor P. F. Walker — "Put the watah in the boilah and take the following datah." 

Raymond — "Wake up, Get some pep." 

Professor Haworth (to book agent) — "These text books are too thick. I want one about 
that thick." (Holds up two fingers.) 

Dr. Burdick — "Gentlemen, this is not a sorority meeting, so kindly be quiet." 

Professor Higgins — "Reasoning that it is thus and so we come to the proper conclusion." ^ 

Professor Hill — "I see by the recitations that you men are studying too hard. I fear that 
you will injure your health." 

Dean Green — "Mr. Blank, that wall is self supporting so you will not need to hold it up." 

Professor Dunlap — "Now ladies I want you to listen to this as if you were really interested." 

Professor Dykstra — "More of you read your text today. I hope that still more will begin 
to do likewise." 

Professor Thorpe — "I will only keep you a few minutes this morning. I am helping the 
fellows out until they get started with the Kansan." 

Dean Johnson — "Pardon this personal experience, but when I worked with Angell, Judd 
and James, we thought this way." 

Dr. Curran — "Who broke the liver." 

Professor Kester — "Actually now it does look that way." 

Dr. Boughton — "These quizz papers show very poor cerebral technique on the part of 
several men." 

Dr. Hyde — "You must get the attitude." 

Professor Scott — "Now the boys at Chicago" 

Dean Sayre — "Don't study too much outthide, but let me lead you in my lectureth." 

Dr. Chambers — "Well, is LeMoine here today?" 

Professor Havenhill — "Now the proper way to fold a powder paper is ■ — ." 

(For one hour.) 

THERE! THERE! 

This college life's so bloomin' tough, they cannot give a man enough, it seems. To keep 
the Profs afloat they grind me down and get my goat. Now when I lived in Podunktown 
before Dad Boynton got me down, my grades were simply out of sight and I could run my 
bluff alright — But here I've stalled my level best and still the ones come four abreast; and even 
though my eyes are weak. Prof. Blackmar thinks I ought not sleep — in class and says I'll have 
to quit, or else pip up a little bit. Solong old Pards, I'm feeling rank; I guess Dad needs me 
in the bank. Remember I made Sigma Nu and showed 'em what a Blood can do. 



Page 430 












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Exclusive Clubs 

GRAFTERS' UNION AND WIRE PULLERS' LEAGUE 

Since Grafting plays such an important part in the life at the University of Kansas, and 
since this is a year of organization at this institution, the Grafters' Union and the Wire Pullers' 
League have been formed to promote this art. Members have all proven themselves profi- 
cient in this, the gentlest and most subtle of all the arts. 

MEMBERS 

Adrienne Atkinson Rachel Coston Frank Benedict 

Merle Clark Charles Younggreen Rose Dyer 

Arvid Frank Amarynthia Smith Ward Maris 

Lena Tripp Grace Wilkie Wayne Wingert 

Brownie Angle Russell Clark Alonzo Buzick 

Nelle Carraher Cecil Gorsuch Bill Hamner 

Flossie Kincaid George Edwards Myra Stevens 

Roscoe Redmond Lucille Kellerman Ray Soper 

MEMBERS FROM P. S. B. CHOSEN BECAUSE OF SPECIALIZATION 

Murray Conley, specialty — Pi Phi Emile Grignard, specialty — Kappa 

France Wilson, specialty — Chi Omega Hal Black, specialty — Theta 

GOSSIP CLUB 

President Emile Grignard 

Vice-President Chas. Younggreen 

Secretary Lucile Yates 

Chief Procurer of Supplies ...George Bischoff 

Chief Starter Delpha Johnson 

Keeper of Records Bess Taylor 

Chief Spreader "Lute" LaCoss 

Seargent at Arms Jeff Miller 

ACTIVE IN THE CAUSE 

"If there is anything I enjoy doing it is gossiping, just pure gossip' — (Bertha Dack). 
"You know I never know any gossip any more" — (Eflie Stevens). 

"If you want to know any real, juicy gossip for the Jayhawker just come to me" — (Emile 
Grignard). 

"I don't gossip any more than some people I know of" — (Villa Crawford). 

"You know when you tell me anything it is just like publishing it" — (Bess Bozell). 

"Oh, tell me some gossip, I never hear any any more" — (Harold Broderick). 

"Gee, I just love to gossip. Don't you?" — (Lena Tripp). 

"Say, any new gossip floating round today" — (Pat Murphy). 

"Using scandal, just come to me" — ("Spec" Brummage). 

MUTTS JEFFS 

Skinny Frith George Marsh Ike Lambert "Jeff" Miller 

Corp "Ike" Irwin "Bud" Ketchem Artie Fast 

Roland Athey George M. Brown "Billikins" Edwards Martin Thomen 

Ira Snyder Ora Hite Pete Heil Paul Ness 

Jim Henshall Pardee Bob Thomas Carl Israel 

Red Brown Candy Cramer Murray Louis LaCoss 

Jack Hill Chester Francis Freddy Degen Grin Potter 

"Happy" Martindell Byron Shinn "Pat" O'Roke "Red" Columbia 

Page 432 



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WOMEN HATERS LEAGUE 

Flower — The Lemon 
Motto — The Female of the species is more deadly than the Male. 

OFFICERS 

President Johnny Boodin 

Vice-President Howard Houk 

Secretary Harold Brownlee 

Treasurer Billy Price 

Specialty Blondes Karl Krehbiel 

Specialty Fine Arts Fred Ott 

CHARTER MEMBERS 

France Wilson Ward Hatcher Lon Buzick 

Chris Curry Burton Sears Don Rankin 

Brick Gephart Harold Broderick Louis LaCoss 

Pearly Boesche Amos Johnson Todd Woodbury 

CONSTITUTION 

We do hereby agree neither to have nor to ask for a single date, midweek or otherwise, 
with the feminine species of our habitat, K. U. 

FRISKY FRATRES 
THE BROTHERHOOD OF BOLD BAD MEN 
FRATERS IN UNIVERSITATE 

Jack Williams Ike Lambert Byron Wentling 

Ri Darrough Skinny Frith Earl Moore 

Publication — Try to be Tough 

PLEDGES— QUALIFICATIONS 

Harold Evans, Smokes big black cigars Howard Wykoff, Reads the Cosmopolitan 

Johnny Johnson, Used to wear his hair Buzz Woodbury, Has had Dates with 

pompadour Ruth Lamb and Dorothy Porter 

Skeet Beauchamp, MoonUght dances WilUs Masemore, Wears a red sweater 

Elmer Dittmar, Nickle mad William Tudor, Loafs at Wilson's 

Jean hall. Tells stories Arvid Frank, Sh sh 

John Clauser, Never shaves Chas. Coates, Plays with politics 

William Hamner, Looks the part Herbert Wilson, Kicks up his heels 

Paul Surber, Carries matches Peaches Dinsmore, Bullies the boys 

A. W. Hozier, Uses herpicide Will Moore, Tries to be a Mormon 

Advice to the Leap Year Girl 

TOO LATE FOR LEAP YEAR GIRL 





i^^A v.,""'^ 


Professor Kiesewetter 


"Art" Moses 


Kabler 




pi 


"Ed" Kohman 


"Fritz" Buckmiller 


Ray Hoskins 




Nelsqn Stevens 


Thomas Jones 


Loren Brown 




■ #^ 


"Art" Haskins 


Harry Berger 


Ulysses Gribble 






"Pete" Heil 


Professor Wheeler 


Elmer Whitney 






Lee Hoffman 


Charles Grueber 


"JohnieV Johnson 






"Brick" Gephart 


WiUiam Tangeman 


Alec Johnson 




^^ 


Page 433 


"Doc" Tillotson 













Acrostics 











Red Brown 
Albert LeMoine 
Hal Harlan 

Relihan 

A. J. Boynton 

Happy Martindale 

Bierer 
O'Roke 
Yeoman 
Sadaharu Katsuno 



BurTon 
CoN Squires 
Buck CampbEU 



Genevieve FaSt 

Velleta BeaUchamp 

Fanny Conley 
Myrtle WykofF 
M'lle WaRd 
Kitty KAtes 
Miss CassinGham 

TEss Hemphill 
EThel LaCoss 
Rachael STockton 

VEnus Dodge 
Mollie Surber 



Clara Bell Lupton 
ORetta Moore 
Helen RIgby 

ClarenCe Falls 
Alberta Korbin 
Gale GoSsett 



Topping 

YatEs 

BickeRstaff 

GOff 

DiXon 

Wilkinson 

Van Doren 

CottEr 



JacK Williams 
PaUl Surber 

CharleS Younggreen 
Paul Flagg 
Skinny Frith 
Ri DaRrough 
Murph HIssem, Jr. 

Tod Woodbury 



HumphrEy 
ForNey 

Grignard 
Bro's Smith 
JoneS 

FuSh 
TuCkey 
MAlcolmson 

Bray 

Swenson 
Queerknerr 
Fuller 
MAlleis 
Dods 



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Nuen Sch Wander 
Aime E Grignard 

Nan Armstrong 
Mild Red Manley 
Virginia Elward 

Fern Edie 
JOseph Smith 
DoRthy Porter 

Hannah Mitchell 

BErtha Mix 
Madeline Nachtman 




Boehm 
Martin 

Greenlees 



Humphrey 
MasEmore 
NApoleon L. 
MangelsDorf 



Hilford 
ConlEy 

BaRtlett 
CaldErwood 



ShAw 

Grignard 
CAdmus 
King 
MoNroe 



SmiTh 

SoWers 
EbnOther 

AmmOns 
GriFfin 



Allen 

BenKelman 
Davis 
LyNch 

Davenport 



NiCh 
BRownlee 
Holsington 
Ziegler 
Zimmerman 
ButLer 
SnYder 



Boehm 
ThEis 
HAmner 
FisheR 

Stacy 



ChiSam 
DalTon 
EAton 
FaiRweather 
Sowers 






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The Nickles 

The'bill at the Nickles next week will present some unusual features in Melodrama. Some of 
the best performers for the moving picture business will appear, and a first class entertainment is 
promised. The following reels will be shown: 



SAM FAIRCHILD 

in 

Adams Street 
Shoot the Chutes 



The Thrilling Rescue 
at Tennessee Street 



JERRY EWERS 

and 

Lucile Smith 

in 

"Skeleton Rag" 



ARVID FRANK 

and 

Clarence Sowers 

in 

Which Girl Shall It Be in the 
Soph Hop 



SPEC BRUMMAGE 

and 

Senior Play Committee 

in 

Who Knows 

and 
Who's Boss? 



IRA SNYDER 



Everything is Rotten 

in the 
State of Denmark 



JACK WILLIAMS 

and 

Student Council 

in 

"A Spy" 






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Sad Jokes 










STORY TOLD BY SKULLY WAUGH TO THE ADMIRING BOYS AT HOME 

Yes you know that it was shortly after I was elected President of the Freshman Class. 
I was standing out on the steps of Fraser Hall meditating on some legislation that I had in mind 
for the freshmen, when I felt a slap on my shoulder and turned to see the chancellor standing 
there. 

"Why Good Morning SkuUy," he said. "This is certainly a fine morning isn't it. By 
the way SkuUy there is something that I intended to speak to you about. I hear that you're 
working too hard. Your professors tell me that you are simply doing all the reciting in the 
class and that the rest of the students feel ashamed to be with you, they suffer so by comparison. 
Now if I were you I'd let up a little." 

"Oh! But Chancellor Strong, I said, "You will let me study just a little bit in the old time 
way before I stop wont you?" 

"No," said he, "I can't think of it." 

"But Chancellor Strong," I protested with tears in my eyes, "How can I ever stand it to 
loaf even the slightest little bit!" 

"You ought to get used to it, "he replied. "By the way," he said, as I turned sorrowfully 
away, "Don't call me Chancellor Strong. Call me Frank." 

The Sophomore Civils should never go hungry as long as they have their Melin. 
Professor Rice. Don't be so noisy Hilford. 
Hilford. I'm trying to keep still. 
Professor Rice. Remember you limitations. 

Professor Stevens. Go on, Shive, Do you think of any enzymes other than albumose? 
Mr. Shive. I'er, why — that is — Flunkose? 

They do say that Murray Conley is a good Pi Phi man, but did you ever see him with 
Lucy March, Irma Spangler, or Helen Pendleton? 




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A LITTLE EVOLUTION 

Many of us were "some pumpkins" at High School but at College we were perfect "beans." 

"Uncle Jimmy," calling the roll Friday before Xmas Vacation — "Ammons" (pause), 
"Atherton" (pause), "Brooks" (pause), "Betourney" (pause) — "I guess these boys are all in 
he promised land." 

Eagle's Hall is brilliantly lighted with various colored lights. The orchestra is most 
vigorously playing "Alexander's Ragtime Band." Among the daintily dressed "co-eds" who 
are being led gracefully, and otherwise, over the floor by many K. U. Brummels, is one in a 
green gown trimmed in fur. 

"Mr. Moore, can you tell me who this Clark Wallace is?" 

"Why Miss Lamb, don't you know him, he's a Senior Law. I thought you were in love 
with all the Senior Laws." 

"Oh no. Bill, they are all in love with me — " 

Colin (few minutes later). "I am a Senior in the College." 

First Inhabitant of Hutchinson. What is old Man Martin doing nowadays? 
Second Inhabitant of Hutchinson. Oh He's working Van's way through college. 

Page 439 



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Time — The morning after the Student Circus 
Place — In front of Green Hall 
Setting — All the Laws standing around sunning themselves 
Dramatics Personae — Constance Fennel and the Blackstones 
Constance. Peanuts! Peanuts! 
Laws. Ha! Ha! Ha! 
Constance blushes and walks hastily away. 



Time — Before the Prom 
Place— Griffiths Club 
Dramatics Personae — Bess Bozell and Glendale 
Glendale (practically.) Now Bess after you wear that beautiful new white dress with 
the long train to the Prom you can use it for a wedding dress. 
Bess (bashfully.) Yes! That's what Mamma said. 




mi^ 



Margaret. 
Mildred. 



Time — Last Winter 
Place — Room of Confidences 
Dramatics Personae — Mildred Hickman and Margaret Graybill 
Why did you say that you wanted to meet Bliss Darnell? 
Why you know it is for no other reason than that I wanted to look into his 



dreamy blue eyes. 



Time— April 27 
Place — Topeka 
Dramatis Personae — Louise Fairchild and Clerk 
Louise. I think Spec would look nice at the Sophomore Hop in these. 
(She puts her finger on a pair of beautiful white trousers.) 



How much? 










Time— 2:30 

Place — Oread High School 

Dramatis Personae — Fame Smart and Guy Von Schriltz 

Setting — Fame, substitute professor, conducting class 

Guy. A student. 

Fame. I am surprised Mr. Von Schriltz that you do not prepare your lessons more 
thoroughly. Your recitation today was simply awful. 
Mr. Von Schriltz. I am sorry. 

Miss Smart. I know I did not have my lesson, but you will see I've been joining so 
many frats lately. I don't have time to study. 



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Page 440 






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Phi Gam Fiji 

This is the way it was: 

"BILLY" 

Produced by the Thespian Dramatic Club 

University of Kansas 

Bowersock Theatre. Feb. 12, 1912 

This is the way it should have been: 

"BILLY" 
Produced by the Phi Gamma Delta 
for 
The Thespian Dramatic Club 
■ University of Kansas 



Bowersock Theatre 



Feb. 12, 1912 





No, this is no joke. It really, cross my heart, should have been this way. The whole 
performance was Phi Gam from start to finish with the exception of a few minor parts and the 
audience, and part of that was of course. The parts for the cast were chosen — no, not by a 
Phi Gam — by a professional director. This is said to show that the performers were chosen 
not on account of the fraternity pins they wore on their breasts but on account of their ability. 
Nor did the Phi Gams have anything to do with "firing" the director and putting Clarence 
Sowers in his place. He got this place on his merit. 

The beautiful maiden (a Phi Gam girl) was wooed by the hero (a Phi Gam) and won in 
spite of the vain attempts of the villain (a Phi Gam) to protrude his lowly self into her graces, 
while the Boatswain (a Phi Gam) and the Sailor (a Phi Gam) furnished the high and low comedy 
respectfully for the play, and a Hne party (Phi Gams and girls) in the fourth row laughed and 
wept, and wept and laughed, and— I almost forgot — while the money cUnked in the pocket of 
the person (a Phi Gam) who made the "grapes" from the program. 

Seriously speaking ,the production would have done credit to professionals. It was con- 
ceded by the University Kansan, and all the Lawrence papers to be the best student play ever 
given in the history of the University. Claude and Clarence Sowers, who did the managing 
and the directing and also playing the two leading parts, have had experience in professional 
dramatics. Ward Maris and Robert Thomas deserve credit for the manner in which they por- 
trayed the characters of an Englishman and an Irishman. 

— From the Jayhawker Fiji 

THE DARE DEVIL REPORTER 

During the Christmas Holidays every student at 
the University of Kansas was pleased to see a young 
man from the University of Kansas, and a student, spring 
with one well planned leap into the spot light and the 
Missouri Valley papers by the construction of a story 
on a terrible murder at an old mill in Olathe. The 
inventor of this ingenious plot, deserves commendation 
for the preparation which he made for this masterpiece, 
and the careful timing with which he brought it to the 
attention of the county officials. A careful search by the 
county sheriff in the ice cold waters of the river, hard- 
by, failed to reveal any traces of the body or of the per- 
petrators of the crime, but Mr. W. W. Ferguson, 
whose photographs appear above, has the esteem and 
good will of all the men on the Kansas City Star and the 
officials of Olathe for furnishing an admiring public with such rare sensationalism. 

Page 442 



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LOST- A jeweled Phi Delta 

' Theta piu Saturday evening. 

Finder please return to the 

Kappa house, 1215 Oread ave. 




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WILLIAM L. BUTLER 
Dancing Master 

No extra charge for private lessons 



Specialty: Boston 



23 East Lee Street 



IRA SNYDER 
University Manager 

Peripatetic Method 

Specialty: Everything Phi Delta Phi House 



ROSE DYER 
Dealer in Dates 

Imitation 

Specialty: Understudying Lamb 

Lamb's Vicinity 



RUDOLPH NESBITT 
Grizzly Bear 

Strangle Hold barred 

Specialty: Cubanola Glide Fraternal Aid 



LENA TRIPP 
Politician 

All the time a buzzin' 



Specialty: W. S. G. A. 



Tripp Club 



SANDY HAMILTON 
Family Man 

Always on the job 



Specialty: Consistency S. A. E. House 






Pi 











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Business Cards 



THEODORE GROVE 
Osteopath 

As many treatments as are necessaty 

Specialty: Swollen Hands Lawrence, Kansas 



WALTER WELLHOUSE 
Artist 

Studio open at all hours 

Specialty: Girls 1332 Louisiana Street 



ROSCOE REDMOND 
Political Boss 

Follow the crowd 

Specialty: Committees 1307 Rhode Island 



DELPHA JOHNSON 
College Widow 

Number no objection 

Specialty: Great Men 1142 Indiana Street 



MISS BERTHA DACK 
General Manager 

Three years experience 



Specialty: Freshmen 



Kappa House 



ELLIS DAVIDSON 
Editor 

Denoument 

Specialty: Oread Magazine No Place 



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Save Time 
Save Worry 
Save Bother 
Save Money 



— by comingjdirect to the one 
institution that is noted for 
the satisfying completeness 
of its stocks, the wholesome 
excellence of its qualities, 
the advanced character of 
its styles, the extreme 
reasonableness of its prices 
and the keen personal 
interest it takes in seeing 
that every customer is 
completely satisfied not 
only at the time of the 
purchase but afterward. 



Ober's 




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Page 450 

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We All Remember 








Sub Rosa Pledging. 
Coach Sherwin's downtown friends. 
Nelson Steven's love-making in the opera. 
Reggie Williams class friends from Missouri University. 
The cast of the Red Domino as it was first announced. 
When Charles Younggreen was eligible. 
The circus elephant. 

Ike Lambert's celebration after the Thespian show. 
That Fred Ott advertised for his Sigma Nu pin. 
The snow in March. 
Harry Kemp. 

Engmeer's and Law's snow fight. 
Jack William's serenade. 
Taft's visit. 

The maintenance fund we did not get. 
When a Council member had a mid-week date. 
Bill's Blondes. 

When Humphrey had a case. 
When Woodrow Wilson gave us a glad hand. 

Uncle Jimmie, saying, "Now, boys, boys, we are expecting an engagement to be announced 
at our house." 

When a Medic passes by. 

When class parties were a financial success. 

The Law assemblage on a windy day. 

When Lucile Yates does things up Brown. 

The Freshman caps we originated. 

The Senior petition. 

The Coal famine. 

The Kansan as a tri-weekly. 

The Sowers Twins. 

Gladys Clark's S. A. E. pin. 

Faye with other men. 

When Billy Price's Timepiece lost it's case. 

Professor Dykstra at chapel. 

The 12 o'clock whistle. 

Moonlight dances. 

Spring parties. 

Clyde Dodge's visit at school before the Glee club trip. 

Cabs and Flowers at the Junior Prom. 

Aunt Carrie on guard duty. 

Professor William Savage Johnson's moustache. 

Jane Kinne's breach of promise suit. 

The Brazilian Princess. 

When Detwiler was a Sigma Chi. 

An AU-yictorious football team. 

Peg-top trousers. 

When Jack WilUams was an Angel Child. 

When Emile was a Theta man. 

The day the Medics moved. 

Page 45 











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iflJirtWy^ of models in ""oampeck Suits 
for College Young Men. All Jo 
not like the same cut, therefore ^ve 
sno^w^ eight distinct styles. Snould 
please ^vith one. 

A Good Navy Blue Serge 
FIFTEEN DOLLARS 



The BLAZER., tLe striped flannel coat. 

A strong novelty for summer. 

For Young Men and Young Ladies. 



Tne TENNIS racket you use in our 
Sporting Goods Section. 



Gordon & Koppel 

1005-1007 Walnut 

















Page 454 









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Our Rogue's Gallery 



Spec Brummage — Unusual specimen. Only one in domestic state. Native habitat, 
dance halls. Handle with care as he is sensitive, and is liable to growl if his fur is stroked the 
wrong way. 

Brick Gephart — Keep on the look-out for this refugee. Apt to be lurking behind telephone 
poles. Don't be taken in by the grin. Liberal reward, dead or alive. Probably dead. 

Cady — Claims to be short sighted but can see a pony if you haven't taken it out of your 
vest pocket. Feed him and he won't bite. 

Murray — Resembles a human hairpin. Can be found either at the Pi Phi house or at the 
Salvation Army citadel. 

Kuchera — Easily recognized by the red ink stains on her fingers. A striking example of 
Kipling's recent, much discussed poem. Three distinct times she has been seen frantically 
chasing a man around the campus. 

Ike Lambert — Short but beautiful. Easily recognized by the shape of his head. Found 
asleep on the back seat of the last car home. A dangerous character. 

Swede Swenson — First offense. Entered Sigma Nu house by night disguised as a sport. 
A social and political whirler. Infests Lee's. 




There's a pretty young freshman named Coston 

Men's hearts— she is liable to cost 'em 

Her ways are en-Theis-ing 

But her heart became icing 

When she told Jack — "Your dates! — you have lost 'em." 



WHERE STUDENTS GO" 



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ROIFLANDS 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 

Half-way on Adams Street 






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The 




INNES 

Department 
Store 



In the Heart of the Shopping District of Lawrence 

This Store was built, in part to better accommodate the wants of 
Kansas University People, to give them more complete stocks, greater 
selection, better service and modern store conveniences. 

The latest novelties and popular ideas in womens wear are always 
carefully anticipated. 

The entire second floor is devoted to a most complete department of 
women's ready-to-wear. Especial attention is given to garments for 
college wear. Coats, suits, waists, skirts, corsets, undermuslins, swim- 
ming and gymnasium suits. 

On the third floor, a department of carpets, rugs and draperies with 
every facility for equipping the Modern Home or Fraternity House. 



lb: 



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r//£ UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE ^^^ °statl'" "'^ 

KNOWN TO ALL OLD STUDENTS AND THE NEW STUDENTS MADE WELCOME 

Special Low Prices made on all Text Books and Supplies 

The University Book Store ^'si^r 



The Popular Dry Goods Store 

For K. U. Students. 

Complete Stocks in all Departments. 

Prices always the Lowest. 

The most Courteous Treatment at all times. 

A. D. WEAVER 



ATHLETIC GOODS 



The Most Interestins Store in the City 



LEATHER GOODS 



PERIODICALS 



STUDENTS' DOWN-TOWN HEADQUARTERS FOR 35 YEARS 

SMITH'S NEWS DEPOT 

CARROLL'S 






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Calendar 
September 

Sept. 10 — Back once more. Lawrence is again on the map. Freshmen trunks arrive at 
Fraser HaU. 

Sept. 11 — Freshman Engineer applies at the Pi Phi house for a room. The "1301" crowd 
organize anti-arc light society. 

Sept. 12 — Parson Spotts is "called." Class of 1911 offer prize for first class baby. 

Sept. 13 — Political caucuses held at various opportune spots. Leora Kuchera meets 
Fred Ott at the train. 

Sept. 14 — France Wilson sells fifty chapel tickets at $1.00 per, and pays room rent for 
one month in advance. Coach Sherwin arrives, and he and Ammons look each other over. 

Sept. 15 — Opening address in Robinson Gymnasium by Senator Hodges of Olathe. 
Chancellor Strong shakes hands all the way round. 

Sept. 16 — Announcement made that Merle Thorpe will teach Journalism. Jack Williams 
enrolls in Botany L "again." 

Sept. 17 — First football practice held on McCook. All rooters asking, "Will Ahrens 
and Baird return?" 

Page 459 



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Sept. IS^Manager Lasdon deserts athletics for newspaper. Museum secures another 
valuable fossil — Emile Grignard returns. Arch MacKinnon with a broad smile hands out 
the constitution, by-laws and "thou shalt nots" of the Student Council. 

Sept. 19 — Oread High School opens. Chancellor takes a fall out of Millionaire Crane. 

Sept. 20 — ^Ward Hatcher arrives with his little pmopadour. Margaret Darrah bids 
John Battaile a fond farewell. 

Sept. 21 — CharUne Smith inherits $10,000,000. Bill Hamner tries out for cheer-leader. 
"Now altogether boys." 

Sept. 22 — Billy Price and Patteison lock horns for the Junior Presidency. Fountain 
pens march out of Haworth Hall. 

Sept. 23 — Senior Valotio enrolls under Uncle Jimmy. Flurry in freshman hearts-soror- 
ities announce pledges. 

Sept. 24— President Taft speaks in Robinson Gymnasium o"! China Y. M. C. A.'s. 

Sept. 25 — Blue Monday. Boynton courses. Wash day. 

Sept. 26 — Charline Smith embarks on the seas of a popular career. 

Sept. 27 — Bertha Dack presides at Pan-Hellenic War-Council to probe charges of crooked- 
ness. 

Sept. 28 — Seniors start anti-graft movement (we're the goats). 

Sept. 29 — Ben Leventhall found in unconscious state beating the walls with $300 violin. 
Graduate students threaten Revolution. 

Sept. 30 — Hawk-Welch wedding. Exit College Widow. Lena Tripp enters politics. 



WM. WIEDEMANN 

Manufacturer of 

Pure Ice Cream and Fruit Ices 



CHOCOLATES A SPECIALTY 
Parties Supplied *:• Quality First Always 



"""rlere s Hoping 
YOU'LL RIDE THE CARS 

Thats All 

La^vrence Rall^v^ay and Light Company 

IS YOUR HOUSE WIRED? 









Page 460 






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The Fraternal Aid Association 

Lawrence, Kansas 

Has Paid Beneficiaries of Five Millions of Dollars. It Invites 

Investigation 

Safe Fraternal Insurance 



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H. E. DON CARLOS, L. D. ROBERTS, T. J. SWEENEY, 

General President General Secretary General Treasurer 

L. D. JOHNSON, 
General Medical Examiner 



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Bell Brothers Pianos 




Are manufactured exclusively for discriminating 
musicians and artists. They contain patented im- 
provements not found in other instruments. These 
improvements give the Bell Brothers Pianos an 
elasticity in the action, a particularly sympathetic 
tone, great reserve power, and wearing qualities 
not equalled by any other make. 

We sell Bell Brothers Pianos at prices con- 
sistent with the quality, and on easy payments if 
desired. 



Van Dyke Studio, 939 8th Ave., New York City 

BELL BROTHERS PIANO CO., 

Gentlemen: — After having used one of your Bell Brothers Pianos for a year it is 
a pleasure for me to state that I am more than pleased with the instrument. Even with the 
severe use that I gave it, it is remarkable for standing in tune and retaining its original tone. 
The action is positively delightful, the tone pure and sympathetic and the entire piano is very 
satisfactory in every way. Yours truly, 

E. GENEVE LICHTENWALTER, 
Graduate Music Dept. Kansas State University. Student of Dr. Jedlickza, Berlin, Germany. 

Bell Brothers Piano Company 



Lawrence, Kansas 



October 

Oct. 2 — Professor Baumgartner receives seven barrels of — specimens. 

Oct. 3 — Madlem puts over the laundry trust. Bernice Ruhlandt adopts would-be 
freshman president. 

Oct. 4 — K. U. band in new uniforms leads P. O. P. parade. 

Oct. 5 — Anna Manley leads cheering at Dormitory Day. Two student Councils mix. 

Oct. 6 — Election returns in. Davy carried out on stretcher. Jack Williams becomes 
"fixture at Theta House." 

Oct. 7 — Pajamas predominate at night-shirt parade. Rumors of Daily Kansan. 

Oct. 8 — Bob Fisher begins campaign for Quill Club president. 

Oct. 9 — Harem skirt appears on the Hill. Laws cut class. 

Oct. 10 — Sowers contests Junior Law election. Gladys Elliott goes to Omaha to be 
fairy queen. 

Oct. 11 — Plea for water in Potter's Puddle. Skeet Wilson puts on first engineer's jubilee. 

Oct. 12 — B. Kansas rejuvenated in Mo. Valley. Genevieve Walker and Leland Angevine 
elect to be "Babes in the Woods." 

Oct. 13 — Cub Baer makes his Oklahoma City find. 

Oct. 14 — Professor Ward ejected from Nickle for smoking during the performance. 

Oct. 15 — "Nig" Butler intruduces the "Boston" to polite society. Sophomore plums 
announced. 

Oct. 16 — Jimmy Green Humble enrolls in the Law School. 

Oct. 17 — Ben Sam Jones tells the Laws how dad does business. Bertha Mix and Levinson 
entertain boarders at Coleman's. 

Page 462 




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\\^nen you tnink of college days 
and scenes send for the — 

University Daily Kansan 

Published by the Students of the 
University of Kansas 



200 1 



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J^or the Particular Man 

KOCH 

THE TAILOR 



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AUTHENTIC HEADQUARTERS FOR 

YOUNG MEN'S CORRECT ATTIRE 

EXCLUSIVE FASHIONS NOT SHOWN 
AT ANY OTHER STORES 



Oct. 18 — Phi Delta Phi's pledge rest of Sigma Chis. Marjorie TempHn pledges to Alle- 
mania. 

Oct. 19 — George Marsh entertains committee of indignant girls who want to know why 
girl's news is never run in the Kansan. 

Oct. 20 — Class pie is cut. Albert Lemoine gets another job. Sandy Hamilton's mouth 
waters. 

Oct. 21 — Pete Heil makes a good run. Kansas advertises for a tradition. George 
Burton from Parsons appears at dance in father's Tuxedo. 

Oct. 22 — Everybody crams for quizzes. 

Oct. 23 — Medics ousted, but leave smell behind. Howard Houk leads crew of howling 
engineers across campus. 

Oct. 24 — Eva Bechtel made chairman at "1301" to enforce house rules. 

Oct. 25 — Sasnaks announced. Alonzo Buzick promoted. Kiesewetter announces that 
on the morrow he will give his first "kees." 

Oct. 26- — Results in Freshman quizzes known. Following forbidden to have dates: 
Rachel Coston, Madeline Nachtman, Constance Fennel, Sister Brummage. 

Oct. 27 — Kansas scores 11 points. Ira Snyder announces his intention of joining every- 
thing. 

Oct. 28^ — Anne Malotte goes in for Moore. 

Oct. 29 — Jones assumes role of Wiley Fusser. 

Oct. 31 — Mrs. Ecke's ghost attended by prominent University girls. Dot Ellis stars 
unaccompanied. 

Page 465 • 






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— because I was told this is a good advertising medium. I know good ad- 
vertising in a good medium gets the people acquainted with a man who has 
something valuable to sell. 

But Is 1 nis Good Aavertismg? 



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I am taking a chance on this space. Reading this, you will be able to say 
whether or nor I am making good use of my investment. I can't know except 
through your telling me or writing to me about it. I would like for you to do this. 
Here's what I have to advertise — 



I Sell Service 



SERVICE through the medium of life insurance, which is helping a man to 
solve his two big life problems — gaining a competency for himself and family in 
his old age, and providing for his loved ones in case he does not arrive at an old 
age. Are these things desirable.'' 

SERVICE through the medium of a corps of energetic and well equipped 
agents — experts who can advise the best forms of contracts to meet the situations 
of persons who are willing that an intelligent analysis of their situations be made. 
Is this desirable .>* 

SERVICE through the medium of this agency whereby you can obtain 
accommodations to help you effect, and keep in force, the contracts we sell. 
This is desirable. 

I SELL MONEY — money which comes to you at the time when it is of 
the greatest importance to to you. 



Equitable Life of Iowa, 45th Year. 
41 Columbian Bldg. 



CARMI L. WILLIAMS, 

TOPEKA, KANS. 



We have a place here for energetic and intelligent young men or women who 
are willing to work hard and to study to make this business their life profession. 
Life insurance is the best paid hard work in the world. 










Page 467 









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CREAMENTHOL 

A remeay for inilainination. 
A splenaid remedy for inflamea surfaces. 
Relieves catarrKal sore throat and nasal catarrn. 
Instant relief for Sunburn, Chapped skin. Cold sores. 

AT YOUR DRUGGIST'S 

In Opal Jars, 25 cents 
Prepared m the Laooratory or 

The McPike Drug Company 

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 



This Big Busy Store 



the Largest and most Completely Stocked 

Dry Goods Store in Kansas, is amply prepared 
to serve you all seasons, with new merchan- 
dise rightly priced. 



THE MILLS DRY GOODS COMPANY 



Topeka, Kansas 



Page 468 














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November 

Nov. 1 — Good bye Billy's. Spud Fisher gets chapel date. 

Nov. 2 — W. S. G. A. invites popular co-eds to executive party. Bess Ulrich weeps, 
Mildred Manley defiant, Leota McFarlin declares that her sorority is more important than 
the council. Uncle Jimmy's Day Banquet "free from graft." 

Nov. 3 — Scoop Club takes first hike to Buermann's. Junior Girl's candy hold-up. 

Nov. 4 — Jayhawkers defeat Washburn. Chi-Omega House warming. 

Nov. 5 — Mae Rossman attempts to organize new sorority. 

Nov. 6 — Elsie Smith bids Stelter good-bye. j^ Spring party-grafters relax efforts. 



EvERY Jayna'svker, when in K.ansas City is cordially invited to come to 
R.otliscKilds. Wnetner or not you are in need of anytliing in Smart 
Clotnes or tne correct accessories. We want you to come in and see 
our splendid stock — w^e 11 always be glad to see you. 

W. A. GUENTHER 



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STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Telephone 226 
721 MASS. STREET LAWRENCE, KANSAS 



ED, ANDERSON 

Restaurant 

Dealer in 

Confectionery,Cigars,Tobacco,etc. 

715 Main Street 
LAWRENCE, KANSAS 



Page 469 



J. W. Shaw 

Lumber 

Galvanized Iron 
Roofing 




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Everybody goes to bed early. 
Thespian play to be directed by Miss 



Jack Williams, Ike 



Nov. 7 — Chemists discover that students have been drinking miUions of germs a day. 
Snaps abolished in Law School. 

Nov. 8 — Fish Codding and Anna Manley takes in the Nickles. Clara Osgood moves 
back to the old stand. 

Nov. 10 — Mina Johnson and Merle Clark invite Nebraska girls down for the game to 
stay with them at the Pi Phi House. 

Nov. 11 — Oklahoma Game. K. U. Rooters get cold feet. 

Nov. 13 — $5.00 fine suggested for week night dates. Fifty-five pound meteor found. 

Nov. 14 — Bruin visits campus. Girl's photograph discovered in Bill French's watchcase. 

Nov. 15 — Class athletes begin training for football. Elmer Whitney and Billy Price 
continue to increase in popularity as Prom approaches. 

Nov. 16 — Scoop Club wins prize for best song. Mrs. Robinson leaves estate to K. U. 

Nov. 17 — Mass Meeting! Rallies!! and Boola!!! 

Nov. 18 — Excuse us please. We can't print it. 

Nov. 20 — Cast chosen for "Gay Mr. Tompkins' 
Ida Kirk of Leavenworth. 

Nov. 21 — Student Council given control of discipline by Regents. 
Lambert and Rye Darrough become interested. 

Nov. 22 — University monkey is sick with pellagra. 

Nov. 23 — Emile reported no better. 

Nov. 24 — Tommy passes away. 

Nov. 25 — The Crowd in front of Journal Worls suppressed by police. 

Nov. 27 — All-Missouri Valley team picked. Hamilton says his athletes will run snow 
shoe race. 



Enjoy Your Western Trip 

By traveling over the line that gives you the maximum of travel com- 
forts and luxuries and that carries you to your destination on time in a 
frame of mind compatable with the object of your journey. 

The Union Pacific is ballasted with Sherman gravel, making a practi- 
cally dustless roadbed^ has fewer curves and lower grades than any other 
transcontinental line; is laid out in long, easy tangents. You are free from 
jolts, jars and dust when you travel via. 

UNION PACIFIC 

Standard Road of the West 

Protected by Automatic Electric Block Safety Signals. 

Excellent Dining Cars on ALL Trains. New and Direct Route to 
Yellowstone National Park. 

The Union Pacific is the great national highway, over which, for two 
generations the east has gone west, and the west has gone east. 

For literature and information relative to fares, routes, stopovers, etc., 
call or address — 

H. G. KAILL, General Passenger Agent 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 

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COMPLIMENTS OF 



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Kansas City, Mo. 



The Southwest's Greatest Store 



OUTFITTERS TO EVERY MEMBER 



OF THE FAMILY AND 



FURNISHERS COMPLETE TO THE HOME 



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The Choice of the 

careful housewif e, the 
thoughtful mother and the 
discriminating hostess is 



for it is made of the purest 
pasteurized cream, is absolutely 
healthy and nutritious, and never 
disappoints at the critical moment 

We 

Continental Creamery Co. 

TOPEKA. KANSAS 



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F. A. FAXON, J.A.GALLAGHER, H.D.FAXON, 

President Vice-Pres. and Treas. Secretary 



F. T. FAXON, 

Asst. Secretary 



Faxon & Gallagher 
Drug Company 

Importers and Jobbers of 

DRUGS AND DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 

Northwest Corner 8th and Broadway 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 




Watkins 
National Bank 

Corner 
Massachusetts and Quincy Streets 

Capital $100,000 

Surplus and Profits 

$90,000 

DIRECTORS 

J. B. \IV ATKlNSy President 
C. A. HILL, Vice President 
C. H. TUCKER, Cashier 
W. E. HAZEN, Ass't. Cashier 
JACOB HOUSE J. C. MOORE 

SAM BISHOP 

Page 474 
















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The Popular Drug Store 

GOOD SODA 

A Fine Line of Candy 

PURE DRUGS 

Perfumes and Toilet Waters 
of the Best 

1101 MASS. 
Phones 6 7 8 



A. H. PETTING 

MANUFACTURER OK 

Greek Letter Fraternity 
Jewelry 

213 NORTH LIBERTY STREET 

BALTIMORE, MD. 

Factory 212 Little Sharp St. 

Memorandum package sent to any fra- 
ternity member through the secretary 
of the chapter. Special designs and 
estimates furnished on medals, rings 
and pins for athletic meets, etc. 










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Nov. 28 — Football banquet boosters become discouraged. Freshmen allowed by Council 
to don coon-skin caps. 

Nov. 29 — Phyllis Burroughs and Lois Brown carried over muddy street by willing hands. 

Nov. 30 — Bowersock opera house reports begin to arrive at weekly intervals, "Finished 
next week." 

December 

Dec. 5 — Professor Carruth has born to him a son, Later: a daughter. Tri- Weekly Kansan 
wants to know whether or not it shall change its name. 

Dec. 6 — Gephart says he doesn't like holding the sack on football blankets. Wesley 
Stout telegraphs that the report he is dead, is erroneous. 

Dec. 7— Dad Herman bids us good-bye. Brownlee elected captain for 1912. 

Dec. 8 — Cries grow stronger, "We want a Daily." Bill Caldwell issues invitations for 
his wedding. 

Dec. 9 — Visions of turkies and mince pies begin to intrude between eyes and books. Man- 
dolin club plans trip to coast. 

Dec. 12 — Faye loses Phi Delt and Kappa pin, both to be returned to the Kappa House. 

Dec. 13 — Football smoker. Sachems do a bloody piece of work. Scoop Club grows 
frivolous. 

Dec. 14 — Students rejoice! Mosse will help coach. Glee Club will rout. 

Dec. 15 — Law Scrimmage. Student Union Boom started. 

Dec. 16 — College Students enroll. Juniors beat the seniors at class football. 

Dec. 17 — Rumors of War with Mexico again agitates the K. U. K. N. G. 

Dec. 19 — All professors assign quizzes for Friday to keep students working. 

Dec. 20 — Ambitious fussers with competition begin making dates for January. 

Page 475 






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Evans-Smith Drug Company 



Importers and 
Wholesale Druggists 

424-426-428 West Fifth Street^ corner Washington 
KANSAS CITY, MO. 




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G. W. EVANS. President 

E. W. ZEA, Vice-President 

W. V. WHERRETT. Sec'y. and Treas. 



Dec. 21 — Farewell parties. 

Dec. 22 — Everybody catches a train, and stands up going home. 

Dec. 23-Jan. 8 — Ineffable eats, ease, rest, contentment, 

January 

January 7 — ^With the exception of a few students left sticking around in Western snow- 
banks, everybody returns to school. Temperature unspeakable. 

Jan. 8 — Adams street a glacier. Bob-sled parties and skees in order. 

Jan. 9 — Frank Davis goes to sleep in his chair while leaning back in practice court. Chair 
demolished. 

Jan. 10 — Junior secretary has great expectations of phone call from manager of Junior 
Prom. 

Jan. 11 — It didn't come. 

Jan. 12 — Bess is asked to lead the Prom with the president. Holiday on account of lack 
of coal. 

Jan. 13 — Professor Boodin and Lucile Arnold attend the Nickel. 

Jan. 15 — Still Holiday. Snow above tree tops. 

Jan. 16 — First Daily Kansan off the press. Seniors petition to be excused from finals. 

Jan. 17 — K. U. beats Baker at basket-ball. Thespians change their minds and decide 
to give "Billy" instead. 

Jan. 18 — Austin Wallack breaks nose with a hammer in Fowler Shops. Bible class and 
rifle club organized. 

Jan. 19 — Ahrens matter first noised abroad. Sigma Nu's rescue Pi Phis from burglars. 

Jan. 20 — Somebody swipes Uncle Jimmy's schedule. Uncle Jimmy posts his defi in an 
open place. W. S. G. A. asks for control of student discipline. 

Jan. 21 — Jayhawker tickets on sale. Gephart resigns from school and goes to Kansas 
city to work. 

Page 476 










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The Reasons 
Why The 



Wabash 



Is The Best 
Road 



TO 






ST. LOUIS 

B EC A USE 

It is the shortest line. 

It operates the greatest service — 

FOUR FAST TRAINS EACH WAY DAILY 

Its trains leave Kansas City at convenient hours — 
10:00 a. m., 1:00 p. m., 9.00 p. m., 11:30 p. m. 

Its trains' regularity is superior to all. 

Its trains are absolutely protected by block system. 

Its trains carry electric-lighted equipment and dining-car service. 

Its track is the smoothest, its line the straightest across the State, 
and riding is made easy by the elasticity of its roadbed. 

Its Delmar Avenue and Vandeventer Avenue Stations are a great con- 
venience for passengers desiring to reach the West End of St. Louis. 

Births and Tickets at 903 Main St, 

OR 

Union Station 
KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 

J. D. McNAMARA, General Passenger Agent, ST. LOUIS, MO. 
J. J. SHINE, Western Passenger Agent, KANSAS CITY, MO. 



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'''Con'' Squires 



The 
Students' Photographer 



1035 Mass. Street 



Are You Ready for Blue 
Bird Weatheri? 

You'll wish for your Spring clothes the first warm 

day. 
Out Spring woolens are on display. You'll have a 

better choice of the smart novelties now than at 

any other time. 
It's going to be a "rough" secison. 
Rough serges, cheviots, homespuns and worsteds. 

Scotch and English tweeds are the leaders for 

both overcoats and suits. 
The new coats are cut with long lapels and high 

vest — natural shoulders. Very smart but not 

overdone. 

Spring Coats and Business 

Suits$25, $30, $35 

and upwards. 

NicoU Standard, Navy and Cerulean B lue Sergre 
SuiU are still $25.00 

N I COLL The Tailor 

Wm. JERREMS' SONS Kansas City, Mo. 




Fraternity Emblems 

In great variety, artistic designs and taste- 
ful settings. These are marked features of 
those made by us. 

All our emblems are of that high art a 
quality found only in jewelry of the finest 
make. Write us for prices and designs. 

GREEN JEWELRY CO. 

1104-06 Walnut St. Kansas City, Mo. 



Page 478 




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THE GRAND CANYON OF ARIZONA 

The greatest scenic attraction in the world. Over a mile deep, thirteen miles across 
and miles long. Exquisitely tinted. Nothing like it anywhere. 

A PULLMAN TO THE RIM. 
EXCELLENT TRAIN SERVICE VIA SANTA FE. 



Send for 

'"Titan of Chasms" 

free. 



J. M. CONNELL, General Passenger Agent 
The Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Ry. 

Topeka, Kansas 



Page 479 












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FOOTBALL 
SMOKER 
EDIXION 



ThebailyKansan. 



EXTRA! 



Vol. I. 



University of Kansas, December 13, 1911. 



No. 1 



Chancelior^ « ^ Smoking -^ Cigarettes 



ROTTEN ! 

And ThatDoesri't Half 
Express It 

Except for one feature the 
Football smoker pulied off 
before a crowded housf in 
Fraternal Aid hall tonight 
was a dismal failure. 

The exception was the per- 
fornumce of the. Scoop Club. 
N"b words of ours could suf- ! 
.liciently praise the play put ' 
on by this band of splendid \ 
voung men. 

The all-star cast handled 
their parts like veterans of 
the stage. Their ease in the 
comic, tracjic and pathetic 
parts of the production was 
commented- upon by all, the 
guests. 

The Friars 
at home in 
stunt that the 
oi)!barrassed. 

The Black 
a sketch in 
which they 
entire fail 
search. 

Arch \IacKinnon. gave bis 
si;eech, which, will be printed 
by th? student government 
club for distribution among 
the stirdents. 

Uncle Jitmiiy and the 
Scoop Club were the redeem- 
ing -features' of an otherwiso 
impossible evening. 



MURDER 



SHOCKING ! HjrnbleCmnealfte 
— Football Banquet. 

COUNCIL TO ACT 



Bare Legs Must Be 

Covered Two Inches 

Below Patella 



, The Mo. Valley 'Confer- 
ence today . made a ruling" re- 
quiring basket ball nieh to 
wear . panties which, extend at 
least two (2) inches below 
the patella.' 



were so mucl- 

. their ■■Rube"' 

audience felt 

Helmets put ■ on 
preparation for 
have' spent the 
in original re- 



A CORREGTION 

The Kaiisan wai -in, error 
when it sauI 'a.' Soh wasf borrn 
to Praf. atltf Mrs.^ Cafruth. 
It should have safd >twilT5,^ a 
boy and a girl. ■. The -Kansarv 
gladly etaoin ETAOIi^ -,)..'.'• 



Read the Daily Kansan. 



IN SOCIETY' . 

, The engagement o^ Captain 
.Ammons is to be; announced 
shortly. It is rumore(J, that 
th? fortvmatc tairy is Eva 
head waitress in a hotel a;. 
M«berly, Mo."^ 

Ecke's Thanksgiving party 
punch sure had a punch in it. 
But you won't see any ref- 
erence" to this )i) the Jay- 
hawker 

The Chi Omega sor()rit\ 
held a slumber party in 
Economics 1 yesterday 



Entirely without provoca- 
tion, a murderous assault 
was made tonight on the 
English drama by a; band of 
aborigines who call them- 
selves the Sachems 

The crime' was" committed 
at • .'the . annual I'ootball 
srtioker given by the Men's 
Student Government club. 
.Strt)hg men who had gazed 
unmoved at Uncle , Tom 
shows wept, but were help- 
Jess to prfevent the outrage. 

Lawrence is in an' uproar 
tonight. Posses are out look- 
ing for, the miscreants wh<i 
wrote the Sachem play. If 
caught, summary vengeance 
will be wreaked upon them. 
\ .Arch MacKinnon' called .1 
session of his student govern- 
ment club to draw up resolu- 
tions. 



NOTICE 

The Mexican .Athletic club 
annual conclave in Haskell 
pasture tomorrow at Moon- 
rise 

1j<.\ S.\VliEK. 

r'residcnt 



Moonlight Dance, Ecke' s Hall Tonight 

GIVENBY W.S.G.A. 
Faculty Chaperones . . . . Punch ^Vill Be Served Admission $2 








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Full particulars of design^ constructions ^ prices^ etc.^ 
are given in Catalogue 16. Write for it. 

W£^ioTv€£sc[uca£^n4tmmentCa 

Main Office and Works: NEWARK. N. J, 



Jan. 22 — Kappa Beta Phi new fraternity of representative students formed. To alleviate 
the sufferings of an anxious public, they let themselves be known at the "Heart-Breakers." 

Jan. 23 — Dean Templin comes back from wooly Mexico. Chemistry Building explodes. 

Jan. 24 — ^Jayha^wkers whop the Blue Diamonds. Studes cramm till morning for exami- 
nations. 

Jan. 25 — Fire breaks out in library cloak room. Saturday Evening Post boy has attack 
of pneumonia. 

Jan. 26 — Earl Ammons receives billet-douxes from factory girl at Moberly. Leavenworth 
officers come up to play in the swimming tank. 

Jan. 30 — Student Council politicians begin to hang 'round. Suspense reigns. 

February 

Feb. 1 — Following results of examinations, "Blighted Hopes" separate themselves from 
our midst. Bess Bozell and Helen Rose apply for a position as summer agent at the Eldridge 
House. 2:30 p. m. Position turns out to be that of book agent. 

Feb. 2 — Louis LaCoss learnedly discusses new quizz system in Kansan. 

Feb. 3 — Report that there is plenty of coal to run the University causes riot in Law School. 

Feb. 3- — Fine Arts Opera showed at the Bowersock. The scenery was said to be quite 
good. 

Feb. 4 — Ahrens matter still boils. James B. Damn falls sick from much stamp licking. 

Feb. 7 — Rosedale nurses telephone the Women's Student Council that they are not 
bothered about mid week date rules. 

Feb. 8 — Mosse says, "Sure I'll help coach the Jayhawkers." 

Page 481 












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BUREAU OF 


ENGRAVING INC. 


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RAY HALL'S 



OFFICIAL K. U. ORCHESTRA 



TOPEKA, 



KANSAS 



K. C. School of 




718 COMMERCE BLDG. 

24 practicing lawyers are Lecturers 

and Instructors. All work at night. Work 

your way through. Write 



E. D. ELLISON 
Dean 



BEN E. TODD 
Registrar 



Feb. 9 — Students warned for positively the last time that they must cease to use telephone 
poles for bill boards. 

Feb. 12 — Lincoln's birthday celebrated. "Billy" scored a hit. 

Feb. 13 — Ike Lambert treats all his friends ofif the proceeds from the Thespian production. 

Feb. 14 — Regents still sore about Ahrens. William Allen White has two page letter in 
Kansan. 

Feb. 15 — Girl's Athletic Association elect to have girl unpires at basket ball games. Glee 
Club concert gets by. 

Feb. 16 — Phi Beta Kappas reach port. Washington basketball team departs sadder but 
wiser. 

Feb. 19 — Glee Club members show track ability in getting away at start. Weather 
continues colder than Klondike. 

Feb. 20 — Pan-Hellenic throws scare into Freshmen by compelling them to finish three- 
fourths work before being initiated. 

Feb. 21 — Student Council tacks up a sign declaring vacancy to attract new members. 
Professor Smith tells about Edgar Allan Poe. 

Feb. 22 — Professor Rice in anticipation of the Engineer's banquet composes a poem. 
Admits that it is pretty good. 

Feb. 23 — Woodrow Wilson talks in chapel. Musselman elected manager of Glee Club. 

Feb. 24 — Somebody starts that story about Bailey's cat. Mrs. Paul Harvey of Columbus, 
Kansas (if you please) protests against inaccurate reports. 

Feb. 26 — Jack Williams begins to lose all hope of Rachel Coston. 



Page 483 



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Feb. 27 — Red Dominos pick first cast. Museum birds pleased by new glass roosts. 
Feb. 28 — Red Dominos pick second cast. James B. Damn recovered. 
Feb. 29 — Red Dominos pick third cast. Wild and wooly tales continue to come in from 
the Glee Club in New Mexico. 

March 

Mar. 1 — Senior girl's society announced. Is it a fake? Faculty pin down class cutters 
by elaborate new system of reports. 

Mar. 4 — Rumors of a new sorority at 1400 Tenn. Roy Spear old football and dance floor 
hero announces his engagement. 

Mar. 5 — Wrangle starts with Nebraska as to whether or not the championship series 
will be played. Glee Club discovers the Pacific. 

Mar. 6 — Gentleman from Texas gives cowboy yells and songs in chapel. Good Govern- 
ment Club has another all night session in which it attempts to elect new members. 

Mar. 7 — Somebody starts to investigate Jayhawker. Cub Baer joins the suffragettes. 

Mar. 8 — Clark Wallace takes a bunch of $1.50 checks to the bank. Cashier finds one of 
them unsigned. Clark still asking who. 

Mar. 11 — Mildred Manley and Arizona Johnson burned severely while attempting to 
make fudge. Lawrence Meissner entertains twelve of his friends at games. 



ESTABLISHED 18T0 



We Protect Our 

Patrons In Every 

Transaction 

Whether it be in person or by 
mail. By the way you can order 
from any distance and be perfect- 
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store service. 

Engraved Invitations 

and 

College Jewelry 

ARE SPECIALTIES OF THIS 
ESTA BLISHMENT 

Cady & Olmstead 

Jewelry Company 

Write for a cataloii 
1009-1011 Walnut Kansas City 



Lawrence 
Real Estate 

We have on hand at all times a large list of 
residence property for sale or rent and spec- 
ialize on finding houses for rent for parties 
who are contemplating moving to Lawrence 
to take advantage of the University. It would 
be wise for you to send your application in at 
once to be placed on our files which will enable 
us to keep you posted on the changes and 
splendid bargains offered. 

We own and control 50% of the vacant 
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Money on hand at all times to loan on first 
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O. H. McQuary, Jr. & Co. 

Rooms 1 and 2 Leader Bldg. 

Home Phone— 1076 Bell Phone— 982 

Page 484 



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The Mutal Life Insurance Company 

of New York 



OLDEST IN AMERICA 



STRONGEST IN THE WORLD 



Assets $587,130,263— Surplus $102,059,173 
Since organization the Company has paid in cash dividends to policyholders the sum of 
$167,811,128.68. This is greater than any other company has paid in dividends by more 
than $24,000,000. 

Also the Company has apportioned for 1912 dividends $15,146,685.72, which is far in excess 
of any sum ever apportioned for dividends in a single year by any other company. 
In Kansas during the last ten years The Mutual Life has paid in matured endowments and 
death claims alone, $1,293,280.84. 

On December 31, 1910, The Mutual Life held investments in Kansas securities and in stocks 
and bonds of railroads, wholly or partly in the State of Kansas, amounting to $26,592,000. 
In addition to the payments made directly to policyholders. The Mutual Life pays annually 
into Kansas large sums of money in dividends, surrender values, rents, salaries, taxes, medical 
fees etc 

ELON S. CLARK, Manager 

A native son 
Smith Building Topeka, Kansas 



Mar. 12 — Professor Boynton made Daily Kansan a call in which changes in the board 
were discussed. Later: Pays the Masque Club a visit. Later: Pays the Red Domino a visit. 
Red Domino pick fourth cast. 

Mar. 13— Toots multiplied. Girls of Jayhawker Board give boys a spread prepared at 
Cafeteria. 

Mar. 14 — Cabs and flowers declared bad form for the Prom. Cornhuskers back down 
on championship proposition. 

Mar. 15 — High school basketball meet. University men quit work on arrival of High 
school girls. 

Mar. 17 — Engineers vanquish laws in snowball fight. It is announced that the Jester 
will soon appear. 

Mar. 19 — Rumors of spring party. Languid fussers revive. Adams, Lee and Hancock 
streets very busy. Another debating society takes form. 

Mar. 20 — S. R. draws deep breath and prepares more gush on "certain fraternity men." 

Mar. 21 — Dry "showers" a new feature in the gym. Serenaders sing and escape. 

Mar. 22 — Golfers bestir themselves. Dockeray continues to rave about his dogs. 

Mar. 23 — Sphinx entertain the Sachems. "See what we may become some day". Cafe 
teria makes report. 

Mar. 24 — Sigma Nu's buy tickets for Margaret Anglin. 

Mar. 25 — ^Loleta McCune calls up the president of the Men's Student Council for a date. 

Mar. 26 — Robert W. Hemphill inveighs against Greek, Latin and Art, in Public Speaking 
class. 

Mar. 27 — Brown tells the janitors not to make so much noise. W. S. G. A. taSfey pull. 

Page 485 



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Mar. 28 — Sororities have auction sale. Uncle Jimmy entertains. Vice-President of 
Engmeers announces engagement in Kansan. Later: Calls at office and threatens to whip 
the editor 

Mar. 29 — Dan Cadmus advertises for a room mate. 

Mar. 30 — Second Senior Girl's society announced. Both say, "We're it.' 

April 

Apr. 1 — Freshman caps out. Pharmics say, "You've got to quit kickin' our hat around." 
Carnegie donates $75,000 to Women's dormitory. 

Professor Dykstra declares war on the educated pups. 



''Where you bought the Post Cards'' 


I'heo. Lieben 


The Rexall Store 


Theatrical and Masquerade 
Costumes 


F. B. McCOLLOCH, 
DRUGGIST 


WIGS— BEARDS 


Lawrence, Kansas 


807 Main St. 
KANSAS CITY OMAHA, NEB. 


Wilder Bros. 


Dick Brothers 


SHIRTS, UNDERWEAR 
PAJAMAS 

To Order from Measure 

SAMPLES SENT UPON REQUEST 

Our Custom Laundry does Specials for 
Students 


Leading 

DRUGGISTS 


LAWRENCE, KANSAS 


747 MASS. ST. 


Take 'em Down to 


^A' hen visiting Kansas City stop at 


<^P^^ 


Tke 

Blossom House 


Those Shoes You Want 


OPPOSITE UNION DEPOT 


Repaired 


European Plan 






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Engraved copperplate announcements, invita- 
tions and calling cards. €1. Dainty printed pro- 
grams for musicals, recitals, etc. C. Steel die 
embossed and illuminated correspondence stat- 
ionery for fraternities, clubs, etc. C Souvenir 
dance programs and banquet menus in leather 
and silk produced by skilled artisans in our 
modern factory. 

UNION BANK NOTE COMPANY 

F. D. CRABBS, Prest. and Gen'l Manager 

*'Our Work is Known Everywhere as the Best" 

10th and Central Streets Kansas City, Missouri 










Page 487 



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TheHall Lithographing Co. 
Manufacturing Stationers 

Engraved Cards and Invitations 
Steel Die Embossed Business Stationery 
Loose Leaf Systems and Devices 

PRINTERS BINDERS 

Topeka, Kansas 




LAWRENCE, KANSAS 



Park Grocery 

WULFKUHLE AND DICKENSON. Proprietors 

"The Best in Groceries" 
1300 MASS. ST. Both Phones 40 



Law Books 

We can sell any Law Book published 

We make a specialty of Kansas 

Reports, Digests, and local books 

VERNON LAW BOOK COMPANY 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 



Kennedy Plumbing Co. 



937 MASSACHUSETTS 



L. L. PHILLIPS & CO. 

Contractors and Dealers in 

Wall Paper, Paints, Varnishes, Mouldings, 
Brushes, Window Glass 

814 MASS. STREET Both Phones 192 



Apr. 2 — Indoor circus. Seniors vote on "Who's who and why?" 

Apr. 8 — Editors arrive. Thetas entertain Melville Stone. 

Apr. 9 — Editors take charge of the hill. University girl's cooking makes a hit. 

Apr. 10 — Ralph Spotts puts out his eye with the juice from a moving picture machine 
and appears on the hill with a bandage and a tin-cup. 

Apr. 11 — Colorado and Oklahoma take Kansas's measure in debate. Lucile Wilkinson 
chosen queen of the Kirmess. 

Apr. 12 — Advertisers of the "Lottery Man" almost sent to prison for illegal performance. 
Senior girls begin to tag for Nickels. Moe Freidman visits the University. Junior Prom. 

Apr. 13 — Convicts at State Penitentiary paralyze sociologists with fright. Lucile Barrett 
arrives for visit. Louis LaCoss cuts class for two weeks. 

Apr. 15 — Sophomores want to know. 

Apr. 16 — Sophomores find out. 

Apr. 17 — Student Council decides on reform. Spring fever abroad in the land. 

Apr. 18 — Spring Festival breaks out. Tennis tryout announced. 

Apr. 19 — More Music. Pi Phi spring party. 

Apr. 20 — Last of calendar written, and sent to printer. 



Page 488 






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Famous Quotations from Famous Men 



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1. General Sherman's opinion of War. 

2. Chancellor Strong's opinion of the Dramatic Situation at the University of Kansas. 

Advice to Freshmen 

1. Freshmen firstly respect the student council for lo the mighty Regents have vested 
all student disciplme m that august body and verily they will get you if you slip. 

2. Thou shall wear a little cap, lest the bloodthirsty laws acquaint thee vith thes ouUess 
paddling machine. 

3. Be prompt in coming to classes for a sluggard is an abomination. 

4. Pay attention to what your teacher sayeth and some day you may become a great 
man not unlike Proxy Weede, 

5. Smoke not within the confines of the building for the Regents ruleth that an unpardon- 
able sin. 

6. If thou hast a sweet tooth for fruit, work hard on election days, for verily grapes come 
not to him who doth not bring in the votes, 

7. Make yourself popular with the people of color even as Bill Hamner did, for truly 
they have a vote. 

8. Attend all the athletic events, for a student who hast not school spirit is looked upon 
with disdain by the cheer leader. 

9. Spend not too many evenings in the rear of the Greek's lest the fair co-ed become 
suspicious and shun your presence. 

10. Use cabs only for parties and trips to the depot for the Wise Men ruleth that cabs 
are not for serenade. 

11. Try not to introduce dark dances for they are held in disfavor by all but freshmen. 

12. In your spare moments organize a class society, for verily that is the prevailing fad 
at K. U. 



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Court House Meat Market 

WILL JOHNS, Proprietor 
Both Phones 81 Beery Building 



Lou Zuttermeister 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

PURE ICE CREAM AND ICES, FINE CONFECTIONS, AND SODAS, 
FOREIGN FRUITS 

Both Phones 44 

723 Massachusetts Street LAWRENCE. KANSAS 

Page 489 



For a business education^ attend 

^•^ Lawrence. Kansas. 



Binding 

Copper Plate Printing 

Rubber Stamps 



Engraving 

Steel Die Embossing 

Seals — Badges 



A. G. ALRICH 

Printing 

''THE HOUSE OF QUALITY" 



LAWRENCE 
KANSAS 



744 



Mass. 
Street 



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YOU have read through the 1912 Jayhawker upon which we have 
spent so much time and thought. We hope that you saw much 
you Hked, and little that was displeasing. We can not, of course, 
make a book free from faults. We can only say that if you are 
dissatisfied with the foregoing pages, it is not because we failed to 
expend our best energies upon it. The artists, photographers, editors and 
literary staff have sacrificed much to entertain you, and to make a book 
worthy to be called a publication of the University of Kansas. 

Next year a new regime will be entered upon, which will no doubt result 
in a far better annual than any before published. We wish our successors the 
best possible success. But for the present we leave the results of our work 
to you. 









Page 490 




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PLATES BY BUREAU OF ENGRAVING INC. 
MINNEAPOLIS. MINN. 






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