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Full text of "Reading men in the early colonial wars"

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Property 
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THE 

READING PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 

Reading 
Massachusetts 


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Reading Men 

in the 

Early Colonial Wars 



''"''■■•'■ ^,;;/,-^ ,;:;•;;»,- ."■.-'*'-'^'''' 

by 
Loea Parker Howard 
30331 






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d. I ^H^z i^C 



INDEX OF READING MEN IN THE 
COLONIAL WARS 



ARNOLD, JOSEPH 
ATWELL, JONATHAN 
ATWOOD, JOSIAH 
BACHELOR, BENJAMIN 
BACHELOR, DAVID . 
BACHELOR, JOHN . 
BANCROFT, JOSEPH . 
BANCROFT, SAMUEL . 
BANCROFT, THOMAS 
BANCROFT, THOMAS 3rD 
BATT, JOHN . 
BEARD, EBENEZER . 
BROWN, EDWARD 
BROWN, JOHN 
BROWN, JOHN, JR. . 
BROWN, THOMAS 
BROWN, THOMAS, JR. 
BOUTEL, JOHN 
BOUT WELL, JOHN . 
BOUTWELL, JOHN, JR. 
BRYANT, ABRAHAM . 
BRYANT, ABRAHAM, JR. 
BRYANT, FRINK 
BRYANT, JAMES 
BRYANT, JEREMIAH, JR. 
BRYANT, JONATHAN . 
BRYANT, TIMOTHY . 
BRYANT, WILLIAM, JR. 
BURNAP, BENJAMIN . 
BURNAP, JOHN . 
BUXTON, JOHN . 



11 



, 15, 



Page 
22 
29 
27 
29 
10 
12 

23, 29 
28 

18, 19 

22 

24 

30 

6 

5, 12 

28 

10 

26 

6 

26 

23, 30 
18 
24 
24 
32 
28 
30 

26, 30 

30 

23 

6 

31 



VI 

CARR, JAMES 10 

CHAMBERLAIN, EDWARD 22 

COGGIN, WILLIAM 28 

COWDREY, NATHANIEL 29 

DIX, JOHN . . 26 

DIX, JONATHAN 31 

DAMON, EBENEZER 22 

DAMON, JABEZ 30 

DAMON, THOMAS . . . . . . . 23 

DAMON, SAMUEL 10 

DAVIS, BENJAMIN , . 6 

EATON, JOHN 12 

EATON, JONATHAN . . ,. . . 21, 26, 27, 30 

EATON, JOSHUA 28 

EATON, THOMAS 22 

EATON, THOMAS, JR 27, 30 

EATON, TIMOTHY 31 

EMERSON, JOHN 30 

EMERSON, PETER 30 

EMERY, JOHN . 27 

FAY, JOSIAH 26 

FELCH, JOSEPH 29 

FLINT, BENJAMIN 26 

FLINT, DANIEL 32 

FLINT, EBENEZER 32 

FLINT, ELIEZER 32 

FLINT, JAMES 31 

FLINT, JOSEPH 27, 32 

FLINT, KENDALL 26 

FLINT, THOMAS 31, 33 

FLINT, YOUNG 33 

FOSTER, ABRAHAM 22 

FOSTER, ABRAHAM, JR 29 



vu 

FOSTER, JONATHAN 27 

FOSTER, SAMUEL 6 

GARDNER, DANIEL 30 

GILBERT, JOSEPH 27 

GOING, (go WING?) EBENEZER 26 

GOODWIN, KENDALL 28 

GOODWIN, NATHANIEL 17 

GOODWIN, TIMOTHY 22 

GOULD, WILLIAM . . . . . . .26 

GREENE, DAVID 29 

HARNDEN, JOHN 13 

HARNDEN, SAMUEL 23 

HARTSHORN, JAMES 29 

HARTSHORN, JONATHAN 24 

HARTSHORN, JOSEPH 6 

HARTSHORN, SAMUEL 23 

HARTSHORN, SAMUEL, JR 26 

HASEY, WILLIAM 11 

HODGMAN, THOMAS 6 

JOHNSON, EDWARD (Wobum) 1 

JEFFREY, JOHN . . . . . . . 24 

JENKIN, LEMUELL 28 

JAQUITH, JONATHAN 30 

JONES, WILLIAM 6 

KENDALL, ASA . . 26 

KENDALL, JOHN 26 

KNIGHT, STEPHEN 28 

LAMSON, SAMUEL 10 

LAMSON, SAMUEL, JR 23 

LAMSON, THOMAS 10 

LOVEJOY, PHINEAS 28 

LUNN, NICHOLAS 10 

LYNDE, (lYNDSEY?) HUGH 27 



Vlll 



MACKINTIER, BENJAMIN 












31 


MACKINTIER, EBENEZER 












31 


MACKINTIER, JONATHAN 


. 










27 


MACKINTIER, TIMOTHY 












31 


MANNING, WILLIAM . 












31 


MELLENDY, RICHARD 












27 


MERROW, DANIEL 












18 


NICHOLS, BENJAMIN . 












. 23, 29 


NICHOLS, DIDEMUS . 












28 


NICHOLS, EBENEZER 






'22, ^ 


k, 21 


i 26, 


31, 33 


NICHOLS, JAMES 












9 


NICHOLS, JOSEPH . 












29 


NICHOLS, JOSHUA . 












29 


NICHOLS, THOMAS . 












. 10, 21 


NICHOLS, TIMOTHY, JR. 












30 


NOYES, ISAAC . 












29 


PARKER, ASA . 












32 


PARKER, BENJAMIN 












. 27, 33 


PARKER, EBENEZER . 












28 


PARKER, EPHRAIM . 












29 


PARKER, GREENE 












. 28, 30 


PARKER, HANANIAH, JR. . 












21 


PARKER, JOHN . . 












11 


PARKER, JONATHAN . 












11 


PARKER, JONATHAN, JR. . 












24 


PARKER, JOSHUA 












24, 28 


PARKER, NATHANIEL 












32 


PARKER, PHINEAS . 












28 


PARKER, THOMAS, JR. 












11 


PEARSON, EBENEZER 












23 


PEARSON, JONATHAN 












23 


PIERCE, ROBERT 












23 


PIKE, JAMES, JR. . 












6 


POOLE, BENJAMIN . 












22 


POOLE, JAMES . 












22 


POOLE, JOHN . 












23 


POOLE, JONATHAN 










3,' 


4, 5, 6 


POOLE, JONATHAN, JR. . 












17 


PRATT, EDV/ARD 












23, 24 


PRATT, EPHRAIM 












31 



IX 



PROYT, (PRATT?) WILLIAM . 








23 


PROCTER, GERSHAM 








22 


RAND, HARRAN 










27 


RAYNER, THOMAS . 










28 


RICHARDSON, THOMAS 










33 


ROBBINS, WILLIAM . 










9 


RUSSELL, TIMOTHY . 










31 


SAVAGE, EPHRAIM . 








11," 


17, 21 


SAWYER, WILLIAM . 










31 


SHELDEN, WILLIAM . 










27 


SHELDING, ( SHELDEN?) A 


BRAHAM . 








31 


SMITH, SAMUEL 










26, 28 


STICKNEY, ABRAHAM . 










31 


STIMPSON, JAMES . 










18 


STIMPSON, TIMOTHY 










27 


STIMPSON, WILLIAM . 










33 


SWAYNE, JEREMIAH . 








7,' 


12, 15 


SWEETZER, MICHAEL 










30 


TAYLOR, ROBERT 










10 


TAYLOR, SEABRED . 












10 


TEMPLE, JABEZ 












28 


TEMPLE, JOHN 












22 


TEMPLE, RICHARD 












11, 18 


TEMPLE, ROBERT 












11 


TOWNSEND, JACOB 












29 


UPHAM, PHINEAS 












6 


UPTON, HEZEKIAH 












32 


UPTON, JACOB . 












27 


WALKER, RICHARD 












1 


WALTON, ISAAC 












27 


WALTON, JOHN 


. 










29 


WALTON, JOSIAH, Jf 


I. 










25 


WALTON, NATHAN 












26 


WELMAN, ISAAC 












10 


WESTON, JAMES 












30 


WESTON, JOHN 












30 


WESTON, JONATHAN 










29 


WILLIAMS, JAMES . 










30 


Total 


. 175 



Printed by 

The Reading Chronicle Press, Inc 

Reading, Massachusetts 



A FOREWORD 



The records of Reading men in the Colonial 
wars are widely scattered in various official 
documents and give a very imperfect idea of 
who the soldiers were, or when and where their 
service took place. For this reason, I have gath- 
ered these items of local history into one pam- 
phlet that will give a better picture of the heroic 
sacrifices made by our early townsmen in the 
defense of their homes and their Colony. 

These records have been copied from pay 
rolls, muster rolls, orders of the military coun- 
cil on file in the State Archives ; from town and 
family records; and from a few soldiers' jour- 
als. It is probable that some documents contain- 
ing the names of Reading soldiers have been 
overlooked. The notes giving the year of birth 
and the father's name will help to identify the 
soldier, but will not always prove reliable, as the 
Town records sometimes list two persons with 
the same name and year of birth. I hope that 



descendants of these men will inform me of 
omissions and errors ; and add information from 
their own family records. 

Material for the text has been found, in the 
Soldiers of King- Philip's War by Bodge, Syl- 
vester's Indian Wars of New England, Eaton's 
History, the 250th Anniversary Volume, and 
the Reading Town Records. The library of the 
Ne,w England Historic Genealogical Society 
and the local histories in the Woburn Pub- 
lic Library have also been of great assistance. 



IvOea Parker Howard 



Concord, Massachusetts, 
April 19, 1934. 



Reading Men 

in the 

Early Colonial Wars 



READING'S EARLIEST SOLDIER 



In obedience to the laws of the Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony, an Infantry Company was 
formed in Reading soon after its incorporation 
in 1644. Richard Walker was its first captain. 
He had been an ensign under Col. John Endi- 
cott of Salem as early as 1636. He and Edward 
Johnson, captain of the Woburn company, were 
members of the Ancient and Honorable Artil- 
lery Company together, and doubtless were well 
acquainted. In his history of New England 
towns, Johnson wrote that when skirmishing at 
Saugus, 

"He fought the Eastern Indians there 
Whose poisoned arrows filled the air 

And two of which, those angry foes 
Lodged safe in Captain Walker's clothes." 

Capt. Walker and two others appointed by 
the Assembly, made a treaty of neutrality in 
1645 with the French of Arcadia. 

He was a selectman and a representative 
from Reading and owned over 300 acres of land 
here. His homestead was on the present Elm 



street (Wakefield) near Winn street, and ex- 
tended to the shore of the '^Create Pond," inr 
chiding land recenty owned by the Ice Com- 
pany and the Lakeside Cemetry. 

He rettirned to Lynn and died there. 



KING PHILIP'S WAR 



The cruel, treacherous treatment of Chief 
Miantonomo by the Boston and Plymouth au- 
thorities had cost them the help of the power- 
ful Narrangansetts, and by September 1675, 
Philip, chief of the Pokanokets, had the sup- 
port of all the tribes from the Merrimac to 
the Connecticut in a long and desperate at- 
tempt to destroy the New England settlements. 
The towns in the Connecticut Valley suffered 
from severe attacks and Major Samuel Apple- 
ton of Ipswich was placed in command of the 
troops sent to their relief. He promoted En- 
sign Jonathan Poole of Reading to be one of 
his captains, and placed his company north of 
the town of Hatfield. The Council objected to 
this assumption of authority by Major Apple- 
ton, but he justified his action by the desperate 
situation that confronted him, and the Council 
confirmed the appointment after a personal in- 
terview with Captain Poole. 

Plubbard's account of the attack on Hatfield 
October 19, 1675, states "that seven or eight 



hundred Indians came upon the Town in all 
Quarters .... But they were so well entertained 
on all Hands where they attempted to break in 
upon the Town that they found it too hot for 
them, Major Appleton with great courage de- 
fending one end of the Town, Captain Mosely 
as stoutly maintaining the Middle, and Captain 
Poole the other end." 

In November, when the troops were distri- 
buted to the garrisons of various towns, Capt. 
Poole was assigned to Hadley with 30 of his 
men. Soon afterward Major Appleton was 
withdrawn from the Connecticut Valley and 
Captain Poole was left in command there dur- 
ing the following winter. How well he per- 
formed his arduous duties is shown in a letter, 
addressed to the Massachusetts Council by the 
Rev. Mr. Russell: 

''Hadley, March 16, 1676 

Capt. Poole who hath been last here for ye 
government of ye souldiers and as president of 
ye Council of warr here doth earnestly entreate 
for a liberty to repaire to his own very much 
suffering family at least for a while. We may 
not be so selfish as to be unsensible to his kind- 
nesse to us in his stay here or the losse to him 



thereby so as to hinder ye promoting of any 
rational request consistent with public safety: 
We are thankfuU for what blessing God hath 
made him to us, desirous to retain him while 
not to much to his prejudice. He signifies to us 
yt there is now in the army a man of ye same 
Town viz Redding by Name Mr. John Brown 
whom he judgeth very fitt to oversee ye soul- 
diers''. Capt. Poole's request was granted; he 
lived only two years after his retirement from 
the army. 



Mass. Archives 
Vol. 68, p. 163 



Reading Men In Captain Jonathan Poole's Company 



Jonathan Poole^ Samuel Foster^ 

Joseph Hartshorn^ William Jones 

Benjamin Davis^ John Burnap^ 

James Pike, Jr.^ Thomas Hodgman'^ 

Phineas Upham, Lieut.^ Edward Brown^^ 
John BouteP 



1. Capt, Jonathan Poole, b. 1634, d. 1678, son of John Poole 
one of the earliest and wealthiest settlers of Reading. They 
lived on the site of the Wakefield Rattan Works and owned 
a grist-mill and a fulling mill there. 

2. Joseph Hartshorn, b. 1652, d. , lived on the south side 
of Elm St. opposite Winn St., Wakefield. 

3. Benj. Davis was probably a son of George Davis who 
came from Lynn; was in the list of house holders in Read- 
ing, 1667. 

4. James Pike owned the old Jaquith house, now re- 
placed by that of the late Wendell Bancroft. This home- 
stead extended along Washington St. as far as the Parker 
Tavern. Sold before 1699 to Ens. Nathaniel Parker whose 
land lay to the east. 

5. Samuel Foster's farm included the Meadow Brook Golf 
Course, west of Grove St. and north to the Ipswich River. 

6. John Burnap, b. 1654. In 1708 sold his house, barn and 
orchard on the east side of High St., north of the Jaquith 
place to Lieut. Nath'l Parker. Later the Burnap homestead 
was on Ash St., south and east of the present Reading Green- 
houses. 

7. Thomas Hodgman was a house holder in 1667. His 
son Josiah's homestead of 36 acres was south of Scotland 
Hill and the Prescott farm. 

8. Lieut. Phineas Upham: b. in Maiden but credited to 
Reading; was severely wounded. 

9. John Boutel, b. 1645. The Boutel homestead was near 
the Dana Parker place on Salem St., extending north into 
the present cemetery. 

10. Edward Brown, b. 1640. Son of Nicholas Brown who 
owned the Lucius Beebe place east of the "Pond"; in 1638, 
the town of Lynn gave him 210 acres within the bounds of 
Reading. 



The Great Swamp Fight 

Major Appleton was withdrawn from the 
Connecticut Valley so that he might direct the, 
Massachusetts forces that assembled at Wick- 
ford, R. L, to attack King PhiHp's stronghold. 
His lieutenant in the First Middlesex Company, 
was Jeremiah Swayne^ of Reading. 

"At daybreak on Dec. 19, the troops from 
Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut 
began their long march of sixteen miles through 
intense cold and a heavy snow storm. They 
reached the Indian fort at about two o'clock. 
Without waiting for any organized attack, the 
Massachusetts men being in front rushed for- 
ward across the ice in an impetuous charge. The 
first company to enter met with a terrible fir^e 
from the front and the flanks. Others coming 
an piercing into the breach though suffering 
severe losses, drove the Indians from the fort 
and into the swamp and woods beyond, and set 
fire to the fort. Then through a bitter winter 
night, these men who had marched from dawn 
till high noon, had engaged in a desperate life 



1. Maj. Jeremiah Swayne, b. 1643, d. 1710, son of Jeremiah 
who early came to Reading from Charlestown. Major Swayne 
was a physican and was highly valued for his service in be- 
half of both town and colony. The Swayne homestead was in 
the eastern part of the present town of Wakefield on the 
"country way" from Saugus to Reading. 



8 



and death struggle from noon till sunset, now 
carrying more than two hundred dead and 
'wounded, plodded in the deepening snow and 
unbroken roads for sixteen miles to their quar- 
ters of the day before." A score of the wounded 
died during that terrible night march. Seven 
captains leading their men were killed, and four 
other officers were wounded, among the latter 
was Lieut. Swayne. 

"Order of the General Court, Sept. 16, 1676. 

Whereas at the firing of M^jor Appleton's 
tent at Narragansett, divers armes and clothes 
were lost by the fier belonging to particular per- 
sons, a lyst of whom is taken and is in the hands 
of Captain Swayne then left to Major Appleton ; 
who heretofore have received no sattisfaction 
for the same, this Court doth order that repara- 
tion be made by the country to the persons 
damnified by sayd fier.'' 

On Dec. 10, 1675 when the Massachusetts 
soldiers were assembled on Dedham Plain to be- 
gin their march against King Philip's strong- 
hold, a proclamation was made to them in the 
name of the Governor, "that if they played the 
man, took the fort and drove the enemy out of 
the Narragansett country, they should have a 
gratuity of land besides their wages." 



Alter the war they petitioned the General 
Court to redeem this promise and received the 
following answer : 

''In answer to the petition of John Lynsey, 
Robert Porter, Senr. and 22 more inhabitants of 
Lyn, Jeremiah Swayne, Samuel Dammon, Sam- 
uel Lambson, William Robbins, James Pyke, Jr., 
and James Nicholls of Reading, Wm. Raymond 
and 5 more of Beverly and Samuel Lincolne 
and three more of Hingham, the Court Judgeth 
it meet to grant the petitioners a tract of Land 
in the Nipmug country of eight miles square 
for their encouragement." This and other later 
grants were known as the Narragansett Towns 
of Westminister, Templeton, Amherst, (N. H.) 
and Buxton, (Me.) Several Reading families 
settled in this territory. In 1677, Reading voted 
six acres of land to each man who was in this 
war with the provision "that they shall not 
sell except to one of their number." In 1686, 
the town "gave to Capt. Swayne his choice of 
fifty acres" at a place called Edward's Neck 
that joins the Woburn line." 



10 



Reading Men In The Swamp Fight 



''Oct. 10, 1675, A Return to the Council by 
Lieut. Thomas Bancroft^ on request of his 
Capt. Gookin, of Reading men impressed by 
us:" 
Samuel Lamson^ ^Thomas Nichols^ 

James Carr Nicholas Lunn 

"^David Bachelor^ '^W'illiam Robbins 

^Samuel Damon* William Roberts 

Robert Taylor 
The following volunteered: 
"^ James Nichols^ "^Seabred Taylor"^ 

*Thomas Lamson "^Thomas Brown 

Isaac Welman 



*Men in Capt. Davenport's company that led the van in the 
charge on King PhiHp's stronghold. 

1. In 1673, Capt. Thomas Bancroft married SaTah Poole 
and settled on a large farm on West St., given to them by 
Capt. Jonathan Poole and Lieut. Thomas Bancroft of Lynn- 
field. The Bancroft part was a lot given to Capt. Richard 
Walker by the Town in 1652. 

2. Samuel Lamson hved near Salem and Pearl Sts., where 
Francis Kingman lived later. 

3. David Bachelor, bap. in Dedham 1643, son of John 
who came to Reading and bought a homestead of Henry Felch 
(Wakefield) in 1648. 

4. Samuel Damon lived in the neighborhood of John and 
Salem Sts. 

5. Thomas Nichols, eldest son of Richard and Annis who 
lived on Elm St., Wakefield, was a captain, a selectman for 
thirty 3^ears. 

William Robbins, married 1680 Precilla "Going", Reading. 

6. James Nichols : b. 1658, d. 1745, a brother of Capt. Thom- 
as. In 1732 gave a half of his homestead on High St. adjoining 
Ensign Nath'l Parker to his son Ebenezer, later a colonel. 

7. Seabred Taylor, b. 1643. d. 1714. The Taylor family 
lived in North Reading, near "Pudding Point". 



11 



In Capt. David Henchman's company were 
Thomas Parker, Jr./ and Sergt. John Parker^ 
sons of Deacon Thomas^ the emigrant. Jona- 
than, a third son, was with Thomas Bancroft 
in the garrison at Groton in Dec. 1675. 

Sergt. Ephraim Savage was in charge of the 
garrison at Quoboag (Brookfield) early in 1676. 

When the Indians destroyed Saco in 1676, 
Robert Temple who had been there since 1670 
was killed, and his family fled to Boston. His 
son, Richard^ came to Reading and will be 
mentioned in connection with a later war. 

In a pay-roll of the Three County Troop, 
Oct. 1675, under Lieut. Wm. Hasey of Read- 



1. Thomas Parker Jr., 1636-1699, lived near junction of 
Salem and Lowell Sts. in the eastern part of Wakefield. 

2. Sergt. John Parker, 1640-1688, lived on Prospect St. 
at Bare Hill. Brook Rd. A picture of his house is on p. 19 
of the Memorial Volume. He was wounded on July 18, 1675, 
near Pocasset, R. I. 

Jonathan Parker, 1656-1680. 

3. Deacon Thomas Parker's homestead was a few rods 
north of the present Wakefield Town Hall. John Parker (3) 
sold it to Jonathan Poole before 1712. See the Parker Gene- 
alogy by Theodore Parker. 

4. Richard Temple in 1697 bought sixteen acres of land, 
with a house, barn and orchard of James Pike. It included the 
land from Summer Ave. to the meadow east of the W. S. Park- 
er School. In 1698 he bought 18 acres adjoining of the widow 
of Benj. Hartshorn. 



12 

ing besides several Reading men named else- 
where, are the names of John Brown b. 1634, 
John Eaton^ (of the Playne) b. 1645, and John 
Bachelor, b. 1643. 

In March 1677, the garrison on the Ken- 
nebeck at Richmond's Id. was recalled to 
Piscataqua (Saco) to which place Capt. Swayne 
led his fifty men and ten natives for the relief 
of tjie settlers who scattered from Dover to 
Wells, began to suffer from the destruction 
wrought by the prowling savages. 

The horrors of Indian warfare were brought 
home to Reading people before the close of 
Philip's War. In August, 1675 Billerica was at- 
tacked and fourteen people killed or captured. 
Col. Lynde reported on the 23rd, "I went that 
night to Billerica where I found about 300 men 
in arms from Woburn, Reading and Medford 
under conduct of Miaj. Wm. Johnson, Maj. Jere- 
miah Swayne and Maj. Wade. That night we 
marched to the Merrimack and guarded the 
three fords between Andover and Chelmsford." 

On Apr. 10, 1676, Samuel Richardson, whose 
farm was on the eastern border of Woburn, was 

1. In 1673, John Eaton inherited from his father, Jonas, a 
farm with a house and barn where the mill at "Slab City" 
lately stood. This was four years before the marriage of 
Sergt. Nathaniel Parker who built the first house near the 
Reading Common. 



13 



in a field working with a son. He looked to- 
wards his house and saw evidences of trouble; 
when he reached the house, he found that In- 
dians had murdered his wife, a son and an infant 
girl. 

A few months later, a son of George Abbot 
of Andover was killed, two boys in Dracut were 
carried away into Canada, captives. The towns 
of Sudbury, Groton, Chelmsford and Dracut 
were abandoned. Their inhabitants flocked to 
Concord, Woburn, Reading and Boston 
for safety and support. 

The attack on the Harnden family in Read- 
ing occurred many years later, but may be re- 
lated here. Their homestead ;*was on Woburn 
and High streets, opposite the present North 
Wilmington nurseries. 

'Tn July, 1707, Col. Schuyler from his trad- 
ing post in Albany notified Gov. Dudley that a 
company of two hundred Indians and French 
soldiers were on their way to the Piscataqua 
River. They first showed themselves at Dun- 
stable, then at Amesbury and Kingston. On the 
8th, fiYt Indians in the edge of dusk attacked 
the house of John Harnden in his absence. They 



14 



butchered his wife and the three youngest chil- 
dren. The other five they carried off. One of 
these, unable to keep up with the savages was 
struck with a tomahawk and left for dead in an 
adjoining swamp, where the child was found 
afterwards alive. The people in the vicinity tak- 
ing the alarm got together, and the next morn- 
ing set out in pursuit. Coming upon their trail, 
they pressed them so hard that they recaptured 
three of the children; and so terrified were the 
Indians that they dropped their plunder and the 
remaining captive. After this success, the Read- 
ing men returned to their houses, but once they 
had retired, the savages swarmed to the west- 
ward until they had startled the people of 
Chelmsford, Sudbury and Groton. When in the 
latter town, they waylaid three soldiers as they 
were going to church, killing two and capturing 
the other." 

Sylvester s Indian Wars Vol. Ill, p. 93 



15 

THE FRENCH AND INDIAN WARS 



About the year 1689, the French government 
directed Count Frontenac to employ his Indian 
allies in harrassing New England settlements. 
It was the commencement of a desperate strug- 
gle between two great nations for the possession 
of America. Its fisheries, timber and furs were 
inexhaustible sources of national wealth and 
power. In these wars many Reading men took 
part. 

In August, 1689, the Massachusetts Council 
and Representatives ordered 

"That six hundred men, horse and foot be 
raised forthwith in Their Majesties Service for 
the Suppression and Destruction of the Indian 
Enemy." Eighty men from the Lower Middle- 
sex Regiment were ordered to rendezvous at 
Woburn under Capt. James Converse, Lieut. 
Thomas Bancroft of Reading wias next in com- 
mand. They were then ordered to what is no\v 
the town of South Berwick, Maine. The IndiSah^ 
had attacked and massacred the inhabitants of 
Wells, Exeter and Saco. 

On August 28, Maj. Jeremiah Swayne was 



16 

placed in command of seven Massachusetts com- 
panies and a party from the Plymouth Colony, 
in an expedition to clear the border towns of 

enemies as far East as Falmouth (Portland). 

He was unable to surround the Indians, as 
they retreated into the wilderness when attack- 
ed : besides this, Indian scouts, sent out by Capt. 
Wiswall, betrayed the plans of the white soldiers 
during the week in which they treacherously 
lived in the camps of the enemy. Notwithstand- 
ing the fault found by his failure to meet the In- 
dians, Cotton Mather speaks of him as our 
''Honest Major Swayne." 

He reported to the Council from Salmon 
Falls as follows : ''Capt. Wiswiall with the big- 
gest part of his company scouted up westward 
into ye chestnut woods 4 dayes but found none 
of ye enimy — it is supposed yt a small party of 
Indians may be in ye chestnut country beyond 
Groaton". 
Oct. 15, 1689. 

In 1690, New Ejngland resolved to attack 
Canada. Sir William Phipps with a fleet 
carrying two thousand men sailed up the St. 
Lawrence; but the great delay before arriving 
at Quebec made the attempt a total failure. The 
chapel of Notre Dame des Victoires in the Low- 



17 

er City, under the great fortress towering far 
above it, still remains to commemorate this 
victory of the French army over the "Yankee 
Knight." 

Several Reading men were in this expedition 
Capt. Ephraim Savage^ in command of one of 
the vessels was wounded. When Sir William at- 
tempted to land soldiers at St. Charles in order 
to divert Count Frontenac from the main attack 
in front of the city, the general in charge report- 
ed Oct. 7, ''we attempted to land soldiers but a 
storm prevented and Capt. Savage's vessel 
went ashore ; the tide fell and left them dry ; the 
enemy came upon them but they manfully de- 
fended themselves; the enemy were awed by 
guns from Sir William, and at the tides coming 
in they floated and all got off in safety." Among 
the men in the Lower Middlesex regt. under 
Maj. Nath'l Wade of Medford, were Lieut. 
Nath'l Goodwin,^ Lieut. Jona. Poole, Jr.,^ Dr. 



1. Capt. Ephraim Savage was very wealthy and a man of 
great ability. He returned to Boston, Was a cousin of Chief 
Justice Samuel Sewell. 

2. Lieut. Goodwin lived on the east side of the Pond; was 
a selectman for many years, also the town clerk and represen- 
tative. 

3. Lieut. Jonathan Poole, b. 1667, d. 1723 ; succeeded to the 
homestead below the present Town Hall; was a selectman and 
a justice. 



18 



James Stimpson, ^ who died on his return, Daniel 
Merrow^, a surgeon's mate, wounded, Richard 
and WilHam Temple and Lieut. Abraham Bry- 
ant,^ who built the Parker Tavern. 

Cotton Mather in his MagnaHa relates the 
following of Capt. Bancroft's part in the build- 
ing of the fort at Pemaquid (Me.) in 1692. 

"His Excellency, Sir William Phipps being 
arrived now the Governor of New England, ap- 
plied himself with all possible vigour to carry on 
the war. He raised about 450 men and in pursu- 
ance of his instructions from Whitehall, he laid 
the foundations of a fort at Pemmaquid which 
was the finest thing that had been seen in these 
parts of America. Capt. Wing assisted with 
Capt. Bancroft went through the former part of 
the work and the latter part was finished by 
Capt. March. 



1. Dr. Stimpson lived on Cowdrey's Hill. "This 24, July, 
1690, I, James Stimpson, Sr., being bound for Canada upon 
the Countrey's Service, do leave this my last will and testament. 
If God's Providence so dispose that I, ye said James return 
no more." From his will on file at Cambridge. His famil}^ 
were left in great want and had to ask the Court for help. 

2. Daniel Merrow, b. 1662, a son-in-law of Dr. Stimpson, 
and listed as a surgeon's mate, succeeded to his father's home- 
stead on West St. south of the Bancroft farm. The house 
was doubtless built before 1667 and perhaps was the first in 
the "Wood End" of Reading. 

3. Lieut. Abraham Bryant, b. 1671, d. 1714, married Sarah, 
daughter of Capt. Thomas Bancroft, in 1693, and built the 
Parker Tavern. His military service in Canada in 1690 was 
proved by Isaac Baldwin. 



19 



"His Excellency attended in this matter with 
these worthy Captains did in a few months dis- 
patch a service for the King with a prudence, 
and industry, and thriftiness, greater than any 
reward they ever had for it. 

''The fort called the William and Henry was 
built of stone in a quadrangular figure, being; 
about 7Z7 ft. in compass. There were laid abovfe 
2000 cart loads of stone. It has eighteen guns, 
mounted and it had generally at least sixty men 
posted in it for its defense." 

Cotton Mather also describes what he terms 
"A Remarkable Experience of One of Lieut. 
Thomas Bancroft's Soldiers while Fighting the 
Indians at Exeter" The story may seem rather 
trivial, but it is certainly interesting ! 

''On July 4, 1690, while eight white men were 
gathering hay in a field near Lamphrey River, 
they were set on by a large number of Indians 
who slew them all and took a lad into captivity. 
The next day they attacked Col. Hilton's garri- 
son at Exeter. Lieut. Bancroft being stationed 
in the town with a small force at a distance prob- 
ably of three or four miles, relieved the garri- 
son at a loss however of eight or nine of his 
party. 



20 



"It is true that one Simon Stone of Groton 
here wounded with Shot in Nine several Places 
lay for Dead (as it was time) among the Dead. 
The Indians coming to strip him, attempted with 
Two several Blows of an Hatchet at his neck to 
cut off his head, which blows added you may be 
sure, more enormous Wounds unto those Port- 
holes of Death at which the Life of the poor man 
was already running out as fast as it could. Be- 
ing charged hard by Lieut. Bancroft they left 
the man without Scalping him and the English 
now coming to Bury the Dead one of the Sol- 
diers perceived this poor man fetch a Gasp 
whereupon a Rough Fellow then present ad- 
vised 'em to give him another Dab with an 
Hatchet and so Bury him with the rest. 

"The English desisting this Barbarous advice 
lifted up the Wounded man and poured a little 
Fair Water into his Mouth at which he Cough- 
ed ; then they poured a little Strong Water after 
it, at which he opened his Eyes. The Rough 
Fellow was ordered now to hale a Canoo ashore 
to carry the Wounded Man up the River unto 
a Chirurgeon: — Simon Stone was thoroughly 
Cured and is at this Day a very Lusty Man; 
and as he was born with Two Thumbs on one 
hand, his Neighbors have thought him to have 
at least as many Hearts as Thumbs." 



21 



On Oct. 16, 1696, Capt. James Converse of 
Woburn reported to Lieut. Gov. Stoughton, "I 
took with me Capt. Thomas Bancroft and came 
to Groaton garrison on Friday morning." 

On Feb. 16, 1707 "Capt. Thomas Nichols 
sat at a court martial at Groaton.'' 

In 1707 Capt. Savage commanded a company 
in Nova Scotia, and in 1711 while he and Capt. 
Blims were sailing down from Annapolis, going 
into Passamaquoddy Bay for water, once on 
shore found themselves surrounded by a consid- 
erable body of Indians, while some French in the 
neighborhood remained passively looking on. 
They were anxious to obtain a cargo and sent 
Capt. Savage on board to bring some of the lad- 
ing on shore ; which he was unable to do, as the 
wind rising blew him off shore, so that he es- 
caped to get to Boston. His companion was 
afterwards ransomed. 

Sylvester III, pp. 193-194 

Under date of March 1711, is recorded the 
death of Jonathan Eaton,^ at Annapolis Royal, N. 
S. after 167 days service. Hananiah Parker, Jr.,^ 



1. Jonathan Eaton, b. 1686, son of Lieut. Jonathan and 
grandson of Jonas and Grace. 

2. Hananiah Parker, Jr., b. 1691 son of John, grandson of 
Lieut. Hananiah. 

Capt. John Parker who led the Lexington Minute Men 
on April 19, 1775 was a grandson of the John mentioned above. 



22 



also died at Port Royal in 1711. Under Lieut. 
Wheelwright there were Lieut. Benj. Poole^ and 
Sergt. James Poole. In 1722 under Capt. Ed- 
mund Ward of Scarborough were Lieut. Timo- 
thy Goodwin^ and Gersham Proctor. Under 
Capt. Eleazer Lyng of Dunstable was Ebenezer 
Nichols,^ a centinal and in 1724 a sergeant. 

Under Capt. Joseph Blanchard at Dunstable 
from Aug. 26 to Oct. 29, 1725 were the follow- 
ing Reading men: — 

Thomas Bancroft ^ 3rd Ebenezer Damon^ 

Thomas Eaton^ (and servant) John Temple^ 
Joseph Arnold Abraham Foster'^ 

Edward Chamberlain Ebenezer Nichols 



1. Benj. Poole, b. 1694, son of Esq. Jonathan. 

2. Lieut. Timothy Goodwin, probably a son of Lieut. Na- 
thaniel. 

3. Ebenezer Nichols, b. 1703, d. Merrimack, N. H., 1777. Son 
of James before noted. Bought Parker Tavern in 1738. In the 
army several years until 1760. Was a selectman and a repre- 
sentative for many terms, a justice also. 

4. Thomas Bancroft 3rd. 1673-1731. His homestead on 
West St. ; is now owned by Dr. Cheng. Was a selectman and 
representative. 

5. Thomas Eaton, 1685-1774. Succeeded his father Joshua 
on the Prescott farm, Summer Ave. ; owned 325 acres ; was a 
tanner. 

6. John Temple, b. 1704, d. 1776. Son and successor of 
Richard; was a selectman and member of the Provincial Con- 
gress of 1774 and 1775 that upheld the charter rights of the 
colonists. 

7. Abraham Foster, b 1702, bought the mill at "Slab City" 
of John Eaton, who inherited a house, barn and farm on the 
"Playne" from his father, Jonas Eaton in 1673. 

8. Ebenezer Damon, b. 1686 son of Sam'l. 



23 



John Boutwell^ Thomas Damon^ 

Benj. Burnap^ Joseph Bancroft^ 

Sam'l Lamson^ Ebenezer Pearson 

Sam'l Hartshorn^ 

In the same year, 1725, under Capt. Eleazer 
Tyng for 14 weeks were : — 

Sergt. Benj. Nichols^ John Poole^ 

Sergt. Sam'l Harnden^ William Proyt 

Jonathan Pearson Edward Pratt^^ 

Robert Pierce 



1. John Boutwell, b. 1702. Son of John and Grace (Eaton) 
This Boutwell family settled on the Dana Parker place where 
the park and portion of the Cemetery are. 

2. Thomas Damon, b. 1703, son of Thomas. 

3. Benj. Burnap, b. 1702, son of Benj. and Eliz. (Newhall). 

4. Samuel Lam.son, b. 1701, lived near the corner of Pearl 
and Salem Sts. 

5. Samuel Hartshorn, b. 1708, son of Timothy and Martha. 

6. Joseph Bancroft, b. 1698. Son of Thomas 3rd. Father 
and son on the same Roll, in the same company. 

7. Sergt. Benjamin Nichols, b. 1699, son of John, who lived 
on Pearl St. near the present Main St. 

8. Sergt. Samuel Harnden, 1699, son of Benjamin. The 
early Harnden families in the north western part of Read- 
ing, now Wilmington. 

9. John Poole, b. 1688. Succeeded his father, Lieut. John 
on the homestead north of the Pond. This included the Caleb 
Wakefield, the Benj. Cox farms and Camp Curtis Guild. 

10. Edward Pratt, b. 1770, son of John who lived on the 
place owned by Lucius Beebe, Esq. 



24 



The Capture Of Louisburg 



In 1745, Gov. Shirley of Massachusetts and 
William Pepperill, a wealthy merchant of Kit- 
tery, raised a large body of soldiers and with the 
aid of a fleet of English war vessels, after a 
desperate siege, captured the French fortress 
of Louisburg, Cape Briton Island, which had 
been a constant menace to the cities of the New 
England coast. General Pepperill was knighted 
as a reward for his services. 

Ebenezer Nichols was captain of the 9th Co. ; 
under Col. Sylvanus Richmond of the Sixth 
Regt. ; Jonathan^ and Joshua Parker^ were ser- 
geants. In the Third Regt. Jonathan Hartshorn^ 
was a lieutenant of the 8th Co. Under Lieut. 
Scollay was Edmund Pi'att an ensign. John 
Batt^ and John Jeffrey died on their return. Ab- 
raham and Frink Bryant, brothers, Sudbury, 
age 22 and 28 years, died at Louisburg, Feb. 
1746. They were grandsons of Lieut. Abraham 
and Sarah (Bancroft) Bryant, the first owners 
of Parker Tavern. 



1. Jonathan Parker, b. 1709 son of Jona. and Ann (North 
Reading). 

2. Joshua Parker, b. 1720, son of Eben, of CTiarlestown. 

3. Jonathan Hartshorn, 1721, son of Benj. and EHz. (Bout- 
well). 

4. John Batt married Ruth Lamson, Reading 1731. 



25 

THE LAST FRENCH AND INDIAN WAR 

A journal of Josiah Walton, Jr., of Reading, 
bound for Crown Point with Major Ebenezer 
Nichols. 

A^. E, Register, Vol. V, p. 42 

June ye 30, 17S?5 
"I went with Major Nichols bound for 
Crown Poynt. Monday from Reading to Wo- 
burn; Tuesday from there through Bedford, 
Concord, Sudbury, Westboro to Worcester; on 
Wednesday from there through Leister, and 
Brookfield to Palmer ; Thursday through Spring- 
field and Westfield to Glascow; Friday through 
part of No. 1 to Sheffield; Saturday through 
Kinderhook to the Half- Way Brook. Sunday, 
July 6, we went to Albany. We went up the 
river (Hudson) from the 6th of Aug. till the 
14th, when we arrived at the carrying place. 
Sept. 4, w^e got to Lake George. Sept. 8 there 
was a scout of seven hundred men which met an 
army of French and Indians which beat us back 
to the camp and there fought for some hours. 
The fight began four miles from camp. 

I was dismissed at Lake George Oct. 4; got 
to Albany the 7th; went on board of Capt. 
Clapp's sloop which sailed that day for Boston 



26 

where we arrived Oct. ye 21, and got home ye 
next day." 

Col. Titcomb was killed in the battle men- 
tioned and Maj. Nichols was fwounded. He later 
became the colonel of this regiment. 

Muster Roll of Capt. John TapHn's Co. un- 
der Major Nichols on the Crown Point Expedi- 
tion from Mar. 28 to Dec. 12, 1755. 

Archives, Vol. 94, p. 36. 

Lieut. Benj. Flint Thomas Brown 

Sergt. Nathan Walton Timothy Bryant 

Sergt. Josiah Fay Sam'l Hartshorn, Jr. 

Corp. Wm. Gould Asa Kendall 

Cornet, John Dix John Kendall 

Cornet, John Boutwell Sam'l Smith 

Ebenezer Going Kendall Flint 

Jonathan Eaton Josiah Walton, Jr. 

(the diarist) 



Benj, Flint, b. 1728, son of Dea. Wm. whose homestead 
half a mile south of village of North Reading. 

Nathan Walton, b. 1729, son of John who probably came 
from Marblehead. 

Wm. Gould, bap. 1726, son of Major "Gold" of Topsfield. 

John Dix was a lieut. in the North Reading Co. April 19, 
1775. 

John Boutwell, b. 1739, son of Nathaniel. 

Eben "Going", b. 1733, son of Ebenezer Gowing. 

Jona. Eaton, b. 1735, son of Jona. who lived on Ash st. 

Thos. Brown, b. 1738, son of Jeremiah. 

Sam'l Hartshorn Jr., b. 1735, son of Sam'l. 

Asa Kendall of Dunstable, married in Reading in 1759. 

Sam'l Smith, b. 1727, son of Isaac. 

Kendall Flint, b. 1733, son of Dea. Wm., bro. of Lieut. Benj. 

Josiah Walton, b. 1736 "the diarist", bro. of Nathan moved 
to N. H.. was in the Battle of Bunker Hill. 



27 



Under Maj. Nichols and Capt. William Flint 
at Ft. Edwards, July, 1756, were Jonathan Mac- 
Kintier, clerk, Joseph Gilbert, age 46 and Wil- 
liam Shelden, age 16. Transferred from Capt. 
Goodwin's Co. were Sergt. Hugh Lynde, Jona- 
than Eaton, age 27 and John Emery, age 20.' 

Under Capt. Tapley, Ft. William Henry, 
Aug. 1756: Sergt. Benj. Parker, died, age 27, 
Thomas Eaton, Jona. Foster, age 19, Richard 
Mellendy, age 33, Harran Rand, age 16, Timo- 
thy Stimpson, Josiah Atwood, Jacob Upton. 



Archives Vol. 93, p. 196 

A Return by Capt. Ebenezer Jones, Sept. 22, 
1755 to Feb. 1, 1756. 

''A Hst of ye mens names Coining ye Expidi- 
tion against Crowyne Pynt which belongs to ye 
Regement whereof Elaser Tyng Esq. is Col. 
presented to me to be vewed and to pass muster 

Joseph Flint Isaac Walton, drummer 



Jona Eaton, b. 1728, son of Nath'l lived near Prospect and 
Brook Sts., Wakefield. 

Benj. Parker, b. 1727, son of Benj. their homestead 370 
Franklin St. now standing. 

Jona. Foster, b. 1737, son of Jona.; his homestead now 
owned by the Meadow Brook Club. 

Timothy Stimpson, b. 1714, son of Dr. Thomas. 

Jacob Upton, b. 1726, son of Joseph. 

Joseph Flint, 1737, son of Ensign Thomas. 

Isaac Walton, b. 1733 son of John and Mary. 



28 



John Brown Kendall Goodwin, corporal 

Thomas Rayner William Coggin, wounded 
Lemuell Jenkin Jeremiah Bryant, Jr. cornet 
Joshua Eaton, clerk Joshua Parker 

Didemus Nichols Greene Parker 

Stephen Knight Ebenezer Parker 



Taken from the militia in the summer of 

1757 for the Relief of Ft. William Henry, — la 

Troop of Horse under Capt. Samuel Bancroft, 

Jr., Reading to Brookfield, 68 miles, 11 day's 

wages. If 10 S. 

Lieut. Jabez Temple Phineas Parker, Jr. 
Phineas ly'ovejoy Samuel Smith 



John Brown, b. 1733, son of Nathaniel. 

Lemuel Jenkin married Sarah Weston of Reading, 1757. 

Joshua Eaton, b 1734, son of Capt. Thos., Sr. ; lived at 
corner of Summer Ave. and Oak St. 

Didemus Nichols, b. 1734, son of Daniel. 

Stephen Knight married Mary Pierce of Reading, 1753. 

Kendall Goodwin, b. 1736, son of John. 

Wm. Coggin, b. 1742, son of Joseph. 

Jeremiah Bryant, b. 1742, son of Jeremiah. 

Ebenezer Parker, b. 1723; Greene Parker, b. 1736; Joshua 
Parker, b. 1738, brothers, sons of Ebenezer, homestead in 
Wakefield. 

Capt. Sam'l Bancroft Jr., b. 1715, son of Capt. Sam'l, home- 
stead on West St., near Woburn line. 

Jabez Temple, b. 1731. In 1790 bought north half of "Park- 
er Tavern" and 20 acres west and south of the barn; sold in 
1802 to Jona Weston," reserving rights to 2nd and 3rd loft." 

Phineas Parker, Jr., b. 1739. In 1728 his father, Phineas 
Sr., inherited the homestead of Ens. Nathaniel, near the pre- 
sent post office with the land extending from Lowell to Wash- 
ington Sts. ; Phineas Sr, years later built the Grouard house 
where the Library now stands, 

Sam'l Smith, b. 1727, son of Isaac who lived on Main 
St., near Crescent St. Wakefield. 



29 



Ephraim Parker 
Benj. Nichols 
Joseph Nichols 
Joseph Bancroft 
Jonathan Weston 



Jonathan Atwell 
Nath'l Cowdrey 
John Walton 
Isaac Noyes 
Joseph Felch 



Jacob Townsend 



Under Capt. David Greene, Reading, in a Hke 
service. ,....•••;•..•■ 



Sergt. Joshua Nichols 
James Hartshorn 
Benj. Bachelor 
Abraham Foster 



/^ 






V^dii.l 



... -f'-'"' 



Ephraim Parker, b. 1728, son of Joseph of Franklin St., 
owned "Parker Tavern". 

Benj. Nichols, b. 1723, son of Joseph. 

Joseph Nichols, b. 1728, son of Joseph. 

Joseph Bancroft, b. 1735, son of Ens. Thos., West St., the 
farm later owned by his grandson, Capt. George. 

Jonathan Weston, b. 1731, son of Ephraim, lived on the 
farm later owned by Jona. Moulton, Main St., near Stoneham 
line. 

Jacob Townsend, b. 1729, West St., near the Wilmington 
line. 

Nath'l Cowdrey, b. 1737, son of Nath'l of Prospect St., 
Wakefield. 

Joseph Felch, b. 1736, son of Ebenezer lived near the Stone- 
ham line. 

Capt. David Greene, b. 1714, son of David ; lived in Green- 
wood near Stoneham line. 

Joshua Nichols, b. 1718, son of Richard; homestead at 
corner of FrankHn and Grove Sts. 

James Hartshorn, b. 1730, son of John. 

Benj. Bachelor, b. 1736, son of Jonathan. 

Abraham Foster, b. 1735, son of Abraham who owned the 
mill at "Slab City". 



30 



Green Parker 

John Emerson a|c Brown Emerson 
Timothy Bryant a|c Peter Emerson 
John Boutwell, Jr. a|c John Boutwell 
Dan'l Gardner a|c Benj. Brown 
Jas. Williams a|c Jona. Pierson 
Michael Sweetser a|c Jas. Emerson 

A Muster Roll of Capt. Jonathan Eaton's 
Troop of Horse, detached from Col Tyng's 
Regt. for the Relief of Ft. WilHam Henry v — 
Lieut. Jonathan Jaquith Timothy Nichols, Jr. 
Q. M. James Weston John Weston 
Corp. Jona. Bryant Ebenezer Beard 

Corp. Jabez Damon William Bryant, Jr. 

Peter Emerson Thomas Eaton 



Green Parker, b. 1736, son of Ebenezer. 

John Emerson, b. 1732, son of Brown. 

John Boutwell Jr., b. 1739, son of John; homestead in- 
cluded Salem St. Playground. 

Michael Sweetser, b. 1735, son of Michael; homestead on 
Main St.; near the "Junction". 

Capt. Jonathan Eaton, b. 1714, son of Capt. Thos. St.; Ash 
St. near Wakefield line. 

James Weston, b. 1733, son of Benjamin, who lived on 
West St. 

Jona. Bryant, b. 1717, son of Esq. Wm. and grandson of 
Sergt. Abraham. 

Jabez Damon, b. 1722, son of Joseph. 

Peter Emerson, b. 1726, son of Brown, 

Timothy Nichols, b. 1731, son of Timothy. 

John Weston, b. 1731, son of Isaac who lived on West St. 

William Bryant, b. 1735, son of Wm. Jr., who removed to 
Sudbury. 

Thomas Eaton, Jr., b. 1729 was Capt. of Reading Co. 1775; 
son of Capt. Thos. Sr. 



31 



Under Capt. Thomas Flint, from the North 
Parish to Marlboro 32 miles Aug. 1757. 

Archives, Vol. 95, p. 501. 

Lieut. Wm. Manning Ephraim Pratt 

Sergt. Abr. Shelding Jonathan Dix 

Sergt. Abr. Stickney John Buxton 

Corp. James FHnt Bben. MacKinter 

William Sawyer Timothy MacKinter 

Timothy Russell Timothy Eaton 
Benj. MacKinter 

N. Hampton, June 2, 17S8 
To Lieut. Eph. Wesson, 
Sir: 

You are to repair to Hadley and there wait 
for Col. Nichols' arrival that you may give him 
an Acct. .of the spare blankets of the Regiment 
that were left there at Mr. Oliver Smith's. 

I am your friend, 

Jn. Smith 
Green s Groton 



Abraham Shelding, b. 1740, son of Abraham Sheldon. 

James Flint, b. 1724, son of Dea. Wm., who lived a half 
mile south of the village. 

Wm. Sawyer, b. 1730, son of William. 

Timothy Russell, b. 1733, son of Robert. 

Benj. MacKinter, b. 1725, son of Sam'l. 

Ephraim Pratt, b. 1729, son of Sam'l who lived near Her- 
rick Batchelor's place. 

Jona. Dix, b. 1738, son of Samuel Dix. 

Timothy Eaton, b. 1736, son of Israel and Diadem. 



32 



Under Capt. Aaron Fay of Southboro, on an 
Expedition to Crown Point, Apr. 21 to Nov. 2, 
1759 was Corp. Asa Parker; and in 1760, for 4 
weeks, 1 day; allowed 98 miles travel home to 
Reading; also James Bryant. 

Under Col. Nichols, Sept. 13, 1758 to Jan. 4, 
1759 was Daniel FHnt, killed. 

Under Col. Williams from June 26 to Dec. 
2, 1760 was Ebenezer Flint. 

Under Capt. Moses Parker, Chelmsford 
from May 2, 1761 to Jan. 21, 1762 was Nath'l 
Parker, Reading, and under Capt. Thos. Far- 
rington from Mar. 18 to Nov. 17, 1762 was 
Nath'l Parker of Reading a "minor," T. Emer- 
son, master. 

In Capt. Hezekiah Upton's 3rd Reading Co. 
was Lieut. Eliezer Flint, Mar. 1762 and Sergt. 
Jos. Flint in Capt. Francis Peabody's Co. from 
June 26, 1760 to Apr. 15, 1761. These two Flint 



Asa Parker, b. 1740, son of Benj.; succeeded his father-in 
-law on Franklin and Grove Sts. Was grandfather of Harri- 
son of Winchester; Oilman and Loea of Reading and Asa of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 

James Bryant, b. 1719, son of Kendall, grandson of Sergt. 
Abraham. ~ 

Daniel Flint, b. 1740; Eben'r Flint, b. 1742, sons of Ebe- 
nezer, 

Nath'l Parker, son of Capt. Nathan ; he was a physician in 
Salem. 

Capt. Hesekiah Upton, b. 1725, son of Joseph. 

Eliezer Flint, b. 1731, Joseph Flint, brothers and grandsons 
of Sergt. George whose garrison house still stands, Park St., 
West, North Reading. 



33 



brothers were in Sudbury at Jona. Rice's Inn 
for 16 weeks. They were probably sick there. 

Before this last war was declared, the fol- 
lowing named Reading men were employed in 
the defense of the eastern frontier under Col. 
Winslow: Nov. 1754. Thos. Richardson, sergt 
and Wm. Stimpson, clerk, 3 mo. 2 weeks, 6 days. 

Capt. Thos. Flint Apr. 23 to Oct. 9, 1754. 

Under Capt. Thos. Flint, May 31 to Sept. 9, 
Corp. Benj. Parker and Young Flint, master 
Benj. Hartshorn. 



From a Diary of Lieut. Samuel Thompson, in Col. 
Nichols^ Regt., Capt. Ebenezer Jones Co., near Lake George 
— In the Woburn Public Library. 

"On July 20, 1758 occurred one of the many 
skirmishes for which Half Way Brook is noted 
(Queenesbury, N. Y.) One of the scouting par- 
ties sent out by Gen. Montcalm to attack and 
harrass the soldiers and convoys on the Ft. Ed- 
wards road, and to take scalps and provisions, 
made one of their hawk-like descents, falling 
upon Col. Nichols regiment then quartered at 
the Half Way Brook. The detachment made up 
of 500 Canadians and Indians succeeded in tak- 



William Stimpson, b. 1732, son of Dr. Wm, and Catherine, 
dau. of Col. Ebenezer Nichols. They lived at the corner of 
Main and Salem Sts., Wakefield. 



34 



ing twenty-four scalps and ten prisoners. Capt. 
Jones of Wilmington, Capt. Lawrence of Gro- 
ton and twelve others were brought into camp 
scalped. 

"On July 27 there was another ambush; Gen. 
Putnam's convoy of sixty baggage carts halted 
at night at Half Way Brook. They resumed' 
their march the next morning before their es- 
cort had left the enclosure. They were attacked 
by a large party of French and Indians, and 
over one hundred of the escort killed. Gen. Piit- 
nam was made a prisoner." 

The capture of Quebec, Sept. 17, 1759 by 
General Wolfe ended all hope on the part of 
France, of conquering New England. It also 
stopped the Indian massacres that had terrified 
the English settlements for nearly a century. 

These wars had imposed heavy burdens on 
the early settlers."^ In two years during King 
Philip's Wars, seventeen county rates were as- 
sessed upon Massachusetts towns. In some in- 
stances, these taxes exceeded the total valuation. 
A single rate of Reading was 16£ 9s lid. The 



*Houses in Reading in 1667, 59; Soldiers here listed in 
Philip's War 1675, 38. 

*Houses in Reading in 1765, 225; Soldiers listed in last 
French and Indian War, 1755-60, 106. 



35 



demand upon the militia was also very severe. It 
is probable that in King Philip's War of 1675-77 
and in the last French and Indian War of 1755- 
'60 there was a soldier in the army from every 
two houses. These men not only endured the 
hardships and dangers common to all army life, 
but in addition, the horrors of Indian savagery, 
such as scalping, mutilation and torture. The 
musty petitions in the State Archives reveal not 
only the desperate poverty of some of their be- 
reaved families, but display also a fortitude and 
devotion worthy of heroes and patriots. 

Notwithstanding the devastation wrought 
during nearly a century of border warfare the 
indomitable spirit of the hardy settlers was 
such that their eastern frontier, which in King 
Philip's War had been at Casco Bay, had at the 
close of the French and Indian Wars, been ad- 
vanced nearly to the Penobscot River. 

Their fortitude should be an everlasting ex- 
ample and inspiration to New England people. 



995 00118 7255 









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