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Full text of "Recipes tested by the families of the parish and comp. by the Women's guild .."

TX 715 
.W53 
Copy 1 




Q[l|e ^ecouft (0t)utct| of Neuitott 
iu-Sfost Neuitmt 



q THE SMALL DEPOSITOR is as 
welcome here as the largest one and 
made to feel entirely at ease. 

^ The big element of personal service 
in our handling of every account is just 
as strong for him as it is for each of 
our depositors — individual, firm or 
corporation. 

*J A service of highest efficiency and 
most intimate, helpful, local nature, 
impartially rendered — 

1§ That is what makes this bank the 
logical bank for your account . 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF 
WEST NEWTON 






Recipes 

Tested by the 

Families of the Parish 

and Compiled by the 

Women's Guild 



October, 1921 



'Now good digestion wait on appetite and health on both. ' ' — Shakespeare 



Copyright 1921 
THE WOMEN'S GUILD OF THE SECOND CHURCH. WEST NEWTON 



PRESS OF ERNEST F. DOW. WEST NEWTON 






©CI.A624896 



OCT 14 Ml 



\ 



BREAD 

"Here is bread which strengthens men's hearts and 
therefore is called 'The Staff of Life.' " 



^> 



ENGLISH NUT-BREAD 

2 cups graham flour. l / 2 teaspoon salt. 

1 cup white flour. l / 2 cup molasses. 

x / 2 cup sugar. 1^4 cups sweet milk. 

1 teaspoon soda. 1 cup walnuts. 

Put graham flour in bowl without sifting, then other dry ingred- 
ients mixed and sifted, add molasses and milk, beat thoroughly 
then add walnuts broken in pieces. 

Bake one hour in slow oven. 

— Mrs. E. H. Rogers. 



NUT BREAD 

3 cups flour. 1 tablespoon cream of tartar. 

\ 1 /^ cups milk. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 cup chopped walnuts. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 egg. 1 cup sugar. 

Mix flour, nuts, salt and cream of tartar, beat egg, add to milk 
and soda and mix all thoroughly. Bake in tin y to one hour. After 
mixing, stand 20 minutes before baking. Moderate oven. 

-^Mrs. C. J. A. Wilson. 



BREAD— 3 YEAST CAKES 

1 pint milk scalded, cooled. 

1 teaspoon sugar. 

Little salt. 

1 tumbler tepid water in which 3 yeast cakes have been dissolved. 

Butter size of a walnut. 

3 pints flour. 

Chop on board 20 minutes. Let rise in a warm place 45 minutes. 
Bake immediately. Make into rolls or loaves. 

—Mrs. G. W. Eddy. 



BREAD ( 

6 cups of flour (sifted). 
1 tablespoon of sugar. 
1 teaspoon salt. 
y 2 yeast cake dissolved in 
x /s, cup water (lukewarm). 
1 cup milk (scalded). 

1 tablespoon lard dissolved in warm milk. 

2 cups water (lukewarm), add more liquid if flour requires. 

This makes 1 loaf and pan of biscuit. (I use King Arthur flour.) 

— Mrs. A. D. Batson. 



VIRGINIA SPOON CORN BREAD 

Stir 1-3 cup of hominy grits into 3 cups of boiling water and \ l / 2 
teaspoons of salt, let cook one half hour. When cool add \y 2 cups 
corn meal, 3 tablespoons of shortening, either butter or Crisco. ^4 cup 
of milk, 3 eggs beaten light, 1-3 cup sugar and 2 teaspoons baking 
powder. Bake Y\ hour, in two pie pans, suitable to serve it in. 

— Mrs. Charles E. Gibson. 



FEATHER MUFFINS 

1 egg- 

1 large spoon sugar. 

1 cup milk. 

2 cups flour. 

2 teaspoons cream of tartar. 

1 teaspoon soda, or 

2 heaping teaspoons baking powder. 
A little nutmeg and salt. 

Beat and bake in muffin tins. 



OAT MEAL BREAD 

Pour 2 cups boiling water on 1 cup rolled oats. When partly 
cool add y 2 cup molasses, 1 teaspoon salt, shortening y 2 size of egg. 
y 2 yeast cake. Stir in bread flour until very stiff. In morning stir, 
let rise, put in pans and let rise again. Bake 1 hour. 

— Mrs. Joseph Symonds. 



SHORT BREAD 

y 2 lb. butter. 1 lb. flour. 

34 lb. sugar. Yolk of 1 egg. 

Cream butter and sugar, add beaten egg, stir in flour, mix well, 
it will be in a crumbly condition. 

Divide into 2 pans, then knead wbile in pans into a solid sheet 
y 2 inch thick, perforate with fork all over. Bake in slow oven \, 
hour. When taken from oven cut into< \ l / 2 inch squares and dip in 
sugar. — Airs. C. J. A. Wilson. 



NUT BREAD 

2 cups flour well sifted 3 or 4 times. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 

l / 2 teaspoon salt. 

1 egg well beaten. 

1 cup milk. 

y 2 cup sugar. 

]/ 2 cup walnut meats chopped. 

Let rise y 2 hour and bake in moderate oven 40 minutes. 

— Mrs. Earl Glover. 



OATMEAL BREAD 

1 cup rolled oats. 

2 cups boiling water. 
Yz yeast cake. 

i/> cup molasses. 

]/ 2 teaspoon soda (in molasses) 

\ x / 2 teaspoons salt. 

1 cup white flour. 

Pour the boiling water over the oatmeal and let it stand 1 hour. 

Then add salt, molasses, yeast cake dissolved in a little lukewarm 
water, and stir in the white flour with a spoon. Let rise over night 
and in the morning put into pans with spoon, not kneading it or 
using the hands. Two loaves. — Freda B. Fisher. 



ENTIRE WHEAT BREAD 

2 lbs. entire wheat flour. 3 dessertspoons molasses. 
1 lb. white flour. 2 dessertpoons lard. 

3 dessertspoons sugar. 4 cups water. 
1 dessertspoon salt. 1 yeast cake. 

Dissolve yeast cake in lukewarm water. Add sugar, salt, mo- 
lasses, lard, water, then flour. Bake slowly. 

—Mrs. Geo. Kellar. 



BISHOP WILLIAMS' CORN MEAL MUFFINS 

1 cup sugar. 

1 cup white flour. 

1 cup yellow corn meal. 

1 cup sour cream. 

Yz teaspoon soda dissolved in boiling water. 

1 teaspoon cream tartar dissolved in sour cream. 

2 eggs, dropped in separately and without beating. 
1 teaspoon salt. 

Batter should be rather thin. Bake 20 to 30 minutes. 

— Mrs. Quincy Wales. 



DIXIE BISCUIT 

3 pints flour. 

2 eggs. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 

2 cups sweet milk. 

Butter or lard size of an egg. 

y 2 yeast cake dissolved in water. 

Mix butter, sugar and eggs together, then add milk, yeast and 
flour. 

Set to rise about 10 o'clock in a moderately warm place. Cut out 
for tea about 4 with two size cutters. Wet the smaller piece and 
place on larger. Bake in moderate oven. — Mrs. Carl Pickhardt. 



GRAHAM GEMS 

2 cups graham flour. 

2 teaspoons baking powder stirred into the flour. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 

J/2 teaspoon salt. 

\y 2 cups milk, good measure. 

1 tablespoon melted butter. 

Bake in patty pans or gem irons. 

— Mrs. Herbert E. Cushman. 



POP OVERS 

5 eggs. 1 pint milk. 

l l /> cups flour. Yz teaspoon salt. 

Bake in greased gem pans in quick oven. 

—Mrs. H. R. Place. 



OATMEAL MUFFINS 

1 cup hot milk on 2-3 cup oatmeal. Let stand five minutes. 
Add 3 tablespoons sugar. 

Yz teaspoon salt. 

2 tablespoons lard. 
y 2 cup flour. 

4 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 egg- 
Mix well and bake in well greased muffin pans in moderate oven. 

— Mrs. H. Pierce. 



DUMPLINGS 

1 cup flour. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Milk enough to make a stiff dough. 

Steam 15 minutes with cover off, then 15 minutes covered. 

—Mary E. Brackett. 



McKINLEY MUFFINS 

1 cup bread flour (before sifting). 

1 tablespoon Indian meal. 

2 heaping teaspoons baking powder. 
1 even teaspoon salt. 

Sift the above together. 

1 egg (beaten light). 

1-3 cup sugar. 

[ / 2 cup milk. 

Add sifted ingredients. 

Butter size of walnut (melted), added last. 

Bake in muffin tins. — Mrs. J. W. Perry. 



SPONGE JOHNNY CAKE 

1 cup bolted corn meal. ]/ 2 cup sugar. 

2 cups flour. 2 teaspoons cream tartar. 
2 cups milk. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 egg. Salt. 

— Mrs. Joseph Symonds. 



HOMINY CAKE FOR LUNCH 

Boil soft 1 pint of hominy measured when cooked. When cool 
add a tablespoon of butter, 3 tablespoons indian meal, 3 eggs well 
beaten, 1 pint milk. 

Melt a tablespoon of butter in spider. Pour in the batter while 
it is hot. Cook 20 minutes in oven. 

Can be eaten with butter or syrup. 

—Mrs. F. S. Hardy. 



CORN CAKE 

\y 2 cups white flour. Sift together, then add 

y 2 cup corn meal. 1 egg well beaten. 

y 2 cup sugar. 1 cup sweet milk. 

1 teaspoon cream tartar. y 2 teaspoon soda. 

1 teaspoon salt. 2 tablespoons shortening. 

Beat well with egg beater. Bake in moderate oven. 



DELICIOUS BROW N BREAD 



1 cup corn meal. 

1 cup flour. 

1 heaping- cup rye flour. 

2-3 cup molasses. 

Steam fully three hours. 



1 egg- 

1 teaspoon soda. 

3 cups milk. 
Salt. 



—Mrs. F. S. Hardy. 



BOSTON PARKER HOUSE ROLLS 

3 quarts sifted flour. 

1 quart scalded milk. 

2 large spoonfuls butter. 
1 large spoonful sugar. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

1 small cake yeast dissolved in a cup of tepid water. 

Put flour in large pan or bowl, making a hole in center of flour, 
and throw in this the butter, sugar and salt before slowly turning in 
the milk and beating it till the mixture is lukewarm, when it is 
prepared for the yeast to be carefully stirred in, and then stood in a 
warm place to rise. When light, knead in all the flour from sides 
of pan until there are blisters to be seen, then set away to rise again, 
when the dough is ready to be rolled out and cut in biscuits the size 
desired. In each of these place a small piece of butter and double 
over, then place in buttered tins, giving ample space for rising 
before baking in a quick oven. 

—Mrs. G. C. Holbrook. 



"RAGGED ROBINS" 



2 cups pastry flour sifted. 

2 rounded teaspoons baking powder. 

]/ 2 teaspoon salt. 

2 large tablespoons butter and lard mixed. 

Milk sufficient to make a soft dough. 

Turn out on bread board and roll about an inch thick. Spread 
with soft butter, sprinkle with sugar, and then cinnamon. Roll up 
and cut like jelly roll and bake in quick oven. 

—Mrs. H. O. Poor. 



10 



SPIDER CAKE 

1 2-3 cups inclian meal. 

1-3 cup flour. 

% cup sugar. 

1 teaspoon salt. All sifted together. 

Add 2 eggs beaten light. 

1 cup milk. 

Wet 1 teaspoon soda in a little milk and stir into 1 cup sour 
milk. Beat into the batter. Have spider very hot and well buttered. 
Put in the batter and turn into the middle without stirring, 1 cup 
sweet milk. This will make a layer of custard when done. Bake in 
a moderate oven. 

The best corn cake that I have ever eaten. 

— Freda B. Fisher. 



CHEESE BISCUIT 

1 cup bread flour. 

2' j teaspoons baking powder. Sift together. 
1 tablespoon shortening (]/ 2 butter, l / 2 lard). 
l / 2 cup grated cheese. 

Mix well together and add 2-3 cup sweet milk (skimmed). 

Bake in the usual way for hot biscuit. 

— Mrs. Fred R. Furbush. 



SQUASH MUFFINS 

1 cup milk. 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

1 egg. 2 teaspoons cream tartar. 

2 cups bread flour. 1 teaspoon soda. 
2-3 cup squash. Salt. 

3 tablespoons sugar. 

—Mrs. Ernest C. Reed. 



NEW PRICES OF CHEVROLET MODELS 




490 Touring 

The lowest priced fully equipped 

automobile on the market. 




90 Sedan 












F. O. B. 


$525 


Del. 


$615 




F. O. B. 


$$75 


Del. 


$985 




F. O. B. 


$975 


Del. 


$1085 




F. (). B. 


$1575 


Del. 


$1715 


Trucks 












F. O. B. 


$525 


Del. 


$008 




F. O. B. 


$745 


Del. 


$840 




F. (). B. 


$1125 


Del. 


$1250 



490 Touring and Roadster 
490 Sedan and Coupe 
F. B. Touring and Roadster 
F. B. Sedan and Coupe 

490 Light Delivery 
Model "G" H Ton Chassis 
Model "T" 1 Ton Chassis 

(Can be equipped with any style body). 

A demonstration will prove to you that the Chevrolet* are 
easy riding, have plenty of power, and are economical to run. No 
hills too long or steep. All roads alike to the Chevrolet. 

W. J. FURBUSH— Authorized Dealer 

Sales and Service Station, 66 Davis Ave.. West Newton, Mass. 
Telephone West Newton 51590. 



COCHRANE & STIMETS 

Fancy Groceries and Provisions 

1293 Washington Street, West Newton 

Telephones: West Newton 360 — 361. 



F. Anderson, Residence 27 Wilmot St., Watertown 
Res. Tel. Newton North 1173-M. 

LIBERTY MOTOR MART 

Automobile Accessories, Etc. 

Auto Repairing of All Kinds 
Live Storage Cars for Hire 

1203 Washington Street West Newton 

Tel. West Newton 1210. 

Telephones. 

M. FRANK LUCAS 

Builders' Finish 

Fine Cabinet Work Dry Floors 

Mill and Yard. Lucas Court and Border Street, West Newton, Mass 

Member Master Builders Association. 



W. E. TOMLINSON 

Hardware, Paints and Oils, Bicycles, Motorcycles, 
Auto Supplies, Kodaks. 
1421-1423 Washington Street, West Newton, Mass. 
Telephone West Newton 169. 



13 



SOUPS 

'Fire burn and cauldron bubble." — Macbeth. 



CLAM CHOWDER (Delicious) 

1 quart clams. 1 quart milk. 

6 slices bacon. 3 potatoes. 

1 large onion. 

Cut clams into small pieces and drain all liquor off into small 
stewing pan. Cut up bacon into small pieces and put into frying pan 
and cook slowly with onion chopped fine until brown. Cook sepa- 
rately potatoes cut in cubes until tender. Strain. Take clam broth 
and bring to boiling point. Take milk and bring to boiling point. 
Mix the two, then add the other ingredients, last the clams that must 
be heated a few minutes. Season to taste. 

Virginia Denny Birgfeld. 



LOBSTER SOUP 

Remove meat from 2 — 2 x / 2 lb. lobster. Cut into rather small 
pieces. Saute in 1 tablespoon butter. Have a quart of milk heat- 
ing in double boiler, add lobster and allow it to cook slowly in milk 
15 minutes. Thicken with 2 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons 
flour cooked together. Add 1 teaspoon salt and few grains pepper. 

—Mrs. G. B. H. Macomber. 



CELERY SOUP 

2 or 3 outside stalks of celery. 2 tablespoons flour. 

\ l / 2 pints milk. 1 teaspoon salt. 

Grind celery through food chopper, saving all juice. Put with 
milk in double boiler and steep y 2 hour. Strain, put back in double 
boiler and bring to boiling point. 

Thicken with flour, mixed with cold water, add salt. 

— Euphemia C. Dow. 



14 



CLEAR TOMATO SOUP 

1 can tomatoes. Salt, pepper, Sugar to taste. 
\y 2 cans water. 2 tablespoons pearl tapioca. 

2 onions. 7 cloves. 

Strain, boil from 1 to 1*4 hours. 

—Mrs. C. J. A. Wilson. 



TOMATO SOUP (Canned) 

14 quarts ripe tomatoes (after cut up). 

14 celery stalks. 

14 bay leaves. 

14 sprigs parsley. 

10 onions. 

50 whole cloves. 

4 green peppers. 

y 2 cup salt. 

Cook until soft, then strain. Thicken with 2 cups flour and add 
2^4 cups brown sugar and one cup butter. 

Put in glass jars and seal. — Mrs. J. E. Park. 



PUREE OF CARROTS 

3 cups sliced carrots. 34 teaspoon white pepper. 

1 teaspoon salt. l / 2 pound stale bread. 

1 teaspoon sugar. 1 quart veal broth. 

Cook the carrots for 10 minutes, drain and cook gently until 
tender, with 2 cups water and seasonings. Add the bread, broken 
into bits, and the broth. Simmer for an hour, pass through a puree 
sieve. If too soft allow it to cook away longer, if too dry, add a little 
broth or milk. Serve with breast of lamb, chops, or veal cutlet. 

— Miss Lillian Cooper. 



ONION SOUP 

Good consomme. 

4 slices toasted bread. 

4 sliced onions fried yellow in butter. 

3 tablespoons finely grated cheese. 

Cover and bake 10 minutes in oven. 

— Elizabeth W. Brace. 



15 



ONION SOUP 

Slice 3 small onions. Cook slowly in a tablespoon of butter 
until tender, taking care not to brown them. Bring- to boiling point 
a quart of Franco-American bouillon or any good bouillon to which 
has been added a teaspoon of Beef Extract, add salt to taste. Skim 
the onions from the butter and add the butter to heated stock. Serve 
in soup tureen. Toast a thick slice of bread, sprinkle it with freshly 
grated Parmesan cheese and place it on top of the soup. Put the 
dish in the oven until the cheese is melted and brown. Add a liberal 
quantity of the grated cheese to each portion when serving. 



ONION SOUP 

Save water in which onions have been boiled and 4 of the onions. 
Put onions through strainer, add cream sauce, salt and pepper. 

—Mrs. G. W. Abbott. 



DUCHESS SOUP 

4 cups white stock. 1-3 cup butter. 

2 slices carrot cut in cubes. J4 CU P flour. 

2 slices onion. 1 teaspoon salt. 

2 blades mace. % teaspoon pepper. 

Yz cup grated mild cheese. 2 cups scalded milk. 

Cook vegetables 3 minutes in \ l /> tablespoons butter, then add 
stock and mace, boil 15 minutes, strain and add milk. Thicken with 
remaining butter and flour cooked together, add salt and pepper and 
stir in cheese. Serve as soon as cheese is melted. 

— Mrs. Macomber. 



BAKED BEAN SOUP 

2 cups cold baked beans. 
2 cups stewed tomatoes. 
2 cups cold water. 

Let simmer several hours in double boiler. 

Mash and strain adding 
1 tablespoon sugar. 
1 tablespoon flour. 
1 teaspoon salt. 

Serve with buttered toast cut in squares. 

— Mrs. F. J. Burrage. 



16 



JENNY LIND SOUP 

Take a large bowl of seasoned white stock (veal best), let it boil 
and while boiling put a tablespoon of sago into it and boil 10 min- 
utes. 

Have ready well mixed, 1 cup of cream and the yolks of 2 eggs. 
Pour the soup into the mixture and stir well. 

Put on stove but do not let boil as it will curdle. 

—Mrs. F. Hardy. 



THE UNIVERSAL CAR 




GENUINE COMMON SENSE 

Many FORD owners can afford to own and operate any car 
they may choose, but they prefer a FORD, "because it is a FORD." 

For "because it is a FORD" means dependability, ease of oper- 
ation, efficiency, — and it means sure, quick transportation, and "be- 
cause it is a FORD" means good taste, pride of ownership, and 
GENUINE COMMON SENSE. 

Newton people have found that it pays to trade with us, because 
they find our organization courteous, accommodating and reliable, 
in our desire to serve their best interests. 

In our service department we have experienced men whose 
workmanship is the very best that can be obtained. 

FOR FORD CARS — PARTS OR SERVICE 
SEE US FIRST 

NEWTON MOTOR SALES COMPANY 

Salesroom, 1250 Washington Street, Tel. West Newton 1600. 

Service Station, 44 Chestnut Street, Tel. West Newton 1601. 

WEST NEWTON 



Ira S. Roe, Pres. 

Tel. Centre Newton 1772-M 



Leon E. Smith, Manager 
Tel. Brighton 1707-M 



INSURE BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE 

FRED S. RETAN, General Manager 
301-304 Tremont Bldg., Boston 
29 Forest Ave., West Newton 
Phones: Hav 1041 and West Newton 566-M. 



CHARLES C. PRESCOTT 

FIRST CLASS GROCER AND PROVISIONER 

Fish and Oysters, Fruits, Vegetables, Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

Between Watertown and Washington Streets, West Newton 

Telephones: West Newton 610 and 611. 
Goods Delivered in All Parts of Newton 



Ralph E. Hatch, President Geo. P. Hatch, Treasurer 



B. S. HATCH COMPANY 



COAL AND WOOD 

Poultry Feed and Grain 



79 Union St. 1288 Washington St. 

Newton Centre West Newton 

Tel. Newton South 181 Tels. : West Newton 66 and 967- J 



19 



EGGS, CHEESE AND VEGETABLES 

The War is o'er, its strife is past 
But yet its lessons still should last 
Less thought of self, real work, less play, 
Plain living, Thrift for every day. 



BAKED EGGS WITH CHEESE 

Cut fine 3/2 lb. cheese and spread in a shallow dish. Upon the 
cheese put 1 tablespoon of butter broken in small pieces. Mix to- 
gether y 2 teaspoon of mustard, 1 teaspoon salt, pinch of cayenne and 
1-3 cup of cream, and pour half of it over the cheese. Beat 6 eggs a 
little with a fork and pour in the dish and then pour over them the 
remainder of cream. Put on top 1 more tablespoon of butter broken 
in pieces. Bake in moderate oven. 



"TOMATO WIGGLE" 

1 lb. cheese. 1 can evaporated milk. 

1 can tomato soup. 2 eggs. 

Melt cheese in tomato. Add evaporated milk and cook in double 
boiler until thick. Add eggs beaten well just before removing from 
fire. Season and serve on crackers or toast. 



HARVARD BEETS 

12 small beets, cooked tender cut in cubes. 

y 2 cup sugar. 

2 teaspoons cornstarch. 

y 2 cup vinegar, boil 5 minutes. 

Pour over beets and let stand in warm place l /i hour. Add table- 
spoon butter. Serve. 



SCALLOPED SWEET POTATOES AND ORANGES 

Put a layer of cold boiled sweet potatoes, cut in *4 bich slices, 
in buttered baking dish, sprinkle with salt, cover with oranges, 
peeled and cut in y± inch slices, sprinkle with about % cup sugar 
and dot with small pieces of butter. Repeat, leaving final layer of 
oranges and sugar on top. Stick into the top a few short, thin 
lengths of the orange peel. Bake in moderate oven -;4 hour. 

—Mrs. E. R. Cooper. 



20 



STUFFED PEPPERS 

1 lb. chopped raw lamb. I*/? cups tomatoes. 

1 cup rice (uncooked). Salt and pepper to taste. 

Mix together well and fill 1 dozen medium sized sweet peppers 
from which tops and seeds have been removed. 

Pack tightly into kettle with small plate on top to keep stuffing 
from coming out. Pour boiling water almost enough to cover and 
bring to a boil. Add a teaspoon of salt and juice of one lemon and 
simmer for 45 minutes. Drain off juice and serve hot. 

This stuffing can be used very nicely for tomatoes, eggplants 
or small summer squash. — Mrs. G. H. Adalian. 



CARROTS EN CASSEROLE 

3 cups diced carrots. 

1 cup mixed ham, corned beef or dried beef. 

2 small onions. 

3 tablespoons butter or bacon fat. 
1 teaspoon salt. 

Y% teaspoon pepper, y& teaspoon nutmeg, 2 cloves. 

1 teaspoon sugar. 

3 tablespoons flour. 

2 cups tomato juice. 

1 Yi cups water. 

Let carrots scak in cold water for 10 minutes. Fry onions and 
carrots in butter for 5 minutes. Add flour and seasoning, tomatoes, 
water and ham. When boiling pour into casserole and bake for 

2 hours. 

CHEESE CROQUETTES 

Cut into dice 1 lb. American cheese. Have ready 1 cup hot 
cream sauce. Add cheese, also yolks of 2 eggs diluted with a little 
cream. Stir and let cook until cheese is steady, season with salt, red 
and white pepper and nutmeg. Stand on ice until cold and firm. 
Form into croquettes. Roll in breadcrumbs, then in egg and again 
in crumbs. Fry in deep fat. — Mrs. F. J. Burrage. 



DEVILED EGGS 

Hard boiled eggs, remove centers, season and add a little salad 
dressing. Stuff eggs with paste and then put cold meat through food 
chopper. To the meat add thick cream sauce and cover eggs with 
meat. Dip in bread curmbs, then in yolks of eggs, then in bread 
crumbs and fry in deep fat. — Charlotte Burrage. 



21 



BAKED RICE WITH CHEESE 



1 cup rice well cooked. Mix with it 1 teaspoon salt, 2 cups 
milk. 2 beaten eggs, a little butter and 1 green pepper carefulh 
seeded, ]/ 2 lb. cheese, both put through the meat chopper. Pour into 
1 large or 2 small buttered pudding dishes, and bake long enough to 
cook the pepper. About 20 minutes. 



CUCUMBERS STUFFED AND STEWED 

Cut in half lengthwise, scoop out the seeds and fill the hollow 
with a bread or meat stuffing, or with quenelle mixture. Lay in a 
sautoir with butter enough to keep from sticking. Simmer till the 
juice flows freely, then add a little good broth and boil gently till 
very tender. Lift the slices, reduce the juice to a glaze, which may 
be dissolved in enough Velonte Sauce to cover. 

— Lillian Cooper. 



CHEESE RAREBIT 

y 2 lb. creamy rarebit cheese. 1 egg. 

1 tablespoon butter. 34 teaspoon mustard. 

], 2 cup creamy milk. 1 small teaspoon corn starch. 

Heat cream and butter, and when hot, add cheese which has 
been cut fine, and had the egg, mustard and cornstarch added to it. 
Stir constantly — don't curdle. Cook over water if possible. 

— Mrs. Charles E. Gibson. 



CHEESE FONDU 

2 large slices of bread buttered and cut into squares. *4 pound 
of cheese cut in small squares. Season with a little salt, mustard and 
paprika. Beat 2 eggs, add 2 cups of milk. Pour over bread and 
cheese. Bake for 35 minutes. — Nettie L. Fales. 



CANAPE CHEESE 

24 cup of shredded cheese. 

1 egg white, beaten stiff, salt, pepper and paprika. 

Fold cheese into egg, add seasoning. Spread on thin slices ot 
bread or toast and leave in a hot oven for 5 minutes. 

—Mrs. E. N. Kimball. 



22 



SCALLOPED EGGS AND MUSHROOMS 

6 eggs hard boiled. 

1-3 lb. fresh mushrooms. 

Make 1 cup well seasoned white sauce, to which add 1 Steero 
tablet and shredded pimento. Bake in serving dish with buttered 
crumbs or add more sauce and serve on toast. 

Boil eggs in double boiler, thereby insuring a powdered yolk. 



CHOP SUEY 

Boil 1 lb. lean hamburg with a very little water 5 minutes, then 
set aside. Fry out 2 good slices salt pork cut in small pieces. Slice 
4 or 5 large onions and fry in pork fat. Be careful not to have fat 
too hot to burn onions. Break y 2 pkg. macaroni in small pieces and 
boil about 20 minutes. Into a large kettle put hamburg, onions and 
macaroni, one can tomato soup or tomatoes, season with salt and 
pepper and mix thoroughly. Simmer on back of stove 1 hour and 
stir occasionally. Any kind of meat can be used. 



SQUAW DISH 

Cut four slices of bacon iti small pieces and fry until done, and 
into the pan add 3 eggs slightly beaten, y 2 cup canned tomatoes, 
Vi cup canned corn, a little pepper. Cook until the egg thickens and 
serve with hot toast. — Mrs. Joseph B. Ross. 



CORN FRITTERS 

1 can corn. 2 teaspoons salt. 

1 cup flour. % teaspoon paprika. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 2 eggs. 

Chop corn, drain and add dry ingredients, mixed and sifted, then 
add yolks of eggs beaten until thick, and fold in whites of eggs beaten 
stiff. Cook in a frying pan, using fresh hot lard. Drain on paper. 

—Mrs. G. B. H. Macomber. 



23 



STRING BEANS 

1 qt. beans. Pepper. 

2 teaspoons butter. 34 CU P stock. 

1 teaspoon sugar. >4 teaspoon lemon juice. 

]/ 2 teaspoon salt. 

Wash, string the beans, and cut lengthwise. Parboil 30 minutes 
Saute in a stew pan with butter and seasonings. Cook until butter is 
absorbed. Add stock and lemon juice and simmer till tender. 

— Miss Lillian Cooper. 



FRIED SUMMER SQUASH 

Slice squash ]/ 2 inch thick. Dip in egg and cracker crumbs 
Frv in hot lard until brown. — Mrs. G. B. H. Macomber. 



STRING BEANS 

String string beans carefully. Cut in V/ 2 inch lengths. To 1 
peck of string beans use *4 lb. salt pork and 1 tablespoon salt. Boil 
from 2 to 3 hours, adding y 2 teaspoon soda the last few moments of 
cooking. Drain and add as much cream as you care to use. 

— Mrs. Macomber. 



CAULIFLOWER 

Trim outside leaves and lay in salt water. Tie in pieces of 
netting and boil in salted water from 20 to 30 minutes. Serve with 
Hollandaise or cream sauce. 

Parmesan cheese may be added to cream sauce. 

— Lillian Cooper. 



POTATO CROQUETTES 

1 egg. % teaspoon onion juice. 

Beat the mashed potato until very light, add beaten egg and 
onion juice. Form while hot into rolls, crumb, egg and crumb again, 
and fry in deep fat till golden brown. Serve with parsley and cream 
sauce. — Miss Lillian Cooper. 



24 



POTATO SCONES 

Rub 34 CU P of butter with 2 cups of flour mixed and sifted with 
y 2 tablespoon salt and 
2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Add 2 cups mashed potatoes, and moisten with enough milk to 
make a soft dough. Roll out about l /2 inch thick, cut into squares 
and bake in a hot oven. 

These are delicious. — Mrs. Herbert E. Cushman. 



POTATO WHIP 

Beat 1 pint of mashed potatoes, season with salt, and pepper, 
and moisten with a little milk or cream ; 2 tablespoons of butter and 
the yolks of 2 eggs. When very light and creamy, add the well- 
beaten whites ; heap lightly on a dish and brown in the oven. 

—Mrs. Harold K. Wead. 



CHEESE FILLING 

1 cream cheese. 

1 tablespoon melted butter. 

y 2 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce. 

1-3 tablespoon anchovy paste. 

Chopped olives to taste. 

Salt and pepper 

—Mrs. E. N. Kimball. 



CHEESE BALLS 

1/^ cups grated cheese. Whites of 3 eggs, beaten well. 

1 teaspoon flour. A little salt and cayenne. 

Roll into balls, dip in beaten egg and fine cracker crumbs. 
Fry in deep fat till a delicate brown. 

— Mrs. Stanley M. Bolster. 

CHEESE SOUFFLE 

1 cup thick white sauce. 
Y<H cup grated cheese. 

4 eggs. Beat yolks and whites separately. 
Mix all together. 

Bake in a buttered dish set in pan of hot water, in moderate 
oven, }i hour. — Dora Allen. 



25 



FRIED GREEN TOMATOES 

Slice hard green tomatoes thin. 

Drop into beaten egg" well seasoned with pepper and salt. 
Cover with rolled cracker crumbs and fry a gulden brown in 
medium deep fat or until tomatoes arc tender. 
Serve immediately. 

— Mrs. I. T. Farnham. 



A SUPPER DISH 

1 pint white potatoes cut in cubes. Cook until tender. Add to 1 
pint white sauce and y 2 cup grated cheese and x / 2 cup finely cut 
sweet red peppers. 

Bake about 1 hour in glass dish, serve from same. 

—Mrs. I. T. Farnham. 



THE PRINT SHOP ON THE SQUARE" 

Ernest Fairman Dow 
printer 



993 watertown st. 
West Newton 65, Mass. 



TELEPHONE, WEST NEWTON G50 



MacKay-Newcomb Co. 



HARDWARE-KITCHEN GOODS 



FEDERAL AND HIGH STREETS 
BOSTON, MASS. 



ALL GOODS CARRY OUR ABSOLUTE GUARANTEE 



27 



MEAT AND FISH 

"Some hae meat that carina eat, 
And some would eat that want it; 

But we hae meat and we can eat, 
So let the Lord be thankit." 



SALMON LOAF 

2 small cans or 1 medium sized can of salmon. Drain off liquor in cup 

and flake salmon. 

3 eggs well beaten. 

2 tablespoons cream. 

2 tablespoons melted butter. 

Y> cup bread crumbs. 

]/\ teaspoon salt, pepper, a little chopped parsley or grated onion. 

Bake in greased pan, set in hot water, 20 minutes to y 2 hour in 
quite a hot oven. Turn out on platter and pour over it a cream sauce, 
to which salmon liquor has been added. 

— Mrs. William T. Isaac. 



SCALLOPED HADDOCK 

Steam a small haddock till it flakes, then remove the skin and 
bones, and put the fish into a deep buttered dish. Beat 1 egg with 2 
teaspoons flour and y 2 pint milk, y 2 teaspoon onion juice, }4 teaspoon 
salt and l / 2 teaspoon pepper. Pour this mixture over the fish, stir 
lightly together, cover with buttered cracker crumbs and bake from 
30 to 40 minutes. 

— Mrs. Walter Lucas. 



SALMON WITH MACARONI 

Pick 1 can red salmon into small pieces, drain off oil. 3 cups 
boiled macaroni, a little onion juice if desired, salt and pepper to 
taste. 2 cups white sauce. 

Put layer of macaroni into baking dish, then layer of sauce, then 
layer of salmon until all is used, having layer of sauce last covered 
with buttered cracker crumbs. 



WHITE SAUCE 

4 tablespoons butter, melted. Add 4 level tablespoons flour, when 
thoroughly mixed add 2 cups scalding milk and stir until thickened. 
Little salt. — H. S. G. 



28 



SHRIMP WIGGLE 

1 onion. . 2 cans shrimp. 

y 2 cup butter 1 jar cream. 

\]/ 2 cups cooked rice. Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 can tomato soup. 

Melt butter, add minced onion, soup and cream. Let come to 
boiling point and then add rice and shrimps. 

— Mrs. Lewis H. Jack. 



JAPANESE CURRY 

Fry 1 onion (sliced) in about a teaspoon of butter. When 
browned add 

1 cup chopped meat of any kind (chicken is best). 
1 cup tomato. 
1 teaspoon curry powder (more if desired). 

Bring slowly to a boil and cook five minutes : then add 
1 cup milk and bring to boil. 
Salt to taste. 

Serve hot with boiled rice and sliced banana. 

—Mrs. William F. Chase. 



CORN OYSTERS 

Grate young sweet corn to 1 pt., add 1 well beaten tgg. 
1 small cup flour. 
1 teaspoon salt. 
l / 2 gill milk. 

Mix well and fry like oysters, a teaspoonful at a time in deep 
fat. — Mrs. F. J. Burrage. 



HALLENDEN HALIBUT 

Arrange 6 thin slices fat salt pork 2 l / 2 inches square in dripping 
pan. Cover with 1 small onion thinly sliced and add a bay leaf. Wipe 
a 2 11). piece of halibut and place over pork and onion. Mix 1 table- 
spoon butter creamed with 3 tablespoons flour, and sprinkled with 
cracker crumbs. Arrange thin strips of fat salt pork over crumbs. 
Cover with buttered paper and bake 50 minutes in a moderate oven, 
removing paper during last 15 minutes to brown crumbs. Remove 
t<> hot serving dish and garnish with lemon and sprinkle with finely 
chopped parsley and paprika. 

Serve with white sauce, using fat in place of butter. 

—Mrs. G. B. H. Macomber. 



29 



CRAB MEAT A LA KING 

Parboil 2 green peppers in boiling water in which 1-3 teaspoon 
soda has been added. Cut peppers in strips. Conk them in 3 table- 
spoons butter 5 minutes, remove peppers and add 2 tablespoons flour 

and 2 tablespoons cornstarch, blend together. Then add 1 cup chicken 
stuck and 1 cup cream, or 2 cups milk, stirring- constantly until it 
thickens, add 1 can mushrooms, 2 cups crab meat, ] / 2 teaspoon onion 
juice, 34 paprika, and ' > wineglass sherry. Serve on toast. 

—Mrs. Harry S. Wells. 



FRIED OYSTERS 

Dip each oyster in beaten egg. Then roll in cracker crumbs. 
Fry in a well buttered frying pan. 

— Mrs. Clendenninsr Smith. 



STUFFED CLAMS 

Equal parts chopped round clams and bread crumbs, soaked in 
milk. Season with pepper and parsley. Mix well. Add yolk of 1 egg. 
Tut a small piece of butter in a spider, when hot, add the clam mix- 
ture. Thicken with flour until consistency of cream. Fill clam shells 
and brown in the oven. — Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



HAMBURG LOAF 

1 lb. hamburg steak. 

7 ground common crackers. 

}i teaspoon salt, pinch of pepper. 

34 teaspoon each of sage and poultry dressing. 

1 egg (well beaten). 

1 cup milk or water. 

Mix all together and press down closely in baking pan and bake 
one hour. Serve hot or cold with tomato sauce. 

—Mrs. J. W. Perry. 



BAKED SLICE HAM 

Eave ham about 1 inch in thickness and soak all day. Mix 1 
teaspoon mustard, 3 teaspoons sugar. Pour water off ham and rub 
mustard and sugar into ham. Cover with milk and bake slowly in 
moderate oven. When done, strain drippings in pan and pour ovei 

Virginia Denny Birgfeld. 



30 



SWISS STEAK 

Slice of bottom round steak (cut very thick). 
Several onions sliced, salt, pepper, suet. 

Sear the steak on both sides, place onions on top and cook (with- 
out water) in fireless cooker using 2 radiators. If made on top of 
stove in frying pan cover and cook slowly several hours. 

Very economical and very tender if cooked in fireless. 

— Mrs. P. C. Scarborough. 



HAMBURG STEAK BALLS 

2 lbs. hamburg (top round). 

2 eggs slightly beaten. 

2-3 cup milk. 

5 Boston Butter Crackers, ground up. 

Salt and pepper. 

1 teaspoon poultry dressing. 

Form in balls and bake 20 minutes. Serve with tomato sauce. 

— Mrs. A. Shirley Ladd. 



HAM BOILED IN CIDER 

Wash the ham. Cover with cold water and soak for 24 hours, 
then wipe dry. Put in a porcelain lined kettle, more than cover with 
cider and simmer gently for 15 minutes to every pound. When done, 
allow to cool in the liquor in which it is boiled. When cold remove 
the skin carefully and with a dry cloth sop the fat to make it per- 
fectly dry. Cut carrots and beets that have been boiled tender into 
fancy shapes with vegetable cutter. Place them tastefully over the 
ham. Garnish with squares of aspic jelly, parsley and olives. This 
is delicious. Virginia Denny Birgfeld. 



VEAL LOAF 

Put cold veal through the meat chopper to make 2 cups when 
ground. 
y 2 pint stock. 
l / 2 pint strained tomatoes. 

Pepper, salt, 1 onion, sprig parsley and bring to a boil. Strain 
and pour over y 2 pkg. gelatine which has stood in a little water 
5 minutes. When dissolved pour over the meat and add 1 small bot- 
tle stuffed olives (cut up), 2 tablespoons capers, a few gherkins 
chopped and a hard boiled egg sliced. 

Set to cool for 2 hours. — Mrs. Joseph B. Ross. 



31 



SMOTHERED CHICKEN 

Have large chicken split down the back, remove backbone and 
neck. Wipe chicken and place in double roasting pan, partially 
cover with equal parts milk and water, dot liberally with small pieces 
butter or oleomargarine and sprinkle with salt. Place cover on pan 
and roast in hot oven \ l / 2 hours, removing cover last 20 minutes that 
chicken may brown. Make gravy of milk and water in pan. Garnish 
with corn fritters. 



BEEF LOAF ROAST 

3 lbs. beef from bottom of round. 
34 lb. bacon. 

Put twice through meat chopper, add 1 egg and 3 crackers rolled 
hue and 1 teaspoon salt. Drop meat onto moulding board and shape, 
forming loaf desired width. Dredge with flour, salt and gepper and 
bake l / 2 hour in hot oven. When nearly done coyer top with thinly 
cut slices of bacon and cook until crisp. Makes delicious sandwiches 
for school lunch. — Mrs. Franklin S. Kurt. 



CROQUETTES 

1 cup chopped meat, veal, lamb, fowl. 

]/ 2 cup milk boiled and thickened with 1 scant tablespoon flour. 

Put in a small piece of butter, then the meat and boil up nice. 
Season to taste with salt and pepper. Shape into croquettes, dip into 
beaten egg, roll in bread crumbs and fry in deep fat. A little onion 
juice and lemon adds very much to the flavor. 



CHICKEN A LA KING 

Cut chicken in dice. 
2 tablespoons butter. 
1 tablespoon flour. 

Put flour and butter in chafing dish and mix well. Add ]/ 2 pint 
milk (but better cream). Stir thoroughly and then add chicken and 
mushrooms (1 dozen sliced fine). Then add the yolks of 2 eggs well 
beaten. Add 2 tablespoons of green peppers. When ready to serv< 
add 2 tablespoons of sherry. 

Note: — Skin mushrooms and put in cold water with slice of 
lemon about an hour before using and set in ice box. 

—Mrs. A. C. Blunt, Jr. 



32 



SOUTHERN SPLIT CHICKEN 

Split a chicken the same as for broiling. Place it in a Savory pan 
(air tight), cover the whole chicken with bacon. Add l l / 2 cnps water. 
Bake slowly for 3 hours. Thicken the rich brown gravy. 

— Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



BAKED CALVES LIVER 

Take whole liver. Wash and put in baking pan. Over this put 
strips of bacon and medium onion cut fine. Salt and pepper and 
sprinkle generously with flour. Cook for an hour in moderate oven. 

—Mrs. H. W. Birgfeld. 



VIRGINIA SMOTHERED CHICKEN 

Take small tender chicken, clean and split down back. Cut up 
medium onion. Salt and pepper to taste and sprinkle with flour. 
Add water and cook in moderate oven 20 minutes to the pound. 

—Mrs. H. W. Birs-feld. 



LAMB CROQUETTES 

1 pt. lamb (or beef or chicken) chopped with onion. 
Cream sauce of 

2 tablespoons butter. 
1 tablespoon flour. 

1 cup milk. 

2 beaten eggs. 
Seasoning. 

Add meat to cream sauce and boil 5 minutes. Remove from 
stove and add 2 beaten eggs. Return to fire and boil 2 minutes more. 
Cool. Shape into croquettes. Roll in cracker crumbs, egg, cracker 
crumbs and fry in deep fat 1 or 2 minutes. 

—Mrs. William T. Isaac. 



SMOTHERED VEAL 

Cut the veal in individual pieces. Salt a very little. Pepper well. 
Roll in flour. Put a large piece of butter in a spider, when hot, drop 
in the pieces of veal. Cook 1 minute, then turn, and cook 1 minute 
on the other side. Then cook very slowly 10 minutes on each side, 
keeping the spider well covered. — Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



33 



MOCK SQUAB 

2 lbs. bottom of round. 

Stuffing such as used for roast fowl. 

1 or 2 bay leaves, and other seasonings. 

When buying the meat ask the butcher to cut into slices % to 
y 2 inch thick, 4 inches wide and 7 — 10 inches long. 

Upon each slice place 1 tablespoon of dressing. Fold over ends 
to center, sew together. Sew ends also. This gives a rectangular 
shaped piece resembling squab prepared for roasting. 

Sear squabs carefully in frying pan, then place in kettle, adding 
bay leaves, salt, pepper, curry powder and hot water to nearly cover. 
Cook slowly about 2 hours. When done remove threads and serve 
in thickened gravy. — Mrs. E. L. Upham. 



BAKED PORK CHOPS 

Place pork chops in a deep pan. Pepper and salt well. Quarter 
and core as many apples as can possibly be put over the chops. Bake 
1 hour. — Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



All Household Budgets rec- 
ommend saving' a portion 
of one's income. 

When m&King' out your 
budg'et do not forg'et to in- 
clude an item for saving' in 
the 

WEST NEWTON 
CO-OPERATIVE BANK 



S. P. Annis 

Successor to C. G. Carley 

PLUMBING — HEATING — VENTILATING 

SHEET METAL WORKER 

HARDWARE — AUTO SUPPLIES 

64 Chestnut Street, West Newton, Mass. 

Just across the Street 

Telephone, West Newton 73 



N. J. Schneider 

Formerly with L. P. Hollander 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

LADIES' AND GENTS' GARMENTS ALTERED INTO 

LATEST STYLES 

Cleaning, Pressing, Dyeing and Repairs 

Work Called for and Delivered 295 Walnut Street 



35 



SALADS 



"To make a perfect salad there should be a spendthrift for oil. a miser 
for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and a madcap to stir the ingredients 
up and mix them well together." — Spanish Proverb. 



TWO MINUTE MAYONNAISE 

1 teaspoon mustard. 

y 2 teaspoon salt on the mustard. 

1 teaspoon sugar up to 2 tablespoons, according to taste. 

Mix well. Break over 1 egg without breaking the yolk. 

2 tablespoons acid (lemon, vinegar or pineapple). 

1 cup Mazola, adding it % cup at a time, beating with Dover egg 
beater. — Mrs. F. S. Hoyt. 



SALAD DRESSING 



1 teaspoon mustard. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 
1 tablespoon flour. 



1 tablespoon melted butter. 
Y^ cup milk. 
1-3 cup vinegar. 
1 egg- 



Mix, dry ingredients. Beat egg slightly and mix with dry. 
Add vinegar slowly, last, and put in double boiler. Stir until 
finished. —Mrs. H. R. Place. 



MAYONNAISE DRESSING 



1 cup olive oil. 

2 cups Mazola. 

% cup vinegar or lemon juice. 

Chill oil and vinegar. 

Beat 2 egg yolks until thick. Add 
1 teaspoon salt. 
l /^ teaspoon cayenne pepper. 
y 2 teaspoon mustard. 
1 tablespoon sugar. 

Add oil slowly to egg mixture, as mixture thickens, add a little 
vinegar alternately with oil. Keep dressing covered in ice box. 

—Mrs. G. B. H. M acorn ber. 



36 



COOKED MAYONNAISE 



Yz tablespoon mustard. 

Yz cup milk. 

2 tablespoons vinegar. 



2 eggs. 

3 tablespoons olive oil. 
y 2 tablespoon salt. 
l /> tablespoon sugar. 

Beat eggs to froth, add dry ingredients well mixed, and oil, a 
teaspoon at a time, beating with egg beater. 

When oil is all beaten in, add vinegar, then cold milk. 

Cook in double boiler until thick, and beat on removing from 
fire. 

Twice the above recipe makes 1 pint. 

6 tablespoons oil equals 1-3 cup. 

— Euphemia C. Dow. 



RUSSIAN DRESSING 



•}<4 cup mayonnaise made with Tarragon vinegar. 

3 tablespoons chili sauce. 

2 tablespoons chopped pimento. 

1 tablespoon Tarragon vinegar. 

1 teaspoon chopped olives. 

Y\ teaspoon Escoffier sauce. 

1 teaspoon Tarragon leaves. 

1 teaspoon chives. 



Strain throusfh sieve. 



—Mrs. G. W. Eddy. 



1 raw egg. 

1 2 cup vinegar. 

1 tablespoon sugar. 

l A teaspoon mustard. 



BOILED DRESSING 



1 tablespoon olive oil or butter. 
l / 2 teaspoon corstarch. 
Salt to taste. 



Mix egg, sugar, salt, mustard, and oil all together, add vinegar 
and cornstarch mixed with a little water. Cook until thick. 

— Mrs. Norby. 



PEAR SALAD 



Pack a can of pears in ice for 3 hours, or until cold enough to 
come out of the can in shape. Slice in round slices, put on lettuce, 
cover with Mayonnaise dressing and then with cream cheese put 
through a potato ricer. — Mrs. G. W. Eddy. 



37 



CREAM CHEESE SALAD 

2 large sweet peppers, remove seeds, and parboil 10 minutes. 

After thoroughly chilled fill with the following mixture: 
2 large cream cheeses, mashed. 
1 tablespoon olives, chopped fine. 
1 tablespoon pimentoes, chopped fine. 
1 2 tablespoon celery, chopped line. 
1 tablespoon English walnuts, chopped fine. 

Moisten with cream, and salt to taste. Fill peppers. Let stand 
until firm. Slice, and place on lettuce. Serve with French or May- 
onnaise dressing. — Mrs. G. W. Eddy. 



CUCUMBER AND PINEAPPLE SALAD JELLY 

y> package gelatine, soaked in 34 CU P of pineapple juice. 

y 2 cup sugar. 

1 level teaspoon salt. 

l / 2 pint boiling water. * 

Add 1 cup of cucumber chopped fine, 1 cup grated pineapple, 
put in small or large mould. Serve with French or Mayonnaise 
dressing. 

FRUIT SALAD— MOLDED 

1 can pineapple. 

1 cup sugar. 

1 cucumber. 

Juice of 3 lemons. 

y 2 lb. white grapes, cut in halves and seeded. 

1 package gelatine. 

1 cup cold water. 

Cut cucumber and pineapple in small pieces. 1 tfssolve gelatine 

in water. Drain the juice from the pineapple and add to the sugar 
and lemon juice. Boil 5 minutes, then add gelatine and strain and 
set until it begins to congeal, add fruit and mold. Serve with 
Mayonnaise. — Mrs. G. Edwin Peters. 

COLD SLAW 

1 teaspoon mustard. 2 tablespoons oil. 

1 small teaspoon salt. 2 tablespoons cream. 

3 tablespoons brown sugar. y 2 cup vinegar. 

Beat light yolks of 2 eggs and stir gradually into the mixture 
while it is cooking in a farina boiler. Chopped celery adds greatly 
to flavor. — Mrs. Norby. 



38 



PERFECTION SALAD 

1 envelope Knox Gelatine. y 2 cup sugar. 
y 2 cup cold water. 1 teaspoon salt. 
y 2 cup mild vinegar. y 2 onion, cut. 

2 tablespoons orange juice. 2 cups raw cabbage, cut. 
2 cups boiling water. 2 pimentoes, cut. 

Soak gelatine in cold water 5 minutes. Add salt, vinegar, onion 
juice, sugar, boiling water. 

Strain. When it begins to stiffen, add remaining ingredients 
Serve with Mayonnaise on lettuce or endive or cut in cubes and 
serve in cases made of red or green peppers. 

— Margaret Longfellow. 



TUCKER HAMLETS 

Dice cold potatoes, place in saucepan, add milk to cover, heat 
and thicken. Add 1 teaspoon butter, salt and pepper. Pour into 
serving dish. Slice cold boiled ham very thin, roll slices and stick 
one end of roll into the dish, other end will open. Lay on top be- 
tween ham — roses slices of stuffed olives and hard boiled eggs. 
Serve immediately. — Margaret Longfellow. 



CLOVER LEAF SALAD 

Cream cheese mixed with a little cream and flavored with Wor- 
cestershire Sauce, paprika and salt and mixed into a paste and put 
into green peppers from which the seeds and pulp have been re- 
moved. Pack as full as possible, then slice rather thin and place on 
lettuce leaves with French dressing. The green peppers are soaked 
first for y 2 hour in salted water. Chopped pimentoes and olives may 
be added if desired. — Mrs. H. C. French. 



HARDWARE CO. 

Telephone N. N. 760 

ADD HEATING CO. 

\J ^\ ^\ Telephone N. N. 2824 

PLUMBING CO. 

Telephone N. N. 737 
865 to 877 Washington Street, Newtonville 



Thos. L. Driscoll 

HOUSE PAINTER 

Interior Painting — Hardwood Finishing — Paper Hanging 

Mouldings — Glazing, etc. 

881 Washington Street 



NEWTONVILLE, MASS. 
Tel. Newton North 1327 



P. L. Newton F. H. Pope 

Telephone West Newton 521-W 

WILLOW FARM 

We endeavor to serve our customers with Milk 
and Cream of the best quality obtainable. 
Inspection of our plant invited at all times. 
Special Milk for Babies Also Pasteurized Milk with 

From Our Own Herd. Latest Modern Equipment. 

120 Farwell St. Newtonville 



40 



PUDDINGS 



Measures heaped or measures small 
Are not Following Rules at all. 



THANKSGIVING PUDDING 



20 crackers (common) — 1 quart. 1 cup molasses. 

3 quarts milk. 1 cup sugar. 

2 lbs. raisins. 1 teaspoon nutmeg". 

5 eggs. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

2 tablespoons butter. y 2 teaspoon clove. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

Soak crackers in milk over night. — Mrs. Ralph E. Hatch. 



OLD FASHIONED PLUM PUDDING 

1 loaf stale bread, sliced and buttered. Soak ]/ 2 hour in 2 quarts milk. 

1 package raisins. 1 good tablespoon vanilla. 

1 package currants. 5 eggs well beaten. 

1 teaspoon salt. y 2 lb. citron. 

V 2 teaspoon nutmeg. 1 cup molasses. 

]/ 2 teaspoon cinnamon. Sugar to taste. 

l /[ teaspoon clove. 1 quart milk. 

Bake 5 or 6 hours in slow oven. Serve with hard sauce. 
1 cup butter, 2 cups confectioners sugar, creamed together. Add 
1 egg well beaten. Vanilla. — Mrs. F. W. Putnam. 



BOILED GINGERBREAD PUDDING 

l / 2 loaf stale gingerbread (one may use stale cake or doughnuts by 
seasoning with ginger), soaked in a little cold water, until very 
soft. 

l / 2 cup molasses. 

1 (small) tablespoon ground cloves. 

1 (small) tablespoon ground cinnamon. 

Beat 1 egg and y 2 cup sugar together and add to above ingred- 
ients. Take as much fruit as desired (raisins, currants and citron) 
and rub into flour. Add to mixture 3 teaspoons baking powder, sifted 
into enough flour to make mixture drop — not run — from spoon. 
Put into pudding tin and steam 6 hours. Serve hot, with hard or 
liquid sauce or whipped cream. — Mrs. William T. Isaac. 



41 



"SO DELICIOUS" 

1 pint thick cream — whipped. 

1 cup chocolate sauce. 

Sponge cake, cut in small pieces. 

Mix the pieces of cake in the whipped cream and place in a round 
mold and leave for 15 minutes, then turn out and pour chocolate 
sauce in the hole in the center. — Elizabeth \Y. Brace. 



BUTTERSCOTCH MOLD 

Cook together 1 cup of brown sugar and 2 tablespoons of but- 
ter till a very dark brown, but be sure that it does not burn. Pour 
this into 3 cups of scalded milk. Cook in a double boiler until the 
butterscotch is melted in the milk. Then pour it over 2 tablespoons 
of granulated gelatine soaked in *4 cup of cold milk. Stir until dis- 
solved and when the mixture begins to stiffen add 1 cup of boiled 
rice cooked very tender. Serve with whipped cream. 



LEMON RICE OR LEMON BREAD PUDDING 

1 cup rice cooked soft or 4 egg yolks 

2 cups stale bread crumbs. Rind of 1 lemon grated. 
Piece butter size of egg. 4 cups cold sweet milk. 

Mix and bake in serving dish. When cool beat whites of 4 eggs 
stiff, add 2 cups granulated sugar and juice of 1 lemon. 

Pour over the pudding and bake in a moderate oven till brown 
and cooked. Serve cold. If meringue be baked too fast it will fall. 
Yz or l /^ of the quantity may be made equally as well. 

— Mrs. Franklin S. Kurt. 



COFFEE GELATINE 

Yolks of 4 eggs, 6 tablespoons of granulated sugar, ' _. box of 
gelatine, dissolved, and a cup of strong coffee. 1 pint of milk, y 2 
pint of cream, whipped stiff. Beat yolks of eggs and sugar until 
light. Heat milk and add to eggs and boil a few minutes, beating all 
the time. Add coffee and gelatine. When cold but not stilt' add 
cream, put in dish and place on ice to harden. 

— Mrs. Andreas llartel. 



42 



ORANGE TRIFLE 



Juice of 3 oranges. 

Mix with l / 2 box of Jello and set to jell. When hard beat in 
Yz pint of whipped cream. If desired sprinkle with chopped nuts. 
This serves 6 persons. — Marion E. Burrage. 



COLD PINEAPPLE SOUFFLE 

Yolks 3 eggs. y 2 cup cream. 

y 2 cup sugar. Whites of 3 eggs. 

2-3 cup grated pineapple. Juice of 1 lemon. 

1 tablespoon gelatine. Few grains salt. 
1-3 cup cold water. 

Beat egg yolks slightly, add lemon juice, sugar and salt. Cook 
in double boiler until mixture begins to thicken, stirring constantly. 
Remove from range and add pineapple and gelatine, which should 
have stood in the cold water 5 minutes. Let mixture cool and when 
it begins to thicken add cream, beaten until stiff and then whites of 
eggs, also beaten until stiff. Pour in jelly mold. 



CHRISTMAS PUDDING 

\y 2 lbs raisins. 1 gill brandy. 

\y 2 lbs. currants. 1 lb. sugar. 

\]/ 2 lbs. bread crumbs. Rind and juice of 2 lemons. 

1 lb. beef suet (chopped fine). 1 pint milk. 

l /2 lb. citron (chopped fine). Spices to taste. 

Y\ lb. candied orange peel " l / 2 lb. blanched almonds. 

34 lb. candied lemon peel " " 12 eggs. 

Flour the fruit before mixing with other ingredients. Steam 
6 hours. — Mrs. Andreas Hartel. 



■ POOR MAN'S PUDDING 

1 cup suet chopped fine. 1 cup sweet milk. 

1 cup molasses. 1 large teaspoon baking powder. 

1 cup chopped raisins. 2 cups flour. 

Mix all together and steam 3 hours. Salt and spice to taste. 

Sauce 
1 cup cream or milk, 1 cup sugar, a small piece of butter. Boil 5 
minutes. Lemon or vanilla extract may be added. 

—Mrs. Wm. Kellar. 



4.1 



DATE PUDDING 



1 cup sour milk. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 cup sugar or molasses. 1 lb. dates, stoned. 

1 teaspoon butter. Spices to suit. 

Stir quite stiff with flour. Steam 2 hours. Serve with slightly 
whipped cream and sugar. — Mrs. Win. E. Gill. 



TROY PUDDING 



Cream 1 large tablespoon butter (or substitute) and 1 scant 
tablespoon sugar. Add : 
Yz cup molasses. 1 even teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 teaspoon soda. 1 heaping teaspoon allspice. 
*/2 cup milk. 1 cup raisins, cut rather fine. 

2 cups flour. 1 egg. 



Steam 2 x / 2 hours and serve with hard sauce. 

—Mrs. G. B. H. 



Macomber. 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE 

Dissolve 1 ounce of gelatine in l / 2 pint of milk. Beat the whites 
of three eggs to a stiff froth, then add 4 ounces of pulverized sugar. 
Whip 1 quart of cream and stir the mixture. Flavor with sherry 
wine and pour in molds lined with sponge cake or lady fingers. 

— Mrs. Andreas 11 artel. 



PLUM PUDDING 



12 butter crackers, roll and soak in 3 pints milk. 

1 cup sugar and 1-3 cup butter, creamed together. 

4 eggs well beaten. 

]/ 2 teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon mixed spice. 

1 lb. best raisins. 

Bake 3 to 4 hours in a slow oven, stirring 2 or 3 times the first 
hour. —Mrs. F. Paul W'elsch. 



44 



ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING 

1 qt. seeded raisins. 1 heaping qt. stale bread crumbs. 

1 pint currants. 8 eggs (beaten separately). 

Yz pint citron (cut up). 1 pint sugar. 

1 qt. apples (peeled & chopped). % teaspoon nutmeg. 

1 qt. fresh, chopped beef suet. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 quart sweet milk. 

Flour fruit thoroughly from a quart of flour, then mix remainder 
as follows : 

In a large bowl or tray put eggs, with sugar, nutmeg and milk. 
Stir in fruit, bread crumbs and suet, one after the other until all are 
used, adding enough flour to make fruit stick together (which will 
take about all the quart). Dip pudding cloth in boiling water, dredge 
on inside thick coating of flour, put in the pudding and tie tightly, 
allowing room to swell. Boil 2 to 3 hours in large kettle with plenty 
of water, adding more as needed. This is enough for 20 people. 
*/> the recipe can be made just as well. 

— Mrs. Glover S. Hastings. 

COFFEE BAVARIAN 

1 cup coffee. 1 cup powdered sugar. 

3 scant tablespoons gelatine. 1 pint cream, whipped. 

Soak gelatine in cold milk, pour on it the hot coffee, add sugai 
and ]/2 teaspoon vanilla. When dissolved set away to cool. 

Whip cream and add to gelatine mixture when it begins to 
stiffen. Beat or stir until thoroughly mixed. 

—Mrs. H. B. Patrick. 



GLORIFIED RICE 

1 package lemon Jell-o and y 2 pint boiling water, stir well. 
Acid I cup raspberry juice taken from a can of raspberries. When 
cold, but not solid, whip to consistency of heavy whipped cream. 
Add 2 cups cold boiled rice (cooked dry). Have 1 cup whipped 
cream ready, sweetened to taste. Fold all together, turn into glass 
serving dish and place on ice until ready to use. 

A very attractive, nourishing and practical dessert for about 
12 people. — Mrs. F. R. Furbush. 

PINEAPPLE WHIP 

Mix 1 can grated pineapple and l /i lb. marshmallows, cut in 
small pieces, and let stand over night. Just before serving whip 1 
cup cream to which a little sugar has been added, and whip all to- 
gether. — Mrs. Sargent. 



45 



VIENNOISE PUDDING 

1 or 2 cups soft bread crumbs. 3 cups milk. 

1 cup dried currants. 3 eggs (beaten light). 

1 teaspoon salt. Yi cup sugar (cooked to caramel). 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. or 1-3 cup maple syrup. 

Mix and bake in a pan of water in a moderate oven as you 
would custard. Serve with cream. 

— Mrs. Stuart Gibson. 



JERUSALEM PUDDING 

1 tablespoon granulated gelatine soaked in % cup cold water 
for 20 minutes. Dissolve in a little hot water. 
1 cup cold cooked rice. 
1 jar heavy whipped cream. 
1 cup sugar. 

Mix ingredients, flavor with vanilla and mould. Serve with 
some preserved fruit poured on it. —Mrs. A. Shirley Ladd. 



RASPBERRY FLOAT 

Beat the whites of 3 eggs, thoroughly. Add to them 3 tablespoons 
of raspberry jam and 1 tablespoon of sugar. Beat all lightly. Place 
on the ice until ready to serve. Serve with whipped cream. 

— Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



TAFFY TAPIOCA 

1 _. cup minute tapioca. 1}4— 2 cups brown sugar. 

3 cups cold water. Mapleine may be added. 

Cook in double boiler 2>4 to 3 hours. Serve cold with whipped 
cream. — Mrs. E. L. Upham. 



COFFEE CUSTARD 

1 ' j cups coffee and -}_i cup milk, heat in double boiler. 

Beat 1 egg and add -y\ cup sugar and 1 large tablespoon corn- 
starch. Add to contents of double boiler, stirring until it thickens. 
Flavor with vanilla. Serve cold with whipped cream. 

— Miss Davis. 



46 



APPLE BETTY 

8 medium sized apples, peeled and chopped quite fine. (There should 

be 1 pint when prepared.) 

1 pint bread crumbs. 1 cup sugar. 

x 4 teaspoon salt. 1 tablespoon butter. 

1 large cup boiling water. 

Put all these on to boil up until ready to pour over the apples 
and bread crumbs. 

Butter a pudding dish. Put in a layer of bread crumbs, then a 
layer of apples, etc.. ending with crumbs on top. Pour over this the 
boiling mixture and bake until apples are done. 

—Mrs. A. C. Blunt, Jr. 



SPICED FRUIT JELLY 

2 cups milk. ^ cup boiling water. 

1 ounce unsweetened chocolate. 1 cup raisins. 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup currants. 

2 tablespoons granulated gelatine. J4 lb- citron. 

y 2 cup cold water. 54 teaspoon cinnamon. 

Heat milk in double boiler. Dissolve in it, chocolate and sugar. 
When scalded, add gelatine soaked in cold water 20 minutes, and 
dissolved in boiling Avater. Let simmer in a little water, raisins, 
currants and citron (cut in small pieces). 

Drain thoroughly and add to custard, also add cinnamon. Mold, 
chill and serve with whipped cream. 

—Mrs. Joseph T. Eddy. 



FLOATING ISLAND 

1 quart milk. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

T /2 cup sugar. 1 tablespoon cornstarch. 

4 eggs. 

Put the milk on to boil in a farina boiler. Beat the whites of the 
eggs to a dry stiff, put them, a few spoonfuls at a time, on top of the 
boiling milk. Let cook 1 minute and then remove with skimmer. 
Now beat the yolks of eggs, sugar, and cornstarch together until 
light, then stir them into the boiling milk. Stir until it thickens 
(about 1 minute). Take from the fire, add the vanilla and stand aside 
to cool. When cold pour into glass dish v heap on the whites of eggs. 
Dot here and there with bits of currant jelly. Dust with powdered 
sugar and serve very cold. This will serve 8 persons. 

Virginia Denny Birgfeld. 



47 



ORANGE CUSTARD 

Rub 1 tablespoon of butter with 1 cup of sugar. Add tbe beaten 
yolks of 3 eggs and beat until very light. Add the juice and a portion 
of the grated yellow rind of 1 large orange, the beaten white of 1 egg 
and 1^4 cup of milk. Pour the mixture into buttered custard cup- 
stand them in a pan y 2 filled with boiling water and bake until nearly 
set. Beat the 2 egg whites until stiff, fold in 2 tablespoons of pow- 
dered sugar, put a large sp< onful on each custard, brown slightly in 
oven and cool. — Mrs. Earl Glover. 



GRAPE NUT PUDDING 



1 cup grape nuts. 

]A cup raisins (seeded). 



y 2 cup sugar. 



2 well beaten eggs. 

1 pint milk. 

34 teaspoon cinnamon. 

Salt. 



Mix ingredients, allow to stand l / 2 hour. Cook in pan of water 
1 hour. Serve with favorite sauce. — Mrs. E. L. Upham. 



SHREDDED WHEAT PUDDING 

2 shredded wheat biscuits. } 2 to 1 cup coffee. 

1 or 2 eggs beaten. (left from breakfast). 

1 cup sugar. Salt. 

1 pint milk. Mapleine. 

Mix these ingredients and allow to stand y 2 hour. Cook in pan 
of water about 1 hour. Serve with cream. 

— Mrs. E. L. Upham. 



BREAD CUSTARD PUDDING 



Soak 6 or 7 pieces of stale bread in 1 quart of scalded milk. Beat 
up well with spoon until smooth. Add 
34 teaspoon salt. 
5 tablespoons sugar. 
2 eggs (unbeaten). 
Vanilla to taste. 
Scant cup seedless raisins. 
Piece butter size of walnut. 

Beat again. Put in well greased pudding dish and hake until 
firm in moderate oven. 

—Mrs. H. \V. Birgfeld. 



48 



CHOCOLATE RICE PUDDING 

2 cups scalded milk. 1 cup brown sugar. 

1 square chocolate. 2 eggs. 

\ l / 2 cups boiled rice. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Mix milk and chocolate and pour over the rice. Let stand ^ hour, 
then add the slightly beaten eggs, sugar and vanilla. Bake in moderate 
oven 20 minutes. — Mrs. A. Shirley Ladd. 



COTTAGE PUDDING 

1 pint flour ( 2 cups). 1 egg. 
Butter size of an egg. Salt. 

2 tablespoons sugar. 1 cup sweet milk. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. Bake 20 minutes.. 

Sauce 

Beat the yolks of 2 eggs with 1 cup sugar. Put in double boiler 
to get hot. Stir until hot, then add the whites beaten stiff. Flavor last 
of all with a small piece of butter and a little vanilla. 

—Mrs. A. C. Blunt, Jr. 



STUFFED PINEAPPLE 

Cut off the top and carefully remove the inside with a spoon 
Chop the pineapple fine. Add ]A cup of chopped figs, ]/ 2 cup oi 
chopped walnuts, 1 cup sugar. Fill the jacket of the pineapple with 
the mixture, put on the top (which was cut off). Place on a round 
platter, garnish with green. Serve with whipped cream. 

— Mrs. Clendenningf Smith. 



STEAMED COTTAGE PUDDING 

1 egg. • 2 tablespoons sugar. 

1 cup sweet milk. 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

2 cups flour. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Steam 1 hour. 

Sauce for Same 
1 cup sugar. 
l / 2 cup butter. 
1 cup cold fruit (raspberries, strawberries or peaches). 

Cream butter and sugar and add fruit, crushed. 

—Mrs. A. S. Woods. 



49 



UNBAKED PRUNE WHIP 

1 lb. prunes. ]/ 2 cup sugar. 

Whites of 5 eggs. Lemon extract. 

Salt. 

Cook prunes in small amount of water, remove stones. Press 
pulp through colander, and add sugar, extract and salt. 

Beat whites until stiff, add a tablespoon at a time of mixture and 
continue beating until pulp is used. Serve with boiled custard made 
from yolks of eggs. — Mrs. E. L. Upham. 



DELIGHT PUDDING 

2 cups of brown sugar or maple syrup, 3 cups of water, 3 table- 
spoons tapioca, pinch salt, and soak over night in double boiler. 
Next day cook until tapioca is clear, then add 1 cup of chopped wal- 
nuts, piece of butter size of walnut, teaspoon vanilla. Mix well and 
put in dish to chill. Serve with whipped cream. 

— Mrs. Arthur \Y. Yaughan. 



FROZEN DESSERT 

Put 2 cups grape juice in a brown bread mould. Beat 1 pint 
cream, add 1 teaspoon vanilla, sweeten to taste, pinch of salt, 3 table- 
spoons chopped nuts. Put on top of grape juice. Put waxed paper 
over top, under cover, and pack in salt and ice (2-3 salt and 1-3 ice). 
Let stand 4 hours. Remove from mould and serve. 

—Mrs. G. W .Eddy. 



FOUNDATION CUSTARD FOR ICE CREAM 

1 cup milk. 2 level tablespoons flour. 

1 cup sugar. 2 eggs. 

Cook until it thickens, add flavoring, and when cool mix in ] / 2 
pint or less of heavy cream. 

— Mrs. Quincy Wales. 



ORANGE FRAPPE 

y 2 pint cream, whipped stiff, add 4 tablespoons milk, x / 2 cup 
sugar, juice of 2 oranges, ]/ 2 dozen macaroons rolled fine. 

Pack in ice and salt, let stand 4 or 6 hours. 

This serves 4 people. — Mrs. C. A. \Y\ man. 



50 



CARAMEL MOUSSE 

1-3 cup sugar caramelled. }i cup sugar. 

1 large cup milk. 1 egg. 

Make custard. When cool add 1 cup whipped cream. Pack in 
ice and salt and let stand 3 or 4 hours. 

—Mrs. O. W. Nelson. 



LEMON MILK SHERBET 

6 cups milk. 4 lemons. 

2 jars cream. 2 J / 2 cups sugar. 

2 heaping teaspoons of powdered gelatine which has been dissolved 

in a little hot milk. 

Add lemon last, and freeze. 

—Mrs. F. S. Hardy. 



MAPLE ICE CREAM 

y 2 pint cream. 

Y> cup maple syrup. 

2 eggs. 

Beat the whites of eggs stiff. Whip the cream thoroughly. Then 
whip all together. Freeze. — Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



A DAINTY DESSERT 

Dissolve 1 package of Jello (or any prepared gelatine) in 1 pint 
of boiling water. Set on ice to harden. 

Heat 1 pint milk in a double boiler. When hot, add the beaten 
yolks of 2 eggs, a little salt and y 2 cup sugar. When it thickens 
remove from the fire, flavor and set on ice to cool. 

Just before serving beat the whites of 2 eggs to a stiff froth, 
add a little powdered sugar and a little lemon juice to taste. 

To serve : cut gelatine into cubes and pile into individual glass 
dishes : pour custard around it and put a spoonful of the beaten whites 
on top. If raspberry flavor gelatine is used a teaspoonful of raspberry 
jam on the top makes a most attractive dish. 

— Mrs. James P. Ramee. 



51 



CARROT PUDDING 

Grind 1 cup of carrots fine. 

Grind 1 cup raw potatoes. 

1 cup sugar. 

y 2 cup shortening (suet preferred). 

1 teaspoon soda. 

Y? teaspoon salt. 

Flour enough for a stiff batter and steam 4 hours. 

Any pudding sauce. —Mrs. E. G. Mills. 



PRUNE WHIP 

Simmer 3 large prunes until soft and chop fine. Add the beaten 
whites of 3 eggs and l / 2 cup white sugar. Put in a mould and set in 
a pan of water in the oven for about 20 minutes, being careful that 
it does not burn. Serve cold with cream. Add whipped cream if de- 
sired. —Miss C. R. Dummer. 



STRAWBERRY WHIP 

1 quart of strawberries thoroughly mashed. 

1 cup sugar. 

y? lb. marshmallows cut in halves. 

Beat all together thoroughly and let it stand over night. Beat 
again before serving. Serve with whipped cream. 

— Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



BUTTER SCOTCH SAUCE 

4 tablespoons butter. 

y 2 cup sugar. 

\y> teaspoons light colored molasses. 

y> teaspoon vinegar. 

2 tablespoons boiling water. 

Cook slowly until right consistency. 

— Mrs. A. S. Woods. 



ORANGE SABAYON SAUCE 

Beat 1 whole egg and 1 yolk. Gradually beat in 1-3 cup sugar 
Set dish over hot water. Add grated rind of orange, 1-3 cup orange 
juice and 1 tablespoon lemon juice. Continue beating until thick as 
boiled custard. — Mrs. Stuart Gibson, 



52 



HOT CHOCOLATE SAUCE 

1 square chocolate. 1 cup sugar. 

1 tablespoon butter. y 2 teaspoon vanilla. 

1-3 cup boiling water. 

Cook in double boiler 15 minutes or longer. 

—Mrs. Harry F. Gibbs. 



CHOCOLATE SAUCE 
To use with bread pudding or ice cream 

Cream 1 scant cup of butter and 1 cup sugar in small bowl. 
Shave into this 1 square of unsweetened chocolate. Set bowl into 
hot water and stir into mixture 2 tablespoons hot water. When 
ready to serve add 1 teaspoon vanilla and ^4 CU P n °t milk. 



PUDDING SAUCE 

Butter, size of an egg. 

1 cup pulverized sugar beaten to a cream. 

Beat 1 egg, then beat into the mixture, beating all till very light 
Set bowl over teakettle till hot, stirring all the time. Add small 
wineglass of sherry just before serving. 

—Mrs. Norby. 



Carl E,. Nordstrom 

Painter and Decorator 

17 Chestnut Street 
WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

West Newton. 1075-W 



Linnell MarKet 

Fresh, Salt and Smoked Fish, Oysters, Clams, Lobsters, Etc, 
in their Season 

1277 Washington Street, West Newton, Mass. 

Telephones: West Newton 302; 1380. 



Independent of All Trusts Tel. West Newton 51474 

A. P. McPherson 

981 Watertown Street, West Newton, Mass. 
Gasolene — Linseed Oil Soap — Cylinder Oil — Gear and Transmis- 
sion Grease — Tires, Tubes and Automobile Sundries 




This is Another StudebaKer Year 



Telephone 1300-1301 Newton North 



BUY AT HOME 



Evans Motor Car Company 

BrooK Street 

Newton 



This is Our Fifteenth Year in Our Present Location 



55 



PIES 



The maid who wisely wields her Household Art 
In World affairs plays no mean part! 



MOCK MINCE-MEAT 

1 lb. chopped suet. 

2 lbs. bread crumbs. 
2 lbs. currants. 

2 lbs. raisins. 

3 lbs. brown sugar. 

1 lb. citron and orange peel. 

4 chopped apples. 

1 tablespoon each cinnamon and cloves. 
)A tablespoon mace. 
y 2 tablespoon salt. 
3 quarts cider. 

Boil cider, sugar and spices and pour over other ingredients, 

— Florence C. Thomas. 



PUMPKIN PIE 

To 1 heaping pint of pumpkin take 4 eggs, 1 quart of milk, a 
lump of butter size of an egg, 1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, y 2 
teaspoon allspice, y 2 nutmeg, a little salt. 

This is enough for 3 pies. — Mrs. Guy C. Holbrook. 

SOUR CREAM PIE 

1 cup sour cream. 
1 cup sugar. 

1 cup seeded raisins. 

2 eggs. 

A little salt and all kinds spice. 

Mix all togetber and bake with 2 crusts. 

— Mrs. Clarence M. Glazier. 

COFFEE WHIPPED CREAM FILLING 

1 cup strong coffee, \ 2 cup sugar, boiled down to y 2 cup. Cool and 
add to y 2 pint heavy cream. Whip stiff. 

— Mrs. Clarence M. Glazier. 



56 



BUTTERSCOTCH PIE 

5 eggs (yolks). 

2 cups brown sugar (heaping). 

Butter size of an egg. 

l /2 teacup flour. 

Beat up thoroughly. 

Heat 1 quart milk and add first mixture and cook until it thick- 
ens well. 

Meringue for top of pie. — Mrs. F. S. Blodgett. 



BUTTERSCOTCH PIE 

1 cup brown sugar and 2 tablespoons flour (rounding full). Mix 
thoroughly. 

1 egg ( well beaten). 

2 cups sweet milk. 

Cook, stirring constantly, until beginning to thicken, then place 
in double boiler and allow to cook slowly a few minutes. Add 1 gen- 
erous tablespoon cold butter and 1 scant teaspoon vanilla. 

Allow to cool a little before turning into crust (already baked). 
Top with meringue. — Mrs. Fred R. Furbush. 



RAISIN PIE 

Pour boiling water over 1 cup of raisins, drain, remove seeds, 
then add 1 cup of boiling water, and cook gently until tender. Mix 1 
rounded tablespoon of flour with 1 cup of sugar and y 2 saltspoon of 
salt. Stir this into the raisins and stir and cook until thick. Remove 
from the fire, add 2 well beaten eggs and 1 tablespoon of lemon 
juice, turn into a pie plate lined with paste, cover with paste having 
3 or 4 slits in it and bake in a moderate oven. 



MOCK MINCE PIE 

1 cup thick sour milk. 1 cup sugar. 

1 egg. 1 cup chopped raisins. 

1 teaspoon each of clove, cinnamon and allspice, salt. 

Bake with 2 crusts. — Mrs. S. B. Sargent. 



AT THE TOY SHOP 




Party Favors 
Place Cards 
Tally Cards 
Dennison 
Decorations 



TOYLAND HERE ALL THE YEAR 



E. S. BALL 



609 Main Street, WALTHAM 
Directly opposite City Hall 





t>od (Shepherd 

in Jock TTlesh Cocoon Sa//s. 



S. M. KIMBALL 


West Newton 


F. D. TARLTON & CO. 


We»t Newton 


THE GRAY SHOP 


Auburndale 


D. B. NEEDHAM 


Newtonville 


OTIS BROTHERS 


Newton 


HUDSON'S CLOTH SHOP 


Newton 


MISS H. S. BLOOD 


Waban 


F. D. BOND CO. 


Newton Centre 



IIIIIIMIIIIIIIIII11IIIII1IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII[IIIHIII1IIIMIIIIIIII1I1IIMI1I!1[|1MIIIII1II1IIIII1I1III|I||L 



IIIIMMIIIIIIIIIIIIF. 




In preparation for the Social Season's activi- 
ties, Evening Wraps and Gowns should now be 
sent to us. They'll be returned delicately cleansed 
and freshened. 

We also cleanse rugs, curtains, portieres, 
blankets and all household goods and our dyeing 
is unexcelled. 

A trial order will convince you. 



Executive Office and Works 
30 Washburn St., Watertown, Mass. 

Telephones 
Newton North, 1850—2176 

36 West St., Boston, Mass.— Beach 1960 

17 Church St., Winchester, Mass.— Win. 528 

99 Union St., Newton Centre, Mass.— Ctr. New. 1027- J 

1370A Beacon St., Brookline, Mass.— Bkln. 7162-R 



YOU OWE IT TO YOURSELF 

To See and to Drive the Single-Six 

AT THE ORIENTAL BAZAAR 



High Gasoline Mileage - - \ 7 to 20 miles a gallon 

Light Tire Mileage - - 15,000 miles 

Light Weight - - - Touring Car — 2920 pounds 

High Efficiency Low Cost of Upkeep Low Depreciation 



We invite you to get behind 

the wheel and see for yourself why we call it 

a 10- Year Car. 



Packard Motor Car Company of Boston 

1089 Commonwealth Avenue Telephone, Brighton 800 



Compliments of a friend to the 

NEWTON BUREAU OF HOUSEHOLD OCCUPATIONS 

306 Walnut Street Newtonville 



Telephone Newton North 3480 

Hours: Week-days 9.15 to 12.15 

Excepting Saturdays and Holidays 



RULES 



The Bureau furnishes no resident help. 

The fee for registration in the Bureau is 
One Dollar for 1 month's service or $3.00 for 
yearly membership. 

The monthly fee entitles one to service for 
thirty days. A worker may for thirty days 
take as many places as he or she can satis- 
factorily fill. Any arrangement mutually 
agreed upon in regard to continuance in these 
places may be made without further payment 
to the Bureau. If at the end of the thirty 
days a worker returns for new places a new 
registration fee must be paid. 

In the case of both employer and worker 
the thirty days dates from the first engage- 
ment made and filled. 

An employer may use the Bureau for thirty 
days after registration to secure any sort of 
worker the Bureau has listed ; — thus if she 
applies for a laundress and later for a wait- 
ress and a seamstress, all these needs will be 
filled under the original fee. 

A worker receives 40 cents per hour for all 
regular work. (Information regarding special 
rates for special services may be obtained 



from the Secretary.) 

A worker employed for more than four 
hours pays carfare up to 20 cents, the em- 
ployer paying any balance. The employer 
pays all carfare when the worker is employed 
for four hours or less. 

A worker is to take her own lunch with 
her, the employer being encouraged to fur- 
nish a cup of hot coffee, tea or soup. If pre- 
ferred by both parties, a hot meal may be 
served to the worker for which 25 cents is to 
be deducted at the end of the day to cover 
the cost of the food. 

A worker must telephone or in some way 
communicate with the employer if unable to 
fill an engagement, and the same courtesy is 
expected from the employer. 

It will be considered a favor to have fail- 
ures on the part of the employer or workei- 
reported to the office that misunderstandings 
may be adjusted, mistakes corrected and it 
possible remedies found. 

Make your telephone calls as brief as pos- 
sible. 



SUGGESTIONS~-Of fered in a Helpful Spirit 

Hoping they may assist our workers to be more efficient and our 
employers to receive the maximum of satisfactory service 



EMPLOYERS:— 

State quite clearly just what you wish to 
have done. 

If you intend leaving the worker alone, a 
brief penciled list of duties is most helpful, 
especially to a worker going to you for the 
first time. She may quite naturally be ner- 
vous, and possibly be hampered with a short 
memory. 

The things which must be done without 
fail place first upon your list, and follow them 
by those to be done if time permits. 

If you have personal preferences as to the 
method used, be sure to state them, giving 
your directions in detail, and slowly, that the 



worker may follow you. Remember she is 
human and fallible, and repetition may be 
necessary to ensure satisfactory performance 
of work. 

Be reasonable. Do not expect too much 
accomplished in a brief period. 

Be careful if you lay out work which Must 
Be Finished, then pay the worker to a given 
time, leaving her alone while you go out, 
that you later ascertain whether you owe her 
for any time. Many reports come to the of- 
fice of half, three quarters, even whole hours 
thus given to employers and never recom- 
pensed. 



READ YOUR 
FORTUNE 

in your Savings Bank Book. Get out that little 
book and look it over. What does it show? Is 
there a long list of regular deposits, did you 
start right and keep it up or has resolution 
wavered? That little book is the surest for- 
tune teller, it forecasts your future, it indicates 
a life of work and worry — or — it indicates 
comfort and satisfied ambition later on. Look 
that book over often. Bring it here often, even 
if the sum you bring with it is small. 

^^ This is a Massachusetts Mutual Savings 
Bank, and SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 
means what it says. 
WEST NEWTON SAVINGS BANK 




The MUTUAL SAVINGS BANKS of United States are 
conducting a campaign for 

"TWENTY MILLION SAVERS BY 1930." 

Help us get our quota by opening an account 
NOW. 



"Madam, Shall I Put Ice in the Baby's Glass? 

"Baby," a Miss of about five summers, was lunching 
with "Mother" at a famous tea room. Little Miss 
America — like all Americans — likes a sparkling bit 
of crinkly ice in her glass. Mother immediately an- 
swered the waitress, "Yes, if it is Purity Ice." 

Mother may always say "yes" when the ice is Purity 
Ice, for it is made from Newton drinking water, frozen 
under ideal conditions, absolutely clean and pure and 
delivered only by trucks. 



If 



If you are not using it, you are not only behind the times, but you are 
missing one of the good things that makes life worth living. 



PURITY ICE COMPANY, Inc. 

Telephone Centre Newton 69. 




The New Reo Six Closed Models 

The ultimate of taste and refinement in automobile design 
and construction at a moderate price. 

REO dependability supplemented by the best coach build- 
ing America can produce. 



Four-pass. Coupe $2700 Five-pass. Sedan $2750 

Business Coupe $2150 Seven-pass. Touring $1685 

Prices f. o. b. Lansing, Mich. Federal tax to be added. 



LINSCOTT MOTOR COMPANY 

566 Commonwealth Avenue Boston 

Near Kenmore Station. 



TUCKER BARTHOLOMEW & CO. 

STOCK BROKERS 

50 Congress Street, Boston, Mass. 



Compliments of 

BOSTON NEWS BUREAU 



57 



WASHINGTON PIE 



1-3 cup butter. 

1 cup sugar. 

2 eggs. 

y 2 cup milk. 



\y 2 cups pastry flour. 
y 2 teaspoon soda. 
1 teaspoon cream tartar. 
y 2 teaspoon vanilla. 

— Mrs. Ernest C. Reed. 



MOCK MINCE PIE 



1 scant cup water. 
Y2 cup molasses. 



y 2 cup butter. 
1-3 cup vinegar. 
y 2 cup sugar. 

Cook together for a very few minutes, then add 
chopped fine, 3 crackers rolled fine, 2 eggs well beaten. 
This is enough filling for 2 large pies. 

—Mrs. O. \Y. 



lb raisins. 



Nelson. 



PIE CRUST 

3 cups flour. 1 scant cup lard. 

34 teaspoon salt. y 2 cup boiling water. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Mix dry ingredients, then add lard and mix well with fingers. 
Add water and finish mixing with silver knife. This amount will 
make one 2 layer pie and 1 layer for custard pie. 

—Mrs. H. W. Birgfeld. 



LEMON PIE 



4 eggs. 

4 tablespoons powdered sugar. 

y 2 cup sugar. 



3 tablespoons hoi water. 
Piece of butter size of walnut. 
1 lemon. 



Mix yolks of eggs, sugar (y 2 cup), butter and boiling water, 
grated lemon and juice of lemon. Cook over boiling water until same 
thickens. Set aside to cool. Whip whites of eggs to a dry stiff and 
add gradually 4 tablespoons powdered sugar. Mix this with the 
cooked custard and put in the already baked pie shell. Brown. 

—Mrs. II. \V. Birarfeld. 



58 



PINEAPPLE PIE 

1 can grated pineapple. 3 medium tablespoons flour. 

I 1 /? cups sugar. 1 egg. 

l / 2 cup water. Salt. 

Bake with 2 crusts. This makes 2 pies. 

— Mrs. Sydney B. Sargent. 



SOUTHERN SWEET POTATO PIE 

Wash and cook 4 nice size sweet potatoes with skin left on. 
When done take off skin and mash. Add the yolks of 3 eggs, piece 
butter size of walnut, 4 tablespoons sugar, vanilla and enough milk 
to make consistency of custard. Put in uncooked pie shell and bake 
in moderate oven until firm. Beat the whites of eggs to a dry stiff 
and 3 tablespoons powdered sugar, beating continually. Flavor with 
vanilla and cover top of pie. — Mrs. H. W. Birgfeld. 



CHOCOLATE PIE 

2 cups milk. 2 tablespoons cornstarch. 

2 eggs, whites for frosting. Pinch salt. 

Yz cup sugar 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat eggs, sugar and cornstarch together and pour into milk, 
and stir until it thickens, let cool and flavor. Pour into crust which 
has been baked, and frost. — Mrs. B. W. Moore. 



MOCK CHERRY PIE 

2 cups sliced cranberries. 1 tablespoon flour. 

1 large cup water. 2 small cups sugar. 

2 teaspoons vanilla. Pinch of salt. 

Mix all together. This makes 2 pies. 



CHOCOLATE PIE FILLING 

2 cups milk. 2 tablespoons cocoa. 

1 cup sugar. 3 eggs. 

J4 cup flour. 

Beat the whites separately and add them to the filling after re- 
moving from the fire. Pour into the hot pie crust. 

Frost with whipped cream. — Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



59 



BUTTER SCOTCH PIE 

1 cup brown sugar. 1 tablespoon flour. 

Yolks of 2 eggs. \ l / 2 cups scalded milk. 

Cook mixture together until it thickens, take off stove and let 
cool, adding piece of butter and a little vanilla. When cool, put in 
crust, which has already been baked. Use whites of eggs for frosting, 
and brown the same as a lemon pie. 

— Mrs. Arthur W. Yaughan. 



PINEAPPLE PIE 

1 cup chopped or grated pineapple. 1 tablespoon flour. 
*4 cup cold water. 3 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. Pinch salt. 

Mix thoroughly and bake in 1 or 2 crusts. Use whites of egg^ 
for frosting. — Mrs. Arthur W. Yaughan. 



CHOCOLATE PIE 

Cook in double boiler the yolks of 3 eggs, 2 blocks of chocolate 
grated, 2 heaping tablespoons of corn starch, butter the size of an egg, 
1 cup sugar, 2 cups of sweet milk. Pour into baked crust. Beat the 
whites to a stiff froth. Sweeten, and flavor with vanilla, and frost 
over the top. This will make 2 pies. — Mrs. Harold K. Wead. 



SQUASH PIE FILLING 

1 teacup squash. % teaspoon cinnamon. 

\ l / A teacups sugar. J4 teaspoon nutmeg. 

y 2 teaspoon salt. 2 eggs. 
34 teaspoon ginger. 

Beat the whites separately, add the yolks. 

— Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



HAVE A REFRIGERATOR WITH OUTSIDE ICING DOOR 

f - — -TICIENT ^ 

REFRIGERATION 
EXPERT 
^ CONSTRUCTION 
ONLY 
EASTERN v *W 
REFRIGERATOR SL V^j! 
EQUIPMENT ^^ 

COMPANY INC. 
BOSTON MASS. 
r *1 I I I I ■■f 1 




SPECIAL REFRIGERATORS 

BUILT FOR 

PARTICULAR PEOPLE 

FOR ANY SIZE RESIDENCE OR BUSINESS 

Eastern Refrigerator & Equipment Co., Inc. 

Sales Office and Factory 
16 Lane St., WALTHAM, MASS. 



C. F. EDDY CO. 



COAL AND WOOD 



Hay, Straw, Flour, Grain, feed, Lime, Cement, Drain Pipe Etc. 



Offices 
Newtonville 207 Moody St., Waltham Auburndale 

WEST NEWTON 



Tel. West Newton 91. 



61 



CAKE 



"Aye, to the leavening, but here's yet in the word hereafter the kneading, 
the making of the cake, the heating of the oven, and the baking. 

Nay you must stay the cooling, too, or you may choose to burn 
your mouth." 



CHOC< >LATE CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 
1-3 cup butter 
1 egg- yolk. 

1 teaspoon soda in 1 cup sour milk. 

2 tablespoons cocoa sifted with \y> cups flour. 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Frosting 

1 cup sugar. 
y 2 cup water. 

Boil together until it will spin a thread and pour gradually on 
the stiffly beaten white of egg. Beat until stiff enough to spread. 

— Mrs. C. A. Stimets. 



CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 1% cups flour. 
y 2 cup butter. y 2 cup sour milk. 

2 eggs. y teaspoon soda. 
2 squares chocolate. 

Cream sugar and butter, add eggs and beat well. Add chocolate, 
sour milk in which soda has been dissolved, and flour last. 

— Mrs. John Clough. 



SOLID CHI >COLATE CAKE 

2 tups brown sugar. 

y 2 cup butter. 

\y> cups sour milk. 

2 small eggs, beaten together, not separately. 

Grate 1-3 cake Baker's chocolate and put in it Jj cup of ho1 
water in which 1 teaspoon of soda has been dissolved. 2 heaping 
cups of flour with tablespoon of vanilla. 

— Mrs. Robt. Ashenden. 



62 



SOUR MILK CHOCOLATE CAKE 

1 egg. y 2 cup sour milk. 

1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon soda. 
1-3 cup hot water. 11-3 cups flour. 

2 squares chocolate. % teaspoon cream tartar. 
1 small piece butter. 1 pinch salt. 

To the egg, well beaten, add the sugar. Melt butter and choco- 
late in hot water and add to sugar and egg. 

Dissolve soda in sour milk and add to above. 

Sift flour, cream of tartar and salt together and add to other in- 
gredients. 

Bake slowly for 45 minutes. 

Cover with boiled frosting. 

Boiled Frosting 

Boil together 1-3 cup of water, 1 cup of sugar until it spins 
a thread and pour on to the beaten white of an egg. Beat until it 
thickens. — Mrs. George Kellar. 



COFFEE CAKE 

2 eggs. 

1 cup butter and 1 cup sugar (creamed together). 

1 cup molasses. 

1 cup strong coffee. 

1 teaspoon each of cinnamon, clove, allspice, nutmeg. 
A little salt. 

2 teaspoons soda dissolved in the coffee. 
2 cups seeded raisins. 

3y 2 or 4 cups flour. 

Bake in deep pan. Moderate oven. 



INEXPENSIVE FRUIT CAKE 

2 cups sugar. 1 package raisins. 

2 tablespoons lard. Y? teaspoon cloves. 

1 teaspoon salt. j/2 teaspoon cinnamon. 

2 cups hot water. 

Mix above and when cool add 3 cups flour, 1 teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in 1 teaspoon hot water. 

Bake in 2 loaves, slowly, 45 minutes. 

—Mrs. Wm. E. Gill. 



63 



CINNAMON CAKES 

y 2 cup hot water. 1 egg. 

]/ 2 cup sugar. Salt. 

y 2 cup molasses. 1-3 cup shortening. 

\y 2 cups flour. y 2 teaspoon soda. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

—Mrs. F. S. Hardy. 



QUICK CAKE 

1-3 cup soft butter. 3 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 1-3 cups brown sugar. y 2 teaspoon cinnamon. 

2 eggs. y 2 teaspoon grated nutmeg. 
y 2 cup milk. y 2 lb. dates, stoned and cut. 
1^4 cups flour. 

Put ingredients all together in bowl and beat for 3 minutes, 
using wooden cake spoon. Rake 35 to 40 minutes. 

— Mrs. J. G. Grush. 



MISSIONARY CAKE 

1 cup raisins chopped with 1 cup sugar. 
1 egg yolk. 
Butter size of egg. 

1 teaspoon soda in 1 cup sour milk. 

2 cups flour (scant). 
1 teaspoon each of cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. 

Bake in cup tins or as a loaf cake. 

SPICE CAKE 
No Eggs 

1 cup sugar creamed with 4 tablespoons melted butter. 

1 cup sour milk with 1 teaspoon soda. 

2 cups flour. 

1 cup raisins chopped and rolled in flour. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 teaspoon cloves — nutmeg. 

Be sure to have it not too stiff with flour. 

— Mrs. Henry J. Patrick. 



— Mrs. Eldridge. 



64 



SOUR MILK CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 1 egg. 

x / 2 cup shortening - . 1 tablespoon molasses. 

1 cup sour milk. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 cup raisins. 2 good cups (bread) flour. 

Bake slowly in loaf. — Mrs. F. S. Hardy. 



CHOCOLATE NUT WAFERS 

1 cup sugar. 2 eggs, beaten separately. 

2 squares melted chocolate. y> cup flour. 
x / 2 cup melted butter. 

Spread thinly and sprinkle over 1 cup coarsely chopped nut meats 
Bake not too brown and cut in desired shape before removing 
from the pan. — L. M. Wood. 



ONE EGG MOCHA CAKE 

Cream together 1 large tablespoon of butter and 1 cup of sugar. 
Add the yolk of 1 egg, stir in j4 c u P of milk, % teaspoon of salt, and 
l / 2 teaspoon of vanilla. Add 1 full cup of flour sifted with 1 rounded 
teaspoon of baking powder. Melt over steam, 2 squares of chocolate 
and mix well. Then add the well-beaten white of egg. 

Frosting 

Beat together until creamy 1 cup of confectioners sugar, 1 large 
tablespoon of butter, a little vanilla, 2 teaspoons of dry cocoa, and 2 
tablespoons of coffee made very strong. 

— Laura E. Morse. 



SPICE CAKE 

1 cup thick sour cream. 

2 small eggs. 

1 cup brown sugar. 

1 level teaspoon soda. 

Y 2 teaspoon cinnamon. 

T /2 teaspoon cloves. 

y 2 teaspoon mixed spices. 

1 heaping cup flour measured before sifting. 

y 2 cup nuts. 

V 2 cup raisins. 

—Mrs. O. W. Nelson. 



65 



BROWN STONE CAKE 

Grate 4 squares chocolate, mix with Y\ cup milk. 
Yolk of 1 egg. 
1 cup sug-ar. 

Boil up a few times. When cold add 1 teaspoon vanilla and mix 
into the following : 

1 cup sugar. 
l / 2 cup butter. 
Yz cup milk. 

Add in and dissolve 1 teaspoon soda. 

2 cups flour. 
2 eggs. 

Frosting 

\ l /% cup sugar. 

Enough water to moisten. Boil until it threads. Gradually pour into 

the white of the egg (yolk used in first part) well beaten. 

—Mrs. Walton S. Redfield. 



COCOA CAKE 

1 cup brown sugar. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 egg. 1 cup flour. 

34 cup butter. Pinch salt. 

Y$ cup cocoa. 1 teaspoon baking powder. 

34 cup sour milk. 34 cup hot water. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

— Mary Brackett. 



MOLASSES LAYER CAKE 

Yolks of 2 eggs. 1 teaspoon soda. 

1 cup molasses. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

y 2 cup butter. 2 cups flour. 
2-3 cup sweet milk. 

Beat the eggs and butter together, then add nmlasses and cinna- 
mon, then the milk and soda dissolved in 1 teaspoon of hot water, 
then the flour. 

Filling 

2 cups of granulated sugar. Water enough to dissolve. Boil until 
it threads from the spoon. Set back where it doesn't boil while beat- 
ing the eggs. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth with 1 tea- 
spoon of cinnamon. Then beat in the boiling sugar very slowly. 
Beat until firm enough to spread on cake. 

—Mrs. A. C. Blunt, Jr. 



66 



SOUR CREAM CAKE 

2 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 

1 cup heavy, thick, sour cream. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

1/^ cups flour. 

y 2 teaspoon lemon extract. 

Y\ teaspoon cloves, mace and cinnamon. 

•>4 cup raisins. 

Beat eggs light with egg beater, add sugar gradually. Put cream 
in measuring cup, add soda and stir together until light and foamy. 
Add raisins to flour. Bake in not too hot an oven. This is good 
frosted with a thick White Mountain frosting or sugar and cinna- 
mon sprinkled over top before baking. Bake 24_of an hour. 

- — Mrs. Phelps. 



GRANDMA'S LUNCHEON CAKE 

\y 2 cups sugar. 
]/ 2 cup molasses. 
•)4 cup shortening. 

Mix together well. 

3 eggs. 

1/-4 cups sour milk with 2 even teaspoons soda. 

4 cups flour sifted with 1 teaspoon each of clove and cinnamon and 
y 2 teaspoon powdered mace (or nutmeg). 

Salt. 

1 cup chopped raisins added last. 

Make 2 loaves. Bake in bread tins. — Mrs. J. W. Perry. 



APPLE SAUCE CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 

Yi cup butter or other shortening. 1 cup chopped raisins. 
y 2 teaspoon cloves. 1 teaspoon (scant) soda. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 1 cup apple sauce (warm). 

y 2 teaspoon nutmeg. L)4 cups sifted flour. 

Cream sugar and butter and add spices. 

Dissolve soda in a little warm water and add to apple sauce. 
Put all together, mix well and add flour. Do not sweeten apple 
sauce. 

Bake in moderate oven 25 or 30 minutes. 

—Mrs. E. G. Mills. 



67 



KING EDWARD CAKE 



1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 
Y> cup butter. 1 teaspoon nutmeg. 

2 eggs. V/ 2 cups flour. 

1 cup sour milk. \y 2 cups chopped raisins. 

1 teaspoon soda. Pinch salt. 

Frosting 

8 tablespoons powdered sugar. 

3 tablespoons butter. 

^4 lb. blanched almonds, dried and chopped. 
1 tablespoon hot water. 

This rule was used at the time of the coronation of King Edward 
of England in 1901. —Freda B. Fisher. 



FRUIT CAKE 

2 cups brown sugar. 4 eggs. 

1 cup molasses. 2 lbs. raisins. 

l l /> cups butter. 2 lbs. currants. 

5 cups flour. y 2 lb. citron. 

1 cup sweet milk. 1 teaspoon mixed spice. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

This recipe makes 2 loaves of cake which will keep a vear. 

—Mrs. F. Paul Welsch. 



DELICIOUS CHOCOLATE CAKE 

24 cup grated chocolate. 
1 cup butter (or Crisco). 

1 cup sugar. 
•)4 cup milk. 

2 cups flour (small). 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 
2 eggs. 
Pinch salt. 
Flavoring. 

Melt butter and chocolate, then add sugar, yolks of eggs, milk, 
flour and flavoring. Last beat in the whites. Bake in moderate oven 
about 25 minutes. Frost with either chocolate or white. 

—Mrs. K. G. Mills. 



68 



PERSIAN FRUIT CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 1 cup raisins. 

]/ 2 cup shortening. 1 teaspoon cassia. 

1 cup cold water. % teaspoon clove. 

1 cup dates, cut in two. Little nutmeg. 

Bring all to a boil, let it get cold, then add 2 cups flour, sifted, 
with 1 teaspoon soda, Y\ teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon lemon extract. 

— Mrs. Walter Lucas. 



EGGLESS CHOCOLATE CAKE 

2 tablespoons butter and 1 cup sugar, creamed. 
l /y cup sour cream. 

3 squares chocolate, melted. 
y 2 cup hot water. 

\y 2 cups flour. 
y 2 teaspoon soda. 
Salt. 
Vanilla. 



CATHERINE CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 

2 teaspoons cinnamon. 
1 teaspoon cloves. 

1 teaspoon grated nutmeg. 

1 teaspoon salt. 

y 2 cup melted butter (or substitute), stirred in. 

1 cup sour milk with 1 level teaspoon soda, 1 cup raisins mixed with 

1 cup flour, add second cup flour, bake 1 hour in moderate oven. 

Improved by % CU P walnuts. — Mrs. C. J. A. Wilson. 



FRUIT CAKE LAYER 

2y 2 cups flour. 

2 cups sugar (teacups). 

y> cup sour milk (large cup). 

3 eggs (beaten separately). 
y 2 cup butter. 

1 small teaspoon soda. 

\y 2 teaspoons cream of tartar. 

1 pint shellbarks or English walnuts. 

1 pint raisins. 

. Flour raisins, add nuts and raisins last. 

—Mrs. H. R. Place. 



69 



SPICE CAKE 



1 cup sugar. 

1-3 cup butter. 

1 cup sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda dissolved in milk. 

1 egg, well beaten. 

2 tablespoons molasses. 
1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 teaspoon cloves. 

1 teaspoon nutmeg. 

2 teaspoons cocoa. 

1 cup raisins. 

2 cups flour. 

— Mrs. Macomber. 



FUDGE SQUARES 

3 tablespoons pure lard. 
1 cup sugar. 

1 egg- 

2 squares unsweetened chocolate. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. , 

1-3 cup milk. 

1 cup pastry flour. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 

Yz cup nut meats chopped not too fine. 

Melt lard, add sugar and unbeaten egg, mix well. Add choco- 
late which has been melted, vanilla, milk and flour which has been 
sifted with baking powder. 

Add nutmeats and mix well. 

Spread thin on greased shallow pan and bake in slow oven 20 to 
30 minutes. — Mrs. Earl Glover. 



PUFF CAKE 

2 cups sugar and 1 cup butter, well creamed together. 

3 eggs, well beaten. 

y 2 cup milk, y 2 cup water, added together in above. 

3 cups pastry flour. 

2 large teaspoons baking powder. 

Pinch salt. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Makes large loaf. 

—Mrs. F. \V. Putnam. 



70 



CHOCOLATE CAKE WITH CARAMEL FILLING 

2 squares Baker's chocolate. 
y 2 cup milk. 
Yolk of 1 egg. 

Cook these until well thickened. Add : 
1 cup sugar. 
1 tablespoon butter. 
y 2 cup milk. 

1 level teaspoon soda in the milk. 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 
\ J / 2 cups flour. 

Bake in layers. 

Caramel Filling 

\y 2 cups sugar. 

l / 2 cup milk. 

Butter the size of an egg. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Boil 15 minutes. Stir until cool enough to spread. 

— Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



ANGEL CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 

1 1-3 cups Swansdown cake flour. 

y 2 teaspoon cream tartar. 

3 teaspoons Royal baking powder. 

1-3 teaspoon salt. 

2-3 cup scalded milk. 

1 teaspoon vanilla, or y 2 teaspoon almond. 

Whites of 3 eggs. 

Mix and sift first 5 ingredients 4 times. Add milk very slowly 
while still hot, beating continually. Add vanilla, mix well and fold in 
whites of eggs. Turn into ungreased angel cake tin and bake in very 
slow oven about 45 minutes. Remove from oven, invert pan and allow 
to stand until cold. 



SPONGE CAKE 

11-3 cups sugar. 

3 eggs, beaten light with egg beater. 

1 2-3 cups flour. 

2 teaspoons cream tartar. 
1 teaspoon soda. 

y 2 cup cold water. 

Beat well before putting in pan. Bake in moderate oven. 

—Mrs. M. H. Fowler. 



71 



BLACK CHOCOLATE CAKE 



1 cup butter. 

1 cup milk. 

2 cups sugar. 
2 I /j cups flour. 

5 eggs, beaten separately. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 square Baker's chocolate, grated and added before the flour. 

Filling 

\y 2 cups Baker's vanilla chocolate. 

1 cup sugar. 

4 teaspoons milk. 

Heat in double boiler, when hot add 1 well beaten egg. Let boil 
20 minutes. When cool, add 1 grated cocoanut. 

— Mrs. Weaver. 



ORANGE CAKE 

2 scant cups sugar. 

Yolks of 6 eggs. 

Juice and rind of 1 orange. 

Whites of 5 eggs. 

2 heaping cups flour. 

\ l /2 teaspoons baking powder. 

]/> cup cold water. 

Beat yolks very light, add sugar, juice and rind of orange, whites 
stiffly beaten, flour, baking powder and water. Bake in small muf- 
fin tins. — Mrs Andreas Hartel. 



BLUEBERRY CAKE 

34 cup shortening and 1 cup sugar, creamed. 

Add unbeaten yolk of 1 egg and beat well. 

Add gradually >}4 CUp milk, \ l /> cups flour, sifted with 2 teaspoons 

baking powder and 34 teaspoon salt. Beat well. Add beaten white oi 

egg last, then 1 cup blueberries, lightly floured. 



SPONGE CAKE 
4 eggs, separated. 

13^2 tablespoons cornstarch put in a cup. Fill cup with flour. 
\ l / 2 teaspoons baking powder. 
}/> teaspoon salt. 

To the unbeaten yolks of eggs, add : 
3 tablespoons cold water and beat until lemon color. 

Add 1 cup sugar. — Mrs. Stuart Gibson. 



n 



SOUR CREAM GINGERBREAD 



Yi cup molasses. 

V 2 cup sugar. 

Yx cup sour cream. 

1 heaping teaspoon soda. 

Salt. 



Bake in muffin tins. 



1 egg- 

1 tablespoon shortening. 

2 cups flour. 

1 teaspoon ginger. 
y 2 teaspoon clove. 
l / 2 teaspoon cinnamon. 

— Dora Allen. 



ANGEL CAKE 

Whites 8 eggs. |4 cup flour. 

1 teaspoon cream tartar. % teaspoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. j4 teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat whites of eggs until frothy. Add cream tartar and continue 
beating until eggs are stiff. (The beating of the eggs is the secret oi 
good angel cake.) 

Fold in flour mixed with salt and sifted 4 times, and add vanilla. 
Bake 45 to 50 minutes in an unbuttered angel cake pan. 

After cake has risen and begins to brown, cover with a buttered 
paper. 

— Mrs. Hermann Birgfeld. 



SPONGE CAKE 

2 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 

y 2 cup scant, potato and bread flour, mixed. 

1 teaspoon baking powder. 

3 tablespoons cold water. 

1 teaspoon flavoring extract. 

Beat whites and yolks of eggs separately and very light. Add 
sugar to the yolks, then water and flavoring, then the whites of egg* 
and last the flour, which has been sifted several times with baking 
powder. Bake 20 minutes in moderate oven. — Mrs. Wilder. 



INEXPENSIVE SPONGE CAKE 

Beat yolks of 2 eggs until thick, add 1 cup of sugar, gradually 
continuing beating. Add 1 tablespoon of vinegar, and 5 of cold water. 
Mix and sift together \]/a, cups of pastry flour, 2 teaspoons baking 
powder, and add to the yolk mixture. Add 2 egg whites, beaten until 
stiff, cutting and folding in carefully. Do not beat. 1 teaspoon lemon 
extract and salt to taste. Moderate oven. 



73 



SPONGE DROP CAKES 

2 eggs. 1 level teaspoon baking powder. 

1 cup sugar. ^ cup hot water. 

1 cup flour. l / 2 teaspoon lemon extract. 
34 teaspoon salt. 

Beat yolks until thick, add gradually the sugar and lemon and 
beat. Add water and egg whites, beaten to a stiff froth, add the flour, 
baking powder and salt, sifted together. Bake 15 minutes in gas oven. 

— Mrs. Arthur D. Batson. 



WELLESLEY FUDGE LAYER CAKE 

2 squares bitter chocolate. 34 CU P sour milk. 

4 tablespoons butter. £4 teaspoon soda. 

y 2 cup boiling water. 34 teaspoon salt. 

1 cup sugar. 134 cups flour. 

1 egg. l /2 teaspoon vanilla. 

Melt chocolate and butter in double boiler, pour on water, stir- 
ring constantly. Add sugar, mix, add egg well beaten, then sour milk. 
Sift dry ingredients, add vanilla, beat well, spread in 2 well greased 
layer tins. Bake in moderate oven. 

Filling and Frosting 

1 cup sugar. 34 cup butter. 

% cup cocoa. y 2 teaspoon vanilla. 

34 cup milk. 

Boil 1 minute. Cool and spread. 

P. S. — This frosting may be used as chocolate sauce for ice cream. 

— Charlotte Bun-age. 



LIGHTNING CAKE 

1^4 cups sifted pastry flour. 

1 cup sugar. 

1 teaspoon baking powder (good rounding). 

Salt. 

Sift together. 

Break 1 egg into 1-3 cup melted butter. Fill cup t<> overflowing 
with milk. Beat well and flavor with vanilla. 

—Mrs. |. \Y. Perry. 



74 



WHITE CAKE 

1 cup sugar, l / 2 cup butter, creamed together. 
l /z cup milk. 

2 scant cups flour. 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 
Well beaten whites of 4 eggs. 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Bake in moderate oven. 
Frost with 

Boiled Chocolate Icing 

Beat 2 egg yolks until thick. Add y cup sugar and l / 2 cup milk 
and 2 squares chocolate. Cook in double boiler until rather thick, 
remove from fire and beat well, adding y 2 teaspoon vanilla. Spread 
on cake when cool. — Mrs. G. B. H. Macomber. 



ICE CREAM CAKE 

1 cup sugar. 

]/ 2 cup butter after melting. 

3 egg yolks. 

y 2 cup milk. 

\y 2 cups sifted flour into which 1 full teaspoon baking powder has 

been added. 
Vanilla flavoring. 

Mix in order given, adding lastly the whites of the 3 eggs, beaten 
very stiff. —Mrs. H. M. Cole. 



MARGUERITES 

2 eggs. 

34 teaspoon baking powder. 

1-3 teaspoon salt. 

1 cup light brown sugar. 

)/ 2 cup flour. 

y 2 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 cup walnut meats or pecans. 

Cook in small pans 10 to 12 minutes in a hot oven. 

—Mrs. Harry F. Gibbs. 



75 



CHOCOLATE CAKE 

2 squares chocolate. 1 cup flour. 

1-3 cup butter. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 cup sugar. Whites of 2 eggs. 

Pinch salt. Vanilla. 

Yz cup milk. 

Melt butter and chocolate together over hot water. Pour onto 
sugar and salt. Add alternately the yolks of eggs and milk, then flour, 
baking powder and whites of eggs beaten until stiff. Add vanilla and 
bake either in layer cake pans or loaf. 

— Dorothy H. Davis. 



CHOCOLATE FILLING 

1 cup sugar. 2 cups scalded milk. 

2 tablespoons flour. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

2 eggs. 1*4 squares Baker's chocolate. 

Pinch salt. 1 cup chopped walnuts. 

Mix dry ingredients together. Add eggs slightly beaten and com- 
bine with scalded milk. Cook 15 minutes in double boiler, stirring 
constantly until thickened, afterward occasionally. Add melted choc- 
olate and nuts last. Cool and flavor. This makes an excellent dessert 
when put on top and between the chocolate layer cake. 

— Dorothy H. Davis. 



76 



FROSTINGS 

"To be good, be useful; to be useful, 
Always making something good." 



COOKED CHOCOLATE FROSTING 

Yolks of 2 eggs, beaten until thick. Beat in x / 2 cup sugar and y 2 
cup milk. 
2 squares chocolate. 

Cook in double boiler until thick. Remove from fire, beat well 
and add 1 teaspoon vanilla. 



FUDGE FROSTING 

1 cup granulated sugar. 
1-3 cup water. 

Boil until it threads. Pour slowly on stiffly beaten white of 
1 egg, beating until stiff enough to spread. Add 2 squares of choco- 
late. , — Mary Brackett. 



CHOCOLATE FILLING 
For Two Layers Between Cake 



2 squares chocolate. 
y 2 cup water. 
y 2 cup sugar. 



1 teaspoon butter. 

Cook in double boiler until dissolved. Then add J /> cup milk, 

2 teaspoons cornstarch. Cook 15 minutes. 

— Mrs. O. W. Nelson. 



QUICK FROSTING 

Have water boiling in bottom of double boiler. In the top place 
1 cup sugar. 
1 unbeaten egg white. 
3 tablespoons cold water. 

Beat until thick enough to spread. Vanilla. 



77 



CAKE FROSTING 



White of 1 egg. Same quantity of water. Do not beat egg but 
add the water and stir in as much confectioners sugar as necessary 
to make a stiff frosting. Flavor to taste. This never cracks and is 
very good. —Mrs. Herbert E. Cushman. 



Louis H. Werner & Co. 

423 BOYLSTON STREET, BOSTON 

FURS of quality and distinction 

Coats, Wraps, Capes, Stoles and Neck Scarves 

We Specialize in Choice Russian and Hudson Bay 

Sable, Natural Blue and Silver Fox Skins. 

GOWNS, DRESSES AND MILLINERY 

Your Inspection Invited 



Dearborn Hats 

Hats that are Distinctive at Moderate Prices 

Sarah Jane Dearborn 

1 00 Boylston Street, Boston 



The Ampico Victrolas and Victor Records 

RISHELL TALKING MACHINE 

A. J. JACKSON 

panoB 

415 Boylston Street 
Tel. Back Bay 4583 BOSTON 



Expert Opinions Concerning the 

New Type 61 Cadillac 

As Expressed by Boston's Automobile Editors 



DUSTIN S. LUCIER 
Boston Herald Automobile Editor 

" It is manifestly a superior product and is 
bound to be sought by those accustomed to 
and demanding beauty and efficiency in motor 
car design. It will be admired by all who 
know quality design, quality workmanship 
and most of all, probably, by those who love 
quality performance." 

J. C. KERRISON 
Boston Advertiser Automobile Editor 

"The car was given a most severe handling 
by men who were not familiar with this par- 
ticular car and who were instructed to "break 
it up." The most inexperienced operator had 
no more effect upon the efficiency of the car 
than did the wise men, it performing admir- 
ably at all times, in all speeds, and under all 
conditions. It started from a standstill with 
the high speed gear in mesh and accelerated 
from that point to seventy miles an hour in 
an exceedingly short space of time. It 
climbed some of the hardest hills hereabouts 
on high without the slightest signs of distress." 

C. F. DONNOCKER 
Boston American Automobile Editor 

"The car simply can teach you how to 
drive. It will not misbehave. After the 
gruelling test that car had at the hands of 
the various drivers, representing all degrees of 
efficiency, it was the unanimous opinion of 
the editors that this new Cadillac was the fin- 
est car ever turned out by the factory and 
that "Miss 61" was due for a very enthusiastic 
reception." 



J. J. McNAMARA 
Boston Post Automobi'e Editor 

"The latest addition to the Cadillac family 
of motor cars arrived in Boston last week 
and won instant favor on account of its beau- 
tiful design and many details in refinement 
that makes the 61 stand out as strengtlieniuj.' 
the Cadillac's leadership." 

JAMES T. SULLIVAN 
Boston Globe Automobile Editor 

"Cadillac's new creation, known as Type 
61, has reached Boston. And the few who 
have ridden in it have pronounced it un- 
questionably one of the best vehicles ever 
sent to this city. Attractiveness is notice- 
able. This is impressed upon one either when 
looking at the car from any angle and noting 
the lines, with the careful details of finish, or 
sitting at the wheel." 

CHARLES F. MARDEN 
Boston Transcript Automobile Editor 

"Cadillac has not departed from its well- 
established methods in the construction of 
its eight-cylinder car. but it has made a lonp 
step forward in the way of refinement. The 
Type 61 possesses notable power, which is 
evidenced not only in speed and climbing 
ability, but in a remarkably quick and smooth 
pick-up, from five to fifty miles an hour in a 
few feet. Contributing largely to this is a new 
carburetor, developed by original re earch 

Ilg a period of years. It has a tWO- 
inch intake and its effect in road performance 
case of Operation and economj is readily per- 

ceptible.' 1 



Cadillac Automobile Company of Boston 

Six Sixty Four Commonwealth Avenue 
BOSTON 



80 



COOKIES AND DOUGHNUTS 

"While our digestion's good 
'Tis folly to abstain." 



OATMEAL COOKIES 



1 cup sugar. 2 eggs. 

)4 cup shortening. y 2 teaspoon salt. 

2 cups flour. 1 teaspoon soda in flour. 
2 cups rolled oats. A few chopped raisins. 

Spread thin in pan. — Mrs. Larned. 



FILLED COOKIES 

1 cup sugar. 1 egg. 

l / 2 cup butter. Pinch salt. 

y 2 cup milk. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

2 teaspoons baking powder and enough flour to roll. 

Roll very thin, cut into shape and spread with filling, place other 
half on top and bake. 

Filling 

1 cup raisins, y 2 cup figs, and y 2 cup walnuts, chopped fine. 

y 2 cup water. 

y 2 cup sugar. 

1 tablespoon flour. 

Simmer all together until reduced to jam, stirring often. 

— B. U. Moore. 



CORN FLAKES COCOANUT CAKE 

Whites 2 eggs. y 2 cup cocoanut. 

y 2 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon salt. 

1 cup corn flakes. 

Beat eggs, add sugar and salt, fold in flakes and cocoanut. Drop 
from spoon on tin sheet, and form round with fork dipped in cold 
water. Bake in moderate oven until a light brown. 

— Mrs. Warren S. Kilburn. 



81 



MOLASSES COOKIES 

1 cup molasses scalded, add 1 teaspoon soda, pour over, 1 table- 
spoon ginger, 1 tablespoon salt and y 2 cup sugar. Let cool after 
stirring well. Add beaten egg, 1 tablespoon vinegar, flour to roll out. 
Bake in moderate oven. — Mrs. J. G. Grush. 



MACAROONS 

1 can condensed milk. 

Yi lb. dry (Dromedary) cocoanut. 

Cocoa to make stiff enough to hold shape. 

Bake about 20 minutes in moderate oven. 

—Mrs. F. S. Hoyt. 



OATMEAL COOKIES 

1 egg- 

1 cup sugar. 

1 cup shortening. 

1 tablespoon molasses. 

4 tablespoons sweet milk. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 teaspoon soda. 

Pinch salt. 

2^4 cups rolled oats put through the meat chopper. 

Flour. 



MARGARITES 

Beat 2 eggs slightly, add 1 cup of light brown sugar, j/> cup of 
pastry flour, y$ teaspoon baking powder, 1-3 teaspoon salt, 1 cup nuts 
broken into small pieces (pecans best). Bake in small tins (a tea- 
spoon of batter in each) with a half nut on top, 10 to 12 minutes. 
Let stand in tins a while before removing. Cover before cold. 

—Mrs. F. S. Hardy. 



"WONDERS" 

3 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 

4 tablespoons butter. 
Salt, and bit of saleratus. 

Mix with flour very hard as for cookies and fry in hot lard. 

—Mrs. H. O. Poor. 



82 



HERMITS 

y 2 cup lard or butter. 1 teaspoon soda. 

2 cups sugar. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

1 cup currants. 1 teaspoon cloves. 

1 cup sour milk. 1 teaspoon nutmeg. 

2 eggs. 

Add flour to roll as soft as possible. 



SNICKERDOODLES 

2 eggs. Salt. 

2 cups sugar. 3 cups flour. 

2-3 cup butter. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 cup sweet milk. 

Drop by spoonful in cookie tins. Sprinkle with sugar and cassia 
before putting in oven. — Florence C. Jenkins. 



WALNUT WAFER'S 

1 cup dark brown sugar. 
\]/ 2 tablespoons molasses. 

2 eggs. 

y 2 cup flour. 

Pinch salt. 

1 cup chopped walnut meats. 

Drop on a buttered tin 1 teaspoon to a wafer. 

Bake in a slow oven. — Mrs. Stanley M. Bolster. 



BROWNIES 

y 2 cup butter (scant). 

1 cup sugar. 

2 eggs. 

Not quite J4 cake Baker's chocolate (melted). 

y 2 cup flour. 

y 2 teaspoon salt. 

y 2 cup walnut meats. 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Bake in sheets and cut like Nabiscos. 

— Mrs. Eldridge. 



83 



COFFEE SNAPS 

]/z cup sugar. 
) 2 cup molasses. 

]/2 cup hot shortening (lard and butter). 
Salt. 

Yi, cup boiling- hot coffee, into which y 2 teaspoon soda has been dis- 
solved. Flour enough to roll very thin. 

Bake. —Mrs. H. M. Cole. 



SWEDISH KISSES 

White of 1 egg beaten very stiff. 
Add 134 cups fine granulated sugar. 
Yz teaspoon vinegar. 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Bake quickly in fairly hot oven. I try one and if it falls add 
more sugar. — H. S. Glazier. 



DOUGHNUTS 

Put about 3 cups of flour in bowl. Break 1 egg in this and add 
1 cup sugar (scant). Put 1 tablespoon thick cream (3 if thin) in cup 
and fill cup with thick milk. 1 level teaspoon soda stirred into milk 
and add to sugar and egg. Add little salt and ]/> teaspoon nutmeg. 
Stir thoroughly and add enough flour to roll out. Fry in deep hot 
fat. — Mrs. Eldridge. 



SUGAR COOKIES 

2 cups sugar. 

2 cups shortening (>4 lard will do). 
y 2 cup milk (add little soda). 

3 eggS - , 1 • , 

2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Flour to make stiff, but not too stiff (about 4% cups). 

Nutmeg and vanilla. 

Little salt. 

Raisin on top each cookie. 

This makes delicious cookies and a large number. 

— Mrs. P. C. Scarborough. 



84 



SUGAR COOKIES 



]/> cup butter. 2 eggs. 

1 cup sugar. 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 tablespoon milk. Flour enough to roll out. 

—Mrs. H. C. Barber. 



SUGAR COOKIES 

1 cup brown sugar. \y 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

y 2 cup butter. Salt. 

Y4 cup milk. Flour to roll, not too stiff. 

1 egg- 

— Mrs. Joseph Symonds. 



RAISED DOUGHNUTS 

3 cups bread dough. 1 cup sugar. 

34 cup butter. y 2 teaspoon nutmeg. 

2 eggs. l /^ teaspoon cinnamon. 

Raise until double, then cut and raise, fry in hot fat. 

— Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



DOUGHNUTS 

1 cup sugar. 1 level teaspoon soda. 

2 tablespoons melted butter. Flour to mold easily. 
2 eggs. Salt. 

2-3 cup milk. Nutmeg. 

2 level teaspoons cream tartar. 



DOUGHNUTS 

1 egg. 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon salt. 

y 2 teaspoon cinnamon. 2 teaspoons hot lard. 

y$ teaspoon nutmeg. 1 cup milk. 

2y 2 teaspoons (rounded) of baking powder sifted into the flour. 
About 3 cups flour but enough to cut well. This makes 24 dough- 
nuts. — Mrs. Clendenning Smith. 



as 



DOUGHNUTS 

1 cup sugar, dissolved in 1 cup milk. 
3 eggs, beaten very light. 

3 tablespoons melted butter. 

4 tablespoons baking powder. 

2 teaspoons vanilla. 
1 teaspoon salt. 

1 teaspoon nutmeg. 
4 cups (level) flour. 

Roll very soft. 

—Mrs. Arthur T. Safford. 



RIGHT QUALITY 



RIGHT PRICES 



at the 



S. K. AMES' 

Butter and Tea Stores 



841 Washington St., 
16 Lincoln St., 
350 Centre St, 



Newtonville 

Newton Hlds. 

Newton 



62 Branch Stores in New England 



OUR WHITE BASEMENT 

is a 

VERITABLE PARADISE 

for the 

HOUSEWIFE 

Here you will find PYREX OVENWARE 
—WEAR-EVER ALUMINUM UTEN- 
SILS—VACUUM CLEANERS -WASH- 
ING MACHINES — FIRELESS COOK- 
ERS, etc 

You will find it a convenient 
department to patronize. 

J. B. HUNTER COMPANY 

HARDWARE 
60 Summer Street Boston 



Telephones 

West Newton 973-M 



Residence 
Newton North 2469- W 



E. B. DeacKs C£l Co. 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTORS 

Estimates Furnished 
Repair Work a Specialty 

Cleaners and Washers Repaired 



343 Auburn Street 



AUBURNDALE, MASS. 



ONCE 
ALWAYS" 



JwMvLiL 



BOSTON. 



CHOCOLATES 

AND 

CreamQj^amels 

c) 

Welcome Guests 
Everywhere 



JAMES T. BAILEY 



Painting and Decorating 



Hard Wood and Furniture Refinishing 



58 Chestnut Street 
West Newton, Mass. 



Telephone. West Newton 312 



The Executive Committee wishes to express hearty appreciation 
to the following contributors: 

H. P. Hood & Sons — Charlestown 0600. 
Bushway Ice Cream Co. — Somerville 3820. 
Neapolitan Ice Cream Co. — University 7460. 
Carroll C. Whittemore, Caterer — B. B. 5891. 
Roy A. Randell, Confectioner — N. North 3660. 
M. S. Junkins, Confectioner — YValtham 1337. 
Josephine E. Farmer, Caterer — Waltham 1755. 
Sherry's, Confectioner, Caterer — \Y. N. 17572. 
E. H. Delesdernier, Delicatessen — N. N. 2220. 
Frank V. Cushman — 153 Webster Street, West 

Newton. 
Automatic Cone Co. — University 3691. 
Federal Cone Co. — Everett 0762. 
London Cone Co. — Maiden 0640-W. 
Hampden Cone Co. — Roxbury 3847-M. 



88 i 

CANDIES 

"Sweets to the sweet." 

PEANUT BUTTER FUDGE 

6 cups brown sugar. 1 cup milk. 

y 2 lb. peanut butter. Vanilla. 

Boil milk and sugar until it forms a soft ball in cold water. 

Add peanut butter and stir until it begins to thicken. 

Add vanilla and spread to cool. — Mrs. G. W. Abbott. 



CHOCOLATE FUDGE 

Yz cup milk. 

% cup melted butter. 

Y&, cup corn syrup. 

2 cups white sugar ( l / 2 may be brown). 

2 squares melted chocolate. 

Boil until it makes a soft ball in cold water, cool, add nuts or 
marshmallows, and beat until it stiffens. Pour into a tin and cut into 
squares. — Mrs. Retan. 



CREAM CANDY 

1 large cup sugar. 
l / 2 cup vinegar. 
1 scant cup water. 

As you take it from the fire, flavor. Do not stir while it is cook- 
ing. Pull when cool. Cook about 15 minutes. 

—Mrs. G. C. Holbrook. 



PENUCHE 

2 cups brown sugar. 

1 cup white sugar. 

2-3 cup milk. 

Piece butter size of an English walnut. 

Small cup nuts. 

Vanilla. 

Boil 15 minutes. 

—Mrs. G. C. Holbrook. 



89 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS 

2 cups sugar. 

9 teaspoons cocoa. 

2 tablespoons molasses. 

Milk enough to moisten. 

Do not stir when boiling. When done, flavor with vanilla. When 
cool mark into squares. 

—Mrs. G. C. Holbrook. 



When in need of Oriental rugs see 

Adalian Bros., Inc. 

IMPORTERS 

460 Boylston Street 
BOSTON 

Rugs washed and repaired 



Charles R. Lynde 

IMPORTER OF CHINA AND GLASS 

424 Boylston Street 
BOSTON 



"Everything for the Sun Porch" 
French Willow, Reed and Rattan 



Western Reed Company 

WICKER FURNITURE 

177 Portland Street BOSTON, MASS. 

Telephone Haymarket 2110. 



91 



PICKLES, RELISHES AND PRESERVES 

"Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers." 



MUSTARD PICKLE 

1/-4 quarts silver onions. 
\ l /z quarts green tomatoes. 

1 quart green peppers. 

4 quarts small cucumber pickles. 

12 large cucumber pickles (get these if desired at your grocer's, all 
pickled). 

2 large cauliflowers (cut up small). 

Make a brine of 2 cups salt and water enough to cover mixture. 
Soak for nearly 24 hours. In the morning simmer this mixture until 
it comes to a boil. 
l /z ounce tumeric. 
4 teaspoons celery seed. 
8 quarts cider vinegar. 
2 cups brown sugar 
y 2 pound mustard. 
1 cup flour. 

Heat 2 quarts of vinegar and pour over mixture with the sugar, 
tumeric, and celery seed. 

Dissolve flour and mustard in the remaining vinegar. 2 quarts 
cold vinegar and mix all together. 

Cook until done. — Grace P. Delano. 



GREEN TOMATO SOY 

2 gallons green tomatoes, sliced without peeling. 
12 good sized onions. 
2 quarts vinegar. 

1 quart sugar. 

2 tablespoons each, salt, mustard and pepper, 1 tablespoon each, 

allspice, cloves. 

Stew until tender, stir often. 



CRANBERRY CONSERVE— DELICIOUS 

1 cup cranberries. 

1 cup raisin-. 

Juice and yellow rind of one orange. 

Put all through meat chopper, then add the same quantity of su- 
gar as the three above articles make, cook about 45 minutes, and add 
1 cup English walnuts either broken or put through the chopper. 
Cook all 15 minutes longer. — Freda B Fisher. 



92 



MUSTARD PICKLE 

1 quart small cucumbers. 

1 large cauliflower. » 

2 quarts small onions. 

2 quarts green tomatoes. 

4 green peppers (remove seeds). 

Cut up all except cucumbers and onions, lay all in a brine con- 
sisting of 1 gallon of water and 1 cup of salt. Let stand 24 hours, 
then cook in brine until tender and drain. Make a paste of 1 cup 
flour, 6 tablespoons mustard, 1 tablespoon tumeric powder. Mix with 
a little vinegar, add 1 cup sugar and enough vinegar to make 2 
quarts. Boil until it thickens, then add pickle and mix together. 
Boil about 5 minutes and can. 

—Mrs. Wm. Kellar. 



MUSTARD PICKLE 

1 cauliflower broken into small pieces and cooked until tender. 

2 quarts small cucumbers. 

1 quart green tomatoes sliced thin. 
1 quart small onions. 

Add Y\ cup salt, stand over night, and drain. 

Boil 2 quarts vinegar, and thicken with ^4 cup flour, add 1 
cup sugar, 3 tablespoons celery seed, 6 tablespoons mustard, and 1 
tablespoon tumeric powder. 

Pour over vegetables and cook all together until thoroughly 
heated through. — Mrs. E. W. Pride. 



TOMATO JELLY 

7 lbs. ripe tomatoes (peeled and quartered). 

3 lbs. sugar. 

1 tablespoon whole cloves. 

3 tablespoons stick cinnamon. 

Put in bag. 
Salt. 
1 pint vinegar. 

Boil tomatoes ^4 hour, then put in sieve and drip. Cook pulp 
with sugar, spices and vinegar 1 hour and bottle. If vinegar is very 
strong use some of tomato water to weaken. 

— Mrs. Harold Larned. 



93 



ENGLISH CHUTNEY SAUCE 

]/ 2 lb. ripe tomatoes. 

1 lb. tart apples. 

3 large peppers (seeded). 

12 small onions. 

Yz cup mint leaves. 

1 1-3 cups seeded raisins. 

1 cup sugar. 

3 cups vinegar. 

2 teaspoons mustard. 
1 teaspoon salt. 

Scald vinegar and cool, add sugar, salt, mustard and stir thor- 
oughly, then add other ingredients chopped fine. Mix thoroughly 
and let stand in covered vessel for 10 days, stirring occasionally. 
Delicious with lamb. 

— Mrs. B ram an. 



SPICED RHUBARB 



6 cups rhubarb diced. 
1 cup seeded raisins. 
4 cups granulated sugar. 
1 teaspoon cinnamon. 
y 2 teaspoon ground clov 
1 cup cider vinegar. 



Skin rhubarb and cut in inch pieces. Put in preserving kettle 
with other ingredients and bring slowly to boiling point. Let simmer 
until the consistency of marmalade. Fill jelly glasses, let cool and 
seal. — F. B. Fisher. 



SPICED APPLE JELLY 

1 peck apples covered with water. 

1 ounce whole cloves. 

1 ounce stick cinnamon. 

1 ounce leaf mace. 

Boil longer than for ordinary jelly. Strain to 2 quarts of juice. 
Add 1 pint vinegar. Boil Yz hour, then add as much sugar as juice 

and boil until it jellies. 

— Mrs. J. Edgar Park. 



94 



CARROT MARMALADE 

3 lbs. carrots, put through food chopper. 

2 lbs. sugar put over carrots and let stand over night. 

Juice and grated rind of 6 lemons. 

1 cup water. 

Mix all together and boil slowly 2 hours. 

— Mrs. Edith Hammersley. 



ORANGE MARMALADE 

2 oranges. 
.1 grape fruit. 
2 lemons. 

Halve lemons, quarter oranges, and eighth grape fruit and slice 
all very thin. Measure and to 1 cup of fruit add 3 cups of water. Let 
stand over night. Next morning boil 10 minutes. Stand for 24 hours 
more, then add sugar measure for measure. Boil until jellied (about 
\y 2 hours. — Dorothy H. Davis. 



ORANGE MARMALADE 

1 dozen oranges (seedless). 
3 lemons. 

Wash oranges and lemons thoroughly. Take a sharp knife and 
slice as thin as possible, weigh, and to each pound of fruit add 1 quart 
of water. Set aside for 25 hours, boil until the skins are tender, then 
set aside, and cool. Weigh the mixture and to each pound, add 1 
pound of sugar. Boil until a marmalade consistency is reached. 

— Mrs. Retan. 



PARSON'S SAUCE 

\y 2 lbs. sugar, wet with water. 

3 lbs. plums (cut small). 

2 oranges, use the inside of both cut small and the grated rind of 1. 

Cook y 2 hour after it is boiling all over. 

When done add 1 lb. English walnuts, chopped rather small. 
Put away in jelly glasses and cover with parafhne when cold. 
The right kind of plums is the variety called Italian prunes. 

—Mrs. S. P. Darlinff. 



95 



GOOSEBERRY JAM 



Take heads and tails from berries and mash with potato masher 
in the preserving kettle. 

Measure. To full bowl of fruit add Y\ quantity of sugar. 

Let stand over night. In the morning cook until the consistency 
of jam. Put up in lightning jars. — Mrs. Pickhardt. 



DUSKY MARMALADE 

1 lb. prunes. 

1 lemon, grated, rind and juice. 

34 lb. walnut meats. 

Sugar. 

Wash and soak' prunes and cook as usual. 

Press through sieve and measure pulp and juice, to each cup 
allow Y\ cup sugar. Mix well, add lemon peel and chopped nuts 
and return to fire to simmer until thick and smooth. Just before re- 
moving from fire add lemon juice, then pour into glasses and seal as 
usual. — Mrs. Arthur D. Batson. . 



SPICED GRAPES 

5 lbs. grapes (ripe). 
3 lbs. sugar. 

\ l / 2 teaspoons cinnamon. 
\ l / 2 teaspoons allspice. 
]/ 2 teaspoon cloves. 

Pulp grapes. Boil skins until tender. Cook pulp and strain. 
Add to skins, put in sugar and spices and vinegar to taste (1 cup 
vinegar). In boiling the skins add water until it just shows through, 
but do not cover. — Mrs. Davis. 



THREE FRUIT CONSERVE 

2 boxes strawberries. 
4 oranges. 
1 pineapple. 

Hull and crush strawberries. Put orange and peel through meat 
chopper. Peel pineapple and put through meat chopper. Combine 
and measure, add V| as much sugar as fruit, and let stand over night. 
This draws out the juice, so no water is necessary. Cook until thick. 
Much nicer put in pint or ]A pint jars. 

— Mrs. Charles E. Gibson. 



96 



CORN RELISH 

1 dozen ears corn cut from cob. 1 quart cider vinegar. 

1 lb. hard cabbage. 2 cups brown sugar. 

2 large onions. l A cup salt. 

1 sweet red pepper, seeded. 1 tablespoon mustard. 

1 sweet green pepper. yi cup flour. 

1 head celery. 

Mix together all dry ingredients. Chop vegetables. Cook 45 
minutes and seal in jars. — L. M. Wood. 



MINT JELLY 

Make tart apple jelly. Put through chopper 10 or 12 stalks of 
fresh mint leaves and stems, and place in muslin bag. Drop bag into 
boiling; jelly and remove when jelly is placed in glasses. 

—Mrs. G. W. Abbott. 



RHUBARB RELISH 

2 quarts rhubarb, cut up. 

1 quart onions, chopped fine. 

\y 2 pints vinegar and a little water. 

2 lbs. brown sugar. 

1 teaspoon each of salt, pepper, clove and allspice. 

Cook rhubarb and onions in vinegar and water about 20 min- 
utes, then add the other ingredients and cook slowly until it thick- 
ens/ — Mrs. James P. Ramee. 



CHILI SAUCE 



18 large tomatoes. 2 tablespoons salt. 

3 cups sugar. 1 tablespoon allspice. 

2 cups vinegar. 1 tablespoon cinnamon. 

1 large onion. ^ tablespoon cloves. 

Chop onion fine and boil Yz hour in vinegar. Put in tomatoes and 

boil another y 2 hour. Add spices and boil 1 hour. Take great care 

against burning. 

S —Mrs. Pickhardt. 



97 



CHILI SAUCE 

18 tomatoes. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

2 onions. 1 teaspoon clove. 

1 cup sugar. 1 teaspoon mustard. 

2 cups vinegar. 1 teaspoon ginger. 

4 teaspoons salt. 1 teaspoon nutmeg. 

Cook until thick. — Mrs. Henrv Pierce. 



CHILI SAUCE 

18 ripe tomatoes ( skin). 2 tablespoons salt. 

3 red peppers. l / 2 cup sugar. 

6 large onions. 3 cups vinegar. 

Yi teaspoon each, clove, cassia, allspice. 

Boil until it thickens, then can. — Minnie C. Jenkins. 



RED PEPPER JELL 

12 sweet peppers. Chop or cut fine, cover with 1 tablespoon salt, 
let stand 1 hour, then drain and rinse. Boil with 3 cups sugar, 2 
cups vinegar, until consistency of marmalade. Be careful as it burns 
easily. A little served on pear or other fruit salad is delicious, or 
serve with cheese and crackers. — Mrs. Warren S. Kilburn. 



PEPPER RELISH 

12 sweet green peppers. 
12 sweet red peppers. 

Take out all seeds. 
10 small onions. 
2 bunches celery (small). 

Put all through coarse food grinder. Cover with water, and let 
come to a boil. Drain and add: 
1 pint vinegar. 
\y 2 tablespoons salt. 
1 small cup sugar. 

Boil all 15 minutes. Put in jars and seal. 

—Mrs. E. R. Cooper. 



98 



PEPPER RELISH 

15 green peppers (sweet). 
15 red peppers (sweet). 
15 onions. 

Chop all fine and pour boiling water over all, drain and add 
1 quart cider vinegar. 
3 cups sugar. 
3 tablespoons salt. 

Cook 6 minutes and put in jars. — Mrs. G. W. Eddy. 



PEPPER HASH 

Chop finely 12 green peppers. 
12 sweet red peppers. 
12 small onions. 
3 tablespoons salt. 

Simmer 10 minutes, then drain and add 1 quart vinegar, 1 cup 
brown sugar. Let it come to a boil, then jar while hot. 

— Mrs. Robt. Ashenden. 



TOMATO CATSUP 

1 peck tomatoes (14 lbs.). 

Cook until soft. Strain. Let stand over night, dip off water. Add 
1 pint vinegar, \)/ 2 cups white sugar and 2 tablespoons salt. Put 2 
tablespoons cinnamon, 1 tablespoon clove, 1 tablespoon ground all- 
spice, y^ teaspoon red pepper in a bag and boil in the tomato until 
thick enough. Bottle. 



RIPE TOMATO CHOW-CHOW 



6 large ripe tomatoes. 1 tablespoon salt. 

1 large onion. 2 tablespoons brown sugar. 

1 green pepper. 2 cups vinegar. 

Peel and slice tomatoes. Chop onion and pepper, add other in- 
gredients. Simmer for \y 2 hours. If tomatoes are very juicy use 
less vinegar. Bottle when cool. — Mrs. Wm. E. Gill. 



99 



INDIAN SAUCE 

16 ripe tomatoes. 1 teaspoon mustard. 

16 tart apples. 1 teaspoon ginger. 

8 onions. 1 teaspoon allspice. 

3 lbs. sugar. 1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

2 tablespoons salt. 1 quart vinegar. 

Chop onions, tomatoes and apples in chopping bowl. Add other 
ingredients. Simmer until tender. This amount makes 4 quarts. 

—Mrs. William F. Chase. 

GREEN TOMATO CHUTNEY 

For each peck of tomatoes allow 8 large onions, slice all, sprinkle 
rather freely with salt and let stand 24 hours. Drain next day and 
strain off liquor, put vegetables in a large saucepan. Add l /\ lb. whole 
mustard seed, *4 lb. ground mustard, 1US lbs. brown sugar, 1 ounce 
each, black pepper, cinnamon,, allspice, cloves, mace and ginger. 
Add enough vinegar to cover and heat gradually to boiling point. 
Cook until vegetables are tender, then can. 

— Mrs. Stuart Gibson. 

CUCUMBER RELISH 

1 gallon peeled and cut cucumbers. Pour boiling water over 
them with handful salt Let stand 2 hours. Drain, pour cold water 
over them, and drain. 

3 small cups granulated sugar. 
1 tablespoon ground mustard. 

1 teaspoon cloves. 
1 teaspoon black pepper. 
1 teaspoon tumeric. 
Salt to taste. 

Dissolve all these in 1 full quart vinegar. Into vinegar cut fine 
y 2 dozen onions. Then add cucumbers and boil all together about 
15 or 20 minutes. Put into jars and seal. 

—Mrs. H. R. Place. 

SPICED TOMATO 

7 lbs. tomatoes (peeled), and 3 lbs. sugar. Boil together 2 hours, 

then add 

\y 2 pints vinegar. 

1 tablespoon salt. 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 

\ x / 2 teaspoons clove. 

y 2 teaspoon pepper. 

Simmer 1 hour, and be sure it docs not burn. 

—Mrs. Walton S. Redfield. 



100 



BEST EVER PICCALILLI 

Slice green tomatoes and sprinkle salt on them. (Layer of to- 
matoes, then salt, etc.) Measure juice after they have stood over 
night to know how much vinegar to use. Onions and peppers im- 
prove it (cut up with tomatoes). In morning drain off juice and cover 
with cold water while vinegar is heating. To each quart of vinegar 
add 1 to 2 cups of sugar, \ Y / 2 teaspoons cinnamon and clove. Pour 
over tomatoes and cook until transparent. Seal as preserves in jars. 

— H. S. G. 



MISS CELESTE F. REED 

The Hat Shop 

1415 Washington Street 

West Newton, Mass. 



Wedding-, Christmas and Birthday Gifts in handpainted lustrous 

China and Glass 



CORA CARTER 

64 Washington Park 
Newtonville, Mass. 
Telephone Newton North 2208-M. 



SUMNER W. EAGER 

INSURANCE 
98 Milk Street Boston 



HOWARD G. TUTTLE, Ph. C. 

REGISTERED PHARMACIST 

277 Walnut Street Newtonville, Mass. 

Call up N. N. 3733-M 

Prescriptions a Specialty 

Ice Cream and Confectionery 



OAKLAND SIX 

The most Dependable, Economical, Comfortable, Car to use 



5 Passenger Touring $1265.00 Cord Tires 

4 Passenger Sport 1395.00 Cord Tires 

4 Passenger Coupe 1775.00 Cord Tires 

Snubbers — Wire Wheels — Sun Visor 

5 Passenger Sedan — Cord Tires — Snubbers 

Sun Visor 

These Prices for Car delivered to your door. 



Davisson Motor Company 

703 Main Street, Waltham 

SALES AND SERVICE 



103 



BEVERAGES 



"One sip of this will bathe the drooping spirits in 
delight beyond the bliss of dreams." 



CRANBERRY PUNCH 

1 quart of cranberries boiled y 2 hour in 2 quarts of water. Strain. 
Take same measure of sugar as juice, boil 10 minutes in 4 quarts 
of water, add the juice of 9 lemons, then add 1 can of shredded pine- 
apple. —Mrs. F. S. Blodgett. 



GRAPE JUICE 

Wash grapes, pick them off from the stems and put into pre- 
serving kettle. Cover with cold water and cook until skins, pulp and 
seeds separate. Strain and add 1-3 as much sugar as juice. Boil 5 
minutes and can air-tight. 

Note : — If grape juice is intended to be served without the ad- 
dition of lemon, less sugar will be needed. — Miss C. R. Dummer. 



GRAPE JUICE 

Fresh Concord grapes in any quantity desired. Remove stems, 
wash and place in a preserve kettle. Cover with water and boil l / 2 
hour. Put through colander, then through jelly bag. Measure and 
boil y 2 hour and add sugar in the proportion of -j/j. lb. to 1 gallon 
liquid. Boil an instant or two, and put in bottles while hot. Cork 
immediately. — Mrs. Henry B. Patrick. 



J. MIGNANO 

Wholesale and Retail 

FANCY GROCERIES 

Imported Olive Oil, Strictly Fresh 
Eggs and All Kinds of Fruit and 
Vegetables in their Season. 

Speedwell's Cream and Butter 

A Special Line of S. S. Pierce 

Goods 

1403 Washington Street 
WEST NEWTON, MASS. 

Telephones 

West Newton 378—379. 



BRAE 
BURN 

NURSERY 



200 Fuller Street 
West Newton 



There are but a few of them left 



Ing'raham <H Paine Co. 

APOTHECARIES 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumes, Toilet Articles, Soaps, Brushes, Combs 
and a Full Line of Druggists' Sundries 

PRESCRIPTIONS CAREFULLY COMPOUNDED 

Come in and see the Man your Great Grandfather used to trade with 

1003 Watertown St., Cor. Waltham and Washington Sts. 

WEST NEWTON, MASS. 



GEO. A. EDMANDS 

REXALL DRUGGIST 

Masonic Bldg. 

NEWTONVILLE, MASS. 



HENRY W. BATES 



Telephone Connection 

SEELEY BROTHERS CO. 

FURNITURE DEALERS 

Repairing and Polishing 

Upholstering, Packing 

803 Washington Street Newtonville, Mass. 



Branch — Newtonville, Mass. 



ROBERT H. JAMES 

120 Milk Street 

Boston, Mass. 



R. H. James & Co. 
Plumbers 



106 



MISCELLANEOUS 



HOME MADE SOAP 

5 lbs. clarified fat. 1 tablespoon borax. 

1 can potash. J4 CU P ammonia. 

1 tablespoon sugar. 1 quart hot (not boiling) water. 

Dissolve sugar in hot water, add potash, stirring occasionally 
while cooling (be careful not to breathe fumes). When water is 
cool stir into lukewarm fat which has b>een strained and add borax. 
Stir until the consistency of honey. Pour in small stream into a pan 
lined with paper. Mark into squares when cool. It is best to let it 
stand a few weeks before using. A cup of kerosene may be added. 

—Mrs. Geo. B. H. Macomber. 



HOUSEHOLD HINTS 

Don't put the salt into cold milk when making a custard. Put 
the salt in after the milk has been scalded, otherwise the custard 
will separate as though curdled. 

When boiling cabbage the salt should always be pttt in some 
time before. The cabbage is rendered more tender and a better color. 
Put a cup with a little vinegar on the stove while cooking cabbage, 
doughnuts, or any odorous food. 

The foundation for scallops should be cooked a little before 
baking. 

Hubbard squash and turnip have a better flavor when a little 
sugar is added after being mashed, seasoned with butter, salt and 
pepper. Also peas and corn. 

Tomatoes need sugar and a pinch of soda. Change the water 
in which onions are boiled twice or three times and they will have 
a delicate flavor. 

Mildew can be removed by soaking in a solution of chloride of 
lime, rinsing thoroughly in hot water. 

One teaspoon alum will purify four gallons of water. 



107 



TABLE OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

2 gills = 1 cup. 

2 cups = 1 pint. 

2 pints — 1 quart. 

2 cups butter — Solid = 1 pound. 

4 cups pastry flour = 1 pound. 

2 cups granulated sugar = 1 pound. 

2 1-3 cups icing sugar = 1 pound. 

2 1-3 cups brown sugar = 1 pound. 

4 1-3 cups coffee = 1 pound. 

2 cups finely chopped meat = 1 pound. 
10 medium eggs = 1 pound. 

1-3 cup almonds blanched and chopped = 1 ounce. 

3 saltspoons = 1 teaspoon. 

3 teaspoons = 1 tablespoon. 

2 tablespoons butter = 1 ounce. 
16 tablespoons butter = 1 cup. 

4 tablespoons flour = 1 ounce. 

A few grains is less than l /% teaspoon. 

1 tablespoon granulated gelatine = *4 ounce. 



108 



INDEX 

Page 

Beverages 103 

Bread 3 

Cake 61 

Candies 88 

Cheese 19 

Cookies 80 

Doughnuts 80 

Hggs 19 

Fish 27 

Frostings 76 

Meats 27 

Miscellaneous 106 

Pickles 91 

Pies 55 

Preserves 91 

Puddings 40 

Relishes 91 

Salads 35 

Soups . 13 

Table of Weights and Measures 107 

Vegetables 19 



Irving & Casson--A. H. Davenport Co. 

Interior Decorators 

573-575 Boylston Street 
Copley Square 

We invite inspection of the galleries to be opened early in 
October for the sale of paintings, etchings and fine prints. 
Appropriate frames of all styles on hand and made to order. 



F. D. Tarlton CQ. Co. 

DRY GOODS SHOES 

997-999 Watertown Street 
WEST NEWTON, MASSACHUSETTS 




The Noetzel Studio 

Photographs of Distinction 

We cannot make all the 
PHOTOGRAPHS 

there are, therefore we make only the best. 

Newton Centre Massachusetts 



WALTHAM SIX 

A CAR OF POWER AND BEAUTY 




-AMERICA'S MOST COMPLETE CAR 



THE PRIDE OF 
NEW ENGLAND CRAFTSMANSHIP 



WALTHAM MOTOR MANUFACTURERS, INC 

Built in one of the largest and most complete 
Automobile Factories in the United States at 

WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 

Salesroom, 915 Boylston Street 
BOSTON MASSACHUSETTS 



Seward \V. Jones Frank L. Richards, in 

President Executive Vice-President 

William T. Halliday 

Treasurer 



THE BANK OF HUMAN SERVICE 

The highest ideal of the Newton Trust Company is to be a friendly 
bank. To help and be of service to every family in Newton. No 
account is too small to receive courteous handling; no account is too 
large to command all the attention and supervision it justly deserves. 

( )nr twenty-eight directors and fifty officers and employees are all 
working to help you; to make friends for this bank; and to build 
Newton. We have four offices, centrally located, with modern safe 
deposit and storage vaults, and fully equipped to take care of any 
of your banking needs. 

We are at present serving over 15,000 depositors. 



Total Resources $9,339,748.90 

Total Deposits, Checking Accounts $6,285,604.74 

Total Deposits, Savings Accounts $1,657,003.75 

Total Moneys under control as 

executor, trustee, etc. $ 857,837.86 



NEWTON TRUST COMPANY 



Newton Newton Centre Newtonville Auburndale 

Newton and Newtonville offices open Saturday evenings 6.30 to 8.00. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 





007 958 210 4