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Full text of "Recent election in the Dominican Republic : hearing before the Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, second session"

W RECENT ELECTION IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

(PART I) 



Y4.F76/l;EL2/2/PT,l 

Recent Election in the Doninican Re... 

[ niiiARING 

BEFORE THE 

SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

ONE HUNDRED THIRD CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



MAY 24, 1994 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Foreign Affairs 



I ^11? 




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^:^i'U?^--'VH. 






U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
84-459 CC WASHINGTON : 1994 

For sale by the U.S. Govcmmcnl PiiiUiiig OITicc- 
Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 
ISBN 0-16-046277-0 



RECENT ELECTION IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

(PART [) 



Y 4.F 76/1: EL 2/2/PT. 1 

Recent Election in the Doninican Re... 

J:lii<ARING 

BEFORE THE 

SUBCOMMITTEE ON 
THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE 

OF THE 

COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

ONE HUNDRED THIRD CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



MAY 24, 1994 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Foreign Affairs 







'•' -' " 1 F .' 



U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
84-459 CC WASHINGTON : 1994 

For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office 
Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402 
ISBN 0-16-046277-0 



COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS 



LEE H. HAMILTON, Indiana, Chairman 

BENJAMIN A. GILMAN, New York 
WILLIAM F. GOODLING, Pennsylvania 
JAMES A. LEACH, Iowa 
TOBY ROTH, Wisconsin 
OLYMPIA J. SNOWE, Maine 
HENRY J. HYDE, Illinois 
DOUG BEREUTER, Nebraska 
CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, New Jersey 
DA>J BURTON, Indiana 
JAN MEYERS, Kansas 
ELTON GALLEGLY, California 
ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida 
CASS BALLENGER, North Carolina 
DANA ROHRABACHER, California 
DAVID A. LEVY, New York 
DONALD A. MANZULLO, Illinois 
LINCOLN DIAZ-BALART, Florida 
EDWARD R. ROYCE, California 



SAM GEJDENSON, Connecticut 

TOM LANTOS, California 

ROBERT G. TORRICELLl, New Jersey 

HOWARD L. BERMAN, California 

GARY L. ACKERMAN, New York 

HARRY JOHNSTON, Florida 

ELIOT L. ENGEL, New York 

ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA, American 

Samoa 
JAMES L. OBERSTAR, Minnesota 
CHARLES E. SCHUMER, New York 
MATTHEW G. MARTINEZ, California 
ROBERT A. BORSKI, Pennsylvania 
DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey 
ROBERT E. ANDREWS, New Jersey 
ROBERT MENENDEZ, New Jersey 
SHERROD BROWN. Ohio 
CYNTHIA A. McKINNEY, Georgia 
MARIA CANTWELL, Washington 
ALCEE L. HASTINGS, Florida 
ERIC FINGERHUT, Ohio 
PETER DEUTSCH, Florida 
ALBERT RUSSELL WYNN, Maryland 
DON EDWARDS, California 
FRANK McCLOSKEY, Indiana 
THOMAS C. SAWYER, Ohio 
LUIS V. GUTIERREZ, Illinois 

Michael H. Van Dusen, Chief of Staff 

Richard J. GaRON, Minority Chief of Staff 

Deborah HaUGER, Professional Staff Member 

MilaGROS Martinez, Staff Associate 



Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere 

ROBERT G. TORRICELLl, New Jersey, Chairman 
ROBERT MENENDEZ, New Jersey CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, New Jersey 

JAMES L. OBERSTAR, Minnesota ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida 

CYNTHIA A. McKINNEY, Georgia CASS BALLENGER, North Carolina 

PETER DEUTSCH, Florida ELTON GALLEGLY, California 

ALBERT RUSSELL WYNN, Maryland 

Rob Henken, Staff Director 

Dorothy Tai-T, Republican Professional Staff Member 

Alan H. FLEISCHMANN, Professional Staff Member 

Jane L. BaJJBER THERY, Professional Staff Member 



(II) 



CONTENTS 



WITNESSES 



Page 

The Honorable Stephen J. Solarz, former Member of Congress, leader of 
National Democratic Institute International Observer Delegation to the 

Dominican Republic 4 

Richard Soudriette, director, International Foundation for Electoral Systems .. 7 

Rafael Marte, former president of the Federation of Dominican Associations 

of New Jersey 11 

APPENDIX 

Prepared statements: 

Hon. Robert C. Torricelli, opening statement 31 

Hon. Stephen J. Solarz 33 

Richard Soudriette 39 

Rafael Marte 42 

Additional Material Submitted for the Record 

A National Democratic Institute for International Affairs preliminary state- 
ment entitled "NDI International Observer Delegation to the May 16 Do- 
minican Republic Elections", submitted by Hon. Stephen J. Solarz 45 

"NDI Latin American Programs", submitted by Hon. Stephen J. Solarz 52 

Background Memo on the Dominican Republic Elections 75 

Copies of documents used by the Central Electoral Board were submitted 
as Exhibit A, Exhibit B, Exhibit C, Exhibit D, Exhibit E, and Exhibit 

F 77 

Letter submitted by Mr. Robert Winthrop Johnson II, lawyer, from Jose 

del Carmen Ariza, Ambassador of the Dominican Republic 119 

Special Delegation of the "Acuerdo de Santo Domingo" of the Partido 
Revolucionario Dominicano (PRD) and the Partido Unidad Democratica 
(UD), testimony 122 



(HI) 



RECENT ELECTION EST THE DOMINICAN 
REPUBLIC (PART I) 



TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1994 

House of Representatives, 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, 
Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, 

Washington, DC. 

The subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 2:50 p.m. in room 
2172, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Robert G. Torricelli 
(chairman of the subcommittee) presiding. 

Mr. Torricelli. The subcommittee will please come to order. 

Last Monday, voters in the Dominican Republic went to the polls 
in an attempt to strengthen their 28-year-old democracy. By many 
accounts the elections were an extraordinary success. Observers re- 
ported record voter turnout in levels in excess of 90 percent. In- 
deed, the turnout was so heavy that election officials worked dili- 
gently to keep polls open an extra 3 hours to accommodate the ex- 
traordinarily large numbers of voters. 

There are, however, continuing allegations of irregularities. 
When the vote count was stopped last Thursday with 223 of the 
9523 precincts remaining, President Balaguer, the incumbent 
President, was ahead of his closest challenger, Pena Gromez, by 
only 1 percent, or some 29,590 votes. 

Pena Gomez has claimed that many of the 200,000 eligible 
Dominicans, many of whom are known to be supporters of the op- 
position, were deprived of their right to vote through manipulation 
of the voter list. The claim has received some support by other ob- 
servers. 

The question now is what if anything needs to be done to rectify 
the situation. The Central Elections Board's announcement over 
the weekend that it will conduct a recount is encouraging, but a 
recount would be of little comfort to those who might have been de- 
nied their chance to vote in the first instance. 

Among the additional remedies that may be necessary is the pos- 
sibility of new elections in some regions if indeed there were irreg- 
ularities that are supported in fact. 

We have asked three witnesses to appear before the subcommit- 
tee today to share their views of the conduct of the election and to 
offer their advice on what U.S. policy should be. Two of those wit- 
nesses served as international observers in the Dominican Repub- 
lic, our former colleague and leader of the National Democratic In- 
stitute delegation, Steve Solarz, and the Director of the Inter- 
national Foundation for Electoral Systems, Richard Soudriette. Mr. 

(1) 



Solarz will be accompanied by Patrick Merloe, Senior Associate for 
Electoral Processes at NDI. 

Our third witness, Rafael Marte, the former president of the Fed- 
eration of the Dominican Associations of New Jersey. He will be 
able to offer us a perspective from the Dominican community in the 
United States. 

Events in the Dominican Republic have taken on increased im- 
portance in the United States because of the country's role in the 
crisis in Haiti. This committee as well as the Clinton administra- 
tion will continue to keep, obviously, a very close eye on this mat- 
ter in the coming days. 

And the United States must be careful not to take actions that 
will threaten widespread civil unrest in the Dominican Republic. 
We do not want to precipitously reach any iudgment as to what oc- 
curred in the Dominican Republic or indeed what policies might be 
pursued. 

Indeed, it is also not our intention to involve ourselves in the in- 
ternal affairs of a sovereign country, simply as people who have 
great affection for the Dominican people, a great respect for their 
democracy, to ensure that as friends that the process has credibil- 
ity and a new democratic government in the Dominican Republic 
has credibility, et cetera. 

With that in mind I want to thank our witnesses for bein^ here 
with us today for this inquiry into the unfolding situation in the 
Dominican Republic, and to again caution that we do not prejudge 
what policies may evolve. We are not here to doubt the Dominican 
Government or to interfere in their internal affairs, simply to take 
a look at unfolding events. 

I would like to first welcome again Steven Solarz before this com- 
mittee, our highly respected former colleague, to welcome him 
back. This is his first chance to testify before this subcommittee 
since leaving the committee, so it is a pleasure to have him as a 
former colleague and as a friend. 

Steve, you are welcome. Please — the committee looks forward to 
hearing your remarks. 

I would like first if I could, however, to ask Mr. Smith if he has 
any comments he would like to share. 

Mr. Smith. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

Let me join you in welcoming our very distinguished panel. This 
is an especially great occasion to welcome Steve Solarz, one of our 
most able and certainly one of our most articulate members of this 
panel, and perhaps even the entire Congress. He is missed. And, 
I say that as a Republican who at times did some battle with Mr. 
Solarz, but very often found that his views and his persuasive abil- 
ity could carry the day. And it is very, very good to have him back, 
and to know that he is still out there pursuing the agenda and 
doing so in a very, very honorable way. 

Ms. Ros-Lehtinen. Whose mother lives in my congressional dis- 
trict, so I know all about Steve's activities. 

Mr. Smith. So, in case you haven't heard it before, Steve, now 
that you are not here on a day-to-day basis, I have always re- 
spected you very, very much. When you said something your word 
was your bond and you always did it in the most gentlemanly of 
ways. 



First of all, Mr. Chairman, the Presidential election that was 
held on May 16 was marked by high voter turnout, but sadly, it 
was marred by a list of irregularities in the electoral process and 
alleged fraud. 

The preliminary returns were showing incumbent President 
Balaguer winning by a very narrow margin, as you pointed out, 
over his closest challenger, Dr. Pena Gomez. As we all know, this 
election may be contested in certain areas or there may be revoting 
as the Central Election Board moves to grapple with these issues 
in the coming weeks. 

Some of the allegations, and I have read the observer reports, in- 
clude citizens holding voter cards not being allowed to vote due to 
irregularities in the official voter list. There was the allegation that 
state resources may have been used for partisan campaign pur- 
poses. There was the allegation that as many as 200,000 people 
had not received their new identity cards and thus were unable to 
participate in the election. And there is the allegation that large 
numbers of voters who had their identity cards were not permitted 
to vote because their names did not appear on the voter lists used 
by officials at the polling places. 

Mr. Chairman, this hearing was called together very quickly, and 
I appreciate the willingness of our distinguished panel to respond 
as they did, ever mindful of the fact, as the observers pointed out 
in their statement, that they went to the Dominican Republic not 
to "supervise the elections or to certify the integrity of the process," 
because "ultimately, it is the Dominican Republican people who 
must judge the elections" for themselves. 

Without further ado, I do look forward to the statements by our 
panel. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Mr. Menendez. 

Mr. Menendez. I just want to very briefly say I want to com- 
mend you for holding this hearing so soon after these issues have 
been raised, and more particularly commend you for the framework 
in which you have described them. 

It would be of concern in terms of an action in which we would 
seek to prejudge and/or, in fact, interfere in the national sov- 
ereignty of another country, particularly at a most precipitous time 
in the history of Hispaniola with what is going on in its neighbor- 
ing country of Haiti. 

This is a crucial time for the Dominican Republic, not only in 
terms of its own history, but also in terms of the history of the is- 
land and where it goes from here. 

I am concerned about the questions that have been raised, but 
I am also concerned about understanding the underlying — persons 
who raise them and underlying their concerns or are these partisan 
issues raised by multiple sides. What is the truth and veracity of 
some of these issues? What are the interests of some of those who 
raise these issues? What are the irregularities claimed by multiple 
parties? Is it true that, in fact, each party was represented at elec- 
toral schools throughout the country and signed off on the votes as 
taken on that day? 

These and many other questions, I am sure, will be asked, and 
hopefully answered today, Mr. Chairman. And we look forward to 
hearing it because as one of the countries that has a record of de- 



mocracy within the hemisphere we want to make sure that it is 
preserved and enriched and that hopefully this hearing will con- 
tribute to that. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Mr. Solarz, welcome. I think you have now been 
adequately praised and welcomed from all perspectives, in a bipar- 
tisan, thorough basis. It was my intention to first see you reappear 
before the Asia Subcommittee, which is what, if you will permit 
me, should have happened. It did not. 

But we are very proud to have you here, knowing that this is the 
beginning of a continuing service to the Congress in a new capac- 
ity. Please proceed. 

I want each of our witnesses to know that we have a window 
here in votes that will probably last about an hour and 15 minutes, 
and then there will be a series of them. So with the cooperation of 
each of the witnesses, if you could keep your analyses as brief as 
possible to allow time for questions, and then we would not be in- 
terrupted by votes. 

Steve. 

STATEMENT OF THE HONORABLE STEPHEN J. SOLARZ, 
FORMER MEMBER OF CONGRESS, LEADER OF NATIONAL 
DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTE INTERNATIONAL OBSERVER DELE- 
GATION TO THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

Mr. Solarz. Muchas gracias, El Jefe, para su introduccion. 

Mr. ToRRiCELLi. De nada. 

Mr. Solarz. I also want to thank Mr. Smith for his very kind 
comments. 

And I can tell Congresswoman Ros-Lehtinen that based on her 
observation she is probably now at least one vote ahead in her 
campaign for reelection. I will report to my mother that you are 
aware of her presence. 

Mr. Chairman, with your permission, I hope that my formal 
statement can be included in the record. 

Mr. TORRICELLL Without objection, we will enter it in the record. 

What I would also like the staff to do is take each of the formal 
statements and have them distributed today to every member of 
the committee with a cover letter, so people can see the analyses 
as the situation is unfolding in the Dominican Republic. 

Mr. Solarz. Let me make a few very brief preliminary observa- 
tions and then get right to the heart of the matter that has re- 
sulted in your decision to call this hearing, which I must say, Mr. 
Chairman, I think speaks very well of you and the other members 
of the subcommittee in the sense that you have moved expedi- 
tiously to deal with a problem that could have profound con- 
sequences for the future of democracy in the Caribbean and also for 
some vital American interests in the hemisphere. 

Our delegation, the delegation sent to the Dominican Republic by 
the National Democratic Institute, consisted of 26 members from 
10 countries around the world, including such Latin luminaries as 
Virgilio Godoy, the Vice President of Nicaragua, and Fidel Chavez 
Mena, who is known, I think, to many members of the subcommit- 
tee as the former Foreign Minister and Presidential candidate of 
the Christian Democratic Party in El Salvador, 



I think that all of us were deeply moved by what we witnessed 
on election day in the form of literally thousands and thousands of 
Dominicans peacefully lined up and waiting to vote when the polls 
opened at 6 in the morning, many of whom had arrived there in 
order to be able to vote early, as early as 3 or 4 in the morning. 

And I think that we all felt that above all else we had an obliga- 
tion to keep faith with the millions of Dominicans who very much 
wanted to participate in an honest election and to play a role in 
the legitimate determination of the destiny of their own country. 

During the course of election day our observers fanned out to, I 
think it was 9 different regions around the country. We covered the 
most heavily populated provinces, and then on the following day 
spent several hours sharing the observations which each team had 
accumulated during the course of election day itself. 

And, in essence, Mr. Chairman, there were two main problems 
which emerged on election day itself which were a source of very 
great concern to the delegation, both of which had to do with the 
general problem of disenfranchisement, by which we mean the phe- 
nomena of thousands and thousands of Dominicans who came out 
to vote on election day, who showed up at the polls with their iden- 
tification cards, or so-called cedulas, whose names, by and large, 
appear to have shown up in the list of voters that had previously 
been distributed to the political parties whose observers were 
present at each polling place but whose names for some strange 
reason did not show up in the list of voters which had been given 
to the election officials in each polling place, as a result of which 
under Dominican election law these people were not entitled to 
vote. 

Early in the morning of May 16, when it became apparent to the 
opposition that thousands and thousands of voters were being 
disenfranchised in this fashion they submitted a joint appeal to the 
Junta Centrale, the Central Election Board in the Dominican Re- 
public, asking them to set aside the rule that prohibited anyone 
from voting whose name was not on the official list in order to per- 
mit individuals to vote if they had a valid identification card and 
if their names appeared on at least two of the opposition party vot- 
ing lists, which had been given to the opposition parties by the 
Central Election Board itself. 

By two in the afternoon, when we had not yet heard of any deci- 
sion by the Central Election Board, the leaders of the OAS and 
NDI delegations met with the president of the Junta Centrale. The 
head of the IFES delegation, who was supposed to join us was de- 
layed, I think because of traffic, but we took the liberty of speaking 
in his name as well since we had discussed this among ourselves 
in advance, and we urged the Central Election Board, in the inter- 
est not only of justice but of an electoral process that would not 
only be honest but be seen to be honest, to accede to this request 
on the part of the opposition, pointing out that their proposal had 
a built-in safeguard against fraud in the sense that no one would 
be permitted to vote unless they not only had a cedula but their 
names appeared on at least two of the opposition party lists. 

The polls were scheduled to close at 6 p.m., and at approximately 
6:12 p.m. the Junta Centrale announced that it was acceding to the 



request of the opposition parties, and in order to accommodate 
them the polls would be kept open for another 3 hours. 

It will come as no great surprise to the subcommittee to find out 
that this order was intermittently and ineffectually implemented. 
It never reached many of the polling places. In others the local offi- 
cials were unwilling to implement it because they had already 
started to count the votes. In any case, thousands and thousands 
of those who had been previously turned away had already gone 
home or couldn't be found or weren't able to avail themselves of 
this opportunity. 

So our first concern with the problem of disenfranchisement had 
to do with the magnitude of the disenfranchisement, and it was the 
view of our observers that it was so substantial that even though 
we could not scientifically quantify it there was a unanimous feel- 
ing on the part of the delegation of observers representing the NDI 
that it was entirely possible that it could have afiected the actual 
outcome of the election itself. 

And we came to this conclusion at a time when we didn't know 
yet what the unofficial margin would be. But I have no hesitation 
whatsoever in saying that if we had known at the time it would 
be in the vicinity of 29,000 votes we would not have retreated one 
iota from that conclusion. 

Our second main concern, Mr. Chairman, insofar as the problem 
of disenfranchisement was concerned had to do with the pattern of 
disenfranchisement. Since it was the view of those of our observers 
who witnessed this problem of disenfranchisement to begin with, 
and I should say parenthetically that this did not happen all over 
the country. In a number of the regions and provinces and munici- 
palities, such as, for example, the National District in Santo Do- 
mingo where I was an obse7*ver on election day it wasn't a serious 
problem at all. But in approximately half a dozen of the provinces 
or regions it was, according to our observers, a very serious prob- 
lem, and it was their view that a substantial majority of those who 
were disenfranchised, who were deprived of the right to vote even 
though they showed up and they had the identification cards and 
their names appeared on the lists of the opposition parties, a sub- 
stantial majority of those people appeared to be supporters of the 
opposition, and it was therefore the conclusion of our delegation 
that while we could not absolutely preclude the possibility that the 
pattern of the disenfranchisement was due to some kind of inex- 
plicable human or mechanical error that there was real reason to 
believe that the pattern of this disenfranchisement was indicative 
of a deliberate effort to tamper with the electoral process. And we, 
of course, called on the Junta Centrale to determine what the rea- 
son for this was and to see what steps could be done to deal with 
its consequences. 

In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, and I am sure after my colleagues 
finish their testimony you will have some questions and we can go 
into this in more detail. Let me just share a few thoughts about 
what we think might be done at this stage of the process. 

In essence, what our delegation has recommended is that the op- 
position, which is most concerned obviously, about what happened 
on election day, attempt to pursue its grievances through the proc- 



esses and procedures that have already been estabhshed for deal- 
ing with this kind of situation. 

And I am pleased to say that so far that is exactly what they are 
doing. Mr. Pena Gomez, the leader of the opposition party that 
came closest to winning the election, assured us that he would at- 
tempt to resolve this through peaceful means and through the es- 
tablished processes and procedures. 

And we also very much hope that the Junta Centrale will re- 
spond to the allegations of irregularities and fraud driven primarily 
by considerations of justice rather than by considerations of par- 
tisanship. 

It is our view that it will be essential for the opposition to dem- 
onstrate by evidence that the magnitude of the irregularities com- 
bined with the pattern was of such a nature that it, in fact, could 
have affected the outcome of the election. And that strongly sug- 
gests the desirability, perhaps the necessity, of a conclusive dem- 
onstration by the opposition that more than 29,000 individuals 
were disenfranchised. 

I think we have to keep in mind that in any election, and what 
the president of the Junta Centrale himself referred to as the "lati- 
tude of underdevelopment," there will be as there is in our country 
an inevitable number of irregularities, and perhaps even a little bit 
of chicanery. 

To have a totally pristine election is simply not a realistic possi- 
bility there or anywhere else. And it would be unrealistic simply 
on the basis of a showing that there were some irregularities, or 
even some chicanery, to call a new election. Because if that was the 
criteria they would have to have one perpetual election in the Do- 
minican Republic. 

But if the opposition can demonstrate that substantially more 
voters were disenfranchised than the margin by which the appar- 
ent winner appears to have won, then they will be in a very strong 
position to ask the Junta Central to take such steps as may be nec- 
essary in order to effectuate the will of the Dominican people. And 
I would be pleased in the question period to talk to you about what 
some of those options might be. 

So I want to thank you, Mr. Chairman, for this opportunity. 

I am pleased to see that you have been joined by another one of 
my old and very good friends, Mr. Gejdenson, who I have been 
reading about lately in the press, and as a result of which I am 
now induced to provide some help to his efforts to remain here. 

Mr. Gejdenson. Don't believe everything you read. 

Mr. SOLARZ. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. 

[The prepared statement of Mr. Solarz appears in the appendix.] 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Mr. Soudriette, welcome. Thank you very much 
for offering your testimony today. 

STATEMENT OF RICHARD SOUDRIETTE, DIRECTOR, 
INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR ELECTORAL SYSTEMS 

Mr. Soudriette. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. I would 
like to thank you and the members of the committee for convening 
this hearing. 

I concur with the sentiments that all of you have expressed that 
the Dominican Republic is a country that is intertwined with that 



8 

of the United States. I think it is important to recognize that basi- 
cally after Santo Domingo the second largest Dominican city is 
New York. So there is a very direct relationship between the Unit- 
ed States and the Dominican Republic, and so what goes on there 
has to concern the United States as well as all the other countries 
in the hemisphere. 

I am particularly interested in the Dominican Republic because 
I had the honor of serving as Director of the Peace Corps in Santo 
Domingo from 1983 to 1985, and during that time it was my pleas- 
ure to have the opportunity to travel across the country, visiting 
all of the provinces and really getting to know the Dominican peo- 
ple, who are wonderful and famous for their hospitality. 

Presently, I serve as a director of a nonprofit, nonpartisan foun- 
dation called the International Foundation for Electoral Systems. It 
was founded in 1987 under the leadership of the first Chairman of 
the Board, F. Clifton White, for the purpose of providing assistance 
and support to emerging democracies in the area of electoral sys- 
tems. Additionally we also engage in monitoring of elections around 
the world. 

Since we were established we have participated in and worked 
in over 70 countries around the world. Presently our Chairman of 
the Board, Charles Manatt, is overseeing and is continuing to pro- 
vide the kind of leadership for the Foundation to enable us to ac- 
complish our mission. 

With regard to the Dominican Republic, the Foundation, or IFES 
as it is better known, was invited by the Junta Centrale Electorale 
of the Dominican Republic to observe the recent elections on May 
16. We were also invited to participate along with other groups 
such as my colleagues from the National Democratic Institute, the 
Organization of American States, and the Center for Electoral Pro- 
motion and Assistance (CAPEL), based in San Jose, Costa Rica. 

My purpose in appearing before you today is to share with you 
the observations of the 20-member observer team that we fielded 
during the recent elections. This team was headed by our chair- 
man, Mr. Manatt, and it included some of the most prestigious 
election, senior election officials from the hemisphere from coun- 
tries such as Ecuador, El Salvador, from Canada, and we also had 
a large contingent who participated from the Electoral Commission 
in Puerto Rico. Additionally, we had civic education leaders, aca- 
demics, and we had a number of constitutional lawyers who partici- 
pated. 

While in country we organized our team so that we were able to 
observe in all of the provinces — in 12 of the provinces of the coun- 
try. The focus of our mission was more on election administration 
issues, and especially as they related to guaranteeing the trans- 
parency of the vote. 

I concur with the statements that were made by the members of 
the committee, and also Congressman Solarz, with regard to the 
impressive way the Dominicans turned out and demonstrated their 
commitment to democracy. In fact, I would dare say that the Do- 
minican Republic set an example that all other countries in the 
world should follow in terms of encouraging the citizens to get out 
and exercise their right to vote. 



The turnout was historic in proportion. Approximately 1 milhon 
more Dominicans voted in the 1994 elections than participated in 
the last ones that were held in 1990. So it really does demonstrate 
their deep commitment to democracy, and it also enhances the re- 
sponsibility of all of the members of the international community 
and especially the observer team with regard to providing whatever 
support to encourage the democratic process. 

Basically, the members of our team for the most part reported 
that in the city of Santo Domingo there did not appear to be major 
problems other than ones that are normally associated, mainly 
logistical problems such as late opening of the polls and some prob- 
lems with regard to large numbers, large lines and how people 
were admitted to polling centers so that they didn't become over- 
crowded. 

There was a little bit of confusion also with regard to the place- 
ment of some of the voting tables, and some citizens were confused 
about exactly where they were supposed to vote. So these were the 
kinds of problems that basically were encountered. 

One word that I think should be offered is as an example of the 
interest of the Dominican people. I know personally what I saw on 
election day, and we began at 5:30 in the morning to witness the 
preparation for the polls. The polls opened at 6. They were sup- 
posed to have closed at 6 p.m. and in the end they actually wound 
up officially closing at 9 p.m. 

What we witnessed was a people who really found out what the 
mechanics of the voting process were all about, and people came, 
they showed up, they basically knew what to do, they knew what 
the process was, and also I think word must also be mentioned 
about the work of the Dominican poll workers. 

This time, in comparison with 1990, the number of voting tables, 
or mesas, was dramatically increased. In 1990 it was around 6,600. 
This time it was almost 10,000 voting tables, and those officials 
that worked at those tables spent long, hard hours and generally 
seemed to do a fairly good job, on the basis of the reports of our 
observer team. 

With regard to the problems that have arisen and the discussion 
with regard to irregularities that potentially can tarnish and lessen 
the impact of the overwhelming will of the Dominican people in 
terms of turning out at the polls, the biggest problem that our team 
discovered was exactly the one that Congressman Solarz just men- 
tioned. 

Our teams early in the morning began to call in and report that 
in certain cities, not in every city, but in certain cities — in fact, we 
recorded a list of at least 10 cities around the country including 
Santiago, which is the second largest city, that there were in- 
stances of people who showed up to vote in good faith, they had 
their voting card, but for some reason they did not appear on the 
official lists that the officials were provided by the Junta Centrale 
Electorale. 

In many instances they did appear on the list that were provided 
by the party poll workers, and this is a particular issue that our 
organization is continuing to look at closely to determine why — how 
this could happen. But apparently there was a problem in terms 
of the configuration of the lists that the polling officials used at the 



10 

tables. Those were set up in alphabetical order. The list that was 
given to the political parties, it was given to them Wednesday prior 
to the elections, for some reason that list was configured on the 
basis of the number of the identity card, or the cedula, and in 
many instances our teams reported that somewhere in the neigh- 
borhood of 8 to 10 people per table in many of these 10 cities re- 
ported that they were not able to vote. 

We immediately made contact with our colleagues. And again I 
want to say a special word of thanks to Congressman Solarz and 
all the folks from the National Democratic Institute as well as the 
people from the Organization of American States. We all felt that 
it was very important that we collaborate very closely, and so it be- 
came evident that the only solution to this particular problem was 
to allow people who had a card to vote if their name appeared on 
at least two of the party lists. This was a solution that was not 
only one apparent to the international observers, but I think it 
should be mentioned, again to the credit of some of the Dominican 
officials in the local election offices, they decided that was the best 
solution and they took that decision and implemented that decision 
before the official announcement was made by the Junta Centrale 
Electorale from Santo Domingo. 

Nevertheless, although that did happen in the city of Santiago at 
approximately 4 o'clock in the afternoon, unfortunately, by the time 
the Junta received visits not only by the international visitors — ob- 
servers, but also a delegation from the church, who has been very 
active in promoting the Pact of Civility that they got all of the par- 
ties to sign, and they also went to the Junta and urged them to 
revise the procedure and allow people to vote if they had a valid 
cedula and they were on at least two party lists. 

That decision was finally made. Unfortunately, it was made so 
late in the day that the actual announcement of it did not take 
place until 10 minutes after 6, which did tend to create some confu- 
sion. 

Nevertheless, based on our debriefing session, our observers in 
the field who witnessed this particular problem said that those in- 
dividuals who were still waiting to vote greeted the announcement 
with great enthusiasm. In the city of Porto Plata there were ap- 
proximately 500 people that were waiting in line, and they burst 
into applause when this announcement was made by Junta 
Centrale Electorale. 

It also did have a calming effect. There was concern that there 
might be civil unrest in several cities. And in fact, several of our 
observers called and asked us to get in contact with the Junta 
Centrale to make sure that the message got out that people could 
still vote. So, obviously, when that announcement and that decision 
was made it did have a positive effect. 

There was also another problem with regard to the situation that 
was brought to our attention of approximately 20 individuals that 
we were made aware of who had cedulas but who the number of 
the cedula did not correspond to the number of the cedula and the 
name of the person in the system, in the computer system at the 
Junta Centrale Electorale. We have not been able to determine how 
widespread that particular problem is. 



11 

As I mentioned, there were about 20 cases of that that were 
brought to our attention. That is also something that we are look- 
ing into and hope to be able to determine how widespread that 
was. 

Bottom line with regard to the election is, as you are aware, it 
is extremely close. I just spoke with representatives from the Orga- 
nization of American States in Santo Domingo, at noon, who advise 
me that negotiation have been underway all morning long, being 
conducted by Monsignor Agripino Nunez, who is the person who 
headed this Pact of Civility between the parties, and the recogni- 
tion is that in spite of all the problems in terms of trying to get 
an adequate resolution of this, of the problems related to the elec- 
tion, that it is very important, as you all have so rightly mentioned, 
that the ultimate solution to this has to be taken by the 
Dominicans themselves. 

There have been a number of steps that are being taken. Tomor- 
row a recount will begin of all of the actas, which are the tally 
sheets from all of the tables, and the proposal has been to do this 
on a hand by hand basis, and that is something that is going to 
take some time. 

But also it should be pointed out that is not an unusual proce- 
dure. That is actually provided for in the electoral law, to do this 
recounting. But it has taken on increased, added importance be- 
cause of the events surrounding the election. 

The other question is they are also looking into trying to study 
the situation with regard to the lists, and the specific cases that 
have been brought not only to our attention, but also to the church, 
related to those individuals who had a card but who were not on 
the official lists. And there were discussions underway today with 
the Junta Centrale Electorale to go in and really look at those to 
determine how widespread the problem was and potentially how 
many persons could have been disenfranchised. 

So, to sum up, I just would like to say that it is a shame that 
the election in the Dominican Republic has been clouded with 
charges of possible fraud and irregularities, but I think the most 
important thing is that at this time that we are very careful in 
making any judgments or pronouncements, that we carefully exam- 
ine all the evidence before any final decisions and judgments are 
made, and above all keeping in mind the important issue of sov- 
ereignty, it is important that we all recognize that ultimately the 
solution to these problems must rest in the hands of the Dominican 
people. 

Thank you. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Thank you very much. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Mr. Marte, the perspective of the Dominican 
community in the United States is obviously important to us, and 
your feelings and what it is you have gathered from people in the 
community is something we would very much like to hear. So we 
welcome you to the committee. 

STATEMENT OF RAFAEL MARTE, FORMER PRESmENT OF THE 
FEDERATION OF DOMINICAN ASSOCIATIONS OF NEW JERSEY 

Mr. Marte. Thank you, Mr. Congressman. 



12 

First of all, I would like to thank you for giving me the oppor- 
tunity of coming here today before the committee and to express 
the concern of the Dominican community living in the United 
States. 

My name is Rafael Marte, for the record. I reside in North Ar- 
lington, New Jersey. And I have been living in the United States 
for 20 years, which means I left my country when I was 14 years 
old. However, my concern for what take place there is like if I 
would have left yesterday. This feeling is taking place among the 
Dominicans living throughout the United States. 

The only way that we could really show physically how concerned 
the Dominicans are in the United States is if we look at the long 
distance carriers and check their phone bills, and we realize that 
the phone calls made from the date of the election to the present 
time is really outrageous. 

Let it be for the record that the information that I have gath- 
ered, talking to people, making phone calls to the Dominican Re- 
public, might coincide with some of the information already testi- 
fied before the committee. 

On May 16, the people of the Dominican Republic held their 
ninth consecutive national election since the establishment of the 
democratic system following the downfall of the dictatorship of 
Rafael Leonidas Trujillo. This past election, however, demonstrated 
once again how fragile the democratic electoral system is. 

Numerous reports, which have already been mentioned here, 
have been alleged that the Central Electoral Board, controlled by 
the ruling party, has engaged in illegal acts that violated the basic 
principles of free, fair and democratic elections. 

Ms. Ros-Lehtinen. Mr. Chairman, if I could interrupt? I just get 
the feeling that Mr. Marte is giving the impression that he rep- 
resents the Dominicans living in the United States. It says rep- 
resenting New Jersey Dominican community. 

I just worry about folks who purport to be representing an entire 
community with a certain political slant. You, perhaps, are rep- 
resenting an organization or you perhaps are representing yourself. 

Mr. Marte. Well, I am sorry. It was my mistake not to men- 
tion 

Ms. Ros-Lehtinen. But I am not sure that with a statement 
like 

Mr. Marte [continuing]. That I am the former President- 



Ms. Ros-Lehtinen [continuing]. The ruling party has engaged in 
illegal acts that violated the basic, I am not sure that we can really 
truly say that Mr. Marte, as nice an individual as he is, represents 
the New Jersey Dominican community. I know that he does not 
represent the south Florida Dominican community. 

Perhaps he represents the entire Dominican community in New 
Jersey. The three of you might be better able to state whether he 
does or does not. But let's say what does he represent. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Being from New Jersey, we afford him certain 
liberties. 

Your point, however, is well-taken, and it should be clear to any 
of those who would listen today that we recognize that in a very 
large and varied community there are indeed many voices. 



13 

The committee was contacted by representatives, indeed, of sev- 
eral political parties in the Dominican Republic who sought to be 
here today. It was my belief that in respect to the processes of the 
Dominican Grovernment and the sovereignty of the country this 
should not become a forum for Dominican political parties. 

I did, however, think that it made sense that we hear something 
of the voices of the Dominican community. As you have noted, they 
are varied voices. 

In going forward therefore, Mr. Marte, let me simply express the 
hope that we can strike a balance. That some impressions of the 
community are shared, as best you can, not simply on behalf of 
your own views, but the larger community, recognizing that it is 
not our interest here today in causing problems for the Dominican 
Government or prejudging the situation, but simply in this forum 
to assure that there is some voice of the community heard. 

I recognize that gives you a delicate and a balanced assignment, 
but please do it the best that you can. 

And Ms. Ros-Lehtinen's comments are, of course, noted in the 
record. 

Ms. Ros-Lp]HTrNEN. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Because I believe 
that having just quickly read part of the statement, and I am look- 
ing forward to listening to the rest of it, I am not sure that this 
is what we would call balanced, in your phrase, at all. 

But I abhor electoral fraud. I am certainly not justifying them. 
However, I do believe that sometimes there is a certain partisan 
edge attached to such allegations. 

Mr. Marte. OK. Perhaps it was my mistake not to say that this 
is only allegations, and based on those allegations, that is where 
the concern of the Dominicans residing outside of the Dominican 
Republic might be as well 

Ms. Ros-Lehtinen. Some Dominicans. 

Mr. Marte. Right. OK. Some of these irregularities have been 
mentioned before by the two witnesses. I will not mention exactly. 
However, I feel that based on the information provided so far, some 
of the problems that have been very clear. In the sense of the re- 
port, information gathered by the press and people involved in 
what is taking place in the Dominican Republic, we could see that 
in some of the provinces, for example, mentioned before in my re- 
port, that in the province of La Altagracia the number of registered 
voters were only 49,554. However, there were allegations that 
58,427 people voted. This means that the number of voters ex- 
ceeded the number of registered voters. 

One of the allegations mentioned in this report is that racial dis- 
crimination played an important factor in the election there. In the 
province of San Pedro de Macoris, where most of the Dominican 
baseball players come from, darker skinned Dominicans were rou- 
tinely denied the right to vote alleging that they were Haitians. 

If we take into consideration all these irregularities, and given 
the unofficial result that the incumbent President has a narrow 
margin of less than 1 percent, we can easily observe that if we cor- 
rect these multiple irregularities the result of the election of May 
16 will have a different result. 

I would say that I am here speaking on behalf of the Dominicans 
who reside throughout the United States, mostly in the North- 



14 

east — to make that correction — and I am afraid that if we do not 
clear — if we do not have free and fair elections in the Dominican 
Republic and respect the will of the Dominican people, the living 
conditions in the Caribbean country could continue to worsen, lead- 
ing to, perhaps, a number of unwilling refugees into Puerto Rico, 
which could become a bridge to come into the United States seek- 
ing for a better life. 

It is, perhaps — our concern is that if we call for a recount, which 
is already going to be done tomorrow, and also mention that if the 
tally sheets, as Mr. Soudriette mentioned before, of all voting sta- 
tions, now it is very important that the doubt in the Dominican 
residents can be eliminated by really observing a recounting of the 
ballots in the presence of international observers. 

The main concern why we are here today is just to give democ- 
racy a chance and have a government, whoever it will be, whether 
Mr. Balaguer or Dr. Pena Gomez, to have an opportunity to govern 
the country without any doubt as to who was the winner of the 
election. 

I feel very strongly that if we have a recount of the vote with 
strict supervision all those doubts can be eliminated from the Do- 
minican people. 

I really would like to thank every one of you for the interest that 
you have shown in resolving this matter peacefully. It is my under- 
standing that — at first I didn't mention that there was no affili- 
ation to any particular party involved, whether the opposition or 
the ruling party. However, the Dominican community in New Jer- 
sey and in the metropolitan area is very concerned as to what is 
taking place in the Dominican Republic. I feel very strongly that 
if we let the process work the result can be beneficial to all 
Dominicans living there and here as well. 

[The prepared statement of Mr. Marte appears in the appendix.] 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Thank you, Mr. Marte. 

I want members of the community to know that, in fact, this 
hearing was put together on several days' notice because of the un- 
folding situation. But indeed, if there is a reason in the future to 
revisit the issue, we will ensure that all members of the Dominican 
community in the United States representing different perspectives 
get an opportunity to participate. 

Thank you very much for your testimony. 

Much now rests in the credibility of the Central Election Board, 
how it is they look at the results and what 'it is they prescribe. 
From your contact with that Board, I would appreciate your view 
and your confidence in their capacity to deal with the problem, 
their objectivity and the degree to which they are representative, 
since we are now so dependent upon them in these next few days. 

Mr. Solarz. 

Mr. Solarz. That is a very good question, Mr. Chairman, and 
one which I asked myself when I was in Santo Domingo. In the im- 
mediate aftermath of the election when it had already become clear 
that there were widespread irregularities and that the opposition 
was almost certain to conclude that the election had been stolen, 
I asked one of the leading diplomats in the country and one of the 
leading figures in the church whether they thought it would be pos- 
sible for the opposition to get justice from the Junta Centrale 



15 

Electorale, because I told them that I would personally find it very 
difficult to urge someone to utilize a process and procedure if I felt 
there was no hope that justice would be done, assuming they had 
a case that would justify in one form or another an action that 
might change the results of the election. And I was told by both 
of these gentlemen that in their view it was not inconceivable that 
justice could be done. 

As you may know, there are five members of the Junta Centrale 
Electorale, three of whom are associated with the government, two 
of whom are associated with the opposition. Four years ago, as I 
understand it, all the members of the Junta Centrale came from 
the government. 

But there was a feeling on the part of people who are somewhat 
more familiar with the personalities involved than I am that it was 
possible. That if the opposition can conclusively demonstrate that 
the magnitude and character of the disenfranchisement was such 
that it probably exceeded the margin by which Mr. Balaguer had 
won, that some kind of appropriate remedial action might be taken. 
And on that basis, I felt entirely comfortable in urging Mr. Pena 
and his followers to utilize the established procedures because 

Mr. TORRICELLI. But is that in fact the burden that has to be 
met? You know, in an election that is decided by 29,000 votes you 
could almost conclude that the margin of victory could be produced 
by a series of late buses. 

Is the burden not instead — goes to the intent of whether indeed 
mistakes that occurred — polls that opened late, inefficiencies, reg- 
istration cards that were not excepted — there must be a pattern 
and a clear intention of disenfranchisement, not simply that the 
numbers are sufficient to make a difference. 

Mr. SoLARZ. Well, my guess is you want to take both into ac- 
count. Let's take one hypothetical example. Supposing it was deter- 
mined that the number of people who were deprived of the right 
to vote numbered 10,000. And let's further hypothesize that it was 
determined that these people where deliberately deprived of the 
right to vote as the result of some kind of partisan manipulation. 

And let's further determine — hypothesize that you concluded that 
every one of the 10,000 would have voted for Mr. Pena. Under 
those circumstances I might insist or ask that those who were re- 
sponsible for this manipulation be held accountable and brought to 
justice if it violated Dominican law. 

But insofar as the election itself is concerned, if that is the most 
that could be shown I would not be uncomfortable with a conclu- 
sion from the Junta Centrale that that by itself would not have af- 
fected the outcome of the election. 

Furthermore, you can't assume, even if more than 29,000 were 
deprived of the right to vote, that every one of them would have 
voted for Mr. Pena. Some probably would have voted for Mr. Bosch. 
Possibly some of them would have voted for Mr. Balaguer as well. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Now, on the issue of the independence and 
credibility of indeed the Central Election Board there may be a 
tendency of all of us to withhold judgment on their operations until 
we see the outcome of their decision. I think what matters is that 
before we know what they prescribe, whether from your contacts 



16 

with them you are convinced of their impartiahty, their objectivity, 
and their capability. 

Mr. SoLARZ. I wish I could tell you that I am convinced of their 
impartiality and objectivity. I simply cannot on the basis of my 
dealings with them, which by and large were not by any means un- 
pleasant, which were cooperative. Some of them, I thought, were 
highly professional. But I cannot tell you that I am absolutely con- 
fident of their impartiality. 

What I can tell you is that I am confident that there is a suffi- 
cient possibility that justice will be done that I think it would be 
wise on Mr. Pena's part and the part of his followers to proceed on 
the assumption that the Junta Electorale, or at least a majority of 
its members, will act fairly and impartially. 

And if it turns out that they don't, if an overwhelming case is 
made for some remedial action and the Junta Centrale operating 
clearly on the basis of purely partisan considerations rejects it, 
then I think they will have to consider other alternatives. 

But it would be a mistake, Mr. Chairman, at this point to con- 
clude that there is no hope whatsoever of justice and therefore they 
shouldn't bother to participate in what could turn out to be a cha- 
rade. 

Mr. ToRRiCELLi. Mr. Soudriette. Or Mr. Marte. 

Mr, Soudriette. Mr. Chairman, just as a point of order, to follow 
up on what Congressman Solarz has said, in 1990 the Junta 
Centrale Electorale had three members and they were all three 
from the governing party, the Reformista Party. The present make- 
up of the Board is five members, as he mentioned, three from the 
governing party, one from the Party de Revoluccionaria 
Dominicano, which was Pena Gomez, and one as the Parte de 
Liberale Dominicano. 

Mr. ToRRiCELLi. And are they appointed by the party or do they 
just happen to be members of the party. 

Mr. Soudriette. No, they — each party was designated to 
have 

Mr. TORRICELLI. So it is their own choice. 

Mr. Soudriette. Their own choice; yes. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Mr. Marte, what is your analysis of the oper- 
ations of the Board? 

Mr. Marte. OK. I feel personally that if the Board really give the 
opportunity to international observers to watch the process of 
counting all the doubts that right now have been implanted in the 
Dominican people, because you are talking about both candidates 
right now which are heading the elections. Joaquin Balaguer and 
Pena Gomez both have over 1 million votes cast already, and count- 
ed. 

So, if we leave the process the way it is and just proclaim either 
one as the winner there will be so many doubts in so many people, 
and by really — clearly the process will leave the Dominican people 
with the certainty. 

Mr. TORRICELLL Mr. Soudriette, do we know in fact whether 
international observers will be part of the recount process as they 
were with the original observer missions? 

Mr. Soudriette. All I know is that one of the members of our 
team has been specifically asked to return. 



17 

Mr. TORRICELLI. To return. 

Mr. SouDRiETTE. And he is the gentleman that basically served 
as the computer adviser to all three of our observer teams. 

Mr. ToRRiCELLi. See, this issue of the popular press carrying a 
number of 200,000 people that may have been disenfranchised. Is 
there anyone who would speak to, in fact, whether you think that 
number has credibility? 

Mr. SOLARZ. I will comment on that, Mr. Chairman. And let me 
just say in response to Mr. Marte's observation that while I think 
the Junta Centrale is to be commended for its relatively prompt 
willingness to agree to a recount on an acta-by-acta basis, clearly 
in the presence of watchers from the opposition parties, hopefully 
with the presence of international observers, that this is not really 
the main problem. 

There may well have been some mistakes in counting. I know 
there are some allegations of fraud in the counting. But the main 
problem, as we understand it, has to do not so much with how the 
votes were counted but how they were cast, or more importantly, 
how they weren't cast. ;. 

And I do not believe that a recount by itself no matter how fair 
it may be is going to satisfy the concerns of the Dominican people 
who are primarily concerned by the magnitude of the disenfran- 
chisement, and that is the issue that will have to be addressed. 

And let me say there is a way to do that. And as of this hearing 
my impression is that the Junta Centrale has not yet agreed upon 
a procedure for doing it. But the easiest way to do it would be to 
take the official voter lists that were held by the officials on elec- 
tion day to determine who is eligible to vote. 

And as I understand it, those official lists were returned together 
with the ballots to the municipal juntas, so presumably they are 
available for each and every one of the almost 10,000 polling places 
around the country. 

To take those lists and systematically compare them on a polling 
place-by-polling place basis with the lists of voters that had been 
given to the political parties. And by doing that one will be able 
to establish a universe of individuals whose names do not appear 
on the official list but whose names do appear on the list that had 
been given to the political parties. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. For the purpose of looking for a pattern or in- 
tention? 

Mr. SoLARZ. Well, that would go a long way toward determining 
the magnitude of the disenfranchisement. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. I think that is exactly the point. If out of 3 mil- 
lion people who have voted, an extraordinary 90 percent participa- 
tion, if 200,000 did not get the opportunity to vote and they appear 
to have randomly been the victims of different problems in dif- 
ferent communities, that is one thing. 

If indeed we are finding that in selected towns where the opposi- 
tion had particular strength for rather transparent reasons they 
were rejected at the polls, then we are talking about a problem of 
a different magnitude. 

Mr. SOLARZ. I agree with that, Mr. Chairman. Let me also say 
I think you have to look at both magnitude and pattern. In other 
words, if you had 200,000 people that were randomly 



18 

disenfranchised and you have a margin of victory of 29,000, I think 
you have got a prettv good case for a new election or a supple- 
mentary election in which those people can vote. The closer you get 
to the 29,000 figure with the magnitude of the disenfranchisement, 
the more important the pattern becomes. And if you combine both 
substantial magnitude and a clear pattern of disenfranchise- 
ment 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Well, isn't it likely the 29,000 number is going 
to get reached? 

Mr. SOLARZ. Well, at this point it is impossible to say. But I can 
tell you what our very rough estimate was, and I want to empha- 
size here that this is not a scientifically precise estimate. There is 
no way it would stand up in a court of law. But we obviously felt 
the need to calculate, if only for ourselves, some rough measure of 
the magnitude of the disenfranchisement, and the figures we came 
up with — and I would be happy, if you would like, to go into the 
methodology, but the figures we came up with were a low, I be- 
lieve, of around 47,000 and a high of around 77,000. And as I say, 
it could very easily have been more, and it could very easily have 
been less. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. You have no opinion on the question of whether 
or not you at least anecdotally saw a geographic pattern to them? 

Mr. SOLARZ. Oh, there clearly was a pattern in the sense that the 
disenfranchisement seemed to be largely confined to roughly 6 
provinces around the country. As Mr. Soudriette and I both pointed 
out, it was not a problem in the National District in Santo Do- 
mingo out of which a third of the vote comes. In a number of other 
provinces there were not serious problems. 

But in six of them there appears to have been widespread dis- 
enfranchisement. And in the others there was some but it was 
very, very limited. 

Mr. TORRICELLI. Well, first, let me thank you for your testimony. 
I want to yield to Mr. Smith. 

In concluding, for my own part let me simply say first, question- 
ing the credibility of any national election of a sovereign country 
is a serious affair. It is not to be done so lightly. 

There is a considerable burden of proof on establishing a pattern, 
and indeed a level of abuse, that would constitute a substantive dif- 
ference in the election. 

It is possible that that burden could be met in this case. But I 
would hope that we would all approach this cautiously and indeed 
await all the available evidence. 

We should be mindful of the fact, living in a country where the 
President of the United States was chosen by probably 25 percent 
of the eligible voters who constituted his majority, that no matter 
which of the two leading candidates won in the Dominican Repub- 
lic, they were probably the choice of larger than 40 percent of the 
eligible voters. 

The elections in themselves are an extraordinary accomplishment 
because of the number of people who were enfranchised. That does 
not excuse if there was a pattern to violate people's basic rights, 
but it should give all of us pause in passing some judgment. 

Finally, I say with some hesitation but indeed out of necessity, 
there are going to be some who are going to find an obvious accom- 



19 

modation of Dominican and American interests in the coming days, 
if the burden is met and these elections are questioned. That is, the 
United States is at the moment very dependent upon the Govern- 
ment of the Dominican Republic in enforcing the expanded embar- 
go on Haiti. 

The Dominican Government has enormous influence over wheth- 
er or not the policies of this administration succeed with regard to 
Haiti. The passing of judgment on these elections and the fulfill- 
ment of certain requests from the Dominican Government with re- 
gard to Haiti could make for a rather transparent accommodation. 
Nothing could further undermine the interest of the U.S. Grovern- 
ment. The democracy of the Dominican Republic is just as impor- 
tant as the democracy of Haiti. 

I know the Clinton administration would never countenance such 
an arrangement. It should not be offered. It should not be dis- 
cussed. It should not even be considered. 

Each nation's democracy is critical for its own people, and I know 
the people in the administration and, I trust, the Government of 
the Dominican Republic will also be cautious that there be no such 
suggestion that one policy accommodate the other. 

Thank you, gentlemen. 

Mr. Smith. 

Mr. Smith. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. And I thank 
the panel for their fine answers to the questions as well as for their 
testimony. 

Steve— Congressman Solarz, in looking at the NDI report it 
makes the point that more than 200,000 cedulas were not distrib- 
uted by election day, and also that large numbers of perspective 
voters with identity cards were turned away because their names 
did not appear on the official list. 

What was the source — because it does say reportedly — of that 
200,000 figure? Because that coupled with that second assertion 
would seem to suggest a threshold far in excess of the 29,000. 

Mr. Solarz. To much can be made, Mr. Smith, of the 200,000 fig- 
ure in the sense that much of that was attributable to people who 
simply didn't bother to pick up their identity cards. 

In other words, we have many people throughout our country — 
I know they certainly existed in my old district of blessed memory, 
they probably even exist in yours — who are perfectly eligible to reg- 
ister to vote but they never bother to show up. 

And in the Dominican Republic there were a certain number of 
people, and maybe because they were real, maybe because they 
were out of the country, maybe because they had become cynical 
or alienated, maybe because they were apathetic, maybe for the 
same reasons that a lot of people in our country don't bother to reg- 
ister, didn't go to get their cedulas. 

So, it wasn't because they were prevented from doing so in many 
instances, but because for whatever the reason they chose not to 
do so. 

Personally, I was far more concerned by the fact that there were 
many people who had gotten their cedulas who did go to the polls 
to vote but who were unable to vote because their names were not 
on the official voter list, where they presumably should have been. 



20 

Now, let me tell you this. The Saturday night before the election 
we met with one of the officials of the Junta Centrale and we said 
what are your main concerns, and at that time there had been a 
lot of talk about the existence of an alternative computer. This was 
a myth which had achieved the level of an excepted fact, and there 
was going to be some extraordinary sophisticated computer manip- 
ulation whereby votes would be falsely tallied on the backup com- 
puter and then somehow plugged into the real computer, and that 
would override the real results. 

But I think we pretty much satisfied ourselves through a secu- 
rity check by a computer expert brought in by IFES that that was 
not going to happen. 

But this fellow from the Junta Centrale told us that his main 
concern was that lots of people might show up on election day with 
cedulas, I.D. cards, but whose names wouldn't be in the official list. 
And he said, but so far none of the political parties have expressed 
any concern about that. 

The reason I think they had not expressed any concern was that 
at the time the main concern, other than this backup computer, 
was that fraudulent or forged cedulas would be given out and that 
people would show up to vote with fake I.D. cards, and it was felt 
that the additional requirement that your name be on the official 
voter list was a prudent check against the more likely form of 
fraud. 

It then turned out that the real problem was, as this fellow had 
anticipated, it would come in the form of people who did have cards 
but whose names wasn't on the list. Now, at that point I was trying 
to figure out how would it be possible for someone who got an I.D. 
card, the information for which was punched out by the computer, 
not to have their name on the computer-generated official voter 
list. 

And I do not exaggerate when I tell you that in the space of a 
half an hour I must have asked this question a dozen different 
times trying to get at it from a variety of different angles, and I 
don't know whether it was a failure of communication, whether it 
was the inadequacy of the translation, whether it was due to an 
inability or perhaps even an unwillingness to explain how this 
could have happened, but I finally, you know, threw up my hands 
in frustration because I couldn't get a lucid answer or explanation. 

And to this day I don't understand how it could have happened. 
You know, I could have understood if 10 or 20 or 50 or even 
200,000 people showed up to vote, their names aren't on the list, 
and it turns out they are randomly distributed across the political 
spectrum. You know, mistakes happen. 

But what is very difficult to understand is the fact that the great 
majority of those who showed up to vote with their cards who were 
denied the right to vote appeared to have been supporters of the 
opposition. And that is why we concluded that there was a real 
possibility, not necessarily a certainty but a real possibility, that 
there was a deliberate effort to tamper with the electoral process. 

By whom? We did not know. How? We couldn't exactly be sure. 
But certainly something which deserved serious investigation. 

Mr. Smith. Let me ask this of anyone on the panel who would 
like to answer it. 



21 

According to the standard used by the Central Election Board, 
and assuming a voter is properly registered in an area, would that 
be sufficient proof, if it turns out they didn't vote, to suggest that 
perhaps they were disenfranchised? Or, would an affidavit or some 
kind of statement have to be made in order to indicate that they 
intended or tried to vote but were barred? 

As we all know, people do register but then sometimes for what- 
ever reasons, personal or otherwise, they do not vote. That could 
even happen in large areas where there is, for some reason, a lack 
of motivation. 

What kind of additional check or balance will be employed, do 
you think, by the Junta Centrale to ensure that these people genu- 
inely were disenfranchised? 

Mr. Soudriette. 

Mr. Soudriette. Well, as you mention, the use of staining ink 
is one that is — it is a practice that is widely used in countries all 
around the world basically as a check to ensure that people have 
only voted once. 

In the particular case in the Dominican Republic, I personally 
was able to observe a case of a person who was vehemently arguing 
that he should be allowed to vote, and was pointing his finger at 
the president of the voting table, and I happened to look at his fin- 
ger and it was about as pink as it could get, because that was the 
color of the staining ink. So obviously they were well taken in their 
concerns about allowing that person to be able to vote, and so they 
didn't allow him too. That was one of the checks. 

On the other hand, the situation with regard to staining ink is 
something that as is the case with all kinds of systems that there 
is always somebody that is going to try to test the system. But that 
was one of the measures that was used. 

Mr. Smith. How do you go back now and figure out if people 
were actually disenfranchised, though? 

Mr. SoLARZ. Well, I think there is a way to do it. My own view, 
Mr. Smith, is that if someone has a cedula which is unpunched, be- 
cause if you voted the election officials were supposed to punch a 
little hole in your I.D. card where it says 1994, and then there is 
another space for 1998. 

If you have a cedula that hasn't been punched, if your name is 
not in the official party list but it is in the — the official list of vot- 
ers but is in the list given to the parties, I would consider it a re- 
buttable presumption that that individual intended to vote. 

And, if someone can show that they were in the hospital at the 
time, they weren't in the country at the time, I would say that the 
presumption has been overcome. 

Furthermore, there is another test you can apply. Let's assume 
a comparison of the list of the official voters to the list given to the 
parties demonstrates there are 50,000 people who were on the 
party list but not on the official list. You had roughly an 85 percent 
turnout. I don't think it would be illegitimate to assume that of this 
universe of 50,000 that had been so identified 85 percent would 
have voted. I don't think you can assume 100 percent would have 
voted. Then on the basis of evidence that can be submitted — affida- 
vits and testimony — the Junta Centrale can reach some conclusions 
about what the pattern of that vote might have been. 



22 

So I think there are ways of getting at this which will enable a 
reasonable judgment to be made both about the magnitude of the 
disenfranchisement and the pattern, and then looking at both of 
those together I think it will probably be fairly clear to most people 
what iustice requires. 

Ana let us hope under those circumstances that the junta does 
what is just. And, indeed, what is just under those circumstances 
may well be to ratify the preliminary results. But if justice seems 
to suggest that the results were or likely could have been distorted 
by this problem, then one would hope they would come to some 
other conclusions. 

And in making that decision one very hopeful aspect of the situa- 
tion is the work of the Civility Commission to which Mr. Soudriette 
has referred, which I gather is intimately involved in the process, 
which has the participation of representatives of the leading politi- 
cal parties, and which is working closely with the Junta Centrale. 
I am sure they will be encouraging both the opposition and the 
Junta Centrale to get to the bottom of this whole affair and to 
make a decision in the best interest of the country based not on 
what is best for one party or another but what the cause of justice 
itself requires. 

Mr. Marte. Mr. Smith. 

Mr. Smith. Yes, Mr. Marte. 

Mr. Marte. I would like to make an explanation. The main con- 
cern is also the doubt that the Junta Centrale Electorale created 
in the people. The voting lists provided by the Junta Centrale to 
the parties were different from the final list that the officials were 
using at the time of the election. 

Let me make an example. If a voter goes to vote and his name 
is not on the list, however the name was listed on the previous list 
given to the delegates of other candidates, the person was not al- 
lowed to vote because his name was not there. 

There are allegations also that were mentioned that many names 
were included on the official list and not notified to the opposition 
parties. That created doubts, by the voters, as to what was taking 
place. One of the concerns that the Junta Centrale Electorale had 
created some people. This is why all these allegations have been 
taking place. 

And if we give the opportunity to the Junta Centrale Electorale 
to explain and to allow — maybe the discrepancy is not enough, as 
Mr. Solarz mentioned, to make a difference in thp result of the 
election. But most important is to clarify all Ihose doubts so every- 
body could be peacefully, I would say, you know, resolved. 

Mr. Smith. Just so I am clear on one point. Would the onus to 
demonstrate the appearance of fraud rest exclusively with the op- 
position, or does the Junta Centrale ha"-^ *^" ability to independ- 
ently suggest that they themselves fe ^ there is sufficient evidence 
to go forward, perhaps with new balloting i.. certain areas? 

Mr. Solarz. Well, I think as a practical matter the onus does fall 
on the opposition here to challenge the results, and it is the obliga- 
tion of the Junta Centrale to consider their complaints. 

Let me say that so far, as I understand it, the Junta Centrale 
has not yet agreed to a procedure which would make it possible to 
compare the official list of voters to the list of voters given to the 



23 

parties, which would be the single most effective and expeditious 
way of determining the universe of those who were presumptivelv 
disenfranchised, and I very much hope that they will agree to sucn 
a procedure. 

I would have to say that if they didn't it would raise the most 
profound questions about the integrity of the process and the deter- 
mination on the part of the Junta to clarify the single biggest cloud 
hanging over the honesty of the election itself. 

So, I am hopeful that a procedure will be worked out here, and 
that will go a long way toward, you know, helping to clear the air 
one way or the other about whether the results do in fact reflect 
the will of the Dominican people or whether they have been dis- 
torted. 

Mr. Smith. Mr. Soudriette. 

Mr. Soudriette. I might add also that in addition to the opposi- 
tion parties also the participation by this Commission of Civility, 
and specifically Monsignor Agripino Nunez, who is the rector of the 
Catholic University in Santo Domingo, is playing a very important 
role. And just this morning — well, at noon, I spoke with the offi- 
cials at the OAS and they indicated to me that there had been 
meetings that had been going on all morning long between this 
Commission and the members of the Junta. So I think that there 
is good reason to believe at least they are making an effort also 
witn regard to trying to resolve this particular issue related to the 
list. 

Mr. Smith. One final very brief question. During the campaign 
it was reported in the Washington Post that Dr. Pena said, or 
promised, that the four corners of the country would bum if he 
were cheated out of victory. Are you confident there are sufficient 
safeguards now in the process tnat he can be assured that this 
kind of tragic scenario won't unfold? 

Mr. SOLARZ. I wasn't present when this statement was allegedly 
made, if it was made. I know it was reported in the press. 

What I can tell you is that I had several conversations with Mr. 
Pena Gomez, and I came away from those conversations absolutely 
convinced that he was determined to work through the established 
procedures and to discourage those in his country who might be in- 
clined to go to the streets and to take matters into their own 
hands. And I had the impression that was also the view of his vice 
Presidential candidate. 

I was very pleased to receive those assurances. As you might 
imagine, our delegation encouraged him to act on that basis. 

You know, some concerns, Mr. Smith, I must tell you had been 
expressed by some people in the country about the impact of our 
findings, and there was even some thought that perhaps in the in- 
terest of tranquility that we should refrain from sharing our obser- 
vation with the Dominican people and the international commu- 
nity. I am pleased that in spite of our preliminary report that the 
situation has remained calm. 

I would like to believe that to some extent our willingness to re- 
port what we observed may have encouraged Mr. Pena Gomez and 
his followers to act through the existing procedures in a peaceful 
fashion by giving them the feeling that their anxieties and their 
concerns were shared by the international community. 



24 

In any case, questions have been raised since then in the Domin- 
ican Republic about the impartiahty of our delegation. Mr. Mar- 
tinez, I think, asked the question pregnant with implications at the 
beginning of the hearing when he asked what are the interests of 
those who make these allegations. Very good question. 

I can only speak for our delegation, and I tell you with absolute 
and total sincerity we had one motivation and one motivation only, 
and that was to be faithful to our mandate — to tell it like we saw 
it, and to observe this process independently, objectively and hon- 
estly, and then to share whatever conclusions we reached with the 
Dominican people and the international community. 

I mean I have to say that if Ken Wallach, the president of NDI, 
when he invited me to lead this delegation had said to me, "Listen, 
Solarz, if you and your fellow observers fmd that it is an honest 
election, by all means report it. If you fmd that there has been a 
little bit of fraud but the margin of victory is so great that the 
fraud didn't affect the outcome, by all means report that as well, 
even including the fraud. That is OK. But if you should fmd that 
the magnitude of the irregularities and the possible existence of 
fraud may have actually affected the outcome of the election itself, 
not necessarily that it did but that it might have, under those cir- 
cumstances in the interest of tranquility, we want you to keep your 
mouth shut and say nothing," I would have said, "Mr. Wallach, 
thank you very much, but get someone else to participate in this 
charade because I am not there to play games." 

And I think that to the extent that the spread of democracy 
around the world, even in the latitudes of underdevelopment, is one 
of the most encouraging phenomena of the last several years. It 
rests on the faith of people in these countries that change can be 
brought about through peaceful means through democratic elec- 
tions, and their faith in that process depends to some extent on the 
phenomena of these observer delegations coming from countries all 
over the world to monitor the electoral process in their nations. 

If they believe that the observers will refrain from reporting 
fraud when they think it may exist, their faith in the integrity of 
the observer missions will diminish and their willingness to partici- 
pate in these elections will decline as well. 

So, I think we were faithful to our mandate. Doesn't mean we 
were right. Maybe we were wrong. But we called it the way we saw 

it. 

Mr. SOUDRIETTK. I just want to also add, having lived in the Do- 
minican Republic in 1984 when there were massive food riots that 
took place all across the country, and as Director of the Peace 
Corps — my responsibility was to make sure that all of our volun- 
teers were safe — I recognize that the poten<^^nl of violence is one 
that is real and it is one that I think everybody has to keep in the 
back of their mind. 

On the other side of it, I would totally concur with the state- 
ments of Congressman Solarz. Mr. Manatt and myself both met 
with Pena Gomez. He expressed exactly the same point of view; 
that it was his opinion that he had to work through the process 
and that he was going to do everything in his power to encourage 
his followers to do the same. 



25 

And I think in spite of the tension, and there is a tension in 
Santo Domingo, people have been a Httle bit reluctant to go out at 
night. But on the positive side there also has been restraint. And 
I think that all the Dominican people are to be commended for the 
fact that I think thev are all trying to work through a peaceful res- 
olution of the difficulties. 

Mr. SOLARZ. Mr. Smith, let me just offer you one final observa- 
tion, since you referred to a statement that was allegedly made by 
Mr. Pena Gomez about the country burning. Mr. Pena Gomez was 
also accused during the course of the campaign of participating in 
voodoo ceremonies. 

Mr. Smith. That was by his opponent, right? 

Mr. Soiv\RZ. Yes. I can only tell you that the only voodoo I ob- 
served in the Dominican Republic was on election day. 

I have no indication as to the veracity of the accusations against 
him or to the allegations by him. 

Mr. Smith. Nor do I, other than press reports which is why I 
wanted to raise it. And the hope would be, and I know this would 
be fully backed by every Member of Congress, that the respect for 
all those participating in those elections would be greatly enhanced 
if everyone acted with restraint. No one wants to see any violence 
or killings or anything of that sort. 

Mr. Soudriette. 

Mr. SouDRiKTTK. I just wanted to add for the record that we met 
with Pena Gomez as we did with all of the other political parties 
and major candidates. 

Mr. Smith. Thank you. That is my last question. I yield back. 

Mr. Menendkz. [presiding] Mr. Solarz, let me just very — first of 
all, it is Menendez not Martinez. And secondly, I regret that my 
pregnant question caused you to feel that you had to answer it. If 
you know as I know representing many Dominicans in my congres- 
sional district, you will have as many views on the subject and as 
many interests raised — as a matter of fact, the chairman was com- 
menting to me when he asked me to finish off the rest of the hear- 
ing that we have as many people angry at us who didn't get to par- 
ticipate today to say their views of what they believe is the appro- 
priate set of circumstances. So that is what I meant. 

Secondly, the fact of the matter is, however, that I think it is fair 
to say that I received an enormous number of phone calls when 
this hearing was put together, and as the chairman said, it was 
just a very short period of time in which it was put together. 

But I think, just for the record, it is fair to say since Dominican 
politics is more volatile than our own here certainly in this country 
that, in fact, it is fair to say that no one here on the panel has par- 
ticipated, other than observing, of course, so that we can assuage 
all of the audience here, as well as others, as it may be reported, 
has participated in any political activity or fund-raising activity or 
election politics? 

Is that fair to say? And this way we can cleanse the proceedings 
so that we cannot have to listen to all the speculation afterwards. 

Mr. Soi^RZ. It is certainly the case with me 

Mr. Menendez. I have no doubt of that. 

Mr. SoLARZ [continuing]. Mr. Menendez. But let me also add one 
other thing. 



26 

I gather since my departure from the Dominican RepubHc there 
has been some allegations that I am on the payroll of President 
Aristide and have received monthly retainers or reimbursements 
from him, I think of $10,000 or $15,000 or some such sum. Let me 
just say for the record that I never received a cent from President 
Aristide or anyone associated with him or his government, or any 
government in Haiti, in my life, and have no intention of soliciting 
such sums in the future. 

Mr. Marte. And I would like to let it be for the record that I 
have not participated in any campaigning for neither party in- 
volved in the election in the Dominican Republic. 

Mr. Menendez. So now that we have cleansed — and, Mr. 
Soudriette I assume is the same, right? 

Mr. Soudriette. Yes. 

Mr. Menendez. So now we have cleansed the record that no one 
has done any fund-raising or political activities all those phone 
calls that I got can be answered. 

Let me ask you this. Does the Junta Centrale Electorale have the 
ability to identify party affiliation? Do they have party affiliation 
in the Dominican Republic as we know it here where you are affili- 
ated to the Democratic or Republican Party or otherwise? 

Mr. SoLARZ. I don't believe they have lists of registered voters 
the way we have here, but the way our observers made that identi- 
fication on election day was by the statements the disenfranchisees 
made of themselves. They self-identified themselves as supporters 
of Mr. Bosch's party or Mr. Pena Gomez's party. In some instances 
I gather there were people who identified themselves as supporters 
of the government. 

But my impression is the only credible way to do that is to ask 
the people themselves. 

Mr. Menendez. When you say supporters of the government, I 
assume you mean the supporters of Mr. Balaguer's party. 

Mr. SoiJVRZ. Yes. 

Mr. Menendez. With reference to — but there is no party affili- 
ation other than the statements of individuals saying to whoever 
is the election person at that table challenging or being the official 
for that party saying I am part of your party and I am not allowed 
to vote. Is that basically 

Mr. SoLARZ. That is right. The list didn't indicate party pref- 
erence. 

Mr. Menendez. Let me ask you this. Is this new? Is this elec- 
tion — is this a new computer system that was used for this elec- 
tion? Is this an old system? Has this been used in the past? Is 
there issues of that involved here as well? 

Mr. Soudriette. This is a totally new system, and, in fact, in 
some ways the Dominican Republic has tried to achieve in a very, 
very short period of time something that a number of other coun- 
tries around the hemisphere are looking at, which is mainly the 
unification of the Civil Register, which is the record, of birth certifi- 
cates, and previously the cedula, or the identity card, was issued 
on the basis of those records. In addition to the cedula, they also 
maintained a separate voters list, and there was a separate voter 
I.D. card. 



27 

The Dominican Congress, in 1992, mandated that there would be 
a unification of the two systems, so they would wind up producing 
a combination cedula/voter I.D. card that would be one document 
that could serve a variety of purposes. And from a cost effective- 
ness standpoint, it makes a lot of sense because it is very, very ex- 
pensive to go through this process — approximately $5 per card. So 
the cost effectiveness of unifying makes sense. 

They went through a process last year that began in February 
where people were told, and basically by announcements on tele- 
vision, radio and newspaper, both by the Junta, but also by the po- 
litical parties, telling people that on a specified day in February 
they were to go to the voting table where they had traditionally 
voted in order to check the list and to make sure that the informa- 
tion on them was correct. If it wasn't, they had to fill out a form. 

For example, if they weren't carried on the Civil Register or 
there was some information that was incorrect, they had to fill out 
a new form. 

All of these forms were all gathered and in — I believe it was in 
June they purchased a new computer system, IBM system, and 
they processed all these forms, and it was basically upon the basis 
of tnat that they began 

Mr. Menendez. June of this year? 

Mr. SouDRiETTE. June of last year. 

Mr. Menendez. Oh, June of last year. 

Mr. SOUDRIETTE. 1993. 

Mr. Menendez. June of this year, we haven't hit there yet. 

Mr. SouDRiETTE. The forms were gathered in February but it 
wasn't until I think May or June that they actually had the equip- 
ment installed and they started processing the information. 

Then beginning in September they organized a series of activities 
that were set up region by region to basically have people come in, 
make sure that the information was correct, then their picture 
would be taken and they would be issued a — well, the information 
would all be prepared on a blank. They checked that information 
and then they had to come back in order to finish their photo and 
pick up their completed I.D. card. 

This is a process that began in September of 1993 and it lasted 
all the way up until — well, the giving out of cards, because you had 
to go back and pick — you had to physically pick up your card, and 
that lasted all the way up until Saturday, May 14. 

Mr. Menendez. So it is a very elaborate system, it sounds like. 
Was the system ahead of them in terms of their ability to deal with 
it, or were they in sync? 

Sometimes we end up with technology and the use of it and it 
is ahead of us and it sometimes cause us problems, although it is 
meant to be in fulfillment of the greater sanctity of the election 
process. I am wondering if that is part of the issue here as well. 

Mr. SOUDRIETTE. In all honesty, it was a very ambitious under- 
taking. 

Mr. Menendez. Could it have been too ambitious in the context 
of the time of this election? 

Mr. Soudriette. Considering the timeframe, it was extremely 
ambitious, and I think your point is well-taken that that obviously 
could have been a factor. 



28 

Mr. Menendez. Well, that leads to my next question. Here we 
have final voting in most States, we have final voting lists which 
are the lists we use on election day, but there is a period of time 
given to us prior to that election. 

You refer — all the witnesses, the Congressman, and yourselves 
refer to a list that was given to political parties prior to the election 
and then a list that was used on election day in which supposedly 
there is a question of — major issue of names on the party list not 
being on the election day list. 

Is that correct? Is my understanding of that 

Mr. SoUDREETTE. Yes. 

Mr. Menendez. Now, under Dominican law, which is the list 
that is valid, the election day list or the list that was issued to the 
parties? 

Mr. SouDRiETTE. According to electoral law, the list that was 
used at the voting table 

Mr. Menendez. On election day. 

Mr. SoUDRlETTE [continuing]. On election day, was the list that 
should have been used. 

Mr. Menendez. So, in that respect, we have what we call pe- 
remptory challenges here where we get people who get blacklisted 
because they haven't voted in x period of time, they have moved or 
what not. Is that the process in which peoples' names from the 
party list versus the voting list on election day is the issue, or what 
is it? 

Mr. SoLARZ. No one knows why the names that are on the party 
list could not be found on the official list. There are lots of theories 
and one can join in the speculation. But at this point nobody knows 
for a fact what accounted for it. 

Mr. Menendez. In your written testimony. Congressman Solarz, 
you said that 3 of the 107 municipalities nullified the elections in 
their localities. Could that not have been, if, in fact, this was as 
widespread as is purported by some, the actions taken by those 
electoral tables in all of those municipalities or in any electoral 
table where they felt, in fact, that was the case? 

My understanding is that they signed, that all parties signed and 
then sent this to the Junta Centrale. If that is the case, and three 
did choose, according to your statement on page 3, to nullify it, why 
did others not seek to nullify it, having that power? 

Mr. SoLARZ. It is a good question, and unless one interviewed the 
officials for the other municipalities one would not know for sure. 
I think this action was considered quite extraordinary, and others, 
I gather, were not inclined to take it. 

I think the real issue, Mr. Menendez, if I may say so, is what 
action, if any, will the Junta Centrale take if a demonstration can 
be made that because of the magnitude and the pattern of the dis- 
enfranchisement something needs to be done. 

And obviously, this will be a Dominican decision to make in a 
Dominican context. But there are, obviously, a number of possibili- 
ties. One would be to order a new election throughout the whole 
country. Another would be to order a new election in those prov- 
inces or municipalities where the problem of disenfranchisement 
was most egregious. A third possibility might be to have a supple- 



29 

mentary election in which only those who were disenfranchised the 
first time would be able to vote in this supplementary election. 

And if, in fact, the official voter lists are still available, and if the 
party lists are still available, it would at least be technically pos- 
sible to establish a procedure for a supplementary election in which 
only those who were deprived the first time would be entitled to 
vote a second time. 

But whether that option was chosen or some other option I 
haven't mentioned was chosen would be obviously up to the Junta 
Centrale. One would hope, however, that if the conclusion is that 
the outcome of the election could very easily have been influenced 
by the magnitude of the irregularities, and perhaps even illegal- 
ities, that some action will be taken to give the Dominican people 
to work their will under circumstances where the conclusion can be 
accepted by the great majority of the people. 

Mr. Menendez. Yes, Mr. Soudriette. 

Mr. Soudriette. I did want to mention that during the course 
of the day there were several local juntas that did take the deci- 
sions to respond and resolve this particular problem of people not 
being on the official list. In the city of Santiago, which is the sec- 
ond largest city in the Dominican Republic, at 4 o'clock in the after- 
noon, the local — the municipal junta there, they made the decision 
to go ahead and respect and allow people to vote if they had the 
cedula but if their names appeared on at least two of the party 
lists. 

And I understand that that also did happen in some other local- 
ities, but I am not sure exactly which ones at this point. But 
Santiago is a pretty significant factor in this given the size. 

Mr. Menendez. Let me just ask this one final question, just for 
information. My understanding is the election was extended by 
agreement of the parties to 3 hours, and I read somewhere else 2 
hours. They extended it 3 hours. And during those 3 hours do we 
know how many more people voted? 

Mr. SoLARZ. We don't for a fact. But we do know based on the 
reports of our observers that the implementation of this directive 
was intermittent and largely ineffectual. And the conclusion we 
reached was that the great bulk of those who had been 
disenfranchised earlier in the day did not end up voting during the 
extended hours either because they had already gone home or they 
couldn't be found or the local polling place refused to permit them 
or for some related logistical reason, although there were some who 
did take advantage of this opportunity and vote during the ex- 
tended period. 

Mr. Menendez. One last question, which doesn't go to the heart 
of the issue, but for our colleagues who, hopefully, will be reading 
this transcript. My understanding is that, for example, the NDI is 
there as part of U.S. appropriations for democratic initiatives or 
partly subsidized by that. Maybe not this particular instance, but 
generally speaking. And democracy funding has been dropped in 
the 1995 foreign assistance appropriations legislation that is now 
pending before the House. 

As persons who are concerned about observations and to be able 
to testify firsthand as you have today, do you think that that is 
good policy? 



84-459 0-94-2 



30 

Mr. SOLARZ. I think it would be truly unfortunate if the re- 
quested levels of funding for the democracy programs were signifi- 
cantly reduced. If anything, we should be spending more rather 
than less. 

The work of observer delegations in the Dominican Republic I 
think were essential in creating a climate in which people felt that 
there were real opportunities for peaceful change through a demo- 
cratic political process. 

I think the larger national interest of our country would be poor- 
ly served by the decline in the number of democracies around the 
world. Indeed, together with the collapse of the Soviet Union and 
the end of the cold war, the single most encouraging international 
development of the last several years has been the extent to which 
democracy has swept across the Western Hemisphere, significant 
parts of Africa, key countries in Asia, and certainly Eastern Europe 
and parts of the former Soviet Union, and we have a vital national 
interest in sustaining and supporting that development. 

My impression, Mr. Menendez — and I apologize for mispronounc- 
ing your name the first time around. My impression is that we 
ought to be doing even more than we are doing, and the amounts 
that are being requested are a pittance in comparison to what we 
are spending on defense and other international programs. 

So, if what happened in the Dominican Republic is any example, 
I think it indicates that the money that is being spent is being well 
spent and is serving important American interests and values. 

Mr. SOUDRIETTE. I think I would concur totally with what Con- 
gressman Solarz has said, and would add that if the United States 
as the leading democracy sends a message that we are curtailing 
our support for democracy initiatives, that sends a message, well 
the work is done and we don't need to worry about it any more. 

The fact is that, yes, there has been a wave of democracy that 
has spread around the world, but the difficult part is institutional- 
izing it and making sure that it takes root. So I think that the sup- 
port that the Congress and the United States has given to democ- 
racy initiatives has played a very important part and has really 
served as a leader for many other countries and many other multi- 
lateral institutions like the U.N. and the European Community. 

So I would discourage any effort to diminish this. And thank you 
for all of your support for democracy programs. 

Mr. Menendez. Well, I want to thank all of the panelists on be- 
half of the chairman and the committee for your testimony today. 
It certainly was insightful for us to hear. 

I know that the chairman expressed his concern to me to relate 
to the audience at large that we will be continuing watching the 
developments that happen with a keen eye, interested in that cer- 
tainly democracy is preserved and that, in fact, people in terms of 
their democratic rights to vote are preserved as well, and we look 
forward to pursuing this in the days ahead. 

And with that this hearing is adjourned. 

[Whereupon, at 4:39 p.m., the subcommittee was adjourned.] 



APPENDIX 



OPENING STATEMENT 
CHAIRMAN ROBERT G. TORRICELLI 
HEARING ON DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ELECTION 
MAY 24, 1994 



Last Monday, voters in the Dominican Republic went to the 
polls in an attempt to strengthen their 28-year-old democracy. 
By many counts, the elections were a success. Observers reported 
record voter turnout levels of near 90%. Indeed, the turnout was 
so heavy that election officials worked diligently to keep polls 
open an extra three hours to accommodate the large number of 
voters. 

However, these elections have also been marred by allegations 
of irregularities and fraud. When the vote count was stopped last 
Thursday with 223 of 9,528 precincts remaining, President Joaquin 
Balaguer, the 87-year-old incumbent, was ahead of his closest 
challenger, Jose Francisco Pena Gomez, by only 1 percent, or 29,590 
votes. Pena Gomez has claimed that as many as 200,000 eligible 
Dominicans, many of whom are known to be supporters of the 
opposition, were deprived of their right to vote through 
manipulation of the voter lists. That claim has been echoed by 
some international observers. 

The question now is what, if anything, needs to be done to 
rectify this situation. The Central Elections Board's announcement 
over the weekend that it will conduct a recount is encouraging, but 
a recount may not matter if 200,000 citizens were improperly denied 
the right to vote. Among the additional remedies that may be 
necessary are new elections in regions where irregularities were 
most frequent. 

We have asked three witnesses to appear before the 

Subcommittee today to share their views of the conduct of the 

election and to offer their advice on what the response of the 
United States, and the international community, should be. 

Two of those witnesses served as international observers in 
the Dominican Republic: our former colleague and leader of the 
National Democratic Institute delegation, Steve Solarz; and the 
director of the International Foundation for Electoral Systems, 
Richard Soudriette. Mr. Solarz will be accompanied by Mr. Patrick 
Merloe, Senior Associate for Electoral Processes for NDI. 

Our third witness is Mr. Rafael Marte, the former President of 
the Federation of the Dominican Associations of New Jersey. He 
will be able to offer us the perspective of the Dominican community 
in the United States. 

(31) 



32 



Events in the Dominican Republic have taken on increased 
importance in the United States because of that country's role in 
the crisis in Haiti. While the Dominican Republic's enforcement of 
international sanctions against the Haitian military and the 
conduct of its elections are not directly related, there will 
clearly be an effort by some in this country to link the two. 
Indeed, the Reverend Jesse Jackson has already suggested extending 
the Haitian embargo to the Dominican Republic if the border is not 
sealed and the elections are not deemed free and fair. 

This committee, as well as the Clinton Administration, will 
continue to keep a very close watch on the outcome of this matter. 
The United States must be careful not to take actions that will 
threaten widespread civil unrest in the Dominican Republic, but we 
also have an interest in answering questions that remain about the 
conduct of the elections. 

I am eager to hear from our witnesses about their experiences 
during the election and their thoughts on how we might arrive at a 
fair conclusion. 



33 



STATEMENT BY STEPHEN J. SOLARZ 

BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WESTERN HEMISPHERE AFFAIRS 

OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

MAY 24, 1994 



Mr. Chairman, I am Stephen J. Solarz, a former member of the House of Representatives 
from the 13th District of New York from 1974-1992 and a former member of the House 
Western Hemisphere Affairs Subcommittee. I first would like to thank you for this opportunity 
to address the Subcommittee and to see many of my friends and former colleagues on this 
occasion. 

I am here today to speak on behalf of a 26-member international observer delegation that 
I led to the May 16 elections in the Dominican Republic. The delegation was organized by the 
National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI), which, as you know, has 
developed an international reputation for objectivity and professionalism in organizing such 
delegations. Patrick Merloe, NDI's Senior Associate for Elections Processes, is seated next to 
me. Mr. Merloe also was a member of the delegation and will be happy to answer any 
questions you may care to ask. 

Our delegation included elected officials, elections experts and regional specialists from 
Europe, the Middle East, Central America, North America and South America. Dr. Virgilio 
Godoy, Vice President of the Republic of Nicaragua, and Dr. Fidel Chavez Mena, President of 
the Christian Democratic Party and former Foreign Minister of El Salvador, were among the 
delegation's members. A list of the members of the delegation and a copy of our Preliminary 
Statement of May 18, 1994 are submitted for the record. 

The primary purposes of the delegation were to demonstrate the international 
community's continued support for the democratic process in the Dominican Republic and to 
provide the international community with an objective assessment of the May 16 elections. We 
also sought to learn from the Dominican people about the nature of the electoral process and its 
implications for the further development of the Dominican Republic's democratic institutions. 

This was NDI's second international observer delegation to the Dominican Republic. 
NDI observed the 1990 polling as part of a joint delegation with the Carter Center of Emory 
University. That delegation was led by former President Jimmy Carter. 

For the 1994 electoral process, NDI sent a five-member international delegation to the 
Dominican Republic from April 19-23 to assess the pre-election environment and preparations 
for the elections. In addition, there has been a continuous NDI staff presence in the country 
since May 2, which is now following up upon the delegation's activities. NDI also has worked 
in close communication with other international observer delegations that monitored the May 16 
elections. 



34 



The delegation's mandate included the examination of three distinct aspects of the election 
process: the campaign; election-day proceedings; and the tabulation of results. It is important 
to note that the tabulation of results and the resolution of electoral complaints have yet to be 
completed. NDI will continue to monitor developments and will issue a detailed report at a later 
date. 

The delegation arrived in the Dominican Republic on Thursday, May 12. During our 
stay we met with government and election officials, leaders of the major political parties, 
representatives of the Catholic Church and Pontifical Catholic University, journalists and others 
involved in the electoral process in Santo Domingo and in nine other regions around the country. 
On election day, members of the delegation visited polling stations and municipal electoral 
boards in rural and urban areas throughout the nation and also monitored activities at the Central 
Electoral Board (JCE). 

The regions observed by the delegation included: Barahona; Comendador; Puerto Plata; 
La Romana; San Francisco de Macoris; San Juan; San Pedro de Macoris; Santiago; La Vega; 
and the Santo Domingo area. These regions and the routes chosen by the delegation's teams 
were coordinated with the observer delegations sponsored by the Organization of American 
States (OAS) and the International Foundation for electoral Systems (IFES). 

I must stress that the delegation was deeply impressed by the enthusiasm of the 
Dominican people in seeking to vote on election day. Thousands of prospective voters lined up 
beginning hours before the 6:00 a.m. scheduled opening of the polls. Large numbers of voters 
turned out and endured long waits in the voting process. 

The delegation also noted a number of positive developments in the Dominican electoral 
process following the 1990 elections. These developments are noted in our Preliminary 
Statement of May 18. In addition, the contesting political parties were able to communicate with 
the electorate through the news media, rallies and other avenues leading up to the May 16 
elections. 

A Pact of Civility was signed by most of the major presidential candidates and formally 
witnessed by a commission of prominent Dominican leaders (the Civility Commission), in which 
the candidates promised to respect the official electoral results and restrain from declaring 
victory prematurely. Monsignor Agripino Nunez and the Civility Commission have been 
continually engaged in the election process and are even now addressing issues that have been 
raised following the elections. 

Notwithstanding these and other positive developments noted in the delegation's 
Preliminary Statement of May 18, a number of features of the electoral process were marred by 
serious problems and irregularities, which caused deep concern for the delegation. Among the 
most serious of those delineated in the Preliminary Statement of May 18 were the following. 



35 



1) The delegation noted with regret the serious incidents of violence that resulted in a 
number of deaths during the election campaign. 

2) There were numerous reports of difficulties in voters obtaining their new identity cards 
(cedulas) and in correcting mistakes in the cards which they received. Reportedly, this resulted 
in more than 200,000 cedulas not being distributed by election day. This problem could have 
prevented a significant number of prospective voters from exercising their franchise. A number 
of Dominican actors expressed concern with regard to measures taken to protect the remaining 
cedulas from potential misuse. 

3) There were problems at polling sites (mesas electorales) in adding the results entered 
onto tally-sheets (actas), which created problems with entering mesa-by-mesa tabulations into 
computers at the Municipal Electoral Boards (JMEs). This created delays in consolidating 
national results and raised questions about the effectiveness of the JCE's computerized tabulation 
process. 

4) The delegation also registered its serious concern over the large number of prospective 
voters who came to the polls with their new identity cards (cedulas) but who were turned away 
without being permitted to vote because their names did not appear on the official lists of voters 
used by election officers at the polling places. The Dominican Revolutionary Party (PRD) and 
the Dominican Liberation Party (PLD) claim that the names of most of these disenfranchised 
individuals were registered on the list provided to the parties by the JCE at an earlier date. 
These two parties further claim that a disproportionate number of those disenfranchised 
individuals identified themselves to party delegates at the affected mesas as PRD or PLD 
supporters. 

Under JCE regulations, previously agreed to by the parties, such persons could not vote. 
The JCE recognized this problem of disenfranchisement on election day. In response to a 
request by the opposition parties lodged in the late morning of election day, and following 
expressions of support by all the international delegations and by the Civility Commission, the 
JCE issued a resolution that extended the close of voting from 6:(X) to 9:00 p.m. and permitted 
the affected individuals to cast tendered ballots (votos observados). This action was close to the 
parties' request, which called for extending voting hours and allowing affected persons to cast 
regular ballots. 

The JCE's resolution was released to the country approximately ten minutes after the 
polls closed, which substantially negated its impact. Members of the delegation observed that 
a large number of mesas apparently did not receive notice of the JCE's resolution until well after 
it was issued. By the time official notice arrived, some of these mesas had started the vote count 
and refused to permit the affected individuals to vote. 

In three of the 107 municipalities, these circumstances led the Municipal Electoral Boards 
(JMEs) to nullify the elections in their localities. These municipalities included Banica, 
Comendador and El Llano, all in the provence of Elias Piiia. The Municipal Electoral Board 



36 



of Comendador stated in its resolution annulling elections in its jurisdiction that the voter registry 
of the political parties and the registry used by the electoral officials "contained different entries" 
and that the percentage of people who did not have the opportunity to exercise the right to vote 
was "highly significant." The representatives of all political parties, including the ruling party, 
signed this resolution along with the president of the Municipal Electoral Board (JME). 

The delegation itself observed sufficient a number of instances of disenfranchisement to 
cause serious concern. This problem was particularly evident to our observer teams in areas in 
and around Barahona, Comendador, La Vega, Puerto Plata, San Francisco de Macoris and 
Santiago. Moreover, the number of the disenfranchisement cases which members of the 
delegation noted appeared largely to affect opposition parties. Members of the delegation 
observed this phenomenon by witnessing instances: where disenfranchised voters approached 
opposition party agents at the mesas and announced their intention of voting for such parties; 
and where opposition party agents showed lists of disenfranchised party supporters to observers 
and party agents from the ruling party and/or mesa election officials agreed that the numbers of 
disenfranchised persons and their distribution among the parties on these lists were accurate. 

The delegation did not rule out the possibility that the disenfranchisement took place due 
to clerical or human error. The delegation noted that the pattern of the disenfranchisement, 
however, suggests the real possibility that a deliberate effort was made to tamper with the 
electoral process. 

It remains impossible at this time to specify the exact number of individuals who were 
deprived of the opportunity to vote because of these circumstances. Nor is it possible to 
quantify how many of those persons would have voted for a particular candidate. It also is not 
possible to determine at this time that the number of votes affected by these circumstances and 
other irregularities will exceed the margin by which the elections are won, once the official 
results are determined. The delegation concluded that nevertheless, the disenfranchisement, 
given its magnitude and distribution, could have affected the outcome of this close electoral 
contest. 

Given these circumstances, the delegation urged the appropriate Dominican authorities 
to investigate the nature and extent of this problem in order to establish (a) why so many 
individuals obtained cedulas but were not on the official voter lists, (b) who may be responsible 
for the phenomenon, and (c) what steps are necessary to correct this situation. The delegation 
recognized that the Civility Commission was working to establish a mechanism to remedy this 
situation. 

NDI is aware that the responsibilities of the delegation did not end with the issuance of 
a preliminary statement. At the same time NDI recognizes that the appropriate Dominican 
authorities must exercise their responsibilities to resolve electoral problems. NDI has maintained 
close cooperation with the other international delegations in the post-election period. IFES also 
was active in the immediate post-election period. The OAS deserves particular praise for their 
ongoing activities following the elections. 



37 



NDI has maintained communication with the JCE and the Civility Commission to leam 
of steps being taken in the post-election period and to offer any appropriate assistance. NDI has 
requested that all political parties supply it with documentation to substantiate their electoral 
complaints. NDI representatives continue to meet with political parties and to follow 
complaints. In addition, vote-count information from a number of polling places (mesas) 
collected by the delegation was compared by a delegation computer expert to the count for those 
mesas recorded in the JCE's central computer. Also, slightly over half of mesa counts in the 
JCE's computer were reviewed to determine whether they contained more votes than registered 
voters. This analysis did not reveal any significant anomalies; however, these were not 
comprehensive nor scientifically drawn samples. 

The Civility Commission continues to work actively in the post-election period. It 
requested that the tally-sheets (actas) be reviewed and that a re-tabulation be undertaken to 
correct any inconsistencies in the JCE's tabulation process; at the same time, the Commission 
called for a careful investigation of irregularities in the election process. 

The JCE announced on May 20 that a winner has not yet been declared in the election. 
This action may provide an opportunity to investigate and take appropriate steps to rectify 
problems. The JCE further has agreed that beginning Wednesday, May 25: 1) a review of the 
actas from all mesas will be conducted to verify that they correspond to those given on election 
day to the political parties and to correct mathematical errors in the actas; 2) a re-tabulation of 
the vote counts from the actas will be conducted to verify the accuracy of the computerized 
tabulation process; and 3) a comparison will be conducted of the official voter registry provided 
to each mesa and the lists provided to the political parties to determine discrepancies. 

These are welcome actions. Moreover, throughout the post-election events to date, the 
political parties have consistently exerted efforts to settle their electoral disputes by peaceful 
means. They should be encouraged to continue to do so. As the delegation stressed, it is 
important for the Dominicans to resolve all electoral issues and problems that have arisen. The 
international community should provide encouragement for a positive resolution and should 
support steps toward this end. 

The JCE has the responsibility to promptly and impartially investigate election 
complaints. At the same time, parties have the responsibility to adequately document complaints 
and to pursue their grievances by peaceful means. In calling for remedial actions, such as for 
new elecuons, parties must demonstrate that irregularities could have affected the results of the 
elections. 

It is critical that both Dominican and international attention remain focused on the May 
16 elections to determine whether actions agreed to are completed. I am reminded of events 
following the 1990 polling in the Dominican Republic, when former President Jimmy Carter and 
NDI jointly observed that contest. Following those disputed elections. President Carter and the 
observer delegation recommended a series of steps to resolve disputes before the vote counting 
was to be finalized. This process was agreed to by the JCE and the political parties. Shortly 



38 



after the observers departed the country, however, the dispute resolution process was halted and 
the vote count was completed. 

There are some in the Dominican Republic who are now attempting to discredit the 
integrity of the NDI delegation and other international observer groups, as well as challenging 
the impartiality of individual observers. This campaign is being waged in newspapers and on 
television and radio. However, by any objective standard, this effort represents a smokescreen, 
deflecting attention from real problems associated with the electoral process and from positive 
actions being taken to resolve these problems. 



Mr. Chairman, in conclusion, may I say that I am proud of the role played by NfDI's 
delegation, which operated in keeping with the Institute's experience in monitoring more than 
25 elections over the past eight years. Our delegation fulfilled its responsibility by reporting in 
a careful and objective manner on the electoral processes surrounding the May 16 elections in 
the Dominican Republic. Our Preliminary Statement of May 18 is the product of more than nine 
hours of debriefing sessions, the conclusion of which was the unanimous adoption of the 
Preliminary Statement. 

In discharging our responsibilities, we worked in close cooperation with other 
international observer delegations from the OAS and IFES. As the statements of these 
delegations demonstrate, it is remarkable that so many observers reached similar conclusions. 



Thank you very much. 1 will be pleased to answer any questions. 




39 



^ InterrurticruH Foundation for electoral Systems 

I ;0I 13^'- S'^l^en- K ■.VirnPDfLCOr'WASHiNGTON. DC :''nO5'i202i 828-8SC7t=,-.X (202) 452-0SC4 

EMBARGOED UNTIL DELIVERED 



PREPARED STATEMENT OF RICHARD W. SOUDRIETTE, DIRECTOR 

INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR ELECTORAL SYSTEMS 

BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WESTERN HEMISPHERE AFFAIRS 

COMMTTTEE ON FOREIGN AFFAIRS 

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 

MAY 24, 1994 



RPrPNT ELECTIONS IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 

I would like to thank Congressman Torricelli and the Subcommittee on Western 
Hemisphere Affairs for inviting me to appear before this committee to discuss a critical topic 
with profound impact on the development of democracy in our hemisphere, the recent elections 
in the Dominican Republic held on May 16, 1994, This topic is especially meaningful to me 
because I had the honor to serve as Country Director for the Peace Corps in the Dominican 
Republic from 1983 to 1985. During that period, I had the opportunity to travel to every 
province of the country and get to know the wonderful people of the DR. 

Presently, I serve as the Director of the International Foundation for Electoral Systems 
(IFES), a private, non-profit, and non-partisan election research and assistance organization. 
Since it was founded in 1987, IFES has provided technical assistance in the field of election 
administration in more than 70 countries around the world, 

IFES was invited by the Junta Central Electoral (ICE- Central Electoral Board) of the 
Dominican Republic to observe the recent elections on May 16, 1994, We did so in 
collaboration with our other colleagues from the Organization of American States, the National 
Democratic Institute for International Affairs, and the Center for Electoral Assistance and 
Promotion (CAPEL) in San Jos6, Costa Rica, 

My purpose in participating in today's hearing is to share with you the observations of 
the IFES Election Observer Mission to the DR. The IFES team consisted of observers from 
nine countries and included senior election officials, leaders of civic education organizations, 
academics and constitutional lawyers and observed in twelve provinces of the country. The 
IFES mission focused attention on electoral administration issues and the transparency of the 
electoral process. 



40 



On May 16, 1994, the IFES mission was profoundly impressed by the Dominican 
people's support of the electoral process. The massive participation of the voters represents both 
an important example for other countries to follow and a significant step forward. The total 
turnout was historic in proportions, with more than 86% of the registered voters participating. 
One million more Dominicans participated in 1994 than in the last elections in 1990. The high 
turnout stands as testimony of the commitment of the Dominican people to democracy. 

The members of the IFES delegation reported that in Santo Domingo, with the largest 
concentration of voters, aside from normal logistical problems such as tables opening late, there 
were no major problems on election day. IFES observers were extremely impressed with the 
fact that voters generally were aware of the mechanics of the voting process. 

Additionally, in other areas of the country, IFES teams reported that in comparison with 
previous elections, there were improvements regarding distribution of election materials and 
training of the poll workers. Virtually all of the 10,000 voting tables or mesas had all of the 
necessary equipment and supplies such as ballots. This was a dramatic improvement over 
previous elections in the Dominican Republic when supplies were still being distributed on the 
day of the election. Observers also noted several other positive changes in relation to the 1990 
elections such as the introduction of a unified identity card/voting card, replacement of the 
multiple-use ballot with a new three-ballot system, and the expansion of voting tables or mesas 
from 6,663 to almost 10,000. 

The most serious problem discovered by IFES team members observing outside of Santo 
Domingo involved significant numbers of potential voters who arrived at their polling place with 
what observers reported appeared to be valid identity cards (c6dulas), but who were not 
permiued to vote because their names did not appear appear on the official list used by polling 
officials at each vodng table. Nevertheless, the names of many of these potential voters did 
appear on the lists provided to the representatives of political parties at each voting table. IFES 
observers witnessed these problems in a number of specific localities in Barahona, Galvan, El 
Seybo, Puerto Plata, San Francisco, Moca, San Juan de la Maguana, Vallejuelo, Santiago, and 
Montecristi. We are presently trying to determine how widespread this problem was and if there 
was any particular pattern to those individuals left off of the lists, 

In reponse to this problem, IFES, along with the other international observer teams and 
the Dominicaji church leaders, urged the JCE to revise its procedures and allow individuals to 
vote if liiey had a valid identity card and if their names appeared on at least two of the lists of 
the political parties at each voting table. The JCE approved this change, and they also agreed 
to extend the voting hours from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. This decision by the JCE was well- 
received by the voters but was impossible to implement in various locations because the ballot 
boxes had already begun to be opened for counting and the surplus ballots had been annulled. 



41 



IFES is preparing a detailed report on the international observation of the May 16, 1994 
elections. The report will include close examination of this problem with the voter lists as well 
as any other problems related to the recent election, LFES will offer observations and 
recommendations for the institutional strengthening of the Dominican electoral system. 

At the present time, the election is extremely close, with Dr. Joaqutn Balaguer of the 
Reformist Party slightly ahead of Dr. Pena G6mez of the Revolutionary Dominican Party. The 
counting of the tables was stopped with approximately 250 tables still to be counted. Tomorrow 
the JCE will begin the process of recounting the results of all of 10,000 tables. Additionally, 
they are in the process of delicate negotiations with the Commission of Resolution which was 
created as a result of the Pact of Civility that all of the political parties agreed to as a means of 
settling differences. 

Presently, Monsignor Agrippino Nufiez is working through this commission to achieve 
a favorable result that will result in respecting the wishes of the Dominican people at the ballot 
box. It is extremely important that we all recognize that while international observers working 
through the OAS can lend support, the ultimate resolution of the current situation involving the 
elections must rest in the hands of the Dominicans. 



42 



PREPARED STATEMENT OF RATAEL MARTE 
Representing New Jersey Dominican Community 

Before 
Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere 
U.S. House of Representatives 
Washington, DC 

On May 16th, the people of the Dominican Republic held their 
9th consecutive national election since the establishment of the 
democratic system following the downfall of the dictatorship of 
Rafael Leonidas Trujillo. 

This past election, however, demonstrated once again the 
fragility of the Dominican electoral system. Numerous reports have 
been alleged that the Central Electoral Board, controlled by the 
ruling party, has engaged in illegal acts that violated the basic 
principles of free, fair, and democratic elections. 

The Dominican Republic today is in a state of political crisis 
which could subsume the nation into major chaos. The international 
observers, among which are the Organization of American States and 
the National Democratic Institute for International Affairs, 
concluded that there were many irregularities which violated the 
democratic right to vote of thousands of Dominican citizens. 

Among these irregularities already detected and documented I 
will mention several of them this afternoon. 

1) Tens of thousands of voters were excluded from the 
official list prepared by the Dominican Republic Central Election 
Board. 

2) Tens of thousands were not permitted to vote after the 
Central Election Board reluctantly accepted the recommendations of 
both the parties and the international observers to extend the 
voting period for three more hours. 

3) The voting list provided by the Central Electoral Board to 
the parties were different from the final official list prepared by 
the Central Electoral Board for controlling the election, despite 
the numerous claims make before the elections by the opposition 
parties to get final official lists. 

4) Many names were irregularly included in the official final 
list without notifying the political parties. As a result 
thousands of irregular voters showed up at the voting stations and 
were permitted to cast their votes despite the protest of the 
delegates of the opposition parties. 



43 



5) Dislocation of names and their identification number were 
also a major factor in preventing citizens from voting. 

6) Many persons illegally received two or more identification 
voting cards. 

7) The municipal Electoral Board of Comendador, Bani, El 
Llano of the province of Elias Pina, voided the elections after 
discovering that the list of voters mainly included members of the 
official party — The Partido Reformista Social Cristiano. The 
official act voiding the elections was signed even by the official 
representatives of the Partido Reformista Social Cristiano. 

8) In many provinces such as San Cristobal, Monte Plata, La 
Altagracia, Espaillat, among others the number of voters exceeded 
the number of registered voters. For example, in the province of 
La Altagracia the number of registered voters is 49,554, however 
58,427 people voted. This means that the number of registered 
voters was exceeded by 20,850. 

9) Racial discrimination played a very important role in the 
election. 

In the province of San Pedro de Macoris where most of 
Dominican Baseball players come from, dark skinned Dominicans were 
routinely denied the right to vote alleging that they were 
Haitians. 

If we take into consideration all these irregularities and 
given the unofficial results that give the incumbent President 
Jocquin Balaguer, a narrow margin of 27,355, which represents a 
lead of less than one percent over his major opponent Jose Pena 
Gomez. We can easily observe that the correction of these multiple 
irregularities could change the final results of the May 18 
election. 

I am here speaking on behalf of thousands of Dominicans who 
reside throughout the United States, mostly in the northeast. 

I am afraid that if we so not have free and fair elections in 
the Dominican Republic and the will of the Dominican people is not 
respected, living conditions in this Caribbean Country will 
continue to worsen, leading to another flotilla of refugees into 
Puerto Rico, which is used as a bridge to come to the United States 
in search of a better life. 

If the actual conditions prevail we might have an illegal 
government. Today I come in front of you to ask that a fact- 
finding mission led by U.S. Representatives and members of 
Presidents Clinton's Administration, travel immediately to the 
Dominican Republic to demand from the Dominican Central Electoral 
Board the following: 



44 



a) A recount of the ballots cast in the past election. 

b) The auditing of the tally sheet of all voting stations. 

c) Examination of all computer transactions and programs used 
to count the votes to determine the validity of the vote 
counting. 

d) Distribution of the voting list used by the Dominican 
Republic Central Electoral Board must be given to 
international observers and to all party delegates. 

To conclude, if the election irregularities are not corrected 
satisfactorily, new national elections should be held under strict 
supervision of international observers. 

I want to thank you for the special interest that you have 
demonstrated in helping us to solve this serious crisis. 




45 



. NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTE 
'-■ FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 

lifth HiK)r \-\~ Ma«achuM-tt5 Avenue, N W Washington. DC 2(K)36 (202) <28-^l«) 



PRELIMINARY STATEMENT 
May 18, 1994 

NDI INTERNATIONAL OBSERVER DELEGATION 
TO THE MAY 16 DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ELECTIONS 

This is the preliminary statement of a 26-member international delegation that 
observed the May 16 elections in the Dominican Republic. The delegation, organized by the 
National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI), includes parliamentarians, 
political pany leaders, regional specialists and election experts from 10 countries in Europe, 
the Middle East, Central America, North America and South America. 

This and other observer delegations have been welcomed by the Central Electoral 
Board (JCE), the government, major political parties, and the Dominican people. Our 
delegauon came as observers. We did not seek to supervise the elections or certify the 
integnty of the process. Ultimately, it is the Dominican people who must judge the 
elecuons. 

The primai7 purposes of the delegation are to demonstrate the international 
community's continued support for the democratic process in the Dominican Republic and to 
provide the international community with an objective assessment of the May 16 elections. 
We also are here to learn from the Dominican people about the nature of the electoral 
process and its implications for the further development of the Dominican Republic's 
democratic institutions. 

This is NDI's second international observer delegation to the Dominican Republic. 
NDI observed the 1990 polling as pari of a joint delegation with the Carter Center of Emory 
University. For the 1994 electoral process, NDI sent a 5-member international delegation to 
the Dominican Republic from April 19-23 to assess the pre-election environment and 
preparations for the elections. In addition, there has been an NDI staff presence here since 
May 2 in preparation for the delegation's activities. 

NDI is in close communication with other international observer delegations that are 
moniionng the May 16 elections. In addition, members of the delegation will remain in the 
Dominican Republic to observe post election-day developments, which will be important to 
informing the international community about the evolving character of the Dominican 
electoral process. 

The delegation's mandate included the examination of three distinct aspects of the 
elecuon process: the campaign; election-day proceedings; and the tabulation of results to 
date. TTiis statement is a preliminary assessment of these issues. We note that the tabulation 



46 



of results and the resolution of any electoral complaints have yet to be completed. NDI will 
continue to monitor developments and will issue a more detailed report at a later date. 

The delegation arrived in the Dominican Republic on Thursday, May 12. During our 
stay we met with government and election officials, leaders of the major political parties, 
representatives of the Catholic Church and Pontifical Catholic University, journalists and 
others involved in the electoral process in Santo Domingo and in nine other regions around 
the country. On election day, members of the delegation visited polling stations and 
municipal electoral boards in rural and urban areas throughout the nation. 

The delegation noted that following enactment of new legislation in 1992, the JCE 
took significant steps to modify election processes. The JCE was expanded from three to 
five members, £uid a new JCE was incorporated from all of the three principal parties 
represented in the National Congress. A new unified identity card, including a photograph, 
was introduced to replace the old two-identity card system. The multiple use ballot was 
replaced with a three-ballot system. The number of polling places (mesas) was increased 
from 6,663 to 9,528. The vote counting and tabulation processes were modified to enter 
results into computers at the Municipal Electoral Boards (JMEs) rather than all data being 
entered at the JCE as was done in 1990. Also, technical assistance was provided to the JCE 
over the last year by the Organization of American States (OAS) and by the International 
Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES). 

The contesting political parties were able to communicate with the electorate through 
the news media, rallies and other avenues leading up to the election. The press also enjoyed 
freedom in political reporting. Additionally, in April the parties were provided with copies 
of the voter registry. In a Pact of Civility signed by most of the major presidential 
candidates and formally witnessed by a commission of prominent Dominican leaders, these 
candidates promised to respect the official electoral results and restrain from declaring 
victory prematurely. We are aware that Monsignor Agripino Nuriez and the Commission 
have been continually engaged in the process and are even now addressing issues that have 
been raised. 

The delegation was deeply impressed by the enthusiasm of the Dominican people in 
seeking to vote on election day. Thousands of prospective voters lined up beginning hours 
before the 6:00 a.m. scheduled opening of the polls. Large numbers of voters turned out and 
endured long waits in the voting process. 

While the performance of polling officials was uneven, the delegation noted many 
examples where election officials worked diligently and for long hours to discharge their 
responsibilities. Those election officials at the polling stations (mesas) who arrived on time, 
kept their polls open for the extra hours of voting from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. and who did their 
best to protect the right to vote of all those who sought to cast ballots deserve praise. 



47 



Political party delegates from the major parlies were present at polling places 
throughout the country. Party delegates received signed copies of the official tally sheets 
after counting was completed at the mesas and were generally allowed to scrutinize the 
tabulation processes at the JMEs and at the JCE. In addition, international observers 
generally were welcomed by election officials, party delegates and prospective voters. 

Notwithstanding these positive developments, a number of features of the electoral 
process were marred by serious problems and irregularities, which cause deep concern for 
the delegation. Among them are the following. 

1) The delegation notes with regret the serious incidents of violence that resulted in a 
number of deaths during the election campaign. 

2) The delegation received allegations from credible sources of the use of state 
resources for partisan campaign purposes. 

3) The delegation also noted significant problems and irregularities in the electoral 
process. There were numerous reports of difficulties in voters obtaining their new identity 
cards (cedulas) and in correcting mistakes in the cards which they received. Reportedly, this 
resulted in more than 200,000 cedulas not being distributed by election day. This problem 
could have prevented a significant number of prospective voters from exercising their 
franchise. A number of Dominican actors expressed concern with regard to measures taken 
to protect the remaining cedulas from potential misuse. 

4) Many mesas opened quite late, which resulted in long lines, confusion and 
frustration for prospective voters. 

5) There were problems in adding the results entered onto tally-sheets (actas), which 
created problems with entering mesa-by-mesa tabulations into computers at the JMEs. This 
created delays m consolidating national results, which could raise questions about the 
effectiveness of the JCE's computerized tabulation process. In addition, there was occasional 
ineffectiveness of the indelible ink, as well as occasional minor problems with missing 
matenals. 

6) Control of all broadcast media is concentrated in the JCE during the election. All 
news is blocked at this time, including foreign cable news programs. The delegation notes 
that It may be appropnate to restnct reports of election results or of public opinion polls 
concerning the election until voting has concluded; however, blocking all broadcast news 
programs may contribute to the perception of a lack of transparency in the election process. 

7) The delegation also wishes to register its serious concern over the large number of 
prospective voters who came to the polls with their new identity cards (cedulas) but who 
were turned away without being permitted to vote because their names did not appear on the 
official lists of voters used by election officers at the polling places. The Dominican 



48 



Revolutionary Party (PRD) and the Dominican Liberation Party (PLD) claim that the names 
of most of these disenfranchised individuals were registered on the list provided to the parties 
by the JCE at an earlier date. These two parties further claim that a disproportionate number 
of those disenfranchised individuals identified themselves to party delegates at the affected 
mesas as PRD or PLD supporters. 

Under JCE regulations, previously agreed to by the parties, such persons could not 
vote. The JCE recognized the problem of disenfranchisement. In response to a request by 
the opposition parties, and following expressions of support by all the international 
delegations and by the commission established by the Pact of Civility, the JCE issued a 
resolution that extended the close of voting from 6:00 to 9:00 p.m. and permitted the 
affected individuals to cast tendered ballots (votos observados). 

The resolution was released to the country approximately ten minutes after the polls 
closed, which substantially negated its impact. Members of the delegation observed that a 
large number of mesas apparently did not receive notice of the JCE's resolution until well 
after it was issued. By the time official notice arrived, some of these mesas had started the 
vote count and refused to permit the affected individuals to vote. In three of the 107 
municipalities, these circumstances led the Municipal Electoral Juntas (JMEs) to nullify the 
elections in their localities. 

The delegation observed sufficient number of instances of disenfranchisement to cause 
serious concern. Moreover, a disproportionate number of the disenfranchisement cases 
which members of the delegation noted appeared to affect opposition parties. 

The delegation does not rule out the possibility that the disenfranchisement took place 
due to clerical or human error. The pattern of the disenfranchisement, however, suggests the 
real possibility that a deliberate effort was made to tamper with the electoral process. 

It is impossible to specify at this time the exact number of individuals who were 
deprived of the opportunity to vote because of these circumstances. Nor is it possible to 
quanufy how many of those persons would have voted for a particular candidate. It also is 
not possible to determine at this time that the number of votes affected by these 
circumstances and other irregularities will exceed the margin by which the elections are won, 
once the official results are determined. Nevertheless, the disenfranchisement, given its 
magnitude and distribution, could affect the outcome of the elections. 

Given these circumstances, the delegation urges the appropriate Dominican authorities 
to investigate the nature and extent of this problem in order to establish (a) why so many 
individuals obtained cedulas but were not on the official voter lists, (b) who may be 
responsible for the phenomenon, and (c) what steps are necessary to correct this situation. 
The delegation recognizes that the Commission established by the Church under the Pact of 
Civility is working to establish a mechanism to remedy this situation. 



49 



The delegation wishes to emphasize that throughout the pre-election and election day 
period, we have maintained contact with a variety of actors involved in the electoral process. 
These actors have been invited to provide the delegation with evidence of fraud, manipulation 
or wide-spread irregularities that could affect the outcome of the elections. The delegation 
praises the political parties' efforts to settle their electoral disputes by peaceful means in this 
post-electoral period, and urges that they continue to do so. We believe it is important for 
Dominicans to resolve all issues and problems that have arisen, and that non-Dominicans 
should only participate in this process where invited. 

Members of the delegation will remain in the Dominican Republic to monitor post- 
election developments, and NDI will release a more detailed report at a later date. 



50 




^ NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTE 
«w^i))i FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 

hifihH.H>r ri'Missachusciu Avenue. NW WashinRton, D C 200% C202) }28-^156 



NDI INTERNATIONAL OBSERVER DELEGATION 
NATIONAL ELECTIONS 

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 
May 12-18, 1994 



Stephen J. Solarz 

Former Member of Congress 

UNITED STATES 



Virgilio Godoy 
Vice President 
NICARAGUA 



Richard Bosweil 
University of California 
Hastings College of Law 
UNITED STATES 

Santiago Canton 

NDI Senior Program Officer 

UNITED STATES 



Mark Hall 

Hunneman Real Estate Corporation 

UNITED STATES 

Johnathan Hartlyn 
Dept. of Political Science 
University of North Carolina 
UNITED STATES 



Fidel Chavez Mena 
Christian Democratic Party 
EL SALVADOR 



Abdul Karim Kabariti 
Member of Parliament 
JORDAN 



Aracciv Conde de Paiz 

Former Vice Presidential Candidate 

(.LATE.MALA 



Ricardo Lesme 

Center for Democratic Studies 

PARAGUAY 



Judith Cooper 
Former \ice-Chair 
Democratic Party, New Mexico 
LTsITED STATES 

Andrew Crawley 
Institute lor European- 
Latm American Relations 
FLROPEAN UNION 

Seruio (iarcia-Rodriguez 
Hclkr Khrman White McAuliffe 
LMTF.D STATES 



Elisa Martinez-Tamyo 
Inter-American Dialogue 
UNITED STATES 

Thomas O. Melia 
NDI Senior Associate 
UNITED STATES 

Patrick Merloe 

NDI Senior Associate, Election Processes 

UNITED STATES 

Christopher Mitchell 

Center for Latin American Studies 

New York University 

UNITED STATES 



51 



Lawrence Noble Martamaria Villaveces 

General Councel Attorney 

Federal Election Commission COLUMBIA 

LTMITED STATES 

Cristina Zuccardi 

Hussein Abdullah Rbaya House of Representatives 

Commission on Elections ARGENTINA 

PALESTINLVN LIBERATION 

ORGANIZATION 

Maureen Taft-Morales 
Congressional Research Service 
UNITED STATES 



NDI STAFF 

Katie Kelsch 
Program Officer 

Mary Hill 
Logistics Manager 

Darren Nance 
Program Assistant 

Kendra Langlie 
Logistics Assistant 




52 



NATIONAL DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTE 
FOR INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 

l.hhHoor l"l" \1i^^2^.nuscIl^ Avenue N \X' vi ishinulon D C :0()-((> .J02M28-<H6 ■ fclcx il(Xj(M'i(X>8 NDIIA 



NDI Latin America Programs 



53 
NDI Latin America Programs 

Table of Contents 



Chronology of NDI Programs in Latin America 

Summary of Model NDI Programs 

Chile 

Nicaragua 

Paraguay 

1993 Latm Amenca Programs 

Argentma 

Women in Politics 

Electoral Reform 

Bolivia 

Haiti 

Mexico 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Paraguay 

Proposed Program Activities for 1994 



ARGENTINA 



54 



Chronology of NDI Programs in Latin America 



August 1985 
Apnl 1987 

December 1988 

Apnl 1989 
July 1989 

August 1993 
November 1993 



Sent a delegation to participate in a seminar on legislative reform in 
Buenos Aires. 

Convened an international seminar on constitutional reform in Buenos 
Aires, which included political leaders and constitutional experts from 
Europe, Latin America and the United States. 

Sponsored a program held in the Dominican Republic on civil-military 
relations in Argentina. 

Invited Argentine political and military leaders to Washington to meet 
with leading U.S. experts on defense policy. 

Organized an international seminar held in Montevideo, Uruguay, on 
civil-military relations that endeavored to promote healthier civil-military 
relations in Argentina. 

Provided technical assistance to political parties during a seminar on 
electoral reform in Buenos Aires. 

Held a seminar on women in politics for aspiring female political leaders 
in Buenos Aires. 



BOLIVIA 



February 1991 Sponsored a seminar on electoral processes for Bolivian political leaders. 

Apnl 1992 Held a semmar on legislative reform in La Paz. 

February 1993 Conducted a seminar on political party legislation for Bolivian legislators. 



BRAZIL 



55 



February 1986 
September 1987 
September 1988 



Invited a group of Brazilian legislators to the U.S. to meet with state and 
federal officials to discuss the role of the legislature in the budget process. 

Sponsored a conference in Brasilia on constitutional reform and the budget 
process. 

Invited senior staff members from the Brazilian Senate to the United States 
to observe and discuss the role of legislative support staff. 



CHILE 



Mav 1985 



May 1986 



September 1987- 
October 1988 



October 1988 



November 1989 
November 1991 



Held a conference in Washington D.C. on democracy in Latin America 
that brought together the leaders of Chile's fragmented democratic 
opposition parties and helped foster the development of the National 
Accord, a framework for the peaceful restoration of democracy in Chile. 

Organized a conference in Caracas on the transition to democracy in Chile 
that helped the democratic opposition reaffirm its common purpose. 

Provided technical assistance and financial support to the free election 
movement to register voters for the national plebiscite and promote the 
"no" vote. 

Sent a 55-member international observer delegation to the presidential 
plebiscite. Former Governor Bruce Babbitt, former Special Envoy to 
NATO countries Peter Dailey and former Presidents of Spain and 
Colombia Adolfo Suarez and Misael Pastrana, respectively, led the 
delegation. 

Sponsored an international observer delegation to the national elections. 

Organized an international group of municipal experts to assist Chilean 
congressional efforts to strengthen local government structures. 



COSTA RICA 



56 



June 1988 



Conducted a conference in San Jose for Latin American political leaders 
to discuss Costa Rica's success in maintaining a vibrant democracy. This 
was the third such conference, following Israel and Botswana, in a series 
of studies on successful democracies in regions of crisis. 



CUBA 



June 1991 



Organized an international conference in Caracas that enabled Cuban 
democratic groups in exile to acquire practical information on democratic 
transitions elsewhere. 



DOMINICAN REPUBLIC 



May 1990 
May 1994 



Sponsored an international observer delegation, led by former President 
Jimmy Carter, to the presidential election. 

Organized an international observer delegation, led by former U.S. 
Congressman Stephen Solarz, to the presidential and legislative elections. 



EL S^iLVADOR 



1988 Organized a survey mission to San Salvador to assess the legal and 

administrative framework for the 1989 presidential election. 

November 1991 Participated in a mission to assess Salvadoran civic organizations. 

March 1994 Began local governance program in El Salvador by sending a survey team 

to assess formal and informal mechanisms for citizen participation in 
municipal government. 



GUATEMALA 



57 



1990 



Sent pre-election mission to assess the election environment. 



November 1990 Sent an international observer delegation, led by former Governor Bruce 
Babbitt, to monitor the national elections. 



GUYANA 



1992 



Provided the Electoral Assistance Bureau (EAB), a nonpartisan Guyanese 
civic organization, with financial and technical assistance in preparation 
for the October national election. The EAB trained party pollwatchers 
and assisted the international observer delegation led by former President 
Jimmv Carter. 



March 1994 Began program to provide the EAB with technical and financial assistance 

in preparation for the 1994 municipal elections. 



HAITI 



August 1986 Sponsored the first in a series of political party building workshops held 

in Puerto Rico for Haiti's 17 major political parties. 



December 1986 



Sent a survey mission to assess the electoral framework and provide 
technical assistance. 



March 1987 Organized an international observer delegation to the referendum on 

Haiti's new constitution. 



June 1987 



Conducted a second political party building workshop. 



November 1987 Sent an international observer delegation to the national elections, which 
were aborted due to military-sponsored violence. 



July-Sept. 1990 



Conducted two sets of pre-election assessment missions along with pany 
development workshops with democratic parties. 



58 



December 1990 



Sponsored an international observer delegation, led by former President 
Jimmy Carter, to the Haiti's first free elections. 



October 1993 Sent a survey mission for a civil-military relations and parliamentary party 

building programs proposed in early 1991. 

April 1994 Sponsored a delegation of five Haitian parliamentarians to observe the 

NDI seminar on "Civil-Military Relations: A Comparative Vision" in 

Managua, Nicaragua. 



MEXICO 



August 1991 Provided the Council for Democracy with technical and financial 

assistance to organize an independent vote tabulation of the Mexico city 
municipal elections. 

April 1992 Provided financial assistance to the Council for Democracy to conduct a 

seminar on electoral reform in Mexico City. Also sponsored the 
participation of international experts in the forum. 



June 1992 



Organized programs providing technical assistance to civic organizations 
to mount an independent vote tabulation of gubernatorial elections in the 
state of Chihuahua and conduct a seminar on election observation. 



September 1992 



Continued work with the Council for Democracy in conducting an 
independent vote tabulation of the gubernatorial and mayoral elections in 
the state of Sinaloa. 



December 1992 



Collaborated with Mexican civic organizations to conduct studies related 
to the elections in Tamaulipas. Studies focussed on media coverage, 
registration lists, training of election observers and the election results. 



November 1993 



March 1994 



Provided financial assistance to the Council for Democracy to panicipate 
in a domestic election observation effort and an independent vote 
tabulation of the gubernatorial and municipal elections in Yucatan. 

Conducted a joint seminar with the Mexican Federal Electoral Institute 
(IFE) on democratization and the electoral process. Sponsored 
participation of four international experts on election processes from the 
Philippines, Paraguay, Portugal and the United States. 



NICARAGUA 



59 



Apnl 1994 Sponsored a national training seminar on election observation. More than 

120 civic leaders from throughout Mexico participated in the event. 



July 1987 

1988 

July 1989 
1990 

December 1992 

March 1993 

August 1993 
February 1994 

Apnl 1994 



Sponsored the participation of international experts to a conference on 
political party building held in Madrid for Nicaragua's principal 
opposition parties. 

Sent international experts to Managua to begin consultations on political 
party building. 

Organized a workshop on political party building for opposition parties in 
anticipation of the 1990 national elections. 

Helped administer congressionally appropriated assistance supporting the 
election process in Nicaragua. The program included a national voter 
education and pollwatching effort. 

Conducted a series of consultations on civil-military relations in 

Nicaragua. 

Began a two-year program on civil-military relations in Nicaragua with a 
forum in Mzmagua. 

Conducted the second in a series of forums on civil-military relations. 

Conducted consultations will Nicaraguan political and military leaders in 
preparation for an upcoming seminar and development of a working group 
on specific topics relating to civil-military relations. 

Conducted joint civil-mililary relations seminar with the National 
Assembly. The seminar was the third in a series of forums to promote 
civilian oversight of security affairs and to familiarize Nicaraguans with 
the nonpolitical role of the armed forces in a democracy. 



PASAMA 



Mav 1989 



Sponsored an international observer delegation, led by former President 
Jimmv Carter, to the national election. 



60 



March, May, Sent three separate groups of international experts to Panama to 

September, 1990 discuss the conversion of the military into a civilian controlled police 
force. 

May 1993 Organized the t"irst of two seminars designed to aid political party 

development. 

August 1993 Concluded second part of political party development program with 

seminars held in Panama City and in the interior. 



PAKAGUAY 



1988 

September 1988 

May 1989 
1990 

May 1991 

October 1992 

May 1993 



Provided the Asuncion-based Center for Democratic Studies (CED) with 
fmancial and technical assistance to conduct civic education programs 

Sponsored the travel of five CED youth leaders to observe the 
implementation of a civic education program in Chile. 

Organized an international observer delegation for the national elections. 

Continued ongoing program of technical and financial support to the CED 
to conduct Civic-Education programs. 

Sponsored an international observer delegation to Paraguay's first 
municipal elections. 

Continued assistance to the CED by co-sponsoring a program on 
municipal governance. 

Sent an international observer delegation to the national elections and 
provided SAKA - a consortium of nongovernmental organizations - with 
technical and material support to conduct an independent vote-count. 



URUGUAY 



June 1987 



Helped conduct a national public opinion poll in cooperation with the two 
leading political parties. 



61 



Summary of Model NDI Programs 
in Latin America 



Chile 

When NDI began work in Chile in 1985 it faced the difficult conditions of the Pinochet 
regime. Although Chilean opposition shunned any collaboration with the government, NDI 
helped the opposition to participate in the process leading up to the 1988 plebiscite on the future 
of Chile 's political system. 

NDI 's Chile programs highlight the value of sharing other countries ' experiences in 
democratic transitions. In 1987, NDI sent four Chileans to observe the elections in the 
Philippines as part of an international obser\'er delegation. Tlie Chileans returned to their 
country with experience in electoral processes that was instrumental to their own 1988 plebiscite. 
Equally important to Chileans was the support and expertise of the international community that 
NDI brought to the democratic transition process. 

NDI began working with Chileans in 1985 when it sponsored a conference in Washington 
D.C. on "Democracy in South America." Leaders of the previously fragmented democratic 
opposition to Chile's military regime were brought together with other Latin American leaders 
to discuss democratic development and consolidation in the region. According to Chilean 
participants, the conference played an important role in the development of the National Accord, 
a framework for the peaceful restoration of democracy in Chile signed by leaders of the major 
political parties. 

In May 1986, at a time when anti-government violence threatened to undermine the 
accord, NDI, in cooperation with Venezuela's leading political parties, sponsored an 
international conference in Caracas on the transition to democracy in Chile. Chilean opposition 
leaders were joined by international political party leaders. The conference provided a unique 
opportunity for representatives of new democracies to share their experiences on the transition 
process with their Chilean counterparts. More important, the conference allowed the Chilean 
opposition parties to reaffirm their common purpose. 

Many of the signatories to the National Accord were also part of the Movement for Free 
Elections (MFE), which launched a voter registration drive in preparation for the 1988 
presidential plebiscite to determine if the Pinochet regime would be extended another eight years. 
NDI sent a team of experts to Chile in July and August 1987 to survey the election law and 
voter registration procedures and analyze the organizational capabilities and needs of the MFE. 

In November 1987, NDI co-sponsored a three day seminar that assisted the MFE with 
its national voter registration drive. The seminar was attended by 300 national, provincial and 
local campaign leaders. The seminar helped increase the level of cohesiveness among the 



84-459 0-94-3 



62 



opposition free election movement and developed strategies for a nationwide voter registration 
campaign. 

During 1988, NDI sustained its efforts in Chile through a series of technical assistance 
programs, grants for research, civic education and election monitoring; the Institute administered 
the bulk of a special $1 million U.S. Congressional appropriation in preparation for the October 
5 presidential plebiscite. The funds were used to acquire computers for independent vote 
counting operations, to commission a national public opinion survey and to produce the literature 
and advertisements necessary to compete with the government media campaign. 

NDI's three-year democratization programs in Chile culminated in an international 
observer mission to the October plebiscite. The 55-member observer mission was led by Bruce 
Babbitt, former governor and U.S. presidential candidate, Peter Dailey, former U.S. 
Ambassador to Ireland, Adolfo Suarez, former president of Spain, and Misael Pastrana, former 
president of Colombia. The international delegation's findings were published by NDI in an 
detailed report that was distributed widely throughout Latin America and the United States. 



Nicaragua 



NDI 's civil-military relations program in Nicaragua has highlighted the Institute 's abiliry 
to bring together opposing sides to reach agreement on highly contentious issues. Central to the 
success of this process has been NDI's credibility as an impartial, non-partisan organization. 

Since Nicaragua's democratically elected administration came to power in 1990, one of 
the most difficult tasks for the new government has been the establishment of civilian control over 
the armed forces. Nicaragua's armed forces have traditionally been controlled by the political 
panv in power. NDI is helping to build consensus among various sectors on the new, 
nonpartisan role of the military in a democratic sociery. NDI programs have also been 
important in developing a new cadre of civilian experts on civil-military issues. 

Based on recommendations made by representatives of the Nicaraguan government, 
political parties and the army, NDI has developed a three-year program to promote civilian 
oversight of secunty affairs and familiarize the Nicaraguan military with the nonpolitical role 
of the armed forces in a democratic society. The program stresses the important distinction 
between internal security and national defense, supremacy of civilian authorities (both executive 
and legislative) over the armed forces, and the training of civilian political leaders on security 
issues. 

Since 1992, NDI has conducted extensive consultations with Nicaraguan civilian and 
military leaders, released a detailed report on civil-military relations in Nicaragua and organized 
three groundbreaking public forums in Managua with international civil-military experts and 
representatives of the Nicaraguan government, armed forces and nongovernmental organizations. 



63 



NDI's civil-military experts have provided information on how other countries have strengthened 
civil-military relations and developed mechanisms and institutions to promote civilian control of 
the armed forces. Following the 1993 program. President Chamorro announced several 
important measures to enhance civilian oversight of the armed forces. Some of these initiatives 
were based on recommendations made in the NDI report and during the August seminar. In an 
Army Day speech, President Chamorro also noted NDI's work and gave public support for 
continued NDI assistance in the area of civil-military relations. 

Nicaraguan participants in the program have included: Antonio Lacayo, chief of staff 
to President Violeu Chamorro; Gen. Humberto Ortega, commander of the armed forces; Luis 
Humberto Guzman, president of the National Assembly; Sergio Ramirez, leader of the 
Sandinistas in the National Assembly; Andres Robles, president of the Defense Commission in 
the National Assembly; and Francisco Mayorga, director of the Civilista Movement and former 
president of the Central Bank of Nicaragua. As Nicaraguan participants have noted, such 
meetings have been unprecedented. For the first time in Nicaraguan history, political and 
military leaders with highly divergent views discussed civil-military issues at the same public 
forum. 

NDI began the program in 1992 by sending a group of international experts to Nicaragua 
to meet with Nicaraguan political and military leaders. NDI experts provided a wide range of 
information on hov,' other countries have developed mechanisms, institutions and practices to 
promote civilian control of the armed forces consistent with legitimate national security 
concerns. Based on the findings of the meetings, the international delegation wrote a report that 
was presented at a public forum in Managua in March 1993. 

At the meeting, Gen. Ortega made several groundbreaking comments in response to the 
NDI report. The general said he would be willing to change the name of the army, an important 
symbolic gesture in improving civil-military relations in Nicaragua. Ortega also said that his 
departure would be in accordance with whatever new military law the National Assembly passed. 
He had never before been flexible regarding his departure. Finally, the general stated that he 
favored institutionalizing the Ministry of Defense, which has never existed except on paper. 

In August 1993 NDI conducted a two-day seminar that brought together representatives 
of all the relevant sectors to address the role of the armed forces. The seminar was attended by 
more than 100 representatives of the government. National Assembly, nongovernmental 
organizations, armed forces, political parties, former Contra forces, the media and foreign 
diplomatic corps. The program was able to broaden its base of participation from the previous 
forum by including not only high-level officials, but medium-level military officers and civilians 
of a range of stature. Program proceedings were broadcast on national television and radio. 

After two days of discussions, several points of consensus were reached: 1) 
communication should be improved between civilian and military officials through similar 
seminar/workshop type activities; 2) greater civilian control over the military should be 
guaranteed; 3) professionalization of the armed forces should continue to occur under adequate 



64 



civilian control; 4) assimilation of military officers into civilian life should be ensured; 5) an 
adequate military budget should be established to cover the costs of the armed forces; and 6) 
basic defense regulations which dictate the function and organization of the armed forces should 
be discussed openly by all of society. 

Most recently, in Apnl 1994, NDI conducted a joint civil-military seminar with the 
National Assembly of Nicaragua. More than 250 people from various sectors of Nicaraguan 
society attended panels and workshops on topics such as the function of a ministry of defense, 
the role of the legislature in defense issues and channels of communication between the armed 
forces and the civilian government. Participants in the two-day event included representatives 
of the national assembly, political parties, diplomatic community, armed forces and 
nongovernmental organizations. A delegation of five Haitian parliamentarians sponsored by NDI 
also attended the sessions as observers. 

Panicipants agreed that a ministry of defense should be established and that all sectors 
should continue to strengthen channels of communication, among other conclusions. In his 
closing remarks. General Joaquin Cuadra, second-in-command of the armed forces, requested 
that NDI continue to organize programs to foster the development of consensus-based solutions 
to civil-military issues. 

NDI brought a distinguished group intemationzd experts to participate in the April 1994 
seminar: retired Gen. Guilherme Belchior Vieira, former director of the Superior Military 
Institute of Portugal; retired Col. Julio Busquets, former vice president of the Defense 
Commission of the Spanish Parliament; Horacio Jaunarena, vice president of the Defense 
Commission of the Argentine Chamber of Deputies and former defense minister of Argentina; 
retired Maj. Gen. Bernard Loeffke, former president of the InterAmerican Defense Board; 
Patncio Rojas, former defense minister of Chile; and Jose Manuel Ugarte. advisor to the 
Argentine Congress on defense and security issues. 

Nicaraguan participants in the April seminar included: Luis Humberto Guzman, president 
of the National Assembly; Antonio Lacayo, minister of the presidency; Gen. Humberto Ortega, 
commander of the armed forces; Andres Robles Perez, president of the Defense Commission 
of the National Assembly; Tomas Delaney, vice minister of the presidency; and General Joaquin 
Cuadra Lacayo, second-in-command of the armed forces. 

Media coverage of the event was extensive. Front page articles appeared in all major 
Nicaraguan newspapers and many television and radio stations broadcast reports about the 
proceedings. 

Following the seminar, the NDI international delegation had intensive consultations with 
the representatives of the sectors of Nicaraguan society most involved with the civil-military 
debate: Gen. Ortega and Maj. Gen. Cuadra; Virgilio Godoy, vice president of Nicaragua; 
Antonio Lacavo; Luis Humberto Guzman; and the Defense Commission of the National 



65 



Assembly. The Nicaraguans consulted were supportive of the program and expressed their 
desire to participate in and organize activities more frequently. 

Based on requests from the Nicaraguans, NDI is helping to organize an informal working 
group composed of leaders from key sectors of Nicaraguan society. The group will develop 
recommendations for monthly roundlables on specific civil-military topics and other potential 
NDI events. 



Paraguay 



NDI programs in Paraguay demonstrate how NDI can help in every stage of a democratic 
transition process. NDI began work in Paraguay in 1988 during the Stroessner regime. 
Initially, NDI focussed on helping local civic groups to organize in anticipation of a democratic 
transition. NDI programs, along with an international observer delegation to Paraguay's first 
open elections in 1989, were instrumental in helping to bring about democratic reform in 
Paraguay 's political system. 

Under the new democratic government, NDI continued to support local civic 
organizations working to strengthen and consolidate Paraguayan democracy. NDI developed 
programs according to the changing needs of Paraguayan civic organizations. Wlien the new 
constitution created municipalities, NDI responded with local governance training and support. 
Both flexibility in response to local needs and long-term support have been vital aspects of NDI 's 
Paraguay programs. 

NDI has been working actively in Paraguay since 1988. An NDI survey mission visited 
Paraguay at the time of the February 1988 presidential elections to explore the possibilities of 
democratic development programs. Civic leaders asked the Institute to help establish a 
nonpanisan organization that would promote civic education and political development. 

In August, 1988, the Asuncion based Center for Democratic Studies (CED) was 
established with NDI support to assist political leaders and parties advocating democratic reform. 
The CED board included leaders of the most important opposition parties, as well as democratic 
opponents of Stroessner within his ruling Colorado Party. 

NDI has provided ongoing technical and financial support for CED activities. This 
support has helped the Center develop the organizational capacity to train pollwatchers. carry 
out mass media campaigns to encourage voter registration and participation, conduct public 
opinion sur\-eys, design and implement an independent vote count and conduct a wide range of 
civic education programs. 

For the May 1, 1989 presidential elections, NDI organized a 19-member international 
delegation led by Canadian Senator B.A. Graham, Chilean political leader Eduardo Frei and 



84-459 0-94-4 



66 



U.S. Representative Bruce Morrison. The May elections occurred a mere three months after 
the Stroessner regime was deposed. Further, the elections took place in a country that lacked 
a democratic tradition and that had suffered severe repression during the Stroessner era. NDI 
published a 68-page report outlining the delegation's findings. 

In 1990, NDI provided CED with a grant that enabled the Center to conduct nearly 200 
seminars and 13 panel debates designed to increase public understanding of and participation in 
the May 1991 municipal elections. CED also trained poUwatchers for the elections. These 
elections provided the first opportunity for Paraguayans to elect leaders at the municipal level. 

A 16- member international delegation organized by NDI to observe the municipal 
elections concluded that despite serious administrative flaws, the holding of the country's first 
local elections represented an important step in consolidating Paraguay's fledgling democracy. 
A 98 page report, published by NDI, outlines the delegations findings and activities. 

Throughout the remainder of 1991 and 1992, NDI continued to provide CED with 
financial and technical assistance in organizing a variety of civic education and governance 
programs. In October 1992, NDI and CED conducted a municipal governance program in 
Asuncion. NDI sponsored the participation of two international experts in local government 
who advised municipal officials. Following these meetings, NDI and CED, in coordination with 
the Asuncion city council, sponsored a broader seminar for city council members from five large 
municipalities near the capital. 

In May 1993, NDI undertook a comprehensive observation effort for the national 
elections in Paraguay. Support for a local group to conduct an independent vote count 
spearheaded the program. Pursuant to a grant provided by NDI, a consortium of 
nongovernmental organizations, named SAKA, conducted the count. SAKA released its election 
results within hours after the polls closed. In addition, NDI facilitated the visit of two 
international experts to assist political parties in identifying and rectifying problems with voter 
registration lists. In conjunction with the Council for Freely Elected Heads of Government, NDI 
fielded a 35-member international delegation led by President Jimmy Carter to observe polling 
sites throughout the country. 



67 



National Democratic Institute for International Affairs (NDI) 
1993 Latin America Programs 



The National Democratic Institute for International Affairs '(NDI) programs in Latin 
America during 1993 extended throui^iiout the hemisphere and involved every area of democratic 
development in which the Institute is engaged. In Paraguay, NDI continued a series of seminars 
on local government, and organized an international election observer delegation led by former 
President Jimmy Carter. In Nicaragua, an historic forum brought together senior military and 
political leaders to discuss civil-military relations and the new role of the armed forces. In 
Panama, NDI began a program to strengthen the country's political parties at the local and 
national levels. In Bolivia NDI completed a program on political parry legislation. In 
Argentina, NDI conducted two programs to promote consensus among the major political parties 
on issues of women 's participation in politics and electoral reform. 



Argentina 

Women in Politics 

In November, NDI conducted a seminar on women in politics in Argentina. The 
program was organized in cooperation with the Argentine Women's Equality Foundation and the 
Lola Mora Association. The seminar focused on developing strategies to increase women's 
panicipation in politics. 

The program provided an opportunity for women throughout the country and from across 
the political spectrum to exchange ideas and experiences on running for office and participating 
in political parties. Approximately 100 women from 18 of Argentina's 24 provinces attended 
the seminar. Participants included women from urban and rural areas who are political activists 
and organizers, civic leaders, newly elected office holders and future candidates. 
Representatives from Uruguay, Peru and Brazil also participated in the seminar. 

Seminar participants, pleased with the seminar, requested NDI' s assistance in organizing 
similar events throughout the country that could focus on leadership training and strategies for 
women's involvement in politics. In response to this request, NDI submitted a proposal to assist 
the Argentine Foundation for Women's Equality in conducting a seminar for newly-elected 
congresswomen, incumbent women legislators and elected women officials at the provincial level 
in Argentina. The seminar will endeavor to enhance the lawmaking and leadership capacities 
of the participants. An international delegation of women political leaders will share their 
personal experiences relating to legislative processes and leadership roles. 



68 



Electoral Reform 

In August, NDI conducted a three-day workshop on electoral reform in Argentina. The 
workshop was organized in cooperation with two Argentine foundations representative of the 
major political parties: The Andean Foundation and the National Studies Center. The purpose 
of the workshop was to build a consensus among the major political parties on electoral reform. 
A paper analyzing previous electoral reform legislation was distributed in advance and served 
as the basis for discussion during the workshop. The paper was also published by an Argentine 
legal newspaper, and distributed among its subscribers. 

NDI invited four international participants to participate as panelists during the plenary 
sessions. The international team comprised a specialist in campaign finance law and formerly 
a lawyer at the Federal Electoral Commission, a Bolivian political analyst currently in charge 
of re-wnting the Bolivian Constitution, a Uruguayan historian and expert in Latin American 
politics, and a Spanish political scientist and sociologist with expertise in Latin American 
electoral systems. 

Topics for the plenary sessions and workshops included: consequences of different 
electoral processes; govemability; rules of conduct of political systems; the leading profile 
emerging from each system; and representation and political legitimacy. During the workshops, 
the participants agreed on 12 specific consensus points, such as primary elections should be held 
on one single day to help ensure greater citizen participation; mechanisms should be established 
to guarantee transparency and control over internal elections; and an independent organism to 
control the transparency of the electoral processes should be established. Approximately 200 
people attended the program and media coverage was extensive. 

Bolivia 

In conjunction with the National Electoral Court of Bolivia, NDI conducted in February 
a conference on political party legislation. Participants included members of the National 
Electoral Court, representatives of the nine major political parties in Bolivia, members of 
congress, political analysts and journalists. The international faculty consisted of a constitutional 
lawver from Spain; a specialist in campaign financing from the United States; and a political 
party organizer from Argentina. 

Panicipants addressed three issues relating to political party legislation: campaign 
financing, constitutional recognition of political parties and party democratization. The 
conference consisted of presentations by the international participants, commentary from a 
Bolivian analyst and general discussion. Participants also formed small groups to discuss and 
record points of agreement, which later served as the basis for a detailed publication that was 
published and distributed throughout Bolivia. 



69 



EL Salvador 



NDI received an AID grant in September to conduct a local governance program in EI 
Salvador. An NDI team including international experts will travel to El Salvador in the spring 
of 1994 to identify the municipalities in which to conduct the program. The program will focus 
on technical and practical training of elected officials to increase the efficiency and effectiveness 
of Salvadoran municipalities. NDI will commence the program after the elections anticipated 
for March 1994 when newly elected officials are expected to assume office. 

Haiti 

During the first week of October, NDI conducted a survey mission to Port-au-Prince to 
evaluate the feasibility of carrying out programs in civil-military relations and political party 
building in parliament. Both programs were authorized under a 1991 AID cooperative 
agreement, but had been suspended between October 1991 and August 1993 as part of 
international sanctions imposed on Haiti following the coup against President Jean Bertrand 
Anstide. 

The NDI delegation included State Senator Judy Ayotte Paradis (Maine), Uruguayan 
civil-military expert Carina Perelli, and NDI staff members. The team met with Haitian 
government ministers, members of parliament, political parties leaders, civic and religious 
leaders, the High Command and other military officers. The NDI delegation also meet with 
members of the diplomatic and international community responsible for implementing the July 
3 Governors Island accord, by which President Aristide was to return to Haiti on October 30. 

All sectors encouraged NDI to conduct a program to facilitate dialogue between the 
civilians and military. More specifically, a program that would overcome long-standing 
suspicions and differences was urged by Prime Minister Malval. 

NDI had hoped to begin its two-year civil-military program in early November. 
However, the disruption in the Governors Island process and general political turmoil have 
reduced prospects for democracy work in Haiti in the immediate future. Nonetheless, in order 
to prepare to resume its work once the current political impasse ends, NDI is currently preparing 
a year-long workplan to present to AID. The plan outlines program activities in civil-military 
relations and political party development. 

Mexico 

In November, NDI worked with Mexican civic organizations in Merida, Mexico, 
providing them with technical and financial support to conduct an election observation and quick- 
count program for the Yucatan gubernatorial and municipal elections. 

Upon the request of various civic groups, NDI will support efforts to conduct a 
nationwide quick-count during the August 1994 presidential election. NDI will work in 



70 



conjunction with the Council for Democracy, a leading Mexican civic organization, to hold a 
senes of fora throughout Mexico for local civic leaders and organizations to provide training and 
experience in implementing successful election monitoring projects. 

NDI received an invitation from the Federal Electorzil Institute (IFE) to conduct a joint 
seminar in March 1994 to address issues relating to the electoral process and local election 
monitor training. NDI has discussed with IFE the possibility of organizing additional seminars 
before the August 1994 Mexican Presidential elections. 

Nicaragua 

NDI has developed a three-year program in Nicaragua to assist political and civic leaders, 
as well as representatives of the armed forces, to build an adequate system of civilian control 
over the military. During 1993, NDI conducted a forum in March and a seminar in August that 
brought together representatives of all relevant sectors to address the role of the armed forces 
in a democratic society. Participants in the programs included: Antonio Lacayo, minister of the 
presidency; Humberto Ortega, commander of the armed forces; Luis Humberto Guzman, leader 
of the United National Opposition (UNO) coalition in the National Assembly; Sergio Ramirez, 
leader of the Sandinistas in the National Assembly; and Francisco Mayorga, director of the 
Civilista Movement. They were joined by more than 200 representatives of the government. 
National Assembly, nongovernmental organizations, armed forces, political parties, former 
Contra forces, the media and foreign diplomatic corps. The proceedings were broadcast on 
national television and radio. 

As the participants noted, such meetings were unprecedented. The forum was important 
for a number of reasons. For the first time in Nicaraguan history, political and military leaders 
with highly divergent views discussed civil-military issues at the same public forum. Ortega, 
who attended the March forum, made several comments that he had never made before in 
response to the NDI report. The general said he would be willing to change the name of the 
army, an important symbolic gesture in improving civil-military relations in Nicaragua. Ortega 
also said that his depanure would be in accordance with whatever new military law the National 
Assembly passed. He had never before been flexible regarding his departure. Finally, he came 
out in favor of institutionalizing the Ministry of Defense, which has never existed except on 
paper. 

The August seminar was also a step forward in Nicaraguan civil-military relations. 
Followmg several days of intense panel discussions and workshop sessions, civilians and military 
officials who had never previously met to discuss such issues reached consensus on a number 
of pomts: 1) communication should be improved between civilian and military officials through 
similar semmar/workshop-type forums; 2) greater civilian control over the military should be 
guaranteed; 3) professionalization of the armed forces should continue to occur under adequate 
civilian control; 4) assimilation of military officers into civilian life should be ensured; 5) an 
adequate military budget should be established to cover the costs of the armed forces; 6) basic 
defense regulations that dictate the function and organization of the armed forces should be 



71 



discussed openly; 7) the name of the military, currently called the Sandinista Army, should be 
changed; and 8) a civilian-led Defense Ministry should be created. 

In her September 2, Army Day speech, President Violeta Chamorro pointed to NDI's 
work in Nicaragua and gave her support for continued assistance in the area of civil-military 
relations. Chamorro announced government plans to enhance civilian oversight of the armed 
forces. Some of these initiatives had been recommended in NDI's report, Civil-Military 
Relations in Nicaragua, which was written after a series of consultations in Managua in 
November 1992. 

Panama 

NDI conducted two programs in 1993 to aid the development of political parties in 
Panama. The programs grew out of information gathered during NDI's March assessment 
mission to Panama and focus-group research conducted later in the spring. The focus-group 
fmdings underscored growing public apathy toward political parties. 

In May, NDI organized a two-day seminar in Panama City on political party building. 
More than 100 party leaders and activists representing 18 political parties attended the event. 
Experts on political organization from the United States, Argentina and Chile gave presentations 
and led workshops on fund-raising, grassroots organization, party platforms and message 
development. The Panamanian participants stressed the importance of continuing to organize 
similar programs. 

Most recently, NDI conducted a program in August which was designed to help 
strengthen the parties' organizational capabilities at the national and local levels, improve 
communication between party structures, and enhance the ability of parties to function in a more 
responsive way to the concerns of the citizenry. Political party experts from other Latin 
Amencan countries and the U.S. led a series of seminars for national party leaders in Panama 
City as well as for regional and local party leaders in four cities outside of the capital. 

The international trainers shared their experiences with political party organization, 
including building coalitions, managing intra-party relations, establishing goals and strategies, 
communicating policies, administering resources, mobilizing grassroots support, and identifying 
strategies to promote accountability. 

Paraguay 

In January, NDI responded to constitutional reforms by conducting a local governance 
program that assisted local officials in clarifying their responsibilities according to the new 

constitution. 

In May, NDI organized an international election observer delegation to the national 
elections in Paraguay. The delegation, sponsored jointly by NDI and the Council of Freely 



I 

I 



72 



Elected Heads of Government and led by former President Jimmy Carter, represented the 
culmination of a two-month program in support of Paraguay's election process. The potential 
for a close election and rumors of fraud or military intervention had prompted political leaders 
in Paraguay to request NDI assistance. 

The NDI/Council delegation, comprised of 31 observers from 15 countries arrived in 
Asuncion, Paraguay, during the week of the elections and met with government officials, 
political and civic leaders, candidates, military officials and members of the Central Electoral 
Board. The day before the elections, a majority of the delegation deployed to the intenor. On 
election day, observers visited more than 300 polling sites throughout the country. 

The May elections resulted in the creation of 17 new local departmental governments that 
are intended to provide greater regional representation and autonomy. In response to this change 
NDI conducted a local governance program. The purpose of the program is to assist 
Paraguayans in clarifying the responsibilities of this new level of government and determining 
the relanonship between each level. Furthermore, the program helped to developed channels 
of communication among municipalities, departments and the central government. 



73 



Proposed Program Activities for 1994 



Latin America In order to respond to needs of Latin American political parties, NDI 

Regional has proposed a multi-faceted party development program that will 

Program involve leaders of maior political parties and representatives of citizen 

advocacy groups throughout Latm America. Program participants will 
develop a comprehensive document outlining strategies to strengthen and 
modernize political parties in Latin America. The document will be 
drawn from discussion and strategic initiatives developed dunng a regional 
political party workshop tentatively scheduled for September 1994. 



Argentina 



NDI plans to assist the Argentine Foundation for Women's Equality in 
conducting a seminar for newly-elected congresswomen, incumbent 
women legislators and elected women officials at the provincial level in 
Argentma. The seminar will endeavor to enhance the lawmaking and 
leadership capacities of the participants. 



Dominican 
Republic 



NDI is sending an international observer delegation to monitor the 
May 1994 national elections. 



El Salvador Following the March 1994 local elections, NDI will conduct a local 

governance program to enhance the capabilities of newly elected municipal 
officials. 



Guvana 



NDI IS providing the Electoral Assistance Bureau (EAB), a nonpartisan 
Guyanese civic organization, with financial and technical assistance to 
conduct a multi-faceted program in preparation for the upcoming 
municipal elections. The program will assist the EAB in conducting voter 
education, training domestic observers and verifying registration lists. 



Mexico 



In March 1994 NDI conducted a joint seminar with the Mexican Federal 
Electoral Institute (IFE) that addressed issues related to democratization 
and the electoral process. In accordance with the Mexican electoral code. 
IFE will conduct educational programs on electoral procedures and 
organize training seminars for domestic poUwatchers. NDI and IFE 
discussed the possibility of NDI providing technical assistance for these 
programs. 



In addition. NDI is supporting the efforts of the Civic Alliance- 
Obser\ation 1994, an umbrella organization comprised of seven Mexican 
independent civic groups, in implementing a comprehensive domestic 
election observation of the August 19>-: national elections in Mexico. 
Specitlcally, NDI is providing technical and financial assistance to the 



74 



Alliance in developing the framework and building support for a 
nationwide parallel vote tabulation. As part of this program, NDI will 
collaborate with the Alliance to organize regional observer training 
seminars throughout Mexico. 

Nicaragua Based on requests received from program participants in the April 1994 

civil-military relations seminar, NDI is helping to organize an informal 
working group on civil-military issues composed of leaders from key 
sectors of Nicaraguan society. The group will develop recommendations 
for monthly roundtables on specific civil-military topics and other potential 
NDI programs. 



75 



BACKGROUND MEMO 
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC ELECTIONS 



The Dominican Republic held elections on Monday, May 16. Although President 
Joaquin Balaguer, the 87 year-old blind politician who has held office for 20 of the last 28 
years, has declared victory, others have asserted wide-spread election fraud. With 92 
percent of the vote counted, Balaguer had won 42.6 percent and his opponent, Francisco 
Pena Gomez, 41.1 percent, a difference of only about 38,000 among the more than 2.7 
million votes cast. Fifty-seven year old Pena is of Haitian decent and was accused by 
Balaguer of planning to let Haitians take over the country. 

Although Balaguer has declared himself the "virtual winner," he has not officially 
announced the election results. This is in deference to a "civility pact" agreed to before 
the elections, under which the candidates would avoid extreme negative campaigning and 
wait for and abide by official results from the Central Election Board. The Central Election 
Board is a five member board comprised of representatives of the four political parties 
and a former official of the Ministry of Justice. 

Several election observers, including former US representative Stephen Solarz, who 
lead a team from the National Democratic Institute (NDI), have questioned the electoral 
process. The election was observed by at least six delegations, including the 
Organization of American States (OAS), the International Foundation for Electoral Systems 
(IFES), and a Costa Rican group. All the groups agree that there were election 
irregularities. The NDI election critique is the strongest. In response to the criticism that 
some opposition voters did not find their names on the voting lists, the polling stations 
stayed open for an additional two hours. Voters were then allowed to vote with a valid 
identification card, even if they were not on the voter lists. However, observers noted that 
the announcement of the extended polling station hours and the new policy on the voter 
lists may not have been received by opposition voters. 

On May 19, Pena formally applied to the election board for a recount under 
international monitoring. The election board has begun the recount, but has not yet 
announced the results. During the last election. President Balaguer was accused of 
drawing out the vote count until the opposition to his claimed victory evaporated. The 
recount of this election involves comparing the official results given to election observers 
at each polling station with the official tally sheets. The Organization of American States 
(OAS) delegation in the Dominican Republic is observing this process as is a delegation 
from the Catholic Church. Both the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and the 
International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES) teams have left the country. 

In a three-hour news conference on May 20, dozens of Pena Gomez's precinct 
workers asserted that thousands of voters were excluded from polling lists and that 
soldiers forced some of his supporters from the polls. 



76 



Dominican history is replete with election controversies. In 1965, the Dominican 
Republic shed the last regime installed by military coup and, while governed by an interim 
civilian regime, held elections which were supervised by an Organization of American 
States (OAS) peace-keeping force. Joaquin Baiaguer won this election although the 
opposition questioned the results, in an act of protest over potential election fraud, the 
opposition parties declined to participate in the 1970 and 1974 elections, in which 
Baiaguer was reelected with wide margins. In 1978, Antonio Guzman, candidate of the 
opposition Dominican Revolutionary Party, was declared the winner, but only after a 
strong protest from the Carter Administration over the suspension of the vote count. In 
1986, challenges of the results and accusations against members of the electoral tribunal 
delayed the announcement of Balaguer's victory until nearly two months after election 
day. Baiaguer was elected President again in 1990, once more amid accusations of 
election fraud. 

This year's election was the most closely observed in the nation's history. US 
concerns are three: (1) that fraudulent elections are contrary to support for democracy 
and free and fair elections in the region; (2) that controversy over the elections might 
undermine efforts to enforce the embargo on neighboring Haiti; and (3) that, if the election 
recount does not go smoothly, that there may be violent protests. 

The US Government could strongly back the recommendations of the election 
observers, even if these include holding new elections. To implement our embargo 
policy, we could further pressure President Baiaguer to live up to his commitment under 
the UN mandate to keep embargoed goods from crossing the border into Haiti. To help 
keep the peace in the Dominican Republic, we could strongly support the official process 
of responding to allegations of fraud and push for an early resolution of the election 
problems. 

Baiaguer has indicated that he would be willing to discuss tightening the embargo 
while casting doubts that his opponent will support the US policy. Pena Gomez has 
made vague statements but taken no strong position on the embargo. He is politically 
in the same camp as Haitian President Bertrand Aristide, and so may be willing to take 
steps to return him to power. 

US economic influence in the Dominican Republic is significant. Most agricultural 
and light manufactured products are exported to the US. US citizens visit the island as 
tourists. Dominicans living in the US send over $800 million back to their home country 
each year. US foreign assistance to the nation is about $40 million per year. 



77 



|7x^/^"^^^ 



LISTAJO DE CIUDADANOS QUE FUERON EXCLUIDOS DEL LISTADO OFICIAL DE 
VOTANTES EN LA SECCION CANOA DEL MUNICIPIO DE VICENTE NOBLE EN LA 

PROVING LA DE BARAHONA. 



N OMBRES 



MESA NUM. 



CEDULA ELECTORAL 



01 Felipe Dotal 15 

Oi; Baldemiro Espinosa 13 

05 Juan Antonio Ramirez 15 

Qi*- victor Cuevas M« 15 

05 Cabral Moreta 15 

06 Juana Espejo Dotel 1^4- 

07 Gaudencia Dotel Roa 15 

08 Hilario de la Paz 14 

09 Luca Evangelista 14 

10 Carrasco Hector Julio 15 

11 Fio Manuel Perez 15 

12 Gonaalez Tnrmrr Fernando 14 

13 Dotel Duarte 15 

14 Yan Profeta Danilo 20 

15 Octavio Luis Yoset 20 

16 Cecilia Batennis Alandres 20 

17 Profeta Feliz Andres 20 

18 Osbaldo Dotel Martes 15 

19 ^eliz de Leon Oranger 14 

20 Jose Antonio Vargas de los S 

21 Ricardo Vargas de los Santos 

22 De Leon Matos E. 13 
25 Pedro Cuevas Mateo 14 

24 De Leon Perez Martina 15 

25 Abel Luis Tigason Yose 20 
25 Yan Nicolas Francisco 20 
27 Espejo Labur mnnnre l^otel A. 13 

23 -"ieuereo Labur Fausto 20 
29 "ustodio Luisa Emilia 20 
10 :'.i(^eL Silverio ''^lorian 20 
Jl Jciri Silberio Florian 20* 
■~ Ir.c ^rnacion !1ontero Marte Ma. 14 

■■• - ' -'. 5B: ■ - : • — ^lici 14 



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78 



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P;<3 pflrrrrio^sYOLucioMARio dosjihicano 

_ COrflTE . UNICIPAL DE TAf'AYO 




A.- JN'X-O 



TA-HAYO, H.D. 
Mayo 6, 19S4.- 



•1 CaroLa Llsrrdo, ?resl'Jento 
A O^riiRAI. SLi-AVr'R/iL 
proho 

loiial 

/jntral ElectoroL por ol ?ARTI;jO 

t nenLiitn r«Itolbn de voruonr.r. d»- 
uula&as 7 que no rpai'ecen -^a llt<tA 



H...^;; 



\ Lo Itidicado on al nsuuto 



!••• .'"uy oortearenlo :!C3 i."iri*?in<^t« « 
diC vXX' tnl.utuU. nloc'k' r»'l» oon la flnelldod C* i;olicitr.rl« Is 
* cJ.i:-"lin fr. iop lii-'tf.i>i''3 ytsr r.-noQ o lcct orp.lt <*.e Ice j-.^ro'-T r> que 
Lb ijiu.clciipji ui\ 1* rijlf.cl6n nn«y.a^i^^ a/^ 



(. ucnciJiu a lo vifirp'':. ■t>" , 



Lie- JU"?^ 
fre Bid oni«' 
d&dato & orl' 



2.— ^ap4»rniB0Bi)(oii ou axc^lirnotB d'vspoi 



Ji /,P/m j-snr 




79 



PKKiJOHAH CEDULADA5 IIS LA IIESA £LEOT01L\L BTJK.l^ UE VLiSiA LknTQk T qUE 
no APAHECEN KK EL REQISTHO D£ VDTAHT&J. 



l^nUHt': T AI^ELLIDOG 



OCDULfl 



1.- BENJAMIN PHSA 

2.- liELKiy PETJA FZiU 

3.- PASCU.;L PliHA 

^,- ^tHAX. yEAJiOiSCO lUTEO CUITAS 

5.- AHQiLL VALDEZ lOY 

s.- AUicio cucray hilciades 

7.- CHAKELJ.'- CLODE TOY 
0,- HIPOLITO Jinj-:jifcZ iinCAKNAUIOH 
9.- lilCHARl* GANTOS PIE 
10.- 5W11 EXILIP UECENA 



&7G-ooo7ai9- ■ 
07»5^012<v54-* 

076-0007 :i?i- 

076-001 W82-1 

076-0012465-0 

O7C>-O012'V25- 

076-0012^23-9 

076-O01245G-1 

076-0012^;6o-l 

07&-0012'^fR-2 



PEHSOHAH CEDUl AJIAR en LYi MESA ELEOTORAL UUll.20 DE HENA ARRIBA Y qiW, 
no APARECKN £r; ICL REGISTRO DE TOTANTES. 



ITOrTBR?^;r> T APEUJ.IDO S 

1.- DAISY nhUrM ai?l'PlM« 

2.- SOOILIA IAN FKLIZ 

5.- LUIS AI?rONIO JIMENEZ WICIUSLI,( 

4,- nA?AEL BO PEREZ 

5.- JJIGEL VALDE" ItlCEELL 

S.- EAnJELIO I-TCNDliZ 

7,.. ALEJA.TDHINA CARABALLO CAHilBALLO 

8,- ISllAEL MATOS 

9,- DOLORES BOoARIO 30EIAK0 



CEDUJ^-'. 



ope GT) ■.">•• '" -"J 

070-oo.'.25l': -"i 

076-002 i";^ic-5 

076-00l2-:75-9 

076-O01592^>-5 

076-0007308-8 

07S-0012469-2 

076-0012488- 

076-001250^ 



80 



GOmUHUAOLOU D£ CEDULADOS QUE nO APKREOEN SB LISTAIK) flK T0TA.Tn^£i3 )^K 
LA IlKi;A JiL£CT01iAL }nm. 10 DE BATCTT nuri.6 



fioru"'.;-: 



i PETJjI WS 



CEDULA 



25.- iJiHiiTi:^* DE LEOH OUEIUILJIO 
^26.- Gi-.RALDO PEKKi', BiViyXA 
2-/.- iJoBA IfilS I>E /OS 3 rfKlS 

29.- JOSELITO OTA". 10 LOIS 

50,- ronTO BAHCif 

51.- A/frORIO mOHELL aiTISTA 

3S2.- LUIS MARIA I-'ZLIS 

35.- GEHAliDO PEKE;'. 3&TiyTA 

3A.- ZOa'ICA GARCIA ;.'l:^'ARIX) 

55,- A^rOiUO F£DRO YKLl'S^ 

36.- DEKTUfJA DE LSON (rUKRRKRO 

57.- EBIiESTO FEHEii 

5G.- aASILIO RETE3 

59,- SlBBLIUIfiJiBE^UI IH2IT0 

-K).- AJIA ?ERIZ FEllEZ 

<H,- AH ORES BHITO 

^.- LEON XL DO DE LA EOSA PEREZ 

^^,~ JULIO HA TIIIE.-^ LUIS 

^r<V.- 11MCEL0 KERGEUES PEEEZ 

^5,- EHELIO CABRERA COIvrRSRA 

^-6.- LIDIA PEREi-. C;\J3REIIA 

47.- OLGA DE LOS ftAlFrOS HEBILIS 

40.- HiflOIi BATI-iTA 

49.- KSIOL PEiVlL ALCATJTARA 

50,- AGUGTINA L^IBIB HQSEJl 

51,- OLGA lAII ::H0CEN 



076-0012 510-a 

076-0012500-1 

07&-C012398-5 

076-0C1256©- 

076-O0151354-3 

076-0012291-r 

0/6-0012415-2 

0*76-0012514-0 

076-0012380-1 

076-00125'Jl-'> 

076-001i???^l 

076-0012?.l.^- 

O76-O0i2r'7V -7 

076-0003 :^.cP'.» 

076-000125^-5 

076-0012 V>- 
076-000122';-G 

076-0012507- 

076-0001254-^ 

076-0012554- 

076-0001239-9 

076-0001253-1 

076-0006901-- 

05C"<)001229-r 

076-0012579- 

<i76-00155£'>-l 

OV"t:-OOl2415-0 



rjv? 



81 



RilLACIOH DE C0HPAHEH03 OEDULADOS £1^ lA IIESA ELECTORAL KUH. 32 UBIOA- 
DA Ell LA SECOION DE EAYAIIONM I QUE HO APARECElf REGISTRADOS KN LA 
niBTA UE VOTAJfTES. 



NOMBRES r APRLLLID09 

1.- AWnWIi-.A PtTTtt 

2.- OUNIRDA TIL 
3.- LUISA L''" "P-L 
4.- AMAGRAClA i^UT^ IIL 
5.- KELIDA AQUSTIHA HALOMOH 
6 .- DUAKIir LUIS TOSEPfl 
7.- MARIA PE A CUEBA 
0.- EU8EBI0 CABRERA GOMEZ 
9.- BELLA ROM CUEVA 
10.- JESU3 ALFREDO FLORIAN 
11,- SOLANA KAELISPI3 
12.- B.IANIA KAELI3 ALFREDO 
15.- CARLOS GUEVARA PEREZ 
lA..- MAURICIO KAHTE 
15.- CHiSTIAN BRITO 
16.- 80NIA BLANCO 
17." ELIA TAN FELIZ 
10.- QREGORIO PEREZ DE LA HOSA 
ly.- MARIA ELHU POLO riAITOLZL 
20.- QABITA BA.EZ EHCARHACION 
21t- rULAQROy MENDEZ OUEDAES 
Z2.- DORA MANUEL BRAKITO 
25.- 8IDABIA PEREZ PEREZ 
2'^- ANTOHIA PEREZ MATEO 
25.- LUISA TEGUE CUEVA 



CEDULA 



076-0001507-6 
076-0001507-4 
076-0001307-3 
076-000129907 
07S-0001 307-0 
076-0083105-1 
076-0013406-3 
076-0015135-8 

076-0013046-7 
076-0013021-0 
076-0015020- 
076-0004438-7 
076-001392-2 
IW76-000 3974-2 

076-rOo^scji^-;;- 

076-0011039-4 
076-0001074-1 
076-0013125-9 
076-0010756-^'- 
076-001 JOSS^l 
076-0013750-4 
076-0013115-0 
076-0015114-3 
076-0013154-9 



C.J vv 



82 



PEH30NAR 0EDULADA8 DE LA IffiSA ELEOTOHAL HUMEKO 031 T q.UE ATARJBCEN 
EN EL REGISTRO DE VOTAHTE. 103 OOITUQUI'WJS 



1.- 3ER0I0 riATor; asYiiS 

2.- KIDIA VARGAS 

5.- JA8INT0 flENDE/i 

4.- HAFAELA KNCAHIUCION UIAZ 

5.- MONICA EBCARIO 

6,- ALEJAIfDRO PIIiEDA ^ATOS 



076-0015959-1 
075-0012996-'^ 
076-0013987-5 
076-00129QO-U 
076-0)01 yK)2-2 
076-001299^B 



PERoONAS CEDULAD'.G IJL LA MS3A HUM. 15 DE IT/ILLA T HO ATJUIBCEN EH 
REGIBTRO Jr. VUTANTE^^, 



1.- yUAiJCISCO QOWZALIvO HEWDLZ 
2.- KANUEL E^iILIO CUEVAS 
5,- EKEMKNCIA (J0HZALK8 

"'J'JaNICA RODIJIOUEZ 



1215^75 
15659-76 
5656-76 

076-121 50-a 



MESA ELn CTURAT. miTI. 16_gE ?[VTIAA 

1.- Ai;r.t;NTiNu samtana &ohzalk!^ 



C76-00i!>6J5ai-5t 



83 



PERSONAL DE LA HES/. Sim. 029 DS GUAKARIiTK QUE £SiTAW 
CEDl.'LADAS I liO APAKK3Eii EN EL iiEGI:5Tj:o DE VOrAfTTE.: . 



1.- nUR-'K-riNA LKB'JOU 
2.- AJfD.W;-:A LKBROH 
3 .- HILflON CARVAJAl FSDIJM 
ft.- BirKNAVENTUaA PERV:Z 

5.- fermhn ^kuez hrlpivdpiz 

6p- NEUHY;'- P'iREZ IlERHIiJJA 
7.- TK7fAIDA PS.^eZ LSB'AOH 
a,- IGNA':iO HERCDIA FiiHKZ 
9.- PLEHIDA P2HEZ «X)NZiALKZ 

10.- nOUk PEREZ nORETA 

11.- KARCIA CAR¥AJAL LEBROK 

12.- ADA PEPiZ 

1 75.- F^REZ PATrrALE'ON 

14,- RAKGI LEBRON PER£Z 

X*?.- CUKlifJilO <K)lTSALK.Vi illUEii 

16,- EAIION PEREZ, PEJ<li2 

17c- GLOlilA iWRWi 

IS.- TORIBIO BATinTA PJiLIZ 

19.- JOSE LEBROIi jrREZ 

20.- DELFIA I'ERl./". .«;r.0ANXO 

21,- DAJ1IRJ LETi^fOH P£.^f.Z 

22.- MAirUEL AirrOJdO LinJRON PEIIKZ 

23.- fWRCELO LEBiiOR 

24.- JOny LL'BRON PEREZ 

25.- CLARA rURIA ?KHKZ 

25.- CANDIUA RAMIRBa 

27.- R03A RA11IHE7. 



cr/s-ooij^GV-^ 

076-0012til6^f 

O76-OOI2O07-3 
076-aC'l?852-l 
C/t^-OOlJ^o^-J 
076-0012i;Ot^:; 
076~O012C5>-^ 
076-001256O-5 
07&-0012Biir-3 
07&-0015%2-:3 
07S-O012«OG-:j 
07&-R?OSS331~3 
07£-001iJ966-C 
0?ti~0012t)22-2 

07c ..xa?mi«3 

076-00120J'=>-{i 

076-«i?l^fe>G»^:^— ^ 

076-0012820-6 
076~00125a3-7 
076-0011616-1 
O';5-O012570-7 
076-001 340 >-0 

076-0012571-5 
0';'6-001283>0-5 
076-®G2Jflt2J<H-2 
07Cr-00159e/fr-l 



>,;vv 



84 



ooin'iimAoioi, i,m.„i>o m ouuumtb. 



28.- JUAHA LEB^'ON PEHSZ 
29.- AKGEITTINA HEDINA JTEDIKA 
50.- BERIS AH- ^ i: i>EUE7. I^DINA 
51.- Vir;';.'nK GONZALfD-S LEBRCiN 
3ii!.- ITLA..NCin MEDINA FiEUIiM 
535.- BAGILIA LEBIiOn PEREZ 

y^.- SANTA LUCIA FEKEZ PEltES 

55,- alejandno bebkow perez 
>6.- to:'>i:liw Pi:kez lebron 
57.- drisi;ki;a noNi'E-/o ogaitix) 
50.- iit:0j>0iL\ LEBHOr? oueva 
39.- ri'J:-.B v'JI^A Pl-IRF.Z 
40.- ACRIPINO fi. LSHROS 
^1.- EUJalJlO REXES 
^.- REINU aor/ZALE^i PERKZ 
43.- OArfTO KS,{ii:OIA LEBUON 
t^,- GRZf/ORIO BTA. PEREZ 
^5,- RUi'L.icrv.' LEBRON 

46.- nAKc:a,i;;o itEiES gouZj\lep> 

47.- KAPAKL G-^RVAJAL 



076-00120 5»-7 
076-0012825-5 
076-0012857-0 
076-00.1.2810-7 
076-0012a2C-5 
076-C012819-ii 
076-0012640-4 
076-0012618-0 
076-0012856-2! 
076-0012829-7 
076-0012617-2 
076-0015968-2 
076-0010091-6 
076-0010099-9 
076-0009960-5 
076-0009972-0 
076~0009955«7 
076-0009978-7 
076-0010102-1 
076-00099^i-6-0 



ni"\: 



85 



A«A4A^w A. VA^vjJX>< * ua U T XXiliA X '^UC* n\J JLI'Ji^ 



REC£N EH ZTj H^JiJi'iTrtO DE TOTArr.CSJ. 



1.- HUHTi: IlAK-ilflES PEIiKZ CUFYAB 

2.- EDUAKP GONZALC" SAHCllES 

3.- DOMINGO CUEYAS GONZALES 

4.- LUCIA GONZALfvT HENDEZ 

5.- PIAJIGARITA AiCAIfTARA GOIJZALES 

6.- YALLTiClA MATOS 

7.- FRANCISCO GONZAL=;P WENDEZ 

a.- lUIKEl' GONZALES FELIZ 

9..- L0I3 BKLTUR 

10.- AKTOHIO rv.:YES DE LA CRUZ 

11.- JUANICA HODHIGUEZ 

12.- FBLIGIAHO GONZALES HEUINA 



CEDITLA rSESA 


ELECT 


076-001 55'M>- 


15 


076-0015587-5 


15 


076-001 5557-a 


15 


076-0012156-7 


15 


076-0015454-5 


15 


076-0015430- 


15 


076-0012155-9 


15 


076-0012154-2 


15 


076-0015468-3 


16 


0'7&O001P^7?'+-5 


26 


076-00 121 '30- 


26 


076-00 L2 J 35-9 


26 



nE£lA ELECTOK/u. MU«.09 DE EL JOBO 

HOriBRE^' 7 APEL].IIX)U 

1.- lUKUF.L £. RAritif:/. 00N2ALK*' 

2.- LUIS aARI'J .^EYiiJ CUEYAS 

5.- ALIDA AGRAMO.Hl'ii 

4.- ALCADLA r^mii'K MATEO F. 

5.- DEIC." r^EKUrtZ DE LOS SANTOS 

6.- CESA!i AUGU3T0 GOI'^Z 

7.- HAHCiA DUZ PENA 
8. - DSI3LS ri£x)iS nONTErtO 

9.- iUIPul SoTHiiL MATEO SENA 
10.- MIREM-^ HOK.'J-^RU GONZALKR 

11.- IRIS gon;.aj,k-; le la eosa 

12.- TOMIWT MICi{EL EGPIN03A 
13, -ROSA CUEYAo 
14,- FRAnCISCC DOTEL LOPEZ 
15.- AWCEL MAHIA 7ELI7. P50NTHH0 
16.- 3ELLITA GOMEZ 7ELIZ 

17.- REINA JULIA DO^^L 

18.- Tins RODRIGO GO^ZAT.TCS MATEO 

-^.x-^o uo ijn riiioA iiasU"rUUAL HUil, 

BO AJ'AHECL-r; SN KL RBGISTKO DE VOTAirTE.-',. 



CEDUU 

076-00060^-6-6 
076-001 5440-2 
076-0011856-1 
076-0011671-0 
076-0012928-7 
076-001 5569-3 
076-0011860-5 
076-0011S8G-e 

076-001 557I-* 

076-0015572- 

076-0011865-7 

076-0011878-5 

076-0015567-2 

076-OC15555- 

076^ 00113^7-1 

071^-0015856-9 

O7Ci-O0tt!l515-7 

076-00?. 55VO-9 



ajx 



19 DE JIESA AEEIBA T qUE 



86 



¥KHSOii.\'l CZDULADK3 E.n LA flESA liUiCTOUAI, HUn.l2 DB OAIiTANA T ^UE 
DO APfi'-iJ'CEW Eli EL EEGfSTHO HK VOTA/'TH.:. 



NO.'lB'-.-J.; i /^PKLl.IDO? 



CEDULA 



1.- HOBEWO DOBILLS FOTIiTCE 

2.- KHlUArtlA DOBILirj RAFAEL 

J.- AiU ROSA HATir.TA MENDE"- 

4.- FELICIA ELANGO PEREZ 

5,- ALD':"'PO oALOMOfJ PEllEZ 

5.- cor::TArrri:io cABUEiiA florian 

7,- DIOr'EDLr. CULTAC r-J^TEO 

0.- ALEI.flIDA DRITO MATOS 

9,- DIOr.FiUEr; DE LEON 

10.- JULIO CEGAR FLORIAN RETEG 

11.- nAL-riNA CUEV/Li; MATOS 



076-000 Vi 07-2 

6771 -7G 
53eC-76 
076-OOO^f 59/4-2 

076-0004 ;'97-5 
O76-0OC4>8a-0 
076-001195^5 
076-CBS3.<J55-8 
076-000^^595-5 



OLDvJLADO E» LA TJJGA ET.ECTORAL HUJ1.2e DK LA CUAVA T '^ilTt-: TJO APARl%eE EH 
EL HEUl ri-ao DE VOTAJJTE. 



BTUngRK 7 APEL LIDO 
1.- ALCIDES CRUZ REYSX". 



CKDUL A 
076-001 572tt-0 



ilii LA rHiGA ELilCTOltAL lOJn.OJl SE LOS OOITU^iUITOS 



LUI • fUQUEJ- nAT03 YAEGAB 



OBD. 07&-00157'*0''5 



«0"»v 



87 



^PSi^OHK'^ CSDULABAS EIT LA HESA ELECTORAL HUM. :'> J)E SAHTARA T QUE HO 
APARECEN EN EL HEGI '.TKO DJi VOTANTE;''i 



1.- J DAK REIK'-; 

2.- LUZ MARIA rtATOS ME3A 

3." PEDRO EIIILIO TOERE 



ClvUUJi/^V> 



07S00011908-8 
076-0011099-1 
076-0015529-7 



CED'JLAD«<' ."-JM LA ntZJA ELECTORAL HlA.ll DE SAITTANA T 'i'Ji-. 110 APAHECr:N 

O EEGIS'iKO Dr: VGTA'J'i?ES. 



rronHTK'- y APi'jj.Tuqr? 

1.- JOAN CU>?^A MAITO 

2.- ORLANDO DHITO CUKVA 

5.- AnrONIO HATOS llESA 

^.- DEUR-ATINA EWCAKMACIOW riEoA 

5.- nAGUAL-TMA EUCAK.NAC10N HESA 

6.- AnAUKY.-. MATEO 

7.- r'Jini/' .-j.T/.(,rL"<;iA sakcrez eeyes 

a.- nEC-oh P.AVI^TA CUEVA3 



CEDULA 

<K»flO0ll*»16-3 

076-001191 >-0 

076-O011959-5 

076-O011926-2 

076-0011927-0 

076-0011956-1 

076-11957-1 (076-0011957-1) 

076-0011912-2 



CKiJULADOC r': L;. rL'^•^ KLECTOHAL Uliri.ia OS SACTANA T .'iUE HO AI-Al?ECEIf 

231 nEGi.:iiv-o L'f; •.".•■i'AKTEn. 



=J» < 



88 



PiiKKEDEISTA HE XA KE'SA ELEOTORAL mm. y> UBICADA KIT aft.K RAKON 
qUh- EOT AN CEDULADG3 T EO APAREOKN EH KL flEOLSTRO HE VOTANTEXi 



1.- R08A IRIS BATISTA GEiiALDO 
d.- ALIXON HONTEKO BE LA PAfl 

3.- y.-uuDELis noirrLRO de la paz 

4.» HARTD^A IIATOS CUEVa 
5.- IlhRALIZ JTORIAN RETES 
6»- rUR.'.UELLA lUTOo KEREUIA 
7.- RAFAEL ESO/vNIO 
0.- JOSELO PINEDA GERALDO 
9.- JX)RALnrA ESOANIO DE LEON 

10.- aarriAGO amawcio matos 

11.- MAKUARITA MONl'EUO CUE7A 

13.- HIUALIRA ESOANIO HEREDIA 

13.- PAULA ESCAinO DE LEON 

14.- ilANUEL MATOS DE LA PAZ 

15.- HEBA at; Lt PAZ 

16.- OLGA MTinTA GERALtX) 

17.- JAIME ESCAKIO PEREZ 

IS.- RAUL 2KRRER0 

19,- ROBEI-n' AnAIICIO MATOS 

£0.- GANUIS DE LA PAZ PINEDA 

21.- Bl'i'ELI". lUTISTA QKRALDO 



076-001 376A-? 

O7&-OOI 5262-0 

076-0015265-3 

076-0013770-2 

076-0013769-^^ 

076-0013252-2 

05(6-001 32'*-7-l 

07G-1 3776-9 

076-0013767-0 

076-0013760-3 

076-001160*^-5 

076-0015249-7 

076-0015763-6 

076-0015255-4 

076-0015242-2 

076-0015965-7 

076-0013250-5 

076-0015778-5 

076-0015759-5 

076-0015762-9 

076-001 57S2-9 



»d' 



89 



PERSOHAa CEDULADA8 D£ LA IffiSA ELEOTOHAL UUMEHO OJl T qUE APAilEOi-N 
EN KL HEOinTHO DE VOTAfri'E. LOS OOnUQUX'rOS 



1,- CEHOIO MATO.T RiTiliG 

2,- NIDIA VAHG^'.r; 

?.- JAQIirrO MEHDE/i 

5,- MONICA ZaCAIIlO 

6,- ALEJAiresO PlilEDA TIATOS 



076-O015yp9-1 
076-OOi;i996-^ 
076-0^13937-5 

076-0015402-2 
076-001299^8 



PEnr.ONAS CEDULAD'.r. Di; Tj;. MS3A KUH. 15 D2 ir/ILU. y no AriSBiiiiN i£Bi 
RfX;i.STRO JL VUTAT.TiLc^. 



1.- PRAJICIf.CO QONZALi:n MEliDiiZ 
2,- MANUEL E^iILlO (lUEP/AH 
5.- FJIIEMKMCIA (K)H/.AT;ivS 

"^''JUA.N'ICA .TODHIGUEZ 



12i55-7o 
13&:)9-7u 
50^6-76 

076-12150-8 



riESA E;/":CTvJn AL im\. 16 ilB _yYi LL A 
1.- AliGENTIhO SANTANA GONZALK-T 



076-OOaG5S(C-i? 



90 



P£HSOHAn CEDUIiADAH KH LA KfiJA KLECTOKAL mjn.005 OHE FUflOIOHA ZM 0ABE2A DK 
BE TOnO r QOE BO APAHKOEN 121 EL RBGISTKU DE VOTAin'E.'',. 



yiOHBRE'. r JPEtLIDOr. 



CEDULA 



1.- TUDKIJKA HETKS PKHA 

2.- JOSS EDUARDO HOiJVAS BOVAS 

J.- raAHCI^O ALBERTO 

4..- LUZ2 ElOLIO flAXEO OS LEOO 

5.- HAILLA J03EFI8A ?I A (JALTA 

6,- GAirrA 

7,- KDOAEDO SOYAS HOVAn 

ai> LSQKARDO SXaCUHX. fiAIlIBE/. 

9,- yAtrriHA batista deito 

10. -JULIO vwsBB nsaszoa 

n.-OATAEL rEttEZ PEKEZ 
12.-DiX;ASI0LIIfA nBDIBA 
13.- rELICri'A H3HILL0 
1^.- ggrantPcBHOB^OM PUIEDA 
1^.- aiBELA rjlTOS Bandoz 
16.- QE30HEYA KEREOIA 

17.- a-uTTA inifl nAT];o values 

18.- R03AUR*. 3ATI8TA EIIITO aHlTO 

19.- DAnL-VflA HOVAB EKREDIA 

20.- JE3U ROVAr> DE LEOn 

£1.- niOUKLITTA RETE3 TAEGAP. 

22.- ?IIHC1A TALDES 

235- ADOLTP VARGAS SAflCHE/> 

Za.- nAJlESTA MORILLO 

25.- EDILIO HSIE? VAfiGAn 

2G.- BIRGEn rUTEO HETB-; 

27.- TASUn HAEILLO DE LA OHUZ 

28.- ATIEEICA OUEYA 

29.- BKSLISniHB RKI&S aABOUEZ 

lai.- T.cnnARDo storkait VAT.T.rjo 

31.- J03E NOVA RETEii 
52.- TKODORO HKTES 02 BOH 
5}.- aVIUaOEL BOVAS EOVAS 










076-00117&1-3 
076-00U7^!J-l 
07&-OO11687-O 
076-0015522-7 
076-0011755-0 
07&-0011755-5 
«?§-00U746-3 
07S-0011769-6 
07G-0011667-2 

ajeww)n7?s-4 

07S-0011751-* 

o76-ooll725-a 

076-O011750-0 

076-0015521-9 

076-11720-9 

076-11700-1 

076-0011717- 

07&-0011G69-3 

076-00117^0-7 

076-0002BQ9-3 

07&-001176J*-7 

076-0011772-0 

076-0011779-5 

076-0011731-6 

07S-0011762-1 

076-aiU1762-l 

076-0011716-7 

076- 0011672-2 

076-00150^5-2 

O7f^O011fi96-7 

076-OD11756-A 

076-0011759-7 

OTS-OOllT^'v-g 



__GXL2ML'T0 DZ I.Et)Ji 075 



>«M#vwa.wn 



ovb-ooii6-:?a-t 

OTSV-OCSaJ-SS- 



91 



PSRoONAf^ CEDULADA.^; Eff Lk fEDA SLEGI-OEAX JSUTl. 006 Qlffi i'TmClOMA EH 
EZ, GRAJIADO QOS HO APARECElf ETi KL EBOIOTRO DE TOTArPTEG. 



KunDRH::^ T apellidos 

1,- AODSTIBA SITRIOJI HSDllIA 
2.- HUADI3 GOnaJ/. LEBRON 
J.- EiinSRARDA GfiTO AfilA 
4.- IlERCBUEn JJDIA HESA FSLIZ 

5.- mniiau oueva poniATi 
6.- JUJ^ cueva m-oriak 
7.- HiEirBEHino riEr-.A 
b:-. ^u.^*-* nsDH^A pei'a 

9.- unZSinLA TxEDA UE liOSASTOS 
ft^^roH^TIGiJELA R/vTOS HRiA 
ll.-ALIDA HESA 
12.-niCHJELIHA GUETA9 filiiiRlAIT 



CEDUIJV 



076-0011786-0 
076-0011792-8 

o7&-ooiiei2-^ 

076-0015556-7 
076-O0SB7»3-C 

076-0053531-0 

07S-CO7wlPO5-5 
076-Ol>15C07-2 

076-0011005-0 
07&-O001797-7 
076-5O!t'v 
S55-2283 



i.- MARIDELLA CUEVA VALUEZ 
2.- rJVRGARITA VARGAG VARQAG 
5.- CRISTOBAL HATEO DE OLEO 
'i.- ROBERTO E5CAHI0 
5.- CUOLO PEivE^^ PEREZ 
6.- niFOCINA EfiUAHIO 
7.- NET VARO'VS VARGAS 
3.- TERJ-IA PEREZ 
9.- LUCAS ESCAHIO 
10.- MORJENIO E3CANI0 
11.- NIC1URIZ PEREZ VALDE/> 
12.- OCTAVIO JIMEjEZ 



075-0011826- 
076-001185'^- 
076-0005504- 

076-001551^ 
076-001585^- 
076-0005479- 
076-0015566- 
076-OOliev;- 
076-000 54SO- 
076-0015557- 
076-00055^- 
076-0005^99- 
075-0015^15- 



92 



PERSOf-'AT, CEDUT.AnAn 5>J LA nCOA SLEOTORAL HUM. 01? T QUE HO APARECEH 
Kn El. nJsGJr>T'iO UK Vl^fAHTL' 



2,- VJ-':'-'n no M/v;;rTNt;7 K.( 

5.- Yi ',!•:. \ ::''PTi:!i::. m. 
5.- ang'.:j, :iapj.a nor; ii-o ^ 

b. - /i.'/n •.-:.jj.\ir 

a.- yy/.r--. mc:;7K;:"' g. ' 
9.- y.r.'''\7:]yv.t. m-'.-ui:' 



CEJ3ULA 



07&-C0155'56- 

07G-C01.?r"?0.^- 

07G-C01223^;- 

07b-Ci!jl?.lttO- 
O7C»-O0iai?'i- 

07b-.'Ui22?9- 

07C.-LiCa27''-5- 



ajw 



/v 



;>^l.Kio Or 











93 



yMBQUk CEDULADA S KH LA nSiJA KLECTOIUR jnm.0002 QUE FDHOIORA El? TA« 

ruro r ho APASEcai ss el hegibtro cs voTAnrii. 



^(.NlBRc^t Y Ai>j:LLI Dpfi 

L.* rtAHIA JVKq\}lU KliCAHrtAOlOH V. 
2.- lUIUiiS IlO/Afi FZtIA 
5.- CLAJlIRiy PfiRE2 nEaA 

5.SJAmJI-X AHTOmO OAHARIO 
6.- (lEIRTOBALIRA HETES WEQA 
7.- FAOTIMA HZTF.r, VAflQAH 
8.- SAJfTA CATALmA RODHIQITEZ 
Q.- FURGARITA H. DZ 108 8AHT08 H. 
lO.-ULTniA E'CAPIO DE LA PAZ 
ll.-ELIORGIFA OAHUJEHO RCTES 
12.-?03is FIGUoHEO HATEO 



JA52-7ft 

076-0011549-2 

070-0001507-5 

c^s-ooi 5292-7 

07ti-0001 371-3 
076-0001452-1 

076-001^72-5 
076-0001478-0 
076-0001 509-B 
076-0011541-9 
076-0011^2^0-8 

076-OCC1105-'J 



rWTV 




94 



TOTAKTES DE Lk HK3A mm.G0^9 QUE ffO EBTAH EH L06 L1UTAD08 



Eonpm:". i apelmdos 

1.- mHIYE HATEO PEKA 
2.- LUCIA CHEVAG IffiDlBA 
5e- DOnHflB BEHA 

4.- nifil^ lUTOS 
5.- LIS ED DECERA MDIIJA 
6.- UI0GE2JLV. PEHA PENA 
7.- EHHni^iUE riATOS EOSARIO 



076- 



gSDOTiA 

076-OOl5^5>-7 
076-0015654-3 

07&-ociy>A9-3 

07C>-0012iW)-5 
07«>-0012427-0 
076-0013917-9 
076-0015917-5 



TOTAJfr^'. DE LA raSA fiUH. 0020 QUE HO EST All EH L03 LI3TAD0S. 

nonoRj-: ■■ t isklliuos cedula 



L.* TOVANIfYS CUEYA3 GAHTAHA 
2,- 3DJAHA CUEYA^J 3..I!TA11A 

5.- rURTIKA CUEVAS nSUDLZ 
TCTR'JEHSI AL3EHT0 HSSA KODRI-iUUSS 



076-0015657-1 
076-0013656-5 
076-0013799-1 
076-O012t-95-2 



TOTAimi: DE LA HESA EUIt. 002? .iDE KO BaiAK EM LOo LI3TAD0S. 



nOMDRv-- T ^LPELLIUGG 



OEUIiLA 



L.a miLIO nUTUEL UIAZ CUEYAS 

2.- JOGK 8UEK0 LUI3 

5.- 



rxjT-/ 








076-001572^9 
076-001 572i; 



95 



55.- IiAlilA Tor 

yt.- JULIO PAT SEGURA 

55,- JLLTAGRACIA MONTEKO ANDERSON 

56,- QMSLlhOA TE^Hhl FHANSUA 

57.- riLOMENA MICHELL (JAHCIA 

5lR.- itlia^ de roc exh«oo 

59,- dulfina feliz luis 

^,- AJXTA (TUIT/A':' ABRAUAi: 

61.- AKn^IA HONTK-40 CU'/.'V.^'-: 

62.- LUZ KARIA ALCA-i'-ftRA *';ii:H0 

63.- LUZ riAHIA yiur.'.Z 

6A,- nARTHA FELTZ- 

G5.- ARi^UlMi:;UES iri'J'^'cd." .TIN"';'.': 

bs.« ROSA nom-EKo li.ai'O 



076-00] 2^18-9 
076-0012373-6 
076-OOli! 562-9 
076-0012'? 15-5 
07&-001255'>-5 

070-00 JL >«*H>- L 

076-00695^! -i 

076-001 32^;a-& 

076-00.1.3567-7 
076-0015570-1 
076-001; 'JJ 4-0 

076-0012516-5 
076-CC06^;7S»0 
076-001236.?- 



nLSA ELECTORAL Sm\.l7» COi-iTIKUACION. 

27,- RWEEJi PEREZ FELIZ 
20.- CiRNELA FE.-xEZ 



076-0012251-* 
076-00122^'l-«:' 



niv'.A ELliCTOi.AL KU:i.0;'9 DS GUAUARATE, 



NcnarvL'-'. y Ai ':i:i.i.ri)03 

l.-iu\FAEL i-E:(EZ 

<,- LEDl Li'B'^Ofi PJ:'<)W 



CEDJJLA 

076-COlClO:/ -4 
076-0012B91-4 



p. K-V 



96 



3^ Feliz Espinal Miguelina 14 

35 Castillo Antonia 13 

36 Amador Espejo Ysabel 13 

37 Olinda Amparo •'^spinosa 14 

38 Gomez Paquita 14 

39 Mendez Biembenido 20A 

40 Amador Espejo Hirdelices 13 

41 Figuereo -^lanca Rosa 13 

42 Gerardo Monero Harcello 14 

43 GaraballoCorniel Tomasina I3 

44 De la Paz Hilario 14 

45 De Leon Dotal de Reyes Laura 15 

46 Lavicita Lidia 20 

47 Cueva Matos Manuela 15 

48 Cuevas Matos Juana 15 

49 Familia Nova Victoria 13 

50 liaria Vargas Finales Matos 13 

51 Clemente Alfonso Cabral Mo 13 

52 Irene Dotel D'Marte 13 

53 Reinoso Martinez Juan Luis 20 

54 Amador Espejo Odalis 20 

55 Al;agracia Yan Profeta 20 
55 Gloria Lovi Mercedes 20 

57 Hirene Marte Dotel de •'^spinosal3 

58 Luis Dabi Yoset 20 

59 Bardeniro ^onzalez Espinosa 14 

60 Reyes Brito Iris Mandalis 20 
51 Reyes Polanco Julio Alexis 20 



079-004514-2 

079-0004092-9 

079-0004063-0 

079-000 

079-0004543-1 

079-0006264-0 

079-0004061-4 

079-000452S-5 
079-0004541-5 

079-0004086-1 

079-0004469-9 

079-0004115-8 

O79-OOO7O6I-I 

079-0004100-0 

079-0004099-4 

079-000159-6 

079-0004356-9 

079-0004085-3 

079-0004136-4 

079-0007079- 
079-0006850-8 

079-0007905 
079-0007064 
079-0004136 
079-0007307 
O79-OOO99OJ-9 
079-0007245-0 
079-0007254-2 



97 



JUNTA CENTRAL ELECTORAL 



NUM. 31-94. 



RZSOLUCION 



^X-ff i S'/T S 



PRIMERO; Disponer que aquellos ciudadanos 
cuya cSdula de identidad y electoral debidamente expedida in- 
dique que deben votar en la mesa electoral que aparece en el 
reverso de 3U carfie, pero cuyo nombre no figure en la lista 
de electores de dicha mesa, podrin votar an la,raisma agre- 
gindose su nombre y datos a la lista de votantes^^ siguiendose 
la regla del voto obszervado. 

SEGUNDO: Disponer que las votaciones sean 
prorrogadas hasta las nueve horas de la noche del d£a de hoy, 
para los ciudadanos que no lo hayan podido hacer ^z tal causa. 

TERCERO: Mandar que la presente Resolucifin 
sea pubiicada de conformidad con la Ley. 

DADA en Santo Domingo, Distrito Nacional, 
RepQblica Dominicana, a los dieciseis (16) dias del mes de 
mayo del af.o raiol novecientos novei)rfta y e^raijo-TtTB 9 4 ) 

<^^ ^R. MANUEL R. GARCIA LJZ*I?5q*^ x 
-^^ I Presidente ^^^^^^"""^ M^M^ 

BERRIDO, 




Clfly'^BLES LI 
Miembro 



OPEZ 



AMAHEE DIAZ CASTILLC 
Secretario 



84-459 0-94-5 



98 



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106 



DIRECCION NAaONAL DE INFORMACION ELECTORAL Provinci.: 2 2 



v^ //e 



ctain- nst. 



Zii\iikXiii 



Aj«lljdM 

Asaaj OLivARES 

A3SBJ OJEZAOA 
A3a?J R03RIGUHZ 

Aaaaj BooacJEZ 

ASaiU R03ARO 
A3SEU SANTOS DE PORTES 
ACCSTA ACCSTA 
ACC3TA PEGUESO 
ACOSTA RODRIGUEZ 
AOAWES G0N'ZA:.EZ 
ALBA LOPEZ 
ALEJO SALCECO 
ALMANZAR TEJADA 
ALMO^^•E 

ALMONTE DE LA CRUZ 
ALMONTE DE LA CR'JZ 
ALMONTE FERNANDEZ 
ALMONTE FERNANDEZ 
A.M0N~WAR7',N£2 
ALVONTc MARTINEZ 
ALVA=EZ 
ARNAUD URENA 
EAEZ GONZALEZ 
5AEZ GONZALEZ 
EAEZ RAMIREZ 
5ALDERA J :>l CASTILLO 
EALDERA JIMENEZ DEH 
EALOERA OUEZADA 
SALDERAOUEZADA 
BALrriSTA RUIZ DE VERAS 
EEATO CA3RERA 
EEATO PORTE 

5EAT0 OUEZADA DE TEJADA 
iETANDEDE J0R3E 
3ID0 

ElDO CASTILLO 
EI00CE3ALLOS 
5!D0CE?EDA 
SRiTOMONEGRO 
f CA5RAL H DE DE JES'JS 
:a3RERA CONTnERAS 
CA3RERA S'JAREZ 
CA3RERA VARGAS 
CA5RERA VARGAS 
CABRERA VARGAS 
CA5RERA VARGAS 
CASRERA VARGAS 
CACE=iS FERNANDEZ 
CAWJVCrlO MEDINA 
CAPB.LAN OJRAN 
CAPELLAN JOAOJIN 
CARDENAS RIVAS 
CARDENAS RIVAS 
CASTILLO 

CASTILLO ARNAUD • 
CASTILLO 3ALDERA 
CASTILLO DIAZ CE HERNANDEZ 
CASTILLO DURAN 
CASTILLO FERNANDEZ 
CASTILLO HERRERA 
CASTILLO MEJLA 
CASTILLO MEJLA 
CASTLLO PICHARDO 
CASTILLO OUIROZ 
CASTILLO OUIROZ 
CASTiaO ROSARiO 
CASTILLO SANCHEZ 
CASTILLO SIRI 
CASTILLO TEJADA 
CASTILLO TEJADA DE SANCHEZ 
CEPEDA CACERE3 DE GUZMAN 
CEPEDA OUEZADA 
CEPEDA SIRI 
COLON DURAN 
COLON LIRIANO 
COMPRESS DE TEJADA 
COMPRES BENCCSME 
CRUZ 
CRUZ 

CRUZ FERNANDEZ 
CUESTO OUEZADA 
CUETO PEREZ 
:E JESUS FERN AN'DEZ 
:E.'ES.S FERNANDEZ 

:e^E5usmoya 



NomhTOT 

JORIAS 

OFH.IA ALTAGRACIA 

ramona EsraA 

ENRIQUE ANTONIO 
SLVIO 
LUZ MARIA 
ILDA MJkRlA 
MILAGROS 
SANTA ZORAIDA 
GERTRUDIS DEL CARMEN 
JOSE FRANCISCO 
KARINA ALTAGRACIA 

jACccjawE Da carmen 

GUSTAVO RAFAEL 
ALTAGRACIA 
ARGENTINA EDUVIGIS 
FRANCISCO ANTONIO 
EDUVIGIS 
VINICKD ERACLO 
HUANDA Oa CARMEN 
WILSON LIZARDI 
ALTAGRACIA VERDMCA 
HERIBERTA MARIA 
ALEXANDER ALBERTO 
HIPOLITO ANTONIO 
GLENNY 

MARIA ASUNCION 
TOMASINA VICTORIA 

GisaA altagrac:a 

IDALIZA ES=ERANZA 
MARIA OLGA 
JOSE DARIO 
ALTAGRACIA EDUVI3ES 
MARIA EVaiA 
YOLANDA ANTOMA 
RAMONA ALTAGRACIA 
SATURNINO 
RAMON ANTONIO 
ALTAGRACIA I MERCEDES 
RAMON aiGIO 
FACUNDA aENA 
ABRAHAM 
JUAN JOSE 

CARLOS JOSE HIPOLITO 
aOR ANGa 
FRANaSCOLEONa 
JULIO CESAR 
YURISAN ALTAGRACIA 
MARGARTA ALTAGRACIA 
JOSE ALEJANDRO 
MARIO AL3ERT0 
GFEGORD 
ESTE5AN MARINO 
GERAROO 
PEDRO 

OALGENIS JOSEFINA 
DULCE MARIA 
MARIA GUARINA 
BELK IS MARIA 
OUBIAN BlENVENIDO 
GLBERTO ANTONIO 
EUCUDES LEONARDO 
MANUa RAMON 
OANILO ANTONIO 
JUAN PABLO 
MARINA YANIRYS 
LEXGER RAFAa 
VIRGILO ANTONIO 
DAMARIS JOCaVNE 
MARIO REM3ERT0 
ANA LUCIA 
IDALIA DOLORES 
JOSE OSIRIS 
MaSA JOSEaSA 
DIONICIA ANTON lA 
ANGa LUIS 
JACINTA ANA ROSA 
VALENTINA 
DISNAiOA 
WILLLAN DE JESUS 
LOURDES XIOMARA 
MARGARuA MARIA 
LEON aELTERIO 
CLAIDI MERCEDES 
FaiX ANTONIO 
FEUX 



Cii. Anienof 



Meti No: 0003 

Dir»coon 

LAALIASIUCIA T 
LA ALTAGRACIA 
JUAN VENTURA 
LUZ ESTREUA DE 
SANCHEZ 34 

SABANA ANGOSTA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
LUZ ESTRELLA 
TOROCENIZO W 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
AHTTJRO ROJAS 

LUZ ESTaU DE 

SANCHEZ 77 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

TOROCENIZO 

CHITO CEPEDA I 

HERMANAS MIRA3AL 

HERMANAS MIRA3AL 

JUAN VENTURA 

JUAN VENTURA : 

PROLONGACION 

CaON 

LUZ ESTREUA 

LUZ ESTRaLA DE 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
HERMANAS MIRA3AL 
HERMANAS MIRA5AL 

DUARTE 

TOMAS D:S'_A I 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

TOMAS DIS'J^ 5 

AVENIDA DUARTE 

LA DUARTE « 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 

DUARTE 

LA AROMAS 

RAFAa OUEZADA : 

PEPE HERRERA 15 

DUARTE 

PEPE HERRERA 

PEFE HERRERA 2; 

PEPE HERRERA 

PEPE HERRERA 

PEPE HERRERA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

SANCHEZ 

SANCHEZ 



003(31 051 
OM376 051 
01CBB5 055 
000000 000 
011200 051 
006032 051 
000041 051 
000000 COO 
006697 C51 
006641 051 
011751 C51 
009082 051 
122568 031 
042628 047 
001966 051 
012942 055 
015972 055 
0015B4 051 
003026 051 
000000 000 
010974 051 
004572 051 
019667 055 
011411 051 
009445 051 
485016 001 

008193 055 

008194 055 
001954 051 
002017 051 
058916 047 
009699 051 
009995 C51 
008657 047 

001311 051 
002350 051 
017425 047 
005E95 051 
002425 051 
006387 055 
006233 064 
027074 047 
009695 051 
009232 051 
009396 051 
009427 051 
009822 051 
000000 000 
004678 051 

011939 051 
076552 056 
002281 058 
006009 051 
037415 054 
010729 055 
000000 000 
002409 051 
017537 047 
000000 000 

011841 051 
010378 051 
012253 051 
009451 051 
028066 055 
000000 000 
006830 051 
012044 051 
008610 051 
000000 000 
016955 055 
019646 047 
004982 OSS 
026089 047 
002535 051 
009349 051 
010749 051 
008366 054 
015846 054 
006139 051 
005932 051 
009868 051 
000000 000 
023499 054 
000300 000 
000000 000 
0101S7 064 



SANCHEZ 



58 



caoN . 

CALLS 3 012 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
TOROCENIZO 
SANCHEZ 



SANCHEZ 
DUARTE 
SANCHEZ 
TOROCENKO 



16 



M 



PEDRO RXUE 
SANCHEZ 

Toao 
caoN 

SANCHEZ N. 104 C 

HERMANAS MIRA3AL 
aiGENIO JIMENEZ 
SAN RAFAEL 

DUARTE PARTE ATRA5 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

PEDRO ROJAS 

DUARTE 

MSIA 7 

COLON 

SABANA ANGOSTA 

MELLA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

HERMANAS MIRABAl 



107 



DIRECCIONMACIONALDEINFORKWCION ELECTORAL Provincia: 22 

Vci6 CedjUA^J"! 



Municipio: 051 



=1 



b: 



Cil 0331C39 S 

C51 03010*0 3 

C51 03010*1 1 

C51 00010<2 9 

Cil 03010*3 7 

C51 030104* 5 

:51 03010*5 2 

:;i 03310*6 

:5i 03010*7 8' 

:51 00010*8 6 

:51 03013*9 * 

C51 0301050 2 

:=l 0301051 

:;1 3301052 B 

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D= LA cauz 

DELACajZARNAUD 
DELACSUZA^SAJO 

OE u cajz DuaAN 

OEUCfUZDUaAN 

CE LA CauZ TAVESAS 

DE LA SOSA 

DELEON 

DE LEON DE LEON 
XDE LEON IDE JIMENEZ 

DECHAMPS 

DIAZCABELA 

0:AZ GERMAN 
J-DlAZhEaKANDEZ 

ClAZaDOUE 

C;S.AYNOA 

:'JnAN 
DU^AN 

:j^an cace=E3 
ZJ-J.K cauz 
dj:an cauz 
:j^n' ousan 
dj=an dusan 

DjaAN DJoAN 

C.'=AN rz-J-l 

O-AAN FEaNANCEZDE ALMONTE 

DJnAN GASCiA 

OJ=AN HERNANDEZ 

CJ=lA^;HER^ANOEZ 

DjaASHEaSANDEZ 
OJiAN HESNANDEZ 
CJ=^N HERNANDEZ 
CJ=AN HEaNANDEZ 
D.=A\ JOaGE 
D.^AM/AaTlNEZ 

:j^\ MAariNEZ 

C'J^AN0LIVA5ES 
Dj:an OLIVAPES 

DjaAN aoDaiGuEZ 

0'J=AN aOOJE 

2j=As aosAaio 
DjaAN aosAao 
ojaAN suASES 

D-=AN SUASES 
D'J=AN TEJADA 
DjaAS' TEJADA 
DJ=AN VAS0-E2 
DjaAN VELEZ 
OjaANVELEZ 
DjaAN VELEZ 

ojaA'j veloz 
EscAaNACiON S'jAaEZ 

yESXlTOGE.awAN 
^ E5:^0TO VALENZ'JELA 

ES=AILLAT EENCCSME 

ES=!^AL ESaiNAL 
XE5=IN0LA 

ES'INOSA PAULINO 

??-FrA3aEU 

;EL1=EVAS0'JEZ 
X?Ea\AN0EZ3:0O 

^Ea-JANDEZ CASTILLO 

^EasANDEZ CASTiaO 

PEaNANDEZ D'jaAN 

?EaNANDEZ FEaNANDEZ 

FEaNANDEZ FEaSAN'DEZ 

FEaSANDEZ aoo'JE 

FEaSANDEZaOOUEZ 

:Ea\ANDEZ T DE BODRIGUEZ 
V FEaSANOEZ TEJADA 

FEasASDEZ VASOUEZ 

FiGuEaoA vEaAS 
vFiG'jEaoA VEaAS 

V FiGJESOA VEaAS 
VGAaClA CACEaES 

GAa:;ACAMILO 

GAa:iACAMILO 

GAaClA CAMILO 

GAaCIA CAMILO 

3Aa;:A DELEON 
GAaciA D^aAN 

GAaCIAO'jaAN 
GAaCAGAaCiA 

GAaciAHEasAN'OEZ 

(GAaciAf-EasANDEZ 



Nontbf*! 



JOSE DAFtIO 

LORENZO ANTONIO 

tMJCH 

YOavi ERMBJEGILDO 

YUDERKA ALTAGRAGIA 

ANGa LUIS 

ESTFVAN 

EMMA MARIA 

DAICY MARIA 

IMaOA 

RAFAa MIGUEL ANGa 

ALBERTO 

ISRAa ALNARDO CE JESUS 

JOSE AMIRIS 

ANTONO NICOLAS 

MAYRA ALTAGRACIA 

JOSE ANTONO 

NOEMIAlTAGaACIA 

PUNIOFaANCISCO 

DOMINGO AMTONIO 

BAJO 

LUIS MANUa 

MIGUa ANGa 

NELSON ANTONIO 

MANua FaANCISCO 

ZORAI MA ONEIDA 

GERMANIA ALTAGa;C;A 

JOSE BIENVENIDO 

JOSE RAFAa 

MANUa SANTIAGO 

MARY ROSA 

ROSA aENA 

WILLIAN RHADAWES 

JUAN JOSc ALiERTO 

ADALGISA ALTAGaiCIA 

YVaiSSE AlTAGRACiA 

FRANCISCO ANTONO 

ISIDRA ALTAGRACIA 

ANDRES 

MANUa DE JESUS 

AKTTONIO E5TE5AN 

MARISa 

RAMON ANTONIO 

R0SAL3A ALTAGRACIA 

aEaSIDA ALTAGaAC:A 

ROSA ESTaA CARiCAO 

ANA MERCEDES 

GLOaiA M=aCEDES 

RAMON ANTONIO 

RULI ANTONIO 

HARDY EUaiNlCE 

DAVID DE JESUS 

ENNOJOSE 

FRANCISCO JAVIE= AJGUSTO 

ULISES FRANCISCO 

MARIA MAGDALENA 

GEORGINA 

MARIA AOUILINA 

RAFAa FaiPE 

JOANY ALTAGRACIA 

KATIA MERCEDES 

JOSE DAVID 

LOURDES NATIVIDAD J 

RAf Aa a<IiJO 

DLSIA MERCEDES 

NERBDA 

FRANCISCO ANTONIO 

aENA MERCEDES 

ANA Ca'A 

JOSE FRAN'CISCO 

LUIS EMILO 

FRANCISCO JOSE 

MERCEDES ALTAGRACIA 

SASINO ANTONIO 

MANUa ANTONIO 

FREDY ANTONO 

JUANA YVaiSSE 

MARILIN MARGARFTA 

ZOILA YANET 

RAMON EMUO 

ENMANua 

JACQUELIN ALTAGRACIA 

ESTHER NOEMI 

ANGELA 

ANGELICA MARIA 



Zii. Anienor 



012221 051 
006*32 C51 
017920 055 
011851 055 
000000 000 
029470 055 
009700 051 
010747 055 
002E25 051 

000000 boo 

027993 0*7 
008069 051 
011125 051 
010943 051 
009923 051 
009696 051 
022172 055 
005001 051 
006129 051 
0031*1 051 
030162 047 
002995 051 
011*50 C51 
011439 051 
009343 051 
0114*0 051 
000751 051 
002**5 051 
006*17 051 
003571 051 
006551 051 
002*33 051 
001797 051 
005*50 051 
0093*2 051 
009516 051 
0098*8 051 
00*3*7 051 
002335 051 
011252 051 
002434 051 
07061* 047 
009250 051 
005732 051 
003671 051 
0C2351 051 
002319 051 
00261! 051 
000554 051 
009365 055 

011157 051 
000000 000 
010983 051 
003244 051 
012570 055 
010536 051 
009730 046 
000002 051 
355079 001 
017403 055 
006703 051 
000000 030 
009449 051 
006597 051 
004086 051 
009956 051 
000791 047 
005908 051 
001239 051 
023855 056 
010605 051 
004589 051 
024527 055 

016811 055 
025230 065 

04449 047 
009431 051 
010233 051 
000000 000 
000000 000 

011620 051 

011259 051 
436755 Ml 

009710 051 
009876 051 
000000 000 



Met! No: 0003 

Dnccion 

LuZ ciiincLLA be 

DUARTE 

SANCHEZ 78 

SANCHEZ 

SANCHEZ 

caoN 

TORO CENIZO 61 

DUARTE PARTE ATRAS 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

MONTE PUTA 13 

DUARTE 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

SANCHEZ 41 

27DEFE3REaO 3 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

SANCHEZ 

MAGUEY 

POLANCO 75 

MAGUEY 74 



SANCHEZ 
SANCHEZ 



62 



HERMANAS MIRA3AL 
TORO CENIZO a 



JUANA SALTITOPA 



JUANA SALTITOPA 

LCS3L-E'. 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
TOMAS DISLA 
TORO CENIZO 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
VILLA TAPIA 

SANCHEZ 90 

SANCHEZ 29 

VIUA TAPIA 

SANCHEZ 

SANCHEZ CIEN IK 

SANCHEZ 



SANCHEZ 67 

SANCHEZ 
PEPEHERRERA 
SANCHEZ 

HERMANAS MIRASAL 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
VILLA TAPIA 
TOMAS DISLA 7 

PEPEHERREaA 4 

MARIA TRINIDAD 
CHAGOJIMBJES 
DUARTE 

AVENIDA DUARTE 
CHA GO JIMENEZ 
CHAGO JIMENEZ 12 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
HERMANAS MIRAEAL 
CHAGO JIMENEZ 
SANCHEZ 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
PEPE HERRERA 
PEPEHERREFIA 8 

PEPE HERRERA 

TOMAS DISLA 

TOMAS DISLA 01 

TOMAS DISLA 

TOMAS DISLA 

TORO CENIZO 

DUARTE 87 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

PROLONGACION 



108 



OIRECCION NACIONAL DE INFORMACION ELECTORAL Provincii: 2 2 



Munieipio: 051 



Vo'l) 


:**jt»Ana( 


/ktwAdoi 


Nartrtj 




Cil 0M1125 2 
C:1 0X1126 


GAnulA tizriSt^^uzl 
GASCIA VENTU^ 


JJi:AN.t)K«3 




LE?IDO BENEDICTO 




:51 0001127 e 

:;i 0M1128 6 


<GERMAN Asaaj 

■/GERMAN A3S5U DE VASO'JEZ 


ESTFJk ALTAGRACIA 




CAROAO 




C:l 0001129 4 


iS"- 


CHARO 




C:l 0X1130 2 


?GL 


JOSE ANTONO 




C51 0X1131 a 


VGLREINOSO 


JOSE FRi.NCISCO 




:j1 0X1132 6 


GLRODSIGUHZ 


BARTOJk MARTINA 




::1 0X1113 6 


GH. flOSARlO 


ALFREDC SAUL 




:;i 0001134 4 

C;i 0X1135 1 


GIL nOSASlO 
GIL ROSASlO 


JORGE RA-AEL 




ROSA EVEUNDA YNMACULADA 




C51 0X1136 9 


GOS 


MARIA MAGDALENA 




:i1 0X1137 7 


G3«ez 


OLIVIA MARIA 




:;i 0X1138 5 


■♦GOMEZ AL5ADER0SARO 


ADELEA ASTONIA 




:;i CM1129 3 


GOMEZ BATISTA 


JOSE R4-Aa 




;:1 XOIUO 1 


GOMEZ BRTO 


aCA RAMO\A 




;;i Dxiiii 9 


GOMEZ DEM>.'EG^ 


JUANAI.'E= CEDES 




;;i M01U2 7 


GOMEZ TEJA3A 


ANNY JJ.SSA 




:;i ODSiio 5 


GONZALEZ DE'Jk CRUZ 


SILVES*RE 




::' COOlltl 3 


GONZALEZ MED:\A 


RA.=AE.; ASTONIA 




;;i CD01U5 


GONZALEZ MONEGRO 


NORA A.-A3SACIA 




:;i CD01U6 e 


GONZALEZ TEJADA OE RDQUE 


POLO\'A 




::1 0001147 6 


GORIS DE RDOJE 


AN'A I.'ERCE:E3 




:-;i 00C1U8 4 


GORIS NueEZ 


EISOC 




;;i C001U9 2 


GORIS SOLANO 


ANAMERCECES 




:;i oxiiso o 


GORIS SOLANO 


LU:3t.'ARA 




:il 0X1151 B 


GORIS SO'JWO 


MPJ3=-3 




r.-i 0X1152 6 
:.-l 0X1-53 4 

:;i 0001-54 2 
:;i 0X1155 9 


GRULLON SANTOS 
GUZMAN 
/GU2XMNCEFEDA 
GUZMAN MARTINEZ 


JOSE 




LAICALAA 




LESEO.'A MERCEDES 




SANTitGO 




:;i 0X1156 7 


GUZMAN ORTEGA 


EMENE3iLDA ALTAGRACIA 




;;i 0X1157 5 


XGUZMAN TEJADA 


MIR;A\ Err.A 




:;1 CXl'Jfl 3 


■^ENRIOUEZ SANTOS 


PALERVCEJAS 




:':•■ 0X1159 1 


HENRIOUEZ SANTOS 


TOMAS 




;;i 0X1160 9 


HERNANDEZ ERrro 


J03E A.EERTO 




:;i 0X1161 7 


HERNANDEZ CACE = ES 


ANGEL EC.'VAR 




:;i :xi-52 5 


HERNANDEZ CA:ERE5 


flOSAEESVENOA 




:;i 0X1163 3 


HERNANDEZ CASTILLO 


GtBE=TC AKTONIO 




:;i 0001164 1 
;;i 0X1155 8 


HERNANDEZ CASTILLO 
HERNANDEZ DURAN 


VENECA RA'/ONA 




OSCAR G.EERTO 




."il 0X1166 e 


HERNANDEZ GARCIA 


aralzme=ce;es 


:;i 0X1167 4 


HERNANDEZ HERNANDEZ 


CESAR JCEE 




:;i :xii6a 2 


HERNANDEZ HERNANDEZ 


CESARSACEL CARMEN 




:;i 0X1169 


HERNANDEZ HERNANDEZ 


JULIO CESAR 


. 


:;i 0X1170 8 


HERNANDEZ JOA 


AMOS:C H'AS'UEL 




;:1 X01171 6 


HERNANDEZ =OLANCO 


RAMON A.O0 




:;i 0X1172 4 


HERNANDEZ REYES 


ANTOS'.A 




:ii :xii73 2 


HERNANDEZ V OE JIMENEZ 


FRANCISCADE JESUS 


1 


:i1 C001174 


HERNANDEZ VASOUEZ 


MARIA E3=E=ANZA 




;;i :xii75 7 
:;i 0X1176 5 


HERNANDEZ VASOUEZ 
HERNANDEZ VASOUEZ DE DURAN 


MARIAJCSE?A 




R03AJRA 




:;i xonn 3 


HERNANDEZ VILLAR 


GIANLCAVERCEOES 




;:1 0X1178 1 


HERNANDEZ ZORRIL LA 


RA.=AEL 




;ii 0x1179 9 


HIDALGO 


MARINO AVTONIO 


"■^ 


:■:! 0X1180 7 


INFANTE TORBlO 


ALTAGRACIA 




:;i 0X1161 5 


INFANTE TOR151O 


JULIA 




:;i 0X1-52 3 


JAOUES BJRGOS 


ANA MERCEDES 




:;i 0X1-63 1 


JESUS MOYA 


AN3EUC0 




:il 0001164 9 


JIMENEZ DE LEON 


JUANA CR:STINA 




:;i 0X1165 6 


JIMENEZ DE LEON 


REMIGIO ANTONIO 


:;i oxiiBs 4 


JIMENQ FRIAS DE ROOUE 


MARIA ISAEEI 




;:1 ;X1'57 2 

:;i 0X1158 

:bl 0-X1189 8 


JIMENEZ GERVAN 
JIM B^EZ GERMAN 
JIMENEZ RAMIREZ 


JOHANNA ALTAGRACIA 




ZOILA ALTAGRACIA 




ELE5A MARIA 




;;i :xii90 6 


JIMENEZ RAMIREZ 


MARIA CONS'JELO 




;:i 0X1191 4 


JIMENEZ RAM.REZ 


RAMON ANTONIO 


1 


:;i :xi-92 2 


JIMEMEZ RAMIREZ 


VICTOR 


1 


:;- 0X1-93 


JIMBJEZ ROOUE 


MIGUEL ANGEL 




;;i :ooi-94 8 


JIMINIAN C OE ROSARO 


ANA JC3E=A 


:-:i 0x1-95 5 


JIMINIAN DURAN 


BEnTlLIA DE JESUS 


:il 0X1-96 3 


JIMINIAN FORTES 


LUIS MANUEL ANTONIO 




::1 :Xl-97 1 

:;i 0X1198 9 


JORAN TEJADA 
JORGE 


YISERMAR.EN 




ANA ALTAGRACIA 




;-:i :xi-99 7 


JORGE BETANCE 


GLOR'A JACOUELIN 




:-;i :o:i:oo 3 


JORGE BET ANCE 


JOSE DANIEL 


1 


::l OX1201 1 


JORGE BET ANCES 


JOSE ALCIDES 




:;i oo:-?02 9 


JORGE BET ANCES 


MARTHA ANTONIA 




:-:i o;:-2:3 7 


JORGE CASTILLO 


INGRIDDEN'SSE ELIZABETH 


1 


::i :::-?04 5 


JORGE JORGE 


OUtBIO E3"EEAN DE JE3-JS 




;;i ::o-::5 2 


JORGE JORGE DEVERAS 


BELKIS RAMONA DEL PP-AR 


. 


■:• :::t:6 


LAJARA Dl-OD 


ALEXIS ANTONIO 


' 


:=' :;:-2:7 s 


LANTIGUA LC=E2 


ANACRESCENCIAA 




:.- ;::■.-:• 6 


.ANTIGUA VELCZ 


JUAN EL'SEO 




- :::::3 4 


.AY B3:qi3jEZ 


LUIS SANDY 




■ ;x :-: 2 


-ECLERC ROCRGUEZ 


ANA LUISA 



C4d, Anlerrar 
010059 Oil 
044530 047 
Xni4 063 
005882 055 
000000 000 
008391 051 
009477 £S\ 
006637 C51 
0110<2 051 
000000 000 
000000 000 
0U356 034 
005830 034 
024381 054 
016774 047 
009238 051 
004520 064 
169134 031 

011511 066 
003951 051 
000000 000 
007324 C55 
012496 047 
010052 051 
010501 051 
254505 001 
007926 051 
019699 051 
002606 051 
0045B9 051 
013609 024 
002644 051 
002325 069 
006733 063 
006951 051 
022400 055 
029045 047 
001977 051 
005392 051 
002201 051 
006966 051 
026069 CSS 
008116 051 
006748 051 
009374 051 
012033 051 
011173 051 
004416 051 
009912 047 
017609 047 
017647 047 
002670 047 
004780 051 
005907 051 
010346 055 

004905 051 

004906 051 
009272 0S1 
025036 047 
000000 000 

011151 051 
019490 047 
000000 000 
063069 056 
000039 051 
006696 055 
0I6S91 047 
023092 047 
000000 000 
003641 047 
004951 051 
009328 051 
000000 000 
000399 051 
006803 051 
009466 051 
000000 000 
0060S5 051 
006768 051 
007922 051 
003993 051 
0080S1 051 
057976 054 
009472 051 
012154 051 
008937 046 



Meu No: 0003 

Drtcajn 

jjANA sALuiurA 

TOMAS DISLA 

JUAN PAPIO 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

SANCHEZ 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 

JUAN SALTrrOPA 

PEDRO ROO'JE ! 

SANCHEZ 

JUANA SALTTTOPA 

SANCHEZ 

DUARTE 54 

DUARTE 54 

DUARTE 

DUASTE 

JUAN VENTURA 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

SA5ANA ANGCSTA 

DUARTE 



SANCHEZ 

DUAR-E 74 

=rinc;:al 

PRNCPAL 1 

HERVANAS M:,RA3AL 

MELLA 

HERMANAS MIRABAL 

JUANA SALTITO=A 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

DUARTE 

CHAGO JIK'ENEZ 9; 

JUAN VENTURA 

LUZDEOUEZADA 7 



JUANA SALTITOPA 

TOVAS DISLA 3 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

AV DUARTi 76 

SANCHEZ PARTE 

ARTURO ROJAS 



JJANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITO=A 

TOROCENZO 

DUARTE 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 16 

SAN RA:aEI 
SAN RAFAEL 23 

S.COC0 01 

RAFAEL QUEZADA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 16 

JUAN PAPIO S 



TORO CENIZO 10 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
SANCHEZ 



U DUARTE 8 

DUARTE 
TOMAS DISLA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
TOMAS DISLA 5 

SAN RAFAEL 
MARIA TRIMDAO 
CHAGO JIMENEZ 
GASTON F. DaiGNE 
HERVANAS MIRABAL 

MARIA TRINIDAD 
SANCHEZ 28 

JUANA SALTITOPA 



109 



DIRECCION NACIONAL D£ INFORMACION ELECTORAL Provineii: 22 



Municipio: 0S1 



ZiijitAs^tal 



Aotllidst 



3 



E 



Oil 
051 
251 
051 
051 
051 
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0001211 

0001212 8 

0001213 6 

0001214 4 
0M1215 1 
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0X1217 I 
000121B 5 

0001219 3 

0001220 1 

0001221 9 

0001222 7 

0001223 5 
000122* 3 

0001225 

0001226 e 

0001227 6 

0001228 4 

0001229 2 

0001230 
0X1231 8 

0001232 6 

0001233 4 

0001234 2 

0001235 9 



0001236 

0001237 5 

0001238 3 

0001239 1 

0001240 9 
0001241 
0001242 
0001243 

:ooi2«4 

0001245 

::oi246 

0001247 

0001248 

0001249 

0001250 8 

0X1251 6 

0001252 4 

0001253 

0301254 

0001255 

0001256 

0001257 

0001258 

0001259 

0001250 7 

0X1261 5 

0001262 3 

0001263 1 

0001254 9 

0001255 6 

0001266 4 

0001267 2 
OOC1258 
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:0C-270 6 
:X1271 4 
0001272 
0001273 

;:1 0001274 

::i ;;o-275 

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:5i :o:i27B 9 

:-:l 0001279 7 
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:51 0X12S1 3 

:;i 0001262 1 

::1 0OC12S3 9 

;'.i :ooi284 7 
::1 ::3:285 4 
:-;i 0001286 2 

:-:i 0001287 
:;i :ooTS8 8 

:00'289 6 

:::-290 4 
:x-29i 2 
:;:-252 
:;o-253 8 
:::t94 6 
:;:-;95 3 
:::-:36 i 



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LrOwWJk 

LRiANO 

LiaUkNO 

URIWO LEONWOO 

uaiANO L50SAS00 

LIRlANORXUe 

LIRlANOaD3JE 

LCPEZ D: MOMEG^ 

LOPEZ ES'AILLAT 

LOPEZ G0N2A:E2 

LOPEZ LI=llANO 

LOPEZ u^;4^'0 

LOPEZ RDS'JE 

LOPEZ rIOQJE 

LUGO 

LUNA DE LA CPUZ 

MAN ZU ETA 

MARIA DE LEON 

M>RTE WEZOjrA 

MARTEAMEZOurrA 

MARTINEZ ALP/ANZAR 

MARTINEZ J AOUEZ 

MARTINEZ N'JSEZ :E TEJADA 

MARTINEZ SALDANA 

MARTINEZ VEiEZ 

MATEO MARTNEZ 

MATIAS ALSA 

MEDINA A5RrU 

MEDINA A5REU 

MEDINA A3=EiJ 

MEDINA A3=E'J 

MEDINA M^TED 

MEDINA OjEZADA DE RCSA.RO 

MEJIA 

MEJIADELEON 

MEJIA DE LEON 

MENOONZA grul:.os 

NONEG^ 

mcnegro d-=w4 

monegrd-ersan'ez 

monegro^erkan:ez 

MONEGROrERNAMDEZ 
MONEGROLC=EZ 
MONEGR0 2.EZA3A 

Moaa 

MOREL AL5M0 

MOYA TEjADA 

NAMIASEAEZ 

NERlSSAN;r:EZ 

NUtEZ 

NUJEZ LIRANZO 

NU»EZ SJA=ES 

NUNEZ MOYA 

OLIVARES 

OLIVARES AiREU :E DURAN 

OLIVARES POLANCD 

OLIVARES ROLANDO 

ORTEGA 

ORTEGA A==EU 

ORTEGA ASRTJ 

PARRA GRJLLON 

PAULINO 

PAULINO SANCHEZ 

OAYANO PAYANO 

PEREZ A5=E'J 

PEREZ BETASCES 

PEREZ CR'jZDETEJOA 

PEREZ DURAN 

PEREZ DURAN 

PEREZ MEDINA 

PEREZ MEDINA 

PEREZ SANCHEZ 

PEREZ SANTOS 

PICHARDO 

PICHARDO 

POLANCC DE LA ROSA 

POLANCO ES='N03A 

SOLAN CO MEDINA 

POLO GUZMAN 

POLO MEDINA 

=0L0 MEDINA 

»OL0 MEDINA 

POLO YNOA 

=ORTES GARCIA DE EEATO 

'0RTE3 GARC A CE JiMJNlAN 

CJEZADAA3=EU 



Namarw 

MAniACOHNcuA 

JOSE MAWja 

LUISA MERCEDES 

JOSE ANTON O 

MARIA oa CARMEN 

EDtTA MERCEDES ALTAGRACIA 

MARIA VICTORIA 

rejciA 

ANA RITA 

CaTR'JDY 

GRICELDA Da CARMEN 

ROSANNA ALTAGRACIA 

JOSE ALCI3IADES 

RAFAEL 

ANTONIO 

MARIA ESTEU 

OANia 

JOSE LUIS 

MiGuaANca 

PORFIRIO ANTONIO 

VIANEL5A ALTAGRACIA 

JOSE EUGENO 

MARIA 

RAMON 

LUZ oa ALSA 

SANTA CANDIDA 

AHia JOAOUIN 

CLARA YLDA 

FERNANDO ANTOMO 

JOSE MANua 

NOEMIALTAGRACIA 

ANGELA FaiClA 

JUANA PAULA 

RAFAEL 

ROBERTO RAFAa 

ROSA EMILIA 

JUAN SAUTISTA 

ANDREINA MERCEDES 

LOURDES RAFAELA 

FaiX 

OUITERJO 

TViaWARAMONA 

YAN'ET MERCEDES 

SANDY YOVANY DE JESUS 

FRANCIS ANTONIO 

DS'.ETRiA 

MARIA YSASa 

WANUa AUGUSTO 

AFRANIO DE JESUS 

JOSE Da CARMEN 

LUIS JOSE 

OAUARI Da CARMEN 

LIOIA MARIA 

YOCASTA Da CARMEN 

MARIA ESTHER 

JOSEFINA ALTAGRACIA 

SANDRA ALTAGRACIA 

EUDOCIA 

oacE DORsa 

FRANCIS ESCO.ASnCA M 

CATULO ALEJANDRO 

RAMONA ALTAGRACIA 

MERCEDES ANTONIA 

GERTRUDYS ANTONIO 

MARIA Da CARMEN 

Fe MARIA 

CaESTlNA 

CLARIZA ANTONIA 

RAFAa ANTONIO 

ANTONIO DE JESUS 

JOSEMIGua 

MLEN 10 ANTONIO 

JOSE ANTONIO 

FRANCISCO ANTONIO 

MIGUa 

ERCILO ANTONIO 

NORVIALIS 

ROSaO ANTONIO 

FRANCISCO JAVIER 

HECTOR MANua EMIUO 

MANUa B'ENVENIOO 

PEDRO JOSE 

YOMARIS ALTAGRACIA 

AIDA MERCEDES AGUSTINA 

ALTAGRAQA MERCEDES 

ANA 



C*d Amtnor 



003084 020 
009429 OSt 
006161 051 
011164 051 
009718 051 
000000 000 
009693-051 
007613 C.55 
009144 051 
000000 000 
008059 051 
006808 051 
005829 051 
005955 051 
012C54 046 
009007 051 
027006 005 
0076S6 051 
026341 C55 
031213 055 
009567 051 
006476 051 
004623 047 
009702 0=5 
000030 000 
021860 068 
011055 051 
006694 051 
011733 C51 
01112B 051 
000000 000 
000000 000 
009022 055 
003951 059 
011123 051 
010201 051 
000030 000 
009033 051 
0067C8 051 
00533D 051 
004303 051 
001840 051 
004553 C51 
000000 000 
009654 051 
000003 030 
006826 051 
120240 001 
009454 051 
004001 051 
009576 051 
00719D 051 
002269 051 
006089 051 
005335 055 
075525 047 
006772 051 
015707 055 
007547 051 
004653 051 
000000 000 
040200 047 
000000 000 
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007197 051 
006642 051 
013418 056 
009881 051 
006031 051 
009722 051 
008208 051 
012349 051 
029954 047 
024865 055 
004766 051 
006960 051 
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011718 051 
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Meti No: 0003 

Dnzea\ 

iriAaiJ JiMJ<it 

OUARTE 

ffJARTE 

DUARTE 

DUAHTE 

J'JLIO ESCOTO 

J-JLOESCOTO 

DUARTE 

TOMAS DISLA 



33 



84 



02 



67 



37 



17 



16 

68 



D'JARTE 
DUARTE 
C-KAG0J.V3JEZ 
CHAG0JW3JEZ 
JUANA SAlTITOPA 
MAGUEY 90 

JUANA SALTTTOFA 

CHAGDJ.WEN'EZ 

CHAGO JA'ENEZ 

JJLIO ESCOTO 

ARTURO ROJAS 

D'JARTE 

•J. SANCHEZ 

SANCHEZ 

RAFAEL DJEZADA 

CaON 2 

C-ITO CEPEDA 

CHITO CE=EDA 

CIHfTOCE^EDA 

CHTOC_E;JpA 

"Ere HERRERA 

SA3ANA ANGCS'A 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITCPA 

TORO CEMZO. VILLA 

V1LLATA=A 6 

SANRAJAa 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

SANCHEZ 

DUARTE 

JUANA SAITITC'A 

JUANA SA.TrTC?A 

DJAPTE 70 

SAN RA=Aa 

DUARTE 

=EDRC RDJJE 

DUARTE 123 

DUARTE 



T030 CENZO 2B 

DUARTE 

SA5AKA ANG03TA 

SA5ANA ANG03TA 

JUANA SALTITC'A 

|J^G^A 

RAFAa D'JEZACA 
3A3ANA ANGOSTA 
CH-OCE=EDA 19 

LA DUARTE 
SANCHEZ 
CHAGO JIViNEZ 
SANCHEZ 80 

SANCHEZ 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
MAGUEY 80 

PE?E HERRERA 10 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 

MARIA TRINIDAD 
TORO CENZO 
waiA 4 

MELLA 4 

SAN RA=AEL 

SANCHEZ 46 

TOMAS ::3LA 



no 



OIRECClONNACIONALDEINFOaSWCION ELECTORAL Provincit: 22 



Municipio: 0S1 



C«dula Actual 



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0X1315 

0M1316 

0X1317 

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0X1319 

0301320 

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0D01322 

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C001324 

0301325 

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0301327 

0301328 

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3301330 

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0301333 

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C301336 

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3301357 

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0301368 
0301369 
0301370 
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0301372 
03:':73 
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QjrxA-'A Ar->r J 
QUE2A2A A5SEU 
QUHZADA 5?iN*3a 
QUE2ADA B1D3 
Q'JEZADA ESTnaiA 
QUEZADA ESTSHllA 
QUE2ADA ESTnELLA OS GOMEZ 
OUEZADAMDNiG^D 
Q'JEZADA Q'JEZAOA 
QUEZADA OJEZADA 
QUEZADA RAMOS 
QUEZADA F03JE 
QUEZADA TEJADA 
QUEZADA TEJADA DE SALOERA 
QUEZADA 7EJA3A DE CEPEDA 
QUEZADA VELOZ 
nAMiaEZI/DNE;=D 

RAMIREZ M^^'E3^^ 

PEINOSQ 0D\^iv3JEZ 
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roveloz 

RIVAS CAMr.O 

ROBLES LO=EZ 

RODRIGUEZ 

RODRIGUEZ 

RODRIGUEZ AR:AS 

RODRIGUEZ DJ=AH 

RODRIGUEZ GP. 

RODRIGUEZ -.ERVANDEZ 

RODRIGUEZ HERVAKDEZ 

RODRIGUEZ LIRiASO 

RODRIGUEZ =E3AJ^D0 

RODRIGUEZ TAVHRAS 

RODRIGUEZ VE:CZ 

ROJAS LORA 

ROOJE 

ROOUE 

ROOUE ALMO^~ 

ROOUE DE LA CRJZ 

ROaUE DURAN 

ROOUE GORS 

R0:XIEG0R3 

RXUE JIMENEZ 

RXUERODR'3-iZ 

RXUERODRIG-EZ 

ROO'JE fOO'JE 

R03ACACE=E3 

ROSA COLO'J 

ROSA COLON 

ROSA ESDCTO 

ROSA REINOSO 

R03ARI0 

ROSARO 

ROSA RIO CRUZ 

ROSARIO OJRAN 

ROSARIO DJRAN 

flOSARIO GARCIA 

ROSARIO KERS 

ROSARIO NERS 

ROSARIO TEJADA 

ROSARIO VA50JEZ 

SALAZAR VILLAR 

SALCEDO PE=EZ 

SANCHEZ CASTl.LO 

SANCHEZ MENDEZ Dz NERIS 

SANCHEZ REINOSO 

SANCHEZ SANC-EZ 

SANTANA MELLA 

SANTANA QUEZADA 

SANTIAGO GRJLLON 

SANTIAGO GRJ'-lON 

SANTOS 

SANTOS ASREU 

SANTOS ASREU DE PEREZ 

SANTOS ALMAN2AR DE TEJADA 

SANTOS SUArES 

S1RIVAS0UE2DE CEPEDA 

SORIANO HERNANDEZ 

SUASES 

SJARESGERWAN 

SJRia A5REJ 

suRia SANTOS 

-AVARES DE V J.AR 
-AVARESWDNiSRO 
"AVASES ROSARO 
"AVERAS 



Nomtjrei 



3CLUIJA A^iAjr\AulA 

VIBGILIO 

ANADINA ANTONIA 

FRANKLIN RHADAMES 

HECTOR EMILD 

N0R3ERTC ANTONIO 

LUZ CaESTE 

LEONa ANDRES 

CARLOS RAFAa 

RAMON EMLIO 

JUAN JOSE DEL CARMEN 

GUllERMO ADAMES 

ViaOR LEONARDO 

HIGINIA ESPERANZA 

CONSuaO 

RAFAEL 

JORGE DE JE3JS 

MILDRE ALTAGPJ^CIA 

NORIS ALTA3RACIA 

JULIO CESAR 

NISIS RAMONA 

JACINTA DIOVEDES 

JUANA CARINE 

JUAN 

OLGA LIDIA MARGARITA 

ANA LUCLA 

GUINA MARIS 

DAELME MARIA 

LUCIA 

SONIA 

HAIMUNDA ANTONIA 

EDIS 

DAVID 

VIBGLO CONPESOR 

RAMONA 

FRANCISCO FERNANDO 

YAIRIS ALTA3RACIA 

ANA RAMONA 

aiZABET MARTINA 

JOSEMANUa 

CORNaO 

MARIA A1TA3RAC1A 

ANA MARTINA 

JCANNI ALTA3RACIA 

JUAN E'lFANlO 

AURaiA 

MARIA DE LA 

RAFAa AN'TONIO 

ROSANCa ALTAGRACIA 

RAMONA ES=ERANZA RAFAEIA 

FBANCISCA MERCEDES 

ANTON O 

GILBERTO WENDY 

ALEXI XIOMARA 

ULIAN MERCEDES 

LUZ SERNAOINA Da CARMEN 

VINICIO ANTONIO 

ROSA YRIS 

YINA MARIA 

ROSA JOSEFINA 

GREGORIO BERNARDO 

ANYOLINA oa CARMEN 

LUZ MERCEDES 

ANA YNaSA 

AGRIPINA 

MARCOS ANTONIO 

AURELIANO 

MANUa ANTONIO 

OUILBlO ESTE3AN 

BENITA ORQUIDIA 

DAMARIS ALTAGRACIA 

RAMON MAURICIO 

ANA MARIA 

ASIA MERCEDES 

ANA VICTORIA 

LUZaDA ALTAGRACIA 

MARIA GREGORIA 

REYES 

JOSE ALTAGRACIA 

ROSA AMERICA 

YVaiSSE ALTAGRACIA 

ANTONIO ALFREDO 

ANA ARIDIA 

ANA FRANCISCA 

ESTELA 

JOSE 



Ci& Amanof 



002*31 051 
011655 055 
004605 064 
008605 051 
030879 054 
0*2516 C31 
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009911 051 
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009473 055 
008*92 051 
012047 C51 
009535 051 
000233 0*7 
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005583 051 
000000 000 
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01*12* C32 
011*13 051 
006012 051 
002567 051 
006752 051 
017*80 039 
007235 051 
003059 051 
009317 051 
000000 030 
050231 051 
000000 000 
000000 030 
012161 051 
009*68 C51 
012073 C55 
000000 030 
006002 C51 
039315 051 
007697 055 
009835 051 
011*02 051 
00496* 051 
00*553 C5I 
036815 051 
006798 051 
008067 051 
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009556 051 
011195 051 
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000926 051 
012322 051 
006876 051 
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008962 051 
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Mtu No: 0003 

Drecobn ^^^^^^^^^ 

PEPE HERRcRA 

DUARTE 

PEPE HERNANDEZ 

DUARTE 13 

DUARTE 

PEPEHEnRERA 29 

PEPE HERRERA 
COLON 

PEPE HERRERA 
CaON £5 

HERMANAS MIRA3AL 
HERMANAS MIRA3AL 
LUZ ESTRELLA 

SABANA ANGOSTA 
CAON ABO 

PEPE HERRERA 

TOMAS D'SA 9 

DUARTE 69 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 101 

TOROCENZO 

TOMAS DISLA 

MARIA TRINIDAD 
TABLON . Vn.U TAPIA 
MARIA TRINIDAD 
SANCHEZ 

DUARTE 89 

SANCHEZ 
SANCHEZ 



ARTURO ROJAS 
SANCHEZ 
SANCHEZ 
SANCHEZ 

SANCHEZ 69 

CHAGOJIM.a'EZ 
CHAGOJW.EN EZ 
MAGUEY 33 

DUARTE 7 

DUARTE 

TOMAS D:3LA 

DUARTE 65 

DUARTE 

SANCHEZ 34 

RANCHITO 

JULO ESCOTO 01 

JULIO ESCOTO 

TOaOCENlZO 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 23 

SAN RAFAa 16-A 

DUARTE 

a COCO 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 2 

SANCHEZ 

SAN RAFAa 

DUARTE 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 

PEDRO ROOJE 

DUARTE 

ARTURO ROJAS 

AHTURO ROJA 9 



MELiA 

SANCHEZ 51 

JULIO ESCOTO 
BJGENIOJMENEZ 



DUARTE 
JULIO ESCOTO 
JUANA SALTITOPA 

JULO ESXTO 
CHAGO JIMENEZ 

PEPE HERRERA 



104 



Ill 



DIRECCIONNAClONALDElNFOat/AClON ELECTORAL Provinci.: 22 Huniclpio: 051 



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051 000138* 5 
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051 000U02 5 
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totfcdot 

TAVHSAS hE^NANOa 
TAVHRAS Li^lAN'O 
TAV=nASMEJlA 
TAVEWVS OLIVA^iS 
TAVERAS SUA^EZ 
TEJADA A^W-ANWa 
TEJADA ALWASZAR 
TEJADA ALVAnEZ 
TEJADA ALVAREZ 
TEJADA 5EAT0 
TEJADA C DE =E^NANDEZ 
TEJADA COM==ES 
TEJADA COM=SES 
TEJADA COK?RES 
TEJADA DE LA ^21K 
TEJADA DE LA SDSA 
T:jaDA 0■JnA^ DE RAMIREZ 
tLaDA GIL 
TEJADA LI=?iAN;3 
TEJADA MA— INEZ 
TEJADA MERCEDES 
TEJADA MERCEDES 
TEJADA ?EREZ 
TEJADA OJl'DNES 
TEJADA SANTC3 
TEJADA SANTCS 
TEJADA SANTCS 
TEJADA SILVA 
TEJADA TAVE = *S 
T=JEDA PINALES 
T0RI3I0 ALMAMAR 

T0RI5I0 garc;a 
TOReioG.rnE==EZ 
T0S.5ORam:=EZ 
TOR'SIOTE.'ADA 
TORRES AiRiU 
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URE»A NU'EZ 
UREtA NUtEZ 
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VASDERLINDERLL'N* 
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VAS3JEZ 

VASOJEZ CAsTr.LO 
VA5D'JEZE5:;3T0 

VASDJEZESCCTO 
VASDL'EZ -E=SANDEZ 
VASD'JEZ?E=AANDEZ 
VAS7JEZ :E=NA^DEZ 
VASOJEZ DE^VAN 
VASOJEZ GE?^'A.N 
VASOJEZ GOMEZ 
VASOJEZ GOSZA.EZ 
VASOJEZ HERNANDEZ 
VASOJEZ HERNANDEZ 
VASO'JEZJDEJIMINIAN 
VASCJEZ JIMENEZ 
VASO'JEZ JIMENEZ 
VASOJEZ JIMENEZ DE DURAN 
VASOUEZ LAJARA 
VASOJEZ OE'A 
VASOUEZ OJEZADA 
VEUSOUEZ 

vaEZ 

vaEZ OJRAN 

VELEZROOJE 

vaOZDE OJEZADA 

VERAS A'O'.INAR'O 

VERAS 5ETANCES 

VERAS CAV.ACrtO 

V=RAS JIMENEZ :E PERNANDEZ 

VILAR DURANCE HERNANDEZ 

ViaARSANC-EZ 

VILLAR TAVAREs 

VILUR TAVA-ES 

VILLAR TAVA = EZ 

vnsanTE tor 5 

ZORRiaA fi^VAS 

ZORRi.LA SAN i OS 



NombfM 

i cniaA 

ELBA MARIA 

PASTORA 

OOMNGO 

AMADA 

JORGE MARTIN 

JOSE MARIA 

PEDRO MARIA 

ALTAGRACIA EMERHIMA 

ROSARIO CAROLINA 

EVaiN INMJ^CULADA 

ISIDRA EMEUNDA M 

CLARA MARIA ANTONIA 

JOSE FERNANDO 

RAMON EMIUO 

RAFAa ADAL3ERT0 

XOMARA ALTAGRACIA 

ROSA aENA 

ANYaiNA MERCEDES 

LUCIA ALTAGRACIA 

ALCIBIADES 

AVeiORIX 

LINDA CRISTAL 

MILDRED ALTAGRACIA M 

CARMEN LUISA 

DEYANIRA ALTAGRACIA 

IRIS MERCEDES 

MIGua ANGa 

CARLOS MANUa 

RUBEN DARIO 

PEDRO 

MARTHA YHlS 

MARIA aiZASETH 

KaVIN RADHAME3 

JUSTINA MlRIAN 

MARIA ROR DALIZA 

AMan ALTAGRACIA 

INES ALTAGRACIA 

DANEOUI RAMONA 

GENRI ANTONIO 

ANSELMO DE JESUS 

ANA MERCEDES 

ALEJANDRA JCSErlNA 

JESUS RAFAEL 

LUIS ARTURODE JESUS 

AUOA MERCEDES 

YTALIA ALTAGRACIA 

ALBERTO DE JESUS 

CARLOS RAFAEL 

CARMEN R WMACULADA 

DAMARIS ANTOMA 

JOSE LUIS 

MAflrrZA 

AIDA MARIA 

DANTE RAFAEL 

LUIS MANUEL 

PATRIA DE JESUS 

GLORIA MARIA 

ROSA AMERICA 

MARIA ROSA 

MERCEDES REINA 

JUDI BOLIVAR 

CARMEN DILENIA 

NORMA ANTONIA 

THaMA ALTAGRACIA 

RAMON DE JESUS 

MARIA ALTAGRACIA DE JS 

MBICEOES 

MARIA VIANEU VALENTINA 

FRANCISCA 

JUAN DE LA CRUZ 

AhfTONIA RAMONA 

MARIA MERCEDES 

JUAN JOSE 

MIGuaANGa 

RAFAa DARIO 

MARIA MAGDALENA 

EDUARDOL0R3JZO 

ROSAMERI 

ANA LUISA 



C*d Anl»nor 



001262 054 
002638 051 
009278 051 
009528 055 
005057 064 
009*73 051 
018397 0*7 
002817-051 
00*676 tlSl 
002516 051 
00*559 051 
001352 051 
002155 051 
035038 054 
00*6*9 051 
010168 051 
00*7*5 051 
0020*4 051 
000000 000 
000000 000 
0037*7 051 
012053 051 
010238 051 
002*01 051 
006675 C51 
003B38 051 
00:999 031 
031553 0*7 
096567 051 
010550 051 
069223 002 
000000 000 
000000 000 
000000 000 
018259 055 
003794 051 
000000 000 
00**4 055 
010*77 051 
009575 051 
030562 031 
398954 001 
002*12 051 
006582 C51 
03073* 047 
00*563 051 
00*926 051 
077B60 0*7 
0852*8 0*7 
0395*5 051 
035215 0*7 
011621 051 
022508 034 
002460 051 
005401 051 
00*573 051 
007366 055 
013936 047 
002450 047 
002510 0*7 
007675 055 
010590 051 
007220 051 
004046 051 
001333 051 
011*01 051 
002633 051 
00*396 055 
00*668 051 
000174 051 
039205 054 
013729 055 
001510 051 
019898 055 
005C86 051 
006024 051 
00*685 051 
011961 051 
008098 051 
009760 051 



M*M No: 0003 

Dffvocion 

PcrcncrvncrlA 8 

JUANA SALirrOPA 
COLON 22 

SANCHEZ 28 

DUARTE 

JUANA SALirrOPA 
LOS BUEN PANES 
DUARTE 55-A 

ESTRELLA QUEZADA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALirrOPA 

LUZ ESTREUA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

DUARTE 

RAFAEL QUEZADA 

JULD ESCOTO 10 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

PEPE HERRERA 

DUARTE 61 

DUARTE 

SAN RAFAa 

DUARTE 

DUARTE 50 

SAN RAFAa 

SANCHEZ 

MAGUEY 

LUZ ESTRaLA DE 

SANCHEZ 

SANCHEZ 

MARIA TRINIDAD 

AVENIDA DUARTE 

SANCHEZ 

LUZ ESTRaLA DE 
RAFAEL OJEZADA 

LAGINA 

MARIA TRINIDAD 

CHAGO JIMENEZ 20 

CHAGOJIMiNEZ 

DUARTE 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

LOS CEREZOS 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

TOROCENIZO 

DUARTE 54 

SANCHEZ 

JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
TOROCENm 29 

DUARTE 15 

AV. DUARTE 
PEPE HERRERA 
PEPE HERRERA 
27 DE FE3RER3 3 

SANCHEZ 

SABANA ANGOSTA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 
JUANA SALTITOPA 

JUANA SALTITOPA 
DUARTE 69 

GASTON FERNANDO 
SANCHEZ 48 

SANCHEZ 

SANCHEZ 63 

SAN RAFAEL 
TOMAS OISLA 
TOMAS DSLA 



112 



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ca 


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hH 


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to 


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o 


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15 


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O 


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a 




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Id 


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< 




















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eg 


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CO 




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a 








Cd 


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(i 




to 


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►^ 


eg 






s 


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CO 


to 


to 


a 


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c-a 




(d 


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^ 


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(d 


[d 


[d 


« 


is 




►-4 


(d 


ic 


Ii2 


ii: 


•c 


3 








Q 


to 


a 


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(Q 


f- 


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Cd 


Id 


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Cd 






O 




t? 


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(« 




< 


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CO 


CO 


tJ 


ee: 


III 






CO 


< 


(S 


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>J 


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Cd 




eg 


cg 






•c 


Cd 


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O 


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>-* 


J 


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OS 


t3 


< 


Cd 


Cd 


< 


•< 


t^ 


x 


•C 








J 


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O 




J 


j2 


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a 


ca 


o 


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J 


^ 


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►^ 


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cc 


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Cd 




Id 


s 


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M4 


(d 




f- 


^ 


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Cd 


Cd 


HH 


h-4 


c2 






[■: 


eg 


IL, 


(d 


iC 


f- 


^ 


eg 


o 


►-4 


'St 


^ 


:3 


3 


t.? 


CJ 








^^ 


•e 


l< 


IQ 


to 




•C 


o 


(U 


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It: 


15 


ts 


1§ 


u: 


J 


.J 


>j 




(0 


•< 


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(d 


►-4 


to 


to 


(d 


Id 


>-4 


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Cd 


hH 


H-4 


V-H 


O 




•c 


tJ 


o 


« 


a 


Id 


(d 


lC4 


(u 


Ct4 


k. 


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C3 


C5 


C5 


t3 


t5 




(O 


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w 


•* 


CO 

1 


T 


13 


UO 


CO 


CO 


O 


CO 


uO 


to 


-»■ 


CM 


to 


o 


(d 


to 


to 


CM 


CO 


CO 


eg 


CO cap 


en 


to 


CVJ 


•* 


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CO 


en 


1 
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1 

CO 


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to 


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o 


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o 


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1 


1 


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1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


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o 


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o 


o 


o 


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o 


o 


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o 


O 


o 


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o 


o 


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o 


^ 


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o 


o 


o 


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C3 


o 


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CO 


C3 


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o 


o 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 



Cd 

a 
•c 

t5.J 

ceco 
Idea 
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to 

Id 

It: 

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i5 



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10 

o 

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lu 
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CO •* CM •* CO -r 1-0 uO CO CO O CO O CO ■« CM CO t-O 

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II 

to to CM c» CO CM CO CO en to CM -J" -r CO cn o -4 co 

lO en .-4 •» 1.0 en en co co ■-4 —4 ••< cm cm cm co co co 

en en CO CO CO o t3 rt — 4 — 4 ^ .-4 ^ T.4 —4 t-4 .-4,-4 

COCO-4T-4.-4T^.-4.-4.-4,-4rtT-4.HT^.H t^ tHtH 

CO CO -4 O O O CO CO CO CO CO CO O O CO O to CO 

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II 

UO O UO O CO UO UO uO O uO L.O uO 1.0 o uo 1.0 1.0 CJ 

CO O CO CO O CO CO CO CO O CO CO O O O O O CO 



^ .-3 




O 3 
Cd Cd 



Cd Cd O Cd Ce: 

►-4 :q ►-4 r3 o 

'- (2 (t: 3 - 

Cd •« -2 

:c a CO 




ci: 










t- 


Cd 








^ 


co 








Cd 


Cd 








CI4 


J 


. 






Cd 


Cd 



2 




•« 






C<4 




Q 


Cd 


t~t 






^-4 





to 


Cd 


Cd 


t7 







CO 


CO 


f-4 


3 


•j: 


n 


(7 


IC 


a 


« 


'-) 


'■> 


IQ 



eg 

Cd 
3 

<y 
•c 

'O 

•c 

.J 

4-4 

ta t3 
•c 

(Q 



>z 

Cd 

Cl4 ( 



-3 
O < f- Cd ►-4 
(3 (Q i-i CU to 



•«: 

[- 

CO :5 

o to 
•-5 

3 3 
CI4 CD 



3 



Cd 

ca 



eg 

(.:> to 

IS O 

3 (- 



O 
C5 



:2 

.-3 



3 tJ O 

•2 CU cc 

►H Cd Cd 

C«: ej Q eg 



:5 »: 3 



-«« -^ -^ 
to -2 
C3 o to 

C6 M 

O 
t- 

to 



(d 



o 

CO Cd 



O 
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4-4 O «i -C < M t5 CD (t: Cd 3 Cd Cd 

la CQ « tj> tj u CD o tj ta cj ta « 



•1: 

CO 



eg 
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Q 



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to 

O 
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3 
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to , 
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3 to 

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CD 
CQ 



C<4 



113 



CM 



c:> CO 
:^ o 

i:> < 'T 
►H [- en 
IZ '2 'v 

:n .^J "^ 

O tu to 
Ci :d .h 

CO 
O CO 
►H CO Id 
iC O -J 
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►-< c^ ;s 
c;> CO Id 
:o -.z. C5 

►J n 
O CO 
:> td Id 

Id a -.z. 

Id c:> 

'.z ►-< 

O CD cj> 

Ci fH C^ 

► -< CJ) Id 
E- -C .a 
IC .J Id 

•2 td 
It, it. 



CO 



s 

'J 

> 

D to 

M t? 
Itl O 

- D 

-H 

a< 
O CO 

H Id 



•H 

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•J 



CO 

o 
c^ 

n 
Cd H 
t^ n 
'■> kJ 

O 

< fU 
►4 

CO 
td O 

n 
►J E- 

< (C 

►-4 -i; »-x 

tj> (U Q 
Cci CO (U 

O O ■-' 

< 

E-. < 

CO 

i-i < 
►J Q 

:s c!> 
:d [d 
c3 It; 

Id E- 

co :s 

Id 



CO 
Id 

►J 

Id < 

t^ It: 

'-> O 

E-> 

•x: tj 

►J Id 

.J 

Id Id 

CO 

CO 






lu CO 

o < 
•.J 
< 
I- -i: 

CO 

^-| CO 

►J -i: 

:s < 

:d t-i 

C5 > 

Id ;r 

CO Id 



CO 

CQ 



CO 

o 

..J 
in 
< 



Id 

(5 .J 

Id Q 

:cid 



Id 

•i; 

ir; :d 
Id a 

.2 Id 

::> c^ 



CO 
Id 

ic 

CQ 

O 



CO 

o 

I— < 
►J 
►J 

Id 
lu, 



O 





< 








. 


< 




..J 




^ 




H 


►-( 




Id 




Id 




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tJ 


< 


f- 


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Q 


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CO 




o 




►J 


1— 1 


Id 


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< 




o 




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<r-\ 


< 


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►-1 


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f-t 


< 


i^ 


ii 


►H 


n 


< 


CQ 


^H 


•C 


Ci> 




CO 


m 


CO 


CO 


lU 


« 


> 


Id 


n 


[d 


Id 


o 


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CO 


►J 


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O 


CJ 


t-3 


t-3 
Cd 


Id 
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< 


< 






rt" 


CJ 


•<: 


a 


Q 


. 


• 




% 


'D 


Id 


< 


:n 


:c 


. 


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Id 


lU 


'■> 






to 


CO 


t-« 


Id 


Id 


t-3 


t-3 


Cd 






CJ) 


t- 


Id 


Id 


Q 


a 


(J 






Q 


Q 


Ic^ 


.J 


»a 


'y 


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'•T' 




kj 


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< 


•5 


:? 


^2 


n 


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kU 


'•T 


"T 


■^ 


E- 


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to 


[■3 


fH 


i5 


iC 


co 


CO 


:d 


:d 


Id 


Cd 


:o 


•j: 


•C 


C5 


C5 


:c 


:n 


Q 


CJ 


CJ 


Cvj 


1 


1 


Cv] 

1 


1 


m 


c& 


•*< 


1 


1 


1 

to 


1 

iri 


1 

CD 


1 

to 


L.-5 


Ln 


co 


to 


CO 


CVJ 


CO 


• H 


'H 


.-( 


.-< 


<:? 


CD 


CD 


.-( 


>H 


1 


<H 


1 


.-1 


.H 


• -( 


,-l 


1 
<-4 


1 


1 
.-1 


1 


1 


LO 


in 


o 


O 


lO 


m 


o 


t3 


C3 


<■■:> 


t3 


c:> 


CD 


CD 


Cvj 

1 


L.-> 
1 


•T 


t>J 

1 


C3 
1 


lO 

1 


cn 


•<" 


1 

c- 


1 


1 

to 


1 

i.-j 


1 

CD 


to 


in 


L.1 


to 


to 


to 


C-J 


CM 


i-i 


^H 


,-t 


iH 


t5 


CD 


CD 


,-l 


1 


«H 


«H 


.-4 


.H 


>H 


1 


»H 


1 


1 
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»-4 


iH 


1 


l.O 


l:^ 


l.O 


1.1 


in 


l.D 


m 


C3 


c:5 


CD 


O 


CD 


CD 


CD 



o 

1-3 



E- 


•x: 








•J" 




y-t 


E- 








id 


< 


CU 


n 




li 






KH 


< 


K 


►J 


< 


o 


a 


t3 




Id 


Q 


CO 


n 


:z> 


« 


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C5 


(-H 


l-( 


..J 


►D 




'■J 




CO 


:d 


O 


►J 


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•«: 


H 


^ 


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Id 










o 










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h3 










o 




►J 










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t-H 


•< 


• 






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« 


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a 




o 


t-3 


Cd 
C3 




t>3 


t<3 






CJ 


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Id 


Id 


^ 


»J 








13 


Q 


;§ 


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CJ 




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n 


f| 


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t<3 


< 


■t. 


Id 


o 


CJ 


hH 


^•r 


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t-3 


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In 


It: 


E- 


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Id 


Id 


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CJ 


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114 



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^ i' 



5R5m 

in m 'n t/i 



n n M N 
rj in n rj 

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8 






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"3; <3; o 0; <:. o rf rj c> ■^ o o -J 

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>\\ REPUBLICA DOMINICANA 

WICIALIA DEL ESTADO CIVIL 

/ 

EXTRACTO DE ACTA DE SBSION No. 4 




En la Cludad y Munlclplo da Binlca, Prorlncia El£a«'Pina, Repfibllci 
Oominlcana, a los 16 dias del mas da Mayo dal aflo 1994, alendo las 10s32 
horas de la noche; reunldos en 8esi6n permanente los "aefloresi JosS Terre 
ro Marte, preflldente de esta Junta Municipal Electoral; Toribio Bautista 
de la Rosa, ler. Vocal y Benjamin da la Rosa 2do. Vocal, an presencia de 
los senoresi Ram6n Antonio RlTera Carvajal dalegado del P.R.D. , Carlos - 
Manuel Berihyete delegado del P«R.I., y Constantino Alc£ntara Pfirea dele. 
gado del P.L.D. asistidos por el infrascrito Secretario Arcadlo Jljn6ne«- 
Guzmin, El presldante declar6 abierta la Sefli6n y pidi6 que se diera lee. 
tura a la oonrocatoria a lo que se procedi6 de ininediato y en la que se 
comprueba que todos los miembros y delegados fueron convocados y que el 
propdsito de la sesi6n es rcbibir y conocer los resultados de las mesas- 
electorales de esta Junta Municipal Electoral. Luego se le dio lectura a 
una comunicacl6n suscrita por el delegado del Partido Reformists Soeial- 
Cristiano, fechada a 16 de Mayo 94, en la que trata sobre el artlculo 73 
de la Ley Electoral No. 5884, en la que respects a las-alianzas o coali- 
ci6n. Luego el delegado del P.L.D. solicit6 que se le diera lectura a 1 
artlculo 155 da la Ley Electoral, erl base a lo qiie sbllcita la anulaci6n 
total de las elecaiones a nivek municipal, en ras6n de' los listados sumi. 
nistrados por la Junta Central Electoral a los partldos, tienen una gran 
difereneia con el llstado Oficial qua tienen las mesas electorales, a 1 
delegado del P.R.D. dijo que se una a la solloitud de anulaci6n qua hace 
el delegado del P.L.D. porque entiende qua es un fraude en contra de los 
partidos de oposici6n, destaesndo qua an donde eb Partido Reformista So- 
cial Cristiano consideraba que tenia menos posibilidad da ganar, el dis- 
locamiento era mayor; el delegado del P.R.Z. tambi6n se 8olidaris6 con 
la sollcltud de anuXaci6n hecha por el seftor Constantino Alcintara PSres 
delegado del P.L.D. El presidente procedi6 a someter a la consider aei6n- 
da los dem&s mlembros de este Organismo Electoral, la sollcltud de anula. 
cl6n, obteniendo la aprobaci6n de los dos vooalas, no obstanta haber ma- 
niffestado el presidente, que el esti en contra de la anulael6n. (Hacemos 
constar que el delegado del PRSC. Ileg6 a la sasidn a las lli30 P.M.}.- 
Conaidcrando que las alecoiones a nival municipal fueroA anuladas, los- 
miembros de ista acordaron recibirlas urnas sin conocer los-resulAados 
de las meaas electorales. No habieodo m&s nada que ttatar,'el presiden- 
te propuso la clausura la cual fue accp^ada por los dem&s mlembros. 

FIRMADpsJ 




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SlOiOO LAS S.3S P.M. OS LA TAJtOB CM EL KUNZCXPZO DS SL LLANO, PROVZN. 
CIA OS EXXA8 PISA, RTPUBLZCA OGMINICANA, PRENTE A UNA SITVACZON 0£ LA 
PASA CHAROSCIOA OCBZOO A CUB HO HABXAN POOIOO VOTAR, NO OeSTANTE CSTAR 
ZNSEJTTAOAS CN LAS RELACI0NS8 ENTRCOAOAS A LOS PART2D0S POLXTZCOS Y TC- 
NCR SU5 CCOULAS CCStRSSPONOZCNTSS Y LUCOO HO APARECErR D< LOS LXS7A009 
CZ LA5 HCSAS DE VCTACIONCS, CCM7AND0 CON LA PRESENCIA DE LOS CBSERVA^ 
0OR£3 INTSRHACIOMCS SEAORCSi SYLVAZN MARCEL DEL PARTXOO SOdALZSTA DK 
rRA>«:iA Y MARIO ENRIQUB SANTAMARZA HERRERA- INZCZATZVA PRZVAOA DS OJA 
TC7VUJK, LOS MI£>reROS REUNIDOS DS CMERaENCZA Y EM PRESElfCZA TAHBZEN DB 
LOS OCLCOAOOS DE LOS PARTZOOS POLZTICOS, rRENTE A LA CALAMZtTOSA SZTUA 
CION GDC POOZA OENERAR EN DESORACZAS LAMEIfTABLES, SN CCNSECUENCZA Y 
POR LAS RAZ0NE5 EXPUESTAS ANXtRZORMEfTTE, 0BCZOZMO8 SUSPENDER LAS VOTA- 
CI0Nr:3k CCnQ^A H£D;I0A'| DE SOLUCZON AL OR/Wf-PROBLCMA. 

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RESOLUCION Mo. 1/94,- 



CONSIKANOot Qua lax >Ei«ccion«8''acn«ril«s rp.aaren r£S)adasrpar«(dl 116 •de'>-'< 
Boyo d«i •noall noT««iantos Mowfrttaiyseuatro.CMSMH, 

CONSXDERARDOi .Qua ilTltdlado i^l Iprocaso-sOfixlial da \vdtBil£6ni ma (comprova 
ron dlf arent«a 'arttras '41 IClbro da Votantas ^y ..Al >ii>iatado caUBli;i1JLAtradO ~— 
a Joi "difarantas.'Pjrtldost •" \ ■ ., . ". ^^ 

CON^IDBRAKDOt jQue ral :porsanta)a 'da Cedulacl6n .^ue ;no :han rPodijip tejecc^r 
su dececho :Al voto rha .sldo altamanta iSigaLflca.tlvO. 

CONSXOETiRANDO: Qua -as Obligatorio da la ^unta 'MunlillpaI.»^l«ctoral rpemi, 
tit^lisrejarcer al suf ragio :a laa iparsonaa-ragUtamaftta, an ilas a*npadz»n«<B 
BkLOftto da Votantai 

VXSTQt -el Art. 155, Ordlnariat ^ptlrraro ida IlaiLey 'Slaotox-al .Vigente c«n :1a 
Rapdbllca Oorainicana. 

La Junta Municipal Electoral raunldo an '8«4i:6n iExtraorflinaxJLat 

- -RESUEVEl 

-UNICQ] lOoclarart^coiao al afacto daolarasos anuladaa laa v&iacQ4'OnttS(<la «^V 
la totaiidad-da las/masaa .que-.coDpon«n<fll munlcipio de ComandAdor, i'9ro-> 

.Vincia Ellas PlfiayR.D. 

' 'f \.' .f -" '- . 

^STE;N0II>Ol Qua ;los Delsgadoa (PqIIUcos ^icreditado antia ila o^unta fNun.li.qlpfl.l'^ 
E:iectoral .SefVsrss Anselmo Tapi:a Rasa, iiOelagadoy dal :PaQ.<;ldo lAa^snils^ta 
Social Xriatiano, P.R.5.C., /Antonio Onrcia iI,orsnzo Oa.ift)3ado (del ,Paci^do 
de la lLit;>araai6n Oominicana r^^V^* CutlMcto i^J.lf a ^^lor :Ael.eguado ,.dei vfer 
cido R«valualonario Dominicano, rP.R*^, ,y (layr>al(lo Aquino Qu^Rflt^, K>* !«>»• 
Uci tado f ormalmente, .a .Aata -.Ti;lbunal LBla<;.tQr«|l ila .AfiHlaei^p idc la vVotOe- 
cionefl .encal dia»i»oy .16 de.na^cde ASS4. 

ATENalDOl Qua ifll 
qua rse Su8pan< 
pu^A-acnp &«*<r 
po3i6n.-^^ ' 

AKn;»2S/A^ 
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irtido 'RQtQflrmiflta ^SioQJkll <<;r:^tl>anq(P>f^«S..C.<), ,j3iiai>taji 
■ i^ldn tpor ,al i4}^oP4QQ9ntac}e ,da jSlactpiTfta ,.<iub (Qp j- 








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119 



Law Offices 

OF 

Robert Winthrop Johnson II 

1050 Potomac Street. N.W. 

Washington. D.C. 20007 

(202) 337-6817 
Telefax (202) 337-3462 



May 24, 1994 



Hon. Robert G. Torricelli 

Chairman 

Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere Affairs 

Committee on Foreign Affairs 

Room H1-A705 

O'Neill House Office Building 

U.S. House of Representatives 

Washington, DC 20515-6135 



Re: Election in the Dominican Republic 
Dear Congressman Torricelli: 



Enclosed is a letter from Jose del Carmen Ariza, Ambassador 
of the Dominican Republic. Ambassador Ariza is still in the 
Dominican Republic, but he requests that this letter be read into 
the record at this afternoon's hearing. 



Sincerely, 



\S oV«-Jb-o > j (jVn.-*^J^ 



Robert W. Johnson II 
Washington Counsel 



Enclosure 



120 



EMBAJAOA OE LA REPUBLICA OOMINICANA 
WASHINGTON 



f^ay 23, 1994 



Congressman Robert G. Torricelll 

Chairman 

Subcommittie on Western Hemisphere Affairs 

Committee on Foreign Affairs 

Room H1-A705 CNelll HOB 

U. S. House of Representatives 

Washington, D. C. 20515-6135 

Re: "Election In the Dominican Republic" 

Dear Chairman Torrlcelll: 

It has come to our attention that the Subcommittee has scheduled 
a hearing for Tuesday, May 24, to discuss the results of the may 
16 elections In the Dominican Republic and, In particular, to 
receive testimony from certain of the International observers. 

As you know, the election turnout was huge and reached 
unprecedented records, the balloting was very close and, because 
of this fact, has attracted the attention of newspapers In the 
United States, as evidenced by recent editorials In "The 
Washington Post" and "The New York Times" which alleged 
Irregularities In the electoral process. 

The Government of the Dominican Republic believes that any such 
criticisms are premature and are certainly based on Incomplete 
Information because the election is not over. The Independent 
Election Board (Junta Central Electoral) has not yet finished 
counting all the votes that were cast on May 16, and It will 
begin a thorough review and recount on Wednesday with 
participation of the Election Board Officials, political parties 
reoresentatives and observation by duly acredited international 
observers, to make sure that the results are fair and accurate. 
This process is expected to take aproximately a week to complete, 
since the Electoral Board will review the reports from each of 
the country's 9,528 precincts (mesas), as well as recounting all 
the votes cast --about 3.15 million. Under the Dominican 
Constitution, the Electoral Board is totally Independent, and no 
results are official until the Election Board announces its 
findings and certifies the vote count. 



.../ 



121 



For this rtason, U appears that it would ba more constructive 

for the Subcommittee to delay holding any hearing on the 

Dominican election until the Election Board has completed its 

recount and announced the officials results. Then the 



Subcommittee 
report. 



would have the benefit of the Electoral Board's 



I look forward to meeting with you when I return to Washington to 
discuss this and any other matters that may be of concern to you 
and other Members on the Subcommittee. 



Sincerely yours, 




del Carmen Ari; 
Ambassador 




mcp 



122 



ACUERDO DE SANTO DOMINGO iX^*^' ^ « « h ecu 

PAKITDO REVOLUCIONARIO DOMINICANO (PRD) / , v 

PAKTIDO UNIDAD DEMOCRATICA (UD) ( .pfX^ihci^ 



Washington, O.C. 
May 24, 1994 



The Honorable Robert G. Torricelli 
Chairman, House Foreign Affairs Committee 
Western Hemisphere Affairs Subcommittee 
705 OHOB 

Honorable Rep. Torricelli: 

It is with the utmost seriousness and concern that we are 
presenting this testimony before this subcommittee with the 
intention of informing all its members about the attempt at 
fraudulently depriving the Partido Revolucionario Dominicano (PRD) 
and its allies under the Acuerdo de Santo Domingo of our victory 
in the national elections held in the Dominican Republic on May 
16, 1994. 

Various groups of neutral international observers have all 
witnessed and reported numerous irregularities and violations of 
the electoral law in detriment of the candidates of the Acuerdo de 
Santo Domingo. 

Observers from the National Democratic Institute (NDI) , the 
Organization of Americem States (CAS), the Institute for Electoral 
Systems (IFES), and the Comisi6n de Asesoramiento para Politicas 
Electorales en Latinoamerica (CAPEL) have already issued their 
preliminary statements in which they point out the occurrence of 
those irregularities. 

In order to reinforce those statements, we want to provide you 
with a list of the most importemt irregularities which have been 
committed by the official ruling party in complicity with members 
and employees of the Central Electoral Board of the dominican 
Republic (JCE) . 

At this very moment we are gathering overwhelming documentary 
evidence from all over the country to substantiate our claim that 



123 



the official ruling Partido Reformista Social Cristiano (PRSC) is 
trying to steal the elections from the PRD and its allies. 

Please take note of the following irregularities that have been 
committed (all of which will be demostrated with the evidence we 
are gathering now) : 

1 . - Tens of thousands of voters were excluded from the 
official voting lists prepared by the Junta Central 
Electoral. (see exhibit A) 

As a result of this exclusion, these individuals could not vote at 
the voting stations (mesas electorales) where they were registered 
and should have voted, and were deprived of exercising their 
democratic right to chose. 

Were are now collecting the affidavits containing thousands of 
names of individuals who could not vote due to this exclusion from 
the voter lists. 

2.- Tens of thousands of voters were not permitted to vote 
after the Central Electoral Board (Junta Central 
Electoral) reluctantly accepted the recommendation of both 
the parties and the international observers to extend the 
voting period for threE more hours to offer an opportunity 
to the disenfranchised voters. (see Exhibit B) 

As you may already know, the Junta Central Electoral purposedly 
delayed the publication of this decision so that it be broadcast 
well after the closing period of the polls. 

Many voting stations (mesas electorales) never received on time 
the notification of the three-hour extension for voting. Many were 
forcefully closed by armed gangs of the Reformista Party, and many 
others were closed by army patrols which responded to instructions 
of local and regional Reformista leaders. As a result, tens of 
thousands of citizens were left without being able to exercise 
their voting right. 

3.- The voting lists provided by the Junta Central 
Electoral (JCE) to the political parties were different 
from the fiNal official list (padron electoral) prepared 
by the JCE for controllign tthe elections, despite the 
numerous claims made before the elections by the 
opposition parties that the final list be delivered 
simulataneously to all parties to verify the consistency 
of the voters rolls. (see Exhibit C) 

According to regulations prepared by the JCE, only that final list 
(padron electoral) could be used to authorise a person to exercise 
his or her right to vote. 

Tens of thousands of citizens could not vote because their names 



124 



were not included in the official final lists (padrones 
electorales) , despite the fact that they were duly registered and 
appeared in the list provided by the JCE to the political parties 
before the elections. 



4.- Many names were irregularly included in the official final 
list (padron electoral) without notifying the political parties. 
As a result, thousands of irregular voters showed up at the voting 
stations and were permitted to cast their votes despite the 
protest of the delegates of the opposition parties, (see Exhibit 
D) . 

We are also gathering additional evidence regarding this issue, 
and will provide it to your at a later date. We are providing you 
now with a sample of the aforementioned affected lists so that you 
can see how the citizens' enumeration lists were altered by the 
Junta Central Electoral. 

5.- Dislocation of names and/or voter's ID numbers was 
also an important irregularity which prevented many 
citizens from voting. Many persons who expected to vote in one 
loations were not listed in their registered voting stations 
(mesas electorales), but in others located many miles away. 

6.- Inclusion of names of persons without the right to 
vote was another serious irregularity. Minors and members of 
the military wre provided with ID voting cards which belonged to 
other people, or were issued regular ID cards to allow them to 
vote . 

One simple case to illustrate this situation: In voting station 
N« 207 located at the Colegio San Judas Tadeo, in Santo Domingo, 
an army lieutenant named Teodoro Moreta Herrera, who works as a 
military escort to President Joaquin Balaguer, candidate of the 
Reformista Party, was detected while attempting to vote at 8:30 
AM. He was allowed to vote, although his vote was marlced as 
"observed" and included in a special envelope of observed votes. 
This case can be easily retrieved as evidence. 

7.- More difficult to detect were the electronic 
irregularities, but our technicians have been able to 
fiGure out how the Junta Central Electoral tampered the 
computer programs at the Juntas Municipales and the four 
Sub-Juntas in Santo Domingo so as to bring about 
mAthematical results which were entirely different from 
the ones that would have resulted from an honest counting. 

According to our technicians, the persons who prepared the 
computer programs in FoxBase (a databae management systems 
software used by the Junta Municipales and the Sub-Juntas to 
process the data) , introduced an instruction in the program which 
allowed the Junta Central Electoral to automatically deduct votes 
from those stations won by the PRD and its allies, and to 



125 



automatically add votes to the official ruling Partido Reformista. 

A comparison of the bulletins issued by the Central Electoral 
Board with the the data in the computer diskettes officially given 
by the Board to the political parties has shown a discrepancy of 
107,009 votes for the Partido de la Liberacion Dominicana (PLD) , 
336,215 votes for the Partido Reformista Social Cristiano (PRSC) , 
and 335,071 for the Partido Revolucionario Dominicano (PRD) . 

We are now demanding that the program used to count votes at the 
Juntas Municipales and the Sub-Juntas of Santo Domingo be given to 
all political parties and international observers so that this 
issue can be thouroughly investigated. 

8 . - In several important municipalities the falsification 
of electoral results took the form of deleting some voting 
stations and adding some others which did not exist. In 
those places the official ruling party is shown as winning 
on inexisting voting stations. For example: 

* In the municipality of Higuey there were only 132 voting 
stations listed, and Junta Central Electoral is showing results 
for 176 voting stations. In this case ony 49,554 persons were 
elegible to vote, but the ficticious turn out, according to the 
Central Electoral Board, was 58,427 persons. As a result, the 
Official ruling Partido Reformista "won" the elections with 27, 
460, against the PRD ' s 18,713. (se Exhibit E) Other similar cases 
have already been documented in the provinces of San Cristobal, 
Duarte,and Monte Plata. 

9.- Anoher irregularity: in several municipalities the 
number of voters exceeded the number of registered voters. 
San Cristobal, and Bayaguana are two relevant cases. In San 

Cristobal the number of registered voters was 91,320, while the 
actual votes counted were 91,645 for a difference of 325 
additional irregular votes. In Bayaguana the numer of registered 
voters was 15,629 while the votes counted were 15,800 for a 
difference of 171 irregular aditional votes. 

10.- A final case of the serious irregularities that marred the 
elections were the municipalities of Comendador, Banica and El 
Llano, near the Haitian border in the province of Elias Pifia, . 
There, the electoral authorities of the Junta Municipal Electoral 
discovered that the list of voters mainly included members of the 
official ruling Partido Reformista, and proceeded to cancel the 
elections, (see Exhibit F) 



This statement is respectfully presented to the House Subcommittee 
of Western Hemisphere Affairs by the special delegation of the 
Acuerdo de Santo Domingo sent by the Partido Revolucionario 
Dominicano and the Partido Unidad Democratica. 

o 



84-459 0-94 (132) 



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 05903 780 2 



ISBN 0-16-046277-0 




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60 462771 



90000