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LIBRARY Of CONGRESS. 



siieii;Rl4:'1 . 

' J 

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 



Goods, Notions 




Matti 



Cloths. 



BUY YOUR 



Carpets, Furniture, 

Bedding, Stoves, Ranges, Refrigerators, 
Baby Carriages, &c. 

OF THE MANUFACTURER 

AND SAVE 25 PER CENT. 



CREDIT GIVEN AT CASH PRICES. 



JOHN WILLIS^ 



298 BURNET STREET, 



NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. 



Merchant Tailors 
AND C LOTHIERS 

Children's Clothing 




A SPECIALTY 



No. 1 



Paterson Block, 
NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



9 



KQTQ 






240 Burnet Street. 

GROUND FLOOR GALLERY. 

J^ew (Brunswick, jV. J. 

WE MAKE A^^^ — 

^SPECIALTY OF 




DAHMER & Co. 

PaiBTsoR Block, 



# 



m.^- 
^•f" 



*J. S. STEWART 
Hatter & Men's Outfitter, 

Superior Grade, Great Variety, 
Lowest Prices. 

29 CHURCH STREET. 



• 



Hardware, Iron and Steel, 

House and Builders' Hardware, House 
Furnishing Goods. Carriage Hardware 
Wood Work, Trimmings, Agricultural. 
Implements. Plows, Paints, Oils, Va.rnishes. 

2 & 7 PEUCE STREET, - NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 



FRANK RUST^S 









OKI 



N. E. Corner George &, New Sts., 

DEALER IN 

PURE DRUGS m IREDICDIES, 

PBRFUniERY, TOILET ARTICLES, ETC., 

pnusican's PrEScriptloas caiBluIIy PrepaiBil. 

( 9 to 10 A. M., 

SUNDAY HOURS J 2 to 4 p.m., 

6 to 7 p. M. 



Dry and Fancy Goods 

BOOTS AND SHOES, 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTH 



c. 






'-^--'^ESTABLISHED 1830^^^"'-^ 

CHflS. P. STRONG: 



^VHOLESALE A.N1D RETAIL IDEALER IN 





H 



NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J 



z*^' 



DEALERS IN 



DffV GOODS, CARPETING, 

Floor Oil Cloths, Mattings, Lace Curtains, Window 
Shades, Curtain Poles, Stair Rods, Etc. 

No. 4 KING BLOCK, NEW BEUNSWICK, N. J. 

I, S. Manning & Son. 





226 Burnet Street, 



New Brunswick, N. J. 



BENJ. M. PRICE, 

JVb. 257 Burnet Street, JVeiv Brini,sicick, JV. J. 

DEALER IN AND MANUFACTURER OF ALL KINDS OF 

DaiDEts, Dil DIotlis, Straw matting aitil Rugs, 

IN IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC. 

A FIRST-CLASS UPHOLSTERER, FOR RELAYING OF CARPETS, ETC, EMPLOYED, 



tc O 



S i 

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o .— 

;2 H 




fS » 









"1 <-^ S 

?r o — 



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CTQ 



To cook by Gas, with small consumption, 
Requires but a little gumption. 



Oia?Y COj^L "YAK.ID. 



WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 




o© 



^^ C O A L pf^ 

BRICK, STONE, LIME, CEMENT 

Commerce Square, 
SKfillK''' New Brunswick, N. J. 



-THE- 



Great fltlantic & Pacific Taa Co., 

LARGEST IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS IH THE WORLD. 

nhtt Cm ^Uxt, 

COR. OF CHURCH flJID PEACE STS. 




We take pleasure in informing our numerous Customers 
and Friends that we have leased the above premises for a 
term of years to better accommodate 

OUR LARGE AND INCREASING BUISNESS 

in the city of New Brunswick. We have fitted it up in the 
Most Elegant Style, and stocked it with the Finest 

NEU/ CROP TERS and PURE SELECTEE COFFEES. 

We have no hesitation in stating that it is the 

FINEST TEA STORE IN THE STATE. 



We have made these very extensive improvements in order 
to accommodate our large and increasing trade in New Bruns- 
wick, which has far outgrown our most sanguine expectations. 

It is unnecessary for us to state that we will in the 
future, as in the past, use our utmost endeavors to keep up 
the high reputation of our house in the matter of supplying 
all with 

Pure Teas, Coffees, Sugar, Baking Powder, 

Condensed Milk and Elgin Creamery Butter. 

ROBERT J. SMITH, Manager. 



' H kind FECBptinn is bEtter than a feast 



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PUBLISHED AMD SOLD BY THE 



Improvenient Society of the Second Reformed Chnrcli, 



/IfEI/y BRUNSWICK, N. J., 



X^ 



^:s^ 







.N'*'^COPYRlQH?r 

JUN 1818 



^'^^i:^ 



Containing contributions from many of the noted 

housekeepers of this Church, distinguished 

for their skill in the culinary art. 



COMPILED BY ONE OF THE HOUSEKEEPERS. 



"Bad dinners go hand in hand with total depravity, while 
a properly fed man is already half saved, " 



COPYRIGHTED, 1890. 



DAILY HOME NEWS PRESS, NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J, 



s 






TABLE OF CONTENTS, 



PAGES. 

SOUPS 5-7 

FISH 8-11 

MEATS 11-15 

SALADS 16-17 

EGGS 17-18 

ENTREES 19-20 

VEGETABLES 20-22 

BREAD, BISCUIT, ET(^ 22-27 

GRIDDLE CAKES 27-28 

PUDDINGS AND CUSTARDS 28 36 

PIES 36-38 

TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 38 

CAKES 38-47 

FROSTINGS AND ICINGS 47 

CREAMS AND ICES 57 

PRESERVES, JELLIES, ETC 57 

PICKLES 58 

DELICACIES FOR THE SICK 59 

CANDIES 59 

MISCELLANEOUS 60 



[Entered according to act of Congress, in tlie year 1890, by the Improvement Society 

of the Second Reformed Church, New Brunswick, N. J., in the 

office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.] 



PREFACE. 

}HAT was wrong in the domestic machinery of Solomon's 
household, that, notwithstanding his seven hundred 
wives, he exclaimed, " All the labor of man is for his mouth, and 
yet the appetite is not filled." Was it the lack of cooks or cook- 
books? Verily, he should have lived in the present day. "Of 
making many books there is no end," but this little edition, with 
its Dutch colored cover, floats out upon the tidal wave of popular 
opinion, to come back bearing encomiums of praise for its mis- 
sion of inaugurating a new era of Domestic Economy. 

The Compiler. 



0N 0LD-RA8HI0NED I^ECEIPT 
FOR A LITTLE HOME COMFORT. 

" Take of thought for self one part, two parts of thought for 
family, equal parts of common sense and broad intelligence, a 
large modicum of the sense of fitness of things, a heaping measure 
of living above what your neighbors think of you, twice the 
quantity of keeping within your income, a sprinkling of what 
tends to refinement and aesthetic beauty, stirred thick with the 
true brand of Christian principle, and set it to rise." 




The Tocsin of the soul — the dinner bell. 



STOCK FOR SOUPS. 



5 pounds of clear beef, cut from the lower part of the round ; 
5 quarts of cold water, let come to a boil slowly ; skim carefully, 
and set where it will keep just at the boiling point for eight or 
ten hours. Strain, and set away to cool. In the morning skim 
off the fat and turn the .soup into the kettle, being careful not to 
let the sediment pass in. Into the soup put an onion, one stalk of 
celery, two leaves of sage, two sprigs of parsley, two of 
thyme, two of summer savory, two bay leaves, twelve 
pepper-corns and six whole cloves. Boil gently from 10 to 20 
minutes; salt and pepper to taste; strain through an old napkin. 
This is now ready for serving as a simple clear soup or for the 
foundation of all kinds of clear soups. (Parloa.) M. E. H. 

POTATO SOUP. 

1 quart milk, 6 large potatoes, 1 stalk celery, an onion and a 
tablespoon of butter ; put milk to boil with onion and celery; pare 
potatoes and boil thirty minutes; mash fine; add boiling milk, 
then butter, pepper and salt to taste. Rub through strainer 
and serve immediately. A cupful of whipped cream, added 
when in the tureen, is a great improvement. Serve as soon as 
ready; must not stand. Mrs. D. D. Williamson. 

BLACK BEAN SOUP. 

1 quart beans, 4 quarts stock, (beef soup stock) ; soak the 
beans over night in cold water, wash clean in the morning, put in 
pot with stock, boil slowly six hours. Rub through a sieve, put 
back in pot, flavor to taste. Put 1 hard boiled eg::g sliced, and 1 
sliced lemon in bottom of tureen and pour the soup in. Serve 
very hot. Enough soup for three days. 

Mrs. D. D. Williamson. 

WHITE BEAN SOUP. 

1 pint white beans, soaked over night. Let boil little over 1 
hour, then put in 6 potatoes chopped ; after these have cooked 
half an hour add 6 apples, chopped, salt and pepper. Let all 
cook half an hour and serve. Mrs. Geo. L. Nevius. 



(5) 



MEATLESS TOMATO SOUP. 

1 qu«rt of tomatoes, 1 quart of boiling milk, 1 teaspoon of 
soda ; season with pepper and salt to taste ; add a little rolled 
cracker to the soup. To 1 quart of tomatoes add a little water 
and let soak until the tomatoes are soft, then add one teaspoon of 
soda and allow to effervesce, after which strain the tomatoes and 
add 1 quart of boiling milk. Let come to a boil, or perhaps boil 
a very few minutes ; season with pepper and salt, add rolled 
cracker. Mrs. J. S. Clark. 

TOMATO SOUP, No. 1. 

1 pint can of tomatoes, 1 quart boiling water. Boil together 
20 minutes; salt and pepper to taste; small lump of butter, 1 
tablespoon cracker dust, 1 pint boiling milk. The two latter 
ingredients added after the soup is strained. 

Mrs. M. E. Pratt. 

TOMATO SOUP, No. 2. 

To 1 quart canned tomatoes add 2 quarts water; boil 15 
minutes, put in 1 teaspoon soda, 1 quart sweet milk, 6 or 8 
crackers, pulverized fine. Butter, salt and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. M. H. Hutton. 

TOMATO SOUP, No. 3. 

1 quart tomatoes, 3 pints of water, piece of butter size of an 
e^S, rubbed with 2 tablespoons of flour, 1 tea cup of milk. Boil 
three-quarters of an hour, strain through a sieve ; add the milk, 
flour and butter at the last. Mrs. D. D. Demarest. 

CLAM SOUP, No. I. 

Drain the liquor from 25 clams, chop the clams and set 
aside. Chop 1 large potato, 1 small onion, a little parsley, a 
dash of pepper, then put on to boil in the clam liquor. Boil 20 
minutes, then add the chopped clams and cook 15 minutes. Beat 
3 eggs very lightly in the soup tureen; when the soup is to be 
served let it be boiling, and pour over the beaten eggs, stirring 
them all the while. Miss Sarah Q. Roe. 

CLAM SOUP, No. 2. 

25 clams, strained and chopped. Heat the juice and skim off, 
five minutes before dishing put in the clams and heat one pint of 
milk ; thicken the milk with one tablespoon of flour mixed with 
one tablespoon of butter. Pour all together into the tureen. 

Mrs. J. S. VooRHEES. 

CLAM SOUP, No. 3. 

25 clams, raw, chopped fine ; add 3 quarts of water, 1 onion 
chopped fine ; boil half an hour, add one pint of milk, thicken 
with a little flour and small lump of butter. Beat 2 eggs in 
tureen and pour your broth over them, boiling hot. Cut up 
toast in small squares and throw over the top. 

Miss Carrie Woodbridge. 



MARTHA WASHINGTON SOUP. 

6 ripe tomatoes, chopped fine, 1 quart water; boil 15 minutes; 
add 1 teaspoon soda, 1 pint boiled milk, 4 or more crackers 
rolled fine, butter, salt and pepper to taste. In winter substitute 
a can of tomatoes in place of ripe ones. Lizzie Applegate. 

OYSTER SOUP. 

Separate with a fork 1 pint oysters from the liquor. Heat 1 
quart milk to boiling, strain and heat oyster liquor, then add 
oysters, and as they boil, skim. When the oysters begin to 
separate into little leaves mix all together, milk, oysters, 
liquor, piece of butter size of an English Walnut, salt to taste. 

Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Boil a marrow bone in sufiicient water to cover until ready to 
skim thoroughly ; then add salt and pepper to taste. For about 5 
quarts of water peel and chop five potatoes, three onions, grate 1 
or 2 carrots and add 1 pint canned tomatoes, or five ripe ones. 
Let all boil slowly for at least three hours. One-half hour before 
serving add 1 tea cup vermicelli. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 

1 pint milk, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 ounce butter, a head of 
celery, a large slice of onion and small piece of mace. Boil 
celery in a pint of water from 30 to 45 minutes, boil mace, onion 
and milk together; mix flour with 2 tablespoons of cold milk, 
and add to boiling milk. Cook 10 minutes. Mash celery in the 
water in which it was cooked and stir into boiling milk. Add 
butter and season with salt and pepper to taste. Strain and serve 
immediately. Mrs. D. D. Williamson. 

PARKER HOUSE TOMATO SOUP. 

1 quart or can of tomatoes, 1 cup milk, butter size of an egg, 
pepper and salt, piece of soda size of pea. Let tomatoes come 
to a boil, add pepper, salt and butter, then soda and milk. 
Strain through colander and serve immediately. 

Mrs. D. D. Williamson. 

VERMICELLI SOUP. 

Boil a shank of veal in three quarts of water 3 hours with 
1 whole turnip, onion and carrot ; then strain ; then add a small 
cup of vermicelli, and boil three-quarters of an hour. Season 
with pepper, salt and bay leaves. If the water boils away add 
more. Mrs. H. Cook. 

WINE SOUP 

4 eggs beaten as for custard. Heat about 1 pint of red wine, 
(port wine is good,) one-half pint of water, sweeten to taste; 
when boiling hot pour gradually in the eggs, stirring all the time 
so the eggs will not curdle. Let it boil until it thickens. Break 
some crackers in a tureen and pour in the soup. 

Mrs. G. Van Pelt. 

. _ _ ^ 




--■^M^ M^15SiM^^ ^^^^'^— 



"Where is the place, and what the time of supper; 
Who are the guests and who the entertainer; 
What fish he ought to buy, and where to buy it." 



BOILED FISH. 



Cod— Put in boiling water, stand on the stove where it is not 
too hot, but will keep simmering for 60 minutes, more or less, 
according to the size of your fish. Halibut and salmon in same 
manner, except thirty minutes longer. Serve with drawn butter 
sauce. (See " Drawn Butter.") Mrs. D. H. Merritt. 

TO BEOIL SALMON STEAKS. 

First remove the outside skin carefully, wash and lay on a 
towel to dry off; grease the broiler, put in steaks, lay it in a 
dripping pan and set on a moderately hot oven with door ajar. 
Let stand one-half hour, put over the coals just long enough to 
brown. Spread them with butter and serve with quarters of 
lemon. Prepare fish or mackerel the same, and with one except- 
ion, do not remove the skin. Mrs. D. H. Merritt. 

CODFISH BALLS, No. 1. 

1 quart of potatoes cut small, U pints of codfish picked to 
bits. Boil in cold water, pepper to taste. When done add 
2 eggs, well beaten, 1 tablespoon of butter. Make in balls and 
fry as doughnuts. Mrs. C. Kinports. 

CODFISH BALLS, No. 2. 

Soak the fish 2 or 3 hours. To a pint of well chopped fish 
add 1 quart of mashed potatoes, a small piece of butter, 1 eg^, 
well beaten. Beat the whole 15 minutes, or longer, if one has the 
time. Make into balls and drop into boiling lard. 

Miss Carrie Woodbridge. 

CODFISH BALLS, No. 3. 

The same as the above, with the exception that hot water is 
put on the fish twice and let stand until cool, which is a saving of 
time. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

BAKED SHAD. 

3 or 4 tablespoons sugar, little mace, pepper and salt, one-half 
cup of vinegar. If the fish is very large take double these 
quantities. Bake slowly ; turn a pan over the fish to bake. 

Mrs. David Clark. 

t ' (8) 






FRICASSED OYSTERS. 



U lar^e tablespoon butter, 1 heapinp: tablespoon floui ; mix 
well together, then let it come to a boil, stirring all the time. 
Add one- half pint milk. Take 75 oysters and one-half pint of 
juice, season with salt and pepper and put them in a pan in a 
good hot oven for a few minutes, then add the above sauce. 
Flavor with just a little lemon. Mrs. M. E. Pratt. 

CLAM CHOWDER, No. 1. 

4 thin slices of salt pork cut about 3 inches square, put in 
bottom of pot and slowly fry out, 3 medium-sized onions, sliced 
and put in after the pork is slightly tried ; add juice of '2o clams, 
4 or 5 medium-sized potatoes, cut as for soup and stew in juice 
until within ten minutes of being done, then add chopped clams 
and stew until potatoes are done, after which add 2 quarts of 
milk, which has been heated or boiled ; season with butter and 
pepper. Serve with oyster crackers and be very careful that it 
may not burn. This is an excellent recipe. I have never known 
it to be a failure. Mr. John I). Bowne, 

(Mrs. L. E. Riddle.) 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS, No. 1. 

Roll fine 1 cup of oyster crackers and dust 1 quart or 30 
oysters; put a layer of the cracker dust in buttered pudding 
dish, then a thick layer of oysters, little salt and pepper, small 
lump of butter, then another layer of crackers, and so on until 
the dish is filled. Sprinkle cracker crumbs on top. One-half cup 
milk, one-half cup of oyster juice, (not too wet,) bake one-half 
hour in hot oven. If these directions are carried out you cannot 
fail to have them just right. Mrs. Tapping. 

SCALLOPED OYSTERS, No. 2. 

Put a layer of oysters in a pan, then sprinkle with pepper 
and salt and spread little bits of butter over them, then a layer 
of cracker rolled fine, and so on until the dish is full, having the 
cracker dust on top ; then fill the pan with milk and bake in a 
hot oven. Mrs. F. Rust. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

Put the oysters over the fire in their own liquor and let them 
simmer ; after they are plump skim them out into a stone pot, a 
layer of oysters sprinkled with whole mace, whole cloves and a 
little pepper. After all the oysters are in the pot cover them, 
alternating 1 cup of cold vinegar and 1 cup of hot oyster liquor. 
Cover slowly and let stand until the next day. 

Mrs. James C. Van Cleef. 

CLAM FRITTERS. 

15 clams, chopped, 2 eggs, 1 cup of juice of the clams, 2 cups 
of flour, li teaspoons of baking powder, a pinch of salt. Beat 
the eggs and add the choppeo clams, then the juice; mix the 
baking powder with the flour and add last. 

Mrs. J. S. VooRHEES. 

2 ~ ^9j "^ 



OYSTER PIE. 

2 ejrgs, boiled hard, an equal quantity of grated bread, add 
cloves, mace, salt and pepper, rub all fine logether. Take 75 oysters, 
one-half cup butter ; put a paste around your dish, put in a layer 
of oysters and a little butter, a sprinkling of eggs, etc., till the 
dish is full. Make it high in the middle, cover with paste and 
bake. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Make a puff paste, take an ounce of butter and 1 tablespoon 
flour; put these in a saucepan and heat gently and stir thorough- 
ly to get smooth. Add a little salt, a sprig of mace and pepper, 
by degrees ; last add 4 tablespoons cream, then having strained 2 
dozen oysters, (not too large ones,) add, little by little, the 
liquor. Lastly, when the sauce is on tbe boil, put in the 
oysters and let them cook not more than 3 minutes. Fill the 
patties. Mrs. D. Clark. 

CREAMED OYSTERS No. 1. 

1 pint of milk boiled with salt and pepper. Mix 1 tablespoon 
flour in a little cold water and add; let the oysters come to a 
boil in their own liquor, skim and drain off all the liquor and 
turn into the cream. I use 1 or 2 eggs in the cream. Pour this 
over toast or crackers. Mrs. Freeman. 

CREAMED OYSTERS, No. 2. 

1 pint cream (or milk), 1 quart oysters, small piece of onion, 
very small piece muce, 1 tablespoon flour ; salt and pepper to 
taste. Let cream with onion and mace come to a boil. Mix 
flour with a liitle cold milk or cream and stir into the boiling 
cream. Let the oysters come to a boil in their own liquor 
and skim carefully. Draw off the liquor and turn the oysters 
into the cream. Skim out the mace and onion and serve. 

Howell,. 
SCALLOPED FISH. 

Cold boiled fish picked in small pieces. Put in a quart of 
milk to boil ; tie up an onion and a pinch of summer savory in a 
thin bag, and boil in the milk; when the milk comes to a boil 
take out the bag, add two tablespoons of corn starch, mixed in 
cold milk ; let all boil. Put layer of fish on a dish, season with 
salt and pepper; then a layer of sauce; so on until all is used, 
leaving sauce on top layer; sprinkle cracker dust or bread 
crumbs on top and bake a few moments until the top is brown. 

Mlss C. Woodbridge. 

TURBOT A LA CREAM AU GRATEN. 

3 pounds cod, bass or any firm flsh, 1 quart milk, 3 table- 
spoons flour, 3 white onions, half pound of butter, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 teaspoon white pepper, 1 nutmeg grated, small bunch of 
thyme tied in a piece of muslin, 2 eggs (yolks only) beaten. Boil 
the fish ; when cold pick out all the bones and sprinkle with 
cayenne pepper and salt. Make a sauce as follows: Rub the 
flour and butter together ; cut the onions in small pieces and stir 
into the milk ; when well boiled pour milk in flour and butter. 



Rub quite smooth and add the other ingredients. Stir over slow 
fire till it thickens, then add the beaten yolks. Pass all through 
a sieve when well boiled. Then chop a little parsley fine. Put 
in baking dish a layer of fi^h ; s|)rinkle with a little of the parsley, 
then a layer of sauce, and so on until the dish is full. Let top 
layer be fish, sprinkled with bread crumbs and grated cheese. 
Bake slowly half an hour. jNIhs. D. D. Williamson. 

LITTLE PIGS IN BLANKETS. 

Take as many large oysters as are wished, wash and dry 
them thoroughly with a clean towel. Have some fat bacon cut 
in very thin slices, cover each oyster with them and pin on with 
wooden toothpicks. Broil or roast them until the bacon is crisp 
and brown. l)o not remove toothpicks. Serve hot. 

RoLFE. (Cleveland.) 




'There's no want of nneats, sir, 
Portly and curious viands are prepared 
To please all kinds of appetite." 



POT ROAST. 



4 pounds beef cut from the inside of the rump. Have the 
butcher interlard it with strips of lard through it the size of your 
little finger. Put it in a pot with very little boiling water. 
Season well with salt and pepper. Let it stew gently on the 
back part of the stove five or six hours, turning frequently. 
When tender remove the meat, and thicken the gravy with 
flour. Pour it over the meat. Mrs. W. R. Hill. 

BEEF A LA MODE. 

In a piece of rump beef weighing about 5 pounds, cut deep 
openings with a sharp knife, and put in pieces of salt pork cut in 
long strips which have been previously rolled in pepper, salt, 
cloves, allspice and nutmeg ; rub this mixture well into the beef 
also. Put this into the roasting pan and pour in a little water, 
then pour over the whole about one-half pint Madeira Wine and 
cook until tender, say 2 and a half hours. 

Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

HAMBURG STEAKS. 

Get your butcher to chop about one pound of round steak fine, 
as for beef tea. Into this rub pepper, salt and three heaping tea- 
spoons of mustard. Pat into cakes and fry like ^usage. 

Mrs. J. H. Eolfe. 

? ■ 

r (11) 



r^ 



FRANKFOKD STEAKS. 



Take an inside round steak and scrape with a sharp knife. 
Season these serapin^js witli salt and |)epper. After making them 
up into small thin cakes, broil slightly ; add a little butter. 

Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

BEEF LOAF. 

2 pounds of chopped beef, 3 milk crackers rolled, i eggs beaten 
well, quarter nutmeg, 1 teaspoon of pepper, 1 tablespoon of salt. 
Mix well together, make in a roll like butter, with little pieces of 
salt pork laid across. Bake one hour. 

Miss C. V/oodbridge. 

POTTED BEEF. 

4 pounds of lean beef ; boil until tender in enough water to 
half cover it ; chop fine ; season well with salt and pepper ; moisten 
with the liquor in which the meat was boiled and pack in a dish, 
press and slice cold. M. E. Hurd. 

FRIZZLED SMOKED BEEF. 

Take a solid handful of shaved beef, put it in one pint of milk, 
set it on back of stove and let it come gradually to scalding heat, 
but not boil; then add one heaping tablespoon of flour, wet 
smooth with cold milk. Let stand long enough to cook the flour, 
add 2 eg(i;^ well beaten, butter size of black walnut, and pepper. 
Put the eggs in only just before serving, too much cooking after 
they are in makes it separate. If the beef is very salt soak tirst 
in vvarra water and pour oflf. Mrss C. Woodbridge. 

SPICED BEEF. 

A plate piece of beef, bones taken out, sprinkle inside thickly 
with ground allspice, ground cloves, ground sage, ground summer 
savory, salt and pepper. Roll it up tightly and tie with a strong 
cord. Plunge it into boiling water, put a tablespoon of salt into 
the water ; turn the meat several times ; boil till tender ; remove 
from the pot, put it on a small meat pan and cover with another, 
putting on top sad-irons or something heavy to press the meat. 
When cold cut the cord off" and slice it for lunch. The liquor can 
be used for a small dish of soup. Mrs. AV. R. Hill. 

PATIE DE VEAN. 

3 pounds veal cutlets chopped fine, large slice salt pork with 
it, 2 eggs broken in the chopped meat, 6 crackers rolled fine, piece 
of butter size of egg rubbed in, tablespoon salt, cayenne pepper. 
A sweet herb to taste. Make into a loaf, smooth over the top 
with melted butter and water ; bake 2 hours in a moderate oven. 
Serve cold cut in thin slices. Mrs. A. D. Atkinson. 

VEAL WITH TOMATOES. 

Veal steak cut and trimmed, dipped in an egg and flour or 
cracker dust, seasoned and fried. Stew tomatoes separately and 
thicken a little, strain if you prefer. Pour over the meat to serve. 

Mrs. W. D. Freeman. 

r (12) "^^ 



SPANISH EICE. (Stew.) 

Alternate layers of parboiled rice, lamb or veal and tomatoes, 
to the top of an open mouthed sauce pan, tiavored with salt 
cayenne, pepper and parsley. It should simmer .«^lo\vly about 2 
hours till the rice is thoroug^hly cooked, but not broken. Very 
little water and when done should be dry enough to turn into a 
dish without breaking- up. Mrs. A. D. Atkinson. 

FEICANDEAU. 

2 pounds chopped beef, large onion grated, 2 large slices of 
bread toasted, then grated, pinch of cloves, allspice, salt and 
pepper, 3 eggs. Mix all together and mould round. Put in a 
dripping pan with two slices of bacon and a large lump of butter. 
Bake one-half an hour in a moderate oven ; ten minutes before 
taking out pour over scam half cup of hot water. Baste fre- 
quently. Mrs. G. L. Nevius. 

TO PEEPAKE COLD MUTTON. 

Slice the mutton thin, put in a buttered pie dish with pepper 
and salt, add a tablespoon f)f currant jelly and cold gravy, if hot 
enough to moisten put in a little water; dredge lightly w'it'h flour 
and cover with boiled rice, in which is mixed a little butter 
pepper and salt. Pour over all a beaten e^r^. Bake brown. ' 

Mrs. D. D. Williamson. 

TO COOK MUTTON. 

Boil it slowly 2 hours, then put it into the baking pan • rub 
with salt and flour, baste it with the hot liquor ; bake 1 hour 
browning every side. Serve with mint sauce. (See mint sauce' 
page 15.) Mrs. D. H. Merritt. ' 

CHICKEN OE VEAL CEOQUETTES, N(i. L 

2i pounds chicken or veal chopped very fine; put in sauce 
pan f pound of butter, 1 tablespoon flour, st'ir till melted ; add 3 
cups milk, 1 whole onion, stir till thick ; take out the onion and 
add, off the fire, 3 eggs, a little parsley chopped fine ; let this just 
come to a boil, stirring all time, then mix in the chicken or veal 
and when cool make into croquettes, dip in eg^ and bread crumbs 
and boil in lard. Mrs. D. D. Williamson. 

CHICKEN CEOQUETTES, No. 2. 

1 solid pint of finely chopped chicken (cold), 1 tablespoon salt, 
* teaspoon pepper, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 tablespoon lemon juice 
1 teaspoon onion juice, 2 eggs, 1 pint bread crumbs, 3 tablespoons 
butter; put cream or .stock on to boil; mix flour and butter to- 
gether and stir into the boiling cream, then add chicken and seas- 
oning ; boil 2 minutes ; add 2 eggs well beaten ; take from the fire 
immediately and set away to cool. When cool shape and fry 
chopped parsley may be added. Miss Alice Florance. 

CHICKEN CEOQUETTES, No. 3. 

1 fowl boiled and chopped ; 14 cups of boiled rice; U cups of 
strong stock (use what the chicken was boiled in) ; (3 spi'igs of 
parsley (chopped), 1 small tablespoon of onion chopped fine as 
possible; i nutmeg, salt and pepper to taste. Mould and roll in 
beaten ^gg and bread crumbs, and fry in boiling lard. This will 
make 20. Miss C. Woodbridge. 



do) -srt) 






^ 



FKICASSED CHICKEN. 

Cut the fowl in small pieces ; wash thoroughly, and leave it 
in water well salted for at least 1 hour, to draw out all blood; 
then put in the kettle, and cover with hot water; salt to taste. 
Let the chicken just boil for about 1 hour, according to the age 
of the bird. For dumplings take 1 cup Hecker's prepared flour, 
and wet with either milk or water sufficient to make a stiff paste, 
first salting it a little. Drop this with a spoon deftly in the 
kettle about 15 minutes before serving, taking care not to raise 
the lid nor stop the boiling. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

Wash the chicken until all the blood is out, cut it in 
pieces, rub a very little salt over them, then roll each piece in 
flour. Fry them nearly covered in lard and butter, till a nice 
brown color. Make a gravy of cream and butter ; if the cream 
is not very thick add a little flour, season to taste. 

Mrs. J. J. JosLYN. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil a chicken until tender; take out all the bones and chop 
the meat very fine ; season with salt, pepper, and plenty of but- 
ter. Add to the liquor the chicken was boiled in, 1 cup of bread 
crumbs, made soft with hot water, and to this, the chopped 
chicken. When heated, take out and press into a dish. Serve 
cold. HuRD. (Cleveland.) 

BOILED HAM, No. 1. 

Put a 10 lb. ham in cold water. Let boil slowly 4 hours. Take 
out, put in just cold water enough to cover it with one cup of 
vinegar in the water and let it get well heated through. Take it 
out, skim, and then sprinkle all over with powdered sugar. Put 
in a hot oven to brown quickly. Miss Tapping. 

BOILED HAM, No. 2. 

Cover the ham with boiling water. Add 1 tablespoon mus- 
tard ; boil slowly or simmer until a fork goes in easily, about 3 
hours. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

COLD LIVER OR HAM. 

Cut meat up into bits; pour over it some milk (cupful), 
thickened with flour. When ready put in the liver or ham. Let 
heat up well. It is a nice dish for lunch. Mrs. W. R. Hill. 

LIVER TERRAPIN. 

Take a few slices of cooked calf's liver and one sweet bread ; 
cut into dice and season ; add 1 cup of cream sauce, slir over hot 
water until hot; add well beaten yolks of 2 eggs, 1 glass of sherry 
wine, and serve at once. Miss S. Q. Roe. 

SCRAPPLE. 

Take a piece of pork, boil it. When done chop quite fine, 
strain the liquor put in the meat and thicken with Indian meal 
and a handful of buckwheat meal. Season to taste, with salt, 

^ ^ 

0-^ Pj^ Vt3 



pepper and sRge. Then let it boil a few minutes. Take it out ; 
when cold cut it in slices and fry. Nice for breakfast. 

Mrs. W. R. Hill. 

MINT SAUCE. 

1 tablespoon of chopped spear mint, 2 tablespoon of sugar ; 
add vinegar to make the quantity you want. If the vinegar is 
too sharp, add more sugar and water. Do not heat it. If you 
are obliged to use dried mint, make it fine and pour boiling 
water over it, just enough to soften it. Mrs. Merritt. 




"To make a perfect salad, there should be a miser for oil, 
a spendthrift for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and a madcap to 
stir the ingredients up and mix them well together." 

— Spanish Proverb. 



CHICKEN SALAD, No. 1. 

Cut cold chicken in dice making 2 qts.; place in earthen bowl 
and season with 4 tablespoons vinegar, 2 of oil, 1 teaspoonful 
salt, 5 teaspoonful of pepper set ; away in cool place 2 hours. Cut 
celery in pieces half an inch, thick enough to make ] quart. Do 
not put together until ready to serve ; then add half the di*essing, 
reserving other half to spread on top. Mrs. M. E. Pratt. 

CHICKEN SALAD, No. 2. 

Mince the white meat of a chicken fine or pull it in bits ; 
chop the white parts of celery. Prepare a salad thus : Rub the 
yolks of hard boiled eggs smooth with a spoon ; put to each 
yolk 1 teaspoon of made mustard, half as much salt, a table- 
spoon of oil, and a wineglass of strong vinegar; put the celery 
in a glass salad bowl ; lay the chicken on that, then pour over it 
the dressing. Lettuce cut small in the place of celery may be 
used. Cut the whites of the eggs in rings to garnish the salad. 

Atkinson. 
POTATO SALAD, No. 1, 

2 cups mashed potatoes; f cup cabbage (white and fine,) 2 
tablespoons cucumber pickles (chopped,) yolks of 2 hard boiled 
eggs, pounded fine. jNIix all together. 

DEESSING. 

1 raw Qgg well beaten ; 1 saltspoon of celery seed ; 1 teaspoon 
white sugar ; 1 tablespoon melted butter ; 1 teaspoon flour; half 
cup vinegar. Salt, mustard and pepper to taste. Boil the vine- 
gar; pour it upon the above dressing, return it to the fire and 

~ (15) " 



O- 



cook the mixture thoroughly until it thickens; while scalding 
hot pour upon the salad. Toss it with a fork (silver,) and let it 
get cold before eating. Fannie Devan. 

(Marion Harlan d.) 

POTATO SILAD, No. 2. 

6 large potatoes, 4 hard boiled eggs, chop the whites and 
potatoes together; rub the yolks smooth ; add 1 teaspoon made 
mustard, 1 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons sugar, 2 tablespoons oil, 1 
pinch cayenne pepper ; vinegar to thin it. 

Misses Harden rergh. 

BEET SALAD. 

Chop together 3 cold boiled potatoes and 2 or 3 dark red cold 
boiled beets. Pour salad dressing over the whole. 

Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

SALAD DKESSING, No. !. 

Mix together 1 tablespoon of olive oil, 1 of mustard, 1 of 
salt, 1 of sugar ; stir well. Add 3 well beaten eggs, a pinch of 
cayenne pepper, 1 teaspoon of cornstarch in 1 tablespoon of milk. 
Stir for a few moments ; then add 1 coffee cup of milk, 1 teacup 
of vinegar. Place in a steamer and cook until thick. Strain, 
and when cold bottle, and keep in a cool place. This will keep 
for several weeks, and is an excellent dressing. 

M. E. Merrill. 
SALAD DRESSING, No. 2. 

2 hard boiled eggs chopped fine, 1 teaspoon celery salt, 1 tea- 
spoon pepper, 1 scant teaspoon mustard, 2 tablespoons oil, half 
cup vinegar. Stir well and dash over salad or coldslaw. 

C. M. Newell. 

SALAD DRESSING, No. 3. 

Beat the yolks of 3 eggs, or the whole of 2, add 5 tablespoons 
of good vinegar, (3 if vinegar is very strong,) half teaspoon of 
made mustard ; and butter size of an almond, 2 teaspoons of 
sugar. Stand the cup containing these ingredients in boiling 
water, and stir until it thickens. Mrs. D. D. Demarest. 

SALAD DRESSING, No. 4. 

Yolks of 2 eggs raw, 1 teaspoon of white pepper, 2 teaspoons 
salt, 1 teaspoon celery seed, 2 teaspoons sugar, 2 teaspoons mus- 
tard wet with vinegar, then add oil until you have used half of 
a 50 cent bottle. Put in a bottle and keep it on ice. (Very nice 
and will keep a week if by the ice.) M. O. Merritt. 

SALAD DRESSING, No. 5. 

1 egg beaten well with 1 teaspoon of mustard, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 heaping tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon melted butter, two- 
third cup vinegar. Put on to boil and stir until it thickens. Set 
away to cool. M. O. Merritt. 



(16) 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING, No. 1. 

For 1 g:ood sized chicken allow 4 eggs, 2 tablespoons of mixed 
mustard, 1 teaspoon of salt, a pinch of red pepper, 2 ounces of 
butter; beat well together; add a gill of vinegar (if very strong 
dilute it with water) and stir it over boiling water until'the con- 
sistency of thick cream. It must be perfectly cold when used. 

Mrs. H. Cook. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING, No. 2. 

Yolks of 2 eggs, well stirred, not beaten, 1 teaspoon of mus- 
tard, half teaspoon of salt and cayenne pepper to taste ; juice of 
1 lemon, 1 small bottle of oil. Beat in the" lemon juice and oil 
alternately ; the oil at first, drop by drop. 

Mrs. D. D. Demarest. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING, No. 3. 

For 1 chicken always use 2 bunches of celery. Take 5 eggs, 
boil 2 for at least half an hour. Mix the raw yolks of the 3 with 
a teaspoon mustard in a teaspoon vinegar ; I teaspoon salt and a 
suggestion of cayenne pepper. Stir in gradually half a bottle of 
oil. Then mash the boiled yolks, mixing with quarter of a cup 
of vinegar. Then put all together, using a good tablespoon of the 
raw egg mixture for the top ; with this I put half a lemon. To 
make more dressing take about 2 teaspoons cornstarch in cup of 
water, making it about the consistency of starch, and stir in the 
dressing when the first heat is off. Before mixing the dressing 
with the chicken and celery season the latter with salt. 

L. P. Stout. 



"A simple mode of testing the soundness of an egg is to 
put it in water; and if fresh it will sink to the bottom." 



OMELETTE. 



6 eggs beaten separately, 6 tablespoons milk. Bake in pan 
from 8 to 10 minutes ; sprinkle salt over it before serving. 

C. M. Newell. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Beat the yolks of a dozen eggs with a half cup of cream, or 
one third of a cup of new milk and a tablespoon of butter. 
Season with salt and pepper. Stir constantly until done. Spread 
on buttered toast. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

3 07) ■ 



^^ 



DEVILED EGGS. 

Boll eggs very hard. When cold, shell them, cut off one end, 
take out the yolks and beat them to a powder. Mix the yolks 
with mustard, salt, butter, pepper to taste, with vinegar enough 
to make like a thick cream. Put this mixture back into the 
whites of the eggs. Serve on lettuce or sliced cabbage with 
Mayonnaise dressing. Mrs. H. Cook. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Put deviled eggs between thin slices of bread. Cut the eggs 
in slices. Miss A. Flora nce. 

SCALLOPED EGGS. 

6 eggs, 4 or 5 tablespoons of minced ham ; a little chopped 
parsley; a very little minced onion. 2 great spoonfuls of cream 
and 1 of melted butter. Salt and pepper to taste. Half cup of 
bread crumbs, moistened with milk and a spoonful of melted 
butter. Line the bottom of a small deep dish, well buttered, with 
the soaked bread crumbs ; put upon these a layer of chopped 
ham, seasoned with the onion and parsley. Set these in the oven 
closely covered, until they are smoking hot, meanwhile, beat up 
the eggs to a stiff froth ; season with pepper and salt, stir in the 
cream and melted butter, and pour on the layer of ham. Put 
the dish uncovered, back into the oven, and bake five minutes, 
or until the eggs are " set." Mrs. M- H. Hutton. 

(Marion Harland.) 

EGGS A LA CREME. 

6 eggs boiled hard and chopped fine, and stale bread. Put in 
a dish alternate layers of chopped egg and grated bread. When 
the dish is full, pour on 3 half pints boiling milk seasoned with 
salt, pepper, and 1 tablespoon butter. Bake a light brown. 

Mrs. J. H. Kolfe. 
EGGS SUR LE PLAT. 

6 eggs, 1 tablespoon of butter. Pepper and salt to taste. 
Melt the butter on a stone china or tin plate, or shallow baking 
dish. Break the eggs carefully into this ; dust lightly with 
pepper and salt, and put in a moderate oven until the whites are 
well "set." Serve in the dish in which they are baked. 

Mrs. M. H. Hutton. 
(Marion Harland.) 

BEAUREGARD EGGS, No. 1. 

5 eggs, half pint milk, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 of cornstarch. 
Boil eggs hard, put n-)ilk on to boil ; toast 4 slices bread while 
milk is boiling ; cut whites of the eggs in small pieces and press 
the yolks through a sieve. Stir butter, half teaspoon salt and 
whites of eggs and cornstarch in the boiling milk. Butter and 
moisten the toast, lay on long, flat dish ; cover sauce with yolk, 
and dust a little pepper on top. Mrs. M. E. Pratt. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil the eggs until quite hard. After carefully removing the 
shells, lay them in large-mouthed jars and pour over them 
scalding vinegar, well seasoned with whole pepper, allspice and a 
few cloves; when cold cover closely. In three or four weeks 
they are fit for use. These are very fine. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

- _ _ 



"It is the bounty of nature that we live; but of philosophy 
that we live well." 



WELSH RAREBIT. 



1 pint milk, heated, and a little salt. Chip sonne cheese fine, 
(about 1 inch deep in a quart pan,) and let it dissolve in the hot 
milk. Just before serving add 2 eggs and stir them into the 
mixture quickly. Serve this poured over toast or soda crackers. 
This should be eaten immediately. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

SOFT CHEESE. 

Heat 1 cup milk, 1 scant teaspoon butter and a little pepper 
and salt. Into this put half cup grated bread crumbs, three- 
quarters cup grated cheese and I egg, well beaten. 

Miss A. Florance. 

CREAM CABBAGE. 

1 cup vinegar, 1 cup sweet milk, 3 eggs, a little flour, 2 tea- 
spoons sugar, 1 tablespoon mixed mustsad, butter size of an egg ; 
salt and celery seed to ta.ste. Mix together carefully the vinegar, 
sugar, mustard, butter, salt and celery seed. Let come to a boil. 
Then add the milk a little at a time, then eggs well beaten, 
and flour enough to make like a thick cream. When proper con- 
sistency throw in the chopped cabbage and let come to a boil. 

Mrs. H. Cook. 
DRESSED CABBAGE. 

Cut the cabbage fine and sprinkle a little salt over it. Mix 
together half teacup of water, quarter cup of vinegar, 1 well 
beaten egg. Put in a frying pan, with 1 tablespoon of butter, 
and remove as soon as it boils. Stir well, and pour over the 
cabbage. Mrs. M. E. Merrill. 

CABBAGE DRESSING. j 

1 egg, I teaspoon dry mustard, Ih teaspoon salt, half cup I 
vinegar, half cup milk, half teaspoon cornstarch. Beat altogether ! 
and let it come to a boil. When cold, mix through the cabbage. 

Mrs. Florance. 
RICE CROQUETTES, No. 1. 

1 cup cold steamed rice, 1 teaspoon sugar, half teaspoon salt, I 
1 egg, (well beaten.) Milk enough to make the rice into a stiff I 

L ^ 

' (19) ^n^ 



paste. Work the ingredients into an adhesive paste, beating 
each ingredient thoroughly into the mixture. Flour your hands 
and make into oval balls. Dip in beaten egi;g, then in the flour 
or cracker dust and fry in boiling lard. Roll in sugar and cin- 
namon. Mrs. H. Cook, 
RICE CROQUETTES, No. 2. 

1 cup cold boiled rice, 1 teaspoon sugar, half teaspoon salt, 1 
teaspoon melted butter, 1 egg beaten light. Enough milk to 
make the rice into stiff paste. Sweet lard for frying. Work rice, 
butter, egg, etc., into an adhesive paste, beating each ingredient 
thoroughly into the mixture; flour your hands and make the rice 
into oval balls. Dip each in beaten egg, then in flour or cracker 
dust, fry in boiling lard few at a time, turning each with great 
care. When the croquettes are of a fine yellow brpwn, take out 
with a wire spoon and lay in a heated colander to drain off every 
drop of fat. Serve hot with sprigs of parsely laid about them in 
an uncovered dish. Misses Hardenbergh. 




■'The turnpike road to people's hearts, I find. 
Lies thro' their mouths, or I mistake mankind. 



TIME FOR COOKING VEGETABLES. 



SUMMER. 



Greens — Dandelions 1^ hrs. 



Spinach 
String Beans... 

Green Peas 

Beets 

Turnips 

Squash 



hr. 
hrs. 
hr. 
hr. 
hr. 
hr. 



WINTER. 



Squash 1 

Potatoes (boiled) ^ 

(baked) 1 

Sweet Potatoes (boiled) | 
" (baked) 1 

Turnips 2 

Beets 3^ hrs 

Parsnips 1 hr 

Carrots H hrs 

Cabbage 3 hrs 

a72d 3 fnilesfrom the house. 



hr. 
hr. 
hr. 
hr. 
hr. 
hrs. 



Potatoes i hr. 

Corn I hr. 

Asparagus i hr. 

This applies to young and 
fresh vegetables. 

SCALLOPED POTATOES. 

4 or 5 potatoes sliced quite thin ; grease a dish, put in a layer of 
potatoes, then little bits of butter, then another layer of potatoes 
and butter, and so on until the dish is full ; then pour milk over the 
whole (I use one pint) and sprinkle over a little salt. Strew fine 
bread crumbs over the top and place in a hot oven. They will 
take about an hour to cook. For those who like it a flavoring of 
onion Is very nice, put through the potatoes. Scrape it fine. 

Mrs. Kenneth J. Duncan. 

- -. ^_ 



Q 



SARATOGA POTATOES. 



Peel and slice very thin 6 large potatoes; lay them in cold 
water 1 hour, and then roughly dry them with a clean towel. 
Drop each slice separately in a kettle of boiling lard, fry until 
crisp and brown Take out with a wire spoon, drain and sprinkle 
With salt while hot. ^ ^ M J J 

POTATO PUFF. 

2 cups of mashed potato, (that has been put through a sieve) : 
season with salt and pepper; stir in 2 tablespoons of butter, beat 
to a cream ; add 2 well-beaten eggs and 1 cup of cream or milk. 
Pour into a baking dish and bake in a hot oven. M. E. H. 

POTATO FRITTERS. 

1 quart of cold boiled potatoes, 1 pint cream or milk, 3 eges 
well beaten. Hecker's flour, sufficient to make soft dough ; droo 
with a spoon in hot lard. Mrs. Applegate. 

SCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Take 6 large ripe tomatoes, skim and cut into small pieces. 
Spread a layer in the bottom of bake dish, season well put a 
layer of coarse bread crumbs over the tomatoes with plenty of 
butter. Continue this until the dish is full, having bread crumbs " 
on top. Bake 1 hour. j^ Hurd. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Cut ripe tomatoes in slices about half an inch thick ; fry in 
lard. After getting hot, the skins of the tomatoes may be 
removed. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, take the tomatoes out, 
(keep warm,) thicken the gravy with a teacup of cream 
or milk in which a teaspoon of flour has been stirred. Pour the 
gravy over the tomatoes. Serve hot. Lizzie Hurd. 

MACCARONI WITH CHEESE. 

One-quarter pound, or 12 sticks maccaroni broken into 1 inch 
lengths and cooked in 3 pints boiling salted water 20 minutes 
Turn into a colander and pour over it cold water ; drain. Make 
a sauce of I tablespoon each of butter and flour and U cups hot 
milk, salt. Put a layer of grated cheese in bottom of bake dish 
then a layer of maccaroni and one of sauce, then cheese, maccaroni 
and sauce, and cover the top with fine bread crumbs, with bits 
ot butter dotted on and a little grated cheese. Bake until brown. 

Mrs. J. H. R. 
FRIED EGG PLANT. 

Peel and cut in slices less than one-quarter of an inch thick 
Immerse in salt water over an hour, drain, and dip each slice in 
beaten eggs and cracker dust and fry brown in half butter and 
half^ard. Mrs. F. Rust. 

BOILED BEETS. 

Boil the beets in hot water until tender, then drain and pour 
cold water over them that they may skin easily. Cut up in 
small, uneven pieces and put them in a baking dish with a little 
butter, pepper and salt. Pour a little vinegar over the whole and 
set in a moderately hot oven for about twenty minutes. 

M. J. ROLFE. 



(31) 



CORN OYSTERS. 

Two dozen ears of ripe, but soft corn. Grate as fine as possi- 
ble ; dredge it with flour; beat 4 eggs, and mix gradually with 
the corn ; add 1 saltspoon of salt. Mix equal quantities of lard 
and butter ; when boiling hot drop in the mixture in the form of 
oval cakes. Fry brown. They are nice for tea. 

Atkinson. 

CORN FRITTERS. 

Eight ears of corn cut three times (not grated), 2 eggs, 1 tea- 
cup sweet milk (more if the corn is not juicy), 2 teaspoons flour. 
Salt and pepper to taste. Make the mixture the consistency of 
a soft batter and fry in lard or butter. L. H. 

BAKED BEANS. 

Soak over night 1 quart of beans. In the morning put them 
in a bean pot with 1 teaspoon salt, 1 of molasses and | pound of 
salt pork. Cover the beans with water and bake 10 or 12 hours. 
Keep the beans covered with water while baking. 

M. E. Merrill. 



"K^ 



fMiiS^llIt 



" The recipe for tnaklng it is not a handful of this, a cup of 
that and a spoonful of something else. It is not something 
sweetened with ordinary condiments, or flavored ivith ordinary 
flavors, or baked in ordinary ovens. It is the loaf of domestic 
ha2)piness, and all the ingredients come doivn from Heaven and 
the fruits are plucked from the tree of life ; and it is sweetened 
with the new wine of the kingdom, and it is baked in the oven 
of home trial. Oh, my readers, that is the loaf you want in the 
pantry, the loaf of domestic happiness— sweet to the taste, satisfy- 
ing to the sold, full of the flour of life. 

Talmage. 



POTATO YEAST. 



Boil 8 large potatoes and a small handful of hops (tied in a 
cloth) together. When done mash the potatoes and the water in 
which they were boiled through a colander. Add 1 teacup sugar, 
2 tablespoons salt and enough boiling water to make 2 quarts in 
all. Before it is cold add 1 cup or more of yeast. Be sure and 
stir well before using each time. Mrs. Freeman. 

POTATO BREAD. 

Two quarts flour, 8 boiled potatoes, 1 pint milk, ] teaspoon 
salt, lard the size of a small egg, 1 tablespoon sugar, h yeast cake. I 
Set the flour where it will keep warm ; when ready to use, sift ; I 



add lard, sugar and salt. Mash the potatoes and add them and 
the water in which they were boiled to the milk to make nearly 
1 quart ; heat to make luke-warm ; dissolve the yeast cake in a 
little of the warm milk ; wet the flour to make a dough soft 
enough to mould easily ; do not get too stiff. Knead 20 minutes, 
let rise over night. In the morning knead again ; put in 
pans; let rise again until light. Bake in a moderate oven. 
Make 2 loaves. Lizzie Hurd. 

GRAHAM BREAD, No. 1. 

One quart graham flour with a teaspoon of salt mixed 
through it, 1 pint buttermilk, 2 teaspoons baking soda, 2 table- 
spoons molasses. Miss A. H. Fisher. 

GRAHAM BREAD, No. 2. 

If a yeast cake is used, make a sponge by dissolving the 
yeast cake in about i pint tepid water and thickened with flour 
until it will drop dry from the spoon. Let the sponge rise for 
about two hours. Then into this put 1 cup water, J cup molasses 
filled up with water and another cup water to rinse out the 
molasses ; a little salt. Stir in graham flour until the dough 
is as stiff as you can get it and a little stiffer. Pour this into two 
greased lins and set to raise over night. Bake early in the morn- 
ing. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

GRAHAM BREAD, No. 3. 

Two cups sour milk, ^ cup molasses, 1 teaspoon soda, salt. 
Thicken with graham flour and steam 2 hours and brown in the 
oven. Mrs. Merritt. 

CORN BREAD, No. 1. 

" Two cups Indian, one of wheat, 
One cup sour milk, one cup sweet. 
One good egg, that well you beat. 
Half cup molasses, too. 
With one spoon of butter new ; 
Salt and soda each a spoon. 
Mix up quickly and bake it soon ; 
Then you'll have corn bread complete. 
Best of all corn bread you meet. 
Good enough for any king. 
That your husband home may bring ; 
Warming up the human stove. 
Cheering up the hearts you love. 
And only Tyndall can explain 
The links between corn bread and brain. 
Get your husband what he likes 
And save a hundred household strikes." 

— Bishop Williams. 
This recipe 1 took from an old paper, and have used it sev- 
eral years, to the great satisfaction of our entire family, 

Mrs. N. B. Smock. 

CORN BREAD, NO. 2. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 egg, II cups of Indian meal, 1 cup 
wheat flour, 2 tablespoons of butter, 2 teaspoons Royal Baking 
Powder. I square tin. Miss Roe. 

__ - 



CORN BREAD, NO. 3. 

1 cup wheat flour, 1 cup white Indian meal, 1 tablespoon lard, 
2 tablespoons white sugar, 1 egg, 2 teaspoons baking powder, | 
cup water or milk. Bake h hour in a hot oven. 

Misses Hardenbergh. 

CORN BREAD, No. 4. 

Mix together thoroughly, dry ; 1 cup Indian meal, i cup flour, 
(a little more) * cup sugar, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, salt, then add 
1 tablespoon butter, 1 egg and ^ pint milk with ^ teaspoonful soda 
dissolved in the milk. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

VIENNA BREAD. 

1 pint sweet milk, 1 pint boiling water, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 
Vienna yeast cake, about 3 pints flour. Pour boiling water in the 
milk so as to scald it. Dissolve yeast cake in half a cup of luke- 
warm water. Mix flour in the milk and water until you have a 
thin batter, and it is quite cool. Put in the salt at this time. 
Pour in the disolved yeast and mix in more flour until you have' 
a soft sponge, and as soon as can be managed take out on the 
iDoard and knead it rapidly for 15 or 20 minutes, sprinkling both 
hands and board with a little flour. After kneading, place in a 
buttered dish and a little soft butter on top to prevent it* hard- 
ening. Cover closely and set in a warm place to rise, (not exposed 
to drafts) for 3 hours. Then mould in loaves and put in pans. 
Cut 2 or 3 slashes on the top. Cover and let rise 1 hour longer. 
Then bake. The dough may be made up in various shapes, cut 
in long strips and braided, rubbed with butter, makes a nice loaf 
for luncheon. 

When the tin foil or Vienna yeast is stale it will not do ; it 
must be quite brittle. When stale it is rubbery and will not make 
good bread. Miss Carrie Woodbridge. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

I pint yellow Indian meal, i pint rye meal, 1 pint milk, 1 tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in a liitle hot water, 3 tablespoons molasses, 
a scant teaspoon salt. Mix and let stand for several hours before 
cooking. Steam 2i hours. Bake from i to f of an hour, accord- 
ing to the heat of the oven. M. E. Merrill. 

COFFEE BREAD. 

1 egg, 1 teaspoon salt, i cup sugar, beaten together ; add 2 cups 
flour, with 3 teaspoons baking powder mixed in the flour, dry, 
1 cup sweet milk. Have gem pans hot. Mrs. D. H. M. 

JOHNNY CAKE. 

1 cup meal, i cup flour, 2 tablespoons baking powder, 1 table- 
spoon sugar, salt. Mix together dry. Add 1 egg, 1 cup milk, 1 
tablespoon melted lard. Mrs. Merritt. 

RAISED BISCUIT. 

1 pint milk, scalded and cooled, 1 tablespoon butter melted in 
the hot milk, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 tablespoon salt, half cup yeast, 
6 or 7 cups of flour. Measure the milk after scalding and put it 
in the mixing bowl ; add the butter, sugar and salt. When cool 

(34) 



add the yeast, and then stir in the flour, adding it gradually after 
5 cups are in, that it may not be too stiff. Use just enough to 
knead it. Knead till smooth and elastic ; cover; let rise till light. 
Then roll out thin and spread with butter. Cut out with biscuit 
cutter, put two together, let rise again, then bake. 

Mrs. Tapping. 



GRAHAM BISCUIT. 

1 quart graham flour, U cups milk, 1 ounce butter, 2 table- 
spoons molasses, 2 teaspo(ms cream tartar, 1 of soda, salt. Bake 
in quick oven. Miss Vincent. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

2 quarts flour, 2 tablespoons lard, 3 tablespoons sugar, 1 tea- 
spoon salt, 1 pint boiled milk, one-half teacup yeast. Sift flour 
and rub the lard in it as for pie crust. Stir in dry the sugar and 
salt. Mix in the cold, boiled milk, adding the yeast. Stand the 
dough in a cool place over night ; knead it down. Knead it 3 or 4 
times through the day ; at night make into rolls ; put in pans ; 
bake for breakfast next morning. In warm weather begin the 
rolls one morning and bake the next morning. Atkinson. 

ROLLS. 

2 quarts flour, 2 tablespoons lard, 1 small cup Baker's yeast, 
the white of an egg, well beaten ; nearly 2 cups warm water, (not 
hot,) 1 small tablespoon salt, the same of sugar. Kub the lard 
into two-thirds of the flour, also salt and sugar ; then the yeast, 
water and egg. Knead in nearly all the flour, only reserving 
enough for moulding. Set this at nine o'clock in the morning if 
you want them for tea, moulding at three and setting near the 
fire. If for breakfast, set at four o'clock in the afternoon, mould 
into rolls before going to bed ; only needs to be baked the next 
morning. These want to be baked in a quick oven, not over 15 
minutes. Mrs. Tapping. 

VELVET ROLLS. 

8 pints flour, 1 cup sweet milk, one-half yeast cake, (or one 
cup hop yeast dissolved in warm water,) 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons 
lard, orS'of butter. Work well and let rise; work and let rise 
again. Make in rolls ; bake when light. Mrs. Boor a em. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

Two tablespoons melted butter, 2 eggs, 1 pinch salt, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder, 1 cup sweet milk, flour to stiffen. Heat 
irons on top of stove, pour in mixture and bake in quick oven. 

Mrs. Rice. 

BREAKFAST PUFFS. 

One egg, 1 cup flour, 1 cup milk, salt. Pour into cups. Bake 
in quick oven. Miss Hurd. 

GERMAN PUFFS. 

Four eggs, 5 tablespoons flour, 1 tablespoon melted butter, 1 
pint milk, i teaspoon salt. Bake 20 minutes. These make a nice 
dessert with lemon sauce. M. E. Merrill. 

l_ 

4 (35) 



^ 



^ 



WHEAT CtEMS. 

One pint milk, 1 egg, melted lard size of an egg, flour 
enough to make a batter not too stiff, 3 te^ispoons baking pow- 
der, a little salt. Have the gem pans hot. Sarah. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

Two eggs, 1 pint milk and water, 2 cups graham flour, salt. 
Have gem pans hot. Mrs. Merritt. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

One quart wheat flour, 1 quart tepid water, 1 cake com- 
pressed yeast, 1 teacup molasses, 2 teaspoons salt. Add graham 
flour enough to make a stiff batter. Mix at night and will be 
ready for baking in the morning. Bake in rings or small tins. 

Mrs. D. D. Demarest. 

MUFFINS, No. 1. 

One cup sugar, 2 eggs, 1 pint milk, h teaspoon salt, 1 heaping 
tablespoon butter, 3 heaping teaspoons baking powder, flour to 
make a little stiffer than cake. Bake in small tins. 

Mrs. Demarest. 

MUFFINS, No. 2. 

One pint milk, 2 eggs, with enough flour to make a dough ; 
2 teaspoons baking powder, pinch of salt, a lump of butter (the 
size of an egg) melted. Heat the muffin rings before. putting in 
the batter. Bake quickly. Mrs. Booraem. 

MUFFINS, No. 3. 

2 eggs and 2 teaspoons sugar, beaten together with a spoon ; 
2 tablespoons butter, 2 cups milk, 1 quart flour, 3 teaspoons 
baking powder; salt. Beat light and bake in hot oven. Will 
make Ig dozen. Mrs. Freeman. 

MUFFINS, No. 4. 

Beat up 3 eggs, whites and yolks separately. Add 3 cups 
milk, take I quart sifted flour, two teaspoons Royal baking pow- 
der, 1 teaspoon salt. Mix all together until light. Put into 18 
muffin tins, and bake in very hot oven until light brown. This 
recipe is very good if made according to directions. 

Mrs. Hugh Boyd. 

HOMINY MUFFINS. 

1 quart flour, 1 cup hominy, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 2 
handfuls sugar, little salt, butter size of an egg, 2 eggs. Mix all 
except tqe eggs well together, rubbing hominy through the flour, 
adding eggs last, with enough milk to make a stiff batter. Bake 
in little tins from 15 to 20 minutes. C. M. Newell. 

DRIED RUSK, No. 1. 

One cent's worth of yeast, two-thirds pint milk, thickened 
with flour at night for a sponge. In the morning take about 
three-quarters of a pint of milk heated with three-quarters pound 
of butter and lard mixed. One-half teaspoon soda in sponge, 7 



egjcs, about a teaspoon of salt ; use enough sifted flour to make a 
soft dough. Don't knend inucli ; just mix them up. Set in a 
warm place to rise. Make into biscuits and bake. 

Mrs. Isaiah Rolfe. 

DRIED RUSK, No. 2. 

1 quart sweet milk, warm, one-half pound butter, 4 eggs, one- 
half teacup sugar, 1 teacup yeast or 2 cakes of National yeast, 1 
teaspoon salt. Set the sponge over night with the warm milk 
and yeast, making a pretty stiff batter. In the morning, if light, 
add the other ingredients and knead thoronghly into a soft 
dough. When light, roll out and cut in cakes. Let them rise 
again and bake in a quick oven. When cool split them open, 
arrange them in pans, with the crust side down, and dry in a cool 
oven. Mrs. N. B. Smock. 

SWEET RUSK. 

3 cups warm milk, 1 cup yeast, 1 cup sugar ; stir in flour 
enough to make a thick batter. When light add 1 cup butter, 1 
cup sugar, one-half teaspoon soda, a little nutmeg. Add flour 
enough to make it smooth. Let rise ; when light roll out and put 
in pans like biscuit. Mrs. Merritt. 



GRIDDLE CAKES, ETC. 



BUCKWHEAT CAKES, No. 1. 

2 cups buckwheat flour, 1 cup wheat flour, 2 tablespoons 
Royal baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon sugar. Sift 
all together; mix with sweet milk. M. O. M. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES, No. 2. 

1 pint buckwheat flour, 1 teaspoon meal, 1 tablespoon yeast, 
1 teaspoon salt. Make up with lukewarm water over night and 
beat till it bubbles. In the morning beat again, and just before 
baking, (if needed,) stir in a little soda, one-eighth teaspoon, dis- 
solved in milk or water, and 1 teaspoon molasses. After baking 
what is needed for breakfast, fill the pitcher up with cold water. 
"When setting for the next morning pour off the cold water and set 
as usual. L. H. 

INDIAN CAKES. 

One-half cup sugar, 1 q%^^ butter size of an egg; 1 cup milk, 
1 cup meal, \\ cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder ; salt. 

Mrs. Merritt. 
RICE CAKES. 

\.\ cups milk, 1 ^^'g, not quite a cup of boiled rice ; I heaping 
teaspoon baking powder. Flour to make the consistency of 
griddle cakes. Miss S. Q. Roe. 



(27) 



BUTTERMILK CAKES. 

1 pint buttermilk, 1 e2:g, one-half teaspoon soda in buttermilk, 
salt ; flour to inake it stiff enough to bake on griddle. 

Lizzie. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

2 egg;s, 1 pint milk, 1 teaspoon baking powder, salt; flour 
enough to make a smooth, thin batter. A little molasses to make 
brown. Mrs. P. Rust. 

SOUR MILK CAKES. 

1 pint sour milk and a little salt. Stir in flour until very 
stiff; do this at night ; for breakfast thin with sweet milk, add 
one-half teasoopn soda, a teaspoon molasses. Bake on the grid- 
dle. Mks. Rolfe. 

WAFFLES. 

2 eggs, 3 cups milk, 3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
1 tablespoon melted butter. C. M. Newell. 

SYRUP FOR CAKES. 

4 pounds A. sugar, 1 quart hot water, 1 teaspoon pulverized 
alum, (to keep from becoming candied). Boil 20 minutes. 

Mrs. J. Rolfe. 



1 paPDiNSg wi> cngT^RDg. I 



■'The proof of the pudding is in the eating." 



COTTAGE PUDDING, No. 1. 

1 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoon of butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 3 cups flour, one-half teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cream tar- 
tar, 1 teaspoon salt. Bake in a buttered mould ; turn out upon a 
dish ; eat with liquid sauce. 

(Marion Harland) Mrs. M. H. Hutton. 

COTTAGE PUDDING, No. 2. 

1 cup sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup milk, 1 egg, 2 cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt. 

Misses Hardenbergh. 

MOUNTAIN DEW PUDDING. 

6 milk crackers rolled, the yolk of 3 eggs, 1 quart milk, a lit- 
tle salt ; bake. When cold, pour over the top the whites of 3 
eggs, 1 teacup coffee sugar, 1 teaspoon lemon, brown slightly. 

Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

_ — _ 



a^> 



QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 



Mr 



1 pint bread crumbs, 1 quart milk, 1 cup sugar, the yolks of 
4 eggs, beaten ; the grated rind of a lemon, a piece of butter size 
of an egg. Bake until done, but not watery. Whip the whites 
of the eggs stitf, beat in a teacup of sugar in which has been 
strained the juice of the lemon, spread over the pudding a layer 
of jelly, pour the whites of the eggs over this ; replacein the oven; 
brown slightly. To be eaten cold with cream if preferred. Extra 
good ! ! ! Mrs. J. M. Rolfe. 

PUFF PUDDING. 

3 eggs, 9 tablespoons flour, 27 tablespoons milk, salt. Bake 
about twenty minutes in a pie plate, in a hot oven. 

Mrs. M. H. Hutton. 

SUET PUDDING. 

1 cup suet chopped fine, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup milk, 1 cup 
seeded raisins, 1 cup currants, 1 teaspoon soda, a little citron, flour 
enough to make it stiff as cake. If wanted very light a cup of 
bread crumbs grated fine, a little salt, spice, cloves, nutmeg. 

Mrs. J. W. BoGART. 

BOILED BATTER PUDDING. 

Into 1 quart milk stir a little salt, a teaspoon soda and 2 
beaten eggs, then thicken very stiff with flour, into which has 
been stirred 2 teaspoons of cream tartar; stir in the fruit well 
dredged with flour. Boil 3 hours ; use 2 quarts fruit. 

Mrs. J. M. Rolfe. 

BREAD PUDDING. 

Spread 3 slices baker's bread (stale) with butter ; add 2 beaten 
eggs, a pinch of salt, 1 quart milk, a little nutmeg and bake. 

Mrs J. H. Rolfe. 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup sweet milk, 
3 cups flour, h teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 1 teaspoon 
salt; bake in layers ; fill with berries; eat with cream. Do not 
sweeten the berries until served. Have the short cakes perfectly 
cold before spreading the berries. (This makes 2 cakes.) 

Mrs. Kinports. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING, No. 1. 

1 quart milk, lei it boil, add 3 tablespoons grated chocolate, 
when that is melted, put in 3 tablespoons of cornstarch wet in a 
little milk ; stir until smooth ; 1 cup sugar ; eat cold. Add a frost- 
ing if you like. Mrs Merritt. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING, No. 2. 

Dissolve 4 tablespoons cornstarch in a little cold water ; pour 
over this a quart of boiUng water and stir qiiicklu. It will thicken 
like starch. Take 2 or 3 eggs, stirring the yolks into the pudding 
and making a meringue for the top of the whites, sweeten to taste; 

■ (29) 



a little salt; a laro^e one-half cup of melted chocolate stirred in 
completes the pudding. Add vanilla, 1 teaspoon if desired. The 
meringue is made by beating the whites of , the eggs to a stiff 
froth and adding a small cup of powdered sugar. Beat well, set 
in oven and brown slightly on top. 

Jennie S. Van Antwerp. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING, No. 3. 

2 ounces Baker's chocolate, grated ; 1 quart milk, brought to 
a boil and poured over the grated chocolate. Let it cool and add 
the yolks of five eggs, well beaten, 5 tablespoons sugar, 1 tea- 
spoon extract of vanilla. Bake like custard and cover with 
meringue made of the beaten whites of the 5 eggs and 3 table- 
spoons powdered sugar. M. F. Booraem. 

PKUNE PUDDING. 

1 pound prunes, stewed, sweetened to taste, pits removed and 
prunes cut in small pieces. When cold add beaten whites of 
4 eggs and bake in a pudding dish for 15 or 20 minutes. Serve 
cold, with a custard made of the yolks of 4 eggs, 1 pint milk, one- 
half cup sugar. Flavor to taste with vanilla. 

C. M. Newell. 

SNOW PUDDING, No. 1. 

Divide yolks from whites of 5 eggs; beat whites to a stiff 
froth. When 1 quart milk boils add sugar to taste, I stick cinna- 
mon. Sweeten whites with 1 tablespoon pulverized sugar and 
drop them into the boiling milk ; leave them in long enough to 
scald, while you whisk them into small flakes. Take a skimmer 
and take out the flakes and let them cool on a dish. Add yolks 
to milk with a teaspoon of corn starch dissolved in water. 
When cool add the flakes and serve. Mrs. D, Clark. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

1 pound raisins, 1 pound currants, 1 pound suet, 1 pound 
sugar, one-half pound citron, 1 pound flour, 5 eggs, one-half pint 
milk, 1 nutmeg, a little salt. Boil about 5 hours. 

Mrs. Geo. Berdine. 

BAKED INDIAN PUDDING, No. 1. 

Cut up a quarter pound of butter into a pint of molasses and 
warm them together till the butter is melted. Boil a quart of 
milk, and while scalding hot pour it slowly over a pint of sifted 
Indian meal, and put in the molasses and butter. Cover it and 
let it steep for an hour, then take off the cover, set it to cool. 
When cool beat in 6 eggs and stir in gradually ; add a table- 
spoon of mixed cinnamon and nutmeg, grated peel of lemon. 
Stir the whole very hard and put into a buttered dish and bake 
two hours. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe.. 

INDIAN PUDDING, No. 2. 

3 large tablespoons of Indian meal, 1 quart ijiilk, 3 eggs, 3 
tablespoons sugar, a little salt ; stir 2 or 3 times while baking. 
To be eaten with a hard sauce. Mrs. J. H. Tapping. 

»" (30) 



^ 



BOILED CHEERY PUDDING. 

Put a layer of cherries in a pot, tlien a layer of crust made of 
a pint of millv, 1 e»g, one-half teaspoon soda, a little salt and 
enough flour to make it as stiff as cake dough ; pour over all 
enough molasses to cover it and a cup of water, cover tightly and 
boil one-half hour. S. J. Rust. 

PLAIN RICE PUDDING. 

Scant one-half cup rice, 1 quart milk, one-half cup sugar, butter 
size of a walnut, a little salt. Grate nutmeg over the top; bake 
slowly until it thickens like cream. S. J. R. 

ORANGE PUDDING, No. 1. 

4 oranges picked to pieces and put in a deep dish with two 
cups sugar. Put 1 quart milk, 2 dessert spoons of cornstarch, 
sweetened and flavored, on to boil ; when done take off" and cool 
and pour over the oranges. Beat the whites to a stift' froth, 
spread over the pudding and bake to a light brown. 

Mrs. Atkinson. 

ORANGE PUDDING, No. 2. 

Cut 6 fine oranges, put in one-half cup sugar ; let them stand 
a little while, then make a soft custard of the yolks of 3 eggs, one 
half cup of sugar, 1 pint milk, 2 even tablespoons of cornstarch. 
When cold pour over the oranges, frost whites and pour over the 
top. Mrs. Merritt. 

SNOW CUSTARD. 

One-half package Cox's gelatine, 3 eggs, 1 pint of milk, 3 
cups sugar, juice (tf 1 lemon ; soak the gelatine one hour in a tea- 
cup of cold water ; to this, at the end of this time, add 1 pint of 
boiling water. Stir until the gelatine is thoroughly dissolved ; 
add two-thirds of the sugar and the lemon juice. Beat the whites 
of the eggs to a stiff froth, and when the gelatine is quite cold, 
whip it into the whites a spoonful at a time for an hour. Whip 
steadily and evenly and when all is stiff, pour into a mould pre- 
viously wet with cold water, and set in a cold place. In four or 
five hours turn into a glass dish, make a custard of the milk, eggs 
and remainder of the sugar ; flavor with vanilla, and when the 
meringue is turned out of the mould pour this around the base. 

Mrs. J. S. VooRHEES. 

SNOW PUDDING, No. 2. 

One-quarter box of gelatine, one-quarter pint cold water. Let it 
stand fifteen minutes ; add one-quarter pint of boiling water, 1 
cup sugar, I cup wine or lemon juice to flavor. Put this on the 
fire till all is dissolved and mixed; strain it ; beat up 3 eggs, the 
whites, with 1 cup sugar and vanilla. When the jelly is cooled, 
add this and mix well ; put in a glass dish on the ice to cool. The 
jelly will thicken to the bottom and the froth rise to the top. 
Make a custard of the yolks of the eggs, with milk, sugar and 
vanilla ; to be eaten with the pudding. Atkinson. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING, No. 1. 

5 dessert spoons of Pearl tapioca ; soak over night in a pint of 
cold water. Scald 1 quart of milk, then add the tapioca and the 
yolks of 4 eggs ; when cool, add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth. 
Sweeten and flavor to taste. Mrs. Merritt. 

— ^^ • -;; 



TAPIOCA PUDDING, No. 2. 

1 small cup tapioca, 4 cups milk, 2 cups water, 1 cup sugar, 4 
eggs, one-quarter teaspoon salt, one-quarter teaspoon soda, vanilla. 
Soak the lapioca in the water over night, scald the milk, with 
the salt and soda in. Put in the soaked tapioca and stir often, 
until it is dissolved ; add the yolks and sugar, beaten very light, 
and after it is taken from the fire, add the whites, beaten. Al- 
ways cook this in a steamer. Mrs. Geo. Berdine. 

APPLE AND TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak large cup tapioca over night in cold water. Next 
morning peel and core 4 large tart apples, cut in round slices. Put 
layer of tapioca in bottom of baking dish, then a layer of apples 
and a little salt, alternating until the dish is full. Almost cover 
with milk ; cover while baking. Eat with cream and sugar or 
sauce. Mrs. H. Strong. 

BOILED PUDDING, No. 1. 

1 cup bread crumbs, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup raisins and cur- 
rants; 2 eggs, spice to taste; butter size of an egg. Boil 2 hours. 

A. S. Newell. 

BOILED PUDDING, No. 2. 

1 cup sour cream, one-half cup molasses, 1 cup flour, one-half 
cup melted butter, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon salt. Mix butter 
and molasses to a cream; stir in the cream anel flour. Boil Ij 
hours ; sweet sauce. Misses Hardenbergh. 

FRESH FRUIT PUDDING, No. 1. 

1 pint sweet milk, 1 pint molasses, 1 teacup suet, 1 teaspoon 
cloves or any other spice preferred, 2 heaping teaspoons Royal 
Baking Powder, 1 pint huckleberries or any other small fruit, 
raisins if preferred ; a little salt ; stir in flour to make a very stiff 
batter. Grease the mould thoroughly, and pour in the batter, 
leaving room for the pudding to swell. Boil three hours. 

SAUCE FOR THE PUDDING. 

1 large tablespoon butter, 1 large tablespoon flour ; rub well 
together, pour on boiling water until it thickens, then add 1 tea- 
cup sugar and juice and grated rind of one lemon. 

Mrs. N. B. Smock. 

FRESH FRUIT PUDDING, No. 2. 

1 pint fruit, IJ pint sweet milk, 1 egg, salt and 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, sifted into flour. Use enough flour to make a 
stitf batter ; boil in a bag or pudding boiler; sweetened cream for 
sauce. Merritt. 

STEAMED GRAHAM PUDDING. 

2 cup" graham flour, 1 cup molasses, I cup sweet milk, 1 cup 
chopped raisins, salt ; steam 3 hours. Serve with egg sauce. 

Mrs. D. M. 



(33) 



% 



HUCKLEBEKEY PUDDING, No. 1. 

1 cup molasses, 2\ cui)s floiir, 1 quart berries, 1 teaspoon soda, 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, I teaspoon allspice, I teaspoon nutmefj:, a 
little salt. Dissolve soda in a little water and mix in molasses; 
mix berries plentifully with part of flour before stirrinji: with other 
ingredients. Bake about 1 hour. S. Stoddard. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. No. 2. 

1 quart huckleberries, 1 cup molasses; mix in thoroughly 2 
cups of flour, 1 teaspoon baking soda dissolved in boiling water; 
1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 of cloves, a little salt. Bake in a hot oven 
about an hour. Eat with sauce. M. F. Booraem. 

SAGO PUDDING. 

1 teacup sago, 1 quart boiling water poured over it ; stand on 
back part of stove until it thickens, (not boil) then add 1 cup sugar 
and 1 can or less of fruit. Mrs. Freeman. 

BOILED APPLE PUDDING. 

1 quart flour, 2 teaspoons yeast powder, a little salt, lump of 
butt er size of an egg ; milk enough to roll out. A plate in the 
bottom of a porcelain pot; boil 1 hour. If water is to be added it 
must be boiling. C. Woodbridge. 

APPLE MERINGUE PUDDING. 

1 pint stewed apples, 3 eggs, one-half cup sugar, 1 teaspoon of 
butter, 1 teaspoon nutmeg and cinnamon mixer! ; sweeten and 
spice, and while the apples are hot stir in the l>utter, and a little 
at a time the yolks of the eggs. Put in buttered dish and bake 10 
minutes; cover with irieringue. (Marion Harland). 

Mrs. Hutton. 

LEMON MERINGUE PUDDING. 

1 quart milk, 2 cups bread crumbs, 3 eggs, one-half cup but- 
ter, 1 cup sugar, 1 large lemon, juice, and half the rind grated. 
Soak the bread in the milk, add the beaten yolks with the butter 
and sugar rubbed to a cream ; also the lemon. Bake in a buttered 
dish until firm and slightly brown ; cover with a meringue of the 
whites whipped to a froth with 3 tablespoons of powdered sugar 
and a little lemon juice. Brown very slightly ; eat cold. 

(Marion Harland), Mrs. Hutton. 

"BROWN BETTY." 

1 cup bread crumbs, 2 cups chopped apples, one-half cup 
sugar, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 2 tablespoons butter. Butter a deep 
dish and put a layer of chopped apples at the bottom ; sprinkle 
with sugar a few bits of butter and cinnamon ; cover with bread 
crumbs, then more apples. Have a layer of crumbs at the top ; 
cover closely and steam three-quarters of an hour in a moderate 
oven, then brown quickly. (Marion Harland). 

Mrs. Hutton. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

4 eggs, 1 quart milk, 1 cup sugar, a little salt, one-half box of 
Dunham's cocoanut, a little vanilla. Bake like a custard. 

M. J. ROLFE 

S" 5 (83) 



I 

3t 



CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING. 

1] pounds raisins, (the best,) one-half pound dried curranis, 
one-half pound eandied citron, or mixed with candied lemon, 
three-quarter pound bread crumbs, three-quarter pound suet, 
(2 or o days old) ; 8 ej^^s, one-half pound brown sugar, one-quarter 
pound flour, wineglass of brandy. Stone and cut the raisins in 
lialves ; wash, dry and pick the currants. Mince the suet very 
fine; should it stick to the chopper use a sprink.e of flour from 
the above quantity ; cut the citron in small thin pieces, use the 
one-quarter pound of flour for sprinkling the raisins, citron, cur- 
rants ani suet. When all these dry ingredients are in, mix well 
together; moisten with the yolks of eggs ; brandy and whites of 
eggs, put in the last thing. After thorough mixing, press the 
pudding in a buttered icould ; tie it down securely ; plunge it in 
boiling water. Let it boil steadily, well covered with water, 6 
hours. It may be made and boiled some days before, then the 
day it is to be eaten plunge it again in boiling water and boil it at 
least 2 hours. Serve with sauce. Mrs. W. R. Hil,l. 

SAUCES FOR PUDDING. 
SOFT SAUCE, NO. 1. 

1 good sized cooking spoonful of butter, 1 cup of brown or 
granulated sugar to be worked together to a cream ; pour in one- 
half teacup of boiling water, put on fire and stir all the time. 
One teaspoon of cornstarch dissolved in cold water put in, mix 
and give a boil and beat in an egg. Nutmeg to taste. 

Mrs. Robinson. 

PUDDING SAUCE, No. 2. 

2 cups boiling water, pinch of salt, butter size of a hickory 
nut ; 4 teaspoons flour, mixed in cold water. Stir in the boiling 
water, (while boiling) put in the other ingredients and boil like 
very soft custard. Put it aside until you beat 2 eggs light, 2 small 
cups sugar ; beat into a cream ; flavor to taste. Next put half of 
the hot mixture into a bowl, then pour one-half the beaten eggs 
into it, stirring well until all foams up ; send to table ; put the 
rest aside until needed for second serving. 

K. L. Hardenbergh. 

PUDDING SAUCE, No. 3. 

1 cup powdered sugar and one-half cup of butter beaten to a 
cream ; add the yolk and white of 1 egg beaten separately. Melt 
over a tea kettle'and flavor with one-half wine glass of wine. 

Mrs. Demabest. 

EGG SAUCE, No. 4. 

Beat the yolks of 2 eggs with a small cup sugar ; add 1 cup of 
hot milk ; set the bowl in the top of a tea kettle and stir it often. 
Flavor to taste and add the whites beaten to a stiff froth ; stir into 
the sauce just as you take it to the table. Mrs. Merritt. 

WINE SAUCE, No. 5. 

One-half pint sherry wine, lump of butter size of egg ; sugar 
to taste, dissolved in wine. Wine glass brandy, one-half nutmeg. 
Serve hot. Mrs. Williamson. 

l_ - 

« (34) 



cox GELATINE. 

One-half package gelatine, 1 pint cold water ; soak three-quar- 
ters of an hour ; juice and rind of 2 lemons, 2 cups sugar, 1 (scant) 
pint boiling water. Stir thoroughly ; cool in moulds, 

Mrs. Merritt. 
CHARLOTTE EUSSE. 

1 pint cream whipped light, scant one-half box of Cox's gela- 
tine dissolved in hot milk ; whites of ;3 eggs beaten to a stiff froth, 
one-half cup powdered sugar. Flavor with 2 teaspoons vanilla, 
mix the cream, eggs and sugar ; flavor, and strain in the gelatine 
and milk last. The gelatine should be quite cold before it is 
added ; line a mould with slices of sponge cake, or lady fingers, 
and fill with the mixture. Set upon ice to cool. 

Mrs. J. S. Clark. 
FRUIT CHARLOTTE. 

One-third cup Cooper's gelatine soaked in one-third cup cold 
water ; when quite thin and soft add boiling water enough to fill 
the cup; 4 eggs, separate whites and yolks ; beat whites to a very 
stiff froth. 1 pint crushed fruit, 1 cup sugar, mix thoroughly ; 
pour gelatine over the fruit arid then into a bowl, which is to be 
set in a pan of cold water and stir until the mixture begins to 
thicken, then add the whites of the eggs; stir thoroughly and put 
all in a dish lined with lady fingers, sponge cake or other ma- 
terial. 

SAUCE FOR FRUIT CHARLOTTE. 

Yolks of 4 eggs, 1 pint milk, sugar, salt and flavor ; cook until 
it begins to boil. Miss Florance. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC-MANGE. 

Boil 1 quart milk, put into it one-half cup sugar, 1 cup grated 
chocolate and one-half box gelatine ; (gelatine to be dissolved in 
a little water) ; when a little cool stir in a teaspoon vanilla. To be 
eaten with milk poured over. M. J. Rolfe. 

SULLABUB. 

1 quart cream, 4 tablespoons sugar, 6 tablespoons sherry wine. 
Have cream ice cold ; beat to a stifif froth, add sugar and beat ; add 
wine and beat thoroughly. This is very nice eaten with wine 
jelly. S. Stoddard. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

One-half box of gelatine, 1 quart milk, 3 eggs, 1 cup sugar ; 
soak the gelatine in the milk ; beat the yolks very light with the 
sugar, add to the liquid after it has scalded and let come to a boil ; 
strain through a jelly bag. Add the whites well beaten, put into 
moulds to cool. Eat with cream. Mrs. Kinports. 

RUSSIAN CREAM. 

Dissolve one-half box of gelatine in 1 pint milk, add 1 pint 
boiling water, 1 cup sugar ; put it on the fire in a pot of boiling 
water, when very hot, stir in the yolks of 4 eggs well beaten. 
When cooked enough take from the fire and stir in the whites of 
4 eggs beaten to a froth ; flavor to taste ; put in a mould to cool. 
(This must be made the day before it is used.) 

Mrs. Ten Eyck. 



^ 



ORANGE CESSER r. 

One-half box Cooper's gelatine dissolved in 1 pint cold water; 
add 2 cups sugar, juice and pulp of 1 lemon, and 1 pint of boiling 
water. Slice 8 oranges and pour over theui the mixturee; keep 
in a cool place until ready to serve. Miss Howell. 

APPLE DAINTY. 

Pare and quarter enough apples to nearly fill your pudding 
dish ; halve them. Make a meringue with whiles of eggs beaten 
very stiff, sweeten with powdered sugar, and spread it over the 
apples. Return to the oven until the meringue is "set;" serve 
with cream. Very delicious. Mrs. Smock. 

WINE JELLY. 

1 box Nelson's gelatine soaked in 1 pint of cold water for 2 
hours ; 1 quart boiling water, juice and rind of 2 lemons, 2 pounds 
sugar, 1 pint sherry wine, 1 glass of brandy. 

Mrs. G. Berdine. 
COFFEE JELLY. 

One-half box gelatine dissolved in one-half pint of cold coffee 
or water; add I2 pints of hot, strong coffee, 1 cup sugar. Strain 
and set away to cool. Eat with beaten cream and sugar. 

Mrs. W. D. Freeman. 

CELESTIAL HASH. 

Dissolve two-thirds box of gelatine in 1 pint cold water ; add 
another pint of boiling water and 1 cup of sherry wine; one-half 
pound of dates, pits removed and chopped; one-half pound of 
figs, cho|)ped ; one-half pound of white grapes, 1 cup English wal- 
nuts, 2 bananas, cut in 3 slices; 2 oranges, divided in sections; 
sugar to taste. Grace H. See. 




" No soil on earth is so dear to our eyes, 
As the soil we first stirred in terrestrial pies." 



PIE CRUST. 



1 cup shortening to 3 large cups of flour ; 1 cup of water 
(small cup) little salt, one-half teaspoon. Handle very little ; 
enough for 2 pies. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

LEMON PIE, No. 1. 

1 lemon, 2 eggs, 5 tablespoons water, I cup sugar, 3 teaspoons 
flour, 1 tablespoon butter ; mix the flour with the water to a paste. 
Mix all together and bake in a quick oven; this makes 1 pie. 
Take the whites and make a meringue. Mrs. Ten Eyck. 

'~ ~~~ ~~ ~~ (3B) ' 



LEMON PIE, N(\ 2. 

To 2 cups boiling water add 2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved 
in a little cold water and boil until clear ; remove from the fire 
and add 1 tablespoon of butter. When nearly cool, add 2 cups of 
sugar, the juice of 3 lemons, the grated rind of 1, and the yolks of 

3 eggs ; beat in a deep pie plate, lined with a delicate crust, about 
20 minutes. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, spread 
over the pies ; sprinkle with powdered sugar and brown in the 
f>ven. M. E. Merrill. 

LEMON PIE, No. 3. 

2 lemons chopped, 2 cups molasses, or 1 cup molasses and 1 
cup sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, 1 cup water, a little butter, molas- 
ses, water and flour, 2 eggs. Scald together ; bake between crusts. 
2 pies. J. H. RoLPE. 

MINCE PIE, No. 1. 

4 pounds of meat, 1 peck apples, 2J pounds raisins, 2 pounds 
currants, 1 pound citron, a little orange peel, IJ pounds fat pork, 
handful of salt, 3 tablespoons cinnamon, 8 tablespoons cloves, 3 
tablespoons allspice; brandy and cider to taste; bake between 
crusts. Mrs. Tapping. 

MINCE PIE, No. 2. 

1 fresh tongue, 1 pound beef suet chopped fine, 1 pound sugar, 
8 pounds raisins, 1| pounds currants, U pounds citron, cut fine; 

4 or 5 apples chopped, 2 nutmegs grated, mace, cloves, (ground) 
1 pint sherry, one-half tumbler brandy, juice and rind of 3 lemons. 
Will make about 15 pies ; keep in stone jar. 

Mrs. Williamson. 
PUMPKIN PIE. 

1 quart stewed pumpkin, 1 pint milk, 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon 
flour, one- half tablespoon ginger, one-half tablespoon cinnamon, 2 
tablespoons molasses, a little salt. C. Woodbridge. 

CHOCOLATE PIE. 

1 pint milk, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 small 
cup grated chocolate ; sweeten to taste, boil until thick. Turn on 
crust and add a frosting of the whites of the eggs when cold ; set 
in the oven and brown it a little. Bake the crust first, 

Mrs. D. H. Merritt. 

CUSTAED PIE. 

4 eggs, 1 quart milk, a little salt and one-half cup of sugar. 
Bake with under crust only. Mrs. Rolfe. 

APPLE PIE. 

Spread pie crust on a pie dish and cover it heaped up with 
apples, pared, cored and sliced thin ; cover this with crust and 
bake. After taking the pie from the oven, remove the upper crust 
by slipping a knife deftly around the edge between the two crusts. 
Season with very light brown sugar, cinnamon or nutmeg, and a 
little butter ; replace the crusts, pressing it down lightly. 

Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

• (37) 



SWEET POTATO PIE. 

1 pint and 1 teacup boiled sweet potatoes put through colan- 
der ; 6 eggs, 2 teacups sugar, H pints milk, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 
little salt, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 tablespoons butter; 3 large pies. 
Bake with one crust. Mrs. J. H. Rolfe. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

2 tablespoons sugar, 2 cups grated cocoanut, 2 tablespoons 
melted butter, 1 pint milk ; put all together, let it come to a boil, 
then add 3 eggs. Bake with one crust. Mrs. Rolfe. 

CREAM PIE. 

1 quart boiling water, 4 eggs, 2 scant cups sugar, 4 tablespoons 
flour, 1 teaspoon salt; crust baked separately and filling put in. 

Atkinson. 
TOMATO PIE. 

Alternate layers of sliced green tomatoes and sliced lemon; 
season with brown sugar or molasses. Sprinkle a little flour over 
the top and bake between two crusts. Mrs. Rolfe. 




"Our praises are our wages." 



In baking cake flour the tins after greasing and the cake will 
not stick in taking out. 

TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

2 cups of Sifted Flour 1 pound. 

1 pint " '• " 1 

1 " of Closely Packed Butter 1 " 

2 tablespoons of Liquids 1 ounce. 

1 wineglass 2 

2 wineglasses 1 giU- 

2cupfuls 1 pint. 

Butter size of an egg (about) 2 ounces. 

FRUIT CAKE, No. 1. 

1 pound butter, 1 pound sugar, (dark brown) 10 eggs, 1 pound 
flour, 3 pounds raisins, 2 pounds currants, 1 pound citron, 1 glass 
brandy, three-quarters cup molasses, li teaspoons cinnamon, 1| 
teaspoons cloves, 1 teaspoon mace, I nutmeg, 1 glass wine. Beat 
the butter and sugar to a light cream, then add the eggs, molasses, 
flour and spices ; then the fruit, well dredged with flour, and last 
the brandy. Bake in slow oven. Mrs. Isaiah Rolfe, Sr. 



(38) 



^s 



FRENCH FRUIT CAKE. 

Mix together one-half pint butter and three-quarters pint 
sugar; add 4 well beaten eggs, 1 wine glass of sweet cream, 1 wine 
glass of sweet wine, 1 teaspoon soda, dissolved in a little boiling 
water; 1 pound each of raisins and currants, one-quarter pound 
citron, 1 pint flour ; spice to suit the taste. Bake in a moderately 
hot oven. M. E. Merrill. 

FANCY POUND CAKE. 

1 pound flour, 1 pound sugar, three-quarters pound butter, 6 
eggs, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 nutmeg, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 cream tartar. 

Mrs. Ten Eyck. 
LADY CAKE. 

1 cup butter, one-quarter pound cornstarch, one-quarter pound 
flour, whites 7 eggs, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 1 teaspoon soda. 

Mrs. Rolfe. 

ORANGE CAKE, No. 1. 
Make plain cup cake for the layers. 

FILLING. 

1 egg, 1 cup sugar, 1 orange, juice and grated rind 1 lemon, 
iuice only ; 1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon flour or cornstarch, 
wet with cold water ; cook until it thickens. 

Mrs. Chas. Nafey. 

ORANGE CAKE, No. 2. 

2 cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 6 eggs, 6 tablespoons melted butter, 
8 of milk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 cream tartar, in flour ; level spoon of 
soda and cream tartar. Mix eggs and sugar together, then but- 
ter, milk, flour. 

FILLING. 

Grated rind of 1 orange, white of 1 eo;o;, 6 tablespoons sugar ; 
grate 3 oranges. Ice on top with lemon flavor. (Splendid.) 

Mrs. Tapping. 

FEATHER CAKE. 

1* cups sugar, one-half butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2k cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar. Miss See. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Whites of 11 fresh eggs, IJ cups granulated sugar, sifted four 
times ; 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon creara tartar, 1 teaspoon vanilla ; 
beat the eggs very stiff, add sugar and then flour ; sift flour four 
times before measuring, then add cream tartar and sift again into 
the cake; add vanilla last. Do not stop beating until in the 
and ; bake 40 minutes in a moderate oven. Mrs. Voorhees. 

Do not grease the pan, and when the cake is done, turn on a 
plate and leave until it sweats enough to drop out. 

Mrs. Rolfe. 

SPONGE CAKE, No. 1. 

i eggs, 2 cups white sugar, 2 cups sifted flour, 2 teaspoons of 
baking powder, 1 small teacup almost boiling water ; bake in long 
narrow tins. Beat the eggs very light, yolks and whites to- 
gether ; then beat in the sugar, then 1 cup flour, then the other, 

^ 

^ (.39) 



%^ 



with which the balding powder has been mixed ; then the water, 
a little at a time. Do not put in any more flour or it will be 
spoiled. Bake in a moderately hot oven ; turn it upside down 
and ice, if you like. Lemon is a good flavor for it. 

Mrs. R. White. 
SPONGE CAKE, No. 2. 

1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 tablespoon vinegar, yolks of 
4 eggs ; mix these well and add 1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking 
powder, whites of 4 eggs. C. M. Newell. 

SPONGE CAKE, No. 3. 

4 eggs, IJ cups powdered sugar, 1 cup flour, one-half cup of 
water, one-half teaspoon soda, another cup of flour, juice of 1 
lemon, salt. Mrs. Hutton. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, three-quarters cup butter, (scant,) 4 eggs, (save 
2 whites for icing,) 1 cup milk, 2J cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder. 

ICING. 

1 full cup pulverized sugar, 4 tablespoons cold water. Boil 
until it ropes or hairs ; then beat the whites in off from the stove. 
Cool a little and spread in the cake; then spread the coooanut 
over. Mrs. Kolfe, 

ENGLISH WALNUT CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, 1^ cups sugar, one-half cup milk, If cups 
flour, 2 eggs, (use yolks only,) one-half teaspoon soda, dissolved 
in the milk, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, sifted in the flour. Filling 
like cocoanut cake with English walnut laid on. Mrs. Rust. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, 2 cups 
flour, H teaspoon baking powder, 3 eggs, I large cup walnut 
meats. Mrs. Hutton. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
BOILED CHOCOLATE. 

Grate one-half cake chocolate ; mix with one-half cup of 
milk, the yolk of 1 egg, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Boil a 
few minutes until the chocolate and sugar are dissolved. Let 
this cool while making the cake, 

CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, one-half cup milk, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs, 2 tea- 
spoons baking powder. Add to this the boiled chocolate. Bake 
in layers. Put between the layers the following icing. 

BOILED VANILLA ICING. 

2 cups granulated sugar, 2 whites of eggs, 6 tablespoons 
water. Boil sugar and water until it forms a thick syrup when 
dropped in saucer. Then pour into eggs, previously beaten, and 
beat until thick. Flavor with vanilla. Miss Florance. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE, No. 2. 

Use cup cake for the layers. In fllling boil together three- 
quarter cup chocolate, one-half cup milk, one-half cup sugar, 1 
teaspoon vanilla. Mrs. Rolfe. 

Cr^ (40) 



COFFEE CAKB:. 

1 cup siio-ar, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup cold coffee, 1 cup butter, 3 
cups flour, 1 egg, 1 pound raisins, 1 pound currants, one-half 
pound citron, ] teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, or 3 level 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon cloves, 2 cinnamon. This 
makes an excellent substitute for rich fruit cake. 

Mrs. L. E. Riddle. 
FKENGH LOAF CAKE. 

1 cup shortening, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups milk, 4 cups flour, 2 
eggs, 1 cup raisins, one-half nutmeg. 'Mix butter and suyar 
thoroughly, add eggs, stir well. Add 2 cups flour and 1 jnilk, 
mix then the other 2 cups flour in which the baking powder is 
mixed, and the milk. Mrs. Freeman. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

3 cups prepared flour, 3 eggs, white of 1 for icing, 2 cups 
sugar, 1 of water, one-half cup butter, one-half teaspoon bitter 
almonds. Mrs. Tapping. 

FIG CAKE. 

Use cup cake for the layers. Filling— one-half pound figs, 1 
cup boiling water. Scald together on the stove, then take figs 
and chop them. Return them to the water and stir in 1 cup 
sugar and let boil until it thickens. Mrs. Rust. 

CREAM CAKE, No. 1. 

3 eggs, 1 cup sugar, li cups flour, 4 tablespoons water, 2 leve^ 
teaspoons baking powder. Filling— 1 pint milk, scalded, 2 eggs. 
beaten, 2 tablespoons cornstarch wet with milk, besides the pint, 
1 cup sugar, little salt ; flavor. Mrs. Strong. 

CREAM CAKE, No. 2. 

2 eggs, 1 even cuj) sugar, 2 tablespoons milk, 1 heaping cup 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking poi? der, a little salt ; flavor. Bake in 3 
small tins. Filling between layers: A large cup of sweet cream, 
whipped sugar and flavor to taste. Howell. 

CINNAMON CAKE. 

1 egg, one-half cup pulverized sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, ] 
cup milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 even cups flour. Bake 
about 20 minutes in a square tin, and just before baking sprinkle 
the top with a little granulated sugar and ground cinnamon, 
mixed ; this is delicious with coffee. Miss Roe. 

SPICE CAKE. 

1 cup dark brown sugar or molasses, one-half cup shortening, 
1 egg and yolk of another, 1 cup inilk, about 5 cups flour, 1 cup 
raisins, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 1 teaspoon soda ; spice to taste, 
with cinnamon, cloves, lemon and nutmeg. Atkinson. 

CORK CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, one-half cup butter, 2 eggs, 1 cup milk, 3 cups 
flour, one-half teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, lemon. 

Mrs. Hutton. 

' _^ 

' 6 (41) * 



GOLD AND SILVER CAKE. 

(roW-One-half cui) butter, 2 cups su^ar, yolks of 6 eggjs, 3 
cups flour, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, oue-half teaspoon soda, two- 
thirds cuj) milk. 

Silver— Same as above except use whites of ejj^g-s. Reserve 1 
white for frosting. Mrs. Merritt. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

1 pound sugar, one-half pound butter, 6 eggs, the white of 1 
taken out for icing; one-half pint milk or water, 1 pound flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, flavoring. 

ICING. 
10 teaspoons powdered sugar to the white of 1 egg ; a little 
flavoring. Ella Pettit. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE, No. 2. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, -1 eggs, 2 teaspoons of 
cream tartar, 1 teaspoon soda, two-thirds cup milk or water. 

Mrs. Merritt. 
MARBLE CAKE, No. 1. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 3 eggs, 1 cup sweet 
milk, one-half teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cream tartar; when the 
cake is mixed take out about a teacui)ful of the batter, and stir 
into this a great spoonful of grated chocolate wet with a scant 
tablespoon of milk. (Marion Harland). 

Mrs. Hutton. 

MARBLE CAKE, No. 2, 

WHITE— 1 cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sour 
cream, 2 cups flour, one-half teaspoon soda, 1 of cream tartar, the 
whites of 4 eggs. 

BLACK— 1 cup brown sugar, one-half cup butter, yolks of 4 
eggs, one-half cup molasses, one-half cup sour cream, 2 cups flour, 
1 teaspoon cream tartar, one-half teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cloves 
and cinnamon. Mrs. Rolfe. 

BANANA CAKE. 

1 small cup butter, U cups sugar, 3 eggs, I cup milk. 3 cups of 
flour, 3 teaspoons Royal baking powder. 

ICING. 

Take the whites of 2 eggs and 1 tablespoon water, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla, beat all together with fine powdered sugar until it is 
smooth ; for the top of cake make thicker with sugar ; spread this 
over layers and place bananas sliced fine and evenly over this 
icing. Do this until all are used : ice the top, but do not put any 
bananas on as they will slide off". Miss Van Antwerp. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

IJ cups sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup milk, 2 cups 
flour,'2 teaspoons baking powder, divide in three parts ; bake 2 
layers, then add to what is left; one-half cup molasses, (very 
scant) 1 cup flour, 1 heaping cup raisins, one-half cup citron, one- 
half cup wine or brandy, cinnamon and cloves to taste ; 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder ; bake in jelly cake tins and put jelly be- 
tween the layers. Put the dark layer in the middle. 

Mrs. J. W. BoGART. 

(42) 



CKOTON POUND CAKE. 

Onp-half pound flour, one-half pound sus'ar, one quarter 
pound butter, one-half tea oup milk, 3eojgs, 1 teaspoon l)akiii<>- pow- 
der. Mrs. Bogart. 

JESSIE CAKE. 

Ij cups sujifar, one-half cup butter, 3 eggs, whites and yolks 
beaten separately ; one-half cup milk, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 
one-half teaspoon soda, 2 cups flour. Mrs. Holfe. 

DEEP RIVEK CAKE. 

6 cups flour, 3 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 cups milk, 2 eggs, 1 
teaspoon soda, 2 cream tartar, I cup raisins, 1 nutmeg. 

Mrs. Rolfe. 
CLOVE CAKE. 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup raisins, 1 cup shortening, 1 
cup milk, 1 cup black currants, 2 eggs. 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 

1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cassia, 1 teaspoon cloves, nutmeg. 

Mrs. Rolfe. 
JERSEY CAKE. 

5 eggs, weight of 5 eggs In sugar, 4 In flour, 3 In butter ; beat 
the butter and sugar light, add the yolks of eggs, then the flour 
and whites alternately. Flavor to taste. Mrs. Duncan. 

DELICATE LAYER CAKE. 

One-half cup butter, 2 small cups sugar, yolks of 3 eggs, 
beaten well together, small half-teaspoon soda dissolved in a 
tablespoon of hot water, added to 1 cup of milk, 2} cups of sifted 
flour, small teaspoon cream tartar sifted through the flour. Beat 
the whites of the 3 eggs very stiff and add last. This quantity 
makes three layers. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

2 ounces of chocolate, 1 cup powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons 
milk or water, one-half teaspoon vanilla. Let cook just a minute 
until thoroughly dissolved. Miss Woodbfidge. 

NEW YEAR'S CAKE. 

If pounds sugar, 1 pound butter, 1 pint milk, one-half cup 
caraway seed, one-half ounce powdered hartshorn dissolved in hot 
water , mix very stiff, beat a long time with rolling pin. This 
makes a large quantity and will keep. Miss See. 

DELICIOUS CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar. 4 eggs, unbeaten ; one-half cup milk, 
2^ cups flour, 2 teaspoons Royal baking powder sifted with a small 
pinch of salt; beat butter and sugar to a cream, add the unbeaten 
eggs; mix well; add other ingredients. After mixing all well, 
add another one-half cup milk, one-half cup cornstarch, sifted; 
flavor with nutmeg and grated peel of 1 lemon. To vary, almond 
essence, or citron and currants may be substituted in place of lemon 
and nutmeg. Make 2 cakes. A. H. Fisher. 

SNOW FLAKE CAKE. 

Ih cups sugar, one-half cup butter 2, eggs, one-half cup milk, 

2 cups flour, one-half teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cream tartar. 
Bake in jelly cake tins. Mrs. Hutton. 

^ (43) ~ ~ 



DELICATE CAKE. 

4 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 cups sweet milk, whites of 6 eggs, 
2 teaspoons soda, 4 teaspoons cream tartar, (! cups flour; add the 
whites of the eggs at the very last. This will make 2 large cakes. 

Mrs. Demarest. 
NUT CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 3 cups flour, I cup cold water, 4 
eggs, 2 cups hickory nuts, chopped, added last. 

Mrs. Kinports. 
COMPOSITION CAKE. 

U cups butter, 3 cups sug<Ar, 5 eggs, 1 cup milk, 3i^ or 4 cups 
flour, on V half teaspoon soda dissolved ill hot water, 3 teaspoons 
lemon or vanilla, a pinch salt. Mrs. Williamson. 

CUP CAKE. 
1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 5 eggs, 2s cups flour, 
he accurate; 1 cup stoned raisins, donH be stingy ; flavor with nut- 
meg ; 2 teaspoons Royal baking powder. 

Mrs. Williamson. 

MOL.ASSES CAKE, No. 1. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup mf)!asses, 4 eggs, 3i cups flour, 
1 teaspoon soda dissolved in 2 tablespoons of warm water, one-half 
nutmeg, pinch of mace. Mrs. Roe. 

MOLASSES CAKE, No. 2. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, IJ cups molasses, 1 cup milk, 4 cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon saleratus, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoons cloves. 

A. H. Fisher. 

MOLASSES CAKE, No. 3. 

2 cups molasses. 3 cups flour, three-quarters cup butter, one- 
half cup milk, 3 eggy^, I teaspoon baking powder. 

Mrs. Kinports. 
PAUL'S GINGERBREAD. 

Three-quarters cup butler, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 1 cup molasses, 
1 cup sour milk, 2 teaspoons soda, ginger ; malce soft. 

Mrs. Hutton. 



SMALL CAKES^ 



DROP CAKES, No. 1. 



1 cup lard, 2 cups molasses, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 heaping teaspoon 
ginger, 1 egg, 2 heaping teaspoons soda dissolved in 1 cup water. 
Mix stiff with flour. Mrs. Merritt. 

DROP CAKES, No. 2. 

1 cup sugar, one-half cup butter, small cup sour cream or 
milk, 1 egg, 2 cups flour, with an even teaspoon soda sifted in ; 
flavor with nutmeg. Drop from a spoon and bake quickly. 

Miss Hurd. 



SMALL SUGAR CAKES. 

1 heaping teacup of sugar, three-quarters teacup of butter, 
one-quarter teacup sweet milk, 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 1 
teaspoon soda, 1 saltspoon salt, nutmeg and cinnamon to taste ; 
flour to enable you to roll out the dough. Cut into cakes and 
bake quickly. (Marion Harland) Mrs. Hutton. 

COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, one-half cup milk, 2 eggs, flour 
enough to knead soft. Mrs. Clark. 

HERMITS. 

1 J cups brown sugar beaten with two-thirds cup butter ; add 2 
well beaten eggs, 1 teaspoon each of cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon, 
1 teaspoon soda dissolved in 2 tablespoons milk, 1 J cups currants ; 
add flour to make stiff enough to roll out like cookies. 

Mrs. Merritt. 

AUNT LINE'S COOKIES. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup shortening, 2 eggs, 1 quart flour, scant ; 1 
teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, salt and nutmeg. 

Mrs. Merritt. 

WAFER JUMBLES, No. 1. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg ; flavor with lemon, flour to 
roll out well. Roll very thin and cut in rings. 

Mrs. Riddle. 
GOOD JUMBLES, No. 2. 

Three-quarters pound butter, three-quarters pound sugar, 1 
pound flour, 4 eggs, 1 wine glass rose water, one-half nutmeg. Do 
not handle, but drop in pan from spoon; about 1 heaping table- 
spoon for each jumble. Sprinkle with powdered sugar as soon as 
baked. Mrs. Williamson. 

JUMBLES, No. 3. 

1 pound butter, 1 pound sugar, 5 eggs, 1 pound flour, 1 tea- 
spoon soda ; ice and while moist sprinkle with cocoanut. 

Miss See. 
CRULLERS, No. 1. 

3 tablespoons melted butter, 2 heaped tablespoons sugar, 6 
tablespoons milk, 1 ego;. To this quantity I use 2 teaspoons 
Royal baking powder, mixed in the flour. Do not make too 
stiff, just so you can handle the dough. Roll very thin and fry in 
hot lard. Mrs. Duncan. 

CRULLERS, No. 2. 

3 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 tablespoon lard, little more 
than full but not heaping pinch salt. Flour enough to roll con- 
veniently. 2 teaspoons baking powder. They are better a week 
old— if they keep ! ! ! Miss Newell. 

CRULLERS, No. 3. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 1 cup milk, 4 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 
flavor with nutmeg or cinnamon. Mix stiff enough to roll out 
with flour, well sifted. Mrs. Riddle. 

GINGER SNAPS, No. 1. 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup butter, one-half milk, 2 
teaspoons ginger, I teaspoon saleratus, Flour to make them stiff 
enough to roll out. (Extra good.) A.H.Fisher. 

t 

(45) 



GINGER SNAPS, No. 2. 

1 cup su^ar, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup melted butter, 1 teaspoon 
vinegar, 1 large tablespoon ginger, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon, 1 
teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon soda, dissolved in one-halt" teacup of 
boiling water, 7 cups flour, or sufficient to roll out well. Roll 
very thin and bake in a quick oven. Mrs. D. D. Demarest. 

GINGER SNAPS, No. 3. 

1 cup molasses, three-quarter cup shortening, 1 teaspoon soda, 
dissolved in a little h(jt water, tablespoon of ginger, cinnamon 
and salt to taste. Flour enough to roll out. Bake quickly. 

Miss Hurd. 
GINGER COOKIES, No. 4. 

1 cup butter and lard, mixed, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, 1 cup mo- 
lasses, 1 dessert spoon soda, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, I tablespoon 
ginger, 2 tablespoons water, 2 tablespoons vinegar, 7 cups flour. 

Miss Woodbrtdge. 

NEW YEAR'S CAKE. 

U pounds sugar, 1 pound butter, 3^ pounds flour, one-half 
pint water, caraway seed, ( if you like). Roll very thin and cut 
into small cakes. Mrs. Ten Eyck. 

OLD FASHIONED DOUGHNUTS, No. 1. 

1 ))lnt sweet milk, one-half cup butter, 3 cups sugar, 4 eggs, 
1 teacup yeast, nutmeg or cinnamon to taste. Melt the butter 
and milk together, add half the sugar and the yeast. Stir in a 
stiff sponge and let it get perfectly light ; then beat the eggs with 
the remainder of the sugar, add the spice. Mix all with the sponge 
very thoroughly into a stiff dough. Set in a warm place to rise, 
and when very light make into small balls, keeping them warm, 
when they will rise again, and when you drop them into the 
boiling lard they will swim like corks. When cool roll them in 
sugar. These doughnuts when rightly made are delicious and 
well repay the trouble taken to make them. Mrs. N. B. Smock. 

DOUGHNUTS, No. 2. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, nutmeg and cinnamon to 
taste, 1 teaspoon soda in 1 tablespoon milk. Stir these into a 
quart bowl of bread dough or light sponge. Make as hard as 
biscuit. Cut in squares and let them use for 2 hours. Drop into 
hot lard. Mrs. Robinson. 

YANKEE DOUGHNUTS, No. 3. 

1 cup milk, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, Hecker's flour sufficient to 
make soft dough. Drop with a spoon in hot lard. Roll in pow- 
dered sugar while warm. Miss Florance. 

CREAM PUFFS, No. 1. 

One-half pint butter, 1 pint water, three-quarter pint flour, 10 
eggs, soda the size of a pea. Boil water and butter together. 
While boiling stir in the flour ; when cold add soda and eggs well 
beaten. Drop on buttered tins and bake. This will make 50 
cakes. For the filling make a stiff cornstarch. 

Mrs. Kinports. 

(4H) 



P 



CKEAM PUFFS. No. 2. 

1 cup boiling water, one-half cup butter. Cook until boilinjr, 
then stir in 1 cup of flour. When cold add 8 eggs, well beaten. 
Drop on buttered tins; bake 2o minutes in quick oven. Fill with 
cornstarch. Atkinson. 

COCO A NUT JUMBLES. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs. Grate cocoa- 
nut. Mix all together. Mrs. Rolfe. 

COCOANUT BALLS. 

1 cocoanut, grated ; white of 1 e^g, not beaten; small cup of 
powdered sugar; make into balls. Bake in a quick oven ; do not 
take from pan until thoroughly cold. Mrs- Geo. Berdine. 

LADY FINGERS. 

1 pound butter, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound flour, 6 eggs, rose 
water and nutmeg. Mrs. Gilchrist. 

"KISSES." 

1 pound best loaf sugar, whites of -1 eggs. Lemon or rose 
flavoring. Mrs. Riddle. 

HICKORYNUT MACAROONS, No. 1. 

1 cup of meats, 1 cup sugar, 3 tablespoons flour, whites of 2 
eggs, a little lemon flavoring. Mrs. J. S. Voorhees. 

HICKORYNUT MACAROONS, No. 2. 

2 cups powdered sugar, 3 eggs, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 quart of 
nut pits, chopped fine. Do not have the oven too hot in baking 
them. Mrs. G. Berdine. 

CHOCOLATE MACAROONS. 

1 pound white sugar, (powdered) one-half pound sweetened 
chocolate, (grated) whites of 8 eggs, 6 ounces flour ; beat the sugar, 
chocolate and eggs half an hour, then add the flour. Drop on tins 
to bake. A . H. Fisher. 



SOFT FROSTING. 

1 tablespoon of milk thickened with xxx confectioner's 
sugar. Lemon flavoring. Mrs. Rolfe. 

ROPED ICING. 

1 full cup pulverized sugar, 4 tablespoons cold water ; boil 
until it ropes or hairs, then beat in the whites of 2 eggs off from 
the stove ; flavor to taste. Mrs. Riddle. 

GELATINE FROSTING. 

Soak 1 teaspoon of gelatine in 1 tablespoon of cold water, one- 
half an hour ; then dissolve in 2 tablespoons hot water, add 1 cup 
powdered sugar. Flavor with vanilla. Mrs. Merritt. 

ICING. 

10 teaspoons of powdered sugar to the white of 1 egg. Flavor 
to taste. Ella Pettit. 



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OUR RECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUB RECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUR BECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUR BECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUR RECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUR RECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUR RECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUR RECEIPT BOOK. 



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OUR RECEIPT BOOK. 



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^-V-CREAMS AND ICES-^^ 

" I always thought cold victuals nice ; 
My choice would be vanilla ice." , 

ICE CREAM.— 1 quart of rich cream, sweeten and flavor to taste. If the cream 
should be very rich add a scant pint of milli Put this into the freezer and turn the 
crank evenly until frozen. Any flavoring may be used. Mrs. Duncan. 

LEMON ICE.— For makins 2 quarts of lemon ice take three pints of cold water 
and add the juice of 8 or 9 lemons ; sweeten to taste. Put 2 tablespoons of Cooper's 
gelatine in a pint measure and fill it with boiling water, stirring occasionally until 
thoroughly dissolved. When it cools add it and 1 cup of sweet cream to the lemon- 
ade and freeze it immediately. M. E. Mekkill. 

LEMON SHERBET.— 1 quart milk, 1 pound sugar, 4 or 5 lemons, according to the 
quantity of juice thej contain. Place the milk over the fire in a double boiler ; when 
it just comes to a boil add the sugar When it has all dissolved take from the fire 
and let it get perfectly cold ; then stir in the lemon juice and freeze as you would 
cream. Mrs. Duncan. 



^—PRESERVES AND JELLIES-^ 

" Sweets to the sweet." — Shakespeare 

PRESERVES.— Prepare the fruit according to the kind used. Fruit and sugar 
as follows : 

Peaches, % pound sugar to 1 pound fruit. 

Strawberries, ^ 

Quinces, 1 '" " " '* 

Pineapples, \ " " " "' 

Cherries, %^ " " " '• 

Quinces should be boiled in water until a broom straw will pass through them 
before putting in the syrup. In peeling fruit throw it into cold water to keep it from 
turning dark ; the air turns peeled fruit dark. Bt)il rather quickly. In preserving 
fruit whole, boil it a short time in the syrup, take it out, boil the syrup 20 minutes, and 
tlien put the fruit in the syrup again. Put preserves in glass jars with screw tops ; 
by this mwans they can be h >oked at occasionally to see if they are keeping well. In 
making nice fruit jelly boil the svrup well before adding the sugar ; the flavor and 
color of the fruit are thus retained. Allow 1 pound of sugar to 1 pint of juice in 
acid fruit jellies, but less will answer for sweet fruits. Put paper wet with brandy on 
top. Mrs. J. H. Rolee. 

PEACH JAM. — To every pound of ripe fruit, weighed after being skinned and 
stoned, allow 1 pound of sugar. Break the stones and blanch the kernels and put 
with sugar and fruit into preserving kettle. Let these simmer until clear ; take out 
the fruit as it becomes tender, and as fast as the scum rises remove it. Put fruit in 
jars and pour the syrup over it. Three-quarters of an hour to boil the jam. 

Mrs, Williamson. 

TOMATO BUTTER.— 13 pounds ripe tomatoes, 4 pounds sugar, 1 quart of vinegar, 
2 tablespoons orange peel, chopped fine, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 1 tablespoon cloves. 
Let the tomatoes boil thick, then add the vinegar and sugar and let boil awhile 
longer ; lastly, add the spices and boil until quite thick. Atkinson. 

BRANDIED PEACHES, (MORRIS WHITES).— 4 pounds fruit, 4 pounds sugar, 1 
pint best white brandy. Make a syrup of the sugar and enough water to dissolve it. 
Let this come to a boil ; put the fruit in and boil 5 minutes. Remove the fruit care- 
fully and let the syrup boil 15 minutes longer, <ir until it thickens well; add the 
brandy and take the kettle at once from the fire. Put the fruit in glass jars and pour 
the hot syrup over it ; then seal. If after removing the fruit a reddish liquor oozes 
from it, pour it away before adding the clear syrup. Mrs. 0. Hardenbergh. 

SPICED FRUITS.— 7 pounds of fruit, 2 or .3 pounds sugar— sour fruit 3 and 
medium or sweet 2 : cinnamon, cloves, allspice, (whole spices are used,) 3 tablespoons 
each. Put all together in a thin bag, or tie them in a thin cloth. (Put spices in the 
vinegar and boil a little before adding the fruit.) Three-quarters of a quart of vine- 
gar. Mrs. Merritt. 

RASPBERRY JELLY.— 1 pint cuiTant juice to 2 pints of raspberij juice, 1 pound 
granulated sugar to each pint of juice. Put in together and boil 35 minutes. 

Mrs. Williamson. 

TUTTI FRUITTI.— Take 1 pint of best alcohol ; into 'his put 8 pounds of fresh 
fruit, a little of each in its season, viz., strawberries raspberries, cherries, pineapple, 
red or white currants, pears, peaches and plums, until you have 8 pounds. To every 
pound of fruit add 1 pound of sugar. Stir frequently ; keep in cool place. 

Miss Plorance. 

GRAPE SAUCE. -Squeeze the pulps out of the grapes, boil and strain through a 
sieve to remove the seeds. Then put the skins and pulp together add three-quarters 
pound sugar to a pound of this. Simmer three-quarters of an hour. Put into cans 
air-tight. Mbs. Merritt. 

8"^ (57) ~' 



4'-^ 



" Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers." 

PICKLE PEACHES.— 7 pounds fruit, 3 pounds ffood brown susar, 1 quart vinegar, 
1 teaspoon powdered cloves, 1 teaspoon cinnamon. Boil the spices, sugar and vine- 
gar for 15 minutes, then add fruit and boil. Mrs. Freeman. 

MUSKMELON PICKLES.— Take fruit not too ripe, cut in pieces, taking out the 
seeds ; cover with vinegar and let stand 24 hours. Take out the fruit, measure the 
vinegar, leaving out 1 quart or more. To each remaining quart add 3 pounds sugar. 
To 1 dozen melons take 3 ounces of whole cinnamon, 2 ounces of whole cloves, 2 
ounces of whole allspice. Tie spices in a bag. Boil in the vinegar and sugar. When 
well skimmed put in the melons to boil 15 or 20 minutes. Let stand 24 hours and re- 
peat the process of boiling and pour over again (the fruit) while hot. 

Miss Woodbridgb. 

TOMATO SOY —1 peck tomatoes, peeled and chopped : 1 teacup salt, one-half 
teacup whole i>epper, 2 tablespoons cloves, 2 tablespoons allspice, 2 red peppers cut up, 
4 large oni(jns chopped line. Boil altogether in kettle 1 hour very hard, stirring all the 
time to prevent burning. Just before taking off add 1 quart strong vinegar. Half 
cup celery seed is an improvement. Misses Haruenbergh. 

CAULIFLOWER PICKLES.— Prepare the cauliflower as follows : Separate in 
small sprays and spread in flat dishes ; sprinkle with salt. Let it stand 24 hours, more 
if necessary ; then put it all together and pour over it a scalding hot weak brine, and 
let it stand a little while ; then drain off and place the flower in bottles or cans. 
When you have made ready the vinegar pour it over the flower. There should be 
enough to cover the sprays. If one receipt is not enough, repeat it until you have suf- 
ficient. Mrs. Merkitt. 

THICKENED VINEGAR FOR CAULIFLOWER PICKLES —To 1 quart of scald- 
ing vinegar add 1 tablespoon of white sugar, 1 teaspoon celery seed, 3 or 4 blades of 
mace one half dozen peppercorns. After this boils a little strain, taking care to put 
back the peppercorns. Mix to a paste in cold vinegar, 3 tablespoons of ground mus- 
tard and 1 of tumeric ; then mix the paste a little at a time with the scalding pickle. 
Pour over the pickles while hot. Mrs. Merritt. 

SAUCE FOR ANY KIND OF PICKLES.— 4 quarts vinegar, 2 small onions, 8 table- 
spoons salt, 3 tablespoons black pepper. Boil them in vinegar 5 minutes. Take, 8 
tablespoons mustard, two and one-half currie powder, three and one-half corn starch 
made into a cream with cold vinegar. Then add to the boiling vinegar. Let boil 5 
minutes. Pour over pickles while hot; This recipe is superfine. Mrs. Tapping. 

COLD CATSUP.— 18 large ripe tomatoes, used before they become watery, chop- 
ped fine and drained well, 1 red onion, 4 red peppers, chopped together very fine. 3 
tHblespoDHs salt, 1 tablespoon ground cloves, 1 tablespoon ground mustard, 1 table- 
spoon gfoiiiid ciiiiiainnn, 1 cup brown sugar, 2 cups vinegar. Not any cooking neces- 
sary, ciiiil will keep for two years if kept in a cool place. Miss See. 

CHOW-CHOW.- 3 heads cabbage, 2 dozen cucumbers, 2 heads cauliflower, 1 quart 
string beans, 6 peppers, 2 quarts small onions, 2 bunches celery, 2 quarts green toma- 
toes. Cut all in small pieces and sprinkle well with salt. Let stand overnight. Drain off 
the water through colander. 2 gallons vinegar (or less in proportion to strength.) 2 
pots French mustard, quarter pound mustard seed, 1 ounce ground pepper, 1 ounce 
cloves, 1 ounce allspice, 2 ounces tumeric. Put vinegar and spices in a kettle and let 
them come to a boil. Then put in vegetables and boil until tender. Put into cans. 

Mrs. Rolfe. 

CHILI SAUCE.— .36 large ripe tomatoes' sliced fine, 5 green swee peppers and 1 red 
one, (5 onions, chopped fine, 6 tablespoons salt, (scant) 1 tablespoon ginger, three quar- 
ters pound brown sugar, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 1 nutmeg, 1 tablespoon cloves, 4 
cups vinegar. Boil two and one-halt hours. Put up cold and seal. 

Miss Van Antwerp. 

BORDEAIIX SAUCE.— 4 quaits cabbage, 3 quarts green tomatoes, half dozen 
onions, 3 red peppers, all of these sliced flue, 1 ounce tumeric, half ounce whole all- 
spice, half ounce whole cloves. 3 ounces white mustard seed, half ounce celery seed, 
14 ounces sugar, 2 quarts vinegar, 1 gill salt. Mix together. Boil 20 minutes and can. 

Misses Hardenbergh. 

TOMATO CATSUP.— Half peck tomatoes. Place over fire until sufficiently cooked 
to strain through a flour sieve. Put this back on the fire and add 4 tat>lespoons salt, 4 
of pepper, 4 of mustard, 4 of allspice. Simmer 3 or 4 hours. Then add 1 pint vinegar 
and bottle. Do not fill the bottles quite full. The next day add a little vinegar to 
each bottle and cork. M. E. Merrill. 

GHERKINS.— To each hundred of gherkins put a pint of salt and pour on boiling 
water sufficient to cover them. Cover tight to prevent the steam escaping ; let them 
stand for 24 hours, then wipe perfectly dry, being careful not to bruise the skin, and 
place in tiie jar in which they are to be kept. Boil vinegar with a few whole cloves 
and allspice in it, and pour over them, taking care tliat all are covered. Add a small 
piece of alum and keep covered tight for two weeks. They will then l)e ready for use. 

M. E. Merrill. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR.— Place raspberries in a .iar and cover with \inegar and 
let them stand K4 hours. Strain through a coarse bag. and to each quart of juice add 
a pound of sugar and boil from 5 to 10 minutes. Pill the bottles and do not cork them 
until the next day. M. E. Merrill 

(58)' ' ' 



Delicacies fcr the Sick. 

A handful of common sense is worth a bushel of learninor." 



MILK PORRIDGE.— Equal parts of milk and water, (say half pint of each,) 1 table- 
spoon of flour to the pint. When almost done, salt, save a little bit of the water, and 
mix it up smooth like starch. Stir it every minute and let it boil until real thick. Boil 
it in a dovible boiler. Sweeten, if desired, when served. Mrs. Rolfe. 

PANADA.— Lay 6 soda crackers in a bowl, sprinkle over them powdered sugar 
and a pinch of salt, adding a very small piece of fresh butter. Pour boiling water 
over the crackers and let them remain near the flre half hour. Then add 1 teaspoon 
of good French brandy, or a tablespoon of Madeira wine, and a little grated nutmeg. 

Mrs. Rolfe. 

RAW BEEF TEA.— To 1 pound of beef, take 1 pint of cold water and 5 drops of 
Hydrochloric acid. (Be very cautious and use a dropper.) Have the beef chopped up 
very fine. Put the cold water and Hydrochloric acid in it, cover it up tightly and let it 
stand in a cool place over night. In the morning stand it in hot water, at a tempera- 
ture of 110 degrees for 2 hours. Then strain through a stout cloth. Season to taste. 
It is better taken cold. Dose for very weak persons, half cupful twice a day. If the 
raw taste is objectionable, brown the beef quickly on one side and prepare as before. 

Miss HURD. 

MILK PUNCH.— Pour 2 tablespoons good brandy into 6 tablespoons milk. Add 2 
teaspoons ground loaf sugar, a little grated nutmeg. Mrs. R. 

EGGNOG.— To each egg 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 wine glass of milk. 1 wine glass 
sherry wine, the sugar and yolks to be well beaten together and the whites (well 
beaten) added by degrees. Mrs. Rolfe. 

ROMAN PUNCH.— 1 quart water, 3 cups sugar, 6 lemons, 3 oranges, best Scotch 
whiskey to suit tasie, say half glass. Freeze in freezer and serve in punch glasses. 

Mrs. Rolfe. 

WINE WHEY.— 1 pint milk ; warm the milk ; add sherry wine until it curdles* 
sweeten to taste with loaf sugar. Strain it. Mrs. G. Van Pelt. 

BLACKBERRY SYRUP.— Procure nice high vine blackberries, perfectly ripe, set 
them over a modf rate fire and let them simmer till they break to pieces. Strain them 
and to each pint of .iuice add a pound'of white sugar, half ounce cinnamon, quarter 
ounce mace, 2 teaspoons cloves (all ground.) Boil all together 15 minutes, strain it, 
and when cold add to each pint of syrup a wine glass of French brandy. Bottle, cork 
and seal it ; keep in a cool place. This mixed with cold water in the proportion of a 
wine glass oi syrup to two-thirds of a tumbler of water is an excellent remedy for 
dysentery and similar complaints. Mrs. Van Pelt. 



HOW^ TO MAKE CANDY.— The white of 1 e^g. Measure the egg and use "^he 
same ouantity of water. Mix in as much sugar as you can (use XXX). Flavor to 
taste. When lemon or orange juice is used leave out the wa er. For chocolate use 
2 tablespoons mixed in the cream. Cochineal put in enough to make a nice color. 

Mrs. Mebritt. 

CREAM CANDY.— 2 1-2 pounds granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 1 small 
teaspoon vanilla, one-half cup water. Boil until thick enough to sound brittle against 
a glas^s. Do not stir at all. Mrs. Williamson. 

COCOANUT BALLS —2 cups grated cocoanut, the white of 1 egg, 1 cup powdered 
sugar, 1 tablespoon of flour. Mix by hand and make into balls. Miss Hurd. 

TAFFY CANDY.— 2 cups Porto Rico molasses, 1 cup granulated sugar, small 
piece butter Boil until it will become very hard in cold water ; then stir in one-half 
teaspoon soda and turn in buttered platters. Flavor with vanilla, and when partly 
cooled pull. A. S. Newell. 

CARAMELS, No. 1.— Three-quarters pound sugar, one quarter cup butter, enough 
milk or ci'eam to moisten the sugar thoroughly, 1 cup grated chocolate, vanilla. Boil 
the sugar and milk for ten minutes ; add the chocolate, and when almost done put in 
the butter. Mrs. Williamson. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS, No. 2.— 1 cup chocolate, 2 cups brown sugar, one-half 
cup milk, small lump butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla. A. Stoddard. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. No. 1.— 1 cup molasses. 1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar. Boil 10 min- 
utes. Pour in pans to cool, M. E Merrill. 

BUTTER SCOTCH, No. 2.-9 tablespoons molasses, 3 cups brown sugar, table- 
spoons water, 3 tablespoons butter. Boil until it hardens in water. Mrs. Demarest. 

" (59i ' 



"^^ 



MISCELLANEOUS^— 



" Never go to a hungry husband with a request, but approach 
him after a good dinner." 



HOW TO COOK A HUSBAND.— The first thing to be done is to catch him ! Many 
a good husband is spoiled in the cooking. Some women keep them constantly in hot 
water, while others freeze them with conjugal coldness ; some smother them with 
contention, and still others keep them in pickle all their lives ; these women serve 
them with tongue sauce. Now it is not to be supposed that husbands will be tender 
and good if treated in this way, but they are, on the contrary, very delicious when 
managed as follows : Get a large jar, called the jar of carefulness, place your 
husband in it and place him near the fire of conjugal love ; let the fire be pretty hot, 
especially let it be clear ; above all, let the heat be constant. Cover him with affec- 
tions, garnish him over with the spices of pleasantry, and if you add kisses and 
other confections, let them be accompanied with a sufficient portion of secrecy, 
mixed with prudence and moderation. Mrs. Eiddle. 

CURE FOR SORE THROAT.— 2 tablespoons molasses. 2 tablespoons vinegar, as 
much red pepper as you can hold on a five cent piece. Pour boiling water in it and 
let it stand until cold. It is then ready for use. Use as a gargle. Mrs. Van Pelt. 

HAIR WASH.— Alcohol, glycerine and rain water, equal parts. Apply with a 
sponge. Mrs. Merritt. 

To remove rust from steel cover with sweet oil, well rubbed in. Let it stand 48 
hours. Rub with unslacked lime powdered very fine ; rub it till the rust disappears. 

Mildew in linen can be removed by soaping the spots and scraping some chalk over 
the marks, rubbing it in well. After one or two applications the spots will disappear. 

Prepare mustard plasters with the white of an egg instead ot water, and it will 
draw perfectly well and not produce a blister. 

Warts may be destroyed by being rubbed with alum. Carry a lump in your 
pocket and rub on the wart frequently, wetting it as you do so. 

Sprigs of wintergreen will make the small red ants leave their cherished haunts. 

Coal ashes mixed with salt and water to a stiiJ paste will harden like a rock ; and 
this paste is excellent to fill cracks in stoves, and it can be used to line a eoal stove. 

POT-POURRI.— One-half peck rose leaves. Spread 1 handful of table salt and 
.3 handfuls rose leaves until all the leaves are used : cover the top and let it remain 5 
days, stirring and turning the mass twice a day. Add .3 ounces of bruised allspice. 1 
ounce bruised cinnamon stick. Let it remain 1 week, stirring daily. Put in 
permanent jar 1 ounce allspice and add leaves. Sprinkle between the leaves tlie 
following: i ounce cloves, 1 ounce of cinnamon, 2 nutmegs, (all ground,) one-quarter 
ounce of bruised anise seed, 5 grains of musk, one-quarter pound fine di-ied lavender 
flowers, 2 ounces of finely sliced orris root. The essential oils can be added if 
desired. Mrs. Rolfe. 



(60) 



ESTABLISHED IN J849. 



HNEST TONE^ 

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AND MATERIAL. 




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EMERSON PIANO CO. 

WAREROOMS; 
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Ladies' House and Walking Shoes a Specialty. 

Before you buy, go and see tlie best assortment in the city. 
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SUYDflm BROTHEHS, 










92 Schureman St., New Brunswick, N. J. 

Headquarters for the Best Flour. Sole agents for tlie 

" Stroudsburg " Butter, Southern Hams and 

Bacon. Everything the "best." 

"O. 0. STILL^ANr 



DEALER IN 










Jewelry and Sterling Silver, 

Repairing of Fine Watches and Jewelry a specialty. 

No. 45 CMrcli Street, - - - New Brunswick, N. J. 



►^RELIABLE AND STYLISH MILLINERY -H^ 



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CATERER AND CONFECTIONER. 

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=^54 DENNIS STREET!^ 

Clioicest and Best Meats Only, Always Fresh and Sweet. 

FRANKFORT SAUSAGES A SFBCIALTY. 



JAS. P. SMITH. WM, E. EDMONDS. 

smitn & Eflmonis, 

HATTERUMEH'SOUTFITTERS 

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FINE CHOCOLATES A SPECIALTY. 

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59 CHURCH STREET, 

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HAVE CONSTANTLY ON HAND A FULL LINE OF 

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Groods delivered to all pai'ts of the city free. Country produce taken in exchange 
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Mrs. H.J. BRADLEY, 

' lio. 83 CHURCH STREET. 

ICE ORE MM MND EINING 3 RLE ON. 
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO DINNERS, WEDDINGS AND PARTIES- 

JOHN H. VAN DEURSEN, 

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L. P. DeFORREST. 






LADIES' ART NEEDLE WORK, 



E. B. DeFORREST. 



75 CHURCH ST., New Brunswick, N. J. 

Stamped Linen Goods, Embroidery, Silks, Worsteds, 
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CE[AS. * TAMM, 



62 DENNIS STREET, 



NEW BRUNSWICK, N. J. 






WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN 



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JILL KINDS OF CRNNEU FISH, 

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