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Full text of "Receipts and expenditures of the town of Durham for the year ending ."

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Tov\fn of Durham 

ANNUAL 
REPORT 
2003 

For the Fiscal Year Ended 
December 31, 2003 





Town of Durham 
15 Newmarket Road 
Durham, NH 03824 
603-868-5571 
FAX 603-868-5572 
www.ci.durham.nh.us 



Publication Design and Production by: 
Design Point Studio 
72 Planner Rd, Epping, NH 03042 
Cover Photo of the Durham 
Town Offices by Jennie Berry 

Copyright 2004 All Rights Reserved 
Printed in USA 



CONTENTS 



Honorable Mentions 3 

Memoriam: 

Owen Durgin 4 

Lewis Franklin Heald 5 

William Prince 6 

New Faces for 2003 7 

Officers, Boards, Commissions 
and Committees 8 

Special Service Recognition: 

Craig Stevens 13 

Luke Vincent 14 

Town Council Members 15 

2004 Agenda Informational 
Town Meeting 16 

■ Administrative Summary 

Business Manager 17 

Council Chairman 18 

Informational Town 

Meeting Minutes 20 

2003 Ordinances 22 

2003 Resolutions 22 

Town Administrator 23 

Warrant 26 



■ Budget & Finance 

(Colored Stock at the end) 

2003 Actual General Fund 
Expenditures 84 

2004 Approved General Fund 
Appropriations 84 

2003 Actual General Fund 
Revenues 85 

2004 Anticipated General 

Fund Revenues 85 

Capital Improvement Program 

Summary 2004-2013 86 

Combined Funds Statement ....88 

General Fund Budget 90 

Independent Auditor's Report ..91 
Net Taxable Valuation 99 



Property Tax Revenue 

Comparison 100 

Statement of Long Term 

Indebtedness 101 

Tax Rate Breakdown 100 

Tax Rate Comparison 94 

Tax Valuation Breakdown 99 

Trustees of the Trust Funds ..101 
Valuation and Tax History: 

Inventory of Town Property ..103 

MS-1 Simvnaryfor'03 102 

Tax Rate '99-'03 102 

Valuation Figures, '99-'03 ..102 

■ Culture and Recreation 

Conservation Commission 29 

Durham Day 30 

Historic District Commission.... 31 
Parks and Recreation 

Committee 31 

Public Library 33 

Swan Report 34 

■ General Government 

Assessor 37 

Cemetery Committee 38 

Planning and Community 

Development 39 

Planning Board 40 

Supervisors of the Checklist ....42 

Tax Collector 42 

Town Clerk 43 

Tree Warden 44 

Welfare Director 44 

Zoning Board of Adjustment ....45 
Zoning, Code Enforcement 

and Health Officer 46 

■ Public Safety 

Durham Ambulance Corps 49 

Fire Department 50 

Forest Fire Warden 53 

Police Department 53 



■ Public Works 

Director of Public Works 55 

Operations Division 56 

Solid Waste Division 57 

Town Engineer 58 

Wastewater Division 59 

Water Division 60 

■ Town Supported 
Organizations 

AIDS Response Seacoast 61 

Durham Historic Association. ...62 
Homemakers of 

Strafford County 63 

Lamprey Health Care 64 

My Friend's Place 64 

Sexual Assault Support 

Services 65 

Strafford County 

Community Action 65 

Strafford Regional Planning ....66 

■ Town Working 
Committees 

Cable Access Television 67 

Economic Development 

Committee 68 

Integrated Waste Mgt. 

Advisory 68 

Lamprey River Advisory 69 

ORCSD Apportionment 

Study Committee 72 

Rental Housing 73 

■ Resource Info & 
Vital Statistics 

American Red Cross 75 

Births 79 

Deaths 80 

Marriages 81 

Resource Information 78 

Telephone Directory 76 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



HONORABLE MENTIONS 



In 2003, many Town 
citizens volunteered 
their time, talents and 
efforts to serve on vari- 
ous elected and appoint- 
ed boards, commissions 
and committees. We 
would like to take this 
opportunity to thank and 
recognize those individu- 
als for the important 
contributions they made 
to the community. 



COUNCIL MEMBERS 

Pete Chinburg 
Michael Pazdon 

DURHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Joan Drapeau 
Roni Slavin Pekins 

MODERATOR 

Micliael Everngam 

Shirley Thompson (Assistant 
Moderator) 

CONSERVATION 
COMMISSION 

Bobbie Jean Weiler 
Jennifer Smith 

HISTORIC DISTRICT 
COMMISSION 

William Schoonmaker 

PARKS AND RECREATION 
COMMITTEE 

Samuel Pierce 
Wesley Smith 

PLANNING BOARD 

Suzanne Loder 
Julian Smith 

ZONING BOARD OF 
ADJUSTMENT 

William Annis 
Jane Towle 
Roberta Woodburn 



DURHAM CABLE ACCESS 
TELEVISION (DCAT) 
GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE 

Paul Eichorn 
Marjorie Smith 

INTEGRATED WASTE 
MANAGEMENT ADVISORY 
COMMITTEE 

Richard Gallant 
Diane Woods 

JULY 4TH CELEBRATION 
COMMITTEE 

Belinda Curtis 
Chris Regan 
Susan Roman 
Ann Shump 
Gerald Smith 
Shirley Thompson 

PEASE DEVELOPMENT 
AUTHORITY COMPATIBILI- 
TY COMMITTEE 

Craig SejTnour 

SCHOOL FUNDING STUDY 
COMMISSION 

Michael H. Everngam 
John Farrell 
Kathy McWilliams 
David Pease 
Shirley Thompson 
Robert Toutkoushian 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



MEMORIAM 



OWEN DURGIN 



November 18, 1921 - 
June 25, 2003 



Owen Durgin, a University 
of New Hampshire faculty 
member who ser\'ed as a 
Durham Selectman and then 
as a Town Councilor, died here 
June 25, 2003. 



orn in Portland, 
Maine, on November 
18, 1921, he attended 
Portland schools and 
graduated from Portland High 
School in 1938. He entered 
Gorham State Teachers College 
in 1939, where his education was 
interrupted by Ai-my service 
(1942-46) during World War H. 



Owen completed his Bachelor of 
Science degree in 1946 and 
taught math and was the 
women's basketball coach at 
Rangeley (Maine) High School 
from 1946 to 1949. There he met 
and married Priscilla Tibbetts, 
who predeceased him in 1993. 
He completed his Master of Arts 
degree at the University of New 
Hampshire in 1951. Owen 
joined the faculty and taught 
statistics throughout his 42-year 
university career. Other 
appointments at UNH included: 
Agricultural Experiment Station 
statistician (1957-61) and UNH 
registrar (1961-67) where he 
and his assistant, Anne Palmer, 
initiated computerized student 
registration. Owen was also 
associate chairman of the 
Resources Development Center 
(1967-81), and director of the 
Institute of Natural and 
Environmental Resources (1981- 
83). He served as director of the 
Office of Biometrics, helping 



countless graduate students con- 
duct and analyze research for 
their dissertations, until his 
retirement in 1993. 



Owen's service in Durham town 
government included appoint- 
ment to the Planning Board in 
1967, member of the Town Board 
of Selectmen from 1972 to 1988, 
and he was active in transform- 
ing the structure of the Town into 
a Manager/Council form of gov- 
ernment. He was then elected 
and served as a Town Councilor 
from 1988 to 1990. Owen is 
remembered as a leader with the 
ability to explain and resolve 
issues with preciseness, and 
always with civility and good 
humor. 



He particularly loved 
spending summers at the family 
camp built by his grandfather 
on Highland Lake in Falmouth, 
Maine, and enjoyed canoeing 
and wildlife photography. He 
was a gifted wood carver and 
craftsman. D 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



MEMORIAM 



LEWIS FRANKLIN HEALD 



February 10, 1917 - 
August 30, 2003 



L. Franklin (Frank) Heald, 

who contributed in countless 
ways to the betterment of the 
community, died here 
August 30, 2003. 

orn on February 10, 
1917, in Littleton, New 
Hampshire, Frank was 
raised and educated in 
Littleton. After graduating from 
Littleton High School in 1935, he 
enrolled at the University of New 
Hampshire where he was a mem- 
ber of Alpha Tau Omega fraterni- 
ty. In 1939, after graduating 
from UNH with a Bachelor of 
Arts in Political Science, Frank 
joined the United States Naval 
Reserve and served in World War 
II, seeing action in the South 
Pacific and being an eyewitness 
to the surrender of Japanese 
forces in 1945. 

After the war, Frank worked for 
the Associated Press (AP) office 
in Boston. He met his first wife, 
Helen Cheney, in 1948 and began 
working at the UNH news 
bureau. (Helen predeceased him 
in 1996). In 1958, Frank became 
Director of Publications at UNH 
and remained in that position for 
thirty-five years. An accom- 
plished pianist, he learned to 
play the UNH carillon, the 246- 



bell organ located on the third 
floor of Thompson Hall. He 
gained this responsibility first as 
a substitute for the music 
department when there were no 
students available to perform the 
daily noontime recital, but soon 
worked it into his daily schedule, 
and eventually he became known 
as "The Carillonneur". Frank 
retired from UNH in 1993, but 
continued playing the bells on a 
regular schedule, either once or 
twice daily. During times when 
he was not available, his music 
would be broadcast via tape, the 
same way that it is done today. 



In addition to his long-standing 
contributions to the University, 
Frank gave unselfishly of his 
time and talents in volunteer 
service for his community. He 
was a volunteer call fireman and 
later fire commissioner for a six- 
year term. He was instrumental 
in the founding and development 
of the Durham Ambulance Corps. 
He served as the official volun- 
teer Durham Police Department 
photographer for 30 years. He 
was a past chairman of the 
Durham Red Cross, Durham 
Historic District Commission and 
served one term as a State 
Representative in the 
Legislature. Frank also served as 
the Assistant Town Moderator 
for twenty-five years. Moderator 
for three years, and Assistant 
Town Treasurer for nine years. 



In remembering Frank Heald, 
one would be remiss to not men- 
tion the many dozens of loaves of 
homemade bread that Frank so 
carefully prepared and sold to 
help support various charity 
events over the years. With every 
loaf, Frank included a piece of 
paper indicating the number of 
the loaf that one had bought and 
the following poem by an 
unknown author: 



"Be gentle when you 
touch bread 

Let it not lie uncared 
for - unwanted. 

So often bread is taken 
for granted. 

There is so much 
beauty in bread - 

Beauty of sun and soil, 
beauty of patient toil. 

Winds and rain 
have caressed it, 

Christ often blessed it. 

Be gentle when you 
touch bread." 



(Information contained in this 
memoriam was drawn from a 
September 19, 2003 article in The 
New Hampshire, written by TNH 
Reporter Adam Shalvey.) D 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



MEMORIAM 



WILLIAM PRINCE 



August 18. 1908 - 
December 5, 2003 



William (Bill) Lawton Prince, 

a graduate of the University of 
New Hampshire and long-time 
resident who served as a 
Supervisor of the CheckUst for 
sixteen years, died here 
December 5, 2003. 



r. Prince graduated 
from the University 
of New Hampshire 
in 1930 and began a 
teaching career in 
Massachusetts. In 1937, he 
joined the accounting depart- 
ment of Raymond-Whitcomb Inc. 
travel agents of Boston, serving 
as accountant on cruise ships. 

He married his UNH classmate, 
Millicent Eda Callahan, June 23, 
1938, and became an educational 
advisor for the Civilian 
Conservation Corps in New 
Hampshire. In 1941, he was 
named business manager for the 
newly established League of New 
Hampshire Arts and Crafts in 
Concord. Mr. Prince joined the 
American Red Cross in 
Washington, D.C., in 1942, and 
became director of the Field 
Service Department in Paris, 
France, where he remained until 
early 1946. 

In March 1946, he became the 
first full-time secretary of the 
Alumni Association of the 
University of New Hampshire, 
serving until 1956 when he 
became Director of Development 
at the University of 
Chattanooga, TN. In 1969, he 
joined Marts & Lundy, profes- 
sional fund-raising counsel and 
public relations company of New 
York, where he served until his 
retirement in 1973. 



After retiring. Bill was involved 
as a volunteer in many communi- 
ty activities, including president 
of the Oyster River Home Health 
Association, member and first 
vice president of the New 
Hampshire Farm Museum, mem- 
ber of the American Rose Society, 
member, president and bronze 
medalist of the New Hampshire 
Rose Society, past president of 
the UNH President's Council, 16 
years as supervisor of the 
Durham checklist, and a delegate 
to the 1984 New Hampshire 
Constitutional Convention. 

He was a charter member of St. 
George's Episcopal Church of 
Durham, member of St. John's 
Church of Portsmouth, and a 
member of Lambda Chi Alpha 
social fraternity at UNH. He was 
Durham BSA Troop 155 scout- 
master, member of the Durham 
Historic Association, president of 
the UNH Class of 1930, and 
recipient of the Alumni 
Meritorious Service Award. D 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



NEW FACES FOR 2003 





James Couch, DPW 

DOH: 09/29/03 





Dennis Durkin, 

Police Officer 
DOH: 01/07/03 



nilr »aiBS8« 




Keith Dawson, Firefighter 
DOH: 10/20/03 




Barry Lavigne. Firefighter 

DOH: 03/24/03 




,i 



^^■ 

'M 






David Seeley, DPW 

DOH: 11/03/03 



Town of Durham 



2003 Annual Report 7 



BOARDS, COMMISSIONS & COMMITTEES 



ELECTED OFFICIALS 











TERM 


APPT. 


OFFICIAL«OARD 


ADDRESS 


PHONE 


TERM 


EXPIRES 


AUTH. 


DURHAM TOWN COUNCIL 












Malcolm Sandberg, Chair 


15 Langley Rd. 


868-5211 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Elected 


W. Arthur Grant, Pro Tern 


PO Box 598 


868-5356 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


Annmarie Harris 


56 Oyster River Rd 


868-5182 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


John Kraus 


7 Cutts Rd. 


868-1929 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Elected 


Mark D. Morong 


21 Emerson Rd. 


868-6025 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


Neil Niman 


10 Cold Spring Rd. 


862-3336 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Elected 


Katharine Paine 


51 Durham Pt. Rd. 


868-2741 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


Patricia Samuels 


6 Riverview Rd. 


868-9946 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


Peter Smith 


PO Box 136 


868-7500 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


DURHAM PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 










John Aber, Chair 


4 Sumac Ln. 


868-2818 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


Ehse Daniel 


4 Plamer Dr. 


868-5786 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


Dale Leland Eichorn, Treas. 


196 Piscataqua Rd. 


742-7465 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


Suzanne K. Loder 


265 Mast Rd. 


868-7532 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Elected 


Ruth Moore 


17 Bucks Hill Rd. 


868-7254 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


William Schoonmaker 


24 Mill Rd. 


868-1797 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


Douglas L. Wheeler 


27 Mill Rd. 


868-9633 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Elected 


Cynthia Cote, Alt. 


21 Littlehale Rd. 


868-3550 


lYr 


3/03 


Council 


Philip Ginsburg, Alt. 


151 Durham Pt. Rd. 


868-2312 


lYr 


3/03 


Council 


Norma Segal, Alt. 


53 Bucks Hill Rd. 


868-3453 


lYr 


3/03 


Council 


LIBRARY DIRECTOR 












Gus Hedden, Director 


P.O. Box 954 


868-6699 


N/A 


N/A 


Lib Trustees 


Laura Matheny, Children's Librarian P.O. Box 954 


868-6699 


N/A 


N/A 


Lib Trustees 


Nicole Moore, Library Asst. 


PO. Box 954 


868-6699 


N/A 


N/A 


Lib Trustees 


MODERATOR 












Anne F. Valenza 


30 Mill Rd. 


868-9666 


2Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


Elisabeth Vail Maurice, Asst 


36 Woodman Ave. 


868-7447 


2Yrs 


3/04 


Moderator 


SUPERVISORS OF THE CHECKLIST 










Ann Lemmon, Chair 


Durham Point Rd. 


868-1458 


6Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


Ann Shump 


10 Fogg Dr. 


868-1342 


6Yrs 


3/08 


Elected 


Rebecca B. Worcester 


21 Davis Ave. 


868-2204 


6Yrs 


3/06 


Elected 


TOWN CLERKJTAX COLLECTOR 










Linda L. Ekdahl 


15 Newmarket Rd. 


868-5577 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


TOWN TREASURER 












Richard Lilly 


15 Newmarket Rd. 


868-5571 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


William Bowes, Deputy 


5 Magrath Rd. 


868-2906 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Treasurer 



8 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



OPMCIAL/BOARD 



ADDRESS 



PHONE 



TERM 



TERM 
EXPIRES 



APPT. 
AUTH. 



TRUSTEES OF THE TRUST FUNDS AND CEMETERIES 

Craig Seymour, C/;a/r 110 Durham Pt. Rd. 868-2441 3 Yrs 

Bruce Bragdon. Treasurer 7 Colony Cove Rd. 868-5435 3 Yrs 

John W. de Campi 55 Adams Point Rd. 868-9665 3 Yrs 



3/04 Elected 
3/05 Elected 
3/06 Elected 



BOARDS, COMMISSIONS AND COMMITTEES 



CEMETERY COMMITTEE 



John W. de Campi 


55 Adams Point Rd. 


868-9665 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Elected 


Craig Seymour, Chair 


110 Durham Pt. Rd. 


868-2441 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Elected 


Bruce Bragdon, Treasurer 


7 Colony Cove Rd. 


868-5435 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Elected 


Mark D. Morong, Cud Rep 


21 Emerson Rd. 


868-2863 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


Katharine Paine, Cncl Rep 


51 Durham Pt. Rd. 


868-2741 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


Peter Smith, Cncl Rep 


PO Box 136 


868-7500 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 










Lee Ale.xander, Chair 


32 Dover Rd. 


868-5822 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Richard Hallett 


193 Packers Falls Rd. 


868-7657 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Duane Hyde 


47 Emerson Rd. 


868-6183 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Melanie Rose 


15 Cutts Rd. 


868-5311 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Wilham Skinner 


6 Bucks Hill Rd. 


868-7049 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Laurel Adams, Alt. 


315 Durham Pt. Rd. 


868-1958 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Dwight Baldwin, Alt. 


6 Fairchild Dr. 


868-5759 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Robert Doty, Alt. 


12 Adams Circle 


868-1142 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Peter Smith, Cncl Rep 


PO Box 136 


868-7500 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


Kevin Webb, PB Rep 


22 Davis Ave. 


868-6949 


lYr 


3/04 


Plan. Brd 


HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 










Roger Jaques, Chair 


47 Dover Rd. 


868-3361 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Crawford Mills, V. Chair 


22 Newmarket Rd. 


868-1410 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Andrea Bodo, Secretary 


20 Newmarket Rd. 


868-7152 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Joan Graf 


360 Durham Pt. Rd. 


868-1844 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Leslie Schwartz 


24 Laurel Ln. 


868-3210 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Malcolm Sandberg, Cncl Rep 


15 Langley Rd. 


868-5211 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


Nicholas Isaak, PB Rep 


35 Oyster River Rd. 


397-5078 


lYr 


3/04 


Plan. Brd 


PARKS AND RECREATION COMMITTEE 










Kenneth Andersen 


16 Garden Ln. 


868-9660 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Denny Byrne 


2 Foss Farm Rd. 


868-2648 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Jane G. Crooks 


1 Hamel Dr 


868-5451 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Frank L. Pilar 


26 Newmarket Rd. 


868-5326 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


VACANT 






3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


VACANT 






3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


John E. Parry, Alt. 


5 Denbow Rd. 


868-3352 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Annmarie Harris, Cncl Rep 


56 Oyster River Rd 


868-5182 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


PLANNING BOARD 












David W. Watt, Chair 


6 Sullivan Falls Rd. 


659-2995 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Stephen Roberts, V. Chair 


174 Packers Falls Rd. 


659-3761 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Amanda Merrill, Secretary 


8 Meadow Rd. 


868-2491 


3 Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Nicholas Isaak, III 


35 Oyster River Rd. 


397-5078 


3 Yrs 


3/06 

..continuec 


Council 

) on next page 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 











TERM 


APPT. 


OFFICIAL/BOARD 


ADDRESS 


PHONE 


TERM 


EXPIRES 


AUTH. 


Rachel Rouillard 


49 Edgewood Rd. 


397-5200 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Neil Wylie 


119MadburyRd. 


868-7345 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Richard Ozenich, Alt. 


15 Fitts Farm Dr. 


868-6091 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Kevin Webb, Alt. 


22 Davis Ave. 


868-6949 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


W. Arthur Grant, Cncl Rep 


PC Box 598 


868-5356 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


Annmarie Harris, Alt Cncl Rep 


56 Oyster River Rd. 


868-5182 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


RENTAL HOUSING COMMISSION 










Mark D. Morong, Cncl Rep 


21 Emerson Rd. 


868-2863 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


Paul Berton 


482 Broad St, Portsmouth 


431-0068 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


Rene Kelly, Durham Police 


86 Dover Rd. 


868-2324 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


Perry Bryant, DLA Rep. 


PO Box 1170, Durham 


659-5263 


N//A 


N/A 


DLA 


Mark Henderson 


12 Pendexter Rd. Madbury 


868-2912 


N/A 


N/A 


DLA 


Ben Barrows 


83 Main St., UNH, MUB 122 




N/A 


N/A 


UNH 


Brett Mongeon 


83 Main St., UNH, MUB 122 


862-2163 


N/A 


N/A 


UNH 


VACANT, (Student Organ.) 










DLA/Council 


VACANT, (Tenant Rep.) 










Council 


ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 










Henry Smith, Chair 


93 Packers Falls Rd. 


659-8396 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Edward McNitt, V. Chair 


PO Box 577 


868-1842 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Jay Gooze, Secretary 


9 Meadow Rd. 


868-2497 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


John deCampi 


55 Adams Point Rd. 


868-9665 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


Robin Rousseau 


345 Packers Falls Rd. 


659-8788 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


Linn Bogle, Alt. 


3 Croghan Ln. 


868-5795 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


Myleta Eng, Alt. 


216 Packers Falls Rd 


659-7099 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


VACANT, Alt. 






3Yrs 


3/04 


Council 



TOWN WORKING COMMITTEES 



COMMUNICATIONS CENTER POLICY COMMITTEE 

Paul Beaudoin, Business Mgr. 

David Kurz, Police Chief 

Ronald O'Keefe, Fire Chief 

Nichola Halias, UNH Police Chief 

Gregg Sanborn, LWH Exec. Asst. to the President 

Susanne Bennett, LW// Maintenance Director 



Peter Brown 

George Kachadorian 

Kathleen Kentner 

Clayton Tolson 

Frank Windsor 

VACANT 

Erika Mantz, UNH Rep. 

Paul Gasowski, ORCSD Rep. 

Katharine Paine, Cncl Rep 



35 Sandy Brook Dr 
9 Carriage Way 

69 Mill Rd. 

36 Mill Pond Rd. 
16 Riverview Rd. 

Schofield House, UNH 
46 Lamprey Ln., Lee 
51 Durham Pt. Rd. 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE (EDO 

Charles Cressy 13 Surrey Ln. 

Richard England 18 Orchard Dr. 



868-5571 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


868-2324 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


868-5531 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


862-1427 


N/A 


N/A 


UNH 


862-2450 


N/A 


N/A 


UNH 


862-3937 
ERNANCE 


N/A 
; COMMITTEE 


N/A 


UNH 


868-7448 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


397-5215 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Council 


868-5535 


3Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


868-3234 


3Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


868-2004 


3Yrs 


3/04 


Council 




3Yrs 


3/05 


Council 


862-1567 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 


659-5273 


lYr 


3/03 


Council 


868-2741 


lYr 


3/04 


Council 




N/A 


N/A 


Council 


868-5314 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 



10 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



OFFICIAL/BOARD 



ADDRESS 



PHONE 



TERM 



TERM 
EXPIRES 



APPT. 
AUTH. 



Joseph Murdoch 

Stephen Roberts 

Robert Rush 

Neil Niman, Cncl. Rep. 

Patricia Samuels Cncl. Rep. 



15 Griffith Dr. 
PO Box 175 
20 Edgewood Rd. 
10 Cold Spring Rd. 
6 Riverview Rd. 



659-8619 
659-3761 
868-6425 
862-3336 
868-9946 



INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Diana Carroll. Chair 
Merle Craig 
Richard Gallant 
Jessie McKone 
Julie Newman 
Tracy Wood 
Dale Valena 
VACANT 
John Kraus, Cncl Rep. 



54 Canney Rd. 
23 Orchard Dr. 
594 Bay Road 
35 Dover Rd. 
38 Mill Pond Rd. 
1 Littlehale Rd. 
9 Bagdad Rd. 

7 Cutts Rd. 



868-2935 
868-2591 
868-1399 
868-7371 
868-7316 
868-6214 
868-2174 

868-1929 



JULY 4TH INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



Belinda Curtis 
Chris Regan 
Susan Roman 
Ann Shump 
Gerald Smith 
Shirley Thompson 
VACANT 
VACANT 
VACANT 

LAMPREY RTVER MANAGEMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



14 Ross Rd. 

16 Littlehald Rd. 

16 Littlehale Rd. 

10 Fogg Dr. 

1 Back River Rd. 

48 Bagdad Rd. 



659-4451 
868-2293 
868-2293 
868-1342 
742-3162 
868-5138 



Richard Hallett 
James Hewitt 
Richard Lord 
Daniel G. Miner 
Judith Spang 



193 Packers Falls Rd. 

4 Fairchild Dr. 

85 Bennett Rd. 

1 Sullivan Falls Rd. 

55 Wiswall Rd. 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
1 Yr 
lYr 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
lYr 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
3/04 
3/04 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
3/04 



N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 
N/A 



PDA NOISE COMPATIBILITY COMMITTEE 

Craig Seymour 110 Durham Pt. Rd. 

SCHOOL FUNDING STUDY COMMISSION 

Michael H. Evemgam 49 Emerson Rd. 

John Farrell 8 Little John Rd. 

Kathy McWilliams 72 Bucks Hill Rd. 

David Pease 11 Willey Creek Rd. 

Shirley Thompson 45 Bagdad Rd. 

Robert Toutkoushian 19 Ffrost Dr. 

Arthur Grant, Cncl rep. 
Paul Beaudoin, ex-officio member 

STRAFFORD REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION (MPO POLICY) 

VACANT 4 Yrs 

Neil Niman 10 Cold Spring Rd. 862-3336 4 Yrs 



Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 

Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 



Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 
Council 



868-7657 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


State 


868-3516 


3 Yrs 


12/05 


State 


659-2721 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


State 


659-3701 


3 Yrs 


7/04 


State 


659-5936 


3 Yrs 


3/04 


State 


868-2441 


3 Yrs 


3/06 


Council 


868-5765 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


659-7605 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 




N/A 


N/A 


Council 


868-3835 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


868-5138 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


868-6393 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 



3/07 Council 

3/06 Council 

...continued on next page- 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



11 



OFFICIAL/BOARD 



ADDRESS 



PHONE 



TERM 



TERM 
EXPIRES 



APPT. 
AUTH. 



George Rief 



23 Edgly Garrison Rd. 



SMPO TECHNICAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

James Campbell, Dii: of 15 Newmarket Rd. 

Planning and Com/Tiunity Development 



868-1759 



868-8064 



4 Yrs 



lYr 



3/04 



6/02 



Council 



Council 



UNH OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL STUDY COMMITTEE (Joint UNHITown) 



Town Reps. 












Cheryle St. Onge 


8 Wiswall Rd. 


659-7528 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


Ken Rotner 


36 Madbury Rd. 


868-5080 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


Edward Valena 


Durham Pt. Rd. 


868-2174 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


Marjorie Wolfson 


12 Fairchild Dr 


868-5192 


N/A 


N/A 


Council 


Annmarie Harris 


56 Oyster River Rd 


868-5182 


lYr 


3/02 


Council 



UNH Reps. 

Ke\nn Charles, VP for Student Affairs 
Allan Braun, Asst. VP of Facilities 
Denny Byrne, Dir, Campus Rec. 
Linda Hayden, Asst. Dir., Campus Rec. 
Doug Bencks, UNH Campus Planner 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES 



TRAFFIC SAFETY COMMITTEE 

Jim Campbell, Planner 
Thomas Johnson, Zoning Officer 
David Kurz, Police Chief 
Ronald O'Keefe, Fire Chief 
Michael Lynch, Dir Of Public Works 
Malcolm Sandberg 

WATER, WASTEWATER & SOLID WASTE COMMITTEE 

Mike Lynch, Dir Of Public Works 

Bob Levesque, Town Engineer 

Brad Larrabee, UNH, Dir Utilities 

Duncan Pollack, UNH, Exec. Dir Facilities Sues. 



868-8064 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


868-8064 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


868-2324 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


868-5531 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


868-5578 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


868-5211 


N/A 


N/A 


N/A 


868-5578 








868-5578 








862-4045 








862-2650 









■ 2 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



SPECIAL RECOGNITION 



CRAIG 



DC AT Coordinator 




Durham has been fortu- 
nate this past year to 
have found two individu- 
als who have contributed 
immeasurably to the 
Town's administrative 
operations. 

Craig Stevens 
became employed with 
the Town on a part-time 
basis in April 2003. 

raig, his wife Ailise, 
and their two chil- 
dren, Aaron and 
Rachel, have lived in 
Durham for 13 years. Craig is 
self-employed and operates his 
business in Durham. He has. a 
background in radio broadcasting 
and was previously employed as 
a General Manager for a print- 
ing company in Portsmouth. 

Craig has dramatically 
improved the organization, pro- 
fessionalism and overall quality 
of the Town's Cable Access 
Television operations. Some 
improvements and changes Craig 
has made as DCAT Coordinator 
include: 

1 Ensuring that qualified, fully- 
trained volunteers/part-time 
video production people are 
scheduled to run the meetings 
and that a crew is ready for any 
special programming requiring 
broadcasting. 



Providing DCAT representation 
at the annual Durham Day at 
Wagon Hill event. 

; Ensuring that the bulletin 
board is kept up-to-date. 

E Coordinating video productions 
for the Planning Office & 
Zoning Board of Adjustment, as 
well as "Durham Day" and the 
Piscataqua Gundalow 
Company in Portsmouth. 

Adding equipment to the DCAT 
control room at the Town Hall 
that was only available at the 
Oyster River High School, 
including editing stations and 
mini-dv cameras. 

Adding satellite commercial- 
free radio to the bulletin board. 

A future initiative for the 
DCAT program will be to begin 
the upgrading of video equipment 
and video streaming. Another 
goal will be to develop and 
implement community 
programming. D 



Town ot Durham 2003 Annual Report 



13 



ECIAL RECOGNITION 



LUKE 
VINCENT 

MIS Coordinator 




Durham has been fortu- 
nate this past year to 
have found two individu- 
als who have contributed 
immeasurably to the 
Town's administrative 
operations. 

Luke Vincent 
became employed with 
the Town on a part-time 
basis in January 2003. 

uke is a senior at the 
University of New 
Hampshire and will be 
gi-aduating in May 2005 
with a Bachelor of Science degree 
in Computer Science. Luke is 
from Loudon, NH. His education 
and astute knowledge of comput- 
ers have been extremely benefi- 
cial to the Town and Luke has 
been instrumental in providing 
support to all Town departments, 
as well as the Durham Public 
Library. Some improvements 
and changes Luke has made as 
MIS Coordinator include: 

is Purchase of updated computers 
for Town staff, thereby leaving 
the Town in a better position 
for future application changes 
and reduction of time spent 
servicing outdated equipment. 

H Initiation of Durham's ListServ, 
which is designed as a means 
for the Town to e-mail 
announcements to the general 
public. The ListServ currently 
has 163 members signed on. It 
is possible to sign up via the 
Town's web site by going to 
www.ci.durham.nh.us. Then 
click "Online Services" at the 



top of the screen, and then 
"Mailing List Signup" on the 
left hand side of the screen. 
This page will then allow inter- 
ested people to sign up for the 
service. 

Bringing the Town's e-mail 
service in-house for better secu- 
rity and stabilization. 

A major initiative of the MIS 
Department for 2004 will be to 
replace the Town's tax and finan- 
cial software programs. These 
are currently DOS-based applica- 
tions that are inflexible and not 
user-friendly. Another goal will 
be to bring more services to the 
citizens of Durham through web- 
based applications. In the near 
future, Durham residents will be 
able to access many GIS applica- 
tions through the Town's website 
as well as renew their car regis- 
trations and even license their 
dogs online. D 



14 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



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Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



15 



2004 AGENDA 
INFORMATIONAL TOWN MEETING 



Wednesday March 10, 2004 at 7:00 p.m. 
Town Hall - Council Chambers 



I. Introductions of Public Officials by Town Moderator 

Members of the 2003 Town Council 

Newly elected members to the Town Council 2004 

Election results of other Town Officials 

II. Remarks 

Town Council Chairman, Malcolm Sandberg 
Town Administrator, Todd I. Selig 

III. Service Recognitions for Elected Officials and Town Staff 



rV. Conversation with Representatives of Town Departments and Town 
Boards, Commissions and Committees 

Written reports of the Town departments, boards, commissions and committees 
appear in the 2003 Annual Report. Representatives will be present to address citi- 
zens' questions or comments. 



V. Other Business 



VI. Adjournment 



1 S Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



ADMINISTRATIVE SUMMARY 



BUSINESS MANAGER 



■ Paul Beaudoin 

Durham Business Manager 

he mission of the 
Business Office is to 
provide support servic- 
es to all Town depart- 
ments by working interactively 
with Department Heads and 
their staff. Our goal is to provide 
timely and reliable information 
by which department managers, 
the Town Administrator and ulti- 
mately the Town Council can 
make informed decisions in the 
best interest of the Town. 

Specifically the Business 
Office provides accounting, pur- 
chasing, payroll, assessing, com- 
puter support services, accounts 
receivable billing and collection 
and cash management services 
for the Town. Additionally, we 
provide support to the Town 
Administrator in preparation of 
the annual operating budget and 
the ten-year Capital 
Improvement Plan. The Business 
Manager is also designated as 
the Welfare Officer for the Town. 

2003 was a year of settling in 
and fine-tuning operations in the 
Business Office. After years of 
turnover and turmoil, the rela- 
tively new staff in the Business 
Office has the financial opera- 
tions of the Town well in hand. 
Financial Analyst Gail Jablonski, 
having completed almost three 
years in the office, has main- 



tained the Town's financial 
records at a level never before 
seen in Durham. Accounting 
Assistant Lisa Beaudoin, with 
almost four years experience 
with the Town, has done a won- 
derful job in overseeing payroll 
and benefits, accounts payables, 
worker's compensation and act- 
ing as intake coordinator for 
Welfare. Having completed my 
second year as Business 
Manager with the Town, I con- 
tinue to focus on staff training, 
which will continue to play an 
important role in keeping the 
Town moving forward. 

We accomplished many of the 
goals set for the year as well as 
addressing unforeseen challenges 
during the year: 



Completed a Request for 
Proposals (RFP) for an integrated 
financial software package that 
includes Tax & Utilities, 
Financial Management, 
Personnel & Payroll, Voter 
Registration and Property 
Appraisal modules. The new soft- 
ware will ultimately afford resi- 
dents the opportunity to query 
information, pay bills and con- 
duct other business with the 
Town via the Internet. 

We have been constantly seek- 
ing additional information in 
preparation for the changeover to 
GASB 34 in 2004, however, in a 
seminar that I attended in early 
November, an analyst from 
Moody's Investor Service 

...continued on next page. 



Business Office staff (l-r): Paul Beaudoin. Lisa Beaudoin and Gail Jablonski. 



»^feiaiCfei»?^ "f^^f 




Administrative Summary 



17 



Business Manager 

(continued) 

announced that non-compliance 
with GASB 34 would not affect 
our bond rating. This new infor- 
mation will be useful in deter- 
mining whether we will take on 
the added expense and work of 
implementing GASB 34. 

After issuing bid requests, we 
received nine bids for a new digi- 
tal copier/printer/scanner for 
Town Hall. A careful review and 
one-month evaluation of the low- 
bid machine has produced a 
machine that has been given high 
praise by all users. Its added 
functionality of being a high- 
speed scanner has given employ- 
ees one more valuable tool in the 
dissemination and storage of 
information. 

In addition to accomplishing 
these goals, the Business Office 
staff has been busy with other 
challenges that came along dur- 
ing the year including: 



Contracts with the DPMMA 
and AFSCME are now under 
tentative agreements. The fire- 
fighter's contract process is 
awaiting the fact-finder's report 
before continuing any further. 

This year, due to the extreme- 
ly low interest rates available to 
the Town for short-term borrow- 
ing, we broke out our short-term 
borrowing, in the form of Tax 
Anticipation Notes (TANs), into 
two pieces. The first piece, a 
seven million dollar issue was 
completed in April of this year. 
This was intended to provide 
enough funds to last the Town 
for approximately six-months. A 
second TAN issued in conjunc- 
tion with our Bond Anticipation 
Note (BAN) to fund 2003 Capital 
Projects was issued in October. 
By breaking our short-term bor- 
rowing into two pieces, the Town 
was able to take advantage of 
extremely low short-term bor- 
rowing rates while keeping the 
money in an investment account 
that earned interest at a higher 



rate that what we borrowed it 
for. The Town realized consider- 
able savings from this process. 

Financial Analyst Gail 
Jablonski attended a three-day 
Supervisory Academy put on by 
Primex geared towards new and 
prospective supervisors. 

Accounting Assistant Lisa 
Beaudoin attended a benefits 
seminar hosted by the 
HealthTrust and two meetings 
on the NH Local Welfare 
Administrators' Association. 

I attended numerous manage- 
ment seminars and financial ses- 
sions during the year. With the 
complexities of duties entrusted 
with me, I find the greatest chal- 
lenge is to keep current in all 
areas that I deal in daily. 

The Business Office staff will 
continue training to keep pace 
with their environment in hope 
of providing the highest level of 
support services to the various 
departments who are serving our 
community. (Zl 



COUNCIL CHAIRMAN 




Malcolm Sandberg 

Council Chairman 

ine citizens serving 
as your Town 
Councilors share a 
common purpose to 
improve the quality of life for 
Durham residents through just 
decision-making. Each values a 
fair and open-minded approach 
to problem solving and strive for 
excellence in all endeavors. We 
value trust, respect, honesty, 
integrity and justice. 



The Town Council set its goals 
shortly after the March election. 
Over the course of the year, we 
try to achieve these goals keeping 
in mind our "purpose" and our 
"values". Durham is fortunate to 
have a professional staff and a 
large number of citizen volun- 
teers dedicated to improving our 
community and achieving our 
community goals. I am very 
pleased to report that our collec- 
tive efforts are paying off in 
many areas. 

The Assessor's revaluation of 
properties in Durham is now 



complete. The revaluation 
process, mandated by the State of 
New Hampshire, is to assess fair- 
ly and consistently properties 
within the Town. We believe we 
now have in place a procedure 
that will allow us to achieve this 
goal on a five-year cycle as 
required by the New Hampshire 
Constitution. 

The Town Council appointed a 
study committee to evaluate the 
school funding formula used to 
apportion the costs of the Oyster 
River Cooperative School District 



"t O Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



among the participating towns. 
The upshot of that effort is that 
the School Board concurred with 
Durham's contention that the 
current apportionment of ORCSD 
costs needs adjustment. At the 
time of this writing, the School 
Board is seeking legal advice on 
the proper procedure for accom- 
plishing this goal. 

At the direction of the Town 
Council, the Town Administrator 
is actively renegotiating multiple 
agreements we have with the 
University of New Hampshire. 
Our goal is to ensure that the 
costs of conducting the business 
of the Town are shared fairly 
with the University. 

As Durham voters know, the 
2.5 million-dollar conservation 
bond initiative that appeared on 
the ballot in 2003 passed with 
very strong support from the vot- 
ers. Although we have yet to 
spend any of that money, I am 
pleased to report that, perhaps as 
a result of the publicity about the 
land conservation effort, some 
landowners have voluntarily 
granted conservation easements. 
We are currently awaiting a 
report from the Conservation 
Commission with their recom- 
mended procedure for evaluating 
potential purchases. 

Recently the Town Council 
voted to proceed with taking 
ownership of the so-called "Craig 
Supply property", adjacent to the 
railroad station. Contaminated 
with dangerous chemicals used 
in the dry cleaning industry, the 
property has been under study 
by the New Hampshire 
Department of Environmental 
Services in cooperation with the 
Town and University. The taking 
of ownership is one step in the 



process of returning the property 
to valuable, safe re-use in the 
near future. 

On another land-use matter, 
there is continuing concern 
about our stewardship of Wagon 
Hill Farm. We are considering a 
resident/non-resident permit 
system that will assist in recoup- 
ing some maintenance costs and 
to fund improvements to the 
property. 

We are all aware of the unfor- 
tunate, riotous behavior exhibit- 
ed by young residents last April 
and again this fall in the down- 
town area. We have been doing 
all we can to prosecute those 
who engage in unlawful activity. 
The University has acted 
against disruptive students with 
swift, meaningful sanctions. It 
is our hope that the combined 
efforts of the Town and 
University will discourage dan- 
gerous, unlawful behavior and 
encourage socially responsible 
celebrations in the future. 

In response to citizen com- 
plaints about degradation of 
properties in their neighbor- 
hoods, the Town Council is 
studying landlord-licensing 
requirements adopted in other 
communities. Absentee landlords 
and laissez-faire property man- 
agers bear some responsibility 
for failing to supervise their ten- 
ants. Concerned citizens should 
follow these developments close- 
ly to ensure that their voices will 
be heard. 

Town Administrator Todd 
Selig and I have actively partici- 
pated in the University of New 
Hampshire Campus Master Plan 
Update. Four major areas of con- 
cern for the Town are 
water/wastewater management, 






4 




Malcolm Sandberg, Council Chairman. 

emergency services, undergradu- 
ate student housing and regional 
and local transportation and traf- 
fic issues. Throughout this 
process, the Town has encouraged 
the University to provide place- 
holders in the plan for future 
housing adequate to provide 
housing for as many students as 
may wish to hve on campus. At 
the present time the demand for 
off-campus student housing 
exists mostly because University 
housing capacity is inadequate. 
In fact, the University houses 
54^^ of undergraduates in facili- 
ties designed to accommodate 
SOVf of the undergraduate popu- 
lation. The current draft of the 
University Master Plan Update 
includes housing for only 60% of 
undergraduates with placehold- 
ers for up to TOVf . The Town 
Council strongly encourages the 
University to provide housing for 
at least 107( of the undergradu- 
ate students. 

The Town has encouraged the 
University to look at the region- 

.. continued on next page. 



Administrative Summary 



19 



Council Chairman 

(continued) 

al impact of its parking and on- 
campus transportation plans. 
For its part, the Town has 
included in its Master Plan and 
in its Capital Improvement Plan 
provisions for a study of a future 
access road from Route 4, west of 
the railroad. The goal is to 
establish better access to the 
West Side campus and relieve 
traffic pressure on Durham's res- 



idential zones. We are still 
hopeful that the University will 
recognize the problems that 
resulted from poor planning of 
the past and join us in finding a 
solution to the traffic flow prob- 
lems experienced by the Town. 

Finally, the Town Council 
appointed an Economic 
Development Committee to 
explore ideas for broadening our 
tax base without further burden- 
ing the taxpayers. Their initial 
report is due to the Town Council 



in January and their "charge" 
will be redefined at that time. 

Speaking on behalf of all the 
Town Councilors, I want to thank 
our citizens for the honor of serv- 
ing as the legislative body of the 
Town. On behalf of all the citi- 
zens of Durham, 1 want to thank 
all the volunteers and our profes- 
sional staff for their hard work 
that has made this year a safe 
and productive one. D 



INFORMATIONAL TOWN MEETING MINUTES 



■ Informational 
Town Meeting 

Wednesday March 12, 2003 
at 7:00 p.nn^ 
Oyster River High 
School Cafeteria 

Submitted by: 
Jennie Berry, Admin. 
Assistant 

Mike Everngam called the 
meeting to order at 7:03 PM. He 
welcomed everyone to the 
Informational Town Meeting. 

I. Introductions of Public 
Officials by Town Moderator 

Moderator Mike Everngam intro- 
duced the current Town Council 
members. 

Mike Everngam introduced the 
newly elected 2003 Town Council 
members - Malcolm Sandberg, re- 
elected for a three year term; 
John Kraus, elected for a three- 
year term, Neil Niman, elected 
for a three-year term; and 
Patricia Samuels, elected for a 
one-year term. 

Mike Everngam read the results 
of the election as follows: 



For Library Trustee 

Suzanne Loder 860 votes 

Jere Vincent 305 votes 

Douglas L. Wheeler 860 votes 

For Moderator 

Christopher T Regan ..371 votes 

Anne F. Valenza 714 votes 

For Trustee of the Trust Fund 
John de Campi 950 votes 

Mike Everngam announced 
that Warrant Article 2 passed 
(1,149 yes, 349 no) regarding the 
appropriation of $2,500,000.00 
for the permanent protection of 
open space to help stabilize 
taxes and protect the rural char- 
acter of the Town by purchase of 
land or acquisition of conserva- 
tion easements. 

II. Remarks 

Remarks by Town Council 
Chairman Malcolm Sandberg: 

Chair Sandberg presented 
Mike Everngam with a Durham 
Historical Association afghan for 
his services as Town Moderator. 
Chair Sandberg also presented 
a gift certificate to Gislea 
Everngam for her assistance 



to the Town. Durham resident, 
Shirley Thompson, presented 
Mike Everngam with a 
teddy bear. 

Chair Sandberg congratulated 
all the candidates who were suc- 
cessful in their campaigns. He 
thanked everyone who ran for 
office and expressed his personal 
appreciation for his or her will- 
ingness to serve. 

Chair Sandberg informed the 
audience that the Town Council 
would begin the process of filling 
vacancies on various Town boards, 
commissions and committees at 
its next meeting. He encouraged 
citizens to consider choosing to be 
involved in some important and 
rewarding work on behalf of the 
Town. He invited citizens to sub- 
mit an application to serve on a 
Town board or committee and 
informed the audience that there 
were applications available on the 
table at the entrance of the multi- 
purpose room. 

In closing. Chair Sandberg 
recognized the following outgoing 
chairmen of important Town 
groups for their efforts: David 
Pease, Chairman of the Planning 



20 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Board; Bill Annis, Chairman of 
the Zoning Board of Adjustment; 
and Bill Schoonmaker, Chairman 
of the Historic District 
Commission. 

Remarks by Town Administrator 
Todd Selig: 

Town Administrator Todd 
Selig presented Director of 
Public Works, Mike Lynch, with 
a certificate of appreciation rec- 
ognizing his 25 years of service 
to the Town. 

Town Administrator Todd 
Selig recognized the current 
Council members for their dedi- 
cation and hard work. He also 
recognized Malcolm Sandberg 
for his leadership while serving 
as Council Chair. 

Town Administrator Selig 
highlighted some of the 2002 
accomplishments listed in his 
report, which are contained in the 
2002 Annual Report. He conclud- 
ed by stating that it was his goal 
to ensure that all Durham munic- 
ipal employees are actively work- 
ing in the service of the Town to 
accomplish goals and objectives as 
envisioned by the Council. 

III. Open discussion between 
Town Council and Durham 
residents 

Mike Everngam introduced 
Kathy McWiUiams, Chair of the 
School Funding Formula Study 
Commission. 

Ms. McWilliams gave a pres- 
entation on the school funding 
issue, which encompassed the fol- 
lowing points: 

Mission of the Commission. 

History of the SAU 5, which 
was formed in 1954 

SAU 5 today 

Breakdown of tax setting 
apportionment 



What has changed since 1954 

Impact of statewide property 
tax aiid adequacy aid 

Other factors affecting the way 
Durham's apportionment for- 
mula works 

Recommendations of the School 
Funding Formula Study 
Commission 

Questions and/or comments were 
made by the following citizens: 

Roni Pekins, 10 Beards Landing 
Road 

Kevin Webb, 22 Davis Avenue 

Sam Pollard, 16 Shearwater 
Drive 

Eileen Sahagian, 32 Sumac 
Lane 

Annmarie Harris, 56 Oyster 
River Road 

Marjorie Smith. Piscataqua 
Road 

Mike Everngam introduced David 
Pease, Chair of the Durham 
Planning Board, to give a presen- 
tation on the development and 
implementation of the updated 
Zoning Ordinance per the 2000 
Master Plan. 

Mr. Pease outlined the makeup 
of the Zoning Rewrite Committee. 
He said the committee was being 
assisted by a consultant, Mark 
Eyerman. He thanked prior Town 
Councilor, Eileen Fitzpatrick, for 
her efforts in beginning this 
process. Ms. Fitzpatrick was the 
first Chairman of the Zoning 
Rewrite Committee. Mr. Pease 
provided a brief history of the zon- 
ing rewrite process. He concluded 
by listing the three largest 
changes that have been made to 
the Zoning Ordinance as: 1) con- 
servation subdivision; 2) creation 
of new districts; and 3) wetlands, 
shoreland and aquifer protection 
overlays. 



Questions and/or comments were 
made by the following citizens: 

Kathy McWilliams, 72 Bucks 
Hill Road 

Robbi Woodbum, 6 Cormorant 
Circle 

Mike Everngam introduced 
Malcolm Sandberg who spoke 
briefly about the Newmarket 
Road/Dover Road intersection. 

Malcolm Sandberg introduced 
the following citizens who provid- 
ed conceptual plans for possible 
Town centers at the Newmarket 
Road/Dover Road intersection 
site: John Aber, Chair, Durham 
Public Library Board of Trustees; 
Art Guadano, Architect and Robbi 
Woodbum, Architect. 

Mr. Sandberg also provided a 
conceptual plan, designed by 
Nancy Sandberg, as one possible 
"vision" for a Town center. 

Town Administrator Todd 
Selig read a letter from Ms. 
Emily Cook, sharing her perspec- 
tive for a Town center. 

rV. Reports of the Town 
departments, boards, commis- 
sions and committees 

Mike Everngam called for a 
recess at 9:05 PM to allow citi- 
zens the opportunity to speak to 
various department heads and 
committee members who were 
present. 

V. Other Business 

Mike Everngam reconvened the 
meeting at 9:19 PM and asked if 
there was any other business to 
be conducted. There was no fur- 
ther business. 

VI. Adjournment 

j Mike Everngam ADJOURNED 
1 the meeting at 9:20 PM. D 



Administrative Summary 



21 



ORDINANCES FOR 2003 



2003-01 

Amending Certain Portions of 
Chapter 153 "Vehicles and 
Traffic", Section 153-29 "Metered 
Parking Areas" of the Durham 
Town Code by Adding the Fees of 
this Section Into The Town-wide 
"Master Fee Schedule", Adding a 
Provision for a Two-hour 
Maximum Parking Time Limit in 
the Pettee Brook Lane Parking 
Lot, and Deleting Paragraph A.4. 
in the Pettee Brook Lane Parking 
Lot Section. 
Passed 02/03/03 

2003-02 

Amending Chapter 153 "Vehicles 
& Traffic", Sections 153-23 and 
153-52 of the Durham Town Code 



by Creating a 15-minute Parking 
Limit for Vehicles Parking in the 
Post Office Parking Lot Located 
on Madbury Road, adding the 
words "Madbury Road Parking 
Lot" behind the Pettee Brook 
Lane street designation, and 
deleting the street designation 
referred to as "Parking Lot" in 
its entirety. 
Passed 03/17/03 

2003-03 

Ainending certain sections of 
Chapter 68, "Fire Prevention" of 
the Durham Town Code in order 
to adopt the 2000 editions of the 
Fire Prevention Code and the 
Life Safety Code, published by 
the National Fire Protection 



Association, and adding the fees 
of this section into the Town-wide 
"Master Fee Schedule" 
Passed 10/06/03 

2003-04 

Amending Sections 132-1, 132-2 
and 132-3 of Chapter 132 "Tax 
Exemptions and Credits" of the 
Durham Town Code to increase 
exemption amounts for the blind, 
disabled and elderly due to the 
overall increase of property val- 
ues within the Town of Durham 
as a result of the 2003 Town-wide 
revaluation and to adjust income 
qualification criteria based on 
current Social Security benefici- 
ary information. 
Passed 10/06/03 D 



RESOLUTIONS FOR 2003 



2003-01 

Correcting errors in Resolution 
#2002-25 dated December 16, 
2002 for approval of the FY 2003 
General Operating budgets 
Passed 01/06/03 

2003-02 

Adopting a town-wide Master Fee 
Schedule for the inclusion of fees, 
by department, as needed 
Passed 01/06/03 

2003-03 

Authorizing the acceptance of pri- 
vate donations made to the Town 
of Durham between July 1 and 
December 31, 2002 
Passed 01/20/03 

2003-04 

Rescinding the current General 
Assistance (Welfare) regulations 
and adopting new regulations for 
General Assistance 
Passed 03/03/03 



2003-05 

Creating a July 4th Independence 

Day Citizens Committee to plan 

and execute Durham's annual 

July 4th Independence Day 

Celebration 

Passed 03/03/03 

2003-06 

Supporting the continued funding 

for the Land and Commimity 

Heritage Investment Program 

(LCHIP) 

Passed 03/03/03 

2003-07 

Recognizing outgoing elected 

officials, appointed members to 

various Town boards, commissions 

and committees, and Durham's 

legislative delegation for their 

dedicated services to the Town 

of Durham 

Passed 03/03/03 

2003-08 

Directing the Town Administrator 



to discontinue development of the 
so-called Wagon Track Bike Path 
consisting of 2.7 miles of bicycle 
path fi-om Route 108 in Durham 
along the "Old Wagon Track" 
through Madbury to the intersec- 
tion of Watson Road and Back 
River Road 
Passed 08/18/03 
2003-09 

Establishing regular Town Council 
meeting dates for April 2003 
through March 2004 
Passed 03/17/03 
2003-1 

Authorizing the acceptance of 
funds from NH Department of 
Safety, Emergency Management 
Grant, awarded for the purchase 
and installation of an emergency 
electrical generator at the Police 
Department 
Passed 03/17/03 
2003-1 1 
Establishing the compensation for 



22 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



non-bargaining unit employees for 

Fiscal Year 2003 

Passed 04107103 

2003-1 2 

Authorizing the issuance of seven 

million dollars ($7,000,000) in Tax 

Anticipation Notes 

Passed 04107103 

2003-13 

Authorizing the additional appro- 
priation of $300,000 for the land- 
fill closure/new transfer station 
projects, said funds coming from 
an additional contribution from 
the University of New Hampshire 
of $300,000 and authorizing the 
Town Administrator to enter into 
a contract with Capitol 
Earthmo\ing of Barre, VT to com- 
plete the construction phase of the 
Durham Point landfill closure and 
new transfer station facility for a 
total cost of $1,349,845 
Passed 07/07/03 

2003-14 

Requesting that the Trustees of 
Trust Funds transfer $13,750 
from the Fire Equipment Capital 
Reserve Fund to the Capital Fund 
account number 07-4700-1008- 
450-03 for refurbishing the Fire 
Department's Engine 3 truck 
Passed 07/07/03 

2003-15 

Requesting that the Trustees of 
Trust Funds transfer $10,500 



from the Fire Equipment Capital 
Reserve Fund to the Capital Fund 
to make up the deficit in the 
Capital Fund due to the sale of 
the Fire Department's old Rescue 
Truck (R-1) for less than original- 
ly anticipated 
Passed 07/07/03 

2003-16 

Authorizing the acceptance of pri- 
vate donations and unanticipated 
revenues received by the Town of 
Durham between January 1, 2003 
and June 30. 2003 
Passed 08/18/03 

2003-1 7 

Accepting a grant from the NH 
Department of Safety "Homeland 
Security Grant Program" of up to 
$29,270.71 and authorizing the 
expenditure of the funds for pur- 
chasing specialized equipment to 
enhance the capability of the 
police and fire departments to 
prevent and respond to possible 
events of terrorism 
Passed 09/22/03 

2003-18 

Authorizing the issuance of one 
million nine hundred thousand 
dollars ($1,900,000) in Tax 
Anticipation Notes 
Passed 09/22/03 

2003-19 

Authorizing the issuance of long- 



term bonds or notes not to exceed 
five hundred ninety-nine thou- 
sand eighty-one dollars ($599,381) 
for the purpose of bonding 2003 
Capital Fund projects 
Passed 09/22/03 

2003-20 

Establishing rules of attendance 
and forfeiture of office for all 
Town-appointed boards, commis- 
sions and committees 
Passed 10/20/03 

2003-21 

Accepting two grants from the 
New Hampshire Department of 
Safety "Homeland Security 
Grant Program" in the amounts 
of $29,270.71 and $30,262.00 
and authorizing the expenditure 
of the grant money for the pur- 
chase of specialized equipment 
to enhance the capability of local 
government agencies to prevent 
and respond to possible events of 
terrorism as outlined in the 
grant 
Passed 12/01/03 

2003-22 

Town Council Approval of the FY 
2004 General Operating Budgets 
Passed 12/15/03 

2003-23 

Adoption of the FY 2004-2013 
Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) 
Passed 12/15/03 D 



TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 



Todd Selig 

Town Aaministrator 

Ithough 2003 will like- 
ly be remembered as 
the year in which the 
Old Man of the 
Mountain, set 1,200' above Profile 
Lake in Franconia State Park, 
met its demise, it was also a year 




marked by tremendous activity 
here in Durham from dealing 
with riotous behavior in the 
downtown area to a town-wide 
reassessment affecting every tax- 
payer in the community. Due to 
the breadth of issues with which 
the Town has grappled in 2003, 
this year's overview highlights 
twenty-one major initiatives. 



The Durham Planning Board, 
the Zoning Re- Write Committee, 
members of our planning and 
zoning staff, and interested resi- 
dents devoted countless hours in 
2003 toward the development of 
revised zoning regulations for the 
Town of Durham. It is anticipat- 
ed that the Town Council will 

..continued on next page 



Administrative Summary 



23 



Town Administrator 

(continued) 

begin to review zoning re-write 
proposals in the first half of 2004. 
Interestingly, the re-write process 
began in 2000. 

In March the Town passed a 
$2.5 Million Land Acquisition 
Bond which will enable the com- 
munity to preserve valuable 
tracts of open space over time 
through outright purchase or by 
utilizing easements. 

The Town continued the 
process of streamlining Durham's 
municipal operation. One full- 
time position within the 
Department of Public Works, 
Water/Solid Waste Division, was 
eliminated as part of a general 
restructuring within that agency. 
In addition, a full-time secretarial 
position was phased out within 
the Town Administrator's Office. 

The Town was confronted with 
a series of civil disturbances & 
riots in the downtown area in 
April revolving around the NCAA 
Men's Hockey Frozen Four 
Championship Tourney, and 
again in October associated with 
the baseball World Series. Rocks, 
bottles, cans, and other objects 
were thrown at police. Fires 
were also set at a number of loca- 
tions in the immediate downtown 
area. In addition to the Town 
pursuing sanctions against those 
arrested during the disturbances, 
the University of New Hampshire 
acted swiftly to hold students 
arrested accountable for their 
behavior. 

The Town worked to revise 
and update Durham's Emergency 
Management Plan in 2003. A 
mock emergency scenario simula- 
tion was conducted on April 14, 



2003, involving representatives 
from the Town and the 
University. 

During the mid-summer 
through the early fall, Durham 
gained national attention with 
an outbreak of a series of burgla- 
ries in which a male assailant, 
locally known as the Durham 
"snipper," gained entry to young 
women's apartments in order to 
steal articles of clothing as the 
victims slept. Durham Police 
organized a regional task force 
and eventually identified and 
arrested an individual whom 
they believe to be responsible for 
these incidents. 

The Town proved successful 
in working with its legislative 
delegation, as well as with repre- 
sentatives from Lee, Madbury, 
and the University of New 
Hampshire, in order to retain 
the Durham District Court in 
Durham in the midst of 
aggressive state cutbacks. 

On August 18, 2003, the 
Durham Town Council took up 
the matter of the controversial 
Wagon Track Bike Path one last 
time. By adopting Resolution 
2003-08, the Council directed the 
Administrator to take any and 
all steps necessary to discontinue 
completely and with finality the 
development of the project; a 2.7 
mile bicycle path from Route 108 
in Durham along the "old wagon 
track" through Madbury to the 
intersection of Watson Road and 
Back River Road. 

It was a year for dealing with 
ongoing labor negotiations with 
all four of the Town's collective 
bargaining units. A bargaining 
agreement with the police offi- 
cers was ratified by the Town 
Council on April 21, 2003. Both 




Todd Selig Town Adminibtrator 

the public works contract and the 
middle manager contract are 
expected to be settled within a 
month's time. Despite a fact- 
finding session in July with the 
firefighters, we have been unable 
to reach agreement with this unit 
since the expiration of the fire- 
fighters' last contract in 
December of 2001. 

Representatives from the 
Town have participated exten- 
sively in the University of New 
Hampshire's ongoing Campus 
Master Plan revision in an effort 
to bring to the attention of 
University administrators the 
impact that institution has upon 
transportation, parking, housing, 
neighborhoods, economic devel- 
opment, and general quality of 
life issues in Durham. It is our 
ongoing goal to ensure that the 
University remains a benefit to 
Durham residents in the years 
to come. 

The Department of Public 
Works has had a busy year with 
respect to ongoing major initia- 



24 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



lives. Following years of discus- 
sion the Town moved forward 
with improvements to and expan- 
sion of the Council Chambers 
located at the Town Office. A 
$1.6 million capping, redesign, 
and reconstruction of the 
Durham Solid Waste Transfer 
Station on Durham Point Road 
proceeded. Modifications and 
upgrades totaling $2.4 million 
were begun at the Durham 
Wastewater Facility in an effort 
to improve equipment deficien- 
cies and other operational prob- 
lems. The $996,909.00 Packers 
Falls Bridge project was also 
completed, however, great con- 
cern presently exists among resi- 
dents with respect to the final 
product as it significantly dimin- 
ishes the view of the river below. 

The Assessing Office was fully 
engaged in 2003 with the comple- 
tion of a two year revaluation 
process. The staff visited every 
property in Durham, a total of 
2360 taxable parcels, in an effort 
to assess the fair market value of 
each. Although the Town had ini- 
tially planned to hire an external 
firm to conduct the revaluation, it 
was determined that this project 
could be completed in-house with 
a savings of $153,000.00 to 
Durham taxpayers. 

After years of dispute between 
supporters of the Jackson's 
Landing Playground, descendants 
of the Leathers family, and the 
Town of Durham, a three-foot 
black aluminum fence was 
installed around the Leathers 
Graveyard located at Jackson's 
Landing in order to safely and 
tastefully separate it from chil- 
dren at play. 

The Durham Business Office 
was instrumental in putting out 



to bid an overhaul of the Town's 
integrated financial software sys- 
tem with an anticipated installa- 
tion date of 2004. This 
$125,000.00 project will put the 
Town on solid footing with 
respect to tracking its funds and 
accounts in the future. 

Former Councilor Scott Hovey 
and present Councilor Arthur 
Grant succeeded in organizing 
an outstanding Durham Day 
Celebration on September 14, 
2003. The Town Council, com- 
munity volunteers, and staff 
members pitched in to make the 
day a great success. 

The Durham Community 
Access Television Station had 
many production successes in 
2003. The Town hired Durham 
resident Craig Stevens as a part- 
time coordinator in April. With 
Craig's efforts, as well as those of 
Paul Gasowski and our dedicated 
DCAT Committee, we can look 
for great things to come in 2004. 

After much discussion and 
review, the Town Council adopt- 
ed a revision to the Durham 
Fire Prevention Code, bringing 
it into conformity with new 
National Fire Protection 
Association standards. The 
modifications were reflective of 
an assessment made by the Fire 
Department concerning the 
appropriate location and mark- 
ings of fire lanes throughout the 
community. In addition, the 
Durham Fire Department host- 
ed an open house on April 27, 
2003, in celebration of its 75th 
anniversary. 

In response to citizen input, 
an evaluation began in 2003 
with respect to implementing a 
landlord permit registry ordi- 
nance and/or a disorderly house 



ordinance intended to help 
address quality of life issues for 
neighborhoods impacted by the 
existence of rental properties. 
The Council will likely take up 
this matter in 2004. 

A comprehensive review was 
conducted by the Durham School 
Funding Study Committee at the 
direction of the Town Council 
with respect to the Oyster River 
Cooperative School District fund- 
ing formula. A subsequent com- 
mittee was then established as a 
result of this effort by the Oyster 
River Cooperative School District 
with representatives from Lee, 
Madbury, Durham, and the 
Oyster River School Board. A 
more comprehensive overview of 
the committee's findings can be 
found in the Budget and Finance 
section of this Annual Report. 

In December, the Town 
Council voted to direct the 
Durham Tax Collector to move 
forward with transferring the tax 
lien, with all applicable safe- 
guards, on Tax Parcels Map 1, 
Lot 1, and Map 1, Lot 1-1, known 
locally as the Craig Supply Site, 
to the Town of Durham. This 
action was taken in conjunction 
with the submission by the Town 
of a grant application to the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency 
in an effort to clean up contami- 
nants on the Craig Supply Site in 
order to bring the property back 
into productive reuse. 

Much effort was expended by 
election officials during the 
months of November and 
December in order to determine 
an alternative election venue for 
the 2004 election cycle due to 
ongoing construction activities at 
the Oyster River High School, the 

...continued on next page. 



Administrative Summary 



25 



Town Administrator 

(continued) 



Town's historical election site. 
After much deliberation, and in 
response to concerns that had 
been raised with respect to voting 
at a religious venue, it was decid- 
ed to hold the Presidential 



Primary scheduled for January 
27, 2004, at the Heidelberg Web 
Systems facility rather than at 
the Durham Evangelical Church. 

From time to time, residents 
approach the Town with the per- 
spective, "What have you done 
for me lately?" Given the 



amount of taxes residents pay in 
Durham, this question is more 
than justified. It is my hope that 
this overview illustrates how 
active local government officials, 
comprised of both paid staff 
members and citizen volunteers, 
have in fact been over the course 
of the last twelve months. □ 



WARRANT 



■ Election Tuesday 
March 9, 2004 

To the inhabitants of the Town of 
Dinham, the County of Strafford, 
New Hampshire. 

You are hereby notified to meet 
at Durham Evangelical Church, 
Route 108/ Dover Road in said 
Durham, New Hampshire, on 
Tuesday, the ninth day of March 
2004 (the polls will be open 
between the hours of 8:00 AM and 
7:00 PM) to act upon the follow- 
ing subjects: 

ARTICLE 1: 

To bring in your votes for three 
(3) Councilors (3-year terms); 
three (3) Durham Public Library 
Board of Trustees (3-year terms); 
one ( 1 ) Durham Public Library 
Trustee (1-year term); one (1) 
Moderator (2-year term); one (1) 
Supervisor of the Checklist (6- 
year term); one (1) Town Clerk- 
Tax Collector (1-year term) and 
one ( 1) Trustee of the Trust 
Fund (3-year term). 

ARTICLE 2: 

Shall the Town approve the 
Charter amendment summarized 
below as recommended by the 



Town Council? 

Charter Article 9, Section 9.2 
"Informational Town Meeting": 
Strike this section in its entirety. 

S e c. 9.2. Informational 
Town Meeting. 

A. Each y o ar the Informational 
Town M oo ting will bo h e ld th e 
wook of the s econd Tue s day of 
March in which the Tov^ti 
Moderator shall s ummon th e 
voters of the town to hoar 
report s of tho previou s year' s 
activiti es and of propo s al s for 
th e curr e nt y o ar by tho Towti 
Council, the Towti Manager, th e 
Busine s s Manager, tho Town 
Trea s ur e r, the Town Cl o rlc/Tax 
Coll e ctor, th o Public Work s 
Director, tho Police Chi e f, th o 
Fir e Chief and th o major town 
committoe o , mth opportunity 
for public discu s sion of each 
report. With appropriat e notic e , 
th e public h e aring r e quir e 
mont s of 67 through 71 for in 
itiativo p e titions and r o forond 
a may be met at thi s mooting. 



& 



.A complet e agenda s hall be 
prepar e d for thi s meeting and 
shall bo includ e d in the Town 
Report, plac e d in two (2) local 
n e w s pap e r s of r e cord, and s hall 
be available at tho mooting. 



This change will eliminate the 
Informational Town Meeting held 
annually in March following the 
Town election. 



ARTICLE 3: 

Shall the Town approve the 
Charter amendment summarized 
below as recommended by the 
Town Council? 

Article 11, Section 11.1 
"Administrative Committees", 
Subparagraph A: 

Strik e through - Indicates lan- 
guage to be stricken from the 
Charter. 

Underline - Indicates lan- 
guage to be added to the Charter. 

A. Planning Board. There shall 
be a Planning Board consisting 
of seven (7) members and not 
more than five (5) alternate 
members as provided by state 
statutes. Six (6) of these mem- 
bers and the alternate mem- 
bers shall be appointed by the 
Town Council for terms of 
three (3) years, such terms to 
be staggered. One (1) Two (2) . 
Town Council members shall 
be appointed annually at the 
Council's first meeting to serve, 
respectively , as an primarv and 



Zo Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



alternate ex officio members. 
This These representatives 
shall have all the rights of 
membership including the 
right to hold office. The Town 
Council shall fill any vacancy 
for the period of the unexpired 
term. The Planning Board 
shall have all the powers 
granted to Planning Boards by 
state law. 

This change will memorialize 
in the Charter the Planning 
Board's ability, in accordance 
with NH RSA 673:6, to have not 
more than five alternate members 
and to memorialize the appoint- 
ment of an alternate Council 
member. 



ARTICLE 4: 

Shall the Town approve the 
Charter amendment summarized 
below as recommended by the 
Town Council? 

Article 11, Section 11.1 
"Administrative Committees", 
Subparagraph B: 

Striketlu 'o ugh - Indicates lan- 
guage to be stricken from the 
Charter. 

Underline - Indicates lan- 
guage to be added to the Charter. 

B. Conservation Commission. 
There shall be a Conservation 
Commission consisting of seven 
(7) members and up to three (3) 
alternate members . The five (5) 
members and the alternate 
members appointed by the 
Town Council shall be appoint- 
ed for terms of three ( 3 ) years, 
such terms to be staggered. The 
Planning Board and the Town 
Council shall each appoint a 
representative to the 
Conservation Commission 



annually at their first meeting. 
These representatives shall 
have all the rights of member- 
ship, including the right to hold 
office. The Town Council shall 
fill any vacancy for the period 
of the unexpired term. The 
Conservation Commission shall 
have all the powers granted to 
Conservation Commissions by 
state law. 

This change will memorialize 
in the Charter the Conservation 
Commission's ability to have up 
to three alternate members who 
can vote in the absence of regular 
members. 



ARTICLE 5: 

Shall the Town approve the 
Charter amendment summarized 
below as recommended by the 
Town Council? 

Article 11, Section 11.1 
"Administrative Committees", 
Subparagraph F: 

Strik c through - Indicates lan- 
guage to be stricken from the 
Charter. 

Underline - Indicates lan- 
guage to be added to the Charter. 

F. Board of Library Trustees. 
There shall be a Board of 
Library Trustees consisting of 
seven ( 7 ) members and not 
more than three (3) alternate 
members. All members shall be 
elected by official ballot at the 
annual Town election as 
required by state law and shall 
have terms of three (3) years, 
such terms to be staggered. 
Alternate members shall be 
appointed by the Town Council 
and shall have terms of one (1) 
year There s hall b o an interim 



Board of Library Tru s tee s con - 

who s hall b o e l e cted by unoffi 
cial ballot by the Town Council 
at it s fir s t regular mooting fol 
lowing adoption of thi s Charter 
am e ndment. M o mb o r s ofth e 
int e rim Board of Library 
Truot ooD shall B er\' o until th e 
next annual Town election at 
which tim e th e r e gular Board of 
Library Trust ees s hall b o elect - 
ed by official ballot. The inter- 
tm Board of Library Trustees 
shall have all of the powers and 
duties established in state 
statutes , grant e d to th e Board 
of Library Truste e s which shall 
be as follows; 

This change will memorialize 
in the Charter the Library Board 
of Trustee's ability to have up to 
three alternate members in accor- 
dance with RSA 202-A:10. 

All references to an "interim" 
Library Board of Trustees are 
obsolete since there is now an 
established Board of Library 
Trustees and are therefore being 
stricken from the Charter 



ARTICLE 6: 

Shall the Town approve the 
Charter amendment summarized 
below as recommended by the 
Town Council? 

Article 11, Section 11.3 "Terms 
of Office": Strike the current lan- 
guage in this section and replace 
with language that is underlined. 

Sec. 11.3. T e rms of Offic e . 
Appointments to Boards. 
Commissions and Committees 

The term s of office of all 
m e mb e r s of appoint e d board s 
s hall b e gin on April 1 and end 

..continued on next page. 



Administrative Summary 



27 



Election Warrant 

(continued) 

on March 31. If aii appoint oo 
rocoivos an appointmont subso 
quont to April 1 of th e y e ar in 
which the term of offic e origi 
nally commoncod, th o t e rm to 
which the p e rson wa s appointed 
will e nd on March 31 in th o 
y e ar that it was s ch e dul e d to 

The Town Council shall 
appoint members to boards, com- 
missions, and committees by May 
1 of each year following the annu- 
al Town election upon which 
newly elected members of the 
Town Council have taken their 
oaths of office. 

This is a newly inserted sec- 
tion. This change will ensure that 
it is the newly elected Council 
each year that makes appoint- 
ments of citizens to the various 
Town boards, commissions, and 
committees. 

ARTICLE 7: 

Shall the Town approve the 
Charter amendment summarized 



below as recommended by the 
Town Council? 

Article 11. Section 11.4 
"Vacancies in Elected Office": 
Strike the current language in 
this section and replace with lan- 
guage that is underlined. 



Sec. 11.4. 

Office. Terms of Office . 



lecteci 



Unless otherwi se sp e cified in 
this Charter, in th o e vent of a 
vacancy in an elected office, 
board or commi s sion of the 
town, th o Council shall fill that 
vacancy by appointment, such 
appointm o nt to continue until 
the next town e l e ction. 

The terms of office of all mem- 
bers of appointed boards, commis- 
sions and committees shall begin 
on May 1 and end on April 30. If 
an appointee receives an appoint- 
ment subsequent to May 1 of the 
year in which the term of office 
originally commenced, the term 
to which the person was appoint- 
ed shall end on April 30 in the 
year that it was scheduled to end. 

This change will allow the 
newly elected Council more time 



to carefully consider appoint- 
ments of citizen members to the 
various Town board, commissions 
and committees. 

ARTICLE 8: 

Shall the Town approve the 
Charter amendment summarized 
below as recommended by the 
Tovra Council? 

Article 11, Section 11.5 
"Vacancies in Elected or 
Appointed Office": Newly added 
section. 

Sec. 11.5 Vacancies in Elected 
or Appointed Office. 

Unless otherwise specified in 
this Charter, in the event of a 
vacancy in an elected or appoint- 
ed office, board, commission or 
committee of the town, the Town 
Council shall fill that vacancy by 
appointment, such appointment 
to continue mitil the next town 
election for elected positions or 
until the remainder of a person's 
term for appointed positions. 

This will be inserted as a new 
section to maintain the numerical 
sequence of the sections. D 



28 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 




CULTURE AND RECREATION 




CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



■ Lee Alexander, 

Chairman, Durham 
Conservation Commission 

^ he Durham 

Conser%'ation 
Commission (DCC) has 
a state legislative man- 
date to inventory, manage, and 
protect the natural resources of 
the Town, and to make recom- 
mendations to the State on all 
applications to the NH Wetlands 
Bureau. DCC acts as an advo- 
cate for natural resource protec- 
tion in town and regional affairs, 
and is a source of information for 
town residents. 

2003 Accomplishments 

fc Maintained close coordination 
with the Land Protection 
Working Group (LPWG) that 
was successful in influencing 
passage of Durham's $2.5 mil- 
lion open space bond in March 
2003. Since that time, the 
LPWG has drafted a proposed 
land and easement acquisition 
process. The LPWG continued 
its work to identify and priori- 
tize land properties that war- 
rant conservation, and has been 
actively meeting with landown- 
ers who may be interested in 
conserving their land. The 
LPWG held discussions with 
over 15 landowners interested 
in land conservation options. 
In December 2003, the Town 
received its first conservation 



easement donation (Dunn 
Property, Bagdad Road). 

Efforts continued to return Mill 
Pond to the scenic and recre- 
ational asset it was at an earli- 
er time. In preparation for sed- 
iment removal fi-om the pond, 
samples were collected and 
analyzed for contaminants, and 
the volume of sediment to be 
removed was determined. A 
Wetlands application was pre- 
pared for submission to the 
New Hampshire Department of 
Environmental Services 
(NHDES). Removal of sedi- 
ment by the U.S. Army 
Reserves 368th Engineering 
Battalion is now planned for 
summer/fall 2005. 

Significant progress was made 
in removing brush along the 
north shore of Mill Pond, there- 
by opening vistas of the water 
from the picnic area, park 
benches, and Mill Pond Road. 
Over 200 hours of volunteer 
work by University of New 
Hampshire (UNH) students 
and Town residents went into 
this effort. 

In cooperation with the Parks 
and Recreation Committee, a 
1991 publication listing the 
outdoor recreation sites in 
Durham was updated. A text 
description of these sites is 
posted on the Town of Durham 
website. A trails map is in 
preparation and will accompa- 
ny the new publication. 



P Reviewed five (5) Standard 
Dredge and Fill applications 
and one Minimum Impact 
Expedited application that 
were submitted to the New 
Hampshire Wetlands Bureau 
by residents of Durham. 
Activities included dock and 
road construction and develop- 
ment projects that impact 
wetlands or shoreland. This 
oversight process included 
two (2) site visits by 
Commission members. 

II A Final Report on: Feasibility 
Study for Re-establisliing a 
Navigation Channel in the 
Oyster River: Jackson's 
Landing to Johnson Creek was 
submitted to the State of New 
Hampshire. In addition, a sup- 
plementary report was pre- 
pared that provided a detailed 
current flow model that could 
be used to assess how dredging 
might contribute to meeting 
outfall/dilution objectives of the 
Sewage Treatment Plant. 

Goals for 2004 

Continue close coordination 
with the LPWG. Make recom- 
mendations to the Town 
Council for using the 10-year, 
$2.5 million bond issue for the 
permanent protection of open 
space in Durham by purchase 
of land or acquisition of conser- 
vation easements. 

B Obtain the necessary approvals 

-..continued on next page. 



Culture and Recreation 



29 



Conservation Commission 

(continued) 

from NHDES for removal and 
disposal of sediment from Mill 
Pond. Assuming necessary wet- 
land permit process can be com- 
pleted in 2004, work could be 
performed in 2005. 

Complete the shoreline restora- 



tion of Mill Pond on land 
owned by the Town of 
Durham. 

Develop a long-term plan to 
reduce sediment and nutrient 
input into Mill Pond. 

Develop a document that will 
highlight the unique hydrolog- 
ic and ecological attributes of 



the Spruce Hole Bog. 
Recommend a long-term man- 
agement plan for the site. 

i Establish an Adopt-a-Trail 
Program whereby Durham res- 
idents become more actively 
involved in care and mainte- 
nance of Town conservation 
lands and trails. D 



DURHAM DAY 



■ W. Arthur Grant 

Chairman, Durham 
Day Committee 

n estimated 700 per- 
sons attended the 
2003 "Durham Day at 
Wagon Hill" to enjoy a 
pleasant afternoon of food, 
games, music, boat rides, exhibits 
and conversation, hosted by the 
Durham Town Council. 

Special attractions at the 
September 14th community-wide 
gathering included the Captain 
Adams gundalow (with Justin 
Kane of The Gundalow Company, 
Portsmouth, piloting and welcom- 
ing a steady stream of visitors 
boarding the craft); a trio of 
country music fiddlers and 
singers led by Kevin Scanlon of 
Durham; a display of classic and 
antique autos provided by Bill 
Lenharth of Durham; and an 
array of emergency response 
equipment from the Town Fire 
Department, Ambulance Corps 
and Public Works Department. 

Civic groups manning infor- 
mation tables about their organi- 
zations included the Durham 
Historical Association, Integrated 
Waste Management Advisory 



Committee, Durham 
Conservation Commission, 
Durham Public Library Trustees, 
Lamprey River Advisory 
Committee, UNH Marine 
Docents and the Durham-Great 
Bay Rotary Club. Members of the 
UNH Student Senate welcomed 
residents provided information 
about campus student activities; 
the Oyster River Youth 
Association's Kathy Trainor 
supervised children's games; and 
Shawn-the-Storyteller enthralled 
a host of young people. 

UNH President Ann Weaver 
Hart and her husband. Randy, 
kayaked to the site and joined 
other UNH representatives in 
chatting with townspeople. The 
University of New Hampshire 
Hospitality Services baked cook- 
ies, UNH Media Services provid- 
ed sound system services, and 
UNH Transportation Services 
operated shuttle bus service from 
downtown locations to the site. 
The Professional Firefighters 
Association provided cotton 
candy, doughnuts, cider and soft 
drinks, and Bonnie McDermott 
and Cliff Zetterstrom served up 
snow-cones to eager youngsters. 

Some 140 attendees enjoyed 



rides on the Oyster River in 
motor boats piloted by Peter 
Smith, Katie Paine, Dave 
Murphy, Loren Tirrell and Ted 
McNitt, with Marjorie Smith, Pat 
Samuels and Rachel Roulliard 
coordinating the activity. 

This year's planning commit- 
tee — Scott Hovey, Art Grant, 
Annmarie Harris and Town 
Administrative Assistant Jennie 
Berry — thanks Town Clerk 
Linda Ekdahl, who greeted visi- 
tors as they arrived at the site; 
Town Councilors and Town staff 
who cooked and served the picnic 
lunch; Maggie and Linn Bogle 
who provided floral displays 
brightening the dining tables; 
Doug Bullen and his Public 
Works crew who prepared the 
grounds, erected the dining tent 
and handled the cleanup chores; 
Chuck Cressy and his Durham 
Marketplace workers for food 
supply; and numerous other 
townsfolk who helped with the 
event. 

The 2004 "Durham Day at 
Wagon Hill" celebration is sched- 
uled for Sunday afternoon, 
September 12. D 



30 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



■ Roger A Jaques 

Chairman, Historic District 
Commission 

^" " he year 2003 was one of 

transition for the 
Historic District 
Commission. After sev- 
eral years of distinguished service, 
Chairman WiUiam Schoonmaker, 
AlA, stepped down fi-om the Board 
as required by Town regulations. 
He is sorely missed. The year also 
saw Planning Board representa- 
tive, David Watt, step down to 
matriculate to Chair of the 
Planning Board, thus losing 
another knowledgeable and capa- 
ble member of the team. 
Fortunately, we welcomed his 
capable replacement, Nicholas 
Isaak, AlA, who is also a local 
architect. We also welcomed Leslie 
Schwartz as a seasoned Board 
member with an outstanding 
background. We are still looking 
for Alternates willing to serve. 

A number of applications for 
Certificate of Approval were 
reviewed and approved during 
2003: Stephen Burns to revise 
plans for a barn reconstruction at 
22 Newmarket Road; Tim and 



Ely Butler for window changes 
at 4 Durham Point Road; Ron 
Peterson for a new roadside sign 
at The Three Chimney's Inn; St 
Georges Episcopal Church for re- 
roofing the "A" section at 1 Park 
Court; The Town of Durham for 
an extension to the Council 
Chambers at the Town Hall; 
Alexander Amell of the Durham 
Historic Association for an air 
conditioning system in the 
Durham Courthouse; Chinburg 
Builders on behalf of Chitenden 
Trust, Brattleboro, Vermont, for 
signage at 8 Newmarket Road; 
and Paul Berton of Fall Line 
Properties, Portsmouth, NH, for 
signage, lighting and landscape 
features relating to the develop- 
ment of a hotel on an adjacent 
lot outside the Historic District. 
A Public Hearing was held, 
allowing public input into the 
planning and review process of 
the planned parking area for the 
hotel and apartment complex by 
Fall Line Properties. 

The Board continued to coor- 
dinate with State planners con- 
cerning the Highway 
Department's plans to widen 
Route 108 through the Historic 
District corridor. Additionally, 



regulations were reviewed and 
put forward to the Planning 
Board with the thought of 
expanding the Historic District 
from its present overlay parame- 
ters to a wider one extending to 
Route 4 on Route 108, further 
down Route 108 heading towards 
Newmarket, and down the 
Madbury Road to protect and 
include the historic homes and 
fraternity dwellings found there. 
Expansion was suggested with 
the goal of preserving the historic 
view of these corridors. A good 
deal of time was spent examining 
in-depth Demolition by Neglect 
and other regulatory bodies such 
as the Heritage Commission con- 
cerning maintenance and upkeep 
of the Historic District. We made 
use of Durham's HDC website 
with monthly postings of meeting 
agendas and minutes. 

We look forward to 2004 and 
the intended submission of 
Demolition by Neglect and other 
proposed regulations such as 
Acceptable Building Standards 
and Practices in Historic 
Districts to further protect the 
inventory of historic homes resid- 
ing in the district and assist 
those who chose to live there. D 



PARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION 



Kenneth K. Andersen 

Chairman, Parks and 
Recreation Commission 



iiMm 



he purpose of the 
Parks and Recreation 
Committee is to help 
set policies, advise of 



needed parks and recreation pro- 
grams, and to help plan, acquire 
and develop recreation facilities, 
parks and open space areas to 
meet future needs of the Town. 
The Committee has five mem- 
bers, but two additional mem- 
bers, plus an alternate, all to be 



appointed by the Town Council, 
are needed. 

2003 Accomplishments 

Outdoor Recreation. 

Members of the Parks and 
Recreation Committee and the 

...continued on next page. 



Culture and Recreation 



31 



Parks and Recreation 
Commission 

(continued) 

Conservation Commission 
revised a 1991 Town publica- 
tion of outdoor recreation 
sites. During the year we vis- 
ited over twenty locations in 
Durham where you can pur- 
sue outdoor recreation. These 
sites are described on the 
Town of Durham home pages 
iwww.ci.durham.nh.us/COM- 
MUNITY/recreationintro.html 
). Besides descriptions, 
recommended recreational 
activities suited to these sites 
are given. A map with a key 
locates the sites. 

' Wagon Hill Farm. 

Restoration and stabilization 
of the severely eroded shore- 
line, carried out by the Public 
Works Department last year, is 
a success. 



Goals for 2004 

i Trail Maps. 

The Town's Master Plan of 
September 2000 devoted a 40 
page chapter to the structured 
and unstructured recreational 
needs of Durham and made 
numerous recommendations. 
As mentioned above, the Parks 
and Recreation Committee, 
together with the Conservation 
Commission, addressed the 
issue of publicizing some of 
the Town's recreation facilities. 
Now we are preparing trail 
maps in collaboration with 
GPS expert Nancy Lambert of 
UNH and Tony Federer, an 
experienced mapmaker. We 
plan to complete the maps 
by the spring. 

Adopt-A-Trail Program. 

There are over 50 miles of 
trails in Durham. The Town 
Conservation Commission and 





Parks and Recreation 
Committee hope to establish a 
volunteer land stewardship 
program to help maintain 
these trails. Stewards would 
help keep the a trail accessible, 
open and attractive. The 
Durham trail system is intend- 
ed for unstructured recreation- 
al activities, such as walking, 
jogging, horseback riding, and 
cross country skiing. If you are 
interested in being a trail stew- 
ard, please contact the Parks 
and Recreation Committee. 
Maps for the trails and further 
information will be available in 
the spring through the Parks 
and Recreation Committee or 
on the Durham Town web site 
at www.ci.durham.nh.us 

We continue to advocate that 
a Skateboard Park be built in 
Durham and that a Director of 
the Parks and Recreation 
Department be appointed. D 



Shelley Mitchell and Haley Parry enjoy a day 
of sledding at Wagon Hill Farm. Phoio courtesy 
of Parks and Recreation Committee 



32 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



PUBLIC LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



■ Board of Trustees: 

John Aber, Chairman 

Elise Daniel 

Dale Eichorn.TVeasurer 

Suzanne Loder 

Ruth Moore 

Bill Schoonmaker, Vice-Chair 

Doug Wheeler 

Cynthia Cote, alternate 

Phil Ginsburg, alternate 

Norma Segal, alternate 

he face of your Library 
Board of Trustees will 
be changing this year. 
The Chair, Treasurer 
(Dale Eichorn), and long-time 
trustee and continuing volunteer 
extraordinaire Ruth Moore will 
be stepping down. It has been a 
continuing source of pleasure and 
inspiration to work with these 
two dedicated and capable volun- 
teers. We all owe them a heart- 
felt "Thank You". 



With the Library operations 
running smoothly and providing 
increasing levels of service to 
patrons and residents, the Board 
has continued to focus on the 
search for a permanent home and 
on fundraising for operations. 

We were blessed to receive, 
albeit with saddened hearts, a 
very generous bequest from the 
estate of Karen Littlefield, long- 
time Durham Public Librarian in 
Dimond Library. The gift of over 
$60,000 has been placed in the 
Building Fund, and, when used 
in the construction of our perma- 
nent home, will be gratefully and 
permanently acknowledged in 
the building. 

We are back to square one on a 
permanent Library home. Our 
proposal to build behind the Town 
Hall remains tabled with the 
Town Council, and other options 
are still under development. The 



Library spends $45,000-1- on rent 
per year. Imagine how we could 
fiarther enhance our services if 
those funds were available for 
operations! 

With the continuation of the 
Town Council's policy of making 
more than 1/3 of town support for 
the Library contingent on our 
raising an equal amount in cash 
donations, we spend an inordi- 
nate amount of time raising 
funds for day-to-day operations 
(including rent! ). The Quaker 
Hill Foundation and the Friends 
of the Durham Public Library 
were major donors again this 
year. What would we do without 
the Friends? In addition, the 
Library owes an enthusiastic 
thank you to the volunteers who 
keep the doors open, the books 
circulating and contribute so 
much to daily operations and 
special projects. D 



PUBLIC LIBRARY DIRECTOR 



■ GUS HEDDEN 

Library Director 

*' ith circulation and 

programming at 
an all-time high, 
2003 was a record 
breaking year. We welcome back 
our newest staff member Peggy 
Thrasher, who was part of the 
library team in 1998. Volunteers 
have always been an important 
part of the library and we are 
grateful to all, especially the 
many UNH students and profes- 
sors who have generously given 
their time and talents to provide 



programs for the children of the 
community thereby blessing both 
the University and community 
and strengthening the connection 
between us. 

The library has a new domain 
name. Our web site can be seen 
at: www.durhampubliclibrary.org. 
Our new e-mail address is: 
maiKSdurhampubliclibrary.org. 

2003 Accomplishments 

: Expanded reference collection. 

ii Offered several adult programs 
including a "Meet the Author" 
"series and a pilot program 



for the New Hampshire 
Humanities Council. 

Created a Yoimg Adult 
collection. 

Collaborated with UNH faculty 
and students to offer various 
children's programs. 

Commenced weeding the chil- 
dren's non-fiction collection. 

Participated in voting for the 
Great Stone Face, Isinglass 
Teen Reads, and Lady Bug 
award books. 

Received and installed a net- 

. .continued on next page. 



Culture and Recreation 



33 



Library Director 

(continued) 

work of four high speed patron 
access computers acquired 
through a grant from the Bill 
and Melinda Gates Foundation. 
Special thanks to Casey 
Streelman and his fellow scouts 
for hundreds of volunteer hours 



constructing and installing fur- 
niture to accommodate the net- 
work and expand library stor- 
age space. 

Supplied materials for four 
reading groups including the 
Middle School "Book Eaters" 
facilitated by UNH Professor 
Ruth Wharton-McDonald and 
some of her students. 



Circulation 22,211 

New patrons 542 

Total patron registration 4,746 

Volvmteer Hours 799 

Program attendance Adult: 300 

Children's: 2,261 

Total programs 2,921 

Community service hours 350 

Materials added 1,712 

Materials withdrawn 2,893 

Total materials 32,702 



;, Initiated a Museum Pass pro- 
gram offering free admission to 
five institutions mcluding the 
Children's Museum of 
Portsmouth and the Currier 
Museum of Art. 

Goals for 2004 

M Use the Gates computers to 
offer training in use of Microsoft 
Word, Excel and other pro- 
grams. 

M Expand Audio book and Video 
collections to include CDs and 
DVDs. 

S Increase staff development 
thi-ough attendance of confer- 
ences and workshops. 

i Consolidate and expand the 
Seacoast Reading Buddies pro- 
gram. 

f Prepare for a complete invento- 
ry of library materials. 

i Research current circulation 
systems that offer an online cat- 
alog accessible through the 
Internet. D 



SWAN REPORT 




Margery Milne 

Swan Keeper 

,eople ask, "What does a 
|swan keeper do? Does 
she live with the swans 
on Mill Pond Road? No, 
but she owns land there! 

February 6, 2003: 

Police call that at the senior 
housing complex on Mill Pond 
Road a swan is sitting in the 
parking area blocking cars. 
What to do? It was a cold night 
and getting dusky. The officer, at 
my suggestion, said she would 



speak to the supervisor about 
wrapping the bird in a towel and 
putting it in the meeting room 
at the police station for the 
night where it would be warm. I 
did not sleep well, being con- 
cerned for the swan, but all was 
well and I heard no more. 

February 22, 2003: 

I received a call that a swan was 
blocking the road at Mill Crest, 
appearing as a huge lump of 
snow. Swans return to Mill 
Pond from open waters of 
Portsmouth, usually in February. 
They are searching for a nesting 



place to start a family. I visited 
Mill Pond and was appalled at 
the amount of snow and ice with 
no place for a swan to feel wel- 
come. It was an unusually cold 
snowy winter. We wonder how 
birds and wildlife know to 
return home. They seem to be 
our natural weather forecasters. 
Their sense of direction is 
remarkable. When we park a car 
at a mall, we experience an 
adventure recalling where we 
put the car after we shop. 

March 17, 2003: 

Spring is arriving with robins 



34 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



and redwing black birds keeping 
the swans company while start- 
ing a nest. Bats are seen over- 
head as warmer weather arrives. 

April 2003: 

Aluskrats and beaver are active 
in the pond while turtles are 
seen sunning on logs in the 
water. 

May 2003: 

Turtles begin digging holes in 
the land and laying their eggs; 
food for busy skunks finding 
them to eat. The swans seem 
very active around their nesting 
area at the far side of the pond 
making viewers aware that all 
cygnets have arrived. 

June 6, 2003: 

Baby swans are tumbling into 
water at the nest site. Only 4 
cygnets out of 5 are observed. 
They are black feathered and 
blend easily with the water, mak- 
ing them difficult to spot. Frogs 
are calling and add pleasant 
sounds at the pond. Summer is a 
busy time, especially for towns- 
people who note the pond filling 
in with vegetation and therefore 
must open the area around the 
pond because of invading plants. 
Recently it has been found that 
plants communicate with one 
another and attract plants of like 
kind by their volatile oils, so it is 
almost an endless task to get rid 
of plants. With the loss of vegeta- 
tion we lose the habitat where 
birds nest and sing. The superb 
Mill Pond area provides a fine 
view of rocks and the scene to 
the Newmarket Bridge but will 
the Warbling Vireo, bluebirds and 
redwinged blackbirds find their 
nesting areas as they have for 
many years? Will the swans, who 
cannot read the new signs about 
not feeding the wildlife, visit 
as always? 



Will nature continue its quest for 
perseverance with the seemingly 
endless waves of human advance- 
ment? Will the swans keep 
returning along with other 



wildlife seen this past year such 
as bears, moose and fox? Nature 
is fi-agile, as shown to us by the 
swans. Only three baby swans of 
five have survived into fall. D 



Margery Milne recognized lor her many years ot service as the Towns "Swan Keeper". 




Two of the swans enjoying thpir habita 
4p 




Culture and Recreation 



35 



Photos courtesy oi Jerry Monkman for the LRAC. 




36 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



* 



ASSESSOR FOR THE TOWN OF DURHAM 



■ J. Robb Dix 

Town Assessor 

g^^Cl* S- he Assessor's office is 
responsible for ensur- 
ing equitable assess- 
ments, which distrib- 
ute the Town's tax burden in 
accordance with state statutes. 
Assessments are based on fair 
market value of property and 
are applied in a fair, equitable 
and consistent manner. 

Regular full revaluations and 
assessment updates are neces- 
sary to maintain property tax 
equity. Property classes increase 
or decrease in value at different 
rates. If an assessment update 
or full revaluation has not 
occurred for several years, 
inequity in assessments may 
result. This is why we conducted 
a full revaluation over the past 
two years. 

The difference between a full 
revaluation and an assessment 
update is as follows: During a full 
revaluation all properties are 
physically inspected, a market 
analysis is conducted, and assess- 
ments are updated; During an 
assessment update, no full inspec- 
tion occurs, only a market analy- 
sis is conducted. Durham's last 
full revaluation was in 1988 and 
last assessment update was in 
1993. The revaluation has brought 
the level close to 100% . The tax 
rate ( $/1000 ) has come down 
from $41.48 to $23.57. 



For information regarding our 
1999 - 2003 valuation and tax 
history, including a breakdown 
of the Town, School District and 
County tax rates, please refer to 
the Budget and Finance section 
of this Town Report. 

We all are burdened by ever 
increasing property taxes in 
New Hampshire and some tax 
relief may be available through 
the following: Exemptions/Tax 
Credits for the Blind, Elderly, 
Veterans', Disabled & Physically 
Handicapped; Exemptions for 
Solar Energy Systems; Tax 
Deferrals for Elderly & 
Disabled; Property Tax Hardship 
Relief; Current Use assess- 
ments; and Abatement requests. 
Please contact me for more 
information. 

2003 Accomplishments 

Finished 2003 full in-house 
revaluation 

ffi Analyzed sales to determine 
market levels 

Gathered & analyzed income 
and expense information 

Formulated and field checked 
new values 

Notified taxpayers of new val- 
ues and held hearings to give 
taxpayers an opportunity to 
respond 

' Finalized values 

Put new values on the Town 
web site 



Goals for 2004 

R Collect property 
data on UNH 

i* Establish data records for 
UNH 

M Review all current use 
accounts 

s Monitor sales activity to verify 
assessment level 

For information and assistance 
regarding assessments, tax 
exemptions, tax credits, abate- 
ment appeals, Current Use, tim- 
ber cutting, tax map and legal 
ownership information, you may 
contact the Assessing Office via 
telephone: 603-868-8065, e-mail: 
rdix@ci.durham.nh.us or visit us 
at the Town Office. D 



Mike Lynch taking measurements for the new 
Council chambers addition floor system. 






General Government 



37 



CEMETERY COMMITTEE 



Committee Members: 

Craig Seymour, Chairman 

Bruce Bragdon 

John de Campi 

Peter Smith, Council Member 

Katie Paine, Council Member 

Mark Morong, Council Member 

n 2003 the Durham 
Cemetery, located on Old 
Concord Road, saw a total 
of 24 internments, including 
10 casket burials and 14 cre- 
mains burials. Five people pur- 
chased graves plots, including 
some in the new section C. One 
cremains plot was repurchased. 
Several monuments and mark- 



ers were also set. Numerous 
visitors commented on what a 
good job the Town does in 
maintaining the cemetery and 
the Committee would like to 
thank the Public Works 
Department for the excellent 
job that it has done. 

Cemetery records and maps 
have historically been main- 
tained in a series of handwrit- 
ten notebooks and other records. 
In September, a group of incom- 
ing freshmen UNH students 
entered some this information 
into a database as the first step 
towards developing a computer- 



ized system of maintaining the 
cemetery records, ultimately 
providing for public access 
through the Town's website. 
The Committee continues to 
seek volunteers to help with 
this project. 

The Cemetery Committee 
will be meeting in early 2004 
to review and update policies 
and procedures including 
grave prices, monument size 
regulations and future expan- 
sion needs. Interested individu- 
als are requested to contact 
Craig Seymour at 
trustees@ci.durham.nh.us. D 



CEMETERY COMMITTEE: 
TRUSTEES OF THE TRUST FUNDS 



■ Trustees: 

Bruce Bragdon, Chairman 
Craig Seymour 
John de Campi 

^ > I were all saddened 

by the death of 
Dorothy Wilcox, 
.vho with her late 
husband, Phil, have a long history 
of contribution to Durham. Her 
estate has assured perpetual con- 
tribution with the creation of the 
Wilcox Fund with ". . .the income 
from said fund (to) be used for the 
further development and upkeep 
of the Old Landing Road Park 
located at the Newmarket end of 
the Old Landing Road, Durham, 
New Hampshire, and for the 
restoration and continued mainte- 
nance of the Mill Pond and the 
surrounding area in said 



Durham". The fund check was in 
the amount of $67,558.27. 
Dorothy and Phil Wilcox (who 
served for many years as a 
Trustee) were also concerned with 
abandoned and under funded 
cemeteries. They contributed 
$5,000 to the abandoned cemetery 
fund. Durham by law has to 
maintain all the cemeteries in its 
boundaries. Some of the cemeter- 
ies have trusts, from which the 
interest earned provides only a 
few dollars for mowing and mini- 
mal maintenance. The town gen- 
eral ftind has to provide any 
shortfall. The Trustees are 
always looking for donations to 
any of the cemetery funds either 
from descendants or just con- 
cerned citizens. 

The Trustees of the Trust 
Funds invest and disperse funds 



in the various trusts and certain 
other Town accounts. These 
include 73 separate trust funds. 
Most of the trusts are small, rang- 
ing from a few hundred to a few 
thousand dollars, and are con- 
cerned with the care and mainte- 
nance of various cemeteries and 
gravesites. Others support various 
Town funds and capital projects. 

At the end of October 2003, 
the Trust Funds had a total of 
$937,053, with $228,083 in ceme- 
tery, graveyard, memorial and 
related funds and $708,970 in 
other town trust funds (education, 
facilities development, fire facili- 
ties, etc.). The trust funds along 
with $1,281,974 in Durham capi- 
tal reserve funds (water, sewer, 
fire equipment, etc) are all invest- 
ed in the New Hampshire Public 
Deposit Investment Pool. D 



38 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



PLANNING AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



James Campbell 

Director of Planning and 
Community Development 

nother year has 
passed at the Planning 
and Community 
Development 
Department. We had a very busy 
and challenging year in 2003. 
Through it all we have tried to 
serve the citizens of Durham as 
best we could. As with last year, 
we have benefited from a very 
active citizenry that has only 
made the process better. It is our 
sincere hope that this participa- 
tion will carry forward into next 
year, especially with the Zoning 
Rewrrite process. This is your 
community and your opinions do 
matter We need you if we are to 
make anything we do a success. 

Many thanks need to be 
expressed for the work that has 
been accomplished this year. The 
Planning Board and Zoning 
Rewrite Committee have given a 
tremendous amount of their time 
and effort towards making this a 
great community in which to live. 
I thank them and could not do it 
with out them. I would like to 
thank my administrative assis- 
tant, Karen Edwards, for not only 
putting up with me but for keep- 
ing this department in order In 
addition, I need to thank John 
Harwood who once again per- 
formed some much needed work 
for the Town of Durham. Finally, 
I would like to thank the other 
departments and the Town 
Administrator for their help and 
support throughout the year 

Below is a brief list of the 
accomplishments from the very 



exciting year we had as well as 
some of the goals for next year. 

2003 Accomplishments 

f Completed drafts of Parts A, B, 
and C of the new ordinance as 
well as the updated zoning 
map. Held many public hear- 
ings that will continue into 
next year. 

Completed the draft of the new 
Subdivision Regulations and 
held a public hearing and 
updated the Planning Board 
Rules of Procedures. 

Began the non-residential sec- 
tions of the draft zoning ordi- 
nance as well as some of the 
performance standards such as 
parking, signage, and landscap- 
ing. 

Began what will be an educa- 
tional campaign for the citi- 
zens of Durham on a variety 
of topics including pedestrian 
and bicycle safety, land con- 
servation, wetland and shore- 
land information, the impor- 
tance of volunteerism, volun- 
tary wildlife conservation pro- 
grams, and learning more 



about the Planning Board and 
what it does. 

Held two (2) Planning Board 
retreats to help educate and 
improve their knowledge and 
understanding. 

Began holding one ( 1 ) meeting 
a quarter for "planning" issues 
vdth no regular business on the 
agenda. 

Worked with the Public Works 
Department (DPW) on develop- 
ing a Geographic Information 
System (GIS) for the town. 

Served the town on several out- 
side committees whose work 
will have an effect on Durham 
so our concerns could be heard 
and taken into consideration. 

Was elected to serve as co-edi- 
tor of the New Hampshire 
Planners Association newslet- 
ter and a member of the 
Executive Committee. 

Continued to move forward on 
the Craig Supply property by 
attending meetings with 
NHDES, Office of Energy and 
Planning to discuss the various 

.continued on next page. 



(l-r); Jim Campbell, Director of Planning; Robb Dix. Assessor; Karen Edwards, Administrative 
Assistant; Tom Johnson. Zoning and Code Enforcement Officer. 




General Government 



39 



Planning 

(continued) 



studies and reports on the site. 
Attended a workshop on 
Brownfield Grants to help fund 
the clean-up of the site. 
Assisted the DPW in applying 
for the grant through the EPA. 

1 Began work as a member of the 
Economic Development 
Committee to improve the cli- 
mate for proper economic devel- 
opment within the town. 

K Submitted two (2) 

Transportation Enhancement 
Gremts totaling over $1 million 
for the next round of funding. 
One grant was for downtown 
sidewalks and the other was the 
next phase of improvements to 
Main Street. Also began 



researching other gi-ant oppor- 
timities. 

H Continued to work with the 
American Ground Water Trust 
on the reclassification of the 
Spruce Hole Aquifer and the 
Lee Well Aquifer We submit- 
ted the reclassification applica- 
tions with the NHDES. Also 
held a public educational meet- 
ing on ground water issues 
which will be shown on DCAT. 

Goals for 2004 

1; Finish the rewrite of the 
Zoning Ordinance. 

Adopt revised Site Plan, 
Subdivision, and Road 
Standard regulations. 

Enhance public participation 
and education. 

^- Work on programs outlined in 



the Master Plan 2000. 

Begin to update the Master 
Plan. 

Continue to seek grant money 
to offset the cost of projects. 

Continue to work on and 
improve our GIS capabilities. 

Continue to work on and follow 
through on the Craig Supply 
property with the goal of a pro- 
ductive reuse of the property. 

Work toward the development of 
the Durham Business Park. 

Work with the Economic 
Development Committee to 
improve the climate for proper 
economic development. 

Strengthen the relationship and 
communication between the 
Durham Community and the 
UNH Community O 



PLANNING BOARD 



■ David W. Watt 

Chairman of the 
Planning Board 

The year 2003 has been 
an extremely busy and 
productive one for the 
Durham Planning 
Board and its major subcommit- 
tee, the Zoning Ordinance Rewrite 
Committee. First of all the total 
number of applications processed 
was the highest in all the years 
since 1998 and was nearly double 
that of 2002. In addition, the 
board has dealt with several diffi- 
cult or politically sensitive proj- 
ects as well as a number of more 
conventional site reviews and 
subdivision applications. The 
Zoning Ordinance Rewrite 
Committee has also been 
extremely busy, with much of the 



Comparison of Number of Application 
Approvals 1999 - 2003 



APPLICATION TYPE 



2003 



2002 



2001 



Total 



31 



17 



21 



2000 



15 



1999 



Subdivision 


4 


4 


4 


1 


6 


Site Review/ 












Conditional Use 


5 


4 


8 


6 


6 


Boundary Line 












Adjustment/Subdivision 












Modification 


9 


1 


4 


2 


4 


Site Plan Review by 












Technical Review 












Committee 


3 


4 








2 


Other* 


10 


4 


6 


6 


2 



20 



*Includes conceptual consultations, design reuiews, UNH project public 
hearings, and scenic road public hearings 



40 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



work focusing on policy and proce- 
dural questions related to 
Conservation Subdivisions and 
Conditional Uses. 

The most contentious cases of 
the year for the Planning Board 
concerned a residential subdivi- 
sion referred to as Craig 
Meadows, an application to build 
a hotel in the limited business dis- 
trict as a conditional use, and a 
modification of an existing site 
plan on a site known as Perely 
Lane. The Craig Meadows case 
raised many issues related to sub- 
di\ision regulations, road regula- 
tions and legal issues associated 
with access to the site. In the end, 
the Planning Board ruled against 
the application on a number of 
grounds derived from the existing 
road regulations, a determination 
that the applicant had no legal 
right of way onto the site, and that 
the development was "scattered 
and premature"" for a number of 
very specific reasons. 

The hotel application con- 
cerned the site at the intersection 
of Main Street and Rt. 108, and 
was the subject of a number of 
well-attended public hearing ses- 
sions. In the end. the Board voted 
in favor of the site plan and condi- 
tional use permits in large part 
because the hotel was considered 
to be economically viable ( based 
on the consultants report), 
because it would have a lesser 
traffic impact than virtually any 
other prospective use, and because 
it would have a positive economic 
impact on the town's tax base and 
on the downtown business com- 
munity. 

The Perely Lane development 
involved reconfiguring an 
approved subdivision to allow for 
the combining of several lots to 
make elderly duplexes from lots 



originally approved for single fam- 
ily houses and duplexes. 
Ultimately the Board was con- 
strained by the existing approved 
site plan, and the existing zoning 
ordinance and approved the appli- 
cation. 

The Zoning Ordinance Rewrite 
Committee (ZORC) has been 
meeting at least twice per month 
throughout the year and has com- 
pleted a revised ordinance in 
which to apply the goals of the 
Durham Master Plan 2000 to the 
residential districts as well as the 
revised subdivision regulations. 
Tlie ordinance has been posted as 
an extensively amended version of 
the existing ordinance. Much of 
the work on the ordinance has 
been spent on discussion for 
implementing the Conservation 
Subdivision as the only permitted 
process for developing residential 
land in Durham. The ordinance 
and associated subdivision regula- 
tions delineate a process by which 
the unique features of the land 
must be identified, the subdivi- 
sion designed to preserve them, 
and the provision for the long- 
term management of the resulting 
conservation land. 

A great deal of discussion went 
into the application of the condi- 



tional use process. Ultimately, the 
ZORC decided to retain condition- 
al uses because they provide the 
Planning Board with flexible 
planning tools needed to guide 
development in Durham. 
However, the ZORC decided to 
require that 2/3 of the sitting 
board vote in favor of any condi- 
tional use in order for it to be 
approved. The revised ordinance 
is scheduled for what should be a 
lively public hearing on January 
7, 2004. It is also expected that 
the ZORC will complete its work 
by finalizing the proposed ordi- 
nance for the non residential 
zones in early 2004. 

As chairman, I would like to 
acknowledge the extraordinary 
efforts of my fellow Board mem- 
bers and alternates, who are: Neil 
Wylie, Art Grant, Annmarie 
Harris, Rachel Rouillard, Stephen 
Roberts, Amanda Merrill, Nick 
Isaak, Richard Ozenich, and 
Kevin Webb. I would also like to 
acknowledge the amazing, thor- 
ough and well thought out public 
comments and other input on 
many town issues that members 
of the public provide to the 
Planning Board. This input is 
critically important to the plan- 
ning process and the Board is 
grateful for it. D 



Masons begin laying the concrete block foundation for the Council chambers addition 




General Government 



41 



SUPERVISORS OF THE CHECKLIST 



■ Ann R. Lemmon 

Chairman of the 
Supervisors of the Checklist 

2003 Accomplishments 

The Supervisors and Town 
Administrator followed many of 
the proposals made before leg- 
islative committees for changes 
in state election law, and went 
to Concord several times to tes- 
tify. New election legislation 
was passed and signed into law 
by the Governor, effective 
September 1. These measures 
represent the first steps in 
bringing New Hampshire into 
compliance with the Federal 
Help America Vote Act (HAVA). 

■ In the Spring we devoted many 
hours to a purge of the check- 
list, with the dedicated help of 
volunteers Lisa Maurice, Aime 
Valenza and Kathy Sparr, all 
former Supervisors. We antici- 
pated finding 1000 names of 
voters no longer in Durham, but 
were shocked to eventually 
delete about 2200 — most being 
University students who had 
graduated or left town. We 
approach 2004 with a checklist 
of approximately 4800 names, 
instead of 7000. 



1 In late August, thanks to the 
perseverance of the Attorney 
Generals office and that of the 
Secretary of State, a meeting 
was held between Town election 
officials and representatives of 
the University, as well as both 
State agencies, to review stu- 
dent voter registration. For the 
first time since I have been 
involved, we seem to have 
established a good working 
relationship with UNH officials 
and the Student Senate, aimed 
at disseminating accurate voter 
registration information on 
campus, and encouraging New 
Hampshire students to register 
and vote in their hometowns. 
We held information/registra- 
tion sessions in the Memorial 
Union Building in November 
and December 

K Perhaps the single most posi- 
tive factor of 2003 has been the 
interest and support of Deputy 
Attorney General Orville Fitch. 
He has recognized Durham as a 
town with unique election/voter 
registration problems, but has 
advised and encouraged us in 
working toward mitigation of 
the difficulties. We have never 
before felt that the AG's office 



even knew that Durham exist- 
ed! Thank you, Mr Fitch. 

Goals for 2004 

This presidential year will 
bring four elections, and once 
again we will have to solicit the 
help of volimteer registrars to 
assist with a large volume of 
same day registrations, espe- 
cially in November. 

While handling the routine 
throughout the year, 
Supervisors will also be follow- 
ing the progress toward a stan- 
dardized technological approach 
to a state-wide checklist, as 
called for by HAVA. A new com- 
puter program for voter regis- 
tration will be forthcoming, and 
we anticipate beginning to use 
laptop computers at the polls. 
The age of teclinology is truly 
here, and to assist us in what- 
ever computer program changes 
are required in order to meet 
state mandates, we will rely 
heavily upon Luke Vincent, a 
student computer specialist 
from UNH who is working for 
the Town. Thank you, Luke, you 
make life for computer illiter- 
ates both understandable and 
pleasant. D 



TAX COLLECTOR 



Uncollected Taxes as of 01/01/03: 

Property Taxes 
Yield Taxes 

Taxes Committed to Collector: 

Property Taxes 
Yield Taxes 

Land Use Change Taxes 
Boat Taxes 



■ Linda Ekdahl 






2003 


2002 


1989 






$1,220,537.89 
1,536.64 


$ 11,187.84 



18,193,698.00 

59.45 

94,500.00 

354.80 


4,251.00 












42 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



2003 



2002 



1989 



OverpajTnents: 

Property Taxes 
Interest Collected 



60,968.22 
4,770.46 



1,732.06 
43,047.18 



TOTAL DEBITS 

Remitted to Treasurer: 

Property Taxes 

Yield Taxes 

Land Use Change Taxes 

Boat Taxes 

Interest Collected 

Conversion to Lien: 

Abatements Made During Year: 

Deeded to Town 



$18,354,350.93 



$17,056,791.47 

59.45 

94,500.00 

354.80 

4,770.46 







$1,271,104.77 

$1,054,957.38 
1,536.64 


43,047.18 

168,921.57 

2,642.00 





$ 11,187.84 















Uncollected Taxes as of 12/31/03: 

Property Taxes 
Yield Taxes 


1,197,874.75 









11,187.84 



TOTAL CREDITS 


$18,354,350.93 


$1,271,104.77 


$11,187.84 


TAX LIENS 


2002 


2001 


2000 


1999 & PRIOR 


Balanceof Unredeemed Liens as of 01/01/03 $ 
Tax Liens Executed During Year 194,877.01 
Interest & Costs After Lien 4,235.98 
Overpayments Made During Year 


$183,925.84 

17,063.07 



$100,927.83 

20,989.73 



$287,713.06 


7.91 



TOTAL DEBITS 


$ 199,112.99 


$200,988.91 


$121,917.56 


$287,720.97 


Remitted to Treasurer: 

Tax Lien Redemptions 
Interest & Costs After Lien 
Abatements Made During Year 
Liens Deeded to Town 
Unredeemed Liens as of 12/31/03 


$ 103,422.15 
4,235.98 


91,454.86 


$ 118,495.22 
17,063.07 


65.430.62 


$ 63,511.31 
20,989.73 




37,416.52 


$ 14.75 
7.91 



287,698.31 


TOTAL CREDITS 


$ 199,112.99 


$200,988.91 


$121,917.56 


$287,720.97 



TOWN CLERK 

■ Linda L. Ekdahl 

Town Clerk 

Auto Registrations ....$869,180.50 

Title Applications 2,748.00 

Municipal Agent Fees.... 14,260.00 



Marriage Licenses 2,250.00 

Vital Statistics Copies ....1,652.00 

U.C.C. Recordings 1,190.00 

U.C.C. Discharges 49.00 

Dog Licenses 5,722.00 



Miscellaneous 252.00 

$897,303.50 

Cars Registered: 6,725 

Dogs Registered: 855 



General Government 



43 



TREE WARDEN 



■ Michael Lynch 

Tree Warden 

2003 Accomplishments 

i 39 Dead or decaying trees were 
removed from Town Property or 
Right of Ways 

t The Town was honored with its 
25th consecutive Tree City USA 
award and continues to be the 
leading award winner in tlie 
state of New Hampshire. The 
Tree City USA award is a 
national recognition for having 
an outstanding tree program. 



? The Town celebrated Arbor Day 
this year with a tree planting 
ceremony on Main St hosted by 
the Durham/Great Bay Rotary 
Club. The Rotary also donated 
the tree. 

■ Did you know that Durham is 
the home to the biggest 
Norway Spruce Tree in the 
country? The tree sits amid the 
30-plot Drew family Graveyard 
at 28 Newmarket Road and is 
estimated at 200+ years old 
and stands 94 feet tall. 



Drought and Its 
Effect on Trees: 

Drought is probably the worst ele- 
ment that stresses trees. Lack of 
rainfall for periods in excess of 
seven days can produce drought 
symptoms in trees. Watering trees 
during these dry times is extreme- 
ly beneficial and a good soaking 
once a week is better than a daily 
light watering. Younger trees 
require more water than older 
trees and 3" of some type of mulch 
around the base of the tree will 
help conserve moisture. D 



WELFARE DIRECTOR 



■ Paul Beaudoin 

Welfare Director 

ach City and Town in 
the State of NH is 
required by NH RSA 
165 to provide for any 
persons who are poor and unable 
to provide for themselves and 



that the Governing Body of each 
City and Town establish written 
guidelines relative to general 
assistance. On March 3. 2003 the 
Durham Town Council approved 
new written regulations relative 
to general assistance. Section 4- 
10 A-7 of the Administrative Code 
of the Town of Durham identifies 



Town Clerks Office (l-r): Donna Hamel, Asst. to ttie Town Clerk: Linda Ekdahl, Town Clerk - Tax 
Collector; and Lorrle Pitt. Deputy Town Clerk. 





the Business Management 
Department, headed by the 
Business Manager, as being 
responsible for overseeing 
Welfare services. 

The Town of Durham is dedi- 
cated to providing for those in 
need without regard to age, race, 
sex or national origin. The 
Business Office is compassionate 
towards all those seeking assis- 
tance. We work with everyone 
who applies, whether the applica- 
tions are approved or denied, to 
assist them towards self-suffi- 
ciency in the future. 

As of January 1, 2003, we had 
no active welfare cases pending. 
During 2003, the Business Office 
received and processed thirteen 
new applications for public assis- 
tance and one reapplication for 
public assistance. Of these 
requests, nine of the new 
requests were approved as quali- 
fying for assistance and of these. 



44 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



assistance was provided to seven 
clients, wdth one never returning 
for a rent voucher and one will 
actually receive assistance in 
2004. Two new requests were 
denied, as they did not meet the 
standard of need guidelines in 
the regidations for general assis- 
tance. We referred one client to a 
homeless shelter and one was 
directed to the Town of Lee for 
assistance, as he/she was a resi- 
dent of that community. The 
client who reapplied for assis- 
tance was initially granted emer- 
gency assistance, but upon close 
review of his/her financial situa- 
tion, he/she was denied due to 
he/she being financially able to 
provide for his/herself I ordered 



restitution for the assistance pro- 
vided which was repaid the same 
day. Over the past year we also 
had numerous people contact our 
office for information concerning 
assistance but never submit a 
formal application for assistance. 
As we move into 2004, there are 
three active case of public assis- 
tance that we are handling. 

During 2003 a total of 
$11,499.99 was provided for 
direct assistance. The Town was 
reimbursed $73.12 from an 
assisted party who received assis- 
tance in an emergency situation 
but was later found to be finan- 
cially ineligible. The Business 
Office works closely with several 
non-profit service providers in 



the area, the University of New 
Hampshire for students in need 
of assistance, the NH 
Department of Health and 
Human Services Office in 
Rochester, and the NH Local 
Welfare Administrator's 
Association for advice and guid- 
ance on the more difficult cases. 

All in all, with the economic 
downturn we faced in 2003, 
Durham's share of needy per- 
sons was remarkably low com- 
pared to surrounding communi- 
ties. For the benefit of everyone, 
we have published our welfare 
regulations and the application 
for public assistance on the 
Town's website at: 
www.ci.durham.nh.us D 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 



■ Henry Smith 

Chairman of the Board 

uring 2003 the 
Durham Zoning Board 
of Adjustment met 17 
times. There were 109 
applications before the Board. 

Variances: There were seventy- 
two requests for variances. 
Forty-seven requests were 
approved, eighteen requests were 
denied, and seven requests were 
withdrawn. 

Motion for Rehearing: There 
were sixteen requests filed for 
motions of rehearing. Thirteen 
requests were denied a rehear- 
ing. One request was with- 
drawn. Two requests were grant- 
ed a rehearing. One of those 
requests was denied on rehearing 
and the other request was 
approved on rehearing. 



Requests for Equitable 
Waiver of Dimensional 
Control: This provision was 
created by the NH Legislature 
in 1996 to address the situa- 
tions where a good faith error 
was made in the citing of a 
building or other dimensional 
layout issue. There were no 
requests filed. 

Appeal of an Administrative 
Decision: There were twenty- 
one appeals of administrative 
decisions. Nine appeals were 
denied, seven appeals were 
approved and four appeals were 
withdrawn. One appeal was not 
heard due to lack of jurisdiction. 

Special Exceptions: There 
were no requests for special 
exception. 

The ZBA, as a quasi-judicial 
body, is mandated the power to 
hear and decide appeals of 



administrative decisions and to 
grant requests in specific cases. 
For example, variances fi"om the 
terms of the Zoning Ordinance, 
as will not be contrary to the 
public interest, in order that 1) 
the spirit of the ordinance be 
respected and 2) 'substantial jus- 
tice" be done. 

The Durham ZBA now consists 
of five regular voting members 
and two alternates. Jay Gooze 
joined the board in April and as a 
regular voting member and 
Myleta Eng in November as an 
alternate. We have been confront- 
ed with dramatically expanding 
agendas over the last several 
months. Consequently, we have 
had to continue our regular 
monthly meeting to a second ses- 
sion 5 times this year: in 
January, May, July, August and 

...continued on next page. 



General Government 



45 



Zoning, Board of Adjustment 

(continued) 

November (when there were 16 
items on the agenda), making for 
a total of 17 meetings for the year. 

The issues at hand have had 
to do with requests for variances 
(by far the largest category), 
requests for rehearings and 
appeals of administrative deci- 
sions by our Code Enforcement 
Officer, Tom Johnson. Some 



I Zoning Board of 
I Adjustment 
I Breakdown of 
I Hearings for 2003 

Variance 72 

Special Exception 

Administrative Appeal ....21 

Equitable Waiver 

Re-Hearing Request 16 

Tofol 109 



examples of particularly difficult 
questions which the ZBA has 
had to deal with have been: 

Requests for variances in the 
Residence Coastal Zoning 
District, an arena where the 
ZBA is being very vigilant 
about protecting our coastal 
areas from (further) encroach- 
ment into the Shoreland 
Protection Zone. There were 2 
official site visits this year, both 
in the RC District. 

Requests for variances to allow 
more than 3 unrelated persons 
to live in a particular dwelling 
unit as defined by the town's 
ordinances in the RA, RB, RC 
and LB Districts. 

The distinction between a sin- 
gle-family dwelling with an 
accessory apartment and a 
duplex. 

Requests for multi-unit hous- 
ing in Durham's Central 
Business District. 



In deliberating these decisions 
as a board, our meetings often 
involve long, thoughtful — even 
intense — discussions over a peri- 
od of several hours during a 
given evening, every session pro- 
ducing at least one split vote (3- 
2) on a particular request. The 
goal of the ZBA might be 
described as being that of giving 
very careful consideration to the 
5 criteria which serve as a criti- 
cal guideline for ZBA's in New 
Hampshire, and of rendering a 
fair and impartial decision inso- 
far as is humanly possible. 

Finally, the mission of the 
Zoning Board of Adjustment, in 
the context of the town's 
Ordinance, could be stated as fol- 
lows: "To ensure that develop- 
ment is commensurate with the 
character and physical limita- 
tions of the land... for the promo- 
tion of the health, safety and gen- 
eral welfare of the Town of 
Durham and its residents." n 



ZONING, CODE ENFORCEMENT 
AND HEALTH OFFICER 



■ Tom Johnson 

Zoning, Code Enforcement 
and Healtfi Officer 

The Zoning 
Administration, 
Building Code 
Enforcement and 
Health Offices collectively have 
had another busy year. As of 
December 1, 2003 there were 
100 more permit applications 
issued over last year. The 
increased permit activity has 
generated revenue as of 
December 1, 2003 of $50,604.75. 



The total revenue generated in 

2002 was $184, 057.16. Last 
year's revenue was made up of 
the large fees for the High 
School, Heidelberg and 
Sprucewoods Inn projects. Those 
three projects have increased 
inspection activity this year and 
the High School project will con- 
tinue into 2004. The value of all 
this building permit activity in 

2003 is $8,586,657 as of 
December 1, 2003. The total of 
all building activity in 2002 was 
$41,325,744. 

The Zoning Board of 



Adjustment has also seen an 
increase in activity; from 56 
cases in 2002 to 109 in 2003. 
This increased activity is from 
residents seeking relief for addi- 
tions and alterations; and/or from 
enforcement of our ordinances, 
particularly relating to student 
housing. Hopefully some issues 
addressed by the ZBA in 2003 
will not be an issue in 2004 after 
the new Zoning Ordinance is 
adopted. The ZBA members 
should be commended for their 
dedication and long hours put in 
this past year. 

The Zoning Re-write 



46 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Committee has completed 
another year on the proposed 
new changes and the Council 
will be having its Public 
Hearings on the proposed 
changes early in 2004. 

The Health Department has 
been busy the last 3 years with 
West Nile Virus in Durham. 
This year statewide, as of 
10/14/2003, 128 birds were nega- 
tive for West Nile virus; 213 
birds were positive for West Nile 
virus; and 3 birds were unsatis- 
factory for testing. The state 
stopped accepting birds for test- 
ing as of that date because of 
the large number of positive 
tests throughout the state. 
Durham transported 3 birds to 
the state labs this year and had 
2 of those birds test positive. 
The Health Department also 
has had an increase in mold 
related complaints from resi- 
dents this past year. 

2003 Accomplishments 

Durham, along with the New 
Hampshire Building Officials 
Association, has been enforc- 
ing the new statewide 
Building Code. The state 
adopted the 2000 
International Building Code, 
the 2000 International 
Plumbing Code, the 2000 
International Mechanical 
Code, the 2000 International 
Energy Conservation Code, 
and the 2002 National 
Electrical Code. We expect to 
put forward local changes to 
our ordinance to update our 
presently adopted 1990 BOCA 
Building Code in 2004. 

II The International Code Council 
has completed its first year of 
merging all Code organizations 
into one unified group vWth sup- 



port by the builders, designers 
and inspectors. 

The Zoning Re-write 
Committee members and 



Planning Board have again 
put in long hours and have fin- 
ished the major changes to the 

.,, continued on next page. 



Zoning & Code Enforcement 
Statistics 2001 - 2003 



2002 



2001 



2000 



CONSTRUCTION PERMITS PROCESSED 

Building Permits 263 189 171 

Building Permits Denied 66 53 7 

Building Permits Withdrawn 1 3 3 

Demolition Permits 10 5 3 

Building Permits on Hold 4 4 4 

Septic Permits/test Pits 68 35 43 

Electric Permits 162 153 114 

Plumbing/Mechanical Permits ..124 124 72 

Total Permits 698 566 416 

Value of Building Permits given $9,267,385 $41,325,745. ...$14,356,847 

Fees Collected for all Permits $55,040 $184.725 $63,912 

BREAKDOWN OF BUILDING PERMITS 

, New Single Family House 12 11 22 

I New Multi-Family Units 27 118** 42 

f Additions, Renovations 159 105 88 

Commercial iNew & Renovations) 32 20 13 

Demolition 10 5 3 

Hold/Renewals 10 7 5 

Swimming Pools 3 8 5 



OTHER PERMITS 

• Signs 19 

' Sidewalk Cafes 4 . 



.17 

..4 



.16 
..6 



Total all Permits 278 

Average Value for New Homes 2003: $212,064 
i Includes 90 units from the Spruce Woods Inn 



.326. 



.200 



General Government 



47 



Zoning, Code Enforcement 
and Health Officer 

(continued) 

new Zoning Ordinance. Those 
changes should be before the 
Council early in the new year. 

i* Through our cooperation with 
Durham residents, the 
Landlord Association, Rental 
Housing Commission, Zoning 
Board of Adjustment and the 
Greek organizations, com- 
plaints have decreased from 
our multi-housing neighbor- 
hoods. Some of our single 
family neighborhoods have 
also seen an improvement in 
quality-of-life issues with the 
removal of problematic stu- 
dent houses. This issue will 
continue to be monitored as 
new houses appear each 
semester. This office and the 
ZBA will be diligent in main- 
taining the quality of our resi- 
dential neighborhoods. D 



Bob Levesque and Raymond LaRoche, Jr. sheath the roof on the Council chambers addition 
while Tom Johnson and Mike Lynch cut the roof rafters. 




48 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



PUBLIC SAFETY 



DURHAM AMBULANCE CORPS 



■ Board of Directors: 

Arthur Boutin, President 
Mary Davis, Manager- 
Paul Henry Treasurer 
Brian Cartier, 

Administrative Vice Pres. 
Hildi Orkin, Training 

Coordinator 
Patrick Ahearn, 

Operations Vice President 
Rachel Cartier, Secretary 

n 2003, the Durham 
Ambulance Corps (DAC), 
proudly marked its 35th 
anniversary serving 
Durham, Lee, Madbury, and 
UNH in memory of Dr. George G. 
McGregor. DAC is a private, non- 
profit, volunteer organization 
that provides 24-hour emergency 
ambulance service. Staffed with 
volunteers, and tv^^o full-time 
employees, the Corps has greatly 
improved its level of patient care 
from the minimal services of 
Advanced First Aid in 1968, to 
the various levels of Advanced 
Life Support currently provided 
when available. The Durham 
Ambulance Corps takes pride in 
35 years of providing some of the 
most sophisticated and progres- 
sive emergency care in the area. 

In 2003, the Durham Ambulance 
Corps responded to a record 1224 
calls, a 14.57e increase from 2002. 
There were 468 calls to Durham 
(38.2%), 326 calls on the UNH 
campus (26.6'^), 261 calls in Lee 
(21.3'7f ), 106 calls in Madbury 



(8.77( ), and 68 calls mutual aid to 
other communities (5.2'^). 

2003 Accomplishments 

A new full-time EMS Training 
and Public Relations Specialist 
was hired to perform training, 
public relations patient care and 
administrative tasks. 

With our 35th anniversary, 
we continue our commitment 
to the vision held by the 
McGregor Memorial 
Committee. An anniversary 
gathering was held for current 
and former members. 

Corps volunteers have been 



researching options and meet- 
ing with manufacturers in 
preparation for ordering an 
ambulance in early 2004 for 
delivery in late 2004. 
Additionally the third ambu- 
lance will be placed in service 
as a reserve unit and to be used 
during major events such as 
mass gatherings and major 
weather events. 

Two additional DAC members 
completed their Paramedic 
Education Programs and sever- 
al members have recently com- 
pleted EMT-Intermediate train- 
ing. We now have a total of 6 

.continued on next page. 



The Durham Ambulace Corps members (or 2003 Phoio cou/resy nnhe Durham Ambulance Corps 



f CLLOW rNS_PrR8 0NNr L 



m 







Public Safety 



<43 



Durham Ambulance Corps 

(continued) 

Paramedics and 10 EMT 
Intermediates. Three DAC 
members are enrolled in 
Paramedic Education Programs. 

1 Corporate and Alumni fund 
drives have been held. The 
resident fund drive will occur in 
early 2004. 

M Evaluated feasibility of pur- 
chasing a utility vehicle as 
budgeted, and instead dedicated 
funding toward placing a third 
ambulance in service 
after the purchase of the 
2004 ambulance. 

Goals for 2004 

I Support DAC EMTBasic and 
Intermediate members who 
wish to become paramedics, by 



providing financial support and 
mentoring. Reciniit additional 
volunteers who are paramedics 
or paramedic students, as well 
as volunteers to provide non- 
ambulance related duty. 

Continue to work with 
Durham, Lee, Madbury, and 
University of New Hampshire 
officials to plan for the future 
EMS needs of the communities. 

Work with Federal, State and 
local agencies to train and 
become equipped to respond to 
weapons of mass destruction 
and other Mass Casualty 
Incidents. 

Plan for future Corps housing, 
including identifying potential 
sites and beginning the station 
design process to ease over- 



crowding and plan for lease 
expiration in 2009. 

Research technology as it 
relates to DAC EMS services, 
for example Mobile Data 
Terminals, Global Positioning 
system/tracking systems, inter- 
facing with the 911 PSAP cen- 
ter, and paperless patient care 
reporting. 

We are grateful for the support of 
members of the communities we 
serve, the Durham, Lee, and 
Madbury Fire Departments, and 
the Durham, UNH, Lee, and 
Madbury Police Departments, 
and the Durham-UNH 
Communications Center. Anyone 
wishing more information about 
the Durham Ambulance Corps 
may call the station at (603) 862- 
3674 or visit our website at 
www.dac.unh.edu. D 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



■ Ronald P. O'Keefe 

Fire Chief 

^^m-x^m he Durham Fire 

Department has had a 
very challenging year. 
Firefighter/EMT Paul 
Marcoux was called up to active 
military duty for the entire year 
and for the first time since the 
1980's, the department has lost 
several valued members of the 
staff in one year due to resigna- 
tions. Firefighter/EMT Paul 
Stevens left to pursue a career 
with the Exeter Fire Department, 
Firefighter/EMT Larry Best, an 
eleven year veteran, left to pur- 
sue a career with the Salem Fire 
Department and Firefighter/EMT 
Brian Murray, a twelve year vet- 
eran, left to pursue a career with 



the Manchester Fire 
Department. Also leaving the 
Durham Fire Department after 
three years of service were Call 
Firefighters Sean Kay and James 
Festa, both who graduated from 
UNH Class of 2003. 

We continue to be responsive to 
the needs of our community to 
create lasting partnerships 
ensuring adequate fire and life 
safety services while maintaining 
the identified core purpose, val- 
ues and goals of the 
Administration and Town 
Council. 

Our focus in 2004 will be to re- 
evaluate our Strategic Plan, 
soliciting input from members of 
the Town Council and the com- 
munity. We have started this 
process by contacting interested 



parties to participate in an intro- 
ductory meeting at the end of 
2003. The Durham Fire 
Department continues to work 
towards meeting national stan- 
dards for emergency response. An 
evaluation of our emergency 
medical services shows that we 
exceed the national response 
time criteria for medical emer- 
gencies. In a business where time 
is critical, a minute or two can 
mean the difference between life 
and death. 

Our members continue to work 
hard to provide quality services 
to the public. We focus a great 
deal of attention on customer 
service and incorporate this into 
our department philosophy. When 
you call upon the Fire 
Department for any type of assis- 



50 



Town ot Durham 2003 Annual Report 



tance we will always be there 
when you need us. I wish to 
thank the community for its 
continued support and thank the 
dedicated men and women of the 
Durham Fire Department for j 

their outstanding performance 
throughout the year. 

2003 Accomplishments 

Completed a DCAT presenta- 
tion of fire department 2003 
goals. 

Marshal Tetreault and 
Inspector Hoisington attended 
an Evidence Handling class in 
Vermont. 

The department participated in 
Flashover Training at the NH 
Fire Academy 

„ Firefighter/Paramedic James 
Lapolla coordinated the instal- 
lation of automatic defibrilla- 
tors at the Town Hall and Police 
Department. 

Firefighter/EMT Glenn Miller 
attended an Emergency 
Medical conference at the 
Portsmouth Regional Hospital. 

Engine 3 refurbishment was 
completed. 

H Firefighter/EMT Scott 

Campbell became certified as a 
CPR instructor 

W. Assistant Chief Blake complet- 
ed a class in Disciplinary Skills. 

1.' Maintenance Coordinator, 
Firefighter/EMT Jeff Furlong 
completed the Automotive 
Service Excellence certification 
in Heavy Truck Gasoline 
Engines. 

ii Firefighter/EMT James Brown 
completed the Automotive 
Service Excellence certification 
in Automotive/Light Truck 
Manual Drive-Trains and 
Suspension and Steering. 



Firefighter/EMT Steve Auger 
completed training on 
Interspiro breathing apparatus. 

Captain Tom Stano graduated 
fi-om UNH with a Masters 
Degree. 

Celebrated the 75th anniver- 
sary of the Durham Fire 
Department with an Open 
House while kicking off the 
fund raising campaign for the 
refurbishment of the 1931 
Seagrave engine by the 
Durham Call Firefighters & 
Durham Professional 
Firefighters. 

Call Firefighter Steve 
Harriman completed certifica- 
tion as a Firefighter Level 1. 

Fire Inspector Hoisington 
attended the National Fire 
Academy in Emmitsburg, MD 
on Plans Review for Inspectors. 

Captain Richard Miller attend- 
ed the National Fire Academy 
in Emmitsburg, MD on 



Command and Control of Major 
Incidents. 

Fire Marshal Tetreault complet- 
ed the 40-hour certification 
course on Child Safety Seat 
Technician, sponsored by the 
National Highway Safety 
Agency. 

Firefighter/EMT Steve Auger 
started Paramedic School. 

Firefighters and Officers 
attended a one-day seminar on 
Maintaining a Positive Work 
Environment, sponsored by the 
Durham Fire Department. 

Firefighters Auger, L. Best, 
Davis, Emanuel & Murray 
completed training in Big Rig 
Rescue in Concord, NH. 

Administrative Assistant Deb 
Quisumbing attended a two- 
day seminar on Microsoft 
Access, in Portsmouth. 

Call Firefighter Wes Smith 
was honored as the Durham- 

.. continued on next page- 



Members ot the Durham Fire Department at the Dame Road training burn in March 2003. 
Front row (l-r): B, LVigne, J. Best, T. Stano, C. Walker. B. Matheny, S. Harnman, G. Miller, 
M Hoisington, and R. Miller. Back row (l-r) C Moorenovich, P Henny, B- Morse, L. Best, J. 

Brown. S Auger. B Murray, and R StevPi. ...'■■. . , • . 




Public Safety 



51 



Fire Department 

(continued) 

Great Bay Rotary's Citizen of 
the Year. 

Firefighter/EMT Jason Best 
completed a Confined Space 
Rescue course at the NH Fire 
Academy. 

1: Captain Stano spent two 

weeks in Montana with a State 
of NH crew on a forest fire 
fighting detail. 

g Chief O'Keefe attended an 
emergency management con- 
ference in Arlington, VA on 
Homeland Security, paid for by 
grant monies. 

i Firefighter/Paramedic Pete 
Henny attended a seminar on 



Strategies and Tactics for 
Company Officers. 

Fire Marshal Tetreault and 
Inspector Hoisington facilitat- 
ed the annual Greek Fire 
Safety Academy. 

Captain Tom Stano attended 
Leadership II seminar at the 
NH Fire Academy. 

1 Completed the evaluation and 
marking of fire lanes on the 
UNH campus. 

Goals for 2004 

M Complete the re-evaluation of 
the Fire Department Strategic 
Plan. 

Re-negotiate the funding for- 
mula for fire protection servic- 
es with UNH. 



Conduct a mass casualty/emer- 
gency management drill. 

Increase the frequency of 
assembly inspections and 
enforcement. 

Upgrade the incident com- 
mand module in Car 2. 

Install a fire cistern in the 
Longmarsh area. 

Find and bring into compliance 
with the fire codes un-reported 
lodging and rooming houses. 

Initiate a committee to research 
the location and space needs for 
a new fire station. 

Secure alternative funding for 
the child safety seat inspection 
program. 



Fire Department Incidents 2004 

rXH TOWN 

Structure Fires 4 11 

Other Fires (vehicle, brush, refuse; 40 47 

Emergency Medical 326 342 

Extrications 21 4 

Spills/Leaks (No Ignition I 18 23 

Service Calls 161 203 

Smoke Investigations 35 18 

Mahcious False Alarms 12 17 

Unintentional False Alarms 63 94 

Good Intent Calls 29 42 

System Malfunction 43 33 

False Calls Not Classified 20 34 

Miscellaneous (assist police, chemical, 

emergencies, arcing electrical equipment) 43 99 

Totals 815 967 

Mutual Aid provided to other communities ....38 

Three Year Average 

UNH TOWN 

Cost Share Rates for 2004 46% 547c 

2003 467f 54'7r 

2002 46*7^ 547c 

2001 46% 547c 



Fire Safety Inspections 308 

(Including; multiple occupancy, commercial, home, daycare & chimney 
and woodstove inspections. ) 

Permits Issued/Approved 237 

Blasting 12 

Burning 138 

Fireworks Display 2 

Hot works 5 

Install/Operate Fire Alarm System 11 

Install (LPG) Tank 9 

Install Oil Burner 4 

Install Fire Sprinkler System 9 

Open Flame in Place of Assembly 5 

Operate Place of Assembly 29 

Permissible Fireworks 1 

Pyrotechnics 1 

Remove Underground Fuel Storage Tank 3 

Suppression Systems 8 

Fire Safety Education 57 

(Including: fire drills, fire extinguisher classes, other programs (public 
school, programs, dormitop.- and Greek System programs, fire station 
tours, etc. ) 

Training Hours 4,999 

Miscellaneous 

Fire Investigations 11 



52 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Work with UNH Computer 
Interoperability Office to 
install new mobile data termi- 
nal communications systems in 
Car l,Car 2 & Engine 1. 

Develop company inspector pro- ^ 



gram to improve fire code 
enforcement & public education. 

Research and draft a report on 
the Durham Fire Department's 
compliance with national stan- 



dards on emergency response 
criteria. 

Continue to find alternative 
funding sources for fire, rescue 
& emergency operations servic- 
es within the community. D 



FOREST FIRE WARDEN 



■ Ronald P. O'Keefe 

Durham Fire Warden 

or briish fires, 2003 
was a very inactive 
year. As of 12/2/2003 
the Durham Fire 
Department responded to only six 
brush fires burning approximate- 
ly one eighth of an acre in total. 

Permits for open burning are 
available seven days a week. It is 



recommended to call first to 
determine if permits are being 
issued that day due to the level 
of fire danger. A new addition to 
provide better customer service 
is the annual fire permit. These 
permits are issued to residents 
who burn their brush pile sever- 
al times a year, minimizing the 
number of trips necessary to the 
Fire Department. Homeowners 
obtaining these permits are 
required to call each time before 



they burn their brush. 

No permit is required with 
lOO'/f snow cover but we ask that 
you call to let us know when you 
will be burning. For a brochure 
on fire permit laws, call us at 
868-5531 or e-mail us at 
fire@ci.durham.nh.us. Check out 
brush fire safety tips and inter- 
esting links at our web site 
wrww.ci.durham.nh.us. 
Remember, practice fire safety 
every day. D 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



■ David L. Kurz 

Police Chief 

his marks the eighth 
annual report I have 
completed as your 
police chief and the 
first where it has not been neces- 
sary to make reference to 
employees leaving for other 
career opportunities or retire- 
ment. We were able to add a 
patrol officer to the staff during 
this calendar year. Dennis 
Durkin of Rye fills this new 
patrol officer's position supported 
by a federal hiring grant. Dennis 
had previously been employed by 
the Town of Farmington Police 
and brings experience, training 
and a professional commitment 



to the Town of Durham. 

We have honed our hiring 
process with the acknowledge- 
ment that it is the people who 
comprise the organization that 
are the true measure of its' quali- 
ty and effectiveness. Nowhere is 
this truer than in the police pro- 
fession. Services that are confi- 
dential and very personal are 
very much affected by the quality 
of the officer and the training 
they receive. We are pleased that 
a solid recruiting and selection 
process has produced exception- 
ally qualified and dedicated 
employees to serve you. 

This was a challenging year 
for the police department and the 
Durham-UNH community that 



experienced three "Celebratory 
Riots" as the aftermath to sport- 
ing events. This national phe- 
nomenon presents unique chal- 
lenges to Durham as the host 
community to a large educational 
institution. In partnership from 
our community, we are working 
collaboratively to prevent these 
events from reoccurring. In addi- 
tion, the national media invaded 
Durham to report on a series of 
burglaries occurring in the mid- 
dle of the night where young 
women awoke to find their 
clothes removed or a male stand- 
ing over them. The department 
was able to rise to the challenges 
of a voracious media and a 
sophisticated and time consum- 

., continued on next page. 



Public Safety 



53 



Police Department 

(continued) 

ing investigation. We continue to 
use our partnership with our 
community in combination with a 
business Hke dedication to cus- 
tomer service to ensure success. 
Partnerships with all of our 



neighborhoods, each with their 
own unique issues, have served 
to open dialogue between the 
police and the residents creating 
an environment where we learn 
to help each other. 

I would like to thank the mem- 
bers of the Durham Police 



Department for their commit- 
ment to this community and the 
countless contributions they have 
made over this past year. We 
look forward to working together 
in providing the level of service 
that the Durham community has 
come to expect from its' police 
department. D 



54 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



PUBLIC WORKS 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 



■ Mike Lynch 

Director of Public Works 

^HUP he Public Works 

Department experi- 
enced the busiest year 
in its history because 
of a major reorganization that 
resulted in the elimination of the 
Superintendent of Solid Waste 
position. The department also 
combined the Highway Foreman's 
position with the Heavy 
Equipment Operators position to 
create one working Foreman's 
position. The department made 
one other administrative position 
change, which allowed Doug 
Bullen, Assistant Director of 
Operations to also take over the 
leadership of the Water and 
Sanitation Divisions. 

Three capitol projects domi- 
nated public works staff time 
over this busy year. The baseline 
improvements project is 407^ 
complete and ran into a bit of 
trouble when the general contrac- 
tor Charwill Construction 
declared a Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. 
The surety company who holds 
the performance bond has now 
taken over the project and will 
stay on until its completion. The 
remaining two projects, the reha- 
bilitation of the Packers Falls 
Bridge and the landfill 
closure/new transfer station, are 
QC/f complete with only minor 
work and punch list items to fin- 



ish. Both projects are in a win- 
ter shutdown phase and will 
start back up in April. 

Other projects occupying lots 
of staff time include our new 
Storm Water H permit, which 
regulates our storm water runoff 
for both solids and water quality. 
The 2003 road program was a 
success with the largest piece, 
Bennett Road, being completely 
reclaimed and resurfaced. The 
department completed an expan- 
sion of the Town Council cham- 
bers at the Town Hall that dou- 
bled the seating capacity and 
included central air conditioning. 
The expansion also allowed us to 
modernize the meeting area and 
correct code deficiencies. Another 
ongoing project is the dredging of 
the Mill Pond. This project is in 
the final phases of permitting 
with an anticipated start date of 
August 2005. 2003 also saw the 
full-time retirement of long-time 
favorite Raymond Laroche, Sr. 
Ray will still work at the new 
Transfer and Recycling Center 
on a part-time basis. 

Goals for 2004 

Sidewalk and street lighting 
reconstruction - Madbury Road 

Erect sand storage shed at pub- 
lic works facility 

Purchase a 2-1/2 cubic yard 
front end loader 

Complete repairs to Wiswall 
Dam 




Mike Lynch, Director of Public Works. 

Replace refuse collection packer 

E Complete a study of the water 
system 

M Start engineering on Waste- 
water Treatment Plant outfall 

1 Roof repairs at the Wastewater 
Treatment Plant 

M Rehabilitation of the 
Woodridge Tennis Courts 

We at Public Works look forward 
to serving the residents of 
Durham in 2004 with great 
excitement and thank you for the 
opportunity to have helped make 
Durham the terrific place that it 
is today. D 



Public Works 



55 



OPERATIONS DIVISION 



■ Douglas Bullen 

Assistant Director of 
Operations 

he Operations Division 
had a very productive 
and busy year in 2003. 
Weather related events 
were a major concern this past 
year and took up most of the 
Division's time during the winter 
months. The Division is responsi- 
ble for the upkeep of all Town 
roads and properties. We also 
respond to any citizen issues that 
may arise during the year. As we 
move into the next year I see 
continued productivity from the 
Division and providing the Town 
with professional services to meet 
any challenges that we 
encounter. 

2003 Accomplishments 

, Due to reorganization in the 
Public Works Department the 



Water and Solid Waste 
Divisions are now under the 
Operations division. My goal is 
to increase cooperation and effi- 
ciency between the units. 

A very busy winter weather 
season created 19 snow-related 
incidents. Town crews worked 
hard to maintain all of the 
roads and walkways. 

It The DPW completed the annual 
spring cleanup in May. 
Employees from all divisions 
assisted in the cleanup. 145 
tons of material were picked up 
and disposed. 

Fall cleanup took place in 
November and for the first year 
we asked residents to use paper 
bags for their leaves. This 
reduced our pick up time by 
one week on leaves. Overall we 
collected 14 tons of leaves and 
35 tons of brush 

Pike Industries of Portsmouth, 



(l-r): Raymond Osborne. Charlton "Chuck" Dill, Bonnie McDermott. Dwight Richard. Daniel 
"Max" Dnscoll, James Currie, James Couch. Brian Beers, Lloyd Gifford. David Seeley. Stephen 

Valpev Tonv Wallingford and Arthur Nutter 




NH was the low bidder on this 
year's road program. Bennett 
road was reclaimed and paved 
from 108 to Packers Falls Road. 
This procedure will allow for 
greater drainage and long-term 
life of the road surface with the 
installation of three new inches 
of asphalt and a more defined 
center crown. Edgewood, 
Meadow and Technology roads 
were also part of this year's pro- 
gram. These roads were 
shimmed and overlaid with 
1.75 inches of asphalt. 

Crack filling in the amount 
of $20,000 was completed on 
various roadways. This type 
of treatment was also used 
prior to our road program 
overlays to further the life 
of those areas. 

DPW crews screened 2500 
cubic yards of sand from the 
Town owned pit. The material 
is then transported to the 
Wastewater Treatment Plant, 
mixed with salt and stored for 
winter use. 

DPW crews painted all cross- 
walks and traffic markings 
during the spring season. Red 
pattern walkways were also 
repainted. 

Contracted all center and road 
edge markings. This operation 
takes place in the spring. 

Assisted various departments 
in emergency situations. 

Assisted with the Town Hall 
renovations. 

Coordinated the replacement 
of the Courthouse roof and 
chimney. 

Completed the Wagon Hill water- 
front beautification project. 



56 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Continued to work with the 
Federal government on Town 
ADA comphance. 

Replaced the Courthouse 
boiler. 

Performed general upkeep 
of all Town owned facilities 
and properties. This includes 
summer and winter mainte- 
nance and any daily issues 
that may arise. 

Responded to any citizen con- 
cern that may arise during the 
year. 

Responded and repaired any 



infrastructure issue. This can 
include drainage, roadway or 
vegetation situations that 
occur. 

Ongoing sign replacement and 
upkeep is a yearly task. 
Federal updates will take sev- 
eral years to complete. 

Performed maintenance to the 
Town owned fleet. Included in 
the fleet are all police vehicles, 
DPW vehicles and equipment 
and vehicles assigned to the 
solidwaste, water and waste- 
water divisions. 



Serviced and repainted all 
snow related equipment. 

Purchased a new 35,000 GVW 
dump truck and plow. The 
package was purchased 
through the state bid program. 

Purchased a new tractor to 
help in the winter and sum- 
mer operations. The new trac- 
tor is equipped with a snow 
blower, which should expedite 
our winter cleanup operations. 

; Coordinated the sensational 
2003 Fourth of July fireworks 
celebration. D 



SOLID WASTE DIVISION 




Douglas Bullen 

Assistant Director of 
Operations 

ig changes have been 
taking place at the 
} transfer facility this 
past year. The total 
reconstruction and capping of the 
facility is nearly complete. Some 
minor items will still need to be 
finished and these items should 
be completed by spring. I would 
like to thank the residents for 
their patience during the con- 
struction as we create a more 
customer friendly facility. As 
Director of Operations for the 
facility I will do all that I can to 
maximize our recycling efforts 
and market our material in the 
most cost-effective manner. 
During the next year we will look 
at our operation and site layout 
to make sure we are creating the 
most up-to-date facility. I would 
also like to thank the solid waste 
staff for their hard work during 



the construction, as a lot of oper- 
ational changes had to take place 
during the change over I would 
especially like to thank Bonnie 
McDermott whose knowledge has 
been of great assistance during 
my transition to the world of 
solid waste and recycling. 

2003 Accomplishments 

M Helped with the construction 
and capping of the Durham 
landfill. Final completion will 
be in the spring of 2004. 

Long time Town employee Guy 
Hodgdon left the service of the 
Town after 28 years and the 
division was incorporated into 
the operations section. 

M A new MW3 was hired to fill a 
vacant position, the new 
employee is James Couch. 

1 Continue to work with 

the Integrated Waste Manage- 
ment Advisory Committee. 
Several newsletters were sent 
out to the residents with gen- 
eral information. I will contin- 



ue to meet with the committee 
on a monthly basis to address 
any question or concerns that 
may arise. 

Assisted the Operations 
Division with the spring and 
fall cleanup programs. 

Opened the new swap shop at 
the transfer station. 

Started a new program of inter- 
nal transportation of mixed 
paper and co-mingle products. 
This will show significant rev- 
enue gains over the new year 

Continued to evaluate the new 
transfer station to ensure it is a 
user-fiiendly operation. 

Continued to evaluate all mar- 
kets that have an impact on our 
operation and Town. 

i Held a household Hazardous 
Waste Collection Day This 
gives residents the opportunity 
to dispose material in a proper 
manner 

Demonstrated two new dual 

.continued on next page. 



Public Works 



57 



Solid Waste Division 

(continued) 

collection vehicles. These vehi- 
cles are set up to collect two 
streams of material at one stop. 

W, Conducted training for employ- 
ees to maintain their State 
required certifications. 

Collected 108 refrigerators and 
airconditioners for reclaiming. 

M Properly disposed of 127 televi- 
sions and monitors. 

^ There was 17,664 visits made 
to the transfer station by 
Town residents in 2003. 

Goals for 2004 

™ Continue to pursue a co-collec- 
tion vehicle. 

» Hold the annual Hazardous 
Waste Collection Day. 

M Work on a grant for the pur- 
chase of dumpsters through the 
N.H. the Beautiful program. 

Review and implement changes 
to benefit the town through our 
programs and operations. D 



2003 Solid Waste Division Data 

2001 2002 



TONS OF MATERIAL MARKETED: 



Recyclable Material: 

Mixed Paper 
Cardboard 

Comingled Containers 
Textiles 



721 


340 

6 



470 
129 
180 



2003 



520 
119 

272 
10 



Totals 1067 787 921 

Recycling Revenue $7,413 $2,057 $3,206 

Tip Fee Avoidance $53,382 $41,821 $50,996 

Other Material Recycled: 

Scrap Metal - tons 112 56 92 

Car Batteries - each 2 2 2 

Car Tires - each 9 7 10 

Waste Oil - gallons 851 892 870 

Antifreeze - gallons 55 

Leaves -Collected @ Curb-tons 15 8 14 

Propane Tanks - each 253 293 356 

Material Disposed: 

Curbside Collection - tons 1,432 1,408 1,459 

Commercial - tons 531 

Refuse Total 1,963 1,408 1,459 

Bulky Waste - tons 576 452 443 

Const. & Demo. Waste - tons 143 105 

SWMF Permits Issued 880 1,270 1,001 

Electronic Stickers Sold 340 



TOWN ENGINEER 






■ Bob Levesque 

Town Engineer 

his year Engineering 
has been spearheading 
the development and 
i^:, implementation of a 
Storm Water Management plan 
for the Town. This is being man- 
dated under, the Clean Water Act 
-Storm Water Phase II guide 
lines. The Town has had to devel- 
op a plan outlining six major 
components: 



1. Public education 

2. Public participation 

3. Illicit discharge detection and 
elimination program 

4. Construction runoff program 

5. Post-construction runoff pro- 
gram 

6. Good housekeeping/pollution 
prevention plan 

The plan has been submitted to 
the Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA) Region 1 and we 



have received our New 
Hampshire Department of 
Environmental Services 
(NHDES) Permit. 
Implementation of the Storm 
Water Management Plan is in 
its beginning stages. Anyone 
interested in reviewing this plan 
or who would like to become 
involved with implementation of 
the plan can contact the Town 
Engineer at Durham Public 
Works. 



58 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Engineering has been oversee- 
ing two large capital improve- 
ment projects this year. First, a 
$2,407,000 Wastewater 
Treatment Plant Improvement 
Project. This project will allow for 
a better processed treatment of 
our wastewater and cleaner 
water to be discharged into the 
Oyster River. This project has 
been delayed due to a Bankrupt 
Contractor, Charwill 



Construction. However, the proj- 
ect will be back on track in early 
2004 with a completion date of 
fall of 2004. Second, the Durham 
Landfill Project is underway and 
is going well. The project is on 
schedule and will be completed 
in the Spring of 2004. 

Engineering has been working 
with the Planning Department 
on the development of a 



Geographical Information System 
(GIS) system for the Town. This 
year we have acquired Arc GIS 
Software and established an aeri- 
al photo base map for all of 
Durham. We hope to continue our 
efforts in 2004. 

This is just a few of the high- 
lighted projects for this year 
Overall, it has been a very pro- 
ductive year and 2004 looks to be 
just as challenging. D 



WASTEWATER DIVISION 



■ Duane Walker 

Superintendent 

2003 
Accomplishments 

In January, quotes were 
sought for the purchase of a 
general purpose drying oven 
and a set of construction scaf- 
folding. Both quotes came in 
under budget and were pur- 
chased. 

In February, bids were sought 
for the purchase of a new 
lawn mower. The lowest bid- 
der for the specified mower 
was M.B. Tractor and 
Equipment Company. The 
mower was ordered and we 
took delivery in April. 

M In April, we repaired a broken 
sewer main on Burnham 
Avenue which was allowing 
infiltration to enter the sewer 
system and was causing a 
dangerous sinkhole in the 
middle of the street. Also in 
April, we repaired the broken 
Business Park force main 
which was allowing raw, 
untreated sewage to enter the 
estuary. 



In May, the Vac Con sewer 
cleaning truck was sent to 
Connecticut for repairs on the 
vacuum pump. Also in May, a 
new Dimminutor was pur- 
chased and installed in the 
Dover Road Pumping Station 
to replace the original unit, 
which had worn out. This 
device chops and grinds 
debris in the flow that would 
damage or clog the main 
pumps. 



In June, quotes were sought 
for the rebuilding of the #2 
Raw Sewage Pump in the 
Dover Road Pumping Station 
as budgeted for. This unit was 
reinstalled and put back into 
service in September. 

In July, 37,576 feet of sewer 
mains were cleaned as part of 
our annual sewer line mainte- 
nance program. 

, continued on next page. 



Wastewater Vital Statistics 

PERMIT AVG. 2003 
PARAMETERS TOTAL 


(12 months) 

AVG. 2002 
TOTAL 


AVG. 2001 
TOTAL 


Avg Flow MGD 

Effluent TSS MG/L 

i Avg% TSS Removal min. 85%. 

Effluent BOD (MG/L) 

Avg'/f BOD Removal min. 85% 


0.94... 

22 

85.9 ... 


0.94 

12.2 

94.9 


1.01 

7.4 

95.9 

5 

94.5 


7.1 .... 

....93.1 ... 


6.8 

86.7 






Total Flow <MG) 

Septage Received (GAL; 


...338.6... 

..52,000 . 


450 

87.000 


...370.1 

..175,000 

Liter 


MGD Million Gallons per Day 

TSS Total Suspended Solids 

i BOD Biochemical Oxygen Dent 


MG/L Milligrams per 

MG Million Gallons 

und GAL Gallons 


. 




Public 


Works 59 



Wastewater Division 

(continued) 

E In August, a new Watson- 
Marlow chemical metering 
pump was purchased for the 
hypochlorite feed system. 

M Approximately 409^ of the 



work involved with the 
Baseline Improvements 
Project has been completed. 
Unfortunately, after suffering 
financial difficulties, Charwill 
Construction Company filed 
for bankruptcy and all work 



has stopped. We are presently 
working with the bonding 
company to ensure that this 
project is completed, as 
designed. 

In November, employee evalu- 
ations were completed. D 



WATER DIVISION 



■ Douglas Bullen 

Assistant Director 
of Operations 

2003 Accomplishments 

I Worked wath the UNH water 
department to produce and dis- 
tribute the lead and copper 
public notification document 
and the consumer confidence 
report as required by the EPA 
and the State of New 
Hampshire. 

B Interacted daily with the UNH 
water treatment plant person- 
nel in the production of potable 
water to the Durham/UNH 
water system. 

H Completed fall and spring main 
line flushing in cooperation 
with UNH. 

M Regular testing for bacteria, 
lead and copper were per- 
formed through out the year on 
the water system. The State 
and the EPA continue to 
require increased testing of the 
water supply. 

H Ensured staff training complet- 
ed to maintain contact hours 
for state certification. 

K Conducted regular monitoring 
of the Lee well water produc- 
tion and its introduction to the 
distribution system. 



W- Inspected 11 new service instal- 
lations. 

■ Performed winter maintenance 
on the system to include 
hydrant antifreeze and snow 
markers. 

Responded to citizen and con- 
tractor requests. 

Continued update of the auto- 
mated meter reading process. 

11 Completed inspection of all 
water facilities, to include the 
Beech Hill and Foss Farm 
water tanks and the Lee well. 

M Completed water meter replace- 
ment contract that began in 
2002. 

if Monitor 2003 expenditures and 
consulted with the public works 
director on the 2004 budget. 

1: Responded to and repaired 9 
water line failures. 

f ' Inspected and reviewed 2 new 
sprinkler systems. 

Performed 21 water meter 
repairs/replacements. 

Repaired 2 fire hydrants. 

Replaced 2 fire hydrants. 

Goals for 2004 

E Continue testing of the water 
system as mandated by state 
and EPA regulations. 



Replacement and upgrade of 
meters and outside readers. 

Work writh the Town Engineer 
and the Public Works Director 
to develop and approve a water 
ordinance, construction and pol- 
icy manual. 

Coordinate with the Town 
Engineer and the Public Works 
Director to implement a master 
water line replacement pro- 
gram in conjunction with the 
road rehabilitation schedule. 
Establish a general line 
replacement and cost schedule. 

Complete a distribution study 
of water demand and supply. D 



60 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



TOWN SUPPORTED ORGANIZATIONS 



AIDS RESPONSE SEACOAST 



■ Wendy Noyes 

Executive Director 

IDS Response- 
Seacoast is a non- 
profit, community 
based HIV/AIDS serv- 
ice organization with a three-fold 
mission: to prevent the spread of 
HIV/AIDS tlirough education and 
prevention programs, to provide 
direct services for those hving 
with and affected by HIV/AIDS 
and their famiUes, and to advo- 
cate for issues affecting 
HIV/AIDS. 

AIDS Response-Seacoast's 
HIV Education & Prevention 
Department has provided servic- 
es to residents of Durham during 
the calendar year 2003. We 
respond to requests for HIV/AIDS 
education programs and consult 
with requesting persons to design 
culturally appropriate training, 
awareness, education, and pre- 
vention sessions. Our profession- 
al education staff coordinates and 
delivers these programs. In addi- 
tion, we participate in training 
the providers who serve individu- 
als at higher risk for HIV/STDs. 
We also work collaboratively with 
UNH on many levels. 

We also provide presenters 
through our speaker's bureau, 
consisting of persons living with 
HIV disease. These volunteers, 
trained and supervised by the 
Coordinator of Community 
Programs, share their experi- 



ences of living and coping with 
HIV and AIDS, and often partici- 
pate with ARS education staff in 
educational sessions. They effec- 
tively put a human face and per- 
sonal story to this epidemic. 
Their presentations and the 
resulting discussions help to dis- 
pel mvths and fears, answer spe- 
cific questions, and create more 
understanding in our communi- 
ties about HIV/AIDS. Feedback 
about this part of our program is 
always highly ranked and is very 
powerful for most participants. 

On an ongoing basis, ARS 
receives calls from area residents 
who have questions about 
HIV/AIDS and STDs, risk behav- 
iors, transmission issues, etc. 
Some of these individuals are 
referred to area providers or to 
the ARS mobile health van for 
free HIV counseling and testing, 
STD counseling and testing, hep- 
atitis A and B vaccines, etc. 
Literature and prevention mate- 
rials are mailed to individuals 
requesting them at no cost to 
them. 

ARS Client Services 
Department Staff provided 22 
units of case management with 
our 0-3 clients in the Durham 
area. 

Client Services assists indi- 
viduals living with HIV/AIDS in 
many ways. We provide emotion- 
al support and refer to clients to 
massage, legal help, housing pro- 



grams, food pantries, mental 
health providers, HIV education 
programs, nutritionist, acupunc- 
ture, and reiki providers. 

We help clients maintain or 
reach the goal of independent liv- 
ing and maintain good health. 
We assist in rental/utility pay- 
ments, fuel assistance and secur- 
ing SSI/CARE benefits. We are a 
resource for housing, furniture, 
and other donated items. We 
help secure baskets for Holiday 
meals and gifts along with our 
Holiday party. We offer nutri- 
tional supplements and a nutri- 
tional counselor. 

Clients also have access to 
transportation for medical 
appointments and to access phar- 
macies. D 



Town Supported Organizations 



61 



DURHAM HISTORIC ASSOCIATION 



■ Alexander R. Amell 

President 

he Durham Historic 
Association s roots go 
back to 1851, making it 
the oldest Historic 
Association in the state and one 
of the oldest (some have said it is 
the oldest) in the United States. 
It is the preserver of the Town's 
artifacts and guardian of the his- 
tory that has marked Durham's 
growth from a riverside agricul- 
tural community to a complex 
town. While the Association is a 
private institution, it is closely 
tied to the town. In addition to 
preserving the town's history it 
also keeps the citizens of the 
town informed about the nature 
and identity of their present com- 
munity. Durham is the sum of its 
past experiences. 

2003 Accomplishments 

The Association received many 
gifts and donations which have 
enhanced the richness of the hold- 
ings in our museum. Especially 
notable amongst the gifts we 
received were two monetary con- 
tributions. One of these was from 
a long time member of the DHA 
who was also a beloved and well 
remembered teacher in the Oyster 
River Schools, Ms. Dorothy Wilcox 
who left us a bequest of $5000. 
Her thoughtfulness is greatly 
appreciated. The second gift, funds 
to air condition the Association's 
Museum on the second floor of the 
old Town Hall, was from Thomas 
and Clara Butler, long time resi- 
dents of Durham who have just 
recently moved to Springfield, 
NH. In the letter accompanying 
the gift the Butlers wrote: "We are 
very pleased to make this contri- 



bution to the Town and the 
Durham Historical Museum. We 
enjoyed living in Durham for the 
past 43 years. We recently moved 
from town to the NH mountains 
and wanted to do something to 
say thank you." And our thanks 
go to the Butlers for providing 
this badly needed addition to the 
Museum. 

At our Oct. meeting, Mr. 
Charles Ronnquist, a retired IBM 
engineer, spoke about old clocks. 
After his retirement Mr. 
Ronnquist went back to school at 
Sotheby's to study clock making 
and restoration. "I have a passion 
for old clocks" said Mr. Ronnquist, 
as he presented his talk. 

Mr. Gilbert Stevens was our 
speaker at the January 2003 
meeting and presented the 
William Bruce ledger to the 
Association at this meeting. This 
ledger is a record of the transac- 
tions of a General Store located 
near the intersection of Emerson 
and Old Bagdad Rds. in Durham. 
We are working with the 
archivists at the UNH Library to 
get this ledger copied so the 
information in it will be easily 
available to interested individu- 
als. We are very grateful to Mr. 
Stevens for this gift. 

In April, Gerry Smith present- 
ed a very sobering and memo- 
rable history of Andersonville, 
the infamous Civil War prison 
built in Sumter County, Georgia. 
Gerry and his wife Dotty have 
spent many months working at 
Andersonville as guides and 
researchers. 

At our annual picnic in June 
Gregory S. McCone of Dover pre- 
sented a talk on "Herbs and 



Weeds". He told us of some of the 
medicinal uses and nutritional 
benefits of various plants, some of 
which we consider weeds. He col- 
lected various species in the vicin- 
ity of the Old Town Landing and 
told us of their usage medicines. 

I wish to once again acknowl- 
edge the work of the Museum 
Committee (Mamie Sumner, 
Alma Tirrell and Trudy Wells) for 
the work they do in sorting and 
cataloging the materials in the 
Museum. With the new air-con- 
ditioning being installed, their 
work during the hot days will be 
much more enjoyable. 

I also wish to thank all of the 
members of the Executive Board 
for their interest and efforts in 
keeping the Association focused 
and progressing. Deserving spe- 
cial thanks are Dick Dewing who 
spends many hours working on 
Association business and never 
fails to answer a call for help 
(and he gets many calls), and Ted 
McNitt, our long time treasurer, 
who keeps us solvent. 

Unresolved Problems: 

The Museum is very crowded and 
not easily accessible. We need 
more room. Some of our artifacts 
must be kept in storage instead 
of being displayed. A long range 
goal, should the Town Court be 
moved to a new location, is the 
expansion of the Museum to the 
first floor of the Old Town Hall. 

Access to the Museum is by 
ascending a long, steep set of 
stairs which prevents many eld- 
erly or handicapped individuals 
from visiting us. We should have 
a chair lift to bring such persons 
up to the Museum. EH 



62 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



HOMEMAKERS OF STRAFFORD COUNTY 




Claudette Boutin 

Chief Executive Officer 

I he Homemakers of 
Strafford County is a 
full service, charitable 
home health and adult 
medical day care organization. 
Established in 1974. the mission 
of The Homemakers is to prevent 
or postpone unnecessary hospi- 
talization or nursing home place- 
ment by offering comprehensive, 
quality, and cost-effective Visiting 
Nurse/Home Health and Adult 
Medical Day Care services 
throughout Strafford County. 

Through its home health care 
programs, the Agency provides 
skilled visiting nurses, rehabili- 
tative therapies, case manage- 
ment, medical social work, home 
health aide, homemaker, in-home 
care provider and Alzheimer's 
respite services. The 
Homemakers also provides adult 
medical/social day care services 
through its "Day Out" program, 
which is the only certified adult 
medical/social day care in 
Strafford County. Through this 
program the Agency provides 
door-to-door transportation to its 
Rochester facility; where older 
and disabled persons receive 
skilled nursing, case manage- 
ment, Alzheimer's respite, con- 
gregate meals, recreational ther- 
apy, physical fitness, nutritional 
counseling, podiatry clinics and 
field trips. 

The Homemakers of Strafford 
County also offers several com- 
munity wellness programs 
including Alzheimer's education- 
al seminars, flu clinics, commu- 
nity wellness clinics and well- 



ness programs such as its 
Strong Living weight training 
program for older people and 
hosts a Take Off Pounds 
Sensibly (TOPS) program. 

2003 Accomplishments 

During Fiscal Year 2003 The 
Homemakers provided: 

24,950 skilled visits - nursing, 
rehabilitative therapies, med- 
ical social work and home 
health aides, 

113,061 hours of home support 
services - homemaker and in- 
home care provider, Alzheimer's 
respite. 

39,465 hours of adult 
medical/social day care. 

122,981 work of "free" non-reim- 
bursable homemaker and adult 
day services, 921 of which was 
provided to Durham residents. 

■ Vaccinated 400 people against 
the flu virus. 

E Provided 14 free Community 
Health Care Clinics. 

Provided educational seminars 
in relation to Alzheimer's dis- 
ease, depression and how to be 
Healthwise for Life. 

Received more than 6,000 hours 
of volunteer services. 

K Hired a volunteer coordinator 
for the newly formed Friend-to- 
Friend Volunteer Program. 

Prepared and delivered more 
than 200 Thanksgiving dinners 
and 200 Holiday food and gift 
baskets to elderly and disabled 
residents in need. 

Goals for 2004 

To continue to help older and 
disabled people remain inde- 



pendent and integrated in the 
community by providing high 
quality, cost-effective skilled, 
home support and adult med- 
ical day care services as well 
as community clinics, wellness 
programs and educational 
seminars. 

To continue to deliver "free" 
care to those in need. 

To continue to collaborate with 
other agencies to meet the 
transportation needs of elderly 
and disabled persons in the 
county. 

To attract more volunteers to 
the Friend to Friend Volunteer 
program, which is designed to 
match older volunteers in need 
with older volimteers who are 
able to meet those needs. 

For more information about The 
Homemakers, persons may call 
(603) 335-1770/1-800-660-1770, 
email us at hsc@gwi.net or visit 
our website at www.thehome- 
makers.org. D 



Town Supported Organizations 



63 



LAMPREY HEALTH CARE 



Ann H. Peters 

Executive Director 



WBS& 



amprey Health Care pro- 
vides a variety of services 
to residents of your com- 
munity and 2003 marks 
our 32nd anniversary. We are 
very proud of this achievement 
and wish to thank the citizens of 
the Town of Durham for their con- 
tinuing support. 

The Senior Citizen 
Transportation Program, operated 
by Lamprey Health Care, is one of 
the most critical services offered 
to residents of the area. The 
buses provide necessary trans- 
portation for food shopping, for 
medical appointments, the phar- 
macy and for recreational trips. 
Residents are picked up at their 
homes and assisted with food 
shopping and their bundles if nec- 
essary. Tlie Senior Transportation 
Program is affiliated with the 
Cooperative Alliance for Seacoast 
Transportation. 

All seven buses operated by 
this program are handicapped 
accessible. Special appointments, 
which cannot be incorporated into 
the specific routes serving the 
Town of Durham, are arranged 
through the Transportation 



Manager and a group of volun- 
teers. The program also operates 
a "Friendly Callers" program in 
that when seniors who regularly 
ride our buses with the program 
are not heard fi-om, they are 
checked on to be sure that every- 
thing is all right. The 
Transportation Health Workers 
( Drivers ) from the program also 
complete necessary errands for 
their riders if they are incapable 
due to illness, for example. The 
goal of this program is to keep 
our senior citizens healthy, inde- 
pendent and in their homes. 

The medical services provided 
by Lamprey Health Care include 
primary medical care, and other 
health related services with an 
emphasis on prevention, educa- 
tion and social services. 
Increased capacity in both our 
Raymond and Newmarket 
Centers allows Lamprey Health 
Care to serve the residents of our 
local area in a timely and efficient 
manner Staffing for both Centers 
includes seven Board Certified 
Family Physicians and one 
Pediatrician. Five Nurse 
Practitioners and a support staff 
of Registered and Licensed 
Practical Nurses, a Registered 
Dietician, a Diabetes Educator 
and Social Workers round out the 



medical team. Medical care pro- 
vided includes prenatal care, 
adult and geriatric medicine, as 
well as screenings and follow up 
for various medical conditions. 
Lamprey Health Care also offers 
a pharmacy assistance program to 
qualifying patients in need of 
financial support and assistance 
with their prescriptions. 

Lamprey Health Care has a 
primary mission to provide for the 
health needs of the residents of 
our service area regardless of 
their ability to pay. Other services 
provided include women's well- 
ness; nutrition; diabetes and asth- 
ma education and treatment; 
transportation; substance abuse 
counseling; social services; health 
education; and information and 
referral services. From prenatal to 
geriatric care and fi-om primary 
health to transportation for sen- 
iors we take great pride in the 
services provided to the communi- 
ties we serve. Lamprey Health 
Care provides comprehensive 
information and referral services 
through InfoLink, "your link to 
community services," (1-888-499- 
2525 ) which can help local resi- 
dents find the answers and sup- 
port they need. 

Thank you again to the Town 
of Durham. D 



MY FRIEND'S PLACE 



y Friend's Place is 
the shelter located in 
Dover, NH that 
serves homeless 
individuals and families from 
Strafford County. For 15 years 
My Friend's Place has provided 



emergency shelter for over 3000 
people. This figure includes 270 
families with more than 400 chil- 
dren. 

In the first 9 months of 2003 
an average of 20 people stayed 



each night as we provided 5510 
bed nights. A single man or 
women stays an average 33 days 
with families staying longer while 
they look for permanent housing. 
The primary referral source is 
from the welfare administrator of 



64 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



the various cities and towns in 
the county. 

My Friend's place also offers 6 
transitional housing units located 
at scattered sites in Dover. A 
family may stay for up to 2 years 
in this program while they look 



for permanent housing, and work 
to solve the issues that made 
them homeless. The Transitional 
Housing program is sponsored by 
the US Department of HUD, and 
through fundraising done by the 
shelter 



My Friend's Place also works 
closely with the Homeless Center 
for Strafford County, located in 
Rochester Daily intake, case 
management, and overall finan- 
cial management are provided to 
this seasonal shelter by the staff 
of My Friend's Place. D 



SEXUAL ASSAULT SUPPORT SERVICES 



■ Kathy Beebe 

Executive Director 

exual Assault Support 
Ser\dces is dedicated to 
supporting victims/sur- 
vivors in their effort to 
heal from the trauma of sexual 
assault and childhood sexual 
abuse, while striving to prevent 
the occurrence of sexual violence 
m local communities and in socie- 
ty at large. This mission is accom- 
plished by providing the following 
services: 

i Toll-free confidential 24-hour 
crisis intervention hotline 1 
(888) 747-7070. 

W Strafford County outreach 
office is located in Rochester at 
One Wakefield St. (332-0775). 

9 Accompaniment to medical and 
legal (police and court) appoint- 
ments. 



Information and referral to 
related services such as attor- 
neys and therapists. 

Support groups for survivors, 
their parents and partners. 

Child sexual assault prevention 
education programs in area 
schools, recreation programs, 
camps and scouts. 

Adolescent workshops on sexual 
harassment and sexual assault. 

Professional training and con- 
sultation to police departments, 
hospital and school personnel 
and human service agencies. 

S "Sexual harassment in the 
workplace" workshops to 
municipalities and businesses. 

Our program is committed to pro- 
viding support, education and 
advocacy to all survivors of sexual 
assault and sexual abuse and 
their parents, partners and other 
community members. 



The primary objectives of 
Sexual Assault Support Services 
are to empower survivors and to 
support them in their healing 
process and to educate the com- 
munity, heightening awareness of 
sexual assault and its prevention. 
We provide prevention programs 
throughout the school system in 
order to broaden awareness of the 
issues of sexual assault and 
harassment among students, 
teachers and the community. In 
addition, our staff coordinates 
with police departments and hos- 
pital staff to improve the response 
to sexual assault cases and to 
assure a supportive environment 
for the survivors. 

Sexual Assault Support 
Services has provided services for 
24 years. Volunteers are welcome 
and utilized in all aspects of the 
program. For further information 
regarding our program please con- 
tact us at (603) 436-4107. D 



STRAFFORD COUNTY COMMUNITY ACTION 



Fuel Assistance 13 households 

Rental Assistance 18 famihes 

Security Deposit 2 families 

Utility Assistance 71 households 

Elderly Transportation 688 rides 

Commodity Food Distribution 363 cases 

Information and Referral 966 units 



Self Sufficiency Case Management 1 family 

Housing Search 5 families 

Medicare Counseling 41 households 

Job Find 1 employed 

Value of goods and services 
provided to Durham families: $69,357.00 



Town Supported Organizations 



65 



STRAFFORD REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION 




Cynthia Copeland 

Executive Director 

*^ trafford Regional 

Planning Commission 
(SRPC), a political sub- 
division of the State of 
New Hampshire, serves in an 
advisory role to its eighteen 
member communities located in 
the northern coastal zone. We 
provide professional services to 
officials, boards, commissions, 
and committees to promote coor- 
dinated planning, efficient land 
use, and managed growth. SRPC 
has focused on the implementa- 
tion of a sustainable develop- 
ment planning strategy for the 
region, integrating economic 
vitality, community well being, 
and natural resource manage- 
ment to ensure a better quality 
of life now and for future genera- 
tions. Using these tenets, com- 
munity decision-makers can seek 
a longterm balancing of various 
community needs. 

The four professional staff 
offer a range of services in trans- 
portation, land use, conservation 
and natural resource planning, 
economic development, down- 
town revitalization, project man- 
agement, and geographic infor- 
mation systems (GIS) mapping 
and analysis. These services use 
multiple modes of communica- 
tion to meet the diverse needs of 
the volunteers who are the foun- 
dation of local communities. 
Educational outreach occurs in 
the form of the Law Lectures, 
monthly newsletter. How to 
guides, topical workshops, 
video/audio training, and person- 
alized training with boards and 
residents by request. 



This past year we have 
focused on the following regional 
issues: water quantity and quali- 
ty within the coastal watersheds, 
wastewater and septage through 
preparing a background report 
on regional outfall, workforce 
housing with an emphasis on 
maintaining the economic vitali- 
ty of the region, and the integra- 
tion of transportation and land 
use planning through access 
management and other planning 
tools. These areas will continue 
to receive the Commission's 
attention as the northern coastal 
region continues to grow. 

Services provided to all com- 
munities for 2003 included: 
Census and GIS data and map- 
ping, NH Land Use planning 
books, websites for the 
Commission and the Seacoast 
Metropolitan [Transportation] 
Planning Organization (MPO), 
road inventories, traffic counts, 
bike maps, transportation confer- 
ence scholarships, and local 
match to federal coastal and 
transportation funds for local 
and regional planning and con- 
struction projects. 

Projects or initiatives conduct- 
ed vdth or for Durham in 2003 
include the following: 

W Provided Zoning Board of 
Adjustment training with for- 
mer Chair of Commission. 

Updated the Town Zoning Map. 

Updated conservation lands 
mapping. 

Updated the building permit 
data fi-om 1/1/2000 through 
12/31/2002. 



Updated Town Tax Map data 
and produced field assessing 
maps for Assessor use. 

Provided special traffic counts 
as requested by Town staff. 

Collaborated with the Oyster 
River Watershed Association 
and the Lamprey River 
Watershed Association and 
Advisory Committee on river 
and watershed concerns. 

Participated in the review of 
the draft University of New 
Hampshire Campus Master 
Plan, reviewing for inclusion of 
local and regional concerns. 

' Provided requested data for 
Towns Transportation 
Enhancement grant proposals; 
processed grant proposals for 
ranking by Seacoast MPO. 

iP Provided data for Federal 
Highway Administration 
Domestic Scanning tour of 
Durham; participated in tour. 

K Interviewed Town staff regard- 
ing the regional outfall concept 
for regional backgroimd report. 

K Provided data, information, 
mapping by request of residents 
of Durham. 

Further questions or comments 
can be referred to Cjoithia 
Copeland, AICP, Executive 
Director at cjc@strafford.org. 
Please visit our website at 
www.strafford.org. We look for- 
ward to working with the citi- 
zens and officials of Durham in 
2004. Thank you for the opportu- 
nity to serve you and for your 
continuing support of regional 
planning and action for sustain- 
able development and an 
improved quality of life. D 



bo Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



TOWN WORKING COMMITTEES 



DURHAM CABLE ACCESS TELEVISION 



■ Peter Brown 

Chairman, Durham Cable 
Access Television 

urham Cable Access 
Television (DC AT) pro- 
vides Durham and sur- 
rounding communities 
with broadcasts of public, educa- 
tion and government (PEG) pro- 
gi-ams. The DCAT Governance 
Committee is responsible for set- 
ting pohcy and guidelines and is 
determined to make Channel 22 
a conduit for communication, 
information and entertainment. 
We are making progress, slowly 
but surely, and hope that more 
residents will begin to take 
advantage of what DCAT offers. 

This past year we hired Craig 
Stevens for a part time position 
as the DCAT Coordinator Craig 
oversees the day to day opera- 
tions of DCAT such as program 
management, equipment mainte- 
nance and staff development. The 
DCAT staff records town govern- 
ment meetings and recently pro- 
duced the 2003 "Durham Days" 
video. Volunteers are welcome to 
join this group. 

Paul Gasowski continues to 
provide programming of local 
interest, as well as high school 
sporting events, through the 
efforts of high school students in 
his television production courses. 
The renovated Oyster River 
High School will house an edit- 



ing suite and production studio, 
and will have UNH cable access, 
opening up the opportunity for 
additional programming from 
the University. DCAT will con- 
tinue to work closely with the 
school district to maintain an 
amicable relationship for the 
maximum utilization of 
Channel 22. 

We are also offering Video 
Production courses. These classes 
are fee based and provide train- 
ing in the use of cameras, story- 
line, editing and production. It is 
the intention of these classes to 
provide residents an opportunity 
to produce a video for airing on 
Channel 22. We also plan to have 
a fee based evening studio ses- 
sion where a group of residents 
can learn how to film in a studio, 
edit their work and produce onto 
video all in one night. This would 
be an alternative to the longer 
Video Production course and 
would be geared toward a talk 
show format. 

The thought of producing 
a video for showing on Channel 
22 may seem insurmountable to 
most so we are trying to provide 
the resources needed by resi- 
dents to produce a program for 
airing. We intend to have people 
trained and available to assist 
residents with filming, editing 
and production, for a nominal 
fee. Any resident can submit a 
program for airing regardless 
of production quality and only 



needs to submit the required 
paperwork, available by down- 
load from the Town of Durham 
website under the DCAT 
heading. 

The DCAT Governance 
Committee encourages residents 
to use Channel 22 to keep 
abreast of local government and 
school issues, for entertainment 
and as a platform for the 
exchange of ideas, information 
and the expression of free 
speech. D 



Town Working Committees 



67 



ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE 



■ Neil Niman 

Town Council Representative 

he Economic 
Development 
Committee was 
reformed in 2003. The 
focus of the committee has been 
to try and identify strategies and 
action steps for expanding the 
tax base in the Town of Durham. 
The committee has decided to 
focus its attention on three 
general areas: 

I Economic Development; 

Identify areas in Town that 
are suitable and appropriate 
locations for commercial/ 
office/research enterprises. 

U Community Development: 



Determine ways in which to 
make Durham more attractive 
to residents and visitors so that 
they will spend more time and 
money in Town. 

Residential Development: 

Identify a section(s) of Town 
where apartment buildings 
would have a minimal negative 
impact while both broadening 
the tax base and reducing the 
pressures on our neighborhoods 
from student housing. 

To accomplish its goals, the com- 
mittee has been exploring: 

Strategies for more effectively 
marketing the Durham 
Business Park. 

II The possibility of more devel- 



opment near Technology Drive. 

The feasibility of developing 
the area from gasoline alley 
down to the waterfront in 
order to expand recreational 
activities and commercial 
opportunities along the Oyster 
River. 

The creation of an identifiable 
and coherent area of Town 
where cultural aspects of the 
community would be para- 
mount and would be an attrac- 
tion to seacoast area residents 
and tourists. 

Potential sites for student 
housing that would reduce 
traffic and provide the mini- 
mum amount of disruption to 
our neighborhoods. D 



INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Merle Craig 

Committee Member 

n order to stay connected to 
the community, committee 
members made contact with 
many residents, business 
people, town organizations, and 
Oyster River School officials. 
Members attended Durham 
Business Association and Main 
Street Program meetings. Others 
acted as liaisons between 
IWMAC and the Committee of 
Citizenship for Environmental 
Issues as well as the 
Interfraternity & Panhellenic 
Council. IWMAC is working with 
the CCEI on a neighborhood 
clean up initiative. Several 
Committee members attended 



Durham Day and many act as 
volunteers at the Swap Shop. 

2003 Accomplishments 

ft Met regularly with Public 
Works officials to discuss the 
capping and redesign of the 
Durham Transfer Station & 
Recycling Center 

W! Coordinated the Swap Shop 
volunteer effort. Between 400 
and 500 hours were contributed 
throughout the year by 25 resi- 
dent volunteers. On December 
6th the Swap Shop moves into 
a brand new building near the 
old tent site. 

B Co-sponsored the annual 

Oyster River Coastal Clean Up 
with the UNH Office of 
Sustainability Programs and 
others. 



Published a spring and fall 
issue of "Down to Earth", our 
newsletter, containing articles 
on such things as ways to reuse 
or recycle, ways to avoid toxins 
in the environment, and how to 
cut back on junk mail. The 
newsletter is now available on 
the town web site after each 
publication. 

In June, composters were once 
again made available to resi- 
dents at reduced prices. The 
"Earth Machine" was displayed 
at Town Hall, Houghtons 
Hardware and also at The 
Durham Marketplace accompa- 
nied by committee members 
with information on compost- 
ing. A composting video was 
run on DCAT, Channel 22, for a 



68 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



few weeks after the bins were 
dispersed. Over 100 were sold. 

Published a list of how and 
where typical construction & 
demolition waste can be dis- 
posed of properly. Lists are 
available at Public Works and 
are issued by the Code 
Inspectors office when build- 
ing permits are applied for. 

Worked with the UNH Office 
of Sustainability Programs to 
encourage composting of 
kitchen waste. In 2003,1,456 
pounds of food waste from 
OEMS and ORHS; 25,884 
pounds of food waste from the 
Durham Market Place was 
hauled to Kingman Farm for 
composting 

Lobbied for the use of bio- 
degradable paper leaf bags 
during fall clean up 

The members wish to thank 
Diana Carroll, who did a 
superb job as committee chair- 
person for 5 years and we look 
forward to working with Tracy 
Wood, our new chairperson. 
We welcome John Kraus as 



our new Town Council liaison. 

Goals for 2004 

Continue to promote waste 
reduction 

Encourage purchase and use 
of items with recycled content 

S Work to promote recycling at 
town events 



Research and analyze waste 
water issues 

Obtain more information about 
options for plastic recycling 

Support the initiative of recy- 
cling in private developments 
in Durham 

Establish a town policy for 
using recycled paper in town 
offices, n 



2003 Integrated Waste Management Advisory Committee members. (Standing l-r): Jessie 
McKone. Tracy Wood Julie Newman John Kraus Merle Craig Dale Valena (Seated l-r)' Diana 
Carroll and Richard Gallant p / c /f i m lei aii i ^v^ tt Ma dwie il m tiff 







LAMPREY RIVER ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Committee 

Judith Spang, 
Durham: 

Rich Hallett 
Dick Lord 
Dan Miner 
Jim Hewitt 
Lee: 

Joe Ford 
Frank Reinhold 
Dick Weyrick 
Kitty Miller 
Sharon Meeker 



Members: 

Chairman 
Newmarket: 

Fred Pearson 
Willfred Hamel 
Epping: 
Kevin Martin 
Greg Tillman 
At Large: 
Brian Giles 



he Lamprey River 
Advisory Committee 
(LRAC) was formed 
when the Lamprey 
was designated a National Wild 
and Scenic River by Congress, 
and a State Protected River by 
the State Legislature. It consists 
of representatives from Epping, 
Lee, Durham and Newmarket. 
The LRAC has developed a long 
range River Management Plan 
and works yearly on carrying 



out parts of the Plan. The 
Committee also reviews all proj- 
ects which could impact the 
river for state and federal agen- 
cies. 

Meetings, open to the public, 
are generally the second 
Tuesday of every month, with 
location rotating among the four 
towns. Call Judith Spang, 
Chair, at 659-5936 for specifics. 

. .continued on next page. 



Town Working Committees 



69 



TOP: Members of the Dept. ol Environmental Services N.H. Fish and Game study the fish population on the Lamprey River below Packers Falls 
Bridge. BELOW: Margaret Watkins and George Gavutis discuss habitat restoration with LRAC members at the Nature Conservancy property off 

Packers Falls Road, Photon courtesy of Jerry Monkman lor lire I RAC 




TO Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Lamprey River Advisory 

(conlinuedl 

2003 Accomplishments 

Public Information Education 

The LRAC is working with Lee 
conservationist Dave Allan to 
edit and publish his children's 
book on a young native 
American's summer on the 
Lamprey. Because it is histori- 
cally correct as well as enter- 
taining, it will supplement the 
LRAC's curriculum on the river, 
being used in area schools. 

M A spring canoe trip guided by a 
noted ornithologist and natural- 
ist, George Gavutis, led commu- 
nity people down the lower 
reaches of the river to explore 
habitat, learn about wetland 
restoration projects, and get a 
glimpse into how a professional 
conducts a bird inventory. 

il Oyster River's Mastway School 
in Lee continues to be one of the 
elementary schools using the 
LRAC's Lamprey River curricu- 
lum. In three river towns there 
are now eight classes using the 
curriculum, which encompasses 
hands-on art, social studies, sci- 
ence and writing. 

Review of River-Related 
Development 

The LRAC worked with state 
and federal agencies to mini- 
mize the ecological impacts of 
reconstructing the Packers Falls 
Road bridge in Durham and the 
Mill Street and Rte. 87 bridges 
in Epping. Recommendations 
were also submitted to the 
State relative to a subdivision 
in Epping. 

Water Quality and Quantity 
Monitoring 

Members assisted the Lamprey 
River Watershed Association in 



monitoring the Lamprey from 
Epping to Newmarket. The 
river is remarkably clean. 
Timely summer rains averted 
the stresses that withdrawals 
for public water supply placed 
on the river in recent years. 

Land Conservation 

By matching the LRAC's federal 
appropriations with funding by 
towns and conservation organi- 
zations, the Committee has been 
able to support the conservation 
of 1,264 acres and 6.4 miles of 
river frontage in the 4-town area. 
In 2003, the LRAC: 

Funded a 50-acre easement on 
the land of Tom and Mary 
Ellen Dunham on Wiswall 
Road , protecting 1,659 feet of 
river front. The landowners 
finalized the easement and 
then sold the house and con- 
served land to a new owner. 

Helped to protect a key 162- 
acre parcel abutting 
Newmarket's Tuttle Swamp, 
which drains into the Lamprey 
and supports its wildlife. 

In partnership with the 
Rockingham Land , funded the 
purchase of a 27-acre Epping 
property with 2,700 feet of 
frontage on the Lamprey. 

it In Durham, the LRAC is sup- 
porting the efforts of the Land 
Protection Working Group in 
saving land that is on the 
river, or ecologically connected 
to it. Residents interested in 
assuring that their land 
remains undeveloped for 
future generations should con- 
tact the Chair about partici- 
pating in this program. The 
LRAC pays for most costs to 
landowners associated with 
easements. 



Fish Passage at Wiswall 

Federal money has been 
appropriated to open up fish 
passage in the Wiswall dam 
area. The LRAC is participat- 
ing in a task force analyzing 
options, including installing a 
fish "ladder", removing the 
dam, or creating a brook that 
by-passes the dam. The Town 
Council will be ultimately 
responsible for the decision 

Goals for 2004 

» Next year, the LRAC will be 
actively working on conserva- 
tion of five Lamprey corridor 
properties that would protect 
an additional 770 acres and 3.4 
miles of river frontage. 

i; Assist the Town in determining 
the best fish passage solution 
for Wiswall dam. 

Is Review and make recommenda- 
tions on projects impacting the 
river. 

Continue to extend outreach to 
residents and landowners on 
best management of riverfront 
lands. 

The Lamprey Committee would 
like to extend a note of apprecia- 
tion to Bob Levesque, Town 
Engineer, for his contributions to 
Lamprey River projects, particu- 
larly the Wiswall fish passage 
working group. His down-to- 
earth frankness, practicality, 
and good humor have been 
greatly appreciated by all who 
work with him. D 



Town Working Committees 



71 



ORCSD APPORTIONMENT STUDY COMMITTEE 



■ Neil Niman 

Durham Town Council 
Representative 

cting on a recommen- 
dation found in the 
Master Plan, the 
Town Council formed 
a commission to study the appor- 
tionment formula for the Oyster 
River Cooperative School 
District. A final report of the 
Durham School Funding 
Formula Commission was pre- 
sented to the Town Council on 
May 5, 2003. Kathy McWilliams, 
the chair of the Commission 
served along with: Paul Beaudoin 
(ex-officio), Mike Everngam, John 
Farrell, David Pease, Shirley 
Thompson and Rob 
Toutkoushian. 

The Commission found that 
Durham ($10,006.80) must raise 
significantly more tax dollars per 
pupil than Lee ($5,536.66) or 
Madbury ($5,767.05). The 
Commission further concluded 
that a fair apportionment formu- 
la is one where each town pays 
the same amount per pupil. They 
therefore brought forward the 
recommendation that the appor- 
tionment formula should be 
changed to one that is based sole- 
ly on student enrollment. 

After the report was presented 
to the Town Council, a joint 
meeting between the three towns 
was arranged to discuss the 
Commission's findings. After sub- 
sequent discussion, the Town 
Council requested that the 
School Board form a committee 
to study the apportionment for- 
mula with representation from 



all three towns. The charge given 
this six member committee (con- 
sisting of two individuals from 
each town), was to evaluate the 
School Board's definition of fair- 
ness which stated: "People living 
in equal value houses in each 
town should be paying the same 
for education (local plus state 
education tax paid)." The resi- 
dents representing Durham were 
Jack Quinn (School Board Chair) 
and Neil Niman (Town 
Councilor). 

The Apportionment Formula 
Study Committee met five times 
for approximately 10 hours. A 
closer examination of the histori- 
cal record revealed that while 
Durham as a town has always 
paid more in total dollars and 
dollars per student, it has always 
paid less per taxable property 
than Lee or Madbury. This is the 
direct result of the fact that 
Durham has more taxable prop- 
erty than the other two towns 
combined. 

What was considered fair 
from 1954 to 1998 was a formula 
that tried to strike a balance 
between the fact that it is easier 
to raise a dollar of school taxes 
in Durham with the fact that the 
benefits received are directly 
proportional to the amount of 
school services utilized. Hence 
the apportionment formula was 
weighted 50'7( equalized value 
and 507^ average daily member- 
ship. What changed was the 
introduction of the state property 
tax in 1999, which brought more 
state aid to Lee and Madbury. 
The net effect was to create an 
apportionment formula that 



worked as if equally valued hous- 
es paid the same school taxes. 

In its evaluation of the cur- 
rent system which effectively cre- 
ated a formula that did not 
apportion the tax burden based 
on the 50/50 formula, the appor- 
tionment committee entered into 
lengthy discussion about whether 
the number of students a town 
sends to the School District 
should play a role in the appor- 
tionment formula. It was agreed 
by all members of the committee 
that the number of students, 
along with equalized valuation, 
should play a role in the appor- 
tionment formula for the School 
District. In the end, it was decid- 
ed that the fairest solution was 
one that once again struck a bal- 
ance between student enrollment 
and equalized valuation. It was 
determined that the only way to 
achieve this solution was to 
remove state aid from the appor- 
tionment formula. Therefore the 
agreed upon formula was one 
that deducts state aid from the 
total apportionment and then 
allocates the remaining costs 
between the three towns based 
on the 50/50 formula. The School 
Board subsequently adopted this 
new apportionment formula. D 



72 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



RENTAL HOUSING COMMISSION 



■ Committee Members: 

Mark Henderson, Chairman 

Brett Mongeon, UNH 

Paul Berton. DLA 

Ken Barrows, UNH 

Perry Bryant, DLA 

Rene Kelley, Durham Police 

Mark Morong, Council Rep. 

he Rental Housing 
Commission was creat- 
ed in 1995 as a conse- 
quence of a settlement 
agreement between the Durham 
Landlord's Association (DLA) and 
the Town of Durham, which 
resulted in the passing of 
Durham Ordinance #95-03 on 
June 5, 1995 (Town Code 
Chapter 98, Paragraph 98-3 ). 

In 2003, D.L. "Pete" Chinburg 
resigned after 4 years as chair- 
person of the Commission and 
Mark Henderson was nominated 
and elected to replace Mr. 
Chinburg. As a Commission we 
held quarterly meetings along 
with a special meeting that was 
held in conjunction with the 
Durham Landlord Association. 
This joint meeting was highlight- 
ed with a presentation by mem- 
bers of the University presenting 
their Master Plan and its pro- 
posed expansion of academic 
buildings and student dormito- 
ries. All meetings are open to 
the public and are posted in the 
Town Hall. 

There are two vacant seats on 
the commission, which include: a 
local off campus tenant represen- 
tative and a representative of an 
on-campus organization. Both of 
the positions are in the process of 
being filled. 



2003 Accomplishments 

Our major accomplishment this 
year was to institute a more 
active involvement of the 
Commission and its members 
and to meet on a more regular 
basis. Our goal was to provide 
an opportunity to receive more 
input from interested or con- 
cerned parties with regard to 
Durham's rental housing indus- 
try, and also provide an opportu- 
nity to receive more input from 
interested or concerned parties 
with regard to Town policies with 
respect to the rental housing 
industry. 

Once again this year we did 
not receive any citizen com- 
plaints as of record at our meet- 
ings. A citizen complaint that 
came into our Town 
Administrator was channeled in 
the appropriate direction along 
with informing the Commission 
of the complaint. Many citizen 
complaints have gone directly to 
members of the Town Council 
without utilizing the Rental 
Housing Commission and the 
purpose it was established. As a 
commission that was instituted 
by the Town of Durham we 
would hope that all concerned 
citizens or Town Councilors 
would utilize our Commission 
and its resources to assist in 
their concerns. 

Some concerns that were 
brought before the Chair were: 1) 
concerns with the new Town 
assessments on commercial and 
rental housing buildings in 
Durham, 2) zoning concerns with 
regard to a maximum of three 
unrelated persons in a dwelling 
unit, 3 ) the concept of "duplex" 



vs. "accessory" from an assessing 
and from a zoning standpoint. 
All of these issues were 
addressed and discussed with the 
assistance of the appropriate 
Town Official. 

Goals for 2004 

As a commission our major goal 
in 2004 is to have a more active 
involvement in the issues that 
pertain to the rental housing 
industry in the Town of Durham. 
The proposal of a rental housing 
permitting process will ultimate- 
ly be a major focus for our com- 
mission throughout the year. We 
look forward to working with 
Town Officials, landlords, and the 
citizens of Durham to ensure 
that we may all coexist in the 
same environment. 

I would like to thank Todd 
Selig, Town Administrator; Tom 
Johnson, Zoning; Robert Dix, 
Assessing; and Mike Lynch, 
Solid Waste for their participa- 
tion in our meetings throughout 
the year. D 



Town Working Committees 



73 



NOTES: 



74 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



RESOURCE INFORMATION 



AMERICAN RED CROSS 



■ Durham Chapter 

Serving Durham and the 
University of New Hampshire 
For Service or Information 
Please Call: (603) 868-9692 

he American Red Cross 
in Durham is staffed 
entirely by volunteers 
and financed largely by 
membership contributions. It is 
the only all-volunteer Red Cross 
Chapter in New Hampshire. 

lt"s a hometown affair. People 
in Durham care about their 
neighbors. Hundreds of men, 
women, and young people are 
Durham Red Cross volunteers. 
Each year, they contribute funds 
to make the Red Cross services 
available to residents of Durham 
and to faculty, staff and students 
at the University of New 
Hampshire. 

This year, thousands of men, 
women and children of the 
Durham-UNH community were 
served by the Durham Red Cross 
in addition to the people who 
were helped by the units of blood 
donated during the 17 days of 
Durham Red Cross blood drives. 

Membership 

AWARD membership $100 or more 

Development $25 to $99 

Sustaining $10 to $24 

Regular $1 to $9 

All who register annually as a 
financial contributor, volunteer or 
blood donor are members of the 



Durham Red Cross chapter. 

Leadership Volunteers 

Mrs. Nobel K. Peterson, Dr. 
James P. Barrett, C. Robert 
Keesey, Mrs. Herbert H. Flat her, 
Dr. Paul C. Young, Robert Doty, 
Kenneth R. Dudzik, Dr. Kevin V. 
Dugas, Kathryn Perry Firczuk, 
David T. Funk. Col. Calvin 
Hosmer 111, Peter J. Pekins, 
Ralph Smallidge, Alden L. Winn, 
Jerilyn B.Young, Col. Richard 
Erickson, Alexander Amell, 
William Carter III, Linda 
Ekdahl, Marcia Erickson, Linda 
L. Hayden, Gerald J. Needell" Dr. 
Amos R. Townsend 

Service to military personnel, 
veterans, and their families is 
one of the primary responsibili- 
ties of the American Red Cross. 
It includes family counseling, 
reporting and communications in 
cooperation with the military 
services and Veterans 
Administration, assistance 
applying for government bene- 
fits, referral to other resources 
and emergency financial assis- 
tance. This service also assists 
with international tracing and 
emergency communications. 

Disaster Services 

All Red Cross disaster assistance 
is free, made possible by volun- 
tary donations of time and 
money from the American peo- 
ple. Immediate emergency aid or 
relief and recovery assistance 
must be provided for residents 



threatened or affected by disas- 
ters such as fire, flood, or hurri- 
cane. The Durham Chapter has a 
small share in Red Cross efforts 
to help alleviate suffering around 
the world. 

Blood Services 

Whenever a resident of Durham 
or a student, faculty or staff mem- 
ber of the University of New 
Hampshire needs blood while 
anywhere in the USA or Canada 
and notifies the Durham Red 
Cross, the blood can be replaced. 
All hospitals in New Hampshire 
are provided blood by the 
American Red Cross. This year, 
the Durham Red Cross conducted 
drives on 17 days. This service is 
successful because generous peo- 
ple contribute funds to their Red 
Cross chapter, serve as volunteers 
and give blood. 

Nursing and Health Services 

Volunteers in nursing and health 
services assist with Durham 
Chapter Red Cross Blood 
Services. Upon request, they 
assist with blood pressure clinics 
and AIDS information programs 
of the UNH Health Services. 
Volunteers told of Red Cross nurs- 
ing and health services at commu- 
nity and area health fairs held on 
the UNH campus. The BAT pro- 
gram and Baby Sitting Course are 
available to schoolchildren. 

Water Safety Services 

Service is provided for young peo- 

.,, continued on next page. 



Resource Information 



75 



American Red Cross 

(continued) 

pie in Durham in cooperation 
with ORYA, and for UNH stu- 
dents and other adults. This year, 
more than 487 participated. 

First Aid/CPR/AED Training 

Training in first aid, cardiopul- 
monary resuscitation, and AED is 



available for all members of the 
DurhamUNH community. This 
year, more than 727 students were 
enrolled. 

Motor Corps Service 

Transportation is provided to 
nearby medical facilities for rou- 
tine treatment or therapy where 
there is need.This is the 59th 



year of service by the Motor 
Corps. 

Equipment Loaned to 
Convalescents 

Wheelchairs, walkers, hospital- 
type beds, canes, and more are 
loaned on a first-request basis 
crutches to residents of 
Durham, UNH faculty, staff, 
and students. D 



TELEPHONE DIRECTORY Durham Web Site 



: www.ci.durham.nh.us 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS 

Fire/Police/Rescue Emergency 9-1-1 Fire/Police/Rescue Emergency 

from UNH campus only ''^-l-l 

MUNICIPAL OFFICES 

NAME TITLE PHONE EXT. FAX E-MAIL 



Administration, 15 Newmarket Road Hours: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Todd I. Selig Town Administrator.... 868-5571 133 868-5572 tselig@ci.durham.nh.us 

Jennie Berry Admin. Assistant 868-5571 129 .jberry@ci.durham.nh.us 

Assessing, 15 Newmarket Road Hours: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Robert Dix Assessor 868-8065 119 868-8033 rdix@ci.durham.rLh.us 

Business/Finance, 15 Newmarket Road Hours: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Paul Beaudoin Business Manager 868-8043 138 868-5572 pbeaudoin@ci.durham.nh.us 

Lisa Beaudoin Accounting Assistant 116 lbeaudoin@ci.durham.nh.us 

Gail Jablonski Staff Accountant 115 gjablonski@ci.durham.nh.us 

Fire Department, 51 College Road Hours: 7:30 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Ronald O'Keefe Fire Chief 868-5531 862-1513 rokeefe@ci.durham.nh.us 

Michael Blake Assistant Fire Chief mblake@ci.durham.nh.us 

Deborah Quisumbing.. Administrative Assistant dquisumbing@ci.durham.nh.us 

Planning & Community Devel., 15 Newmarket Road Hours: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

James Campbell Director 868-8064 121 868-8033 .jcampbell@ci.durham.nh.us 

Karen Edwards Secretary 117 kedwards@ci.durham.nh.us 

Police Department, 86 Dover Road Hours: 8:30 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

David Kurz Police Chief. 868-2324 868-8037 dkurz@ci.durham.nh.us 

Rene Kelley Deputy Chief rkelle.y@ci.durham.nh.us 

Jennifer Johnson Office Assistant .jjohnson@ci.durham.nh.us 

Public Works, 100 Stone Quarry Road Hours: 8:00 AM-4:30 PM, Mon-Fri 

Mike Lynch Director 868-5578 868-8063 mlynch@ci.durham.nh.us 

Sharice Plitkins Assistant to Public Works Dir. splitkins@ci.durham.rLh.us 

Solid Waste Division, 100 Durham Point Road Hours: 6:30 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Thu 

Doug Bullen Opns Director 868-1001 142 dbullen@ci.durham.nh.us 



76 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Tax CoIlector/TowTi Clerk, 15 Newmarket Road Hours: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Linda Ekdahl Tn Clerk/Tax Col 868-5577 137 868-8033 Iekdahl@ci.durham.nh.us 

Lorrie Pitt Deputy Town Clerk 136 lpitt@ci.durham.nh.us 

Donna Haniel Assistant to Town Clerk 135 dhamel@ci.durham.nh.us 

Wastewater, Route 4 Hours: 7:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Duane Walker Superintendent 868-2274 dwalker@ci.durham.nh.us 

Water Division, 100 Durham Point Road Hours: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Doug BuUen Opns Director 868-5578 dbullen@ci.durham.nh.us 

Zoning & Code Enforcement, 15 Newmarket Road Hours: 8:00 AM-5:00 PM, Mon-Fri 

Thomas Johnson Superintendent 868-8064 118 868-8033 tjohnson@ci.durham.nh.us 



OTHER COMMONLY USED NUMBERS 



Oyster River School District 

Superintendent of Schools 868-5100 

Moharimet Elem School 742-2900 

Mast Way Elem School 659-3001 

Middle School 868-2820 

High School 868-2375 

Oyster River Youth Association 

Office 868-5150 



Ice Rink 868-3907 

MainStreet Program, 

Pati Frew-Waters, Executive Director 868-3322 

Durham Post Office 868-2151 

Durham Public Library 868-6699 

Historic Museum 868-5436 

Durham District Court 868-2323 

NH Fish & Game 868-1095 



STATE AND U.S. REPRESENTATIVES 



Governor 

The Honorable Craig Benson 

Office of the Governor 

107 North Main Street, Room 208 

Concord, NH 03301 

Office: 271-2121 

www.state.nh.us 

US Senators 

Senator John Sununu 

One New Hampshire Ave., Suite 120, 

Portsmouth, NH 03801 

Office:430-9560 

mailbox@sununu.senate.gov 

Senator Judd Gregg 

125 North Main Street 

Concord, NH 03301 

Office: 225-7115 

mailbox@gregg.senate.gov 



US Representatives 

Congressman Jeb Bradley 

104 Washington St., Dover, NH 03820 

Office: 743-4813 

Executive Councilor 

Ruth Griffin 

Rm 207, State House, Concord, NH 03301 

Office: 271-3632 Home: 436-5272 

Durham's Representatives in the House 
District 72 

Rep Marjorie Smith 

PO Box 136, Durham, NH 03824-0136 

Office: 271-3661 Home: 868-7500 

marjorie.smith@leg.state.nh.us 

Rep. Judith Spang 

55 Wiswall Rd., Durham, NH 03824-4420 

Office: 271-3570 Home: 659-5936 



continued on next page. 



Resource Information 



77 



State and U.S. Representatives 

(continued) 

Rep. Naida Kaen 

22 Toon Ln., Lee, NH 03824-6507 

Office: 271-3396 Home: 659-2205 

naidaKaen@hotmail.com 

Rep. Emma Rous 

64 Adams Pt. Rd.. Durham, NH 03824-3406 

Office: 271-3403 Home: 868-7030 

werous@rcn.com 

Rep. Joseph Miller 

13 Burnham Ave., Durham, NH 03824-3010 



Office: 271-3589 Home: 868-1689 
docjoe@localnet.com 

Rep. Janet Wall 

4 Pudding Hill Rd., Madbury, NH 03820-7001 
Office: 271-3184 Home: 749-3051 
Janet. wall@leg.state.nh.us 

Durham's Senate Representative 

Senator Iris Estabrook 

8 Burnham Ave., Durham, NH 03824 

Office: 271-2675 Home: 868-5524 

iris.estabrook@leg.state.nh.us 



RESOURCE INFORMATION 

Land Area 

(2.2 miles of which is water surface) 25.5 sq. miles 

Population (based on 2000 census) 12,664 

Incorporated... 1732 

Durham's Congressional District Number 1 

Town Tax Rate 

(Per $1,000 Assessed Valuation) $23.57 A list of all new property valuations in Durham can 

Town $ 5.85 b^ viewed on the Town's web site at: 

School (Local) $11.91 unvw.ci.durham.nh.us. 

School (State) $ 3.84 ^ copy of the listings may also be obtained at the 

„ . * 1 OT Town Office or the Durham Public Library. 

County $ 1.97 „ . ' , ,, , ^ . ", ^ri~ 

Residents may also call the Town Assessors Office 

Net Assessed Valuation $775,296,708 ^^ 868-8064 to request a hard copy, which will be 

Percentage of Valuation 99%* printed and mailed at no cost to taxpayers. 

* Estimate of percent of valuation. 

Meeting Dates for Town Boards, Committees & Commissions 

(Notices are posted on the Bulletin Board outside the Town Hall and on the Town's web Site: 
www.ci.durham.nh.us.) 

Town Council First and third Mondays of each month at 7:00 PM, Town Hall 

Conservation Commission Second Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM, Town Hall 

Historic District Commission First Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM,Town Hall 

Parks & Recreation Committee Third Thursday of each month at 7:00 PM, Town Hall 

Planning Board Second & fourth Wednesdays of each month at 7:00 PM, Town Hall 

Zoning Board of Adjustment Second Tuesday of each month at 7:00 PM,Town Hall 

Durham Web Site: www.ci.durham.nh.us 



78 Town ol Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Town Office Functions 

Town Office Hours Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 

Car Registration Registration in month of birth. Renewal stickers and license plates can be 

purchased at Town Clerk's Office for an additional $2.50 per registration. 

Car Inspection Car must be inspected within ten (10) days of first registration in New 

Hampshire. After that, inspection is done in the registrant's birth month. 

Driver's License Apphcation available at the Dover Point MV Substation. 

Dog Registration Due May 1st. Neutered Male/Spayed Female: $6.50. Unneutered 

Male/Unspayed Female: $9.00. 

Property Taxes Due December 1st. 

Water «S: Sewer Billings Issued every six (6) months. 

Voter Registration New voters can register with the Supervisors of the Checklist or the Town 

Clerk. Proof of age and citizenship are required. 

Marriage Licenses Available through Town Clerk's Office 

Miscellaneous 

Public Hearings & Public Forums: Notices for public hearings & public forums are published in the legal 
notice section of the Foster's Daily Democrat, on the bulletin board outside of Town Hall, and on the Town's web 
Site: www.ci.durham.nh.us. 

Solid Waste Management Facility: Located on Durham Point Road. Hours of operation: Tuesday and 
Saturday, 7:30 a.m-3:15 p.m. Landfill Permits may be obtained at the Public Works Department, located 
at 100 Stone Quary Drive, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon and 12:30 p.m. and 4:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. 868-1001 

Tax Exemptions: For information regarding elderly, veteran's, blind, solar energy, totally disabled and phys- 
ically handicapped exemptions, or current use taxation, please contact the Tax Assessor at 868-8065. 



BIRTHS 2003 



CHILD'S 
NAME 



DATE OF 


PLACE OF 


BIRTH 


BIRTH 


January 13 


Exeter 


January 18 


Exeter 


January 31 


Dover 


February 12 


Dover 


February 21 


Portsmouth 


February 24 


Durham 


February 27 


Portsmouth 


March 06 


Los Alamintos, CA 


March 23 


Exeter 


April 12 


Dover 


April 13 


Portsmouth 



PARENT'S 

NAMES 



Adhithi Viswanathan 

Nathaniel Luke Huston 
Danielle Marjorie Ford 
Andrew Joseph O'Brien 
Benjamin MacGregor Evans 
Jordan Shin Rogers 
Robert Taylor Clyde 
Emma Louise K Maleskey 
Alexander Mathieson Moore 
Sarah Elizabeth Black 
David Edmund S Vallery 



Viswanathan Palaniswamy & 
Banumathi Mylswamy 
Brian & Charlene Huston 
Evan & Rebecca Ford 
Michael & Cathy O'Brien 
Ian & Shawna Evans 
Craig & Caroline Rogers 
Wilham & Malin Clyde 
James & Renee Maleskey 
Andrew & Jennifer Moore 
Kelly Black & Lisa Hunt 
David & Ireen Vallery 

..continued on next page. 



Resource Information 



79 



Births (continued) 



CHILD'S 
NAME 



DATE OF 
BIRTH 



PLACE OF 
BIRTH 



PARENT'S 

NAMES 



Mackenzie Shay Smith April 20 Dover 

Riley Ashford Byers April 24 Portsmouth 

Patrick Emmett Moore April 29 Exeter 

Avery William McFadden May 05 Dover 

Lauren Elizabeth Vincent May 08 Dover 

Taylor Beth Kinsman May 16 Dover 

Biron Joshua Carlson May 21 Exeter 

Sophie May Sullivan May 26 Portsmouth 

Ailla Rose Ellis Grossman June 04 Dover 

Grace Molly Mahoney June 10 Exeter 

William Alexander Kandle June 14 Dover 

Liam Shin Walker June 20 Exeter 

Robert Corum Nichols June 30 Portsmouth 

Emma Sutphen Hall July 04 Portsmouth 

Mohamed Maher Alganem July 07 Dover 

Matilda Charlotte Butler July 13 Exeter 

Miles Steven Goldberg July 13 Dover 

Ellis Corbet Tonkin July 13 Portsmouth 

Aaron Anthony Dumas July 21 Portsmouth 

Antonio Stevens Riofrio July 26 Exeter 

Luke Joseph Carroll August 15 Dover 

Marlee Catherine Yoder August 15 Portsmouth 

William Foche Lovejoy September 02 Portsmouth 

Christian Harlan Knightly September 05 Concord 

Meredith Ann Brooks September 08 Concord 

Sarah Elizabeth Hackenburg September 10 Portsmouth 

Annalise Ritchie Lanoue September 23 Portsmouth 

Nadia Kate Pavlik October 28 Portsmouth 

Tatum Case Morton October 31 Dover 

Aidan Thomas O'Connell November 11 Portsmouth 

Allison Howland November 13 Dover 

Jack O'Grady Caldicott November 14 Portsmouth 

Joseph Theodore Luchsinger December 19 Exeter 

DEATHS 2003 



Nathan & Heather Smith 
James & Tyra Byers 
John & Diane Moore 
Scott & Michelle McFadden 
Jerett & Brenda Vincent 
Eric & Deanna Kinsman 
Joshua & Colleen Carlson 
Robert & Elise Sullivan 
Thomas Grossman & Kathryn Ellis 
James & Mary Mahoney 
Michael & Louise Kandle 
Johnathan Walker & Lan-Hua Hsu 
Rad & Ann Nichols 
Christopher & Trisha Hall 
Maher & Algawhrah Alghanem 
Timothy & Eleanor Butler 
Matthew & Jennifer Goldberg 
Kevin & Kristine Tonkin 
Anthony & Dee-Ann Dumas 
Fabricio Riofrio Crisostomo 
& Monica Stevens 
Kevin & Julie Carroll 
Thomas & Colleen Yoder 
William & Pamela Lovejoy 
Scott & Tonya Knightly 
Christopher & Wendy Brooks 
David Hackenburg & Katherine 

Montgomery 
Mark Lanoue & Jeannine Ritchie 
Robert & Jennifer Pavlik 
Jeffrey & Trina Morton 
Sean O'Connell & Christa Williams 
Allan Howland & 
Janet Perkins-Howland 
Robert & Amy Caldicott 
John & Joanna Luchsinger 



DATE OF 
DEATH 


PLACE OF 
DEATH 


DECEDENT'S 
NAME 


FATHER'S 
NAME 


MOTHER'S 
MAIDEN NAME 


January 07 


Portsmouth 


Ruth F Hurd 


William Hughes 


Nellie Belyea 


January 29 


Exeter 


Irene M Grochmal 


James Phalen 


Mary Parks 


January 30 


Dover 


Frederick W Usner 


Frederick Usner 


Lorena Walsdorf 


February 05 


Dover 


Golda Zarrow 


Michael Lechner 


Rose Pilzen 


February 07 


Durham 


Alice Bassett 


Clarence Dodge 


MjTtle Woodworth 



80 



Town of Durhann 2003 Annual Report 



DATE OF 


PLACE OF 


DECEDENTS 


FATHER'S 


MOTHER'S 


DEATH 


DEATH 


NAME 


NAME 


MAIDEN NAME 


February 14 


Durham 


David E Swenson 


Guy Swensen 


Mildred Bolan 


March 12 


Dover 


Anna S Teeri 


Patrick Sullivan 


Annie Hayes 


April 03 


Dover 


Theodore R Simmons 


Harry Simmons 


Gabrielle Predmetsky 


April 12 


Durham 


Carol H Mullins 


John Mullins 


Mary Leavit 


April 18 


Durham 


Wolfgang C Kuchenmeister 


Horst Kuchenmeister 


Edeltraud Schwimmbeck 


April 20 


Durham 


Evelyn G MacLean 


Edward Emerson 


Gertrude Fox 


April 21 


Durham 


Annabelle C Picardy 


Roy C Hamel 


Jennie Steves 


May 02 


Dover 


Hugh C Pritchard 


Edward Pritchard 


Alice Rees 


May 19 


Dover 


Gordon J Allen 


Orlo Allen 


Elsie Chaisson 


June 25 


Durham 


Owen B Durgin 


Austin Durgin 


Louise Milliken 


June 28 


Lee 


Jean M Lockwood 


Albert Manville 


Elizabeth Hyde 


July 05 


Exeter 


John H Belknap 


Carroll Belknap 


Margaret George 


July 11 


Portsmouth 


Robert W Randall 


Coleman Randall 


Evelyne Williams 


July 29 


Durham 


Aimee H Stoykovich 


Victor Rehr 


Blanche Chryst 


August 07 


Durham 


Alexandra Brasol 


Vladmir Revoutsky 


Unknown 


August 30 


Dover 


Lewis F Heald 


Walter Heald 


Fannie Billings 


September 16 


Exeter 


Jayne B Neil 


John Merrill 


Unknown 


September 20 


Durham 


Raymond C Merrill 


Carl Crosby 


Merrilyn Peterson 


October 05 


Durham 


Karen H Mower 


Holger Hoiriis 


Helene Ronholt 


October 17 


Durham 


Homer J Bourque 


Omer Bourque 


Ruth Mahoney 


October 26 


Durham 


Maryann Costa 


Arthur Gabriel 


Josephine Millman 


November 04 


Durham 


Robert Kennedy 


Robert Kennedy 


Amelya Horlback 


November 08 


Durham 


Janice R Warren 


Roland Rice 


Janie Scantlin 


November 16 


Durham 


Peter T McLaughlin 


Peter McLaughlin 


Marion Faulkner 


November 18 


Durham 


Kathleen T Murtagh 


James Murtagh 


Winifred Doherty 


December 30 


Dover 


James W Christensen 


Peter Christensen 


Hilda Beneke 



MARRIAGES 2003 



DATE OF 
MAHlilA(,K 



January 04 
January 04 
January 16 
February 14 
February 15 
March 04 
March 30 
April 05 
May 04 
June 06 
June 09 
June 14 
June 20 
June 27 
June 28 



piace of groom's 

mahhiai;k name 

Durham Patrick Joseph Murphy III 

Spofford Jonathan D Miller 

Durham Matthew J Macarty 

Durham Peter Rand Getchell 

Durham George P Reed 

Durham Adrian Alexander Acosta 

Durham John W Kimball 

Durham Marc Anthony Plante 

Carroll Daniel H Sheehan 

Durham Patrick T Wade 

Durham Andrew Murray Bumdred 

Dover James T Woods 

Durham Eric Matthew Panning 

Durham Thomas E Bonello 

Rye John R Sheehan 



RESroENCE AT 


BRIDE'S 


TIME OF MARRIAGE 


NAME 


Lee 


Cheryl Frances McAllister 


Durham 


Kathryn L Shively 


Strafford 


Ying Tian 


Somerville, MA 


Christine Alost FlanagEin 


Manchester 


Marilyn M Shaw 


Gillette, WY 


Sarah Longbottom 


Durham 


Donna M Everett 


Berwick, ME 


Kelli Ann Botelho 


Durham 


Donata Sauklyte 


Durham 


Anna K Meres 


England 


Margaret Ann Bailey 


Durham 


Amy E Rowe 


Hillsboro, OR 


Sandra Joan Farrell 


Durham 


Jessica A Jensen 


Durham 


Laura J Delaney 



.continued on next page. 



Resource Information 



81 



Marriages (continued) 



DATE OF 
MARRUGE 



PLACE OF 
MARRIAGE 



GROOM'S 
NAME 



RESIDENCE AT 
TIME OF MARRIAGE 



BRIDE'S 
NAME 



July 03 
July 05 
July 05 
July 06 
July 12 
July 12 
July 13 
July 26 
July 28 
August 02 
August 08 
August 09 
August 09 
Augxist 09 
August 16 
August 16 
August 16 
August 23 
August 31 
August 31 
September 20 
September 27 
September 27 
September 28 
October 04 
October 04 
October 04 
October 04 
October 11 
October 11 
October 11 
October 11 
October 15 
October 18 
October 18 
November 01 
November 01 
Januray 22 
December 26 



No. Hampton Jean-Pierre Latourette 



Paul Sang Chi 
Jeffrey David Lightfoot 
Nathan Tait LaPierre 
Liam Dennis Crill 
James J Houle 
Jason Douglas Wood 
Chad Lee Robinson 
Donald W Ketchum 
Jonathan W Newton 
Nathan Scott Herzog 
Bradley Russell Tetu 
Jeffrey Arthur Nelson 
Andrew R Vaughn 
Jose Nunez 
Troy L Fogg 
Scott T Picard 
Alfredo Del Valle 
Neil Lauran Conley 
Andrew W Hartmann 
David Leslie Calderwood 
Thomas James Baggett 
Brett David Hartenbach 
Robert Michael Anthony 
Craig Nelson Stewart 
Richard Craig Durgin 
Mark D Morong 
Dennis J Mooney 
Richard Abraham Davis 
Corey Frank Stacy 
David L Giroux 

Waterville Valley Curt A Kenoyer 

Durham Raymond Lamprey Brooks Jr 

Allan Everett Wright Jr 
Gregory Tyler Zinser 
Jason Patrick Marshall 
Christopher S Vachon 
Mark G Lefsrud 
Alexander Parker Wood 



Durham 

Dover 

Durham 

Lee 

Durham 

Durham 

Portsmouth 

Durham 

Rye 

Durham 

Claremont 

Durham 

Manchester 

Durham 

Newmarket 

Durham 

Nottingham 

Durham 

Portsmouth 

Durham 

Durham 

Durham 

Rye 

Durham 

Durham 

Durham 

Dover 

Dixville Notch 

Durham 

Portsmouth 



Durham 

Derry 

Durham 

Portsmouth 

Durham 

Durham 



Durham 

Philadelphia, PA 

Portsmouth 

Corvallis, Or 

Revere, MA 

Durham 

Grand Island, NY 

Frisco, CO 

Durham 

Ann Arbor, MI 

Cambridge, MA 

Claremont 

Marlborough, MA 

Durham 

Dover 

Durham 

Durham 

Nottingham 

Ai-lington, VA 

Durham 

Amesbury, ME 

Lawrence, MA 

Berwick, ME 

Evanston, IL 

Gilbert, AZ 

Vero Beach, FL 

Durham 

Durham 

Newmarket 

So. Royalton, VT 

Dover 

Durham 

Somersworth 

Lee 

Dover 

Albany, NY 

Rochester 

Durham 

San Antonio, TX 



Doreen L Whitney 
Jenna Bekeris McNeill 
Joanne B Hanifan 
Cicely Rose 
Dawn Juanita Perry 
Kristin M Randoph 
Jennifer Ann Gill 
Courtney Elizabeth Walton 
Gloria P Smalley 
Marianne Smith 
Kerry Elizabeth Swift 
Hilary Jean Petrin 
Roberta Jean Oehley 
Leslie A Yinger 
Christine E Gambetta 
Kimberly L Cichon 
Julie B Batchelder 
Toni Jean Ruis 
Holly Repp MacKay 
Kecia G Wallace 
Melissa Dawn Carrier 
Alison Susan Faulhaber 
Dawn Elizabeth Boyer 
Carolyn Anne Read 
Adrienne Elizabeth Orlowski 
Jessica Lee Lamountain 
Virginia A Siegfried 
Devina A Pope 
Heather Anne Coletti 
Kerry Kristin O'Neill 
Gretchen S Browne 
Belle A Vukovich 
Jill Ann Griffin 
Lori-ann Gula 
Ilaria Paula Hamelin 
Renee Jaros 
Jennifer Marie Ellis 
Casey A Finn 
Alicia James 



82 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 




BUDGET AND FINAN 




BRIEF HIGHLIGHTS OF FISCAL YEAR 2003 



The Town of Durham in 
2003 completed a full 
revaluation of all prop- 
erties in the community, 
resulting in the Total Assessed 
Valuation of Properties increasing 
to $775,296,708 — a 99.4 percent 
increase over the 2002 valuation. 

Owners of properties with val- 
ues that doubled as a result of the 
2003 revaluation would have seen 
no change in what they paid in 
taxes in 2002. However, due to a 
$2.16 miUion increase in the 
amount to be raised by taxes in 
2003 — primarily attributed to 
school and county government 
increases — the total tax rate in 
Durham increased by 13.48 per- 
cent, despite the substantial 
growth in property values. 

To determine actual increases 
in component tax rates, the 
Business Manager and the Town 
Assessor calculated what the 2002 
tax rate would have been by com- 
paring the 2003 taxable valuation 
of all Durham properties 
($775,296,708) against the 2002 
values ($388,797,639) for the 
Municipal, County and Local 
School portion of taxes. 



Tax Rate Breakdown: 

Municipal $ 5.85 

County $ 1.97 

Local school $11.91 

State school $ 3.84 

Total $23.57 



In 2002, the Assessed Value of 
all properties in Durham used to 
calculate the Municipal, Local 
School and County tax rates was 
$388,797,639 as compared to 
$775,296,708 in 2003 after the 
town-wide revaluation. 
Di: -nam's Total Assessed 

ation of Properties 
increased by 99.4% in 2003. This 
means that properties with val- 
ues that doubled this year would 
have seen no change in what the 
property owner paid for taxes in 
2002 as a result of the revalua- 
tion. However, due to a $2.16 
million increase in the amount 
to be raised by taxes in 2003, 
primarily attributed to school 
and county increases, the overall 
tax rate in Durham will increase 
by $13.48% over last year. 

The Town Council worked 
hard to keep the Municipal por- 
tion of Durham's Tax Rate — the 
only portion within the control of 
the Town Council — to a mini- 
mum. The Council anticipated a 
2.88 percent increase in the 
Municipal tax when, in December 
2002, it adopted budgets for Town 
Government operations in 2003. 
The actual increase, as set by the 
State Department of Revenue 
Administration following the 
revaluation, amounted to a 2.81 
percent increase in the Municipal 
portion of the tax rate. 

As can be seen from the table 
at the left, a substantial portion 
of the increase in the overall tax 
rate in 2003 was caused by the 



$1.74 million increase (a 23.16 
percent increase) in Durham's 
share of funding the Oyster River 
Cooperative School District. The 
Town's payment to Strafford 
County government in 2003 also 
increased by $295,000 (a 24 per- 
cent increase over 2002). These 
increased apportionments to the 
School District and to County 
Government accoimt for 95 per- 
cent of the overall tax increase in 
the Durham tax rate this year. 

A more satisfying financial 
highlight for Durham taxpayers 
in 2003 was the annual Report of 
the Independent Auditors (Plodzik 
& Sanderson, professional 
accountants and auditors) review- 
ing Fiscal 2002 operations. 

In presenting the 30-page 
audit report to the Town Council, 
lead auditor Greg Colby noted 
that no significant items were 
found to require reporting in the 
"management letter" summarizing 
the report, and he highly com- 
mended the work of Business 
Manager Paul Beaudoin and his 
staff. Mr. Colby termed the very 
favorable results of the audit "a 
true test of the excellent job" the 
Town's business management 
staff (and Town Administrator) 
are doing. The Town's accumulat- 
ed "Fund Balance" (or "surplus") 
of $1,665,118 at the end of Fiscal 
Year 2002 falls within the State's 
recommendation that communi- 
ties maintain a general fund bal- 
ance of between 5 and 10 percent 
of total appropriations to meet 
unexpected contingencies. D 



Budget and Finance 



83 



2003 ACTUAL GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES 



Fire- UNH's 
Share 

12.01% 



Fire- Town' s 
Share 



14.09% 



19.19% 
Police 



Other Exp 
1 .90% 



Elected 
Officials 
2.22% 



Administrator & 
Gen Gov Exd 

5.55% 




3.22% 
Ambulance & Emerg 
Communications 



0.87% 
Parks & Rec. 



2.56% Finance 
1 .08% Library 

13.43% 

Debt Service 

& Interfund 

Transfers 

19.27% 
Public Works 

4.61% 

Planning, Zoning & 

Code Enforcement 



2004 APPROVED GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS 



Fire- UNH Portion 
1 1 .98% 
Fire- Town's Portion 
14.06% 

Library 
1 .07% 



Finance 
2.43% 



Other Exp. 
0.30% 



Elected Officials 
2.87% 




19.03%' 
Police 



3.09%- 

Ambulance & 
Emerg. Comm. 



0.66% 

Recreation 
& Culture 



Administrator & 

General 

Government 

6.34% 



13.57% 

'^ Debt Service 
& Interfund 
Transfers 



Public Works 
19.87% 



4.73% 
Planning, Zoning & Assessing 



84 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



2003 ACTUAL GENERAL FUND REVENUES 



54.04% 

Property 

Taxes 



UNH 
Revenues 



14.83% 



Department 
Revenues 



7.01% 




3.49% 
All Other 
Revenues 



10.32%- 
Licenses, Permits & Fees 



10.31% 

State & Federal 

Revenues 



2004 ANTICIPATED GENERAL FUND REVENUES 



52.99% -J 
Property Taxes 



UNH Revenues 
15.87% 



Department 
Revenues 



9.90%- 
Licenses, Permits & Fees 



5.81% 




Other 
Revenues 
7.57% 



7.86% 

State & Federal 
Revenues 



Budget and Finance 



85 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM 









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Budget and Finance 



87 



COMBINED FUNDS STATEMENT 





FY2003 


Unaudited 


Differential 


FY2004 




Estimated 


Revenues 


Increased 


REVENUES 


Revenue 


FY Ending 


(Decreased) 


Estimated 
Revenue 




(Amended 


12/31/2003 


Revenue 


General Fund 










Taxes 


$4,583,458 


$4,694,721 


$111,263 


$4,711,838 


State Taxes & Shared Revenue 


$668,973 


$895,315 


$226,342 


$698,640 


UNH - School Allocation, Fire & Debt 


$1,370,706 


$1,287,962 


($82,744) 


$1,411,423 


Licenses & Permits 


$850,136 


$896,591 


$46,455 


$880,250 


Miscellaneous Revenue 


$240,051 


$302,917 


$62,866 


$308,286 


Departmental Charges 


$692,727 


$609,302 


($83,426) 


$516,175 


Fund Balance 


$159,500 


$0 


($159,500) 


$365,000 



Total General Fund 


$8,565,551 


$8,686,808 


$121,257 


$8,891,612 


Water Fund 


$469,790 


$404,722 


($65,069) 


$460,217 


Sewer Fund 


$1,338,925 


$1,251,627 


($87,298) 


$'1,369,721 


Parking Fund 


$174,973 


$206,351 


$31,378 


$216,000 


Capital Fund 


$3,271,809 


$2,915,475 


($356,334) 


$3,651,555 


TOTAL ALL FUNDS 


$13,821,048 


$13,464,983 


-$356,066 


$14,589,105 



EXPENDITURES 



FY2003 

Council 

Approved & 

Amended 



Unaudited 

Expended & Differential FY2004 
Encumbered (Over) Under Council 

FY Ending Expended Approved 

12/31/2003 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 










Town Council 


$78,772 


$23,524 


$55,248 


$72,571 


Elections 


$7,453 


$5,285 


$2,168 


$14,808 


Tax Collector/Town Clerk 


$145,577 


$150,493 


($4,916) 


$161,431 


Town Treasurer 


$6,028 


$6,028 


$0 


$6,028 


Town Administrator 


$223,490 


$189,301 


$34,189 


$195,614 


General Government & Computers 


$279,908 


$274,680 


$5,228 


$368,478 


Finance Office 


$207,950 


$213,537 


($5,587) 


$215,705 


Planning, Zoning & Assessing 


$343,192 


$384,753 


($41,561) 


$420,512 


Other General Government 


$7,286 


$7,192 


$94 


$7,646 


General Government Total 


$1,299,656 


$1,254,791 


$44,865 


$1,462,793 


PUBLIC SAFETY 










Police Department 


$1,608,079 


$1,603,172 


$4,907 


$1,692,066 


Fire Department 


$2,225,477 


$2,180,022 


$45,455 


$2,315,074 


Communication Center 


$233,814 


$233,814 


$0 


$256,000 


Ambulance Services 


$35,166 


$35,166 


$0 


$19,125 



Public Safety Total 



$4,102,536 $4,052,174 



$50,362 $4,282,265 



88 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



EXPENDITURES 



FY2003 

Council 

Approved & 

Amended 



Unaudited 

Expended & 

Encumbered 

FY Ending 

12/31/2003 



Differential 

(Over) Under 

Expended 



FY2004 

Council 

Approved 



PUBLIC WORKS 










Administration 


$329,019 


$292,773 


$36,246 


$378,353 


Buildings & Grounds 


$255,929 


$247,904 


$8,025 


$238,730 


Equipment Maintenance 


$152,333 


$161,369 


($9,036) 


$150,848 


Roadway & Drainage 


$134,185 


$116,259 


$17,926 


$139,342 


Snow Removal 


$155,078 


$187,250 


($32,172) 


$135,632 


Traffic Control 


$103,546 


$92,326 


$11,220 


$102,657 


Bridges & Dams 


$142,877 


$141,347 


$1,530 


$138,763 


Public Works Total 


$1,272,967 


$1,239,227 


$33,740 


$1,284,325 


SANITATION 










Solid Waste Administration 


$106,352 


$110,717 


($4,365) 


$102,618 


Curbside Collection & Litter Removal 


$140,463 


$159,351 


($18,888) 


$138,036 


Recycling 


$102,266 


$104,055 


($1,789) 


$103,603 


Solid Waste Management Facility (SWMF) 


$95,050 


$103,368 


($8,318) 


$111,182 


Hazardous Waste Day 


$3,500 


$2,985 


$515 


$3,500 


Rolloff Vehicle Operation 


$18,469 


$20,025 


($1,556) 


$23,852 


Sanitation Total 


$466,100 


$500,500 


-$34,400 


$482,791 


Public Works & Sanitation Total 


$1,739,067 


$1,739,728 


-$660 


$1,767,116 


HEALTH & WELFARE 










Health Inspector 


$1,000 


$13 


$987 


$500 


Administration & Direct Assistance 


$13,771 


$21,328 


($7,557) 


$18,859 



Health & Welfare Total 

CULTURE & RECREATION 

Public Library 

Parks & Recreation Programs 

Resident Pool Rebate 

July 4th 

Memorial Day 

O.R.Y.A. 

Swans 

Conservation Commission 

Historic District Commission 

Historical Association 

Durham Day 



$14,771 



$21,340 



-$6,569 



$19,359 



$90,000 


$90,000 


$0 


$95,000 


$6,000 


$5,333 


$667 


$2,500 


$15,000 


$15,095 


($95) 


$15,100 


$7,895 


$8,318 


($423) 


$0 


$650 


$695 


($45) 


$700 


$24,796 


$24,796 


$0 


$25,086 


$260 


$260 


$0 


$260 


$10,000 


$4,140 


$5,860 


$10,000 


$510 


$510 


$0 


$600 


$13,963 


$11,683 


$2,280 


$2,550 


$1,500 


$1,936 


($436) 


$1,500 



Culture & Recreation Total 
DEBT SERVICE 

Long Term 
Short Term 
Interfund Transfers 



$170,574 



$649,447 
$185,000 
$404,500 



$162,765 



$649,449 

$68,111 

$404,460 



$7,809 $153,296 



($2) 
$116,889 
$40 



$702,783 
$185,000 
$319,000 



Debt Service Total 
TOTAL GENERAL FUND 



$1,238,947 
$8,565,551 



$1,122,020 
$8,352,819 



$116,927 $1,206,783 
$212,732 $8,891,612 



.continued on next page. 



Budget and Finance 89 



Combined Funds Statennent (continued) 



EXPENDITURES 


FY2003 

Council 

Approved & 

Amended 


Unaudited 

Expended & 

Encumbered 

FY Ending 

12/31/2003 


Differential 

(Over) Under 

Expended 


FY2004 

Council 

Approved 


OTHER FUNDS 

Water Fund 
Sewer Fund 
Parking Fund 
Capital Fund 


$469,790 
$1,338,925 

$174,973 
$3,271,809 


$420,341 

$1,321,511 

$37,242 

$2,968,566 


$49,449 

$17,414 

$137,731 

$303,243 


$460,217 
$1,369,721 

$216,000 
$3,651,555 


Other Funds Total 
COMBINED TOTALS 


$5,255,497 
$13,821,048 


$4,747,660 
$13,100,479 


$507,837 
$720,569 


$5,697,493 
$14,589,105 



GENERAL FUND BUDGET TO ACTUAL 1999-2003 



9000000 
8000000 
7000000 
6000000 
5000000 
4000000 
3000000 
2000000 
1000000 










1999 



2001 



2003 
(Unaudited) 



I Budget ■Actual! 



90 



Town of Durhann 2003 Annual Report 



independent auditor's report 

Plodzik & Sanderson 

Professional Association/Accountants & Auditors 
193 North Main Street ♦ Concord » New Hampshire « 03301-5063 • 603-225-6996 « FAX-224-1380 



INDEPENDENT A UDITOR 'S REPORT 

To the Members of the Town Council 
Town of Durham 
Durham, New Hampshire 

We have audited the accompanying general purpose financial statements of the Town of Durham, New Hampshire 
as of and for the year ended December 31, 2002 as listed in the table of contents. These general purpose financial 
statements are the responsibility of the Town's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these 
general purpose financial statements based on our audit. 

We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. 
Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the 
general purpose financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test 
basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes 
assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the 
overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. 

The general purpose financial statements referred to above do not include the general fixed assets account group 
which should be included in order to conform with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States 
of America. As is the case with most municipal entities in the State of New Hampshire, the Town of Durham 
has not maintained historical cost records of its fixed assets. The amount that should be recorded in the general 
fixed assets account group is not known. 

In our opinion, except for the effect on the financial statements of the omission described in the preceding 
paragraph, the general purpose financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the 
financial position of the Town of Durham as of December 31, 2002, and the results of its operations and the cash 
flows of its nonexpendable trust funds for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally 
accepted in the United States of America. 

Our audit was made for the purpose of forming an opinion on the general purpose financial statements of the 
Town of Durham taken as a whole. The combining and individual fund financial statements listed as schedules 
in the table of contents are presented for purposes of additional analysis and are not a required part of the general 
purpose financial statements of the Town of Durham. Such information has been subjected to the auditing 
procedures applied in the audit of the general purpose financial statements and, in our opinion, is fairly presented 
in all material respects in relation to the general purpose financial statements taken as a whole. 

Ma.ch 12, 2003 l^^^Alsi^ (WwtlMO 

...continued on next page. 
Budget and Finance 9 i 



Plodzik & Sanderson 

Professional Association/Accountants & Auditors 
193 North Main Street « Concord ♦ New Hampshire « 03301-5063 » 603-225-6996 » FAX-224-1380 



INDEPENDENT AUDITOR'S COMMUNICATION OF 
REPORTABLE CONDITIONS AND OTHER MATTERS 



To the Members of the Town Council 
Town of Durham 
Durham, New Hampshire 

In planning and performing our audit of the Town of Durham for the year ended December 31, 2002, we 
considered the Town's internal control structure in order to determine the scope of our auditing procedures for 
the purpose of expressing our opinion on the financial statements. Our review of these systems was not intended 
to provide assurance on the internal control structure and should not be relied on for that purpose. 

Under the standards established by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, reportable conditions 
involve matters coming to our attention relating to significant deficiencies in the design or operation of the internal 
control structure that, in our judgment, could adversely affect the Town's ability to record, process, summarize, 
and report financial data consistent with the assertions of management in the financial statements. A material 
weakness is a reportable condition in which the design or operation of one or more of the internal control 
structure elements does not reduce to a relatively low level the risk that errors or irregularities, in amounts that 
would be material in relation to the financial statements being audited, may occur and not be detected within a 
timely period by employees in the normal course of performing their assigned functions. Our consideration of 
the internal control structure would not necessarily disclose all matters in the internal control structure that might 
constimte reportable conditions and, accordingly, would not necessarily disclose all reportable conditions that are 
also considered to be material weaknesses as defined above. 

We are pleased to report that, during the course of our review of internal controls, no material weaknesses in the 
Town's accounting systems and records were identified. Minor weaknesses or other considerations coming to 
our attention were generally procedural in nature and dealt with administrative or recordkeeping practices. In 
these instances, we made specific recommendations or provided instruction to applicable individuals during the 
course of our audit fieldwork. 

This report is intended solely for the information and use of management and others within the administration. 
This restriction is not intended to limit distribution of this report, which is a matter of public record. 

March 12, 2003 TV-&|l&LBl^O^ (U^eaotLBlO^ 



92 Town ol Durham 2003 Annual Report 



TOWN OF DURHAM. NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Combined Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances 

Budget and Actual (Budgetary Basis) 

General and Special Revenue Funds 

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2002 



Revenues 
Taxes 

Licenses and Permits 
Intergovernmental 
Charges for Services 
Miscellaneous 





General Fund 




Budget 


Actual 


Variance 

Favorable 

(Unfavorable) 


$ 4,422,699 

907,950 

1,951,948 

473,248 

70,400 


$4,345,499 

1,026,910 

1,950,868 

470,185 

101,095 


$ (77,200) 

118.960 

(1,080) 

(3,063) 

30,695 



Other Financing Sources 
Operating Transfers In 

Total Revenues and Other Financing Sources 



246.424 
8.072.669 



262.764 
8.157.321 



16.340 



84.652 



Expenditures 
Current 

General Government 

Public Safety 

Highways and Streets 

Sanitation 

Water Distribution and Treatment 

Health 

Welfare 

Culture and Recreation 

Conservation 
Debt Service 
Capital Outlay 

Other Financing Uses 
Operating Transfers Out 

Total Expenditures and Other Financing Uses 

Excess (Deficiencv) of Revenues and 
Other Financing Sources Over (Under) 
Expenditures and Other Financing Uses 

Decrease in Fund Balances Reserved For: 
Prepaid Items 
Tax Deeded Property 

Unreserved Fund Balances - January 1 

Unreserved Fund Balances - December 31 



1,218,901 


1,208,950 


9,951 


3,688,455 


3,687,345 


1,110 


1,289,613 


1,220,931 


68.682 


421,156 


396,593 


24,563 


11,653 


11.968 


(315) 


2,250 


2,565 


(315) 


52,340 


48,464 


3,876 


10,000 


9,649 


351 


986,546 


740,932 


245,614 



427.755 
8.108.669 



$ (36.000) 



795.508 



8.122.905 



34,416 



24,633 
11,654 

1.594.415 

$ 1.665.118 



(367.753 ) 
(14.236 ) 

S 70.416 



Budget and Finance 



93 



TOWN OF DURHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Combined Balance Sheet 

All Fund Types and Account Group 

December 31, 2002 



Governmental Fund Types 



ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS 

Assets 
Cash and Equivalents 
Investments 
Receivables (Net of 
Aliow^ance For Uncollectible) 
Taxes 
Accounts 

Intergovernmental 
Interfund Receivable 
Voliuitary Tax Liens 
Voluntary Tax Liens 

Reserved Until Collected 
Prepaid Items 

Other Debits 
Amount to be Provided for 
Retirement of General Long-Term Debt 

TOTAL ASSETS AND OTHER DEBITS 

LIABILITIES AND EOUITY 

Liabilities 
Accounts Payable 
Accrued Interest Payable 
Accrued Payroll and Benefits 
Retainage Payable 
Intergovernmental Payable 
Interfund Payable 
Escrow and Performance Deposits 
Other Current Liabilities 
General Obligation Bonds/Notes Payable 
Capital Leases Payable 
Compensated Absences Payable 
Accrued Landfill Closure and 

Postclosure Care Costs 
Other Long Term Commitments 
Total Liabilities 

Equity 
Fund Balances 
Reserved For Encumbrances 
Reserved For Endowments 
Reserved For Special Purposes 
Unreserved 
Designated For Special Purposes 
Undesignated 
Total Equity 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY 



General 


Special 
Revenue 


Capital 
Project 


$ 6,041,846 


$ 3,758 
409,099 


$ 


1,407,829 
41,429 
22,594 
19,561 
23,540 


125,931 
941,333 


52,129 
137,133 


(23,540) 
18,744 


2,500 




$ 7.552.003 


$1,482,621 


$ 189.262 


$ 210,614 
176,712 


$ 117,781 
16,945 


$ 7,135 
34,356 


5,238,432 

20,708 

180 


66,567 





5.646.646 



240,239 



1.665.118 
1-905.357 

$ 7.552.003 



201.293 



64,334 



1,216,994 

1.281.328 
$1.482.621 



41.491 



147,771 



147.771 
$ 189.262 



94 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Fiduciary Account Group 

Fund Types General Total 

Trust and Long-Term (Memorandum 

Agency Debt Only) 

$ $ $ 6,045,604 
2,146,891 2,555,990 



1,407,829 

219,489 

22,594 

4,215,608 5,313,635 

23,540 

(23,540) 
21,244 



10.067.521 10.067.521 

$ 6.362.499 $10.067.521 $25.653.906 



; $ $ 335,530 

176,712 

16,945 

34,356 

4,544,890 4,544,890 

8,636 5,313,635 

20,708 

180 

7,138,437 7,138,437 

502,488 502,488 

351,151 351,151 

1,414,396 1,414,396 
661.049 661.049 



4.553.526 10.067.521 20.510.477 



304,573 

242,754 242,754 

1,566,219 1,713,990 

1,216,994 
_____ 1.665.118 



1.808.973 5.143,429 

$ 6.362.499 $10.067.521 $25.653.906 



Budget and Finance 95 



TOWN OF DURHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Special Revenue Funds 

Combining Balance Sheet 

December 31, 2002 



ASSETS 



Cash and Equivalents 
Investments 
Accounts Receivable 
Interfund Receivable 
Prepaid Items 



Public Conservation Water Sewer 

Parking Library Commission Department Department Vehicle Total 



1,096 



$ 3,758 


$ 


$ 


$ $ 


$ 3,758 


309,279 


99,820 






409,099 






55,932 


69,999 


125,931 


15,509 


147,254 


584,563 


192,911 


941,333 


2.500 








2.500 



TOTAL ASSETS 



$ 1.096 $331.046 S 247.074 $ 640.495 $262.910 $ -0- S 1.482.621 



LIABILITIES AND EQUITY 



LiabilJtieg 
Accounts Payable 
Accrued Payroll and Benefits 
Interfund Payable 

Total Liabilities 



$ 536 $ 1,485 $ 

560 
10.925 _ 



1.096 12.410 



$ 20,920 $ 94,840 $ 

3,403 12,982 
55.642 _ 



24.323 163.464 



$ 117,781 

16,945 

66.567 

201.293 



Equity 
Fund Balances 
Reserved For Encumbrances 
Unreserved 
Designated For 
Special Purposes 
Total Equity 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 
AND EQUITY 



22,945 41,389 



318.636 247.074 593.227 58.057 
318.636 247.074 616.172 99.446 



64,334 



1.216 . 994 
1.281.328 



$ 1.096 $331.046 $ 247.074 $ 640.495 $262.910 $ -0- $1.482.621 



96 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 





Annually Budgeted 






Total 




Soecial Revenue Funds 


' 




(Memorandum Onlv) 








Variance 






Variance 






Favorable 






Favorable 


Budget 


Actual 


(Unfavorable) 


Budget 


Actual 


(Unfavorable) 


$ 


$ 97,254 


$ 97,254 


$ 4,422,699 


$ 4,442,753 


$ 20,054 








907,950 


1,026,910 


118,960 


1,103,784 


802,569 


(301,215) 


3,055,732 


2,753,437 


(302,295) 


1,022,109 


1,021,335 


(774) 


1,495,357 


1,491,520 


(3,837) 


12,450 


86,978 


74,528 


82,850 


188,073 


105,223 


140.000 


140.000 




386.424 


402.764 


f6.340 


2.27§,343 


2.148,136 


(130.207) 


10.351.012 


10.305.457 


(45.555) 


40,532 


29,762 


10,770 


1,259,433 


1,238,712 


20,721 








3,688,455 


3,687,345 


1,110 








1,289,613 


1,220,931 


68,682 


837,037 


739,144 


97,893 


1,258,193 


1,135,737 


122,456 


240,943 


242,274 


(1,331) 


240,943 


242,274 


(1,331) 








11,653 


11,968 


(315) 








2,250 


2,565 


(315) 


90,000 


142,934 


(52,934) 


142,340 


191,398 


(49,058) 


50,000 




50,000 


60,000 


9,649 


50,351 


802,635 


539,227 


263,408 


1,789,181 


1,280,159 


509,022 


38,371 


51,101 


(12,730) 


38,371 


51,101 


(12,730) 


233.825 


258.294 


(24.469) 


661.580 


1.053.802 


(392.222) 


2.333.343 


2,002.736 


330.607 


10.442,012 


10.125,641 


316,371 


$ f55.00m' 


^- 145,400 

1.071.594 
$1,216,994 


$ 200,400 


$ (91.000) 


179,816 

24,633 
11,654 

2.666.009 

$ 2.882,112 


$ 270.816 



Budget and Finance 



97 



TOWN OF D URHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Special Revenue Funds 

Combining Statement of Revenues, Expenditures and Changes in Fund Balances 

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2002 





Parking 


Public ( 
Library 


Conservation Water 
Commission Department 


Sewer 
Department 


Vehicle 


Total 


Revenues 
Taxes 

Intergovernmental 
Charges for Services 
Miscellaneous 


$ 

188,562 
1.028 


$ 

57,422 


$ 97.254 
1,475 


$ 

390,689 
12,577 


$ 

802,569 

442,084 

14,476 


$ 


$ 97.254 

802.569 

1,021.335 

86.978 


Other Financing Spurpes 
Operating Transfers In 




90.000 
147.422 


50.000 
148.729 








140.000 


Total Revenues and 
Other Financing Sources 


189.590 


403.266 


1.259.129 




2.148.136 


Expenditures 
Current 
General Government 
Sanitation 
Water Distribution 

and Treatment 
Culnire and Recreation 
Debt Service 
Principal 
Interest and 
Fiscal Charges 
Capital Outlay 


29,762 


142.934 




242,274 

71,475 

51,065 
10,396 


739,144 

320,384 

96,303 
6,956 




29,762 
739,144 

242,274 
142,934 

391,859 

147,368 
17,352 


Other Financing Uses 
Operating Transfers Out 


159.828 
189.590 






40.775 
415.985 


57.691 
1.220.478 


67.516 
67.516 


325.810 


Total Expenditures and 
Other Financine Uses 


142.934 




2.036.503 


Excess CDeficiencv) of Revenues 
and Other Financing Sources 
Over (Under) Expenditures 
and Other Financing Uses 


4,488 


148.729 


(12,719) 


38,651 


(67.516) 


111.633 


Fund Balances - Januarv 1 




3R148 
$318,636 


98.345 
$247,074 


628.891 
$616,172 


60.795 
$ 99.446 


67.516 
$ -0- 


1.169.695 


Fund Balances - December 31 


$ -0- 


$1,281,328 



98 Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



NET TAXABLE VALUATION 1999-2003 



800000000 
700000000 
600000000 
500000000 
400000000 
300000000 
200000000 
100000000 




775,296,708 



349,183,492 



369,827,888 



361,456,773 



388,797,639 







1999 



2000 



2001 



2002 



2003 



TAX VALUATION BREAKDOWN FOR 2003 

Commercial Other Exempt 

5.64% ^2.78% 

Residential 
37.41% 




0.62% 
Utilities 



UNH 
(Exempt) 

53.55% 



Budget and Finance 



99 



PROPERTY TAX REVENUE COMPARISON 1999-2003 



20 

18 

16 

14 

12 

10 

8 

6 

4 

2 






D SAU 5 Apportionment 

B Municipal 

D County 

D State Education Tax 



1999 2000 2001 



2002 2003 



TAX RATE BREAKDOWN FOR 2003 



State Education Tax 
16% 



County 
8% 



Municipal 
25% 




51% 
SAU 5 Apportionment 



I OO Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



STATEMENT OF LONG-TERM INDEBTEDNESS 

Payments 1-1-03 through 12-31-03 



DESCRIPTION OF BONDS/LOANS 



LOAN DATE PRINCIPAL 



RATE 





PRINCIPAL 


INTEREST 


PRINCIPAL 


DUE DATE 


PAID 


PAID 


BAUNCE 


9/1/2019 


$218,672 


$70,652 


$3,060,786 


12/15/2009 


$195,000 


$55,883 


$1,085,000 


12/1/2006 


$26,910 


$2,916 


$85,010 


12/18/2008 


$238,990 


$61,798 


$1,342,544 


9/15/2004 


$50,000 


$5,650 


$50,000 



2002 General Obilgation Bond including 2000, 2001 and 2002 
Capital Projects and Refunded 1996 and 1999 Bonds 

1989 Refinanced in 1=j,' WHF & Spruce Hole 

1997 SRLF- Oectilorination at WWTP 

1994SRLF-WWrP 

1994 Land Purchase (Sewer Users)- Durtiam Business Park 



11/5/2002 $3,279,458 3.0%-4.5% 

12/15/1989 $2,305,000 4.25%4.6 

10/20/1997 $259,625 2.61% 

6/6/1993 $3,366,018 3.91% 

9/15/1994 $500,000 5.74% 



$729,572 $196,898 $5,623,340 



TRUSTEES OF THE TRUST FUNDS 



NAME OF 
CAPITAL RESERVE 


PRINCIPAL 

BALANCE 

1/1/2003 


CHANGE IN 
FUNDS 


PRINCIPAL 
BALANCE 
12« 1/2003 


INCOME 

B<\LAN(! 

1/1/2003 


CHANGE IN 
FUNDS 


INCOME 
BALANCE 

12^1/2003 


COMBINED 
FUND BALANCE 

12/31/2003 


Parking $ 


7,500.00 


$0 


$ 7,500.00 


$ 24,411.18 


$ 257,83 


$ 24,669.01 


$ 32,169.01 


Fire Equipment 
and Service 


17,187.69 





17,187.69 


43,028.92 


(23,816.72) 


19,212.20 


36,399.89 


Community 
Development 


218,810.36 





218,810.36 


152,846.50 


3,002.77 


155,849.27 


374,659.63 


Reserve Water 


311,485.04 





311,485.04 


82,656.01 


3,184.58 


85,840.59 


397,325.63 


Sewer Fund 


329,181.35 


55,732.84 


384,914.19 


54,699.58 


3,407.86 


58,107.44 


443.021.63 


Total 


$884,164.44 


$55,732.84 


$939,897.28 


$357,642.19 


$(13,963.68) 


$343,678.51 


$1,283,575.79 


NAME OF 
TRUST FUND 


PRINCIPAL 
BALANCE 

1/1/2003 


CHANGE IN 
FUNDS 


PRINCIPAL 
BALANCE 
12/31/2003 


INCOME 
BALANCE 

1/1/2003 


CHANGE IN 
FUNDS 


INCOME 
BALANCE 
12/31/2003 


COMBINED 

FUND BALANCE 

12/31/2003 


43 Separate 
Trust Funds 


$ 25,353.58 


$ 600.00 


$ 25,953.58 


$ 5,535.89 


$(1,902.77) 


$3,633.12 


$ 29,586.70 


Smith Chapel 
Cemetary Care 


8,645.60 





8,645.60 


1,416.84 


(448.86) 


967.98 


9,613.58 


Smith Town 
Improvements 


6,628.96 


(630.00) 


5,998.96 


6,144.65 


101.02 


6,245.67 


12,244.63 


Durham 250 Fund 
Memorial 


6,418.22 





6,418.22 


4,769.98 


90.55 


4,860.53 


11,278.75 


George Frost 
Education 


4,441.23 





4,441.23 


5,031.68 


76.37 


5,108.05 


9,549.28 


Olinthus Doe 
Farm Care 


23,278.17 


(45.00) 


23,233.17 


2,972.86 


151.61 


3,124.47 


26,357.64 


Town Cemetery 
Cemetary Care 


155,824.73 


4,200.00 


160,024.73 


7,154.17 


(4,618.40) 


2,535.77 


162,560.50 


Philip Wilcox 
Unfunded Graves 


2,273.50 


5,000.00 


7,273.50 


1,403.78 


51.94 


1,455.72 


8,729.22 


Leather Graveyard 
Cemetary Care 


624.70 





624.70 


101.00 


5.55 


106,55 


731.25 


Wagon Hill 
Memorial 


765.38 





765.38 


363.43 


9.22 


372.65 


1,138.03 


Tirrell Fund 

















..continued on next page. 



Budget and Finance 101 



Trustees of the Trust Funds (continued) 



NAME OF 
TRUST FUND 


PRINCIPAL 

BALANCE 

1/1/2003 


CHANGE IN 
FUNDS 


PRINCIPAL 
BALANCE 

12/31/2003 


INCOME 

BALANCE 

1/1/2003 


CHANGE IN 
FUNDS 


INCOME 
BALANCE 

12/31/2003 


COMBINED 

FUND BALANCE 

12/31/2003 


Cemetary Care 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 422.81 


$ 3.71 


$ 426.52 


$ 426.52 


Memorial Day Parade 











376.84 


3.70 


380.54 


380.54 


Memorial Park 


8,406.00 





8.406.00 


2,482.62 


88.04 


2,570.66 


10,976.66 


July Fourth 
Celebration 


3,503.52 





3,503.52 


1,679.53 


42.01 


1,721.54 


5,225.06 


ORSD/Cap 
Development 


40.930.41 





40,930.41 


24,329.89 


527.24 


24,857.13 


65,787.54 


Wagon Hill 
Expense Trust 


80,076.53 





80,076.53 


19,133.13 


801.62 


19,934.75 


100,011.28 


Fire Station Exp. 
Trust 


125,000.00 


25,000.00 


150,000.00 


9,931.51 


1,182.19 


11,113.70 


161,113.70 


Track Fund 

Appropriate 


97,099.85 





97,099.85 


2,202.58 


802.25 


3,004.83 


100,104.68 


Special Education 
Fund 


104,246.19 





104,246.19 


6,289.50 


892.96 


7,182.46 


111,428.65 


Fac. Dev. Capital 
Reserve 


102,620.99 





102,620.99 


7,204.40 


887.46 


8,091.86 


110,712.85 


Town Cemetery 
Improvements 





200.00 


200.00 





0.05 


0.05 


200.05 


Wilcox Fund 





67,558.27 


67,558.27 





74.58 


74.58 


67,632.85 


Total 


$796,137.56 


$101,883.27 


$898,020.83 


$108,947.09 


$(1,177.96) 


$107,769.13 


$1,005,789.96 



VALUATION, TAX HISTORY AND INVENTORY 



Valuation Figures 

1999-2003 



YEAR 



PERCENT 
OF VALUATION 



TAXABLE 
VALUATION 



.*99% $775,296,708 

..57% $388,298,739 

..607c $369,827,888 

..71% $361,456,773 

..75% $349,183,492 



2003 

2002 

2001 

2000 

1999 

^estimate of percent of valuation 



iVIS-l Summary 2003 

Total Taxable Land $253,409,098 

Total Taxable Buildings $512,341,300 

Total Taxable Public Utilities $11,038,900 

Valuation Before Exemptions $776,789,298 

Total Dollar Amount of Exemptions $1,492,590 

Net Valuation on which local tax rate is computed $775,296,708 

Tax Credits: Total Veterans' Exemptions $42,100 



Tax Rate in Duriiam 1998-2003 



YEAR 



TOWN 



LOCAL SCHOOL 
DISTRICT 



STATE 
SCHOOL 



COUNTY 



TOTAL 



2003 $ 5.85 $11.91 $ 3.84 $ 1.97 $23.57 

2002 11.35 19.27 7.69 3.17 41.48 

2001 11.14 19.54 8.43 3.22 42.33 

2000 10.38 18.01 7.38 2.70 38.47 

1999 10.08 15.28 7.64 2.64 35.64 

1998 9.84 24.68 2.69 37.21 



102 



Town of Durham 2003 Annual Report 



Inventory of Town Property 

STREET NAMii DESCRIPTION TAX MAP ID# ASSESSED VALUATION 

Bagdad Road Stolworthy Wildlife Sanctuary 03-02-06 & 14 $ 8,700 

Beech Hill Road Water Ta..,. Site 09-26-00 (99-300-0) 213,400 

Bennett Road Doe Farm 18-01-03 270,600 

Coe Drive Beard's Creek Scenic Easement 04-20-11 Easements only 

ColvosRoad Sewer Pumping Station 99-300-0 100,000 

Dame Road Willey Property 19-06-05 18,800 

Dame Road Westerly side 18-27-00 63,400 

Davis Avenue Conservation easements 1-4-1. ..1-4-6 Easements only 

Dover Road Police Facility 11-4-1 638,000 

Dover Road Sewer Pumping Station 11-11-00 194,100 

Durham Point Road Solid Waste Management Facility 16-01-03 389,600 

Durham Point Road (off) Conservation land 11-36-02 162,000 

Durham Point Road (off) Conservation land 16-03-02 11,400 

Fogg Drive Father Lawless Park 07-03-00 158,700 

Foss Farm Road Water Standpipe 99-300-00 1,020,000 

Foss Farm Road Woodlot 06-01-13A 2,700 

Littlehale Road/US4 Vacant lot 10-21-00 9,900 

Longmarsh Road Colby Marsh/Beaver Brook Conservation 16-27-00 64,300 

Longmarsh Road Langmaid Farm/adjacent to Beaver Brook 16-06-01 & 02 169,700 

Main Street Grange Hall/Davis Memorial Building 05-01-05 446,300 

Mill Pond Road Mill Pond Dam 05-03-03 11,900 

Mill Pond Road Mill Pond Road Park 05-07-00 14,700 

Mill Pond Road Smith Chapel 06-14-00 140,200 

Mill Road Vacant Land 06-01-02 57,500 

Mill Road Vacant Land 06-01-05 43,300 

Mill Road «& Main St Strip of Park Land at Shopping Center Easement only 

Newmarket Road District Court and Museum 05-04-12 395,000 

Newmarket Road Easterly side 06-12-14 5,000 

Newmarket Road Town Offices 05-04-11 276,900 

Newmarket Road Sullivan Monument 06-11-00 140,000 

Main Street Cemetery 09-24-00 106,700 

Old Concord Road Sewer Pumping Station 99-300-00 297,000 

Old Landing Road Town Landing 05-05-14 (Incl 5-5-13) 154,600 

Old Landing Road Town Landing Footbridge 05-06-06 162,900 

Orchard Drive Scenic easements 6-2-22. ..6-2-25 Easements only 

Oyster River Access easement Easement only 

Oyster River Road Sewer Pumping Station 99-300-00 100,000 

Packers Falls Road Lord Property 17-55-01 64,800 

Packers Falls Road Spruce Hole Conservation Area 13-13-05 26,800 

Packers Falls Road Abutting Spruce Hole 13-13-01 416 CU* 

Pettee Brook Lane Town Parking Lot - Multiple Parcels 2-15-0, 1 481,800 

Pinecrest Lane Scenic easements (title remains with Linn) ....15-15-08 Easements only 

...continued on next page. 
Budget and Finance 1 03 



Trustees of the Trust Funds (continued) 

STREET NAME DESCRIPTION TAX MAP ID# ASSESSED VALUATION 

Piscataqua Road Thatch Bed 11-31-31 $ 151,700 

Piscataqua Road Wagon Hill Farm 12-08 - 01 & 02 590,520 CU* 

Piscataqua Road Jackson's Landing 11-11-04 (Incl. 11-11-3) 921,200 

Piscataqua Road W. Arthur Grant Circle 11-27-0 464,000 

Piscataqua Road Near Jackson's Landing 11-09-02 105,700 

Piscataqua Road Sewer Treatment Plant 11-09-05 6,856,300 

Piscataqua Road Quarry Lot - Part of Treatment Plant 11-09-05 Included above 

Piscataqua Road Public Works Site 11-12-0 766,700 

Schoolhouse Lane Former Highway Garage-Multiple Parcels 05-04-10 443,100 

Schoolhouse Lane Cemetery (owned by heirs, town maintained) 05-05-12 79,600 

Simons Lane Two small lots 18-11 - 13 & 14 21,000 

Simons Lane Vacant Land 18-11-06 51,700 

Technology Drive Water Booster Station 99-300-00 90,000 

Williams Way Boat Landing Lot 11-23-04 45,700 

WiswallRoad Wiswall Dam Site 17-7-0 111,400 

Wiswall Road Vacant Land 17-11-00 972 CU* 

Woodridge Road Lot 55 07-01-55 85,600 

Lee Five Corners, Lee Vacant Lee 6-7-0700 73,400 

Garrity Road, Lee Gravel Pit Lee 9-03-00 2,123 

Packers Falls Road, Lee Gravel Pit Lee 15-1-0900 254,172 

Snell Road, Lee Water Pump House Lee 5-6-0100 178,300 

Garrity Road, Lee Vacant L ee 9-3-0100 93,200 

Total $17,807,503 

*Assessed at Current Use Value 



• 04 Town of Durhann 2003 Annual Report 



Town of Durham 
15 Newmarket Road 
Durham, NH 03824 



PRSRT STD 
U.S. Postage 
PAID 

Permit No. 1 

Durham, NH 

03824 



X