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Full text of "The reappear; a book of choice recipes"

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□ □ 



THE REAPPEAR 



BOOK of CHOICE KECIPES 

COMPILED BY 

The Ladies' Aid Society 

of the 

Fulton Presbyterian Church 
n 

PRICE 50 CENTS 

I m D 




Sonoma County, California 



1908 



□ □ 



u 









UBHARY of CONFESS* 
I wo Ooeies itouewe* 

AUG 12 jyub 

CLASS A AXc, No. 

C©PY «*. 



Copyright, 1908, 

by Ladies' Aid Society 

of Fulton, Calif. 



PRESS OF 

C. A. WRIGHT & CO. 

SANTA ROSA, CAL 



Of all appeals— although 

I grant the power of pathos and of gold, 
Of beauty, flattery, threats, a shilling— no 

Method's more sure at moments to take hold 
Of the best feelings of mankind, which grow 

More tender, as we every day behold, 
Than that all-softening, overpowering knell, 
The Tocsin of the soul— the dinner bell. 

—Byron. 



C0HTEHT 



Bread 7 

Soups 17 

Fish 23 

Entrees 31 

Meats 41 

Vegetables 49 

Salads 55 

Meat Sauces 65 

Puddings and Desserts 71 



Pies 85 

Frozen Dainties and Beverages 89 

Cakes 97 

Pickles 119 

Confectionery 127 

Breakfast and Luncheon Dishes 131 

For the Invalid's Tray 145 

Table of Weights and Measures 149 



USE 



the Best Flour 



POKT COSTA 



28 Per Cent Gluten 



"Would you know how first he met her? 
She was cutting bread and butter." 

—Goethe 



PERPETUAL YEAST-Mrs. Briggs 

A quart preserving can is the most convenient thing to start 
and to keep this yeast in. To begin a can of this perpetual 
yeast, dissolve a compressed yeast cake in a quarter of a cup of 
lukewarm potato water — that is, the water in which the potatoes 
for dinner are cooked. Fill a quart can of glass half full of luke- 
warm potato water. Add half a cup granulated sugar to it, and 
when this is dissolved add the quarter of a cup of dissolved 
yeast. Stir well and set the can containing the yeast in a 
moderately warm place, but not where it will be heated percep- 
tibly, and let it stand until the whole is very light. Seal up the 
can and the day before you are ready to make bread, fill the can 
full of lukewarm potato water and add another half cup of sugar. 
Let the can stand for about twenty-four hours. Beat the foam- 
ing white yeast and use a pint, or half the can, for four small 
or three large loaves of bread. Use as much lukewarm water 
as you do of yeast, and mix the bread at once, kneading it 
thoroughly. Seal up the can of yeast, set it away and a day be- 
fore the yeast is needed fill up the can again with lukewarm 
potato water, in which the potatoes were boiled, and a half cup 
sugar, and it is ready for use again when it is risen. 

GRAHAM BREAD -Mrs. Baldwin 

Stir into a quart of water (warm in winter and cold in sum- 
mer) enough wheat flour to make a soft batter, also a cup of 
yeast. Let rise over night. In the morning add salt, one-half 
tea cup molasses, one teaspoon soda in cup of boiling water and 
enough Graham flour to make batter thick enough to pour into 
well greased tins. Let rise very light and bake in moderate oven. 



8 
POTATO CAKES- Mrs. Eldredge 

One quart flour, one cup mashed potatoes, one half cup butter, 
two teaspoons baking powder, little salt. Rub butter in the 
flbur dry, then add potato, milk enough to moisten. Roll out an 
inch thick, cut with biscuit cutter and bake in moderate oven. 

RICE GEMS-Mrs. Wilkinson 

One heaping cup flour, two-thirds cup cold boiled rice, one and 
one-half cups sour milk, one tablespoon butter, one egg, pinch 
salt, one teaspoon soda. Beat hard and bake in buttered gem 
pans, in hot oven about twenty minutes. 

GOOD BROWN BREAD-Mrs. A. Faught 

One cup Indian meal, one cup of rye, one cup of wheat flour, 
one cup sour milk, one-half cup molasses, one teaspoon salt, two 
teaspoons soda. Steam four hours and then put it in the oven 
a little while. 

BISCUIT— Mrs. Jas. H. Laughlin 

One quart flour, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoonfuls of cream 
tartar and one teaspoon salt. Sift all together. Rub in one table- 
spoon lard, mix with sweet milk to soft dough and bake im- 
mediately. 

CORN MEAL GEMS— Mrs. Bryant 

One egg beaten well, one and one-half tablespoon sugar, two 
tablespoons melted butter, one cup milk, one heaping cup white 
flour, one scant cup corn meal, one and one-half teaspoons baking 
powder, pinch of salt. Bake in gem pans about twenty minutes. 

POP-OVERS -Mrs. Dornin 

Two eggs, two cups milk, two cups flour, pinch of salt. Bake 
in very hot well greased gem pans in hot oven. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD-Mrs. MaKee 

Two cups cornmeal, one cup flour, two cups sweet milk, one 
cup sour milk, one cup syrup, one teaspoon soda, one tablespoon 
salt. Boil three hours in a two quart pail in a kettle of boiling 
water. 

BREAKFAST MUFFINS— Mrs. Meacham 

Mix two cups Yankee Rye meal, one cup yellow corn meal, 
one cup whole wheat flour. Add tablespoon salt and sift. Dis- 
solve level teaspoon soda in about two tablespoons warm water, 



9 

add it to one and a half pints sour milk or butter-milk. Then add 
to this one cup of molasses. Thoroughly mix; pour over dry in- 
gredients, mixing well. Pour into greased two-quart molds, 
cover tight, and steam five hours. Lift out, allow to cool, and 
bake half an hour. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD— Mrs. Wilkinson 

Three eggs, one breakfast cup of milk, one tablespoon melted 
butter, one tablespoon sugar, a pinch of salt, two heaping tea- 
spoons of baking powder. Beat the eggs well and mix with the 
milk; put melted butter with the above ingredients, mixing in 
flour enough to make batter. Bake in round tins, and when al- 
most done wash the top of each with a feather dipped in milk. 

POP-OVERS— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One cup milk, one cup flour, three eggs, one teaspoon salt. 
Beat thoroughly and cook in hot oven. 

COFFEE CAKE— Mrs. Voss 

One cup brown sugar, one cup butter, one-half cup molasses, 
two eggs, one cup strong cold coffee, one teaspoon soda, two 
teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one cup raisins or 
currants. Add the fruit last rubbed in a little of the dry flour. 
Bake about one hour. 

CORN BREAD (New Orleans)— Mrs. Baldwin 

One and one-half pints corn meal, one-half pint flour, one 
tablespoon sugar, one teaspoon salt, two heaping teaspoons 
Royal Baking Powder, one tablespoon lard, one and one-quarter 
pints milk, two eggs. Sift together corn meal, flour, sugar, salt 
and powder; rub in lard cold, add eggs (beaten) and the milk. 
Mix into a moderately stiff batter; pour 'from bowl into a shal- 
low cake-pan. Bake in rather hot oven thirty minutes. 

MARYLAND BISCUIT— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Rub one tablespoon butter and one tablespoon lard into one 
quart sifted flour, one teaspoon salt, milk enough to make a stiff 
dough. Use the hands in mixing dough. When the milk, flour and 
shortening have been thoroughly mixed, flour the bread-board, lay 
dough on it and beat it with rolling pin until it blisters and cracks 
loudly. This beating will occupy at least one-half hour. When 
the blisters are abundant, tear off pieces of dough as large as 
an egg, mold with hand in form of a biscuit. Prick the top of 
each biscuit with fork and bake in moderate oven. 



10 




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11 

TREMONT HOUSE ROLLS— Mrs. A. Faught 

Take two quarts of flour, add one teaspoon salt; make a hole 
in the middle and put into it one tablespoon of sugar, butter 
about the size of an egg, one pint of boiled milk and one teacup- 
ful of yeast. Do not stir, but put them together and knead fif- 
teen minutes. Set in cool place for six hours and then roll out 
about one-half inch thick and cut with a biscuit cutter. Moisten 
one edge with butter, and fold together like rolls; lay in the pan 
so they will not touch. Set for half hour in a warm place to rise 
and bake in quick oven. 

FRENCH ROLLS— Miss Annie Laughlin 

At noon scald one pint of new milk and let cool. Sift two 
quarts flour into which rub two tablespoons butter and then make 
a hole in the center. Stir a spoonful of yeast and two table- 
spoons sugar into your milk, then put all into the center of flour. 
Let it stand several hours until foaming, then mix in all the flour 
cover and set away over night. In morning knead it down and 
set to rise again. Roll out not too thin, spread over with butter, 
and cut in rounds lapping one edge. Do not place the rolls near 
together in the pan. Let them rise about two hours, then bake 
in quick oven about twenty minutes. 

MUFFINS- Mrs. A. Faught 

One pint new milk, one egg, one tablespoon sugar, one table- 
spoon butter, half teaspoon salt, half cup home-made yeast. Mix 
with flour until a very stiff batter is formed; leave in a warm 
place over night and bake in the morning in rings. 

CORN MEAL GEMS— Mrs. Jas. H. Laughlin 

One egg and one tablespoon sugar beaten together, one cup 
sweet milk, one heaping cup corn meal, two tablespoons flour 
in which one teaspoonf ul of baking powder has been well mixed, 
and a pinch of salt. Stir well and bake in hot gem-pans. 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD- Mrs. Jas. H. Laughlin 

Three cups graham flour, two cups corn meal, one cup flour, 
three cups butter, or clabber in which several tablespoons sour 
cream are mixed; one cup syrup or molasses, one pinch salt, two 
teaspoons soda. Steam three hours. This quantity fills seven 
one-pound baking-powder cans. 



12 



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13 
DELICIOUS BREAD-Mrs. J. W. Mitchell 

One quart flour, one-half cup sugar, two teaspoons baking- 
powder sifted together dry. Rub in piece of butter the size of 
an egg. Add yolks of two or three eggs and milk enough to 
make a stiff batter. Beat until well blistered, then fold in the 
whites of eggs. 

HOT CROSS BUNS— Mrs. E. S. Denner 

Sift into a bowl one quart of flour, half a cup of sugar, and a 
teaspoon of salt; melt one-fourth cup of butter in a generous 
half-pint of milk, warmed; add to the dry ingredients with the 
well-beaten yolks of two eggs, and half a good yeast cake dis- 
solved in water, half a grated nutmeg, and the whites of eggs 
beaten to a stiff froth. This will make a very soft dough. 
Cover in warm place, and let rise until light. When raised, take 
out on well-floured board, and mold pieces the size of an egg, 
flatten, and place in buttered pan, allowing space between. 
Cover and put to rise until they double in size, then make a 
cross in the top of each, and bake in steady oven half an hour. 
Brush the top over with syrup made from sugar and a little 
water to glaze. 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE- Janet Mackenzie Hill 

One cup scalded milk, two cakes compressed yeast, one-fourth 
cup water, one-third cup melted butter, one-fourth cup sugar, 
one-half teaspoonful salt, one egg, grating of lemon rind, flour. 
Make a sponge with the milk, yeast softened in the water, and 
flour; when light add the other ingredients and flour to make a 
very stiff batter; beat thoroughly; when light again spread in a 
buttered dripping-pan, cover and let rise. When ready for the 
oven, brush over with beaten egg and dust thickly with sugar 
and cinnamon, mixed. Bake in a hot oven. 

SALLY LUNN-Janet Mackenzie Hill 

One cup scalded milk, one cup boiled water, one-half cake 
compressed yeast in one-half cup luke-warm water, three cups 
flour one teaspoonful salt, four eggs, well-beaten, one cup but- 
ter mixed with lard, one quart flour. At eleven o'clock a. m. 
make a sponge of the milk, water, yeast, and three cups of flour. 
When light, at about half-past one, add the eggs, shortening, 
salt, and the quart of flour, beat hard and turn into the pans in 
which it is to be baked. Bake for tea. 



14 



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"Appetite comes with eating, says Augeston." 

—Rabelais. 

SOUP STOCK 

To a two-bit shin of beef I add what beefsteak and meatbones 
I may have, add six quarts of water, cover tightly, and boil 
gently all day. Strain at night and set away to cool. The next 
day skim the fat from it and, if the stock is not a thick jelly, 
put it on the stove and boil still longer. This should make three 
quarts of rich jelly, to which you can add rice, barley, macaroni, 
vermicelli or vegetables, or whatever you fancy, as a flavoring. 
The fat I skim from the soup I put on the stove and boil until 
it is transparent, pour it into a small pan or tin and use it in the 
place of butter or lard for cooking. It is much superior to but- 
ter or lard for frying or shortening. 

BEAN SOUP-Mrs. Ford 

Wash and boil your beans with a piece of salt pork. When 
the beans are soft take them out and press through a colander, 
then put them back in the water they were boiled in, together 
with four hard boiled eggs, quartered, and half a lemon sliced, 
a little pepper and salt. Boil up and serve. 

ASPARAGUS SOUP— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Boil two bunches of asparagus one-half hour. Put one quart 
milk on stove, press tender stalks through colander into milk. 
Thicken with two tablespoons flour rubbed into one tablespoon 
butter. Let come to a boil and serve hot. Season with pepper 
and salt. 

CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP-Mrs. A. L. House 

One quart milk, one can tomatoes strained, one teaspoon of 
soda in tomatoes just before removing from the stove. Butter 
size of an egg, salt and cayenne pepper to taste, two crackers 
rolled fine. Heat milk and tomatoes separately. Mix in tureen 
just before serving. 

OYSTER STEW— Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

One can of best cove oysters, one quart sweet milk, one table- 
spoon butter, two tablespoons flour, salt and pepper to taste. 



18 

Strain the liquor from the oysters and to this add the milk. 
When it has reached the boiling point thicken with the flour 
into which the butter has been rubbed. When this has boiled, 
pour over the oysters which are in the soup tureen and serve 
immediately. 

POTATO SOUP-Mrs. Eldredge 

Four medium sized potatoes cut in very small pieces. Pour on 
one quart boiling water, little salt, pepper and good slice of but- 
ter. Let boil until soft. Rub through a sieve. Just before serv- 
ing add one teaspoon of flour mixed with cold water, two cups 
of milk and let boil up once. 

ONION SOUP-Mrs. Bryant 

Slice and fry six large onions until quite brown, add two 
quarts rich milk, one tablespoon butter, one teaspoon cayenne 
pepper and salt to taste. Thicken with two tablespoons flour 
mixed with cold water. Serve very hot. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP-Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

One cup split peas, one and one-half pounds lean neck of beef 
(no bone) , two thin slices of salt pork, three quarts cold water. 
Wash and soak peas for an hour, cut meat in small pieces. Put 
all together in soup kettle and cook for three hours; you may 
have to add some boiling water at the last. When done thicken 
with one tablespoon of flour rubbed smooth in one-half cup of 
creamy milk; strain and serve with toast bread cubes. 

CREAM CELERY SOUP-Mrs. S. E. Polhemus 

Take the root and several stalks of celery cut in small pieces, 
cover with water (being careful not to use too much) add a lump 
of butter and salt and pepper. Boil until celery is tender, then 
add a quart of milk and let come to the boiling point. Take three 
or four slices of bread cut in small squares and fry in a little 
butter to a light brown, place in tureen and pour the soup over 
them. 

BEAN SOUP-Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

One large cup of small white beans, two pounds lean neck of 
beef. Soak the beans over night and boil three-fourths of an 
hour, changing water twice. Put the beans into the soup kettle 
with the meat, cook until the beans can not be found, and the 
meat to shreds. Salt and pepper to taste, add a cup of creamy 
milk, strain and serve. This is also nice with toast cubes 
instead of crackers. 



19 
CLAM SOUP-Mrs. SamuelJ. Holms 

Place one pint clams in bowl and chop very fine. Put one 
quart milk on the stove with the liquor of the c'ams, season 
with pepper and salt. Roll four or five crackers and sprinkle in 
milk. Chop fine one small piece of onion and let all boil up. 
Just before removing from the fire put in butter the size of a 
walnut. 

CLAM CHOWDER— Mrs. W. P. Slusser 

One dozen and one-half of clams. Scrub shells and place in 
a kettle over the fire. Cover with one quart of boiling water. 
As soon as shells open, remove from fire. Save the water. Chop 
fine a little salt pork, and slice four large potatoes thin. Put 
pork in kettle; after frying until brown add strained water and 
the juice of the clams, the potatoes, and three onions sliced thin. 
Simmer one and one-quarter hours. Add a quart of milk, or 
water if preferred, cook fifteen minutes longer, add clams and 
serve. 

TOMATO FOR SOUPS, SAUCES, ETC.— Mrs. M. J. Granger 

Skin and boil tomatoes, then strain free from seeds. Then 
boil down as thick as possible without burning, and bottle hot 
in glass jars or bottles that can be made air tight, the same as 
in canning fruit. Small bottles are preferable to large ones, as 
it does not keep well after being opened. The pulp after being 
boiled down, can also be dried, by being spread thinly on buttered 
plates. The dried pulp readily dissolves in soup. 

NOODLES— Mrs. E. S. Denner 

Into two eggs work with a knife as much flour as possible, 
also a pinch of salt. Turn out on molding-board and mold well, 
using plenty of flour. Roll very thin, and leave for two or three 
hours to dry. Cut in equal pieces and place one above the other, 
then cut in thin strips and shake loosely apart. Put into rapidly 
boiling water for ten minutes. Have ready frying-pan with a 
good piece of butter melted and hot; remove the noodles with a 
skimmer, let drain a minute, then put into the pan with the 
butter for ten minutes, and serve. Good with or without meat. 

FRENCH SOUP-Mrs. E. S. Denner 

In a strong, clear soup, just before serving, add two well 
beaten eggs very gradually. Pour into tureen at once. 

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20 



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FISH— Miss Annie Laughlin 



Pick to pieces, fish previously boiled, season with salt, pepper, 
and butter, mix in rolled crackers or bread crumbs, cover with 
cream and bake. 

CREAMED SALMON— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Make a white sauce of one-half pint milk and as much cream, 
two tablespoons butter and two tablespoons flour. Melt butter, 
stirring in flour and diluting with hot cream and milk. Season 
with salt, cayenne, and nutmeg. To this add a can of nice sal- 
mon freed from skin and bone. Stir until hot and serve in little 
individual cases. 

FILLETS OF FISH WITH BECHAMEL SAUCE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Slice salmon or any white fish; fry lightly in butter for six 
minutes, then dip in beaten egg, roll in crumbs, season, dot 
thickly with butter and place in a good oven for fifteen minutes. 
Serve with a sauce made by melting one tablespoonful of butter, 
rub smoothly in this one of flour, and dilute with a half pint of 
stock made from chicken or veal; season nicely, lift out fish, 
sprinkle thickly with minced parsley and pour the sauce over. 
You can prepare the fish beforehand, cooking it only ten min- 
utes, and then merely place in the oven to heat while the soup 
is being served. The sauce will keep if stood in a vessel of hot 
water. 



24 
CREAMED OYSTERS— Mrs. Samuel J. Holms 

One-half teacup of butter melted in a sauce-pan. Add one 
heaping tablespoonful flour. Cook a few minutes and stir in 
gradually one cup of milk, seasoned with salt and pepper. Boil 
one pint of fresh oysters in their own liquor until plump, drain, 
and place on squares of buttered toast. Pour the sauce over 
and serve immediately. 

HALIBUT STEAK- Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

Cut fish one and one-half inches thick, remove the bones and 
skin. Place in cold water and salt one hour before cooking, 
drain and wipe. Dip pieces of fish in beaten egg, roll in crack- 
er crumbs, submerge in hot fat and fry until a delicate brown, 
Remove with wire skimmer and serve immediately, Cooked in 
this way it retains its delicate flavor and is free from grease. 

OKRA GUMBO (Creole) —Mrs. H. H. Brooks 

One onion, one tablespoon of flour, parsley, thyme, two cloves 
of garlic, salt to taste, one slice of ham, three dozen shrimps, 
one-half dozen crabs, two large tomatoes, one-half pod of red 
pepper (without seeds) , one bay leaf, fifty green okra pods, cut 
fine. Cut ham in small squares, put into lard and let brown; 
then put in onions, parsley, and thyme. Skin and chop fine the 
tomatoes and put in, saving out the juice. Let cook ten min- 
utes and put in the flour. When brown put in the crabs and let 
cook another ten minutes, covering tight. Then put in chopped 
okra, and watch carefully, as okra burns easily. When okra 
browns put in two quarts of water with the tomato juice; set 
back on the stove and let simmer for about an hour longer. Put 
in the shrimps (prepared by scalding and removing the shells 
or skin) about twenty minutes before serving. Serve hot with 
boiled rice. (Prepare the crabs by scalding or boiling about five 
minutes. When cool enough cut off claws and crack, separating 
the joints. Remove the "apron," the spongy substance, and 
the shell, and cut the body into four parts, cutting down the 
center and across. ) 

BAKED HALIBUT WITH TOMATO SAUCE— Mrs. M. D. Brown 

Two pounds fish. Cook two cups tomatoes with one cup water, 
one slice onion, three cloves, and one-half tablespoonful sugar. 



25 

Cook twenty minutes. Melt three tablespoonfuls butter, add 
three tablespoons flour, and stir into hot mixture. Add three- 
quarters teaspoon salt, one-eighth teaspoon pepper, cook ten 
minutes and strain. Put fish in baking dish, pour around it one- 
half of the sauce, and bake forty-five minutes, basting often. 
Remove to hot platter, pour on remaining sauce, garnish with 
parsley. 

LOBSTER. IN CREAM SAUCE— Janet Mackenzie Hill 

Lobster meat, cut in dice, may be mixed with an equal bulk 
of cream sauce and served in patty cases, shells, etc. In mak- 
ing the sauce, chicken, fish, or lobster stock and milk, or cream, 
may be used, either alone, or half and half. 

FISH CHOPS— Janet Mackenzie Hill 

(canned salmon or any remnants of cooked fish) 

If canned salmon be used, drain the oil from the can, remove 
the skin and bones and pick the fish fine with a silver fork; add 
a tablespoonful of lemon juice and a dash of paprika. Make a 
cup of white sauce, using two tablespoonf uls of butter and one- 
fourth cup of flour; add the fish and a teaspoonful of chopped 
parsley. When the mixture is thoroughly cold, form into chops. 
Egg and bread-crumb them, adding a little chopped parsley to 
the crumbs. Put a piece of macoroni into the end of the chop, 
to represent the chop bone, and fry in deep fat. Arrange a 
crouton of bread in the centre of a serving-dish; upon this place 
a dish filled with sauce Tartare (or other fish sauce), and set 
the chops against and around the bread. 

Sauce Tartare; — To a pint of Mayonnaise sauce, made with 
Tarragon vinegar and mustard, add a shallot chopped fine, one- 
fourth cup each of fine chopped capers, olives, and cucumber 
pickles, two tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley, and half a tea- 
spoonful of powdered Tarragon. Half a teaspoonful of onion 
juice may take the place of the shallot. 

CRAB a La CREOLE— Mrs. Chas. Hoffer 

Put into a sauce-pan a large piece of butter, and four 
young onions cut into rings, two green peppers chopped fine, 
one small-sized tomato, salt, black pepper, and a little cayenne. 



26 



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27 

Stew gently five or six minutes, then dredge in a very little 
flour, and add a very little good cream. Pick the meat from two 
crabs, put into the sauce, stew two minutes, and serve on toast. 

CRAB a La NEWBURG— Miss Marion W. Thomson 

Take two whole crabs, or one good sized can of crab, cut up 
in small pieces about the size of a shelled almond. Put in the 
same pan with a piece of butter the size of a walnut. Season 
with salt and red pepper to taste. Thicken with heavy cream 
sauce, add the yolk of one egg, and pour out on squares of crisp 
buttered toast. Sauce: One ounce butter melted in sauce-pan, 
two ounces flour mixed with butter. Thin with boiling cream 
and cook till it is slightly thickened. 

DEVILLED CRAB— Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

To the meat of one crab add the following dressin'g: one hard- 
boiled egg, rubbing the yolk in one tablespoon melted butter; 
add to this three-fourths tablespoon lemon juice, cayenne pep- 
per, mustard, and salt to taste; one and one-half mustard-spoons 
made mustard; then stir in the yolk of a well beaten raw egg, 
and add the white, having first beaten it separately ; then add 
the chopped white of the hard-boiled egg, one soda-cracker 
rolled, and two tablespoons melted butter. Bake to a delicate 
brown either in shells or ramekins. Serve with wafers and a 
piece of lemon. 



28 



F. A. EMEKY 

WINDSOR 
BUTCHER and LIVERYMAN 



ESTABLISHED 1892 



Dealer in fresh Beef, Mutton, Pork and Veal 

which is delivered to Mark West, Fulton, 

Trenton, Mt. Olivet and surrounding country. 

Live Stock Purchased 




To Preserve 
the Eyesight 



Infant's eyes should not be exposed to intense sunlight; 
if left to wink and blink at the sun permanent bad effects 
may result to the retina or other parts of the eye. 

Vision is a mechanical function, and as few eyes are 
proportioned so as to give perfect sight, the sooner marked 
defects, indicated by eyeache, headache, inflamed eyes and 
lids are corrected with glasses the better for either children 
or adults. No strain, no pain. No injury to an organ, no 
disease of it. Glasses fitted by us will give perfect vision 
and keep the eyes healthy and strong. 

Lawson-Rinner Optical Co* 

535 FOURTH ST. SANTA ROSA 



"The turnpike road to people's hearts I find 
Lies through their mouths, or I mistake mankind." 

—Dr. Wolcot 

PATTY SHELLS— Mrs. Bryant 

One pint flour, two teaspoons baking powder, half teaspoon 
salt. Sift all together. One-half pound good butter, work half 
the butter by degrees into the prepared flour and mix with a 
little more than a gill of cold water or enough to make a stiff 
dough. Roll out the paste and strew over it a part of remain- 
ing butter, divided into little pieces dredged with flour. Roll 
up dough like jelly roll, and roll out again. Repeat latter pro- 
cess once more and add remaining butter. Roll one-half inch 
thick, cut into rounds two inches in diameter. Press a small 
cutter one inch in diameter on each round a quarter of an inch 
deep. Place on buttered tins and bake brown. 

CHICKEN AND OYSTER PATTIES-Mrs. House 

Put two tablespoons butter and three of flour, one-half tea- 
spoon salt and one-fourth teaspoon white pepper on the fire, 
and when melted and mixed well, add one pint cream or rich 
milk. Stir until it thickens, then add one pint diced chicken. 
Simmer five minutes, then add one pint oysters (drained), and 
cook until edges curl. Fill heated patty shells and serve. 

OYSTERS a La RICHELIEU— Mrs. A. L. House 

Put one tablespoon of butter in chafing dish. When melted 
add one-fourth teaspoon paprika, two tablespoons chopped celery 
and two dozen large oysters free from liquor. Cook and when 
plump add four tablespoons of sherry and serve on hot buttered 
toast. 

DEVILED CRAB— Mrs. A. L. House 

One crab, two hard boiled eggs chopped fine, two (2) table- 
spoons cracker crumbs rolled very fine, juice of one lemon, two 
tablespoons sherry, red pepper, salt; mix well. Butter size of 
an egg; flour to thicken. Cook, then thin with milk and season 
with salt, spoonful mustard and mace. Mix well with the crab, 
sift over cracker crumbs and cover with bits of butter. Heat in 
oven until nice brown. 



32 
THE RIGHT PLACE TO TRADE 



THE 



Santa Rosa Department Store 

ALL DEPARTMENTS OF THE HOUSEHOLD 
SUPPLIED UNDER ONE ROOF 



Dry Goods, Boots and Shoes, Crockery, Kitchenware, 

Toys, Hardware, Tools, Sewing Machines, 

Stationery, Notions, Etc. 

The Santa Rosa Department Store 

432-434 FOURTH ST. - - SANTA ROSA 



KEEGAN BKOS. 

Santa Kosa 

SPECIALIZING 

Hart, Schaffher &- Marx Clothes 

Knox and Stetson Hats 

Waterhouse Cravats 



33 
JUGGED PIGEONS— Mrs. Chas. Hoffer 

Clean and wash well and stuff with a dressing made of the 
giblets boiled and chopped, a slice of fat pork, the yolks of two 
hard-boiled eggs rubbed to a powder, seme bread crumbs, pep- 
per and salt, bound with a beaten raw egg. Tie the legs and 
wings close to their bodies and pack the pigeons in a tin pail 
with a tight top. Plunge this into a pot of boiling water, put 
a weight on top to keep it steady, and cook two hours and a 
half. The water should not boil over the top. Drain all the 
gravy into a saucepan, thicken with a tablespoon of butter rolled 
in flour, season, boil up, pour over the pigeons, cover again, and 
leave in the boiling water ten minutes before serving. 

CHICKEN and PEAS SPANSIH-Mrs. M. E. Slusser 

Take the giblets, one onion sliced, a little parsley, and grated 
lemon peel, put them into a frying-pan with butter and cock 
slowly. Cut up two chickens, add it with some sliced ham or 
bacon and fry brown. In a separate stew-pan put a little gravy, 
salt, pepper, one teaspoon oil, one of tarragon vinegar, and the 
fowl and ham; also chop the heart and liver and some of the 
onion and parsley fine and add it; then put in one quart of 
green peas, and cook all gently until the peas are done. Put 
the peas in center of warm platter, chicken around them, and 
serve. 

SIMPLE WELSH RABBIT- Miss Annie K. Voss 

Make three large slices of toast and cut into halves; butter 
them and slightly moisten them with hot water; put them into 
the oven on a platter. Put a half cup of milk into a double 
boiler, and when it boils put in two cups grated cheese and stir 
until smooth; then stir in the yolks of two eggs beaten with a 
half teaspoon of salt and a dash of red pepper; as soon as it 
thickens pour it on the toast and serve at once. 

CROQUETTE MIXTURE— Mrs. C. B. Laughlin 

Three quarters cup rich milk, one rounded tablespoonful flour, 
one rounded tablespoonful butter, one-half teaspoon salt, one- 
fourth teaspoon white pepper, one teaspoon chopped paraley and 
one of chopped onion, dash of nutmeg and red pepper, one egg. 
Cook in double boiler until smooth and creamy, add egg last. 
Mix in two cups of finely minced meat of any kind. Spread on 
dish and do not form into croquettes until thoroughly cold and 



34 



Noonan's Market 



DEALEK IN ALL KINDS OF 



Fresh and Corned Meats, Sausages, 
Lard, Hams and Bacon 

423 Fourth St. Santa Rosa, Cal. 

COULSON CO.'S 
POULTRY FOODS 

ARE UNEXCELLED 
SPECIAL DRY CHICK 

UNEQUALED FOR LITTLE CHICKS 

GROWING CHICK 

A PERFECT RATION AFTER FOURTH WEEK 

IMPROVED MASH EGG FOOD 

BEST FEED MADE FOR LAYING HENS 

COULSON'S SCRATCHING FOOD 

THE OLD STAND-BY. ALWAYS GOOD 

NO. 3 CONDITION POWDER 

KEEPS HENS HEALTHY AND PROFITABLE 
PROGRESSIVE DEALERS SELL THEM 

COULSON POULTRY AND STOCK F000 CO., PETALUMA, CAL 



35 

stiff. It is better to mix them in the morning: if they are to be 
cooked at night. Form into croquettes, dip into egg and bread 
crumbs and fry in deep, hot lard. 

BANBURY TARTS— Mrs. C. B. Laughlin 

Make rich pie crust, roll thin, and cut in three inch squares. 
Put tablespoon tart mixture in center, and form into three- 
cornered tarts, pinching edges to keep in place. Brush top 
with milk and sugar, and bake in brisk oven. 

Filling for Tarts: One cup chopped raisins, one-half cup 
chopped blanched almonds, piece of citron size of an egg, same 
of candied orange and lemon chopped; one egg, one cup sugar. 
Mix thoroughly. 

HOT TAMALES-Mrs. J. H. Frese 

Scald one quart white corn-meal in just enough water to 
moisten; tear several corn husks into narrow ribbons and into 
other husks put a layer of meal forming a roll about six inches 
long. Prepare mixture of one pint finely-chopped chicken, 
one Spanish pepper chopped fine, and one teaspoon salt; put 
two tablespoons of the mixture into the center of the corn-meal; 
roll the meal over mixture; fold over the husks and tie the ends. 
Put bones taken from chicken into bottom of kettle with sliced 
onion, three or four cloves, two bay leaves, salt and pepper; cover 
with cold water and let heat gradually to boiling point. Lay the 
tamales upon the bones above water and cook about two hours. 

RAVIOLI— Mrs. Q. Eckel 

Dressing: Enough to make one pint when cooked until tender 
of lettuce or spinach. Chop fine, add parsley and two large onions. 
One quart (Holland) cheese grated, one pint bread crumbs, one 
dozen eggs well beaten, one cup olive oil, small piece butter, salt 
and pepper to taste; mix well. 

Batter: Four cups flour, two eggs, a pinch of salt, two table- 
spoons olive oil; mix with luke-warm water to a stiff batter, and 
roll into thin crusts. Put one teaspoonful of dressing on each 
crust, turn over the edges, then cut into squares. Put into 
boiling salted water for ten to fifteen minutes, and when done 
drain and fix with this gravy and grated cheese. 

Gravy: A small pot roast browned in olive oil. To the gravy 
add one good-sized onion chopped fine, parsley, one can toma- 
toes, salt and pepper to taste, and one-half cup chopped mush- 
rooms (put into hot water until tender, then chopped). 

SWEETBREADS, WITH SHRIMPS-Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

Boil sweetbreads in salted water until well done, then remove 
from water. Let one and one-half pints cream, or very rich milk, 
come to a boil. Have the sweetbreads cut into small pieces, and 



36 



No. 17—10 In. 




37 

put into the cream. Add one small can shrimps broken into 
small pieces, and a little salt and pepper. Thicken, and serve on 
hot toasted bread. 

SWEETBREADS- Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

Soak sweetbreads in salted water about one hour to remove 
blood, then remove skinny covering. Slice thin, lengthwise, 
roll in beaten egg, then in cracker crumbs, corn-meal, or flour, 
and fry in a very hot pan, with a heaping tablespoon of butter 
and lard. Salt to taste. 

OLD-FASHIONED FRITTERS— Mrs. Parker Maddux 

Beat five eggs light, add a cup of milk, a half cup of water, 
and a scant teaspoonful of baking-powder. Flour enough to 
make quite a stiff batter. Fry in hot lard. 

RAVIOLI— Mrs. Tovani 

One pound of lean pork chopped fine, two cups of stale bread 
soaked in water, parsley and spinnach, one green onion chopped 
fine until you have one coffee-cup full, one cup of mashed pota- 
toes. Put pork and greens in a frying-pan on back of stove, 
pour over it one quarter-cup of olive oil. Let simmer slowly. 
When wilted pour over the bread. Add one scant cup of grated 
Romano cheese, a few leaves of summer sage and mint, a little 
garlic chopped very fine, one teaspoon of celery salt, one-half 
teaspoon each of cloves and nutmeg (ground), one teaspoon of 
allspice, salt to taste; three eggs well beaten, one-fourth cup 
mushrooms chopped fine, two teaspoons black pepper. Stir un- 
til well mixed. Take noodle paste ( page 19 ) roll thin but thick 
enough not to break. Cut out as for cookies, put on one side of 
each one a dessert-spoon of this mixture; turn over the other 
side, moisten the edges with cold water and press together 
firmly. Drop in boiling water salted to taste and let boil fifteen 
minutes. Have plenty of water so they will boil freely and not 
stick together. When done pour in colander and drain well. 

Sauce: — Roast any kind of meat as for ordinary use. When 
done remove from pan. Add to the gravy one can of tomatoes, 
one-half a chicken chopped fine (not cooked), one dozen olives, 
one-half cup of butter or enough to make rich gravy; season to 
taste with allspice, cloves, salt and pepper; let cook until it 
thickens and chicken is done. Take dish that can go on table, 
put in a layer of gravy, then a layer of Ravioli from colander, 
sprinkle with grated cheese; repeat until dish is full, being sure 
to have gravy on top. Set in oven for ten minutes, and serve hot. 



"Some hae meat and canra eat, 
And some would eat that want it. 
But we hae meat, and we can eat, 
Sae let the Lord be thankit." 

—Burns. 



RULES FOR COOKING MEATS 



Put all salt meats in cold water; all fresh meats, excepting 
for soups, into hot water, then cook slowly. All roast meats, 
excepting veal, are put dry into a very hot oven; veal requiring 
a little more moisture. When well browned, add hot water; and 
when about half done, salt. Never salt meat until partially 
cooked. Rare meat requires about fifteen minutes to the pound. 
Baste all roasts frequently. Roast beef requires a hotter oven 
than any other meat. 

MOLDED VEAL— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Ten cent knuckle veal and boil until it can be pierced with 
fork. Take from liquor and cool. When cold cut into small 
pieces. Have ready three hard boiled eggs. Slice eggs length- 
wise. Commence by putting slices of egg in mold, then meat 
and alternate in this wise until all is used with an occasional all 
clove and pepper corn. When all is ready pour over the liquor 
which is boiling hot and has been freed from grease or settlings. 
Set away to cool. Serve cold cut in slices. If liquor seems too 
thin, add one teaspoon Knox Gelatine. 

DUMPLINGS— Mrs. Miller 

To each cup full of sifted flour add one teaspoon of baking 
powder, add a little salt, sift until thoroughly mixed, then add 
half as much milk as flour (by measure) and beat a minute. 
Drop by spoonfuls into the stew, cover tightly and boil twelve 
minutes. 

STUFFING FOR A TURKEY 

For a turkey weighing from eight to ten pounds allow one loaf 
of stale baker's bread, one quart of oysters, one lemon, two 



42 

roots of celery and one-quarter of a pound of butter. It is taken 
for granted that the turkey is thoroughly cleaned and wiped dry 
before putting the stuffing in. Crumble the bread till very fine; 
season with pepper and salt. Drain the oysters, setting the 
liquor aside. Now take a very sharp knife and peel off the 
outer rind of the lemon, being careful not to have any of the 
bitter and tough white skin left on. Cut the peel in very small 
bits, chop the white part of the celery very fine, adding the but- 
ter and the juice of the lemon. Mix the ingredients mentioned, 
stirring until thoroughly mixed; then proceed to stuff body and 
crop. A turkey of the size spoken of requires at least two hours 
baking, and it should be basted frequently; the liquor of the 
oysters should be put in the pan when the pan is first set in the 
oven, and this is to be used in basting. The giblets and livers 
should be cooked in a basin on top of the stove, then chopped 
fine, and when the gravy is made, add them to it. 

VEAL OR. BEEF LOAF— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Three pounds chopped veal or beef, three well-beaten eggs, 
salt and pepper to taste, one-half cup butter. Powdered cracker 
to make the above the consistency of dough. Make into a loaf 
and bake until done, basting with butter. Use hot water to 
moisten the ingredients if it is too dry to mold with hand. 

BOILED TONGUE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Soak tongue over night and boil four hours in milk and water, 
peel and place on platter; garnish with parsley. 

DAUBE a La CREOLE -Mrs. H. H. Brooks 

Three pounds of the round of veal or beef, two large onions, 
two tablespoons of flour, two cloves of garlic, two large toma- 
toes, one bay leaf, one sprig of thyme and parsley, salt, pepper, 
and cayenne to taste, one tablespoon of lard. Make incisions 
in the meat and put the garlic into them; then rub the meat 
well with salt and pepper. Put into the hot lard and cover well; 
when brown on both sides put in a half cup of water; when this 
cooks up, put in onions and flour; when brown put in tomatoes 
and other ingredients, and set back on stove; let simmer slowly 
about five minutes, then put in three cups of water and let cook 
one hour slowly. 

High Grade Scissors and Table Cutlery at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



43 
CANNELON OF BEEF— Janet Mackenzie Hill 

Two pounds of lean beef from top of round, one tablespoon- 
f ul of fine-chopped parsley, one teaspoonful of salt, one tea- 
spoonful of onion juice, one-fourth teaspoonful of mace, one 
egg beaten, one-third cup of soft bread crumbs, one-fourth 
teaspoonful of pepper. Pass the meat through a chopper several 
times; add the other ingredients, the egg, beaten, and the bread 
crumbs, wrung dry after standing some time in cold water; mix 
thoroughly and shape in a roll. Bake on a rack in a small pan 
between thirty and forty minutes. Baste frequently with fat 
from salt pork and hot water. Serve, if desired, with tomato 
sauce. 

GRILLADES a La CREOLE— Mrs. H. H. Brooks 

One round steak, two tomatoes, one large onion, one clove of 
garlic, salt and pepper and cayenne to taste. Select a nice round 
steak and beat well; cut into grillades (pieces) about four inches 
square. Put a tablespoon of lard in a deep frying-pan and cover 
closely. When the steak browns put in a half cup of water and 
set back on the stove; when this browns put in the sliced onions 
and garlic; when a light brown, put in a tablespoon of flour, and 
as it browns, put in tomatoes and let brown. Then put in two cups 
of water and stir well. Set it back on stove and let it simmer 
slowly for about half an hour. This makes enough for six 
persons. 

WHOLESOME WAY TO COOK HAM— Miss C. Denner 

Cut the pieces of meat in full thick slices straight across the 
ham, and place them in a frying-pan, covering well with boiling 
water. Set the pan directly over the fire for a few minutes, 
that it may boil rapidly, and then transfer it to the bottom of 
the oven, where it must be left to cook slowly for fully one hour. 
Replenish the pan with hot water as often as necessary, as the 
ham must not actually "fry" until the hour has passed. When 
this time has elapsed, howeyer, return the pan to the top of the 
stove that the meat may brown. 

A GOOD WAY TO COOK MUTTON OR LAMB- Mrs. Chas. Hoffer 

Take a leg of lamb and put in a kettle with some lard and 
brown thoroughly, then add one-half cup of water and cook 
gently for one-half hour. Then add one cup of clabber and one 
cup of sour cream, and about a tablespoon of salt. Cook slowly 
for two hours. Serve with mashed potatoes. 



SAVINGS BANK OF SANTA ROSA 

FOURTH ST. and EXCHANGE AVE 

Capital, fully paidup $200,000 00 

Surplus $100,000 00 

Undived Profits $ 71,244 24 

OFFICERS 

J. P. OVERTON President 

CORNELIUS SHEA Vice-President 

C. A. HOFFER Cashier 

J. R. EDWARDS Assistant Cashier 

H. G. HAHMAN Assistant Cashier 

RALPH A. BELDEN Bookkeeper 

A. G. WRIGHT Assistant Bookkeeper 

DIRECTORS 

F. H. Denman, M. Prince, Samuel Talmadge, C. Shea, J. P. Overton, 
H. G. Hahman, Harrison Mecham. 

CORRESPONDENTS 

San Francisco Anglo-Californian Bank (Lim.) 

New York National Bank of Commerce 

Chicago, 111 Merchants Loan and Trust Co. 

London Anglo-Californian Bank (Lim.) 

A General Commercial Banking Business Transacted 

interest-bearing certificates of deposit issued 

SAVING ACCOUNTS:— Interest-bearing passbooks furnished deposi- 
tors desirous of opening Savings accounts bearing 3% per cent computed 
on June 30th and December 31st of each year and added to the principal. 

MUST HATCH INCUBATOR CO 

HAS MADE THOUSANDS OF POULTRYMEN SUCCESSFUL 



I 

N 
C 

u 



WE MANUFACTURE 

ii i'llMBMiiiiiii b 



o 

R 

S 




R 
O 



AND POULTRY SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS 



As well as Operate the Largest Hatcheries in the World having a Combined Capacity 

for Producing 100,000 Chicks per Month. If you are interested inthe poultry business 

WRITE FOR OUR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LISTS 

Must Hatch Incubator Co., Petaluma. Cal 



45 
BEEFSTEAK ROLL- Mrs. Chas. Roat 

One slice of round steak. Spread with dressing made of one 
cup bread crumbs, one small onion chopped fine, one teaspoon 
of butter, salt, pepper, and sage (cook onion before putting in). 
Roll steak, tie securely, especially at ends. Brown in pork drip- 
ping, then add water and cook two hours. Add thickening and 
seasoning. 

BAKED CHICKEN with SPANISH DRESSING- Mrs. Chas. Hoffer 

Take a chicken (hen), cleanse and singe; on the bottom of a 
kettle, deep enough to hold the chicken, put a bowl; pour in 
about a pint of water. Take the fowl and stuff with the follow- 
ing: one quart bread crumbs, two tablespoons butter, season 
with sage, salt, chopped onion or Chili pepper cut fine, hand- 
ful of stoned raisins, same of olives. Tie the legs down tightly 
and place the chicken in the bowl, neck down. Keep the lid on 
tightly, and steam from two and one-half to three hours, accord- 
ing to the age of the chicken; then place in the oven with the 
pot liquor; add a little water if required. Cover closely and bake 
a rich brown. An old hen thus treated is superior to a young 
one. Fine when cold. 

BEEF TONGUE SPANISH— Mrs. Chas. Roat 

Boil tongue until tender, skin while hot. Slice and place in 
saucepan with one can of tomatoes, one onion, two green pep- 
pers, and salt. Boil one-half hour, and thicken with flour. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING— Mrs. Baldridge 

Thoroughly beat two eggs, stir in two heaping tablespoons of 
flour, add one quart of sweet milk, salt and pepper to taste. 
Pour beaten mixture into a well-greased pan, with small pieces 
of fat, pork. Bake in a hot oven and serve at once. 

LICK Self-Basting Enamel Roasters at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



46 
We Cater to tKe Ranch Trade 

"A Modern Store for the Country People" 

SONOMA COUNTY FRUIT & PRODUCE CO., Inc. 

Good Clean Groceries 
E-verytHing in Feed for CHicKens 
A.11 Kinds Poultry Remedies 
Best Store to Buy Your E.g£g£s 

Fourth and Wilson Sts. - - Santa Rosa 

Phone Main 87 



H. S. Johnson, President F. L. Wright, Secretary 

Nnrttjuttfifrrtt iEbrtrir dnmpang 

Rural Telephone Line Construction and Maintenance a Specialty 

Contractors for 

Telephone Line Construction, Installation of Exchanges, Intercommunicating 
Systems, Annunciator Systems 

Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 
All Kinds of Bell Telephone Apparatus and Material 

All Kinds of Electric Wiring. Electrical Supplies. All Kinds of Tools for 
Inside and Outside Wiremen. 

Office, 538 Third Street - - Santa Rosa, Cal. 

Phone Main 204 



CANNED CORN— Mrs. Jas. Laughlin 

Use one ounce tartaric acid to eight quarts corn. Cut corn 
from cob, use sufficient water to cook corn. Dissolve the acid 
in a little water, stir well into corn just before putting into can 
and seal. . 

BAKED TOMATO AND EGG PLANT -Mrs. House 

Take a deep earthenware dish, pour into it a cup of cream, 
cut several slices of egg plant very thin, salt well, and line the 
dish with them; slice two large tomatoes, place a layer of these 
on the egg plant, next a layer of spaghetti (cooked) ; sprinkle 
with grated cheese, pieces of butter, salt and pepper; cover 
this with layer of tomatoes, salt well and sprinkle with chopped 
green pepper and a top layer of egg plant, which also salt and 
pepper well. Cook gently an hour and half in a slow hot oven. 

CREAMED SQUASH— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Bake Hubbard Squash in the oven and when done scrape 
from shell and place in a granite kettle on the stove; add sweet 
cream, salt, pepper and butter; beat to a cream and serve hot. 

TO BAKE SWEET POTATOES- Mrs. Dwinelle 

Boil until almost done, then pour off water and stand them in 
a hot oven about fifteen minutes. Remove skins and serve. 

SWEET POTATOES AU CARAMEL— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Boil sweet potatoes, peel and cut in long strips, lay in a bak- 
ing dish that can be sent to table, dredging with two tablespoons 
flour, two teaspoons cinnamon. Dot with four tablespoons but- 
ter cut in bits, sprinkle with four tablespoons sugar, and pcur 
over all a cup of hot water. Bake until brown. 



50 
CORN PUDDING— Mrs. Compton 

Dozen large ears of sweet corn, one quart of sweet milk, three 
eggs well beaten, butter size of an egg, salt and pepper to taste. 
Mix all together and bake in a moderate oven until the milk 
and eggs are thick. 

CORN SOUFFLE- Mrs. A. L. House 

One can corn (chopped fine), one pint of milk (scant), two 
eggs, salt to taste, one-half teaspoon yeast powder, one table- 
spoon of flour stirred into the milk. Beat eggs very light, add 
to the other ingredients. Put all into a buttered pudding dish 
and bake about forty minutes. To be eaten immediately. 

CREAMED POTATOES— Miss S. E. Polhemus 

Peel the potatoes and boil till well done. Place on the stove 
a little milk or cream in which you put a lump of butter; let this 
come to the boiling point. Mash the potatoes until there are no 
lumps; salt to suit the taste, then add the hot milk and beat 
until creamy; add a white of egg beaten stiff, put in a dish and 
set in oven until the top is slightly b"rowned. Serve at once, as 
it will spoil them to wait long. Use a dish for the baking that 
can be brought to the table. 

SPINACH a La CREME— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Boil the spinach; drain off and press out all the water; chop 
and heat, with two spoonfuls of thick cream, one of butter 
and seasoning to suit taste, dredging with a spoonful of flour 
as you stir. Serve in small mounds on piece of buttered toast, 
with a poached egg on top. 

POTATOES SCALLOPED RAW-Miss S. E. Polhemus 

Cut the raw potatoes in thin slices; butter a baking dish and 
put a layer of potatoes, salt and pepper and bits of butter; re- 
peat until dish is full. Pour over all until it is covered, sweet 
milk or cream, and then bake. 

CREAM BEETS— Mrs. J. H. Frese 

Wash and peel beets, cut in very thin slices, boil, adding a 
little soda. When well done, pour off the water, adding milk 
or cream, enough to cover beets. Let boil, add salt, pepper, 
and piece of butter. Thicken with corn-starch. Do not use flour. 



51 
BAKED GREEN PEPPERS— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Cut the tops off the peppers, scoop out the seeds, and fill the 
cups with chopped cold roast, chopped ripe tomatoes, bread 
crumbs, and salt. Add a piece of butter to each cup and put 
on the caps. Set them upright side by side in baking-pan with 
little water and bake until tender. 

BAKED TOMATOES- Miss E. Granger 

Select round smooth tomatoes of an even size. Cut off the 
tops, and carefully scoop out the insides. Mix the pulp and 
juice with bread or cracker crumbs, season to taste, and fill the 
tomato cups. Put a piece of butter on top of each and put on 
the caps. Bake until soft. 

ASPARAGUS, Spanish Style— Janet Mackenzie Hill 

Cook the asparagus tied in a bunch, the tips out of the water, 
or cut the tender portion in small pieces, and put all but the 
tips over the fire to cook, and when partly cooked add the tips. 
Drain the asparagus and turn into a serving-dish; add two table- 
spoonfuls of vinegar or lemon juice to the water, and in it poach 
three or four eggs; place the eggs in the asparagus and pour 
over the whole French dressing, to which a teaspoonful each of 
fine-chopped parsley, capers, and cucumber pickles have been 
added. 

CAULIFLOWER (German) —Mrs. Chas. Roat 

Boil one head of cauliflower in salted water until tender. 
Place in baking-pan and pour over it this mixture: the beaten 
yolks of two eggs, mixed with a little cream, two heaping table- 
spoons of grated cheese, a little butter, cayenne pepper, and a 
pinch of salt. Bake five minutes in hot oven. 

VEGETABLE HASH -Miss E. Granger 

Into a kettle of beef boiling for soup, which has already boiled 
about two hours, put to boil potatoes, carrots, turnips, cab- 
bage, onions and tomatoes. When boiled tender, skim out the 
vegetables, chop and season. Brown in frying-pan with butter. 
Croquettes may be made from this mixture by adding bread or 
cracker crumbs, and molding into cakes before frying. 



52 



KOPF & DONOVAN 



Wholesale and Retail 



SANTA ROSA, CAL 




t) tMSIClS 



"To make a perfect salad there should be 
a spendthrift for oil, a miser for vinegrar, a 
wise man for salt, and a madcap to stir the 
ingredients up and mix them well together." 

—Spanish Proverb. 



POTATO Salad— Mrs. Harvey 



Slice cold boiled potatoes enough to fill a quart dish; salt and 
pepper to taste. Chop two small onions very fine and add to 
potatoes. Put half a cupful of vinegar and one teaspoon of 
butter in a pan and let it heat gradually. Beat the yolks of two 
eggs well, pour into a cup, and fill the cup with thick sweet 
cream. Beat well together and stir in hot vinegar. Stir con- 
stantly till it reaches the boiling point, then pour it immediate- 
ly over the potatoes and mix thoroughly. 

CHICKEN Salad— Mrs. J. H. Faught 

Boil two young chickens until very tender, cut into shreds 
(do not chop) . As much celery and white tender part of cab- 
bage as will measure as much as the meat, chopped fine. 

Dressing: Boil six eggs, chop the whites, mash the yolks 
with two tablespoons mustard, one teaspoon black pepper, one- 
half teaspoon cayene. Scald one cup vinegar, into this stir one 
cup butter and yolks of eggs. When thick take from fire and 
cool. Then stir into other ingredients with four tablespoons 
olive oil, several hours before serving. 

FRESH FRUIT Salad- Miss Annie Laughlin 

One-third box Cox's gelatine and one pint of hot water soaked 
for an hour. When ready, pour over either prepared peaches, 
sliced bananas, strawberries, blackberries, grapes, plums, or- 
anges or a combination of any two of the fruits; sugar to taste 
and flavor to judgment. Set aside in cool place. 



56 
CREAM SALAD DRESSING— Mrs. Dwinelle 

Yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, one teaspoon of salt, small 
one-half teaspoon mustard, one tablespoon sugar, two table- 
spoons vinegar, two tablespoons thick sweet cream to each egg. 
Beat all thoroughly. 

SALAD DRESSING-Mrs. Bryant 

One teaspoon mustard, yolk of one egg. Mix well and add, 
drop by drop, olive oil and lemon juice, alternately. Season 
with cayenne pepper and salt. 

DRESSING FOR APPLE AND NUT Salad— Mrs. Eastwood 

Four tablespoons vinegar, two well beaten eggs, butter size 
of an egg, one teaspoon made mustard, two and one-half scant 
saltspoons salt, one-quarter teaspoon red and white pepper, one 
teaspoon sugar, equal amount whipped cream. Let vinegar 
come to a boil; stir in egg until it thickens; cool; stir in season- 
ing and add cream just before serving. Use equal amounts 
chopped apples and walnuts. 

SALAD DRESSING— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Place on stove one-half pint vinegar, one tablespoon butter; 
heat slowly but not boil. When hot, stir into it this mixture: 
two thoroughly beaten eggs, one teaspoon salt, one-half tea- 
spoon mustard, one-half teaspoon pepper, one tablespoon flour, 
one tablespoon sugar. Turn into hot vinegar and let thicken, 
stirring all the time. Set aside to cool. Thin with sweet cream. 
Keeps well if kept in cool place. 

SALAD DRESSING-Mrs. Dwinelle 

Mix a tablespoon of dry mustard and a heaping teaspoon of 
salt to a stiff paste with a little vinegar. Into this beat 
thoroughly one egg. Then pour in best olive oil, about a wine- 
glassful at a time, stirring it in well each time till quite smooth 
before adding more; continue until a generous one-half pint 
has been used, when the mixture ought to be thick like cake 
batter. Add cayenne pepper to taste and one wineglassful of 
vinegar, stirring until smooth. This will keep in a tightly 
covered jar in a cool place for some time. 



57 
SWEETBREADS Salad— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Soak sweetbreads one hour in cold water and parboil twenty 
minutes. When cool, slice thin, rub the bottom of dish with 
sliced onions. Arrange leaves of lettuce on it, put on sweet- 
breads and more lettuce and pour mayonnaise over all. 

CABBAGE Salad—Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

One cup vinegar, one cup water, one heaping tablespoon but- 
ter, one tablespoon sugar, one tablespoon corn starch, one-half 
teaspoon mustard, yolks of two eggs. Place water, vinegar, 
salt, and butter in an enameled saucepan. When it boils, add 
mustard and corn starch, which has been moistened and rubbed 
smooth in one-half cup cream. When this has boiled two or 
three minutes add the well beaten yolks of the eggs. Let re- 
main over fire a moment longer and put aside to cool. Thin 
part of this with cream and a teaspoon sharp vinegar and mix 
with cabbage which has been shaved, not chopped. 

MOCK CHICKEN Salad- Miss S. E. Polhemus 

Take three pounds of veal and boil till well done; when cold 
chop fine; chop one head of celery, mix veal and celery well to- 
gether, season well with salt and pepper, toss up lightly with 
silver fork; pour any good salad dressing over it, tossing and 
mixing until the bottom of the mass is as well saturated as the 
top; turn into salad bowl and garnish with the white of egg 
(boiled), cut into rings and sprigs of bleached celery tops. 

DUCK Salad— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Cut cold roast duck into dices. To six pints allow four pints 
of diced celery and two pints mayonnaise, season duck with salt 
and cayenne. Heap in dome. Mask with thick mayonnaise and 
put stoned olives on and over it. 

CHICKEN Salad— Mrs. Sutherland 

To furnish salad for thirty guests requ ; res three large 
chickens. Boil thoroughly, then remove the bones and chop the 
meat fine, season to taste, mix with this the thoroughly blanched 
part of two bunches of celery cut fine. When ready to serve 
pour over all the following dressing, toss and mix well. 

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59 

Dressing: Beat two eggs well, then add one teaspoon sugar, 
one-fourth teaspoon salt, one-fourth teaspoon prepared mustard, 
one-third small teacup sweet cream, one teacup vinegar. Place 
bowl containing mixture in a pan of boiling water, stir until 
thick as cream. Season with pepper according to taste. 

SALAD DRESSING- Mrs. John Clay 

Two eggs, three tablespoonfuls sour cream. Cook, then add 
tablespoonful sugar, teaspoonful mustard, salt, pepper, and 
vinegar to taste. Serve cold. 

TOMATO JELLY (Salad) -Miss Annie Laughlin 

Stew a can of tomatoes with a small sliced onion and salt and 
pepper until reduced one-half. Strain through fine sieve press- 
ing the pulp through. To two pints of juice add one teaspoon 
Knox gelatine that has been soaked in a little water fifteen 
minutes, one tablespoon Tarragon vinegar, season sharply with 
cayenne pepper. When firm, cut in two inch squares, place on 
blanched lettuce leaf. Turn into square dish to cool. When set, 
should be one inch thick. Serve with either French or mayon- 
naise dressing. 

CABBAGE Salad (for Large Gathering)— Mrs. M. D. Brown 

One quart vinegar, four quarts cabbage chopped fine, one 
tablespoonful salt, two tablespoonfuls mustard, one tablespoon- 
ful pepper, two cups sugar, eight eggs. Put salt on cabbage; 
mix thoroughly sugar, mustard and pepper, and stir into the 
vinegar. When boiling hot, stir in the beaten eggs, and pour 
over cabbage. This will keep indefinitely. 

NUT Salad— Mrs. Samuel J. Holms 

Serve pecan nuts on crisp lettuce leaves, and over the nuts 
pour a mayonnaise dressing. (For convenience buy the nuts 
already shelled). 

CREAM Salad DRESSING— Mrs. Jos. DuBois 
(ESPECIALLY FINE FOR CHICKEN OR SHRIMP SALAD) 

Three eggs, one cup cream, one tablespoon butter, one cup 
weak vinegar, one teaspoonful each mustard, sugar, and salt, 
red and black pepper to taste. Let vinegar and butter come to 
a boil, then stir in other ingredients until smooth and thick, 
being very careful not to boil. 



60 
ORANGE Salad— Miss Irma G. Slusser 

Slice four peeled oranges lengthwise, dress with three or four 
tablespoonfuls of olive oil and one tablespoonful of lemon juice. 
Arrange slices in a mound upon a layer of lettuce leaves. Dress 
one cupful of nut meats with one tablespoonful of lemon juice, 
and dispose upon the center of the mound. Toss together be- 
fore serving. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING— Mrs. W. P. Slusser 

Yolks of two eggs, one teaspoon sugar, one tablespoon mus- 
tard, pinch of salt, pinch of cayenne pepper, one half pint salad 
oil, three tablespoons of vinegar and one tablespoon of lemon 
juice. Beat the eggs well, then add the oil, drop by drop, al- 
ternately with a little of the vinegar until about half has been 
used. Mix the mustard, salt, pepper, and sugar well together 
and add gradually, beating continually, add the rest of the oil 
and vinegar little by little and last the lemon juice. 

VEGETABLE Salad- Miss E. Granger 

Cut a fresh peeled cucumber into quarters lengthwise, and 
slice very thin crosswise; put into a bowl with small pieces of 
skinned tomato (omitting the seed and pulp) , the hearts of head 
lettuce torn into bits, and if possible some tender stalks of celery 
sliced thin. A few pickled nasturtium seeds or radish pods will 
add to the flavor. Pour French dressing (which includes mus- 
tard) over the vegetables, and mix well. Serve on lettuce 
leaves, and if desired, garnish with slices of cold boiled egg. 

MAYONNAISE— Mrs. J. H. Frese 

Yolk of one egg well beaten, one teaspoon dry mustard, a little 
salt, a little sugar; mix this well together. Beat white of one 
egg stiff, add to the above. Then add oil, a little at a time, 
beating all the time, a little vinegar, a little Worcestershire 
sauce. With this amount you can make as much as you wish 
by adding as much oil as you like. This will keep good a long 
time. 

LOBSTER AND MACARONI Salad -Miss Lillian Hoffmeyer 

Cut two cups of cooked macaroni into small pieces. Pick one 
can of lobster into pieces, and chop some celery. Mix these to- 
gether and pour the dressing over it. Serve on lettuce leaves. 

Dressing: Stir together the yolks of two eggs, one teaspoon 
flour, one teaspoon sugar, a little vinegar, a little red pepper, 



61 

pinch of mustard and salt. Then stir about a cup of California 
salad oil into this, slowly at first, until it thickens. When ready 
for use the dressing should be quite stiff. 

CELERY AND APPLE Salad- Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

One and one-half cups chopped celery, one cup chopped ap- 
ples, one-half cup chopped nuts, one cup lettuce chopped. 

Dressing: One cup very thick cream, beaten, one teaspoon 
mustard, one teaspoon salt, a dash of cayenne, one tablespoon 
sugar, one fourth cup vinegar added last. Stir well while add- 
ing vinegar. Serve on lettuce leaves. 

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62 



Everybody Reads 



TTe PRESS DEMOCRAT 



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SEMI-WEEKLY, $1.50 per year : : : : : 

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PRINTING and BOOKBINDING PLANT 
IN SONOMA COUNTY : : : : : 



The Congressional Orator 

Now Stands 
With Open Mouth 
And Pleading Hands. 

The people nowadays want 
something more than mere 
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we desire most. To those de- 
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FRESH and JUICY MEATS, the cause we wish to plead is 
that it pays to adopt any measure that will result in your 
securing absolute satisfaction. This can be accomplished by 
patronizing the FELIZ MARKET for MEATS. 




S. J. FELIZ^ 



540 THIRD ST. 

PHONE MAIN 14 



Prop. 
santa rosa 



MINT Sauce FOR LAMB— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One handful mint leaves and tender stems. Stir well with 
one cup sugar, one cup vinegar. Set on back of stove for one- 
half hour, stirring occasionally. When mixture is consistency 
of syrup it is done. 

MUSTARD Sauce— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One cup vinegar, one cup sweet cream, two tablespoons mus- 
tard, one tablespoon salt, three eggs well beaten. Stir eggs, 
mustard, salt and cream together. Let vinegar come to a boil, 
then stir in mixture and let boil a few minutes, stirring all the 
while. 

ONION Sauce — Miss Annie Laughlin 

One tablespoon butter, one tablespoon flour mixed with one 
half pint soup stock; add one-half dozen small onions which 
have been boiled and mashed. Season with pepper and salt. 
For roast duck or chicken. 

CRANBERRY Sauce-Mrs. Wilkinson 

To two quarts of cranberries put one quart water. Let it 
come to a boil, then mash all the berries. When this is done 
add one quart sugar; let it boil fifteen minutes, stirring all the 
time; when done sift through a colander; it will all go through 
but the skin. Then pour into molds. It is better to do it the 
day before wanted for the table. 

CRANBERRY Sauce— Mrs. Delano 

One quart cranberries, one pint sugar, one-half pint water. 
Boil fifteen minutes. Do not strain. 



66 



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67 
MINT CHUTNEY— Mrs. Wm. E. Woolsey 

Take a handful of finely chopped mint leaves; add to this a 
cup of seeded raisins, two tablespoons of sugar, one of tomato 
catsup, and a saltspoon of salt. Mash and mix together until the 
substance is juicy. A delicious accompaniment to cold meats. 

ORANGE MARMALADE— Mrs. Wm. E. Woolsey 

Cut up fine four oranges and one lemon adding the juice of a 
second lemon. Put in a large dish, add one pint water, and 
allow all to stand twenty-four or even forty-eight hours. Hav- 
ing previously measured sugar, bowl for bowl, put on stove the 
cut-up fruit and water, and cook until very tender. Then add 
sugar and boil until it jells. Pour into glasses and cover. This 
makes from ten to twelve glasses. 

APPLE MINT JELLY— Mrs. Wm. E. Woolsey 

Delicious to serve with roast goose or pork. Make apple jelly 
in the usual way, using partially unripe apples, which give a 
beautifully clear jelly. Add to each glassful of the strained 
jelly liquid the same measure of sugar and a tablespoonful of 
mint juice. To make this, mash a packed cupful of mint, with 
two cups of boiling water, in a bowl. Cover closely and steep 
for one hour. Lay a coarse muslin over a bowl and pour in the 
mint, then press out the juice and mix with the jelly as directed. 

CURRANT CONSERVE— Mrs. Wm. E. Woolsey 

Five pounds of washed and stemmed currants, five pounds of 
sugar and five oranges, peeled, seeded and cut into bits. Add 
two and one-half pounds seeded raisins. Mix all together and 
boil for thirty minutes. Seal while hot. 

CHUTNEY— Mrs. T. L. Eckel 

Twelve pounds ripe tomatoes, two pounds onions, two pounds 
sugar, two pounds apples, one-half pound salt, two ounces 
ground ginger, two ounces garlic, two scant ounces cloves, two 
teaspoons white pepper, two teaspoons red pepper, one teaspoon 
mace, four or five Chili peppers, six pints vinegar. Chop all 
finely, and boil six hours. Bottle when cold. 

HORSE-RADISH Sauce— Mrs. J. H. Faught 

Two teaspoons made mustard, two teaspoons white sugar, 
one and one-half teaspoons salt, and a gill of vinegar. Mix and 
pour over grated horse-radish. 



68 



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rS and DESERTS 



"Love in a cottage and cottage pudding with it." 



COTTAGE Pudding— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One cup sugar, one cup milk, two and one-half cups flour, 
two eggs, two tablespoons butter, two teaspoons baking powder. 
Flavor with vanilla and bake in shallow pan. 

Sauce: One pint boiling water, one tablespoon flour moistened 
and boiled in water, two tablespoons butter, two tablespoons 
sugar creamed together. Pour on boiling water, boil up and 
flavor with nutmeg and lemon juice or tablespoon sharp vinegar. 

PLUM Pudding— Mrs. Wilkinson 

One cup molasses, one cup brown sugar, one cup sweet milk, 
two cups finely chopped suet, two eggs, one cup currants, three 
cups chopped raisins, four cups flour, one teaspoon cinnamon, 
one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon allspice, one teaspoon soda. 
Boil in double boiler four hours and serve with hard sauce. 

EGCLESS PLUM Pudding- Mrs. MaKee 

One heaping cup of bread crumbs, two cups flour, one cup 
suet chopped fine, one cup raisins or prunes chopped fine, one 
cup molasses, one cup sweet milk, one tablespoon soda, one tea- 
spoon salt, one teaspoon each cloves and cinnamon. Boil two and 
one-half hours in a two quart pail set in a kettle of boiling water. 

Sauce : One-half cup sugar and one tablespoon cornstarch 
mixed well. Then add one cup boiling water and one teaspoon 
lemon, boil ten minutes. 

COFFEE JELLY— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One package Knox's gelatine dissolved in one pint cold water. 
Stand one hour. Put two cups strong coffee and one pint of 



72 

sugar in a quart cup, add gelatine soaked and fill measure with 
boiling water. Stir well and strain. Pour in mold. Serve with 
whipped cream and sugar. 

PLUM Pudding— Mrs. Purrington 

One pound flour, one pound of bread crumbs, one pound suet 
chopped fine, one pound citron, one pound sugar, two pounds 
currants, two pounds raisins (seeded), five eggs, three tea- 
spoons baking powder mixed with flour, one cup brandy, one 
tablespoon cloves, one tablespoon allspice, two tablespoons cin- 
namon, two grated nutmegs, add a little water in mixture, boil 
six hours. Either cook in small cake pans in a steamer or 
sprinkle pudding cloth with flour, put the pudding in and tie up 
as tight as possible. Put a plate in bottom of your pot to keep 
the pudding from burning. These will keep some time. 

FRUIT Pudding— Mrs. Bryant 

One-half dozen bananas, one-half dozen oranges, two lemons, 
one can pineapple, one box gelatine, soaked in three-quarters 
cup cold water until dissolved, then add three-quarters cup boil- 
ing water. Sweeten to taste and set away to harden. 

COTTAGE Pudding— Mrs. Voss 

One heaping pint flour, one-half cup sugar, one cup milk, one 
teaspoon soda dissolved in the milk, one tablespoon butter, two 
teaspoons cream tartar, flavor with nutmeg. Bake in a moder- 
ate oven. Cut in slices and serve warm with wine or brandy 
sauce or sweet sugar sauce. 

DRIED PEACH Pudding— Mrs. Dwinelle 

Put some slices of bread in the oven and dry until they are 
very crisp, making about a bowl of crumbs. Add to these 
crumbs an equal quantity of stewed peaches, two or three eggs, 
one pint of milk, one-half cup sugar and bake about twenty 
minutes, browning a little. It should not be milky. Eat either 
hot or cold with a sauce made of sugar and lemon juice. 

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73 
STEAMED Pudding— Mrs. Meacham 

One cupful of suet chopped fine, one cupful molasses, one 
cupful currants washed and dried, one cupful sour milk, one 
teaspoon soda, a little salt and flour. Mix well, using flour 
enough to make a stiff dough. Pour into a mold and steam 
three hours. 

BANANA CREAM -Mrs. Bryant 

Five ripe bananas, remove skin and pound the fruit with five 
ounces white sugar. Whip one-half pint cream to stiff froth 
and add mashed fruit and one-half glass sherry wine and juice 
of one lemon. Mix well together and add one-half ounce of 
dissolved gelatine. Set in a mold to cool and harden. Serve 
with cream. 

SUET Pudding— Mrs. J. H. Faught 

One-half cup suet (chopped), one cup raisins, two-thirds cup 
molasses, one and one-half cups sweet milk, two cups flour, one 
heaping teaspoon soda. Steam two hours. 

Sauce: One-half cup butter, one cup sugar, one cup cream, 
one-half nutmeg, three eggs well beaten. Cream, butter and 
sugar well together, then add other ingredients. 

SNOW Pudding— Mrs. Dwinelle 

Soak one-half box of Cox's gelatine in one-half pint of cold 
water, set it on back of stove until dissolved. Add one-half 
pint of boiling water and just before it hardens beat well with 
the whites of three eggs, one cup sugar, and a little lemon 
juice. Put this in a mold. When served pour over it a custard 
made of one pint of milk, yolks of three eggs, two-thirds cup 
of sugar and one teaspoon vanilla. 

FAVORITE Pudding— Mrs. Sutherland 

Beat two eggs light, add one cup milk, one cup bread crumbs, 
one cup finely chopped sour apples, one cup currants, one cup 
sugar. Bake brown and serve with sauce. 

STRAWBERRY SPONGE— Mrs. Bryant 

One quart strawberries, one-half package of gelatine, one and 
one-half cups water, one cup sugar, juice of one lemon, whites 
of four eggs. Soak gelatine two hours in one-half cup of the water. 



74 

Mash strawberries and add half the sugar to them. Boil remain- 
der of sugar and the cupful of water gently for twenty minutes. 
Rub strawberries through a sieve. Add gelatine to the boiling 
syrup and take from fire immediately, then add strawberries. 
Place in pan of cold water and beat five minutes. Add the well 
beaten whites of eggs and beat until thickens a little. Pour in 
mold and set away to thicken. Serve with cream. 

RICE Pudding— Mrs. Dwinelle 

One cup rice (uncooked) , one cup of sugar, nine cups milk, 
butter size of walnut, salt and nutmeg, raisins if desired. Bake 
one and three-quarters or two hours. To be eaten cold. The 
oven should not be too hot. Cook slowly, and stirring it several 
times in the first hour is well. Everything is in the baking. 

SPONGE Pudding— Mrs. House 

One teacup flour, one-half teacup sugar, one pint sweet milk. 
Boil all together till thick, then add three-quarters cup of but- 
ter. Beat to a froth, and separately, the whites and yolks of 
eight eggs. Stir well together and bake in a pudding dish set 
in a pan of water nearly an hour. 

Sauce: Rub to a cream one cup powdered sugar and one-half 
cup butter. Add by teaspoonful, one-half cup sherry, and set 
in a dish of hot water to dissolve. 

STRAWBERRY Pudding-Mrs. Bryant 

Make a custard of one quart milk, one cup sugar and yolks of 
four eggs; flavor with vanilla. Slice one stale plain cake and 
cover the bottom of a dish with it. Moisten with custard; over 
this put a layer of preserved strawberries, then another layer 
of cake, then custard, then strawberries. Repeat until your 
dish is full. Make a meringue of the whites of two eggs and 
color with some of the strawberry juice. Spread on top and 
serve with cream. 

POOR MAN'S Pudding— Mrs. Dwinelle 

Four cups flour, one cup milk, one cup chopped suet, one cup 
New Orleans molasses, one cup raisins, one-half teaspoon of 
soda dissolved in a little water. Citron and currants if you 
wish, and salt. Boil three hours in tin with stem through center 
and tie cover on tight. To be eaten with hot sauce. 



75 
STEAMED APPLE ROLL- Miss Annie Laughlin 

Mix up soft, rich biscuit dough (chopped suet preferred for 
shortening) and roll to about one inch thick; spread on this two 
cups hashed apples. Sprinkle with sugar and spices. Spread 
over this plum or cherry preserves. Jelly and raisins take place 
of preserves. Roll up and put in buttered mold and steam three 
hours. 

Sauce: Butter, sugar, little flour heated together; pour en 
boiling water; add a little vinegar and nutmeg. 

PRUNE Pudding- Mrs. Eldredge 

Soak forty prunes in cold water over night. When well swol- 
len, pour off the water and cover with boiling water; let boil 
for twenty or thirty minutes. When soft, pour off water and 
rub prunes through sieve. Put three tablespoons of sugar in 
this and then add the well beaten whites of six eggs. Mix well 
and bake about thirty minutes in a moderate oven. Serve with 
cream. 

TROY Pudding — Miss Annie Laughlin 

One cup raisins, one cup chopped suet, one cup molasses, one 
cup sweet milk, three and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon 
soda, cinnamon, nutmeg. Boil in pudding dish three hours. 
Serve with either brandy or hard sauce. 

TAPIOCA CREAM-Mrs. Eldredge 

Two tablespoons tapioca soaked in one cup of water about an 
hour. One pint milk in double boiler, when hot pour in the 
tapioca and let cook for one hour. Pinch of salt, yolks of two 
eggs, into which beat one cup sugar. Then mix well with a 
little cold milk and pour into the hot milk, stirring a few min- 
utes. Beat up the whites of the eggs and stir into the mixture 
after removing it from the fire. Add one teaspoon vanilla and 
set away to cool. 

INDIAN AND APPLE Pudding— Mrs. Wilkinson 

One-half cupful Indian meal, one-half cup molasses, one 
quart milk, one teaspoon salt, one and one-half tablespoons 
butter, one pint pared and quartered apples, one-quarter tea- 
spoon ginger, one-quarter teaspoon grated nutmeg. Put the 



76 

milk on in double boiler, when it boils pour gradually on the 
meal; return to boiler and cook half an hour, stirring often. 
Add molasses, butter, seasoning and apples; butter pudding 
dish, pour in mixture and bake slowly three hours. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS— Mrs. Voss 

Make a rich biscuit dough. Roll out a piece of dough as thin 
as pie crust and cut in squares large enough to cover an apple. 
Put into the middle of each piece, two apple halves pared and 
cored. Put a pinch of cinnamon and a spoonful of sugar on the 
apples and lap the dough around them; lay the dumplings in a 
well buttered dripping pan. Put a piece of butter on each, and 
sprinkle over a large handful of sugar and turn in a cupful of 
boiling water. Bake in a moderate oven three-quarters of an 
hour. Serve with pudding sauce. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one egg, one cup sweet 
milk, three cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder. Bake in 
layers; serve with sauce hot. 

Sauce: One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one 
pint strawberries mashed until juicy. Beat butter and sugar 
to cream, then stir in the berries and beaten whites of two eggs. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE— Mrs. McKisick 

One pint whipped cream, one-half pint milk, one-half gill of 
wine, two-thirds cup gelatine, four eggs. Boil milk and gela- 
tine until latter is dissolved. Beat yolks with four tablespoons 
sugar, mix into the gelatine, add whites well whipped and last 
the cream. Line a deep glass dish with sponge cake and fill 
with above mixture. 

PUDDING SAUCE— Mrs. Parloa 

One cupful butter, two cups powdered sugar, whites of two 
eggs, five tablespoons wine or three of brandy, one-fourth tea- 
cup boiling water. Beat the butter to a cream and gradually 
beat the sugar into it. Add whites of eggs, unbeaten, one at a 
time and then the brandy or wine. When all is a light smooth 
mass add the water, beating in a little at a time. Place the 
bowl in a basin of hot water and stir until smooth and frothy, 
about two minutes. 



77 

HARD SAUCE— Mrs. Bryant 

! 

One-third cup butter, add gradually one cup powdered sugar, 
and two tablespoons cream or milk, drop by drop. Add one- 
third teaspoon vanilla. 

SWEDISH CARROT Pudding— Mrs. J. H. Frese 

One cup grated raw carrots, one cup bread crumbs, one cup 
grated raw potatoes, one-half cup raisins, one-half cup currants, 
one-half teaspoon soda, one-half cup flour, one cup sugar, one 
cup suet, spice same as for plum pudding. Boil three or four 
hours in covered can, or bake in oven in covered pan with an 
asbestos mat under it. 

Sauce: Piece of butter size of a walnut, two tablespoons 
flour, blend, and add cold water gradually. Let boil, then beat 
one egg light in bowl, and pour hot sauce on it. Flavor to suit. 

ORANGE CUSTARD-Mrs. Samuel J. Holms 

Place one pint milk on stove; when at boiling point add one 
tablespoonful corn-starch dissolved in a little cold milk. Beat 
yolks of three eggs and one-half teacup sugar. Stir into the 
milk and cook a few minutes. When cold add the beaten whites 
of three eggs, stirring slightly into the custard. Peel six oran- 
ges, cut in thin slices, mix with one teacupful sugar, place in 
sauce dishes and dip the custard over it. 

RUSSIAN CREAM— Mrs. Munson Deuprey 

Three tablespoons gelatine, level full, dissolved in one-fcuith 
cup cold water. Add about one-third cup warm water just be- 
fore adding to milk. Scald one pint milk, add gelatine and two 
egg-yolks beaten well with three-fourths or one cup sugar. 
Just bring to a boil, strain. Beat whites stiff and stir in mix- 
ture slowly. Flavor with one-half teaspoon vanilla, or less. Pour 
into small moulds and serve with whipped cream. 

SUET Pudding— Mrs. John Clay 

One cup each molasses, suet, sweet milk, one and one-half 
cups each currants, raisins, and cracker crumbs, one-half tea- 
spoon soda, little salt, three eggs, two and one-half cups flour. 
Add citron and spice to taste. Steam three hours. This will 
keep and can be re-steamed. 



78 
MARSHMALLOW Pudding- Mrs. J. W. Mitchell 

One tablespoon gelatine and a little pink coloring dissolved 
in a tablespoon of cold water. Add one cup boiling water, one 
cup sugar, and a little vanilla. Put on stove until all dissolves, 
strain and cool. When thick, not solid, drop in the unbeaten 
whites of two eggs, and beat for twenty minutes. Fold in one 
cup of any kind of berries. Serve with whipped cream. 

WATERMELON PRESERVES -Mrs. Jas. W. Hall 

Prepare the rind by cutting away all the green and red, leav- 
ing the pieces rather thin, cut in any desired shape or size. 
Wash and place in milk pan and cover with water, with one 
tablespoon salt, and alum the size of a walnut added. Let stand 
over night, then drain, rinse and pour boiling water over them. 
Let stand about an hour, then place on stove, and boil until 
tender. It may be necessary to change the water two or three 
times to remove salt and alum taste. When tender drop in a 
good rich syrup and cook slowly until transparent. Then place 
in either glass or tin and seal. 

PINEAPPLE MARMALADE-Miss Annie Laughlin 

Chop pineapple very fine and weigh, allowing three-fourths 
pound sugar to every pound of fruit. Sprinkle the sugar over 
the fruit and let stand over night. Pare and stone apricots and 
weigh. Take an equal number of pounds to the pounds of pine- 
apple. Allow three-fourths pound sugar to every pound of ap- 
ricots. Sprinkle the sugar over the apricots and let stand over 
night also. In the morning put both fruits together and boil 
half an hour, stirring continuously. Seal while hot. 

FIG MARMALADE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

To two pounds figs allow one pound sugar, one orange, one 
lemon. Peel figs and cut very fine. Boil by themselves half 
an hour. Then add the grated rind and the juice of the orange 
and lemon and the sugar. Boil all together half an hour longer, 
stirring continuously. Seal in pint jars. To be served with 
cream. (Proportion of fruits after peeling: ten pounds figs, 
five pounds sugar, five oranges, five lemons. This makes ten 
pints of marmalade. ) 



79 
STEAMED BLACKBERRY Pudding-Mrs. D. C. Cameron 

Line the sides of a well buttered pudding dish with a rich soft 
biscuit dough. Then fill the dish with first a layer of canned 
fruit, then dough cut in strips, then fruit and dough alternately 
until the dish is full, having the dough on top. Steam about 
three hours. Serve with hard sauce or whipped cream. 

MOCK PLUM Pudding- Miss Edith Clements 

Three or four slices of bread soaked in milk, one cup raisins 
chopped but not fine, one cup currants, one cup citron, one cup 
chopped suet, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon nutmeg, 
one teaspoon ginger, two eggs. Drain the bread fairly dry, add 
fruit, suet, spices, and the well beaten eggs. Mix well together 
and bake in a well greased pudding pan about an hour and a 
half in a slow oven. Before placing in the oven dust the top 
with cinnamon. Serve with hard sauce. 

STEAMED GRAHAM Pudding-Mrs. G. O. Guy 

One cup sweet milk, one and one-half cups graham flour. 
Add one egg, five teaspoons melted butter, one-half cup mo- 
lasses into which one teaspoon soda has been stirred, one cup 
raisins. Steam three hours. 

Sauce: Two tablespoons butter, five tablespoons sugar, one 
tablespoon flour, beaten to a cream. Add one beaten egg, then 
boiling water to thin to proper consistency. Boil and flavor to 
taste. 

BANANA SNOWBALL-Miss Irma G. Slusser 

Place in a double boiler one pint of milk, two tablespoonfuls 
of sugar and the yolks of two eggs, a pinch of salt, and butter 
the size of a walnut; add one teaspoonful of cornstarch; stir 
over the fire until thick; then add vanilla flavoring to taste. 
When custard is cold beat the two whites to a stiff froth and 
mix with two tablespoonfuls of sugar. Cut three or four ba- 
nanas into slices and place in a dish; pour the custard over it, 
and put whites of eggs on top in shape of snowballs. 

RAISIN Pudding— Miss Emily Denner 

One cup finely chopped suet, one-half cup sugar, two eggs, 
one-half cup milk, one cup entire-wheat flour, one teaspoon 
baking powder, one cup floured raisins. Steam three hours. 
Serve with liquid sauce or cream. 



80 
FRIAR'S OMELETTE-Mrs. E. S. Denner 

Boil about one dozen apples as for sauce; stir in butter the 
size of an egg, and four ounces of sugar. When cold add four 
eggs beaten very light. Thickly strew bread or cracker crumbs 
on buttered baking-dish, put in the apple mixture and strew 
crumbs plentifully over the top. Bake in rather slow oven. 

BAKED BANANAS— Mrs. Chas. Roat 

Cook one tablespoon butter, two of sugar, and juice of one 
lemon in double boiler until clear. Peel and slice lengthwise 
one dozen bananas, put on buttered baking-dish, pour one-half 
of sauce over them and bake fifteen minutes. Then add re- 
mainder of sauce and bake until brown, basting occasionally. 

VANILLA SOUFFLE— Mrs. J. M. Laughlin 

Heat one-half pint milk in double boiler. Moisten three table- 
spoons flour with a little cream, add to the hot milk and cook 
until it thickens. Separate four eggs and add the well beaten 
yolks to the hot mixture, then take from the fire and beat in 
thoroughly the stiffly beaten whites. Place in a buttered pan 
or bowl, and stand in a pan of boiling warer in the oven and 
bake in a moderately quick oven fifteen or twenty minutes. 
Serve hot with wine sauce. 

Wine Sauce : One-half cup powdered sugar and one table- 
spoon butter rubbed to a cream; add one egg beaten lightly. 
Flavor with Sherry wine. 

SPONGE Pudding- Mrs. E. F. Cole 

Six eggs, one pint milk, one cup sifted flour, one-half cup 
sugar, one-half cup butter. Wet flour with a little milk and 
stir into rest of milk when boiling. Let cool. Stir sugar and 
butter to a cream, add well beaten yolks, add to paste and last 
add whites of eggs. Pour into a buttered dish and set to bake 
in oven in dish of boiling water. Bake about one hour. Serve 
hot or cold with sauce. 

Sauce: Two cups sugar, one cup butter. Cream and add a 
little flour, one-half nutmeg, one pint boiling water, and bring 
to a boil. 

PRUNE Pudding— Miss Mae Kelly 

Soak one cup dried prunes two hours, then cut in small pieces, 
removing the pits. Two eggs well beaten, two-thirds cup mo- 



81 

lasses, one-half teaspoonful of nutmeg and cinnamon, dash of 
cloves, pinch of salt, one cup sweet milk, one cup graham flour 
(sift the flour), one teaspoon soda in little hot water, stir 
thoroughly and add cut prunes. Put in covered pail well greased 
and set in a kettle of boiling water. Boil two hours keeping 
water in all the time. Serve hot with hard sauce. One-half 
cup raisins and currants added will make a richer pudding. 

DUTCH APPLE Pudding— Mrs. J. H. Faught 

Two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder, pinch salt, mix 
well. Rub into this two tablespoons butter. Beat one egg, add 
to it one cup milk and stir into the flour and beat well. Grease 
a shallow pan and spread the dough one-half inch thick. Pare 
apples and quarter them, stick close together in parallel rows, 
sprinkle plentifully with sugar and cinnamon to taste. Bake 
about three-quarters of an hour. Serve with cream. Rhubarb 
or any fruit can be used instead of apples. 

PINEAPPLE CREAM— Mrs. M. E. Slusser 

One can shredded pineapple; bring to a boil with a half pound 
of white sugar; strain over half an ounce of gelatine which has 
been dissolved in enough cold water to cover it. When cool stir 
in the beaten whites of three eggs and a half pint of whipped 
cream. Pour into a mold and set on ice. 

INDIAN Pudding- Mrs. J. H. Faught 

Scald one quart milk and gradually stir in one pint of Indian 
meal. Cook it slowly and thoroughly, then add to it cne cup 
molasses and a little salt, and one cup finely chopped beef suet. 
When it is partly cold stir in a quart of cold milk. Butter a deep 
dish and bake slowly two or three hours. 

COFFEE Pudding-Mrs. J. H. Faught 

Strong coffee sufficient to moisten one quart bread crumbs, 
one cup brown sugar, three eggs, one teaspoon soda, one cup 
raisins, one cup currants, one teaspoonful each of cloves, all- 
spice, and cinnamon. Steam one hour and serve with wine 
sauce. 

MARSHMALLOW Pudding-Miss Nelle Mead 

Dissolve one tablespoon of gelatine in a little cold water in a 
cup, and then fill the cup up with boiling water, stirring well. 
Break the whites of three eggs on a large platter. Pour over 



82 

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83 

one cup sugar, one teaspoon flavoring, and over all pour the hot 
water and gelatine. Beat until stiff. Take out a cupful and 
tint with pink coloring. Alternate the white and pink mixture 
in a pudding dish that can be brought to the table. Serve with 
whipped cream. 

TAPIOCA ROLL- Mrs. F. W. Laugh. in 

Two eggs, three-fourths cup sugar, three-fourths cup flour, 
one and one-half tablespoons boiling water, one teaspcon bak- 
ing powder. Bake in oblong pan spreading dough very thin. 
Soak one-half teacup pearl tapioca two hours in cold water, 
then boil in double boiler till it is clear. While boiling add one- 
half cup sugar and one teaspoon butter. Spread hot on cake 
and while cake is hot, and roll. Serve cold with whipped cream. 

COCOANUT PIE— Mrs. F. W. Laughlin 

One scant pint of milk, one-half teacup sugar, yolks of two 
eggs, one heaping tablespoon cornstarch, one teaspoon butter. 
In a bowl beat the eggs and sugar, add the cornstarch moistened 
in a little water. Beat all together thoroughly. Add to the 
scalding milk. Cook until it thickens, stirring all the time. 
When done add one cup fresh cocoanut. Place in a crust which 
has been already baked. Whip the whites of eggs to stiff froth, 
add two tablespoons sugar and spread over pie. Eeturn to oven 
and brown. 

BRJDGE BEACH Stoves Always the Best at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



"No soil upon earth is so dear to our eyes. 
As the soil we first stirred in terrestrial pies." 

—Holmes. 

PUMPKIN Pie— Mrs. Estinghausen 

One cup pumpkin, one cup milk, one-half cup sugar, two eggs, 
one rolled cracker, cinnamon and ginger to taste. This makes 
one large pie. 

LEMON PIE FILLING— Mrs. McKisick 

One and one-half cups sugar, yolks three eggs, two lemons, 
one and one-half tablespoons cornstarch, with a cup and a half 
of boiling water poured on it, a little salt. Cook above mixture 
until it begins to thicken, then pour it in the pie and cook again 
in the oven until brown, then add the whites with four table- 
spoons of sugar whipped in them. This will make one thick pie. 

MOCK MINCE Pie- Mrs. Wood 

One cup sugar, one cup raisins, one cup of clabber milk, one egg. 
Spices and one teaspoon flour, tablespoon vinegar and little salt. 

MINCE MEAT— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One-half pound suet chopped fine, two pounds beef and two 
pounds apples chopped, one cup sugar, two pounds raisins seed- 
ed, one-half pound currants, two cups boiled cider, two cups juice 
of sweet spiced fruit, one piece candied lemon peel, one piece 
citron (cut fine) , one teaspoon salt, little cinnamon, one teaspoon 
nutmeg and allspice, a few raisins left whole, one cup vinegar. 

GREEN TOMATO Pie— Mrs. Wood 

One pint minced tomatoes, one pint minced tart apples, two 
cups sugar, one-half cup strong vinegar, two tablespoons flour, 
one teaspoon each of cloves, allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg and 
black pepper. (I sometimes add one teacup raisins, which is 
an improvement). 

APPLE MERINGUE Pie- Miss Annie Laughlin 

Stew seven apples until soft, while hot add one tablespoon 
butter, two tablespoons sugar and mash well. Beat four eggs, 
leaving out the whites of two, and stir into hot apple. Flavor 
with nutmeg and lemon juice. Bake with under crust as in cus- 
tard pie. When done spread meringue made with whites of two 
eggs and one tablespoon of sugar over top and return to oven 
to brown. 





86 


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87 
PUFF PASTE FOR TARTS- Mrs. E. S. Dermer 

Have ingredients very cold; flour, water, lard, butter, and 
beaten white of egg. Begin by making paste of flour, lard, and 
water; then roll to half an inch in thickness, spread with the 
white of egg and the butter in bits, roll up and repeat three 
times. 

LEMON Pie— Mrs. J. W. Mitchell 

After removing the crusts from two slices of bread, each one- 
half inch thick, pour over them one cup boiling water; add one 
dessertspoon of butter, and beat thoroughly. Then add juice 
and grated rind of one lemon, one cup sugar, the yolks of two 
eggs well beaten, and a pinch of salt. Bake in a rich crust. 
When cool spread over it the well beaten whites of the eggs 
mixed with four tablespoons of sugar. Brown in oven. 

CHEESE CAKES— Mrs. E. S. Denner 

To a pint of curd, add a pint and a half of new milk, three 
beaten eggs, one cup of currants, one sugar, grated peel of 
lemon, pinch of salt, and a little nutmeg. Make puff paste and 
bake in pie pans without upper crust. 

ORANGE CUSTARD Pie- Mrs. W. P. Slusser 

One cup milk, one cup orange juice, one cup sugar, one large 
tablespoof ul of flour, a pinch of salt and two eggs. Stir orange 
juice and sugar together. Bring milk to a boil, add salt to milk; 
mix flour with milk to smooth paste, stir into boiling milk and 
let cook one minute. Remove from fire, add orange juice and 
sugar gradually, stirring until well mixed, then add yolks of 
two eggs well beaten. Line a deep pie pan with rich paste, 
pour in mixture and bake in moderate oven till custard is set. 
Make a meringue of the whites of the two eggs well beaten, 
two tablespoons of sugar and a little vanilla extract, spread 
over top and return to oven until a delicate brown. Serve cold. 

CRACKER Pie— Mrs. T. L. Eckel 

Six crackers, two eggs, one-half cup butter, one cup hot water, 
one cup sugar, one cup molasses, one : half pound chopped rais- 
ins, one-half cup vinegar, one teaspoon cinnamon, one nutmeg, 
one teaspoon cloves, and a little salt. 



ffVozesa IDsdimtiies &&&<di IBe^eir^Mes 



"An't please your Honour" quoth the peasant, 
"This same dessert is very pleasant." 

—Pope. 



ICE CREAM— Mrs. Sutherland 

To make one gallon, take one quart rich cream, one and one- 
half quarts milk, one and one-half cups sugar, one and one-half 
teaspoons vanilla or other flavoring as preferred. Freeze, then 
pack for one hour or more. 

ICE CREAM— Mrs. Dwindle 

One quart milk scalded (not boiled), with three well beaten 
eggs, one and one-half cups sugar and one-third box of Cox's 
gelatine first dissolved in bowl of milk. Put this in a cool place 
over night. In morning add one quart of cream, two or three 
teaspoons vanilla and either new milk or more cream, enough 
to fill one gallon freezer within two or three inches of the top. 
Then freeze. . 

ICED TEA OR TEA PUNCH-Miss Annie Laughlin 

Juice of three oranges and three lemons. Juice and pulp of one 
pineapple shredded finely with a silver fork; over this pour two 
cups sugar, add six lumps sugar rubbed briskly over the peel of 
the lemons and oranges; one quart strong cold tea, half ceylon 
and half green, and one quart of Apollinaris Water or ice water. 
Pour all this over a large lump of ice in a punch bowl and throw 
in one pint of any fresh fruit in season- strawberries, raspber- 
ries or currants. 

FROZEN PUDDING- Mrs. Bryant 

One generous pint milk, two cups granulated sugar, scant one- 
half cup flour, two eggs, two tablespoons gelatine, one quart 
cream, one pound French candied fruit, four tablespoons wine. 
Let milk come to a boil. Beat the flour, one cup of sugar and 
the eggs together and stir into the boiling milk. Cook twenty 
minutes and add gelatine, which has been soaking one or two 



90 

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Children's Clothes 



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your ingredients from CnopiUS & Co. 

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91 

hours in water, enough to cover it; set away to cool; when cool 
add wine, sugar, and cream; freeze ten minutes, then add fruit 
and finish freezing. Take out beater, pack smoothly and set 
away for an hour or two. When ready to serve, dip the tin in 
warm water, turn out cream and serve with whipped cream 
heaped around it, 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One can pineapple, one pint sugar, one pint water, two table- 
spoons gelatine (Cox's), juice of three lemons. Boil sugar and 
water ten minutes, cool, add gelatine which has been dissolved 
in cup of water one hour. Add pineapple and lemon juice. At 
last add beaten whites of two eggs and two tablespoons Jamaica 
rum. Freeze, 

NECTAR— Mrs, Sutherland 

Take the pulp and juice of one dozen naval oranges, one and 
one-half dozen large bananas mashed to a smooth paste, one 
pineapple chopped fine, one cup shredded cocoanut, one and 
one-half cups sugar. Freeze, 

MY DOCTOR'S ICE CREAM- Miss Annie Laughlin 

One tablespoon gelatine soaked in one cup of milk one hour. 
Beat one egg yolk with one cup sugar, add one cup cold milk 
and stir this with cup of milk and gelatine. Put on stove and 
bring to scalding point, stirring well, and set away to cool. 
Take sufficient cream to nearly fill freezer (three pints) and 
whip with egg beaten until light, not stiff, add another cup 
sugar. Add prepared ingredients and flavor. Beat well and 
then add whites of seven or eight eggs beaten light. Freeze. 

PLOMBIERE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Take the above recipe of ice cream and after the cream first 
begins to freeze add glazed fruit (sliced) of peaches, apricots, 
cherries, and pineapple. 

AMBROSIA Mrs. Sutherland 

One dozen sliced bananas, one-half dozen oranges sliced very 
thin, one can pineapple chopped fine, one cup sugar. Mix thor- 
oughly and serve ice cold. 



92 



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93 
MILK SHERBET- Mrs. C. B. Laughlin 

Six lemons, five cups sugar, two quarts milk, two tablespoons 
cornstarch. Squeeze juice of six lemons on four cups sugar and 
let come to boil, so as to form a sort of syrup. Put skins with 
a pint of water on stove and let simmer for ten minutes, then 
strain into syrup. Scald two quarts of milk with two table- 
spoons cornstarch and a cup of sugar. When cold put in freez- 
er, and when it begins to stiffen, add syrup and freeze. This 
makes about three quarts. 

MAPLE FRAPPE— Mrs. C. B. Laughlin 

Six well beaten eggs (beaten separately) , one quart cream, 
two cups maple syrup, one tablespoonful gelatine. Beat eggs 
well and add maple syrup; heat in double boiler stirring con- 
stantly until it thickens. Set aside to cool. Dissolve gelatine 
in one-half cup hot water; when cold add to whipped cream. 
Stir all together and freeze. 

CREAM SODA, a Cooling Summer Drink— Mrs. J. H. Frese 

Four pounds coffee sugar, three pints water, three grated 
nutmegs, whites of ten eggs well beaten, one ounce gum arabic, 
twenty drops lemon, or extract of any kind. Mix well, place 
over a slow fire, stir about thirty minutes, remove from the fire 
and strain. Divide into two parts. Into one half put eight 
ounces carbonate of soda, into the other half put six ounces 
tartaric acid. Shake well. When cold both mixtures are ready 
for use by pouring four spoonfuls both into separate glasses, 
each one-third full of water. Stir each and pour together, and 
you have a fine glass of soda, which you can drink at your leis- 
ure, as the gum and eggs hold the gas. 

PINEAPPLE SUNDAE— Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

Make a very heavy syrup of one and one-half cups white 
sugar and one-half cup water. Let boil about two minutes, 
then add one can grated pineapple, and boil about twenty min- 
utes. Let this become ice cold before serving over any kind 
of ice cream. Nuts or berries can be substituted for the pine- 
apple. Four or five drops of citric acid added to the pineapple 
makes it more tart. 

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'Aye. to the leavening, but here's yet in the word hereafter, 
the kneading, the making of the cake, the heating of the 
oven, and the baking. Nay, you must stay the cooling, 
too, or you may chance to burn your mouth." 

Shakespeare. 



APPLE JELLY Cake- Mrs. McKisick 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half 
cup milk, three eggs, white of one left out, two and one-half 
cups flour, two teaspoons yeast powder. Bake in layers. 

Filling: One large grated apple, one lemon (grated rind and 
juice), one large cup sugar, one egg. Boil till jelly (ten or fif- 
teen minutes). 

NUT Cake- Mrs. A. Faught 

One cup butter, one cup sugar, one-half cup milk, three cups 
flour, three eggs, one cup raisins, one cup walnuts (do not chop 
them but break them in pieces) , one-half teaspoon soda, one 
teaspoon cream tartar. Bake two hours. Put walnuts on the 
frosting. 

NUT Cake— Mrs. McKisick 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, three cups 
flour, four eggs, two teaspoons baking powder, two cups finely 
chopped walnuts. 

CREAM PUFFS-Mrs. A. Faught 

Melt one-half cup butter in a cup of hot water and while boil- 
ing beat in one cup flour. Take from fire and when cold stir in 
three eggs one at a time without first beating them. Drop mix- 
ture on tins in small spoonfuls and bake in a moderate oven. 

Filling: One and one-half cups milk, two eggs, four table- 
spoons flour, sugar to taste and flavor with vanilla. Beat up eggs 



98 

and sugar and stir in the milk with flavoring and when it comes 
to a boil stir in flour mixed smooth in a little milk, cool and fill 
puffs by opening them a very little. 

BELMONT Cake-Mrs. McKisick 

One cup butter, three cups sugar, four eggs, one cup sweet 
milk, five cups flour, two pounds raisins, two teaspoons baking 
powder, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon cinnamon, one tea- 
spoon nutmeg. Boil raisins fifteen minutes; when cold flour 
them well to prevent them from falling. Bake one hour. This 
will make two loaves. 

LEMON COOKIES— Mrs. Eldredge 

Two and a half cups sugar, two eggs, one large cup lard, one 
pint milk, flour enough to make rather stiff dough, five cents 
worth of baking ammonia dissolved in the milk, five cents 
worth of oil of lemon. Bake in quick oven. 

GINGER BREAD- -Mrs. Tartter 

One cup sugar, one tablespoon lard, one-half cup molasses, 
one teaspoon soda, one cup sour milk, two cups flour, one tea- 
spoon each of ginger, cinnamon and cloves. 

WALNUT WAFERS -Mrs. Eldredge 

One cup brown sugar, two eggs, pinch of salt, three heaping 
tablespoons flour, one cup chopped walnuts. One teaspoon for 
each wafer dropped on buttered tins and on top of each wafer 
place half a walnut. Bake in quick oven. 

CREAM PUFFS- -Mrs. Bryant 

One-half pint hot water, four ounces butter, six ounces flour 
(sifted), five eggs. Boil water and butter; and while boiling 
stir in flour and beat until smooth; remove from stove and when 
lukewarm add beaten yolks and then beaten whites of eggs. 
Drop on buttered pans and bake in moderately hot oven. Fill 
with whipped cream. 

PLAIN DOUGHNUTS— Mrs. Tartter 

One cup sugar, one cup sour milk with a scant teaspoonful of 
soda, one or two eggs, one large spoon of melted butter. Nut- 
meg for flavoring, flour sufficient to roll out. 



99 
COOKIES- Mrs. Ford 

Cream half a pound of butter and half pound sugar, add two 
eggs, two tablespoons milk, then three-quarters pound flour and 
half pound cornstarch and two teaspoons baking powder. Mix 
into stiff dough, roll out quarter inch thick. Sprinkle over with 
sugar, cut with round cutter; flavor to taste. 

FRUIT Cake -Mrs. MaKee 

One pound sugar, one-half pound butter, five well beaten 
eggs (reserve whites until the last), one teaspoon ground cin- 
namon, one teaspoon ground cloves, one teaspoon ground all- 
spice, one-half a nutmeg, one teaspoon of soda in six cups sift- 
ed flour, one pound each of currants and raisins, one-half pound 
citron, one cup shredded cocoanut, one cup almonds or walnuts. 
Stir well, and just before baking;, add one cup thick sour cream. 
Bake slowly for three hours. 

"BRACKEN" SPICE LAYER Cake- Miss Annie Laughlin 

One-half cup butter, one cup sour milk, one and one-half 
cups brown sugar, two and one-half cups flour, two eggs, one 
teaspoon soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, cocca and a little cloves. 
After all is well beaten, add one teaspoon baking powder. Bake 
in layers. 

Filling for Cake Without Eggs: Two cups sugar, butter 
size of egg, three-quarters cup sweet milk. Boil twenty-five 
minutes, then beat until stiff. 

ORANGE Cake— Mrs. Dwinelle 

Two oranges, two cups sugar, two cups flour, one-half cup 
water, five eggs, one-half teaspoon soda and one teaspoon 
cream tartar. Use the juice and grated rind of oranges. This 
makes a good moist sponge cake or a layer cake, by reserving 
the juice and rind of one orange and white of one egg to mix 
with powdered sugar for spreading on each layer. 

MARBLE Cake— Mrs. J. H. Faught 

One-half cup butter, one cup brown sugar, yolks of four eggs, 
one-half cup milk, one teaspoon (each) cinnamon, allspice, 
cloves, two and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon baking powder. 

White Part: One-half cup butter, one cup white sugar, 
whites of four eggs, one-half cup milk, two and a half cups 
flour, one teaspoon baking powder. Flavor with lemon. 



100 



If You Want Good Goods 



USE 



HILL'S BROS. 

Arabian 
Roast Coffee 



Oyama Tea 
Spices and Extracts 



101 
LEMON Cake— Mrs. Harvey 

Break two eggs into a common sized cup and fill with rich 
sweet cream. Turn into a mixing bowl, add one cup of sugar, 
one cup flour, two teaspoons baking powder. Beat together 
thoroughly. Bake in two pie pans, when almost cold split with 
a broad bladed knife, and put in the following filling. 

Filling: One cup boiling water, one cup sugar, two table- 
spoons cornstarch, mixed smooth with little cold water, butter 
size of a walnut, yolks of two eggs and juice of two lemons. 
Have water boiling, add cornstarch, sugar, and butter. Let boil 
until clear and then add eggs and juice of lemon. Boil a few 
minutes. 

LADY BALTIMORE Cake— Mrs. J. G. Smith 

One-half pound butter, one pound sugar, one-half pint milk, 
eight eggs, one pound flour, four teaspoonfuls baking powder. 
Flavor with almond or vanilla. Cream sugar and butter, add 
beaten yolks, then milk, flour, and well beaten whites of eggs. 
Bake in quick oven in five or six layers. 

Filling: Boil three cups of powdered sugar and three-fourths 
cup of water about five minutes. Stir the boiling syrup into 
four eggs beaten together. Mix with two cups of chopped 
raisins and two cups of chopped blanched almonds. Flavor 
with vanilla and spread between layers. 

SPICE Cake -Mrs. Compton 

Two cups sugar, one cup of butter, one cup sour milk, three 
cups flour, one cup fruit (currants and raisins), three eggs, one 
teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon nutmeg, 
one teaspoon soda put in dry. 

GINGER SNAPS- Mrs. Wood 

Two cups sugar, two cups molasses, one cup butter or lard, 
four eggs, six teaspoons soda, twelve teaspoons of ginger. 
Flour enough to make a stiff dough. 

CREAM Cake- Mrs. Compton 

One cup of sugar, one cup of cream and milk mixed, one egg, 
two and a half cups flour, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons 
cream tartar, pinch of salt. 

Cream for Filling: One cup sweet cream whipped, two 
tablespoons sugar, one teaspoon lemon. (I usually put lemon 
in cream and vanilla in cake. ) 



102 



What kind of Groceries do you buy? 

WELLMAN 



AND 



SILVER THISTLE 

GROCERIES 

Comprise all of the Canned Vegetables 

Fruit and Fish of the 

BEST QUALITIES 

Any article packed under these Brands is 

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T. L. ECKLE 



FULTON CALIFORNIA 



103 
SOFT GINGER BREAD Mrs. McKisick 

One cup molasses, one-half cup butter, one cup brown sugar, 
one cup sour milk, three cups flour, three eggs, one teaspoon 
soda. Flavor with ginger and a little cinnamon. 

CHOCOLATE Cake <md FILLING Miss Ella Wood 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk, 
one and one-half cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder. 
Whites of four well beaten eggs added last. 

Filling: Three-quarters cup grated chocolate, three-quarters 
cup sweet milk, one-half cup sugar. Yolks of four well beaten 
eggs, one teaspoon vanilla. Boil until it strings from spoon. 

APPLE FRUIT Cake- Mrs Jeff. Maddux 

Soak two cups of dried apples over night. In the morning 
drain and chop fine, add one cup of molasses and let it boil 
slowly for three or four hours, until the molasses thickens. Let 
stand until cool, then add one and a half cups brown sugar, one 
cup butter, half cup sour milk, one teaspoon cloves, one tea- 
spoon allspice and one of cinnamon, one teaspoon soda, three 
eggs, three and one-half cups flour. Bake in two square or one 
five quart tin. If baked in the large tin bake slowly for two 
and a half hours. A teaspoon of baking powder added makes 
the cake lighter. 

DRIED APPLE Cake- Mrs. A. Faught 

One and a half cups brown sugar, one-half cup melted but- 
ter, four eggs, four and a half cups flour, two and a half tea- 
spoons soda. Soak two cups dried apples over night, drain and 
chop fine in the morning. Boil apples two hours in three cups 
molasses. Let mixture cool, then add two cups seeded raisins, 
cloves, cinnamon and allspice to taste. Mix with first mixture 
and bake. 

STRAWBERRY SAUCE FOR PLAIN Cake- Mrs. Bryant 

Beat one-half cup butter and one cup sugar to a cream. Add 
the white of one egg beaten stiff and a large cup of ripe straw- 
berries mashed. Pour over plain cake and serve. 

LEMON FILLING— Mrs. Miller 

One cup sugar, one teaspoon flour, one tablespoon water, one 
lemon, juice and peel, one egg. Boil until thick in double boiler. 



104 
BOILED WHITE FROSTING -Mrs. Bryant 

One pint sugar, just enough water to moisten it. Boil until 
it strings from the spoon. Have the whites of two eggs beaten 
to a stiff froth and pour drop by drop the hot syrup on it. Beat 
continually until thick enough to spread on cake. Flavor with 
vanilla, 

ICING— Mrs. Tartter 

Two cups sugar, butter size of an egg, three-quarters cup 
milk. Boil about ten minutes, then beat until thick. 

MARSH-MELLOW FILLING -Mrs. Bryant 

Dissolve over night three-quarters of a pound of marsh- 
mellows in one-half pint cream. In the morning beat until 
smooth and spread between layers and on top of cake. 

ANGEL Cake- Miss Annie LaugWin 

Whites of eleven eggs, one and one-half tumblers (one and 
one-half pints) sifted granulated sugar, one tumbler sifted 
flour, one teaspoon vanilla, one scant teaspoon cream tartar. 
Sift the flour four times, then add cream tartar and sift again. 
Sift sugar four times; mix flour and sugar and sift four times; 
beat the whites of eleven eggs on a large platter until very 
light, add pinch of salt, vanilla and three tablespoons cold 
water, beating continually. Sift in dry ingredients, stirring 
just enough to take it all up. Bake about forty-five minutes, 
using a new cake pan or a pan that has never been greased. 
Do not open oven door until cake has been in fifteen minutes. 
When done, take from oven and turn cake pan upside down to 
cool, letting edge of pan rest on three cups. When cold, take 
out of pan by loosening around edge with knife; then ice. 

Icing: One and a half tumblers sugar, one-half tumbler cold 
water, one-fifth teaspoon cream tartar. Stir until all melted 
and strain; now place on stove and boil until it hairs. Do not 
stir while boiling. When done pour in a piatter, and when par- 
tially cool, add one teaspoon lemon juice. Beat until cold; if 
icing gets too cold or stiff set platter on stove. 

Glass and Nickle Plated Towel Rods at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



1D5 
WALNUT Cake— Mrs. M. E. Slusser 

Whites of six eggs beaten light, one and one-half cups white 
sugar, two cups flour, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet 
milk, one teaspoon baking powder, two cups walnuts chopped 
fine. Mix cake thoroughly and then add nuts and bake in a 
moderate oven; flavor with lemon. 

Icing: One cup white sugar, enough water to dissolve it 
Boil until it strings. Pour over the beaten white of one egg 
while hot, beating all the time. 

LAURA'S BIRTHDAY Cake -Miss Annie Laughlin 

One cup butter, one cup sweet milk, two cups pulverized 
sugar, three cups flour, one-half cup cornstarch, four eggs, two 
teaspoons baking powder, one teaspoon vanilla. Bake in loaf, 

CHOCOLATE Cake-Mrs. M. E. Slusser 

Two cups white sugar, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, 
two cups flour, one cup cornstarch, whites of five eggs well 
beaten, one heaping teaspoon baking powder. 

Filling: Two bars of Eagle brand chocolate dissolved, whites 
of two eggs beaten stiff, two cups sugar, boil until it strings. 
Flavor with vanilla. 

COOKIES- Mrs. Voss 

Two eggs, one and one-half cups butter, two cups sugar, one 
cup milk, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons cream tartar, flavor 
with vanilla; flour enough to make a stiff batter, 

GINGER. COOKIES- Mrs. Voss 

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one cup butter, one egg, 
one tablespoon vinegar, one tablespoon ginger, one teaspoon 
soda dissolved in boiling water, mix like cooky dough, rather 
soft. 

SCOTCH FRUIT Cake-Mrs. S. J. Briggs 

One cup butter, two cups white sugar, one cup milk, four 
cups flour well sifted with two heaping teaspoons baking 
powder, nine eggs beaten, yolks and whites separately, one 
pound raisins, one-half pound currants, one-quarter pound cit- 
ron. Cream butter and sugar, add milk gradually, then beaten 
yolks of eggs, and lastly, while stirring in the flour, the whites 
well whipped. Flavor with one teaspoon each, lemon and va- 
nilla. Have raisins seeded and citron sliced thin. Wash and dry 
currants before using, and flour all fruit slightly. In putting in 



106 

/. S. SWEET, A. M., President A. J. FUSCHIA, Vice President 

A. B. GLENN, Principal Shorthand Dept. A. M. CROUSE. Secretary 







s/j/f.)/ywjj 



fY/sY/r 



AND SCHOOL OF SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

Founded in the Year 1891. "No Better School Anywhere at Any Price" 

BOOKKEEPING 

BUSINESS ARITHMETIC CORRESPONDENCE 

BUSINESS PRACTICE PENMANSHIP 

BUSINESS LAW GRAMMAR 

SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

What Makes This a Great School? 

1. It occupies its own building which was made for its use. 

2. It has every facility for imparting a thorough business training. 

3. Its courses of study are modern and based upon the actual demands 
of business. 

4. It does not scatter its energies by trying to teach many different 
subjects. 

5. It Confines its work to only two courses of study: Business, 
Shorthand, and Typewriting. 

P. It gives to every student the benefit of individual attention as 
well as of class instruction. 

7. Its office equipment is the finest on the Pacific Coast. 

8. It operates four banks, eight wholesale concerns, twelve commission 
houses, real estate, insurance, express and transportation offices. 

9. It has a faculty of teachers experienced in actual office work, teach- 
ers who know the needs of business, and who know how to instruct 
students to supply that need with a high degree of efficiency. 

10. It has opportunities for social and cultural enjoyment afforded by 
no other business college on the Pacific Coast. Ask our graduates. 

11. Its rates of tuition are as low as any other reputable business col- 
lege in the State and much below those of the large schools of the 
great cities. 

We do not claim to be the largest school; that is not our ambition; but 
we do claim to stand among the very besl in any country, east or west. 
Address all communications to J. S. Sweet, A. M., President, Santa 
Rosa, Cal. 

SWEET'S SANTA ROSA BUSINESS COLLEGE 
THE GREAT BUSINESS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA 

ROSS STREET, SANTA ROSA, CAL 



107 

pan place first a thin layer of cake, then sprinkle in some of the 
three kinds of fruit, then a layer of cake and so on, always fin- 
ishing- off with a thin layer of cake. Bake in a moderate oven 
for two hours. (Tested by many and never failed. ) 

DELLA'S CHOCOLATE Cake— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup sweet milk, three 
cups flour, whites of seven or eight eggs, two teaspoons yeast 
powder, one teaspoon vanilla. Bake in dripping pan. 

Filling: One cup chocolate, three cups sugar, three-quarters 
cup sweet milk, three eggs. Mix thoroughly and boil twenty 
minutes. Let it cool a little before putting on cake. 

COCOANUT POUND Cake— Mrs. Voss 

One-half cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, five eggs 
beaten stiff, one teaspoon soda and two of cream tartar stirred 
into four cups sifted flour. After beating all well together add 
a small cocoanut grated. Line the cake pans with well buttered 
paper. Spread over the top a thin frosting sprinkled thickly 
with cocoanut. 

NANNIE'S LAYER Cake- Miss Annie Laughlin 

One-half cup butter, one cup milk, two cups sugar, three cups 
flour, four eggs, two teaspoons baking powder. Flavor to taste 
Put sugar and flour in mixing bowl and stir well. Beat eggs 
separately, add milk to yolks, add this to flour and stir well. 
Add butter warmed and beat thoroughly. Now add baking 
powder, and last cut and fold in the whites of eggs well beaten. 

FAMILY FRUIT Cake- Mrs. Knight 

Three pounds dry flour, one pound sweet butter, one pound 
sugar, three pounds stoned raisins, two pounds currants, three- 
quarters pound sweet almonds blanched, one pound citron sliced 
fine, twelve eggs, one tablespoon each allspice and cinnamon, 
two tablespoons nutmeg, one teaspoon cloves, one wineglass 
wine, one-half pint brandy (wine may be omitted if desired), 
one coffee cup molasses with spice in it, steep this gently twenty 
or thirty minutes, not boiling hot; beat the eggs very light, put 
fruit in last stirring it gradually; also a teaspoon of soda dis- 
solved in a tablespoon of water. The fruit should be well floured; 
if necessary add flour after the fruit is in. Butter a sheet of 
paper and line the pan, bake three or four hours according to 



108 



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109 

thickness of loaves, in a tolerably hot oven and with steady 
heat. Let it cool in the oven gradually. Ice when cold. It 
improves the cake to add three teaspoons baking powder to the 
flour. This is a fine wedding cake recipe, and can be made 
smaller by taking one-third of all the ingredients required. 

WHITE CAKE WITH CAR.OMEL FILLING— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Whites of eight eggs, two cups white sugar, one cup butter, 
one cup milk, three and one-half cups flour, one-half cup corn- 
starch, two teaspoons baking powder. Bake in layers. 

Caromel Filling: One and one-half cups cream, one and 
one-half cups brown sugar, three tablespoons butter, three 
tablespoons vanilla, two tablespoons flour. Cook until thickens 
and spread between layers. 

NUT Cake- -Mrs. W. E. Woolsey 

Two tablespoons butter, two cups granulated sugar, two 
eggs (beaten separately), one cup sweet milk, three cups flour, 
one teaspoonful baking powder, one pint nuts (mixed, or of 
one kind as convenient) blanched and chopped. Flavor with 
one teaspoonful vanilla. Put in buttered tin and bake in mode- 
rate oven. The longer it is kept the better it grows. Iced and 
with nut-meats on top, it is very attractive. 

ROCKS— Miss Blanche Hoffer 

One and one-half cups brown sugar, one and one-half pounds 
chopped walnuts, three-fourths pound raisins, one cup butter, 
one teaspoonful cinnamon, one teaspoonful soda, one pinch salt, 
two and one-half cups flour, three eggs. 

RASPBERRY Cake— Mrs. M. D. Brown 

One and one-half cups unsifted flour, one cup sugar, three 
eggs, one and one-half teaspoonfuls cream of tartar, one-half 
teaspoon soda, seven tablespoonfuls milk. Bake in layers. 

Filling: One cup raspberries thoroughly mashed, two-thirds 
cup sugar, white of one egg. Beat until thick and spread be- 
tween and on top of layers. 

GOLD LOAF Cake— Mrs. J. M. Laughlin 

Yolks of eight eggs, one and one-fourth cups granulated 
sugar, two-thirds cup butter, two-thirds cup sweet milk, two 
and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, scant half 
teaspoon soda, flavor to taste. Sift flour once and measure, add 
soda and sift three times. Cream butter and sugar. Beat yolks 



110 

about half, then add cream of tartar and beat to a stiff froth. 
Add this to creamed butter and sugar, and stir thoroughly; add 
milk, then flour, then flavor; stir very hard. Put in a slow oven. 
Bake in Mrs. Van Deusen's pans, or pans that have never been 
greased. 

WHITE LOAF Cake-Mrs. J. M. Laughlin 

Whites of eight eggs, one and one-fourth cups granulated 
sugar, three-fourths cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk, two 
and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon cream of tartar, scant half 
teaspoon soda. Flavor to taste. Sift the flour once and measure; 
add soda and sift three tirnes. Cream butter and sugar; whip 
whites of eggs to a foam, then add cream of tartar and whip 
until very stiff; add creamed sugar and butter, then milk, then 
flour, then flavor, and stir very hard. Put in a slow oven. 

MACAROONS — Miss Annie Laughlin 

Whites of three eggs beaten to stiff froth; add one-fourth 
pound powdered sugar, one-half pound cocoanut, one-half pint 
rolled and sifted cracker crumbs. Flavor with bitter almond. 
Drop on buttered paper, making little cakes. 

CAKE FILLING— Miss Abbie Finley 

. One cup brown sugar, one cup white sugar, one cup water, 
nine tablespoons vinegar. Boil until thick like candy. Then 
stir in the beaten whites of two eggs and a quarter of a pound 
of marshmallows. Boil up again and spread between layers, 
letting each layer of filling cool before placing another on 
top of it. 

"FANNY'S" WHITE Cake-Mrs. Jos. DuBois 

Two cups sugar and three-fourths cup butter creamed to- 
gether; one cup milk, whites of six eggs well beaten, three cups 
flour, and one teaspoon baking powder. Flavor. 

COCOANUT KISSES— Miss Irma G. Slusser 

Beat together the whites of two eggs with as much granu- 
lated sugar as they will hold, making a rather stiff batter. Add 
a piece of butter the size of a walnut, and half a teaspoonful 
of vanilla or lemon extract. When beaten perfectly smooth add 
grated cocoanut, which should be fresh and carefully prepared. 



Ill 

Stir in the cocoanut, beating for a few minutes. Then drop 
upon buttered tins, let stand a few minutes, and then place in 
the oven until slightly brown. 

CORONA BRIDE'S Cake- -Miss Abbie Finley 

Cream together one scant cup butter and three cups of sugar; 
one cup milk, the beaten whites of twelve eggs; sift three tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder into cup of cornstarch mixed with 
three cups of sifted flour. Mix well together and flavor to taste. 

DEVIL Cake— Mrs. M. D. Brown 

One-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk, one cup brown 
sugar, two cups flour, two eggs, one teaspoon soda (level) dis- 
solved in milk. Boil the following to a cream (don't scorch) 
and stir into the above while hot: One-half cup milk, three- 
fourths cup brown sugar, yolk of one egg, one cup ground 
chocolate, two teaspoons vanilla. Bake in layers. 

Filling: Two cups white sugar, eight tablespoons water. 
Boil until it spins a thread, then pour it onto the whites of two 
eggs well beaten. Beat until cool. Chocolate may be added to 
make the filling darker. 

APPLE FILLING- Mrs. J. H. Frese 

Four grated apples, one grated lemon rind and piece of lemon, 
one egg, one cup sugar, piece of butter size of a walnut. Boil 
all together until creamy, or until it drops from spoon, stirring 
all the time. Let it cool before using. 

POTATO CARAMEL Cake-Mrs. C. B. Laughlin 

One cup butter, one and three-quarters cups sugar, four eggs, 
two cups flour, one and one-half cups mashed potatoes, one cup 
chopped nuts, one cup chocolate, one-half cup milk, three tea- 
spoons baking powder, one-half teaspoon each cinnamon, all- 
spice, nutmeg, one-fourth teaspoon cloves, vanilla, salt. Bake 
in layers. Use caramel filling. 

WORLD'S FAIR Cake- Mrs. John Clay 

One and one-half cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half 
cup sweet milk, one and one-half cups flour, three eggs beaten 
separately, one large teaspoonful baking powder, six table- 
spoonfuls chocolate. When all is well mixed add three level 
teaspoonfuls of sugar dissolved in two tablespoonfuls scalded 
milk. Bake in large flat dripping pan. 



112 



M.J.B. COFFEE 




J NO. W. GODFREY 

Manufacturer of and Dealer in 

Fine Harness and Saddlery Goods of all kinds, 

including Whips, Robes, Blankets, Oils 

Soaps, Combs, Brushes, Cushions 

Collar Pads, and things too 

numerous to mention. 

Suit Cases, Leather Bags, Gloves, Belts, Purses 

Repairing and Carriage trimming promptly 

and neatly done. 

I have the only shop in this city equipped with a 

Campbell wax thread machine: its work is sup= 

erior to hand work, come in and see it work. 

Visit my shop and I will explain why. 

543 Third St., opp. Exchange Ave, 

SANTA ROSA, CAL. 



113 

Frosting: Two cups granulated sugar, butter size of an egg, 
three-fourths cup sweet milk. Boil fifteen minutes. Stir until 
just cool enough to spread on cake. Flavor with vanilla. 

MOLASSES Cake (Without Eggs) -Miss C. Denner 

One cup sugar, one of molasses, one of sour milk, four of 
flour, half a cup of butter and lard mixed, one teaspoonful soda 
dissolved in the milk. Beat up quickly and bake in two pans. 

ROLL JELLY Cake- -Miss C. Denner 

One cup sugar, two eggs, beat until very light; one cup flour, 
two teaspoonfuls baking powder; lastly four tablespoons boiling 
water. Bake in dripping-pan, spread with jelly and roll. 

POTATO Cake— Miss Abbie Finley 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one-half cup milk, four eggs, 
one cup mashed potatoes, one cup grated chocolate, one cup 
chopped walnuts, two cups flour, two teaspoons baking powder. 
Flavor. 

SPONGE Cake-Mrs. J. M. Laughlin 

Four eggs, beaten separately, one cup flour, one cup sugar, 
one teaspoon baking powder. Cream yolks of eggs with sugar, 
then add flour and baking powder, and well beaten whites. 
Stir all together well and bake in a moderate oven. 

COOKIES— Mrs. Fenton 

Four eggs, one and three- fourths cups sugar, one cup shorten- 
ing, four tablespoons sour cream or milk, one level teaspoon 
soda dissolved in cold water, nutmeg or other flavoring, flour 
to make a soft dough. 

GERMAN PUFF DOUGHNUTS-Mrs. J. H. Frese 

Two eggs, one quart flour, a little salt. Mix with milk or 
water stiff enough to roll very thin. Cut in strips or squares, 
fry in hot lard or oil. Sprinkle sugar and cinnamon over them 
when brown. 

CAKE FILLING- Miss Annie Laughlin 

One-fourth pound sweet butter (unsalted), one cup powdered 
sugar, beaten very light; stir in yolks of two eggs and one-half 
cup steamed Baker's Chocolate; vanilla. 

You will Always Smile and Be Happy if You Cook on a Charm Mohawk Stove 



114 

SUNSHINE Cake— Mrs. J. M. Laughlin 

Whites of seven eggs, yolks of five eggs, one and one- 
fourth cups granulated sugar, one cup flour, scant one-third 
teaspoon cream of tartar, pinch salt added to whites before whip- 
ping, flavor to taste. Sift, measure, and set aside flour and sugar. 
Separate the eggs, beat yolks to a stiff froth, beat whites to a 
foam, and add cream of tartar and whip until very stiff. Add 
sugar to the whites and beat, then yolks and beat, then flavor- 
ing, then flour and fold lightly through. 

PORK Cake— Mrs. John Clay 

One pound fat salt pork entirely free of lean or rind, chopped 
so fine as to be almost like lard; pour one-half pint boiling 
water upon one pound raisins seeded and chopped, one-fourth 
pound citron shaved into shreds; two cups sugar, one cup mo- 
lasses, one teaspoonful saleratus rubbed fine and put in the 
molasses. Mix these all together and stir in sifted flour to 
make the consistency of common cake mixture; then stir in one 
ounce each of cinnamon and cloves, two ounces nutmeg. Be 
governed about the time of baking it by trying with a sliver; 
when nothing adheres it is done. Bake slowly. 

CARAMEL Cake— Mrs. J. H. Mitchell 

Cream together one cup sugar and one tablespoonful butter. 
Add yolk of one egg, two small cups of flour sifted with two 
teaspoonfuls baking powder, salt, and one cup milk. Beat 
thoroughly and bake in layers. 

Filling: One and one-half cups brown sugar, one-half cup 
water. Boil until it strings. Remove from stove and add the 
well beaten white of one egg. Flavor with vanilla and beat 
until thick enough to spread. 

DOUGHNUTS-Mrs. G. O. Guy 

One egg, one-half cup sugar, beaten together. Add seven 
teaspoonfuls melted lard, pinch of salt, one nutmeg, one cup 
sweet milk, about one quart flour, two teaspoons baking powder. 
This makes about thirty doughnuts. 

DOUGHNUTS— Miss M. J. Briggs 

One and one-half cups sugar, one cup sour milk, two cooking 
spoons sour cream, two eggs, one teaspoon soda dissolved in 
milk, one teaspoon ginger, one nutmeg, salt, flour to make soft 
dough. 



115 
LEMON HONEY- Mrs. J. H. Faught 

Six well beaten eggs, grated rind of one lemon, juice of three 
lemons, one pound white sugar, one-quarter pound butter. 
Stir butter and sugar to a cream and add lemon. When hot 
add eggs. Stir briskly for five minutes, remove and cool. Can 
be kept for months. To be used for cakes or tarts. 

FRUIT Cake— Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

One and one-half cups butter, three cups sugar, one and one- 
half cups milk and thin cream mixed, six cups sifted flour, four 
eggs, one glass sherry wine, one and one-half pounds raisins, 
one and one-half pounds currants, one-fourth pound citron, two 
(or less) cups dried prunes (which have been boiled for an 
hour in syrup), one-half glass tart jelly, either plum or berry, 
one teaspoonful each of cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, one-half 
teaspoonful cloves. Flour fruit before mixing. 

NUT Cake— Miss M. J. Briggs 

One cup seedless raisins, one cup chopped nuts (one kind or 
mixed nuts), one and one-half cups sugar, three-fourths cup 
butter, one cup sweet milk, three eggs, two teaspoons baking 
powder, flour to make stiff dough. 

ROLLED OATS MACAROONS— Mrs. Baldwin 

One cup brown sugar, one egg, one tablespoon melted butter, 
one teaspoon vanilla, one teaspoon baking powder, one and one- 
half cups rolled oats. Drop on buttered pans in pieces about 
the size of a walnut, two or three inches apart. Bake in quick 
oven. 

GINGER Cake- -Mrs. G. 0. Guy 

One cup molasses, one tablespoon lard and one of butter, one- 
half cup boiling water. Beat together, then beat in the yolk of 
one egg, one and one-half cups flour, one teaspoon ginger, one 
teaspoon soda in a little hot water. Beat in white of one egg 
last. 



116 

J. B. SHRIYER 
GENERAL CONTRACTING 

BUILDING, PAINTING, PLUMBING and PAPER HANGING 

Jigent For 

Red Cross Wind Mills, Pipe and Fittings 

Fxcelsior Adjustable Round HooK TanKs 

Pattons Sun Proof Paints, Oils and "WKite Lead 

'Wall Paper, Linings, Curtains 

and Draperies 

Material FurnisHed at MarKet Prices 

All worK guaranteed Prices rVig'Ht 

Address Box 12 FULTON, or call at Residence 



GEO. C. HOLBROOK 

PIANO TUNER 

REGULATING REBUILDING REPAIRING 

521 Fifth Street SANTA ROSA, CAL 

Second hand ^Pianos For Sale 



F. J. POOL 



DEALER IN 



GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

I. O. O. F. BUILDING 

WINDSOR, CAL. 



"'Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers." 

GRAPE Pickles- Mrs. Jas. H. Laughlin 

One gallon grapes, one quart vinegar, one quart sugar, two 
tablespoons cinnamon, two tablespoons cloves. Free bunches 
of muscat grapes (of withered grapes) and wash well. Now dip 
several times into a kettle of boiling water and place in stone 
jar. Boil sugar and vinegar together with spice which is tied 
up in thin cloth; pour over grapes hot. Let cool and tie up well. 

Pickled GRAPES— Mrs. A. Faught 

Fill a jar with layers of sugar and nice bunches of grapes, 
not too ripe; fill one-third full of good cold vinegar and cover 
tightly. 

PLUM JAM-Mrs. Dwinelle 

To seven pounds of Damson plums add four pounds sugar, 
one pint vinegar, one tablespoon ground cloves and one small 
spoonful whole mace. Put spice in a bag. Boil four hours over 
slow fire, stirring occasionally. 

Pickled GREEN TOMATOES— Mrs. James Laughlin 

One peck green tomatoes, one dozen onions. Slice tomatoes 
and onions thin and sprinkle with one pint salt. Let stand 
over night; next morning drain and cover with vinegar and 
one-quarter pound of mustard seed and a few sticks of cinna- 
mon. Tie up loosely in cloth, one-half pound mustard, one 
ounce cloves, one ounce of ginger. Let all simmer about 
twenty minutes. 

TOMATO CATSUP— Mrs. Purrington 

Twenty large ripe tomatoes, six good sized onions, three large 
green peppers, three tablespoons salt, six tablespoons brown 
sugar, three teaspoons ground cinnamon, two small teaspoons 
ground ginger, one-half teaspoon ground cloves, six cups gocd 
vinegar. Mash the tomatoes, chop or slice the onions and 



120 

peppers. Mix all in a porcelain kettle and boil till perfectly soft 
and when cool rub them through a colander and cook down to 
a proper consistency, that of catsup, and bottle for use. 

GREEN TOMATO PRESERVES-Mrs. Jeff. Maddux 

Eight pounds of small green tomatoes (pierce each with a 
fork), seven pounds sugar, the juice of four lemons, one ounce 
of ginger and mace mixed. Heat all together slowly and boil un- 
til fruit is clear. Take from kettle in a perforated skimmer and 
spread on dishes to cool. Boil syrup till thick, put fruit in jars 
and pour syrup over hot. Keep in a cool dry place. 

PICALILLI— Mrs. J. H. Faught 

Two dozen cucumbers, two heads cabbage chopped fine and 
let stand over night with two cups salt mixed in it. Fifteen 
long green peppers chopped fine, five dozen small silver onions. 
Soak peppers and onions well in salt water, drain all thoroughly, 
two ounces white mustard seed, two ounces celery seed, one 
ounce timmeric powder, one-half pound mustard dissolved in 
vinegar, one-half pound brown sugar, cover all with cider vine- 
gar and boil thirty minutes. 

CHILI SAUCE- -Mrs. Baldwin 

Two red peppers, eighteen ripe tomatoes, six large onions, 
three cups of vinegar, two tablespoons salt, six tablespoons 
sugar, one tablespoon mustard, one tablespoon cinnamon. Chop 
tomatoes, onions and peppers fine. Boil one hour; then add vin- 
egar, mustard, salt and sugar. Seal well. 

HYDEN SAUCE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

One gallon finely chopped cabbage, one-half gallon finely 
chopped green tomatoes, one quart finely chopped onions, one 
pint finely chopped green peppers. Remove seeds from green 
peppers, sprinkle with a tea cup of salt. Let stand about six 
hours and then bag and hang up to drain. Let hang all night. 
In morning place on stove two quarts vinegar, two pounds 
brown sugar, two ounces Tumeric, one tablespoon celery seed, 
one tablespoon cinnamon, four tablespoons ground mustard. 
Heat to boiling and add the chopped greens. Set on back of 
stove and simmer twenty minutes. Set in small jars and cover 
with grated horseradish. 

LISK Cooking Utensils and Enamel Ware at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



121 
ADELE'S Pickles— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Pick small cucumbers fresh from vine, put in a jar and cover 
with water, allowing one pint of salt to one gallon of cucumbers. 
Let soak over night. Next morning place one-half gallon of 
vinegar on stove, let come to near a boil, put pickles in and let 
simmer about ten minutes (be sure and not let them boil. ) At 
the same time put on the stove in another kettle one-half gallon 
vinegar (more or less according to how many jars are to be put 
up. ) To this vinegar add one pint sugar, one-half teaspoon 
alum, two tablespoons black pepper, mustard, ginger, cinna- 
mon and mace. Tie spices up in a bag and boil slowly ten 
minutes. When pickles have simmered long enough pack down 
in glass jars. Pour over the hot spiced vinegar, put in a good 
piece of horseradish and five or six cloves to each jar and seal. 

APPLE AND CRANBERRY JELLY— Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

Two cups apple juice, one cup cranberry, three cups sugar. 
When you are tired of making plain apple jelly, this is very 
pretty and the flavor is excellent. 

MUSTARD Pickles— Mrs. W. P. Slusser 

One quart each small whole cucumbers, large cucumbers 
sliced, green tomatoes sliced, and small "button onions; one 
large cauliflower divided into small parts, and four green pep- 
pers cut fine. Make a brine of four quarts of water and one 
pint of salt; pour it over the mixture of vegetables and let it 
soak twenty-four hours. Heat just enough to scald it, and turn 
into a colander to drain. Mix one cup of flour, six tablespoons 
of ground mustard, and one tablespoonful of tumeric with 
enough cold vinegar to make a smooth paste, then add one cup 
of sugar and sufficient vinegar to make two quarts in all. Boil 
this mixture until it thickens and is smooth, stirring all the 
time. Then add the vegetables and cook until well heated 
through. Put in jars and seal. 

PRUNE Pickles- Mrs. Jas. H. Laughlin 

One pint very strong vinegar, three pints sugar, one table- 
spoon cinnaman, one tablespoon allspice, one teaspconful cloves. 
Stir and let come to a boil. Put in enough prunes to make a 
pint jar full, leave them in just long enough to be heated 
through, and fill pint jar with hot prunes, adding as much juice 
as jar will hold, and seal. Put more prunes in the boiling vine- 
gar and proceed as before. 



122 

C. WALTER REED 

DENTIST 

BARNETT BUILDING 

OVER RIDDLE, BACIGALUPI SCO SANTA ROSA, CAL 

C. D. ROBERTS W. B. SIMPSON 

SIMPSON & ROBERTS 

Contractors and Builders 

Windows, Doors, Roofing, Roofing Paint, Sheathing Paper 
Sash Weights, Glass 

432 thTrd st. SANTA ROSA, CAL 

Mrs. L. J. BEARSS 
FINE MILLINERY 

Phone Main 504 

627 Fourth Street SANTA ROSA, CAL 

HENRY HEM 

DEALER IN 

Groceries, Flour, Feed and Notions 

Fourth and North Sts. 
Phone Black 4691 SANTA ROSA, CAL 



123 
CHILI SAUCE-Mrs. G. O. Guy 

Peel and cut in small pieces twenty ripe tomatoes, two red 
peppers, two onions, four cups vinegar, four tablespoons sugar, 
two tablespoons salt, two tablespoons ginger, one tablespoon 
each cloves and allspice. Boil two hours and bottle. 

SPICED CHERRIES- Mrs R. H. Thomson 

Eight pounds Queen Anne cherries (stones removed), four 
pounds sugar, one-half cup vinegar, and two tablespoons cloves, 
just enough water to moisten sugar. Let them come to a boi!, 
then put in two tablespoons whole cloves tied in a thin cloth. 
In a few minutes put in the vinegar, then remove the fruit into 
the jars and let the syrup boil down a little. Pour into the jars 
and seal. 

CHICAGO CHILI SAUCE (No Cooking) —Mrs. M. J. Granger 

One peck ripe tomatoes peeled and chopped fine. Drain as 
dry as possible. Two cups chopped onions, two cups chopped 
celery, two cups sugar, one-half cup salt, four ounces white 
mustard seed, one teaspoon ground mace, one teaspoon black 
pepper, one teaspoon ground cinnamon, four green peppers 
chopped fine, three pints vinegar. Mix well and put in jars. 
Seal and turn upside down over night. 

OIL Pickles- Mrs. Chas. Hoffer 

Take one hundred small cucumbers and seventy-five small 
white onions. Slice very thinly, separately, and soak over 
night in salt water. Dra ; n in the morning and pack in a jar in 
alternate layers with mustard and celery seed sprinkled in. 
Pour over all olive oil and vinegar in proportion of one-third 
oil to two-thirds vinegar. Keep two weeks before using. More 
oil can be used if desired. 



124 

A WELL PREPARED DISH 

DOES NOT AMOUNT TO VERY MUCH UNLESS IT IS 
PROPERLY SERVED. BE SURE TO USE ON YOUR TABLE 

K. WALLACE Silverware 

Its good, for it Kesists Wear 
JOHN HOOD, Jeweler 545 Fourth Street 

SIGN OF THE BIG CLOCK 



Mrs. FANNY EDGAR 

UpTo-Date MILLINERY 

416 FOURTH STREET 
Santa Rosa, CaL 



"CITY OF SANTA ROSA" 

The Exclusive Dry Goods, Cloak and Suit House 

ROHRER, EINHORN & CO 

S. W. CORNER FOURTH and B STREETS 



laiMlt'S 

ART and C^SIPIIT SHOP 

Pictures, Frames, Artists Materials, Mouldings 
Window Shades, Hirrors, Glass 

426 FOURTH STREET, SANTA ROSA, CAL 



"Sweets to the Sweet" 

CREAM CANDY -Mrs. Bryant 

Two coffee cups granulated sugar, one teacup hot water, one 
large kitchen spoonful of glucose, pinch of cream tartar. Stir 
on stove until sugar is dissolved, then boil without stirring un- 
til it strings or threads from the spoon. Pour into platter, flavor 
with one teaspoon vanilla and let cool for five or ten minutes, 
then beat until it turns a white creamy mass. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS- -Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

One cup molasses, one-half cup white sugar, one-fourth pound 
chocolate, one heaping tablespoon butter. Boil until it 'hardens 
when dripped onto a buttered plate. Pour it onto buttered 
plates or slab of marble. When cold cut in squares and wrap 
each square in waxed paper. Stir continually while cooking. 

FUDGE- Mrs. Wilkinson 

One cup brown sugar, one cup white sugar, one cup milk, 
two heaping tablespoons grated chocolate, piece of butter size 
of an egg, one cup chopped nuts. Boil all together from twenty 
to thirty minutes. Test by stirring a small quantity in a cup. 
Stir the mixture while boiling constantly and also after taking 
off stove until it is cool. 

PANOCHE—Miss Annie Laughlin 

One and one-half cups brown sugar, one-half cup white sugar, 
one tablespoon butter, two tablespoons milk; place these in- 
gredients in a granite pan, set over a good fire, and stir con- 
stantly for about four minutes after it begins to boil. Test by 
dropping a bit in cold water; if it gets tough, but not brittle, it 
is done; stir in one cup of shelled peanuts and pour on buttered 
plates. 



128 



DA.NL h lafferty 



WILSON C SMITH 



1 
I 



IGaffrrig & £>mttlj 

UNDERTAKERS 

CALLS ANSWERED DAY AND NIGHT 

LADY ATTENDANT 



I 



Parlors. Fifth ako A Streets 
Phone Main 85 



Santa Rosa. Cal 



W. H. LEE 



F. M. COOPER 



LEE BFkOS. & CO. 

EXPRESS AND DRAYMEN CITY BILL POSTERS 



PIANOS and FURNITURE 
Carefully Handled 

BAGGAGE CALLED FOK 
and Checked to all Points 

GOODS TAKEN ON STORAGE 



telephones 



1 12 FOURTH ST, w H o L F E F E C R E Es MAI R N E 6 D 4 3e 2 SANTA ROSA, CAL 



C. E. LEE RES.. MAIN 399 



EUGENE C. FARMER 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



701 Fourth St Cor. D. phone main 50 Santa Rosa. California 



129 
CREAM DATES— Miss Irrrra G. STusser 

Boil one and one-half cupfuls of sugar and three-fourths of 
cupful of sweet milk; add one-half teaspoonful of butter. Boil 
about ten minutes. Let it cool; when lukewarm beat, adding a 
teaspoonful of lemon juice. When it becomes soft and creamy 
have ready seeded dates, fill with this cream and serve. 

CREAM CANDY- Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup water, one-half teaspoon cream 
of tartar, one teaspoon vanilla. Add flavoring after taking 
from - stove. Let water, sugar, and cream of tartar boil until 
it hairs from spoon. Set in cool place. When nearly cold beat 
until it gets hard and very dry. To make in any desired shape 
heat by rubbing it in the hands, and mold. 

All Kinds of Food and Vegetable Choppers at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



SCHLUCKEBIER HARDWARE CO 

PETALUMA, CAL 

Stoves, Cooking Utensils, Farming Tools 

Wagons, Buggies and Everything 

in the Line of Hardware 

DROP US A POSTAL AND GET OUR PRICES 
SCHLUCKEBIER HARDWARE CO. 



3Bire^]&£^§& aiad JLuamielhieoffii Daslhes 



"Dinner may be pleasant; 
So may social tea; 
But yet, methinks the breakfast 
Is best of all the three." 

—Anon. 

BAKED EGGS- Mrs. Domin 

Two cups of cold chopped ham, two tablespoons crackeY 
crumbs, moistened with water. Put in baking pan, making 
round holes in the mixture; break into each hole one egg, season 
with pepper, salt, and small pieces of butter. Bake in hot oven 
until eggs are cooked, and serve hot. 

CODFISH BALLS— Mrs. K. 

Two cups salt codfish, one quart raw potatoes (six good sized 
ones), two teaspoons melted butter, two eggs, one saltspoon 
pepper, salt if needed. Wash fish and pick apart in cold water 
in one-half inch pieces; pare raw potatoes and cut into quarters, 
put potatoes and codfish into boiling water, cook twenty-five 
minutes, or until they are soft; drain very dry and shake over 
the stove; mash together until you cannot distinguish one from 
the other; beat eggs light, mix into fish with pepper and butter; 
work together with masher until light. Have fat very hot, 
make mixture into small balls with floured hands, and cook in 
wire basket until a rich brown. Drain on brown paper before 
serving. 

GERMAN TOAST— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Take stale bread, slice, dip in sweet milk and lay in baking 
pan. Over this pour four, five or six well beaten eggs, seasoned 
with salt, pepper, and one teaspoonful of cornstarch. Bake a 
few minutes and serve hot 

EGG TOAST Miss Annie Laughlin 

Slice stale bread and dip in sweet milk; now dip in well beat- 
en eggs and fry quickly in hot lard. Serve immediately. 

Gasoline, Coal Oil, and Gas Stoves at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



132 



HERCULES 
WHEAT FLAKES 



FOK BREAKFAST 



A PERFECT FOOD 



HATTl£, McftlNNEY CgL TITUS 

New and Second Hand 

furniture:, carpets, matting 
and linoleum 

Steam Carpet Beating AfVorKs in Connection 

AGENTS FOR WHITE SEWING MACHINES 

304 Fourth St. Phone Red 1641 Santa Rosa, Cal. 

THE RED FRONT 

Now located in our new quarters with a select line of ready-to-wear 
CLOTHES FOR WOMEN, MILLINERY, FANCY AND STAPLE DRY 
GOODS. EVERYTHING MEN and BOYS WEAR from crown to sole. 

THE PLACE TO SHOP 

New Overton Block, S. E. Cor. 4th and B Sts. SANTA ROSA, CAL. 



133 
EGGS AND TOMATOES SPANISH— M. R. R. 

(Three Persons) 

Three tomatoes, three bell peppers, six eggs, one tablespoon 
butter, little Worcestershire sauce, salt and a little sugar. Take 
three firm ripe tomatoes, three mild bell peppers; peel tomatoes 
and slice, also slice peppers. Put in hot frying pans, the but- 
ter, add tomatoes and peppers, also a little salt and a pinch of 
sugar. When tender, break over this six eggs do not break 
the yolks. Season with a dash of Worcestershire. 

SAUTED CHICKEN a La REGENCE— Miss Annie Laughin 

Joint young chicken, roll in flour and fry. Remove from fat 
when done. Stir in two tablespoons flour and dilute with one- 
half pint stock made from trimmings of chicken or beef, one 
gill mushroom juice and one gill cream. When all is smooth 
boil up and add half can of chopped mushrooms and pour over 
the fried chicken. This is a most delectable dish. 

MINCED TURKEY WITH POACHED EGGS Mrs. Dornin 

Take all small pieces of cold turkey, the quantity you wish, 
add to it some celery chopped v$ry fine, season with pepper and 
salt. Put a little butter in hot frying pan, put above mixture 
in and moisten with turkey gravy or soup stock. Drop as many 
eggs as needed in boiling water, when done have the meat ar- 
ranged on pieces of buttered toast. Spread meat away from 
center and put one egg in place on the toast. Cold lamb, chick- 
en, or other meats are good fixed this way. 

CHEESE FONDU— Mrs. Wilkinson 

One-half cup rich cheese grated, one-half tablespoon butter, 
one cup hot mi!k, one egg, one saltspoon salt, one-half salt- 
spoon pepper, one cup soft bread crumbs. Melt the cheese and 
butter in the hot milk, add the egg well beaten, the seasoning 
and crumbs. Bake in a quick oven until brown. 

POT ROAST OF LIVER- Miss Annie Laughlin 

Cut two in squares of liver and drop into an iron kettle that 
has had two tablespoonfuls of lard or drippings in it and made 
very hot. Stir the liver often and when browned pour in two 
pints water, salt, pepper and an onion. Cover and simmer un- 
til done. Thicken gravy with cracker crumbs. 

Look Wise— Buy an Up-to-Date Food Chopper. MAILER HARDWARE CO 



134 

FULLER'S PAINTS 

.Art Decorative Enamels 

Designed for the Artistic Enameling of countless household articles 
guch as Tables, Chairs, Wickerware, Furniture, etc. These enamels are 
unexcelled for beauty of finish and wearing qualities. All of the colors dry 
quickly and with a brilliant gloss. 

WOODWORK in any room that has become dingy or defaced with age 
can be handsomely and artistically finished by applying ART DECORA- 
TIVE ENAMEL. The Enamel dries with such a hard and durable lustre 
that the surface, if it becomes soiled, can be washed innumerable times 
without discoloring or crumbling. 

At a trifling expense a worn and soiled WICKER CHAIR can be im- 
proved in appearance and not only made useful but very attractive. 

ART DECORATIVE ENAMEL will impart a lustrous and handsome 
finish to an IRON BEDSTEAD that has become battered or rusty looking 
and make it modern and presentable. 

ART DECORATIVE ENAMELS are put up in pints, half pints, gills. 

5. Gallon Can, per gal. $2.25 I Half -Gallon Can $1.35 I Pint Can 40c 

I -Gallon Can $2.50 I Quart Can 75c I Half Pint Can 25c 

Rubber Cement Floor Paint 

Is made expressly for painting interior floors. It is ready for use, 
works easily, dries hard and with a high gloss finish and is very durable. 
It may be washed as often as desired without injuring the gloss or dura- 
bility. We recommend it as being superior to all other Floor Paints. 
One-half gallon is sufficient for a large sized room. Explicit directions 
for use are on every package. 



UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY 

The Santa Rosa National Bank 

SANTA ROSA, CALIFORNIA 

CAPITAL $160,000. SURPLUS and UNDIVIDED PROFITS $60,000 

WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

OFFICERS 

J. H. BRUSH President 

R. F. CRAWFORD Vice-President 

F. A. BRUSH Cashier 

C. B. WINGATE Assistant Cashier 

W. C. GRANT Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

J. H, BRUSH J. E. CLARK 

R. F. CRAWFORD C. H. THOMPSON 

F. A. BRUSH D. P. ANDERSON 

JOHN STRONG 



135 
LUNCH DISH- Mrs. Porcher 

One cup chopped cold beef or chicken mixed with one and 
one-half cups cold rice, two hard boiled eggs chopped fine, little 
gravy, small piece butter, pepper, and salt, water enough to 
moisten it. Put in frying pan and stir with fork until light, 
and then brown. 

CHICKEN AU SUPREME— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Cut the chicken as for frying; salt, pepper and flour each piece 
as it is laid in the spider with hot lard and butter, fry to a light 
brown, dredge in two tablespoons flour, cover with hot water, 
simmer slowly until tender. Lift out chicken and finish the 
sauce with seasoning to taste and half pint minced mushrooms. 
Place chicken in deep dish and pour on sauce. 

GARDEN PEPPERS STUFFED WITH MEAT— Mrs. Bryant 

Take two cups of cold beef, mutton, chicken or veal and chop 
fine. Mix with equal amount rice (boiled) or bread crumbs, 
one chopped onion, salt and pepper. Remove tops and seeds 
from six bell peppers, then scald and wash. Fill with meat 
mixture and stand in baking pan, add one-half cup of soup 
stock or water, two tablespoons of butter and bake in slow oven 
one hour, basting often. 

HAMBURG LOAF— Mrs. R. H. Thomson 

Two pounds of Hamburg steak, one quart of bread crumbs, 
one heaping tablespoon butter, salt and pepper to taste. Put 
all in a mixing bowl and pour into it boiling water, stirring un- 
til it is well mixed and quite moist. Put into a long narrow bak- 
ing pan and bake three-fourths of an hour; if the loaf is thick 
give it fifteen minutes more. 

STUFFED EGGS— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Boil fresh eggs about fifteen minutes, when cold remove shell, 
cut in halves. Now mash yolk with silver fork, add salt, pep- 
per, celery salt, and salad dressing. Cream well and fill white 
cups. 

BAKED HARD BOILED EGGS- Mrs. Bryant 

Six hard boiled eggs cut in thin slices. Place in a baking dish 
with alternate layers of grated cheese, sprinkled with pepper 
and salt. Cover the top with a layer of bread crumbs dotted 
with butter and bake fifteen minutes; brown well and serve hot. 

LISK Four-Coated Enamel Cooking Utensils at MAILER HARDWARE CO 



136 
CHICKEN PIE -Miss Annie Laughlin 

Two nice tender chickens, one sweetbread, two dozen raw 
oysters and one onion. Stew the chickens with the onion— the 
latter must be taken out whole. Season with salt, pepper and 
butter, thicken with flour and add one cupful of sweet cream, 
then set aside to cool. Stew the sweetbread, and when cold, 
cut in thin slices. Make a nice puff paste, line your dish and 
place a cup in center. Next lay the chicken and sweetbread in 
the dish and strew oysters evenly over them. Cover with upper 
crust, make a small hole in the center, and bake. 

SPANISH STEW -Miss S. E. Polhemus 

Take a good sized round steak, cut into small pieces and fry 
with an onion until nicely browned. Dredge with flour and 
cover with water. Add one quart of ripe tomatoes, salt, small 
red peppers to suit the taste. Cook this until meat is thoroughly 
done at least two hours. 

LANCASHIRE PIE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Take cold meat, beef, veal or mutton, chop fine and season as 
for hash. Take hot mashed potatoes ready for table. Place 
layer of meat, then potatoes, meat, then potatoes. Potatoes 
come last. Smooth with knife and place in oven. Bake until 
brown and serve in same dish. 

A LUNCH DISH- -Miss Annie Laughlin 

Nearly fill a pudding dish with cooked macaroni. Make a 
hole in center and put in chopped cold roast, mutton or steak 
which has been seasoned. Pour over all the juice of cooked to- 
matoes. Cover whole with bread crumbs, over which pour 
gravy or melted butter. 

CORN OYSTERS— Mrs. Dwindle 

Grate six ears of corn; mix with the grated corn one table- 
spoon of flour, yolks of two eggs, and a little salt. Beat all 
well together, then fry in the shape of oysters in fresh lard or 
butter. 

MEAT SCALLOP— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Cracker crumbs, macaroni, cold meat, gravy or soup stock. 
Boil macaroni until soft. Take pudding dish, cover bottom first 
with cracker crumbs, then a layer of meat cut fine and seasoned 



137 

with pepper and salt. Then a layer of macaroni, bits of butter, 
then a layer of crumbs, meat, etc., until dish is filled, but 
crumbs last. Pour over all gravy; milk would do if no gravy. 
Bake about three-quarters of an hour. 

MEAT AND TOMATO (Scalloped) 

Made the same as meat scallop, ripe tomatoes taking the place 
of macaroni. Season with pepper, salt, butter, and add no 
gravy or milk. Last layer is to be tomatoes and bread crumbs 
Bake in moderate oven. 

CURRIED EGGS— Mrs. Bryant 

Mix one tablespoon of cornstarch or wheat flour and one tea- 
spoon of curry powder to a smooth paste with a little cold milk. 
Pour this into one pint boiling milk, stirring until it thickens. 
Break an egg carefully in a saucer, slip it into the boiling liquid 
and let it poach until it sets (about two minutes.) Have ready 
squares of buttered toast, and as the eggs are cooked, lift them 
out and lay one on each. When all done pour remaining liquid 
around them. 

MEAT POT PIE 

Cut meat in small pieces, stew in water in which is cup of 
milk. When tender add one egg and one tablespoonful of but- 
ter, salt and pepper. Crust as for pie. 

POTATOES a La DUCHESSE 

Mold out potatoes into cakes size of biscuits. Glaze with 
beaten egg and bake to light brown. 

OYSTER ON TOAST— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Chop fine fifteen oysters, add salt and pepper and a little 
nutmeg, one gill cream, one tablespoon flour. Place on buttered 
toast. 

CODFISH BROILED— Mrs. Dornin 

Cut pieces of white codfish in halves and soak over night. 
Change water two or three times in evening and rinse in clear 
water in morning. Dry on cloth, brush a little butter over each 
piece and broil. Serve with lemon juice. 

PRESSED HAM 

Chop fine cold boiled ham, add a few spoonfuls of hot soup 
stock and melted butter; put in mold and press. When cold 
turn out and slice. 

China Lac-Will Make Old Chairs Look New— MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



138 



HATS 

SUITS 
TAILORING 

FANCY VESTS 

OVERCOATS 
SHIRTS 

ETC. 
HODGSON-HENDERSON CO. 

51V FOURTH STREET. SANTA. ROSA 

CLEVELAND'S 



Superior Baking Powder 



PURE and SURE 



139 
HAM CROQUETTES-Miss Annie Laughlin 

Chop fine cold cooked ham, one egg to each person. Beat 
egg, mix with chopped meat, make into balls and fry in butter. 

HASH ON TOAST -Miss Annie Laughlin 

Chop any cold meat, season and cook the same as hash. 
Have ready bread nicely toasted and buttered. Place a spoon- 
ful of hash on each slice, set in oven a few moments and send 
to table smoking hot. 

CHICKEN RICE PIE— Mrs. Porcher 

Line a crock with four slices raw bacon; around sides put 
cold boiled rice. Fill bottom of dish with boiled chicken and six 
hard boiled eggs. On top put good rich crust. Bake one hour 
and a half. Serve hot. 

EGGS ON TOAST -Miss Annie Laughlin 

Toast as many slices of bread as persons. Take as many eggs. 
Separate yolks from whites and do not break. Beat whites to 
stiff froth, place on the buttered toast, make a small hole and 
drop on yellow and place in oven a few minutes. 

PAULINE'S RICE PAN CAKES— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Three cups rice, one-half pint flour, two teaspoons baking 
powder, one egg, one tablespoon sugar, milk to make batter 
not too thin. Serve hot with maple syrup. 

OMELET— Mrs. Briggs 

Four eggs, salt to taste, two tablespoons cream. Beat the 
yolks alone to a smooth batter, add cream, salt and pepper, 
lastly the well beaten whites. Have frying pan very hot, put 
in a tablespoon of butter which should instantly hiss. Fellow 
it quickly with the mixture and do not stir this after it goes in. 
Cook over a hot fire and as the egg sets loosen it frcm the edge 
of the pan without breaking, turn half of the omelet over upon 
itself before turning from pan upon a hot dish. Serve hot. 

WAFFLES— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Beat well the yolks of three eggs. To this add one and a 
quarter cups sweet milk, one pint flour, one-half teaspcon salt, 
one teaspoon baking powder. Sift flour and add the liquid 

A Word to the Wise—Cooking Utensils at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



140 

gradually. Lastly, cut and fold the whites of the eggs beaten 
stiff. Serve with syrup made as follows: One cup sugar, one- 
quarter cup water, when thick add one tablespoon lemon juice 
and one teaspoon butter. Do not boil after adding lemon juice. 

CORN MEAL WAFFLES- Miss Annie Laughlin 

One quart buttermilk, three egg yolks (well beaten), one tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in a little warm water, little salt and corn 
meal to make batter a little thicker than for pan cakes. 

PIMENTO SANDWICHES— Miss S. E. Polhemus 

Drain pimentoes, chop or grind them, then add chopped hard 
boiled eggs and olives. Mix with mayonnaise dressing and 
spread. 

PRESSED CHICKEN— Mrs. W. P. Slusser 

Select two chickens about a year old, clean, cut up well, and 
stew in just enough water to cover. When nearly cooked, 
season with salt and pepper. Stew down until the water is 
nearly all boiled out and the meat drops easily from the bones. 
Remove the bones and gristle, chop the meat rather coarsely, 
then put back into the stew kettle with broth (first skimming 
off all fat), and let it heat again. Turn it into an oblong bread- 
pan, drop in along center four hard boiled eggs. Place a weight 
on the top. This will turn out like jelly and may be sliced. 
Success depends upon not having too much water, and see that 
the chickens are not too young. 

COLD COOKED MEAT FRIED IN BATTER- Janet Mackenzie Hill 

Tender, cold cooked meat of any kind may be trimmed into 
pieces of uniform shape and size, dipped in villeroi sauce (to a 
cup white or brown sauce made in the usual manner add, after 
removing from the fire, the yolks of two eggs beaten with one- 
fourth cup of cream or milk; cook over hot water, stirring con- 
stantly until the sauce is quite stiff), and when cold, egg and 
bread crumbed and fried in deep fat. Fritter batter may take 
the place of the sauce and egg and bread crumbing. Cold roast 
turkey and chicken are excellent prepared after this recipe. 

HARICOT OR RAGOUT OF MUTTON (Uncooked Meat) 

Janet Mackenzie Hill 

Three pounds of mutton (neck or breast) , one-quarter cup 
butter, two tablespoonfuls flour, one clove of garlic, one onion, 

Toasters, Etc. for Gas Stoves at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



141 

one sprig of thyme, one bay leaf, one clove, potatoes, salt, four 
sprigs of parsley. Cut the mutton in pieces two inches long 
and one inch wide, and saute in the butter until well browned, 
then stir in the flour, and when blended with the butter add 
cold water to cover; add also the seasonings, the onion whole, 
and the garlic chopped fine. Let simmer until nearly tender, 
stirring occasionally; add the potatoes pared and quartered 
small, having about as many pieces of potato as of meat, and 
let simmer until the potatoes are tender. Serve the pieces of 
meat in the middle of the dish, the potatoes around, and the 
liquid, from which the fat has been removed, over the whole. 
Prepare other meats, as veal, chicken, and rabbit, in the same 
manner, 

EGGS BAKED IN CHEESE SAUCE— Mrs. Chas. Roat 

One teaspoon melted butter, one teaspoon flour. Let these 
brown and add one cup milk slowly to make smooth sauce. 
Add four tablespoons grated cheese, stir well, and when thor- 
oughly hot put into baking dish that can go on table. Drop in 
eggs as if for poaching, and bake in hot oven until eggs are set. 

CROQUETTES— Miss E. Granger 

One cup of cold cooked meat or fowl, one cup of dry bread or 
cracker crumbs, one egg, one small onion chopped fine, one 
tablespoon of melted butter, salt and pepper, a little sage or 
other preferred herb. Chop or grind the meat, and mix all the 
ingredients with enough milk to enable the mixture to be mold- 
ed into soft flat cakes. Fry brown. If a little cooked fat salt 
pork or ham can be added, the butter may be omitted. The 
quantities may be somewhat varied, and the addition of cold 
cooked vegetables will vary the flavor. 

RICE SPANISH- Mrs. Chas. Roat 

Put one-half cup rice into a pan with one heaping tablespoon 
lard, and let boil until all the kernels turn white. Add one 
quart tomatoes, one green pepper, one large onion browned in 
butter, salt to taste. Add more pepper if not hot enough. 

OYSTERS AND MACARONI-Janet Mackenzie Hill 

One pint of oysters, three-quarters cup of macaroni broken 
into inch pieces, three-quarters cup grated cheese, salt and 
paprika, one-half cup cracker crumbs, one-fourth cup butter, 
one-fourth cup melted butter. Cook the macaroni until tender; 
drain and rinse with cold water. Put a layer in the bottom of a 



142 

buttered baking dish, cover with oysters and sprinkle with 
cheese, salt, and paprika; add half the butter in bits, and cover 
with a layer of macaroni, then with oysters and seasoning. 
Cover the top with the cracker crumbs mixed with the melted 
butter. Bake fifteen minutes in a hot oven. Serve at once. 

OYSTERS COOKED WITH RICE- Mrs. Chas. Roat 

Two cups of rice cooked in the juice of one quart of oysters, 
salt, and enough water to cook tender. Add one-half cup but- 
ter and beaten yolks of two eggs. Remove from fire and when 
partly cool stir in the beaten whites of the eggs. Turn into 
buttered baking dish, smooth over the top, and with the back 
of the spoon make dents in the top, put one oyster in each and 
close together. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, one-half cup cracker 
crumbs, and small pieces of butter. Bake quickly and serve hot. 

CHICKEN SOUFFLE -Janet Mackenzie Hill 

Two tablespoons of butter, two tablespoons of flour, one pint 
of milk or chicken stock or part of each, one-half cup of fine 
bread crumbs, three eggs, one pint of fine chopped chicken 
(cold) , salt and paprika, onion juice, parsley, celery-salt. Make 
a sauce of the first three ingredients; add the bread crumbs, 
the chicken (cooked and chopped very fine) , the yolks of eggs 
well beaten, and the seasonings; and lastly fold in the whites 
of eggs beaten until dry. Bake in a moderate oven from twenty 
to thirty minutes, and serve promptly from the baking dish. 

DEVILLED HAM ROLLS— Mrs. Chas. Roat 

Make light rich paste, roll thin, cut in four-inch squares. 
Spread each square with devilled ham, moisten edges with cold 
water and roll, pressing edges well together. Brush with white 
of egg and bake. 

RICE SAVORY— Miss Edith Granger 

After boiling the rice tender in salted water, press it through 
a potato ricer. Mix in a well beaten egg and a small cup of rich 
milk. Season with salt and a trifle of white pepper, and bring 
to a boil. 

TRIPE SPANISH- Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

Soak tripe in cold water about ten minutes. Cut into small 
pieces and put into enough boiling water to cover it. Boil one 

Asbestos Sad Irons at MAILER HARDWARE CO. 



143 

hour or longer. Fry one large onion and two Chili peppers until 
well done, add one quart of tomatoes, salt, a few sparing dashes 
of cinnamon and nutmeg, one tablespoon sugar, one-quarter 
cup vinegar. Let boil and add to tripe after water has been 
poured off. Boil a few minutes. 

GULOSCH— Mrs. Parker Maddux 

Put some drippings or lard in a pot or other rather deep 
utensil, and fry with an onion cut up fine. Cut up lean beef in 
pieces the size of an egg, rub in flour, flavor with white pepper 
and salt. Fry a little, then set it on the back of the stove and 
let cook three hours in its own juices; then put in half a cup of 
sour cream, which makes a thick rich gravy. 

DEVILLED EGGS— Mrs. W. C. Fowler 

Prepare a dressing of one-half cup rich thick cream beaten 
until it begins to swell, one teaspoon sugar, one-half teaspoon 
mustard, a dash of cayenne, salt, and one-fourth cup vinegar 
added last and slowly. Have as many eggs as desired hard 
boiled and cold. Remove shells and cut in halves, lengthwise, 
and remove hard yolks. Mash yolks well with a fork and add 
to them enough or all of the dressing to make a moist filling for 
the whites of the eggs. Then fill them and round up the whites 
with the prepared yolks. 



FOR THE SHVAILgD p S TRAY 

"Simple diet is best, for many dishes bring many diseases, 
and rich sauces are worse than even heaping several meats 
upon each other."— Pliny. 

NOURISHING DRINK- Miss Ella Wood 
One teaspoon dry coffee in one cup milk brought to a boil. 
Have ready a well beaten egg, add strained milk to the egg-, 
sweeten if desired. . 

CHEESE STRAWS -Miss Annie Laughlin 
Take a pint of flour and one-half pint grated cheese. Mix 
them and make a paste with lard as you do for pies. Roll out 
in a thick sheet, cut in strips half an inch broad and five or six 
inches long, bake a light brown. 

BEEF BROTH Mrs. Baldwin 

Trim off all the fat from one pound round steak, add three 
coffee cups cold water, also salt and pepper and let simmer 
about one-half hour or until there is a pint of broth. Strain 
through fine sieve and serve hot. 

EXTRACT OF BEEF BLOOD— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Catch in bowl warm beef blood and let it stand until it clots, 
which will not be long. Now take out and lay on a clean and 
smooth board and cut in narrow strips, tilt board and stand in 
hot sun. In a short time all watery substance will have run 
away and that left is dry and will crumble. It must crumble 
or it is not ready, rub in palm of hand until a fine powder, sift 
through fine wire sieve, bottle and it will keep for years. This 
can be taken in plain soup or dry as most acceptable to patient; 
the strength gained is wonderful. When cutting to dry, cut in 
as narrow strips as possible. To be given to any person with 
little strength or vitality. 

GRAPE JUICE -Mrs. Wm. Woolsey 

Take Zinfandel grapes and run through a cider mill. Put juice 
in earthen jars where it stands over night. Next morning pour 
into preserving kettle only what looks clear, rejecting sediment, 
which is the sugar that ferments. Put kettle on fire and bring 
juice to a good boiling point only. Skim if needful. Bottle 
while hot, straining through a thin cloth. Seal bottles and keep 
in a dark place. 



146 



THE 



Means sound sleep, good digestion, cool judgment, and manly in- 
dependence. The most healthful thing I know of is a Savings Bank 
Account. There are no microbes in it to steal away your peace 
of mind. It is a guarantee of good behavior. —Elbert Hubbard. 

Don't be backward about beginning small. Most big accounts started small. 
Three and one half per cent compound interest will help you. This bank is a 
strictly savings bank and transacts a savings business only. Receives deposits of 

ONE DOLLAR 

Thi Union Trust- Savings Ianic 

Pays Dividends on All Deposits, Compounded Semi- Annually 
F U R T H 5 T . A N D H I N T N A VI, - - SANTA ROSA, CAL 



H. H. MOKE 



FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



(iUADUATE LADY KMDALMKR, ASSISTANT 



IIS Fourth Street Santa Rosa, Cal 

PHONE MAIN' 21 



147 
BLACKBERRY CORDIAL— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Pick over and wash the berries and drain; place in double 
boiler and let them steam, the water boiling well about them 
for good thirty minutes. Turn them into a jelly bag and hang 
up to drain; do not squeeze the bag. To one pint of juice put 
one-half pound sugar and boil five minutes. When cold add half 
as much brandy as juice. Bottle and cork tight. 

MUTTON TOAST— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Cut in pieces one pound of mutton, the bony part is the best, 
and put on the stove early, in one quart of cold water. Cook 
slowly. When the meat is tender strain the broth through a 
sieve and set away to cool. After removing the grease that has 
risen to the top, let the broth come to boiling, and add flour 
thickening, with a little cream or butter. Meanwhile toast 
slices of white or brown bread, and dip in hot water to soften. 
Pour the stew over the bread, adding the pieces of mutton. 

OAT MEAL BLANC MANGE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Stir two heaping tablespoonfuls fine oat meal into a little cold 
water and then stir in a quart of boiling milk; boil a few min- 
utes, salt, turn into a mold. When cold eat with jelly and cream. 

PURE BEEF JUICE— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Take good juicy round steak, remove all fat. Place in hat 
skillet, sear both sides of meat, gash pieces with knife, place 
on earthen plate, cover with another plate and set in hot oven. 
Let remain until all juice leaves meat. One tablespoon of this 
juice is equivalent to one cup of broth. 

REFRESHING DRINK— Miss Annie Laughlin 

Cover raspberries with vinegar and soak over night. Drain 
off or squeeze out the juice, to every pint of which add one 
pound of sugar. Let it simmer about fifteen minutes; when 
cool bottle, and when used as a drink put in as much of it to a 
glass of water as is palatable to the invalid. 

Washing Made a Pleasure — HORTON Washing Machine at MAILER'S 



COOBUBJG DIRKED FRUITS 



To make a most delicious conserve of either apples, apricots, 
pears, peaches, figs or prunes, proceed as follows: Pick over the 
fruit and wash it thoroughly but quickly. Put it in a dish, 
earthen is preferable, at about noontime, and covering it gen- 
erously with water, allow it to soak during that afternoon and 
night. In the morning take the fruit carefully out into a cook- 
ing utensil — a graniteware kettle or saucepan or an earthen 
crock — and pour over it, being careful not to disturb the sedi- 
ment at the bottom, the water in which it was soaked; then 
cover the dish tightly and set it either on the back of the range 
or in a moderate oven, where it will quietly simmer, and let it 
remain there for eight or ten hours. 

If you have an unreasoning sweet tooth, and must spoil things 
with sugar, add that article not more than twenty minutes be- 
fore removing the cooked fruit from the range, and add it spar- 
ingly, since, by this method of cooking, all the natural flavor 
and saccharine quality of the fruits are preserved, and nearly 
everyone who is privileged to taste them thus prepared readily 
concedes that they are quite "sufficient unto themselves." 

Prunes and dried grapes become simply "idealized" under 
this treatment- plump, smooth, juicy and generally delicious, 
and the sliced or quartered fruits rival the daintiest and richest 
of preserves in their amber-hued translucency, as well as in 
flavor. 

Verily, if the cooks and housewives would add to their little 
bills of fares the dried fruits of California, cooked after the 
fashion herein prescribed, the cry for "more" would be so loud 
and so unanimous that all the State's broad orchards would be 
quite inadequate to supply the demand of even the home market. 

GEO. D. DORNIN 



(SELECTED) 

1 quart of Sifted Flour (well heaped) 1 pound 

1 " Unsifted Flour 1 pound, 1 ounce 

3 coffee cups Sifted Flour (level) 1 pound 

4 tea cups " " " 1 " 

1 pint Soft Butter (well packed) 1 

2 teacups " " " 1 " 

V/s pints powdered sugar 1 " 

2 coffee cups " (level) 1 " 

2% teacups " " " 1 " 

1 pint Granulated Sugar (heaped) 14 ounces 

V/2 coffee cups " (level) 1 pound 

2teacups " " " 1 

1 pint Best Brown Sugar 13 ounces 

1% coffee cups " " (level) 1 pound 

214 teacups " " " " 1 " 

2 tablespoons (well rounded) Powdered Sugar or Flour.. 1 ounce 

1 " " " Soft Butter 1 " 

3 Sweet Chocolate grated 1 " 

2 teaspoons (heaping) Flour, Sugar or Meal equal 1 heaping 

tablespoon. 

ILaqtMadls 

1 pint contains 16 fluid ounces (4 gills) 

1 teacupful equals 8 fluid ounces (2 gills) 

4 teaspoonfuls equal 1 tablespoonful 

2 teaspoonfuls equal 1 dessertspoonful 

4 teacupf uls equal 1 quart 

A common sized tumbler holds about one-half pint 



To Our Readers: 

We would call attention to the 
advertisements that appear on these 
pages. Let us show these firms 
our appreciation by giving them, 
in turn, our patronage. 



AUG "IS 1908 



V 



P. BBRKA 



DEALER IN 



LUMBER 



AND 



1«1IJ)IN'G MATERIALS 



TELEPHONE MAIN 41 



COR. 8TH AND WILSON STS.. SANTA ROSA, CAL 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




i iiiii mil in i 
014 485 426 3 •