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Full text of "Recipes from the old country and the new"

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Book___J4_3£iL 
Copyright N". 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSm 



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And How and When and Where. 



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M/^^T A T?1Z^T?'C '^ made from the finest Fruits, 
rS. V^J_//-VrvJVJjy O Nuts, Spices and Brandy obtain- 

HOME ■ MADE 7""'' "' '° "' ""\ "" 

FRUIT CAKE 45c per lb. 

^ For Sale by JOSHUA CLARKE 
^^ 121 Main Street, Lancaster, Ohio 

C. W. WOODIN 
& COMPANY 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

DRY GOODS 

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Shippers of all kinds of Live Stock 

CORNER WHEELING AND COLUMBUS STREETS and 
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Ohio University 



ATHENS, OHIO 

1910 

Summe 
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The Perry County Telephone Company 

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NEW STRAITSVILLE, OHIO ^^^^ ^^^^ ^L ^ 

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Dealers in 



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NEW DRY GOODS, CLOTHING 

STRAITSVILLE. HATS, CAPS and SHOES 



Forest Rose Flour 

Has Stood the Test of Time 



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Other brands come and go, but careful bakers 
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MADE BY 

THE GRAHAM & BLACK CO. 

LANCASTER, OHIO 











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The Largest and Most Reliable Optical 
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The White-Haines Optical Co, 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

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11 



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Manufacturers of 



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Factory 

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12 



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For 40 years we have supplied your wants in 

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We are also headquarters for Kitchen Utensils in Aluminum, Copper, Granite, Iron, 
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NEW STRAITSVILLE. OHIO 



J. D. MARTIN, Secretary and Treasurer 
FRANK FRANCIS, President 



The Sines Brothers 
& Company 



Miners and Shippers of 




Straitsville 

Lower 
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13 



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14 



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All kinds of insurance written. Call or write us or our representative MR. J. C. FAINE 
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Furniture and Undertaking 

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Ambulance Service in Connection 



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Booklet and Information Free. Correspondence Solicited. 



CHAS. R. CORNELL, Manager 

Box 5 Station A, or 1087 Dennison Avenue, COLUMBUS, OHIO 

16 



Recipes From the Old 
Country and the New 



ijj 



Collected and Published for the Benefit of 

The New Straitsville Social 
and Athletic Club 

by the Secretary 

Maria E. Martin 

New Straitsville, Ohio 



1910 



Columbus, Ohio 

The F. J. Heer Printing Co. 

1910 



<^'v\V 



Copyright 1910 

BY 

MARIA E, MARTIN. 



©C(,A2712il 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Drinks 21 

Bread and Breakfast Foods 24 

Soups 4(1 

Soup Garnishings and Forcemeats 5') 

Fish 50 

Meats 71 

Fowls 93 

Sauces for Meats, Fish and Vegetables !)!) 

Vegetables 107 

Salads 1:5(1 

Salad Dressings 187 

Eges and Cheese 140 

Sandwiches 147 

Puddings and Desserts 152 

Pudding Sauces 184 

Pastry 189 

Cakes 204 

Cake Icings and Fillings 238 

Ice Creams, Sherbets, Etc 242 

Candies 250 

Fruits 261 

Canned Fruits and X'egetables 265 

Fruit Jellies 260 

Preserves, Jams and Syrups 272 

Pickles, Catsups and Vinegars 280 

Monie Made Wines and Liquors 291 

(^iruels and Drinks for Invalids 295 

( )(Ids and Ends 300 

Iseful Hints in Housekeeping 306 

Weights and Measures 308 

Common Poisons and their Antidotes 309 

19 



DRINKS. 



AFTER DINNER COFFEE. 

Filippini. 

Put light tablespoons freshly ground coffee in an enameled 
sauce-pan, sprinkle } cup cold fresh water over it, cover and let 
stand in a cold place 20 minutes. Pour over it U pints cold water, 
mix well, and set on the side of the fire letting come very slowly 
to the boiling point but without boiling. Stir a few times only 
while heating and immediately replace the cover. Remove from 
fire, let settle a moment, and strain through a cloth into a hot 
serving coffee pot. Will make 6 small cups. 

CHOCOLATE. 

Melt 4 ounces chocolate in a double boiler, add 2 tablespoons 
sugar, and 1 quart milk ; stir till smooth ; let boil 5 minutes or 
longer; when ready, beat until perfectly smooth with an egg beater; 
serve with whipped cream. 

CLARET PUNCH. 

Mrs. W. T. Sherman. 

Take the yellow rind of 3 lemons, add it to 3 pounds granulated 
sugar, 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon. ^ tablespoon ground cloves 
and 2 grated nutmegs. Pour over all 2 quarts boiling water, and 
let stand J hour. The spices should be put in a thin bag. Just 
before serving, add J pint Jamaica rum and 3 bottles of claret. 
Add 3 or 4 sliced oranges. 

COCOA. 

Moisten 4 tablespoons cocoa with a little cold milk and add it 
to 1 quart boiling milk; stir and bdil about 5 minutes. 

COFFEE. 

The best coffee is made by both browning and grinding just 
before it is needed ; allow 1 heaping tablespoon to each person and 
1 to the pot, mix with a little white of egg in cold water, and pour 
over it 1 cup for each person of freshly boiling water; let simmer 
5 minutes and serve. 

For Cafe au Lait pour into a cup at the same time equal quan- 
tities of scalding coffee and scalding milk. 

Vienna coffee is served with whipped cream. 

21 



22 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CURRANT SHRUB. 

Take equal quantities of currant juice and water, sprinkle with 
grated nutmeg, and chill. 

Raspberr}' Shrub is made in the same way but requires a little 
lemon instead of nutmeg. 

EGG NOG, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

12 eggs, 1 quart milk, J pint cream, § pint French brandy, a 
little Jamaica spirits, 1 large teacupful sugar. 

Beat the yolks with the sugar, pour the liquor on slowly and 
let stand some hours. Add the milk and cream, beat the whites 
of the eggs stiff, stir some in and put a little on top. 

EGG NOG, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Herbert Evans. 

Beat the yolk of 1 egg with 2 tablespoons sugar,- stir in 2 
tablespoons brandy, put in a large glass and fill up with milk. 
Beat the white of the egg stiff and stir in last. 

FRUIT PUNCH. 

Mrs. Anise Holcoinb. 

I')oil 4 cups sugar in 2 quarts water for 10 minutes ; cool and 
add 1 gallon cold water; add the strained juice of 6 oranges and 
1 dozen lemons, and 1 can grated pineapple. Serve with cracked 
ice. Slices of oranges and lemons and a little tart jelly may be 
added, if liked. 

ICED TEA OR COFFEE. 

Fill the glasses with cracked ice, and jiour over it scalding hot 
tea or coffee. Tea may be served with sugar and slices of lemon, 
and coffee with sugar and whipped cream. These drinks may be 
made with cold tea or coffee, but lose much of their flavor. 

LEMONADE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Katie Callahan. 

Roll 6 lemons and slice thin ; sprinkle over them 2 cups white 
sugar and let stand 15 minutes. Pour over them 1 gallon water, 
and add a lump of ice. 

LEMONADE, NO. 2. 

Allow 2 large juicy lemons for each quart water: shave off 
the thin yellow rind, put it in the pitcher with 2 tablespoons sugar 
to each lemon and mash the peel into the sugar; roll the lemons 
and squeeze the juice into the pitcher without the seeds; pour 
over 1 quart boiling water and set awav to cool ; ice and serve. 
Or pour cold water over, and stir till the sugar is dissolved, then 
serve. 

Orangeade is made in the same way using less water. 



DRINKS. 23 

MINT GINGER ALE. 

Put 1 cup grauulated sugar with the juice of 6 lemons in a 
bowl; when dissolved, add 6 stalks of mint bruised; half fill with 
crushed ice, put in 2 bottles ginger ale ; stir till very cold, and 
serve. 

TEA. 

Scald the teapot letting it get quite hot ; put in the tea, 1 tea- 
spoon to each person and 1 to the pot, and at once pour over it \ 
the proper amount of boiling w'ater, let draw a few minutes, fill 
up with boiling water and serve. 

Russian tea is served with a slice of lemon in each cup. 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST FOODS. 



BAKING POWDER BISCUITS. 

Mrs. Lawrence Walters. 

For 1 quart flour, take 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 tablespoon 
lard, a little salt, and 1 pint buttermilk. Mix and knead quickly, 
using the. hand instead of the rolling pin to flatten the dough. 
Cut and bake in a quick oven. 

BERRY CORNCAKE. 

Mrs. T. A. Campbell. 

Mix 2 cups cornmeal, 1 cup flour, 3 tablespoons sugar, 2 eggs, 
i teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon soda in 1 pint sour milk, 1 cup of any 
kind of berries. Bake till a nice brown. 

BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Sam Davis. 

Mix 1 cup molasses, 1 cup cornmeal, 3 cups brown flour, 1 
tup sour milk, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in hot 
water, butter size of an egg, and salt to taste. Steam 3 hours ; 
bake 1 hour. 

BREAD. 

A. 

Boil 2 small potatoes at noon ; when well done, drain and 
mash, pouring the water back on them ; when lukewarm, add 2 
tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon salt, and 1 cake yeast foam ; let 
stand in a warm place till time to set sponge in the evening, then 
take 6 pints warm water, and stir into it 2 sifters of flour and 
the yeast. Let rise over night: in the morning take 2 sifters flour, 
put in the bread pan, add -\ cup salt, pour in the sponge, and mix 
with water enough to knead to a soft dough ; cover and let rise 
in a warm place till very light ; knead and let rise again ; then 
knead into 4 loaves, put in pans, let rise again, and bake 1 hour. 
The surface of the dough should be greased with butter or lard 
each time it is left to rise. 

BREAD MUFFINS. 

Mrs. John E. Williams. 

Make a setting as of bread at night with \ cake yeast. In 
the morning mix the yeast, 1 beaten egg, butter the size of an egg, 
a little salt, 1 pint milk, and flour enough to make a stiff dough ; 
let rise once and roll out as thin as for biscuit, cut with a biscuit 
cutter, double together, let rise vcr\- light, and bake, 

24 



BREAD AXD BREAKFAST FOODS. 25 

BROWN BREAD, NO. 1. 

Mrs. John E. Brown. 

Mix 5 cups graham flour, 3 cups buttermilk, 2 teaspoons soda, 
1 teaspoon salt, ^ cup molasses, and J cup brown sugar. Bake in a 
slow oven 1 hour. 

BROWN BREAD, XO. 2. 

.J cup corn meal, 1 cup white flour, 1 cup molasses, 2 cups 
graham flour, | pound seeded raisins, 1 pint sour milk, 1 teaspoon 
soda. Put into four 1-pound baking powder cans, perforate the 
lids, and steam 2 hours. 

BROWN SCONES. 

Heat 1 pint good cream, and as it gets hot dredge in brown 
flour until it makes a thick paste, season with salt; keep stirring 
till smooth. Turn out on a floured board, roll \ inch thick, cut in 
rounds and bake oil a hot griddle, turning and baking both sides 
brown, but not scorched. If not crisp, put in the oven to dry out. 
Scones made with white flour should be served hot but not crisp. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

Beat 3=1 cups buckwlicat flour and 1 teaspoon salt in a jar until 
smooth with 1 quart cold water; add ^ an yeast cake and mix; 
cover and let stand in a warm place over night. Dissolve J tea- 
spoon soda in 2 tablespoons boiling water, add to the batter with 
1 tablespoon sugar ; beat, and bake. One cup wheat flour is an 
improvement instead of as much buckwheat. 1 cup of batter may 
be saved each day to start the cakes instead of fresh yeast, if 
made often enough. 

BUNS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Pat. Dougherty. 

Break 1 egg into a cup and fill up with sweet milk; mix witli 
it J cup yeast, J cup butter, 1 cup sugar, and enough flour to niake 
a soft dough. Flavor to taste with grated nutmeg. Let rise till 
very light, then stir in a few dried currants cleaned, mould into 
biscuits, let rise a second time in the pan, and bake. When nearly 
done, glaze with a little molasses and milk. 

BUNS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Rose Call. 

Boil 1 quart sweet milk and let cool. Soak 1 cake yeast in 
a cup of warm water. Mix together 1 cup lard, 1 cup sugar, the 
whites of 2 eggs beaten to a froth, flour enough to make a stifle 
batter, the milk and lastly the yeast. Let stand over night. Then 
add a little salt, and mix as bread. Make into small rolls and 
bake in a moderate oven, 



26 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BUNS, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Wm. Breeze. 

Boil 3 small potatoes in U- pints water, and mash fine. When 
lukewarm, add I cake yeast foam, and 1 tablespoon sugar. Let 
rise over night. In the morning, take 1 pint of this yeast, 1 pint 
water, i pint sugar, and ^ pint lard (part butter, if you have it), 
a small handful of salt; rub lard in flour, and mix till stifif. Let 
rise till light, about 4 hours ; make into 40 buns, and place 2 inches 
apart ; let rise till 4 or 5 times their natural size ; then bake in a 
rather quick oven. 

(BATH) BUNS. 

Scald 1 pint milk, add 1 cup butter, let cool till only lukewarm, 
then add ^ cup yeast and 3 pints sifted flour; let stand over night 
in a warm place. Beat ^ cup sugar with yolks of 6 eggs, work 
into the sponge with 1 teaspoon cinnamon, J cup chopped citron, 
and .J- cup currants. Work in well with the hands, and add flour 
enough to roll out. Cut with a round cutter, put in greased pans, 
cover, and when very light bake in a quick oven 35 minutes. 

BUTTERMILK BISCUITS. 

Mrs. Alta Hoskins. 

Sift 1 scant teaspoon soda and 2 teaspoons baking powder in 
1 quart flour; add 2 tablespoons lard, 1 pint buttermilk, and a little 
salt. Mix very soft, and bake in a hot oven. 

CINNAMON ROLLS. 

Miss Joanna S. Holleran. 

Take 1 quart light bread dough, mix with 1 cup sugar and 1 
tablespoon lard ; roll ^ inch thick ; spread with butter, sugar and 
cinnamon; roll as a jelly roll; cut slices 1 inch wide, let rise, and 
bake in a quick oven. 

COFFEE CAKE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. J. W. Evans. 

Take 1 cup bread dough ; add 2 tablespoons soft butter, 1 egg, 
1 tablespoon sugar, i cup currants. Beat and make into a soft 
loaf ; let rise, roll out 1 inch thick, let rise again and bake. When 
done spread the top with 1 tablespoon milk and 2 tablespoons 
powdered sugar, and put back to brown. 

COFFEE CAKE, NO. 2. 

Soak I cake compressed yeast in ^ cup lukewarm milk ; when 
dissolved add } teaspoon sugar, and 1 saltspoon salt, then a large 
half-cup of sifted flour; mix thoroughly, cover and put in a warm 
place to rise for several hours. When ready, cream in a large 
bowl i" cup sugar and 3 ounces butter, with the grated rind of 
half a lemon or orange; then beat in 1^ eggs until light, k cup 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST FOODS. 27 

milk, \ teaspoon salt, and 2\ or 3 cups flour. When smooth and 
light stir in the risen dough, and knead well for 10 minutes. Cover 
and let rise several hours or all night. Roll small portions out 
the desired size, and put in buttered pans. When light again, 
spread melted butter evenly on top, dredge thickly with sugar and 
cinnamon, and, if wanted, finely chopped nuts, and bake till a light 
brown. 

CONTINENTAL WAFFLES. 

Mrs. Frank Grandy. 

Beat 4 eggs separately; add a pinch of salt, I pint milk, 1 tea- 
spoon sugar, 1 teaspoon butter, and 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
with flour enough to make a thin batter. Bake on a hot, greased 
waffle iron. 

CORN BATTER BREAD. 

Miss Fillie Welton. 

1 quart fresh buttermilk, 1 scant cup cornmeal, 3 eggs, 1 small 
teaspoon soda, butter or lard size of an egg, a little salt. Bake 
quickly in a deep pan. 

CORN BREAD, NO. 1. 

Mrs. J. W. Holleran. 

Sift 1 quart of cornmeal well with 1 cup flour; work in a large 
tablespoon lard, anfl 2 tablespoons sugar, salt to taste, 1 well beaten 
egg, and 2 cups sour milk. 

CORN BREAD, NO. 2. 

M. E. Kendall. 

Add 1 teaspoon soda to 1 quart buttermilk, then 2 well beaten 
eggs, and 1 teaspoon salt, lastly 1 quart corn meal. Bake in a 
moderate oven in shallow pans. 

CORN CAKES. 

Mrs. John M. Stone. 

Mix 1^ cups corn meal with 1 cup flour, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons 
lard, \ teaspoon soda in the flour, 1 tablespoon syrup, a good pinch 
of salt, and \\ cups milk. Plrst scald the corn meal with a little 
boiling water. Bake on a griddle. 

CORN DODGERS. 

Filippini. 

Put 1 pint milk in a saucepan with 3 saltspoons salt, and as 
soon as it comes to a Iioil, scatter over it slowly J- pound cornmeal, 
stirring briskly. Let boil 6 minutes, stirring from the bottom occa- 
sionally. Mix in 1 ounce butter, 1 egg yolk, and a pinch grated 
nutmeg, turn into a dish to cool. Divide into 12 equal parts, put 
in a buttered pan in oval shapes, baste with a little butter, and 
set in a slow oven for 20 minutes. Take up, split half open, spread 
butter inside, and serve on a hot dish in a napkin. 



28 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CORNMEAL FLAPJACKS. 

Marion Harland. 

Alix 1 quart buttermilk or sour milk with 2 eggs beaten light, 
1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon soda in hot water, 2 tablespoons mo- 
lasses, 1 tablespoon melted lard, i cup flour, and enough cornmeal 
to make a batter a trifle thicker than for flannel cakes. Bake on 
a griddle. 

CORNMEAL MUSH. 

Mix ^ teaspoon salt with J cup cornmeal ; sprinkle it over 1 
cup boiling water in a double boiler, stirring very hard till smooth ; 
add f cup milk, and cook 3 hours, replenishing the boiling water 
in the under kettle as needed. Serve hot with sugar and cream or 
milk. 

Cold nuish may lie cut into tl:in slices and fried brown in a 
little butter or dripping. 

CORNMEAL PONE. 

Marion Harland. 

Mix 1 quart cornmeal with 1 teaspoon salt, a little melted lard, 
and cold water enough for a soft dough. Mould with the hands 
into thin oblong cakes, lay in a buttered pan, and bake very quickly. 

An ash cake is a pone laid on the hot hearth, covered with hot 
ashes, and baked. 

CORN PONE. 

Mrs. Robert Sines. 

Mix together 1 pint milk, l.V pints cornmeal, 3 eggs beaten 
well, lard the size of an egg, and 1 cup }cast. Set in a warm place 
to rise. When light, bake in a buttered pan ].5 minutes in a 
moderate oven. 

CREAM BISCUIT. 

1 pint thick sour cream, 1 teaspoon soda and 1 teaspoon cream 
tartar sifted in the flour ; stir in quickly enough flour to roll out, 
cut and bake in a quick oven. 

CREAM TOAST. 

Mrs. John Achauer. 

Butter thin slices of toast, pour enough boiling water over them 
to soften, sprinkle with pepper and salt, and pour over 3 table- 
spoons cream to each person. 

CRUMB CAKES, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Forest Alexander. 

Soak pieces of dry bread in water till soft, squeeze and mash 
fine ; to 2 pints pulp, take 2 well beaten eggs, 1 teaspoon butter, 
|- teaspoon salt, I teaspoon soda in a cup hot milk, and wheat 
flour to make a thin batter. Bake on a greased griddle. 



BREAD AXD BREAKFAST FOODS. 29 

CRUMB CAKES, NO. 2. 

Prepare a hatter for flannel cakes. Brown 3 tablespoons bread- 
cruniijs in butter, drain, and adtl to the batter. Bake as usual. 

CRUMPETS. 

Mrs. RortT. 

Scald 1 pint milk, and let it stand until lukewarm ; then add 
1 teaspoonful salt, and about 3 cups flour; beat vigorously; then 
add 4 ounces butter melted, and 1 cup yeast; beat again; cover 
and stand in a warm place until very light. Grease muffin rings 
and place them on a hot griddle. Fill each ring half full of the 
batter ; bake until brown on one side, then turn and brown on 
the other. May be eaten fresh with lauttcr ; or when cool may 
be toasted on both sides, buttered nicely and served on a hot plate. 

CURRANT BREAD. 

Mrs. Peter Pierce. 

Sift together 3 quarts flour, 2 tablespoons salt and 3 cups 
sugar ; add 1 grated nutmeg, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon and 
allspice, 1 box currants and 1 box seeded raisins. Make a sponge 
as for light bread, and set to rise in the morning. At night mix 
in the dry ingredients, J pound lard, and 3 eggs. Let rise over 
night. Knead well and let rise again. Knead again, make into 
loaves, let rise, and bake 1 hour in a moderate oven. Tf kept in 
a damp place, will keep fresh a long time. 

DATE ROLLS. 

When light bread is ready to be made into loaves, roll a piece 
1 inch thick, spread with butter, then with chopped dates, or tigs, 
or both, roll up the dough, slice crosswise i inch thick, lay in a 
well greased pan, let rise, and bake in a moderate oven. 

ENGLISH MUFFINS. 

Scald 1 pint milk, add 1 ounce butter, and stand to one side 
till hike warm; then add ^ cup yeast (or J a compressed cake), 
3 cups flour and 1 teaspoonful salt. Beat continuously for 5 
minutes ; cover with a ^wel and stand in a warm place to 
rise about 2 hours. When light add enough flour for a soft 
(lough; work lightly with the hand; divide into small cakes, place 
each cake in a greased muffin ring, cover and let rise again. Then 
bake on a hot griddle in the rings, until a nice brown. When 
done break them open, butter and serve immediately. 

ENGLISH TEA CAKE. 

Mrs. Thomas Fletcher. 

Take enough light bread dough for a small loaf ; mix with 
it 1 tablespoon lard, 1 of sugar, and one large tablespoon currants. 
Let rise again till very light, then bake. Cut into round slices 
and toast them, buttering while hot. 



30 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

ENGLISH TEA CAKES. 

Mrs. Wm. Carmichael. 

2 ounces butter, 2 ounces lard, 2 pounds flour, 1 pint milk, 
2 tablespoonfuls sugar, 6 ounces currants, 2 ounces lemon peel, 
2 eggs, 1 teaspoonful salt, 2 cakes yeast. 

Mix flour and salt in a warm dish and make a hole in the 
centre. Soak the yeast and stir the sugar into it. Melt the 
butter and lard in a pan, and add the milk lukewarm. Pour these 
into the yeast, and stir all into the flour with the eggs well be'aten. 
Add the fruit and mix all together with the hand till a soft dough. 
Set to rise over night. In the morning divide into small cakes 
about the size of a pie plate, half an inch thick. Set these to rise 
in a warm place from 20 minutes to a half hour. Bake in a rather 
hot oven 20 minutes. When taken from the oven rub butter over 
the top to glaze. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

1 cup sweet milk, 2 eggs beaten separately, flour enough 
for a good batter ; lastly 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in a little 
water, a little salt and the whites of egg. Bake immediately on a 
Iiot griddle. 

Rice flour may be used instead of wlieat flour in the batter. 
Buttermilk or sour milk is an improvement. 

FRENCH TOAST. 

Mrs. Gomer Tliomas. 

Take 2 eggs, \ cup milk, flour enough for a thick batter, 
salt and pepper. Cut stale bread into thin slices; dip in the 
batter and fry in a skillet with a little butter. Serve hot with 
pot roasts or alone as a breakfast dish. The flour may be omitted 
if desired. 

FRENCH TWISTS. 

To 1 quart warm milk add 1 coffee cupful of potato yeast, a 
little salt, and flour enough for a stiff batter. Let it rise; when 
very light, work in 2 tablespoons butter, 1 egg and flour enougli 
to roll. Cut in strips, braid and let rise again. When light, hake 
on buttered tins \ hour. 

FROISE, NO. L 

Mrs. Richard Johnson. 

Beat 3 eggs together till very light, add 1 quart melted snow 
water and flour enough for a very thin batter. Bake on a greased 
skillet, each cake the size of the skillet. Sprinkle with cleaned 
and swelled currants, and when brown on the first side, turn and 
brown the other. Pile on a plate till all are done, sprinkling 
each with sugar, and spreading first with butter or not according 
to taste. Serve at once, cutting in pieces as if serving cake. 



BREAD AXD BREAKFAST FOODS. 31 

FROISE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. D. D. Richai-ds. 

Take 2 cups flour, sift with J cup sugar, add 2 well beaten 
eggs and enough milk to make a very thin batter. Bake and serve 
as in Froise, No. 1. 

GEMS. 

Mrs. John McGrath. 

Sift together 1 pint flour, 1| teaspoons baking powder and a 
pinch of salt. Beat two eggs well and add to the flour with 2 
tablespoons melted butter and I cup milk. Bake in gem pans 15 
minutes. 

GERMAN COFFEE CAKE. 

Mrs. Peter Kramer. 

Take a handful bread dough when ready for loaves; work in 
1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, nearly 1 cup butter, 1 teaspoon cinnamon 
and 1 of mixed spices, and 2 teaspoons strong coffee; let rise 
again; then roll out not so thin as pic paste, put in a dripping pan, 
let rise again, sprinkle well with cinnamon, sugar and bits of 
butter, and bake. 

GERMAN CRACKNELS. 

Set a sponge at night with i cake yeast, i cup warm milk, 1 
teaspoon caraway seeds, f cup sugar, and flour enough for a sponge. 
In the morning knead and let rise 3 times; roll the dough into 
little balls the size of walnuts. Let rise and bake a little more 
than lialf done; split and bake again. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Miss Johanna I'eeney. 

Set a sponge at night as for white bread. In the morning add 
to the dough 1 tablespoon each of lard and molasses and 4 small 
tablespoons salt ; use graham flour to mix it up. Finish as with 
white bread. 

GRAHAM CAKES. 

Mrs. James Alvis. 

Beat together J cup butter, ^ cup sugar, 1 egg, 1 cup sour milk, 
^ teaspoon soda, and enough graham flour to make a stiff baf^^er. 
Bake in gem pans. 

GRAHAM GEMS, NO. L 

Miss M. D. Jones. 

Take 1 cup graham and I cup wheat flour, J cup sugar, I cup 
sour milk, 1 well l)caten egg, 1 good tablespoon lard, ^ teaspoon 
baking powder sifted in the flour, J teaspoon soda dissolved in tlie 
milk, and a pinch of salt. Mix all together and bake in gem pans 



32 OLD COUNTRV RECIPES A.KD KEli\ 

GRAHAM GEMS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Dick Spicer. 

Mix 2 cups sour milk, 3 cups graham flour, and I teaspoon 
soda in the milk. Beat well together, drop into hot buttered gem 
pans, and bake in a quick oven 10 or 15 minutes. 

GRAHAM GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Scald IJ' pints milk and let cool ; beat in smoothly S quart 
graham flour; add 2 tablespoons melted butter, 1 teaspoon salt 
and ^ cake yeast ; beat well and stand in a warm place over night. 
Add 3 beaten egg yolks, then 3 beaten whites, let stand 15 minutes, 
and bake on a hot griddle. 

GREEN PEA GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Boil and mash 1 pint green peas, stir with a little pepper, 1 
saltspoon salt, 1 tablespoon butter, 1 pint sweet milk, J teaspoon 
soda, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 2 eggs beaten light, about 2 cups 
flour, or enough for a medium batter. When mixed, beat hard a 
few minutes before baking. 

HOMINY. 

Put 1 cup fine hominy in a double boiler with 1 teaspoon salt 
and 5 cups cold water; boil 3 hours, replenishing with boiling 
water if necessary. 

HOMINY MUFFINS. 

Marion Harland. 

Beat 2 cups fine cold boiled hominy till smooth ; stir in 3 cups 
sour milk, then J cup melted butter, 2 teaspoons salt, 2 tablespoons 
white sugar, 3 well beaten eggs, 1 teaspoon soda in hot water ; lastly 
1 large cup flour. Mix well and bake in a quick oven. 

HONEY CAKES. 

Place 1 cup sifted flour in a bowl, crack in 2 eggs, add 1 table- 
spoon honey, i ounce powdered sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
1 saltspoon salt, half as much grated nutmeg, and I- pint milk. 
Beat until thoroughly mixed. Bake like flannel cakes. 

HOT CROSS BUNS. 

Set a sponge over night of 3 cups sweet milk, 1 cup yeast, and 
flour for a thick batter. In the morning add 1 cup sugar, J cup 
melted butter, \ nutmeg, 1 saltspoon salt, and flour enough to roll 
out like biscuit. Knead well and set to rise for 5 hours. Roll ^ 
inch thick, cut into round cakes, and lay in a buttered baking pan. 
Let stand ^ hour ; then make a cross upon each with a knife, and 
put instantly into the oven. Bake to a light brown, and lirush 
over with white of egg beaten up with sugar. 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST POODS. 33 

HOTEL WATKINS WAFFLES. 

Miss Jennie Johnson. 

Sift 2 teaspoons baking powder with 1 quart flour, add 1 
teaspoon salt and a little sugar, and mix with enough sweet milk 
to make a thin batter ; beat 3 eggs separately and add, and lastly 
2 tablespoons melted butter. Bake at once in hot waffle irons. 

HUCKLEBERRY TEACAKE. 

Beat ^ cup sugar with 1 egg, add 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
soda in 2 cups sour milk, 1 cup berries and flour for a stiff dough. 
Bake and eat hot with butter. 

JOHNNY CAKE: 

Marion Harland. 

Take 1 cup sweet milk, 1 cup buttermilk, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 
teaspoon soda, 1 tablespoon melted butter, and enough corn meal 
to enable you to roll the dough into a sheet half an inch thick. 
Spread on a buttered tin or in a shallow pan, and bake 40 minutes. 
As soon as it begins to brown, baste it with a rag tied to a stick 
and dipped in melted butter. Repeat 5 or 6 times till brown and 
crisp. Break, not cut it up, and serve with buttermilk. It may be 
baked on a board before a hot fire. 

JOHNNY CAKE. (1776.) 

Add 1 teaspoon salt to 1 quart cornmeal and scald well with 
boiling water. Pour in a skillet to the depth of ^ inch. Bake 
brown on both sides, take up and cut in squares for the table. 
Baked on a hoe before a fire, this becomes a "hoe cake." 

JOLLY BOYS. 

1 cup sour milk, 1 egg beaten light, 2 tablespoons molasses, 
a small ^ teaspoon soda, a pinch salt, rye meal, corn meal. Put tlie 
soda in the milk, add the molasses and the rye meal till a thin 
batter; add salt and cornmeal till a stiff batter; lastly the egg. 
Drop by half tablespoons into deep boiling fat, and fry like 
doughnuts. Serve with a light hard sauce. 

KENTUCKY CORN DODGERS. 

Mix 1 pint sifted cornmeal, 1 heaping tablespoon lard, 1 pinch 
of salt and a scant cup of cold water. Heat a griddle, grease it 
and sprinkle meal over it. Make the dough into goose eggs, drop 
on the griddle, put in the oven and bake till brown on the bottom, 
then put on the shelf and brown on top, 20 to 30 minutes in all. 
Serve hot with butter. 

3 



34 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

LAPLAND CAKES OR POPOVERS. 

"Aunt Clara." 

1 quart milk, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 quart flour, a small lump of 
butter, 3 eggs. Beat the eggs together, adding salt, milk and 
melted butter. Stir gradually into the flour avoiding any lumps. 
Grease muffin pans and put them into the oven to get smoking hot. 
Fill them about half full, and bake in a quick oven about 30 min- 
utes. Serve at once. 

LIGHT ROLLS, NO. L 

Mrs. Peter Harrington. 

Beat 2 eggs well, add 1 pint warm milk and 1 cake yeast; 
let rise as if for bread. When light, add |- cup butter, ^ cup sugar, 
and enough flour to make a stiff dough as for bread; when light 
again, make into rolls, let rise and bake. 

LIGHT ROLLS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Wm. Thompson. 

Make a setting with yeast at night as for bread with J an 
yeast cake. In the morning, knead in 1 egg, 1 cup sugar, | cup 
lard, and let rise 3 or 4 times. The last time make into small rolls, 
and let rise well. Bake in a hot oven } hour. 

MARYLAND BISCUIT. 

3 pints of flour, 3 teaspoons salt, 6 ounces lard, S pint cold 
water. Knead well, then pound until the dough blisters, at least 
i hour. Mould into small biscuits, and bake immediately in a 
quick oven. 

MOCHA MUFFINS. 

Cream 1 tablespoon sugar with 2 of butter, and 1 well beaten 
egg. Stir in i cup milk and 1 cup strong cofifee, and add alternately 
H cups flour sifted with lA teaspoons baking powder, and J tea- 
spoon salt. Lastly beat in 1 cup cooked oatmeal, and bake 20 
minutes in hot buttered gem pans. 

MUFFINS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. O. O. Cherrington. 

Sift two level teaspoons baking powder with 1 pint flour 
and I- teaspoon salt ; stir in 2 tablespoons sugar beaten up with 
3 tablespoons melted butter, and i egg; add f cup sweet milk; 
bake in gem pans. 

MUFFINS, NO. 2. 

Miss Mary Sweeney. 

Sift together 1 quart flour, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, 
and 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder ; add 1 tablespoon melted 
butter, 1 pint milk, and the beaten yolks of 3 eggs ; stir all together 
and lastly add the stiffly beaten whites of the eggs. Bake in 
muffin pans in a hot oven 15 minutes. 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST FOODS. 35 

NORWEGIAN BREAD. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Scald 1 pint milk and let stand till lukewarm ; add 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 cup \east (or half a cake), mix, add 1 pint barley meal, 
I pint graham flour, h pint wheat flour, beat hard for 10 minutes, 
turn into a greased bread pan, cover with paper and stand in a 
warm place till very light and full of bubbles; bake in a moderate 
oven 40 minutes. 

OATMEAL BANNOCKS. 

Mrs. Lincoln Lloyd. 

Take 1 quart oatmeal, a pinch of soda, a pinch of salt, a little 
piece of lard and enough water to make a soft dough. Roll out 
about h inch thick, and cut and bake as oatmeal cakes. 

OATMEAL BROSE. 

Mrs. Robert Ramage. 

Sprinkle oatmeal into boiling water until thick enough. Boil 
about 5 minutes, stirring. Add salt and butter to taste, and when 
taken from the fire, stir in buttermilk till the proper consistency. 

OATMEAL CAKES. 

Mrs. Lincoln Lloyd. 

Mix 1 quart raw oatmeal with a pinch of salt and enough 
water to make a soft dough. Roll into as thin a sheet as possible, 
cut into small triangles and bake on a buttered griddle. Put into 
the oven to get crisp. In Scotland these are baked on a very large 
griddle over the coals, and toasted in front of the fire. 

OATMEAL PORRIDGE. 

Boil 1 quart salted water in a double boiler, stir in 1 cup oat- 
meal, stir hard for a moment, and let boil 2 or 3 hours, stirring 
occasionally. Stir till (|uite smooth before taking up. 

POCKET BOOK ROLLS. 

Mrs. James Duflfy, Jr. 

Take part of the bread dough after working it up in the 
morning, mix with it i cup butter and ^ cup sugar, let rise again 
till very light ; knead again, roll out and cut with a biscuit cutter, 
double over, let rise again and bake. 

PULLED BREAD. 

Take from the oven an ordinary loaf when about half baked, 
and wdiile it is still hot pull the half set dough into pieces about 
the size of an egg. Do not smooth or shape them. Put in a pan 
in a slow oven and bake a rich brown. Serve hot. 



36 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

RAISIN BREAD. 

Miss Ella McGrady. 

Set a sponge at night as for bread. In the morning, mix the 
bread, take out enough for 2 loaves, add 1 cup sugar, ^ cup lard, 
spices if you want them, 1 egg, 1 box seeded raisins, and enough 
flour to make a stiff dough ; knead and let rise twice ; the third 
time make 2 loaves, and bake when light again. Rub milk and 
sugar on the tops when baked. 

RHODE ISLAND "SPAT-OUTS". 

1 pint sweet milk, 4 tablespoons wheat flour, 2 well beaten 
eggs, corn meal to make a stiff batter, and a little salt; spat into 
round cakes \ inch thick, fry in boiling lard like doughnuts, split 
and eat warm with butter. 

RICE BREAD. 

Beat 3 eggs together until very light, then add 1} pints milk ; 
2 cups white cornmeal, 1 cup boiled rice, 1 ounce melted butter, 
and 1 teaspoon salt. Beat thoroughly and mix in 2 heaping tea- 
spoons baking powder. Grease 3 round shallow pans, pour in 
the mixture, put at once in a hot oven, and bake 30 minutes. Serve 
hot. 

RICE CAKES. 

Beat well together 1 cup cold boiled rice, 1 pint flour, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 2 well beaten eggs, and milk to make a tolerably thick batter. 
Bake on a griddle. Cold oatmeal may be used instead of rice. 

RICE MUFFINS. 

Mrs. Mary McGrady. 

Take 1 coffee cup of warm boiled rice, add J tablespoon sugar, 
1 tablespoon butter well worked in, 1 cup milk and flour enough 
to make a stiff dough. Dissolve i or J an yeast cake in a little milk 
and add it to the rice. Let rise till light. Then add 2 eggs well 
beaten, and drop into well buttered pans. Let rise again till very 
light. Bake 10 minutes in a hot oven. 

RICE WAFFLES. 

Heat \l cups boiled rice with 1 pint milk. Mix it smooth, 
then take from the fire, stir in a pint of cold milk, and a teaspoon 
salt, 4 well beaten eggs, and enough flour for a stiff batter. 

RYE BREAD. 

Make a sponge from wheat flour, and in the morning add 
enough rye flour to make a soft dough. Knead lightly ; then 
form into loaves, place in greased breadpans, cover and stand in a 
warm place to rise again. When light bake as white bread. It 
must not be as stiff as white bread, and does not require as 
much kneading. 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST FOODS. 37 

RYE DROP CAKES. 

To 3 cups sour milk add a heaping teaspoon soda, a little 
salt, half a cup of molasses, and rye meal enough for a thick batter. 
Drop into hot iron gem pans, and bake about 20 minutes. 

SALLY LUNN, NO. L 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

3 pints flour, 1 pint milk, 1 tablespoon yeast, 3 eggs, butter 
size of a walnut. 1 tablespoon sugar. Melt the butter, beat all 
well together, put in a buttered tin pan, and let stand all night. 
Bake whole, slice round the loaf and butter for breakfast. 

SALLY LU-\'N, NO. 2. 

Miss IT. r. \'an Meter. 

J teacup sugar, \ cup butter, l} pints flour, 4 eggs beaten 
separately, 1 pint sweet milk or cream, 2 even teaspoons baking 
powder. " Bake about 1 hour in a moderate oven. 

SALT RLSING BREAD. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Add to 1 pint scalding water enough flour to make a thick 
batter; add i teaspoon salt, and beat until smooth and full of 
air bubbles. Cover -closely, stand in a pan of warm water and 
keep in a warm place over night. In the morning, scald 1 pint 
milk, stand aside until lukewarm : add 1 teaspoon salt and enough 
flour to make a batter that will drop from the spoon. Now turn 
into this the salt rising which should be very light and smell un- 
pleasantlv ; beat thoroughly for 3 minutes, then cover with a towel, 
stand in pan of warm water, and put where if will keep warm 
until verv light ("about 2 hours) : then add sufficient flour to make 
dough; knead thoroughly until smooth and elastic, divide into 
loaves, mould, place in 'greased pans, cover with a towel, and 
when very light, bake in a moderate oven (300° F.) one hour. It 
must be kept much warmer than an yeast bread or it will not 
rise. 

SNOW FRITTERS. 

Mrs. Edward Call. 

Make a rather thick batter of milk, flour and a little salt ; add 
new fallen snow in the proportion of 1 cup to each pint of milk; 
have the fat hot before stirring in the snow, and drop the batter 
into it with a spoon. 

SODA BISCUITS. 

Mrs. M. J. Stoddard. 

Sift 2 teaspoons each of cream tartar and salt, and 1 teaspoon 
soda with 2 sifters flour; rub in ^ cup butter; add quickly about 
1 pint milk or water, kneading as lightly as possible ; roll out f inch 
thick, cut, put in buttered pans, and set in a hot oven. Bake 20 
minutes. 



38 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

SOUTHERN CORN MUFFINS. 

Mrs. R. J. Wilson. 

Mix 1 pint buttermilk or sour cream, 1 beaten egg, 1 teaspoon 
soda, 1 large lump of lard melted, 1 large pinch baking powder, 
and enough sifted cornnieal to make a soft batter. Bake in muffin 
tins. 

SPOON CORNBREAD. 

Mrs. A. W. Pitzer. 

Beat Up one &gg in the baking dish you mean to cook it in. 
Add J^ pint of fresh milk, about 1 teaspoon lard or butter and a 
little salt. Put on stove and let it get hot but not boil. Then stir 
in J cup cornmeal graduall\^ and with the last a small quantity 
baking powder. Put at once into the oven and bake 20 minutes. 
Serve with a spoon. 

SQUASH BISCUITS. 

]\Irs. T. A. Campbell. 

Take 1 cup stewed squash, 1 cup sour milk, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, a little salt and 1 teaspoon soda; add 
flour till stiff enough to roll out. Cut, bake and serve hot. 

TEA BISCUITS, NO. 1. 

"A Friend in Need." 

Boil 1 quart of milk ?> minutes, let it cool and add h cup of 
yeast; melt a piece of butter the size of a large walnut; stir it in 
with enough flour to make a stiff sponge; let it rise 3 hours; then 
roll and cut out the biscuit. Make them thinner than ordinary 
biscuit ; spread evenly with butter, double together ; draw out to 
make a good shape ; let rise from 1-5 to -30 minutes, and bake in 
a quick oven. 

TEA BISCUITS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Michael Monahan. 

Sift together 1 quart flour. 1 teaspoon each sugar and salt, 
and 8 teaspoons baking powder. Then rub in 1 tablespoon lard, 
and add 1 pint of either sweet milk or water, or both mixed. The 
dough should be as soft as can be handled. Flour the board and 
roll out, cut with a small tin cutter, and bake in a good hot oven 
about 20 minutes. 

TEA RUSKS, NO. 1. 

Miss H. C. Van Meter. 

3 teacups flour, | cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 heaping table- 
spoons butter melted, 2 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder. 

TEA RUSKS, NO. 2. 

IMrs. B. James. 

Dissolve 1 cake compressed veast in h cup lukewarm water ; 
scald 1 pint milk, and let cool till lukewarm; sift 3 cups flour in 
a bowl, add the milk, strain in the yeast, beat and let rise till very 



BREAD AND BREAKFAST FOODS. 3 9 

light. Cream f cup sugar with h cup butter, add 1 teaspoon salt, 
and as much either cinnamon or lemon extract ; work into Lhe 
sponge with 4 eggs, and enough flour to make a soft dough. 
Knead and set to rise ; when very light roll to V inch in thickness 
Cut w-ith a biscuit cutter, let rise again and bake. Powdered or 
light brown sugar preferable. 

VELVET ROLLS. 

Mrs. Arthur Van Meter. 

For IJ dozen rolls use 1 quart flour, 2 taltlespoons butter. \ 
yeast cake, ^ teaspoon salt, whites of 2 eggs, a generous \ pint 
of milk. Boil the milk and add the butter to it. Let it cool, then 
add the sugar, salt, yeast, and the well beaten whites of egg. Sift 
the flour into a bowl and pour the mixture upon it, stirring with a 
spoon until it is smooth. Cover closelv and let rise in a warm 
place over night. In the morning knead afrain, and let rise until 
twice its size. Make into rolls, place in buttered pans, and let 
rise again until twice their size. Bake 2') minutes. 

WAFFLES, NO. 1. 

1 pint sweet milk, i cup l)iittermilk or clal)ber, 2 eggs beaten 
separately, U pints flour, and a piece of lard the size of a small 
egg, melted. Beat well for 15 minutes. Grease the irons, fill with 
the batter and bake quickly, turninsf the irons. Sour milk or butter- 
milk will do without any sweet milk. 

WAFFLES, NO. 2. 

Add 2 ounces of melted butter to 1 pint milk, then 4 well 
beaten eggs, 1 pound sifted flour, 1 teaspoon salt, and 4 tablespoons 
yeast. Let stand until light. Pour on well greased waffle irons, 
bake on both sides by turning the irons: and serve immediately. 

WHEATEN GRITS. 

Put 1 pint cold water, l pint milk and 1 teaspoon salt in a sauce- 
pan and let come to a boil. Add J- pound wheaten grits, and boil 
slowly IJ hours, stirring occasionally. Pour in a hot dish and 
serve with cream and sugar. If served cold, it makes a good 
dessert for children. 

WHEAT GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Mrs. John Cannon. 

Mix 1 pint sour milk, 1 egg, a little salt, 1 tablespoon melted 
butter, and flour enough to make the right consistency. Beat till 
very smooth. When ready to use, put in a little soda. 

WHOLE WHEAT BREAD. 

Set a sponge at night as for white bread. In the morning 
work it up with whole wheat flour. 



SOUPS. 



SOUP STOCK. 

Tlie most useful stock is made from beef. Soak a bone with 
meat on in plenty of cold water for an hour, cover and boil slowly 
4 or 5 hours ; add the common soup vegetables, /. c, 1 onion, carrot 
and turnip, 1 stalk celery, 1 sprig parsley, a bay leaf, and, if liked, 
a few cloves and pepper corns ; simmer another hour, salt, and 
strain. Put in a cold place. The next day, skim and make your 
soup. Or keep a few days for strengthening cream soups and 
sauces. 

White Stock is made from veal or raw chicken bones. 
BARLEY SOUP. 

Mrs. Leo Fox. 

Wash and boil for 2 hours 1 cup barley in enough water to 
keep it well covered ; drain and add it to a good beef, veal or 
chicken broth ; let simmer for 10 minutes. Take from the fire 
and stir in the A'olk of 1 or 2 eggs beaten in \ cup sweet milk ; 
season with salt and a little nutmeg. 

Rice or tapioca may be used in the same way. 

BEEF SOUP. 
Mrs. R. P. Taylor. 

Put 1 pound lean beef in a kettle with 1 gallon cold water; 
let boil slowly 1 hour. Add 2 onions, 2 parsnips, 2 carrots, and 8 
potatoes cut coarsely. Boil another hour ; then add a little parsley 
and 1 level tablespoon flour, cook 5 minutes longer, season with 
salt and pepper, and serve. 

BOUILLON. 

Cut in inch cubes 5 pounds lean round of beef; put I in a 
kettle and soak on back of stove \ hour; take the marrow from a 
2 pound bone and brown the rest of the meat with this in a hot 
pan ; put all with the bone in the kettle, bring to the boil, skim, 
and simmer for 5 hours; add 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon pepper- 
corns, and ^ cup each of diced carrots, turnips, onions and celery ; 
cook 1 hour, strain and cool. Skim and clear by adding the beaten 
white of an egg while heating to serve. A little caramel or wine 
may be added. Serve in cups. 

40 



SOUPS. 41 

CABBAGE SOLJP. 

Take h a small sound cabbage, cut in quarters, remove core 
and stale leaves, and cut in fine strips. Put in a saucepan with 
1 tablespoon butter, U teaspoons salt and J teaspoon pepper; cook 
over a moderate fire 15 minutes, or until tender, stirring occasion- 
ally. Add 2 peeled and quartered raw potatoes, i pound each raw 
fresh, lean pork and beef, and 3.V quarts water. Cover pan and 
let sinuuer 2 hours. Take out the meat and chop it coarsely, re- 
turn to the pan, and when hot again, serve in a hot tureen with 2 
ounces grated Parmesan cheese in a separate dish. 

CARROT SOUP. 

Wash and clean 1 dozen young carrots, slice thin, put in a 
saucepan with 2 tablespoons butter, and a little salt and sugar, 
and cook slowly turning often till they color. Add 1 pint rich 
broth and boil gently till the carrots are soft. Rub through a sieve, 
return to the saucepan, and take up when smoking hot. 

CELERY BROTH. 

Clean 3 stalks fresh celery. Take out the hearts, pick off 
spoiled leaves, and chop branches and roots in small pieces. Take 
l.V pounds beef, chop fine, put in a saucepan with 2 branches pars- 
ley, 1 branch each of chervil and chives (if at hand), the whites 
of 2 eggs, 2 teaspoons salt, 2 saltspoons pepper, and the washed 
and drained celery. Mix and heat for five minutes, place over the 
fire and slowly stir in 2} quarts water continuing till it reaches 
the boil. Set back and let simmer 1.} hours. Strain. 

CHICKEN BROTH. 

Wash in cold water and drain 1 pound fresh chicken bones; 
chop fine and put in a saucepan with 2^ quarts cold water ; set 
pan on fire and season with 1 teaspoon salt and half as much 
pepper. As soon as it comes to a boil, skim and add 1 each sliced 
carrot, turnip and onion, 2 branches each celery and parsley, 1 
clove, 1 bay leaf, 2 chopped leeks, and a sprig of thyme. Cover 
pan and let simmer li- hours, skim and strain through a cheese- 
cloth, and serve. H wanted cold, put into a stone jar until cool, 
then place jar in a bowl of cracked ice and let get thoroughly 
cold. Serve in cups. 

n wanted for an invalid,- use the whole chicken cut up without 
any vegetable but rice. 

CHICKEN SOUP. 

"The Housekeeper's Friend." 

Cut up 2 chickens and put them in a pot with 5 quarts cold 
water. Season with salt and pepper. Let boil until the meat is 
very well done. Remove it from the liquor and cut it up into 
sniiill pieces. Put in the soup \ pound butter, mixed with a little 
flour, and a pint of cream, Throw in the cut meat and just before 



42 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

you serve it add the beaten yolks of 2 eggs and a little parsley. 
You may also add (if in season) a pint of green corn cut from 
the cob and put in when the soup is half done. 
Squirrel soup is made the same way. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

Wash 1 quart clams with 1 cup cold water, and keep the liquor. 
Chop the clanis. Make the chowder precisely as fish chowder, but 
put the clams in the fat at the same time with the potatoes. When 
about done, heat the clam liquor to the boiling point, strain, thicken 
with butter and flour and stir into the chowder just before serving. 
1 cup hot cooked tomatoes is an addition liked in some places. 

COCKIE LEEKIE. 

Prepare a tender young chicken for cooking, and cut the meat 
into \ inch pieces. Put in a saucepan with 2 tablespoons butter, 
and cook about 10 minutes, stirring. Drain off the butter and add 
3 quarts hot water. When it boils add 1 sliced onion (leeks, if 
at hand) , 1 small bunch fresh parsley, 2 teaspoons salt and h tea- 
spoon pepper. Cover and boil slowly 45 minutes. Add 2 ounces 
raw rice, cover again and boil slowly 40 minutes more. Skim, take 
out the parsley, and pour into a hot tureen. 

CONFEDERATE ARMY SOUP, 

as made at General Pickett's headquarters. 

"Mrs. Owen's Cook Book." 

1 ham bone, 1 beef bone, 1 pod red pepper, 1 pint black eyed 
peas. Boil in a mess kettle in 2 gallons salted water. Splendid 
soup for a wet day. 

CONNECTICUT CHOWDER. 

Prepare as Eish Chowder, using the fish liquor when the pota- 
toes are added to the fat in place of 2 cups water; omit the milk, 
and use instead 2|- cups stewed and strained tomatoes. 

CONSOMMfi. 

Put in a saucepan 2 pounds finely chopped shin of beef, 1 
medium sized sliced carrot, turnip, onion, branch of celery, pars- 
ley, tarragon and chervil, 2 sliced leeks, 1 bay leaf, 1 sprig thyme, 
1 clove, 1 bean garlic, 1 tablespoon salt and 2 raw eggs. Stir hard 
for 5 minutes, then stir in slowly 3J quarts boiling water. Put 
over the fire and let slowly boil. Then pour in 1 gill cold water. 
Let simmer 2 hours. Strain through a damp double cheesecloth 
into a hot tureen, li wanted cold, strain into a stone jar, and 
when cool put the jar in a bowl with cracked ice around, let 
thoroughly set, fill up cups and serve. 



SOUPS. 43 

CORN AND TOMATO CREAM SOUP. 

Cut tfie corn from six fresh ears ; place in a saucepan with 1 
sliced onion, 2 branches celery chopped and 1 branch parsley. Add 
3 pints white broth (or water), and 1 quart milk. Season with a 
heaping teaspoon salt, let come to a boil, put in 3 ounces raw rice, 
and let boil slowly 1} - hours, stirring well occasionally. Press 
through a sieve and a strainer and return to the saucepan. Add 
i tablespoon butter and 1 pint tomato sauce, mix well and boil 
5 minutes. Serve with croutons. If no tomato sauce at hand, 
boil down fresh or canned tomatoes to the desired quantity and 
season well. 

CREAM OF BARLEY. 

Wash thoroughly i pound barley; add it to 2.V quarts beef 
broth, 1 sliced carrot and 1 sliced onion. Add 1 teaspoon salt, 
cover and let simmer for 2 hours. Press it through a sieve, and 
return to the saucepan ; add 1 cup cream, 2 cups milk, and ^ table- 
spoon butter. Beat it well, bring to the boil, skim, add a very 
little sugar, and serve. 

Cream of rice is made in the same way, using rice for barley. 

CREAM OF CAULIFLOWER. 

Clean and soak 1 head cauliflower, and boil it 10 minutes ; 
remove and drain. Cut in small pieces, and put in a saucepan 
with 1 ounce butter, cooking 5 minutes. Add 1 quart broth, 
3 pints water, 2 branches parsley, 1 onion with 2 cloves, and 1 
hay leaf. Season with 1 tablespoon salt, 2 saltspoons cayenne pep- 
per, and a pinch nutmeg. Boil slowly 1 hour. 

Rub 1 ounce butter with 2i ounces flour in a hot saucepan; 
strain the caidiflower broth into this and stir well. Rub the vege- 
tables through a sieve, and return to the soup, boiling 15 minutes 
while stirring. Put in 1 cup milk and cream, cook again, mix 
2 egg yolks with 3 tablespoons cream, add to the soup with i 
ounce butter, and stir till perfectly hot. Strain and serve with 
croutons. 

CREAM OF GREEN PEAS. 

Shell J peck green peas, wash the pods, cover with cold water, 
and boil till tender; drain the pods and keep the water; put it 
back in the kettle and boil the peas till done ; take out 1 cup and 
mash the rest through a sieve. Put 3 times the quantity of milk 
with it, add the peas, and let come to a boil ; add butter and flour 
rubbed to a paste, 1 tablespoon chopped parsley, pepper and salt. 
Some like a touch of sugar and mint. Serve at once with croutons. 

CREAM OF LI^IA BEANS. 

Cover 1 quart young lima or butter beans with boiling water, 
and boil slowly 30 minutes; drain and press through a colander; 
finish as Salmon Soup, adding, if desired, the beaten yolks of 2 
eggs just before it is taken from the fire. String beans may be 
cooked tender, and finished the same way. 



44 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

Canned peas are pressed through a colander and finished 
precisely as Salmon Soup. Any of these soups will do for Friday 
by omitting the stock and using double the quantity of milk. 

CREAM OF TAPIOCA. 

Soak the tapioca in cold water 2 hours ; finish as Cream of 
Barley, using a white stock in preference. 
Cream of Sago is made in the same way. 

CREOLE SOUP. 

Mrs. Frank Connell. 

Brown 2 tablespoons each chopped peppers and onions in 1 
tablespoon butter, add ^ can tomatoes, and 1 quart brown stock; 
simmer 20 minutes. Put a little grated horseradish at the bot- 
tom of a tureen with 1 teaspoon vinegar, and some boiled macaroni 
cut in small pieces. Thicken the soup with a little butter and flour 
rubbed together, adding it very carefully, and pour into the tureen. 

ECONO^IICAL SOUP. 

Slice small a variety of soup vegetables and herbs, brown them 
in a saucepan with \ tablespoon butter, add 5 pints hot water, 
season to taste, put in a little chopped salt pork and whatever 
beef or chicken bones are at hand. Cover and simmer 30 minutes, 
skimming every 10 minutes. Add 4 tablespoons raw rice, and 
half as much chopped spaghetti. Cover again and boil 40 min- 
utes. Take out the bones and pork, skim, and serve with toast. 

EGYPTIAN CREAM. 

Put 1 pint can corn in a saucepan with 1 quart milk and 3 
pints broth. Season with li^ teaspoons salt, 2 saltspoons pepper and 
half as nmch nutmeg. Boil slowly 40 minutes. Melt 1 tablespoon 
butter in another pan with 2J ounces flour, stir hard for 2 
minutes, pour in the corn, stir till it comes to a boil, add 1 egg 
yolk with \ cup cream: stir well for -5 minutes without boiling, 
strain and serve with bread croutons. 

FISH CHOWDER. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

Take a 4 pound fresh cod or haddock, skin, cut ofif head and 
tail, take out the backbone, throw away the skin, and put the head, 
etc., into a pan with 2 cups cold water; stew slowly 20 minutes; 
in the meantime cut the meat into 2 inch pieces, and put aside. 
Chop a small piece salt pork, fry out, brown an onion in the fat, 
and strain the fat into a kettle with 4 cups diced and parboiled 
potatoes ; add 2 clips boiling water and cook 5 minutes ; then the 
liquor from the fish pan and the diced fish; cover and simmer 10 
minutes longer ; season with 1 tablespoon salt, ^ teaspoon pepper, 
3 tablespoons butter, 4 cups scalded milk, and 8 Boston crackers 
split and soaked in the milk; tea crackers would need no soft- 
ening, 



SOUPS. 45 

GIBLET SOUP. 

Take the giblets, neck and first joints of wings and legs o{ 
uncooked turkey, chicken, etc. Dice, and dice also 1 peeled carrot, 
turnip, onion, 2 leeks and 2 l)ranches celery. Brown meat and 
vegetables with Ik tablespoons butter in the soup kettle for 15 
minutes; add 3 quarts water, i pint tomato sauce, or thick cooked 
tomatoes, 1 tablespoon salt, ^ teaspoon pepper, and 2 tablespoons 
Worcestershire sauce. Add a bunch of soup herbs, .and simmer 1 
hour ; add 3 ounces raw rice and simmer another hour. Take out 
the herbs and serve. 

GREEN TURTLE SOUP. 

Filippini. 

Heat a pint can of green turtle, in a double boiler, and chop 
the meat into dice. Have 3 pints consomme prepared ; heat it 
in a saucepan, add the turtle and its broth, with ^ gill sherry, 1 
tablespoon brandy and 1 saltspoon cayenne pepper. Boil 20 min- 
utes. Skim, add 3 tablespoons arrowroot diluted in 2 tablespoons 
sherry; mix, boil 1 minute longer, and serve. 

IMPERIAL CONSOMMfi. 

Cut 2 pounds lean veal into small pieces with J pound lean 
ham, and a small chicken ; brown in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon 
butter, and a bunch of soup vegetables and herbs (no tomatoes) ; 
add I cup water and stew till well browned ; then add 4 quarts 
water, let simmer 3 hours, strain and put on the ice to cool. 
When cool, skim, and pour into cups to jelly. Serve cold. 

MACARONI CLEAR SOUP. 

Mrs. Kate Hoodlet. . 

Take a quarter of a pound of macaroni, break into short 
pieces, and parboil it 3 minutes, then drain. Put in a saucepan 
containing 2 quarts boiling clear chicken or veal broth, and simmer 
gently till the macaroni is thoroughly cooked, skimming if nec- 
essary. Serve with grated cheese in a side dish. 

MISSISSIPPI GUMBO SOUP. 

"Mrs. Owen's Cook Book." 

Fry a large tender chicken very brown ; take up and fry 1 
quart sliced okra in the gravy; add to the chicken without the 
grease ; put chicken and okra in a porcelain vessel of cold water, 
add 1 pint peeled sliced tomatoes, 1 large white onion sliced, a 
few chips of smoked ham, and salt to taste. Cook slowly 1 hour ; 
add 1 dozen broken soda crackers, 1 large tablespoon butter, and 
1 teaspoon black pepper. If liked, G hard boiled eggs may be 
added chopped; get very hot and serve. 



46 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Mrs. John D. Martin. 

Take the stock from 2J- pounds boiling meat; add 1 small 
onion, 2 medium sized potatoes diced, ^ teaspoon each of cloves, 
allspice and celery seed, and salt to taste. Cook until the vege- 
tables are done. Then add 3 hard boiled eggs sliced, the juice of 

1 lemon and half the lemon sliced thin, and 1 wineglass sour wine, 
and let simmer ^ hour. 

MULLIGATAWNY. 

Filippini. 

Prepare the following ingredients : ^ carrot sliced, 1 onion 
sliced, i turnip sliced, 1 each sliced leek, branch of celery, parsley 
root, apple, green pepper ; 2 ripe sliced tomatoes, 2 shallots sliced, 

2 bay leaves, \ eggplant sliced, 1 crushed garlic bean, 2 cloves, 
i ounce lean raw ham or bacon diced, and 1 piece chopped lemon 
rind. Heat 1 ounce butter in a saucepan, add all these ingredients, 
and brown for 5 minutes, stirring well. Mix in 1 tablespoon flour 
and cook 8 minutes longer. Stir in 2^ quarts hot broth, 1 light 
tablespoon salt, ^ teaspoon pepper, 1 saltspoon cayenne and same 
of grated nutmeg, and 1 good teaspoon curry powder dissolved 
in water. Stir well and let simmer 1 hour. Skim and strain ; add 
1 tablespoon cocoanut milk, or cream, 2 tablespoons boiled rice, 
and same of chopped cold chicken ; stir until very hot, but do 
not boil again. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

Mrs. Charles Kling. 

Boil a nice fat chicken till tender ; set aside, and season the 
broth. Break 3 eggs into a bowl, add flour enough for a very 
stiff dough, work until it looks like nice butter; roll as thin as 
possible and let dry a little; have the broth boiling, cut the dough 
into fine strips, drop them in slowly, and stir for a few seconds till 
the noodles come to the top of the broth : serve at once. 

OKRA SOUP. 

Dice 1 ounce raw lean ham and a little more veal, 1 onion, 
1 green pepper ; brown in a saucepan without burning for 10 
minutes, with a little butter. Add 5 pints water and 1 pint 
tomato juice. Season with 1 tablespoon salt and I teaspoon pepper, 
and add about 1 pound raw veal bones. Boil slowly 30 minutes. 
Trim, wash and cut into i inch pieces 1 dozen fresh okras ; 
add to the soup and boil until they are done, about 25 minutes. 
Add 2 tablespoons each canned corn and lima beans, cook a few 
minutes, take out the bones, skim the fat ,and serve. 

ONION SOUP AU GRATIN. 

Prepare and strain a consomme and keep hot. Slice 3 onions 
and brown them for 15 minutes in 1 tablespoon butter. Rub in 

3 tablespoons flour, and 1 saltspoon cayenne pepper, stir in the 



SOUPS. 47 

consomme, and let simmer 85 minutes. Put in an earthen soup 
tureen, put G slices toast on top, dust 3 ounces cheese over all, and 
bake in the oven 15 minutes. 

PEPPER POT. 

Chop fine 2 each of onions and green peppers. Put in a 
saucepan with ^ tablespoon butter and brown for 10 minutes. 
.Add 4 ounces fresh tripe (or calf brains) diced, 2 ounces raw rice, 
2i- quarts white broth or hot water, 1 pound fresh veal bones, 
-1 tablespoon salt and ^ teaspoon pepper. Cover and simmer 30 
minutes. Peel and cut into eighths 3 medium ripe tomatoes, add, 
and let boil 35 minutes longer. Remove the bones and serve. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Chop 4 ounces lean salt pork, 2 leeks and 1 onion, and put in 
a saucepan with 1 tablespoon butter, and 2 bay leaves. Cook 10 
minutes, stirring. Slice fine 6 peeled raw potatoes, and add to 
the pan with 1 quart white broth, 3 pints water, 1 light teaspoon 
salt, and ^ teaspoon pepper. Cover and let boil slowly 1 hour, 
and press through a sieve into another saucepan. Drop 2 ounces 
vermicelli in 1 pint boiHng broth, and boil 10 minutes ; add it to 
the soup. Mix well, boil 10 minutes longer and serve. 

PURfiE OF TOMATOES. 

Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan. Slice fine i each 
carrot, onion, branch of celery, and green pepper; J ounce raw lean 
ham, and 1 branch parsley; add all these to the saucepan and stir' 
for 10 minutes until nicely browned. Stir in 3 tablespoons flour, 

1 quart fresh or canned tomatoes, and 2 quarts white broth or 
water. Season with 1 talilespoon each salt and sugar, and J tea- 
spoon pepper. Simmer 1 hour, and strain. Add 2 potatoes previ- 
ously diced and cooked in salted water for 20 minutes. Serve 
immediately. 

PURfiE OF TURNIPS AND TOMATOES. 

Peel 8 medium sound turnips, slice thin and cook slowly in 
a saucepan with 1 tablespoon butter for 15 minutes. Add 2 sliced 
raw potatoes, and 2 sliced onions. Put in a bunch of herbs tied 
together. Season with salt and pepper, add 1 quart broth and 

2 quarts water, mix well and boil slowly 1^ hours. Stir occa- 
sionally. Strain, return to the fire, let it come to a boil, add 1 pint 
tomato sauce, boil for 10 minutes, and serve. (If raw or canned 
tomatoes are used in place of the sauce, put them into the soup 
earlier.) 

QUEEN VICTORIA'S FAVORITE SOUP. 

"Invalid Cooking." 

Boil a chicken until done. Remove the skin, tendons and 
bones; chop the chicken until as fine as meal; take 1 cup of chicken, 
mix it with \ cup cracker or bread crumbs soaked in a little 



48 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

cream. Boil the yolks of 3 eggs hard, rub through a sieve and add 
to the chicken with 1 teaspoon salt, h saltspoon pepper, and 1 pint 
of chicken broth. Strain the whole through a colander, adding 1 
pint of cream slowly and pressing through all of the meat. Cook 
for \ hour in a double boiler. 

RABBIT SOUP. 

Prepare the rabbit for cooking, and cut in h inch square 
pieces. Put in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon butter, 1 stalk celery, 
an onion, and 1 green pepper, seeded. Brown for 10 minutes. 
Brown in an ounce of flour. Add 5 pints water, \ cup red wine, 
and 1 cup strong broth. Add a bunch of soup herbs, pepper and 
salt, then let simmer IJ hours, stirring occasionally. Take out the 
herbs, mix in 2 tablespoons sherry, and serve. 

SALMON SOUP. 

Take 1 pound fresh or canned salmon, cover with boiling water 
and simmer 15 minutes ; take out skin and bones and mash through 
a colander. Bring 1 pint each of milk and veal stock to the boil, 
stir in 2 tablespoons flour rubbed with 1 tablespoon butter ; when 
it thickens, put in the salmon, and take up when it reaches the 
boil again. Season with salt and pepper. 

Any white fish may be cooked in the same way ; if no stock 
at hand, use that much more milk, and boil in it a little onion, 
bay leaf and parsley. 

SALSIFY SOUP. 

Trim, scrape and wash 2 bunches salsify. Drain and slice very 
tine. Fry in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon butter until tender; 
then add 2 tablespoons flour, and mix well while heating through. 
Add 2 quarts broth or water, 2 finely sliced onions and leeks 
(each), and 1 branch parsley. Season with 1 teaspoon salt, half as 
much pepper, and 1 saltspoon nutmeg. Cover and let boil slowly 
1 hour. Press through a sieve and again through a strainer back 
into the saucepan, add ^- tablespoon butter, 1 pint milk and \ pint 
cream. Stir constantly wdiile boiling 5 minutes. Serve in a hot 
tureen with croutons. 

SORREL SOUP. 

Pick, wash and squeeze dry 1 pint fresh sorrel. Cut into strips. 
Heat 1 tablespoon butter in a saucepan, add the sorrel, cover and 
steam 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Rub in 2 tablespoons 
flour, add 2 quarts white broth or water, and 1 pint milk. Season 
with 2 teaspoons salt, 1 of sugar, and \ teaspoon pepper; mix, and 
let simmer 20 minutes. Add \ gill cream beaten with the white 
of 1 egg ; boil 1 minute : beat the yolk with 2 tablespoons milk, 
and stir it in, cooking 5 minutes longer. 

SPANISH CELERY SOUP. 

Clean and cut into 1 inch pieces 2 whole stalks celery. Put 
in a saucepan with 1 finely chopped green pepper and \\ table- 
spoons butter. Cover and let steam 10 minutes. Then add 2 quarts 



SOUPS. 49 

broth, 2 ounces raw rice, 2 peeled and finely chopped tomatoes, 1 
teaspoon salt, 3 saltspooils pepper; mix and let I)oil slowly 45 
minutes. 

SVEZHSA SHTCHEE. 

Filippini. 

Put a 3 pound piece of the short ribs of beef in a saucepan 
with 5 quarts water and a level teaspoon salt, cover and boil for 
30 minutes, skimming occasionally. Take half of a small cabbage, 
core and trim it, cut in small pieces, and plunge into boiling water 
for 5 minutes, then drain and put in the soup with 2 onions and 
carrots each sliced. Cover and let simmer for 3 hours. Take 
out the beef and skim the soud. Rub 1 ounce butter with IV ounces 
flour, and gradually add to the soup, stirring continuously. Lastly 
J cup cream and 2 tablespoons vinegar. Stir well, boil for 2 min- 
utes and serve hot. 

THICK VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Mrs. Mary Roylc. 

Wash \ cup pearl barley, cover with water, and let come to a 
boil ; pour off the first water, and add 1 quart of fresh. Let sim- 
mer gently for 2 hours. Then add 1 quart *of the thick stock 
left from clear soup, 1 cup each of diced turnips, carrots, onions, 
and cabbage, scalding the vegetables first in boiling water. Simmer 
till nearly done : add 1 cup diced potatoes and 1 cup diced celery, 
salt and pepper to taste. Cook 30 minutes longer, or until done. 

TURKEY SOUP. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Break up the neatly picked carcass of a popular turkey, cover 
well with cold water, and simmer 2 hours with 1 chopped branch 
of celery ; strain, season, and when it boils again drop in a hand- 
ful of vermicelli or noodles, and serve when they are done. Or 
J cup dried corn may be cooked in it in place of the vermicelli. 

VEGETABLE SOUP, NO. L 

Mrs. James S. Leonard. 

Cover a ten cent soup bone with cold water, and boil nearly 
all day ; keep adding to the water from the boiling kettle to keep 
it where it started. Have about 2 quarts when finished. Take out 
the bone and let stand over night. The next day skim, and add 
the vegetables — 2 large sized potatoes, 2 onions, ^ of a small cab- 
bage, i pint tomatoes and, if liked, a turnip and a couple of carrots, 
chop the vegetables quite coarsely ; boil until they are done, then 
rub the soup through a colander; return to the fire, get scalding 
hot and serve. 



50 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

VEGETABLE SOUP, NO. 2. 

Miss Laura Wilson. 

Boil 2 pounds soup meat 4 hours slowly and set away till next 
day. Skim, and put in J cup rice ; let cook on the back of the 
stove. Chop 1 large onion, 1 bunch celery, 1 large potato, 1 small 
carrot, and a little parsley. Boil the vegetables separately till done. 
Pour into the broth with 1 can tomatoes, season with salt and 
pepper and cook on the front of the stove till the tomatoes are 
done. 



FRIDAY SOUPS. 



BEAN SOUP. 

Wash 1 quart dried white soup beans and soak them over 
night. Drain, and boil in 2 quarts fresh water. Drain again, re- 
turn to the kettle with 2 quarts fresh boiling water, add a pinch 
of soda, and boil until mushy. Rub through a sieve, add enough 
boiling water to make it the thickness of cream, stir in 1 table- 
spoon butter, salt and pepper to taste, let boil up once, and serve 
with croutons. 

BISQUE OF PICKEREL. 

Filippini. 

Put a bunch of soup herbs and a collection of sliced soup 
vegetables (omitting tomatoes) with a few whole spices in a 
saucepan with 3 quarts cold water, adding 1 tablespoon salt and ^ 
teaspoon pepper. Boil 45 minutes. Cut a fresh pickerel of 2 
pounds into small pieces and -add to the broth. Cover and boil 
20 minutes. Rub 2J ounces flour with l^ ounces butter in a hot 
saucepan, strain the broth into it, add a little nutmeg, boil 5 min- 
utes. Beat 1 egg yolk in i cup cream, and add with J tablespoon 
butter ; stir for 5 minutes without boiling. Strain and serve with 
croutons. 

Cod and other fresh fish may be cooked the same way.' 

BROWN FISH SOUP. 

Cut any kind of fresh fish in small pieces, roll in flour and 
brown in butter or olive oil in a saucepan ; cover with plenty of 
hot water, season with salt and pepper, and boil slowly 15 minutes. 
1 clove garlic may be added. 

CABBAGE SOUP. 

Mrs. Cicero Phipps. 

Shave the cabbage fine and boil til! tender ; add 1 even table- 
spoon sugar, salt and pepper to taste : drop in dumplings, and 
when ready to serve add butter and sweet cream to taste. 



SOUPS. 51 

CARROT CREAM SOUP. 

Boil carrots till tender and chop ^ cup fine. Reduce the water 
in which they were boiled to I cup. Rub 1 tablespoon butter with 

2 tablespoons flour in a hot saucepan, season with salt and pepper, 
and add gradually 3 cups niilk, stirring till it boils. Turn in the 
carrots and carrot brotli, let boil up once and serve. 

CLAM SOUP. 

Wash the clams in a little cold water, and strain the liquor. 
Cut out the soft parts, chop up the hard, and put to boil with the 
liquor. Strain and thicken with butter and flour rubbed together. 
Take as much milk as clams, scald with a slice of onion, add the 
milk and the soft clams to the soup; season with salt, pepper, 
butter, and a little nutmeg, and cook 2 minutes. 

The whites of 2 eggs may be beaten stiff and put in the tureen, 
and the soup stirred into them ; or the yolks of 2 eggs may be 
added when taken up. 

CORN CHOWDER. 

Mrs. .Mian Thomas. 

Put in a kettle 1 can corn, 2 cups water, 3 potatoes and 2 
onions pared and sliced ; cook slowly until potatoes and onions 
are done. Add 1 pint milk, a piece of butter as large as an egg, 
salt and pepper to taste. Serve hot with crackers added the last 
moment. 

CORN SOUP. 

Mrs. H. C. Tuttle. 

Chop 1 can corn or 1 quart fresh corn and add 1 slice onion, 
chopped. Then 2 cups water and simmer 20 minutes. Rub through 
a sieve, add 2 cups milk, 1 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste, and 
thicken with 1 tablespoon each butter and flour rubbed together 
Stir well and serve as soon as it boils up. 

CREAM OF - ASPARAGUS. 

Wash the asparagus, cut off the tips, cut the stalks into small 
pieces and boil tips and stalks separately in the same pint of boil- 
ing, salted water ; put aside the tips but press the rest through a 
sieve. Rub together 2 tablespoons each of butter and flour with a 
little hot milk, stir into the rest of 1 quart boiling milk, and cook 
5 minutes. Have the asparagus very hot, pour the milk into it, 
season, add the tips and serve. This must not be boiled after put- 
ting together. 

FISH SOUP. 

Put a head of some large fresh fish in a saucepan with soup 
vegetables and herbs ; add 2 teaspoons salt, ^ teaspoon pepper, 1 tea- 
spoon curry powder, if liked, and 3 quarts water. P>oil slowly l^ 
hours. Strain through a cheesecloth into another saucepan, add 

3 ounces raw rice, and boil slowly 15 minutes. Remove the skin 



62 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

and bone from 1 pound fresh halibut, cut in pieces \ inch square, 
add to soup and simmer 15 minutes. Add the juice of \ lemon, 
and the yolk of 1 egg beaten up with ^ cup cream, stir in care- 
fully, and cook a few moments longer, but do not boil. 
Macaroni would serve instead of the rice. 

FRIDAY SOUP. 

Mrs. A. M. Thackara. 

For 2 quarts soup, take Ci potatoes, 4 onions, 4 ounces crushed 
tapioca, IJ^ pints milk, butter, pepper and salt to taste. Cut up the 
vegetables into 2 quarts of boiling water, and boil f of an hour. 
Rub the vegetables through a sieve. i)ut back the paste 'into the 
water, add the seasoning, and boil the tapioca 15 minutes in the 
soup. Then' add the milk and when thoroughly heated, serve. A 
little marjoram or nutmeg is a good addition. 

LOBSTER CHOWDER. 

Dice the meat from a 2 pound lobster : scald 4 cups milk with 
1 slice onion, take out the onion, add :'> tablespoons butter, the 
lobster liver and meat, salt and pepper to taste, 1 cup hot water 
in which the bones have been stewed for 10 minutes, and 2 rolled 
crackers. Use cayenne pepper or paprika. 

MUSHROOM SOUP. 

Miss Anna Walters. 

Put 1 quart milk in a double boiler and season with salt, pepper 
and 1 teaspoon butter. Let them come to a boil and add 1 pint 
mushrooms. Boil about 3 minutes, then serve. 

ONION SOUP. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Cut six white onions fine, and fry in a spoonful of butter till 
a light brown. Add a quart of boiling water and one pint milk ; 
season with 1 teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon pepper, a pinch of mace 
and \ teaspoon sugar. Boil very slowly for an hour and then 
strain. Beat 4 eggs to a foam, add one cup cream, and one table- 
spoon cornstarch dissolved in a little cold water. Boil up once 
and serve with croutons. 

OYSTER BROTH. 

Put 1 quart oysters in a saucepan with their liquor and 1 
pint water, 4 branches celery chopped and 2 branches chopped 
parsley. Add \ teaspoon salt and half as much cayenne pepper. 
Let boil 5 minutes. Skim the broth, add a little butter and sweet 
cream, strain into cups and serve. Take out the parsley and celery, 
and keep the oysters in a cool place for further use. 



SOUPS. 53 

OYSTER SOUP, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Frank" Thomas. 

Put the liquor from 1 quart oysters in a kettle with 1 quart 
water, let boil and skim ; add 2 quarts milk ; when nearly at the 
boil put in 2 tablespoons butter, salt and pepper to taste, the 
oysters and 1 dozen rolled crackers. Take up as soon as it be- 
gins to boil. 

OYSTER SOUP, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Drain the oysters well ; put the milk on to boil with a little 
water to prevent scorching; when scalding hot, add butter, salt 
and pepper to taste; drop in the oysters, let get heated through 
without cooking, and serve at once. 

OYSTER SOUP WITHOUT OYSTERS. 

"The Housekeeper's Friend." 

Boil li dozen onions with 1 turnip in water enough to cover 
them. When soft enough, mash very smooth through a colander, 
then boil again in 1 quart milk. Mix 1 teaspoon flour with 1 table- 
spoon butter and stir into the soup. Let boil up thoroughly and 
season with pepper, salt and mace. 

PISTACHIO SOUP. 

Wash clean 1 quart spinach, sprinkle with salt, and wilt in a 
hot saucepan ; drain, chop fine and pound to a paste. Boil 1 quart 
v'\\k m T' double boiler 20 minutes with 1 teaspoon almond paste, 
and 2 ounces pistachio nuts pounded : add the spinach, 1 table- 
spoon each butter and arrowroot moistened, and press through a 
sii've. Season with salt and paprika. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Doil 4 good sized potatoes until half done ; drain and cover 
with 1 pint boiling water; add 1 slice onion, 1 bay leaf, 1 branch 
celery, and 1 sprig parsley, and boil till done. Put 1 quart milk 
in a double boiler. Rub the butter and flour together and stir into 
the milk till it thickens. Rub the potatoes through a sieve into 
the tureen ; pour the hot milk over them, stir well until smooth, 
and serve immediately. 

POT AU FEU. 

Soak \ pint soup beans in cold water for 8 hours, drain and 
put them in a large earthen soup pot. Core and trim half a very 
small cabbage and finely slice it into the pot. Boil 2 ounces dried 
split peas for 5 minutes, drain and add to the pot with 3 quarts 
water, a heaping teaspoon salt, i teaspoon pepper, and 1 tablespoon 
butter. Boil slowly 4.") minutes. Then add 2 small sliced raw 
potatoes, and 1 teaspoon chopped parsley. Cover and sinuncr slowly 
for l^ hours. 

PURfiE Ol- LIMA BEANS. 

Drain 1 <in,'irt can lima beans, and put in a saucepan with 4.t 
pints water, the usual s(jup vegetables and herbs, (except tomatoes), 



54 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

jounce butter, 1 level tablespoon salt, and boil hard 40 minutes. 
Drain and keep the broth. Remove the soup vegetables ; mash 
the beans fine, return them to the saucepan with the broth seasoned 
with cayenne pepper and a little nutmeg, and 1 tablespoon butter. 
Boil 5 minutes ; add 2 tablespoons rice flour in \ cup cream ; boil 
up nicely, strain into a tureen, and serve with croutons. 

SPINACH SOUP. 
Mrs. B. F. Martin. 

Boil 2 quarts of well washed spinach 10 minutes in salted 
water ; drain, chop fine, put through a strainer into 3 pints of 
boiling milk. Melt 2 tablespoons butter, add 3 tablespoons flour, 
when smooth stir into the soup, season with salt and pepper. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 

Mrs. David Atlas. 

Take 1 cup split pea.s, let boil 2 or 3 hours in 3 pints water, 
replenishing with boiling water as it boils away. When soft, rub 
through a colander, and add to a saucepan in which 2 tablespoons 
flour have just been browned in 2 tablespoons butter. Let boil 
10 minutes. Put several thin squares of buttered toast in a soup 
tureen and pour the soup over them. Serve at once. 

TOMATO CREAM. 

Mrs. J. A. Devol. 

Stew until tender 1 quart tomatoes either raw or canned; 
strain ; put back on the fire and add a pinch of soda, salt and 
pepper to taste, butter tlie size of an egg, and 3 tablespoons 
rolled crackers. Take from the fire, and stir in 1 quart scalding 
hot milk. Serve immediately. 

TOMATO SOUP, NO. 1. 

Mrs. P. R. .Sines. 

Stew 1 pint milk with a little chopped celery; stew 1 can 
strained tomatoes 15 minutes with butter size of a walnut, salt 
and pepper to taste, and a pinch of sugar; when ready to serve stir 
into the hot milk, and serve immediately. 

TOMATO SOUP, NO. 2. 

Mrs. F. E. Kramer. 

Cook and strain 5 good sized tomatoes ; stew 5 minutes with 
a pinch of soda ; season with i tablespoon butter, salt, pepper and 
celery salt; take up and stir in 1 pint scalded milk. Serve hot. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Mrs. Pat Duffy. 

Boil G potatoes dry and mash in the kettle; add 1 can to- 
matoes, 1 can peas, 3 chopped onions, i gallon water, \ pound 
butter, and salt and pepper to taste. Boil slowly till the vegetables 
are done. 



SOUP GARNISHINGS AND FORCEMEATS. 



APPLE STUFFING. 

Take i pound pulp of baked or steamed apples; add 2 ounces 
breadcrumbs, some powdered sage, a little cayenne pepper and a 
finely minced onion. Use with roast goose or duck. 

BREAD CANAPfiS. 

Cut slices of stale bread U inches thick, cut off the crusts, and 
hollow out the centres till the size wanted, taking care not to leave 
the undercrust too thin. Fry brown in boiling fat, or butter and 
toast in the oven. For serving roast birds, creamed vegetables, etc. 

BREAD CROUTONS. 

Cut several slices of rather stale bread ^ inch thick, cut again 
into small dice; put 1 tablespoon butter into a hot saucepan, 
when hot add the croutons, and fry carefully until of a golden 
brown. Drain, and add to soups, etc., when ready to serve. 

CHEESE BALLS. 

Boil 1 tablespoon butter with ^ cup water; stir in quickly } 
cup tiour till smooth ; take off, add 1 well beaten egg, and 2 table- 
spoons grated cheese ; drop in bean sized pieces on a greased 
pan, and bake in a hot oven 15 minutes. Serve with clear soups. 

CHESTNUT STUFFING. 

"Glasgow Exchange." 

Peel i pound Italian chestnuts, and boil in a little stock or 
water; pound and mix with I pound breadcrumbs, J pound pork 
sausage, 1 teaspoon dried herbs, 1 teaspoon chopped parsley, 
salt, pepper and nutmeg to taste, and 2 beaten eggs. Stuff a roast 
turkey with this dressing, put several slices of bacon on its breast, 
and serve with bread sauce as well as gravy, and with several 
sliced sausages cooked in the pan 10 minutes. The giblets may be 
parboiled, chopped and added to the stuffing if liked. 

CHICKEN FORCEMEAT. 

Scald 1- pint milk, add h pint stale breadcrumbs; when it 
thickens put in tlie beaten yolks of 3 eggs ; take off, stir in 1 pint 
raw chopped chicken, 1 tablespoon parsley, | teaspoon salt, a pinch 
of cayenne and nutmeg. When cold, use for stuffing, or make 
into small balls, dip in egg and breadcrumbs, and fry in boiling 
fat. Use to garnish made meat dishes. 

55 



56 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

DROP DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. Elsie Davis. 

Sift 2 teaspoons baking powder with 1 pint flour, add 1 egg, 
J cup sweet milk or water, J teaspoon salt, and 1 heaping tea- 
spoon lard; drop in boiling water. Cover and boil 10 minutes. 

GERMAN CHRISTMAS DRESSING. 

Mrs. L. C. Laube. 

Cliop coarsely 3 or 4 onions and 2 sour apples and fry them in 
the turkey fat or in butter till brown. Soak a loaf of bread in 
cold water, mix with it the onions and apples, a little grated 
nutmeg, cinnamon and allspice and salt and pepper to taste. Add 
1 pound seeded raisins and about a cupful of boiled and peeled 
chestnuts. The turkey may be stuffed late the night before it is to 
be cooked. This dressing is also used for roast veal, which may be 
stuffed like a fowd or the dressing may be baked brown in the 
oven and served as a side dish. 

HAM FORCEMEAT. 

Make precisely the same as chicken forcemeat except that you 
take cold boiled ham and use 1 teaspoon French mustard in 
place of the nutmeg. 

HUNGARIAN NOODLES. 

Mrs. Samuel Orndorf. 

Cut enough of the shell from the end of a fresh egg to drop 
the egg out ; add 2 shells of milk and 1 of water, and a pinch 
of salt ; mix stiff with flour. Roll out thin into 6 small sheets. Lay 
the sheets on top of each other, and cut into strips ^ of an inch 
wide. Put aside to dry. Drop into boiling salted water and 
cook till tender. Drain. Sprinkle 1 pound cottage cheese lightly 
through the noodles. Serve hot, dusting with finely minced parsley. 

LIVER DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. L. C. Laube. 

Grind 3 pounds of calf's or beef's liver witli a good sized 
onion. Beat in it 3 eggs, add salt, pepper and spices to taste, and 
about one cup flour to hold it together. Drop by tablespoons into 
boiling beef broth or salted water, boil imtil done, place on a 
platter, pour bread sauce over them and serve with apple sauce in 
a separate dish. . The bread sauce is made by frying breadcrumbs 
in butter, seasoning and adding milk enough to make a sauce. Let 
boil up thoroughly before serving. 

NOODLES, NO. 1. 

Mrs. George Pargeon. 

Beat 3 eggs stiff, add J cup rich cream and a piece of butter 
the size of an egg, with enough flour to make a stiff dough. Roll 
out thin in a long piece; cut in strips as fine as you want, let dry 
15 minutes, and add to a clear soup 10 minutes before serving. 
They may also be served in many ways as macaroni. 



SOUP GARNISHINGS AND FORCEMEATS. 57 

NOODLES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. D. L. Charles. 

Sift 3 cups flour with ^ teaspoon baking powder, and a little 
salt; work together with 2 eggs, lard the size of an egg, and 
enough water to make a stiff dough. 

0.\TMEAL STUFFING. 

Toast 1 cup oatmeal till crisp ; let get cool ; add 2 tablespoons 
finely chopped suet, 1 teaspoon chopped parsley, a few drops onion 
juice, salt and pepper. Use with boiled fowl. 

ONION DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. Margaret Einerick. 

Fry a pan of chopped onions till nearly done but not brown. 
Pour in 5 or beaten eggs, and stir till cooked. Have ready a 
good biscuit dougli. Roll out as thin as for pies, cut in squares, 
put one or more spoonfuls of the mixture on each square, fold 
over and press the edges tight, drop into boiling water, cover 
and boil till done, 10 or 15 minutes. Take up and drain. Brown 
some breadcrumbs in butter, put the turnovers on a hot dish, and 
pour the butter and crumbs over them. 

ONION PUDDING. 

Mrs. Matthew Cox. 

Chop fine 3 large onions and \ pound suet, mix with 1 pint 
flour, season with salt, tie in a greased and floured bag and boil 
2J hours. Serve with roast meats. 

ONION STUFFING. 

1 large cup bread crumbs, 2 Spanish onions boiled till tender 
and chopped fine, 1 beaten egg, salt and pepper to taste, 4 or 5 
minced sage leaves, and 1 teaspoon l)Utter. Use with roast duck or 
goose. 

OYSTER STUFFING. 

Wash and drain the oysters and add them to a plain stuffing. 
PECAN STUFFING FOR TURKEY. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Take bread crumbs, cold boiled rice, bacon chopped fine, sweet 
herbs, celery, and lemon peel pared very thin, and cliopped fine, 
2 dozen pecans cut small, pepper and salt. Work all together 
well with the hands, binding with an egg, a little melted butter 
and a little milk. Put a Httle suet or lard in a skillet, when liot 
turn the dressing into it, and fry slightly, turning ail the while 
to prevent burning. When cooked through, but not brown, turn 
into a bowl and stuff the turkey witii it. It is ])etter if the turkey 
lies stuffed several hours before roasting. 



58 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PLAIN STUFFING; 

Mrs. James S. Leonard. 

Take stale bread, cut off all the crust, crumble well, mix it 
with melted butter, seasou with pepper, salt and powdered sage. 

POTATO STUFFING. 

Take I as much grated boiled potatoes as dry bread crumbs, 
1 egg, butter the size of an egg, pepper, salt and powdered sage ; 
mix well. 

RHODE ISLAND DUMPLINGS. 

Wet 1 quart cornmeal and I teaspoon salt with enough water 
to make a stiff batter. Form into little balls. Put in a kettle, 
and pour boiling water over them. Boil briskly for 1 hour. Pota- 
toes may be cooked with them, and both may be served with meat 
gravy. 

TURKEY DRESSING. 

Cut up several small onions and fry them in a pound of 
bacon minced fine. Cut the crust from a loaf of stale bread, grate 
the loaf, and season with salt, pepper and sage. Mix up with 
the fried onions and bacon while hot, and stuff the fowl. 

YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Goldie Harrison. 

Take 2 eggs, i cup milk, a pinch of salt, and flour enough for a 
thin batter. Pour some of the gravy from roasting meat into 
another hot dripping pan, pour in the pudding, and bake till brown. 
Cut in square pieces, and serve under the meat or on a separate 
plate. , 



FISH. 



CLAMS. 

Clams may be cooked in all plain ways as Oysters are cooked. 
They are in season almost -all year around. 

DEVILLED CLAMS. 

Chop 50 clams very fine; chop fine 2 tomatoes, 1 onion, a little 
parsley, sweet marjoram and thyme ; mix with the clams, and 
add salt, pepper and bread crumbs ; add the clam liquor until a 
good thick paste is formed. Put in clam shells, or patty dishes, 
put a lump of butter on each, sprinkle with bread crumbs, and 
bake ^ hour. 

ROAST CLAMS. 

Wash the shells and put on a gridiron over the hot coals. 
When the shells open, remove the upper one and serve in the 
under shell at once with a little butter and pepper on each. 

STEWED CLAMS. 

Stew 1 qtuirt clams in their own liquor for several minutes, 
add 1 tablespoon flour, 2 tablespoons butter, several whole pepper- 
corns, and stew 15 minutes. Add h cup cream and 2 egg yolks 
well beaten. Stir in well, season with pepper and salt and serve. 

Mussels are cooked in the same way. 

CLAM PUDDING. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Steam 25 or .30 clams, saving the liquor. Butter a pudding 
dish, put in a layer of cold boiled potatoes sliced, then a layer 
of clams, repeating until the dish is full, finishing off with the 
potatoes. Sprinkle each layer with pepper, salt and chopped pars- 
ley. Thicken the liquor with a little flour, add a piece of butter, 
and pour this sauce over the pudding until the dish is § full. 
Cover and bake in a moderate oven for 1 hour. 

BREAKFAST CODFISH. 

Soak over night a cup of shredded codfish. In the morning 
drain, put it on the stove, add a cupful cream or milk, and a 
large piece of butter. Simmer slowly and stir well. Take off the 
fire, pour over it a beaten egg, and brown in the oven. 

For Creamed Codfish, serve directly from top of the stove. 

59 



60 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BROILED CODFISH. 

Soak a salt codfish in fresh water 24 hours, changing the water 
twice. Just bring it to the boil in the last water, and drain. Dry, 
and place on a wire broiler and toast till brown. Serve with a 
cream sauce made of cream, not milk. 

DUTCH CODFISH. 

Take the bones from a 3 pound piece of fresh codfish. Put in 
a l)uttered baking dish, add 2 peeled raw potatoes cut in shapes 
aiound the fish; season with salt and pepper, and a few drops of 
oriion juice. Pour \ cup white wine around. Bake it in the 
oven 40 minutes. Serve with chopped parsley sprinkled over. 

SCOTCH CODFISH. 

Mrs. Lincoln Lloyd. 

Take a bov/l of picked left over codfish. Add 1 teaspoon 
mustard, 2 well l^eaten eggs, a little pepper, and flour enough tc 
make it hold together. Make into cakes with the hands and fry 
in the skillet. 

SPANISH CODFISH. 

Fry i pound clean raw rice in olive oil ; drain and put into a 
large baking pan ; take some thick cod steaks, fry them till a golden 
brown, and place them on the rice ; fry 1 sliced Spanish onion 
brown in the same oil as the fish; drain ofif the oil, and add 6 
large ripe seeded tomatoes and cook with the onions slowly for 
5 mintites ; pour this over the fish; season with salt, pepper and 
lemon juice, pour over 1 pint good stock either fish or meat, 
or hot water, cover the pan and bake about 30 minutes or until 
done. Take out the fish and stir the rest up well on top of the 
stove, then turn on a hot platter and place the fish on top. Serve 
with any good fish sauce, or with none. 

Butter may be used instead of oil. 

CODFISH BALLS. 

Mrs. Gus Winefordner. 

Cover the shredded codfish with cold water and let stand at 
least (i hours. Drain, cover with fresh water, and boil until 
tender. Drain and remove bones. Mash several freshly boiled 
potatoes, mix with codfish and add a small quantity of milk and 
a piece of butter, with pepper to taste. Make into cakes, dip in 
flour and fry until brown. 

If eggs are liked, two eggs may be beaten into the mixture. 

CODFISH WITH EGGS. 

Mrs. B. F. Martin. 

Soak and pick to pieces 1 cup codfish, add 2 well beaten eggs, 
drop from the spoon into hot butter and fry. 



FISH. 61 

CORXISH FISH PIE. 

Skin the fish, take out the hackbone and cut up or leave 
whole according to the size; flour it well, put m a buttered dish 
add a little chopped parsley and onion, pepper and salt, and 
broth or hot water; cover with a nice short crust, leave a hole 
in the top, and just before taking up, pour some cream into the 
hole. 

DEVILLED CRABS. 

Pick out all the meat from 1 dozen freshly boiled crabs; 
scald i pint cream ; stir in 2 tablespoons tlour rubbed with 1 table- 
spoon'butter; cook several minutes, take from the fire and stir 
in the crab meat, the mashed volks of i hard boiled eggs, 1 
tablespoon chopped parslev, ', a grated nutmeg, and salt and 
cayenne to taste. Glean the upper shells, fill with the mixture, 
brush with beaten ci^g, sprinkle with bread crumbs, and brown 
in the oven, or fry in a basket in boiling fat. 

Lobster, halibut, etc., may be devilled in the same way, using 
2 cups of the meat. 

FRIED SOFT SHIiLL CRABS. 

Remove the spongv parts under the side joints and the aprons 
from the crabs ; wash well in cold water, dram, season with salt 
and pepper, dip in cold milk, roll in flour, and fry in deep boiling 
fat until a nice brown. Drain, sprinkle with salt, put on buttered 
toast, and decorate with (|uarters of lemon, and with parsley. 

CRAB OR LOBSTER PATTIES. 
Prepare a crab Newburgh, fill the patty shells, and serve. 

FRIED EELS. 

Mrs. James. S. Leonard. 

Skin and clean the eels; cut in 3 inch lengths; put in boiling 
water with a little vinegar and let simmer o minutes. Drain, dry 
and season ; then cook as any other small fish. 

BAKED FISH, XO. \. 

Take a large fish, shad, red snapper, rock, etc., scale, clean and 
wash inside and out; stuff with plain dressing, and sew it up. Put 
in a greased dripping pan, dredge with flour, salt and pepper, put 
in 1 cup boiling water, and bake in a hot oven lo minutes to 
each pound, basting everv 10 minutes. If the boiling water evapo- 
rates, add more. Put carefullv on a hot platter, garnish with 
parsley and lemon, and serve with sauce HoUandaise, or a white 
sauce to which (if a shad) the boiled and mashed roe has been 
added. 



62 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BAKED FISH, NO. 2. 

Put 3 one pound slices fresh halibut or any large fish in a 
frying pan with ^ tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon salt, and less 
than half as much pepper ; add \ cup water, and \ cup white wine. 
Cover with a greased paper, boil 5 minutes, then bake in the oven 
20 minutes. Take out, dress on a hot dish, and serve with the 
following sauce poured over it : 1 tablespoon butter rubbed with 
1:} tablespoons fiour in a hot saucepan, the fish liquor strained 
into this, 1 chopped hard boiled egg added, and 1 egg yolk beaten 
up with 2 tablespoons cream ; all to be very hot when served. 

BOILED FISH. 

Scale and clean the fish and wash well in cold water ; wipe dry, 
and rub with a little salt ; sew it up in a single piece of cheese- 
cloth ; put in a kettle, cover with boiling salted water, and cook 
very slowly, 10 minutes to each pound ; drain, turn on a hot platter, 
and garnish with lemon and parsley. Serve with drawn butter with 
chopped hard boiled eggs, or any favorite sauce. 

BROILED FISH. 

Mrs. Thomas John. 

Clean, wash and wipe the fish dry, split and take out the 
back bone ; sprinkle with salt, and cook on a hot buttered griddle 
until a light brown, then turn and cook the other side. Take up 
on a hot platter, butter and dust with pepper, and serve hot. 

ESCALLOPED FISH. 

Cut up any left over white fish in small dice; make a good 
cream sauce, stir in the fish, turn into a baking dish, sprinkle with 
bread crumbs and bits of butter, and bake 15 minutes or more. 
Grated cheese may be sprinkled over the top instead of bread 
crumbs. 

FRIED FISH. 

Clean, wash and wipe the fish ; sprinkle with salt, dip in eggs 
and then in crumbs, and fry in boiling fat (oil is best). Garnish 
with lemon and parsley, and serve with sauce Tartare. They may 
be fried without the egg and crumbs, and may be fried in a pan 
with a few slices of bacon. All small fish may be cooked in this 
way, also steaks of halibut and other large fish. 

FISH BAKED IN MILK. 

A Glasgow Recipe. 

Take a 2 pound piece of cod or halibut, wash and skin it, 
and put in a baking dish. Pour over it 1^^ cups milk, and a 
dessertspoon butter in bits ; dust with salt and pepper. Bake in a 
hot oven 45 minutes, basting with the milk. Take the fish up on 
a hot dish, pour the milk into a saucepan, moisten 1 tablespoon 



PISH. 63 

flour with cold milk, stir into the hot milk smoothly till it boils; 
add salt and pepper and 1 teaspoon butter, and pour over the fish. 
Garnish with slices of hard boiled eggs. 

FISH CROQUETTES. 

Dice li pounds cold boiled fish ; stew 1 small chopped onion 
10 minutes in IJ tablespoons melted butter; rub in 3 tablespoons 
flour, and stir briskly a moment;, add 1 cup hot milk and I cup 
fish or meat stock ; let boil 5 minutes ; stir in 1 teaspoon each salt, 
ground mustard, Worcestershire sauce, 2 saltspoons cayenne and 
a pinch of nutmeg; add 2 beaten egg yolks, then the fish, stirring 
well for a few minutes. Make into croquettes, fry and serve with 
a cream sauce. 

FISH PIE. 

Place a few slices of bacon at the bottom of a pie dish, put 
pieces of fresh cod or haddock over these, sprinkle with minced 
onion and parsley, pepper and salt, and put in more layers, finish- 
ing with bacon. Brown 1 tablespoon flour with a tablespoon but- 
ter in a hot saucepan, add hot water, and a spoonful tomato sauce 
or Worcestershire. Pour over the fish, make a rich crust, and 
cover the dish. Prick holes in it with .a fork and bake quickly. 
Serve with potatoes. 

FISH TIMBALES. 

Filippini. 

Remove skin and bones from U pounds fresh fish ; chop fine 
and pound to a pulp with 2 egg yolks, 1 light teaspoon salt, half 
as much cayenne pepper, a pinch grated nutmeg, and ^ teaspoon 
anchovy essence. Press through a sieve, and put on ice. Whip 
I cup cream and gradually beat in the fish ; put thin slices of 
truffles at the bottoms of small cups, fill with the fish, put in a 
pan with hot water to half their height, cover with buttered 
paper, and bake 20 minutes. Turn out on a hot dish, and pour 
a cream sauce around them. 

FISH TURBANS. 

Cut thin strips from the side of a piece of any large fish; re- 
move the skin, sprinkle with a highly seasoned stuffing, roll each 
one up, and fasten wnth a broom straw : put in a pan in the oven 
v>ith a verv little hot water, and bake till flaky. Serve with sauce 
Tartare. If no stuffing is used, grease the pan but put no water. 

FISH TURBOT. 

Rub 1 tablespoon each of butter and flour together in a hot 
saucepan ; stir in ^ pint milk or cream : wdien it boils add 1 pint 
cold boiled fish chopped, several chopped mushrooms, salt and 
pepper to taste. Heat over steam : add 1 beaten egg yolk, 1 table- 
spoon chopped parsley, and fill shells. If no mushrooms, a few 
drops onion juice will do. 

Or the shells may be sprinkled v.ith bread crumbs and browned 
in the oven. This rnay also be made in one large dish. 

Lobster or crab meat may be used instead of the fish, 



64 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

FROG LEGS, FRIED. 

Cut off the feet and otherwise trim the hind legs of frogs 
very neatly, sprinkle with salt and pepper, roll in flour, then in 
beaten egg and cracker crumbs. Fry in boiling fat (in a frying 
basket if at hand) for G or 8 minutes, drain, dust with salt, and 
arrange on a hot dish with quartered lemons and parsley for 
garnishing. 

FINNAN HADDIE. 

Pick 1 pound cooked Finnan haddie fine and free from skin 
and bone. Make 2 cups good cream sauce, add 2 well beaten eggs, 
3 hard boiled eggs chopped fine, 1 tablespoon Edam cheese, and 
pepper to taste. Stir in the fish, and when very hot serve on hot 
toast. 

Ordinary cheese may be used, and fewer eggs, if scarce. 

FINDON HADDOCK. 

Mrs. Malcolm McNeill. 

Freshen them a little with cold water. Take a fish at a time, 
hold before the fire, lay it on one hand and clap it with the other, 
beginning at the head. The skin will come off quite easily. Put a 
little butter in a frying pan, put in the fish and let cook till brown, 
turning them. Serve hot. Or they may be seasoned and broiled, 
or fried with bacon. 

BOILED HALIBUT. 

Cut steaks about 2 inches thick ; wrap in cheesecloth and boil 
about 20 minutes or till done. Serve with egg, cream or shrimp 
sauce. 

Cod, salmon or any large fish may be boiled the same way. 

BAKED HERRINGS. 

- Scale, wash and dry the herrings ; rub with pepper, cloves and 
salt ; lay in a pot, cover with vinegar, add a few bayleaves, cover 
tightly, and bake in a moderate oven. Serve cold. 

BOILED LOBSTER. 

Put a live lobster head downward in salted warm water, cover, 
and boil ^ to f hour. It will turn scarlet. Take out, and cool. 
Twist off the claws, remove the tail, shake out the greenish liver 
and the red coral. Take out of the shell, take out the stomach 
(below the head), and throw it away. Split the body through the 
middle, and take the meat from the cells ; take the meat from the 
tail and the claws in solid pieces, and throw away the vein running 
the length of the tail. Arrange on a dish, garnishing with the red 
claws and anything else the fancy suggests. Serve cold with 
French dressing, or on lettuce with mayonnaise ; cook in any way 
desired. 



FISH. 65 

Crabs are cooked in the same way, and cleaned by taking oft 
the stomachs, the shells and the spongy snbstance on the outside, 
and clearing from any sand. There is less edible substance, and 
also less that is unsafe. Serve in the same way. They are made 
into the same kind of dishes. 

BROILED LOBSTER. 

Get a live lobster weighing about \\ pounds, cut off and crack 
the claws, split in two and clean out the head; season with salt, 
paprika and olive oil, and broil over a brisk fire, cut part upward, 
10 minutes ; remove and bake 10 minutes. Bake the claws the 
whole time the lobsters are cooking. Spread with maitre d'hotel 
butter, and serve with quarters of lemon. 

LOBSTER A LA NEWBURGH. 

Take the meat of one boiled lobster diced or 1 pint can; put 
into a saucepan with a large lump of butter, salt and cayenne 
pepper to taste ; stir till hot. Beat the yolks of 2 eggs with J 
pint cream, add 1 gill sherry, pour over the lobster and let sim- 
mer till thoroughly hot, then serve. 

Crab meat may be treated the same way. 

Oysters should be stewed 5 minutes in their own liquor with 
a little water and salt, drained and finished as above. 

BOILED SALT MACKEREL. 

Soak the mackerel over night in cold water. Put in a skillet 
with 1 quart hot water, and let boil 10 minutes. Dress on a hot 
dish, pour melted butter over it, and decorate with parsley. 

BROILED SALT MACKEREL. 

Wash and soak as for boiling. Rub with melted butter, season 
with pepper, lay on a broiler greased with suet, and broil the in- 
side first, then turn and broil the skin side without burning. 
Spread with butter, or serve with maitre d'hotel sauce. 

Smoked salmon should be soaked in warm water on the stove 
l; hour, and then broiled the same as mackerel. 

MOCK CAVIARE. 

Bone and pound some anchovies together with a little dried 
parsley, a clove of garlic, a little red pepper, salt, lemon juice and 
oil. Serve on toast. 

BROILED OYSTERS. 

Drain the oysters and wipe dry. Season with salt and pepper, 
roll in oil or melted butter, put in a double broiler, and broil over 
a brisk iire 4 minutes on each side. Put on fresh slices of toast 
on a platter, pour a little melted butter over, decorate with quar- 
tered lemons and parsley. 

5 



66 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CREAMED OYSTERS ON TOAST. 

Mrs. Margaret Murday. 

Wash and drain 1 pint oysters. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a 
granite saucepan, rub into it 1 level tablespoon flour, add slowly 
still stirring 1} pints milk and let cook until thick. Put in the 
oysters, add salt to taste, let it just come to a boil, and pour over 
hot buttered toast on a platter. Serve immediately. 

ESCALLOPED OYSTERS. 

Mrs. Kerr W. Rittenhouse. 

Drain 1 quart oysters and remove all bits of shell. Take 1 
large cup cracker crumbs, cover the bottom of a buttered l)aking 
dish with the crumbs, season with salt, pepper and bits of butter ; 
then a layer of oysters seasoned likewise ; repeat imtil they are 
all used, putting crackers last. Put a larger quantity of butter on 
top, and pour over the oyster liquor ; also a cup of new milk or 
part cream and milk. Allow room to rise. Bake J hour uncovered. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Mr.s. James S. Leonard. 

Drain the oysters and remove pieces of shell ; dip in beaten 
egg, roll in bread crumbs, and fry quickly in a frying pan with a 
little hot butter. Brown both sides and take up. 

Fried oysters are nice served on hot toasts, with slices of 
thin crisp bacon over them. 

Mussels and clams may be fried as oysters. . 

MARYLAND STEWED OYSTERS. 

Put the liquor into a saucepan and let simmer, skimming it 
carefully. Rub the yolks of 3 hard boiled eggs and 1 large spoon- 
ful flour together, and stir into the liquor till smooth. Cut in 
fieces \ pound butter, add with ^ teaspoon whole allspice, a little 
.'-"alt and cayenne pepper, and the juice of a fresh lemon ; let all 
simmer 10 minutes, add 2 quarts oysters, let get heated through 
and serve. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Put the oysters in a colander, pour cold water over them ar.d 
drain. Put into a hissin? hot frying pan over a quick fire, au'l 
shake and stir till they boil : sprinkle with salt, pepper and bits of 
butter, and take up immediately on a hot plate. 

ROAST OYSTERS. 

Put oyster shells in a pan in the oven and heat very hot ; put 
a little butter, salt and pepper in each and when hot. drop in th» 
oyster, turning it over and serving in the shell after 1 minute. 



FISH. 67 

OYSTER COCKTAIL. 

Mrs. Mark Stacker. 

Mix together 2 tablespoons each of tomato catsup, grated 
horseradish and lemon juice. 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, 
7 or 8 drops of tabasco sauce and a little salt. Have the oysters 
very cold; put in small glasses, pour the sauce over and serve. 

OYSTER COCKTAILS IN PEPPERS. 

Mrs. R. :\I. Connell. 

Cut green peppers in half lengthwise and soak for an hour 
in salt water, and a few moments in fresh. Fill with oyster cock- 
tails, heaping red catsup on tup. 

OYSTER FRITTERS. 

Mrs. Mark Stecker. 

Drain 25 oysters and chop fnu'. Beat 2 eggs, add 1 cup milk, 
and a scant pint of sifted flour; beat smooth with salt and pepper 
to taste. Stir in the oysters adding 1 teaspoon baking powder. 
Mix well, and drop by tablespoons into hot butter to fry. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Miss Uarda Thompson. 

Take 1 quart flour, 1 cup butter and lard mixed, and rub to- 
gether, having sifted 1 teaspoon baking powder in the flour; add 
enough ice cold water to form paste: roll thin and bake in muffin 
pans. Rub together 1 tablespoon each of butter and flour, stir 
into 1 pint hot cream luitil smooth, seasoning well with pepper and 
salt. Add the oysters and let simmer until they are heated through, 
fill the heated shells and serve immediately. 

OYSTER PIE. 

"The Housekeeper's Friend." 

Strain the liquor from the oysters, and put it on to boil with 
butter, pepper, a thickening of breadcrumbs and milk well beaten 
together ; after boiling a few minutes throw in the oysters. Let 
them get just heated through, take off the stove, and add the 
beaten yolks of 3 eggs. Line a buttered dish with paste, and fill 
with white paper to support a lid of paste and bake it. When* 
nicely browned, take off the lid, pour in the oysters, set a few 
minutes in the oven, and serve hot. This may also be baked in 
individual pies. 

OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL. 

Wash the shells, take off the upper one, put half a dozen 
on a plate on cracked ice, and serve with a piece of lemon \x\ 
the middle, 



68 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BROILED SALMON. 

Cut the steaks 1 inch thick, wash and dry, iM-oil over a clear 
fire until each side is brown. Put on a hot dish, spread with 
butter, dust with salt and pepper on both sides, and garnish with 
parsley. 

Slices of halibut, cod, or other large fish may be cooked in 
the same way. 

STEAMED SALMON. 

Pick 1 can of salmon into nice pieces, season with salt, pepper 
and lemon juice, add 1 cup cream plain or whipped, and beat till 
smooth ; then steam in a well greased mould 45 minutes. Garnish 
with slices of hard boiled eggs, lemon and sprigs of parsley. Serve 
mashed potatoes or potato balls with it, and sai'cc Ilollandaise. 

SALMON CAKES. 

Mrs. Joseph Brooks. 

1 can of salmon chopped fine ; i pound of finely rolled crackers. 
Mix and season with pepper and salt. Make into small cakes 
and fry until brown. Serve hot. 

SALMON CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. Charles Stewart. 

Clean 1 can salmon from bones and skin, chop fine, add 1 cup 
breadcrumbs, season with salt and pepper. Put 1 tablespoon butter 
in a hot saucepan, add 1 heaping teaspoon flour, a pinch of salt, 
and enough milk to thicken. Boil a couple of minutes, and mix 
with the salmon into a thick paste. When cold and stiff, make 
into rolls about the size of eggs, and fry in deep fat or lard. 

SALMON JELLY. 

Break the salmon into flakes: season with allspice, nunneg, 
salt and pepper; fill a mould with alternate layers of aspic jelly 
and salmon ; turn out on a flat dish, and garnish with lettuce and 
hard boiled eggs. 

SALMON LOAF. 

Mrs. Isaac Brandt. 

Mix well together 2 cans of salmon, 1 cup of rolled crackers. 
3 eggs and 1 teaspoon melted butter. Bake | hour in a deep 
greased pan, placed in a larger pan of water. Serve hot or cold 
with the following dressing : 

Dissolve 1 tablespoon cornstarch in a cup of milk, boil and 
stir until it begins to thicken ; stir in the oil from the cans of 
salmon and 1 egg; take from the fire, add the juice of i a lemon 
and a little chopped parsley. 



FISH. 69 

SALMON PATTIES. 

Take ^ can salmon, flake it and mix over the fire with rather 
more than i- pint of a good cream dressing ; season with salt, 
pepper, anchovy sauce (if at hand), and a few olives chopped 
fine. Fill the hot patty cases, if served hot; if not, let cool before 
filling them. 

DEVILLED SARDINES. 

Prepare six pieces buttered toast. Put 2 split sardines on 
each piece. Spread a little French mustard on the sardines, 
sprinkle with 1 tablespoon bread crumbs, put 1 tablespoon butter 
over them in bits, place on a pan, and set in the oven for 10 
minutes. Serve with quartered lemons on the dish. 

SCALLOPS. 

Scallops may be washed, drained and cooked 5 minutes in a 
cream sauce. Or they may be scalded, drained, dried, and dipped 
in egg, then in breadcrumbs, and fried in boiling fat. 

SHAD ROE. 

Filippini. 

Take about 2.} pounds fresh shad roes; put in a lightly but- 
tered skillet with 2 tablespoons each white wine and sherry, i table- 
spoon butter, ^ teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon each pepper and nutmeg. 
Cover with a lightly buttered paper. Put over the fire for 5 minutes, 
then in the oven for 3o minutes. Take out the roes carefully 
without breaking, place them on a large dish, put the pan on the 
fire, add f cup cream, a little salt and cayenne, and let boil 5 
minutes ; add 2 egg yolks beaten up with 2 tablespoons cream, 
stirring briskly while heating for 3 minutes. Strain the sauce 
through a cheesecloth over the roes and serve. 

SHAD ROE A LA NEWBURGH. 

Plunge 2 shad roes of 1^ pounds each in a quart boiling water, 
with 1 teaspoon salt and 2 tablespoons vinegar, and boil 10 
minutes ; drain, cut in 1 inch pieces, and finish as lobster. New- 
burgh, taking care not to break the pieces. 

SHRIMPS WITH PEAS. 

Mrs. John D. Araitin. 

Drain a pint can French peas, plunge in l)oiling water for 
2 minutes, drain again and keep warm. Make a good cream 
sauce, add 1 can shrimps cut in halves, cook 5 minutes, put in the 
peas, get boiling hot and serve. 

SOUSED STURGEON. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Cut the fish in large pieces and put in an iron pot with 
water sufiicient to cover it. Add a cup salt and tablespoon white 



70 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

pepper, one of cloves and allspice mixed, a pinch of mace and 
a small bunch of sage tied in a thin rag, and put in before 
the fish. Let all boil until the fish is nearly done. Then add a 
quart of cold vinegar. It will jelly in '24 hours. A rock soused 
is delicious. 

STEWED TERRAPIN. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Put 2 liver terrapins in boiling water and boil 1-j minutes. 
Pull off the outer skin and toe nails, put back in fresh boiling 
water, add salt, and boil slowly till the shells part easily. Take 
out, remove the under shell, and let cool off. Take them out of 
the upper shells ; remove carefully the sandbags, bladders, thick 
intestines, and the gall sacks which are in the liver ; throw these 
away. Break the terrapin into small pieces, cut the small intestines 
fine, put all with the broken up liver and the eggs. Add the liquor 
that has drained in cutting, roll ^ pound butter in flour, and add it. 
and heat through. Mash the yolks of 6 eggs with 2 tablespoons 
sherry, stir it in with J pint thick cream, salt and cayenne pepper. 
Let boil up once, take off, add 1 gill wine and i teaspoon mace, 
and serve. 

PLANKED WHITE FISH. 

Mrs. J. W. Ilolleran. 

Take a fish that weighs between 3 and 4 pounds, wash well, 
scrape and split clear down the whole length, removing the back- 
bone without loosening the meat too much ; tack to a plank, inside 
up, season with pepper and salt, and dot with bits of butter. 
Bake in the oven from 20 to 30 minutes, not letting it cook too 
long. Serve with quarters of lemon. It is that much better if 
it can be roasted before a clear fire. 

Shad is good cooked in the same way. 



MEATS. 



AUXT BRIDGET'S FAMILY STEW. 

:Mrs. W. B. Ward. 

Place in a roaster a layer of thin round steak, season with 
salt and pepper and dredge with flour. Slice a small onion over 
the meat, then a layer of sliced potatoes, again season and dredge, 
making as many layers as desired. Fill up the pan with water. 
Bake in slow oven about 1 hour, adding water as necessary. 

BACON. 

Trim the bacon all around and slice very thin crosswise. Broil 
over a moderate fire 2 minutes on each side. Serve immediately. 

To fry bacon, get a very little butter hot in a pan, and fry 
the bacon 2 minutes on each side. Never let it stand. 

BOILED BEEF. 

Select a 4 pound piece of short ribs of beef. Tie it tightly 
and put in a pot with 4 quarts boiling water, 1 tablespoon salt, i 
teaspoon pepper, 4 small scraped carrots, 4 small peeled turnips, 
2 onions, and a bunch of soup herbs. Cover and simmer for 2^ 
hours. Serve the vegetables on the same dish as the meat. Keep 
the broth for future use. 

BRAISED BEEF. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Put 1 tablespoon butter in a kettle over a good fire, and 
brown in it 1 sliced onion : put in 3 or 4 pounds solid lean 
beef, brown on both sides, then add 1 small carrot sliced, 1 cup 
canned tomatoes, and from 1 pint to 1 quart of water according 
to the size and tenderness of the meat. Boil slowly a couple of 
hours. Take out and serve with a gravy made from the liquor 
left in the pot. 

BROILED BEEFSTEAK. 

Mix 1 tablespoon melted butter with 1 teaspoon salt and \ tea- 
spoon pepper; trim a small steak neatly and roll in this dress- 
ing ; arrange on a broiler and broil over a good fire G to 8 minutes 
on each side, turning to avoid scorching. Serve with any dressing 
liked. Or broil without the previous dressing, browning both 
sides, but being careful not to cook through. Put on a hot 
platter, and baste both sides with butter, salt and pepper, press- 
ing slightly to release the juices. 

71 



72 OLD COUNTRY RFXIPES AND NEW. 

With certain gas ranges which do not permit of broiling 
properly speaking, a good substitute is to get a skillet quite hot, 
and put the steak in, searing it on both sides, and cooking as 
quickly as possible. 

MINCED BEEF. 

Cut 1 do'cn thin slices from a thick sirloin steak. Dust with 
salt and pepper. Cut 6 Spanish red peppers in halves, and fry 
in 2 tablespoons hot butter for '2 minutes on each side. Take out 
to a hot plate. Put the beef in the pan and fry 1 minute on each 
side, take out with a fork and arrange on a hot dish the pieces 
overlapping, place the peppers on top, and sprinkle chopped parsley 
over them. Remove the fat from the pan, add 1 cup half water 
and half red wine, season with pepper and salt, boil for five minutes, 
pour over the beef and serve. 

SPICED BEEF. 

Put 2 pounds tender lean beef in a saucepan with 1 cup each 
of wine and water, 3 tablespoons vinegar, cinnamon, pepper, salt 
and onions ; cover the saucepan tight ; place over a slow fire for 
2 hours ; take the meat from the gravy and let cool. To be served 
cold. 

STUFFED BEEFSTEAK. 

Cut a large juicy beefsteak from the tender side of the round, 
pound it, season with salt and pepper, spread a stuffing as for fowls 
on it quite thickly and roll up, tying it securely. Put in a dripping 
pan and cover with cold water. Let it stew slowly for 2 or 3 hours, 
adding boiling water if more is needed. The gravy should not 
need thickening, but a glass of wine is a good addition. Serve with 
the gravy in a boat. 

BEEF A LA BOURGEOISE. 

Slice 1 pound or more of cold boiled beef quite fine and put 
in a baking dish. Brown 1 chopped onion in a little butter, sprinkle 
with 1 tablespoon flour and a little chopped parsley, stir well and 
add 1 tablespoon lemon juice, and 1 cup stock or hot water. Let 
boil a moment and pour over the meat ; sprinkle with bread crumbs 
and bake J- hour in a moderate oven. 

The lemon may be omitted and J cup tomato sauce, or thick 
stewed tomatoes added. 

BEEF A LA SAGERS. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Rub the bottom of a chafing dish or saucepan with garlic, melt 
in it 1 tablespoon butter ; add 2 tablespoons wine, 1 tablespoon each 
catsup and Worcestershire sauce, and I teaspoon salt. When 
cooking, put in thin slices cold roast beef, and serve when very 
hot. 



MEATS. 73 

REEF CROQUETTES. 

Chop «ne any left over beef, add half the quantity of bread 
crumbs. Frv 1 finely chopped onion in a saucepan \vitli A tame- 
spoon butter until- brown, mix with the beef; also 1 teaspoon 
chopped parsley. 1 teaspoon salt, | teaspoon white pepper, and 
saltspoon grated nutmeg. Crack in 2 raw eggs and 'l tf Icspoons 
cream, and mix hard for 5 minutes. Let stand till well set, then 
roll out into croquettes, roll in flour, and fry in a skillet with 
a little lard or butter. Turn, remove, drain, and serve with horse- 
radish sauce around them. 

BEEF DUMPLING. 

Mrs. John White (Plummer Hill). 

Make a paste as for pie; peel and slice 2 large onions and 
2 large potatoes, cut 1 pound beefsteak in small pieces, dust with 
salt and pepper, till in the paste, tie up in a floured cloth, and 
let boil for 2 hours. 

BEEF EN CASSEROLE. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

1 pound tender side of the round of beef cut in i inch pieces; 
frv brown in butter in a saucepan; have a casserole ready, put in 

1 dozen button onions, a couple raw potatoes, 1 stalk celery, and 

2 small carrots all coarsely diced; turn in the mgat and gravy, 
pepper and salt to taste, cover with the lid and bake 2 hours. 
When done, brown 1 tablespoon flour with 1 tablespoon butter 
in a hot saucepan and mix through the stew. Brown stock may 
be used to advantage in place of water, and brown gravy stirred 
in instead of the browned flour. 

Tough meat or fowl of any kind is improved by long baking 

in a casserole. __ ^^ , ^^^ 

BEEF HASH. 

Dice any left over roast or boiled beef, and half the quantity 
of cold sliced potatoes. Brown a finely chopped onion with a 
little butter in a saucepan, add the beef and potatoes, season with 
salt and pepper, and add a cup of white broth or hot water Cover 
and stew a few minutes, then remove to the oven and bake JO or 
more minutes. Remove to a covered dish, sprinkle chopped 
parsley over and serve. Or dress on a baking dish, sprinkle with 
bread crumbs, baste with butter, and brown for 10 minutes in the 
oven The onion mav be omitted, if desirable, and cold rice is 
quite as acceptable as "potatoes. Tomato juice from a can is better 
than water, and left over cooked tomatoes (unless sweetened) 
make a- good addition, as do small quantities of many cooked vege- 
tables. A mixture of cold meats is also good. 

BEEF LOAF, NO. 1. 

Mrs. P. R. Sines. 

Take 1 pound raw lean beef chopped fine. 1 cup chopped suet, 
1 cup rolled cracker crumbs, 2 eggs beaten light, 1 cup sweet milk, 



74 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

butter the size of an egg, and salt and pepper to taste. Mix well 
together, pack in a buttered pan, and bake 1^ hours. Serve hot 
or sliced cold. 

BEEF LOAF, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Thomas Watkins. 

Chop 3 pounds lean raw beef fine, mix with 1 cup chopped suet, 
1 cup cracker crumbs, 2 eggs beaten light. 1 cup sweet milk, butter 
size of an e^g, salt and pepper. Pack in a bread pan, and bake 
1^ hours. 

BEEF ROASTED IN THE OVEN. 

Take at least 3 pounds, either ribs or sirloin, place it in a bak- 
ing pan, dust with pepper, and put 1 teaspoon salt in the pan with 
1 cup water. Put in a very hot oven, baste every 10 minutes, 
turn several times, and cook 15 minutes to each pound. Take up 
on a hot platter, and garnish v/ith hot boiled rice or potatoes 
roasted in the pan, or Yorkshire pudding. Pour the liquid out of 
the pan except about 2 tablespoons, add 1 tablespoon flour to the 
pan and mix till smooth, add 1 cup hot water, stir till it boils, 
then add salt and pepper to taste, and serve in a gravy boat. 

BEEFSTEAK PIE. 

Mrs. Maitland Murday. 

Get 2 ponflds good steak, cut into pieces about 3 inches square, 
slice 1 onion with it, add pepper and salt, and Vvater enough to 
stew it, cover and bake from \ to | hour. Make a good piecrust 
with either lard or xtvy finely minced suet, take the pie out, edge 
the pan with a narrow strip of paste, wet the edge with cold 
water, and put on a top cover, pressing down the edge tight. 
Make a good hole in the centre, and bake till the crust is done. 
If the water has boiled off when the crust is put on, add a little 
boiling water. A beef's kidney, sliced very thin, is considered 
a good addition by some. 

BEEFSTEAK ROLLS. 

Cut 2 pounds beef from the tender side of the round in slices 
about :\ inch thick; cut these up in pieces the size of one's hand. 
Chop 1 pound sausage meat with a few sprigs of parsley, and 
place 2 tablespoons on each piece of beef ; roll the steaks and tie 
both ends with thread. Let them brown in butter in a skillet, 
then add the juice of 1 lemon, 2 cups brown stock, 2 sliced carrots 
and onions, salt and pepper to taste. Cover the pan and cook about 
2 hours. Put the rolls on a warm platter, cut away the threads, 
and strain the gravy over them. Serve with mashed potatoes and 
a good salad. 

BEEFSTEAK SMOTHERED WITH ONIONS. 

Broil the steak, place on a hot platter and cover with smothered 
onions. 



MEATS. '?5 



BTTOCKS. 



Take 2 poiiiuls loan beef fmni tlic shoulder; chop fine ; soak 
1 pounxi l)read crumlis in milk till soft ; mix with the beef Alake 
the mixture into cakes with the hands, roll in flour and fry in a 
little hot butter in a skillet for about 10 mmutes. Take out but 
keep hot. Rub into the pan 2 tal)lespoons flour, add 1 pmt milk, 
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, and let boil a few minutes. 
Pour this over the meat, and bake in the oven till brown. 

BROWN STEW WITH DU.MPLIXGS. 

Mrs. Bradrick. 
Put "^ tablespoons butter in a hot skillet over a good fire ; cut 
9 pounds of beef from the tender side of the round into pieces an 
inch square: dredge thicklv with flour; put in the hot butter, and 
stir until nicelv browned. Skim the meat out and place in a 
saucepan Add' 1 tablespoon flour to the gravy in the frying pan, 
miv and add 1 quart boiling water; stir until it boils, then strain 
over the meat. Cover the saucepan and simmer 2 hours. When 
half done add 1 teaspoon salt. Sift 1 pint flour twice with 1 
heapin<^ teaspoon baking powder, and \ teaspoon salt: add enough 
milk fa little over * cup) to make a soft dough. Do not work 
it much Drop by small spoonfuls over the top of the meat; 
cover quicklv, pus+i' back the saucepan and simmer 10 mmutes with- 
out uncovering the stew. Serve at once. 

CALF'S BRAINS. 
Prepare as sweetbreads, and parboil. Cut in small pieces, 
bread and fry. They are often added to other meats m making 
croquettes. 

CHIPPED BEEF AND TOMATO SAUCE. 

Mrs. A. M. Thackara. 
Remove the seeds of a green pepper and chop fine; brown in 
butter with a finely chopped onion. Cover some finely chipped 
beef in a saucepan with cold water, and when it boils, dram off 
the water, add a piece of butter the size of a walnut, and when 
it has cooked several minutes, add the pepper and onion, with 
a dessertspoon tomato catsup; serve on hot buttered toast. 

CHOP SUEY. 

"Dainty Dishes." 

Take 1 cup cold chicken, \ cup cold veal, 2 onions, i cup celery. 

\ cup mushrooms, all chopped, and 1 tablespoon butter. Mix well 

together cover, and cook slowly until done. Add 1 tablespoon 

Chinese 'suey sauce, season with salt and pepper and serve hot. 

CORNED BEEF HASH, NO. 1. 

Mrs. H. W. Miller. 
Take cold cooked corn beef, remove all surplus fat and bits 
of '^ri'stle, chop fine, and season with salt and pepper. To h meat 



76 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

add S cold boiled potatoes and 1 onion all chopped very fine ; put 
into a baking- pan, dredge thickly with flour, and pour in at the 
side enough water to come up level with the hash ; place in the 
oven and do not stir. When the flour is a light brown and has 
formed a crust, take out, add a lump of butter, stir it through 
several times, and you will have a delicious hash. 

Cold meat of any kind may be hashed the same way. 

CORNED BEEF HASH, NO. 2. 

Mrs. King. 

Take 2 pounds fat corned beef, boiled and cold; 1 pound cold 
boiled potatoes ; 1 large white onion ; put all in chopping tray and 
mince fine. Put in a saucepan with 2 ounces butter, pepper and salt 
to taste; add boiling water to soften it. Stir over a slow fire till 
the onion is cooked. Take up in a hot covered dish, and serve. 

DRIED BEEF. 

Mrs. Gus Winefordner. 

Cut fine, boil 10 minutes, drain. Bring 1^ cups milk to the boil. 
Mix a lump of butter with same amount of flour and stir into the 
milk until smooth ; add the dried beef and when boiling hot pour 
over slices of buttered toast. Pepper to taste. 

DRIED BEEF WITH CHEESE AND TOMATOES. 

Mrs. John D. Martin. 

Chop fine 1 jar of dried beef, add 1 cup tomatoes and \ cup 
grated cheese, a few drops of onion juice and a little cayenne 
pepper. Melt 2 tablespoons butter, turn the mixture into this, and 
when hot add 3 eggs slightly beaten. Cook until creamy, stirring 
constantly, and scraping from the bottom of the pan. 

DUTCH MESS. 

Mrs. Lydia Z. Knight. 

Chop fine 1 pound each of veal and lean beef, ^ pound ham, 
1 small onion and 1 sprig parsley. Season with salt and pepper, 
and mix well together with 2 beaten eggs and ^ pint bread crumbs. 
Form into a loaf and put in a baking pan. Brown a small chopped 
onion in butter, add \ can tomatoes, season with butter, salt and 
pepper, cook thoroughly and strain over the loaf. Bake about 1 
hour. 

DUTCH STEW^ 

Put 1 dessertspoon dripping in a deep pan ; wlien smoking hot 
add 1 sliced onion, and when brown 1 pound mutton. Put a 
tight lid on and let simmer ^ hour ; cut 1 small cabbage in chunks, 
soak ^ hour in cold water ; peel and cut in coarse slices 6 pota- 
toes, and wash in cold water ; lift the potatoes out of the water 
and pack them dripping around the meat; lift the cabbage out 
and pack it dripping on top ; season each with salt and pepper. 
Put the lid on close and steam till the cabbage is tender — about 
1 hour. Take the meat up on a hot platter, and put the vegetables 
around it. 



MEATS. 11 

FAGGOTS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Jas. N. Mills. 

Take 1 pig's liver, scald and chop line ; add about 2 slices of 
bread, crumbed, 4 or 5 chopped raw onions,- pepper and salt to 
taste. Take a pig's apron, cut in squares, put a large spoonful of 
this mixture on eacli piece, fold it up closely and place side by 
side in a dripping pan, with water to half cover them, and bake 
till brown. Serve hot. 

FAGGOTS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. H. D. Lewis. 

1 pig's liver chopped fnie or run throuf^h the grinder, -S onions 
chopped fine in a wooden bowl, pepper, salt and sage to taste; 2 
heaping mixing spoonfuls of flour to stick the rest together; mix 
all thoroughly. Cut a pig"s apron in small squares, put 1 table- 
spoon of the mixture on each, wrap up. lay close together in a 
dripping pan, fill with water, and cook 20 minutes or till brown. 

BAKED HAM. 

Mrs. Isabel Hall Tedrow. 

Soak the ham over night in cold water ; next morning skin, 
rub with brown sugar, stick in a few cloves, and cover with a 
paste made of 3 cups flour mixed with water enough to roll out, 
and sprinkled with brown sugar. Bake 3 hours in a slow oven. 
The paste can all be cracked off with a knife. 

BOILED HAM. 

Mrs. Henry Spencer. 

Boil a ham with the skin on in a porcelain lined kettle until 
a fork may be run in easily. Keep covered with water all the 
time. Take from the fire and peel. Put in a pan with the fat 
side up. Score the fat deeply until the knife reaches the lean 
portion, then fill the openings with brown sugar moistened with 
wine or water. Stick whole cloves over the surface, and bake 
for a half hour in a very slow oven. When cold put in a crock 
and cover tight. Will keep moist for a week. Or boil in cider, 
skin, brush with beaten egg, sprinkle with bread crumbs, and 
brown in the oven. 

BROILED HAM. 

Cut in slices i inch thick ; trim the edges : broil over a clear 
fire not over 10 minutes, turning. Put small bits of butter on the 
slices when served, and dust with pepper. 

FRIED HAM. 

Put thin slices of ham in a hot frying pan, and fry in their 
own fat about 10 minutes. Serve with a cream gravy made in the 
pan, if any gravy is wanted. Eggs served with the ham should 
be fried after it in the hot fat, and laid on the slices in a hot 
dish. 



78 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW.' 

HAM AND EGG PIE. 

Mrs. Isabel Urquhart. 

Take slices of good boiled ham and chop fine. Cover the 
bottom of a pie pan lined with good paste. Beat 2 eggs up hard, 
mix in a cup of milk, and a little pepper and butter, pour over 
the ham, and bake till done. 

HAM AND RICE CROQUETTES. 

Brown 1 small sliced onion in butter, add I teaspoon paprika, 
2 rounded tablespoons flour, and \ teaspoon salt ; stir in gradually 
1 pint hot milk ; take oft' when smooth and stir in the beaten yolks 
of 2 eggs, and 1 cup each of chopped ham and boiled rice. When 
cold, make as other croquettes. 

HAM AND VEAL PATTIES. 

Chop half as much ham as cold, cooked veal ; stir into a good, 
hot cream sauce, season with nutmeg, salt, paprika, lemon juice 
and a very little lemon peel. "^Cayenne pepper may be used instead 
of paprika, but in much smaller quantity.) Fill the patties hot or 
cold and serve. 

HAM NOODLES. 

Boil the noodles in slightly salted water: chop cold boiled 
ham very fine ; put in alternate layers with the noodles into a 
buttered baking dish ; beat 2 eggs with I pint sweet cream, pour 
over the. top, cover with a layer of bread crumbs, and dots of 
butter, and bake a light brown. 

HAM ON TOAST. 

Chop cold ham or tongue very fine ; to each cup, add the 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs, season with n.iustard and cayenne, stir 
over the fire till the eggs are cooked, and serve at once on hot, 
buttered toast. 

HAMBURG ROAST. 

Mrs. Mike Snyder. 

Take 2 pounds raw beefsteak chopped fine, 2 medium sized 
onions also chopped fine, 1 q^^, 6 rolled crackers, 1 heaping tea- 
spoon butter, 1 teaspoon poultrv seasoning, salt and pepper to 
taste. Mix well, make into a roll, and dust with flour. Put in a 
pan in the oven with just enough water in the pan to baste it 
well while cooking. Bake about 45 minutes. Make a gravy with 
the juice in the pan, 2 tablespoons flour, a piece of butter, and 
season it with celery salt, salt and pepper to taste. 

HAMBURG STEAK. 

Chop fine 2 pounds of the tender side of the round, removing 
all gristle and ligaments. Season with salt and pepper, and, if 
liked, a little onion juice. Make into a cake in a tin pan of the 
thickness of steak preferred, but do not pack too hard. Put 1 
tablespoon butter over the steak and bake 10 minutes. Remove to 
a hot platter to serve. 



MEATS. 79 

HASH ON TOAST. 

Rub 1 tablespoon butter in a hot saucepan with 1 tablespoon 
flour, and when browning add 1 cup boiling water or good stock; 
when boiling, stir in 2 cups hashed, cooked meat (beefsteak is 
best), season, and simmer 15 minutes. Serve with the gravy on 
hot buttered toasts. Ha white meat is used, add some milk or 
cream to the stew. 

HIGHLANDER. 

Filippini. 

Cut in half-inch square pieces a half pound pig's liver, four 
skinned fresh mutton kidneys, 2 pounds raw lean mutton, and 4 
ounces raw, lean salt pork. Brown 1 finely chopped pepper and 1 
chopped onion in 2 tablespoons butter, add all the meat and 1 
quart broth, 1 level tablespoon salt, i teaspoon pepper, and 1 salt- 
spoon grated nutmeg. Add a bunch of soup herbs, cover the pan 
and simmer l.V hours. Mix in 2 coarsely diced raw potatoes, and 
4 peeled and crushed tomatoes, then set in oven for 1 hour, bast- 
ing it with its own gravy occasionally. Take out the herbs, turn 
into a deep, hot dish, and serve. 

HOT TAM.\LES, NO. 1. 

Grind boiled veal or chicken, 2 red peppers, 2 onions. Salt to 
taste and add enough cayenne pepper to make it very hot. Fill 
corn husks, tie up, and steam several hours. 

HOT TAMALES, NO. 2. 

"Dainty Dishes." 
Soften clean corn husks by putting in hot water. Take 2 
large red, dry Chili peppers; remove seeds and pour hot water 
over the peppers. Toast the seeds in a pan over the fire; add to 
the Chili pulp and pound to a paste. Add garlic and onions if 
desired and enough water to make a pint of liquid. Cut up a 
fat piece of raw beef or mutton into pieces about 1^ inches long; 
take a spoonful of freshlv made cornmeal mush, spread it flat on 
the husk, and put in centre a teaspoonful of Chili sauce and a 
piece of cut meat, fold up, roll up the corn husks and tie. Put 
in a kettle and steam 4 hours, serving hot. 

HUNGARIAN GOULASH. 

Filippini. 

Cut 2 pounds of rump of beef into 1 inch squares. Put in a 
saucepan with 2 tablespoons melted lard. 1 teaspoon salt and 2 
Faltspoons paprika. When browning add 1 small sliced carrot and 
2 small sliced onions; stir and cook several minutes. Stir in 1 
tablespoon flour, 1 cup hot water, \ cuo claret and \ cup tomato 
sauce. Put in a muslin bag several allspice. 2 cloves, 1 bayleaf 
and a little thvme, and add to the pan. Lastly 2 peeled and coarseTy 
dice^ raw potatoes. Cover and let cook slowlv 30 minutes. Add 1 
bean garlic and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley. Cover and cook 
for 20 minutes. Take out the spice bag, pour in a hot dish and 
serve. 



80 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

IRISH STEW. 

Mrs. Stephen Callahan. 

Take 2h pounds loin mutton chops, put in a pot in alternate 
layers with 8 sliced potatoes, 4 turnips and 4 small onions coarsely 
chopped, and pour over them 1 quart water. Cover pot closely 
and let stew gently about 2 hours; then turn into a hot dish and 
serve. 

SOUR KIDNEY STEW. 

Mrs. Leo Fox. 

Put 1 teaspoon each of lard and butter in a hot skillet, and 
when melted rub in enough flour to make your gravy. When the 
flour is browned, add boiling water, and when cooked 3 or 4 min- 
utes, put in the kidneys cut small ; stew for 20 minutes. If the 
gravy boils away, add boiling water. Season with salt and pepper, 
and before serving add from 1 to 3 tablespoons vinegar. 

STEWED KIDNEYS. 

Split and trim the kidneys, and cut small. Cover with cold 
water in a saucepan, and bring almost to the boiling point ; drain 
and repeat twice more. Brown 1 tablespoon butter in a pan, rub 
in 1 tablespoon flour, and add 1 cup stock or boiling water ; add 1 
tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, 1 tablespoon mushroom catsup, 
salt and pepper, and the chopped kidney. Stir till heated through, 
take off, add a little sherry and serve. 

Or the chopped kidney may be fried in butter with a little 
onion, and the same ingredients added to the gravy. 

BROILED LAMB CHOPS. 

Trim and pound lightly. Season with salt and pepper, lay on 
a broiler, and broil 5 minutes on each side. Lay them on a hot 
dish, and garnish with watercress or parsley. 

LAMB CHOPS WITH BACON. 

Put 1 tablespoon butter in a hot frying pan ; put in thin slices 
bacon and fry 2 minutes on each side ; take out and keep hot. 
Season the lamb chops and fry brown in the pan ; dress on a dish 
with the bacon, and green peas in the middle. 

LEG OF LAMB. 

Trim a leg of lamb neatly, place it in a roasting pan, dust 
with salt and pepper, rub over it 2 tablespoons melted lard or 
butter, pour 2 tablespoons water in the pan, and roast in the oven 
1 hour, turning and basting occasionally. Place on a hot platter, 
skim and strain its own gravy over it, and garnish with water- 
cress. Serve with mint sauce. 

Or make a gravy and serve it in a gravy boat. 

Green peas and asparagus should be served with spring Iamb. 



MEATS. yi 

RIBS OF LAMB WITH POTATOES. 

Trim neatly a rack of lamb, put in a pan with even sized 
peeled raw potatoes, new or old. Season both meat and potatoes 
with salt and pepper, and spread 1 tablespoon butter over them. 
Roast in the oven for about 40 minutes, turning and basting 
irequently. Arrange the potatoes around the lamb on a platter, 
and sprinkle all with a little chopped parsley. 

CALF'S LIVER. 

Cut slices of liver i inch thick, roll in melted butter (or oil), 
sea.soned with salt and pepper. Arrange on a double broiler and 
cook o mmutes for each side. Dress on a hot dish. The same 
number of slices of freshly broiled bacon may be laid on top. 
-The hver may be pan broiled by -cooking in a very hot skillet 
the same length of time. Fried onions are served with liver 
and bacon. 

IMITATION PAT£ DE FOIE GRAS. 

Boil a calf's liver till very tender in slightly sailed water. 
When cold cut into small pieces and pound to a smooth paste. 
Fry a sliced onion till brown in ;3 tablespoons butter; press all 
the liquid through a strainer upon the liver, add salt and pepper 
to taste, a little grated nutmeg and ground cloves, and 1 teaspoon 
each of made mustard and Worcestershire sauce. If not moist 
enough add 1 tablespoon boiling water. Pack very hard in small 
jars or cups, and cover with melted butter. It will keep for 
months in a cool place. Use in sandwiches in the same way as the 
genuine article. 

ONTARIO LIVER. 

Boil a beef's, calf's or lamb's liver till tender: while warm 
mash it fine with a wire potato masher : season with salt, pepper 
and onion juice._ Meanwhile scald \ the quantity of oatflakes, 
and let cook thick but not too soft. Mix porridge and liver 
well together, and pack in a mould. When cold and firm, cut 
in slices, and frv. 

MEAT JELLY. 

Miss Sarah Watkins. 

Take the shank hone of veal or young beef, cover with water, 
and cook till the meat leaves the bone. Take out the bone, pick 
the lean meat to pieces; let the broth get cold and skim it, then 
boil down to less tlian 1 pint, pour over the meat, and set out 
to cool. Season with salt and pepper when' nearly done cooking. 
Slice for the table. 

MEAT PIE. NO. 1. 

Mrs. Joseph Blankenship. 

Take 2 or 3 pounds of lean meat, beef, veal, or pork. Cut in 
pieces the size of an egg, put in a kettle with plenty of water, 
cook until done. Line a deep pan with a good short dougli. put 
in a layer of meat, then a layer of dough, and so alternatelv, 

6 



82 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

covering the top with dough. Before putting the cover on take 
the broth the meat was in, add '2 well beaten eggs, and thicken 
with milk or cream. Pour over the pie, put on top paste, put in 
a hot oven and bake until brown. 

MEAT PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Thompson. 

Put } pound of the tender side of the round of beef and | 
pound lean fresh pork through a grinder ; chop 1 onion tine and 
brown it in 1 teaspoon butter in a saucepan ; add the meat and 
cover with hot water. Stew about 1 hour. Season with salt 
and pepper. Make a pie crust, line a pie pan, fill with the stew, 
put over it a top crust, and bake till done. Serve hot. 

MEAT POTATO CAKES. 

Mrs. John D. Martin. 

Take any cold meat, chop fine, add 3 times the quantity of cold 
mashed potatoes, salt and pepper to taste, and enough eggs to make 
a thin batter ; beat well and fry as griddle cakes. 

MOCK TERRAPIN. 

Take ^ a calf's liver or the same quantity cold veal, or 
chicken, hash it rather coarsely, season and flour it thickly, and 
fry brown in butter ; add 1 teaspoon French mustard, a little 
cayenne, 2 hardboiled eggs chopped fine, a lump of butter the size 
of an egg, and 1 cup water. Let boil a few minutes. 

Or rub the butter and flour together in a hot saucepan, add ^- 
pint milk, and when it boils, the meat, salt and pepper. Stir till 
thoroughly heated, take off, stir in the beaten yolk of 1 egg, 2 
tablespoons sherry, and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley. Serve im- 
mediately. If liver is used, it must be first browned as in the 
first recipe. 

MUSHROOM PUDDING. 

Mrs. T. S. Johnson. 

Make a paste with flour, water, a little salt, and very finely 
minced suet ; roll out and line a bowl ; fill the bowl with small 
pieces of mutton, and fresh mushrooms, washed and peeled; season 
with salt and pepper, and pack down tight ; . add a very little 
water. Cover the bowl with a top crust, tie up in a cloth, put in a 
kettle of boiling water, and boil 3 hours. Serve in the bowl. 

BOILED LEG OF MUTTON. 

Wipe the leg, wrap in a heavily floured cloth, put in boiling 
water, and simmer 15 minutes to each pound, adding 1 teaspoon 
salt when half done. Serve on a hot dish with caper or egg sauce, 
and garnish with parsley. 

ROAST LEG OR SADDLE OF MUTTON. 

Roast in the oven the same as roast beef. Roast done. The 
breast should have the bone removed and be stuffed with poultry 
dressing, rolled, tied and roasted. 



MEATS. 83 

MUTTON CHOPS. 
Broil as lamb chops, or bread and fry as veal cutlets. 

MUTTON HASH. 

Dice rather small any left over mutton, and add half the 
quantity chopped boiled potato. Brown an onion and a pepper, both 
chopped, in a pan with 1 tablespoon butter, add the hash, season 
with salt and pepper, moisten well with broth, or left over soup, 
or hot water, cover the pan and set in the oven for 50 minutes. 
Dress the hash nicely on a hot dish, sprinkle with chopped parsley 
and serve. It may be served as the centre of a platter of hot 
boiled rice. 

MUTTON PIES. 

Cut 1 pound mutton in very small pieces, season with salt and 
pepper, and add 2 or 3 tablespoons water. Fill small individual 
baking dishes with a good pie crust, put in the mutton, and cover 
with paste, cutting a hole in the middle of the top. 

MUTTON STEW. 

Cut 4 pounds of mutton from the neck into IJ inch squares. 
Add it to 3 tablespoons hot lard in a saucepan, 1^ teaspoons salt, 
h teaspoon pepper, and cook till a light brown. Pour off the fat, 
and sprinkle 3 tablespoons flour over the meat; cook two minutes, 
stirring. Add ^ pint water and 1 pint tomato juice; stir and boil 
3 minutes. Add 2 carrots finely chopped, 2 raw potatoes coarsely 
chopped, (5 very small onions browned in butter, a little chopped 
cooked pork or boiled ham, if at hand, and a bunch of soup herbs. 
Cover, boil a few minutes, then set in the oven for 1 hour. Re- 
move, .skim, take out the herbs, add 3 tablespoons of cooked green 
peas (if left over), and serve in a deep hot dish. 

NORTHUMBERLAND POT PIE. 

Mrs. John Carr. 

Cut IJ pounds of the round of beef into small pieces, add 
2 chopped onions, salt and pepper. Make a pie dough with flour, 
water, a pinch of salt and 1 tablespoon lard, roll out thin, put in 
the meat, fold it up adding 1 cup water, pinch it tight, put in a 
pudding bag, and boil 3J hours. 

OLD-FASHIONED BOILED DINNER. 

Put corned beef in a large kettle of cold water about nine 
o'clock ; at 10 put in 1 or 2 pounds salt pork, in a solid piece ; 
put in small beets at the same time: at 11 put in peeled and 
quartered turnips and scraped parsnips; at 11:30 add some peeled 
potatoes and a small calibage in quarters. Let boil a full half 
hour. Half a red pepper improves the dish. Dish the meat on a 
platter, and most of the vegetables in separate dishes, using the 
carrots and parsnips for garnishing. Serve horseradish with the 
meat. Be careful not to break the skin of the beets while cook- 
ing, and peel and quarter them to serve. 



84 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

'POSSUM. 

"Mrs. Owen's Cook Book." 

Clean as a pig, scrape, not skin it. Chop the hvcr hue, mix 
with breadcrumbs, chopped onion, and parsley, pepper, salt and 1 
beaten egg. Stuff with it. Or stuff with peeled and sliced apples. 
Sew up, roast and baste with salt and water, and rub over with a 
rag dipped in its own grease when finishing. Make the gravy with 
browned flour, and serve whole with a baked apple in its mouth. 

PHILADELPHIA SCRAPPLE. 

Mrs. H. I. Ellis. 

Take bits of cold fowl or any cold meat or several kinds 
together. Chop fine, put in a frying pan with water to cover. 
Season well. When it boils, thicken with cornmeal stirred in 
carefully as for mush. Cook a few minutes, turn into a mould, 
and cut slices to fry for Ijreakfast. 

BREADED PIGS' FEET. 

Wipe the feet dry, dip in beaten egg, roll in bread crumbs, 
or cracker crumbs, and fry in butter in a skillet. They cook 
quickly. Serve with quartered lemons. 

BROILED PIGS' FEET. 

Sprinkle pickled pigs' feet with salt and pepper, brush with 
butter, roll in breadcrumbs, and broil over a clear fire, turning 
often. Serve with Piquante Sauce. 

FRIED PIGS' FEET. 

Dip the feet in a light batter, and fry in deep fat. Serve 
with tomato sauce. 

PICKLED PIGS' FEET. 

Put the feet into common brine for 10 days ; wash well and 
cook slowly in water with a carrot, 2 large onions, several branches 
of celery and a little parsley. Simmer for 3 or 4 hours. Drain, 
cut in half, remove the larger bones, press together into shape, and 
put away to cool. 

PIG JOWL WITH SPINACH. 

Put half a smoked pig jowl in 2 gallons boiling water, and boil 
for 2 hours. Take out, peel off the skin, and trim neatly. Have 
ready some freshly Ixiiled spinach, place it on a hot dish, and 
arrange the jowl over it. 

ROAST PIG. 

Have a sucking pig sent from the butcher prepared for the 
oven ; wash and wipe dry. Stuff it with plain turkey stuffing, using 
suet in place of butter, and seasoning well with sage, parsley and 
onion juice besides salt and pepper. Sew the opening together. 



MEATS. 85 

and truss all the legs forward, the hind legs close under the body. 
Put a corncob in the mouth, rub all over with melted butter, and 
dust with pepper, salt and flour ; roast before a moderate fire, 
turning often. If an oven roast is wanted, put in a pan, in a 
moderate oven, and bake from 2 to 2^^ hours. Put a little salted 
water in the pan, and baste with this and melted butter, until there 
is enough dripping. If browning too fast, rub all over with butter. 
Dish on a hot platter with an apple in place of the corncob, and 
garnish with parsley. Make a gravy as with other roast meat, 
adding a little wine. Serve with apple sauce. 

CHESHIRE PORK Plh:. 

Cut several small steaks from a loin of pork; season with salt, 
nutmeg and pepper. Make a piecrust, and fill with a layer of pork, 
then one of pared and cored apples, with a little sugar sprinkled 
t)ver, then another layer of pork; pour over ^ pint white wine, 
and spread with a little butter. Cover with paste and bake. Good 
hot or cold. 

ENGLISH PORK PIE. 

Mrs. Isabella Breeze. 

Line the sides of a deep pie dish with pie paste; put a layer 
of thin sliced bacon at the bottom, next thin sliced potatoes, and 
onions chopped or sliced very fine, lastly lean fresh pork cut small. 
Season with pepper, salt and sage. Fill the dish with any left over 
gravy or water thickened with flour and butter. Cover with a 
crust, cut a vent and bake about \^ hours. 

PICKLED PORK. 

Roil with sauer-kraut or cabbage, or greens ; bake with white 
beans. It takes about '2\ hours to cook the same number of pounds. 

ROAST PORK. 

Put a piece of fresh loin of pork in a roasting pan, sprinkle 
with salt and pepper, and spread a little butter over it. Pour \ 
cup water in the pan and set in the oven for 1 hour or more, 
according to the size of the roast. Baste occasionally. Small 
peeled raw potatoes may be roasted in the pan with the pork, sea- 
soning and basting them also. Set them around the meat on the 
same platter. 

PORK AND BEEF LOAF, NO. L 

i\Irs. Henry Rischert, 

Chop fine 2 pounds raw beef and i pound pork ; add 1 cup 
cracker crumbs, 2 beaten eggs, 1 cup sweet milk, salt and pepper 
to taste. Bake 2J hours. 

PORK AND BEEF LOAF, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Anna Everetts. 

Chop fine !•] pounds lean beef, and l pound pork; mix well 
with 6 rolled crackers. 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon salt, butter the size 
of an egg and \'h cups sweet milk. Bake in a hot oven. 



86 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PORK CHOPS. 

Dust with pepper, salt and flour, and fry in hot dripping till 
done. Make a brown gravy with a little of the dripping left in 
the pan. 

PORK TENDERLOIN. 

Split the tenderloins in half lengthwise. Dust with salt and 
pepper, and fry in a hot skillet with 1 tablespoon butter. Dress 
on a hot dish and serve with a good sauce. Fried onions are 
good with this dish. 

POT-AU-FEU. 

Mrs. Helen Campbell. 

Take 4 to 6 pounds lean beef, put in a porcelain kettle, and 
cover with three quarts of cold water. Bring to a boil and skim 
carefully. Add a tablespoon salt and three peppercorns, and boil 
very slowly for three hours. Then add two onions sliced and 
browned in a little butter, 2 leeks, 1 large parsnip, 2 turnips, 2 
small carrots, quarter of a cabbage, a stalk of celery and a bay leaf. 
Boil all very slowly for 2 hours longer. Then take up the l)eef ; 
pile the vegetables neatly about it ; strain the broth, pouring a 
little over the beef. Any remnants of poultry or roast meat may 
be added. Must not be boiled to rags. 

POT ROAST, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Lena Moseman. 

Dust a small roast of beef with salt and pepper, put in a hot 
pot with some hot dripping or lard, fry on both sides, turning 
several times. Put a sliced onion on top the roast, sprinkle with 
flour, add 2 pints water and baste often while cooking slowly. 
When half done, turn, add onion and flour as before, and baste 
quite often. When done, take up, thicken the gravy a little and 
pour over the meat. Cheap cuts of meat cook nicely in this way. 

POT ROAST, NO. 2. 

Mrs. B. E. Winters. 

Cut the meat into small pieces and sear on all sides in a hot 
skillet. Melt 1 tablespoonful Jnitter in a kettle, mix with it 2 
tablespoons flour, and a little cold water until it is smooth. Add 
salt and pepper. Add the meat and cover with hot water. Let 
simmer for a couple of hours cooking down to a brown gravy. 

POT ROAST, NO. 3. 

Mrs. J. W. Holleran. 

Take a piece of beef weighing 3 or 4 pounds, put it in a pot 
with 1 cup hot water, and cover closely, turning often without 
pricking with the fork, keeping the same amount of boiling water 
over it till almost done. Then season and let it brown nicely. 



MEATS. 87 

POTTED HEAD. 

Mrs. Robert Sneddon. 

Slit a beef's head in quarters or less, and put in a tub with 
a strong brine for several days. Boil the feet until the hoofs can 
be removed, and put them in the same brine. Wash vi-ell, and 
rinse and vi-ash in fresh cold water. Then put in a pot full of 
water, -and boil all night, or until the meat all comes off the bones. 
Take out all the bones, return to the kettle, season with salt and 
pepper, and boil about 20 minutes. When cold, serve in slices. 

POTTED MEAT. 

Chop any kind of cold meat very fine ; season with salt, 
pepper, cloves and cinnamon: mix with a little wine, vinegar and 
Worcestershire sauce. Pack in a jar, and cover with J inch melted 
butter. It will keep some time. 

. PRESSED MEAT. 

Take a quart of pieces of left over cooked meat, as from 
soup, etc. Take out any gristle or bones. Add salt to taste, 1 
teaspoon each of cinnamon and allspice, \ teaspoon each of cloves, 
pepper and mace, and 1 cup boiling stock. A little vinegar may 
be added, if liked. Mix, press into a square mould, and put aside 
to cool. Serve sliced. 

BROILED RABBIT. 

If young and tender, rabbit may be broiled as a chicken. 
Squirrels may be cooked in all ways as rabbits are cooked. 

BROWN FRICASSEE OF RABBIT. 

Prepare the rabbit properly, cut ii'f pieces, lay in salted culd 
water | hour, rinse in cold water, then lay in a saucepan and cover 
with hot water and a pinch of salt. Cook till tender, skimming 
when necessary. Put a slice of fat pork in another pan, add a 
few slices of onion, a bunch of sweet herbs, 1 tablespoon butter, 
i dozen peppercorns, and fry till a good brown ; add the liquor 
from the rabbit, let it boil up once, then strain, put back over the 
rabbit, thicken with browned flour, let boil up again, and turn out 
on a hot platter. 

RABBIT PIE. 

Line a deep dish with a rich biscuit dough ; stew the rabbit, 
season well with salt, pepper and butter, put in the dish, cover 
with a top crust and bake. 

SAUSAGE. 

Cut off the desired length, prick the skins in several places, 
and fry in their own fat over a moderate fire. If not in skins, 
make into small cakes and fry in their own fat ; or bread and fry as 
veal cutlets. Serve with a cream gravy, if any, made in the same 
pan. 



88 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BREAKFAST SAUSAGE. 

Chop 2 pounds lean pork, add 1 teaspoon powdered sage. 
I teaspoon salt, and 1 saltspoon black pepper, and form into small 
cakes. Fry on both sides in a pan with a little dripping. Serve 
plain or with cream sauce. 

PORK SAUSAGE. 

Mrs. Jemima Campbell. 

Take tenderloins, and trimmings from shoulders and hams, 
fat and lean alike, and grind fine. To 10 pounds of meat add 4 
tablespoons salt, 2 tablespoons pepper, and 5 tablespoons powdered 
sage. Try a cake of it to test the seasoning before finishing. Pack 
it down tight in crocks, and pour hot lard over it. Cover with cloth 
and paper, and tie up tight. It will keep all winter. 

, SAUSAGE ROLLS.- 

Mince fine j pound pork, and 3 ounces fat; add salt, pepper, 
mace and allspice; mix well with 3 ounces bread crumbs. Finish 
like Savory Rolls. 

SAVORY ROLLS. 

Fry some soup herbs, including parsley, 5 minutes in 1 table- 
spoon butter; add 1 pint broth, salt and pepper, the liquor from 1 
can mushrooms, and 2 pounds rump steak ; simmer for I hour, 
take out the steak and thicken the .gravy with a little butter and 
flour mixed ; boil several minutes. Chop the steak, the mushrooms 
and 4 hard boiled eggs very fine; stir into the sauce, and let cool. 
Make some pufT paste, roll very thin, cut into pieces 4 inches 
square, put a little of the mixture in the centre of each, glaze 
the edges with white of ep9C. fold over, pinch the edges together, 
put on a pan, and bake in the oven a light brown. Serve hot or 
cold, 

SCOTCH HAGGIS. 

Mrs. Hugh Campbell. 

Take a sheep's bag and pluck, wash the bag in cold water, 
scrape and clean it well ; let it lie all night with cold water and 
a little salt ; wash the pluck, put it into a pot of boiling water 
with 1 tablespoon salt, boil for 2 hours with the windpipe hanging 
out ; when cold, cut oft the windpipe, grate \ the liver, mince the 
heart and lights very small ; mince J pound suet and 4 small 
onions; add \ pound oatmeal toasted brown, \ teaspoon each 
pepper, salt and powdered herbs, and a cup of the water in which 
the pluck was boiled: mix well: fill the bag rather more than half 
full with the mixture, and sew it up : place in a pot of boiling 
water, and prick from time to time to keep it from bursting. Boil 
about 8 hours. 

^lany omit the heart as too tough, and the lights as too soft. 



MEATS. 89 

SEA PIE. 

Mrs. Maitland JNIurday. 

Cut 2 pounds steak in inch pieces, add a sliced onion, and 
several sliced potatoes, season with salt and pepper, cover with cold 
water and stew an hour or more; put a layer of pie paste made 
with finely minced suet inside the pan, having the water come up 
over the paste. Cover and cook ahout l-") minutes. 

A "double decker" is made by putting half the meat and 
vegetables on top the paste, and covering with a second crust, the 
water rising above this also. 

SHEPHERD'S PIE. 

Mrs. B. F. Martin. 

Half fill a baking dish with pieces of cold meat cut small and 
seasoned with salt and pepper. Pour over a gravy with a little 
Worcestershire sauce or catsup. Cover with a thick layer of 
mashed or finely chopped potato, glaze with melted butter, and 
bake until brown. 

SHROPSHIRE PIE. 

Line a dish with good puff paste ; chop together a rabbit and 
1 pound fat pork; season with salt and pepper; lav in the dish. 
Make some good forcemeat balls, and put in, adding a pinch 
of nutmeg and 1 pint white wine. Bakt- in a hot oven 1 hour. Serve 
hot or cold. 

ROAST SPARE-RIB. 

Mrs. Anise Holcomb. 

Trim off the rough ends neatly, crack the ribs across the 
middle, rub with salt and sprinkle with pepper, fold over, stuff with 
turkey dressing, sew up tightly, place in a dripping pan with 1 
pint hot water, and bake till a rich brown, basting frequently and 
turning over once to cook both sides equally. 

SPARE-RIBS WITH CABBAGE. 

Trim a medium cabbage, cut in quarters, put in a kettle with 1 
gallon hot water, 1 teaspoon salt and half as much pepper, cover 
and boil slowly 45 minutes. If the spareribs are salted, keep them 
in fresh water during this time. Add them to the kettle, cover 
and cook 45 minutes longer: then add several raw peeled potatoes, 
and cook till the potatoes are done. Drain the cabbage, put on a 
hot platter, lay the meat on top, and dress with the potatoes. If 
the cabbage is young it need not cook so long. 

Corned beef may be cooked in the same way, cooking it 1 hour 
before the cabbage is put in. Spinach may be used to garnish 
either, but should be cooked separately. 

SULZBECHER STEAK. 

Mrs. John C. Snee. 

Pepper and salt a Hamburg steak, and put in a dripping pan. 
Put an onion and a tomato throu.gh the chopper, mix it with 2 
tablespoons catsup and 1 tablespoon Worcestershire, and pour 
over the meat. Add small lumps of butter and bake 1 hour. 



90 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

SWEETBREADS. 

Throw calf's sweetbreads into cold water as soon as they come; 
soak 1 honr; trim free from fat, put in boiling water with 1 
teaspoon salt and boil 15 minutes ; remove skin and strings, and 
put in the icebox until used. They will keep 2 days after par- 
boiling. Cut with a silver knife. They may now be cooked in 
any way wanted. 

BROILED SWEETBREADS. 

Cut the sweetbreads in half crosswise, roll in butter, salt 
and pepper, and broil a few minutes on each side. Serve hot with 
melted butter, and garnish with parsley. 

CREAMED SWEETBREADS. 

Cut small with several finely chopped mushrooms, and cook 
a few minutes in a good cream sauce. Season well. They are 
also nice added with the mushrooms to a fresh Bechamel sauce. 
Canned mushrooms are always good with sweetbreads ; if fresh 
ones are used, take less. 

FRIED SWEETBREADS. 

Cut parboiled sweetbreads in nice sized pieces, dip in beaten 
egg, roll in breadcrumbs, and fry in boiling fat, or in a frying 
pan with a little butter. Serve with a cream sauce. 

SWISS STEAK. 

Mrs. John C. Snee. 

Take I'k pounds round steak cut two inches thick, lay on 
board, take a broad-hcadcd hammer and pound in a cup of flour, 
salt and pepper until pulped but not broken apart. I\Ielt some butter 
in a skillet and sear the meat on both sides. Then add 1 cup 
water, cover and bake in a slow oven 2 hours, turning 2 or 3 
times, adding water if necessary. Remove the steak to a heated 
platter, make a gravy adding 1 can of mushrooms to it, pour 
over the steak and serve immediately. 

BOILED TONGUE. 

Wash a smoked tongue and soak in cold water over night. 
Put in a kettle full of cold water, and cook over a slow fire several 
hours, till it can be pierced with a fork. Let get cold in the kettle. 
Skin and use hot. It may be garnished with parsley and black 
currant jelly. Sliced very thin when cold, it may be served 
plain or with sauce Tartare, and the dish prettily decorated. 

FILLETS OF TONGUE. 

Cut slices of cooked tongue, fry in butter and serve with 
mushroom sauce. 



MEATS. 91 

FRESH TONGUE. 

Wash well a medium sized beef tongue; brown a selection 
of soup vegetables and herbs, with a few whole spices and pepper- 
corns in a saucepan with a little butter; place the tongue in this, 
pour over it 1 quart hot water, | cup claret, 1 cup tomato sauce, 
and 1 cup strong broth. Season with 1 teaspoon salt, and J tea- 
spoon pepper. Cover and let come to a boil, then place in the 
oven for 2 hours, turning occasionally. Take up the tongue, skin, 
trim and keep hot. Reduce the sauce on top the stove to 1 pint, 
strain, add several sliced pickles, chopped mushrooms^, .chopped 
Spanish peppers and a little minced cooked ham, boil 5 minutes, 
skim, pour over the tongue and serve. 

TRIPE. 

It is usually bought cleaned. Put in a stew pan at once, cover 
with cold water, add 1 onion stuck full of cloves, 1 sprig parsley, 
and' 1 dozen peppercorns. Simmer gently for 6 hours. Then 
cook any way it is liked. 

BROILED TRIPE. 

Cut pieces of fresh well cleaned tripe into two-inch squares, 
roll in melted butter (or oil), pepper and salt, and broil 5 
minutes on each side. Serve on a hot plate. 

FRIED TRIPE. 

Cut into H inch squares, season, dip in fritter batter, or else 
in egg and then in breadcrumbs, and fry in l)oiling fat. Serve 
with sauce Tartare. 

STEWED TRIPE. 

Cut boiled tripe into small squares and proceed as for kidney 
stew'. 

R.AGOUT OF VEAL. 

Cut any pieces of cold roast veal into squares ; brown 2 table- 
spoons butter, rub in 2 tablespoons flour, add 1 pint stock. J- gill 
w'inc, and 1 pint meat, letting simmer ^ hour ; add J pint chopped 
mushrooms, the yolks of 3 hardboiled eggs mashed, and salt 
and pepper; cook 10 minutes longer. Take off, add J gill more 
wine, and serve. 

ROAST VEAL. 

Loin of veal is baked as beef, allowing 15 minutes to the 
pornd. It should be well done. Breast and shoulder may be 
stuffed as fowls, a little chopped salt pork proving an addition; 
then roast as the loin. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. Lewis Rush. 

Scald a cup of cream. Rub together 1 tablespoon flour with 3 
tablespoons butter and stir into the hot cream until smooth. Add 



92 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

1 pint of finely chopped cooked veal, 1 teaspoon salt, even \ 
teaspoon pepper, 1 teaspoon onion juice, and 2 well beaten eggs. 
Put the eggs in last after cooking a couple of minutes ; let cook 
up thick, stirring constantly. Set aside to get cold. Then shape 
into croquettes, dip first in beaten egg, roll in cracker crumbs, 
put in a frying basket, and fry in boiling fat until a light brown. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

Dust thin cutlets with salt, pepper and flour; fry in a pan with 
1 tablespoon hot dripping; brown both sides; take out on a hot 
dish, add 1 tablespoon flour to tlie pan, and when brown 1 cup hot 
water ; season when it boils and pour over tlie cutlets. 

VEAL CUTLETS BREADED. 

Cut into nice sized pieces, dip in egg, roll in breadcrumbs, and 
fry on both sides in a little dripping. Serve with brown gravy or 
with maitre d'hotel butter ; or with a good cream gravy as for 
fried chicken. 

VEAL LOAF, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Win. Ilarbaugh. 

Grind or chop 2 pounds raw veal with \ pound salt pork ; 
add 1 tablespoon salt, 1 teaspoon nepper, 4 tablespoons milk, 3 
tablespoons melted butter, 6 rolled crackers, and 2 well beaten 
eggs. Put in a roasting pan and bake in a good oven 1 hour. 
Put 1 cup cold water in the pan and use it to baste with. 

VEAL LOAE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Waldie. 

Chop 4 pounds veal fine; roll 15 crackers fine; mix with 4 
well beaten eggs, butter the size of an egg, 1 grated nutmeg, salt 
and pepper to taste, and 1 pint cold water. Make into 3 loaves ; 
sprinkle with flour, cut 1 onion in thin slices and lay on top the 
loaves. Fill pan half full of hot water, and bake 2 hours, basting 
often. 

VEAL LOAF, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Raymond Orndorf. 

Mix 2 pounds ground veal with 1 cup rolled crackers, 1 cup 
sweet milk, and 2 well beaten eggs. Add pepper and salt to taste. 
Make into a loaf and bake. 

VEAL PIE. 

Make by any of the recipes for meat pies, using a knuckle of 
veal. I pound of chopped ham is a good addition to a baked 
pie. It then becomes Silas Wegg's favorite "weal and hammer." 

VENISON STEAK. 

Roll the steaks in butter, salt and pepper, broil quickly about 
4 minutes on each side; serve on a hot platter with currant jelly 
at the side. 



FOWLS. 



ARROZ AAIARILLO (YELLOW RICE). 

"A Friend in Need." 

Cut up a chicken and fry in 2 tablespoons lard, then add i 
an onion sliced, cover and let brown on a slow fire about 20 min- 
utes. Add 1 cupful canned tomatoes, or fresh sliced tomatoes, 
let cook about 10 minutes, add 1 quart of boiling water, and when 
chicken is tender, 3 cups of rice. Let it cook slowly, adding water 
until the rice is thoroughly done. Salt to taste. 

BRUNSWICK STEW. 

I^frs. Ralph Wilson. 

1 chicken or 2 squirrels cut up small with k pound bacon, and 
stewed in 6 quarts water till tender ; take the meat off the bones 
and put back in the pot with more water, if necessary. Add 1 
pint each peeled and chopped potatoes and tomatoes, | pint grated 
corn, \ pint butter beans, i the juice and grated rind of a lemon. 
Stew till done, seasoning with butter, pepper and salt. 

BOILED CHICKEN. 

An older chicken may be used for boiling and stewing than 
for any other way. Prepare as for roasting, dredge with flour, 
put in a pot, cover with cold water, and let simmer 2 hours or less 
if done. Serve with egg sauce. Make soup of the water that 
is left. If liked, J cup of rice may be boiled withthe chicken. 

BROILED CHICKEN. 

Clean and dress a spring chicken, split it down the back, wipe 
inside and break the breast bone to make it flatter. Brush with 
oil or melted butter, and dust with salt and pepper ; put on a 
broiler inside down, cover and let broil slowly 45 minutes ; when 
nearly done, turn and broil the other side. Turn on a hot platter, 
baste with melted butter, season and garnish with parsley. 

BROWN FRICASSEE OF CHICKEN. 

Clean and dress the chicken, and cut it up. Put \ pound salt 
pork in a saucepan ; when browned add the chicken ; let every 
piece brown nicely, then stir in 2 tablespoons flour, and when 
brown 1 pint boiling water, and 1 teaspoon salt. Cover and let 
simmer till done. Take up neatly on a hot platter, add a little 
pepper and onion juice to the gravy, and pour over the chicker*. 
Garnish with parsley. 

93 



94 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CURRIED CHICKEN. 

1 teaspoon curry powder mixed with cold water may be added 
to the gravy of stewed, fried of fricasseed chicken. A Httle lemon 
juice should also be added. 

FRIED CHICKEN. 

Clean, dress and cut up the chicken ; roll in salt, pepper and 
flour, put 1 tablespoon each of lard and butter in a skillet ; when 
hot add the chicken, and fry slowly | hour or more till done. 
Take up on a hot platter. Pour ofif most of the fat from the 
pan, add 1 tablespoon flour, and when smooth 1 cup milk or cream, 
salt and pepper to taste ; stir well and pour over the chicken. 

JELLIED CHICKEN. 

Boil a chicken in a very little water till the meat leaves the 
bone ; pick off, chop fine, season with pepper and salt and put in 
a mould in alternate layers with thin slices of hard boiled eggs 
till nearly full ; boil down the liquor in the pot to ^ ; add \ ounce 
gelatin, and when dissolved, pour over the mould. Set in a cold 
place over night. 

Veal may be done in tlie same way, or chicken and veal may 
be mixed. 

ROAST CHICKEN. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Clean and singe a chicken not over a year old ; stuff with 
plain stuffing; fill the body, also the place from which the crop 
came, and sew them up ; cross the legs up under the skin and 
fasten with a small skewer to the rump ; turn the wings back and 
run a skewer through them and the body ; tie the skewers with 
twine ; put on its back in a dripping pan, rub with butter, cover 
the bottom of the pan with hot water, and bake in quick oven 
15 minutes to each pound, basting every 10 minutes. Let it brown 
before taking up. Take off the strings and skewers, and serve on 
a hot dish with giblet gravy in a boat. 

Cover the giblets in a saucepan with cold water, and let sim- 
mer while the chicken is baking : cut them fine. Put the dripping 
pan on top the stove, stir 1 tablespoon flour into the gravy ; when 
smooth and brown add 1 cup of the water in which the giblets 
were boiled, and, as soon as it boils, the giblets ; season to taste. 

SMOTHERED CHICKEN. 

Mrs. P. C. Clarke. 

Dress a year old chicken, and split it down the back. Cut 
the neck off close, cut off the first joints of the legs and wings. 
Put these with the giblets in the bottom of a dripping pan or 
roaster ; sprinkle them with salt. Lay the chicken flat in the pan 
with the breast up, rub the breast with butter, sprinkle a little 
flour, and dust with pepper and salt. Add ^ cup water to the 
pan, cover tightly and bake about H hours, or till done. If the 
chicken does not brown in the roaster, take off the lid when nearly 
done, and let brown. 



FOWLS. 95 

STEWED CHICKEN. 

Mrs. Thos. Ward. 

Cl«an, wash and cut up 1 chicken, put in a kettle with 1 quart 
boiling water, 1 handful rice, 1 sliced carrot, 1 sliced onion and 1 
medium sized sliced potato. Cover and stew \\ hours; wlien 
nearly done, season with salt, pepper and butter. If the chicken 
is old, stew longer. 

STEWED CHICKEN WITH DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. Isabel Hall Tedrow. 

Clean and dress the chicken and cut into small pieces ; stew 
until tender with a little salt in water enough to cover. iNIake a 
dough of 1 quart flour, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, I 
heaping tablespoon lard, 1 level teaspoon salt and milk enough 
so that it will not stick to the hands. Cut in squares, pour part 
of the chicken broth into a baking pan, lay in the dumplings and 
bake until a nice brown. Take up the chicken, lay it on the dump- 
lings on a hot platter, thicken and season the broth and milk 
enough to make a nice gravy, pour over the chicken and serve. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. G. B. Wilson. 

Chop a cold boiled chicken very fine, leaving out the skin and 
gristle. Rub 2 tablespoons butter with 2 of flour in a hot sauce- 
pan, and add very slowly 1 cup milk, stirring till thick ; take off, 
stir in the chicken and season with salt, pepper and a little nut- 
meg. A few drops of onion juice, a little celery salt, or finely 
chopped parsley may be added ; also chopped mushrooms or calf's 
brains. When cold, take a large tablespoon at a time, form with 
cracker crumbs into a roll, dip in beaten egg and roll in crumbs 
again, and fry in deep, hot fat or lard. 

Turkey and Sweetbread Croquettes are made in the same way. 

CHICKEN EN CASSEROLE. 

Boil 2 cups rice and season well with butter, cream, salt and 
pepper. Press into a buttered baking dish, and let get cold. Scoop 
out the centre of the rice, leaving it about 1 inch thick all around, 
fill with stewed chicken, and cover with the rice. Brush the top 
with beaten egg, and set in a hot oven about 15 minutes, or till 
brown. 

CHICKEN JELLY. 

Pound i a raw chicken with the bones and meat, cover with 
cold water, "and let simmer till the meat is rags: strain through 
a fine sieve, return to the fire, salt and pepper to taste, and sim- 
mer 5 minutes. Skim and let get cool. Good for garnishing. 

CHICKEN LIVERS. 

Clean the livers and fry about 10 minutes in a pan with butter, 
salt and pepper; dress on a dish with as many slices of freshly 
broiled bacon. 



96 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CHICKEN PATTIES. 

Cut the white meat of a chicken into small pieces. Let 2 
ounces of chopped lean ham simmer in a saucepan with ^ pint 
stock till the broth is reduced to half ; rub 1 spoon each of butter 
and flour in a saucepan, strain the stock into it; add ^ cup cream; 
when thick add the chicken; stir while keeping at the boiling point 
for 5 minutes, put in fresh patty cases, and serve garnished with 
parsley. If wanted cold, let get cool before filling the cases. A 
few canned mushrooms chopped, and 1 tablespoon sherry are a 
nice addition. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson. 

Dress a young chicken and cut in pieces. Place a few bony 
pieces in the bottom, cut 5 or 6 potatoes in several pieces each, 
put in the pan and over these the rest of the chicken. Add about 
1 pint water and parboil on top the stove. Then add butter, 
pepper and salt, cover with a rich pie crust made of cream and 
butter, and bake in tlie oven till the crust is done. Leave a vent 
in the middle and add more water if it boils away. 

CHICKEN POT PIE. 

Mrs. Hiram Campbell. 

Cut the chicken up and boil till tender, leaving the kettle 
half full of broth when done. Make a stifif dough of 1 pound 
flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 egg and a 
lump of lard or butter. Cut dough in strips, put a layer in the 
kettle, a layer of chicken on top, and repeat till the kettle is 
nearly full. Season to suit the taste, adding a lump of butter' the 
size of a walnut and celery seed, if desired. Cover and boil till 
the dumpling is done. 

CHICKEN SOUFFLE. 

Rub 1 tablespoon each of butter and flour in a hot saucepan ; 
stir in 1 pint milk till it boils ; add i cup stale bread crumbs, stir 
in well, take ofif, add 2 cups cold chopped chicken, 1 tablespoon 
chopped parslc}', ^ teaspoon salt, a little pepper, and 3 eggs beaten 
separately. Put in a greased baking dish, and bake in a hot oven 
20 minutes. Serve at once. 

ROAST DUCK. 

Dress, stufif and roast as a chicken, using plain or potato 
stuffing. Serve with giblet gravy and apple sauce, or currant 
jelly. If a duckling, it should not be stuffed, nor roasted as long. 

WILD DUCK. 

Dress as a chicken ; rub the breast witli an onion, and put a 
few raw cranberries inside to disguise the fishy odor. Put butter, 
salt and pepper inside, and bake as a chicken, but do not stuff. 
Serve with currant jelly. If stuffing is demanded, use potato 
stuffing. 



FOWLS. 97 

GIBLET PIE. 

Take the gizzards, livers, necks, legs and first joint of wings 
of several chickens, and stew in just enough water to cook tender. 
Line the sides of a deep disli with a rich pie crust; season the 
stew with pepper, salt and hutter, and pour into the dish ; cover 
with a crust, slit the top and bake. 

GERMAN POTTED GOOSE. 

Take off the excess fat from a nicely dressed goose, and boil 
till nearly tender in just water enough to cook it: season with salt 
and pepper and add 1 pint good cider vinegar ; boil till very tender ; 
then pack in a stone crock, leaving the bones in. It is sliced up 
cold. 

Turkey and chicken may be cooked the same way. 

ROAST GOOSE. 

Prepare the same as a chicken using potato or onion .stuffing. 
Place in a dripping pan, add 1 cup water and 1 teaspoon salt, and 
roast 1 hour in a cpiick oven, basting every 10 minutes ; then cool 
the oven and finish at a moderate heat. Allow 25 minutes to a 
pound for a goose; 15 minutes for a gosling. Serve with apple 
sauce. 

GOOSE STUFFED WITH SAUERKRAUT. 

Prepare tlic goose as for roasting, fill with sauerkraut, sew it 
up, put in a kettle, cover first with sauerkraut, then with boiling 
water, and sinmier -3 hours. Take up, put in a dripping pan, dredge 
with butter and flour, and bake about 1 hour or till brown. Take 
up the kraut on a hot platter, and place the goose on top to serve. 

GUINEA FOWLS. 
Fricassee or stew as chicken, or bake in a pot pie. 

PARTRIDGES A LA FRANCAISE. 

YsaguirrS and La Marca. 

Truss and skewer the partridges ; lay over their breasts a 
slice of lemon and a slice of fat bacon ; wrap in paper and tie 
tightly. Roast | hour ; when done, take off the papers, and serve 
cold with a sauce of orange juice. 

PILAU OF BIRDS. 

Boil ^ dozen small birds with 1 pound bacon in enough salted 
water to cover well. Take out when tender, put 2 pounds of rice 
into the water, and cook till done, keeping covered. Stir into it 

1 cup butter and_ salt to taste. Put a layer of rice in a deep dish, 
then the birds with bacon in the middle, next the liquor and cover 
with the rest of the rice. Smooth it and spread with the yolks of 

2 eggs. Cover with a plate and bake 20 minutes in a moderate 
oven. 



98 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

ROAST QUAIL. 

]-)ress the quail as a chicken. Put in a hot pan in a brisk oven„ 
lay .a strip of fat bacon over the breast, or a lump of butter, dust 
witlj salt, and roast 15 minutes or till done. Serve on a piece 
of hpt buttered toast, or a bread canape. 

Squab is r6asteci the same way, putting a little hot water 
ih the pan. 

QUAIL PIE. 

Mrs. Joseph Lanning. 

Boil 6 quails until tender and remove the hones. Line a; 
large pudding dish with a good pic paste, put in the quails with 
lumps of butter, and salt and pepper to taste. Put strips of paste 
across the pie, fill up with the broth the quails were boiled in,, 
put on a top crust and bake until a rich brown. 

Wild pigeons may be cooked the same way, and blackbirds. 
If the latter, use four and twenty if your oven will stand it. 

BROILED SQUAB OR QUAIL. 

Prepare as a chicken, split down the back, press flat, dip 
in melted butter and broil over a steady fire till done ; sprinkle with 
^alt, pepper and bits of butter, and serve on hot buttered toast. 

BOILED TURKEY. 

Prepare as a boiled chicken ; stuff with oyster dressing, or, 
not at all. Wrap in a floured cloth, put in a kettle of boiling water, 
add a little chopped onion and parsley browned in butter, and 
simmer 15 minutes to the pound, or till done. Serve with egg 
or bread sauce, or, if unstuffed, oyster sauce. Cranberries also 
should be served. 

ESCALLOPED TURKEY. 

Butter a deep baking dish, put into it diced cold chicken or 
turkey, add any left over stuffing, and a can of mushrooms or a 
dozen fresh buttons. Pour over it a good white sauce, cover with 
crumbs and bits of butter and bake. 

ROAST TURKEY. 

Clean, prepare and roast precisely as a chicken is roasted. 
Stuff with plain or any fancy dressing, and serve with cranberry 
sauce. 

TURKEY HASH. 

Rub H tablespoons flour v>ith 1 tablespoon butter in a hot- 
saucepan : add 1 pint half cream and half milk. Stir till it comes 
to the boil, then add left over pieces of turkey chopped fine. Sea- 
son with salt, pepper and a little nutmeg. Let simmer about 10 
minutes, and serve on slices of hot buttered toast. Chicken can 
be used the same way, and a sprinkling of chopped parsley is a 
good addition. A green pepper, scalded, seeded and chopped is 
good with it. The hash may be turned into a baking dish, grated 
cheese and butter sprinkled oyer, and baked, 



SAUCES FOR MEATS, FISH AND 
VEGETABLES. 



A.XCHOVY BUTTER. 

Add 1 tablespoon anchovy paste to f tablespoon bnttcr and 
tlie juice of \ lemon. Mix well and put in a cool place till wanted. 
Serve with broiled fisli. 

AXCHOVV SAUCE. 

Make 1 pint draAvn butter using broth or water; stir in 1 table- 
spoon anchovy paste or extract. 

APPLE SAUCE. 

Pare, core and slice tart apples ; put in a saucepan and cover 
the bottom of the pan with cold water ; cook and stir till soft ; rub 
through a sieve, sweeten to taste, add a little butter, turn out in a 
dish, and grate a little nutmeg on top. Serve hot with meats- 
otherwise cold. ' 

ASPIC JELLY. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

Two tablespoons each of carrots, celerv and onion- 2 sprigs 
parsley and thyme; 2 cloves; 1 sprig savory and 1 bav leaf- i 
teaspoon wdiole black pepper; put them in a saucepan w'ith i cup 
white wine: cook 8 minutes, and strain. Put 1 quart white stock 
in a saucepan ; add 1 box gelatin and the juice of 1 lemon - bring 
to a boil and add the strained liquor. Season with salt and pepper - 
add the frothy whites of 3 eggs, and 2 tablespoons wine stirring 
constantly till again at the boil. Let stand 30 minutes at the back 
of the range. Strain through a thin jelly bag into moulds. 

Aspic jelly is used for elaborate entrees w^here roast hirers 
or boned chickens, etc., are to be served in jelly, often fancifully 
garnished. Use white stock for vegetables or white meat ; brown 
stock for dark meat. 

BfiCHAMEL SAUCE. 

Rub 1 tablespoon each of flour and butter together in a sauce- 
pan until smooth ; stir in carefullx- \ cup cream and i cup stock or 
hot water and keep on stirring till it boils; take froni the fire and 
add i teaspoon salt, a pinch of pepper, and the well beaten yolk 
of 1 egg. Is good with eggs, chicken, white meats, fish, etc 

99 



100 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BREAD SAUCE. 

Put 1 large cup milk in a saucepan, stick 2 cloves in a small 
piece of onion, put it in the milk with a few peppercorns, and let 
the milk keep hot without boiling, 30 minutes. Take out onion, etc., 
stir in 3 oz. bread crumbs, let boil a few minutes, add 1 table- 
spoon cream, 1 teaspoon butter, salt to taste, and serve. 

BROWN BUTTER. 

Put 1 tablespoon butter ii^. a frying pan and toss over a brisk 
fire until brown without burning. Serve over boiled potatoes, Brus- 
sels sprouts, or any vegetable requiring a butter sauce, including 
plain boiled macaroni or noodles. 

CAPER SAUCE. 

Rub in a saucepan over the fire 1] talilcspnons butter with 2 
tablespoons flour: then add 1 pint mutton broth or white broth, 
season with salt and pepper and let cook down to half the quantity, 
stirring occasionally. Add 2 tablespoons capers, boiling 2 minutes 
more. Beat up the yolk of I egg with \ cup cream and stir into 
the sauce. Wlicn scalding hot, serve. Use with boiled mutton. 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Cut up very fine 4 branches of the white part of celery and 
boil 15 minutes with H cups cold water and J teaspoon salt. Make 
a cream sauce in a saucepan, using half the celery water instead of 
milk ; add salt, pepper and nutmeg to taste, and i cup good cream. 
Mix well, add the celery rubbed through a colander, simmer for 5 
minutes, and serve. Tt is used with fowl. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

Wash the cranberries, and put in a granite saucepan with 
cold water enough to be visible. Boil about 10 minutes till soft , 
rub through a colander, return to the saucepan with half the quan- 
tity of sugar, and heat slowly till the sugar is dissolved, and the 
fruit nearly at the boil. Serve cold with game or mutton. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Rub 1 tablespoon butter and 2 tablespoons .flour together in 
a hot saucepan. Pour in a scant half cup of hot milk and after 
a moment's boiling the same quantity of sweet cream. Seasbn to 
taste with salt and cayenne pepper, and, if liked, a very little 
grated nutmeg. Let simmer for several minutes and serve hot. 

CREAM TOMATO SAUCE. 

Heat the quantity of tomato sauce desired, add J cup cream, 
stir in rapidly and serve. 



SAUCES POR MEATS, FISH AND VEGETABLES. 101 

CUKKV SAUCE. 

Chop 1 niediuin onion and l)ro\vn it in a saucepan with 1 
tablespoon butter; add 1 tablespoon finely chopped lean ham, J a 
branch of celery and J^ a green pepper both chopped, 1 clove and. 
^ dozen black peppers. Mix thoroughly and cook 5 minutes. 
Season with h teaspoon salt, h tablespoon flour and 1 teaspoon 
curr}' powder. Mix well, and add 1 cup soup stock or boiling 
water. Simmer for 20 minutes stirring occasionally. Beat up the 
yolk of 1 egg with 1 tablespoon cream, add it and let get scalding 
hot. Strain anxi serve hot. 

CUCUMBER SAUCE. 

Peel and seed 2 large cucumbers, grate and drain ; add 1 
tablespoon fmel}' chopped red peppers ; mix with | pint mayonnaise 
dressing. 

Or, mix with i teaspoon pepper, I a grated onion, i teaspoon 
salt, and 1 teaspoon vinegar. On serving stir in 3 tablespoons rich 
cream whipped. 

DEVILLED BUTTER. 

^ tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon vinegar, 1 teaspoon Worcester- 
shire sauce, \ teaspoon salt, half as much cayenne pepper, i teaspoon 
ground mustard, and the yolk of 1 egg, thoroughly mixed together. 
L^sc with devilled crabs, lobsters, etc. 

DEVILLED SAUCE. 

Chop a small onion fine and brown in i tablespoon butter ; add 
^ teaspoon ground mustard, 1 teaspoon flour, 1 of salt, 1 of pow- 
dered sugar and 1 of Worcestershire sauce ; cayenne pepper to 
taste. Mix thoroughly and add four peeled, crushed and strained 
tomatoes or the same amount of canned tomatoes. Boil slowly 
about 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. When done, stir in 1 even 
teaspoon butter, and serve hot with broiled fish. 

DRAWN BUTTER. 

Rub 1 tablespoon flour with 2 tablespoons butter in a hot sauce- 
pan : stir in gradually 1 cup boiling water, and J teaspoon salt. 
When it begins to thicken, take up and use immediately. 

EGG SAUCE. 

Make J pint drawn butter, and add to it 2 or 3 chopped hard 
boiled eggs. Serve with boiled fish. 

GREEN BUTTER. 

1 spring onion, 2 sprays parsley, 1 branch fresh watercress 
all chopped fine, Ih saltspoons salt and h as much cayenne pepper, 
pounderl in a mortar or rubbed in a dish to a pulp. Add a small 
tablespoon butter and. pound again until well mixed. Strain 
through a sieve, and put in a cool place until wanted. 



102 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

I-TOLLANDAISE SAUCE. 

Beat the yolks of 3 eggs with -} teaspoon salt, a dash of paprika, 
2 tablespoons butter, and half a cup hot water. Set the dish over 
hot water, and cook, stirring continuously and adding butter grad- 
ually until half a cup has been used. When the sauce thickens, 
remove from the fire, stir in the juice of half a lemon, and serve 
immediately. 

HORSE RADISH SAUCE. 

Mrs. B. F. Martin. 

] cup grated horse radish, J teaspoon mixed mustard, pepper 
and salt to taste. ]\Iix together with h cup cream, plain or 
whipped. 

HORSE RADISH SAUCE (HOT). 

Rub 1 tablespoon each of flour and butter into 1 cup boiling 
milk, add h teaspoon salt and boil for 10 minutes. Mix in 3 
tablespoons freshly grated horse radish, and boil 1 minute longer. 

ITALIAN SAUCE. 

Brown a finelv chopped onion in butter in a saucepan, stir in 1 
teaspoon flour; add i^ cup strong soup or broth, J cup tomato 
sauce and a wineglass white wine; add salt and pepper to taste, 
and a very little nutmeg, i teaspoon chopped parsley and, if at 
hand, a dozen chopped mushrooms. Mix well and cook until only 
half the quantity. Serve with baked fish. 

LYONNAISE SAUCE. 

Brown a finely sliced Spanish onion in a saucepan with 1 
tablespoon melted butter, then add 1 cup tomato sauce and J cup 
strong broth or left over soup. Add the juice of | lemon, \ tea- 
spoon salt, half as much cayenne pepper, and J teaspoon chopped 
parsley; mix well, boil for 12 minutes and serve. Nice with 
hashed meat on toast. 

MATTRE D'HOTEL BUTTER. 

Mix on a cold soup plate, 3 ounce butter, \ teaspoon chopped 
parsley, \ teaspoon chopped chervil, h teaspoon lemon juice, 1 salt- 
spoon salt and h saltspoon pepper. Keep in a cool place till 
wanted. 

MINT JELLY, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Frank Connell. 

Tear (> large stalks of mint, pour over them 1 pint boiling 
water, and let stand on the back of the stove for 15 minutes. 
Strain, extracting all the juice, and return to the stove adding IJ 
envelopes of powdered gelatin, 1 small cup sugar, and the juice of 
a lemon. Strain and mould. 



SAUCES FOR MEATS, FISH AND VEGETABLES. lO'S 
MINT JELLY, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Frank Connell. 

Wash 3 quarts grapes fully grown but still perfectly green. 
Put tbcm over the fire with 3 pints boiling water and cook 15 
minutes, breaking and mashing with a wooden spoon. Turn into a 
jelly bag and strain. Measure the juice and return to the kettle 
with 3 sprigs of freshly bruised spearmint. Cook 20 minutes, skim, 
remove mint, and for each cup of juice, add a scant cup of hot 
sugar. Stir until it boils up, and turn into glasses. A little green 
vegetable coloring should be added, or a few drops of extract 
of mint. 

Apples may be used instead of the grapes, witli a little lemon 
juice. 

MINT SAUCE. 

Mrs. Carrie Shuttlewortli. 

Chop fine 1 cup mint, and add to it 2 cups vinegar and 1 table- 
spoon sugar. Mix and let stand J hour. Serve with roast Iamb. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE, NO. 1. 

Chop very fine 1 dozen canned button mushrooms. Boil for a 
few minutes with 1 wineglass sherry, add ^ cup good stock, boil 5 
minutes longer and serve hot with meats. 

MUSHROOM SAUCE, NO. 2. 

Peel and wash 12 fresh mushrooms, chop fine, put in a sauce 
pan with 1 tablespoon butter and the juice of ^ lemon, and cook for 
5 or 6 minutes stirring occasionally. Stir in 1 tablespoon flour ; 
then add | cup mixed cream and milk, ^ teaspoon salt, J teaspoon 
cayenne pepper; mix and let boil for 6 minutes. Add H table- 
spoons sherry, and serve hot. Used with croquettes, etc. 

MUSTARD DRESSING. 

Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a double boiler, add 1 teaspoon 
French mustard, the juice of 1 lemon, salt and pepper to taste, 2 
tablespoons cream, and the beaten yolks of 3 raw eggs. Beat smooth 
and heat until thick. 

OKRA SAUCE. 

Take equal quantities of ripe tomatoes and young okras ; skin 
the tomatoes, chop the okras with 1 onion, and stew all together 
till tender; season with salt, pepper and I tablespoon butter. Serve 
with cold meat. 

ONION SAUCE. 

Boil 1 cup milk; season to taste; add 1 small lump butter, 1 
tablespoon flour mixed with a little cold milk, and ■) onions boiled 
and chopped line. 



104 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

ORANGE SAUCE. 

Add the grated rind of 2 oranges to 6 tablespoons currant 
jelly and 1^ tablespoons white sugar. Beat for 5 minutes. Add 
the juice of oranges and 1 lemon, mix well together and strain. 
2 tablespoons port or sherry improve the sauce. Serve with roast 
fowl. 

OYSTER SAUCE. 

Rub 1 tablespoon each butter and flour in a hot saucepan, ad- 
ding 1 cup milk and stirring till smooth ; season with salt and 
pepper, add 1 pint oysters cliopped and boiled in their own liquor 
5 minutes ; bring all to the boil. 

PAPRIKA SAUCE. 

Rub together 1 tablespoon each of butter and flour, put the 
saucepan over the tire while rubbing, add a scant | cup cream 
and milk mixed, half a teaspoon each of salt and paprika, and a 
little grated nutmeg : stir briskly until it has boiled several minutes, 
take up and serve hot. Used with shell fish. 

PARSLEY SAUCE. 

Boil 3 pieces fresh parsley for 5 minutes in f cup milk, strain 
and add to 1 tablespoon butter well rubbed into 1^^ tablespoons 
flour. Beat up an egg yolk with 1 tablespoon cream and 1 tea- 
spoon vinegar, add salt and pepper to taste and ^ teaspoon freshly 
chopped parsley, stir into the sauce when it reaches the boil, sti" 
hard for a minute or two, and pour into a sauce bowl for im 
mediate use. 

PIQUANTE SAUCE. 

Chop separately 6 shallots or small onions, and 6 sharp 
gherkins ; mix with 1 tablespoon capers. Put in a saucepan with h 
cup white vinegar, some thyme, a bay leaf, and a pinch of pepper. 
Simmer till the vinegar is reduced to J. Add 1- cup white stock, 
boil a few minutes, skim, take out the thyme and bay leaf, and 
serve in a gravy boat. 

POLISH CRUMBS. 

Put 2 tablespoons butter in a hot frying pan. Add 2 or 3 
tablespoons fresh breadcrumbs, and toss till a golden brown. 
Sprinkle over any vegetable dressed with a cream sauce. 

PURfiE OF CHESTNUTS. 

Plunge 3 dozen Italian chestnuts slit on one side into boiling 
water for 10 minutes, drain and peel. Put in a saucepan with \\ 
cups cold water ; season with salt and pepper ; cover, bring to the 
boil, and cook in the oven 35 minutes. Turn into a mortar and 
pomid to a smooth paste, press through a sieve, add 1 saltspoon 
grated nutmeg, i oimce butter, and 2 tablespoons cream, and serve 
Vihen hot. 



SAUCES FOR MEATS, FISH AKD J'EGETABLES. 105 

SAUCE RORERT. 

Brown a medium sized sliced onion in a saucepan with I 
tablespoon butter ; rub in 1 tablespoon flour. Add 1 cup rich broth 
or left over soup, 8 little pickles finely chopped, 1 teaspoon French 
nnistard, and ^ saltspoon cayenne pepper. Add 2 tablespoons 
vinegar, and, if at hand, 1 tablespoon chopped capers. Let boil 
slowly stirring occasionally. Serve with boiled beef. 

SAUCE SUPREME. 

Clean the meat from the bones of a raw freshly dressed 
chicken ; put in a saucepan with a sliced onion, 1 branch parsley, 
1 of celery, i teaspoon salt, half as much pepper, and i as much 
nutmeg, if liked. J cup white wine, and a little leek and chervil 
are good additions, if at hand. Let simmer f hour, skimming oc- 
casionally. Melt in a sauce pan 1 tablespoon butter with 1| 
tablespoons flour, strain ^ the broth into the saucepan, and boil 
down to half the quantity, stirring occasionally. Beat up J cup 
cream with the yolk of 1 egg, stir into the sauce ; when scalding 
hot remove from the fire, strain through a cheesecloth and serve. 
Good with croquettes of any white meat. 

SAUCE TARTARE. 

Chop very fine and mix 3 small pickles, ^ teaspoon parsley, 
1 teaspoon capers, i teaspoon tarragon vinegar, and a few drops 
onion juice. Chopped olives may take the place of capers. Add 
to f cup good mayonnaise, and keep cold until served. Use with 
fried fish. 

SHRIMP SAUCE. 

Add shrimps cut rather coarsely to a good cream or Bechamel 
Sauce. 

SWEET PEPPER BUTTER. 

Pound 4 Spanish sweet peppers to a pulp, press through a 
sieve, add ^ ounce good butter, mix and use with broiled fish. 

TABLE MUSTARD. 

Mrs. George Ewing. 

Take 1 tablespoon dry mustard, add 2 of flour. 2 of brown 
sugar, 1 of butter and 5 teacup boiling vinegar with a pinch of 
salt. Sift the flour and mustard together, add the other ingredients 
and stir in the vinegar until a smooth paste. 

TARRAGON SAUCE. 

Use tarragon vinegar instead of ordinary vinegar in making 
a mayonnaise dressing, and when finished add i teaspoon chopped 
tarragon leaves if they arc obtainable. 



10b OLD COUXTRV RECIPES AMD NEW. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

Add 1 small chopped onion, 1 branch chopped parsley and i 
branch chopped celery to 1 pint stewed tomatoes, with 1 bay leaf 
•and 1 blade mace. Simmer slowly for 10 minutes. Rub to- 
P'ether until smooth 1 tablespoon each of butter and flour in a 
hot saucepan ; strain the sauce into the pan through a sieve, 
st^ir constantly until it boils, and add pepper and salt to taste. 
Any kind of chopped raw meat may be added if wanted stronger. 
It keeps well sealed, and it saves time to put up a few bottles, 
of the sauce when canning tomatoes in the fall. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

Melt .] cup butter in a hot saucepan, rub in well \\ tablespoons 
tlorr, then 1 pint milk, stirring constantly till it boils. Several 
tablespoons of finely chopped cauliflower make a nice addition 
in some cases. Season with salt and white pepper. 

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE. 

"Glasgow Exchange." 

Boil 2 drachms mace, 2 ounces cayenne pods, and 1 quart malt 
vinegar 15 minutes, put in a jar. and add 4 ounces shallots and 1 
ounce garlic sliced. Let stand 14 days, strain and add 6 ounces 
Indian soy. Bottle and seal. 



VEGETABLES. 



FRENCH ARTICHOKES. 

Scrape the artichokes and drop in water to prevent discoloring. 
Chop fine. Cover with water and boil nntil tender ; drain ; 
nearly cover with milk ; season with butter, salt and pepper. Cook 
a few moments. 

JERUSALEAI ARTICHOKES. 

Peel and wash the artichokes well. Plunge them in boiling 
salted water and boil 15 minutes. Drain, and put in a skillet with 
1 tablespoon melted butter. Season with salt and pepper, and cook 
till brown, turning them occasionally. Sprinkle a little chopped 
parsley over them, toss a little and take up. 

ASPARAGUS. 

Scrape and cut off the ends of fresh asparagus, wash well, tic 
in bunches, and plunge in 3 quarts boiling water with I table- 
spoon salt. Cover and boil 25 minutes, or until done. Take up 
and drain, and dress on a dish with a folded napkin, with a good 
cream sauce served separately. Or prepare several slices of fresh 
buttered toast, lay the asparagus on these and cover with a cream 
sauce, or drawn butter made with the asparagus water instead 
of fresh water. 

ASPARAGUS PUDDING. 

Boil the green tops of 2 bunches asparagus till tender ; cut 
in small pieces. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a .saucepan, add 4 well 
beaten eggs, pepper and salt to taste, and 1 cup milk ; beat all to- 
gether adding very gradually 4 tablespoons flour ; cook till smooth ; 
add the asparagus, turn into a buttered mould, cover, put in a 
kettle of boiling water, and boil 2 hours. Serve in a pudding dish 
with a cup drawn butter poured around it. 

BAKED BEANS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. C. A. Judson. 

Soak the beans over night. In the morning, parboil, changing 
the water a couple of times. Put in an iron skillet, season with 
pepper and salt; put several thin slices of good bacon on top, 
then another layer of beans and of bacon, sprinkling U table- 
spoons brown sugar through the dish. Bake in the oven about 2 
hours. Half a small bottle tomato catsup poured over the beans 
before baking is an addition relished by many. 

1U7 



108 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BAKED BEANS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. John Davis. 

Soak 2^ cups soup beans over night. Next morning drain, 
and boil slowly 20 minutes. Drain again and put into a baking 
pan or pot with 1 small onion sliced, 1 tablespoon sugar, 1 quart 
cooked tomatoes, and 1 large piece of pork. Season with salt and 
pepper to taste. Bake 3 hours. 

BAKED BEANS, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Emzi Davidson. 

Soak 1 quart beans over night ; in the morning parboil until 
the skin is broken ; set the pan in the oven, salt to taste, put in 
J pound salt or fresh pork, 1 tablespoon ground mustard dis- 
solved in a little water, and 2 tablespoons molasses. Put 1 large 
onion on top, and bake 2 hours. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Mrs. Ellis Koon. 

Boil 1 quart beans till almost tender ; drain, put in a covered 
baking dish a layer of beans, then a layer breakfast bacon. 
cut small, and repeat till full ; sprinkle with pepper and salt, add 
a lump of butter the size of an egg, and a small cup dark brown 
sugar. Cover well with water, and bake several hours in a mod- 
erate oven, replenishiing the water as necessary. Remove the 
cover the last hour to brown. 

DRIED BEANS. 

Soak 1 pint shelled beans of any variety over night in warm 
water ; drain and soak again in f resJi warm water. Boil 2 hours 
in soft water, changing the water at least once, and salting the 
second time ; drain and dress as fresh beans. 

LIMA OR BUTTER BEANS. 

Shell the beans, cover with boiling water, and boil 30 minutes, 
or till done ; drain, add pepper, salt and butter, and \ cup boiling 
milk or cream, if liked. 

STRING BEANS, NO. 1. 

String the beans and break into short lengths ; let soak in cold 
water \ hour ; cover with boiling water, and boil at least 1 hour ; 
drain, add salt, pepper and butter to taste. Or put in a hot skillet 
with a little bacon, season and fry a few minutes. Or heat again 
in a cream sauce. 

STRING BEANS, NO. 2. 

Slice several small onions and brown in butter ; add 1 table- 
spoon flour and a little meat broth or stock ; season with salt and 
pepper, and when boiling stir in some string beans previously 
boiled and diced. Cook about 10 minutes. 



VEGETABLES. 109 

BEETS. 

Wash but do not scrape or peel ; cover with boiHng soft water, 
and cook from 1 to 4 hours according to age ; when tender throw 
into cold water, rub ofif the skins, slice, season with salt, pepper 
and melted butter, and serve. 

NEW ENGLAND BEETS. 

"Buckeye Cook Book." 

Boil and skin joung, tender beets, mash together with hot 
boiled potatoes, and season with salt; add a large lump of butter. 
Put in a hot covered dish with a big lump of butter on top, 
sprinkle with pepper and serve at once. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Pick oft' all the dead leaves from the sprouts. Wash well, 
changing the water until clean. Put into boiling water with 1 
teaspoon salt and boil about 2n minutes. Drain and serve in a 
covered dish with drawn butter. May also be returned from the 
drainer to a hot saucepan with a little melted butter, salt and 
pepper, and tossed until thoroughly hot. They are good also with 
brown butter. 

CRE.\MED CABBAGE. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Chop the cabbage fine, and stew till tender. Drain, season 
with butter, pepper and salt, and ^ cup rich milk or cream. Let 
simmer a few minutes before serving. 

FRIED CABBAGE. 

Slice or chop the cabbage fine ; put in a frying pan with a 
very little water, cover closely and let steam till tender ; season 
with salt and pepper, put in a little pork dripping and fry brown. 

Kraut may be fried in the same way. 

STEWED CABBAGE. 

Mrs. John Johnson. 

Cut the cabbage up fine and boil until tender in salted water. 
Drain through a colander. To a quart of cabbage allow 1 table- 
spoon butter, and pepper to suit taste. Put back on the fire and 
stew o minutes, stirring constantly. 

CARROTS. 

Scrape and wash 2 dozen very small spring carrots. Place 
m a saucepan with 1 tablespoon butter, J teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon 
sugar, and half as much pepper; add nearly 1 pint water, cover 
and leave over the fire a few minutes, then put in the oven for 
45 minutes. Drain and use as a garnish for beef. 



110 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CREAMED CARROTS. 

Scrape and wash 12 small carrots, cut into slices \ inch thick, 
put in a saucepan with i tahlespoon butter and k pint white broth. 
Season with salt, pepper, parsley and a very Tittle sugar. Mix, 
cover the pan and boil 10 minutes, then set in the oven for 30 
minutes. Turn into a vegetable dish and serve. 

GLAZED CARROTS. 

Wash and scrape 6 large carrots, parboil in salted water ; 
drain well and put in a saucepan with 1 pint stock, and a large 
lump of sugar; boil over a brisk tire till reduced to a glaze; add 
2 tablespoons butter and a sprinkling of salt. Shake till the butter 
is well mixed. The carrots should take up all the sauce in the pan. 

BOILED CAULIFLOWER. 

Cut the stem off close to the head, take off all the leaves, and 
cut out any spots ; wash well and soak upside down in cold water 
1 hour. Tie in a piece of cheesecloth, put right side up in a kettle 
of boiling salted water, cover and boil 30 to 45 minutes, or till 
tender. When done, take off the cloth, drain, put in a hot vege- 
table dish, pour over it a cream sauce, and serve. Broccoli is 
boiled in the same way. 

ESCALLOPED CAULIFLOWER. 

Mrs. John Whitmer. 

Boil the cauliflower whole, and place in a deep buttered bak- 
ing dish with the stem down. Make a sauce with 1 cup bread 
crumbs beaten to a froth with 2 tablespoons melted butter and 3 
of cream or milk, 1 well beaten egg, salt and pepper to taste. 
Pour this over the cauliflower, cover tight and bake 6 minutes in 
a quick oven, browning it nicely. 

FRIED CAULIFLOWER. 

Clean a cauliflower, break into its separate florets, and let 
cook in cold water 1 hour. Drain, cover with boiling water, and 
stew until tender. Drain and cool. Sprinkle with fine cracker 
crumbs, dip in egg beaten up with a tablespoon hot water, then 
in crumbs again, and fry brown in deep, hot fat. Garnish with 
parsley. Or cook 5 minutes in a frying pan with a little butter, 
without the egg and crumbs. 

CAULIFLOWER AU GRATIN. 

Drain a freshly boiled cauliflower, and separate the florets ; 
add to a boiling cream sauce with 1 tablespoon grated cheecc, 
pour into a baking di'sh, sprinkle with a little more cheese, and 
bake 15 minutes. 



VEGETABLES. Ill 

STF:^VED Cl'XERY. 

Cut the outside pieces of celerv into small pieces. Boil until 
tender witli a little salt. Drain well. Make a good cream sauce, 
stir the celery in well, season to taste and serve hot. The roots 
also may be scraped, cut up, and stewed. 

CELERY CROQUETTES. 

Chop the white part of celery and add an equal amount of 
bread crumbs: to a quart of this mixture add the beaten yolks 
of 2 eggs, and if needed a little milk; season with salt and cayenne 
pepper ; form and fry as other cro'iuettes. 

BOILED CORN. 

Clean the corn, removing every thread of silk; put in a kettle 
of boiling water, and boil rapidly I'l minutes. Serve on a plate 
covered with a napkin. If liked, it may be boiled in the inner 
husks. 

DRIED CORN. 

Cover with warm water and let soak over night. In the morn- 
ing add more water if necessary, and boil slowly 2 or more hours; 
dress with salt, pepper, butter and cream. 

ESCALLOPED CORN. 

Mrs. Vernon Webb. 

Butter a baking dish. Put in a layer of cracker crumbs and 
then a layer of corn ; season with salt, pepper, a little sugar and 
bits of butter : then another layer of crumbs and lastly corn with 
its seasoning. Fill the dish with milk and bake about | hour. 

FRIED CORN. 

Boil several ears of corn in salted water with a little milk for 
1-") minutes. Drain, run a knife between the rows, press out the 
grains with the back of the blade ; have 1 tablespoon butter melted 
in a hot saucepan, add the corn, and fry 10 minutes, tossing fre- 
ouentlv. Season with salt and pepper, and serve in a hot covered 
di'^h. 

ROAST CORN. 

Husk and clean the ears of corn, plunge in boiling salted 
wpter and boil 15 minutes. Drain ; put in a pan, baste with a little 
melted butter, and set in a hot oven until a good brown, turning 
occasionally. Serve on a hot dish in a napkin. 

STEWED CORN, NO. 1. 

Split and cut the corn from four good sized ears; add hve 
tablespoons good cream, 1 tablespoon butter. | teaspoon salt, and 
bake in a moderate oven f of ah hour, stirring frequently. Season 
with salt and pepper to taste, and turn into a covered dish to 
serve. 



112 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

STEWED CORN, NO. 2. 

Take canned corn, or corn cut from cold boiled cobs, add cream, 
butter, salt and pepper, and cook 5 minutes. 

CORN FRITTERS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. John Terry. 

Mix well together 1 can corn, 2 well beaten eggs, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 12 finely rolled crackers, 1 cup of flour sifted with 1 teaspoon 
baking powder, salt, butter, and pepper to taste. Drop by table- 
spoons into hot skillet and fry brown in butter or lard. 

CORN FRITTERS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Florence Humphrey. 

Take 4 dozen ears of corn, clean them and grate off all the 
corn ; add 3 well beaten eggs, \ cup sweet milk, \ cup flour, 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder, and salt to taste. Drop by tablespoons into 
boiling fat, and fry a nice brown. Serve hot. 

CORN OYSTERS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. C. F. Frasure. 

Beat 3 eggs till light ; add 7 rolled crackers, salt and butter to 
taste, and 1 can corn; drop by spoonfuls into a hot skillet with a 
little butter ; serve hot. 

CORN OYSTERS, NO. 2. 

Cut and scrape or grate the corn from the cob ; make a batter 
of 2 eggs, well beaten, 2 tablespoons tlour, salt, pepper, \ pint milk, 
and 1 pint corn. Beat all together, and drop by spoonfuls into a 
skillet with hot butter or lard in. Fry brown. 

CORN PIE. 
Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

1 quart of tender green corn split and scraped from the cobs : 
season with salt and pepper to taste, and add 1 heaping tablespoon 
butter. Have ready a nicely stewed chicken ; put a layer of corn 
is a baking dish, then a layer of chicken, repeating this until it 
has all been used, having the corn last. Pour over it the chicken 
gravy and 1 cup sweet cream. Bake in a moderate oven. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Take about eight ears young, fresh corn ; cut the length of 
the cob through the grains and scrape out all the pulp ; add 1 
pint milk, 2 well beaten eggs, and- some salt. Beat all together 
well. Grease a pudding dish, and pour the mixture in, adding 
small lumps of butter. Bake in a slow oven about 1 hour. 



VEGETABLES. 113 

CORN SALAD. 

Corn salad may be cooked and served as spinach, or, fresh, 
as a salad. 

FRIED CUCUMBERS, NO. 1. 

Peel, slice lengthwise, dip in beaten egg and then in cracker 
crumbs, bread crumbs, corn meal or flour, and fry in hot butter 
or lard. 

FRIED CUCUMBERS, NO. 2. 

Melt H tablespoons butter in a frying pan. Add 1 sliced white 
onion and. when beginning to brown, 2 large peeled and sliced 
fresh cucumbers. Season with ^ teaspoon salt, and half as much 
pepper; toss while cooking for 5 minutes; add 1 tablespoon vinegar, 
and 1 teaspoon chopped parsley, tossing for ^ minute. Serve on 
a hot dish. 

DIXIE. 

Mix 1 cup cold boiled hominy, 1 cup milk, 1 well beaten egg, 
butter the size of an egg, and a little salt. Put in a deep dish 
and bake 30 minutes. 

FRIED EGG-PLANT. 

Pare the egg-plant and cut in very thin slices, dust with salt 
and pepper, dredge with flour, or dip in egg and then in cracker 
crumbs, and fry both sides till brown in dripping. Drain on 
brown paper and serve hot. 

STUFFED EGG-PLANT. 

Boil *ill tender f about 30 minutes), cut in h.'df, scoop out the 
meat, mash with butter, pepper and salt, and put back in the ."^ins ; 
sprinkle the tops with bread crumbs, and brown in the oven. 

GREENS. 

IMany young plants in early spring may be picked in lawns 
and pastures and cooked like spinach, making wholesome and 
delicious greens. Dandelions are among the earliest. Cut ofT the 
stems, flower stalks and dead leaves, wash the green leaves through 
several waters, and boil several hours, changing the water at least 
once, and salting the last water. Drain, season with butter, pepper 
and salt, and serve ; or fry several minutes with a few slices of 
bacon in a skillet. The long leaves of the curly or narrow dock 
will cook in much less time, and. reduce the bitterness of the 
dandelion. The young shoots of poke come next. They should 
be gathered when just appearing above the ground; after 4 inches 
they are unwholesome, though the tops may be used when some- 
what larger. These should cook within an hour, changing the 
water several times. Serve as greens, or on toast as asparagus 



114 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

with a cream sauce. Later the _voung shoots of wild mustard and 
cress appear in the garden and lamb's quarter which, however, 
must be carefully watched for insects, the sprouts from old tur- 
nips, the leaves of fresh radishes, and young beets with their 
roots. If the greens are mixed, allow at least 2 hours of hard 
boiling in salted water, and serve as you like spinach. A piece of 
salt pork may be boiled witFi dandelions or beets. 

HOMINY. 

Soak 1 quart of large hominy over night, put over the fire in 
a double boiler, cover with cold water and let boil 5 hours. Do 
not stir. If the water boils off before it is done, add more boiling 
water. Boil or steam perfectly dry, and salt as it is dished up. 

KALE. 
Kale is cooked and served the same as spinach. 

KOHL RABI. 

This resembles the turnip and is very nice when the heails 
are not too large. Pare, cut in slices crosswise, and wash. Pour 
boiling water over it and cook an hour or more till tender. Drain, 
heat in a saucepan and mash fine ; season with pepper, salt and 
butter. 

Or dice instead of slicing, and serve with a cream sauce. 

Or dice, and when cooked tender, put in a frying pan with 1 
tablespoon butter and as much sugar; stir till a delicate brown; salt 
and pepper to taste. 

Or dice, and when tender, put into a baking dish with a cream 
sauce, sprinkle with bread crumbs and bake. 

LENTILS. 

Wash and soak the lentils over night; boil like dandelions, 
changing the water ; drain when tender, and cook a few minutes in 
a frying pan with butter, salt and pepper. 

Rice may be boiled separately and fried in the pan with the 
lentils and a browned sliced onion. 

WILTED LETTUCE. 

Put' several slices of bacon in a hot skillet, fry 2 minutes, 
add 2 tablespoons vinegar, salt and pepper to taste ; put the washed 
and dried lettuce leaves into this, and stir till wilted. An egg and 
either sweet or sour cream may be added to this sauce before 
putting in the lettuce, if desired. Dandelions and endive may be 
wilted in the same way. 

MACARONI. 

Boil 8 quarts water in a saucepan with ^ tablespoon salt. Drop 
in ^ pound macaroni, and boil 30 minutes, or until white and tender. 
Do not cook too long or it will become pasty; and do not stir. 



VEGETABLES. 1]5 

Turn into a colander and drain. Put back into tlie saucepan, add 
1 tablespoon butter, salt and pepper to taste, and heat tlirough. 
Serve in a hot covered dish. A couple of tablespoons of grated 
cheese, either American, Swiss or Parmesan, or mixed, may be 
stirred through before serving, or a good cream sauce may be 
prepared and the drained macaroni put in this to heat through. 
Here again the grated cheese may be added. Thick stewed toma- 
toes may be placed in the dish around the plain macaroni, or a 
regular tomato sauce around or mixed through the more elaborate 
dishes. Polish crumbs sprinkled on top are a good addition. Olive 
oil may always be used in place of butter. 

BAKED MACAROXT. 

Mrs. John Sweeney. 

Boil macaroni as directed. Place it in a baking disli in alter- 
nate layers with grated or crumbled cheese, bits of butter, and a 
little pepper and salt. Fill to the top of the macaroni with sweet 
milk; place in the oven and bake about 45 minutes. 

MACARONI AlILANAISE. 

Boil l package macaroni in salted water until tender. Drain. 
Cook 1 can tomatoes 20 minutes with 1 bay leaf, 1 slice onion, 1 
blade mace, 1 stalk celery, ."1 cloves and a pinch of soda. Season 
with salt and pepper. Melt 1 tal)lespoon butter and mix with 1 cup 
bread crumbs and h cup grated cheese. Butter a baking dish, 
put in a layer of macaroni, then a layer of tomato sauce, dot with 
bits of butter, add a layer of brea.d crumbs and cheese, and repeat, 
finishing with the bread crumbs. Bake in a moderate oven. 

MACARONI WITH TOMATOES AND PEPPERS. 

Mrs. Wm. Call. 

Boil h pound macaroni in salted water until done, put into a 
baking dish, add 1 can tomatoes, a pinch of soda, h cup milk and 1 
large .green pepper chopped tine: season with salt and pepper, 
dot it with 2 tablespoons butter in small bits, and bake in slow 
oven J hour. 

BAKED MUSHROOMS. 

Place large firm mushrooms in a buttered baking dish, put 
a small piece of butter on each, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and 
set in a very hot oven to bake. Serve with a little melted butter 
on hot toast. Or, bake on thin slices of bread. Maitre d'hotel 
sauce is served with this. 

BROILED MUSHROOMS. 

Place large mushrooms on a broiling iron, set over the fire, 
and turn. Season with pepper and salt, take up on a heated dish, 
spread with butter and squeeze over them the juice of a lemon. 
Serve on thin squares of hot toast. 



116 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

DEVILLED AlUSHROOMS. 

Peel a quart of mushrooms, break iu pieces, season with salt, 
pepper, and lemon juice. Mash the yolks of 3 hardboiled eggs; 
mix with the raw yolks of 2 eggs, a pint of stale bread crumbs, 
and an ounce of butter. Fill small shells with the mixture, and 
cover the tops with grated bread crumbs and bits of butter. Set 
in the oven to brown. 

FRICASSEE OF MUSHROOMS. 

Put firm peeled mushrooms into boiling water, take out im- 
mediately, drop into ice water, drain and wipe dry. Lay them in a 
saucepan with a large tablespoon melted butter, set over the fire 
and turn. Sprinkle in an ounce of flour, white pepper, salt and 
a little minced thyme and parsley. Pour in a pint of stock and 
let simmer 20 minutes. Break hot biscuits in half, lay on a heated 
dish, lay the mushrooms carefully on them, strain the gravy adding 
to it the beaten yolks of three eggs and the juice of a lemon. 
Pour over the mushrooms, and serve immediately. 

FRIED MUSHROOMS. 

Roll larg£ mushrooms in cracker crumbs, then in beaten egg, 
and again in cracker crumbs ; dredge with salt and pepper, and 
fry in boiling hot butter. 

STEWED A4USHR00MS. 

Rub 1 tablespoon butter with h tablespoon flour in a hot sauce- 
pan, add 1 pint fresh button mushrooms and cook L5 minutes ; 
add J cup milk, season with salt and pepper, let cook up and serve 
hot. 

NOODLES WITH TOMATOES. 

Prepare the noodles and boil them. Drain, put in a frying 
pan with 1 cup tomato sauce, 1 tablespoon butter, and salt and 
pepper to taste. Mix well with a fork and cook 5 minutes ; then 
add 1 tablespoon each of grated Swiss and grated Parmesan cheese, 
stir in carefully, pour into a deep hot dish and serve. 

OKRA. 

Cut the stems from tender young okras, wash, and boil 35 
minutes in a saucepan in salted water with a little milk added, 
an onion and 2 cloves. When tender, drain, and serve with a hot 
cream sauce. Or slice and stew with an equal quantity of tomatoes. 

BAKED SPANISH ONIONS. 

Peel 3 medium Spanish onions, clip off the ends and cut in 
half crosswise. Put in a baking dish cut side up. Mix together 
1 ounce butter, 1 teaspoon chopped parslev, 1 saltspoon each salt 
and pepper, and the juice of ^ lemon. Spread over the onions. 
cover with a buttered paper, and set in the oven for 35 minutes, 



VEGETABLES. 117 

basting frequently. Bring dish to the oven door, take off the 
paper, sprinkle 2 tablespoons grated bread crumbs, baste well, and 
put back in the oven for 10 minutes more. 

BOILED ONIONS. 

Peel and wash carefully small white onions, put into boiling 
salted water, and boil 50 minutes, or until tender. Drain and 
serve in a hot covered dish with melted butter poured over, and 
sprinkled with salt and pepper. Or prepare a good cream sauce ; 
when the onions are drained put them in the hot sauce and cook 
a few minutes more. Serve with the sauce poured over them. 

FRIED ONIONS. 

Peel and slice the onions; boil in salted water 20 minutes; 
drain, put in a skillet with 1 large tablespoon butter, and fry i 
hour, seasoning to the taste. 

SMOTHERED ONIONS. 

Slice several white onions very fine, season with salt and 
pepper, put them in a hot saucepan with 1 tablespoon melted but- 
ter, cover and cook on the range o minutes. Then set in the oven 
for 35 minutes. Pour over a freshly broiled steak on a hot platter. 

STUFFED ONIONS. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Peel Spanish onions under water, scoop a piece out of the top, 
parboil 5 minutes, and turn upside down to drain. Stuff witli 
chopped onion, bread crumlis, salt, pepper and plenty of butter. 
Put in a baking dish with a little water, sprinkle witli buttere I 
crumbs, cover and bake 1 hour or till tender. Uncover and brown. 

PARSNIPS. 

Mrs. Frank Miller. 

Wash, scrape and slice the parsnips lengthwise. Boil in slightly 
salted water till tender ; drain, put a couple tablespoons butter in 
a skillet, sprinkle the parsnips with sugar, and fry till a nice brown. 
Season slightly with pepper. 

BAKED PARSNIPS. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

If young, scrape the parsnips ; if old, pare and slice length- 
wise ; put in boiling water, and boil till tender. Drain, put in a 
baking dish, dust with salt and pepper, lay .several thin slices of 
bacon over the top, and bake about ^ hour. 

PARSNIP CAKES. 

Boil and mash your parsnips. To a dozen good sized parsnips, 
add 2 well beaten eggs, a little salt and pepper and enough Hour 
to hold them together. Make into flat, round cakes, and fry in 
butter until both sides are a rich brown. 



118 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PARSNIP FRITTERS. 

Peel 6 medium parsnips, cut in pieces 1^ inches long, cut these 
in strips, wash, put in boiling, salted water with a little lemon, 
cover and let boil slowly 45 minutes, or until done. Drain and 
put in a bowl. Season with salt and pepper, 2 tablespoons oil, 1 
teaspoon chopped parsley, and the juice of J a lemon. Let stand 
in this J hour. Have a good fritter batter prepared, drop in the 
parsnips, then drop them into boiling fat and fry. 

Salsify fritters are made in the same way. 

PEAS (CANNED). 

Drain the liquor from canned peas, put in boiling, salted water 
and boil 3 minutes, drain again, place in a saucepan with a little 
melted butter, salt and pepper, and stir while cooking about 2. 
minutes. 

GREEN PEAS. 

Take fresh young peas, shell just before using, and put in 
kettle of boiling, salted water; boil 20 minutes, or till tender; 
drain, turn into a hot covered dish with a lump of butter, and 
serve. 

STEAMED PEAS. 

Mrs. Grover Spencer. 

Put peas in a double boiler witli a piece of butter tlie size of 
a walnut to every quart. Let steam until peas are tender. Season 
with pepper and salt, and serve hot. 

PEPPERS. 

Take green peppers, wipe them, cut the tops off, or cut in 
half lengthwise, take the seeds out, and put in cold salt water 
for J hour. Take any kind of cold meat minced fine : moisten 
well with rich stock or gravy, or milk or tomatoes, and fill the 
peppers. Stand on end in a buttered baking dish, put bits of 
butter on top, cover and bake about i hour. Take the cover off 
to let brown when nearly done. Cold rice is good alone, mixed 
with meat or with cooked tomatoes as a pepper stuffing : or toma- 
toes well seasoned and mixed with toasted bread crumbs. Stuft'ed 
tomatoes may alternate in a dish with stuffed peppers, or a tomato 
sauce may he served with them. Red peppers are a good addition 
to a dish of baked tomatoes. In fact, follow your taste in cooking 
peppers, and you cannot go amiss. 

PEPPERS AND RICE. 

Steam rice until tender and whole. Slice green peppers cross- 
wise, take out the seeds, and throw into salted water for an hour. 
Dry the slices, dip them in flour and fry in a little hot butter 
until soft and somewhat brown, about 5 minutes. Have the rice 
just ready, turn it into a baking dish, arranee the slices of peppers 
over it, and pour the rest of the butter over. Put in the oven 
for 5 minutes. The fried pepper is also a nice garnish for meats 
cither hot or cold. 



VEGETABLES. 119 

BAKKD POTATOES. 

Select sound potatoes with good skins, wash and cut the ends 
off; put on the floor of the oven and bake 45 minutes to 1 hour 
until they will squeeze. Serve at once on a plate covered with a 
napkin. 

Or peel, place in a dripping pan with roasting meat, and bake 
1 hour; brown. New potatoes need only to be scraped. 

BOILED POTATOES. 

Select solid medium sized potatoes. Wash and cut off the 
ends. Put in a pot with enough boiling water to cover well, add 
1 teaspoon salt, cover and boil about 35 minutes, or until tender. 
Take up in a skimmer, arrange on a napkin on a hot dish, cover 
with the ends of the napkin and serve. Potatoes either baked 
or boiled in their jackets should not be put in a covered dish. 

Or peel and boil or steam. Serve as soon as done. 

BROWXED MASKED POTATOES. 

Boil, mash and season the potatoes, put in a baking dish, 
smooth the surface with a little beaten egg, and put in the oven 
to brown. 

CHEESE POTATOES. 

Mrs. John White. 

Boil potatoes in salt water until done ; mash them thoroughly, 
add a little milk and Ijutter, and •') tablespoons grated cheese, put 
in a pudding dish, sprinkle liroad crumbs over, and bake | hour 
or more. 

DUCHESS POTATOES. 

Prepare potatoes as for croquettes. Flour the board, roll out 
the potato paste, cut into cookies, place in a buttered pan, brush 
them with melted butter and bake in the oven 10 minutes, or until 
browned. Take up with a skimmer and serve on a hot dish. 

EAST INDIAN POTATOES. 

Brown 1 finely chopped onion in a saucepan with 1 taljlespoon 
butter. Stir in 1 teaspoon curry powder, and add 1 pint hot water. 
Add 1 teaspoon salt, and 1 dozen small peeled potatoes. Cover 
and boil 35 minutes. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES, NO. 1. 

Miss Delia Slatzer. 

Pare and slice thin some good potatoes. Put in a baking dish, 
scatter lumps of butter, and sprinkle pepper and salt all through, 
fill up the dish with sweet milk, and bake in a moderate oven 1 
hour. 



120 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

ESCALLOPED POTATOES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Waldie. 

Put 1 quart sliced, boiled potatoes in a buttered baking dish ; 
add 1 pint sweet cream, butter the size of a walnut, salt and 
pepper to taste. Bake in a moderate oven. 

FRENCH FRIED POTATOES. 

Mrs. Tlioinas Ewiiig. 

Cut and fry as Straw Potatoes, making the slices \ inch or 
more in width and thickness. 

FRIED POTATOES, NO. 1. 

Take potatoes freshly boiled in salted water. Drain, cut into 
thin slices, drop in boiling fat, and fry 5 minutes. Take out with 
a skimmer, drain, lightly dredge with salt, and serve on a hot dish. 

Or, put in a hot frying pan with melted butter, cook about 10 
minutes, stirring occasionally. 

FRIED POTATOES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. IMargaret Bailey. 

Boil potatoes in their skins. When cold, peel and cut up 
small. Put in a skillet with butter or half lard and butter, and 
fry brown. Make a good cream gravy as for chicken, pour over 
the potatoes, let cook up well, dish and serve at once. 

FRIED POTATOES, NO. 3. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. , 

Peel and slice raw potatoes thin, throw into cold water, drain, 
and put into a frying pan with 1 tablespoon hot drippitig; fry 
brown. 

GERMAN POTATO CAKES, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Winefordner. 

Grate 6 large raw potatoes, add 2 well beaten eggs, 2 table- 
spoons flour, J teaspoon soda in \ cup sour milk, and a pinch of 
salt. Fry like pancakes. 

GERMAN POTATO CAKES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. A. E. Spires. 

Grate 6 large raw potatoes and 2 onions in a bowl together. 
Add 2 eggs and ^f cup flour, season with salt and pepper, stii" well 
toeether and bake like griddle cakes until nicely browned. Serve 
hot. 

HASHED BROWN POTATOES. 

Take freshly boiled potatoes, peel and chop fine. Put a little 
butter in a frying pan, get it hot, add the potatoes, and cook for 
10 minutes, tossing occasionally, .Season with salt and pepper, 



VEGETABLES. 121 

form into an omelet, and cook until a good brown, 5 or more 
minutes. Turn on a hot dish. A little chopped and browned onion 
may be added. 

HASHED CREAM POTATOES. 

Boil sound potatoes, peel and chop tine. Put in a saucepan 
with milk or cream, butter, salt and pepper to taste. Stew slowly 
at least 15 minutes. Turn into a hot dish and sprinkle chopped 
parsley over them. Cold I)aked potatoes may be used in the same 
way. 

HASHED POTATOES AU GRATIN. 

Prepare hashed cream potatoes. Butter a baking dish, turn 
in the potatoes, sprinkle the surface with grated cheese, and bits 
of butter, and bake for 10 minutes, or until nicely browned. 

LYONNATSE POTATOES. 

Slice freshly boiled potatoes in not very thin slices. Melt 1 
tablespoon butter in a frying pan, brown a finely sliced onion, 
add the potatoes, season with salt and pepper, and toss gently 
while cooking 7 or 8 minutes. Give them a good omelet form, 
let brown lightly for about 7 minutes, fold, turn on a hot dish, 
and sprinkle with chopped parsley. 

MASHED POTATOES. 

Mrs. Ellen Campbell. 

Peel and wash medium sized sound potatoes, cut in halves, 
plunge into boiling salted water and boil about 35 minutes. Drain 
well, and rub through a sieve, or mash with a potato masher 
quickly, add salt and pepper, considerable butter and a little hot 
milk ; put in a deep hot dish, smoothe the surface, till a hole in 
the centre with melted butter, dust with salt and pepper, and 
serve with the dish covered. 

O'BRIEN POTATOES. 

"Country Club." 

Slice and parboil the potatoes. Put in a buttered baking dish 
in alternate layers with sliced pimentos and a sprinkling of flour, 
salt and butter. Pour over the liquor from the can, and enough 
cream to make out. Bake till done. 

POTATOES WITH BUTTER. 

Scrape and wash new potatoes or peel small old ones. Boil 
in salted water 30 minutes or until done. Drain, put in a sauce- 
pan with 1 tablespoon butter, turn them over lightly a minute or 
two, and serve w-ith the butter poured over them. Brown butter 
may be used instead, or Polish crumbs, or cream sauce, 



122 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

POTATO BALLS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Lydia Z. Knight. 

Boil, mash and season with butter, pepper and salt 7 or 8 good 
sized potatoes ; dice '2 slices bread and fry brown in a little butter ; 
add these to the potatoes with 2 well beaten eggs and enough 
flour to make the mixture into balls the size of a small cup. Boil 
these like dumplings in a good beef or veal broth, turnmg oc- 
casionally. If left over, they are good sliced cold and fried in 
butter. 

POTATO BALLS, NO. 2. 

Take 2 tablespoons each of mashed potatoes and grated cheese, 
1 tablespoon breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, cayenne to taste, and half 
a beaten egg. Mix well ; form into cakes or balls, with the aid 
of a little flour ; dip in lieaten egg and roll in toasted bread 
crumbs. Fry in deep hot fat, or in a skillet with butter. 

POTATO CAKES. 

Season cold mashed potatoes with butter, pepper and salt. Pat 
into flat cakes, if necessary using a little flour and milk to make 
them stick. Fry brown on both sides in a little butter. 

POTATO CROQUETTES, NO. I. 

Mrs. Jas. McGrady. 

Take cold mashed potatoes, 1 onion chopped fine, 1 egg, salt 
and pepper to taste, a pinch of nutmeg and another of baking 
powder. Take about 1 pint potatoes, beat in the egg and the 
other ingredients with flour enough to make them stick, roll and 
fry in a pan with a little hot lard, or dip in egg and cracker 
crumbs and fry in deep fat. 

POTATO CROQUETTES, NO. 2. 

Boil and mash 8 medium potatoes. Beat up with ^ teaspoon 
salt, half as much pepper, a very little nutmeg, 2 raw eggs, and i 
tablespoon butter. Form into croquettes, dip in beaten egg and 
then in breadcrumbs, place in a frying basket, and fry in boiling 
fat 5 minutes. Drain thoroughly, and serve on a hot dish on a 
folded napkin. 

Chopped parsley may be added or sprinkled on top. 

POTATO DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. Peter Kramer. 

Wash, peel and grate 6 good sized potatoes, and drain. Add 
a pinch of salt to 1 cup cooked rice. Brown 2 tablespoons bread- 
crumbs in a skillet with 2 tablespoons butter, and stir in 2 eggs 
till cooked. Mix rice, potatoes, and fried crumbs all together 
with enough flour to hold them, make into balls, and drop into 
boiling water ; cover and boil gently J hour. Serve immediately, 



VEGETABLES. 123 

POTATO PIE. 

A Michigan Recipe. 

Make a crust as for meat pies, line a shallow dish, fill with 
potatoes freshly cooked, mashed and seasoned with salt, pepper, 
!)utter and cream. Over this sprinkle a little summer savory or 
sage. Cover with crust, and bake in a quick oven until crust 
is done. Serve with fried chicken or any meat that has a brown 
gravy. 

POTATO PUFF. 

Mrs. Edward Daugherty. 

Into 4 cups mashed potato stir 3 large tablespoons niell::d 
butter, beating to'a white cream; add 2 or 3 eggs beaten very light, 
and 2 small cups cream or milk, salted to taste; beat all well, 
pour in a deep dish, and bake in a quick oven, until nicely browned. 

QUARTERED POTATOES. 

Peel and cut rather small potatoes into 4 cubes each. Put in 
a hot frying pan with a little lard, and fry for about 10 minutes, 
until a light brown, turning occasionally. Take up, put in a roast- 
ing tin, sprinkle with salt and pepper and bits of butter, and 
place in a quick oven for 30 minutes. 

SARATOGA POTATOES. 

Peel medium sized raw potatoes, slice as thin as possible, 
drop one by one into boiling fat, and fry about five minutes, or 
until a good color, turning them over. Take out with a skimmer 
and let thoroughly drain and dry. Sprinkle a little salt over 
them, and serve on a hot dish with a folded napkin. 

SNOW POTATOES. 

Boil new potatoes with their jackets on in salted water until 
tender (about 30 minutes). Peel quickly, season with salt and 
pepper and rub through a sieve into a hot dish, and serve im- 
mediately. Do not touch them after putting through the sieve, 

STRAW POTATOES. 

Select good medium potatoes, peel, cut in long, very thin 
strips, wash and drain, dry on a cloth, plunge into boiling fat and 
fry about 5 minutes until a good brown color. Drain in the frying 
basket, sprinkle a pinch of salt over them and serve at once on 
a hot dish. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Bake good potatoes in their skins ; when done, scoop out, 
mix with pepper, salt and plenty of butter, fill the skins, and set 
on end in a pan in the oven to brown. Smooth the tops of the 
potatoes with beaten egg. 



124 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

RICE, NO. 1. 

Pick over and wash one cup of rice. Put in double boiler and 
fill with cold salted water. Boil about ^ hour, or until dry. Do 
not stir. It should turn out with the kernels separate and whole. 
If not boiled dry when done, turn into a colander and stand on a 
pan in the oven with the door open for 5 minutes. Then serve 
immediately. It makes a good dressing on a platter, with roast 
meat in the centre, or a roast or stewed chicken. 

RICE, NO. 2. 

Put well washed rice in a double boiler, cover with milk and 
boil two hours. When done dress with cream, butter and a little 
salt. When served, powdered sugar and a little nutmeg may be 
dusted over the top. Beaten egg and sugar may be added, if de- 
sired, before taking up. 

RICE CAKES. 

Mrs. D. H. Jones. 

Take 1 cup cold boiled rice, mix it with 1 well beaten egg, 
J teaspoon baking powder and a little flour, season with salt and 
sugar, and fry like potato cakes in a skillet with a little hot butter. 

RICE CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. Margaret Murday. 

Steam 1 cup rice in a double boiler. When done, drain and 
add J teaspoon salt, J cup sugar, 3 eggs well beaten together, and 
steam 3 minutes longer; then add the juice and grated rind of 1 
lemon. When perfectly cold, take 2 heaping tablespoons for each 
croquette, and shape like buns, making a dent with the finger m 
the top centre of each. Dip in raw egg, roll in cracker crumbs, 
drop in smoking hot lard or fat, and fry a nice brown. Drain on 
paper. Sprinkle with powdered sugar, put a small lump of jelly 
in each dent, and serve hot. 

2 ounces currants may be cooked with the rice the last 15 
minutes, and a sweet fruit sauce poured over the croquettes. 

RISOTTO. 

Filippini.. 

Brown 1 medium finely chopped onion in a saucepan with ^ 
tablespoon butter ; add i pound washed rice ; stir until a golden 
color, then gradually moisten with 1^ pints hot broth, stirring 
constantly. Add 1 small cervelat sausage, a pinch of Spanish 
saffron, 1 teaspoon salt, half as much pepper. I\Iix well, cover, 
and, as soon as it begins to boil, put in a hot oven for 30 minutes. 
Take it out, remove the sausage, stir in well 3 tablespoons grated 
cheese, and J tablespoon butter. Serve on a hot dish garnished with 
the sausage sliced. 



VEGETABLES. 125 

CRKA^fED SALSIFY. 

Scrape a larjrc Inincli frcsli salsify, cut off stems, and throw 
into cold water with a little flour and vinegar mixed through it. 
Wash thoroughly, drain and put in hoiling water with 1 tablespoon 
salt, and a sliced lemon, and boil 40 minutes or until tender. Drain 
and cut into half inch pieces. Have a cream sauce ready, put in 
the salsify with a little lemon juice, and boil 5 minutes. Serve with 
chopped parsley sprinkled over it. 

SAUERKRAUT. 

Mrs. Wm. Hughes. 

Take good sound cabbage early in the fall, and slice on the 
cutter not quite so thin as for slaw. Pack in a large jar, or keg, 
sprinkling the layers with salt. Do not use too much. Press 
these layers down with a potato masher but without crushing. 
Cover with water, lay a clean white cloth over, and put a heavy 
oak board, or bricks over it. Let the brine come up over the 
board. After several days, remove to the cellar. Examine daily 
at first, and keep replenishing the brine. If the l)rine gets slimy, 
skim it well, wash the cloth and board clean, and put back. After 
10 days, it may be good to eat if the weather is warm; in cool 
weather, it takes longer. It will keep all winter, if paid attention. 

BOILED SAUERKRAUT. 

Put into a kettle, cover with boiling water, add a piece of 
salt pork ; boil 'W or more minutes. 

SPAGHETTI. 

Mrs. Ellen B. Lynch. 

Take a piece of suet the size of half a hand, boil it in a little 
water until thoroughly done. When browning add butter the size 
of an egg and 3 to 6 onions sliced ; fry slowly until quite brown, 
without burning.. Then add 1 pound juicy round of beef, chopped 
fine; 1 can tomatoes; allspice, cloves and cayenne pepper to taste. 
When well cooked strain thoroughly, and keep the sauce hot. In 
the meantime put half a box of macaroni into salted boiling water, 
and boil 20 minutes oc until done and not soggy. Rinse off starch 
and salt. Put back in the stewpan with a little butter. Serve on a 
heated platter with a well of sauce in the centre. The part of 
the sauce that did not go through the colander makes an excellent 
hash mixed with cold rice and baked. Mushrooms may be added 
to the sauce, if desired. 

SPAGHETTI WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Mrs. Isabel Hall Tedrow. 

Boil the spaghetti until tender in salted water ; drain and put 
into a baking dish in alternate layers with stewed and seasoned 
mushrooms. Sprinkle cracker crumbs on top, and bits of butter, 
and bake ni a slow oven 20 or 30 minutes. The mushroom dress- 
ing must be generous enough to take care of the spaghetti also. 



126 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

SPINACH. 

Cut off the roots, dried leaves, etc. Wash in several waters, 
put in a kettle, cover with hoiling salted water, and boil 20 to 
30 minutes ; drain, chop, add a little melted butter, salt and pepper, 
and serve in a covered dish with sliced hard boiled eggs on top. 
Or the spinach may be put in the kettle with only a cup of water, 
and steamed till done. 

SPINACH CROQUETTES. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Chop fine 1 pint cooked spinach, brown J- a small onion in 1 
tal)lespoon butter, take out the pieces and stir in the spinach : add 
gradually 1 scant tablespoon each of flour and bread crumbs, ^ 
cup grated cheese, beaten yolks of 2 eggs, \ or more cup milk, 
salt and nutmeg. Mould while warm on a floured board. Fry like 
other croquettes. Drain, dish, sprinkle with grated cheese, add 
a little melted butter, and set in the oven to heat through. 

SPINACH FRITTERS. 

An Italian Recipe. 

Wash thoroughly clean J peck spinach, and cook done. Drain 
in a colander and chop fine. Put back into a saucepan with a 
tablespoon each of butter and sugar, i cup milk, \ teaspoon salt, 
some cayenne pepper, and grated lemon peel. Let simmer for 10 
minutes. Take it off the nre and when cool stir in 2 well beaten 
eggs and a tablespoon flour. Form into little balls, dip in egg and 
cracker crumbs and fry in boiling fat. 

SPINACH WITH CREAM. 

Cook the spinach in boiling salted water until done ; drain and 
squeeze, and chop line. Rub 1 tablespoon melted butter in a hot 
saucepan with 2 tablespoons flour ; add \ cup half milk and half 
cream, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon pepper ; stir well, add the 
spinach, cook for five minutes, and stive in a hot covered dish. 
Sprinkle the top thickly with grated hard boiled egg. 

BAKED SQUASH. 

Cut into convenient sizes, scrape out the seeds and the soft 
part, bake about | hour in the oven, and serve in its shells. 
Pumpkin may be baked the same way. 

BOILED SQUASH. 

Pare and cut into small cubes ; cover with boiling salted water, 
and boil till tender; drain, return to the saucepan and set on the 
back of the stove till dry. Then mash with a potato masher, season 
with salt, pepper and butter, and serve. 



VEGETABLES. 127 

SUCCOTASH. 

Boil separately corn on the col) and either string beans or Lima 
beans. Cut the corn from the coli and put in a hot saucepan 
with the beans, add plenty of butter and salt and pepper. Cook 
together about five minutes. Rich milk may be added, and where 
liked a little flour rubbed in butter for thickening; cook 5 min- 
utes longer. When served without milk sauce, boil a little milk 
with the corn on the cob. Make the proportion of corn and bean.s 
according to taste. 

SWEET POTATOES. 

Sweet potatoes are boiled or baked precisely like Irish po- 
tatoes. 

ESCALLOPED SWEET POTATOES. 

Miss Lizzie Sherman. 

Peel and parboil the potatoes. Slice crosswise, and put in a 
buttered baking disli in layers, sprinkling each with sugar and 
a little salt and pepper, and bits of butter. Cover with a half 
cup of cream and bake. It is quite as good with plenty of butter 
without the cream. 

FRIED SWEET POTATOES. 

Boil, peel and slice the potatoes lengthwise ; fry in hot dripping 
in a skillet ; dust with salt and pepper, and serve hot when browned. 

Or cut fine cold boiled sweet potatoes with rather more white 
potatoes, and fry in butter, seasoning with salt and pepper. 

GLAZED SWEET POTATOES. 

Boil and peel the potatoes, put in a greased pan in a good oven. 
As they crust over baste several times with a little butter. When 
a rich golden or brown color, dish and serve. 

MASHED SWEET POTATOES. 

Boil ^ dozen medium sweet potatoes in salted water 40 min- 
utes. Drain, peel and press through a sieve into a baking dish. 
Season with a little salt and pepper, I tablespoon butter, and f 
cup hot milk. Beat well, smoothe the top, glaze with melted butter, 
and set in the oven for about 15 minutes, or untif brown. 

SWEET POTATO CROQL^ETTES. 

Pare and boil the sweet potatoes till- done. Mash fine, season 
with butter, pepper and salt, and a little sugar, and when cool 
enough to handle mould into croquettes, roll in flour, and fry brown 
in hot butter. 

BAKED TO:\L-\TOES. 

Mrs. King. 

Wipe the tomatoes, take out the seeds, fill the cavities with a 
dressing of onions chopped fine, bread crumbs, salt, butter and 
pepper. Bake 45 minutes in a good oven. Serve hot. 



128 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Cut sound tomatoes in halves, season, place on a broiler, and 
broil the skin side about 20 minutes or till tender. Serve on a hot 
plate with melted butter. 

CURRTED TOMATOES. 

Mix I teaspoon curry powder with 1 quart canned tomatoes ; 
salt to taste ; put in a buttered baking dish with 1 cup raw rice 
in alternate layers, ending up with tomatoes ; sprinkle with bread 
crumbs, dot with bits of butter, and bake \ hour or longer. 

^ ERIED TOMATOES. 

Mrs. Wm. Evans. 

Slice ripe tomatoes and dip them in well beaten eggs which 
have been seasoned with salt, pepper and 1 teaspoon sugar to 
each egg. Dip then in fine bread or cracker crumbs, and fry in 
a skillet with 2 tablespoons hot butter, five minutes on each side. 
Serve on thin slices of toast. 

Half ripe or juicy green tomatoes may be fried in the same way. 

The sugar or toast may be omitted. 

STEWED TOMATOES, NO. 1. . 

Mrs. John A. Williams. 

Put 1 quart tomatoes to stew with 1 good sized onion chopped 
fine ; when nearly done add a good lump of butter, salt, pepper 
and sugar to taste. Break some butter crackers in the bottom of a 
hot dish and pour the tomatoes over them. 

STEWED TOMATOES, NO. 2. 

Rev. Henry Ward Beecher. 

Parboil 3 small onions; cut up 3 pints ripe tomatoes; add the 
onions cut fine, \\ cups 1)read crumbs, a dessertspoon salt, and a 
small teaspoon black pepper ; stir together and simmer at least 
an hour. Just before serving stir in 6 eggs beaten separately and 
four tablespoons butter, and boil up once to cook the eggs. 

STEWED TOMATOES WITH CREAM. 

"West Virginia." 

Peel and slice six or eight large ripe tomatoes, put in a hot 
saucepan with butter size of a large walnut, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 table- 
spoon sugar, and a dash di pepper. Simmer gently until dinner is 
ready to serve; then add 1 pint fine bread crumbs, stir up well, 
add \ pint rich cream, and serve immediately. 

STUEEED TOMATOES, NO. 1. 

Take round smooth red tomatoes. Cut a slice off the tops. 
Scoop out the inside without cutting through, put it in a bowl, mix 
it with a little chopped meat, bread crumljs, butter, salt and pepper, 
chopped onions, chopped peppers, cold boiled rice, etc. Almost 



VEGETABLES. 129 

anj- "left-over" can be used in stuffing tomatoes. Season the 
shells inside, stuff them, put on the covers, put in a buttered dish, 
put bits of butter on top, and bake in a moderate oven 30 minutes 
or longer. 

STUFFED T0:M.\T0ES, XO. 2. 

An old French Cook Book. 

Take large ripe tomatoes, cut in half crosswise, and remove 
tiie centres carefully. Fill each half with a mixture of chopped 
cold meat of any kind but pork, bread crumbs, chopped parsley, 
one or two yolks of eggs, seasoned with salt and pepper to taste. 
When all filled, glaze \vith the whites of the eggs; have some hot 
fat in a frying pan ; place the tomatoes meat side down ; when 
l-rown, turn and cook them 15 minuted 

TOMATO RICE AU GRATIN. 

Put six ounces raw rice in a saucepan with 1 pint tomato 
sauce (or cold stewed tomatoes), i pint broth, J teaspoon salt, 
and 3 saltspoons pepper. Mix well aiid boil 35 minutes, stirring 
occasionally. Add 2 ounces grated cheese with I ounce butter, 
stir in well and put in a baking dish. Sprinkle bread crumbs and 
bits of i)Utter on top and sc: in oven for 12 minutes. It may also 
be used as stuffing for whole tomatoes baked. 

TURKISH PILAFF. 
Miss McMath. ^ 

Cover 1 cup rice with salted water and parboil 20 minutes ; 
drain, and put into a double boiler with U cups broth, and one cup 
of canned tomatoes rubbed through a sieve ; season with pepper 
and salt, and cook one hour. Just before serving, add J cup 
butter. 

TURNIPS. 

Cook in any way as Kohl Rabi is cooked. 
BOILED TURNIPS. 

Mrs. Frank Miller. 

Slice the turnips, cover with boiling water, and cook till tender. 
Drain and stir up in the kettle with butter, salt and pepper to 
taste. If soft enough they will mash properly by simply stirring. 

VERMICELLI. 

A Mexican Recipe. 

Put a tablespoon lard in a porcelain vessel ; when hot throw- 
in the vermicelli slightly i^roken up, with some thinly sliced onions 
and tomatoes, some chopped red peppers, 1 clove garlic and a 
few cumin seeds ground, salt and black pepper to taste. Stir to 
prevent burning till a light brown : then add stock or hot water, 
and borl until tender. Have somewhat drv. 



SALAD5. 



BEAN SALAD. 

Boil soup beans till done but whole ; strain ; season with salt, 
pepper, vinegar, oil, 1 tablespoon cream and 1 tablespoon French 
mustard. 

BEET SALAD. 

Boil and peel the beets, slice fine, season with salt and pepper, 
and cover with vinegar when cold. Or, 

Cut the freshly boiled beets into squares, add an equal number 
of button onions, sliced and twice scalded ; mix with a little 
chopped parsley, and serve with French dressing, or mayonnaise. 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS SALAD. 

Cook the sprouts and let drain until cold. Cover with any good 
salad dressinuf. 

Asparagus salad is made in a similar way, but serve the dressing 
in a sauceboat. 

CAULIFLOWER SALAD. 

Boil the cauliflower, break into its florets, put in a salad bowl, 
and pour mayonnaise over it. Garnish with lettuce leaves and 
slices of egg. Or, 

Boil until just cooked, chop fine with hard boiled eggs and 
parsley. Garnish with beets cut in fancy shapes and with olives. 
Pour French dressing over it. 

CELERY SALAD. 

Chop rather coarsely crisp and cleaned celery ; chop an equal 
quantity of green peppers (less if sharp), mix well together, and 
serve with lettuce or as stuffing for tomatoes. Dress with any 
dressing liked. Celery chopped and mixed with a good dressing 
is nice served in half peppers, where much pepper is not liked. 
About as much chopped apple makes a good addition. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

Mrs. C. A. Judson. 

Boil a chicken tilltender ; remove the bones and skin; if wanted 
extra nice use only the white meat ; cut in coarse dice, and season 
with salt and pepper ; chop in I inch pieces the tender parts of 
celery : mix g as much celery with the chicken ; mix with mayon- 

180 



SALADS. 131 

naise dressing, arrange nicely on a dish, put some dressing over 
it; garnish with celery tops. Do not mix till wanted. The 
dressing may be thinned with whipped cream. 

A small proportion of pecan nuts is liked by many. 

COLD SLAW, NO. L 

Miss Rose Tipping. 

Slice fine enough cabbage to till an ordinary salad bowl : mix 2 
tablespoons sugar with butter the size of ^ an egg, 2 tablespoons flour 
and ] cup weak vinegar ; l)ring to the boil, cook a moment, then 
take off, stir in 2 well beaten eggs, and salt and pepper to taste. 
Salt the cabbage also. Pour the dressing over the slaw 1 hour 
before serving, cover and let stand till wanted. 

COLD SLAW, NO. 2. 

1 pint chopped cabbage, 1 cup celery chopped, and h cup grated 
horseradish. Season with salt. Stir a good mayonnaise or lettuce 
dressing into the mixture a few moments before serving. 

COLD SLAW, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Donna O'Reilly. 

Chop 1 small head cabbage fine ; sprinkle with 1 teaspoon salt, 
I tablespoon sugar and a dash of white pepper ; mash until moist. 
Then put ] cup vinegar with \ cup water and a bit of butter 
in a saucepan and let come to a boil ; thicken with 1 teaspoon corn- 
starch, let boil up, stir it into the cabbage, and set the slaw on the 
ice to get cold. 

CREAM SLAW. 

Mrs. Alta Hoskins. 

Cut cabbage very fine, salt and pepper to taste. Beat up 1 
egg thoroughly with 1 tablespoon flour, add 1 tablespoon butter, 
1 cup sugar, 1 small cup vinegar and 1 pint cream. Boil all to- 
gether, then pour over the slaw. 

CUCUMBERS. 

Pare and slice the cucumbers, and cover with brine for h hour; 
drain, put in a dish with pepper, salt and vinegar. If onions are 
served with them, they may be peeled and sliced and added raw, 
or scalded ivith boiling water, standing in it 5 minutes, then drained 
and put with the cucumbers. Slices of red pepper are a good 
addition. Let get quite cold. 

EGG SALAD. 

Mrs. Mark Stecker. 

Boil C) eggs hard ; chop the whites fine and rub the yolks 
smooth. Sprinkle in a little salt and pepper. Stir this into mayon- 
naise dressing and mix up with it a cup of chopped chicken or ham 
and some chopped celery. Serve on lettuce leaves. 



132 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

FRUIT SALAD, NO. 1. 

Pulp of 4 oranges and 1 grape fruit, 1 cup white grapes seeded, 
i dozen Maraschino cherries cut in halves, i cup EngHsh wahiuts 
broken small. Mix with this a wine glass sherry or Madeira. 
Cover with a French dressing made of 5 tablespoons oil, half as 
much vinegar, a teaspoon salt and a salt spoon paprika. Set on 
ice until thoroughly chilled. 

FRUIT SALAD, NO. 2. 

Miss Mary Sweeney. 

Slice fine 3 bananas, 2 oranges, dice 2 apples, and seed and cut 
in halves 1 bunch white grapes. Mix with mayonnaise dressing, 
snd serve on lettuce leaves. 

GRAPE FRUIT SALAD. 

Put leaves of head lettuce in a salad bowl ; peel the grape 
fruit, take out the sections, break the membrane and extract the 
pulp in as large pieces as possible; put in the midst of the lettuce, 
and cover with mayonnaise or French dressing. 

Orange salad is made in the same way. 

HERRING SALAD. 

Skin, bone and dice fine 2 smoked herrings ; boil, peel and 
dice 2 potatoes; peel, core and dice 2 apples; dice a little pickled 
red beet, and 2 cold hard boiled eggs. Mix well with 4 table- 
spoons Filippini dressing. 

LAMB SALAD. 

Cut cold lamb into very thin slices. Mix in a bowl 1 finely 
sliced small onion, 2 stalks finely sliced celery, ^ teaspoon chopped 
tarragon, ^ teaspoon salt, 3 saltspoons pepper, 2 tablespoons oil and 
1^ tablespoons tarragon vinegar. Mix up well with the sliced lamb 
and serve. 

LETTUCE SALAD. 

Arrange delicate leaves of lettuce on individual plates, put 
a small mould of currant jelly in the middle, arrange around it 
small balls of cream cheese, and pour French dressing over. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Cut the lobster meat whether freshly boiled or canned into 
pieces ^ inch square. Take ^ the quantity of celery washed and 
well dried and chopped the same size. Alix with Filippini dress- 
ing. Put in a salad bowl, smooth with a rounded top, spread 
with a mayonnaise dressing, decorate with hard boiled eggs in 
quarters, sprinkle with a teaspoon capers, put tender lettuce leaves 
around the edge of the bowl, and, if a fresh lobster, ornament 
'-vith head or claws. 



SALADS. 133 

MACEDOINE SALAD. 

Take a potato scoop and scoop out what you can from several 
scraped carrots and peeled turnips. Boil until tender in salted 
water. Drain and let cool. Mix carefully in any proportion con- 
venient with odds and ends of cooked green vegetables, peas 
and beans, asparagus and cauliflower. Season with French dressing 
or Filippini dressing, or plain vinegar, salt and pepper. 

ORANGE AND APPLE SALAD. 

Peel and slice carefully, removing the seeds, 3 each ripe apples 
and oranges. Mix well with 2 ounces of powdered sugar, 1 table- 
spoon each of rum, kirsch and maraschino, and keep cold until 
wanted. Mix again before serving. Home made wine or lemon 
juice may be used instead of the flavorings named. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Mrs. Mabel Rush. 

Take 1 cup chopped oysters, 1 cup English walnuts, | cup 
cabbage chopped, I teaspoon celery seed, and salt and pepper to 
taste. Make a dressing of 1 egg, i cup sour cream, 2 tablespoons 
vinegar, and 2 tablespoons flour. Heat through and pour over the 
salad. Garnish with slices of hard lioiled eggs. 

PEA SALAD. 

Mrs. James Costello. 

Mix 1 can peas. 3 hard boiled eggs chopped fine, J pint 
chopped celery, 1 cup English walnuts, and sufficient mayonnaise 
dressing to cover nicely. Serve at once. 

PEPPER SALAD, NO. 1. 

Cut a green or a red pepper in half, remove the seeds, and 
chop or slice very thin. Put in a bowl with fresh lettuce leaves, 
endive, corn salad, pcppcrgrass, mustard, dandelions or watercress. 
Mix with any good dressing. 

PEPPER SALAD, NO. 2. 

Mrs. John E. Brown. 

Cover 1 box gelatin with cold water and let soak \ hour ; 
add 1 cup sugar, the juice 1 lemon, 2 teaspoons salt, and' 1 pint 
boiling water; when cool, add 4 cups chopped celery, 2 chopped 
cabbage, J can pimentoes chopped, and, if you choose, 1 cup chopped 
almonds ; stir in well, pour into a mould, and set aside to harden. 
Turn out on a plate of lettuce leaves. 



134 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

POTATO SALAD, NO. 1. 

Mrs. George Webb. 

5 small potatoes boiled and 3 onions of same size cut in 
thin slices, 1 bunch of celery chopped, 1 pint of sweet pickles 
chopped or sliced, 3 hard boiled eggs sliced, 1 pint hickory nuts 
or any good nuts, pepper and salt to taste. Mix with any salad 
dressing liked. 

POTATO SALAD, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Reese Ward. 

Take cold potatoes freshly boiled in their jackets, peel and 
slice them thin. Cut -4- pound fat bacon into the smallest pos- 
sible dice, put into a skillet over a slow fire; when the bacon 
is crisp and a light brown color, add 1 shredded onion, 1 teaspoon 
salt, 1 cup vinegar and hot water (half and half), and 2 table- 
spoons salad oil, turning in slowly lest it spatter. Add the po- 
tatoes, heat thoroughly and serve hot or cold. 

As much cabbage as potatoes may be added, in which case 
boil them together till done. 

POTATO SALAD, NO. 3. 

Miss H. C. Moodie. 

Slice six cold boiled potatoes alternately with one medium sized 
onion into a large dish, sprinkling occasionally with pepper and 
salt. Put ^ pint vinegar over the fire. When it boils, add A 
cup of butter, take from the fire and add 4 tablespoons sweet 
cream. Pour over tlic potatoes and mix thoroughly. 

POTATO SALAD, NO. 4. 

Mrs. O. O. Cherrington. 

Mix 1 tablespoon flour with 4 tablespoons sugar and 1 well 
beaten egg; add 1| teaspoons salt, pepper to taste, and 4 table- 
spoons water ; scald 1 cup vinegar, and stir in slowly the other in- 
gredients. Peel and chop fine 6 boiled potatoes and 3 hard boiled 
eggs, and mix with the dressing. 

POTATO SALAD, NO. 5. 

Mrs. E. J. Davis. 

For each quart of cold baked or boiled potatoes sliced, allow 
1 sliced cucumber, 1 cup diced celery, and 1 measure of dressing. 
In mixing, do not stir, but lift carefully and turn over. 

POTATO SALAD, NO. 6. 

Mrs. J. R. Coughtrie.^ 

6 potatoes boiled in their skins, pared and sliced; 1 onion 
peeled and sliced thin, 1 saltspoon salt ; \ as much pepper ; 1 table- 
spoon vinegar, and 3 tablespoons melted butter. Mix all together. 



SALADS. 135 

POTATOES AND BEETS. 

Boil separately, peel and slice thin equal quantities of fresh 
beets and potatoes. Season, and mix with any dressing desired. 

SALMON SALAD, NO. 1. 

Mrs. :Mark Stacker. 

Pick and chop 1 can of salinon, chop 1 small onion and 1 
bunch celery fine, add ] pound Knglish walnuts. Mix all together 
with mayonnaise dressing, and serve on lettuce. 

SALMON SALAD. NO. 2. 

Take a pint of cold boiled chopped potatoes, and a pint of 
cabbage, cucumber pickles and canned salmon, chopped and mixed 
in equal quantities. Mix a mayonnaise dressing with hard boiled 
egg, and twice as much vinegar as oil; stir all well together. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Put 1 pint can shrimps or 1 pint cooked fresh sin-imps in a bowl. 
Season with 3 tablespoons Filippini dressing. Garnish a salad bowl 
with lettuce leaves, heap the shrimps in the centre, spread a 
mayonnaise over them, sprinkle 1 teaspoon capers over all, and 
arrange 2 quartered hard boiled eggs about the base. 

Shrimps are very good cut in several pieces, mixed with 
chopped celery, and with mayonnaise dressing, with a few capers 
added, or a few small chopped cucumber pickles. 

SOUTH AMERICAN SALAD. 

Slice thin 1 large well flavored pear, 1 apple, 1 green pepper 
and 1 cucumber. Add the kernels of 2 dozen English walnuts. 
Mix well with any good salad dressing. 

STRING BEAN SALAD. 

Mrs. C. A. Judson. 

Take tender young beans, string and break them into short 
pieces, and boil in salted water till done. Slice a small onion 
lengthwise, and mix with the beans when cold. Make a dressing 
with the yolk of 1 egg, 1 good sized piece of butter, 3 tablespoons 
sour cream, and vinegar to make it as thin as wanted. Mix w-ell 
just before serving. Chop a hard boiled egg fine for a garnish. 
Or sprinkle with minced herbs and serve with French dressing. 
If lima beans are used with French dressing, use less oil. 

SWEET POTATO SALAD. 

Dice 3 large boiled sweet potatoes ; add 2 branches of celery 
chopped fine ; mix with French dressing with more vinegar than 
usual, salt and pepper to taste; and garnish with olives and parsley. 



136 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

TOMATO JELLY. 

Mrs. R. M. Connell. 

Cover \ box gelatin witli \ cup cold water and let soak 1 
hour. Put in a saucepan 1 pint strained tomatoes, a stick of celery 
chopped, 2 bay leaves and 1 slice onion. Boil a few minutes. Add 
the gelatin and strain through a sieve. Add 1 teaspoon salt, and 
a tablespoon lemon juice. Turn into small round moulds and put 
in a cold place to harden. Serve on lettuce leaves with mayon- 
naise dressing. 

TOAL\TO SALAD. 

Peel the tomatoes without scalding. Serve sliced or whole in 
any manner to suit the taste — plain, or with an onion sliced with 
them ; on lettuce leaves or in a saucedish, with French dressing, 
any kind of mayonnaise or other dressing, with salt or sugar, with 
vinegar or without. They are ornamental as well as good with 
the centres scooped out and filled with nicely seasoned, chopped 
onions, or with peppers and onions, or with celery chopped and 
mixed with mayonnaise dressing, with or without lettuce leaves. 
In fact, nothing that you like will hurt a tomato, and tomatoes 
enrich and embellish anything they are served with. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

Chop up not too fine, equal quantities of tart apples and celery, 
and half as much broken English walnuts or mixed nuts. Serve 
on lettuce with mayonnaise dressing. 

WALDORF-ASTORIA SALAD. 

Filippini. 

Cut into Julienne strips 1 good sized pickled beet, 2 peeled and 
cored apples, 2 tender stalks white celery, 4 Spanish sweet peppers ; 
chop 3 dozen hazel nuts. Season with 4 tablespoons Filippii* 
dressing, and mi.x very thoroughly. 



SALAD DRESSINGS. 



CHEESE DRESSING. 

Mix the yolks of 2 hardboiled eggs, with J teaspoon Fre^ich 
mustard, or half as much dry mustard, 1 teaspoon tarragon vinegar 
(if at hand), 1 teaspoon grated cheese, 1 teaspoon catsu]i. 4 table- 
spoons oil and 1 tablespoon cider vinegar. Beat well. 

CREAM DRESSING. 

Mrs. George Bird. 

Beat up 3 eggs with I cup creatn, IJ- cups vinegar, 4 tablespoons 
sugar, 1 small teaspoon salt, h teaspoon pepper, } teaspoon ground 
mustard and 1 teaspoon flour. Heat slowly just to the bnil, and 
pour over chopped cabbage. 

FILIPPINI SAL.AD DRESSING. 

Mix in a cold soup plate 1 level teaspoon curry powder, i 
teaspoon French mustard, 1 saltspoon ground mustard, 1 saltspoon 
cajv'enne pepper, 1 teaspoon finely chopped parsley, i teaspoon 
chives, 2 chopped shallots, a suspicion of garlic, 4 teaspoons salt, 
1 teaspoon white pepper, and the finely chopped rind of } of a 
lemon. (For the herbs that are difficult to obtain, a few drops of 
onion juice will answer.) Mix well with a fork, add 1 tablespoon 
olive oil, and mash the whole with the fork until almost a pulp, 
gradually adding 4 tablespoons white wine vinegar. Mix up well, 
pour into a bowl, and add olive oil and vinegar slowly in the pro- 
portion of 2 to 1, beating continuously until 1 quart is reached. 
Press through a strainer into a glass jar, cork or seal and keep in 
a cool place. This will keep a good while, and is used principally 
to season plainer dressings. If desired, melted butter and whipped 
cream can be used in place of the oil, and the curry powder may 
be omitted. Always shake well before using. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

Mix well together 3 tablespoons olive oil with 1 tablespoon 
vinegar, salt and pepper. Keep cold till wanted. 

GREEN MAYONNAISE. 

Mrs. R. M. Connell. 

Make a good mayonnaise dressing. Rub in a bowl 1 large 
tablespoon parsley chopped very fine until it makes almost a paste 
with 4 or o drons of alcohol. Stir this into the mayonnaise. A 
few boiled spinach loaves mav be added. 

1:^7 



138 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. ■ 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

Put 2 raw egg yolks in a bowl, beat up well, add ^ teaspoon 
ground mustard, ^ teaspoon salt, and a pinch of cayenne pepper. 
Stir these in well, and then drop slowly and stir in rapidly J pint 
or more olive oil. From time to time thin with a little lemon 
juice or vinegar. If the oil should curdle, begin again with a raw 
yolk, and gradually stir in the curdled dressing. Do not add much 
of either oil or vinegar at one time, and very little vinegar suffices 
if a thick dressing is wanted. The dressing may be flavored with 
onion juice, tarragon vinegar, or a few drops of tabasco ; and 
more or less whipped cream may be added. The ingredients 
should be cold when mixed, and the dressing kept in a cool place 
till wanted. Will keep some days. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING WITHOUT OIL. 

Mrs. Joseph Brooks. 

Beat the yolks of 3 eggs with '2, teaspoons mustard, 1 of corn- 
starch, 1 of sugar and 1 of salt, a shake of pepper and one cup 
of milk. Let i cup of vinegar come to the boil. Stir in the mix- 
ture, and cook until thick. On taking from the fire, add a piece 
of butter the size of a walnut. 

When cold whipped cream may be added if desired. 

POTATO SALAD DRESSING. 

Mrs. Gertrude Williams. 

Melt J cup butter or dripping, bring to the boil with h pint 
vinegar, season with pepper and salt and pour over 4 tablespoons 
sweet cream. Beat up well and mix up with the salad. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Miss Sallie L. Mumaugh. 

Beat up the yolks of 2 eggs, ^ cup sugar. 1 teaspoon pepper, 
1 heaping teaspoon ground mustard, salt to taste, and ^ pint milk 
or cream. Scald f pint vinegar, and pour over this mixture. Stir 
to a smooth paste, put back on stove, and cook 5 minutes, stirring 
all the time. 

SLAW DRESSING. 

Mrs. Frank Auker. 

Season the slaw with pepper, salt, sugar and sweet cream ; 
lastly add vinegar to the taste, stirring in slowly so as not to 
curdle. 

SOUR CREAM DRESSING. 

Mrs. John D. Martin. 

Season rich, sour cream with pepper and salt, whip it well, 
add vinegar to taste, and pour over chopped cabbage. Mix thor- 
oughly. 



SALAD DRESSINGS. 139 

WHIPPED CREAM DRESSING. 

Whip J pint sweet cream with 2 or 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 
and a saltspoon each of salt and paprika, until the cream is stiff. 
Js good with any nut or with a fruit salad. 

WIXE DRESSING. 

Mix h cup sugar with I cup sherry and 2 tablespoons Mara«- 
cliino or Madeira. 



EGGS AND CHEESE. 



BAKED EGGS. 

Boil hard and shell six eggs. Cut into 4 slices lengthwise. 
Heat a good cream dressing in a saucepan until it comes to the 
boil, adding 2 tablespoons grated cheese. Put half the slices of 
egg at the bottom of a baking dish, spread some sauce over them, 
then a second layer of each. Sprinkle the top with bread crumbs, 
and bake 10 minutes. 

BAKED OR'IELET. 

Mrs. B. F. Martin. 

Beat the yolks of 4 to 6 eggs, with butter the size of a walnut, 
a teaspoon flour, a small cup of milk, and a little salt. Stir in the 
well beaten whites. Put in a buttered dish and bake quickly. 

BEAUREGARD EGGS. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Boil 5 eggs hard ; shell, chop tlie whites fine and rub the yolks 
through a sieve. Bring h pint milk to a boil, rub a lump of butter 
size of a walnut with 1 tablespoon cornstarch, and stir smoothly 
into the boiling milk; add the white's of egg, pepper and salt to 
taste. Put 5 squares of buttered toast on a hot platter, spread 
with the sauce, sprinkle with the grated yolks, again with the 
sauce, and finish with the yolks ; dust with salt and pepper, and 
stand in the oven a moment before serving. 

BOILED EGGS. 

Put the eggs in boiling water, and let boil hard from 2 to Si- 
minutes, according to taste. Or put the eggs in a pan of cold 
water, and let boil. Take up at once. Or put the eggs in a pan, 
pour over them boiling water, cover, and set back on the stove for 
G minutes. The last 2 ways are suited to invalids. 

To boil eggs hard, put them in hot water, and let boil 10 
minutes. 

BREAD OMELET. 

Beat 3 eggs separately, add i- cup each milk and bread crumbs 
to the yolks, } teaspoon salt and a little pepper ; stir the stiff whites 
in carefully ; have a piece of butter size of a walnut hot in a pan, 
turn m the eggs, and shake to keep from sticking ; when brown 
set in the oven a moment to cook the middle ; turn out on a 
warm dish with or without folding, and serve immediately, 

140 



EGGS AND CHEESE. 141 

CHEESE BALLS. 

Mrs, George Ewing. 

Mix a small plate of grated cheese with a good dash of cay- 
enne pepper and a little salt, and stir in the white of an egg. Form 
into small balls, roll in the beaten yolk of the egg, then in fine 
cracker crumbs, and fry like doughnuts. 

CHEESE BISCUITS. 

Rub 2 tablespoons butter with 6 tablespoons flour, work in 2 
heaping tablespoons cheese, the beaten yolk of 1 egg, salt and 
cayenne pepper to taste, and enough milk for a firm paste. Roll 
the paste out ^ inch thick, cut into rounds, put in a buttered pan, 
and bake in a moderate oven about 8 minutes. If not served fresh, 
they should be heated again before serving. 

CHEESE OLIVES. 

Stone 1 dozen queen olives. Take ^ ounce Philadelphia cream 
cheese, mix with it 2 saltspoons salt, 1 saltspoon cayenne, and ^ 
teaspoon chopped parsley. Fill the olives with the prepared cheese. 

CHEESE SOUFFLfi. 

Rub 1 tablespoon butter with IJ- tablespoons flour till smooth; 
stir into ^ cup boiling milk, and cook till thick. Add 2 tablespoons 
grated cheese, take off, add salt and cayenne pepper, and the well 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs. Lastly stir in the stiff whites, turn into 
buttered cups or one dish. Put in a pan, half fill it with hot water, 
and bake in a moderate " oven about 25 minutes. Serve at once. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

Mrs. Charles Ewing. 

Break into i pound flour 2 ounces butter, and rub with the 
hands to a smooth paste. Add 2 ounces of grated cheese, the 
yolks of 2 eggs, and the white of one well beaten ; season with 
cayenne pepper and salt; mix thoroughly, roll out ^ inch thick, and 
put on a well buttered tin; then cut in very narrow strips 4 or 
5 inches long. Bake in a moderate oven 5 minutes till a golden 
brown. Serve hot, taking care not to break them in taking from 
the pan. 

COTTAGE CHEESE. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Set a pan of clabber where it will get slightly warm and the 
curds will begin to separate from the whey. Pour into a thin 
muslin bag to drain. Let drain about 12 hours. Put the curds 
in a dish, mix lightly with cream, adding salt and pepper to taste. 
' Keep it cool until used. Serve with extra cream. If the milk 
is too long in souring, or the clabber is made too hot, or stands 
too long, the cheese will be bitter or "cheesy". 



142 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW.^ 

CREAM DATES. 

Select whole dates, remove the seeds and fill the cavities with 
Philadelphia cream cheese with or without paprika. 

CURRIED EGGS. 

Put 2 small minced onions in a skillet with 2 tablespoons butter. 
When browning, stir in 2 dessertspoons curry powder. Mix well, 
then add 2 tablespoons flour, stirring quickly, and J pint of stock 
or 1 tablespoon beef extract dissolved in hot water. Simmer 10 
minutes, then add 2 tablespoons cream and six sliced hard boiled 
eggs. Serve hot. 

DEVILLED EGGS. 

Shell hard boiled eggs, and cut neatly in halves. Take out the 
yolks and mix them with the same quantity of devilled ham ; put 
back in the whites. Dish on lettuce leaves. 

The eggs are equally good mixed with plenty of salad dressing 
of any kind, omitting the ham. 

EGGS A LA CR£ME. 

Mrs. Mark Stecker. 

Boil 6 eggs hard, shell and cut crosswise in half, shaving a 

piece of the ends so they will stand upright. Mix a tablespoon 

butter with a teaspoon flour, stir into a pint of scalding milk, sea- 
son and pour over the eggs. Serve hot. 

EGGS A L'lTALIENNE. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Heat 1 cup milk, add ^ cup chopped boiled spaghetti, half a 
cup of chopped mushrooms, and one tablespoon butter; season with 
salt and pepper. Cook 2 minutes stirring constantly. Add three 
well beaten eggs, stir until the mixture begins to thicken, stir in 
1 tablespoon chopped parsley and serve. 

EGGS GRATIN. 

Boil 8 eggs hard and shell them. Rub 1 tablespoon butter with 
IJ tablespoons flour, add 1 cup milk and cream. Season with salt, 
pepper and nutmeg; stir until it boils. Dice the eggs and mix them 
with the sauce. Put in a baking dish, sprinkle a tablespoon grated 
cheese over all, and bake 8 minutes. 

EGGS WITH BROWN BUTTER. 

Brown 2 ounces butter in a frying pan; break into it care- 
fully several fresh eggs ; season and fry ; take up carefully when 
done: brown a second tablespoon butter and pour over; then pour- 
into the pan 2 tablespoons strong vinegar, let boil down, and pour 
hot over the eggs. 



rV 



EGGS AND CHEESE. 143 

ESCALLOPED CHEESE. 

Miss Emily L. Curran. 

Grate 1 pound cheese, or cut into small bits. Put in a baking 
dish in alternate layers with cracker crumhs, sprinkling each layer 
with pepper, salt and bits of butter. Fill the dish about 3 full. 
Beat up 2 eggs in enough milk to fill the dish, pour over the layers, 
and bake in the oven until a light brown. 

ESCALLOPED EGGS. 

Mrs. G. Gaus. 

Mix equal parts minced ham and fine bread crumbs, season 
with salt, pepper and melted butter, and add milk to moisten till 
quite soft. Half fill buttered patty pans with this mixture. Break 
an egg on the top of each, dust with salt and pepper, sprinkle fine 
crumbs over all, set in the oven and bake 8 minutes, serving 
immediately. 

FRIED EGGS. 

Miss Betty Martin. 

Fry several slices of bacon in a pan ; take out, break the eggs 
gently into the pan, and fry until the yolks are set; serve on a hot 
dish with the bacon. 

GOLDEN FLEECE. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Break 1 pound cheese into small pieces, melt it with i pint 
cream, stirring until smooth, season with an even half teaspoon 
of dry mustard, and 1 teaspoon of salt. Add 6 unbroken eggs, 
put cover on saucepan, and let stand 2 minutes, then remove cover, 
break up the eggs, and stir until well scrambled, and pour when 
smooth and creamy over saltines or Uneeda biscuits. 

Golden Buck is made by adding poached eggs whole when the 
cheese is served. 

MACAROXI RAREBIT. 

Detroit "Free Press." 

Break ^ pound of macaroni in small pieces and let stand in 
warm water until tender; drain, put in a stewpan with li pints milk 
and boil ten minutes ; add 1 pound cheese cut in small pieces ; 
butter size of an egg. pepper and salt. Remove from the stove 
as soon as the cheese has melted, stirring constantly to keep from 
sticking. Pour over buttered toast and serve hot. 

MUSHROO:\I OMELET. 

Put a pint of fresh mushrooms in a saucepan with a table- 
spoon of butter rolled in cornstarch. .J teacup of sweet milk, a few 
drops of lemon juice, salt and pepper. Let simmer until the 
mushrooms are tender. Make plain omelet, and pour into an 
omelet pan. When ready to turn pour half the mushrooms in 
the centre, fold over, turn and dish. Pour the rest of the mush- 
rooms around the omelet and serve immediately. 



144 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

OMAVES COLCHAVES. 

l\Irs. Frank Connell. 

Put 2 tablespoons olive oil in a hot skillet, add 3 young onions 
chopped fine, cook a few minutes, add 10 green peppers (half of 
them sweet) chopped fine, and cook some more, lastlj' a dozen 
tomatoes, and cook half an hovir longer. Serve on a platter as a bed 
for fried eggs cooked without turning. 

OMELET. 

Break 8 or 10 eggs in a I)Owl ; add 1 small teaspoon salt, a 
little pepper and 1 tablespoon cold water; beat well. Put butter size 
of an egg in a hot frying pan ; when hot cover the pan with a 
thin layer of the eggs; fry till the under edges show brown when 
lifted with a skimmer. Double over and serve. Put in a lump of 
butter for each omelet. 

OiMELETTE A LA LANGTRY. 

"Egg Cookery." 

Break in a bowl the yolks of 4 eggs ; add pepper, salt, a little 
chopped parsley, mushrooms and shallots (or a few drops of onion 
juice) ; beat up well with -1 tablespoons cream, and add the stiff 
whites of the eggs; put 2 ounces fresh butter in a frying pan; when 
it fritters pour in the omelet and stir briskl}' a moment, skimming 
the sides towards the centre till it begins to set ; when light brown 
turn out on a hot dish and serve immediately with a thin sauce 
or gravy. 

OMELETTE A LA PROVENgALE. 

Rub a hot frying pan with a clove of garlic ; put in h gill olive 
oil and when hot brown 4 sliced onions ; drain, set aside, put butter 
in the pan, and when hot fry an omelet ; spread the onions over it 
when done, fold over and serve. 

OMELETTE AUX FINES HERBES. 

SHce a few shallots, mushrooms, and a handful of parsley in 
butter or olive oil. Mix the omelet with the herbs and 2 table- 
spoons cream, and fr}' as usual. 

OMELETTE SOUFFLfiE. 

Beat the whites and yolks of six eggs separately until very 
stifif ; sweeten and flavor the yolks, mix them together and beat 
again a long time. Bake in a very hot oven until it rises very 
light and browns nicely. Serve immediately with sauce. 

OMELET WITH SPINACH. 

Prepare a little creamed spinach ; beat up an omelet, cook, and 
just before folding, spread over 3 of the spinach. Fold the omelet, 
take up, and dress the rest of the spinach on the same dish. 



EGGS AND CHEESE. ;I45 

Finely chopped ham, creamed chip hccf, jelly or any chopped 
meat may be folded into an omelet in this way. 

Peppers, either Spanish or green, are first chopped and browned 
and then mixed with the eggs before baking the omelet; croutons 
or grated cheese may be mixed with the eggs, or chopped mint or 
parsley. Parsley, cress and peppers combined with the eggs make 
a green omelet. 

POACHED EGGS. 

Place some muffin rings in a skillet of boiling water; drop an 
egg Arefully in each ring, and boil till the white is set; take up 
carefully with a skimmer, drain a second, put on a hot dish or on 
toast, put a little butter on each and dust with pepper and salt. 

RINK-TUM-DIDDY. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Cook together a finely minced onion and the pulp of i cup 
tomatoes with a large tablespoon butter. When smooth, a'dd f 
pound finely chopped cheese, stir till the mixture is smooth, add 
Worcestershire sauce and mustard to taste, and lastly stir in 1 egg. 
Pour over soda crackers. 

SCOTCH RAREBIT. 

Cut J pound rich cheese into thin slices, and put over boiling 
water to melt; stir in salt and pepper to taste, and pour over 4 
slices of buttered toast on a hot platter. 

SCRAMBLED EGGS. 

Beat six or eight eggs together very slightly, add a little salt 
and pepper, put into a hot frying pan in which a little butter is 
melted. Stir quickly as they cook until thev are cooked through 
but not hard. Serve at once on a heated dish. 

SHIRRED EGGS. 

Heat some butter in a fireproof china dish; break in the eggs 
carefully, dust with pepper and salt, spread a little cream over, 
and set in the oven 5 minutes. 

SPANISH OMELET. 

Fry 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion in 2 tablespoons melted 
butter until a light brown. Thicken with a little flour or corn- 
starch. Add gradually If cups strained tomato pulp, and 1 table- 
spoon chopped green peppers. Season with \ teaspoon salt and a 
few drops of tabasco. Capers and chopped mushrooms may also 
be added. Now beat together 4 eggs and 4 tablespoons water, 
with J teaspoon salt and pepper to taste. Cook in a buttered 
omelet pan, spread some of the sauce over it when brown, fold, 
and serve with the remaining sauce as dressing, 

10 



146 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

STODGE. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Take 2 ten cent rolls of Philadelphia or any good soft cheese, 
beat into ^ pint cream, season with salt and cayenne, and add 6 
slightly beaten eggs. Scramble and pour over hot crackers or 
toast. 

SWISS EGGS. 

Halve lengthwise 6 hardboiled eggs ; work the yolks soft with 
salt, pepper, a little nutmeg, and by degrees 2 raw yolks, 3 spoons 
double cream, and enough grated cheese for a soft paste. Fill up 
the cavities in the whites with this, round smoothly, put in a but- 
tered dish in the oven and sprinkle with cheese. Get hot and 
brown with a hot stove lid. Serve with Bechamel Sauce. 

TOMATO RAREBIT. 

Put 1 tablespoon butter in a chafing dish or saucepan and 
brown 1 small chopped onion ; add 1 cup thick, canned tomato, 1 
teaspoon salt, and a pinch of cayenne pepper and of sugar. Stir 
until it boils, then add 4 tablespoons grated cheese, and 3 raw 
eggs. Stir, and as soon as the eggs are done, serve on crackers 
or small slices of toast. 

WELSH RAREBIT, NO. 1. 

Mrs. John A. Williams. 

Put several thin slices of bacon in a frying pan and fry several 
minutes on each side. Put them on a baking plate in the oven 
and cover with slices of cheese, with bits of butter on top. Bake 
5 or 10 minutes or till the cheese is thoroughly melted. Serve im- 
mediatelv. 

WELSH RAREBIT, NO. 2. 

Put 1 gill Bass's ale in a saucepan with 1 tablespoon Worcester- 
shire sauce, and 1 saltspoon cayenne pepper. As soon as it boils 
briskly, add 1 pound rich grated cheese, and stir until melted and 
very hot. Have 6 slices of hot fresh toast on 6 hot dishes, pour 
the cheese over the pieces of toast, and serve immediately. 

A freshly poached egg is a good addition to a Welsh rarebit. 



SANDWICHES. 



Every variety of bread is used in making sandwiches. 
When white bread is wanted, tlie reguhir baker's sandwich loaves 
are the best a day old. Cut the crust from the loaf first and 
butter each slice before cutting it as thin as possible. After filling 
and covering they are cut in any shape wanted. For rolling, take 
fresh loaves, even warm. If they must be kept some hours before 
serving, wrap them in a napkin wrung dry from boiling water. 
Serve on a plate covered with a doily. 

CAVIAR SANDWICHKS. 

Cut slices of bread into squares of 4 inches, butter on one side 
and toast nicely. Cover the buttered side with a thin layer of 
Caviar, lay a few pickled oysters on top, having removed the hard 
part, put over a few drops of onion juice, and ornament with olive 

CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Cut slices of Boston brown bread very thin. Spread with 
Philadelphia cream cheese, beaten up with a rich sweet cream, 
and, if liked, a sprinkling of cayenne pepper. Put 2 together, and 
cut in half. Or, spread with grated cheese, with or without chopped 
nuts. 

CHEESE AND NUT SANDWICHES. 

IMrs. George Leyshon. 

Chop hickory nuts or English walnuts with an cf|ual bulk of 
Philadelphia cream cheese, or Neuchatel ; add a little mayonnaise 
dressing. Cut very thin slices of bread and spread without butter. 
Cover. If desired, a lettuce leaf may be laid on tlie bread first, 
and covered with the mixture. 

CHERRY SANDWICHES. 

Chop candied cherries very fine, adding a few drops at a 
time of sherry or orange juice ; spread on water thin crackers. 

CLUB SANDWICHES (CHICKEN). 

Cut 12 rather thick slices from a loaf of sandwich bread, 
toast and butter. Cover 6 with thin slices of cooked chicken, 
season with salt and pepper. Broil 6 very thin slices of lean bacon 
1 minute on each side, cut in two and lay over the chicken. Put a 
fresh lettuce leaf with a little mayonnaise over each slice, cover 
with the other 6 pieces of toast, trim the crusts off with a sharp 
knife, and cut in two diagonally. Place in the oven a couple of 

147 



148 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

minutes before serving. Thin slices of ham may take the place 
of the bacon. 

Duck, lamb, veal, and lobster club sandwiches are made in the 
same way. 

For ham club sandwiches, broil thin slices of ham, and omit 
the bacon. 

For sardine club sandwiches, skin and remove the bones of the 
sardines, and spread a little French mustard over them,- finishing 
like the chicken sandwiches. 

For anchovy club sandwiches spread the toast witli anchovy 
butter, arrange the anchovies over them, and proceed as with 
chicken. 

For egg club sandwiches, fry 6 eggs and proceed as with 
chicken. 

For cheese club sandwiches, lay a thin slice Swiss cheese over 
the toasts, and proceed as with chicken. 

CREAM OF CHICKEN SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Take the white meat of a chicken, chop fine and pound it to 
a paste ; put 1 teaspoon gelatin in 2 tablespoons cold water, and 
stand it over the fire till dissolved, then stir it into the cliicken 
with 1 teaspoon grated horseradish and \ teasnoon salt. Stir till 
it begins to thicken, then add ^ pint cream whipped stiff, and set 
away to get very cold. Cut the slices of bread a little thicker 
than for ordinary fancy sandwiches ; butter, and spread with this 
cream mixture, trim off crusts, and cut into shape, but do not 
cover with bread. Garnish the tops with sliced olives, capers or 
tips of celery. 

DREAM CAKES. 

Miss McMath. 

Rub together I pound grated American cheese, salt, red pepper, 
and enough cream to make a smooth paste. ]Make sandwiches 
with the cheese for filling, and fry slowly in butter on both sides. 
Serve very hot. The bread may be buttered first, and the sand- 
wiches baked. It is also good with the grated cheese alone. 

DREAMS. 
Miss Beall Ewing. 

Cut thin slices of bread, cut off the crusts, put them together 
with thin slices of cheese as for sandwiches, without buttering. 
Put a small lump of butter ui a chafing dish, and when it bubbles 
put in the dreams ; brown on both sides. A dropped egg on each 
dream is a nice addition. 

EGG SANDWICHES. 

Cut thin slices of hardboiled eggs, lay them on thin slices of 
bread and butter, season, put a little mustard and cress over them, 
cover, and cut off crusts. Or, mash fine the yolks of 6 hard boiled 
eggs, mix with 2 tablespoons each of cream and olive oil, ^ tea- 
spoon salt, and a good pinch of paprika, or less cayenne pepper. 
Finish as ham sandwiches. 



SANDWICHES. 149 

GERMAN SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Butter and cut thin slices from a loaf of rye bread. _ Spread 
each slice with a thin layer of liinburger cheese. Cover with very 
thin slices of bologna, and then a thin piece of pumpernickel. 
Cover with a second slice of bread and cheese. Do not cut oft 
the crusts. 

HAM SANDWICHES. 

Chop cold, boiled ham very fine, and mix with 2 tablespoons 
melted butter, a little onion juice, and a pinch of cayenne pepper 
to each cup of ham. Cut the crusts off a sandwich loaf, butter 
and cut very thin slices. These may be covered with a buttered 
slice, or rolled, the edge pressed firm, and tied with ribbon. 

Tongue sandwiches are made the same way. 

LETTUCE SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. J. W. Holleran. 

Cut thin slices of bread ; butter, and put together by twos with 
strips of lettuce between, spread with mayonnaise, and if liked, 
several thin slices of onions. Cut the crusts off all around. 

LOBSTER SANDWICHES. 

Cut canned or freshly boiled lobster into dice: sprinkle with 
salt red pepper and tarragon or other vinegar. Let stand a few 
minutes, and sprinkle with melted butter. As soon as it is cool, 
place on thin, buttered slices of bread, cover with a second but- 
tered slice, trim off the crusts and cut the size wanted. 

MARMALADE SANDWICHES. 

Cover tl.in slices of buttered bread with any kind of mar- 
malade: roll and press the edge, then tie with baby ribbon. 

Preserved ginger cut in thin slices and used like the marmal- 
ade is good. 

NUT SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. A E Faine. 

Cream i cup butter with 1 cup granulated sugar: add 1 tea- 
spoon vanilla and 1 cup nutmeats. Spread on very thinly sliced 
bread, and sprinkle thickly with chopped nuts. 

OLIVE SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. Hampton D. Ewing. 

Chop Stuffed olives quite fine; cut sandwich bread very thin, 
spread each slice with a mayonnaise dressing, then a layer of olives 
on the under slice and cover. Trim and cut as usual. 



150 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

OYSTER SANDWICHES. 

Cut thin slices of bread the size wanted, remove the crusts 
and toast. Cover closely with pickled oysters, cutting out the hard 
part, dust with red pepper, and cover with a highly seasoned 
mavonnaise. Do not cover. 



PARISIAN CANAPfiS. 

Ysaguirre and LaMarca. 

Cut thin slices of stale bread into small oblongs, and cut off 
the crusts. Fry in butter to a light brown. Spread each piece 
with anchovy butter, and place on each a boned anchovy ; sprinkle 
over them finely chopped olives and chopped chives, if at hand. 

PAT£ DE FOIE GRAS SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

One can will make 24 sandwiches. Remove the fat and mash 
the foie gras to a perfectly smooth paste, adding gradually 4 table- 
spoons soft butter, ^ teaspoon salt, a pinch of pepper and about 
10 drops onion juice; press the whole through a sieve.- Have thin 
slices of bread cut into fancy shapes and toasted ; spread thickly 
with the paste, and garnish with olives and white of hard boiled egg 
cut in rings or fancy shapes. Do not cover. 

PEANUT SANDWICHES. 

Shell and grate very fine 1 quart roasted peanuts ; add 1 
Philadelphia cream cheese; mix to a smooth paste. Spread thin 
slices of bread, put 2 together, trim edges, and cut small. Or, 
butter and cut thin slices of brown bread, cover with finely chopped 
peanuts, and salt. 

PICNIC SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Take a fresh French roll, cut the top off neatly, and scoop out 
the inside. Chop the white meat of 1 chicken fine with 2 ounces 
cold tongue or ham, chop very fine 1 large green pepper, 1 cucumber 
pickle, 4 oliVes, and mix all together with 1 tablespoon capers, 
and a good mayonnaise dressing. Fill the roll, put on the top crust, 
and serve at once. 



PIMENTO SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. Frank Connell. 

1 small can of sweet pimentoes put through a grinder and then 
rubbed to a paste with 1 small sized package of Philadelphia cream 
cheese. Trim tb.e crust off a small loaf, slice thin and spread with 
this paste. 



SANDWICHES. 151 

ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES. 

Take the remains of cold roast beef; mince it very fine; mix 
1 teaspoon each of melted butter and Worcestershire sauce, 1 table- 
spoon tomato catsup, and i teaspoon salt to each j puit of meat ; 
stir the meat into the sauce. Spread on tlian buttered slices of bread. 
Cover. 

SARDINE SANDWICHES. 

Cut slices of bread about h inch thick, cut off crusts, butter and 
toast l/ake the skin and bones from 1 box sardines, lay them 
carefullv over the toast, sprinkle with chopped olives and capers, 
and 1 teaspoon lemon to each toast. Do not cover. 

WORKMAN'S CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Mix 1 cup cottage cheese with 2 tablespoons melted butter, '2 
tablespoons thick cream, and .} teaspoon salt. Beat till smooth and 
light Cut brown bread into slices h inch thick, spread with. the 
cheese cover half of them with very thin slices of white bread, 
and put the other slices of brown bread and cheese on top. Do 
not trim. 



PUDDINas AND DESSERTS. 



AIR BALLS. 

Mrs. Dick Spicer. 

Make a dough as for cream tartar biscuits, cut in small squares, 
and fry like douglmuts in hot fat. Drain on paper. Have some 
molasses simmering hot, dip these balls in and serve hot. 

ALMOND CUSTARD. 

Put in a double boiler 1 pint new milk, 1 cup sugar, } pound 
blanched and pounded almonds, 2 spoonfuls rosewater, and the 
yolks of 4 eggs. Stir over a slow fire until the consistency of 
cream, then remove it and put it in a pudding dish. Beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff froth with a little sugar, spread over 
the top and put in the oven to brown. 

AMERICAN CREAM. 

Cover ^ box gelatin with \ cup cold water and let soak ^ hour. 
Put H- pints milk in a double boiler and let come to the boil : add 
the gelatin, stir till dissolved, strain and stand aside to cool. When 
cold add 1 cup sugar and the juice and rind of 1 lemon, turn into 
a mould and put in a cold place to harden. Serve with Cream or 
Vanilla Sauce. 

APPLE CHARLOTTE. 

Pare and steam 6 large apples till tender ; rub them through 
the colander, sweeten to taste, and add J box gelatin which has 
been soaking in cold water. Stir till dissolved. Pour into a 
basin, set it in cracked ice, stir hard till it begins to thicken ; then 
add carefully 1 pint of cream whipped. Put in a mould, and set 
in a cold place to harden. 

Other fruit or fruit juices may be used in the same way. 

APPLE CUSTARD. 

Mrs. A. R. Koon. 

Make a good custard as for pies. Slice verj- thin several 
ripe mellow apples, cover the bottom of a baking dish, and pour the 
custard over them. Bake about 20 minutes in a slow oven. Serve 
with a cream sauce, or sweetened milk, flavored with lemon. 

152 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 153 

APPLEDORE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Line a pudding dish with stale cake. Fill to within 3 inches of 
the top with fresh berries or currants. Allow ^ cup of sugar to 
swell the berries, or 1 cup to currants. Cover the whole with cake, 
and wet it with 1 cup wine. Bake J hour, and frost with whites 
of 2 eggs and 1 cup sugar beaten to a stiff froth. Brown. 

APPLE DOWDY. 

Butter a baking dish and line the bottom and sides witli but- 
tered slices of bread with the crusts cut off. Fill with sliced apples, 
grate over them a little nutmeg. Mix ^ cup water and ^ cup 
molasses, and pour over the apples ; sprinkle over this } cup brown 
sugar, and cover with slices of buttered bread. Cover with a tin 
plate, and bake in a moderate oven 2 hours. Turn out on a dish, 
and serve hot with sugar and cream. 

BAKED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. Jno. A. Connor. 

Make a rich biscuit dough, roll out thin, cut in squares, fill with 
pared and quartered apples, and fold over the edges. Put 1 cup 
sugar, 1 pint water, butter the size of an egg, and a little grated nut- 
meg into a pan on the stove. When boiling, drop in the dumplings, 
set in the oven and bake 1 hour. Serve in the sauce in the pan. If 
it should boil away too fast, add more boiling water. 

STEAMED APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

1 pound suet chopped very fine ; 1 pound flour ; 1 heaping 
teaspoon salt ; mix all thoroughly adding cold water enough to 
make a paste; roll as thin as pie crust; pare a dozen large apples, 
quarter and core them, put the quarters together again and cover 
each apple with a square of the paste ; then butter slightly the 
bottom of a steamer and lay in your dumplings. Steam 1 hour. 
Serve with hard sauce or with a hot cream sauce. 

APPLE FOLLY. 

Mrs. H. W. Miller. 

Beat up 1 cup of the pulp from baked apples with 2 cups of 
sugar, and the whites of 3 eggs for ^ hour, and serve with a good 
boiled custard. 

APPLE FRITTERS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Wm. Patterson. 

Take 1 pint sour milk, add 1 teaspoon soda, and mix in flour 
enough to make a batter. Peel and core large apples, slice clear 
across, dip the slices in the batter, and fry on both sides in hot 
fat. Roll in granulated sugar, and serve hot. 



154 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

APPLE FRITTERS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Mark Stecker. 

Beat 2 eggs togetlier until light ; add 1 cup milk, a pinch of salt 
and 1 cup flour or enough to make a thin batter. Add 1 teaspoon 
baking powder and Ijeat until smooth. Chop 2 or 3 sweet apples 
fine, mix with batter, and fry in hot butter. Drain and sprinkle 
with pulverized sugar. 

APPLE MERINGUE. 

Boil peeled and cored apples until tender in a rich syrup ; 
set on a dish, cover with a meringue, and set in the oven until 
browned. Serve hot. 

APPLE PUDDING, NO. \. 

l\Irs. Hugh Ewing. 

Boil apples with a little orange peel until soft, and mash them 
through a colander. Cream 1 pound butter and 2 of sugar, add the 
apples and 10 well beaten eggs, 1 wineglass of wine, brandy and 
rosewater mixed, 1 teaspoon each of cinnamon and nutmeg. Line 
dish with pufif paste, put in the mixture and bake. 

APPLE PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Miss Kate ?Iazelton. 

Sift together IJ cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, and a 
pinch of salt ; mix with f cup water. Put 3 pints finely chopped 
apples in a saucepan with 3 teaspoons cinnamon, a pinch of salt and 
sugar to taste. Cover with the freshly made dough, put a lid over 
the pan and stew slowly for ^ hour. Take off the lid, and place in 
the oven to brown. Serve with cream or a hot sauce. 

APPLE SPONGE. 

Boil 1 pound of sugar in h pint of water until clear. Pare, 
core and slice 1 pound apples into the syrup. Stew till tender. 
Cover h box gelatin with cold water and let soak while the apples 
are cooking; stir together and rub through a sieve, add the juice 
of 2 lemons and the grated rind of one, and stir till cold. Beat the 
whites of 3 eggs stiff, stir in and beat until cold and thick, then 
pour into a mould to harden. Serve on a dish with Sabayon* sauce 
around it made from the yolks of the eggs. 

Peaches, apricots or quinces may be used in the same way, 
suiting the flavoring to the fruit. 

APPLES PRALINfiES. 

Filippini. 

Peel and core 6 good apples. Put \ cup sugar and 1} pints 
water in a saucepan, and as soon as it boils add the apples and 
boil until done. Take them up and arrange on a dish. Blanch and 



PUDDINGS AND DESSHRTS. 155 

chop 2 ounces almonds; put over the fire in a saucepan with 3 
tablespoons sugar, i cup water, and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Stir until 
nicely browned. Fill the hollows of the apples with currant jelly, 
spread the almonds over the apples, and serve cold. 

APRICOT JELLY. 

Put a can of apricots in a saucepan with .1 pound sugar, and let 
boil a few minutes; strain off the syrup; if canned with skins and 
stones, remove them ; let get cold. Dissolve i box gelatin in a little 
water; add 1 pint of the syrup; boil and clarify wath white of 
egg. Pour a little jelly in the bottom of the m'ould ; when set, 
place a few apricots over it: add more jelly and apricots alter- 
'lately till the mould is full; let get very cold, turn out of the 
mould and serve with whipped cream. All bought canned fruits 
make good desserts treated in this way. 

BAKED FLOUR PUDDING. 

1^, pints buttermilk, 1 cup cream, 4 well beaten eggs, 2 tea- 
spoons soda in the milk, flour enough for a thin batter. If you 
have no cream, take that much more buttermilk. Butter a pudding 
dish, pour the batter in and bake until done. Serve hot with any 
hot sauce or cream and sugar. 

BANANA CREAM. 

Skin and mash five ripe bananas with o ounces sugar ; whip 
J pint creani ; add the bananas, the juice of 2 lemons, and, if you 
use it, I wineglass brandy ; mix in well i ounce gelatin dissolved 
in a little hot water; beat well a few minutes, fill a mould and 
keep in a cool place till firm. 

BANANA FRITTERS. 

Mrs. Margaret Abram. 

Beat 2 eggs with 1 cup milk, 1 cup flour, i teaspoon baking 
powder in the flour, and } teaspoon salt. Peel six bananas, slice 
them lengthwise, dip in the batter, and drop in boiling fat. 

BANANA PUDDING. 

Beat together 1 tablespoon butter, i cup sugar, 3 yolks of egg, 
and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Add 3 sliced bananas, and 1 cup sifted 
flour. Mix gently. Add the well beaten whites of the eggs, put 
in a buttered pudding mould and bake in a moderate oven 40 
minutes. Turn out on a dish and serve hot with raspberry sauce. 

BANANA SHORTCAKE. 

Make a plain layer cake and let get cold. About 1 hour be- 
fore serving, make a syrup of U cups sugar, 4 tablespoons hot 
water, and the juice of 2 lemons. Slice 6 bananas, and let infuse 
in the syrup, turning occasionally. When ready to serve, put a 
thick layer on the top of each cake, sprinkle with chopped walnuts, 
put together, and heap whipped cream over it. 



156 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BATTER PUDDING. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Put 1 quart milk in a double boiler reserving enough to wet 
7 tablespoons flour. Beat in ;J eggs with the milk and flour, and 
pour this into the boiling milk. Add a little salt, and if berries 
are wanted, 1 cup berries and i more flour. Boil 2 hours without 
any interruption. Serve hot with lemon sauce. Any fresh or 
canned fruit may be used. 

BISCUIT PUDDING. 

Mrs. Lena Moseman. 

Prepare a good biscuit dough, cut into biscuits, one at a time 
lay half of them at the bottom of cups, spread with fresh or 
canned fruit, and put a second biscuit over each one. Put the 
cups in a steamer, cover with the lid, put over a pot of boiling 
water, and steam half an hour or more till done. Serve with 
cream and sugar, or any sauce liked. 

BLACKBERRY PUDDING. 

Mrs. Ralph Wilson. 

Beat together f cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1|- cups flour, 4 eggs, 
3 tablespoons sweet cream, 1 teaspoon soda, and 1 cup canned 
blackberry juice. Bake in a dripping pan, and serve hot with 
sauce. 

BLACKBERRY SPONGE. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Cover \ box gelatin with \ cup cold water, and soak for |- 
hour. Pour over it 1 pint boiling water, add ^ cup sugar, and stir 
till dissolved; add ^ pint blackberry juice and strain into a tin 
basin set in cracked ice, stirring occasionally until cold. Add the 
stitf whites of 4 eggs, and beat until smooth ; turn into a mould 
to harden. Turn out on a dish and serve with vanilla sauce poured 
around it. 

For Raspberry Sponge, double the quantity of juice. 

For Currant Sponge, take currant juice in place of blackberry, 
twice as much sugar, and half as much water. 

For Strawberry Sponge, double the juice and sugar, and use 
half the quantity of water. 

For Orange Sponge, double the sugar, and use the juice of 
5 large oranges. 

For Lemon Sponge, use the juice of 3 lemons in place of the 
b'ackberry juice, and 2\ cups sugar. 

BLACK CURRANT PUDDING. 

Mrs. Jonah Webb. 

Chop beef suet very fine, mix with enough flour and water 
for a good, soft dough ; add a pinch of salt and one of baking 
powder ; roll out in a sheet. Grease a pudding bowl, line the sides 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 157 

with the paste, fill with the currants, sjirinklc well with sugar, 
cover with a top crust, and that with floured cloth, and boil 2J- 
hours. Serve with a hot sauce. 

BLANC MANGE. 

Mrs. Katie Callahan. 

Dissolve 3 heaping tablespoons corn starch and the same 
amount of sugar in 1 pint milk, add whites of 3 well beaten eggs, 
and pour into 1 pint boiling milk; stir continuously till it boils 
again. Take off. flavor to suit the taste, and pour into cold moulds. 
Serve cold with cream and currant jellj^. The eggs may be 
omitted. 

BOMBAY PUDDING. 

"The Housekeeper's Friend." 

To a good, sweet custard, add a little butter, a little nutmeg 
, and a glass of wine. Mix in a grated cocoanut. Line a dish 
with puff paste, fill and bake a light brown. 

BREAD PUDDING, NO. I. 

"The Housekeeper's Friend." 

Cut a loaf of baker's bread in slices, spread each with butter, 
put it in a pan and pour a quart of boiling milk over it, letting it 
stand over night. In the morning add 7 eggs (very light), \ pound 
sugar, 1 pound raisins, and spices to taste, cinnamon, nutmeg and 
mace. Bake as you would pound cake and eat with a sauce. 

BREAD PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Miss Bertha Truax. 

Beat 3 eggs very light, add 1 quart milk, sugar, vanilla and 
allspice to taste, and about a cup of bread crumbs. Bake till done. 
Serve with cream. 

BREAD AND BUTTER PUDDING. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

Cut i inch slices from a small loaf stale bread ; butter well 
and place in a buttered pudding dish butter side down ; beat 3 
eggs slightly, add J cup sugar, ^ teaspoon salt and 1 quart milk : 
strain over the bread and let stand 30 minutes. Bake in a slow 
oven 1 hour, keeping the dish covered the first half hour. Brown 
well, and serve hot with hard sauce, or any plain sauce. If liked, 
f cup raisins may be parboiled, seeded and sprinkled between the 
layers. 

BROWN BETTY. 

Mrs. Peter Curtis. 

^ cup brown sugar, \ cup butter, 1 pint soft bread crumbs, 
juice of ^ lemon. 

Melt the butter and add to the crumbs. Put a layer of the 
crumbs in a baking dish, then a layer of sliced apples, and sprinkle 
with sugar and lemon juice. Put more crumbs on top, and bake 
until apples are done. Serve hot with hard sauce. 



158 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

Butter a pudding mould (1 quart). Cut from a firm loaf of 
bread a number of slices J inch thick. Cut again about 30 round 
pieces an inch in breadth from these slices, and soak them for 
10 minutes in a custard made of 2 raw eggs beaten up with 1 
tablespoon powdered sugar and J cup cream. Chop very fine 6 
slices of candied pineapple, and a number of good nutmeats, and 
mix them. Arrange the bread and the pineapple in the mould in 
alternate laj-ers, seeing that the last is bread. Gradualh' fill up 
the mould to the top of the bread with an uncooked vanilla cus- 
tard. Put in the oven in a pan filled with water half the height 
of the mould, and bake in a moderate heat 1 hour. Turn out on 
a hot dish and serve with a hot pineapple sauce. 

CARAMEL CREAM. 

Boil 1 ounce powdered sugar with 2 tablespoons cold water 
till a light brown. Pour in the bottom of a pudding mould. Bea^ 
together the yolks of 3 eggs and the whites of 2 with 2 ounces 
fine sugar, 1 cup milk, J cup cream, and h teaspoon vanilla. Strain 
into the mould. Put in the oven in a deep pan, and pour in boil- 
ing water half the height of the mould. Cook 20 minutes. Let 
get cold, then turn out on a dish, and serve with the liquor of the 
caramel. 

Chocolate Caramel Cream is made by adding 3 ounces sweet- 
ened chocolate to the cream. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE, NO. 1. 

Line a quart pudding mould with split lady fingers. Whip 
J pint rich, sweet cream, let stand 2 minutes, then add 3 ounces 
powdered sugar and 2 teaspoons vanilla, and whip again for 5 
minutes. Fill up the mould, turn out on a cold dish, decorate with 
extra whipped cream, and serve. 

Coffee Charlotte needs 2 tablespoons strong coffee added to 
the whipped cream. Other flavorings may be used. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Cover I box gelatin with cold water and let soak ^ hour. 
Whip and drain 1 quart rich cream. Line 2 quart moulds with ^ 
pound lady fingers, put the bowl of cream in a pan of cracked 
ice; add just enough boiling water to the gelatin to dissolve it: 
whip f cup powdered sugar in with the cream, then 1 teaspoon 
vanilla and 4 tablespoons sherry (if you use wine), and lastly 
strain in the gelatin. Stir inmnediately from the sides and bottom 
of the bowl till it be<rins to thicken, then pour into the moulds 
and set away to harden. 

CHARTREUSE D'ORANGES. 

"The People's Cook Book." 

Make a clear orange jelly with U nints water, 6 oranges, 
sugar to taste, and 1} ounces gelatin. Divide 3 oranges into quar- 
ters, cut off all the rind, remove the seeds, and slice in several 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 159 

pieces lengthwise. Take 2 plain moulds, one considerably smaller 
than the other; pour a little of the jelly into the larger mould; 
when set, place a layer of orange slices over it, and cover with 
enough jelly to make a smooth surface; put on ice till quite firm. 
Place the small mould exactly in the centre of the other, put 
orange slices around it and fill up with the rest of the jelly. Fut 
the mould on the ice. Whip 1 pint cream stiff with ^ ounce dis- 
solved gelatin and some sweetened orange juice added a verv 
little at a time. When the jelly is set, remove the small mould 
by pouring hot water into it, and fill up the hole with the cream. 
Set on ice for an hour, turn out of the mould and serve. 

The gelatin is not a necessity for the cream if tlic latter is 
rich. 

CHERRY DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. Evan Jones. 

Prepare a biscuit dough as for shortcake ; roll thin and cut 
into pieces G inches square. Put 2 tablespoons pitted cherries in 
tlie centres, then bring up each corner of the square to the centre, 
cut a tiny square on top, and crimp the edge ; put the dumplings 
in a baking pan, and pour in a syrup made of 1 cup granulated 
sugar and 2 cups water. Bake 20 minutes in a hot oven, basting 
often. Serve with a cherrv sauce. 



CHERRY PUDDING, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Charles Sweeney. 

Beat up 1 cup sugar with 1 tablespoon butter, and 1 well beaten 
egg: add i cup water, and flour enough to stiffen: put 2 teaspoons 
baking powder in the flour. Seed and sweeten 1 quart cherries ; 
grease a pudding pan, pour i the batter into the pan, spread the 
cherries over, and pour the rest of the batter on top. Bake slowly 
for 1 hour. Serve with milk or a cherry sauce. 

The batter may be made with milk if preferred. 

CHERRY PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Four ounces of dry bread diced ; mix with 1 cup lukewarm 
milk, squeeze the milk out lightly. Put the bread with 1 table- 
spoon butter, 1 saltspoon salt, 3 eggs, 3 ounces preserved cherries 
chopped (or candied cherries), 1 teaspoon vanilla and 4 table- 
spoons cream ; beat well together for 5 minutes. Put in a buttered 
pudding mould, and bake in a pan filled with hot water in a 
moderate oven for 20 minutes. Turn on a dish, pour a Sabayon 
sauce over it and serve hot. 

CHERRY TAPIOCA. 

Wash the tapioca well, cover with cold water and soak over 
night. In the morninc. put on the fire with 1 pint boiling water, 
and simmer slowlv till nerfectly clear. Stone li- pounds sour 
cherries, stir into the boiling tapioca, and sweeten to taste. Turn 



160 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

into the dish in which they are to be served, and put where it 
will get very cold. Serve with sugar and cream. 

Orange tapioca requires 1 dozen oranges to 1 cup tapioca. 

Peach tapioca takes 1 quart can peaches. 

Raspberry and strawberry tapioca require 1 quart berries. 

Sago may be used instead of tapioca. 

CHESTNUT CREAM. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Scald 1 pound French or Italian chestnuts and remove the 
outer shell. Boil 20 minutes and rub off the inner coating. Chop 
very fine, add J pint cream, sweeten slightly and beat to a stiff 
froth. Must be served very cold. If the cream is very thick add 
a little milk. 

CHOCOLATE BAVARIAN CREAM. 

Melt 2 ounces chocolate in a saucepan ; add 1 pint hot milk 
and stir until it comes to a boil. Beat up 3 yolks of eggs with 3 
tablespoons sugar and 1 teaspoon vanilla and stir into the milk, 
cooking for several minutes but not boiling. Stir in 1 ounce 
gelatin until dissolved, strain the whole into a bowl ; set the bowl 
on the ice and beat until it begins to thicken, then add 1 cup 
whipped cream, and mix gently. Pour into a mould, cover tightly 
and bury in a tub with broken ice and salt for 2 hours. Turn 
out on a cold dish and serve. This is also good kept in a cold 
place without the freezing, but it takes longer to get done. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM. 

Melt \ ounce Baker's chocolate in a double boiler, stir in 2 
tablespoons sugar, and, slowly, 1 pint rich cream ; stir till perfectly 
smooth. Then add the stiff whites of 4 eggs, and cook 3 minutes, 
stirring all the time. Pour into a dish and serve cold. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING, NO. 1. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Take 6 tablespoons grated chocolate, 10 tablespoons grated 
breadcrumbs, 1 quart milk. Boil together to the consistency of 
pap ; when cold, add 1 cup brown sugar, and 6 eggs, leaving out 
the whites of two. Bake until done. Then make an icing of the 
2 whites of egg and 6 tablespoons of. sugar, and spread over the 
top, browning in the oven. WTien served hot, no sauce is needed ; 
when cold, cream is nice. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Make a solid chocolate cake in a pan with a . tube in the 
centre. Serve hot. filling the hollow with and pouring over the 
cake at the last moment, whipped cream. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. J 61 

CHRISTMAS ALMOND TART. 

Mrs. H. C. Begland. 

Blanch and chop fine f pound almonds, mix with a large 
saucer of grated stale bread ; beat separately until very light the 
yolks of 6 eggs and the whites of 12, add 1 pound white sugar, 
the crumbs, and the juice and grated rind of 1 lemon. Bake in a 
slow oven 1 hour. 

COCOANUT BLANC MANGE. 

Miss Nye. 

Put 1 quart milk in a double boiler, let it come to the boil, 
then stir in 1 grated cocnauut and 3 even tal)lespoons corn-starcli 
mixed with enough cold water to soften, and sugar to taste. Boil 
5 hour, stirring occasionally ; then take it off the fire and stir in 
the beaten whites of 4 eggs. Put in a mould, and when cold turn 
out and serve with cream. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. (White House.) 

Mrs. Taft. 

Melt over the fire butter the size of an egg, a cup of sugar 
and a tablespoon of water. Boil for a couple of minutes and 
then pour into a bowl to let cool. Mix with it half a grated 
cocoanut, a tablespoon of small cuts of citron, the grated rind 
and juice of half a lemon, the yolks of 4 eggs (beaten separately), 
and lastly the whites beaten to a stiff froth. Fill little paper cases 
and bake immediately. Can be served hot or cold. 

COCOANUT RICE. 

Filippiiii. 

Take the milk from 2 good sized cocoanuts and place in a 
saucepan with 1 pint cold milk, and the shredded white part of 
1 cocoanut, 8 ounces raw rice, 2 ounces sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla 
essence and 1 saltspoon salt. Cook slowly for 40 minutes stirring 
from the bottom to prevent scorching. Stir in 1 fresh egg until 
very hot. Take off, stir in well 1 cup whipped cream and serve. 

COFFEE BAVARIAN CREAM. 

Cover ^ box gelatin with cold water and let soak i hour. 
Then add 1 cup strong boiling coffee ; add 1 cup sugar and stir 
till dissolved. Strain and let .stand till cool. Then add 1 cup milk 
and 1 pint cream whipped ; mix well, turn into a mould and set in 
a cold place to harden. 

Caramel Bavarian Cream is made as above using double the 
quantity of milk, 2 tablespoons caramel, and J cup sherry in place 
of the coffee. 

11 



162 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

COFFEE CREAM. 

Boil 1 pint milk with 1 pint cream and h teaspoon vanilla for 
1 minute. Beat the yolks of 5 eggs well with \ cup sugar, pour 
the hot milk over it, return to the stove and cook without boiling 
for 5 minutes. Strain J cup very strong, freshly made coffee into 
the cream, turn into a nice bowl, and serve in the bowl when 
thoroughly cold. 

CORNSTARCH PUDDING. 

INIrs. Harrison Crawford. 

Put a quart of milk in a double boiler, bring to tlie boil, add 
3 tablespoons sugar, a pinch of salt, butter size of a walnut, 'i 
tablespoons cornstarcli mixed with a little of the milk kept out, 
and, as it begins to thicken, the beaten yolks of 3 eggs. Put in 
moulds to cool, turn out, and serve with the beaten whites of the 
eggs and sugar, or with whipped cream. 

Chocolate cornstarch requires 2 tablespoons grated chocolate 
added to this recipe. 

COTTAGE PUDDING, NO. 1. 

Miss Elizabeth Morgan. 

Beat together 2 eggs and a cup of sugar, add. 2 cups cream, 1 
pint of flour with 1^ teaspoons baking powder sifted in, and a 
pinch of salt. Mix into a smooth batter as for cake. Bake in a 
bread or cake pan in a hot oven 3U minutes. Serve with a hot 
liquid sauce. 

COTTAGE PUDDING, NO 2. 

Mrs. Robert Sines. 

Cream 2 cups sficar with \ pound butter, add 2 eggs beaten 
light, 1 quart flour siftecf with 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 2 cups 
milk, and 1 teaspoon soda in the milk. Bake J hour in a buttered 
dripping pan. Serve with wine sauce. 

CRANBERRY ROLY POLY. 

Sift 1 teaspoon soda and 2 teaspoons cream tartar in 1 quart 
flour. Mix into a soft dou?h with sweet milk, roll out thin, cut 
oblong, and spread over it 1 auart cranberries sprinkled well with 
^igar. Dust with a little flour and roM over and over, then tie 
in a pudding cloth and steam for 1 hour, .^nv tart fruit is good 
used the same way, or blackberry and other jams may be used, 

CREAM FRITTERS. 

Mrs. Helen Campbell. 

Boil 1 quart of milk and thicken with 1 tablespoon of corn- 
starch dissolved in a little cold water. Add 1 large tablespoon of 
butter, 1 cup of sugar, \ teaspoon salt, 1 cup blanched and chopped 
almonds, and 1 tablespoon orange water. Boil for five minutes. 
Take from the fire, and stir in 6 well beaten eggs ; spread about 
an inch thick on an oiled platter and allow to cool. When cool, 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 163 

cut in strips an incli wide and three long; roll carefully in fine 
crumbs, dip in beaten egg, and then again in crumbs, and fry in 
boiling lard. Drain on brown paper, dust with powdered sugar, 
and serve hot. 

CROQU.WTE OF PEACHES. 

Boil 1 pound sugar in i pint water till the crack ; take off the 
fire. Rub a plain 2 quart mould with melted butter ; take 18 pared, 
halved and stoned, ripe peaches ; take one at a time on a wooden 
skewer, dip in the syrup, then dip a maraschino cherry in the 
syrup and fill the hole left by the stone, and press the peach 
against the side of the mould, so continuing until it is entirely 
lined ; then stand in a cold place to harden. When cold fill with 
Charlotte Russe, omitting the cake. Keep in a cold place for 2 
hours. When served, put a plate over the mould, turn upside 
down, put a hot cloth around the mould and carefully remove it. 

CUP PUDDING. 

Mrs. T. S. Johnson. 

Take 2 eggs, and beat to a smooth batter with milk, flour, 
baking powder in the flour, and a little salt. P>utter a basin, put 
the pudding in, cover with a floured cloth, put in a kettle of boil- 
ing water, and boil J hour. Serve with a hard sauce. 

CURRANT SOP. 

Mrs. Raynor. 

Cut thick slices of bread into 2 inch squares, arrange in a dish, 
and pour over them fresh currant syrup made as for jelly, allow- 
ing J pint sugar to 1 pint juice. When cold, set it on the ice till 
wanted. 

BAKED CUSTARD. 

Mrs. Jolin Grandy. 

Beat 4 eggs until light, add \ cup sugar, beat again, add 1 
quart milk, J of a grated nutmeg, and stir till the sugar is dis- 
solved. Pour into custard cups or into a baking dish. Place in 
a pan of boiling water in a cool oven, and bake imtil the custards 
are set, i. e., firm in the centre. Take out of the water and stand 
away to cool. 

BOILED CUSTARD. 

Mrs. Wm. Hoskins. 

Let 1 quart sweet milk come to a boil ; add the yolks of 4 
eggs well beaten, J cup sugar, a little grated nutmeg and 1 table- 
spoon cornstarch mixed up in a little cold milk. Cook all to- 
gether a few minutes. Put in the dish it is to be served in, beat 
the whites of egg to a stiff froth, drop over the top and set in 
the oven to brown slightly. 



164 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CUSTARD SOUFFLfi. 

Miss Parloa. 

Rub 2 tablespoons butter with the same amount of flour in 
a hot saucepan; stir in slowly 1 cup milk; let boil for 10 minutes. 
Beat the yolks of 4 eggs with 2 tablespoons sugar, stir them into 
the milk, and turn the mixture out to cool. When cold, beat in the 
stiff whites, turn into a greased baking dish, and bake 20 minutes 
in a quick oven. Serve innnediately with cream sauce. 

DATE PUDDING, NO. 1. 

]\'[iss Fannie Mumaugh. 

Mix well together I cup sugar, 1 tablespoon fiour, 2 beaten 
eggs, 1 cup of English walnuts or other nuts, 1 cup chopped dates, 
and 1 teaspoon baking powder. Bake 20 minutes. Serve either 
hot or cold with whipped cream. 

DATh: PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Cicero Phipps. 

Mix 2 cups bread crumbs, 1 cup flour, \h cups suet chopped 
fine, 2 cups dates chopped, and V cup sugar. Add a good pinch 
of salt and 2 teaspoons baking powder. Moisten with 2 eggs beaten 
in a little milk. Put into a well buttered bowl, and steam from 
3 to 6 hours. Serve hot with cream, or any sweet sauce. 

DUTCH PEACH PUDDING. 

Mrs. R. H. Webb. 

Separate 2 eggs ; beat the yolks, add a cup of milk, \ teaspoon 
salt, and a tablespoon melted butter. Mix and stir in 1^ cups flour 
sifted with 3 level teaspoons baking powder. Add the well beaten 
whites, and pour the batter into a shallow greased pan. Put halves 
of canned or fresh peaches over the top, sprinkle with 6 table- 
spoons sugar, and bake in a quick oven for J hour. Serve hot 
with peach sauce, hard sauce or cream. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Mrs. Ambrose Gibbs. 

Wash and pick 1 pound currants very carefully : chop 1 pound 
beef suet very fine ; add to them 1 pound seeded raisins, \\ pounds 
sifted flour, 1 pound sugar, \ pound lemon and citron, ^- teaspoon 
each ginger, cinnamon, allspice and salt, and \ a grated nutmeg; 
beat up 3 eggs in 1 cup molasses and add "k pint beer : mix this 
thoroughly with the dry ingredients. Warm the beer before mix- 
ing. Put this in 2 bowls and cover, or in 2 pudding bags greased 
and floured and filled about s full. Put in a kettle of water and 
steam 12 hours. Put over a gas fire late at night with a cover 
over the kettle, it will not boil dry before early morning, but will 



PUDDIS'GS AXD DESSERTS. 165 

be ready for noon dinner. Wlien a left over pudding appears 
the second time, it need only be steamed about an hour, or may 
be cut in slices and heated in the oven. 

SAUCE. 

Grate a little nutmeg into | cup hot water, stir in 1 dessert- 
spoon cornstarch, and 2 tablespoons sugar, boil about 5 minutes, 
add 1 wineglass brandy, and a generous squeeze of lemon juice, 
and serve hot. 

EWING PUDDING. 

Mrs. Rose Dolan. 

Butter a deep pudding dish ; put a layer of sliced apples in the 
bottom, sprinkle with sugar, cinnamon, and nutmeg, and bits of 
butter; break coarse pieces of stale bread over them, put a second 
layer of apples and seasoning and bread crumbs on top. Fill in with 
warm water till it shows. Bake and serve hot with hard sauce. 

FARINA PUDDING. 

Bring 1 pint of milk to a boil; stir in 1 ounce farina gradually: 
boil 10 minutes stirring; take off, add 4 tablespoons powdered 
sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 tablespoons currants and the yolks of 
3 eggs ; mix thoroughly, add the well beaten whites of the eggs, 
put in a buttered mould, place in the oven in hot water, and bake 
30 minutes or more until done. Turn out on a dish and serve hot 
with Sabayon sauce. 

Rice flour may be used instead of farina. 

FAVORITE PUDDING, OR "APPLE JACK". 

Mrs. Grace Duckworth. 

Butter the bottom of a pudding dish, and put in 2 cups sliced 
apple (or any other fresh fruit) ; make a batter of 1 cup sugar, 1 
cup milk, 1 well beaten egg, 2 cups flour, 1^ teaspoons baking powder 
sifted in the flour, and half a grated nutmeg. Pour this over the 
apples and bake. W'licn done, turn out on the serving disii, fruit 
side up, and serve with milk or a liquid sauce. 

Or the apples may be cored whole and the cavities filled 
with sugar. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Mrs. James Costello. 

8 figs chopped very fine, i cup finely chopped beef suet, i cup 
chopped raisins, h cup molasses, h pint bread crumbs, 4 eggs beaten 
very light. Soak the bread crumbs for h hour in 1 pint milk ; put 
a pinch of soda in the molasses, mix all together, put in covered 
bowl and stearn 3 hours. Serve with hard sauce. 

FLOAT. 

Mrs. Levi Thrapp. 

Put 1 quart of milk to boil in a double boiler, adding 1 cup 
sugar. When it Iioils stir in 2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in 
a little milk, the yolks of 4 eggs well beaten, and 1 teaspoon lemon 



166 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

extract. Stir until it just starts to boil. Beat up the whites of egg 
very stiff, drop with a tablespoon over the top and put in the oven 
to brown. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

Scald 1 pint milk, and pour over the yolks of 2 eggs beaten with 
2 tablespoons sugar ; return to saucepan and boil till it begins to 
thicken. When somewhat cool, flavor and pour into a glass dish. 
Beat the whites of the eggs as stiff as possible, beating in grad- 
ually \ cup currant jelly. Drop this by spoonfuls over the top. 
If preferred, the jelly and eggs may be dropped on in separate 
spoonfuls. 

FRENCH FRITTERS. 

Mrs. Mark Stacker. 

1 tumbler water, 1 teaspoon sugar, \ cup butter, 1 teaspoon salt. 
Put all together in a saucepan and when the butter is thoroughly 
melted stir in rapidlv 1 heaping pint of flour. Take from the fire 
and add 5 eggs broken in and mixed one at a time. Drop by 
tablespoons into hot butter or lard, take out when brown, roll in 
sugar and cinnamon and serve. 

FRENCH PANCAKES. 

Put 1 cup sifted flour in a bowl, break into it 2 raw eggs, add 1 
even tablespoon powdered sugar, 1 ^altspoon salt, J pint cold milk, 
a few drops vanilla extract, half as much orange extract, and 1 
tablespoon Jamaica rum. Beat up together hard for a few minutes, 
then let stand for \ hour. Butter a griddle very lightly, pour the 
batter on it a tablespoon to a cake, bake and turn, and lift to a 
hot plate until all are done. Then sift powdered sugar over them 
one at a time, roll each one up, dust again and serve all on a dish 
with jelly. They may be spread thickly with jelly before rolling, 
and the rolls dusted with sugar as before. They are also good 
served with a chocolate, or coffee, or hot fruit sauce. 

FRENCH PUDDING. 

Mrs. Jacob Hoy. 

Put 1 quart of milk on to boil in a double boiler, with \ cup 
sugar and a little salt. Save a little of the milk to dissolve 3 
tablespoons cornstarch ; when the milk boils stir this in, and when 
beginning to thicken add the beaten yolks of 4 eggs. Take from the 
fire and add 1 teaspoon vanilla. Pour into a pudding dish, beat 
the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth with half a cup of sugar, 
saving out a little, flavor with lemon, spread over the pudding and 
put in the oven to brown. Moisten the top with the remnant of 
frosting, and sprinkle over it grated cocoanut. 

GERMAN CUSTARD. 

Mrs. George Van Horn. 

Make a pint of good rich custard; when boiling hot add 1 
ounce sweet almonds and h ounce peanuts, blanched, roasted and 
pounded to a paste ; also a little candied citron cut into thin strips ; 
when cooked through, pour into a dish and set on ice until wanted. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 167 

GINGER PUDDING. 

Stir together briskly for 5 minutes 1 tablespoon butter, 2 eggs, 
1_ pinch salt, 1| ounces sugar, 1 level tablespoon grated, preserved 
ginger, one ounce cake or bread crumbs, 1 teaspoon vanilla, and 1 
cup sweet milk. Butter 6 cups, put in the mixture, put in deep 
pans with boiling water to half their height, and set in a hot oven 
30 minutes. Turn out on a hot dish, and serve with a good hot 
sauce. 

I tablespoon ground ginger may be used instead of the 
preserved. 

GOODY TWO SAUCES. 

Mrs. Frank Thomas. 

Into a pint of rich cream sweetened with granulated sugar stir 
sufficient currant jelly to give it a rich pink color. Pour this in a 
glass dish. In the center put slices of stale plain cake, each piece 
covered with marmalade or raspberry jam, lapping neatly over each 
other. Flavor another pint of cream with the juice of 2 lemons, 
whip up stiffly and pile up over the cake. 

GOOSEBERRY FOOL. 

Stem 1 quart ripe gooseberries, stew in 1 pint water till tender, 
and rub them through the colander. Add 1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup 
sugar, and the yolks of 1 eggs beaten very light. Put in a glass 
dish. Beat the whites of the eggs with 2 heaping tablespoons pow- 
dered sugar till stiff, heap over the gooseberries, and let them get 
very cold. 

HAMBURG CREAM. 

Beat the yolks of 5 eggs with the juice and grated rind of 2 
lemons and ^ pound powdered sugar ; put on the fire and let come 
to the boil. Add quickly the beaten whites of the eggs, stir up 
together, take from the fire and serve in glasses cold. 

HARRISON PUDDING. 

Cream ^ cup butter with h cup sugar, add 1 well beaten egg, 
J cup milk, \ cup clean currants, and f teaspoon baking powder 
sifted with ^ cup flour. Bake in a narrow tin not quite j hour. 
Serve with hard sauce, or any liquid sauce preferred. 

HOME PUDDING. 

Miss Mary Holleran. 

Beat well together 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons butter and one of 
sugar, add 1 cup sweet milk, and 1 full pint flour sifted with 2 
teaspoons cream tartar; add 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in hot 
water. Steam 80 miimtes. Serve with any good sauce. If you 
wish to add fresh or canned fruit, then steam 1 hour. 



168 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING, BAKED. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing, Jr. . 

Butter several slices bread on both sides ; place one at bottom 
of a pudding dish, cover with huckleberries and sprinkle sugar over 
them. Put in a second layer of bread, cover with the rest of 
the berries and the sugar. Pour cold water in until nearly up to 
the top of the fruit. Use about 1 pint berries and 1 cup sugar for 
2 slices bread. Bake in a slow oven |- hour or more. Any other 
berries may be used the same way, or canned fruit. Vary the 
amount of sugar to suit the fruit. Pie plant makes a good pudding. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING, BOILED, NO. 1. 

Make a batter of 1 pint milk, 2 eggs, 1 gill baker's yeast, 1 
saltspoon salt, 1 teaspoon soda in boiling water, and about 1 quart 
flouj- — enough for a thick batter. Set to rise in a warm place for 4 
hours. Dredge 1 quart huckleberries with flour, stir it quickly into 
the batter, and boil in a buttered mould or pudding bag for 2 
hours. Serve with any sweet sauce. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING, BOILED, NO. 2. 

li pound flour, i pound chopped beef suet, ^ pint cold water, 
and J teaspoon salt mixed together to a smooth paste. Roll it out 
thin. Line a buttered quart bowl with the paste. Beat up 1 egg 
with \ pound sugar, 2 ounces flour, 1 teaspoon vanilla, and IJ 
pounds liuckleberries. Fill the bowl, cover with paste, wet the 
edges, pinch together, wrap in a buttered cloth and boil 1 hour. 
Serve with a hot sauce. 

HUCKLEBERRY SHORTCAKE. 

Mrs. Herbert Grandy. 

Cream h cup butter with 2 cups sugar, add 1 pint milk, 1 tea- 
spoon salt, 3 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder in the flour, 
and 1 quart washed and drained huckleberries. If necessary, add 
more flour to make a thick batter. Bake in a dripping pan, and 
serve hot with sauce. 

INDIAN PUDDING (BAKED). 

Bring 1 quart of milk to the boil; stir in 1 cup cornmeal, and 

1 cup molasses ; let come to the boil again ; add 4 eggs well beaten, 
butter the size of an egg, \ cup cold milk, a little salt and ginger; 
pour into a pudding dish and bake 2 hours. Serve with hard 
sauce. 

INDIAN PUDDING (BOILED). 

Scald 1 quart Indian meal with water enough to swell it ; add 

2 teaspoons salt, \ pound suet chopped fine, raisins or chopped 
apples; boil 4 hours. This goes well with roast pork. 



• PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 169 

JELLIED CHERRIES. 

Stone 1 quart of ripe, red cherries, saving the liquor. Put 1 
cup sugar over the cherries, and add 'the juice to 3 teaspoons 
gelatin previously dissolved in ^ pint cold water. Stir in a double 
boiler until the gelatin is thoroughly dissolved, and pour over the 
cherries. Mix thoroughly, put in a mould, and set in a cold place 
several hours, to stiffen. If sour cherries are used, more sugar 
will be needed. 

LAURA'S RENOUNCEMENT. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Butter a pudding dish ; peel, quarter and core enough tart 
apples to half fdl the dish, sprinkle with butter, sugar and cinna- 
mon to taste. Make a good, soft gingerbread batter, and pour 
over the apples leaving just room for the batter to rise. Put in 
the oven and bake J hour. Serve with a good plain, hot sauce. 
If the apples will not cook in the time, thev must be half baked 
first. 

LEMON JELLY. 

Soak I box gelatin in cold water J hour ; pour over it 2^ cups 
boiling water; when dissolved, strain and add it to 1 cup sugar 
and i cup lemon juice. Pour into a mould and chill. 

Orange Jelly is made like lemon jelly using only li- cups boil- 
ing water, the same quantity orange juice and 3 tablespoons lemon 
juice. Orange wine makes a pleasantly flavored jelly. 

Coffee Jelly is made in the same way, using 1 cup boiling water, 
2 cups freshly made coffee, and only i cup sugar. Serve with 
cream, plain or whipped. 

LEMON PUDDING, NO. L 

Beat the whites and yolks of 10 eggs separately; stir 1 cup 
sugar lightly into the yolks and add the grated yellow rind of half 
a lemon and also the juice and pulp of the whole; add the other 
half of the grated rind to the stiffly beaten whites, and mix all 
together, beating very thoroughly. Bake in a pudding dish about 
J hour. 

LEMON PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Miss M. E. Donohoe. 

Stir into the beaten yolks of 6 eggs 1 cup sugar, | cup water, 
and the juice and grated rind of 2 lemons. .Soften in warm water 
() crackers, lay in the bottom of a baking dish, pour the custard 
over them and bake till firm. Beat whites of egg to a froth, add 
ti tablespoons sugar, and beat. When custard is done spread with 
the frosting and brown in the oven. 

LEMON PUDDING, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Rosanna Campbell. 

Soak 2 cups dried bread crumbs in 1 large cup milk : add 1 
cup chopped beef suet, 4 eggs beaten well with 1 cup sugar, the 
juice and grated rind of 1 lemon, and lastly -1 tal)lespoons flour. 
Mix gently into a stiff batter. Boil 3 hours in a Inittered mould, 
and serve hot with a hot sauce of any kind. 



170 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

LYONNAISE CAKE. 

3 ounces almonds, 2 beans bitter ahiionds, 2 tablespoons sugar, 
3 eggs beaten separately, ^- cup flour, 2 tablespoons Jamaica rum. 

Pound the almonds to a paste with the white of 1 egg. Mix 
with it the rum and sugar, then one at a time the yolks of the 
eggs beating hard. Add gently the sifted fiour and the stiffly 
beaten whites of the 2 remaining eggs. Butter a dome shaped 
mould ; pour in the batter, and bake in a moderate oven 25 min- 
utes. _ Take out, let cool, turn out of the mould and cut crosswise 
into half-inch slices. Spread a good custard hlling over each slice, 
and replace the slices as they were originally. Put the cake on a 
dish, decorate with whipped cream, and serve with a claret Sahayon 
sauce in a separate bowl. 

A very acceptable dessert can be made without the whipped 
cream and with a simpler sauce. 

MACEDOINE OF PRESERVED FRUITS. 

Take G green gages, 6 apricots, a cup of preserved cherries and 
1 of strawberries, and 3 bananas cut in bits. Two oranges may 
also be added. Have ready 1 quart of wine or orange jelly and 
pour ^ into a glass dish. When hard add the fruits, and pour over 
them the rest of the jelly. Let all stand on ice for some hours, 
and serve in the dish. 

Any single fruit or any combination of nuts and fruit may be 
treated in the same way. 

MANHATTAN APPLES. 

"Boston Cooking School.." 

Core and pare J dozen apples and boil in a syrup of l^ cups 
each of sugar and water, turning often until tender. Lay J dozen 
rounds of sponge cake on a dish, and place an apple on each, boil- 
ing down the syrup until it jellies, l; tumbler of currant jelly 
added to the syrup is good. Pour this over the apples. When 
cold, place about on the dish 1 cup of sweet cream, well whipped, 
and ornament with maraschino cherries. If served hot, the cream 
must be in a separate dish. The apples may be baked instead of 
boiled. 

MAPLE PUDDING. 

Cover 1 tablespoon gelatin with cold water and let soak J 
hour. Beat 4 eggs very light, add gradually 1 cup maple syrup, 
stir over the boiling kettle till thick; add gelatin, and when cold 
enough stir in 1 pint cream, whipped. Pour in a mould and set 
on the ice to harden. 

MERINGUES. 

"Dainty Dishes." 

Whites of 2 eggs beaten very stiff : stir in gently 3 ounces of 
pulverized sugar. Place a sheet of white paper on a damp board, 
put the mixture on by tablespoons shaping each rounding and 
smooth like an egg. Place in a very cool oven for 15 or 20 rain- 



• PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 171 

utes, then open the door and let stand 10 minutes longer to dry 
out slowly. Remove from the paper when cold, take out the 
moist inside carefully, fill with whipped cream sweetened and flav- 
ored, or ice cream, and put gently together. 

MIRONTON OF APPLES. 

Pare, scald and mash J dozen apples, and pile high on the 
serving dish. Boil 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel with 2 or 3 
^tablespoons sugar in a cup water; add the beaten yolks of 2 eggs 
and the white of one, i tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon flour, and 
1 tablespoon brandy. Stir till quite smooth. Pour over the apples, 
beat 1 egg white stiff, spread this over the top. sift some powdered 
sugar over it, and bake in a slow oven 10 or 15 minutes. 

ORANGE CREAM, NO. 1. 

Mrs. B. F. Martin. 

Dissolve half a box gelatin in warm water, add 2 tumblers 
orange juice, whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff and sugar to taste. 
When nearly cold, add a pint of whipped cream and put in a 
mould on the ice. 

ORANGE CREAM, NO. 2. 

Mrs. John Elliott. ' 

Heat 1 pint sweet cream in a double boiler ; when at the boil- 
ing point, stir in 1 cup white sugar beaten up with the yolks of 4 
eggs, and the juice and grated rind of 1 orange; heat a moment 
longer, then take off and stir till cold. Put in small glasses. Beat 
the whites of the eggs stiff with 1 tablespoon sugar, and drop a 
spoonful in each glass. 

ORANGE CREAM PUDDING. 

Mrs. Viola Poling. 

Moisten 3 tablespoons cornstarch in part of a i)int of milk ; 
beat the yolks of 2 eggs with a half cup sugar; scald the remainder 
of the milk and add to -it the grated rind of 1 orange, the corn- 
starch, eggs and sugar and the orange juice in order. When cooked 
pour into a pudding dish, cover with a meringue made from the 
whites of the eggs and -^ cup sugar. Brown in oven_j and serve 
cold. 

ORANGE FLOAT. 

Mrs. Morgan Griffith. 

Take 1 quart water, the juice and pulp of 2 lemons, and 1 
coffee cup sugar. When boiling hot add 4 tablespoons cornstarch. 
Let boil lo minutes, stirring all the time. When cool, pour it 
over 4 or 5 sliced oranges in a glass dish, and over the top spread 
the beaten whites of 3 eggs, sweetened and flavored with vanilla. 



172 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

ORANGE FRITTERS. 

Peel, divide in sections and skin 3 juicy oranges. Soak for 
15 minutes in 1 tablespoon sugar and 2 tablespoons rum, or any 
preferred flavoring. Dip in a good fritter batter and fry in deep 
fat. Drain, dust witb powdered sugar and serve hot. 

ORANGE JELLY. 

Peel six oranges, cutting off all the white rind. Remove all 
the seeds, and slice them into a mould or a glass dish. Sprinkle 
with sugar. Soak J box gelatin in ^ pint cold water one hour, add 
1^ pints boiling water and sugar "to the taste. Flavor with the 
juice of 2 lemons. When thoroughly dissolved, strain over the 
oranges, and set aside to cool. 

ORANGE ROLY POLY PUDDING. 

Mrs. . Frank Thomas. 

Prepare a dough as for apple dumplings, and roll into an ob- 
long sheet. Pare, slice and seed good, sweet oranges, spread 
thickly over the paste, sprinkle with white sugar and a little grated 
yellow peel ; roll up and press tlie edges down with cold water to 
keep in the juice. Boil in a floured cloth about 2 hours, and serve 
with lemon sauce. 

ORANGE SHORTCAKE. 

Mrs. T. A. Sherrard. 

Slice 6 oranges very thin and sprinkle with powdered sugar. 
Take 1 pint flour, butter the size of an egg, 2 tablespoons sugar, 
yolk of 1 egg, 2 teaspoons baking powder, a pinch of salt, and 1 
cup milk. Mix and bake in a square tin. When done split the 
cake, spread the oranges between the layers, and serve v;ith sugar 
and cream. Pineapple may be mixed with the oranges. 

ORANGE SNOWBALLS. 

Boil rice for 10 minutes, drain and cool ; pare several oranges 
closely, cutting off all white rind. Butter and flour as many small 
pudding bags as you have oranges, spread them with rice, put an 
orange in each, tie up and boil 1 hour ; turn out on a pretty dish, 
sprinkle with powdered sugar candy ; and serve with sauce or 
sweetened cream. 

PAIN DE PRAISES. 

The Countess of Aberdeen. 

1 quart of fresh strawberries, rubbed through a fine sieve into 
a bowl; add 1 ounce of melted gelatin and 2 ounces granulated 
sugar. Stir well and pour into chilled moulds ; set on ice. Turn 
out of the moulds, and serve with whipped cream. 

PARISIAN CHARLOTTE. 

Cut the centre out of a 1 pound stale sponge cake, leaving 
the bottom and sides about I inch thick. Crumb the cake with 
} pound macaroons, and mix with 1 cup grated cocoanut. Cover 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 173 

\ box gelatin with cold water and let soak \ hour. P.ring 1 pint 
cream to the boil in a double boiler, beat 4 eggs until light with 2 
tablespoons sugar, stir into the cream until it thickens ; add the 
gelatin, take from the fire, add 1 teaspoon vanilla and the cake 
crumbs, and turn into a basin; set the basin in a pan of cracked 
ice, stir continually until beginning to thicken ; add i pint cream 
whipped, mixing thoroughly. Pour the mixture into the shell of 
sponge cake, and pul over the ice to harden. Serve with Sabayon 
sauce. 

PEACH BAVARIAN CREA^r. 

Cover \ box gelatin with 1 cup cold water, and let soak ^ 
hour. Press 1 pint can peaches through the colander; if fresh 
peaches, stew and sweeten them. Stir the gelatin over boiling 
water until dissolved, strain. Mix the peaches and gelatin in a 
bowl, put it on ice and stir until it begins to thicken. Then add 
1 pint whipped cream. Stir well and put into a mould in a cold 
place to harden. Serve with whipped cream around the base. 
Apricots or large plums may be used in place of the peaches. 

PEACH FOAM. 

Peel and cut into small pieces 8 or 4 ripe peaches, to make 
1 cup. Put in a bowl with J cup powdered sugar and the wdiite 
of 1 egg. Beat with a fork for ^ hour until it is a perfectly 
smooth, velvety cream. Serve in glasses, quite cold. 

PEACH PUDDING, NO. 1. 

Cut 3 slices of bread \ inch thick ; cut off the crusts and dice 
them. Cut up 1 pint canned peaches or the same amount fresh 
peaches into \ inch dice. Mix these together, adding a few drops 
of almond flavoring and vanilla. 2 tablespoons Sultana raisins 
may be added if at hand. Fill a pudding mould with the mixture, 
pour in a good boiled custard to the height of the pudding, place 
in a pan of hot water half as deep as the mould, and let steam 
in a hot oven for \ hour. Turn out on a hot dish and serve with 
a hot rum sauce, or any hot liquid sauce. 

PEACH PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Miss Mary Burns. 

Beat together 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, butter the size of an 
egg, 1 t§^, a pinch of salt, 1 pint flour, and 1 teaspoon baking 
powder. Slice 6 peaches. Pour half the batter into a buttered pan, 
lay in the peaches, sprinkle a little sugar and cover with the rest 
of the batter. Serve with a hot liquid sauce. 

Whole apples, peeled, cored and the centres filled with sugar 
and cinnamon are very nice in place of the peaches. 

PEACH SHORTCAKE. 

Mrs. Isabel Hall Tedrow. 

Mix I cup butter with 1 quart flour; add 2 heaping teaspoons 
baking powder, 1 cup sugar, and beat in 1 egg; mix all together 



174 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

with milk enough to make a soft dough. Bake in layers. Slice 
the peaches and let stand awhile covered with sugar ; put between 
the layers and on top : serve with whipped cream. Canned peaches 
may be used, or any kind of fruit. 

PEACH TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Mrs. May Livingston. 

Soak I pint tapioca in cold water for 3 hours ; then set on the 
stove until it boils ; sweeten with white sugar ; peel and slice ripe 
peaches to nearly fill a baking dish, sprinkle over them white 
sugar, pour over them the tapioca, and bake slowly for 1 hour. 
Serve with cream and sugar. 

For Apple Tapioca the apples are cored whole, and the cavities 
filled with sugar. 

PEAR CHARLOTTE. 

Butter a quart pudding mould. Trim the crust off a large 
loaf of bread, and cut a piece the height of the mould. Cut into 
slices \ inch thick. Put one at the bottom of the mould. Cut 
each of the others into -1 lengthwise strips, dip each in melted 
butter and arrange around the mould standing up and close to- 
gether. Peel, cut in half and core 8 good sized pears; put in a 
frying pan with 1 ounce butter, 2 ounces sugar and a little vanilla, 
roll them over and cook about 8 minutes. Fill the mould with 
the pears and their liquor. Cover with a whole slice of the bread 
dipped in butter. Put in a slow oven for 1^ hours. Turn out on 
a dish, pour a rum sauce around it, and serve hot. Any highly 
seasoned sauce would do. 



PEAR COMPOTE. 

Pare, cut in halves and core. Boil the pears in a syrup as 
rich as is liked until clear; take them out and boil down the syrup 
till it will jelly. A few peelings may be added to the jelly to 
give a richer color, and taken out again. Pour over the pears 
and serve cold. If used for dessert, plain or whipped cream is a 
good addition. 

Apples, quinces and peaches also are used for compotes. 
Apples may be cored whole. Fruit that is not ripe or good enough 
to serve raw makes good compotes. 

PINEAPPLE CREAM. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Pour a little melted raspberry or strawberry jelly m the bot- 
tom of a mould and allow it to set : soak \ ounce gelatin in \ cup 
milk; stir over the fire till thoroughly melted. Whip 1 pint cream, 
add \ pound sugar and \ pound chopped, preserved pineapple ; 
stir in the gelatin; when "the raspberry jelly is stifif pour in the 
cream, and set in cracked ice to harden. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 175 

PINEAPPLK PUDDIXG, NO. I. 

Dice 4 ounces fresh or canned pineapple ; melt l^ ounces but- 
ter in a saucepan, rub in 2 ounces sifted flour, add 1 gill hot milk, 
and heat for 3 minutes. Remove, add the pineapple and 2 ounces 
sugar, and one by one beat in the yolks of 2 eggs. Lastly add 
the stifif whites of the eggs and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Pour into a 
buttered quart pudding mould, set in the oven in boiling water, and 
cover with a buttered paper for 35 minutes. Unmould on a hot 
dish, decorate with slices of fresh pineapple, and serve with any 
hot sauce desired. 

PINEAPPLE PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Edward Daugherty.jj 

Dissolve 4 tablespoons cornstarch in the juice from 1 can pine- 
apple ; add 2 cups granulated sugar, and 1 quart boiling water ; 
cook till it looks clear, then add the pineapple, and take from the 
fire. Serve cold with cream. 

PINEAPPLE TRIFLE. 

Pare, cut out the eyes and slice a ripe pineapple. Sugar, and 
let stand till it is dissolved. Make holes in a stale sponge cake, 
and pour in as much syrup as it will absorb ; put slices of the 
fruit on top and around the cake : cover with whipped cream, and 
sprinkle with a few chopped almonds, candied cherries, etc. 

PLUM DUFF. 
Mrs. George Leyshon. 

Mix together 1 cup bread crumbs, 2 cups flour, 1 cup molasses, 
1 cup sweet milk with a teaspoon soda in the milk, 1 teaspoon each 
of salt, cloves and cinnamon, 1 cup suet chopped fine. 1 pound 
raisins, 1 pound currants well floured. Steam in a well greased 
pan or mould 2:] hours. This makes 2 good sized puddings. 

PLUM PUDDING, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Henry Lawrence. 

1 large cup each of suet, raisins, currants, bread crumbs and 
flour: U cups sugar, ^ cup citron, 1 nutmeg. ^ teaspoon each of 
cloves, allspice, salt and baking soda. Mix all dry : then beat 2 
or 3 eggs and make a stiff batter with water or cold tea. Grease 
a pudding bag and sprinkle flour over it, or grease a bowl or tin 
mould. 

PLUM PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Mix together f pound grated bread crumbs, ^ pound suet 
chopped fine, H pounds stoned raisins, i pound currants, 1 pound 
brown sugar, 10 eggs beaten toTetber, 1 piece citron chopped fine, 
juice and grated yellow rind of 1 lemon, 1 grated nutmeg, and 1 
wine glass brandy; steam from 4 to G hours. Serve with a hot 
sauce. 



176 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PLUM PUDDING, NO. 3. 

Mrs. John L. Williams, Jr. 

Mix 1 cup beef suet chopped very fine with 1 cup white sugar, 

1 grated nutmeg, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, a pinch of salt, 1 table- 
spoon butter, 1 cup each of ligs, raisins and currants, 2 good cook- 

• ing apples chopped fine, 2 eggs, | cup N. O. molasses, ^ cup cream, 

2 cups flour, and 2 teaspoons baking powder in the flour. Steam 

3 hours, and serve hot with brandy sauce. 

PRUNE WHIP. 

Miss Fannie Muniaugh. 

Stew 14 large prunes without sugar, chop and mix with i cup 
sugar, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, and the well beaten whites of 4 
eggs. Put in a baking dish and set in water inside the oven. Bake 
and serve with plain or whipped cream, or a custard made from 
the yolks of the eggs. 

PUFF PUDDING. 

Miss Mary Gardner. 

4 eggs beaten separately ; to the yolks add 6 tablespoons flour, 
and a pinch of salt, and slowly pour in 2^ cups milk, mixing very 
smoothly. Lastly add the whites of egg. put in a greased pan, 
and bake in a slow oven ^ hour. Serve with sugar and cream. 

QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 

Mrs. A. W. Pitzer. 

Beat together 1 pint bread crumbs, 1 cup of sugar, the yolks 
of 4 beaten eggs, the grated rind of 1 lemon, a piece of butter the 
size of an egg, and 1 quart milk. Put into a pudding dish and 
bake until done — not longer. Spread over the pudding a layer 
of jelly or preserved damsons; make a meringue of the whites of 
the eggs and 1 cup granulated sugar, and the juice of 1 lemon. 
Put this lightly over the pudding and brown in the oven. Eat 
cold with cream. 

RAISIN CREAM. 

Mrs. Henry Spencer. 

Boil 1 cup raisins in 1 pint cold water 15 minutes. Dissolve 
1 tablespoon gelatin in ^ cup water, then add with ^ cup sugar and 
1 teaspoon vanilla to the raisins. Pour into a mould and set on 
ice 3 hours. Serve with whipped cream flavored with sugar and 
vanilla. 

RAISIN PUFFS. 
Mrs. John Williamson. 

Mix 2 well beaten eggs, i cup butter, 3 teaspoons baking 
powder, 2 tablespoons sugar, 2 cups flour, 1 cup milk, and 1 cup 
raisins chopped very fine. Steam | hour in buttered cups. Serve 
with cream sauce. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 177 

RASPBERRY SOUFFLfiE. 

Put 1 glass raspberry jelly in a bowl with 2 tablespoons sugar, 
and ^ teaspoon orange extract. Mix well together for 5 minutes, 
then beat in the yolks of 2 eggs, and later the stiff whites of 5 
eggs. Pour into a pudding dish, and bake for 20 minutes. Re- 
move, sprinkle a little powdered sugar over the top, and serve 
immediately. Other jellies may be used in the same way. 

RENAISSANCE PUDDING. 

Cut into small dice 2 gimces of plain stale cake. Mix with 
chopped, candied fruits and slices of preserves. Pour over them 
1 tablespoon maraschino, or any delicate wine. Put in a pudding 
mould, pour over a good, uncooked vanilla custard, put in a pan 
in a hot oven, pour in boiling water to half the height of the 
mould, and steam for 30 minutes. Turn on a dish and serve hot 
with a Sabayon sauce. 

RENNET CUSTARD, OR JUNKET. 

Stir 1 tablespoon sugar into 1 pint milk, add 1 teaspoon vanilla 
or other flavoring, pour into a glass dish, and stir in 1 teaspoon 
rennet. Cover and put in a warm place, not hot, till it is set. Grate 
nutmeg over the top, and serve cold. 

Junket tablets can be bought cheap, and are very convenient 
for making this. 

RHUBARB PUDDING. 

Prepare the rhubarb as for pie, and fill the bottom of a bak- 
ing dish. Sprinkle with 1 cup sugar. Make a batter of 1 cup sour 
milk, 2 eggs, a pinch of salt, h teaspoon soda, butter size of an 
egg, and flour enough for a cake batter. Spread over the rhubarb 
and bake. When done, turn upside down, stir up the rhubarb, 
and serve with sugar and cream. This is a good way to make apple 
and fruit pies for those who do not like under crusts. 

RICE AND RAISINS. 

Glasgow "Exchange". 

Wash 4 ounces rice, stone 8 ounces raisins, mix well and tie 
loosely in a scalded and floured pudding bag. Drop in boiling 
water and boil 2 hours. Turn on a hot dish, sprinkle with sugar, 
and serve with hot syrup or a hot pudding sauce. 

RICE BALLS. 

Mould hot, boiled rice in small cups. When cold turn out on 
a dish, take a spoonful of rice from the centre of each ball, put 
instead some tart preserve, and pour a custard over the balls. The 
rice should be slightly sweetened and flavored before taking from 
the stove. 

12 



178 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

RICE PUDDING, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Thomas Davis. 

Soak 1 cup of rice 15 minutes, then boil J hour ; drain, add 1 
cup sugar, ^ teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon vanilla, and the yolks of 3 
eggs. Stir all together with 1 pint milk, put into a baking dish, 
sprinkle with little bits of butter, and bake until firmly set. Make 
an icing of the whites of egg with 1 tablespoon sugar, spread over 
the top and brown. 

RICE PUDDING, NO. 2. 
L. A. 

1 cup rice, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup and a half raisins, a small piece 
butter, a little salt and 3 pints milk, and half a nutmeg grated. 
Bake 2 hours, and serve with sauce. 

RICE PUDDING, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Jack Moore. 

Beat up in a pudding dish, the yolks of 4 eggs, 1 cup cooked 
rice, a pinch of salt, sugar to taste, a little grated nutmeg and 
vanilla extract and 1 quart milk. Bake in a good oven about J 
hour. Serve hot or cold with cream. 

POOR MAN'S RICE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Newton Irvin. 

Beat up 3 tablespoons rice with a pinch of salt and 2 eggs. 
Add 1 quart sweet milk, sugar and flavoring to suit the taste. 
Bake in a slow oven 2^ hours. 

SCOTCH FIG PUDDING. 

Mrs. H. C. Begland. 

Wash and soak ^ pound cooking figs ; put 2 ounces white sugar 
into a saucepan with the grated rind of half a lemon, the strained 
juice of a whole lemon, and 1 large breakfast cup of water. Let 
the syrup boil a few minutes, add the figs and let stew till tender. 
Butter a pudding dish well, split the figs and line the basin ; chop 
:he rest of the figs. Dice 4 ounces bread, put in a basin with the 
chopped figs, 4 ounces sugar, and the rest of the grated rind. Boil 
1 large cup milk, and pour over them. Beat 2 eggs and add ; also 
any flavoring liked, and pour into the pudding dish ; cover with a 
greased paper or pudding cloth and steam 1 hour. Turn out on 
a hot dish and serve with a sauce made by boiling down the water 
the figs were stewed in and adding 1 tablespoon red currant jelly. 

SNOW CREAM. 

Mrs. J. Williamson. 

Grate the white meat of 1 cocoanut. Heap it up on a glass 
di.sh in the centre. Beat the whites of 5 eggs to a stiff froth, add 
4 large spoonfuls of white sugar, a large spoonful rosewater or 
pineapple- essence, and 1 pint whipped cream. Put this around 
the cocoanut, and serve with it. 



PUDDINGS AND DESSERTS. 179 

SNOW EGGS. 

Mrs. John L. Jones. 

To the whites of 5 eggs add a pinch of salt, and whip to a 
ver}' stiff froth, gradually adding 1 tablespoon powdered sugar, 
and a few drops of flavoring. Scald 1 quart milk in a large pan. 
Shape whites in a tablespoon, drop a few at a time in the hot 
milk, and turn until cooked. Lift out with a skimmer and lay 
on a glass dish. When all are cooked, make a custard with the 
yolks, hot milk and 3 tablespoons sugar and pour around the eggs. 

SNOW PUDDING. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

1 tablespoon granulated gelatin soaked in ^ cup cold water 
and dissolved in 1 cup boiling water ; 1 cup sugar, and \ cup lemon 
juice; mix, strain, and set aside to cool; stir occasionally and 
when quite thick, beat with a wire spoon till frothy; add the stiff 
whites of 3 eggs, and beat until stiff enough to hold its shape. 
Mould, and serve on a dish with boiled custard around it. 

SOUR CREAM PUDDING. 

Mrs. R. B. Arnold. 

1 pint sour cream mixed with the beaten yolks of 4 eggs, 10 
tablespoons sifted flour, and h teaspoon each of salt and soda. 
Beat the whites of egg stiff and add- last. Will bake in a few 
minutes. Serve with the following sauce : 1 cup sugar and J cup 
butter creamed. Flavor and add 1 cup sweet cream. 

STRAWBERRY BAVARIAN CREAM. 

Make precisely as Peach Bavarian Cream if the canned fruit 
or juice is used. If ripe fruit, take 1 quart, press through a sieve, 
add 1 cup sugar, and proceed as with peaches, but do not cook. 
Raspberry and Pineapple Bavarian Creams are made the same 
w'ay, but require less sugar. 

STRAWBERRY DUMPLINGS. 

Make a good baking powder biscuit dough; roll out very thin; 
cut in rounds ; place strawberries on each round ; fold the edges 
over together, put in a buttered pan, brush with milk, and bake in 
a quick oven 15 minutes. Serve with cream and sugar, or Jessica 
Sauce. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE, NO. 1. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Make a rich pie dough, using 1 pint flour, h cup butter, 1 
teaspoon baking powder, a ])inch of salt and milk enough for a 
soft dough. Roll out quickly about 1 inch in thickness, put into 
a greased, square baking pan. and bake in a hot oven about 20 
minutes. Take out, split in halves, and spread each half lightly 
with butter. Have ready 1 quart strawberries, stemmed, and wait- 



180 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

ing in a bowl, cut or mashed slightly and sweetened to taste. Lay 
the lower half of the cake on a large plate, put half the berries 
on this, cover with the other half, and spread that too with the 
berries. Serve with cream in a cream pitcher. 

It may also be made with cake dough and covered with whipped 
cream. 

STRAWBERRY SHORTCAKE, NO. 2. 

Miss Tessie Hinzy. 

Sift 1^ teaspoons baking powder in 1|- cups flour, and rub in 
a good sized lump of butter. Roll out thin, and cut into 2 layers 
the size of your pan. Put one in the pan, butter it, put the second 
one on top, .and bake. When done, take them apart and put sug- 
ared berries between and on top. 

STRAW PUDDING. 

Mrs. C. H. Furman. 

Make some good noodles and cut very fine; butter a pudding 
dish well, put in a layer of noodles, then a layer of sugar and 
cinnamon, cocoanut and raisins ; beat the whites of 3 eggs to a 
stiff froth, dot with it, make 4 layers, ending up with the eggs. 
Bake in a slow oven 1 hour. 

SUET DUMPLINGS. 

Mrs. Isabel Lawson. 

Sift together 1 cup flour and ^ teaspoon baking powder; add 

1 cup grated bread crumbs, 1 cup finely chopped suet, h; cup sugar, 

2 well beaten eggs, 1 pint milk and a large pinch salt. Form into 
a smooth batter and drop it by tablespoonfuls into a quart of boil- 
ing milk, three or four at a time. When done dish and pour 
over them the milk they were boiled in. A Danish dish. 

SUET PUDDING. 

Miss Mabel West. 

Rub together h cup chopped suet and i- cup sugar ; add 2 table- 
spoons molasses, 1 teaspoon each of cloves, cinnamon and nut- 
meg ; 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in ^ cup sour milk ; 1 cup each of 
currants and raisins ; J cup chopped English walnuts, and 2 table- 
spoons brandy. Add flour to make a stiff batter. Boil or steam 

3 hours. 

SUET PUDDING (PLAIN). 

Mrs. David Evans. 

1 cup chopped suet. .]- cup molasses, .} cup brown sugar, 2 eggs, 
1 cup sour milk, h teaspoon soda in the milk, } teaspoon salt, 2J 
cups flour. 

Pour in a greased mould, cover and steam U hours. Serve 
with lemon sauce. 



PUDDINGS AXD DESSERTS. 181 

SWEDISH PL: DOING. 

Mix well in a ])o\vl 1 tablespoon thick honey, 2 ounces bread 
crumbs, 1 tables];oon sugar, \ of the grated rind of a lemon and 
the juice, 1 egg. h ounce Jjutter, 1 ounce flour, J cup cold milk, 
and 1 tablespoon kirsch. (Cherry juice witli a little almond ex- 
tract would take tlie place of the kirsch.) Mix thoroughly, then 
add the beaten white of 2 eggs, and put in a pudding mould. Put 
in a deep pan of boiling water in the oven for 30 minutes. Turn 
out on a hot dish and serve with hot maple syrup poured over it. 

SWEET POTATO PUDDIXC. 

Pare ^ poinul sweet potatoes and grate them; beat '{ cup 
butter to a cream with 1 cup sugar, and add 8 well beaten eggs ; 
stir in the potatoes, the juice and rind' of 1 lemon and 1 orange, 
\ teaspoon mace, 1 even teaspoon cinnamon, and } teaspoon salt; 
turn into a buttered dish, and bake in a moderate oven f hour. 
Serve hot or cold with sauce. 

^ cup sherry and 2 tablespoons brandy are a good addition, 
if you use liquor. 

SYLLABUB. 

Add 1 gill wine, the juice of 3 lemons, the beaten whites of 6 
eggs, and sugar to taste to 1 quart of cream which has been well 
chilled. Whip stiffly and serve in glasses with cake. 

TAPIOCA. 

Mrs. J. W. Brumage. 

Instead of soaking tapioca before cooking, put directly into 
boiling water or milk, and it will have less of a starchy taste. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Joe Winefordner. 

Soak 1 small cup of tapioca J hour on back of stove, drain, 
put in a double boiler with H pints milk and boil 30 minutes. 
Beat the yolks of 2 eggs hard, add 1 cup of sugar, a little salt, 
and vanilla or lemon flavoring. Pour the pudding into the eggs, 
stir well, turn into buttered pudding dish, and bake 30 minutes in 
a slow oven. Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs and 2 
tablespoons of sugar, flavoring as desired, and put back in the 
oven to brown. This pudding is good with a meringue top without 
the baking. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING, NO. 2. 

Mrs. James Monahan. 

Soak 6 tablespoons tapioca 6 hours. Scald 1 quart milk, then 
add the tapioca, the yolks of 3 eggs, and k cup sugar. Stir and 
cook until tiiick. Remove from the lire, flavor with lemon extract, 
and add the well beaten whites of the eggs. Serve hot or cold, 



182 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Kemper. 

Soak 1 cup tapioca over night ; add 1 cup sugar, 1^ cups water, 
the juice and grated rind of 1 lemon, and cook until clear. Add 
the stiffly beaten white of 1 egg. Pour into a dish, and spread 
over the top a frosting of the whites of 2 eggs and 3 tablespoons 
sugar, and serve very cold with cream. 

TRIFLE. 

Soak sponge 'cake in sweet wine. Wlien soaked drain off the 
excess. Make a custard of a pint of cream, yolks of 3 eggs and 
white of 1, sugar to taste and grated lemon peel. When cool, pour 
over the cake, beat the whites witli sugar and lemon juice and 
pile up over the dish. 

If you do not use wine, orange juice will do, also any stale, 
delicate cake without icing. 

VANILLA CUSTARD. 

Beat together briskly 2 eggs and 2 tablespoons sugar ; add 1 
cup milk and a few drops vanilla. L^sc it uncooked to add to 
bread puddings. 

WASHINGTON PUDDING. 

Mrs. H. B. Denman. 

Cut cubes of dry bread tvyice as thick as a thick slice of 
bread. Cut off all crusts. Soak for several hours in a mixture 
of beaten yolks of 2 eggs, 1 quart milk, sweetened to taste, and 
flavored with nutmeg and vanilla. Fry in a skillet with butter, 
turning the cakes, or in a deep pan of boiling fat or lard. Serve 
hot with a large lump of hard sauce on each. 

WHIPPED CREAM. 

Mrs. Wm. Horden. 

Chill ^ pint thick cream, and add to it l\ tablespoons pulver- 
ized sugar, and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Put in a bowl set in a pan of 
cracked ice, and beat with a wire egg beater until quite stiff. Pour 
off any unwhipped cream in the bottom of the bowl. Set in a 
cold place until wanted. A syllabub churn can be used, if pre- 
ferred, or if neither is at hand, a couple of silver forks will answer. 

Whipped cream is used as a sauce for various jellies and deli- 
cate desserts, or with rich, frozen desserts, or served by itself as 
a dessert with cake. Flavored with many liquors or flavorings, it 
takes the name, as a sauce, of the liquor used. Packed in a mould 
and frozen for several hours, it makes every variety of mousse. 

WIGWAM. 

"The Housekeeper's Friend." 

Open 1 pound of lady fingers and spread on a dish ; cover them 
with currant jelly, and on the jelly spread meringue, then other 



PUDDINGS AXD DESSERTS. 183 

layers of lady fingers, jelly and meringue; make each layer a little 
smaller in order to have a pyramid. Cover the whole with merin- 
gue and put in the oven a moment to brown. Do not make the 
meringue too stiff. 

WINE JELLY. 

Mrs. A. W. Pitzer. 

1 box Cox's gelatin soaked in a pint of cold water 1 hour. 
Then add 1 good pint of sugar, 2 quarts boiling water, juice of 
2 lemons, and 1 pint sherry wine. Put in an egg shell, let all come 
to the boil, then strain and put in a cold place 12 hours. This 
will serve 10 or 12 persons. 

In summer, use less boiling water. 

YANKEE. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Cut medium slices of stale bread, cutting off crusts or not, as 
preferred ; butter on both sides, and fry in molasses. Serve hot. 
The molasses must be hot when the bread is put in, or it will soak 
in too much ; but it must not be fried too fast for it should get 
gummy and most particularly not bum. Syrups left over from 
preserves and rich, sweet pickles make a good imitation Yankee. 



PUDDING SAUCES. 



BRANDY SAUCE. 

Boil li tablespoons granulated sugar in i cup water, with the 
rind of i lemon ; add ^ tablespoon butter, and 2r} tablespoons 
brandy, remove, and beat briskly a few minutes. Take out the 
lemon and serve. Use with steamed puddings. 

CARAMEL SAUCE. 

Put 1 cup sugar in a saucepan over a hot fire until it begins 
to turn brown, constantly stirring. Add 1 cup hot water, let boil 
2 minutes and take up. 

CHERRY SAUCE. 

Chop 15 candied or preserved cherries not very fine, add 2 
tablespoons sugar, same amount currant jelly and f cup hot water: 
boil 8 minutes, and serve hot. 1 tablespoon maraschino and 1 
tablespoon kirsch or cherry brandy is a nice addition. Good with 
hot puddings and over vanilla ice cream. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

Melt 2 ounces grated chocolate in a saucepan ; add 1 cup hot 
milk and boil for a couple of minutes, stirring. Beat together 2 
heaping tablespoons sugar with the yolks of 2 eggs and \ teaspoon 
vanilla. Still beating, add the chocolate slowly, turn all back into 
the hot saucepan, set over the fire for 5 minutes, still beating. 
Strain and serve hot. Use over plain puddings, French pancakes, 
etc. 

CIDER SAUCE. 

Mrs. B. James. 

Mix 2 tablespoons butter with an even tablespoon flour : add 
] cup maple or brown sugar, and } cup boiled cider; add ^ cup 
boiling water, stir and let simmer a few moments and serve hot. 

CLARET SABAYON. 

Filippini. 

Beat until stiff the yolks of 2 eggs and the white of 1, 2 table- 
spoons white sugar, the grated yellow rind of \ lemon, and f cup 
claret. Strain through a cloth into a saucepan and heat very hot 
without boiling. Use with hot puddings. 

184 



PUDDING SAUCES. 185 

COFFEE SAUCE. 

Grind 1 tablespoon freshl_v roasted coffee and add it to \ cup 
boiling milk. Cover the saucepan and let boil 2 minutes ; stand 
aside for 10 minutes. Beat up the yolks of 3 eggs with 2 table- 
spoons sugar, strain the coft'ee through a cloth into the egg, add 
i cup cream, beat well and put over the fire stirring hard for 
five minutes. Do not let boil. Strain if necessary when taken up, 
and serve immediately with a hot pudding, or French pancakes. 

CREAM SAUCE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. A. W. Pitzer. 

1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter, h cup cream, season with 
grated nutmeg, and let just come to a boil. 

CREAM SAUCE. XO. 2. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Dissolve 2 tablespoons powdered sugar in 1 pint rich cream, 
add 1 teaspoon vanilla (or 2 tablespoons sherry, if wine is liked), 
and 1 grated nutmeg. Stir in well and keep in a cool place till 
wanted. 

DIP. 

Mrs. George Pargeon. 

1 cup sweet milk : when at the boil add 1 tablespoon flour, 
rubbed with 1 small lump butter, about 2 tablespoons sugar, and 
a little grated nutmeg. If too thick, thin with boiling water. 

FAIRY BREATH SAUCE. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Beat togethe'i until very light 1 cup butter and 2 cups powdered 
sugar, add a little nutmeg and lemon juice, 1 wine glass sherry, 1 
of brandy, and ^ pint boiling water just before serving. 

HARD SAUCE. 

Beat to a cream granulated or pulverized sugar with \ the 
quantity of butter. Add vanilla to taste and a little nutmeg or 
ground mace, dusting the top with nutmeg. This can be flavored 
with lemon instead, or with wine or liquor, according to the de- 
mands of the hot pudding with which it is served. 

JESSICA SAUCE. 

John D. Martin. 

Cream together 1 cuj) butter, and 1 cup sugar, add the stiffly 
beaten white of 1 egg and 1 (|uart fresh strawberries mashed. 
Serve with cottage pudding, etc. 



186 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

LEMON SAUCE, NO. 1. 

Scald 1 cup milk, stir in the beaten yolk of 1 efeg mixed with 
\ cup powdered sugar ; cook and stir for 3 minutes. When cold, 
stir in the juice and grated yellow rind of 1 lemon, and, when 
ready to serve, the stiff whites of 2 eggs. 

LEMON SAUCE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Mark Stecker. 

Beat 1 cup sugar and h cup butter to a cream, add the well 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs, the juice of 1 lemon and gradually 1 pint 
of boiling water. Lastly add the whites of egg beaten stiff. 

MAPLE PUDDING SAUCE. 

Mrs. H. C. Tuttle. 

Rub 2 teaspoons flour with i cup butter, pour over it 1 pint 
boiling water, stirring until smooth. Add a pinch of salt and 1 
pint maple syrup. Let come to the boil. 

MOLASSES SAUCE. 

Boil 1 cup molasses with 1} tablespoons butter for -5 minutes, 
take from the fire and add 2 tablespoons lemon juice or 1 table- 
spoon vinegar. 

ORANGE SAUCE. 

I cup butter creamed with 1 cup sugar, adding 1 teaspoon 
flour, grated rind of 1 orange and juice of 2, and 1 pint boiling 
water. Bring to the boil and serve hot with boiled puddings. 

ORANGE HARD SAUCE. 

Make a hard sauce pf butter and sugar; flavor with the juice 
of 1 orange and as much of the grated yellow rind as is liked, or 
with orange essence if preferred. Slit the peel of a good orange 
half way down in several places, work the orange out, fill with 
the sauce, round it oflf smoothly, and turn under the tips of the 
sliced rind. 

PEACH SAUCE. 

Take 1 pint canned peaches, press through a sieve with their 
liquor, add 1 tablespoon each of maraschino and kirsch (or cherry 
bounce), or \ teaspoon almond extract. Get very hot without 
letting it boil. Serve with hot puddings. Apricot sauce is made 
the same way. 

PINEAPPLE SAUCE. 

Heat in a saucepan J cup canned pineapple liquor with \ cup 
white sugar, and \ a lemon peel. Let boil 6 minutes. Add 1 tea- 
spoon any liquor preferred. Serve hot with a hot pudding. 



PUDDING SAUCES. 187 

PLUM PUDDING SAUCE. 

1 cup (lark brown sugar, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 tablespoon but- 
ter, 1 pint boiling water. Cook 5 minutes and flavor with vanilla 
extract. 

RASPBERRY SAUCE, NO. 1. 

Put 4 tablespoons raspberry jam in a saucepan with 1 ounce 
sugar, i cup water, and 1 teaspoon kirsch ; mix well for a minute, 
then boil for 2 minutes, stirring. A little cherry juice and almond 
extract will take the place of the kirsch. Plain raspberry juice 
from canned or fresh berries can be used hot. Fruit juices of all 
kinds make good pudding sauces with appropriate flavorings added. 

RASPBERRY SAUCE, NO. 2. 

Boil together for 10 minutes I cup cold water, 2 tablespoons 
sugar, I cup raspberry juice, and 1 tablespoon Jamaica rum. Use 
hot or cold. 

RUM SAUCE. 

Put 2 tablespoons sugar in a saucepan with .] cup water, the 
rind of 1 lemon, a small piece of cinnamon, 1 teaspoon butter, a 
few drops of vanilla, 1 teaspoon brandy, and 3 tablespoons Jamaica 
rum. When it begins to simmer add a saltspoon arrowroot, letting 
simmer for a couple of minutes while stirring. Take out the 
lemon and cinnamon and serve in a sauceboat hot. 



SABAYON SAUCE. 

Filippini. 

Beat until light 1 heaping tablespoon granulated sugar with 
the yolks of 2 eggs. Scald in a saucepan 1 cup cream and milk 
mixed ; when at the boil add \ teaspoon vanilla, and pour gradu- 
ally over the eggs and sugar, stirring continuously. Set back on 
the stove and get very hot without boiling, stirring all the time. 
.Strain through a cheesecloth into a hot sauceboat, and serve with 
hot puddings. 

VANILLA SAUCE. 

Mrs. Herbert Grandy. 

1 cup sugar, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon flour, a small piece butter ; 
mix well, pour over it boiling water till the thickness required, 
let come to the boil, add 1 teaspoon vanilla and serve. 

VINEGAR SAUCE. 

Brown 1 tablespoon butter in a hot saucepan, rub in 1 table- 
spoon flour; add slowly 1 pint boiling water, stirring constantly. 
Add 1 teaspoon caramel and ^ cup sugar, put over the boiling 
tea kettle for 15 minutes, then add i cup vinegar, and serve. 



188 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

WHITE SAUCE. 

Beat { cup butter with 1 cup powdered sugar to a cream, add 
the white of 1 unbeaten egg, and beat, then a second white of egg, 
and beat hard until as light as possible. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
stand in a pan of boiling water over the tire, and stir in briskly 
^ cup boiling water. Stir till it froths and serve immediately. 
I cup sherry may be used instead of vanilla, if wine is liked. 

WINE SAUCE. 

Mrs. H. W. Miller. 

Beat 1 egg and 1 cup sugar together, add 1 tablespoon butter, 
and 2 wine glasses sherry. Cook in double boiler 5 or lU minutes 
without boiling, stirring all the time. 

YELLOW SAUCE. 

Beat together very hard "2 eggs and 1 cup sugar, set the bowl 
in a pan of water on the stove, and stir constantly until it comes 
to a boil. Put a piece of butter the size of a walnut in a sauce- 
boat, pour the egg over it, and flavor with wine or vanilla or 
both. Serve cold, and stir well before using. 



PASTRY. 



PIE PASTE. 



Mix i teaspoon salt witli 11 cups flour; work m \ cup lard 
with the tips of the fingers; moisten with cold water till a dough 
is formed. Dredge a board with Hour, place the dough on it, pat 
and roll out; wash i cup butter, make into a round cake, and fold 
it into the paste; pat again; repeat this. If not to be used at 
once, wrap up in cheesecloth, put in a covered tin, and keep m a 

cold place. . , r , < i . i <■ 

Good paste may also be made entirely of lard, but rarely ot 

butter alone. ^^^ 

PUFF PASTE. 

Sift 1 pound flour on a board ; make a hole in the centre, and 
pour into it 1 cup ice water and i teaspoon salt. Knead well until 
perfectly mixed. Then let rest 15 minutes. Wash 1 pound butter 
in 1 quart ice water, then knead it out well flattening with the 
hand, and put in a cool place. Flour the board and roll out the 
paste to li larger than the butter ; put the butter on top cover it 
with the 4 corners, and roll out to a square 1 inch thick, then 
fold it in 3 folds without separating. Roll out again to a square 
a little thinner. Fold up and place on a pan, cover with a towel 
and put in a cool place for 20 minutes. Roll it out square as be- 
• fore and fold again, letting rest another 20 minutes. Roll out 
again, fold as before and put in a cool place until wanted. 

ALMOND PUDDING. 

Mrs. Ralph Wilson. 

Mix together 6 well beaten eggs, 4 tablespoons powdered sugar, 
1 teaspoon rosewater, 3 tablespoons powdered cracker, 4 tab e- 
spoons melted butter, 4 ounces finely shredded citron and lastly 
3 pound sweet almonds, blanched and chopped fine. Lme a pud- 
ding dish with rich pie paste, pour the mixture in and bake till 
done. It should stand several hours before serving. 

APPLE CAKE. 

Mrs. Margaret A. Sayers. 

Roll a good pie crust out thin, and line the bottom and sides 
of a dripping pan about 14 inches square. Peel core and slice 
fdozen goocf sized apples, put them in the pan with 1 cup raisms 
or currants, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla,^ teaspoon cinna- 
mon or nutmeg, and bits of butter amounting in size to a walnut 
Cover with a second crust, but have the lower crust large enough 
to roll over the edge of the upper one. Bake in a moderate oven- 

189 



190 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

APPLE PAN PIE. 

"The Ladies' Home Cook Book." 

Take a deep earthen pudding pot, fill it with slices of tart 
apples, pour on enough molasses to sweeten them ; sprinkle over 
them a little cinnamon, cover with a paste, cut a hole in the 
middle, and place in the oven. After the first paste is baked, it 
may be taken off and a second one baked. This should also be 
taken off, and the apple stay in till it becomes a deep red. When 
done, take from the oven and immediately break the paste into 
small pieces, and stir into the sauce while hot. Serve cold. 

APPLE PIE. 

Stew a dozen tart apples ; when soft add 1 tablespoon butter, 
1 cup sugar, \ glass rosewater, and a little nutmeg. Fill a freshly 
baked crust, and serve cold. 

APPLE TARTS. 

Pare, core and slice G sound apples. Put in a saucepan with 
1 tablespoon butter, 3 tablespoons sugar and a little vanilla. Cover 
and cook slowly for 30 minutes, or until tender. Rub through a 
sieve, and let cool. Roll out puff paste h inch thick, cut 12 pieces 
3 inches square, wet the surface of 6 with beaten eggs, divide 
the sauce over them, cover with the remaining pieces, and pinch 
the edges together. Glaze the surfaces with egg, dust with granu- 
lated sugar, and bake for 20 minutes. 

^ DRIED APPLE PIE. 

Stew dried apples with a piece of lemon peel till tender, and 
rub through the colander. Sweeten to taste, add a pinch of nut- 
meg or cinnamon, and, if liked, a well beaten egg. Bake with 
two crusts, and serve warm. 

FRIED APPLE PIES. 

"The Ladies' Home Cook Book." 

Mix 1 tablespoon lard, 1 quart flour, 1 tablespoon yeast, and 
water to form a stifif batter, and let stand till light. Add a very 
little soda, and knead up not very stiff : roll out the paste, cut in 
rounds with a saucer, lay a spoonful of freshly made apple sauce 
either green or dried on one-half the crust, fold the other over, 
pinch the edge, and fry in hot lard. 

SLICED APPLE PIE. 

Mrs. Thos. Coughtrie. 

Line a pan witli paste. Take ripe, tart apples, pare, core and 
slice them thin, filling the pan ; dust over them as much sugar as 
they seem to need, add a little nutmeg or cinnamon, and a tea- 
spoon of butter in bits. Put on the top crust, prick holes in it, 
and bake in a moderate oven. 



PASTRY. 19] 

SWEET APPLE PIE. 

Mrs. Clara Stephenson. 

Pare and grate 6 large, sweet apples, add 1 well beaten egg, 
^ cup sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, J teaspoon salt, butter the size of 
a hickory nut, and lemon to flavor. Bake with one crust. Dust 
powdered sugar over when baked. 

BANANA CUSTARD PIE. 

Mrs. Kate Slatzer. 

Line a pie tin with paste and bake. When done slice in it 

2 small bananas. Make a custard with 1 pint milk, 2 tablespoons 
cornstarch, the yolks of 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons sugar and a little 
vanilla. Pour this over the bananas, and spread with the whites 
of the eggs beaten stifif with 2 tablespoons sugar, returning to the 
oven to brown slightly. 

BANANA PIE. 

Mrs. Charles Wilson. 

Bake 2 crusts. Cut bananas in slices and fill the crusts; beat 

3 eggs up light with 1 teaspoon flour, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 
and sugar to taste; pour boiling water over this slowly, stirring 
till it begins to thicken ; take off and pour over the bananas. Make 
a meringue of the whites of egg and sugar, and put in the oven 
to brown. 

BANBURY CAKES. -^ 

"Buckeye Cook Book." 

Take an equal quantity of cleaned currants, chopped lemon 
peel and granulated sugar, mix all together with ginger and cinna- 
mon to taste ; add enough butter to make a good paste. Make a 
good puff paste, roll \ inch thick, cut into 2 inch squares, and 
place a lump of the mixture on each. Pinch 2 opposite corners of 
the dough together, and press down flat; wash the remaining 
corners with water, and put as much powdered sugar on as will 
stay. Bake in a slow oven. 

BLACKBERRY GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Mrs. H. D. Lewis. 

Make a dough not quite as rich as for pie ; roll out in a large 
sheet, cover one-half thickly with blackberries, turn the other 
half of the dough over it and press down the edges tight. In 
Wales this would be baked on an immense griddle over the grate, 
and turned over. In default of griddles of the proper size, bako 
in the oven until done. Take out, turn back the top crust, spread 
the berries "Over the whole sheet, sprinkle with sugar and bits of 
butter, cut in squares, and serve on separate plates. 

Sliced apples may be used in the same way. 



192 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BLACKBERRY PIE. 

Mrs. Joseph Reid. 

Pick over the berries, wash it necessary, line a pie pan with 
good paste, put in the berries, sprinkle well with sugar, put on a 
top crust, slash it across the middle, pinch around the edges and 
bake in a moderate oven. Dust the top with sugar when serving 
hot or cold. 

Other berries and small fruits may be treated in the same 
way. A crossbar of paste is good with a berry pie. 

BLUEBERRY PIE. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

Slightly dredge 21 cups berries with flour, and fill a pie pan 
lined with paste ; sprinkle with ^ cup sugar, and a pinch salt. 
Cover with paste, and bake in a moderate oven about 45 minutes. 

Huckleberry Pie is made like blueberry, but is improved by 
the addition of half a dozen seeded and chopped green grapes. 

BUTTERMILK PIE. 

Mrs. Clara Stephenson. 

1 cup sugar, 2 cups buttermilk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons flour, a 
little butter, and flavoring to taste. Bake with 1 crust. 

CHEESE CAKES. 

Put 1 spoonful rennet in 1 quart rtew milk; keep near the fire, 
and when the curd forms, drain oiT the whey through a sieve. 
Rub into the curd 4 tablespoons powdered sugar, ^ cup butter, 1 
grated nutmeg, and the yolk of 1 egg ; beat well, add 1 whole egg 
and beat again. Mix in ^ pound dried currants, or the grated 
rind and juice of 1 lemon. Line patty pans with a rich paste, 
half fill, dust with sugar and bake. 

CHOCOLATE PIE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Charles Breeze. 

Put 2 cups of milk on to boil in a double boiler. Add 3 table- 
spoons chocolate or cocoa, J cup sugar, butter the size of a small 
egg, 2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in a little cold milk. Stir 
well until it begins to thicken, then add the yolks of 3 eggs well 
beaten, cook a moment longer, take from the fire, add 2 teaspoons 
vanilla, and pour into a freshly baked pie crust. Make a meringue 
of the whites of the eggs with 3 tablespoons sugar, spread over 
the pie, and return to the oven to brown. 

CHOCOLATE PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Frank Auker. 

Mix 4 tablespoons unsweetened, grated chocolate wi-th 2 table- 
spoons cornstarch and a little cold water. Bring the rest of 1 pint 
water to the boil, stir in tlie mixture, and cook till thick. Sweeten 



PASTRY. 193 

with 6 tablespoons sugar, take from the tire, add vanilla to taste, 
and the yolks of 2 eggs well beaten. Pour into a freshly baked 
crust, and spread on a meringue of the whites of the eggs, and i 
cup sugar. Brown. 

CINNAMON ROLLS, NO. L 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Roll out a sheet of pie paste J inch thick; cut in pieces ^ 
inches square ; spread with sugar, cinnamon and bits of butter ; 
fold over, and pinch the edges together all around. Prick the 
tops and bake in a slow oven. 

CINNAMON ROLLS, NO. 2. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Roll out pie paste to ^ inch in thickness; spread with sugar, 
bits of butter and cinnamon ; roll up tiglit. press the edge down, 
and cut in pieces about an inch long. Bake in a slow oven. 

COCO AN UT PIE, NO. 1. 

Grate 1 cocoanut ; take its weiglit in sugar. J its weight in but- 
ter, 5 eggs, the milk of the nut and 1 pint milk, grated peel and 
juice of 1 lemon. Beat the eggs and sugar together, add the milk 
and melt the butter and put in. Line 4 pie pans with paste, fill 
and bake. 

COCOANUT PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. A. H. Flowers. 

Put 1 quart milk and- 1 pint water on to boil, reserving enough 
to wet 3 tablespoons flour ; sweeten to taste : beat the yolks of 3 
eggs light, stir in the flour and water, and add to the boiling milk ; 
stir till smooth, then add the most of h box cocoanut. Have 3 
freshly baked crusts, fill, cover witli a meringue of the whites of 
egg beaten stiff with a little sugar, sprinkle with the rest of the 
cocoanut, and brown in the oven. 

COCOANUT STRUDEL. 

Mrs. C. H. Furman. 

Take 1 quart flour, 1 tablespoon lard, a pinch of salt, and 
enough water to make a soft dough, but not sticky. Knead and 
slap it verv hard ; let rise covered in a warm place J hour. Pre- 
pare all the ingredients so thev can be added without delay. 
Cover a table with a clean cloth, flour it well, put the dough in the 
middle and stretch it first one place and another till as thin as 
tissue paper. The edges. will always be thicker than the rest; 
when stretched as far as it will go, cut off the edges with a sharp 
knife, and scatter the ingredients over the sheet; first a thin dust- 
ing of fine bread crumbs, then a heavy sprinkle of cocoanut, cinn^^ 
13 



194 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

mon. sugar, poppy seed, l)its of butter, dots of jelly, raisins, and 
lastly white of egg beaten very stiff. Do this quickly or the dough 
will dry. Take one side of the tablecloth in your fingers, and 
roll the dough up like a jelly roll — it is too delicate to roll with 
the hands — if too long for the pans, cut the roll in shorter lengths; 
put in a buttered pan, and bake in a slow oven. Cut in slices to 
serve. 

If the dough sticks in stretching, wet the edges with lard. 

For Apple Strudcl use less cocoannt and considerable grated 
apple. 

COVENTRY PUFFS. 

Roll puff paste into a sheet \ inch thick; cut rounds 3 inches 
across. Put a teaspoon preserves on each, turn up the edges in 
3 places so as to form a triangle. Pinch tight, put bottom side 
up in a buttered pan, wash over with egg and water, dust with 
powdered sugar and bake. 

CR.^NBERRY PIF. 

Mrs. A. E Faine. 

Cook until thick 1 pint cranberries with h cup water and 1^ 
cups granulated sugar. Set aside to get cold. Whip 1 cup thick 
cream with U tablespoons sugar and ^ teaspoon vanilla. Put the 
cranberries in a freshly leaked crust, cover with cream, and serve. 

CREAM PIE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. James Friel. 

Bake a fruit pie without a top crust : when cold cover with 
freshly whipped cream, and serve. 

CREAM PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Lucy Huston. 

Line a deep pan with paste, prick it and bake a delicate brown. 
Put over the fire in a double boiler 1 large cup of milk. Stir to- 
getlier h cup sugar, piece of butter the size of a walnut, 1 small 
half cup of flour, 1 tablespoon cold milk and the yolks of 2 well 
beaten eggs. Mix thoroughlv and add to the milk when it boils. 
Stir until it thickens. Take from the fire, flavor with vanilla, and 
fill the baked crusts with the custard. Beat the whites of the eggs 
with 2 tablespoons of sugar, cover the top of the pie, and brown 
slightly in the oven. 

To make a chocolate pie add 2 tablespoons cocoa or 1 table- 
spoon grated chocolate to the custard. 

CREAM PIE, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Robert McGuire. 

Put a pint of milk in a double boiler ; bring to the boil. Beat 
together the yolks of 2 eggs, ^ cup suear. 2 tablespoons flour, and 
stir into the boiling milk, cooking till thick. Add" flavoring to 
taste. Pour into a freshly baked crust, cover with a frosting made 
of the whites of the eggs and a little sugar, and brown in the 
oven. 



PASTRY. 195 

CRUMB A XI) LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. II. C. Begland. 

Soak 1 cup l)read crumbs in enough milk to cover them. 
Cream (3 tablespoons sugar with 4 of butter, beat 4 eggs light and 
add them to tlie cream : Havor with the juice and grated rind of 
2 lemons; and stir in the crumbs. Line a large pie plate with a 
rich paste, fill and bake till set and brown. 

CURRANT PIE. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Line a pie pan with fresh paste, sprinkle some sugar in the 
bottom, till with stenmied currants in any stage from green to 
ripe, sprinkle more sugar, cover with strips of paste, and bake in 
a slow oven at least -"iO minutes. It will tak^e 1 cup of sugar or 
more according to the greenness of the fruit. 

Gooseberry Pie is made in the same way. 

For Cherry Pie stone the cherries and make just like currant 
pie. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

Mrs. Satnuel Auker. 

Line a pie pan with paste. Rub 1 teaspoon tlour smooth witli 
.} cup cold milk; pour into "2 cups boiling milk and cook 5 min- 
utes ; pour over 3 well beaten eggs, ^ cup sugar, 1 saltspoon salt, 
and 1 teaspoon vanilla or lemon flavoring: pour into the paste while 
hot and bake slowly. A knife blade will make a clean cut when 
done. 

ECCLES CAKES. 

"Buckeye Cook Book." 

Prepare the ingredients for Banbury Cakes, put 1 teaspoon 
mixture on each piece of paste and fold the corners over. Flatten 
with the hand and turn upside down on the board ; roll with the 
pin till the contents break through. Put in buttered pans, slash 
the tops, brush with milk and egg, dust with sugar, and bake 
brown in a hot oven. 

EGOLESS PUMPKIN PIE. 

Mrs. Peter Urquhart. 

Mix 1 cup mashed pumpkin with 1 pint milk, 1 tablespoon 
cornstarch, 1 cracker rolled very line, a pinch of salt, a little of 
all kinds of spices, sugar to taste. Bake in a single crust. 

ENGLISH I-RUIT PIES. 

Put the prepared fruit in a deep baking dish with plenty of 
srgar and a little flour, if very juicy; if not juicy omit the flour, 
and add a little w^ater. Line the edge with pie paste, and let it 
extend about \ the way down. Place an inverted cup in the 
riddle, and cover with a short crust, wash with cold water, or 
the white of eg", and dust powdered sugar over. Make fancy 
cuts in the crust. Pinch the edges and bake in a slow oven. 



196 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

GRAPE PIE. 

Mrs. Joe Williams. 

Pop ripe grapes and stew the pulps until the seeds separate. 
Rub through a colander. Stir in the skins again, fill the paste- 
lined pan, sprinkle with 2 tablespoons flour and 3 tablespoons 
sugar, put a paste cover or crossbars, and bake. These may be 
canned for pies with just enough sugar to keep them. Use in the 
same way. 

GREEN TOMATO PIE. 

Mrs. A. H. Flowers. 

Line a pan with paste, slice pretty full of green tomatoes ; add 
I cup sugar and a little cinnamon, cover with a top crust and bake. 

HICKORY NUT PIE. 

Mrs. Ralph Wilson. 

1 cup chopped nutmeats, 2 eggs, 3 cups milk, 2 tablespoons 
sugar. Bake with one crust. 

JAM PIE. 

Make enough rich paste for 2 pies ; lino the pans, one a rather 
shallow one, and fill with rice or beans till baked ; shake out the 
rice. Put a ^ inch layer of jam in the larger pie, spread whipped 
cream over it, set the shallow pie on top, and fill it with whipped 
cream, sweetened and flavored ; chopped nuts may be added. 

JAM ROLL. 

Roll a strip of puff paste to ^ inch in thickness ; spread with 
jam, roll and pinch the ends to keep the jam from coming out. 
Glaze with white of t^g, and bake in a moderate oven. 

KENTISH PIE. 

Bring \\ cups milk to the boil in a double boiler, sprinkle in 
IJ ounces rice flour, 1 ounce butter, 2 ounces sugar ; cook about 
10 minutes; take from the fire, stir in 1 ounce butter, 2 ounces 
sugar, a pinch each of salt and nutmeg, a few drops of lemon 
essence, and 2 well beaten eggs. Fill paste lined patty pans, 
sprinkle a few^ currants on top, and bake about 20 minutes. 

LEMON CHEESE CAKES. 

"Exchange." 

Powder 2 stale, small sponge cakes and beat into them the 
juice and grated rind of 2 lemons to which have been added 3 
tablespoons of sugar. Melt and add 2 ounces of butter; simmer 
over the fire for a few moments and then add very gradually 2 
well beaten eggs. Bake in puff paste shells. 



PASTRY. 197 

LEMON PIE, NO. 1. 

Miss Annie Feeney. 

Put 1 cup milk in a double boiler. Mix together 1 cup sugar, 
2 tablespoons flour, 1 teaspoon butter, and the yolks of 2 eggs. 
When the milk has come to the boil, stir this mixture into it, and 
cook until it thickens. Take from the fire, add the juice of 2 
lemons and a little of.^the grated rind, pour this into a freshlv 
baked crust. Then whip the whites of the eggs with 2 tablespoon's 
sugar spread over the pie and return to the oven to brown. Orange 
Pie may be made in a similar way. 

LEMOX PIE. NO. 2. 

Mrs. \Vm. Angle. 

Take a deep dish, grate into it the yellow rind of 2, lemons ; 
add to that U cups sugar, 2 heaping tablespoons flour, or 1 of 
cornstarch. Stir well together, then add the yolks of 3 well beaten 
eggs; add lemon juice, 2 cups of water and a piece of butter the 
size of a walnut. Set this on the fire in double boiler, and cook 
until it strings like cold honey. Turn into a pie pan lined with 
paste ; bake, and when done, cover with a meringue of tlie whites 
of egg beaten up witli :'> small tablespoons sugar, and brown. 

LEMON PIE, NO. 3. 

Mrs. W. J. Barry. 

Mix the grated rind and juice of 1 lemon, 1 cup sugar, beaten 
yolks of 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons cornstarch dissolved in cold water, 
and 1 cup boiling water. Cook and stir till thick. Pour into a 
pie pan lined with a freshly baked crust. Beat the whites of egg 
stiff with a little sugar, spread on top, and return to the oven 
until brown. 

LEMON PIE, NO. %. 

Mrs. John Taylor, Jr. 

Mix together I] cups water. U cups sugar, 3 teaspoons corn- 
starch, butter the size of an egg, and the grated rind and juice 
of 1 lemon. Cook in a double boiler until beginning to thicken; 
add the beaten yolks of -1 eggs, stir till hot again, put in a paste- 
lined pan and bake. Make a meringue of the" whites of egg with 
a little sugar, sjiread over the pie, a!id return to the oven to 
brown. 

MARLBOROUGH PIE. 

Mrs. Mary Slatzer. 

Stew and strain apples enough for 1 pie. Add 1 tablespoon 
thick cream. I well beaten egg, sugar and nutmeg to taste. Fill 
a paste lined pan and bake. Cover with a meringue of white of 
egg and pulverized sugar, flavored with lemon, and brown. 



198 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

MARTHA WASHINGTON PUMPKIN PIE. 

"Colonial Recipes." 

Pare and cut into pieces a good pumpkin. Put into a porce- 
lain kettle with 1 teacup water, cover and steam till tender. While 
hot add 1 tablespoon butter to each quart. Press through a col- 
ander, draining ofif the water. Sprinkle over it while hot 1 table- 
spoon flour to each quart. Take 1 quart of strained pumpkin, add 
6 well beaten eggs, 1 cup sugar, \ teaspoon mace, 1 tablespoon 
ginger, \ nutmeg and 1 gill brandy. Line the pans with a good, 
rich paste, pour in the mixture, put strips of paste across, and 
bake % hour in a quick oven. 

MINCE MEAT, NO. 1. 

Mrs. N. B. H. Gardner. 

5 lbs. of neck beef, 2 lbs. of suet, 2 lbs. of raisins, 2 lbs. of 
currants, ^ lb. of citron, 2 lbs. granulated sugar, 1 gallon of cider, 
juice and yellow rind of 2 oranges, juice of 2 lemons, 1 peck 
apples, 1 quart each of canned peaches, pears, cherries and grapes, 
1 cup of New Orleans molasses, 1 teaspoon each of cloves, cinna- 
mon, allspice and nutmeg. 

Boil meat till very tender and chop fine. Chop apples and 
suet fine, and mix with the meat, and add all the other ingredients. 
If sealed in glass jars, will keep indefinitely. 

MINCE MEAT, NO. 2. 

Mrs. H. D. Ross. 

Take 2 pounds of lean fresh beef, boil until tender and chop 
fine. Pick 1 pound beef suet clean from threads, and chop very 
fine. Pare and chop 5 pounds apples, and stone and chop 4 pounds 
raisins. Chop \ pound citron. Mix all together, adding 2\ pounds 
brown sugar, 1 tablespoon each of salt, cloves and allspice, and 2 
tablespoons cinnamon. Lastly add 4 quarts cider. Cover closely 
in a jar and keep in a cool place. Make with 2 crusts. 

MOCK CHERRY PIE. 

Miss McMath. 

Cut 2 cups cranberries in halves and wash them out in cold 
water to remove the seeds. Seed and chop 1 cup raisins. Mix 
together 2 cups of sugar and 1 tablespoon flour, and add 1 cup 
boiling water, and 2 teaspoons vanilla. Bake between 2 crusts. 

MOCK MINCE PIE. 

Roll 4 crackers and mix with 1} cups sugar; stir in 1 cup 
molasses and J cup lemon juice or vinegar; add 1 cup seeded and 
chopped raisins, .] cup butter, 2 well beaten eggs, and spices to 
taste. Make a top crust. 



PASTRY. 199 

MOONSHINE PIE. 

Mrs. G. S. Mohler. 

Dissolve 1 cup sugar in 2 cups milk, and bring to the boil in 
a double boiler; stir in §■ cup cornstarch dissolved in a little of the 
milk while cold, and stir till thick; lastly stir in the beaten whites 
of 4 eggs, take off, flavor, put in a freshly baked crust, sprinkle 
with shredded cocoanut, and set in oven to brown. 

NAPOLEON PUDDING. 

Mrs. Ralph Wilson. 

Line a (?celT plate with rich paste ; cover with a thick layer 
of preserves, sprinkle with 1 tablespoon chopped almonds, and half 
as much chopped, candied lemon peel. Beat separately 4 yolks 
and 2 whites of eggs, add 1 cup sugar, and h cup butter melted, 
and pour all over the preserves. Bake in a moderate oven, and 
cover with a meringue of the other 2 whites and sugar. Brown. 

ORANGE PIE. 
Mrs. Nancy Rush. 

3 eggs, f cup white sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, juice of 1 
orange and ^ the grated rind, juice of 1 lemon and ^ the grated 
rind. Beat the butter and sugar together, add the yolks and the 
fruit, put into a paste lined pan and bake. When done spread 
over it the whites of egg beaten stiff with powdered sugar, and 
return to the oven a few minutes to brown. 

ORANGE CREAM PIE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Elmer Marlowe. 

Beat well together 3 eggs and J cup sugar. Heat 1 pint milk 
to the boiling point and pour slowly over eggs and sugar. Add 
the grated rind and juice of 1 orange. Return to the fire and cook 
3 minutes. Remove and add 1 package orange jello. Stir until it 
begins to thicken. Have ready a freshly baked pie crust, pour 
the mixture in and let cool. Then whip 1 cup cream stiff, and 
fail in the top of the pie like a meringue. 

ORANGE CREAM PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Porter Hoskins. 

Boil U cups rich milk; add I cup sugar, the yolks of 2 well 
beaten eggs, a small pinch salt, and 2 tablespoons cornstarch in ^ 
cup cold milk. When beginning to thicken, take from the fire, 
flavor with orange essence, and pour into a freshly baked crust. 
Beat the whites of egg with 3 tablespoons sugar, flavor with orange, 
and spread over the custard. Set in the oven to brown. Serve 
cold. 

ORANGE CREAM PIE, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Wm. Bird. 

Take 3 eggs, 1 quart milk, 4 tablespoons sugar, the juice of 2 
oranges, J teaspoon cornstarch, and a pinch of salt. This recipe 
makes 2 pies, using the whites of the eggs for frosting. 



200 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

ORANGE STICKS. 

Roll pie or puff paste thin, cut in strips 5 inches by 1, and 
bake in hot oven. Spread with orange filling and put together in 
pairs. 

Lemon filling or any good cake filling may be used for sticks. 

ORANGE TARTS. 

Line patty pans with puff paste and bake 15 minutes in a 
quick oven. Remove, put 1 teaspoon orange marmalade on each 
patty, cover with a meringue, and brown in the oven. Any other 
marmalade or jam may be used instead of the orange. 

PARTY PUFFS. 

Make a rich paste, roll out thin and cut with a biscuit cutter. 
Lay them on a shallow buttered tin pan. Make a puff paste and 
cut with the same cutter. Cut the centres out of the puff cakes 
with a small wine glass, and lay the rims on the first cakes. Brush 
all over with white of eggs sweetened, and bake .till a nice brown. 
Fill with jelly or sweetmeats of any kind. 

PEACH COBBLER. 

Mrs. Wm. Davis. 

Make a rich biscuit dough, roll out and line a dripping pan ; 
put in a layer of peaches peeled, stoned and cut in half ; sprinkle 
with sugar, bits of butter and a little flour. If the dish is deep, 
a second layer may be put. Add a little water; more if the peaches 
are not juicy. Cover with the crust, pinch the edges down tight, 
and cut slits in the centre. Bake in a moderate oven. Serve with 
cream. 

PEACH MERINGUE PIE. 

Pare and stone ripe peaches, and stew till tender with a num- 
ber of kernels thrown in. Rub through a colander ; fill a paste, 
and bake till done. Spread over it a thick meringue of white of 
egg and sugar, flavor with vanilla, and brown. Serve cold. Any 
preserved fruit may be served the same way. 

PEACH ROLLS. 

Stew dried fruit, sweeten and flavor to taste ; make a good 
baking powder crust, roll thin, spread fruit on, put thin slices 
butter on the fruit, and roll up. Put in a deep pan, to each 4 
rolls add 1 cup sugar, and 'k cup butter, cover with hot water, and 
bake h hour. 

PINEAPPLE PIE, NO. 1. 

Dissolve 3 level tablespoons cornstarch in a little cold water. 
Pour over it 1 cup boiling, grated pineapple, juice and all. Stir 
till mixture thickens, then add juice of ^ lemon, 1 tablespoon 
butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 beaten egg, } teaspoon salt. Beat all to- 
gether, turn into a pie pan lined with paste, and put on a top 
crust. Bake about h hour. 



PASTRY. 201 

PINEAPPLE PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Seth Robinson. 

Beat J cup butter to a cream with 1 cup sugar, add the beaten 
yolks of 5 eggs, 1 cup sweet cream, 1 grated pineapple and lastly 
the stiflf whites of the eggs. Bake with an under crust only. 

If preferred, the whites of egg may be kept out, and used 
for a meringue when baked. 

PINE.VPPLE TART. 

Fill a freshly baked pie crust with slices of preserved pine- 
apple. Put the syrup of the pineapple in a saucepan and boil up 
well with 3 tablespoons apricot or strawberry jam, 1 tablespoon 
rum or brandy, the juice of 1 lemon, and 1 teaspoon cornstarch. 
Strain and cool, and pour over the pineapple slices ; cover with 
whipped cream. 

PLUM PIE. 

Mrs. Marion Truax. 

Make a good pie dough and line a pan. Fill with plums, 
seeded or not, as you choose. Sprinkle well with sugar and a 
little flour. If the large dry plum, use a little water. Cover with 
a second crust, pinch the edges all around, make a row of slashes 
across the middle, and bake till done. 

POTATO PIE. 

Boil 1 pound potatoes, peel and mash through a colander. 
Stir to a cream ^ pound sugar, | pound butter, add gradually a 
wine glass wine and 1 of brandy, 1 teaspoon ground mace and 
cinnamon, 1 grated nutmeg, the juice and grated rind of 1 large 
lemon. Then beat 6 eggs very light and add them by degrees to 
the mixture alternately with the potato. Bake without a top 
crust. 

POTATO CUSTARD PIE. 

Mrs. Mary Keller. 

Grate 2 good sized boiled potatoes; beat the yolks of 4 eggs 
very light, add a little sugar and grated nutmeg, the potatoes, a 
heaping teaspoon butter, and milk enough for a very thin custard. 
Fill a good crust and bake till the custard is set. 

N. B. During the war, this was known as a "Jeff Davis" ])ie. 

PRUNE PIE. 

Wash I pound prunes and cover with cold water to soak ; 
cook in the same water till soft. Take out the stones, cut in 
quarters, mix with a scant i cup sugar, and 1 tablespoon lemon 
juice. Boil the liquor down to ]\ tablespoons. Line the pan 
with paste, cover with prunes, pour over the liquor, dot with l.V 
teaspoons butter, and sprinkle witli 1 tablespoon flour. Put an 
upper crust. 



202 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PUMPKIN PIE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Frank Orndorf. 

1 pint stewed pumpkin, 1 pint cream, 1 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 
butter the size of an egg, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ^ teaspoon allspice, 
a little salt. Line a pan with paste, prick it several times, fill and 
bake brown. 

PUMPKIN PIE, NO. 2. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Peel, cut up and stew a piece ot pumpkin; when tender rub 
it through a colander ; add a pinch of salt, sugar to taste, a lump 
of butter size of a hickory nut, 1 teaspoon ginger and 1 teaspoon 
mixed spices, 1 tablespoon brandy, 1 cup milk, and 2 eggs. Beat 
all together till light. Put in a pan lined with paste, and bake 
in a moderate oven without any top crust. 

RAISIN PIE. 

Mrs. Jacob Drease. 

Take \ box seeded raisins, cover with water, add h cup sugar, 
and let sinniier for ^ hour. Thicken with I teaspoon flour dis- 
solved in a little water. Fill a paste lined pan, and bake with a 
top crust. 

RHUBARB PIE, NO. 1. 

Miss Johanna Feeney. 

Wash and cut the rhubarb into 1 inch pieces, but do not peel, 
if young. Line a pan with paste, sprinkle sugar on the paste, fill 
in with rhubarb, about a pint, and sprinkle the rest of a cup of 
sugar over it. Cover with strips and bake in a slow oven 30 min- 
utes or more. Sprinkle with sugar when it is served. 

RHUBARB PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Ella Owens. 

Wash the rhubarb well and cut it in slices ; put it on to stew 
adding a pinch of soda. When tender, measure out a cup of rhu- 
barb and a cup of sugar; beat up tiie yolk of 1 egg, stir in it 2 
teaspoons cornstarch or flour, and add it to the rhubarb and sugar 
mixing well. Put it in a pie pan lined with paste, and bake done. 
Beat up the white of the egg with .S tablespoons sugar, spread it 
over the pie, and brown. 

SPONGE CAKE STRUDEL. 

Mrs. C. H. Furman, 

Prepare a dough as for cocoanut strudel. Drop spoonfuls of 
a soft sponge cake batter over it, and sprinkle with chopped 
almonds. Roll as before. 



PASTRY. 20B 

STRAWBERRY PIE. 

Mrs. F. E. Martin. 

Bake 2 fresh crusts, fill with fresh berries, sprinkle with sugar, 
and set in the oven long enough to heat through without cooking. 
Put 1 pie over the other, and serve with a whipped cream cover, 
or plain cream in a pitcher. 

STRAWBERRY T A RTS. 

Bake 6 tart crusts. Put in a saucepan 2 ounces sugar, with 1 
cup water, i teaspoon vanilla, and 1 pint fresh strawberries Let 
boil 5 minutes, fake up the berries with a skimmer and lay on 
the crusts. Boil the syrup down to half the quantity, pour over 
the tarts and serve. 

SWEET POTATO PIE. 

Mrs. H. B. Coulson. 

Boil peel and mash fine 3 good sized sweet potatoes; add 5 
well beaten eggs, and 1 quart milk carefully to prevent lumping. 
Sweeten to taste, add vanilla and \ pound melted butter. Bake 
in paste lined pans. 

VINEGAR PIE, NO. 1. 

Miss Sophronia Tucker. 

4 teacups water, 21 cups sugar, 3 yolks of egg, 6 tablespoons 
flour mixed in a little water, 2 teaspoons butter, 11 teaspoons 
vinegar, 3 teaspoons lemon extract. u ^ a 

Stir all together and cook until thick. Fill a freshly baked 
crust, cover with the beaten whites of the eggs, and brown. 

VINEGAR PIE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Harrison Crawford. 

Beat together 1 teacup brown sugar and 1 egg; add 2 level 
teaspoons flour, and 1 cup vinegar. Cook until thick. Line a pan 
with fresh paste, fill it. cover with strips of paste, and bake in a 
quick oven. 

WHIPPED CREAM PIE. 

Mrs. George Hoodlet. 

Take 1 small cup of rich, sweet cream, sweeten to taste, flavor 
with vanilla or lemon, and chill until very cold. Bake a fresh 
pie crust, whip the cream until very stiff and fill the crust. 



CAKES. 



CAKE MAKING. 

Measure the ingredients carefully, the flour after it is sifted; 
beat the butter and sugar to a cream, add yolks of egg well beaten 
next, the milk and flour alternately ; dredge any heavy fruit with 
flour and add next; lastly the stiff whites of egg folded in care- 
fully. Do all the hard beating before the flour goes in. Sift bak- 
ing powder or cream tartar with the last of the flour, put soda in 
the milk or molasses or, if neither, dissolve it in a little hot 
water. Have the oven ready and not too hot at first, grease the 
pan, and if any fruit, line the pan with greased paper. Do not 
move the pan more than absolutely necessary; if browning too 
fast, cover with a paper. When the cake leaves the sides of the 
pan, it is done, or if a broom straw run through it comes out 
dry. Let cool a few moments before taking from the pan. If 
you follow these instructions and your cake is not good, change 
your flour. 

ALMOND CAKES. 

1 pound sugar, J pound flour, 6 eggs, f pound almonds, h 
pound citron. 

Beat the eggs thoroughly and then beat into them the sugar, 
chopped citron, and blanched and halved almonds. Sift the flour 
gradually into the mixture. Pour into shallow, well-buttered tins. 
Bake in a quick oven. When done, roll in powdered almonds 
and sugar. Packed carefully in tins these cakes will keep a 
long time. 

ALMOND DROPS. 

Mrs. B. E. Winters. 

2 cups sugar, 4 eggs, 1 pound chopped almonds, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, enough flour to stiffen. 

Beat the eggs and sugar together until quite stiff, add the 
other ingredients, drop by spoonfuls on to buttered pans and bake. 

ALMOND LOAF CAKE. 

Miss Emily L. Curran. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 5 cups flour, whites of 6 eggs, 1 
cup milk, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon 
almond extract, 1 cup almonds blanched and chopped fine. 

Sift the cream tartar in the flour, dissolve the soda in four 
tablespoons hot water. Bake in loaf cake pan. 

204 



CAKES. 205 

ANGELS' FOOD. 

Miss Mary V. Gardner. 

IJ- cups granulated sugar, U cups flour, U teaspoons cream 
tartar, a pinch of salt, whites of 15 eggs. 

Put eggs in mixing bowl with the salt and half beat them; 
add cream of tartar and beat thoroughly. Now sift in sugar, 
scant measure, and lastly the flour, being careful not to stir more 
than to make smooth. Line the pan with thick greased paper, and 
bake m slow oven 55 minutes. 

APPLE SAUCE CAKE. 

Mrs. Hugh Sliuttlewortli. 

h cup I)uttcr. ] cup sugar, 2 cups flour, M, cups apple sauce, 
1 cup seeded raisins, 1 tablespoon hot water, 2 teaspoons soda, 
] teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves. 

Cook the apples as for the table, straining and sweetening. 
Prunes, pineapple, pieplant, etc.. may be used in place of the 
applesauce, using less soda if the fruit is sweet. Bake in a loaf 
cake. 

BANANA CAKE. 

Mrs. Ed. Spicer. 

\ cup Initter. 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, .V cup milk, \] tea- 
spoons baking powder. 3 eggs. 

Bake in layers. Spread with a boiled white icing, spreading 
thin slices of banana between. Ice the top also. Must be eaten 
fresh. 

BERLIN PANCAKES. 

Mrs. Seth Robinson. 

Roll out a very plain raised dough as for doughnuts, cut with 
a biscuit cutter, put a teaspoon currant jam or jelly in the centre 
of one, cover with another, press the edges tightly together, and 
fry quickly in boiling fat. 

BLACK CAKE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

2 pounds currants, 2 pounds raisins, 1 pound citron, 1 pound 
flour, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound butter. 12 eggs, 4 grated nutmegs, 
1 large tablespoon mace, 1 large tablespoon cinnamon, 2 large wine- 
glassfuls white wine, 1 large wineglass brandy, 1 large wineglass 
rosewater. . . 

Wash, pick and dry the currants; stem and seed the raisms ; 
cut the citron into thin slices; add the spices and the liquor and 
stir all together. Cut the butter into the sugar and beat to a 
cream. Beat the eggs together hard, and add them to the butter 
and sugar alternately with the sifted flour. Stir in the mixture of 
fruit and spices. Put in a large deep pan ; line bottom and sides 
with greased paper, bake in moderate oven If hours, and let stand 
in the oven until cold. 



206 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AXD NEIV. 

BLACK CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. N. B. H. Gardner. 

2 pounds raisins, 2 pounds currants, J pound citron, J pound 
blanched almonds, 1 cup of walnut kernels, i cup New Orleans 
molasses, 1 pound sugar, | pound butter, 1 pound flour, 12 eggs,- 
1 teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves, allspice and nutmeg. 

Line a pan with greased paper, and put in about ^ inch of 
batter; then a layer of fruit, and so on until pan is filled. Steam 
4i- hours, then dry off about l hour in moderate oven. 

BOSTON CREAM PIE. 

•J cup sugar, 2 tablespoons l)utter, 1 cup flour, 4 eggs, i tea- 
spoon vanilla. 

cake in a deep layer pan 20 minutes. Let cool, split the pic 
crosswise, spread the cut side of both with a good cream custard, 
join them again and sprinkle powdered sugar over the cake. 

BROWN CAKE. 

Mrs. Mary McBride. 

1 cup butter or lard, 3 cups sugar, 2 eggs, 1 cup cold water, 
I cup sour milk, 2 tablespoons molasses, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, I 
teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 cups raisins, flour enough for 
a stifif batter. 

BROWNIES' DELIGHT. 

4 cups sugar, whites four eggs, 1 grated cocoanut, 1 orange, 
1 cup hickory nuts, 1 cup chopped and seeded raisins, 1 table- 
spoon grated chocolate, 1 cup chopped citron, 1 cup blanched and 
chopped almonds. 

Make 4 layers of a rich white cake. Add enough water to the 
sugar to dissolve it and put it on to boil. Beat the whites of egg 
very stiff on a platter. When a teaspoon of the syrup dropped 
in cold water becomes waxy, it must be poured very slowly into 
the eggs, beating continuously until cold. Divide into 4 parts. Into 
the first stir the cocoanut and the pulp of the orange rubbed 
through a sieve. Spread this on the first layer. For the second, 
add the nuts, raisins and chocolate. For the third add the almonds 
and citron. The frosting for the top should be plain. This will 
make two cakes. 

BUCKEYE CAKE. 

Mrs. M. J. Stoddard. 

|- cup butter, ^ cup milk, 3 eggs, li cups sugar, 2 cups flour, 
1 teaspoon cream tartar, ^ teaspoon soda. 
Bake in a long pan, and ice or not. 



CAKES. 207 

CARAMEL CAKE. NO. 1. 

Mrs. John Sprankel. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, :! cups flour, 1 cup milk, 3 eggs, 3 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspt)on vanilla. 

FILLING. 

Boil together for 12 minutes 2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup milk 
and butter^ the size of a walnut. Take from the fire, add 1 
teaspoon vanilla and beat until creamy. Spread between the layers 
and on top. 

CARAMEL CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Margaret Murphy. 

1 cup butter. 2 cups sugar. 1.} cups flour, 1 cup cornstarch, 1 
cup milk, whites of 7 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 1 tea- 
spoon vanilla. 

Bake in a long pan or in layers. 

CARAMEL. 

Mix thoroughly } pound grated chocolate, i pound brown 
srigar, i- cup milk, "butter size of an egg, and 2 teaspoons vanilla. 
Cook until the syrup looks thick enough, and spread quickly. 

CARDS. 
Mrs. B. E. Winters. 

\ pound butter, ^ pound sugar, i pound flour, 2 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon each cinnamon and cloves. 

Roll out, cut in squares, lay an almond on top of each, put in 
buttered pans, brush tops with white of egg, and bake in a 
moderate oven. 

CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 

Mrs. Thomas Breckenridge. 

i cup butter, 1 cup sugar, \ cup milk. 1 well beaten egg. 2 
ounces melted chocolate, 2J^ cups flour. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Rollvery thin, cut. and bake in a moderate oven. 

CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. 

Miss Kate Hazelton. 

h cup butter. U cups sugar, i cup milk. IJ cups flour, yolks of 
4 eggs, 2 ounces chocolate, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla. 

Cream the butter and sugar, add the beaten eggs : dissolve the 
chocolate in 5 tablespoons boiling water, add it and the milk, and 
lastly the flour, baking powder and vanilla. Bake in a moderate 
oven 45 minutes. 

CHOCOLATE AL\RSHMALLOW CAKE. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup milk. I cup butter, 2 eggs, 3 squares 
chocolate, U cups flour, 1 small ralf teaspoon soda. 



208 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

Beat up half the sugar with the eggs, add half the milk and 
the flour with which the soda has been previously sifted. Melt 
the chocolate, add the remaining sugar and milk and the butter and 
cook until beginning to thicken ; then add it to the batter already 
made. Bake in a moderate oven, and when done cover with 
marshmallows torn in half and then spread with a good caramel 
icing. Bake in layers or in a sheet. 

CHOCOLATE NOUGAT CAKE. 

Bake a layer cake with chocolate in the batter ; put together 
with boiled icing with almonds in and stick halved almonds on top. 

CHRISTMAS NUT CAKES. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 3 cups flour, 3 eggs, 
3 teaspoons baking powder, 1 cup of blanched and chopped nuts. 
Bake in small tins and ice with vanilla icing. 

CINNAMON WAFERS. 

1 pound sugar, \ pound butter, 3 eggs, J teaspoon soda. 2 table- 
spoons ground cinnamon, flour enougli for stiff batter. Roll very 
thin, cut and bake quickly. 

COCKLES. 
Mrs. H. C Begland 

2 ounces flour, 2 ounces corn flour, 1 egg. strawberry jam, 2 
ounces butter, 2 ounces sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 teaspoon bak- 
ing powder. 

Mix well and drop in h teaspoon fuls on a buttered pan, bake 
5 minutes in a hot oven, and when cool, put 2 together with the 
jam, letting it show around the edges. 

COCOA CAKES. 

Miss Anna Lawrence. 

1 cup sugar, i cup butter, \ cup cocoa, ^ cup water, 1 cup 
flour, 3 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

Mix as usual, adding cinnamon and cocoa last. Bake in gem 
pans. 

COCOANUT CAKE, NO. L 

Mrs. John Hoy. 

1 cup butter, 3 cups sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 4J cups flour, 4 
well beaten eggs, 1 cup grated cocoanut, 2 heaping teaspoons 
baking powder. 

Bake in a loaf cake pan. 



CAKES. 209 

COCOAXUT CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Alta Hoskins. 

J cup butter, 2 scant cups sugar, yolks of 4 eggs, whites of 
2, 1 cup milk, 3^ cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Bake in layers. Cover with boiled icing and sprinkle with 
cocoanut. 

COCOANUT COOKIES. 

Mrs. David Evans. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup grated cocoanut, 2 eggs, 1 
teaspoon vanilla, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Add flour enough to roll out thin. Bake in moderate oven. 

COCOANUT GINGER CAKES. 

IJ ounces flour, U ounces rice flour, 2 ounces butter, 2 ounces 
powdered sugar, 1 gill molasses, i ounce ginger, 1 ounce grated 
cocoanut, grated rind of ^ lemon. 

Boil the molasses and butter in a saucepan, add all the other 
material and stir briskly for 5 minutes. Butter a pastry tin and 
drop the mixture in with a tablespoon. Bake in a moderate oven 
20 minutes. 

COCOANUT MACAROONS. 

"Oakland." 

1 pound grated cocoanut, 1} pounds pulverized sugar, 6 whites 
of egg-, a little oil of lemon. 

Mix the sugar and cocoanut and brown them a little over 
the fire; add the flavoring and the eggs well beaten, drop on well 
buttered pans with a teaspoon. Bake in cold oven. 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Mrs. James R. Lanning. 

1 cup butter. 2 cups sugar, 1 cup strong cofYee, 3 eggs, 1 cup 
raisms, i teaspoon all kinds of spices, 1^ teaspoons baking powder, 
i cup milk, Hour enough for a smooth batter. 

COFFEE CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mrs. Matilda Sines. 

S cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 2 eggs, 3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla, J cup strong coffee, 1 square chocolate, i cup milk, 3 tea- 
spoons baking powder, } teaspoon salt. 

Bake in a loaf cake pan. 

COFFEE FRUIT CAKE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Marion Wallace. 

1 cup butter or lard, 8 cups sugar, 2 cups raisins, 2 cups cur- 
rants, 1 cup chopped citron. 4 eggs, 1 pint black coffee, 2 tea- 
spoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon each nutmeg and allspice, 1 teaspoon 
soda, flour enough for a stiff batter. 

14 



210 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

COFFEE FRUIT CAKE. NO. 2. 

Mrs. Robert Wilson. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 4 eggs, 1 cup hot coffee, flour for 
a stiff batter, 2 cups raisins, 2 cups currants, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 
teaspoons nutmeg, 1 teaspoon each cloves and allspice. 

Bake 2 hours in a moderate oven. 

COFFEE LAYER CAKE. 

Mrs. Port Slatzer. 

^ cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, J cup molasses, ^ cup strong 
coffee, 2 cups flour, J teaspoon salt, 1^ teaspoons mixed spices, 2 
teaspoons baking powder, 2 eggs. 

Bake in laj^ers. Put together with boiled icing made with 
coffee instead of water. 

COOKIES, NO. 1. 
Mrs. Richard Jones. 

2 quarts flour, 1 full cup lard, 2^ cups sugar, 1 cup sour milk 
or buttermilk, 1 teaspoon soda, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Mix as for pie crust and roll thin. Flavor with vanilla or 
lemon. 

COOKIES, NO. 2. 

J cup sour cream, 1^ cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 3 eggs, J tea- 
spoon soda, I nutmeg grated, flour to roll thin. Bake in a quick 
oven. 

CREAM DROP CAKES. 

1 cup rich sour cream, 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, ^ teaspoon soda, 
flavor to taste, enough flour to stiffen. 

Drop from the spoon on buttered tins and bake in a moderate 
oven. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Mrs. Wm. Grandy. 

^ cup butter, 1 cup flour, 1 cup hot water, 3 eggs. Filling: 
1 cup milk, J cup sugar, 1 egg, 2 tablespoons flour. Flavoring to 
taste. 

Boil the water and butter together, and stir in 1 cup sifted 
flour. Take off and stir to a smooth paste. When cool, add 3 un- 
beaten eggs and beat 5 minutes. Drop by tablespoons into a 
greased pan, and bake in a quick oven 2-5 minutes. Cook the fill- 
ing thoroughly and flavor. When both are cool, open the puffs 
at one side and fill. 

CREAM SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs. M. Breeze. 

1 cup sugar. 11 cups flour, J cup sweet cream, 1 teaspoon bak- 
ing powder, 1 teaspoon lemon extract, 2 eggs, a pinch of salt. 

Beat the eggs together in a cup and fill up the cup with 
cream. ]\Iix and bake quickly. 



CAKES. 211 

CROSTRI. 

Get quite liot in a saucepan without hoiling '^ cup milk, IJ- 
tablespoons white sugar, 4 tablespoons butter, 1 saltspoon salt and 
1 teaspoon vanilla. Pour into a bowl, and add 2 well beaten eggs, 
then mix in little by little 6 cups sifted flour, and 2 saltspoons 
baking powder. Place on a floured board, and knead vigorously 
for lU minutes, return to bowl and let stand 35 minutes." Divide 
the batter into 18 equal balls, roll out as thin and round as pos- 
sible, and let stand 15 minutes more. Fry in very hot lard mixed 
with a little butter, until a good brown. Take out with a skimmer, 
drain on a cloth, and sprinkle with powdered sugar. They will 
keep several days. 

CRULLERS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. B. Leonard. 

2 cups sugar, 2 cups sour milk, 3 eggs, 2 level teaspoons soda, 
6 tablespoons melted butter, a pinch of salt, flour enough for soft 
dough. Flavoring to taste. 

Roll out, cut in rings, and fry in boiling lard. 

CRULLERS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

5 cups flour, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, 4 eggs, 1 spoon rose- 
water, nutmeg to taste. 

Cream the sugar and butter, add the other ingredients beating 
the eggs separately, roll lightly into a sheet J inch thick, cut 
with jagging irons into long, narrow strips, twist and frv in boiling 
lard. 

CRUMB CAKE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Eva Eberts. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup lard, 3 cups flour, 3 eggs, 1 pint buttermilk, 
1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon of each kind of spices. 

Crumb together the sugar, lard and flour as for pies. Dissolve 
the soda in the buttermilk, add the snices and eggs, beat up well, 
and add to the dry mixture. BaJ<e in a deep, well greased pan.' 

CRUMB CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Cuthbert Long. 

3 cups flour, 2 cups sugar, | cup butter or lard, 1 egg, 1 cup 
currants, 1 teaspoon each cloves, cinnamon and allspice, 1 tea- 
spoon soda, U cups sour milk or hot water. 

Rub together flour, sugar and butter; take out one cupful of 
mixture and set it aside. Now add the effg well beaten, the soda 
dissolved in the milk, the currants and spices. Beat well together, 
put in a greased pan. and sprinkle the cupful of drv mixture over 
the top, pressing it down lightly with a spoon. Bake 40 minutes 
in a moderate oven. 



212 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CRUMB CAKES. 

Mrs. Velma Hite. 

1 pound lard, 2 cups sugar, 1 pint molasses, 6 eggs, 1 table- 
spoon ginger, 1 tablespoon cloves, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 1 table- 
spoon soda, 2 pints bread crumbs. 

Mix a stiff batter, and bake in muffin pans. 

CUP CAKE, NO. 1. 
Mrs. Rachel Johnson. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3J cups flour, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 

1 cup milk, 3 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder, a pinch of salt. 

Bake in a loaf cake pan. If wanted for layer cake, use only 
3 cups flour. 

CUP CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Emma Breeze. 

I cup butter, 2J cups powdered sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 4 
eggs, 3 cups flour, 4 teaspoons baking powder. 

Beat the whites and yolks of eggs separately, adding the 
whites last. Use any flavoring desired. 

CURRANT CAKE. 

Mrs. Joe Williams. 

1 cup lard or butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 large cup water, lemon or 
vanilla essence, 1 box currants, 3 cups flour, 3 teaspoons baking 
powder, 4 eggs beaten together. 

Save the white of 1 egg, and add 3 tablespoons sugar for 
frosting. Bake in a loaf cake pan. 

CURRANT SCONES. 

Mrs. John H. Taylor. 

Take 1 pound flour, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 tablespoons pow- 
dered sugar, \ pound currants, 1 teaspoon each soda and cream 
tartar, and 1 cup buttermilk. Rub the butter in the flour, add 
the other ingredients, the buttermilk last ; mix very quickly, roll 
out on a floured board, divide in 3 pieces, form each into a round 
scone, flatten with the hand, place on a tin, and either brush with 
beaten egg, or sprinkle with flour. Bake in a quick oven 10 min- 
utes. If sweet milk is used, double the cream tartar. Pile on a 
plate to serve. Or bake on a greased griddle. 

CUSTARD CAKE. 

Mrs. C. A. Barrow. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup milk, 2 cups sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 3 
cups flour, 3 eggs, 3 heaping teaspoons baking powder. 

Mix and bake in layers. Make a custard of i pint milk, yolks 
of 2 eggs, and 1 teaspoon flour. Flavor with vanilla or lemon 
extract, or put nuts in. Spread on the layers, and frost with the 

2 whites of egg and enough sugar to stiffen. 



CAKES. 213 

DATE COOKIES. 

Miss McMath. 

1 cup sugar, 3 cup butter, ^ cup milk, 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla, 1 cup chopped dates, 1 egg, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 1 
teaspoon soda, a little salt and nutmeg. 

Mix well and drop on well buttered tins. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

2 cups sugar, | cup butter, :] cup sweet milk, I teaspoon soda, 
3 cups flour, whites of 6 eggs, yolks of 3. 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 
flavor to taste. 15ake in a loaf or in layers. 

DEVIL CAKE. 

Mrs. R. H. Webb. 

1 cup sugar, | cup butter, 5 cup grated chocolate wet with 1 
tablespoon hot water, 5 cup milk, 2 cups flour, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon 
baking powder, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 level teaspoon soda, ^ tea- 
spoon each cinnamon and allspice. 

Put together witli a chocolate caramel filling. 

DEVILS' FOOD, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Margaret Bailey. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups brown sugar, 4 cups sifted flour, 1 cup 
buttermilk, 2 eggs, ^ cake grated chocolate or 4 tablespoons cocoa, 
1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup raisins. 

Beat well and bake in layers in a moderate oven. Put together 
with a chocolate caramel filling. 

DEVILS' FOOD, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Martha Ross. 

2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup butter, 2 cups flour, 2 eggs, 1 cake 
sweetened chocolate, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 cup buttermilk. 

Dissolve the soda in the buttermilk and the chocolate in a 
little hot water. Bake in lavers, and put together with a caramel 
filling. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Mrs. Calvin Essex. 

1 cup sugar, a pinch of salt, 1 cup sour milk, 1 egg, flour 
enough to roll soft, 1 level teaspoon soda. Dissolve the soda in the 
milk, mix, roll out, cut and fry in boiling fat. 

fiCLAlRS. 
"Dainty Dishes." 

Put 1 cup boiling water and i cup butter in a large saucepan 
and when it boils turn in 1 pint flour. Beat until perfectly smooth. 
Take from the fire and when cold break into it 5 eggs, one at a 
time, beating hard. Spread on buttered sheets in oblong pieces 



214 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

about 4 inches long and 1^ wide. Put about four inches apart. 
Bake in a quick oven for 25 minutes. Ice with vanilla or choco- 
late frosting. When the icing is cold, slit the sides and fill them 
with whipped cream or a good custard. 

EDITH CAKE. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

i pound sugar, ^ pound butter, J pound flour, ^ teaspoon soda, 
6 eggs, 1 wine glass sherry, 1 wine glass rosewater, 1 teaspoon 
cream tartar. 

Mix the butter with § the flour, beat sugar and yolks together, 
the whites separately, then mix them alternately with the flour and 
butter. Add the liquor and sift the soda and cream tartar with 
the remainder of the flour and add last. 

EGOLESS CAKE, NO. 1. 

Miss Cecilia Sweeney. 

J cup butter, 1^ cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 1 cup sour milk, 1 
cup minced raisins, i- teaspoon grated nutmeg, 1 teaspoon soda. 
Bake in a moderate oven. 

EGOLESS CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. W. M. Irwin. 

li cups sugar, I cup butter, 1 cup sour milk, 3 cups flour, ^ 
teaspoon soda, •} teaspoon nutmeg, } teaspoon cinnamon, 1 cup 
raisins chopped and floured. 

EGOLESS FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. Peter Waldie. 

2 cups sugar, 5 cup butter, 4 cups flour, 2 cups buttermilk, 1 
teaspoon soda, 1 pound chopped raisins, 1 teaspoon each kind of 
spices. Bake in loaf or layer pans. 

ELECTION CAKE. 
"Boston Cooking School." 

^ cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, \ cup sour milk, 1 cup bread 
dough, i cup chopped raisins, 1 egg, 8 figs chopped fine, IJ cups 
flour, l~ teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, ^ 
teaspoon each, cloves, mace and nutmeg. 

Work the butter into the dough with the hand. Add the egg 
well beaten, the sugar and milk, and the flour-^ well mixed with 
the other ingredients. Put into a well greased bread pan, cover 
and let rise 1 hour and a quarter. Bake one hour in a slow oven. 
Cover with a boiled milk frosting. 

ENGLISH LOAF CAKE. 

Miss Hannah Milgate. 

1 pound butter, 2 pounds sugar, 3 pounds sifted flour, 6 well 
beaten eggs, 1 cup hot water, 3 teaspoons soda, 1 tablespoon cinna- 



CAKES. 215 

mon, i nutmeg grated, 1 pound currants, 1 pound raisins, 1 pound 
blanched almonds, 1 cup chopped citron or lemon peel. 

Work the whole well together with the hands, lastly addmg 
the soda dissolved in the hot water, put into 3 well buttered loaf 
pans, and bake 1 hour in a moderate oven. 

FAIRY GIX'GER COOKIES. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Yoder. 

^ cup each butter and milk, 1 cup liglit brown sugar, U cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons ginger, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Cream butter, sugar and milk: sift the other uigredients to- 
gether and add. Spread thin with a long broad-bladed knife on 
the bottom of a new pan, buttered or floured. Bake o or 6 mm- 
utes in a moderate oven, turning frequently to bake alike. Cut in 
squares while hot. 

FIG CAKE. 

1 good half cup butter, 1| cuns sugar, i cup sweet milk 3 
cups flour, n teaspoons baking powder, whites of 8 eggs, good J 
pound figs, cut in strips. 

Flour the figs, and bake in a loaf cake pan. 

FLORENCE CAKE. 

Mrs. J. W. Jones. 

1 cup sugar, i cup milk, } cup butter, whites of 3 eggs, 2 cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Bake in a small loaf tin lined with buttered paper. 

FRENXH MACAROONS. 

"Oakland." 

Blanch and pulvcri;^e 1 pound almonds : beat up with 2 pounds 
pulverized sugar and 12 whites of egg. Drop with a teaspoon on 
buttered paper and bake in a cold oven. 

FRIED CAKES, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Joseph Grandy. 

3 large potatoes mashed, 3 eggs, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 1 nutmeg grated, 3 teaspoons l)aking powder, 1 teaspoon 
butter, a pinch of salt, enough flour to roll out thin. 

Cut and fry like doughnuts in boiling lard. 

FRIED CAKES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Emma Backus. 

5 cups flour, teaspoons baking powder, 2 cups sugar, 1 table- 
spoon butter, a pinch of salt, 1 cup sweet milk, 2 cups mashed 
potatoes, 2 eggs, i grated nutmeg. 

Beat the potatoes up hne, adding the milk gradually as it lor 
table use. 



216 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

FRUIT CAKE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Parkinson. 

^ pound butter, f pound brown sugar, | pound flour, 1 pound 
currants, 1 pound raisins, \ pound citron, \ pound seeded dates, 
4 eggs, 1 grated nutmeg, J pound hickory nuts, 1 tablespoon cinna- 
mon, ^ cup sour cream, J teaspoon cloves, ^ teaspoon soda. 

Bake 2^ hours in a slow oven. 

FRUIT CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Alex. Porter. 

1 cup butter and lard mixed, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup butter- 
milk, 5 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 grated nutmeg, 1 teaspoon lemon 
extract, 1 box seeded raisins, 1 box currants, 1 teaspoon each cin- 
namon, cloves and allspice, flour for thick batter. 

Flour the currants and raisins adding them last. Beat the 
eggs separately, and use flour enough for a fairly stiff batter. 

FRUIT CUP CAKE. 

Mrs. Matilda Sines. 

1 cup sugar, } cup butter, 2 cups flour, 1 egg, 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, J- cup raisins, ^ cup currants, \ teaspoon salt, h 
teaspoon nutmeg, } teaspoon cloves, 1 cup milk. 

Bake about | hour. 

FRUIT DROP CAKES. 

Mrs. Lizzie Ward. 

1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, .3 cups flour, 4 eggs. •} pound 
raisins, \ pound currants, \ pound citron, \ teaspoon soda, 1 tea- 
spoon each of all kinds of spices, a little brandy. 

Bake in gem pans. 

FRUIT LAYER CAKE. 

Mrs. H. Moellencamp. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 4 eggs, 1 table- 
spoon cinnamon, 1 pound raisins, 2 pounds currants, \ pound 
chopped citron, 2 teaspoons soda, flour enough for stiff batter. 

I3ake in layers and put together with white icing. 

GENOESE CAKE. 

Make 1 layer of any delicate cake. When done, glaze the 
surface with white of egg, sprinkle over it 2 tablespoons finely 
chopped almonds, over these 1 tablespoon powdered sugar, return 
to the oven for '^ minuter until nicely browned. Turn on to ;: 
plate with a folded napkin, and serve hot. 



CAKES. 217 

GENTLEMEN'S GINGERBREAD. 

Mrs. Nye. 

^ pound butter, } pound sugar, yolks of 12 eggs, h pound flour, 
§ glass of brandy, IJ- wineglass wine, juice and grated rind of 1 
lemon, 1 grated, nutmeg, 2 large tablespoons cinnamon, 6 table- 
spoons ginger. 

Beat thoroughly, spread very thin on buttered pans, bake in a 
quick oven and cut in squares while warm. 

GERMAN BISCUITS. 

\ cup butter, J cup sugar, 2 cups flour, 1 egg, \ teaspoon 
cinnamon, jam. 

Make into a very stiff paste, work well together, roll out \ 
inch thick, cut into rounds, put on a buttered pan, and bake in a 
slow oven. Remove, spread with jam, stick 2 together ; ice with 
white icing, and decorate with colored sugar, or candied fruit. 
Or the cakes may be split and spread, etc. 

GERMAN COOKIES. 

Miss I>ella Hoy. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 21 cups flour, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla, 1 cup English walnut meats, 1 cup chopped raisins, ^ cup 
coffee, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon 
cinnamon. 

Beat all together well : drop by spoonfuls on buttered tins, 
and bake in a moderate oven. 

GINGERBREAD, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Joseph Turner. 

. 1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup sour milk, 2 
well beaten eggs, 2 teaspoons soda, ^ teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons 
ginger, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 cup raisins, flour enough for a 
stiff batter. 

GINGERBREAD, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Wm. Stephenson. 

2 cups sugar, 2 cups buttermilk, 1 cup baking molasses, 2 eggs, 
1 tablespoon pinger, 1 teasporwi soda, flour enough for a smooth 
batter. 

Mix, putting the soda in the buttermilk, and bake in a 
moderate oven. 

GINGERBREAD, NO. 3. 

Mrs. •Frank Hoy. 

1 cup lard, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup molasses, a pinch of salt, li 
tablespoons ginger, 2 eggs, 1 cup sour milk, 3 cups flour, 1 table- 
spoon baking soda. 

GINGERBREAD LOAF. 

Miss Daisy M. Tucker. 

2\ cups sugar, 1} cups molasses, 1 tablespoon lard, 2 cups 
buttermilk, 3 eggs, 1^ tablespoons ginger, 1 teaspoon soda, flour 
for medium batter. 



218 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

GINGERBREAD WITHOUT EGGS. 

1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon ginger, \ cup brown sugar, 
2 cups molasses, 2 cups water or sour milk, li^ teaspoons soda, 
flour for a soft batter. 

Stir up quickly and bake in a moderate oven. 

GINGER COOKIES. 

Mrs. Chas. Evans. 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup milk, 4 teaspoons 
soda, 1 cup lard or butter, 1 tablespoon ginger, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 
flour enough to roll out. 

Mix well and let stand over night ; in the morning roll out, 
cut and bake in a quick oven. 

GINGER DROP CAKES. 

Mrs. J. W. Brumage. 

1 cup light brown sugar, i cup butter, \ cup cold water, 
?. cup molasses, 1 egg, 1 large tablespoon ginger, 1 teaspoon soda, 
flour for a thick batter. 

Drop by teaspoons in a well greased pan, and bake in a 
moderate oven. 

GINGER SNAPS, NO. 1. 

Miss H. C. Van Meter. 

1 cup butter or lard, 1 cup sugar, 1 pint N. O. molasses, 
H tablespoons ginger, \ tablespoon soda in hot water, 3 pints 
flour or enough to stiffen. 

Roll out thin and bake. The dough will keep seve "al days. 

GINGER SNAPS, NO. 2. 

i pound butter or lard, \ pound brown sugar, 2 pounds flour, 
1 pint milk, 1 large tablespoon ground ginger, a dash of cayenne. 

Rub the butter and flour thoroughly together ; add the other 
dry ingredients, mix well, and add slowly the milk ; knead and 
roll out into a very thin sheet ; cut with a small round cutter, 
and bake in a moderate oven untij a light brown. 

GINGER SNAPS, NO. 3. 

jMrs. Guy Bigum. 

1 can Orleans molasses, 1 cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 heaping 
tablespoon ginger, 1 heaping tablespoon soda, 1 cup hot coffee, 
flour enough for a stiff dough. 

Mix well, dissolving the soda in the coffee, roll out thin, cut 
and bake. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Mrs. B. D. Jaggi. 

\ cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, J cup sour milk, yolks 
of 4 eggs, 1 tablespoon cornstarch, 1 teaspoon vanilla, ^ teaspoon 
soda. 



CAKES. 219 



HERMITS. 



1 cup sugar, n cup butter, U cups flour, 2 eggs, 1 level teaspoon 
soda, 1 pound chopped English walnuts, 1 pound blanched and 
chopped almonds, 1 pound seeded raisins, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 
teaspoon cinnamon. Bake in drop cakes. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE, NO. 1. 

Miss A. C. Murphy. 

J cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3^ cups flour, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
1 pint hickory nut meats, s cup milk, whites of eight eggs, 3 tea- 
spoons baking powder. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. NO. 2. 

2 cups sugar, J cup butter, 1 cup milk, 3 cups flour. 1 large 
cup chopped hickorj- nuts, 5 whites of egg, 3 teaspoons baking 
powder, l\ teaspoons vanilla. 

Cream butter and sugar, add the other ingredients, beating well. 
Lastly add the whites of egg beaten stiff. Bake in layers 15 
minutes in a moderate oven. Put together with boiled icing. 

HICKORY NUT CAKES. 

Mrs. Thos. Lynch. 

2 cups sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, 1 egg, 1 cup nuts sliced line. 
Mix and drop on buttered tins. Bake in a quick oven. 

HONEY CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups honey, i cup sour milk, t well licaten 

eggs, 1 tablespoon lemon essence, 1 teaspoon soda, flour for a 
very stiff batter. 

Bake at once in a quick oven m a loaf cake pan. 

HONEY CAKES. 

1 quart strained honey, I pound powdered sugar, J pound 
butter, juice of 2 oranges or lemons, 1 grated nutmeg, 2 pounds 
or less flour. 

Make a dough stiff enough to roll out easily: beat well all 
over with a rolling pin : roll i inch thick ; cut with a tumbler 
dipped frequently in flour, lay on buttered tins and bake well. 

HUCKLEBERRY CAKE. 

1 cup sugar, butter size of an egg, h cup milk, 1 egg. 1 teaspoon 
soda, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 2 cups flour, 
1 pint huckleberries. 

Dredge and add the berries last and liake in a quick oven. 
Good hot or cold. 



220 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

. JAM CAKE, N'O. 1. 

Mrs. Frank Spurgeon. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 6 eggs, 6 table- 
spoons sour milk, 1^ cups jam, 2 teaspoons soda, 2 grated nutmegs, 
1 teaspoon each allspice and cinnamon. 

Bake in four layers witl: frosting between. If desired the 
jam may be used for a filling. 

JAM CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Samuel Auker. 

J cup butter or lard, 2 cups sugar, 3 eggs, 1 cup buttermilk, 
1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 glass blackberry jam, 1 teaspoon each 
nutmeg, allspice and cinnamon, 1 cup raisins, 1 level teaspoon 
soda in the milk. Bake in a loaf cake. 

JELLY CAKE. 

Miss Nellie Alvis. 

I cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup sour milk, 3^ cups flour, 1 
teaspoon nutmeg and cinnamon, 2 eggs, 1 cup seeded raisins, 1 
teaspoon soda, 1 glass tart jelly, \ teaspoon cloves. 

Bake in layers, and put together with the jelly. 

JELLY JUMBLES. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Yoder. 

-J cup butter, 1 cup sugar, \ teaspoon salt, 1 well beaten egg, 
\ teaspoon soda in the milk, } cup sour milk, flour for a soft 
dough. 

Mix and let chill on ice. Pat into shape, a small piece at a 
time, cut with a round cutter, cut 3 holes in half the rounds with 
a thimble. Spread the plain rounds with jelly, cover with the 
others, press the edges together slightly, and bake in a quick 
oven. 

JELLY ROLL, NO. 1. 

Miss Mary Mahley. 

1 tablespoon melted butter, | cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 3 eggs, 2 
tablespoons sweet milk, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, 2 
teaspoons vanilla or lemon flavoring. 

Beat together until very light, and bake in a moderate oven. 
When done, turn out on a damp cloth. Trim off the crusty edges, 
spread quickly with any tart jelly, and roll. 

JELLY ROLL, NO. 2. 

Miss Emma Keller. 

2 eggs, 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder, a 
little salt, enough hot water for thin batter. 

Stir all together adding the water last. When baked turn 
on a damp cloth, spread with any tart jelly, and roll. This must 
be baked in a very long, shallow pan, or else cut through the 
middle so it will roll. Use plenty of jelly. 



CAKES. 221 

JELLY ROLL, NO. 3. 

Mrs. P. J. Clancy. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 table- 
spoons sweet milk, 3 eggs. 

Bake in a sheet, cut through the niicklle, spread both halves 
with some tart jelly, and roll w^iile warm. 

JUMBLES. 

"Oakland." 

1 pound butter, 1 pound pulverized sugar, 1} pounds flour, 1 
gill rosewater, 5 eggs, lemon flavoring. 
. Lay on lightly buttered pans in little rings. 

KELLEY ISLAND CAKE. 

Mrs. Hugh Shuttleworth. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 4 eggs, J cup milk, 
3 teaspoons baking powder. 

Bake in layer pans. For the filling, boil together 4 minutes, 
1 grated lemon, 1 large, tart apple grated, 1 egg and 1 cup sugar. 

KISSES OR MERINGUES. 

"Oakland." 

1 pound pulverized sugar, whites of 6 eggs^ lemon flavor. 
Beat the eggs very stiff, then stir in the sugar and flavoring 
lightly. Drop by large spoonfuls. Bake in a moderate oven. 

KOKOSING COOKIES. 

"A Friend in Need." 

5 eggs, 4 tablespoons cream, J pound butter, 2 cups white 
sugar, 3 teaspoons baking powder, just flour enough to roll out. 

Beat eggs together. When rolled out sprinkle with sugar and 
roll again. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE, NO. L 

Miss Emily L. Curran. 

^ cup butter, U cups sugar, ^ cup water, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, 2} cups flour, whites of 4 eggs, 1 cup walnut meats, \ 
teaspoon salt. 

Bake in a moderate oven about 50 minutes. Cover with a 
boiled white icing flavored w-ith 1 tablespoon lemon juice; press 
into it as fast as spread fresh or prepared cocoanut. 

LADY BALTIMORE CAKE, NO. 2. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3.V cups sifted flour. 1 cup milk, 1 
teaspoon rosewater, whites of 6 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Bake in 3 layers. prqsting. 

Dissolve 3 cups sugar in 1 cup boiling water, and boil until 
it threads. Then pour slowly on the stiffly beaten whites of 3 



222 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW, 

eggs, beating constantly. Add 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup 
chopped nutmeats, pecans preferred, and five figs, cut into thin 
strips. Spread between the layers and all over the cake. 

LADY FINGERS. 

Yolks of 2 eggs, whites of 3, i cup powdered sugar, ^ tea- 
spoon salt, 3 cup flour, | teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat the whites of egg and sugar stiflf, then the stiff yolks 
and vanilla, lastly the flour sifted with the salt. Put a sheet un- 
buttered paper on a tin sheet, shape 4^ inches long by 1 wide, 
squeezing through a pastry bag, sprinkle with powdered sugar, and 
bake 8 minutes in a moderate oven. 

LANCASTER CAKE. 

Bake any good, delicate or white cake in layers. Put together 
with almond custard filling. 

LEMON CAKE. 

Mrs. James Alvis. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, yolks of 5, whites 
of 4 eggs, 3 fups flour, grated rind of 1 lemon, 2 heaping tea- 
spoons baking powder. 

Bake quickly in layer tins, and put together with boiled icing 
flavored with lemon juice. 

LEMON CRACKERS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. L. D. Tucker. 

1 cup lard, 3 cups sugar, 1.^- pints sweet milk, 3 eggs, 5 cents 
worth of baking ammonia, 5 cents worth of lemon oil. 

Dissolve the ammonia in the milk ; cream sugar and lard to- 
gether, add the well beaten eggs, and the oil ; lastly the ammonia 
and milk. Stir in enough flour to make stiff batter, roll out thin, 
cut and bake. 

LEMON CRACKERS, NO. 2. 

Mrs. John S. Wilson. 

1 pint sweet milk, 2^ cups sugar, 2 eggs, 1 cup lard, 5 cents 
worth lemon oil, 2 heaped teaspoons baking ammonia. 

LEMON JELLY CAKE. 

Mrs. Wilbur McDonald. 

1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 1 egg, 2J cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Bake in 3 layers. Put together with lemon filling. 



CAKES. 223 

LIGHT FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. David Evans. 

1 cup butter, 2 scant cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 3 cups thrice 
sifted flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, whites of G eggs, \ pound 
chopped English walnuts, 2 slices candied pineapple chopped, ^ 
pound glace cherries, h cup grated cocoanut. 

Seedless raisins may be used instead of, or in addition to the 
cherries. 

MADELEINE AU CAFfi. 

Filippini. 

^ cup sugar, 3 tablespoons butter melted, 1 cup flour, 4 eggs 
beaten together, 3 tablespoons strong coffee, \ teaspoon baking 
powder. 

Beat the eggs together, beat in the sugar, add the flour and 
cofifee, melted butter and baking powder, stirring in very lightl3^ 
Grease a pastry tin, and bake in a moderate oven 20 minutes. 
Take from the oven, sprinkle a little powdered sugar over it, cut 
in triangular pieces, and serve hot. Any other variety of madeleine 
can be made by changing the flavor. 

MAPLE SUGAR CAKE. 

Miss McMath. 

1 cup maple sugar, 1 cup sour cream, \\ cups flour, 1 egg, 1 
teaspoon soda, a pinch of salt. 
Bake in a loaf cake pan. 

ALAPLE SUGAR CAKES. 

Mrs. Dick Spicer. 

1 cup maple sugar, butter size of an egg, 2 cups flour, 1 heap- 
ing teaspoon baking powder, an even teaspoon salt, 1 cup sweet 
milk. 

Soften a cake of maple sugar in the oven and shave a cup of 
thin slices from it. Granulated maple sugar may be used instead, 
hut the texture will not be the same. Mix the dry ingredients, 
then the butter, milk and lastly the sugar. Beat up quickly, roll 
out, cut with a biscuit cutter and bake in a quick oven 10 minutes. 

MARBLE CAKE, NO. \. 

Mrs. Henry Taylor. 

Light Part. 
1 cup white sugar, i cup butter, 1| cups flour, whites of 2 eggs, 
1 teaspoon baking powder, \ nutmeg, I cup tjiilk. 

Dark Part. 

\ cup brown sugar, \ cup butter, 2 cups flour, yolks 2 eggs, 
1 teaspoon baking powder. -V cup molasses. \ cup milk, 1 teaspoon 
each cloves and cinnamon. 

Beat the light and dark parts separately, put them into a loaf 
cake pan in alternate spoonfuls, and bake in a moderate oven. 



224 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

MARBLE CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Herbert Minchell. 

Dark Part. 
Yolks of 4 eggs, 1 cup brown sugar, \ cup butter, 1 teaspoon 
baking powder, 1^ cups flour, h cup milk, 2 ounces melted chocolate, 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Light Part. 
\ cup butter, 1} cups white sugar, 1 cup water, 2J cups flour, 1 
teaspoon baking powder, 1 teaspoon almond extract, whites of 4 
eggs. 

MARBLE CAKE, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Henry Thompson. 

Light Part. 
1 cup butter, 2 cups white sugar, 1 cup sweet milk, 4 cups 
flour, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, \ teaspoon soda, whites of 8 eggs. 

Dark Part. 

i cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, s cup milk, 2J cups flour, 
1 teaspoon cream tartar, ^ teaspoon soda, yolks of 8 eggs. 

Mix each part separately, adding 2 teaspoons each allspice and 
cloves, \ teaspoon nutmeg and 4 teaspoons cinnamon to the dark 
part. Bake in a moderate oven in layer pans, and put together 
with boiled icing. 

MARGUERITES. 

"Dainty Dishes." 

15 teaspoons powdered sugar, J pound chopped nuts, whites of 
5 eggs beaten stiff, wafers. 

Beat up well, spread on square or salted wafers, and brown 
in the oven. Or a boiled icing may be made and the nuts stirred in. 

MOCHA CAKE. 

Beat very hard for 5 minutes, 3 tablespoons sugar, the yolks 
of 4 eggs, \ teaspoon vanilla, and 1 tablespoon very strong coffee. 
i\dd 2 tablespoons sifted flour, and the stiff whites of the eggs. 
Bake in a small square layer cake pan for 20 minutes. When a 
little cool, turn out of pan, cut in two crosswise, spread half a 
Mocha Cream filling on the split side,' put the cakes together, 
spread the rest of the filling on top, dust with sugar, and serve 
fresh. 

MOCHA CAKES. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

Bake a sponge cake in sheets ; cut in rounds, and slice each 
round in 3 pieces crosswise. Beat J cup butter to a cream with 1 
cup sugar, and add 1 cup cooled cream or custard filling ; color 
and flavor as you choose. Put the slices together again with a 
thin layer of this frosting ; spread it over the sides and roll in 
shredded cocoanut. Spread the top, and ornament as fancifully as 
possible with colored icing forced through tubes, candied fruit, etc. 



CAKES. 225 

MOLASSES COOKIES. 

Mrs. Edith Campbell. 

1 cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, f cup sour milk, 1 cup butter, 1 
teaspoon ginger. 1 teaspoon soda, flour enough to stiffen. 
Roll out thin, cut and bake in a quick oven. 

.MOOXSHINES. 

1 cup yellow sugar, \olks of 6 eggs, a pinch salt, flour for a 
soft dough. 

Roll vcrv thin, cut with a tumbler, drop into hot lard, and fry 
quickly. Sift powdered sugar over them. 

MOXAHALA COOKIES. 

Mrs. Charles Williams. 

2 cups soft white sugar, 1 cup luitter or lard, 3 eggs, 1 tea- 
spoon soda in hot water, flavor to taste, flour for a soft dough. 

NUT BREAD. 

Mrs. John C. Snee. 

i cup sugar, 1 cup milk, 3'; cups flour, 1 egg, 1 teaspoon salt, 
i cup chopped pecans, 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder. Bake 
in slow oven. 

NUT CAKE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Sarah Cotterman. 

i cup butter, IJ cups sugar, 2h cups flour, 1} teaspoons baking 
powder, 3 eggs, i cup milk. 1 cup any kind of nutmeats, 1 tea- 
spoon vanilla. 

Mix well together in a rather firm batter, and bake in a deep 
paper lined pan in a steady oven 3.5 minutes. 

NUT CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. W. T. Sprankel. 

i cup butter, 1 cup sugar, i- cup milk, 2 cups sifted flour, 2 
eggs, 1 cup seeded and chopped raisins. 1 coffee cup chopped Eng- 
lish walnuts, I teaspoon soda. 1 teaspoon cream of tartar. 

Beat eggs separately, add nuts and raisins last, and bake in 
moderate oven. 

NUT COOKIES. 

Mrs. Joseph Brooks. 

1 cup sugar, 2 level tablespoons butter. 2 cups chopped nuts, 
3 tablespoons sour cream, 2 eggs, \ teaspoon soda, a pinch of salt. 

Add enough flour to make a stiff dough that will roll out very 
thin. Cut in rounds and bake in a moderate oven. 

15 



2?6 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

OAT CAKES. 

Mrs. L. M. Call. 

2 cups sugar, 3 cups Mother's Oats, 3 cups sifted flour. 2 eggs, 
1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 cup raisins, 3 tablespoons 
sour milk, 1 cup butter. 

Mix well, roll out thin, cut and bake in a moderate oven. 

OATMEAL CAKES. 

Mrs. W. E. Thompson. 

i cup butter and lard mixed, 2 cups brown sugar, 3 cups oat- 
meal, 2 cups flour, J package seeded raisins, 3 eggs, 1 small cup 
buttermilk. 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 even teaspoon soda, a pinch 
of salt. Mix well, roll out thin, cut and bake in quick oven. 

OATMEAL COOKIES. 

Mrs. John D. Martin. 

1 cup rolled oats. 1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup melted butter, I 
teaspoon soda in hot water, 2 eggs, 1 cup raisins. 1 cup nutmeats, 
flour enough to roll thin. Cut and bake in quick oven. 

OAT^IEAL MACAROONS. 

Miss Esther Bashford. 

1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup susar, 2 ea;2S, beaten separately, 1 
teaspoon vanilla, 1 teaspoon salt, 2h cups rolled oats. 

Mix all together and drop in small teaspoons on a buttered 
pan. Bake in quick oven. 

OHIO CUP CAKES. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewiiig. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar. 4 cups flour. 1 cup sour creain, 5 
eggs, 1 small teaspoon ."^oda in a little warm water. 
Pake in small pans. 

OLLY KOEKS. 

Mrs. Seth Robinson. 

Make a good doush for raised doughnuts, roll i- inch thick, 
cut with a small biscuit cutter, let rise, and when light roll down 
a little, lay a few raisins rolled in cinnamon in the centre, wet the 
edges with the fingers, double them over and press the edges firmly 
•together. Fry in boiling fat. 

ONE EGG CAKE. 
Mrs. T. J. Price. 

J cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 1 e^g, 2 cups flour, 1 cup sweet 
milk, 2 teaspoGn.s baking powder. Bake in a hot oven. 



CAKES. 227 

ORAXCiE CAKE, XO. 1. 

Mrs. Thomas Taylor. 

2 cups sugar, 5 cuj) butter, 8 eggs, 1 cup milk, 2 cups flour, 2 
teaspoons baking powder. I'illing: 1 cup sugar, 1 egg, juice and 
grated rind of 2 oranges, 1 tablespoon butter. 

ORANGE CAKE, XO. 2. 

Mrs. Lemuel Rush. 

2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter. 1 cup sweet milk, •■'. cups flour, 
yolks of 5, whites of 4 eggs, grated rind and juice of 1 orange, 
2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Bake in layers. I'or the fdling, beat up the white of the Hth 
egg with 1 tablespoon sugar, and a little orange juice. 

ORANGE CAKE, NO. 8. 

Miss Stella Turner. 

2 cups sugar, 2 cups flour, .] cup water, yolks of '> and whites 
of 3 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, juice and rind of 1 orange. 
Bake in layers and use orange icing. 

ORANGE LOAF CAKE. 

Mrs. Goldie Hoy. 

i cup butter, 2 cups sugar. 2 cups flour. 5 eeJTs, 2 teaspoons 
bakinff powder, } cup oransre juice, grated rind of 1 orange. 
Mix and bake in a loaf cake. 

ORANGE MADELEINE. 

I\Iake 1 layer of any good delicate cake, seasoning with lemon 
or orange juice. Turn upside down on a cloth, spread orange 
marmalade over it, and snread this again with orange glaze. A 
little finely chonped ni'^tachio nuts is a good addition, sprinkled 
over the top. Serve hot. 

ORANGE WAFERS. 

} cup butter, J cup sugar, yolks of 2 eggs, 1 tablespoon orange 
juice, and the grated peel of 1 orange, 1 scant cup flour, 1 tea- 
spoon baking pow'der. 

Chill the ingredients, mix well, roll very thin, put a piece of 
candied orange peel on the top of each wafer, and bake in a 
quick oven. 

PAINESVTT.LE SEMINARY GINGERBREAD. 

Miss Prescott. 

1 heaping tablespoon butter. 1 cup molasses, 1 cup sugar, 1 
teasroon cinnamon, 4 cups flour. 1 cup sour milk, 2 teaspoons soda, 
1 teasfoon fri'T^er. 

Bake in shallow pans and serve hot. Dissolve the soda in 
hot water, but, if sweet milk is used, take baking powder instead. 



228 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PEACH BLOSSOM CAKE. 

Mrs. Jas. O'Donnell, Jr. 

1 cup sugar, \ cup butter, whites of 3 eggs, flour for not too 
stiff batter, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 scant cup milk, pink 
sugar, ahnond extract. 

Beat the cake well, bake Iialf in 2 layers, add enough red 
sugar to get the desired coloring in the second half, bake that 
in 2 layers, and put together with boiled icing. 

PEACH LAYER CAKE. 

Take any good layer cake recipe. Spread white icing over 
a layer, then cover with thin slices of ripe peaches ; put a second 
layer of the cake over this, which treat in the same way. When 
the top layer is on dust it with powdered sugar. Apricots or 
berries may lie used in place of peaches, and preserved fruit in- 
stead of the fresh. 

PEANUT COOKIES. 

2 heaping tablespoons butter, .]- cup sugar, 1 Qgs:,. 1 cup flour, 
1 tablespoon milk, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, I teaspoon soda, 1 cup 
finely chopped peanuts. 

Drop with tlie spoon onto buttered tins. \i the recipe is 
doubled, do not double soda or cream tartar. 

PHIL SHERIDAN CAKE. 

"Buckeye Cook Book." 

4 cups confectioner's sugar, 1 cup butter, 1.^ cups sweet milk, 
5 cups flour. 1 teaspoon soda in the milk, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 
whites of 16 eggs. 

PINEAPPLE CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, l cun milk. 3 cups flour. 2 teaspoons 
baking powder, 6 eggs beaten separately. 

Mix well and bake in layers. Make a thick boiled icing add- 
ing the juice of 1 orange. Spread thickly over thv= layers, and 
sprinkle with grated pineapple. Best eaten fresh, or served in one 
laver. 

PLAIN CAKE. 

Mrs. Margaret Price. 

^ cup butter, 1 cup sugar, .} cup milk. 2 eggs, nutmeg to taste, 
a pinch of salt, 1 heaping teaspoon baking powder, flour enough 
for a soft batter. 

POLISH CROQUETTES. 

Filippini. 

Beat well together the whites of ?> egp-s. 2 tablespoons sugar, 
]\ ounces chopped almonds, U ounces si-^ted flour and i teaspoon 
vanilla. Butter and flour a pastrv pan. Take a tablespoon of the 
mixture and lightly roll in powdered sugar to a croquette form; 
put in the pan. When all are done, bake in the Oven 10 minutes 
or until a golden brown. Serve at once. 



CAKES. 229 

POOR MAX'S CAKE. 

Mrs. Thomas Rice. 

1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon lard, 1 cup buttermilk, 1 large cup 
raisins and currants, 1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon mixed ground 
spices, 1} cups flour. 

Mix and beat well. This makes 2 layers. For tilling, take 1 
cup buttermilk, 1 cup sugar, and boil to a thick syrup. Spread on 
the outside also. 

PORK FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. Howell Thomas. 

1 pound salt fat pork, 3 cups sugar, 1 cup Orleans molasses, 
7 cups flour, 1 tablespoon soda, 1 nutmeg, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 
cloves and allspice, 1 pint boiling water, 2 pounds raisins, 1 pound 
currants, 1 pound almonds, J pound citron, | pound lemon peel. 

Grind the pork well ; mix and bake 4 hours in a slow oven. 
This will make 2 large cakes. 

POUND CAKE. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

1 pound butter, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound sifted flour, yolks of 
12 eggs, whites of 0, 1 teaspoon grated nutineg, 1 teaspoon essence 
of lemon. 

Bake 1 hour in a quick oven. 

Queen Pound Cake requires the addition of 1 wine glass 
rosewater, wine and brandy, and 1 handful currants. 

PRINCE CAKE. 

Mrs. Wm. Eberts. 

Ti cup butter, 2 cups brown sugar, 1 cup buttermilk. '^ cups flour, 
2 cups raisins, 4 eggs, 4 tablespoons New Orleans molasses, 1 tea- 
spoon cinnamon, J teaspoon nutmeg, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 teaspoon 
soda in milk, and 1 in flour. 

Bake in layers, using a caramel filling. 

PRINCE OF WALES CAKE. 

Mrs. P. W. Weymueller. 
BL.^CK P.\KT. 

h cup butter, 1 cup brown sugar, h cup sour milk. 1 cup flour, 
i cup cornstarch, yolks of :^ eggs, h teaspoon soda in warm water. 
1 teaspoon each cinnamon and nutmeg. 

WItlTE P.\RT. 

I cup butter, 1 cup powdered sugar, i cup sweet milk. 1 cup 
flour, \ cup cornstarch, wh.ites of 3 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 
der. 1 teaspoon of almond or vanilla flavoring. 

Take each r.art in 2 layers. Put together alternately with al- 
mond cream filling. 

.liLMONn CKEAM KII.LIXG. 

Blanch and pound to a paste 1 pound of almonds ; add 1 coffee 
cup sweet cream, 2 tablespoons corns'arch scalded in a little sweet 



230 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

milk, 1 tablespoon sugar, and a little almond extract. Beat well 
together. Spread between the layers. The top may be frosted 
with plain frosting if desired. 

PUFF BALL DOUGHNUTS. 

^Irs. Rose Wallace. 

Beat 3 eggs very li.'lit, add 1 cup sugar, 1 pint sweet milk, salt 
and nutmeg to taste, and enough flour to permit the spoon to stand 
upright in the batter. Sift 2 teaspoons baking powder in the flour. 
Drop by spoonfuls into boiling fat. 

QUEEN CHARLOTTE'S CAKE. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Set a sponge with 1 pint of sifted flour, 1 teacup warm milk, 
and 1 cake of yeast, or 2 tablespoons of liquid yeast with half a 
teaspoon salt. Let it rise in a warm place till very light. Then 
add i pound of butter and :} pound powdered sugar, beaten to a 
cream, 4 eggs, 1 cup flour, i pound candied peel cut fine, 1 teaspoon 
powdered cinnamon, and a small cup of blanched and chopped 
almonds. Let stand J hour, and then bake 1 hour in a moderate 
oven. While still hot, prick holes with a sharp knife and pour in a 
syrup made of one cup of sugar and a large tablespoon of water 
boiled together five minutes. Cover the top of the cake with harle- 
quin comfits, or dust it thick with powdered sugar. 

RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 

1 pint milk, \ cup butter, \ cup lard, 1 teaspoon salt, 1 cup 
A'east, 'Ih cups sugar, 4 well beaten eggs, "J teaspoons cinnamon, a 
little nutmeg, flour as needed. 

Warm the milk, stir into it the salt, yeast, shortening and flour 
enough to make a stiff batter. Set near the stove to rise. When 
light work in the sugar, eggs and spices ; add flour until not quite 
as stiff as bread, kneading well ; let rise again until very light, 
roll out thin and cut into small round cakes. Fry in hot lard and 
sprinkle sugar 6ver them. 

RIBBON CAKE. 

Make a layer cake, adding fruit and spices to h the dough. 
Make the middle layer of this, and put together with boiled white 
icing. 

RICE CAKE. 

\ pound flour, \ pound ground rice, ', pound butter, \ pound 
sugar, 2 eggs, l teaspoon flavoring, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
\ cup milk. 

Bake in a greased and papered loaf cake pan H hours in a 
moderate oven. 



CAKES. 2;;i 

ROCK CAKES. 

"Oaklanil." 

1 pound chopped almonds, 1 ounce cinnamon, 2U ounces pul- 
verized sugar, whites of 4 eggs. 

Mix, form in little steeples, set on buttered pans, and bake in a 
very cold oven. 

ROSVS GINGERBREAD. 

Mrs. George Justus. 

1 cup butter and lard mixed, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup molasses, 1 
teaspoon soda, 3 teacups flour, 1 cup sour milk, 4 eggs, 2 teaspoons 
ginger. 

Beat the molasses, sugar and eggs together, add butter, milk 
with soda and flour, lastly the ginger. 

RUSSIAN ROCKS. 

Miss Heall Ewing. 

1] cups dark brown sugar, 1 cup butter, 3 cups flour, 1 pound 
chopped raisins, 3 eggs beaten separately, 1 teaspoon soda in \ 
cup hot water, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves, 1 pound 
chopped nuts. 

Alix well together, drop with a teaspoon on buttered tins, and 
bake brown. 

SCOTCH CURRANT BUN. 

Mrs. II. C. Begland. 

2 pounds flour, \ pound butter, 1 pound raisins, 1 pound cur- 
rants, i pound soft sugar, \ ounce each cinnamon and allspice, 
grated yellow rind 1 lemon, ', pound each candied orange and 
lemon peel, \ pound blanched and chopped almonds, }f ounce 
ground ginger, \ teaspoon Cayenne pepper, h teaspoon salt. 

Add a little salt to the flour, and mix with j-east and warm 
water, as if for bread. Set in a warm place to rise. When risen, 
work into it the butter slightly warmed, and let rise again for i 
hour. Have the fruits prepared in advance, and slightly warmed 
when the dough is ready for them. Mix the sugar, spices, salt, 
pepper and lemon peel together and work into the dough. Keep 
the latter by the fire to keep warm. Butter the baking tins and 
heat them. Take out about i the dough, mix it well with the fruit 
until smooth. Roll out the remaining dough very thin, and line 
the pans with it, keeping a piece to coyer with. Fill in with the 
mixture about 'i full, smooth it over, wet the edges of the paste 
lining and put on the thinly rolled covers. Brush the top with 
beaten eggs, prick it with a fork, and pierce with a skewer in 
several places down to the bottom of the tins. Let the buns stand 
to rise again for ] hour, set them in the oven and bake slowly for 
2 or 3 hours. 

SCOTCH SAND LOAF. 

Miss H. C. Moodie. 

1 pound sugar, 1 pound butter, 1 pound flour, 6 eggs, 1 pint 
milk, 1 cup citron and orange peel, 3 heaping teaspoons baking 
powder. 

Stir all together and bake in a moderate oven. 



232 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

SCOTCH SCONES, No. 1. 

I\rrs. Janet Park. 

1 tablespoon lard, 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 cup currants, 1 table- 
spoon salt, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 quarts flour. 

Use water fcir mixing. Roll out like biscuits, i inch thick, cut 
into squares and bake in a hot oven, 10 or 15 minutes. 

SCOTCH SCONES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Isabel Lawson. 

Thoj^oughly mi.x while dry 1 quart of sifted flour loosely 
nieasurccT with 2 heaping teaspoons baking powder, then rub into 
it a tablespfon butter and 1 teaspoon salt, working the butter well 
in. Add enough sweet milk to make a very soft paste. Roll out 
the paste about \ inch thick, using plenty of flour to roll with. Cut 
it into triangles about 4 inches to a side. Or cut round the size of 
a saucer and scar across to form 4 quarters. Flour the sides and 
bottom of a biscuit pan, and place the pieces on it. Bake imme- 
diately in a quick oven 20 to 30 minutes. When half done brush 
over with sweet milk. 

SCOTCH SHORTBREAD. 

Mrs. Robert Essex. 

h pound butter, \ pound sugar, 1 pound llour. 

Cream the butter and sugar. Add the flour gradually, VO/^ 
knead until perfectly smooth. Divide into several round or squarf 
pieces flattened out thin, pinch the edges, prick over with a fork, 
and bake in a moderate oven until a nice brown color. Sprinkle 
with powdered sugar. 

SEED CAKES. 

I pound butter, 1 pound sugar, 1 cup sour cream, 1 teaspoon 
soda, 1 tablespoon caraway seeds, flour enough to roll thin. 
Bake in a quick oven. 

SILVER AND GOLD CAKE. 

Mrs. Julia Slatzer. 
SILVER. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 1 cup milk, whites 
of eggs, i teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cream tartar. 

GOLD. 

I cup butter, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, | cup milk, yolks of 5 
eggs, h teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cream tartar. 

These cakes may be baked in layers and put together with a 
white icing, or in separate cakes. They may be flavored with the 
same or with dift'erent flavorings. ^, 

SILVER CAKE. 

Mrs. EUen Alvis. 

i cup butter, 1 cup sugar. 1 cup sweet milk, i teaspoon lemon 
extract, whites of 8 eggs, 2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder 
sifted in the flour. 



CAKES. 233 

SOFT GINGERBREAD, No. 1. 

Mrs. R. Walters. 

/ 
1 cup butter, i Clip brown sugar, 2 cups molasses, 3 eggs, 1 
cup sour milk, 1 tablespoon ginger, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 tea- 
spoon soda, 4 cups flour. 

Dissolve the soda in 1 tablespoon hot water, and bake in a 
moderate oven 1 hour. 

SOFT GINGERBREAD, No. 2. 

Mrs. Matilda Whitmer. 
I cup sugar. 1 cu]) molasses, -V cup butter, 2\ cups flour, 1 cup 
boiling water, 2 well beaten eggs, 1 teaspoon each ginger, cinna- 
mon and cloves, 2 teaspoons soda in the hot water. 

SOFT GIXGERBREAD, NO. 3. 

Mrs. J. Ward. 
1 cup sugar, 1 cup molasses, 1 cup shortening, 2 teaspoons soda 
in boiling water, 2 eggs, 1 teaspoon each ginger and cloves, 1 tea- 
spoon cinnamon, flour for a soft dough. 

SOFT JUMBLES. 

Mrs. Newton Irvin. 
1 cup butter, U cups sugar, 1 cup milk or thin cream, grated 
rind. of 1 lemon, 3 "cups flour, 3 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Pour in rings in a greased pan, and bake slowly until a golden 
brown. 

SPANISH BUN. 

Mrs. Chas. Hoy. 

1^- cups brown sugar, 1 cup sour cream, 2 eggs, 2 cups flour, 
1 teaspoon each nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, allspice and soda. 

If sour milk is used instead of cream, add i cup butter. Bake 
in gem pans or in a shallow loaf. 

SPICE CAKE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. George White. 

IJ cups brown sugar, ij cup butter. 1 cup sour milk, 1 level 
teaspoon soda, a little sliced lemon peel, \ cup grated chocolate, 
1 teaspoon grated nutmeg, 2| cups flour, 3 eggs beaten separately, 
1 cup each raisins and currants, 2 grated apples, k cup nuts. 3 
teaspoons ground cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves. 

SPICE CAKh:, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Hannah Price. 

1 cup butter and lard mixed, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour. 1 cup 
sour milk, J teaspoon nutmeg, 4 tablespoons molasses, yolks 4 
eggs, whites of 2, 1 cup seeded raisins, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 
1 teaspoon soda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 teaspoon cloves. 

Mix as usual, adding the molasses to the sour milk and then 
tl-e soda. Bake in 3 layers. Beat the whites of 2 eggs stiff with 
two tablespoons sugar, flavor with lemon juice and use tor tilling. 



234 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

SPONGE CAKE, XO. 1. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. , 

12 eggs, their weight in sugar, =} their weight in flour, rinu of 
3 lemons, juice of 1, 1 wine glass wine. 

Beat up quickly and bake in moderate oven. 

SPOXGE CAKE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. George Leyshon. 

1.} cups sugar, 1.] cups flour, 3 eggs, 2 teaspoons lemon juice, 

1 teaspoon baking powder, i- cup boiling water. 

Mix the baking powder with the flour, beat the yolks sepa- 
rately together, beat in the sugar, add the flour gradually and 
lightly, and lastly the hot water. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

II cups powdered sugar, whites of 10 eggs, yolks of G, 1 cup 
flour, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 1 teaspoon lemon extract. 

Beat the whites of egg until stiff and dry ; add sugar gradu- 
ally still beating; then add the yolks beaten thick, and the extract. 
Lastly cut and fold in the flour with the cream tartar. Bake 5U 
minutes in a moderate oven in an angel cake pan. 

SURPRISE CAKE. 

Mrs. H. W. Clark. 
RED. 

^ cup butter, ^ cup red sugar, strong, 2 cups flour, ^ cup water, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, whites of 4 eggs. 

YELLOW. 

^- cup butter, I- cup sugar, strong, 2 cups flour, J cup water, 
2 teaspoons baking powder, yolks of 4 eggs. 

Bake in 4 layers and put together with boiled icing. 

TREACLE BUN. 

A Glasgow Recipe. 

h pound flour, \ pound sugar, J pound butter, -} pound raisins 
or currants, 1 tablespoon ginger, \ teaspoon soda, 1 teacup molasses, 
H teaspoons cloves and cinnamon, 2 eggs. 

Put butter, sugar and molasses into a pan ; when they boil 
pour over the well beaten eggs, mix the other ingredients in and 
bake in a moderate oven an hour or more. 

VANILLA STICKS. 

Mrs. Wm. Huston. 

1 pound chopped almonds, 1 pound confectioner's sugar, whites 
of 4 eggs, vanilla flavoring. 

Beat the eggs stiff, and then beat in the sugar and vanilla. 
Add half the luixture to the almonds ; roll out in a sheet 3 inches 
wide, spread the icing over it, cut into sticks, and bake in a cool 
oven. 



CAKES. 235 

VELVET SPONGE CAKE. ' 

Miss Ellen Crowe. 

2 cups sugar, 2i cups flour, 1 cup boiling water, 1 tablespoon 
baking powder, yolks of 6 eggs, whites of 3, 1 teaspoon lemon 
extract. 

Beat the yolks a little, add the sugar and beat 15 minutes ; 
add the 3 well beaten wliites and the boiling water just before 
the flour and flavoring. Bake in 3 layers, putting together with 
icing made by adding to each white left 6 dessertspoons pulverized 
sugar and lemon to flavor. 

WALXUT CAKE. 

Bake a white or delicate cake adding ^ cup walnut meats to 
the batter. Bake in a sheet, cover with a boiled icing, mark in 
squares, and put i walnut on each square. 

WALXUT WAFERS. 

Mix ^ pound brown sugar, \ pound broken walnut meats, 2 
level tablespoons flour, ^ teaspoon baking powder, h teaspoon salt, 
and 2 eggs. Drop small spoonfuls on buttered pans, and bake in 
a quick oven. 

WATERAIELOX CAKE. 

Mrs. Norah Shellhammer. 
WHITE PART. 

5 cup butter, 1] cups v.diite sugar. 1 cup sweet milk, 3 cups 
flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, whites of 4 eggs, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla. 

RED P.\RT. 

h cup butter, 1 cup red sugar, i cup sweet milk, 2 cups flour, 
2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 cup seedless raisins, 1 teaspoon 
vanilla, yolks of 4 eggs. 

Bake in a round or oval pan. Have a tin or pasteboard ring, 
round or oval, a little larger than half the size of the pan ; place 
it in the centre, fill it with the red mixture, and pour tlie wliite 
mixture around it. The ring must be buttered so it will lift out. 
Bake in a slow oven. 

WELSH CURRAXT BREAD. 

Mrs. David Collins. 

1 cup butter. 2 cups sugar, 1 quart flour, 3 eggs, 1 pint milk, 
1 box currants, 1 box raisins, 5 ccjnts worth lemon peel, i nutmeg, 
Ih cakes yeast. 

Soak the yeast in 1 cup lukewarm water ; mix all your ingredi- 
ents except the milk and eggs the night before. Next morning 
warm the milk, and beat the eggs together and mix everything 
to a stiff batter. Put in 2 tins and let rise 5 hours. Bake U 
hours in a slow oven. 



236 OLD COUXTRV RECIPES AXD !\EW. 

WELSH GRIDDLE CAKES. 

:Mi-s. H. ]). Lewis. 

Take 3 pints flour, salt and sugar to taste, 1 cup good Lard, 
2 eggs, beat all together, mix in 3 teaspoons baking powder and 
1 pound washed and dried currants. Add water enough to make 
like pie dough ; roll out in size and shape to fit a skillet, dust the 
skillet with flour, and bake first on one side, toss the cake, and 
bake on the other. Pile on top of each other, and cut from the 
top cake in slices like a pie. On Welsh griddles these cakes arc 
made very large. 

WEST INDLVN GINGER CAKES. 

1 quart molasses, 1 large cup vellow sugar, 1 pound butter, 1 
pint W. L preserved ginger, 1 cup syrup of same, 1 tablespoon 
race ginger, 2 or more quarts flour. 

Boil the molasses and sugar together 20 minutes. Stir into 
the syrup the butter and ginger, the race ginger being first pounded 
and sifted. Remove from the fire. Sift 2 or 3 quarts of flour 
into a bowl, make a hole in the middle of it, and pour in the 
mixture. When cool enough to handle, mix with enough flour to 
make a pliable dough ; roll out thin, cut into round cakes and 
bake crisp and brown. 

W'HITE CAKE. 

Mrs. George Long. 

1 cup butter, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 1 cup sv^reet- milk, 
whites of 5 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, flavor with vanilla 
or bitter almond. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

1 pound butter, 1 pound sugar, 1 pound sifted flour, 1^ pounds 
citron, 12 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 cocoanut, ^ pound 
almonds. 

Line a deep pan with greased paper, and bake slowly for 2 
hours. When cold, ice with cocoanut icing. A cup of shredded 
cocoanut mav be used instead of the fresh fruit. 



WT^ITE LADY FINGERS. 

Whites of 1 eggs, i cup sugar, ?, teaspoon cream tartar, i cup 
pastry flour, i teaspoon any desired flavoring. 

Beat the eggs to a froth : add the cream tartar and beat until 
stifif ; sift in the sugar gradually, continuing the beating. Stir in 
carefully the flour 4 times sifted, add flavoring, and press through 
a pastry bag into the small tins used for ladv-fingers. Sift pow- 
dered susar lightlv over them and bake slowlv 20 minutes. 



CAKES. 237 



WHITE MOUNTAIN CAKE. 

Mrs. Kate Hoodlet. 



2 cups sugar, 1 cup butter, ^ cup milk, whites of 10 eggs. 2i- 
teaspoons baking powder, 1 teaspoon vanilla, flour to make a 
rather thin batter. 

Beat the whites of egg very stiff, adding them last. Bake in 
layers and put together with boiled icing. 



WIGGS. 

"Colonial Recipes. 



4 pints flour, 1 pound butter, 1 pound sugar, 6 eggs, 1 pint 
milk, ^ pint yeast. Mix the flour and sugar, add 1 teaspoon 
caraway seeds, melt the butter, mix it with the milk, then stir it 
into the flour, and add the eggs and yeast. Stand in a warm 
place 4 hours. Roll it. cut and bake quickly. 



YELLOW CAKE. 

jMrs. Chris. Slatzcr. 



i cup butler, 1 cup sugar, yolks of •"} eggs, I cup sweet milk, 
a pinch salt, flour for a soft batter, 1 teaspoon baking powder 
sifted in each cup flour, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 cup raisins. 

Bake in layers and put together with jelly. 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 



AGNES FROSTING. 

Mrs. Geo. Ewing. 

Put 1 cup i)owdcre<l sugar into a saucepan with 4- cup water. 
Let simmer gently until it strings. Then add the white of 1 egg 
beaten stiff, } cup chopped raisins, 1 cup chopped English walnuts, 
1 tablespoon cocoanut, and .] teaspoon vanilla. Good for any white 
layer cake. 

ALMOND CUSTARD FILLING. 

Miss Ida E. Rising. 

Blanch and pulverize 1 pound almonds, mix with 1 pint thick 
sour cream ; beaj: the yolks of S eggs with 4 tablespoons sugar, 
add the almonds and cream, and the whites of the eggs beaten 
stiff with 2 tablespoons sugar ; vanilla to the taste. It should be 
as thick as sponge cake batter. Use between the layers of a 
white cake. 

APPLE FILLING. 

Take 1 pint grated tart apple, the juice and grated yellow rind 
of 1 lemon, and 1 cup sugar. Cook till thick, let cool and spread 

between the layers. Dust the top of the cake with sugar. 

BOILED ICING. 

Take 1 pound sugar and } pint water and boil until it strings 
from a spoon. Pour the syrup slowly over the stiffly beaten 
whites of 4 eggs, and beat until cold. Flavor with lemon juice, 
rose water or vanilla extract, and apply with a wet knife. 

Brown sugar may be used for a brown icing. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 

TiTiss H. C. ^'an Meter. 

Boil together 3 cups brown sugar, 'J cup butter and } cup 
sweet cream until a spoonful will harden in coM water; add 1 
tablespoon vanilla and beat until nearly cold. Then spread the 
layers quickly. 

CARAMEL ICING. 

Mrs. Andrew Shuttleworth. 

Take H cups sugar, boil with i cup sweet milk or water, 5 
minutes without stirring, or until it begins to brown. Flavor with 
1 teaspoon vanilla, 

• 238 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 239 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

Mrs. II. 1>. Ross. 

]\lix I cup sugar, a lump of Inittcr the size of an egg, i cup 
milk, and 2 tablespoons melted cliocolate. Cook until thick, beat 
well and pour on while hot. 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

.Miss A. C. Murphy. 

Whites of ■) eggs beaten stiff, adding gradually U cups sugar, 
3 tablespoons gratecl chocolate and 1 teaspoon vanilla. 
Or the chocolate may be added to a boiled icing. 

FIG FILLIXG. 

]\Iake a boiled icing, spread layers of white cake, and put a 
layer of coarsely cut hgs over it. then cover with more icing. Put 
together and cover the cake with plain icing. Nuts, dates or 
raisins mav be chopped with the figs, and a tablespoon lemon 
juice added. 

FRENCH CREAM. 

^yhil) 1 cup cream stiff, add :} cu]) powdered sugar, J teaspoon 
vanilla, and 1 stiff white of egg. Fill cream ])uffs. 
This may be llavored with coffee or any fruit. 

LE^.ION COCOANUT CREAM. 

Juice and grated rind of 1 lemon, 1 cup sugar, yolks of 2 
eggs, 1 cup shredded cocoanut. 

Beat the eggs with the sugar and lemon ; cook 10 minutes in 
a double boiler stirring constantly; add the cocoanut, and let cool 
a little before applying. 

LEMON CUSTARD FILLIXG. 

Beat nine eggs together until stiff, add I pound sugar, juice 
and grated rind of 3 lemons, a small cup wine. Stir constantly 
over the fire until thick. 

LEMON FILLING. 

Mrs. Edward Daugherty. 

Mix 1 tablespoon cornstarch. 1 tablespoon butter and 1 cup 
sugar with a little cold water, stir into ^ cup boiling water, and 
when thick add the grated yellow rind and juice of 1 lemon, pour 
over 1 well beaten egg, beat well and, when cool, spread. 

LEMON ICING. 

Miss .Mary Winter. 

Boil 3 cups sugar with 11 cups wster till the syrup strings: 
pour over the stif? whites of 3 e<^o-s ; a'ld the juice of 1- lemon 
and 1 tablespoon orange juice, and beat till cold enough to spread. 



240 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

MAPLE ICING. 

Break in pieces and melt 1 pound cake of maple sugar, add 1 

tablespoon water and boil until it threads. Beat the whites of 2 

eggs stiff and pour over them the boiling sugar, beating until it 
stiffens. Spread quickly. 

MARSHMALLOW FROSTING. 

Mrs. H. C. Tutlle. 

\ cup white sugar, h cup brown sugar, } pound marshmallows, 
\ cup water, •} teaspoon vinegar, 1 white of egg. 

Boil the sugar, water and vinegar until the svrup threads, beat 
it slowly into the beaten white of the egg, and add the marsh- 
mallows previously melted in a basin over hot water. Beat until 
thick. 

MOCHA CREAM FILLING. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Cream together \ cup liutter, with 1 cup confectioner's sugar, 
add 2 teaspoons powdered cocoa, 2 tablespoons very strong coffee, 
and 1 small teaspoon vanilla. 

ORANGE GLAZfi. 

Put together in a saucepan the juice and chopped rind of 1 
orange with 1 tablespoon sugar and j cnm water. Boil -5 mimites, 
then pour in a bowl to steen 10 minutes longer. Put 2 tablespoons 
sugar in a sauce pan, melt, strain the orange infusion into it, 
sharply stir until warm, then use as wanted. 

ORANGE ICING. 

Boil 1 pound pulverized sugar with 'i cup water until it strings. 
Add the grated rind and juice of 1 orange, ^ teaspoon vinegar, 
stir throu9"h and beat into the stifflv beaten whites of 3 eggs. 
Use for filling and icing both of a delicate or an orange cake. 

PINEAPPLE FILLING. 

Mrs. Wm. Huston. 

Boil 2 cups sucar with % cup cream for 10 minutes: take off 
the fire and beat till tiiick and smooth. To h this add 1 cup grated 
pineapple for the filling; add the pineapple juice to the remaining 
i for the icing. 

PISTACHIO PASTE. 

Alelt \ pound marshmallows over steam, add 2 tablespoons 
boiling water, cook till smooth and turn in a syrup made of i cup 
milk and | cup sugar boiled, without stirring, 6 minutes; add a 
few drops almond extract, J cup pistachio nuts blanched and 
chopped, and a few drops green coloring; beat till cool enough to 
spread. Use for filling and frosting. 



ICINGS AND FILLINGS. 241 

PRUNE ALMOND FILLING. 

Make a boiled icing and add i cup clioi)i)C(l prunes and J cup 
blanclied and chopped almonds. 

STR.WVBERRY FILLING. NO. 1. 

Whip 1 cup tliick cream with ', cup sugar, white of 1 egg. \ 
teaspoon vanilla, and h cup fresh strawberries mashed. Serve 
fresh. 

STRAWBERRY FILLING, NO. 2. 

Beat until stiff, 1 cup powdered sugar witli tiie whites of 2 
eggs, 1 tablespoon fresh strawberry juice, and a very little lemon 
juice. Gradually beat in more sugar till thick enough to spread 
easily. Put aside enough for the top of the cake, and into the 
remainder stir very carefully as many halved strawberries as it 
will hold. Put a thick layer of this Ijctween the layers of a delicate 
cake, and spread the plain icing on top. 'I'his must be eaten 
while fresh. 

Raspberry and otlier fruit fillings are made the same way. 

TUTTI FRUTTI FILLING. 

Boil 1 cup water with 3 cups sugar till thick and waxy ; pour 
over the stiff whites of 2 eggs and beat till cool ; add i pound 
finely chopped almonds, a scant i cup chopped raisins, and a little 
citron sliced thin. Spread at once. 



ICE CREAMS, SHERBETS, ETC. 



HOW TO FREEZE. 

Get a good freezer and keep it clean. Use rich cream without 
gelatine or glaze, when it can be gotten; if not, rich fruits with 
milk are almost as satisfactory. Scald the milk or cream, and dis- 
solve the sugar while hot. Thin flavorings may be added before 
freezing; crushed fruits, nuls, etc., when partly frozen. Put in 
the mixture, fill around the sides with crushed ice and coarse salt 
in layers, using plenty of salt. Turn the crank slowly and steadily 
till it gets stiff; here put in the fruit or coarse flavoring, and turn 
till it becomes too hard. Take out the dasher, stir the cream 
thoroughly, and, if whipped cream is added, stir it through now. 
Cover the can, cork it tight, put a buttered strip of muslin around 
the joint, drain off the water, and repack with ice and salt over the 
top of the can ; cover the freezer with a heavy cloth, and let stand 
in a cool place from 1 to 2 hours to ripen, according to the ingre- 
dients of the cream. Jf wanted in moulds, fill them when ready 
to repack, and bury them in salt and ice the same way. 

Ices take longer to freeze, and will melt more quickly. Always 
hav<i them as stiff as possible before packing. When the dasher 
comes out, the beaten white of egg should be stirred in, if any is 
used. Frozen whipped creams require 3 or 4 hours to ripen, but 
only need to be packed, so they can be made without a regular 
freezer ; in severe Aj/inter weather it is only necessary to set the 
mould outdoors for several hours. 

ANGEL PARFAIT. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Put h cup sugar and i cup water in a saucepan on the fire. 
Stir slowly until the sugar is dissolved. Then let it cook slowly 
until it balls. Pour 3 tablespoons of the boiling hot syrup slowly 
into the stiffly beaten whites of 3 eggs, add 1 teaspoon vanilla, 
sherry, maraschino, or any delicate flavor, and a pint of cream 
whipped very stiff. Mould and pack in ice and salt for 4 hours. 

BAKED ICE CREAM. 

Cover a brick mould of ice cream with a thick meringue, and 
brown all sides with a hot shovel, or set inside a hot oven for a 
moment. 

BANANA ICE CREAM. 

Prepare the cream and sugar as in vanilla ice cream ; when 
cold, add 5 large bananas mashed fine and the remaining cream, 
and freeze. 

242 



ICE CREAMS, SHERBETS, ETC. 248 

BISCUIT TORTONI. 

Boil together 1 cup sugar and 1 cup water lo minutes ; stir 
into this the well beaten 3'olks of 4 eggs, cooking 5 minutes 
longer; when cold add 2 tablespoons each of slierry, maraschino, 
and chopped almonds, and h cup powdered macaroons. Turn this 
over 4 quarts of whipped cream, mixing well together. Prick in 
freezer for 4 hours, li quarts of thick cream before whipping 
will make the amount. 

BISQUE ICE CREAM. 

Prepare the cream and sugar as for vanilla ice cream; half 
freeze it, stir in 1 teaspoon each of vanilla and caramel, \ pound 
powdered macaroons, with a few kisses and lady lingers, and 5 
tablespoons sherry; beat till smooth, take out the dasher and pack. 

Dried and powdered brown bread is also used in place of the 
cakes and wine, stirred in the same way when half frozen. 

BRULfi. 

Mrs. I'rnnk Conncll. 

Bring to the boil 1 quart ricli milk ; add 4 cup white sugar and 
a pinch of salt. Add from ") to 8 slightly beaten eggs, and when 
the custard is almost done, stir in 1 cup caramel made from light 
brown sugar. Add it hot. When cool, turn into a mold, pack and 
•freeze 3 hours. 

CAF£ AU PARK AIT. 

Make i cup strong fresh coffee, strain it into 1 pint vanilla 
ice cream, add also h pint whipped cream, beat in well, let stand 
in the freezer 15 minutes more, and serve in sherbet glasses with 
a little whipped cream on top. 

CAFfi MOUSSE. 

Add 1 gill black coffee tn 1 qu.arl thick cream, and |V cup pow- 
dered sugar; whip very stiff, turn into a mould, pack in salt and 
ice, and freeze 3 hours. This is good whatever becomes of it. 

Any canned or fruit juice may be treated in this way, sweeten- 
ing to taste, remembering that some sweetness is lost in freezing. 

CARAAdEL ICE CREAM. 

Make a caramel of \ cup sugar, pour into 1 pint hot milk, and 
when dissolved add i pound sugar, stirring till dissolved. Wlun 
cold, mix with 1 quart cream and 1 talikspoon vanilla, and freeze 
till stiff; take out the dasher, stir in 1 ))int whii)ped cream, repack, 
cover and let ripen 2 hours. 

CHERRY CUPS. 

Soak 1 pint freshly stoned sweet cherries with 2 tablespoons 
sufear and any delicate flavoring 'desired. Keej) on the ice. Take 1 
pint vanilla ice cream. Put the cherries in the bottom of (J sherbet 



244 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

glasses, fill up with the ice cream, put a cherry or 2 on top (or a 
candied cherry, if at hand), and serve immediately. 

Any fresh fruit or any sijital)le mixture of fruits may lie 
served in this way, soaking first in sugar, with or without a flavor- 
ing liquor. 

CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 

Scald 1 pint cream, add \ pound sweet chocolate, 1 tablespoon 
vanilla, J teaspoon cinnamon, and 1 cup sugar ; when perfectly 
smooth, cool, add 1 pint cream, and freeze. 

COFFEE ICE CREAM. 

Steep } pound coarsely ground coffee with 1 pint cream, letting 
it just miss the boil; strain through a thin muslin, squeezing hard, 
add f cup sugar, stir till dissolved, and when cold add the remain- 
ing pint of cream, and freeze. 

FROZEN CUSTARD. 

Mrs. George Ewing. 

Heat 1 quart milk. Beat up the yolks of C or 8 eggs with a 
pinch of salt and a large cup of sugar. Pour over this the warm 
milk, and put over the fire until it is well blended. Then cool. 
Before freezing, stir in the beaten whites, a tablespoon rosewater, 
and a good dash of rum, or flavor with vanilla. A pint of cream 
added to this before freezing makes it delicious. 

FROZEN PLUM PUDDING. 

Miss McMath. 

Make a rich chocolate custard, adding a heaping tablespoon of 
mixed spices, and a large cup of stale fruit cake crumbs ; after 
half freezing it, add 1 cup currants, 1 cup seeded raisins, and a- 
wineglass brandy. When frozen mould in a shape. Serve with a 
regular cold pudding sauce. 1 egg beaten up with a cup of whipped 
cream and flavored with brandy is very good. 

ICE CREAM CHARLOTTE. 

Line the bottom and sides of a plain quart pudding mould 
with lady fingers, fill up the mould with vanilla ice cream, turn 
out on a cold dish, decorate with 1 cup of whipped cream and 
serve. 

Or fill with frozen custard and serve with cold brandy sauce. 

ICE CREAM PRALINE. 

Put 3 oimces blanched almonds in a saucepan with 3 table- 
spoons sugar, and 1 tablespoon water. Stir until well browned. 
Pound to a paste ; when cold, add to 1 quart mixture for vanilla 
ice cream, mix up well and freeze. 



ICE CREAMS, SHERBETS. ETC. 245 

LEMON ICE CREAM. 

Scald 1 quart cream, and let cool. Mix the grated yellow rind 
of 3 lemons with !) ounces of sugar, and the juice of 2 lemons and 
1 orange, and let stand in a cool place 1 hour. Partly freeze the 
cream, stir in the fruit, and finish freezing. 

MAPLE MOUSSE. 

Beat the yolks of 4 eggs li'-di', add 1 cup maple syrup and 

cook in douhle I)oiler until it thickens slightly. Take from fire 

and beat until cool. Add 1 pint cream whipped stifif, pack in salt 
and ice, and freeze 4 hours. 

NEAPOLITAN VANILLA CREAM. 

Beat the yolks of (i eggs light with ij pound sugar, then stir 
in the stiff whites and add all to 1 quart scalding cream; stir till 
it begins to thicken. Strain, add '2 tal)lcspoons vanilla extract, 
cool and freeze. Any of the plain creams may be made Neapolitan 
by the addition of 6 eggs, and } pound sugar. 

NESSELRODE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Shell 1 pint Italian chestnuts, b: il them 20 minutes, skin and 
press through a colander; chop fine 1 peeled and cored pineapple 
or an e(|ua! amount of canned; cl'op 1 pound mixed candied 
fruits: i)ound 1 pint lilanclied al'.ro'ids : boil 1 pint sugar with 
1 pint water 1') minutes, stir ii tl'e beaten yolk of (3 eggs; 
when it boils again take off the svrup and beat till cold. Add the 
fruit and nuts, 1 tablespoon vanilla. 4 tablespoons sherry, and 1 
pint cream. Mi.x well and freeze. Let ripen 4 or 5 hours. 

ORANGE ICE CREAM. 

Make the same as vanilla ice cream, using f pound sugar, the 
rind of 1 orange and the juice of (i in place of vanilla flavoring. 

ORANGE SHERBET. 

Mrs. Henry Spencer. 

Add i cup sugar to 1 quart rich milk, freeze slightly ; then 
add a mixture of 1 cup orange juice, 1 cup sugar and 1 tablespoo i 
'cmon juice, and finisli freezing. 

PEACH FRAPPfiE. 

Mrs. Jolm Whitmer. 

Line a mould with vanilla ice cream, fill the centre with sliced 
ripe peaches, cover with ice cream, cover the mould anfl pack in 
salt and ice for h hour. The fruit must be chilled but not frozen. 

Any fruit or berries may be served in this way. 



246 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PEACH ICE CREAM. 

Scald 1 pint, cream, dissolve in it | pint sugar ; when cold, 
add 1 pint cream and partially freeze. Pare and mash a scant 
quart of peaches, stir them in, turn until stiff, take out the dasher, 
l^ack and finish freezing. 

Apricot ice cream is made in the same way. 

PINEAPPLE ICE CREAM. 

Mrs. Edward Call. 

Slice 2 large ripe pineapples thin, scatter 2 pounds powdered 
sugar between the slices, cover and let the fruit stand 3 hours ; 
chop it up in the syrup, and strain through a fine sieve ; beat grad- 
ually into •> pints cream, and freeze rapidly. Keep a few pieces 
of pineapple unsugared, cut into square bits, and stir through the 
cream when half frozen, witli 1 pint whipped cream. Pack and let 
stand several hours. 

PISTACIITO ICE CREAAI. 

Boil the sugar and •] the cream as in Vanilla Ice Cream: when 
cold, add the rest of the cream, ^ pound shelled pistachio nuts 
blanched and pounded, 1 teaspoon each of vanilla and almond 
extract, and enough spinach juice or harmless vegetable green to 
'•-olor it a light green. Ereeze. 

PRINCESS PUDDING. 

Cover 1 tablespoon gelatin witli cold water and let soak ^ 
hour. Add enough hot water to dissolve it thoroughly and add 
it to 1 quart good cregm, 1 cup susrar, 1 e?g beaten light, 1 table- 
spoon vanilla, and 3 tablespoons sherry. Put into the freezer and 
half freeze. Prepare previously a heaping cupful of fresh peaches 
peeled and mashed. Stir into the half frozen mixture with 2 
tablespoons chopped blanchcil almonds, pack and let stand 2 hours. 

STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM. 

Wash and mash 2 quarts berries, sprinkle over them 2 cups 
sugar, let stand until dissolved, and squeeze through a piece of 
cheesecloth. Put into a separate bowl the mash left in the bag, 
pour over it gradually 1 pint milk stirring it well to separate the 
seeds, and squeeze through the bag again. Add this juice to the 
other, and sweet cream and sugar according to taste. Freeze as 
usual. 

Raspberry ice cream is made in the same way, adding juice 
of 1 lemon. 

TUTTI FRUTTI ICE CREAM. 

Make 1 quart Neapolitan cream; when half frozen, stir in 1 
pound candied fruit chopped, 4 tablespoons sherry and 1 table- 
spoon brandy. Pack and let ripen 2 hours. 



ICE CREAMS, SHERBETS, ETC. 247 

VANILLA ICE CREAM. 

Scald 1 pint cream in a double boiler, add 1 cup sugar, and 
stir till dissolved ; take off, add 2 tablespoons vanilla extract, and 
when cold add 1 pint rich cream and freeze. 

VAX ILEA PARFAIT. 

Take a pint of vanilla ice cream. Sweeten and flavor \ pint 
thick cream, whip. Add \ to the ice cream stirring in thoroughly ; 
put in sherbet glasses, cover with the balance of the whipped 
cream, decorate with a candied cherr}-, if at hand, and serve im- 
mediately. Any variety of ice cream may be converted into a 
parfait in this manner. 



WATER ICES. 



When fruit juices are fro.^en with water and sugar they are 
called "water ices": if, when half frozen, a white of egg is stirred 
in, they become "sherbets". If served only half frozen without 
packing, the drink is "frappe". Canned or fresh juices may be 
used ; the fresh fruit may be boiled or only mashed, but it must 
be strained, and sweetened to taste. If good material is used, and 
put together with judgment, the ice will be good whether frozen 
successfully or not. 

CAFE FRAPPE. 

Pour 1 quart boiling water over 1 cup finely ground coffee in 
a French coffee pot ; when it has dripped through, pour it back 
again and in this manner, let it drip 4 times; pour into a bowl 
and dissolve I cup sugar in it and set aside to cool. When cold, 
add the unbeaten white of an egg, turn into a freezer and freeze 
to a mush. Serve in glasses. 

Tea frappe is made by sweeten.ing freshly made tea to taste, 
and freezing to a mush. 

CARDINAL PUN'CH. 

Take 1 cup granulated sugar, the grated rind of h lemon and 
the juice of 3 lemons, and | orange, adding h cup raspberry syrup, 
\^ pints water, 2 teaspoons kirsch and 1 teaspoon maraschino. 
Thoroughly mix, strain and freeze. 

CHEST.VUT SHERBET. 

Boil 1 pound French chestnuts 30 minutes, shell, blanch and 
press them through a sieve; boil 1 quart water and 1 cup sugar 
five minutes, add 4 talilespoons sherry, \ cup lemon juice and the 
chestnut pulp; half freeze; add tl<' stiff whites of 2 eggs and 
fniish freezing. 



248 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

FROZEN FRUITS. 

The pulp of fruits may be frozen in the same manner as their 
juice, cutting or mashing as inne as possible, but without straining. 

FROZEN ORANGEADE. 

Boil 3 cups water with 1 cup sugar 10 minutes, take off and 
add the juice of 6 oranges and 2 lemons. When cold add the 
white of 1 egg and freeze to a mush. 

GRAPE SHERBET. 

Use equal amounts of grape juice and water, sweeten to taste, 
add the juice of 2 lemons, and freeze. 



LEMON GINGER SHERBET. 

Pare the thin yellow rind from 2 lemons ; pour over 1 quart 
boiling water, cover and let infuse 10 minutes. Squeeze the lemon 
juice and steep in it \ pound candied ginger cut very fine; put all 
together, add 1 pint sugar, strain and freeze. 



LEMON ICE. 

Peel the thin yellow rind from o lemons and 1 orange, add 1 
quart water, and 2} cups sugar; boil ."> minutes, and cool. Squeeze 
the juice from the fruit and from a couple more lemons, add to 
the syrup, strain and freeze. 

Orange Ice is made in the same manner, taking 12 oranges 
and 1 pint sugar to the quart of water, and boiling 3 rinds. 1 or 
2 lemons added is an improvement. 



LEAION SHERBET. 

• Mrs. Bess Jones. 

Grate the yellow rind from 3 lemons, roll, and squeeze out all 
the juice. Pour 1 quart boiling water over them and let stand 
a few minutes. Dissolve 1 cup sugar in a little water and boil to 
a syrup, add 1 teaspoon gelatin dissolved in a little hot water ; 
add to the lemon syrup and freeze. When almost frozen, stir in 
tiie stiff white of 1 egg, pack, and finish freezing. 

MACEDOINE ICE. 

Mix 1 pint each of orange juice and pineapple juice, and J 
pint lemon juice; make quite sweet, add 2h pints water, and freeze. 

Or J pint each cherry, strawberry and currant juice; sweeten, 
add U pints water and freeze. 

Or ^ pint each of currant and raspberry juice; sweeten, add 
1 quart water and freeze. 



ICE CRliAMS, SHERBETS, ETC. 249 

OXE, TWO, THREE LExMON ICE. 

Mrs. George Ewing. 

1 cup lemon juice, 2 cups sugar, 3 cups water. Mix well and 
freeze. 

ORAXGE WATER ICE. 

Mrs. G. Donnelly. 

Mix the juice of 1 lemon and G oranges, 2 teaspoons extract 
orange, 1 gill rich sweet cream, 1 pound powdered sugar, and 1 
quart water. Strain and freeze. 

PIXEAPPLE ICE. 

Mrs. Peter McQuadc. 

Soak 2 tablespoons gelatin i hour in cold water ; when ready 
to use pour over it A pint hot water. Mix this with 1 can 
shredded pineapple, tlic juice of 3 lemons, 8 cups sugar. This 
should measure 3 pints; if not. till up with cold water. Put into 
the freezer and when parti}' frozen, add the stifBy beaten white of 
1 egg. 

PLXEAPPLE WATER ICE. 

Pare, core and grate 2 large pineapples and press through a 
sieve: add 3 cups sugar, tlic iuicc of 2 lemons, and 1 quart water: 
when the sugar is dissolved, freeze. 

RASPBERRY SHERBET. 

Mash enough berries to make 1 pint juice: add the juice of 1 
lemon, 1 pint sugar, I pint boiling water ; when the sugar is dis- 
solved, strain and freeze. 



CANDIES. 



The common terms that are used to describe the stages of heat 
reached by the boiling sugar in candv making are the "thread" or 
"string," from 215° to 217° F. ; the" "soft ball," 238° ; the "hard 
ball," 248° ; and the "crack," about 50° higher. The test is made 
by dropping a teaspoonful of the syrup in cold water. The 
"thread" strings from the end of the spoon ; the "soft ball" will 
just keep its shape; the "hard ball" hardens, and the "crack" is 
brittle. At 350° F., the syrup becomes quite brown and smokes. 
This is the "caramel" stage. 

BARLEY SUGAR. 

Soak 1 pint barley over niyht ; in the morning simmer in more 
water until as clear as thin jelly; strain, add 1 pound white sugar 
and juice of 1 lemon; boil again till it reach the hard ball. Take 
from the stove, whip in the stiff white of 1 egg, and pour in 
buttered pans. When cold enough mark in squares. 

BONBONS. 

Bonbons are made of fondant, cooked or uncooked. Any 
flavoring or coloring desired may be added to the boiled fondant 
just before taking from the fire; and cocoanut, chopped nuts or 
chopped fruits may be worked in while yet soft. When well 
worked make up into small balls of any size or shape. Whole nuts 
or candied fruits are rolled in fondant, and all bonbons are put 
aside to ripen. They are then dipped in colored or white melted 
fondant, or in melted chocolate. 

To color the outside of bonbons, melt boiled fondant over 
boiling water, color and flavor as desired, drop the bonbons in 
one at a time, turn with a two tined fork until covered, remove 
with the fork, and drop on buttered paper to harden. For cover- 
ing with chocolate, melt Baker's chocolate over boiling water, and 
dip in the same manner. The chocolate mav be sweetened if 
preferred, or sweetened chocolate may be used. 

BURNT ALMONDS. 

"Yonkers H. H. Cookbook." 

Put 2 cups brown sugar into a saucepan with very little water. 
Stir until dissolved. Let it boil a minute and then throw in 1 cup 
blanched almonds and stir until the sugar forms caramel. When 
the nuts are well coated, turn them out and separate them. 

250 



CANDIES. 251 

BUTTERSCOTCH, No. 1. 

Mrs. John E. Jones. 

Mix together 3 pounds sugar, \ cup molasses, 1 heaping cup 
Iiutter, and h teaspoon cream tartar. Boil until it cracks dropped 
m cold water. Flavor and pour into buttered pans. 

BUTTERSCOTCH, No. 2. 

Put 3 cups granulated sugar in a saucepan with 1 cup water, 
let it boil about lU minutes without stirring. When the syrup 
changes from white to straw color, stir in 2 tablespoons butter, 
and pour into buttered pans, marking off in squares when cool 
enough. 

CANDIED GINGER. 

Boil race ginger in water until tender, changing the water 
several times. The last time add an equal weight of sugar, and 
boil until it threads from the spoon. Roll the ginger in white 
sugar, pack in small jars, pour the remaining syrup over it and 
tie up. 

CANDIED VIOLETS. 

"Dainty Dishes." 

Dissolve 1 cup su.gar in a little water and boil until it threads. 
Set aside to cool slightly. Take fresh double violets, dip them in 
the syrup, and then sprinkle with confectioner's sugar. Lay away 
in dry su.gar. Rose petals and tender crisp mint leaves are done 
the same way. These make pretty garnishes for fancy desserts. 

CHIPS. 

Boil the syrup to the crack, color and flavor as desired, pour 
on to buttered platters, pull or work when cold enough, lastly roll 
out very thin with a buttered roller. Break into shapeless pieces. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS, No. L 

Miss Pearl Essex. 

1 cup molasses, 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, \ cake Baker's choco- 
late. 

Boil twenty minutes, take off stove, add 1 teaspoon vanilla, and 
turn into buttered tins. When cold enough, cut into squares. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS, No. 2. 

Put li pounds granulated sugar in a saucepan, add 10 ounces 
Baker's chocolate, 1 pint thick cream, \ pint raspberry syrup, and 1 
teaspoon vanilla, mix well and boil, constantly stirring until the 
syrup reaches the hard ball. Pour into buttered pans, and when 
cool enough cut into squares. 



252 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CHOCOLATE FUDGE. 

Mrs. John E. Jones. 

Mix together 2 cups granulated sugar, 2 cups confectioner's 
sugar, 2 cups sweet milk, and butter size of a walnut and boil 
together five minutes. Add 3 cup cocoa or grated chocolate, and 
boil 3 minutes longer. Take from the fire, beat until it thickens, 
pour into buttered nans, and when nearly cold mark into squares. 

If nuts are wanted, stir them in after taking from the fire. 

CHOCOLATE WAFERS. 

Melt sweetened or unsweetened chocolate. Drop on sheets of 
wa.xed paper. 

COCOANUT BALLS. 

Grate the white of .} a cocoanut; mix with enough of the milk 
to stick together ; make into small balls ; cover with cream fondant 
or boiled fondant, or drop in boiling fondant. Let ripen. 

COCOANUT CREAM CANDY. 

Boil \ pound granulated sugar with the milk of 1 cocoanut 
and 2 tablespoons water. Boil until it makes a soft ball when tried 
in water. Add ^ pound grated cocoanut. Stir until it looks white, 
then pour into buttered pans and cu.t in squares when stiff enough. 

COCOANUT DROPS. 

INIrs. Thiimas Lynch. 

Beat half stiff the whites of 5 eggs, add slowly 1 pound white 
sugar beating continuously, 1 large cocoanut grated, and \ teaspoon 
rose extract. Drop by spoonfuls on buttered paper, and set in a 
cool oven till crusted. 



COCOANUT FUDGES. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Melt 1 cake sweet chocolate, add 2 cups milk, 2 cups sugar, 
and 1 cup cocoanut. Bcil until it creams in cold water. Take off, 
add 1 teaspoon vanilla, and stir as usual until ready to pour out. 

COCOANUT TAFFY. 

Boil 2 cups N. O. molasses with 3 tablespoons each butter and 
sugar until soft ball is reached. Stir in 1 cup freshly, grated cocoa- 
nut, and boil 1 minute. Pour in a buttered pan. When cold 
enough, mark in strips. Have prepared some neat round sticks 
about 4 inches long, and roll the strips of taffy on them. Should 
keep their form but be too sticky to handle without the sticks. 



CANDIES. 253 

COFFEE CARAMELS. 

Put in a saucepan over a brisk fire, 1} pounds granulated sugar, 
5 pint sweet cream, h teaspoc n vanilla and \ pint strong fresh 
coffee. Stir well and continue as with chocolate caramels, No. 2. 

Tea caramels are made the same way. 

CRACKER JACK. 

Mrs. Oliver Devol. 

1 cup light brown sugar, 3 tablespoons N. O. molasses, lump of 
butter size of an egg, alum size of a pea, pinch of soda. Boil to 
tlie hard ball. Pour over 1 gallon of popped corn. 

CREAAI CARAMELS. 

"Boston Cooking Scliool." 

Put 1 pound sugar, 1 pound glucose, \ pound butter and 1 
cup cream over the fire. Stir and cook until it boils throughout. 
Then stir in gradually so as not to stop the boiling, a second cup 
of cream. Stir every 3 or 4 minutes until the hard ball is reached. 
Add 1 teaspoonful vanilla, and turn into a large shallow well but- 
tered pan. When nearly cold, cut in cubes. Roll these at once 
in waxed paper. It may need to boil an hour. 

CREAM CHERRIES. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Boil 1 cup sugar and \ cup water together until the syrup 
threads. Take off the fire and stir until it hardens. Put back on 
the stove in a second pan of hot water, and melt. If too thick 
add a few drops of boiling water. Dip into the syrup whole 
bunches of cherries or single pieces of any small fruit, and lay on 
the dishes or paper cases they are to be served on. 

CREAMED WALNUTS. 

Put in a bowl the white of 1 egg, \ tablespoon cold water 
and I teaspoon vanilla. Beat well. Add confectioner's sugar 
gradually until stiff enough to knead, somewhat less than 1 pound. 
•Shape" in balls and flatten between the two halves of English wal- 
nuts pinched together. Filberts may be treated this way, or fond- 
ant may be used in place of the uncooked cream. 

CREAM TAFFY. 

"Yonkers H. H. Cookbook." 

Take 1 cup sugar, \ cup molasses, 1 cup cream and a piece 
of butter the size of an'egg. Boil over a brisk fire, stirring until 
it cracks. Pour into a buttered tin and mark in squares when 
cold enough. May be poured over a layer of nuts in the pan. 



254 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CREOLE KISSES. 

"Yonkers II. H. Cookbook." 

Beat together for 1-5 minutes 1 pound confectioner's sugar and 
tlie whites of tJ eggs. Add 1 teaspoon cream tartar and beat until 
it stands alone. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla and 1 cup chopped nuts, 
and bake in a thin layer. Take from the oven, cut into narrow 
strips and roll them still hot over small sticks. 

CURRAXT AND RASPBERRY PASTE DROPS. 

i pound each of currants and raspberries boiled and rubbed 
through a sieve; add 1 pound sifted sugar, and stir over a brisk 
fire until the paste is so reduced as to show the bottom of the 
kettle when the spoon is drawn across it. Drop on a tin sheet 
about the size of silver quarters, and place on the oven screen 
with a low fire for 1 hour. Remove from the tin and place be- 
tween sheets of paraflin paper in a closed box in a dry place. Any 
other fruit may be treated the same way. 

DIVINITY EUDGE. 

Mrs. Ilaskins. 

Boil together until it threads 2 cups sugar, h cup water, and 
\ cup Karo syrup. Pour slowly into the stiffly beaten whites of 
"2 eggs. Add 1 cup finely minced nutmeats, and vanilla to taste. 
Beat hard until cooling, and pour into buttered tins, marking the 
squares. 

FONDANT. 

"Fondant" is the "foundation" of all French candies. To 
make "white fondant", put 2} pounds sugar and \ teaspoon cream 
tartar in a smooth granite saucepan with 1^ cups hot water. Boil 
without stirring till the soft ball is reached. As the sugar ad- 
heres to the sides of the kettle, wash it off with the hand dipped 
in cold water. Butter a large platter or a marble-topped table, and 
pour the mixture slowly on it. Let stand a few minutes only to 
cool. Then scrape up together and work with a wooden spatula 
or spoon until white and creamy. If it lumps, work with the hands 
until perfectly smooth again. Put into a bowl, cover with oiled 
paper, and let stand 24 hours to ripen. Always make it on a 
clear day. 

"Coffee fondant" is made by using strong coffee in place of 
water. 

"Maple fondant" is made by using half maple sugar. 

For an uncooked white fondant, beat the white of 1 egg with 
i tablespoon cold water and | teaspoon vanilla. Add gradually as 
much fine confectioner's sugar as it will take up to the amount of 
1 pound. This is good if eaten fresh. 

FRUIT BONBONS. 

Mrs. John E. Brown. 

j\lix an equal quantity of chopped walnuts, dates and figs, and 
make into bonbons with jelly. Dip in melted chocolate. 



CANDIES. 255 

FUDGK. NO. 1. 

Mrs. Lizzie Ward. 

■1 cups brown .suj^ar, 1 cup cream or milk, butter size of an 
egg, 1 pound English walnuts. 

Boil sugar and cream until the syrup threads ; then add the 
nuts and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Take off the stove and stir until 
white. Pour into greased platter and mark into squares. 

FUDGE. NO. 2. 

Miss Margaret Corbett. 

Put in a saucepan 1 cup each of white and brown sugar, ^ 
cup milk, I cup molasses and as much melted butter; boil about 
3 minutes stirring constantly. Add 2 squares grated chocolate 
and cook five minutes longer, still stirring. Take the kettle off, 
add 1| teaspoons vanilla, and beat until creamy. Pour into a but- 
tered pan and when cool mark into squares. Any kind of nuts 
may be added when taking from the fire, chopped figs, candied 
fruits, etc. 

GINGER CANDY. 

Dissolve 1 pound white sugar in i pint water, boil until a 
thick syrup ; add 1 teaspoon ground ginger to a little of the syrup 
and when smooth, stir it into the whole. Boil until it threads, then 
add the grated rind of a lemon and- boil again stirring all the time 
until the hard ball stage is reached. Drop with a spoon in small 
cakes on a buttered pan. 

GLACfi NUTS. 

Put 2 cups sugar in a saucepan with J teaspoon cream tartar 
and 1 cup lioiling water. Boil without stirring until the syrup be- 
gins to discolor. Put the pan into a pan of cold water to in- 
stantly stop boiling and then into a saucepan of .hot water for the 
dipping. Take nuts separately on a long pin. dip in the syrup 
until covered, remove and place on oiled paper to cool. Glace 
fruits, such as strawberries, sections of oranges, and cherries, dip 
in the same way. Grapes should be dipped by their short stems. 
The fruit shoidd be served fresh. 

GRILLED ALMONDS. 

"Yonkers H. H. Cookbook." 

Boil 1 cuj) sugar and \ cup water until the syrup threads. 
Drop in 1 cup blanched almonds, letting them cook five minutes 
stirring occasionally very carefully. When slightly brown remove 
and stir until the syrup turns to sugar, some of which will cling 
to the nuts. 

HONEY CANDY. 

Boil 1 cup honey and 1 teaspoon butter until it reaches the 
crack : j our in a well greased pan ; pull when cooling. 



256 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. ^ 

HONF.Y CARAMELS. 

Put in a saucepan J pint each honey and sweet cream, ^ gill 
Jamaica rum, J teaspoon vanilla, 2 pounds granulated sugar, and 
the juice of -\ lemon. Boil, constantly stirring until it reaches the 
hard ball. Add 2 tablespoons butter, and boil 3 minutes longer. 
Proceed as with chocolate caramels. No. '2. 

ICE CREAM CANDY. 

Put 2 pounds sugar on to boil with 1 cup water and \ cup 
vinegar. Cook until it hardens in water. Take from the lire, add 
vanilla to taste and a small piece of butter, and pour on buttered 
plates to cool. As soon as it can be handled, pull until white, 
and break into convenient lengths when cold enough. 

MAPLE CARAMELS. 

Make like vanilla caramels, using maple syrup in place of 
sugar and vanilla. 

MAPLE FUDGE. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Cook 2 pounds soft maple sugar with 1 pint cream from 30 
to 15 minutes, stirring all the time until the "crack" is reached. 
Remove, beat hard about 5 minutes, pour into buttered pans and 
mark in squares. 

MAPLE NUT CANDY. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

2 pounds brown sugar, .] pint cream. It cups pecan nuts 
chopped, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Beat the cream and sugar together 
and cook until the syrup balls. Add the flavoring and nuts, take 
off, beat well and pour into buttered tins. 

MAPLE PRALINES. 

Boil 1| cups confectioner's sugar, 1 cup maple syrup, and J 
cup cream until the soft ball is reached. Tlien take from the fire, 
and beat vmtil it shows signs of sugaring, stir in 2 cups nutmeats 
quickly, and drop from the spoon on buttered paper. 

MAPLE PUFFS. 

2 cups maple or brown sugar, ^ cup water, J teaspoon vanilla, 
^ cup chopped walnuts, white of 1 egg. Boil the sugar and water 
to the soft ball ; pour slowly into the beaten egg, add vanilla, and 
beat till stiff. Stir in the walnut meats, and drop by teaspoons on 
buttered paper. 

MARSHM ALLOWS. 

"Dainty Dishes." 

Dissolve \ pound gum arabic in 1 nuart water ; add 1 pound 
best granulated sugar, and stir con=tantb' over a slow fire until 
about as thick as molasses. Add the stiffly beaten whites of 8 



CANDIES. 207 

eggs, flavor witli vanilla, and stir until it does not stick to the 
fingers. Pour into a pan dusted with cornstarch, and as it cools 
mark into squares. When taken out, dust all sides with cornstarch. 

MOLASSES CAXDY, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Kate Hoodlet. 

Put 1 pound granulated sugar in a saucepan with just enough 
water to dissolve it, and boil until it reaches the hard ball ; add 
1 quart N. O. molasses, 2 tablespoons vinegar, and 1 tablespoon 
butter; boil again till the hard ball is reached. Take it off, stir 
in a small J teaspoon soda, and pour into buttered tins ; as soon 
as it begins to cool, pull until white. Moisten the hands with ice 
water or butter. Lay out in long sticks, braids or twists, and as 
it hardens, cut into short lengths. 

When taken from the stove flavor with the juice of 1 lemon. 

MOLASSES CANDY, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Edith W'incfordiicr. 

Boil 1 cup molasses with 2 cups sugar, 1 tablespoon vinegar, 
a little butter and vanilla for I't miimtes. Pour out onto buttered 
plates. When cool enough, pull till light, and break into small 
pieces. 

NELLIE'S CARAMELS. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

1 pound brown sugar. ] cup sweet milk, 1 cake sweetened 
chocolate, butter the size of an ecg. Hoil until thick as taffy, 
pour onto buttered plates, and mark into sc|uares when cool enough. 

NOUGAT. 

Grease a shallow square pan w-ith butter. Fill with hickory 
nut kernels, Brazil nuts sliced, almonds, sliced cocoanut, dates and 
orange peel. Melt 2 pounds su?ar with 1 cup water, boil without 
stirring until the crack, add 1 tablespoon lemon juice and pour 
over the nuts in the pan. When cool mark in narrow strips with 
a knife. 

NUT CARAMELS. 

Make like vanilla caramels, adding 2 cups nutmeats before 
removing from the fire. The vanilla may be omitted or less used. 

PEANUT NOUGAT. 

Shell 1 quart peanuts, remove the skins and chop fine. Sprinkle 
with \ teaspoon salt. Put 1 pound sugar in a granite saucepan, 
put over fire, .and stir constantly until incited to a syrup. .Add 
the nuts at once, pour into a warm buttered tin and mark in. 
small squares. 

17 



258 OLD COUXTRV RECIPES AND NEW. 

PEPPERMINTS. 

Boil 2 cups white sugar and h cup water for 5 minutes ; flavor 
with peppermint; stir until thick and creamy and drop on parafifine 
paper. 

Wintergreen oil may be used to flavor, in which case use a 
few drops of pink coloring. 

POPCORN BALLS. 

Mrs. Campbell. 

Boil 3 pint molasses for 12 minutes ; put 4 quarts popped corn 
into a pan, and pour the syrup over it. Mix well. Roll into balls 
to suit. 

POPCORN BARS. 

Crush freshly popped corn with a rolling pin ; make a syrup as 
for popcorn balls ; cook till it reaches the crack, add the corn, mix 
well and press into a buttered pan to the depth of h inch, pounding 
it smooth with the potato masher. Mark into bars with a sliarp 
knife. Break apart when cold and wrap in waxed paper. A cup 
of nutmeats is a good addition. 

PRALINES. 

Mrs. A. M. Thackara. 

For each pound of shelled nuts, English walnuts, filberts or 
pecans, put 1 cup of brown sugar in a skillet with just water 
enough to dissolve it. Cook till it balls soft, then remove and stir 
until it begins to cream, when add the nuts and drop from the tip 
of the spoon in small piles on buttered paper. 

PUFFED RICE CANDY. 

Mrs. Arthur \"an Meter. 

Boil together 1 cup sugar, J cup water, 1 tablespoon vinegar, 
and butter the size of an egg. When it strings, add 1 teaspoon 
vanilla and a pinch of cream of tartar, and stir in 3 cups of puffed 
rice. Pour out on buttered platters, and break in pieces when cold. 

SCOTCH TOFFEE.. 

Mrs. H. C. Begland. 

Put 3 cups confectioner's sugar in a saucepan with 2 table- 
spoons butter, \ teaspoon cream tartar, \ cup cold water. Let 
boil without stirring until the crack is reached and the syrup is 
amber colored. Pour into a buttered pan, and mark off when firm. 

SEA FOAM. 

Miss Udell Evving. 

Mix 2 cups brown sugar with \ cup water, cook without stir- 
ring until it will form a hard ball in cold water. Then remove 
from the fire and stir into the beaten white of 1 egg. adding A 
t'-p spoon vanilla. When nearly stiff add 1 cup chopped nuts, and 
drop in balls on a buttered platter. 



CANDIES. 259 

SEA FOAM FUDGE. 

Mrs. Wm. Brown. 

1 cup light brown sugar, i cup water, i cup grated chocolate, 
white of 1 egg. 

Put sugar, chocolate and water over the hre m a saucepan, 
and boil without stirring until it spins a thread from the point of 
a spoon. Pour this mixture over the well beaten while of an egg. 
and stir until it begins to stiffen. Drop from a spoon on waxed 
paper in little bonbons. 

SOUR DROP^. 

Boil 3 pounds granulated sugar with 8 cups water, and 1 tea- 
spoon cream tartar till the hard ball is reached. Take from the 
iire, stir in a few drops of essence of lemon, and sprinkle over, 
carefully mixing. 1 tablespoon powdered tartaric acid. Pour on 
an oiled tin and keep warm. Take a little at a time, make into 
small rolls, cut into bits, and roll each in the hands till round. 
Sprinkle with powdered sugar. 

STUFFED DATES. 

Miss Beall Ewing. 

Split the side of each date and remove the seed. Fill with 
plain fondant, nuts rolled in fondanti. or plain English walnuts. 
Fold the edges together and roll in pulverized sugar, i'canuts 
make a stuffing liked by many. 

SUGARED PEANUTS. 

Treat the nuts as for salted almonds, using powdered sugar 
instead of salt. 

TUTTI-FRUTTI CANDY. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

T^Ielt in separate pans, a large piece of white fondant and ] the 
quantity of maple. Mix English v.-alnut meats with the latter, and 
pour in the bottom of a mold. When cooled, take half the white 
fondant, color pink, flavor with rose or cherry, and chopped can- 
died cherries; pour over the first candy: lastly flavor the white 
with vanilla, add nuts and chopped candied pineapple and pour on 
top Cover the mould with oiled paper and let stand over night. 
Remove from mould, put on a fancy plate, and surround with glace 
nuts. A border mould is very pretty; when this is used fill the 
center with the glace nuts. 

VANILLA CARAMELS. 

Take 2 cups white sugar, 2 tablespoons glucose, butter the size 
of a large hickory nut ; boil until it hardens in cold water ; add i 
cup rich cream and boil until it again hardens in cold water, stirring 
constantly. Take from the fire, add vanilla to taste, pour into 
well buttered pans; when cool enough, cut into small squares and 
wrap in paraffine paper. 



200 OLD COUXTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

WHITE ALMOND TABLET. 

Mrs. H. C. B?gland. 

Put 1 pound confectioner's sugar on to boil with 1 cup milk, 
stir until the hard ball is reached. Butter a tin pan, and sprinkle 
thickly with blanched almonds, whole or split. Stir the syrup 
rapidly after taking it off until it becomes creamy, when pour over 
the almonds. If it hardens too quickly to pour, add a little water, 
and put back on the fire to try again. 



FRUITS. 



AMBROSIA. 

Peel several oranges, removing the white skins, slice, taking 
out the seeds, lay in a glass dish, and sprinkle with sugar and 
grated cocoanut. Add other layers, piling the cocoanut on top. 
You may add pineapple if desired. 

BAKED APPLES. ^ 

Wipe the apples, cut out any spots, and stand them in an 
eartJTen baking dish ; pour over them a cup of cold water, and 
put a spoonful sugar on each. Cover and bake, basting occasion- 
ally. Let get cold in the dish they were baked in, put in a glass 
dish, and serve with cream. 

Pears may be baked in the same way. 

Apples may be cored or not, peeled or not, sugared or not for 
baking, according to the taste of the cook, and a good baking 
apple needs no water. They may be peeled, cored and quartered, 
put in a pan in the oven, sprinkled with sugar, a few sticks of 
cinnamon added, drawn butter poured over them, and then baked 
till done. 

BROWNED APPLES. 

Pare and core tart apples ; roll in melted brown sugar, fill 
the centers with chopped nuts, and bake in a pan with a little 
water about 25 minutes. 



CANDIED APPLES. 

Pare, core and halve tart apples ; cover with water and stew 
till tender, not mushy. Alake a syrup of sugar and orange juice, 
boil till about to candy, dip the apples in and lay on a flat plate 
till cold. Serve with whipped cream. 

DRIED .APPLE S.AUCE. 

Wash thoroughly and soak lo minutes in clean warm water : 
drain, cover with cold soft water, put back on the stove and stew 
from 2 to 4 hours. Do not stir while cooking, and 5 minutes be- 
fore taking up season with cinnamon, and sweeten to taste. Mash 
or not as you like. 

Dried peaches may be cooked in the same way, but do not 
mash. 

261 



262 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

FRIED APPLES. 

Take apples that are not very sour, wasli, core and slice them 
but do not peel. Put into a frvin^ jian with a large piece of 
butter, and about 1 cup sugar. Cover and try slowly, stirring 
occasionally until doue. They should be brown and gummy. 

STEWED APPLES. 

Pare and core, and quarter the apples ; put in a saucepan 
with i the quantity of sugar, cover with boiling water, and simmer 
till tender. Add a few slices of lemon when nearly done. Serve 
cold or hot. If kept over night, remove the lemon peel. 

APPLE PORCUPINE. 

Pare and core large apples; make a syrup of equal parts 
sugar and water, boil till rich, then add the apples and cook till 
soft. Skim. Drain and cool the apples, fill the core cavities with 
a suitable jelly, and stick the apples full of blanched and split 
almonds. Serve with cream or a cream sauce. 

BAKED BANAXAS. 

Peel and slice lengthwise G bananas. Put in a baking dish. 
Pour over them h tablespoon butter beaten up vvith 1 tablespoon 
sugar and a few drops vanilla. Bake 10 minutes, basting with 
their own s^•rup. 

FRIED BANANAS. 

Peel ripe bananas, slice lengthwise, sprinkle with sugar, and 
fry in butter. Serve hot. 

CRANBERRY SAUCE. 

Mrs. Bernard Mitchell. 

Boil 1 quart cranberries with 1 pint sugar and \ pint water 
for 20 minutes. Pour into the serving dish, and serve when cool. 

STEWED CRANBERRIES. 

Stem, and wash the berries, rejecting any spoiled ones. Put 
in a granite or porcelain lined kettle, pour in cold water till visible, 
and cook till soft, 10 or more minutes. Take off and mash with 
a potato masher, add pint for pint of sugar, and boil again jusi 
long enough to remove all the scum. Serve cold. 

Green Gooseberries are done the same way, but need not be 
mashed. 

Ripe Gooseberries are cooked like green ones, but require less 
sugar. 

FROSTED CURRANTS. 

Take fine, clean bunches of ripe currants, dip in frothed 
white of egg mixe^' with a little cold water: drain and roll in 
I'ulverized sugar. Dip several times, and lay on paper to dry. 
They make a pretty garnish for jellied desserts. 



FRUITS. 263 

FKUIT SALAD. XO. 1. 

Mrs. John E. Jones. 

Cut small 3 oranges, 3 bananas, 1 large apple and 1 cup Eng- 
lish walnuts. Put a layer of oranges at tho bottom of a glass dish, 
cover with sugar, then bananas and sugar, next apple and sugar, 
and lastl}' the nuts. Let stand from } to I hour in a cold place 
before serving. 

FRUIT SALAD, NO. '2. 

Prepare a pineapple for the table, cutting the slices small : 
slice oranges in small pieces, removing the seeds ; sprinkle each 
separately with sugar and let stand; cut Malaga grapes in half 
removing the seeds ; and lastly, slice several bananas fine, sprink- 
ling with sugar and lemon juice. Let all infuse in their liquors 
awhile ; then mix together, and pour over them a wine dressing. 
If wine is not used, take more lemon and sugar. Serve in glasses 
with a Maraschino cherry on top. 

Grape fruit is good with the above fruits, and its juice is 
very useful where wine is not employed. 

FRENCH PEACHES. 

Peel, halve and stone 12 peaches ; sprinkle with 2 tablespoons 
sugar and 2 tablespoons maraschino. Let stand till absorbed. Heap 
the centre of a glass dish with whipped, sweetened and flavored 
cream, and arrange the peaches around it. 

STEWED PRUNES. 

Wash thoroughly, cover with cold water, and soak several 
hours, or over night. In the morning put prunes and water in a 
granite saucepan and simmer till tender. .Sweeten to taste ; some 
prunes need no sugar. Take out the fruit, boil down the syrup a 
little and pour it over them. Serve cold. 

Any dried fruit may be cooked the same way. 

BAKED QUINCES, NO. 1. 

Wipe, core and pare the quinces; put in a baking dish, half 
fill with water, put a heaping tablespoon sugar on each, cover and 
cook till soft in a slow oven, basting frequently. They are good 
])aked in their skins, but either way takes a long time. 

BAKED QUINCES, NO. 2. 

Pare, quarter and core the quinces : stew in clear water till 
they can be pierced with a straw ; put into a baking dish with h 
cup sugar to every 4 quinces, pour over the water in which they 
were boiled, cover closely and steam in the oven 1 hour : take them 
out, put in a covered bowl to keep warm, and boil the syrup 20 
minutes; pour over the fruit, cover and set away to cool. Serve 
cold. 



264 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

STEWED RHUBARB. 

Wash the rhubarb and cut in inch lengths; do not peel if 
young; cover with pound for pound of sugar, let heat slowly till 
the sugar melts, then rapidly until it boils. Skim and take up 
without stirring. Serve cold. 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 



CANNED FRUIT5. 



Take fruit in good condition, clean and handle it carefully, 
use granulated sugar, have the jars clean, sterilized, whole, the 
tops and rubbers in the same condition, put the fruit in boiling 
hot and cover at once, and fruit will keep with much or little 
sugar. Keep in a cool, dark place. Canned vegetables are much 
more uncertain. If put in glass jars, it would be well to cover 
the glass. 

APPLES. 

Take bell flowers or equally good apples ; peel, core, and 
throw into cold water to keep from discoloring. Weigh the fruit 
and allow ^ as much sugar ; put the apples on the fire, pour over 
them boiling water, and let cook slowly till nearly done. Put the 
sugar on to boil with twice the quantity of water ; when boiling 
transfer the apples with a skimmer to the juice; add 1 lemon sliced 
to about 4 pounds of fruit ; boil until tender enough to pierce 
easily with a straw. Lift carefully with a silver spoon, and fill the 
heated jar standing in a pan of hot water on the stove. Do not 
stop the kettle from boiling. Fill the jar to the brim with the 
syrup, wipe clean, put the cover on instantly, and put aside out of 
a draft to cool. The next morning tighten the lids still more if 
possible. More apples may be boiled in the same water, but if any 
syrup is left it should be canned separately and fresh made. Do 
not put the lemon peel in the jars. 

Quinces may be added to the apples to mutual benefit, in the 
proportion of 1 to 4. . 

Apricots may be canned as apples, either with or without the 
stones. In the latter case, add a few kernels to the syrup. Omit 
the lemon. 

APPLES WITH PINEAPPLE. 

To 4 pounds of apples allow 1 good sized pineapple. Pare it. 
remove the eyes and grate it, adding it to the syrup preparing 
for the apples, with an extra allowance of sugar for it. Quarter 
the apples, and continue as for canned apples, omitting the lemon. 

BLACKBERRIES. 

Put the berries in a porcelain lined kettle, cover with \ the 
quantity of sugar, and let stand 1 hour or more. Put over the 
fire, and let come to the boil. Skim and can innnediatcly. 

265 



'266 O/,/) C OCX TRY Rr.ClPRS AND NEW. 

Blue1)crries. elderberries, lilack and red raspberries are canned 
like bkickberriea : ripe gooseberries and strawlierrics require twice 
as much sugar; otherwise they are canned like blackberries. If 
meant for table use all canned fruit should be sweetened to taste, 
as the berries themselves vary in different pickings. SauCe should 
have enough in the first jdace ; pies are improved by adding it 
fresh. 

CHERRIES. 

For table use do not stone ; for pies, stone the cherries, and in 
either case allow h pound sugar to 1 pound fruit, if sour cherries. 
If a sweet variety, use less sugar. Continue as with blackberries. 

CRANBERRIES. 

Wash and pick over the berries very carefully, stemming such 
as need it, and throwing out the soft ones. Fill the jars and pour 
in cold water till it overflows ; screw on the tops and let stand 24 
hours. Open the jars, pour off the water, fill again to overflowing 
with fresh water, and screw on the lids "for keeps." They may 
also be canned as stewed for the table. 

Green gooseberries and green currants, it is said, may be kept 
in the same way. 

CURRANTS. 

Can at any stage of ripeness or unripeness, if they have begun 
to be juicy. Stem the currants, and allow -4 their weight of sugar. 
Finish as blackberries. 

If currants are added to red raspberries it should be in the 
form of juice, using about i currants. Allow extra sugar for the 
juice, pint for pint. 

GRAPES. 

Take ripe grapes and snip off the stems close to the grapes 
without cutting the skins. Fill Mason jars with the fruit, and set 
on a board in the oven turning on the heat so as to heat through 
without breaking the skins. Make some grape juice as for jelly, 
have pint for pint of sugar hot, and when the juice comes to the 
boil, add the hot sugar, stir till dissolved only, boil a few moments 
till the scum can be removed. Take out the grapes a jar at a 
time, and fill the jar full with the juice, sealing at once. Plums 
may be canned whole the same way. 

GREEN GOOSEBERRIES. 

Stem and wash the berries. If for sauce, allow pint for pint 
of sugar. If for pies, \ the amount is better. Finish as with 
blackberries. 

PEACHES. 

Pare and stone the peaches and throw them into cold water. 
Put half the weight in sugar on the fire with an equal quantity of 
water, and stir till the sugar is dissolved. Put in the peaches, 
bring quickly to the boil, skim, and let simmer slowly till tender. 



c-iv.vED ria-rrs and vecf.tabi.fs. 267 

Lift very carefully into jars, fill to tlic I)rim witli tlic i)oilinK 
s\ nip, and fasten up. A few kfernels arc an improvement. 

Small and inferior peaches and clings should he pared only 
and not stoned. Some jars even of freestones should be done that 
way, as the ilavor is superior to that of the stoned fruit. 

P1NE.A.PPLE. 

Mi-s. .Xndrcw ShuUlewoiili. 

Peel the fruit, take out the core and eyes, slice or grate it and 
sprinkle over night with % pound sugar to 1 pound pineapple. Add 
1 cup water to each 4 pounds fruit, cook and .skim for 20 minutes, 
and can. 

PLUMS. 

Allow •] the weight of the plums in sugar; cover with it and 
let stand over night. For small plums conti^me as with black- 
berries, cocking slowly until lender. Prick large plums before 
sugaring down. 

QUINCES. 

Pare and quarter the quinces, removing the cores. Continue 
as with apples, but allow twice as much sugar and no lemon. Use 
the parings and the skins (not the cores) for jelly, and cover with 
the water the quinces were boiled in. 

RHUBARB. 

Take young and tender rhubarb, wash, peel and cut into small 
pieces. Pack in glass jars, fill to overflowing with fresh cold water, 
screw on the covers tight, and let stand over night. Drain off the 
water, till again to overflowing with fresh water, screw the lids on 
again, and put in a cool dark place. 

Rhubarb may also be canned as .stewed for the table. 

STRAWBERRIES. 

Stem the berries, and wash in a colander if sandy. Allow \ 
pound sugar to 1 pound berries, mix with the berries, and let stand 
1 hour. If there is not enough juice extracted, add a little water 
to the kettle, and boil 5 minutes. 



CANNED VEGETABLES. 



CORN, No. 1. 

Mrs. Frank Connell. 



Take 9 cups young corn cut from the cob, add 1 cup water, 1 
cup sugar, ^ or ii'cup salt. Boil H> minutes and seal in glass jars. 
When opening for use. drain ofT the liqui^r, and freshen the corn 
in lukewarm water for 3 or 4 hours. Then drain again and cook 
in milk, seasoning to taste. The sugaj" may be. omitted, if desired. 



268 OLD COrXTRV RECIPES AND XEIV. 

CORN. No. -2. 

Fill the jars with cut err, and then proceed as for String 
Beans, No. 3, but without adding water. Screw the lids on; at 
the end of 3 hours Irosen them up a moment, then screw up again 
and boil another hour. The cans must be just as full as they can 
hold and the lids not too tight at first. 

CORN AND TOMATOES. 

Take yoiuig green corn, cut from the cob and put in a kettle 
with twice the quantity of peeled and quartered tomatoes. Bring 
to the boil and cook till the tomatoes are soft, then can. Corn is 
certain to keep in this way. Less tomatoes wall answer. Some 
prefer to cook the corn on the cob first for 10 minutes. 

PEAS. 

Select tender young peas. Shell and pack closely in the jars, 
and continue as with String Beans, No. 2. 

PEPPERS WITH TOMATOES. 

Mrs. E. .S. Martin. 

Halve the peppers, remove the seeds, and soak in salt water 
1 hour. Add to a kettle of tomatoes, in any proportion liked, and 
can with them. 

PUMPKIN. 

Wash and cut in small squares without peeling ; fill the kettle, 
add a very little water to start it, cover closely and steam till 
tender; take off the cover and boil dry if it takes all day, stirring 
often. Put in jars or cans and seal immediately. If in glass, 
cover the jar to keep but the light. 

SPINACH. 

Pick over fresh spinach with more than usual care, and wash 
through several waters. Cook in boiling salted water about 20 
minutes or till done. Take out with a fork and pack in hot jars, 
filling them very full. Pour in boiling water till it overflows, and 
seal. 

Okra, beans of all kinds, peas, whole beets, whole tomatoes, 
succotash, etc., may all be canned in the same way, by preparing 
as for the table and boiling till tender, not soft. 

STRING BEANS, NO. 1. 

Mrs. W. J. Miller. 

Take yoimg green beans, string and break them, and cook 
about \ hour or until tender. Drain and fill Mason jars, putting 
first a layer of beans and then a layer of salt, finishing up with 
the salt. Seal immediately. When wanted for use soak until 
perfectly fresh, then cook as if they were fresh beans. They may 
also be packed in stone jars \vith a weight on top, and well tied up. 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 269 

strixg'beaxs. no. 2. 

Mrs. John Sweeney. 

String beans should be tender and young. String them and 
break into 1 inch lengths. Pack closely in tin cans or glass jars, 
add 1 teaspoon each of salt and sugar dissolved in water to each 
jar, fill the jars with cold water, and cover loosely. Fut ma 
kettle or boiler, pack hav around to keen the jars steady, hll with 
cold water to the neck of the jars, and boil 3 hours. Keep the 
water in the boiler at the same height by addmg bodnig water. 
Screw the lids on tight, and when the bottles are cold, screw 
again. If cans are used, take off the lid. wipe dry, return it 
immediately and seal before taking out of the kettle. 

Lima beans, peas and asparagus tips may be canned m tlic 
same way. 

STRIXG BEANS, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Blanche Eberts. 

Can according to String Beans. No. 2, l)Ut omit the salt and 
sugar. 

TOMATOES. 

Scald and peel the tomatoes, cut in (juarters, and boil until 
soft Ad'd an even tablespoon salt to a kettle. Stir and skim as 
often as necessary. Keep the tomatoes boiling while lillmg the 
jars. If wanted as whole as possible, do not quarter, and only 
heat them through. 

FRUIT JELLIES 



Make jellv on a clear dav. Take the fruit just npe or a 
little under ripe. Do not pick it just after a rain, and do not 
wash unless sandv. Large fruits should be wiped clean, the de- 
caved spots removed, then cut in quarters or less, placed in a 
preserving kettle, and barelv covered with cold water. Cover the 
kettle and let cook slowly till soft. Stir occasionally to keep from 
burning. The small fruits should be picked over carefullv, placed 
in a stone jar inside a large preserving kettle, the kettle hllcd witli 
hot water as high as practicable, and kept filled with boiling water 
as fast as it boils away. Stir once in a while to heat the fruit 

\\'hen soft turn the fruit into a coarse flannel bag (first dipped 
in hot water and wrung drv), tie the bag. and hang it up till the 
juice all drains out. Do not squeeze the light colored jellies, or 
thev will be cloudv. When the juice quits dripping, squeeze dry 
for" a second grade of jelly. Measure the juice, put it over the 
fire in a preserving kettle, and bring it to a boil. Allow pint tor 
pint of sugar, and put it in earthen dishes where it will heat. 
When the juice boils, skim it well, add the sugar, stirring just 
enough to dissolve it quicklv. and boil without stirring tdl done. 
Put a little in a cold saucer, and if it jellies on top it is done. 
Or dip a spoon into the boiling syrup, and if the last drops cling 
to the spoon, while the bowl remains covered, it is done. Begin 



270 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

testing ill 15 minutes unless it appears done earlier. The time 
depends somewhat upon the amount of water, and the thorough- 
ness of the previous cooking of the fruit. Skim well and take 
off the stove. 

Have the glasses ready, washed in hot water, and kept hot ; 
take the syrup out with a cup and liU them, pouring a little at 
a time in each. A silver teaspoon left in a glass while filling is 
a safeguard against cracking. Keep the glasses out of a draft 
until cold. The next day, if the jelly is set, cut white glazed 
paper to fit the inside of the glasses, dip in brandy and lay over 
the jelly. Or pour melted parafiin over it to the depth of \ an inch. 
Fasten on the tin tops and set away in a cool place. A trouble- 
some, but satisfactory top consists of white glazed paper, cut a 
little larger than the tops of the glasses, dipped in white of. egg, 
and pasted over with the hands. 

If the jelly is not firm in 24 hours, cover with paper or glass 
and set in the sun for several days. If still not jellied, boil it 
over. 

Some fruits make a "ropy" jellv. If some one of the reliable 
kinds is combined with an unreliable one, it will correct this. 
Grape, quince, apple and currant give no trouble. Apple, or rhubarb, 
makes a good base for the more expensive jellies, and also tones 
down too strong a flavor. 

APPLE JELLY. 

Wipe the apples, cut out spots, and cut into small pieces. Put 
in a preserving kettle, place over the fire, and pour over fresh 
water until nearly covered. If the apples are somewhat tasteless, 
cut part of a lemon in with the fruit. Proceed according to gen- 
eral instructions. 

BLACKBERRY JELLY. 

Make according to general instructions for small fruit. 
Squeeze. 

CHERRY JELLY. 

Make according to general instructions for small fruit. 

CRABAPPLE JELLY. 
Make precisely like apple jelly, but do not use lemon. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Put the berries in the kettle, with ] the amount of water, 
and boil until soft, about 10 minutes. Squeeze through a bag. 
Return the juice to the kettle, with an equal amount of sugar, and 
boil about 15 minutes or until it jellies. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Pick the leaves and spoiled fruit from the currants ; do not 
stem, and only wash the bunches that are sandy. Put in a stone 
jar, set that in a preserving kettle and proceed according to gen- 
eral instructions. Test the jelly in 5 minutes or less. 



CANNED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 271 

Currant shrub may I)c made from the mashed currants in the 
bag, after the juice lias quit dripping. Turn them into a stone 
jar, cover with cold water and let stand over night. Squeeze 
through a jelly bag, sweeten to taste, grate a little nutmeg over 
"it, and put on the ice till cjuite cold. 

GOOSE RKRRY JELLY. 

Put the berries in the preserving kettle with a little water, as 
with the large fruits. Finisli according to general directions. 

GRAPE JELLY. 

Pick the grapes from the hunches, and make according to 
general instructions for small fruit. 

GREEN GRAPE JELLY. 

Take the grapes just as thcv start to color. Cut from the 
bunches, wash if necessary, and put in a preserving kettle, pouring 
in water until it is seen. Continue according to general directions. 
The large fox grape makes the best jelly. 

PEACH JELLY. 

Pare, stone and cut up the ])cachcs. Put in a stone jar with 
a very little water, and a few of the kernels. Put the jar in a 
kettle and pour boiling water in the kettle. Continue according 
to general directions. A little lemon juice strained and added to 
the peach juice will help it to jelly. 

PEAR JELLY. 
]\lake precisely like apple jelly. 

PLUM JELLY. 

Wash the plums, put in a kettle with a little water, and cook 
till they go to pieces. Strain without squeezing. Finish accord- 
ing to general instructions. 

QUINCE JELLY. 

Wipe the quinces, cut out spots, quarter and remove the 
cores, then cut into smaller pieces. Put in the preserving kettle, 
cover with cold water, and continue according to general instruc- 
tions. Where apples are plentiful and quinces scarce, i apples may 
be used : and the parings from c|uince preserves and marmalade 
should be used in making jelly. Test the jelly after 15 mivutei 
boiling. 

RASPBERRY JELLY. 

Make according to general instructions for small fruit, h. cur- 
rants is a pleasant addition, a,nd ensures the jellying. 



272 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

RHUBARB JELLY. 

Cut the rhubarb into inch lengtlis, put in a preserving kettle 
with 1 small cup water to each 2 quarts of rhubarb ; simmer till 
soft, and squeeze through a jelly bag. Allow 1 pound sugar for 
each pint juice. Continue according to general directions. A 
few apples, or half blackberries may be added to the rhubarb. 

STRAWBERRY JELLY. 

Make according to general instructions for small fruit. 

TOMATO JELLY. 

Mrs. Nick Fuchs. 

Take yellow or bright red tomatoes : cut them up and boil 
until soft with a small piece of lemon. Turn into a cheesecloth 
bag and drain without squeezing. To 1 pint tomato juice take 
f pint sugar. Continue according to general instructions. 

TUTTI ERUTTT JELLY. 

Mis. Rorer. 

Take equal quantities of sour cherries, red raspberries, cur- 
rants and strawberries. Mix together, put in a jelly bag and 
squeeze hard. Wash the bag out well, return tlie juice to it, and 
let drip through without squeezing. Xow proceed according to 
general directions. 



PRESERVES, JAMS AND SYRUPS. 



APPLE BUTTER, No. L 

Mr.s. Ricliard Johnson. 

Wash, core and cut the apples small; cover with water and stew 
till tender; rub through a sieve, and flavor with oil of cinnamon 
and sugar to taste. Put back in tlic kettle and boil, stirring con- 
stantlv, till done. 

APPLE BUTTER. No. -2. 

Cook \ bushel good pippins thoroughly in 1 gallon sweet fresh 
cider ; rub throue-h a colander ; return to the fire, add 6 pounds 
white sugar, cook several hours stirring constantly. \ hour before 
it is done add ground cinnamon, cloves and allspice to taste. Cook 
till quite thick; when cod pour into stone jars, and cover tight. 

APPLE MARMALADE. 

Peel and slice fine 25 pcunds good cooking apples, add 1 quart 
cold water and the juice of a lemon, cover the kettle and cook slowly 
until soft. Press through a sieve into a bowl. Allow f pound 
granulated sugar to each pound marmalade, put in a fresh kettle, 
add 2 gills cold water, a little vanilla, and cook over a brisk fire 
for 10 minutes. Add marmalade, and boil for 12 minutes, con- 



CA.\'y^FJ) FRUITS AND VEGETABLES. 273 

stantly stirring, fill Mason jars while hot and seal. This will keep 
in stone jars if covered with brandy papers and tied up tight. 
Pear and quince marmalades are made in the same way. 

BLACK CURRANT JAM. 

Prepare rhubarb as for jelly, and take 3 pints rhubarb juice. 
Put it in a preserving kettle with 9 pounds sugar, stir till it boils 
then add 6 pounds black currants, and boil for 15 minutes or until 
the currants are tender. Seal in small jars. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 

Take fresh clingstones, and drop for a minute in boiling lye 
Take out with a perforated ladle, and drop into cold water. Rub 
with a rough towel to remove the skins, and drop into a prepared 
svrup of i pound sugar to each pound of fruit, and water enough 
to dissolve it. Let cook 15 minutes, take from the syrup, and pu 
on dishes to cool. Boil the syrup down to half and add an equal 
quantity of old peach brandy or French brandy. Seal or tie up 

•" ^^^" CHERRY JAM. 

Stone the cherries. Put them in a kettle over a good fire If 
sweet cherries allow I quart sugar lo 1 quart stcned fruit; a little 
fresh currant juice may also be added. If sour cherries, the sugar 
should be almost quart for quart. Continue as for gooseberry jam. 

CURRANT SYRUP. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Prepare the currant juice as for jelly. Put in a kettle with 
lialf the quantity of sugar, stir until dissolved, and boil brisk y 
just until it can be well skimmed. Have ready some thoroughly 
clean hot bottles, till, cork and seal. A little raspberry juice is an 

improvemen^.^_^ juices are prepared in a similar manner using less 
su-ar for the sweeter fruits. They make delicious drinks with the 
addition of a little water (and, in some cases, lemon) and ice. Are 
also useful for water ices and pudding sauces. Have the juice 
clear, bottle while very hot, and neither sweeten enough nor cook 
long 'enough to have it turn to jelly. 

GREEN GOOSEBERRY JA^I. 

Mrs. H. C. Begland. 

Stem and wash 1 pound green gooseberries, put in a kettle 
with 2 pounds sugar and 2 cups water. Boil 1 hour or until they 
become red. ^^^^ GOOSEBERRY JAM, No. 1. 

■\[rs. Francis. 
Boil 1 pound sugar with U cups water 10 minutes; add 1 pound 
ripe gooseberries and cook 1 hour. 



18 



274 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

RIPE GOOSEBERRY JAM, No. 2. 

Stem and wash ripe gocseberries, and measure them. Put in 
a preserving kettle and mash witli a potato masher. Add | sugar 
and boil 20 minutes, or more, stirring continuously. Skim, seal 
very hot in Mason jars, or, if boiled down sufificiently, pour in 
stone jars, cover with brandied paper and tie up securely. 

Blackberry, raspberry, strawberry, huckleberry and currant jams 
are made precisely as gooseberry jam, except that the amount of 
sugar varies, — less for huckleberries and blackberries, more for 
currants. Jams should always be sweetened according to taste, i 
currants to 3 red raspberries improves either jam, as 4 pineapple 
improves strawberry jam. 

GRAPE JAM. 

Stem and wash ripe Concord grapes. Pop them, put the pulps 
in a kettle and stew until the seeds will separate. Press through 
a colander to remove the seeds, return the pulp to the kettle with 
the skins, and for every quart of grape add f quart sugar. Finish 
as gooseberry jam. 

GRAPE JUICE, No. 1. 

Mrs. D. A. Williams. 

Mash 3 quarts fresh grapes, pour over them 2 quarts cold water, 
and 1 ounce tartaric acid. Let stand 24 hours, and strain. To 2 
pints of juice, add 1 pint sugar, put over the fire, let come just to 
the boil, bottle and seal while hot. 

GRAPE JUICE, No. 2. 

Mrs. Anna Abram. 

Take 4 quarts ripe grapes, picked from their stems and washed ; 
cover with water and cook very slowly until the grapes are soft. 
Drain through a double cheesecloth. Add 4 cups white sugar, and 
when dissolved let boil up once. Bottle and seal, and keep in a 
dark place. Serve with equal amount of syrup and water and a 
little lemon. 

ORANGE MARMALADE, No. 1. 

Mrs. Peter McQuade. 

Slice the oranges on a cabbage sheer. Weigh them, and to 
every pound of fruit, add 1\ pints water. Boil f hour. Let stand 
24 hours, weigh again and to every pound of fruit allow li pounds 
sugar, and juice of 2 lemons. Do not put sugar in till the fruit 
comes to a boil, and cook only until clear. Skim and put into 
pint glasses or jars. 

ORANGE MARMALADE, No. 2. 

Mrs. Wm. J. Davis. 

Put 6 large oranges and 4 lemons in a kettle, cover with cold 
water and boil slowly 2 hours. Take out the fruit and reduce the 
juice to 1 quart. Take out the seeds, and shred the fruit very fine 
(using the scissors) ; then return to the juice, and add 10 pounds 
granulated sugar, and boil slowly for 35 minutes. 



CANNED FRUITS AMD VEGETABLES. 275 

ORANGE MARMALADE, No. 3. 

Mrs. David Campbell. 

Wipe 4 pounds bitter oranges and 2 lemons thoroughly .and 
grate off all fhe yellow rind. Cut off all the white inner nndpu 
ft aside and cut the pulp up fine into a preserving kettle wUh 2 
au.rts vva?er let boil .V hour, stirring frequently; strain through 
a iellv bac^ without squeezing. Measure the liquor and put back 
fn 'the keule with 1 pint sugar to each | pint ; add the yellow grating, 
and let it boil hard for lU minutes. Skim and can. 

ORANGE SYRUP. 

Boil 1 pint orange juice with 1 pound sugar 10 minutes Skim, 
and bottle when cold. Use for drinks, pudding sauces ec 
Lemon syrup is made the same way, using 2 pints sugar. 

PEACH BUTTER. 

Mrs. T. Williamson. 
Pare and halve i bushel peaches; put in a large kettle and 
stir consta^^^lv to prev-ent sticking until perfectly smooth and thick 
Put T number of kernels in at first, and take them out before i 
fslmie Add 5 pounds sugar, when nearly done; put in jars, and 
cover tight or seal. A little cider boiled with it is good. 

PEACH MARMALADE. 

Take 25 pounds ripe good peaches, halve them, remove the 
stones, cut in two again, add 1 quart cold ^vater and 1 pomi^^^ 
granulated sugar, and cook over a b"^^ h re until soft stirring 
freauently. Remove, and press through a sieve into a bowl. Crack , 
he peacl stones, remove the kernels, and blanch them adding a 
umber of them to the marmalade about five minutes be ore it is 
done With this exception peach marmalade is continued accord- 
ing to the apple marmalade recipe. 

Apricot marmalade is made m the same way. 

PINEAPPLE HONEY. 

Boil 2 pints sugar and 2 pints water until thick .-is honey. 
When nearly done add 1 grated pineapple and stir till tlnck enough. 

PINEAPPLE SYRUP. 

Put 3 pounds of prepared pineapple in 1 cpiart water : boil till 
very soft. Mash and strain: to 1 pint juice take 1 pound sugar, 
boil to a syrup, bottle and cork tightly. 

PLUT^I BUTTER. 

Mrs. Thomas Fletcher. 

Cook 1 peck plums and h bushel sweet apples in separate 
kettles till soh. with just enough water to prevent scorclnng^ 
Rub through a colander, mix, and to each pound of fruit add i 
pomid sugar; cook till thick enough, put mto jars and seal. 



276 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

PLUM JAM. 

Allow 1 pound sugar to each pound large plums, and 1 cup 
water. Put the plums and water on the stove, and bring to the 
boiling point. Take out the plums with a skimmer, and remove 
the skins and seeds. Put these back in the kettle and boil 20 
minutes, then strain, put back in the kettle with the sugar, let 
boil 5 minutes, then add the plums and cook about 30 minutes, 
or until done. 

Small plums may be boiled down thick with or without the 
seeds, but retaining the skins. 

POT POURRI. 

Mrs. Tlitodore Oxholm. 

Put any left over fruit in a jar, add 1 or more sugar, and 
cover well with brandy. From day to day, other fruits may be 
added, always putting in the proper amount of sugar. When the 
jar is full, leave enough brandy to cover well, and seal. If these 
jars are started at the beginning of summer, many an odd saucer 
of berries will be saved, and the pot pourri is delicious, served 
with ice cream. 

PRESERVED CHERRIES. 

Wash, stem and stone tart cherries. Save the juice and put 
in a preserving kettle with the sugar, allowing pound for pound 
of fruit and sugar. When the sugar is dissolved put in the 
cherries, and boil until the juice is thick. Put in glasses or sealed 
jars. If the cherries are covered with the sugar for an hour or 
two, there will be more syrup. 

Currants are preserved in the same way. 

PRESERVED CRABAPPLES. 

Select ripe Siberian crabs and wash them. Put in a kettle, 
cover with boiling water, and simmer till the skin will peel easily; 
then drain, skin and take out the cores with a penknife. Weigh 
and allow pound for pound of sugar. Dissolve the sugar in half 
the quantity of water, boil and skim till clear. Add the crabs and 
boil slowly till tender, skimming and stirring as necessary. When 
done, put in small jars or tumblers, cover with the syrup, and let 
get cold. Cover as you would jelly. 

Or the fruit may be cored in the first place and not peeled at 
all. 

PRESERVED DAMSONS. 

Stem the fruit; put in stone jars in alternate layers with an 
equal weight of sugar. Cover the jars, place them in a large 
kettle of cold water, bring to the boil, and let simmer till tender. 
Put the damsons carefully into tumblers or jars, pour the juice 
into a preserving kettle, boil it briskly 1") minutes, strain through 
a jelly bag, and pour over the fruit. Seal the jars, and cover the 
glasses when cold as for jelly. 



CAXXED fKUITS AND J-EGETABLES. 277 

PRESERVED MULF'.ERRIES. 

JMrs. Roicr. 

Put 1 pound mulberries and 1 cup water in a preserving 
kettle, simmer till soft, then strain and squeeze out all the juice. 
Put this back in the kettle, add 4| pounds sugar, boil and skim 
till clear, add 4 pounds mull)erries, and simmer 15 minutes. Set 
aside over night. ]t the juice is not jellied in the morning, simmer 
again 15 minutes, breaking the berries as little as possible. Put 
into jars or tumblers, and fasten up when cold. 

PRESERVED PEACHES. 

Take ripe freestones. Pare, halve and stone. Weigh and allow 
pound for pound of sugar. Put in lavers in a bowl over night. 
In the morning turn into a preserving kettle, add .V dozen kernels 
to each pound of fruit, and bring to a boil. Skim and set back to 
simmer till tender. Put carefully into jars or tumblers, and pour 
the syrup over them. Seal or cover. 

Apricots and pears may be done in the same way. Pears re- 
quire a few sticks of cinnamon, or a few slices of lemon for 
flavoring. 

PRESERVED PIXEAPPLE. 

Peel the pineapples, cut out all the eyes and grate. .Allow 
equal weight of sugar and pineapple, and boil, stirring often, until 
it forms a rich jam. 

PRESERVED PLUMS. 

Treat the plums as you do crabapples : when skinned, weigh 
and allow pound for pound of suo^ar. Mix the sugar through 
them and let stand over night. In the morning pour off the juice 
into a kettle, bring to the boil, skim till clear, add the plums and 
simmer till clear, perhaps ;10 minutes. Put carefully into tumblers 
or small jars, boil the syrup down a little more, and pour over 
them. Cover or seal as required. 

PRESERVED QUINCES. 

Pare, core and slice or quarter the quinces. Put in the kettle, 
cover with boiling water, and simmer till tender. Take out and 
place on platters till all arc done. Use the same water for all. 
Put the parings and rough pieces into this water, cover, and sim- 
mer 1 hour; strain and measure, allowing pint for pint in sugar. 
Put back in the kettle with the sugar and stir till it is dissolved, 
and boil for 10 minutes, skimming thoroughlv. Now add the 
quinces and boil till clear, tender and red. Keep the cover on. 
When done, put into glasses or jars, boil the syrup till about to 
jelly, pour over the fruit, and let get cold before fastening up. 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. 

, Marion Plarl.ind. 

,^tem the berries, separating the tine ones from the bruised. 
Mash the latter and strain through a jelly bag. Allow 1 pound 



278 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

sugar to each pint of juice, put in the preserving kettle and boil 
juice and sugar for 15 minutes, or until showing signs of jellying. 
Weigh the perfect berries, allowing pound for pound, add the 
sugar to the syrup, then the fruit, let cook through, skim and 
put in jars. 

Raspberries and blackberries arc preserved in the same way. 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES AND PINEAPPLE. 

Mrs. L. G. Byrne. 

Prepare the fruit, allow '■. pineapple to 3 strawberries and cook 
according- to any favorite method of preserving strawberries. 

PRESERVED GREEN TOMATOES. 

Marion Harland. 

Take 8 pounds small green tomatoes, pierce with a fork ; add 
7 pounds sugar, the juice of 4 lemons, and 1 ounce mace and 
ginger mixed. Pleat all together slowly and boil till the fruit is 
clear. Take out with a skimmer and spread out to cool. Boil 
the syrup till thick. Put the fruit in jars, and cover with the hot 
syrup. 

Small, ripe, yellow tomatoes are preserved in the same way. 

PRESERVED V/ATERMELON, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Take the green rind of the melon and scrape the outside off. 
]\lake the thickness you wish. As you scrape, rinse in clear water 
and throw into a pan of water with a little alum in it. Put grape 
leaves at the bottom of the kettle, then put in the rind and alum 
water, cover with leaves and then with the cover. Cook over a 
slow fire for 3 or 4 hours. Make a strong ginger tea. Put the 
rinds in and let them be covered in it 3 days. (If the weather 
is warm, the tea should be changed.) Take pound for pound of 
sugar and rind, make a rich syrup with a little lemon peel in it 
and mace, put the rind in and boil slowly until you can put a 
straw through. Put in glass jars, pour the syrup over and seal. 

PRESERVED WATERMELON, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Samuel Whitmer. 

Cut enough of the white inside rind of watermelons into 
small pieces to make 1 gallon. Peel, core and cut small 4 or 5 
quinces. Put in a stone jar a layer of sugar, then a layer of 
melon and quinces till all are in ; set in a cool place for 24 hours : 
put in a preserving kettle and boil slowly for several hours till 
well preserved. 

QUINCE CHEESE. 

Boil quince marmalade until so thick that it will retain the 
form of a mould when cold. "Leather" is maryialade boiled still 
longer, put in a mould and cut in slices to eat with the fingers. 
Any fruit may be treated in this way, but much less sugar must 
b<? used than for marmalades, 



CANNED FRUITS AND I'liGETABLES. 279 

QUINCE HONEY. 

Mrs. Eli Rush. 

Peel and grate six large quinces, and 2 sour apples. Boil 5 
1 ounds granulated sugar in 4 pints water until the syrup strings. 
Add the fruit and boil until it jellies. Put in sealed jars. 

The honey may be made entirely of quinces. 

ROSE SYRUP. 
Mrs. Rorer. 

Stir 1 pound rose leaves into a kettle of freshly boiling water, 
take from the fire, cover, and let stand over night. Strain through 
a fine cloth, add 4 pounds granulated susrar, put in a doul)lc l)oiler, 
and boil until the sugar is thoroughly dissolved. Cool and bottle. 

Violet syrup is made the same way, taking the petals only. 



PICKLES, CATSUPS AND VINEGARS. 



BANDEN SAUCE. 

Mrs. Florrie Walters. 

Salt 3 gallons green tomatoes and 5 gallons cabbage all choppe 1 
ihic, and let stand over night. In the morning, drain, and put in 
a kettle with 4 pounds brown sugar, 1 ounce each of celery seed, 
mustard seed, ground cloves, white pepper, white ginger root and 
turmeric, and 2 gallons vinegar. Boil 1 hour, put in jars, and 
tie up tight or seal. 

BEAN PICKLES. 

Boil fresh young beans till tender in salted water; drain, and 
when cold, fill jars, sprinkle with cayenne, or add a pod or two, 
a tablespoon each mustard seed and horseradish chopped, and 
cover with cold vinegar. 

BEET PICKLES. 

Mrs. R. V. Dixon. 

Boil, peel and slice the beets or keep them whole. Put in \ 
.gallon jars, and sprinkle over tliem 1 teaspoon salt and 2 tea- 
spoons whole mixed spices to earli jar. Add 2 pounds light 
brown sugar to each gallon of vinegar, boil together and pour 
over the beets. Seal while hot. 

. CABBAGE PICKLE. 

Mrs. Jacob Newman. 

Chop Up the cabbage fine. Add i cup salt and 1 cup sugar 
to 1 cjuart vinegar, with a little water to weaken if very strong. 
Just bring to the boil and pour over the cabbage. Stir up well. 
When cold it will be ready to use. This will keep in a stone jar 
with a saucer over it if tied up well. Be sure the vinegar is over 
the top of the cabbage. 

CHILI SAUCE, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Bryan Leonard. 

Peel and chop 1 dozen ripe tomatoes, and 2 onions ; seed and 
chop 4 ripe peppers, add 2 to o tablespoons salt. 2 of sugar, 1 
teaspoon mixed spices, and 3 cups vinegar. Boil 1 hour. 

CHILI SAUCE, NO. 2. 

Mrs. John Keller, Jr. 

Scald, peel and chop fine 50 large ripe tomatoes ; add 15 
onions chopped; 4 red peppers chopped fine; 10 cups vinegar; 2 
cups granulated sugar ; 1 cup salt ; 2 teaspoons ground cinnamon ; 
1 teaspoon each cloves and ginger. Boil 2 hours, stirring enough 
to prevent scorching ; and seal while hot. 

280 



PICKLES, CATS ITS .IXD riXEGARS. 281 

CHILI SAUCE, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Anna Abram. 
18 ripe tomatoes, 4 onions and 1 green pepper all chopped fine; 
1 tablespoon salt, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups vinegar, and 1 teaspoon all 
kinds of spices. Boil 3 hours, bottle and seal. 

CHILI SAUCE, NO. 4. 

Miss Addie T. Losey. 
18 large ripe tomatoes, 8 red peppers, 1 large onion; chop all 
fine and add 4 cups vinegar, 4 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons 
salt, 1 tablespoon each of ginger, cloves, allspice, cmnamon and 
nutmeg. Boil 1 hour, bottle and seal. 

CHILI VINEGAR. 

Fill wide mouthed bottles with Chili peppers, fill up with hot 
vinegar, cork ; will be ready for use in 2 weeks. Seal, if put away 
indefinitely. Fill up the bottle as the vinegar is used. 

CHOW CHOW. NO. 1. 

Mrs. M. E. Kendall. 

Chop fine 1 peck green tomatoes, 6 green peppers, and 5 large 
onions. Sprinkle with 1 cup salt and let stand over night. Then 
drain and add 2 large heads of cabbage chopped fine, mix together 
with \ pound white mustard seed, sugar, salt and pepper to taste. 
Boil in vinegar until tender. Put in glass jars and seal. 

CHOW CHOW, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Cuthbert Stobbs. 
Take i gallon each of pieces of cauliflower and green tomatoes, 
small, round onions, little cucumbers or large ones cut in coarse 
pieces, and small string beans or broken larger ones. Put in a 
strong brine over night. The next day drain and scald with boil- 
ing water. When cooled off, drain again and scald again. Do 
this several times, if necessary, to heat the vegetables clear through. 
]\Iix well and put in jars. To each gallon of vinegar take 1 pound 
white sugar, 3 tablespoons mustard seed. 1 tablespoon each of cel- 
ery seed, cloves and allspice, bring to the boil all together, stir in 
one ^ pint bottle French mustard, and pour over the pickles. 
Cover and tie up well. 

CHOW CHOW\ NO. 3. 

Mrs. John .\. Smitli. 

Take 4 quarts green tomatoes, 4 medium heads of cabbage, 4 
bunches of celerv, 3 onions. 5 red, 3 green and 4 yellow peppers, 
^ pound mustard seed, and J ounce celery seed. Chop up the 
tomatoes, onions and cabbage and salt over night. Next morning 
squeeze and drain ; add the peppers and celery chopped, put all in 
the kettle, and cover with vinegar, adding LV pounds sugar, a 
tablespoon each of ground cloves, cinnamon and grated nutmeg, 
\ pound mustard seed and J ounce celery seed. Heat slowly to 
the boiling point, and put in jars. This makes 8 quarts, 



OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 
COLD CHILI SAUCE. 

Mrs. J. W. Gibson. 

Take 1 peck ripe tomatoes, scald and peel, chop up fine and 
drain. Add 1 tablespoon salt, 1 cup white mustard seed, 1 cup 
ground horseradish, 1 cup sugar and 1 pint vinegar. Mix all 
together without cooking and seal up in glass jars. 

COLD VINEGAR PICKLES, NO. L 

Mrs. Samuel Spencer. 

Put 10(1 medium sized cucumbers in a stone jar, and mix 
through tlicm 2 tablespoons mixed whole spices, and a small bunch 
of dill. Dissolve \ pound box Coleman's mustard in a little cold 
vinegar and stir it into the balance of 1 gallon vinegar with 1 
cup salt. When dissolved, pour over the pickles, cover and tie 
up tight. 

COLD VINEGAR PICKLES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Alex. Angle. 

Mix 1 gallon good cider vinegar with 1 cup ground mustard, 
2 cups sugar, and 1 cup salt. Pour into a 2 gallon jar, or half 
fill smaller jars. Pick fresh cucumbers of pickling size, wash and 
wipe dry, and put them into these jars a few at a time as they 
are gathered. When the jars are filled, prepare more vinegar, 
etc., and fill more jars. 

CORN SALAD, NO. 1. 

Mrs. John Kennedy. 

20 cups corn, 14 cups cabbage, 3 cups sugar. 2 tablespoons cel- 
ery seed, 1 tablespoon mustard, 2 quarts vinegar, salt and pepper 
to taste. 

Cut the corn from the cob. grind corn and cabbage, mix all 
ingredients, cook 30 minutes, and seal. 

CORN SALAD, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Baxter. 

Take 20 cups of green corn freshly cut from the cob, 14 cups 
of chopped cabbage, 3 cups granulated sugar, 2 tablespoons salt, 
2 of celery seed and 2 of mustard seed, 2 red peppers and 2 
onions finely chopped. Add 2 quarts of vinegar and boil 30 min- 
utes. After it has cooked awhile, add 1 cup flour mixed with a 
little of the cold vinegar. Put in jars and seal. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

Seed and grate 1 dozen large, ripe cucumbers. Make a bag 
of thin muslin, put in the cucumbers, and hang them up to drain 
over night. Chop 2 or 3 onions, 2 or 3 green peppers ; add 1 
tablespoon salt, 1 quart vinegar and the cucumbers. Bottle and 
seal. Very good fresh ; does not keep long. 



PICKLES, CATSUPS AXD J'lXEGARS. 283 

CUCUAIBER PICKLES, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Wm. Hoskins. 

Wash small cucumbers and let soak in salt water over night. 
Put in glass jars, sprinkle in sugar and mixed spices to taste, and 
pour over them enough boiling vinegar to cover. Seal while hot. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Rose Wilson. 

Put small cucumbers in salt water for 24 hours ; rinse and 
drain ; bring 1 quart vinegar to the boil with 1 pint sugar, put in 
the cucumbers and get them heated through: take them out, pack 
in jars, l)oil the vinegar again with mixed spices to suit the taste, 
and pour over the cucumbers. Tie up tight or seal. 

Slices of horseradish may be mixed with the cucumbers. 

FRENCH PICKLES. 

Mrs. Gus Winefordner. 

1 peck tomatoes, 15 large onions, 1 dozen cucumbers. 1 gallon 
vinegar, | dozen red peppers, ^ pound mustard, h pound sugar, 1 
ounce celery seed. 

Put the washed vegetables througli a meat grinder, sprinkle 
thickly with salt, let stand over night and drain several hours. 
Put everything on the stove together, let come to a brisk boil, 
bottle and seal. 

FRENCH SLAW. 

() heads cabbage, 2 bunches celery, 3 large onions, U dozen red, 
green and yellow peppers, 3 quarts vinegar, a few whole cloves 
and peppercorns, a few pieces white ginger cut small, 1 small cup 
grated horseradish, 5 cents worth white mustard seed, 5 cents 
worth black mustard seed, ^ pound white sugar. 

Cut the cabbage on a slaw cutter, chop the onions, peppers 
and celery fine, salt over night and squeeze dry next morning. 
Add the other ingredients and mix well together. Boil the vinegar 
and sugar and pour over the mixture; stir well and pack in jars. 
Cover tight or seal. 

GRAPE CATSUP. 

Mrs. Lawrence Walters. ' 

Pick ripe grapes from the stems. Put enough water over 
them to cook them soft. Rub through a sieve. To each gallon 
of grapes as picked, take 1 cup sugar, 1 cup vinegar, and a little 
pepper, salt and spices. Boil down until as thick as tomato cat- 
sup. Bottle and seal. Nice with cold meats. Pluni catsup is 
made the same way. 

GREEN TO^L'XTO PICKLE. 

Mrs. May Emerick. 

Chop fine 8 pounds grJen tomatoes : add 4 pounds brown sugar, 
and boil down 3 hours : add 1 quart cider vinegar, 1 teaspoon mace, 
cinnamon and cloves mixed: and boil about In minutes. Let cool 
and put in sealed or tightly covered jars to keep. 



284 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

HORSERADISH. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

To a coffee cup of grated horseradish, add 1 tablespoon salt, 
1 tablespoon white sugar, \h pints good vinegar. Bottle and seal, 
[f prepared in the fall, will keep all winter. 

MANGOES. 

Soak small melons in brine for 2 weeks, then soak in clear 
water over night, simmer 1 day in vinegar, slit, scrape the seeds 
out and fill with the following: Cut cabbage fine and salt over 
night; squeeze out the water and add 1 pint grated horseradish, 
I pint mustard seed (black and white"), 3 cloves of garlic, 1 pound 
brown sugar, \ pint olive oil, cloves, mace, ginger and allspice. 
Put 1 small pepper in each melon, fill with the mixture, sew them 
up, pour boiling vinegar and a little sugar over them, and tie up 
tight. Green peppers arc stuffed the same way. 

MEAT SAUCE. 

Mrs. Robert Williamson. 

6 dozen large cucumbers and \ peck onions peeled and sliced ; 
fi red peppers seeded and chopped ; } pound mustard seed, 1 ounce 
celery seed, 1 pound brown sugar, a little horseradish cut in small 
bits, and 1 gallon vinegar. Salt the vegetables over night ; drain 
in the morning. Mix the sugar with f box of dry mustard and 
both with a little vinegar till smooth. Put the rest of the vinegar 
on to boil; when hot add the other ingredients, let scald well and 
seal. 

MELON PICKLE. 

Mrs. Nick Fuchs. 

Take 'J small half ripe muskmelons; cut in half and scrape out 
the seeds and all the soft part. Then cut with the knife into 
small dice. Take half the quantity of chopped cabbage, and 6 
onions chopped fine; salt all over night. In the morning drain, 
and put in a kettle with vinegar enough to cover, sugar, cloves, 
cinnamon and pepper to taste. Cook about 1 hour, bottle and seal. 

MINT VINEGAR. 

¥\\\ a wide mouthed bottle with fresh mint leaves ; cover with 
good vinegar; after it has been corked tight for several weeks, 
pour off the vinegar into another bottle and keep well corked. 
Serve with lamb when fresh mint may not be had. 

MOCK OLIVES. 

Mrs. J. Williamson. 

Take green plums before they begin to ripen, pour over 
them scalding hot vinegar, with salt and mustard seed; let stand 
all night, drain, boil and pour over again, bottle and seal, 



PICKLES, CITS UPS AND VINEGARS. 285 

MUSHROOM CATSUP. 

Mrs. II. C. Begland. 

Take 2 quarts fresh niuslirooms, cut off the stalks, and wipe. 
Break them into a bowl, and sprinkle over them 3 ounces salt 
and some mixed spices. Soak for 3 days, occasionally stirrmg; 
then strain without squeezing; measure the liquid, to each pmt of 
liquid allow \ ounce black peppercorns and J drachm whole mace, 
r.oil until reduced about half. Strain into a pitcher, let stand J4 
hours, then fill small bottles, cork and seal. 

MUSTARD CABBAGE. 

Mrs. Frank Spurgeon. 

Sprinkle \ cup salt over U gallons chopped cabbage and half 
a dozen large" onions chopped line. Let stand over night. In the 
morning drain, put in a kettle with enough weak vinegar to cover, 
and let simmer J hour. Take enough strong vinegar to saturate 
this quantity, add U pounds brown sugar, heating it but not boil- 
ing. When scalding hot add \ pound of white mustard seed, \ 
pound of ground mustard, 2 ounces celery seed, 1 red pepper 
chopped fine, 1 teaspoon ground pepper, 1 ounce turmeric; stir 
well together, drain off the first weak vinegar and pour this mix- 
ture over the pickle. 

MUSTARD PICKLES, NO. L 

Miss Bessie Crooks. 

Cut up 1 quart large cucumbers, 1 quart green tomatoes and 
1 large cauliflower; add 1 quart small onions, 1 quart small cucum- 
bers, 1 quart string beans broken up, and 6 green peppers, seeded 
and cut up. Cover with salt water for 24 hours, then scald in 
the same water, and drain. :\Lake a paste as follows: 1 tablespoon 
Coleman's mustard, 1 tablespoon turmeric, 2 cups sugar and J 
cup flour, mixed slowlv with H pints vinegar and 1 pint bo>ling 
water to a smooth paste. Let boil until a little thick, add the 
pickles and let boil a few minutes. Pack away in closely covered 
jars. 

MUSTARD PICKLES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Carrie Sliuttleworth. 

Mix ^ pound each of mustard and flour in a bowl with 5 cents 
worth of' turmeric, 2 cups sugar and enough vinegar to moisten 
them. Boil the remainder of 1 gallon vinegar, and stir in the 
contents of the bowl. 

Prepare onions, cucumbers, cauliflower and green beans, break- 
ing up the cauliflower; sprinkle salt over them separately, and 
fet stand over night. In the morning, rinse and drain, pack 
in jars well mixed, and pour over them the mustard mixture 
when it comes to a boil. 



286 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

NASTURTIUM PICKLES. 

Pick the green seeds after the flowers have dried off. Put i i 
brine 2 days and in fresh water 1 ; pack in bottles, and cover with 
scalding vinegar, seasoned with mace and white peppercorns, and 
a very little sugar. Cork and use after 4 weeks. They make a 
good substitute for capers. 

ONION PICKLES. 

Peel 4 quarts small white onions, lay them in a brine of \\ 
cups salt to 2 quarts boiling water, and let stand for 2 days. 
Drain and repeat. Drain again, put this 3rd brine on to boil and 
boil the onions in it 5 minutes. Drain and put in bottles inter- 
spersing with bits of mace, white peppercorns and slices of red 
peppers. Fill to overflowing with vinegar scalded with sugar, 
allowing ^ cup sugar to 2 quarts vinegar. Cork and seal while 
hot. 

PEPPER CATSUP. 
Mrs. T. A. Campbell. 

Take 50 pods of large red peppers with the seeds. Add 1 
pint vinegar and boil till the pulp will mash through a sieve. Add 
a second pint vinegar, 2 spoons sugar, -cloves, mace, allspice, onions 
and salt. Put all in a kettle and boil to the proper consistency, 
then run through the sieve again, bottle and seal. 

PEPPER PICKLE. 

Mrs. Arthur Van Meter. 

Take a number of green peppers, half as many tomatoes 
and a quarter as many onions. Grind peppers and tomatoes, salt 
well and let stand several hours. Drain over night in a bag. 
Grind the onions, mix with them some ground mace and celery 
seed, cover all with vinegar and sweeten to taste. Cut one red 
pepper through it. 

RED CABBAGE PICKLE. 

Mrs. Wm. C. Connell. 

Chop the cabbage, salt lightly and drain over night. In the 
morning squeeze out the juice, and mix into the pickle 5 cents 
worth of cinnamon bark, 5 cents worth of yellow mustard seed, 
some horseradish cut fine, some chopped Chili peppers and some 
black peppercorns. Add sugar and cayenne pepper to vinegar to 
suit your taste, boil and skim. When cold, pour over the cabbage, 
and nut into a crock with a small saucer over the pickle to keep 
the vinegar over it. Tie up. . It will soon be ready for use. 
Green cabbage may be treated the same way. 

RED SAUCE. 

Mrs. Mar}' Slatzer. 

Scald and peel 30 ripe tomatoes, peel and chop S onions, 
chop 8 red peppers, add 5 tablespoons salt, 10 tablespoons sugar, 
and 9 cups vinegar. Boil 1 hour, bottle and seal. 



PICKLFS, CATS r PS AXD JIXHGARS. 287 

SALTED CUCUMBERS. 

Mrs. Rorer. 

Put good unbroken cucumbers in a cask or jar in alternate 
layers with coarse salt i inch thick; cover with cabbage or horse- 
radish leaves, then with a board and a weight, and pour 1 quart 
water over. Fresh layers of cucumbers and salt may be added, 
picking the fruit in the morning or evening. When nearly full, 
tuck a cloth tight over the top, cover with the board and weight, 
and they will keep in the brine 1 or 2 years. Take out as they 
are wanted to use, skimming the brine and washing cloth and 
board before replacing. To use the pickles, soak 3 days in, fresh 
water, changing it daily, put in a kettle with a lump of alum, cover 
with good vinegar, and bring to the boil; throw away this vinegar 
and finish pickling according to any recipe liked. 

Beans of any kind, corn or sliced green tomatoes may be 
salted down in this wav. 

PICCALILLI. 

Mrs. Richard Crowe. 

Take 1 peck green tomatoes, and 4 green peppers ; slice them 
and put in a dish in layers. Sprinkle over them 1 cup salt, and 
let remain over night. In the morning press dry through a sieve. 
Put in a porcelain kettle, cover with vinegar, add 1 cup sugar, and 
1 tablespoon each kind of spice in a muslin bag; stew slowly about 
1 hour, or until done. 

if onions are liked, add eight sliced. 

PICKLED PARSLEY. 

Wash heads of curly parsley in salt water, drain and shake 
dry. Put into jars of cold vinegar with 1 tablespoon chopped 
horseradish to each quart. Fasten up. 

SLICED CUCUMBER PICKLES, NO. 1. 

Mrs. Lewis Newman. 

Slice cucumbers as for the table; salt lightly and let stand 
over night. Drain and drop them in boiling vinegar long enough 
to be heated through, but not cooked. Put in jars, cover with 
the vinegar and seal. Are very like fresh cucumbers when opened, 
and this method disposes of the cucumbers too large to be used 
for ordinary pickling. 

SLICED CUCUMBER PICKLES, NO. 2. 

Mrs. Wm. Mitchell. 

Take 1 gallon medium sized cucumbers; put them in a jar 
and cover wi'th boilim; water in which a handful of salt has been 
dissolved ; the next 2 mornings drain and repeat : the 4th morning 
drain, cut into J inch slices and fill glass jars. Boil enough cider 
vinegar to cover the cucumbers, with a lumo of alum the .size 
of a walnut, a teacup horseradish root cut fine, and 1 teaspoon 
each of ground cinnamon, mustard and cloves (m a bag), lour 
over the cucumbers when scalding hot, cover and seal. 



OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEIV. 
SLICED TOMATO PICKLES. 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

1 peck green tomatoes sliced, 1 dozen onions sliced, sprinkled 
with salt and let stand until the following day. Then drain and 
put in a kettle in layers with 1 box prepared mustard, \\ ounces 
black pepper (whole), 1 ounce cloves, 1 ounce white mustard 
seed, and 1 ounce allspice. Cover completely with vinegar, and 
let boil about ^ hour. 

SPICED APPLES. 

Mrs. Sarah Hinzy. 

Boil 2 cups vinegar, 1 cup water and 3 cups sugar with a 
little whole allspice and cloves and cinnamon bark to a thin syrup : 
skim well ; add tart aoples, peeled, halved and cored, or whole and 
cored, and boil till you can pierce easily with a fork. Put in jars 
and cover with the syrup. Take as many apples as the amount of 
syrup will probably cover well. 

Peaches, and other large fruit may be spiced in the same way. 

SPICED CHERRIES. 

Mrs. Elmer Rush. 

Put 1 pint vinegar on to boil with 4 pounds sugar, 1 ounce 
cinnamon bark, \ ounce whole cloves ; when boiling skim and add 
9 pounds cherries. Cook till the skin breaks ; take them out and 
place in jars; boil the syrup down till thick and pour over the 
cherries. Cover and tie up or seal. 

SPICED GRAPES. 

Miss Fannie Devol. 

Seed 11 pounds of ripe grapes as for jam. Place the pulp 
and skins in a porcelain kettle with 1 quart of cider vinegar, 6 
pounds of sugar, 2 tablespoons of ground cinnamon, and one 
each of cloves and allspice. Boil \h hours, stirring often to pre- 
vent burning. 

SPICED PRUNES. 

Miss Ona Phillips. 

Soak the prunes over night. In the morning let simmer in 
the same water 2 hours, then drain. Boil the prune juice with \ 
pound sugar, h cup vinegar, \ tablespoon cloves, the same of 
cinnamon and a pinch of ginger to 1 pound prunes. After 10 
minutes, add the prunes, and cook slowly 5 minutes. 

SPICED QUINCES. 

Mrs. Dora Shelhamer. 

Put 2 cups vinegar, 1 cup water and 3 cups sugar on to boil ; 
add whole allspice and cloves, fuid pieces of cinnamon bark. Boil 
to a thin syrup, skim well, add the quinces pared, halved and 
cored, boil until they can be pierced with a fork, put in jars, boil 
the syrup down thick and pour over them. 

Peaches and other fruit may be done the same wav. 



PICKLES, CATSUPS AND VINEGARS. 289 

SWEET PICKLED PEACHES. 

Mrs. E. S. Martin. 

Pare 7 pounds peaches, but do not stone. Put 4 pounds sugar 
on to boil with 1 pint vinegar ; mix 1 teaspoon ground cloves, 2 
teaspoons each ground allspice and cinnamon, and ^ teaspoon 
ground mace, and tie them up in 4 little muslin bags. Put these 
into the kettle and also i ounce ginger root. When the syrup is 
liot, add the peaches, bring all to the boiling point and turn care- 
fully into a stone jar. Stand in a cool place over night. For 9 
consecutive days, pour off the syrup, bring it to the boil, and 
scald the peaches again. The last time, boil the liquor dovvrn 
somewhat, add the fruit to it, bring the whole to a boil, and put 
in sealed or stone jars. They will keep for years, and the syrup 
is always good for sauces, yankee or hot cakes. 

Any large fruit may be spiced in the same way. 

SWEET PICKLED WATERMELON. 

2 pounds watermelon or muskmelon rinds, boiled in pure water 
until tender. Drain well. Make a syrup of 1 quart vinegar, 2 
pounds sugar, .} ounce mace, 1 ounce cinnamon, and some roots 
of ginger, boiled until thick, and pour over the melons boiling hot. 
Drain off this syrup 3 days in succession, boiling it and pouring 
it over the pickle as before. Then tie up in jars. 

TARRAGOX VINEG.'VR. 

Put into a jar 1 cup fresh tarragon leaves, cover with good 
cider vinegar; cork and let stand several weeks, shaking occa- 
sionally. Squeeze through a jelly bag, bottle, cork and seal. 

TOMATO C.XTSUP, XO. 1. 

Mrs. V. r. Voung. 

\\'ash the tomatoes and quarter them : boil about 2 hours and 
press through a sieve. Add \ cup salt, 1 tablespoon each of ground 
cinnamon, mustard and black pepper ; 1 teaspoon each of ground 
cloves and cayenne pepper : 1 small onion chopped fine ; and 3 
pints cider vinegar. Roil all together, and just before bottling add 
.] cup grated horseradish. 

TOMATO CATSUP, NO. 2. 

Mrs. T. A. Reynolds. 

\ bushel peeled ripe tomatoes. 1 quart vinegar, 1 cup salt, 3 
boxes ground mustard, \ pound whole black peppers. V pound all- 
spice, \ ounce cayenne pepper, 2 ounces cloves, 6 onions, 2 poimds 
brown sugar, 1 handful peachtree leaves. 20 cloves garlic. Cook 
all together but the cayenne 4 hours. Strain, add the cayenne and 
cook 20 minutes. Bottle and seal. 

19 



290 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

TOMATO CATSUP, NO. 3. 

Mrs. Charles Evans. 

Cut up \ peck ripe tomatoes, cook until soft, and rub through a 
sieve. Put back on the stove, add 2 tablespoons pepper, \ table- 
spoon ground mustard, \ tablespoon each allspice and cloves, 1 
tablespoon salt, and 1 pint vinegar. Cook till quite thick. 

TOMATO PICKLES. 

Mrs. H. B. Denman. 

Take 1 peck yellow tomatoes or small round red ones, prick 
each with a fork, put in a jar in layers with salt between. Let 
remain 8 days. Drain off. Add 12 large white onions sliced, 2 
ounces each of ground cloves and allspice, 1 ounce pepper. 1 bottle 
good mustard. Put a layer of spices and onions between 2 
layers of tomatoes. Scald the vinegar and pour over cold. They 
are fit for use in 10 days. 

TOMATO SOY, NO. 1. 

Mrs. G. O. McDonald. 

4 quarts ripe tomatoes peeled 'and chopped, 1 cup red peppers 
chopped, 1 cup onions peeled and chopped ; i cup each sugar and 
salt; li pints vinegar, L} teaspoons cloves and cinnamon, 1 tea- 
spoon ginger, and 1 grated nutmeg. Boil 3 hours, strain or not, 
bottle and seal hot. 

TOMATO SOY, NO. 2. 

]Mrs. Charles Essex. 

1 peck ripe tomatoes and 8 large onions chopped fine. Add 1 
cup sugar, 1 cup vinegar, a little salt, a little red pepper, 1 table- 
spoon mixed spices tied in a muslin bag. Boil until as thick as 
you want it. 

WALNUT CATSUP. 

Take green walnuts earl\- in August or before the shell is 
formed. Grind or pound them, and squeeze the juice through a 
coarse cloth. To every gallon of juice add 1 pound anchovies, 1 
pound salt, 4 ounces cayenne pepper, 2 ounces ground black pepper, 
1 ounce each ginger, cloves and mace, and 1 horseradish root. 
Boil till reduced to i the quantity. Strain and when cold, bott'e. 
Use in 3 months. 



HOME MADE WINES AND LIQUORS. 



RI.ACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

To 2 quarts blackberry juice, add \ ounce cacb of ground nut- 
meg, cinnamon and allspice, and | ounce cloves. Boil and skim 
until clear. While hot, add 1 pint French brand}-, and sweeten 
to taste with white sugar. 

BLACKRERRV WIXE. 

l\Irs. Robert Raniage. 

Pour 1 quart boiling water over 1 gallon fresh blackberries, 
and let stand 3 or 4 days till thcv foam up. Squeeze well, and 
add 3 pounds sugar to the juice. Let stand in a covered jar until 
it has quit fermenting, skimming off every little while. Whc i 
ready, strain 3 or 4 times tb.rough a thin cloth without squeezing, 
bottle and cork. Black currants improve this wine in the propor- 
tion of 1 quart to a gallon of lierrics. 

CHERRY BOUNCE. 

Mrs. John Byrne. 

Take nine quarts picked and washed cherries, put in a ke^: 
or jug, add 9 cups granulated sugar and a quart of brandy. Shake 
up well and let stand 2 or 3 hours ; then add 2 quarts water ; let 
this stand a day and add another quart of brandv and 2 quarts 
water: and so on until you have used 2 gallons of brandy. Let 
stand about a month, and then put in a few cloves and cinnamoii 
sticks. It will then be readv to use in about 10 davs. 



CHERRY WINE^ 

1 quart strained juice, 2 of water, 3 pounds sugar. Finish like 
currant wine, 

CRANBERRY WINE. 

Marion Harland. 

Mash ripe berries, put in a stone jar and add half the quan.tit 
of cold water. Stir well and let stand 2 days. Strain throueb a 
flpunel jelly bag. Mash a second supply of berries, and cover wit'^ 
the liquor. Treat it as before. Then take 1 pound sugar to 3 
quarts liquor, and boil 5 minute= T of H ferment in cloth covered 
jars; rack off and bottle. Good for skin disorders. 

291 



292 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

CURRANT WIN'E. 

"The Housekeeper's Friend." 

Mash ripe currants, strain through a jelly bag, put into a tub 
and let stand 3 days, skimming it every day. To each quart of 
juice add 2 pounds sugar and enough water to make a gallon. 
Fill a cask, leave out the bung until fermentation ceases which is 
usually from 12 to 15 days. Fill up the cask daily with water. 
When it ceases to ferment, rack off the wine carefully by a 
syphon, cleanse the cask thoroughly with boiling water, return the 
wine to it, stop the hole tight and let stand 4 or 5 months. 

ELDERBERRY WINE. 

]Marioii Harland. 

Pour 4 quarts boiling water over 8 quarts elderberries; let 
stand 24 hours, stirring now and then. Squeeze the juice through 
a jelly bag. To 4 quarts juice, add 3 pounds sugar, 1 ounce pow- 
dered cinnamon, and \ ounce powdered cloves. Boil 5 minutes 
and set away to ferment in a stone jar with a cloth thrown over 
it. When it is done fermenting, rack it off carefully not to dis- 
turb the lees. Bottle and cork tight. 

ELDER BLOSSOM WINE. 

Miss Junkermann. 

Clip the blossoms from the stems ; over 1 quart pour 1 gallon 
boiling water. Let stand 24 hours. Strain and add 3 pounds 
sugar, h cake yeast, and 1 sliced lemon. Let stand a few weeks 
till fermentation ceases, then <skim and bottle. 

GINGER BEER. 

Pour 4 gallons boiling water on 4 pounds good brown sugar, 
or 2 quarts N. O. molasses. 1^ ounces cream tartar, and \\ ounces 
race ginger cracked a little. When cool add 1 pint good yeast. 
Let stand 24 hours, then skim and strain gently through a cloth, 
bottle and cork tight. Will be fit for use in 2 or 3 days. Don't 
fill the bottles too full. Keep in a cool place. 

RIPE gOOSEBERRY WINE. 

Mrs. Jonah Webb. 

Pick the gooseberries clean of leaves and sticks, put into a 
jar, bruise well and let stand uncovered 24 hours. Squeeze the 
juice through a jelly bag. Turn the contents of the bag into a 
second jar, pour over it i the quantity of boiling water, and stir 
\A'cll \ hour. Let stand 12 hours, squeeze, and add the juice to 
the first. Stir in well 2\ pounds sugar to each gallon of the 
liquor, and let stand to ferment. When it has done fermenting, 
draw off and add f pint brandy to each gallon. Let stand to 
settle 4 or 5 weeks, then draw off carefully into a cask that will 
just hold it: keep in a cool cellar 12 months or more, and bottle 
on a clear cold day. Will be fine in 2 years. 



HOMF. MADIl iri\'h:S ./A'/) LIQUORS. 293 

GRAPE WINE. 

Mrs. M. M. Clothier. 

Put 2o pounds ripe fresh grapes in a jar, pour (ner them G 
quarts boiling water; wh.en cool enough squeeze well with the 
hands, cover the jar with a cloth, and let stand 3 days, then 
squeeze the juice through a jelly hag, and stir in 10 pounds white 
sugar. After it has stood for a week, skim, strain and bottle, 
corking loosely. When through fermenting, strain and bottle 
again, corking tight and sealing. Lay the bottles on their sides in 
a cool cellar. 

HVDROMEL. 

Mix 2^ pounds honey w^ith 1 gallon warm water, until thor- 
oughly incorporated. Then pour into a cask ; when fermented and 
clear, draw off, bottle and cork tightly. 

ORGEAT. 

Blanch ^ pound each of sweet and bitter almonds, and bruise 
them to a paste in a mortar with 1 tablespoon orange flower 
water, 3 pints rosewater, -J pint cold boiled water ; when thor- 
oughly blended, strain through a coarse sieve, add l^ pints clari- 
fied sugar, put in a saucepan, let come to a boil, bottle and seal. 
A tablespoon to a tumbler of cold water makes a delightful drink. 

PEACH CORDIAL. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Wipe the fuzz off clean. Make a rich syrup, boil 3 minutes, 
put the peaches in and boil until they are a little soft. Lay them 
separately on a platter to cool, then put them in the jar which 
contains the spirits — peach brandy preferred. Add a few peach 
kernels. 

QUIXCE CORDIAL. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Wipe and grate the quinces. To 1 gallon add 1 pint water 
and let stand 12 hours. Strain through a flannel bag, and put on 
to boil adding sugar and cloves to taste. Skim until clear. Cool 
and to a quart of juice put 1 pint spirits, and a few peach kernels. 
Cork and let stand in the sun a week. 



RASPBERRY CORDIAL. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Mash the raspberries and strain through a flannel bag. Sweeten 
the juice and let boil 10 or 15 minutes, skimming. Let get quite 
cold. Then add half the quantity in spirits or brandy. Cherry 
cordial is made the same way. 



294 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

RASPBERRY VINEGAR. 

Fill a crock with raspberries, either red or black, pour over 
half as much vinegar, let stand 2 days, and drain through a jelly 
bag without squeezing. Put the same quantity in a second crock, 
pour this juice over and repeat process. Use fresh berries a third 
time and wlien juice is well drained, measure pint for pint in sugar, 
put over the lire in a preserving kettle, bring to the boil and then 
let simmer wliile it is being well skimmed. Put in clean, hot 
bottles, cork tight and seal the corks. 

Blackberry and strawberry vinegars are made in the same way. 

RHUBARB WINE. 

Bruise down 3i- pounds rhubarb, cover it with 3 pints water 
that has been freshly boiled and cooled ; let soak for a week, 
stirring occasionally. Strain through a jelly bag and measure the 
juice. To 1 gallon allow 2 pounds powdered sugar. Bottle loosely 
when the sugar is dissolved, and if it does not ferment any more, 
cork tightly. 



GRUELS AND DRINKS FOR INVALIDS. 



ALBUMEXIZED .MILK. 

Pour h cup uiilk over the wliite of au egg, cover the vessel 
and shake well. 

APPLE WATER. 

Roast 2 tart apples until soft; put in a pitcher, pour over them 
1 pint cold water and let stand in a cool place 1 hour. A good 
drink in fevers. 

ARROWROOT GRUEL. 

Pour l_ pint l)oiling water over 1 tablespoon arrowroot; add i^ 
pint sweet milk. Add a little white sugar to taste. 

BARLEY COFFEE. 

Roast barley as coffee is roasted. Add 2 tablespoons to 1 
quart boiling water, and boil ') minutes. Add a little sugar. 

BARLEY WATER. 

Add 2 ounces of pearl barley to 2 quarts boiling water: boil 
down to i and strain. A little lemon juice and sugar will make 
it more palatable. 

BEEF TEA, NO. L 

Mrs. Thomas Ewing. 

Cut into small pieces 1 pound lean beef, cover with 1 quart 
cold water, and when it comes to the boil let simmer 20 minutes. 
Let it get cold, skim, strain, and add a little salt and pepper. 

BEEF TEA, NO. 2. 

l-'ill a bottle with lean beef cut in small pieces, cork loosely 
and iiut in a kettle of cold water kee])ing it upright by tying to 
tlie handle of the kettle. Boil for 2 hours, then press out the 
liquid and skim it. Season with salt and pepper, and wine if 
ordered for the patient. 

BOILED FLOUR. 

Dip a linen cloth in cold water and heavily dredge with flour 
to make a crust ; put in 1 pound flour and tie up tightly : boil till 
it becomes a hard dry mass. Grated and prepared as arrowroot 
gruel it is an excellent substitute for it. 

295 



296 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

BUTTERMILK PAP. 

Boil 1 quart fresh buttermilk; beat 1 egg, a pincli of salt and 
a heaping tablespoon flour together, and pour into the boiling 
milk; boil and stir hard for a few minutes; and serve hot with 
sugar or syrup. 

COCOA CORDIAL. 

"Boston Cooking School." 

Mix 1 teaspoon each cocoa and sugar, add enough hot water 
to form a paste, then the rest of ^ cup ; boil 1 minute and add 
1^ tablespoons port wine. Useful in cases of chill or exhaustion. 

CRACKER GRUEL. 

Roll and sift a fresh cracker; scald 1 cup milk, add the cracker 
with a pinch of salt; boil 5 minutes. 

FLAXSEED LEMONADE. 

Take 1 tablespoon whole flaxseed, wash it, put in a saucepan 
and pour over it 1 pint boiling water; let cook 2 hours just short 
of boiling. Strain, sweeten and add lemon juice to taste. 

GRAPE JUICE. 

For all fruit juices, see "Canned Fruit." Dilute with water to 
taste, and add a little lemon juice. 

HOT APPLE TODDY. 

Put in a large glass half a medium well-baked apple, h table- 
spoon sugar, 1 wine glass old apple jack, dissolve well with a 
little hot water, fill up with hot water, mix well, grate a little nut- 
meg on top and serve with a spoon. 

KOUMISS. 

. "lii-iston Cooking School." 

Heat 1 quart milk till lukewarm ; add 1^ tablespoons sugar 
and h of an yeast cake dissolved in 1 tablespoon warm water. Fill 
beer bottles within 1|- inches of the top, cork and invert. (The 
corks must be firmly tied on.) Let stand for 6 hours at a temper- 
ature of 80 F. Chill, and serve the following day. 

LIME WATER. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

To a pint bottle of rainwater put 1 gill good freshly slacked 
lime. Let it stand quietly well corked, jiouring off gently when 
wanted. Is good for digestion. 1 tablespoon for a child of two. 
1 gill or more for an adult. 



GRUELS AND DRINKS l-'OR INl'AUDS. 297 

MILK PORRIDGE. 

Put 1 pint milk and 1 jjint water over a brisk fire; mix 2 
tablespoons wiieat Hour, corn tULal, or oatmeal with cold water 
to form a thin paste. When tlie milk boils, stir in the paste very 
carefully. Boil at least h, hour. 

MILK PUNCH. 

Mix \ cup milk witli 1 tablespoon liquor, sugar and grated 
nutmeg to taste. Cover the vessel and shake well. 

AIILK TOAST. 

Cut off the crusts of stale bread and slice h inch thick. Toast 
over the hre till brown and not scorched. Butter and place in a 
deep dish. Sprinkle with salt. Bring some milk to the boil, add 
butter and salt, and pour over the toast. Serve immediately. Do 
not make much at a time, as soaking spoils it. 

MULLED WINE. 

"Invalid Cooking." 

Put h cup water in a saucepan with a very small piece of 
cinnamon and 1 clove. Boil for 10 minutes; then add ^ cup wine 
and let the liquid just reach the boiling point. Meanwhile beat 
together very hard 1 egg and 1 tablespoon white sugar ; pour the 
wine over it slowdy, stirring constantly. Serve hot. 

Beer, ale and porter are excellent mulled in the same way. 

MUTTON BROTH. 

Cut 1 pound lean mutton in small pieces, pour over it a pint 
and a half of boilin.tf water and let simmer \ hour. After strain- 
ing, a little cold boiled rice may be added or some barley water. 

OATMEAL BLANX MANGE. 

Stir 2 heaping teaspoons fine oatmeal in a little cold water, 
and then stir into a quart of boiling milk: boil a few minutes, 
flavor, and turn into a mould; when cold, serve with cream and 
sugar. 

OATMEAL W.\TER. 

Put 4 tablespoons fine oatmeal in a small jug and fdl with cold 
water; shake well and allow to settle. This is a safe drink during 
exposure to the sun in summer. 

PANADA. 

Take Bent's water crackers, split, sprinkle with sugar, salt 
and nutmeg, cover with boiling water, and set in a warm place, 
covered, for an hour or more until quite soft. Serve in the same 
bowl. Other crackers will do. 

Bread panada is made by tirst toasting the bread. The sugar 
and nutmeg may be omitted. 



298 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

RICE GRUEL. 

Add 1 lieaping tablespoon of ground rice to 1 quart water; 
boil gently for 20 minutes. When nearly done add 1 teaspoon 
ground cinnamon. Strain and sweeten slightly. Wine is some- 
times added. 

SAGE TEA. 

Pour 1 quart of boiling water over h ounce dried sage. Let 
infuse for \ hour and strain. /\dd sugar and lemon juice if de- 
sired. 

SAGO GRUEL. 

Pour 1 pint water over 2 tablespoons sago ; boil gently until 
it thickens, stirring frequently. Wine, sugar and nutmeg may be 
added as desired. 

SASSAFRAS TEA. 

Mrs. Samuel VVhitmer. 

Get red sassafras root in March ; wash and scrape, and peel 
off the bark. Dry well Put a small handful in a fresh teapot, 
pour 6 cups boiling water over it, and steep for 10 minutes. Other 
herb teas are made in the same way. 

STERILIZED MILK. 

Put the fresh milk in bottles, cork loosely, stand in a kettle 
of cold water, the water three fourths their height, bring the 
water just below the boiling point and keep it there 10 minutes. 

TAPIOCA JELLY. 

Pour 1 pint water over 2 tablespoons tapioca ; boil gently for 
an hour until it looks like jelly. Add sugar, wine, nutmeg, or 
lemon juice according to circumstances. 

TPIICKEKED MILK. 

Mix a tablespoon flour and a pinch of salt smootli with a 
little cold milk. Pour over it a ciuart of boiling milk and when 
it is thoroughly mixed put all back into the saucepan and boil up 
once, being careful not to burn, and stirring all the time to pre- 
vent lumping. Serve with slices of dry toast. 

TOAST WATER. 

Cut thin slices of bread and toast brown in the oven. Break 
into small pieces; pour over them an equal quantity of boiling 
water, and let infuse 1 hour. Strain through a thin cloth and add 
a pinch of salt. Serve hot or cold. 



GRUELS AND DRINKS FOR INVALIDS. . 299 

WATER GRUEL. 

Pour 1 c|uart boiling water over 2 tablespoons oat or corn 
meal. Boil 1") minutes and strain, adding salt and sugar also if 
desired. 

WINE W^HEY. 

Scald 1 cup milk, and add 1 cup wine, sherry or port. Let 
stand 5 minutes, or until tlie curd and whey shall separate. Strain 
and serve hot. 



ODDS AND ENDS. 



CANDIED LEMON PEEL. 

Cut the fruit into quarters lengthwise, take out the pulp and 
put the peels into strong salt and water for 2 days ; take out and 
soak 1 hour in cold water, put into a preserving kettle with fresh 
cold water, and boil till the peels are tender, then put them on a 
sieve to drain. Make a syrup of 1 quart of the water in which 
they were boiled and 1 pound sugar, and simmer the peels in it 
i hour or until clear; pour into a bowl to stand till the next day. 
Make as much syrup as will cover them in equal quantities of 
sugar and water, boil this till it threads, put in the peel, stir and 
boil I- hour ; take out, drain on a sieve, and as they dry put on 
a dish to finish drying in a cold oven or other warm place. Store 
in tin boxes for use in mincemeat, plum puddings, etc. Do orange 
and citron the same way. 

CARAMEL. 

Put white sugar in a saucepan, let it melt, and stir it until it 
becomes quite brown and begins to smoke. Add an equal quantity 
of boiling water, and simmer until a thick syrup. Bottle, and use 
for coloring soups, sauces, etc. 

CARMINE. 

Carmine is made by mixing 1 ounce of No. 40 carmine (ob- 
tained from the druggist) with 3 ounces boiling water and 1 ounce 
ammonia. Bottled and corked it will keep indefinitely. It is used 
for coloring ice creams, jellies, candies, etc. A few drops are 
sufficient. 

DRIED BEANS. 

Boil wax beans in water until tender ; drain, place on a 
stretcher and dry like corn. Li^se the same water to cook each 
batch of beans in. 

DRIED CITRON. 

Pare and quarter and boil till clear and tender; drain, put into 
a ricli syrup and boil till sweetened through. Take out, put on 
dishes, sprinkle with sugar, put in a cold oven and dry slowly, 
turning till dry. Pack in tin boxes with sugar between the layers. 

DRIED CORN. 

Husk and silk the corn carefully, and use only fresh green 
ears. Cut the grains from the coli with a sharp knife not too 
close, and scrape witli the ijack of tlie knife. Put in ):)rcadpans 

300 



ODDS AND ENDS. 301 

in a hut oven, and cook stirring at times till the milk dries up. 
Xow scatter the corn on a stretcher. Put outdoors in the sun, 
and dry. Put in thin muslin bags, and tie these up in heavy paper 
bags. Hang up in the attic. 

To make a stretcher, tack thin muslin to a frame stretching 
it as tightly as possible. 

DRIED CURRANTS. 

Put the currants at th.e bottom of the preserving kettle with 
half the quantity in sujrar over them ; when the sugar is dissolved 
lot boil a minute or two then skim from the syrup and spread on 
plates to dry in a cool oven. Boil the syrup till it is thick, then 
I'our it over the currants to dry with them. Pack in jars, and 
cover tight. 

Berries and cherries may be dried in the same way, using less 
sugar. 

DRIED PARSLEY. 

Select fresh crisp sprays of parsley, wash well, ])lungc in boil- 
ing .salted water, boil 1 minute, take out, drain and dry before 
tlic lire as quickly as possible; put in a tin box and store in a 
dry place. Before using, soak in warm water for a few minutes 
to freshen it. Other herbs may be dried in the same way. 

DRIED PEACHES. 

Pare, cut in halves and stone the peaches. Lay on earthen 
plates, cut side up. Sprinkle with sugar ; set in a moderate oven 
with the door open. Turn 2 or 3 times a day. When dry but 
neither hard nor scorched, pack in jars and cover closely. When 
coriked, put in a saucepan, cover with warm water, and let stand 
on the back of the stove for several hours; then sweeten to taste. 
and let boil* only a few minutes. 

Plums and apples are dried in the same way, but plums are 
not iiared. 

DRIED PEARS. 

Mrs. Hugh Ewing. 

Peel a peck of pears. Put in a kettle with 3 pints water and 
3 pounds white sugar. Cook till transparent, then take out, drain 
and lay out to dry. Rub in sugar every day or two. Tomatoes 
may be done the same way. 

DRIED PUMPKIN. 

^[rs. Wm. Hoskins. 

Stew the pumpkin as for pies and mash fine. To everv quart, 
add 2 tablespoons sugar, and 1 of molasses. Stew on back of 
stove till quite dry. Grease shallow pans, put in an inch thick> 
and dry in the oven. Put in paper bags to keep clean. When 
wanted, soak a quantity over night. 



302 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

FRENCH liONEY. 

Mrs. Wm. C. Connell. 

Dissolve a small lump of alum the size of a hickory nut in 
li pints of water, with 5 pounds white sugar. Boil 3 minutes. 
When cool, add I ounce rosewater. 

ORANGE EXTRACT. 

Cut off the 3'ellow outside peel of 5 oranges, shave it thin, 
put in 1 pint good alcohol, and cork tightly. Let stand for a 
fortnight. 

Lemon extract is made in the same way. 

PEACH EXTRACT. 

Blanch the pits of peaches, pound to a paste, and add twice 
the quantity of brandy. It will take the place of bitter almonds. 

POTATO YEAST. 

Mrs. Richard Johnsdii. 

Peel 1 dozen good potatoes, cover with water and boil till 
done. Mash in the pot. Cover 2 handfuls hops with water and 
boil till the strength is extracted — about i hour; strain into the 
potatoes ; add 1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon each of ginger and 
salt, and 2 cakes yeast foam. Let rise al)out 24 hours, till bottles 
not too full and cork loosely. It will keep several weeks. } cup 
answers for a setting of bread. 

SOUP POWDER. 

Dry 1 ounce each of lemon peel, thyme, sweet marjoram and 
parsley in a warm oven; pound and sift, and add 1 drachm pow- 
dered celery seed; bottle and cork. 1 teaspoon may be added to 
1 quart of almost any soup. 

TO BROWN COFFEE. 

Butter a baking dish thoroughly, put in good green coffee, i 
Mocha and- 5 Java. Put in a moderate oVen to roast until brown, 
from 20 to 25 minutes. Stir well occasionally. Put in a stone 
jar and keep well covered. 

TO BROWN FLOUR. 

Spread on an iron pan and set in a hot oven, stirring continu- 
ally after it begins to color. Brown evenly ail through. Keep 
in a glass jar in a dry place. It is added to Iiash and gravies. 

TO CLARIFY BUTTER. 

Put \ pound good butter in a double boiler ; when thoroughly 
melted, skim, strain through a fine cloth, and keep in a moderate 
temperature until wanted. 



ODDS AND ENDS. -{03 

TO CLARII'V WINE. 

Beat the white of 1 e^rg with' a little wine, and stir into the 
whole. This will do for 10 gallons wine. 

TO CORN BEEF. 

Have your beef cut up in suitable pieces for cooking. Then 
pack them loosely in a tight barrel, placing a weight on top. 
Cover them with the following brine : 4 gallons water, 8 pounds 
salt, 2 ounces saltpetre, 1 quart molasses ; put in a kettle and bring- 
to a boil ; skim thoroughly, let cool and pour over the beef. Let 
remain in the brine until wanted for use. If the brine should 
mould, pour it off, bring it to a boil again, skim and pour over 
the beef quite hot. 

TO CURE BEEF HAMS. 

"Sirs. Robert Sneddon. 

]\Iake a brine that will float an egg, add 1 tablespoon each of 
ground cloves and allspice, 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, and \ 
pound black pepper. Put in 2 beef hams, properly dressed by the 
butcher, and with the bones taken out. Let stay in the brine ■? 
weeks, changing their positions in the cask occasionally. Let 
drain several hours; then sprinkle lightly with brown sugar and 
cayenne pepper, if more is needed. Roll in a tight roll and wind 
with coarse string, hanging up to let dry. It may be cut from 
in a few days. Slice and cook as 3'ou would beefsteak. A slice 
of sidcmeat cured in the same way is good to broil with the 
steak, as the beef seems dry to unaccustomed palates. 

TO KEEP GRAPES. 

Take full clusters, removing every bruised one. Dip the end 
of the stems in sealing wax, wrap each bunch in tissue paper and 
pack in boxes in layers, with paper between. Close the box ; 
keep in a cool dry room. 

TO KEEP LEMON PEEL. 

Put all spare lemon peel in wide mouthed bottles, pour brandy 
over it and keep corked. This is always ready for use to flavor 
sauces, puddings, etc. If the fresh peel is chopped fine, and a little 
salt sprinkled over it in a dry bottle, it is ready to use for stufi"- 
ings, croquettes, etc. -Dried in the oven it is good to keep for 
flavoring stewed fruit. 

Orange peel may be treated the same way. 

TO KEEP PEPPERS. 

Pack in a jar with or without see-b'nq- and pour scalding 
vinegar over them ; cover and tie titrht. When used, freshen in 
cold water. Or pull up the plant before fro=t bitten, and hang 
by the roots in a cool place where it will not freeze. Or pick the 



304 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

peppers before freezing, string and hang up. Chili peppers should 
be packed in wide mouthed bottles, and hot vinegar poured over 
them. 

TO KEEP TOMATOES. 

I. Take ripe tomatoes,- wipe dry without breaking the skin. 
Put into a jar with cold vinegar, adding a thin muslin bag of 
cloves and whole peppers. Seal and keep in a dry place. 

II. Before frosts, dig up tomato plants that are covered with 
green fruit, leaving plenty of dirt around the roots. Slip over 
the roots a heavy sack, and put the plants in the cellar. It may 
be necessary at times to wet the roots a little. Pick off the fruit 
from time to time and let ripen in a sunny window as wanted. 

TOMATO FIGS. 

Mrs. Eliza Marsh. 

Scald and peel round ripe tomatoes. Put in a stone jar with 
equal weight of sugar. Let stand 2 days. Pour off syrup, boil 
and skim until clear. Pour over and let stand 2 days as before. 
Boil and skim again. After third skimming, let them stand in the 
syrup until good drying weather. Then place on large earthen 
dishes and let stand in the sun to dry. It will take about a week. 
After which pack down in small wooden boxes with fine white 
sugar between the layers. Will keep for years. 

Apples boiled in the remaining syrup are good. 

TO PACK EGGS. 

Mrs. Calvin Essex. 

Dip in boiling water, then pack in salt, small end down, not 
touching. Keep in a cool place. 

TO SALT ALMONDS. 

Shell the almonds, scald them and remove the skins. Melt a 
small lump of butter in a pan in the oven. Dry the almonds and 
put them in the butter stirring and turning as they brown. When 
a good golden brown, sprinkle considerable salt over them, and 
let stand until cold. Tlicn rub off the excess of salt. 

VAXILLA ESSENCE. 

Slice 1 pound best stick vanilla, and pound in a mortar with 
3 ounces lump sugar. Then put in a quart jar, fill up with the 
best alcohol, screw lid on tight, shake well, and it can be used 
in a day. It improves very much in strength with age. 

HOW TO COOK HUSBANDS. 

"Greenfield Hill Cook Book." 

A good many husbands are entirely spoiled by mismanage- 
ment in cooking, and so are not tender and good. Some women 
keep them too constantly in hot water; others freeze them; others 



ODDS AND EKDS. 305 

put tliein in a stew; otlicrs roast tlinii ; and others keep them con- 
stantly in a pickle. It cannot he supposed that any husband will 
he good and tender managed in this way, hut tiiey are really 
delicious when properly treated. 

In selecting your husband you should not be guided by the 
silvery appearance as in buying mackerel, nor by the golden tint, 
as if you wanted salmon. Be sure and select him yourself, as 
ta.stcs difi'cr. Do not go to <<he market for him as those Ijrought 
to the door are always best. It is far better to have none than 
not to learn how to cook them properly. It does not make so 
much dift'erence what you cook him in as how you cook him. 
Sec that the linen in which he is wrapped is white and nicely 
mended, with the required number of strings and buttons. Don't 
keep him in the kettle by force, as he will stay there himself if 
proper care is taken. If he splutter or hzz, do not be anxious ; 
some husbands do this. 

Add a little sugar in the form of what confectioners call 
"kisses", but no vinegar or pepper on any account. A little spice 
improves them, but it must be used with judgment. Do not try 
him with anything sharp to see if he is becoming tender. Stir 
hiiu gently the wliile lest he stay too long in the kettle and be- 
come flat and tasteless. If thus treated, you will find him very 
digestible, agreeing nicely with you : and he will keep as long as 
vou want. 



USEFUL HINTS IN HOUSEKEEPING. 



BORAX. 



1 part of liot water dissolves (J parts of borax. It makes a 
good wash for the hair or slvin, where the water is hard. Is 
good to wash combs and brushes, paint, blankets, etc. Laces may 
he washed by leaving in water with a little bora.x in several hours, 
and then rinsing without ruljbing. 

BURNS. 

Mix equal parts of wiiitc of egg and olive oil, spread over 
the burn, and bandage with a piece of old linen ; or dust thickly 
with baking soda, bandage, and keep the bandage wet. This will 
prevent blistering. 

COLD PROCESS SOAP. 

Mrs. G. O. Beery. 

Dissolve 1 ten cent can of Babbitt's potash and J pound pow- 
dered borax in 3 pints warm soft water. Melt 5 pounds of clean 
rendered grease. When the solution is cool, and before the grease 
becomes hot, pour the grease slowly into the potash and borax, 
stirring constantly until the mixture is like molasses, when it can 
he poured into the vessel to harden. Just before it hardens, add 
I- pint gasoline. 

CUCUMBER LOTION. 

Eresh cucumbers mashed to a pulp are good to spread over 
a sunburned face. Cucumber peelings boiled and cooled make a 
good wash for the complexion. 

ECZEMA CURE. 

Mix 3 sulphur with ^ cream tartar, and enough N. O. molasses 
to make it palatable. Take 1 teaspoon every morning for 9 morn- 
ings ; wait a week and take a second course. 

HAIR TONIC. 

Witch hazel rubbed well into the roots of the hair at niglit 
is an excellent tonic. So is sage tea or equal parts of quinine, 
whiskey and bay rum. Also loosening the hair and rubbing tlie 
scalp thoroughly with the hand brings excellent results. 

^ pint sage tea mixed with i pint bay ruin, ^ ounce tincture 
cantharides and 20 grains bisulphide of quinine is a good toniir 
also. 

30fi 



USEFUL HINTS IN HOUSEKEEPING. 307 

LINIMENT. 

Mrs. George Howe. 

Break a fresh egg into a l^ottle; add the same quantity of tur- 
pentine, vinegar and anuuonia. Shake well. Fine for rheuma- 
tism, sprains and bruises. 

LOTION FOR Till-: ll.XNDS. 

Mrs. Wm. C. Council. 

Put .] ounce of gum tragacanth into 2 pints of soft water. 
Let stand for 2 days: then beat up well, strain, and add h ounce 
alum dissolved in a little water. 4 ounces glycerine, 6 of alcohol, 
and 1 of boracic acid. Add 1 pint soft water and a little perfume 
if desired. Excellent for chapped hands. 

OATMEAL SOAP. 

Mrs. H. C. Begland. 

Shave 1 pound Castile soap, put on the stove in a tin pail, 
barely cover with water, and simmer gently till dissolved. Stir 
in 4 ounces each sweet almond oil and powdered borax, 1 ounce 
tincture benzoin, and the juice of 1 lemon. Beat it well, take from 
the stove and as it cools put by spoonfuls into fine oatmeal ; 
shape into cakes with the hands, and dry. It improves with age. 

SALVE. 

Mrs. George Howe. 

i pound mutton suet, I pint sweet oil, 5 cents worth of pow- 
dered rosin. 

Melt the suet and pour over the rosin ; add the oil, and mix 
them thoroughly. Ready for use when cold. Good for cuts, 
liurns. bruises and boils. 



TO KILL BEDBUGS. 

]\Iix 5 cents worth corrosive sublimate with 1 pint wood 
alcohol ; squirt with an oil can into tlie cracks of furniture every 
few days till rid of the pests. 

TO REMOVE CLARET STAINS. 

Mrs. J. G. Blaine. 

If claret wine is split on a cloth, cover at once with salt, and 
wash in cold water as soon as convenient. 

TO REMOVE GRASS STAINS. 
Wash in alcohol the stained goods. 



308 OLD COUNTRY RECIPES AND NEW. 

TO REMOVE HOT WATER MARKS. 

Cover the marks made by hot water jugs, etc., on polished 
tables with a paste of salad oil and salt, leave it there for an 
hour, and rub well with a dry cloth. 

TO REMOVE INK STAINS. 

Saturate the spot with lemon" juice and cover with salt; let 
stand in the sun several hours: wash in warm water and then in 
Sai)olio. 

Iron rust is removed in the same way. 

TO REMOVE OLD TEA AND COFEEE S^TAINS. 

Wet the spots with cold water, cover with glycerine, and let 
stand 2 or 8 hours. Wash with cold water and hard soap. Re- 
peat if necessary. 

TO SET DYES. 

Dissolve I teaspoon sugar of lead in a pail of water, and soak 
uncertain calicoes in it for 1 hour before washing. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 



4 gills 1 P'"t. 

2 pints 1 quart. 

4 quarts 1 gallon. 

16 ounces 1 pound. 

^ teacup 1 gin. 

2 teacups 1 pint. 

2 cups granulated sugar | ^ pound 

2^ cups powdered sugar ) 

1 heaping tablespoon sugar ( _ , ,,L„T(,p 

1 heaping tablespoon butter \ 

1 cup butter *■ pound. 

4 cups flour j I pounrl. 

1 heaping quart flour \ 

5 round tablespoons dry material 1 cup. 

Ui tablespoons liquid 1 cup. 



USEFUL HINTS IN HOUSEKEEPING. 309 

COMMON POISONS AND THEIR ANTIDOTES. 



" EMERQE^CY NOTES." 



ACIDS. 



Hydrochloric or muriatic, nitric, oxalic and sulphuric. 

Antidotes: 1 teaspoon haking soda in a cup water; as much 
lime water as the patient will swallow; 1 teaspoon magnesia, whit- 
ing, chalk, tooth powder or lime scraped from the wall, stirred into 
a cup of water; 1 tablespoon strong soapsuds. 

Carbolic acid. 

Antidote: There is no chemical antidote. Give oil freely, 
olive, linseed or castor. 

ALK.ALIES. 

Lye, soft soap, various washing fluids and powders, strong 
ammonia or hartshorn. 

Antidotes: 1 tablespoon vinegar in 1 cup water: the juice of 
2 lemons or oranges in an equal amount of water; olive, linseed 
or castor oil. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Arsenic. Some rat and fly poisons. 

Antidote : A fresh preparation of iron ; send to druggist for 
antidote. 

Iodine. The common tincture. 

Antidote: Boiled starch — laundry or cornstarch, arrowroot, 
boiled or baked potatoes. 

Lead. Sugar of lead ; paint containing white lead. 

Antidote: A tablespoon Epsom salts in a tumbler water. 

Mercury. Corrosive sublimate is the commonest form. 

Antidote: Raw white of egg. 

Opium. Morphine, laudanum, paregoric, many cough medi- 
cines and soothing syrups. 

Antidotes: There is no chemical antidote, but strong coffee, 
pain and motion counteract its effects. Give an emetic, and then 
large quantities of strong, black coffee ; keep the patient walking 
up and down ; switch him ; throw cold water on his face and 
chest; if the breathing becomes very slow, perform artificial res- 
piration. 

Phosphorus. Matches, and some rat pastes. 

Antidote: Common turpentine which has been exposed to the 
air for some time mixed with magnesia. -Send to druggist. Do 
not give oil. 

Silver. Nitrate of silver or lunar caustic. 

Antidote: 1 teaspoon common salt in a cup water. 



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CLARKSVILLE. MECKLENBURG CO., VIRGINIA 

322 



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I may iry the machine' for fiye days. If entirely salisfae- 
tory, I agree to remit |5 witbin five da.vs of receipt, and 
pay the balance in nine monthly Instalments of $.1 each. 
If the typewriter does not come up to my expectation in 
every "way, I reserve the right to return it immediately 
without incurring any obligation on my part. Title of 
the machine to renialii in your name uatil the machine 
is fully paid for. 

Name 



Addr 



Town . State 

References refiuired. 



328 



ESTABLISHED 1870 



We Make a Specialty of 

Fine Teas 

Pure Cider Vinegar 

Canned Goods 

and Fine Flour 



A. J. EVANS 



Dealer in 



Groceries and Provisions 

Both Phones 813 

236, 238 and 240 E. Long St. COLUMBUS, OHIO 

TERMS CASH 



As An Attractive Display 



v*5' i 




you cannot find anything to equal our 

China and 
Crockery Line 

judging from the satisfaction it gives and 

the money saved in buying here. 

^ These are not cheap goods, but the 

iVV prices are very low considering the quality. 

1^ Have you seen our week-end specialties ? 



May we have the pleasure to show you 



Established 1840 



J. M. & W. WESTWATER 



141 and 143 North High Street 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 



The Vance- Winans Co. 

Exclusive and Correct Styles in 

Readv-to-Wear Outer Garnments 
for Women and Misses 



75 North High Street 



COLUMBUS, OHIO 



329 



'^he Most Complete Stock of Post Cards in Logan 









CASE'S DRUG and 
JEWELRY STORE 



66 EAST MAIN STREET 
LOGAN. O. Soth "Phones 



^ ! Recommend 



Peerless Sure Corn Killer I Oc 

Peerless Toothache Drops I Oc 

Pearl of Beauty for the Ladies . . 25c 

Pinard's Veloet Pearl for the Ladies . . 25c 

'Denlifoam for Teeth 25c 

Velvo Lotion for Hands I Oc 



All Fully Guaranteed under Ture Food and Drug Law 



9 

2 

ra" 

On 

o 
n 
.^ 

Q 
fa 



'^he Most Complete Stock of Post Cards in Logan 



C J WILLIAMS ■ BELL 'PHONE MAIN 2444 

C. W. TAYLOR CITIZENS PHONE 2865 



WILLIAMS & TAYLOR 



OPTICIANS 



No. 72 NORTH HIGH STREET 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 

330 



JOHN EATO.-\, Prfsidenl BRANCH STORES 

LOriS C. SANDS, Vice Prcsl. AND WAREHOUSES 
LOVrS BROH'N, Treasurer THROUGHOUT 

(;R ANT HUBLEV, Secretary THE OIL COUNTRY 



Supply (Enmpang 

iHain (iflSrpa 



EVERYTHING YOU WANT FROM GREENHOUSE OR GARDEN 
Floral Work a Specialty. Headquarters for Carnations. 



THOMAS MONTELL '' 



awnee 

Ohio 



J. A. DEVOL JU Blacksmkhing 

XT O • -11 r^^ • W I I ot ail sorts promptly 

New Straitsville, Ohio jj . l^A^lAir 



Or. (£. A. ilJaninii. yirsihrnl 3f. t. Svraiiirr. (Casliirr 

ail|^ Mnvtxn Sank (C0. 

(Ea^iital ^turk ^25.Dnn.nn 
331 



THE GRIFFIN 
DRILLING CO. 



CONTRACTORS FOR 



OIL, GAS 



AND 



ARTESIAN 
WELLS 



OFFICE: 12 NORTH HIGH ST. 

COLUMBUS, OHIO 



332 



Falcon Beekeepers^ Supplies 



Write for illustrated catalog 

W. T. FALCONER MFG. COMPANY 

JAMESTOWN, NEW YORK 



Eat Furnas 
Ice Cream 



It's made of the best sweet cream, sugar, flavor, etc. , 
and we know how to mix these ingredients to make 
the delicious product for whicJj cue are famous. 
Ask for it at your druggist or confectioner. 

The Furnas Ice Cream Company 
581 East Long Street, Columbus, Ohio 



J.W. Jones 



GENERAL 



Hardware 



f 



Paints, Oils and Lumber, 

Wall Paper, Tinware, 

Jewelry and Notions, 

Roofing, Sash, Doors, 

Glass and Gas Fixtures 

Plaster, Lime and Cement 



NEW STRAITSVILLE, OHIO 



333 



Maizes Delicious 
Puddings. 

Use Part Royal for 
Bread, Rolls, etc. 

Can be eaten and 
relished h}) the 
most delicate. 




THE PAPER STORE 

is the proper place to buy Birthday, Holiday, and Patriotic Post Cards, 
Paper Drinking Cups, Napkins, Dishes, Plates, and Table Cloths for Lunch- 
eons and Picnics, Playing Cards, Games, Tally Cards, Writing Stationery 
of all kinds; Inks and Pencils, Typewriter Ribbons and Papers, Pocket and 
Bill Books, Card Cases, Bible and Prayer Books, Engraved Wedding Invi- 
tations, Cards, Book Binding and Printing. 

NITSGHKE BROTHERS 

31 to 37 EAST GAY ST., COR. PEARL COLUMBUS, OHIO 



JOSEPH HATEM UNIS HATEM 

JOS. HATEM & BRO. 

Bmhts in IFruilH. QlDufrrtiiinrrij. (Cigars m\h ©nbarrna 

SOFT DRINKS AND ICE CREAM NEW STRAITSVILLE, OHIO 

. H. D. BURGESS 

PRESSING PROMPTLY DONE NEW STRAITSVILLE, OHIO 

The MODERT^TsfORE 

DRY GOODS, CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, CARPETS, 

CURTAINS, Ladies', Gents' and Children's FURNISHINGS 

SAM PASTOR, Proprietor NEW STRAITSVILLE, OHIO 



Gihson Price & Gibson, Restaurant ^^' 

BOARDING BY THE WEEK, DAY OR MEAL. 

Cigars, Tobaccos -and Soft Drinks. Short Order Meals and Lunches All Hours. 

Cor. Main and Clark Sts. Phone 36 New Straitsville, Ohio 



Lynch's Lyric Theatre 

MOVING PICTURES 
AND VAUDEVILLE 

Booking Acts from the Bert Marshall Vaudeville Circuit of Cleveland, O. 

335 



Coirts & Botki 



OIL, GAS and 

ARTESIAN 



-WELL 
DRILLER, 

Send all inquiries to 

LANCASTER, OHIO 



and they will have prompt attention 

336 



BLETZ ACKER 
FURNITURE CO. 

Furniture, Carpets, Wood 

Mantels, Tile Floors, Baby Carts, 

Grates and Undertal^ing 



BELL PHONE 18 
CITZ. PHONE 18 



Cor. Broad and Chestnut Sts. Lancaster, Ohh 



to 



ANTILL'S 
ICE CREAM 



LANCASTER, OHIO 




ON SALE AT 
SHUTTLEWORTH'S 



337 



How to Make $12,0001 

a year clear profit on a small egg farm 

The CORNING EGG-BOOK 

tells how these men did it. 

$6.41 Per Hen Per Year 



Here are 
some of 
the things 



I The troubles of great hotels in getting reliable eggs. 
The prices paid for Corning eggs throughout the year. 
How to get the mo^ eggs when moS people get none. 
When to hatch chicks that are to lay winter eggs. 



that the <^ How to grow juicy broilers in nine weeks. 



Corning 

Egg-book 

tells : 



How to mix the feed that makes the mo^ eggs. 
How to save 97 per cent of the young chicks. 
Why they send hens to rooS with full crops. 
How to make hens attend Sridtly to business. 



The Corning Egg-book is sold in combination with 

The Farm Journal 

to increase its subscription li^ to one million for next year. It is the 
ftandard monthly farm and home paper of the country ; clean, bright' 
pradtical; it is for the gardener, ^ockman, trucker, farmer, villager* 
suburbanite, the women folks, boys and girls. 

ORDER FROM :US 

THE SOCIAL AND ATHLETIC CLUB 

NEW STRAITSVILLE, OHIO 

We will send postpaid the Corning Egg-book ^ jr\ 
and the Farm Journal for two years, both for ^Jv/C^ 

Cash, money order or check. 



338 



The Clark St. 
Harness Shop 

New Straitsville, Ohio 



JOHN JENKINS, of Shawnee, Ohio. Owner 
MACK FISK, Manager 

Good Stock of HARNESS 

CON6TANTLY ON HAND 

Repair Work of all kinds PnTN^X''"- 

Best of Workmanship Guaranteed. Prices Most Reasonable. 



H. P. RISCHERT New Straitsville,Oh.o 

Seasonable Goods Oi 1_ _ J YT _ /"^ ..!_„ 

Always on Hand otaplc ancl F diicy Liroceries 



1876 
1910 



JOSEPH L. WEST 

General Merchandise and Groceries 



New 

Straitsville, 

Ohio 



SHUTTLEWORTH & SONS 

Dealers in GENERAL HARDWARE, NOTIONS, ETC. 
Qas Fixtures and Supplies, 'Uinware and QraniteWare New Straitsville, Ohio 



OYSTERS IN 
SEASON 



CIGARS AND 
TOBACCO 



F. G. MILLER 

Old Reliable Ice Cream, Soda Water, Confectionery vuTe. 



New Straits- 
Ohio 



1904 



N^m 



1910 



•nrtal an& 
Kt\}kt\c mnb 



(EtttHint nurr 15 



ffiymitantnm. J*'liumrr Ii5atlj8. 

\Sai\l. ilUIliariiH anb 

Uiuuiliuit. (liamcs. fflusir. 

fHauasiurB aiti» NruiBpaprra 

ICaiitcii 50 rents 

prr IBmith 



339 



RUMFORD 



THE WHOLESOME 



Baking Powder 

A Strictly Pure Phosphate Powder 

Made of the genuine Prof. Horsford's phosphate, 
which adds to the bread [the lacking phosphate 
element so essential to health, found in wheat and 
other grains. Does not contain alum. 



840 



AUG s6 \m 



One copy del. to Cat. Biv. 



^a5» 



92 "^^^ 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



014 488 639 2 *