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Full text of "Real estate record and builders' guide [electronic resource]"

^* 



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O LIBRARIES 2 



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jr 



^'r, OP »♦** 

AVERY 
UBRARY 



noNS 



SECTION ONE 



^J 



1 

POUNDED 1868 

V^^REAL ESTATE JPkk BUILDERS 

Recoup ^•'^ Qm i de 

'DEVOTED TO REAL ESTATE, BUILDING MANAGEMENT AND CONSTRUCTION IN GREATER NEW YORK AND VICINITY 




NEW YORK. JANUARY 7, 1922 












GEO. R. READ & CO. 

Member Real Estate Board, ?J. Y. 

Real Estate 

30 NASSAU STREET 
3 EAST 35TH STREET 


Established 1853 

HORACE S. ELY 
& COMPANY 

Real Estate 

BISHOP BUILDING 
76 WILLIAM STREET 


J. ROMAINE BROWN CO. 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate 

J. Romalne Brown, Pres. Elliott L. Brown. Treas. 
Nathan H. Gregory, Vlce-Pres. Morris E. Klnnan, Secy. 

ESTABLISHED 1856 
ID RA.ST 43d STREET 












CRUIKSHANK COMPANY 

Member Seal Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate 

Managers of Estates — Brokers — Apprmsers 

Established 1794 Incorporated 1903 

S 141 BROADWAY 

t 


WM. CRUIKSHANK'S 

SONS 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 
Real Estate 

Brokers. Appraisers, and the 
General Management of Real Estate 

85 LIBERTY STREET 


BUTLER & BALDWIN 

INCORPORATED 
Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate 
Building Management 

15 EAST 47th ST. Tel. Murray Hilf 6632 








PEASE & ELLIMAN 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate— Insurance 

Managers of Estates, Brokers 
and Appraisers 

340 MADISON AVENUE 
55 LIBERTY ST. 165 WEST 72D ST. 


F. & G. PFLOMM 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y.. 

Real Estate 
Agents— Brokers—Appraisers 

1333 BROADWAY Tel. 2127 Fitz Roy 


PORTER & CO. 

Geo. W. Short Chas. F. Porter 

Real Estate 

Renting and Collecting a Specialty 
159 WEST 125TH STREET 








CHAS. F. NOYES CO. 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Reai Estate 
Agents and Brokers 

Downtown Business Property 
a Specialty 

118 WILLIAM STREET 


Established 1869 

D. KEMPNER & SON, Inc. 

Real Estate Investments 

I. H. KEMPNER, President 
522 FIFTH AVENUE 


J. EDGAR LEAYCRAFT 
& CO. 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate 

Agents, Brokers, Appraisers 

Insurance 

30 EAST 42D STREET 










BRETT & GOODE CO. 

Real Estate 

Specialists in Business Properties 
582 FIFTH AVENUE 


WOOD. DOLSON COMPAN Y 

IN0(>i:POBATED 
Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate 

Mortgage, Loans, - Insurance 
Managemettt of Properties 

BROADWAY, AT 80TH STREET 
Downtown Office: 141 Broadway 


WM. H. WHITING & CO. 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate 

Rental, Management and Sale 
of Business Property 

41 PARK ROW 


j 






CROSS & BROWN CO. 

Member Real Estate Board, N, Y. 

Real Estate 
Building Management 

1« EAST 4Ist STREET 

409 BROADWAY 

175 FIFTH AVENUE 

FISK BUILDING, S7th STREET 


M. & L. HESS, Inc. 

Business Property 
Rental-Sale-Management 

907 B'WAY Stuyvesant 
Cor. 20th St. 4200 


WM. A. WHITE & SONS 

The Management of Real Estate, 

Sales, Rentals and 

Mortgage Loans 

46 CEDAR STREET TEL. 5700 JOHN 
Established 1868 











MEMBERS REAL ESTATE BOARD OF NEW YORK 



Eatabliahed 1881 

AMES & COMPANY 

REAL ESTATE 

» WEST 31ST ST. Tel. 4810 Longacre 

A. V. AMY & CO. 

ECONOMICAL AND EFFICIENT 
MANAGEMENT OF PKOPERTT 

160 WEST 72ND ST. Phone 5809-6810 Columbus. 



JAMES S. ANDERSON & CO. 

REAL ESTATE 

Management — Leasing — Rentals — Insurance 

Over twenty-five years' experience in 

the management of property. 

Offices: 82-84 NASSAU STRIET 
Jokn 0079 



Eatabllshed 1852 

ASHFORTH & CO. 

Incorporated 

REAL ESTATE 
Agents — Brokers 

SOI FIFTH AVE., AT 42nd ST. 
Murray Hill 0142-0143 



JOHN J. BOYLAN 

Real Estate Agent, Brolcer and Appraiser 



401 WS8T eiST eTBKET 
277 BBOADWAT 



Clrale TTSe 
WsRk l>18 



EUGENE J. BUSHER CO. 

INCOBPOBA'ntD 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Martgagea, Appraising, Uanagement 
N. W. Car. East 149tli St. and Cvartlandt 

Are., Bronx 
Pheae: Mott Bavea lill ■stabUaiM* 1««5 

CAMMANN, VOORHEES 
& FLOYD 

MANAGEMENT OF ESTATES 

84 WILLIAM STREET NKW YORK 

BROEBBS, APPRAISERS, AGENTS 



FIRM OF 

LEONARD J. CARPENTER 

Agents Brokers Appraisers 

75 MAIDEN LANE 

Branch: Comer Third Ave. a.uA 68th St. 

Entire Chars* of Property 

D. T. BwalDson A. EL Carpenter 0. L. Catveater 



THE CHAUNCEY 
REAL ESTATE CO., Ltd. 

BBOOKLYN'S OLDEST 

REAL ESTATE OFFICE 

187 MONTAGUE ST. BROOKLTN 

▲ppralser^—ADCtioncers — Brolsera 



CUDNER REAL ESTATE GO. 

BROKERS and MANAGERS 
3B4 WEST 23BD ST. Tel. Chelsea 127«l 



ARTHUR CUTLER & CO. 



Real Estate 

291 BROADWAY, Suite 1904 



Worth 6365 



HARRY B. CUTNER 

REAL ESTATE 

1181 BROADWAY, AT 28TH ST. 
Tctepbonc: WatMna 4B8t-« 

W. E. DEAN & CO. 

Specialists in Lower Manhattu 
REAL ESTATE 

3 Coenlies Slip. Nrv Yark Tel. Broad 2582 



c:;^^'^^^ 



Aaetioneer 



67 LIBERTY ST. 
N. y. aTY 



Telephone; 
Cort 0744 



0. D. & H. V. DIKE 

Specialists in the 
Management of Lncome-P^roduclng 

PROPERTIES 

CANDLER BUILDING 

220 WEST 42ND STREET 

BRANCH: 271 WEST 23RD STREET 



DUROSS COMPANY 

Real Estate 
ISa WEST 14TH ST. 2«1 BROADWAY 



CHARLES G. EDWARDS CO. 
Real Estate — Insurance 

Specialist in Downtown Dry Goo<ls Distript 

321-323 BROADWAY 

Phone: Worth 8420 

Uptown Office: 425 FIFTH AVENUE 



J. B. ENGLISH 



REAL ESTATE BROXER 



INSURANCI 
ESTATES MANAGED 
HENT COLLECTED 
HOUSES FOR SALI 
AND TO LIT 



1(31-7 Broadway 

N. W. earner 45th St. 

Astor Theatre Bnllding 

Phonal Bryant 4773 



J. ARTHUR FISCHER 

Real Estate and Mortgagea 

LonBacre 7176-7-S 690 SIXTH AVE., near 40tb St. 



FRED'K FOX & CO., Inc. 

Business BuUding Brokers 

297 MADISON AVENUE 

Southeast Comer 41st Street 

TandertlUt «l4t 

793 BROADWAY 

Near 11th Street 

Stnyreeant 161S 



GOODWIN & GOODWIN 

REAL ESTATE and INSURANCE 
Management of EsUtes a Specialty 

148 WEST t7TH STREET 
Near Canwsla Hall Telaphone: Ortle 6095 

2(0 LENOX AVENUE 

N. ■. Car. UlnJ StrMt TeleplwBi: Harlem «»•• 



C. BERTRAM HUBBARD 

INCORPORATED 

REAL ESTATE— INSURANCE 

MANAGEMENT 

489 FIFTH AVENUE 

Tel. Murray Hill 458-3339 



HENRY G. LEIST 

REAL ESTATE— INSURANCE 

APPRAISER— ESTATES MANAGED 

M4 East 8(th Street Established 1887 



Edgar A. Manning Anton L. Trunk 

MANNING & TRUNK 

REAL ESTATE 
489 Fifth Arenne Phone: Murray Hill 6834 



SAMUEL H. MARTIN 

Real Estate and Insuranee 

Management Specialist 
1974 BROADWAY Phone: Columbas e«9« 



LEWIS H. MAY CO. 

SPBCIAUZINO 
23rd to 34th St., Lexington U Seventh Are. 
18 WEST 27TH ST. Fboae: Watklu StlS 



F. BRONSON MONELL 

Real Estate — Insurance 
MANAGEMENT SPECUUST 

71-73 NASSAU ST. Phone: Cortlandt 0001 



J. K. MOORS 

REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE 

MANAGEMENT — LIASINQ — INBUKAlfCB 

315 WEST 57TH STREET 

Phones Circle 9800-1-2 



MORRIS MOORE'S SONS 

Incorporated 

SPECIALIZING IN WEST HARLEM 

AND HEIGHTS PROPERTY 

THE KNICKERBOCKER BUILDING 

152 West 42nd Street, Suite 923-924 



NEHRING BROTHERS 

INCOBPOBATED 

Real Eatate — Insurance 

ST. NICHOLAS AVE. AND 183D STRJUtT 



OGDEN & CLARKSON 

Corporation 

Real Estate and Inauranca 

One East 49th St. Plus 6tf5 



O'REILLY & DAHN 

Real Estate — Msaagemaat 

TOBKTILLa SBCTION 
124 EAST Seth ST. Phone: Lenox 3M1 



GEO. J. RYAN 

Qaeens Borongh Real Estate 

AGENT BROKER APPRAIBI 

Member Real Estate Beard ef New York 

4C Jaclcson Avenne, Long Island CHy 

Telephone: Hunters Point I45l-i 



SPOTTS & STARR, Inc. 

Real Estate — Insurance 
Manacement 

TIMES BUILDING 
Pliona Bryant 4»H 



J. IRVING WALSH 

BPICIALIST 

Washington Square and Greenwich Village 
73 WEST IITH STREET 



JAMES N. WELLS' SONS 

(Jamea P. Eadie) 
Real Estate and Insurance 

Since 1835 at No. 191 NINTH AVENUE 
Established 1819 Phone: Watkins 5200 



WALTER C. WYCKOFF 

Real Estate — Insaranee 

Management 
403 MADISON AVENUE 



FRED'K ZITTEL & SONS 

Real Estate and Insnranc* 

BROADWAY at 79TH STREET 
THE APTHORP 
\ SchoTln STtt ■etahllsliel ISSS 



Real Estate Record and Builders Guide 

Founded March 21, 1868, by CLINTON W. SWEET 

Devoted to Real Estate, Building Construction and Building Management in the Metropolitan District 

Published Every Saturday by THE RECORD AND GUIDE COMPANY 
FRANK E. PERLEY, President and Editor; W. D. HADSELL, Vice-President; E. S. DODGE, Vice-President; J. W. FRANK, Secretary -Treas. 



Entered as second class matter November 8, 187?, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y.. under the Act of March 3, 1879. 
Copyright, 1922, by The Record and Guide Company 119 West 40th Street, New York (Telephone: Bryant ' 



VOL. CIX 
NO. 1 (2808) 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 7, 1922 



25c. A COPY 
$12.00 A YEAR 



Advertising Index 

Page 
A. B: See Electric Elevator 4th Cover 

Ackerly, Qrville B 17 

Adams & Co 16 

Adler, Ernest N 17 

American Bond & Mortgage Co... 27 

American Bureau of R. E •• 17 

American Enameled Brick & Tile 

Co 23 

Ames & Co 2d Cover 

Amy & Co., A. V 2d Cover 

Anderson & Co., James S...2d Cover 
Anderson Brick & Supply Co4th Cover 

Armstrong & Armstrong 17 

Ashforth & Co 2d Cover 

Atlantic Terra Cotta Co..; 24 

Automatic Fire Alarm Co 24 

Baiter, Alexander 16 

Bauer, Milbank & MoUoy 16 

Bechman, A. G 16 

Bell Co., H. W 27 

Biltmore Realty Corp 16 

Boyd, James 14 

Boylan, John J 2d Cover 

Brennan, Edmund M 17 

Brensam Realty Corp 14 

Brett & Goode Co Front Cover 

Brook, Inc., Louis 29 

Brooks & Momand 14 

Brown Co., J. Romaine. .Front Cover 
Builders' Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 

Bulkley & Horton Co 16 

Busher & Co., Eugene J.... 2d Cover 

Butler & Baldwin Front Cover 

Cammann, Voorhees & Floyd 

2d Cover 

Carpenter, Leonard J 2d Cover 

Chauncey Real Estate 2d Cover 

Chesley Co., Inc., A. C 29 

City Investing Co 4 

Classified Advertisements 15 

Coburn, Alfred P 16 

Cross & Brown Front Cover 

Cruikshank Sons, Wm.. Front Cover 

Cudner R. E. Co 2d Cover 

Cusack Company 16 

Cutler & Co., Arthur 2d Cover 

Cutner, Harry B 2d Cover 

Dailey, Clarke G 4 

Davies, J. Clarence IS 

Day, Joseph P 2d Cover 

Dean & Co., W. E 2d Cover 

Dike, O. D. & H. V 2d Cover 

Dodge Co., F. W 10 

Dowd, James A 17 

Dubois, Chas. A 16 

Duffy Co., J. P 24 

Dunlap & Lloyd 16 

Duross Co 2d Cover 

Edwards Co., Charles G. ...2d Cover 
Edwards, Dowdney & Richart.... 4 

Elliman & Co., Douglas L 14 

Ely & Co., Horace S... Front Cover 

Empire Brick & Supply Co., 

_ ,. , , „ ''th Cover 

English, J. B 2d Cover 

Finch & Co., Chas. H 26 

Finkelstein & Son, Jacob 17 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Editorials S 

Governor Miller Urges Further Economy at 

Albany 7 

Tax Exemption Little Help to People of Mod- 
erate Incomes 8 

Miss Annie Mathews Nevif York's First Woman 

Register 9 

Review of Real Estate Market for the Current 

Week 11 

Private Sales of the Week 11 

Statistical Table of the Week 18 

Manhattan Building Costs in 1921 Aggregate 

$142,448,868 19 

N. Y. City Contracts Awarded in 1921 Total 

$394,754,400 20 

Personal and Trade Notes 20 

Recent Awards Indicate Active Building Next 

Spring 21 

Trade and Technical Society Events 21 

Building Materials Markets 22 

Current Building Operations 22 

Contemplated Construction 24 

Plans Filed for New Construction 27 



Page 

Fischer, J. Arthur 2d Cover 

Fisher, James B 16 

Fox & Co., Fredk 2d Cover 

Goodwin & Goodwin 2d Cover 

Grunert, Robert G 17 

Gulden, Royal Scott 16 

Harris Exchange 17 

Hecia Iron Works 26 

Hess M. & L., Ins Front Cover 

Holmes Elec. Protective . .4th Cover 

Holt & Merrall, Inc 17 

Home Title & Insuarnce (jo 4 

Hubbard, C. Bertram 2d Cover 

Jones & Son, William P 17 

Kane Co., John P 4th Cover 

Keller, Charles G 16 

Kelley, T. H 16 

Kelly, Albert E 16 

Kempncr & Son, Inc., D., 

Front Cover 

Kilpatrick, Wm. D 4 

Kissling, J. P. & L. A 16 

Kloes, F. J 27 



Page 

Kohler, Chas. S 4 

Kopp & Co., H. C 16 

Lackman, Otto 16 

Lawyers Title & Trust Co 13 

Lawrence, Blake & Jewell 4 

Lawrence Cement Co 4th Cover 

Leaycraft & Co., Edgar, J. 

Front Cover 

Leist, Henry G 2d Cover 

Lesch & Johnson 24 

Levers, Robert 16 

Losere. L. G 16 

Manning & Trunk 2d Cover 

Martin, Samuel H 2d Cover 

Maurer & Son, Henry 27 

May Co., Lewis H 2d Cover 

JlcMahon, Joseph T 18 

Milner, Joseph 17 

Mississippi Wire Glass.. ..4th Cover 

Monell, F. Bronson 2d Cover 

Moore, John Constable 17 

Moore's Sons, Morris, Inc.. 2d Cover 
Moors, J. K 2d Cover 



Advertising Index 

Page 

Morgan Co., Leonard 17 

Muhlker, Arthur G 17 

Murray & Sons, Inc., John A. . . 22 

Murtha & Schmohl 4th Cover 

Nail & Parker 4 

Natason, Max N 18 

Nehring Bros 2d Cover 

New York Edison Co., The 25 

New York Title & Mortgage Co.. 4 

Niewenhous Co., Inc 13 

Noyes & Co., Chas. F.... Front Cover 

Ogden & Clarkson Corp 2d Clover 

O'Hare, Geo. L 4 

Oppenheimer, Fred 16 

O'Reilly & Dahn 2d Cover 

Payton, Jr., Co., Philip A IS 

Pease & Elliman Front Cover 

Pell & Co., S. Osgood 27 

Pendergast, John F., Jr 16 

Pepe & Bro 14 

Pflomm, F. & G Front Cover 

Phelphs, Albert D 16 

Pomeroy Co., Inc., S. H 24 

Porter & Co Front Cover 

Quell & Quell 16 

Read & Co., Geo. R.... Front Cover 

Realty Co. of America 4 

Rickcrt-Brown Realty Co 22 

Rinaldo, Hiram 16 

Rose & Co., J 26 

Ross, Frank U 24 

Runk, Geo. S 16 

Ryan, George J 2d Cover 

Schindler & Liebler 16 

Schwamm, Dr. H , 14 

Schweibert, Henry 16 

Seaman & Pendergast 16 

Shaw, Arthur L 17 

Shaw, Rockwell & Sanford 16 

Sherman & Kirschner 17 

Simberg, A. J 15 

Smith, Gerritt, Mrs 18 

Smith, Inc., Malcolm E 16 

Solar Engineering Co 26 

Solove, R 13 

Spear & Co 16 

Speyers, Inc., James B 17 

Spotts & Starr 2d Cover 

Sterling Mortgage Co 15 

Tabolt, Jacob J 16 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co 4 

Tyng & Co., Stephen H., Jr 4 

Union Stove Works 29 

Van Valen. Chas. B 14 

Walsh, J. Irving 2d Cover 

Watson Elevator Co., Inc. 4th Cover 

Weill Co., H. M 14 

Wells Architectural Iron Co 29 

Wells Sons, James N 2d Cover 

West Side Y. M. C. A 12 

Westergren, Inc., M. F 4th Cover 

White & Sons, Wm. A.. Front Cover 
Whiting & Co., Wm. H. .Front Cover 

Whitney-Foster Corp 16 

Williams-Dexter Co -17 

Winter, Benjamin 14 

Wood-Dolson Co Front Cover 

Wolff Gas Radiator Co., A 22 

Wyckoff, Walter C 2d Cover 

Zittel & Sons, Fred'k 2d Cover 



Getting Set for 1922! 



1922 is going to be a fine year for business. If we all think so, say so, and ACT so, we can 
make it so. It is encouraging to see how many far-sighted, long-headed business men have 
already drafted their plans for an intensive advertising campaign — they are getting set for 
1922 and at the crack of the pistol will be off to a lead that their less aggressive competitors 
can never wear down. And you~YOUR schedule, like theirs, must surely include 

THE RECORD AND GUIDE 

for more than fifty-three years the recognized authority in Real Estate and Building. 

Phone Bryant 4800 and a representative will call. 



Title Insurance and 
Mortgage Loans 

for . he Real Estate Owntr 

Protection in 
Placing Loans 

for the Broker 

Guaranteed First Mort- 
gages and Certificates 

for the Investor 

New York Title 
&. Mortgage Company 



Manhattan 
Brooklyn 
Jamaica ' 
Richmond 
White Plains 
Mt. Vernon 



- 135 Broadway 

203 Montague St. 

375 Fulton St. 

24 Bay St. 

163 Main St. 

3 South 3d St. 



EDWARDS, 
DOWDNEY&RICHART 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

MORTGAGE 
LOANS 

156 Broadway, New York 

Tel. Cortland 1S71-1572 
Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 



BrtiJilUhed 1887 

CHAS. S. KOHLER. Inc. 

Real Estate 
Insurance 

Broker and Manager of 
Estates 



MAIN OFFICE : 
MI Golonbtu Ave.— Comer ie4th SL 

BRANCH OFFICE ! 

14a St. Nicholas Ave.— Near ISlit St. 

NEW YORK 



Lawrence, Blake &JeweD 

Mortgage Loans 

115 Broadway 

Tel. 4080 Rector 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 



GEORGE L. O'HARE 

MEMBER REAL ESTATE BOARD OF N. T. 

REAL ESTATE 

EXCEPTIONAL mVESTMSNTt 

BBLUNCI— RENTING— BUSINESS AND 

APARTMENT BUILDINGS 

SPECHALIZING IN LEASEHOLDS 

MORTGAGE LOANS 

FULL EQUIPPED DEPT. FOR EXCHANQINa 

489 FIFTH AVE. 

TEL. VANDERBILT S092— 8441 




Specialists in Harlem 

and 

Colored Tenement 
Properties 

NAIL & PARK£R 

REAL ESTATE 

145 West 135th Street 
New York City 

JOHN E. NAIL Telephoo. ( 7M1 
HENRY C. PARKER MomliuBlA) { TM» 






William D. Kilpatrick 

REAL ESTATE 
OPERATOR 

149 BROADWAY 

SAMtlEL KILPATRICK 




BROADWAY STORE 
FOR RENT 

Located in Breslin Hotel, East Side of 
Broadway, near 29th St. Size: 15x50. 

For details apply to 

CLARKE G. DAILEY 

lis BROADWAY Rector 4300 

Full Commission to Brokers 


The Finest Investment for 1922 

Guaranteed First Mortgages of the Home Title Insurance 
Company yield 51/2%, payable semi-annually. They are 
the finest investment for the new year. Principal and 
interest guaranteed. 

HOME TITLE INSURANCE CO. 

Willoughby and Jay Streets Post Office Building 

Broolilyn Jamaica | 



I STEPHEN H. TYNG H. OAKEY HALL | 

SteplienH.TyDg,Jr.,&Co. 

Incorporated 
Member Real Estate Board. N. Y. 

REAL ESTATE 

MANAGEMENT OF 
BUSINESS PROPERTY 

41 Union Square West 

22 EAST 17TH STREET 
Telephone: Stuyvesant 4090 



Exceptional Security 

We do all that we can for our 
banking customers. This in- 
cludes advice on investment, 
finance and general business. 

We are, however, pre-emi- 
nently a safe bank, our re- 
sources being very large in pro- 
portion to our deposits. 

For every million dollars de- 
posited with us, we have half a 
million of capital and surplus 
of our own in addition — all for 
the protection of our depositors 
and clients. 

Tliis is a wealth of security of- 
fered by very few banking institu- 
tions. 

JiTlE guarantee 
& TRUST C9 



Capital 
Surplus 



$6,000,000 
$11,000,000 



176 Broadway, New TorK 

175 Bemsen St., 196 Montaeue St., Brooklyn 

350 Fulton St., Jamaica 67 .Tackson Ave.. I/. I. City 



QTlje 

Eealtp Companp 
of America 

FRANKLIN PETTIT 

President 
TRANSACTS A GEN- 
ERAL BU8INE68 IN 
T HE PURCHASE AND 
BALE OF NEW YORK 
CITY REAL ESTATE 

2 WALL STREET, NEW YORK CITY 

Rector OiTS-OtyS 



City Investing 
Company 

61 Broadway, New York 

Telephone: Bowling Green 8530 

Capital, $5,000,000 

r'^BERT E. DOWLING, President 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 




Mayor Hj'lan's Second Administration 

Mayor Hylan was in happy mood last Monday when he 
entered upon his second term as Chief Executive of this 
great city. Much can fairly be said in praise of, and less 
in criticism of, his second inaugural address. In most 
respects Mayor Hylan put his best foot forward and un- 
questionably he pleased the great majority of New Yorkers 
by his call to everyone to "Boost the Metropolis." Mr. 
Hylan contends, and undoubtedly he is right, that there has 
been too much knocking of this imperial city by some of its 
residents. It would be a great deal better, as he points out, 
if the knockers would turn boosters and thus make unani- 
mous the effort for a greater and better New York. 

Mayor Hylan talked good common sense to his heads of 
departments and to all other city employees. "Our plain 
duty to the people," he said, "is to see to it that taxation 
is reduced to the minimum expenditure required for an eco- 
nomical operation of government. This is common hon- 
esty. With this in mind, every item of departmental ex- 
penditure must be limited to the lowest point consistent 
with effective service ; all unnecessary positions should 
be abolished and the employment of any individual whose 
services are of scant or doubtful value should be discon- 
tinued forthwith." These are laudable sentiments and the 
Record and Guide hopes that the Mayor will enforce 
them. 

Mayor Hylan's inaugural address would not have been 
complete, of course, if he had failed to utter a new protest 
against the heavy burdens imposed upon the people of this 
city by the State rulers at Albany. His demand for a 
greater measure of Home Rule in the metropolis undoubt- 
edly is backed by a large majority of our citizens. This 
fact was amply attested at the recent election and it seems 
reasonable to expect that the Mayor's desires will have due 
consideration, because the commission recently appointed 
to revise the charter gives evidence of its purpose to pro- 
vide genuine Home Rule for New York City. Public in- 
terest in this matter has been so thoroughly aroused that 
New Yorkers will be satisfied with nothing less. Mayor 
Hylan expressed the belief that if New York had enjoyed 
heretofore the same right to govern itself as prevails in 
second and third-class cities up the State, it would have 
been possible for the city administration to effect econo- 
mies and to make more efficient the transaction of city 
business. 

On the same day that Mayor Hylan began his second 
term in the City Hall, another well-known Mayor, Mr. 
Edwin W. Fiske, entered upon his ninth term as Mayor of 
Mount Vernon. Mount Vernon adjoins New York City 
on the north and conditions there are not dissimilar from 
those which prevail in the metropolis. It is interesting to 
note, therefore, that Mayor Fiske started out by reducing- 
his own salary ten per cent, along with that of several other 
important city officials, at the same time abolishing several 
positions which he considered useless. Reference is made 
to this action of the Mount Vernon Mayor because it illus- 
trates one wa}' in which Mayor Hylan can give that moii- 



economical government of which he treated in his inau- 
gural address. No one would suggest, of course, that May- 
or Hylan should set the example of reducing his own salary, 
but he could accomplish a great deal for the taxpayers of 
the city if he would emulate that other feature of Mayor 
Fiske 's action and have stricken from the city pay roll the 
name of every unnecessary employee. Along that line lies 
one method of cutting the city budget down to a figure well 



within the legal limit. 



Ambitious Boston and the Census 

Boston has been importuning the Census Bureau to re- 
vise its count of population, which was given out as 748,000. 
What the civic authorities of the Hub want is for the cen- 
sus officials to include,, in their enumeration of its citizens, 
all the inhabitants of its numerous suburban colonies within 
a radius of about fifteen miles from the State House. If 
this were done, Boston would have a population of 1,772,254 
and rank as fourth city in the country, being outnumbered 
only by New York, Chicago and Philadelphia, instead of 
seventh in line, below, Detroit, Cleveland and St. Louis. 

That there is merit in the contention of the Mayor and 
other citizens of the municipality having a codfish on its 
C' cutcheon is borne out by the action of the National Geo- 
graphic Society, which has gone on record as favoring the 
measurement of population by the group method rather than 
according to the strict demarkation of municipal boundary 
lines. 

For a community that had the enterprise and hardihood 
to successfully bring off a certain celebrated Tea Party, it 
is inconceivable that Boston will not eventually find a way 
to get itself higher up in the census scale. Chicago, it may 
be certified, took in the whole of Cook County in its mad 
endeavor to minimize New York's supremacy. Other cities 
have gradually garnered voters and their dependents by an- 
nexation. New York, it may be admitted, welcomed Brook- 
lyn to more intimate civic association. 

Why then should not Boston take into its municipal 
Ijosom Wellesley Hills, Newton, Somerville. Maiden, 
Duxbury, Roxbury, Lynn, Brockton and other out- 
lying but closely linked communities? Probably this com- 
jiaratively easy way to become the fourth city in point of 
population has never appealed to the conservatism that is 
figuratively set forth by a century or more of addiction to 
brown bread and beans for Sunday Morning Breakfast. 



Miss Mathews Becomes Register 

New "S'orkers in general, and those having realty inter- 
ests in particular, felt a special interest in the induction 
into office of Miss Annie Mathews as Register of New York 
(,"ounty on New Year's Day. Register Mathews is the first 
woman chosen to an elective office in New York County or 
New York City, which is a notable distinction in itself. 
Any woman who attains to an outstanding position in so- 
ciety, business or public affairs becomes an interesting per- 
sonality from the public viewpoint. To be the first of her 
sex to gain high ofificial position makes the case of Miss 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 1922 



Mathews especially interesting. And, it must be admitted, 
the special touches of femininity which attended her inau- 
guration furnished a good sign in themselves, adding as 
they did dignity to the occasion and expanding the new 
spirit which was reflected in the adoption of equal suffrage. 
The office of which Miss Mathews has just assumed con- 
trol is a very important one, and its successful manage- 
ment calls for executive ability of the first order. The 
Record and Guide, while appreciating fully the impor- 
tance of the Register's office to the realty owners which it 
represents, does not share in the old-fashioned belief of 
some that the business of the office can be handled properly 
only by a man. On the contrary, there seemed no occasion 
for uneasiness during the recent campaign because of the 
fact that each of the leading political parties had nominated 
as its candidate for Register a woman. Miss Mathews, who 



won the election, and Miss Boswell, who was defeated, 
were both recognized by well-informed citizens as women 
of unusual capabilities, either of them very well qualified 
to conduct successfully the important office to which they 
aspired. 

Register Mathews enters upon her new duties with the 
cordial good wishes of all who favor competent administra- 
tion of public affairs. The Record and Guide is confident 
that she will prove entirely equal to her new opportunites, 
and that her administration will give satisfaction to all 
having business in the Register's office, and at the same time 
reflect credit on her sex. New York City has many women 
of high character and ability filling important executive po- 
sitions and making good in them, just as Miss Mathews, 
who happens to be the first of them to assume an important 
public office, will make good in it. 



William L. De Bost Clears Up Facts About Macy Site 



Editor of the Record and Guide: 

I have read with much interest the article on page 807 of the 
Record and Guide:, issue of December 24th, on the new records 
set for land rentals in the Metropolis. Referring especially to 
that portion of the article regarding the renewal of the R. H. 
Macy & Co. leaseholds on Broadway, West 34th and West 
3Sth streets, I should like to take this opportunity of correcting 
in your next issue some errors in this article, especially in 
respect to the ownership of the properties. 

The firm of R. H. Macy & Co. are the lessees of the whole 
property occupied by their store and this large plot is divided 
into twelve individual plots, each one covered by different 
leases. Mr. Frederick Brown is the owner in fee of the Plots 
Nos. 1317 Broadway and 109 West 34th street and 115-121 West 
34th street, and also owns a one-quarter interest in the Plots 
Nos. 1323 Broadway and 113 West 34th street, 141-147 West 
34th street and 134-138 West 3Sth street. The balance of the 
property, with the exception of minor interests which have 
been acquired by R. H. Mac}^ & Co., the tenants, is owned by 
the Hegeman, Aycrigg, Grinnel, Lillibridge families and others 

Under the terms of these twelve leases, the first twenty-one 
year term of which expires May 1st, 1922, it was necessary to 
fix the rentals for the next term of twenty-one years by arbi- 
tration and the arbitrators were instructed to fix this rent 
at the fair rental value of the property. 

Mr. Frederick Brown appointed Mr. Frank D. Ames to rep- 
resent him in the two plots which he owned in fee and all of 
the other owners of the balance of the property, including Mr. 
Frederick Brown, owning a one-quarter interest in certain 
parcels, appointed Mr. William L. De Bost, vice-president of 
Cruikshank Company, to represent them as their arbitrator 
and R. H. Macy & Co. appointed Mr. Lawson Purdy to repre- 
sent them as tenants in the arbitration. 

As Mr. Ames and Mr. De Bost could not agree with Mr. 



Purdy as to the fair rental value, by mutual agreement, they 
appointed Mr. Clarence H. Kelsey, president of the Title 
Guarantee & Trust Company, to act as third appraiser or um- 
pire and by this process an agreement was finally reached, 
fixing the rents as mentioned in your article, at $395,000 per 
annum net for twenty-one years, commencing May 1st, 1922, 
or a total rental for the term of $8,295,000 net, that is, the 
tenants paying taxes and all other charges. 

From the intensive study which it was necessary for me to 
give to this property during the arbitration, and which lasted 
for a period of over six months, I concluded that the site of 
the R. H. Macy & Co. store is, without doubt, the finest loca- 
tion for a retail store. There is no other section of New York 
which is reached by so many transit lines; the Pennsylvania 
Railroad station is within a block of the property and it is 
within the great hotel centre, accommodating thousands of 
people who come to New York daily to shop. 

You have covered in your article the activities now going on 
in the neighborhood, that is, the new lease of the Saks' sto;e 
and the old Herald Building, but an inspection of the location 
will show that there are many other smaller improvements 
now actually in progress or in contemplation, both on 34th 
street and adjacent streets. 

I was prompted to write this letter to you especially for the 
reason that your article gave the impression that R. H. Macy 
& Co. were practically the owners of the balance of the prop- 
erty not owned by Mr. Frederick Brown. 

The following law firms were active in the arbitration: 
Charles M. Bleecker, 49 wall Street, and Eraser & Speer, 16 
Exchange Place, representing the majority of the owners; 
Messrs. Marks and Marks, of 358 Fifth Avenue, representing 
Mr. Brown ; Wise & Seligsberg, 15 William street, representing 
R.-H. Macy & Co. Laurence McGuire and Charles F. Noyes 
Co. sold the interests in the property to Mr. Brown. 

New York, Dec. 27, 1921. William L. De Bost. 



Joseph P. Day Reviews Auction Market of Past Year 



Joseph P. Day, in discussing the reiuarl.able interest shown 
by the public generally during 1921 in the sale of building 
sites, declared that the year just closed will go down in history as 
a record-breaking auction period. 

"Since last Spring," said Mr. Day, "I have sold more lots and 
houses and at better prices than ever before, and the totals 
of my sales aggregate a volume of business larger by many 
millions of dollars than in any other corresponding year. 

"After one of the most strenuous lot sale years in the his- 
tory of the market, it seemed a fitting climax to hold the record 
breaking auction sale of all time and sell 1,898 houses for the 
United States Government. 

"Tlie auction lot market is in a healthy condition, the hous- 
ing shortage being a large contributing factor. Today, the de- 
mand is far from satisfied. The "Build Your Own Home" move- 



ment is well under way, and, in my opinion, many more 
thousands of lots will be purchased on the auction block for 
the erection of new homes. 

"Since last May I have sold about 13,000 lots, located in 
every section of New York City and surrounding territory — 
Manhattan, the Bronx, Brooklyn, Long Island City, Nassau 
and Westchester counties, and New Jersey. These lot sales 
have totaled about $28,000,000. In addition, I have sold about 
2,500 houses for almost $7,000,000. 

"1920 was a record year in the auction market and few peo- 
ple thought that the 1921 totals would even equal it. That they 
were mistaken is now a matter of history, and 1921 will cer- 
tainly go down as a banner year. The home and lot buying 
movement is in full swing. The demand is far from satis- 
fied and I look to see great activity during the next year." 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 




Governor Miller Urges Further Economy at Albany 

In Annual Message to Legislature of 1922 the State Executive Outlines Plan to 

Lessen Burden on Real Estate by $22,500,000 i 

(Special to the Record and Guide) 



Albany, Jan. 4. 

IN the longest annual message sent from the Executive 
Chamber in recent years, Governor Miller today advised 
the Legislature of 1922 as to the condition of state affairs 
and his suggestions for their management during the next fis- 
cal year. Adhering to the policy which he outlined in his 
message to the Legislature of 1921, Governor Miller urged fur- 
ther economies in state expenditures and the consolidation of 
various state departments not effected during the first year 
of his administration. 

The Governor followed an established custom in opening his 
message with a summary of the state's financial condition. 
His statement showed a surplus of $43,613,077.85, as of July 1, 
1921, adding that this greatly exceeded the estimates of a 
year ago. After pointing out that the departmental requests 
for the next fiscal year total about $145,000,000, as against 
$201,000,000 a year ago, the Governor continued: 

If the appropriations can be kept within approximately $125,000,000 it will 
only be necessary to levy a direct tax of $12,181 895.49 for debt service, thus 
relieving real estate of the burden of the direct tax of $22,500 000 for 
teachers' salaries. That result can be obtained without impairing the 
efficiency of any activity of the State, provided no new or unusual expendi- 
tures be undertaken, and if attained the public business will then be upon 
such a basis that it can reasonably be expected that under normal condi- 
tions the present sources of revenue, with the direct tax for debt service, 
will be adequate to meet the expenses of the government and that the 
normal increase in such revenue will adequately provide for the inevitable 
expansion in the needs of the State government. 

It is not just to the taxpayers to accumulate an unnecessary surplus, 
and it is sound policy to use the existing surplus to tide us over the 
present period of lean revenues. The total amount of appropriations 
requested by each State department will be transmitted as requested with- 
out revision. The departmental studies made by the newly created bureau 
set up by the Board of Estimate and Control were not completed in time 
to be available for a revision of the requests before submitting them to 
the Legislature. Indeed, those studies are still incomplete. Detailed reports 
of examinations, with the comments thereon by department heads, are 
available for the information of the Legislature. 

The requests as compiled total $145,019,665.08. which is $56,624,627.35 less 
than the requests submitted last year, totaling $201,644,292.43, and not 
including requirements which had to be met of $4,621,545.61. 

That comparison is the best evidence of the new spirit which pervades 
the public administration and demonstrates that notwithstanding the 
drastic reductions made last year the actual needs of the State were amply 
provided for. 

"A significant absence of the usual requests for deficiencv appropriations 
for adijninistrative expenses will also be noted. Department heads and 
institutions have administered theii* functions within the appropriations, 
and instead of asking for deficiencies, many will show surpluses at the 
end o fthe year. 

Governor Miller's message contained many recommenda- 
tions of importance, not only as to the consolidation of state 
departments, but urging the establishinent of a central pur- 
chasing body to buy all supplies for every state department 
and institution; open competition for state printing; a com- 
prehensive welfare program; obligatory use of voting ma- 
chines in cities of the first and second class, better distribution 
and regulation of the water power of the State; reforms in 
the operation of prison industries, and the sale of 1,600 parcels 
of non-revenue producing State lands. 

Governor Miller gave considerable attention to the subject 
of taxation, declaring: 

With the task of reducing the expenditures of the State government to 
a point where its revenues may be expected to keep pace with its expendi- 
tures nearing completion we should now seriously address ourselves to the 
problem of removing the inequalities and injustices nf ou-- tax laws b\ a 
careful revision of them. This is a task which must be .7,)proached wiih 
caution and worked out by degrees so as to produce no serious deranur- 
ment of the State's revenues. We arc not confronted with the necessity 
of seeking new revenues. The construction of a just and equitable I x 
system is our problem. The report paves the way for such a piece of 
constructive work, which I trust will be accomplished as soon as tl-e 
subject has received the consideration which its importance and intricacy 
demand. 

Although the direct State tax was reduced this year $12,802,815.94, there 
was tn many counties little net reduction in taxation and in some counties 



there were actual increases, the saving effected by the State administration 
being thus in whole or in part absorbed by the increased cost of local 
governmentis. The great burden from direct tax resting upon real estate 
results from the cost of local, county, town and municipal governments, 
and that cost has been increasing at a time when it has been demonstrated 
to be practicable to reduce the cost of government. The demand for a 
change in methods of local administration led to the adoption of a con- 
stitutional amendment at the last election relating to only two counties 
in the State. It may be that the need was greatest in those two counties 
because of developments incident to their proximity to the City of New 
York, but I have no doubt that there is some need, though possibly of 
varying degree, in every county in the State. I recommend that provision 
be made for an inquiry into the causes of the excessive cost of local 
governments and the remedies therefor. The Joint Committee on Taxation 
is well organized to conduct such an inquiry. 

Governor Miller urged the Legislature to postpone action on 
all local legislation aflfecting the City of New York, explaining: 

The New York Charter Commission recently appointed by me is now 
engaged in the work of revising the Charter of the City of New York. 
I hope that it will be able to report to the present Legislature, in which 
case I shall convene it in extraordinary session. In view of that work I 
recommend that, except to provide for emergencies, all proposed local 
legislation affecting the City of New York be held for consideration together 
with the report of the Charter Commission. 

The Governor also recommended various election reforms 
and the equal participation of men and women in party man- 
agement. Taking up the State's institutional problem Gover- 
nor Miller groups this in three sections, (1) the hospitals, (2) 
the penal institutions and (3) the asylums for mental defec- 
tives. The message said that housing, food and clothing con- 
ditions in all classes of State institutions are good. Concern- 
ing hospitals the Governor holds that the chief problem lays 
with the curative side and advances the belief that the num- 
ber of discharged and paroled inmates should be increased. 
In 1921, the increase in the number of patients in State hos- 
pitals was 1,337, as against only 299 in the preceding year. 

Regarding the assembling of ex-service men in the new 
Kings Park Hospital the Governor declared: 

There are within the metropolitan district 530 ex-service men in the 
.State hospitals, excluding paroles. The Federal Government makes com- 
pensation for the care of 257 of them. There are at Kings Park two units 
admirably suited for the care and treatment of the ex-service men. One 
hundred and seventy-two are now being cared for in one of such units. 
There is nearing completion at Kings Park a reception hospital which is 
believed to embody the last word in modern psychiatry. It is desirable, 
if possible, to assemble the ex-service men from the metropolitan district 
at one place, so that the assistance in therapeutic work and occupational 
training which the Federal Government is willing to render may be utilized 
to the maximum. I am advised by the officers of the State department 
of the American Legion that the executive committee of that organization, 
after a thorough investigation, approves of the bringing together, if 
possible, of the ex-service men in tlie metropolitan district at Kings Park 
Hospital, and at my request the Hospital Commission now has under 
consideration the method of effecting the necessary transfers to make 
that possible. 

Governor Miller did not discuss in his annual message the 
plans of the New York Port Authority, but informed the Leg- 
islature that he would treat this subject in a later communica- 
tion to that body. 

"The State," says the message, "is the owner of tax titles to 1,600 parcels 
of real estate; it has acquired title to 113 parcels by foreclosure of United 
States loan mortgages; it is the owner of 607 mortgages on real estate and 
has other miscellaneous holdings not devoted to public use and not within 
the forest preserve counties. It receives from all of its real estate an 
annual rntal of about $1,400. The land acquired at foreclosure sale has 
been owned by the State from sixteen to seventy-live years. It owns 
mortgages which are more than eighty years old, many of them for small 
sums. 

"The Commissioners of the Land Office have the power to sell real estate 
owned by the State not within the forest preserv and not devoted to public 
use, but it i.s obvious that that power is inadequate to deal with the 
situation. 

"I recommend the adoption of some simple procedure to have the State- 
owned property appraised and sold with as little formality and red tape 
as possible. I also recommend that the Comptroller be authorized to 
accept transfers of title to mortgaged property with the approval of the 
Land Board." 

After the reading of the Governor's message, both houses of 
the Legislature adjourned until next week. 



8 RECORDANDGUIDE January 7, 192-' 

Tax Exemption Little Help to People of Moderate Incomes 

Measure Stimulated Building, Says Frank Bailey, But New Construction Has 
Been Almost Entirely of High Priced Apartments 



FRANK BAILEY, vice-president of the Title Guarantee 
and Trust Company, discussing the housing situation in 
its relation to high prices generally, declares that the ex- 
emption from taxation of new houses for ten years hase not 
relieved the people for whom relief was most necessary. 

"Tax exemption," said Mr. Bailey, "has stimulated building 
to a great degree, but the new construction has been entirely 
of that class which is not available because of its cost to the 
people of moderate incomes. 

"In Greater New York at the present time those having 
moderated incomes are under greater pressure for rent than 
ever before, and as incomes decrease the high rents of cheaper 
apartments will day by day oppress more people. At the pres- 
ent time it is absolutely impossible to produce a house which 
can be occupied by a tenant who can afford to pay a maxi- 
mum of $12 a room, and when one remembers that the great- 
est number of people are in the class that can pay $12 or less 
a room, then it is perfectly obvious that the poor man is not 
approaching cheaper rents, but is approaching higher rents. 

"There has been immense relief in the construction of houses 
where the rent is from $20 a room up, and the peak of prices 
of that class of apartment has long since passed. 

"The exemption from taxation has produced so much con- 
struction that the labor unions have been able to work their 



will with the builders, until the cost of construction is but a 
little under the so-called war prices. As long as this enormous 
construction of buildings for the more wealthy continues and 
is stimulated, prices for materials and for labor will probably 
continue and the poor man will receive no relief. 

"Relief of housing will be worked out in two ways, and in 
two ways only, in my judgment. One is by stopping the 
stimulation of construction which is no longer in great demand, 
to wit, the higher priced apartments. Second, by the Ameri- 
can people rising superior to the domination of people who 
work as little as they can for wages away beyond those they 
are entitled to earn, and thereby inflict upon the people of 
Greater New York almost a calamity. 

"Eighteen dollars a day for plasterers with the wage scale of 
$10; bricklayers handling from 600 to 1,000 brick a day against 
a capacity of over 2,000 for a good workman ; electricians pay- 
ing a gang for the privilege of working, with the ability of a 
builder to employ only one man to put on his lath and at any 
.old price that man may ask; with the persistent strikes for 
no reason whatsoever — the poor people and those who can pay 
moderate rents can hope for no relief. 

"There is just one old-fashioned rule which can help, and that 
is for 5,000.000 people to assert their independence against pos- 
sibly 40,000 people. 



Bryan L. Kennelly Sees Bright Outlook for 1922 Auction Market 



BRYAN L. KENNELLY, president of Bryan L. Kennelly, Inc., 
and vice-president of the Harriman National Bank, when 
asked about the outlook for the real estate auction mar- 
ket for 1922, declared that it promised to be the brightest in 
the annals of New York realty. 

"I am as confident of this," said Mr. Kennelly, "as I am of 
the ultimate results of the Washington disarmament con- 
ference. The auction market was never better than during 
1921 and the market for 1922 promises to overshadow it, par- 
ticularly in the volume of vacant lot transactions. And there 
is good reason for believing this. Civilization has begun to 
put its house in order again. It is recovering from the moral 
slump which has kept the world in a state of paralysis for 
almost a decade. It is turning to peace and is making its po- 
sition more stable and secure. It is getting rid of disorders 
and restoring confidence. It is reviving trade everywhere, 
setting in motion all its industrial looms and creating a de- 
mand by one nation for the wares and goods and good will of 
another. It is extracting the dross from credit, restoring 
currency to its real value, and checking the sinister fluctua- 
tions of foreign exchange. A world-wide awakening to sanity 
is developing; unity of purpose and endeavor is being re- 
kindled; doubts and discouragements are being dispelled; false 
prophets and their vicious and misleading prophecies are being 
thrown into the discard. 

"Other things upon which my confidence is founded is the 
amazing shipment of gold to the United States by foreign 
capitalists for investment here — a sum almost totalling a billion 
dollars; the enthusiastic response of the world's leading gov- 
ernments, rulers and statesmen to President Harding's invita- 
tion to meet in Washington and discuss ways and means to 
end wars and their causes; the attitude of the whole American 
public toward the proposal to scrap navies and eliminate fur- 
ther danger of general economic disaster and forestall another 
conflagration of anarchism; the universal joy over the pros- 
pect of the establishment of a super-government; the uniting 
of nations by unbreakable treaty or agreement, or by bonds 
of sound and unalterable friendship, so as to permanently 
guarantee peace and good will between all peoples whatever 
their race, their color, or their creed. 



"That the world will some day be united in some way as 
the result of the epoch-making conference in Washington I 
am certain of as I am of the wave of prosperity that will 
sweep over America and the rest of the world before another 
year is past. With the coming of this wave of prosperity 
there will naturally eventuate a great business boom, wide- 
spread good times, and an unprecedented outpouring of home- 
seekers, investors, speculators, developtrs, operators and 
builders to absorb vacant land in New York City and all other 
sections in the metropolitan area. 

"Added strength is given to my faith in the future of the 
real estate auction market in the return of investors to the 
field of realty and their active participation in most of the im- 
portant transactions. For several years past they have held 
aloof, devoting most of their attention to stocks and bonds 
and other securities. They lost sight of the solidarity of New 
York real estate and of real estate as a source of constant 
and steady income. Having sustained tremendous losses in 
other fields, which they had been led to believe offered fabu- 
lous profits, the truth has dawned upon a large number of 
investors that the safest kind of an investment is improved 
real property which produces substantial returns. 

"Let me say that investment in the real estate market during 
the 1914-1918 conflict against militarism and during the post- 
war period to date has meant the conservation or saving of 
fortunes for many American citizens, because of the soundness 
of real estate and its ability to stand up against even so great 
a catastrophe as the World War. It is truly remarkable that 
while everything else virtually went to smash, real estate, es- 
pecially New York real estate, stood the shock without once 
feeling it. 

"When one considers Manhattan real estate by itself, what 
equals it from an investment standpoint? There is no spot 
on the Island whose value of the moment is not fixed and 
whose greater value of the future is not assured, 
than ever before, and they realize more than ever before the 

"My confidence in the future of the real estate auction mar- 
ket is also strengthened by the increasing number of women 
investors, operators and speculators at all my sales. 

"What is the outlook for real estate? I say, all signs point 
to an unprecedented volume of business in 1922." 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



Miss Annie Mathews New York's First Woman Register 

Elected by a Decisive Plurality the First Representative of Her Sex as Head of 

a Department Takes Important Office 



THE first woman to be the head of an important branch 
of the local government took office on Monday, when 
Miss Annie Mathews became Register of New York 
County, as a result of her election thereto last November. 
When interviewed about the duties of the office. Miss Mathews 
said that necessarily she could say little, as she had not been 
in office long enough to fully acquaint herself with its rami- 
fications and to become fully acquainted with the entire working 
force. 

"I do not care merely to express vague phrases about my 
duties," she said. "When I can say something tangible about 
this place I hold that is of personal interest to every property- 
owner and builder in town then I will be heard from. Wait 
until I get over the brand newness of the position. I am begin- 
ning to settle down to business. The first day or two were 
days of congratulations, bouquets and kind words, as they are 
for all new incubents in oflfice. 

"There is this much that I can say with some sense of state- 
ment : I am deeply appreciative of the great honor which the 
voters of New York conferred on me by the splendid plurality 
(86,000) given me in the recent election. I am assuming office 
with a full determination to prove to the voters that they made 
no mistake in their choice, and that a great public office can 
be administered by a woman. 

"I count myself fortunate in taking over from my predecessor 
a competent and experienced staff and feel sure that I can 
count on their full co-operation in the effort to make our 
office record, if possible, even better in the future. 

"One of the most urgent problems of our day is the making 
of democratic institutions efficient and thus economical. I 
believe that at least one vital factor in the solution of this 
problem is the awakening in each official of a department a 
sense of his importance to and responsibility for the success of 
"the whole. If we can work in this spirit, as I sincerely believe 
we can, I am confident we can be happy in our work, and 
promise the public good service with courtesy and promptness." 

The new Register is a native of this city, a daughter of 
John and Elizabeth Gillespie Mathews. She was educated in 
the New York public schools. Her further education has been 
obtained by travel, by keen observation, by long business 



experience and as an ardent advocate of woman suffrage be- 
fore it became a reality. Since it has been in effect Miss 
Mathews has been Democratic leader of the Nineteenth As- 
sembly District of Manhattan. She was such a good cam- 
paigner that she ran ahead of some others on the Democratic 
ticket as much as 5,(KX). Miss Mathews has traveled abroad 
extensively during her vacations, and she believes that is the 
best finishing off process that any one's education can get. As 
a result of her travels and her political experience she has 
met all kinds of persons, so that she comes into oflfice with her 
powers of observation well developed. 

The retiring Register, James A. Donegan, on Monday posed 
with his fair successor for a picture. And in turning over the 
office to Miss Mathews, Mr. Donegan said: "From my ac- 
quaintance with you I know you are capable and competent to 
discharge its most responsible duties. I know you will dis- 
charge those duties as economically as I have. The office 
has become self-sustaining since I came here." 

Responding to the compliment, Miss Mathews said that the 
important thing now to do was to demonstrate to the New York 
public the success of good municipal principles and to prove by 
action in office that the era of the Czar and boss rule are over. 

All of Register Mathews' immediate assistants are new in- 
cumbents, except the cashier, who was promoted from the 
place of assistant cashier. They are, in order, as follows: 
Edmund P. Holahan, Chief Deputy Register; Mrs. Josephine 
Flynn, Secretary to the Register; Thomas F. Murray, Cashier, 
and Miss Loretta Bonner, Assistant Cashier. Two of this staflf 
reside on Washington Heights, one in Harlem and one on the 
West Side. 

Regarding the Torrens Law confirmation of titles and the 
work of title insurance companies. Miss Mathews said that 
she would be perfectly impartial so far as the Register's office 
is concerned, that it is up to the property-owner affected to 
have any kind of search desired, without any attitude being 
taken in favor of the Torrens Law or against it. 

Former Register Donegan is now County Clerk, succeeding 
William F. Schneider; while Martin Hoffman, formerly cashier 
to the Register, is head of the Naturalization Bureau of the 
County Clerk's office. 



Real Estate Board to Hold Monthly Dinner Meetings 



THE Real Estate Board of New York has decided to hold 
monthly meetings for its members. The first of these 
meetings will be held on the evening of Thursday, Janu- 
ary 12, at which time the proposed development of the Port 
of New York will be presented by members of the Commis- 
of the Commission, former Governor Alfred E. Smith and Mr. 
sion including, it is expected, Mr. E. H. Outerbridge, Chairman 
Lewis H. Pounds. The proposed development of the port will 
be illustrated with motion pictures. 

The dinner will be held at Delmonico's. It will begin prompt- 
ly at 6.30 and it is planned to conclude the meeting not later 
than 9.30. Members have been asked to reply promptly and 
informed that reservations cannot be made later than Tues- 
day, January 3. Referring to these meetings which the Board 
plans to hold monthly from now on, Mr. Charles G. Edwards, 
President of the Board, says: 

"It is the purpose of the Board of Governors to make these 
meetings entirely of an educational character. There are so 



many important public projects of vital interest to members 
of the Real Estate Board that it should not be difficult to select 
su'jjects upon which our members will be glad indeed to be in- 
formed. The success of these meetings will depend entirely 
upon the reception by the members but it seems to me that 
these gatherings should prove successful from the very first 

"The development of the Port of New York, for instance, 
is of greater importance even than our transit problem, and 
yet I doubt very much whether the public generally and even 
members of the Real Estate Board, who are supposed to follow 
matters of this kind, know very much about it. 

"It will probably be necessary to omit a meeting in Feb- 
ruary because of the annual banquet which the Board will 
hold on the evening of February 4. But the Board of Gov- 
ernors is determined to try out this method of interesting its 
members in the great business affairs of-the city and they feel 
sure that the members will respond to the call for the meeting 
on January 12 and on succeeding occasions." 



Improvement in Gvpsum Plaster 



Manufacturers of gypsum wall planter announce that a new 
manufacturing process has been adopted. The statement is 
made that this is the first radical change in 4,000 years. The 
new product is known as syanizcd plaster. The process sc.ils 
each minute particle of gypsum against atmosphere moistii e. 



The plaster loses none of its sand-carrying capacity, even whea 
stored for many months. It does not go "dead" while in stor- 
age, and, being always "fresh," assures full coverage. Other 
economics of this plaster are the rapidity with which it takes 
the water in mixing, and its unusual plasticity under the trowel. 



10 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 1922 



Covers 27 States 



DODGE REPORT SERVICE —Established January 1, 1892 



$2,500,000,000 

is the average annual volume of construction 
contracts awarded in this company's territory 
since the war. 



Last year did not quite reach this figure. This 
year may surpass it. The large volume of 
building contracts let in recent months is most 
encouraging. 

Subscribers to Dodge Construction Reports re- 
ceive daily advance information on the indi- 
vidual projects -which roll up this enormous 
total. 

Advance information enables you to get your 
share of the business in the highly competi- 
tive markets of today. 

THE F. W. DODGE COMPANY 



Have your stenographer fill out this form and mail to our New York office 



WE ARE NOT OBLIGATED BY MAILING THIS FORM 



THE F. W. DODGE CO. 



,1922 



Gentlemen: — We are interested in learning more 
about your Daily Construction Report Service for 
the increasinsr of sales in our line of business. 



We operate in the following states : 



Name. . . 
Address. 
Business. 



Offices of 
The F. W. Dodge Company 

Boston 47 Franklin Street 

New York - - - 119 West 40th Street 
Buffalo - - 409 Niagara Life Building 
Philadelphia - - 1821 Chestnut Street 
Pittsburgh - . . . Bessemer Building 
Cleveland - 920 Citizens Bank Building 
Cincinnati - - . . 301 Gerke Building 
Detroit - - - 860 Penobscot Building 
Chicago - - - 131 No. Franklin Street 
St. Louis - 600 Title Guaranty Building 
Minneapolis - 407 South Fourth Street 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



11 



Review of Real Estate Market for the Current Week 

Several Large Sales in Manhattan Added Tone to Dealing There, While Sales of 
Apartment Houses Shared Honors With Plots in Bronx 

THE New Year, in real estate, started well. The week 
shows transactions closed of substantial size that indi- 
cate that the market is likely to show greater strength 
as it progresses toward Spring. All parts of town were repre- 
sented in the dealing this week. Even an old tenement house 
in Market Slip, a part of the city that seldom figures in the 
trading, changed hands for improvement. The Corn Exchange 
Bank acquired an improved West Bronx corner which will 
house a new branch of that widespread financial institution. 
An old builder bought another West Bronx corner for im- 
provement with a taxpayer containing stores. One store has 
been leased, on the plans, to a chain grocer. This reflects 
the neighborhood growth steadily going on in the Bronx, es- 
pecially in the western half of it, where new rapid transit 
routes are making themselves felt. The New Year witnessed 
a continuity of general buying and selling of vacant plots in 
the northerly borough, for improvement with apartment houses. 

A new feature was the sale of some large new apartment 
houses, showing that investors are interested in these modern 
properties. 

Giving impetus to this year's dealing in Manhattan was the 
sale of a large mercantile building at West S7th street, ad- 
joining the Hecksher building at the corner of Fifth avenue, 
the sale value approaching $1,500,000. Among other notable 
transactions were the sale of a large West Side plot for re- 
improvement with a 17-story building; the sale of the old 
Hotel Grosvenor, on a lower Fifth avenue corner, and the 
' enlargement, by purchase, of a plot near Madison avenue, 
owned by William R. Hearst. 

The 12-story Strathmore apartment house, on an upper 
Riverside Drive corner, again changed hands. This, together 
with numerous recent sales of vacant corner plots on this 



famous river front thoroughfare, shows that the Drive is in 
steady demand as a residential center and that it is not so 
remote from traffic routes as many suppose. The fee to a 
large loft building on a Fourth avenue corner was bought by 
the owners of the building, who are the tenants. A large site 
for a 12-story loft building in the Garment Center was bought. 
This, together with other site sales in that zone recently, in- 
dicates that the sky line of that new business section will be 
materially changed by next year and that the concentration of 
cloak and suit makers there will be stronger and rental values 
better and fee values higher. 

The Sydenham Post Graduate Hospital bought a block front 
in West Harlem, which means that that institution will re- 
move from the East side of the city eventually to a new million 
dollar structure to be built on the new site. It is not believed 
that this semi-fashionable part of town welcomes the coming 
of the hospital. But, institutions of this character must neces- 
sarily follow trend of population and settle in accessible neigh- 
borhoods. 

The march of trade northward, in Madison avenue, was 
shown by the purchase of two fine dwellings there for the pur- 
pose of remodeling them into mercantile buildings. There 
was considerable dealing in fine dwellings elsewhere in town. 
Apartment house dealing was fairly active. Some mercantile 
buildings, downtown, changed hands. An old mansion on 
Washington Square was bought to remodel for trade. 

That large summer hotel properties are still doing business, 
in spite of the travel by automobile, is indicated by the sale, 
for about $1,000,000, of the Hotel Kaaterskill, in the Catskill 
Mountains, together with 600 acres of mountain land. The 
new State highway, along the west bank of the Hudson River, 
undoubtedly had much to do with the determination to ac- 
quire this large property and remodel it. 



PRIVATE REALTY SALES. 



T^HE total number of sales reported, but not 
-^ recorded in Manhattan this week, was 81. 
as against 69 last week and 88 a year ago. 

The number of sales south of 50th st was 26. 
as compared with 29 last week and 41 a year 
ago. 

The number of sales north of .50th st was 55. 
as compared with 40 last week and 47 a year 
ago. 

From the Bronx .35 sales at private contract 
were reported, as against 39 last week and 24 
a year ago. 

Statistiral tables, including the number of re- 
corded instruments, will be found on page 18. 



the partnership, received many congratulations 
and looked back on their silver jubilee, at a 
successful and gratifying business career. 

The firm, during all these years, has been 
located in the Yorkville section, of whose real 
estate values it is a recognized authority- It 
has not fontined its operations to this locality 
alone, but has done an extensive business 
throughout the entire city, making a specialty of 
management of estates. It still retains, as 
clients, a number of large estates with which 
it began business 25 years a^o, the most im- 
portant of which consists of the large real es- 
tate interests of the Hoguet family. 



Real Estate Lecture Next Week 

Harry Hall, vice-president of the old and 
prominent brokerage firm of William A. White 
& Sons, will deliver the first lecture in the real 
estate course for 1022 of the West Side Y. M. 
C. A., at 318 West 57th st, on Tuesday evening. 
January 10. 

Mr. Hall's subject will be: "As New York 
Grows. A Survey of the Development of New 
York City During the Past Century." 

An open forum follows the lecture. 

Monthly Dinner By R. E. Board 

The Real Estate Board of New York will hold 
a series of monthly dinners during the winter 
and spring months. The first dinner will be 
held at Dnlmonico's next Thursday evening at 
6:30 o'clock, and it is planned to conclude the 
meeting at 9:30 o'clock. Tickets are .$2.50 each 
and dress is informal. 

The subject of discussion is the proposed de- 
velopmnnt of the Port of New York, and the 
speakers will be the Commissioners of Port 
Authority, E. H, Outerbridge. chairman of the 
commission ; former Gov. Alfred E. Smith and 
Lewis H. Pounds, of Brooklyn. The proposed 
devnlnnnvnt of the port will be illustrated with 
motion pictures. 



Taxpayers' Association Officers 

At a meeting of the Greater New York Tax- 
payers' Association, held on December 20 last, 
the following were elected for the year 1022 : 
Elias Diamond, president ; Louis Roossin, first 
vice-president; Karl Shapiro, second vice-presi- 
dent; Julius Feinberg, treasurer; Samuel S- 
Isaacs, secretary. 



Harlem Firm Opens a Bronx Branch 

Shaw. Rockwell & Sanford, who for many 
years have maintained a general real estate 
office on West 12.')th st, have opened a Bronx 
branch office at 1972 Jerome av, which is fully 
equipped to offer complete real estate and in- 
surance service for all parts of both the Bronx 
and Manhattan. The firm, until during the last 
ypar, was known as Sliaw & Co., its Manhattan 
office being at 1 West 12.5th st. 



Real Estate Firm Celebrates Anniversary 

Lpst Monday the well known real estate firm 
of Schindler & Liebler. of 1303 Third avenuf. 
celebrated the 25th anniversary of Its establish- 
ment. Each, personally, still active, Philip A. 
Schindler and Jacob P. Liebler, who comprise 



Architect Member of Budg-et Guard 

Goodhue Livingston, of Trowbridge & Living- 
ston, has accepted appointment as Commander 
of the Architects' Division in the mobili-iation 
of New York business men in the "Budget 
Guard" being organized by the National Budget 
Committee, of 7 West Sth st. under direction of 
Sam A. Lewisohn, weil-known banker and city 
chairman, to support the movement for national 
economy and lower tuxes. Every trade a"'' ■■'- 
dnatry in New York City is being mobilized 
with the most prominent men in their respec- 
tive trades as division commanders. 

Columbia Stadium Site Assured 

A donor, whoso nain" is. for the present, with- 
held, has given the .$700,000 necessary for Col- 
umbia ITniversity to acquire a large trnct of 
vacant land in the northern part of Manhattan 
as the site for a university stadium for all kinds 



of athletic events. Fronting on the south shore 
of Harlem Ship Canal and the west shore of 
Harlem River, the tract embraces 26 acres. 
Broadway and 21Sth st are the other boun- 
daries. A short distance away is Isham Park. 
Its acquisition will mean that New York City 
will offer the greatest facilities for intercolleg- 
iate tests of every kind and for such public 
spectacles as the Horse Show, brigade reviews, 
etc. The action to acquire the tract was the 
result of the study of the university stadium 
propect made by a committee consisting of rep- 
resentatives of officers, alumni and students 
appointed by President Butler on March 17 last 
to take up the whole question of a Stadium and 
athletic field, to plan how best to carry the mat- 
ter forward and to recommend to President But- 
ler for transmission to the trustees such steps 
as they might think desirable. 

A committee of alumni and students under 
the chairmanship of Archibald Douglass, gradu- 
ate of Columbia Law School of the class of 
1S07. has been working since May, 1921, to raise 
the needed amount. At the Columbia holiday 
luncheon on December 29, Dr. Butler announced 
that up to that time the efforts had been un- 
successful. The raising of the money by Dr. 
Butler at the last minute came to Columbia 
and to the city in the nature of a New Year's 
surprise. 

Steps will be taken at once to develop the 
tract in accordance with the plan which has 
already been mapped out in detail. Dr. Butler 
made the announoeraent of the gift, which comes 
from a personal friend, in the following state- 
ment : 

"It is with profound satisfaction that I am 
able to announce that a warm personal friend, 
who wishes for the time being to remain anony- 
mous, has made a princely gift of the sura 
needed to enable Columbia University to acquire 
for an athletic field and stadium the Dyckman 
tract of more than 26 acres, which has been 
held under option since May last. 

•'The total cost of acquiring the property will 
be about $700,000. The option to purchase was 
to expire at noon Saturdav, December 31. and 
the generous donor, who bad been greatly in- 
terested in the project from the time it was 
first brought to his attention, made his gift on 
Friday. 

"Tt !s difllcult to exaggerate what possession 
of this property will mean to the health and 
the enjoyment of generations of Columbia Uni- 
versity students and alumni. When developed 
as we plan to develop it, it will be as notable 
an addition to the resources of New York as a 



12 



Real Estate 

LECTURES 

Cooperation of Many 

Weil-Known Authorities on Real 

Estate and Related Subjects 

Endorsed by the 
Real Estate Board of New York 



MR. 



WILLIAM C. DEMAREST 

President, Realty Trust 
HONORARY CHAIRMAN 

While tliese fifteen lectures, for which 
a nominal charge is made, are intended for 
real estate men, they will also be of prac- 
tical value to property owners and managers 
of real estate. 

An open forum follows each lecture, offer- 
ing a splendid opportunity for securing 
sound counsel and advice on real estate 
problems from these experienced men. 

SCHEDULE OF LECTURES 

Tuesday Evenings, Jan. 10 to Apr. 18 
Auditorium, West Side Y. M. C. A. 

January 10 — As New York Grows. A Sur- 
vey of the Development of New York City 
During the Past Century. Harry Hall, Vice- 
President, William A. White & Sons. 

January 17— Real Estate Mortgages— What 
They Are, How They .A.re Made, How They 
Are Collected. VValter Stabler, Comptroller, 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, and 
Vice-President, Real Estate Board of New 
York. 

January 24— Practical Real Estate Law. 
John M. Stoddard, Board of Governors, Real 
Estate Board of New York, and of the law 
firm of Stoddard & Mark. 

January 31— Legislation As It Affects Real 
Estate. Edward P. Doyle, Manager, Bureau 
)f Information and Research, the Real Estate 
Board of New York. 

February 7 — The Brokers' Point of View. 
Francis Guerrlich, Secretary, Horace S. 
Ely & Co. 

February 14 — The Selling of Real Estate at 
Auction. Joseph P. Day, real estate auc- 
tioneer, 

February 21 — Modern Building Construe- 
tion. Arthur S. Lukach, engineer, George 
Backer Construction Company. 

February 28— The Operators" Point of View. 
Robert E. Simon, real estate operator. 

Marcb 7 — The Appraising of Real Estate. 
William L. DeBost, Vice-President of the 
Cruikshank Company. 

March 14— The Selling of Apartment 
Houses and Residences. Lawrence B. Elli- 
man. President of Pease & Elliraan. 

March 21— The Revision of the Greater 
New York Charter As It Affects Real Es- 
tate. A. C. MacNulty, Counsel, the Real 
Estate Board of New York. 

March 28— Why Real Estate Should Be 
Highly Organized. Charles G. Edwards, 
President, Charles G. Edwards Company; 
President, Real Estate Board of New York. 

April 4— Development of Property for In- 
dustrial Use. Martin Dodge, Manager, In- 
dustrial Bureau, The Merchants' Associa- 
tion of New York. 

April 11 — The Examination and Insurance 
of Titles to Real Estate. George L. Allin, 
Counsel, Title Guarantee and Trust Com- 
pany. 

April 18— The Management of Apartment 
Houses. L. H. Moore, Manager, Manage- 
ment Department, Douglas L. Elliman & Co. 

Details on Request 

WEST SIDE Y. M. C. A. 
318 West 57th St., N. Y. 

Telephone Circle 2560 
KINDLY U<E This COUPON 

WEST SIDE Y. M. C. A., 

318 WEST 57TH STREET, N. Y. 

Send me. without obligation, complete details of 
Real Estate LLTture Course and pass to oi>enlng 
lecture. 




RECORD AND GUIDE 

metropolitan city as has been made in many a 
day." 

Dr. Butler stated that the committee o( 
alumni and students who have been at work on 
the plans since last spring have before them a 
complete scheme for developing the property 
prepared by Eugene Klapp, engineer of the 
Columbia class of 1912, and Henry F. Horn- 
hostel, architect, of the Columbia class of ISai. 

Speaking of the plans for athletic fields, Dr. 
Butler said that they provided for a football 
stadium with a seating capacity of 56,000, cost- 
ing $ToO,000 : a separate baseball field with a 
capacity of 10,000, costing %\2i>fi00, and an ath- 
letic field with three tracks and a 220-yard 
straightaway with a capacity of 8,000 or 9,000, 
costing $450,000. 

A field boulevard 200 feet wide that will park 
from 1,000 to 1,500 automobiles will be built 
across the property at a cost of $120,000. This 
road or boulevard will look down over the foot- 
ball and baseball fields on the one hand and 
look out on the athetic fields on the other. Dr. 
Butler explained. 

A boathouse and rowing headquarters will be 
built in the extreme westerly part of the prop- 
erty in a cove protected from the tidal currents 
of the Harlem River. A sea wall costing .$135,- 
000 is also provided for in the plans, which 
further contemplate the erection of a war me- 
morial, whose cost, like that of the boathouse 
and a clubhouse, has not yet been estimated. 



January 7, 1922 



Madison Av. Dwellings for Trade 

Pease & Elliman sold for Miss Cornelia Will- 
iamson, Mrs. Alice F. Bodwell and Mrs. Mary 
E. Bodwell to George C. Camas 6S3 Madison 
av, a 4-sty and basement brownstone dwelling, 
on a lot 18x80. It is the first sale of the 
parcel since 1870. The buyer will remodel the 
structure and use it for his lingerie business. 

•Xegotiations are pending for the sale of CSl 
3Madison av, adjoining, a dwelling on a lot 
21 .Tfx^'y. 



Sells Fee to Fourth Av Corner 

A tenant syndicate, in which Herring Bros, 
and J. I, Granowitz, silk and woolen merchants, 
are interested, has purchased from Esther B. de 
, P. Hosmer the land, 98.7x75, at the northwest 
corner of Fourth av and 21st st, which it leased 
a few years ago and improved with a 12-sty 
building. Title has been acquired under the 
name of the Leah Realty Co. 

Papers have also been recorded in which the 
seller allows a mortgage for JS.S'.oOO to remain 
for 10 years at 5 per cent, and a further loan 
of .$225,000, payable in installments and bearing 
6 per cent, interest is advanced by Paul Herring 
and others. 



Evening Post Sells Its Uptown Site 

It is understood that the New York Evening 
Post has sold the site for a contemplated new 
building, at 2.m to 265 West •S.'^d st, which it 
bought about two years ago. The name of the 
buyer is not disclosed. The plot is 125x980 and. 
with the exception of a 25-foot front apartment 
house, the site is vacant. It adjoins the north- 
east corner of Eighth av and is opposite the 
Pennsylvania Station and close to the General 
Post Office. 

Last May the Post borrowed $2.50.000 on the 
property from the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Co. The loan becomes due in June, 1926, and 
bears interest at the rate of fi per cent. 

The Post has been on Vesey st tor a decade or 
more. Soon after the paper was purchased by 
Thomas W. Lamont the uptown site was ac- 
quired, presumably with the intention of utiliz- 
ing it tor the plant when the Vesey st lease 
expired. 



Sale of Big Broadway Corner 

The 16-sty Merchants Building at the south- 
west corner of Broadway and 4th st, has been 
sold for Morris P. Altman and the Broadway 
Fourth Street Corporation to Joseph & Zeamans. 
representing a syndicate of investors- The price 
was reported to be in the neighborhood of 
.«;i .000.000. William Sussman, Inc., were the 
brokers. 

The structure, which covers a plot 80.5x110, 
was erected about 15 years ago by the late 
Philip Braender, one of the pioneer builders of 
steel and masonry structures in the city. 



Sells Dyckman Block Front 

Bernard Smyth & Sons sold to Gustavus L. 
I nwrenee for the estate of Frederick Mead the 
plot of more than 21 lots, comprising the entire 
block front on the enst side of Broadway, be- 
tween Dyckman and Thnyers sts, in the Dyck- 
man section, having a fi-ontaee of 202 feet on 
Broadway 2,82.7»4 feet on Dyckman st and 2.50.10 
feet on Thayer st. The plot will probably be 
divided and sold to builders for improvement. 



West Side Sale Involving Old Lane 

Another loft operation is indicated in the jiur- 
chase of the vacant plot. 67x95. at 146-152 West 
STth St. 75 feet east of Seventh av. by Frederick 
Brown thr-^ugh Hnrry B. Cutner. as br-^ker. from 
the M. Cohen Sr Bros. Realty Corporation. 

Mr. Br-^wn also purchased the rear gore plot, 
size ."..9x07, from Jefferson M. Levy, making the 
t"til denth 98.9. Mr. Levy has owned this gore 
plot, which was formerly an old lane running 



from Broadway to Seventh av, for more than 40 
years and it is the last of his holdings of this 
strip. 

Negotiations are pending for the resale of the 
property by Mr. Brown to a prominent builder 
for the erection of a 12-sty loft building. 



Sell a Cooperative Apartment 

Douglas L. Elliman & Co. sold a large co- 
operative apartment, containing 15 rooms and 5 
baths, in 290 Park av, for Edward H. Everett, 
of Washington, D. C, to Mrs. George S. Dear- 
born, who now resides at the Carlton House, 22 
East 47th st. 

Mystic Shriners Buy West Side Plot 

The Masonic Order of The Mystic Shrine 
bought through Clarence H. Kelsey, president 
of the Title Guarantee & Trust Co., the plot 
lol West 55th st, extending through to 130 West 
50th st, at present covered by a 3 and 4-sty 
brick building, the plot 200.10 feet in depth and 
fronts 101 feet on 55th st and 99.6 feet on 56th 
St. Yale University was the seller. The pur- 
chase price is understood to be $400,000, 

The site chosen for the elaborate temple of 
the local organization of Shriners has recently 
been used as a moving picture studio by the 
Famous Players-Lasky Corporation. The old 
buildings will be razed to make room for the 
mosque, which is to be of the finest execution, 
as befits the mother of all Temples of the An- 
cient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. With the cost of the plot, the new home 
of the Shriners of Mecca Temple will cost them 
nearly $2,000,000, and it will represent one of 
the most expensive as well as one of the most 
striking works of architecture ever erected in 
this country for the exclusive use of a fraternal 
order. 

Work on the Temple will be begun at once, 
and it is to be completed and opened in connec- 
tion with the jubilee celebrating the fiftieth an- 
niversary of the order, to be held in this city 
the latter part of 1922, when 12,000 representa- 
tives of the 160 Temples in North America, in- 
cluding Canadians and Mexicans, are expected 
►o be present and parade through the streets of 
New York in their picturesque Oriental cos- 
tuines. 

The consummation of the real estate deal was 
the occasion of a quiet celebration in the even- 
ing by prominent Shriners at Mecca Temple in 
West 45th st, where the details of the under- 
taking were explained by Louis N. Donnatln, 
Recorder of tUe Temple. 

"Originally we had planned to combine the 
new home for Mecca Temple with an office 
building, so that the expenses might be partly 
defrayed by rentals," explained Mr. Donnatin. 
"But we now find that our finances are in ex- 
cellent shape, as is indicated by the fact that 
our surplus is $i 5,000 in excess of that of last 
year, and we feel that we have an organization 
than can carry out the undertaking. 

"We have nearly $1,000,000, and what addi- 
tional funds we may need we will raise through 
the Mecca Temple Holding Co., recently or- 
ganized to do the underwriting. The holding 
company will raise additional funds by selling 
bonds to the members of the Mecca Temple. 
We have 11.080 members, and it is apparent 
that the cost of the mosque when pro-rated 
among this number represents an insignificant 
sum. However, we cannot expect every member 
to furnish his theoretical share of the cost. 

"We are going to build a mosque without 
asking help from any other temple. It is purely 
an affair for the local organization and Mecca 
Temple will take pride in the fact that it alone 
built the home for the mother temple. 

"Several sketches have been submitted by 
nobles who are skilled architects and are in- 
terested in the type of mosque that is to be 
constructed. But no decision has been reached 
as to the exact plan. The only definite decision 
has been that we are to have a building of our 
own here where the mother of all temples nay 
be properly housed. 

"Our great drawback has been the comp.ra- 
tively limited number of plots offered. We luust 
build for the future. It has been the historj of 
every temple that the original plans have proved 
too small by the time that the building was 
completed. 

"Take Syria Mosque, in Pittsburgh, for in- 
stance. At the time this work was started it 
was declared that it would meet all require- 
ments tor years to come. Two or three months 
a.gn the trustees were empowered to purchase an 
additional plot on one side for the purpose of 
building larger foyers. It will not be possible 
to enlarge the auditorium, but they want to 
make at least standing room for those nobles 
who cannot gain admission to the ceremonial 
itself. Meriinah Temple, in Chicago, with her 
great membership is in even worse condition 
They cannot enlarge. 

"We do not want to make the same error and 
this in part accounts for the magnitude of the 
undertaking. We want an auditorium that will 
meet the demands of the members. We will 
have not only an auditorium with a suitable ca- 
pacity, but we will have smoking rooms, a ban- 
quet hall, committee rooms, executive offices 
club rooms and a limited number of rooms foi- 
visiting Shriners." 

The bonds by which it is planned to rnioo fi,p 
necessary funds to carry out the construction of 
the mosque are offered to the members of Mecca 



January 7, 1922 

Temple iu denominations of $50, IflUO, $oOU and 
$1,U(X), by the Mecca Temple Holding Company, 
which inchldes Robert D. Williams, Charles A. 
Benedict, William J. Matthews, Louis N. Don- 
natin, Henry C. Arthur, Paul Jones and R. A. 
Mansfield Hobbs. 

Mecca Temple was founded in this city 50 
years ago by William J. Florence, an old actor, 
who came to this country from England. The 
first home of the Temple was at the Old Cottage, 
464 Sixth av, now occupied by Mouquin's Restau- 
rant. In the lUO temples on the North Ameri- 
can continent today there are oO0,0U0 members, 
each of whom is assessed $2 a year, which is to 
be devoted to hospitals, charities and other 
worthy purposes. 

Robert Levers was the broker in the sale of 
the new Temple site. The order has long occu- 
pied a converted dwelling at 107 West 45th St. 



Hearst Adds to Holdings 

E. K. Van Winkle and Huberth & Huberth 
sold I'J East 57th st. a U-sty apartment house 
with store, on lot 2u.xl(i0, for the Itl East Fifty- 
seventh Street Co. to a client tor investment. 
It was held at $300,000. 

The property is just west of Madison av and 
is understood to have been purchased in behalf 
of William Randolph Hearst. Last April Mr. 
Hearst leased through his representatives, 
Huberth & Huberth, the former Wilson residence 
at 15 East 57th st. a 43-toot parcel, for 21 years 
at an annual rental of $:;0.000, and with an 
option of purchasing the property for .f.jDO.OOO. 

Subsequently he purchased the adjoining altered 
dwelling at 17 East 57th st from Stephen O. 
Lookwood. The latest purchase will give Mr. 
Hearst control of a frontage of 82 feet at this 
point. 



Hotel Grosvenor Acquired 

The old Hotel Grosvenor at the northeast cor- 
ner of Fifth av and 10th st has been sold by 
Leonard D. and Arthur J. Baldwin to John A. 
McCarthy, the building material dealer who 
recently bought the adjoining vacant plot, 24. Ox 
94.9, on East 10th st, which is to be utilized 
for a 12-sty annex to the old downtown apart- 
ment hostelry. The Grosvenor is a 7-sty struc- 
ture, on a plot 80.8x100. E.xtensive alterations 
will be made to the building. The transfers 
have been recorded. 



Valuable Dreicer Holding Sold 

Dreicer Realty Co., of which the late Michael 
Dreicer was the head, sold to Isaac D. Levy, 
head of Oppenheim, Collins & Co., the 11-sty 
mercantile building 6-8 West 57th st, on a plot 
65.6x100.5, adjoining the Hecksher building at 
the southwest corner of Fifth av and 57th st. 
The new owner has not announced his purpose 
in buying the property. The price was about 
$1,500,000. 



Site for Big School Bought 

An important step toward a large head- 
quarters and resident school building was taken 
this week when the National Bible Institute of 
214 and 216 West 35th st (Don O. Shelton, 
president, Hugh R. Monroe, treasurer) acquired 
title to the property at 330 to 348 West S.jth st. 
On this site are 10 dwellings with an aggregate 
frontage of 200 feet, located about 500 feet west 
of Broadway. 

The building to be erected will be a 17-sty 
fireproof structure and will be divided into two 
sections, providing for the general offices of the 
institute and for a library, study rooms, class 
rooms, social rooms, dining room, an auditorium 
on the main floor that will seat approximately 
1,200 people, and 550 rooms that will accommo- 
date between 600 and 700 students- The site 
and the buildings will involve an aggregate ex- 
penditure of approximately $1,.500,000. The 
architects are McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin. 
The sale of the property was negotiated through 
the Manning-Bernhard Co. 



Operator Buys Dwellings 

Frederick Brown purchased as a site for an 
apartment house operation the three 4-sty and 
basement brick dwellings 147-140-151 West 74th 
St. covering a plot 64.6x102.2. The sellers were 
Alice C. Phelps, the C A. Miunt estate and 
Caroline K. Burr. The Brown, Wheelock Co. 
were the brokers. Negotiations for a resale to 
a builder are pending. 

Riverside Drive Corner Plot Sold 

Slawson & Hobbs sold for the Liberty & Church 
Street Corporation, Robert E. Dowling, presi- 
dent, to the 610 West 110th Street Co., Benjamin 
P. Walker, president, the north corner of River- 
side dr and 109th st, a vacant plot fronting 74 
feet on the drive and 151.7 on the street. 

The buyer will Immediately Improve the plot 
with a 14-sty fireproof apartment house to be 
ready for occupancy on October 1, next. The 
plot is one of several Mr. Dowling bought from 
the estate of Russell Sage. 



Former Owner Buys Back a Parcel 

Resale of the Linlithgow, a 7-sty elevator 
apartment house at the southeast corner of 
Riverside dr and 12nfh st. has been made by 
the West Heights Realty Corporation fSol Le- 
Tine president and Jacob Granat secretary and 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

treasurer). The purchaser is Joseph Shenk, 
who formerly owned the property. The house 
rents for about $70,000 annually and was valued 
at $100,000. It fronts lOO.S feet on the drive 
and 157.6 feet on 13Uth st, and accommodates 
00 families, who occupy suites of from 4 to 
rooms each. 

Mr. Shenk disposed of the structure last 
March to the Ardsmore Estates, Inc., from 
wuicu the present selling company acquired it. 
The grounds of the St. Regis Convent are di- 
rectly opposite. 

An East Side Investment 

Maurice Werthoim sold for Dennis J. Mc- 
Donald, of Yonkers, N. Y., to Patrick Coughlin 
and John Ryan, for investment, 155 East 30th 
st, a 5-sty stone apartment house, on a plot 
27.3x98.2 ; and 157 East 39th st, a 5-sty stone 
apartment house, known as the Edgewood, on a 
lot 19x91.3. The first is a double apartment 
building and the second a single one. The sales 
have been recorded. 

Garage To Supplant Factory Building 

S. & H. Realties. Inc., or the Herman Lumber 
Co., sold to Isidor Friedman 196-204 Mulberry 
st, northeast corner of Kenmare st, a 6-sty and 
basement brick factory building, on a Dlot front- 
ing 118.2 feet on Mulberry st and 100.2% feet 
on Kenmare st. 

On the site the buyer will build a 4-sty fire- 
proof garage, with stores and showrooms on 
the Kenmare st side. It is the first sale of the 
property in more than 50 years. Shaw, Rock- 
well (& Sanford were the brokers. 



13 



Markeen Apartments Resold 

Charles Galewski purchased from Matilda 
Susamaii the Markeen apartments at 570 West 
loGth st, a 6-sty brick elevator semi -fireproof 
structure containing 9 families on a floor, with 
trom 2 to 5 room suites. It stands on a plot 
lliuxlOO, located 100 feet east of Broadway. The 
property was held at $425,00iJ and returns a 
rental of $50,000 per annum. 

Company Buys Tiffany Arms 

The newly formed Tiffany Arms Realty Cor- 
poration (.A. M. Bloch, A. J. Shapiro and H. 
Uann) purchased the 6-sty elevator apartment 
house, on plot 100x108, at the southeast corner 
of Tiffany and IGod sts, Bronx. The house is 
known as Tiffany Arms and shows a yearly 
rent roll of $40,0U0. It was valued at $225,000 
and contains 51 suites of from 3 to 6 rooms 
each and 7 stores. The Great Northern Apart- 
ments Corporation, the seller, acquired the prop- 
erty last June. The buying company is reprt 
sented by C. Diringer, attorney. It is capital- 
ized at $50,000. 



Builders Buy Large Heights Plot 

The 615 West 164th Street Corporation, com- 
posed of Theodore Klein, Abraham Bricken, 
Isidore Friedman and Leo Schloss purchased 
from the Waunegan Realty Co. the vacant plot, 
lT5xl40x irregular, on the south side of 165th 
st, 200 feet west of Broadway. They will im- 
prove the property with two 87-feet front 5-sty 
and basement walk-up apartment houses, which 
will be ready for occupancy October 1, 1922. 

This is the fourth block front which the pur- 
chasing company has acquired from the Waune- 
gan Realty Co. in the last year. 

Ardshane Apartments Bought 

Michael J. Connaughton, of Flynn & Con- 
naushton, sold for Max Gold and Henry Bern- 
stein the 5-sty and basement brick apartment 
house known as "The Ardshane," 562 and 564 
West 191st st, on a plot 51x9S.Ti4x irregular, to 
the Ginkenna Realty Co., Inc.. Michael Mc- 
Kenna, president ; John Ginnity. secretary and 
treasurer. The property was held at $100,000. 



Hospital Goes from East to West Harlem 

Leon S. Altmayer sold for Elizabeth Mc- 
Dougall the bloik front on the west side of 
Manhattan av, from West 123d st to Hancock 
;>! and West I24th st. The purchaser is the 
Sydenham Post Graduate Course and Hospital, 
who will immediately erect a 10-sty fireproof 
hospital on the plot. The hospital will be non- 
soctarian in character and upon its completion 
will be one of the most modern and up-to-date 
hospitals in this country. 

The location is unusually accessible, as it is 
but one block from the elevated railroad sta- 
tion on Eighth av and is but one block from all 
(Tosstown lines on 125th st and the Fifth av 
bus and St. Nicholas av electric carllnes pass 
the door. It has unusual light and air advan- 
tages, having frontages on four streets. It is 
but a short distance from the new Rockefeller 
School being erected on West 123d st. 

One of the features of the new hospital build- 
ing is the elimination of wards, as every patient, 
whetlLer charity or pay, will have a separate 
room, and this privacy tends to hasten re- 
coveries. There will be five operating pavilions. 

The Sydenham Post Graduate Course and Hos- 
pital has been functioning for the last 18 years 
in the nine old buildings at 331 to 347 East 
110th St. which location it has outgrown and 
which buildings have recently been sold for 
the hospital by Mr. Altmayer to the American 
National Red Cross of Washington, D. C, and 
other institutions and private parties. 

When completed, the new building, land and 
equipment will represent an outlay of about 
$1,000,000. The plot is 116.11x101.5x163.7x90. 



Great Expectations 

Do your January dividends sometimes call to mind other 
stocks that no longer pay? Or still others, where per- 
haps you had the greatest expectations, that never paid at 
all? No such disappointment is possible with our Guar- 
anteed Mortgages. They are paying their 51/2% interest 
as regularly as the half year comes around, and until 
their principal matures and is paid off. 

UWYERS TITLE & TRUST CO. 

160 Broadway, New York 367 Fulton Street, Jamaica, N. Y. 

188 Montague Street, Brooklyn 58.3 East 149th Street, New York 

44 Court Street, Brooklyn 1354 Broadway, Brooklyn 

160 Main Street, White Plains, N. Y. 



NiEWENHOus Company, Inc. 

We specialize in Financing, Planning and Erect- 
ing Legitimate Building Operations 
on a 60% Loan Basis. 
Commission Moderate. 316-318 East i6ist Street 

Telephone: Melrose 1694-1695 New York City 



PAINTING AND DECORATING 

GENERAL CONTRACTING 

HIGHEST WORKMANSHIP BEST MATERIALS 

REDUCED PRICES ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

im W. 96th St., New York R. SOLOVE Riverside 3419-7490 



14 



HOMES IN 
GREENWICH VILLAGE 

New York City has restricted a large part 
of Old Greenwich Village for residential 
purposes only. Many of the fine old 
homes are now available. 
You Can Buy a Splendidly Built Residence, 
Renovate it at Little Cost, and Have as 
Fine a Home as you can Find in New 
York City. 

We Have Satisfied Many Families — Let 
Us Help You. 

PEPE & BRO. 

40 South Washington Square 



Douglas L.Ellinian£[o. 

Real Estate Brokers 

Fifth and Park Avenue Districts 

Efficient Property Management 
Plaza, 9200 15 East 49th St. 



JAMES BOYD 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

135 BROADWAY 
Phone: Rector 8658-S65( 



SPECIALISTS IN 

PENN. TERMINAL SECTION 

REAL ESTATE 

AGENTS— BROKERS— APPRAISERS 

H. M. Weill Co. 

TeL Longacro 2290-2817 221 West 33rd St. 



BENJAMIN WINTER 

BUY AND SELL HIGH-CLASS 

MANHATTAN PROPERTY 

BROKERS ARE INVITED TO SUBMIT 

PROPOSITIONS — Quick Decision GIvm. 

Lansing Building 

229» BROADWAY, AT a2nd STREET 

Suite 6 Phone: Schuyler 2897 



BRENSAM REALTY CXDRP. 

SAMUEL BRENER, Pres. 

REAL ESTATE OPERATORS 

50 EAST 42n<» STREET 

Vanderbilt 3918-19 



DR. H. SCHWAMM 
DENTIST 

Knickerbocker Building 

152 West 42nd Street 

Phono Bryant 7475 

Including X-Ray Serric* 



BROOKS & MOMAND 


Member of Real Estate Board 


Real Estate Mortgages 


1 15 BROADWAY Phone 22?J Rector 

2268 



Charles B. Van Valen. Inc 


Member Real Estate Board of N. Y. 


REAL ESTATE 


MORTGAGii. LOANS— INSURANCE 


110 WILLIAM STREET 


Phone: 6000 Beekman 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

Sells Fine Park Av Residence 

William D. May & Co. sold lor Adele Q. 
Brown iSy Park av, a 5-sty stune American 
basement dwelling, on a lot 25x;.t>. The house 
is Well-known in art circles tor its remarKable 
interior, puituus of which are in Gothic, Ital- 
ian and Louis XIV. Illustrations ot the im- 
portant rojms have appeared in all the leading 
art magazines. 

Madison Theatre in New Hands 

The Madison 'theatre, a two-story building, on 
plot lUO.ll.NlliU, at the northwest corner of Mad- 
ison av and lii2d st. has been conveyed by the 
Chain Amusement Co. to Louis Myers- It is 
suuject to mortgages for $91,0uO. 



Sells Strathmore Apartments 

Strathmore Real Estate Corporation, David 
B. K. Chapman, president, sold to Newbold Mor- 
ris the southeast corner of Riverside dr and 
14Uth St, a lli-sty elevator apartment house, 
known as the Strathmore, on a plot 101.4,xll7.U. 

Builder Buys Bronx Corner 

Henry Acker, pioneer builder of taxpayers in 
the Bronx, has, after an absence of 10 years, 
again re-entered the market and purchased from 
the Jupiter Realty Corporation the plot 50x120, 
on the northwest corner of Burnside and Uni- 
versity avs, upon which he will immediately 
erect a high-class taxpayer. This is one of the 
best locations in the West Bronx and one of the 
stores has already been rented from the plans 
by the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Co. Her- 
man A. Acker was the broker. 



Bank Buys a Bronx Corner 

Shaw. Rockwell tt Sanford sold lor the Hatfen 
Realty Co. to the Corn Exchange Bank the 4-sty 
apartment house with stores at the northeast 
corner of Burnside and Jerome avs. The bank 
will establish a branch at this location as soon 
as alterations have been completed. 

Sell Numerous Bronx Plots 

Douglas & Gettell sold the plot, 50x100, at the 
southwest corner of Davidson av and lS3d st 
to George Hastings ; a lot on east side ot David- 
son av, 200 feet south of Pordham rd, to Harry 
Douglass, who owns two adjoining lots ; a plot, 
7.JX2IG. on east side of the Concourse, extending 
to Valentine av, 2S9 feet south of I'JOth st. tor 
Louis Urstrung to a builder who plans three 
j-sty apartment houses ; also a 115-toot frontage 
on the east side of the Concourse, north of Bed- 
ford Park Boulevard, to Anne Wasser, who plans 
a $25,000 home ; a lot on east side of Morris 
av, near 197th st and facing Jerome av, to 
Henry C. Glaser ; and an adjoining lot to S. 
Aginsky for immediate improvement with homes 
for their use. 



Big New Apartment House Sold 

Harry H. Cohen sold for Peter Sinnott the 
southeast corner of 199th st and Valentine av, 
a G-sty 54-family apartment house, on a plot 
l.oOxlOO, to M. Blutman, an investor, for about 
.$250,000. The house has just been completed 
and the rental is about ,$46,000. Samuel Bitter- 
man, attorney, represented the buyer. 



Brown Resells Maxwell Mansion 

The stately stone and brick mansion of the 
late J. Rogers Maxwell at the southwest corner 
of Eighth av and Union st, Brooklyn, on a plot 
134x171, which Mrs. Maxwell recently sold to 
Frederick Brown, operator, has been resold by 
him to Charles Laue. builder, who will raze the 
house and improve the plot with three 6-sty ele- 
vator apartment houses. J. T. Miller was the 
broker. When the property was purchased by 
Mr. Brown the sale was made on the condition 
that the house be demolished and the site re- 
improved. 



Comer Plot In Borougli Park Sold 

Realty Associates sold to the Casino Building 
Corporation the vacant plot, 100x.S4.1x irregular, 
at the southeast corner of Twelfth av and 55th 
st, in the Borough Park section of Brooklyn, 
which the purchasers will improve with semi- 
detached 2-family houses with driveways and 
private garages. 



Hotel Kaaterskill Sold 

The Lewis H. May Co. sold for the Girard 
Trust Co., George J. Harding, and William Pitt 
Mason, trustees, the Hotel Kaaterskill property 
at Catskill, N. Y., to Harry Tannenbaum, of 
Oak Court. Lakewood. N. J., and formerly of 
the Hollywood Lodge. Highmount, N. Y. 

This property covers an area of 600 acres, 
comprises a township and contains main build- 
ing, anne.x and outbuildings, with several lakes. 
The main building contains 1.000 bedrooms, ex- 
clusive of other rooms, also bowling alleys, bil- 
liard rooms, and numerous recreation "rooms. 
The outbuildings consist of garage, stables, car- 
riage houses, dormitories, po^er houses, etc. 
Property also includes a 9-holp golf course, 
which will be extended to the regular 18-hole 
course. 

Property was originally constructed by day 
labor in the year 1.SS2 by George Harding,* lead- 
ing patent attorney of his time, and cost more 
than .$1,000,000 to complete. It was necessary 
to cut roads through and level mountain tops 



January 7, 192? 

in its erection. Its altitude is 2.800 feet, which 
is believed to be the highest point of habitation 
in New York State. 

It is historical as the summer capitol of 
General U. S. Grant in the year 1S82, at which 
time Mr. Harding deeded to the General what 
1- Known as Boulder Rock, one of the highest 
points in the Catskill Mountains, it again be- 
came the summer capitol ot President Arthur 
in 1884. 

Tile Kaaterskill is the largest mountain hotel 
in tile United States, is the highest point in the 
Catskills, and is one of the famous sights of the 
tourists up the Hudson, comparative to the 
castles built along the famous rivers of Europe, 

Mr. Tannenbaum has contracted for extensive 
changes and alterations, including private baths 
throughout, running water and electricity, also 
general remodelling. The larger lake will be 
dredged and steam coils will be installed for 
tempering the water. Upon the lake shore will 
be constructed a large Casino and bathing pavil- 
ion. 

The Kaaterskill is 100 miles from New York 
on the State road, recently completed, and is 
now one of the famous rendezvous for auto- 
iii'ibilists. The total cost of the improvements 
will exceed $200,000. 

Brooklyn Apartments Traded 

The Buick Realty Co. sold to Joseph F. Mus- 
selman its property, known as the Grosvenor 
and the Berkeley, on Montague st, two 8-sty 
elevator apartment houses, opposite the Bossert 
Hotel. The plot is 75x100. The property was 
valued at $350,000. The sellers took in part 
payment one 4-sty brick double apartment house 
and two 4-sty single apartment houses at 235 
to 241 Quincy st, on a plot 100x100 ; also a 
plot on the east side of Howard av, between 
Sutter and Pitkin avs, 2(¥ix78. The purchaser 
is the 726 Ocean Avenue Co.. Inc., ot which 
Mr. Musselmah is president. George L. Long, 
Maurice G. Straus and I. J. Riker were the 
brokers. 

William Rockefeller in Two Deals 

William Rockefeller is the purchaser of the 
Anna Enders property of 4S'^ acres at Scarbor- 
ough, N. Y., and ot the Abel Weeks property of 
22 acres at North Tarrytown, Westchester 
County, N. Y., sold recently through William 
A. White & Sons. 



Mortgage Loans 

Waddel & Martin placed the following loans : 
.$325,000 on 148 to 156 West 23d st ; .$100,000 on 
142 West .34th st ; $60,000 on 260 West .34th st ; 
.$•10,000 on southeast corner of Mount Hope pi 
and Morris av ; $45,000 on southwest corner of 
Boirton rd and Jefferson pi ; $45,000 on 290 West 
End av ; $00,000 on 1010 Rogers pi : $29,000 on 
northeast corner ot Amsterdam av and 14Sth st ■ 
.$.30,000 on 457 East 174th st : $12,500 on south- 
west corner of Grand Boulevard and Concourse 
and 197th st : $14,000 on 811 East 169th st ; 
$49,000 on 265 East 181st st : $14,000 on 548 
Grand st ; $37,000 on 2110 Vyse av : $60,000 on 
southwest corner of Madison av and 97th st : 
$37,000 on southeast corner ot Willis av and 
1.34th st : $18,000 on 142 West 24th st ; $39,000 
on 1038 Southern boulevard : $40,000 on 96'> 
Southern boulevard : $70,000 on .3044 Kings- 
bridge aT, and $30,000 on 1429 Bryant ay 



Galveston Building Co. obtained a first mort- 
gage loan of $86,000 on the new 5-sty and base- 
ment apartment house at the southeast corner 
ot Walton av and 184th st. 

The Kamtun Realty Co. obtained from the 
Lawyers' Mortgage Co. a loan ot $108,000 on 
the property,- 80x100, at the southwest corner of 
Pinehurst av and 179th st, improved recently 
with a 5-sty apartment house. 

Sharp & Co. placed a first mortgage loan of 
$1.80.000 for the Agra Holding Co. on the 9-sty 
apartment house, on a plot 62.6x100. at 144 East 
3Gth St. 

A mortgage loan of $93,000 has been placed 
on the two 6-sty apartment houses with stores 
at the northwest corner of First av and 57th st. 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co. loaned, on first 
mortgage. $5.50.000 to the 95th Street and Broad- 
way Corporation, on the 2-sty fireproof building 
known as the Healy Theatre and stores, at the 
southwest corner of Madison av and 68th st 
a plot 125x164. for a term of 3 years, at 6 per 
cent, per annum. 



A formal contract was filed with County Clerk 
James A. Donegan Tuesday, for the advance- 
ment bv the Metrnnolitan Life Insurance Co of 
the $S50,ono building loan, which is to make 
possible the erection of a 14-stv building ex- 
clusively for lawyers, on the north side of West 
43d St. 342.4 feet east of Sixth av and extending 
through to 44th st. The structure is to be built 
bv the Bar Association of the City of New 
York and will adjoin the latter's present home 
at 42 West 44th st. 



Oninlan & Leland placed a first mortgaee loan 
of $93,000 on the two 6-sty apartment houses at 
the northwest corner of First av and 57th st. 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



IS 



Quintan & Leland placed for the Claire Build- 
ing Corporation, Adolph Blumenthal, president, 
a building and permanent loan of $270,000 for 
the erection of two ."j-sty apartment houses on 
the west side of Valentine av, 200 feet north of 
Fordhani rd, Bronx, size 120x100 each. 

Edwards, Dowdney & Richart secured a build- 
ing and permanent loan of .$40,000 on the prem- 
ises on the west side of Grand av, ISO feet north 
of 180th st, Bronx. They also placed loans of 
$28,000 on premises on the south side of ITGth 
St, 185 feet west of Grand av ; $4."i,000 on 
premises 464 Eighth av : $54,000 on premises at 
the northeast corner of Crotona av and 179th st- 



Title Guarantee & Trust Co. loaned to the 
Barclay Holding Corporation $000,000, for a 
term of 5 years, at the rate of per cent, per 
annum, on the parcel 1317 Broadway, part of 
the leasehold of the R. H. Macy Co. building, 
as well as on 115 to 121 West ^Mth st, another i 
part of the Macy leasehold. The holding com- 
pany represents Frederick Brown, operator. 



South of 59th Street 

GOUVERNEUR ST. — Anzonetta B. Knappa 
sold to Moe Torgow the 6-sty brick tenement 
house with stores at 46 Gouverneur st, on a 
lot 25. 4x101. 6x irregular. 

7TH ST. — The Lawyers' Mortgage Co. sold to 
Baruch Hornik two 5-sty brick tenement houses 
with stores at 215 and 2151/™ East 7th st, each 
on a lot 16.8x97.6. 

WHITE ST. — Minnie Long purchased from the 
Wilton Holding Corporation !55 and .57 White 
st, southwest corner of Franklin pi, a 5-sty 
stone and brick business building, on plot 59, 7x 
lOOx irregular. 

12TH ST. — The Co-operative League of 
America, now at 2 West 13th st, is to have a 
new home for its exclusive use at 167 West 12th 
st, between Sixth and Seventh avs. The prop- 
erty has been purchased through William A- 
White & Son from the estate of Ellen E. Lord. 
The building is a .j-sty and basement brick 
dwelling, on a lot 21x103.3, which will be 
altered for the use of the league. The league is 
a member of the National Association for Co- 
operative Unity and Education and a member 
of the International Co-operative -Mliance. It 
collects information and promotes knowledge of 
history, objects and practical methods of the 
Consumer Co-operative Movement. J. P. War- 
basse is president. 

17TH ST. — H. M. Weill Co., in conjunction 
•with the John P, Peel Co., sold for a client 58 
West 17th st, a 5-sty brick mercantile building, 
on a lot 22x92. 

lOTH ST.— Bridget O'Neill sold to Edward 
Fast two 3-stv brick tenement houses and a 
1-stv brick stable at 243 and 245 West inth st. 
30x62x irregular x3O.10x75. 

20TH ST.— Maud Van B. Holmes sold to Tillie 
Teitlebaum 1.53 West 20th st, a 2-sty brick loft 
building, on a lot 22x02. 

24TH ST.— H. V. Mead & Co. sold for a client 
to Millie Rosenberg 2.30 West 24th st, a 5-sty 
and basement stone apartment house, on a plot 
26.8x98.9. 

4.5TH ST. — Irving Bachrach sold 229 East 
45th st, a 5-sty and basement brick tenement 
house with store, on a lot 25x100.5. 

.53D ST. — Through the Herman Arms Co. and 
George W. Mercer & Son, Millie Rosenberg pur- 
chased 432 West 53d st, a 5-sty brick tenement 
house, on a lot 25x100.5. 

EIGHTH AV.— H. M. Weill &. Co. sold for the 
Silver Lunch Co., Inc., 402 Eighth av. adjoining 
the northeast corner of 33d st, a 4-sty brick 
building, the store of which is occupied by the 
seller. The new owner has leased the store to 
the former owner, for a term of years. The 
building covers a lot 24.81/4x100. It was held at 
$125,000, 

MARKET SLIP.— William A. White & Sons 
sold for the Ella L. Murphy estate, Charles H. 
Paddock, executor, to an investor 89 Market 
Slip, a 3-sty brick tenement house with store, 
on a lot 20x51. The propertv has been owned 
by the selling estate since 1835. 

WAVERLY PL. — Williams Dexter Co. resoM 
to the Mattakeunk Cabin C''lony, Inc., two 3-stv 
and basement brick dwellings, 176 and 178 
Waverly pi, on a plot 33.6x85.6. 

FIRST AV.— Frederick Flaccus sold to Mollie 
and Abraham Herzfeld the two 5-sty brick ten- 
ement houses with stores, at 102 and 104 First 
av. each on a lot 21. 3x70. adjoining the north- 
cast corner of East 6th st. 

SECOND AV.— Simon Karp sold to Jacob 
Klein and Louis Glickman the 4-sty brick tene- 
ment house with store, at 832 Second av, on a 
lot 18x70. 

North of 59th Street 

ir.TH ST. — Frank L. Crocker resold to Henrv 
A. Alexander the 4-stv and basement stone 
dw»lling 130 East 65th st, on a lot 20x 
100. .5. adjoining the southwest corner of Lex- 
ington av. Mr. Crocker bought the house re- 
cently from William H. Hamilton. 



GOTH ST.— The newly formed Betax Holding 
Corporation, of which Betty C. Axelrod is pres- 
ident, purchased from the Underwood estate the 
5-sty brick American basement dwelling, on a 
lot 25x11)0.5. at 20 West 60th st, through Slaw- 
son t^I' Hobbs, Inc. 

74TH ST.— Schindler & Liebler sold for Car- 
rie Altman to Julia Vayda 2+2 Bast 74th st, a 
4-sty and basement brick dwelling, on a lot 
10.9x102.2. 

70TH ST. — Irving Bachrach sold to Domenico 
Arcuri 355 East 76th st, a 4-sty brick tene- 
ment house with store, on a lot 25x102-2. 

7STH ST.— Cusack Co. sold for a client 150 
West 7Sth st, a 4-sty and basement stone dwell- 
ing, on a lot 20x102.2. The furnishings were in- 
cluded in the sale. 

7STH ST.— William P. Dixon sold to George 
A, Phelps 127 East 78th st, a 4-sty stone dwell- 
ing, on a lot 17-4x102.2. 

79TH ST.— The Brown, Wheelock Co., Inc.. 
sold for Henry H. Abbott 115 East 79th st, a 
3-sty and basement stone dwelling, on a lot 
20x102.2. It was held at $85,000. 

80TH ST. — Leon S. Altmayer resold for How- 
ard A. Raymond 155 East 80th st, a 3-stv and 
basement stone dwelling, on a lot 16.8x100, to 
A. M. Bing. Through this resale Mr. Altmayer 
has completed for Mr. Bing the assembling of a 
plot of land having a frontage of 100 feet on 
Lexington av and a frontage of 79.4 feet on 
East 80th St. On this plot Mr. Bing will im- 
mediately erect an 11-sty apartment house. 

83D ST. — Thomas Stone sold to Elizabeth B. 
Hendrick 128 West 83d st, a 5-sty brick apart- 
ment house, on a plot 32,4x102.2. 

8:!D ST. — Maurice B. Blumenthal sold to Myra 
E. Williams the 3-sty and basement brick dwell- 
ing 224 East 83d st, on a lot 16.11x102.2. 

S4TH ST — Anna A. Schaffer sold to Louis 
Kahn 517 East S4th st, a 3-sty stone dwelling, 
on a lot 19.5x102.2. 

80TH ST.— Morris H. Rothschild bought from 
Henry D. Brewster, Joseph W- Sanford and 
William G. Green, respectively, 230 to 240 East 
86th st, six old 4-sty brownstone apartment 
houses, each on a plot 26.8x102,2, adjoining the 
southwest corner of Second av. On the com- 
bined site the new owner will erect a 5-sty 
modern apartment house containing suites of 3 
and 4 rooms each, all of which will face on a 
large Italian garden in the central court, thus 
giving each stiite the advantages of light and 
air. There will be eleven stores on the street 
grade. The plans, for this operation are being 
drawn by Rosario (".'andela. The project will be 
one of the largest undertaken recently in the 
Yorkville section. Leon S. Altmayer was the 
broker. 

89TH ST. — John J. Meenan, Inc., sold tor Dr. 
Thomas F. Reilly 74 West 89th st, a 5-sty 



brick walk-up apartment house, known as the 
Daylesford, on a plot SOxlOO.SMi, adjoining the 
southeast corner of Columbus av. 

95TH ST.— Pierre & Golden Co. sold for Car- 
rie Isarr to C. Dreyfuss 4 West 95th st, ad- 
joining the south corner of Central Park West, 
a 3-sty and basement stone dwelling, on a lot 
l6.8xlOO.Sy2. 

llilST ST.— G. Tuoti & Co. sold for Bochicobie 
Bros. 327 East lolst st, a 6-sty and basement 
brick tenement house with store, on a plot 2S.6x 
100.11. 

109TH ST.— Sherman & Kirschner sold for 
the estate of Charlotte Brinckerhoff to a builder, 
for improvement 19-21 East lOoth st, a vacant 
plot, .50x100.11. 

122D ST.— George W. Brettell & Son sold for 
Mrs. John Velders to Henry Mott Brenuan a 
3-sty dwelling, 22x100, at 158 East 122d st. This 
is the first sale of the property in more than 
30 years. The same brokers resold the prop- 
erty to the present tenants. 

133D ST.— Porter & Co. sold for the estate of 
James Milliken to the Reyvan Realty Co. 1.50 
West 13.'Jd st, a 3-sty and basement brick dwell- 
ing, on a lot 12.6x99.11. 

138TH ST.— Charles B. Van Valen, Inc., re- 
sold for Joseph Sheak 029 West 138th st, a 
5-sty and basement brick apartment house, 
known as the Annett, on a plot 50x99.11. 

177TH ST. — Isaac Lowenfeld and William 
Prager purchased from the estate of Edward 
S. Schaeffler the two 5-sty and basement brick 
apartment houses 605-009 West 177th st, ad- 
joining the northwest corner of St. Nicholas av, 
each on a plot 50x90, housing 40 families. The 
property was held at $150,000. The broker was 
Joseph Keenan of Charles Berlin's office. 

AMSTERDAM AV.— The 501 West 133d Street 
Corporation (S. Gerber, B. R. Stein and H. 
Vogel) has been formed to take over the 6-sty 
brick apartment house with stores, 40x100, at 
the northwest corner of Amsterdam av and 133d 
St. It is represented by Morrison & Schiff, at- 
torneys. 

AMSTPRDAM AV,— Ryan & Co, sold for 
Emily Beerman to Peter Fay, restaurateur, 
2132 Amsterdam av, a 0-sty apartment house 
with 2 stores, on a plot 30x101. 3x irregular. 



ARCHITECT 

A. J. SIMBERG 

1133 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
Phone: Watkins 8832 



P 



MONEY TO LOAN 



JBuilelJnvf Alter'SL ±ioixs 

L & £t S G II oJtIS 

Slerlinsf Mortcfacfe Compaivy Inc. 

135 Biroa,<i-w<^a,"y. Ne-wYoi-Kj 

TELEPHONE PtECTOe^ /Sza-3-^'^7 



mmn^ 







Classified Advertisements 

WanU and Offers, For Sale and F*r Rent — Rate 2Sc. per line; count lut word* to the Uaa. 



Employera anxious to secure help (clerical or 
professional), or employees wishing to obtain 
a position or better a present one will find the 
Record and Guide the quickest and most direct 
method of bringing their wants to the atten- 
tion of the largest number of interested read 
ers, in the real estate or building professions. 



No medium reaching real estate interests af- 
fords owners, brokers, and executors wishing 
to dispose of desirable property (in or out 01 
the city), so farorable an opportunitr to bring 
the merits of their propositions to the atten- 
tion of possible buyers as does the For Sale 
and For Rent section of the Record and Guide. 



SITUATION OPEN 
BROKER experienced in commercial properties 
in Grand Central district. In business de- 
partment prominent real estate office. Bos 855, 
Record & Guide. 



SITU.^TrONS WANTED 

OPEN FO;: ENGAGEMENT 
BTTILDING SUPERINTENDENT 
18 years' experienn' on new and alteration 
work (10 years in New York): fully quali- 
fied in all branches of construction; best cre- 
dentials. Box 850, Record & Guide. 



ENGINEER-ARCHITECT, good appearance, 
long experience, wishes position as superin- 
tendent and representative with contracting 
firm ; salary expected reasonable. George Mul- 
ler, 1526 North 5th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

WANTS AND OFFERS 
WANTED: .$7,000 first mortgage loan; quick; 
will pay .fSOO bonus. lacolina, 178 H. 118th 
St. Telephone, Harlem 8909. 

T)¥S\s. ROOM to let to real estate man in at- 
torney's office. Room 214, 147 Fourth Ave- 
nue. Stuyvesant 9433. 



16 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 1922 



MEMBERS REAL ESTATE BOARD OF NEW YORK 



ADAMS & CO., INC. 

Real Eitata 

170 STH AVE. lei. Gramercy 3854 

SPECIALIST IN BUSINESS PKOPERTV 



ALEXANDER B ALTER 

REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 

Management of Property a Specialty 
152 VV. 42nd St.. Knickerbocker BldE. Bryant 2042-3 



BAUER, MILBANK & MOLLOY, INC. 

REAL ESTATE 

51 East 42nd Street Murray Hill 1936 



BII.TMORE REALTY CORPORATION 

REAL ESTATE — COMMERaAL LEASING 
V ,' MANAGEMENT 

TIUfES BtlTLniNG PHONE: BRYANT 6868-6869 



ALFRED P. COBURN 

Real Estate — Appraisals — Insurance 
Management of Estate a Specialty 

159 W. 72nd ST. Phones: Columbus 4356-2548 



CUSACK COMPANY 

Real EsUte and Insurance Brokar* 

Specialists in West Side Propertiei 
176 WEST 72nd STREET 
Telephones: Columbus 6947 8179 



CHAS. A. DUBOIS 

REAL ESTATE 



ROYAL SCOTT GULDEN 

REAL ESTATE, FIFTH AVE. SECTION 
6«0 FIFTH AVENUE Phone: Circle 8315 



CHARLES G. KELLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

109 WEST 23RD STREET 
Watkins 5336 



ALBERT E. KELLY 

Successor to Fredk. A. Booth 
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

50 Union Square Tel. Stuyyesant 1125 



J. P. & L. A. KISSLING 

Sales — Management — Appraisals 

896 STH AVE., NEAR 54TH ST. 
Established 1870 Circle 0591 to 5 



H. C. KOPP & COMPANY 

Specialists in Retail Store LocatitHis 

MANAGEMENT and BBOKSBAOB 
402 Madison Avenue Vanderbilt 4900 



ROBERT LEVERS 

Real Estate — Insurance 

THE KNICKERBOCKER. 152 W. 42(1 StTMt. Phone: 
Bryant 7945. Uptown Offlco: I7« Lenoi A»e. Phone: 
Harlem 2675. 



HIRAM RINALDO 

Specializing in the Sale and Leasinj: mt 

East Side Property 
230 GRAND ST. Bowery Bank Bldg. 



l-lfith St. 



3551 BROADWAY 

Eitsblished IJM 



DUNLAP & LLOYD 

INCORPORATTD 
Real Estate— Insura»ee 

GROVE STREET Phoii. Eprtni 551 « 



GEORGE S. RUNK 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
Mortgage Loans — Management 

1252 LEXINGTON AVENUE 



SCHINDLER & LIEBLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Rhlnelander 6122 1393 THIRD AVE., at 79th St 



SEAMAN & PENDERGAST 

Member Ri-al Estate Board of New York 

RENTALS— SALES— MANAGEMENT 

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 

542 FIKTU AVENUE Vanderbilt 1309 



Nfanhattan Office Bronx Office 

1 WEST 125th STREET 1972 JEROME AVENUE 



Tel. Harlem 8400 



Tel. Connection 



SHAW, ROCKWELL & SANFORD 

REAL ESTATE— INSURANCE 

Successors to 

SHAW & CO. 



MALCOLM E. SMITH, INC. 

Real Estate Agents and Brokers 

185 MADISON AVE. Vanderbilt 7393 



COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

Rentals — Sales — Appraisals 
Insurance 




MO BROADWAY NEW YORK 

Stuyvesant 0627 



JACOB J. TABOLT 

REAL ESTATE 
558 EIGHTH AVE. Phone: 

Above 37th St. Fits Bo» 1366 

WHITNEY-FOSTER CORP. 

Real Estate Administrator 

150 WEST 72nd ST. Columbus 6409 



EAST END AV.— James Kyle & Sons resold 
for Frederick Brown the southwest corner of 
East End av and SSth st, a 5-sty stone apart- 
ment house with stores, on lot ^o.S'/axUS. This 
is the second of the corners that the same firm 
has resold for Mr. Brown recently. 

MADISON AV.— Herzig-Ernst Realty Co. sold 
to Herman Schwartz 1724-1728 Madison av. 
three 5-sty brick tenement houses with stores, 
on a plot 50.6x100. 

SHERMAN AV. — Sherman Arms, a 5-sty 
apartment house at 248 Sherman av, west of 
Isham St, has been sold by the Ardsmore Es- 
tates, Inc., Barnet Klar president, to the newly- 
formed Joe-Hen Realty Corporation. It occu- 
pies a plot 75x1.50. and was sold subject to 
mortgages for $86,000. 

SHERMAN AV. — David Stewart sold for Miss 
Rose E. Cardani the vacant plot, 50x110. on the 
south side of Sherman av, 50 feet east of Acad- 
emy St. for Immediate improvement. 

SECOND AV. — Folsom Bros., Inc.. sold for 
Mrs. Wilhelmina F. Muller and Mrs. Wilhel- 



Brooklyn Brokers 



DON'T "SHOP" FOR REAL ESTATE 

It doesn't pay. When you want to buy. take ad- 
Tantsgo of our four ofncM, 50 years' eirerlenc©, and 
thorouch ort-anlzatlon and get WHAT YOU WANT. 
AT THE RIGHT PRICE. PONTENIENTLT. 
"Established Over Half a Century" 

BULKLEY & HORTON CO. 

Member of Beal Estate Board of New York 
Member of Brooklyn Real Estat« Board. 
G. S. HORTON 585 Nostrand At©., near Dean St. 

Prea. 414 Mynle Ave., near Clinton Ave. 

A. J. HORTON 7520 Third Afe., near 75th 3t. 

Secy. 1214 Flatbush A?e, . near Dltmaa Ave. 

JAMES B. FISHER 

Member of Brooklyn Real Estate Board 

REAL ESTATE 

174 MONTAGUE ST\ Main 7267 

QUELL & QUELL 

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 

MANAGEMENT 

918 Patchen Avenue Brosltly*, N. V. 

Telephone: Decatur 4981 



mina L. Miunerly, the two 4-sty brick tenement 
houses with stores, on a plot 52x105, at 1511- 
1513 Second av, to the 79th Street Amusement 
Corporation. 

THIRD AV.— George W. Brettell & Son sold 
for Anfleur Frankenthaler to Julius Reich the 
5-sty brick double tenement house with stores, 
on a lot 25x100. at 2177 Third av. This is the 
first sale of the property in 30 years. 

THIRD AV. — The Hermitage Company sold to 
Antoinette D. Vermeulen the 4-sty brick tene- 
ment house with store at 1870 Third av, ad- 
joining the northwest corner of 103d st, on a 
lot 25x65. 

SEVENTH AV. — Albert F. Brugman sold to 
Louis Klein and Harry Bernstein the north- 
west corner of Seventh av and 14Sth st. a 5-sty 
brick flat with stores, on a plot 59.11x100. 

EIGHTH AV.— Bermax Realty Co. sold to 
Ephraim and Louis Simon the o-sty brick flat 
with store at 2379 Eighth av, on a lot 25x84, 
adjoining the southwest corner of 128th st. 

Bronx 

HORNADAY PL.^Morris Eosenfeld sold to 
Nathan D. Rosen 851 Hornaday pi, a 5-sty and 
basement brick apartment house, on a plot 50x 
100, adjoining the northwest corner of Mohegan 
av. 

139TH ST.— Mary C. Hanrahan sold the 2- 
sty and basement brick dwelling 417 East 130th 
st, on a lot 16.8x100, to Simon Tobasnik. 

176TH ST. — John T. Kelly sold to Beatrice 
Edelman the 2y2-sty frame detached dwelling, 
on a plot 40x100.10. at the northeast corner of 
176th st and Prospect av. 

CONCOURSE. — Israel Feinberg sold to the 
Marwald Realty Co. (Samuel Markel. Joseph 
Wald and Isidore H. Levey) the property. fi4.10x 
44x irregular, at the southeast corner of Grand 
Boulevard and Concourse and Weeks av. 

CONCOURSE. — Thomas K. Cruse sold to Mil- 
dred H. Ballow the vacant plot, .50x72.10. on the 
east side of Grand Boulevard and Concourse. 
315.6 feet north of lOSth st. 

BELMONT AV. — Harry Cahn sold to Serafino 
Porcelli the 5-sty and basement brick apart- 
ment house, on a plot 50x80.5, arranged for 20 
families, at 2159 Belmont av. Nicola Paraggio 
was the broker. 

BOSCOBEL AV. — Thomas A. Wilson sold tor 
Theresa P. Tautier to Hyman Berman the va- 
cant plot, 116x80x Irregular, at the southwest 
corner of Boscobel and Shakespeare avs. The 
new owner will either resell the site or Im- 
prove it with a taxpayer. 



BROOK AV.— Ararat Realty Corporation sold 
to Katie Merk 098-1000 Brook av, two 5-sty and 
basement brick apartment houses, each on a 
plot 26.5x114. 



Bronx Brokers 

A. G. BECHMANN 

Read Estate and Insurance 

Tel. Intervale 556 1065 SO. BOULEVARD 

One block from Simpson Street Subway Station 

T. H. KELLEY 

Speciedist in Fordham Heights Property 

158 East 188th St., at Grand Concourse 
I'hone: Fordham 2509 

OTTO LACKMAN 

Management of Properties my SpecisJty 

2514 Grand Concourse, near Fordkam Kead 
FboM: rsrdhan IfX 

L. G. LOSERE 

REAL ESTATE 

Entire Charge Taken of Pro|)erty 
«71 Brook Ave., at 161»t St. aitsbiisiMil 1»«8 

FRED. OPPENHEIMER 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

640 Bergen At., corner 14!>tb St-, one block east tt 
149th St. "L" and Sub Statton*. 

Phone: MSLR08B 69 07 

JOHN F. PENDERGAST, Jr. 

Real Estate — Estatas Managed 
340 WILLIS AVENUE 

Phone Melrose T22t 

ALBERT D. PHELPS 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

554 Melrose Ave., near 149th St. and 3rd Ave. 
PHONE MELROSE 4371 

HENRY SCHWiEBERT 

Real Estate — Insurance 

261 EAST FORDHAM ROAD 

Near TalAntlne Avenue Fordbaa 9141 



January 7, 1922 

BRYANT AV.— Louis Chustek sold to Hilda 
Lundeluma the 3-sty aud basement brick, dwell- 
ing 1448 Bryant av, on a lot 20xlU0. 

HUNT AV.— William Peters & Co. sold for 
Maria Domnisch to Louis M. Marschhauser the 
2^-sty and basement frame 2-family house 
1711 Hunt av. on a lot 25x^0. 

JEROME AV. — Abbey Garage. Inc., sold to 
Meyer S. Albert the vacant plot. 220.11xl02.7x 
irregular, at the northwest corner of Jerome 
av and ITTth st. 

MORRIS PARK AV.— William Peters & Co. 
sold for Johanna Habeck to Johanna Kuver 727 
Morris Park av. a 3-sty frame store and loft 
building, on a lot 25x!)3, adjoining the north- 
east corner of Hunt av. 

OGDEN AV.— Nehring Bros, sold for a client 
to Joseph J- Lese 1435 Ogden av, near the 
junction of University av, a 5-sty and base- 
ment brick apartment house, on a plot 75x100. 

SHERMAN AV.— Schwab & Co. resold for 
Mrs. Louise Bauer 1167 Sherman av, a 5-sty and 
basement brick apartment house, on a plot 45x 
100. 

SOUTHERN BOULEVARD.- Alexander Selkin 
and David Mintz sold to an investor 1222 and 
12l.*4 Southern boulevard, two 4-sty apartment 
houses with stores, on a plot 00x105, renting for 
.^7.600, and held at $60,000. 

STEBBINS AV.— Harry Cohen sold through 
Richard Dickson to Mrs. E. Callahan 965 Steb- 
bins av, a 2-sty and basement frame 2-family 
house, on a lot 20.8x118. 

UNIVERSITY AV.— George Coburn Construc- 
tion Co- sold to Anna M. Neff 2471 University 
av, a 5-sty and basement brick apartment house, 
on a plot 50x100. 

UNIVERSITY AV.— Herman A. Acker sold 
for the Occidental Holding Corporation, Nathan 
Wilson, president, the new taxpayer, on plot 100 
xl50, on the west side of University av, between 
Burnside av and 179th st. The S stores in the 
building have been rented from the plans at a 
yearly rental of about $14,000. The property 
was valued at $125,000. 

UNIVERSITY AV.— Ennis & Sinnott pur- 
chased from the Nagion Holding Co. the plot 
101.0x114, on the west side of University av, 
131 feet south of 179th st. Morris I. Strunsky, 
Harry J. Rogers and A. D. Phelps were the 
brokers. The plot adjoins the taxpayer sold 
recently by Nathan Wilson. 

VALENTINE AV.— Regina Karlstadt sold to 
George Friedrick 2024 Valentine av, a 2-sty and 
basement frame dwelling, on a lot 25x90.8. 

VYSE AV.— George Steinman. Inc., sold for 
Charles Schnabel 2064 Vyse av, a o-sty and 
basement brick 20-family apartment house, on 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

a plot 42x103.3, renting for $11,000, and held at 
$60,000. 

WASHINGTON AV.— Tiffany Realty Co. sold 
through Julius Trattner 1647 Washington av, a 
5-3ty and basement brick apartment house, on 
a plot 40x140. 

WEBSTER AV. — Richard Dickson sold tor 
George Schwind, 13.VJ Webster av, a 4-sty and 
basement brick double apartment house, on a 
lot 2.5x90. 

THIRD AV — Julius Trattner sold for Elkan 
Kahn to Adolf Reich 3780 Third av, a 5-3ty 
brick flat with store, on a lot 25x100. 

Brooklyn 

CHURCH AV.— The newly organized Benalax 
Building Co., represented by Alfred W. Norck, 
attorney, bought from the Matthew Smith es- 
tate the plot. 102.6x118.6, at the southeast cor- 
ner of Church av and East 32d st. which it will 
improve with five 2-sty buildings with stores, 
plans for which have been drawn by Cohen 
Brothers, architects. The property was held at 
$25,000. Dr. Bencil Hoffman Is president of the 
new company, which includes A. Sokolow and 
I. Nathanson. 

REMSEN ST. — Webb estate sold to Robert O. 
Deyer 28 Remsen st, a 3Mi-sty brick dwelling. 

EAST 14TH ST.— A. Mishkin sold tor Silver- 
man & Fuchs to H. Licht, for occupancy. 96;5 
East 14th st, a 2-family house. 

EAST 38TH ST.— Bulkley & Horton Co. sold 
for the Harwin Construction Co. to a buyer, for 
occupancy, !)04 East 35th st, a new detached 
dwelling, on a lot 26x100. 

EAST 38TH ST.— Knox Realty Co. sold tor 
Michael Noonan 786 East 38th st, a stucco 
dwelling in course of construction. 

PLATBUSH AV— The Realty Associates, Inc., 
sold the five 6-sty apartment houses with stores 
at 307 to 321 Flatbush av, extending through to 
126 to 132 Prospect pi, fronting 161 feet on each 
thoroughfare, to a client of E. A. Goldstein. 

ROGERS AV. — Alfred Norek bought the va- 
cant plot, 99.6x122, at the southwest corner of 
Rogers av and Winthrop st. He will improve 
it with a 4-sty apartment house to contain 44 
apartments and 8 stores. 

AV X. — Meister Builders, Inc., sold the dwell- 
ing at the northwest corner of Av X and East 
12th st, which they recently completed, to 
Lorenzo D'Ambrosio, for occupancy. 

THIRD AV.— Bulkley & Horton Co. sold for 
Isador Blum 7.522 Third av, Bay Ridge, a 2-sty 
brick flat with store, on a lot 18x80. 

SIXTH AV. — Realty Associates sold to A. Van 
Brunt 6740 Sixth av, Bay Ridge, a new 2i4-sty 
brick and stucco semi-detached dwelling with 
garage. 



17 



Queens 

EDGEMERE.— Lewis H. May Co. sold for the 
Edgemere Crest Co., M. Morgenthau, president, 
to Schnurmacher & Levy the plot of 14 lots at 
Lincoln av, Cheever av and Camp pi, Edge- 
mere. 

PAR ROCKAWAY.— Lewis H. May Co. sold 
for the Banister Realty Co., M. Morgenthau, 
president, at Ostend, Far Rockaway, to Martha 
M. Nathons the plot on the south side of Sea- 
girt pi. corner of Beach 13th st (formerly Neil- 
son av) : to Samuel Levy. Jr.. a plot on the west 
side of Beach loth st (formerly Fulton st). 
The sale of these two plots completes the dis- 
position of all the property held by the Banister 
Realty Co. north of Seagirt av (formerly South 
st). 

PAR ROCKAWAY.— Lewis H. May Co. sold 
for the Banister Realty Co., Maximilian Mor- 
genthau, president, the southeast corner of Sea- 
girt av (formerly South st) and Beach 13th st 
(formerly Neilson av), consisting of 7 lots, at 
Ostend. Far Rockaway, to Edward Cohen, tor 
immediate improvement with summer homes ; 
also 3 plots on the west side of Beach 14th st 
(formerly Rue de St. Felix) and the south side 
of Heyson rd (formerly Seagirt pi), comprising 
11 lots, at Ostend, Far Rockaway, to the Dorcoe 
Realty Co., Jacob Dorf, president, who will im- 
mediately improve with 4 dwellings, for all year 
occupancy. 

FLUSHING. — Halleran Agency sold for Wll- 
mot Y. Hallock, of Brooklyn, to Harry Klein 
the vacant plot, .50x100, on the north side of 
State St. .50 feet east of 14th st. Flushing. The 
buyer will improve the plot with a 7-room 
Colonial dwelling for his own occupancy. 

FLUSHING.- James Callin. builder, pur- 
chased through the Halleran Agency the vacant 
plot. 60x100, on the west side of 18th st, SO feet 
north of State st. Flushing. Mr. Callin will im- 
prove the plot with a Colonial dwelling to con- 
tain 11 rooms and 3 tiled bathrooms, built in 
fixtures, sun parlor and sleeping porch. The 
plot adjoins the residence of Robert Culhane. 
Corporation Counsel for Queens Borough. The 
seller was Charles H. Canner, of East Strouds- 
burg. Pa. 

FLUSHING.— Halleran Agency sold tor John 
U. Ferris to Henry L. Des Anges. in charge of 
the marine division of the Long Island Railroad, 
the 7-room Colonial dwelling, on a plot 60x100, 
with garage, at 80 North 22d st. Flushing. 

JAMAICA. — Among the recent sales ot lots in 
the Country Club district of Jamaica by the M. 
Morgenthau, Jr., Co. were the following : 4 lots 
to D. M. Lay. of this city ; 4 lots to William 
Petchler, of Brooklyn, and one lot to Miss 
Frederica De Wolfe, of this city. 



MANHATTAN BROKERS 



ORVILLE B. ACKERLY 

Appraiser of 

LONG ISLAND REAL PROPERTY 

Phone: Long^acre 2280 

243 West 34th Street, New York City 



ERNEST N. ABLER 

Upper East Side Property a Specialty 

ISM FIRST AVE., at 79th St. 

■atkbllslLad IMS Phone: BMnelHsdw H2S 



Telephone; Pennsylvania 0396-0397 

AMERICAN BUREAU 
OF REAL ESTATE 

All About Eeal Estate Everything — Everywhere 

MODERN "AiiliBlIfflic" SYSTEM 

18 West 34th Street 

Aster Court Building, New York 

Co-operation of Reliable Brokers Invited 



ARMSTRONG & ARMSTRONG 

Real Estate Agents and Brokera 

212 ST. NICHOLAS AVE.— Kmt Hehth Ave. und 
121st Stre«t Phona: Momicgside 1376 



EDMUND M. BRENNAN 

INCORPORATED 
Baal Eatata— Inaoranee 

11 KAST -Wfh ST. PI»i« 7694 



JAMES A. DOWD 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Renting — Management 

874 SIXTH AVENUE, above 49th Street 



JACOB FINKELSTEIN & SON 

Real Estate— Mortgages 
Specialists in the Bowery Section 

42 BOWERY Phone: Franklin 1810 



ROBERT G. GRUNERT 

SuccesBor to the 

O. A. CUSHMAN REALTY CORPORATION 

Real Estate — Management 

173 Ninth Ave., at 21st St. Phone: Chelsea 2841 



HARRIS EXCHANGE 

Real Estate — Mortgages 

Renting and Leasing of Stores and Lofts 

Times Building Broadway at 42d Street 

Phono: Bryant S10-H24 



HOLT & MERRALL, Inc. 

Industrial Real Estate 

342 MADISON AVE. Tel. Vanderhilt 4699 



WM. P. JONES & SON 

ESTABLIS lED 1835 

Real Estate & Insurance 

1358 BROADWAY 

Compr afith St, Phone : Fits Roy aiftT 



JOSEPH MILNER 

Real Estate 
EAST 41st STREET, NEW YORK 
Murray Hill 2619 



JOHN CONSTABLE MOORE 

REAL ESTATE 

15 EAST 40th ST. Vanderbilt 8189 



LEONARD MORGAN CO. 

Real Estate^Insurance — Estates Managed 

Gotham Bank Building, Columbus Circle 
Suite 504-5 Phone: Columbus 1646 



ARTHUR G. MUHLKER 

Real Estate — Insurance 

YorkTllle Section 

1112 PARK AVE.. NEAR 90TH ST. 

Phone: Lenox 2S35 



ARTHUR L. SHAW 

Washington Heights Specizdist 

4032 BROADWAY, ABOVE 169TH STREET 
Wadsworth 4150-4151 



SHERMAN & KIRSCHNER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

54 E. 109th STREET 
NEW YORK 

Tel. Harlem 9028-5863 



JAMES B. SPEYERS, INC. 
Real Estate 

CANADIAN PACIFIC BUILDING 
342 Madison Ave. Suite 814-SlB 



WILLIAMS-DEXTER CO., INC. 

Greenwich Vlllass RmI Estat* 
InstiraBce 

72 GREENWrrH AVE. rh.I«,-a WW 



18 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 1922 



REAL ESTATE NOTES. 



JAMES E. LINTON has removed his office 
from 2324 Seventh av to 2123 Fifth av. 

ALFRED OLENICH has removed his real es- 
tate and insurance office from 3 West 116th st 
to 121 West lltith St. 

HOLLLN'GS C. RENTON has removed his real 



estate and insurance office from 3 East 44th st 
to the Canadian Pacific building, 342 Madi- 
son av. 

THE RECENTLY REPORTED lease to the 
Star Co. of the 7 -sty industrial building 55-.j7 
Frankfort st also carries an option of purchase 
at :|;l3ll,uuii prior to June 30. i;i22. A rental of 
.flO.OUO is being paid annually. The Star Co. is 
the corporate name of William R. Hearst's pub- 
lications. 



REAL ESTATE STATISTICS 



MANHATTAN 



CONVEYANCES 

BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1921-1922 

Dec. 2S to 
Jan. 3 



1920-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



Total No 

Assessed Value 

No. with consideration 

Consideration 

Assessed Value 

Total No 

Assessed Value 

No. with consideration 

Consideration 

Assessed Value 



Total No. tor yr. . . 
Total Amt. for yr.. 



1S3 

$11,225,800 

20 

$775,425 

$955,500 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



251 

$15,135,100 

22 

«669,763 

$515,000 

Jan. 1 lo 

Jan. 4 



37 

$2,392,500 

5 

$317,.500 

$313,500 



1921 

10,713 
$65,325,692 



90 

$6,890,000 

4 

$303,500 

$154,000 



1921-1922 


1920-1921 


Dec. 28 to 
Jan. 3 


Dec. 20 to 
Jan. 4 


219 


121 


21 
$161,685 


15 

$130,122 


Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 


Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 4 


27 


34 


11 
$32,050 


7 
$63,395 



1921 
Dec. 27 to 



1920-1921 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



499 



503 



27 
$323,350 



61 
$214,949 



Jan. 1 to 
Dec. 31 



Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



78 



$50,714 



1920 



1921 



1920 1921 

15,721 10,969 12,069 40,067 

$108,771,094 $10,159,702 $9,321,536 $22,802,712 $28,811,06 



1920 
51,00 



MORTGAGES 



MANHATTAN 



BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



1020-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



1020-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



1921 

Dec. 27 lo 

Dec. 31 


1920-1921 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



lOLeli AU. 



10 u,iiii^;3 & iuo. ^y 

AiUOUUC 

iNo. at OVo 

AUIOUUL 

Jsio. at UV2V0 

Amouui 

No. al 0% 

Amount 

No. at 4y2Vo 

Amount 

No. at 4% 

Amount 

Unusual Rates 

Amount 

Interest not given. . 
Amount 



149 

$8,018,128 

22 

$3,179,500 

lis 

$5,124,628 

1 

$60,000 

3 

$370,250 



149 

$9,624 460 

IS 

$6,523,000 

109 

$7,471,960 

9 

$635,000 

5 

$110,000 



l.W 

$2,448,988 

7 

$29,700 

128 

$1,079,613 

2 

$12,500 

1 

$5,000 



59 

$557,698 

6 

$95,900 

38 

$393,518 

6 

$66,905 

4 

$15,200 



488 

$3,210,019 

86 

$605,350 

473 

$3,130,369 

13 

$77,250 

2 

$2,400 



377 

$1,723,268 

71 

$372,147 

320 

$1,530,401 

38 

$133,040 

4 

$5,750 



$2,000 

1 

$1,700,000 

24 

$861,250 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



3 

$120,750 

23 

$1,286,750 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 4 



1 

$1,500 

22 

$1,350,375 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



11 

$82,075 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 4 



Jan. 1 to 
Dec. 31 



$4,777 
11 
$39,300 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 3 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks & Ins. Co. 
Amount 



24 

$1,973,325 

2 

$64,000 



58 

$3 506,670 

4 

$438,000 



13 
$98,190 



$8,500 



16 
$148,000 



$6,500 



64 

$296,935 

8 

$39,300 



Total No. tor yr. .. 
Total Amt. for yr. . 



1921 

8,377 
$303,575,520 



1920 
10,724 
$351,904,762 



1921 



1921 1920 

9,222 8,417 35,315 
$66,347,008 $53,952,556 $186,819,731 



1920 
42,157 
$195,208,405 



MORTGAGE EXTENSIONS 

MANHATTAN 



BRONX 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



1920-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



1921-1922 
Dec. 28 to 



Jan. 



1920-1921 
Dec. 20 to 
Jan. 4 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks & Ins. Companies. 
Amount 



29 

$2,056,900 

19 

$1,918,850 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



53 

$3,266,750 

34 

$2,839,750 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 4 



19 

$381,250 

11 

$171, .500 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



15 

$365,000 

10 

$249,500 

Jan. 1 to 

. Jan. 4 



3 
$14,150 

2 
$10,600 



1921 

Total No. tor yr 2,197 

Total Amt. for yr $164,590,843 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks & Ins. Companies. 
Amount 



20 
$606,500 

15 
$466,500 

1920 

2,285 
$149,614,164 



4 
$90,500 

4 
$90,500 

1921 

744 
$17,698,491 



1 
$7,000 



1920 
800 
$17,345.82J 



MANHATTAN 



BRONX 



BUILDING PERMITS 

BROOKLYN 



Member Brooklyn Real EiUte Bmt4 

Money to Loan on First Mortgage 

Joseph T. McMahon 

REAL ESTATE and 
MORTGAGE LOANS 

188 and 190 MONTAGUE STREIT 

BROOKLYN 

Main •S34 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

COLLECTING, RENTING 
AND MANAGEMENT OF ESTATES 



MAX N. NATANSON 

BUYS AND SELLS 

IMPROVED 

MANHATTAN 

PROPERTY 

170 BROADWAY 



Suite 915-919 



Cortlandt 7637-7S3S 



MRS. GERRIT SMITH 

Member Real Estate Board of I\'ew York 

42 EAST 40th STREET 

CITY DEPARTMENT 

APARTMENTS AND HOUSES 

SOUND SHORE PROPERTY A SPECIALTV 



J. CLARENCE DAVIES 

Member Real Estate Board, N. T. 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

AUCTIONEER— BROKER 
APPRAISER— MORTGAGE LOANS 

Main Office: 149th St. and Third Ave. 

BRANCHES: 

32 Nassau Street 51 East 42nd Street 

Phone Connections 



Philip A. Payton, Jr., 
Company 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
AND BROKERS 

New York's Pioneer Negro 
Real Estate Agents 

127 West 141st Street 

Between Lenox and Seventh Avenues 
Telephone: Audubon (MS 



QUEENS 



RICHMOND 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 
Jan. 3 



1920-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



1920-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



1920-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



^ew Buildings. . . 

Cost 

Alterations 



9 

f891,063 

$246,470 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



6 
$526,500 
$457,650 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 4 



78 

$1,527,275 

$84,750 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



4 
$.30,200 
$7,900 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 4 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



1920-1921 

Dec. 29 to 

Jan. 4 



1921-1922 

Dec. 28 to 

Jan. 3 



131 

$3,245,470 

$95,900 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



34 

$437,850 
$133,175 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 4 



1920-1921 

Dec 29 to 

Jan. 4 



New Buildings. 

Cost 

Alteraflona . . . . 



3 

$55,300 
$72,950 



1921 
Total No. for yr. 841 

Total Amt. for yr $128,477,974 



$51,500 
$77,400 



1920 



11 
$155,400 



1 
$2,000 



457 
$1,721,521 

$146,785 
Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 3 



112 
$733,128 
$322,480 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 4 



78 
$242,540 



Jan. I to 
Jan. 3 



5 

$119,250 

$18,100 



58 
$177,400 
$9,706 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 4 



53 
$77,370 



$91,034,456 



1921 1920 1921 
3,408 1.012 9,414 
$72,186,729 $18,562,200 $100,994,655 



1920 1921 

7,645 14,639 
$58,593,453 $80,109,923 



12 

$19,000 

$5,125 

1920 

6,715 
$35,591,624 



1921 

2,811 
$8,868,648 



1920 
1,915 
$3,860,749 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



19 




Manhattan Building Costs in 1921 Aggregate $142,448,868 

Rudolph P. Miller, on Relinquishing Office of Superintendent of Buildings, 
Reviews Condition of Business, Only Once Before Exceeded in Amount 

RUDOLPH P. MILLER, for the last two years Superinten- general reorganization in the city government under the pres- 

dent of Buildings in Manhattan under Borough President ent Greater New York Charter, by which the present bureau 

Henry H. Curran, upon turning over the office to his sue- of buildings with the superintendent as its head was given 

cessor points out the great increase in the magnitude of build- jurisdiction in the borough of Manhattan alone, 

ing operations that have taken place although there has been "Previous to 1902, a real comparison with the present condi- 

an almost steady decrease, in recent years at least, in the tions is possible only for the period including the first six 

number of building erected each year. years of the table (1868-1873) when the City of New York still 

"With the close of the year 1921," said Supt. Miller, "the consisted solely of the island of Manhattan. In 1874, a portion 

several bureaus of buildings of the city close the second decade of what is now the Bronx, was annexed to the City of New 

of their existence as separate administrative bodies under the York, as the 23rd and 24th wards. From that time on, the 

direction of the respective presidents of the five boroughs. figures in the table include the operations of Manhattan Island 

It would seem interesting, therefore, to consider the present and such portions of the present borough of the Bronx as 

activities of the bureau of Manhattan in comparison with were at these different periods a part of the City of New 

those of the' past. York. 

"The building operations for the year 1921, up to and in- "The second period of eight years, (1874 to 1881) brings us 

eluding December 24th, may be briefly stated as follows: up to the time when a general revision of the building laws 

Application Building Estimated '^f. f ^."^^ ^^ "^« Legislature. From that time on, the periods 

Filed Contemplated Cost which have been selected are each ten years long and repre- 

Ah:ra?ionf'"^::::;:::::;;:;;:;:::::3.^8 3,!^' ^'^'.S ^^^^^t successive decades of building operations fitting in with 

■ ■ the time when the activities were transferred to the department 

■^°'"' '■'"' "'2^" $142,448,868 ^f buildings in 1892 and when the reorganization creating the 

"For the purpose of comparison with the activities of pre- separate borough bureaus was effected in 1902. 
vious years, I have prepared a table, divided into periods of "Only once before in the history of the bureau was the total 
ten years with the exception of the first and second periods cost of building operations for 1921 exceeded by that of any 
which are respectively six and eight years, of the building op- other year. That was in 1909, when the total operations for 
erations of the past so far as we have any official knowledge. the borough of Manhattan were $144,332,212. The nearest ap- 
This table is largely based on a statement in the annual report proach to the 1921 figures were thoie of the year before, 1920, 
of the bureau for the year 1910, showing the building opera- at $139,199,563. These statements apply even considering the 
tions for each year since 1868, prepared by Mr. William H. years preceding 1902 when the figures for the entire city 
Class, for 45 years a faithful employee and, at the time of (Manhattan and the Bronx) are included, 
his death at the close of the year 1909, chief clerk of the bu- "Taking new buildings apart from the total operations, to find 
reau. Unfortunately, the record for the years 1862 to 1867 is an excess over 1921, we must go back to the year 1909 again, 
missing and no longer available. The following table shows the most active year the borough of Manhattan or the former 
the periodic annual averages of building operations of the city ever experienced, when the estimated cost of new build- 
borough of Manhattan and the former city of New York: ings amounted to $131,246,483, and to 1905, the year just fol- 
NEW BUILDINGS lowing the opening of the first subway, when they totalled 
Applications Approx. Av. "^io"*' Total $124,746,552. Once during the period when the Bronx opera- 
Period Filed Cost per Bldg. Cost Cost tions were included, the new building operations exceeded 
1868-1873 2,089 $34,157,589 $16,300 $3,308,301 $37,465,890 fl,r,=<. «f 1051 r,orr,oKr ;^ 1QQQ tU^ «„,. • u- u ..u c ,. u -u 

1874-1881 1,784 2i;807,il5 Vaoo 3:438,566 25;245;680 those of 1921, namely, in 1899, the year m which the first build- 

M821891 3,354 54,981,181 16,400 6,184,628 61.165,809 ing code as a city ordinance was enacted and to anticipate 

1892-1901 3,157 79,401,1(>1 25,000 7,113,856 86,514,960 f. , ,/ ^. r, , r r^ .,j. ••" <'_"'• ^ P<i^c 

1902-1911 1,179 94,988,348 80,000 12,710,719 107,699,067 vi^nicn many applications were hied for buildings which were 

"l^'92i 438 74,027,572 140,000 18,555,923 92,583,496 never actually constructed. Another comparatively active year 

"The history of building inspection in the borough of Man- was that of 1901, when the operations were increased to a 

hattan dates back to 1862, completing with this year sixty great extent just preceding the enforcement of the present, 

years of activity. When first inaugurated, building inspection but then new, tenement house law. 

-was under the jurisdiction of a bureau of the fire department "Generally speaking, there had been a gradual advance in 

and the enforcement of building requirements continued under the value of building operations as shown by the figures of 

such direction until 1892 when by the enactment of Chapter the 1910 report. In the 70's there seems to have been a slump, 

275, Laws of 1892, a department of buildings was created, to which is reflected in the average for the period, and not till 

which was transferred the jurisdiction of the matters relating the recent war period, when there was a drop which left its 

theretofore administered by the bureau of inspection of build- impress on the ten-year period, has there been any marked 

ings of the fire department. At the same time all matters retrogression. While the cost of new buildings has increased 

under the control of the board of health in regard to light, during the history of the building department, there has, on 

ventilation, plumbing and drainage were delegated to the new the other hand, been a very decided decrease in the number 

department. This arrangement prevailed till 1898 when the of buildings erected, at least in recent years. The slump in 

consolidation of the five boroughs into the City of New York building operations already referred to as occurring in the 

was eff^ected. With this change came a new department of 70's, showed itself also in the number of buildings erected at 

buildings, headed by the board of buildings, consisting of that time. After that there was a gradual increase in the 

three commissioners, one of whom had jurisdiction over the latter part of the '90's, since wlien there has been a steady 

boroughs of Manhattan and the Bronx. In 1902, there was a (Continued on page 20) 



20 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 192? 



N. Y. City Contracts Awarded in 1921 Total $394,754,400 

Amount of Construction Work Undertaken by Builders 25 Per Cent. Greater 
Than 1920 and 41 Per Cent. Over 



IN 1921 New York City carried through the largest con- 
struction program on record for many years, according 
to the F. W. Dodge Company. The total amount of con- 
tracts awarded during the year was $394,754,400; This figure 
is 25 per cent greater than the total for 1920, which was $315,- 
048,650; it was alo 41 per cent greater than the total for 1919, 
which was $279,478,200. The actual volume of construction, 
distinguished from the dollar cost, was very considerably 
greater in 1921 than in either of the two previous years. 

Residential construction, greatly stimulated by the Tax Ex- 
emption Act, has been largely responsible for this record vol- 
ume of building. This class of construction accounted for 
$262,184,400, or exactly two-thirds of the total. 

In 1921, there were 56,356,700 square feet of residental floor 



tlie Figure for 1919 

space contracted for, compared with 15,142,000 square feet in 
1920, and 38,179,500 square feet in 1919. 

Second in importance to residential construction in 1921 
was the construction of commercial buildings, which accounted 
for $70,062,200, or 18 per cent of the year's total. Although this 
was considerably les's than the 1920 volume pf construction of 
this class, it was greater than the corresponding amount for 
1919. 

The total amount of contracts awarded in December was 
$44,071,500, an increase of 17 per cent over the November fig- 
ure. This increase, unusual for the closing month of the year, 
taken with the fact that there is still a great quantity of con- 
struction planned which has not yet been started, is an indi- 
cation of a healthy volume of activity during the coming 
year. 



Comparative 


Table Showi 

1919— 

New 
Floor Space 
in Sq. Feet 

13,288,900 

1,082,000 

557,900 

7,314,500 

• 74,700 
20,300 

117,500 

580,100 
38,179,500 

1,690,200 

62,905,600 


ing Number i 

Valuation 

$62,791,420 

7,391,759 

3,239,265 

25,730,235 

3,382,380 
303,700 

25,334,388 

10,393,600 
134,492,180 

6,419,300 


and Va lue 


! of Contracts Awarded in 


New YorL 


: City. 




Number of 
Classification Projects 

Business Buildings 1,325 

Educational Builidings. 85 
Hospitals, Institutions.. 47 
Industrial Buildings . . 351 
Military and Naval 

Buildings 34 


Number of 
Projects 

1,121 
13 
90 

283 

24 
46 

307 

41 
1,736 

111 

3,890 


New 
Floor Space 
in Sq. Feet 

15,778,800, 

1,767,000 

836.200 

7,435,200 

34,000 
738,500 

545,500 

163,100 

15,142,000 

1,545,800 

43,985,500 


Valuation 

$104,219,500 

14,293,400 

7,199,200 

26,224,500 

1,657,700 
7,475,400 

59,793,450 

2,256,500 

81,650,200 

10,278,800' 


Number of 
Projects 

1,150 
90 

48 
208 

8 
14 

91 

76 

4,89i 

137 

6,721 


New 
Floor Space 
in Sq. Feet 

11,979,000 
2,475,000 
1,304,900 
2,051,900 

11,600 
130,600 

257,700 

659,700 

56,356,700 

1,734,000 


Valuation 

$70,062,200 

12,359,400 

8,265,800 

10,386,100 

. 107,700 


Public Buildings 22 

Public Works and Pub- 
lic Utilities 237 

Religious and Memo- 
rial Buildings SO 

Residential Buildings . .4,275 
Social and Recreational 
Buildings 110 


1,329,500 

13,575,600 

4,563,800 

262,184,400 

11,919,900 


Total 6,536 


$279,478,227 


$315,048,650 


76,961,200 


$394,754,400 



Federal Census Shows Industrial Growth of Queens 



THE industrial importance of Queens Borough can be 
best gauged by the facts disclosed in the figures re- 
cently published by the United States Census, showing 
the amount of manufacturing in each State in the Union for 
the year 1919," Ray Palmer, Chairman of the Industrial Pro- 
motion Committee of the Queensboro Chamber of Commerce 
stated today. "These figures show that Queens Borough ex- 
ceeded nineteen different states in the amount of capital in- 
vested in manufacturing, fifteen states in the total value of 
products and eight states in the number of industrial estab- 



lishments. Moreover, there were fourteen states which had a 
less number of industrial employees and sixteen states in which 
a less amount was paid for salaries and wages of industrial 
employees." 

The states which Queens Borough surpassed in the amount 
of capital invested in manufacturing are Arizona, Arkansas, 
Colorado, Delaware, Florida, Idaho, Kentucky, Mississippi, 
Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Wyoming, North 
Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah and Ver- 
mont. 



Manhattan Building Costs in 1921 Aggregate $142,448,868 



(Continued from page 19) 
drop to 1906 from which time on the number of new building 
operations were about the same each year till the war broke 
out. 

"On the other hand the average cost of new buildings has 
proceeded in the other direction. It kept fairly steady from 
the beginning to early in the '90's, when it began to rise. At 
the end of that period, the average cost of a new building was 
about $60,000. This condition continued along until about 1907 
when quite suddenly the average cost of a new building nearly 
doubled, remaining in that condition for a period of about 10 
years, when it rose again, due to high building costs. 

"For 1921 the estimated cost of alterations constituted about 
WAfo of the total value of building operations. Comparing 
this with previous periods, there is indicated a gradual rise in 
this proportion; in other words, and generally speaking, as 
new building operations decreased in number, alterations in- 
creased. Looking back over the table of the 1910 report, it 
appears that there has been always a considerable reconstruc- 
tion going on in Manhattan. The earlier years of the table 



show that the numbers of alterations are not much diflferent 
from the numbers of new building operations. Since the 
record of building operations has been separately kept for the 
borough of Manhattan, it appears that the number of altera- 
tions far exceeds that of new buildings; that is, Manhattan is 
being steadily reconstructed." 



Figures of the United States Geological Survey show that the 
production of cement for the first eleven months of 1921 
amounted to 91,734,000 barrels, and shipments to 91,354,000 bar- 
rels. This latter figure is about 1 per cent, under the record 
shipments for the first eleven months of 1920, and about 9 
per cent greater than the average for the first eleven months 
of years 1917 to 1921. Production of cement during Novem- 
ber, amounting to 8,921,000 barrels, is a falling off from the 
record figure of October, 10,506,000 barrels, but is about 17 per 
cent higher than the average November of years 1917 to 1921 
inclusive. Production for eleven months was only one-half 
per cent below the high record of 1920, and is 11 per cent 
greater than the average. 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



21 



Recent Awards Indicate Active Building Next Spring 



statistics of Final Week of 1921, Tabulate. 
Improvement in Commercial 

MAINTAINING the high average of the past four or 
five months the building year closed with a record of 
achievement much better than w?as anticipated during 
the early weeks of 1921. The final week of the year just closed 
was noteworthy for the number of new building projects being 
planned by local architects and also for its record of opera- 
tions actually placed under contract during the last few days 
of the old year. 

Building statistics for New York State and New Jersey, 
north of Trenton, for the closing week of 1921, show that 
architects and engineers had reported work on 342 plans for 
new structural projects, at an estimated value of $13,373,000. 
These figures, as tabulated by the F. W. Dodge Company also 
show the award of 261 contracts, the total value of which was 
approximately $14,236,300. 

Despite the fact that residential construction continues as 
the dominating factor in local building there has recently been 
a very decided improvement in the general building outlook 
and as a result the future is considered bright for all depart- 



1 by F. W. Dodge Company, Show Steady 
and Industrial Construction 

ments of the industry throughout the coming year 

Among the 342 operations for which plans were announced 
during the final week of 1921 were 57 business and commercial 
projects such as stores, lofts, office buildings, banks, commer- 
cial garages, etc., $1,420,500; 10 educational buildings, $1,247,- 
000; 1 hospital, $7,500; 10 factory and industrial buildings, $568,- 
000; 8 public works and public utilities, $87,000; 7 rehgious and 
memorial buildings, $391,000; 242 residential projects such as 
apartments, flats and tenements and one and two-family 
dwellings, $9,360,000 and 7 social and recreational buildings, 
$292,000. 

■ The list of 261 projects for which contracts were awarded 
during the last week of 1921 included 36 business buildings 
of various types, $1,080,500; 11 educational projects, $1,122,800; 
10 factory and industrial buildings, $597,000; 2 military and na- 
val structures, $15,000; 1 public building, $700,000; 5 public 
wor'<s and public utilities, $170,500; 1 religious edifice, $13,000; 
192 residential buildings, $10,413,500, and 3 social and recrea- 
tional projects, $124,000. 



PERSONAL AND TRADE 
NOTES. 



■Walter F. Plcuthner, architect, an- 
nounces the removal of his office from 599 
Fifth avenue to 132 East 40th street. 

AIl-Metal Sales Company has moved 
from 70 Roger savenue, Broolilyn, to 3fiU 
Broadway. Manhattan. 

Clinton & Russell, architects, have 
moved their offices from the Mutual Life 
Building to 100 Maiden Lane. 
Trade & Tech Soc Events Heller Uf 

Robert D. Snod^rass has been made 
vice-president in charge of engineering 
of Hamilton & Chambers Co., Inc., steel, 
29 Broadway. 

Metropolitan Electric Appliance Com- 
pany, 246 Third avenue, electrical jobbe:-. 
announces a change of name to tli.i 
Metropolitan Electrical Distributors. 

William F. McCtilloch, architect, an- 
nounces that he has become associated 
with the firm of Godwin & SuUivant, with 
offices at 350 Madison avenue. 

Holopliane Glass Company. Inc., hd.s 
moved its New York office and showroom 
from 340 Madison avenue to the Canadian 
Pacific Building, 342 Madison avenue. 

J. Artliiir Olson, former purcliasing 
agent for the Fred P. French Company, 
has formed a partnership- with his brother, 
"W. O. Olson, and will do a general con 
trading business under the firm name of 
N. O. Olson & Bro., 210 Westervelt avenue, 
New Brighton, Staten Island. 

Apex Metal Weather Strip Co. and the 
Roebuck AVeather Strip tfc Wire Screen Co. 
have moved their offices from 503 Fifth 
avenue to better equipped and more com- 
modious quarters in the Astor Trust 
Building, 501 Fifth avenue. 

Bullock Manufacturing Company, manu- 
facturers of lighting equipment and fix- 
tures, has moved its plant from 408 West 
13th street to 35G-358 West 40th street, 
where there is approximately four times 
the amount of manufacturing space. 

Charles R. Leo, formerly general mana- 
ger of the Palmer Lime & Cement Co., 103 
Park avenue, has been elected vice-presi- 
dent of the company, taking the place of 
Carlton PI. Palmer, resigned. C. G. King, 
formerly .superintendent of the plant, was 
elected general manager. 

Structural AVaterprooflng Company. Jo- 
seph Rose, president, announces the form- 
ation of an allied company, the J. Rose 
Concrete Co.. Inc., to engage in cement 
flnish and plain and reinforced concrete 
work. Offices are at 17 East 42d street. 



Principles for Standard Contract Approved 

General principles for the formulation of 
one standard form of contract, to supplant 
the 200 various styles of contract now in 
common use, and which can be made uni- 
versally practical for all branches of the 
construction industry, were approved at 
the final session of the recent joint confer- 
ence of engineers, architects and contrac- 
tors at the Department of Commerce. 

Gen. R. C. Marshall, Jr., presented a plan 
for this standard form and a list of sub- 
jects w^hich would cover ground common 
to all construction projects. 

A sub-committee consisting of Gen. 
Marshall for the Associated General Con- 
tractors of America; W. S. Parker, for the 
American Institute of Architects, and W. 
D. Faucette, of the American .Railway En- 
gineering Association, was appointed to 
write out the first tentative draft of the 
standard form and submit it for correction 
and approval to the full conference at its 
next meeting, the last of January. 

A list of over 200 different forms of 
construction contracts, which now are in 
general use and which always have been 
the source of endless litigation, were 
placed in evidence, and it was found that 
two-thirds of all the clauses they set forth 
could be condensed within the scope of the 
proposed "agreement." Such a simplifica- 
tion of contracts has been much discussed, 
but never attempted before. The confer- 
ence plans to devise an addenda of special 
conditions for each industry, to be at- 
tached to the standard contract form. 



TRADE AND TECHNICAL 
SOCIETY EVENTS. 



Honors for Downtown Buildings. 

The Downtown League, through its com- 
mittee', consisting of J. Louis Schaefer, 
Richard S. Elliott and Charles F. Noyes, 
recently awarded to the Lawyers Mort- 
gage Company first honors for construct- 
ing in 1921 the mo.st representative and 
best downtown offlie building; to the In- 
ternational Mercantile Marine Company 
the first award for an altered building-, 
and this award covered their beautiful 
building at 1 Broadu-ay, formerly known 
as the "Washington Building." 

The second award for reconstruction 
was made to Errett, the Lily Cup man, for 
the alteration of an unattractive saloon 
and tenement property at the northwest 
corner of Fulton and Water streets into 
a clean, little office Ijuilding, adding dig- 
nity to the neighborliood. 

In awarding first lienors to the Lawyers 
Mortgage Company i nnsideration was giv- 
en to the exceedingly artistic lines and 
the fact that this or ration probably more 
typically amplifies tlie buy-for-occupancy 
movement and the ni'ivement to hold prop- 
erty for such purposes in the downtown 
district than any other builciing. 



Building Managers' and Owners' Asso- 
ciation of New York will hold its regular 
monthly dinner meeting at the Advertising 
Club, 47 East 25th street, Tuesday even- 
ing January 10. The speaker of the even- 
ing will be announced later. 

American Society of Heating and Venti- 
lating Engineers will hold its annual 
meeting in New York City, January 24 
to 26. 1922, inclusive. 

National A.ssociation of Building Trades 
Employers' Associations will hold its an- 
nual convention at Cleveland, Ohio, Janu- 
ary 12-14, 1922, inclusive. 

National Brick ]>Ianufaeturers' Associa- 
tion will hold its annual convention at 
the Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, Ind., 
January 23-28. 1922. 

Retail Lumber Dealers' Association of 
Neiv York State will hold its annual meet- 
ing and convention at the Powers Hotel, 
Rochester, January 14-21, 1922. 

Metropolitan Hardware Association will 
hold its annual banquet at the. Hotel Com- 
modore, Wednesday evening, January 18. 
1922. H. A. Cornell is chairman of the 
dinner committee. 

Brooklyn Manufnctmers* Industrial Ex- 
liosition will be held at the Twenty- 
third Regiment Armory, Bedford and At- 
lantic avenues. January 11 to 22, 1922, In- 
clusive. 

American Institute of Architects has 

selected Chicago as the city in which to 
hold its 1922 convention, which will be 
held early in the spring. Further details 
will be announced later. 

New Y'ork State Retail Hardware A«>«>- 
ciation will hold its annual convc ntlon 
and exhibition at Rochester. N. Y., Febru- 
ary 21 to 24. inclusive. Exhibition at Ex- 
hibition Park; headquarters and sessions 
;i t the Powers Hotel. 

Common Brick Manufacturers' Assocl- 
.-ilion of America will hold its annual con- 
^ention at the Statler Hotel, St. Louis, 
Mo., January 30 to February 1, 1922. In- 
dications are that this convention will 
draw a larger attendance than the his- 
toric gathering in New York City last 
January. 

Associated General Contractors of 
America will hold its .annual convention 
at Cleveland. January 17 to 19, 1922, In- 
clusive. Speakers of national prominence 
will feature the opening session of this 
convention. Reports of standing commit- 
tees will be received and discussed 



22 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 1922' 




WHILE Important developments in the 
building situation liave been ladiing-, 
tlie first wfel< of 1922 iias ended with a 
feeling throughout the industry that the 
weelvs to come -will be far different from 
those of last year, when the future was 
clouded with doubt as to what was to come 
For the most part, the local building in- 
dustry is now optimistic, as the improve- 
ment in construction lias been marked dur- 
ing the past three or four months and as 
there is a vast amount of new building 
being planned the future is promising. 

Although there is a possibility that resi- 
dential construction will show somewhat 
of a falling- off during the coming building 
season, there is now almost every assur- 
ance that an increase in commercial and 
industrial work will more than make uji 
for the loss. Reports from architects and 
engineers indicate a slow but steady im- 
provement in the general building situa- 
tion. 

An early settlement of the wage scale 
controversy would do more to improve the 
building outlook than any other single fac- 
tor, but it is liltely that it will be at least 
March 1 'before a new agreement is con- 
summated. 

C: iiiiiii>ii nrick. — The combination of hol- 
idays and unusually cold weather has re- 
sult -d in greatly curtailed activity in tlie 
New York wliolesale market for comirion 
brick. Buying was relatively light as com- 
pared with the average weekly sales for 
the previous wt-eks. but the business of 
the week was fair when the business of 
1: st year at this time is considered. Iii- 
(!i iry is good, however, and indicative of 
an active brick market throughout the re- 
maining winter and earl>- spring. Because 
the Hudson River is ice-bound nortli off 
Newburgh Bay the arriv.-^ls this weelv were 
very light. Only five barge loads were 
docked in New York, and thees all were 
from tlie Haverstraw district. Common 
bricl^ arrivals from Hudson River points 
are lilvely to be negligible until the ice 
breaks up. but there is an ample supply 
in the market and in the yards of the deal- 
ers to supply all immediate requirements. 
Common brick prices are unchanged, with 
the range from $14 to .?14.50 a thousand to 
dealers in cargo lots, according to quality. 
Suniiiiary. — . Transactions in the North 
River brick market for the weeli ending 
Thursday. January 5, 1922. Condition of 
marl^et: Demand light; prices firm and un- 
changed. Quotations: Hudson Rivers, $14 
to $14..')fl a thousand to dealers in cargo 
lots alongside dock. Number of cargoes 
arrived, 5; sales, 16. Distribution: Manhat- 



tan, 5; Bronx, 1; Brooklyn, 8; New Jersey. 
1; Flushing, 1. Remaining unsold in tlie 
New York wholesale market, 34. 

Builders' Hardware. — There is every 
promise of long- continued activity in this 
line, as building prospects are excellent. 
There are still many operations in the 
final stages of completion and plans now 
in preparation indicate one of the most ac- 
tive buildinu seasons soon to start. Hard- 
ware prices are quite steady, but as a num- 
ber of tile leading manufactui'ers now 
have their plants on a full production 
basis, it is possible that some further re- 



ductions may be announced during the 
next month or so. 

]Reiiif<»roing- Bar.s. — The new year opened 
witli demand extremely light, but a fair 
outlook tor further business. The general 
building situation is show-ing steady im- 
provement which will naturally be shortly 
reflected in all material requirements. 
Plans now on the boards indicate consid- 
erable new industrial construction to bo 
undertaken this year. Prices are faily 
steady. 

Structural Steel.^Although actual book- 
ings have been light the general tone of 



BUILDING COMMODITY PRICES 



CURRENT prices for building materials 
and supplies as quoted by leading 
dealers and jobbers in the city for delivery 
in New l^ork. 

Note — Price changes are indicated by 
bold-face type. 

Brick (Wholesale, on Dock. N. Y.), per 
thousand: 

For delivered prices in Greater New 
York add cartage, handling, plus 10 per 
cent. 
Hudson River best grades. . $14.00 to $14.50 

Raritan No quotation 

Second-hand brick, per load 

of 3,000, delivered $45.00 to 

Face Brick — Delivered on job in New 
Y'ork ; 

Rough Red $45.00 to 

Smooth Red 45.00 to 

Rough Buff 50.00 to 

Smooth Buff 50.00 to 

Rough Gray 53.00 to 

Smooth Gray 53.00 to 

Colonials 45.00 to 

Cement — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan. Bronx. Brooklyn and Queens: 

Domestic Portland cement, per bbl..$2.S0 
Rebate for bags, 10c. each. 

Gravel — Delivered at job site in Manhat- 
tan and Bronx: 

IV'-in., Manhattan deliveries, per cu. 

yd J4.25 

Bronx deliveries 4.25 

%-in., Manhattan deliveries 4.25 

Bronx deliveries 4.25 

Note — Prices for deliveries in Brooklyn 
and Queens are approximately the same 
as for Manhattan, except where job is lo- 
cated at a great distance from the water 
front, in which case prices will be slightly 
higher. 

Grit — Delivered at job site in Manhattan 
and Bronx: 

Manhattan deliveries $3.50 

Bronx deliveries 3.50 



Hollow Tile — 

Exterior — Not used in Manhattan; quota- 
tions only on specific projects. 

Interior — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan, south of 125th street. 

3x12x12 split furring $0.12 per sq. ft. 

3x12x12 0.12 per sq. ft. 

4x12x12 0.17 per sq. ft. 

6x12x12 0.19 per sq. ft. 

Note — For deliveries north of 125th St., 
Manhattan, and in Brooklyn. Bronx and 
Queens, prices job site are slightly higher, 
according to location of work, which 
varies trucking charges. 
Lath — 
Eastern Spruce delivered 

at job site in Manhattan. 

Bronx, Brooklyn and 

Queens $10.50 per 1,000- 

Lime — 

Delivered at job site in IVfanhattan. 
Bron.x, Brooklyn and Queens; 
Finishing Lime (Standard in 

300-lb. barrel) $4.70 per bbl. 

Common Lime (Standard 300- 
lb. barrel) 4.40 per bbl. 

Finishing Lime (Standard in 
Hvdrate Finishing, in paper 

bags 24. 00 per ton 

Hydrate Common, in cloth 

bags 22.50 per ton 

Plaster — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan. 
Bronx. Brooklyn and Queens: 
Neat Wall Cement, in cloth 

bags $21.00 per ton 

Brown Mortar, in cloth bags. 18.00 per ton 
Lath Mortar, in cloth bags... 18.00 per ton 
Finishing Plaster, in cloth 

bags 24.50 per ton 

Rebate for returned bags. 15c. per bag 
Finishing Plaster (250-lb. 

barrel) $4.00 per bbl. 

Finishing Plaster (320-lb 

barrel ) B.35 per bbl. 

Plaster Blocks— 

2-in. (solid) per sq. ft $0.17 to 0.19- 

3-in. (hollow) per sq. ft 0.17 to 0.19 



Wolff Gas Fired Steam Radiator 
Solves Your Heating Problem 



Costs Less to Install. 



Costs No More to Operate. 



Gives Absolute Satisfaction. 
LET US TELL YOU HOW 

A. H. WOLFF GAS RADIATOR CO 

4 Great Jones Street, New York 

Telephone: Spring 4333 ESTABLISHED 1891 




Keen CompFtition and thr- Great Struggle for Business has brought into the New York 
Market a Light Weight Extra Heavy Cast Iron Pipe. 

We are selling Full Weight. New York Regulation, Extra Heavy. Cast Iron Pipe. 

Wr rio not Substitute, but sell Full. Hortesi Weioht 

JOHN A. MURRAY & SONS, INC. 

'■The Htniae ot Relinhility" 
310-312 WEST 39TH STREET, NEW YORK 



BUILDING 

and PERMANENT 

LOANS 

On one and two family houses 
and five-story walk-ups in 
Long Island City ; 75% sub- 
ordination on the land ; MOST 
LIBERAL BUILDING PROP- 
OSITION EVER OFFERED; 
unlimited demand for houses 
and apartments; 141 houses al- 
ready sold for $1,744,500. 

3^icfeert=?Prottin 
a^ealtp Co. 

Tel. Vandcrbilt 9484. 52 Vanderbilt Av. 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD A N D GUIDE 



23. 



MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 



the local market for fabricated structural 
steel is i^ood because of the large amount 
of high class business that is scheduled 
to be released very soon. Several very im- 
portant building' projects have been placed 
under contract during the past week and 
othere are pending'. In all, their steel re- 
quirements will amount to a most satisfac- 
tory tonange. There was a slow but very 
consistent improvement in the fabricated 
steel business throughout the latter half 
of 1921. and there is now every prospect 
of a continued improvement in the demand 
that will shortly bring' this industry back 



to its normal tonnage basis. There has 
lately been some evidence of a slight 
wi-akening in shape prices, but with a 
jump in demand that is bound to come 
upon the release of the tonnages no'ft^ 
pending, it is likely that this tendency will 
be arrested. Structural steel, fabricated 
and erected in commercial buildings, is 
now generally quoted at $62 to $G5 per 
ton, according to type of operation. 

Ca.st Iron Pipe. — The new year opened 
with conditions fairly satisfactory as far 
as manufacturers of this commodity are 
concerned. The majority of the local 



IN THE METROPOLITAN MARKETS 



Plii.ster Board — 

Delivered at Job site in Manliattan, 
Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. ^^^ 

27x48x1/2 in $0.38 each 

32x36xJ4 in 0;22 each 

32x36x% in 0.24 each 

32x36xi,i in 0.30 each 

Sand — 

Delivered at job in 

Manhattan $1.80to- 

Deliverod at job in 

Bronx 1.80 to - 



• per cu. yd. 

• per cu. yd. 

.$5.00 percu. yd. 



White Sand — 

Delivered in Manhattan. 
Broken Stone — 

l'/2-in., Manhattan delivery . $4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

%-in., Manhattan delivery. . 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Building Stone — 

Indiana limestone, per cu. ft $1.63 

KentucUv limestone, per cu. ft 2.27 

Briar Hill sandstone, per cu. ft 1.68 

Gray Canyon sandstone, per cu. ft. . . . 1.65 

Buff Wakeman, per cu. ft 1.90 

Buff Mountain, per cu. ft 1.80 

North River bluestone, per cu. ft.... 1.85 

Seam face granite, per sq. ft 1.20 

South Dover marble (promiscuous 

mill block), per cu. ft 2.25 

White Vermont marble (sawed) New 

York, per cu. ft 3.00 

Structural Steel — 

Plain material at tidewater; cents per 
pound: 
Beams and channels up to 14 

in l.SSc. to 2.03c. 

Beams and channels over 14 

in l.SSc. to 2.03c. 

Angles. 3x2 to 6x3 l.SSc. to 2.03c. 

Zees and tees l.SSc to 2.03c. 

Lumber — 

Wholesale prices, New York. 
Yellow pine, merchantable 1905, f. o. b., 
N. Y.: 



3x4 to 14x14, 10 to 20 ft $41.00 to $5a. 00 

Hemrock, Pa., f. o. b., N. Y., 

base price, per M 37.50 to 

Hemlock, W. Va., base price, 

per M 37.00 to 

(To mi.xed carg-o price add freight, $1.50.) 

Spruce, Eastern, random car- 
goes, narrow (delivered) . . 30.00 to 

Wide cargoes 33.00 to 

Add $1.00 per M for each inch in width 

over 12 inches. Add $1.00 per M for every 

two feet over 20 ft. in length. Add $1.00 

per M for dressing. 

Cypress Lumber (by car, f. o. b.. N. Y.): 

First and seconds, 1-in. .. .$110.00 to 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 

1 Hearts to 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 

1 Prime to 

Quartered Oak — to $166. Ut) 

Plain Oak to 136.00 



Fl4iorinp:: 

AV'Iiile oak, quart'd sel. 
lied oak. quart'd select. 



■to $87.50 
-to 87.60 



Maple No. 1 65.00 to 

Yellow pine No. 1 common 

flat 55.00 to 

N. C. iiine flooring Nor- 

folks 65.00 to 



Wiiido^v Glass — 

OfBcial discounts from manufacturers' 

lists: 
Single strength, A quality, first three 

brackets 82% 

B grade, single strength, first three 

brackets 82% 

Grades A and B, larger than the first 

three brackets, single thick 82% 

Double strength, A quality 82% 

Double strength, B quality 85% 

Linseed Oil — 

City brands, oiled, 5 bbls. lot. $0.72 to $0.74 
Less than 5 bbls 0.75 to 0.77 

Turpentine— ^^^j 

Turpentines $0.80 to$0.82 



plants are producing at approximately 
.'■(^venty-five per cent, of capacity, where- 
as one year ago but one or two plants had 
orders on hand that kept their production, 
at more than twenty-flve per cent, of 
capacity. Last year at this time there was 
but little nCAV business in sight, but for 
the coming months excellent business is 
lircdicted, as several important municipal 
orders are pending and it is quite certain 
that private buyers will come into the 
market within the next few weeks with 
orders that will involve a relatively large 
total tonnage. According to recent orders 
for deliveries during the next two months 
or so bviyers of pipe are not anticipating 
any important drop in prices. As a mat- 
ter of fact the price situation is remark- 
ably firm, with New York quotations as 
follows: 6 in. and larger, $47.30 per net 
ton; 4 in. and 5 in., $52.30; 3 in., $62,30, 
with Class A and gas pipe $4 extra per 
ton. 

Kleetriviil Su|>i>lle.s. — It will be some- 
what difficult to describe the electrical 
supply market situation until after the in- 
ventory season is past and contractors and 
dealers begin to buy again for stock. Con- 
.«uming demand is steady and good and in 
view of the amount of active and prospec- 
tive building it is likely to improve as the 
year goes on. Demand for wiring mate- 
rials is particularly good at present and In 
geneial the outlook for this industry is 
bright. Prices are steady and no changes 
of importance have been deported during 
the past week, but there are some who an- 
ticipate a further favorable revision in 
discounts at an early date. 

Window Glass. — Demand continues 
strong, and there is every prospect of an 
increase in the consumption requirements 
because of the large amount of new con- 
struction now scheduled for an early start. 
Although it is not anticipated that the 
house Ijuilding program of 1922 will be 
quite as extensive as it was last year, it 
.otill will involve a tremendous total out 
lay and there is a vast volume of non-resi- 
dential building now projected that will 
make up for any drop in the former class. 
At present glass prices are steady and no 
changes are anticipated before February 
1. 

IVsiils. — No changes of consequence have 
occurred in the local nail market during 
the past week. Demand is fair and inquir- 
ies denote a continuation of fairly active 
business. Stocks are adequate and prices 
firm and practically unchanged. New 
York quotations are as follows: $3.50 to 
$3.70 base, per keg for wire nails and $4.25 
to $4.45 base, per keg, for cut nails. 




Face 

Enameled 

Fire 



As manufacturers of BRICK for thirty years, 
we have a record of repeat orders that affords 
you a 100% guarantee of satisfactory service. 
To the service given by our Face, Enameled 
and Fire BRICK, is added the service we 
render in shipment and delivery. Prompt 
shipments on any size contracts in any range 
of shade or texture, at fair prices and of 
first-class quality. 



BRICK 

FACE BRICK 

in Buffs, Ironspots, Browns and Mingled Effects, in full range or any 
individual Shade or Texture. 

ENAMELED BRICK 

in White and Mottled Effects, first and second quality for interiors, 
exteriors and courts. 

FIRE BRICK 
and fire clay of highest grades. 

Loivest market prices. May we estimate for youf 



American Enameled Brick & Tile Company 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE, NEW YORK 



Telephone Murray Hill 8787-8788 



24 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 1922 



A Clean Building 




We clean masonry of every type. 

A clean building will sell or rent as ■^jell 
as a new building. In appearance it i» * 
new building, for cleaning restorei the 
original freshness of color. 

Estimates for cleaning — and pointing, il 

desired— submitted on request. 

Atlantic Terra Cotta Co. 

Cleaning Department 

350 Madison Avenue 

Telephone: Vanderbilt 99S0 



CONTCMPLATED 

CONSTRUCTION. 



J. P. Duffy Co. 

Flue Pipe 
Terra Cotta Blocks 

Gypsum Blocks 
Masons' Materials 

138th Street and Park Avenue 

BROOKLYN 
SOth-Slst Streets and 2nd Avenue 

QUEENS 
Jackson Avenue and Madden Street 



FOR 

PAINTING, DECORATING 
and PLASTERING 

Consult 

LESCH & JOHNSON 

261 East Fordham Road N«w York 

Telephone: Fordham 9345 



TELEPHONES : H AK1.EM [ p" 

FRANK U. ROSS 

Contractor and Dealer in 

TILE and MARBLE 

8« EAST nSTH STREET NEW YORK 



POMEROY 

FIRE RETARD ANT 
WINDOWS 

Built in the belief that the BEST hollow 
metal fire retardant window is the only 
SAFE fire retardant window for a builder 
to use or for a manufacturer to sell. 

S. H. POMEROY CO., Inc. 

282-96 East 134th Street NEW YORK 

Phone Melrose 6104 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

MADISON AV. — Geo. F. Pelham. 20U West 'lid 
St, has plans in progress for an 11-sty brick and 
steel apartment house, 101x110 ft, with stores, at 
the northeast corner of Madison av and 64th st 
for Albert Sokolski, 2i;0 Broadway, owner. Cost, 
.i;i,i«IO.00O. 

MORRIS AV.— David S. Lang, 110 West 34th 
St, has plans in progress for a 5-sty brick and 
limestone apartment house, 97x114 ft, on the 
west side of Morris Av Bast, 72 ft north of 
East lS4th St. for Marcus Buda Construction Co., 
M. Buda. president, 18UU Lexington av, owner 
and builder. Cost. $180,000. 

WEBB AV. — John P. Boylaud. 120 East Ford- 
ham rd, has plans in progress for a 5-sty brick 
and limestone apartment house, 5Ux03 ft, on the 
east side of Webb av. 100 ft north of Devoe ter- 
race, for Tee Taw Realty Corp., Jas- Murray, 
Jr., president, 113S St. Nicholas av, owner and 
builder. Cost, $100,000. 

ISSTH ST.— Chas. Kreymborg, 2334 Marion av, 
has plans in progress for two 5-sty brick, lime- 
stone and terra cotta apartments, one 115x01 ft 
and one S0xll3 ft, at the southeast corner of 
ISSth St and University av lor Chas. Mark 
Realty Co., care of Philip Stein, 370 East 14t)th 
St, owner. Cost, .$32."i.0U0. Owner will take bids 
on separate contracts shortly. 

SHERMAN AV.— Chas. Kreymborg, 2534 
Marion av. has plans in progress for a 5-st> 
brick, limestone and terra cotta apartment 
house, 75x100 ft, on Sherman av, north of 167th 
St, for Frank Willetts, 280 Madison av, owner. 
Cost, $125,000. 

HALLS AND CLUBS. 

40TH ST.— George H. Streeton, 115 East 34th 
St. has completed plans for alterations to the 1- 
sty brick gymnasium, 30x98 ft, at 507-9-11 West 
4Uth St for the Roman Catholic Church of St. 
Raphael, Rev. M. J. Duffy, rector, 502 West 41st 
St, owner. Cost, $2."i.000. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

1S3TH ST.— John De Hart, 1031 Fox st, has 
completed preliminary plans for a 2-sty brick 
and concrete garage. 50x60 ft, at the corner of 
l.S5th st and Broadway for I. Langner, 700 
Trinity av, owner and builder. Cost, .?!)0.U00. 
STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

3GTH ST.— Schwartz & Gross, 347 5th av, have 
plans in progress for a 14-sty brick and lime- 
stone store and loft building. 75x100 feet, at 142- 
48 West 3Gth st for Julius Tishman & Sons, Inc., 
2S0 Madison av, owner and builder. Cost, $1,- 
000,000. 

171ST ST. — Chas. Kreymborg. 2534 Marion av, 
has completed plans for a group of 1-sty brick 
stores, 190x190 ft. in the south side of 171st st 
and St. Nicholas av for G. L. Lawrence, 144 
West 72d st, owner and builder 

231ST ST.— Chas. Kreymborg, 2834 Marion 
av, has plans in progress for seven 1-sty brick 
and stone stores, 28x100 ft, at the southeast 
corner of 231st st and Albany rd for Superior 
Construction Co., 132 Nassau st, owner. Cost, 
.f 15 .000. 

Bronx 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

HULL AV — John P. Boyland, 120 East Ford- 
ham rd, has plans in progress for a' 5-sty brick, 
limestone and terra cotta apartment, 100x100 ft. 
on the west side of Hull av, 125 ft south of 209th 
St. for John O'Leary, 2218 University av. owner. 
Cost. $200,000. Owner will take bids on separate 
contracts. 

PROSPECT AV.— Chas. ' Kreymborg, 2.534 
Marion av, has plans in progress for a 5-sty 
brick apartment. 67x100 ft, at the northeast cor- 
ner of Prospect av and Crotona Park North for 
Johnson-Deichsel BIdg. Co., 219 East 188th st. 
owner and builder. Cost, $20U.OOO. Owner will 
take bids about March 1. Plumbing, A. F. 
Dcichsel. 584 East 169th st. 

DAVIDSON AV.— Gronenberg & Leuchtag, 4.50 
5th av. have completed plans for two 5-sty brick, 
limestone and terra cotta apartments, 100x78 ft 
each, on the east side of Davidson av. 143 ft 
south of ISlst St. for Samuel Roseff. 113 West 
4th st, Mt. Vernon, owner and builder. Total 
cost. $360,000. 

BRYANT AV.— J. Kleinberger. 20 West 43d st, 
has completed plans for a 2-sty brick and stone 
tenement, 52x75 ft irregular, on the west side 
of Bryant av, 275 ft north of Spofford av. for 
Isaac Kranter, 419 East 121st st, owner. Cost, 
$22,000. 

UNIVERSITY AV— Geo. F. Pelham. 200 West 
72d st, has completed plans for two 6-sty brick 
tenements, 80x90 ft, on the west side of Uni- 
versity av, 50 ft north of Tremont av. for An- 
tonio Mungo. 39] East 149th st. owner and 
builder. Cost. $170,000. 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

KINGSBRIDGE RD. — Chas. Kreymborg, 253' 
Marion av. has completed plans for a group of 
1-sty brick stores, 76x109 ft. at the corner of 
Kingsbridge rd .ind Sedgwick av for Siegfried 



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AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER 
VALVE ALARM SERVICE 
INTERIOR FIRE ALARM 

EQUIPMENT 

INSTALLED AS A LOCAL SYSTEM 
OR FOR CENTRAL OFFICE SERVICE 

AUTOMATIC 

FIRE ALARM SERVICE 

SPECIAL BUILDING 

SIGNAL SERVICE 

Automatic Fire Alarm Co. 

416 Broadway New York City 

CANAL 5188 



Karlsbad, 2775 Bainbridge av, owner and builder. 
Cost, ,$25,000. 

Brooklyn 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

30TH ST.— Samuel L. Malkind. 16 Court st, 
has plans in progress for a 4-sty brick apart- 
ment, 60x104 ft, in West 30th st, between Mer- 
maid and Railroad avs, for J. Greenbury, 36 
West 17th st, Manhattan, owner. Cost $60,000. 

53TH ST.— Cohn Bros., 361 Stone av, have 
plans in progress for a 4-sty brick and lime- 
stone apartment, 100x107 ft, at the southeast 
corner of East 55th st and Ditmas av for Morris 
Posner, 35 Amboy st, owner and builder. Cost, 
$1.50.000. 

BENSONHURST.— Wm. I. Hohauser, 116 West 
39th st, Manhattan, has plans in progress for a 
4-sty brick and limestone apartment house, 60x 
100 ft, in Bensonhurst. for Fidelity Improvement 
Co.. 116 West 39th st, Manhattan, owner and 
builder. Cost. $80,000. Exact location will be 
announced later. 

DUMONT AV.— Chas. Goodman, 375 Fulton st, 
has plans in progress for two 4-sty brick apart- 
ments, one 35x90 ft and one 65x88 ft, with stores, 
at the northwest corner of Dumont av and Bar- 
rett st, for owner, care of architect. Total cost, 
$120,000. 

HEGEMAN AV.— S. Millman & Son. 1780 Pit- 
kin av, have plans in progress for a 3-sty brick 
apartment. 30x84 ft, on the south side of Hege- 
man av. 40 ft west of Stone av, for Isaac Gor- 
don and Pincus Toback, 72 Sutter av, owners 
and builders. Cost, .$45,000. 

NEW LOTS RD.— S. Millman & Son. 1780 Pit- 
kin av. have completed plans for a 3-sty brick 
apartment, 16x44 ft, at the northeast corner of 
New Lots rd and Stone av for Tillie Hood, 55 
New Lots rd. owner and builder. Cost, $25,000. 

OSBORN ST.— Martyn N. Weinstein, 16 Court 
st, has plans in progress for six 2-sty brick flats, 
20x80 ft, in the west side of Osborn st. 28 ft 
outh of Hegeman av, for Craftsmen Building 
Corp., Samuel Levine, president. 7,52 Rockaway 
av, owner and builder. Total cost. $78,000. 

BAY PARKWAY.— Slee & Bryson. 154 Mon- 
tague St. have plans in progress for a 4-sty 
brick apartment, 90.x00 ft, at the corner of Bay 
tect will soon take bids on general contract, 
forming, owner. Cost. $175,000. 

BLAKE AV — S. Millman & Son, 1780 Pitkin 
av. have plans in progress for three 2-sty brick 
flats. 20x69 ft. on Blake av, between Pine st and 
Euclid av, for Max Seidman. 1463 St. Marks av, 
owner and builder. Cost. .$36,000. 

LOUISA ST.— A. Farber, 1746 Pitkin av, has 
plans in progress for two 2-sty brick flats, 21x 
72 ft. at the southeast corner of Lopisa st and 
Story st for Louisa Story Construction Co., 
Louis Gold, treasurer. 1774 Bergen st, owner and 
builder. Total cost, $24,000. 

DWELLINGS. 

LINDEN AV.— Philip Caplan, 16 Court st. has 
completed plans for two 2-sty frame dwellings. 
22x60 ft. at the southeast corner of Linden av 
and East 46th st for Samuel Seltzer. 328 Hins- 
dale st, owner and builder. Co=it, $20,0(X). 

9TH ST. — Irving Brooks. 26 Court St. has 
plans in progress for a 2'^-sty frame and stucco 
dwelling. 26.\50 ft. in East 9th st for M. Klein- 
feld. owner, care of architect. Cost. $23,000. 

7.5TH ST— Ferd Savignano. 6003 14th av, has 
comoleted plans for a 1-sty frame dwelling. 22x 
43 ft. in the south side of 75th st. 240 ft east of 
12th av. tor Mariano Cordi. 1170 65th st owner 
and builder. Cost, $12,000. 

IfiTH AV.— Seelig & Finkelstein. 44 Court st, 
have completed plans for five 2-sty brick dwell- 
ings, 19x52 ft, on the west side of 16th av. 215 
ft south of snth St. for Straus & Shummer. 
owner, care of architect. Cost, $75,000. 



January 7, 1922 

WITH ST. — Jos. Hartung. 661 5th av, has com- 
pleted plans tor a 2-sty brick dwelling, 20x50 ft, 
in the south side of oiHh st, 180 It east of 11th 
av, for Rocco Agoglia, 6713 4th av, owner and 
builder. Cost, $10,000. 

SCTH ST — Fred R. Thieme, 619 81st st, has 
completed plans for a 2J/2-sty frame dwelling, 
24x50 ft, in the north side of 8bth st, 180 It 
west of Narrows av. for John H. Bakrenburg, 
148 88th St. owner and builder. Cost, lt.lS.OUO. 

76TH ST.— Jacob Lubroth, 44 Court st, has 
plans in progress for eight 2-sty brick dwell- 
ings 20x58 ft. in the north side of ibth st, lou 
ft west of liith av, for owner, care of architect. 
Total cost, $100,000. 

PRESIDENT ST. — Jacob Lubroth, 44 Court st, 
bas plans in progress for four 2-sty brick dwell- 
ings '^d.^iS ft, in the west side of President st, 
100 ft east of Rochester av, for owner, .care ol 
architect. Total cost, .$.50,OOU. 

70TH ST —Jacob Lubroth, 44 Court st, has 
plans in progress for eight 2-sty brick dwellings, 
■'l(x.")S ft in the north side of 76th st. 100 It west 
of'llith av, for owner, care of architect. Total 
cost, $100,000- 

OOTH ST — R. T. Schaefer, 1543 Flatbush av, 
has completed plans for a 2-sty frame clwelling 
20x57 ft, in the north side of 60th st ,«0 ft east 
of ''2d av, for John Liona, 1.160 East 5th st, 
owner and builder. Cost, $10,000. 

"i8TH ST — S Gardstein, 26 Court st, has 
plans in progress for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 2ix 
(13 ft in the south side of 5Sth st. 140 ft east of 
ir.th 'av for Armor Construction Co.. Louis Le- 
vine, president, 1334 40th st, owner and builder. 
Cost. $14.(100. 

PENNSYLVANIA AV.— Boris W. Portman. 26 
Court st, has plans in progress tor seventeen _- 
sty brick dwellings, 20x64 ft. on Pennsylvania 
av between Riverdale and New Lots avs, tor 
Vo'orhies Realty Corp., Morris Worronnck. presi- 
dent 373 New Lots av. owner and builder, total 
cost.' $240.0110. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 
TROTTMAN ST. — Boris W. Dorfman. 26 Court 
st has completed plans for a 1-sty brick storage 
hiiilding 25x05 ft. at the northeast corner ot 
Troutma'n st and Wyckoff av for Joseph Lowen- 
stein, 162 Throop av. owner and builder. Cost, 
.$15',o6o. 

HALLS AND CLUBS. 
ITT HST. — Abram Bastow, 1711 Bast 22 st. 
has completed preliminary plans tor a 3-sty 
brick hall, 60x100 ft, with stores, in the east sul. 
ot East 17th st, 48 ft south of Kings Highway, 
for Kings Highway Community Corp., 1701 Kings 
Highway, owner. Cost, $40,000. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 
15TH ST.— J. Howard Tracy. 4210 Ft. Hamil- 
ton av, has completed plans for a 1-sty brick 
garage 40xRS ft, in the north side of 15th st, -V> 
ft east of 5th av, tor Burns & Hurley, 231 lath 
St. owners and builders- Cost, $16,000. 

KINGS HIGHWAY.— Chas. M. Spindler. 20 
Court st, has completed plans tor a 1-sty brick 
garage 124x104 ft, with stores, at the north- 
west corner of Kings Highway and Flatbush av 
for Alexander N. Stafford. 148.0 East 17th st, 
owner and builder. Cost. $18,000. 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 
PACIFIC ST. — Brooks & Rosenberg. 26 Court 
St. have plans in progress for two 2-sty brick 
stores, 20x80 ft, at the northeast corner of 
Pacific and Nevins sts tor Bluebird Realty Co.. 
Paul Dombek, president, 44 Court st, owner and 
builder. Cost, $24,000. 

Queens 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

JAMAICA, L. I.— Cohn Bros., 361 Stone av. 
Brooklyn, have plans in progress for two 4-Bty 
brick apartments. 05x80 ft. on Hillside av. near 
Victoria st. Jamaica for Aix Improvements Co., 6 
Maxwell av, Jamaica, owner and builder. Cost. 
$180,000. 

ELMHURST. L. I. — Andrew J. Thomas. 1.3" 
East 45th St. Manhattan, has completed plans for 
a 4-stv brick apartment, 86x110 ft, at the north- 
east corner ot 25th st and Hayes av, Elmhurst, 
for Hayes Avenue Apartment, Inc.. 2 Claremont 
terrace. Elmhurst, owner and builder. Cost. 
$136,000. 

ELMHURST. L. I. — Andrew J. Thomas. 137 
East 4.5th st. Manhattan, has comnleted plans for 
a 4-stv brick apartment, 86x110 ft, at the north- 
west corner of 26th st and Hayes av, Elmhurst, 
for Hayes Avenue Apartment, Inc.. 2 Claremont 
terrace, Elmhurst. owner and builder. 
DWELLINGS. 

WOODHAVEN, L. I.— L. Danancher. 328 Ful- 
ton st, Jamaica, has nlnns in progress for a 2- 
stv frame dwelling. 22x52 ft. on the east side of 
Wondhaven rd. 80 ft north of Park av. Wool- 
haven, tor Jacob Gunther, 35 Scbaeffer st. Brook- 
lyn, owner and builder. Cost. $10,000. 

CORONA. L, I. — A. Brems. Corona av. Co- 
rona, has plans in progress for a 2-sfy brick 
dwelling, 20x45 ft. in the south side of Fergu- 
son St. 175 ft west of Tiemann av. Corona, for 
Jos. Vitarelli. 06 Merritt st. Corona, owner and 
builder. Cost, $10,000. 

NEPONSIT. L. I.— Slee & Bryson. 1.54 Mon- 
tague st. Brooklyn, have plans in pros-ress for 
a 2-sty frame and stucco dwelling. 25xno ft. at 
Neponslt for Bernard Block, 50 Court st, Brook- 
lyn, owner. Cost, $12,000. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, L. I — G. C. Buchten- 
kirch, 280 Madison av, Manhattan, has plans in 
progress tor a 2-sty and basement brick and steel 
bakery, 70x80 ft. on the north side of Queens 
blvd, near Thompson av, L. I. City, for S. B. 
Thomas, 335 West 20th st, Manhattan, owner. 
Cost, .$25,000. ■ Architect will take bids on gen- 
eral contract about January 15. 

JAMAICA, L. I. — Louis Allmendinger, 20 Pal- 
metto st, Brooklyn, has plans in progress for a 
3-sty brick refrigerator and storage building, 
60x75 ft, on Chichester av, Jamaica, for Merkel 
Bros., Chichester av, Jamaica, owners. 

Nassau 

DWELLINGS. 

GREAT NECK, L. I.— Slee & Bryson, 154 
Montague st, Brooklyn, have plans in progress 
for a 21^-sty frame dwelling, 26x36 ft, at Great 
Neck tor Dr. Masters, owner, care of architect. 
Cost, $20,000. Architect will take bids on gen- 
eral contract. Exact location will be announced 
later. 

HALLS AND CLUBS. 

GLEN COVE, L. I.— Wm. J. Boegel. 8566 11.3th 
st, Richmond Hill, has completed plans tor alter- 
ations to a dwelling on Glen Cove av. Glen Cove, 
which is to be converted into a club house for 
James Morton Council Knights of Columbus, 
Wm. A. Moe Hill, president, Glen Cove, owner 
and builder. Cost, $n,000. 

Suffolk. 

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. 
CENTRAL ISLIP, L. I.— Edward Hahn, Hemp- 
stead Bank Bldg., Hempstead, has been re- 
tained to prepare plans for a grade school at 
(.'ontral Islip for the Board ot Education of 



25 



Union Free School District No. 1 of the Town 
ot Islip, Fred C. Hendrickson, clerk, School 
Building, 4th av. Bay Shore, owner. Cost, 
$200,000. 

Westchester 

DWELLINGS. 

PELHAM HEIGHTS, N. Y.— Wm. E. Hau- 
gaard, 185 Madison av, Manhattan, has plans 
in progress for a iVa-sty brick dwelling, 40x30 
ft, with garage, on Corlies av, Pelham Heights, 
tor A. L. Werekle, owner, care ot architect. 

MOUNT VERNON, N. Y.— Stern & Peyser, 
Proctor Bldg., Mt. Vernon, have completed plans 
for a 2V2-sty brick dwelling, 28x42 ft. with 
garage, at the corner ot Vernon pi and Graham 
st, Mt. Vernon, tor Frank Slatt, owner and 
builder, on premises. Cost. $25,000. 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

MT. VERNON, N. Y.— Louis Larkin, Proctor 
Bldg., Mt. Vernon, has plans in progress for a 
2-sty tapestry brick and limestone store and 
office building, 25x80 ft, in 1st st, between 3d and 
4th avs, Mt. Vernon, tor Herman Stern, 16 East 
1st st, Mt. Vernon, owner. Cost, $25,000. Archi- 
tect will take bids about January 28. 

New Jersey. 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

NEWARK. N. J.— Nathan Welitoff, 240 Wash- 
ington st, Jersey City, has plans in progress tor 
fourteen 2-sty brick apartments, with stores, on 
Avon av, from 10th to 11th sts, Newark, for 
Gershonowitz Bros., 81 Jewitt av. Jersey City, 
and Chas. Barbash. 240 Washington st. Jersey 
City, owners and builders. Cost, $30,000. 

NEWARK. N. J— Harry M. Veix, 738 Broad 
St. Newark, has plans in progress for a 3-sty 
frame and clapboard flat, .32x60 ft, at 67-71 
Brnokdale av. Newark, for Allied Engineering ^- 



Turkish Baths 

One of the largest Turkish Baths in the 
city will soon be opened at 20-24 Second 
Avenue by the Second Avenue Baths 
Corporation 

An electric sign 40 feet high carrying 
approximately 800 lo-watt lamps will 
attract thousands to the baths and to the 
roof garden which will top the building 

The entire electrical installation ot 3520 
lamps and 40 horsepower in motors will 
be supplied with Central Station Service 
through the mains of this company 

Architects — Gronenberg A: Leuchtag - - 450 Ficrtli Avenue 

General Contractor — Magoba Construction Company 103 Park Avenue 

Big Buildings Use Edison Service 

The New York Edison Company 

i^t Tour Service 
Irving Place and Fifteenth Street 

Telephone Stuyvesant 5600 




26 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 7, 1922 



Construction Co., Michael Mazzola, president, 156 
Marliet st, Newark, owner and builder. Cost, 
$25,00U. 

MONTCLAIR, N. J.— J. B. Acocella, Union 
Bldg., Newark, has completed plans for a 2-sty 
and basement common and tapestry brick and 
frame flat, 6Ux60xD8 ft, with stores, at 610-612 
Valley rd, Montclair, for Giuseppe Lammardo, 55 
Wildwood av, Montclair, owner and builder. 
Cost, .$35,000. 

MORRISTOWN, N. J.— Hyman Rosensohn. 18S 
Market st, Newark, has completed plans for a 
4-sty brick, limestone and terra cotta apartments 
38x74 ft, with stores, at 55 South st, Morris- 
town, for James J. Lyons, care of Park Theatre, 
Park pi, Morristown, owner. Cost, $60,000. 
Architect will take bids on general and sepa- 
rate contracts about January 28. 

LEO.NIA, N. J.— Nathan Welitotf, 240 Wash- 
ington st, Jersey City, has plans in progress for 
two 4-sty brick apartments, 50x100 ft, at the 
corner of Broad av and Crescent pi, Leonia, for 
Dr. S. S. Lefkowitz, 3S2 Broad av, Leonia, owner 
and builder. 

BANKS. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Holmes Winslow, 134 East 
44th st, Manhattan, has been retained to pre- 
pare plans for a brick bank building at the cor- 
ner of Wight st and Clinton av, Newark, for 
Weequahic Trust Co., owner, care of architect. 
CHURCHES. 

JERSEY CITY, N. J.— J. A. Jackson, 660 
George st, New Haven, has plans in progress for 
a 1-sty brick or stone church, 6Sxl.3o ft, at the 
corner of Bge av and Boulevard, Jersey City, for 
R. C. Church of Our Lady of Victory, Rev. T. 
Hampton, pastor, 241 Ege av, Jersey City, 
owner. Cost, $150,000. 

DWELLINGS. 

KEARNY, N. J. — Plans have been prepared 
privately for a 2V2-sty frame dwelling, 22x52 ft, 
at 1!I3 Maple st, Kearny, for Joshua Porter, 
Kearny, owner and builder- Cost, $10,000. 

PASSAIC, N. J. — A. Preiskel, Playhouse Bldg., 
Passaic, has plans in progress for a 2-sty brick 
dwelling, 36x38 ft, on Aycrigg av, Passaic, for 
Abraham Endler, 182 3d st, Passaic, owner. 
Cost, $26,000. 



ELIZABETH, N. J.— J. Ben Beatty, 15 Reid 
st, Elizabeth, has plans in progress for five 2M:- 
sty hollow tile and stucco dwellings, 24x52 ft, in 
West Jersey st, Elizabeth, for Frank Beluscio. 
corner 2d av and Christine st, Elizabeth, owner 
and builder. Total cost, $14,000. 

BAYONNE, N. J.— Geo. McCabe, 86 5th av, 
Manhattan, has plans nearing completion for a 
4-sty brick memorial building, 63x125 ft, at the 
corner of Av C and West 30th st, Bayonne. tor 
Knights of Columbus, Star of Sea Council, 
Thomas Herbert, chairman building committee, 
Broadway and 3d st, Bayonne, owner. Cost, 
$150,000. 

RIDGEWOOD, N. J. — Harold E. Paddon, 280 
Madison av, Manhattan, has plans in progress 
for a 21^-sty stucco on terra cotta blocks dwell- 
ing, of irregular dimensions, at Ridgewood, tor 
owner, care of architect. Cost, $15,000. Archi- 
tect will soon take bids on geenral contract. 

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. 

BAYONNE, N. J.— Donald G. Anderson, 28 
East 40th st, Manhattan, and 472 Broadway, 
Bayonne, has plans in progress for a 3-sty 
brick junior high and vocational school, 200x300 
(t, at the corner of Av A and 29th st, Bayonne, 
tor City of Bayonne, Board of Education, James 
D. Boyd, secretary, Broadway, Bayonne, owner. 
Cost, $400,000. 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

All items following refer to general 
contracts, except those marked"sub." 



DWELLINGS. 

SCARSDALE. N. Y.— Edwin Cutwater, Inc., 
516 Fifth av. Manhattan, has the general con- 
tract for a 21/4-sty frame dwelling, 30x80 ft, at 
Scarsdale, for Mrs. Du Bois Beale, owner, care 
of architect, from plans by I. E. Ditmars, 111 
Fifth av, Manhattan, architect. 

SCARSDALE. N. Y.— Edwin- Cutwater, Inc., 
516 Fifth av. Manhattan, has the general con- 
tract for a 2^-sty frame dwelling, 30x80 ft, at 
Scarsdale. for Mrs. I. E. Ditmars, 14 East 28th 




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st, Manhattan, from plans by I. E. Ditmars, 111 
Fifth av, Manhattan. 

SHORT HILLS, N. J— Frederick P. Craig. 
West Road, Short Hills, has the general con- 
tract for a 2iA-sty frame, clapboard and shingle 
dwelling, on plot 200x118 ft, at the northeast 
corner of South Terrace and Coniston rd. Short 
Hills, for Windermere Corp. — H. R. Craig, sec- 
retary — Windermere Terrace, Short Hills, own- 
e, from plans prepared privately. Cost $18,500. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

BROOKLYN, — Turner Construction Co., 244 
Madison av, Manhattan, has the general con- 
tract for a 6-sty brick, concrete and steel ware- 
bouse and sweat building, 75x100 ft, in San- 
ford st, between Park and Myrtle avs, for The 
American Tobacco Co., Ill Filth' av, Manhat- 
tan, owner, from plans by R. D. Ward and Geo. 
P. Bender and W. S. Schneider, 120 Broadway, 
Manhattan, associate architects and engineers. 
Cost $200,000. 

JERSEY CITY, N. J.— B. Manceni. 88 Bright 
st, Jersey City, has the general contract for a 
1-sty brick and frame wagon factory, 100x100 
ft, in Golden st, Jersey City, for Thomas Wright 
Co., 71 Colden st, Jersey City — Mr- Colicchiolin 
in charge — owner, from, plans by Robert Shan- 
non. 1 Bernius Court, Jersey City, architect. 
Cost $25,000. 

SECAUCUS, N. J. — Dominick Marinneori & 
Co., 2384 Hughes av, Bronx, have the general 
contract for a 4-sty and basement reinforced 
concrete factory, 90x234 ft, on the Hackensack 
River, Secaucus, for American Chocolate Prod- 
ucts Co-, W. H. Miner, president, 158 Broad- 
way, Manhattan, owner, from plans by Andrews, 
Towers & Lavalle, 21 East 40ih st. Manhattan, 
arhitect and engineer. Cost, $350,000, 

STORED OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y.— Barto Phillips Co., 
280 Madison av, Manhattan, has the general 
contract for a 3-sty brick store and loft build- 
ing, 50x100 ft, at the corner of Lexington and 
Martine avs, White Plains, for Mrs. Edith L. 
Just, Scarsdale, owner, from plans by Chas. 
Volz-, 371 Fulton st, Brooklyn, architect. Cost 
$65,000. 

SUMMIT, N. J. — Macbert Construction Co., 1 
West Erie av, Rutherford, has the general con- 
tract for a 2-sty brick reinforced concrete and 
limestone store, at the corner of Springfield av 
and Beechwood rd. Summit, for Johu McClaj , 
ii2 Mountain av. Summit, owner, from plans by 
Marshall N. Shoemaker, 15 Central av, New- 
ark, architect. Cost $41,000. 

JERSEY CITY. N. J.— D'Elia Contracting 
Co., 504 Newark av, Jersey City, has the gen- 
eral contract for a group of 1-sty brick stores, 
24x40 ft. at 126 Jackson av, Jersey City, for 
Thos- Lynch, 26 Park st, Jersey City, owner, 
from plans prepared privately. Cost $10,000. 

MANHATTAN.— B. Golden. 56 John st, has 
the general contract for alterations to the 5-sty 
brick store and loft building, 25x56 ft, at 185 
William st. for owner, care of architect, from 
plans by Geo. and Edw. Blum, 505 5th av, 
architects. 

RAH WAY. N- J. — Marco Tomasso, Rahway. 
has the general contract for alterations to two 
stores in Main st, Rahway, for Samuel Schwartz 
and J. A. Fass. North and Watchung avs, 
Plainfield, owners, from plans by Wra. E. Clum, 
152 Park av. Plainfield. architect. Cost. $8,000. 



STANDARDS AND APPEALS 

Calendar 



DATES AND HOURS OF MEETINGS. 

Board of Appeals, Tuesdays, at 10 a. m. 

Special meetings as listed in this Calendar. 

Call of Clerk's Calendar. Tuesdays, at 2 p. m. 

Board of Standards and Appeals as listed In 
the Calendar. 

All hearings are held In Room 919, Municipal 
Building. Manhattan. 

NOTICE TO APPELLANTS OR PETITIONBRS. 

At the time of filing an application the appel- 
lant or petitioner shall file with the papers a 
signed notice of appeal addressed to the ad- 
ministrative official (either superintendent of 
buildings or Are commissioner), and attack 
thereto a duplicate set of the plans which he 
submits to this board in support of his applica- 
tion. 

The notice of appeal addressed to the admlB- 
istrative official will at once be forwarded tm 
him from this office; and the applicant will not 
he required to give any other notice to that 
official. 

Petitioners are advised that their plans shouK 
show the point? of the compass. Frequently 
petitions will refer to the *"nnrTh side" of a 
Inillillng. while on the plans filed with the pe- 
tition there is nothing to Indicate which is the 
north side. 

Hearings will be simplified and the time of 
petitioners and of the board will be saved by at- 
tention to this matter. 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



27 



Money 

to 

Loan 

on all classes of high- 
grade income pro- 
ducing properties in 
New York City, in 
amounts of $500,000 
and upward. 

Building Loans 

American 

Bond & Mortgage 

Company, Inc. 

562 Fifth Ave., New York City 
Telephone 9600 Bryant 



SHADES, AWNINGS 
AND CANOPIES 

47 years in making window shades, awn- 
ings, canopies, etc., has placed us in a 
position where we can guarantee satis- 
faction. 

Agent and owner alike find our service 
prompt, quality fully satisfactory, and 
workmanship of the best. 
Estimates cheerfully supplied, without 
oblie^M'nn to owners, agents, etc. 



F. J. KLOES 

Established 1872 

243 Canal St., New York 

Telephone: Franklin 2216 




H. W. BELL CO. 

Gypsum Blocks 
Terra Cotta Blocks 

Plaster Boards 

Dumbwaiter Blocks 

Flue Pipe 

Firebrick 

Park Ave. & 139th St. 

Phone — Mott Haven 3134 

BROOKLYN 

KENT AVENUE & MORTON STREET 



BUILDERS 

LITTLE CASH REQUIRED 

We can suboniiiiate entire purchase price of sev- 
eral welMoc!>teil plots and obtain liberal building 
HHil permanent loans. 

S. Osgood Pell & Co. 



5 & 
Tel. 



17 West 44th St. 
Vanderbllt 5610 



UENRY MAURER & SON Manufacturer 

•" Fireproof Building Materials OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION 
Hollow Brick made of Clay for Flat Arches, 
Partitions. Furring, Etc.. Porous Terra Cotta. 
Fire Brick, etc. 

Office and Depot. 420 EAST 23RD STREET 
Works: Maurer, N. J. NEW YORK 



PLANS FILED FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION 
IN ALL BOROUGHS OF NEW YORK CITY 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

3TH AV, :i31, 2-lJ-sty bk tnts, 50x100, tile rf ; 
$.-,1)0,1100 : (0) Cora Dillon Wyckoff, UO:! Park av ; 
(a) Henry Otis Cliapman, 334 5 av (UO.'i). 

5TH AV, SOO, 12-sty t. p. apt, 2:ixl40 ; (o) The 
Farmers Loan & Trust Co., trustees under will 
of Helen C. Bostwk-k, 22 William; (a) Jos, E. 
R. Carpenter, 681 -5 av (607). 
DWELLINGS. 

SEAMAN AV, nee Emerson, 3S-2-sty bk 
dwss, 20x30, slate & slag rf : $323,000; (o) L, 
B Rolston, Purchase st. Purchase, N. Y., & B, 
L. Kemmelle, Lincoln st, Purchase, N. Y. ; (a) 
Herbert Lucas, 117 E 60th (604). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

IIOTH ST, 413 E, 1-Bty metal garage, 12x20. 
metal rf ; $300; (o) Consolidated Gas Co,, 130 
E lath ; (engr) W. CuUen Morris, 130 E loth 
(1). 

144TH ST, S-i-ll W, 1-sty bk garage, 09x00, 
tar & felt rf ; .$30,000; (o) Kenerly & Peters, 
Inc 2424 7th av ; (a) Harrison G Wiseman, 
2.J W 43d (3). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

3eTH ST 132-8 W, 12-sty f. p. show rooms, 
lofts & offices, 70x197, slag rf ; $500,000; (o) 132 
W 36th St. Corpn,, ,005 5 av ; (a) Robt T. Lyons, 
342 Madison av (602), 

7TH AV 429, 3-sty bk store & offices, 20x100, 
tar, felt & rubberoid rf ; $20,000; (o) Aurelia 
M. Michels, Flushing, L. I.; (a) B. H. & C. N. 
Whinston, 2 Columbus Circle (2), 
MISCELLANEOUS. 

•'STH ST 109 E, 1-sty bk kitchen & storage 
room, 10x20, slag rf ; .$800; (o) Thos. Snell, 110 
4 av ; (a) Dietrich Wortmann, 116 Lexington av 
(603). 

BROADWAY', 3144, 2-1-sty metal lunch rooms, 
10x40 garage, 18x20, metal rf ; (o) McMillan 
Rlty. & Constn. Co., 930 West End av ; (a) 
Kolb Bldg. Co., Inc., 30 Church (606). 

Bronx 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

197TH ST, n s. 85.13 w Valentine av, 5-sty bk 
tnt 120x78, slag rf ; ,$210,000; (o) G & F Const. 
Co., Isidor Fein, 22 Thornton, Bklyn, pres. ; (a) 
Margon & Glaser, 2804 3d av (2835). 

BRYANT AV. nee 174th, 2-5-sty bk tnts, 55x 
no OOxSS, plastic slate rf ; $180,000; (o) Wm. 
Sinnott, 967 B 160th st ; (a) Chas, Kreymborg, 
2.034 Marion av (2800). 

DAVIDSON AV, e s, 142.8 s 181st, 2-6-sty bk 
tnts, 100x78, slag rf ; .$.360,000; (o) Samuel 
Roseff 113 W 4th, Mt. Vernon ; (o) Gronenberg 
& Leuchtag, 450 4 av (2806). 

RAND.^LL AV, s s, .00 w Manida st, 3-sty bk 
tnt, 20.XSS, plastic slate rf ; $27,.000 ; (o) Frank 
Zaccardo, 441 B 116th; (a) De Rose & Cava- 
lieri, 370 E 149th (282S). 

UNIVERSITY AV, w s, 50 n Tremont av, 2- 
6-sty bk tnts, slag rf ; $170,000; (o) Antonio 
Mungo, 371 E 149th; (a) Geo, F. Pelham, 200 W 
172d (2786). 

V\LENTINE AV, n e c Bedford Park blvd, 
0-sty bk tnt, 60.2x00, slag rf ; $100,000; (o) 
200th St. Constn. Co., Wm. J. Yennie. 20 W 42d. 
Pres; (a) Moore & Landsiedel, 3 av & 148ta 
1276.0). 

WEBB AV, nee Devoe ter, 5-sty bk tnt, 88.2 
x90 plastic slate rf ; $220,000; (o) Masso Realty 
Corp Samuel Friedenberg, 2176 Grand Con- 
course, Pres. ; (a) Springsteen & Goldhammer, 
32 ITnion sq (2785). 

DWELLINGS. 

CENTRE ST, n s, 391 w City Island av, 1»,4- 
sty tr dwg 18x34, shingle rf ; $6,000; (o) Sam- 
uel Cowhill. City Island; (a) T, H. Booth & 
Sons, City Island (2727). 

De Witt pi, s s, 106.8 w Seymour av, 2-sty 
H T dwg, 22x50, rubberoid rf ; $6,000; (o) 
Matthew Macino, 480 E 74th st ; (a) A. D. Bar- 
tholomew, .3813 White Plains av (2714). 

DEPOT SQUARE, sec, Webster av, 2-sty 
hk dwg, offices and garage, 63.8x39.8, slag rf ; 
$10 000; (0) Thos. J. Byrne, 415 E 200th st ; 
(a) Wm. Geiscr, 2403 Creston av (25,35), 

EDGEWATER TER. n s, 1 00.1 s Barkley av. 
lV,-sty fr dwg. 21x24, shingle rf ; $3,!)fl0 ; (o) 
Hans E. Grabau, Barkl.y & Dean vas ; (a) Geo, 
J, Deennenfelser, 2211 chattcrton av (2778). 

FIELDSTONE RD, e s, 180 s 261st st, 2-sty tr 
dwg 21x,0S, plastic slair rf ; $5,000; (o) Mar- 
• nrct Scholes 216 W 1 osth ; (a) Geo. Diemer, 
223 1st, Union Hill, N. J. (2684). 

FIEDLSTON RD, s 0. c 261st St. 2-sty T C 
dwg. 24.6x30.6 : 1-sty T C garage, 17.0x9.0. 
shingle rf ; $4,S00 ; (o) Rosman Roalty Corp.. 
O.o's W 125th st ; (a) Geo, Stahl, 120 E Ford- 
ham rd (2700). 



FORDHAM ST, s s. 00 w William st, 1-sty 
fr dwg, 20x42, asbestos rf ; $0,000; (o) John M. 
Balmore, 61 Fordham st ; (a) Chas. S. Clark, 
441 Tremont av (2040). 

FORDHAM ST, s s, 75 w William, 1-sty fr 
dwg, 20x42. asbestos rf ; $0,000; (o) Patrick 
McGuire, City Island; (a) Chas. S. Clark, 441 
Tremont av (2546). 

FOWLER, e s, 200 s Neil av, 2-sty fr dwg, 
21X.07, slag rf ; $10,000; (o) Gregorio & Colelli, 
606 Van Nest av ; (a) Louis Bracco, 217 W 
120th st (2096). 

GILES PL, w s, 100 s Cannon pi, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 28x28, shingle rf ; $7,000 ; (o) N. W. 
Durrin. 2686 Heath av ; (a) International Mill 
& Lumber Co., 1 W 34th st (2087). 

HENNESEY PL, e s, 1.56.1 n Burnside av, i- 
sty fr dwg, 19x31.8, shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) 
Lydia T. Stenschuss, 2;i99 Grand Concourse ; 
fa) Wm, Steuschuss, 2309 Grand Concourse 
(2738). 

HE.NNESSY PL, e s, 287 s 179th, 2-sty & attio 
(r dwg, 24x5.8,4, shingle rf ; $7,500; (o) Hiram 
A. Douglas, 191 9 av ; (a) Paul C. Hunter, 191 
9 av (2821). 

HENNESSY PL, e s, 230 s 179th, 2-sty & attic 
fr dwg, 24x.08,4, shingle rt ; $7,500; (o) Hiram 
A, Douglas, 191 9 av ; (a) PaulC. Hunter, 191 9 
av (2820). 

HORTON ST, n s, 152 w City Island av, 2- 
sty fr dwg, 20.2x34.6, shingle rf ; $4,500; (o) 
Vera Gauso, Marvin st, C. I. ; (a) Karl F. J. 
Seifert. 153 E 40th st (2531). 

KELLY ST, s e c 106th st, 2-sty bk dwg, 25x 
78 6, tar rf ; .$7,500; (o) Samuel Greenstein, 126 
Liberty (a) John A. Hamilton, 126 Liberty 
(28,37). 

LAKEVIEW PL, s s, 89 w Bway, 2i^-sty fr 
dwg, 20x60, shingle rf ; $7,000; (o) John J. 
Kennedy, 56.04 Newton av ; (a) Wm. A. Ken- 
nedy, .0654 Newton av (2586). 

MANIDA ST, e s, 446.4 a Lafayette av, 6 
2-sty bk dwgs, 20x67, shingle rf ; $60,000 ; (o) 
Henry Schultz, 5317 12th av : (a) M. A. Can- 
tor, 373 Pulton st, Bklyn (2532). 

MINNIEFORD ST, w s, 223 s Fordham st, 
I-sty and attic, fr dwg, 20.x38, shingle rf ; 
$3,000; (0 & a) John Hawkins, 277 Minnieford 
st (2698). 

O BERING ST, e s, 5 s Maclay av, 2 2%-sty 
H T dwgs, 20x38, shingle rt ; $13,000; (o) Anna 
Herwig, 1515 Appleton av ; (a) B. Ebeling, 1372 
Zerega av (2650). 

PURDY ST. e s, 60.7 n Parker st, 2-sty bk 
dwg, 22X.50. plastic slate rf ; $9,500; (o) Fillppo 
Benianto, 2.39 E 118th; (a) De Rose & Cavalieri, 
.370 E 149th (2772). 

RESERVOIR OVAL, s s, 250 n Holt pl, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 20x48, tin rf ; $8,000; (o) Anna N. Mc- 
Garry, 637 Rosewood; (a) Chas, McGarry, Bronx 
Park East (2716). 

ROCHELLE ST, s s 379 W City Island av, 
three 2-sty and attic fr dwgs. 27x41.9; shingle 
rf; .$21,000; (o) H, S. Sayers, Rochelle st ; (a) 
Justin McAghon, 247 E 43d st (2466), 

SCOTT PL, es. 98.11% n Tremont av, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 191/.X38, shingle rf, $5,000; (o & a) Chas. 
Derminger. 813 Freeman st (2483). 

SOMMER PL. n s, 100 w Edison av, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 22x35, comp shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) Chas. 
Swan, 7.30 E 178th; (a) M. A. Cardo, 61 Bible 
House (2.528). 

SULLIVAN PL, s s, 100 e Tremont av, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 22x45, asphalt shingle rf : $10.000 ; (o) 
Jos. Knoll, 474 E 146th st ; (a) Robt. Ran- 
dolph. 100 Lexington av (2632). 

WHITTIER ST, w s, 124.9 s Lafayette av. 2 
2-sty br dwgs. 21x.04. tar and gravel rf ; $40.- 
000; (0) Better'sky & Monomitch. 70 E 111th 
st: (a) Geo. Miller, 575 Academy st (2.5,89). 

WILLIAMSBRIDGE RD. e s. 175.10 n Pierce 
av. 2-sty bk dwg. 25\4S, 1-sfy bk garage, 2.3x23, 
rubberoid rf. .$13,000; fo) Honora Kingston. 
1495 Ed^ewater rd ; (a) F. W. Reim, 70 W 181 
(2470). 

WILLIAMSBRIDGE RD. e s. 177.5 s Pierce 
av. 2"/<-sty fr dwg, 20x34, shingle rf ; $4,000; 
(o) John Daiiflur, 1143 Beach av ; (a) T. 
Fl"id. 1144 St, Laurence av (2540). 

lOlST ST E, n a, 63 c Jackson av, 3-sty bk 
str & dwg, 21x42,0, plastic slate rf ; $10,000 ; 
(o) Dr. Philln Stifflre. 1412 Charlotte; (a) M. 
J. Harrison, 110 E 31st (2.597). 

174TH ST W. n s. 67 w Macombs rd. 4-2-sty 
hk dwgs, 22x43.4 & 22x34.8, 4-1 -sty bk garages, 
20x20. t.Tr & gravel rf ; $48,000; (o) Artolfo 
Partoceini. 100 5 av ; (a) E. H. Janes. 105 W 
40th (2725). 

ISOTH ST. s s, ,37.6 e Osborne pl. 2i.4-6ty bk 
dwg, 21x39. asbestos rf ; $12,000; (o) Univer- 
slfv Park Bldg Co, Wm. C. Bergen. 1.30 W 
ISOth st, nres; (a) Chas. S. Clark, 441 Tre- 
mont av (2543). 



28 

194TH ST, n s, 415 w Hobart av, 2-sty & 
attic fr dwg, 26x59, asbestos shingle rl ; $8,000 ; 
(0) Morris Clawson. 472 52d, Bklyn ; (a) Wal- 
ter Celander, 354 41st. Bklyn (2771). 

1U4TH ST, n s, 415 w Hobmart av, 2-sty & 
attic I'r dwg, 26x59, asbestos shingle rf ; .$S,000 ; 
(o) Wm. Hamilton, 200 Boston Post rd. Rye, 
N. Y. ; (a) Walter Celander, 354 41st, Bklyn 
(2270). 

194TH ST, u s, 250 w Hobart av, two 2-sty fr 
dwgs, 25.3x45.5, asphalt rf ; .i;20,000 ; (o) Marcia 
B. Treadwell, 33 Bradhurst av ; (a) Chas. E. 
Muller, 1806 Appleton av (2S33). 

185TH ST E, n s, 350 w Hobart av, 1-sty fr 
dwg, 20.\3j, shingle rf ; $4,500; (o) Chas. Por- 
ter, 1959 Mapes av ; (a) M. A. Buckley, 32 
Westchester sq (2558). 

197TH ST E, e 5, 176.4 n Continental av, 2%- 
sty h t & fr dwg, 24x.55, & garage, 24x19, as- 
phale shingle rf, $13,500; (o) Albert Keller, 
1744 GarflelJ st ; (a) TurnbuU & Pia, 143 Lib- 
erty (2489). 

107TH ST, n s, 75 W Claflin av, 2V2-sty br 
dwg, 30x45 ; 1-sty br garage, 86x20 ; shingle 
rf ; $16,500; (o) Bella Schlackson, 2675 Morris 
av ; (a) M. A. Cardo, 61 Bible House pi (2451). 
214TH ST E, ns, 175 w Barnes av, 2-Ety bk 
dwg, 20.4x42, slag rf, $12,000; (o) Vincenzo 
Pinelli, 779 E 214; (a) De Pace & Jussu, 3Gli 
White Plains av (2510). 

215TH ST E, s s, 448 w Wilson av, 2-sty h. t. 
dwg 24.0x37, comp rf : .$7,000; (o) Mrs. F. W. 
Home, Highland av, Yonkers ; (a) Fredk. W. 
Home, Highland av, Yonkers (2554). 

215TH ST, n s, 300.3 e Bronxwocd av, 2-sty ht 
dwg, 20.6x48, rubberoid rf ; $8,000; (o) A. Bee- 
tone, 214th St & Bronxwood av ; (a) A. D. Bar- 
tholomew, 3813 White Plains rd (2664). 

■'19TH ST. s s, 280 w Bronxwood av, 2-sty bk 
dwg. 216x48, plastic slate rt : .$8,000; (o) 
Frank Premusoro. 585 E 188th; (a) Lucian 
Pisciotti. 3011 Barnes av (2S48). 

22'"'D ST, w B, 161 s Wickham av, 1%-sty fr 
dwg, 22.X35, shingle rf ; $8,000; (o) Marie 
Wadman, on prem ; (a) B. Ebeling, 1372 Zerega 
av (2617). 

2''4TH ST, n s, 155 e Barnes av, 2-sty H T 
dwg, 21.X48, comp rt, $8,000; (o) Jos. Tittro, 
749 E 224th st ; (a) Cannava & Viviani, 110 
W 40th st (2633). 

2'''5TH ST E, s s, 225 w Barnes av, 2-sty h. t. 
dwg 22x50, slag rf ; $11,000; .(o) Durante 
Const. Co.. 7.37 E 21Tth ; (a) Robt. Skrivan, 3aj 
E 149th (2722). 

''2.5TH ST, n s, 105 B Carpenter av, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 1.8x50, tin rf ; $7,000; (o) Christina 
Leibrock 3910 Bronx blvd ; (a) N. F. Leibrock, 
152 W 00th st (2654). 

227TH ST E, s s, 201.0 e Paulding av, 2-sty 
fr dwg 16x32, slate coated paper rf ; $4.000 : 
(0) Harry E. Reihl, 763 B 224th; (o) Robt. 
Smith, 2074 Arthur av (2616). 

232D ST E, e s, 480 w Bronxwood av, 2-sty 
bk dwg, 20x55, plastic slate rf ; $8,500; (o) 
Peter Lammardo, 949 E 232; (a) Lucian Pisci- 
otta, .3011 Barnes av (2670). 

232D ST, s s, 116 e Bussing av, 2-sty bk dwg, 
21x50, & 1-sty bk garage, 23x18.0. rubberoid rf ; 
$7,900; (o) Henry Guerino, 748 E 224th; (a) 
B. P. Wilson. 171)5 Bussing av (2764). 

233D ST, n s, 252.11 e Oneida av, 2-sty and 
attic fr dwg. 22x30, slate rf ; .$5,000; (o) Lind 
Friton. 132 W 125th st (2637). 

2:;4TH ST. n s, 144.7 w Vireo av. 2-sty fr 
dwg 17x36. tar & gravel rt ; $5,000; (o & a) 
Henry Schneider, 506 E 162d (2S29). 

235TH ST, n s, 140.4 e Napier av, 2-sty bk 
dwg. ;iUx4:>, plastic slate rf ; $12,500; (o) Walter 
S Sfeinle. 1183 Clay av ; (a) Wm. Farrell, 1 
W 47th (2827). 

235TH ST. s s. 181. 5 w Webster av, 1-sty fr 
dwg 24x36. shingle rf ; $5,000; (o & a) Samuel 
Garland. 668 E 223d st (2.537). 

2.37TH ST. s s, 75 c Matilda av. 2-sty fr dwg. 
21x56.6. slag rf ; $9,000; (o) Patrick D. Sulli- 
van, 43.S3 Byron av ; (a) Geo. A. Bagge & Sons. 
299 Madison av (2566). 

23STH ST, n s, 2.50 w Kepler av. 1-sty fr 
dwg, 26x4J, shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) Wilhelmine 
Dehnert. IS South St. Mt. Vernon: (a) Wm. 
Maaso, 134 South Hight st. Mt. Vernon (2712). 
241ST ST. n s. 385 e Katonah av. 2-sty br 
dwg. 20x52. slag rf ; $13,000; (o) Arthur Cul- 
len. 755 E 1.38th st ; (a) Herman Blumberg, 40 
E 41st st (2708). 

243D ST E, n s. 148.5 e White Plains av. 2-2- 
sty bk dwgs. 17.10x40. shingle rf, $14,000: (o) 
Morris Wetzler, 622 Lexington av ; (a) J. L. 
De Mesnuita. 2022 Lexington av (2505). 

261ST ST. s s. 8714 E Spencer av. 2-stv fr 
dwg. 19x36.6; shingle rf ; $8,000 (o) Chas. 
Sager. 6065 Broadway; (a) Wm. W. Schwartz, 
238 W 238th st (24.53). 

261ST ST. s s. 34.10 E Fioldstine rd. 3 2-sty 
3 1-stv T C dwgs. 22.6x26 6 — 9.0x17.0; shingle 
rf : $13,500; (oi Rosman Realty Corp.. .5.58 E 
l?5'li st ; (a) Geo. Stahl. 120 E Fordham rd 
(2701). 

A DEE AV. n w c Paulding av, 2-sty fr dwg. 
24x36. shingle rf : (o) Stephen Gramacy. 436 E 
76; (a) D. P. Kovack. 1270 Ford av (2665). 
ADEE AV, see Bouck av, 2-sty stn dwg. 2bx 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

52. plastic slate rt ; $10,000; (o) Paul Calilla, 
308 E 120th; (a) Carl B. Cali, 81 E 125th 
(2599). 

ALLERTON AV. n s, 50 Fish av, 2-sty bk 
dwg, 21x;K, rubberoid rt ; $8,000; (o) Michael 
Rusciauo, 23 W 170th ; (a) Paul Lagana, 2526 
Glebe av (2842). 

BAINBRIDGB AV, n e 208tb, 2-sty bk dwg, 
48x22, asbestos shingle rf ; $15,000; (o) Chas. 
J. Beamchemin, 3142 Perry av ; (a) Max 
Haisle, 3307 3 av (2622). 

BAINBRIDGB AV, w s, 104.11 n 213th, 6-3- 
sty bk dwgs, 20.\55, slag rf ; $60.000 ; (o) Jas. 
C. Gaftney. 106 B lS2d; (a) Wm. A. Geisen, 
2403 Creston av (2763). 

BARCLAY AV, s 3, 50 w Hollywood av, 2V4- 
sty bk dwg, 20x37.6, 1-sty bk garage. 16x18, 
shingle rf ; $5,300; (o) Anna E. Clinch, 244 
Walton av ; (a) G. W. Godfrey, 2447 Walton 
av (2548). 

BARKER AV, w s, 225.4 n Waring av, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 19x33, asphalt shingle rt, $5,000; (o) 
.)ohn N. Fitzpatrick, 2400 Bronx Park Bast; (a) 
Anton Pirner. 2069 Westchester av (2492). 

BARKER AV, nee Mace av, 2-sty bk dwg, 
25x48. slag rf ; $9,000; (o) Max Soushine, 
1501 Boston rd ; (a) Chas. S. Clark, 441 Tre- 
mont av (2544). 

BARNES AV, w s, 245 s Rhinelander av, 2- 
sty bk dwg, 21x50, rubberoid rt ; $9,000; (o) 
.las. & Dennis Lennon. 1873 Barnes av ; (a) T. 
J. Kelly, 707 Morris Park av (2737). 

BAYCHESTER AV, w s, 234 n Boston & West- 
chester R R, 1-sty and attic fr dwg, 20x36 ; 
asphalt slate rf ; $4,5o0 ; (o) John Ryszeweiz, 
129 Alexander av ; (a) Ralph J. Marx, 3525 
Eastchester rd (2454). 

BEACH AV, w s, 175 n Patterson, 2-sty fr 
dwg. 20x30, asphalt shingle rf ; $4,.500; (o) 
Albert Shorski, 1406 Prospect av ; (a) John 
Schwalbcnberg, 2075 «aviland av (2810). 

BELL AV, w s, 100 s Strang av, 2yj-sty fr 
dwg, 23x45. shingle rt ; $8,500; (o\ Henry Carl, 
Mill la; (a) Geo. H. Olphert, 675 E 222 (2798). 
BOLTON AV, w s, 75 n Patterson av, 2-sty tr 
dwg, 18x30, tin rt ; $5,000; (o) Daniel Murray, 
1 E Fordham rd ; (a) The Pelham Co-, 1 E 
Fordham rd (2796). 

URE.N.NER AV, w s, 100 s Tillitson av, 2-sty 
tr dwg. 24x50. shingle rt ; $9,000; (o & a) Fran- 
cis S. Marion, 2131 Fifth av (2753). 

BRENNER AV, e s, SO s Tillitson av, four 
1-sty fr dwgs, 30x12. shingle rf ; $10,000 (o & 
a) Francis S. Marion. 2131 Fifth av (2754). 

BRONXWOOD AV, nee 230th, 2-sty & attic 
concrete dwg, 20.6x206, shingle rf ; .$5,000; (oj 
Tho.^. Duff Co., Inc.. Thos. D. Malcolm. 132 W 
42d. Pres; (a) E. R. Williams, 2296 7 av (2776). 
BRONXWOOD AV, e s, 50 n Duncan av. 2'.- 
sty fr dwg, 20x40. shingle rt ; $4..5O0 ; (o) Stanis- 
laus Walaczkowski. 282 E 155th; (a) S. J. 
Sheridan. 5646 Newton av (2767). 

Bl'HRE AV, s s, 125 w Mahan av, 2-sty bk 
dwg. 20.8x45, shingle rt ; $9,000; (o) Matilda 
Eagles. 1043 Tiffany ; (a) N. S. Baudesson, 824 
.lackson av (2794). 

BURR AV, n s, 350 s 196th, 2-sty h. t. dwg, 
21x50, rubberoid rt ; $10,000; (o) John Ber- 
nabo, 349 E 51st; (a) T. J. Kelly, 707 Morris 
Park av (2608). 

BYRON AV, w s, 171.01 s 2.37th st, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 18x26. shingle rf ; $4,500: (o) Kate 
McEnany, 404 E 175th st ; (a) Robt. Smith, 
2074 Arthur av (2699). 

CLAFLIN AV, e s. 250 s 197th, 2-sty bk dwg, 
26x44. asphalt sbingle rf ; $15,000; (o) Louis S. 
Wund, 327 E 30th ; (a) Thos. W. Golding, 119 
W 63 (2777). 

CLAFLIN AV, e s, 75 n 195th st, 2-sty and 
attic fr dwg, 18x44, shingle rt ; $4,500; (ol 
Mrs. A. V. Douglas, 44 Buchanan pi; (a) Paul 
C. Hunter, 101 9th av (2636). 

CLAFLIN AV, w s, 78.9 s -Moth st, 2-sty fr 
dwg. 29x42. shingle rf ; $10,000; (o) Eugene 
Frering. 2i38 Webb av ; (a) Louis Haysser, 
2816 Claflin av (2.541). 

CLAFLIN AV. w s, 375 n in7th st, 2 2-sty 
br dwgs ; .$20.000 : (o) Julia D. Neimann. 16 
University av : (ai Moore & Laudseidel, 3d av 
and 148th st (2661). 

CLAFLIN AV. w s. 125 s 197th. 1^-sty fr 
dwg, 18x29. shingle rt : $5,000; (o) Ada S. 
Teller, 39 McDonough, Bklyn; (a) Int. Mill & 
Lumber Co. of N. Y., Inc:, 1 W 34th (2515). 

GOLDEN AV, e s. 366.10 n Boston rd, 2-sty 
bk dwg. 21x51, tin rt ; $6,500: (o) Albert New- 
man. 2312 Prospect av ; (a) Thos. C. Petersen, 
1628 McCombs rd (2530). 

GOLDEN AV. e s. 425 n Mace av, 2-sty bk 
dwg. 22X.55, rubberoid rt ; $9,000: (o) Frank 
Mascoli, 2310 Belmont av ; (a) Delia, Penna & 
Erickson, 280 E 149th (2591). 

GOLDEN AV. e s. 275.3 n Pierce av, 2^4-sty 
br dwg, 18.6x58: 1-stv br garage, 16.0x18; tin 
rf; $12,000; (o) Morris Goldstein, 007 So Boule- 
vard ; (a) Loranz F. J. Weiher, 271 W 125th 
st (24.52). 

GOLDEN AV, w s. 150 n Burke av. l^^-sty tr 
dwg, 19x24 shingle rf ; $1,500; (o) B. Wasser- 
raan. .532 E 120th st ; (a) Jos. Ziccardi, 912 
Burke av (2459). 

COMMONWEALTH AV. w s, 225 n Merrill. 2- 
sty fr dwg, 21x50. tar gravel rf ; .$9,500; (o) 



January 7, 1922" 

John & Chas. Masterson, 209 W 117th ; (a) 
Alfred Di lasi, 94 B Jackson av. Corona, L.. I, 
(2732). 

CORSA AV, w s, 52.2 s Oakley, 3-sty bk dwg, 
21x55, slag rt; $10,000; (o) Louis Porco. 620 
E Fordham rd ; (a) M. W. Del Gaudio, 158 W 
45th (2619). 

DANIEL ST, s a, 162.6 e Plymouth av, 2y2-str 
tr dwg, 18x36, shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) Daniel 
McClinchy, 253 Mosholu av ; (a) Wm. A. Ken- 
nedy, 5654 Newton av (2666). 

DANIEL ST, s s, 125 e Plymouth av, 2H-8ty 
tr dwg, 1S.X36, shingle rt ; $5,000 ; (o) Daniel 
McClinchy, 253d st & Mosholu av ; (a) Wm. A. 
Kennedy, 5654 Newton av (2667). 

DE RBIMER AV, w s, 100.30 s Pitman av, 
1-sty fr dwg, 24x34, asphalt shingle rf : $4,000; 
(o) Annie Young, 4253 De Reimer av ; (a) 
Della-Penna & Erickson, 289 E 149th (2755). 

DUNCAN AV, n s, 50 w Paulding av, 2-sty 
br dwg, 21x48, tar and gravel rf ; $6,500; (o) 
A. F. A. Gleason, 362j^ E 79th st ; (a) Geo. P. 
Crosier, 689 E 223d st (2647). 

DYER AV. e s, 94 s City Line, l',i-sty fr 
dwg. 24x37, shingle rt ; .$4,000; (o & a) L. A. 
Bassett. 704 So Fifth av, Mt Vernon (2843). 

EASTCHESTER RD, e s, 325 s Tillotson av, 
2-2-sty bk dwgs, 18x38, asphalt shingle rt ; $10,- 
000; (o) Christman & Strieker Realty Co., John. 
Christman, 60S B Fordham rd. Pres. ; (a) Wm. 
H. Meyer, 1861 Carter av (2.520). 

EDISON AV, e s. 105 s Otis av. 2-3ty fr dwg, 
22.X34. shingle rf ; $6,000; (o) Catherine Hickey,- 
— Greene pi ; (a) R. J. & F. J. Johnson, 375 E 
Fordham rd (2522). 

EDISON AV, w s, 355.1 Morris Park av, 2-sty 
bk dwg, 22x45, tin rf ; $8,000; (o) F. Di Stefano, 
167 E 166th ; (a) Jos. Orlando, 529 Courtlandt 
av (2521). 

EDISON AV, w s, 100 s Wilkinson av, 2-sty 
bk dwg, 21x54, plastic slate rf ; $0,000; (ol 
Pasquale Grleco. 309 E 105th; (a) Carl B. Call, 
80 E 125th (2579). 

EDISON AV, w s, 125 s Wilkinson av, 2-sty 
bk dwg, 21x45, plastic slate rf ; $8,000 ; (o) 
Francisco, 312 E 108th; (a) Carl B. Cali, 81 
E 125th (2580). 

EDISON AV, s s, 50 e Sommer pi, 2-sty h. t. 
dwg, 37.X37.8, shingle rf ; $10,000; (o) Henry 
Van & Theresa Windisch, .596 E 149th; (aj 
Vari T. Chirehugh, 126 W 124th (2740). 

EDISON AV, e s, 377.11 s Morris Park av, 2- 
sty fr dwg, 18.6x40. shingle rt : $8,000: (oc 
Ivar Saari. 231 E 122d ; (a) A. Rinnee, 601 W 
160th (2682). 

EDISON AV, e s, 2S0 s Lafayette av. 2-sty fr- 
dwg, 20.4x52, plastic slate rf ; $10,000: (o) Owen 

Brennan, Ellsworth av ; (a) Frank Hansle, 

SI E 125th (2787). 

EDISON AV, e s. 305 s Lafayette av, 2-sty tr 
dwg, 20.4x52, plastic slate rt : $10,000 ; (o) Owei\ 
Brennan, Ellsworth av ; (a) Frank Hansle, 81 E 
125th (2788). 

ELLIS AV, n s, 81 E Castle Hill av. three 
2-sty br dwgs, 18.4x.34; tin rt ; $12,000; (o) 
Castle Hill Realty Co., Jos. Feldman, 200 Lin- 
coln bldg, Philadelphia, Pa; (a) Samuel Rosen- 
berg. 911 Simpson st (2457). 

ELSWORTH AV, n s, 250 w Randall av, 2- 
sty fr dwg, 16x40, shingle rf ; .$5,000; (o) John 
Jurdyga, 1409 Amsterdam av ; (a) Carl B. 
Cali. SI E 125th (2.598). 

ELLSWORTH AV, e s, 475 s Schley av. 1-sty 
fr dwg, 16X.30. slate rt ; $1,500: (o) S. A. Fer- 
guson. 10.84 Park av ; (a) H. R. Cloyd, 261 
B'way (2846). 

FARADAY AV, n s. 350 w Newton av. 2-sty fr 
dwg. 21x31.6, asphalt shingle rf : $5,000; (o) 
Patrick Keete. Fieldstone rd : (a) T. J. Cun- 
ningham, 5663 Newton av (2807). 

FENTON AV. e s. 250 s Arrow av. 1-sty tr 
dwg. 21X.37. asphalt shingle rf ; .$2..S00 : (o) 
T. M'Guiness, 445 W .53d; (a) Geo. H. Aphart. 
.Ir., 657 B 22d (2845). 

FISH AV. w s, 125.08 n Warring av. 1-sty 
fr dwg. 19x45, tar paper rf ; $3,500: lo) Frank 
Giorlano. .507 E 16th; (a) Frank R. Nicosia, 
423 E 114th (2844). 

FISH AV, e s. 275 s Mace av. 2-sty fr dwg, 
21x45. tin rf : $6,000: (o) Angelo Lehongone, 
660 E lS7th ; (a) Robt. Glenn, :3.58 E 151st 
(276S1. 

FRISBY AV, n s. 95 w St. Peters av. 2-2-sty 
fr dwgs. 17X.36. shingle rf ; .$8,000; (o) J. L. 
Freis. Inc., 17:>4 Eastchester rd ; (a) L. P. Fries 
120 Westchester sq (2789). 

GRAND CONCOURSE, e s. 63.74 s St George's 
Crescent. 2-sty bk dwg. 35.94x32. slag rf : $15 - 
000: (o) Anna Manac-i, 3164 Villa av ; (a) De 
Rose & Cavalieri. 370 E 149th (2751). 

GREYSTONE AV. w s. 100 s 2.3Sth. 2-2-sty bk 
dwgs. 20.6x55.6, slae rt : $20,000; (o) Michelson 
.C- Hoffman. 20 E 112th; (a) Jos. Sulton. 4350 5 
av (2790). 

GUNTHER AV. w s. 90.7 s Burke av. three 2- 
sty fr dwgs, 22x45, shingle rf : $24.000 ; (o) 
Emily Wisseman. 38 Stevens av ; (a) Wm. S. 
Irving. 261 E 2.35 (2743). 

HOLLYWOOD AV. w s. 253.5 n Coddington av, 
2U-sty tr dwg. 27x28. shingle rt ; $4,000; (o) 
Matthew Cahill. 1533 Merry av ; (a) S. J 
Sheridan. .5646 Newton av (2792). 



January 7, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



29 



s Npil av, 2y2-sty i.' 
$10,OUO; (o) Amalia 
(a) Salvatore Butera, 



HARRISON AV. w s, 433.;) s Burnside av, 3- 
sty I'r dwg & garage. 2'2x7y7t, slag rf : .?15,(J1)0 ; 
(o) Hazel Toop, ISSl Harrison av ; (a.) Moore 
.& Landsiedel. 3 av & 148tli (2t;T.S). 

HERING AV. w s. 1(X).38 n Sackett av, 2'/2- 
sty fr dwg, 18x24. shingle rf ; $4,726: (o) Geo. 
A. Kaufman. 11 St Marks pi; (a) Chas. A 
Newburg, Grand Central Terminal (2Gi)2). 

HERING AV. e s, 225 n Pierce av. 2V2-sty fr 
dwg. l.';.\24. shingle rf ; $4,980; (o) Geo. Tid- 
conibe. 2:i:i Willis av ; (a) Chas. A. Newburg. 
<3rand Central Terminal (2G:J3). 

HERING AV. w s. 273 n Pierce av. 2-sty fr 
dwg, lSx3a, tin rf. $4,5U0 ; (o) S. Tobias. 548 E 
147; (a) Larson & Walters, 4 Court st, Bklyn 
(2471). 

HOBART AV, e s, 75 n Wilkinson av, 2-sty 
H T dwg, 20.6x45. asphalt shingle rf ; $9,0(J0 ; 
(o) Frank Marino, 319 B 117th st ; (a) Jos. 
Orlando, 529 Courtlandt av (2639). 

HOBART AV, e s. 175 n 194th, 2-sty bk dwg, 
.21x49, slag rf; $8,000; (o) Jas. Murano, 216 E 
111th : (a) R. Gottleib, 26 W 113th (2583). 

HOLLYWOOD AV. n s. 300 e Lafayette av. 
1-sty fr dwg, 33x28. asphaltic rt ; $3,000; (o) 
Lola Kinzel, Uth st, Marks pi, Bklyn; (a) H. 
G, Knapp, 335 Bway (2697). 

HOLLYWOOD AV. w s, 2r>0 s Lafayette av, 
:;-sty fr dwg, 20x28, shingle rf ; $.'),000 ; (o) 
Edith M Silverman. 40S E 1.523; (a) Benj. 
Silverman. 408 E 152d (2824). 

HONE AV. e s. 250 s Pierce av. 2-sty fr dwg, 
22x26. asphalt shingle rf ; $3,500; (o) Andreas 
Rauch, Union Hill. N. J.; (a) Carl Cibiseh, 282 
W 114th (2802). 

HONE AV. w s. 150 
.dwg. 21x52. shingle rt ; 
•Wolff. 1869 Wallace av ; 
«10 Wales av (2690). 

JARVIS AV. w s, 175 3 Buhre av, 2-sty fr 
dwg shingle rf, $8,000; (o) Lawrence & Klein, 
— Edison av; (a) B. F. Morgatroyd, 27 B 41^ 
(2300). ' 

JARVIS AV. w s. 223 s Buhre av, 1 & 2-sty 
t c garage & dwg, 14.2x10 & 25x42. asbestos 
shingle rf ; .$9,500; (o) Chas. Dammeyer, 960 
Sherman av ; (a) De Rose &. Cavalieri, 370 B 
149 1 27.10). 

.JESSUP AV, e s. 362.75 s Featherbed la. 2-sty 
■enncrete dw?. 23x59. shingle rt ; $10,000; (o & a) 
Henry D. Trieper, Jr., 30.59 Heath av (2814). 

lESSUP AV. e s. 275 s Featherbed Lane, two 
ii-sty bk dwgs. 20x60.2. rubberoid rf ; $24,000 ; 
10) Siegel & Swidler, 2526 Glebe av ; (a) Paul 
Lagana, 2.326 Glebe av (2841). 

JESSI'P AV e s. 325.3 s Featherbed la, 2-sty 
bk dwg, 28.4x48. 1-sty bk garage. 20x20. asphalt 
shingle rf. $16,000; (o) Florence Swanson. 2406 
University av ; (a) W. G. Paries. 1339 Bristow 
st v2496). 

LA SALLE AV. n s, 127.3 w Gillespie av, 2- 
sty bk dwg. 22x50. plastic slate rt ; $9,500; (o) 
•Carmela Carusano. 3,39 E 113th; (a) De Rose & 
■Cavalieri. 370 E 140th (2773). 

LA SALLE AV. n s. 107 e Mayflower av, 2- 
sty H T dwg. 20x36. rubberoid rf ; $5,000; (o) 
N & O. Kennedy. 32 Westchester Sq ; (a) M. 
A. Buckley. 32 Westchester Sq (2539). 

LEIBIG AV, w s, 320 n 261st, 2-sty bk dwg, 
■29x57. Spanish tile rf ; $10,000: (o) Domenick 
Vaccaro, 6207 Liebig av ; (a) M. W. Del Gaudio. 
158 W 45 (2663). 

LELAND AV, w s. 250 n Gleason av. 2-2-sty 
fr dwKS, 20x50. tin rf : $20,000; (o) Wm. Por- 
■dyce. "1.361 Herschell ; (a) Wm. K. Fordyce. 
1.361 Herschell (2612). 

LELAND AV. w s. 263 8 Gurlain st. 2-sty fr 
dwg. 20x47. shingle rf : $10,000; (o) Goss ConsL. 
-Co., Barnet Goss, 548 St. Paul's pi. pres ; (a) 
Anton Pirner. 2069 Westchester av (2694). 

LOGAN AV. s s, 200 e Philip av. 2-sty bk 
dwg. 21x54. slag rf ; $8,000: (o) Lawrence A. 
"Reilly. 2063 Belmont av ; (a) F. F. McKeever, 
■2133 Crotona av (2614). 

LOGAN AV, w s, 50 n Barclay av, 2-lH-Bty fr 
■dwgs. 20x36. asphalt shingle rf ; $10,000; (o) 
Henry T. Bowsky. 713 W 170th; (a) Morgan M. 
■O'Brien. 49 E 90th (2736). 

LOGAN AV. e s. 123 n Philip av. 1-sty fr 
dwg. 20x:!6. tile rf ; .$3,000; (o) Henry Kasper. 
■2400 Williamsbridge rd : (a) Franz Wolfgang, 
.337 E Tremont av (2850). 

LOGAN AV. w s. 100 n Philip av. 1-sty fr dwg, 
17.,8x:i3.4, shingle rt ; $3,000; (o) Mrs. P. J. 
Clamfl, 4 Pennyfleld Camp; (a) Bdw. J. Kern. 
1310 Theriot av (2822). 

LOGAN AV. w s. 123 n Lafayette av, 2-sty fr 
dwg, lSx3S. asphalt shingle rf : .$6,300: (oi 
Howard A. Turner. 356 E 139th; (a) Valentine 
Becher. 954 Edison av (2815). 

LOGAN AV. w s. 150 s Philip av. 2-sty fr dwg. 
17.8x33.4. shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) Elizabeth M^- 
Leon. 197 W 10th; (a) Edw. J. Kern, 1310 
Theriot av (2823). 

LOGAN AV, e s, 285 s Barkley av. 2-3ty fr 
dwg. 20x34. 1-sty fr garage. 10x18. shingle rf ; 
.$3..300: (o) Mrs. L. Robinson. 862 E 169th; (a) 
Emil Stauffer. 3004 Barkley ay (2791). 

LOGAN AV. s s. 260 e Barkley av. two 1-sty 
fr dwgs. 21x36. shingle rf ; .$8,000: (o) Cornac 
•Const. Cori).. Irving Cohen. 170 B'way, pres. : 
(a) H. J. Hewitt. 2119 Glebe av (2758). 



LONGFELLOW AV. e s, 1.50 s Spoftord av. 2- 
sty concrete dwg. 19.6x52. slag rf ; $8,000; (o) 
Alfred Young. 115 E 111; (a) Dodge & Morrison, 
160 Pearl (2746). 

LYDIG AV. n w c Hone av. 2-sty tr dwg, 
20.X48: slag rf : $9,000; (o) Edmund C. Stack, 
211 Hancock st, J C ; (a) Anton Pirner, 2069 
Westchester av (2450). 

MAHAN AV, e s, 100 s Burke av, two 2-sty 
br dwgs. 20X.35 ; one 1-sty br garage. 20x20 ; 
slag rf; $21,0(10; (o) John Sellitto, 1815 West 
Farms rd : (a) B. Ebeling, 1372 Zerega av 
(2453). 

MATILDA AV. w s. 200 s 237th. 2y2-sty fr 
dwg. 33x43. comp shingle rf : $12,000: (o) Jos. 
Mochs. 372 E 1.38th; (a) B. P. Wilson, 1705 
Bussing av (2325). 

MAYFLOWER AV, e s, 50 n 197th, 2y2-sty 
h. t. dwg. 21x40, shingle rf ; .$9,000; (o) Jacob 
Long, 763 Morris Park av : (a) T. J. Kelly, 707 
Morris Park av (2611). 

MAYFLOWER AV. e s. 200 s Waterbury av. 
2-sty tr dwg. 21x53.6. asphalt shingle rf ; $7,- 



000; (0) Geo. Millet, 286 B 1.56th: (a) De Rose 
a Cavalieri. 370 E 149th (2774). 

MAYFLOWER AV. e s, 55 n Tremont av. 2- 
sty tr dwg. 18x22. slate rf ; $3775; (o) Chas. 
Hugger. 497 E 87th; (a) Louis D. Kirby, 1750 
Tremont av (2.8:U). 

M.AYFLOWER AV, w s. .325 s Waterbury av. 
2-sty fr dwg. 20x28, shingle rt : $4,500 (o & a) 
John Tarpey, 1738 Unionport rd (2817). 

McCOMUS RD. w s. 150 n 174th. 3-sty bk dwg, 
17x60, slag rf, $10,UOO ; (o) Seymour Schampain, 
316 W 42; (a) Wm. A. Geisen, 2403 Creston av 
(2499). , ; 

MINNIEFORD AV, e s. 223 s Bowne. 3-1-sty 
fr dwgs, 19x31.6, asphalt shingle rt ; $13.000 : 
(0) Ernst & Kuhl. 1770 Tremont av : (a) Moor 
& Landsiedel. 3 av & 149th (2784). 

MIDDLETOWN RD, s s, 50.5 w Gillespie a, 
2-sty br dwg, 30x44, shingle rf ; $10,000; (o) 
Morris Schwan, 11.50 Fox st ; (a) T. Ratner 
2:i41 Webster av (26.53). 

MICKLE AV, w s. 176 n Waring av. 2-sty 
bk dwg. 19X.36. asphalt shingle rf : $5,000: (o) 



CHESLEY DOORS 

FIRE PROOF STANDARDIZED 
SHIPPED FROM STOCK 



WHKREVEK cither 
law or client fdc- 
m a n cl s fireproof 
doors, beauty and safety 
may be gained most eco- 
nomically with Chesley 
Doors. 

Chesley Doors have no 
rivets, bolts, open joints, or 
separate moldings. Easily 
finished to harmonize with 
interior. Light weight but 
absolutely fire- safe. Cost 
only slightly more than 
wood; much less than hol- 
low metal. Large stocks in 
all centers insure prompt 
delivery. See Sweet's and 
write. 

A. C. CHESLEY CO., Ipc. 

S704 E. 133d St.. New Yprk 

Telephone: 

Melrose 2452 and 2453 





LOUIS BROOK, INC. 

LUMBER and TIMBER at RETAIL 

S.\SHES BLINDS MOULDING TRIM SHELVING FLOORING 

SHINGLES ROOFING PARTITION BOARDS VENEER PANELS, ETC. 

OFFICE: TEL. 2600 GREENPOINT YARDS: 

148-152 INDIA STREET GREENPOINT, BROOKLYN OAKLAND i INDIA ST8. 



WELLS ARCHITECTURAL IRON CO. 



Phanei 



f laTt 
Mott BsTra I lan 



Manufacturers of Ornamental Iron Work 

Office and Factory: River Ave. and East 15l8t St 




The 

UNION STOVE WORKS 

Headqnarters for Ballders for 

Kitchen Ranges for Coal or Gas, Standard or 

Pipeless Furnaces, Heating Boilers, Laundry 

Apparati 

THE GREAT "ASTOR" LINE 



70 BEEKMAN STREET 



Established 88 Years 



Telephone: Beekman 249A 



30 



Edw. Matte. 27Sth and Paulding av ; (a) Della- 
Penna & Erickson, 281) B 149th (2750)-. 

MORRIS AV, s s. 719.0 e 196th. 2-sty fr dwg. 
20x36, slate rt. .$10,01)0; (o) H. Glaser. 120 W 
43; (a) J. Gloster. 110 W 40 (2.j01). 

MURDOCK AV. w s, 250.09 s Nereid av, 2- 
sty tr dwg, 19x34, shingle Tt ; ,$4,000; (oj 
Christian Souderly, 1,S54 Jerome av ; (a) E. A. 
Lyndc. 26S5 Briggs av (2707). 

MURDOCK AV. w s. 4.30.11 s Bissel av, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 24x40, shingle r£ ; $5,000; (o) Chas. 
Weslerholm. 615 E 141st ; (a) Andrew Carlson, 
203 E 124th (2803). 

OAKLEY AV, w s, 366.^ n Fish av, 2-sty bk 
dwg, 22X.50, plastic slate rf, $9,500 ; (o) Luigi 
Terminello, 1.33 W 98; (a) De Rose & Cavalieri 
370 E 149 (2478). 

OTIS AV. n s, 123 e E Tremont av, 2y2-sty 
tr dwg, 22x40, shingle rt ; $8,500; (o) Paul 
Alft, 1826 Clinton av ; (a) Andrew Carlson. 205 
E 124th st (2689). 

OLMSTEAD AV, w s. 28 s Haviland av, 2-2- 
sty bk dwgs, 20x48, slag rf ; $18,()ii0; (o) Edw 
J. Moberg Co.. Inc.. Edw. J. Moberg, 2280 Lyon 
av, Pres ; (a) Anton Pirner, 2069 Westchester 
av (2549). 

ORLIFF AV. 6 s. 100 s Van Cortlandt av 2- 
sty fr dwg. 22x.32.6, 1-sty fr garage, 18x20, 
shingle rf ; .$7,000; (o) James O. Murray, on 
prem ; (a) Moore & Landsiedel, 3 av & 148th 
(2550). 

OTIS AV, n w e, Edison av, 2 2-sty br dwgs 
24x50, asbestos shingle rf ; $10,000; (o) Jacob 
Solomon, 1876 Marmion av ; (a) Harry Schuler 
1005 Edison av (2642). 

PAULDING AV, s w c 231st. 21/,-sty fr dwg. 
22x36. shingle rf ; .$5,000; (o & a)'Mrs. Jos. K. 
Bevins, 1780 Bussing av (2816). 

PAULDING AV, w s, 400 n Allerton av, 2-sty 
bk dwg. 21x50, slag rf ; $10,000; (o) Michael 
F. Collins. 945 St. Nicholas av ; (a) Anton 
Pirner. 2069 Westchester av (2602). 

PAULDING AV, w s, 84.8 s 22.5th, 2-sty bk 
dwg, 21x47, tar & gravel rf ; $9,000; (o) Glu- 
sepoe Bartolatta. 620 Lenox av ; (a) D. Borgia. 
1947 Bway (2567). 

PHILIP AV. s s. 75 w Logan av. 1^-sty fr 
dwg. 16X.32. shingle rf ; .$3,750; (o) J. E. Fitz- 
gerald. 480 Brook av ; (a) Chas. Newburg, 
Grand Central Terminal (2691). 

PIERCE AV, s s, 100 e Williamsbridge rd, 
2%-sty fr dwg. 22x38. & IVa-sty fr garage. 20x 
20, asbestos shingle rf ; $8,000; (o) John Has- 
tead. 2167 Glebe av ; (a) B. Ebeling. 1372 Ze- 
rega av (2779). 

PILGRIM AV, w s, 316.6 s Liberty st, 2-sty 
vk dwg, 18x55, tar & felt rf, $8,000; (o) N. 
Grossman, 921 Home st ; (a) Jos. Ziccardi, 912 
Burke, av (2474). 

PILGRIM AV. w s. 229.9 n Middletown rd, 2- 
sty fr dwg. 20x30. shingle rf, .$5,000; (o) Chas. 
M. Stilul, 987 4 av, L. I. City; (a) The Aladdin 
Co., Bay City (2475). 

PITMAN AV, n s. 49 w Monticello av. 2-sty 
fr dwg, 36.8x38.4, rubberoid rf ; $7,000 ; (o) D 
A. Tsistimas, 85 6th av ; (a) E. R. Kane, 1060 
Jackson av (2626). 

PITMAN AV, n s. 25 e De Reiner av, 2-stv 

fr dwg, 161/2x46, shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) Fred 

Widen, 129 E 12.3d: (a) E. A. Lynde, 2685 
Briggs av (2793). 

PpPHAM AV, e s. 419.9 n 176th st, 2%-sty 
br dwg, 41.0x32; 1-sty br garage, 11.4x20; as- 
bestos shingle rf; $15,500; (o) David Kopu. 
226 Martenese st. Bklyn ; (a) Crumley & 
Skrwan. 355 E 149th st (246).. 

POWELL AV. n s. 188.5 w Olmstead av 4-'>- 
stv bk dwgs. 20.6x65 8 : 4-1-sty bk garages. 19.48 
xl9, shingle rf ; .$40,000: (o) Goldman Investing 
Co Bernard Krause. 5S2 Beck. Pres: (a) Baker 
& Koester, 9 Jackson av. L. I. City (2783). 

PRATT AV. e s, 182.0 n 233d. 2y2-sty. fr dwg. 
24x38. asphalt shingle rf. $9,000; (o) Herman 
Lmd. .i957 Amundson av ; (a) Crumley & Skri- 
van. 3.55 E 149 (2484). 

■, PROSPECT AV. e s, 100 s 176th st. three 
2-sty bk dwes. 19x61. rubberoid rf • .$.5" 000 • 
(o) Brieter Bldg Corp.. Inc.. Jos. Brieter 9.3 
Canal, pres.: (a) Ferdinand Sanigrano 6005 
14th av. Bklyn (2826). 

QUIMBY AV, n s. 115 e Almstead av, 2-sty 
fr dwg. 18x38, asphalt shingle rf ; $6 000- (o) 
Edw. H. Leiber. 2118 Watson av ; (a) Anton 
Pirner, 2069 Westchester av (2640), 

QUINCY AV, e s. 150 s Barkley av. 2-sty 
br dwg, 17x35, asphalt shingle rf ; $6,500; (o) 
Pietro Boz. 663 E ]88th st ; (a) M. W Del 
Gaudio, 158 W 45th st (2662). 

QUINCY AV. e s. 245 s Lafayette av, 1-sty 
fr dwg. 19x26. shingle rf : $1,000; (o) Harry 
Jarvl, 1737 Weeks av ; (a) E. A. Lynde, 2685 
Briggs av (2706). 

RADCLIFPE AV, w s. 250 n Mace av, 2-stv 
bk dwg, 22X.36. rubberoid rf ; .$6..500 ; (o) Pas- 
quale Espnsito, 1675 Lexington av ; (a) Delia 
Penna & Erickson, 289 E 149th (2683). 

RADCLIFFE AV. nee Sackett av, 2-2-sty 
bk dwgs, 20X.50, rubberoid rf ; $16,000; (o) An- 
tonio Guirl, Sackett av ; (a) T. J. Kelly 707 
Morris Park av (2607). 

RHINELANDER AV. s 8. 25 w Lurtlng av, 2- 
6ty bk dwg, 21x40, slag rf ; $10,000; (o) Earth 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

Webber, 555 W 160tli ; (a) H. G. Knapp, 335 
Bway (2516). 

RICHARDSON AV, e s, 55 s 238th, 2-2-sty bk 
dwgs, 21.X50, slag rt ; $22,000; (o) Wm. Garrett, 
664 E 2.37th ; (a) Crumley & Skrivan, 335 E 
149th (2723). 

RIVERDALE AV. e s, 90 s 263d. 21/2-sty fr 
dwg & garage. 20x37.8. asphalt shingle rf ; $8,- 
000 : (o) De Forest Becker, 104 W 174th; (a) 
Moore & Landseidel, S av & 148th (2805). 

ST LAWRENCE AV, e s, .50 n Mansion st, 2- 
sty fr dwg. 19.X.35, slag rf, $8,000; (0) Carl 
■Tacobsen, Curtine & Jackson avs, Mt Vernon, 
N. Y.; (a) Moore & Landseidel, 3 av & 14Sth 

ST PETERS AV, n e c, Glebon av, 2-sty t. c. 
dwg and garage, 20x53, plastic slate rt ; $10,- 
000; (o) Angelo G. Fasany, 152 W 42d st • (a) 
Robt. Glenn. 286 Alexander av (2627). 

SACKETT AV, n s, 26.11 w Hering av, 2-sty 
bk dwg, 20x36, tin rf ; $7,000; (o) Chas. H. 
Dooley, 443 W 51th; (a) Larsen & Walters, 4 
Court, Bklyn (2584), 

SCHLEY AV. s s, 50 W Vincent av, IVi-sty 
fr dwg, 19x4315; shingle rf, .$3,000; (o) Eliz 
Crofton, 1754 Anthony av ; (a) S. J. Sheridan. 
5046 Newton av (2463). 

SETON AV. e s, .500 3 Edenwald av, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 24x46, asphalt shingle rf ; $10,000; (0) El- 
len Johnson, 2141 Prospect av ; (a) Otto John- 
son, 2141 Prospect av (2074). 

SETON AV, e s, 175 n Nereid av, 1-sty tr 
dwgs. 16x22. asphalt shingle rf ; $1,600; (0 & a) 
James Galvano. 204 S 8th av, Mt Vernon (28.36). 

SEYMOUR AV. e s, 93.9 Mace av. 2-sty fr 
dwg. 20x45. plastic slate rf ; $7,000; (o) Jacob 
Horwitz. 1,85 Christie av ; (a) Lorenz F. J 
Weiher, 271 W 125th (2838). 

SOUND VIEW AV, e s, 85 n Patterson av. 
2y2-sty tr dwg, 20.6x31.3. tin rf ; $5,000; (o) 
Daniel Murray. 1 E Fordham rd ; (a) The Pel- 
ham Co.. 1 E Fordham rd (2795). 

SPENCER AV. s e c 262d. 2-sty tr dwg, 36.8x 
2i^ shingle rf ; $7,000; (o & a) Gottfried Olson, 
■56 1 3 Bway (2769). 

THROGMORTON AV. e s, 200 s Balsley av 
2-sty fr dwg. 20.8x.36. tin rt ; .$6,000; (o) John 
Sheridan, 409 W 35th ; (a) Larsen & Walters, 
4 Court, Bklyn (2825). 

WEBB AV. e s, 130 n 195th st, two 2-sty bk 
dwgs & garages, 28x71.4. asbestos shingle rf ; 
$.32,000: (0) Cohen & Vogel. 417 E 170th; (a) 
M. J. Harrison. 110 E 31st (2839). 

TIEMANN AV, e s, 86.2 s Burke av. three 2- 
sty fr dwgs. 22x45. shingle rt ; $24,000; (o) 
Emily Wisserman, 1.38 Stevens av ; (a) Wm S 
Irving, 261 235 (2744). 

TREMONT AV, w s, .370.4 s Lafayette av 2- 
sty tr dwg. 16V,x46. shingle rf ; .$5,000- (ot 
Morris Belkin. 630 Concord av ; (a) E. A Lvnde 
2685 Briggs av (2813). 

TOMLIXSON AV. e s. 165-10 s Pelham Park- 

??n'mA°"'; 'V^r ^ ^ ■^ •'■^S^- 23.7x44. shingle rt ; 
$.TO.0O0: (o) Lapidno & Kahn. 2.30 E 124th- (a) 
Geo. H. Levy. 101 Park av (2851). 

VINCENT AV, s s, 225 w Philip av, 1-sty tr 
dwg, 19x44, tar & gravel rf ; ,$2,000; (o) Alex 
fi'j'^''-^-^" '^ 133d ; (a) Anthony Dahen, 541 E 
142d (2i81). 

WALLACE AV. s w c So Oak Drive. 3-sty 
bk dwg. 24x50. plastic slate rf ; $9,000: (o) 
Geo Corti. 744 E 214th; (a) Lucian Pisciotta, 
.3011 Barnes av (2847). 

WALDO AV, e s. 250.29 s 238th. two 2-sty tr 
dwgs. 20x45. asphalt shingle rf ; $20,000; (o) 
Christine Marshall. 21 E 127; (a) Slmone P 
Saxe. 77 E 127 (2749). 

WARING AV. e s, 25 n Morgan av, 1-sty fr 
dwg. 18x35. shingle rf ; $1,600: (o) Geo T 
Bernard, 1010 Tremont av : (a) Boston Bldg & 
Const. Co.. 1985 Boston rd (2797). 

WICKHAM AV. sec Tillitson av. seven 
1 -sty fr dwgs. 18x30. shingle rf : .$.35 000 - 
(o S- a) Francis S. Marlon, 2131 Fifth av 
(27.52). 

WILDER AV, w s. 183.4 s Cranford av. 1-stv 
fr dw.g. 26x38. shingle rf; $4,500; (ol Ideal 
Home Constn. Corpn.. David .T. Rosen, 350 Bway, 
Pres; (a) L. A. Bassett, 2593 Grand Concourse 
(2 16I) . 

WILDER AV, e s, 232 Cranford av, 1-sty fr 
dwg. 26X.33, shingle rt ; $4,.500 ; (o) Ideal Homes 
Const. Corn. David J. Rosen. 3.50 B'wav. ores. ; 
(a) L. A. Bassett. 2.593 Grand Concourse (27601. 

WILDER AV. e s. 166 s Cranford av. 1-sty 
fr dwg. 24x33, shingle rf : $4,000; (o) Ideal 
Homes Const. Corp.. David J. Rosen. .3.50 B'wav, 
pres.; (a) L. A. Bassett, 2,593 Grand Con- 
course (2759). 

WILKINSON AV. s s, 125 e Hobart av, 1%- 
sty h t dwg, 20x40. shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) 
Henry J Baztold. 2467 Tratman av ; (a) B, Ebel- 
ing, 1372 Zerega av (2747). 

WOOD AV, n w c White Plains av, 2-sty fr 
dwg. 20x52. tar & grnvel rf ; $6,000; (o) Wm. A 
Leonard. 3.56 E 145th: (a) H. G. Lawson. 1.54 
Nassau (2780). 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

144TH ST. n s. 347.7 e Park' av. 2-sty bk fac- 
tory. 27.28x95.8. tar & felt rf : $17,.500 ; (o) 
Mouritz F. Westergren. 213 E 144th: (a) Phil 
H. Gabel. 381 4 av (2818). 



January 7, 1922 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

GIRARD AV, e s, 80.07 s 149th, 1-sty bk 
garage, 134.8x200. plastic slate rf : $40,000; (o) 
Est of Henry Lewis Morris, 32 Liberty ; (a) 
Anthony Durenbacher, 72 E 124th (2812), 

GROSVENOR AV, e s, 551.11 n 246th, 1-sty fr 
stn garage, 21x13.6, concr rf ; $1,5(X) ; (o) A. E. 
Wheeler, 246th & Tibbett av ; (a) Julius Greg- 
ory, 56 W 45th (2801). 

UNIVERSITY AV, w s, 250.10 n 183d st, 1-sty 
concr garage, 30x19, slag rf ; $2,000; (o) Henry 
Sullivan, on prem. ; (a) Euell & Euell, 135 
Sherman av (2757). 

VAN NEST AV. sec Matthews av, 1-sty tii^j 
& bk garage, 41.3x16.4, plastic slate rt ; $2,000 ; 
(o) John F. Kelly, on prem; (a) John J. Dun- 
nigan, 394 E 150th (2799). 

WELLMAN AV, n s, 250 w Mayflower av, 1- 
sty concrete garage, 18.8x18.8. rubberoid rf ; 
$700; (o) Francis J. Long, on prem; (a) 
Kingsley Lloyd, Mamaroneck, N, Y, (2809). 
STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

182d ST, n e c Adams pi. 1-sty bk ofHce, S.8x 
22.3. rubberoid rf ; $1,300; (o) Adams Place 
Holding Co.. Oil E 182d ; (a) Gustave DieHch. 
970 Prospect av (2819). 

AQUEDUCT AV, sec 183d. 1-sty bk strs & 
garage. 86.,3x irreg, slag rf ; $30,000: (o) M. P. 
Mulhall, 2422 University av ; (a) Chas. Kreym- 
borg, 25.34 Marion av (2804). 

KINGSBRIDGE RD, sec Davidson av, 1-sty 
bk strs, 120.8!.)x irreg, tar & gravel rt ; $25,000 ; 
(o) Weeks Av- Constn, Co., Isidor Robinson, 865 
E 172d, Pres. ; (a) P. R. Henkel, Inc., 318 E 
161st (2782), 

LAPONTAINE AV, n w c 177th st, 2-sty bk 
strs & offices, 110.70x7.02, slag rf ; .$60,000; (0) 
Reywal Holding Co.. Aaron Miller, 255 W 106th, 
pres. ; (a) Chas. Kreymborg. 2.534 Marion av 
(2832). 

RIVER AV. sec 167th st. 1-sty bk strs. 
115x70. slag rt ; $17,000; (o) Manee & Walkers, 
141 B'way : (a) Moore & Landsiedel, Third av 
& 148th (2840), 

TREMONT AV, s s, 183.9 e Morris av, 1-sty 
bk strs & offices, lSl.6y.x50. slag rt ; $.35,000 : 
(0) Rothbart Garage Co., Max Rothbart, 139 
Marcy pi, pres. ; (a) J. M. Fikon, 1133 B'way 
(2840). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 

WHITE PLAINS AV, w s. 222 s Morris Park 
av, 2-sty bk str & dwg, 25x41, rubberoid rf ; $7,- 
000; (o) David Broschart Roofing Co., David 
Broschart, 2008 Bathgate av, Pres; (a) Anton 
Pirner, 2069 Westchester av (2808), 
MISCELLANEOUS. 

ZEREGA AV, e s, 20 s Quinby av, 1-sty fr 
shed, 72x24, asphalt rf ; $1,000; (o) Interbor- 
ough Asphalt Co. 2.30fi Creston av ; (a) Chas. 
Schaefer, Jr., 3£>4 E 150th (2831). 

Brooklyn 

DWELLINGS. 
SHORE RD, 8619-23, nee, 87th st, 2-sty fr. 
1-fam dwg, 16x32 : $10,000 ; (o) John Somer- 
ville, 1.58 5th av ; (a) Max L. Reiser, 1613 Pit- 
kin av (17284). 

SHORE RD, 8619-23, nee, 87th st, 2 2-sty 
tr, 1-fam dwgs, 16x32; $20,000; (o) John Som- 
erville, 158 5th av (17285). 

SHEPHERD AV, 782-4, w s, 225 s Hegeman 
av, 2 2-sty bk, 2-fam dwgs, 20x03; $28,000; (o) 
Murray Goldstein, 83 Division st, N T; (a) 
Jack Pern, 211 Snediker av (17.301). 

Richmond. 

DWELLINGS. 

ANNADALE.— Forest av & Fagan av, e s, 105 
w Amboy pi 1-sty (attic ), brick dwg, rub- 
beroid or slate rf ; $6,000; (o & a) F. M. Lugo, 
560 Eastern pkway, Bklyn, N. Y. (2640). 

BRIGHTON HEIGHTS.— Brighton av, s s, 494 
s Castleton av, 2-sty fr dwg. 22x45, slate rf : 
$10,000: (o) H. Shippen, 272 Flatbush av ext, 
Bklyn, N. Y. : (a) Ole T. Krewick, 58 Richmond 
tpke. S. I. (2630). 

CASTLETON COR.— Richmond Turnpike, n s, 
nee Fairview av, 2-stv bk dwg. 26x26. slas 
rf; $5..500: (o) H. McMillan, W New Brighton, 
S. I.; (a & b) J. O. Johnson, W New Brighton, 
S. I. (2733). 

CLIFTON. — Hope av, s s, 106 w New York av, 
2-sty bk dwg, 29.x31. shingle rf ; $10,000: (o) 
John A. Boeder, Fingerboard rd. Ft. Wads- 
worth ; (a) James Whitford, Tompkinsville, S. I. 
(2644). 

CONCORD.— Butler pi, w s, 140 s Northcote 
pi. 2-sty bk dwg and terra cotta, 29x40, rubber- 
oid rf; $10,000; (o) Vincent & Farena, 140 W 
3d, N Y C : (a) T.udovico Bassi, Brighton Ho- 
tel, Sand Lane (2727). 

DONGAN HILLS. — Southfleld blvd w s 40 s 
Reed, 2-sty bk dwg, 22x35, rubberoid rf ; $3,000 ; 
(o & a) Catarina Delero, 165 Chrystie, N. Y C. 
(2698). 

ELTINGVILLE.— Walner pi, e s, 228 n Am- 
boy rd, iy.-sty fr dwg, 24x26, slag rf ; $4,000: 
(o .C- b) G. & J. Paquitte, 97 Ann st, P. R.. S. I 
(2724). 

GREAT KILLS.— W s. 150 n Nelson av, 1%- 
sty fr dwg, 18x.30, rubberoid rf ; $3,500; (o) 
Chas. J. Wilcox. Great Kills. S. I. ; (a) Wm. 
HarringI m, 511 Madison av, N. Y. C. (2661) 



January 7, 1922 

MARINERS HARBOR.— Amity pi. e 3, 560 s 
Washington av, 1-sty tr dwg, lSx3S : $3,500 ; (o 
& a) Paul Guestler, 71 Amity pi (2622). 



PLANS FILED 

FOR ALTERATIONS 



Manhattan. 

BROAD gT, 42-4, new mezzanine, F P stairs, 
in S-sty F P offices ; $2,000 ; (o) Wall St. Jour- 
nal Bldg. Co., 42-4 Broad; (a) F. P. Piatt & 
Bro., U.SO Fifth av (7). 

CARMINE ST, 37, remove partitions In 5-sty 
bk str & tnt ; $2.50 ; (o) Monroe V. W. De Mott, 
306 Bway ; (a) Otto Reissmann, 147 4 av (3111). 

DELANCEY ST, 194, new concrete floor in 5- 
sty bk tnt, strs & lauudry ; $500; (o) A. Z. 
Holding Co., 2',>l) Montgomery. Bklyn ; (a) Jacob 
Fisher. 2.3 Av A (3106). 

FORSYTH ST, 127, excavate cellar, remove 1 
floor, new coluiuns, girdefs, stores, show win- 
dows, in 5-sty .'flk store & tnt; $10,0IK» ; (o) 
Solomon* Brinn, 63 Park av : (a) Zipskes, Wolff 
& Kudroff, 432 Fourth av (1). 

GREENWICH ST, 2S6, new bulkhead, extend 
stairs, in 5-sty bk lofts & factory ;• $350 ;. (ol 
Langon Greenwood. 30 Church; (a) Carl B. 
Call. 81 E 125th (3). 

GREENWICH ST, 474, new tank on 6-sly bk 
factory; $750; (o) Saml. Well & Son, 1D4 Frank- 
lin; (a) .Chas. Mayer, 110 W 40th (3107). 

GREENWICH ST, 90, remove wall, partitions, 
new str front, ext, cone floor, toilets, partitions, 
plumbing in 5-sty bk str & apt; $15,000; (o) 
Patk. J. McCarthy, 825 West End av ; (a) Geo. 
Meisner. 125 W 31st (3001). 

HOUSTON ST, 132 W, remove floor, str front, 
partitions, new bk wall, partition, 2 add stys on 
2-sty bk tnt; $8,000; (o) Alberte Baratta, 167 
Thompson; (a) Vincent M.Cajaue, 230 Bleecker 
(3086). 

PEARL ST, 536-40. extend stairs, new balcony 
on 5-sty bk str & printing; $100; (o) Oberly & 
Newell Rlty Co.. 540 Pearl; (a) John B. Snook 
Sons. 261 Bway (3108). 

SULLIVAN ST, 154, two new added stories, 
stairs, fire escape, in 4-sty bk res; $0,000; (o) 
St. Anthony of Padua's R. C. Church. 151 
Thompson; (a) Geo. F. Spelman, 2.5.50 Briggs 
av, Bronx (2). 

4TH ST, 278 W, move stairs, change parti- 
tions, new bathrooms, electric work, steam heat- 
ing in 3-sty bk dwg; .$4,000; (o) Dorothy P. 
Barker, 8 W 523 ; (a) Geo. Malcolm. 8 W 52d 
(2115). 

12TH ST, 503-5 E, remove toilets, new toilets 
in 4-sty bk strs & tnt; $2,000; (o) Monogram 
RItv. Co., 1819 Bway; (a) Michael A. Cardo, 61 
Bible House, Astor pi (3098). 

22D ST, 41 E, remove wall, floor, new wall, 
O^jt, remodel stairs, raise floor in 4-sty bk res ; 
^T-.tOOO; (o) Chas. A. Eckhard, 7 E 22d ; (a) 
JohT} G. Stasse, 175 5 av (3090). 

20 aH ST, 540 W, new fire-escapes on 3-sty bk 
storage; .$400; (o) Heucken Rlty. Co., 539-45 W 
28th ; IS,) Dietrich Wortmann, 116 Lexington av 
(3089). 

29TH ST, 202-4 B. new elevator in 6-sty bk 
factory; $400; (o) Theresa Kolhler. 1155 Park 
av; (a) Fredk. Gerber. 101 E 87th (3119). 

.33D ST. 117-9 W, change of occupancy in 5- 
sty bk-strs & offices; $50; (o) Sidem Bldg. Co., 
1457 Bway ; (a) Saml. Rosenblum, 51 Chambers 
(3094). 

33D ST, 121 W, change of occupancy In 5- 
sty bk strs & offices; $50; (o) Sidem Bldg. Co., 
1457 Bway ; (a) SamL Rosenblum, 51 Cham- 
bers (3095). 

34TH ST, 122 W, new f. p. door in 5-sty bk 
strs & offices: $10; (o) Matthew Micolino, 87 
Washington Market; (a) Saml. Rosenblum, 51 
Chambers (3104). 

35TH ST, 9 E, extend stairs, new f. p. door 
on 5-sty bk str & offices; .$500; (o) Wm. Wal- 
dorf Astor. 21 W 26th ; (a) Le Roy Barton, 132 
Madison av (3115). 

37TH ST, 2.32-4 W, patching & repair.-;, new 
add. toilets, columns, girders, floors, metal ceil- 
ings, in 3-sty bk offices; .$40,000; (ol McCall 
Co., 2.36 W 37th; (a) C. Aubrey Jackson, 243 
W 36th (C). 

42D ST, 621-3 W, enclose elevator shaft, new 
f. p. doors, alter show windows in 2-sty bk 
auto repair shop: $3,000; (o) Eugene Higgins, 
1 Madison av ; (a) Zipkes, Wolf & Kudroff, 432 
4 av (3102). 

47TH ST, 156-8 E, remove wall, re arrange 
partitions, raise floors, new wall, floor, plumb- 
ing, heating, electric work in 2-4-sty bk room- 
ing houses: $10,000; (o) 1.56 E. 47th St. Corp., 
37 Evergreen av, Bloomfield, N. J. ; (a) private 
plans (3118). 

49TH ST. 18 E. acceptance of flre-escape on 7- 
sty f. p. strs & offices; $10;; (o) Centre-White 
Co., 135 Bway ; (a) Saml. Rosenblum, 51 Cham- 
bers (3112). 

51ST ST, 405 W, remove wall, new beams, 
columns, ext on 3-sty bk & fr str & dwg ; .$2,- 
000; (o) John Mullen, 761 9 av ; (a) Ross & 
McNeil, 46 W 24th (3087). 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

57TH ST, 200-10 W, lower vault, restt beams, 
new wall on apt house; $500; (o) 200-10 W. 
57th St. Corp., 530 5 av ; (a) Chas. T. B. Dis- 
terlen, 18 W 38th (3120). 

dOTH ST, lOU-18 W, new steel trusses, gird- 
ers, granite piers, ceiling in 1-sty bk church; 
$611,000; o) Church of Paulist Fathers, 100-118 
W. 60th; (a) Thos. O.Reilly & Son, 17 E 49th 
(3114). 

71ST ST, 165-7 W, remove stoop, partitions, 
new partitions, plumbing in 7 & 3-sty res & 
physicians' offices; $15,000; (o) Dr. Edwin 
Cudlipp, Great Neck Station, L. I.; (a) Som- 
merfeld & Steckler, 31 Union sq (3099). 

72D ST, 201 W, new tan on 8-sty f. p. hotel ; 
$850; (o) Morris Schauasi, 201 W 72d ; (a) 
Reliance Tower & Steel Constn. Co., 94 Mangin 
(308). 

70TH ST, 168 E, remove area, new bath 
room, entrance in 4-sty bk tnt; $2,000; (o) 
Gertrude A. Forman, 16S E 79th ; (a) Anderson 
& Lucht, 201 11 av, Astoria, L. I. (3100). 

91ST ST, 171 E, enlarge dining room in 5- 
sty bk tnt; $5uO; (o) Louise Ohlenberg, 171 E 
91st; (a) Geo. Dress, 116 W 39th (3103). 

lOlST ST E, s s, 117 e 5 av, raise rf, new tier 
in 1-sty f. p. bakery; $1,000; (o) Mt. Sinai Hos- 
pital, on prem ; (a) Arnold W. Brunner, lol 
Park av (3110). 

130TH ST, 127 W, remove partitions, new 
beams in 4-sty bk lodge room & apts ; $1,500 : 
(o) Independent Order of St. Luke's, 125 W 
130th; (a) Albert E. Davis, 258 E 138th (3096). 

133D ST, 16 W, remove partitions, new wall, 
partitions, str front, entrance in 5-sty bk tnt ; 
.$900 ; (o) Fitzherbert A. Lowe, 2125 5 av ; (a) 
Alfred A. Brandon, 30 W 134th (3085). 

140TH ST, 253 W, remove stairs, partitions, 
new iron & marble stairs, partitions, in 5-sty 
bk tnt; $10,000; (o) Jacob Boltan, 617 W 152d ; 
(a) Otto Reissmann, 147 Fourth av (4). 

AMSTERDAM AV, 1789, remove partition, 
new wood floor, stairs, in 4-sty bk apart : $600 : 
(o) Morris Elser, 178!) Amsterdam av ; (a) Wm 
Silver, 4,50 W 149th (S). 

BROADWAY, 1331-9, new t. p. passage, iron 
stairs, convert basement into salesroom in 12- 
sty f. p. str & offices; $10,000; (o) Broadway- 
3.5th St. Rlty. Corp.. l.'!33 Bway; (a) F. W. 
Woolworth Co., 233 Bway (2117). 

BROADWAY, 1457, new partitions in 12-sty 
f. p. bldg; $1,200; (o) Chas. Brokaw, 1457 
Bway; (a) Robt. A. Fash, 163 W 2d (3093). 

LEXINGTON AV, 108, remove partitions, new 
ext, toilets in 4-sty bk strs & offces ; $12,000 ; 
10) Glavera Rlty. Co.. 115 Bway; (a) Dietrich 
Wortmann. 116 Lexington av (3116). 

THIRD AV, 167, new skylight, toilet, in 6-sty 
bk factory; $1,000; (o) Hup Rlty Co., Inc., 229 
E .3Sth : (a) Bruno S. Borger & Son, 121 Bible 
House (5). 

WEST END AV, lCO-0, new tank on 5-sty bk 
warehouse; $1,000; (o) Arrow Holding Co., 565 

5 av ; (a) Sidney Daub, 217 Bway (3109). 

3D AV. 608, remove wall, new beams, par- 
titions, walls 3-sty bk str & apt; (o) Jos. New- 
man, 608 3 av; (a) Jacob Fisher, 25 Av A 
(3010). 

5TH AV, 110-2, new fire-escape, f. p. shut- 
ters on 11-sty f. p. offices & lofts; $1,000; (o) 
Est Ogden Goelet, 8 W 51st; (a) John H. 
Duncan, 347 5 av (3097). 

8TH AV, 949, new mezzanine In 3-sty bk 
strs & offices; .$2.50; (o) Goldsmith Van Dyck 
Rlty. Corp, 77 Nassau ; (a) Geo. H. "Van 
Auken, 430 W 44th (3101). 

8TH AV, 523-29, new tank on 6-sty bk fac- 
tory: $3,800; (o) Surprise Bldg. Co., 2.35 6 av ; 
(a) Royal J. Mansfield, 135 William (3092). 

Bronx 

FREEMAN ST, 827, new str front, new par- 
titions to 3-sty bk str & tnt; $700; (o) Elka 
Torgoff, 181 Clinton ; (a) Carl J. Itzel, 1365 
Prospect av (634). 

GUERLAIN PL, 18.50, 2-sty fr ext, 29.10x10.6, 
new plumbing & new partitions to 2-sty fr dwg; 
$3,O00 ; (o) Annie N. Mascullo, on prem; (a) H. 
J. Hewitt, 2119 Glebe av (633). 

163D ST, 935, new partitions to 6-sty bk strs 

6 tnt; $800; (o) Filben Realty Co., 108 Bway; 
(a) S. F. Oppenheim, 36 8 av (628). 

163D ST, 945, new cols & girders, new str 
fronts, new partitions to 6-sty bk strs & tnt : 
$8,000; (o) Filben Realty Co., 198 Bway; (a) 
S. F. Oppenheim, 36 8 av (629). 

BURNSIDE AV. 19 E. new concrete floor, new 
str front, new partitions to 1-sty bk strs ; $3,- 
000; (o) Burnwalt Realty Corp., Julius Kovacs, 
245 Ft. Washington av, Pres : (lessees) Teddy's 
Pish Stores, 16 Exchange pi; (a) P. Y. Joannes, 
16 E 40th (636). 

CLAY AV, 1.369, 1-sty fr ext, 18x12.6, to 2-sty 
fr dwg; $SO0 ; (o) Moss it Liernbaum, on prem: 
(a) R. H. Segal, 56 W 4(;th (631). 

CONCORD AV, 633-37, new plumbing, new 
str fronts & new partitions to 2-2-sty fr strs 
factory & dwgs ; $10,000: (o) Wm. Bogen, 2330 
Valentine av ; (a) Otto L. Spannhake, 116 Nas- 
sau (630). 

HARTS ISLAND, e s, 1,000 s Dock, 1-sty bk 
ext, 25x25, to 1-sty bk high tension room ; $3,- 



31 



500; (o) City of New York; (a) Sylvester S. 
McGrath. Municipal Bldg (638). 

MOKHIS AV, 551-53, 1-sty bk ext, 20.11x27.4, 
& new plumbing to 2-4-sty bk tuts; .$20,000; (oj 
Frog Hollow Realty Co., 524 Willis av ; (a) 
Moore ii Landsiedel, 3 av & 148th (637). 

PROSPECT AV, 1032-36, 4-sty bk ext, 50x10, 
& raise 3 ft. 3-3-sty fr strs & dwgs; $8,000; (o) 
Wm. V. Kruhnle, 3606 Park av ; (a) P. Kissin, 
3006 Park av (632). 

THIRD AV, No. 3021, new plumbing, new str 
fronts, new parritions, to 3-sty fr strd & offices ; 
$5,090; (o) J. Clarence Davies, 14Sth & Willis 
av ; (a) Moon & Landsiedel, Third av & 14Sth 
(641). 

TINTON AV, 879, 2-sty fr ext, 19x15, to 2i4- 
Bty tr dwg; $1,500; (o) Anastasia Vogel, 655 E 
161st; (a) Geo. P. Crosier, 689 E 223d (627). 

TREMONT AV, 410-14, new str fronts, new 
girders, new. plumbing & new partitions to 3-3- 
sty tr strs & dwgs; $15,OuO ; (o) Julius Kuhn, 
1^1 Bway; (a) Moore & Landsiedel, 3 av & 
listh (640). 

UNION AV, 1312, 1-sty bk ext, 25x27, to 1-sty 
bk str & dwg; $2,.500 ; (o) Isreal Shapiro, on 
prem; (a) Wm. Kurtzer, 1385 Crotona av (635). 

ZEREGA AV, e s, '20 s Quimby av, 1-sty fr 
extension, 12.6x24, to 1-sty fr dwg; 1J950 ; (o) 
Interborough Asphalt Co., 2306 Creston av ; (a) 
Chas. Schaefer, Jr., 394 E 150th (642). 

3D AV, e s, 28.4 s 147th. 1-sty bk ext, 25x16'^, 
new str fronts 4i new partitions to 3-sty Ir str 
& dwg; $2,000; (o) Robt. A. Cools, 1140 Clay 
av ; Geo. H. Kibitz, 800 E 175th (039). 

Brooklyn 

BUTLER ST, 366-88, s s, 250 w 5 av, stair 
towers on 5-sty bk factory ; $7,500 ; (o) The K. 
& O. Co., Inc., prem; (a) Frank H. Quimby, 110 
William, Manhattan ( ). 

ORANGE ST, 58, s s, 150 e Hicks, rf & int 
alts to 2-sty fr 2 tarn dwg; $2,000; (o) Adeline 
Briggs, 175 W 72d, Manhattan; (a) Gilbert 
Johnson, 248 Clinton (19652). 

UNION ST, 106, 3 s, 16 w Columbia, exterior 
& int alts to 3-sty bk str & 2 fam dwg; $6,000; 
(o) Simon Neuschatz, prem; (a) Burke & 
Olsen, 32 Court (19526). 

S 5TH ST, 297, n s, 122 e Marcy av, exterior 
& int alts to 3-sty bk dance hall & 2 fam dwg; 
,$5,000; (o) David Schechter, prem; (a) Irving 
M. Fenichel, 583 Bedford av (19663). 

64TH ST, 2052, s s, 427 e 20 av, ext to 2-sty 
bk 2 fam dwg; $2,500; (o) Louisa A. Menroll, 
prem: (a) Lawrence J. Frank, 549 Putnam av 
(19512). 

AV Q, 1209-11, n s. 71.8 w E 12th, ext to str ; 
$4,500: (o) Louis Thaler, 847 E 13th; (a) S. 
Millman & Son, 1780 Pitkin av (19540). 

FRANKLIN AV, 721, e s, 72.2 s Park pi, str 
fronts on str & 2 fam dwg; $2,000; (o) S. 
Madorsky, 236 Lee av ; (a) Murray Klein, 37 
Graham av (19527). 

CARROLL ST, 1379, n s, 80 e Kingston av, 
add sty on garage; $2,000; (o) Rose Bellin, 
prem; (a) Savignano & Federer, 6005 14 av 
(10583). 

FT. GREENE PL, 163, e s, 130 s Hanson pi. 
exterior & int alts to 2-sty bk str & 1 fam dwg ; 
$10,000; (0) Lehman Bros., 161 Ft. Greene pi; 
E. M. Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin av (1960). 

JOHNSON AV, 272-306, s s, 96 w White, ext to 
abattoir: $4,300: (o) Henry May, 2.30 W 79th, 
Manhattan; (a) John L. Plock, 96 5 av, Man- 
hattan (1964S). 

LIVINGSTON ST, 156, sec Smith, str front 
& int alts to str; $5,000; A. Marko. lessee, 
prem; (a) Edgar N. Bogert, High st, Leonia, 
N. J. (19572). 

PRESIDENT ST, 1592-4, s w c Bedford av, 
int alts to club; $2,000; (o) Cavalry Club, 
prem : Chas. M, Hart. 331 Madison av. Man- 
hattan (19553). 

SEDGWICK ST. 41-43, nee Van Brunt, str 
fronts, etc, to 2-sty bk 1 fam dwg; .$8,000; (o) 
Hills Bros. Co., prem ; (a) Morris B. Adler, 217 
Havemeyer (19570). 

BAY 23D ST. 128-34, w s, 188.10 s Benson av,. 
ext to 2%-sty fr 2 fam dwg; $7,.500 ; (o) Italo 
Mauno, 197 Bay 20th; (a) Chas. M. Straub 147 
4 av, Manhattan (19542). 

METROPOLITAN AV. 1000-18, s s, 57 w 
Morgan, int alts cS: plumbing in 2-sty bk fac- 
tory; $2,000; (o) Estey Bros. Co., 270 Union 
av ; (a) G. Howard Estey, 270 Union av 
(19596). 

Queens 

JAMAICA. — 453 Fulton st, n e c 166th st re- 
move store fronts, int alt, plumb; $3,000; 
Sara'l Berkowitz. .387 Fulton st. Jamaica; (a) 
A. Farber, 1746 Pitkin av, Bklyn (3C61). 

JAMAICA.— Pulton st, s s, 51 w Washington 
av, 1 & 2-sty bk ext, rear. 2x49. storage & gar- 
age ; $7.500 ; (o) Julius F. Jarnes, Union Hall 
st, Jamaica (3662). 

ROCKAWAY BEACH.— Rockaway Beach blvd, 
s w cor, & 82d st, new store front, new foun- 
dation, plumb: $1,000; (o) Wm. Kasten. prem- 
ises (3663). 

WOODHAVEN.— Water st. n s. 75 w Ferry st. 
2-sty fr ext, 4x8, raise extension 1-sty : $1.000 ; 
(o) Salvatore Galeotiflore, 212 Water st. Wood- 
haven (3665). 



John P. Kane Company 

TROWEL MASONS' 

PORTLAND CEMENT BUILDING MATERIALS 

MAIN OFFICE: 103 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 

/ FOOT EAST MTH BT„ NEW TORK 
niBTRiRTITINR TARMi ) ^OOT WEST 9«TH 8T- NEW TOBK 
DIBTRIBUTIMI. TAKDB! < ,45th ST. AND HABLEU BIVER. NEW TOEK 

V (TH ST. AND OOWANUB CANAL. BBOOKLTN 



Empire Brick & Supply Co. 



YARDS 

12th Ave., 47th to 4gth Stt., Manhattan 

138th and Exterior Sta., Bronx 

Morgan Avenue and Newtown Creeh 

(near Stan St.), Brooklyn 



OF BRICK. IN 

MASONS' BUILDING MATERIALS 
Executive Offices: 103 PARK AVE., NEW YORK 



WORKS 

STOCKPORT, M. Y 

GLASCO. N. Y. 



MURTHA & SCHMOHL CO. 

MASONS' BUILDING MATERIALS 

OFFICE: FOOT IMTH 8TBEET, EAST RIVEB 



YARDS 

Foot 14th Street, East River 
Foot 108th and 109th Sts., East River 



High Grade 



Watchman's Service HULMEjO "A 1 KUL 

Holmes Electric Protective Company 



Day Tel.: Franklin 6030 
139 CENTRE STREET 



Regular Post Patrol and Special Watch. 

Day and Night. Capable, Sober, Reliable, 

Efficient. 

Night Tel.: Murray Hill 3030 
66 WEST 39TH STREET 



MISSISSIPPI WIRE GLASS COMPANY 



St. Louis Office 
4070 North Main St. 



220 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK 



rhlcago Office 
7 West Madison 8« 



M. F. WESTERGREN, INC. 



FIREPROOF DOORS AND WINDOWS 



213-31 EAST 144th STREET 



'Phone 0770-1-2 Mott Hava 



Builders Brick and 
Supply Co., Inc. 

Mason's 
Building Materials 

172d St. and West Farms Road 

Telephone: Intervale 0100 




f^dOft 



The Lawrence 



PORTLAND cr^cEMENT Cemeut Company 

302 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



WATSON 



New Electric Elevators 

All makes and types repaired and altered. Es- 
timates free. Weekly or monthly Inspecdoni by 
comrett?nt elevator men keep eleTators safe and 
reduce repair blllB. 

Phone: Longacre 0670, 0671. 0672 
Night and Sunday: Westchestor 3521 

WATSON ELEVATOR CO., INC. 

407-409 WEST 36TH STREET. NEW YORK 



LOUI.S C. ANDERSON, Pres. 

THE ANDERSON BRICK 

AND 

SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

MASONS' AND PLASTERERS' 
SUPPLIES 

YARD and OFFICE 

201 East 129th Street, New York 

Telephone 

Harlem 0285 



A.B.SEE 



ELECTRIC 
ELEVATOR 
COMPANY 



220 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



Real Estate Record and Builders Guide 

Founded March 21, 1868, by CLINTON W. SWEET 

Devoted to Real Estate, Building Construction and Building Management in the Metropolitan District 

Published Every Saturday by THE RECORD AND GUIDE COMPANY 

FRANK E. PERLEY, President and Editor; W. D. HADSELL, Vice-President; E. S. DODGE, Vice-President; J. W. FRANK, Secretary-Treas. 



Entered as second class matter November 8, 1879, at the Post Office at New York. N. T.. under the Act of March 3, 1879. 
Copyright, 1922, by The Record and Guide Company 119 West 40th Street, New York (Telephone: Bryant "(800) 



VOL. CI.X 
NO. 2 (2809) 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 14, 1922 



25c. A COPY 
$12.00 A YEAR 



.'Advertising: Index 

Page 
A. B. See Elecitrio Elevator 

4th Cover 

Ackerly, Orville B 49 

Adams & Co 48 

Adler, Ernest N 4!) 

.-Vmerican Bureau of R. E 4V1 

.American Enameled Brick & 

Tile Co 5.5 

.\mes & Co 2d Cover 

Amy & Co., A. V 2d Cover 

Anderson Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 
.\nderson & Co.. James S.. 2d Cover 

.Armstrong & Armstrong 4'J 

Ashforth & Co 2d Cover 

Automatic Fire Alarm Co 36 

Baiter, Alexander 48 

Bauer, Milbank & Molloy 4s 

Bechmann, A, G 48 

Bell Co., H. W T,'.> 

Biltmore Realty Corp 48 

Boyd, James 44 

Boylan, John J 2d Cover 

Brennan, Edmund M 49 

Brensam Realty Corp 44 

Brett & Goode Co Front Cover 

Brooks & Momand 44 

Brown Co., J. Romaine. Front Cover 
Builders' Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 

Bulkley & Horton Co. 48 

Busher & Co., Eugene J... 2d Cover 
Butler & Baldwin Front Cover 

Cammann, Voorhees & Floyd, 

2d Cover 

Carpenter. Leonard J 2d Cover 

Chauncey Real Estate ....2d Cover 

City Investing Co ?<G 

Classified Advertisements 47 

Coburn, Alfred P 48 

Cross & Brown Front Cover 

(Truikshank Co Front Clover 

Cruikshank's Sons, Wm. Front Cover 

Cudner, R. E. Co 2d Cover 

Cusack Company 48 

Cutler & Co., .\rthur 2d Cover 

Cutner, Harry B 2d Cover 

Dailey, Clarke G 3C 

Davies, J. Clarence 50 

Day, Joseph P 2d Cover 

Dean & Co., W. E 2d Cover 

Dike, 0. D. & H. V 2d Cover 

Dodae Co., P. W fi^i 

Dowd, James A 49 

Dubois, Chas. A 48 

Duffy Co., J. P 56 

Dunlap & Loyd 48 

Duress Co 2d (^over 

Edwards Co., Charles G... 2d Cover 
Edwards, Dowdney & Richart... ."lO 

Elliman Co., Douglas L 44 

Ely & Co.. Horare S. .. .Front Cover 
Empire Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 
English, J. B 2d Cover 

Pinch & Co.. Chas. H .=>fi 

Finkelstein & Son. Jacob 4!) 

Fischer, J, Arthur 2d Cover 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Editorials 37 

Realty Board Holds Housing Emergency Has Passed 39 

Review of Real Estate Market for the Current Week 43 

Private Sales of the Week 43 

Statistical Table of the Week SO 

National Outlook for Construction During 1922 is 
Bright 51 

New York Building Managers Hold Monthly Dinner 
Meeting 52 

.\rchitects Start New Year with Many Large 
Proj ects 53 

Personal and Trade Notes 53 

Trade and Technical Society Events S3 

Building Materials Markets 54 

Current Building Operations 54 

Contemplated Construction 56 

Plans Filed for New Construction 59 



Page 

Fisher, James B 48 

Fox & Co.. Predk 2d Cover 

Goodwin & Goodwin 2d Cover 

Grunert, Robert G 49 

Gulden, Royal Scott 48 

Harris Exchange 49 

Hecla Iron Works -jS 

Hess, M, & L., Inc. .. .Front Cover 
Holmes Elec. Protective, .4th Cover 

Holt & Merrall, Inc 49 

Home Title & Insurance Co 36 

Hubbard, C, Bertram . . . .2d Cover 

Jones & Son. William P 49 

Kane Co.. John P 4th Cover 

Keller, Charles G 48 

Kelley, T, H 48 

Kelly, Albert E 48 

Kempner & Son, Inc., D.. 

Front Cover 

Kilpatrick, Wm. D 36 

Kissling, J. P. & L. A ,.. 48 



Kloes, F. J 

Kohler, Chas. S. . 
Kopp & Co., H. C. 



Page 

59 
36 
48 



Lackman, Otto 

Lawyers Title & Trust Co, . 
Lawrence, Blake & Jewell 

Lawrence Cement Co 4th Cover 

Leaycraft & Co., J. Edgar, 

Front Cover 

Leist, Henry G 2d Cover 

Lesch & Johnson .'',(; 

Levers, Robert 48 

Losere, L. G 4,8 

Manning & Trunk 2d Cover 

Martin, Samuel H 2d Cover 

May Co.. Lewis H 2d Cover 

MeMahon. Joseph T .",() 

Milner, Joseph .' 4fi 

Mississippi Wire Glass. .. .4th Cover 

.Monell, F. Bronson 2d Cover 

Moore. John Constable 49 

Moore's Sons, Morris, Inc.. 2d Cover 



Advertising Index 

Page 

Moors, J. K 2d Cover 

Morgan Co., Leonard 49 

Muhlker, Arthur G 4y 

Murray & Sons, Inc., John A...' 54 

Murtha & Schmohl 4th Cover 

Nail & Parker 36 

Natanson, Max N , , 5y 

Nehring Bros. ..» 2d Cover 

.\ew York Edison Co.. The 57 

New York Title & Mortgage Co.. 36 

iNiowenhous Co., Inc 46 

Noyes & Co,, Chas. F. . .Front Cover 
Ogden & Clarksou Corp... .2d Cover 

OHare, Geo. L 36 

Oppenheimer, Fred 4a 

O'Reilly & Dahn 2d Cover 

Payton, Jr., Co., Philip A 50 

Pease 4i Elliman Front Cover 

Pell & Co., S. Osgood 59 

Pendergast, John P.. Jr 48 

Pflomm, F. & G Front Cover 

Phelps, Albert D 48 

Pomeroy Co., Inc., S. H '. 56 

Porter 4i Co Front Cover 

Quell & Quell 48 

Read a Co., Geo. R Front Cover 

Realty Co. of America 36 

Rickert-Brown Realty Co 35 

Rinaldo. Hiram 43 

Ross, Frank U ' " ' 56 

Runk, Geo. S ',,]', 4$ 

Ryan, George J 2d Cover 

Schindler & Liebler 48 

Schweibert, Henry ' . 48 

Seaman & Pendergast . . 43 

Shaw, Arthur L ' ' ' 49 

Shaw, Rockwell & Santord.' .'.' ! ' 48 

Simberg, A. J 59 

Sherman & Kirschner 4U 

Smith, Malcolm E., Inc 48 

Smith, Gerritt, Mrs 30 

Solove, R '■ 58 

Spear & Co .....'.' 48 

Speyers, Inc., James B .'..'. 49 

Spotts & Starr 2d Cover 

Sterling Mortgage Co 47 

Straus & Co,. S. W 5U 

Tabolt, Jacob J 43 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co.!.!! 36 

Tyng & Co., Stephen H., Jr .36 

Union Stove Works 54 

United Elec. L. & P. Co., '45 

Van Valen, Chas. B 44 

Vorndrans Sons, C 5(j 

Walsh, J. Irving !!!!2d Cover 

Watson. Elv. Co.. Inc 4th Cover 

Weill Co., H. M 44 

Wells Architectural Iron Co.!!!! 56 

Wells Sons, James N '2A Cover 

Westergren, Inc., M. F.. . .4th Cover 
White 6 Sons, Wm. A. . Front Cover 
Whiting & Co.. Wm. H.. Front Cover 

Whitney-Foster Corp 48 

Williams-Dexter Co 49 

Winter. Benjamin ! ! ! ! ! 44 

Wond-Dols"n Co Front Cover 

Wyckoff. Walter C 2d Cover 

Zittel & Sons, Pred'k 2d Cover 



Getting Set for 1922! 



1922 is going to be a fine year for business. If we all tiiink so, say so, and ACT so, we can 
make it so. It is encouraging to see how many far-.sigbted, long-headed business men have 
already drafted their plans for an intensive advertising campaign — they are getting set for 
1922 and at the crack of the pistol will be off to a lead that their less aggressive competitors 
can never wear down. And you— YOUR schedule, like theirs, must surely include 

THE RECORD AND GUIDE 

for more than fifty-three years the recognized authority in Real Estate and Building. 

Phone Bryant 4800 and a representative will call. 



Title Insurance and 
Mortgage Loans 

for . he Real Estate Owner 

Protection in 
Placing Loans 

for the .Broker 

Guaranteed First Mort- 
gages and Certificates 

for the Investor 

New York Title 
&. Mortgage Company 



Manhattan 
Brooklyn 
Jamaica 
Richmond 
White Plains 
Mt. Vernon 



135 Broadway 
203 Montague St. 
375 Fulton St. 
. 24 Bay St. 
163 Main St. 
3 South 3d St. 



BatabUshed 1887 

CHAS. S. KOHLER, Inc. 

Real Estate 
Insurance 

Broker and Manager of 
Estates 

MAIN OFFICE! 
HI Columbus Ave. — Corner HMth 8it 

BRANCH OFFICE: 

HOB St. Nleholai Ave.— Near 181st St. 

NEW YORK 



GEORGE L. O'HARE 

MEMBER REAL ESTATE BOARD OF N. T. 

REAL ESTATE 

EXCEPTIONAL INVESTMENTS 

BELLING— RENTING— BUSINESS AND 

APARTMENT BUILDINGB 

SPECIALIZING IN LEASEHOLDS 

MORTGAGE LOANS 

FULL EQUIPPED DEPT. FOR CXCHANSIN* 

489 FIFTH AVE. 

TEL. VANDERBILT 5092— «441 



WiUiam D. Kilpatrick 

REAL ESTATE 
OPERATOR 

149 BROADWAY 
SAMUEL KILPATBICX 



EDWARDS, 
DOWDNEY&RiCHART 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

MORTGAGE 
LOANS 

156 Broadway, New York 

Tel. Cortland I57I-U72 
Member Real EsUte Board, N. Y. 



Lawrence, Blake & Jewell 

Mortgage Loans 

115 Broadway 

Tel. 4080 Rector 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 



Specialists in Harlem 

and 

Colored Tenement 
Properties 

NAIL & PARKER 

REAL ESTATE 

145 West 135th Street 
New York City 



JOHN E. NAIL 
HENRY C. PARKER 



Telephona ( 7MI 
MomlnaKls ) 768S 



BROADWAY STORE 
FOR RENT 

Located in Breslln Hotel, East Side of 
Broadway, near 29th St. Size: 15x50. 

For details apply to 

CLARKE G. DAILEY 

115 BROADWAY Rector 4300 

Full Commission to Brokers 



STILL PAYING 5V2% 

The Guaranteed First Mortgages of the Home Title Insur- 
ance Company yield 51/2%. Every investor in these 
mortgages is protected, by the written guarantee of the 
Company, against loss of principal or interest. 

HOME TITLE INSURANCE CO. 



WlUoughby and Jay Streets 
Brooklyn 



Post Office Building 
Jamaica 



STEPHEN H. TYNG H. OAKEY MALI 

Stephen H.TyDgir.,($Co. 

Incorporated 
Member Real Estate Board, N. Y 

REAL ESTATE 

MANAGEMENT OF 
BUSINESS PROPERTY 

41 Union Square West 

22 EAST 17TH STREET 
Telephone: Stuyvesant 40M 



Worry Kills 

They say that worry has killed 
more people than disease. 

Every once in a while we see some 
one who is really worried over title 
troubles. 

This, however, is never a person 
who holds our title policy. In such 
cases, we are the people who pay for 
you without worrying, for this is 
our business. 

Title insurance is not expensive 
and it brings with it a great deal of 
comfort and peace of mind. 

TiTlE guarantee 
& TRUST C9 



Capital 
Surplus 



$7.-500,000 
$11,000,000 



17 6 Broadway, New TorR 

175 Remaen St., 196 Montacue St., Brooklyn 

350 Fulton St., Jamaica 67 Jackson Ave.. L. I. Olty 



Eealtp Companp 
of America 



FRANKLIN PETTIT 

President 



TRANSACTS A OEN- 
ERAL BUSINESS IN 



T HE PURCHASE AND 
SALE OF NEW YORK 



CITT REAL ESTATE 



2 WALL STREET, NEW YORK CrFT 

Rector 027B-0X7« 



City Investing 
Company 

61 Broadway, New York 

Telephone: Bowling Green 8539 

Capital, $5,000,000 

POBERT E. DOWLING, President 



January 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUI-DE 



37 




Conflicting Views as to Housing Situation 

What are the real facts about the housing situation here 
in New York at the opening of the year 1922? Is the 
shortage in living quarters as great as when the Emergency 
Rent Laws were passed sixteen months ago? Does a crisis 
still exist which is so serious as to warrant the Lockwood 
Committee in urging the new Legislature to extend these 
Emergency Rent Laws for another year ? 

At recent hearings before the Lockwood Committee its 
counsel, Mr. Untermyer, brought out testimony from sever- 
al witnesses which resulted in big headlines in the news- 
papers declaring "House Famine Called Worst in City's 
History," "Housing Shortage as Bad Now as Ever," and 
other headlines somewhat less disconcerting, the whole ex- 
hibit being finished off with the statement "Lockwood 
Committee Fails to See Where Crisis Has Passed." 

As against these views of the present situation, no pub- 
licity was accorded the statement submitted to the committee 
by Mr. Charles G. Edwards, President of the Real Estaite 
Board of New York, in which he declared "The allegation 
that there is a housing shortage of 70,000 living quarters 
in the City of New York at this time is utterly without 
foundation of fact." 

It is clearly evident from the foregoing that a wide differ- 
ence of opinion exists as to the present housing shortage in 
the metropolis. Either some of the Lockwood Committee 
witnesses who get big headlines in the daily papers are in 
error, or else the leaders of the Real Estate Board of New 
York, whose statements do not get similar headline treat- 
ment, presumably because they are less sensational, are in 
error. If the desire is to get all the facts, surely the state- 
ments and views of such men as Mr. Edwards are entitled 
to as much consideration and as much publicity as the more 
sensational statements of the "crisis" witnesses. The public 
cannot determine whether or not a crisis still exists, and 
neither can the Lockwood Committee nor the Legislature 
determine that point, unless all of the facts are placed before 
them and given consideration in exact proportion to their 
relative merits. 

In order that the pertinent and convincing facts assembled 
by President Edwards may be fully read and discussed, the 
Record and Guide prints elsewhere in this issue the com- 
plete text of the statement which the Lockwood Committee 
declined to accept as testimony, but which its counsel said 
would have the consideration of the committee. The "crisis" 
testimony, of course, already had gone into the commit- 
tee's records. 

The most reliable information the Record and Guide 
has been able to gather shows conclusively that the housing 
shortage is not nearly so serious today as it was when the 
Emergency Rent Laws were enacted. It is true, as Presi- 
dent Edwards pointed out in his statement, that "overcrowd- 
ing and congestion of today exists among the same classes 
of people and for the same reason as have obtained for 
years in this and every other large city." Mr. Edwards' 
declaration that "housing conditions in New York City have 
not impaired and do not imperil the public health" must be 
logically sound — otherwise no reliance can be placed in Com- 



missioner Copeland's ; statement that New York is the 
healthiest city in the world. These are only two vital as- 
pects of the situation which Mr. Edwards covered in his 
statement. He brought out many other pertinent points, 
one of which is that if the emergency actually is greater 
today than it was when the Emergency Rent Laws were 
enacted that in itself proves the emergency laws have not 
provided a remedy and some other remedy must be found. 



Construction Outlook for 1922 Good 

When all of the factors are taken into consideration 1921 
was anything but a bad year for the building industry, after 
all. True, there were periods of considerable weakness, 
and in many ways conditions could have been more favor- 
able, but when the results of the past twelve months are 
viewed in retrospect the only fair conclusion is that the year 
was a period of definite progress and achievement in con- 
struction. 

There is no fact of greater significance for its influence 
upon the final results of the year than the manner in which 
the volume of building and engineering commitments steadi- 
ly increased, the record of each month surpassing that of 
the previous one, until the totals of the closing month estab- 
lished an unusually high record. 

The fine showing made by the December, 1921 building 
totals for the entire country, as indicated by the figures 
tabulated by the F. W. Dodge Company, following the ex- 
cellent records of the four previous months, is an added 
confirmation of the nearness of the long-predicted revival 
in the building industry. Every present indication is that 
1922 will witness a measurably greater volume of construc- 
tion activity than that embodied in the ambitious program of 
the year recently closed. 

Prominent among the factors favorable to a record build- 
ing year in 1922 are the still unsatisfied demands for build- 
ings of almost every type and in practically every 
community, and the steadily increasing amount of money 
available for investment in new construction projects. Lack 
of available funds has been one of the chief deterrents to 
building progress during the post-war years, but it is quite 
apparent now that investors are looking with greater favor 
upon investments in real estate and buildings. With suf- 
ficient money assured one of the most serious of the build- 
ing retardants will have been eliminated. 

Although there is every likelihood that residential con- 
struction will continue to predominate through the coming 
building season, because there is still a national shortage 
of living accommodations, the records of the past few 
months show conclusively that the percentage of work of 
this character will be considerably lower than it was last 
year and in closer contact to a normal ratio. According to 
the plans already announced and an analysis of the recent 
commitments, the coming months will witness a marked im- 
provement in the volume of commercial and industrial con- 
struction, the latter, however, largely dependent upon a 
general business revival. 

Taken as a whole there is every reason for the building 



38 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 14, 1922 



industry to be optimistic regarding its prospects for the 
coming months. There is a vast amount of contemplated 
construction now being planned which, when added to the 
operations now estimating or actually under contract, will 
insure ample work for all trades during the coming season. 
The building material markets are fairly well stabilized as 
to prices and essential basic materials are easily available 



in amounts sufficient to meet all requirements. Money is 
easier and there is a firm desire to start operations on the 
part of a host of prospective builders. The only factor that 
remains uncertain at present is building labor, and there is 
good reason to anticipate that this problem will be settled 
within a short time to the entire satisfaction of all interested 
in the building industry. 



Harry Hall Delivers First 1922 Y. M. C. A. Real Estate Lecture 



THE iirst k-cture of the season of 1922, under the auspices 
of the Real Estate Class of the West Side Y. M. C. A., 
was delivered Tuesday evening by Harry Hall, a member 
of the well-known real estate firm of William A. White & Sons. 
A distinctive feature of the meeting was the keen human inter- 
est shown in the subject discussed. Entitled "As New York 
Grows," Mr. Hall's address was a survey of the development 
of the metropolis during the last century. The attendance 
was the largest that has, so far, appeared to hear a lecture 
about real estate. Mr. Hall answered a variety of questions 
about real estate that were asked him by members of the 
class. The speaker was much impressed by the intelligent 
interest shown in the subject. 

William C. Demorest, who introduced Mr. Hall, laid stress 
on the fact that the real estate business in this city has become 
a profession that required as honorable and confidential a 
relation as exists between lawyer and client. 

Mr. Hall gave an interesting sketch of the growth of the 
city from its evacuation by the British in 1783 up to 1900, com- 
paring its growth to that of a human body, which when born 
into the world is a small but complete organism, with veins, 
arteries, heart and organs, and a suitable frame covered with 
flesh which as it grows expands in all its parts. 

So New York's framework may be said to consist of Broad- 
way as its backbone, the main cross streets as its ribs, with the 
transportation lines its arteries, the business districts and mar- 
kets its digestive organs, the banking system its heart and veins 
and its residences its fiesh, all of which have expanded con- 
sistently to meet the city's growing population, fed by its 
increasing commerce. 

He drew a picture of the little town of 10,000 people which 
the end of the Revolution found wrecked bs' fire, with ruined 
trade and an empty treasury, and traced its gradual develop- 
ment with picturesque descriptions of its life and appearance 
at dififerent periods;, emphasizing especially the important 
events, which induced its phenomenal growth, which he said 



were the development of its shipping interests in the early days 
of the century, the invention of the steamboat in 1807, the 
opening of the Erie Canal in 1825, the coming of the railroads 
in the thirties which made possible the opening of unoccupied 
areas of the continent, the introduction of the Croton Water 
System in 1842, the invention of the telegraph in 1846, the open- 
ing of the Elevated Railroads in 1880, the invention of the 
telephone, the introduction of electric lights at about the same 
time and finally the adaptation of steel to building construction 
in 1884. 

Mr. Hall gave some interesting reminiscences of his own 
early recollections of New York in 1880 and traced the north- 
ward movement of the social centre, retail stores, hotels and 
theatres as the town grew in size. 

He called attention to the fact that in 1900 there was no 
business centre north of Madison Square, no Public Library, 
Pennsylvania Terminal or Grand Central development, no sub- 
way, tubes, "movies," and very few automobiles. That the 
present Equitable Building, the Woolworth, Bankers Trust and 
City Investing buildings were not then in existence and stated 
that since 1890 practically the entire financial district had been 
rebuilt. 

Following his simile of a human person he stated his belief 
that the city had just about arrived at early manhood and 
that the next twenty-five years would see still greater atid 
more important development than the past quarter century. 

He ended with a comparative example of values at different 
periods in various parts of the town, such as Wall street, Fifth 
avenue and Times Square, showing among other items that 
John Jacob Astor bought the Eden Farm about 1840 for $34,000 
and that the lease of the Hotel Astor, occupying only a small 
corner of the farm, had recently been renewed for twenty years 
at an annual, rental of $500,000. 

At the close of the lecture the meeting was thrown open 
for informal' discussion in which many of the audience par- 
ticipated. 



Month-to-Monlh Tenants Get Thirty Davs' Notice 



THE .Appellate Term of the Supreme Court, Brooklyn, has 
rendered a decision that a month-to-month tenant must 
get thirty days' notice from the landlord of intention to 
terminate tenancy, and, that the landlord may not sue the tenant 
for possession of the premises unless the notice has been given. 
The opinion was written by Justice Charles Kelby, and con- 
curred in by Justices Cropsey and Lazansky. The case was 
appealed from the Municipal Court, in which Richmond Weed 
bro.ught an action to recover $721 from his tenant, Matthew W. 
Carswell of 61 Sanford avenue, Flushing. 

"The original agreement or lease having expired, the tenant 
holds over by force of the statute in the absence of any new 
agreement," says the' decision. "Even if the tenant makes a 
new agreement he can attack the rent reserved as unjust and 
unreasonable on the first day that the rent accrues. Under 
these circumstances there' is no necessity of the landlord notify- 
ing the tenant that after the expiration of his term use and 
occupancy will be at an increased rate. 

"In the case of tenancies from month to month, or monthly 
tenancies, a dififerent rule applies. Under the terms of Chapter 
,209, Laws of 1920, such a tenant, in the absence of service 
of the notice to quit therein provided for has the right to 
occupy the premises for another month at the same rent. This 
statute has not been repealed. 



"Summary proceedings to recover real property under Chap- 
ter 942, Laws of 1920, must still be predicated upon thiv 
statutorj' notice to quit. If, therefore, a landlord W'sbes to 
sue k monthly tenatit or a tenant from month' to mont'.i for use 
and occupation, or upon an implied agreement for an increased 
. rental, he must serve the tenant with a thirty days' notice, 
stating that he elects to terminate the tenancy. In the absence 
of such notice the landlord can recover from the tenant only 
the former monthly rent agreed upon. 

"While Chapter 209, Laws of 1920, does not in terms provide 
what we have above stated, we believe that must necessarily be 
ts meaning and effect. That statute clearly intended to prevent 
a tenant from being dispossessed unless he had received at 
lease thirty days' notice of the termination of his existing 
agreement. 

"If, witliout having given such notice, the landlord at the 
end of any month could claim that the reasonable rental value 
was greater than the amount heretofore paid and could sue the 
tenant therefor, he would, if successful, obtain a judgment 
against the tenant under which the latter could be dispossessed 
unless he paid the judgment within five days. In this way the 
landlord might dispossess his tenant without having given him 
any notice. This would virtually nullify the provision of 
Chapter 209 of the Laws of 1920." 



January 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



39 



REAL ESTATE SECTION 



Realty Board Holds Housing Emergency Has Passed 

President Edwards Submits Memorandum to Lockwood Committee Which Reveals 
Marked Improvement in Situation, Despite Testimony to the Contrary 



THE question of whether the emergency rent laws, which 
expire on November 1, next, should be extended for 
another year was taken up by the Joint Legislative Com- 
mittee on Housing, of which Senator Charles C. Lockwood is 
chairman, at the hearing on Thursday, January 6. City oflficials 
and representatives of the Real Estate Board and other realty 
interests were called as witnesses to testify as to housing con- 
ditions at the present time. The testimony of the city officials 
as brought out by Samuel Untermyer, counsel to the Commit- 
tee, indicated that the emergency is as acute as a year ago and 
that there is a shortage of low-priced apartments. The realty 
experts, on the other hand, contended that until a survey of 
housing conditions was made by competent authorities it would 
be impossible to decide whether the extension of the emergency 
rent laws and of tax exemption was necessary. 

This suggestion was first made by Charles G. Edwards, 
president of the Real Estate Board, who testified that in the 
opinion of that organization the emergency under which the 
rent laws were enacted no longer existed, but he promised if 
a survey should prove otherwise that the organization of 
which he is head would make no objection to the extension 
of the laws for another year. At a subsequent hearing of the 
Committee on last Tuesday when Mr. Edwards was recalled to 
to the stand, he presented a memorandum respecting the hous- 
ing situation, which is given in full below, stating that it was 
the primary purpose of the memorandum to justify the request 
of the Board for a full and impartial investigation of the pres- 
ent housing situation with the view of determining 

1. Whether a general housing shortage exists or whether 
the shortage is limited to housing for particular classes of our 
population? 

2. Whether or not the existing rent laws have operated to 
discourage the construction of multi-family buildings, particu- 
larly of those within the means of mechanics, laborers and 
other wage-earners? 

3. Whether or not the existing rent laws should be continued 
or should be replaced by a re-enactment of the so-called 
"April Laws," perfected by the remedying of the defects there- 
in indicated by Justice Spiegelberg, on lines suggested by the 
Real Estate Board of New York in September, 1920. The main 
purpose of the proposed change being to relieve the municipal 
courts of the ever-rising flood of "jury" cases. 

Mr. Untermyer, after glancing briefly at the memorandum, 
said he would not accept it for the record as testimony but 
told Mr. Edwards it would be considered by the committee as 
a brief. 

Mr. Edwards' memorandum follows: 

Thi.' Ke:il E.?t:ite Board of New York respectfully asserts: 

1. That tht* report of the Joint T.effisnItiTe Housing Commit- 
tee, tiinile it* the Legislature on September 20, 1!>20, expressly <le- 
elaretl the non-existenee of the partlenlar form of emorjj;eney 
urp:eil by tlie t^overnor :iiifl aeoepteil by the Ijeffislatiire as neees- 
sltatiiiK tlie eiiaetineiit <»f the Housing T,aiv.s at tlie extraorilinai y 
lep'islatii'e se.vsion of .September, 1!»20. 

This alleged emergency was that from 60,000 to 100.000 fami- 
lies would lie thrown out upon the streets of New York City on 
October 1. 1920. unless, meanwhile, the Legislature intervened to 
prevent it. 

No such emerg-ency existed or could have existed in September, 
1920. for. at thot time, there was upon the statute books a series 
of laws enacted at the regular session of 1920 (Chaps. 130, 131. 
135-139. T.,. 1920) which was fully adequate to prevent any such 
general flood of evictions on October 1. 1920, as -was prophesied 
by the iii-omoters of the alleged "public emergency." 



Upon this point, at page 7 of the printed report of the Joint 
Legislative Housing- Committee to the Legi.slature. dated Septem- 
ber 20, 1920. there is this declaration: "THE 1920 RENT LAWS 
WERE GENERALLY SUCCESSFUL IN PREVENTING EVIC- 
TIONS. RUT PARTIALLY FAILED TO STOP EXORBITANT IN- 
CREASES OP RENT." 

In a public address delivered at the Fort Washington Demo- 
cratic Club in New York City on October 14. 1920, Justice Freder- 
ick Spiegelberg, of the Municipal Court, said: 

"I told the members of the Legislative Committee in August, 
and I have repeated it ever since privately and in public, that 
the old laws should continue, with certain amendments of a 
minor character. But the spectre of October 1 arose before the 
Legislature. They were in a panic. They meant well, but they 
were in a panic and nothing could stop them. The newspapers 
took the matter up. Lurid statements were made about one 
hundred thousand dispossess proceedings having been started 
on October 1. How they could have known I do not know, be- 
cause a dispossess proceeding cannot start in advance of Oc- 
tober 1. October 1 must pass before the proceeding is to be 
taken. But they were in ,-i. panic, and. strange to ?ay, the panic 
did not start so much among the members of the Legislature 
from this borough, not even from the Bronx, but from Brook- 
lyn." 

The Real Estate Board of New York has a full stenographic 
"eport of Justice Spiegelberg's address and insists that he tie 
called as a witness by the Joint Legislative Housing Committee 
to verify or deny the statements herein quoted from his said ad- 
dress. 

Furthermore. It is also stated in the same report of the Joint 
Legislative Committee on Housing (p. 6) as follows: 

"During the past year the calendars of Municipal Courts of 

New York City have been so congested with rent cases that 

other business has been deferred." 

But this condition operated to check evictions rather than to 
promote them, since it delayed the obtaining of final orders of 
dispossess, and accordingly, the application for and granting of 
stays of such orders; meanwhile, of cousre. the tenants continued 
in their occupancy undisturbed. Under these circumstances, the 
service of even 60,000 notices requiring tenants to quit on Oc- 
tober 1, 1920. could not possibly have operated to create an emer- 
gency. No tenant could have been evicted on October 1. 1920. on 
a notice to quit on that date, because the notice was merely the 
first step in a legal proceeding that would necessarily have been 
delayed, on account of the congestion in Municipal Courts, and 
the final order in which could have been Judicially stayed for a 
further period of twelve months. 

On Sunday, September 26. 1920. "The World." at p. 18. printed a 
dispatch from its Albany correspondent which contains the fol- 
lowing illuminating paragraph: 

"Much was said of the session concerning the 'October 1 
crisis.' A person not famili.nr with the situation would have 
thought that unless the laws were passed before .September 
30. half the tenants in New York City would have found them 
selves in the streets along with their goods and chattels. This 
was merely a. talking point. In the vernacular of the busi- 
ness world, the legislative leaders had something to 'sell' 
and they took this way of disposing of it. As a matter of 
fact, the old laws fully protected the tenants during the 
month of October. What was accomplished was to free the 
courts of thousands of dispossess cases which the Justices 
had authority to stay and quiet the nerves of the tenants." 
In the interest of the truth, concerning the alleged "emer- 
.gency" that moved the Legislature at its extraordinary session 
of 1920. the Real Estate Board of New York submits that the pub- 
lisher of "The World" should be required to disclose the name of 
tbe correspondent who wrote the paragraph above quoted and 
that he be subpoenaed to appear before the Joint Legislative 
Housing Committee and be ex.nmined as to the truth'or falsity of 
the assertions contained in said paragraph. Let us see whether 
or not the alleged "emergency" was merely a "talking point of 
legislative leaders who had 'something to sell.' " 

The existing Landlord and Tenant Laws have produced the 
present intolerable condition of congestion and oppression in the 
.Municip.nl Courts by transferrins the function of ascertaining 
what is a reasonable rent from the Municipal Court Justices to 
Municipal Court Juries, composed usually of tenants alone. 

Under Chapter 137 of the Laws of 1920, the determination of 
the amount to be paid for use and occupation by a hold-over 
tenant was lodged In the discretion of the trial Justice, who might 
.?ran.t a stay of dispossess for a year, subject to the payment of 



40 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 14, 1922 



the adjudged rental value of the demised premises for such a 
period. This operated to stabilize the holdover's tenancy, both 
as to its term and the return to the landlord. Had the law been 
efficiently and uniformly administered by the Municipal Court 
Justices, it would have operated satisfactorily to all concerned. 
But, as stated by Justice Spiegelberg, in his address before the 
Fort Washington Democratic Club on October 14, 1920: 

"The grave defect and the one grave defect in the April 
hold-over law was this: These laws had to be administered by 
individuals. A person when he becomes a judge does not 
cease to be a human being fortunately, and these laws were 
administered differently by some and differently by others. 
Some of the judges were very strict and in my judgment 
very narrow-minded. Notwithstanding the fact that the law 
was primarily to try to continue the tenant in his home, with 
adequate compensation to the landlord, some of the judges 
limited the stay to thirty days and that was the end of it. 
They played directly into the hands of the very man we all 
condemn, whether they are friends of the landlords or friends 
of the tenants. I do not criticise these judges. They are per- 
fectly conscientious. Some of them I have recently talked 
to. They are perosnal friends of mine and they are very 
high-minded men. They are very conscientious, but they took 
a view of these laws which to me was absolutely false and 
wrong." 

Although it was quite feasible to remedy the defect in the 
law indicated by Justice Spiegelberg, the Legislature in its panic 
at the extraordinary session of 1920 substituted therefor a series 
of enactments that made it plain that the real emergency actu- 
ating the lawmakers was that the Municipal Justices would not 
enforce the April laws in a uniform and reasonable manner. These 
new laws deprive the Justices of the discretionary power to grant 
stays in summary proceedings and created a statutory stay of all 
such proceedings, witli a few specified exceptions, until Novem- 
ber 1, 1922, and made it possible for the tenant in every action 
for rent or rental value to demand a jury trial upon the issue of 
the reasonableness of the rent or rental value demanded and 
every other issue of fact involved in a landlord-and-tenant con- 
troversy. It is this change in the form of procedure In landlord- 
and-tenant litigations which has choked the machinery of the 
Municipal Courts with an impossible grist of "jury" cases. The 
Real Estate Board of New York insists that Justices of the Muni- 
cipal Court, and particularly Justices Levy, Spiegelberg, Davies, 
Genung and Law, be examined by the Joint Legislative Housing 
Committee, to determine whether or not a return to the proce- 
dure that obtained under the April laws is not preferable to ttie 
existing state of congestion and confusion in their courts and in 
the Appellate Terms of the Supreme Court of the First and Sec- 
ond Departments. 

Upon this point, the Real Estate Board of New York calls par- 
ticular attention to the statement of Assemblyman Joseph V. 
McKee, printed in "The World" of September S, 1921, under the 
title "Rent Law Justice of Kinds as Many as the Justices." In 
this statement, the Assemblyman is quoted as follows: 

"Assemblyman Joseph V. McKee, attorney for the associa- 
tion, said yesterday he personally handled a case in which 
three sets of tenants living in the same house received from 
three judges decisions that ranged from no increase at all to 
$15. In each case, the rooms had originally rented for $24." 
Speaking of the Justices in the Bronx, Mr. McKee said: 'No 
two judges try their cases alike. One makes no allowance 
for depreciation; another requires the landlord to submit 
proof of his depreciation, while a third takes an arbitrary 
two per cent. One Judge requires the landlord to put in 
proof of expenses for repairs. Another won't receive such 
proof in the bill of particulars and arbitrarily allows 10 per 
cent, of the rentals." 

2. The :illeg:atioii that there is a housing shortage of 70,000 
IlTlne quarters in the City of New York at this time is utterly 
Yvithout foundation of fact. 

It is a matter of general knowledge that during the period be- 
tween 190S and 1916, inclusive, there was a heavy over-produc- 
tion of moderately-priced apartments, which frequently resulted 
In liberal concessions of free rent to new tenants therein. There 
was certainly no unusual housing shortage in the City of New 
York in 1916, as has been established by the figures of Superin- 
tendents of Buildings. Since 1917, as testified by the Tenement 
House Commissioner on January 5, 1922, before the Joint Legis- 
lative Housing Committee, apartments for 29,120 families have 
been produced in new multi-family houses, as follows: 

1917 14,241 apartments 

1918 2,706 apartments 

1919 1,624 apartments 

1920 4,822 apartments 

1921 5,677 apartments 

These additions provided living quarters for approximately 
145,600 persons. But this is not all. During 1921, Commissioner 
Mann testified, accommodations for about 14,000 families, or 70,- 
000 persons, were also added to the local housing supply by the 
construction of one and two-family houses under the stimulus of 
the new tax exemption law. The aggregate of these sources of 
new housing, added since 1917. was 43,100 apartments, containing 
provision for approximately 215,000 persons. But as shown by the 
World Almanac for 1922, p. 562, the population of New York City 
Increased during that period by only 14.367 persons; the popula- 
tion for 1921 (July 1) being stated by said authority as 5,751,859 
as against 5,737,492 in 1917 (July 1). 

On the question of addition to housing in 1920 and 1921, the 
F. W. Dodge Company Is quoted, in the "New York Times," of 
Sunday, January 8, 1922, as stating that New York City carried 
through a program of building involving contracts awarded to 
the amount of $394,764,400, and that residential construction ac- 



counted for two-thirds of this, or for $262,184,400. The statement 
in full is as follows: 

"RECORD CONSTRUCTION IN NEW YORK CITY LAST 
YEAR. In 1921 New York City carried through the largest 
construction program on record for many years, according to 
F. W. Dodge Company. The total amount ot contracts award- 
ed during the year was $394,754,400. This figure is 25 per 
cent greater than the total tor 1920, which was $315,048,650; 
it was also 41 per cent, greater than the total for 1919, which 
was $279,478,200. The actual volume of construction, dis- 
tinguished from the dollar cost, was very considerably great- 
er in 1921 than in either of the two previous years. Residen- 
tial construction, greatly stimulated by the tax exemption 
act, has been largely responsible for this record volume of 
building. This class of construction accounted for $262,184,- 
400, or exactly two-thirds of the total. 

In 1921 there was 66,356,700 square feet of residential floor 
space contracted for, compared with 15,142,000 square feet 
in 1920, and 38,179,500 square feet in 1919. 

"Second in importance to residential construction in 1921 
was the construction of commercial building, which account- 
ed for $70,062,200, or 19 per cent, of the year's total. Although 
this was considerably less than the 1920 volume of construc- 
tion of this class, it was greater than the corresponding 
amount in 1919." 

In conclusion upon this point, the Real Estate Board of New 
Yorli calls attention to the fact that Justice Spiegelberg of the 
Municipal Court is thus quoted in an article entitled "Re-enact- 
ment of Rent Laws for one or two years favored by more New 
York Judges," printed in the final edition of the "Evening World" 
of January 6, 1922: "The housing shortage has been grossly ex- 
aggerated. In fact, it is almost entirely due to sensationalism. 
The consequence of such misinformation is a panic and a general 
"jacking up" of rentals. Because of this state of mind we need 
the further protection of the rent laws." 

In this same article Justice Davies of the Municipal Court is 
thus quoted: "The dilflculty now is not with a shortage of houses 
but with prices. The exorbitant priced apartment is a drug on 
the market. There are thousands of them vacant and it may take 
at least another year or so to bring the owners to reason." 

The Real Estate Board of New Y'ork insists that the eminent 
jurists thus quoted be invited to testify before the Joint Legis- 
lative Housing Committee, as to the truth or falsity of the state- 
ments ascribed to them by "The Evening World." 

3. Overcrowding and congestion of today exists among the 
same classes of people and for the same reasons as have obtained 
for years in this and every large city. 

Overcrowding is urged as a strong reason for rent legislation. 
Most of us remember the harrowing stories of overcrowding told 
by the Charity Organization Society in connection with the enact- 
ment of the Tenement House Laws in 1901. Then there were thou- 
sands of vacant apartments and no talk of "emergency." 

In 1906 the Federation of Churches, through its official organ, 
"Federation," published an article entitled "New York's Populous 
and Densest Blocks." 

This article gave a list of overcrowded blocks. One bounded 
by West 61st street, Amsterdam avenue, West 62d street and East 
End avenue, contained 6,173 people. Fifty-one city blocks had 
each over 3,000 people. The population of these 51 blocks had in- 
creased from 132,881 in 1900 (an average of 2,605 to the block) to 
177,988 in 1905 (an average of 3,490 to the block). This included 
many lower east side blocks with populations of between 3 000 
and 5,000. 

Overcrowding is largely the result of temperament and occurs 
naturally with certain types of people whether there is a housing 
shortage or not. Even in the poorer classes of tenements the ac- 
commodations are so much better than most of our immigrant 
population were formerly accustomed to, that they often thriftily 
utilize the housing space to the uttermost. 

Be this as it may — and every consideration of decency requires 
the admission that overcrowding is undesirable — it will also be 
admitted by all fair-minded persons, that what is and always has 
been a commonplace of life in large cities should not now be ex- 
aggerated and paraded before the public as a reason for extend- 
ing the rent laws. 

4. . Housing Conditions in New York City have not impaired and 
do not imperil the public health. 

The Commissioner of Health has frequently emphasized the 
housing shortage in its relation to congestion and to the public 
health. From his statements, it might be inferred that the al- 
leged housing shortage was seriously menacing the public health 
In the "New York Tribune" of December 2, 1920, the foUowine 
appeared: 

"OVERCROWDING INCREASES DISEASE, SAYS COPELAND. 

Health Commissioner Finds Twenty Cities Suffering from 
Shortage of Dwellings. 

Dr. Royal S. Copeland, Health Commissioner, returned yes- 
terday from Detroit, where he presided at a meeting of health 
officials from twenty cities, having a population of 200 000 
or more, which was called at the request of the Senate Com- 
mittee on Reconstruction. • « . Unsanitary condition' re- 
sulted from overcrowding, he said, increasing the infant mor- 
tality rate and the danger from tuberculosis, pneumonia and 
other diseases. Infant mortality was shown to be 50 per 
cent, higher, he said, in the districts where overcrowding 
was the worst. • « »•> 

In the "New York Herald" of May 5. 1921, there is reprinted 
from the Weekly Bulletin of the New York City Department of 
Health a lengthy article under the caption of "Healthy Babies 
in New York." From this the following is quoted- 

"The infant mortality rate continues to be most encourag- 
ing. For the first thirteen weeks of the year, that is up to 



January 14, 1922 RECORDANDGUIDE 41 

the week ending March 26, the Infant mortality rate was 80, out by the committee. Increased the cost of housing, 

as against 113 for the corresponding period of last year, a Neither does it believe to be either practically or economically 

difference of 33 a thousand children born. This Infant mor- sound, the proposal to continue the existing high schedule of 

tality rate represents a numerical reduction of 1,069 infant wages with a statement to the unions that this will be continued 

deaths from all causes." when efficiency is maintained and withdrawn when it is not. The 

In the "New York Times" of September 11, 1921, the follow- Real Estate Board of New York sees in this plan nothing but a 

ing statements are made in an article headed "East Side Dis- proposal to insure the continued high cost of housing. 

trlct Healthiest In the City"- There is available (Handbook of Building Trades Employers 

"Mortality Rate Cut in Half for Section Bounded by Third Association of the City of New York for 1921, pages 50 to 55) a 

and Ninth Streets and Avenues A and B." statement showing the steadily increasing cost of labor since 

"Deaths Only 6 44 a 1 000 pre-war times. It is hero referred to for the reason that it con- 

"Dr. Copeland Says It' Is Due to Observance of Health De- Arms common observation that one of the main reasons for the 

partment Regulations by Aliens." continued high cost of construction is the fact that the price of 

„ ^ . , ,. , ^. \, ,^^. . J. « n „ •*„ i„ labor in the building industry is still at war time levels. 
Contrary to general belief, the healthiest part of the city is 

not that section in which wtalth has its dwelling. In a report 7. I.obor i.x prodiiring on a lower basis of efficiency than tn 

on the general e.xcellent health condition of the city made public pre-war tiniew. 

yesterdav, Dr. William H. Guilfov. Registrar of Records of the It is universally admitted that there is a great loss in the effl- 

Health Department, has placed the point of lowest mortality in ciency of labor and it must also be considered .that in the bor- 

Sanitary District 26, which constitutes ten square blocks run- oughs outside of Manhattan in pre-war years a fen hour day 

ning from Avenue A to Avenue B and extending from Third to was the usual work day. 

Ninth street. Some builders .state that labor is 50 per cent, under normal. 

In this section the mortality rate, compared with the city's others 40 per cent., and most of them claim, and the testimony 

rate, has been cut in two. The population of the district is 33.- before the Joint Legislative Housing Committee bears out the 

373, according to Health Department figures. Many of the resi- claim, that bonuses in addition to the regular pay must be given, 

dents are foreign born. In this small city, for there are more Then there is the constant interference of shop stewards, the 

than 3,000 persons in each block, the mortality rate is 6.44 for frequent calling of strikes, and the vastly increased cost of 

each thousand. The city's average mortality rate is 12.93 a workmen's compensation insurance. 

thous.ind. The infant mortality rate in the district is 52 a thou- The Committee has constantly referred to the shortage of 
sand, and the infant mortality rate for the city is S5 a thousand. low-priced housing as constituting the so-called "emergency." 
In commenting on the report Health Commissioner Dr. Royal This shortage is a permanent condition because houses renting 
S. Copeland said: "The people in this section have been used to for less than ten to twelvn dollars per room cannot be produced 
governmental control all their lives in countries where pater- either under existing conditions or those which we are likely to 
nalism is conspicuous. The result is when they come here they have for some years to come. The average "poor" tenant, how- 
place themselves under the regulations of the Department of ever, is better able to pay rentals of ten to twelve dollars per 
Health, patronize our baby health stations and follow the Board room today than he was able to pay six to eight dollars per 
of Health teachings. It is unfortunate that Illness among room in pre-war times. His wages have increased to a far great- 
children and a high child mortality rate frequently are found er extent than this increase in rentals. Moreover, rentals gener- 
among well-to-do people. It is a sad commentary on our citi- ally have increased more slowly than any other factor in the cost 
zenship that too many children coming from so-called good of living. The statistics of the Department of Labor show this 
homes are turned over to nursemaids and do not receive personal beyond question. In any event, the community must be pre- 
attention from their mothers so essential to their health. * • •" pared to pay a fair economic rental for housing — that is, rentals 
The following table summarizes the steady decrease in the which will provide a return on the investment sufficient to lu- 
death rate in New York City from 1918 to 1921 inclusive, during duce enough houses to be built to house the community. If the 
which New York City has established its reputation as "the Joint Legislative Housing Committee intends to endeavor to 
greatest health resort in the world." The Health Department keep rentals below this level, it will defeat its own object and 
figures seem to prove not only this, but that there was a percep- the housing problem will never be solved, 
tlble drop in the death rate for the last three months of 1921: s. The cost of livln;; has declined from war time levels. 

Common observation, supported by published statements on 

MORTALITY RATE PER 1,000. authority, indicate that the cost of living has fallen. The tables 

,— Mortality Rater Per 1,000—, published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics in October, 1921, 

Under Under show the following index figures: 

,^°l ^,^"^J^^ = JfY^ ^ I,^^'" Dec, 1914 Dec. 1920 May, 1921 Sept.. 1921 

191S n.bX Jb.l »^. ..(>« 2014 1<!1 7 170 7 

1919 13.35 26.6 82. ^"" ''"^•* ^"'^'^ ^^^-^ 

1920 12.93 30.8 85. In the Monthly Review of Credit and Business Conditions In 

1921 (To Sept. 10) 11.54 24. 76. the Second Federal Reserve District by the Federal Reserve 

1922 (Estimated year) 11.17 23.8 71.1 Agent. Federal Reserve Bank, New York. January 1, 1922. at 

,,,,,,,.,,, ^. .. x^ „ , X , , • page 7, the following statement is made, showing a further decline 

"Greater ^ew York" (the bulletin of the Merchants Associa- from .797 above pre-war living costs" • * » While the Sta- 
tion of New York) under date of January 9, 1922. contains an tist price index for Great Britain is now only 11 points higher 
article entitled "New York City Is the Safest Spot on Earth. than the Department of Labor index of wholesale prices in the 
The subhead states that this article was prepared by Dr. Royal United States, the Index for the cost of living in England Is 103 
S. Copeland, Commissioner of Health of New York City. points above the 1914 level, while that for the United States Is 

In this article Dr. Copeland is quoted as saying: "Going back 34 points above it. • • • 

fifty years we find that the general death rate of New York City a i\ ... j .= ^ 

was twenty-eight per thousand. In 1921 it reached the remark- "• Opcratine and flxed costs have lncrea.sed. 

ably low rate of eleven per thousand. Translated Into terms of .. * "^,t" . ''"^'^^ ^^""^ '"^^reased. as well as construc- 

what this means to the community, let me say that the two *;°" <""'*;"'• Mortgage money, formerly 4 1-2 to 5 per cent., is now 

points by which the death rate was lowered in 1921 over the universally b per cent. 

preceding v«ar, 1920. indicates that more than 10,000 persons are ^. wages of all classes of employes in connection with the opera- 
alive and Well in New York today who would have died under Jion of buildings have increased to 50 to 100 per cent. Tn addl- 
the conditions of one year ago." !'°" thereto, the cost of repairs, coal and other supplies have 

5. High rents are due primarily to high cost of construction. '"creased In like proportion, to say nothing of the heavy ex- 

One phase of the testimony that should have been sufficient ^lense of an abnormal number of rent litigations. 

to satisfy the Joint Legislat'ive Housing Committee as to the ™ *^'' "tf ^'^, ^e^" ^.e^" was 2 per cent, on approximately 

reason for continued high rents was the statement of Building "" "'' r""" c<>nt v.nluation. Today It Is 2.77 on approximately a 

Superintendent Reville of the Bronx that in 1910 20,000 separate J"" "''.L^''"*.^''''"'', '°"- To"ching this phase of the housing prob- 

apartments were built in the Bronx at a cost of $34,000,000 and Y.J^- T.^': ^"""L?' "" °''*"'""", "' "^^- '"■'"*«'' «" article en- 

that 10.000 vvere built in 1921 at a cost of $39,000,000. As the l'"'^'! Higher Tax Rate Clearly Traced in Rent Increases," In 

file destimate of cost is usually about 10 per cent, under the wnicn it was stated: 

actual cost, this would mean that an apartment cost to build in "The .iverage family In New York City, excluding the very 

1910, $1,870, and in 1921. $4,290. If there is added to $4,290 the poor, who have been affected to a lesser degree, has had from 

architects' fees, the cost of obtaining money, the cost of the land 530 to $200 added to its .annual rent bill in the last three 

and incidental expenses, it brings the cost of the apartment to years by the Increase In taxation. 

$6,000; on which the landlord, to make 7 per cent. net. must get "Thousands of families four years ago were paying their 

16 per cent. This is $960 a year, or $80 a month. landlords around $12 a month for the taxes which the latter 

A statement issued by Superintendent of Buildings Miller, of had to pay. Now they are paying $19 or more a month for 

Manhattan, and published in "The World" of January 1, 1922, the s,"ime purposes and are blaming the landlords for raising 

under the heading "Steady Increase In Average Cost of New the rents. • • • 

Buildings." shows that for all buildings erected in Manhattan "Interesting Is the disclosure that so far as the elevator 

from 1902 to 1911, the average cost was $80,000, as against $140,- apartments are concerned, the tax bill hns Increased faster 

000 between 1912 and 1921. than have the other expenses of the house. In one house, 

0, Wages in the hnildlng trades are an important factor In the taxes In 1918 -were 29.9 per cent, of the total expenses: 

the high cost of honsing, and are still at war time levels. In 1921 they were 32.8 per cent. In another the percentage 

The outstanding factor in the high cost of producing housing lumped from 28.8 to 33.1 per cent., while In a third It rose 

Is the price of labor. Practically since the days of Sam Parks from 27.8 to 34.4 per cent. • • •" 

In 1903 the item of wages in the building industry has been up- The foregoing are the facts unon which the Real Estate Board 

ward, reaching the peak during the war, when It touched a point of New York relies to maintain Us contention that an Intelligent- 

approximately 100 per cent, higher than pre-war rates. ly and Imparttnlly conducted Investigation hv the .Tnint Leglsla- 

The Real Estate Board of New York does not coincide with the five Hnusing Committee will disclose the housing situation as It 
opinion of counsel for the Joint Legislative Housing Committee actually exists. Without the facilities for such comprehensive 
that the labor unions, merely on request of counsel, will "bo and ofilcial Investigation as the .Toint Legislative Housing Corn- 
good' and cease to carry on the practices which have, as brought mlttee has at Its disposal, the Real Estate Board of New York 



42 RECORD AND GUIDE January 14, 1922 

has, at short notice, as indicated in this memorandum, demon- ate, and we are getting no relief for these people," was Mr. 

strated the following points: Reville's statement. 

I. That the drastic rent laws of September, 1920, were en- ^^ . . r- t-. • i i i-c j u ^ *i,„ „,.«_-,„,..Jaj ^a; 

acted under a misapprehension of the facts and because of an Dr. Annie S. Daniel testified about the overcrowded condl- 

atmosphere of hysteria and panic created by lurid misstate- tions on the East Side in the section between Houston and 

ments of the actual conditions: and that congestion in the Fourteenth streets from Third avenue to the East River, which 

Municipal Courts is due entirely to the rent laws and par- . . 

ticularly those of September, 1920. has for many years been notorious for congestion ot popula- 

II. That, contrary to the impression created by the con- tion 
t^^'j:^!^Tt^"^^^!^-r^'!i^%^^; Tenement House Commissioner Mann declared the housing 
or unusual shortage of housing exists now as the public shortage is more acute than ever. In February, 1921, he testified 
has been led to believe. vacant apartments fit for occupancy aggregated one-fifth of 

III. That congestion and overcrowding have existed in i c lu i * i u ■ 4.u ■» u. » •-. ., ^^m.... 
New York City to a marked degree when there was a sur- o"e P" cent, of the total number in the city, but in a census 
plus of housing. just completed the vacancies showed only one-tenth of one per 

IV. That the attempt to prove that the public health suf- jgnt. Commissioner Mann said that up to 1917 there were built 
fers, because of congestion on account of the alleged short- ,, . ^, . .^ or nnn ^ ^ c-- ^i. i onion 
age, does not harmonize with the published statements of annually in this city 25,000 apartments. Since that year 29,120 
the Health Commissioner. apartments have been built. He gave the following figures. 

V. That, while housing is being produced at an almost Anart- 
unprecedented rate, the cost of housing is still at least twice Apa 
pre-war cost; and that no matter how much housing is pro- Year. Houses. mentS. 
duced at tiie present cost, it cannot benefit the average rent- 101 7 760 14 241 

er. The chief items of cost, labor and material, must come o%n/: 

down before housing rented at $6 to $10 per room, or prices 1918 , 95 2,706 

the masses can afford to pay, can be produced. 1919 95 1624 

VI. That the one item of cost which remains at war time in-jn 9-37 a 879 
levels is the item of labor. ^^'^^ "' t,ei^^ 

VII. That labor is not producing on as effective a basis 1921 (to Dec. 15) 264 5,667 

VIII. That the cost of living has fallen very consider- "There is a shortage of 80,000 apartments right now," he de- 
ably. clared, "as against 70,000 last year. Were that made up, we 
abnm-mlny\°gir""^' ™^'"""'-"'=^ ^""^ ^^^'^ expenses are ^^g^t to have new buildings each year with from 20,000 to 
The Real Estate Board of New York appreciates the fact that 25,000 apartments. 

these conclusions reflect a very serious condition. But it attri- Health Commissioner Copeland testified there was danger 

butes tliem, as do all thinking persons, to a number of abnormal r ,. f..i j-r*. ^ 

factors, all of them in conflict with ecinomic law. ^'°^ P'^gue because of the overcrowding of tenements. 

The Real Estate Board of New Y'ork believes that the rent Judge Levy said that the rent laws should be extended, and 

i»=nif/r largely responsible for the situation because they have asserted that the poor tenants of the East Side, of Brownsville, 

resulted in a method of administration which has been discour- ^ ' ' 

aging to owners, and in Court decisions which are at wide vari- Harlem and the Bronx had been the target to a far greater ex- 

ance with established understanding of constitutional rights, be- tent of the profiteers than the Riverside Drive dwellers, who 

cause they have resulted in the intimidation of owners and ,ji.^^ crj^..i c ^i. ■ ■ ^ i. 

investors, and the frightening away of capital; and because they '^ould better afford to take care of their interests, 

have for these and other reasons, tended to prolong the period of William H. Dolson, secretary of the Real Estate Board, 

high rents. »v, „ , t^ . . t, , ^ », ,. , urged that a written agreement be binding on both landlord 

In these circumstances the Real Estate Board of New York t= o 

does not believe that the rent laws should be extended or that and tenant, and that the latter be required to pay the rent 

conditions warrant their extension beyond the time fixed by the which he may agree to pay in a lease. The law now permits 

Legislature of 1921 for their expiration. »i .,. .. .. i- ^l ... ..i. i. i • ^i. 

The rent laws do not expire until November 1, 1922, nearly '^e tenant to question the rent, even though he may sign the 

a year hence. The Real Estate Board of New York fails entire- lease. Mr. Dolson admitted to Mr. Untermyer that this would 

ly to see how the Legislature can honestly be asked to legislate eliminate new tenants from protection under the rent laws, 

in January, on the pretext that there will be an emergency in _,- , rir /- • ri-r.i 

November. Nor does the Real Estate Board of New York see, in Stanley Isaacs, member of the Law Committee of the Real 

view of the facts on increased housing production here submit- Estate Board, told the committee there was urgent need for 

ted, how the Legislature can, with any regard for the obvious cc ■ ^ -u-^ ^- x -t, i ^ j ii. ^ »• i 

facts in the case, enact such legisaltion if it is asked to do so. °^"''^ arbitration tribunals to decrease the congestion of 

If the Joint Legislative Housing Committee intends to recom- rent cases in the COUrtS. 

mend to the Legislature that the laws be extended, and if the Rudolph P. Miller, Superintendent of Buildings of Manhat- 

Legislature acquiesces in this recommendation, the Real Estate -/^ j i j j , i. ■ • t. 

Board of New Y'ork requests that the Committee give due con- t^n, testified he regarded the emergency on the increase in the 

sideration to the statement of its Counsel when it was said, that low-priced apartments. From 1910 to 1916 there were built 

enic'trd'TrvTni%f7Hv'"th«?''tL"n''^in,T' '"T" """ l^^"" ^1'", o^ projected in Manhattan, 1,251 tenements, he said, and only 

enacted, proving cleaily that the present laws have not provided f j » ' • > j 

the remedy and that some other remedy must be found. 207 built or projected from 1916 to 1921. In the Bronx, tenement 

The Real Estate Board also reaffirms its belief, as expressed houses to accommodate 17,360 families have been erected in the 

to the Joint Legislative Housing Committee in a resolution dated , ^ c t ..i. j- ^ j »• 

November 9, 1920. that legislation providing for incorporation '^st five years. In the preceding five years accommodations 

and state supervision of labor unions is an essential factor in for 72,746 were erected. 

the situation and should be presented to the Legislature just Victor M. Earle, who testified on January 6, was recalled last 

convened. . , 

Tuesday and asked if he had any suggestions for amendment 

Following Mr. Edwards on the stand Mr. Untermyer called of the rent laws. He made the following-that a written lease 

Prof. Samuel McCune Lmdsey of Columbia University, who made subsequent to the amendments should be valid and not 

testified he had jwepared an analysis of facts bearing on the within the protection of the rent laws; that a tenant who 

housing situation which had been attached to the brief ot the holds over beyond the expiration of his lease should be held to 

lawyers who were engaged in appealing to the United States the end of the term; that a tenant who has been given four 

Supreme Court the case involving the constitutionality of the months' notice that the landlord will renew the lease at the 

Emergency Rent Laws, the purpose of the analysis being to same rental should be compelled to answer thirty days before 

show that there is no evidence to prove there ever was a the expiration of his lease whether he will accept or not and 

shortage of 70,000 apartments in this city but that, using the that if he fails to accept he shall be compelled to move at the 

same figures from which such a deduction had been made a expiration of his lease; that the purchaser of an apartment 

surplus of 30,000 apartments was indicated. should be able to obtain possession of that particular apart- 

Mr. Untermyer demanded to know how Prof. Lindsey reached ment in a house which has been actually sold on the co-opera- 

the conclusion that there was a surplus of 30,000 instead of a tive plan, where at least 20 per cent, of the apartments in said 

shortage of 70,000 apartments. The witness referred to his house are included for sale in said plan; and that a reasonable 

reasons in his pamphlet. rent should be absolutely and definitely defined and should be 

Patrick J. Reville, Superintendent of Building of Bronx Bor- figured on a certain percentage, say 10 per cent, of the actual 

ough, testified that while there had been considerable construe- market value, and not on the equity as called for under the 

tion of apartments renting from $18 to $25 a room nothing was present rent laws, 

being built for the families which could pay half that amount. Several other witnesses were recalled last Tuesday but no 

"Housing conditions for workingmen are becoming desper- further testimony relative to the housing shortage was taken. 



January 14, 1922 RECORDANDGUIDE 43 

Review of Real Estate Market for the Current Week 

Large Transactions Seasoned a Market That Abounded in Widespread Dealing", 
Wiiile Many Tenants Bought Their Places of Occupancy 



THIS week was one crowded with good real estate trans- 
actions. There have l)een weeks in the recent past when 
the number of sales aggregated as much as they did this 
week and when large properties were distinguishing features, 
but in no week for a long time has there been stronger invest- 
ment interest shown nor n better variety of good sales. The 
week, too, disclosed some leases of more than passing interest. 
The most notable sale was that of the leasehold of the Knox 
building, at the southwest corner of Fifth avenue and 40th 
street, by August Heckscher, who tooR over this choice site in 
the name of the Anahma Realty Corporation from the Fortieth 
Street and Fifth Avenue Corporation controlled by Benjamin 
Mordecai and E. C. Potter. There are 19 years yet to run on 
the lease, with privilege of renewal. A sale that would seem 
to mark a revival of co-operative buying of business buildings 
was that of the sale of a 12-story loft building on a Seventh 
avenue corner, to the tenants. It is the largest co-operative sale 
in many months and probably the most notable commercial 
building sale of the kind. 

The scope of the buying movement by individual tenants of 
the properties they occupy was wide this week. A tenant of 
a group of business buildings at Second avenue, S3d and 54th 
streets, bought them; another bought an old building on West 
street; another bought a parcel downtown; while numerous 
tenants of dwellings bought them. Such transactions always 
strengthen values roundabout. 

Downtown properties were in the limelight of dealing this 
week, also. Conspicuous among them was the sale of some 
old warehouses on a Water street corner that had been in the 
continuous ownership of one family since the era of Peter 



Stuyvesant, or more than two centuries. This is probably the 
best answer to the question : "Does New York real estate 
pay?" 

A group of old frame buildings on lower Vesey street, in the 
wholesale produce district, changed hands. Covering a small 
plot, they adjoin another small plot on a corner. It will be 
interesting to see if the corner is acquired for a joint reim- 
provement. A wholesale merchant bought a loft building on 
Lispenard street. Business properties on Madison avenue, 
Sixth avenue, Eighth avenue and other prominent thorough- 
fares changed hands. A large vacant holding of Robert E. 
Dowling's in West Harlem, was bought for improvement. 

There was considerable dealing in all kinds of multi-family 
houses. Numerous large elevator apartment houses on Wash- 
ington Heights changed hand and two parcels on Marble Hill 
were bought. In the Bronx extensive buying of dwellings and 
multi-family houses exceeded the buying of vacant plots for 
improvement for the first time in many months. Some large 
new apartment houses were among those sold. 

In the leasing field a good sized site for a 9-story loft build- 
ing was leased on the West Side, for a long term. Marking 
great rental increment was the sub-leasing of the Siebrecht 
building at the northeast corner of Fifth avenue and 38th 
street. The new lease shows more than a doubling of the rental 
in twelve years. A large lease in the Heckscher building marks 
the most northerly movement of trade on Fifth avenue. Fifth 
avenue is an investment prodigy among world thoroughfares. 
The annual rental of the Siebrecht building under the new lease 
is almost as much as the late James Gordon Bennett obtained 
for the fee of it about 20 years ago when he sold it to the 
late Austin Corbin. 



PRIVATE REALTY SALES. 



np HE total number of sales reported, but not 
J- recorded in Manhattan this week, was 1'6'S, 
as against 81 last week and 78 a year ago. 

The number of sales south of 50th st was 59, 
as compared with 26 last week and 43 a year 
ago. 

The number of sales north of 50th st was 74, 
as compared with 55 last week and 35 a year 
ago. 

From the Bronx 56 sales at private contract 
were reported, as against 35 last week and 13 
a year ago! 

Statistical tables, including the number of re- 
corded instruments, will be found on page 50. 



Observations by Max Natanson 

Max N. Natanson, one of the city's most ac- 
tive real estate operators, now located at 170 
Broadway, will soon join the northward march 
of the real estate fraternity. Ho has leased, 
through the Brown-Wheelock Co-, for a term 
of 10 years, a large suite of offices in the Guar- 
anty Trust Co.'s Building, formerly the Sherry 
Building, at ri22 Fifth av, southwest corner of 
44th St. Mr. Natanson will occupy his new 
offices sometime in March. 

Mr. Natanson's dealings in real estate during 
the last several years have been spectacular in 
the extreme, his operations having aggregated 
close to ;K200.0nO,000. His latest transactions 
involved the purchase and the immediate resale 
of. the Belnord Apartment house, assessed at 
$4,500,000, and occupying the entire square 
block bounded by Broadway, Amsterdam av, 
Seth and 87th sta. 

Discussing the removal of his offlces from the 
financial zone to the new uptown business dis- 
trict, Mr. Natanson said: "I am moving uptown 
to be closer to the center of things and to the 
district, which, in addition to being the 'up- 
town Wall Street.' rapidly is becomin" the real 
estate and mortgage loan center of New York. 

"Within a stone's throw of my new quarters 
are the offices of some of the most nrominpnt 
estate owners, real estate operators and brokers 
In New York. All parts of the city can be 
reached readily by way of the subways that 
radiate from the Grand Centra! Station, from 
which point also the Queensboro Subway, the 
N. Y. Central, N. Y.. N. H. & Hartford Railroad 
Pennsylvania Railmad, the Long Island Rail- 
road and the New York and Hudson Tubes are 
most accessible. 

"The advantage of being located in the heart 
of the city is the ease with which a property 



presented in the morning can be inspected and 
passed upon within the hour. On the other 
hand, the great purchasing power of New York, 
from the residential point of view, is now con- 
centrated north of 42d st and east and west of 
Central Park. It is advisable for a real estate 
operator to be as close as possible to this pur- 
chasing power. 

"There is also to be considered the compara- 
tive potentialities of the downtown and uptown 
districts as fields of speculation and invest- 
ment. The downtown districts have been fine- 
combed by the speculator, the investor and the 
broker. Prices in certain sections have about 
reached their peak and the main thoroughfares 
are so fully improved with permanent buildings 
that there remain but few opportunities for 
quick turns. And yet there is always a drift 
from the side streets to the main thoroughfares 
such as Broadway. Nassau and William sts. and 
these arteries of trade and travel will always 
be money-makers. 

"In general, however, the opportunity for 
profitable investment and speculation is great- 
er in the midtown district, the terminal zone, 
the new uptown business section and the dis- 
tricts lying east and west of Central Park, to- 
ward which the business and residential popu- 
lation of New York is trending steadily, 

"The proper location for the offlces of an active 
real estate operator is that which is closest to 
the active centers : wherefore, I have concluded 
to move to 44th st and Fifth av." 



On December 15. last, the Lewis H. May Co.. 
were appointed agents to dispose of the remain- 
ing holdings at private sale by January 1, 1022; 
these holdings consisting of 100 seashore lots, 3 
ocean fronts and 7 private plots, containing 60 
lots. These sales were completed within the con- 
tract time, practically two weeks, which is a 
record in suburban selling. 

Mr. Morgenthan stated that since all the real 
estate holdings of the Banister Realty Co. have 
been disposed of steps will be taken in the im- 
mediate future to wind up the affairs of the cor- 
poration and liquidate the same. 



Closes Out Ocean Front 

Lewis H. May Co. sold for the Banister 
Realty Co.. Maximilian Morgenthau. president, 
the last of the ocean front holdings of the com- 
pany in the Ostend section of Far Rockaway, 
namely: to Max Fishel and Max Katz the parcel 
on the east side of Beach 13th st (formerly 
Neilson av). 120 feet south of Seagirt av and 
100 feet wide to the Atlantic Ocean, including 
riparian rights;: to Henry Matz the entire block 
on the .^ast side of Beach 12th it (formerly 
Seneca av). with a frontage of 120 feet on Sea- 
girt av (formerly South st) to the Atlantic 
Ocean, approximately 20 lots. The buyers of 
both parcels will improve them with dwellings 
for summer occupancy which will be ready next 
season. 

The Banister Realty Co., In 1005, acquired 
1,500 feet of ocean front, includin.T; the bathing 
establishment known as the Kuloff. five dwell- 
ings and 40 acres of nd joining land, part of 
which was ocean meadow land. The cninpany 
exnended over .S400.000, exclusive of purehnse 
price, in developments, including reclaiming, 
streets, sewers, sidewalks, etc. 



New York Title Has Election. 

The yearly organization meeting of the New 
York Title & Mortgage Co. directors was held 
at the main office of the company, 1.35 Broadway. 
The following officers were re-elected: Harry A. 
Kahler. president; Cyril H. Burdett. vice-presi- 
dent; Henry S. Acken, vice-pres;ident : Gerhard 
Kuhne. vice-president and secretary; Ernest J. 
Habighorst, vice-president ; Hubert F. Breit- 
wieser, vice-president ; Joseph L. Obermayer, 
treasurer; Louis Palestrant, assistant secretary'; 
Nelson A. Mesereau, assistant secretary; Harry 
E. Kuhlman. assistant secretary ; Frank L. 
Stiles, assistant secretary ; Edward Mullowney, 
assistant treasurer; William Huntsman Williams, 
solicitor ; Morgan J. O'Brien, general counsel, 
and an addition made by the election of Alfred 
C. Busch, as assistant secretary. Mr. Busch has 
been with the New York Title & Mortgage Co. 
for many years and for a considerable lime has 
been attached to the Brooklyn office, 203 Mon- 
tague st. 



Operator in a Big Trade 

Samuel Brcner sold to the Wed;;ewuod Realty 
Corporation. Francis M. Kvle. president. 425 
West End av and 303-.305 West SOth st. at the 
northwest corner, consisting of a 7-sty elevator 
apartment house on the immediate corner and a 
6-sty elevator apartment house adioiniiig the 
street, the combined plot fronting 102.2 feet on 
West End av and TOO feet on SOth st. 

In part payment Mr. Brener takes the follow- 
ing free and clear properties: Plot 150x100 at 
the southeast corner of Morris av and 101st st, 
opposite St. James Park; 15 acres on Wilmot 
rd, opposite the Bloomingdale residence at 
Scarsdale, and the waterfront propertv at Milton 
Point. Uye, adjoining the American Yacht Club 
and the estate of Senator Wainwright. 

Mr. Brener recently purchased from the Cen- 
tral Union Trust Co. the West End av property, 
togethei' with two dwellings adjoining on 80th 
st, which are not included in the sale. Richard 



44 



H. Scobie was the broker in the present deal. 
Waldemar F. Timme, attorney, represented Mr. 
Kyle, and Goldsmith & Rosenthal acted for Mr. 
Brener. 



Activity in Jamaica 

Homes are beginning to spring up in the 
Country Club District of Jamaica, Queens, re- 
cently sold by the M. Morgenthau. Jr., Co. 
Herbert L. Miller is constructing a house and 
seems likely to win the prize of an Overland 
Sedan offered by Mr. Morgenthau for the first 
to move in his own home built on the property. 
Mrs. Jane Smith, of Hicksville, L. I., has ar- 
ranged to start the first of the week, as has 
Mrs. L. McGinness, of Jamaica. Many others 
who purchased property in this section are 
drawing up plans and the time is not far off 
when, from all indications, this section will soon 
be another community of homes. 



Big Deal on the Heights 

S. & J. H. Albert, brokers, sold the Cliffwood 
Court and Westwood Court apartments, two 6- 
sty elevator apartment houses, covering the block 
front on the west side of Fort Washington av, 
between ITOth and ISOth sts. The Capricon 
Realty Holding Co., Richard A. Geis, president. 
Is the new owner- The Herbstone Realty Co.. 
formerly the W. J. Rich Development Co.. 
which acquired the properties in 1914 through 
the same brokers, was the seller. 

The houses, erected in 1^12 by William H. 
Picken. are valued at $600,000 and return a 
yearly rental of $90,000. They measure 202 feet 



Douglas L.Ellinian£[o. 

Real Estate Brokers 

Fifth and Park Avenue Districts 

Efficient Property Management 
Plaza, 9200 15 East 49th St. 



JAMES BOYD 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

135 BROADWAY 
Phone: Rector 8651-8651 



BROOKS 


& MOMAND 


Member of Real Estate Board 


Real Estate Mortgages 


115 BROADWAY 


Phone ^^^ Rector 



Charles B. Van Valen, Inc. 

Member Real Estate Board of N. Y. 

REAL ESTATE 

mortgage; loans— INSURANCE 

110 WILLIAM STREET 

Phone: 6000 Beekman 



SPECIALISTS IN 

PENN. TERMINAL SECTION 

REAL ESTATE 

AGENTS— BROKERS— APPRAISERS 

H. M. Weill Co. 

Tel. Loneacro 2290-2S17 221 West 33rd St. 



BENJAMIN WINTER 

BUY AND SELL HIGH-CLASS 
MANHATTAN PROPERTY 

BROKERS ARE INVITED TO SUBMIT 

PROPOSITIONS — Quick Decision Given. 

Lansinu Building 

2299 BROADWAY, AT 82nd STREET 

Suite 6 Phone: Schuyler 2897 



BRENSAM REALTY CORP. 

SAMUEL BRENER, Pres. 

REAL ESTATE OPERATORS 

50 EAST 42n(' STREET 
Vanderbilt 3918-19 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

on the avenue and 115 feet on each street and 
accommodate 72 families, being laid out In 
suites of 4 to 9 rooms each. S. & J. H. Albert, 
who have been appointed agents of the build- 
ings, report that they are fully rented- 

Otto H. Kahn Makes a Trade 

Otto H- Kahn purchased the o-sty stone Ameri- 
can basement dwelling 30 West .'J4th st, on a lot 
2'J.GxlU0.5, on the Rockefeller block. Harold C. 
Matthews was the seller. The property was held 
at $125,000. Mr. Kahn gave in exchange the 5- 
sty stone American basement dwelling 10 East 
6Sth st, on a lot 25xlOU.5, which was recently 
reported sold. William B. May &. Co- were the 
brokers in both transactions. 

St. Francis Apartment Sold 

Samuel Kaplan sold for a client 41-47 St. 
Nicholas terrace, a 6-sty and basement elevator 
apartment house with stores, known as the St- 
Francis. on a plot !ID, 11x148, northwest corner of 
129th st. overlooking St. Nicholas Park. 



Operators Buy Second Avenue Comer 

Eisman. Lee, Corn & Levine sold through L. 
G. Johnson to Meister Builders, Inc., OOH Second 
av, northwest corner of 4Sth st, a G-sty brick 
tenement house with stores, fronting 70.5 feet on 
■the avenue and 40 feet on the street. It was 
held at $75,000. 

Brown Makes West Side Purchase 

Frederick Brown purchased the 12-sty busi- 
ness building, on a plot 60x98.9. at 151 to 155 
West 25th St. between Sixth and Seventh avs, 
from a client of Dwight, Archibald & Perry. 
The structure has an annual rent roll of $55,- 
OiiO and is largely occupied by furriers. 



Madison Avenue Site Assembled 

A new building is to be erected on the west 
side of Madison av. between 82d and ?>?jd sts. as 
a result of a series of sales which have been 
neqotiated by Joseph P. Day during the last two 
months. The new owner, whose name is not 
revealed, intends to improve the site, which has 
a ground area of 7.500 feet and was held at 
$375,000. The parcel has frontages on the ave- 
nue and both side streets. It is just south of 
the Murray Hill district, and north of the 
Madison Square zone, a section which has been 
active recently. 

Included in the sale was 158 Madison av, a 
5-sty building. 24.7x95. This property was sold 
by Mrs. Caroline McLanahan. represented by 
■William A. White &. Sons. The deal also in- 
cluded 19 East 32d st. a 4-sty building. 25x98.9, 
sold by Mrs. McLanahan, executrix of her hus- 
band's estate. The third parcel involved 22 East 
33d St. a 5-sty building, 25x98.9, sold by the es- 
tate of W. H. Moore, represented by Albert B. 
Ashforth. Inc. 



Tenants Buy Large Buildingrs 

Frederick Osann, president of the Predprick 
Osann Co.. sewing machines, and a tenant In 
the l--sty and loft building at the northeast 
corner of Seventh av and 24th st. has bought 
the property from the Seventh Avenue Property 
Corporation. Alexander S. Fisher president. The 
buildine. which was sold subiect to mortgages 
for .$287,250. measures 86.11 fept on the avenue 
and 79.2 feet on 24th st. William A. White & 
Sons were the brokers. The sale is recorded. 



The General Cigar Co.. Frederick Hirsehborn 
nresident. with nn^rters in the 7-stv factory 
building lOlfi to 1020 Second av. southeast cor- 
ner of n4th st. has purchased that nronerty. 
together with the adioinin<5' 5-sty store buildings 
at 1014 Second av and 310 East r.4th st. and 
the abutting O-sty building. 57.2x100..^). at 307 
fo 311 East 53d st. They were arnuired from 
the Xorwelt Corporation. Henry Fisher, nresi- 
dent. f^r a stated eonsiderat;inn of $2^5 000. of 
which" S168. 812 rf^pr'^'=ents mirtgas-^s. The nr'^n- 
erty fronts 100.5 feet on the avenuf* and 125 
feet on 54th st. The sales are recorded. 



Owner Buys Adjoining Parcels 

Tlip Norko Roalty Corporation (T'^sn Koch) . 
whirh owns the properties at 5"0 to 574 T^ex- 
Ington av and 128 and 130 East 51st st, forming 
the southwest corner of those thorouehfares. 
has purchased fmm M. M. Marks the adioining 
5-sty biiildines 50R and 568 Lexington av. on a 
plot 40x80. The cAmnany now controls an ave- 
nue frontage of 111,10 feet and a street front- 
age of 106 feet. 



Fine Apartment House Bought 

C.porge Noimnn bought tbrnuph Stanlnv 
Wolfson from the 106 East 85th Street Cor- 
poration the 9-stv and basement rlovator apart- 
mpnt hrtiisp inn^llO East 85th st. on a plot 
54.9x102.5- Tt was built 3 years a^o bv the 
seller. Two door? awav. at the southeast cor- 
ner of Park av and 85th st. is the private 
residence of E. R. L. Stettlnius. the banker. 



Chateau d'Armes Changes Hands 

The npwly or^^mized Chateau d'Armns Realty 
Corporation , with M. R- Donald. S. Scammpll 
and F- S, Castvslone as directors, has nurfhased 
the 6-sty and brr^pment elevator anartment 
house at the southeast corner of Fort Wnsh- 
Ineton av and 16igt st. known as the Chateau 
d'Armes. The house has an avenue frontage of 



January 14, 1922 

lOS: ' feet and a street frontage of 145.10 feet. 
Large holdings located in Mercer County, N. J., 
were given in part payment by the buying com- 
pany, which is represented by Noble, Morgan & 
Scammeli, attorneys. 



Resells Harold Court 

The Maxroe Realty Corporation, representing 
Max Rosenfeld. purchased from the Ardsmore 
Kstates, Inc., Barnet Klar. president, the Har- 
old Court apartments, a 6-sty elevator struc- 
ture with stores, at the southwest corner of 
St. Nicholas av and 183d st- The property, 
measuring 104.11 feet on the avenue and 150 
feet on the street, was disposed of subject to 
mortgages for $340.i;."i0. It was acquired by the 
selling interests hisr March from Joseph Shenk. 



Tenant Buys Pearl St. Parcel 

Clinton K. Scofield purchased from Denisoa 
Realty Corporation the 5-sty brick loft build- 
ing, on a lot 25x101.3, at 27 1 Pearl st, in which 
he was a tenant- 



Good Upper West Side Sale 

The 225 Central Park West Corporation sold 
to the Lapidus Engineering Co. .■!0-32 West 
G5th st, two 5-sty stone and brii-k apartment 
houses, on a plot 41.8x100.5. The buyer will 
reimprove the site with a 9-sty elevator apart- 
ment house. 



Buys Site for New Dwelling 

Pease & Elliman resold for Joseph G. Abra- 
hamson 130 East 79th st. a 4-sty and basement 
stone dwelling, on a lot 19x102.2. The buyer 
is Arthur Upham Pope, representing a client 
for whom he will erect a 5-sty American base- 
ment dwelling. Mr. Abrahamson bought the 
house and that adjoining at 132 through the 
same brokers a few months ago. The latter 
was resold to Shephard Morgan, vice-president 
of the Federal Reserve Bank. 



Childs" Buys a Sixth Avenue Parcel 

The Chi Ids Restaurant Co. purchased from 
the estate of Oscar Hoyt, Bryan L. Kennelly, 
trustee, 221 Sixth av, between 14th and 15th sts, 
a 4-sty brick building with store, on a lot 20x 
120. The property was held at $100,000. 

Building Site Assembled 

Pease & Elliman, who recently announced the 
sale of 683 Madison av, at the same time re- 
ported that negotiations were in progress for 
681 Madison av to the same buyer, have con- 
summated the sale of the latter property for 
John Sherman Hoyt and others. The buybrs 
are George C, Alexander C. and Victor C- Ca- 
mas, who, under the name of Maison Camas, 
are now at 617 Madison av. The two houses 
just purchased form a plot 39.5x85, between 
61st and 62d sts. The buyers will erect a busi- 
ness building for their own use. The property 
was held at $150,000. 



Purchases East Houston St. Corner 

Purchase has been made by the newly formed 
Mott and East Houston Streets Realty Corpora- 
tion (F. D. Paoli. J. d'Anugelo and P- Mato) 
of the three 5-sty stone and brick tenement 
houses with stores. 63.4x76x irregular, at 53 to 
57 Mott st, forming the southwest comer of 
those thoroughfares. The new company was 
represented by Alexander Bloch. attorney. 



R. E. Dowling Closes Out a Tract 

Slawson .6 Hobbs sold for the Liberty and 
Church Street Corporation. Robert E. Dowling. 
president, the vacant plot. 105x71 10. on the 
north side of 109th st, 100 feet west of Broad- 
way. 

In March, 1920, Mr. Dowling purchased 17 
lots from the estate of Russell Sage, extending 
from 109th st to Cathedral Parkway, with the 
entire front on Riverside dr and being 100 feet 
west of Broadway. He resold through the same 
brokers the plot on the south side of Cathedral 
Parkway. lOO feet west of Broadway, to the 610 
West 110th Street Co. (Boniamin P. Walker), 
and the northeast corner of Riverside dr and 
109th St. 160x71.10. to Mr. Walker. The 375 
Riverside Drive Corporation (M. E. Paterno) , 
purchased the southeast corner of Riverside dr 
and llOth st. 

This last transaction on 109th st completes 
the sale of the entire tract. 



Buys 



a Park Row Parcel 

The Sillcnoks Roalty Co, sold to Samuel Mil- 
ler 160 and 162 Park Row, n 3-stv brick build- 
ing with store, on a lot 25.2xl20x irregular, 
adjoining the southwest corner of Baxter st. 

Investment on Lispenard St. 

Daniel Birdsall & Cn. sold for Richard S. El- 
liott 46-48 LisDcnard st. a 5-sty stone loft 
building, on a plot 48x93.5. After extensive al- 
terations the buyer will occupy the property. 

Sale in Produce District 

W. J. Russell sold for Gpmmina Roncoroni to 
the Jersey York Realty Co. 74, 76 and 78 Vesey 
St. three old 3-sty frame buildings, on a plot 
40.10x49, adjoining the northwest corner of 
Greenwich st. The corner is an old brlek budd- 
ing, on a plot 41.2x53 11. The adjoining prop- 
erty was held at $55,000 and was sold for all 
cash. 



January 14, 1922 

Knox Building Leasehold Sold 

August Heckscher, whose opuratious in up- 
town real estate in recent years, have been not- 
able, has bought from the Fortieth Street & 
Fifth Avenue Corporation the leasehold of the 
Knox building on the southwest corner of Fifth 
av and 4uth st. The selling corporation is con- 
trolled by Benjamin Mordecai and E. C. Potter, 
who, two years ago, obtained a 21-year lease 
with privilege of renewal, which passes to Mr. 
Heckscher in the name of the Anahma Realty 
Corporation. 

Cushman & Wakefield, Inc-, have been ap- 
pointed agents for the building. The total 
amount involved in the leasehold is something 
over $2,OUU,O0U. The plot is MoxllO feet. 



Avoca Apartments Bought 

The Avoca, an S-sty elevator apartment 
house at the northwest corner of Fort Wash- 
ington av and 178th st, has been purchased by 
the VVashingtouian, Inc., represented by Kohii. 
Nagler & Williams, attorneys. The seller was 
Louise Greenberg. The house measures lUl.l 
feet on the avenue and 911.7 feet on the street. 
It was valued at .f'aOU.OOO. 



Buys Palisade Apartments 

Charles S. Kohler sold tor Amelia A. and 
Charles H. J. Dilg to Ennis i; Sinuott 71* Haven 
av, adjoining the northeast corner of 17lHh st, 
a 5-sty and basement brick apartment house, 
known as the Falisade. on a plot 50.UxSl!.4. It 
is the first sale of the property in 5 years. 



Sell Two Elevator Apartment Houses 

Frederick Zittel & Sons sold for the Vera 
Building Corporation 353-359 West 118th st, 
two 7-sty and basement elevator apartment 
houses, each on a plot 50x100.11, within one- 
half block of Morningside Park. 



Operator Takes Quick Profit 

James H. Cruikshauk purchased from J. A. 
Smith, J. A. Smith, Jr., and Mary M- Ramsteck 
128-130 East lUith st, two 3-sty and basement 
brick dwellings, on a plot 39.2x90.11. And he 
Immediately resold same to Julius Reich. 
George W. Bretell & Sons were the brokers in 
both transactions. 



A Bit of Ancient New York Sold 

After an ownership of more than 250 years 
by the descendants of Henry Rutgers, when 
this city was known as New Amsterdam untler 
the Dutch rule of Governor Peter Stuyvesant. 
the property 561 to 565 Water st, southeast 
corner of Clinton st and part of the old original 
Rutgers Farm, passes into the hands of I. 
Randolph and Everett Jacobs, who have pur- 
chased the three 5-sty brick warehouses, size 
24x74 each, from Henry S. Leverich, Lucius H. 
Beers and Eli G. Partridge, as trustees of the 
estate of Amelia Stuyvesant. The buildings 
were erected more than 70 years ago and are 
still occupied by the original tenant, whose 
tenancy started prior to the Civil War. Harry 
B. Cutner was the broker. 



Old Ryan House for Jewish Home 

The old Ryan mansion at 532 Riverdale av. 
just north of the city line, in Yonkers, has been 
bought by the Jewish Home for Friendless Chil- 
dren, Millie Jacobus president. It will be 
altered to provide accommodations for about 
100 children and will be conducted on non- 
sectarian lines. The property measures 185x400 
and was purchased through Douglas-Gettel. 



Co-operative Buying 

The newly formed 171 West Twelfth Street, 
Inci, which acquired recently the dwelling at 
that location from the Excelsior Estates Co.. 
has also bought from the same seller the ad- 
joining 3-sty and basement brick dwellings, 
each 21x103.3. at 169-173 West 12th st. The 
buying concern represents a co-operative or- 
ganization, which will improve the combined 
site with a G-sty elevator apartment house, to 
be conducted on the 100 per cent- co-operative 
plan. The entire operation calls for an ex- 
penditure of $225,000. of which $140,000 repre- 
sents the cost of the new building. 

The proposed house will contain 24 suites, 
each of 4 rooms and bath. Harvey P. Vaughn 
was the broker who assembled the site. The 
buying company is composed of Mr. Vaughn, 
Evart G. Routzahn, Ethel Armes. Lloyd T. 
Williams and Edith H. Day. It was organized 
by Ahnerly & Bryde, attorneys- 

Recently the Co-operative League of America 
purchased the building at 167, adjoining. 



Corner Picture Theatre Sold 

The Eighth Theatre Corporation, Louis 
Schneid(!r president, incorporated at Albany, 
on January 4 bought from the Four Ks, Inc.. 
the 3-sty motion picture theatre, 13 to 17 
Second av, southwest corner of 1st st. The new 
company represents the M. & S. Circuit, which 
will operate the theatre as the eighth under 
its control on the East Side. J. Barodkin and 
M. Spiro are also directors in the company, 
which is represented by M. D. Bohrar, attor- 
ney- The property measures 70.4 feet on the 
avenue and 59.2 feet on the street. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

School Buys on East Side 

The Browning School (John A. Browning), 
now on West 55th st, purchased for its use the 
two 2-sty stone buildings 50 and 52 East 62d 
st, adjoining the southwest corner of Park av, 
on a plot 33. 4x100.5- The sellers were the re- 
ceivers of the American Real Estate Co., whicb. 
acquired the property several years ago. 



45 



feet north of 184th st, 114x96, recently acquired 
from the Debb Corporation. 

Morris Bogdanoff bought from Mr. Frieden- 
berg the vacant plot at the southwest corner of 
Mount Eden and Townsend av, part of a plot 
Mr. Friedenberg acquired through Joseph P. 
Day at the Mahoney estate auction sale. 



Operators Buy Second Av Corner 

Maurice Wertheim sold for Lucy Madden to 
Edward Baer and the Willstone Realty Co., 
William Goldstone, president, the northwest 
corner of Second av and 43d st, a 3-sty frame 
tenement house with store, on a lot 2o.2V2XlOU. 
together with an "L" 50 feet in depth around 
the rear of the adjoining Sedond av parcel. 
The "L'* is a 2-sty brick building. 



Builders Buy Bronx Plots 

Samuel Friedenberg sold to John Wander- 
man the vacant plot on the northeast corner 
of Webb av and De Voe Terrace, as the site 
for an apartment house to accommodate 49 
families. Mr. Friedenberg sold to John A. 
Sharp the vacant plot on the west side of Nel- 
son av, 120 feet south of Featherbed la, 100x06. 

To Max Marcus Mr. Friedenberg sold the 
vacant plot on the west side of Morris av, 70 



Buys a Row of Bronx Flats 

The Htsu Realty Co. (Heiler & Sussman) 
bought from the New York City Unit Owner- 
ship Realty Co. S8S to 002 Union av, six 6-sty 
and basement brick apartment houses, each on 
a plot 37.0x100. They abut the rear of the B. 
S. Moss Theatre on Prospect av. 

Operator in Three Bronx Deals 

Joseph Sager purchased from Mindlin & Rose- 
man 815 and S17 Southern Boulevard, a plot 
150x110, 135 feet north of Longwood av and 
held at $6.j,000. Mr. Sager will erect a 1-sty 
business building- Arthur Deutsch was the 
broker. Mr. Sager also purchased from J. M. 
Martin the southeast corner of 231st st and 
Albany Crescent, a plot 35x100, which will be 
improved with a 1-sty taxpayer. Harry T. F. 
Johnson and McLernon Bros, were the brokers. 
From Charles S- Levy Mr. Sager bought the 
1-sty taxpayer at the southwest corner of Tre- 




A recent United Electric Service installation 



The P. LorlUard Company Building, located 
between 71st and 72nd Streets and Avenue A; 
a new three story factory that will be devoted 
to the manufacture of cigarettes. 

The owners are the P. Lorillard Company; 
the architect, E. G. Tremaine; the builders, 
Turner Construction Company, and the electrical 
contractors, Hatzel and Buehler. 



When hi need of Electric Light or Pozcer Service^ 

call Stuyvesant 4980. Your requirementSy whether 

large or small, will receive the prompt attention of 

our Commercial Department representatives. 



^he United Electric 
Light *"'*=' Power Co. 

\V> East icth St., New York. 



89th Street and Broadway 



i46th Street and Broadway 



■46 



^EgWrD AND GUIDE 



January 14, 1922 



mont and Marmion avs, ccrntaining 5 stores and 
a bakery- If rents for $6,U0U and was held at 

^ $60,€00. Samuel Katzen was the broker. Max 
Monfried represented the purchaser in all of 

' the deals. - 



City Island Landmark Sold 

Mulvihill & Co. sold for Stephen Collins the 
Collins Homestead, on Carroll st, City Island, 
Bronx, 100 feet from water front, to William 
Cronk. The property has been in the Collins 
family for more than 100 years, and it will be 
the second time in more than 140 years that 
the property has been transferred. 



Bronx Corner Apartments Sold 

Meyer Isear, operator, sold 4S1 East 167th st, 
northeast corner of Washington av, a 6-sty 
brick apartment house with stores, on a plot 
20x128, to the J. G. Gold Realty Corporation, for 
all cash- Mr. Isear also sold to the same buyer 
1154 Washington av, adjoining, a 6-sty brick 
apartment house with stores, on a plot 36x128. 
Jacob Gumberg negotiated both sales. 

A Trade of Brooklyn Real Estate 

William Liss, Inc., exchanged for the Crex 
Construction Co. with a client three new 2-fam- 
ily houses, with garage, on the east side of 
10th St. luO feet north of Av R. for the block 
front on the south side of Thirteenth av. be- 
tween Tlst and T2d s*s. 200x100. The buyers 
will erect 3-sty double apartment houses on 
the plot. The transaction involved $65,000. 



The Riissians are sa!d to h-ave formerly held 
high positions in the late Czar's army and in 
the Russian financial world- Geer Bros, and 
G. M. Taylor were the brokers. 

Choice Newark Parcel Sold 

The building occupied by Marshall & Ball, 
clothiers, at SOT to S13 Broad st, Xewark, to- 
gether with the loasehold, stock, fixtures and 
good will, has been purchased by M. B- Haus- 
man. an officer t.f the Diamond Shoe Co., of 
this city and the I. Hausman & Sons Co., of 
Newark. Louis Kamm, Inc., were the brokers. 
The aggregate amount of money involved in 
the deal, including the T5-year rental of the 
ground site from the First Presbyterian Church, 
will, it is said, amount to $3,000,000. 

Plans for alterations to the building to fit it 
for the purposes of the new owners are already 
being made by Nathan Myers, architect. The 
work will entail an expenditure of $75,000. Mr- 
Hausman will retain the shue department of 
the sellers and will dispose of the goods to 
make room for the alterations. 

The stores are 3 stories high and of brick 
They front 66 feet on Broad st and extend west 
through the block 100 feet to Nutria st in the 
rear. The sellers have occupied the building 
for more than 50 years and were among thn 
oldest firms of clothiers' row in Newark. Their 
stock will be moved to the main store of Mc 
Gregor & Co., at 859 Broad st. where it will 
be disposed of. 



Borough Park Comer Plot Sold 

A. J. Murphy sold for Edward J. McGaffney 
to Henry Keltey the northeast corner of New 
Utrecht av and 42d st, Brooklyn, a vacant plot 
126xS5x irregular, for immediate improvement 
with apartment houses with stores. 

Operators Buy in Long Island City 

The Casilear Realty Co. sold through the pri- 
vate sales department of Bryan L. Kennelly, 
Inc., to the Bliss Street Realty Co., Monroe 
Douglas Robinson, president, 50 lots in the 
Thompson Hill residential pecti n of Long 
Island City. The lots were '■■' at $200,000. 
and are located in the block boiiided by Heiser 
and Fitting sts and Nelson av and Queens 
Boulevard, and close to the Bliss st station of 
the dual subway system. 

The buyers intend to erect 42 2-family tax 
exempt Colonial red brick houses, 25x100, and 
have them ready for occupancy by June. Con- 
tracts to build them have been awarded to T. 
C. Desmond & Co.. Inf., and foundations will 
be put in at once. Herbert Lucas is the i«vchi- 
tect. 



Suffolk County Acreage Sold 

Bankers Trust Co- as executor sold a tract of 
07^ acres of timberland. at Farmingville, Suf- 
folk County, Long Island. 



Russian Colony for Nassau County 

The large home and 15 acres belonging to 
A. G. Greensward at Roosevelt. L. I., have been 
purchased by New York business men for a 
number of Russian friends who have come to 
this country to escape the Bolshevik regime. 



South of 59th Street 

CHERRY ST.— Lawyers Mortgage Co. sold to 
Max Scheiner 362 Cherry st, a 5-sty brick tene- 
ment house with store, on a lot 26x94.9. 

DIVISION ST.— Nathan Horwitz sold to Ida 
Oser 139 Division st, a 5-sty brick tenement 
house with store, on a lot 25x61.9. 

GRAND ST. — Esther Weiskopk sold to Samuel 
Friedman 415V2-41T Grand st, a 6-sty brick ten- 
ement house with stores, on a plot 26.8x100. 

GREENWICH ST. — Duross Co. , sold for the 
Bankers Trust Co., as trustee, to Alexander E. 
Schiller 550 Greenwich st, a 5-sty stone tene- 
ment house with store, on a lot 27.2x76.3, ad- 
joining the southwest corner of Charlton st- 

LEROY ST. — Arthur Dorn sold through the 
Duross Co. to Thomas Putney 121 Leroy st. 
adjoining the northeast corner of Greenwich st. 
a 3-sty and basement brick dwelling, on a lot 
22x82. 

RIVINGTON ST.— Adolf Jabloner sold to Max 
Markowitz the 6-sty brick tenement house with 
stores at 231 Rivington st, on a lot 25x63, south- 
west corner of Willett st. 

THOMPSON ST.— Raffaele De Raco sold to 
Francesco Nigro 69 Thompson st, a 5-sty brick 
tenement house with store, on a lot 21-6x100. 

VANDAM ST.— The Spring Street Presby- 
terian Church, at Spring and Varick sts, bought 
from William S. Coffin the 2y2-sty and base- 
ment brick house, on a lot 20x100, at 25 Van- 
dam st, for $17,000. 

WEST ST. — James Squillante, a tenant in the 
old 4-sty brick loft building, 26.8x88. at 175 
West St. adjoining the southeast corner of 
Warren st. has bought the property from the 
Italian Fruit Co. 



LENDING AGAIN 

It is an encouraging sign of improved financial 
conditions that we are again able to announce : 

MONEY TO LOAN ON 
BOND AND MORTGAGE 

LAWYERS TITLE & TRUST CO. 

160 Broadway, New York 367 Fulton Street, Jamaica, N. Y. 

188 Montague Street, Brooklyn 383 East 149th Street, New York 

44 Court Street, Brooklyn 1354 Broadway, Brooklyn 

169 Main Street, White Plains, N. Y. 



NiEWENHOUs Company, Inc. 

We specialize in Financing, Planning and Erect- 
ing Legitimate Building Operations 
on a 60% Loan Basis. 
Commission Moderate. 316-318 East i6ist Street 

Telephone: Melrose 1694-1695 NeW York City 



7TH ST.— Michael • Eallovsky sold to Leo 
Freiman 31 East 7th st, a 3-sty and basement 
stone clubhouse, on a lot 26x75. 

9TH ST. — Beatrice Schwartz sold to Israel 
Rosenltranz Uij East 9th st, a S-sty brick tene- 
ment house with store, on a lot 125x92.3. 

12TH ST. — Martha A. Hinds, who occupies 
the 4-sty and basement brick dwelling, on a lot 
25x193.3, at 39 West 12th st, has bought the 
property from Henry C. Piercy 2d. She paid 
.$26,599, according to the deed. 

17TH ST. — Margaret Derry sold to Michael A. 
Frascella 139 West 17th st, a 5-sty brick tene- 
ment house, on a lot 25.\92. 

ISTH ST. — Gertrude Gunshor sold to Rachel 
Levine 255 West ISth st, a 3-sty frame flat 
with store and a 2-sty rear frame building, on a 
lot 26x67.5. 

39TH ST. — Dr. John Rogers sold through 
Charles M. Baldwin to James H. Cruikshank 
102 East 30th st, a 5-^ty English basement 
brownstone dwelling, on a lot 20x79, adjoining 
the southeast corner of Fourth av. 

.34TH ST. — Westchester Trust Co.. as trustee, 
sold to Helen Karreuberg 40S West 34th st, a 
3-sty and basement brick converted dwelling 
with store, on a lot 20x08.9. 

49TH ST. — Aaron Kushito, who recently pur- 
chased the 3.-sty and basement stone dwelling, 
on a lot 18.9x100.5, at 357 East 49th st, has 
resold it to Samuel Hadler through Joseph 
.\asanowltz, 

49TH ST. — Butler & Baldwin. Inc., sold for 
the 431 West 49th Street Corporation, a o-sty 
brick tenement house, on a lot 25x100.5, at the 
address mentioned. It was held at .$24,000- 

49TH ST. — M. A. C. Levy purchased the va- 
cant plot 447-449 West 49th St. 50x100, through 
S. H. Rosner Co. and has resold the same to 
Snyder & Co., with a building loan, for Im- 
provement. 

49TH ST- — Lena Harburger sold to Simon 
Shampain 3.3S East 49th st, a 5-sty stone flat 
with store, on a lot 25x100.5. 

54TH ST. — Peter Often sold to George H. 
Klein 327 East 54th st, a 5-sty brick tenement 
house, on a lot 24.2x100.5. 

.54TH ST. — The Norwelt Corporation, Henry 
Fisher president, whose sale of the southeast 
corner of Second av and 54th st to the Central 
Cigar Co. was announced recently, has sold to 
John M. Miihalik the remainder of its holdings 
there, comprising the three 5-sty brick tenement 
houses, on a plot 75x100.5, at 312 to 316 East 
.")4th st, adjoining the corner parcel on the east- 
The price for the properties was $52,500. 

.50TH ST. — Francis Speir sold to Bella Krauss 
247 East 56th st. a 4-sty brick stable, on a lot 
25x100-5, adjoining the northwest corner of 
Second av- 

57TH ST. — Patrick McMahon sold to Joseph- 
ine C. McCormack 452 West 57th st, a 5-sty 
stone flat, on a plot 33.4x100.5. 

AV B. — Mary Schnabel sold to Conrad and 
Anna Maurer a 5-sty brick tenement house wifh 
store, on a lot 19-93. 

FIRST AV. — Carmela de Benedictis sold to 
Vito de Robertis 176 First av, a 5-sty brick ten- 
ement house with store, on a lot 17.9x94. 

SECOND AV.— Cord H. Schroeder sold to 
William H. Ursprung the 4-8ty brick flat with 
store, 795 Second av on a lot 20.1x75. 

SIXTH AV- — George A. Bowman sold for the 
estate of Charles F. Hoffman 765 Sixth av, a 
4-sty stone fiat with store, on a lot 25x75. 

EIGHTH AV. — Sidney L. Warsawer sold for 
the Bankers Trust Co., executor of the estate 
of Samuel Rosenblatt 577 Eighth av. a 4-sty 
brick Bat with store, on a lot 12.4x100. 

EIGHTH AV.— Brown-Wheelock Co. sold for 
the Clem Realty Co. 526-528 Eighth av, the 
first being a 5-sty brick apartment house with 
store, on a lot 24-8Hxl00, and the second a 2- 
sty brick store building, on a lot 24.8x100. 



North of 59th Street 

COOPER ST. — The 15 Cooper Street Co. sold 
to Tom Rees 15 to 19 Cooper st, two 5-sty and 
basement brick apartment houses, on a plot 
lOOxlllO. in the Dyckman tract. 

7 1ST ST. — The Parish Visitors of Mary Im- 
maculate purchased from John T. Tallon 330 
West 71st St. a 3-sty and basement stone dwell- 
ing, on a lot 18x100-5. 

86TH ST.— Rose Eisenbrand sold to Joseph 
Breunig 524 East 86th st, a 4-sty brick tene- 
ment house, on a lot 28x102.2. 

.SOTH ST. — Leon S. Altmayer sold tor A. C. 
Quackenbush to Howard A. Raymond the 3-sty 
and basement dwelling, on a lot 15.:'xlO0.S^^, at 
241 East 86th st. A few days ago Mr- Altmayer 
sold the six flats 2-30 to 240 East S6th st, on a 
plot 160x102.2, making the third sale of that 
property by this broker. These six buildings 
will now be demolished for the erection of a 
multi-family apartment house surrounding a 
large Italian Garden. 

93D ST. — James H. Cruikshank resold through 
Harry Sugarman to Annie E. Logan 151 West 
93d st, a 3-stv and basement brick dwelling, on 
a lot 17xl00.1Ji. 



January 14, 1922 

97TH ST. — Ward Belknap & Son sold for 
Noel B. Fox to an out-of-town investor the 4- 
sty stone tenement house with store, on a lot iio 
xlOl.ll, at il'M East 97th st. 

104TH ST. — Morris Leventhal sold to Samuel 
Feinstein 72 East With st, a 3-sty stone dwell- 
ing, on a lot IGxKIO.ll. 

107TH ST. — Thomas J. O'Reilly sold for Louis 
Block to an investor 07 West 107th st. a 5-sty 
and basement brick apartment house, on a plot 
37x100.11. 

IIOTH ST.— The Amherst, a 12-sty elevator 
apartment house at 2U4 West 110th st, is to be 
taken over by the newly formed 204 West 110th 
Street Co., repiesented by Niles & Johnson, 
attorneys, and capitalized at $100,000. The 
house fronts 100 feet on the street and has a 
depth of 70.11 feet. It adjoins the southwest 
corner ol Amsterdam av. 

IIITH ST. —George Brenfleck sold to Adolph 
Karpf the 6-sty brick apartment house 204-20ti 
West 111th St. on a plot 50,\71.10. 

IIITH ST.— J. C. Hough & Co. sold tor Ben- 
jamin Silverfine the 6-sty apartment house 220 
to 222 West 111th st, on a plot G2.6x71.10. 

li;>TH ST. — Samuel Gruber sold to Ida Park- 
er 230 West lloth st, a G-sty and basement 
brick apartment house, on a plot 50x100.11. 

114TH ST.— Manville Realty Company sold to 
Elias Friedes 33 West 114th st, a 0-sty brick 
flat, on a lot 20x100.11. 

115TH ST. — The Frame Realty Co. sold to 
Soren Ziff 'J East 115th st, a 5-sty brick apart- 
ment house with store, on a lot 25x100.11. 

115TH ST. — Edward A. Metzler sold to the 
Loyal Dry Wash Laundry 78 East 115th st, a 
5-sty brick tenement house with store, on a lot 
2G.8xl00.ll. 

115TH ST. — Azzoline A. Severin sold to Mar- 
tha Braun 232-234 East ILIth st, a 5-sty stone 
flat, on a plot 35x100. llx irregular. 

115TH ST. — Fischer Realty Co. sold tor 
Charles Newman to S. Feiner 212 East 115th 
st, a 5-sty stone tenement house, on a lot 25 
xl 00.11. 

118TH ST. — Meyer Ganz sold to Frank A. 
Palermo an d Ignazio Palermo the 6-sty brick 
tenement house with stores at 30G and 308 East 
118th St. on a plot 40.0x100.11. 

123D ST.— Clara Kelly sold to Ida R. Trenner 
24 West 123d st. a 3-sty and basement stone 
dwelling, on a lot lG.3xl00.ll. 

126TH ST.— Mary McDonough sold to A. Can- 
cro 150 West 12Gth st, a 3-sty and basement 
stone dwelling, on a lot 16.8x9!J.ll. 

130TH ST.— Porter & Co. sold for the Gen- 
eral Synod of the Reformed Church in America 
to Jacob Goodman 243 West 130th st. a 3-sty 
and basement brownstone dwelling, on a lot 
18.Gx09.ll. 

133D ST.— William Hyman sold to Mae C. 
Hawes 35 West 133d st, a 3-sty and basement 
brick dwelling, on a lot 16.8x00.11. 

134TH ST. — Kean-Manhattan Corporation sold 
to Samuel Nassau and Samuel Friedman 51S 
West 134th st, a 5-sty brick apartment house, 
on a plot 43.0x09.11. 

137TH ST. — The Grant Holding Corporation 
sold to William Mandolwitz 121-123 West 137th 
St. two o-sty and basement brick and stone 
apartment houses, on a plot 50x09.11. 

141ST ST. — W. D. Morgan resold for Ennis 
.& Sinnott to Anna J Gerlach 313-315 West 
141st St. two 3-sty frame flats with stores, on 
a plot 50x90.11, adjoining the northeast cor- 
ner of Edgecombe av. 

AMSTERDAM AV. — Slawson & Hobbs sold tor 
Daniel B. Freedman to the Little White House, 
Inc., 285 Amsterdam av, adjoining the nortu' 
east corner of 73d st, a 3-sty frame and brick 
building, on a lot 21x100. The seller 2 years 
ago leased the parcel to the buyers for a term 
of 21 years with option of purchase. 

LENOX AV. — William Onldstone and Simon 
Myers purchased from Stewart Hemingway 53.K 
Lenox av. a 5-sty brick apartment house, with 
two stores, on a plot 37.6x100, adjoining the 
northeast corner of 137th st. It returns an an- 
nual rental of about $12,000. Messrs. Gold- 
stone and Myers are also the buyers of the 5- 
sty houses at the southwest corner of Second 
av and fi5th st, reported sold recently by the 
New York Life Insurance & Trust Co. 

LEXINGTON AV. — Dr. Harris Welnstein sold 
S25 Lexington av. adjoining the northeast cor- 
ner of 63d St. a 3-Rty and basement stone dwell- 
ing, on a lot 20x70. 

LEXINGTON AV.— Leopold Friedheim sold 
for the United States Trust Co. to an Investor 
the northeast corner of Lexington av and 112th 
St. known as 1803 to 1800 TjCxlngton av, a 5-sty 
brick apartment house, with 6 stores, on plot 
100.11 feet on Lexington av and 41.8 feet on 
112th St. 

OLD BROADWAY.- E. K. Van Winkle sold 
for Eva W- Day. residing In Nice. France, the 
5-sty brick tenement house with 2 stores at 85 
Old Broadway, on a lot 26.6x120, adjoining the 
southeast corner of 132d st. 

MADISON AV. — Morris Kahn resold through 
Sherman & Kirschner 1473 Madison av, a 5-sty 
brick apartment house with store, on a lot 25.2 
x73.7, adjoining the northeast corner of lOlst 

«t. •• • . . .. , . . i 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

MADISON AV. — Meister Builders, Inc., resold 
2083-2087 Madison av, three 5-sty brick apart- 
ment houses with stores, on a plot 75x98, ad- 
joining the northeast corner of loist st. 

PARK AV. — The Phelps Stokes Estates sold 
to Jacob Cinnan 1074 Park av, adjoining the 
southwest corner of 88th st, a 3-sty brick tene- 
ment house with store, on a lot 25.2x82.2. 

TERRACE VIEW AV. — The triangular shaped 
vacant jilot at tne intersection of Terrace View 
av and Tunisseu pi, on Marble Hill, has been 
sold by Elizabeth Sherman to George J. Wolf. 
It Ironts 115.9 feet on the avenue, 183.8 feet on 
the place and has a rear line of 109 feet. 

AV A. — The Presbyterian Hospital, which 
controls a large site at Av A, G7th and GSth sts, 
has disposed of a portion of the property to 
James Keilly and Prank D'Aquila. The sale at- 
fetts the one and 2-sty buildings, partly cov- 
ering the plot, 75x201x50, on the south side of 
GSth St. 150 ft west of Av A, and extending 
through to G7th st. 

FIRST AV. — Ralph Russo sold for Samuel 
Isaacson to Antonio Siviglia 2405 First av, 
northwest corner of 123d st, a 4-sty stone and 
brick tenement house with stores, on a lot 
22.11x60. 

THIRD AV. — Isaac N. Heidelberg sold to the 
Durand Realty Co. the 6-sty brick tenement 
house with stores, on a plot 40.5x100, at the 
northeast corner of Third av and GGth st. 

THIRD AV. — Harry Karger bought 2086 
Third av, a 5-sty brick tenement house with 
store, on a lot 25.6V2XIOO, adjoining the north- 
west corner of 114th st. 

THIRD AV. — Fischer Realty Co. sold for 
Frank Weinreich to Victor Stoller 2177 Third 
av, a 5-sty brick tenement house with store, 
on a lot 20XJ.0O. 

FIFTH AV. — Mulvihill & Co. resold tor Ella 
Kelsch and Barbara Whitman 2034 Fifth av, a 
4-sty and basement stone dwelling, on a lot 20 
x85, between 125th and 126th sts. 

EIGHTH AV. — Henry B. and Esther Lipner 
sold to George J. Handrinos 2717 Eighth av, a 
5-sty brick flat with store, on a lot 25x100. 



Bronx 

180TH ST. — Mrs. Vinnie L. Batavia bought 
from the E. Habers Co. 611 to 637 East 180th 
st, northwest corner of Hughes av, a 1-sty 
brick taxpayer, containing 14 stores, on plot 195 
x65x irregular S. Lichtenstein, J. Simons and 
Cohen Bros, were the brokers. 

ISOTH ST. — Edward Polak, Inc., sold for John 
Donnelly to Mrs. C. Sovalizo 589 East ISOth st. 
a 3-sty and basement frame 3-fami!y house, on 
a lot 25.3x102.9. 

184TH ST. — J. Clarence Davies sold for Ada 
E. Maslen to Eugene Hatterer 14 West lS4th st. 
a 3-sty and basement brick dwelling, on a lot 
1,8x82.1. 

BASSFORD AV. — Barnett & Smith sold for 
clients the vacant block front, 134.1x.5.5xl25.4x 



47 



31.8 on the west side of Bassford av, between 
East lS2d and Fletcher sts. 

BRIGGS AV.— Richard Dickson sold for B. 
Winterroth 2022-2924 Briggs av, northeast cor- 
ner of lyDth st, two 2^-sty and basement 
frame 2-family houses, the first being on a lot 
25.11x106.3 and the second on a lot 25.1x104. 

CONCOURSE. — Butler & Baldwin resold for a 
client to the Sexton Realty Co. the 5-sty walk 
up apartment house, on a plot SUxlUU, on the 
east side of the Concourse, adjoining the south- 
east corner of 180th st. The property rents for 
$15,000 and was held at $U5,000. The brokers 
have sold the property twice in the last month 
and have been appointed agents. 

CONCOURSE.— Charles B. Van Valen, Inc, 
sold for Martin Silverman, builder, to a client* 
for investment, 2U95 Grand Boulevard and Con- 
course, a 5-sty and basement apartment house, 
tax exempt, on plot lUOxlOU. The property con- 
tains 31 rooms on a floor, laid out in suites of 
3 to 5 room apartments. The property showa 
an annual rental of $45,00li and was held at 
$250,000. This property was completed by Mr, 
Silverman about a year ago. 

CONCOURSE.— The S. L. K. Realty Co. sold 
to Ephraim Sundarsky the 5-sty and basement 
brick apartment house, on a plot 101. 7x105. 7x 
irregular, on the west side of Grand Boulevard 
and Concourse, 03.8 feet north of ISUth st. It 
was sold subject to mortgages for $1U4,000. 

CRESTON AV. — Byrne & Bowman resold for 
William J. Daniel to an investing client of 
John J. Meenan, Inc., 2030 Creston av, a 5-sty 
apartment house, UOxlOU. It is arranged for 5 
families on a floor and rents for about $24,- 
UOO annually. It was held at $135,000. This 
property, together with the adjoining house at 
2043 Creston av, southwest corner of Burnside 
av, was sold to Mr. Daniel by the same brokers 
last year for the Realty Managers, Inc. 

FORDHAM RD.— Byrne & Bowman sold for 
A. L, Levy to William J. Daniel for invest- 
ment the i-sty business building, on plot 75x 
130, at the southeast corner of Fordham rd and 
Walton av, containing stores, all rented, and 
a finished basement. The projierty, which was 
held at $225,000, was acquired by Mr. Levy 
several months ago through the same brokers 
from the Simrud Holding Corporation, Rudolph 
Simon, president. 

KINGSBRIDGE RD.— Samuel Brener sold to 
the Paragon Construction Co., Charles Cohen, 
president, a plot, 165x150, on the north side of 
Kingsbridge rd, between University and Webb 
avs. 

MORRIS AV. — The Marcus Buda Construction 
Corporation purchased the vacant plot, 114x07, 
on the west side of Morris av, 70 feet north of 
184th St. and will improve this plot with an 
apartment house, to cost about $250,000. 

MORRIS AV.— D. Kempner & Son sold for 
Samuel Rubin to Abraham Hochroth the vacant 
plot. 125x02, on the east side of Morris av, 373 
feet south of 170th st- The buyer will improve 
the plot with two 5-sty walk-up apartment 
houses. 



i MOWEY TD LDAH i 



Builelin^ Alter'ation s 
Ju & £t s G Ii ol el s 

BK-OJiERS JPJFUyrECTED 



Slerlinsf Mort^acfe Compaivy Inc. 



135 B r- o a d. -w^slY- N ew Yol-K. 

TELEPHONE FlECTOf=l /Z2e-3^fJ 




NBA 



Classified Advertisements 

Wants and Offers, For Sale and F«r Rent — Rate 25c. per line; count six words to the line. 



Employers anxious to secure help (clerical or 
professional), or employees wishing to obtain 
a position or better a present one wilt find the 
Record and Guide the quickest and most direct 
method of bringing their wants to the atten- 
tion of the largest number of interested read 
crs. in the real estate or building professions. 



No medium reaching real estate interests af- 
fords owners, brokers, and executors wishing 
to dispose of desirable property (in or out of 
the city), so favorable an opportunity to bring 
the merits of their propositions to the atten- 
tion of possible buyers as does the For Sale 
and For Rent section of the Record and Guide. 



WANTS AND OFFERS 



DESK ROOM desired in city by painting and 
decorating firm. Write Wm. Johnson, 674 
President Street, Brooklyn. 

SITUATION OPEN 

MAN to interview property owners; leads fur- 
nished; commission only. Good opportunity 



for energetic worker with good personality. 
Write Box 856, Record & Guide. 

SITUATION WANTED 

ENGINEER-ARCHITECT, good appearance, 
long experience, wishes position as superin- 
tendent and representative with contracting 
firm, salary expected reasonable. George 
Muller, 1526 North 5th Street, Philadelphia, Pa, 



48 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 14, 1922 



MEMBERS REAL ESTATE BOARD OF NEW YORK 



ADAMS & CO., INC. 

Real Eatate 

170 5TH AVE. Tel. Gramercy 3854 

SPECIALIST IN BUSINESS PROPERT Y 

ALEXANDER BALTER 

REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 

Management ot Property a Specialty 
152 W. 4 2nd St., Knickerboclier Hlds. Bryant 2042-3 



ROYAL SCOTT GULDEN 

REAL ESTATE, FIFTH AVE. SECTION 
680 FIFTH AVENUE Phone: Circle 8315 



BAUER, MILBANK & MOLLOY, INC. 

REAL ESTATE 

51 East 42nd Street Murray Hill 1936 



BILTMORE REALTY CORPORATION 

REAL ESTATE - COMMERaAL LEASING 

MANAGEMENT 

TI1.IES BUILDING PHONE: BRYANT 6868-6869 



ALFRED P. COBURN 

Real Estate— Appraisals— Insurance 
Management of Estate a Specialty 

159 W. 72nd ST, Phones: Columbus 4356-2543 



CHARLES G. KELLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

109 WEST 23RD STREET 

Watklns 5336 



ALBERT E. KELLY 

Successor to Frcdk, A, Booth 
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

50 Union Square Tel, Stuyvesant 1125 



J. P. & L. A. KISSLING 

Seiles — Management — Appraisals 

896 8TH AVE,, NEAR 54TH ST, 
Established 1S70 Circle 0591 to 5 



SEAMAN & PENDERGAST 

Member Real Estate Board of New York 

RENTALS— SALES— MANAGEMENT 

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 

542 FIFTH AVENUE VanderMlt 1309 



Manhattan Office Bront Office 

1 WEST 125th STREET 11172 JEROME AVENUE 
TeL Harlem 8400 Tel. Connection 

SHAW, ROCKWELL & SANFORD 

REAL ESTATE— INSURANCE 

Successors to 

SHAW & GO. 



H. C. KOPP & COMPANY 

Specialists in Retail Store Locations 

MANAGEMENT and BftOKEBAQB 
402 Madison Avenue Vanderbilt 4900 



CUSACK COMPANY 

Real Estate and Ineurance Broker* 

Specialists in West Side Properties 
176 WEST 72nd STREET 
Telephones: Columbus 6947-8179 



CHAS. A. DUBOIS 

REAL ESTATE 



At 146th Ft. 



3551 BROADWAY 

Established 1894 



DUNLAP & LLOYD 

INCORPORATTO 
Real Estate— Insurance 

GROVE STREET pbon« Bprlng 55l» 



ROBERT LEVERS 

Real Estate — Insurance 

THE K.N'ICKERliOrKER, 152 West 42nd Street 
Tptown Office: 37C Lenox Avenue. Phone Connections. 



HIRAM RINALDO 

Specializing in the Sale and Leasing of 

East Side Property 
230 GRAND ST, Bowery Bank Bldg, 



MALCOLM E. SMITH, INC. 

Real Estate Agents and Brokers 

185 MADISON AVE. Vanderbilt 7393 



COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

Rentals — Sales — Appraisals 
Insurance 




840 BROADWAY NEW YORK 

Stuyvesant 0627 



GEORGE S. RUNK 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
Mortgage Loans — Management 

1252 LEXINGTON AVENUE 



SCHINDLER & LIEBLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Rhln.lander 6122 1393 THIRD AVE., at 79th St 



JACOB J. TABOLT 

REAL ESTATE 
558 EIGHTH AVE. Phoae; 

Above 37th St. Fltj Eor 1S«« 

WHITNEY-FOSTER CORP. 

Real Estate Administrator 

150 WEST 72nd ST. Columbus 6409 



RECENT LEASES. 



New Rental Power on Fifth Av 

Bonwit, Teller & Co., Fifth av retailers who 
recently subleased the 5-sty S.ebrecht bmldmg 
at the northeast corner of Fifth av and dbtb 
St opposite their store, have leased the buiia- 
liiK for a term of 21 years with two renewal 
privileges tor similar terms to the Primrose 
Silk Stores. Inc., at a total aggregate rental 
of nearly $3,000,000 for the first 21 years This 
is the largest lease negotiated on Fifth av 
in many months. 

The building fronts 50,11 feet on the avenue 
and 125 feet on the street, and it has a 2o-toot 
L with a depth of 100 feet. The lease dates 
from August 1, 1M24. In liilO the United Cigar 
Stores Co, leased the building and in turn sub- 
leased it to Bonwit Teller & Co, Both these 
firms will realize substantial profit from the 
transactions. 



Bonwit, Teller & Co, obtained control of the 
property in order to protect their store prop- 
erty across the street and to maintain the 
present high standard of this Fifth av block, 
which includes the stores ot Lord & Taylor and 
Franklin Simon & Co. Francis J. Thynne, pres- 
ident of the Primrose Silk Stores, Inc., was for 
many years with B, Altman & Co. 

Joseph Milner was the broker and Cushman 
& Wakefield, represented by William J. Dem- 
orest, were associate brokers. The United 
Cigar Stores Co, in 1910 acquired control of the 
property tor a net rental of $70,000 a year. 



Quick Leasing of New Building 

Louis Carreau leased for the owner, in the 
building recently completed at the northeast 
corner of Sixth av and 37th st. and known 
as 6,3C-640 Sixth av, the corner store and base- 



Brooklyn Brokers 



DON'T "SHOP" FOR REAL ESTATE 

It doesn't pay. When you want to buy. taio «a- 
»ant»go ot our tour offices. 50 years eirertence, and 
"otou'h oreanllatlon and get WHAT TOO WANT, 
AT THE BIGHT PRICE, CONVENIENTLY, 
"Established Over Half a Century 

BULKLEY & HORTON CO. 

Member of Real Estate Board of New York 
Member of Brooklyn Real Estate Board. 
O S HORTON 585 Nostrand Atb., near Dean St, 

Prea. 414 Myrtle Ave., near Clinton Ave. 

A J HORTON 7520 Tlilrd Are., near T5th 9t. 

Secy 1214 Flatbush Ave., near Dttmaa Ave. 



JAMES B. FISHER 

Member of Brooklyn Real Estate Board 

REAL ESTATE 

174 MONTA GUE ST. Main 7267 

QUELL & QUELL 

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 

MANAGEMENT 

lit Pattlies Avaiiua Brooklyn. H. Y. 

Tata^ooo: DMatur 49S1 



Long Lease in Heckscher Building 

A deal ot unusual significance was closed this 
week, through the leasing of the entire 8th 
floor of the new 25-story Heck=cher building, 
now nearing completion, at the southwest corner 
of Fifth av and 57th st, to Stroheim & Romann, 
importers and wholesalers of upholstery and 
decorative fabrics. The lease, which is for a 
term ot ten years, and involves an area ot 
15,000 square feet, marks an epoch In the ever- 
changing history of Fifth av, . The decision of 
Stroheim & Romann is not only the first move 
of any concern of prominence in that industry 
to locate above 42d st, but the lease actually 
establishes a record, in that this wholesale estab- 
lishment will be located farther north on Fifth 
av than any other wholesale house, irrespective 
of the line of business. 

In commenting on the lease from a real estate 
standpoint it was said by J, Clydesdale Cushman, 
president of Cushman & Wiikefield, Inc, the 
brokers in the transaction : "While this move on 
the part of Stroheim & Romann appears daring, 
I prophesy it is merely a forerunner of many 
others, in the same trade, basing my opinion on 
the present congested condition of the old 
upholstery zone which centers around Fourth 
av and lOth st. Also, In viewing the situation 
with a knowledge of other prominent upholstery 
firms which are now negotiating for large space 
in the Heckscher building, and in light ot the 
fact that Fifth ay and 57th st is firmly estab- 
lished as the center of dealers in object d'art. 
antiques and of decorators, the establishment of 
a new center of the upholstery and decorative 
trade in the Heckscher building seems both In- 
evitable and imminent. The lower floors of 
the building were designed for show rooms and 
their frontage of over 160 feet on 57th st with 
unobstructed north light and with unusual freight 
facilities provided on the 56th st side ot the 
building renders it peculiarly adaptable for 
bousing wholesale concerns carrying vast stocks 
of art fabrics and kindred merchandise," 



Bronx Brokers 

A. G. BECHMANN 

Real Estate emd Insurance 

Tel. Intervale 556 1065 SO. BOULEVARD 

One block from Simpson Street Subway Station 

T. H. KELLEY 

Specialist in Fordham Heights Property 

158 East 188th St., at Grand Concourse 
Phone; Fordham 250^1 

OTTO LACKMAN 

Management of Properties my Specialty 

2514 Grand Concourse, near Fordtikm Koad 

Pbona: rordh&m 6T99 

L. G. LOSERE 

REAL ESTATE 

Entire Charge Taken of Property 
S7t Bronk Ave., at 161st St. fctabUjllrf H»l 

FRED. OPPENHEIMER 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

540 Bergen Av., at 149th St, 
Phone: MBLROSH 5907 

JOHN F. PENDERGAST, Jr. 

Real Estate^Estates Managed 

340 WILUS AVENUE 

Phone Melrose 7228 

ALBERT D. PHELPS 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

554 Melrose Ave,, near 149th St, and 3rd Ave. 
PHONE MELROSE 4371 

HENRY SCHWIEBERT 

Real Estate — Insurance 

261 EAST FORDHAM ROAD 
Near Talcntlne Arenu* Fordbui 1141 



January 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



49 



merit, containing about 3,500 square feet, to a 
furrier ; the top floor in the same building to 
the Bankograph Co. ; space on the 2d floor to 
the International Silk Goods Co. ; small store 
on Sixth av front to Friedenbeig and Kaplan, 
and in conjunction with Charles M. Noble, the 
north store on Sixth av to Elting & Pickup, 
opticians ; in conjunction with Adams & Co-, 
space on the 1st floor to the Royal Notion Co. ; 
in conjunction with Homer Pence space on the 
2d floor to Chicago Mercantile Co., and in 
conjunction with L. Tannenbaum, Straus i: 
Co. the entire od floor to L. Schenker. 

With the consummation of these leases the 
entire leasing of the building has been com- 
pleted with the exception of one small store on 
Sixth av for which negotiations are in progress. 
Ready for occupancy on November 1, all of the 
renting has been accomplished within two 
months. 



National Budg^et Committee Leases 

Pease & 'EUiman leased to the National Bud- 
get Committee the 3d floor of their own build- 
ing, 340 Madison av, near 43d st. 



Good Eighth Av Corner Lease 

D. Kempner ii Son, Inc^, leased for Anne 
Halley the two stores in 491 Eighth av, south- 
west corner of S5th st, to Max Amster, who 
will alter the stores into a large confectionery 
and cigar store. The lease, which covers a 
long term of years, calls for a graduated rental 
of from $5,000 to .1^13,000 per annum. 



Another Brooklyn Deal by Brown 

Frederi(-k Brown, the operator, leased the 
7-sty department store occupied by the J. S. 
Bailey Co. at 502 Fulton st, surrounding the 
southeast corner of Bond st. The lease is for 
a long term and is said to entail an aggregate 
rental of $5,000,000. The property fronts 90 
feet on Fulton st, 125 feet on Bond st and 60 
feet on Hanover pi. It contains 23,000 square 
.feet on each floor. 

In order to obtain the lease Mr. Brown was 
obliged to buy the entire stock of the depart- 
ment store concern, for which he is reported 
to have paid $."5110,000. The concern started 
in business in the store in 1916. Mr. Brown 
subsequently sold the merchandise. The deal 
was negotiated by Harvey B. Newins and Rob- 
ert J. Coverdale. 

This is the third large lease which the 
operator has made in Brooklyn during the last 
12 months. Early in 1021 he leased the Healy 
store property, at 476 Fulton st, and later the 
Imperial Restaurant Building, at 360 Fulton st. 
Both of these he subsequently sub-leased 
through the same brokers. 



J. E. Ridder Leases on Park At 

Leon S. Altmayer leased, for a long term 
of years, for S. Charles Welsh, the new 5-sty 
American basement dwelling lu2S Park av. be- 
tween 85th and 86th sts, to Joseph B. Ridd**, 
of the New York Staats Zeitung. 



Strong Lease in West 57th St. 

W. H. Ebbitt Co. leased through C. Boyce 
Kelley to a client of H. M. Weil Co., 147 West 
"i7th st, two 4-sty and basement buildings, 37x 
100. for a term of 21 year.s, at an aggregate 
rental approximating $4u0,000 net. with an op- 
tion of renewal for 21 years on a reappraise- 
ment basis. A building operation is planned. 

Leases to City College Club 

The City College Club leased the 5-3ty English 
basement house, 46 East 50th st, from Mrs. 
H. K. S. Williams. The club proposes to use 
this property as a club house. Seaman and 
Pendergast were the brokers. 



Leases in Textile Building 

The H. H. Gibson Realty Co. has closed leases 
aggregating $3,.500.000 in the Textile Building 
at Snth st and Fifth av, built by the late 
George Backer. Among the various tenants 
are the Firth Carpet Co., George Nicols Co., 
Art Loom Co., Philadelphia Tapestry Co., Beatty 
Manufacturing Co.. Bush & Diamond. Hodges 
Fibre Carpet Co., Charles W. Poulson Co.. Jack 
Sheehan Co.. t^otts-Lapp Linoleum Co., Plimp- 
ton Co., Hightstown Co.. Dodge & Co.. Aird and 
Watson. Williams and Avdoyan. Menthrop Co.. 
McElroy Co., and George Kazan. These leases 
are for terms of 5 and 10 years each. 



Leases Site for Loft Building 

A 9-sty modern loft building operation is 
forecast for the site, 50x98.9, at 151 and 153 
West 2Sth st, which was subleased by WiHiam 
R. Lohman to the Magoba Construction Co. 
The outlay involved, including the rentals, will 
amount to about $1,000,000. The M. Rosenthal 
Co., which recently leased the plot to Mr. Loh- 
man, was the broker in the recent deal. Gotr- 
lieb & Pickett are the building representatives 
of the lessees and will put up the loft. The site 
is 100 feet east of Seventh av and is now 
covered with old buildings. Thp br-^k-^rs have 
been appointed agents of the new building. 



the fourth club which has recently made its 
home on this block. The owner of record of 
the property is Ella D. Milbank. 

New Branch of Columbia Trust Co. 

Douglas L. Elliman & Co. and Veiller & 
Robinson leased for a client to the Columbia 
Trust Co. space at the northwest corner of 48th 
st and Park av, in the new apartment building 
known as 200 Park av, for a long term of years. 
The lessee will open oflices in this space par- 
ticularly for its women depositors- It will be 
equipped in an unique manner, and when com- 
pleted will give the impression of a drawing- 
room rather than a banking office, and will be 
the first thing of its kind in New York. Warren 
& Wetmore. architects of the building, are 
working on the plans for the new office, which 
it is hoped will be ready for occupancy about 
February 1. 

The Trust Company was influenced in its 
choice of this location by the tremendous 
amount of new construction of apartment houses 
and hotels in the immediate neighborhood. There 
is 270 Park av. one of the largest apartment 
houses in the world; 290 Park av, the largest 
co-operative apartment building in the world, 
with the famous "Pierre" restaurant on the 
ground floor; 300 Park av, also known as the 
new "Sherry Building" ; the Hotel Ambassador, 
Hotel Chatham, the Ritz Carlton, etc. The de- 
velopment of Park av, at this point, is making 
it a serious rival of Fifth av from a social 
.standpoint. 

Mortgage Loans 

A building loan for $150,000 has been ob- 
tained by the George F. Johnson Estate, Inc., 
from the Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. on 
the plot. 100x125. at the northwest corner of 
Southern Boulevard and 156th st, where a 6- 
sty apartment house will be erected. 



Quinland & Leland placed a first mortgage 
loan of $115,000 on the 6-sty elevator apart- 
ment house, on plot 100x100. at the northeast 
corner of Northern av and 179th st. 



College Fraternity Leases 

Delta Tan Delta Club, which now has its 
home at 257 Madison av, has leased the 5-sty 
dwelling with elevator at 27 East 39th st- The 
property measures 25x100 and was rented 
through Horace S. Ely & Co., agents. This la 



New York Title & Mortgage Co. made a 
building loan of $175,000 on the north side of 
171st st, 100 feet east of Fort Washington av, 
where a 6-sty elevator apartment house is to 
be erected by the West 171st Street Corpora- 
tion, a syndicate composed of Leo Schloss, 
Theodore Klein and others. 



Quinlan & Leland placed a first mortgage 
loan of $145,000 on the 6-sty elevator apart- 
ment house, on plot 91xll5x irregular, at 4180 
Broadway, northeast corner of 177th st. 



MANHATTAN BROKERS 



ORVILLE B. ACKERLY 

Appraiser of 
LONG ISLAND REAL PROPERTY 

Phone: Longacre 2280 
243 West 34th Street, New York City 



ERNEST N. ABLER 

Uvper East Side Property a Specialty 

liM FIRST AVE., at 7$th St. 
htakUikad IMS Phona: RUndandar 1121 



Telephone: Pennsylvania 0396-0397 

AMERICAN BUREAU 
OF REAL ESTATE 

All About Real Estate Everything — Everywhere 

MODERN "AiHSUISlE" SYSTEM 

18 West S'tth Street 

Astor Court Building, New York 

Co-operation of Reliable Brokers Invited 



ARMSTRONG & ARMSTRONG 

Real Eatata Agenta and Braken 
212 ST. NICHOLAS AVE.— N« Behth At^ .nd 
lllBt Street Phona: Momintiide U76 



EDMUND M. BRENNAN 

INCORPORATED 
Real Estate — Inaaranee 

II FAST '.f.th ST Plaia 76W 



JAMES A. DOWD 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Renting — Management 

874 SIXTH AVENUE, above 49th Street 



JACOB FINKELSTEIN & SON 

Real Estate — Mortgages 

Specialists in the Bowery Section 

42 BOWERY Phone: Franklin 1810 



ROBERT G. GRUNERT 

Sucoesaor to the 

D. A. CUSHMAN RBALTT COKPORATION 

Real Estate — Management 

172 Ninth Ave., at 2ist St. Phone: Chelae* 1841 



HARRIS EXCHANGE 

Real Estate — Mortgages 

Renting and Leasing of Stores and Lofts 

Times Building Broadway at 42d Street 

Phone: Bryant 310-1124 



HOLT & MERRALL, Inc. 

Industrial Real Estate 

342 MADISON AVE. Tel. Vandcrbilt 4699 



WM. P. JONES & SON 

ESTABLISHED 1895 
Real Estate & Insurance 

1358 BROADWAY 

Onrnwr Sfith St. Phong- Fits Roy CUT 



JOSEPH MILNER 

Real Estate 
EAST 41st STREET, NEW YORK 

Miirrnv Hill 2619 



JOHN CONSTABLE MOORE 

REAL ESTATE 

15 EAST 40th ST. Vanderbilt Slip 



LEONARD MORGAN CO. 

Real Estate — Insurance — Estates Managed 

Gotham Bank Building. Columbus Circle 

Suite 504-5 Phone: Columbus 1646 



ARTHUR G. MUHLKER 

Real Estate — Insurance 

TorkTlMo Section 

1112 PARK AVE., NEAR 90TH ST. 
Phone: Lenox 2SS5 



ARTHUR L. SHAW 

Washington Heights Specialist 
4032 BROADWAY, ABOVE 169TH STREET 

Wadsworth 4150-4151 



SHERMAN & KIRSCHNER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

54 E. 109th STREET 
NEW YORK 

Tel. Harlem 9028-5863 



JAMES B. SPEYERS, INC. 

Real Estate 

CANADIAN PAaPIC BUILDING 
342 Madison Ave. Srrite I14-6K 



WILLIAMS-DEXTER CO., INC. 

Greenwtcli Vllla«e Real Eatata 
Insurance 

72 CRFyN^VT^K 4VF Chelsea SOW 



SO' 



REAL ESTATE NOTES. 



A. G. RING, "Who was formerly with. Law- 
rence, Blake & Jewell, is now associated with 
t'hilds &i Humphries. 

JOHX S. HEEP, formerly of 110 William st, 
has removed his office to 115 Broadway, where 
he will carry on a real estate and insurance 
business. 

THOMAS A. WILSON has removed his real 
estate office from 156 Broadway to 206 Broad- 
way. His telephone number has not been 
changed. 

DOUGLAS VOUGHT, of the realty firm of 
Harris, Vought & Co., heads the Middletown 
Holding Corporation, which purchased the Hotel 
Wentworth at 59 and 61 West ^6th st. recently 
reported sold. 

CHARLES B. VAN VALEN. INC., have 
added to their brokerage staff Harry \V. Hopton 
in the sales department ; Glenn K. Carver and 
.Tnhn Thornton in the mortgage department, and 
Thatcher McKenna in the renting department. 

MISS MARY MONAHAN and Miss Anna 
Mulry have opened a real estate office ,at 2525 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

Broadway, Symphony Theatre building, under 
the firm name of Monahan & Mulry- Miss 
Monahan was located at Broadway and 107th 
st for a number of years. 

EDWARDS, DOWDNEY & RICHART and 
Horace S. Ely & Co. were the joint brokers in 
the recent sale of 55-57 White st, southwest 
corner of Franklin pi. a 5-sty loft building, the 
sale of which was recently reported. It was 
held at $140,000. 

BRACHER & HUBERT is the name of a real 
estate firm formed by Vasa K. Bracher and C. 
Royce Hubert, both of whom have been well 
known individual brokers for a long time. The 
firm has opened an office at 200 West 72d st, 
where it will conduct a general real estate and 
insurance business. 

FREDERICK FOX & CO- announce the open- 
ing of a country department in connection with 
their New York city business, under the man- 
agement of N. Raymond Fox, formerly of the 
Fox Realty Co. Mr. Fox will specialize in 
Westchester and Connecticut real estate, in 
acreage, plots, dwellings, estates, etc. 

SPEAR & CO. have been appointed managing 
agents of the 10-sty and basement building 188- 
\M} West 17th st, owned by Frank Willetts, 
builder- 



REAL ESTATE STATISTICS 



MANHATTAN 



CONVEYANCES 

BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



Total No 

Assessed Value 

No. with consideration 

Consideration 

Assessed Value 

Total No 

Assessed Value 

No. with consideration 

Consideration 

Assessed Value 



282 
S21.64S.400 

ai 

SI, 058. 250 

$1,231,000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



227 
$14,514,700 
23 
«3.553,250 
J2,894,000 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 


1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 


324 


17U 



1922 
Jan. 3 to 
Jan. 



1921 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



38 
1385.004 



14 

t59,575 



863 



673 



28 
8228,675 



S4 



47 
;l,169 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 10 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 9 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 10 



319 

$24,040,900 

36 

$1,375,7.50 

$1,544,500 



317 
$21,404,700 



$3,856,750 
$3,048,000 



351 



204 



863 



49 
$417,054 



21 
$122,970 



28 
$228,675 



751 



' 56 
$471,883 



MORTGAGES 



MANHATTAN 



BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. o to 
Jan. 11 



iuLal -so 

Aliioauc 

To JJauiiS St ins. Co. 

Auiouut 

No. at 6% 

Amount 

No. at 5Va% 

Amount 

No. at 5% 

Amount 

No. at 4/3% 

Amount 

No. at 4% 

Amount 

Unusual Rates 

Amount 

Interest not given... 
Amount 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks & In3. Co. 
Amount 



249 

$7,060,672 

19 

$888,800 

214 

$4,439,692 

1 

$81,550 

3 

$290,000 



174 

$7,622 241 

16 

$309,000 

142 

$5,667,841 

6 

$276,400 

$13,000 



260 

$2,316,295 

22 

$364,915 

216 

$2,094,977 

5 

$32 300 

3 

$10,400 



116 

$600,065 

3 

$15,000 

92 

$489,717 

4 

$14,120 

3 

146.000 



1922 
Jan. 3 to 
Jan. 9 


1921 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



901 

$4,631,029 

154 

$967,050 

872 

$4,437,829 

23 

$178,500 

3 

$9,000 



583 

$3,010 807 

87 

$912,750 

517 

$2,793,402 

29 

$131,0.50 

8 

$28,500 



1 

$2,500 

1 

$550,000 

29 

$1,696,930 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



24 

$1,665,000 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



1 

$5,115 
35 

$173,,503 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 10 



17 

$50,228 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



$5,200 

1 

$500 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 9 



273 

$9,033,997 

21 

$952,800 



232 

$11,128,911 

20 

$747,000 



1 

$2,000 

28 

$55,855 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



273 

$2,414,485 

24 

$373,415 



132 

$748,065 

5 

$21,500 



MORTGAGE EXTENSIONS 

MANHATTAN 



901 

$4,631,029 

154 

$967,050 



BRONX 



647 

$3,307,742 

90 

$962,055 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



1922 

Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks & Ina. Companies. 
Amount 



$3,201,575 

43 

$2,792,200 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



$: 



34 

329,660 

20 

$2,019 150 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 11 



ToUI No 

Amount 

To Banks & Ins. Companies. 
Amount 



20 

$588,500 

9 

$338,000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



69 
$3,215,725 

45 
$2,802,800 



12 

$256,300 

4 

$67,500 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 11 



54 
$2,936,150 

35 
$2,485,650 



24 
$679,000 

13 
$428,500 



13 

$263,300 

4 

$67,500 



January 14, 1922 



Member Brooklyn Real Eaute Board 

Money to Loan on First Mortage 

Joseph T. McMahon 

REAL ESTATE and 
MORTGAGE LOANS 

188 and 190 MONTAGUE STKKBT 
BROOKLYN 

Main 6834 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

COLLECTING, RENTING 
AND MANAGEMENT OF ESTATES 



MAX N. NATANSON 

BUYS AND SELLS 

IMPROVED 

MANHATTAN 

PROPERTY 



170 BROADWAY 

Suite 915-919 Cortlandt 7637-763$ 



MRS. GERRIT SMITH 

Member Real Estate Board of New York 

42 EAST 40th STREET 

CTTY DEPARTMENT 

APARTMENTS AND HOUSES 

SOUND SHORE PROPERTY A SPECIALTY 



J. CLARENCE DAVIES 

Member Real Estate Board. N. T. 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

AUCTIONEER— BROKER 

APPRAISER— MORTGAGE LOANS 

Main Office: 149th St. and Third Ave. 

BRANCHES; 
32 Nassau Street 51 East "12nd Stnt 

Phone Connections 



PhUip A. Payton, Jr., 
Company 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
AND BROKERS 

New York's Pioneer Negro 
Real Estate Agents 

127 West 141st Street 

Between Lenox and Seventh Avenues 
Telephone: Audubon 0945 



MANHATTAN 



BRONX 



BUILDING PERMITS 



BROOKLYN 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



QUEENS 



RICHMOND 



New Buildings. 

Cost 

Alterations . . . . 



J2. 149.000 
$325,450 

Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 10 



28 
$250,600 
$199,150 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



New Buildings. 

Cost 

Altera'tons . . . . 



65 

$1,945,300 

$20,500 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. fi to 
Jan. 11 



13 
$2,120,000 
$8,100 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



10 

$2,204,300 
$398,400 



30 
S302.100 
$276,550 



76 

$2,100,700 

$20,500 



94 

$878,510 

$38,0.30 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



1922 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



74 

$2,120,000 
$8,100 



84 
$865,345 
$386,350 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



2.32 

$1,169,300 

$18,292 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 10 



1022 
Jan. 4 to 
Jan. 10 



54 
$3.57.175 
$18,615 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



1921 
Jan. 5 to 
Jan. 11 



50 
$169,895 



94 

$878,510 

$38,030 



89 
$984,595 
$404,450 



285 

$1,246,670 

$18,292 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 10 



66 

$386,175 

$23,740 



12 
$29,925 
13,170 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 11 



50 
$169,895 



12 

$29,925 

$3,170 



Jtifluary 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



51 



BUILDING SECTION 



National Outlook for Construction During 1922 Is Bright 

Building Figures for December, 1921, Tabulated by F. W. Dodge Company, 
Shows Definite Improvement When Compared With Previous Totals 

influenced by the fact that there was a sufficient supply of 
neither materials, labor nor transportation facilities to carry 
through the extensive program that was mapped out. 

In 1922 the community's collective efifort will be toward a 
three-billion dollar construction year, (or four billions for the 
entire country). The supply of materials, labor and trans- 
portation facilities is still inadequate to carry through such 
a large program. It is neither likely nor desirable that a pro- 
gram of such magnitude be actually started. Slowness of re- 
covery in general business, labor disputes still unsettled, and 
other retarding factors may be expected to curb a too rapid 
boom in construction. If this year shows a moderate margin 
over two and a half billions invested in construction con- 
tracts in the 27 Northeastern States (say an increase of 8 or 
10% over 1921) rather more evenly distributed than the 1921 
construction was, it will justify present expectations and spell 
increased prosperity for the industry. 

December building contracts in the New England States 
amounted to $26,474,000, an increase of 44% over November, 
and double the figure for December, 1920. 

The total building contracts let during the entire year 1921 
amounted to $205,407,000, or Zi^ less than the total for the 
year 1920. 

The year's total included $85,773,000, or 42%, for residential 
buildings; $26,743,000, or 18%, for business buildings; $23,- 
494,000, or 11%, for educational buildings; $18,973,000, or 9% 
for public works and utilities ; $16,057,000, or 8%. for industrial 
plants. 

The amount of contemplated new work reported during the 
year $377,674,000, showing a shortage of construction which 
should be at least in part, made up during the coming year. 

Contracts let in New York State, and Northern New Jersey 
during December amounted to $62,331,000, the largest December 
total on record for this district. This figure was 6% greater 
than the November total and more than three and a half 
times the figure for December, 1920. 

The December figure brought the year'.^ total construction 
up to $647,051,000, which was 7% greater than the 1920 total 
and was, consequently, the largest yearly total on the Dodge 
Company's records for this district. 

Residential building was the dominant factor in the 1921 
record, amounting to $369,443,000, of 57% of the year's total. 
Business buildings amounted to $99,831,000, or 15% of the total; 
public works and utilities, $45,598,000, or 7%; industrial build- 
ings, $37,280,000, or 6%; educational buildings, $36,177,000, or 
6%. 

Contemplated new work reported during the year amounted 
to $1,176„000,000, compared with $647,000,000 worth of construe- 
tion actually started showing a deficit still to be made up. 

December building contracts in the Middle Atlantic States 
(Comprising Southern New Jersey, Eastern Pennsylvania, Del- 
aware, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia and the Car- 
olinas) amounted to $32,923,000, an increase of 9% over the 
November figure, and more than double the total for Decem- 
ber 1920. 

The total for the year 1921 came to $335,235,000, compared 
with $300,812,000 for the year 1920. This increase, however, was 
in large part due to the addition of North and South Carolina 
to the district in 1921. 

(Concluded on page 52) 



DECEMBER building contracts in the twenty-seven 
Northeastern States of the country as reported by the 
F. W. Dodge Company, amounted to more than for any 
previous December, with the exception of December 1919. The 
total amount of these contracts was $198,518,000, an increase of 
3% over the November figure, whereas December usually 
shows a decline from November. The closing month of 1921 
showed an increase of 98% over the corresponding month of 
1920. 

The total amount of construction contracts let during 1921 
was $2,359,018,000, only 8% under the 1920 total. It is doubtful 
whether any other business fared so well in 1921 as the con- 
struction industry as a whole has, even though the volume of 
construction has been unevenly distributed as to classes of 
projects and as to locality. 

The predominating factor in the year's program was resi- 
dential building, which amounted to $880,052,000. It was il% 
of the 1921 total, and represented an increase of 54% over 1920 
residential construction. Public works and utilities took second 
place, amounting to $459,184,000, or 19% of the year's total. 
Other important items were : business buildings, $336,920,000, 
or 14%; educational buildings, $242,562,000, or 10% (this figure 
representing a very considerable increase in number of pro- 
jects and in total over 1920) ; and industrial buildings, $173,- 
325,0000, or 7% of the year's total. 

The remarkably good showing of the month of December, 
following the good records of the four previous months, give 
added confirmation of the revival of construction activity. 
Every present indication is that 1922 will see a measurably 
larger volume of construction than the program carried 
through in 1921. 

The principal factors favorable to a big construction year 
are the still unsatisfied demand for buildings of every class 
and the steadily increasing amount of money available for 
investment in construction projects. These factors are not 
uniformly favorable everywhere. Recovery in recent months 
has been rapid in the east and very slow in the Central West. 
This unevenness in the rate of recovery m.ay be expected to 
continue well into 1922. The recovery of general prosperity in 
the Central West will continue to be slow, and general business 
conditions in that section will retard speedy revival or con- 
struction activity, particularly in agricultural communities. 

While it's reasonable to expect increased activity in every 
class of construction projects, it is probable that residential 
buildings and educational buildings, all of which made good 
records for activity in 1921, may be expected to continue at a 
satisfactory rate. Even industrial buildings, which special 
class is likely to be about the last to return to a normal rate 
of activity, should show an increase over 1921. 

The records of construction that was contemplated during 
the past three years indicate that the community comprised 
within the F. W. Dodge Company's territory (including about 
Yi, of the total construction of the country) has collectively 
worked toward a three-billion dollar total each year. The 
average accomplishment per year has amounted to two and a 
half billions. The year 1920 was the only one since the war 
that started off at a sufficiently high rate to reach a three- 
billion dollar total. That rate was maintained for four months, 
and then the reaction came. This reaction was caused not only 
by the reaction in general business conditions, but it was also 



52 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 14, 1922 



New York Building Managers Hold Monthly Banquet 

Wm. E. Walsh, Chairman, Board of Standards and Appeals, Outlined Policies 
of Board and H. C. Boyden Discussed Developments in Concrete 



THERE was an excellent attendance at the regular month- 
ly dinner meeting of the Building Owners' and Managers' 
Association of New York, which was held at the Ad- 
vertising Club, 47 West 2Sth street, Tuesday evening, January 
10. E. Everett Thorpe, newly elected president occupied the 
chair and acted as toastmaster. 

The speakers of the evening were William E. Walsh, Chair- 
man of the Board of Standards and Appeals, who spoke in- 
formally of some of the problems of his office, and H. C. Boy- 
den of the Portland Cement Association, who delivered an 
address on "Recent Developments in Concrete." 

Mr. Walsh described the efforts of the Board of Standards 
and Appeals to be fair in all cases that came before it for 
settlement and still uphold the law which means so much for 
the safety and comfort of the citizens of New York. He also 
assured the members of the Building Managers and Owners 
Association that they will always have his fullest co-operation 
and consideration when the come before the Board in answer 
to notices of violations etc. He cited several interesting in- 
stances of the application of the laws of safety and showed 
that the Board of Standards and Appeals is not an arbitrary 
tribunal designated to make life more difficult for property 
owners but that it is essentially a medium for eliminating un- 
necessary hazards and assuring the maximum of safety to the 
occupants of buildings in this city. 

Mr. Boyden spoke of the growing popularity of the use of 
concrete in general construction work and explained the new 



uses constantly being found for this material. He told of the 
economics that can be obtained through the use of concrete 
instead of other basic materials for certain types of work and 
also of the extremely low cost of maintenance. 

After the two addresses the meeting was turned over to 
routine business which included the reading of several annual 
reports that were not submitted at the last meeting. 

The Building Owners' and Managers Association is planning 
to make 1922 a banner year of achievement and if only a part 
of the program now outlined is put through a new record 
for progress will be attained. One of the most interesting 
and important of the plans of this organization was recently 
presented by Charles F. Merritt, executive secretary. This 
undertaking provides for the establishment of a bureau of 
records for information and instruction on elevators, boilers, 
building construction materials, supplies and general equip- 
ment. It is also planned to make a compilation of the history 
of building in Manhattan, giving dates of the erection of all 
prominent structures, the names of the architects and builders, 
and otlier details such as the number of square feet of floor 
area, height of building and the ceiling heights, square feet of 
corridor space, square feet of rentable space, wages paid to 
building .employees such as porters, cleaners, elevator oper- 
ators, superintendents, and other helpers, general operating 
costs, etc., together with a collection of photographs and 
prints of the exteriors and interiors of the most prominent 
buildings. 



National Outlook for Construction During 1922 is Bright 



(Concluded from page 51) 

In the year's total were the following items: $118,841,000, or 
33%, for residential buildings; $88,337,00, or 25% for public 
works and utilities; $46,235,000, or 13%, for business buildings; 
$32,627,000, or 9%, for educational buildings; $28,804,000, or 8% 
for industrial buildings. 

Contemplated new work reported during 1921 totaled $695,- 
000,000, compared with $355,000,000, worth of work actually 
started. 

Contracts awarded during December in Western Pennsyl- 
vania, West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky and Tennessee amounted 
to $22,453,000, a decrease of 35% from the November figure, 
but an increase of 14% over the total for December, 1920. 

The total volume of construction for the year 1921 in this 
district amounted to $422,049,000, a decrease of 9% from the 
1920 total. 

Included in the 1921 total were the following: $120,859,000, or 
29%, for residential buildings; $117,259,000, or 28%, for public 
works and utilities; $49,247,000, or 12%, for educational build- 
ings, $49,107,000, or 12%( for educational buildings; $49,107,- 
000, or 12%, for business buildings ; $41,315,000, of 10%, for in- 
dustrial buildings. 

Contemplated new work reported in 1921 reached a total of 
$663,000,000, compare with $422,000,000 for construction actually 
started. 

December building contracts in the Central West (compris- 
ing Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Wisconsin, Missouri and 



portions of Eastern Kansas and Nebraska) amounted to $45,- 
985,000, an increase of 1% over November, and an increase of 
37% over December, 1920. 

The year's total for this district amounted to $644,014,00, a de- 
crease of 19% from 1920. It is thus seen how the severe de- 
pression in the agricultural states has affected the construction 
industry. 

Included in the 1921 total were; $165,801,000, or 27%, for 
public works and utilities; $161,175,00, or 26%, for residential 
buildings; $97,377,000, or 15%, for business buildings; $85,- 
318,000, or 13%, for educational buildings; and $47,673,000, or 
7%, for industrial buildings. 

The total amount of contemplated new work reported dur- 
ing the year in this district amounted to more than one and 
a half billion dollars, showing the largest deficit in the year's 
program of any district mcluded in the Dodge Company's 
territory. 

Contracts awarded during December in Minnesota and the 
Dakotas amounted to $8,443,000, which was an 80% increase over 
November and a 75% increase over December, 1920. 

The year's total amounted to $85,262,000, a decrease of 8%, 
from 1920. Included in this total were the following items: 
$23,962,000, or 28%, for residential buildings : $23,216,000, or 27%, 
for public works and utilities; $15,698,000, or 18%, for educa- 
tional buildings; $7,627,000 or 9%, for business buildings. 

Contemplated new work reported during the year amount- 
ed to $233,000,000, compare with $85,000,000 for work actually 
started, leaving a considerable deficit in the year's program. 



Commerce Department Collecting Construction Data 



AMONG the recently inaugurated activities of the Division 
of Building and Housing of the U. S. Department of Com- 
merce are the collection from contractors and secretaries 
of building exchanges of building material prices actually paid by 
contractors. Information has been obtained for several months 
and has been distributed among those who have supplied the infor- 
mation. 



The division, which is under the direction of John M. Cries as 
chief, is also obtaining from the contractors data on the percent- 
age of different materials and the amount of labor that go into a 
typical six-room frame and a six-room brick residence. This sur- 
vey will enable some estimate to be made of the importance of 
price fluctuations in labor and in different classes of materials 
entering into these types of dwellings. 



January 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



53 



Architects Start New Year with Many Large Projects 

Weekly Figures of F. W. Dodge Company Indicative of Active Spring and 
Summer Building Season in Metropolitan Area 

coming spring as rapidly as possible so as to get their opera- 
tions well under way before April 1, the date specified for 
the expiration of the Tax Exemption measure. Suburban 
builders, who cannot claim the advantages of tax exemption, 
are also preparing for an extremely active season because the 
demand for small dwellings is still far from satisfied. 

The list of 375 projects for which plans were reported dur- 
ing the first week of 1922 included 43 business structures such 
as stores, offices, lofts, commercial garages, etc., $1,153,500; 4 
educational projects, $685,000; 3 hospitals and institutions, 
$959,000; 8 factory and industrial projects, $172,500; 6 public 
works and public utilities, $135,000; 8 religious and memorial 
buildings, $202,500; 298 residential operations including apart- 
ments, flats and tenements and one and two-family dwellings, 
$9,509,600 and 5 social and recreational buildings, $315,000. 

Among the 245 projects for which contracts were awarded 
during the week were 25 business structures of various types, 
$1,216,000; 6 educational buildings, $553,600; 8 factory and in- 
dustrial buildings, $385,500; 3 public buildings, $311,500; 11 
public works and public utilities, $909,900; 4 religious and 
memorial structures, $110,000; 184 residential operations in- 
cluding multi-family dwellings and one and two-family houses, 
$4,276,000 and 4 social and recreational projects, $312,500. 



DESPITE the fact that there were only four business 
days in the first week of this year the building totals 
for that period indicate unusual activity and may be 
taken as an excellent sign that the coming months will be 
notable for the volume and value of new structural projects. 
Reports from architects and engineers in New York State and 
New Jersey, north of Trenton, are significant of the vast 
amount of new work to be undertaken during the coming 
spring and summer. It has been several years since the first 
week in January has been so productive of newly contemplated 
operations, the majority of which are scheduled for an early 
start. According to figures tabulated by the F. W. Dodge 
Company, there were 375 new building and engineering proj- 
ects) reported during the first week of the new year, repre- 
senting an approximate cost of $13,132,100. During the same 
period 245 contracts were awarded in this territory that call 
for an outlay of $8,075,000. 

Although there is a decided improvement in the outlook for 
commercial and industrial construction during the coming 
months residential building still continues to be the dominating 
factor in the building situation. Speculative builders fh 
Greater New York are advancing their scheduled work for the 



PERSONAL AND TRADE 
NOTES. 



Ferdinand W. Roebllng, of the John A. 

Roeblingrs' Sons Co., Trenton, has been 
elected a director of the Otis Elevator Co. 

Schaefer Construction Company an- 
nounces the removal of its offices from 
5 West 31st street to 157 Bast 44th street. 

D. Gross has been appointed secretary 
of tlie Building Bureau of the Borough 
of Manhattan. Mr. Gross has been chief 
clerk of the department for the past 
twelve years. 

John R. Alpine has been appointed New 
York Department Manager of the Grin- 
nell Co., Inc., 1 Liberty street, represent- 
ing the company's power, steam, hot 
water and industrial piping interests. 

P. S. Slater, tor several years with the 
Detroit Graphite Co.. has resigned to take 
a position with the M. B. Suydara Co., 
paint manufacturer. Pittsburgh, in its 
New York office, 17 East 42d street, as 
Eastern sales manager. 

Jac. C. Holman has been elected vice- 
president of the A-J Contracting Com- 
pany, Inc.. building contractors, 101 Park 
avenue. Mr. Holman is a graduate of 
Cornell University, Class of 1910, and pre- 
vious to his association with this firm was 
in charge of the Cost Engineering De- 
partment of the Housing Corporation, New 
Brunswick, N. J. 

Charles A. Johnson and F. G. Stlckel, 
architects, have recently established 
offices in the Savings Bank Building. 
Peekskill, N. Y., for the general practice 
of architecture. Mr. Johnson is a gradu- 
ate of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and has been associated with 
some of the leading architects in Boston 
and New York. He was connected with 
the office of Cass Gilbert for the past 
eight years and during that time has ha.i 
charge of some important building pro- 
jects. Mr. Stickel has been with the Cass 
Gilbert org.anization for twenty-one years 
as a designer. 

■\V. R. Stovol and H. A. nrinkerhoff, both 
forinerly with Westinghouse, Church, 
Kerr & Company, have formed a partner- 
ship as consulting engineers, with head- 
quarters at 136 Liberty street. The new 
-(organization, under the firm name of 
Stovel & Brinkerhoff, will handle design, 
construction and equipment of electric 



and steam power stations, factories and 
railroad shops, and investigations and re- 
ports on factories and power plants and 
on the purchase and generation of power. 
Mr. Stovel served overseas as lieutenant- 
colonel in the A. B. F. in charge of the 
mechanical and electrical equipment at 
all ports used by the American forces. 



T. C. Desmond & Co. Starts Large Contract. 

A general contract was recently award- 
ed to T. C. Desmond & Co., engineers and 
contractors, 26 Beaver street, for the con- 
struction of forty two-family brick dwell- 
ings on Queens Boulevard and Heiser 
street, Long Island City. The work is al- 
ready started and will call for an outlay 
of $216,000, or $5,400 per house. These 
dwellings are of brick with combination 
slate and gravel roots. They are to be 
heated by steam and lighted by electricity. 
Hardwood floors are to be included. The 
buildings are for the Bliss Street Realty 
Co., in which Bryan L. Kennelly is largely 
interested. The houses were planned by 
Herbert Lucas, architect, 117 Bast 60th 
street. 



Contract Let for Large Newark Project. 

A general contract has been awarded to 
the Geo. A. Fuller Company, 175 Fifth ave- 
nue, for the construction of a modern fire- 
proof office building for the Newark 
Chamber of Commerce. This structure, 
which will be erected according to plans 
and specifications prepared by Guilbert & 
Betelle. architects. Aldene Building, New- 
ark, will be ten stories in height and will 
occupy a plot 80x100 feet at the southwest 
corner of Branford and Treat places, in 
the heart of Newark's business district. 
The building has been designed in the 
Renaissance style of architecture and the 
facades will be of Indiana limestone, face 
brick and terra cotta. The cost of con- 
struction is estimated at $700,000, exclu- 
sive of the value of the land. 



Architects Offer Medals. 

The New York Chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects will offer two 
medals and four certificates of honorable 
mention to owners for excellence in the 
exterior design of apartment houses. One 
medal will be awarded In a class of apart- 
ment houses of morn than six stories in 
height, and the other medal will be 
awarded for a class of multi-family dwell- 
ings of six stories or less in height. Two 
honorable mentions will be awarded In 
each of the above classes. 



TRADE AND TECHNICAL 
SOCIETY EVENTS. 



Building lHanager.s' and Owners' Asso- 
ciation of New York will hold its regular 
monthly dinner meeting at the Advertis- 
ing Club, 47 East 25th street, Tuesday 
evening, February 14. The speaker of the 
evening will be announced later. 

New York State Builders' Supply Asso- 
ciation will hold its annual meeting at 
the Lafayette Hotel, Buffalo, January 17 
and 18 inclusive. 

American Society of Heating and Venti- 
lating Engineers will hold its annual 
meeting in New York City, January 24 
to 26, 1922, inclusive. 

National Brick Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion will hold its annual convention at 
the Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, Ind.. 
January 23-28, 1922. 

Retail Lumber Dealers' Association »t 
New York State will hold its annual meet- 
ing and convention at the Powers Hotel, 
Rochester, January 14-21, 1922. 

Metropolitan Hardware Association will 
hold its annual banquet at the Hotel Com- 
modore. Wednesday evening, January 18, 
1922. H. A. Cornell is chairman of the 
dinner committee. 

American Institute of Architects has 
selected Chicago as the city in which to 
hold its 1922 convention, which will be 
held early in the spring. Further details 
will be announced later. 

New York State Retail Hardware Asso- 
ciation will hold its annual convention 
and exhibition at Rochester, N. Y., Febru- 
ary 21 to 24. inclusive. Exhibition at Ex- 
hibition Park; headquarters and sessione 
at the Powers Hotel. 

Common Brick Manufacturers' Associ- 
ation of America will hold its annual con- 
vention at the Statler Hotel, St. Louis, 
Mo., January 30 to February 1, 1922. In- 
dications are that this convention will 
draw a larger attendance than the his- 
toric gathering in New York City last 
January. 

Associated General Contractors of 

America will hold its annual convention 
at Cleveland, January 17 to 19, 1922, In- 
clusive. Speakers of national prominence 
will feature the opening session of this 
convention. Reports of standing commit- 
tees will be received and discussed 



54 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 14, 1922: 




DEVELOPMENTS in the local building- 
industry during the first two weeks 
of the new year indicate a forthcoming 
season of splendid progress for all inter- 
ested in construction. There is a large 
amount of high class building now being 
planned and contractors feel that the 
work to be undertaken during the coming- 
months will be far more representative 
than that of last year. Although there is 
an over-balance of residential construc- 
tion now under way or planned for a start 
next spring, the general situation is much 
more favoral^le that it has been and there 
is an excellent prospect that the building 
activity of the coming season will be far 
more diversified as to type. 

During the past week or so a number 
of important operations were announced 
and several others have been released for 
estimates, and local contractors are an- 
ticipating a decided im.provement in the 
number of a.wards in the near future. As 
a matter of fact there is already consid- 
erable increase in the number of 
announced commitments for new building 
projects, and if any real percentage of the 
work now proposed matures to the point 
of actually commencing operations the 
building trades will have all they are able 
to handle with efficiency. 

The markets for building- materials and 
supplies are fairly active, and all signs 
point to a steady ii-nprovement in the vol- 
ume of business. Brick is in fair de- 
mand, and cement, lime, terra potta and 
other basic products are in a favorable 
position. Prices are steady at present and 
no important changes are anticipated un- 
til the spring building business opens. 
There is some talk of higher building 
material prices next spring, but any 
changes along this line will be totally 
dependent upon the ratio of demand to 
the supply. At present there seems to be 
suflicient materials easily available for all 
normal building demands, and it will only 
be an unusually active season that will be 
responsible for increased material prices. 
— Common Briok. — Owing largely to the 
weather conditions, there was a falling off 
in activity in the New York wholesale 
market for Hudson River common brick 
during the past week. Sales were light 
and inquiries infrequent, but there is an 
undercurrent of feeling that just as soon 
as the weather is more favorable there 
-will be a decided change in the rate of 
common brick demand, as there is a vast 
amount of projected construction piling 
up for a start early next spring. There 
were no arrivals of brick from up-river 
plants this week because of the ice-bound 



condition of the river. The Hudson is 
frozen solid north of Tarrytown and un- 
less a mild spell comes to thaw this ice 
there is no likelihood of the arrival of 
brick barges for some weeks to come. 
There is quite a reserve unsold in the 
wholesale market, however, and dealers 
have an-iple stacks in their yards for all 
current demands. Prices are somewhat 
firmer than they have been during the 
past two or three weeks, and n-ianufac- 
turors are of the opinion that the market 
will be notably firm as to price until the 
river is again open to navigation. 



Siiminnry. — Transactions in the North 
River brick market for the week ending 
Thursday. January 12, 1932. Condition of 
market: Demand, lighter; prices slightly 
firmer. Quotations: Hudson Rivers, ?14,50 
to $15 a thousand to dealers in cargo 
lots alongside dock. Number of cargoes 
arrived, none; sales, 13. Distribution: 
Manhattan, 2; Bronx, 1; Brooklyn, 10. 
Remaining unsold in the New York 
whnlesiile market, 21. 

Lumber. — As is usual at this particular 
peiiod of the year, there is no great 
amount of activity in the lumber business. 



BUILDING COMMODITY PRICES 



CURRENT prices for building materials 
and supplies as quoted by leading 
dealers and jobbers in the city for delivery 
in New York. 

Note — Price changes are indicated by 
bold-face type. 

Brick (Wholesale, on Dock, N. Y.), per 
thousand : 

For delivered prices in Greater New 
York add cartage, handling, plus 10 per 
cent. 
Hudson River best grades. .$14.00 to ?14. 50 

Raritan No quotation 

Second-hand brick, per load 

of 3,000, delivered $45.00 to 



-Delivered on job in New 



Pace Brick- 
York: 

Rough Red $45.00 to — — 

Smooth Red 45.00 to 

Rough Buff 50.00 to 

Smooth Buff 50.00 to 

Rough Gray 53.00 to 

Smooth Gray 53.00 to 

Colonials 45.00 to 

Cement — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan, Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens: 

Domestic Portland cement, per bbl..$2.S0 
Rebate for bags, 10c. each. 

Gravel — Delivered at job site in Manhat- 
tan and Bronx: 

l>/2-in., Manhattan deliveries, per cu. 
yd $4.25 

Bronx deliveries 4.25 

%-in., Manhattan deliveries 4.25 

Bronx deliveries 4.25 

Note — Prices for deliveries in Brooklyn 
and Queens are approximately the same 
as for Manhattan, except where job is lo- 
cated at a great distance from the water 
front, in which case prices will be slightly 
higher. 

Grit- — Delivered at Job site in Manhattan 
and Bronx: 

.Manhattan deliveries $3.50 

Bron.x deliveries . . . . . . ; 3.50 



HolloTC Tile — 

Exterior — Not used in Manhattan; quota- 
tions only on specific projects. 

Interior — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan, south of 125th street. 

2x12x12 split furring $0.12 per sq. ft. 

3x12x12 0.12 per sq. ft. 

4x12x12 0.17 per sq. ft. 

6x12x12 0.19 per sq. ft. 

Note — For deliveries north of 125th St., 
Manhattan, and in Brooklyn, Bronx and 
Queens, prices job site are slightly higher, 
according to location of work, which 
varies trucking charges. 
Lath — 
Eastern Spruce delivered 

at job site in Manhattan. 

Bronx, Brooklyn and 

Queens $10.50 per 1,000 

Lime — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan, 
Bronx, Brooklyn and. Queens: 
Finishing Lime (Standard in 

300-Ib. barrel) $4.70 per bbl. 

Common Lime (Standard 300- 

Ib. barrel) 4.40 per bbl. 

Finishing Lime (Standard In 
Hydrate Finishing, in paper 

bags 24. 00 per ton 

Hydrate Common, in cloth 

bags 22.50 per ton 

Plaster — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan, 
Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens- 
Neat Wall Cement, In cloth 

bags $21.00 per ton 

Brown Mortar, in cloth bags. 18.00 per ton 
Lath Mortar, in cloth bags... IS. 00 per ton 
Finishing Plaster, in cloth 

bags 24.50 per ton 

Rebate for returned bags. 15c. per bag 
Finishing Plaster (250-lb. 

barrel) $4.00 per bbl. 

Finishing Plaster (320-lb 

barrel ) 5.35 per bbl. 

Plaster Blocks^ 

2-in. (solid) per sq. ft $0.17 to 0.19 

3-in. (hollow) per sq. ft 0.17 to 0.19 




The 

UNION STOVE WORKS 

Headquarters for Bnllderi for 

Kitchen Ranges for Coal or Gas, Standard or 

Pipeless Furnaces, Heating Boilers, Laundry 

Apparati 

THE GREAT "ASTOR" LINE 

70 BEEKMAN STREET 



Established 88 Tears 



Telephone: Beekman 249* 



Keen Competition and the Great Struggle for Business has brought into the New York 
Market a Light Weight Extra Heavy Cast Iron Pipe, 

We are selling Full Weight, New York Regulation, Extra Heavy, Cast Iron Pipe. 

We do not Substitute, hut tell Full, Honest Weight 

JOHN A. MURRAY & SONS, INC. 

'•The Hou»e of ReUabiUtj/" 
310-312 WEST 39TH STREET, NEW YORK 



$80,000 

To loan on corner plot, 75x100 
feet, in Norwood Gardens, 
Long Island City, for construc- 
tion of 0-story walk-up with 
stores. 

One Million Dollars 

To loan on one and two-family 
houses. 

Eealtp Co, 

52 VANDERBILT AVE., NEW YORK CITY 
Ter. Vanilerljill 9484 4-6 



January 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



;5S 



MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 



Both wholesalers and retailers are en- 
gaged with their inventories, and until 
these are completed the business will 
naturally be light. Demand is fair and 
shows every likelihood of improving 
steadily as the prospects for an unusually 
active building season are excellent. The 
holidays and the inclement weather of 
the past two weeks has curtailed buying 
to some extent, but there is a large 
amount of business in sight. There is a 
general feeling in the lumber industry 
that prices are likely to advance. While 
there is as yet nothing definite to go by 



the marked trend toward higher values 
so noticeable during the last few months 
of the past year are taken as indicative 
of the future. The fact that wholesale 
stocks are low. coupled with depleted re- 
serves at mill points, seems to lend color 
to the predictions of higher prices to come 
next spring, particularly as it is now pos- 
itive that the demand for lumber to be 
used in new construction projects will be 
abnormally heavy. Reports from subur- 
ban districts show a tremendous potential 
demand for lumber products, as there is 
a large building prograin scheduled for 



IN THE METROPOLITAN MARKETS 



Plaster Board — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan, 
Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. 

27x48x% in $0.38 each 

32x36x^ in 0.22 each 

32x36x% in 0.24 each 

32x36x% in 0.30 each 

Sand — 

Delivered at job in 

Manhattan ?l-80 to per cu. yd. 

Delivered at job in 

Bronx 1.80 to per cu. yd. 

Wbitc Sand — 

Delivered in Manhattan. .. .$5.00 per cu. yd. 

Broken Stone — 

lV4-in., Manhattan delivery. $4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

%-in., Manhattan delivery. . 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Building Stone^ 

Indiana limestone, per cu. ft $1.63 

Kentucky limestone, per cu. ft 2.27 

Briar Hill sandstone, per cu. ft 1.68 

Gray Canyon sandstone, per cu. ft. . . . 1.65 

Buff Wakeman, per cu. ft 1.90 

Buff Mountain, per cu. ft 1.80 

North River bluestone, per cu. ft.... 1.85 

Seam face granite, per sq. ft 1.20 

South Dover marble (promiscuous 

mill block), per cu. ft 2.25 

White Vermont marble (sawed) New 

York, per cu. ft 3.00 

Structural Steele 

Plain material at tidewater; cents per 
pound: 
Beams and channels up to 14 

In 1.88c. to 2.03c. 

Beams and channels over 14 

in 1.88c. to 2.03c. 

Angles, 3x2 to 6x3 1.88c. to 2.03c. 

Zees and tees 1.88c to 2.03c. 

Lumber^ 

Wholesale prices. New York. 
Yellow pine, merchantable 1905, t. o. b., 
N. Y.: 



3x4 to 14x14, 10 to 20 ft $41.00 to $5a. 00 

Hemlock, Pa., f. o. b., N. Y., 

base price, per M 37.50 to 

Hemlock, W. Va., base price, 

per M 37.00 to 

(To mixed cargo price add freight, $1.50.) 

Spruce, Eastern, random car- 
goes, narrow (delivered) . . 30.00 to 

Wide cargoes 33.00 to 

Add $1.00 per M for each inch in width 

over 12 inches. Add $1.00 per M for every 

two feet over 20 ft. in length. Add $1.00 

per M for dressing. 

Cypress Lumber (by car, f. o. b., N. Y.): 

First and seconds, 1-in. .. .$110.00 to 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 

1 Hearts to 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 

1 Prime ?. . . to — 

Quartered Oak to $166.00 

Plain Oak to 136.00 



1* looring; 

White oak, quart'd sel . . . . — 
Red oak, quart'd select..— 

Maple No. 1 65.00 to 

Yellow pine No. 1 common 

flat 55.00 to 

N. C. pine flooring Nor- 

folks 65.00 to 



■to $87.50 
-to 87.50 



Window Glass — 

Official discounts from manufacturers' 

lists: 
.Single strength, A quality, first three 

brackets 82% 

B grade, single strength, first three 

brackets 82% 

Grades A and B, larger than the first 

three brackets, single thick 82% 

Double strength, A quality 82% 

Double strength, B quality 85% 

Linseed Oil — 

City brands, oiled, 5 bbls. lot . $0.72 to $0.74 
Less than 5 bbls 0.75 to 0.77 



Turpentine- 
Turpentines 



.$0.80 to$0.82 



the early spring and summer months. 

Struetural Steel. — Although current 
business is light as compared with the 
volume of a few weeks ago, the outlook 
for the coming month or so is excellent, 
as there are a number of large projects 
soon to be released that will require an im- 
jJortant total tonnage. Recent bookings of 
fabricated materials for new building 
projects, while numerous, have not been 
for large individual amounts, but there is 
every indication that the next week or 
so will show a decided improvement in 
this respect. Fabricated steel prices are 
steady and unchanged. 

Klectrical Supplies. — Tile market for 
these materials is not quite so active as 
it was a few weeks ago, but conditions 
are expected to improve within the next 
week or ten days, as there is a large 
amount of active building with electrical 
material requirements yet unsatisfied and 
an imposing program of new construction 
waiting for a start. A settlement of the 
local labor problem would be of material 
benefit to all material lines, as there is 
considerable proposed building being held 
in abeyance pending the consummation 
of a new working agreement between 
employers and workmen. For the most 
part prices in the electrical lines are 
steady, with but slight changes reported 
during the past few weeks. Demand for 
conduit is light; prices unchanged. The 
recent advance in rubber-covered wire 
prices has not stimulated buying to any 
extent. 

Ca.st Iron Pipe. — Business in this line 
has dropped off to some extent, but at 
that it is far better than it was one year 
ago at this time. The majority of thu 
Eastern plants are operating at approxi- 
mately seventy-five per cent, of capacicy 
.and there is considerable new business in 
sight for the spring and summer. Munici- 
pal lettings are scarce at present, but 
Several important projects are likely to 
be released for bids within the next few 
weeks. Private buying is light and no 
real improvement is anticipated until 
weather conditions are more favorable. 
Prices are steady and practically un- 
changed, with New York quotations as 
follows: 6 in. and larger, in carload lots, 
$47.30 per net ton; 4 in. and .5 in., $52.30; 
3 in.. $62.30. 

Window Glass — Because of the large 
amount of residential construction, both 
ipartments and one and two-family houses, 
now in the final stages of completion, the 
uemand for window glass is excellent and 
likely to hold so for some time to come. 
Stocks are fairly complete and prices firm. 




m0y 



Face 

Enameled 

Fire 



BRICK 

We are well and favorably known wherever brick is used 
throughout the United States, Canada and South America. 
There can be but one reason for this — SERVICE. Whether it 
be FACE BRICK, ENAMELED BRICK, FIRE BRICK or FIRE 
CLAY, our product is furnished in all textures and shades, we 
are here to serve you in small quantities or large. It will be a 
pleasure to estimate for you — write us or phone for a repre- 
sentative. 

American Enameled Brick & Tile Company 



As manufacturers of BRICK for thirty years, 
we have a record of repeat orders that affords 
you a 100% guarantee of satisfactory service. 
To the service given by our Face, Enameled 
and Fire BRICK, is added the service we 
render in shipment and delivery. Prompt 
shipments on any size contracts in any range 
of shade or texture, at fair prices and of 
first-class quality. 



52 VANDERBILT AVENUE, NEW YORK 

Telephone Murray Hill 8787-8788 



S6 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 14, 1922 



J. P. Duffy Co. 

Flue Pipe 
Terra Cotta Blocks 

Gypsum Blocks 
Masons' Materials 

138th Street and Park Avenue 

BROOKLYN 
SOth-Slst Streets and 2nd Avenue 

QUEENS 
Jackson Avenue and Madden Street 



POMEROY 

FIRE RETARD ANT 
WINDOWS 

Built in the belief that the BEST hollow 
metal fire retardemt window is the only 
SAFE fire retardant window for a builder 
to use or for a manufacturer to selL 

S . H. POMEROY CO., Inc. 

282-96 East 134th Street NEW YORK 

Phone Melrose GI04 



FOR 

PAINTING, DECORATING 
and PLASTERING 

Consult 

LESCH & JOHNSON 

261 East Fordham Road N«w Y«rk 

Telephone; Fordham 934S 



TBIiBPHONBS: fTART.KM { |||5 



FRANK U. ROSS 

Contractor and Dealer in 

TILE and MARBLE 

8* EAST IKTH STREET NEW TOKK 



HOUSE MOVERS and SHORERS 

Honse Morlng, Shoring and Jobbinf 
Promptly Attended to 

Christian Vomdrans Sons 

411 ■. 14Tth at„ Bronx Tel. MelroM iM 



CONTEMPLATED 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS, PLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

165TH ST, — Gronenberg & Leuchtag. 450 4th 
av, liave plans in progress for a oV^-sty brick, 
steel and limestone apartment house, lOUxlS.'J 
ft, in the south side of 165th st, 160 ft east of 
Broadway, for a corporation now forming, 
owner. Cost. ^200,000, 

BROADWAY.— R. Candala, 200 "West 72d st, 
has completed plans for a 15-sty brick and lime- 
stone apartment, 100x175 ft. at 24S0-8S Broad- 
way, northeast corner of 91st St. for Lucania 
Realty Co.. A. Campagna. president. 200 West 
72d st, owner and builder. Cost, $1,500,000. 
Owner will take bids on separate contracts 
about January 15. 

PARK AV. — Electus D. Litchfield, 477 5th av, 
has plans in progress for- a 13-sty brick and 
steel apartment house. 2.5x02 tt, at 1094 Park 
av for Joint Ownership Construction Co., Fredk. 
Culver, president, 342 Madison av, owner. Cost, 
.fSOO.OOO. 

RIVERSIDE DR.— Schwartz & Gross, 345 5th 
av, have plans in progress for a 14-sty brick 
and steel apartment house, 74x160 ft, at the 
northeast corner of Riverside dr and 109th st 
for 610 West 110th Street Corp., Benj. P. 
Walker, president, 610 West 110th st, owner. 
Cost, $1,500,000. 

CROTONA PARK NORTH.— Charles Kreym- 
borg, 2534 Marion av, has plans in progress for 
a 6-sty brick, limestone and terra cotta apart- 
ment bouse. 57x100 ft. at the northeast corner 
nf Crotona Park Xorth and Prospect av for 
Johnson-Deichsel Building Co., C. P. Johnson 
and -A.. F. Deichsel, 129 East lS8th st, owner. 
Cost, .$120,000. Owner will take bids on sepa- 
rate contracts shortly. Plumbing,' A. F. Deich- 
sel, 584 East 169th A. 

HALLS AND CLUBS. 

MORNINGSIDE DR.— McKim. Mead & White, 
101 Park av, have plans in progress for a 3- 
sty and basement brick and limestone club 
house, 80x82 ft, at the corner of Morningside dr 
and 117th st for Columbia University, Nicholas 
Murray Butler, president, 116th st and Amster- 
dam av, owner. Heating and ventilating engi- 
neer, Werner Nygren, 101 Park av. Electrical 
engineer. Chas. E. Knox Association, 101 Park 
av. Architect will take bids on general con- 
tract about January 15. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

144TH ST. — Harrison G. Wiseman, 25 West 
43d st, has completed plans for a 1-sty brick 
garage, 99x99 ft, at 35-41 West 144th st for 
Kenerly & Peters, Inc., Leonard E. Kenerly, 
president, 2424 7th av, owner. Cost, $30,000. 

lOTH AV.— Springsteen & Goldhammer, 32 
Union sq, have completed plans for a 2-sty brick 
garage, 100x100 ft, with stores, at 841-49 lOth 
av for W. M. W. Realty Corp., Meyer Merkin, 
president, 116 West 39th st, owner and 
builder. Cost, $65,000. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

55TH ST. — McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin, 
1123 Broadway, have preliminary plans in 
progress for a 17-sty brick and limestone Na- 
tional Bible Institute building, 200x100 ft, at 
330-48 West 55th st for National Bible Insti- 
tute, Don O. Shelton, president, 214 West 35th 
st, owner. Cost, $1,500,000. 



TELEPHONE: MANSFIEUJ r3«» 



RETAIL LUMBER 



CHARLES H 



"THE ACCOMMODATING HOUSE" 



FINCH & CO. 

Coney Island Ave. and Ave. H, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



WELLS ARCHITECTURAL IRON CO. 



Pkne: f MT« 
Mat* Hmraa ) ItTl 



Manufacturers of Ornamental Iron Work 

Office and Factory: River Ave. and East 151st St 



PAINTING AND DECORATING 

GENERAL CONTRACTING 

HIGHEST WORKMANSHIP BEST MATERIALS 

REDUCED PRICES ESTIM.\TES FtTRNISHED 

im W. 96th St., New York R. S GLOVE Riverside 3419-7490 



SPRINKLER 
SUPERVISORY SERVICE 
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER 
VALVE ALARM SERVICE 
INTERIOR FIRE ALARM 

EQUIPMENT 

INSTALLED AS A LOCAL SYSTEM 
OR FOR CENTRAL OFFICE SERVICE 

AUTOMATIC 

FIRE ALARM SERVICE 

SPECIAL BUILDING 

SIGNAL SERVICE 

Automatic Fire Alarm Co. 

416 Broadway New York City 

CANAL 51U 



Bronx 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

238TH ST.— Robt. Skrivan and Edw. Crumley, 
3,55 East 149th st. have completed plans for a 
3-sty brifk and limestone tenement, 25x75 ft, in 
the south side of 238th st, 75 ft west of Matilda 
av, for James Quinlan, 4412 Bronx blvd, owner. 
Cost, .$24,000. Owner will take bids on separate 
contracts about February 15. 

TUDOR PL. — Irving Margon and Chaa- 
Glaser, 2806 3d av. have plans in progress for a 
5-sty brick, limestone and terra cotta apart- 
ment, 100x102 ft, at the northeast corner of 
Tudor pla and Walton av for Mavis Realty 
Corp., Max Davis, president, 81 East 12.5th st, 
owner. Cost, $1.50,000. Owner will take bids 
on separate contracts about February 1. 

CROTOXA PARK EAST.— Chas. Schaefer, 394 
East 150th st, has plans in progress for a 5-sty 
brick and limestone apartment house. 127x92 
ft, at the southeast corner of Crotona Park East 
and Charlotte st for A. Brand, 1560 Wilkens av, 
owner. Cost, $180,000. 

VALENTIXE AV.— Moore & Landseldel, 3d 
av and 148th st, have plans in progress for a 
5^-sty semi-fireproof apartment house, 60x100 
ft, at the northeast corner of Valentine av and 
Bedford Park, east of East Grand Concourse 
blvd, for 200th Street Construction Co., Wm. J. 
Yennie. 25 West 42d st, owner and builder. 
Cost, $120,000. 

WALTON AV, — Irving Margon and Chas. 
Glaser, 2,806 3d av, have plans in progress for 
two 5-sty brick, limestone and terra cotta 
apartments, 100x125 ft each, on the east side of 
Walton av, from Tudor pi to McClellan st, for 
a corporation now forming, care Max Davis, 81 
East 12,ith st, owner. Cost, $440,000. Owner 
will take bids on separate contracts about 
February 1. 

DWELLINGS. 

PROSPECT AV. — Ferdinand Savignano, 6005 
14th av, Brooklyn, has completed plans for 
three 2-sty brick dwellings, 19x61 ft, on the 
east side of Prospect av. 100 ft south of 176th 
st, for Bruter Building Corp., InCi Jos. Bruter, 
president, 83 Canal st, owner. Total cost, 
$52,000. 

ALLERTON AV.— J. J, Gloster Co,, 110 West 
40th st, has completed plans for a 1-stv frame 
dwelling, 30x45 ft. at the corner of Allerton and 
Fenton avs for J. Fitzgerald, owner, care of 
architect. Cost, $12,000. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

PROSPECT AV.— B. M. Sylvan, 1,879 Prospect 
av, has completed plans for a 1-sty brick garage, 
91x142 ft. on the east side of Prosnect av, 70 ft 
.south of lS2d st, for Davis Levin, 1S,S8 Marmlon 
av. owner and builder. Cost, $18,000, 

3D .^V. — John J, Dunnigan, 394 East 1.50th st. 
has completed nreliminary plans for a 1-sty 
brick earage. 121x127 ft. on the east side of 3d 
av. 109 ft south of 1,«9th st. f"r C. W. Fraser, 
306 West 72d st. owner. Cost, $25,000, 

STORES, OFFTCES AND LOFTS. 

176TH ST.^Wm. Koppe, 2310 Waterbury av, 
has plans in progress for a group nf 1-sty brick 
and stone stores, 100x100 ft, at the northwest 
corner of 176th st and Jerome av for Occi- 
dental Holding Co,, N. Wilson, president, 71 
West 2Sd st, owner. Cost, .'«40,000. Owner will 
take bids on separate contracts about January 
30. 

FORDHAM RD, — Wm. Koppe. 2310 Water- 
bury av, has plans in progress for a group of 
1-stv brick and stone stores on the south side 
nf Fnrdhnm rd. 90 ft west nf Davidson av, fnr 
Occidental Holding Co,, N. Wil=;nn, president, 71 
West ?3d St. owner. Cost. $25 000. Owner will 
t^ke bids on separate contracts about January 
15. 



January 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



5; 



HUNTS POINT RD.— BenJ. Sackhelm, 26 
Court St. Brooklyn, has plans in progress for 
ten 1-sty and basement bricK stores, on plot 
60x160 ft, at the soutbeast corner of Hunts 
Point rd and Wbitlock av for Louis Rosenman, 
owner, care of architect. 

FORDHAM RD.— Wm. Koppe, 2310 Water- 
bury av, has been retained to prepare plans for 
a group ot stores, l:j0.xl3S ft, at the southwest 
corner of Fordham rd and Grand av for Julian 
Kovacs, 245 Ft. Washington av, owner. 

TREMOXT AV.— J. M. Felson, 1133 Broad- 
way, has completed plans for a l-sty brirk store 
and oiEce building, 50x181 ft, on the south side 
of Tremont av, 183 ft east of Morris av, for 
Rothbart Garage Co., Max Rothbart, president, 
131.) Marcy pi, owner and builder. Cost, $35,000. 

THEATRES. 
WEBSTER AV.— S. Walter Katz, 505 5th av, 
has plans in progress for a 2-sty brick theatre, 
on plot 25,000 sq. ft., with stores, on the block 
bounded by Webster and Valentine avs and 
ITSth St for Silmel Holding Corp., 1438 Broad- 
way, owner. Cost, $1,000,000. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
161ST ST.— Jallade, Lindsay & Warren, 12y 
Lexington av, have been retained to prepare 
plans lor a contemplated extension to the brick 
Y. M. C. A. building, on plot 100x139 ft, at the 
southeast corner of 161st st and Elton av for 
Y. M. C. A., City Board of Directors, care of 
Mr. Orne, 2 West 45th st, owner. Cost, 
$250,000. 

Brooklyn 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

OCEAN AV.— Rouse & Goldstone, 512 5th av, 
Manhattan, have completed plans for a 4-sty 
brick apartment, 102x134 ft, on the east side of 
Ocean av, dIo ft north of Parkside av, for Port- 
wood Realty Co., 305 Broadway, Manhattan, 
owner and builder. Cost, $160,000. 

COTTAGE PL.— Seelig & Finkelstein, 44 Court 
st, have plans in progress for six 3-sty brick 
apartments, 20x86 ft, on the east side of Cottage 
pi, 04 ft south of Surf av, for I. & C. Rosen- 
berg, 2248 West 22d st, owners and builders. 
Cost, $90,000. 

PACIFIC ST.— Edw. M. Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin 
av, has plans in progress for a 4-sty brick 
apartment, 60x90 ft, in the south side ot 
Pacific st, 80 ft east ot Saratoga av, tor Abe 
Klein, 149 Peun av, owner and builder. Cost, 
$75,000. 

MONTGOMERY ST.— M. A. Cantor, 373 Pul- 
ton st, has completed plans for two 2-sty brick 
dwellings, 20x60 ft, in the north side of Mont- 
gomery st, 70 It west of Kingston av, for 
Rothschild Mason Worker, Inc., M. Rothcshild, 
president, 632 Saratoga av, owner and builder. 
Total cost, $20,000. 

NEWPORT AV.— A. Farber, 1746 Pitkin av, 
has plans in progress for four 2-sty brick apart- 
ments, 22x63 ft, at the corner of Newport av 
and Amboy st for a corporation now forming, 
owner. Total cost, $110,0u0. 

SUTTER AV.— Edw. M. Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin 
av, has plans in progress for five 2-sty brick 
apartments, 20x65 ft, with stores, at the north- 
east corner of Sutter av and Herzl st for 
Spring-Fox Realty Co., 593 Howard av, owner 
and builder. Total cost, $50,000. 

HEMLOCK ST.— Sbampan & Shampan, 1543 
Flatbush av, have completed plans for a 4-sty 
brick tenement, 40x86 ft, in the west side of 
Hemlock st, 100 ft south of Pitkin av, for Emil 
Reinking, 384 Crescent st, owner and builder. 
Cost, $25,000. 

ALBANY AV. — Shampan H Shampan, 50 Court 
st, have plans In progress for a 4-sty brick 
apartment, 100x110 ft, at the northwest corner 
of Albany av and Crown st for Crown Heights 
Building Corp.. 2002 Douglass st, owner and 
builder. Cost, $175,000. 

6TH ST.— Samuel Cohen, 32 Union sq, Man- 
hattan, has completed plans for a 3-sty brick 
tenement, 20x68 ft, at the northwest corner of 
West 6th st and Av R for Giusseppina Campagna, 
59 New Chambers st, Manhattan, owner. Cost, 
$50,000. 

BANKS. 
COURT ST — McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmeliu, 
1123 Broadway, Manhattan, have plans in prog- 
ress for a bank at the southwest corner of 
Court st and Atlantic av for South Brooklyn 
Savings Institute, 160 Atlantic av, owner. Cost, 
$500,000. Heating and ventilating engineer, 
Meyer, Strong & Jones, 101 Park av, Manhat- 
tan. Vault engineer, F. S. Holmes, 2 Rector st. 
Manhattan. Engineer will take bids on vault 
about March 1. 

CHURCH. 

FOSTER AV.— Hobart B. Upjohn, 456 4th av, 
Manhattan, has plans in progress for a church 
at the corner of Foster av and East 23d st for 
Flatbush Presbyterian Church, Rev. Herbert 
Field, pastor, 657 East 23d st. owner. Cost. 
$!iU,U(iO. Architect will take bids on general 
contract in the spring. 

DWELLINGS. 

WEST END AV.— Edw. M. Adelsohn, 1778 
Pitkin av, has plans in progress tor a 2-sty 
frame and stucco dwelling, 27x50 ft, with garage, 
at the southwest corner of West End av and 



Oriental blvd for Emil Lorber, 13 Garfield court, 
owner and builder. Cost, $15,000. 

71ST ST.— E. M. Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin av, 
has completed plans for fifteen 2-sty brick 
dwellings, 20x57 ft, in the south side of 71st 
st, 72 ft west of 7th av, for K. R. Contracting 
Co., H. Repetsky, president, 221 Union st, 
owner and builder. Cost, $150,000. 

GREENWOOD AV.— Edw. M. Adelsohn, , 1778 
Pitkiri av, has plans in progress for two 2-sty 
brick dwellings, 20x65 ft, at the northeast cor- 
ner of Greenwood av and East 7th st for Joseph 
Dubesther. 065 Dumont av, owner and builder. 
Cost, $20,000. 

BELMONT AV.— Edw. M. Adelsohn, 1778 Pit- 
kin av, has plans in progress for a 2-sty brick 
dwelling, 20x60 ft. with garage, at the north- 
west corner of Belmont av and Warwick st for 
M. Hecht, 517 Miller av, owner and builder. 
Cost, $20,000. 

CROVVN ST.— Edw. M. Adolsohn, 1778 Pitkin 
av, has plans in progress for a 2-sty brick 
dwelling. 20x65 ft. with garage, in the south 
side of Crown st, 120 ft west of Kingston av. 
for H. Shames, 293 Vermont st, owner and 
builder. Cost, $10,000. 

9TH ST.— Wm. C. Winters, 106 Van Siclen av, 
has plans in progress for twenty-eight 2-sty 
brick dwellings. 2ux60 ft, in the east side of 
West 9th st, 120 ft south of Highlawn av, for 
John R. Churlo, 70 Av R, owner and builder. 
Total cost, $300,000. 

lOTH' ST— William C. Winters, 106 Van 
Siclen av, has plans in progress for fourteen 2- 
sty brick dwellings. 20x60 ft, in the west side 
ot West 10th st, 275 ft south of Highlawn av, 
and the east side ot West 10th st, 120 ft south 



ot Highlawn av, for John R. Churlo, 70 Av R, 
owner and builder. Total coat, $168,000. 

BUSHWICK AV.— Wm. C. Winters, 106 Van 
Siclen av, has plans in progress for three 2-str 
brick dwellings, 2ox63 ft, on Bushwick av, near 
Kosciusko st, for Dr, Dticitman, owner, care of 
architect. Total cost, $.36,000. 

NARROWS AV.— Beuj. B. Lowe, 573 Clinton 
st, has plans in progress for a 2y2-sty brick 
dwelling, 32x35 ft, at the corner of Narrows av 
and Slst st for owner, care of architect. Cost, 
$40,000. 

PRESIDENT ST.— McCarthy & Kelly, 16 
Court st, have completed plans for a 2-sty brick 
dwelling, 24x55 ft, at the southwest corner of 
President st and Albany av tor Stanson Build- 
ing Co., Inc.. Chas. I. Mandel, president, 136 
Broadway, owner and builder. Cost, $15,000. 
FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

lOTH ST.— Chas. M. Spindler, 26 Court st, 
has plans in progress for a 3-sty brick storage 
and warehouse building, 160x200 ft, in 19th st, 
through to 20th st, 60<.) ft west of 3d av, for 
Callan Bros., Inc., 19th st and Gowanus Bay, 
owner. Cost. $75,000. General contract will be 
awarded without competition. 

IdTH ST.— S. Barclay MacDonald. 1630 Surf 
av, has completed plans for a 2-sty brick fac- 
tory. 40x108 ft. with dwelling, in the west side 
of West 15th st, 440 ft north of Neptune av, for 
Harry Gleicher, 2992 West 31st st, owner. Cost, 
$20.o00. Owner will take bids on general con- 
tract. 

14TH AV.— Chas. P. Cannella, 1163 Herkimer 
Kt. has plans in progress for a 3-sty brick fac- 
tory, 30x90 ft, on the east side ot 14th av, 40 ft 
south of 64th st, for Vincenzo LaBarberta, 6405 



i6oo Horsepower 
3000 Lamps 

The new building of the Herald Square 
Press Building Corporation at 313-21 
West 37th Street will be occupied by 
several large printing establishments 

Edison Service will be used throughout 
the building both for lighting and power 
purposes. The electrical installation calls 
for 3000 lamps and 1600 horsepower 



Architects: Schwartz & Gross 
Wiring Contractor : S W Horowitz 



354 Fifth Ave 
313 Clinton Ave, Bronx 



Big Bui/dings Use Edison Service 

The New York Edison Company 

t/^/ Tour Service 
Irving Place and Fifteenth Street 

Telephone Stuyvesant 5600 





.58 



14th av, owner.. Cost, $25,000. Owner will 
take bids on general contract. 

BUTLcR ST.— Frank Quimby, 110 William st. 
Manhattan, has plans in progress for alterations 
to the 5-sty brick factory at 306-8 Butler st for 
K. & O. Co., Inc., E. Oldendusch, president, 
owner, on premises. 

Queens 

DWELLINGS, 

LOXG ISLAND CITY, L. I,— John Boese, 280 
Broadway, Manhattan, has completed plans for 
a 2V2-sty brick dwelling, 23x40 ft, on the west 
side of 1st av, 166 ft north of Jamaica av, L. 1. 
City, for Mrs. Jos. W. McKenna, 495 1st av, 
Manhattan, owner. Cost, .$10,000. 

ROCKAWAY PARK, L. I.— H. Hohauser, 
Rockaway Park, has plans in progress for a 2- 
sty frame dwelling. 24x56 ft, on Bayside dr. be- 
tween 110th and 120th sts, Rockaway Park, for 
Mrs. M. Kiernan, owner, care of architect. 
Cost, $14,000. 

FAR ROCKAWAY, L. I.— H. Hohauser, Rock- 
away Park, has plans in progress for a 2-sty 
stucco dwelling, 24x38 ft, on Mott av. Far Rock- 
away, for B. Friedman, 8403 Boulevard, Rock- 
away Beach owner. Cost, $13,000. Owner will 
take bids on general contract about January 17. 

KEW GARDENS, L. I.— R. F. Schirmer, Wood- 
haven, has plans in progress for a 2-sty hollow 
tile and stucco dwelling. 34x46 ft, at Kew Gar- 
dens for Mr. Wunsch. owner and builder, care 
of architect. Cost, $15,000. 

Westchester 

BANKS. 

SCARSDALE, N. Y.— Schultz & Weaver, IT 
East 49th st, Manhattan, have plans in progress 
for a 4-sty brick and limestone bank, about 
SO,0fM> sq. ft., with store and apartments, on 
Popham Block, Scarsdale, for syndicate identi- 
fied with Scarsdale National Bank. Rush Wilson, 
president, Scarsdale, owner. Cost, $150,000. 
Architect will take bids on general contract 
about January 20. 

DWELLINGS. 

SCARSDALE, N. Y.— Plans have been pre- 
pared privately tor three contemplated 2iA-sty 
frame, brick and stucco dwellings, 26x40 ft, on 
Heathcote rd. Scarsdale, for Heathcote Land 
Corp.. Scarsdale, owner and builder. Cost, 
$20,000 each. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y.— D. A. Summo, 280 
Huguenot st. New Rochelle, has been retained 
to prepare plans for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 
20x36 ft, on Coligne av. New Rochelle, for 
Joseph Girardi,' owner, care of architect. Cost, 
$8,000. 

NEW ROCHELLE. N. Y.— A. Sundberg, 236 
Huguenot st. New Rochelle, has completed plans 
for a 2%-sty frame and stucco dwelling, 24x49 
ft, on Argyle av. New Rochelle, for owner, to 
be announced later. Cost, $8,500. Owner will 
take bids on general contract, 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y.— D. A. Summo, 280 
Huguenot st. New Rochelle, has been retained 
to prepare plans for a 2-sty frame and stucco 
dwelling. 24x56 ft, in Walnut st. New Rochelle, 
for Joseph Russillo, owner, care of architect. 
Cost, $10,000. 

RYE, N. Y. — Wm. Dewsnap, 334 5th av, Man- 
hattan, has plans in progress for a 2^-sty 
brick and frame dwelling, 40x,56 ft, with garage, 
at the northeast corner of Forest av and Rye 
Beach rd. Rye, for Fred Ponty, 17 North Main 
st, Portchester, owner. Architect will take bids 
on separate contracts about January 15. 

THEATRES. 
NEW ROCHELLE. N. Y.— Laurence M. Loeb, 
.57 Lawton st. New Rochelle, has plans in prog- 
ress for a 2-sty brick and steel moving picture 
theatre, 100x100 ft, with stores and studios, at 
the corner of North and Horton avs. New 
Rochelle, for George Neiman. 522 5th av, Man- 
hattan, owner- Cost, $100,000. Architect will 
take bids. 



New Jersey 



APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

LEONIA. N. J.— Hacker & Hacker, Palisades, 
have completed plans for two o-sty and base- 
ment brick and limestone apartments at the 
northwest corner of Christie st and Broad av, 
Leonia, for John Hovd, 207 Christie st, Leonia. 
owner. Cost, $100,000 each. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

NEWARK, N. J.— Daniel J. Scrocco, 185 
Market st, Newark, has plans in progress for a 
4-sty common and tapestry brick apartment, 
."lOxlOO ft, at 079-681 North Sth st, Newark, for 
D'Amblo Bros., 674 North Sth st, Newark, 
owner. Cost, $60,000. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Daniel J. Scrocco, 185 
Market st, Newark, has completed plans for 
three 2-sty frame and clapboard flats, 44.x55 ft, 
at the corner of Clinton pi and Wolcott terrace. 
Newark, for Niagara Construction Corp., Sam- 
uel Rehr. president, owner and builder, care of 
architect. Cost, $16,000 each. 

BELLEVILLE. N. J.— Jas. V. Thetford, 
Bremond st, Belleville, has completed plans for 
a 3-sty common and face brick, limestone and 
stucco fiat, 59x50 ft. with stores, at the south- 
east corner of Washington and Overlook avs, 
Belleville, for Thos. W. Reilley, Belmont st, 
Belleville, owner and builder. Cost, .$30,000. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Nathan Stegler, 164 Market 
st, Newark, has completed plans for a 3-sty 
frame, clapboard and shingle flat, 24x61x57 ft, 
at the northeast corner of Wolcott terrace and 
Patten pi, Newark, for Star Construction Co., 
403 Littleton av, Newark, owner and builder. 
Cost, .$20,000. 

BANKS. 

NEWARK, N. J. — Holmes & Winslow. 134 
Bast 44th st, Manhattan, have plans in progress 
for a 1-sty brick and limestone bank building. 
50x89 ft. at 221 Clinton st, Newark, for Wee- 
quahic Trust Co., R. L. Strickland, president, 
owner, care of architect. Cost, $75,000. 
DWELLINGS. 

NEWARK, N. J.— J. B. Acocella, Union Bldg., 
Newark, has completed plans for a 2V.-sty frame 
and clapboard dwelling, 22x44 ft,' at 13-13 
Schuyler av. Newark, for Helen Witten, Morris 
av. Union Township, owner and builder. Cost, 
$10,000. 

HILLSDALE. X. J.— Harold E. Paddon, 280 
Madison av, Manhattan, has been retained to 
prepare plans for a li/a-sty stucco on terra cotta 
blocks parish house of irregular dimensions at 
H-illsdale for Holy Trinity Church, Hillsdale, 
owner. Architect will probably take bids on 
general contract about March 1. 

BLOOMFIELD. X. J.— Fred L. Pierson, 160 
Bloomfield av, Bloomfleld, has completed plans 
for a 2M:-sty frame dwelling, 22.\28 ft, at 127 
Berkeley av, Bloomfleld, for Chas. Lucas, Broad 
st, Bloomfield, owner and builder. Cost, $6,.50O. 

ASBURY PARK. N. J.— Arthur F. Cottrell, 
Kinmouth Bldg.. Asbury Park, has plans in 
progress for a 2i2-sty frame and clapboard 
dwelling, 28x32 ft, with garage, at the south- 
west corner of 1st av and Heck st. Asbury Park, 
for Arthur Britwoods, Home Construction Co., 
224 Main st, Asbury Park, owner. Cost, $15,000. 
HALLS AND CLUBS. 

BLOOMFIELD, N. J.— Fred L. Pierson, 160 
Bloomfield av. Bloomfield. has plans in progress 
for a 2-sty brick and hollow tile club house, 
60x100 ft, on Myrtle av, Bloomfleld. for Polish 
National Home, 40 Myrtle av, Bloomfield, owner. 
Cost, $25,000. 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Frank Grad. 245 Springfield 
av, Newark, has completed preliminary plahs 
for_a 6-sty brick and limestone office building 
at 5-7 Belmont av. corher Court st, Newark, for 
Federal Loan Corp.. 15 Belmont av, Newark 
owner. ' , ' 

ELIZABETH. N. J — Wm. E. Lehman. 738 
Broad st, Newark, has completed plans for an 
addition to the' 3-sty brick and limestone de- 
partment store at 104 Broad st. Elizabeth for 
Goerke Kirch Co.. Rudolph Goerke, president, 
1 01 Broad st, Newark, owner. Cost, $150,000- 



January 14, 1922 



CONTRACTS AV/ARDED. 

All items following refer to general 
contracLS. e:.CLpt t.iose ii.arl.ed s-b. " 



APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

BRONXVILLE, N. Y.— Hegeman & Harris. 185 
Madison av. Manhattan, have the general con- 
tract for six 3-sty brick and stucco apartments, 
411x130 ft each, on the north side of Palmer av, 
between Bronx parkway and Bronxville rd, 
Bronxville, for Joint Ownership Construction 
Co., Fredk. Culver, president, 342 Madison av, 
Manhattan, owner, from plans by Mann & Mac- 
Neille, 70 East 45th st. Manhattan, architect. 
Cost. $750,000. 



HECLA IRON WORKS 



ESTABU8BED 187* 



Architectural Bronze and Iron Work 



Office, 118 North 11th Street 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



BANKS. 
MANHATTAN. — Thompson Starrett Co., 49 
Wall st, has the general contract for a 1-sty 
brick and stone bank building at the north- 
east corner of Canal and Varick sts for Corn 
Exchange Bank. Mr. Brown, vice-president, 13 
William st, owner, from T)lans by Alfred Fell- 
heimer and Stewart Wagner, 7 East 42d st, 
architects. 

CHURCHES. 

MANHATTAN.— Thos. O'Reilly & Son, 17 
East 49th st, have completed plans for alter- 
ations to the 1-sty brick church, 136x290 ft, at 
1011-118 West 60th st for Church of the Paulist 
Fathers, Rev. Father Thos. F. Burke, superior, 
lOD-llS West 60th st, owner, from plans by 
Warren W. Chapin, .347 Madison av, consulting 
engineer. Cost. $60,000. 

NEW BRIGHTON, S. I.— Niewenhous Co., 316 
East 161st st, Manhattan, has the general con- 
tract for a 1-sty and basement brick and con- 
crete Catholic church, 35x100 ft, at 110 Brighton 
av, corner of Webster av. New Brighton, for 
Church of Assumption, Rev. Father Crisci, rec- 
tor, owner, on premises, from plans by P. R. 
Henkel. 316 East 161st st, Manhattan, archi- 
tect. 

DWELLINGS. 

LONG ISLAND CITY. L. I.— T. C. Desmond & 
Co.. 26 Beaver st, Manhattan, has the general 
contract for forty brick dwellings at Queens 
hlvd and Heister st, L. I. City, for Bliss Street 
Reality Co., Bryan L. Kennelly, president, 149 
Broadway, Manhattan, owner, from plans by 
Herbert Lucas, 117 East 60th st, Manhattan 
architect. Total cost. $.340,000. 

HOLLIS, L. I.— E. P. Townsend. Choctaw av, 
Hollis. has plans in progress for two 2-sty frame 
and stucco dwellings. 24x50 ft, at the northwest 
corner of Smith st and Luzerne av, Hollis, 
for owner, care of general contractor, from 
plans prepared privately. Cost, $10,000 each. 

JAMAICA, L. I.— H. R. Williams, Queens, has 
the general contract for a 2-sty frame and 
stucco dwelling. 20x.50, on the east side of 
Hillcrest av. 224 ft south of Hyland av. Ja- 
maica, tor H. Francis, care of F. R. Smith Co., 
New York av. Jamaica, owner, from plans by 
H. T. Jeffrey, Jr.. 309 Fulton st. Jamaica, archi- 
tect. Cost, $20,000. 

ROCKAWAY PARK. L. I.— J. Peterson, 214 
Norris av, Jamaica, has the general contract for 
a 2-sty frame and stucco dwelling, 28x46 ft, on 
Newport av, between 123d and 124th sts, Rock- 
away Park, for F. Shanley. Beach S2d St. Rock- 
away Beach, owner, from plans by H. Hohauser 
Rockaway Park, architect. Cost, $12,000. 

BRADLEY BEACH. N. J— Henry P. Gant 
Bradley Beach, has the general contract for a 
2V2-sty frame dwelling. 28x.30 ft. with garage, 
at 302 La Reine av, Bradley Beach, for Mrs. 
Lena Levinson. Bradley Beach, owner, from 
plans by Harold D. Steward, Bradley Beach 
architect. Cost. $10,000. 

GLEN COVE. L. I.— G. Richard Davis. 30 East 
42d St. Manhattan, has the general contract for 
alterations and an addition to the 2','i-sty frame 
and clapboard dwelling, of irregular dimensions 
at Glen Cove for I. Sanger. Glen Cove, owner' 
from plans by Tachau & Vougt. 109 Lexington 
av. Manhattan, architects. Cost, $15,000. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 
MANHATTAN.— Cauldwell Wingate Co.. 381 
4th av. has the general contract for a 2-sty 
brick factory, 27x95 ft. in the north side of 
144th st, 347 east of Park av. for Mouritz F 
Westergren. 213 East 144th st. owner, from plans 
by Phil H. Gabel. 381 4th av. architect. Cost. 
$1 1 .500. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, L. I.— Levering & Gar- 
rigues Co., ,5.52 West 23d st. Manhattan, has the 
.general contract for a 2-sty brick manufactur- 
ing building. .50x100 ft. at the southeast corner 
•of Bodine and Hamilton sts, L. I. City, for Egan 
* Hausman. 476 Clinton av. Brooklyn, owners 
from plans prepared privately. Cost. .$20,000. 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 
. MANHATTAN.— Chas Money. Inc., 241 West 
36th st, has the general contract for alterations 
f" the 3-sty brick ofBce building, 37x50 ft at 
2.32-.34 West 37th st for McCall Co. Wm ' B 
Warner, president. 236 West 37th st. owner from 
plans by C. Aubrey Jackson, 243 West 36th st, 
architect. Cost, .$40,000. 

BRONX.— Max Just. 4925 Broadway, has the 
general contract for a group of 1-stv brick and 
stone stores, 115x70 ft. at the southeast corner 
of Ifiith st and River av for Amanda Manee and 
Mary L. Walker. 1(1 Broadwav. owners from 
plans bv Mnnre * Lan-'siedel. 14Sth st and 3d 
av, architects. Cost. $17,000. 

MISCELLA NEOUS. 
ST. GEORGE. S. T— Frank J. Dougherty. 1.86 
Washington st. Manhattan, has the general con- 
tract for a 3-sty and basement, stone and terra 
c^tta station house. ,82xlno ft, with prison, ,-' 
th" corner of Richmond terrace and Wall st 
'P6fh Precinct Hdq.1, St. George, for Citv of 
M„w York. Denartment nf Police. Richard V. 
Fnright. commissioner. 240 Centre st. Manhat- 
tan, ownor, from nlnns bv James J Whitford 
S<.iten Islander Bide:.. St. Genrse .irchifoct' 
Coot, .f.nooooo. Heafintr, John Bradv, 210 East 
3.«th St. Manhatf.in Plunibin<r. Altni.nn Plumb- 
ing Co., 219 East 2.5th st, Manhattan. 



January 14, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



59 



A SIGN POST 
OF SAFETY 

The record of S. VV. Straus & 
Co., now 40 years without loss 
to any investor, is a sign post 
pointing the way to safe Janu- 
ary investments. 

Our booklet, "Common Sense 
in Investing Money," tells the 
reasons for this record and 
shows how investors may profit 
by it. Write for it today, and 
specify 

Booklet A-\2Q2 

S.W . STRAUS & CO. 

Established 1882 Incorporated 

STRAUS BUILDING 
565 Fifth Ave., at 46th St., NEW YORK 

Offices in 15 Principal Cities 
Telephone^ TanderMlt 8500 

40 Years Without Loss 
to Any Investor 



Copyright, 1022, by S. W. Straus if Co. 



SHADES, AWNINGS 
AND CANOPIES 

47 years in making window shades, awn- 
ings, canopies, etc., has placed us in a 
position where we can guarantee satis- 
faction. 

Agent and owner alike find our service 
prompt, quality fully satisfactory, and 
workmanship of the best. 
Estimates cheerfully supplied, without 
obligation to owners, agents, etc. 



F. J. KLOES 

Established 1872 

243 Canal St., New York 

Telephone: Franklin 2216 




H. W. BELL CO. 

Gypsum Blocks 
Terra Cotta Blocks 

Plaster Boards 

Dumbwaiter Blocks 

Flue Pipe 

Firebrick 

Park Ave. & 139th St. 

Phone — Mott Haven 3134 

BROOKLYN 

KENT AVENUE & MORTON STREET 



BUILDERS 

LITTLE CASH REQUIRED 

We can subonlinate entire purchase price of sev- 
eral well-Iocatetl r'ots and obtain liberal building 
and permanent loans. 

S. Osgood Pell& Co. '%f!. l^anr^biit^Va'-.o'*- 



ARCHITECT 

A. J. SIMBERG 

1133 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 
Phone: Watkins 8832 



PLANS FILED FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION 
IN ALL BOROUGHS OF NEW YORK CITY 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

lOSlTH ST, 10-21 E, 6-sty bk tnt, 50x86, slag 
T-r ; .flOO.OilO; (0) Morris & Harry Michelson ; 
la) Gronenberg & LeucUtag, 4."iD -Itli ac (6). 
STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

UNION SQ, E, 14-lS, remove walls, new cop- 
per store fronts, beams, in 6-sty bk stores & 
Hotel; .$5,000: (o) Jos Kerns & Geo Amron, 
Holel Marlborough; (a) B. H. & C. N. Whin- 
ston. 2 Columbus Circle (38). 

)3TH ST, 122 E. 2-sty bk power house, 25x 
103. tile rf ; .$75,000; (o) The N. Y. Edison Co., 
130 E 15th ; (a) Wm. Whitehill, Buckley New- 
hall Co.. 41st and 6th av (8). 

107TH ST, 201, E. remove toilets, new toilets, 
dress rooms in 6-sty bk factory; $800; (o) 
Chas. E. McManus, 45 B 42d ; (a) Zipkes, Wolff 
* Kudroff, 432 4th av (39). 

BROADWAY. 150S-70. 4-sty bk strs, restau- 
rant & ofilces ; .$60,000; (o) Lloyd Rlty. Co., 44 
W 18th; (a| Louis A. Abramson, 48 W 46th 
(10). 

1ST AV. 2.57, remove partitions, extend ex- 
tension on 4-sty bk tnt & stores; $1,500; (ol 
Edgerton L. Winthrop. 100 E 91st; (a) Henry 
Klein. 505 E 15th (37). 

7TH AV, 710, 7-sty bk stores and offices, 25x 
79, tar, felt & rubberoid rf ; $100,000; (o) 719 
7th Av Corp., 880 Bway ; (a) B. H. & C. X. 
Whinston, 2 Columbus Circle (7), 

STORES AND TENEMENTS. 

BROADWAY, 24S0-S8. 15-sty f. p. strs, doc- 
tors' ofHces apts, 100x165, rubberoid rf ; .$1,500,- 
(100; (o) Lucania Rlty. Corp., 200 W 72d ; (a) 
Rosario Candela. 200 W 72d (9). 

Bronx 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

CROTONA PARK N, n s, 95 w Marmlon av, 
5-sty bk tnt. .50x.S8. slag rf ; $70,009; (o) Bes- 
sie Miller, 1817 Mohegan av ; (a) Chas. Schae- 
fer, Jr., .394 E 150th (35). 

GRAND AV, nee ISOth, 6-sty bk tnt, lOOx 
M, slag rf ; $150,000; (o) Val Constn. Co., 
Gustav Halpern. 311 Bway. pres. ; (a,) Chas- 
Kreymborg, 2534 Marion av (49). 

KINGSBRIDGE ROAD, w s. 275 n Kings- 
bridge ter, 2-5-sty bk tnts, 75x82.8. slag rf ; 
$260,000; lo) Michael Herman, Inc., Michael 
Herman, 277 Bway, pres. ; (a) Murice -Cour- 
land, 47 W .34 (47). 

KINGSBRIDGE RD. w s, 200 n Kingsbridge 
ter, 5-sty bk tnt. 75x92.8, slag rf ; $130,000; 
(o) Michael Herrman, Inc., Michael Herrman. 
277 Bway, pres. ; (a) Maurice Courland, 47 W 
.'14 (48). 

MORRIS AV. w s, 22 n 184th, 5-sty bk tnt, 
114x84.7, plastic slate rf ; $200,000; (o) Mar- 
cus Buda Constn. Co.. Max Marcus. 1800 Lex- 
ington av, pres.: )a) David S. Lang, 110 W 
34 (51). 

SHAKESPEARE AV, e s, 301.28 n 172d. 4-sty 
bk tnt. 40.2x64.2, slag rf ; $35,000; (o) Donna 
Bldg. Co., Albert Picciotta, 2754 Crotona av, 
Pres.; (a) M. W. Del Gaudio, 158 W 45th (5). 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS. 
SOUND VIEW AV. sec Theriot av, 1-sty fr 
school. .108x57, comp rf ; $16,000; (o) City of 
New York; (a) C. M. Morgan, 529 Courtlandt 
av (2775). 

DWELLINGS. ■ 

COSTER ST, e s, 275 n Spofford av, 2iA-stv 
bk dwg, 25x33, 2-sty bk dwg, 22x51, 1-sty bk 
garage. 18x18. shingle rf ; .$27,000: (o) S. Jar- 
vitz. .'■'.89 Hunts Point av ; (a) J. J. Gloster, 110 
W 40lh (32). 

EASTCHESTER RD, w s, 151.4 n Waring av. 
2-sty t. c dwg. 30x29. asbestos shingle rf ; .$5.- 
000; (o & a) Edw. D. Moeslein, 163 Lafayette 
av. BUlyn (27). 

FIELDSTONE RD. w s. 129 n 246th, 2V.-sty 
fr dwg. (!Sx2n. shingle rf ; $25,000; (o) A. D. 
Mayo. Yonkers, N. Y. ; (a) W. S. Phillips, 1.37 
K 43d (36). 

GUN HILL RD. n s, 50 e Paulding av, 1-stv 
bk dwg, 21x48, plastic slate rf; .$6,000; (ol 
Caetano Cougfalost. 2-357 Crotona av ; (a) Prank 
J. Ross. 2276 Hughes av (2562). 

GUN HILL RD, n s, 250 e Paulding av, 1- 
Rty bk dwg. 21x48. plastic slate rf ; .'fe.OOO : (o) 
Elise De Marco, 2409 Beaumont av ; (a) Frank 
J. Ross, 2276 Hughes av (2561). 

ODELL ST. s 3. .50 e Archer av, 2-sty fr dwg 
17x30. tar & gravel rf ; $4..500 ; (o) Herbert 
Wittger. 4267 Boston rd ; (a) O. H. Spin, 1233 
Theroit av (14). 

nOCIIELLE ST. n s. 360 w City Island av. 
'J-sty fr dwg. 17x34, shingle rf ; .$6..5()0 ; (o) 
Harry Westoott, 350 E 1.39th; (a) B. A. Lyslde, 
'J6.S5 Briggs av (19). 



SCHOFIELD ST. s s, .300 e City Island av, 
2-sty fr dwg, 21x28, shingle rf ; $4,100; (o) 
Robt. Lee, 351 City Island av ; (a) M. A. Buck- 
ley. 32 Westchester ^q (16). 

SCOTT PL, s w c EdWon av. 1-stv fr dwg 20x 
30. asphalt shingle rf ;' $4,500 : (o) John H. 
Bromiley. 1CC2 Holland av ; (a) Anton Firner, 
2069 Westchester av (26). 

212TH ST, n s, 45 e' White Plains av, 3-sty 
bk dwg, 21X.53, slag rf ; $10,000; (o) Chas. 
Bertone. 838 E 214th; (a) M. W. Del Gaudio, 
158 W 45th (7). 

217T HST E, 2.30.9 e White Plains av, 2%- 
sty fr dwg, 22x.50, shingle r£ ; $15,000; (o) 
Mildred Bonavice, 727 E 217th; (a) H. Nord- 
heim, 726 E 234th (9). 

22STH ST, s s, 85.01 e Paulding av, 4-2-sty 
concrete dwgs, 24x55, shingle rf ; $.38,000- (o) 
Upper Bronx Home Corp.. Wm. Ufland, 51 
Chambers, Treas ; (a) Kingsley Lloyd, Mamaro- 
neck, N. Y. (13),: 

229TH ST B, ' n s, 1.55 w Bronxwood av, 2- 
sty bk dwg, 22x44.8, rubberoid rf ; $8,000; (o) 
Michael Morra;: S.'iS , E US; (a) Delli Penna & 
Erickson, 289 E .149 (46). 

CLARENCE AV, e s, 75 n Randall av, 1%- 
sty fr dwg. 17x40. asphalt shingle rf ; $3,500; 
(0 & a) Nathan Aronowitz, 4485 3 av (54). 

CLARENCE AV. e s, 20 n Randall av, 1%. 
sty fr dwg. 17x40, asphalt shingle rf ; $3,500; 
(0 & a) Nathan Aronowitz. 4485 3 av (52). 

CLARENCE_AV. e s. 100 n Randall av, IV^- 
sty fr dwg. Iix40. asphalt shingle rf ; .$3,500; 
(o & a) .Nathan Aronowitz, 4485 3 av (53). 

CONTINENTAL AV, e s, 165 s 196th, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 17.3x47.0, asbestos shingle rf ; .$5,000; 
(o) Lena Wagner. 1166 Forest av ; (a) Harry 
Schuler. 1005 Edison av (17). 

FARADAY AV. n s. 223 w Newton av, 2-sty fr 
dwg. 25x28, shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) Mrs. Prank 
C. Fleris, 167 W 231st; (a) Frank C. Flerls. 
597 5 av (2). 

PENTON AV, e s, 100 n Arnow av, 2-sty i- 
dwg, 21x42, rubberoid rt ; $8,500 ; (o) John 
Brennan, 420 W 56th ; (a) M. A. Buckley, 32 
Westchester sq (2573). 

FBNTON AV, w 3, .3.50 n Waring av, 1-sty fr 
dwg, 25.3x32. tar rf ; $2,500; (o) Pred Sieveets, 
2327 Eastchester rd ; (a) Pranz Wolfgang, 535 E 
Tremont av (2731). 

GILLESPIE AV. n e c La Salle av, 2%-sty 
fr dwg, 21x25, shingle rf, $8,000; (o) Edna 
Carlson, 133 Alexander av : (a) Moore & Land- 
seidel, 3 av & 14Sth (2497). 

GLEASON AV. s s. 50 E St Laurence av, 1%- 
sty fr dwg, 21x36; asphalt shingle rf ; $5,000; 
(o) Nils E. Erickson. 501 W 41st st ; (a) An- 
ton- Pirner, 2069 Westchester av (2449). 

GROSVBNOR AV. e s. 551.11 n 246th st, 2%- 
sty fr dwg. 41.2x25.2, shingle rf ; $18,000; (o) 
A. E. Whalen, 702 W 181st st; (a) Jultus 
Gregory. 56 W 45th st (2638). 

GUNTHER AV. e s, 600 s Nereid av, 3-1%- 
sty fr dwgs. 23x.S6, shingle rf ; $12,000; (o) 
Hermustadt & Borman, 1051 Forest av ; (a) 
Chas. H. Hermustadt. 1051 Forest av (2524). 

LUDLOW AV, n s, 194.44 e Castle Hill av, 
2-sty fr dwg. 22x31. 1-sty fr garage. 12xl», 
asphalt shingle rf ; $0,500; (o) Eric Lundsten, 
2143 Hermany av ; (a) Anton Pirner, 2069 
Westchester av (8). 

MAYFLOWER AV. w s. 175.11 n Waterbury 
av. 1-sty fr dwg. 20x30. shingle rf ; .$3,000 : (o) 
John Petrokorosky. 1442 Edwards av ; (a) Emil 
Stauffer. 3004 Barkley av (44). 

MINNIEFORD AV, e s, 175.10 n Sutherland 
av. 2-sty fr dwg. 16x44.2. shingle rt ; $3,600; (0) 
Herman Cohen. 1350 Wilkins av ; (a) Arthur 
Eisemann. 212 E 21st (38). 

MURDOCK AV, e s. 190 n Strang av. 2-sty fr 
dwg. 19.4.\31.10, tin rf ; $7,000; (o) Jos. Vis- 
hart, 419 E 6Sth : (a) L. A. Sheinart, 194 Bow- 
ery (24). 

MURDOCK AV. w s. 125 s Nereid av, 2H-sty 
fr dwg, 24x42, asphalt rf : $9,000; (o) Geo. C. 
Maas. 20SS Lem^ine av. Fort Lee, N. J. ; (a) 
Chas. S. Clark. 441 Tremont av (18). 

NEFDHAM AV. s s. 271.43 e Eastchester rd, 
2-sty h. t. dwg. 20x43, slag rt ; $8,500; (o) An- 
tonio Ceretta. 1468 Nendham av ; (a) M. W. Del 
Gaudio. 158 W 45th (6). 

■ QITIMBY AV, n s, 140 e Olmsfead av. 2-sty 
fr dwg. 19x38, nsnhnlf shinEle rt ; $6,000; (o) 
Chas. Plock. 173 Beach 110th. Rockaway Park; 
(a) Anton Pirner. 2009 Westchester av (25). 

QUINCY AV. s s, 260 w Lafayette av, 2-sty 
bk dwg, .35X.50. shingle rf ; $7,000; (o) Israel 
Kleinman, 6.36 E 169th ; (a) Thos. A. Ryder, 
534 Concord av (15). 

SETON AV. e a. 200 s Strong av, 2^-sty fr 
dwg, 21.6x49.6, shingle rf ; $10,000; (o)' Oscar 
Anderson. 623 E 141st; (a) Jonasson & Jorger, 
1.5.32 Overlng (2519). 



« JJ 

SEYMOUR AV, e s, 285 n Hammersly av, a- 
Bty £r dwg, 18x30, rubberoid rf ; $4,000 ; (o) 
Helen M. Shary, 369 B 207Ui ; (a) Wm. Shary, 
41 Union sq (2726). 

SEYMOUR AV, e 8, 225 n Arnow av, 2-8ty 
hollow tile dwg, 22x40, rubberoid rf ; $6,000 ; 
(0) Barney De Rosa, 856 2 av ; (a) A. D. Bar- 
tholomew, 3813 White Plains av (2715). 

SEYMOUR AV, w s, 275 n Allerton av, 2-sty 
and attic tr dwg, 28x30, shingle rt ; $5,U00 ; (o; 
Fred Haberstroh, 764a Quincy st. Bklyn ; (a) 
F. E. Albrecht, 764a Quincy st, Bklyn (2635). 
SEYMOUR AV, e s, 425 n Waring av, IVz-sty 
fr dwg, 17x31.6, slate rt ; $2,UU0 ; (o) Thos. 
Sheehan, 1 E Fordham rd ; (a) The Pelham 
Co., 1 E Fordham rd (2656). 

SEYMOUR AV, w s. 100 s Astor av. 2-2-sty 
fr dwgs, 10x33, asphalt shingle r£ ; $8,000; (oj 
Gustav Schwarz, 415 W 128th ; (a) A. F. Meis- 
ner, 44 7S)th, Woodhaven, L. I. (2000). 

SOUND VIEW AV, e s, 28.5% n Patterson 
av, 2 2-sty bk dwgs, 23.10x56.4, plastic slate rt ; 
$20,000; (o) Daniel Murray, 1 E Fordham rd ; 
(a) The Pelham Co., 1 B Fordham rd (2533). 

SOUND VIEW AV, n s, 100 E King av, 1-sty 
fr dwg, 2Gy.xuO; shingle rt ; $4,500; (o) Eliz. 
M. Robitzik, 098 Tinton av ; (a) E. A. Lynde, 
2685 Briggs av (2465). 

SOUTHER.X BLVD. w s, U.2 n ISlst, 2-2-sty 
bk dwgs & garages, 22.6.x36, 23.6x:j6, slag rf ; 
$11,800; (ol Leware Realty Corp.. Davis Levine, 
11888 Marmion av. Pres ; (a) B. M. Sylvan, 
1870 Prospect av (21). 

SPENCER AV, e s, 175 n 260th, 2-sty bk dwg, 
21x55, slag rt ; $10,000; (o) Salvatore Soraci, 
327 E 113th; (a) M. W. Del Gaudio. 158 W 
45th (2620). 

SPENCER AV, w s, 100 n 262d, 2-sty fr dwg, 
20.\.36, shingle rf. $7,00<J ; (o) Elsie Forsyth, 00 
Saratoga av, Yonkers, N. Y. ; (a) Wm. P. Katz, 
4 Hudson st, Yonkers, N. Y. (2495). 

STILWELL AV, e s, 100 n Saratoga av, 2- 
sty fr dwg, 21x55, slag rt ; $8,000; (o) Monaco 
& Esposito, 3094 Villa av ; (a) M. W. Del 
Gaudio, 158 W 45th (2621). 

STRANG AV, n s, 103.8 w Pratt av, 1-sty fr 
dwg, 20x42, shingle rt ; $4,200; (o) Thos. Berry, 
2031 Ellis av; (a) Edw. J. Staufter, 140 Willis 
av (2702). 

STUEBEN AV, e s, 125 n 208th, 2-sty fr dwg 
& garage, 22x63, asbestos shingle rf ; $12,000 ; 
(o) Francis Collin, 349 E 42d ; (a) Eisendrath 
& Horowitz, 18 E 4l3t (2590). 

TEUTON AV, e s, 100 n Arnow av, 1-sty fr 
dwg. 21x:jS. rubberoid rf ; $5,000; (o) Jennie 
Brennan, 32 Westchester Sq ; (a) M. A. Buck- 
ley, 32 Westchester Sq (2538). 

THERIOT AV, e s, 120 s 177th, 2-sty bk dwg, 
20x50, tin rf ; $12,000; (o) Sylvester Wissing, 
2110 Mohegan av ; (a) Franz Wolfgang, 535 E 
Tremont av (2730). 

THERIOT AV, e s, 100 n Gleason av, 2-sty 
br dwg, 30x44, shingle rf ; $10,000; (o) A. 
Leverie, 136"i Lyman pi; (a) T. Ratner, 2341 
Webster av (2687). 

TIBBETT AV. w s, 175 n 232d, 1-sty tr dwg, 
24x34, rubberoid rf ; $2,000; (o) John O'Hara, 
231st & Riverdale av ; (a) Wm. Shary, 22 E 
17th (2676). 

TREMONT AV, e s, 68 s Otis av, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 20x40, tile shingle rf ; $7,000; (o) Mary 
Tremble, Rockaway, L. I.; (a) Carl J. Itzel, 
1365 Prospect av (2660). 

TREMONT AV, e s, 202.7 s Philip av, 2-aty fr 
dwg, 22x45, asphalt shingle rt ; $10,000 ; (o) 
John L. Behlert, 623 Meade; (a) Robt. Ran- 
dolph, 100 Lexington av (2512). 

TREMONT AV, e s, 101.03 s Philip av, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 20x50, plastic slate rf ; $6,500; (o) Mary 
Szato. 315 E 81st; (a) M. A. Cardo, 61 Bible 
House (2527). 

TREMONT AV, sec Greene pl, 1%-sty fr 
dwg, 38x34, 1-sty tr garage, 30x17, asbestos 
shingle rf; $5,000; (o) Anna A. Hoffman, Tre- 
mont av & Eastern blvd ; (a) Anton Plrner, 2069 
Westchester av (2518). 

TREMONT AV, e s, 100 s Eastern blvd, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 19x34, shingle rf ; $4,000; (o) E. A. 
and J. E. Lynde. 2685 Briggs av ; (a) E. A. 
Lynde, 2685 Briggs av (2705). 

TOMLINSON AV, e s, 125 n Pierce av, 2-2H- 
sty bk dwgs, 19x36, shingle rt ; $13,000; (o' 
Wm. McKinley, 1612 Halght av ; (a) T. J. 
Kelly, 707 Morris Park av (2610). 

TROOP AV, w s, 100 n Arnow av, 1-sty fr 
dwg, 22x42. shingle rt ; $4,500; (o) N. Wolf- 
stramer, 436 E 67th st ; (a) Frank Chenellk, 
796 3d av (2704). 

UNDERBILL AV, w B, 225 n Randall av, 
1-sty br dwg, 20x39, plastic slate rf ; $6,000 ; 
(o) Guiseppe D'onofrio, 203 E 15th st ; (a) V. 
Bonagur. 780 Home st (2659). 

UNDERHILL AV, w 3, 2.')0 n Randall av, 1- 
sty bk dwg. 20x30, plastic slate rf ; $6,000; (u) 
Michael Laguaglia, 297 E 151st; (a) Vincent 
Bonagur, 789 Home (2681). 

UNIVERSITY AV, n e c Strong st, 2-3ty bk 
dwg, 30x48, Imitation Spanish tile rf, $10,000; 
(o) Bertha Shrank, 251 W 91; (a) M. W. Del 
Gaudio, 1.5S W 45 (2486). 

UNIVERSITY AV, w s, 75 s 197th. 2-aty bk 
dwg, 22x43. shingle rf ; $7,500; (o) Julia Mul- 
Ilns. 2331 Grand Concourse; (a) Samuel Cohen, 
32 Union sq (2585). 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

VINCENT AV, e s, 317.6 n Schley av, 1-sty 
h. t. dwg, 22x42, asphalt shingle rt ; $4,500; (o) 
Giuseppe Mugo, 825 Burke av ; (a) De Rose & 
Cavalieri, 370 E 140th (2568). 

VINCENT AV, w s, 200 n Philip av, 2%-sty 
tr dwg, 21x43, shingle rt ; $7,500; (o) Herbert 
Cocks, 207 W 123d; (a) Andrew Carlson, 205 B 
124th (2.-47). 

WALDO AV, e s, 100 n 238th, 2-sty hk dwg, 
,34x28. slate rt ; $8,000; (o & a) Edw. Hisnay, 
442 W 238th (2079). 

WALDO AV, w s, 50 n Dash pl, 1-sty & attic 
bk dwg, 27x31, slate rf ; $8,000; (o & a) Eon. 
Hisnay, 442 W 238th (2680). 

WALLACE AV, e s, 395 n Morris Park av, 2- 
sty bk dwg, 20x38, asphalt rf, $10,000; (o) 
Frank McLennan, 1883 Holland av ; (a) Dunnl- 
gan & De Hart, 394 E 150 (2309).' 

WATERBURY AV, n 3, 30.4 e Mayflower av, 
2-sty fr dwg, 18x31, slag rt ; $7,000; (o) Caro- 
line Humbert, 1830 Geurlaine pl ; (a) Moore & 
Landsiedel, 3 av & 148th (2738). 

WATSON AV, s s, 229 w Castle Hill av, 2 
2-sty tr dwgs, 20x50 ; 1 1-sty tr garage, 24x9, 
slag rf; $20,000; (o) R. & E. Const. Co., Inc., 
Michael J. Rasin, 1220 College av, sec; (a) An- 
ton Pirner, 2069 Westchester av (2695). 

WHITLOCK AV, e s, 225 n Philip av, 2i/2-sty 
fr dwg. 20x40, asphalt shingle rf ; $7,000; (o) 
Cartange Celli. 294 E 152d ; (a) Delia, Penna & 
Erickson, 289 E 149th (23). 

WILCOX AV, w s. 200 n Phillip av, 2-sty fr 
dwg. 40x,34, shingle rf ; $8,500; (o) 0. B. 
Sandlehen, 323 9th, Bklyn; (a) John A. Hil- 
pert, Oil Garden (33). 

WILCOX AV, e s, 100 n Layton av, lV.-sty 
bk dwg, 35x26. shingle rt ; $5,500; (o) Anna C. 
Kraft, on prem ; (a) Thos. C. Petersen, 1628 
McCombs rd (2.329). 

WILDER AV, e s, 200.09 s Nereid av, 2-sty 
tr dwg, 22x37, asphalt shingle rt, $7,500; (o) 
Michael Robasco, 4396 Garden pl ; (a) Tremont 
Engr. Co., 240 E Tremont av (2485). 

WILKINSON AV, s s, 100 E Tobart av, IV2- 
sty H T dwg. 20x40; shingle rf ; $5,000; (0) 
Lessie S. Etzold, 2467 Tratman av ; (a) B. Ebel- 
ing, 1372 Zerega av (2456). 

WOODHULL AV, e s, 100 a Mace av, 2-sty 
fr dwg, 18x40, shingle rf ; $4,500; (0 & a) 
James Anderson, 1790 e Tremont av (2830). 

YATES AV, e s, 400 n Pierce av, 2-sty tr dwg, 
27.6x35, 1-sty tr garage, 20x20, asphalt shingle 
rf, $10,3.50; (o) Jacob Jacobsen, 1483 Southern 
blvd; (a) Moore & Landseidel, 3 av & 148th 
(2487). 

YATES AV, w s, 350 n Pierce av, 2-sty bk 
dwg, 22x54, tin rt ; $12,500; (0) Caroline Ab- 
rezzi, 259 E 204th st ; (a) Edw. J. Staufter, 140 
Willis av (2542). 

YATES AV, w s, 232 s Van Nest av, 2H-sty 
tr dwg, 26x44, comp shingle rf ; $10,000; (o) 
Margaret Greco, 1(366 Parker st; (a) M. A. Car- 
do, 61 Bible House (2658). 

YOUNG, A. S., w s. 187 a Astor av, 1-sty tr 
dwg, 18x44, asbestos shingle rf ; $4,500; (o) F. 
A. Becker, 4185 3d av ; (a) A. D. Bartholomew, 
STABLES AND GARAGES. 

137TH ST, n s, 250 e Brook av, 1-sty bk 
garage & strs, 129x100, tar & felt rt ; $35,000 ; 
(o) Isidor Langner, 406 E 149th; (a) Wm. 
Shary, 41 Union sq (28). 

AMUNDSON AV. e s, 300 s Edenwald av, 11/2- 
sty fr garage, 21x15. asphalt shingle rf ; $400; 
(0) Velina Nelson, on prem; (a) Peter Nelson, 
on prem (37). 

LAPONTAINE AV, e a, 40.7 3 179th, l-aty 
bk garage, 50x100. plastic alate rf ; $12,000 ; 
(o) Giovanna D'Onfaro, 2024 Lexington av ; 
(a) M. A. Cardo. 61 Bible House (22). 

MAPES AV. e s. 198-19 s 1.82d, 1-sty bk 
garage, 33.04x20. comp rf ; .$3,000; (0) Jos. 
Spadapino, 2148 Mapes av ; (a> Meisner Utfner, 
301 Tremont av (31). 

PROSPECT AV, e a, 70 s 182d, 1-sty bk 
garage, 91.5x142.3. slag rf ; $18,000; (0) Davis 
Levin. 1888 Marmion av ; (a) B. M. Sylvan, 
1879 Prospect av (20). 

UNIVERSITY AV, e s, 450 n 181st, 1-sty bk 
garage, 40x24, concrete rf ; $2,400; (0) Klugil 
& Grislede, on prem ; (a) Geo. C. Wigle, 1097 
Lincoln pl, Bklyn (3). 

YATES AV, e s. 275 n Pierce av, 1-sty fr 
garage, 18x18, asphalt shingle rf ; $200 ; (o) 
Hellen M. Shary, 369 B 207th; (a) Wm. Shary, 
41 Union ss (29). 

3D AV. e s, 109.3 s ISflth, 1-sty bk garage, 
121.94x177.5, slag rf ; $25,000; (0) C. W. Eraser, 
306 W 72d; (a) John J. Dunnigan, 394 E 150th 
(1). 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOPTS. 

FORDHAM RD, n s. 25 w Bathgate av, 4-sty 
stn publication offlces, 181x54, slag rf ; .$200,- 
000 ; (o) Fordham University, Rev. John P. 
O'Rourke, on prem. Pros ; (a) Robt. J. Reily, 
477 5 av (43). 

1.37TH ST E, s s, 100 e Brook av, 1-sty bk 
strs & market, 468x90, tin rt ; $12,000; (o) 
Samuel Katzan. 512 B 137th; (a) Max Muller, 
115 Nassau (12). 

137TH ST E. n s. 1.50 e Brook av, 1-sty mar- 
ket 6 strs, 100x100, tar & felt; $20,000: (o) 
W. C. P. Realty Co.. Philip Wattenberg. 40R 
E 149, pres. ; (a) Wm. Shary, 41 Union sq (50) 



January 14, 1922 

183D ST, s s, 47.08 e Park av, 1-sty bk strs, 
50x60, slag rf ; $10,000 ; (o) Cohen & Gordon, 
509 Willis av; (a) Chas. Schaeter, Jr., 394 B 
1.50th (34). 

1S8TH ST, s s, 100 w Grand av, 1-sty bk strs, 
30x11.10, slag rt ; $18,000; (o) Nevada Holding 
Corp., Hyman Berman, 190 Bway, Pres. ; (a) 
Wm. Koppe, 935 Intervale av (10). 

BURNSIDE AV, s w c Davidson av, 1-sty 
bk strs. 101.1x72, tar & gravel rt ; $75,000; (o) 
Chester D. Judis Bldg. Corp., John Erickson, 
HI3 Park av. Sec., (a) Gronenberg & Leuchtag, 
450 4 av (42). 

CRESTON AV, s w c 198th, 1-sty bk strs, 50x 
90.8, plastic slate rf ; $25,000; (0) Nowel Realty 
Co., Inc., Abram Levinson, 2720 Decatur av, 
Pres; (a) Wm. H. Meyer, 1861 Carter av (40). 

JEROME AV, n e c Mt. Hope pl, 1-sty bk 
strs. 51.40x112.78, slag rt ; $30,000; (o) Thoa. 
.1. Waters, 971 Woodycrest av ; (a) Frank M. 
Egan, 12U E Fordham rd (30). 

TREMONT AV, nee Vyse av, 1-sty bk atrs, 
108x33, blag rt ; .$30,000; (o) John Russo, 2356 
Lorillard pl ; (a) M. W. Del Gaudio, 158 W 
45th (4). 

UNIVERSITY AV, w s, 333.7 s 179th, l-sty 
bk strs, 50x70, slag rt ; $18,000; (o) Henry 
Acker, on prem ; (a) Wm. Koppe, 935 Iner- 
vale av (11). 

STORES AND TENEMENTS. 

BOSTON RD, sec 165th, 6-sty bk strs & tnt, 
102x120, slag rf; $250,000; (o) S. G. & M. 
Realty Co., Mitchel Smoleroff, 1300 Boston rd, 
Pres; (a) Goldner & Goldner, 47 W 42d (45). 
MISCELLANEOUS. 

MOTT AV, e s, from 157th to 158th, 3-3ty bk 
laboratory, 165.2x51.8, tile rt ; $150,000; (o) The 
Pleischmann Co., 701 Washington; (a) Arthur 
B. Heaton, 52 Vanderbilt av (41). 

Brooklyn 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

LINCOLN PL, 375-87, n s, 150.10 n Wash- 
ington av, 4-sty bk tnt, 125x84; $150,000; (o) 
Madison Const. & Impt. Co., Inc., 1147 54th ; (a) 
Springsteen & Goldhammer, 32 Union sq, Man- 
hattan (56). 

PACIFIC ST, 2084-90, s s, 80 e Saratoga av, 
4-sty hk tnt, 60x90; $75,000; (o) Klein & 
Evans, Inc., 148 Pennsylvania av ; (a) B. M. 
Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin av (99). 

PRESIDENT ST, 1392-4, s s, 130 w Kingston 
av, 4-sty bk tnt, 50x84.7; $100,000; (o) Morris 
B. Evens, 739 Flushing av ; (a) Shampan & 
Shampan, .50 Court (76). 

HEGEMAN AV, 214-16, s s, 40 w Stone av, 3- 
sty bk tnt. 30x84; .$43,000: (o) Isaac Gordon 
& Pincus Toback, 72 Sutter av ; (a) S. Mill- 
man & Son. 1780 Pitkin av (240). 
DWELLINGS. 

E 17TH ST 1471-5, e s, 300 n Av O, 2-2-aty 
fr 2 tam dwg, 20.4.'!69.10 ; $20,000; (0) Geo. M. 
Craigen Co., 637 E 24th; (a) owner (6). 

63D ST, 1131-60, n s. 100 w 12 av, 6-2-aty 1 
tam dwgs, 18x28.6; $30,000; (o) Edwards & 
Jessup, 639 Rogers av ; (a) Jas. A. Boyle, 367 
Fulton (233). 

62D ST, 1146-70, s s, 110 w 12 av, 8-2-sty fr 1 
tarn dwgs, 18x28.6; $40,000; (o & a) same as 
above (234). 

76TH ST, 1839-63, n s, 100 w 19 av, 8-2-sty 
bk 2 tam dwgs, 20x64 ; $80,000 ; (o) Edw. A. 
Weiss, 7812 18 av ; (a) Jacob Lubroth, 44 Court 
(22). 

95TH ST, 334-6, a s, 266.2 e 3 av, 2-2-sty fr 
2 tam dwgs. 16x51; $15,000; (o) Jennette Mc- 
Guire. ,3,38 78th ; (a) Olof B. Almgren, 8801 3 
av (228). 

AV C, 717-21, n s, 60.6 w B 8th, 2-2-sty bk 
2 tam dwgs, 20.4x67; $25,000 (o) Non Taxable 
Home Corp. 201 Barrett; (a) Jas. J. Mlllman, 
26 Court (55). 

BANNER AV, 1021-3, n w c E 11th, 2-2-sty tr 
2 fam dwgs, 16.10x51; $18,000; (0) Pasquale 
Fringo, 2816 W 22d ; (a) Geo. H. Suess, 1131 
Gravesend av (52). 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

MOULTRIE ST, 27, w s, 170.4 n Norman av, 
2-sty bk factory. 25.2x100: $12,000: (o) T. J. 
McManus & Son, Inc., 35 Moultrie; (a) P. 
Tillion & Sons. 103 Park av, Manhattan (227). 

OAKLAND ST, 312. e s, 50 s Huron, l-sty bk 
factory, 25x100; .$5,800; (o) Chas. Cohen, 310 
Oakland; (a) Jas. McKillop, 821 Manhattan av 
(91). 

14TH AV, 6405-11, e a, 40 s 64th, 3-sty bk 
factory, 30x100; $.30,000; (o) Vincenzo La 
Barbera. 6405 14 av ; (a) Chaa. P. Cannella, 
1163 Herkimer (64). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

E 9TH ST, 1754-66, w s, 116 6 s Kinga High- 
way. 4-1-sty cone garages. 10x18; .$2,000; (o) 
Rex Homes Corp., 15 E 40th, Manhattan ; (a) 
Seelig & Finkelstein, 44 Court (1). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 

LINWOOD ST. 823, sec Hegeman av, 2-sty 
hk sfr fi 2 fam dwg, 25x70; $15,000; (o) John 
Oastellano. 271 20th; (a) Jas. A. Boyle 367 
Fulton (104). 

LINWOOD ST. 827-33, e s. 25 s Hegeman av 
3-2-sty bk 2 tam dwgs. 20x50; $30,000; (o & a) 
same as above (105). 



January 14, 1922 

S6TH ST, 2217-21, n s, 140 e Bay pkway. 3- 
sty bk str & 2 fam dwg. 20x52; $15,0110; (o) 
Schlum & Duetch, 2221 86th; (a) Jacob Lubroth, 
44 Court (3). 

STORES AND TENEMENTS. 

ESSEX ST, 276, w 8, 275 n Liberty av, 3- 
8ty bk str & tnt, 20x55; $15,000; (o) Geo. 
Simonetti, 270 Essex; (a) Gibson & Kay, 312 
Milford (7). 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

ORIENTAL BLVD. 702-18, sec Ocean av, 
2-sty bk bathing pavilion, 106x154 ; .$64,000 ; 
(o) Manhattan Bob. Pk-, Inc., 07 Liberty. Man- 
hattan ; (0) Nelson K. Vanderbeck, 15 Maiden 
la, Manhattan (115). 

Queens 

DWELLINGS. 

DOUGLASTON.— Orient st, e s, 625 n Pine, 
3-iy2-sty (r dwgs, 24x36, shingle rt, 1 family, 
gas, hot air heat; $13,500; (o) John C. Gabler, 
Douglaston ; (ai Morgan M. O'Brien, 49 E tlOth, 
Manhattan (110-11-12). 

EAST FOREST HILLS.— Union tpke, n s, 106 
w Vleigh rd, 4-2-sty fr dwgs, 32x3(3, shingle rf, 

1 family, gas; $10,000; (o & a) Jos. F. Negren, 
8 E 23d, Manhattan (123-124). 

EDGEMERE.— Beach 34th St, e s, mO s Edge- 
mere av, 3-2-sty fr dwgs, 22x34, shingle rf, 1 
family, gas, steam heat; $21,000; (o & a) T. A. 
McDonald, Beach 83d st, Rockaway Beach (39- 
40-41). 

FLUSHING. — Bayside av, s s, 350 w Brewster 
av, 2-sty bk dwg. 24x50, shingle rf, 1 family, 
clec. steam heat; $10000; (o & a) Joseph Hosek, 
26 43d. Corona (178). 

GLENDALE. — Proctor st. w s, 175 n Myrtle 
av, 2-sty fr dwg, 20x56, slag rf, 2 families, gas ; 
$8,500; (o) Jos. J. Webern 54 Almstead pi, 
Glendale ; (a) H- C. Brucker, 2549 Myrtle av, 
Ridgewood (171). 

HOLLIS.— Hillside av. n s, 360 e Hollis Park 
blvd, 2y2-sty fr dwg, .32x21, shingle rf, 1 fam- 
ily, gas. steam heat; $9,500; (o) Berje Co., Inc. 
13 Judd av, Jamaica; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., 
Fulton st, Jamaica (186). 

JAMAICA. — Norwich av. s s, 270 e Flushing 
av, 2-2-sty fr dwgs, 20x57, gravel rf, 2 families, 
gas, steam heat; $16,000; (o) Harry Archibald, 
33 W 42d, Manhattan ; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., 
Fulton St. Jamaica (68). 

JAMAICA.— Canal st, ws, 109 n Fulton, 1-sty 
bk printing office, 33-91. slag roof ; .$15,000 ; 
(o) Benj. Marvin, 386 Fulton. Jamaica ; (a) 
H. T. Jeffrey. Jr., Fulton st, Jamaica (188). 

KEW GARDENS.— Talbot pi. n e c Lefferts 
av, 4-21/2-sty fr dwgs, 25x100, shingle rf. 2 
families, gas. steam heat; $48,000; (0) East 
Richmond Hill Land Co.. 56 Wall. Manhattan ; 
(a) John K. Turton Co., 101 Park av, Man- 
hattan (138-1.39-140-141). 

LITTLE NECK. — Glenwood av. n w c Summit 
av, 2-sty fr dwg. 36x25. shingle rf, 1 family, 
elec, steam heat; $7,500; (o) Andrew Benson, 
Westmoreland. L- I. ; (a) Carl P. Johnson, 30 t 
42d, Manhattan (159). 

L. I. CITY.— 14th av. w s. 525 n Bway, 2-sty 
bk dwg, 18x54, slag rf, 2 families, gas, steam 
heat; $7,.500 ; (o) Ernest De Marco, 340 Free- 
man av, L. I. City; (a) L. H. Bailey, 229 Web- 
ster av, L. I. City (164). 

L. I. CITY. — Grand av, n e c 17 av, 5-2-sty bk 
dwgs, 20x.i2, slag rf, 2 families, elec. steam 
heat; $35,.5n0; (0) Webton Realty Co.. .56 Hal- 
let, L. I. City; (a) Albert C. Kunzi, 779 Man- 
hattan av. Bklyn (173-174). 

MIDDLE VILLAGE.— Memorial st, n s, 300 e 
Morton, 12-2-3ty fr dwgs, 19x40, slag rf, 2 
families, gas; $09,.500 ; (0) A. Hendel & Sons, 
10 Morton av. Middle Village; (a) William 
Von Felde, 2188 Metropolitan av, Middle Vil- 
lage (102-3-4). 

MIDDLE VILLAGE.— Memorial st, n s. 300 e 
Morton av. 12-2-sty fr dwgs. 19x40. slag rf. 2 
families, gas; l?69,500 ; (0) A. Hendel & Sons, 
10 Morton av. Middle Village; (a) William Von 
Felde, 2188 Metropolitan Middle Village (102- 
3-4). 

MIDDLE VILLAGE.— Metropolitan av, n s, 
174 e Catherine, 2-2-sty fr dwgs, 18x45, slag rf, 

2 families, gas: .$9,000; (o & a) Jos. Seiz, Mor- 
ton St. Middle Village (158). 

MIDDLE VILLAGE.— Stone av. e s. 112 n 
Juniper Valley rd. 2-2-sty fr dwgs, 16x38, tar 
& slag rf, 1 family, gas, hot air heat ; $11,- 
000; (0) Baier & Bauer. Howard Beach; (a) 
Chas. Baier. Howard Beach (31). 

OZONE PARK. — Attlie av. a w c Boss av, 3- 
2-sty fr dwgs, 10x33, shingle rf, 1 family, gas; 
$13..5n0; (o & a) Chaa. Voos, 9505 118th, Rich- 
mond Hill (153-4-5). 

QUEENS.— 220th st, w s. 100 3 104 av, 1 Va- 
sty fr dwg, 24x26. shingle rf, 1 family, gas, 
steam heat; $■; -.j ; 1-sfv fr garage; $.''00; (o) 
Ino Remels. 1.529 90th. Ozone Park; (a) Chas. 
Infanger, 2634 Atlantic av, Bklyn (150-1). 

QUEENS,— Charles st, n e c Bryan av. 3-21/2- 
sty fr dwgs. 16x35. shingle rf. 1 family, gab, 
steam heat; $15,000; fo) Wonnberger & Moel- 
ler, Jackson av & Spruce. Queens; (a) H. T. 
Jeffrey, Jr., Fulton st, Jamaica (65-66-67). 

QUEENS. — Ches'nut st, n s. 162 w Jefferson 
av, 3-214-sty fr dwgs, 16x32, shingle rf, 1 fam- 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

ily, gas, steam heat; $15,000; (o) A. Kostro, 
317 Fulton, Jamaica ; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., 
Fulton st, Jamaica (54-55-50). 

QUEENS. — Orange st, n s, 100 w Jefferson 
av, 2-21^-sty fr dwgs, 16x32, shingle rf, 1 fam- 
ily, gas, steam heat; $10,000; (o) A. Kostro, 
317 Fulton, Jamaica; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., 
Fulton St. Jamaica (57-58). 

QUEENS.— Chestnut st, s s, 100 w Jefferson 
av, 5-2V2-sty fr dwgs, 16x32, shingle rf, 1 fam- 
ily, gas, steam heat; $25,000; (o) A. Kostro, 
317 Fulton, Jamaica; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr.. 
Fulton st, Jamaica (125-26-27-28-29). 

RICHMOND HILL.— 334th St. e s. 50 n Bath 
pi, 2-2i:;-sty fr dwgs, 18x.34, shingle rf, 1 fam- 
ily, gas, steam heat; .$14,()00 ; (o) Richmond 
Hill Investment Co., Briggs av & Jamaica av, 
Richmond Hill; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., Fulton 
st, Jamaica (62-63). 

RICHMOND HILL.— 124th st. e s, 400 s Sut- 
ter av, 6-2-sty fr dwgs, 18x33, shingle rf, 1 
family, gas; $18,000; (o & a) J. C. Zook Or- 
ganization, 11815 Liberty av, Richmond Hill 
(1-2-3-4-5-6). 

RICHMOND HILL.— 109th st, w s, 135 s 
Roanoke av, 3-2-sty fr dwgs, 15x35, shingle rf, 
1 family, gas, steam heat; $12,000; (0) Froh- 
witter Building Corp., 150 90th, Woodhaven ; 
(a) T. G. Anderson, 20 Homer Lee av, Jamaica 
(181-82-83). 

RIDGEWOOD. — Grove st. s s, 1.58 e Prospect 
av, 12-2-sty bk dwgs, 20x55, gravel rf, 2 fami- 
lies, gas, hot air heat; $96,000; (o) Grove St. 
Investors. Inc., Augustave Roth. Pres., 2429 
Myrtle av. Ridgewood ; (a) Louis Berger Co., 
Myrtle & Cypress avs, Ridgewood (15 to 20). 

RIDGEWOOD. — Cypress av, n e c Norman, 
28-2-sty bk dwgs, 20x55, 1 & 2 families, gas, 
steam heat; $104,020; (a) Charles Fritz, 1723 
Stephen st, Ridgewood; (a) Louis Berger & 
Co.. cor Myrtle & Cypress avs, Ridgewood (23 
to 30). 

SOUTH OZONE PARK.— Attalie av, s s, 100 e 
Lincoln av, 2-2-fcty fr dwgs, 16x33, shingle rf, 1 
family, gas; $14,000: (0 & a) P. Nolan, 65 Pul- 
ton, Jamaica (189-90). 

ST. ALBANS.— Dunkirk st, s s. 40 w Sulli- 
van pi. 21/^-sty fr dwg. 24x57, shingle rf, 2 fami- 
lies, gas, steam heat; $10,000; (o) Henry M. 
Prehn, St. Albans; (a) Chas. G. Wessel, 1339 
E 4th, Bklyn (119). 

WOODHAVEN.— 102d rd, n s, 100 w 88th, 2- 
2-sty fr dwgs. 20x54, tar rf, 2 families, gas ; 
$13,601); (0) Mrs. Mary Del Giorno, 3982 Water 
Woodhaven; (a) J. Monda, 3917 Jerome av, 
Woodhaven (47-48). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 

CORONA. — Junction av, e s, 50 s Sibastian 
av, 3-sty bk str & dwg, 50x82, slag rf, 13 
families, gas, elec; $.30.00<3 ; (o) Elsie Semlers, 
KH-100 Junction av. Corona; (a) Fred. Hirsh, 
406 Homestead av, Mt. Vernon. N. Y. (35). 

LONG ISLAND CITY.— Grand av, 3 w c 6 av, 
5-3-sty bk sirs & dwgs. 25x50, slag roof, 2 
families, elec, steam heat; $48,500; (0) Web- 
ton Realty Co, 06 Hallet, L. I. City; (a) Al- 
- bert C. Kunzi, 779 Manhattan av, Bklyn (175- 
176-177). 

QUEENS. — Fulton st, s w c Reno pi, 4-21^- 
sty fr strs & dwgs, 20x50, shingle rf, 1 family, 
gas. steam heat : $32,000 ; (o) John Osterman, 
12 Lafayette, Jamaica; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., 
Fulton st, Jamaica (59-60). 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

HOLLIS. — Jamaica av, n w c, 195th, 3-1-sty 
hk strs. 40x55, tar & gravel rf, steam heat ; $22,- 
000: (o) Middle Holding Co.. Jamaica & 105th, 
Hnllis: (a) H. T. Jeffrey, 309 Fulton, Jamaica 
(1.30-131). 

JAMAICA.— Fulton st, s s, 22 e Smith, 2-sty 
bk strs, 57x84, slag rf, steam heat, elec ; $5,- 
000; (0) Benjamin Marvin, 386 Fulton, Ja- 
maica ; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., Fulton st, Ja- 
maica (80). 

JAMAICA.— Fulton st, s e c Smith, 2-sty bk 
str & office. 22x90, slag rf, elec, steam heat; 
$50,000; (o) Benjamin Marvin, 386 Fulton, Ja- 
maica; (a) H. T. Jeffrey, Jr., Fulton st, Ja- 
maica (79). 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

L. I. CITY- — Vernon av. e 3, 172 s Wilbur av, 
1-sty bk machine shop & blacksmith shop, 50x 
200, rubberoid rf. elec; $19,.500; (o) R. Steel & 
Sons, Inc., .5.58 W 162d. Manhattan; (a) Alfred 
Weln, 21 E 40th, Manhattan (46). 

Richmon<l. 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS. 

ANNADALE. — Lament av, s e s, 175 s w Jef- 
ferson blvd, 1-sty fr bldg (school), 63.1x63.1; 
$15.0(10; (o) City of N. Y., City Hall, New 
York City; (a) A. Snyder, Municipal Bludg., 
N. Y. C. (2741). 

WESTERLEIGH.— Clinton pi & Plske av, e a, 
68 n Leonard st. 1-sty fr school, 63x63, asphalt 
slate shingle rf : $15,000; (o) City of N. Y.. 
City Hall, N. Y. : (a) A Snyder, Municipal 
Bldg., N. Y. (2740). 

DWELLINGS. 
ANNADALE. — Lament av. 3 s. 320 w Wash- 
ington av. lM;-3ty fr dwg, 24x26, asphalt shingle 
roof; .«3.000; (0 & bl G. Carlson, 128 Lemont 
av (27.53). 



61 



DONGAN HILLS.— Vista av, w s 
dale av, 2-sty bk dwg, 32x40, shingle roof; .$4,- 
50O; (o) Geo. Casella, 65 Downey, N. Y. C. ; 
(a) Chas. A. Duncker, Dongan Hills (2783). 

ELTINGVILLE SHORE.— Oceanic av, s s, 820 
e Southfleld blvd, 1-sty fr dwg, shingle roof, 
25x28; $4,000; (o & a) Katheryn Missall, 197 
Jewett av. Port Richmond (2769). 

GRANT CITY.— Bancroft st. n s. 390 e Rail- 
road av, 2-sty fr dwg, 24x24, shingle roof ; 
$4,000; (o) Agnes Steinmetz, Lisbon pi. Great 
Kills, S. I.; (a) Chas. A. Duncker, Dongan 
Hills, S. I. (2681). 

GRANT CITY.— Lamoiit av, 82, n s, 348 w 
Railroad av. 2-sty fr dwg. 20X.33. shingle roof; 
$:;,1I(I0; (o & b) Arthur P. Kimball, 82 Lamont 
av. 

GRANT CITY.— Bancroft av, n s, 230 e Rail- 
road av, 2-sty fr dwg, 24x24, slag rf ; .$4,000 ; 
(o) Albert M. Ruland. 578 Westchester av. N 
Y C; (a) Chas. A. Duncker, Dongan Hills, S. I. 
(2080). 

GRANT CITY.— Bancroft st, n s, 390 e Rail- 
road av, 2-sty fr dwg, 24x24, slag rf ; $4,000; 
(o) Agnes Steinmetz, Lisbon pi. Grant City, 
S. I.; (a) Chas. A. Duncker, Dongan Hills, 
S. 1. (2681). 

GREAT KILLS.— Armstrong av, s s, 202 e 
Kings St. IVii-sty fr dwg. 24x30, asphalt slag 
rf; $5,000: (01 Margaret Loganbuhl, 20 W 
65th. N Y City; (a) Geo. W. Suess, 1131 Grave- 
send av. Bklyn. N. Y. (2691). 

GREAT KILLS.— Hillcrest av. w s. 90 Linden- 
wood rd. 1-sty fr dwg, 24x39. slag rf ; $4,000; 
(o) Katherine Block. Amboy rd, Great Kills, 
S. I. ; (a) Arthur Buhlmann, 201 Nelson av 
(2687). 

GREAT KILLS.— Southfleld blvd. e s. 20 3 
Cleveland av. 2-sty fr dwg. slag rf. 24x26 ; $3,- 
000; (o) Mrs. Antony Heinze, Great Kills, i 
(2616). 

GREAT KILLS.— Great Kills rd. w s, 100 a 
Ocean av, 2-2-sty f r dwgs, 22x30, shingle rf : 
$6,000; (0) Henry Sukes. Bklyn, N. Y. ; (a) 
Capt. Max Schneider. Great Kills. S. I. (2751). 

GRYMES HILL.— Howard av. e s, 561 s Eddy, 
2-sty bk dwg, 62x20. Spanish tile rf : $12,000 ; 
(0) Adams T. Rice, 124 Central av, Tompkins- 
ville, S, I. : (a) James Whitford, Tompkinsvllle, 
S. I. (2645). 

LIVINGSTON.— Kissel av. e s. 385 a Castle- 
ton av, ly^-sty fr dwg. 2ex.36. shingle rf ; $5,- 
0(10; (a) Fred L. Space, 413 Westervelt av. 
North Brighton. S. I. : (a) Wm. H. Hoffman, 
160 VIove rd. West New Brighton, S. I. (2773). 

MARINERS HARBOR. — Division av. s e s, cor 
Van Name av, 2-sty fr dwg & garage, rubberoid 
rf ($4,000) (garage $200). 20x44; (o & a) A. M. 
Alkivicke, 305 South av. Mariners Harbor, S. I. 
(2618). 

MIDLAND BEACH— Eighth St. n s. 120 w 
Midland av. 2-sty fr dwg, 23x39, slag rt : .$3,500; 
(0) Mrs. C. H. Hampton. 225 8th. Midland 
Beach; (a) A. M, Arrington, 617 Bay, Stapleton, 
S. I. (2670). 

MIDLAND BEACH.— Eighth avj w a, 300 s 
Barnes av, 1-sty fr dwg, 24x48, slag rf ; $3,000; 
(0) Mrs. Harry Rodgera, 115 Leroy, N. Y. C. 
(2627). 

NEW BRIGHTON.— 2d av. s s. 125 w Bismark 
av. 2-2-sty fr dwgs. 24x45, slag rf ; $6,000 total ; 
(o) Stanley Carazznne. .52 Andrew. S. B. ; (a) 
Chas. A. Duncker, 132 Andrew, S. B. (2728). 

NEW BRIGHTON. — Carson av. s s, 400 w 
Westervelt av. 2y2-sty fr dwg, 22x36. slag rf ; 
$4,000; (o) Mrs. A. Kells, Brook st, Tompkins- 
vllle. S. I. (2719). 

NEW BRIGHTON.— Winter av, n a, 600 w 
Westervelt av, 2V..-sty fr dwg. 22x48, slag rf ; 
,$6 000; (o) Rosenholz & Dalgtn, Tompkinsvllle 
(2723). 

NEW BRIGHTON.— Westervelt & Hamilton 
avs, e and w s. two 2-sty fr dwgs. .32x18, slag 
rf; .$5,000; (o) Henry P. Comtols. 2.33 Jersey 
st: (a) Henry F. Comtols, 233 Jersey st (2736). 

NEW BRIGHTON.— Corson av. e s. 2.50 e Jer- 
sey, two 2-3ty fr dwgs. 37x48. rubberoid rf ; 
$4,000: (0 & a) T. Cooper, 4th av. New Bright- 
on (2722). 

NEW DORP BEACH— PInley av, s a, 240 e 
Beason pi. 2-sty fr dwg, 28x26, slag rf ; $6,000; 
(o) R. Morelle & P. Malfettamo. New Dorp 
Lane Sr Hett av : fa) S. Butera, 119 Mills av, 
South Beach (2732). 

NEW DORP BEACH.- PInley av. s s, 200 e 
Beacon pi. 2-sty fr dwg. 28x26, slag rf ; $6,000; 
(o) R. R: G. Mucciaio. Hett av. New Dorp, S. I. ; 
(a) S. Butera. 119 Mills av. South Beach, S. I. 
(2731). 

NEW DORP. — Burbank av. e a, 3fl st, 4-2-sty 
fr & stucco dwgs. 20x.36. slag rf ; $4,500 each ; 
(o) G. W. Hughes, 76 Rose av. New Dorp, S. I.; 
(a) R. E. Archibald, 111 Locust av. New Dorp 
(2648-2651). 

NEW DORP COKERY.— Cubbpsly pi, e s, 350 
n Oakley pi, 2-sty fr dwg, 22x2.'). slag rf; 
.$5,000; (o) Michael Sero. 48 Dale st. New Dorp; 
(a) Byron C. Pneuman. New Dorp. S. I. (2742). 

NEW DORP — Beach av. n s. 100 a e 3d, 2-8ty 
fr dwg, 27x32, shingle rf ; $7,000: (o) Mr. & 
Mrs. Edwin Clohesay. 297 Garden. Stapleton, S. 
I.; (a) Geo. H. Wood, 90 2 av, Stapleton, S, I. 
(26,39). 



62 

NEW DORP.— Burbank av, e s, 100 n 5th, 2- 
sty £r & stucco dwg, 20x36, ehingle rf ; $4,50f! ; 
Co) G. W. Hughes, 76 Rose av, New Dorp; 'a) 
R. B. Archibald, 111 Locust av. New Dorp, S. I. 
(2647). 

PORT RICHMOND.— Palmer av, s s, 160 w 
Richmond av, 2»/2-sty fr dwg, 26x24 ; $5,700, 
shingle rf ; (o) Frederick Morhard, 45 Wright 
st. Mariners Harbor. S. I. ; (a) William F. Beh- 
ler, SOS Richmond av, Port Richmond, S. I. 
(2625). 

PORT RICHMOND.— Lincoln av, e s, 271 w 
Washin-ion av, 1-sty £r dwg, 14x36; $2,500; (o) 
M. Coil Steen, 535 E 78th, N. Y. C. ; (a) John 
Laine, R F D. Lincoln av. Port Richmond, S. I. 
( 2054 ) . 

ROSEBANK. — Tompkins av, e s, on corner 
Marybird av. 2-sty fr dwg, 22x4S, slag rf ; 
.$0,800; (0 & bi Peter Farina, 1S7 Virginia av 
(2i07). 

SOUTH BEACH.— Austin av, n s, 140 e Cedar 
av. 1-sty bk dwg. t. c. block, 20x30, rubberoid 
rf; .1.3,000; (o) Emilio Miscione, 417 E 110th 
Manhattan ; (a) Cannava & Viviano, 110 W 40tE 
Manhattan (2480). 

STAPLETON.— Gordon st, n s. 524 w Broad 
St, 2-sty fr dwg. 20x40, rubberoid rf ; $5,500 • 
(o & b) Carol Nakoneskny, care of T. Roman 
Hudson st, Slaplcton, S. I.; (a) A. H. Nelson 
Stapleton. S. I. (2725). 

TOMPKINSVILLE.— S e cor Sherman & Ben- 
ziger avs, two 2-sty bk dwgs, 40.x55, rubberoid 
rt; total $12,000; (o) Louis Melinko, 71 Ben- 
ziger av; (a) James Whitford, St. George, S. I. 
(2623). 

WEST NEW BRIGHTON.— CastU ton av n s 
ISn w Buyler av, five 2-sty fr dwgs & strs, 17 
x;){i. rubberoid rt ; $10.0110; (o) E. J. Plummer 
900 Castleton av : (a) Chas. B. Heweker. Tomn- 
kinsville (2774). 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

CONCORD. — Richmond rd, w s. cor Concord 

pl, 2-sty store, office & shop (1-sty), (two aprts 

2-3ty), 4.5x48. slag rt : $10.0<]0 ; (o) Henry & 

R. A. Carstensen, 90 Vista av, Stapleton S I • 

(a) Henry & R. A. Carstensen, 00 Vista av' 
Stapleton, S. I. (2750). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 
PORT RICHMOND— Richmond av. e s 45 n 
Vreeland st, 2-sty bk dwg & stores, 31x75 
(1-sty), 31x55 (2-sty), slag rf ; $16,000: (o) 
Michael Kaplan, 48 W 25th st, N. Y. City: (a) 
Nathaniel L. Brodie, 815 Breene av, Bklyn N 
Y. (2729). 

MISCELLANEOUS- 
CLIFTON. S. I— n s Willow av. w Bay st 
concrete wall & steel tank: .$6,000: (oi N. Y. 
& Richmond Gas Co.. Willow av. Rosebank ■ 

(b) Thns. Cummings. 468 Targee st. Stapleton 
S. I. (2781). 

STAPLETON.— Roff st & Targee st, 2-sty bk 
bldg. laundry & dwg. 2.5x30. rubberoid root ; 
.$5,1100; (o) E. .1. McCormick : (a) Thos. Cum- 
mings, 468 Targee, Stapleton, S. I. (2704). 



PLANS FILED 

FOR ALTERATIONS 



Manhattan. 

ALLEN ST. 51. remove columns, new beams, 
toilets, partitions in 5-sty bk store & tnt ; $1,000 
(o) Rosa Levy, care A. H. Levy. 654 W 161 : 
(a) Philip Bardcs, 230 Grand (53). 

BEACH ST, 36-.3S-40, new exf, piers, office, 
toilet, remove walls in 1-sty bk garage ; $15.- 
(o) Est Thos. Lenane. 307 West; (a) Margon 
& Glaser. 2S04 av (47). 

BROAD ST. 20-22, new tank on 20 and 16-sty 
F P offlcps; $5,000; (o) Clarence H. Mackay, 
2.53 Bway : (a) Guy W. Culgin, 141 Washing- 
ton pl (:«). 

CANAL ST, 260, new f. p. doors, partitions, 
skylights in 5-sty bk factory; .$3,000; (o) 
Frank J. Klons. 243 Canal; (a) Jean Jeanne. 
231 W IS (50). 

GREEN ST. 130. new toilets in 6-sty bk stor- 
age warehouse; .$3,000; (o) Henry Gerushym. 
342 Madison av ; (a) G. C. & H. Bochin, 7 W 
42d (15). 

MURRAY ST. 103-5, lower floor, new column, 
girders, add sty on 3-sty bk storage ; $6,000 : 
(o) Herman Kornahrens, Inc.. Ill Murray; (a) 
Alex S. Traub, 2.55 Greenwich (541. 

THOMPSON ST, 235-7-0, remove partitions, 
walls, new girder, windows, apart, stairs, in 
3-sty bk hotel annex; $12,000; (o) N. Y. C. 
Baptist Missions Sec. 276 5th av : (a) Hood 
& Fouilhoux, 7 W 42d (36). 

WARREN ST. 82. remove elevator & wood 
shaft, new elevator ,t bk shaft in 5-sty bk str & 
lofts: .$6,000: (o) Macback Hardware Co.. 82 
Warren; (a) Chas. H. Richter, 06 5 av (IS). 

WASHINGTON PL. 72, remove partitions, 
stoop, new bathroom, kitchenette, vestibule, 
beams, raise walls on 4-sty bk hotel dormitory; 
$8,000; (0) The Hurst RIty. Co., 42 E 11th; (a) 
Chas. F. Winkelman, 103 Park av (9). 

WASHINGTON SQ. 31, remove pent house, 2 
new add stys. elevator, toilets, int court in 4- 
Bty f. p. hospital; .$60,000: (o) Mrs. Rose Sa- 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

vini, 43 W 11; (a) Thos. F. Dunn, 62 W 45 
(51). 

STH ST, 44 E, remove bk wall, new iron 
beams, in 4-sty bk stores and lofts; $1,000; (o) 
H. Kantor, Inc., 13 Mt Morris Park, West; (a) 
.\lfred L. Kehoe & Co.. 130 Nassau (28). 

14TH ST. 120-22. E, new marquise on 5-sty 
bk stores and lofts; $500; (o) Carolina T. B. 
Condit, 19 W 55th; (a) Geo Wagner, 120 114th 
(29). 

16TH ST, 5-7 E, new iron stairs in 12-sty bk 
str, factory, office: $l.ii00; (o) Sidman Rlty. 
Co.. 7119 Bway: (a) Jacob Fisher, 25 Av A 
(44). 

16TH ST, 410-16 W, new steel beams, tank on 
6-sty f. p. warehouse; .$430; (o) National Bis- 
cuit Co., 4(KI W 15th; (a) A, G. Zimmerman 85 
9 av (13). 

17TH ST, 314 W. remove fence, pier new 
sidewalk, window.s jiartitions wardrobe, class 
rooms, doors in 4-stv bk school: $13,000; (o) 
i'i;y of N Y.. Bd. of Ed., 500 Park av ; (a) 
C. B. J. Snyder. Municipal Bldg. (49). 

2.5TH ST, 104 E. new steel beams, concrete 
arches, partitions in 12-sty f. p. offices & show 
rooms; $.500; (o) Braender Bldg. & Constn. 
Co.. 315 4 av; (a) Frank A. Moore, 109 E 29th 
(10). 

.39TH ST, 633-35 W, new enclosure tor hog 
conveyor, f. p. door in 3 bldgs. engine & boiler 
room bldg. tank bldg. hog bldg: .$3,000; (o of 
land) Edgar S. & John Appleby, 135 Bway; 
(0 of bldg & lessee of land) Jos. Stern & Sons, 
616 W 40th ; (a) G. P. Bron, 616 W 40 (24). 

40TH ST. .344 E, new elevator shaft enclosure, 
wall, skylight in 5-sty bk factory; $6,000; (o) 
Henico Elect Co., 344 E 40th; (a) Ferdinand 
Savignano, 6005 14 av, Bklyn (23). 

43TH ST. 121 W, new columns in 3-sty bk 
restaurant and dance hall; $1,500: (o) Jos H 
Goldbi.Ttt. 231 E 77th : (a) Bottomley & Hess, 
112 E 55th (,34). 

57TH ST, 161 W. remove entrance, new en- 
trance, doors, raise floor in 4-sty bk- res : $5.- 
000: (o) E. Clarence Jones. 505 .5" av ; (a) 
Lewis E. Welsh, 132 Madison av (23). 

.30TH ST. 110, E, raise beams, extend floors, 
new partitions, plumbing, in 4-sty bk store and 
workrooms; .$2..500 ; (o) Edgewater Rlty Co.. 
324 Willis av ; (a) Wm. Shary. 41 Union So 
( 31 ) . 

75TH ST. 545 E. new extension on 1-sty bk 
garage: .$3,000; (ol John Blumers & Bros.. .345 
E 75; (a) Victor Mayper. 15 E 40 (52). 

.S3D ST. 247. E, new extensions, toilets, ex- 
tend balcony, on 4-sty bk stores and aparts : 
$.300: (o) Thos. Bernstein. 1613 2d av ; (a) 
Sam'l Pelton. 104 Lowell (30). 

91ST ST. 00 E, remove stoop, rearrange 
stairs, new door, window in 4-sty bk res; $5.- 
000; (o) Irma H. Kaufmann, 1.361 Madison av ; 
(a) Herbert Lippmann, 126 E 59th (19). 

116TH ST. 70. W. remove beams, wall, new 
girders, column, stores, partitions, show win- 
dnws. in 7-sty bU stores and tnt; .$20,000; (o) 
Sam'l Kemlet, 24 W 120th; (a) Gronenberg & 
Lenchtag. 4.30 4th av (32). 

117TH ST. 179 B. remove partitions, toilet, 
new partitions, toilet, galv iron ducts, plumb- 
ing in 4-sty bk str & tnt: •$2,.500 ; (o) Giuseppe 
Laporta. 427 E 121st: (a) De Rose & Cavalieri, 
.370 E 149th (22). 

12.3TH ST, 35-37 W. new marquise on 4-sty 
bk strs & aots: $2,000: (o) Wm. Patten. .57 W 
125th: (a) Wm. M. Racburn. 208 W 54th (45)- 

137TH ST. 245 W. remove stairs, partitions, 
new stairs in 5-sty bk res: .$5,000; (o) Mon- 
arch Lodge. 245 W 137th; (a) Hewlett & 
Mitchell. 129 E 27th (11). 

139TH ST. 200 W. remove stoop, walls, new 
windows, stairs, rearrange partitions in 4-sty bk 
dwg, offlc-s, strs: $10,000: (o) Chas w. An- 
derson. 233 W 42d : (a) Harold t). 5'oung, 2,33 
W 42d (26). 

AV A, 32, remove fire-escapes, partitions, new 
stairs in 4-stv bk str & apts ; .$800; (o) Elsa 
Decker. .309 w 98th : (a1 Irving M. Fenichel. 
383 Bedford av. Bklyn (27). 

AV A. 98. new stairs, partitions in 4-sty bk 
str & tnt; .$400; (o) Henrv C. Drayton, 14 
Wall: (a) Adolnh E. Nast. .36 W 45th (16). 

B0WER3'. 123. excavate portion of yard for 
passageway for 4-sfv bk str & warerooms : S2no ; 
(n) Robert Hartshoine. 63 Wall : (a) Philip 
Bardes. 230 Grand (17). 

BR0*DWA3'. 2.3.30 change stairs, new parti- 
tions, in 12-sty F P apart ho'el : $3,000; (ol 
The Anderson Price Co.. Hotel Brenton Hall : 
(al Delano H Aldrirh, 126- E 38th (.33). 

BR0,4DW»Y. .373-77 W, new toilets, girders, 
columns, elevator, floor beams, reconstruct ele- 
vator shaft in 3-sty bk str & factory: $-10,000: 
10) Phoenix Commercial Co., 477 Bway; (a) 
Ross & MacNeil, 46 W 24th (43). 

BROADWAY, 1457, new partitions, offices in 
11-sty f. p. stores & offices ; $3,.50O ; (o) Henry 
Phipps Est,, 787 5 av : (a) Henry S. Lion, 15 B 
40 (57). 

HAVEN AV, 241-67. neW ext on 2i^-sty fr 
restaurant & sleeping quarters : $12;000 ; (o) 
Ben C. Riley, W mth, cor Haven av ; (a) 

Dwight J. Baom, Waldo av, cor Spuyten Duyvil 

pkway (21). 



January 14, 1922 

LENOX AV, 490, new partitions, door, toilet 
in 5-sty bk apts & strs; $800; (o) Geo. Cohen, 
826 West End av : (engr) J. E. Cohen, 1153 
Boston rd (12). 

MADISON AV, 1722, new ext on 3-sty bk res; 
.$3,500; (o) Dr. Isaac I. Plotz, 1722 Madison 
av ; (a) Alfred Auslander, Jackson av. Queens, 
L. I. (59). 

PARK AV, 63, remove partitions, stairs, fence, 
entrance, new partitions, stairs bath rooms, 
vestibule, window in 5-sty bk res ; $25,000 ; (o) 
Annabella D. Huntington, 2 E 37 ; (a) Maurice 
Courland, 4i W 34 1.35). 

ST. NICHOLAS AV, 1220, remove str front, 
partitions, new partitions, str front in 5-sty bk 
strs & tnt: $:;0(i : (o) Jacob Ruppert Rlty. Co., 
1639 3 av ; (a) Ignatz I. Rosenberg, 250 W 
112th (14). 

4TH AV. 113-19. 4 new pressure tanks on 8- 
sty f. p. lofts; $7,000: (o) Peoples Rlty. Co., 
Inc., 31 Nassau; (a) Reliance Tower & Steel 
Constn. Co., 94 Mangin (42). 

5TI^,Ay, 114-6, new partitions, toilets in 18- 
sty f. p. salesroom, offices, factory: $5,000; (o) 
American R. E. Co.. in receivership : receivers, 
W. E, Noyes ii A. E. Marling. 141 Bway; (a) 
Jardine, Hill & Murdock. 50 E 42d (41). 

5TH AV, 122-4, new partitions, f. p. floors, 
windows in 10-sty f. p. factory: .$2,500; (o) 
E. Sharuni' Co., 170 Bway; (a) Fredk. W. 
Moore, 154 Nassau (48). 

6TH AV, 1(111. new coal hole, columns, reduce 
sidewalk on 5-sty bk store, offices & aparts ; $3,- 
.300: (o) Est- Robt. T. Ballantine. 790 Broad 
St. Newark, N. J.: (a) Schwartz & Gross. 347 

5 av. tbO). (60). 
7TH AV. 468, new stairs, partitions in o-sty 

bk .itore. offices & furnished rooms; $5,000; (o) 
Paul G. Daly, Hotel Willard. 234 W 76 ; Danl 
L. Daly. 75 Coleridge St. Manhattan Beach ; (a) 
Morris Schwartz, i-titf) Bway (58). 

Bronx 

n.\WSON ST. s s, 115 w Ligget av. new plbg, 
new partitions to 1-sty fr dwg: $1,000; (o) 
Rosofsky & Weiss, on prem : (a) Erhard D. 
Djooup. 1343 Chisholm (4). 

BAINBRIDGE AV. .3014. 1-sty fr ext, 9.6x21.6, 
new plumbing, new partitions to 2i^-sty fr dwg; 
$1..30(i: (o) Dr. Louis Kobel. on prem; (a) 
John H. Mortens. 37 E 28th (1). 

BOSCOBEL AV. w s. 2:M.7 n 168th, 2-sty fr 
ext, 13.6x30. new plumbing, new partitions & 
move 2-sty & attic fr dwg; $5,000: (o) Danto 
Vaene, 1262 Shakespeare av ; (a) Delia, Penna 

6 Erickson, 289 E 149th (3). 

GERARD AV. nee 161st, raise 10x13 2-2-sty 
fr strs & dwgs & build 1-sty of bk under same, 
making 3 stys, new str fronts, new girders & 
cols: $10,000; (o) Chas. W- Meyer, on prem; 
(a) Chas. S. Clark. 441 Tremont av (2). 

MULINER AV. 1S42, new plbg. new partitions 
to 2-sty fr dwg; $1,000; (o) Karl Olander, on 
prem: (a) H. Nordheim. 726 E 2.34 (5). 

PARK AV, 3123, new plbg, new partitions to 
2-sty & attic fr dwg; $2,000; (o) Angelina La- 
vitola. 291 E 149 : ( a ) Moore & Landseidel, 3 
av & 148th (Ol. 

Brooklyn 

BERGE NST. 1870, s w c Howard av, exterior 
& int alts to 3-sty fr str & 2 fam dwg ; $5,000 ; 
(o) Morris Macholder, 1772 Prospect pi- (a) 
E. M. Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin av (73). 

COTTAGE PL. .3027-41, e s, 214.7 s Surf av, 
move bldg. str front, etc, to 3-stv fr strs & 
hotel: $10,000; (o) Harry Weissbe'rg. 52 5 av 
Manhattan : (a) Jas. J. Millman, 26 Court 

ESSEX ST, 541, e s, 1.55 n Blake av, raise 
bldg, etc, 2 fam dwg; ,$2,000; (o) Hyman 
nugowich, 537 Essex; (a) Irving Kirshenblatt, 
335 Miller av (101). 

S6TH ST. 2217-21, n s, 140 e Bay pkway, ext 
to 3-sty fr str & 2 fam dwg; .$3,000; (o) 
SchUim & Duetch, 2221 ,86th : (a) Jacob Lub- 
roth, 44 Court (53). 

FRANKLIN AV, 320, w s, 47 s Clifton pi, int 
alts ,<;■ wall to 2-sty bk str. shop & 2 fam dwg; 
•$2,000: (o) Ben.i. Rosenberg. 1094 Bedford av ; 
(a) Gilbert I. Prowler, 367 Fulton (49). 

HOPKINSON AV. 4.35. e s. 100 n Pitkin av, 
exterior & int alts to 3-sty str & 2 fam dwg ; 
$6,000; (n) B. Newman, prem; (a) Harry 
Brodsky, Jr.. 583 Sutter av (5). 



Queens 

EVERGREEN.— Cypress av, 1179, 1-sty bk ext 
2.)X..4. rear shop & dwg, slag rf, int alt; $2,000; 
(o) Josephine Preslmayer. premises: (a) J. H. 
Lanzarone, 60 Jefferson St. Bklyn (58). 

JAMAICA. — Union Hall st, s w c, & Fulton 
St. elevator: $2,000; (o) Bank of Manhattan 
Co., s w c Union Hall & Pulton. Jamaica (47). 

L. I. CIT^'. — Grand av, s s, 75 e 3 av. 2-st-y 
fr ext. 10x19. rear, raise rf 2-sty, plurnbing'; 
.$2,200; (0) Anna Reges, 505 1 av. L. I. City 
(3). 

RIDGEWOOD.— Myrtle av, g s. 35 e Sum- 
merlield, 1-sty con blk ext, rear, 19x19, int alts 
& plumbing: $2,300; (o) Nathan Keller. 2396 
Myrtle av, Ridgewood : (a) -Geo. Clarke. 1756 
.\rmand pl. Ridgewood (9).- 



Real Estate Record and Builders Guide 

Founded March 21, 1868, by CLINTON W. SWEET 

Devoted to Real Estate, Building Construction and Building Management in the Metropolitan District 

Published Every Saturday by THE RECORD AND GUIDE COMPANY 
FRANK E. PERLEY, President and Editor E. S. DODGE, Vice-President J. W. FRANK, Secretary-Treasurer 



Entered as second class matter November 8, 1879, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under tha Act of March 3, 1879. 
Copyright, 1922, by The Record and Guide Company 119 West 40th Street, New York (Telephone: Bryant 4800) 



VOL. CIX 
NO. 3 (2810) 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 21, 1922 



25c. A COPY 
$12.00 A YEAR 



AdvertisinB Index 

Page 

A. B. See Electric Elevator. 4th Cover 

Ackerly, Orville B °j 

Adams & Co °' 

Adler, Ernest N • o^ 

American Bond & Mortgage Co... »i 

American Bureau of R. B oJ 

American Enameled Brick & Tile 

Co o-* 

Ames & Co 2d Cover 

Amy & Co., A. V 2d Cover 

Anderson & Co., James S... 2d Cover 
Anderson Brick & Supply Co.4th Cover 

Armstrong & Armstrong o3 

Ashforth & Co 2d Cover 

Atlantic Terra Cotta Co JJO 

Automatic Fire Alarm Co M 

Baiter, Alexander S2 

Bauer, Milbank & Molloy 82 

Bechman, A. G 82 

Bell Co., H. W 93 

Biltmore Realty Corp 82 

Boyd. James '6 

Boylan, John J 2d Cover 

Brennan, Edmund M 83 

Brensam Realty Corp TG 

Brett & Goode Co Front Cover 

Brook, Inc., Louis 92 

Brooks & Momand T6 

Brown. Frederick TO 

Brown Co., J. Romalne. .Front Cover 
Builders' Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 

Bulkley & Horton Co 82 

Busher & Co., Eugene J 2d Cover 

Butler & Baldwin Front Cover 

Cammann, Voorhees & Floyd 

2d Cover 

Carpenter. Leonard J 2d Cover 

Chauncey Real Estate 2d Cover 

City Investing Co G8 

Classified Advertisements 81 

Coburn, Alfred P 82 

Cross & Brown Front Cover 

Crulkshank Co Front Cover 

Cruikshank Sons. Wm.. Front Cover 

Cudner. R. E. Co 2d Cover 

Cusack Company 82 

Cushman & Wakefield 82 

Cutler & Co.. Arthur 2d Cover 

Cutner. Harry B 2d Cover 

Dailey. Clarke G 68 

Davies, J. Clarence 81 

Day. Joseph P 2d Cover 

Dean & Co., W. E 2d Cover 

Dike, 0. D. & H. V 2d Cover 

Dodge Co., F. W 74 

Dowd. James A 83 

Dubois, Chas. A '. 82 

Duffy Co.. J. P 90 

Dunlap & Lloyd 82 

Duress Co 2d Cover 

Edwards Co.. Charles G 2d Cover 

Edwards. Dowdney & Rlchart.... 08 

Elliman & Co.. Douglas L 76 

Ely & Co.. Horace S. .. .Front Cover 
Empire Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 

English, J. B 2d Cover 

Finch & Co., Chas. H 92 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Editorials 69 

Hoiising Shortage Measured by Census and 

Building Facts 71 

Port Topic is First at Monthly Realty Board 

Dinner 73 

Bill Before Congress Paves Way for New Fed- 
eral Building 73 

Review of Real Estate Market tor the Current 

Week 75 

Private Sales of the Week 75 

Statistical Table of the Week 84 

Principal Structures Scheduled for Erection in 

1922 85 

Many Large Buildings Planned for Early Spring 

Start 87 

Personal and Trade Notes ' 87 

Trade and Technical Society Events 87 

Building Materials Markets 88 

Current Building Operations 88 

Contemplated Construction 90 

Plans Filed for New Construction 93 



Page 

Finkelstein & Son, Jacob S3 

Fischer, J, Arthur 2d Cover 

Fisher, James B 82 

Fox & Co., Fredk 2d Cover 

Goodwin & Goodwin 2d Cover 

Grunert, Robert G 83 

Gulden, Royal Scott 82 

Harris Exchange 83 

Hecla Iron Works 02 

Hess, M. & L.. Inc Front Cover 

Holmes Elec. Protective. ..4th Cover 

Holt & Merrall. Inc 83 

Home Title & Insurance Co 68 

Hubbard. C. Bertram 2d Cover 

Jones & Son, William P S3 

Kane Co.. John P 4th Cover 

Keller. Charles G 82 

Kelley. T. H 82 

Kelly. Albert B 82 

Kempner & Son., Inc., D., 

Front Cover 

Kilpatrlck. Wm. D 68 

Kissling, J. P. & L. A 82 



Pag* 

Kloes. F. J 113 

Kohler. Chas. S 68 

Kopp & Co.. H. C 82 

Lackman, Otto 82 

Lawyers Mortgage Co t'J 

Lawyers Title & Trust Co 80 

Lawrence. Blake & Jewell 68 

Lawrence Cement Co 4th Cover 

Leaycraft & Co., Edgar J.. 

Front Cover 

Lelst, Henry G 2d Cover 

Lesch & Johnson 93 

Levers, Robert 82 

Losere, L. G 82 

Manning & Trunk.. 2d Cover 

Martin. Samuel H 2d Cover 

May Co., Lewis H 2d Cover 

McMahon, Joseph T 84 

Milner. Joseph 83 

Mississippi Wire Glass 4th Cover 

Monell, F. Bronson 2d Cover 

Moore. John Constable S3 

Moore's Sons. Morris. Inc. .2d Clover 



Advertising Index 

Page 

Moors, J. K 2d Cover 

Morgan Co., Leonard 83 

Muhlker, Arthur G 83 

Murray & Sons, Inc., John A.... 88 

Murtha & Schmohl 4th Cover 

Nail & Parker G8 

Natanson. Max N 84 

Nehring Bros 2d Cover 

New York Edison Co., The 91 

New York Title & Mortgage Co. 68-77 

Niewenhous Co., Inc 80 

Noyes & Co.. Chas. F. . . .Front Cover 

Ogden & Clarkson Corp 2d Cover 

O'Hare, Geo. L US 

Oppenheimer, Fred 82 

O'Reilly & Dahn 2d Cover 

Payton, Jr.. Co.. Philip A 84 

Pease & Elliman Front Clover 

Pell & Co.. S. Osgood !)3 

Pendergast, John F., Jr 82 

Pepe & Bro 76 

Pflomm, F. & G Front Cover 

Phelps, Albert D 82 

Pomeroy Co.. Inc., S. H !J0 

Porter & Co Front Cover 

Quell & Quell 82 

Read & Co., Geo. R Front Cover 

Realty Co. of America 68 

Rickert-Brcwn Realty Co 88 

Rinaldo. Hiram 82 

Ross. Frank U 00 

Runk, Geo. S 82 

Ryan. George J 2d Cover 

Schindler & Llebler 82 

Scbweibert. Henry 82 

Seaman & Pendergast 82. 

Shaw. Arthur L 83 

Shaw. Rockwell & Sanford 82 

Sherman & Kirschner 83 

Simberg, A. J 16 

Smith, Gerritt. Mrs 84 

Smith. Inc.. Malcolm B 82 

Solar Engineering Co 92 

Solove. R 80 

Spear & Co 82 

Speyers, Inc., James B 83 

Spotts & Starr 2d Cover 

Sterling Mortgage Co SI 

Tabolt. Jacob J 82 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co 68 

Tyng & Co., Stephen H., Jr 68 

Union Stove Works 88 

Van Valen. Chas. B 76 

Walsh, J. Irving 2d Cover 

Watson Elevator Co., Inc.4th Cover 

Weill Co.. H. M 76 

Wells .Architectural Iron Co 90 

Wells Sons. James N 2d Cover 

Westergren. Inc.. M. F 4th Cover 

White & Sons. Wm. A. .Front Cover 
Whiting & Co., Wm. H. .Front Cover 

Whitney-Foster Corp 82 

WIlllams-Dexter Co 83 

Winter. Benjamin 76 

Wood-Dolson Co Front (3over 

Wolff Gas Radiator Co., A. H 92 

Wyckoff, Walter C 2d Cover 

Zittel & Sons, Fred'k 2d Cover 



A Positive Foundation Upon Which to Build 



The Federal Reserve Board, in its January bulletin, declares that "the most encourag- 
ing feature of the business situation is that a positive foundation apparently has been estab- 
lished upon -which to build development during 1922." Governor Harding believes that the 
country as a -whole has passed safely the points of danger entailed in after-war deflation. 

One positive foundation upon -which real estate and construction interests can efifec- 
tively build their business is regular, consistent advertising in 

THE RECORD AND GUIDE 

For 54 Years the Authority in the Metropolitan District. 
Phone Bryant 4800 and a representative will call. 



Title Insurance and 
Mortgage Loans 

for . he Real Estate Owner 

Protection in 
Placing Loans 

for the Broker 

Guaranteed First Mort- 
gages and Certificates 

for the Investor 

New York Title 
&. Mortgage Company 



Manhattan 
Brooklyn 
Jamaica 
Richmond 
White Plains 
Mt. Vernon 



135 Broadway 

203 Montague St. 

375 Fulton St. 

24 Bay St. 

163 Main St. 

3 South 3d St. 



BrtU>Ushed 1887 

CHAS. S. KOHLER. Inc. 

Real Estate 
Insurance 

Broker and Manager of 
Estates 



MAIN OFTICE; 
Ml Oolnaibiu Ave. — Comer IMth St. 

BRANCH OFFICE: 

1«H Bt Nkiudat Ave.— Near ISlit St. 

NBW YORK 



GEORGE L. O'HARE 

MEMBER REAL ESTATE BOARD OF N. T. 

REAL ESTATE 

EXCEPTIONAL INVESTMKNTR 

8ELLIN0— RENTINO— BUSmBBB AND 

APARTMENT BUILDINGS 

SPECIALIZING IN LEASEHOLDS 

MORTGAGE LOANS 

FULL nUIPPID OEPT. FOR IXOHANaiNI 

489 FIFTH AVE. 

TEL. TANDERBILT 609}— •441 



William D. Kilpatrick 

REAL ESTATE 
OPERATOR 

149 BROADWAY 
SAMUEL KILPATBICK 



EDWARDS, 
DOWDNEY&RICHART 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

MORTGAGE 
LOANS 

156 Broadway, New York 

Tel. Cortland 1S71-U72 
Member Real Estate Board. N. Y. 



Lawrence, Blake & Jewell 

Mortgage Loans 

115 Broadway 

Tel. 4080 Rector 

Member Real Eatata Board, N. Y. 



Specialists in Harlem 

and 

Colored Tenement 
Properties 

NAIL & PARK£R 

REAL ESTATE 

145 West 135th Street 
New York City 



JOHN E. NAIL 
HENRY C. PARKER 



TelephoM (TMl 
Homliurtde I r«a 



BROADWAY STORE 
FOR RENT 

Located in Breslin Hotel, East Side of 
Broadway, near 29th St. Size: 15x50. 

For details apply to 

CLARKE G. DAILEY 

115 BROADWAY Rector 4300 

Full Commission to Brokers 



A Worry -Exempt Investment 

Investors can buy worry-exempt as well as tax-exempt 
investments. Home Title 5V2% guaranteed mortgages 
are worry-exempt, yield a steady income and principal 
never depreciates. 

HOME TITLE INSURANCE CO. 



i STEPHEN H. TYNG H. OAKEY HAH | 

SteplienH.TyDg,Jr,&Co. 

Incorporated 
Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

REAL ESTATE 

MANAGEMENT OF 
BUSINESS PROPERTY 

41 Union Square West 

22 EAST 17TH STREET 
Telephone: Stuyvesant 40M 



Wlllonghby and Jay Streets 
Brooklyn 



Post Office Building 
Jamaica 



Applications for Loans 

We would be glad to receive ap- 
plications from borrowers for loans 
between $10,000 and $30,000 in the 
Boroughs of Manhattan and the 
Bronx. 

We do not confine our loans to 
any particular class of property but 
require it to be properly located for 
its use and advantageously occupied. 

The rate is six per cent, and the 
fees are reasonable and we are pre- 
pared to deal either with brokers 
or principals. 

Our special desire for loans of this 
size just now does not preclude our 
handling very small loans or very 
large loans as usual. 

TiTlE guarantee 

& TRUST C9 

Capital $7,500,000 
Surplus $11,000,000 

176 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 
137 WEST 125TH STREET, NEW YORK 
370 EAST 149TH OTREET. NEW YORK 



^{je 

Eealtp Company 
of america 



FRANKLIN PETTTT 
Presidint 



TRANSACTS A QKN- 
ERAL BUSINK68 Dl 
T HE PURCHASB AND 
SALE OF NEW TORK 
CITY REAL KSTATB 



2 WALL STREET. NEW YORK CITT 

Rector OtlS-OtJI 



City Investing 
Company 

61 Broadway, New York 

Telephone: Bowline Green 9S39 

Capital, $5,000,000 

POBERT E. DOWLING, President 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



69 




Emergency Laws vs. Economic Laws 

During the discussion over the question of whether the 
Emergency Rent Laws and the resolution providing for 
tax exemption of new housing should be extended another 
year, it is advisable to consider the fact that with the ex- 
ception of Boston and Milwaukee, in no other large city in 
the country has special legislation been secured to protect 
tenants from voracious landlords, nor has special privilege 
been given to builders in the way of relieving them from 
paying their share of the municipal expenses for a term of 
years. But during the war building was proscribed in 
other commonwealths than New York, and rentals mounted 
rapidly in every community throughout the country as an 
increasing population demanded more housing and office 
space. And since the war building has been restricted in 
other cities by the same causes as have prevented the con- 
struction of new housing here, namely, the continued diffi- 
culty of getting mortgage money and the continuance of 
high wages of labor and high cost of building materials. 

Outside of New York, however, state legislatures gen- 
erally have not been called on to interfere with the working 
of the law of supply and demand. According to the sum- 
mary of legislation during 1920 and 1921, prepared by 
the Public Affairs Information Service of the Public Li- 
brary, only Wisconsin, Massachusetts and New Jersey 
have enacted "emergency" laws. Those passed in New 
Jersey are similar to the enactments in this state. The 
Wisconsin legislation, which is mild in character, is appli- 
cable chiefly to Milwaukee, and in Massachusetts provision 
has been made for a discretionary stay of proceedings in 
actions of summary process to recover possession of prop- 
erty and to provide that unjust, unreasonable and oppres- 
sive agreements shall be a defense in action for rents. Ac- 
cording to the same authority no states other than New 
York and New Jersey have passed tax exemption meas- 
ures. People in the less enlightened sections of the nation 
kicked just as vigorously about paying higher and higher 
rents as did New Yorkers, and they bemoaned the cessa- 
tion of building in their home towns, but they have not, 
with the exceptions noted, stormed legislative halls with 
quack palliatives to fend off oppressive landlordism, nor 
did they grant special favors to those few fortunates who 
were able to find money with which to build. 

Many New Yorkers are in doubt to-day whether the 
Emergency Rent Laws and tax exemption have really 
benefited them because they have to fall back on the fact 
that they do not know what might have happened if these 
measures of safety and provision had not been enacted. 
Things might have been worse, and then again they might 
have been no worse, or even better. Nobody knows, be- 
cause there is no way of knowing what might have taken 
place if things had been different. 

There is, however, one way in which the value of the 
rent and tax legislation may be measured. What happened 
in other cities where such measures were not taken and what 
are conditions now in these communities ? The New York 
Herald has taken pains to find out by a questionnaire di- 



rected to other cities where housing conditions were similar 
to those existing in New York when the "emergency" laws 
were passed. The returns show that in Chicago rents for 
the better class of apartments and detached houses are 25 
per cent higher than they were two years ago, while rents 
in tenement districts and poorer neighborhoods have ad- 
vanced only 10 per cent in two years. In Cincinnati six- 
room residences that rented at $36 a month two years ago 
rent for $40 now; five-room apartments that were $15 are 
now $18 per month, and $65 apartments now bring $75. 
Realty men in St. Louis report rentals as approximately 10 
cent cent more than two years ago. In Pittsburgh a few 
vacancies are reported, and it is believed that the rental 
peak was reached last year. 

Cuts in high-priced Boston apartments are declared to 
have equalled 25 per cent and this broke the backbone of 
prices down through the list. A 20 per cent decline is 
noted in Detroit, houses and apartments renting from $50 
up, while the reduction in rents in Indianapolis is esti- 
mated at about 10 per cent. In Baltimore and Philadelphia 
there has been little change from peak prices, which were 
about 50 per cent above the pre-war scale. 

When these facts are carefully weighed it forces the 
question whether the "emergency" legislation was justified, 
and if so, if it was wisely devised. Certainly the special 
legislation so far enacted at the instance of the Lockwood 
Committee has not resulted in any great addition to the 
number of dwellings in which three-quarters of the citizens 
of this community must, perforce of limited income, re- 
side. It is a well-known fact that rentals of moderate- 
priced apartments here show no sign of being lowered. 
They may not yet have reached the peak. In eight other 
cities the peak has been reached or definitely passed. We 
have "'emergency" laws ; they, excepting in Boston, have 
had none. We have been trying nostrums ; they have been 
relying on old and tried economic laws mixed with common 
sense. Which is the better off — New York, with 100,000 
landlord and tenant cases clogging the municipal courts 
and millions of rent money tied up in escrow, or these other 
American cities that have weathered the crisis without re- 
sort to questionable emergency measures? 

We are forced, it seems, to one of the following conclu- 
sions, either that New York is a city where the ordinary 
economic laws, elsewhere all powerful, cannot be relied on 
to work satisfactorily; or that New York is unique in being 
able to precipitate an "emergency" based on the same con- 
ditions which in other communities are deemed the cus- 
tomary consequences of certain precedents ; or that this 
state and city is endowed with officials whose sense of 
obligation to some of their constituents is exaggerated to 
the degree which affords them an excuse for the enactment 
of laws that disregard the rights of other citizens. 



Building Revival in Mid-Town District 

Study of the important building operations now sched- 
uled for erection during the coming spring indicates a lively 
interest on the part of builders and investors in the com- 



70 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



mercial development of the mid-town district of Manhat- 
tan, west of Broadway. Prior to the war there was a well- 
defined store and loft-building movement in this vicinity, a 
movement responsible for the erection of many modern 
commercial structures which were rapidly sold or rented at 
profitable terms. 

Businesses, which had for many years been confined to 
buildings of an almost obsolete type in the downtown sec- 
tion, were brought further north, following the improve- 
ment in rapid-transit facilities, and these downtown dis- 
tricts were practically deserted in favor of the more modern 
up-town conveniences. In several instances important in- 
dustries, which for generations had been grouped in lower 
Manhattan, followed the trend of the times and journeyed 
northward. The war, with its resultant disruptions of 
business activity, particularly that of real estate develop- 
ment along commercial lines in the mid-town section, 
checked this movement for several years. Now, however, 
investors and operators are apparently of the opinion that 
the time is ripe for further commercial expansion, and they 
are preparing a program of store and loft-building con- 
struction in the district between Thirty-first and Forty- 
second streets, Broadway to Eighth Avenue, which, while 
not as yet so important as that movement of several years 
ago, still is indicative of an extremely lively building period 
to come later this year. 

Two of the most important daily newspapers are plan- 
ning new structures for the expansion of their news serv- 
ice. The New York Tribune recently purchased a plottage 



'n West Fortieth Street for the erection of a modern print- 
ing establishment, and the New York Times has announced 
its plans for a large addition to its plant in Forty-third 
Street. S. Alorrill Banner and Herbert Mitler have had 
plans prepared by Robert T. Lyons for a $2,000,000 office 
and showroom building, twelve stories in height, at 132 to 
138 West Thirty-sixth Street, running through to Thirty- 
fifth Street. Schwartz & Gross are preparing plans for 
a fourteen-story store and loft building at 142 to 148 
West Thirty-sixth Street for Julius Tishman & Son, who 
in former years were extremely active in this section. This 
project will cost approximately $1,000,000. George and 
Edward Blum are the architects for a fourteen-story store 
and loft structure at 237 to 239 West Thirty-seventh Street, 
for Lefcourt & Haas, and Max Aronson will soon start the 
construction of a $2,000,000 commercial building at 242 to 
252 West Thirty-sixth Street, from plans by Schwartz & 
Gross. At 206 to 212 West Thirty-fourth Street the 
North River Savings Bank is planning a new building to 
cost about $100,000, and there are several important altera- 
tion projects underway or contemplated that will practically 
amount to new buildings, as they will completely recon- 
struct old-fashioned buildings into modern commercial 
structures. 

It has been a number of years since there was as much 
activity in this particular part of Manhattan as is scheduled 
at present, and with this for a start there is every likelihood 
this district will be one of the most active from a construc- 
tion .standpoint of any in Greater New York. 



Walter Stabler Discus.ses Mortgages at the Y. M. C. A. Realty Lecture Course 



BEFORE a good-sized audience, comprising the Real Estate 
Class of the West Side Y. M. C. A., Walter Stabler, 
Comptroller of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 
delivered a lecture Tuesday evening that aroused much interest 
among the class, many of whose members asked questions 
afterward. His subject was: "Real Estate Mortgages— What 
They Are, How They Are Made, How They Are Collected." 
Louis V. Bright, president of the Lawyers' Title & Trust Com- 
pany, presided and introduced the speaker as one best qualified 
to discuss the subject of mortgages. A feature of the class 
was the presence of several women, which in this era of women 
real estate brokers, shows that there are more women consid- 
ering real estate as a business. 

Mr. Stabler, in opening his address, remarked that Mr. 
Bright knew as much about the mortgage market as he did 
and that he could recall the time when he was glad to go to 
Mr. Bright to learn something of value about real estate and 
mortgages. 

Continuing, Mr. Stabler said: "Mortgages are such a com- 
mon thing in life that the general public knows all about 
them. I should say that about 95 per cent of all real estate is 
mortgaged. The investing public is so accustomed to a mort- 
gage that they think they are as necessary to real estate as a 
house is. Some real estate is unimproved and is mortgaged. 

"What is a mortgage?" asked Mr. Stabler. "It is an instru- 
ment tliat is recorded. It establishes a lien of record against 
real estate and is an official notice of a lien. Mortgages in New 
York state, and in some other states, are always accompanied 
by a bond. A bond is really a personal promise to pay, a per- 
sonal liability. If a property is sold in foreclosure and does 
not bring the amount of the mortgage with expense, then, of 
course, a deficiency judgment is taken against the borrower. 
No man should lend or borrow on mortgage without the services 
of a lawyer, for there is nothing wiser than avoiding mistake 
for either side. A mortgage is a technical instrument. 

"In many states, among them Missouri, California, Louisiana 
and others, a trust deed takes the place of a mortgage. The 
borrower deeds his property, during the life of the loan, to a 
trustee, specifying the purpose. He signs notes, agreeing to pay 
RO much with interest: Sometimes he does not sign interest 
notes. This trust deed provides security of payment at the time 



fixed. The practice is not exactly the same in all states that 
use this method. In Indiana, Illinois and Minnesota, especially, 
the lender has less security than in other states. It is up to 
the lender there to thoroughly know v^'liat he is doing. An 
owner in those states has right of redemption before the pur- 
chaser at foreclosure can get title. This is bad for both the 
borrower and lender, because it makes complications regarding 
the rent and taxes. 

"In New York state the normal time for a foreclosure to be 
completed is about three months, provided there is no defense 
to the action. With a defense, and in bankruptcy proceedings, 
the time is usually much longer; in fact, it is frequently in- 
definite. 

"In states where the trust deed procedure is followed there 
is no such delay and uncertainty. If there is a default in the 
trust deed the holder of the deed has the Sheriff advertise the 
property for sale and that official sells it from the Court House 
steps. The owner cannot get away with the income. The mort- 
gagee gets quick possession. That has its advantages. I would 
like to see the various states get together on this vital subject 
of mortgages and arrange some uniform method that would 
redound to the advantage of all. The New York method has its 
good points and so has the trust deed method. 

"Pennsylvania is strong on mortgage matters. The mortgagor 
has to give a judgment bond wherein he confesses judgment. 
If he is in default the mortgagee can docket the confession of 
judgment and the Sheriff, as a result, can sell. The judgment 
bond also encumbers any other property the mortgagor may 
have, as this bond automatically becomes a lien. It is advan- 
tageous because it provides absolute security for the lender 
and practically prevents the necessity for a deficiency judgment." 

Mr. Stabler went into a lengthy discussion of real estate 
bonds. He said that the system was a Western idea originally. 
The methods, he said, were not the same as those used by 
conservative lenders. The underlying principle of real estate 
bonds was the same as that of railroad bonds. The bonds are 
issued and secured by mortgages, said the speaker. 

"Another system/' said Mr. Stabler, "are real estate certifi- 
cates, such as title insurance companies provide. They are 
really bonds. The advantage is that they have a careful real 
estate security behind them and guarantee of payments. Cer- 
tificates and guaranteed mortgages are fine investments. The 
companies that issue them have large capital and surplus and 
the interest is always paid. This line of mortgage business 
(Continued on page 86) 



January 21. 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



71 



REAL ESTATE SECTION 



Housing Shortage Measured by Census and Building Facts 

Increase in Population in Last Five Years Just About Equals Some Estimates of 
Present Deficiency, But Allowance Must Be Made for New Building 



WITH the Legislature at Albany considering plans to 
continue the rent and tax-exemption laws for another 
year or possibly longer, the question uppermost in real 
estate and building, as well as lay circles is: "How extensive is 
the actual shortage of living space in New York City today?" 
A great many think inadvertently of Manhattan as comprising 
the municipal area afifected, whereas the question applies in- 
tensely to the Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens as parts of the 
city contributing much to the alleviation of the housing short- 
age and as parts where population is growing. 

The Federal census shows an actual decrease in the popula- 
tion of The Borough of Manhattan in the ten-year period from 
1910 to 1920 of 48,860, and the Bureau of Vital Statistics esti- 
mates that there has been a further decrease in this borough 
of 9,872 in the two years since the census was taken, making 
a total decline of 58,732 in twelve years. Taking Manhattan 
alone^ there are, therefore, about 6,000 less families to be taken 
care of than there were twelve years ago. This means that, 
other things being equal, a "shortage" of apartments in Man- 
hattan cannot reasonably be figured out, because the number 
of large apartment buildings constructed and of one-family 
houses altered into one- and two-family apartments has almost 
certainly offset the replacing of housing by commercial struc- 
tures on the Island . 

Investigation by the Record and Guide shows that there con- 
tinues to be a shortage of housing space in all the other bor- 
oughs. Rentals have not receded any in them, except slightly 
between renting seasons ;and they rise to prevalent levels with 
the approach of each rental period. There is not being built 
and there probably will not be built any apartment houses that 
builders can rent at the standards which prevailed before 1918. 
Builders maintain that no such rentals can be offered, that the 
question is entirely an economic one involving the cost of labor 
and material and that pre-war standards of rentals would be 
absolutely unprofitable. 

On the other hand, it is contended by some that if multi- 
family houses increase vastly in number the increased supply 
will cause a reduction of rentals. The fact that rentals have 
not decreased is causing thousands of families, who in the past 
lived in rented apartments, to board with families who have 
fair-sized apartments. There are thousands of families, too, 
who in the past occupied apartments of from^ five to seven 
rooms who are living now in apartments of three rooms in order 
to whittle as closely as possible to the bone of low rental. 

The Bureau of Vital Statistics, using the Federal census fig- 
ures as a basis, estimates the increase in the population of the 
five boroughs of New York City from 1917 to 1922 as 439,395, 
or a total of 87,879 families, on the generally-accepted theory 
that on the average five people constitute a family. The Lock- 
wood Committee holds there is a shortage of about 80,000 or 
85,000 apartments in New York, or practically the same as the 
probable increase in population as figured on the arithmetical 
basis by the Bureau of Vital Statistics. Building stopped in 
1917, and if there had been no building since it would be rea- 
sonable to estimate a shortage of about 85,000 apartments in 
the whole city. But what are the facts? 

In 1920 there were built over a hundred tenements costing 
more than $20,000,000, also 4,000 one-family houses, and nearly 
a thousand two- and three-family houses. The figures for 1921 



are given more in detail below, but they aggregate many times 
the 1920 showing, and all reports indicate that before the Emer- 
gency Rent Laws expire by limitation on November 1 next 
there will be constructed, ready for occupancy, many times the 
number of apartments, one- and two-family houses and single 
residences that have been built during 1921. 

These facts must be taken into consideration in estimating 
the present shortage and that which will exist on November 1 
next. Certainly enough housing has been constructed in 1920 
and 1921 to materially reduce the "shortage" of 80,000 or 85,000 
which the Lockwood Committee indicates. And with the pres- 
ent impetus attained by builders this shortage will be still fur- 
ther reduced by next November . 

Brooklyn last year built and is now building more apartment 
houses than any other borough and a large number of one- and 
two-family houses. The total number of applications for build- 
ing permits granted in Brooklyn last year was 2,194, and ninety 
per cent of these have been utilized to build and the rest will 
be, the delay being a matter of arranging building loans. The 
total estimated cost of all kinds of buildings for living pur- 
poses planned in Brooklyn last year was $162,132^547. These 
will accommodate 25,000 families. 

The new year has started well in the matter of new building. 
The week ending January 7 witnessed the filing of plans in 
Brooklyn for 160 new buildings to cost $1,336,000 and to pro- 
vide for 299 families ;and the week ending January 14 showed 
plans filed for buildings to house a total of 800 families and 
to cost an aggregate of more than $4,500,000. 

In Queens about forty per cent, of the new living space 
planned and being built is ready for use. This includes multi- 
family houses and one- and two-family houses. This Long 
Island borough is building more one- and two-family houses 
than multi-family houses, with the result that while the total 
number of buildings is greater the total amount of living space 
is not any greater, if as great, as in Brooklyn. The street and 
sewer system of Queens, as a whole, is not so complete as in 
the older borough of Brooklyn, and consequently one- and 
two-family houses are more suitable for much of the territory. 
During 1921, in Queens, plans were filed for 7,864 frame one- 
and two-family houses to accommodate a total of 11,844 fam- 
ilies; 786 brick one- and two-family houses, to accommodate 
1,280 families; 346 frame flats with stores, to house 586 
families; 407 brick flats with stores, to house 768 families ;and 
141 multi-family houses, with accommodations for 1,267 families. 
Practically all of these are under way and will be finished this 
Spring. In addition, there are 87 brick tenement houses with 
■■itores that will house 664 families. The total estimated cost 
of new living space in Queens planned during 1921 is $58,000,000. 
The year 1922 will in all likelihood witness even heavier build- 
ing of residential buildings of all kinds. Queens did not start 
the erection of multi-family houses to any extent until midsum- 
mer last year, whereas this year numerous plans for multi- 
family houses and one- and two-family houses have already 
been filed. Of 16,409 new living quarters provided for in 
Queens last year about 6,500 of them are ready for occupancy, 
and they have been largely rented or sold, as some of this space 
comprises one- and two-family houses. Plans for new buildings 
for living purposes filed with the Queens Bureau of Buildings 
(Continued on page 86) 



72 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



DEVELOPMENTS OF 1921 AND PROSPECTS FOR 1922 

ANALYZED BY REALTY AND CONSTRUCTION LEADERS 



Frank Bailey, vice-president of the Title Guarantee and 
Trust Company — At the present time it is absolutely Im- 
possible to produce a Iiouse which can be occupied by a 
tenant who can afford to pay a maximum of $12 a room, 
and when one remembers that the greatest number of peo- 
ple are in the class that can pay $12 or less a room, then 
it is perfectly obvious that the poor man is not approach- 
ing cheaper rents, but is approaching higher rents. 

Louis v. Brlglit, President, Lawyers Title and Trust Company 

— A slow but steady resumption of buyers willing to take 
mortgage offerings is apparent. Even the demand for out- 
side bonuses and commissions is less evident. As yet the 
demand is for the very best, and investors are critical, as 
they should always be, of the security offered. 

Joseph P. Day — 1920 was a record year in the auction market 

and few people thought that the 1921 totals would even 
equal it. That they were mistaken is now a matter of his- 
tory, and 1921 will certainly go down as a banner year. 
The home and lot buying movement is in full swing. The 
demand is far from satisfied, and I look to see great activ- 
ity during the next spring and summer. 

Robert E. Dowlingr, President, City Investing Company — Real 
estate in New York is in fine shape entering the new year. 
It is in the soundest condition I have known since 1907. 
It may not be known generally, but there is less mortgage 
on Manhattan real estate today than there was ten years 
ago. Thousands of mortgages have been reduced from 20 
to 40 per cent, during that time and equities, of course, 
have been increased. Too much stress cannot be placed on 
this point, for the mortgages were reduced during periods 
of depression. People got into the habit of paying off 
mortgages. 

J. Clarence Da-»-ies — I think that 1922, from all present as- 
pects, is going to be a year of real real-estate activity. In 
my opinion the people who get in at present will have the 
opportunity to make profits before the year 1923. 

Colin M. Eadie, of James IV. W^ell's Sons — There are several 
hundred houses in the Chelsea section rented to tenants, 
in most cases at old rentals, who sublet for furnished 
rooms, and whose owners would be glad to alter inlo 
apartments, but the rent laws as administered will not al- 
low them either to improve the property or obtain an equi- 
table return for their investment, so that the Chelsea sec- 
tion for 1921 has had the poorest year in its history. 

Charles G. Edwards, President, Real Estate Board of New 
Yorli — The beginning of the new year brings to mind the 
great activities in real estate during the year just closing 
and the possibilities of a new year and the necessity for 
co-ordinating the interests of real estate brokers and own- 
ers throughout the city. The Real Estate Board of New 
York has adopted its programme of activities for the com- 
ing year and hopes for great achievements in municipal 
and legislative work, tending to increase the usefulness of 
the board to its members and creating activities that 
should enlist the hearty support of those interested in real 
estate, whether from the standpoint of the broker or 
owner. 

Douglas L. Elliman — It looks now as if an equilibrium had 
been established and that owners would no longer seek the 
excessive rentals of two years ago. but would be satisfied 
witli a fair return on their investment, which would mean 
a slight reduction from the scale of rentals established last 
year. We are, however, a long way off from an adequate 
supply of low-priced apartments, and a great change must 
come over the entire industrial situation before such a 
thing is possible. 

James B. Fisher, President of the Brooklyn Real Estate 
Board — Tlie next year bids fair to be a wonderful year for 
real estate to come into its own, with fixed values, better 
financing, restored confidence and a fuller realization by 
the public that after all it is the most stable thing in ex- 
istence. 

Fenimore C. Goode, of Brett & Goode — The center of specu- 
lative activity just now is the Pennsylvania Terminal dis- 
trict. This wide expanse of territory, extending from 
Thirtieth to Forty-second street and from Broadway to the 
Hudson River, affords more opportunity for the real estate 
operator and speculative builder than almost any other 
section of the city. After fifteen years of quietude the 
district is at last awakening. 

Harry Hall, Vice President of William A. White & Sons — 

A man need not be a prophet to venture the assertion that 
New York — far from being finished — has really only just 
begun. 



Charles H. Jewell, of Lawrence, Blake & Jewell — The new 

year of 1922 promises to show further improvement in the 
general estimation of real estate as a possesion, with 
therefore higher appraisal valuations on land and old 
buildings in good condition and more building on account 
of lower costs of new construction. There should be a con- 
stantly increasing supply of mortgage funds. 

Clarence H. Kelsey, President of the Title Guarantee and 
Trust Company — The crux of the whole situation is the ex- 
cessive cost of materials brought about in many cases by 
illegal combinations on the part of the material men and 
the excessive wages and limited production of union labor. 
The Lockwood Committee is right in insisting upon the 
evils of both classes being corrected as quickly and fully 
as possible so as to make unnecessary any extension of the 
tax exemption privilege and to discontinue it as quickly as 
possible. The situation will never be righted until honesty 
in dealings is recognized by both the material men and the 
mechanics as the best policy. 

Bryan L. Kennelly — Manhattan has hardly been developed 
and within the next decade or two, when the real stride 
of development is begun, we must look for a real estate 
growth outdistancing by a tremendous margin any growth 
of the past. 

W^illiam D. Kilpatrick — The fact that building was progress- 
ing all over the country without tax exemption or other 
artificial stimulant has not seen the light of day. It is 
unfortunate that the extra burdens of taxes and rents of 
non-exempt property imposed by tax exemption must be 
borne by those least able to bear them. 

E, A. MaoDou^all, President, Queensboro Corporation — If 

there was any justification for the existing emergency rent 
laws there was the same justification for the tax exemption 
law. If there is excuse for one there is need for the other. 
The exemption should continue ■with the rent laws. If one 
is re-enacted the other should be. But, in any event, the 
exemption sliould be continued to November 1, 1922, so as 
to insure that new dwellings "will be constructed for which 
plans have already been filed as of December 10, 1921, 
which amounted to $95,000,000. 

AVillinm F. Morgan, President of the Merchants' Association 
of Ne-*v York — Tile underlying business conditions through- 
out the country are sound. Our resources are unimpaired. 
Our domestic market, to whicli apparently we must look 
mainly for some time to come, is increasing in purchasing 
power. All that is needed is the spirit of confidence and 
there are many signs that tliis is returning. 

Paul Nehring, Vice President, Nchring Brothers — Last year 
was a very active and interesting year on Washington 
Heights, with a strong demand for investment property. 
The majority of owners realize tliat in holding Heights 
improved property they have something that is staple and 
will be in demand as long as real estate is to be considered 
a good investment. 

Charles F. Noyes — In our opinion the year 1921 clearly dem- 
onstrated our belief in the superiority of downtown real 
estate. We expect that the year 1922 will see a large 
amount of funds ordinarily invested in stocks and bonds 
devoted to the purchase of downtown real estate. There is 
also a constantly increasing flood of funds for mortgage 
loans, wliich greatly aids investing purchasers. 

rtobert E. Simon — Many fear the possibility of a reduction in 
rents. This is bound to come, but should not disturb the 
investment market. The activity will be on a much safer 
and saner price level. It is not healthy to have a condition 
where either landlord or tenant is in the position of dic- 
tator of price and terms. The large lending institutions 
can help a great deal to prevent extreme over-production. 

Paul Starrett, President, George A. Fuller Company — A large 
number of substantial new building projects are on the 
way. The supply of space at present is probably greater 
than the demand, but the population of New York Is in- 
creasing at the rate of 200,000 per year, and this will ob- 
sorb a large amount of space. Conservative real estate 
men are of the opinion that the present unoccupied space 
will be absorbed within a year. Before very long tenants 
who were forced into inconvenient, undesirable space will 
return to the better, more up-to-date buildings, and this, 
with the natural growth of the city, will absorb any 
available space now unoccupied, and there will be tenants 
for many more well located, up-to-date buildings. 

S. W. Siranss. President of S. ^V. Strauss & Co The supply 

of money and credit have been restored to normal. With 
interest rates relatively low, the price of credit is again 
within reach of business men. The great reservoir of tlie 
national cerdit is ready and funds are ample to put into 
business when business is ready to go ahead. 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



73 



Port Is Topic at First Monthly Realty Board Dinner 

Successful Inauguration of Series of Get-Together Meetings for Discussion of . 
Questions of Prime Importance to Business 



MARKING the first monthly gathering of members of the 
Real Estate Board of New York, in accordance with a 
program to be carried out seven more time this 
year, about two hundred members of the organization dined at 
Delmonico's on Thursday evening, January 12. The diners 
heard an analysis and a lively discussion of the question of 
improving the Port of New York in accordance with the gen- 
eral plan of the Commission of Port Authority. After the 
event was over it was the consensus of opinion that the 
occasion was one of the best get-together affairs that the 
Board has ever held. The spirit of good fellowship abounded, 
and many members who were not well acquainted had oppor- 
tunity to become more intimate as the evening wore on. 

Charles G. Edwards, President of the Board, who presided, 
said that he was much gratified at the size of the attendance, 
and he expected that the next dinner would be still better 
attended. He said he hoped that the gatherings would be 
educational ; and it was evident that the first one was. Mr. 
Edwards stated that each month there would be discussed some 
question vital to real estate values that hinged on municipal 
improvements or taxation, and that at these gatherings such 
questions could be heard at length. 

E. H. Outerbridge, Chairman of the Commission of Port 
Authority, and Julius Henry Cohen, counsel to that body, 
were the speakers. Mr. Outerbridge had illustrated on a 
screen various working parts of the port area and discussed 
appropriately each picture as it appeared. 

A question that interested the realtors greatly was one put 
to Mr. Cohen by Alfred E. Marling, former President of the 
Chamber of Commerce, which was: "How is this great project, 
as proposed, to be financed?" And promptly Mr. Cohen an- 
swered : "The act creating the Port Authority did not empower 
it to raise money by taxation or by pledging any municipality 
or any state within the port area to extend credit. The money 
will have to be raised by the issuance of stock. No one can 



doubt, in the light of the business already done within the port 
area and the business yet to be done on an enlarged scale, 
the stability of the investment. These securities will be tax 
exempt and the exemption cannot be impaired by any future 
action of either New York or New Jersey. 

"After the states have approved the plan we know that there 
will be sufficient saving accomplished by the development of 
new facilities to take care of a sinking fund for any securities 
issued. We must prove the efficacy of the plan to the public, 
not the voting public, but the investing public. And we can go 
ahead with the building of the facilities proposed just as 
fast as we can show that they are economically sound. We 
have tried to show by our remarks and illustrations here tonight 
that they are as sound as every dollar put into them." 

Mr. Cohen was asked what the effect would be if the proposed 
St. Lawrence River canal should be built before plans for the 
improvement of this port could be put into effect. 

"If the canal it built first it would develop the diversion of business 
away from New York," he said. *'The cotton business has gone, and I 
have been told that New York need never expect to get it back again. 
The export tobacco business also has been lost. If the grain export 
business goes to New Orleans and Montreal, New York may expect to 
lose it all before she can catch up." 

"We can use the Barge Canal and the Hudson River and give the West 
a cheaper outlet to the sea than through the St. Lawrence. That is what 
Governor Miller meant when he urged the use of existing capital invest- 
ment. The State has spent .$165,000,000 on the Barge Canal, and the 
Governor took the business point of view in saying that we should take 
existing capital investment and improve that." 

Prominent among the members of the Real Estate Board who 
attended were Robert E. Simon, W. D. Kilpatrick, Charles F. 
Noyes, Laurence McGuire, Walter Stabler, Alfred E. Marling, 
Francis Guerrlick, A. N. Gitterman, Alexander C. McNulty, 
Richard O. Chittick, as well as representatives from nearly 
every prominent real estate firm in the city. From Brooklyn 
came Fenwick B. Small, George H. Horton, and James B. Fisher, 
President of the Brooklyn Real Estate Board, and Arthur W. 
Gelston, Secretary of that Board. 



Bill Before Congress Paves Way For New Federal Building 



PLANS for the demolition of the old postoffice and the 
erection of a new Federal building on the old court house 
site have been materially advanced by the introduction in 
Congress of a bill providing for the appointment by Post- 
master General Hays of a commission of "Three officials who 
shall have authority to exchange the land known as the old 
postoffice site in the city of New York for other lands to be 
deeded by the city of New York in exchange for such site ; 
that this commission shall confer and arrange with the author- 
ized committee of the Board of Estimate of the city of New 
York, consisting of the Mayor, Comptroller and President of 
the Borough of Manhattan." 

The bill was introduced by Representative Albert B. Rossdalc 
following the approval by President Harding of Postmaster 
General Hays' proposal at a recent cabinet meeting that a 
suitable building or buildings should be provided to house the 
various Federal bureaus in the city now in the old postoffice or 
in rented quarters. It was found that approximately $900,000 
per year is expended for rent of offices in New York City. 
The project of the removal of the old postoffice building has 
been agitated for several years but not progress was made 
until about three months ago when Postmaster General Hays 
took the matter up with Comptroller Craig and representatives 
of various civic organizations in the chambers of Federal Judge 
Martin T. Manton. It was then virtually decided that the 
Federal Government would go on with the project if the 
proper sort of legislation and an appropriation could be ob- 
tained from Washington. The Board of Estimate Committee, 
which was appointed after a hearing on the project several 



weeks ago, and with whom Mr. Hays' commission will have to 
deal, consists of Mayor Hylan, Comptroller Craig and Julius 
Miller, President of the Borough of Manhattan. 

Comptroller Craig, in discussing the matter with Postmaster 
General Hays, told him that if the Federal authorities would 
indicate how much ground they needed for new buildings the 
city would be in a position to make an offer of land in ex- 
change for the old postoffice site. In accordance with this 
plan the various Federal departments at Washington are 
making investigations of their present accommodations in this 
city and the need for additional space. When these facts have 
been collected tentative plans for one or more buildings will 
be drawn and estimates of cost will be prepared for submis- 
sion to Congress. Congressman Rossdale has received assur- 
ances that his bill will come up for a hearing before the House 
Committee on Public Buildings and Grounds within a few 
weeks. President Harding's approval of the project marks a 
departure from the Government's policy for several years that 
no public building measures should be considered by Congress 
until other pressing legislation was disposed of. 

The city officials are considering the offer of the blocTc 
bounded by Leonard street on the north, Baxter street on the 
east. Worth street on the south and Center street on the west. 

Postmaster Morgan is working with the special committee 
appointed by Postmaster General Hays to study ways of im- 
proving the postal service in this city. The members of this 
committee are William Fellowes Morgan, President of the 
Merchants' Association; Clarence H. Kelsey, President of the 
Title Guarantee and Trust Company; Michael Friedsam, Presi- 
dent of B. Altman & Co.. and ex-Governor Alfred E. Smith, 



74 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



Covers 27 States 



DODGE REPORT SERVICE — Established January 1, 1892 



December Contracts 

awarded in the Dodge Territory amounted to 
$198,518,300, the second largest December total 
on our records. 

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Offices of 


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New York 


- - - 119 West 40th Street 


Buffalo - 


- 409 Niagara Life Building 


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- - 1821 Chestnut Street 


Pittsburgh 


- - - • Bessemer Building 


Cleveland 


- 920 Citizens Bank Building 


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- - - - 301 Cerke Building 


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- - 860 Penobscot Building 


Chicago - 


- - 131 No. Franklin Stre«t 


St. Louis - 


600 Title Guaranty Building 


Minneapolit 


- 407 South Fourth Street 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



75 



Review of Real Estate Market for the Current Week 

Eveiy Borough of the City Figured Prominently in the Dealing and Residential, 
Manufacturing and Commercial Parcels Divided Honors 



THERE were a few notable high spots in the real estate 
market this week, together with a varied assortment of 
general dealing. Emphasizing the heavy dealing in va- 
cant plots in the Bronx, that has prevailed for many months, 
was the sale of the old homestead tract of the Patterson es- 
tate, comprising 34 lots and overlooking Poe Park, in the 
Fordham section. The old holding was for many years the 
residence of the late well known City Magistrate and politician, 
Jacob Patterson. The tract will be improved with large apart- 
ment houses and a picturesque spot will have vanished. An- 
other big transaction was the sale of a six-story factory build- 
ing, with railroad connections, in Long Island City. 

The Childs Restaurant firm bought a building, in the Broad- 
way section of Harlem, for its business uses. This is the 
second parcel that this chain store firm has bought within two 
weeks. Its policy usually, in the past, has been to lease a 
store or building for 21 years or more and equip it for its pur- 
poses. Perhaps the notably high rentals on new leases in busy 
centers is impelling the firm to buy links in its chain as a more 
satisfactory and profitable way of handling them. Another 
large sale in Long Island City was that of the American Chicle 
Company's plant to a dye firm. 

Marking activity in improved property in the Bronx was 
the resale of the Haffen Brewery property in the Melrose 
section. The sale to the city of a 9-story concrete loft building 



in Brooklyn, for use by the Board of Education, was another 
distinguishing feature of a busy week. There were some large 
apartment house deals in the northern reaches of town. A 
landmark was marked for demolition when old St. Luke's Ger- 
man Evangelical Church property, on West 42d street, changed 
hands. Church sites adjacent to Times Square or any other 
vital center of the city's life have become too valuable for 
religious uses; but, the church that has such a site to sell is 
hicky. 

Two large sites for modern buildings in the Pennsylvania 
zone and the sale of some small parcels there swelled the total 
of the week's business remarkably. The lower West side 
contributed some sales that mark an activity caused by the 
building of the vehicular tunnel. Numerous business tenants 
bought the properties they occupy. This may be taken as sta- 
bility of business in given centers and a strengthening of the 
investment movement throughout the city. Some large parcels 
on Staten Island changed hands. 

Some large and long-term leases in strategic business sec- 
tions were negotiated. The renewal of a long lease in the 
chemical district was marked by a one hundred per cent in- 
crease in the rental. Numerous dwellings in good residential 
sections were leased and several were leased for the purpose 
of remodeling into business structures and small apartment 
houses. 



PRIVATE REALTY SALES. 



THE total number of sales reported, but not 
recorded in Manhattan this week, was 127. 
as against 133 last week and DS a year ago. 

The number of sales south of 5ftth st was 51, 
as compared with 5ii last week and 76 a year 
ago. 

The number of sales north of 59th st was 76, 
as compared with 74 last week and 44 a year 
ago. 

From the Bronx 53 sales at private contract 
were reported, as against 56 last week and 20 
a year ago. 

Statistical tables, including the number of re- 
corded instruments, will be found on page 84. 



Another Ancient Holding Sold 

An additional purchase has been made by I. 
Randolph Jacobs and Everett Jacobs to their 
holdings by the acquisition of 557 Water st., a 
5-story brick warehouse, size 24x74.4, through 
Harry B. Cutner, from the estate of Katherine 
Remson Hunter, another branch of the old 
Rutger's family, who part with this property 
after an undisturbed ownership dating back 
over 250 years. M'-ssrs. Jacobs now control the 
four warehouses, 557-565 Water at. 



Seamans Estate Sells a Corner. 

L. Tanenbaum, Strauss & Co, sold lor the es- 
tate of Clarence W. Seamans to George A. 
Gunshor the northeast corner -if Bloccker and 
Lafayette sts, a gore strip 2xli;0x81, running 
along Bleecker st to Shinbone alley. The es- 
tate at one time owned the adjoining improved 
parcel and sold it in 1920 through the same 
brokers. The late Mr. Seamans was long of the 
firm of Wyckoff, Seamans & Benedict. 

The buyer of the gore will improve it with 
a store structure. The gore was caused by the 
widening of Lafayette st. 



Tenant Buys Hudson St. Parcel 

Crist & Herrick sold for Herbert and Albert 
Marshall, to the tenant. 555 Hudson st.. a 3- 
Btory brick building on a lot 16x87.4x16.9, ad- 
Joining the northwest corner of Perry st. 



Bradhurst Av. Corner Sold 

Nehring Bros, sold for the Chateau Holding 
Corporation. Sidney Sonn, president, to Fred- 
erick Horlina: 242-246 Bradhurst av., two 6- 
story apartment houses, on a plot 101.11, north- 
east corner of ln4lh St., overlooking Colonial 
Park. The immediate corner contains stores. 



Resells Elevator Apartments 

The two 6-story elevator apartment houses. 
240x07.4. at 715 to 725 West 172d St., have been 
purchased from the Ralph Realty Co., Samuel 
Wacht, Jr., president, by the Joe-Hen Realty 



Co., Joseph Goldfein president. The houses are 
between Fort Washington and Haven avs, and 
are arranged for 84 families. They were held 
at $.")50,000 and return an annual rental of 
.$00,000. Benjamin Harris was the broker. 

This is part of the square block comprising 
ten apartment houses and 19 lots, bounded by 
Fort Washington and Haven avs.. 172d and 173d 
sts., bought by the sellers in November from 
the Ecallaw Co. All of the block has now been 
resold with the exception of the Fort Washing- 
ton av block front. A large vacant parcel was 
sold to Joseph Wolkenberg, who is erecting two 
elevator apartments. 



City Buys Big Brooklyn Building 

M. & L. Hess sold for the Tillary Construction 
Co.. to the City of New York the 9-story rein- 
forced concrete and fireproof building. 200x100, 
covering the block fronting on the side of Con- 
cord St., from Duffic.'ld st to Flatbush av exten- 
sion. The ground area is 20,000 square feet, 
while the structure itself embraces 180,000 
square feet. 

The same brokers leased 4 floors of this build- 
ing in October, 1921. to the Board of Education. 
The city authorities, however, found it to the 
advantage of the city to become owner rather 
than lessee, and hence purchnsed the property. 
The owners were asking $850,000. The Board 
of Education has taken possession and is now 
occupying the premises. 



President Kelsey's Annual Report 

C. H. Kelsey. president of the Title Guaran- 
tee and Trust Company, submitted his annual 
report to the stockholders and trustees at the 
annual meeting of the company, held on Tues- 
day last. President Kelsey pointed out that 
from the standpoint of earnings 1921 was the 
most productive year in the company's history, 
showing net profits of $2,461,562. He added, 
however, that these excess earnings were due to 
the fact that the securities sold showed a profit 
ins'end of showing a loss, as they did in 1920. 

The statement of the condition of the com- 
pany on December 31. 1921. shows total re- 
sources of $54,77O..^iO0.54. of which $13,987,042.11 
repres'^nts bonds and mortgages. The Title 
Gupranteo and Trust Company is cipitalized at 
$7,500,000, its surplus at the end of the year was 
$11,000,000. and undivided profits $584,427.23. 

In the course of his annual report. President 
Kelspy brought out the fact that th^re were 
fewer deeds and mortgages recorded this year 
in most counties in and surrounding Greater 
New York. Queens. Richmond and Nassau 
show a slight Increase in the number of deeds 
and mortgages recorded, but the total number 
for Greater New York and surrounding coun- 
ties this year is 241.020 as compared with 272,- 
795 instruments for 1920. The company's busi- 
ness in Brooklyn and Queens shows an increase 
in earnings, but Mnnhattan, Staten Island and 
Westchester a decrease. 

A total of 31.170 titles were examined com- 



pared to 34,353 last year and 40,182 for the 
year 1019, which was the record year. 

Continuing, the report says : "Our sale ot 
guaranteed mortgages, including guaranteed 
mortgage certificates, this year amounted to 
$55,642,278. This is the largest sale of mort- 
gages since the year 1909 when the sales amount- 
ed to $63,000,000. There are only four years in 
our history where the amount has exceeded the 
present year's sales. These were the years 1904, 
1905. 1006 and 1909. 

"Of the more than $55,000,000 In mortgages 
sold last year, $13,000,000 were certificates sold 
to about seven thousand separate investors. 
These small investors are not concerned with 
income taxes and through these certificates, se- 
cure a high type of mortgage investment and 
safety of principal together with a liberal re- 
turn on their money and freedom from any dan- 
ger of loss which many of them have exper- 
ienced in investing in fluctuating securities and, 
far too often, wild-cat ventures. 

"The company, on the other hand, has been 
able to take large mortgages without giving 
thought to finding some large investing institu- 
tion to take them off its hands. We took last 
year and disposed of in these certificates many 
large mortgages. Among them, one of $1,500,000 
on the Garment Center Building, $775,000 on the 
Combustion Engineering Building at Nos. 43-47 
Broad St.. $750 000 on the Brooklyn Edison plant, 
$650,000 on 440 Fourth Ave., .$500,000 on the 
Town Hall, $.500,000 on the New England Apart- 
ments and $1,250,000 on the Pershing Square 
property opposite the Grand Central Terminal. 

"Besides the larger mortgages, there were 
many mortgages of $100,000 and less sold to 
investors through our certificates. The first 
weok of January is particularly investment week 
and the sales this year have exceeded anything 
we have ever done before during this part of the 
year. In the first week of the year with four and 
on"-half working days, the Manhattan offce sold 
$856,000 worth of certificates to 391 people and 
the total sales of mortgages and certificates In 
both Manhattan and Brooklyn amounted to more 
than $2,000,000." 

The Banking Department, it is shown in the 
report, had dr-nosits at the close of the year 
amounting to $.33,773,078. representing 13.226 ac- 
counts. The earnings of thi sdepartment during 
the yea raraounted to $500,170.73. after charging 
off every questionable loan. 

An interesting feature of President Kelsey's 
annual report was his comment on the prospects 
for the new year. In this connection, he said : 
"We are looking for a good year in 1922. Capi- 
tal is ready for investment in building if only 
investors can be assured that those who build 
the houses will get their raalorials at fair prices 
and that thosp who work on the houses will do 
a fair day's work for a generous day's pay. It 
wn can have honestly construrted buildings, there 
is no limit to the prosperity that can come to 
thr' building industry in Now York City and its 
surroundings during the coming year. Almost 
all sorts of construction are needed badly and 
we will make wonderful progress if those who 



n 



HOMES IN 
GREENWICH VILLAGE 

New York City has restricted a large part 

of Old Greenwich Village for residential 

purposes only. Many of the fine old 

homes are now available. 

You Can Buy a Splendidly Built Residence, 

Renovate It at Little Cost, and Have as 

Fine a Home as you can Find in New 

York City. 

We Have Satisfied Many Families— Let 

Us Help You. 

PEPE & BRO. 

40 South Washington Sqnare 



Douglas LEllimanECo. 

Real Estate Brokers 

Fifth and Park Avenue Districts 

Efficient Property Management 
Plaza, 9200 15 East 49th St. 



JAMES BOYD 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

135 BROADWAY 
Phone: Rector USS-USt 



BROOKS & MOMAND 


Member of Real Estate Board 


Real Estate Mortgages 


115 BROADWAY Phone ^^ Rector 



FREDERICK BROWN 

REAL ESTATE 
OPERATOR 



565 5th Ave. 



Tel. Vanderbilt 8725 



CHARLES B. Van Valen, Inc. 

Member Real Estate Board of N. Y. 

REAL ESTATE 

mortgage; loans— insurakce 

no WILLIAM STREET 
Phone: 6000 Beekman 



SPECIALISTS IN 

PENN. TERMINAL SECTION 

REAL ESTATE 

AGENTS— BROKERS— APPRAISERS 

H. M. Weill Co. 

r«l, Loneacre 2290-2817 221 West 33rd St. 



BENJAMIN WINTER 

BUY AND SELL HIGH-CLASS 

MANHATTAN PROPERTY 

BROKERS ARE INVITED TO SUBMIT 

PROPOSITIONS — Ouick Decision GIvn. 

Lansing Building 

22» BROADWAY, AT B2nd STREET 

Suite 6 Phone: Schuyler 2897 



BRENSAM REALTY CORP. 

SAMUEL BRENER, Pres. 

REAL ESTATE OPERATORS 

50 EAST 42nri STREET 

Vanderbilt 3918-19 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

supply the material and those ■who do the work 
can only learn that they suffer along with the 
rest of the community when the materialman 
fixes unfair prices and the mechanic furnishes 
only half a day's work for a full day's pay. Real 
profits and real wages are not increased by such 
methods. So much more must be spent for the 
necessities and the pleasures of life that the 
real income is much lower than it seems and the 
amount in the bank at the end of the year does 
not spell prosperity. 

"The fact is that the tax exemption privilege 
on new construction is really working to the dis- 
advantage of the people who need housing relief 
most seriously — the people who cannot pay more 
than $8 or $10 a room per month. The tax ex- 
emption is creating a boom in the construction 
of homes for the well-to-do — those who can pay 
$25 or more per room per month, and if it con- 
tinues, there will soon be an over-production of 
such space and nothing will be done for the 
poore rclasses. Homes are not built for them 
because, with the present costs of material and 
high cost and low productivity of labor, no homes 
can be built to rent for $8 or $10 per room per 
month. The result is that so long as labor can 
be employed at the extravagant rates demanded 
and produce as little as it does, the material men 
can get the high prices demanded for material, 
and builders can employ both and have the tax- 
payers foot the bills, there will be nothing done 
to produce the kind of homes that are most need- 
ed. There should be no extension of the tax ex- 
emption and no more building of the kind of 
homes that have been produced so extensively 
during 1921, but labor should come down in its 
wages and up in its production and material 
prices should come down so that something can 
be done for those who can pay only a low rent." 



Bronx Sheriff's Auctioneer 

Eugene J. Busher, of the Eugene J. Busher Co., 
has been appointed Sheriffs Auctioneer for 
Bronx county. 



D. H. Jackson Moves Uptown 

Having occupied a suite of offices at 135 Broad- 
way during the last decade, Daniel H. Jackson, 
who is prominent as a real estate operator, will 
remove on May 7 to the Craftsman Building, at 
5 East 38th st, through to 6-8 East 39th st. Mr. 
Jackson owns the building, a 12-sty structure. 
He has long bought and sold choice parcels in 
Manhattan and the Bronx. 



Another Board Member 

John J. Fogarty, of T. A. & J. J. Fogarty, has 
been elected an active member of the Real 
Estate Board of New York. 



J. B. Cornell Buys Dwelling 

Douglas Gibbons & Co, sold for H. A. Collins, 
Jr., to John B. Cornell, head of the Cornell Iron 
Works, 144-146 East 83d st., two 5-story Ameri- 
can basement brick dwellings, on a plot 25.8x 
102.2, 3 doors east of Lexington av. The buyer 
will alter them into one house. 



Large Industrial Building Sold 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co. sold for all cash, 
for approximately $500,000, to the Standard 
Sanitary Manufacturing Co. of New York and 
Pittsburgh, manufacturers of plumbers* supplies, 
the 6-story fireproof building, with railroad 
siding, comprising 83.000 square feet of floor 
space, with 69.000 square feet of vacant land 
adjacent, located in the industrial section of 
Long Island City, at the southwest corner 
Jackson av. and Honeywell st., opposite the 
Beebe av. subway station and 12 minutes from 
the Grand Central station. Cross & Brown 
were the brokers. 

The building was erected by the Goodyear 
Tire & Rubber Co. for occupancy by Its Eastern 
distributing house. Subsequently it was leased, 
through the Cross & Brown Co., to the Chevrolet 
Motor Co. for a term of 10 years, for the uses 
of the research department of that company. 
After the Dupont interests gained control of the 
General Motors Co. this department was re- 
moved to Detroit. With the sale of the building 
the lease to the General Motors Co. hag been 
cancelled. This is one of the few buildings 
with a railroad siding available in the indus- 
trial section of Long Island City. 



Big Bronx Corner Resold 

Simon Myers and Fred Oppenheimer sold the 
6-story apartment, Nos. 1933-1939 Southern 
Boulevard, the northwest corner of Elsmere pi. 
and opposite the Elsmere Theatre. The building 
fronts 82 feet on Southern Boulevard and 140 
feet on Elsmere pi., contains 6 stories and 35 
rooms on each floor, arranged In suites of 4 to 6 
rooms each. The purchaser is Mr. Kafka, who 
will hold the property for investment. The 
sellers recently acquired the premises from the 
Edmund Francis Realty Co., a holding com- 
pany for the Rhinelander Estate, and held the 
same at $165,000. 



Notable Bronx Transactions 

Julian Kovacs. operator and builder, pur- 
chased from the Patterson Estate plot of 34 
lots, covering the block front on the east side 
of Grand Boulevard and Concourse, having a 
312-foot frontage ; the block front on the north 



January 21, 1922 

side of Kingsbridge rd. having over a 322-foot 
frontage, and the block fronting on the west 
side of Valentine av. having over a 313-foot 
frontage. 

It has an ideal location, as it is situated di- 
rectly opposite Poe Park and the elevator apart- 
ment house, which is now being constructed by 
a prominent Bronx builder, who has also pur- 
chased an additional 235 feet for improvement. 

Mr. Kovacs will improve the corner of the 
Concourse and Kingsbridge rd. with a 12-story 
elevator apartment house, which will have a 
frontage of 212 feet on the Concourse and 200 
feet on Kingsbridge rd. This building will 
accomodate 300 families, and will be laid out in 
suites of 2. 3, 4 and 5 rooms. The cost of this 
operation is estimated at $2,000,000. 

The balance of the plot on the Concourse and 
the plot on Valentine av will be disposed of to 
builders for apartment house sites and the 
Kingsbridge rd. site will be disposed of to 
builders for business. 

This property has been in the Patterson 
family for more than 5U years. Armstrong; 
Bros, were the brokers who negotiated the sale. 
The same brokers are now negotiating for a 
re-sale of the balance of the plot to builders. 



Co-Operative Buying in Queens 

The Misses Julia H., Florence A., and Emily 
P. Davis, formerly residents of Baltimore, Md., 
have purchased two apartments in 137 23d St., 
Jackson Heights; also at 136 21st St., Jackson 
Heights, an apartment has been sold to John C. 
Sparkes, production manager of the Standard 
Scientific Co. 



New York Title & Mortgage Company 
Establishes New Records 

In his annual report to the stockholders of 
the New York Title & Mortgage Company, Persi- 
dent Harry A. Kahler states that the operating 
results for 1921 record another advance over all 
previous years in the history of that company. 
President Kahler further advised the stock- 
holders : 

"The current ease in the money market Is 
strengthening the demand for guaranteed mort- 
gages and certificates. Mortgage certificates are 
acquiring an unique place among investment 
securities. They combine the safety of an or- 
dinary investment with insurance against shrink- 
age in capital value and fiexibility in amounts 
available. Public appreciation of the safety and 
convenience of our guaranteed mortgage certi- 
ficates will surely furthe rexpand this depart- 
ment of the company's business. 

"Satisfactory growth of the American Trust 
Company continues in all branches of its busi- 
ness. There has been a substantial increase in 
the trust department activities, including regis- 
trar and transfer work, requiring additional 
space for proper administration. Impotrant ad- 
ditions to facilities for both the Title Company 
and Trust Company are also to be made in the 
Brooklyn and Jamaica offices, the latter ntfw 
being under way. 

"The total number of deposits in the American 
Trust Company on December 31, 1921, was 7,070, 
an increase of 1,565 during the year. The total 
capital, surplus and profits were $2,156,221.44, 
with total resources of $19,042,563.87, at the end 
of the year. Dividends at the rate of six per 
cent, per annum, payable quarterly, are now 
being distributed. After paying dividends, set- 
ting aside reserves fo rtaxes and other purposes, 
and inventorying securities at market values, 
the balance of earnings for 1921, amounting to 
.fl50. 448.93, was carried forward to undivided 
profits. This gives the American Trust Com- 
pany stock a book value of $143.75 per share, at 
which figure it is carried as of December 31, 
1921. on the books of the Title Company. 

"The current trend of title and mortgage busi- 
ness is indicated by the fact that, during the 
month of December, the numbe rof title items 
and the gross amount of fees entered were 
greater than in any other month of the year." 

President Kahler also presents in his report 
some interesting comparisons of important items 
in the company's operations for the past two 
years, showing that during 1921 a tota lof $32,- 
206.321.23 was loaned on bond and mortgage, as 
against a total of $23,028,013.82 in 1920, an in- 
cerase of $9,177,707.41 ; sales and mortgages 
totaled $30,599,983.66 in 1921, as against $22,986,- 
241.69 in 1920, an increase of $7,613,741.97 ; and 
that at the end of 1921 the company's total of 
guarantee dmortgages outstanding was $59,923,- 
432.28. as against $50,786,350.32 at the close of 
1920. an increase during the last year of $9,137.- 
081.96. 

The gross income of the company for the year 
1921 was $1,662,670.07, and the expenses, includ- 
ing appropriations for employees' profit-sharing 
fund, were $921,994.81, leaving net earnings for 
the year of $740,675.26. Dividends paid within 
the year amounted to $299,376.00, and the un- 
divided profits shown on December 31 1921 
amounted to $1,432,712.23. 



East Side Block Front Resold 

The property on the west side of Av. A. front 
3d to 4th sts., recently sold by the Astor Estate 
through Charles F. Noyes Co.. was purchased 
by Well & Mayer, who. it is reported, have al- 
ready disposed of part of the plot. Seemingly 
great demand exists for property In this sec- 
tion. 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



71 



Fordham Theatre in New Hands 

Samuel Wood, president of Wood's Business 
School in Harlem, purchased from Thomas 
Ward property known as "The Fordham The- 
atre Photoplay House," having a seating ca- 
pacity of 600 and the 1-story brick taxpayer, 
adjoining, containing nine stories, known as 25- 
37 West Fordham rd.. and the 2y2-story frame 
dwelling, with garage, north of Fordham rd., 
known as 2458 Davidson av. This property 
covers 120 feet on Fordham rd., taking in the 
northwest corner of Davidson av. with 128 feet 
on the avenue. Property was held at $225,000, 
which transaction was for all cash. Armstrong 
Bros, were the brokers. 



Group of Brooklyn Sales 

Joseph Stein sold for the Realty Associates to 
the Dobwill Corporation the vacant block front, 
220x100, on the south side of 48th St., between 
Eleventh and New Utrecht avs., for improve- 
ment with brick 2-famiIy houses ; also for S. 
Krotman to L. Rothman the vacant plot, 40x100, 
on the south side of 5Sth St., 100 feet west of 
Fifteenth ave., for improvement with two 2- 
family houses ; for the Koben Construction 
Co. to Philip Hochstadt 1065 5ad St., a brick 2- 
family house ; for H. Danner to Mrs. Charles 
Solow, for occupancy, 1362 4!Jth st, a stucco 
dwelling, and for Carl Nelson to Samuel Riskin 
5609 Thirteenth av., a brick 2-family house ; all 
in the southern section of Brooklyn. 



Brooklyn Block Sold 

The plot bounded by .55th and 56th sts., New 
Utrecht and Thirteenth avs., has been sold by 
Kilkoyne Bros., for P. Quinn to D. Ross for im- 
provement. The same brokers sold the 2-story 
apartment house with store, at the southeast 
corner of 47th st. and Sixteenth av., on a plot 
40x100, for the owner to B. Sankerwitz for in- 
vestment. 



Sales in Suburban Brooklyn 

Meister Builders, Inc., purchased from Gut- 
man Semel the vacant plot, 100x100, at the 
northwest corner of 75th st and 21st av ; the 
vacant plot, 100x100, at the southwest corner of 
75th St. and 21st av. and a plot, 120x100, on 
the south side of 74th St., between 12th and 
13th avs., Brooklyn. The brokers were Miller & 
Scheinkoff. 



D. KEMPNER & SON, INC., have been ap- 
pointed agents for the store property at 167th 
and Webster av, Bronx, and are associated, as 
agents, with Samuel Kronsky, Inc., for the 
building in course of construction at the south- 
west corner of 91st st and Amsterdam a.. 
Kempner & Son have, also, been appointed man- 
aging agents by the Bendheim Construction 
Co. o£ the 3 buildings, 153 to 157 East 85tli St. 



Mortgage Loans 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co. loaned to the 
Rhinelander Realty Co. $500,000, at 6 per cent 
per annum, for a term of 5 years, on the 10- 
story brick and stone apartment house with 
stores, on a plot 145x100, at the southeast cor- 
ner of Lexington av. and 90th st. 



Quinlan & Leland placed a first mortgage loan 
of $1.55,000 on the 6-sty apartment house, on 
plot 100x100, at 976-980 Amsterdam av, north- 
west corner of 108th st. 



Edwards. Dowdney & Richart obtained a first 
mortgage loan of $129,000 on premises south- 
east corner Featherbed La. and Jessup av., 
Bronx. They also placed first mortgages of 
$30,000 on 83-85 Post av ; $25,000 on the tax- 
payer at the northeast corner of Clay av. and 
167th St., and $11,000 on the premises on the 
south side of 176th st., 185 feet west of Grand 
av. 



Quinlan & Leland placed a first mortgage 
loan of $40,000 on the 6-sty apartment house, 
on a plot 42x103, at 342-344 East 15th st. 



Lawrence, Blake & Jewell placed for the Egal 
Realty Corporation a first mortgage of $45,000. 
at 6 per cent per annum, for 5 years, on the 
northeast corner of Amsterdam av. and 76th St., 
a 5-sty flat, and tor B. Columbus $37,000, at 6 
per cent per annum, for 5 years, on 622 West 
136th St., a 5-8ty apartment house. 



The mortgage department of Slawson & Hobbs 
recently placed loans to the amount of $6,798.- 
500. Among the properties upon which they 
have obtained mortgages are the following : On 
the south side 110th st, 100 feet west of Broad- 
way, .$525,000 ; on the northeast corner Rlve. 
side dr and 90th st, $1,150,000; northeast cor- 
ner Broadway and 108th st, .$600,000 ; north- 
east corner Riverside dr and 88th st, $700,000; 
southeast corner Haven av and 181st st, $225,- 
000 ; southwest corner Northern av and 181st st, 
$200,000; on 112 to 116 West 70th st, $210,000; 
in Douglaston, Queens, on 20 dwellings. $118,- 
500; in Arleigh. Queens, 50 dwellings, $275,000 
in Arleigh, 200 dwellings, $900,000, and in 
Norwood, Queens, on 20 2-family houses, 
$200,000. 



A first mortgage loan of $550,000 has been 
underwritten by S. W. Straus & Co. on the 
apartment house to be erected at 141 West 71st 



New York 

Title & Mortgage 

Company 



CONDENSED BALANCE SHEET 



December 31, l'!2 

ASSETS 

Cash on hand and in Banks . . $1,209,090.10 

Stocks and Bonds 3,535,459.00 

Bonds and Mortgages 887,674-49 

Loans 400,000.00 

Accounts Receivable 167,071.43 

Interest Receivable (Net) . . . 55,136.53 

$6,254,431.55 



LIABILITIES 

Capital $3,000,000.00 

Surplus 1,000,000.00 

Undivided Profits 1,432,712.23 

Premiums and Fees Prepaid . . . 275,589.12 

Reserve for Taxes and Contingencies 265,955.88 

Reserve for Dividends 121,488.46 

Agency Accounts 134,066.39 

Current Accounts 24,619.47 

$6,254,431.55 



Guaranteed Mortgages, December 

31st, 1920 $50,786,350.32 

Guaranteed Mortgages, December 

31st, 1921 59,923,432.28 

New York 

Title & Mortgage 

Company 



135 Broadway, New York 

375 Fulton St., Jamaica 

White Plains, N. Y. 



203 Montague St., Bklyn. 

Bridge Plaza, L. I. City 

St. George, S. I. 




78 



St, on a plot 100x102. The house will contain 
21 suites of from 3 to 4 rooms. The street floor 
suites will be equipped for the use of physi- 
cians- The owners are the 141 West Tlst Street 
Apartment Building Co. Schwartz & Gross are 
the architects and Slawson & Hobbs were the 
brokers. 



Brooks & Momand placed a first mortgage 
loan of $lti2,000 for the Twin City Development 
Co. on the 21 houses now being erected on the 
south side of Tlst st, Including the entire 
block front between Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
avs, Brooklyn ; also $32,oOU for I. Levine, cov- 
ering the southeast corner of Newkirk av and 
Rugby rd, Brooklyn. 

Lawrence, Blake & Jewell placed for the 
Bearmali Building Co. a building and per- 
manent loan of ifUO.OUO, at the rate of S per 
cent, per annum, for a term of 10 years, for 
the erection of a 4-sty apartment house, on a 
plot 100x120, at the southwest corner of 
Thirteenth av and 55th st, Brooklyn. The 
operation will total $200,000. 

New York Title and Mortgage Co. made two 
building loans, one for $285,000 and one for 
$255,000, for the construction of two 6-sty and 
basement brick elevator apartment houses on 
the west side of Broadway, between 170th and 
171st sts- The building is being constructed by 
the Broadway-170 Street Holding Corporation, a 
syndicate composed of Selig Rosenberg, Joseph 
Schwartz, Julius Vogel, Jacob Schultz and Max 
Glicken. 



Shaw, Rockwell & Sanford placed tor W. P. 
Hollingsworth a first mortgage of $7,000, for a 
term of 5 years, on 118 West 126th st. a 3-sty 
and basement brownstone dwelling, on a lot 
18.9x99.11. 



The New York Title and Mortgage Co. made 
two building loans, one for $285,000 
and one for $255,000, (or the construc- 
tion of two 6-sty elevator apartment 
houses on the west side of Broadway, between 
ITOtb and 171st sts. The buildings are being 
constructed by the Broadway-170th Street Hold- 
ing Corporation, a syndicate composed of Selig 
Rosenberg. Joseph Schwartz, Julius Vogel, Ja- 
cob Schultz and Max Glicken. 



Justice George V. Mullan in Bronx Su- 
preme Court has granted permission to the 
Institution of Mercy to mortgage its real prop- 
erty at r.l9th st and Grand Boulevard and Con- 
course for $7,000 to the Emigrant Industrial 
Savings Bank. The purpose of the mortgage is 
to complete buildings at that point. 

The Metropolitan Life Insurance Co. has au- 
thorized loans on bond and mortgage of nearly 
$6,000,000, of which over $2,500,000 were farm 
loans scattered in 20 western and southern states. 
About $2,500,000 were housing loans for the 
construction of S.jo dwellings and 29 apartment 
houses, to accommodate altogether 735 families. 
Of the dwelling houses 210 were single, in 
places outside of New York city, and 25 were 
dwellings in New York city. Nine apartment 
houses, tor a total of $1,310,000, to accommo- 
date 365 families, were in New York city, and 
20 apartment houses (or about $400,000, to ac- 
commodate 132 families, were in other cities. 
Loans were made on 6 business buildings 
amounting to about $.500,000. The out-of-town 
building loans were widely scattered, a num- 
ber being in and around Chicago, some in 
Cleveland, some in Los Angeles and one or 
more loans were made in half a dozen places 
in Georgia, Virginia and Florida. 



Bernard Smyth & Sons placed for the Stores 
Building Corporation 11 mortgages, aggregat- 
ing .$100,000, covering the premises 114-132 
Dyckman st. each being a 2-sty building with 
store, size IfixlOO each. They also placed for 
the Kay Building Corporation, Inc., 13 mort- 
gages, aggregating $132,000, on the 13 2-sty and 
store buildings, covering the entire block, West- 
chester av to IfiSth st. Hoe av to Faile st, 
Bronx, size 232.05 on Westchester av. 200 (eet 
on 16oth st, 20.06 on Hoe av and 137.73 on 
Faile st. 



Brooks & Momand placed a first mortgage 
loan of $30,000 on southwest corner of Parsons 
boulevard and Amity st. Flushing, Queens ; $.50,- 
000 on 501 West 133d st, and $60,000 on 578- 
580 West 176th st. 



Many Loans by White & Sons 

Out»o( $21.0(10,000 in loans placed during 
1921 y) William A. White & Sons more than 
$2,000,000 is now going into the production of 
houses that will shelter more than 750 fami- 
lies. Most of the residential building loanu 
were obtained from the Metropolitan Life In- 
surance Co. The largest single loan made by 
WIDiam A. wniite & Sons was $2,750,000 on the 
garme»^t center buildings on Seventh av, 3Tth 
to PPflt it. 0( this $1,250,000 was placed with 
th^'fiiual Life and $1,500,000 with the Title 
Guaramne and Trust Co. 

Brookl'E got the benefit of most ot the 
housing nrans placed by the brokers. Some of 
the more interestiffg Brooklyn loans recently 
obtained (rom the Metropolitan Life Include 
$90,000 on a.,' 39-family house at East 7th st 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

and Ditmas av, Flatbush ; $180,000 on a house 
for 72 families in Twentieth av, from 81st to 
S2d st ; .$80.0011 on an apartment for 34 fami- 
lies at Linden and New York avs ; $90,000 on 
a 42-family house at Utica av and President st ; 
$100,000 for a 31-(amily house at Ocean Park- 
way and Ditmas av ; .$90,0110 for a 36-family 
house at 84th st and Twentieth av ; $105,000 tor 
a 40-family house at Utica av and Union st ; 
$55,000 for a 2S-family house on Twentieth av, 
near Benson av : also $95,000 on a 36-family 
house at Sixth av and 83d st and Fort Hamil- 
ton av. 

Manhattan. 
South of S9th Street 

BLEECKER ST.— Janet B. Foster, of Chi- 
cago, sold, through Crist & Herrick, 381 
Bleecker st., adjoining the southeast corner of 
Perry St., a 5-story brick tenement house with 
store, on a lot 23x61.7%. 

CHRYSTIE ST.— William H. Whiting & Co. 
sold for the Central Union Trust Co. 116 Chrys- 
tie St., a 5-story and basement brick tenement 
house, with stores, on a lot 25.1x100.4. The 
purchaser sold to Ralph Girdo. 

DOWNING ST.— Pepe & Bro. sold for David I. 
Christie to Samuel Mitchell, (or occupancy, 58 
Downing st., a 3-story and basement brick 
dwelling, on a lot 10.8x04.8. 

4TH ST.— Crist & Herrick sold (or Joseph A. 
Felter to a client who resold 290 West 4th st., a 
3-story and basement brick dwelling, on a lot 
20x60. 

30TH St. — James H. Cruikshank resold to Ed- 
ward Hlnderson 102 East 30th st., a 5-story 
stone American basement dwelling, on a lot 
20x79. 

31ST ST. — James H. Cruikshank purchased 
from the 434 West 49th Street Corporation 124 
East 31st st, a 3-sty and basement stone dwell- 
ing, on a lot 22.0x98.9. Butler & Baldwin were 
the brokers. 

34TH ST.— Albert B. Ash forth sold (or Isa- 
bella V. Adams to the Burnett-Well Construc- 
tion Co. 413-415 East 34th St., two 4-story brick 
tenement houses, with stores, on a plot 49.6x98.9 
and close to the 34th street (erry. 

57TH ST. — Paul W. Cronce sold (or the estate 
o( G. J. Kitching 436-438 East 57th St., two 4- 
story stone flats, on a plot 44.8. The buyer 
will renovate the structures and put garage 
facilities in the rear. 

58TH St.— Everett M. Selxas Co. sold (or 
Harry L. Weil to a buyer for occupancy, 400H' 
East 58th St., a 4-story brick building, on a lot 
20.11x46 X irregular, adjoining the southeast 
corner of First av. The buyer will remodel 
the structure. 

LEXINGTON Av.— Maurice Werthelm sold 
for the Estate of Jane Irwin the 4-s'ory and 
basement stone dwelling, 601 Lexington av., 
on a lot 16.3x70, adjoining the northeast corner 
of 52nd St. This property Is directly opposite 
the Y, W. C. A. building. The purchase is for 
investment. This Is the first sale of the prop- 
erty in 52 years. 

North of S9th St. 

73D ST.— Douglas L. Elliman & Co. sold the 
5-story stone American basement dwelling, 25 
East 73d St., on a lot 20x80, for Mrs. Monson 
Morris and Miss Amelia N. Kohlsaat, to a cli- 
ent who Intends to effect extensive improve- 
ments. The property was held at an asking 
price of $75,000. 

116TH ST.— Williams & Nlemeyer sold for 
Herman H. Blomeier 366 West 116th st., a 5- 
story and basement stone flat, on a lot 25x100.11. 

134TH ST.— Joseph Shenk bought 511 West 
134th St., a 5-story brick apartment bouse, on a 
plot 39.3x99.11. 

140TH ST.— Ernest T. Bower sold (or the 
Wallheim Realty Co. to the Ethell Holding Cor- 
Upration 310-316 West 140th St., (our 3-story 
and basement brick dwellings, each on a lot 
15x99.11. 

147TH ST. — Louis Elsenberg sold to Jacob 
Henderson 300 West 147th st., southwest corner 
of Eighth av., a 6-story brick apartment house, 
with stores and 20 apartments, oh a plot 50x85. 
It rents for about $14,000 and was held at $100,- 
000. 

170TH ST, — Herman Berson purchased from 
Robert Broadman 555 West 170th st, a 6-story 
elevator apartment house, arranged for 41 fami- 
lies, on a plot 75x100. It was held at $175,000 
and rents for about $32,000. 

172D ST.— Nehring Bros, sold for Richard 
Cronin 580 West 172d St., a 5-story and 25 
family apartment house, on a plot 62.6x100. It 
was built by Paterno Bros. 

BROADWAY.— Bernard Smyth & Sons sold 
for the Arborvlew Realty Co. to Jacob Mayers, 
the lot, 25x141.7, on the east side of Broadway, 
150 feet south of 207th st. Mr. Mayers Is the 
owner of the Arras Inn, at the southeast corner 
of Broadway and 207th st. 100x100, and the two 
lots adjoining on Broadwpy. This purchase 
gives him a combined plot of 175 feet on Broad- 
way by 100 feet on 207th st. 

EDGECOMBE AV.— James H. Cruikshank 
bought from Daniel Seymour 191 Edgecombe 
av., a S-storj^ and basement brick dwelling, on a 
lot 17x100. 1,'Eeluae, Washburn & Co. were 
the brokers. 



January 21, 1922 

MADISON AV.— P. M. Clear & Co. sold (or 
Harris Brown to Henry Dobry 1548 Madison av, 
a 5-sty brick apartment house with stores, on a 
lot 25x70, adjoining the southwest corner of 
105th St. 

ST. NICHOLAS PL.— Daniel H. Jackson pur- 
chased from Alice D. Blauvelt, of Catsklll, N. Y., 
66 to 74 St. Nicholas pi., facing 154th St., (our 
dwellings. No. 66 is a 2'/^ story and basement 
brick dwelling, on a plot 72.UxlOo, while the 
others, 70-74. are 2V2 story and basement brick 
dwellings, on a plot 77.8x100. 

THIRD AV.— Maurice Werthelm sold (or Cor- 
neMus Lynch to Rebecca Shenkin 743 Third av., 
a 5-sty brick tenement house, with store, on a 
lot 25x75, adjoining the northeast corner of 
46th St. 

Bronx. 

135TH ST. — Julius Trattner sold (or John 
Florschinger 577 East 135th st, a 4-sty and 
basement brick apartment house, on a lot 25x 
100, adjoining the northeast corner o( St, Anns 
av. 

136TH ST.— Moses Cooper sold to Harry 
Friedman 610-621 East 136th st, two 4-sty and 
basement brick apartment houses, each on a lot 
25x100. 

139TH ST.— Herman Leis sold through Julius 
Trattner to Christian Bandel 426 East 139th st, 
a 5-sty and basement brick apartment house on 
a lot 25x100. 

140TH ST.— Francis M. Santera sold for Mrs. 
Bertha Schneider 622 East 140th st, a 5-sty and 
basement brick apartment house, on a plot 37.5 
xlOO. 

151ST. ST.— Schwab & Co. sold (or the RoseJf 
Construction Co., for cash, 313-315 East ISlst 
St., a 2-story brick loft building, on a plot OOx 
116.5. It was long occupied by Baumann & Co. 

160TH ST— Selena Simberknopf sold to Louis 
Feldstein 765 and 767 East 160th st, two 5-sty 
and basement brick apartment houses, on a plot 
80x145, adjoining the northwest corner of Tin- 
ton av. 

164TH ST.— Everett M. Selxas Co. sold (or 
Mayer Winston and others 457-459 West 164th 
st, a 5-sty brick apartment house, on a plot 
.50x102.11. 

167TH ST.— Alexander R. Nicol sold to 
Frank Douglas the vacant plot. 99.10xl29x Ir- 
regular, at the southwest corner of 167th st 
and Sherman av. 

167TH ST. — Meyer Isear, operator, sold 481 
East 167th st, northeast corner of Washington 
av, a 6-sty brick apartment house with stores, 
on a plot 29x128, to the J. G. Gold Realty Cor- 
poration, for all cash. It was held at $85,000. 
Jacob Gumberg was the broker. 

172D ST.— Snowber & Co. sold (or the estatS 
of Oswald Cammann to Miss E. Lindelin 1000- 
1004 East 172d St., southeast corner of Long- 
fellow av, a 3-story frame flat, with store and 
two 2-story and basement frame 2-family houses, 
all on a plot 75x100. The buyer will remodel. 

BROOK AV. — Anna Rubin sold to Solomon 
Kaplan 1.301 Brook av, a 4-sty and basement 
brick apartment house, on a plot 28x90, adjoin- 
ing the northwest corner of lOflth st. 

BURNSIDE AV.— Max N. Natanson resold to 
Patrick J. Dwyer the block front on the south 
side of Burnslde av., between Grand and Har- 
rison av., comprising about 10 lots. The pur- 
chaser acquired the property for Improvement. 
It was held at $150,000 and was sold for cash. 
Byrne & Bowman were the brokers. The parcel 
was purchased by Mr. Natanson 5 weeks ago 
from John O'Leary. 

CLINTON AV.— Schwab & Co. sold for Rosen 
& Kosiever 1830 Clinton av, a 3-sty and base- 
ment brick 2-family house, on a plot 30x90. 

PAIRMOUNT PL.— Schwab & Co. sold (or M. 
Reinholt 741 Falrmount pi., a 3-story and bas»- 
ment frame 3-family bouse, on a lot 25x125. 

It was a cash sale. 

GRAND AV.— Thomas A. Wilson sold for 
William F. Hyam to Rudolph Simon the south- 
east corner of Grand av and West 183d st, a 
vacant plot, 50x100, which the buyer will Im- 
prove with a taxpayer. 

HOE AV. — Charles G. Jorgensen sold to Paul- 
ine Bador 1283 Hoe av, a 2-sty and basement 
frame dwelling, on a lot 25x100. 

HONEYWELL AV.— The Manager Realty Cor- 
poration sold to Bernard Jakubovitz the 5-sty 
brick apartment house with stores at 2095 
Honeywell av, on a plot 65.2x118.2, at the south- 
west corner of 180th st. 

LONGFELLOW AV.— Louis Gold sold to Sam- 
uel Glazerman the 3-sty and bas*nent brick 
dwelling 1144 Longfellow av, on a lot 20xl30x 
irregular. 

LONGWOOD AV.— M. V. Dimond sold 1095- 
109i Longwood av, two 2-sty and basement 
frame 2-family houses, each on a lot 17.7x03.5. 

LYMAN PL.— Samuel Shapiro so%l to a build- 
er the northwest corner of Lyman and 'lOOth 
St., 147x185, on which the purchaser Intends to 
erect a 1-story taxpayer. It was held at $45.- 
000. Jacob & Emil Leitner were the brokers. 

MINFORD PL.— The Mlnford Holding Corpor- 
ation sold to Irving A. Adler the northwest cor- 
ner of Minford p^and 172d st. a 4-8ty and base- 
ment brick apartment house, on a plot 34x67. 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



79 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 

LAWYERS MORTGAGE COMPANY 

Richard M. Hurd, President 
JANUARY 1, 1922 

The outstanding feature of the investment world at the present time is the fall in the 
interest rate, which has made Guaranteed Mortgages, netting 5V2% — with absolute safety — a 
highly desirable investment. The active demand for our Guaranteed Mortgages gives clear 
evidence of the present situation. 

Since the Lawyers Mortgage Company was organized it has guaranteed $659,024,529 of 
Mortgages, of which $525,285,238 have been paid in full, leaving now outstanding $133,739,291. 



ASSETS 

N. Y. City Mtgs $7,463,786.13 

Acc'd. Int. Receivable 135,824 58 

Co.'s OCfice Bldgs. Cost 1,328,955.1 1 

U. S. Treasury Ctfs 100,000.00 

Cash 1,933,661,36 



LIABILITIES 

Capital $6,000,000.00 

Surplus 3,000,000.00 

Undivided Profits 888,960.70 

Mtgs. Sold, not del 282,318.44 

Mtg. Nassau-M. Lane 438,000.00 

Reserve for taxes, premiums, 

etc 352,948.04 



$10,962,227.18 



$10,962,227.18 



Assets and Liabilities verified by The Audit Company of New York. 

The outstanding Guaranteed Mortgages of the Company are divided among the cus- 
tomers of the Company as follows: 

58 Savings Banks $22,220,334 

1,465 Trustees 27,756,662 

5,298 Individuals 60,058,252 

215 Charitable Institutions 11,085,853 

19 Insurance Companies 5,862,100 

18 Trust Companies 6,756,090 

7,073 $133,739,291 



Howard S. Borden 
Theodore C. Camp 
Guy Cary 

Frederic R. Coudert 
Edward De Witt 
Cecil C. Evers 
Julian P. Fairchlld 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Robert Walton Goelet 
Charles P. Howland 
George A. Hurd 
Richard M. Hurd 
D. Irving Mead 
A. Henry Mosle 



Robert L. Pierrepont 
Thomas N. Rhinelander 
Samuel Riker, Jr. 
Henry L. Stimson 
Charles H. Van Hise 
William I. Walter 
Bronson Winthrop 



Detailed report in pamphlet form mailed on request 

59 Liberty Street, New York 
184 Montagu^ Street, Brooklyn 
4 Herrinfen Avenue, Jamaica 



80 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



MORRIS AV. — Samuel Shapiro purchased 
2683 Morris av., a new 5^-story apartment, oa 
plot lOOxlUo, from the Henlee Real Estate Cor- 
poration, Sam Minskoff, president. The house 
contains 30 rooms on a floor. In suites of 3 to 5 
rooms, all occupied. The rents are about $38,- 
000, and it was held at ?215,000. Ancowitz & 
Cohen were the brolcers. 

OGDBN AV.— Barnett & Smith sold for cli- 
ents the southwest corner of Ogden av and 170th 
st, a vacant plot. 50x100. 

PARK AV. — Herman A. Acker sold for Fred- 
erick Pflueger the vacant plot, 76.0x127, on the 
west side of Park av., 201 feet north of 17!(th 
St., to a client for improvement. The property 
was held at $18,000 and has been in the seller's 
family for the last 20 years. 

PROSPECT AV.— Edward Polak, Inc., sold 
for P. Naughton to W. Edelman the northeast 
corner of Prospect av and East 176th st, a 2V^- 
sty and basement frame detached dwelling, on 
a plot 40x100. 

RYER AV. — Nicholas Schaeffer sold to an ad- 
joining owner the 5-sty and basement brick 
apartment house 2326 Ryer av, on a plot 50x 
100. 

SOUTHERN BOULEVARD.— The newly formed 
S. B. Aldus Realty Co., with P. R. Blitz, F. 
Harrison and M. M. Alport as directors, pur- 
chased the 5-sty apartment house with stores. 
on a plot 100x150, at the corner of Southern 
boulevard and Aldus st. The company, capital- 
ized at $50,000, is represented by Sobel & 
Brand, attorneys. 

ST. ANNS AV. — Rosa Warner sold to Abra- 
ham Goldblum the 5-sty and basement brick 
apartment house 283 St. Anns av, on a lot 25x 
98.10X irregular, adjoining St. Ann's P. E. 
church yard. 

THIRD AV. — For improvement with a 1-story 
building the newly organized Weinmax Con- 
struction Co. purchased the plot. 72x120, at the 
southeast corner of Third av. and 168th st. The 
cost of the proposed building is estimated at 
$75,000. 

THIRD AV. — Former Judge Chas. P. McLean 
bought from Cecelia V. Crookstein 2449 Third 
av, a 3-sty brick flat with store, on a lot 23. 7x 



10U.2, and abutting the frontage on Mott Haven 
Canal. 

TOWNSEND AV.— Shaw, Rockwell & Sanford 
sold for Catherine Dugan to James L. Van Sant 
the vacant plot. 50x100. on the east side of 
Townsend av., 90 feet north of 175th st. 

TREMONT AV. — M Rubin sold through Ed- 
ward Polak 80S East Tremont av. a 2M!-sty and 
basement frame 2-family house, on a lot 25x100- 

TREMONT AV.— Nelson P. Mead sold the va- 
cant plot, 32x120, on the north side of Tremont 
av. about 175 feet west of University av. David 
L- Woodall. Jr.. was the broker. 

TREMONT AV.— Shaw, Rockwell & Sanford 
sold for Max Just the vacant plot, 75x96. on the 
south side of East Tremont av., 25 feet east of 
Walton av. The purchaser is the Shirenson 
Realty Corporation, L. Shirenson, president. A 
taxpayer will be erected on the plot. 

UNION AV. — Edward Polak, Inc., sold for 0. 
Wallach to Samuel Palachik 612 Union av, a 
4-sty brick flat with store, on a lot 17.5x90, 
southeast corner of East 151st st. 

UNIVERSITY AV.— Spotts and Starr, Inc., 
sold for Raymond Rubin the recently completed 
5-sty and basement apartment house 1801 Uni- 
versity av, northwest corner of Tremont av, ar- 
ranged in suites of from 3 to 5 rooms each. 
The aggregate rent is $35,000 per annum. The 
property was held at $200,000. The purchaser 
was the Sigley Realty Co. Max Monfried repre- 
sented the sellers, and Seymour Mork the pur- 
chasers. The property has a frontage of 95 
feet on University av and 90 feet on "Tremont 
av and 104 feet on the northerly line. 

WASHINGTON AV.— Meyer Isear sold to the 
J. G. Gold Realty Corporation 1154 Washing- 
ton av, a 6-sty and basement brick apartment 
house, on a plot 36x128, adjoining the northeast 
corner of 167th Bt- 

WILKINS AV.— Philip D. Shapiro, as attor- 
ney, purchased for a client the two 5-3ty apart- 
ment houses with 4 double stores at 1411 and 
1415 Wilkins av. Each house is -on a plot 40-6x 
150. They are located at the Freeman st sub- 
way station, rent for $22,000 and were held at 
$130,000. 



A. J. SIMBERG 


A R C H I 


T E C T 


113J BROADWAY, N. Y. | 


AT 26TH STREET 


Phone: Watklns 1877 



Brooklyn 



CARROLL ST. — Estate of the late William J. 
Carr, Justice of the Supreme Court, Second De- 
partment, gold 831 Carroll st, a 4-sty and base- 
ment brownstone dwelling that was long the 
residence of Justice Carr. It is near Prospect 
Park. 

MONROE ST.— Bulkley & Horton Co. sold for 
A. Marinotf to a buyer, for occupancy, 538 Mon- 



BUILD, BUY 



"Build, Buy, Work" is the appeal of public spirited citi- 
zens, to speed the return of prosperity. We are doing our 
part by 

LENDING MONEY 

on real estate. Whether you wish to buy for investment, or to 
improve your property, or to raise capital, you need delay no 
longer. Yon can borrow from us on bond and mortgage. 

UWYERS TITLE & TRUST CO. 

160 Broadway, New York 367 Fulton Street, Jamaica, N. Y. 

188 Montague Street, Brooklyn 383 East 149th Street, New York 

44 Court Street, Brooklyn 1354 Broadway, Brooklyn 

160 Main Street, White Plains, N. Y. 



NiEWENHOus Company. Inc. 

We specialize in Financing, Planning and Erect- 
ing Legitimate Building Operations 
on a 60% Loan Basis. 
Commission Moderate. 316-318 East i6ist Street 

Telephone: Melrose 1694-169S New York City 



PAINTING AND DECORATING 

GENERAL CONTRACTING 

HIGHEST WORKMANSHIP BEST MATERIALS 

REDUCED PRICES ESTIMATES FURNISHED 

m W. 96th St. New York R. SOLOVE Riverside S41t-74N 



roe st, a 2i4-aty and basement brownstone 
dwelling, on a lot 20x80. 

WYCKOFF ST.— Henry L. Nielsen Oinces 
sold the 21/2-sty garage at 95 Wyckoff st lor A. 
L. Scattergood to J. A. Brenack. 

7TH ST.— Henry L. Nielsen Offices sold tor 
Leonard Blank 480 7th st, a brick 3-tamily 
house. 

68TH ST. — Realty Associates sold to T. L. 
Farrell 622 68th st, Bay Ridge, a new 2%-sty 
brick and stucco dwelling, with garage. 

6STH ST.— Realty Associates sold to L. Kass- 
man 614 68th st, Bay Ridge, a new 2y2-sty brick 
and stucco dwelling, with garage. 

EAST OTH ST. — M. Rosenthal Co. sold to Lew 
Rogers a 3-sty dwelling, on a lot 20.\100, at Av 
J, East 9th st and Kings Highway, held at 
•lilS.OOO. The same brokers sold to M. Jawitz 
lor the Garden Land and Improving Co. a 3- 
sty dwelling at East 9th st and Av J, held at 
.fl5,000. 

EAST lOTH ST.— A. Mishkin sold for the 
Blue Jay Realty Corporation to M. Hochman 
brick 2-family house on the east side of East 
loth st, 277 feet north of Av Q, for occupancy. 

EAST lOTH ST.— A. Mishkin sold for the Gla- 
berson Construction Co., to M. Rappaport the 
dwelling 950 East lOth St., Midwood Manor, for 
occupancy. 

EAST lOTH ST.— Melville Realty Co. sold for 
the Corrigan estate a vacant plot, 176x105, on 
East 10th St., running through to Coney Island 
av., to the Sagamore Building Corporation, for 
immediate improvement. The same company 
negotiated loans for $63,000 for the purchasers, 

EAST 37TH ST.— The stucco dwelling in 
course of construction at 1074 East 37th st was 
sold for M. DeStefano and F. Barbarito to a 
client of the Knox Realty Co., brokers. 

BEDFORD AV.— Realty Associates sold, 
through Duft & Conger, Inc., to W. G. Butler, 
for immediate improvement, the northeast cor- 
ner of Bedford av, and Sullivan St., in the 
Crown Heights section, a vacant plot, 200xl49x 
165. 

CARLTON AV. — Anderson estate sold through 
Bulkley & Horton 28 Carlton av, a 3-sty frame 
3-lamily house, on a lot 18x100. 

CARLTON AV.— Bulkley & Horton Co. sold 
for Catherine Maloney and Mary Fitzmaurice 
to Philip Tracktman 34 Carlton av, a 4-aty 
brick double tenement house, on a lot 24.4i^x 
100. 

FRANKLIN AV.— Beckie Hockman sold 604 
Franklin av, a 3-sty brick single flat with 
store. 

LINCOLN PL. — Madge B. Leasing sold to a 
buyer, for occupancy, 610 Lincoln pi., a 3-story 
brownstone 2-family house. 

THIRD AV.— V. Levy and Isadore Blum sold 
through the Bulkley & Horton Co. 7510 Third 
av. Bay Ridge, a 3-sty brick flat with store, on 
a lot 20x80. 

TWELFTH AV.— Realty Associates sold to the 
Casino Building Corporation, through S. Michael, 
the vacant plot, 100x84.1 irregular, at the south- 
east corner of Twelfth av. and 55th St., Borough 
Park, which the purchaser will Immediately Im- 
prove by erecting 2-family brick, semi-detached 
houses, with driveways and private garages. 

Queens 

EDGEMERE. — Lewis H. May Co. sold for 
Maria Curry to Harry Joseph, for occupancy, 
447 Beach 37th st, Bdgemere, a 2H-story de- 
tached dwelling, on a plot of 4 lots. 

FAR ROCKAWAY.— Lewis H. May Co. sold 
for the First Presbyterian Church to Corrine 
Cohen a vacant plot, 67x142, on the west side 
of Central av. Far Rockaway. The buyer will 
improve the parcel. 

FLUSHING.— Oulut Thomson, of Flushing, 
purchased through the Halleran Agency the 
plot, 100x117, on the south side of Laburman av, 
25 feet east of Bowen av. Flushing. The pur- 
chaser will improve the property with two 8- 
room dwellings and will occupy one of the 
houses himself. The seller was the Tousey 
estate, which owns about 300 lota in this section. 

FLUSHING — Estate of Mary B. Parsons sold 
through the Halleran Agency to Andrea Pipi- 
tone, a Long Island City manufacturer, the va- 
cant plot, 75x173, on the south side of Broad- 
way, 181 feet east of Parsons av.. Flushing. 
The plot is part of the famous Parsons 
Nurseries, and It Is the first sale of It in more 
than 80 years. The buyer will erect on the plot 
an 11-room dwelling of hollow tile construction, 
to be ready for occupancy In the spring. 

FLUSHING.— James D. Tullls, of the Arm Tul- 
lis & Blanchard, builders, purchased through the 
Halleran Agency, from the Mary E. Parsons es- 
tate the plot, 100x100, on the north aide of Wash- 
ington st, west of Percy at, and adjoining the 
properties of Philip H. Plaget and Dr. J. R. 
Lessee. The buyer will Improve the property 
with an 8-room Colonial dwelling with two tiled 
baths and all up-to-date Improvements, for his 
own occupancy. The Parsons Estate has dis- 
posed of all its holdings on Washington st to 
owners who will erect homes this spring. 



January 21, 1922 



RECENT LEASES. 



Store In Heckscher Building Leased 

Another indication of the nortliward trend of 
Fifth av retail stores is shown in a lease closed 
with Mosse. Inc., retailers o£ linens, trousseaux 
and children's layettes, for a store and base- 
ment in the new 2U-sty Heckscher building, 
southwest corner of Fifth av and 57th st. The 
store involved adjoins the Fifth av entrance, 
has a frontage of 18 feet on the avenue and a 
depth of 80 feet. The e.\eeptionally high store 
ceiling provided makes possible a mezzanine 
floor, thus the actual sales space secured Is 
virtually the equivalent of 3 floors of a building 
on a :i5-toot lot. Mosse, Inc., of which Charles 
L. Bernheimer is president, is now at 19 West 
45th St and will move to its new location 
shortly after February 1. William Pierre Jockin 
represented the lessee and Cushman & Wake- 
field, Inc., represented the lessor in the trans- 
action. This lease involves an aggregate rental 
of over $250,000. 

The Heckscher building, the newest and most 
dominating landmark on upper Fifth av, is al- 
most completed and the building will be ready 
for occupancy February 1. 

Building Leased for a Garage 

John J. Meenan, Inc., leased for a long term 
of years, to a client of the Gotham Realty Co.. 
the 6-sty fireproof building 252-254 West 65th 
St for Charles Gysin, owner. Building to be 
used as a garage. 



Equitable Trust Enlarges Space 

Due to the expansion of business the Equitable 
Trust Co. has increased its space in 43 Ex- 
change pi by taking the large banking space 
formerly occupied by August Belmont & Co., on 
the 2d floor. The trust company already occu- 
pies the ground floor of this building in addi- 
tion to a large part of its own building, 37 Wall 
fit. The lease was negotiated by William A. 
White & Sons. 



New Owners Lease 125th St Store 

The newly formed Light Realty Co., repre- 
senting Samuel and R. Lichtman, buyer of 4 
and 6 West 125th st, reported sold recently tv^s 
leased the store and basement in the premises 
to Rahmey Bros, for a department store for 5 
years, with the privilege of a similar renewal. 
The upper floors in the building are to be taken 
over by the New York Engineering Institute for 
a similar term. The new company, which is 
represented by Sol Strauss, attorney, is also the 
purchaser of 42 West 125th st, sold recently. 



Tire Company Leases Floors 

The Kelly-Springfield Tire Co. has leased more 
than two full floors of the new 25-sty Flsk 
Building, at 57th st and Broadway, through 
Cross & Brown Co. The rental involves ap- 
proximately 40,000 square feet, at an aggregate 
rental for the term of the lease exceeding $1,- 
000.000. 

In moving to the Fisk Building the Kelly- 
Sprlngfleld Tire Co. will effect the consolidation 
of its various departments on two closely con- 
nected floors. The executive offices will be on 
the 16th floor, together with the sales and pro- 
motion departments. The 15th floor will be o^- ■ 
cupied by the accounting, cost, statistical, 
branch control and clerical departments. 



Some Broadway Corner Leases 

M. & L. Hess leased for clients to Joseph Rob- 
inson, hosiery, etc., the store and basement of 
903-007 Broadway, northwest corner of 20th 
St. ; in the same building the 4th floor to the 
Stanley W. Blum Co.. sport wear, and the 5th 
floor to the Collingbourne Mills, Inc. 



Laundry Leases Entire Building 

M. & L. Hess leased tor John J. Hadley to 
the Perfect White Steam Laundry Co., Inc., the 
3-sty brick factory building, 75x02, at 617-621 
East 18th St., for a term of years, at an aggre- 
gate rental of more than $75,000. Other leases 
by M & L. Hess were the 10th floor in 134-140 
West 2f)th St. to Jacob Bobrow & Bros. ; the 
11th floor in the same building to Maynard 
Miller, Inc., and the 6th floor in 115-117 East 
23d St. to A. N. Khourl & Bro. 



Record Nassau Street Rental 

Snowber & Co., representing the tenant, and 
Edwards-Dowdney & Richart, representing the 
landlord, sub-leased for the Mirror Candy Co. 
the store in 49 Nassau St., directly opposite the 
entrance of the New Federal Reserve Bank, to 
a well known tobacconist, for a long term of 
years, at a rental that makes it the highest 
record price ever paid on Nassau st. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

Haberdashers Make Investment 

Lewis L. Rosenthal Co. leased for the Scott 
Investing Co. to Gillette Bros., haberdashers, 
the three brick flats with stores 601-605 Eighth 
av, northwest corner of 39th st, on a plot 
73.1 IVi. 

The term of the lease is 21 years at an aggre- 
gate rental of $420,000. The lessees will re- 
model the properties for office and mercantile 
purposes and use the immediate corner store for 
a new link in its chain of men's furnishing 
shops. The brokers have been appointed ex- 
clusive agents of the buildings. 



Big Lease on West Broadway 

L. Tanenbaum, Strauss & Co. leased for Ed- 
ward C. Cammann, trustee, the entire 5-sty and 
basement building 65-67 Wooater St., running 
through to 379-81 West Broadway, on a plot 55x 
200, containing 66.000 square feet, for a term 
of years, to the Lightoller Co., manufacturers 
of lighting fixtures. 



81 



Long Lease on Eighth At. 

Dwight, Archibald & Perry, Inc., and Norman 
S. Holton leased for Ada H. Arnold to Edward 
Margolies, for a term of 21 years, with renewal 
privilege, the 4-sty brick building, 832 Eighth 
ave., two doors from the northeast corner of 
5Uth St. Mr. Margolies contemplates extensive 
improvements to the property at the expiration 
of the present lease. 



Auto Firm Leases 59th St Corner 

Peter Grimm leased for Mrs. Theodore W. 
Myers to the W. H. Ash Automobile Co. of At- 
lanta, Ga., for a term of years, the store in the 
southwest corner of Seventh av and 59th st, or 
Central Park South, at an aggregate rental of 
about $100,000. 

This lease means the bringing to New York a 
salesroom of the Hanson automobile which has 
not hitherto been sold north of Mason and 
Dixon's line. 

Will Remodel Dwelling 

Royal Scott Gulden leased for Dr. George F. 
Laidlaw to Philip Blass, for a term of 21 years, 
the 4-sty and basement stone dwelling, 58 West 
53d st, on a lot 21x100.5. The lessee will re- 
model the structure into small suites of 2 rooms 
and bath each. 



Cammeyer Leases Brooklyn Store 

The Cammeyer Shoe Co. leased a portion of 
the store property of A. J. Nutting & Co., at 386 
Fulton St., for a term of 12 years, in which it 
will establish a branch store. The Nutting 
property is at the southeast corner of Fulton 
and Smith sts.. in the heart of the downtown 
shopping center of Brooklyn. 



Old Downtown Corners Leased 

Charles F. Noyes Co. leased for the Roosevelt 
Hospital, for 21 years, at an aggregate rental 
of about $150,000, to Thomas Hayeck, the pres- 
ent tenant, 314-318 Pearl st, and 3-5-7 Peck Slip, 
six 3 and 4-sty buildings at the northeast cor- 
ner. The lease is a particularly interesting 
transaction, because the rental paid by Mr. 
Hayeck is exactly 100 per cent greater than the 
present figure. Mr. Hayeck has had the build- 
ing for more than 20 years, and will make ex- 
tensive improvements, modernizing a number of 
the buildings and subleasing for business and 
living purposes. 



Charles F. Noyes Co. leased for John Gilgar 
the store, basement and sub-basement of 24-26 
Murray st., southeast corner of Church st,, to 
Suerken Bros., restauranteurs, who also hold a 
lease on abutting premises, 27 Park PI., ob- 
tained through the same brokers. Suerken Bros, 
will make extensive improvements. The Noyes 
Co. subleased a portion of the store floor nof 
required for their business and the basements 
of the building to the Daily News, located in the 
adjoining building. The combined transactions 
represent an aggregate rental of about $110,000. 



ADAMS & CO. leased for E. R. Poerschke 
•Jo.OOO square feet at 213-217 Grand st to Fore- 
man & Clark Mfg. Co. ; also tor William P. 
Goldman & Bro. the advertising sign on the 
roof at Broadway, northeast corner of 49th st, 
to the Shubert Enterprises, for a long term of 
years. 

ADAMS & CO. leased for the estate of Brad- 
ish Johnson an entire floor in 921-925 Bread- 
way, running through to 149-151 Fifth av, to 
the Belmont stores Corporation, for a term of 
years, at an aggregate rental of $50,000; lor the 
Style Dress Co. a floor in 41-43 West 25th st, 
to Kanowitz & Krouish ; and for the Oolip 
Realty Co.. 10,000 square feet in 155-157 Woos- 
ter st to M. & S. Bermas. 

ADAMS & CO. leased for the Shapanka Realty 
Co. the store and basement in 125-127 Fifth av 
to the Imperial Merchandise So. tor a term of 
years ; for L. J. Carpenter a floor in 696-702 
Broadway, containing 10,000 square feet, to the 
Metropolitan Juvenile Clothing Co. : for the 
Twenty-fifth Street Realty Co. a floor in 138-144 
West 25th st to the P. Schlansky Co. 

AMES & CO. leased for Crystol & Crystol the 
5th loft in 29 West 17th st to Dutchess Neckwear 
Co., Inc., tor a term of years; also tor the 
Terminal Realty Co. the 2d loft in 26 West 31st 
St. to David Lassman, for a term of years. 

ARTHUR S. ALEXANDER, president of the 
J. Alexander Manufacturing Co., is the buyer 
of the large plot at the southeast corner of 
Broadway and 91st st, sold by the William Wal- 
dorf Astor estate through J. Irving Walsh. 

LEON S. ALTMAYER leased for Mrs. Elsie 
Redman Nelson the ground floor simplex apart- 
ment, in 1131 Park av, to Dr. August Francis 
Roland. 

ALBERT B. ASHPORTH. INC., leased the 3d 
loft at 290 Fifth av to the Paramount Garment 
Corporation, for a term of years. 



P 



MONEY TO LOAN 



Building AltGT*£L±ion s 
L & £L s G li old S 

Bu Z 1 cL J n.^ Z^ C9£LI2 s 

Sterling Mort^acfe Compaivy Inc. 

135 B f o a, ci sveLy. N e-w Yoi-K, 




Classified Advertisements 

Wants and Offeri, For Sale and F«r Rent — Rate 2Sc. per line; count six words to tk« Una. 



Employers anxious to secure help (clerical or 
profesiional), or employees wishing to obtain 
a position or better a present one will find the 
Record and Guide the quiclcest and most direct 
metliod of bringing their wants to the atten- 
tion of the largest number of interested read 
era, in the real estate or building professions. 



No medium reaching real estate interests af- 
fords owners, brokers, and executors irisliing 
to dispose of desirable property (in or out of 
the city), so favorable an opportunity to bring 
the merits of their propositions to the atten- 
tion of possible buyers as does the For Sale 
and For Rent section of the Rocord and Guide. 



SITUATION OPEN 



A LARGE financial institution is desirous of 
securing the services of a young man to in- 
spect property and make report on condition 
of houses. Good chance for the right man. 
Write, giving qualificationB and salary. Reply 
by letter only to N. M.. Room 308, 135 Broad- 
■way. 

SITUATIONS WANTED 

BUILDIN'? SUPERINTENDENT 
OPEN VOW ENGAGEMENT 
IS years' experience on new and alteration 
work (10 years in New York) ; fully quali- 



fied in all branches of construction ; best cre- 
dentials. Box 850, Record «& Guide. 

BUILDING MANAGER 
Have been chief clerk of Management depart- 
ment of large real estate concern for five 
years, having charge of all management de- 
tails, including correspondence, repairs, etc. 
Now at liberty and seeking permanent con- 
nection. Age 39; married. Box 857, Record & 
Guide. 

TOUNG MAN, 28, with 4 years' experience, 
with ability and Inltative desires connection 
with live broker, where hard work merits ad- 
vancement; salary secondary. Box 858, Record 
& Guide, 



82 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



MEMBERS REAL EBTATE BOARD OF NEW YORK 



ADAMS & CO., INC. 

Real £stat« 

170 5TH AVE. Tel. Gramercy 3854 

SPECIALIST IN BUSINESS PROPERTY 



ALEXANDER BALTER 

REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 

Management of Property a Specialty 
152 W. 42i]d St.. Knickerbocker Bldg. Bryant 2042-3 



BAUER, MILBANK & MOLLOY, INC. 

REAL ESTATE 
51 East 42nd Street Murray Hill 1936 



CUSHMAIL5: 
wAKEFIELD.y:!£ 

RENTING AND MANAGEMENT OF 
BUSINESS BUILDINGS 

50 EAST 42d ST. Murray Hill 7820 



BILTMORE REALTY CORPORATION 

REAL ESTATE — COM MERaAL LEASING 

MANAGEMENT 
TIIIBS BUILDING PHONE: BRYANT 8868-8869 



ALFRED P. COBURN 

Reed Estate — Appraisals — Insurance 
Management of Estate a Specialty 

159 W. 72nd ST. Phones: Columbus 4356-2548 



CUSACK COMPANY 

Real Estate and Insurance Broker* 

Specialists in West Side Propertiei 
176 WEST 72nd STREET 
Telephones: Columhua 6947 8179 



CHAS. A. DUBOIS 

REAL ESTATE 

3551 BROADWAY 
At 146th St. Eitabliihed MM 



DUNLAP & LLOYD 

INCORPOKATTD 
Real Estate — Insuraaee 

GROVE STREET PhoM Eprlns 5518 



ROYAL SCOTT GULDEN 

REAL ESTATE, FIFTH AVE. SECTION 
680 FIFTH AVENUE Phone: Circle 8315 



CHARLES G. KELLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

109 WEST 23RD STREET 

Walkltii 5.136 



ALBERT E. KELLY 

Successor to Fredk. A. Booth 
REAL E5TATE AND INSURANCE 

50 UntoD Square Tel. Stuyresant 1125 



T. H. KELLEY 

Specialist in Fordham Heights Property 

158 East 188th St., at Grand Concourse 
Pboo«: Fordham 2509 



J. P. & L. A. KISSLING 

Sales — Management — Appraisals 

896 8TH AVE., NEAR 54TH ST. 
Established 1870 Circle 0591 to 5 



H. C. KOPP & COMPANY 

Specialists in Retail Store Locations 

MANAUEMJCNT and BKOKEBAUB 

402 Madison Avenue Vanderbilt 4900 



ROBERT LEVERS 

Real Estate — Insurance 

THE IvNICKERBOCKER. 152 West 42nd Street 
Uptfiwn Office: 376 Lenos Avenue. Plione Connections. 



HIRAM RINALDO 

Specializing in the Sale and Leasing •< 

East Side Property 
230 GRAND ST. Bowery Bank Bldg. 



GEORGE S. RUNK 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
Mortgage Loans — Management 

I2';2 l.F.XINGTON AVF.NUE 



SCHINDLER & LIEBLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

RMnelander 6122 1393 THIRD AVE., at 79th St. 



SEAMAN & PENDERGAST 

Member Real Estate Board of New York 

RENTALS— SALES— MANAGEMENT 
RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 

542 FIKTU AVENUE Vanjerbilt 1309 



Manhattan OiTice Bronx OITice 

I WEST 125tli STREET 1972 JEROME AVENUE 
TeL Harlem 8400 Tel. Connection 

SHAW, ROCKWELL & SANFORD 

REAL ESTATE— INSURANCE 

Successors to 

SHAW & CO. 



MALCOLM E. SMITH, INC. 

Real Estate Agents and Brokers 

185 MADISON AVE. Vanderbilt 7393 



COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT 

Rentals — Sales — Appraisals 
Insu.rance 




840 BROADWAY NEW YORK 

Stuyvesant 0627 



JACOB J. TABOLT 

REAL ESTATE 
558 EIGHTH AVE. PhoM: 

Above 37th St. Fits Eo» 1186 

WHITNEY-FOSTER CORP. 

Real Estate Administrator 

150 WEST 72nd ST. Columbus 5409 



ROBERT N. BASSETT CO., INC., one of the 
largest manufacturers of metal goods, with 
offices at 220 Fifth av and factories at Derby, 
Shelton and Waterbury, Conn., has closed a 
lease for a large suite of offices on the 21st 
floor of the Canadian Pacific Building, Madison 
av, 43d to 44th st. One of their associate com- 
panies, the Standard Cloth Co., converters of 
cotton goods, will occupy a portion of the suite. 
Albert B. Ashforth, Inc., represented the lessee 
and Cushman & Wakefield, Inc., agents of the 
building, represented the lessor, 

BASTINE & CO., INC., leased, for clients, 
the 5th floor in 10 West 24th st, to Barnet Mir- 
kin ; the 4th floor in 91-03 Fifth av to Herman 
Bamberger Co., Inc. ; the 2d floor in 28-30 West 



Brooklyn Brokers 



DON'T "SHOP" FOR REAL ESTATE 

It doesn't pay. When you want to buy. tak« Bd- 

T&ntme* of our four oCTlcee, 50 years' experience, and 

thorouKli or,!inlluUon and get WHAT YOU WANT. 

AT THE RKHIT PRICE, CONVENIENTLY. 

"Established Over Half a Century" 

BULKLEY & HORTON CO. 

Memher of Real Estate Board of New Torfe 
Member of Brooklyn Re&l Estate Board, 
a. 3. HOKTON 585 Noatrand At©., near Dt-an St. 

Pre*. 414 Myrtle Ave., near Clinton Ave. 

A. J. HORTON 7520 Third A?e.. near T5th S»t. 

Secy. 1214 Plathush Ave., ntar Dltmas Are. 

JAMES B. FISHER 

Member of Brooklyn Real Estate Board 

REAL ESTATE 

174 MONTAGUE ST. Main 7267 

QUELL & QUELL 

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 

MANAGEMENT 

118 Patehen Avenue Broeklyil, N. Y. 

Telepboiie: Deeatur 4911 



25th st, to Miller & Finkel ; and the 5th floor in 
36 East 22d st to Max Horn. 

BERLOWITZ & CAINE leased for the L. H.- 
N. W. Co. the 6th floor in 130 West 25th st to 
Sperling Bros. ; for Prakin & Lebofsky a portion 
of the 0th floor in 48 West 28th st to Elmer Cloak 
and Suit Co. ; space in 133 West 21st st to B. 
Neiman & Co. and Penn Dress Co, ; and for S. & 
M. Greensteln space In 402 West 27th st to 
Barnes Press. 

P. M. CLEAR & CO. leased for the 23 West 
31st Street Corporation the easterly store in 
23 West 31st st to Richard Ritter, for a term 
of years, as a luncheonette ; also, leased for 
Albin Realty Co. the corner store at 1814 Sec- 
ond av to John Wiidberger, Inc. graceries ; and 
for Philip Siff the store in 228 West 29th st to 
Charles Hoffman. 

CROSS & BROWN CO. leased the 12th floor 
in 220 West 28th st. to the Powers Motor Colori- 
type Co. for use in their business of photo- 
graphic engraving and printing. 

CROSS & BROWN CO., in conjunction with 
Stephen H, Tyng & Co., leased space in 220-230 
West 28th st to the Barnes Printing Co. ; also. 
In conjunction with Pocher & Co., the store in 
219 West 47th st to A. Langstadter, Inc., sta- 
tioners and printers. 

CROSS & BROWN CO., in conjunction with 
M. & L. Hess, Inc.. leased for Jacob J. Schmuk- 
ler space in 103 Fifth av to the Arthur Manu- 
facturing Co. Cross & Brown Co. also leased 
the 5th floor in 251 Fourth av to Jacob Lunitz 
& Sons : also space In 20-26 West 22d st to 
Goldberg & Todd : and space in 15 East 40th 
st to the Gould Optical Equipment Co.. Inc. 

CROSS & BROWN CO. leased for a client to 
the L. H. Motor Company of New York 5,000 
square feet of space in the industrial buildin"; at 
the southeast corner of Vernon and Webster 
avs. Long Island City ; also le'^sed. for clients, 
to Katz, Hecht & Co. the 10th floor In 40-42 
East 22d st, Manhattan ; also to Joseph Love, 
Inc.. the 7th floor in the same building, also, 
in conjunction with H, J. Friedman to Alex- 
ander. Silverman & Cadous space in 38-42 East 
32d St. 

CHARLES M. DEROSA CO. sub-leased for 
Henry J. Schult to James Kaftas and Stelos 



Mehail the store in 160 East 34th st. for 
term of 5 years. 



Bronx Brokers 

A. G. BECHMANN 

Real Estate and Insurance 

TeL Intervale 556 1065 SO. BOULEVARD 

One block from Simpson Street Subway Station 

OTTO LACKMAN 

Management of Propertiee my Specialty 

2514 Grand Concourae. near Fordkam Koad 

PbOM: rwdbani BT»9 

L. G. LOSERE 

REAL ESTATE 

Entire Charge Taicen of Property 
871 Brook Ave., at 161tt St. Bitabllakad I(*t 

FRED. OPPENHEIMER 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

540 Bergen Av., at 149th St. 
Pbune: MSLROSB IS 'J 07 

JOHN F. PENDERGAST, Jr. 

Real Estate — Estates Managed 

340 WILUS AVENXJK 

Phone Malr08« 7221 

ALBERT D. PHELPS 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

554 Melrose Ave., near 149th St. and 3rd Ave. 
PHONE MELROSE 4371 

HENRY SCHWIEBERT 

Reed Estate — Insurance 

{ 261 EAST FORDHAM ROXD 

Near Talantlne Arenua Fordbaji 9ti§ 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



83 



CHARLES M. DE ROSA CO. leased for the 
G. & W. Lunch to B. Heller the store in 41 
Lexington av, known as Gramercy Hotel, for a 
long term of years : and leased for C. J. Wirth 
Realty Corporation the loft in 207 Lexington av 
to J. Melfa, embroideries, for a term of years. 

JOHN G. DABOUR, INC., was broker in the 
lease recently made for a term of 21 years of 
594 to SyS Eighth av, southeast corner of 39th 
at, to Joseph E. Marx. The lessee will either 
remodel the present buildings or will erect a 
new business building on the site. 

DUROSS CO. leased tor Froment & Co. to the 
Columbia Smelting & Refining Works the 2d 
floor, containing IS, 000 square feet, in 140 to 
156 Bank st, southwest corner of Washington st, 
for a term of years. 

OSCAR D. & HERBERT V. DIKE leased for 
Asa G. Candler, Inc., at 135-7 West 27th st, the 
entire loth loft to Jacobson & Geiger ; also, the 
entire Sth loft to Florence Costume Co., Inc., 
both for a term of years. 

DOUGLAS L. ELLIMAN & CO., INC., leased 
for Robert Ensko the parlor floor store at 6S2 
Lexington av to the Brick Shop, Inc., dealers in 
antiques. 

J. ARTHUR FISCHER leased for the Elgin 
Construction Co. to Max Kaplan the 3d loft in 
48 West 39th st, for a term of years. 

J. ARTHUR FISCHER leased for a client to 
Joseph Schultz the top loft 201 West 29th St., 
and to Harry Schiff the first loft 342 Seventh 
av. Both lessees are furriers. 

FOLSOM BROS., INC., and Mrs. Delany Mar- 
tin, sold for Miss S. McGee the furnishings, 
good will and lease of 41 East 83d st, a 4-sty 
and basement stone dwelling, to Waldemar 
Sandberg. 

GLOBE HOLDING CO. leased to Charles Cook, 
for a term of 15 years and 3 months, the 3-sty 
garage at the southeast corner of Third av and 
64th st, at an annual graduated rental of from 
125,000 to $27,000. 

HARRIS, VOITGHT & CO. leased for clients 
store in 711 Madison av to Nathan Malmut, and 
offices in 240 Broadway to W. W. Sharpe & Co., 
advertising agents. 

HAGGSTROM-CALLEN CO. leased for the 
Ess Eff Realty Co. the 2d loft in I.'jO West 45th 
st to the Artcraft Printery, for a term of years. 

A. A. HAGEMAN leased for a client to Julius 
Lattln the store in 67 West 30th st : and to 
Louis Blechman the 3d loft in 62d Sixth av. 

HEIL & STERN leased, for clients, to Leon 
Marks & Son the store and basement in 29 West 
31st st ; to R. Tahan Co. the 10th floor In 76-78 
Madison av ; to Kohn & Goldschmidt the Sth 
floor in 34-36 West 32d st ; to Strauss, Fast & 



Co. the 12th floor In 33-43 Bast 33d st ; and to 
H. Eisenberg the 10th floor In 118-120 West 
27th St. 

HEIL & STERN leased for the estate of J. N. 
Mahony to the Regent Export Co. and others 
547 Broadway, a 6-sty loft building; and for 
the same estate to George T. Matthews & Co. 
the 5-sty brick building 105 Water st., all for a 
term of years. 

M. & L. HESS leased tor a client to David W. 
Dazian & Son (he easterly store in 113-117 East 
23d St. ; the 2d floor In 5 East 20th st. to the 
Invincible Importing Co., and the 5th floor of 
103 Fifth av. to the Arthur Mfg. Co. 

M. & L. HESS leased for the Empire City 
Mortgage Co. to the Reingold Hosiery Co. the 
store and basement of 9 West 20th st. : to Hol- 
man & Kass the 2d floor of 128-130 West 30th 
St.; to Louis Liebowltz the 4th floor of 34-38 
West 27th St., and tor Michael Kennedy to the 
National Belt & Bag Co. the Sth floor of 26 East 
22d St. 

M. & L. HESS, INC., leased for the Mortgage 
Associates, Inc., In 49-53 East 21st st the store 
and basement, containing 15,000 square feet, to 
Walter A. and Fred H. Ardery, dress goods ; 
also offices to the Belle Embroidery Co. and the 
Reggie Embroidery Co. in the same building ; 
tor the Beattie Mfg. Co. the 2d floor- in 133 
Fifth av to S. M. Frank & Co., smoking pipes. 

LEWIS H. MAY CO. leased tor the estate of 
Bradlsh Johnson the Sth floor at 921 Broadway, 
for a term of years, to J. Bouton & Co. 

PEASE & ELLIMAN leased the store at 33 
Worth St. for the American Express Co. to 
Johnson & Porter, and the store 128 Chambers 
St. for C. L. Acker to the Gotham Sporting 
Goods Co. 

PEASE & ELLIMAN leased for Miss E. R. 
Requa to Antonio Sclafan! the 4-sty and base- 
ment dwelling, 55 West 52d st. 

HOMER L. PENCE leased tor the Garment 
Center Realty Co. Loft B In the building .SOO 
Seventh av to LIsh Bros., manufacturers of 
ladles hats, for a long term of years at an an- 
nual rental of approximately $18.000 ; In con- 
junction with Cross & Brown Co. the 11th floor 
in 29-33 West ,36th st to Morris J. Gerber, 
manufacturer of ladies' hats ; also the 12th floor 
in 29-33 West 36lh st to A. W. Maas. Co., manu- 
facturers of artiflcial flowers ; to Charles Char- 
ney, manufacturer of fancy feathers, the Sth 
floor in 2S-.30 West 36th st ; and to Harry Solo- 
mons & Son, manufacturers of ladies* trimmed 
hats, the Sth floor in 37 West 37th st. 

GEORGE R. READ & CO. leased, for a client, 
large space on the loth floor of the Varick 
Building, ,34 Hubert st, to the First Aid Spe- 
cialty Co., for a term of years. 



Sales in Penn Zone 

Maria S. Simpson sold through Joseph M. May 
to the Manufacturers Trust Co. 314-:j20 West 
35th st, four 3-sty brick buildings, on a plot 50x 
98.9, adjoining the rear ot the Manhattan Opera 
House. The purchase, too. abuts the property 
acquired by the purchasers in January, 1920, 
from the West 34th Street Reformed Church, ad- 
joining the northwest corenr of Eighth av and 
34th st, formerly occupied by the West Side 
Bank. 

This addition gives the Manufacturers Trust 
Co. a plot fronting 30 feet on the west side ot 
Eighth av and 175 feet on the north side ot 
West 34th st, extending to the Manhattan Opera 
House, and thence northerly 200 feet to the 
south side of West .35th st, where it fronts 50 
feet, giving the buyers a continuous plot of 
17,.'>00 square feet. 

The West 34th Street Reformed Church edifice, 
acquired a year ago, has been altered and is now 
used in connection with the banking office of 
the buyers. 



Mannheimer estate sold through Hell & Stem 
to Charles GalewskI 2.")4-23S West 37th st, be- 
tween Seventh and Eighth avs, three old build- 
ings, on a plot 75x1(10. It will be reimproved 
with a large loft building. 



"Childs" Buys Harlem Parcel 

Kennelly's Restaurant, a 2-sty building, 60.5 
Xl.^, at the southeast corner of Broadway and 
111th st, has been purchased by the Childs Res- 
taurant So., which will alter the structure and 
open a branch restaurant. The building was 
erected about 10 years ago on land owned by 
Henry C. Copeland and leased to Joseph P. Keu- 
nelly, proprietor of the restaurant. The latter 
has now disposed of the lease and the building 
at a price reported to have been in the neigh- 
borhood of $100,000. The lease has several years 
yet to run. 



Old Church Property Resold 

The old St. Luke's German Evangelical Church 
property at 233-239 West 42d st. which was re- 
cently leased to the Case Holding Co. (Harry B. 
Davis and Allen Westheimer) for restaurant 
purposes, has been sold by J. C. and M. G. Mayer 
to an investor. Leopold and Herbert Weil were 
the brokers. The parcel was held at $600,000. 
Davis and Westheimer have recently subleased 
the property to I. Flugelman, proprietor of the 
Hotel Hamilton, who will conduct the restaurant 
Alterations are being made from plans by 
Schwartz & Gross, architects. 



MANHATTAN BROKERS 



ORVILLE B. ACKERLY 

Appraiser of 

LONG ISLAND REAL PROPERTY 

Phone: Lonsracre 2280 

243 West 34th Street, New York Cltj 



ERNEST N. ADLER 

Upper East Side Property a Bpeelalty 
ISM FIRST AVE., at 7»th St. 

■rtahUstaad IMS Phoiu: Rhluliuute *12i 



Telephone: Pennaylvanla 0S96-0397 

AMERICAN BUREAU 
OF REAL ESTATE 

All About Real Estate Everything — Everywhere 

MODERN "AiU^UffilE" SYSTEM 

18 West 34th Street 

Astor Court nulMlne, New York 

Co-operation of Reliable Brokers Invited 



ARMSTRONG & ARMSTRONG 

Real Estat* Airents and Broken 
212 ST. NICHOLAS AVE.— »•« D«hth Ato. mid 
lilst BtrMt Phooa: Mornlnriide U76 



EDMUND M. BRENNAN 

INCORPORATED 

Seal Eitate— Imaranee 

11 FASTWMiST . Plai, T«M 



JAMES A. DOWD 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Renting: — Management 

874 SIXTH AVENUE, above 49th Street 



JACOB FINKELSTEIN & SON 

Real Estate — Mortgraffes 
Specialists in the Bowery Section 

42 BOWERY Phone: Franklin 1810 



ROBERT G. GRUNERT 

fluCCfBSOT to th« 

O. A. CnaHMAN REALTY CORPORATION 

Real Estate — Management 

172 Ninth Ave., af 21st St. Phon«: Chelsea 1841 



HARRIS EXCHANGE 

Real Estate — Mortgagee 

Renting and Leasing of Stores and Lofts 

Times Building Broadway at 42d Street 

Phons: Bryant 810-11S4 



HOLT & MERRALL. Inc. 

Industrial Real Estate 
342 MADISON AVE. Tel. Vanderbilt 4699 



WM. P. JONES & SON 

EflTABLIPHBD 1895 

Real Estate & Insurance 

1358 BROADWAY 

Cnrnrr Sftth fft Phone: Fltl Roy tiBT 



JOHN CONSTABLE MOORE 

REAL ESTATE 

15 EAST 40th ST. Vanderbilt S189 



LEONARD MORGAN CO. 

Real Estate— Insurance— Estates Mana(ed 

Gotham Bank Building, Columbus Circle 
Suitf 504-5 Phnnc: Columbus 164« 



ARTHUR G. MUHLKER 

Real Estate— Insurance 

York t1 Me Sect I on 

1113 PARK AVE.. NEAR 90TH ST. 

Phone: Lencrt JSSS 



ARTHUR L. SHAW 

Washington Heights Specialist 
4032 BROADWAY, ABOVE 169TH STREET 

Wadsworth 4:50-4151 



SHERMAN & KIRSCHNER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

54 E. in9th STREET 
NEW YORK 

Tel. Harlem 9028-5863 



/? 



JOSEPH MILNER 

Real Estate 

8 EAST 41st STREET. NEW YORK 

Murray Hill 2619 



JAMES B. SPEYERS, INC. 

Real Estate 

CANADIAN PAaFic Bun.nmn 

342 M»disnn Ave Swile I14-8t» 



WILLIAMS-DEXTER CO., INC 

Greenwich Vtllaare Real Estate 
Insurance 

72 nRKFNWTrH AVK Tbelsea gOM 



84 

Part of Haffen Brewery Sold 

Part ot the old HaBen brewery property, in- 
cluding the three 4-sty tenement houses with 
stores, 100x75.5. at the northwest corner of Mel- 
rose av and 151st st, has been sold by the Tyrol 
Realty Corporation, Samuel Wheeler, president, 
which acquired it last October. The new owner 
is the Summit Holding Co., which will pay $67,- 
000 for the property. The remainder of the 
block front extending to 152d st, which the sell- 
ing company also controls, is to be improved 
with a 6-sty apartment house. 



REAL ESTATE NOTES. 



FREDERICK J. PEACOCKE, real estate 
broker, has removed to 103 Lawrence st from 
137 Lawrence st, Brooklyn. 

CLARK T. CHAMBERS and Frank D. Veiller 
were the brokers in the sale of the 12-sty build- 
ing 6-S West 57th st, to Isaac D. Levy by the 
Dreicer Realty Co., reported in these columns 
recently. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

GEORGE B. DOOLAN, INC., ot Westchester, 
has opened an office in 51 East 42d st. Special 
attention will be given to seekers for homes in 
Westchester. William H. Oakley 2d, formerly 
of the Brown, Wheelock Co., Inc., has been ap- 
pointed New York manager. 

HERMAN A. LEWINE has severed his con- 
nections with the firm ot Levin, Harris & 
Lewine, Inc., and has opened offices at 432 
Seventh av, under the name of Lewine & Co., 
Inc., where he will transact the real estate 
business in all its branches. 

PEASE & ELLIMAN have been appointed by 
the Islesbrook Estates, controlled by Charles 
Hopkins, of the Punch & Judy Theatre, man- 
agers of the apartment house with store at the 
southwest corner of Madiosn av and 68th st, 
known as 30 East 68th st. 

CULVER & CO. have opened a country sub- 
urban department which will specialize in 
Westchester County and Western Connecticut 
properties, under the management of Miner D. 
Randall, who has specialized for some years 
past in the shore and hill properties between 
Greenwich and Norwalk, Conn. 



REAL ESTATE STATISTICS 



MANHATTAN 



CONVEYANCES 

BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



1922 

Jan. 10 to 

Jan. 16 



1921 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



Total No. 



236 
r»ses8ed Vkii;: : . . . . 520.062.200 
No. with consideration 2d 

Consideration Iomooo 

Assessed Value S963 .000 

Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 17 



200 

$] 0.390,200 

22 

$639,100 

S464.000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 18 



276 



133 



798 



543 



23 
$186,700 



10 
$37,900 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 17 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 18 



40 
$1,292,284 

Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 16 



43 
$453,070 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 17 



Total No 555 517 

Assessed Value $44,103,100 $31,794,900 

No with consideration 59 49 

Consideration $2,305,675 $4,495,850 

Assessed value $2,507,500 $3,512,000 



627 



337 



1,294 



72 
$603,754 



31 

$160,870 



1 68 
$1,520,959 



99 

$924,953 



MORTGAGES 

MANHATTAN BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



1922 
Jan. 11 to 
Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



1922 


1921 


Jan. 10 to 


Jan. 11 to 


Jan. 16 


Jan. 17 



Total No . „„ 196 

Amount $6,062,858 

To Banks & Ina. Co. 31 

Amount Sl.910.000 

No. at 6% „ ,„fi^? 

Amount $3,532,633 

^^t""^:::::::: S9,25 

SmoSnt'^".-.-.-.-.-.-.-.-.:: t50,000 

No. at 454% . 1 

Amount S9,000 

No. at 4% 

Amount ■ 

Unusual Rates. ^ „ „„1 

Amount $1,100,000 

Interest not given... 23 

Amount $1,361,975 

Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 17 



132 

$6 370 900 

20 

$3,396,400 

109 

$5,068,300 

10 

$293,900 

2 

$164,000 



224 

$2,313 879 

15 

$477,025 

172 

$2,081,301 

1 

$4,000 

3 

$9,000 



68 

$339 727 

6 

$55,000 

52 

$303725 

2 

$10,000 



1 

$6,000 

10 

$838,700 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 18 



884 

$5,135,158 

185 

$1,565,475 

858 

$4,904,413 

16 

$168,125 

7 

$54,920 



423 

$2,165,619 

67 

$489 794 

382 

$1,997,305 

22 

$91,154 

4 

$8,050 



48 
$219,578 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 17 



14 
$26,002 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 18 



$1,000 

2 

$6,700 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 16 



2 

$32,000 

13 

$37,100 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 17 



Total No 469 364 479 

Amount $15,096,855 $17,499,811 $4,728,364 

To Banks & Ins. Co. 52 40 39 

Amount . ." $2,862,800 $4,143,400 $850,440 



200 

$1,087,792 

11 

$76,500 



MORTGAGE EXTENSIONS 

MANHATTAN 



1,785 

$9,766,187 

339 

$2,532,525 



BRONX 



1.070 

$5,473,361 

162 

$1,441,844 



1922 
Jan. 11 to 
Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 
Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. IS 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks A Ins. Companies. 
Amount 



51 
$2,610,700 

39 
$2,301,450 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 17 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks £ Ins. Companies. 
Amount -... 



120 

$5,826,425 

84 

$5,104,250 



50 
$1,438,900 

30 

$1,056,400 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 18 

104 

$1,375,050 

65 
$3,542,050 



19 

$565,000 

9 

$416,000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 17 



43 

$1,244,000 

22 

$844,500 



14 

$226,000 

7 

$131,000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 1 8 

27 
$489,300 

11 
$198,500 



January 21, 1922 



Member Brooklyn Reil Estate Baw4 

Money to Loan on First Mortgage 

Joseph T. McMahon 

REAL ESTATE and 
MORTGAGE LOANS 

188 and 198 MONTAGUS STSSBT 
BROOKLYN 

Main 8834 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

COLLECTING, RENTING 
AND MANAGEMENT OF ESTATES 



MAX N. NATANSON 

BUYS AND SELLS 

IMPROVED 

MANHATTAN 

PROPERTY 

170 BROADWAY 

Suite 915-919 Cortlandt 7e37-7«3a 



MRS. GERRIT SMITH 

Member Real Estate Board of New York 

42 EAST 40th STREET 

CITY DEPARTMENT 

APARTMENTS AND HOUSES 

SOUND SHORE PROPERTY A SPECIALTY 



J. CLARENCE DAVIES 

Member Be«l Estate Board. N. T. 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

AUCTIONEER— BROKER 
APPRAISER— MORTGAGE LOANS 

Main Office: 149th St. and Third Ave. 

BRANCHES: 
32 Nusau Street 51 East 42nd Stn«t 

Pbone ConnectloDB 



Philip A. Payton, Jr., 
Company 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
AND BROKERS 

New York's Pioneer Nesro 
Real Estate Agents 

127 West 141st Street 

Between Lenox and Seventh Aveauee 
Telephone: Audubon S945 



MANHATTAN 



BRONX 



BUILDING PERMITS 

BROOKLYN 



QTTEBNS 



RICHMOND 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 
Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. IS 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 
Jan. 18 



1922 

Jan. 11 to 

Jan. 17 



1921 

Jan. 12 to 

Jan. 18 



New Bulldlaes. 

Coat 

Alterations . . . . 



16 
$5,199,850 

$150,165 
Jan. 1 to 

Jan, 17 



11 
$2,239,325 

$635,725 
Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 18 



67 

»3,410.4S0 

$13,000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 17 



New Building!. 

Cost 

AlteraXons ... . 



26 

$7,404,150 

$548,565 



41 

$2,541,425 

$912,276 



133 

$5,511,150 

$33,500 



14 

$84,200 

$22,900 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 1 8 

28 

$2,204,200 

$31,000 



346 
$3,614,680 

$143,225 
Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 17 



51 
$300,,500 
$128,955 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. IS 



208 

$1,284,715 

$67,585 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 17 



46 
$178,423 
$40,660 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 18 



37 

$173,200 

$57,800 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 17 



17 
$19,150 
$4,375 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 18 



440 

$4,492,190 

$181,255 



140 

$1,285,095 

$533,405 



493 

$2,531,385 

$85,877 



112 

$564,698 

$64,400 



87 

$343,095 

$57,800 



25 

$49,075 

$7,649 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



85 




Principal Structures Scheduled for Erection in 1922 

Important Operations Already Under Contract Plus Numerous Projects Planning 
Assure Busy Building Season in Metropolitan Area 



THERE is every present indication that 1922 will be a banner 
year for building interest in the Metropolitan District. 
Already the list of proposed operations is far more ex- 
tensive and diversified than it was at this time in 1921 and 
every day brings announcements of new operations either be- 
ing planned or actually placed under contract. Considerable 
of the new construction reported during the past month is 
scheduled for an immediate start and the remainder will in all 
probability be under way before the end of spring. 



amount of small residential construction, such as non-fire- 
proof apartments, garages, srnall factories, stores, etc. Al- 
though some speculative operations have been included they 
are in every instance imposing structures designed for promi- 
nent locations, and therefore should appear in this list in 
order to make it representative of the character of work that 
will be undertaken during the coming months. 

One of the principal facts brought out in a study of this 
list of projects to be constructed this year is the marked re- 



Location, class. 

Manhattan. 

803 Fifth av Apartment. 

804 Fifth av Apartment. 

1094 Park av Apartment. 

Nee Riverside dr & 109th st. .Apartment. 
Nee 80th st & Lexington av. . Apartment. 

Nee Broadway & 91st st Apartment. 

Nee Madison av & 64th st. . . . Apartment. 

139-147 West 71st st Apartment. 

108-110 East 81st st Apartment . 

39 Fifth av Apartment 

Hamilton pi. 138th st Apartment 

S w c West End av & 105th st.. Apartment 

East 61at st Apartment 

1136 Fifth av, 3 e c 95th st. .. Apartment 

1134 Fifth av Apartment 

Beaver & William st Office Building. 

229 West 43d st Office Building. 

132-1.38 West 36th st Office Building. 

142-148 West 36th st Stores & Lofts. . 

Seventh av, 31st to 323 at Office Building. 

330-348 West 55th st Office Building. 

Nee Canal & Varick 6t8 Bank & Offices. 

206-210 West 34th st Bank 

242-252 West 36th st Stores & Lofts. 

N w c Broadway & 60th st, . . .Stores & Offices. 

237-239 West 37th st Stores & Lofts. 

Ninth av, 58th to 59th sts Hospital 

202-210 West 91st st School 

Cor Lenox av and 129th st School 

Second av, 67th to esth sts . , , , School 

Amsterdam av, cor 183d st,... School 

Randall's Island Dining Hall... 

Academy st, near Broadway. . .Theatre, etc.... 
Broadway and 218th st Stadium 

BRONX, 

Mott av. 157th to 158th sts Laboratory 

Sec 161st st & Elton av Y. M. C. A 

Sec Fordham rd & Tiebout av.Dept. Store 

Bathgate av, n of Tremont av,, School 

Spuyten Duyvil Parkway College 

Nee Burnside & Walton avs.,.rheatre 

Ogden av, n of 171st st Theatre 

BROOKLYN. 

S w c Court st & Atlantic av. . Bank 

Bushwiek av, near DeKalb av., Hospital 

Sanford st & Park av Warehouse 

Parkville av & West 1st st, . . . Church 

Flushing av, e of Irving av. . .Factory 

Foster av & East 23d st Church 

Broadway & DeKalb av Church 

Glenmore & Miller avs .Synagogue 

Neptune av & W 33d st School 

RICHMOND 
St. George. S. I Police Station. . 

NEW JERSEY. 

Summit, N. J School 

Secacus, N. .1 Factory 

Elizabeth. N. J Departm't Str. 

Newark. N. J Apartment .... 

Asbury Park, N, J High School. . . 

Bayonne, N. .T Memorial Club 

Bayonne. N. J School 

East Orange. N. J Apartment 

WESTCHESTER 

Bronxville, N, Y Apartment . , . , 

Mt, Vernon. N. Y Dairy Plant 

New Rochelle. N. Y Club House 

Larchmont. N. Y Club House 



Owner. 

P. C. Satterwbite 

W. Emlin 

Fred Culver, et, al 

B. P, Walker, et, al 

Holborn Realty Co 

Lucania Realty Co 

A. Sokolski 

Jacob S. Kahn, et. al.... 
Alta Vista Hold'g Co, Inc 

Bing & Blng 

Max J. Kramer 

Joseph Paterno 

E. T. Gerry 

Al. Hyman 

Mary D. Gerard 

New York Cotton Exch.. 

New York Times 

132 West 36th St. Corp... 
Julius Tishman & Sons. . 
Equitable Life Assur. Soc. 
Natioanl Bible Institute. . 
Corn Exchange Nat. Bank. 
North River Sav'gs Bank. 

Max Aronson, et. al 

1.841 Bway Realty Co 

Lefcourt & Haas 

Roosevelt Hospital 

Temple Israel 

Board of Education 

Board of Education 

Board of Education 

City of New York 

Carnival Palace Corp. . , , 
Columbia University 



Architect, 



Height. 



Montrose Morris Sons 12 

Montrose Morris Sons 12 

E. D. Litchfield 13 

Schwartz & Gross 14 

Emery Roth 11 

R. Candala 15 

Geo. F. Pelham 11 

Schwartz & Gross 9 

Rouse & Goldstone 9 

Emery Roth 14 

Geo. F. Pelham 7 

R. Candala 14 

J. B. Snook Sons — 

Private Plans 14 

.H. G. Wiseman 13 

Donn Barber 23 

Ludlow & Peabody. 11 

Robert T. Lyons 12 

Schwartz & Gross 14 

Starrett & Van Vleck — 

McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin 17 

Fellheimer & Wagner — 

Charles E. Birge 2 

Schwartz & Gross 13 

B. H. & H, N. Whinston 8 

Geo. & Edw. Blum 14 

York & Sawyer 8 

Tachan & Vought 4 

C. B. J. Snyder 5 

C. B. J. Snyder 5 

C. B. J. Snyder 4 

Chas. B. Meyers 2 

Private Plans 2 

Henry Hornbostel 1 



Fleischmann Co Arthur B. Heaton 3 

Y. M. C. Association. .. .Jallade, Lindsay & Warren.. 6 

Not announced M. W. Del Gaudio 2 

St. Joseph's R. C. Church. Robert J. Reiley 3 

Manhattan College Corp. O'Connor & Delaney ... .Various 

Occidental Holding Corp.Wm. Koppe 2 

Ogden Amusement Co....EmiIie De Rosa 2 

South Brooklyn Sav'gs Bk. McKenzie, Voorhees & Gmelin 2 

Bikur Cholim Hospital. .. Missac Thompson 5 

American Tobacco Co. . , .Ward & Bender 6 

St. Rose of Lima R. C.Ch.F. J. Berlenbach 1 

C. Werbelovsky Murray Klein 3 

Flatbush Presty. Church . . Hobart B. Upjohn 1 

Strausberg & Bleender. . .R. Thomas Short.. 2 

Cong. Agudath Ach, B, J.K. M. Adelsohn 3 

City of New York C. B, J. Snyder 5 

City of New York lames J, Whitford 3 

.Board of Education Cuilbert & Betelle 3 

, Amer. Choc, & Prod. Co.. .Andrews, Tower & Lavelle. . . 4 

Goerke-Kirch Co Wm. E. Lehman 3 

Ritz Holding Co Wm, E, Lehman 8 

Board of Education E, A. Arend 3 

Knights of Columbus Geo. McCabe 4 

Board of Education Donald G. Anderson 3 

Withheld David M. Ach 7 

Fred Culver, et. al Mann & MacNell 4 

■ Willow Brook Dairy Co. .McCormick Co 5 

Winged Foot Golf Clvib..L, G. Sweezy 2 

Bonnie Brier Co'try Club, Private Plans 2 



Est, Cost, 


Contarctor. 


$2.';o,ooo. 


.Not let. 


230,000. 


.Not let. 


300.000. 


.Not let. 


1,500,000. 


.Architects build. 


225,000. 


.Owner builds. 


1,500,000. 


.Owner builds. 


1,000,000. 


.Net let. 




.Owner builds. 


200,000. 


.Owner builds. 




.Plans in progress. 


7.j'o,666. 


.Owner builds. 




.Owner builds. 


1.250,000. 




.'500,000, 


.Fred F. French Co. 


350,000, 


.Not let. 


3,000,000, 


.Geo. A. Fuller Co. 




.Not let. 


2,000,000, 


.Owner builds. 


1,000,000, 


.Owners build. 


6,000,000, 


.Thompson, Starrett Co 


1,500,000, 


.Not let. 


400,000. 


.Thompson, Starrett Co 


100,000. 


.Not let. 


2,000,000, 


.Not let. 


300,000, 


.Not let. 




.Owner builds. 


1,000,000. 


.Marc Eidlitz & Son. 


.300,000, 


.G. Richard Davis Co. 


845,000, 


.Not let. 


1,000,000. 


.Not let. 


250,000. 


.Not let. 


2."'.0,(I00. 


.Not let. 


4.50.000, 


.Not let. 


2,000,000. 


.Not let. 


1.50,000. 


.Not let. 


•2.50,000, 


.Not let. 


115,000. 


.Not let. 


100.000. 


.Not let. 


1 .000,000 , 


.Not let. 


200,000, 


.Not let. 


100,000. 


.M. Shapiro 6 Sons. 


.500,000. 


.Not let. 


1,. 500,000. 


.Not let. 


200.000. 


.Turner Const. Co. 


150.000. 


.Not let. 


175,000, 


.Not let. 


100.000. 


• Not let. 


2.50,000, 


.Not let. 


100,000, 


.Harry Gross. 


850,000. 


.Not let. 


300,000. 


.Frank J. Dougherty. 


500,000 


Gustave De Kimpe. 


:!50,000 , 


. I). Marinneori & Co. 


200.000. 


.Not let. 


(UlO.OCMI, 


.Owner builds. 


400,000, 


.Not let. 


150,000, 


.Not let. 


400.000. 


.Not let. 


.500,0150. 


.Not let. 


750,000 


.Hegeman & Harris Co. 


250.000 


.Barney-Ahlen Co. 


M 650,000, 


.Armstrong Const. Co. 


V. 150.000 


.A. G. Vermilye. 



The list of projected building operations printed herewith is 
not a complete summary of the construction in the ]\fctro- 
politan area by any means. It only points out the most im- 
portant of that large group of operations to be erected dnrin^ 
the coming months, and does not include any of the vast 



vival of interest in the commercial development of the mid- 
town district of Manhattan. Already' the plans for new struc- 
tures in this section will require the outlay of millions of dol- 
lars, and there are negotiations now under way that will materially 
increase the number of l.irge structural operations in this vicinity. 



86 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



Walter Stabler Discusses Mortgages at Y. M. C. A. Lecture Course 



(Continued from page 70) 
began about 10 years ago, and it is now a most important 
branch of the mortgage business. 

"Now, as to a second mortgage. It is something you pay for 
and pay well. Big chances are often taken with them. High 
rates of interest and bonuses usually accompany it as well 
as discounts. A second mortgage is frequently a necessity. It 
is a fairly safe investment if not too large. One always needs 
to remember that the first mortgage takes precedence and the 
holder of a second mortgage should look well into the first 
one. Fine first mortgages are those of the average building 
and loan association. A good feature of them is that they are 
steadily amortized. Building and loan associations are active 
in every state and they are very strong in some. Their total 
assets are $2,500,000,000 in the' nation. Their operations mean 
that after a dozen years many a man owns his own home who 
would not otherwise own it. 

-Much has been said," continued Mr. Stabler, "about speculative 
builders They are a necessity to any growing community, espe- 
cially to a large city. New York has practically been built and 
rebuilt by speculative builders. It is their policy to borrow all 
that they can get on a building undertaking. They take build- 
ing or temporary loans. An agreement is made with the lender 
to advance monev in given sums of the total to be obtained at 
certain stages of construction. When the building is completed 
the lender is sure to make a search tor liens and the final pay- 
ment is not made until there is evidence there are no liens. 
Insurance and other companies make permanent loans on real 
estate. The largest part of the Metropolitan Life Insurance 
Company's business is in permanent mortgage and building loans. 

'■Before a big lender on building loans does business at all 
with a builder, the lender must have plans submitted for minute 
inspection by an architect employed by the lending institution 
tor that purpose. They must be good plans to be favorably con- 
sidered. They must visualize the building to the practised eye 
as it will look when completed, including all of its living con- 
veniences and comforts, its heating and sanitary systems, etc. 
When buying land, a builder should take all of this into con- 
sideration. And then go to the company's architect with com- 
prehensive plans for careful inspection. The architect examines 
the layout of the plumbing, heating, elevator service and what 
not. There are stringent provisions in the building loan agree- 
ment regarding all of these factors of construction. And it they 
are not fully complied with the builder may not get his loan; 
at least not all of it. The strong hand held over building loans 
by the large lending institutions has resulted in better built 
buildings of all kinds. The speculative builder is thereby re- 
strained from doing poor work and the building is a better in- 
vestment for the buyer and a better investment for the mort- 
gagee. The building loan agreement is in effect a certificate of 
the character of the structure. All lenders, large and small, 
should follow this course. It tends to stabilize real estate. There 
is a plan in contemplation by the title insurance companies to 
establish a bureau to enforce such an agreement where they 
have anything to do with building loans. It makes buildings 
better to lend on and above all it makes better buildings. 

"There is a tendency, nowadays, to make long term loans more 
popular, with instalment payments. The American Ambassador 
to France, Hon. Myron T. Hcrrick, is not only a keen diplomat 
and publicist, but he is also a careful observer of contemporary 
events of life. He has written a book entitled 'Rural Credits,' 
wherein he elucidates the mortgage lending methods among the 
populace of France, Belgium, Germany, Austria and the Scandi- 
navian countries. You should all read it. In those countries 
they have very long term mortgage loans on all kinds of real 
estate, terms of 50 years and less, and terms that run beyond a 
lifetime and are taken up by the heirs of the departed. The rate 
of interest is very low. There is an amortization of one per 
cent, or more a year, according to the capacity to pay com- 
fortably. These mortgages encourage thrift among the working 
classes and they accordingly promote a better social status and 
better civilization. 

"The general impression of a mortgage is that it runs forever. 



If it does it should not. Something should be paid off of a mort- 
gage every year, even though it be a little. It makes the lender 
feel more comfortable and the borrower feel easier and richer. 
The lender can only call so much at one time as is mutually 
agreed upon. Savings banks everywhere ought to follow this 
rule, but they do not always do so. Some such mortgages run 
in their entirety for years. A good plan would be to arrange 
longer term loans with easy payments. Such a policy affords 
money to help others on the road to safety. I hope to see such 
a plan become more general. Guaranteed mortgages are the 
best for small investors and of that there is no doubt. I hope 
that the era will arrive when banks and insurance companies 
will lend almost entirely on real estate mortgages. When a 
mortgagor has paid something on account of his mortgage he 
has not spent it or sent good money after bad. He has simply 
invested it and that is the way he should feel about it. That 
is what I tell mortgagors I deal with. The method of paying 
mortgages differs in nearly all the states. New York has the 
safest method of all. Every satisfied mortgage or payment on 
a mortgage is recoriJed. In New Jersey only a receipt is written 
on the mortgage instrument that a payment has been made. 

"Blanket mortgages are another form of mortgage security. 
Many land companies avail themselves of them. A blanket mort- 
gage should provide for releases, from the blanket, to given lot 
buyers. The particular lot and block number sold should be 
marked 'Released' on the map or diagram filed with a blanket 
mortgage. Sometimes releases are not provided for, but where 
they are provided for there is no difficulty." 

Discussing the abolition of the mortgage tax in New York 
State, Mr. Stabler said: "In its place the lender has a mort- 
gage recording tax. It calls for the collection of one-half of 
one per cent. This income is divided between the county and 
the state. In New York and adjacent counties the tax yields 
a large revenue. A mortgage is otherwise exempt from state 
and local taxation. Theoretically the lender pays the tax, but 
actually the borrower does. The unusual mortgage tax cre- 
ated the impression that the title companies lending on mort- 
gage were practicing usury, inasmuch as the interest on the 
mortgage was often six per cent and the mortgage tax was 
additional. It is now fully settled that there is no usury prac- 
ticed, as any tax charged goes to the state and not to the 
lender. Very few states have a mortgage tax of any kind. 
The tax does not exempt such mortgages as are subject to it 
from the income tax. The last few years have witnessed some 
of the largest real estate owners paying 73 per cent, of their 
income annually over to the government in the form of an 
income tax. This condition has resulted in eliminating the big 
individual lenders from the mortgage market, and it has been 
a serious blow. On a mortgage at six per cent they each got 
net about 1 per cent. The result has been that these former 
big lenders have put their money into tax exempt securities. 
It has removed from the mortgage loan market hundreds of 
millions of dollars^ and the circumstance accounts for the high 
rates of interest that have prevailed so long. There are now 
sixteen billions of dollars in tax exempt securities. Secretary 
of the Treasury Mellon recently announced that there would be 
no more of them. At least he will recommend that there will 
be no more of them, anyway. And it is probable that there 
will not be. 

"As regards title insurance, it is wise for every buyer of 
property and every lender of money on mortgage to be sure 
of the validity of the title. Do not trust to any guess work 
and trust no one except the clear title after search. It is the 
only safe and sound way. Thousands of persons have had bit- 
ter experiences by not having titles searched and guaranteed." 



Housing Shortage Measured by Census and Building Facts 



(Continued from page 71) 
this year aggregate to date 400, including one- and two-family 
and multi-family houses. 

The Bron.x during 1922 will far outstrip its building record of 
1921. During the last few months there has been an extensive 
sale of large vacant plots there, for improvement with apart- 
ment houses. Since January 1 this year up to last Monday 
there had been filed with the Bronx Bureau of Buildings plans 
for 155 multi-family houses, to accommodate 5,850 families; and 
a total of 1^217 one- and two-family houses to accommodate 
1,550 families. During 1921 the Bronx built only seventy multi- 
family houses, providing for 2,710 families, and a total of 618 



one- and two-family houses that accommodate 780 families. 
The total cost of living space construction in the Bronx last 
year was $56,167,749, whereas during 1920 the total cost was 
only $7,672,975. Which shows that the Bronx in 1921 did more 
than eight and one-half times as much to meet the living 
situation as it did in 1920. In 1916 there were 6,033 vacancies 
in buildings in the Bron.x containing three or more families. 

The figures of population and building during 1920 and 1921 
prove conclusively that there cannot be a shortage as great as 
is claimed by some, and that whatever shortage exists today 
will be substantially reduced by November 1 next when the 
rent laws, unless extended, will e.xpire by limitation. 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



87 



Many Large Buildings Planned for Early Spring Start 



Construction Statistics Tabulated by F. W. Dodge Company Show 
in Commercial and Industrial Activity in Local Territory 



Gains 



RECORDS of building commitments for the first two 
weeks of 1922 show that the construction industry is 
in an infinitely better position than it was one year 
ago and that there is every reason for an optimistic attitude 
on the part of every one affihiated with the planning and erec- 
tion of new structures. According to figures tabulated by the 
F. W. Dodge Company, showing the number and value of new 
construction projects planned and contracted for .in New York 
State and New Jersey, north of Trenton, for the second week 
of 1922, there is far more work for building interests in sight 
at the present time than there was a year ago, and every like- 
lihood that the list of projected operations will steadily 
increase. 

The statistics for the week of January 7 to 13 inclusive show 
that architects and engineers in this territory had started 
work on plans for 444 new structural projects that will in- 
volve an outlay of approximately $27,622,000. During the same 
week announcements were made of the ward of 304 contracts 
that will require an expenditure of more than $13,000,000. 

Residential construction continues to predominate when the 
figures for the entire territory are analyzed, but according to 
all reports there is likely to be a better ratio between housing 
construction and all other types of building in the Metropolitan 



district during the coming season than there was last year. 
Already there is a decided improvement in the volume of pro- 
posed commercial and industrial construction scheduled for 
New York City and its environs and an increase has also been 
noted in educational and philanthropic building. 

The list of 444 operations for which plans were announced 
during the second week of 1922 includes 79 business projects, 
such as stores, ofiices, lofts, commercial garages, etc., $6,319,- 
500; 7 educational buildings, $224,100; 3 hospitals and institu- 
tions, $1,610 000; 19 industrial projects, $760,000; 11 public works 
and public utilities, $171,400; 3 religious and memorial pro- 
jects, $148,500; 315 residential operations, including apartments, 
flats and tenements and one and two-family dwellings, $17,- 
436,500, and 7sociaI and recreational projects, $952,000. 

Among the 304 projects for which contracts were placed dur- 
ing the week were 40 business and commercial jobs of various 
types, $1,873,500; 2 educational buildings, $330,000; 4 hospitals 
and institutions, $201,000; 6 industrial projects, $811,000; 2 
public structures, 33,000; 20 public works and public utilities, 
$691,600; 2 religious and memorial buildings, $35,800; 223 resi- 
dential projects, including multi-family structures and one and 
two-family houses, $8,643,500, and 5 social and recreational 
operations, $477,000. 



PERSONAL AND TRADE 
NOTES. 



H. C. Stearns, architect, 25 Broadway, 
announces the opening of a branch office 
at 15 Exchange street, Boston, Mass. 

Rock Plaster Corporation announces the 
removal of its offices to the Barrett 
Building, 40 Rector street. 

R, Grosvenor Hutchinson has been elect- 
ed to the board of directors of the J. G. 
White Engineering Corporation. Mr. 
Hutchinson is a director of the Advance- 
Rumley Co. and the Allis-Chalmers Manu- 
facturing Co. 

\V. L. Sauiiders, representing the Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers, has 
been appointed a member of the Board of 
Trustees of the United Engineering Society 
for a term of three years, expiring in 1925. 
He succeeds Irving E. Moultrop, whose 
term expired. 

Rome Wire Company, Rome, N. T., has 
established a district sales office at 50 
Church street. H. S. Hammond, who has 
represented the company in the eastern 
territory for the past twenty years, is in 
charge of the New York City office. 

Marcus Contracting Co., Inc., 305 Broad- 
way, has obtained contracts from the 
Turner Construction Company for excavat- 
ing at 14S Elizabeth street, for the new 
building for the Knickerbocker Ice Com- 
pany, and in Sanford street, Brooklyn, for 
a structure for the American Tobacco 
Company. 

Hottraan Heater Company, L/Orain, O.. 
announces the opening of a direct factory 
branch at 23 East 33d street, In charge of 
J. C. Fullerton and W. How.ird Arrighi. 
The company has established a modern 
showroom at this address, with sales and 
service departments and a complete stock 
of all sizes of heaters will be carried. 

Wm. E. Bloodeood announces that the 
firm of Bloodgood & Sugarman, architects, 
is dissolved by mutual consent. Mr. Blood- 
good retains his personal clients and their 
accounts, and Mr. Sugarman assximes all 
the other assets and liabilities of the firm. 
Mr. Bloodgood continues the practice of 
architecture at the old office, 17 East 49th 
street, and Mr. Sugarman .joins with Ar- 
thur Paul Hess, under the firm name of 
Sugarman & Hess, with offices at 16 East 
43d Btreet. 



Efficiency of Fire Windows 

The steady increase in the annual Are 
losses shown in reports from all parts of 
the United States is arousing new atten- 
tion to ways and means for reducing this 
menace to life and property, whose toll 
during 1921 again set a high record. 

At the present time a method for retard- 
ing fires is rapidly gaining greater popu- 
larity, which is said to be the most suc- 
cessful means yet devised for preventing 
the spread of fires. This is the Installation 
of what are known as "flre windows" in 
buildings, supplanting shutters and 
sprinkler systems. 

Such windows, which are made of wire 
glass — that is, glass re-enforced by a wire 
mesli which is imbedded in it — and have 
hollow metal frames, are manufactured by 
the S. H. Pomeroy Company, Inc., whose 
factory and general offices are located at 
2S2-296 East 134th street. 

They were first introduced some twenty 
years ago, and Avere immediately pro- 
claimed far superior to metal shutters for 
windows as fire retardants. Their inven- 
tion is said to have been inspired by the 
failure of shutters in several disastrous 
h'azes and tlie realization that some more 
efficient window protection was necessary. 

In a numl:)"r of s-^'rions fires it was found 
that the wire glass windows not only re- 
mained intact liiit nrpvented the communi- 
cation of fires to inflammable bulldfnga. 

Since that time the wire glass windows 
have lieen adopted for many of tlie most 
important office and factory structurr? 
not only in New Yorlc City and Its environs 
but throughout the country, and wherever 
tested by flre are declared to have proved 
their complete efflciency. 



TRADE AND TECHNICAL 
SOCIETY EVENTS. 



Creosoted Wood Rlock Floors 

The use of treated wood blocli floors in 
1920 showed an increase of over 80 per 
cent, over the 1919 figures, according to 
the Service Bureau of the American "Wood 
Preservers' Association. Creosote oil and 
a creosote coal-tar paving oil were used' 
as preservatives, with an average absorp- 
tion of approximately nine pounds pi-r 
cubic foot. Incomplete statistics for 1921 
show an increase over the 1920 figures 
and a tendency toward the absorption of 
a little less oil per cubic foot for interior 
floors. 

The desire for a permanent, resilient 
floor with high wearing qualities is given 
as the reason for the increased demand 
for floors of this type for factories, ma- 
chine shops, foundries, warehouses, and 
mills of various kinds. 



Bnilding Managers* and Owners* Asso- 
ciation of IVew York will hold its regular 
monthly dinner meeting at the Advertis- 
ing Club. 47 East 25th street, Tuesday 
evening, February 14. The speaker of the 
evening will be announced later. 

lluilding Trade Employers* Association 

will hold its annual election of officers at 
the association rooms, 30 West 33d street, 
Tuesday, February 21. The Nominating 
Committee has presented the following 
slate; For president, Walter S. Faddis; tor 
vice-president, A. J. Rosenthal; for second 
vice-president, John J. Grace, and for 
treasurer, J. Odell Whitenack. 

Nng-ent Construction Corporation, build- 
ers, announces the removal of its offices to 
21 East 40th street. 

Lift-hting Fixture Dealers' Society of 
America will hold its annual convention at 
the Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, 
Wis,. January 30 to February 4, inclusive. 

Mason Material Dealers' Association of 
New Jersey will hold its annual meeting 
at the Hotel McAlpin, New York City, Jan- 
uary 26. 

American Society of Heatins and Ventl- 
Intinc Engineers will hold its annual 
meeting in New York City, January 24 
to 26, 1922, inclusive. 

Niitional Brick Manufacturers* Associa- 
tion will hold its annual convention at 
the Claypool Hotel, Indianapolis, Ind., 
January 23-28, 1922, 

American Institute of Architects has 
selected Chicago as the city in which to 
hold its 1922 convention, which will be 
held early in the spring. Further details 
will be announced later. 

New York State Retail Hardware Asse- 
ciation will hold its annual convention 
and exhibition at Rochester, N. Y., Febru- 
ary 21 to 24. inclusive. Exhibition at Ex- 
hibition Park; headquarters and sessions 
at the Powers Hotel. 

Common Brick Manufacturers* Associ- 
ation of America will hold its annual con- 
vention at the Statlcr Hotel, St. Louis. 
Mo., January 30 to February 1, 1922. In- 
dications are that this convention will 
draw a larger attendance than the his- 
toric gathering in New York City last 
January. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



CURRENT BUILDING OPERATIONS 



A GOOD deal of satisfaction is daily being 
manifest by construction interests 
over tile manner in which the building 
situation is shaping- up. There is no doubt 
that the outlook is far more encouraging 
than it "was one year ago and that during 
the coming months a tremendous volume 
of new construction will be released. This 
is already apparent through a study of 
the commitments of the past few weeks 
and an analysis of the work being planned 
by the leading architects and engineers 
of this city. 

The new projects scheduled for an early 
start are much better diversified as to 
type than they were one year ago; there 
is a large amount of residential work con- 
templated and in all probability this char- 
acter of operation will continue to be the 
dominating influence during the forth- 
coming season. But there is a very de- 
cided improvement in the outlook for com- 
mercial and industrial operations and fair 
prospects for considerable educational and 
philanthropic building. Taken as a whole 
the building situation is far better off at 
present than it has been for a long while 
and if the labor question could be settled 
without further delay there would be no 
reason for building interests not experi- 
encing an unusually busy and prosper- 
ous year. 

The inclement weather of the past few 
weeks has slowed down business in the 
local building material markets to some 
extent, but there is a lot of new inquiry 
that is indicative of active times just as 
soon as conditions permit. Prices are 
fairly steady and the only exception is the 
slightly advanced quotations on common 
brick. 

Common Brick — Business in the New 
York wholesale market for Hudson River 
common brick has been dull during the 
past week. The cold weather has slowed 
down construction to a considerable ex- 
tent and as a result sales in the wholesale 
market have been light. Inquiry is fair, 
however, and denotes a large amount of 
important construction ready for a start 
as soon as weather conditions permit. No 
arrivals of new brick were reported this 
week and as long as the river remains 
ice-bound there is little likelihood of added 
supplies as shipment by rail is prohibitive 
because of the high freight rates. Com- 
mon brick prices are slightly higher than 
they were last week. Although $15 a 
thousand is the general quotation there 
are several manufacturers who are ask- 
ing a slight advance over this price and 
it is the general opinion that the price 
situation will be firm with possible ad- 



vances while the source of supply is shut 
off by the ice. 

Summary — Transactions in the North 
River brick market for the week ending 
Thursday, January 19, 1922. Condition of 
market; Demand relatively light; prices 
slightly advanced and firm at the new 
level. Quotations: Hudson Rivers, $15 a 
thousand to dealers in cargo lots along- 
side dock. Number of cargoes arrived, 
none; sales, 6. Distribution; Manhattan, 
2; Brooklyn, 4. Remaining unsold in the 
New York wholesale market, 15. 

Structural Steel — Although actual orders 



for fabricated steel for buildings are not 
numerous there is a lot of new inquiry and 
there is every indication that within the 
next few weeks a decided change will take 
place in the market situation as applied 
to structural steel. Quite a number of 
important contracts have been awarded re- 
cently and a vast amount of proposed work 
is now out for estimates, so that it is like- 
ly that the commitments of the next week 
or so will involve a large total tonnage. 
Among the projects for which structural 
steel orders are pending are the addition 
to Macy's department store, S.OOO tons; the 



BUILDING COMMODITY PRICES 



CURRENT prices for building materials 
and supplies as quoted by leading 
dealers and jobbers in the city for delivery 
in New York. 

Note — Price changes are indicated by 
bold-face type. 

Brick (Wholesale, on Dock, N. T.), per 
thousand: 

For delivered prices in Greater New 
York add cartage, handling, plus 10 per 
cr^nt. 

Hudson River best grades. . . .$15.00 to 

Raritan No quotation 

Second-hand brick, per load 

of 3,000, delivered $45.00 to 

Face Brick — Delivered on job in New 
York: 

Rough, Red $45.00 to 

Smooth Red 45.00 to 

Rough Buff 50.00 to 

Smooth Buff 50.00 to 

Rough Gray 53.00 to 

Smooth Gray 53.00 to 

Colonials 45.00 to 

Cement — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan, Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens: 

Domestic Portland cement, per bbl..$2.S0 
Rebate for bags, 10c. each. 

Gravel — Delivered at job site in Manhat- 
tan and Bronx; 

1%-in., Manhattan deliveries, per cu. 

yd $4.25 

Bronx deliveries 4.25 

%-in., Manhattan deliveries 4.25 

Bronx deliveries 4.25 

Note — Prices for deliveries in Brooklyn 
and Queens are approximately the same 
as for Manhattan, except where job is lo- 
cated at a great distance from the water 
front, in which case prices will be slightly 
higher. 

Grit — Delivered at job site in Manhattan 
and Bronx; 

Manhattan deliveries $3.50 

Bronx deliveries 3.50 



HoIloTT Tile — 

Exterior — Not used in Manhattan; quota- 
tions only on specific projects. 

Interior — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan, south of 125th street. 

2x12x12 split furring $0.12 per sq. ft. 

3x12x12 0.12 per sq. ft. 

4x12x12 0.17 per sq. ft. 

6x12x12 0.19 per sq. ft. 

Note — For deliveries north of 125th St., 
Manhattan, and in Brooklyn, Bronx and 
Queens, prices job site are slightly higher, 
according to location of work, which 
varies trucking charges. 
Lath — 
Eastern Spruce delivered 

at job site in Manhattan, 

Bronx, Brooklyn and 

Queens $10.50 per 1,000 

Lime — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan, 
Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens: 
Finishing Lime (Standard in 

300-lb. barrel) $4.70 per bbl. 

Common Lime (Standard 300- 
lb. barrel) 4.40 per bbl. 

Finishing Lime (Standard In 
Hydrate Finishing, in paper 

bags 24. 00 per ton 

Hydrate Common, in cloth 

bags 22.50 per ton 

Plaster — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan. 
Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens: 
Neat Wall Cement, In cloth 

bags $21.00 per ton 

Brown Mortar, in cloth bags. 18.00 per ton 
Lath Mortar, in cloth bags... 18.00 per ton 
Finishing Plaster, in cloth 

bags 24.50 per ton 

Rebate for returned bags. 15c. per bag 
Finishing Plaster (250-lb. 

barrel) $4.00 per bbl. 

Finishing Plaster (320-lb 

barrel) 5.35 per bbl. 

Plaster Blocks^ 

2-in. (solid) per sq. ft $0.17 to 0.19 

3-in. (hollow) per sq. ft 0.17 to 0.19 




The 

UNION STOVE WORKS 

Headquarters for Bailders for 

Kitchen Ranges for Coal or Gas, Standard or 

Pipeless Furnaces, Heating Boilers, Laandiy 

Apparati 

THE GREAT "ASTOR" LINE 

70 BEEKMAN STREET 

Established 88 Tears Telephone: Beekman 249# 



Keen Competition and the Great Struggle for Business has brought into the New York 
Market a Light Weight Extra Heavy Cast Iron Pipe. 

Wo are selling Full Weight, New York Regulation, Extra Heavy, Cast Iron Pipe. 
We So not SubtHtute, but <e(l Full, Honest Weight. 

JOHN A. MURRAY & SONS, INC. 

'•The Haute of ReliaUUty" 
310-312 WEST 39TH STREET, NEW YORK 



$80,000 

To loan on corner plot, 75x100 
feet, in Norwood Gardens, 
Long Island City, for construc- 
tion of 5-story walk-up with 
stores. 

One Million Dollars 

To loan on one and two-family 
houses. 

3^icfeert=protDn 
laealtp Co, 

52 VANDERBfLT AVE., NEW YORK CITY 
Tel. Vanderbilt 9484 4-6 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



89 



MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 



New York Cotton Exchange, 3,000 tons; the 
Newark: Chamber of Commerce Building, 
1.000 tons, and a number of smaller ton- 
nage orders for less prominent operations. 
The manner in which the steel business Is 
improving is reflected in the monthly re- 
port of the Bridge Builders and Structural 
Society, which states that during the, 
month of December, 1921. 71,500 tons of 
fabricated structural steel was contracted 
for throughout the United States, which 
Is equivalent to forty per cent, of the en- 
tire capacity of the bridge and structural 
shops of the country. The total tonnage 



sold in the United States in 1921 was 758,- 
300 tons, equal to thirty-five per cent, of 
capacity. 

Electrical Supplies — Trade is fairly ac- 
tive in this line, and all signs point to a 
busy season ahead. Jobbers generally re- 
port that wiring materials are moving 
steadily and there are indications that 
both contractors and dealers are buying 
somewhat in excess of their immediate re- 
quirements. There has been a very decid- 
ed improvement in the number of new 
inquiries, and with the promised revival of 
building there is no doubt the electrical 



IN THE METROPOLITAN MARKETS 



Plaster Board — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan, 
Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens. 

27x48xy2 in $0.38 each 

32x36x^ In 0.22 each 

32x36x% In 0.24 each 

32x3 6x% in 0.30 each 

Sand — 

Delivered at job in 

Manhattan $1.80 to per cu. yd. 

Delivered at job in 

Bronx 1.80 to per cu. yd. 

White Sand — 

Delivered in Manhattan .... $5.00 per cu. yd. 

Broken Stone^ 

lV4-in., Manhattan delivery. $4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

%-in., Manhattan delivery. . 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Buildin^r Stone — 

Indiana limestone, per cu. ft $1.62 

Kentucky limestone, per cu. ft 2.27 

Briar Hill sandstone, per cu. ft 1.68 

Gray Canyon sandstone, per cu. ft. . . . 1.65 

Buff Wakeman, per cu. ft 1.90 

Buff Mountain, per cu. ft 1.80 

North River bluestone, per cu. ft.... 1.85 

Seam face granite, per sq. ft 1.20 

South Dover marble (promiscuous 

mill block), per cu. ft 2.25 

White Vermont marble (sawed) New 

York, per cu. ft 3.00 

Structural Steel — 

Plain material at tidewater; cents per 
pound: 
Beams and channels up to 14 

In 1.88c. to 2.03O. 

Beams and channels over 14 

in 1.88c. to 2.03c. 

Angles. 3x2 to 6x3 1.88c. to 2.03c. 

Zees and tees 1.88c to 2.03o. 

Lumber — 

Wholesale prices. New York. 
Yellow pine, merchantable 1905, f. o. b.. 
N. Y.; 



3x4 to 14x14, 10 to 20 ft $41.00 to $51.00 

Hemlock, Pa., f. o. b., N. Y., 

base price, per M 37.50 to 

Hemlock, W. Va., base price. 

per M 37.00 to 

(To mixed cargo price add freight, $1.50.) 

Spruce. Eastern, random car- 
goes, narrow (delivered) . . 30.00 to 

Wide cargoes 33.00 to 

Add $1.00 per M for each Inch In width 

over 12 inches. Add $1.00 per M for every 

two feet over 20 ft. in length. Add $1.00 

per M for dressing. 

Cypress Lumber (by car, f. o. b., N. Y.): 

First and seconds, 1-in.. . .$110.00 to 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 
1 Hearts — 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 
1 Prime — 

Quartered Oak to $166.0t) 

Plain Oak to 136.00 



■to 



■to 



Flooring:; 

White oak, quart'd sel. . . . — 
Red oak, quart'd select..— 

Maple No. 1 65.00 to 

Yellow pine No. 1 common 

flat 55.00 to 

N. C. pine flooring Nor- 

folks 65.00 to 



■to $87.50 
■to 87.50 



VVindo-w Glass — 

Official discounts from manufacturers' 

lists: 
Single strength, A quality, first three 

brackets 82% 

B grade, single strength, first three 

brackets 82% 

Grades A and B, larger than the first 

three brackets, single thick 82% 

Double strength, A quality 82% 

Double strength, B quality 85% 

T.inseed Oil — 

City brands, oiled, 5 bbls. lot. $0.72 to $0.74 
Less than 5 bbls 0.76 to 0.77 



Turpentine- 
Turpentines 



.$0.80 to$0.82 



industry will experience excellent business 
during the coming months. Prices gener- 
ally are steady and no radical changes are 
anticipated. Conduit stocks are in good 
shape, and there is a fair demand. The de- 
mand for flexible armored conduit and 
rubber-covered wire is steady, but with 
marked signs of increasing as building im- 
proves. 

Cast Iron Pipe — Private demands for 
this commodity continue to dominate the 
market and the trading is somewhat above 
normal for this time of the year. There 
Is but little municipal demand current, but 
according to plans now in preparation 
there should be a decided revival of busi- 
ness from this source early next spring. 
Throughout the cast iron pipe industry 
there is a very much better feeling than 
existed at this time one year ago. In Jan- 
uary, 1921, manufacturers were extremely 
happy to be able to operate their plants at 
about twenty-five per cent, of capacity, 
while now the busiest of the eastern man- 
ufacturers is running at about eighty per 
cent, of capacity on actual orders, and 
none are working at less than seventy per 
cent. Prices are firm, with New York 
quotations as follows: 6 in., and heavier, 
$47.30 per net ton; 5 in. and 4 in., $52.30; 
3 in., $62.30, with Class A and gas pipe $4 
extra per ton. 

Reinforcing Bars — Both demand and in- 
quiry have improved during the past week 
or so and manufacturers anticipate excel- 
lent business in this line this year. There 
are indications of a marked improvement 
in industrial and commercial construction 
and reinforced concrete will be a popular 
medium in this work. Concrete bar prices 
are steady. 

AVindo^v Glass — Business in this line has 
dropped off to some extent during the past 
week or so, but prospects for spring and 
summer business are very good, as there 
rs a vast amount of proposed building that 
will likely be started soon. The outlook 
for another large residential building 
movement this year is promising and job- 
bers are depending- upon this to a consid- 
erable extent. Prices are steady and prac- 
tically unchanged. 

Builders* Hardware — Demand for hard- 
^vare item's continues active, and local job- 
bers and dealers expect an unusually busy 
season, as there are prospects of a tre- 
mendous increase in general construction 
within the next few months. The residen- 
tial building program of 1921 was the sal- 
vation of this industry, but from ail cur- 
rent accounts the business of last season 
■will be relatively small when compared 
to that scheduled for the coming season. 




Face 

Enameled 

Fire 



BRICK 

We are BRICK SPECIALISTS. We do nothing else but make brick 
and ship brick. Consequently we are able to assure you abso- 
lute satisfaction on every order, whether large or small. FACE 
BRICK in BufTs, Reds, Ironspots, Browns and Mingled Effects. 
High grade FIRE CLAY. ENAMELED BRICK in White and 
Mottled EfTects, first and second quality for interiors, exteriors 
and courts. Write or phone for immediate attention. 

American Enameled Brick & Tile Company 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE, NEW YORK 

Telephone Murray Hill 8787-8788 



As manufacturers of BRICK for thirty years, 
we have a record of repeat orders that afTords 
you a 100% guarantee of satisfactory service. 
To the service given by our Face, Enameled 
and Fire BRICK, is added the service we 
render in shipment and delivery. Prompt 
shipments on any size contracls in any range 
of shade or texture, at fair prices and of 
first-class quality. 



90 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 21, 1922 



A Clean Building 




We clean masonry of every type 



lean building will sell or rent ua ^ell 
new building. In appearance it i» a 



A cle 

as a new building. In appearance !■.*•<> 
new building, for cleaning restore! the 
original freshness of color. 

Estimates for cleaning— and pointing;, if 
desired — submitted on request. 

Atlantic Terra Cotta Co. 

Cleaning Department 

350 Madison Avenue 

Telephone: Vanderbilt 9980 



J. P. Duffy Co. 

Flue Pipe 
Terra Cotta Blocks 

Gypsum Blocks 
Masons' Materials 

138th Street and Park Avenue 

BROOKLYN 
SOth-Slst Streets and 2nd Avenue 

QUEENS 
Jackson Avenue and Madden Street 



POMEROY 

FIRE RETARD ANT 
WINDOWS 

Built in the belief that the BEST hollow 
metal fire retardant window is the only 
SAFE fire retardant w^n-^rw for a builder 
to use or for a manufacturer to •»!!. 

S H. POMEROY CO., Inc. 

282-96 East I34th Street NEW YORK 

Phone Melrose 6104 



TELEPHONES: HABI.EM [ ^^^^ 



FRANK U. ROSS 

Contractor and Dealer in 

TILE and MARBLE 

8« El*ST U6TH STREET NEW TOBK 



CONTEMPLATED 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS, PLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

8i)TH ST.— Emery Roth, im West 40th St., 
has completed plans for an 11-sty brick and 
limestone apartment, 62x100 feet, at the north- 
east corner of SOth st. and Lexington av. tor 
Holborn Realty Co. A. M. Bing, 111) West 40th 
St., owner and builder. Cost $:;2o,000. 

AMSTERDAM AV.— Lowinson & Schubert, 366 
5th av., have completed plans for alterations to 
the 5-sty brick tenement, 78x25 feet, at 701 
Amsterdam av., for Daniel Korn, 170 West 74th 
St., owner. Cost -flo.OOO. 

5TH AV. — Montrose Morris & Son, 533 Nos- 
trand av, Broolityn, have completed preliminary 
plans for a 12-sty fireproof apartment, S.'ixLiO ft, 
at 8U3 5th av for F. C. Satterwhite, 803 5th av, 
owner. Cost, .$2.50,000. Architect will take bids 
on general contract. 

5TH AV.— Montrose Morris & Son. 5^S Nos- 
trand av, Brooklyn, have completed preliminary 
plans for a 12-sty fireproof apartment, 25x103 ft, 
at 804 5th av for W. Emlin, 805 5th av, owner. 
Cost. $2.50,000. Architect will take bids on gen- 
eral contract. 

1C5TH ST.— Gronenberg & Leuchtag, 450 4th 
av, have plans Hearing completion tor a 5V4-sty 
brick, steel and limestone apartment, 100x135 
ft. in the south side of lG5th st, 160 ft east of 
Broadway, for M. Lipman, 90 Haven av, owner. 
Cost, $200,000. 

DWELLINGS. 

SEYMOUR AV.— Morris Whinston, 116 West 
30ih St., has completed plans for a 2-sty frame 
and stucco dwelling, 20x32 feet, with garage, at 
2210 Seymour av, for E. Klein, 410 East 122d 
St., owner. Cost $10,000. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

COLUMBUS CIRCLE DIST.— Palmer & Plon- 
sky, 63 William st, have preliminary plans in 
progress for a 6 and 7-sty brick and reinforced 
concrete garage, 100x200 ft, in Columbus Circle 
district for Owners' G_ara5e Corp., C. G. Taylor 
& Co., fi.scal agents, 2( William st, owner. 
STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

43RD ST.— Ludlow & Peabody, 101 Park av., 
have plans in progress for an annex to the 11- 
sty brick and terra cotta newspaper plant and 
office building, lOOxlOO feet, at 22!) West 43d 
St., for New York Times, 22U West 43d St., 
owner. 

7TH AV.— B. H. & C. N. Whinston, 2 Co- 
lumbus Circle, have completed plans for a 7-sty 
brick store and office building, 25x70 feet, at 7th 
av., for 789 Seventh .\venue Corp. L. Simpson, 
president, 880 Broadway, owner. Cost $100,000. 



APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

SHAKESPEARE AV.— M. W. Del Gaudi, 158 
West 45th St., has completed plans for a 4-sty 
brick apartment, 40x64 feet, on the east side of 
Shakespeare av., .391 feet north of 172d St., for 
Donna Building Co. Albert Picciotta, president, 
2754 Crotona av., owner and builder. Cost $35,- 
000. 

MORRIS AV.— Margon & Glaser, 2S04 3d av. 
have completed plans for a 5-sty brick tene- 
ment, 110x88 ft, on the west side of Morris av, 
102 ft south of 181st St. for Kings Winter Build- 
ing Corp.. A. W. King, president. 81 East 125th 
st, owner and builder. Cost, $200,000. 

KINGSBRIDGE RD.— Maurice Courland, 47 
West 34th st, has completed plans for two 5-sty 
brick and limestone apartment houses, 75x83 ft 
each, on the west side of Kingsbridge rd, 275 ft 
north of Kingsbridge terrace, for Michael Her- 
man. Inc.. 277 Broadway, owner and builder. 
Cost, $270,000. 

DWELLINGS. 

WEBB AV.— M. Jos. Harrison, 110 West Slat 
St.. has completed plans for two 2-sty brick 
dwellings. 30x45 feet, with garages, on the east 
side of Webb av., 150 feet north of 195th St., 
for Cohen & Vogel. 417 East 170th st. owner. 
Cost .$32,000. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

WEBSTER AV.— S. J. Kessler, 529 Cortland 
av.. has plans in progress for a 4-sty concrete 
garage, of irregular dimensions, on the east 
side of Webster av., at Moshohi pkway, for S. 
M. De Tasquale, 2875 Marion av., owner. Cost 
$120,000. Architect will take bids on general 
contract about February 9th. 



WELLS ARCHITECTURAL IRON CO. 

Manufacturers of Ornamental Iron Work 

Office and Factory: River Ave. and East 15l8t St 



Phan*: ( ISTt 
Mott BsTra I IITI 



SPRINKLER 
SUPERVISORY SERVICE 
AUTOMATIC SPRINKLER 
VALVE ALARM SERVICE 
INTERIOR FIRE ALARM 

EQUIPMENT 

INSTALLED AS A LOCAL SYSTEM 
OR FOR CENTRAL OFFICE SERVICE 

AUTOMATIC 

FIRE ALARM SERVICE 

SPECIAL BUILDING 

SIGNAL SERVICE 

Automatic Fire Alarm Co. 

416 Broadway New York City 

CANAL 5188 



STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 
MOUNT HOPE PL.— Frank M. Egan, 120 East 
Fordham rd, has completed plans for a group of 
3 -sty brick stores, 51x112 ft, at the northeast 
corner of Mount Hope pi and Jerome av for 
Thos. J. Waters, 971 Woodycrest av, owner and 
builder. Cost. .$30,000. 

THEATRES. 

WEBSTER AV.— Moore & Landsiedel, 148th st 
and 3d av, have plans in progress for a 1-sty 
brick moving picture theatre, lOOxloO ft, with 
stores, on the west side of Webster av, 100 ft 
north of 204th st, for West 190;h Street Con- 
struction Co., Chas. Schlessinger, president, 1776 
Weeks av, owner. Owner will take bids on sepa- 
rate contracts about February 20. 
MISCELLA.NEOUS. 

MOTT AV.— Arthur B. Heaton, 52 Vanderbilt 
av, has completed plans for a 3-sty and cellar 
brick, limestone and granite laboratory, 105x52 
ft, on the east side of Mott av, from 157th to 
1.5Sth sts, for the Fleischman Co., 701 Washing- 
ton st, owner. Cost, $150,000. 

Brooklyn 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

HAMILTON AV.— Boris W. Dorfman, 26 Court 
st, has plans in progress for four 4-sty brick 
apartments, .50x110 ft, with stores, on the east 
side of Ft. Hamilton av, between 07th and 08th 
.sts. for Jonas Construction Co., 902 5Sth st. 
owner and builder. Cost, $270,000. 

IITH ST.— McCarthy & Kelly, 16 Court st, 
have plans in progress for a 4-sty brick apart- 
ment, 40x127 ft, in the west side of East 11th 
st, 52 ft north of Church av, for Kraslow Build- 
ing Co., 190 Montague st, owner and builder. 
Cost, $75,000. 

MONROE PL.— Slee & Bryson. 154 Montague 
St. have completed plans for a 5-sty brick 
apartment. 25x85 feet, on Monroe pi., near 
Clark St., tor 83d Street Construction Co. Chas. 
Dibner, in charge, 1U41 S3d St., owner and 
builder. Cost $80,000. 

BARRETT ST.— Chas. Goodman, 375 Fulton 
St., has completed plans for a 4-sty brick apart- 
ment, 55x90 feet, at the northwest corner of 
Barrett and Dumont sts., tor Louis Walnick, 
365 Elton st., owner and builder. Cost $45,000. 

OCEAN AV. — McCarroll, Murphy & Lehman, 
852 Monroe St., have plans in progress for a 
4-sty brick and limestone apartment, 120x120 
feet., at the southeast corner of Ocean and 
Foster avs., tor Morrison Land Co., Inc. I. 
Morrison, president, 1675 40th st., owner. Cost 
$200,000. 

STONE AV.— J. M. Berlinger, 469 7th av.. 
Manhattan, has completed plans for a 4-sty 
brick apartment, 70.x89 feet, on the east side of 
Stone av., 130 feet north of Livonia av., for 
Joseph Levine, 140 East 92d St., Manhattan, 
owner and builder. Cost $80,000. 

OCEAN PARKWAY.— Shampan & Shampan, 
.50 Court St. have plans in progress tor a 4-sty 
brick and limestone apartment house. 80x100 ft. 
on the east side of Ocean parkway. 200 ft north 
of Beverly rd, for Samuel Hendler and Abraham 
Abrahams, owner, care of architect. Cost, 
$150,(100. 

ATLANTIC AV.— S. Millman & Son, 1780 Pit- 
kin av, have plans in progress for two 4-sty 
brick apartments, 50.x88 ft, with stores, at the 
southwest corner of Atlantic and Hopkinson avs, 
for Harry Rubin, 317 Bradford st, owner and 
builder. Total cost. $110,000. 

CHURCHES. 
CONSELYEA ST.— F. J. Berlenbach, "60 Gra- 
ham av, has plans in progress for a church at 
the northeast corner of Conselyea and Humboldt 
sts for St. Francis of Paola, Rev. Doctor Leonard 
Riisso, pastor, 25 Orient av, owner. Architect 
will take bids on general contract. 



January 21, \922 

WALTON ST. — Harry A. Yarish, 29 Graham 
av., has completed preliminary plans for a 3- 
sty and basement, brick and terra cotta syna- 
gogue, 43x80 feet, in the northwest side of Wal- 
ton St.. K)J feet west of Throop av.. for Hebrew 
School, Pride of Israel, owner, care of architect. 
Cost $5U,0iJU. 

DWELLINGS. 

EXETER ST. — Philip Caplan, IG Court st, has 
completed plans for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 4Ux 
ao ft, at the northwest corner of Exeter st and 
Esplanade av for Frank Grushinsky, 30G8 East 
2d st, owner and builder. Cost, $10,000. 

CROWN ST.— Harry A. Yarish, 2;j Graham av, 
has plans Hearing completion_tor a 2M'-sty brick' 
and limestone dwelling, 2Sxi3 ft, with garage, 
in Crown st, near New York av, for owner, care 
of architect. Cost, $20,U00. Architect will soon 
take bids on separate contracts. 

58TH ST. — A. Brems, 83 Corona av. Corona, 
has plans in progress tor a 2-sty brick dwell- 
ing, 22x35 ft, in the east side of East nSth st 
273 ft north of Av K. for H. Arcangelo, 3Gi East 
10th st, Manhattan, owner and builder. Cost, 
$10,000. 

OCEAN PARKWAY. — Wm. Wingerath, 101.^ 
Av. W, has completed plans for two 2-sty brick 
dwellings, 22.\.j2 feet, at the northeast corner 
of Ocean pkway and Ocean Court, for G. La- 
ciria, Larent pi., Manhattan, owner and builder. 
Cost $24.0110. 

48TH ST. — Benj. Drlesler, Jr., 153 Remsen 
St., has has completed plans for two 2-sty brick 
dwellings, 20x64 feet, in the north side of 4Sth 
St., 88 feet west of Ft. Hamilton av., for Max 
Rolnick, Inc., .5117 Sackman St., owner and 
builder. Cost .?20.000. 

UNION ST.— Fein & Rosen, 1709 Pitkin av, 
have plans in progress for four 2-sty brick dwell- 
ings, 25x40 ft. in Union st, near Brooklyn av, 
for Spain Construction Co., owner, care of archi- 
tect. Cost, .f80,UU0. 

LUDLAM PL. — Benj Driesler, Jr., 153 Remsen 
St. has plans in progress for seven 2-sty brick 
dwellings, 20x55 ft. on Ludlam pi, OS ft north 
of Sullivan st, for Realty Associates, 162 Rem- 
sen st, owner and builder. Total cost, $77,000. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

OAKLAND ST.— James McKillop. 821 Man- 
hattan av., has completed plans for a 1-sty 
brick factory, 23x100 feet, in the east side of 
Oakland St., 50 feet south of Huron st., for 
Charles Cohen, .310 Oakland st., owner. Cost 
$6,000. General contract will be awarded with- 
out competition. 

HOSPITALS AND ASYLUMS. 

BUSHWICK AV.— Missac Thompson, 180 
Montague st., has been retained to prepare 
plans for a 5-sty brick hospital, 280x100 feet, on 
the west side of Bushwick av., lOo feet south 
of DeKalb av.. for Great Bikur Cholim Hospital. 
Jacob F. Strahl, president, 84 Cook st., owner. 
Cost $1,500,000. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

ST. JOHNS PL.— R. Thos. Short, 370 Macon 
st, has completed preliminary plans for a 2-sty 
brick garage. 100.\225 ft, irregular, on the north 
side of St. Jolins pi, 83 ft east of Brooklyn av, 
for Saul Lavine, 215 Montague st, owner. Cost, 
$75,000. 

MOORE ST. — Murray Klein, 37 Graham av, 
has completed plans for a 1-sty brick garage. 
80x100 ft, in the north side of Moore st, 277 ft 
east of Bushwick av, for Charne Katz. 392 Bush- 
wick av. owner and builder. Cost, $15,000. 
STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS 

3GTH ST.— Seelig & Finkelstein, 44 Court st, 
have completed plans for a group of 1-sty brick 
stores, 27X.36 ft and 73x50 ft, at the southeast 
corner of 36th st and 15th av and southwest cor- 
ner of West st and 36th st, for Simon Doyne, 
336 Dahill rd, owner and builder. Cost, .$.34,000. 

PITKIN AV.— Edw. M. Adelsohn. 1778 Pitkin 
av, has completed plans for alterations to the 
3-sty brick store building at 1.562-72 Pitkin av 
tor Dr. Wm. Linder, SS!I St. Marks av, owner. 
Cost, $,'!0,000. Owner will take bids on general 
contract. 

Queens 

DWELLINGS. 

KEW GARDENS. L. I.— John K. Turton Co., 
101 Park av., Manhattan, has the general con- 
tract for four 2 '/.-sty frame dwellings, 23x100 
feet, at the northeast corner of Talbot pi. and 
Lefferts av. Kew Gardens, for East Richmond 
Hill Land Co.. .56 Wall St., Manhattan, owner, 
from plans prepared privately. Cost $48,000. 

ROCKAWAY PARK, L. I.— J. Smith & Cald- 
well, 218 Beach S2d St., Rockaway Beach, have 
the general contract for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 
24x32 feet, in Beach 124th st.. Rockaway Par^, 
for Mary Caldwell. Beach 83d st., Rockaway 
Beach, owner, from plans by H. Hohausor, 
Rockaway Park, architect. Cost $12,000. 

SCARSDALE. N. Y.— Edw. Cutwater, Inc.. 
516 5th av., Manhattan, has the general con- 
tract tor a 2V,-sty rubble stone dwelling. 41 x 
43 feet, irregular, with garage attached, at 
Scarsdale, for John Mitchell, 24 West 10th st., 
Manhattan, owner, from plans prepared pri- 
vately. 

FI.USHIMG, L. I.— A. Raymond Ellis. 36 Pearl 
st, Hartford, has plans in progress for a 2y>-sty 
frame and stucco dwelling. 26x37 ft. at Flsuhing 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

for L. T. Stratton, Flushing, owner. Cost, 
$11,000. 

FREEPORT, L. I.— C. E. Kerns, president, has 
plans in progress for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 
24x46 ft, at Freeport for Frank Grossman, 8 
St. Mary's pl, Freeport, owner and builder. Cost, 
$8,000. 

JAMAICA, L. I.— R. Thos. Short, 370 Macon 
st, Brooklyn, has plans in progress for four 2- 
sty brick dwellings, 20xGl ft, at the southwest 
corner of Parsons blvd & 88th av, Jamaica, for 
J. Schwartz, 14iil Flatbush av, Brooklyn, owner 
and builder. Cost. .$50,000. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 
LONG ISLAND CITY, L. I.— Baker & Koester, 
9 Jackson av., L. I. City, have completed plana 
for a 1-sty brick factory, 100x100 feet, in the 
east side of Buckley st., north of Queens blvd., 
L. I. City, for W. H. Murphy, owner, care of 
architect. Cost .$25,000. 

HOSPITALS. 

HUNTINGTON, L. I.— A. B. Sammis, Hunting- 
ton, has plans in progress for an addition to the 
2-sty and basement hollow tile and stucco hospi- 
tal. 20x42 ft. on Park av, Huntington, for Hunt- 
ington Hospital, Dr. A. C. Cooper, Fairview av, 
Huntington, owner. Cost, $25,000. 

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. 

MANHASSETT. L. I.— Fred H. Briggs, Plan- 
dome, has completed plans for an addition to 
the 3-sty brick and stone high school, 210x.5O 
feet, at Manhassett. for the Board of Education 
of Manhassett, Manhassett, owner. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

ELMHURST, L. I.— Charles Schaeter, Jr., 



91 

394 East 150th st., Manhattan, has plans In 
progress for a 1-sty brick garage, 237x100 feet, 
on the south side of Roosevelt av, southeast 
corner of 21st St., Elmhurst, for Mendes & 
Samson, 770 Bast 179th st., Manhattan, owner. 
Cost $30,000. Architect will take bids on gen- 
eral contract about February 1. 

Westchester 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

YONKERS, N. Y.— Wm. Heapy, 30G South 
Broadway, Yonkers, has completed plans for a 
4-sty brick apartment house, 50x62 ft, on Van 
Cortland Park av, Yonkers, for Albert Salvator, 
62 Portland pl, Yonkers, owner and builder. 
Cost, .$60,000. 

YONKERS, N. Y.— Wm. Heapy, 306 South 
Broadway. Yonkers, has completed plans for a 
5-sty brick apartment house, 30x05 ft, on Van 
Cortland Park av, Yonkers. for Yonkers Con- 
tracting Co.. 621 Broadway, Yonkers, owner and 
builder. Cost, $80,000. 

DWELLINGS. 

PELHAM, N. Y.— S. S. Calatati, 502 Main st. 
New Rochelle, has completed plans for a 2-sty 
brick or stucco on hollow tile dwelling, 52x80 
ft, on Colonial av, Pelham, for John Smith, 
Wolfs lane, Pelham, owner and builder. Coat. 
$50,000. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y.— Henry S. Lion, 15 
East 40th st, Manhattan, has plans in progress 
tor a 21/2-sty terra cotta block and stucco dwell- 
ing, 25x32 ft, with garage, at Premium Park, 
New Rochelle. for Jac. Bender, owner, care of 
architect. Cost, $15,000. Architect will take 
bids on general contract about February 1. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y.— Henry S. Lion, 15 



A New Automat 

Horn & Hardart, owners of the Automat 
Restaurants, are erecting a modern office 
building at 68 Trinity Place and 103 
Greenwich Street. The basement will be 
used for a new Automat Restaurant 

Electricity for lighting and for the opera- 
tion of an elaborate system of refrigeration, 
ventilation, and elevators, will be supplied ' 
by this Company. The installation con- 
sists of 1000 lamps and 238 horsepower 



Architects— F P Piatt & Brother 
General Contractor — T J iWurphy 
Wiring Contractor — Lord Electric Co 



680 Fifth Ave 

405 Lexington Ave 

105 West 40th Sc 



Big Buildings Use Edison Service 

The New York Edison Company 

cL^/ Tour Service 
Irving Place and Fifteenth Street 

Telephone Stuyvesant 5600 





92 

East 4(Jth St, Manhattan, has plans in progress 
lor a 2V'2-sty frame dwelling, 25x32 ft, with 
garage, at Premium Park, New Rochelle, for A. 
H. Jacobson, owner, care of architect. Cost, 
$15,000. Architect will take bids on general 
contract about February 1. 

CROTON-ON-HUDSON, N. Y.— Tachau & 
Vought, 109 Lexington av., Manhattan, have 
plans in progress for a 2y2-sty frame and stucco 
dwelling, of irregular dimensions, on York- 
town rd.. Croton-on-Hudson, for Geo. W. Naum- 
burg. 14 Wall St.. Manhattan, owner. 

NEW ROCHELLE. N. Y. — D. A. Summo. 280 
Huguenot st. New Rochelle. has plans in prog- 
ress for a 2-sty frame dwelling. 18x28 ft, on St. 
Johns pi. New Rochelle, for J. J. Chippelettl. 
Madeline av. New Rochelle. owner and builder. 

NEW ROCHELLE. N. Y. — A. Sundberg. 236 
Huguenot st, New Rochelle, has completed plans 
for a 2y>-sty frame and stucco dwelling, 24x49 
ft, on Argyle av. New Rochelle, for Mrs. John 
Kuestner. 101 East Tremont av, Manhattan, 
owner. Cost. .fS.oOO. Owner will take bids on 
general contract at once. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y. — Henry S. Lion and 
Otta A. Held. 15 East 40th st, Manhattan, have 
plans in progress for a 2%-sty terra cotta block 
and stucco dwellings. 25x32 ft, with garage, at 
Premium Park, New Rochelle, for Dr. Perliman. 
owner, care of architects. Cost, $15,000. Archi- 
tects will take bids on general contract about 
February 1. 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

YONKERS. N. Y.— W. P. Katz, 2 Hudson st, 
Yonkers. has plans in progress tor tour 1-sty 
brick stores. 50x75 ft. at the corner of New Main 
st and Chicken Island, Yonkers, for M. & R. 
Mortgage Co., 1230 48th st, Brooklyn, owner. 
Cost. $30,000. Architects will take bids on gen- 
eral contract about January 26. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

New Jersey 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

WEST HOBOKEN. N. J.— Peter L. Schultz, 
411 Lewis St., Union Hill, has plans in progress 
tor a 3-story brick apartment, 20x77 feet, in 
Fulton St., West Hoboken, for Pietro Sufaro, 
712 Syms St., West Hoboken, owner and builder. 
Cost $25,000. 

NEWARK, N. J. — Nathan Siegler. 164 Market 
St.. Newark, has completed plans for a 2-sty 
frame and clapboard flat, 40x56 feet, at Home- 
stead Park, Newark, for Harris Kantrowitz. 639 
South 12th St., Newark, owner and builder. 
Cost $16,000. 

IRVINGTON, N. J. — Strombach & Mortens, 
1001 Clinton av., Irvington, has completed plans 
for a 3-sty frame, clapboard and shingle flat, 
32x60 feet, at the northeast corner of 21st st. 
and Alphine St.. Irvington, tor Zwigard & 
Schwoerer, 139 Schley St., Newark, owners and 
builders. Cost $16,000. 

NEWARK, N. J. — Wm. E. Lehman, 738 Broad 
st, Newark, has completed plans for an 8-sty 
fireproof apartment, 140x129 ft, at the Bouthwest 
corner of Clinton av and Stratford pi, Newark, 
for Ritz Holding Co., Meyer Krasner, president, 
790 Broad st, Newark, owner and builder. Cost, 
$600,000. 

BLOOMFIELD, N. J. — Ed. V. Warren, Essex 
Bldg.. Newark, has completed plans for a 4-sty 
and basement common and tapestry brick and 
limestone apartment, 46x121 ft, at 202 Broad 
st, Bloomfleld. for Max Olman, 17 Maolia av, 
Bloomfleld, owner and builder. Cost, $80,000. 

JERSEY CITY, N. J. — Nathan WelitoH. 249 
Washington st, Jersey City, has plans in prog- 
ress lor a 4-sty brick apartment, 65x140 ft, at 
the corner of Clinton & Grand sts, Jersey City, 
for Katz Building & Construction Co., Barnet 



January 21, 1922 



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BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



TELEPHONE: MANSRELD »0» 



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ESTABLISHED 18S1 




Katz, president, 31 Wegman Parkway, Jersey- 
City, owner and builder. Cost, $1^5,000. 

EAST ORANGE. N. J.— David M. Ach, 1 Madi- 
son av. Manhattan, has plans nearing completion 
for a 7-sty brick apartment, 100x150 ft, in Har- 
rison st. East Orange, for owner, care of archi- 
tect. Cost, 500,UUO. Architect will take bids 
about February 1. 

CHURCHES. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Wm. T. Fanning, Colt 
Building, Paterson, has preliminary plans in 
progress for a church at the corner of Warren 
and Gray sts., Newark, for St. Rose of Lima 
R. C. Church. Rev. Father Thos. J. Martin, 
pastor, Warren and Gray sts., Newark, owner. 
DWELLINGS. 

PALISADE, N. J.— Granville W. Dexter, Pali- 
sade, has completed plans for a 2M>-sty hollow 
tile and stucco dwelling. 36x4S feet, with garage, 
at the corner of Anderson av. and Dearwood 
rd.. Palisade, for L. Gilbson, owner, care of 
architect. Architect will take bids about Feb- 
ruary 1. 

JERSEY CITY, N. J.— Nathan Welitoff, 249 
Washington st, Jersey City, has completed plans 
for two 2y2-sty brick dwellings, 21x29 ft, at 
li)6-8 Danforth av, Jersey City, for Louis Dori- 
son. 95 Grant av, Jersey City, owner and builder. 
Cost, .$12,000 each. Mason work, S. Torio, 10& 
Jackson av, Jersey City. 

BAYONNE, N. J.— Nathan Welitoff, 249 Wash- 
ington st, Jersey City, has completed plans for 
a 2V4-sty brick dwelling. 30x40 ft, with garage, 
on Av C, Bayonne, for Hyman Temkin, 134 West 
3Sth st, Bayonne, owner and builder. Cost, ?30,- 
000. 



CONTLIACTS AWARDED. 

All items following refer to general 
contracts, except those marked "sub. " 



APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

MANHATTAN.— Geo. A. Dugan, 600 5th av, 
has the general contract for alterations to the 
5-sty brick apartment, 20x75 ft. at 272 West 
119th st for Mrs. W. Broadhead. 272 West 129th 
St. owner, from plans by J. J. Shea, 200 5th av, 
architect. Cost, $30,000. 

BANKS. 

FREEPORT, L. I.— Wills-Egelhof Co.. 101 
Park av, Manhattan, has the general contract 
for a 2-sty brick and limestone bank, 35x125 ft, 
on Merrick rd, near Church st, Freeport, for 
the Citizens National Bank of Freeport, S. P. 
Petit, president. Freeport. owner, from plans by 
R. T. Short. 370 Macon st, Brooklyn, architect. 

MANHATTAN.— R. H. MacDonald, 29 West 
Ij4th st, has the general contract for alterations 
to the 16-sty fireproof bank. 53x162 ft, with 
offices at 381-3-5 4th av, for the Hyde Real Es- 
tate Corp., A. Fillmore Hyde, president. 25 Madi- 
son av. owner, from plans by Charles E. Birge, 
29 West 34th st. architect. Cost. $50,000. 
Lessee, The Industrial Bank of N. Y., Straughton 
B. Lynd. president, 4th av & 24th st. 
DWELLINGS. 

YONKERS, N. Y.— H. & H. Construction. Co.. 116 
Nassau St. Manhattan, has the general contract 
for a 2-sty stucco on terra cotta dwelling, 27x 
35 ft, on Palmer av. Yonkers. for C. M. Doyle, 
care of Hotel Ansonia, 73d st and Broadway, 
Manhattan, owner, from plans by E. G. Worden, 
i;:: West 91st st, Manhattan, architect. Cost, 

.•t;;j(i,oo<5. 

BRONX.— S. L. Koenig. 1789 Bathgate av, has 
the general contract tor a 2-sty and basement 
stucco and terra cotta dwelling, 20x40 ft. on the 
south side of Morris av, between 196th and 197th 
sts, for H. C. Glaser. 120 West 43d st. owner, 
from plans by J. J. Gloster, 110 West 40th st, 
architect. Cost, $10,000. 

NEPONSIT. N. Y.— W. T. Kennedy Co., Beach 
82d st, Rockaway Beach, has the general con- 
tract for a dwelling in Beach 142d st, 602 ft 
south of Neponsit av, Neponsit, for Lucy M. 
Wolf. 343 Beach 146th st. Neponsit. owner, from 
plans prepared privately. Cost. $14,000. 
FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

BLOOMFIELD. N. J.— Austin Co., 217 Broad- 
way, Manhattan, has the general . contract for a 
1-sty brick book manufacturing plant, 375x400 
ft, at the corner of Watsessing and Bloomfield 
avs. Bloomfield. for the American Book Co.. A. 
V. Barnes, in charge. 100 Washington sq. Man- 
hattan, owner, from plans prepared privately. 
HOSPITALS. 

MANHATTAN.— Marc Eldlitz & Son. 33-49 
East 42d St. have the general contract for an 
addition to the S-sty brick and stone hospital, 50 
xlOO ft, on 9th av, from 5Sth to .59th sts. for 
Roosevelt Hospital, W. E. Roosevelt, president, 
.58th st and 9th av, owner, from plans by York & 
Sawyer. 50 East 41st st, architects. Cost, 
$1,000,000. 

THEATRES. 

BRONX.— M. Shapiro & Sons, 103 West 46th st, 
have the general contract for a 2-sty brick and 
terra cotta theatre, of irregular dimensions, on 
the west side of Ogden av, 75 ft north of 171st 
St. for Ogden Amusement Co., Emanuel Glick. 
president. 186 West 4th st, owner, from plans by 
Eugene De Rosa, 110 West 40th st, architect. 
Cost. $100,000. 



January 21, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



93 



Money 

to 

Loan 

on all classes of high- 
grade income pro- 
ducing properties in 
New York City, in 
amounts of $500,000 
and upward. 

Building Loans 

American 

Bond & Mortgage 

Company, Inc. 

562 Fifth Ave., New York City 
Telephone 9(00 Bryant 



SHADES, AWNINGS 
AND CANOPIES 

47 years in making window shades, awn- 
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positioH where we can guarantee satis- 
faction. 

Agent and owner alike find our service 
prompt, quality fully satisfactory, and 
workmanship of the best. 
Estimates cheerfully supplied, without 
obligation to owners, agents, etc. 



F. J. KLOES 

Established 1872 

243 Canal St., New York 

Telephone: Franklin 2216 




H. W. BELL CO. 

Gypsum Blocks 
Terra Cotta Blocks 

Plaster Boards 

Dumbwaiter Blocks 

Flue Pipe 

Firebrick 

Park Ave. & 139th St. 

Phone — Mott Haven 3134 

BROOKLYN 

KENT AVENUE & MORTON STREET 



BUILDERS 

LITTLE CASH REQUIRED 

W© can subordinate entire purchase price of sev- 
eral well-located idiots and obtain liberal bulIdlnjE 
and permanent loans. 

i3. USgOOarell&*.,0. t,| Vanderbllt 5610 



FOR 

PAINTING, DECORATING 
and PLASTERING 

Consult 

LESCH & JOHNSON 

2«1 East Fordham Road N«ir Y«rk 

Teleghona: Fordham (345 



PLANS FILED FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION 
IN ALL BOROUGHS OF NEW YORK CITY 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

75TH ST, 164-G-8 W, 15-3ty I. P. non-house 
keeping aparts, UlxlOO, slag rt ; .fuOO.OOO ; (o) 
166 W Toth St. Corp., 342 Madison av ; (a) 
Robt. T. Lyons, 342 Madison av (26). 

86TH ST, 12 to 40 E ; also 85TH ST, 11 to 35 

B, 14-sty bk tnt, 204x220, rf not specified; $2,- 
500,000; (0) N. Y. Railway Co.. 165 Bway ; (a) 

C. W. Bucham & F. H. Dewey Co., 173 5 av 
(15) 

155TH ST, 500-15 W, 6-3ty bk tnt, 139x86, 
slag rf; $275,000; (o) 509 W. 155th St. Corp., 
860 Riverside dr ; (a) Chas. B. Meyers, 31 Union 
sq (21). 

EDGECOMBE AV, w a, 749 & 824 n 150th, 
2-5-sty bk tnts, 75x88, slag rl ; $300,000; (o) 
Hudson Builders Corp., 712 B 136th ; (a) 
Springsteen & Goldhammer, 31 Union sq (16). 

FORT WASHINGTON AV, 500, 5-sty bk tnt, 
129x94, slag rf ; $225,000; (o) W. H. B. Rlty. 
Corp, 700 W 179th; (a) Geo. A. Bagge & Sons. 
299 Madison av (14). 

5TH AV, 801-2, 13-sty bk tnt, 45x78, slag rf ; 
$350,000; (o) Bostwlck Holding Co., 801 5 av ; 
(a) Harry St. Clair Zogbaum, 27 E 40th (13) 

5TH AV, 803, 12-sty bk tnt, 2.5x90, tile & 
slag rf; $250,000; (o) Florence C. Satterwhite, 
803 5 av ; (a) Montrose Morris' Sons, 533 Nos- 
trand av, Bklyn (18). 

5TH AV, 804, 12-sty bk tnt, 25x103, tile & 
slag rf; .$250,000; (o) W. Emlen, 804 5 av ; (a) 
Montrose Morris' Sons, 533 Nostrand av, Bklyn 
(19). 

DWELLINGS. 

80TH ST, 116-8 E. 4-sty bk dwg, .36x78, plastic 
slate & tile rf ; $100,000 ; (o) Lewis S. Morris, 
182 B 64th; (a) Cross & Cross, 681 5 av (23). 
FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

LEWIS ST, 207, 2-sty bk storage & loft, 22x 
85x irreg, plastic slate rf ; $10,000; (o) Bessie 
Lebowltz, Sm E 4th; (a) Lorenz F. J. Weiher, 
271 W 125th (22). 

BROADWAY, 4176, 1-sty metal storage bldg, 
15x11, metal rf ; $350; (o) Est David L. Philp 
lips, 148 W 72d (lessee) Jos. Calder, 2448 Bway 
(25). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 
12TH ST, 358-62 W, 1-sty bk pub garage, 45 
x49.\160, tar & slag rf ; $20,000; (o) Herman 
Frob, 32 Court, Bklyn; (a) Frank S. Parker, 44 
Court, Bklyn (27). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

35TH ST, 257 W, 2-sty bk str & salesroom, 
23x90 ,tar & gravel rf ; $14,500; (o) P. M. B. 
Rlty. Co., 206 Bway; (a) Saml. L. Waller, 154 
Nassau (17). 

37TH ST, 237-39 W, 14-sty t. p. show rooms 
& factory, .50x98. slag rf ; $300,000; (o) 
Hoascourt Rlty. Co.. Inc., 134 W 37th (a) 
Geo, & Edw. Blum, 505 5 av (5). 

38TH ST, 246-50 W, 14-sty t. p. show rooms 
& factory, 75x98, slag rf ; $500,000; (o) 
Courtley Rlty. Corp., 134 W 37th; (a) Geo. & 
Edw. Blum, 505 5 av (12). 

BROADWAY, 2067, 7-sty bk stra & offlcea, 32x 
99, rubberoid rf ; $50,000; (o) Christ P. E 
Church, Warden, Jos. W. Bradin, 203 W 78th ; 
(o) Rosario Caudela, 200 W 72d (20). 
STORES AND TENEMENTS. 

AMSTERDAM AV, 650-64, 6-sty bk str & tnt, 
150x100, slag rf; .$600,000; (o) Stuyvesant Est., 
Inc., 2.33 Bway; (a) Gronenberg & Leuchtag, 450 
4 av (24). 

BROADWAY, 4069-77, 6-sty bk strs & tnt, 95x 
100x106; $225,000: (o) Gross & Herbener, 558 
W 15th; (a) Geo. A. Bagge & Sons, 299 Madi- 
son av (11). 

lOTH AV, 4018, 2-sty bk str, apts, offices, 37x 
90, felt & plastic rf ; $14,000; (o) Ellanan Rlty. 
Corp., 30 E 42d ; (a) Edw. F. Hommel, 280 
Madison av (4). 

Bronx 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

CHARLOTTE ST, a w c Crotona Park B, 6- 
sty bk tnt, 127.6x97.4, Barrett rf ; $2.S0,0n0; (o) 
A. M. Brand Realty Co., Aaron Brand, 1560 
Wilklns av, Pres ; (a) Chaa. Schaefer. Jr.. 394 
E 15th (95). 

KINGSBRIDGE RD. n w c Grand Concourse, 
n-sty bk tnt. 146.6x130. slag rf ; $1,000,000; (o) 
S. & L. Bldg. Corp., Sam Minskoff, 1312 Clin- 
ton av, Pres.; (a) Margon & Glaser, 2804 3 av 
(72). 

MORRIS AV, w s, 102.6 a ISlat. 5-sty bk tnt 
110.9x.88. slag rf: $2(10,000; (o) Kings Winter 
Bid?. Corp.. A. W King, 81 E 12.5th. Pres.: (a) 
Margon & Glaser. 2804 3 av (73). 

STEBBTNS AV, n w c 165th, 5-sty bk strs & 
tnt 95.6X.32.0, slag rf ; $.35,000; (o) Gold 



Gross Corp., Leon Grossman, 277 Bway, Prea ; 
(a) Maurice Courland, 47 W 34th (68). 

DWELLINGS. 
APPLETON RD, e s, 217 s Buhre av, 2-aty fr 
dwg. 23x28, shingle rf ; $6,000; (o) C. Swenson, 
Appleton rd ; (a) M. A. Buckley, 32 Westchester 
sq (104). 

DORSEY ST, e s, 299.8 n Zerega av, 2-3ty fr 
dwg, 21x50, shingle rf ; $10,000 ; (o) A. Johan- 
son, 103 W 176th; (a) M. A. Buckley, 32 West- 
chester sq (105). 

TIBMAN ST, w s, 150 a Mace av, l-sty fr 
dwg, 2ux24, shingle rf ; $3,500; (o) Chas. 
Teirney, 448 E 148th; (a) Boston Bldg. & Con. 
Co., 1085 Boston rd (65). 

167TH ST E. n s, 75 e Franklin av, 3-Bty bit 
dwg, 20x44.6, 1-sty bk garage, 25x18, rubberoid 
rf ; $9,800: (o) M. Deuer, 3444 3 av ; (a) Robt. 
Gottleib, 26 W 113th (61). 

224TH ST, n e c Paulding av, 2-sty fr dwg, 
20x.50, shingle rf ; $7,500; (o) Henry Poster, 284 
E l(32d; (a) The Aladdin Co., Bay City, Mich. 
(108). 

241ST ST. s s, 100 e Martha av, 2-aty fr 
dwg, 20x30, shingle rf ; $5,000; (o) Adolphuls 
T. Wilkens. 218 Nepperham av, Yonkers : (a) 
R. J. & F. J. Johnson, 375 E Fordham rd (102). 

ALLERTON AV, n a, 75 w Seymour av, 2- 
sty bk dwg, 21x49, plastic slate rf ; $10,000 ; (o) 
Ottavia Carfango, 122 E H6th ; (a) Carl B. 
Cali, 81 E 125th (87). 

BARKLEY AV, n w c Hollywood av, 2-aty fr 
dwg, 21x38, shingle rf ; $9,000; (o) Walter 
Mattson, 719 Courtlandt av ; (a) Sterling Archtl. 
Co., 154 Nassau (99). 

BENEDICT AV, n a, 304.5 w Olmstead av. 2- 
sty bk dwg, 22x37.6, rubberoid rf ; $10,000 ; (o) 
Adam Schlett, 924 E 169th; (a) Anton Pirner, 
2069 Westchester av (110). 

BAYCHESTER AV, e a, 139.2 a Needham ay, 
2y2-sty fr dwg, 18.x24, slate rf ; .$4,750; (o) 
Alfred Wessan, 537 E 83d; (a) Chas. New- 
burgh, Grand Central Terminal (69). 

DE KALB AV, nee 210th, 2iA-sty bk dwg, 
24.2x42.8, 1-sty bk garage, 18x18.6, asbestos 
shingle rf : $11,000; (o) Jas. A. Barry, 2148 7 
av ; (a) Chas. Sheres, 56 W 45th (88). 

DE RBIMBR PL, e s, 100.3 s Pitman av, 2- 
sty bk dwg, 21x55, slag rf ; $9,000; (o) Felix 
& Vincenzo Bove, 3175 Villa av ; (a) M. W Del 
Gaudio, 158 W 4.5th (71). 

EASTERN BLVD, e s, 50 n Baisley av, 2-2- 
sty fr dwgs, 16x36, asphalt shingle rf ; $10,000; 
(o) Julius Ewoldt, 512 Morris Park av ; (a) 
Anton Pirner, 2069 Westchester av (64). 

EDISON AV, nee Lafayette av, 2-sty fr dwg, 
2.3x47, shingle rf ; $6,500: (o) John L. Gettlnger, 
403 W 49th; (a) Chaa. H. Gillespie, 1123 Bway 

( lUJ) 

HOUGHTON AV, s s, 164.11 e Olmstead av, 
2-sty fr dwg, 20x28, asphalt shingle rf ; $5,000; 
(o) John Knatz, 2156 Quimby av ; (a) Anton 
Pirner, 2069 Westchester av (90). 

LA SALLE AV, n s, 385.11 e Tremont av, 
IVa-sty bk dwg. 26x42, asphalt shingle rf ; $6,- 
500; (o) Karle Amstotz, 2844 Coddlngton av ; 
(a) Anton Pirner, 2069 Westchester av (89). 

LA SALLE AV, n s, 1,215.10 w Ft. Schuyler 
rd, 1-sty bk dwg, 23x44, rubberoid shingle rf; 
$5,300: (o) Mary Harabeeck, 2923 La Salle av ; 
(a) M. A. Buckley, 32 Westchester sq (96). 

LELAND AV, e s, 200 n Randall av, 1-sty bk 
dwg, 21.6.X52. plastic slate rf ; $3,000; (o) An- 
thony Guerra. 2306 Basford av ; (a) Carl B. 
Cali. 81 B 125th (106). 

LIEBIG AV, w s, 270 n 261st, 2-sty bk dwg, 
20X.57.6. tar rf ; .$9,000; (o) Eloise K. Davia, 
2211 Bway: (a) Geo. F. Bache, 2794 8 av (62). 

MACE AV, s s, 256.4 e Bastchester rd, 3-2- 
sty fr dwgs, 19x36. shingle rf ; $13,500; (o) 
Wm. Aitken, 892 E 167th ; (a) Frank Maaaam, 
4321 Katonah av (67). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

CROMWELL AV, e 8, 211.S n Jerome av, 1- 
sty bk garage & stable, 68.1x1.35.10, asphalt 
rf; $14,000: (o) Thos. J. McKeon. Baldwin, L. 
I.; (a) John De Hart, 1039 Fox (93). 
STORES AND DWELLINGS. 

MORRIS PARK AV, n w c Hunt av, 2-1-sty 
bk strs & dwgs, ,57xa5, 72x65, slag rf ; .$12,000; 
(o) Wm. Peters & Co.. 1044 E Tremont av ; (a) 
Chas. Schaefer, Jr., 394 E 150th (.55). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

ISIST ST E. n e c Walton av, 1-sty bk stra, 
99x60. tar & gravel rf : $20,000; (o) T. F. W. 
Bldg. Corp., Harry Wolflnger, 44 Court, Bklyn; 
(a) Seelle. Flnkelsteln & Wolflnger, 44 Court, 
Bklyn (100). 

BERGEN AV, s w c 153d, l-sty bk strs, 130x 
48.9. plastic slate rf ; $22,000; (o) Adotto Realty 
Co.. Otto G. Hiinfel, 842 St. Anna av, Prea; (a) 
Max Hausle, 3.307 3 av (107). 



94 

TREMONT AV, sec Morris av, 1-sty bk 
Btrs, l:;u.63xlll.66, slag rf ; $45,000; (o) Henry 
J. Gaudel, 023 W ISoth ; (aj Moore & Land- 
siedel, 3 av & 148th (07). 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

161ST ST E, s s, 15Tth, n s. from River av to 
Douglity, 3-sly grand stand, dressing rooms & 
offices of concrete & tile, 0:;2x540. shingle rf ; 
$750,000; (o) Huston & Ruppert. 3 av & 93d 
(American League Baseball Club) ; (a) Os- 
borne Eng. Co., 2848 Prospect av, Cleveland, 
Ohio (01). 

161ST ST E, s s 157th, n s, from River_av 
to Doughty, 1-sty fr stand, 70.5x378, no rf ; $75,- 
000- (o) Huston & Ruppert, 3 av & 03d (Ameri- 
can League Baseball Club) ; (a) Osborne Eng. 
Co., 2848 Prospect av. Cleveland, Ohio (02). 

Brooklyn 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

CROWN ST, 555-63, n w c Albany av, 4-sty 
bk 38 fam tnt, lOOxllG.O : $175,000; (o) Crown 
Heights Bldg. Corp., 2002 Douglass; (a) Sham- 
pan & Shampan, 50 Court (448). 

STORY ST, 1-11, sec Louisa, 2-sty bk tnt, 21x 
75; $14,i]00; (o) Julius Pollokoff, 1774 Bergen; 
(a) Abraham Farber, 1746 Pitkin av (380). 

BEVERLY RD, 1713-23, n w c K 18th, C-sty 
bk tnt, 100x00; .^250,000; (o) Hilrose Holding 
Corp., 31 Union sq, Manhattan ; (a) Jos. Mar- 
tine, 31 Union sq, Manhattan (415). 

BAY 28TH ST. 85-107, sec Benson av, 5-sty 
bk 4 fam tnt, 80.8x118; $175,000; (o) Zelda 
Besnik, 80 Bay 28th; (a) McCarthy & Kelly, 
16 Court (480). 

NEWKIRK AV, 2011-21, n B, 40 w E 21st, 4- 
Ety bk 34 fam tnt, lOOxWO ; $130,000; (o) The 
Victor Court, Inc., 071 Bway ; (a) McCarthy & 
Kelly, 16 Court (458). 

OCEAN PKWAY, 249-57, nee Beverly rd, 
6-sty 42 fam tnt, 90x80; $175,000; (o) Frank 
Grossbard, 183 Hendrix ; (a) Philip Steigman, 
26 Court (526). 

DWELLINGS. 

AMBOY ST, 432-42, w s, IS.'i s Newport av, 4- 
2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs, 20x66; $44,000; (o) 
Meshfeld Bldg. Corp., 404 Alabama av ; (a) 
Abraham Farber, 1746 Pitkin av (209). 

AMBOY ST, 444, w s, 100 n Newport av, 2- 
sty bk 2 fam dwg. 22x66; $11,000; (o & a) 
same as above (300). 

AMBOY ST, 430, w s, 230 s Riverdale av, 2- 
sty bk 2 fam dwg, 22x66; $11,000; (o & a) 
same as above (301). 

JEROME ST, 526, w s, 220 s Blake av, 2-sty 
bk 2 fam dwg, 10x56; $7,700; (o) Domlnick 
Marmo, .563 Hegeman av ; (a) Ernest Dennis, 
241 Schenck av (350). 

LOUISA ST, s s, 21.4 e Story, 2-sty bk 2 faiu 
dwg, 21x72; $13,000; (o) Julius PoUokoft, 1774 
Bergen; (a) A. Farber, 1740 Pitkin av (387). 

PRESIDENT ST, 1637-57, n s, 340.9 w Utlca 
av, 0-2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs, 20x07; $103,500; (o) 
Sol Teitelbaum, 112 Sutter av ; (a) Jas. J. Mill- 
man, 26 Court (431). 

PRESIDENT ST, 1722-6, s B, 200 w Rochester 
av. 4-2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs. 20.4.x76.10 ; $80,000: 
(o) Brick House Con. Corp., 1822 Barrett; (a) 
Cohn Bros., 361 Stone av (345). 

RUSSELL ST, 40-42, e s, 60.6 n Engert av. 
2-2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs, 20x60; $18,000; (o) 
Biago Grieco, 172 Russell; (a) Laspia & Sam- 
enfeld, 525 Grand (464). 

RUSSELL ST, 44, e s, 100.6 n Engert av. 2- 
sty bk 2 fam dwg, 23x60; $10,000; (o & a) 
same as above (465). 

RUSSELL ST, 46-8, e s, 123.6 n Engert av, 2- 
2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs, 19x60; $17,000; (o) Blago 
Grieco, 172 Russell: (a) Laspia & Samenfeld, 
525 Grand (466). 

E 4TH ST, 1819-4T, e s, 334 s Av I, 10-2-sty 
fr 1 fam dwgs, 16x38; $60,000; (o) Ocean 
Garden Dev. Co.. 26 Court; (a) S. Gardstein, 
26 Court (400) 

E 4TH ST, 1701-1817, e s, 100 s Av I, 9-2-sty 
fr 1 fam dwgs, 17x38; $58,500; (o & a) same 
as above (401). 

E 5TH ST, 1828-58, w s, 376 s Av I, 11-2-sty 
fr 1 fam dwgs, 16x40; .$66,000: (o) Ocean Gar- 
den Dev. Co., 26 Court : (a) S. Gardstein, 26 
Court (4.30). 

E 5TH ST. 1703-1823, e s, 100 s Av I, 10-2- 
Bty fr 1 fam dwgs. 17x40; $65,000; (o) Ocean 
Garden Dev. Co., 26 Court: ia) S. Gardstein, 
26 Court (441). 

E 5TH ST, 1827-45, e a, 371 s Av I, 7-2-sty fr 
1 fam dwgs, 17x40; $45,500: (o & a) same as 
above (443). 

E 5TH ST, 1704-1824. w s, 100 s Av I. 11-2- 
sty fr 1 fam dwgs, 16x40; $66,000; (o & a) same 
as above (444). 

W OTH ST, 1815-57, e s, 120 s Highlawn av, 
12-2-sty fr 2 fam dwgs, 18x48: $90,000: (o) 
John P. Churlo, 70 Av R ; (a) Wm. C. Winters, 
106 Van Slclen av (512). 

W 9TH ST, 18,50-71, e s, 480 s Hlghlawn av, 
4-2-sty fr 2 fam dwgs, 18x48: $30,000; (o & a) 
same as above (513). 

W 9TH ST, 1816-58, w s, 120 s Hlghlawn av, 
12-2-sty fr 2 fara dwgs, 18x48; $90,000; (o) 
John F. Churlo, 70 Av R : (a) Wm. C. Wintera, 
106 Van Slclen av (510). 
I 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

W lOTH ST, 1815-35, e s, 120 s Hlghlawn av, 
6-2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs, 18x48; $54,000; (o) 
John F. Churlo. 70 Av R ; (a) Wm. C. Winters, 
106 Van Siclen av (511). 

W lOTH ST, 18:W-62, w s, 275 s Hlghlawn av, 
8-2-sty fr 2 fam dwgs, 18x48; $60,000; (o) John 
F. Churlo, 70 Av R; (a) Wm. C. Winters, 106 
Van Siclen av (514). 

E 14TH ST, 205-7, e s, 200 s Av I, 2-sty fr 
2 tarn dwg, 22x35; $10,000; (o) Geo. K. Morln 
Corp., 300 E 23th ; (a) R. T. Schaefer. Ij43 
Flatbush av (370). 

W 17TH ST, 2013, e s, 120 s Av Z, 2-sty fr 2 
fam dwg. 17x42; $8,000: (0) Simon Koppel, 
2865 W 13th ; (a) Geo. H. Suess, 1131 Graves- 
end av (400). 

E 22D ST, 1508-1600, w a, 330 s Av O, 2-2-sty 
fr 1 fam dwgs, 16x40; $12,000: (o) A. & W. 
Stewart, Inc.. 1543 Flatbush av ; (a) R. T. 
Schaefer, 1543 Flatbush av (481). 

E 22D ST. 1 203-75, s e c Av L, 2%-sty fr 2 
fam dwg, 33.0x48; $14,000; (o) Naomi Bldg. 
Corp., 209 Rochester av ; (a) Saml. Levlne, 2b 
Court (321). 

E 2nTH ST, 1091, e s, 30 n Av K, 2-sty fr 1 
fam dwg, 18x30; $7,500; (o) Wm. Bordfeld. 
2810 Av N; (a) R. T. Schaefer, 1543 Flatbush 
av (471). 

BAY 34TH ST, 14-32, w s, 200 s 86th, 8-2-8ty 
bk 1 fam dwgs, 10x42; $56,000; (o) Ginsberg & 
Moss Realty Co., 2034 81st; (a) Isaac Kalllch, 
8609 Bay pkway (316). 

E 37TH ST, 1078-80, w 8, 217.0 n Av I, 2-2^4- 
sty fr 1 fam dwgs, 16x40: $13,000; (o) Michael 
De Stefano & Jos. Brabareto. 53 Park av ; (a) 
Herman A. Weinstein, 375 Fulton (310). 

.53D ST, 822-8, s s, 100 e 8 av, 4-2-sty bk 2 
fam dwgs, 20.\.38 ; $32,000; (o) Ben]. Berk, 36 
Flatbush av ; (a) Thos. Bennett, 7826 5 av 
(437). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 
MOORE ST, 183-01, n s, 277 e Bushwick av, 
1-sty bk garage, 80x100; $12,500; (o) Charne 
Katz, 302 Bushwick av ; (a) Murray Klein, 37 
Graham av (320). 

62D ST. 2027-83, n w c 21 av. 19-l-3ty cone 
garages, 20x20; $19,000: (o) Ramal Bldg. Corp., 
44 Court; (a) Seelig & Finkelstein, 44 Court 
(436). 

LEXINGTON AV. 389-91, n s, 200 e Marcy av. 
1-stv bk garage, 50x100; $9,000; (o) Lewis W 
Gordon, 801 Marcy av ; (a) Henry Holder. 242 
Franklin av (473). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 
BRIGHTON BEACH AV, 211, n s, 75.85 e E 
2d, 2-sty bk office & 1 fam dwg, 20x62 ; $9,000 ; 
(o) Lazarus Kaplan, 2018 Mermaid av : (a) 
Morris Perlstein, 49 Fulton av. Middle Village 
(426). 

FLUSHING AV, 657, nee Harrison av, 2- 
sty bk Btrs, otHce & 2 fam dwg, 58.9x32.2 ; $15,- 
000; (o) Malman Sussman & Morris Weinstein, 
784 Lafayette av ; (a) Max Hlrsch, 76 Court 
(409). 

HEGEMAN AV, 1-5, n 8. 9.4 e E 89th, 2-8ty 
fr str & 2 fam dwg, 19x54.2; $8,000; (o) Sam 
Lapldus. 528 Rockaway pkway; (a) Jack Fein, 
211 Snediker av (422). 

HEGEMAN AV, 1-5, n e c E 98th, 2-aty fr 
str & 2 fam dwg, 9.4x45.4; $8,000; (o & a) 
same as above (424). 

KINGSTON AV, 300-6, w s, 26.9 n Mont- 
gomery, 5-2-sty bk strs & 2 fam dwgs, 19x60; 
$50,000; (o) Rothschild Mason Works, Inc.. 632 
Saratoga av ; (a) M. A. Cantor, 373 Fulton 
(484). 

KINGSTON AV, 308, n w c Montgomery, 2- 
sty bk Btr & 2 fam dwg, 19x65; $10,000; (o & 
a) same as above (485). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS, 
CLEVELAND ST, 253-7, e s, 236.8 s Fulton, 
3-sty bk strs. garage & 2 fam dwg, 50x80; $30,- 
000; (o) Albert Flala, 1692 East New York av : 
(a) Allen A. Blausteln, 432 15th (303). 

FLATBUSH AV EXT. 338-.^2. s w c Fleet, 2- 
sty bk lofts & strs, 125.10x100: $80,000; (o) 
C. I. M. Realty Co., 130 Bway; (a) Springsteen 
& Goldhammer. 32 Union sq, Manhattan (389). 

ROCKAWAY AV, 400, w a, 280.2 n Sutter av, 
2-sty bk Btr & storage, 24.6x00; $16,500; (o) 
M. Goldenherg. 15.39 Pitkin av ; (a) Abraham 
Farber. 1746 Pitkin av (437). 

SURF AV. 2018-30, a e c W 2lBt 1-aty bk strs, 
110x110; $15,000: (o) David Friedman, care 
arch: (a) S. Gardstein, 26 Court (440). 
STORES AND TENEMENTS. 
STONE AV, 669-83, e a, 130 n Riverdale av. 
4-sty bk sts & tnt, 70x89; $80,000; (o) Jos. 
Levine, 140 E 92d, Manhattan : (a) J. M. Ber- 
linger, 469 7 av. Manhattan (358). 

Queens 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

ARVERNE.— Beach 70th st, e s, 90 a Amatel 
blvd, 3-sty bk tnt. .39x77. slag rf, 2 families, elec, 
steam heat: $12,000: (o) Arverne Homestead 
Corp., Remington av, Arverne; (a) J. P. Powers. 
Rockaway Beacf (382). 

KEW GARDF^S. — Union turnpike, s e c, & 
Austin St 4-sty ^k tnt. 125x106. rubberold rf, 45 
families, elec, st-am heat; $.300,000; (o) Roa- 
noke Constn Co T66 Fresh Pond rd. Bklyn : (a) 
Shampan & SheTSjpan, 50 Court, Bklyn (341). 



January 21, 1922 

DWELLINGS. 

ARVERNE. — Beach OSth st, n s, 175 e Boule- 
vard, 2-sty fr dwg, 22x63, slag rf, 2 families, 
gas; .$0,000; (o) Max Margolls, Beach OSth. 
Arverne ; (a) J. P. Powers, Rockaway Beach 
(370). 

CEDAR MANOR.— Fisk av, s s, 420 w Elder 
av, 3-2-sty fr dwgs, 10x34, shingle rf, 1 family, 
gas; $12,000; (o) Jamaica Property Corpora- 
tion, 53 Sutphin blvd, Jamaica; (a) Adam £2. 
Fischer, 373 Fulton, Jamaica (225-26-27). 

COLLEGE POINT. — loth st, w s, 50 n 3 av, 
2-sty bk dwg, 24x60, slag rf, 1 family & str; 
$0,.3iiO; (o) Samuel Jacobs, 405 13th, College 
Point; (a) A. E. Richardson, 100 Amity, Flush- 
ing (221). 

CORONA. — 40th st, n e c Hayes av, 2-sty fr 
dwg. 20x54, slag rf, 2 families, gas, steam heat; 
$7,000; (0) Edward Smith, Corona; (a) P. H. 
Woesthoft, 158 Nott av, L. I. City (204). 

EDGEMERE. — Beach 43d st, e s, 160 s Boule- 
vard, 6-2-sty £r dwgs, 14x32, shingle rf, 1 fam- 
ily, gas; $18,000; (o & a) A. S. Sonnblum, 
Edgemere (196-97-98-99-200-1). 

ELMHURST. — Bloomfleld st, w b, 138 n Phelps 
av, 2-li/.-sty fr dwgs, 20x:i8, shingle rf, 1 fam- 
ily, gas." steam heat; $8,000; (o) Val Hoffman. 
Joost pi, Elmhurst ; (a) Chas. J. Stidolph, 15 
Ivy, Elmhurst (246-247). 

FLUSHING. — Ferncliff st, n s, 540 e Law- 
rence av, 2-sty Jr dwg, 40x42, shingle rf, 2 fami- 
lies, gas, steam heat; $14,000; 2 bldgs ; (o) L. 
Di Stefano. 274 Woodside av, Elmhurst; (a) 
Andrew F. Brems, 83 Corona av. Corona (230). 
JAMAICA.— Arlington ter, s s, 375 w Sutphin 
rd, 2-sty fr dwg, 24x:», shingle rf, 2 families, 
gas, steam heat; .$8,000; (o) Frank Sablinski. 
Arlington ter, Jamaica; (a) Ernest G. Peterson. 
64 Flushing av, Jamaica (353). 

JAMAICA. — Lincoln av, w s, 100 s Park av, 
5-2-sty fr dwgs, 16x36, shingle rf, 1 family, gas. 
steam heat; $13,500; (a) A. Bossert, 0212 17Tth. 
Jamaica; (a) A. P. Sorice. Jr., 303 Fulton, Ja- 
maica (387-88-89). 

JAMAICA. — 181st st, w 8, lis n Fulton, 18-2- 
sty fr dwgs, 16x38, shingle rf, 1 family, gas, 
steam heat; $72,000; (o) Louis Rabinowitz. 490 
Fulton, Jamaica; (a) Louis Dannacher, 328 
Fulton, Jamaica (239 to 274). 

JAMAICA SOUTH — Rockaway blvd, s 8, 60 e 
Elm, 2-2-sty fr dwgs, 32x36, slag rf, 1 family, 
gas; $0,000: (o) Michael Messerl, 2443 Fulton. 
Blkyn ; (a) A. P. Sorice, Jr., 363 Fulton. Ja- 
maica (302). 

L. I. CITY. — 1st av, e s, 50 n Pierce av. 2-sty 
bk dwg. 21x53, slag rf, 2 families, gaa. hot 
water heat; $10,000; (o) Frank Milano, 1039 
Simpson, Bronx; (a) Frank Chmellk, 796 2 av, 
L. I. City (343). 

L. I. CITY. — Vandeventer av, s s, 177 e 2 av, 
2-sty bk dwg. 23x.55, slag rf, 2 families, gas. 
steam heat; $12,000; (o & a) Mrs. Mary Greaai. 
260 Hoyt av, L. I. City (222). 

L. I. CITY. — Theodore st, w s, 171 n Ditmars 
av, 2-sty bk dwg, 21x57, tar & gravel rf, 2 fami- 
lies, gas, steam heat; $10,000; (o) Mrs. Louise 
Stockinger, 790 11 av, L. I. City; (a) Wm. 
Sproesser, Jr., 281 Stelnway av, L. I. City (329). 
L. I. CITY. — Theodore st, w s, 143 n Dltmara 
av, 2-aty bk dwg, 21x."i7, tar & gravel rf, 2taml- 
lies, gas, steam heat ; $10,000 ; (o) Adam 
SchwelUng. 570 Grand av, L I. City ; (a) Wm. 
Sproesser. Jr., 281 Stelnway av, L. I. City 
(330). 

RICHMOND HILL.— 116th st, e 8, 175 n Sut- 
ter av, 5-2-sty fr dwgs, 16x38, shingle rf. 1 
family, gas, steam heat: $22,500; (o) Joseph 
Miller & Sons, 10415 Church, Richmond Hill : 
(a) Louis Dannacher, 328 Fulton, Jamaica 
(252-53-54-55-56). 

RIDGEWOOD. — Madison st, n s, 275 e Pros- 
pect av, 2-2-sty bk dwgs. 20x55, slag rf, 2 fami- 
lies, gas; $17,000; (o) Andrew Herbert. 5 Wll- 
lard av. Hellis ; (a) Louis Berger Co., 2695 
Myrtle av, Ridgewood (208-209). 

ROCKAWAY PARK.— Beach 119th st, e a. 160 
n Triton av, 2-sty fr dwg, 24x.'>6. shingle rf. 2 
families, elec, steam heat; $10,000; (o) Bertha 
Keramer, care archt ; (a) H. Hohauser. Beach 
116th, Rockaway Park (295). 

SPRINGFIELD.— 5th st, w s. 112 n Cherry, 2- 
sty bk dwg. 22x54, slag rf, 2 families, gas, steam 
heat; $10,000; (o & a) Francesco Ballstreri, 147 
Wilson av, Bklyn (342). 

WHITESTONE. — 7th av, a w c 11th, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 25x25, shingle rf, 1 family, gas. hot water 
heat; $8,000; (o) Joseph Ruff, Whitestone; (a) 
Geo. Grotz, Jr., 188 Montague, Bklyn (290). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 

CORONA.— Jackson av, n e, 85 w 5lBt. 3-8ty 
bk str & dwg, 20x60, slag rf, 2 families, gas; 
$12,000: (0) Ellz. De Blast, 38 54th, Corona; 
(a) Alfred De Blasl, 94 B Jackaon av, Corona 
(312). 

ELMHURST.— Woodside av, a s, 60 e 20th, 2- 
2-sty bk strs & dwgs. 20x43, alag rf, 2 families, 
gas, steam heat ; $16.000 ; (o) L. Dl Stefano. 
274 Woodside av, Elmhurst; (a) Andrew F. 
Brems, 83 Corona av. Corona (232). 

GLENDALE. — Myrtle av, s w c Tompkins pi, 
5-2-sty bk strs & dwgs, 20x99, slag rf, 2 fami- 
lies, gas; $50,000: (o) Free Realty Co., 282 
Buffalo av, Bklyn ; (a) Morris Perlateln, 49 
Fulton av. Middle Village (216). 



January 21, 1922 

L. I. CITY.— Hamilton st, s a. 270 e Pierce 
av, 3-sty bk str & dwg. 21x45, slag rf. 2 fami- 
lies, gas, steam heat; $12,000; (o) Egidlo Cala- 
bretta, 573 Boulevard, L. 1. City; (a) A. De 
Blasi, 04 E Jackson av. Corona (313). 

METROPOLITAN. — Metropolitan av, n e c 
Andrew, 8-3-sty bk strs & dwgs, 20x5."i, slag rf, 
2 families, gas; $G2,000 ; (o) Zeidler Realty Co., 
Inc., tiol Fresh Pond rd. Ridgewood ; (a) Louis 
Berger Co., 1606 Myrtle av. Ridgewood (211- 
212-213). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

ELMHURST.— Polk av, 3 e c 10th, 1-sty bk 
str, 1011x60, slag rf, elec, steam heat; $:50.nOO ; 
(0) Queensboro Investing Co., Bridge Plaza, 
L. I. City; (a) G. H. Wells, 21 E 40th, Man- 
hattan (316). 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

FLUSHING.— Congress av, n w c Park pi, 1- 
sty bk film development bldgs, 50x40, slag rf, 
steam heat; $10,000; (o) Associated Screen 
News, 120 W 41st. Manhattan; (a) Samuel 
Cohen, 32 Union sq, Manhattan (383). 

ROCKAWAY BEACH. — Ocean av, s e c, & 
Pier av, 2-sty fr bath house, 100x253, tar & 
paper rf ; IflO.OOO; (o) James Flint, 4.50 163d, 
Rockaway Beach; (a) J. Powers, Boulevard; 
Rockaway Beach (374). 



PLANS FILED 

FOR ALTERATIONS 



Manhattan. 

BROOME ST, 265-60, remove fr wall, new 
beam in 4-sty bk str & dwg; $1,.500 ; (o) Jacob 
Holbren, 141 Bowery ; (a) Max MuUer, 115 
Nassau (02). 

LEROY ST, 40, remove stoop, alter front, re- 
arrange partitions, reset stairs in 3-sty bk str 
& apt; $3,000; (o) Melbie E. Williams, 204 Riv- 
erside dr; (a) Jos. Mitchell, 332 W 24th (105). 
WASHINGTON ST, 600-4, steel structures for 
1 gravity & 2 pressure tanks on 5-sty bk stor- 
age warehouse; $5,300; (o) Independent Ware- 
houses, Inc., 141 Washington; (a) The Rusling 
Co., 26 Cortlandt (67). 

WASHINGTON ST, 431, rebuild & reglaze 
skylights, new wheel & coal pits, walls, cone 
floor, tar & gravel rf, remove wood floor In 2- 
sty bk wheelwright shop; $3,000; (o) Domenlco 
Tringale, 2:i24 Dean, Bklyn ; (a) Philip P. 
Spano, 43 Linden, Yonkers (91). 

13TH ST, 18 E, remove show window, par- 
tition, new show window, door, girder, columns, 
toilets in 3-sty bk str & office & apt; $2,000; 
(o) Benj. Wahl, 18 E 13th; (a) Vincent M. 
Cajano, 230 Bleecker (89). 

14TH ST, 214 E, remove partitions, relocate 
plumbing flxtures, doors, radiators, toilets in 3- 
sty f. p. theatre; $3,000; (o) The Greater N. 
y. Vaudeville Theatre Corp., Palace Theatre 
Bldg. ; (a) Eugene De Rosa, 110 W 40th (88). 

22D ST, 101 W, new front, ext, fire-escapes, 
stairs, toilets, flxtures In 3-sty bk str & apt ; 
$10,000; (ol Saml. S. Hyman, 161 W 22d ; (a) 
Jos. Mitchell, 332 W 24th (102). 

23n ST, 2-4-6 E, remove wall, new columns, 
partitions, wall, tile floors, tulles, beams In 3- 
5-sty bk strs & apts : $10,000; (o) Susan W. 
Grand D. Hauteville, Newport, R. I.; (a) L. A. 
Abramson, 48 W 46tli (104). 

23D ST, 131-3 E, remove stairs, rearrange 
toilets, change partitions, new stairs, beams in 
12-sty f, p. bank & offices; $2,500; (o) Chas. 
Kaye Rlty. Co., 131 B 23d; (a) Buchman & 
Kahn, 56 W 45th (84), 

34TH ST, 17 W, raise rf, reset coping, new 
metal ceiling, stairs in 2-5 & 4-sty bk strs, 
show rooms, lofts; $15,000; (o) The Bedell Co., 
19 W .34th ; (a) Geo, A. Schonewald, room 4733, 
G, C. Term. (68). 

38TH ST, 58 W, new ext, alter stairs, flre- 
escapes on 4-sty bk str & offices; $1,500: (o) 
Fernard Dreyfus, 58 W 38th; (a) Harold Blrk- 
mlre, 1133 Bway (66). 

.39TH ST. 149 E, remove partitions, reset 
stairs, new front ext, f. p. vent shaft In 4-3ty 
bk tnt; $18,000; (o) Mrs. Lida D. Klotz, 87 
University pi; (a) Beinelx & Snyder, 135 W 42d 
(96). 

4] ST ST. .'549-51 W. new windows In 1-sty bk 
storage: $2..500 ; (o) Consolidated Tele. & Elec- 
trical Subway Co., 54 Lafayette (77). 

57TH ST. 151 E, remove 2 tier pens, new en- 
closed iron stairs, steel & cone floor, wood & 
glass partitions in 3-sty bk court house & prison ; 
,$25,000; (o) City of N. Y., Dept., Public Bldgs., 
& Ofllces, Room 2043 Municipal Bldg. (111). 

eiST ST, 10 W, remove 1-sty limestone, dimin- 
ish limestone piers, new front, partitions In 1^- 
sty f. p. stores & apart hotel; .$20,000; (o) Ja- 
cob Zimmerman, 18 E 41 ; (a) Seellg & Flnkel- 
eteln, 44 Court, Bklyn (109). 

77TH ST, 203 W, remove Ist floor, new front, 
f. p. floor, f. p, stairs, chimney flue, alter fire- 
escapes, fire retard ceilings & floors In 6-sty bk 
stable & factory; $8,000; (o) Ella Crawford, 7 
E 42d; (a) Sidney Daub, 217 Bway (80). 

83D ST, 401 E. remove ent hall, wall, new 
hall, ext for hall In 5-Bty bk tnt; $2,500; (o) 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

Ludwig Rosenberg, 401 B 83d; (a) Adolph E. 
Nasi, 50 W 45th (09). 

93D ST. 24 E, new bath rooms in 3-sty hk 
hotel; $2,000; (o) Frederica A, Bennache, 1312 
Madison av ; ( a) Saml. Cohen, 32 Union sq (110) . 

nOTH ST, 20 W, remove stairs, laundry, new 
batbroom, laundry, entrance in 5-sty bk res: 
.$3,000; (o) Wm. H. Taylor, 12 W 96th; (a) 
David M. Ach, 1 Madison av (83). 

IIOTH ST, 3;;0-2 E, remove sheds, wall, new 
skylight, beams, bk pier, steam heating, walls in 
3-sty bk & fr dwg; $10,000; (o) Jos. Sclacca, 
2267 2 av; (a) Thos. P. Sclacca, 332 B 110 
(107). 

112TH ST. 108 E, remove walls, chimney 
breasts, new beams, extension, boiler flue in 3- 
sty bk storage & apart; $1,500; (o) Abraham 
Abromowitz, 108 E 112; (a) Louis A, Sheinart, 
104 Bowery (106). 

114TH ST, 05 E, new show windows, stairs in 
5-sty b ktnt; $1,500; (o) Saml. Pilchick, 10 H 
114th ; (a) Jas. P. Whiskeman, 153 B 40th 
(83). 

BROADWAY, 3920. new strs, toilets, col- 
umns, girders in 6-sty tnt; $4,000; (o) Mau- 
rice L. Nartler, 47 Walker; (a) Chas. F. Peck, 
7 E 42d (65). 

LEXINGTON AV, 247, new ext, stairs & halls, 
elevator, plumbing, heating, elec work, 1, 2 & 3 
tiers In 4-sty bk dwg; $20,000; (o) Chas. S. 
Brown, 14 Wall: (a) Peabody, Wilson & 
Brown. 140 E 39th (75). 

WELFARE ISLAND. Borough Manhattan, opp 
B 76th St, remove floor, new elevator & shaft, 
bk wall, pent & machinery room on Metropolitan 
Hospital, M, N & O Bldg: $8,000: (o) City N, 
Y., Dept. Public Welfare, Municipal Bldg. ; (a) 
Sylvester A. Taggart, Municipal Bldg. (82). 

3D AV, 197, new str front, compo floor, stairs, 
bk wall, partitions, bath tubs, plastering in 3- 
sty bk str & apts; $11,000; (o) Bisen & Co.. lO 
Bedford; (a) Fred Liese, 10421 12t8h. Rich- 
mond Hill, L. I. (97). 

5TH AV, 160. new flre-escapes on 9-3ty t. p. 
str & lofts; $2,000; (o) Est Edw. H. Van Ingen, 
160 5 av ; (a) Herts & Robertson, 331 Madison 
av (93). 

GTH AV, 506, new bk front, excavate base- 
ment, gen repairs on 4-sty bk str, studios, 
offices; $1,.500; (o) Annie Kovner, 3 W 20th; 
(a) Harold Blrkmire, 11.33 Bway (81). 

9TH AV. 642. remove show windows, plumbing, 
new windows, plumbing fixtures, partitions, re- 
arrange kitchen in 3-sty bk str 6 tnt; $3,000; 
(o) Elizabeth M. Sammon, 414 W 51st; (a) Geo. 
H. Van Auken, 430 W 44th (100). 

Bronx 

GARFIELD ST. 1712. new steel girders, new 
partitions to l-3ty bk church & offices: $1,000; 
(o) First Van Nest Hebrew Cong., on prem ; 
(a) Edw. M. Rlnltz, 1609 Melville (11). 

160TH ST, 362, 2-sty bk ext, 20x45, new str 
front, new partitions to 3-sty fr strs & dwg; 
.$3,500 ; (o) N. Goldstein, on prem ; (a) R. 
Gottlieb, 20 W 113th 7). 

1S4TH ST, 505 E, new str front, new parti- 
tions to 2-sty fr str, shop & storage; $1,000; (o) 
Frank Marciano, on prem; (a) M. W. Del 
Gaudlo, 158 W 45th (9). 

GRAND CONCOURSE. 2050, new doors, win- 
dows & new plastering to 2-sty bk club house; 
$5,000; (o) Bronx Lodge No. 871, B. P. O. Elks, 
on prem ; (a) Bruno W. Berger, 121 Bible 
House (8). 

SEDGWICK AV. 1311-17. new show windows, 
new boiler, new partitions to 2-sty fr strs & 
tnt: .$2,.500: (0) Mlohael Del Papa, 147 Mott ; 
(a) M. W. Del Gaudlo, 158 W 45th (10), 

Brooklyn 

COURT ST, w s, Fulton to Livingston, tank In 
Hall of Records: $8,000; (o) City of New York; 
(a) Jas. J. Byrne, 50 Court (330). 

HUMBOLDT ST. 102-4, nee Selgel, Int alts 
to poultry slaughter house: $3,000; (o) BenJ. 
Groff, 1.52 Sei^el ; (a) Harry A. Yarlsh, 39 
Graham av ; (368). 

PACIFIC ST, 860, 3 s, 275 w Underbill av. str 
frts & Int 3-sty fr office & 2 fam dwg: $3,000; 
(o) Isidore H. Meyer, 465 Crown; (a) Louis All- 
mendinger. 20 Palmetto (634). 

2D ST, ,314-18, 3 s, 165.9 e 4 av, exterior, Int 
alts & plumbing In 3-sty bk str & 2 fam dwg; 
$5,000: (o) Lulgl Fatato, prem; (a) W. J. Con- 
way. 400 Union (397). 

S 8TH ST. 74. s s, 83.3 e Wythe av, fire-es- 
cape, int alts & plumbing on 3-3ty bk 3 fam 
dwg ; $3,000 : (o) Mrs. Frieda Edelman. 60 S 
10th; (a) Irving M. Fenlchel, 583 Bedford av 
(336) . 

12TH ST, 406-42, s s, 307.10 e 7 av, Int alts 
to factory; $3.!50O ; (o) AnsonIa Clock Co., 7 
av & 12th ; (a) Jas. W. Magrath, 367 Fulton 
(352). 

W 25TH ST, 2856, w s, 280 n Mermaid av, 
raise bldg, 2-sty fr str & 1 fam dwg; $3,000; 
(o) Constanza Dal Boscoe, prem; (a) Geo. H. 
Suess, 1131 Gravesend av (378). 

ATLANTIC AV, 151-5, n s, 141.6 w Clinton, 
int alt & plbg to 4-sty bk warehouse : $5,000 : 
(o) The Hoovey Mercantile Co., 6 Harrison, N. 
Y. ; (a) N. K. Vanderbeek, 15 Maiden la, N. Y. 
(679). 



9S 



BEDFORD AV (Grant sq), 19-29, sec Dean, 
fire-escape & int alts to 5-sty bk club; $7,300; 
(0) The Unity Club, 1354 Union; (a) Frank H. 
Quimby. 110 William, Manhattan (300). 

BELMONT AV, 2.50-63. n w c Hins-lale, ext to 
shop; $2,000; (o) Regal Cleaners, 228 Belmont 
av ; (a) Jack Fein. 211 Snediker av (417). 

CLASSON AV. 764, s w c Sterling pi, ex- 
terion & int alts & plumbing in 3-sty bk str St 
2 fam dwg; $2,.300 ; (o) Fred D. Heimberg, 760 
Classen nv : (a) Louis Allmendinger, 20 Pal- 
metto (487). 

DE KALB AV, 1353-5, n s, 223 e Central av, 
porch & int alts to 2-2-fam dwgs; $4,00(1; (o) 
M. Blackman, .508 Bway; (a) Wm. J. Dllthey, 
120 Liberty, Manhattan (359). 

DE KALB AV. 1:^1-7, n s, 200 e Central av, 
porch & int alts to 2 fam dwg; $3,000; (o & a) 
same as above (360), 

DE KALB AV, .30. s w c Flatbush av ext, 
add 2-sty to ext 3-sty bk storage & str ; $15,- 
000: (0) Edw. 0. Flynn. Hotel Imperial, Man- 
hattan: (a) Hy. J. Nurick, 44 Court (:«7). 

EMMONS AV, 2601-29, n s, E 26th to E 27th 
sts, ext store; .$3,000; (o) Geo. Tappan, Emma 
Stevens, 2017 Emmons av ; (a) Fred B. McDuItee, 
65 Clifton pi (624). 

FRANKLIN AV, 67, e 3, 48.8 n Park av, ext, 
etc, in 3-sty fr str & 2 fam dwg; $3,5(10; (o) 
Gaetano Serpe, premises: (a) Salvati & Le Quor- 
nik, 30O Fulton (674) 

GREENE AV, 690, s s, 280 e Throop av, rf, 
int alts & plumbing to 3-sty bk 2 fam dwg : $3,-' 
000: (o) Arthur Iser, 1015 DeKalb av ; (a) 
Gustave W. Iser, 1015 DeKalb av (480). 

LAFAY'ETTE AV, 893. n w c Lewis av. str 
frts & int to 4-sty bk str & 3 fam dwg; $2,500; 
(o) Annie Hanken, premises; (a) Glucroft & 
Glucroft, 720 Flushing av (6S4), 

MYRTLE AV. 116, s s, 100,2 e Bridge, str frts 
& int alt in 4-sty bk store & tenement; $1,.500; 
(0) Wm. Hettrick, 10 Stockholm; (a) Anast. 
Catsanos. 101 Park av, N. Y. (649). 

MY'RTLE AV, 187, n w c Fleet pi,, str front 
on str; $2,200; (o) Benj. Sharoff, prem; (a) 
David Krosnove. 4200 3 av, Bronx (327). 

OVINGTON AV. 415-23, n s, 109.7 e 4 av, ex- 
terior & Int alts to 2%-sty fr synagogue; $13,- 
000: (o) Cong. Sheras Israel, 417 Ovlngton av ; 
(a) E. M. Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin av (421). 

SHEEPSHEAD BAY RD, 518-22, s e c W 5th, 
ext add sty, etc, to 3-sty fr strs & lodgings : 
$0,200: (o) Sam Rosof, premises; (a) Chas. C. 
Lundberg, 5408 7 av (626). 

TOMPKINS AV, 232, w e, 100 n Lafayette av, 
raise bldg, etc. In 3-sty fr stores & 2 fam dwg; 
.$3.S00: (o) Sam Gllcksman. 69 Tompkins av ; 
(a) Hy M. Entlich. 413 So 5th (631). 

VOORHIES AV. 2113-23. n w c Elmore pi, 
int alts & plumbing In 2\4-sty fr 2 fam dwg; 
$3,000: (o) Chas. Kahn. prem; (o) Jos. F. 
Brewster. 2634 E 27th (317). 

WASHINGTON AV. 43-3. e s. 100 s Flushing 
av. ext to str; .$2,000; (o) Jack P, Harrison, 
49 Washington av ; (a) Ralph H. Segal, 56 W 
40th, Manhattan (343). 

14TH AV. 6922-4, n w c 70th. porch on 2 fam 
dwg; $1,500; (o) Domenlck Saleml. 6918 14 
av: (a) Raphael Caporale, 6023 19 av (302). 

14TH AV, 6805, e s, 40 s 6Sth, ext & raise 
bldg 3-sty fr str & 2 fam dwg; $10,000; (o) 
Frank Pannaehio, 75 Mulberry; (o) Ferd 
Savignano, 6005 14 av (491). 

27TH AV, 113, e s, 170 s Bath av, add sty & 
Int alts to 2-sty cone 2 fam dwg; $3,000; (o) 
Giuseppe Romano, prem; (a) Michael Cardo, 61 
Bible Huse, Manhattan (375). 

Queens 

ASTORIA.— 9th av. w s, 156 a Grand av, 2- 
sty fr bk veneered ext, 13x24, flat rf removed, 
new plumbing, int alts, exterior alts to dwg; 
$12,000: (0) I. J. Moss, 271 Stelnway av, As- 
toria: (a) Peter Coco, 281 Stelnway av, As- 
toria (92). 

ARVERNE.— Beach 71st st, n w c L. I. R. R., 
1-sty bk ext. 37x76. rear public laundry ; $12, 
000 ; (0) Joseph Lohensteln, Beach 7l3t, Ar- 
verne (124). 

CORONA. — Lewis av. n s. 112 w Corona aT, 
1-sty fr ext on str, 15x4, front, cone foundation, 
plumbing, front wall removed: $1,200; (o) 
Jacob Berger, 163 Corona av. Corona (01). 

FLUSHING. — Forest av. s w c Burling av, 
build ext on front of dwg, new bay window, 
plumbing: $2,400; (o1 A. Tarantlno, 169 Gran- 
conla av. Flushing (82). 

JAMAICA,— Fulton st, s s, 51 w Washington, 
raise rf of 1-sty ext. bk. Int & exterior alts; 
.$2,500; (0) Julia T. James. Union Hall st, Ja- 
maica; (a) W. H. Spaulding, 375 Fulton, Ja- 
maica (68). 

JAMAICA.— Rosevllle av. e s._fi3 n South. 2- 
sty bk ext. 6x12, raise rf of main bldg. 1-Bty 
light manufacturing company, plumbing: $15,- 
000: (0) Gottlieb & Selff. 107 Rosevllle av. Ja- 
maica; (a) Louis Dannacher. 328 Fulton, Ja- 
maica (106). 

RIDGEWOOD. — Cypress av, 818. n w c Cor- 
nelia, extend on rf, steel & glass sun parlor, 
22x23. Int alts, plumbing: $5,000; (o) Lena 
Krauth. 2.306 Norman, Ridgewood ; (a) Louis 
Berger * Co., 1696 Myrtle av, Ridgewood (75), 



John P. Kane Company 

TROWEL MASONS' 

PORTLAND CEMENT BUILDING MATERIALS 

MAIN OFFICE: 103 PARK AVENUE, NEW YORK 

/ FOOT KA8T 14TH 8T, NBW TORK 
ntBTBiRirrrar tarim. ) FOOT WEST 9«TH 8T_ NBW TORK 
DIBTKIBUTlMb lAKOBi < ^i^ gx. AND BABLEM BITER. NEW TOKI 

1 6TH ST. AND 00WANV8 CANAU BROOKLTN 



Empire Brick & Supply Co. 



YARDS 

latk At*., 47th to 48th St*.. M» i i hi tf 

IJSth and Exterior St*., Brsnx 

Morfui Avenue and Newtown Creek 

(near Stan St), Brooklyn 



OF BRICK, IN 

MASONS' BUILDING MATERIALS 
Executive Offices : 1 03 PARK AVE., NEW YORK 



WORKS 

STOCKPORT, ». Y. 

GLASCO, N. Y. 



MURTHA & SCHMOHL CO. 



YARDS 
Foot 14th Street, East River 

MASON S ' B U I L D I N G__M__AT E R I A L S p„„. ,,3^ .„, „,^ ^u, E.- «„ 



OPnCSi FOOT IMTB 8TRKKT, EAST RTVER 



High Grade 
Watchman's Service 

Day Tel.: Franklin 6030 
139 CENTRE STREET 



f J^\t JiliT^C* Ty A ' 1 * 1 ^^^T Regula"" Post Patrol and Special Watch. 
HI Jl ^IVI r^^ lJ\. 1 Ixl II M ^^y ''"'* ^'Sht- Capable, Sober, Keliable, 

Holmes Electric Protective Company 



Efficient. 

Night Tel.: Murray Hill 3030 
66 WEST 39TH STREET 



MISSISSIPPI WIRE GLASS COMPANY 



St. Lonla Offle* 
4070 North Main St. 



220 FIFTH AVENUE 
NEW YORK 



Chicago Offioe 
7 WMt Hadlaon St. 



M. F. WESTERGREN, INC. 



FIREPROOF DOORS AND WINDOWS 



2U-31 EAST 144th STREET 



'Phone 0770-1-2 Mott lUva 



Builders Brick and 
Supply Co., Inc. 

Mason's 
Building Materials 

172d St. and West Farms Road 

Telephone: Intenral* nt* 



LOUIS C. ANDERSON, Pre». 

THE ANDERSON BRICK 

AND 

SUPPLY COMPANY, Inc. 

MASONS' AND PLASTERERS' 
SUPPLIES 

YARD and OFFICE 

201 East 129th Street, New York 

Telephone 

Harlem 0285 




The Lawrence 
PORTLAND c^^cEMENT Ccment CompaDy 



.AND<^CEMENT 

302 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



WATSON 



New Electric Elevators 

All makes and types repaired and altered. B«- 
tlmatea free. Weekly or monthly Inapectloni by 
competent elevator men keep eletatora iafe and 
reduce repair bills. 

Phone: Longacre 0670, 0671, 0672 
Night and Sunday: Westchester 3521 

WATSON ELEVATOR CO., INC. 

407.409 WEST 36TH STREET, NEW YORK 



ME 



ELECTRIC 
ELEVATOR 
COMPANY 



220 BROADWAY 
NEW YORK 



Real Estate Record and Builders Guide 

Founded March 21, 1868, by CLINTON W. SWEET 

Devoted to Real Estate, Building Construction and Building Management in the Metropolitan District 

Published Every Saturday by THE RECORD AND GUIDE COMPANY 

PRANK B. PEELEY, President and Editor; B. S. DODGE, Vice-President ; J. W. PRANK, Secretary-Treasurer 



Entered as eecond class matter November 8, 1879, at the Post OiUce at New York, N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 
Copyright, 1922, by The Record and Guide Company, 119 West 40tli Street, New York. (Telephone: Bryant 4800) 



VOL. CIX 

NO. 4 (2S11) 



NEW YORK, JANUARY 28, 1922 



25c. A COPY 
$12.00 A YEAR 



Advertising Index 

Page 
A. B. See Electric Elevator 

4th Cover 

Aclterly, Orville B 113 

Adams & Co 112 

Adler, Ernest N 113 

American Bureau of R. E 113 

American Enameled Bridt & Tile.. 

Co 119 

Ames & Co 2d Cover 

Amy & Co., A. V 2d Cover 

Anderson Briclt & Supply Co., 

4tli Cover 
Anderson & Co., James S..2d Cover 

Armstrong & Armstrong 113 

Ashtorth & Co 2d Cover 

Automatic Fire Alarm Co 120 

Baiter, Alexander 112 

Bauer, Milbank & Molioy 112 

Bechmann, A. G 112 

Bell Co., H. W 123 

Biltmore Realty Corp 112 

Boyd, James 108 

Boylan, John J 2d Cover 

Brener, Samuel — 

Brennan, Edmund M 113 

Brett & Goode Co Front Cover 

Brooks & Momand 108 

Brown, Frederick 108 

Brown Co., J. Romalne. Front Cover 
Builders' Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 

Bulkley & Horton Co 112 

tiusher & Co., Eugene J... 2d Covbi 

Butler & Baldwin Front Cover 

Cammann, Voorheea & Fioyd, 

2d Cover 

Carpenter, Leonard J 2d Cover 

Chauncey Real Estate 2d Cover 

City Investing Co 100 

Classified Advertisements Ill 

Coburn, Alfred P 112 

Cross & Brown Front Cover 

Cruikshank Co Front Cover 

Cruikshank's Sons, Wm. Front Cover 

Cudner, R. B. Co 2d Cover 

Cusack Company 112 

Cushman & Wakefield 112 

Cutler & Co., Arthur 2d Cover 

Cutner, Harry B 2d Cover 

Dailey, Clarke G 100 

Davies, J. Clarence 114 

Day, Joseph P 2d Cover 

Dean & Co., W. E 2d Cover 

Dike, O. D. & H. V 2d Cover 

Dodge Co., F. W 127 

Dowd, James A 113 

Dubois, Chas. A 112 

Duffy Co., J. P 120 

Dunlap & Loyd 112 

Duress Co 2d Cover 

Edwards Co., Charles G...2d Cover 
Edwards, Dowdney & Rlchart. . .101) 

Elliman Co., Douglas L 108 

Ely & Co., Horace S Front Cover 

Empire Brick & Supply Co., 

4th Cover 

English, J. B 2d Cover 

Finch & Co., Chas. H 120 

Finkelstein & Son, Jacob 113 

Fischer. J. Arthur 2d Cover 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Editorials 101 

Davenport Committee Proposes to Equalize 
Taxes 103 

John M. Stoddard Outlines Real Estate Broker- 
age Laws 104 

How a Few Landlords Used Wash Sales to 
Force Rentals Up 105 

Construction Started on Large West Side Apart- 
ment 106 

Review of Real Estate Market for the Current 
Week 107 

Private Sales of the Week 107 

Statistical Table of the Week 114 

Employers Reject Untermyer's Wage Scale Pro- 
posal lis 

New York State Builders Meet in Albany Next 
Week 116 

Residential Building Still Dominates Local Sit- 
uation 117 

Personal and Trade Notes 117 

Trade and Technical Society Events 117 

Building Materials Markets 118 

Current Building Operations 118 

Contemplated Construction 120 

Plans Filed for New Construction 123 



Page 

Fisher, James B 112 

Fox & Co., Predk 2d Cover 

Goodwin & Goodwin 2d Cover 

Grunert, Robert G 113 

Gulden, Royal Scott 112 

Harris Exchange 113 

Hecla Iron Works 122 

Hess, M. & L., Inc Front Cover 

Holmes Elec. Protective. .4th Cover 

Holt & Merrall, Inc 113 

Home Title & Insurance Co 100 

Hubbard, C. Bertram 2d Cover 

Jackson, Daniel H 108 

Jones & Son, William P 113 

Kane Co., John P 4th Cover 

Keller, Charles G 112 

Kelley, T. H 112 

Kelly, Albert B 112 

Kempner & Son, Inc., D., 

Front Cover 

Kilpatrick, Wm. D 100 

Kissling, J. P. & L. A 112 



Pag* 

Kloea, P. J 123 

Kohler, Chas. S 100 

Kopp & Co., H. C 112 

Kurz Co., Wm. P. M 112 

Lackman, Otto 112 

Lawyers Title & Trust Co 110 

Lawrence, Blake & Jewell 100 

Lawrence Cement Co 4th Cover 

Leaycraft cSi Co., J. Bdgar, 

Front Cover 

Leist, Henry G 2d Cover 

Leach & Johnson 123 

Levers, Robert 112 

Losere, L. G 112 

Manning & Trunk 2d Cover 

Martin, Samuel H 2d Cover 

May Co., Lewis H 2d Cover 

McMahon. Joseph T 114 

Milner, Joseph 113 

Mississippi Wire Glass.... 4th Cover 

Monell, P. Bronson 2d Cover 

Moore, John Constable 113 

Moore's Sons, Morris, Inc.. 2d Cover 



Advertislnir lnde(X 

Moors, J. K 2d Cover 

Morgan Co., Leonard 113 

Muhlker, Arthur G 113 

Murray & Sons, Inc., John A... 118 

Murtha & Schmohl 4th Cover 

Nail & Parker 100 

Natanson, Max N 114 

Nehring Bros 2d Cover 

New York Edison Co., The 121 

New York Title & Mortgage Co.. 100 

Niewenhous Co., Inc 110 

Noyes & Co., Chas. F... Front Cover 
Ogden & Clarkson Corp. . . .2d Cover 

O'Hare, Geo. L 100 

Oppenheimer, Fred 112 

O'Reilly & Dahn 2d Cover 

Payton, Jr., Co., Philip A 114 

Pease & Blliman Front Cover 

Pell & Co., S. Osgood 12o 

Pendergast, John P., Jr 112 

Pflomm, P. & G Front Cover 

Phelps, Albert D 112 

Pomeroy Co., Inc., S. H 120 

Porter & Co Front Cover 

Quell & Quell 112 

Read & Co., Geo. R Front Cover 

Realty Co. of America 100 

Rickert-Brown Realty Co 118 

Rinaldo, Hiram 112 

Ross, Frank U 120 

Runk, Geo. S 112 

Ryan, George J 2d Cover 

Schindler & Liebler 112 

Schweibert, Henry 112 

Seaman & Pendergast 112 

Shaw, Arthur L 113 

Shaw, Rockwell & Santord 112 

Simberg. A. J 120 

Sherman & Kirschner lu 

Smith, Malcolm B., Inc 112 

Smith, Gerritt, Mrs .'.114 

Solove, R 120 

Spear & Co 112 

Speyers, Inc., James B '. !ll3 

Spotts & Starr 2d Cover 

Sterling Mortgage Co Ill 

Straus & Co., S. W 123 

Tabolt. Jacob J 112 

Title Guarantee & Trust Co 100 

Tyng & Co., Stephen H., Jr 100 

Union Stove Works 118 

United Elec. L. & P. Co 109 

Van Valen, Chas. B 108 

Vorndrans Sons. C 120 

Walsh, J. Irving 2d Cover 

Watson, Elv. Co., Inc 4th Cover 

Weill Co., H. M 108 

Wells Architectural Iron Co 120 

Wells Sons, James N 2d Cover 

Westergren, Inc., M. F. ..4th Cover 
White & Sons, Wm. A. .Front Cover 
Whiting & Co., Wm. H.. Front Cover 

Whitney-Foster Corp 112 

Williams-Dexter Co 113 

Winter, Benjamin 108 

Wood-Dolson Co Front Cover 

Wyckoff, Walter C 2d Cover 

Zittel & Sons, Fred'k 2d Cover 



A Positive Foundation Upon Which to Build 



The Federal Reserve Board, in its January bulletin, declares that "the most encourag- 
ing feature of the business situation is that a positive foundation apparently has been estab- 
lished upon -which to build development during 1922." Governor Harding believes that the 
country as a -whole has passed safely the points of danger entailed in after-war deflation. 

One positive foundation upon -which real estate and construction interests can eflfec- 
tively build their business is regular, consistent advertising in 

THE RECORD AND GUIDE 

For 54 Years the Authority in the Metropolitan District. 
Phone Bryant 4800 and a representative will call. 



Title Insurance and 
Mortgage Loans 

for . he Real Estate Owutr 

Protection in 
Placing Loans 

/or the Broker 

Guaranteed First Mort- 
gages and Certificates 

for the Investor 

New York Title 
& Mortgage Company 



Manhattan 
Brooklyn 
Jamaica 
Richmond 
White Plains 
Mt. Vernon 



135 Broadway 

203 Montague St. 

375 Fulton St. 

24 Bay St. 

163 Main St. 

3 South 3d St. 



EDWARDS, 
DOWDNEY&RICHART 

REAL ESTATE 

AND 

MORTGAGE 
LOANS 

156 Broadway, New York 

Tel. Cortland 1S71-U72 
Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 



BrtabUsbed 1887 

CHAS. S. KOHLER. Inc. 

Real Estate 
Insurance 

Broker and Manager of 
Estates 

MAIN OFFICE: 
fM Coltunlnu Ave. — Comer 104tli St. 

BRANCH OFFICE: 

14V St Nlehola* Ave.— Near ISlst St. 

NEW YORK 



Lawrence, Blake & Jewell 

Mortgage Loans 

115 Broadway 

TeL 4080 Rector 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 



GEORGE L. O'HARE 

MEMBER REAL ESTATE BOARD OF N. T. 

REAL ESTATE 

EXCEPTIONAL mVESTMENTS 

8BLUNO— RENTING— BUSINESS AND 

APARTMENT BUILDINGS 

SPECIALIZING IN LEASEHOLDS 

MORTGAGE LOANS 

FULL EaUIPriD OEPT. FOR IXCHANaiNI 

489 FIFTH AVE. 

TEL. YANDERBILT 5092—6441 



Specialists in Harlem 

and 

Colored Tenement 
Properties 

NAIL & PARKER 

REAL ESTATE 

145 West 135th Street 
New York City 



JOHN E. NAIL 
HENRY C. PARKER 



Telephone I 7«8I 
Uornlnsalde ( 7«U 



WiUiam D. Opatrick 




BROADWAY STORE 
FOR RENT 


REAL ESTATE 




Located in Breslin Hotel, East Side of 
Broadway, near 29th St. Size: 15x50. 


OPERATOR 




For details apply to 


149 BROADWAY 




CLARKE G. DAILEY 

115 BROADWAY Rector 43M 


SAMUEL KILPATSICK 




Full Commission to Brokers 


A Passing Opportunity 


Experienced real estate men know that 5^% on a first mortgage, 
guarded and guaranteed by a mortgage insurance company, is an 
abnormally higli rate. That is why we suggest that guaranteed 
mortgages be purchased now, for a reduction in rate later in the 
year is very probable. 


HOME TITLE INSURANCE CO. 


Capital and Surplus over $1,500,000 
51 Willoughby Street, Brooklyn Post Office Building, Jamaica 



I STEPHEN H. TYNG H. OAKEY HALL | 

SteplienH.TyDg,Jr,&Co. 

Incorporated 
Member Real Estate Board. N. Y. 



REAL ESTATE 

MANAGEMENT OF 
BUSINESS PROPERTY 

41 Union Square West 



22 EAST 17TH STREET 
Telephone: Stuyvesant 40M 



Applications for Loans 

We would be glad to receive ap- 
plications from borrowers for loans 
between $10,000 and $30,000 in the 
Boroughs of Manhattan and the 
Bronx. 

We do not confine our loans to 
any particular class of property but 
require it to be properly located for 
its use and advantageously occupied'. 

The rate is six per cent, and the 
fees are reasonable and we are pre- 
pared to deal either with brokers 
or principals. 

Our special desire for loans of this 
size just now does not preclude our 
handling very small loans or very 
large loans as usual. 

TiTlE guarantee 

& TRUST C? 

Capital $7,500,000 
Surplus $11,000,000 

176 BBOADWAT. NEW YORK 
137 WEST 125TH STREET. NEW YORK 
370 EAST 149TH OTBEET, NEW YORK 



Eealtp Company 
of America 



FRANKLIN PETTIT 

President 



TRANSACTS A GEN- 
ERAL BUSINESS IN 



T HE PURCHASE AND 
SALE OF NEW TORE 



CITY REAL ESTATE 



2 WALL STREET, NEW YORK CrFY 

Rector OtlS-Ont 



City Investing 
Company 

61 Broadway, New York 

Telephone: Bowline Green tSM 

Capital, $5,000,000 

POBERT E. DOWLING, President 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



101 




Labor Must Share the Burden 

When the Board of Governors of the Building Trades 
Employers' Association formally rejected the proposal of 
Samuel Unterniyer that the prevailing wage problem be 
settled by entering into a new contract with labor for two 
years from January 1, that the present wage scale be 
continued for the year 1922; and that the wage scale for 
1923 be based on that of 1922, subject to decrease or in- 
crease in the cost of living for the year 1922 as compared 
with 1921, they took the only action possible if the building 
situation is to be readjusted upon a basis fair and equitable 
to all. 

Up to the present time every element in the industry, 
with a single glaring exception, has made concessions, and 
sacrifices in an effort to revive activity in tlie construction 
held. Contractors have cut their profit margins to the 
absolute minimum compatible with good business practice; 
.naterial manufacturers have lowered prices by reducing 
their labor costs and increasing their output; and material 
dealers, in order to stabilize and improve the building situ- 
ation, have absorbed losses that under ordinary conditions 
should have been passed along to the consume'-. 

Organized building labor stands alone as being unwilling 
to make a reasonable concession to stimulate construction 
and relieve the housing shortage even when they will be the 
direct gainers through more employment and lower living 
costs because of reduced rentals. 

A proposition that is favorable to one element of the 
building industry and not to all is not economically sound. 
So that adequate housing may be provided at moderate 
rentals everyone affiliated with construction must share 
equally in the burden of reducing costs. Labor cannot be 
the exception nor should it be. The old agreement between 
employers and employes expired on December 3.1, 1921, 
and since then several constructive plans have been pre- 
sented for drafting a new contract. None of these have 
been acceptable to labor now apparently insisting on having 
its own way or leaving the situation deadlocked. 

This attitude is manifestly unfair. Much work is to be 
done if the housing problem is to be solved and labor, one 
of the most important factors in this program, is holding 
out for conditions tliat would give them a decided advantage 
over all other elements in the industry. 



pears when they have passed it on to their readers. 

"Mr. Untermyer Plans Homes for 225,000," one head- 
line reads : "Untermyer Has Plan to Construct 45,000 New 
Homes for $100,000,000," is the way another daily booms 
tlie big news. All along the line in newspaper offices, Mr. 
Untermyer's pronouncement from Washington Heights 
is treated with the utmost solemnity. No magician assert- 
ing that he could turn elephants into pink butterflies by 
wiggling his left ear could possibly have inspired greater 
awe. 

There is, of course, no question but that it would be a 
great thing if Mr. Untermyer could build 45,000 new homes 
for 225,000 people for $100,000,000. In fact, that would be 
a fine thing for anybody to do. Maybe that is why the news- 
papers suppressed their sense of humor for the moment and 
"played up" the idea. Mr. Untermyer stands ready, if the 
newspapers reflect his idea accurately, to do all of these won- 
derful things if some one else will furnish the money, if 
labor will contribute a part of its labor gratis, and if material 
dealers will furnish the materials regardless of market con- 
ditions. Under such circumstances, almost anybody could 
end a housing crisis without the slightest difficulty, and 
have time left over to dabble in a dilettante way in the 
struggle for justice of the Western farmer and the sup- 
pression of the booze traffic along the Atlantic Coast. 

This latest idea of Chief Counsel Untermyer may deserve 
well, but it will be interesting to see whether the other fel- 
lows come forward to furnish the money, to do the work for 
less than regular pay, and to furnish the materials for less 
than market prices. Stranger things have happened, but 
it is very difficult to recall when or where. 



Printers' Ink to the Rescue 

Editors of the metropolitan dailies must have misplaced 
their sense of humor, judging from the very grave and 
serious manner in which they accord big display heads and 
front-page space to Mr. Samuel Untermyer's latest scheme 
for solving the housing shortage. 

Mr. Untermyer's plan gets top position all along the line, 
no happening anywhere el=e in the world being of sufficient 
importance to crowd it off the first page of the morning 
dailies. Newspaper editors may have winked at their asso- 
ciate'; or poked the office boy in the ribs as thus they give 
.such prominence to the scheme, but it is to be doubted if 
any of them really take the news half as seriously as it ap- 



Report of the Davenport Committee 

After three years of earnest work, Senator Davenport's 
committee which has been studying the tax laws of the 
state has filed its report with the Legislature. That this in- 
quiry should have extended over so long a period causes sur- 
prise in some quarters, but the fact that Senator Davenport 
and his associates gave so much time to the task may prove 
in the end of the greatest possible advantage. 

No subject has so palpably needed careful attention at 
Albany as revision of the tax laws. The injustice of some 
of these statutes, the inconsistencies, the ineffectiveness, and 
especially the absence of impartial enforcement in all sec- 
tions of the state, have constituted for many years a grave 
scandal. Other sagacious leaders before Senator Davenport 
had taken up boldly the task of improving this situation, but 
it is the unfortunate fact that their efforts did not meet with 
marked success. A lot of petty politicians, with Assembly 
Districts as their kingdoms, have lieen able for years to con- 
trol enough Assemblymen to block any real lasting revision 
of the state's taxation system. Former efforts for improved 
conditions have met with such poor support in the Legis- 
lature that Senator Davenport and his associates deserve 
special credit for plunging into the subject with so much 
force and determination. 

In some respects the report just made by the Davenport 
Committee contains recommendations more sweeping than 



102 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28, 1922 



any submitted by former investigators. Public attention 
particularly will be directed to the committee's proposal that 
the Special Franchise Taxes be abolished. The fact that 
these levies were established after a hot fight at Albany 
led by Roosevelt as Governor and fought by the corpora- 
tions and the politicians, will cause the public to look with 
suspicion upon their repeal. There is, however, great force 
and logic in the Davenport Committee's contention that 
these special franchise valuations, classified by law as real 
estate and in many cases pledged in fixing the local constitu- 
tional debt limits, may be working to the very serious dis- 
advantage of real estate itself. 



Like every other intelligent body studying taxation in 
this state, Senator Davenport's Committee finds realty over- 
burdened with taxation. That has been the situation for 
many decades. Various remedies have been proposed from 
time to time, but enough small-minded Senators and As- 
semblymen to defeat real tax reform have been sitting in 
the Legislature when each new attempt has been made. It 
remains to be seen whether the Legislature of 1922 possess- 
es any higher degree of intelligence or public spirit. There- 
in will lie the answer to the question as to .vhether or not 
Senator Davenport and his associates have dr.ne their three 
vears' work in vain. 



Rent Cases Argued Before United States Supreme Court 

(Special to the Record and Guide) 



Washington, Jan. 25, 1922. 

THE rent law cases on appeal to the United States Supreme 
Court were argued today by Louis Marshall, who appeared 
for those attacking the law on the ground of its unconstitu- 
tionality, and by W. D. Guthrie and Julius Henry Cohen, in defense of 
it. Two cases were before the Court. The first was that of the Edgar 
A. Levy Leasing Company against Henry R. Stern, which involved 
the constitutionality of Chapter 944 of the laws of 1920, providing 
that in suits to recover rent for premises used as a dwelling it 
should be a good defense that the rent had been increased over the 
charge existing one year before the lease, on the ground that such 
rent was unjust, unreasonable and oppressive. The other case, 
known as 810 West End Avenue, Inc., against Jerome Siegel, 
involved Chapters 942 and 947, which prohibited the bringing of 
ejecting proceedings and summary proceedings to recover possession 
of dwellings prior to Nov. 1, 1922. 

The landlords side of the argument was presented by Mr. 
Marshall who said the acts deprived the landlord of his property 
■without due process of law, impaired the obligation of his contract 
and denied him the equal protection of the law. He attacked the 
presumption created by the act that the lease was oppressive from 
the mere fact of an increase within one year. He said that a public 
emergency due to housing conditions affecting the public welfare did 
not in fact exist ; that the mere recital in the act of the existence 
of such an emergency did not create one, and that even if an emer- 



gency existed, it would not justify legislation in violation of the 
Federal Constitution. 

Mr. Guthrie argued that the Legislature passed the law after 
three years of exhaustive examination by a legislative committee 
and the taking of 50,000 pages of testimony. 

Mr. Guthrie stated that on Oct. 1, 1920, 100,000 families in New 
York were served with notices of eviction. 

Basing his argument on the maxim that "The welfare of the 
people is the supreme law," Mr. Guthrie said he conceded the 
measure would be unconstitutional if there was no compelling 
necessity for it. 

"But," he added, "if there was an emergency which really in- 
volved the health and the morals and the safety and welfare of 
the community, neither the contract clause nor the due process 
of law clause of the Constitution, within the settled doctrine of 
this court, prevented the Legislature from affording the appropriate 
remedies : and the only question before the court, the only question 
of constitutional law, was whether the end was legitimate ; whether 
the purpose in the mind of the Legislature was legitimate; and if 
so, then whether the means adopted were reasonably adapted to 
remedy the public evil." 

Mr. Cohen, in supporting the law, said that the whole course of 
history showed the evils resulting from wholesale evictions, and 
that every civilized country had found it necessary to pass such 
legislation as a result of the war. 



New Federal Building Bill Favorably Reported 

(Special to the Record and Guide) 



Washington, January 25, 

A FAVORABLE report on Representative Rosedale's 
bill to "authorize the President to appoint a Commission 
to negotiate the exchange of the old Postoffice site 
below City Hall, New York, for other property on which a new 
Federal building or buildings may be erected to provide aconi- 
modations for the postoffice, the Federal courts and other 
bureaus now housed in rented quarters, at a cost to the National 
Government of $800,000 .annually. 

It is understood here that President Harding will appoint 
Postmaster General Hays, Secretary Hoover, Secretary Mellon, 



Secretary Davis, Attorney General Weeks, and that the New 
York City Commission will include Mayor Hylan and Comp- 
troller Craig. 

The hearing on the bill was held by the House Committee on 
Public Buildings and Grounds and the favorable report was the 
result of unanimous action of the Committee. 

A number of representatives of business organizations from 
New York appeared, including D. Everest Wade of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Architects, R. B. Ingersoll of the City Club, 
Henry Collins Brown of the Citizens' Committee, and Arthur 
N. Travers of the Merchants' Association, all of whom favored 
the bill. There was no opposition. 



Real Estate Board Banquet Next Saturday 



THE twenty-sixth annual banquet of the Real Estate Board 
of New York, to be held at the Hotel Commodore on the 
evening of February fourth, will be unusual to the extent 
that it will have as its chief speakers, the governors of two 
states. Governor Nathan L. Miller of New York and Governor 
Edward I, Edwards of New Jersey have both consented to be 
present and to speak. Governor Miller's subject will be the de- 
velopment of the Port of New York. Governor Edwards will 
probably discuss the same subject, it being a joint project in 
which both the States of New York and New Jersey are in- 
terested. 
James A. Cattel, City Statistician of Philadelphia and Martin 



W. Littleton will also address the diners. Mr. Cattel runs to 
humor, as those attending the banquet in 1921 will recall. A 
public official of national prominence is expected to be among 
♦ he speakers, but it cannot at present be announced definitely 

Charles G. Edwards, President of the Board, will make a brief 
address and act as toastmaster. 

The Banquet Committee, in addition to its arrangements 
for the speakers, has prepared a program of entertainment that 
will compare favorably with previous enorts along these lines. 
The Committee is gratified with the reservations already made, 
which insure an attendance equalling that of 1921, when the 
diners numbered 1.450. 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



103 



REAL ESTATE SECTION 



Davenport Committee Proposes to Equalize Taxes 

Finds Great Inequalities and Evasion in Present Scheme of Taxation While All 
National, State and Local Expenditures are Increasing Rapidly 

(Special to the Record and Guide) 



Albany, Jan. 25. 1922. 

THE; Coniinittee on Taxation and Retrenchment, of which 
Senator Frederick M. Davenport is chairman, will make a 
preliminary report of its investigations which have been 
almost continuous for the last three years. This report con- 
tains several recommendations for tax changes and points out 
that great inequality exists in the taxes imposed on some 
classes of enterprise while others entirely escape taxation. 
The object of the legislation which will be asked for, according 
to Senator Davenport, will be not to increase but to equalize 
taxation. The committee has been impressed with the fact 
that expenditures of national, state and local governments 
have been increasing at an alarming rate during recent years. 
"It is true these additional expenditures have, in many in- 
stances," said Senator Davenport, "gone for great public im- 
provements. The Committee believes, however, that expendi- 
tures, even for such objects, will have to be watched closely 
in order that waste may be prevented." 

The special franchise tax. Senator Davenport contends, should 
be abolished as soon as a constitutional amendment can be 
obtained for that purpose, and in the meantime all other Stste 
taxes on public utilities should be at once abandoned. 

Among other outstanding recommendations made are one 
in favor of wiping out the last vestige of the personal property 
tax and another for the relief of real estate by doing away with 
the direct tax for State purposes now levied against realty, 
with the substitution of business taxes on unincorporated as 
well as corporated business earning annually above $5,000 on a 
basis of net income. The committee calls attention to the fact 
that from one-fifth to one-fourth of all the realty in the State 
is tax exempt. 

Co-operation between the State and Federal Governments 
toward the elimination of exemptions from income tax of State 
and national bonds also is urged. A tax on gasoline and higher 
motor vehicle license fees are recommended. 
The report of the Committee follows : 

"Lack of attention to waste and to vast extensions of ex- 
penditure might easily precipitate a financial crisis in govern- 
ment of more far reaching effect than financial crisis in indus- 
try. The total tax burden, Federal, state and local, is estimated 
to be $106.97 a man, woman and child in the commonwealth. 

"This is an increase of 170 per cent, in the ten year period 
between 1910 and 1920. Half of this burden is Federal and 
most of the remaining half is local. Only about 10 per cent, 
of the entire burden is made necessary by the state government. 
If the state government were entirely abolished, the reduction 
in per capita cost of government is shown to be only about 
10 per cent. 

"The Committee is impressed with the fact that burdensome 
taxation in some directions and unequal taxation in others is 
repressing initiative, is alarming property holders, and is re- 
tarding progress in many directions. 

"The inequality of the tax burden is being felt alike by the 
rent payer, the farmer, the home owner, the small business 
man and the officials and stockholders of large and wealthy 
corporations. Even the rent payer does not escape the burden 
because, naturally, landlords pass on whatever they can of their 



increased tax load to their tenants. 

"As far as the corporations are concerned, the question is 
not one of increased taxation but rather of unfair and unequal 
taxation. Some corporations and some classes of corporations 
are being taxed out of all proportion to the taxes levied against 
other business enterprises. Among different classes of public 
utility corporations some are being taxed to the amount of 4 
per cent, of their net income and some to the extent of 10 
per cent. Within the same class of corporations the present 
method of computing bank taxes or public utility taxes, for 
example, results in very unequal burdens. 

Regarding the public utility taxation the report says in part: 

"The present system of taxing these corporations in the State is a 
chaos of intricacy and complexity. The statf of the committee has re- 
duced these complicated taxes to a basis which makes possible a com- 
parison with the taxes paid by other business interests. The grossest 
inequalities come to light. Many of the companies, particularly some of 
the electric railway companies which are bound by a fixed low rate of 
fare, have been literally taxed into bankruptcy. Based on net income, 
the business taxes on electric railways are nearly four times as great as 
the corresponding taxes on manufacturing corporations. If local real 
estate taxes are taken into account, electric railways pay over 38 per 
cent, of their net income in taxes. This is nearly five times the tax paid 
altogether by manufacturing companies, for example. 

"Not all the public titilities are so unfavorably situated, because some 
have been more successful in their efforts to shift their burdens to the 
consumer through increased rates. Every class of public utility, however, 
pays heavier taxes than either manufacturing or financial institutions. 

"It is evident that the State has been using the public utilities to a 
considerable extent as tax collectors, imposing upon them obligations 
which in many cases are justified only upon the assumption that the extra 
burden can be passed on in higher charges to certain particular sections 
of the consuming public. Some can pass it and some cannot. In the 
case of those which can pass it on. why strike particular sections of the 
consuming public with unfair burdens : 

"Completely satisfactory adjustment cannot be made until the Con- 
stitution is changed so as to make practical the abolition of the so-called 
special franchise tax. 

"As an immediate means of improvement, the committee recommends 
that the entire series of complicated State taxes on public utilities be at 
once abandoned, with the exception of the special franchise tax, which 
cannot be immediately abandoned ; and that in subsitution a 'gross net' 
tax be established, against which special franchise taxes, pending the 
passage of the constitutional amendment, may be used as an offset. It is 
contemplatea that the real estate public utility corporations, closely de- 
fined, shall continue to be taxed locally. 

"What there is left of personal property taxation consists In part of 
the stock in trade of small business men whom the committee now pro- 
poses to reach by a more equitable method of general business taxation. 
The cities mainly interested in what remains of the personal property 
tax generally are Buffalo and New York. The committee proposes to 
safeguard their interest by permitting localities to participate to a 
reasonable extent in the proceeds of the taxation of those particular kinds 
of business which have never before been reached in the State. 

"The purpose of this Committee has been to study the most 
important and urgent aspects of the taxation system of New 
York State in a comprehensive and scientific manner. It has 
utilized all available government data, both Federal and state, 
bearing on the problem, and has in addition conducted ex- 
tensive statistical surveys on its own initiative. It will pro- 
pose some changes, the carrying out of which must take time. 
It will also propose other changes that can be made at once, 
and that, in the Committee's judgment, should be made at 
once. 

"The first of the latter class of changes has to do with re- 
lieving real estate of a portion of the tax burden it is now car- 
rying. The revenue now obtained from real estate must, in 
part, be obtained elsewhere. As the state's immediate contribu- 
tion to the relief of real estate the Committee intends to 
suggest that the state direct tax on real property be eliminated 
at the earliest practical moment in order that a beginning may 
be made in easing the onerous burden now borne in many 
(Continued on page 116) 



104 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28, 1922 



John M. Stoddard Outlines Real Estate Brokerage Law 

Interesting and Instructive Lecture Given by Prominent Lawyer Before Realty 

Class in Y. M. C. A. Educational Course 

BEFORE an audience comprising the Real Estate Class of 
the educational course at the West Side Y. M. C. A. on 
Tuesday evening, John M. Stoddard delivered a lecture 
on "The Law of Real Estate Brokerage." The speaker, who 
was introduced by Alfred E. Morling, is a prominent real estate 
lawyer and a member of the Board of Governors of the New 
York Real Estate Board. 

Mr. Stoddard prefaced his exposition of the relations gov- 
erning realty brokers with their principals by calling attention 
to the three kinds of law, constitutional, statutory and the 
common or unwritten law which latter has been defined as 
"the embodiment of principles and rules inspired by natural 
reason and an innate sense of justice," and stressed its im- 
portance, and then took up the business of brokerage. He 
explained that a broker to sell, must find and produce to the 
seller a person financially able, ready and willing to buy, upon 
the seller's terms, within the period of his employment, and be- 
fore some other broker or the owner himself negotiates the 
sale. In short, he must bring the buyer and seller to an agree- 
ment upon all terms. Failing to do that, all of his pains are 
usually for naught. 

"The duty of prime importance," continued Mr. Stoddard, "which a 
broker owes to himself, before engaging in the enterprise of negotiating 
a sale of real estate, is to see to it that he is properly employed by the 
person to whom he proposes to look for his commissions. One cannot 



usually recover for services voluntarily rendered without any employ- 
ment. This is such a simple principle that it seems commonplace. But 
hundreds of cases have reached the Courts where brokers who actually 
brought about sales were deprived of commissions merely because they 
were not hired to perform the services which they did perform so well. 

"In those cases where a broker negotiates a sale, and the Seller deter- 
mines to contest the broker's claim for commissions, on the ground that 
there was no employment of the broker, the Seller usually pretends 
great surpri.se that a bill should be presented to him, and says that he 
assumed all through the negotiation that the broker was employed by 
the buyer. 

"In real estate, we know that it is only in rare instances that a 
buyer is willing to pay commissions. Yet it does occasionally happen — 
just about often enough to make that pretense serve as a defense for 
an unscrupulous or unappreciative or ignorant Seller, when he is sued 
for a commission by a broker who has negotiated a sale. The Seller 
says. 'I never hired him. I assumed that he was employed by the 
purchaser.' . 

"This is the conventional defense which a broker has to meet in 
Court. In a large percentage of the brokers' cases which get into the 
Courts, the answer of the defendant owner is that, 'I never hired him.' 

"In a case where two ladies informed a broker that they would like 
to buy a certain piece of property on Park avenue, in this city, and such 
broker had an associate who knew the owner, a United States Senator, 
resident in this city, the broker arranged with his friend to approach 
the Senator. The second broker induced the Senator to enter into a 
contract of sale upon which the purchaser subsequently defaulted. 
Thereupon the broker brought suit and obtained a verdict in his favor, 
but the judgment was reversed because no employment was shown. The 
Court said : , ,_ i. 

" 'We are of the opinion that said verdict is not supporte-1 by the 
evidence and is against the weight thereof, in that the plaintiff has 
failed to prove that he was ever employed by the defendant as a broker 
to sell its property. His negotiations were entirely those of a purchaser. 
He did nothing in the interest of. or for the benefit of the defendant ; 
the property was never put into his hands for sale ; he made the offers, 
and he represented people whom he continually spoke of as his clients." 

"Another case of interest on this point related to a claimed com- 
mission for selling the property at the Northwest corner of Broadway 
and ,'!4th street. The plaintiff was a real estate broker. He first called 
upon a gentleman who became the ultimate purchaser, and induced him 
to make an offer tor the property to the owner's rental agent. The 
owner was abroad at the time. After the owner returned to this country, 
the plaintiff and his customer. Smith, called on the defendant, and during 
their conference a bargain was struck. Nothing whatever iras snirl to 
the defendnnt nboiit plaintilf's claim for a commission or that he was 
acting for the defendant owner. After the contract of sale was signed, 
plaintiff sent a bill to the owner which the latter declined to pay. Suit 
was brought. The court said : 

" 'It is hardly necessary to cite authorities to prove that there must 
he an emploiiment to entitle a broker to commission for the sale of the 
property; but what was said by Judge Woodruff in Pierce v. Thomas (4 
E. n. Smith. 3"i4) so concisely states the legal principle Involved that 
the decision of this case can be rested upon his opinion. He says : 

" 'To entitle a broker to recover commissions for effecting a sale of 
real estate, it is indispensable that he should show that he was employed 
by the owner (or on his behalf) to make the sale. A ratification of his 
act. where original employment is wanting, may, in some circumstances, 
be equivalent to an original retainer, but only where there is a plain 
intent to ratify. An owner cannot be enticed Into a liability for com- 
missions against his will. A mere volunteer without authority is not 
entitled to commissions, merely because he has inquired the price which 
an owner asks for his property, and has then sent a person to him who 
consents to take it. A broker has no better claim to recover tor volun- 
tary service, rendered without employment and not received and acted 
updn by the owner as rendered in his behalf, than any other volunteer. 
It is not true that an owner may not declare his price to whom 
he will without the hazard of paying commissions to those who volun- 
teer, unasked, to send him a purchaser on his own terms.' " 

"So, I urge upon you," continued Mr. Stoddard, "don't do 
any work unless you are employed to do it. Don't waste your 



time. Your time and skill and your willingness to venture them 
in a speculation are the only commodities that you have to sell. 
Make sure that your success will be rewarded before you ente" 
upon the speculation. 

"In a number of cases where a broker has been employed to 
sell or lease property, the courts have decided that such em- 
ployment did not authorize the sub-employment of sub-brok- 
ers. The sub-employment of a sub-broker may obligate the 
broker to pay a commission to the sub-broker, but it does not 
fasten any liability upon the owner toward the sub-broker. 
The latter must prove that the broker was given authority to 
employ a sub-broker. 

"In a case where the owner's son was a real estate broker, 
with authority to negotiate leases, and another broker intro- 
duced to the son the International Silver Company as a pros- 
pective tenant of a store on Fifth Avenue, and the Silver 
Company did take the lease, the court reversed a verdict in 
favor of the bro'<er, on the ground that the son, although him- 
self a real estate broker, and to a large extent in charge of his 
mother's property, had no authority to hire a sub-broker. 

"So, also, where a married woman has owned property, and 
her husband has listed it with brokers for sale, she has, in many 
instances escaped paying a brokerage, because the broker was 
not able to prove in court that she had authorized her husband 
to employ a broker. There is no safe rule for you to follow 
except the one of securing employment, or a promise as to com- 
missions from the owner himself. Reliance upon anything else 
involves too much risk." 

Mr. Stoddard cited the following examples of the things in 

which a broker must use care to protect his own interests: 

"In a case where a husband and wife owned property together, and 
the husband employed a broker to bring about an exchange, and later 
the wife, with full knowledge of the facts, signed the deed with her 
husband, the Court decided that she had thereby ratified the hiring of 
the broker and that he was entitled to commissions. 

"In another case, where an attorney at law for the owner, without 
authority, employed a broker, and the broker did some work interest- 
ing an adjoining owner, and afterwards the broker and owner met. and 
the broker then mentioned his negotiations with the adjoining owner, 
and then the husband of the owner quietly stepped in and concluded 
the sale to such adjoining owner, the Court decided that the employment 
of the broker by the attorney had been ratified, and that the broker was 
entitled to a brokerage. 

"It may also be possible for a broker to protect himself, under this 
principle of ratification, even where there has been no original employ- 
ment by anybody. This can be accomplished by informing the owner, 
before the negotiation is cnmnl'^ted. of what the broker has done, and 
obtaining the owner's approval of it." 

Other points for a broker to remember were described by 
Mr. Stoddard as follows: 

"The mere fact that an owner employs a broker to sell property does 
not accord to the broker an indefinite period in which to consummate 
a sale. The owner may terminate the employment and take up the 
negotiations himself, or employ other brokers, or withdraw the property 
from the market, provided that he acts in good faith. 

"In one case which reached the courts it appeared that the brokers 
were employed in August to sell 2."R lots, and were promised by the 
owner a commission of $."0 per lot. The brokers erected an office on the 
property and expended considerable of their own money. There was no 
time limit in the contract of employment. The brokers sold only two 
lots. As a result, the owner revoked the employment in the following 
February, and sold the entire plot in bulk. The brokers sued for com- 
missions or damages, but the Court decided that the owner had acted in 
good faith and could so terminate the contract. 

"On the other hand, in another case, the brokers were employed in 
the middle of a summer, to sell 200 lots. Nothing was said about time 
limit. They expended considerable sums of money and did sell 8.t lots. 
In December, the owner terminated the emoloyment, and thereupon tht 
brokers sued for damages. The Court decided that the broker had no\ 
been given sufficient time, and that they were entitled to have submitted 
to a jury the quesMon as to the amount of their daamges. 

'"A faux vas often made by a broker in his discussions and corre- 
spondence with an owner is to refer to the orospeclive purchaser as his 
"client." That is usually fatal to his clf^im against the Seller for a 
brokerage, and it always is fatal unless there is a definite a*:reement 
with the Seller to pav commissions. The reason is simple. When you 
tell the Seller that the tirospective purchaser is your client, the Seller 
has a right to assume *hat non are ifyorking for your client and that 
your client is the one who will pay you. 

"It very often happens," declared Mr. Stoddard, "that a 
broker is approached by some one who wishes to buy or to take 
a lease of property but who will not pay a brokerage. In such 
case the broker expects to work in the interest of the buyer nr 
the lessee, as the case may be; but also must collect his com- 
(Concluded on page 106) 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



105 



How a Few Landlords Used Wash Sales to Force Rentals Up 

Lockwood Committee Gets Testimony toSliow That Most of the Recent Landlord 
and Tenant Litigation Was Instigated by Ten Men 

JOHN P. BURNS, chief clerk of the Seventh District Muni- 
cipal Court, on Thursday, January 19, gave the Joint Legis- 
lative Committee on Housing the names of ten landlords he 
declared had instigated three-quarters of the landlord and ten- 
ant cases in the section from 110th Street to Spuyten Duyvil 
which has a population of 600,000. Mr. Burns testified that 
these landlords had brought approximately 20,000 suits in his 
court and that 25,000 tenants had deposited more than $1,800,000 
with the court as a result of these suits of which $1,350,000 
had subsequently been paid to the landlords. The names of 
the landlords, with the corporate names under which they 
brought the cases and the approximate number begun by each, 
follows : 



Joseph Schenck, from 1,500 to 2,000 cases, using the names of 
the Ardmore Estates, Clason Finance Corporation, Liberal Fi- 
nance Corporation, Klamer Realty Company, Penant Realty 
Company, Ranger Realty Company and Joseph Schenck Realty 
and Construction Company. 

Newmark and Jacobs, 1,000 cases, operating as the Alabama 
Holding Company, Ashton Holding Company, Kentucky Hold- 
ing Company and Broadway and 146th Street Holding Com- 
pany. 

Charles Moore, from 2,000 to 3,000 cases, operating under the 
names of Morris Moore's Sons, Inc., Anmore Realty Company, 
Traymore Leasing Company, Tri-Borough Investment Com- 
pany, St. James Apartment, James Rensellaer, Inc., Carl Silver- 
man and Clara Bauer. 

Corporation of H. and A. Cohen, 1,000 cases. 

F. A. Ottenberg, 1,000 cases, operating as Blanche O. Fos- 
ter, Rauchen Rauncheim. 

David H. Van Damm, 2,000 cases, operating as Bendheim 
Construction Company, Duluth Realty Company and Evelyn 
Realty Corporation. 

Mrs. Nellie Roach, 500 cases, operated as Roach Leasing 
Company, Arabella Realty Company. 

Fifty Per Cent. Profit Sharing Company, 500 cases. 

Philip A. Payton, Jr. & Co., 300 cases, operating as Payton 
Apartments. Inc., and W. A. Wortham. 400 Manhattan Avenue 
Corporation, 700 cases. 

Burns said that the figures he gave were estimated and he 
was asked to have drawn from the books the exact number of 
cases in which the ten persons mentioned began rent suits. 

William H. Wortham of 130 W. 142d Street, head of the 
Philip A. Payton agency, called to the stand by Samuel Unter- 
myer, counsel to the Committee, testified that he was in busi- 
ness with his wife in the negro section of Harlem. He said 
he had brought 200 actions for increase of rent and 300 for 
dispossesses. He gave the real estate holdings of his wife, 
including 9 West 137th Street, 65 and 67 West 134th Street and 
28 West 134th Street. The Payton Apartments, Inc., owns 
six apartment houses in West 141st and 142d Street. The wit- 
ness was unable to answer many questions put to him by 
Mr. Untermyer. pleading he could not remember all the trans- 
actions. He will be recalled. 

On Friday, January 21, Joseph Schenck was called to the 
stand. He testified that he is head of the Schenck Realty and 
Construction Corporation, which has never built a house, but 
has bought from 300 to 400 houses in the past five years. His 
place of business is at 552 Riverside Drive. 

A year ago, Schenck testified he sold sixty apartment houses 
to the Ardsmore Estate. The transfer involved $8,000,000 
worth of property and he received $250,000 in cash and .$200,000 
in preferred stock in the Ardsmore Estate and a blanket mort- 
gage. He denied that he was in any way interested in the Lib- 
eral Finance Corporation, but under cross-examination he ad- 



mitted that the Liberal Finance Corporation was controlled by 
Barnett Klahr of Brooklyn, co-owner with Schenck of the 
Ardsmore Estate. He also said the only property of the Liberal 
Finance Corporation consisted of two apartment houses sold to 
it by the Ardsmore Estate, which got them from Schenck, who 
bought them in 1919 for $375,000. 

Schenck said that much of the $250,000 in cash paid into 
the Schenck Company by the Ardsmore Estate, went to the 
Liberal Finance Corporation. He was asked who collected 
for the Schenck Company. "Schenck," he replied. 

Q. — And the Pennant Co. collects for the Ardsmore Estate? A. — Yes. 

Q- — And the Pennant Co. is Mr. Shenk? A. — That's right. 

Schenck testified that the Pennant Company was a name 
used by him to avoid keeping an agreement with the owner of 
a house he leased at Broadway and 168th Street to whom he 
promised to reveal the rents he was receiving. He renewed 
the lease in 1919 for $30,000 a year, an increase of $8,000, and is 
now collecting in rents from $55,000 to $56,000. He testified 
that he had increased the rents twice in that house. He changed 
this to say that he had increased the rents twice since the lease 
was renewed by him. 

Schenck testified that the Klasco Company was controlled 
by Klahr, his associate in other business. He admitted that 
he had been bound over for trial on a charge of failing to pro- 
vide sufficient heat and had served six months on Blackwell's 
Island for renting apartments to disorderly persons. 

Tenants of 200 Claremont Avenue, owned by Schenck, had 
given the Committee figures which were shown to him after 
which he admitted that the increase in rent demanded of ten- 
ants were as high as 83 per cent, and that some of the tenants 
had paid increases of 25 per cent, to the previous owner, 
making total increases of 108 per cent. 

The records produced showed that in one apartment a tenant 
named Mauriqe, paying $62.50, is being asked to pay $110. 
Other increases sought are from $65 to $110, $75 to $125 and 
$81.25 to $125. 

Schenck said he had 2,379 tenants and had taken 300 cases to 
court. He denied that he furnished cash for the sale of the 
houses to other concerns so that he could legally raise the 
rents. He asserted his only revenue was a 3 per cent, commis- 
sion on his collections. 

Schenck admitted that he was being sued for the return of 
$16 a month rent in excess of the amount permitted by the court 
in the case of a tenant at 200 Claremont Avenue, whose rent 
was $84. 

The Committee's examination into the affairs of 1,690 Broad- 
way indicated a maze of transactions involving several trans- 
fers, new leases and the return of the property to Schenck and 
the transfer again to the Newton estate, which now owns it. 
Schenck owns 40 per cent, of the stock of the Newton estate, 
and Klahr, his associate in other enterprises, owns 60 per 
cent. 

Watt Terry, a negro, head of the Terry Holding Company, 
owner of properties in the negro section of Harlem, testified as 
to the Fifty Per Cent. Profit Sharing Corporation, which he 
controls. Stock of this corporation had been sold to colored 
people. 

Mr. Untermyer produced an official court summons in the 
case of Cyrus Trent, a tenant of Terry's, which showed that 
Terry had demanded an increase in rent of from $40 to $84. 
Terry testified his lawyer had probably demanded $84 in order 
to fix a basis for adjustment. 

Charles Moore of 29 East 124th Street described his interest 
in Morris Moore's Sons, Inc., the Anmore Realty Co., Tray- 
more Leasing Corporation, the Tri-Borough Investment Com- 
pany, James Rennsellaer and Charles Silverman. He denied 
he had instigated 2,000 cases in the Seventh District Court and 
said he controlled only 700 apartments. 



106 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28. 1922 



Construction Started on Large West Side Apartment 

S. W. Straus & Co. Underwrites Mortgage for Nine-Story Project Being Erected 
from Plans by Scliwartz & Gross, Architects 

WITHIN a short time actual construction will be started conditions of the building industry," said Mr. S. W. Straus in 
on a new nine-story fireproof apartment house to be discussing the building outlook, "and it is expected that activ- 
located in the north side of West 71st Street about ities during the ensuing year will be on a very heavy scale. 
midway between Columbus Avenue and Broadway. This struc- There is a healthy inquiry for capital for building purposes, 

ture, which will be erected from plans and specifications by 

Schwartz & Gross, will be owned by the 141 West Seventy- 
first Street Company, Jacob S. Kahn, president. The building 
will occupy a plot with a frontage of 100 feet by 102 feet in 
depth and will involve a number of unusual labor saving fea- 
tures. 

S. W. Straus & Co. have underwritten a first mortgage seven 
per cent, serial bond issue of $550,000 on this project. It is 
expected that the structure will be completed and ready for 
occupancy by October 1, 1922. A valuation of $800,000 has been 
placed on both the land the building and the net annual earn- 
ings are estimated at appro.ximately $78,000. 

This new multi-family building will occupy lots 139 to 147 
West 71st Street and will contain sixty-three housekeeping units 
of three and four rooms, each with bath, with a pent house 
on the roof in which quarters for servants will be located. 
The apartments will each have a large living room, one or 
two bed rooms and a combination kitchen and breakfast room. 

S. W. Straus & Co. announce that they have recently under- 
written first mortgage serial bond issues amounting to $12,485,- 
000. The list includes two large apartment house projects in 
Manhattan, $2,250,000; one apartment in the Bronx, $1,300,000; 
a Brooklyn multi-family structure, $210,000; an apartment in 
Chicago, $1,000,000; one in Detroit, $1,250,000; an apartment 
hotel in Omaha, $550,000 and others in San Francisco, Wilming- 
ton, Philadelphia, besides large mortgages have been made on 
a manufacturing plant in Chicago and an office building pro- 
ject in Dallas, Texas. 

"There is a continued improvement to be noted in underlying 




Schwartz & Gross, Architects. 

NEW APARTMENT AT 139 TO 147 WEST 71st ST. 

pai-ticularly for residential improvements and a large propor- 
tion of the outflow of capital for the building industry is being 
absorbed in financing the construction of these types of struc- 
tures." 



John M. Stoddard Outlines Real Estate Brokerage Laws 



(Continued from page 104) 
pensation from the owner. There is just one way that he can 
accomplish his purpose, and treat both parties honorably. 
That is, by making a full disclosure to the owner, and securing 
from the owner a promise to pay commissions notwithstanding 
the situation. 

"Unless a broker has announced to the owner that he is 
working in the interest of the buyer and has secured the prom- 
ise of the owner to pay commissions notwithstanding that 
fact, it is the duty of the broker to act in the sole interest of 
the owner. The man who pays for the services and negotia- 
tions of the broker is entitled to all that the broker can do for 
him. 

"Frequently, a broker learns that a parcel of real estate can 
be purchased at such a price that he is disposed to participate 
in the purchase himself. In such cases, it is imperative that he 
disclose to the owner that he is the purchaser or interested in 
the purchase, and obtain from the owner a consent to the 
changed conditions. Otherwise, he not only loses his commis- 
sions, and is guilty of fraud, but also he will be charged as 
holding the property in trust for the seller, so that if any profit 
eventually results, he will be obliged to pay it over to the 
owner. Those are the penalties. Besides, any such business is 
not honest. There is plenty of opportunity to make a fortune 
in real estate brokerage, while adhering strictly to the line 
of honorable dealing." 

Mr. Stoddard concluded by giving the following interesting 
examples of a broker's experiences: 

"In a case where a broker so handled an exchang:e transaction that he 
himself obtained some of the property conveyed by his principal, the 
Court characterized the entire transaction as fraudulent, and gave back 
such property to the owner and in a case where a broker's clerk became 
the purchaser, he was required to account to the Seller for all the 
proceeds of his resales. 



third party at a stated price, and where upon the closing the broker 
himself took the title, the Court upset the transaction and compelled the 
broker to restore the property. 

"In another case where a broker upon receiving an inquiry by a 
prospective purchaser in respect to a piece of property, went to the 
owner and advised that its value was .$42,000 and persuaded the owner 
to sell at that figure, and it later developed that the broker was inter- 
ested to the extent of one-half in the purchase, it was held that the 
Broker and his associate were liable for all of the enhancement in value 
down to the time of the trial, to wit. $18,000." 

"You gentlemen have chosen an honorable calling," said 
Mr. Stoddard. "That is, it is honorable if you make it so. 
Sometimes you will be thrown in contact with unscrupulous 
clients and unscrupulous competitors. If you sink to their 
level, you may obtain one commission or a few commissions, 
but sooner or later you will be classed as a trickster, and 
treated accordingly. 

"Yoiir profession is one in which a good will can be created. 
You meet many people. The majority of them are looking for 
an honest man with whom they can trade, and to whom they 
may give their confidence. In 10 or 15 years' experience you 
can capitalize that. Look around this town. Is not the im- 
portant business, are not the most important holdings within 
the control of the old reliable firms of real estate brokers? 
The position which they now occupy is the one that you should 
fill when you reach the prime of life. That is the goal for 
which you should aim. Any transitory profit is of no conse- 
quence compared with it, especially if accompanied with any 
species of disloyal effort. 

"My advice to you is: First: That you be sure, before en- 
tering upon any enterprise, that you are promised by somebody 
that the success of your efTorts will be suitably rewarded. 
Second: That you stick to the negotiation until it is con- 
cluded. Third : That you devote your time, skill and honor- 
able efforts in behalf of the persons from whom you expect 



"in another case where a broker advised a contract of sale with a your recompense. 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



107 



Review of Real Estate Market for the Current Week 

Fifth Avenue and 34th Street Corner Set a High Notch for the Week's Dealing, 
While Other Good Sales Added Strong Features 



MAl'tKING the high-water line of ihe week, as well as ot 
the year, so far, in real estate dealing is the transaction 
about to be closed by jNIax Natanson whereby he disposes 
of the 14-story Columbia Trust building, on a plot 61.9x100, at the 
northwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 34th Street. It is one 
of the premier individual transactions of the city. This build- 
ing was originally only four stories in height and was built by 
the Knickerbocker Trust Company and superseded, on the site, 
the historic mansion of Alexander T. Stewart. The seller en- 
larged it only a few years ago and it is looked upon as one of 
the fine investment properties of the city. Mr. Natanson must 
have had a tempting ofTer to part with it. Giving the market 
a New Year's surprise, as he has by this sale, it is to be re- 
membered that he gave it a Christmastide surprise a few weeks 
ago by the purchase and quick resale of the Belnord apartment 
house that covers a square block on upper Broadway. The 
buyer of the Fifth Avenue corner has not yet been announced, 
but it very likely will be soon. It is to be recalled that about a 
year ago Mr. Natanson resold to William Ziegler the tall build- 
ing, known as the structural splinter, at the southeast corner of 
Broadway and Wall Street. 

Less prominent, but nevertheless important, was the sale of 
one building and the leasing of another one, this week, in the 
Broadway part of the Pennsylvania zone. The parcel sold was 
in the ownership of one family for four generations, a period 



of time and less when Broadway north of Fourteenth Street 
evoluted from open country to the world's greatest commercial 
thoroughfare. Another sale of more than ordinary moment 
was that of the Abyssinian Baptist Church property on West 
40th Street, between Seventh and Eighth Avenues. Situated as 
the latter parcel is, in the new garment center, the church edi- 
fice will in all probability make way for an immense loft 
building for occupancy by cloak and suit manufacturers. 

Of marked contemporary interest, in this era of projected 
port improvements, was the sale by certain heirs of the Rhine- 
lander family of Piers 16 and 18, at the foot of Barclay Street 
and the foot of Murray Street, respectively, to a private pur- 
chaser. Both piers are well leased. The city usually makes it 
a point to acquire any private waterfront in Manhattan that 
is offered for sale, but the sale alluded to seems to be the ex- 
ception that proves the rule. 

Other sales of importance were several Madison Avenue par- 
cels ; the Elmore Court and El Casco apartment house in Har- 
lem; numerous small business properties throughout the city; 
and numerous newly completed apartment houses in the 
Bronx and some, there, that are not yet completed, but the 
floor plans of which satisfied the buyers they were worth own- 
ing. The sale of vacant plots in the northerly borough is not 
as frequent as it was two weeks ago, but renewed activity is 
expected at any time. 



PRIVATE REALTY SALES. 



THE total number ot sales reported, but not 
recorder! in Manhattan this week, was 1-1 
as against 127 last week and 105 a year ago. 

The number of sales south of 5iHh st was 56. 
as compared with 51 last week and 51 a year 
ago. 

The number of sales north of 59th st was 75. 
as compared with 76 last week and 54 a yeai 
ago. 

From the Bronx 27 sales at private contract 
were reported, as against 5.3 last week and 22 
a year ago. 

Statistical tables, including the number of re- 
corded instruments, will be found on page 114. 



Lawyers Title Elects Officers 

At a meeting of the directors of Lawyers 
Title and Trust Co., held January IS, the follow- 
ing officers were elected or appointed for the 
ensuing year: Edwin W. Coggeshall, chairman 
of the board : Louis V. Bright, president ; Thor- 
wald Stallknecht, vice-president : Herbert E. 
,Jackson, vice-president and general manager ; 
Lewis H. Losee, vice-president : Walter N. 
Vail, secretary ; Archibald Forbes, assistant 
vice-president and treasurer ; Robert L Smyth, 
assistant vice-president; William P. Baeck, 
assistant vice-president ; William K. Swartz, 
assistant vice-president ; Joseph P. Stair, assist- 
ant treasurer ; George F. Parmelee. assistant 
secretary ; John A. Stoehr, assistant secretary ; 
Marshall E. Munroe, assistant secretary ; Henry 
C. Mersereau, assistant secretary ; Walter H. 
Grief, aurlitor, and Wilbur C. Witherstine, man- 
ager of the Jamaica office. 

Operator Buys on East Side 

Joseph C. Abramson, operator, purchased from 
Morris M. Kilborn and William J. Dr"wn .306 to 
310 East 74th st. three 4-sty brick flats, on a 
plot 75x102.2 ; and from the same sellers 234 to 
2:18 East 56th st, three 5-sty brick tenement 
houses, 2,'IS containing stores, on a plot 75x 
10O.5. Pease & Elliman were the brokers in 
both transactions. 



Officers of D. L. Elliman & Co. 

The annual meeting ot stockholders of Doug- 
las L. Elliman & Co.. Inc., was held at the com- 
pany's offices, 15 East 4nth st, on January 17. at 
which meeting the following directors were 
eletced : Douglas L. Elliman. Roland P. Elli- 
man. Argyll R. Parsons, Alfred E. Taylor, D. 
Chester Noyes. Henry A. Frey. Leslie H. Moore, 
Keith P. Walker, Lawrence B. Cummings and 
Sydney A. Jackson. 

Immediately following the stockholders' 
meeting, the newly elected Board held its first 
meeting and elected the following officers for 
the ensuing year : President and treasurer. 
Douglas L. Elliman ; first vice-president and 



assistant treasurer, Roland F. Elliman ; second 
vice-president, Argyll R, Parsons : third vice- 
president, Alfred E. Taylor ; secretary, Henry 
A. Frey. 

The eleventh annual dinner of the entire or- 
ganization was held at the Hotel Loraine, Tues- 
day evening, January 17, 



Report by Cushman & Wakefield 

Following the annual meeting on January 18, 
of the stockholders of Cushman & Wakefield, 
Inc., announcement was made that in spite of 
adverse general business conditions this realty 
organization has experienced a prosperous year, 
its net earnings for 1021 having shown an in- 
crease of i;^8 per cent, over the corporation's net 
profits of 1920. Since its inception four years 
ago the corporation has developed increased 
earnings, averaging more than 100 per cent. In- 
crease each year. 

On account of the increase in volume and ex- 
pansion of its business it was decided to separate 
the office of secretary and treasurer. Consequent- 
ly. William J. Demorest, for several years a di- 
rector, was elected secretary of the corporation, 
and Cyril F. Taylor was re-elected treasurer. J. 
Clydesdale Cushman was re-elected president, 
and Reginald W. Murray vice-president. 

The following directors were re-elected for an- 
other year to succeed themselves : G. Maurice 
Heckscher, Charles B. Jaqua, J. Clydesdale Cush- 
man, Reginald W. Murray, William J. Demorest 
and Cyril F. Taylor. 



Famous Fifth Av Corner Sold 

Negotiations are under way for the sale of 
the Columbia Trust Co. Building, at the north- 
west corner of Fifth av and 34th st, by Max N. 
Natanson. operator. The building was originally 
a 4-sty white stone structure and was designed 
by McKim, Mead & White. It formed a notable 
architectural landmark, with its tall Corinthian 
columns and decorative cornices. Mr. Natanson 
bought it about two years ago, and later added 
10 stories to it. 

The building was designed and built for the 
old Knickerbocker Trust Co. The foundations 
were made sufficiently powerful to bear the 
weight of the additional height. It was once 
the site of the home ot A. T. Stewart, the mer- 
chant prince of early New York. It was later 
occupied for a number of years by the Manhat- 
tan Club under lease. In January, UIOl, it was 
purchased by Charles T. Barney for the Knick- 
erbocker Trust Co. from the following Stewart 
heirs: the Butler and Clinch estates and Bes- 
sie T. White, wife of the late Stanford White. 

West Side Landmark Sold 

Buildcr.s are buying the old Abvssinian Bap- 
tist Church property, on a plot 75xO.S.O. at 244 
West 40th St. h.tween Seventh and Eighth avs. 
for reimprovement with a large commercial 
.■itructnre. The nric" is said to be in the neigh- 
borhood ot $200,000. The Abyssinian Baptist 
Church Is one of the oldest negro religious or- 



ganizations in the city, having been founded 
aiore than a century ago. The Rev. A. Clayton 
Powell has been its pastor for 14 years. The 
church is said to have a membership of nearly 
4,000, the majority of whom reside in the Har- 
lem colored section. 

A year ago six lots on 1.38th st, between 
Lenox and Seventh avs, were purchased for a 
new church site. Work on a new structure 
will begin soon. The main auditorium will ac- 
commodate 2.000 persons. The church will re- 
tain the use of its 40th st property for one year, 
at the expiration ot which time the uptown 
edifice is expected to be completed. 



Site at Herald Sq. for New Building 

Tho southeast corner of Broadway and 37th st 
has been leased by the estate ot Robert Hoe to 
Harry Fischel. who will reimprove the site with 
a 10-sty office and showroom building to har- 
monize in architectural appearance with the new 
bank home, which is to be erected on the Broad- 
way plot adjoined on the south by the Green- 
wich Savings Bank. The bank, by the way. will 
make the building and permanent loan on Mr. 
Fischel's building operation, which, It Is expect- 
ed, will cost .fl .500.000. 

The site contains about 14,000 square feet, and 
is one of the principal holdings of the Hoe estate. 
The building operation will not include the small 
buildings on Sixth av. This parcel, however. Is 
under negotiation for a leasing deal on similar 
building conditions. The Hoe estate will receive 
a net income of about 6 per cent, on the assessed 
value of the property. The lease is for 21 years. 
with two renewal privileges. 

Frederick Fox & Co. were the brokers. Joseph 
Ravitch. who has been connected with Mr. Fisch- 
el in some of his other Broadway building deals, 
will erect the building from plans by Sommer- 
field & Steckler. The Greenwich Savings Bank 
site, adjoining, was purchased last spring by the 
bank from the Van Ingen estate. It comprises 
the 2-sty brick taxpayer on .30th st, from Broad- 
way to Sixth av, with good frontages on the 
three streets. 



Hotel Leased on the Plans 

L. Marshall Thompson, proprietor of the 
Thompson chain of hotels, leased the 15-sty 
apartment hotel to be known as the Emerson, 
which is about to be erected at 164-168 West 
75th st by James Booth, the plans for which 
were filed on January II), by Robert T. Lyons, 
architect. The lease, which was negotiated 
through Slawson & Hobbs and Boland & Camp- 
bell. Is for a long term of years and calls for 
an aggregate rental of .$3,000,000. 

The structure will contain .300 rooms and 176 
baths, and will. It is expected, be ready for 
occupancy about October 1. It will be added 
to the Thompson chain, which now includes the 
Madison Sauare. the Langwcll and the West- 
minster. Stoddard & Mark represented the les- 
sor and Samuel M. Rciss represented the les- 
see. 



108 



DANIEL H. JACKSON 

REAL ESTATE 
OPERATOR 

Brokers Invited to Subnait Offerings 



135 BROADWAY 
Suite 911 



Phone 
Rector 3569 



Douglas LEllinian£[o. 

Real Estate Brokers 

Fifth and Park Avenue Districts 

Efficient Property Management 
Plaza, 9200 15 East 49th St. 



JAMES BOYD 

Member Real Estate Board, N. Y. 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

135 BROADWAY 
Phone: Rector 8S5«-8*5I 



SPECIALISTS IN 
PENN. TERMINAL SECTION 

REAL ESTATE 

AGENTS— BROKERS— APPRAISERS 

H. M. Weill Co. 

Tel, Loniracre 2290-2S17 221 West 33rd St. 



FREDERICK BROWN 

Real Estate Operator 

OFFERINGS SOLICITED 
FROM BROKERS 



565 5th Ave. 



Phone Vanderbilt 872S 



BENJAMIN WINTER 

BUY AND SELL HIGH-CLASS 
MANHATTAN PROPERTY 

BROKERS ARE INVITED TO SUBMIT 

PROPOSITIONS — Quick Decision GIvin. 

Lansing Building 

2299 BROADWAY, AT 82nd STREET 

Suite 6 Phone: Schuyler 2897 



SAMUEL BRENER 

REAL ESTATE OPERATOR 

50 EAST 42n(l STREET 
Vanderbilt 3918- 19 



BROOKS & MOMAND 


Member of Real Estate Board 


Real Estate Mortgages 


115 BROADWAY Phone 2267 r,<.,o. 



CHARLES B. Van Valen. Inc. 


Member Real Estate Board of N. Y. 


REAL ESTATE 


MORTGAGt LOANS— INSURANCE 


110 WILLIAM STREET 


Phone: 6000 Beekman 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

Leeds Sells West End Av. Comer 

Rudolph G. Leeds, of Richmond, Ind., son o£ 
the late William B. Leeds, tinplate king, sold to 
Benjamin Winter, of the Winter Realties, Inc., 
the 12-sty apartment house, 92x100, at 7S0 West 
End av. southeast corner of 08th st. The house 
is arranged in suites of from 5 to 8 rooms, and 
has an annual rental income of about $125,000. 

Mr. Winter has also bought from Mr. Leeds 
the 3-sty and basement dwelling at 766 West 
End av, adjoining on the south, to protect the 
light and air of the apartment house. The 
properties were held at $800,000. The 
apartment house was built by T. J. McLaughlin 
& Sons and was sold by thera several years ago 
to Mr. Leeds, who gave in part payment the 
southeast corner of Broadway and 105th st, 
which was later improved by the buyers. 

The Wood. Dolson Company represented Mr. 
Leeds and Henry I. Cooper of N. Cohn & Co., 
was the broker for Mr. Winter. 



Operator in East Side Sale 

Samuel Brener, operator, purchased from 
Vanderbilt Webb the five 4-5ty and basement 
dwellings 127 to 1.35 East 63d st, on a plot lOOx 
1(10.5. between Park and Lexington avs, on a 
plot 80x100.5. The property was acquired along 
with a number of other parcels on Park av and 
adjacent side streets before the New York Cen- 
tral Railroad electrified its road. William J. 
Roome & Co. were the brokers in the transaction. 

On the Park av end of the block the Third 
Church of Christ, Scientist, is erecting an orna- 
mental structure on the 63d st corner, while on 
the adjoining Park av and 64th st corner is the 
new home of tbe Fifth Avenue Baptist Church. 



A New West Side Building 

The ever increasing demand for space in 
modern buildings with heavy floor capacity is 
one of the reasons for the erection of the new 
S-sty Kymson building, at 313-327 West 37th 
st, which is now under construction and will 
be ready for occpancy in May, according to 
Samuel Minskoff the builder. Concerns desir- 
ing to remain in the section north of 23d st 
and requiring a floor capacity of over 200 
pounds per square foot have been practically 
forced to move their plants and operations to 
the extreme east or west sides of the city. The 
majority of present buildings north of 23d st 
and adjacent to main arteries of the city, being 
built for the express purpose of office, light 
manufacturing and garment concerns, have not 
been able to accommodate manufacturers of 
commodities necessitating heavy floors. 

.Jacob Monsky. president of the Herald 
Square Press, realizing this situation and hav- 
ing the fact brought home to him in his own 
business, conceived the idea of relieving this 
condition somewhat by the erection of the Kym- 
son Building. Consequently heavy floors, good 
light and fire proof construction are facts whtL.i 
are sure to be of interest to many concerns. 
The building has been designed by Schwartz 
& Gross the architects and Price. Birkner & 
Johnston have been appointed as managing 
agents. 



Elmore Court In a Trade 

Elmore Court, a e-sty elevator apartment 
house. lO.SxlOl. at 541 West 124th st, figured 
in a three cornered deal. The property, which 
was held at $235,000, was sold by Joseph M. 
Ximhauser for Joseph G. Abraham, who was 
represented by the Lloyd Winthrop Co. The 
purchasers were Isidor and Philip Baer, who 
gave in part payment the 5-sty. triple flat, 130 
Edgecombe av, 25x112, held at $42,500. 

In further payment the purchasers gave 
two second mortgages, amounting to .$40,250, on 
the premises at 75 to 83 Northern av. As 
part of the transaction, the parcels given in 
trade were all sold by the Lloyd Winthrop Co. 
to a client. This is the second three cor- 
nered deal effected in less than a year by 
Joseph Nimhauser for the Mes&rs. Baer. 



Tenants Were the Buyers 

Charles F. Noves Co. were the brokers who 
sold 277 Pearl st to Clinton K. Scofield : 109-111 
Beekman st to A. W. Craven, and a plot, 3o.0x 
100, on Atlantic av, adjoining the southwest cor- 
ner of Kingston av, Brooklyn, to Charles H. 
Eggert & Bros. Title to all these properties was 
transferred within the past few days and all 
purchasers are present tenants of the premises 
sold. The Noyes company reports a strong 
demand for investment properties and properties 
suitable for occupancy. 

N. Y. Times Leases Stores 

Theodore C. Young leased to the New York 
Times Co. the stores in 213-215 West 4.3d st. 
which adjoin on the east the Times Annex 
building. The Times occupies adjoining stores, 
under lease, as well. 

At 231-2.30 West 43d st, adjoining the Times 
Annex on the west, are five S-sty brick and 
stone apartment houses, on a plot 100x100.5. 
which The New York Times Co. owns and 
which it will soon reimprove with an addition 
to its building that will be of equal height to it. 
The Times is now using parts of the old 
buildings it owns for some of its departments. 



January 28, 1922 

Undivided Pier Interest Sold 

Cruikshank Co. sold tor Miss Caroline de For- 
est, Frederic W. Rhinelander and George W. 
Murray, executors of the estate of Mary R. Cal- 
iender, to Charles E. Perkins, a large undivided 
interest in Pier 16 and bulkhead and Pier 18 and 
bulkhead, North River. Pier 16 is under lease 
to the N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R. Co. and Pier 18 is 
under lease to the Eastern- Steamship Lines. Inc. 
Pier 16 is at the foot of Barclay st and Pier 18 
is at the foot of Murray st. 



West Side Plot for Improvement 

S. Morrill Banner and Herbert Mitler, the 
operators who recently purchased the Tribune 
Building at 154 Nassau st, have added to their 
now extensive holdings in Manhattan by acquir- 
ing the four 3-sty and basement brick dwellings, 
71 to 77 West 12th st, on a plot on the north 
side, just east of Sixth av. The buyers will 
erect a G-sty elevator apartment house on the 
site. The properties were sold by Pierce F. 
Groome, a cotton broker, who has held them 
since early in 1020. Peyton, Handle & Co. were 
the brokers. 



Completes Apartment House Site 

Pease & Elliman sold for Juliet A. Stursberg 
to James C. McGuire & Co., builders, 055-950 
Lexington av, adjoining the southeast corner of 
70th St. No. 053 is a 4-sty and basement brick 
dwelling, on a plot 38x80.6, and 050 is a 3-sty 
and basement stone dwelling, on a lot 21.6x80.6, 
while 057 intervening, is a vacant lot 19.5x80.6. 
The aggregate plot is 70.1x80.6. 

In January of 1020 the same firm bought 
through the same brokers 943 to 953 Lexington 
av old 4-sty dwellings, giving them a frontage 
of 170.4 in all on the east side of the avenue. 
The builders are having plans prepared for the 
proposed improvement. The seller of the plot, 
purchased in 1020, was the estate of James 
McCabe and Henry and Simon McCabe. 



Seamans' Estate Sold Two Parcels 

Estate of Clarence W. Seamans not only sold 
tbe gore, 2x100x8.1, at the northeast corner of 
Bleecker and Lafayette sts, and along Bleecker 
st to Shinbone alley, but it also sold 51 Bleecker 
st, adjoining a 4-sty and basement brick build- 
ing, on a lot 2ixlU0 and through to Shinbone 
alley. 

L. Tanenbaum. Strauss & Co. were the brok- 
ers in both transactions, the buyer being George 
A. Gunshor. A store will be built on the gore. 



Fine Home Site Sold 

Brown-Wheelock Co., Inc., sold for the estate 
of Henry D. Babcock, 20 and 22 East 71st st, a 
vacant plot. 45x10(15, situated 25 feet west of 
the southwest corner of Madison av. The pur- 
chaser is a prominent manufacturer, who, it is 
said, plans to erect a residence on the site esti- 
mated to cost $2(10,0011. This is part of the old 
Lenox Library block, on which many prominent 
persons built homes following the improvement 
of the Fifth av end of the block with the man- 
sion of Henry Clay Frick. 

Investor Buys West Side Lofts 

Dwight, Archibald & Perry, Inc., in conjunc- 
tion with the Duross Co., sold for Thomas Deve- 
lon, Jr., to the Acme Lighting & Fixture Co., 
the 6-sty stone loft building. 107-100 West 13th 
St. on a plot 40x100. The purchaser will use the 
greater part of the building for its own business. 



Operators Buy Lexington Av Corner 

William A. White i; Sons sold for William 
Sloane and others to I. Randolph and Everett 
Jacobs for an apartment house site the south- 
east corner of Lexington av and 73d st, contain- 
ing approximately 12,000 square feet, with a 
frontage of 85 feet on Lexington av and 130 
feet on East 73d st. The site is at present oc- 
cupied by five dwellings and a 2-sty garage. 
The property was held at $275,000. 

The garage at 162 East 73d st had been owned 
by the Sloane family since 1803. In IfH)!) they 
purchased the abutting property at 1000-lOlT 
Lexington av to fill out the plot. 

Nottingham Apartments Sold 

County Holding Co. sold through Sharp & Co., 
.35 East 30th st. a 0-sty elevator apartment hotel, 
known as the .Nottingham, on a plot 65x98.9. It 
was held at $400,000. William Crittenden Adams 
is president of the selling company. 



Resell Second Av Corner 

Meister Builders, Inc.. resold through Minnie 
Cohen to R. Mignola, 000 2d av and 259 E 48th 
St. the northwest corner of the two thorough- 
fares, a 6-sty brick tenement bouse with stores, 
on a plot 70.5x40, the longer frontage being on 
the avenue. 



Fine Harlem Apartments Sold 

Everett M. Seixas Co. sold for the El Casco 
Realty Corporation El Casco Court, at 203-209 
West 103d St. a G-sty elevator apartment house, 
on_ plot 80x100. The property was held at 
.^2."0,00il and the owners took back a second 
mortgage of $6S.0lio for 10 ye:irs beside a first 
mortgage of $132,000. The rentals are $42,000. 
The sr>lling agents will manage the property. 



January 28, 1922 

Family Heirloom Sold 

The 4-sty business building, 117!) Broadway, 
on a lot 25x84, adjoining the southwest corner 
of 2Sth St, has been purchased by I. Randolph 
Jacobs and Everett Jacobs from Henry S. Lev- 
erich, Margaret D. Leverich and Catherine S. 
Leverich, the maternal great grand-children ot 
Dr. Henry Grafton, a foremost physician of his 
day, who purchased the property in 18G3 for his 
residence and olRce. 

it was altered for business purposes in the 
late '70s and the purchasers are negotiating for 
the resale of the property to a prominent retail 
concern, who will occupy same tor their own 
business at the- expiration of the present lease. 
Harry B. Cutner was the broker. 

Investor Takes Madison Av Comer 

Pease & Elliman sold tor the United States 
Mortgage & Trust Co. to an investor, 24 East 
75th St, southwest corner of Madison av, a 5- 
sty stone and brick building, on a plot 25.7Vi'< 
102.2. A banking room is in the first floor and 
apartments are in the upper stories. 

The seller utilized the banking room for its 
East Side Branch ; but it will remove to 27-29 
East 74th St, northwest corner of Madison av, 
as soon as the fireproof building it is erecting 
there is completed. 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

■sisting ot 248 lots at St. A' bans Station, Queens, 
to a syndicate which will Immediately under- 
take development and sale of the property. 
Streets will be graded, four-foot sidewalks in- 
stalled and other improvements made. 

M. Morgenthau, Jr., Co., have been retained 
as sales agents and have decided to sell this 
property at public auction in their own sales- 
room, Fulton St and Bergen av, Jamaica, be- 
ginning Wednesday evening, February 1. 



Buys Rosalind Apartments 

Heil & Stern sold for the Evelyn Realty Co. 
to H. W. Gennerich, 510-512 West 144th st, a 
6-sty brick elevator apartment house, known as 
the Rosalind, on a plot 10t)x99.11, adjoining the 
southwest corner of Amsterdam av. It contains 
42 apartments. 

Cash Sale of Eighth Av Corner 

Max N. Natanson purchased through William 
H. Caldwell, from William J. Robertson, HAG 
Eighth av, southeast corner of 41st st, a 4-sty 
brick building, on a lot 24.9x100, including 
small stores, on the 41st st side. The property 
was held at .$125,000 and was sold for cash. 

Good Harlem Comer Sold 

Jeanette Henriquez sold, through White-Good- 
man, 1315 Amsterdam av, southeast corner of La 
Salle st (formerly 125th st), a 6-sty brick apart- 
ment house with 7 stores, on a lot 25.2^x100. 



Sells Apartment House on Plans 

Edward Polak, Inc., sold tor the Skandia 
Building Co., 0. A. Pederson, president, the fire 
proof apartment house on the northwest cor- 
ner of the Grand Boulevard and Concourse 
and ISOth st. The apartment is in course of 
construction and will be finished in April. The 
house is built on a plot 93 feet on the Concourse 
by 100 feet on 180th st and contains 161 rooms. 
It will rent for about $42,000 and was held tor 
$250,000. A first mortgage ot $100,000 for .. 
years will be loaned on the property. 



Good Lower West Side Sale 

The J. B. Wallace Co. purchased from the 
Manhattan Retrigertaing Co. 84 to 88 Gansevoort 
st, near Washington st, three buildings, with 
stores, on plot 81.11x94.6x irregular. The sale 
is recorded. 



New Bronx Apartments Sold 

S. & J. H. Albert sold for the Stebbins Realty 
and Construction Co., 2722 Morris av, a 5-sty 
and basement newly completed apartment 
house, arranged for 42 families. The structure 
stands on a plot 75x106, and is laid out in 
suites of 3 and 4 rooms, all of the apartments 
being occupied. The property was held at $175,- 
OOO and returns an annual rental of about 
$30,500. 

The new owner is the Rotank Realty Co., H. 
Kantor, president, which gave in part payment 
the flat with stores at 1261 Park av, on a lot 
25x100, Manhattan. 



Large Vacant Bronx Corner Sold 

Albert J. Schwarzler purchased from Frederic 
A. de Peyster the vacant plot, 4.54x100, at the 
northwest corner of Morris av and McClellan st. 



Buys Prominent Brooklyn Corner 

Realty Associates sold through B. A. Gold- 
stein the row of 4-sty brick apartment houses 
with stores at the southwest corner of Flatbush 
and St. Marks avs, Brooklyn. The property has 
a frontage of 145.9 feet on Flatbush av and 163.2 
feet on St. Marks av. It was purchased by 
Nathan Strauss, for investment. 



109 

Mortgage Loans 

Edwards, Dowdney & Richart negotiated the 
following first mortgages : $35,000 on 133 East 
71st st; $31,0110 on 138 West 116th st and $25,- 
500 on 505 West 176th st. 

The M. V. and S. Realty Corporation obtained 
from the Title Guarantee and Trust Co. a build- 
ing loan ot $102,000 on the property, 12.)X200, on 
the west side ot Coster st, 381.7 feet north o£ 
Spoftord av, Bronx. 



The Lebos Realty Corporation obtained from 
the Metropolitan Lite Insurance Co. a building 
loan of $249,000 on the plot, 100x275, on the 
west side of Sherman av, 75 feet north of Mc- 
Clellan st, where three 5-sty apartment houses 
are to be erected. 



An Old Queens Fire House Sold 

Louis Fallamal, of Golden av. Flushing, pur- 
chased through the Halleran Agency from the 
Twinboro Corporation the old "Young America 
Hose Co." fire house, on Washington st, near 
South Prince st. Flushing. It Is a 2-sty frame 
structure, on a lot 25x100. It was at one time 
owned by the City of New York. The seller had 
remodeled it into a garage with apartment 
above. The buyer will use the premises. 



Builders Buy Bay Ridge Plot 

Realty Associates sold to Kings View Home 
Builders, Inc., the vacant plot, 420x100, on the 
south side of 68th st, between Fourth and 
Fifth avs. In the Bay Ridge section of Brook- 
lyn, which the purchasers will Immediately 
improve with 3-sty brick double apartment 
houses. 



Sells Corner Floor Lease 

Real Art Pictures Corporation sold its long 
term lease of the fioor, 100x125, in 461-469 Fifth 
av, northeast corner of 40th st, to the W. W. 
Hodkinson Corporation, which will take pos- 
session February 1. Cross & Brown were the 
brokers. 



Charles F. Noyes Co. has negotiated a loan 
of $110,000 for the C. & M. Envelope Co. on 
their large plot, taking in the entire block 
front on Prince st, 63-67, from Lafayette, 274- 
278, and Crosby st, 111-113. The loan was 
placed for 3 years at which time the C. & M. 
Envelope Co. intend to erect a 12-sty building 
containing 100,000 square feet of space on the 
site which largely will be occupied for their 
own business. 



St. Albans Lots at Auction 

M. Morgenthau. Jr., Co., sold for the Laneret 
Realty Co. an interest In their property, con- 




A recent United Electric Service installation 



The P. Lorillard Company Building, located 
between 71st and 72nd Streets and Avenue A; 
a new three story factory that will be devoted 
to the manufacture of cigarettes. 

The owners are the P. Lorillard Company; 
the architect, E. G. Tremaine; the builders, 
Turner Construction Company, and the electrical 
contractors, Hatzel and Buehler. 



fVhen in need of Electric Light or Power Service, 

call Stuyvesant 4980. Your requirements, whether 

large or small, will receive the prompt attention oj 

our Commercial Department representatives. 



t?he United Electric 
Light «'"*=' Power Co. 

ixx> East itth St., New York. 



89th Street and Broadway 



146th Street and Broadway 



uo 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28, 1922 



Edwards, Dowduey & Richart obtained a 
first mortgage of $108,000 on the premises 
southeast corner Simpson st and Westchester 
av, Bronx. They have also placed first mort- 
gages of $35,000 on premises 133 East 71at st 
and 130,000 on 87-S9 Post av. 



The Lawyers' Mortgage Co. made a build- 
ing loan of $00,000 to the Sil-Mark Realty 
Corporation on the plot, 75x100. at the south- 
jeast corner of Longwood av and Beck st, 
Bronx, for the erection of a 5-sty apartment 
house. 



Realty Managers, Inc., Frank Begrisch, Jr., 
president. 

Abraham Saffir placed for the Choice Apart- 
ment Corporation, Morris Weinberg, president, 
a building and permanent loan of $120,000 on 
the 4-sty apartment house, on a plot 122x100, 
being erected on the southeast corner of Brook- 
lyn av and Carroll st, Brooklyn ; also, for the 
same owners, a building and permanent loan of 
$11"!, 000 on the 4-sty apartment house, on plot 
122x100. being erected on the northeast corner 
of New York av and Crown st, Brooklyn. These 
buildings when completed will have accommoda- 
tions for 64 families. 



The Brook and Third Avenue Corporation 
obtained a building loan of $60,000 on the 
property, 50x70, at the southeast corner of 
Third and Brook av, Bronx, from the Rock- 
land Realty Corporation. 



The Wacht Construction Corporation oo- 
taiued from the City Mortgage Co. a building 
loan of $130,000 on the plot, 70x105.2. at the 
northwest corner of the Grand Boulevard and 
Concourse and 108th st, Bronx, which it plans 
to improve with a 5-sty apartment house. 



Waddell & Martin placed a loan of $145,000 
on the 5^-sty apartment house, on a plot lOOx 
125, at the northwest corner of Mount Eden 
and Walton avs, Bronx. 

Charles Hirshon obtained from the United 
States Savings Bank a loan of $125,000 on the 
12-sty store and loft building, 102.6x08.9, at 
148 to 156 West 23d st. 



Quinlan & Leland placed a first mortgage 
loan of $108,000 on the new 5-sty apartment 
house, on plot 80x100, at the southeast corner 
of Creston av and Field pi, Bronx, for the P. 
H. Construction Co., Philip Herschowsky. 
president. 



Lawrence, Blake & Jewell placed for the 
Prankford Realty Corporation. 18 building and 
permanent loans of $6,500 each, for the erec- 
tion of 2-family houses on the north side of 
59th st, 125 feet each on Twentieth av, Brook- 
lyn, each on a lot 25x100. The operation will 
involve $250,000. 



New York Title & Mortgage Co. loaned to the 
Kamtun Realty Co., Inc., comprising I. Kamer- 
man and M. Tunik. $160,000. as a building loan, 
on the 5-sty and basement apartment house 
under way at the northeast corner of St. Nich- 
olas av and 189th st. 



Title Guarantee & Trust Co. loaned, on first 
mortgage, to the S. & L. Building Corporation, 
for a term of 5 years, at 6 per cent, per annum. 
$135,000 on a new brick theatre and store 
building at the northeast corner of Jerome av 
and Kingsbridge rd, Bronx. 



Quinlan & Leland placed a first mortgage 
loan of $120,000 on the new 1-sty store building 
covering the block front on the south side of 
Burnside av, from Walton to Morris avs, for 



Metropolitan Mortgage Loans 

The Metropolitan a_,ife Insurance Co. on 
Wednesday authorized mortgage loans amount- 
ing to over $5,000,000. Of this about $2,700,000 
were on farms in Tennessee. Iowa, Colorado, 
Alabama, Oklahoma, Nebraska and Illinois. A 
report was made to its real estate committee 
that on the company's loans on farms, the in- 
terest on which amounted to about $2,500,000, 
not one dollar that was due on December 31, 
1921, in arrears. 

Of the building loans about $750,000 was on 
New York City dwelling houses and apartment 
houses, numbering 41 in all, to acommodate 2S9 
families. A little more than $1,000,000 was ou 
269 dwelling houses and 20 apartment houses 
outside of the City of New York to accommo- 
date 412 families. These housing loans outside 
of New York were widely scattered, being a few 
each in Massachusetts, Connecticut, Virginia, 
Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Alabama, 
Ohio, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Utah, California, 
Missouri, Illinois. Indiana, Wisconsin. Florida 
and South Carolina. About $400,000 was loaned 
on business buildings. The company now has 
engagements to loan about $45,000,000 on bond 
and mortgage. 

Charles F. Noyes Co. announces that Fred- 
erick B. Lewis. William B. Falconer, Jos- 
eph D. Cronan, Edwin C. Benedict, Walter J. 
Cashel, Francis W. Gridley, William J. O'Con- 
nor, Thomas D. McBride, Charles F. Heller, 
Albert B. Himmelman, Edward H. Hesse and 
Thomas Christie have been re-elected members of 
the board of control. While the company's year 
ends April 30 yet it is reported that the com- 
pany is doing a larger business now in the ag- 
gregate than it did a year ago, and business for 
December, 1921, showed a very large gain over 
that for December, 1920. During the calendar 
year 1921 the company made a net gain of 32 
buildings exclusively managed. Thirty-nine 
buildings, for management, were placed with 
the Noyes company during the calendar year 
1921, of which 7 were oflBce buildings, 18 were 
store and loft structures and 14 properties for 
living purposes. Seven properties were with- 
drawn due in each case to a sale of the proper- 
ties. The business is owned and under the active 
direction of Charles F. Noyes, the founder, and 
the affairs of the company are under the direc- 
tion of an executive committee consisting of 
Frederick B. Lewis, general manager, William 
B. Falconer, Joseph D. Cronan, Edwin C. Bene- 
dict and Walter J. Cashel. 



DIVIDENDS 



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is best invested in a different kind of security — none more at- 
tractive than our 5%% Guaranteed Mortgages. 

LAWYERS TITLE & TRUST CO. 

160 Broadway, New York 367 Fulton Street, Jamaica, N. Y. 

188 Montague Street, Brooklyn 383 East 149th Street, New York 

44 Court Street, Brooklyn 1354 Broadway, Brooklyn 

160 Main Street, White Plains, N. Y. 



NiEWENHOus Company, Inc. 

We specialize in Financing, Planning and Erect- 
ing Legitimate Building Operations 
on a 60% Loan Basis. 
Commission Moderate. 316-318 East i6ist Street 

Telephone: Melrose 1694-1695 New York City 



Manhattan 
South of 59th Street 

HROOME ST — Meister Builders, Inc., resold 
through Augusta Pisani to F. Acierno. 362-366 
Broome St. two 5-sty and basement brick tene- 
ment houses, each on a plot 32. 7^x117. llx u 
regular. 

CHAMBERS ST— William C. Walker & Son 
sold for the St. Michaels Methodist Episcopal 
Church the 4-sty brick loft building, on a lot 
2."'ix75.1, at 00 Chambers st. The purchasers, 
Kirtland Bro. & Co., dealers in sporting goods, 
will occupy the premises. The sale is recorded. 

DOWNING ST — Pepe & Brothers resold for 
Samuel Mitchell to a client 58 Downing st, a 3- 
sty and basement brick dwelling, on a lot 16.8x 
64.8. The purchaser will occupy. 

MINETTA LA — Emeline C. Rickerson sold to 
Anthony Valentine, 21 Minetta la, a 3-sty and 
basement frame and brick tenement house, on a 
lot 28x80, adjoining the southwest corner of 
Minetta st. 

WATER ST.— Norden Ship Supply Co. sold 
to Edwin E. VoUhart 32 Water st, a 4H-sty 
brick building, on a lot 29.4x38.9, between 
Broad st and Coenties slip. 

4TH ST — Helcne Brand sold to Anna Green- 
wald and Abraham Gerster three 6-sty and 
basement brick tenement houses with stores, on 
a plot 83.6x95, at 374-378 East 4th st. 

14TH Stj — Estate of John Cropper sold, through 
F. & G. Pflomm to the Lloyd Realty Co., 105 East 
14th st, a 4-sty brick mercantile building, on a 
plot 32x83.9, close to the northeast corner of 
Fourth av, on Union Sq. The parcel was held 
at .fllO.UUO. 

21ST ST — Joseph P. Burke sold 147-151 East 
21st st, three 4-sty and basement brownstone 
dwellings, each on a lot 16.4x98.9, four doors 
west of Third av. 

23D ST.— Carrie M. Schmuck sold 331 East 
23d st, a 5-sty and basement brick tenement 
house with stores, on a lot 25x98.9. 

29TH ST— Jacob J. Tabolt sold for the estate 
of Matthew Corbett, 305 West 29th st, a 4-sty 
and basement brick single flat, on a lot 23x08.9. 

35TH ST — F. & G. Pflom sold tor the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Co. to J. B. Orkin. 34 
West 35th st, a 3-sty brick mercantile building 
on a lot 20x80. It adjoins the Oakdale apart- 
ment hotel. 

45TH ST— Jennie Levy sold to Vincent Vltran, 
432 West 45th st, a 4-sty brick tenement house 
with store, on a lot 25x100.5. 

45TH ST. — Estate of Madame Obrey sold 
through the H. H. Gibson Realty Co. to Charles 
Tanuenbaum 119 West 45th st, a 6-sty brick 
building, known as the Century Hotel, on a lot 
25x100.5. 

47TH ST— Charles P. Noyes Co. sold for the 
trustees of the Masonic Hall and Asylum Fund, 
327 East 47th st, a 5-sty brick tenement house 
with stores, on a lot 25x100.5, to Sarah Kuhn. 

4STH ST.— Gatehead Realty Co., Charles 
Tanenbaum, president, bought from the 48th 
Street Corporation 312-316 West 48th st, a 6- 
sty and basement apartment house, known as 
Henri Court, on a plot 50x100.5. 

FIRST AV. — Ward Belknap & Son sold tor 
Florence Taylor and others to Domenick Palazza 
the 4-sty brick tenement house with store, on a 
lot 19.0x70, at 559 First av. This Is the first 
sale of the property in more than 50 years. 

EIGHTH AV. — Duress Co. sold tor Philip 
Schuyler and others 75 Eighth av, adjoining 
the southwest corner of 14th st, a 4-sty brick 
building, on a lot 25.9x100. It was owned by 
the Schuylers more than 50 years, they having 
bought it from John Astor. 

FIRST AV. — Charles Wynne and Louis H. 
Low, operators, resold to the Bill Realty Co., 
Inc., the 7-sty brick tenement house with stores 
at 21 and 23 First av, on a plot 36.7y2XlU0, with 
an interior L, which they recently purchased 
from the National Butchers and Drovers' Bank. 
Ira Rosenstock & Co., were the brokers. 

MADISON AV— Joseph P. Burke sold 222 
Madison av, a 4-sty and basement stone dwell- 
ing, on a lot 25x95. 

North of 59th Street 

LEYDEN ST — Daisy D. Moran sold to Fanny 
L. Conn the vacant lot, 24.6x47.3x irregular, on 
the north side of Leyden st, 105.1 feet south- 
west of 225th St. 

6UTH ST — Millie I. Levy sold to Fillipo Mar- 
crllo. 313 East 60th st, a 5-sty brick tenement 
house with store, on a lot 25x98. 

70TH ST— Cross & Brown Co. sold for the 334 
West 70th Street Corporation, 332-334 West 
70th st, two 2-sty brick garages, on a plot 41x 
100.5. 

74TH ST — Edward Freund sold to Jacob Abra- 
ham the 6-sty brick tenement house with stores, 
on a plot 41.8x70.6x irregular, at 417 and 419 
East 74th St. 

75TH ST — F. R. Wood & Co. sold for Adele 
E. Walsh to Joseph Valery, 25 West 75th st, a 
4-sty and basement stone dwelling, on a lot 
21x102.2. 

86TH ST. — William R. Ware, represented by 
C. Ames, sold for Julia Quimby the 5-sty brick 
American basement dwelling, on a lot 20x102.2, 



January Z&, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



111 



at 278 West S6th st to a purchaser, who will 
occupy. 

8:)D ST.— Pauline Lewkowitz bought through 
the Pierre & Golden Co. 01 West 83d st, a 4-sty 
and basement brick dwelling, on a lot 16x1(12.-. 
tUST ST— Rosalia A. Becker sold to a client 
of Louis W. Osterweis, 151 East Ulst st, a 3- 
sty and basement stone dwelling, on a lot -O.K 
100.8M;. Frederick W. Kroehle, Jr., and Leon 
Lemle were the brokers. 

94TH ST.— Edmund J. Snelly sold 24 East 
04th st, a .5-sly brick American basement dwell- 
ing, on a lot lllxlOO.S'/s. adjoining the south- 
west corner of Madison av. 

'J4TH ST— Joseph H. Kern sold iov S. L. 
Pakas to Edwin Lent, 21 West Mia st, a ;!-sty 
and basement brick dwelling, on a lot ISxlUO.- 
SVi- 

103D ST. — Porter & Co. sold for Margaret L. 
Alexander "Jl West 103d st, a 5-sty brick apart- 
ment house, on a lot 27x100.11, adjoining the 
northeast corner of Columbus av. 

lOoD ST — William Goldstone and Fanuel 
Myers purchased from the Johnson Estate, 168 
170 East 103d st, the first being a u-sty brown- 
stone flat and the second a 5-sty brownstone 
flat with stores, each on a plot 27x100. 11, ad- 
joining the southwest corner of Third av. The 
brokers were Ward Belknap & Son. 

105TH ST.^-Mary Kimball Marsh sold through 
Harry Sugarman to James H. Cruikshank 345 
East 105th st, a 5-sty and basement brick tene- 
ment house with store, on a lot 25x100. 11. It 
<s the first sale of the parcel in 20 years. 

lOOTH ST— Grenville Kane sold to Anna Sa- 
lese. 337 East 10!)th st, a 0-sty and basement 
brick tenement house with store, on a lot 25x 
100.11. 

113TH ST. — Joseph Winstock sold to Mary 
Rotherham 2.53, 257, 259 and 261 West 113th st, 
each a 3-sty and basement brick dwelling, each 
on a lot ISxlOO.ll. 

115TH ST — A. Kane Co. sold for Anna M. 
Mclntyre to a buyer, for occupancy, 314 West 
115th st, a 3-sty and basement stone dwelling, 
on a lot 16.8x100.11. 

121ST ST. — Adolph Weiss, operator, pur- 
chased from Fannie Lustgarten the 5-sty brick 
tenement house, 236 West 121st st, on a lot 
18x100.11, held at $20,000. Anthony Minot was 
the broker. 

124TH ST— George W. Bartlett & Son sold for 
the estate of Emil Gabler to James H. Cruik- 
shank. 326 East 124th st, a 3-sty and basement 
brownstone dwelling on a lot 18x100.11. 

124TH ST— James H. Cruikshank resold to 
Thomas Zodda, 326 East 124th st, a 3-sty and 
basement brownstone dwelling, on a lot 18x 
100.11, which he purchased last week from the 
estate of Emil Gabler. George W. Brettell & 
Son were the brokers. 

127TH ST.— Irban Realty Co., Inc., Irving 
Bursteia, treasurer, purchased the two 4-sty 
brick tenement houses 277-279 West 127th st, 
on a plot 50x90.11, adjoining the northeast cor- 
ner of Eighth av, and held at $38,000. 

140TH ST— Henry M. Pitch sold tor F. B. 
Hall to Mary O'Connor the 3-sty and basement 
brick dwelling, on a lot 18x99.11, at 473 West 
140th St. 

147TH ST.— Coughlan & Co., Inc. sold for Ed- 
win Bendreira to an investor the Dardanelles, at 
460 West 147th st. a 6-sty and basement eleva- 
tor apartment house, on a plot 125x99.11, rented 
for $47,000, and held at $285,000. The seller 
was represented by Stoddard & Mark, attorneys, 
and the buyer by William Rosmarin. 

153D ST— Elizabeth Moore Ogdeu sold to 
Juana Frontela, 514 West 1.53d st, a 3-sty frame 
dwelling, on a lot 25x99.11, opposite Trinity 
Cemetery. 

179TH ST — Nehring Bros, sold for Frederick 
Herling, 622 West 179th st, southeast corner ot 
Wadsworth av, a ,^-sty brick apartment house 
with stores, on a plot 100x45. 

192D ST — The newly organized Royal Heights 
Realty Co., having for directors B. and G. G. 
Feinberg and S. Goldman, purchased from the 
Alper Realty Co., .563-,565 West in2d st, a 5-sty 
and basement brick apartment house, on a plot 
75x100. The house rents tor $25,000 annually 
and was valued at $140,000. 

214TH ST — Nehring Bros, resold tor the 3 
West Thirtieth Street Corporation. 429-431 
West 214th st, a 5-sty and basement brick 
apartment house, on a plot 75x99.11, between 
Columbus and Amsterdam avs. The brokers 
continue as agents for the property. 

CENTRAL PARK WEST— Horace S. Ely & 
Co. sold the vacant plot, 50x100, at ,372 and 
.373 Central Park West, adjoining the north 
corner of 97th st, for Mrs. Julia H. S. Smith. 
The purchaser will erect a 6-sty apartment 
house. 

CONVENT AV— Charles A. Du Bois sold for 
Charles S. Allen to Alfred C. Wotton, 427 Con- 
vent av. a 3-sty and basement stone dwelling, 
on a lot 16x100. 

EDGECOMB AV — James H. Cruikshank re- 
sold to the Dickie Terry Realty, Inc., 191 
Edgecombe av, a 3-sty and basement brick 
dwelling, on a lot 17x100. 

EIGHTH AV.— The newly formed 2.'i09 Eighth 
Avenue Corporation (M. Prackman, J. H. Rob- 
ins and H. Radel) is buying the 5-sty brink 
tenement house with stores, on a lot 25x75, at 



2."i09 Eighth av, southwest corner o£ 134tb St. 
It is represented by Frackman & Robins, attor- 
neys. Lillian R. Zwilling, as plaintiff, acquired 
the parcel last month in foreclosure proceed- 
ings. 

FIRST AV— Meister Builders, Inc., bought 
from the Bloomfleld Realty Co., 2011-2015 
First av, adjoining the southwest corner of 
104th st, three G-sty brick tenement houses 
with stores, each on a lot 25.3x100. M. Fein 
and M. Aronson were the brokers. 

HAVEN AV— H. H. Gibson Realty Co. sold 
lor the Commonwealth Savings Bank the 
vacant lot. 25.10x134.2x25x127.8, on the east 
side of Haven av, 73.11 feet north of lOOth st. 

KI.N'GSDRIDGE AV.— Benenson Realty Co. 
bought from Charlotte Mark 3044 Kingsbridge 
a\^ adjoining the southeast corner of West 
231st St. a 5-sty and basement brick apartment 
house, on a plot 75x113, renting for $27,0U0, and 
valued at $145,000. 

PINEHURST AV— The Goldstein, Salzberg 
Co.. Inc., sold for the Kamtun Realty Co. 
iKamerraan & Tunik) to an investor the re- 
cently completed 5-sty apartment house at the 
southwest corner of Pinehurst av and 179th st, 
on a plot, 80x100. The structure, classed 
among the best of the non-elevator structures 
on Washington Heights, is arranged for 35 
lamilies and has an annual rent roll of about 
$40,000. It was held at $225,000. The brokers 
have been made agents. 

PARK AV — Charles Galewski purchased 
through A. H. Landley from the United States 
Life Insurance Co. the southwest corner of 
Park av and 116th st, a 6-sty elevator apart- 
ment house with stores, known as the Her- 
moinc, on a plot 125x90. The property, which 
houses 7 families on a floor, rents for about 
$30,000 per annum, and was held at $200,000. 
The United States Life Insurance Co. takes 
back a purchase money mortgage of .'^150,000 at 
Mi per cent, per annum, for a term of 10 years. 

POST AV— James N, Butterly sold to Julius 
B. Ikelheimer the vacant plot, 50x150, on 'the 
east side of Post av, 150 feet north of 204th st. 

ST. NICHOLAS AV.— M. I. Strunsky sold for 
Gustavus L. Lawrence to Morris Aron, an in- 
vestor, the 2-sty brick building, known as the 
Picken, on a plot 100.11x118, at the southwest 
corner of St. Nicholas av and 125th st. The 
building contains 10 stores and offices, has an 
annual rent roll of $35,000 and was valued at 
$350,000. 

THIRD AV — Charles F. Noyes Co. sold for I. 
Henry Walker to Hyman Rose, 1897 Third av, 
southeast corner of 105th st, a 4-sty brick tene- 
ment house with stores, on a lot 25.2x74. The 
buyer is a hardware dealer at 1912 Third av 
and he will remodel the building just bought 
and remove his business thereto. The property 
had been in the previous ownership more than 
20 years and was held at $50,000. The adjoin- 
ing parcel, 1895 Third av, was recently sold to 
another buyer. 



Bronx 

HOME ST.— William F. Kurz sold to Murray 
Holding Co. the vacant lot, 25x90x25x87, north- 
east corner of Home st and Bryant av, on which 
will be erected a 1-sty taxpayer. 

iSOUH ST— William F. Kurz sold for the 
173d Street Realty Co. the vacant plot, 75x100, 
on the south side of 150th st, about 74.20 feet 
west of St. Anns av, to a client who, it is re- 
ported, will improve with a business building. 

15STH ST.— Harry Cahn resold to Amelia 
Samuel the 4-sty and basement briL-k apart- 
ment house arranged for 12 families at 463 
East l.':i8th st, on a lot 25x108. Harry H. Cohen 
was the broker. 

163D ST. — A 1-sty taxpayer to contain 12 
stores is to be erected on the south side of 163d 
ft, 198 feet east ot Prospect av, by the C. I. 
Weiustein Building Construction Co., which has 
purchased the property from the Stebbins Realty 
and Construction Co. It will occupy a plot 50x 
mo. Gettner, Simon & Asher, attorneys, repre- 
sented the purchaser in the deal. 

ALEXANDER AV— Eugene J. Busher Co., 
Inc., with Julius Trattner, sold for Mrs. Groet- 
zinger and Mrs. Daniels, 270 Alexander av, a 
5-sty brick flat with stores, on a lot 25x81.5. 

COLLEGE AV— Max Markowitz sold to Saul 
Cohen, 1240 College av, a 3-sty brick 2-£amily 
house, on a lot 20x100. 

CONCOURSE.— Benenson Realty Co. sold to a 
builder the southwest corner of Grand Boule- 
vard and Concourse, a vacant plot, 100x126. 

CRESTON AV.— Alexander Selkin and 
Samuel Hochstein resold for Morris Kasten- 
baum, 1985 Creston av, a 5-sty and basement 
brick apartment house, for 40 families, on a 
plot 102.6x100. It was held at $215,000. 

CRESTON AV.— Max Bloch bought tr.om the 
2075 Creston Avenue Corporation the tw^ nfew 
5-sty and basement brick apartment hoa^^a 
2075-2083 Creston av, each on a plot 66.8xi'0H. 
They were sold subject to mortgages for 
$140,000. ■ 

FINDLAY AV.— Abraham Leichter sold 1133 
and 1135 Findlay av, a 5-sty apartment house, 
on a plot 105x100, to Michael Rectzker. The 
building was recently completed by the 167th 
Street Building Corporation, Harry Uhlfelder, 
president. It accommodates 45 families and 
was held at $225,000. The annual rental is 
$40,000. Charles Goldberg was the broker. 

INTERVALE AV— Samuel Corven sold for 
M. Katz, 1163 Intervale av, southwest corner 
169th St. a 4-sty brick flat with one store on 
a lot 25x62x irregular. The purchaser will 
make improvements. 

LEGGETT AV. — Siivershire Holding Corpora- 
tion sold to Morris Sehanberg 984-986 Leggett 
av. a new 5-sty and basement brick apartment 
house, on a plot 46x105, adjoining the northwest 
corner of Pox st. 



I MONEY TO LOAN I 

Buzlfiinvf Alter-ations 
L ^ a. s G li €>I fl s 

Slerlinsf Mortsfacfe Compaity Inc. 

135 B 1- o a <i -wa.^'. N e-w Yoi*JK> 

TELEPHONE /^ECTOf^ /a2a-S-94r 




Classified Advertisements 

Wants and OfTers, For Sale a^d F«r Rent — Rate 2Sc. per line; count six word* to tke line 

No medium reaching real estate interests af- 
fords owners, brokers, and executors wishing 
to dispose of desirable property (in or out of 
the city), so faTorable an opportunity to bring 
the merits of their propositions to the atten- 
tion of possible buyers as does the For Sale 
and For Rent section of the Record and Guide. 



Employers anxious to secure help (clerical or 
profeBsional), or employees wishing to obtain 
a position or better a present one will find the 
Record and Guide the quickest and most direct 
method of bringing their wants to the atten- 
tion of the largest number of interested read 
ers. in the real estate or building professions. 



PROPOSAL 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. Supervising 
Architect's Office. Washinnton, D. C, January 
17. 1922— SEALED TROPOKALS will be 
opened in this office at 3 p. m., Feb. 10, 1922, 
for Changes in Construction and Mechanicil 
Equipment, at the United States Public Health 
Service Flospital. Hoise. Idaho. Drawing and 
specification may be obtained at this office In 



the discretion of the Supervising Architect. 
Jas. A. Wetmore, Acting Supervising Architect. 

SITUATION WANTED 

ENGINEER-AKCHITECT, good appearance, 
long experience, wishes position as superin- 
tendent and representative with contracting 
firm, salary expected reasonable. George 
Mullpr. 1520 North 5th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 



112 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28, 1922 



MEMBERS REAL ESTATE BOARD OF NEW YORK 



ADAMS & CO., INC. 

Real Estate 

170 5TH AVE. Tel. Gramercy 3854 

SPECIALIST IN BUSINESS PROPERTY 



ALEXANDER BALTER 

REAL ESTATE & INSURANCE 

Management of Property a Specialty 
152 \V. 4 2iul St.. Knickerbocker BldR. Bryant 2042-3 



BAUER, MILBANK & MOLLOY, INC. 

REAL ESTATE 

51 East 42nd Street Murray Hill 1936 



CUSHMANf: 
WAKEFIELD.!N£ 

RENTING AND MANAGEMENT OF 
BUSINESS BUILDINGS 

so EAST 42d ST. Murray Hill 7820 



BILTMORE REALTY CORPORATION 
REAL ESTATE — COMMERCTAL LEASPJG 

MANAGEMENT 
TIMB3 BUILDING PHONE: BRYANT e8e8-e8e9 



ALFRED P. COBURN 

Real Estate — Appraisals — Insurance 
Management of Estate a Specialty 

159 W. 72nd ST. Phones: Columbus 4356-2548 



DUNLAP & LLOYD 

INCORPORATTD 
Real Estate — Insurance 

GROVE STREET Phone eprlng 6518 



ROYAL SCOTT GULDEN 

REAL ESTATE, FIFTH AVE. SECTION 
680 FIFTH AVENUE Phone: Circle 8315 



CHARLES G. KELLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

109 WEST 23RD STREET 

Watklna 5336 



ALBERT E. KELLY 

Successor to Fredlc. A. Booth 
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

50 Union Square Tel. StuyTcsant 1125 



T. H. KELLEY 

Specialist in Fordham Heights Property 

158 East 188th St., at Grand Concourse 
Phone: Fordham 2509 



J. P. & L. A. KISSLING 

Sales — Management — Appraisals 

896 8TH AVE., NEAR 54TH ST. 
Established 1870 Circle 0591 to 5 



SCHINDLER & LIEBLER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Rhlnelander 6122 1393 THIRD AVE., at 79th St. 



SEAMAN & PENDERGAST 

Member Keal Estate Board of New York 

RENTALS— SALES— MANAGEMENT 

RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES 

542 FIFTH AVEXUE Vandt»rbilt 1309 



Manhattan Office 

1 ^^'EST 125th STREET 

Tel. Harlem 8400 



Bronx Office 

19 72 JEROME AVENUE 
Tel. ConnectlOD 



SHAW, ROCKWELL & SANFORD 

REAL ESTATE— INSURANCE 

Successors to 

SHAW & CO. 



MALCOLM E. SMITH, INC. 

Real Estate Agents and Brokers 

185 MADISON AVE. Vanderbilt 7393 



H. C. KOPP & COMPANY 

Specialista in Retail Store Locations 

MANAOEMSNT and BROKIBAOI 
402 Madison Avenue Vanderbilt 4900 



CUSACK COMPANY 

Real Estate and Insurance Brokers 

Specialists in West Side Properties 
176 WEST 72nd STREET 
Telephones: Columhut W47 8179 



CHAS. A. DUBOIS 

REAL ESTATE 

3551 BROADWAY 
At 146th St. 



ROBERT LEVERS 

Real Estate — Insnrance 

THE KNICKERBOCKER, 152 West 42nd Street 
Uptown Office: 376 Leno:t Avenue. Phone Connections. 



HIRAM RINALDO 

Specializing in the Sale and Leasing ef 

East Side Property 
230 GRAND ST. Bowery Bank Bldg. 



Established UM 



GEORGE S. RUNK 

REAL ESTATE BROKER 
Mortgage Loans — Management 

12S2 LEXINGTON AVENUE 



COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 

MANAGEMENT 

Rentals — Sales — Appraisals 
Insurance 




MO BROADWAY NEW YORK 

Stuyvesant 0627 



JACOB J. TABOLT 

. REAL ESTATE 
558 EIGHTH AVE. pm 

Above 37th St. Fits Bo» 1886 

WHITNEY-FOSTER CORP. 

Real Estate Administrator 

150 WEST 72nd ST. Columbus 6409 



LONGWOOD AV. — The Penzance Realty Co., 
Sam Grubstein, president, sold 1015 Long- 
wood av, a 22-family apartment house, 22x110. 
The property rents for $11,000 and has been 
held at $60,000. George Steinman, Inc., were 
the brokers. 

MELROSE AV. — Cahn & Cahn sold to John 
Nievergelt 7.30 Melrose av, a 4-sty brick double 
flat with stores, on a lot 25x92.5. 

MORRIS AV. — For the erection of a 5-sty 
apartment house the vacant plot, 114x00, on the 
west side of Morris av. 190 feet north of 184th 
St, has been purchased by the Walton Holding 
Corporation from Samuel Friedenberg. The 
purchaser was represented by Gettner, Simon & 
Asher, attorneys. 

OGDEN AV — Joseph L. Lese resold to Joseph 



Brooklyn Brokers 



DON'T "SHOP" FOR REAL ESTATE 

It doesn't pay. When you want to buy. taka td- 
TSntac* of our four offices, 50 yoars' experience, and 
thorough organization and eot WHAT YOU WANT. 
AT THE RIGHT PRICE, CONVENIKNTLT. 
"Established Orer Half a Century" 

BULKLEY & HORTON CO. 

Member of Beal Estate Board of New York 
Metnber of BrooklTn Real Estate Board. 
Q. S. HORTON 585 NostnuKi Ave., near Dean St. 

Pre*. 414 Myrtle Ave., near Clinton Ave. 

A. J. HOHTON75J0 Third Ate.. i»ar 75th m. 

8«:y. 1214 Flatbush A»e., near Dltmas Are. 



JAMES B. FISHER 

Member of Brooklyn Real Estate Board 

REAL ESTATE 

174 MONTAGUE ST. Main 7267 

QUELL & QUELL 

REAL ESTATE INVESTMENTS 

MANAGEMENT 

III Patthen Avenua BreeklyR, N. Y. 

Telapbeu: Dentur «9tl 



M. Wikler through J. Rubin the 5-sty and 
basement apartment house, 1435 Ogden av, ar- 
ranged for 32 families and on a plot 75x100. It 
was held at $120,000 and returns an annual 
rental of about $20,000. Mr. Lese recently ac- 
quired the property. 

OLMSTEAD AV.— Brown, Wheelock Co., Inc., 
sold for Hasten & Nichols to an investor 1501 
Olmstead av, northwest corner of Sterling av, 
a 2-sty frame flat with store, on a lot 25x100. 

TELLER AV. — The Bronxtown Realty Co. sold 
to Dr. Louis Schwartz 1068 Teller av, a 5-sty 
and basement brick apartment house, accom- 
modating 25 families, on plot 51x104, renting 
tor $20,000 and held at $95,000. 

UNIVERSITY AV— Ennis & Sinnott resold to 
C. Roeser the vacant plot, 101x115, on the west 
side of University av, 150 feet north of Burn- 
side av. It is the last vacant plot on the block. 
Albert D. Phelps and H. J. Rogers were the 
brolters. The buyer will erect on the plot a 
taxpayer store building. 

VALENTINE AV.— The Joe Hen Realty Cor- 
poration, represented by Gettner, Simon & 
Asher, atlorneys, purchased from the Shirenson 
Realty Corporation the northeast corner of 
Valentine av and 197th st, a newly completed 
5-sty and stone apartment house for 41 families 
and renting tor $32,000 annually. The prop- 
erty fronts 90 feet on the avenue, 85 feet on the 
street, and was valued at $180,000. 

VYSE AV.— Benenson Realty Co. sold 1769 
Vyse av, a 5-sty and basement brick apart- 
ment house, on a plot 50x100, adjoining the 
northwest corner of East 174th st. 

WEBSTER AV— Charles B. Van Valen, Inc., 
sold for Harry Klmmerman, 2354 Webster av, 
a 5-sty and basement brick apartment house, 
on a plot 50x100. 



The erection of a tall apartment structure is 
soon to be undertaken at 584 to 588 West End av 
by the newly organized 588 West End Avenue 
Corporation, which has just purchased the prop- 
erty from the Pandora Realty Corporation for 
that purpose. The site, now vacant, measures 60x 
100 feet and adjoins the southeast corner of 89th 
St. The buying company's directorate is com- 
posed of M. Wielands, Jr.. J. Krease and H. 
A. Hyman. It is represented by Krakower & 
Peters, attorneys. 



Bronx Brokers 



A. G. BECHMANN 

Real Estattt and Insurance 

Tel. Intervale 556 1065 SO. BOULEVA&D 

Ona block from SlmpsoD Street Subway StatloD 



WM. F. A. KURZ CO. 

Bronx Real Estate 

370 EAST 149TH STREET 
Established 1897 Phone: Motl Haven 4910-4911 

OTTO LACKMAN 

Management of Properties mjr Speeialtjr 

2514 Grand Concourse, near Fordkam Ree4 

Phoee: Fgrdbsia tTti 

L. G. LOSERE 

REAL ESTATE 

Entire Charge Tslien of Property 

871 Brook Ave., at 161st St. ^tabUslwd 1«*» 

FRED. OPPENHEIMER 

Real Estate — Mortgage Loans 

540 Bergen Av., at 149th St. 
Phone: MZLROSl I'Jtl 

JOHN F. PENDERGAST, Jr. 

Real Estate— Estatm lAtatfi 

340 WILUS AVENUE 
Phone Melrose T2SS 

ALBERT D. PHELPS 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

554 Melrose Ave., near 149th St. and 3rd Ave. 
PHONE MELROSE 4371 

HENRY SCHWIEBERT 

Real Estate— Insuranoe 

261 EAST FORDHAM ROAD 

Near TslestlDi Atenue Fwdbsa ••«• 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



113 



Brooklyn 

BERGEN ST.— Helena Trading Corporation 
sold througli the Bulltley & Horton Co. 1039 
Bergen et, a 4-sty briclt and stone double apart- 
ment liouse, on a plot SUxlOU. 

DAHILL RD— A. Mishkln sold for E. Varon- 
haki to E. Galindo, 1024 Daliill rd, a detached 
dwelling. 

JORALEMON ST. — Realty Associates sold 
through E. P. Del Masse to J. M. Perazio and 
Q. Guala 163 Joralemon st, a 4-sty and base- 
ment brownstone dwelling, on a lot 25.3x100, be- 
tween Court and Clinton sts. 

ISTH ST.— Bulkley & Horton Co. sold for M. 
Downes to a buyer, for occupancy, 571 18th st, 
a 2-sty and basement frame 2-family house, on 
a lot 18x100. 

S2D ST.— Frank A. Seaver & Co. sold a vacant 
plot, 60x10(1. on the north side of 82d st, 100 feet 
west of Tenth av, for H. R. Dunkum. 

COLUMBIA HEIGHTS— H. H. Gibson Realty 
Co. sold for Anna Russell of Washington the 
garage property at 165 Columbia Heights. 

CONEY ISLAND AV.— Bulkley & Horton Co. 
sold the plot, 100x120, on Coney Island av, 200 
feet south of Av V, for Mrs. A. H. Ganalo to a 
builder for improvement. 

KINGS HIGHWAY— William Liss, Inc., sold 
for the Ritz Holding Co. to Samuel Kahn and 
clients a block on the south side of Kings 
Highway, consisting of 5 buildings containing 
7 new stores with apartments, fronting 131 
feet on Kings Highway and 100 feet on East 
10th st by 119 feet by irregular. The property 
was held at $110,000. The purchasers, it is re- 
ported, paid all cash above the mortgages. 

THIRD AV.— Bulkley & Horton Co. sold for 
V. Levy and Isadore Blum 7522 Third av, a 3- 
sty brick flat with store, on a lot 20x80. 

FIFTH AV.— Edward C. Cerny sold for Max 
Simon 4106 Fifth av, a 3-3ty brick flat with 
store, on a lot 25x100. 

STUYVESANT AV.— Victoria Hotstatter sold 
342 Stuyvesant av, a 2-sty and basement brown- 
stone dwelling, to a buyer, for occupancy. 

ST. JOHNS PI^Rose V. Wertheimer sold 
616 St. Johns pi, a 2-sty and basement brick 
2-family house. 

ST. MARKS AV.— Dr. Louis Gamble and Re- 
becca Benson sold 552 St. Marks av, a 4-8ty 
brick double apartment house with stores. 

Queens 

EDGEMERE — Lewis H. May Co. sold for 
Jennie R. Tannenbaum the southwest corner 
of Maple and Edgemere avs, Edgemere, a 2V^- 
sty colonial dwelling, to Morris Posnesky, for 
occupancy. 



RECENT LEASES. 



Some Good Midtown Leases 

F. & G. Pflomm leased tor a M. Shidlovsky & 
Co. to Henry Kirschman. for a term of years, 
about 6,00U square feet of space in 1333 Broad- 
way, at an aggregate rental of $30.000 ; for 
Kaplan Bros, to Philip Gavis Co.. the second 
loft in 131-137 West 35th st, for Thomas Snell 
to Harry Kunet, the 4-sty building, 115 East. 
2!Sth st ; for the estate of Isaac Walker, to J. 
Kreinitz, for a term of 5 years, the 5-sty stone 
mercantile building, 15-17 West 30th st, at an 
aggregate rental of $70,000 ; for a client to J. 
H. Strauss, for a term of 3 years, the store in 
275 Eighth av and to S, L. Phorylles, Inc., the 
first loft in the same building: and in conjunc- 
tion with Spear & Co. to R. Solomon the 6th 
floor in 130-134 West 17th st. 



Art Firm in West 34th St. 

The entire 3d floor of the Cammeyer building 
on West 34th st has been leased for a term of 
10 years by George H. Ainslie. of the Ainslie 
Galleries, now located at 615 Fifth av. in the 
Buckingham hotel. The floor will be fitted up 
extensively for the Ainslie Galleries. Brown- 
Wheelock Co., Inc., and Spear & Co. were the 
brokers. 



Some Strong Store Leases 

Lewis L. Rosenthal Co. leased for Bert Har- 
ris the store in 144 East 42d st to Philip Kotler ; 
two stores in the southeast corner of 74th st 
and Broadway to one of the well-known delica- 
tessen companies, for a long term of years ; also, 
the store at the northwest corner of Broadway 
and 40th st to S. Meisel, which was formerly 
occupied by Mitchell the tailor ; for the Tivoll 
Construction Co. the store adjoining the en- 
trance to the Tivoli theatre at 843 Eighth av 
for a term of 5 years, to Nathan Willens ; for 
the Sidmin Realty Corporation store and base- 
ment at 13511 First av, adjoining the southeast 
corner of 73d st, to Kostos Baskoutas auu 
Michael Karvelis ; the store in 620 Eighth av to 
the Washington Butter & Egg Market Co. These 
leases aggregate a rental of $130,000. 

Sub-Lease Mercantile Buildings 

Daniel Birdsall cS: Co., Inc, sub-leased for 
Allister Greene the 5-sty stone loft buildings 130 
and 132 Duane st, comprising 45.0U0 square feet, 
to the Merritt-Elliott Co., at an increase of about 
50 per cent, of the present rental. The brokers 
have been appointed agents. 



A Good Downtown Lease 

The entire 22d floor and part of the 21st floor 
of the new Munson building, 67 Wall st. have 
been leased by the Munson Steamship Line to 
Frank B. Hall & Co., fire and marine insurance, 
for a term of years. Albert B. Ashforth. Inc., 
was the broker. 



Large Floor Leases 

H. H. Gibson Realty Co. leased for the 
Twenty-sixth Street and Fifth Avenue Co.. 
Benjamin Winter president, the 8th floor In 
212 Fifth av, through to 1130 Broadway, to E. 
W. ■ Robischon, Inc., hosiery and underwear, at 
an aggregate rental of $150,000; In the same 
building, the 18th floor to the American Car- 
bonization Co. at an aggregate rental of $150,- 
000, and to Schreiber & Brantman, woolens and 
silk, showroom space on the 19th. 



Long Lease of Lexington Av Corner 

James Kyle & Sons leased for the Sidum 
Building Co., Inc., to a lessee for a term of 21 
years, the 1-sty brick building, 50.5x100, at the 
southeast corner of Lexington av and 51st st, 
adjoining the Lexington Avenue Opera House. 
The aggregate rental is .$315,000. Extensive im- 
provements will be made by the lessee. 

Rival Captures Chain Lunch Store 

Mark Rafalsky & Co. leased store and base- 
ment now occupied by Thompson's lunchroom 
m 1250 Broadway for a long term of years to 
the Capitol Lunch System at an aggregate rental 
of $2.50,000. Possession will be had on July 1, 
1922, at the expiration of the Thompson lease. 
The Capitol Lunch System will pay $1,000 a 
front foot, which is considered a record rental 
for a lunch room in the Pennsylvania zone. 



Important Lease Near Times Sq. 

Lewis L. Rosenthal Co. leased for a client to 
Dr. M. P. Gordon, 144 West 46th st, 5 doors 
east of the rear of Loew's State Theatre, a 5- 
sty stone building, on a lot 15x100.5. The 
lessee will remodel the structure into a studio 
and apartment building, with a store remain- 
ing in the ground floor. The aggregate rental 
is $115,000, for a term of 21 years. 

St. Denis Building All Rented 

Spear & Co. leased 3,000 square feet in the 
St. Denis Ofiices to the Workers' Party of 
America. By this lease, the building, with a 
total rent roll of $155,000, is 100 per cent, 
rented. Although It is In the manufacturing 
district south of Union Square, the tenantry 
of the St. Denis OfBces, which consists largely 
of lawyers, accountants, dentists and sales 
agencies, has demonstrated the need for an 
office building in this neighborhood. It was 
originally the St. Denis Hotel. 



MANHATTAN BROKERS 



ORVILLE B. ACKERLY 

Appraiser of 

LONG ISLAND REAL PROPERTY 

Phone: Longacre 2280 

243 West 34th Street, New York City 



ERNEST N. ADLER 

Upper East Side Property m Specialty 

ISM FIRST AVE., at 7Sth St. 

EnabUabed IMS Pbons: RUiuliuiite •121 



Telephone: Pennsylvania 0396-0397 

AMERICAN BUREAU 
OF REAL ESTATE 

ill About Real Estate Everything — Everywhere 

MODERN "AiMlB^ffiiE" SYSTEM 

18 West S-lth Street 

Astor Court Building, New York 

C*-operation of Reliable Brokers Invited 



ARMSTRONG & ARMSTRONG 

Real Estata Asenta and Brokan 

212 ST. NICHOLAS AVS.— Nmt Ktbtb An. «nd 
131st Streat Fhona: Homincaide Vffi 



EDMUND M. BRENNAN 

INCORPORATED 
Kaal Eatata— Iniarane* 

11 EAST 56th ST. PUza 7«M 



JAMES A. DOWD 

Real Estate — Insurance 

Renting — Management 

874 SIXTH AVENUE, above 49tli Street 



JOHN CONSTABLE MOORE 

REAL ESTATE 
15 EAST 40th ST. Vanderbilt tl8S 



JACOB FINKELSTEIN & SON 

Real Estate — Mortg&gem 
Specialists tn the Bowery Section 

42 BOWERY Phone: Franklin 1810 



ROBERT G. GRUNERT 

SucOTsaor to the 

O. A. CU8HMAN REALTY CORPORATION 

Real Estate — Management 

172 Ninth Ave., at 21st St. Phone: Chelaw 2841 



HARRIS EXCHANGE 

Real Estate — Mortgagee 

Renting and Leasing of Stores and Lofts 

Times Building Broadway at 42d Street 

Phone: Bryant 810-1134 



HOLT & MERRALL. Inc. 

Industrial Real Estate 

342 MADISON AVE. Tel, Vanderbilt 4699 



WM. P. JONES & SON 

ESTABLISHED 1895 

Real Estate & Insurance 

1358 BROADWAY 

Comer 86th 8t. Phone: Ftts Boy tlftT 



JOSEPH MILNER 

Real Estate 
EAST 41st STREET, NEW YORK 
Murray Hill 2619 



LEONARD MORGAN CO. 

Real Estate — Insurance — Estates Managed 

Gotham Bank Building, Columbus Circle 
Suite 504-5 Phone: Columbus 1646 



ARTHUR G. MUHLKER 

Real Estate— Insurance 

TorkTllle Section 

1112 PARK AVE.. NEAR 90TH ST. 

Phone: Lenox 2SS5 



ARTHUR L. SHAW 

Washington Heights Specialist 
4032 BROADWAY, ABOVE 169TH STREET 

Wadsworth 4150-4151 



SHERMAN & KIRSCHNER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

54 E. 109th STREET 
NEW YORK 

Tel. Harlem 9028-5863 



JAMES B. SPEYERS, INC. 
Real Estate 

CANADIAN TACIFIC BUILDING 
342 Madison Ave. Snite S14416 



WILLIAMS-DEXTER CO., INC 

Greenwich Vlllacs Raal Eatat* 
Insuranc* 

72 GREENWICH AVE. Chelsea HW 



114 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28, 1922 



Applications wanted for 

First Mortgage Loans 

(Building and Permanent) 

AMOUNTS FROM $100,000 UP 

on improved property in Greater New York 

The PRUDENCE COMPANY, Inc. 



162 Remsen Street- 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 



Member Brooklyn Real ElUU Be«r4 

Money to Loan on First Mortgage 

Joseph T. McMahon 

REAL ESTATE and 
MORTGAGE LOANS 

188 and 190 MONTAGUE STREET 
BROOKLYN 

Main 0U4 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 

COLLECTING, RENTING 
AND MANAGEMENT OF ESTATES 



REAL ESTATE STATISTICS 



MANHATTAN 



CONVEYANCES 

BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1922 

Jan. IS to 

Jan. 1^4 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. '2a 



1922 

Jan. IS to 

Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 
Jan. 25 



1922 

Jan. 17 to 

Jan. 23 



1921 

Jan. IS to 

Jan. 24 



Total No 

AsaeBsed Value 

No. w ith consideration 

Consideration 

Assessed Value 

Total No 

Assessed Value 

No. with consideration 

Consideration 

Assessed Value. ..; .. 



209 

$18,517,100 

20 

$856,578 

$723,600 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



$9, 



190 

09.100 

25 

$864,250 
S819.000 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 2.-, 



232 



137 



759 



438 



22 
$176,633 



6 
$48,500 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 24 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 2.5 



33 
$364,358 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 23 



27 
$335,633 



Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 24 



764 

$62,620,200 

79 

$3,162,253 

$3,231,100 



707 

$41,504,000 

74 

$5,360,100 

$4,331,000 



94 
$780,387 



37 
$209,370 



2,420 



101 
$1,885,317 



1,732 



126 
$1,260,586 



MORTGAGES 

MANHATTAN BRONX 



BROOKLYN 



1922 

Jan. 18 to 
Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



1922 

Jan. 18 to 

Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



' 1922 


1921 


Jan. 17 to 


Jan. 18 to 


Jan. 23 


Jan. 24 



Total No 

Amuuui 

lo tsauka dk Ins. Cu. 

Amount 

No. at *j% 

Amount 

No. at 5V47o 

Amount 

No. at 57e 

Amount 

No. at 4/j%i 

Amount 

No. at 4% 

Amount 

Unusual Rate* 

Amount 

Interest not given... 
Amount 



176 

$3,937,705 

25 

Sl.031.500 

151 

$3,557,779 

4 

$125,250 

4 

$39,276 



126 

$7,009,561 

26 

$5,258,750 

83 

$1,896,150 

12 

$247,796 

3 

$900 000 

1 

$7,000 



212 

$2,222,120 

12 

$259,700 

162 

$1,943,550 

5 

$26,000 

3 

$6,500 



72 

$480,160 

4 

$39,000 

63 

$394,860 

2 

$8,100 



17 
$215,400 
Jan. ] to 
Jan. 24 



$3,531,000 
25 

$427,615 
Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 25 



1 

$550 

41 

$245,.520 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



861 

$4,847,287 

206 

$1,900,045 

826 

$4,579,337 

31 

$252,850 

3 

$14,500 



378 

$2,344,009 

55 

$924,750 

340 

$2,143,059 

15 

$105,750 

5 

$15,000 



$77,200 
Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 25 



1 
$600 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 23 



4 

$12,500 

14 

$67,700 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks £ Ins. Co. 
Amount 



645 

$19,034,560 

77 

$3,894,300 



490 

$24,509,372 

66 

$9,402,150 



691 

$6,950,484 

51 

$1,110,140 



272 

$1,567,952 

15 

$115,500 



MORTGAGE EXTENSIONS 

MANHATTAN 



2,646 

$14,613,474 

545 

$4,432,570 



BRONX 



1,448 

$7,817,370 

217 

$2,366,594 



1922 

Jan. 18 to 
Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



1922 

Jan, IN l(; 
.Ian. L'J 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 
Jan. 25 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks & Ins. Companies. 
Amount 



69 
$3,768,850 

51 
$3,150,350 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 24 



47 
$2,077,400 

28 
$1,749,100 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 25 



$744,100 

18 

$575,000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



25 

$390,730 

8 

$202,000 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 2.T 



Total No 

Amount 

To Banks & Ins. Companies. 
Amount 



189 
$9,595,275 

135 
$8 254.600 



151 

$6,452,450 

93 

$5,291,150 



69 
$1,988,100 

40 
$1,419,500 



52 
$880,030 

19 
$400,600 



MAX N. NATANSON 

BUYS AND SELLS 

IMPROVED 

MANHATTAN 

PROPERTY 

170 BROADWAY 

Suite 915-919 Cortlandt 7637-7eM 



MRS. GERRIT SMITH 

Member Real Estate Board of New York 

42 EAST 40th STREET 

CTTY DEPARTMENT 

APARTMENTS AND HOUSES 

SOUND SHORE PROPERTY A SPECIALTY 



J. CLARENCE DAVIES 

Member Real Estate Board. N. T. 

BRONX REAL ESTATE 

AUCTIONEER— BROKER 
APPRAISER— MORTGAGE LOANS 

Main Office: 149th St. and Third Ave. 

BRANCHES: 
32 Nassau Street 51 East 42nd Strest 

Phone Connectlonfl 



Philip A. Payton, Jr., 
Company 

REAL ESTATE AGENTS 
AND BROKERS 

New York's Pioneer Net^ro 
Real Estate Agents 

127 West 141st Street 

Between Lenox and Seventh Avenues 
Telephone: Audubon 0945 



MANHATTAN 



BRONX 



BUILDING PERMITS 

BROOKLYN 



QUEENS 



RICHMOND 



1922 

Jan. 18 to 

Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



1922 

Jan. 18 to 

Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



1922 

Jan. 18 to 

Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



1922 

Jan. 18 to 

Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



1922 

Jan. IS to 

Jan. 24 



1921 

Jan. 19 to 

Jan. 25 



New Building,... ^^^^^^ 

Alterations $445,550 

Jan. 1 lo 
Jan. 24 
New Buildings. . . 45 

Cost $10,720,150 

Altera'Idns $994,115 



4 
$11,600 
$454,135 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 25 



75 

$1,864,800 

$67,600 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



10 
$138,700 
$40,000 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 25 



197 

$2,159,525 

$151,810 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



102 
$3,241,645 

$427,115 
Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 25 



444 

$3,251,715 

$156,520 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



46 
$302,550 
$40,250 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 25 



58 

$159,855 

$11,935 

Jan. 1 to 

Jan. 24 



12 
$39,925 
$2,845 
Jan. 1 to 
Jan. 25 



45 
$2,653,025 
$1,366,410 



208 

$7,375,950 

$101,100 



38 

$2,342,900 

$71,000 



637 

$6,651,715 

$333,065 



242 

$4,526,740 

$960,520 



937 

$5,783,100 

$242,397 



158 
$867,148 
$104,650 



145 

$502,950 

$69,735 



41 
189,000 
$10,390 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



115 




Employers Reject Untermyer's Wage Scale Proposal 

Board of Governors Hold Plan of Lockwood Committee Counsel Discriminates 
Against All Other Elements in Industry in Favor of Labor 

wage question is necessary to the making of agreements with 
the building trades unions. 

"We have not charged that the entire membership of any 
union has been guilty of shirking. The consideration given 
by the union in return for the wages paid is a fair day's work 
by its members, and to enter into arbitration before a 
numerous board upon the question of whether the consideration 
has not been or is not being given by the union would mean 
continuous arbitration as to the performaricc of the contract, 
which would be a cumbersome proceeding. 

"The Building Trades Employers' Association has for seven- 
teen years enforced an arbitration policy. The unions have 
for all that time assented to arbitration. We now feel that, in 
fairness to our members, the public should not only be a party 
to the arbitration but should sit in all negotiations and par- 
ticipate in the settlement of all questions. 

"We have fully advised the unions of our wishes." 

A special committee headed by Walter Stabler recently at- 
tempted to use its influence in an effort to settle the matter of 
wage scales and trade abuses without further delay and sub- 
mitted a program of procedure, that was accepted by the em- 
ployers, but turned down by the labor representatives. 

The letter of the Building Trades' Council to Mr. Stabler, 
rejecting the proposition of his Committee said in part: 

"Your letter of January 16, addressed to Mr. Patrick Crowley, 
President Building Trades' Council has been received and 
considered by the Council Executive Committee and the Coun- 
cil. Your letter proposes that a committee of five from the 
parties you represent be present at a meeting between repre- 
sentatives of the Building Trades Employers' Association and 
the Building Trades Council in order to assist in the selection 
of another committee of citizens, this committee to be present 
and participate in negotiations for a settlement of the agree- 
ment for 1922 or longer. 

"In a former letter to Mr. Robert D. Kohn, we stated that 
the Council had accepted a proposal made by Mr. Samuel 
Untermyer as a solution of existing differences. We can only 
reiterate that the Council still believes that nothing beetter 
than the proposal made by Mr. Untermyer has been suggested 
by any one. Coming as it does from the Council for the 
Lockwood Committee a Legislative Committee which had made 
an exhaustive investigation of building conditions — it eman- 
ates from that representative of the public best qualified to 
speak in the public interest and because of that must carry 
with it the approval of the public. There is nothing sinister or 
hurtful about it to any one and to the building trades workers 
it seems to be a fair and square solution of the question at 
issue. 

"We do not want to appear discourteous to the gentlemen 
you represent but we are responsible to the men we represent 
and to the public and we must discharge that responsibility in 
a manner that will conform to the wishes of those men and the 
public. The organizations seated in the Council have decided 
in favor of the Untermyer plan and if the Building Trades Em- 
ployers' Association does likewise meetings between the two 
bodies need only consider details and therefore the presence 
of a third party would hardly be necessary. If however the 
Employers' Association deems the presence of a third party 
necessary or if the Lockwood Committee feels that it can pro- 
(Conchided on page 116) 



AT a special meeting of the Board of Governors of the 
Building Trades Employers' Association held Wednes- 
day afternoon further consideration was given to the 
proposal recently made by Samuel Untermyer, special counsel 
to the Lockwood Joint Legislative Committee. This proposi- 
tion provided that a new contract for two year from January 1, 
be entered into between the employers and the Building Trades 
Council; that the present scale of wages be continued for the 
year 1922: and that the wage scale for 1923 be based on that 
of 1922, subject to decrease or increase in the cost of living for 
the year 1922 as compared with 1921. 

After all of the trade organizations affiliated with the Build- 
ing Trades Employers' Association had met for a careful con- 
sideration of this proposal their conclusions were reported to 
the Board of Governors and the Board, acting in accordance 
with the expressed will of the entire membership, wrote a 
letter to Mr. Untermyer rejecting his proposal. This letter 
said : 

"Your proposition, that a new contract be now made for two 
years from January 1st by and between the Building Trades 
Employers' Association and the Building Trades Council, that 
the present wage scale be continued for the year 1922, and that 
the wage scale for 1923 be based on that of 1922, subject to de- 
crease or increase in the cost of living for the year 1922 as 
compared with 1921, provided that the continuance of the 
present wage scale and the amount of the wage scale for 1923 
be condition, as to the wages of $1.00 per day for each member 
of the unions, upon the efficiency of each union separately con- 
sidered, efficiency to be determined by an arbitration board of 
seven members, has been considered by the trade associations, 
comprising the Building Trades Employers' Association. 

"These trade associations have reported their conclusions to 
the Board of Governors, and the Board, acting in accordance 
with the expressed will of the entire membership, has rejected 
your proposal. 

"The present wage scale has been repeatedy condemned by 
the public. Its continuance without a fair hearing of all the 
facts relating thereto by the representatives of the public would 
be unfair to the public and to the nine hundred members of 
the Building Trades Employers' Association who are dependent 
upon the patronage of the public for a living. 

"Housing is one of the principal items of expenditure con- 
sidered in computing the cost of living. Our investigation con- 
clusively shows that the peak in rental values has been passed 
and that the trend is now downward. The items of cost of 
housing construction, other than labor, have been greatly re- 
duced. The prices of all materials have been reduced and the 
wages of all those employed in the manufacture of housing 
materials already have been reduced. You now propose that 
the labor employed on housing construction, which up to the 
present suffered no reduction from war time wages, shall not 
only be exempted from a reduction during the whole year of 
1922, but its wages for 1923 shall not be reduced unless addi- 
tional reductions shall be made in all of the other items enter- 
ing into the cost of living, which must mean a still further 
reduction in wages of all other lines except the building line. 
It seems to us that the building trades unions would not ask 
for more. 

"The solution of other problems almost as important as the 



116 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28, 1922 



New York State Builders Meet in Albany Next Week 

Constructive Program of Activity for 1922 Outlined for Annual Convention of 
Association of Building Trades Employers 



THE New York State Association of Builders will hold its 
trtenty-sixth annual convention at Albany, Tuesday and 
Wednesday, January 31 and Feljvuary 1. The headquar- 
ters of the convention will be at the Ten Eyck Hotel and the 
sessions w'ill be held in the ball room. The responses from the 
various employers' associations throughout the State indicate 
that the forthcoming convention will be a notable gathering as 
far as the number of delegates is concerned and the sessions 
should result in some very constructive effort to revive interest 
in building in this Commonwealth. 

The first session will be called to order at 10 a. m. Tuesday 
and the convention will be formally opened with an address 
by William S. Hackett, Mayor of Albany. C. W. Luther, 
president of the New York State Association of Builders, is 
scheduled to respond to the address of welcome after which 
the session will be turned over to routine business. This will 
include the annual reports of the secretary and treasurer and 
the appointment of special committees. One of the most im- 
portant of the topics for discussion at this session will be that 



of wage scales and trade agreements and working conditions 
in each of the cities represented by delegates. 

The annual banquet of the Association will be held in the ball 
room of the Ten Eyck Hotel on Tuesday evening at 7 p. m. 

The Wednesday morning business session will convene at 
10 a. m. and the program includes the reading of annual re- 
ports of the various standing committees, the report of the 
Executive Committee, the appointment of a new executive com- 
mittee, the report of the Counsel on legislative work of 1921, 
session of State Legislature; the consideration of a legislative 
program for 1922 and whatever further routine business may 
come up. One of the most important features on the program 
of this session is an address by W. S. Hays, Secretary of the 
National Federation of Construction Industries, who will speak 
on national building problems and the plans for their solution. 

This session will adjourn at 1 p. m. and will be immediately 
followed by the annual State Association luncheon. William 
T. Ritch, of New York City, will be the song leader and in- 
formal addresses will be made by past officers of the associa- 
tion and also by Edward A. Keeler, Secretary i 



Davenport Committee Proposes to Equalize Taxes 



(Continued from page 103) 
districts of the state by the farmer, the home owner and the 
rent payer. 

"The committee believes that permanent relief for overburdened real 
property lies in the development of a new practice in the localities 
themselves with respect to waste and the extravagant extension of 
expenditures. At the present time real estate in New York is in an 
especially exposed position, bearing the full brunt of the mounting 
costs of government, the committee finds. It is now practically the sole 
shock absorber. 

"Assessments of real property throughout many sections of the State 
appear to be involved in much incompetence and injustice," the report 
says. "What appears to be needed is a larger assessment district and 
more skilled and permanent assessment service. The attainment of this 
involves the adoption of a constitutional amendment." 

"Another proposal which is urgent in the opinion of the 
Committee has to do with the increased taxation of motor 
trucks. It is perhaps not generally known that of every $30,- 
000 a mile spent at present by the state for road building the 
second $15,000 is expended mainly that the roads may be fit 
to permit the operation of heavy trucks carrying great loads 
of freight. 

"The committee has found," continues the report, "that the old method 
of taxing banks and other financial institutions, which has been in force 



for many years, produces very unequal results, and proposes that financial 
institutions be taxed by a new method on the basis of their 'net income.' 
This will make it possible to treat financial institutions with more exact 
fairness as compared with other business, and to correct the injustices 
which the committee's investigations show now rest upon the smaller 
banks of the State. 

"A crisis has developed in bank taxation In the country because of a 
decision of the Supreme Court of the Unted States whch apparently, 
makes illegal the traditional method of taxing national banks. Certain 
of the national banks in the State are seeking under this decision to 
escape from all State taxation. This committee has joined in an effort 
to obtain an amendment to the Revised Statutes of the United States 
which will meet the condition created by the decision of the Supreme 
Court. Unless this amendment is conceded by Congress, the committee's 
plan outlined above for a reorganization of the bank taxes of the State, 
although greatly needed in the interest of justice to the banks them- 
selves, as well as to the State, cannot be put into operation. 

"However, if a reasonable plan is blocked through the short-sighted 
opposition of a small section of the financial community, the committee 
proposes to prevent the evasion of a fair share of the Government burden 
by validating the traditional national bank tax through a return to the 
taxation of all moneyed capital competing with national banks at the 
same rate as that imposed upon national banks themselves. 

"The committee has received many complaints regarding the unequal 
manner in which the business taxes of the State apply when restricted 
merely to incorporated business entitles. The committee believes that a 
fair business tax must be as broad as business itself, and that the unin- 
corporated business entitles, which prosper under the support and pro- 
tection of the environment of a free and stable Government, should pay 
their fair share of the burden which the State finds it necessray to impose 
upon business. The committee recommends a reasonable tax upon the net 
income above !P5,000 of unincorporated business." 



Restricts Height of Buildings on Fifth Avenue 



HEIGHT of buildings on Fifth Avenue between 60th and 
9Sth Streets will be restricted to 75 feet. This was de- 
decided at the meeting of the Board of Estimate on Fri- 
day, Jan. 20. Several weeks ago owners of property along this 
part of Fifth Avenue made an attempt to have the Board of 
Estimate include that territory in the zoning restrictions, there- 
by limiting the erection of tall buildings. 

A majority of the board voted in favor of the restrictions, but 
when it was pointed out that the law provided that if 20 per 
cent, of the property owners within any zoning district opposed 
restrictions it required a unanimous vote of the board to adopt 



a zoning resolution, the matter was laid over until tomorrow 
to determine if the objectors numbered 20 per cent. 

The Corporation Counsel gave an opinion that 20 per cent, of 
the o.wners had not protested, and that the resolution passed 
last November was legal. 

Under the present law the height of buildings in this section 
may be 150 feet, but the amendment restricts the height to 75 
feet. 

Since the fight to restrict buildings on the Avenue to 75 feet 
plans have been filed for several apartment houses reaching 
the 150-foot limit. 



Employers Reject Untermyer's Wage Scale Proposal 



(Continued from page 115) 
mote the public interest by being present at meetings between 
representatives of the Employers and the Council we will not 
object to the presence of the Lockwood Committee because it 
is truly representative of the public. Your body can render no 
greater public service in this matter than by urging the Em- 
ployers to accept the solution offered by Mr. Untermyer and 
we would earnestly request you to follow that course. 
"Since writing the above Mr. Crowley has been in touch with 



Mr. Untermyer and Mr. Untermyer has made the following 
suggestions. That the Council will have no objection to a 
small committee — say three from your associates to be present 
while the representatives of the Employers' Association and 
the Council are discussing their diflferences but under no con- 
sideration are the members of this committee to have any 
voice in the discussion or to be considered as having any right 
to arbitrate existing diiierences. 
"This council is thoroughly in accord with this suggestion." 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



117 



Residential Building Still Dominates Local Situation 

Weekly Figures of F. W. Dodge Companj' Show Tremendous Influence of Tax 
Exemption Measure Upon Construction Outlook in Greater New York 



REPORTS from architects and engineers in New York 
State and New Jersey, north of Trenton, show a steady 
increase in the volume of projected construction now 
scheduled for a start during the early spring months. Although 
the commitments of the past few weeks have not quite kept 
pace with the newly projected work reported the actual con- 
tract awards have been fair and certainly indicate sufficient 
active building to assure a busy season to the construction 
fraternity. 

According to the figures tabulated by the F. W. Dodge Com- 
pany for the third week of 1922 there were 446 new building and 
■engineering operations reported as being planned for locations 
in New York States and Northern New Jersey. This work 
will involve an outlay of approximately $26,020,500. During 
the same week the contracts awarded in this territory num- 
bered 279 and represented a total value of $11,754,900. 

Residential construction accounts for approximately one-half 
of the proposed buildings reported and is nearly two-thirds of 
the work actually placed under contract during the week. This 
is largely due to the fact that the close of the tax exemption 



period is near at hand and speculative builders are making 
every effort to get their operations started in order to claim 
their e.xemption for the specified period. 

Among the 446 projects for which plans were reported during 
the week of January 14 to 20 inclusive were 73 business build- 
ings such as stores, offices, lofts, commercial garages, etc., 
uS,345,000; 17 educational projects, $4,625,400; 3 hospitals and 
institutions, $1,058,000; 17 factory and industrial buildings, 
$323,500; 9 public works and public utilities, $345,000; 8 religious 
and memorial structures, $224,000; 301 residential operations in- 
cluding apartments, flats and tenements and one and two-family 
dwellings, $13,180,100 and 18 social and recreational projects. 
$918,500. 

The list of 279 projects for which contracts were reported 
during the third week of 1922 was comprised of the following 
groups: 49 business buildings of various types, $1,428,800; 3 
educational buildings, $305,000; 3 hospitals and institutions, 
$655,000; IS factory and industrial projects, $315,000; 6 public 
works and public utilities, $465,000; 1 religious edifice, $10,- 
000; residential operations, $8,270,100 and 4 social and recrea- 
tional projects, $306,000. 



PERSONAL AND TRADE 
NOTES. 



bur M. Whitlock. Action was taken to 
fill the vacancy caused by the death of 
Superintendent Walter Rooksby, who died 
on January 17. He had held this position 
for the past twenty years. 



I,eonnrd S. Henry, architect, has moved 
his office to 36 East 49th street. 

Radio Manufacturing Company an- 
nounces the removal of its general offices 
a,nd sales department to 170 Fifth avenue. 

Birch Burdette Long, architect, an- 
nounces the removal of his offices from 
400 West 23d street to 36 East 49th street. 

William Neumann, architect, announces 
the removal of his offices from 314 Pal- 
isade avenue to the Lerner Building, 
Boulevard and Bergen avenue, Jersey City, 
N. J. 

William G. Dan'.son, a prominent builder 
of Mt. Vernon, was elected president of the 
Westchester County Building Trades Em- 
ployers' Association at the recent annual 
meeting of this organization. 

H. I. Peldman, architect, announces the 
■opening of an office for the general prac- 
tice of his profession at 17 West 42d 
street, and desires samples, catalogues 
and price lists of building materials and 
specialties. 

Kent Company, Inc., Rome, N. T., man- 
ufacturer of the Utility electric floor ma- 
chine and the Kent stationary cleaner, 
announces the establishment of a New 
Tork City office at 147 West 57th street. 
The new office will be in charge of F. T. 
Kent. 

Starobln Electrical Supply Company re- 
cently established a branch office and 
sales room at 173 Hunter avenue, Long 
Island City. Besides carrying a general 
line of electrical supplies at this new ad- 
dress the company has put in a stock 
of commercial and residential lighting 
fixtures. William Haag is in charge of 
the Long Island City depot. 



TRADE AND TECHNICAL 
SOCIETY EVENTS. 



**OTTn-Your-Home'' Exposition 

The fourth annual "Own-Your-Home" 
Exposition will be held in New York City 
April 22 to 30, inclusive. Robert H. Sex- 
ton, 512 Fifth avenue, is the managing 
director. The 1922 Exposition will be 
even more extensive and interesting than 
those of previous years. Practically every 
phase of home planning, financing and 
construction will be shown graphically 
and considerable exposition space will be 
devoted to the furnishing and decoration 
of houses of moderate cost. 



I'aiiit Research To Be Undertaken 

Research into the problems of the pro- 
tecting power and durability of paint on 
wood is being planned by the Engineer- 
ing Foundation. It is likely that the or- 
ganization of the proposed investigation 
will be directed .iointly by the Foundation, 
the Division of Engineering, and the Di- 
vision of Chemistry and Chemical Tech- 
nology of the National Research Council. 
The Foundation says that in view of the 
great annual expenditure for paint, about 
.$300,000,000. it is important to have de- 
pendable information on the durability 
both of paint and of the wood which it 
protects. 



Newark nuiiders Elect Officers 

The annual meeting of the Builders' and 
Traders' Exchange of Newark was held at 
the Exchange headquarters, 156 Market 
street, Thursday, January 19. The follow- 
ing officers were re-elected for a term of 
one year: Frederick Bowden, president: 
Hugh Kinnard. vice-president; William C. 
Clift, secretary, and Lewis C. Rusling, 
treasurer. Two directors were chosen for 
a term of three years — John W. Shaw and 
David P. Smith. The other members of 
the Board of Directors are Harry G. Fow- 
ler. John F. Dcy, Ira J. Ingram and Wil- 



.lohn \Mlson, Material Dealer, Dies. 

John Wilson, president of the Brooklyn 
Builders' Supply Company, Sixth street 
and Gowanus Canal, Brooklyn, died of 
pni-'Umonia at his home, 456 Fourteenth 
street, Saturday, January 21. Mr. Wilson, 
who has one of the organizers of the 
Brooklyn Builders' Supply Company, had 
been its president for the past ten years. 
Prior to entering the material supply 
business he was one of the most prom- 
inent builders of the Park Slope section 
of Brooklyn, where he erected many pri- 
vate residences and large apartment 
houses. He was born in Aberdeen, Scot- 
land, and came to the United States when 
he was about twenty years of age. For 
the past thirty years he had been a resi- 
dent of Brooklyn and was prominently 
identified with business and civic activi- 
ties. He "was a member of the Rotary 
Club, the Brooklyn Chamber of Com- 
merce, the Crescent Athletic Club and 
Greenwood Lodge. No. 569, P. & A. M. 
He is survived by his widow and a 
daughter. 



Architectural League of IVe^v York will 

hold its annual exposition at the Fine 
Arts Building, 215 West 57th street, Sun- 
day, February 5, to Saturday, March 4, 
from 1 P. M. to 10 P. M. The exhibition 
will be preceded by the usual reception 
on Saturday afternoon, February 4. 

New York State Association of Builders 
will hold its annual convention at the 
Ten Eyck Hotel, Albany, January 31 and 
February 1, inclusive. 

Building Managers* and Owners* Asso- 
ciation of New York will hold its regular 
monthly dinner meeting at the Advertis- 
ing Club, 47 East 25th street, Tuesday 
evening, February 14. The speaker of the 
evening will be announced later. 

Building Trade Employers* Assoctation 
will hold its annual election of officers at 
the association rooms, 30 West 33d street, 
Tuesday, February 21. The Nominating 
Committee has presented the following 
slate: For president, AValter S. Faddis; for 
vice-president, A. J. Rosenthal; for second 
vice-president, John J. Grace, and for 
treasurer, J. Odell Whitenack. 

Lighting Fixture Dealers* Society of 
.Vnierica will hold its annual convention at 
the Milwaukee Auditorium, Milwaukee, 
Wis,. January 30 to February 4, inclusive. 

American Institute of Architects has 
selected Chicago as the city in which to 
hold its 1922 convention, which will be 
held early in the spring. Further details 
will be announced later. 

New York State Retail Hardware Asso- 
ciation will hold its annual convention 
and exhibition at Rochester. N. Y., Febru- 
ary 21 to 24, inclusive. Exhibition at Ex- 
hibition Park; headquarters and sessione 
Ht the Po'wers Hotel. 

Common Rrick Manufacturers* Associ- 
ation of America will hold its annual con- 
vention at the Staticr Hotel, St. Louis, 
Mo., January 30 to February 1, 1922. In- 
dications are that this convention will 
draw a larger attendance than the his- 
toric gathering in New York City last 

National Metal Trade Association 'will 
hold its twenty-fourth annual convention 
at the Hotel Astor, New York City, .\pril 
19 and 20, inclusive. The program of this 
meeting will be announced later- 
American Sot'iety for Testing Materials 
will hold its twenty-fifth anniutl meeting 
at the Chalfonte-Haddon Hall Hotel, At- 
lantic City, June 26 to July 1, inclusive. 



118 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



lanuar.v 28, 192? 



CURRENT BUILDING OPERATIONS 



OCALi building interests are now 
chiefly concerned with the prospects 
for a new working agreement and wage 
scale with labor and until this question 
is settled there is likely to be some 
hesitancy about starting new construc- 
tion. There is a vast amount of contem- 
plated work pending, a large percentage 
of it for which plans are fully matured, 
but owners are unwilling to make defi- 
nite commitments while there remains 
any doubt as to wages for building 
mechanics. 

Reports from speculative building In- 
terests are indicative of an early spring 
start on a lot of new apartment houses 
and one and two-family projects so as 
to obtain the advantages of tax exemp- 
tion. Although there is a possibility that 
the tax exemption law may be extended 
the majority of prospective builders of 
speculative operations are not taking a 
chance on the extension of the present 
law, but will make every possible effort 
to get their jobs substantially under way 
by the time specified under the law as it 
now reads. 

Recently there has been a slight ad- 
vancing tendency to material prices and 
the markets in general are now quite 
firm. Brick, Hudson River common, is 
being held at $17 a thousand in the whole- 
sale market and lumber is higher than 
it was. Fabricated steel is off a bit, but 
several other lines are more costly today 
than they were a few weeks ago. 
Demand is fair, but inquiry shows that a 
large amount of new business will be 
released just as soon as conditions 
warrant. 

Conimnn Brick — Owing to the extremely 
cold weather of the past week or ten 
days business in the New York wholesale 
market for Hudson River common has 
been quite light. Sales l^ave been negli- 
gible and as the river is completely ice- 
bound above Tarrytown there have been 
no arrivals of bricli from up-river yards. 
Common brick prices have advanced 
sharply during the week with current 
quotations $17 a thousand. The manu- 
facturers who are asking this figure feel 
that they are fully entitled to it because 
of their extra costs in holding and cover- 
ing this brick. 

Summary — Transactions in the North 
River common brick market for the week 
ending Thursday, January 26. Condition 
of market; Demand light; prices sharply 
advanced. Quotations; Hudson Rivers, 
$17 a thousand to dealers in cargo lots 
alongside dock. Number of cargoes 
arrived, none; sales, 6. Distribution; 
Manhattan, 4; Bronx, 1; Astoria, 1. 



Remaining unsold in the New York 
wholesale market, 9. 

Lumber — Trade is quiet in both branches 
of the local lumber market, but recent 
inquiry is indicative of a large amount of 
potential business that is likely to be re- 
leased shortly. It is reported that the 
majority of the yellow pine mills have 
again resumed operations after the holi- 
day shutdown. Although the present de- 
mand for this kind of lumber is weak, 
prices have not been reduced Long leaf 
timber prices are also holding firmly. 
Plat grain floorings which advanced dur- 



ing the last quarter of 1921 are now sell- 
ing considerably below the December 1 
prices, with demand light. Spruce prices 
are flrm but stocks are badly broken. 
There is a tendency on the part of some 
mills to make concessions in prices on 
maple and oak flooring. The market at 
present is particularly spotty and will not 
settle down again until the 1922 building 
season gets actually under way. 

Structural Steel — The local market for 
fabricated steel for buildings is steadily 
improving, with a continuation of fairly 
good tonnage for commercial construe- 



BUILDING COMMODITY PRICES 



CURRENT prices for building materials 
and supplies as quoted by leading 
dealers and jobbers in the city for delivery 
in New York. 

Note — Price changes are Indicated by 
bold-face type. 

Brick (Wholesale, on Dock, N. T.), per 
thousand; 

For delivered prices in Greater New 
York add cartage, handling, plus 10 per 
cent. 

Hudson River best grades. . . .!(!17.00to 

Raritan No quotation 

Second-hand brick, per load 

of 3,000, delivered $45.00 to 

Face Brick — Delivered on job in New 
York; 

Rough Red .$45.00 to 

Smooth Red 45.00 to 

Rough Buff .; 50.00 to 

Smooth Buff 50.00 to 

Rough Gray 53.00 to 

Smooth Gray 53.00 to 

Colonials 45.00 to 

Cement — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan, Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens: 

Domestic Portland cement, per bbl..$2.S0 
Rebate for bags, 10c. each. 

Gravel — Delivered at job site in Manhat- 
tan and Bronx: 

I'A-in., Manhattan deliveries, per cu. 

yd »4.25 

Bron.K deliveries 4.25 

%-in., Manhattan deliveries 4.25 

Bronx deliveries 4.25 

Note — Prices for deliveries in Brooklyn 
and Queens are approximately the same 
as for Manhattan, except where job is lo- 
cated at a great distance from the water 
front, in which case prices will be slightly 
higher. 

Grit — Delivered at job site in Manhattan 
and Bronx; 

.Manhattan deliveries $3.50 

Bronx deliveries 3.50 



Hollow Tile — 

Exterior — Not used in Manhattan: quota- 
tions only on specific projects. 

Interior — Delivered at job site in Man- 
hattan, south of 125th street. 

2x12x12 split furring $0.12 per sq. ft. 

3x12x12 0.12 per sq. ft. 

4x12x12 0.17 per sq. ft. 

6x12x12 0.19 per sq. ft. 

Note — For deliveries north of 125th St., 
Manhattan, and in Brooklyn, Bronx and 
Queens, prices job site are slightly higher, 
according to location of work, which 
varies trucking charges. 
Lath — 
Eastern Spruce delivered 

at job site in Manhattan, 

Bronx. Brooklyn and 

Queens $10.50 per 1,0(T0 

I'imc — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan, 
Bronx, Brooklyn and Queens: 
Finishing Lime (Standard in 

300-lb. barrel) $4.70 per bbl. 

Common Lime (Standard 300- 
lb. barrel) 4.40 per bbl. 

Finishing Lime (Standard In 
Hydrate Finishing, in paper 

bags 24.00 per ton 

Hydrate Common, in cloth 

bags 22.50 T)er tou 

Plaster — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattaix 
Bronx. Brooklyn and Queens 
Neat Wall Cement, In cloth 

bags $21.00 per ton 

Brown Mortar, in cloth bags. 18.00 per ton 
Lath Mortar, in cloth bags... 18.00 per ton 
Finishing Plaster, in cloth 

bags 24.50 per ton 

Rebate for returned bags. 15c. per bag 
Finishing Plaster (250-lb. 

barrel) $4.00 per bbl. 

Finishing Plaster (320-lb 

barrel) 5.35 per bbl. 

Plaster Blocks — 

2-in. (solid) per sq. ft $0.17 to 0.19 

3-in. (hollow) per sq. ft 0.17 to 0.19 




The 

UNION STOVE WORKS 

Headqaarters for Builders for 

Kitchen Ranges for Coal or Gas, Standard or 

Pipeless Furnaces, Heating Boilers, Laundry 

Apparati 

THE GREAT "ASTOR" LINE 



70 BEEKMAN STREET 



Established 88 Tears 



Telephone: Beekman 2499 



Keen Competition and the Great Struggle for Business has brought into the New York 
Market a Light Weight Extra Heavy Cast Iron Pipe. 

We are selling Full Weight, New York Regulation, Extra Heavy, Cast Iron Pipe. 

We do not Substitute, 6u( tell Full. Honest Weight. 

JOHN A. MURRAY & SONS, INC. 

"The Boxite of Reliability" 
310-312 WEST 39TH STREET, NEW YORK 



$80,000 

To loan on corner plot, 75x100 
feet, in Norwood Gardens, 
Long Island City, for construc- 
tion of 5-story walk-up with 
stores. 

One Million Dollars 

To loan on one and two-family 
houses. 

Eicfeert=proujn 
Eealtp Co. 

52 VANDERBILT AVE.. NEW YORK CITY 
Tel. Vanderbilt 9484 4-6 



January 28, 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



119 



MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES 



tion and the release of quite a number of 
apartment house projects, the majority 
ranging from 500 to 1,000 tons each. Al- 
though there has not been quite so much 
new construction figuring during the past 
week as there was just prior to the close 
of 1921, the outlook tor the early spring 
is bright as architects and engineers are 
working on plans for a number of im- 
portant operations that will in all prob- 
ability be shortly released for bids. Prices 
are slightly lower and ruling quotations 
range from $60 to $65 per ton, fabricated 
and erected. 



Builders' Hardware — There is quite an 
active interest in this line and both man- 
ufacturers and jobbers are anticipating 
a busy season ahead. Early prospects for 
an extensive building movement during 
the coming spring and summer months 
are excellent and as a consequence the 
outlook for a heavy hardware demand is 
particularly bright. At present the move- 
ment out of jobbers' stocks is fair and 
dealers seem to be augmenting their 
stocks in preparation for the early 
spring building requirements. Prices are 
stoady and no changes were reported. 



IN THE METROPOLITAN MARKETS 



Plaster Board — 

Delivered at job site in Manhattan, 
Bronx. Brooklyn and Queens. 

27x48x^ in J0.38 each 

32x36x14 in 0.22 each 

32x36x% in 0.24 each 

32x36x1/2 in 0.30 each 

Sand — 

Delivered at job in 

Manhattan $1.80 to per cu. yd. 

Delivered at job in 

Bronx 1.80 to percu.yd. 

White Sand — 

Delivered in Manhattan . . . . $5.00 per cu. yd. 

Broken Stone — 

ll^-in., Manhattan delivery . $4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

%-in., Manhattan delivery. . 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Bronx delivery 4.00 per cu. yd. 

Building Stone — 

Indiana limestone, per cu. ft J1.62 

Kentucky limestone, per cu. ft 2.27 

Briar Hill sandstone, per cu. ft l.Si 

Gray Canyon sandstone, per cu. ft. . . . 1.65 

Buff Wakeman, per cu. ft 1.90 

Buff Mountain, per cu. ft 1.80 

North River bluestone, per cu. ft 1.85 

Seam face granite, per sq. ft 1.20 

South Dover marble (promiscuous 

mill block), per cu. ft 2.25 

White Vermont marble (sawed) New 

York, per cu. ft 3.00 

Structural Steel- 
Plain material at tidewater; cents per 
pound: 

Beams and channels up to 14 

In 1.880. to 2.03c. 

Beams and channels over 14 

in 1.88c. to 2.03c. 

Angles, 3x2 to 6x3 1.88c. to 2.03c. 

Zees and tees 1.88c to 2.03c. 

Lumber — 

Wholesale prices, New York. 
Yellow pine, merchantable 1905, f. o. b., 
N. Y.: 



3x4 to 14x14, 10 to 20 ft $41.00 to $5il.00 

Hemlock. Pa., f. o. b., N. Y., 

base price, per M 37.50 to 

Hemlock, W. Va., base price, 

per M 37.00 to 

(To mixed cargo price add freight, $1.50.) 

Spruce, Eastern, random car- 
goes, narrow (delivered) . . 30.00 to 

Wide cargoes 33.00 to 

Add $1.00 per M for each Inch in width 

over 12 inches. Add $1.00 per M for every 

two feet over 20 ft. in length. Add $1.00 

per M for dressing. 

Cypress Lumber (by car, f. o. b., N. Y.): 

First and seconds, 1-in. .. .$110.00 to 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 

1 Hearts to 

Cypress shingles, 6x13, No. 

1 Prime to • 

Quartered Oak to $166.00 

Plain Oak to 136.00 

Flooring: 

White oak, quarfd sel to $87.50 

Red oak, quart'd select.. to 87.50 



Maple No. 1 65.00 to 

Yellow pine No. 1 common 

flat 55.no to 

N. C. pine flooring Nor- 

folks 65.00 to 



Windo^T Glass — 

Official discounts from manufacturers' 

lists; 
Single strength, A quality, first three 

brackets 85% 

B grade, single strength, first three 

brackets 85% 

Grades A and B, larger than the first 

three brackets, single thick 85% 

Double strength, A quality 85% 

Double strength, B quality 87% 

Linseed Oil — 

City brands, oiled, 5 bbls. lot.. $0.73 to 

Less than 5 bbls 0.76 to 



Turpentine- 
Turpentines 



.$0.92 to $0.95 



Window Glas.« — Although business in 
this line has been somewhat dull since the 
beginning of the year, there has been an 
increase in the number of inquiries local 
jobbers have received during the past 
week that are indicative of greater buy- 
ing activity within the next few weeks. 
There is still considerable new construc- 
tion with window glass requirements yet 
to be taken care of and a large amount of 
new work has lately been placed under 
contract, so that the market for glass is 
practically assured for the coming spring 
and summer. Prices are firm and un- 
changed. 

Electrical Supplies — Business in this 
line has slowed down to some extent dur- 
ing the past week and it is all the more 
apparent because there was quite a buy- 
ing spurt directly after the first of the 
year. The outlook for early spring busi- 
ness is excellent, however, and with the 
volume of projected construction steadily 
increasing there should be no complaint 
of a lack of business during the coming 
season. Prices for electrical materials 
and supplies remain steady and are prac- 
tically unchanged. For the most part 
stocks are adequate for the light current 
demand and ample supplies are easily 
available at production points. Quota- 
tions on flexible armored conduit are 
somewhat easier than they were and rub- 
ber-covered wire prices are slightly off. 

Cast Iron Pipe — Orders for cast iron 
pipe for spring delivery are coming in 
from private buyers quite rapidly and 
some are for fairly large tonnages, so 
that the industry has quite a large vol- 
ume of business ahead and prospects of 
considerable municipal business shortly 
to be released. Manufacturers are far 
better off as regards orders than they 
were one year ago, and practically all of 
the plants are working at more than 75 
per cent, of capacity. Prices are firm and 
unchanged, with New York quotations as 
follows: 6 in. and heavier, $47.30 per net 
ton; 5 in. and 4 in., $52.30, and 3 in., 
$62.30. with Class A and gas pipe $4 extra 
per ton. 

Linseed Oil — During the past week 
there has been somewhat of a change in 
the linseed oil market situation. The de- 
mand has improved, although practically 
all buying is in small lots, and the num- 
ber of current inquiries leads to the belief 
that business conditions are changing for 
the better. Prices are firm. 

Nnils — Business has been quite dull 
during the past few weeks and jobbers 
do not anticipate much of an increase un- 
til the spring building season commences. 




Face 

Enameled 

Fire 



BRICK 

FACE BRICK 

in Buffs, Ironspots. Browns and Mingled Eflfects, in full range or any 
individual Shade or Texture. 

ENAMELED BRICK 

in White and Mottled Effects, first and second quality for interiors, 
exteriors and courts. 

FIRE BRICK 
and fire clay of highest grades. 

Lowest market prices. May zve estimate for you? 

American Enameled Brick & TUe Company 

52 VANDERBILT AVENUE, NEW YORK 

Telephone Murray Hill (787-87S8 



As manufacturers of BRICK for thirty years, 
we have a record of repeat orders that affords 
you a 100% guarantee of satisfactory service. 
To the service given by our Face, Enameled 
and Fire BRICK, is added the service we 
render in shipment and delivery. Prompt 
shipments on any size contracts in any range 
of shade or texture, at fair prices and o5 
first-class quality. 



120 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



January 28, 1922 



J. P. Duffy Co. 

Flue Pipe 

Terra Cotta Blocks 

Gypsum Blocks 

Masons' Materials 

138th Street and Park Avenue 

BROOKLYN 
50th-51st Streets and 2nd Avenue 

QUEENS 
Jackson Avenue and Madden Street 



POMEROY 

FIRE RETARD ANT 
WINDOWS 

Built in the belief that the BEST hollow 
metal fire retardant window is the only 
SAFE fire retardant window for a builder 
to use or for a manufacturer to a^XL 

S. H. POMEROY CO., Inc. 

282-96 East 134th Street NEW YORK 

Phone Melrose 6104 



THLBPHONBB : HABUSM 1 1^' 



FRANK U. ROSS 

Contractor and Dealer in 

TILE and MARBLE 

8« EAST 116TH STREET NEW YORK 



A. J. SIMBERG 


ARCHITECT 


1133 BROADWAY, N. Y. 


AT 26TH STREET Phot..: Walkins 1877 



HOUSE MOVERS and SHORERS 

House Moving, Shoring and JobbinK 
Promptly Attended to 

Christian Vorndrans Sons 

411 E. 147th St., Bronx Tel. Melroie iM 



CONTEMPLATED 

CONSTRUCTION, 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

RIVERSIDE DR. — Plans which are being pre- 
pared privately are nearing completion for three 
G-sty and basement brick and limestone apart- 
ments. 138xl25x205x irregular, at 837 Riverside 
dr 320 ft north of 158th st, for Friedman & 
White Realty Co., Inc., 900 Riverside dr, owner 
and builder. Cost, $1,000,000. 

BENNETT AV. — Samuel Cohen, 32 Union sq, 
has plans in progress for a 5-sty bricli apart- 
ment, 157x40 ft. at the southeast corner of Ben- 
nett av & West 184th st, for Phil Gold Realty 
Co., 108 8th av, owner and builder. Cost, $150,- 

ooo'. 

12TH ST. — Bmilo Levy, 331 Madison av, has 
plans in progress for a 6-sty brick apartment, 
ti3x84 ft. at 169-173 West 12th st, for 171 West 
12th St. Inc. — E. G. Routjohn, president — oi 
Greenwich av, owner. Cost, $100,000. Architect 
will take bids on general contract from a sel- 
ected list of bidders about February Ist. 
CHURCHES. 

93D ST. — Sommerfeld & Sleekier, 31 Union sq, 
have plans in progress for a synagogue on plot 
75x100 ft. in the south side of 93d st, 100 ft east 
of Broadway, for Congregation Chaarizaiak, ^3- 
■I-i West 118tb at, Nathan Frankel, president, 
owner. 

DWELLINGS. 

96TH ST. — David M. Ach, 1 Madison av, has 
plans nearing completion for alterations to the 
4-sty & basement brick dwelling, 20x72 ft. at 20 
West 06th st, for W. H. Taylor, 12 West 96th 
st, owner. Cost, $10,000. 

SOTH ST. — Cross & Cross, 681 5th av, have 
completed plans for a 4-sty brick & stone dwell- 
ing, 30x78 ft, at 116-118 East 80th st, for Lewis 
Spencer Morris, 182 East 64th st, owner. Coat, 
$100,000. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

15TH ST. — Maurice Courland, 47 West 34th st. 
has plans in progress for alterations and a top 
addition to the 8-sty brick factory, 75x100 ft, 
at 31-33 West 15th st, for Max Schaffer Co., 26 
Warren st, owner. Cost, ,$90,000. Architect will 
take bids on general contract about February 1. 
HOTELS. 

5TH AV— Emery Roth, 119 West 40th st, has 
plans in progress for a 14-sty brick and lime- 
stone apartment hotel. .=i4xl00 ft, at 37-39 5th 
av. tor Ring & Bing, 119 West 40th st. owner 
and builder. Owner will soon take bids on 
separate contracts. Concrete and electrical 
engineer, Alex Brociner, 110 West 10th st. 
STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

UNIVERSITY AV. — Samuel Cohen, 32 Union 
sq. has plans in progress for a 1-sty brick tax- 
payer, 011x100 ft, on the west side of University 
av'. 81 ft south of West 179th st, for Occidental 
Holding Co., owner, care of architect. 

36TH ST.— Schwartz & Gross, 347 5th av, have 
completed plans for a 13-sty brick loft building, 
126x06 ft, at 242-252 West .36th st, for the 242- 
252 West 36th Street Corp., Max Aronson, presi- 
dent, 229 West 36th st, owner. Cost, $2,600,000. 
Structural engineer. Ball & Snyder, 25 East 24th 

St. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
120TH ST.— J. J. Gloster Co., 110 West 40th st. 



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has completed plans tor alterations and an addi- 
tion to the 1-sty brick laundry, 40x90 ft, at 118 
Bast 120th st, for Manhattan Wet Wash Laun- 
dry, owner, on premises. Cost, $20,000. 

Bronx 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

MORRIS AV. — I. Margon & C. Glaser, 2806 3d 
av, have completed plans tor a 5-sty brick, lime- 
stone & terra cotta apartment house, 120x88 ft, 
on the west side of Morris av, 103 ft south of 
181st st, for Kings Winter Building Co., 81 East 
125th st, owner and builder. Cost, $200,000. 

GRAND CONCOURSE. — Irving Margon & Chas. 
Galser, 2806 3d av, have plans nearing completion 
lor two 5-sty brick, limestone & terra cotta 
apartments, 90x125 ft each, on the west side of 
Grand Concourse, north of 196th st, tor W. J. 
Diamond, 1646 Monroe av, owner. Total cost, 
$50,000. 

171 ST ST. — James F. Meehan and associate. 
Times Building, 42d st & Broadway, have plans 
in progress for a 6-sty brick, stucco & granite 
apartment, 3.j8x270 ft, on the block bounded by 
171st & 172d sts. Grand Concourse & Whyte pi, 
for Billingsley Holding Corp., Dr. Logan Bill- 
ingsley, president, 1884 University av, owner. 
Cost, $2,000,000. Architect and owner will take 
bids on separate contracts at site about Febru- 
ary 5. 

BRONXWOOD AV.— Luclan Pisciotta, 3011 
Barnes av, has completed plans for a 3-sty brick 
& limestone tenement, 24x60 ft. on the east side 
of Bronxwood av, 45 ft south of 214th st, for 
Rose Giordano Emanuell, 636 Crescent av, own- 
er. Cost, .$20,000. Owner will take bids on gen- 
eral contract about February 15. 

MORRIS AV— Chas. Schaefer, 304 East 150th 
st, has completed plans for two 5-sty brick and 
limestone apartment houses, 63x81 ft, on the 
east side of Morris av, 249 ft south of 170th 
St. for Abraham Hackrott, 3.548-50 Park av, 
owner and builder. Cost, $180,000. 

171ST ST — Jas. F. Meehan and associate. 
Times Building, 42d st and Broadway, have 
plans in progress for a 6-sty brick, stucco and 
granite apartment, 358x270 ft, on the block 
bounded by lilst and 172d sts, Grand Concourse 
and Whyte pi, for Billingsley Holding Corp. — 
Dr. Logan Billingsley. president — 1884 Univer- 
sity av, owner. Cost, $2,000,000. Architect and 
owner will take bids on separate contracts at 
site about February 5th. 

CROTONA PARK EAST.— Chas. Schaefer, 394 
East l.'^Oth st, has completed plans for a 5-sty 
brick and limestone apartment house, 127x92 ft, 
at the southeast corner of Crotona Park East and 
Charlotte st for A. Brand, l.'tOO Wilkens av, 
owner and builder. Cost, $180,000. 

DWELLINGS. 

CAFLIN AV.— Thomas W. Golding. 117 West 
03d St. has completed plans for two 2-sty brick 
dwellings. 26x44 ft. with garage, on the east sidu 
of Caflin av. south of West 197th st, for J. B. 
Laemmle, owner, care of architect. Cost, 
$25,000. 

MAHAN AV. — B. Ebeling, 1372 Zerega av, has 
completed plans for two 2-sty brick dwellings, 
20x55 ft each, with a 1-sty garage, 20x20 ft, on 
the east side of Mahan av, 100 ft south of Burke 
av, for John Sellitto, 1815 West Farms rd, own- 
er and builder. Total cost, $21,000. 

HOLLAND AV. — Jos. Ziccardi, 012 Burke av, 
has completed plans for a 2-sty brick dwelling, 
35x50 ft. irregular, on the west side of Holland 
av, near 211th st, for Leonardo Palumho, 3530 
Holland av. owner and builder. Cost, $10,000. 
FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

WEBSTER AV.— Wm. H. Meyer, 1S61 Carter 
.av, has plans in progress for a 4-aty brick Ice 
plant. 75x110 ft, with storage & offices, on Web- 



January 28, 1922 

ster av, between 174th & 175th sts, for E. M. 

Schlldwachter, 4130 Park av, owner. Total cost, 

$1,0U0,0U0. Bids will be taken about February 1. 

STORES. OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

KINGSBRIDGB ROAD.— P. R. Henkel, 316 
1 Bast lUlst St. has completed plans for a 2-sty 
brick store & office building. ilO.Nl20 ft, at the 
southeast corner of Klngsbridge rd & Davidson 
av, for Weeks Avenue Construction Co., I. Rob- 
inson, president, 222 Fulton st, owner and build- 
er. 

TREMONT av. — Moore & Landsledel, 148th st 
and 3d av. have completed plans for eleven 1-sty 
and cellar brick and limestone stores, 111x112 it 
irregular, at the southeast corner of Tremont 
and Morris avs for Henry T. Garidel, 623 West 
l.S.'>th st, owner and builder. Cost. $45,UUU. 

ItlSITH ST. — Moore & Landsledel, USth st and 
lid av, have completed plans tor eight 1-sty and 
cellar brick and limestone stores. 2."ixlU0 ft, at 
the southwest corner of lllUth st and Jerome av 
for West r.lOth Street Corp.. care Chas. Schles- 
singer, 17T6 Weeks av, owner and builder. Cost, 
.•^1.5,U00. 

Brooklyn 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

UNION ST. — S. Millman & Son, 1780 Pitkin av, 
have completed plans for a 4-sty brick apart- 
ment, oOxiJ7 ft, in the south side of Union st, 
IIJO ft west of Utica av, for Jacob Kurlander, o 
Wayne st. Middle Village, owner and builder. 
Cost, $4S,0ii0. Owner will take bids on separate 
contracts about March 15. 

LINCOLN PL.— McCarthy & Kelly, 16 Court 
st, have comiileted plans for a 4-sty brick apart- 
ment, 83x100 ft, on the south side of Lincoln pi. 
70 ft east of Underbill av. for Wisconsin Realty 
Co., Harry Gordon, president, 330 Wyona st, 
owner and builder. Cost, Ifl2u,000. 

SIST ST.— Thos. I. Hohauser, 116 West 39th 
st, Manhattan, has completed plans for a 4-sty 
brick apartment, 6UxT6 ft, in the north side of 
81st st, 4UU ft east of Bay pkway, for Hicklow 
Construction Co.. 110 West 3!lth st, Manhattan, 
owner and builder. Cost, $80,000. 

BAY 2riTH ST.— Shampan & Shampan, 50 
Court st, have plans in progress for a 4-sty 
brick and limestone apartment. 7tixlOO ft, in the 
west side of Bay 2,"ith st, l.jO ft south of 8t0h 
St. for I. S. Chanin, 211 Bay 10th st. owner anu 
builder. Cost, .$140,000. 

NEW YORK AV — C. B. Meyers, 31 Union sq 
Manhattan, has plans in progress for a ti-sl. 
brick apartment, 100x120 ft. at the southeas 
corner of N Y av and Carroll st. tor M. Solo 
mon & Sons. Inc., 217 Havameyer st, ownei 
and builder. Cost, $175,000. 

44TH ST— Ferdinand Savignano, 6005 14tl 
av, has plans in progress for a 4-sty brie 
apartment, 40x100 ft. in the south side of 44t: 
st, 100 ft east of 13th av. for S. Kraus, ownei : 
care of architect. Cost, .f70.0UO. 

DWELLINGS. 
3STH ST— Geo. Alexander, Jr., 3402 av K. ha: 
plans in progress for two 2-sty frame dwellings 
16x61 ft, in the east side of East 3Sth si 

170 ft north of av I, for Richard Von Lehn. Jr 
2701 Glenwood rd. owner and builder. Cost 
$14,000. 

AV I — Jack Fein, 211 Snediker av, has com 
pleted plans for two 2-sty frame dwellings, 20 
40 ft, at the northwest corner of Av I and Eas 
."jlst St. for John Morobito, 230 Thompson si 
owner and builder. Total cost, .$12,000. 

AV Q— P. A. Smith. 51 East 42d st. has com- 
pleted plans for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 28x.")i 
ft, on the south side of Av Q, 60 ft east of East 
18th st, for Nellie G. Pease, 12 Kenmore pi, 
owner. Cost, $16,000. 

VAN SICLEN ST— Wm. A. Lacerenza, 16 
Court st, has completed plans for a 2-sty frame 
dwelling, 18x50 ft, in the east side of Van Sic- 
len st, 354 ft south of Kings Highway, for Fred 
L. Bartlett, 35 Pineapple st, owner and builder. 
Cost, $10,000. 

LINCOLN PL— Benj. Driesler. Jr., 153 Rem- 
sen st, has completed plans for a 2-sty brick 
dwelling. 20x60 ft. on the north side of Lincoln 
pi, 545 ft east of Underbill av, for Elite Build- 
ers, Inc., 1627 Union st, owner and builder. 
Cost, $10,000. 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

LAFAYETTE AV.— Murray Klein, 37 Graham 
av, has plans in progress for a 2-sty brick store 
and office building, 100x134 ft, at the corner of 
Lafayette av and Ashland pi for Samuel Agelolf, 
126 Reid av. owner and builder. Cost. $175,000. 

FLATBUSH AV.— R. T. Schaefer, 1543 Flat- 
bush av, has completed plans for a 1-sty brick 
store, 29x80 ft, on the east side of Flatbush av, 

171 ft south of Utica av, for Angelo Marani, 2395 
Flatbush av, owner and builder. Cost, $6,(i00. 

EMMONS AV.— Benj. Driesler. Jr.. 153 Remsen 
St. has plans in progress for four 2-sty brick 
stores, 40x70 ft, at the corner of Emmons av & 
Leonard pi, for Milkon Realty Co., M. Cohn, 
president-owner, care of architect. Cost, $7,000. 
Architect will lake bids on general contract. 

Queens 

APARTMENTS. FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

JAMAICA, L. I.— G. Rlccl, 137 Brighton av, 
Perth Amboy, has plans in progress for a 4 & 
7-sty brick apartment, with stores, at the north- 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

west corner of Hillside & Flushing avs, Jamaica, 
for J. L. Mott Engineering & Construction Co., 
1049 Haddon av, Camden, owner and builder. 
Cost, $1)00,000. 

LONG ISLAND CITY, L. I.— Shampan & 
Shampan, .50 Court st. Brooklyn, have completed 
plans for a 5-sty brick apartment, 88x100 ft, on 
the south side of Hunterspoint av, 100 ft west 
of Van Alst av, for Tubes Realty & Terminal 
Co.. Wm. P. Shunick. president, 51 East 42d 
st, Manhattan, owner. Cost, $140,000. Archi- 
tect will take bids soon. 

DWELLINGS. 

HOLLIS PARK GARDENS, L. I.— G. Crane. 
1115 Stoothoff av, Richmond Hill, has plans in 
progress for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 60x27 ft, 
on Fairmont av, Hollis Park Gardens, for A. 
Gascov.ie. 1264 Jamaica av, Woodhaven. owner 
and builder. Cost. $17,000. 

HEMPSTEAD, L. I.— Godwin & Sullivant & 
Wm. F. Mcculloch. 3.50 Madison av, Manhattan, 
have plans in progress for a 2V^-sty frame & 
stucco dwelling, 40x60 ft, at Hempstead, for D. 
A. Marsh, Front st. Hempstead, owner. Archi- 
tect will take bids on general contract soon. 

FLORAL PARK, L. I.— Harold F. Smith, 14 
East 23d st. Manhattan, has plans nearlng com- 
pletion for a 2y2-sty frame dwelling, 30x66 ft, at 
Floral Park, for Frank Brunella, owner, care of 
architect. Cost. .$25,0"0. Architect will take 
bids on general contract about February 6.. 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 
RIDGEWOOD, L. I.— H. Brucker, Myrtle av, 
Ridgewood, has plans in progress for a l^^-sty 
brick stable, 32x70 ft, in the west side of Scbaler 



121 



st, north of Catalpa av, Ridgewood, for William 
Keller, owner and builder, care of architect. 
Cost, $15,000. 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 
EDGEMERE, L. I.— J. Cornell, O'Kane Build- 
ing, Far Rockaway, has plans in progress for 
eight 1-sty brick stores, 42x118 ft, on Far Rock- 
away blvd, Edgemerc, for I. Goldberg, O'Kane 
Building, Far Rockaway, owner and builder. 
Total cost, $20,000. 

Suffolk. 

HOSPITALS. 
BAYSHORE, L. I.— York & Sawyer, 50 East 
41st st, Manhattan, have plans in progress for 
a 3-sty brick hospital, lOOxKio ft, at Bayshore, 
for South Side Hospital. Bayshore. owner. Cost, 
$200,000. Architect will take bids on general 
<-ontract about March 1st. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
BRIDGEHAMPTON. L. I.— Benj. V. White, 29 
West 34th st, Manhattan, has plans nearlng 
completion for a 2-sty frame community build- 
ing, 26x72x42.x82 ft, at the corner of Main & 
School sts. Brldgehampton, for Community As- 
sociation, J. T. Adams, chairman of Board, Jobs 
Lane. Brldgehampton. owner. Cost, $45,000. 

Westchester 

DWELLINGS. 
WHITE PLAINS, N. Y.— Plans are being pre- 
pared privately for a 2-sty frame dwelling, 24x 
20 ft, on Alexander av. White Plains, for A. B. 
Piatt Co., 174 Marline av, White Plains, owner 
and builder. Cost. $7,000. 



National Surety Building 

One of the largest new building operations 
now proceeding in the down town section 
is the new office building of the National 
Surety Corporation at Washington, Albany 
and Carlisle Streets 

The New York Edison Company will 
supply the electric service for this build- 
ing for the operation of elevators, venti- 
lating system and house pumps. The 
installation consists of 6,700 lamps and 
256 horsepower 



Architect — Arthur C Jackson - - - - 501 Fifth Avenue 

General Contractor — Geo A Fuller Co - - - 949 Broadway 
Wiring Contractor — Walter H. Tavcrncr Corp - 17; Fifth Avenue 



Big Buildings Use Edison Service 

The New York Edison Company 

<^t Tour Service 
Irving Place and Fifteenth Street 

Telephone Stuyvesant 5600 





122 

WHITE PLAINS, N. Y.— A. B. Piatt Co., 174 
MartiBe av. White Plains, has completed plaus 
for a 1%-sty frame dwelling, 30x36 ft, on Wayne 
av. White Plains, for Anita M. Feister, owner, 
care of architect. Cost, $9,000. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y.— ReiUy & Hall, 405 
Lexington av, Manhattan, have plans in prog- 
ress tor three 214-sty brick and frame dwellings, 
70x30 ft, in Braecrest Section. New Rochelle, 
tor owner, care of architect. Cost, $15,000 each. 
HALLS AND CLUBS. 

NEW ROCHELLE, N. Y.— L. V. V. Sweezy, 
Bible House, Manhattan, has plans in progress 
for a 2-sty stone club house, 55x245 ft, with golf 
course, at New Rochelle, for Winged Foot Golf 
Club, C. C. Nobles, president, 58 West 59th st, 
Manhattan, owner. Cost, $650,000. Golf course 
architect, A. W. Tillinghast, 56 West 4oth st, 
Manhattan. Landscape architect, Lewis & Val- 
entine, 47 West 34th st, Manhattan. Bids will 
he taken about February 13. 

New Jersey 

.\PARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

ELIZABETH, N. J.— Romollo Botelll, 207 Mar- 
ket st, Newark, has plans in progress for two 
4-sty common & tapestry brick & limestone apart- 
ments, 55x100 ft, with stores, on Westminister 
av, between Prince & North Broad sts, Elizabeth, 
for A. G. Construction Co., Abraham Gennett, 
president, 74 Treacy av, Newark, owner and 
builder. Cost, $100,000 each. Owner will take 
bids on separate contracts soon. 

NEWARK, N. J. — Ed. V. Warren, Essex Build- 
ing, Newark, has completed plans for three 3- 
sty frame clapboard & shingle flats, 24x75 ft each 
at 207-213 Hillside av, Newark, for B & D Con- 
struction Co., Louis Doroson, president, 52 Hill- 
side av, Newark, owner and builder. Cost, $2ti,- 
000. 

ORANGE, N. J.— Albert P. Nucclarone, 206 
Central av. East Orange, has plans in progress 
for two 3-sty brick flats, 24x48 ft, at 341 Me- 
chanic st. Orange, for Anthony Tarantmo, own- 
er, care of architect. Cost, $12,000 each. Archi- 
tect will take bids about January 30. 

NEWARK, N. J. — Ed. V. Warren. Essex 
Building. Newark, has completed plans for a 4- 
sty common and tapestry brick and limestone 
apartment. 49x84 ft, at 96-08 Mt. Pleasant av, 
Newark, for Edward Lowes, 31 Lawrence av. 
West Orange, owner and builder. Cost, $60,001). 

NEWARK, N. J. — Ed. V. Warren. Essex 
Building, Newark, has completed plans for two 
3-sty frame and clapboard flats. 32x67 ft, at the 
northeast corner of Nye av and Wolcott terrace, 
Newark, for Morris Breitman, 330 Waverly av, 
Newark, owner and builder. Cost, $20,000 each. 
CHURCHES. 

PATERSON, N. J. — F. J. Schwarz, Colt Build- 
ing. Paterson, has completed plans for a 1-sty 
brick, terra cotta and limestone church, 50x90 
ft, in Marshall st, Paterson, tor St. Georg'e's 
Syrian R. C. Church, Rev. Cyril Anid, Marshall 
st, Paterson, owner. Cost, $45,000. 

NEWARK, N. J.— M. B. Silberstein, 119 
Springfield av, Newark, has plans in progress for 
a 1-sty tapestry brick, limestone & terra cotta 
synagogue, 64x80 ft, at Newark, tor Congrega- 
tion Estreich Hungarian, owner, care of archi- 
tect. Cost, $50,000. Architect will take bids on 
general contract and separate contracts about 
February 1. Exact location will be announced 
later. 

NEWARK, N. J.— Frank Grad, 245 Springfield 
av, Newark, Henry Baechlin, 665 Broad st. New- 
ark : Backoff, Jones & Cook, Essex Building, 
Newark, amd Jordan Green, Essex Building, 
Newark, associate architects, have plans in 
progress for a 3-sty & basement brick & stone 
temple at 1020-1024 Broad st, Newark, for Sa- 
laam Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S., Geo. M. Buttle, 
illustrious potentate, 165 Market st, Newark, 
owner. Cost, $1,000,000. 

NEWARK, N. J. — Jos. B. O'Rourke, Firemen's 
Building, Newark, has preliminary plans in 
progress for a brick & stone church, ectoy, 
school and convent, on plot 200x200 tt, at the 
corner of Custer. Meeker & Peshine avs, New- 
ark, for St. Charles Borromeo R. C. Church, Rev. 
Father Thos. A. Walsh, rector, 86 Custer av. 
Newark, owner. 

DWELLINGS. 

WEST ORANGE, N. J. — Plans have been pre- 
pared privately for a 2i/^-sty frame dwelling. 24x 
25 tt, at the corner of Wellington av & Spruce 
st. West Orange, for J. G. Sinclair, Inc., 358 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

South Jefferson sts, Orange, owner and builder. 
Cost, $6,UU0. 

ORANGE, N. J. — W. Frank Bower, 441 Main 
st. East Orange, has completed plans tor a 2Vi- 
sty frame dwelling, 28x47 ft. at 442 Berkeley av, 
Orange, for Andrew Lenart, 114 Chestnut st, 
East Orange, owner and builder. Cost, $15,000. 
Mason work, Josef Christenson, 296 Tremont av. 
Orange. 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

ELIZABETH, N. J.— H. Wilhelms & Son, 803 
East Jersey st., Elizabeth, have the general con- 
tract tor a 3-sty hollow tile and stucco factory, 
60x100 ft, at 232-6 Marshall .st, Elizabeth, for 
Fred Rieke, 230 Marshall St., Elizabeth, owner, 
from plans by Louis Quien, Jr., 229 Broad St., 
Elizabeth, architect. Cost, $45,000. Plumbing 
and heating, Sbarpe Plumbing & Heating Co., 
Roselle Park. Electric work, Victor Electric 
Co., 254 Morris av, Elizabeth. 

IRVINGTON, N. J. — Plans are being prepared 
privately for a 1-sty brick warehouse, 35x60 ft, 
with garage, on Lyons av, at Lehigh Valley Rail- 
road, Irvington, for Tide Water Oil Co., Wm. De 
Lichtenberg, in charge, 11 Broadway, Manhat- 
tan, owner. Cost, $25,000. Owner will take bids 
on general contract about April 1. 

NEWARK, N. J. — Frank V. Nickels, 4400 
Maneyunk av, Philadelphia, has plans in prog- 
ress for a 2-sty and basement brick factory, 75x 
2U0 tt, at Newark, for A. B. Nassib. 27 East 
21st st, Manhattan, owner. Cost, $100,000. 

NEWARK, N. J.— J. B, Acocella, Union Build- 
ing, Newark, has completed plans for a 1-sty 
frame and sheet iron storage building, 50x100 
ft, in Meadow st. Newark, for Nickelsburg 
Bros., owners and builders on premises. Cost, 
$8,0000. 

HALLS AND CLUBS. 

PATERSON, N. J.— Fredk. W. Wentworth, 
140 Market st, Paterson, has plans in progress 
lor a Masonic temple, on plot 130x200 ft, on 
the north side of Broadway, near Graham av, 
Paterson, for Masonic Temple Association, A. C. 
Kendrin, chairman building committee, 82 Clay 
st, Paterson, owner. 

PATERSON, N. J.— Elliott R. Coe, Romaine 
Bldg., Paterson, has completed plans for a 3- 
sty brick and terra cotta community house, 
with stores, in Market st, between Paterson av 
and Church st, Paterson, for Market Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church, Rev. C. E. Scud- 
der. pastor, 219 Market st, Paterson, owner. 
Cost, $125,000. 

ASBURY PARK, N. J.— Wm. Newmann, 314 
Palisade av, Jersey City, has been retained to 
prepare plans for an addition to the 4-sty brick 
club house, 32x100 ft, on Monroe av, Asbury 
Park, tor Asbury Park Lodge, B. P. O. Elks, 
George J. Daley, chairman building committee, 
Monroe av, Asbury Park, owner. Coat, $150,000. 

HOBOKEN. N. J.— Fred J. Meystre, 84 Wash- 
ington st, Hoboken, has completed plans for a 
4-sty brick & granite masonic temple, 40x115 
ft, at 9th & Washington sts, Hoboken, for Com- 
bined Lodges of Free & Accepted Masons, John 
M. Verner, chairman building committee, 1239 
Garden st, Hoboken, owner. Cost, $200,000. 
Architect will take bids in spring. 
HOSPITALS. 

IRVINGTON, N. J.— Jos. B. Allen, 1091 San- 
ford av, Irvington, has completed plans for 
a 2 or 3-sty brick hospital on Chancellor av, 
Irvington, for Town of Irvington. Department of 
Parks and Public Property — Dr. Albion C. 
Christian, chairman of building committee^ 
General Hospital. Irvington, owner. Cost, 
$300,000. Consulting architect, Oliver H. Bar- 
tine, 152 Lexington av, Manhattan. 



January 28, 1922 



CONTRACTS AWARDED. 

All items following refer to general 
contracts, except those ir.arl.'ed"s-b." 



BANKS. 

STAMFORD, CONN.— F. S. Dawless. Stamford 
National Bank Building. Stamford, has the gen- 
eral contract for an addition to the 2-sty brick 
and steel bank. 31x41 ft, at 300 Main st. Stam- 
ford, for Stamford Trust Co. — Walter Ferguson, 
president — 300 Main st, Stamford, owner, from 
plans by J. C. Jacobson and W. C. Hunting, 4 
West 47th St. Manhattan, architects. Cost, 
.$25,000. 

CHURCHES. 

MANHATTAN— Thos. O'Reilly & Son. 17 East 



HECLA IRON WORKS 



ESTABLISHED 187* 



Architectural Bronze and Iron Work 



Office, 118 No th nth Street 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



49th st, have the general contract for altera- 
tions to the 1-sty brick church, 136x290 ft, at 
100-118 West 6Uth st, for Church of the Pauliat 
Fathers — Rev. Father Thos. F. Burke, superior — 
100-llS West 60th st, owner, from plans by War- 
ren W. Chapin, 347 Maidson av, consulting en- 
gineer. Cost, $60,000. Steel work, Post & 
McCord, 101 Park av. 

DWELLINGS. 

SOUTH ORANGE, N. J.— Geo. H. Becker & 
Bros., 267 Techenor av, South Orange, have the 
general contract for ten 2-sty frame & brick 
veneer dwellings, on University Courts, South 
Orange, for Geo. H. Becker, 267 Techenor av, 
South Orange, owner, from plans prepared pri- 
vately. Cost, approximately $15,000 each. 
FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 

ELIZABETH. N. J.— H. Wilhelm'e & Sons, 803 
East Jersey st, Elizabeth, have the general con- 
tract for a 3-sty hollow tile & stucco factory, 
60x100 ft, at 232-6 Marshall st. Elizabeth, for 
Fred Rieke, 230 Marshall st, Elizabeth, owner, 
from plans by Louis Quien, Jr., 229 Broad et, 
Elizabeth, architect. Cost, $45,000. 
HOTELS. 

MANHATTAN— Jos. G. Siegel, Inc., 17 East 
149th st, has the general contract for a 15-sty 
brick apartment hotel, 56x149 ft, with stores and 
restaurant, at the northeast corner of Broad- 
way and 74th st, for 2120 Broadway Corp. — Jos. 
Zubor, director — 471 4th av, owner, from plans 
by Sugarman & Hess, 16 East 43d at, archi- 
tects. Cost, $1,000,000. Associate architect, 
Wm. E. Bloodgood, 17 East 49th st. Structural 
engineer, Chris Jepperson, 56 West 45th sc 
Lessee, Prisament Bros.. 45 West 32d st. 
STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

MANHATTAN.— J. S. Hyers Co., 123 West 
30th st, has the general contract for alterations 
to the 4-sty brick store, 25x63 ft, at 41 East 
22d st, for Chas. A. Eckhard, 7 East 22d st, 
owner, from plans by John E. Stasse, 175 5th 
av, architect. Cost, $10,000. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

VERONA, N. J. — Morgan Construction Co., 207 
Market st, Newark, has the general contract for 
a 1-sty brick & stone public library, 30x40 ft, 
on Bloomfield av, between Central School & 
Gould sts, Verona, for Boro of Verona, Wm. Pitt, 
chairman of building committee, 56 South Pros- 
pect st, Verona, owner, from plans by Francis 
A. Nelson, 15 West 38th st, Manhattan, architect. 
Cost, $25,000. 

BRONX.— Geo. A. Fuller Co., 175 5th av, has 
the general contract for a 3-sty and cellar brick, 
limestone and granite laboratory, 165x52 ft, on 
the east side of Mott av, from 157th to 158th 
sts, for The Fleischman Co., 701 Washington 
av, owner, from plans by Arthur B. Heaton, 52 
Vanderbilt av, architect. Cost. $150,000. 



New York Gas Ligkt Rates 

The New York Mutual Gas Light Co., the 
Standard Gas Light Co., the New Amsterdam 
Gas Co. and the East River Gas Co. of Long 
Island City, filed affidavits with the Public 
Service Commission Saturday last in justifica- 
tion of the $1.25 rate which these companies 
have filed with the Public Service Commission, 
to take effect February 11, superseding the 
$1.2u rate charged by these companies under 
the temporary injunction granted by the Fed- 
eral Court. These companies have just ob- 
tained final decrees in their rate suits in tno 
United States District Court, and the affidavits 
filed by the presidents of the respective com- 
panies explain that the $1.25 rate is slightly 
less than the companies are legally entitled 
to receive, as a matter of adequacy of return, 
but that the $1.25 rate is promulgated In the 
interests of uniformity with the $1.25 rate now 
being charged by the Consolidated Gas Co., the 
Central Union Gas Co. and the Northern Union 
Gas Co., in the same territory in Manhattan 
and The Bronx. 

The affidavits show the detailed costs of the 
production and distribution of gas as of Janu- 
ary 1. 1922. in comparison with the costs in 
1919 and 1020. and show the present cost to be 
substantially higher than in those years. These 
actual costs for the four companies, including 
return on their actual investment at the ra^e 
found by the Federal Court, are stated by the 
affidavits to be as follows : 

Jan. 1, 
1919 1920 1922 
New York Mutual Gas 

Light Co $1.29.38 $1.4694 $1.4012 

Standard Gas Light Co. 1.3581 1.4296 1.4.526 
Xew Amsterdam Gas Co. 1.3075 1.3395 1.4132 
East River Gas Co 1.3075 1.3395 1.4132 

An affidavit contemporaneously filed by Rob- 
( rt A. Carter, vice-president of the Consolidated 
Gas Co.. and in charge of the accounts and 
records of that company and the affiliated com- 
panies in Manhattan and The Bronx, shows 
the combined cost, as of January 1, 1922. for 
all the comoanips. to be $1..36ii6, as contrasted 
with a rpte of $1.25. 

The affiiavit of Mr. Carter shows that sev- 
eral items of costs, notably taxes, have in- 
creased in 1922 as compared with previous 
years. The increases in taxe- assessed by 
public authority, which the companies are 
powerless to prevent, amount to several cents 
per thousand cubic feet of gas sold. 



January 28. 1922 



RECORD AND GUIDE 



123 



A SIGN POST 
OF SAFETY 

The record of S. W. Straus & 
Co., now 40 years without loss 
to any investor, is a sign post 
pointing the way to safe Janu- 
ary investments. 

Our booklet, "Common Sense 
in Investing Money," tells the 
reasons for this record and 
shows how investors may profit 
by it. Write for it today, and 
specify 

Booklet A-\2Q2 

S.W. STRAUS & CO. 

Established 1882 Incorporated 

STRAUS BUILDING 
565 Fifth Ave., at 46th St., NEW YORK 

Offices in 15 Principal Cities 
Telephone— Tanderbilt 8500 

40 Years Without Loss 
to Any Investor 



PLANS FILLED FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION 
IN ALL BOROUGHS OF NEW YORK CITY 



Copyright, 1922, by S. W. Straus & Co. 



SHADES, AWNINGS 
AND CANOPIES 

47 years in making window shades, awn- 
ings, canopies, etc., has placed us in a 
position where we can guarantee satis- 
faction. 

Agent and owner alike find our service 
prompt, quality fully satisfactory, and 
workmanship of the best. 
Estimates cheerfully supplied, without 
obligation to owners, agents, etc. 



F. J. KLOES 

Established 1872 

243 Canal St., New York 

Telephone; Franklin 22ie 




H. W. BELL CO. 

Gypsum Blocks 
Terra Cotta Blocks 

Plaster Boards 

Dumbwaiter Blocks 

Flue Pipe 

Firebrick 

Park Ave. & 139th St. 

Phone — Mott Haven 3134 

BROOKLYN 

KENT AVENUE & MORTON STREET 



BUILDERS 

LITTLE CASH REQUIRED 

\\V can subordinate entire purchase iirice of sev- 
eral well-loenled plots and obtain liberal building 
ami permanent loans. 

S. Osgood Pell & Co. Tel. Vanderblll 5610 



FOR 

PAINTING, DECORATING 
and PLASTERING 

Consult 

LESCH & JOHNSON 

261 East Fordhara Road New Y^rk 

Telephene: Fordbam 9345 



Manhattan. 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

ACADEMY ST, 6S5 ; also COOPER ST, 2, 5- 
sty bk apt house, lOOxSKl, aspahlt & ruberoid r£ ; 
$100,000; (0) Cori RIty. Co., 11 Cooper; (a) 
John P. Boyland, 120 E Fordham rd (37). 

EAST BROADWAY, 286, 5-sty bk tnt, 57x100, 
tar & gravel rf ; .$125,000; (o) Louis Cohen, 1.50 
Rivington ; (a) Seelig, Finkelstein & Wolflnger, 
44 Court, Bklyn (36). 

RIVERSIDE DR, 355, 14-sty f. p. apt house, 
44x87, t. c. tile & 1. g. rf ; $200,000; (o) 355 
Riverside Drive Corp., 535 W 20th; (a) Alfred 
C. Bossom, 680 5 av (40). 

6fiTH ST, 24 W, 9-sty t. p. tnt, 42x85, slag rf ; 
$125,0(10; (o) 24 W. OOth St. Corp.. 17 W 42d ; 
(a) Geo. Fred Pelham, 200 W 72d (35). 

71ST ST, 130-47 W, 9-sty f. p. apt & doctors' 
offices, 100x86, slag rf ; $550,000; (o) 141 W 71st 
St. Co., Inc.. 1074 Bway ; (a) Schwartz & Gross, 
347 5 av (33). 

162 ST, 501-13 W, ST NICHOLAS AV, 1041- 
40, 6-sty bk tnt, 121x87, slag and gravel rf ; 
$180,000 ; (o) Sophie Simpson, 1646 Monroe av, 
Bronx; (a) Margon & Glaser, 2804-6 Third av 
(39). 

16.5TH ST, 600 W, 5-sty bk tnt, 100x106, slag 
rf; $180,000; (o) 615 W 164th St Corp, 1540 
Broadway; (a) Gronenberg & Leuchtag, 450 
4th av (30). 

:05TH ST W, s s, 100 w Bway, 5-sty bk tnt, 
1011x100, slag rf; $180,000; (o) Fay Rlty., Inc., 
16 Haven av ; (a) Gronenberg & Leuchtag, 450 
4 av (31). 

HAVEN AV, 276-86, 6-sty bk tnt. 151x167x85. 
slag rf ; $75,000; (o) Arrowhead Bidg. Corp., 41 
Convent av ; (a) Geo. Fred Pelham, 200 W 72d 
(28). 

5TH AV, 810, 12-sty f. p. tnt. 50x08. slate rf ; 
$800,000; (o) Mrs. Florence Fish, 810 5 av ; (a) 

F. B. Hoffman, Jr., & Muray Hoffman, 147 E 
51st (29). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

BROADWAY, 41G0, 5-1-sty metal garages, lOx 
17, metal rf ; $.500; (o) Robt. D. Phillips, 148 W 
72d; (a) Peter Herb. 30 E 42d (34). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

CANAL ST, n e c Varick, 3-sty f. p. bank & 
offices. 80.xS8.x83x31 ; $100,000; (ol The Corn 
Exchange Bank. 13 William; (a) Q. Fellheimer 
& Steward Wagner, 7 E 42d (32). 
MISCELLANEOUS. 

LAFAYETTE ST, 258-62, 1-sty bk gas sta- 
tion, 4x6: $500; (o) John Hayes, 258-62 Lafay- 
ette; (agt) Martin J. Ford, 534 W 46th (38). 

Bronx 

APARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

KINGSBRIDGE RD, nee 230th, 5-sty bk tnt, 
101x00, slag rf; $300,000; (o) Sydell Realty 
Corp., Abner Distillator, 2 W. 33, pres. ; (a) 
Margon & Glaser, 2804 3 av (114). 

230TH ST, n s, 83.0 e Kingsbridge rd, 5-sty bk 
tnt, 70.7x103.0, slag rf ; $180,000; (o) Sydell Re- 
alty Corp.. Abner Distillator, 2 W. 33, pres. ; (a) 
Margon & Glaser, 2804 3 av (113). 

ANDREWS AV, sec 170th, 6-sty bk tnt. 169.4 
X73.7. slag rf : $225,000; (o) Build Well Constn. 
(^0., Jos. Wein. "M\ W 57th, Pres; (a) Chaa. 
Kreymborg, 25;!4 Marion av (147). 

BROXXWOOD AV, e s, 45 s 214th St, 3-sty br 
tnt. 3^x00. plastic slate rf ; $20,000; (o) Rosa 

G. Emanuele, 6.'i6 Crescent av ; (a) Lucian Pis- 
cinlta. .3011 Barnes av (175). 

DAVIDSON AV, n w c 180th, 5-sty bk tnt. lOOx 
81, slag rf ; $150,000; (o) Val Court Co., Gustav 
Halpern. 311 Bway., pres.; (a) Chas. Krym- 
borg. 2534 Marion av (118). 

MANIDA ST, e s, 141.4 s Lafayette av, 5-sty 
bk tnt, 66x86, asphalt rf ; $70,000; (o) Harry 
Sherman. 1011 Westchester av ; (a) John De 
Hart, 10,39 Fox (150). 

GRAND CONCOURSE, n w c Clarke pi, 5-sty 
bk tnt, 00.4x154, plastic slate rf ; .$2.50.000; (o) 
Joe Hen Realty Corp., Jos. Goldfein. 3.50 Bway, 
Pres: (a I Springsteen & Goldhammar, 32 Union 
sq (1211. 

GRAND AV. w s. 178.5 n Fordham rd, 5-sty 
bk tnt. 72.6x03. rubberoid rf ; $120,0(10: (o) 
Hurley Si Son, Inc., Edw. Hurley. 300 E 164th. 
Pres; (a) John P. Boyland, 120 E Fordham rd 
(163). 

MARION AV, n w c 104th, 6-sty bk tnt. 100x80, 
slag rf; $1.50,000; (o) Val King Corp.. Frank 
Millner, 2534 Marion av. Pres; (a) Chas. 
Kreymborg, 2534 Marion av (148). 

MORRIS AV, e s. 248.11 s 170th, 2-5-sty bk 
tnts, 02.6x80 0, Barrett's rf ; $180,000; (o) Abra- 
ham Hochrott. .3.550 Park av ; (a) Chas. Schae- 
fer. Jr.. :«/4 E 150th (1531. 

VALENTINE AV. e s. 277.10 s 192d. G-sty bk 
tnt, 50x80, slag rf ; $'.Ki,000; (o) Padula Realty 



Corp., Louis Padula, 201 E 119th, Pres; (a) 
Moore & Landsiedel, 3 av & 14Sth (133). 

WEBB AV, e s, 100 n Devoe ter. 5-sty bk tnt, 
50x03, rubberoid rf ; $00,000; (o) The Taw 
Realty Corp.. Jas. Murray, Jr., 1138 St. Nicho- 
las av. Pres; (a) John P. Boyland, 120 E 
Fordham rd (164). 

DWELLINGS. 

BASTCHESTER RD, n s, 230 e Laconla av, 3- 
sty concrete dwg, 20x40, tin rf ; $4,(X)0 ; (o & a) 
Patrick Carry, 422 Willis av (120). 

SIGMA PL, e s, 100 s Palisade av, 1-sty fr 
dwg, 41x27, shingle rf ; $8,000 ; (o) Barthalin 
Osgood, 10 Hamilton av, Yonkers ; (a) Geo. 
Provot, 50 W 47th (168). 

212TH ST, s s, 200 e Paulding av, 2-sty fr 
dwg, 20X.3O, tin rf ; .$4,500; (o) Groacchirlo, 712 
E 215th; (a) Jos. Ziccardi, 012 Burke av (167). 

224TH ST, n s, 400 e Schieffelin av, iy2-sty fr 
dwg, 20x36, slate rf ; $3,000; (o) John Lynch, 
110 w 101st; (a) Robt. Moser, 1238 E 223d 
(3.52). 

231 ST ST E, 3 s, 105 w Bronxwood av, 2-3ty 
fr dwg. 22x58, 1-sty fr garage, 20x10, rubberoid 
rf; $0,500; (o) Jos. Reitano, 827 E 226th; (a) 
B. P. Wilson, 827 E 226th (123). 

236TH ST. s s, 137.68 w Webster av, iy2-sty 
fr dwg, 21X.38. asphalt shingle rf ; $4,500; (o) 
Kutzner & Kutzner, 4236 Verio av ; (a) B. C. 
Smith, 414 E 141st (145). 

237TH ST E, n e c Matilda av. 3-sty fr dwg, 
27.6.X57.6, 1-sty fr garage, 17x17, shingle rf ; 
$13,100; (0) Frank Selman, 4438 White Plains 
av ; (a) G. A. Innecken, 44.38 White Plains av 
(161). 

259TH ST, n s. 70 e Tyndall av, 2-sty bk dwg, 
lSx.53, tin rf ; $10,000; (o) Jos. Eder, 417 E 
158th; (a) John H. Friend, 148 Alexander av 
(127). 

BARNES AV, n w c 2.34th, 2-sty bk dwg, 25x 
55, plastic slate rf : $12,000; (o) Peter Buccino, 
.309 W 116th: (a) Geo. P. Crosier, 223 & White 
Plains av (156). 

BENEDICT AV, n s, 332 w Olmstead av, 2-sty 
bk dwg. 21.4x55, rubberoid rf ; $10,000; (o) 
Adam Feeher, 366 E 183; (a) Anton Pirner, 2069 
Westchester av (111). 

BRONX BLVD. w s, 72 n 241st, 2-3ty fr dwg, 
18x26, slate rf : $4,500; (o) Anna M. Raber, 1150 
Teller av : (a) Louis D. Kirby, 1750 E Tre- 
mont av (143). 

BRONX BLVD. e s, 3.50 s 240th, 2-sty fr dwg, 
21x45, tin rf ; $8,500 ; (o) Antoine Beuda, 383 B 
138th: (a) Edw. J. Pavelka, 2416 Dorsey (1301. 

BRONXWOOD AV, w s, 25 a Bartholdi, 3V>- 
sty fr dwg, 23x44, shingle rf ; $8,500; (o) Nicola 
Mallardi, 942 E 215; (a) Jos. Ziccardi, 912 
Burke av (115). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

LONGFELLOW AV, n w c, 172d st, 1-sty br 
garage, 100x100, slag rf ; $15,000 : (o) Land 
Est, Inc., Geo. RicUings, 1.35 Broadway, pres; 
(a) Chas. B. Meyers, 31 Union Square (173). 

PARK AV, w s, 163 s 160th. 1-sty bk garage, 
25x35. slag rf; .$2,500: (o) Angelina Lovitola, 
201 E 14nth ; (a) Moore & Landseidel, 3 av & 
]4.Sth (157). 

PARK AV, w s, 206.3 n 179th, 1-sty bk garage, 
76.6x126, plastic slate rf ; $30,000; (o) Henry J. 
Semke, 1662 Boston rd ; (a) John E. Kerby, 4487 
Park av (144). 

3D AV, e s, 50 s Bathgate av, 1-sty bk garage, 
75.0x127, slag rf : $20,000; (o) B, P. Cruccl, 
4.582 3 av ; (a) Chas. Kreymborg, 2534 Marion 
av (119). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

BOSTON RD, nee 174th, 1-sty bk strs, 47.33 
xOl.33, slag rf : $7,0(iO : (o) Wm. Keogh Amus. 
Co.. Wm. T. Keogh. 570 Bergen av, pres. ; (a) 
Geo. A. Bagge & Sons, 200 Madison av (117). 
QUEENS BLDGS 

JEROME AV. sec 100th, 1-sty bk strs, 2S.53x 
100. slag rf: $15,000: lo) West 100th St. Corp.. 
Harry Gillnian, 1743 Montgomery av, Pres ; (a) 
Moore & Landsiedel, 3 av &. 148th (132). 

JEROME AV, n w c Fordham rd, 1-sty bk 
strs. 204.22x71. flag rf : .$75,000; (o) Realty 
Managers. Inc.. Frank Begrisch, 342 Madison av, 
Pres; (a) Moore & Landsiedel, 3 av & 14.Sth 
(134). 

LEGGETT AV. nee. Beck st, 1-sty br Mar- 
ket and strs. 117.4x06.08, rubberoid rf ; $20.0110: 
(o) Leggett Av Bldg Corp. Isidor Schwab. 223 
So 5th av, Mt. Vernon, pres: (a) Albert E. 
Davis, 258 E 138th st (172). 

OGDEN AV, e s, .300 n 170th st, 1-sty br strs, 
50x50. cemp rf : $10,000: (o) Archie Realty 
Co.. Sntntiel Shapiro, 132 Nassau st, pres; (a) 
Geo. W. Kibitz. 800 E 175th st (179). 

UNIVEUSITV AV. w s, 132.33 s 179th. 1-stv 
bk strs. 101.111x74.6. plastic slate rf ; $30,000; 
(0) Chas. J. Rosen. 10 Hamilton av. Bronxvllle; 
(a) Samuel Cohen, 32 Union sq (146). 



124 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

PORDHAM RD. n s, 150 w Hoffman. 1-sty bk 

shop. 25x83. rubberoid rf ; .$6,0U0 : (o) Thira 

Realty Co.. Thira Young. 2.wS Morris av. Pres ; 

(a) John P. Boyland, li'O E Fordham rd (12.S). 

Brooklyn 

*.PARTMENTS, FLATS AND TENEMENTS. 
iJARRETT ST, 22ti-ii2, w s, :!5.2 n Dumont av. 
4-sty bk tnt. 65xS7.G ; .$70,000; (o) Louis Wab- 
nik, 36.J Elton; (a) Chas. Goodman, 3i5 Fulton 
(801). 

COLERIDGE ST, 225, e s, 180 s Oriental blvd, 
2-sty bk 1 (am dwg, 2.5x4G : .$11,000; (o) Jacob 
Cohen, 71 5 av, Manhattan; (a) Nelson K. 
Vanderbeek, 15 Maiden la, Manhattan (S65). 

COTTAGE PL, 3013-25. e s, 94.7 s Surf av, 6- 
:i-5ty bk tnts. 20x78; $1)0,000; (o) Isaac & Chas. 
Rosenberg, 2248 W 22d ; (a) Seelig & Finkel- 
stein, 44 Court (.588). 

DEAN ST. 2155-61, n s, SO e Saratoga av, 4- 
sty bk 28 (am dwg, 00x1X1; .$7.'i,llOO; (o) Klein 
& Evans, Inc., 148 Pennsylvania av ; (a) B. M. 
Adelsohn, 1778 Pitkin av (Sti7). 

LINCOLN PL, 3.38-4S, s s, 475 e Underbill av. 
4-sty bk tnt, 10UxS3,2 ; $125,000; (o) Wisconsin 
Realty Co.. 3.30 Wyona ; (a) McCarthy & Kelly, 
16 Court (742). 

BAY 16TH ST, 8402-12, s w c 84th, 3-sty bk 
tnt. 31x00; $:^5.0n0 ; (o) Rosario Leonardi, 01 
Monroe, Manhatan ; (a) Michael A. Cardo, 01 
Bible House, Manhattan (722). 

W 21ST ST, 2042, w s, 167.514 n Surf av. 3-sty 
bk tnt, 20x02; $15,000; (o) Guyden Caynlia, 11 
Mermaid av ; (a) Morris Perlstein, 49 Fulton, 
Middle Village (654). 

20TH ST, 141-43, n s, 270 w 4 av, 2-3-sty bk 
tnt, 20x71; $50,000; (o) Prank Spero, 7625 
Ridge blvd; (a) McCarthy & Kelly, 16 Court 
(OCl). 

;!OTH ST, 105, n s. 320 e 4 av, 3-sty bk tnt, 
22x(i0.2 ; $:!n,noii ; (o) Frank Srancerella. 829 3 
av : (a) McCarthy & Kelly. 16 Court (960). 

E 3STH ST. 1015-17. e s. 170.0 n Av I. 2-2-siji 
fr 2 (am dwgs. 10x61: $14,000; (o) Richd. Von 
Lehn, Jr.. 2701 Glenwood rd ; (a) Geo. Alexan- 
der, Jr,, 3402 Av K (821). 

E :19TH ST. 047-9. e s. 227.6 s Glenwood rd. 
2-sty (r 1 fam dwg. 24x41; $8,000; (o) Alfred J. 
Durtin, 1034 Prospect av ; (a) Chas. G. Wessel. 
i:i99 E 4th (8281. 

CROPSEY AV, 2137-.53, n w c Bay 29th, 4-sty 
bk tnt, l:ll.:!x:i3.4 ; .$200.0011; (o) C. S. L. Const. 
Co., 1(10 57th; (a) Gronenberg &. Leuchtag, 450 
4 av, Manhattan (604). 

FT. HAMILTON PKWAY. 6701-5. sec 67th, 
4-sty bk tnt, .5(i.!ix91.1 ; .$!1(I,()II0 ; (o) Jonas 
Const. Co.. 1102 58th; (a) Boris W. Dorfman, 20 
Court (.5.89). 

FT. HA.MILTON PKWAY, 6707-11. e s. 50.9 s 
fl7th. 4-sty bk tnt, 50.9x102.4; $75,000; (o & a) 
same as above (590). 

LI.VDEN AV, 440x4, s s, 40 e E 37th, 2-2-sty 
fr 2 fam dwgs, 16x48; .$14,000; (o) Herman S. 
Brody, 412 Linden av ; (a) M. A. Cantor. 37;! 
Pulton (868). 

LINDEN AV, 445-9, n s, 00 w E 38th, 2-2-si.„ 
fr 2 fam dwgs, 25x.55 ; $18,0(K1 ; (o & a) same 
as above (869). 

MARCY AV. 742. w s, 50 s Greene av, 4-sty 
bk tnt. 28.6x88.8; .$40,000; (o) R. H. G. Const. 
Co., 995 Tiffany ; (a) Seeling & Finkelstein, 44 
Court (637). 

OCEAN AV. 253-63, e s, 515.H4 n Parkside 
av. 4-sty bk tnt, 102x137; $160,000; (o) Port- 
wood Realty Co., Inc., 305 Bway.. N. Y. ; (a) 
Rouse & Goldstone, 512 5 av, N. Y. (676). 

2STH AV, 107-9, s s, 200 w Cropsey av, 2-sty 
bk 2 fam dwg, :i2x42 ; .$9,(100; (o) Francisco 
Conneto. 170 Thompson, Manhattan; (a) Jos. J. 
Fricano, Arrochar, S. I. (849). 

DWELLINGS. 

BARRETT ST. 321-31, w s, 200.2 n Riverdale 
av. 4-2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs. 20x.57 ; .$.52,000; (o) 
Tovo Const. Co., Inc., 1393 Lincoln pi; (a) S. 
Millman & Son, 1780 Pitkin av (7.52). 

BARRETT ST. .333-43, w s. 100.2 n Riverdale 
av. 4-2-sty bk 2 (am dwgs, 20x57; .$52,000; (o) 
*; a) same as above (753). 

CROWN ST. .397-9, n s, 200 w Brooklyn av. 
2-sty bk 1 fam dwg. 23x60; .$25,000: (o) Isidor 
Pnlivinick, 267 Barrett; (a) E. M. Adelsohn, 
177 Pitkin av (750). 

FARRAGUT RD. 3416-18. s s. 40 w E .35th, 2- 
2».i-sty fr 1 fam dwgs, 16x50; $16,000; (o) Bel- 
lam Realty & Const. Co.. 253 Bway, Manhat- 
tan; (a) Albert Morris, 894 Nostrand av (614). 

LINCOLN PL. 333, n s, 545 e Underbill av, 
2-sty bk 2 fam dwg, 20.6x66 $10.0110; (o) Elite 
Builders, Inc., 1627 Union; (a) Benj. Driesler, 
Jr.. 153 Remsen (7,34). 

MONROE PL. 16. e s. 175 s Clark. 5-sty bk 1 
fam dwg. 25x82.8; $40,000: (o) S3d St. Const. 
Co.. 1941 83d; (a) Slee & Bryson. 1.54 Montague 
(.806). 

PRESIDENT ST. 1738-44. s s. 100 w Roches- 
ter av. 4-2-sty bk 2 fam dwgs. 20x79 ; $.50.000 : 
fo) Webster Const. Co.. 390 Saratoga av : (a) 
Jacob Lubroth, 44 Court (612). 

VAN SICKLEN ST. 43-7, e s, 304.6 s Kings 
highway, 2-2-sty fr 2 (am dwgs, 18x50: $16,- 
000; fo) Fred L. Bartlett, .35 Pineapple; (al 
Wm. A. Lacerenza, 16 Court (811). 



RECORD AND GUIDE 

E 15TH ST. 1720-30. w s. .578 n Av R. 3-2-sty 
fr 2 fam dwgs. 22x.53 ; .$:30,0(IO ; (o) Miller 
Bergs Co.. 1513 Flatbush av ; (a) R. T. Schaefer, 
1543 Flatbush av (800). 

E 18TH ST, 1182-92, w s, 2.55 n Av L, 2-2i4- 
sty fr dwgs, 24.8x68.10; .$25,000: (o) South 
Side Bldg. Co.. Inc., 287 Vermont: (a) Chas. 
Infanger & Son, 2(334 Atlantic av (397). 

B 24TH ST, lS:i3-7, e s, 260 s Av R, 2-21/2- 
sty (r 1 fam dwgs. 16x:)6 ; $11,000; (o) C. E. 
Congdon & M. C. McLaughlin. 2288 Coney 
Island av ; (a) C. E. Murray, 301 Atlantic av 
( 701 ) . 

E 24TH ST. 882, w s, 100 n Av I, lV4-sty fr 
2 fam dwg, 26.0x44; $6,500; (o) Henry B. Ly- 
ons. 1409 Av J : (a) Fredk. J. Dassau, 26 Court 
( 661 ) . 

E :J2D ST, 1128-30, -w s, 220 s Av K, 2-2-sty 
fr 1 fam dwg, 16x40; $12,000; (o) A. & V.'. 
Stewatr. Inc., 1543 Flatbush av ; (a) R. T. 
Schaefer (642). 

FACTORIES AND WAREHOUSES. 
.\BWTON ST. 119-25. n s, 130 w Graham av, 
1-sty bk factory, .50x94; $10,000; (o) I. Feldman 
& Son. !I8 Engert av ; (a) Albt. C. Kunzi. 779 
Manhattan av (974). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 
HUMBOLDT ST. 865-87, s w c Greenpoint av, 
1-sly bk garage, 89.7x45: $8,000; (o) Chas. C. 
Miller, 425 Greenpoint av ; (a) J. Bernard Peif- 
fer, 670 48th (620). 

MONTGOMERY ST, 682-722, s s, 09.8 e King- 
ston av. 14-l-5ty cone garages. 18x18; $11,200: 
(ol Hochschmit BIdrs.. Inc., 573 E 5th; (a) 
Philip Caplau, 16 Court (069). 

RICHARDSON ST, 104-14. s s, 1.59 w Man- 
hattan av, 1-sty bk garage, 57.8xll(;.5 ; $12,000; 
(o) John Eraser, 122 Lee av (840). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 
GRAND ST. .576-84, s s, 20 e Lorimer, 4-2-sty 
bk sirs & 2 fam dwgs, 20x70; $48,000; (o) Jos 
Sotoloff & Isaac Miller, 254 Manhattan av ; (a) 
Murray Klein, 37 Graham av (784). 

GRA.VD ST. .574, sec Lorimer, 2-sty bk str & 
2 fam dwg. 20x90; $12,000; (o & a) same ttj 
above (785). 

SUTTER AV, 137-45, n s, 20 e Herzel, 4-2-sty 
bk strs .Si 2 fam dwgs, 20x75 ; .$48,0(Xi : (o) 
Springfox Realty Co., 593 Howard av ; (a) E. M. 
Adelsohn. 1778 Pitkin av (747). 

SUTTER AV, 135, nee Herzel, 2-sty bk str 
& 2 fam dwg, 20x82.11; $15,000; (o & a) same 
as above (748). 

SUTTER AV, 591-3, n e c Georgia av, 3-sty 
bk str Si 2 fam dwg, 11,6x39; $12,000: (o) Louis 
Silverglade, ,593 Sutter av ; (a) Harry Brodsky. 
,lr.. 58:! Sutter av (850). 

4TH AV, 605, e s, 60.2 s 17th. 3-sty bk str & 
2-fam dwg. 20x40: $10,000; (o) Jos. Ekmaus, 
.570 4 av ; (a) Paul Lubroth, 26 Cortlandt, N. Y. 
(629). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

GRAND ST. 726-32, sec Graham av, 2y2-sty 
bk offices & bank. 60.4x94.4; $150,000; (o) Bush- 
wick Savings Bank. 726 (3rand ; (a) R. Thos. 
Short. 370 Macon (644). 

JUNIUS ST. 64-74, n w c Liberty av, 1-sty bk 
str, 50x.S0: $12,(iu0; (o) Harry L. Cohen, Inc., 
1848 Pitkin av ; (a) Chas. Goodman, 375 Fulton 
(817). 

LEONARD ST. 418-26, sec Newton, 2-sty bk 
office & warehouse, 30x1(10; $13,000; (o) Chas. 
F. Kcyes, 472 E 10th, N. Y'. ; (a) Albert C. 
Kunzi, 779 Manhattan av (619). 

MESBROLE ST. 161, n s, 125 e Graham av, 
3-sty bk str n lofts, 25x90; $20,000; (o) Max 
Rosen, 109 Graham av ; (a) Henry M, Entlich, 
413 S 5th (971). 

KINGS HIGHWAY'. 2808-14, s e c E 28th. 1- 
sty bk sirs, 67x60; $8,500: (o) Sheepshead Bay 
Bungalow Corp., 2030 Ocean pkway (807). 

PARKSIDE AV. 216-32, s s, 65.11 w Flatbush 
av, 1-sty bk strs, 130,8x34.5: ,$70,000: (o) Dyker 
Cons*. Co., 1916 Cropsey av'; (a) Shampan ii 
Shampan, 50 Court (731). 

PARKSIDE AV, 234-40, s w c Flatbush av, 2- 
sty tk office & strs. 63.11x34.5; $70,000; ( o 6: i, 
same as above (732). 

STORES AND TENEMENTS. 

DUMONT AV. 71-71. n w c Barrett. 4-sty bk 
sts & tnt. :15 2x100: $45,000; (o) Louis Wabnik, 
365 Elton: (a) Chas. Goodman, 375 Fulton 
(772). 

GRAHAM AV. 283-5, s w c Powers, 4-sty bk 
strs & tnt, .50x67.6: .$43,000; (o) Philip Gast. 
749 Metropolitan av ; (a) Louis F. Waillant, 
394 Graham av (602). 

MISCELLANEOUS. 
4TH AV. 4602-12. s w e 46th, 4-sty bk nurses 
home, 46x37.4 : $45,000; (o) Norwegian Lutheran 
Deaconesses Home & Hospital, premises; (a) 
Foster & Graham. 15 W. 38, N. Y. (657). 

Queens 

APARTMENTS. PLATS AND TENEMENTS. 

ELMHURST.— 24th st. w s. s w c Hayes av. & 
23d St. e s, s e c Hayes av. 4-6-sty bk tnts. 69x 
56, slag rf. 12 families, elec, steam heat : $324, 
000; (o) Queensboro Corporation, 50 E 42, Man- 
hattan; (al Andrew J. Thomas. i;'.7 E 45th. 
Manhattan (566-67-6S-69). 



January 28, 1922 



ELMHURST. — 24th St. w s. 250 s Hayes av, & 
23d St. e s, 250 s Hayes av, S-5-sty bk tnts, 66x 
,53, slag rf, steam heat, elec: .$512,000; (o) 
Queensboro Corp.. 50 E_42d, Manhattan; (a) 
Andrew J. Thomas. 13i E 4Dth. Manhattan 
( .549-.50-51-52-53-.j4-55-56) . 

DWELLINGS. 
ARVERNE. — Beach 64th st, e s, 200 s Larkin, 
2-2-sty fr dwgs, 31x61," shingle rf, 2 families, 
gas, steam heat; $19,200; (o) Max Seligman, 
Beach 64th, Arverne ; (a) J, P. Powers, Rock- 
away Beach (372). 

BAISELBY PARK. — Proctor st, n e o Baiseley 
a\'. seven 1-sty fr dwgs, 26.x40, shingle rf, 1-fam, 
gas, hot air heati $31,300; (o) Harris Nevins, 44 
Court, Bklyn ; (a) Louis Danancher, 328 Pul- 
ton, Jamaica (477 to 483). 

BELLE HARBOR.— Beach 127th st, e s, n e e 
Newport av, two 2iA-3ty fr dwgs, 28x40, ehingle 
rf, l-(amily, gas, steam heat; $20,000; (o) Gene- 
vieve A. Regan, 175 Beach 113th, Rockaway 
Park; (a) J. Alcalde Co., Par Rockaway (427- 
428). 

COLLEGE POINT.— 14th st, e s, 100 s North 
blvd, 2-sty fr dwg, 21x32, slag r(, 2 families, 
gas; $8,000; (o Andrew Connor, 214 7 av, L. I. 
City; (a) Geo. J. Fischer, 406 12 av, L. I. City 
(5(15). 

CORONA. — 15th St. w s. 114 n Sackett st, 10 
2-sty frm dwgs, 20x54. slag rf. 2-fam. gas, 
steam heat: $85,000: (a) Paul Roth, Grand and 
Gilmore av. East Blmhurst : (a) A. DeBlasi, 
94 East Jackson av. Corona (777). 

EDGEMBRE.— Beach 35th St. w s, 400 n 
Boulevard. 5-2-sty (r dwgs. 20x32, shingle rf, 1 
family, gas; $:ri,000 : (o) E. G. A. Maier, Beach 
:!3th st, Edgemere : (a) Adolph Honnen, Beach 
5!:th, Edgemere (.558-59-60-61-62). 

EAST ELMHURST.— Ditmars av, s s, 76 w 
43d st, IVa-sty bk dwg, 2Sx:^9, shingle rf, 1-fam, 
gas; $10,0011: (a) William Schubert, 1361 Lex- 
ington av ; (a) Geo. Fischer. 4U6 12th av, L. I. 
City (789). 

ELMHURST.— 22d St. w s. 100 s Roosevelt av. 
four 2-sty (r dwgs. 16X.38, shingle rf, 1-family, 
gas, steam heat; $10,000; (o) V. Scudderl, 277 
Woodsido av, Elmhnrst ; (a I Charles Stidolph. 
15 Ivy, Blmhurst (460 to 461). 

FLITSHING.— 17th St. w s. 100 n Franconia 
av. 4-2-sty fr dwgs. 18X.34. shingle rf. 1 fam- 
ily, gas, steam heat; $18,000; (o) Geo. Krea- 
mer. 4183 Bway. Manhattan: (a) H. G. Lam- 
son, 1,54 Nassau, Manhattan (668-669-670-0711, 

JAMAICA. — Atlantic st. n s, 1.34 e Rockaway 
rd. 2-sty fr dwg. 17x26. tin rf, 1 family, gas, 
steam heat: $12,000: (o) Herbert Shelton, 164 
W 144th, Manhattan; (a) Ernest Peterson, 64 
Flushing av, Jamaica (709). 

JAMAICA. — Homerlee av. e s. 249 n Fulton. 
2-2-sty fr dwgs. 16x38. shingle rf, 1 family, gas, 
steam heat; $10,000; (o & a) Arthur Short, 
Homerlee av, Jamaica (363-64). 

J.^MAICA. — White av. nee Eady. fi Silver 
av. s e c Eady, 20-lV2-sty fr dwgs, 22x.34. shingle 
rf. 1 family, gas. steam heat: $80,000: (oi 
Modern Homes. Inc., 381 Fulton, Bklyn; (a) 
R J. Schaefer. 1543 Flatbush av. Bklyn (623 to 
042. 

L. I. CITY.— 16th av. w s. 35 n Grand av, 2-sty 
bk dwg. 2(lx.52, slag rf, 2 families, gas: $11,000; 
(o) William Wade, .5,55 Grand av, L. I. City; (a) 
Geo. F. Fischer, 406 12 av, L. I. City (.504). 

RICHMOND HILL. — 91st av. n e 104th. two 
2-sty fr dwgs. 20x55. tar & slag rf. 2-(amiIy, gas, 
steam heat; .$20,000; (o) W. J. Dunn, 33 Court, 
Bklyn; (a) Geo. Crane, 8711 114th, Richmond 
Hill (436). 

RICHMOND HILL.— Roanoke av. s e c 115th, 
•3-2-sty fr dwgs. 16x44. shingle rf. 1 family, gas, 
steam heat; $13,500; (o) Shulman & Richie, 305 
Snediker av. Bklyn; (a) Louis Dannacher, 328 
Fulton. Jamaica (276-76-77). 

WOODHAVBN.— 75th st w s. 277 n 90 av. 11- 
2-sty fr dwgs, 19x42, shingle rf, 2 family, gas, 
hot air, heat: $,S2,.500 : (o) Chichester Realty 
Corn.. KW.f Chichester av. Woodhaven ; (a) 
J. M. Baker and Chas. L. Koestcr. 9 Jackson 
av. L .1. City (1.59-60-61-62-03-64). 

STABLES AND GARAGES. 

WOODHAVEN.— 78th St. e s, 80 n 101st. ten 
2-sty fr dwgs & garages. 20x.30, tar & gravel r£. 
l-family. gas, steam heat; .$48.0fi0 ; (o) Herman 
Schroeder, 791 Carroll st, Bklyn ; (a) Louis Ber- 
ger & Co.. 1696 Myrtle av, Ridgewood (474). 

STORES AND DWELLINGS. 
FLUSHING. — High St. s w c Lawrence st. 3- 
sty fr store & dwg, 21x46. shingle rf. 2 families, 
gas, steam heat; .$12,000: (o) Angelo Pissitto, 76 
Washington. Flushing; (a) W. J. McKenna, 21 
State. Flushing (398). 

HOLLIS.— Jamaica av. n e c Villard. 3-2-sty 
fr strs & dwgs. 18x80. slag rf. 2 families, gas, 
steam heat: $34..50n : (ol Harry Silverman. 193 
Van Buren. Bklvn : (a) Geo. E. Crane. Rich- 
mond Hill (527-.528). 

L. I. CITY. — Astoria av. s s. .33 w 2 av. 3-sty 
bk store &• dwg. 24x60. slag roof. 2--family. gas. 
steam heat; $19,000: (o) Samuel Jacovsky, 145 
Flushing av, L. I. City; (a) R. Lukowsky, 49 
Stevens. L. I. City (500). 

MORRIS PARK. — Liberty av. n s. n e c 
11.5th. 7-3-sty bk strs & dwgs. 23x.53, slag rf, 2 
families, gas. steam heat; .$90,000; (o) Fred 



January 28, 192J 



Richtberg. 10344 12Utll. Richmond Hill: (al 
Chas. Infanger & Son, 2634 Atlantic av, Bklyn 
(75:i-7541. 

RICHMOND HILL.— Letferts av, w s. 90 s Ja- 
maica av, 2-sty bk str & dwg, 40x56, slag rt, 
steam heat, 2 families, elec ; $17, SOU ; (o) David 
Schmeier, 1HI22 Jamaica av, Richmond Hill; 
(a) A. H. Mcissner, 44 79th, Woodhaven (417). 

STORES, OFFICES AND LOFTS. 

EDGEMERE. — Beach Hoth st, n e c. Boulevard, 
1-sty bk stores. llSxOtl. slag rf, elec, steam heat ; 
$15,000; (0) J. Goldberg, Far Rockaway ; (a) 
J. H. Cornell, Far Rockaway (775). 

FAR ROCKAWAY.— Beach 21st st, 3 s, 250 w 
Mott av, 1-sty bk strs. 46x40, slag rt. elec; $8,- 
000; (o) G. T. Soper, Far Rockaway; (a) J. H. 
Cornell. Far Rockaway (710). 

FLUSHING. — Jackson av, nee, Leavitt av, 
1-sty bk stores. 48x100. slag rf, elec. steam 
heat; $15,000; (o) Jerome P. Bremmis. 34 11th 
st, College Point; (a) A. E. Richardson, 100 
Amity st. Flushing (770). 

L. I. CITY. — Jamaica av, n s. 50 w 11 av, 2- 
1-sty bk sir, 25x75, slag rf, gas, elec; $16,000; 
(ol Adam Bayer. 335 11 av, L. I. City; (a) Val- 
entine Schiller, S.'lu 11 av, L. I. City (619-620). 

ROCKAWAY PARK. — Washington av, 65 e 
Beach 116th, 2-sty fr str, 35x60, slag rf, 2 fami- 
lies, gas; $8,000; (o) F. Hallfleld, Rockaway 
Park; (a) A. H. Knoll. 214 Beach 97th, Rock- 
away Beach (711). 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

L. 1. CITY. — Boulevard, n w c Rawson, 2-sty 
bk bakery. 80.\67, slag rf, steam heat; JfSO.OOO; 
(0) Robert Swanson. 360 W 23d. Manhattan; (a) 
Geo. C. Buchtenkirk, 280 Madison av, Manhat- 
tan (565). 

ROCKAWAY BEACH.— Ocean av. sec, Pier 
av, 2-sty fr bath house